Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text




fharvbados



ESTABLISHED 1895



Britain Will Stay In
uez Canal And Sudan

t's Decision To Drop

Treaty Called Mlegal

LONDON, Oct. 9
BRITAIN Tuesday night denounced Egypt’s decision
to junk the Anglo-Egyptian treaty as illegal and announced
her intention to stay in thé Suez Canal Zone and the
Anglo-Egyptian Sudan until satisfactory Middle East
defence arrangements are made.

Britain also accused the Egyptian Government indirect-
ly of double-dealing inasmuch as Egyptians were advised
on September 21 of a new Anglo-American and French
plan for settling the Anglo-Egyptian dispute and setting
up an overall Middle East defence plan.

The official British Government statement was issued
in the name of Foreign Secretary Herbert Morrison after
a day of conferences at the Foreign Office.

Morrison said Egyptian Prime Minister Nahas Pasha had
been informed by a personal message on September 21
that a new western proposal was forthcoming shortly,
aimed at a satisfactory solution of the dispute over Brit-
ain’s position in Egypt.

MIDDLE EAST. DEFENCE



The new proposal to Egypt was understood to propose:
Firstly, mutual abrogation of the Anglo-Egyptian 1936
treaty in contrast to Egypt’s proposal to junk it unilater-

ally.

Secondly the creation of a Middle East defence system
in which Egypt would play the major role. It would in-
clude the U.S., Britain, France possibly Turkey and British
Commonwealth nations which age vitally ‘interested in
the Suez Red Sea life line. :

Informed sources said exchanges that have taken place
so far on the proposed Middle Eastern plan have empha-
sized it would be “unrealistic” for Egypt to pretend she
could defend the area herself without the help of the big
Western Powers.

The new British, American and French proposal how-
ever would not solve the Sudan problem. The British
position on that is that the Sudanese people themselves
must decide their future in due course.

The text of Morrison’s statement read: “His Majesty’s
Government take the strongest exception to the action of
the Egyptian Government in introducing legislation seek-
ing to abrogate the Anglo-Egyptian treaty of Alliance of
1936, and the 1899 Anglo-Egyptian condominium agree-
ments relating to the Sudan,

The Egyptian Government aware that new and far
reaching proposals were about to be presented to them
which would have direct bearing on the improvement of
Angiy-Reyptian relations and the security of the Middle

ast”,

“In a personal message to Egyptian Prime Minister on

..such proposals were under urgent consideration: and he
expected to be in a position to arrange for their discussion
with the Egyptian Government in the near future. This
was confirmed in the last week by His Majesty’s Ambas-
sador in Alexandria in a personal communication to the

Egyptian Foreign Ministér anticipating an early present-

ation of these proposals.
NO RECOGNITION

“His Majesty’s Government do not recognize the legality
of the unilateral renunciation of the 1936 treaty and of the
condominium agreements and they maintain their full
rights under those treaties. pending a satisfactory agree-

ment with Egypt on the basis of the proposals referred
to above”—(U.P.)

re





Reds Battle U.S.
Troops To A Halt

EIGHTH ARMY H’QRS,,
Korea, Oct. 9.

Fanatic Reds battled attacking

U.S. troops to a standstill on two
| vitai ridgelines in East Central
Korea to-day.

Another U.S. unit captured a
strategic hill in an adjacent sector
however. On the Western front
the U.S. First Cavalry Division
smashed ahead more than a mile
against mounting resistance.

Heaviest fighting was above
Yanggu on the East Central front
where the Eighth Army was trying
to break through Communists
“Little Siegfried Line” to the val-
ley approaches to the East coast.

The U.S. Second Division's 38th
Infantry Regiment checked stub-
born North Korean Reds with
fixed bayonets on “Kim Il Sung
Ridge” named for the North Kor-
ean Premier and Commander-in-
Chief.—U.P.

Roman Party
ROME, Oct, 10,

President Elpidio Quirino of the
Philippines was honoured at a re-

Se ee
LORD ROWALLAN

CHIEF SCOUT
TO TOUR
CARIBBEAN

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, October 9, |
Chief Scout Lord Rowallan!
flies from London January 29, to
carry out a tour of the Caribbean.
Bermuda and the Bahamas. He





U.K. Presents Case

made it clear that}

WEDNESDAY,



Te World Court

THE HAGUE, Oct. 9.

Britain has put forward her
written arguments against nation-
alisation of the British owned oil
industry by Iran to the Interna-
tional Court of Justice, it was
announced on Tuesday.

Britain took the case to the
Court last spring but has since
been forced to evacuate her oil
experts from Iran, Z

The Court announcement said
Sir Eric Beckett delivered the
British memorial on the case
within the October 10 deadline,
and that it was “confidential” and
not related to “recent develop-
ments in Iran”.—U.P.

FISH FOR LUNCH edo al










































TWO FOR TWO—Shortly after the arrival of the American naval
vessels these two sailors standing in the shade of the “Stars and
Stripes”, hooked two fish, They’re smiling at the prospect of fresh
fish for lunch.





21 Guns Welcome |

The Royal Couple |
To Quebec Province

QUEBEC, Oct. 9
PRINCESS ELIZABETH and the Duke of Edinburgh
stepped from a private railway car at 9.47 a.m, E.S.T, and
formally began their Royal tour of ten Canadian provinces.
Bells in every Roman Catholic chureh and school and the
whistles of shops and fire stations sounded as the Royal
couple left the train.







en nemneneeinmione The Princess and oe Duke are
the first British Royalty to visit
|
Chiefs Of Staffs ead pe of French Canada in 12
‘ Wi A royal salute of 21 guns start-
Confer ith ed booming over the old fashion-
. sed provincial capital as the Prin-
Eisenhower cess placed her feet on a red =
et stretching 150 yards from the
SUPREME ALLIED HEADQUAR- Gain through a long shed to a
TERS, Rocquencourt, rae raised dais on the dock alongside
Chiets of Staffs of the US,| Metall stations stent
Britain and France conferred ati aoe eee on ale Pi ae
length with General Eisenhower |. ; s i a
amid growing tension over the|Y'"ce of Quebec by French spea
Middle Sast's role in Western | ing Lieut.~Governor Gaspard Fau-
defence teux, Premier Maurice noe
Talks occurred on the eve, of|Mayor Lucien. Borne and other
the flight by Chiefs to Greece and|civic and Prench seeeperion |
Turkey for exploratory talks on} The Princess face a heavy
the: part those two nations will schedule of 11 major appearances
play in Western defence. | before leaving tonight for Ottawa,
Those attending the conference —UP.



Chairman of the U.S. Joint Gniefs

hopping off the bar;

silver piece fell into



u
Ss
» Oarlisle Bay on a three-day visit,

‘ three other naval craft.



’

PRICE: FIVE CENTS










CARGO TRANSPORT, U.8.S. ALSHAIN of the U.S.A. Navy now in

arrived yesterday accompanied by

LOCAL STEEL BAND

ENTERTAINS _U.S. NAVY

; THE U.S. NAVY invadedBarbados yesterday. Some
§60 enlisted men and 47 officers came in with the US.S.

., Alshain (AKA55), LST 509, LST 980 and LST 525.
4 With a strong southeast wind blowing across the har-

The tour mouse-coloured ships

/-—in no way as sparkling as the

English navy ships which call
here~jeresented a formidable pic-

ture in the harbour,
Throughout the day sailors were
and cut-
ters—some in all white and others
in khaki of a soft texture. They
hanged out” in the streets and in
es places of amusement in the
ity.
Calypsoes
But some sailors who had to
stay on board enjoyed intervals of
musie from a local steel band—
calypsoes—-and silver piece after
he boat for
he players. The band stole
the sh ut over two dozen
divers. who made their way out to

@ ships in small boats
' wp as they

red into the sea by the sail-
ors before they reached five yards
down,

The sailors kept some of their
coins for the “Advocate’s” repre-
sentative, No sooner had he
alighted on the deck than a crowd
of officers and men gathered
around him, each apparently
wanting his newspaper first,

This was the kind of reception
the newspaperman got on each
ship and he made some brisk sales,

Aboard the ships, members of
each crew were doing routine
work but everybody seemed at
ease, The Press Relations Officers
said that they were just from
Vieques, Puerto Rico, where they
were carrying out landing exer-
cises and now they have) begun
their Caribbean recreation period
at Barbados, Three days of shore-~
leave they will spend at, Barba-
dos before going on to Trinidad,

Cargo Transport

Tue Aisnain, 14,907 tons, a cargo
transport under Captain , 5
Field, U.S.N., is the command ship,
LST 609 is under Lt. W. A.
McNamee, U.S.N.R., LST | 980
under Lt. J. D. eee U.S.N.R.,
and LST 525 under Lt A, N, Volk,
U.S.N.R. Most of the officers and
men are reservists and temporar-
ies. Few of the Officers have seen
active service before.

Alshain carries a keel while the
three LST’s are built a flat
bottoms so that they can sail right
up on the land, q

Alshain has quite a history at-
tached to her, She was named
after the star “Alshain” and
during World War IL and the
Korean War won the battle stars
of Guam, Leyte, Lingayen, San
Felipe-San Narciso, Okinawa and
Inchon.

Assault Cargo Ship

The ship was built in 1944 by
the Federal Shipbuilding and Dry~-
dock Company, Kearney, New
Jersey as an assault cargo ship.
She first took cargo from Norfolx
to Pearl Harbour, in 1944 and
later carried out an ag@sault on













struggle ty

will arrive in Jamaica in time for
the First Caribbean Jamboree at
Kingston March 5 to 17.

This news was. released from
Boy Scouts’ Headquarters today.
It is expected that the route of
the Chief Scout will include
Nassau, Kingston, Antigua, Barba-
dos, Trinidad, St. Vincent, Grenada
St. Lucia, Georgetown, Cayman
and Belize.

Accompanying him will be
Lieutenant-Commander E._ P.
Mallinson a Yorkshire Field
Commissioner. Since becoming
Chief Scout in 1945, Rowallan has'
travelled nearly 120,00C miles on
visits to seouts in the Common-
wealth.

ie sales ‘ a
A-Bomb’s Cousin
WASHINGTON, Oct. 9.
About six weeks ago the U.S.
Air Force announced it had a new
mission, This was to use atomic
weapons against ground troops.
The atom bomb has been some-
thing that needed a big expensive
target. The Air Force announce-
ment
the at
whict
result

emplacer





m bomb had been developed



oon or

against



Nts) ot

j
|

ception at Rome City Hall on Tues-
day night with a cocktail party
attended by some 600 selected
guests. —U.P.

PLANE CRASHES

MEXICO CITY, Mexico, Oct. 9.
A D.C.3 transport plane, with

21 persons aboard, crashed near

Cerro Banco in the State of Vera



Cruz, according to Aero Trans-
portes Airli: The number of
dead in the sh was not imme-
diately avai:..' .e from the remote

area. An airiine spokesman said:
“It is known there, were four sur-
vivors.”—U.P.
15,000 WORDS
JAKARTA, Oct. 9.

Halmar Schacht, former Nazi
financial wizard who has _ been
studying Indonesian financial and
economic conditions,
15,000-word report to
Sukiman on Tuesday.—wU.P.

were General Omar N. Bradley |

of Staff, British Field Marshal,
Sir William Slim,
Imperial General Staff and Gen-
eral Charles F. Lecheres, Chair-
man of the French Chiefs of
Staff, Lord Fraser First Sea Lord
of the British Admiralty, and
Admiral Jacques Messoffee,
Frenah Chief of Staff for the Mid-
dle East.

A Headquarters spokesman dic
not disclose the agenda of_talks
but informed sources saidthe
views were exchanged on the
possible Command Structure for
the Middle East. —(U.P.)

BOWLES APPOINTED

WASHINGTON, Oct. 9.
The Senate approved the ap-
pointment of former OPA Chief
Chester Bowlés as United States
Ambassador to India on Tuesday



presented ajnight despite Republican charges
Premier| that he is

not qualified for the

post.--U.P.



S. Africa Wants Airmen

méant that little cousin: off

be used with good} The South African ¢ err

force a civiliar

citizen

mott
mot




ermanent force

Chief of the Air Staff. I

JOHANNESBURG Oct. 9
ll for * teers fr tt
ice in Korea said Brigatiier

ery e na



been confined

Chief of |

King’s Tour Off

LONDON, Oct. 10.
Buckingham Palace announced
today King
able to make a tour of Australia
and New Zealand next year. The
announcemyent said Princess Eliz-
abeth and Prince Philip would

make the tour instead.—U.P.

US Tanker Rammed

NORFOLK, Virginia, Oct. 9

The U.S. Navy tanker Suamico
was rammed amidships by the
free freight vessel S.S. Saxon be-
fore dawn about 12 mils off the
North Carolina coast.

Early reports indicated there
were casualties and that neither
ship was in danger. There were
47 men aboard the Suamico. The





number aboard the Saxon is not
learned,—U.P.
WOUNDED THIRD TIME

WASHINGTON, Oct. 9
Army said on Tuesday that
William Clark, son of

the Chiei f the Art Field

The

Mark (¢ t

ni third Vvounda

UP

Guam in the Marianas. ;

After the war years of rigorous
operating activities, the welcome
break came when she made a stop
at Tulagi to pick up cargo ana

George will not be while at Noumea, New California

—far from the combat area~—news
of the war’s end came to her.

Alshain reverted to the role of
cargo ship, typhoons being her
only immediate postwar ad-
ventures, During the postwar
days she continued her operations
in the Pacific.

But in 1948, Alshain was in touch
with another war. Her first jot
was to deliver 2,200 tons of am-
munition for Chinese Nationalists
fighting the Reds. Three or four
times she was 60 to 100 miles
within her Formosa destination
and each time was ordered not to

@ On Page 3
CALLA

TO-DAY'S WEATHER
: CHART
Sunrise: 5.47 a.m.
Bunset: 6.54 p.m.
Moon: First Quarter
6.00 p.m

High Tide
Low Tide

12.58 p.m

Lighting:
6.36 a.m., 7.05 p.m

From Codrington

| !



bour giving rise to many swells while navy landing barges
and cutters “skated along” from ship-to-shore, Carlisle Bay
was an attraction for many Barbadians.

From Alt Quarters :

‘Garman J owe
Are Satisfied

The Central Council of German
Jews expressed satisfaction with
the Bonn Government's desive te
make restitution for Nazism’s
vast Jewish persecutions,

Tt announced simultaneously a
nine-point programme which i
hoped Government would fulfi:
including a constant and thoroug!
ae eee against

tis n all its forms te
aetna te entire educa,
nal system and by the’ Press aric
Radio,
Not Elk—During the elk-hunt-
ing season in Soberga, Sweden s«
many cows have been shot that ¢
peasant painted “cow,” “horse”, ir
big white letters on his livestock

Russian Resolution Defeated—
The Russian Resolution to invite
Communist China, Poland Czecho
slovakia to the Far East Economi:
Conference (ECAFE) was reject:
ed by fourteen votes to two at th
conference’s opening session,





U.S. Naval Losses—The Unitec
States Navy said at least 27 mer
were killed or wounded when tw:
U.S. naval vessels were damage
by Communist action off th
northeast coast of Korea last week
end,

Mass Withdrawal — Argentin:
delegation withdrew en mass
from the Inter-American Pres
Association Conference at the
opening of the second

[HOUSE PASS
SUGAR BILL

The House of Assembly yester-
day passed a Bili to impose a
Special levy on sugar and fancy
molasses manufactured in this
island in certain circumstances,

The Bill arose out of an agree
ment between the Sugar Pro-
aucers Federation and the Barba-
dos Workers’ Union and sought w
give effect to clauses C and D
(except in the part of Clause C
relating to the levy in respect of
a Harbour Fund) of the agree-
ment.

Section C of the agreement
refers to the payment, when tne
Sugar crop of any one year (in
the years 1951, 1952 and 1953)
exceeds the average of the five

Welfare Fund,
Section D relates to the reduc-

alent, of the present
$6.00 per ton payable to
Price Stabilisation Fund by 60¢
per ton or $1.20 per ton accordin;
to whether the crop is below or
exceeds the previous five-yea
average, and the increase by a)
equivalent amount of the presen
cess of $2.40 per ton payable to
the Labour Welfare Fund.

The Opposition opposed Claus
3 of the Bill dealing with the
additional levy of $1.80 per ton
and suggested that it be taken ou
from the Biil.

Government members pointe:
out that if this was done, it woulc
destroy the whole principle oi}

cess 0)

the Bill.
The motion for the retentior
of the clause was then put t

the vote and,agreed to by a 9 to (
majority.

Voting for the retention were
‘Mr, Miller, Mr. Mapp, Mr. Lewis
Mr, Bryan, Mr. Cox, Mr, F. L
Walcott, Dr, Cummins, Mr. Adam:
and the Speaker.

Against were Mr. Dowding,
Mr, Haynes, Mr. Goddard, Mr
Gill, Mr. Reece and Mr, E. K
Walcott,

Mr. Adarns said that he hopec
honourable members had beer

He spoke att meetings i
preceding years, of an additional }own constitue or

cess of $1.80 per ton to the Labouyjeest af

th: |Labour leaders that

“Too Little

}

Too Late”
Says Churchill

LONDON, Octobe, 9,
Winston Churchilf charged
Tuesday night that the “peace at
ny price” advocates have captured











ont. ol of the Bri @bour Party
and a Labour vig Nees
tion would Ae |
nti-agitatid ee a

mM Ul
of World WHex i

Churchill
little ahd fitg
Government" lic’ ididld
East whet ley
evacuate Ir \
important Egypt.
nis/

Londo, sho.
Labour Foreign Sec
Morrison declared Egypt's ffiten-”

tion, whenever the island's crop jtion to junk the Anglo-Egyptian
jexceeds 120,000 tons or its equiv. |treaty was illegal.

Churchill caustically reminded
six months
ago he had proposed a joint Anglo-
American French solution of the
Viddle Eastern problem especially
he Egyptian one

The three powers had planned
© present the joint plan to Egypt
his week but Egypt acted first.
“hurchill said, “One gets quite
ired of saying things which are
it first mocked at, and then adopt-
ed sometimes, alas too late,”—-U.P.,

RUSSIA WILL

NOT CONTROL
IRAN’S OIL

UNITED NATIONS, New York,

October 9,
Hossein Fatemi, Iran Vice-
Premier pledged that his country’s
41 will not fall into Soviet hands
jue to the dispute which Britain
1as brought to the United Nations
While Mohammed Mossadegh
76-year-old Lranian Premier,
rested at the New York hospital
or his appearance before the
jeeurity Council, his 34-year-old
aid and chief adviser said in an



able since last Tuesday to read Jexclusive interview:

carefully the Memorandum oi
Agreement = which had beer
reached between the Sugar Pro-
ducers Federation of Barbados

and the Barbados Workers’ Union, } satistied

affecting the sugar industry with

respect to wages and profits o:
the industry for the next three
years,

He would repeat that he hoped
honourable members had read the
Agreement carefully because | it
was of great importance anc
there were points in it with which
doubtlessly they might differy.

The House and Legislature were
only concerned, however, with
whether they were going to
approve of the transfer of cer-
iain conditions on some of the
Stabilisation Fund of Labour Wel-

“Britain has sought to spread
false propaganda that Iran will
fall or be pushed into the Soviet
voit if her demands are noy

Mossadegh began a series of
jedical tests Tuesday and U.N,,
sources said the scheduled Thurs-
jay meeting of the Security
Souncil might be postponed until
Saturday,

Concern was voiced that the 76
year-old Premier might be suffer-
ing from something more serious
than fatigue -and ernotion, but
there also was spéculation that any
Couneil postponement might be
purely for diplomatic reasons.

Weary though he was, from his
33-hour flight from Teheran Mos-

fare which was one of the terms sadegh was able Monday to spend
4 the Agreement, and that there}@most an hour conferring with

ihould be imposed a levy for the, 4merican

hree years to be taken out of
-he profits of the sugar industry
o go to the Labour Welfare Fund,
Majority Vote

“It was, however, obviously
1ecessary that members of the
fouse should have before them
he whole _agreement out of
whieh this Bill has arisen, It was
with the object of officially put-
ing the Agreement before them
that the Legislature has been
‘urnished by Government with
copies of it.”

The preliminary agreement had
xeen reached between some of
hem representing the Barbados

delegate Ernest Gross
and Assistant Secretary of State
George McGee,
Furthermore he
long

scheduled a
list of diplomatic appoint-

ments for Tuesday in his six-room
$240 per day suite in the Baker
pavilion of the New York hospital.

—(U.P.)
Hopes Revived For
Korean Ceasefire

U.N, ADVANCE BASE, Korea,
Oct. 9.
Agreement on Pan Mun Jom as



Workers’ Union and other parties |the site for resumption of Korean

-epresenting the Sugar Producers

plenary , Federation, said Mr, Adams. The

pession this morning after the ; Federation had accepted it by a

Board of Direetors had declined to

for membership.

Bomb Exploded — Unidentified
attackers exploded a plastic bomb
at the entrance of the Communist
newspaper Le Patroite early to-
day. The blast shattered windows
over a wide area in the centre of
Nice and wrecked the entrance to
the hall of the newspaper buil7
ing. No casualties were reported.

Would Be Glad — The White
House said Tuesday that Truman
will be glad to see Iranian Premier
Mossadegh while he is in this
country, but no definite appoint-
ment has been made so far,

War Inevitable — Italian Com-
munist leader Palmiro Togliatti
said Tuesday “war cannot be
avoided” between Western Powers
and Russia if the rearmament of
the Allies continues and “while
atomic bombs are at hand.”

Faith in Turkey—President Celer
Beyar of Turkey informed Truman
Tuesday that Turkey will fulfil the
latter’s confidence that it will
“maintain her independence and
territorial integrity in the face of
all pressure and threats.”

Anglo—U.S.

By W. G. LANDREY

LONDON, Oct, 9.
Britain’s relations with the U.S
are emerging as a big issue in the
October 25 elections — more than



in any other British election in
history. :
On one side of the fight are

Winston Churchill and his Con-
servatives who charge that Labour
is responsible for “ill-natured
criticisfns” of U.S. policy that have
lost much of the goodwill Britain
gained in the U.S. during the war

On the other side are Aneurin
Bevan and other Leftwing Labour-

ites and their side was put for-
ward when Bevan opened the
fcampaic: in Liverpool and the



beg ing Sunday Pietorjal warned
he U.S. to “stop kicking Britair
} around.’

Silent
Prime Minister Clement Attlee
nd the Rightwing of the Labou

admit all Argentine =a the Union had aceepted it by

majority vote just as the Council

i majority vote, He was saying
Hat in order that it might not be
that an

thought Agreement

armistice talks revived hopes for
an early cease-fire agreement.
High officials believed there
would be a “stop shooting” agree-
ment within 30 days or at most be-
fore winter grips the fighting front.

of They pointed to the note of com-

‘hig sort could easily have met|Promise on the site of the con-

with
sides.

It was a
agreement between
ind employees, not merely as
regards what one might call the
naterial advantages which might
be obtained on one side or the
cher, but as regards the effect
which it must necessarily have
in continuing peace, in the sugar
industry, he should say, for

universal approval on

most
employers

fiable for Barbadians to remem-
ber sometimes that industrial

all [ference and the softened tone in

the last Communist message to

outstanding |General Ridgway.-—U.P.

Australia And Suez

SYDNEY, Oct. 10.
The Conservative Sydney Tete-
graph on Wednesday demanded
a stronger Australian say in the
Suez. “Britain has no right to

ajact as if she is the sole custodian
period of three years, It was justi- |of

relattons in this island were on|gacrificed would be disastrous for

the whole more devoid of friction
than their Jess unfortunate neigh-
bours of the Caribbean area.
Stupendous

“Tt is Lecause this very spirit
‘has been created for the past ten
‘years or go, that it has been pos-
sible to achieve what I would

the British Commonwealth's
interests and honour. The sacri-
fice of the Suez as Abadan was
the whole Commonwealth and
the end of British power and
prestige throughout the Middle

East.”"-——U.P.



The “ADVOCATE”

pays for NEWS.
Dial 3113

call this ‘stupendous agreemén’’
|stupendous in the history of rela-





itions between employer and ‘
‘employee in any part of tihe Day or Night
world. Certainly, one may say.t

@ On Page 5 "



Relations Is Big Issue

|Party are strangely silent jn the| repeat in China the same folly in
cispute but they are solidly in 1951 we committed against Ru sia
t tevour of western rearmament in|in 1918.” He referred to Western
close co-operation with the U.S | intervention after the
Criticism against the U.S. is bept revolution. i
demonstrated in Bevan’s speech Co-operation Needed
and the Sunday Pictorial editorial. | He said: “Believe me if we 2%
Bevan told nearly 6,000 persons | Western civilization will eom
{in the Liverpool stadium that if; down in ruins and no amount ¢
Conservatives win “there will be! atom bombs will enable it to sur-
no one to pluck the coat tails of} vive. You can’t keep. modern
some impetuous statesman wh¢ | civilization together by threats c
{will want to solve the problem in| mutual destruction. You can oniy

| in Russia

some old bloody war.” | keep it together by co-operation
Bevan said :“One historical truth The Sunday Pictorial began
hat our American friends must | editorial with the statement
learn is that the world is disturbed | the future of Britain and her Co
today not because there was any- ; monwealth “would be bleak inde
thing intrinsically nwlevolent| were it net linked with the futur

nbout the Soviet system in 1918. of that other great English speal

It is disturbed and threatened|ing nation the Unfted States
ie le America”
ed p--ts of the world at that} He added
“, mlowes the US rv
ur f y€

rid.’ lleast we can do i
‘ ly »*
her

nod now face a Fors j
isd o









PAGE TWO



Carubh Calling

R. W. S. JONES, President
of the B.G. Cricket Board

of Control, gave sa stag luncheon
party at.the Carib Hotel last
Friday. “His guests were, Messrs
Charlie ‘Taylor and Keith Wal-
cott of. the Barbados Cricket
team, Mé&. “Foffie” . Williams,
Manager of the team, Mr. Teddy
Jones, Dr.eLouis Ward and Mr

QO. S. Coppin, visitors from Bar-
bados, Mr. Maurice Green, Mr
Kenny Wishart and Mr. Frank
de Caires, members of the B.G.
Cricket Boar@ of Control, Messrs.
B. Gaskin and Lennie Thomas of

the B.G. team and Mr. C. R.
Browne.

The following evening there
was a party at B.G’s., Press As-
sociation on Robb Street in
honour of Professor Rudolph
Dunbar and Mr. O. §S. Coppin,

Sports Editor of the Barbados

Advocate.

New Exhibition

HE next exhibition at the

Barbados Museum will be
one of school children’s Art and
Handicrafts. It opens on Friday
October 12th and continues unt.!
November 9th.

To-day Begins 5712
-DAY, the Jews of Barba-
dos celcbrate their New

Year and Jewish stores in the
City will be closed for the entire
day. On the Jewish calendar this
is the opening of the year 5712.

Auction Sale
URING ‘be dance at the
Crane Hotel on Saturday Octo-
ber_13th~there is going to be a
smuil auction sale and Mr. Bladon
has offered to auction articles
which are being collected. These
are some of the things which will
be on sale—a bottle of champagne,
a box of chocolates, a saucepan,
a large doll, a suitease and there
are many other useful items.
Proceeds from ‘the dance will
go to the Vinter Memorial Fund
-—to help build a school hall at
Codrington High School.

On Five Months Leave
LYING Officer Julian A. Mar-
ryshow, son of the Hon. T. A.
Marryshow, C.B.E. of Grenada,
who hed been holidaying in
Grenada with his wife and baby
is at present in Barbados. Ac-
companied by his wife and baby
they arrived from Grenada on
Monday ‘by B.W.LA. and are
staying at Athlone Guest House
Fontabelle.

Mr. Marryshow is on _ five
months’ leave from the R.A.F. in
which he enlisted in 1941, hav-
ing the distinction to be Grena-
da’s first volunteer for air com-
bat when he left the island for
Trinidad shortly after the out-
break of hostilities to join the
Air Training Scheme there.

Going over to England, he
rose from Aircraftsman to the
commissioned rank in 1944. He
Saw action from 1941 as a fighter
pilot, operating in “Spitfires” till
the invasion of Europe, in which
he took purt, when he was trans-
ferred to dive-bomber _ types,
piloting these craft over France,
the Low Countries and Germany.

On the cessation of hostilities,
he setyed as v lisison officer for
the Colonial Office for about six
months, being stationed with
about 120 Jomaicans with whose
welfare he was entrusted. He
was then §econdec to the Minis-
try of Labour at Cambridge,
serving in a similar capacity con-



nected with the selection of
vocational trainees from the
Colonies who had ended their

war service.

At the end of 1946 he entered
Hull University, with RAF.
leave, doing Social Science for
two years and during the next
three years studied Economics
and Political Science at the Lon-
don School cof Economics. After
his final examination he returned
to the Air Force and is now on
five months’ leave. He may re-
sume his R.A.F, duty in January
next if he so chooses.



CROSSWORD

rt tt LP
ok ee ed
Hy Pee tol
Pie

1”
Bd
ba eed ig
tT
oe eel
el ae
Across
Ung artist paper seller y
Mixea as classified. (8)
A Mard sort of mateh pera;
(4) . 12. Halt-company. "
Resolved.-in canvas? (6)
This dave is a iegal commana
(3) 17. Sat in the blot. jo)
No walter this. (4)
A tree tor the present.
Music for two. (4)
How tines are fastened +
indian peasant trom Troy
Rool room. (5)

Your missus sir! (4)
His progress was filmed '

Down
Side is fat (ana contented
+ to) in Passing. (3%)
Ad@ea up to lea (4)
sdueh Qsed club, 14)
Heart of the trunk. (3)
ide gets ten lines. (8)
He cin 3 Down obviously
May. tine shows disiike. (6)
Beyond recall. (4)
Aro’ as | see (talian mosaic (4)
The'French tent upset. i6)
Just a notion. (4)
LIOt «as though
sold’ you teetotal,
flair fastener? (4)







i ie Diet

| 4





Ww

‘

(3)

(5)
(a

New
15)



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WHITE SHARKSKIN
FLANNELLED SPUNS

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gat
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neavens sake Sop say

ut At wast wr Ministers

doat burst mto tears '—there

ve moments when it would

1 make o fot more sense tf some
otcem didt’

Keeping Together

HERE are to be no separate

engagements for Princess
Elizabeth and Prince Philip dur-
ing their tour of Canada.

Hamilton (Onturio) had sug-
gested that Prince Philip should
visit naval headquarters there,
HMCS Star, while Princess Eli-
zabeth was havir, cea with the
Argyll and Suthr rind: Highland-
ers of Canada, Ste is Colonel-in-
Chief of the regi: »nt,

But officials in Ottawa have
told the Mayor of Hamilton, Mr.
Lloyd Jackson, that the Princess
and her husband preferred to
remain together at, all functions
planned for the tour. So _ the
naval visit has been cancelled;
toth will visit the Highlanders.

One Serious Note

NGLISH comedian Ted Ray
raised a crop of laughs with
the help of West Indies sprinter
McDonald Bailey on the pular
radio show “Calling All Forces”
in London last week. Ray gets a
prominent sportsman along eaalr
week for a witty chat during the
programme and enlisted Bailey
this time. Mac got a big reception
from the studio audience and
came through the “interview
like a seasoned performer, During
one %erious note, he said his
ambition was to win two titles at
the Olympic Games in Helsinki
next year—the 100 and 220.



Rupert and the L

One warm summer: day Rupert
goes to the Common to see if he
can find any ripe blackberries,
though it is still rather early for
them, ile he is searching he
hears a cheery shout and he spies
his friend Rollo, the Gipsy boy.
coming up from the direction of the



DEAL AT No. 33,

WINGS ROLLED OATS — FR



Eden’s Niece
ISS ANN EDEN, 28-year-old
daughter of Sir. Timothy

and Lady Eden, and niece of Mr, V!8iting British flower shows,
Anthony Eden, will have a coun-
try wedding
M

when she marries
r. Peter Negretti on October 27.
It Will be at All Saints Church,

Minstead, in the New Forest.

After the wedding there will
be a reception at Miss Eden's
home, Fritham House, near

Lyndhurst. In pari of the house
Lady Eden runs a girls’ school
She has another school, for
younger children, in Kensington.

Miss Eden, slim and auburn-
haired, has done the secretarial
and accounting work for her
mother. Now Lady Eden is look-
ing for another assistant.

Miss Eden will wear a wedding
dress of cream and gold brocade.

W.I. Students Welfare
HILE he was in England,
Mr. B, C. Sangster, Jamaica's
Minister of Social Service, apart
from his pre-occupation with the
Ministers Supply Conference,
made enquiries regarding West
Indian students welfare in Britain
and addressed public meetings on
Jamaica affairs. Before he left he
had taiks with the Director of
Colonial Scholars, Mr. Keith. Mr.
Sangster feels allowances to Gov-
ernment scholars should

increased. Among other lecture
engagements of Mr. Sangster wus
in Birming-

last week-end
Likes It

one
ham.

R. R. L, NEDD of St. Vincent, apove the 60th.

who is in England on holiday
from Nigeria, was in London last
week. He is a Magistrate in the
Easiern Provinces of that colony. more American than French per-

Every Time

i

BARBADOS ADVOWATE

‘Women

T. H. EVERETT, head of New
York’s Botanical Gardens, has been
He
reports that while British garden-
lovers are ahead of Americans in
standards of cultivation an
variety of plants shown, Americ
does better in flower arrangement,

Reason? Women dominate)
American shows and “women are
more colour and composition?
eonscious than men.”

ACTRESS TELLS HOW

ACTRESS Gertrude Lawrence
is going to fit an academic teach-
ing job into her stage engage-
ments.

Miss Lawrence, who is starring
in the Broadway musical smash
hit, “The King and I’—she plays
the part of an English governess
who attended the court of the
King of Siam—has so impressed
New York’s Columbia University
that it has asked her to deliver
a course of lectures on “Theory
and practice of acting.”

THAT MAN COLUMBUS

FIFTH-AVENUE merchants al-
most wish Columbus had nevet
discovered America. There is w
great parade down Fifth-avenue
in his honour every October 12.
It blocks the traffic and lures a
customers out of the stores. Thi
merchants lose thousands of dol-
jars. So this year they are asking
the city officials to stop the parade
at 60th street, There are no shops


















APPLE PERFUME
WOMEN may soon be using

Mr. Nedd says he likes it very fumes—and the perfume they use

much in Nigeria and expresses ma
the hope that West Indians and
West Africans will become yet bei

closer friends.

Three Talks

be made of apples.
he Agriculture Department i
ng asked by the apple growers
to develop the flavour oils obtained
from apples into perfume bases

UNDERSTAND that after the The name of the new perfume hes
publication of the Wadding- been chosen—“Eve.”

ton Commission Report on aete
o
include in its Home and General
three talks caught
about current trends in the West habit so hard
Indies. The speakers in the series joomed sales fantastically. In one
of talks will include two West recent week they bought 12,000,006
tins of frozen orange concentrate.

In June, July, and August they
Evening. News accounted for 120 million tins ex-
anc

Guiana, the BBC. plans

Overseas Service,

Indians, :
Writing A Book
‘HE London

last week published a short clusive

COOLING OFF
HOUSEWIVES in America havc
the frozen orange juice
that they have

of what hotels

story written by Gordon Wool- restaurants were doing—one-thir«

ford, son of

ried to a French artist,
bean Voices Programme”. He i
now writing a book of
stories which he hopes will

House,

ion Rock—1





“Hullo Rupert, you're just
the sort of person | want,"’ cries the
boy. ‘ Are you fond of mysteries?"
= Soh, ves rather.”

river.

Rupert.
“What mystery ‘% chere?”
Before Rollo can answer there 1s
another call and they see an elderly
gentleman approaching in» hurry

* says

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~4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m, Rugby League Foot-
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bm. South Eastern Counties v. The
Springboks, 5.05 p.m Interlude, 5.15
o.m. New Records, 6 p.m, Sandy Mac-
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Ulster Magazine, 6.45 p.m. Programme
Parade, 6.55 p.m. Today's Sport, 7 p.m
The . News, 7.10 p.m. News Anal sis
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Statement of Account, 8.45 p.m. Com-
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"rom the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Mid
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Music
C.B.C PROGRAMME
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1951

time evacuee girl who has return-
jed to the United States to play
10.05—10.20 p.m, News
10.20—10.35 p.m Canadian Chronicle.
11.72 Mes. 25.60 M.

ore Chaplin in his next film.

B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME
i Asthma Mucus
Dissolved 1st. Day





WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 10, 1951
11.15 a.m. Programme Parade, 11.30
a.m. Musica Britannica, 12 noon The
News, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis.
4.00—7 15 p.m. 26.53 M. 31.32 M
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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1951

Leg. Co.

Fencing

Will Be Strictly Enforced

THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL yesterday passed with

minor amendments, the Bill to amend the

actories Act,

1947, in order to give effect to the recommendations of the
Secretary of State for the Colonies and of the Labour

Commissioner.

The Secretary of State has
advised the Government that the
Factories Act, 1947, does not ade-
quately provide for the fencing of
machinery and for the inspection
of every type of steam boiler and
the Labour Commissioner has
pointed out that the administrative
machinery for carrying out the
provisions of the Act are cumber-
= = Sun Liaednes will be

untered when car

ss reer one of the Mm wry

n moving the second readi
the Bil, the Hon. the Colenial
oe said: —
_ The Factories Act, 1947, which
it is the purpose of the ‘present
Bill to amend, has never been
brought into operation, The rea-
sons for not bringing it into opera-
tion immediately, which were
published at the time were, first
the lack of a substantive Labour
Commissioner, on whom the brunt
of the work of carrying out the.
provisions of the Act in ‘the early
stages would fall; second, the lack
of a Factory Inspeetor; and third,
the inconvenience of bringing the
Act into operation during the erop
season, The first lack was soon
remedied but the second was not,
and it was decided to defer pro-
claiming the Act under Clause 35
until a suitable Factory Inspector
could be recruited.

2. In accordance with the
usual procedure the Act was for-
warded for the signification of His
Majesty’s pleasure, and early in
1949 a reply was received to the
effect that, although His Majesty's
power of disallowance would not
be exercised, there were several
features in the Act, relating to the
fencing of machinery and the in-
spection of boilers, which contain-
ed dangerous weaknesses.

Doubts Discussed

3. In the meantime the Labour
Commissioner, (Mr. Burrowes)
had begun t6 entertain doubts
about the workability of the Bill.
In 1950 he diseussed these doubts
with Miss Ogilvie, the Assistant
Labour Adviser to the Secretary
of State, who shared them.

4. In view of the contin-
ued failure to secure the ser-
vices ofa Factory Inspector
the amendment of the Act was
not given high priority, but
earlier this year the Acting
Attorney General was able to
devote attention to it, and the
Bill which is before the Coun-
cil to-day represents the stm
of the amendments which
have been proposed by the
Secretary of State and the
Labour Commissioner.

5. To take the points raised, by
the latter first. The present defi-
nition of “factory’ in Section 2
of the Act does not include work
places where no power is used,
out includes places where no
workers are employed, It is con-
sidered that factories in which no
power is used are greatly in need
of inspection, as sometimes very
bad conditions, such as overcrowd-
ing, exist in such factories. ‘The
definition of factory, which is in-
cluded in Clause 3 of the Bill, and
is based on that contained in the
Trinidad legislation, ‘is compre-
hensive and includes any factor-
ies owned or operated by the
Barbados Government or by any
parochial or other public body.

Sections Repealed

6. Clause 4 of the Bill repeals
Sections 3, 4 and 5 of the Prin-
cipal Act. These set up a Factory
Board, consisting of the Chief
Medical Officer (now Director of
Medical Services), Colonial Engin-
eer, Labour Commissioner, Gov-
ernment Electrical Inspector, and
two others, to supervise all factor-
ies and machinery in the Island,
a Factory Appeals Board to hear
and determine appeals against the
Factory Board and the Registra-

tion of Factories.

The Labour Commissioner con-
sidered, and Executive Committec
agreed, that the s ui e of
a Factory Board and a Factor;
Appeals Board was very cumber-
some. Not only could the officers
concerned ill afford the time to
spend on a Factory Board, but
they would find it a practical im-
possibility to carry out all the
supervision imposed on them by
the Act.

It seems far preferable that the
responsibility for the administra-
tion of the Act should be vested
in the Labour Commissioner, sub-
ject to delegation of his s
to the Factory Inspector, n he
is recruited, and they will ob-
viously eall in ether officers as and
when they need advice and assist-
ance,

It has been argued that the
Labour Commissioner himself has
got the technical knowledge to
sarry out the responsibilities which
Clause 4 of the amending Bill
would give him, but it is the in-
tention that, if the services of an

experienced Factory Inspector can |

be obtained from the United King-

dom on secondment, these duties

sae in fact be largely delegated to
im.

Registration

Mis Ogilvie saw littie point in

introducing registration in_terri-
tories where the practice did not
exist already, and foresaw “the
risk of members of staff being in-
volved in nothing but registering,

checking, registration, and re-reg- |
It is considered that it |

istering.”
will be sufficient if owners of fac-
tories notify the Labour Commis-
sioner of the existence of factories
within the time limits set out in
the bill.

7. I have nothing to add to the
Objects and Reasons regarding
Clause 5. Clause 6 is incidental.
Clause 7 repeals Sections 6, 8 and
9 of the Act, which relate to the
machinery for registration and
duration of the validity of certifi-
eates of registration, and sets in
their place provision to enable a
court of summary jurisdiction, on
the complaint of the Factory In-
spector to make orders as to dan-
gerous conditions and _ practices.
Clause 8 of the Bill extends the
power of the Factory Inspector in
the manner set out in the Clause.

8. So much for the amend-
ments proposed by the Labour
Commissioner to make the Bill
less cumbersome to work. Clause
12 of the Bill refers to criticisms
by the Secretary of State. In Sec-
tion 19(a) of the Act, which was
based on Section 14 of the U.K.
Factories Act, 1937, certain. words
were added which were not in
the U.K. Act,

They are the following:—‘so as
to prevent bodily danger to per-
sons employed er working on the
premises,” The Secretary of State
regarded these words as of doubt-
ful value as they tend to weaken
the absolute requirement to fence
securely which is a feature of
the U.K. Act and might be
regarded as a loophole in the
requirements of the Section.

Accidents

Section 19(b) is also considered
to be unsatisfactory, and in the
experience of the U.K, Factory
Department some of the most
serious accidents occur when
guards are removed while
machinery is under repair. Sec-
tion 19 of the Act, whigh in its
prmeent form is considered by the

ecretary of State to contain dan-
gerous weaknesses, has accord-
ingly been re-drafted.

9. The Secretary of State
eommented on two points in Sec-
tion 20(1). The first was that
the sub-section only applies to
boilers used for the purpose of

|

a









THEIR

een







wre



Socialists
from the

HE Tories still hold a |
commanding lead of 12
in the election |

|

T

per cent. |
race. Stil! the same |
number of people

are
voting for them.

This {ts shown by a Daily |
Express Poll of Publiie |
Opinion conducted in the

he Socialists have gained one per
cent, from the Liberals in the
last fortnight—so the Tory Jead |
over the Socialists is reduced by
one,

futest figures put the Tortes at
514 per ecent.; Socialists 39) per
cent.: Liberals 8 per cent,

Question one
The first question put was:—
‘1 a General Election, were held

second hal! of September.

mimediateiy, lor which warty |
vould you vote ?” |
Che result wa3si— j
July Aug. Sept. |
a) @) @) a) @)

® & &% &. SoS

Tory 49) 50 50 50 S514 614
Soe. 49, 41 405 “3 38) 39) |

Lib 9 8 8 8 4 8

Others 1 1 1 1 1 uN
Although 97 per cent, of those who
voted Torv at the last General
Election intend to do so again
onlv 801 oer cent. of Socialists

THE TORIES HOLD

ZyVelen
Z x 4 oe 7

BARBADOS ADVOCATE




VOTE



q
5

wae





ie




win point
Liberals

remain steudiast. Ten per cent.
have turned Tory and 14 per

cent Liberal. The other eight
per cent. are undecided.

Two out of three Liberals say they
will vote Liberal ay vin, but one-
fifth have turned Tory.

The second question was :—

" Regardless oj how you would
vote yoursel/, which party do
you think would win tf a
General Election were hela
immediately ?

July Aug. Sept.

@ (2) M™) ¢)
Tory win .. 45 45 47 45) 50
Soc, win .. 36 35 37 33 By
- “SPPGRS Ades, : 4 4
ndecided .. 19 20 16 21 18

*Less than half per cent,

More thun three-quarters of

Tories are confident of victory,
but 1) per cent. take the view

that the Socialists will hold on
to office.

Of Socialists, 62 per cent, are
optimistic about their party's
chances of being returned
against 18 per cent, who foresee
a Tory come-back. MHalf the
interviews in the second
Septembe: investigation were
completed before Mr. Attlee
announced a General Election
(Tne Daily Express will take

further polls every week until
election day—October 25.

ee

driving machinery and not to
steam boilers used for other pur-
poses, such as boilers for pressure
vessels, e.g., steam tubes in ovens,
calendars, boilers for injection,
ee, into vats or boilers for cook-
ng.

It was felt that steam boilers
should be covered by the section,
The second was that no power is
given, even to the examining
engineer, to require boilers to be
fitted with safety attachments
such as a safety valve and a
pressure gauge, and an amend-
ment to Section 23 is accordingly
proposed in’ Clause 14 to meet
this point.

Disciplinary Measures
10. The Secretary of State

also considered that Section
25(4) was of doubtful value
since the giving of the notice
was made to depend on the
opinion of the o or manager
of the factory, and that Section
26(5) was undesirable, since the
failure of an official to do his
duty should be a matter for dis-
ciplinary measures and not for
prosecution, and should be de-
leted.



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In fact Clause 16 repeals Sections
25 and 26 relating to the notifica-
tion of accidents, which it is pro-
posed to include in a separate Bill,
and also mpkes provision to im-
pose a penalty on persons actually
committing the offence for which
the occupier is liable afd to énable
the occupier or owner to exempt
himself from liability on the con-
viction of the actual offender. I
have no comments on Clauses 19
and 20 of the Bill.

11. It is unusa] to amend an Act
before it has been brought into
operation, but the Assistant Labour
Adviser to the Secretary of State
supports such ation in this
instance.

Inavequaie Salary

12. It may be asked when the
long awaited Factory Inspector
may be expected to arrive. In
this connection, I will not weary
Honourable Members with the
various proposals that have been
considered during the last three
years and the difficulties which
have been encountered in securing
a suitable serving officer from the
U.K, Factory Service.

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These difficulties relate to the
inadequacy of the salary offered
(8800 per annum) and the in-
ability, ynder the conditions gov-
erning the employment of Factory
Inspectors in the U.K. of securing
the services of an officer on second-
ment for a period of more than
one year.

The possibility of getting an
active retired officer to come here
for, say, a couple of years in the
first instance has accordingly been
taken up with the Secretary of
State, and I hope that I will soon
be in a position to submit con-
crete proposals to the Legislature.
I myself hope that it will be
possible to complete arrangements
for a Factory Inspector to arrive
in time for the next crop season.
I should not like, at the present
stage, to give any commitment as
to when the Act will be brought
into force.

Minor Points

Hon'ble J. A. Mahon said that
he was not in any way opposed
to the principle of the Bill, but

}there were some points which
had him a little worried, He had
listened most carefully to the
Hor’ble the Colonial Secretary
when he stated that the services
of an experienced factory in-

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LATE FINAL—Lewis Gibbs

MAY WE BOOK YOUR ORDER FOR THE DUKE OF
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Steck already consigned to this bookshop,

spector had not yet been obtained

“I am a litthe chary about this
Bill where it says that a factory
inspector must be appointed. If
we pass this Bill to give the La-
bour Commissioner power to
appoint the inspector, unless we
insert some clause to say that the
inspector has to be appointed
with the necessary qualifications,
we might find ourselves landed
with someone acting as a
factory inspector without the
slightest idea of what he is do-
ing” Mr. Mahon said,

He could not see what they
were possibly going to do with a
whole time factory inspector. His
work would be cut out for the
first two years while he was get-
ting the necessary machinery
feneed. After that machinery had
been fenced, his sole job would
be to inspect boilers of 24 D.C.
factories and six cyrup plants.

Accidents

He did not think that the num-
ber of aceidents reported in Bar-
bados as a result of the operation
of factories justified the Govern-
ment in undertaking the expen-
diture of appointing a factory in-
spector.

Hon'ble G. B. Evelyn agreed
with the principle of having a
factory inspector rather than the
old Factory cord, He however
wanted to know if this inspector
was going to be, employed per-
manently and the colony saddled
with another man in the civil
service establishment.

The Hon'ble the Colonial Sec-
retary said that originally it was
intended that the post of factory
inspector should be on the prin-
ciple of shared secondment, J.e.,
work between Barbados and the
Windward and Leeward Islands.
That idea did not however seem
to be working out.

The Government intended get-
ting a fully qualified factory in-
spector from secondment from
the United Kingdom, If they had
to get ® man from the Home Ser-
vices, then they would have to
provide a gratuity so as to offset
the loss of certain pension rights,

He was in communication with
the Secretary of State for the
Colonies and he had however
hoped to get a retired man so that
the gratuity would not be neces-
sary in that case.

He said that the Legislature
would have the privilege to con-
sider the matter again because he
doubted they could get a good man
for £800 and they would have to
come back with a resolution for
additional money.

Two Years’ Work

In addition, the Colonial Secre-
tary said that Government realisec
that the work of the factory in-
spector would be over a_ period
of two years and the Legislature
at the end of that time would
have to reconsider the matter in





4427





Pass Factories Act Amendment Bil
Of Machinery

}











the light of existing cireumstances.

The President said that the
Hon'ble the Coloniai Secretary
had mentioned £800. He wantec
to know if the Government woulc
take into consideration the fact
that they would have to provide
passage money to ang from the
United Kingdom for this man anc
maybe his family, as well as
travelling allowance for doing hi:
work in Barbados.

He did not agree with the
Hon'ble Mr. Mahon when he talked
about getting a fully qualifiec
man, because looking at it from :‘
financial peint of view, it mean
that Government would have to
pay a salary commensurate with
full qualifications,

Hon'ble Mr. Mahon replying to
the President said that he was not
\Ninking of finance from the Gov-
ernment’s point of view, but from
the point of view of the industry,
because, if they had an inspector
not fully qualified who did not
know what he was doing, he might
call on industries to instal un-
necessary safety gadgets etc.

In Committee

The Bill then went into Com-
mittee during the course of which
Hon. Mr. Mahon raised the ques-
tion as to whether there should
be a fully qualified inspector rather
than just any ingpector occurring
in the section where it stated thai
the Labour Commissioner might
delegate the powers to inspectors,

Hon'ble F, E, Field pointed ou
that no other inspector was re-
ferred to in the Bill except the
factory inspector and therefore
the word “any” oceurring before
inspector in the section would of
necessity have to refer to the
factory inspector.

He however admitted that thr
word “the” rather than the wor,
“any” would make the section
clearer and suggested that it shoul:
be amended along those lines.

‘Hon'ble Mr. Mahon accepted
that suggestion,

The Bill was then passed with o
few minor amendments.

Steel Band

@ From page 1

enter because of the fierce fighting
in the vicinity. She touched
many new parts, including Subic
ay, Yokohama, Shanghai and
Tsingtao, covering about 30,001
miles in 1948 and about the same
mileage in 1949.

The years 1949 and 1050 were
heetie for Alshain and in Novem-
ber 1950 came another break in
her activities, She proceeded to
the East Coagt and on April 30,
1951, at Norfolk, Virginia, she was
assigned to the Amphibious Force,
Atlantic Fleet, That called for a
larger crew, an addition of land-
ing boats, operational training and
drills to prepare for her not un-





PAGE THREE





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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS #9 ADVOCATE

Green SS Se Ss
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BARBADOS ADVOCATE

MY BROTHER RAINBOW'S END
: : THE KING | Britain’s Election stirs

| the Americans... They
say it is ‘in the bag’
for the Tories

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1951





ata



Wednesday, October 10, 1951





Dangerous Practice

WHEN the Legislature was asked to
consider the new regulations controlling

A; the watchful, hopeful eyes

motor traffic in this island, it was suggested
in the House of Assembly that something
be done to control the impromptu and
dangerous contraptions used on motor
lorries for religious outings and bank holi-
day picnics. The discussion resolved itself
in two factions, one supporting the ‘bus
owners who had complained that they were
being denied legitimate business and the
other supporting the lorry owner who paid
taxes and was entitled to indulge in any
trade which brought him revenue.

There is a point at which the exercise of
certain rights degenerates into a license to
indulge in selfishness at the probable ex-
pense of the public. That point has now
been reached in connection with these vehi-
cles and the Government should take cogni-

of Britain are turned on Buckingham
Palace, a book is published which
reveals with warmth and_ intimate
knowledge much of the character of
the man whose health holds so much
for us all. Here, from “A King’s
Story,”’ by the Duke of Windsor, are
some glimpses of the King—Bertie to
his brother—as the Duke sees him.

Jur boyhood ... his marriag:
-.-.and my abdication

BERTIE came into my room
alone that evening (the evening

BERTIE

aa s

Le :
Rael t-] ae



Frederick Cook

NEW YORK. |
THE Americans this time are not even|Â¥
* |going through the motions of honouring the} }
os |time-worn fiction that a British election is
|none of their affair. They think it is—espe-
cially this one. Right across the U.S.A. they
|are quite openly hoping for a Tory victory.
| And most of them think it is in the bag.



So ae

%



me | Writing from London, Scripps-Howard | ¢
|columnist Parker La Moore warns, however,)$
| it may prove easier to turn the Socialists out
| than to repair the damage they have done.
|Fuel and power shortages this winter may
be as serious as in 1947. There is the short-

, |
returned to! age of train crews threatening transport

father

time the Professor
Marlborough House my











on the particular route. And it was now
alleged that other ‘bus owners were re-

bled companionship of our youth.
The situation seemed to cry
mutely for a symbolical laying

to -understand my feelings

had nearly overpowered me; and}

ist for the same paper, believes, that a Tory

victory would bring no basic change in

. '
«ree : was 380! . i
sance of what is an obvious public danger of the abdication, December 11, § taken aback by my} sent for him to ask precisely | breakdown. |
ar 1936) for a last talk. : : news that in his soy} what he meant. {
and find means of checking it. I was in the midst of packing way he could not* The Professor, embarrassed, |
; : hich my most personal possessions. . .. ; bring himself tot finally explained: “Your Royal! There are rising living costs, meat ration |
It may be that the difficulties which many I closed the door, and pushed § express his innermost} Highness, it isn't only that Prince : : 3 ’ : |
people experienced in obtaining "buses for aside the things on the sofa to ; ar ~ magne ne mi Albert. is inattentive, but, when cuts and the widening gap between imports : |
religious outings and picnics, because of — a place for him to sit} .oohsing for’ ‘next to I scold ye he as my beard.” | and exports. ' %
ah . ra own. 73 Bertie had most at orne peti ic , ‘
the regulations dealing with concession- Shy and retiring by nature, he Te ee eae iar atthe Ce The Socialists, say La Moore, can be con-
ri : ; s shrank instinctive rom © §} have to wear crown if I? “ gy : : }
aires led to this contrivance to accommo- Gvenmirtotas jife I bed lived. with i eee ait noes womeicl ‘concern my brother Bertie joined the piss naa a facing up to these ao ee
t . fe aye ; for me was mixed with the ° s . ne rlier i i
date the faithful. It was alleged that cer some zest. fee ose Bnei Stade: Kala adeba:: Sten aia earli ut t e incoming Government wi
Yet he essed , admirable 3
tain’ ‘bus owners met great difficulty in qualities—-qualies that may not } - responsibilities of king: not pérmit a senior to be seen in find them difficult to solve.
ee mie an ot : ; the company of a_ first termer I;
obtaining permission to use a Bie ta of ere eee oe ine king = i fle, waived a, few days | wise = Ree establish thons the sig ine
*buses outside their route. But it was known confident of -that Ligsouaite toe: teten” Bet close companionship we hag | TH WIN...
; . rate thar he oe 4 lways known.
i 5 uring these last days we had $ wrote that he loaged for me a ys |
that in some cases the granting of this sian . — or Whar "4.1 5 be bene wie’ wasnt However he was soon beset by | permission would have upset the schedule frankness recalling the untrou- } 2f all people snou'd be able i the same new-boy difficulties that ‘ ’
4

fused permissien to rent "buses to other
owners who had contracts for transporting
outing parties.

All this cannot outweigh the fact that
the method of circumventing the regula-
tions has now led to a positive danger to
the public?

The contraptions which are fitted on to
the platforms of lorries when occasions
demand are in many instances, old, dilapi-
dated, and badly adjusted. They are not
subject to any inspection by the 4Jnspec-
tors provided by Government to work in
the Highways and Transport Department.
The motor lorry itself is inspected and
must conform to certain specifications and
answer certain engineering tests for reli-
ability before it can be put on the road.
On this lorry however, an owner can put
any contraption made of pine, oak, or
shingle and he has the right to crowd as
many people into it as will subject them-
selves to the danger.

Public evidence is overwhelming to sup-
port the fact that many of these “tops”
which are now fitted to the lorries are out
of alignment and look as if they. would top-
ple off. In many instances the services of a
carpenter has to be summoned just before
they move off and even then they seem to
defy the law of gravitation along the
journey.

On a recent outing by one of these reli-
gious bodies one passenger fell from the
top and suffered injuries. It is true that a
passenger might fall as easily from a
*bus but the fact remains that the protec-
tion which he can get from a properly con-
structed "bus is not available in one of
these jitneys.

What constitutes a scandal is that these
contraptions are not subjected to any in-
spection and can carry as many passengers
as the owner cares to carry. The owner who
provides a proper ‘bus according to the
regulations is therefore penalised to the
extent of having to limit the number of
his passengers and to keep his vehicle in
such a condition, mechanical and other-
wise as is laid down by the law and en-
forced by the Transport Department.

It might be that in view of the neces-
sity to afford the public some means of
transport it will be desirable to allow vehi-
cles of this type on the road at intervals
when there is great pressure on the ‘bus
service but the least the Government can
do is to provide that they be subject to
inspection and conform to some rule of
safety. The vehicles themselves constitute
a danger to other users of the road.



The King

THE announcement that there will be no
further daily bulletin concerning the ill-
ness of His Majesty the King would seem
to indicate that the period of anxiety has
passed and that His Majesty is on the road
to recovery. This conclusion is further for-
tified by the visit of H.R.H. Princess Eliz-
abeth and the Duke of Edinburgh to
Canada.

The humble thanks of the peoples of the
British Empire and Commonwealth will be
offered for the recovery of the King. The
Empire is already faced with setbacks of an
alarming nature and even the continued
illness of His Majesty with the consequence
of state affairs being conducted by a Coun-

cil of State would have added to the incon-
venience.

But above all this there is the fact that His
Majesty following in the footsteps of his father
has endeared himself to millions of his people by
his human interest in their affairs. He has been
able through the science of radio tomake his own
personal appeal to their loyalty and to create that
bond of affection which it is possible in these
days to forge between kings and common people.

The prayers of a loyal and faithful people have
beén answered and the hope now is that quick
recovery and good health to His Majesty will be
a@ further cause for thankfulness,

on of hands,’ a passing of the
torch. But there is not much
that a former Monarch can tell
his successor. F
“You are not going to find this
a difficult job at all,” I assured
him. “You know all the ropes
and you have almost overcome
that slight hesitation in your
speech which used to make public
speaking so hard for you.”
Words do not come easily to

Bertie on occasions of great
emotion; without his having to
tell me so. I knew that he felt

my going keenly, At the same
time he can be extremely practi-
cal. |

“By the way David,” he asked
me, “have you given any thought
as to what you are going to be
called now?”

This question took me aback.

« * a

As that late hour the question
of another title seemed of little
consequence to a man who had
been King.

Immediate reflection told me
that, as the son of the Sovereign,
I was by right of birth a Prince—
ue Royal Highness the Prince

ward.

But Bertie had evidently pon-
dered the question and no doubt
judging it only proper that [
should bear a title at least equal
to that of my younger brothers,
Harry, Duke of Gloucester, and
George, Duke of Kent, he said
thoughtfully: “I shall create
you a Duke. How about the family
name of Windsor?”

“Duke of Windsor,” I said, half
to myself. Liking the sound of
it, I modded in agreement.

“It shall be the first act of my
reign.”

He waz sure that
Whatever I ceeided !
would ibe in the ‘bes
interests cf the coun {
and the Empire hi

try

eeaneunee aneeenens!

Outlook ...

I TOOK comfort from the fact
that my brother Bertie, to whom
the succession would pass, was
in outlook and temperament very
much like my father. Tihe pat-
terns of their lives were much
the same, with the steady swing
of habit taking them both year
after year to the same places at
the same time and with the same
associates. Strongly rooted each
in his own existence, they tended
to be withdrawn from the hurly
burly of life that I relished.
Both were devoted family men a
quality that goes a long way for
a king in a constitutional
monarchy.

My father was greatly beloved.
And the undoubted popularity of
my brother Bertie, whose life is
so much like that which my
father led, suggests that irrespec-
tive of whatever other forms the
monarchy might have taken
under the impress of a different
personality, the British people
are rightly pleased with his faith-
ful carrying on of my father's

ways.
Lessons ...

THE SCENE changes, swings

back to boyhood days...

I LIKER German and studied
diligently, and profited from the
hours I spent with the Professor.

However, Bertie did not share
the same partiality and treated
the lessons lightly.

In one of the Professor’s week-
ly reports to my father on our
separate progress he once wrote
under Bertie’s column: “In-
attentive and playful.” The next



WHY WE NEED NOT BE ALARMED ABOUT

Stalin’s 300 Submarines

FOR some time it has been
known that the Russians are
building a powerful fleet of sub-
ee: We are told they have

We cannot ignore the rise of
this new striking force, But, for-
tunately, we do know something
about these submarines.

Most of them are of conven-
tional types, many are of pre-
war design and probably less effi-
cient than the German U boats.

Included in the 300 are a large
number of small coastal sub-
marines — which might not be
dangerous — and some quite ob-
solete boats.

Secret High-Speed Ship

Reported Blown Up

Russia, according to “Jane’s
Fighting Ships,” seems to have a
policy of never scrapping a ship.

The rez! core of the fleet are
the “K” and “Shtcha” class sub-
marines, but the performance of
even these relatively modern
boats is not out of the ordinary.

The important question to
answer is: What progress have
the Russians made with new-type
submarines ?

They must have German tech-
nicians working for them. It is
therefore reasonable to suppose
that they are pressing on with the
revolutionary “Walther-boat,” a
submarine on which the Germans
were. experimenting towards the
end of the war.

It carries its own oxygen in the
form of hydrogen peroxide, and
is said to be capable of under-
water speeds of 25 ‘knots.

But hydrogen peroxide is
tricky and unstable stuff, and
there are reports that the one
“Walther-Boat” on which the
Russians were experimenting
blew up and sank with all
hands,

We might be on safe grounds,
therefore, if for the present we
liscounted this as a _ serious
langer.

Ne Fears of Atom-Sub.

There is also talk of an atomic-
powered submarine of unlimited
range and endurance, but we
have nothing to fear here, so far.

A force we must reckon with

is the new, fast, German-type
XXI U boats. These large sub-
marines have improved Schnor-
kels, and their maximum sub-

merged speed is something like
15 knots, with a cruising speed
of eight knots.

The Germans were actually
prefabricating the type XXIs on

By
EDWARD SHACKLETON, MP,

Son of the famous explorer,
late Anti-U Boat Intelligence
Coastal Command

a big scale, and in the words of
the official account of the Battle of
the Atlantic: “The advent of these
new U boats would have revolu-
tionised submarine warfare”; but
they came too late.

‘Handful’ on Patrol

The Russians possess a dozen
type XXIs and should be building
others. Indeed, they are said to
have over 100 submarines under
construction,

Yet, having said all this,
there is no reason at all to be
alarmist.

The majority of Russia’s sub-
marines are old,

Such submarines boldly
handled and using acoustic hom-
ing torpedoes could be a_ serious
nuisance. But could the Russians
emulate the Germans in “wolf-

pack” tactics? That is cebateae
The Russians in modern ti x

have not achieved much success
in naval warfare. It is certain
that the number of submarines
they could maintain on patrol
would be a handful compared
with the size of their fleet.

It is true that new high-speed
submarines might neutralise the
effectiveness of the aircraft tactics
and weapons that were. r -
sible for more than half the Ger-
man U boat killings. a.

But we do not standstill. New
types of radar may enable a plane
more easily to detect a Schnorkel.

Buoy That Listens

There is the.Sono-Buoy, a com-
bined hycerophone and radio
transmitter which relays the
sound of a submarine to an aero-
plane. It can be dropped in
numbers to cover a wide area.

Its tactical use is exceedingly
complicated, and there are many
noises in the sea, including fish
which bark, squeal, and even
imitate the thud of a submarine’s
engine.

Sometimes, too, the radio
operator had been startled to
hear not a propeller’ but’ dance
music !

Further, we. 4re_ progressing
with homing torpedoes which, if

dropped in the area, pursue the
submarine and destroy it.

There are, too, undoubtedly
new and startling detection
vices and weapons which
remain secret.

de-
must

by arrangement we _ used to go
for walks beyond the playing
fields.

Bertie would tell me his trou-
bles and I would try to advise
him on the basis of my own ex-
perience.

Power Of Girls

MY sister Mary’s threat, “I'll |
tell Mama,” although seldom,
earried out, had a powerfully |
subduing effect upon us. |

In this manner Bertie and 1}
discovered for the first time the}
powers that little girls the world
over exert over their brothers,

On Marriage

IN 1923 my brother Bertie had |
married the daughter of a Scot- |
tish earl, Lady Elizabeth Bowes-
Lyon, who had brought into the
family a lively and_ refreshing,
spirit. |



One Blessing |

AND. from that last broadcast)
speech’ on the abdication evening.

A FEW hours ago I discharged
my last duty as King and
Emperor and now that I have
been succeeded by my _ brother,
the Duke of York, my first words
must be to declare my allegiance |
to him with all my heart.

This decision has been made
less difficult to me by the sure
knowledge that my- brother with
his long training in the public
affairs of this country. and with
this fine qualities will be able to
take my place forthwith, without
interruption or injury to the life
and progress of the Empire,

And he has one matchless
blessing, enjoyed by so many of
you 309 not bestowed on me—a
happy home with his wife and
children,

*“ FROM “A_ King’s _ Story.”
Memoirs of the Duke of Windsor
(Cassell, 258.), out today,

—L.E.S.



We can think of the last U
boat war as a_ sequence of
measure and counter-measure,

When it became too dangerous
for the Germans to travel on the
surface by day, they surfaced by
night.

We replied by fixing search-
lights to aircraft which homed in
on their radar, switching on the
light for the actual attack,

Attack, and Counter

When the Germans fitted radar |
search receivers which gave)
warning of the presence of air-
craft we retaliated by flooding
the area with so many aircraft
flying high with their radar}
switched on that the U boat com-!
mander never knew when it was!
safe to remain on the surface, |

At one time the U boats stayed
on the surface by day and fought
back, using anything up to ten
light flak guns. To counter this,
forward firing cannon and rocket
projectiles were fitted to aircraft.

Must Have The Planes
All tiis equipment calls for
like a flying Christmas
tree, afiq Coastal Command and
Naval Aviation must have the
right aircraft for the job.

_ Coastal nd is _ still
equipped mainly with Lancasters
and old pre-war Sunderlands.

But at last the Shackleton, a
specially designed maritime air-
craft, is coming into the ‘squad-
rons, and we expect soon to get
the Neptune, a first-class Ameri-
can anti-submarine aircraft.

Meanwhile the Navy is concen-

trating its main resources on
preparations for anti-submarine
warfare.
Our own submarines have here|
an important part to play as
potential hunters of enemy sub-
marines.

Our _ surface anti-submarine
forces are being strengthened by!
new building.

A Double Weapon
The Asdic, the famous under-



water detecting apparatus, will]
be vital. i
One important new device!

locks ‘the Asdic’' to the anti-sub-|

marine weapon projector:

submarine is simultaneously |
Yocated and the anti-submarine
weapon fired, |

In the long run the thing that}
really counts is, the brains of our
scientists anq ‘the skill,
and adaptability of our seamen)
and airmen. }

If the challenge should come we
shall be ready to meet it

—L.E.S,

British policy, but “the Conservatives would
bring more needed administrative efficiency
to the Government than the Labourites.”

What happens could be’ important for
Americans, says the Wall Street Journal. “A
Labour victory might mean more bailing out
of Britain’s ailing economy—a Tory victory,
fewer drains on the American taxpayer.”

The Journal expects no new Socialist pro-
jects and thinks nationalisation schemes are
now stuck away for fear of offending thé
middle-class, whose votes will be decisive.

Says the influential “Kansas City Star”:
“The .people are tired of controls, ever-
mounting taxes and the failure of Labour to
selve the major problems. The temper of the
people places Labour on the defensive and
it is inconceivable that Mr. Churchill will
allow them to get off.”

OPTIMISTS? NO

Even on the American Left there is no

optimism about Labour’s chances.

In the New York Post, for instance, Dr.
Frank Kingdon, just back from London,
writes: “I expect the Conservatives to win a
majority of 25 to 30. The one group that may
profit politically from the present situation is
that of Aneurin Bevan. The struggle of this
group for control may well be the most
dramatic political story out of England in

the coming months.”

In the Hearst newspapers, Washington

political columnist George Brown says: “The
British people have reached the end of their

rainbow.

“Socialism has been given a fair and very
long trial and has proved a delusion.”

In St. Louis, Missduri, there is unanimity.
The Courier Journal says bluntly: “Labour's
chances don’t look bright. There's little doubt
Anglo-American relations will be improved
by a Tory victory.”

And the Globe Democrat says: “British
Socialism is at its lowest ebb. Unless there
is a revival of Socialist fervour, Jvabour’s
supremacy looks doomed.”

The Boston Herald feels the coming Social-
ist rejection may be in name only but adds,
“Even that is important in the Anglo-Ameri-

can partnership. A Conservative Govern-

ment will smell sweeter on this side of the
Atlantic”.

New York Herald Tribune’s London corres-

pondent, Joseph Newman, believes Mr. Att-
belief that |

lee is basing his hopes on the

Labour will hold its following while th)
Tories will fail to increase theirs.
Opinion polls do not support this, com

ments Newman.

Reporting the Evening Standard’s pre-
posal that the Tories should enter the lists
without any fixed programme Newman says:
“This was an indirect warning to Conserv-
atives to refrain from making promises which

ities will remain.”

In the Middle West the Cleveland Plain



| they will not later be able to fulfil. The Con- |
\servatives may win but the economic real- |

|

So the| Dealer agrees that odds are against the Social- |

ists and says, “What the Tories really want!

is two full terms as Government, one to

i

straighten out world problems, the second

courage,|to put Britain as far as practicable back on a}

|

free enterprise basis”
World Copyright Reserved.
—L.E.S.



“JAEGER TIME”

Peel For Strength

Cherries

Hagel Mute cot EAT J. & Rf.
Se eee a es BREAD

CHEESE we

Processed Gouda ANCHOR

Canadian Red

Canadian Cheddar BUTTER



AND THE BEST
BUYS TOO!!

JAMS
CRYSTALS
PEAS

By Wm. P. HARTLEY Ltd.

NO ADDATIVES — Only FRUIT and SUGAR
@ Obtainable at all Grocers












OUR LADIES’ JAEGER COATS
Raglan Sleeves
Button-up Collars
Slit Pockets

ARE DESIGNED FOR TRAVEL

CEREALS

Shredded Wheat
All Bran
Weet a bix




(1-Ib. Blocks)
CHEESE IN TINS

MEAT Dept.
Fresh Sausages
Minced Steak

SQUASH
« Calves Liver
24e. per Ib. Fresh Vegetables

PHONE GODDARDS 1To-DAY

SSF









WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1951

HOUSE PASS SUGAR BILL ‘

@ From Page 1
EE in an island like
Barbados and an industry like the
sugar industry which is a symbol
of free enterprise.

“At this stage I may say,” said
Mr. Adams, “that it would be chur-
lish in me not to start by saying
that in some respects I have been
surprised at the fact that this
agreement has been achieved, be-
cause if I had the misfortune to
be a capitalist and sugar planter
for 300 years; to have complete
and absolute dictation over the
terms J] am going to emplo: peo-
ple on; how much money I am
going to make and keep out of
the sugar industry, I too might
have had the misfortune of not
wanting te conclude an agreement
of this sort.”

A very important thing’ about
whe agreement was that the pro-
fits of the industry would be lim-
ited, and out of the money that
the ‘industry would not be taking

, as its own by way of profits, cer-
tain provisions would be made for
the benefit of others. There would
be a higher rate of production
bonus than had been given the
workers for the past few years; a
certain portion of the money would
go to the Labour Welfare Fund,
and a portion would be earmark-
ed for the proposed harbour if
and when Government decided to
- tegaee with the construction of

Mr. Adams said that the agree-
ment had been the subject of
negotiations existing for roughly
nine months and that there had

nm much give and take. “But
I do feel” he said “that the House
will agree with me, that if for
no other reason, the establishment
of the principle of profits being
shared between employer and em-
ployee is in itself an outstanding
achievement.”

In one respect, said Mr. Adams,
it might be said that the idea
arose as a result of the compara-
tive stability which the long term
agreement with the Ministry of
Food to take West Indian sugar,
provided. It was felt that as a
result of this long term contract,
stability at the production end
should also be attempted.

Profits Shared

Both sides that had subscribed
to the agreement had agreed that
there should be reasonable wages
and reasonable profits in the
sugar industry in relation to the
average crop, that being taken for
some years now as 110,000 tons;
that when the sugar crop exceed-
ed that average, its extra profits
should be shared, and that the
Stabilisation Fund should be care-
fully guarded when the crop did
not exceed that average.

It was also felt that something
should be done to bring a sense
of stability to peasants as far as
the price paid for their canes
vere concerned, Perhaps equally
outstanding was that the public
should be given information of
the financial position of the eco-
nomic situation.

Hon, members would remember,
said Mr. Adams, that when the
Moyne Commission came out here,
the sugar industry said that~they
had no objection to the publishing
for the benefit of the public, fig-
ures showing what the industry
was making, in order that em-
ployees in the industry could see
that they were speaking the truth
when they said that they could
not afford to pay more than Is. 6d.
2s. or half a crown a day or
whatever it was. The industry
hati forgotten that ever year
since.

After some persuasion in some
cases, a little in others and none
in others. seventeen of the twenty-
four loval factories had now
agreed to allow their figures to
be seen in order that from an
analysis of those figures a reason-
able profit could be computed,
and so on:

He knew they would all agree
that it was an excellent thing for

Leg. Co.

BARBADOS will be represented
at the British Industries Fair in
1952. A resolution approving the
expenditure of funds for this pur-
pose was concurred in by the
Legislative Council at its meeting
yesterday.

The resolution js for the sum of
$2,520.

In moving the concurrence of
the resolution, the Hon’ble the
Colonial Secretary said that in
1950, Barbados was not represented
at the British Industries Fair. In
1951, it was originally proposed
that Barbados should again not be
represented and the daily news-
paper came out with an article on
October 4, 1950 entitled “Barbados
out again.”

“7 am glad to say that about
the same time that the article ap-
peared in the Paess, the Chamber
of Commerce decided that they
would go in for the British In-
dustries Fair of 1951 and the West
India Committee in, London was
notified Se ee a erineeerers eee RNASE



It's delicious!

the agreement to be made volun-
tarily @md he hoped that the other
factory owners would realise that
a voluntary agreement was pref-
erable to compulsion.

Continuing Mr. Adams said
that one of the reasons of stabili-
sation as it originally was, was to
provide against bad years. Not
merely drought or disease but bad
years as regards prices, Now
however, there was some guaran-
tee as regards prices.

Labour Trouble

The sugar industry, if he might
disclose some of what had been
discussed. seemed fearful to touch
the Stabilisation Fund at all, and
one could well see that if they
encountered the reverse of what
they had been experiencing the
last few years and they did not
have a substantial Fund there
might possibly be labour trouble.
One of the chief points of differ-
ence was, therefore, whether the
Fund should be touched at all.
It was eventually felt that in a
good year—and they had only
agreed on a figure of five years—
if the cron exceeded the five year
average, the industry out of its
profits would put 7s. 6d. per ton
to Labour Welfare and in addition
there would be taken out of the
Stabilisation Furid a further 5s.
If the crop of any particular year
exceeded the previous five year
average, the sum agreed on was
the sum to be taken out and it
was with that object that the Bil!
was brought before #2 House. If
the crop on the other hand, did
not exceed the previous five year
average, only half a crown would
be taken from ‘the Stabilisation
Fund and given to Labour Wel-
fare. If in any year the crop
dropned below 120000 tons, the
Stabilisation Fuad would not be
touched. “The Stabilisation Fund
and Labour Welfare Fund were,
so to speak, twe aspects of the
same thing. You get the Labour
Welfare Fund to repair your
houses and therefore you do not
have to take it out of your wages.
I hope hon, members will have
read the agreement and I hope
that I have made it clear about
the Stabilisation Fund.”

Referring to the payment of the
Production Bonu", Mr. Adams paid
tribute to the last Labour Com-
missioner and the Secretary of
the Workers’ Union. “Production
Bonus is something new to Barba-
dos and it is now well established
and well accepted by both sides,”

he said. The present arrange-
ment was for 19 per cent., be
added. ,

Deep Harbour

Or, the matter of a harbour, Mr.
Adams said that this would un-
doubtedly benefit the sugar indus-
try more than any other section of
the community, even more than
the merchants, it was therefore
only fair that the necessity of find.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ing the huge sum of money for the
purpose — certainly more than
£5,000,000—the people who would
benefit from it most should sub-
scribe over and above the average
taxpayer. Thig was the payment
of a cess of $2 per ton. Agreement
had been reached however; in view
of two facts. The Government
had agreed in principle to examine
carefully the possibilities of con-
structing the harbowr, but the
financial implication and in view of
the fact that the agreement before
them had only recently been arriv-

ed at, it was felt that in a matter
of the sort with its repercussions
on other people besides the large
landowner, it should be presented
to the public for di-cussion before
implementation this year.

It was for that reason and for
that reason alone that Government
were not proposing that day to ask
for legislative sanciion of that pro-
vision. Of course everything «
pended on the fiscal survey They
must know how much money they
could afford for a harbour or
whether they could get a loan
floated.

Mr. Adams said thai he was
trying to be persuasive rath>r .aan

le.

yield to the temptation of saying
things that might stir one or .wo
members to writh. He would
merely say though that election
or no election, it was not playing
the game to start rumours and
try to persuade peasants in the

island that the agreement
do them some everlasting harm,
That was not true. “So far as the
agreement is conc erned a certan
measure of praise ip due to “ie
Sugar Producers Federation, for
30) years we have never had a 1y~
thing like it in this island. There
has been profit sharing among the
shareholders but not among the
workers, Now I can only say that
i: the ee, thir tho far ory
owr a Id havo g¢y them
more this year for their canes but
for this agreement they have been
dreaming for 300 vears,”

would

Mr. Waleott (E) said that there
was one point of the Memorandum
of Agreement that he had com-
plained of. It was Clause 3 of
the bill which dealt with $1.80
per ton to be allocated to the
Labour Welfare Fund when the
sugar crop exceeded the average
of the five preceding years.

Taking the agreement on a
whole, he felt that it was a matter
worth congratulations when in the
island, one could find interests
coming together when concerned
with an industry and arriving at
an agreement which is supposed
to last three years,

In 1947, he shid, there was
never found to be too much diffi-
culty in effecting negotiation be-
tween the planters and the Bar-
bados Workers’ Union when they

came to discuss year after year
the question of “would any bonus
be given the workers in arrears
of the Wages which were just
earned.’

He pointed out that, so far as
sharing in the profits of the indi
try were concerned, the bonts
was bound to be considered as a
share in the profits, Since 1947,
he said, the question was always
to determine what the excess
amount was likely to be.

Mr. Walcott said that when the
Hon. Senior Member for St. Jos-
eph regarded it as a great achieve-
ment, wjth which he _ entirely
agreed, -he felt that the Hon.
Member would admit that, sinee
1947, he had ‘ound no difficulty
in realizing and recognising t
the sugar workers, as distinct
from the owners and producers,
could. not say what benefit they
would accrue.

In the sugar industry in these
days, he said the producer relied
on the good weather to get a good
crop. As regards the percentage
or bonus paid out this year, there

had been an increase,

He was of the opinion that it
was not so great an achievement.
There was no doubt that they had
hed good weather and conse-
quently good crops. It was agreed
ihree years by both parties that
the workers should share in the
profits of the sugar industry, The
only thing new was that the
—* had got a bigger percent~

“erie pointed out that if one got
20 tons of sugar, representing a
little profit, and over the same
period of time he got 32 tons of
sugar, which is 12 tons more,
there would obviously have been
an. increase.

Referring to the additional cess
of $1.80 per ton allocated to the
Labour Welfare Fund, he said
that when they made that alloca-
tion, they were only reducing the
amount that went into the work-
ers’ pockets. They would not be
affecting the producer or the mer-

chants,

He said that there was no one
way that they could get it out of
the profits. As regards the $2 that
was to be paid towards a Harbour
Fund, England had never allowed
taxation within taxation. But he
wanted to say that there was
nothing that would be more use-
ful to the community than a har-
bour because it was to be used
by all.

He said that there was little in
the agreement to quarrel over,
but he felt that nothing should
have been allocated to the Wel-
fare Fund which grows and grows
from year to year and cannot sink.

Mr. Watcott further pointed out
that the person who contributed
hundreds of tons of sugar to the
industry should be given better
treatment than the others who
contributed comparatively little.

In The Legislature Yesterday

‘ oot, Legisia
p.m. yen'
The

Council met




the Colonial Sec-

COUNCIL
at lishment (General) (Amendment)
No, 2 Order, 1951" made by the

Governor-in-Executive Commit-

tee on the S0th a. of eee



4 +4 ent of the Director 1951, under the ovisionn of
~ and Transport as an sects 3 of the clu Establish
'y of the Seo. ment Act, 1949,



ment,

The Hon'ble the Colonial Sec-

Dis vation Board
and the Domestic Sugar Agree-

Resolution to make it lawful
for th Governor-in-Executive
Committee to lease to the Vestry
of the parish of 8t, George a

retary laid the Report of the parcel of land formerly part of
Comptroller of Customs on the _ Carmichael Plantation, situate at
Customs Revenue, Trade, Ship- Ellerton in the parish of St.
ping and Excise of the Island George and containing by ad-
for the year 1950, ‘mtoasurement five acres, two

The Council concurred in

the

roods for the purpose of estab-

Provision
wages of workers,

Bill intituled an Act to amend

the Trade Act 1910,

Bill to authorise the Vestry of
the parish of Christ Chureh to
raise a loan not exceeding $7,200.

The Council postponed the fol-

lowing :—

Bill to authorise the Commis-

sioners of Highways of St, Philip
to increase the rates of pay and
travelling allowances to the In-
spector
of Highways of the said parish,

and Assistant Inspector

Bill intituled An Act to
for the

make
Protection of

following :— lishing a playing fleld. Resolution to approve of the

Resolution to place the sum of The Council passed the follow- compulsory aequ)sition by the
$2,520 at the disposal of the Gov- ing :— Governor-in-Executive Commit-
ernor-in-Executive Comngittee to Bill to amend the Factories tee of all that certain parcel of
supplement the Estimates, 1951— Act, 1947. land (Part of the tenantry lands
52, Part I, Current, as shown in Bilt to amend the Public of a place called Bosvigo) con-
the Supplementary Estimates, Health Act, 1008, taining by estimation 15,870 sq.
1951—52, No, 25, which form the Bill to amend the Old Age ft, for the purpose of establish-
Schedule to the Resolytion. Pension Act, 1937. ing a district market,

Resolution to approve the Bill to amend the Package Tax The Council adjourned to Tues-

Order entitled

“The Civil Estab-

Act, 1941.

day next at 2.00 p.m,



Approve B.IL.F. Expenditure

“T think it has been agreed that
participation of Barbados in the
British Industries Fair of 1951
which coincided with the Festival
of Britain, was a success.

A Success

The Colonial Secretary then
quoted from the West India Com-
mittee Circular supperting the re-
marks that Barbados’ participa-
tion in the B.LF. had been a suc-
cess,

The specific report relating to
Barbados which was prepared by
the West India Committee, point-
ed out that many overseas and
home buyers had never heard of
Barbados rum and had associated
all West Indian rum with Jamaica,
To those acquainted with the good
quality of Barbados rum, it came
as a serious surprise that it had
not been seen. at the B.I.F. before.
‘The same thing applied to fancy
molasses and the rest.

A week or two ago, the Cham-

It's cooked

VALOR

a reputation for good
ve the fallowing models:

TABLE MODEL

2 Burner with

The stove with
cooking. We ha

WICKS No. 200 44c.



stands

No, 300 80c.

$25.21 & $17.50

AON Ne ak cass

No. 21 $1.00



ber of Commerce which had been
asked whether they would partici-
pate in the 1952 Fair, reported
that owing to lack of funds, they

_would be unable to do so, It

seemed to the Executive Commit-
tee that it would be a crying
shame if Barbados did not
participate.

There were occasions when a
light should be hidden under the
bushel, but it was thought that
there were other occasions when
the good name of a colony or a
country required that it should
take its proper place in an ex-
nibition like the British Industries
Fair.

Rum, Molasses

“T have already referred to ru$
and faney, molasses, I am sure
that from the impression given at
the Fair, the result can be nothing
but good to Barbados,” he said.

As regards tourism, owing to
shipping difficulties since the war,
there were not many people com-

on a

ing from the United Kingdom to
Barbados,. but they had been told
that ships were coming. He was
convinced that the attractive stalls
proposed for 1952 at the B.I.F.,
would put Barbados on the map
and encourage people to come here,

He said that the Executive Com-
mittee had decideg that in as much
as the Chamber of Commerce had
gone to the full expense of bear-
ing the cost of the stand at this
year’s Fair, it was only fitting that
the Government should come for-
ward next year to bear the cost.

He was very glad to say that the
Chamber of Commerce had said
that if the Legislature providec
the necessary funds, the Chamber
of Commerce ‘vould be only toc
please to co-operate with the Gov-
ernment by supplying the exhibits
at the Fair.

He had much pleasure in moving
that the resolution be concurred
in,

Hon'ble F. E. Field seconded.

a



‘}10th and 12th July, 1951 addressec

Suit

Mr. E. A, McLeod Police Magis- Guiana,
ment Centre on

trate of District‘A”, discharged



PAGE

FIVE







Chief
Briti
Move
evening

Sgt.
S.P.C.A,

Major Torrezao,
Inspector of
visited the Youth
Monday

Elsie Aimes of Beckles Hill, St. and gave a lecture to 25 boys an

Michael, when the preliminary
hearing in the case in which she
was charged by the Police with
throwing corrosive acid on Car-

men Marshall on June 16, ended the Centre

yesverday.

G. Springer prosecuted on behalt
oi tue tviice. Before discharging
Aimes Mr. McLeod said that on

the evidence before him he could Chief

girls on
Animals.” A
parents also attended the lecture

playing games,
Mr. E. K. Walcott appeared on part in other activities.

behalf of Aimes while Inspector jecture a

Be Kind Tx
number o

“How To
large

When the Sgt.
the
typing,

Major arrived at
members wer

and taking
After the

of thanks wa
A, Young

vote
moved by Rev. C

The Sgt.
Inspector

Major, aiong wit!
Williams an

no. cend up the ease and the one Inspector Licorish visited Walk
witness rur the prosecution—Mr. ers Plantation, St. George yeste!

A. Durant was not lying.

she did not recognise threw the
acid on her,

day.
It seemed to him that Marshall there. He told the Advocate tha‘
went by the window that night the cows were all clean and the

. pens
and looked out and someone whom Somaition.

He inspected the animal

kept in a very sanitar

Along with Inspector Licoris!

Mr. Torrezao called at Glendair

After the preliminary hearing prison and was shown around |

Carmen Marshall was taken to the

Major Foster,

Governor of thc

Central Investigation Department prison. He saw the poultry anc

when a container filled with liquid
was knocked out of her hand by
Clyde Boxhill while Marshall was

approaching Aimes who was talk- poultry
ing in the courtyard after she was Inspector

discharged.

A sample of the liquid and the
container have been sent*to the
Government Analyst for a report.

Forty-eight-year-old Charles
Austin of Dunlow Lane, St. Michael
was bound over for a period of
six months by His Worship Mr.
E. A. Me)

pig farms

, Police Magistrate | giving

in the prison com-
ound. “The pigs are well fed anc
ook in the pink of condition. Th«
too look fine,” Chie’

Torrezao told the
Advocate.

He said that the Governor ha
made arrangements for him t
ive a lecture to the prisoners o1

Friday next.

Although Animal Welfare Week
is past, Chief Inspector Torreza
is continuing his tour of the island |
lectures at schools an

of District “A’ when he was found | other institutions,

guilty of the larceny of a quantity
of plants valued at $5.00 the
property of Clifford Mayhew.

The offence was committed on
October 2.

The Office of the Police Traffic
Branch which was the first office
on one’s left while going into the
Central Station is now behind the
Charge room opposite to the Re-
creation Room.

ERRATUM

A MESSAGE from the Governot
concerning an error made in
paragraph 1 of the Domestic
Sugar Agreement was put before
the Legislature yesterday.

The Message reads:

His Excellency the Governor
has the honour to inform the
Legislature that his attention has
been drawn to an error in para-
graph 1 of his Message No,
34/1951 of the 2nd of October, on
the subject of the Domestic Sugar
Agreement, in the reference to
the different organisations con-
cerned,

2. His Excellency has the
honour to notify the Legislature
that paragraph 1 of Message
No. 34/1951 should have read as
follows: —

“His Excellency the Governor
“has the honour to invite the
“attention of the Honourable the
“House of Assembly to a
“memorandum of Agreement
“dated the 13th September,
“1951, which, in accordance
“with the terms, has been
“submitted to the respective
“organisations mentioned there-
“in for their consideration and
“which, it is understood, has
“veen confirmed by these
“organisations, Copies of this
“Memorandum of Agreement
“were laid in the Legislature
“yesterday.

Another Message telling of an
eddition to the proposed member-
ship of the Scotland District Con-
servation Board also went before
the Legislature.

The Message reads:

His Excellency the Governor
hus the honour to refer to his
Deputy's Message No, 21 of the



to the Legislature in connection
with the proposed membership o
the Scotland District Conservatior
Board and to inform the Honour-
able the Legislature that the
Director of Highways and Trans-
port has been added to the list of
members set out in that Message.

New Boys’ Olub

Major R. A. Stoute, Deputy
Commissioner of Police will open
a Boys’ Club at Belleplaine, St.
Andrew at 4.30 p.m., today, This
Club will be housed in the Com-
munity Hall which has been made
available by the Rector and
Parochial Treasurer of the Parish.}

The Club brings the number of|
Boys’ and Girls’ Club to 13, Thirty-|
eight boys have already seated
for membership in the
plaine Club,



|

EE)

Ly" ( WONDER WiMicdi THE >|





ople is the tire for you to buy?

THE SAFEST RIDE!

















sesn't it stand to reason that the tive that
ives the greatest satisfaction to tl

Sliustrated is Goodyear’s great new tire, the /
Super-Cushion. Look what it gives you: |

THE MOST COMFORTABLE RIDE!

BLINDING

HEADACHES

MADE HER HELPLESS |



KRUSCHEN
brought relief

People who
suffer from
severe head-
aches will be fnterested in
reading how this woman
ended her troubles ;—

pouey in my hands anc
© lie dowa for hours at a time,
My aunt, who has taken Kruschen
Salts for yoars, suggested my
trying them. so, and I've
not had a return of those terrible

and to the unsuspected retention
in the syitern of stagnating
waste material, which poisons
the blood, Remove the poisonous
accumulations — prevent them
from forming again—and you
won't have to worry any more,
And that is juat how Kruschen
brings swift and lasting relief-
by SrOA IS the system thor-
oughly of all harmful, pain-giving
waste.

Ask your nearest Chemistor
Stores for Kruschen.

=
ie



are |
: YOU }
; x
: SCARED }:
By i
RHEUMATIC 3
PAINS? x
Here's the sure and certain X
way to vonquer them, Rub
in
ind it's penetrating powers
will act quickly and effec-
tively
sbi :
» On Sale at 3
KNIGHT'S DRUGSTORES
\ eenmnmnannnnmnecenss

cs





» most

/oman Discharged S.P.C.A. Inspector’: ¢
1» Acid Throwing Lectures Continue

“I was subject to terrible
headaches. While they lasted, |
seemed to lose my alg t and all

was forced |

headaches for months. In fact,

T feel quite cured,"'— ‘
Headaches can nearly always |

be traced to a disordered stomach

FOR THE BEST IN

MATCHES |

ASK FOR :



THREE PLUMES |
MATCHES

| ON SALE
| EVERY WHERE



evr) fi Bones want

SEPTIC OINTMENT






-_ ~ Children’s accidents LS uickly te-

>, spond to the soothing and healing

Doropertis of Gern Eien which
Â¥ 4? draws out the dist aad stinnalates
ay the growth of new skin over
the damaged area, Keep.a tin
handy for family use.



Fon
SPOTS, BRUISES,

- > RASHES,

ea ABRAGIONS, Ete.












\

hi



BeSATHG .. te deen ++. the antiseptic vapour from
your handkerchief by day or from your pillow
at night or use the
VAPEX INHALER
handy for daytime
Easily recharged from
standard bottle.

On Sale at KNIGHT'S
DRUG STORES



Made in England by THOMAS KERFOOT & CO. LTD.
ACTOR Eo a

a —

FS



\)







LES

LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH



-—— Also —
GALY. OIL CANS — i, 2 & 5 Glns. Sizes

1. HERBERT Ltd.

10 & 11 ROEBUCK STREET.

Incorporated
1926

Established
1860





=
a Fala le el ll al =
a FOR BEST RESULTS -
a USE a,
n. PURINA CHOWS .,
“5 IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS a,
ey H. Jason Jones & Co,, Ltd— Distributors ®,
. a
i Neel eel onl
a
PLE PLLA PEEP LPL LLLP LES .

A Goop Job —
REQUIRES GooD

TOOLS

We can supply You with the following:

PO rer

CPCSOOPFOE SO

cHeere

*
; Ilammers
Rules (Boxwood)

» Uand Saws 18”’—36”
. Back Saws 12” & 14”
Compass Saws 12” & 14” (Claw & Engineer
Fismer Chiscls "4" to} Screw Drivers all sizes
Socket Firmer C Pee
‘to 1’ Gimlets all sizes
Bench Vices all sizes
Hand Drills

Squares
Plane Irons
Spoke Shaves

: Serew Cramps 49
‘ Braces, Hand, Chest &
: Ratchet
* Planes
Oil Stones
And many others too numerous to be mentioned.

us a Visit Before Making Your Selection
Elsewhere

Pay

LONG TROUBLE-FREE MILEAGE!

GOODFSYEAR

‘ “lore people, the world over, ride on
\ een ,

sap teae than an env othe> mats

CITY GARAGE TRADING

| CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO., LID.

12 & 13 Broad Street. |

BARBADOS HARDWARE LTD.

‘s (THE HOUSE FOR BARG AINS)

$406, and 35:



10, 11,



-

109



LOVLCLLLLLSLDUCCOLLD CI a Asia n09se%



6666664 4 6.65666669050606-6668638%
POPOL SCE S CLL S PSPS SSPE LGSS FFA A





OVENS e
: Boge Sk oh ee ee ee Be i ,_£
) |



va
Q





PAGE Six BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1951

FOR LASTING —Vigour Renewed

QUALITY & SHADES Without Operation

It you feel old before your time or suffer
trom nerze. brain and ness and te in
ret oe ‘nedt discovery Which re-

INSIST ON Ihan gland See ig a simple home













HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



ee



REGISTERED














e that must mak

i you of . energy and vitality,

f STA D and feel OM Fee ee or

VOICE! ... (T TOLD] [ANYWAY... IT’S A GOOD PLACE TO IT'S A GOOD THING I'M A GHOST | toner back ntl aenpty pecenat:
TO GO INSIDE! || LOOK FOR THE GHOST THAT'S CAUSIN MYSELF ...OR 1 MIGHT BE ALITTLE special, double-strength bottle of #8 \i-
MICKEY AND ME ALL THE TROUBLE.... | | SCARED! - Vi-Tabs and “the ‘uarantes

Restores Manhood and Vitality

OCO s
|
SRT









cor HASTEN
FOLKS!

READY MIXED

PAINTS

~ ANIL C1. PRODUCT
A. 8. BRYDEN & SONS (00s) [70.

AGENTS



{f You want to keep Food

Fresh and improve your

Cooking use ....

THE MIRACLE HYGIENIC
FOOD WRAP

BY CHIC YOUNG

pe pa
L, JUST THOUGHT

YOU MIGHT ENJOY
HOLDING IT AGAIN ie

5, mT Uy »






{ 7 WANT IT FOR
( ¢}mE NEW DRAPES
FOP THE LIVING OOM



Buy a Roll To-day From
Your Grocer

H. JASON JONES
& CO. ITD,
CITY











| A NEW | Vol. 1
el cosa A NEW SCHOOL GEOMETRY



WITH TRIGONOMETRY VOLS 1 & 2
By ANDREW G. J. CAMACHO, B,A., (LOND.) with a foreword
by Sir Alan Collymore, Chief Justice of Barbados
NOW ON SALE AT THE ADVOCATE STATIONERY







ee



————

IT PAYS YOU TO D

————eeeeeeeEeeeeEeeeeeEEoEoEooEoEoEET_eooeeee————ee—————EEESS SSS”
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only






















USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
, Tins Kraft Macaroni & Cheese 40 36 Bottles Strawberry Jam 54 40 }
Bottles Marila Olives (120z) 125 120 Pkgs. Chivers T. Jellies 23 20
Tins Vienna Sausage (40z) 38 34 Pkgs. Bird’s T. Jellies 20 18 \
‘Tins Aspargus Soup 33 28 Pkgs. Jello Puddings 23 20



a WILL you Gve THIS |
I'S BEEN My || SSI Sais COULD HAVE CANE - SSG #
: | LEFT IT ON THE
PLEASURE // { TO THE OPE a Bae Ar ONTy'S—T
za THOUGHT HE'D NEED



q Q H#O4 LOOK / YUST YEAH... ONLY 1 GOT A
FOOL fave LIKE A PRETTY FEELING THERES SOMETHING
B-BUT.. WONDROUS TABRIZ . YOU EVER SEEN p oT .

PAINTING / WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE /
. WHERE 16 THE BAIT THAT WiLL MORE EXOTIC S ITS LOADED /
MAKE THOSE TWO UNDERWATER BAIT THAN i} la git

TABRIZ 2!







CASE AGAINST MRS. / STAFFORD WAS STANDING, SHE
STAFFORD! COULON'T POSSIBLY HAVE FIREO
THE GHOT THAT KILLED “THE

Ié you haye not yet tried ‘ Ovaliing) ae

a cold drink, you have a great treat ——

in store. It is really most delicious. . .
cool, creamy, mg and sustaining.

Remember that your light hoteweather
meals are seldom sufficiently nourishing
to replace the energy you spend so freely.
A’ glass of ‘Ovaltine’ Cold makes the .
lightest meal much more nourishing

and revitalizing.

TAKE HIM IN,
Boys. AT THE VERY

LEAST HE'S A

MATERIAL

If you find yourself lying awake
WITNESS! 4

at nights; are constantly “tired” ;
easily upset and too often depressed,
it is a sure sign that your strength is
flagging and you're suffering from over-
taxed nerves. The special ingredients of
BUCKFAST TONIC WINE wiil
quickly restore lost energy; fortify you
against fever and the exhaustion of
long-term fatigue.



So do not delay the happy experience.
*Ovaltine’ Cold is made in a twink!
Just add ‘Qvyaltine’ to cold milk, or
milk and water, and mix with a whisk—
or in a shaker.

Mee nl) as
ED wa >VALTINE
Sars DIDI DO IT? jin eSaaiiine
| Dainty and delightfully crisp
, bh | (| ‘Ovaltine Scbits are idea
s a for all oceasions. They are
: of made from the finest ingre-
fi 7 OS | On ey ¥ K | eae eae
. are highly nourishing and
* digest:
(| | he «

» the Ideal | ft
Hot~weather Drink| ‘”

Sold in airtight tins by all Chemists and Store

Lee



‘HE PHANTOM ~





ae a (NATURALLY HE WAS UNDER A
GREATEST THING | EVERSAW! \inaes asap TP OREAT STRAIN. ITS VERY

THE WITCH DOCTOR FAINTED 1 | | EXHAUSTING TO CHANGE A
FROM THE gape GIRL INTO A TIGER.
MIGHTY

EFFORT. Og ee :
MN! aes

CONGRATULATIONS? WE WILLSING
YOUR PRAISES THRU THE JUNGLE.
OUR PEOPLE WISH TO HONOR YOU.















Teke home
a bottle teday !

BUCKEAST

TONIC WINE







a cemerretgisines
MADE BY
i THE MONKS OF
BUCKFAST
ABBEY








i pie Bsaibs Cag eit 2 eee

Sh





WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER

CLASSIF

10, 1951

IED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.

4



The charge for ts |
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow!l- |
edgements, and ‘n Memoriam notices is






































FOR SALE



































oF OR RENT

te ee hee

UNE” Cattlewash. Fully fur-

ee Four bedrooms, all modern con-
iz veniences including Refrigerator. October
15th —November 15th. Dial Mrs. Stuart











BARBADOS ADVOCATE

UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER |

TAKE NOTICE
CLOVER LEAF

That BRITISH COLUMBIA PACKERS
| LIMITED, @ corporation organized under
the laws of the Dominion of Canada,
| Packers,

|
|
}
|
j

whose trade or business address
is Foot of Campbell Avenue, Vancouver,
| Canada,























ON TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY, 16th and 17th of October, 1951,

we will hold a Pawnbroker’s Sale at our Rooms,
the following items left in pledge with HOLDER BROS., of Swan} To:





Nov. 1949

17 High Street, when |

v.
7th day of December 1951 at 11 o'clock in the forenoon by the Petitioner for
a Decree for the dissolution of Marriage,





PAGE SEVEN

In the Court for Divorce and Matrimonial Causes

BARBADOS
GARNET GORDON

MATELDA IPFLL i -Reeibediins
and

ae

JAMES INNISS—Co- -respondent

INNTISS, the Co-respondent
NOTICE that this Honourable Court will be moved on Friday. the

~

JAMES
AKE

and that you are required to file



























|: an Appearance in this Cause on ar before the 2%rd day of November 1951 and
An Answer within fourteen days thereafter, otherwise the Court may. proceed
30475 1 Pr. Silver Bangles E hear and determine the charges alleged in the Petition, your not
30495 2 Gold Rings ; | wera thle Sth aiy of pbptenier 1861 ,
30498 Gold Rin ; Solicitor for the wut oF be ewe 5 Street.
H op sa ran {Evidigetown, Barbados om
10.10. 51—3n
30512 Gold Ring .
30533 Gramophone ' ann.
30536 Gold Ring | CES.
30541 1 Gold Bangle :
30546 Ladies’ R.G. W. Watch SSeS RE sts a: ae
30548 2 Gold Pins (Gold Cameo) nae)
— tgs HARRISON LINE
27958 Gold Necklace
27972 Gold Signet Ring
27994 Gold Ring | OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
28012 Camera : :
28068 Gold Signet Ring Due
old Ring |
28117 Ladies C.W. Watch j Vessel Bran Sees Benet
28134 Gold Ring S. “SCHOLAR” .. ..London 25th Aug. 5th’ Oct.
28138 Gold Necklace & Pendant S, “SCULPTOR” .. Liverpool and
Gold Ring . Newport 27th Sept. 12th Oct.
28160 Gent's R.G.W. Watch S.S. “STATESMAN” . London 15th Oct. Ist Nov.
28165 Cake Stand | S.S. “STUDENT”... . Liverpool 27th Oct. 10th Nov.
S icteshibeies ail,
Dec. 1949 HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM a
30581 Camera ch
30567 Gold Rin loses in
30590 Gold Ring | Vessel For Barbados .
4 Gold Ring os. “SCHOLAR” f . Liverpool end Oct.
30665 Gold Ring . “TRIBESMAN” : Caen end Oct.
auras ee Te W. Watch — pomeenpoontit
es ng For further Informa’ , a
$0743 Ladies’ RG. W. Watch — -
30779 Gold Ring resi yae DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents
80793 2 Gold Rings ccaniblbeiciancejiihueieatninilihtepe taint itis isang ii 8
30823 Gold Neck!
ngs Gold Neckiet & Cros | Canadian N I hi
s0871 Gold ing ational Steams ps.
Jan. 1950 SOUTHBOUND
a peed = CAM, CONSTRUCTOR | - Sept ib Get ie a oct wae
NELSON 4 t. 15 Oct. 24 ~
28229 Gold Necklace & Pendant |°A%: CRUISER 1 Oc. 58 Ont So Ewer. Nov”
28243 Gold Ring
28246 1 Pr. Gold Earrings NORTHBOUND
28248 Gold Ring Syrveten Rertetes “Mets teliee tances
aoe aa LADY RODNEY 16 Oct 17 Oct 27 Oct. 28 Oct. t neve
0!
28363 Gold Signet Ring The M.V. “CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR?” is expected to arrive
28367 1 Gold Bangle aoe ad ot October, atcepting cargo for St. John, Halifax,
28407 Gold Ri ue! ani ‘on! ‘
28451 Gold Ring a
5087s Gola Rin | GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents. ~~ —
one Gold Ring |
0910 Gold Ring
30960 Gold Ring ROYAL NETHERLANDS \\
30981 Gent's C. W. Watch | STEAMSHIP CO.
31010 Gold Ring SAILING FROM KUROPE FRENCH LINE
sigs ad Bing LHR, ASR Set:
e Tr,
nee ie Roe Bangles SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND Cie., Gle., Tri tlantique
31117 re Ring ms ORANIROTAD IMA October, 1951 383
31120 Pr. S. Bangles; Gold | M.8. WILE2MSTAD—6th November 1951
Sroka SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND Sailings to England &
31151 Gold Ring A. 8. PORREERIEI ia ents abs France.
$1152 Gold Bracelet .i 8. AGAMEMNON—Tth November, 1951 5
81202 2 Gold Rings CAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO ‘COLOMBIE” 14th t=
31214 Gent’s C.W. Watch re & BRITISH yore 196i ber, 1951 via Marti
$1229. Gold Rin SATLING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO [jf #4 Gaudeloupe,
31232 Gent's R.G.W. Watch 8 HYDKA—Sth November, 1951. “GASC a
31246 White Gold Stone Ring P. MUSSON, SON & CO,, LTD... OGNE” 3rd Novénte.
31255 Ladies’ C.W. Watch Agents. ber 1951 via St. Lucia,
21256 Gold Ring BECO EOSEECLOSTSS, nee Guadeloupe
31278 Gold Ring a, ae ait
Feb. 1950 Dominica, “Antigua, ‘Momtaerrat, om
eal cde Nevis and “St. Kitts, Salling SOUTHBOUND, s=- Hy"
ic ng = CoD “GASCOGNE” 25th October
The M.V. ’
aio soa ine accept Cargo, and "Passengers for Arh calling + shee mae
28544 Gold Necklet & Pendant Licdgers' onle Sor, ai.” Visoont. nided and British “wy
28567 Gold Ring galling Fiiday 18 inet French Guiana,

$199 on week-dayy and $1-80 on Sundays os cee tena ag ae ie eee 3,40 BheoGn | Pe trdae winks ie maine Sgt es Street, and are overdue will be sold,
mumber = eRaIRGe cere
2 tease per wat ae ance = words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a} ae On St. James" sea coast, ! respect of fresh fish. frosen ~ 2... ee ee
word ¥ wes from t Full: e an
4 cents per ward on Sundays for each on Sundays. Light and water. Dial Oreo, ore" | pastes of all varieties, and will be entitled Jan. 1949
9-29.51-—Gn jy ong Rae re Guten 1951, ‘aie }23698 Ty pewriter
F Births, ’ y
eletuniaeis rs Se —_ ___ AUTOMOTIVE MALTA, Cattlewash. From Nov. ist a Po rote _ the — +h
. —————a= to 15th Dec. and J. Apaty notice in duplicate to me at my office
Sharae is 63.00, for ny number of wards | “CARMorng_Minor converte Tose [1° ‘Weathehesd” “anstri, “PB pits | Uppontioa” ef sock sopitation. “te | May 1849
additional word. Terms cash. Phon- 2508 running order Newly Serevent First ana 6.10.51—4n | 3" m wake ang ee eer Gold Rin:
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death offer (subjct to approval on pur-| “pomNT lew". “pated this 26th day of t September Lg 288: Gold N et
Notices only after 4 p.m. cheser’s inspection and trias) will secure. | Cacrabank), ¥ Newi: en (opposit. 289 Gen ac
Car now in St, Lucia but wall be avail- bungalow—Unturnished hy bedroom Registrar ot Trade Marks. 3old Ring
able Barbados about Uctober 9th. Cash | stuart Bynoe “ $310. Mrs. 9 10. 51—3n | 28949 Gold Ring
offers oniy. HKepty Box No. B.B. U/o 3.10.51—3n | 28963 Gold Ring
DIED Advocate Co. 7.10, 51—4n CAMP—On the Sea, St. La -
CAR—One #1) 1946 Plymouth Car ain | *WHY furmushed. Dial 6357, TAKE NOTICE June 1949
ARCHER: On October 9th 1951 at his| Perfect condition, eee new. Appiy: 4.7. 51.—t fn. é
residence 4th Avenue Bay Land, Cosmopautan Garage, agazine Lane WEYMOUTH, s. - , 29079 1 Gold Ban le
Beckles Beas, Wilfred Archer better | Phone Svs. ¥.10.51—3n. | Se. James Coast abi e GRANDEE 291 Gold Ring .
. 1 q *
pigs Br Tee catee. ak sudorsl OARS: Gus 1NY Chavrolet Suis Master at Jor Bog pk Write to Mrs 2 That at BRITISH COLUMBIA PACKERS | 29132 Gold Ring
ym. today for the St’ Michael's] ®Md one 1948 Ford Prefect. Both are iy tee Tae {IMITED, @ corporation organized under | 29133 Ladies’ R. G. W. Watch
Cathedral and thence to the West-| im, sound condition right through. Dial See eckere: Wines rege nn of Canede. 196185 Gold. Iden, Bracelet
bet w a. da 4 7 aim ~ xf
bury, Gematent. aT ea abi rs O-, Oe diet 51 PUBLIC s tts Zoot “ Campbell Avenue, Vancouver, oa aoe ar Gee
4 rma’ < —an A a ES ; Canada, has appli or the registration ent’s C. ; atch
10.10.51 pe ens Rs CAR—One (1) Ford Prefect + of a trade mark in Part “A” of gut 29247 Gent's C. W. Watch
further particulars Phone 4231. H. Ten cents per agate line in respect of fresh fish, frozen fish, salt
Coke hare meta bhaote and 12 cents per noote ie ae fish, enoked fish, canned fish and fish July, 1949
0 + | pastes of all varieties, and will be entitled ,
ee 10.10, 51—t.f.n. a te aes $1.50 on week-days|to register the same after one month
THANKS MOTORCYCLE—One 1) BSA.) BSA. Shonee- one from the 9th day of October 1951, unless | 96185 Gold Stone Ring
pices excle 244 hp. O.H.V. in good cond- REAL ESTATE notice in duplicate to 'me at my. omee | 26233 Gold Ring
tion. pply: H. O. Edwards C/o M/S « 7
ALLAMBY—The undersigned beg through | Oot ade natin Ge io” Lika, " of copogttion of such registration, The | 26339 Gold Ring
this medium to return grateful thanks 9.10.51—2n The undersigned will set Up fac sale trade mark can be seen on application 26376 Two G Rings; One Iden.
te all those who attended the funeral, at his office 12 James Street, Bridgetown, hate rage 3 f Septe Ss Bracelet :
gent wreaths, cards or in other ways * at 2 p.m. on Friday the 12th day of . Cay. of Baptemiber 1961, ; .
Seo terran, Corte ce te ne ete ELECTRICAL October 1951, ALL THAT dwellinghouse iegisttar ot HO eee =Cle Ring
occasion of our recent sad bereave- | ————————————_-_——— | called * "GLENWOOD" situate at Ventor, caer a eas ised 26421 Gold Ring
aaa. CLIMAX" ELECTRIC WASHING | Rockley. Christ Church comprising open 26481 Ladies C.W. Watch & Strap
Fronk, Violet, Ivy and Jenny Inniss. | MACHINES.—A smali shipment of these ' verandah, dra’ , dining bed- oo 265 Gent’ &
Airlie, just received from Canada and at our rooms, Kitchen, W.C. and ent’s R.G.W. Watch
Cave Hill, price of $247.12 represents outstanding | 6@rege and servant's room, ere an TAKE NOTICF Strap
St. Michael. 10.10.51—1n. | Value. Dial—3878 or 4710. DA COSTA &| water services. All standing on 377/10 29 1
Co., Ltd. Electrical ea et piace perches in. y of u ta’ * -
c tim: ct: ee 29385 Gold
PERSON AL BATTERIES—Torehlight Batteries at} For inspection apply to the Tenant on 29403 Gold Ring
14 cents each. Also small Batteries and | Premises. 29404 Gold Ring
Penlights at llc each. G. W. Hutchinson For all further Sreenantre and con-
—_———_—_——— | & Co. Ltd. 10.10.51—3n. | ditions of sale, apply t 29413 Gold Ring
Pi Rubiie are nereby, warned against D ioe SARJEANT 29428 Gold Ring
ving credit to my wife, OLIVE
(nee Ward), as I do not hold myself FURNITURE 39.0 Shan io488 Gola Ch Pendant
responsible for her or anyone else con- a A rs ain and Pendan
tracting any debt or debts in my name| STEEL FURNITURE.—Complete range} Offers in writing are invited Tor the 29492 Necklace & Pendant
unless by a written order signed by me. | Of steel furniture including Senior and] purchase and removal of dwell 29498 Gold Ring
Go . Junior Executive Desks, ‘Typists Desks, | house known as “Wakefield” aback ot 29529 1 Gold Baby Bangle
Dunscombe, St. Thomas. iP » Filing Cabinets,/the Y.M.C.A. Headquarters, Pinfold g
9.10.51—2n. fn aiacaay Cae ee Chairs, aa aes Street
ee | ON display at HUNTE & Co. Lid.) Offers will be accepted Aug, 1949
The public are hereby warned against |New Showroom, Dial—5136. or 5027. including 15th inst. The purchaser wil
giving credit to my wife, CLARISSA 3.10.51—6n. | be required to take down and remove }
WEEKES (nee Haynes) as I do not hold the Dwelling House from the premises 26535 Gold Bangle
myself responsible a: her oe spvone NIC by noon 10th November 1951. Inspection 26540 Gold Ring
else contracting any debt or nm my AL cia’ ay 654 i
name unless by a written order signed MECHA Signed BOARD OF eon EL S { E pee fie ming pane
by me. SINGER SEWING MACHINE almost
FITZ WEEKES, net al” SMaboeany “Surateare Puone Per HERBERT WILLIAMS, 26611 Gold Bangle
Spooners Hill, Butler's Gap, her General Secretary That THE BORDEN COMPANY, a cor-| 26623 Ladies C.W. Watch & Stra
10, 10.51—2n. 's . p
St. Michael. 9.10,.51—6n, | poration organized and existing under the 26644 Gold Rin
6.10.81—an “SROSEEET TO nine ce pad of — a fs New Jersey, United 26651 Gold Ring
aes A ENS—A tates © merica, whose trade or 7
The public are hereby yrarned agatast MISCELLANEOUS a a A Sool gat comfortable cae atacess e La Riaact Avenue. | 26685 Gold Stone Ring
giving er my wife, LILIAN medium-s: ouse at avy Garden ew York, New York, United States of
WOOD (nee Sylvester) as I do not hold) ANTIQUES — Of every description] built of stone with verandah, drawing | America, has applied for the registra- | 28097 Machine
myself responsible for her or anyone|Givss, China, old Jewels, fine Silver] #%d dining rooms, 2 very spacious bed-|tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of | 26702 Gold Ring
else contracting any debt or debts in/ Watercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto-|T@oms, toilet and bath, kitchenette, | Register in respect of substances used | 26729 Gold Ring
my name unless by a written order) graphs etc, at Gorrings Antique Shop| #4rage and servants’ room, and about| #8 foods and as ingredients in foods: |9@751 Ladi R.G.W. Watch
signed by me. adqoining Royal Yacht Club. 11,000 sq. ft. of land with bearing fruit | infants’ and tnvalids’ foods, and will be es eave ate
WHAtAM H. YEARWOOD, | 3,10.51—t.f.n nes. A home with everything. Why not entitled 2 segister the same after one ee Ges Ring
ar’ oad, us! ali, 00! a a rey A. Scott, \ mon rom er jay oO ctober
S. Michael. COCOANUT PLANTS—Selected cocoa-| Magazine Lane. 10 io. 6).28n 1851 unless some péreon ’ shall in the 26872 mar ae la Earri
10,.10.51—2n. | nut plants. Apply: Niagara Factory, meantime give notice in duplicate to me ie ‘ 0) rings
Spry Street. Dial 4322 REAL ESTATE AGENT at my office of opposition of such regis- | 26896 Ladies R.G.W. Watch
9.10.51—3n.] L, BERESFORD BRATHWAITE tration, The trade mark can be seen on} 26910 Gold Ring
ANNOUNCEMENTSE “GALVANISED NAILS Email Guan. |.BLACK ROCK—One (1) Bungalow Reece Oa doth dar ot September, 1961,/20800 Gold ing
tity of Galvanised Nalia 1 inch to 4 Inch | Consisting of three (3) bedrooms, drawing “H. WILLIAMS, — | 26935 Gold Ring
Hy . ene ee eee cant neal room, dining room, and all modern con- Registrar of Trade Marks 26946 Gold Bangle
To meet numerous requests of our & € “itd, or 4 d Roeb . Bt mats, veniences, standing on 1 rood ad 23 9.10. 51—3n *, ng!
customers, we have opened a section se ia yes O10 10.81 gn, | Perches of land with possibilities for 26953 Gent's C.W. Watch
for custom made shirts, pyjamas, pants, two (2) other Bungalows cttininihineeanestinsnitcaines 29541 Gent’s C.W. Watch
shorts, ladies slacks, boys clothing ete. OOD CUT.OPEN MBELLO-KREEN_|..NAVY GARDENS—One (1) Bungalow 29550 Camera
Having at our disposal the facilities of a SAib.) tins 3/- per dos, Also old card-1o sisting of two (2) bedrooms, drawing 29574 Gold Rin
modern factory we are able to offer! poor boxes 1/6 per doz. Call at Ro¥erts room, dining room, servant rooms, c is
prompt services at exceptionally reason-| jiunufacturing Co, Bay Street garage, and all modern conveniences, 29582 Camera
able prices, ng iy 10. 10.51—8n Standing on 13,000 sq. ft. land, Land 2963) Lady’s R. G. W. Watch
Reliance Shirt Factory, Shirt Depot.} Jo J containing. plenty fruit trees. 29651 Gold Ring
Palmetto Street, Phone 4764. TORNADO — international K.4l. oo o = of Land can accommodate 29672 2 Gold E
10.10.51—19n.. | Recutiful condition, excellent equipment, COUBANMENT HILL—One (1) New 9 29682 Gold Rin
— | good racing record. Cost $700.00 new Bungalow with three (3) bedrooms. 7 B
= No offers. Leacock. Telephone | drawing room, dining room, and ali 29696 Gold Ring
TAKE NOTICE 10,10.51—t.f.n. | modern conveniences Hl Co Ltd 29703 Gold Ring
BORDEN’S IN Iv¥—One (2) Spot of Land consisting 9 ° 29765 Gold Ring
of 7, sq. ft.
That THE BORDEN CoMPANY, a cor-| PUBRLIC NOTICES UPPER DAYRELLS ROAD—One (1) Inform their Customers and Sept. 1949
poration organized and existing under the » | Bungalow with three (3) bedrooms, Friends that th h i 7
laws of the State of New Jersey, United] Ten cents per agate tine on week-days| ing room and drawing room and ail riends a ey have in-
States of America, whose trade or] and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,| Moder conveniences standing on 1/8 of ||] stalled a Private Telephone |}| 26975 Ladies R,G.W, Watch
business address is 850 Madison Avenue, minim: char $1.00 k-days | A" acre of land. Another Bungalow Exchan thei ffices in
num ge on wee Peri scad cay’ mos A init’ seinhern xchange at their offices 27019 Gold Ring
New York, New York, United States of] and $1.80 on Sundays. w ° rooms and all moder Rickett Street as fro 10th
America, has applied for the registra- conveniences. cc m. 27028 2 Gold Rings
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of RITTONS HILL—One (1) Bungalow October. 27051 Ladies R.G.W. Watch
Register in respect of substances used NOTICE with three (3) bedrooms, dining room, 27052 Gold Ring
as foods and as ingredients in foods:]1s HRREBY GIVEN that it is the in- drawing room, standing on 3,000 sq. ft. Please Dial No. 3584 or
infants’ and invalids’ foods, and will be} tention of the Comznissioners of High-| °f land. 3585 for:— 27070 Gold Necklet & Pendant
entitled to register the same after one] wars for the parish of SAINT JAMES|_,JAMES| STREET—One (1) Business 27085 Gold Ring
isl foe tanta pereen steal October} in this Island to cause to be introduced ee ah eo eae ae good DIRECTORS 27108 Gold Ring
un h 1; ad
meantime give notice in duplicate to me nto duthovata’ team 65 teedanee the REAL ESTATE AGENT AND SALES DEPARTMENT 27119 Gold Ring
at my office of opposition of such regis-] saiary payable to the Inspector of High- , AUCTIONERS, ACCOUNTS 27146 Gold Ring
es Se ege aee can be seen On) ways for the said parish to a sum not] oycne Aare No. 6 sweat Pl INSURANCE 27168 Gold Stone Ring
applica ¥ exceeding £500 per annum, and the ; se ae
Dated this 26th day of September, 1951 | travelling allowance payable to the said Mhaietacs >} we ‘ GENERAL OFFICE. 27212 Gold Ring
H, WILLIAMS, inspector of Highways to a sum not oe at RaSniay | ertnes, cero 27238 Gent.s Signet Ring
Registrar of Trade Marks. exceeding £100 per annum, such in- £3,500 to £8,000. Also houses at aE ore 27253 Gold Ring
9.10.51—3n'| creases to take*UHect as from the 1st goer we gr or Ee Pat The Provisions Store a 27346 Gold Ring
~_ Oy et naa of October 1951. For particulars about building, selling Marhill Street remains the 29780 Camera
y or buying Phone B. A. Brooks at 8335. same 4672. 29790 Lady’s R. G. W. Watch
PEAT COD ROYCE, Pi leave Phone Number or Address ye Se : atc
TAKE NOTICE | soctora’tor'the:Comntasonors ot | Fieneeietve. Phone My 20707 Gold Necklet & Pendant
Highways, Saint James. e age 3 ; inane 29814 Gold Rin
9.10. 51—3n. 9.10.51—Tn. Please adjust your Direc 2 ts) gz
DRYCO aetna iligpidonneiadp-amcetenes are tory accordingly. ares toe nee
That THE BORDEN COMPANY. « cor! DUBTIC OFFICIAL SALE eg cana | 59849 Camera
poration organized and existing ae ed By ORDER OF THE INSURANCE CY oo —————hRm_——SESSEeeee ~ ’,
jaws of the State of New Jersey } will sell at CHELSEA GARAGE, | 29860 Gent's R.G.W. Watch
States of America, whose trade “or (The Provost Marshal's Act 104 PINFOLD STREET ON FRIDAY 12th} Advertise for Results aoe? Gold Necklace
business address Is 350 Madison Avenue, a )» 8 30) at 2 p.m. one (1) Standard at 12 h.p. 2 Gold Ring
New York, New York, United States of On Friday, the 12th day of October,| cogan Car. Damayed. Terms Cash. on Gold Ri
America, has applied for the registra-|1951 at the hour of 2 o'clock in the R. ARCHER McKENZIE, eee terry ie ng
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of | afternoon will be sold at my office to the fr ‘Auctioneer. 29952 Gold Ring
Register in respect of eee ene nisnae ae fs) ny gum mot “Under |... ceieserssdenennineiunennetineimeniiaasionn Fiectors of nm “City”
foods and as ingredients in foods, |the appra’ value.
infants’ and invalids’ foods, and will be All that certain piece of Land contain- UNDER THE SILVER Oct. 1949 ig
entitled to register pe Beare aoe ing by manesh Pe aueeces 8s Rerchey | { B e d to
th from the 9th day of! ictober | situate in Parish o: hrist ure! ut- ' 6 in:
i881 unless some person shall in the| ting and bounding on lands of Yorkshire ee eee ie by peeks rae 0 ridgetown 27397 oes poet W. Chain; G,
nieantime give notice in duplicate to me | Plantation, on lands of Prince A, Scott,| ¥- ‘- ton otis Britton: Cr aad 2 . Wate
at my office of opposition of such regis-|on lands of Kate Rose and on the Public; ®t “Denfor hy a nud — ‘ | 27485 2 Gold Earrings
tration. ‘The trade-¢ark can be een On | Roads appraised “St folly ot Gaod Extension Dining “Table, Upright| MEET YOUR CANDIDATE = | 57503 1 Pr. Gold Earrings
offi whole area of land appral ‘0 . .
are ed this Win aay of September, 1951.| SIX HUNDRED DOLLARS ($600.00), At-|{9d Arm Chairs, ornament Tables; 27533 Gold Nugget Brooch
H. WILLIAMS, tached from Matilda King for and to-| Couch, Pedestal Sideboard in Mahogany: |) the Coming General Elections.| 27542 Gold Bracelet
{ Trade Marks. wards satisfaction, &c. Uphols. Spring Rockers, China Cabinet, £4
een 9.10,51—3n | N.B.—-25% Deposit to be paid on day|Long Wali Mirror, Glass and China, [27860 R.G.W. Watch
of parchase. Dinner and Tea Services; Platd. Ware, | 27563 Gold Ring
BSS T. 5 HEADLEY. | | Broome. Table snd Chairs, Clocks) 27572 Gent's R.G.W. Watch
Provost Marshal. Breakfast Table and Chairs, Clock, 27578 Gold SI Ri
Provost Marshal's Office, Double Irom Bedstead, Three Quarter ate 0. tone ng
27th September, 1951. Mahog. Bedstead with Vono Spring, 27616 Gold Necklet
ADVE TIS. ee —— _| Peinted Presses, MT. and wooden 27618 Gold Ring
Waabstants,. Cheniber) “Warv, Saecers | 27619 2 Gold Rings
, f Tables, Springs, ye 0; lectric 4
IN THE WANTED Stove, Kitchen Table, Oii Stove ' i 27636 Clock
Freezer, Lawn Mower, Fowl Runs, Goat r 27659 Gold Ring
Pens, Plants, Orchids, Ferns and 27672 Gold Coin B h
f ADVOCA TE HELP Anthuriums, very good Deck Chairs and i) ‘oin rooc'
ne __| Chest of Drawers in Mahogany, Norge 29970 Gold Ring
GENERAL SHRVANT — Immediately. Refrigerator in Working onder. | 29982 Gold Ring
SS | Alp Beard Ye crton”, “Top Rock 1S TROTMAN & CO. | 30005 Gold Ring
Between 4.30 and 5.30 4m BRA 30021 Gold Ring
1y.10/£1—2n Auctioneers yore gh 30026 Gold Ring
a 30034 Gold Necklet
' TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH 3} MISCELLANoUS Oe RP eas ie 80078 Gold Watch Chain; Gold
ld Street ‘ ‘ 4
ete nea Dee eren yt unaailaned monet ‘Age ebountiy TGverhaulen) in good 30078 Ring ate hain; 0
L yan y. ie couple oC ren
WINSTON CHURCHIL Be ar), SOW rey: Weta. Box cocking ‘condition. 1637 V-8 Ford Car 79084 Gold Bracelet
THE SECOND WORLD H, H. C/o¥Advoeate Co: = Ne dae in good working argeeetels make aReee gas — ‘
rend R. ARCHER ver bangles
WAR — Volume IV Auctioneer. 30092 Gem Ring .
THE HINGE OF FATE TAKE NOTICE FR 51—Sn | 30093 Silver Vanity Case
At Johnson's Stationery PE ee ieee at 30094 Gem Ring
———$—$—$—— JEPP Fina paar A na renys ners oe nae 30095 Ladies’ R.G.W. Watch
y wo
CARPENTER RULES That RECKITT & COLMAN LIMITED, | jgsi. at 2 em we 30118 Gramophone
‘At a British Limited Liability Company. | 70 Barbados Fire Insurance Co. Ltd |“ 30176 Gold Necklet & Pendant
Manufacturers, of Kingston Works, Dan- | snares 30179 Gold Ring with Stone
At Johnson’s Hardware om Lane, Hull, England, has applied G W. CLARKE & CO. \ ALBERT A. MAYNARD
c for the registration of a trade mark in James ees | |
Part “A" of Register in respect of 10.10. 51- FEARLESS, ENERGETIC | Nov. 1949
pharmaceutical and medicinal prepara- | p=: — —~- DYNAMI
one, and will be entitled to register 0 nq c 27692 Gold Ring
the same after one month from the $th
Cay of October 1951 unless some person DENTAL NOTICE 1 The toiling masses of this City 27699 Gold Necklet & Pendant
shall in the-meantime give notice in|], My office will be closed from |1| need FORCEFUL representation. |27749 Gent's C. Stop Watch
ance y Guplicate tame at my office of opposition |}/ MONDAY 15th inst. and re-opens ||) decl t|27760 Gold Ring
of such registration, The trade mark can on MONDAY 29th. We must re ahi Tei agains 27790 3 Gold Rings
licati t fice. I! si ictimization.
nli ht Pfonted this Bath day of September. 1981. ||| E, F, i ed | Oppression and Victi 27798 Gold Ring
Moo H. WILLIAMS, | entist i “« 27800 Gold Rin,
; g Registrar of Trade ante | | ONE GOD, ONE AIM 127830 Gold Ring
9.10,51—3n of ie rm C
and the POLICE BAND . ONE DESTINY. (io cana
er 27847 Ring
i. ‘JOHN M. BLADON & CO. |....... 5. ws feet esata
| ae |27874 1 Gold Bangle
Crane Hotel ey pore me light Stalveer's | dress Camera ,
y Voting eC. -—-
APS, F.V.A. || [See Beneneer
SATURDAY, 13TH re |, MAYNARD | YX” |30226 Gola Ring
| } oO ing
OCTOBER, 8.30 P.M. OR | Albert Augustus | 130257 Gold Ring & Watch
130270 Gold Ring
. in aid of REAL EST A 4 E || Albert Gomes, Port-of-Spain, poags Gola Ring
. MEMORIAL Trinidad | 30 ing
§ THE VINTER 0 AND 30305 Gold Ring
FUND . | Albert Marryshow, St. George’s, |a0222 Silver Set Leather Case
AUCTION SALES | Grenats|20800 Gold Ring
& 4 | | 30382 Gents’ Gold Pocket Watch
| i ildi a Maynard, Bridgetown, 20452 Gent's C. -
- ADMISSION — 3/- Sif} Phone 4640 — Plantations’ Building NT eee ne, eT Adda HEE cote Gould Peeleat’ Witeh
RENEE GE 50008 | Re hai 10. 10, 51—In 130467 Gold Ring





:
’

Gold Necklet & Cross



The M.V. MONEKA will accept

Cargo and Passengers for Domin- as





















+
*
>






%
.
>
28620 Lady's R. G. W. Watch 3 and St. Kitts. Sailing date to be
28621 Gold Nugget Brooch Antigua, M . N
28656 Gold Ring (ome er R. M. JONES & Co., Ltd.
28739 2 Gold Rings iy B.W.t. SCHOONER iownmns
28762 Camera m Aan. Co AGENTS
28773 Gold Ring ‘ TEL. NO, 4047 Phone 3814
28829 Gold Necklet & Pendant | r
31393 Gold Necklace
21400 Gold Ring
31407 Gold Ring —-s SSS
31435 Gold Stone Ring To ensure that your car is given the best lubrication—USE . . «
March 1950 GERM LUBRICATING OILS
31444 Gola Ring Obtainable from - - - -
31455 Go n.
31461 Gold Ring Nt CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Trafalgar St.
31553 Gold Tie Clip
31580 2 Gold Rings REMEMBER
31624 Gold ae DON'T ONLY OIL IT — GERM IT
31643 1 Gold Bangle iN
31653 Gold Ring =
31662 Ladies’ R.G.W. Watch |
41693 Gold Ring NOTICE | “ORIENTAL i om
31705 Gold Ring sou iRs |=
81711 Cutlery VEN :
We shall be glad if any Cus- if! Curios, Jewels om
April 1950 tomers whose burners have , Coane Ivory, Silks m
|| not yet been changed will { Ete., Ete. Ete. :
ates gaa nae. Ring notify the Company today. Z
0 f ohn
31779 Gold tang Gold a Telephone No. . 4308 ¥ ss
81791 Gold Signet Ring ; ; ve ts pues 2608 [ee
31814 Gent's R.G.W. Watch The Barbados Gas Co. Ltd. Pr. Wm. Ury /
81822 Gold Necklace & atc | seeeeeeeceeeeenets ee eS a+
$1828 1 Gold naate wes | r
$1907 Gent's Gold Pocket Wate. 33034 Gold Ring y
ld Ri
81914 Gold Iden, Ring sae eae tices Wks 33054 Gent's C. Pocket Watch
$1919 Gold Ring | 32880 Gold Ring 33057 Gent's C.W. Wate
May 1950 32696 8 Silver Bangles 33061 2 Gold Rings ne ~
ries Gena i a3104 Geld Ring
‘e; Gold| 32905 Gold Ring i 3
31956 oltn, Chain é Pendant | 32016 Clock 23113 Gold Ring
31975 Gold Ring {32922 Gold Brooch 33117 Gold Stone Ring
32011 Camera 32929 Gold Necklace & Crucifix] 33121 Gold Ring
32017 Gold Iden. Ring 32945 2 Gold Rings; 2 Gold Links 33146 Gent's R. G. W. Wateh
32084 Gold Signet Ring | 32951 Lady’s R.G.W. Watch 33170 Gent's c.W. Watch
32087 , Gent’s C. Pocket Watch 32952 2 Gold Bangles 35191 Gent's C.W. Watch
32114 Gent's R. G. W. Watch | *ug. 1950 33214 Gold Ring : ¥
32147 Gold Ring \ sears qa Necklace & Pendant} 23224 1 Gold Bungle; 3G. Rings
32198 Gold Ring 2 prs. G. Earrings; 2 Gok!
32237 Gold Rin | aaee Gold Ni & Pendant Brooches; Gold Necklet & :
32240 2 Gold Rings 33009 2 Gold Baby Bangles Pendant er
June 1950 1 Sree ore a RTE AL RETR SYR EC IIR ORR “Ter ae
SPECIAL CONTRACT
32320 ote ane
32333 Gol ng |
32371 Ladies’ R.G, W. Watch | ne one S
32376 Gold Ring ;
$2473 Gold Ring MAMA PR eee ieee: ME $868 AU sb seus cs July 7, 1949 :
satee Gold Pignet Ring LEE Soa ievheasedannsi M 7663 Oct. 20, 1949 ;
ites Geld Ris | MGBT ie cdee ee ee ees M 7724 Penis Nov. 1, 1949. ;
PEM. one aioe sais aht OYE, bce ss ad Skids . 3, ae
32566 Gold Watch, Chain ant/ Siggy 7000000000007" M 8223 IIT! Dee. 5, 1949
dine Stren a. GW. Watch ROAD. Me ies sce M 8092 060 oe ee cents Jan. 9, 19505
32585 Ladies’ R. G. W. Watch op 3 ah ed a a oo ae eae
32587 Gold Ring 28686 Me Ua Atele vga e > Me MEME enh ean e Minlpse Gowan 2 7 % aa
32594 2 Gold Earrings, G, Neck-' : . 15,1949
lace & Pendent .M : Oct. 29, 1949. *
July 1950 Mi oN f and
M ov. 7, rhea
M 1, 1949. =
32659 Gold Neckiace & Pendant) 91345 |)... cee M ’ Feb. 13, 1950. Pa
82662 1 Gold Bangle tee oC ahs eae G Jan. 12, 1951. —-
32663 Gold Gem Ring BAMOD: ocd hes ood vers M 9655 : Jan. 18, 1951, :
$2664. Vulcanizer | SUMMR Sp ce:s cxosdns abe K USBS sass akdecd acd March 27, 1981
a ear BASED. pce dae sods ME $486 eee rele San. 80 1950.
70) ing | REO = coc Wdidly. cb o's Aube ROS M 8912 beep’ ug. 17,
32738 2 Gold Rings | /MOUORES (Stig cess eek | M 1346 * Sept. 11, 1950.
32748 Gold Necklace; 2 Gold aS?” eae ng a si Wt ER, oA ea A Clery Jan, 27, 1951.
Earrings SO10G oN atine icaccev esos MONG! . Vibe Se .. Jan, 29, 1951;
32750 Gold Ring SO ek Fae oH) bbs M. 6569 . Feb, 3, 1951...
32757 Camera | 40629 S ml " March 19, 1951
22788 Radio Me 40696 ... 4 9000 ks taal ew Ce arch » 1952-
32805 2 Gold Rings; 2 Goid Ear- | 33830.... “RAAIWG «a 5 coe A ee » Oct. 7, 1950,
rings |
32817 Gold Necklace& Pendant, Any article ps be redeemed before the day of a ae
G. Ring; G. Bracelet SALE: 12 o'clock erms ash
g2822 Gold Ring oe BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
32826 Gold Ring Auctioneers



tation



PAGE EIGHT

C. Smith Batted Well In Second

is mcf

How The Barbados— ferbiceDraw Police Defeat
Bonitas

B.G. Game Was Drawn

By O. S. COPPIN
: WED. Oct. 3

BARBADOS today scored 343 in reply to B.Gs first innings
total of 368 in a day of exciting cricket in which the for-
tunes of the game fluctuated with intriguing regularity.

I predicted yesterday that Bar- 7 SE es
bados would have been able to
reach the B,G. total when they
finished the day with 93 runs for
the loss of two wickets, since the
eight remaining batsmen includ-
ed at least five seasoned players.

B.G. offered handsome assist-
ance to them when five chances
went abegging in the day’s play
but ironically enough a magnifi-
cent running catch at the long off
boundary by Gibbs, one of the
offending players who had put

This is the detailed 3.9200
of the fourth and last day of
play in the second Barbados-
B.G. game which was left
drawn when rain washed out
the final , fifth day. Barbados
scored 343 in reply to B.G@'s
368,

The Barbados team is ex-
pected home this evening.

down one of the five catches some other indiscretion if he
dropped, endeq the Barbados took it for an inswinger, for six
innings. runs high to the Jong on bound-

The most heartening aspect of
the Barbados innings today was
the fine effort by Smith who
scored 80, marred only by one
real chance at 75.

Freedom
Smith batted with such com-
plete freedom, fluency and sang-

ary, the second of the match, the
first having been struck by Far-
mer in the First Test.

The end to a bright innings,
which I agreed with him on
this occasion was just the thing,
came when he broke his own
wicket in getting back and late
cutting one from Norman Wight.

Wood

froid that quite a few British
Guiana supporters twere willing (

re : 7 Gerald Wood, fighting off an
acioaltey. _ cee Pe BS on attack of tonsilitis that has since
“Gaskinitis”, played Gaskin on Put him to bed while the rest of
his merit “and punished him ‘he teem hes.gone to Berbice, did
whenever the DP not play his usually forceful

doing. 80 wether tee fie He seemed unable to

i ; ‘ i ball as hard as is his wont
With his considerable reach heg®it the
was able to play forward com- in Saturday afternoon ames,

fortably and on the offensive to 294 he went at 11 after still try-

balls that would have forcea iS, hard. i
7 " . Greenidge, determined to
carers. ier: | Seana Fear, | 38 break his string of “ducks” from

play right back defensively or
play a cramped half cock stroke
which is still a defensive stroke.

The first real setback to Bar-
bados came with the dismissal of
Proverbs with but nine runs
added to Barbados’ overnight
score of 93—2. This was perhaps
the most pardonable run out suf-
fered by the Barbados team for

the first Test got off the mark
with a do or die single but after
that was a model of cheeky,
hustling, determined batting. He
got into double figures with a
series. of railroaded singles but
after that he batted quite well,
executing two good drives that
earned him the plaudits of the

the series. crowd,
i y _ Holder, last man in at 833 was
an ae Se aad eee we entirely ' uninfluanced by the

tenseness of the situation or at
least his batting gave one to be-
lieve this, .
Free Cricket

He was right down the wicket
driving fast medium bowlers
Gaskin and “Bruiser” Thomas
correctly and without a_ care.
Free cricket and forceful too. He
added nine of the badly needed
35 runs before he was magnifi-
cently caught overhead in the
gathering darkness in a fine fun-
ning effort by Glendon Gibbs to
a stroke that deserved a pound-
ary—a solid punch off a_half
volley from a medium fast bow-

inimitable Persaud at cover
effected a Lghtning one handed
pickup and return to the bowler
and Proverbs was run out by
yards trying to regain his wicket
as both batsmen tried to get back
home after Persaud’s brilliant
piece of fielding.

; Farmer

Then came another valuable
Farmer innings that was halted
at 56 because of cramp that ne-
cessitated. his retiring ‘io the
pavilion until later in the batting
order, finally ending with a tame
catch to cover off omas. This
was another good combination of ler. :
aggressive and restrained bat-, Thus ended Barbados’ first
ting. ‘innings for 343 just 25 runs be-

It was unfortunate for Farmer hind B.Gis total and Greenidge
that he was so handicapped that had carried owt his bat for a use-
he had to use a runner after re- ful 25 runs.
suming his innings otherwise it it was touch and go and Gas-

seem as if he would reach kin himself told me that he had

the coveted three figure mark, almost given up the hope of pre-
He did not use his feet to the venting Barbados from gaining
stroke which got him oufy and first innings honours when they
had he been able to do so it had scored 216 with half! the
would have been a regulation team still available for batting.

cover drive. A Tribute
Norman Marshall was the key 1 must here pay tribute to a
man now and he appeared as if commendable steadiness in the

he would be instrumental in
placing the issue beyond doubt.
He was at once comfortable and
his good timing earned him quick
runs along the carpet but when
Gaskin took the second new ball
he fell victim to one of Gaskin’s
enticing but deadly inswingers.
His lapse was similar to that of
Charlie Taylor, Hunte and all the
batsmen caught in the legtrap
to- Gaskin this series. They are
quite conscious of the three men
in the leg trap and the wicket-
keeper making a fourth “custo-
dian of the swing” and they leave
quite a few alone. There is a
momentary lapse in concentra-
tion and—presto—there is a nice
inswinger beautifully floated
from leg and centre going away

B.G. bowling even wh@ it was
not offensive, the honours going
to Gaskin who sent down 41
overs and had 81 runs struck off
him, capturing 2 wickets. Twen-
ty-three year old Norman Wight
who first played Intercolonial, he
told me, at the age of 16, is a
young old player end his 41 overs
for 81 runs with 4 wickets to his
cred was the chief factor re-
sponsible for keeping the Barba-
dos scoring down,
Not far behind was “Bruiser”
Thomas’ good figures of
Oo M rn WwW

14.5 5 19 2
As a matter of fact he struck
two strategic blows for B.G. in
the fight for first innings hon-
ours when he claimed the wicket

off the pad. It is made to order of Farmer at 78 and that of
for gliding and they do so and— Holder, last man who looked
presto—Gaskin chalks up an- every bit like helping Greenidge
other wicket. to add the necessary runs.
Atkinson Rain washed out the fifth day

Erie Atkinson fought for form
con:cientiously striving to get
the range of the bowlers but he
wos out in this process before he
had accomplished it. He played

of play and this game was left
drawn B.G. 368 and (for 1 wkt.
5) Barbados 343.



forward inquiringly to a good %
length =< Ga oe pores YESTERDAY s
Wight e t of whic t

him through the air and he was WEATHER REPORT
bowled, beaten in playing a for-

ward stroke to the full extent of From Codrington

his considerable reach,

Keith Walcott, an_ entirely
aggressive batsman this tourna-
ment, entertained no fears for
Gaskin. He flogged those well
up with powerful coverdrives
and cut the short ones hard down
to deep third man.

In one over he lifted a straight
one from Gaskin on the leg
stump, obviously designed to
lure the batsman into padding or

They'!l Do It Every Time)

WHUPS! pov'r WorRy
I_KNOW HOW TO HANOLE
KIDS “HE'S M’PALRIGHT,
CHEDDAR? SEE THAT2
HE LOVES IT! HERE ff
We ooh Tw fs

Rainfall: .49 in,

Total Rainfall for Month to
Date: 1.22 ins.

Highest Temperature: 86.5 °F

Lowest Temperature>. 74.0 °F

Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour v4

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.018
(3 p.m.) 29.917














{

























BLADES
A MET WHAT IS HEF
f APIANO

ans DAY OFF
ans Cf BIG LUG!

Game With
Barbados

(From Our Own Corresponder.ty
GEORGETOWN, B.G. Oct. 9.

The three-day Barbados vs
Berbice match ended i a draw at
Fort Canje ground, New Amster-
dam, yesterday, Berbice declaring
at 250 for eight wickets, Milne 81,
and Ganim Khan 52, top scoring.

Barbados entered upon their
second innjngs to make 193 in 90
minutes but at the drawing of
stumps had lost six for
Taylor 23, Hunte 27, Smi:h 15,
Marshall not out 16, Proverbs 5,
Farmer 0, Atkinson 0, Williams
not out 1, Extras 7.

The Barbadians returned to
Georgetown today and will be
guests at a farewell dinner tonight
at Hotel Tower.

Basketball Team
To BePicked Today

The local basketball players are
preparing for the visit of the
‘Trinidad team. A practice match
was held last night and the Selec-
tion Committee which comprises
Messrs. Rudolph Daniel, “Dinky”
Alkins and “Algie’ Symmonds,
will today announce the players
for the first Test.

The visiting team, Seigerts
Tigers will be arriving on Satur-
day. Three Test matches and two
games against local clubs will
be played.

Arrangements are being made
to have two basketball matches
against teams from the U.S. Navy
ships at present in port, at
Y.M.P.C. on Thursday night.

Melwi Beat YMCA

Melwi met Y.M.C.A., yesterday
at Belleville in the first round of
the Inter-Club Tennis Tournament
which is being held by the Barba-
dos Amateur Lawn Tennis
Association,

A fair crowd saw some good
tennis played.

In the Men’s_ 5S M.
Crichlow of the Y,M.C.A,,. beat’
Albert Williams of Melwi to the!
tune of 6—2, 6—4. Melwi however
came back to beat Y.M.C.A., in. the



Doubles fixture 8—4, 8—1, after
Y.M.C.A., «had forfeited two
doubles to Melwi.
TRUMPETER
CUP SHOOT

Continuing their series for the
Trumpeter Cup at the Govern-
ment Rifle Range yesterday,
marksmen of the B.R.A, took
part in Event 3—The Civil Ser-
vice and Event 13—The Cadets.
Shooting took place at 600 yards
with seven rounds. For the Civil
Service the highest possible score
was 35, while the Cadets’ maxi-
mum was 28. For the Civil Ser-
vice four 32’s were counted out.

Results were: —

The Civil Service
“A” CLASS

Major J. E. Griffith ,......... 33
Mr. P. A. Cheeseman ..,....- 32
Mr, G. E. Martin ........+... 32
Mr. J. M. Cave: oi. s cise cnser 82
“BY” CLASS
Mr. H.C. Bovee unk biave vie 34
gg he ME cle a cakes 33
yp, eee Se Bancrote sy i .ieciys 32
Cpl. FE Sembee si sai veces 32
The Cadets

Cadet Lt. G. M. Rudder (H.C,) 19
C.Q.M.S. J. G. Outram (L.S.) 15
Cadet A. M. Archer (L.8.) .. 18



WHAT'S ON TODAY |

Court of Common Pleas-—10.00

Court of Original Jurisdiction
a.m.

—10.00 a.m,

Police Courts—10.00 a.m.
Meeting of the Chamber of
Commerce—2.00 p.m.
Meeting of the Board of

Health—2.00 p.m.

Police Band gives concert at
Christ Church Almshouse
—4,30 p.m.

Table Tennis at Bush Hill.
Cable & Wireless and
Strathclyde—4.30 p.m.

Mobile Cinema gives show at

St. Catherine’s School Pas-
ture, St. Philip at 7.30 p,m.

Gramophone Concert of Brit-
ish Music at Wakefield—
8.15 p.m.

GLOBE: The Seeret df Convict
‘und gre puw g oyey
5 & 8.15 pm.
PLAZA (Bridgetown): The Fleets
In & El Paso 4.45 & 8.30

P.m.

PLAZA (Oistin): Mystery of Marte
Roget & Man Made Mon-
ster 5 & 8 p.m

OLYMPIC: Doctor and the Girl
& Message to Garcia 4 30
& 4.15 p.m

ROYAL; The Lady Objects and
Aretic Man Tunt 4.30 and

4.15 pom
ROXY: Naked City and Scarlet
Street 4.30 and 8.15 p.m.
EMPIRE: Old Texas Trail and
Madonna of the Seven
Moons 4.36 and 880 p.m.



ON fox THE CEILING



TIME THEIR VISITS
WITH BABYS EATING
SCHEDULE ++



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Police defeated Bonitas by the
wide margin of six goals to two
in their water polo match at the
Aquatic Club yesterday afternoon.

This gave Police their first win
for the season and was their last
scheduled appearance in this year’s

6—2

This was the only game of the
afternoon as Barracudas forfeited
their game to Snappers. The final
Jeague game, Flying Fish vs. Boni-
tas, is scheduled for tomorrow
afternoon. Bonitag however are as
yet undecided as to whether they

Match |

* through the second half,







| @esigned for the job. Correct support,
1
'
|

league series.

Lorenzo Best the lanky Police
centre-forward scored all six goals
for his team, five in the first haif
and the remaining goal mid-way

can ‘field’ a team.
K.O. Opens October 16

The Knock-Out competition
opens on Tuesday, October 16th.
The draw for this competition
was made yesterday and Tues-
day’s games are Barracudas vs.

mapper and Flying Fish, vs.
Whipporays. Referee is Mr. Archie
Clarke. Games to be played on
Thursday October 18th are, Bo-
nitag vs. Police and Harrison
College vs. Swordfish. Referee is
Maj. A. R. Foster.

It is under consideration that
the Knock-Out © competition
played by floodlight, as the eve-
nings ¢lose in too early at this
time of the year to enable two
matches to be played per after-
noon. However the final deeision.
has not ‘yet been made.

p Aaatedienaraiane ena wie

BADMINTON
The teams were:—

Bonitas: N. Warren, T. Year- In an effort to popularise the
wood, G. Atwell, C, Johnson, Brgame of Badminton demonstration
Lucas and B, Patterson (Capt). _ matches will be played in the

Police: L. Shannon, W. Phill Combermere Hall this evening.
M. Richards (Capt.), M. Fran! ‘The times are for present pupils
and L. Best. ' 4 p.m. i 5

BUSINESS |
MEN!!

You have been complaining about not being able
to get to your satisfaction your - - -

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CALCULATING MACHINES
SERVICED

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got their two goals in the d
half, when Cliff Johnson Jd
a pass from Bonitas ceritre ick
Patterson, Johnson made no mis-
take scoring from close range.
Their second goal came soon after
when Neville Warren, who was left
unmarked on the right wing swam
the ball down-field about four
yards to score, The ball hit the
cross-bar and rebounded inside the
nets. Best scored Police’s sixth
goal shortly afterwards.
Muddled Game

It was rather a muddled game;
inclined to be rough and with no
teal combination shown by either
team.

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Important Soccer
Decisions Made

LONDON, Oct. 9.

Two important decisions regard-
ing soccer in Colombia and Ger-
many were reached during the re-|
cent meeting of the Federation of}
the International Football Associa-|
tion. At the end of the 4-day meet-
ing, the Executive Committee of
the F.1.F.A. said an agreement)
was reached among the delegates |
by which the major league -of;
Colombia now recognizes the
authority of the Football Federa-|
tion of Colombia and of the}
F.I.F.A. |

’
The communique also revealed |
that the Committee accepted pro-
visional affiliation of the “Foot-|])
ball Section of the German Demo- |
cratic Republic”. But it stressed
there can only be one entrant for
the World Cup.

The Committee also decided to}



—_—_ ————




tional Committee that football be |
added to the list of compulsory }
sports in the programme of futlre,
Olympic Games.—U.P. |



SILVER BEACH

CASINO
Silver Beach renovated and |
under New Management |
Floureseent Lighting |
Water Installed &
Sea Bathing Facilities
Make your date now.
Apply on premises—
I, D. CAREW. ig
10.10.51.—2n. .

INTERCOLONIAL

BASKET BALL

TRINIDAD v. BARBADOS ,
SEIGERT TIGERS i%

v. Harrison College, Sat, Oct. 15
v. Bidos. (ist Test) Mon. Oct. is
v. ¥M.P.C, Wed. Oct. 1.

v. B'dos. (2nd Test) Thurs, Oct 18
v

. Bdos, (3rd Test) Sat. Oct.

All games at ¥.M.P.C.,” Beckles
Ra at 8 p.m Admission “Mec,
48c. Season Tickets $2.00,



COCKTAIL DANCE
AND PARTY

At
THE BARBADOS

AQUATIC CLUB
(Members Only)



on
SATURDAY, October 13th
6 — 8 p.m.

In

VICTORIOUS WATER
POLO TEAMS

Music by Mr. KEITH
CAMPBELL and his
Society Five

Honour of the

A Special MENU is being
prepared (Snacks & Drinks)
Price of Tickets for Dance
and Party $1.20 each
These Tickets may be pur-
chased at the Office in ad-
vance, and not later than
Friday, October 12th

Admission to Ballroom by
Ticket Only





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PAGE 1

<£!&&. ESTABLISHED 1895 WEDNESDAY. "35TO.-M 10, ISM tH***^ Id / ltfj-/ PRICE: FIVE LIJI Britain Will Stay In \ Suez Canal And Sudan Egypt's Decision To Drop Treaty Called Illegal Til S\\\ flOMRft LONDON. Oct. 9 BRITAIN Tuesday night denounced Egypt 1 dtcWon to junk the Anglo-Egyptian treaty as illegal and announced her intention to stay in the Suez Canal Zone and the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan until satisfactory Middle East defence arrangements are made. Britain also iCCUtd the Egyptian Government indirectly <>f double-dealing inasmuch as Egyptians were advised on September 21 of a new Anglo-American and French plan for settling the Anglo-Egyptian dispute and setting up an overall Middle East defence plan. The official British Government statement was issued in the name of Foreign Secretary Herbert Morrison after a day of conferences at the Foreign Office. Morrison said Egyptian Prime Minister Nahas Pasha had been informed by a personal message on September 21 that a new western proposal was forthcoming shortly, aimed at a satisfactory solution of the dispute over Britain's position in Egypt. MIDDLE EAST DEFENCE The new proposal to Egypt was understood to propose: Firstly, mutual abrogation of the Anglo-Egyptian 1936 treaty in contrast to Egypt's proposal to junk it unilaterally. Secondly the creation of a Middle East defence system in which Egypt would play the major role. It would include the U.S., Britain, France possibly Turkey and British Commonwealth naflions which ase vitally Interested in the Suez Red Sea Me line. Informed sources said exchanges that have taken place so far on the proposed Middle Eastern plan have emphasized it would be "unrealistic" for Egypt to pretend she could defend the area herself without the help of the big Western Powers The new British, American and French proposal however would not solve the Sudan problem. The British position on that is that the Sudanese people themselves! must decide their future in due course. The text of Morrison's statement read : "His Majesty's Government take the strongest exception to the action of the Egyptian Government in introducing legislation seeking to abrogate the Anglo-Egyptian treaty of Alliance of I9;fb\ and the Irfyy Anglo-Egyptian condominium BgMS> ments relating to the Sudan. The Egyptian Government aware that new and far reaching proposals were about to be presented to them which would have direct bearing on the improvement of Anglo-Egvplian relations and the security of the Middle East". "In a personal message to Egyptian Prim,Minister on September 21, the Foreign Secretary made it clear that uch proposals were under urgent consideration and he expected to be In a position to arrange for their discussion with the Egyptian Government in the near future. This was confirmed in the last week by His Majesty's Ambassador in Alexandria In a personal communication to the Egyptian Foreign Minister anticipating an early presentation of these proposals. N O RECOGNITIO N "His Majesty's Government do not recognize the legality of the unilateral renunciation of the 1936 treaty and of the condominium agreements and they maintain their full rights under those treaties pending a satisfactory agreement with Egypt on the basis of the proposals referred to above"—(U.P.) U.K. Presents Caw To World Court THK HAGUE Oct B Britain has |-ut forward tier Wl itU-n argument-* against nationalisation of the British owned oil by Iran to the International Court of Justice, It was I on Tuesday. Britain look lha caw to the Court last spring hut ha* aims* bf-en roiced to evacuate her oil i Thr Court announcement aaid Sir Eric Beckett delivered the British memorial on the cue within the October 10 deadline. and that it was "confidential" and not related to "recent developments in Iran" —t'.P. I ISII I on LORD KOHALLAN CHIEF SCOUT TO TOUR CARIBBEAN rxiNDoS oc Mb w. i Chief Scout Lord Rowallan flies from London January 2'J. i i carry out a tour of the Caribbean. Bermuda und the Bahamas. He %  ill arrive In Jamaica in timr for the First Caribbean Jamboree at Kingston March r. to 17. This news was released from Boy Scouts' Headquarters today. It Is expected that the route of the Chief Scout will include Nassau, Kingston, Antigua. Barbados, Trinidad. St. Vincent, Grenada St. Lucia. Georgetown, Cayman und Bella*. Accompanying him will be Ueutenant-Commander R. Mallinson a Yorkshire Field Commissioner. Since becoming Chief Scout in IMS, Howallan has travelled nearly 120,00c miles on visits to scouts in the Commonwealth. Reds Bailie U.S. Troops To A Hall EIGHTH ARMY H'0,RS„ Korea, Oct. 0. ranatte Reds battled attacking U,S. troops to a standstill on two vital rldgclines in East Central Korea to-day. Another U.S. unit captured I strategic hill In an adjacent sector however. On the Western front the US First Cavalry Division maabad ahead more Ihiio a mile against mounting resistance. Heaviest sighting was above Yanggu on the East Central front "line thEighth Army was trying to break through Communist-. "Little SicgirUd One" to the valley approaches to the East coast. The U.S. Second Division's 38th Infantry Regiment checked stubborn North Korean Reds with fixed bayonets on "Kim II Sung Ridge" named for the North K< ean Premier and CommanderChief.-r r CARGO TRANSPORT. Dll ALSHAIN of tot USA Knvv DOW In Carlisle Bsy on a t?.ree-dsy viit, arrived yesterday accompanied by throe other naval craft LOCAL STEEL BAND ENTERTAINS U.S. NAVY THK US. NAVY invatli^arba(los yesterday. Some 560 enlisted men and 47 officers came in with the U.S.S. lin (AKA55). LST 509, LST 980 and LST 525. With a strong southeast wind Mowing, across the harbour giving rise to many swells white navy landing barges I and cutters "skated along" from r.hip-lo-shore, Carlisle Bay s an attraction for many Barbadians, -coloured ship, frtm, AII QMrfar*: JHOUSE PASS "Too Little M.\ii I si i.i. Too Late" Says Ghurchill IXJNDON. Octotsr 9 Winston Chur, hill' i Tuesday night thai %  %  %  th nnUjgi_Lsj£lu Party ; .ibou. %  of World Chuich tile ahd Govtg mnt) E-5t win .\i - ii :n[Hiitant %  * n\ Egypt. K SOOtM aV*temeeti. own consUtucrHs/VoqdloTiLiwr'na east of LonduN.. vhoi'.lf" ,*ff.i i.|HH.I V '%  >*'' Morrison declared RgypSjflBBl^HP! lion to tunk the Anglo-Effvplian treaty was illegal. Chu'chill caustically reminded labour leaders that six months %  go he had prop sod %  Joint Anglo\merlcan French solution of Lot UddD • t ists 'i : ihe Egyptian cne Cousin WASHINGTON. Oct. . About six weeks ago the U.S. Air Force announced it had a new mission This was to use atomic weapons against ground troops The atom bomb has been something that needed a big ntpensr target The Air Forte announcement meant that little couslni the atom bomb had been developed mid be used with good gainst platoon or artillery emplacement* r>r against tanks. Roman Party ROME. Oct. 10. I>reidcilt Elpidio tiuir.no of thi Philippines was honoured at a reception at Rome City Hall on Tuesday night with a cocktail party attended by some 600 selected guest* —I'.F. PLANE CRASHES .nl MEXICO CITY. Mexico. Oct. 9. A D.C.3 transport pUtM, 21 persons aboard, crashed asar Cerro Banco in the State of Vera Cruz, according to Aero Transportes Airll The number of dead In the ih was not immediately aval e from the remote area. An airune spokesman said "It is known there were four survivors."—I'.P. SUPREME AIJ.IED HEADQUARTERS, Rocquencourt, France. October 0. Chiefs of Staffs of the US., Britain and France conferred at length with General Eisenhower amid growing tension over the Middle East s role In Western defence. Talks occurred on tineve Of the flight hy Chiefs to Greece and Turkey for exploratory talks on the-part those two nations will play in Western defence. a Those attending the conference were General Omar N Br:idley.l Chairman of the U.S Joint GTlcf' of Staff. British Field Marshal Sir William Slim, Chief of t Imperial General Staff and General Charles F Ixvhcres. Chairman of the French Chiefs of Staff. Lord Fraser Finrt Sea Lord of the British Admiralty, and Admiral Jacques Mesa'rffre. French Chief of Staff for the Middle East. A Headquarters spokesman di-' not disclose the agenda of talk-, but informed sources laiaThe views were exchanged on the possible Command Structure for the Middle East. — (U.P.) 15,000 WORDS JAKARTA. Oct. S Halmar Schacht. former Nazi financial wizard who has beei studying Indonesian financial and economic rondltions. presented 15.000-word report to Premier Suklman on Tuesday.--! r BOWLES APPOINTED WASHINGTON, Oct. 0. The Senate apfioved the appointment of former OPA Chief Cheater Bowles as United States Ambassador to India on Tuesday night despite Republican charges l not qualified for the II' S. Africa Wants Airmen JOHANNESBURG Oct 9 The South African G-wemment Is to call for volunteers from the .zen forte ana civilians for service In Korea aaid Brigadier G. Wilmott. Chief of the Air Staff. Hitherto service his been confined 'to the permanent tore*. DM tau i—tn no way as sparkling as thu English navy ships which call hero— la-esentod a formidable picture In the harbour. ninugjheM the day asfl hopping off tho baragg and cut i lets—some in all white nnd other it. khaki of a sort texture. Thej Hit" In the streets and in '*" %  pises* Of amusement In the Calypsoes But apma sailors who had to rj on Imoid %  ojoyod intervalof isu from a local steel band and silver piece after pllvei piece fell hit.i the boat lor the players The Uwl band stole ( Un> show. But over two doreii divers who made their way out to in small boats provided 1 tots of fun as they exercised their '^Srar rains which wrre natng showared into the sea by tha sailor* bafore thev reaehed RVl ysjuj %  down Tht sailors kept itom* of their oin fnr the "Advoeate's" repressntatlvf Ni sooner had he .lighted on tho deck than a crowd • 1 oAtafl Sfld men gathered %  round him, each apparently %  \ anting hi* newspaper first. This was the kind of reception •hinewspaperman got on each -hip and h* made some brisk sales. I Aboard the ships, members of i gw were doing routine won hut everybody seemed nt %  •as* The Press Helntlons Officers %  .!-! that they were Just from Vieques. Puerto Rico, where they were carrying out landing exerand now they have, begun •heir Caribbean recreation period at Barbados. Three days of shorc%  Will spend at. Barha§ dos liefore going on to Trinidad, 0sss%w Transp4irt To. .visti.nn. ia.907 ions, a cargo transport under Captain B. P. Field, U.S N is the command ship. LST BOB is under Lt. W. A. McNamcc, U S.N.R. LST 880 under Lt J. D. Hryn USN H.. and LST 525 undtr Lt A. N. Volk. USN It. Most of the officers and men are reservists and temporaries. Few of the Officers hava seen %  live Nervlce before Alshain carries a keel while tho throe LST's are built wljh flat bottoms so that they can sail right up on the land. Alshain has quite a history attached to her. She was named after the star "Alshain" and during World War II nd the Korean War won the battle stars of Gusm, Leyte. Lingayen. San HallnS Ian N-niso, Okinawa and Inchon. Assault Cargo Ship The ship was built In 1944 -y the Federal Shipbuilding and Or/dock Company, Kearney. jNw Jersey as an assault cargo ship. KM r | look cargo from Norfolx to Posrl Harbour, in 1M4 and lutit carried out an assault Gimm in the Marianas. After the war years of rigorou.operating activities, the welcome LONDON Od 10 LVeak came when she mada a stop ,harn Palace annoum.d| a| ^^^ |o rk up far(|0 8n .md suggesUHt that It bo I trom tho Bill. aonl members pointei sil that U id,..... dork it wool* destroy the whole pno.iple the Bill. riie BBvtsaa u>i Ha I f i he clause was Ihen puf U tho vote and,agreed to ba ntajorlty. Voting for the reterdion wenMr Miller. Mr. Mapp, Mr. Lewis Mr. Bryan. Mr. Cox, Mi t Walcntt, Dr. Cumniln*. Mi. Adamt •uKl ttie Speaker. Against were Mr Dnwding Mr. Haynes. Mr Gndd.ird. Mr i.ill. Mi ee,-e .ni,| Mr K K Waleott Mi Adanu vald tlul he hope, iionourable inemlM-r^ luul heei iblc tinea last Tuoaday to iead lefnii. tha Motnotandum o: Agroo m eni which had bsot rOMhsd botwos u kba Sugar Proiucen. Fitlcrsiiofi of Barb.id md ihBarbados Workers* Union. %  IT.' 11'is* DM ugai Iniiustry will wagoa and profits Ih* 1 Hie rsWf thre* MM I Ho Woulu repeat ttiat he hoped MsrwurabJa membera had read th* Agreement larefutly becauaa it was of Krent import nice an< Uwro weie pomK M it with whirl, doubtlessly they mlahl dttTar. The House and l^'Ui-lalura SrtTi only concerned. rUiwovor, trnn whether Ihey were KOIIIK to ipprovi ai HH inssBsflsf of ear%  i of the Stabili.^ilion Fund of I^ilmur Weli i svhk h ww one of lha tornu Ihe Agreement, nnd that iheie •hould be imposed J la*] foi tha ',!• % %  rOSI T.p lie t,ik> I not lie pio||f. of UM Mil!" iiuiusm B fO SO lha LabOtll Welfme Kunil Majority Vole "It wa-. nOwaV< i rihvlously .M-essary thai rnombofi of lha (ouse should have before them he isjsDH asieotnen! gtri M .vl.ieh this nill has nriicn It m *lth tl hject !-f irfllciallv puling the Agreement before them hat 11Mlegislature has l>een urnlshed by Government wish eoBtaa oi it/' Th<> preliminary agroemont had ssta reached between some of HMD rssprsoontlril lha llnrnwdw InJOD and othor parties • IT Hie SiiKJH Pruducers Uon, said Mr. Adam i Is ,... Feder.ithin | I Director* had doclmcd t.i|-' -J'"v e.de lust y Ihe C.IUIH-H II Argentine annllcHnns lh Vntnn had m-eeptod II by i majoril) vote He was saying dor thai ii rnlght not ba .bought that .in Agreement of ins sort could easily have met with universal approval on all It snsl a moot -niUtaiidniii %  igreement Mwffti amiAoytri ind eiiinh.yees, not inOrOh hat one might call the -natcrlal advantage* which might :. or the tor, hoi us regards I which It must nece-s.irlly have in i ottllnulnsj poai a, ia ba should say, r-.r i II rtod of three years. It wna Justln.itiie foi nsihaillaiii to rotnam bei somelimts that industrial i. l.iMons in this island German Jev/8 Are Satisfied IsM Oaabral Council of Oerman lews esjjresaed MlMactlon with he Bonn Governments desire t< make resUtution for Nailsm'i ast Jewish persecutions. ft ..i.iiutiiu.-i .ii mt ii. neoii.ly ^ nine-point programme which I hoped Qovernment WOtdd hlM including a constant and thonugl lUi.ggle by Oovfjrnmonl agslmn AiUi-Scnn'. in in all IU i-.m t bo carried out In Use entire edueu ttonal systom and liv Ih( Madia Not Elk—During the elk • in* logaon In Sobergn, Sweden si %  COWS have i %  nl painted "cow," I, MR white letters on In Tl.. U.S. Naval Losses The t'mlc< itates Navy said *\ lea-it 27 mei *ere killed or wounded when lw US. naval vessels were damage by Communist action of! lh >rtii. tot oooal of Rorao ust week end. Ms*Withdrawal — Aiaentm le legation withdrew en snasa from Ihe Inler-Aiiierican Pm Association Conferanci opening of the second plenary •jBBsMl ihis morning after the Board of admit all Argentine appltestfon for member*hip. Itomb Knptedrtl — UnldV taikers exploded a plastic bomb at tho entrance of the Communi-l wspaper \jt PaUulle I day. The blast shattered isrindOWi ,ii ITM in the eanlra oi Nice and wrecked Hie | | thihall of the nawapan Ing. No easualties weri Weald Be Glad — The Whlu House said Tuesday that Trmn.uwill be glad to see I rani .! %  Mossadegh while he i. in this country, but no definite appointment has been mule so far. KesoluUea l>efeaU-dItu 'i.iii He-ulnti'n, in mnt oriuminiHl ChfaM, Pohmd Crccho lovaklo tn the Fsr Kast g) onMBl Conference (KCAFEj was reject 'd by fourteen votes to Iwo at lh. ' War Inevitable — Italian Communist lender Palmiro TogUatli said Tuesday "war cannot bo ivoicied"' between WcSMrn powers •md Russia If the rearmament of tho Allies continues and "while it'imic bombs arc at hand." ralth in Turkey—President Celei J'.eyji i Turkey 111(01 rued Trumai tour of Austral; and New Zealaml noxl year Thes announcement sold Princess Dizabeth ind Prince Philip would tour instead.—V.P> that Turkey will fulfil the ^.pendouj in tho history of rclalatlcr's confidence that it will.|| ( „, s ba tw a an employer and "maintain her independent I in .my part of the lOHHaglal integrity in the taca of arofld Cei t.ilnly. otw may say II pressure and threats." • Oa l*age 5 US Tanker llaimniff NORFOLK. Virginia. Oct. 9 The U S. Navy tanker HssusUeo by tho --a sen boll %  bout II mi 1 '.* off tho arolina coos*. loporta Indicated there were casualties and that neither ship was in danger Ho hoMsosa. TIM number aboard Ihg *a*,an KOl learned.—IT-P. WOUNDED THIRD TIME WASHINGTON. Oct. 9 %  .v said on Tuesday that CapUin William Cl.-rk. son of ha Armv Field Forcos. General Mark Clark, hes suffered hU third wound in tho Korean war. -II' Alshain reverted to the role of cargo ship, typhoons being hei only immediate postwar adventures. Durlnu the postwar days she continued hor operatloni in tho Pactnc. But tn \H9, Alshain, was uVWueh with another war. Her first Jot was to deliver 2.100 tons of ammunition for Chinos.' Nat tonally fighting the Reds. Three or four times she was 60 to 100 mile, within her Formosa destination and each time was ordered not tn *> Oa Psge 3 TO-DAY'S WEATHER CHART Sunrise: 6.47 ID. Sunset: 6.54 p.m. Moon First Quarter LtgkUng: 0.00 ass Hub Tide: ISM p . Low Tide • S an. 7 Oft p.m. From Oodrtngtoh hole mule devoid i-r fin lion khan their less unfortunate neiotii .urs of tho ( arliiiieoti area Stuoendw*.. "It Is l*cause tins 1 has boon created for the past ten 1 years or so. that it has lieeti pos|bM to achieve what I v. tu>o f mad BsaasasSaah .(1-year-old Iranian I fort hospibo %  I iiearance l ( leCUfltJ Council in34-ytar-old %  id and chief adviser said in in exclusive Interview. Britain has sought U> spread fxlae propaganda that Ii.m will f.ill or be pushed Into Ihe Soviet ibit if her demands are no atlstled. Aloswatiegh began a series of tedical (oats Tueedav and UN. Id the scheciul.il Thur^iiv meeting .>f the Security 'uuiictl might bpoatprmed un'il Saturday. Concern was VOscad that the 16 •Ji-old Premier might be suffering from something mor> lhan tstlgxie osM there also was spoeiiluilon that grr "*t|Mnemrnt might be ,>urely for diplomatic iage *o r.r. Australia .\nd Sioz lypjnn %  SydSW) I'elr graph 00 II a stronger Australian say in the Sue/ HrtUin has no right to act as if she is the sole i of the British Common hSUrests and honour The sacrifice of IhO Sue/ .is Abadan was ikl be disastrous for n ilth and Is) i Brlthf piesliKt%  Middle Uisf -V.P. The "ADVOCATE" pays for NEWS. Dial 3113 Day or Night Anglo—U.S. Relations Is Big Issue a. si i' i *wites-Y t"iHn • •t~n*k' aiiem \n ih. reoeat in China the same foily %  < W. a LANDhEY LONDON, Oct. 9. Britain's relations with e emerging as a big Issue in the October 2 elections more than In any other British election in history. On one side of the fight are *ded %  ;. Party are strangely silent in thi repeat in t h < pute but the> ore solidly In Hoi wo committed .uc' ..nut Of wele.n rearmament in In 1P1H.' He referre-i rlose co-operation with the US intervention n mssan i against the US. la be, t revolution. lie van's speech] Co-operalion .V %  mil the Sunday PtrterleJ editorial. Ho said "BeUeVS mi n nearly 8.000 persons Wostern civilisation in the Liverpool stadium thai II down In ruins snd no amount Winston Churchill and his Con-I con:> < Ihora will Ite atom bombs will en„! servatives who charge that L> pluck the coat tails >>f vlve. You can't %  Is responsible for "ill-natured %  some impetuous sta'esman wh. civilization toge'.lie: criticisms'' of US. pOUcy that bOVO | sdll want to SOLvo the problem In mutual destniction. You i lost much o* the goodwill Britain ,,„ n e „ld bloody war." keep It together by co-operatiT. gained in the US. during the war. ; Be van said 6i %  .. ririaetal began '. On the other side are AtwUrta thai our American friends must', editorial with the state-: % %  Sevan and other I^eftwing Labourlearn Is that thr world Is disturbed the future of Britain nnd hi lies and their side was put fortoday not because there was anymonwealth "would ward when Bevan opened Ihe thing. InlrttwicaUy BlOsVMVheal VMS* It gsat UohSd wttb tho tWltr ramp.'ii'-i In Liverpool and the nbout the Sovi-t system in IBlg. of that other great Engli Leftwing Sunday PteSssrUsI wsrned h ,% disturbed and threatened kicking Briti the US Silent Prime Minister Clement Attlee and the Rightwing of the Labou .eloped p''' of 'he world at that i :ime had**' frundlv hand from any part of tht' world." He added; Are we going to I ing nati<>*> I States America". He added that In loci owes the VS. so much least we can do Is to be h



PAGE 1

WBDNESOAT, Ol roBKR 10. 15I BARBADOS ADVOCATE I'M.I MM JHJUlS!j Xy4.00 &U(^/\.K lilLjLj In Asid ThroHinJ; 'Lenii, Continw• Fran, race I phenomenal* m an Island hkv Barbados and an Industry like the • ugar Industry whirh U a svmbol of free enterprise. "At this state I may say." said Mr. Adams "th,it it would be churlish in me not to start by wiving thai in acme respect. I have been surprised at the fact that this agreement has teen achieved, because if I had the misfortune to be a capitalist and swear planter lor 300 years; to have compart* and absolute dictation over the terms I am goinic to employ people on; how much money' I am going io make and keep out of the *urar industry. I too might have had the misfortune of not wanting to .u1ude an agreement *ort." A very important thing' about Uie agreement was that the profits of the industry wuuld IH limited, and out of the money tluit the industry would not be taking as its own by way of profit-, certain provisions would he made for the benelit of others. Ti %  be a higher rate of production bonus than had been workers for the past few years; a certain portion of the money would %  10 the Labour Welfare Fund, and a portion would be earmarked for the proposed harbour if and when Government decided to proceed with the construction of Mr Adams said that the agre, mem had been the subject of negotiations existing for rough Iv nine months and that there hud been much give and take. "But I do feel" he said "that the House will agree with ,„.. thai 5 for no other reason, the establtshmmi DC the principle of profits being shared between employer and employee is in itself an outstanding achievement In one respect, said Mr Adams it might be said that the idea arose as a result of the com paralive stability which the long term agreement with the MiFood to take West Indian sugar provided. It was fell that as a result of this long term contract. stability at the production end should also be attempted. Profits Shared Boll aktaa that had subscribed lo the agreement had agreed that (here should be reasonable wages and reasonable profits in the sugar industry In relation to the average crop, that being taken for some years now as 110,000 Ions; that when the sugar crop exceeded that average, its extra profits should be shared, and that the Stabilisation Fund should be carefully guarded when the crop diu not exceed that average. It was also felt that something should be done to bring a sense of stability to peasants as far as the price paid for their canes vere concerned. Perhaps equally outstanding was that the public should be given inform.Hun of the llnann.il I>MIH>II of the 0CO> ROttllC slination lion mcmliers would remember, said Mr. Adams, that when the Moyne Commission came out here. the sugar industry said thaflhey had no objection to the publishing for the benefit of the public figures showing what the industry was making, in order that employees in the Industry could sec Hint they were speaking tin truth when tney said that they could not afford to pay more than It, fid 2s. or half a crown a day or whatever it wag. The Industry ha£i forgotten that ever year since. After some persuasion in some cases, a little in others and none in others, seventeen of the twenty* four lo-al factories had now agreed lo allow their figures to I"' B in order that from an analysis of those figures a reasonable profit could be computed, and so on. Hr knew they would all agree that it was an excellent thing for i rrwnt to be made voluntarily and he hoped that the other factory owners would realise that a voluntary agreement was prefirable to compulsion. Continuing Mr. Adams said that one of the reasons of stabilisation as It originally was, was to provide arainst bad years. Not merely drought or disease but bad vears as regards prices Now however, there was some guarantee as regards prices. I .ili.mi Trouble Th. sugar industry, if he might disclose some of what had been -•iscuvted seemed fearful lo touch the Stabilisation Fund at all, and one cnalti mfl asg that if thev encountered the levers* > %  ( hat thea had been experiencing the last few vcars and thev did not have a substantial Fund there might Dossiblv be labour (rouble One of the chief points "of difference was. therefore, whether the Fund should be touched at all It was eventually felt that in a good year—and they had only igreed on a figure of five years — if the CTOO rx/ecderi the five vear average, the industry out of Hi nrofits would out 7s. 6d per ton U) Labour Welfare and in addition uld be taken out of th* in Fund a further 5s If the croo of any particular year exceeded the previous five yew average, the sum agreed on wa* the sum lo be taken out and i' was with that object 'hat the Bill was brought h lore / i House. If i n ti.. "'.in. hand, did not ex.eed ih praaioui live yaai average, onl* hall a rrosrn enDul t >e taken frmn theStabilisation Fund and given lo Labour Welfare If n> any year ihr crop drooned below 120 000 tons, the Stabilisation Fu.ul would not be touched "ThStabilisation Fund and Labour Welfare Fund were. so to speak, two aspects of the same thine You get the Labour Wejfa** fund to repair your houses and therefore you do not take n t.ui Of row wages I hope hon. members will have read the agreement and 1 ht.pi> that 1 have made It clear abou* ihe Stabilisation Fund." Refen ing to the paymen" of the Production Bonn Mr. Adams paid tribute to Ihe last Labour Cmi and the Bacretarj of tho Wm ki'i-' Union. "Ihoduetmn .omethmg new to Barbados and it Is no* well established %  Dd well accepted by both sides.'' he said. The present arrangemenl was for 19 per cent., be added. Deep Harbour Orthe matter of a harbour. Mr. Adams said that this would undoubtedly benefit the sugar industry more than any other section of the community, even more than the merchants, il was therefore only fair that the necessity of find. ing the huge sum of money for the purpose — certainly more than f5.000.000—Ihe people who would benefit from it most should subscribe over and above the average taxpayer. Thig was the payment of a cess of 2 per ton. Agreement had been reached however; in view Bf two facts. The Government had agreed in principle to examine carefully the possibilities of constructing the harhn.ir, but the financial implication and in view of th (act that the agreement before them had only recently been arrived al, it was felt that rn a matter of the sort with its repercussions on other people besides the large landowner, it should be presented to the puhlufor d'.-cus-Mon bofor* implementation this year. II was for that reason and for that reason alone that OeasarMnonl %  N re not proposing that day to ask for legislative sane.ion of t" Il provision Of course avtrj pended on the fiscal survey Thev must know how much n rould afford ' i hw whither thev could get a loin floated Mr. A.. fy;ng to i yield to too IvrnpUrtton •' lying things that might members lo wr :n il a aid merely sa> | IOSJ oi no ele. '. % %  to atari try to pa . | that I d %  tin m some aw I : ' kroantaui HI con am d i i rtVMMire of prohaj &\ .. ;,. Sugar Producers Federation, tot "<• l:..vo Btvaj thing like it m thi. island. There has been profit sharing am->ng ,h. shareholders but not among ih. workers. Now I can only say thai I thnco-ft-'* thil I |K t • ** • %  • an more this year for their canes but for this agreement thev have been dreaming for Son Mr. Wsleesl (B) said that there was one point of the Mm or Agreement that he h plained of It was Clause 3 of the bill which dealt with tl 80 K r ton lo IKallocated to the bour Welfare Fund when the sugar crop exceeded the average M the live preceding years. Taking the agreement on a whole, he felt thai it was a matter worth congratulations when in the island, one could find interests coming together when concerned with an industry and arriving at an agreement which is supposed to last three years. In 1M7. he said, there was never found to be too much difficulty in effecting nrgotiallon between the planters and the Bar'lados Workers' l?nlpn when they eame to discuss year after year the question of "would snv bonus be given the workers in arrears of the wages which were jus! .•arn.d He pointed out that, so far as sharing i-i the profits of the industry were concerned, the noon was bound to be considered as %  share In the profits. Since IM7, he said the iu.<*tlon was always to determine what the excess amount was likely lo be. Mi Waleott said that when the or Member for Si Joseph regarded it as a great achievement, wjlh which he enttrelj agreed, ht felt that the Hon Isambai would admit that, since 1847, he had * l(ev A Young riw s h : Major, aumg witl Chief In>p.vf..i Williams an %  Inspector Ucnnnh vblti ris Plantation, si Oaorgai ya t' day. He inspected UsO there lie told the \dtrste uW tho oo* i wan aU i IOM ud U i pong kepi in a reej sanllai e,dition. Along with InaBOCtoi l Mr Torrezso called a* I Prison aid was BtWwB mi \ Major Foster. (.. Prison. He saw the (-> pig farms in the prtag BOUMl The pigs are . li-ik in Uie pUU poultrv' tiH> loot %  %  Torrezso told th Agftvanga, He said thai th. made arrangements for him t< Igive a leetunto tin pi Friday nsutL Although Animal Wclf.ur Wee*. is oast. Chief Inspactoi is contimilng hi| giving h' i. o'her Instltutioni FOM Till; BEST I.X MATCHES is*, ion THREE PLUMES MATCHES o.x SALT: EVEmYWMBME In The Legislature Yesterday COUNCIL ra* U|iUiu i % % % %  ii •"•! at l,>.hm.,.i iu*rt*ial> i*ai.a*nl Hill Int IS* l> %  TMtWSBf We. t OeOsff. wav* -ia. ht OM Tkt HiB'bl* U i -L.i.i.l —. th %  SSWi-M'i %  • in,..i., •f Hun..,, ma ir.i,,|...pt %  % %  hM a-'lh. —th 4a.' .1 AaV-V I'.l %  •* lh Hil<'<-' -1 ...o. 1 ml Ih* lliH l-i.lh.h. %  h* *arlah %  ( llnu 1 har-h [a r.itr %  Ua* n*l • %  •• %  aiaa 81.SM •MMI...I m*mkrr %  ( u.—~ r..i"i ~ hM DlaUln QS—mllia *aar a*a*l*ll*n 1* aiah* ll lanf.l Bill U %  alharla* Ih* 1 *nrah>far IK. n***rnar-la Kt..ll.. .,-.,". ,.l llllhu.i. ,.l |. Phlll* 1* ln*r*aa* Ih* ral*> al *a> ..d o.i-lh". .II. _.„... 1. ih. |„. 1 amaalll** 1. !*.•* la ihr V..o, Tfct II... .1. lb* i .I....1.I S..-i Ih* pariah ,i si ...-<. a r.uwT 1...1 Hi* ii. ,. ,, .r ihr I..T..I *l l.-.d I„, !" ,,|. p.rl .1 I •imirhifl ri.ni.iL-" illaal* al a' HUli.o. .1 ih* aalS >., ,4 Th* iooi.ll .n ..ord In Ih* (all.*!*.' — i..h..n a FlBtlni SrIS. I>M.II.II.H u aaaraei ai is* Hr..l.iU. u Slat* Ih* aM ul Th* Csaasil i..rd ih* r..r... *.!*• at Ih* 4 !• %  ••>) al Ih* OIL Bill 1* ara**4 Ih* 1 arUrl*. t. Part 1. C*rr*nl a. ih.-. Ii. am i .....I ih* rhiu al a BBSSS callrd Baa.lS*) (.*. Ih* Ra>l*an*nUr> liUaili. IS.1I—St. S: tS. which f*f*a Ih* inn 1* aa**J Ih* Old Atr.n.i*. AM in Bill U aM*nS Ih* raahM* Ta Th* (aanril ..it..,, .„ u T.. %  i> nail al IN B m Leg. Co. Approve B.I.F. Expenditure BARBADOS will be represented at the British Industries Fair in I9S2. A resolution approving the expenditure of funds for this purpose was concurred in by the Legislative Council at its meeting yesterday. The resolution is for the sum of $2,320. In moving tin MBOUnaBOl of the resolution, Ihe llnn'ble the Colonial Secretary said that in 1950. Barbados was not 11 at the British Industries Fair. In 1951. il was originally proposed that Barbados should again not be represented and the daily newspaper came out with an article on October 4. 1950 entitled "Barbadop out again." "I am glad tO 'ay that ; Imut the same lime tbal tno %  rtlota ; %  (>pea red in the Pies*, the Chamber of Commerce decided that they would go in for the BrtHA Industries Fair of 1951 and the West India Committee in London was notified accordinitly. 'T think it has been agreed that participation of Barbados in the British Industries Fair of 1951 which coincided with the Festival of Britain, was a success. A Success The Colonial Secretary then quoted from the West India Committee Circular supporting ihe remarks that Barbados' participation in Uie B.I.F. had been a success. The specific report relating to Barbados which was prepared by the Wes* India Committee, pointed out that many overseas and home buyers had never heard ol Barbados rum and had associated all West Indian rum with Jamaica To those acquainted wild the good quality of Barbados rum, it came ni a icrioiis surprise thai it had not been seen al the B.I.F. before •Hst same thing applied io fancy molases and the rest. A week or two ago. the (bariber of Commerce which had been asked whether Ihey would participate in the 1952 Fair, reported thai owing to lack of funds, they would be unable lo do so. It seemed to the Executive Committee that it would be a crying shame if Barbados did n o t participate. There were occasions when I light should be hidden under the bushel, but it was thought that fherc were other occasions when the good name of a colony or a country required that it should take its proper place in an exhibition like the British InJustrll Fair. Hum. MoiaHM** I have already referrcn to fU I and fancy, molasses. I am Mr* that from the impres-iun given at thiFair, the result can be nothing but good to Barbados," he said. As regards tourism, owing to *hipp!ng difficulties since |hg war, I'llmrc not many people roming from the United Kingdom to Barbados, but they had been told thai ships were coming. He was that the attractive stalls proposed for 1952 at the B.I.F would put Barbados on the map and encourage people lo come here. He said that the Executive Com* :nittee had decided that in as much as the Chamber of Commerce had gone to the full expense of bearing the cost of the stand at this year's Fair, it was only fitting thai the (iovi-rnment should come forward next yeur to bear the cost. Tie was very glad to say that the Chamber of Commerce had mkl th.it if the Legislature provldo try funds, the Chamber ot I'oinmerce -vould be only toi pleaie lo co-nperate with tbg ('."• anunoni by supplying the exhibit' at tho Fair. He had much pleasure In movin* that the resolution be oonvutieo In. Hon'b F E Field ildcd It's delicious! It's cooked on a VALOR The slove with a reputation for good cooking. We have the following modefs TABLE MODEL 2 Burner with stands $25.21 & $17.50 Single Burner 9.43 OVENS Single 510.54 WICKS No. 200 44c. No. 300 80c. No. 21 J1.00 CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO., LTD 10. II. 12 Sc 13 Broad Street. ERRATUM A MESSAGE from IfeO Qovnmo concerning an error mode 11 Paragraph 1 of Ihe Dome*'i Sugar Agreement was put befnii the l^eglsliiluie vesterdsy. The Mesoagc reads: Ills ExL-lleiuy tinQoVOrROl has the honoui lo UnfOTaa Ua legislature that his attention ha bean drawn to un error In paragraph I of his Message No. 3* 1U5I of the 2nd of October. < Ihe subject of the l>omestlc Sug Agreement, In the reference to Ihe different organisations concerned. 2 His Excellency has thLtinoiir to notify Uie Legislature that paragraph I of Messagi No 34/1BM should have read ai follows: — "His Excellency the Governor "has the honour to Invite the •'attention of Ihe Honourable Ihi "House of Assembly to i 'memorandum of Agreement dated the 13th Septembei. 1951, which, in accordan. "with the leims. has been submitted to the rsspecU "organlsalions inOMttonod 0BM0> "in for ihetr consideration and ••which. Il Is understood. hs "Hern confirmed by these "organ!salions. Copies of "Memorandum of Agreement "art-re laid in the LegUlalu "yesterday. Another Message telling of an addition lo the proposed membci %  hip of the Scotland District Conservation Board also went beforo Ihe legislature The Messagi* reads His Excellency the Governor has the honour to refer to his Deputys Message No. 21 of th< 10th and 12th July, 1951 addressm to tho 1-egniaiurc in coruioeuori with the proposed im-ml**!*hlp o the Scotland District Consc-atloi Board and lo Inform the Honourable the Legislature thai th. Director of Highways and Transport has been added to Ihe list <>f member* set out In that Message Wetv Boys' Club Major R. A. Stoute. Deputy Commissioner of Police will open Boys' Club at Ilelleplalne, St Andrew at 4.30 p.m., today. ThlCli b will U housed in the Community Hall which has been made available by the Rector anil 1'arochial Treasurer of the Parish The Club brings the number of Boys' and Girls' Club to 13. Thirtyeight boys have already registered fo ( membership in the BeMridaine Club. BLINDING HEADACHES MADE HER HELPLESS Weil soon have that better I i i of Cd-ii-acr* hKt i %  .. f i I aaawA of • J^[ '\J*f^ inadaanaasdi 4n iifTl V hu.1y for umjly Je. Until KRUSCHEN s>rau V ht muni juMv.r'" fr".! 1 .;: ..1 aobsa will bo Interested In reading how tbla woman sndsd bar troubles "1 waa auhjsct to MrrlMf hea.la.hes. While they lasted. I seemed to lose mv sight ami all powerln my hanilHsml w.i i to He dowa for hours al a tlmw. Mv aunt, who baa taknn 11 Sails for years, sugget*-l my trying them. I did so. ami I not had a return of thoBe terrlhls headailies for months. In fail, I feel quite cored."M.W. aohw. be traced to a disorder* and tu ihe uoauspeoled retention in the eyatem of stag nm inu waale malnrlal. which poinoim the blood. Homove lb* polsonou* a'cumulatlons prevent thorn front tininlmr again m won't hr*vo to worry am And that U joat how ft I bring* BWlfl ami liMlnr reliof by cleansing the ivstam ougbly of ull hannfu T mi K lag ron CWJ1S. IMMSES, %  UW MftftJ -,.-, Etc U | JM i .. r,i time. 0 Tizlttituvt CM (3 V. *,*,'****>'*','*'*'*'••*•*' VAPEX ffU IN HAL ANT 1 '.lit ATHS . the antiseptic vapour irom *5 r*\ your handkorchief by day c from your pillow ot night or uie the j£j VAPEX INHALER — dandy for daytime Eoi'ly recharged from standard bottk. On Si.le nl KNH.IIT'S lucre; STORKS M.*, i* t,.,i.... ., r • '" %  IR'OOT 4 CO LTD (nfeBBjl ,.-v,i„ (tl IMIk ill 111111 1 t III IL'II V Mttrntlng powat Djulckly si lively KNIGHTSDBIIGSTORF.S i LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH SUl'HKMF IN QUALITY AND FINISH — A'.o — <. \i \ un <".> •i • ,v Glna Rh %  SST l. BIRBERI Ltd. """ST in at 11 ROr.BlTK ST 111 IT H" IrUVVWMArVlinAaV^AAAArVUa_ FOR BEST RESULTS B %  USE a" *' m IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS B ~ H. Jaton Jones & Co., Ltd—D..ir bulo.. B^ WVWWWkWWWVW %  ^V///////#V/V//.v'*//V,*, .'/*'.V'.'.'/'-V/.'A'///// 4 i A i.tiOtt JOB — IIIJOI mis noon TOOLS I \\v i M .iippK Nou uiih ihr follnuing: .'> jesn't h itand te rtMtn Ihatthc n i the greatest sitisfactr>n lo : ople is the lire for you to buy? lii'iMrated isGoodyear's great nr s -Cushion. Look what ii gives yi THI SAIIST RIDIf IONO TROUIU-rSU MILIAOI! GOOD/VEAR Mere sweets, HM -wU evw, ••*• m CITY GARAGE TRADING i HI 1 SaVWl 18 — %  %  '•' h s.,. 12" & II' |i.;Siiv/S 12" & 14" 1 I'uirr t'hisi Is i to 1 ..K>d) (CsarVj & ablf^Mwf Strew llrivrrs nil tires f.iinl. Is nil sites B i< Ii Vices all sixes H lad DrilK Bojiuonai I'lanr Irons Spoke Shaves Ami ni.my olhen> loo numerous to be mentinnetl. I'.r. M %  Visit Bnfofi Mnttni afoul selection I Isruhere BARBADOS HARDWARE LTD. i i in HOUBI I (M BARG UNA) D 2109. 4s00 and 3534 ^



PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10. 1)51 UAKRADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN' CLASSIFIED ADS. TELEPHONE 2300. The rhMfi tot announccmcnU ol Birth*. Marriage. Deeih* flihwiwl gasSinilllll. an* *M Memo, lam nut Ices i> M M • %  <*eek-da,i %  r-d II N on Sui.day. Mr ata> KimMt m* wordt up i„ M. and I eenla per wot* on wooA-day* ana) cent, sec ward an Sunday* lor each •dditMnal *a>C. Far Birth*. HurUfi 0 B*gsgsir.cn I %  nUBu n c wui M In Carlb Calling Uvt Warar la BJ N lor any number of worsts a* lo H and • cents prr word lor each additional •uid TariRj caah pheaMM b. tueer, I K .nd • p m 1113 lot DaMa Matltaa unlir aflar 4 p n D1KD AMOMfe On October Hh 1MI at hi. i**>dor* *4h Avenue Bav Uitd IMckleRood. Wih.ro AITM better known a* Wilfred liibb. Hi. funeral -.11 leave Iho above midoict at 1> iif l'i h p OH V in good I Don. App*': H U Edwardt In AI.1AHIT-Tha undersigned beg through t.-rdlnrr Austin A Co Lid FOll KALE aftoia km charge woolII MS* as M inn *.s" sprayed First Arm ( %  '<'.*! and iria.i will setUIS. at Lord but will be avail, able Barbados about vMtuber no. Caui oiler* oruv. Hepi> %  NJ. U U. C.O -iln.ni „ T , Ji *n 1*4 HJ • u APPO %  CANS On. 1MJ Cbevruael SI V MMM and one IMg Voed I'rele. t Moth .r* in sound condition right through Dial MM between ID • in and 4 p in t 10 SI 4fi CAR On*
  • FOll III.M HOUSES %  CULDUNE' Cities, eah r U |) r Dlawad Four ka dr n u —a. all modem NBaaaaaa includingKelt .get aloe lior ISih Dial Mr. Brno* i i SBOLANZA -On SI Jamoa' aaa coast I nun from town Fully furniaheij alghl and water Dial II U %  14 It—# %  TAKE NOTICE CLOVER LEAF Th ai M uTMl COLUMBIA HACK LB* UaUlaW i %  n:i..iiii. l -I.I.I,.I under la* lews of the Dominion of ~nra*>l lacker, whoa* trade or bi. inaaa addraaa, Stuart ** '"" "' <-'" %  "*•" A.rn..e V.nfoum. •._*„ I Canada. h*i spoiled lo, the rrgtatratMn _Z. H a trade mark in Fart "A" ot IWgiatar MALTA, laltlewaah From Mor IM to IStn Dec and January AapU Ml* I Wt.lhf.hw4. Ml IIIII, or .'-non. ">• l 11 4,1 POINT VJJtW Worthing lnnnnj.ll Carrabanki. liawly built J bodroaw. hungahrw—L'nlurnkthrd—Dial f|M\ Mtt aajtap Ha*, awaokod nih. fh. rroaan Bah. aatt %  led flati and Bah %  he aama alter one montr •> of Ortobrr IM1. unkwa •hall KB the moan time give to me at any ofwto •h registration The .i..de mark can be arm on applKalton M .-.m.e Dated thi. M4h d of Septeenba* IMI II WUJAAMB Kegutrar ol Tradw Igarka. • !• SI in UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER IB Ikf t'ttrt ftr Diiorrr aid Malrimnial lausrs (IN TUESDAY >nd WEDNESDAY. lBlh and I71h ol Orti*r. ItSl. wr ill huld a Pawnbrokrr's Sale a', our ROOM I pel, when the fallowing Item* lefl In plrdgr with HOI.DEK BROS, of Swan Strat. aid are overdue will be sold. ma CAJtr-o. ia.an.ai tanea. ruiif inrniafinl Dial gajj), 14 M.-t I a. Furnlaned fm-.. I medium to return grateful thank tr all Ihoae who attended Ihe lunrral rent wraatlu. carda or in other wa>i ripieuad their lympalhy. on tru and Jenn, Innla* HI MlChtel PEBSO.Vtl. The public ara hereby warned against giving crodll to my wife. OIJVE BICE u*e Wardi. as I do no! hold m-acll retpr-n.iDlr (or her or anyone elar conirarllng any dobt or debts In my name unlra. by a wrtttm order signed by me GORDON BICE. Diinarombe. ^*l Thomas • 10 si in arned a gal lift I, ClAWfWA 1 do not hold The public ore hrrrb %  Wnf Imm Haynea. a mytell responsible t i har or anyone alar contracting any debt or debt, in my ii.ine ni[eby a written order algnceJ V ma F1TZ WFXKEB Spoanet. Hill. Butler Gap. St Mrcruvrl. 4 10 si m The public arr her giving credit to my a) WOOD inea Sylveatei m>irll letponatble for nr elar rontrartlng any debt v.anted sgalnsl LILIAN YEAH • I do not hold EEEUTKIUAI. C1JMAXELXCTRIC WASHING MACHINES -A small shipment of Uirac just rrcrlved from Canada and at our puce ot 4947 II rauraaanls outataiadlng value Dial—MTg or 4T1 DA COSTA 4 Co.. Ltd Electrical Oepanmanl S 10 %  —4n ri'HI.HSALES Tea emu par aoola Una yfj week-dan. •d U ctmig par u.-:. I. M „ ^ IlAL i..nlr,u_, cnaege |, a oa^av. I*d SIM on iaiKls.1 REAL ESTATE UA'PiTJtlEa* Torchlight Uati EUKMTLKE STEEL FL'BNITUBE—Complata range of steel furnlturo Including Senior and Juniot IMecuUve Desks. Typist. Desk* Stauoneiy Cupboards. Filing Cablnou. Eaecutlva Chairs. Typuta Chair*, etc On display at K B HUNTE A Co. Ltd New Showroom, Dial—SIM or MOT 1U M Cn MECHANICAL HtNGCH 1EWINC. MACHINE almocw and Mahogany Pumilure J*hon< m 10 IO sim MISCELLANEOUS ^ pjunrooD ANXOI!KrElIEXT*i To meel numerous rrque.ta ot saga i.slorrn n. wr have opened a section for custom made IhkrU. pylamaa. panla. -hort.. ladles alrks. bolt ."lothlng etc Having al our disposal the lacililiea of a modern rartory we aie able lo oBer ipl seivlcra al eaceiitronallv reasonable I Bella Shirt Fat icv. sj h(Pl Dafyot %  4TM 10 10 ll-ln TAKE NOTICE BOR DEN'S Thai THE BOKDEN COMPANY, a cor%  anUfan n'ganlaed and ealsling under the laws of the Slat* of New Jersey. United ilied for the I Of %  A I of subalanraa Ingredients ,„ toe Is' looda. and will thr samr -Her i the tHIi day of Oclobat Ntw York. Nn Don of 'a trad Kf-g liter in r.i I' fantsand trier tit led i rnontl, f 1141 unless some person ahull In the ncantime give nol.ee in dupllralr lo ma at my oaVe of oppoelUon ol such regwtiallon The trade mark can be teen on i ph. ..t.on al my onVr. Dated this 39th day of Septenilter. 1991 II WILLIAMS. Ilegisira> of Trade Marks. f 10 11 .in TAKE NOTICE DRYC0 That THE BORJQCN COMPANY, a corporation organlicd and eal'llng under the Uwa of Ihe State of New Jersey. Unltad Mutes of America, whose trad* ot luainess addreaa Is 1*0 Madison Avanue Niw York, New York. United States Ot Amrriea. has applied foe the registration of a trade mark In Part "A" ol Register in respect of substance* uaed as foods and na ingredicn.t In foods. InfanU' and invaildtfoods, and will be n lltled to register Ihe >an.e allet r H mil. IIOctobai n" shall In th duplicate lo mi r .eanlime give nollee ii %  I mi orlln of opposition oi iwi mi %  ration. The tiwda nuuk can ba aern afplicatton al my r*fnc-e. Daled thlt -lh day nl SrptassyJ>sa\ IP H. WILLIAMS. Registrar of Trade Marks ADVERTISE m THE /NTimiES Ot every description Clefs. China, old Jewels, fine Sliver rrcolours Early boakt. Map*. Autographs etc. at Clam rigs Anlkaud Shop idajoining Royal Yachl Club J 10 SI —t f n COCOANUT l-LANTS Selertrd cocoaHI plants Apply. Niagara Factory. Spry Street Dial 4JH II 10 SI J-i GALVANISED KAHJt A small qui ly of Galvanised Nalla I Inch to 4 Ir I 41 cent* par lb O W Hutchiru & Cn Ltd Broad and Roebuck Stre. in H II ; GOOD CUT-OPEN 1 Ib tins J per do board bone* l 0 per d< u fact urine Co.. M. Mru 'i Kin i"Also old cardI Call at Roaerti TORNADO lie. utiful condition. I good racing record (SOD on No ofters I nal K 41 • -juiptnent. Cost giUO OB new roi-ocH Telephone Pl'lK.ir NOTICES a loaek-davt on JftlOOUaal, ureei-ao.. NOTICE IS MKI"ln GIVI N I'..! .1 .I'.mtcnlio,, of the Cnmimaaiom-rs ol lligh%  for the parish of SAINT JAMES iis l.land lo cause u, be i %  he LegUlalUte oi tin. M.u.il aothorlBing thin to linn.iv tlidie In HitInspector Wt NsafaV ways for Ihe aatd pariah lo a turn not exceeding ESOf p.. nnum Bnf j ihe tiavelling alh>.anc ;>a>sb!e lo the said •naprctor of Highways to a rum not e*feeding C lop per annum, auch In%  — lo Uke*'JW*cl at from Ihe It If of April IMI. Dated Ihe „ day of October 1HI YFAKWOOD , BOYCE. Solicitor* for Ihe Coiiimiaaloncii of Highway*. Saint James • 10 II 3n The undersigned will aei up t„ t%lm m his offk-e II James Slntet. prulgrt„ri. October 'Vaol^Ali^TOAT'd-^ninghou.'' • ailed -GLENWOOD" iltuata al Vaate. Hockley. Cbrlat Church cornprising op.,, verandah, drawing, dining and Uu-ca badrootaa. *iichen. W.C. and bath, with water aervke* All tlartdlng on %  1/H r-eche. ol Und thereto lai„„,in. gba %  egBar-*ffl *""* ' "^ A For inspection apply to thr Tenant or. pren-iae*. For all further Information ana eondltlont of sale, apply lo O LEE SABJEANT. Sollcllor 0 al—4n TAKE NOTICE GRANDEE nm •'UUMBIA PACKKBS IIMITEO. a rontoiallon organiml uivdrt 'Ibm oi the DomlriMMi o( Canaala..mpbell Avemse. Vancouver, (anada. ha* applied for the registration nl • th day ol October IMI. unless tame person shall In the meantime give notice in duplicate lo me at my ontca Ol oppoaltkui ol such rmlMration The trade mark can be seen on apiilic.ition JAM. iMt Mil* Tvr* writer Ma, IMt t'-'r-1 I '•* ItSl H WIUAAMg of Trade Marks B 10 II Ir TAKE NOTICF riling are invited lor Hi id icmo.al of a dwellin ttmmrnr aback A Htadq^saits-i Oiler, will n. hasssasj |jgajat ic required ti ha Dwelling House fi Bjaaaj ;iii! kssj %  d up to and purchaser will n and remov. the premise. Sighed BOARD OF D1BJCCTOKS Y M C A Per HEHIIEBT WD^LlAMS, Oeneial SecrtHary f 10 Si On PIUH'EHTY AT NAVY GARDENS A dellghlfully cool and comfortable med i ion-.lied hnusa al Navy Garden* bum of Hone with verandah, drawing Aiuem %  ..i diiui 23BM a Mud 2U0TB JSI.IJ 2Si:i: MI.U I llsj 1S| mot 29217 Gold Ring Hold Necklet Hold Rinj Hold Rlni I Gold Ring %  Ml I Gold Bangle Oold Ring Gold Ring K. (i. W. W..U-I. %¡ old Iden. Uraoelei Hold Necklace a Pendant (out* C W. Watch C. W. Watch 2flJ 22:il StJJS 2*l; 20.1111 ISt 'I %  M I 2< ling ELSIE That TUT ROKDEN COMPANY, a corporatlon organlied and ealsling under the law* ol the State of New Jersey. Culled Stales of America, whose trade at butane-, adlreaa Is 3M Madison Avenue New York. New York Unltad Stales at and bath, %  vain* room, and *or land with bearing fr rttfl iiiowriiiig VA'n, i I IT43 ll-Am. A Set 10 10 SI i REAI, KSTATK \t .1 M L. ftERKSFOKU URATHWAITK I'l-ACK HOCK -Ong HI Bungalotv cnnalating of three Hi bednsoina. drawing •om. dining room, and all modem conrnleiwet. standing on I rood ad SI rrchea ol land wilh poaalbllltla. f< to ill other Bungalow. NAVY GARDENS One III Bungalow >i slating of two ill Irtdrooiiia. drawing -om. dining room. servant rooms. %  rage, and all modern conveniences. ( %  rawing room, dmln modern niininirn IVY One Hi Spot ol 1 "U aq ft UPPER DAYREtJB It OAIV. Our llung'low with Ihire Hi bedii •lining rown and drawing room an trade mark In Part A' ol In respect of substances used and a* ingradleiiii m loods id invalidsfood-. MtfJ u' ba nn m i Blh day Lif Octobei i.II 'i r e nonce in duplicate il mi 11(Tiff of oppoi'lloii %  >( such reglsliitrade mark can be seen on nmc*. Dnled this 1-ath day of Brptrmber. IMI 11 ll HAMS ll.ui.ir.il of Trade Marki IM -:i 284H3 2840H 211413 L'IMJJt I!'!..( 294HK 294B2 294113 2BS-' 25S4II Jii.-ll MM1 26U1I 2K023 26644 261-51 lftU S4WHV 2tT02 29151 Igfl ,n 2lWo2 2W72 IMM M01Q Ma*30 26635 '.'(i'ui. G ..i Btah Q M nuiK (.old Ring: Two O Rinns; Oiic .den. 1 .uclrt Cold RHIE QoU Rinjr L-tdics C.W Which ck Situp Ornig H.O.VV. Wstch o\ Strap 1 Gold Manilas lady's C. W. Walch Ciold Rin (;.-lil Ring Cold Ring <" %  !.( Ring Qold Ring Cold Ring Cold Chain and Pendant Nookliirc & Pendant Cold Ring 1 Cold Baby Banglc Gold Bangle Gold Ring Qold Necklare Gold Mm,: Gold Bangle Ladies C.W. Watch & Strop Gold Ring Gnld Ring Gold Stone Ring MJ thine Gold Ring Gold Ring I-iidics RG.W. Watch Gold Ring Guld Ring One Pr. Gold Ea I.idtoa RG.W. Cold Ring Gold Ring GM Ring Gold Bangle ring*. Watch I 1 %  4SWBBSI 1 Anolhar Bungalow BRHTdNS HILL—One 'Il Bungalow rith Ihree ill bedroom*, dining room, .rawing room, atanding on MOO *q ft J'lH... 4133 I mil in HOUSEN At Rockley. prleea from AJ.303 lo ES.OOO Also hoinse. at Navy Garden". Dayrell, Koad. Pin-Hill and C.ty. Alao lionSpots M Maiwell For particulars about tniildlng. telling of buying PI one D A llrooks al fOU I'leoae leave Phone Number or Address and 1 will conlact you • 10 51 -In PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE 8T1UDBT ON PRIDAV lltl. [1pm ... Hi ao.na.rd al II h w rdan Car Dama.nl T.rm. Ca.h K AKC-HCH M.KET-/.II:. EVELYN, ROACH & Co., Ltd. Inform their Customer*, attd ri.1,.111. that they have tn%  taUsrCJ a I'nvate Telephone Extlinnge at their offlees in Rlcketl Street ai frnm lOth Plt-Ohc Dial No. 3584 or 35*5 for— DIRBCTOR8 SALES DEPAHTMF.NT ACCOUNTS INSrMANlK GENERAL OFTICE. The Provisions Ston -i Murhill Street remains tho same 4672. *••.'*• | 2M53 Gent's C.W. Wnt.h 29541 Gent's CW. Watch 29550 Camera 29574 Cold Ring 29582 Camera MOSS 1-irty's R G W. W 19651 C..I.I Ring 29C72 2 Gold Ring* 2B682 Gold Ring 29696 Cold Ring 29703 Gold Ring 29766 cold Ring I'lf.r lory ac • ...IjuM ;.. ordingly. HrpL 1949 Advertise for 26l 75 27019 27028 27051 27(152 27070 2.(185 271118 27119 27146 27168 27212 27238 I72SS 27346 29780 %  .7110 29797 '•HI I 2M4I 29845 'ti84tf 2MM 21 '881 GENfRAl r*lHVANT Imrr.adlataly Aiply Bear i Top Rock Between 4 and 1 %  iio n -:* IMHIi THE SILVER HAMMER ON THURSDAY llth by order of Mr* W W Davis -r will tell her Itimllure nl Ih nli.rl Rrlltont Cross Boa.I which Includes Good Ealenalon Dining Table. Upright ind Arm Chair*, ornament Tables. Couch. Pedestal Bldaboard In Mahoganv Uphoii Spring Bnckers. China Cabinet Long Wall Mirror, Ola., and Chin. D.nner and Tea Servtcaa. PVatd War. S|l MAN I ;MITTD a Brut,. I I Campari* .rs. of K.ng.to., Works. D om IJIIC. HUH. England has appltM (.; UN i-^i.tration ol a IrasV mark in P-ut 'A'' of Regular in retard of UHH and will be rntilleu Vm samo after one month from the 41. rav ol October IMI unlet. tome perwn .hull in in* ine.intlme givia|spl|catlon al my office Dated thi* Mfh day of Sewtember IM II WIUJAMH Beglttriii ol Trade Marks 10 SI %  ': I I M p t On FRIDAY i Oarage, nnfo'd Sedan Car rocanlly ov r,d pckJP working condition Its" lr good working orl R ARl HF.H McKENZIK 11 lould B* public competition at the OffUi the iinoertigned on Frldn. IBh n by |h. a Decree for the dlaaolutlon of Man.age. and that you are requlrsd to Ble an AaassararMe In IhM Cataae on or bsrfWe Iho lard day of Novamhar ISSI and AM A—l within laurtaan daya IhorcaUcr. alharwlaa the Court may pmreata M haae and da-tamtlna thchargas .lirge.1 m thPetition, .vour ahtan r a Mi wilhatandlng Dated that Mh day of .. **. %  *..r IMI ^ ^ WRJBA: T fcUcftflr lor tha pwuttener of No II J-m-a. Streal IK.-tdJetnwri. Barhayg.n N | 27953 Gold Necklace 11*71 Gold Signet Ring 27994 Gold Ring 28012 Cnmcia %  Ml Gold Signet Ring 28097 Cold Ring 28117 iMdiCf. C.W. Walch 28134 Gold Ring 28138 Gold Necklace Gold Ring Pendant 28160 Gent 1 KG W Watch 28165 Cake Stand Dee. 1919 30511 CsjBBtn 30567 Gold Ring 30590 Gold Ring MMi Gold King 30665 Oold M;i.i: J0685 ladles' R.G W Watch 30741 Gold Ring 30743 ISfMaa 1 R.G W Watch 30747 Gem Hlng; Gold Ring MTTI Gold Ring .' Gold Mn.,: 30793 30810 Gold King 30823 ...klet & C rots 30871 Gold Ring SHIPPING NOTICES HARRISON LINE OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM Due Bnrhadoi 5th Oct. SS. "SCHOLAR' S.S. "SCULPTOR SS 'STATESMAN S S. "STUDENT' From lA>ndon Liverpool and Newport laondnn 1 avet (it.1 LMWS 25th Aug 27th Sept I5ih Oct 27th Oct. 12th Oct. IS) Ni.v :o:i Ni HIIMFWARD FDR THE UNITED KINGDOM Clo-tcT In flarbadoa SS "SCHOLAR" SS "TRIBESMAN" flid Oct I ml (,! Par further Information apply to 28180 282113 28229 28243 28246 28248 28341 28350 28363 28367 28107 28451 M4U 30873 :niji'i, 30910 30960 30981 %  1010 31049 31076 1107 ai II? 31120 31151 31152 31202 31214 31229 31232 31246 31255 31256 31278 IMM 28*118 28529 28544 28567 286 IB IMM 28621 IMM 28739 28762 28773 MM 31393 2I4IK) 3I4H7 31435 Guld Ring (.old Ming Gold Necklace *> Pendant Gold Ring 1 Pr. Gold Earrings Gold Ring Clock Gold Ring Ciold Sigurt Ring 1 Gold Bangle Gold Ring Gold Ring Gold Ring Gold Ring Gold King Gold Ring Guld Ring Cents C W Walch Cold King Gold Ring 1 Pr. Gold Hnnglc* OoM Rlni Ciold Ring I Pr. S. Mangles; Gold Ncklt I Gold Ring Cold lliacelet I CM King* Gent's C.W Wntch Gold Ring Gent'* HOW. Watch White Gold Stone Ring Ladles' C.W. Watch Gold King Gold Ring Gold IIII.I; GoUI King Gold Ring Gold Necklei A Pendant Gold Hlng Gold Necklet h Crosg Lady's R. G. W. Watch Gold Nugget Brooch Guld Ring 2 Gold Rings Camera Gold Ring Gold Necklet A Pendant Gold Necklace Gold Ring Gold Hlng Oold BtOM Ring DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents Canadian -National Steamships %  in riMiiiNii UK CONSTBOCTOB l AOY NELSON AN t HUtSTB Msslrtal Haltfat Arrises Malls Eai*s4.t Bsraad. io On il Or! M Oct IS Oct • OtlthlllMl '-ADY BODNEY Arrltea Arrlees Mssl.a B.IK., IT Oct M on The M.V. "CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR" is expected to arrive here about the 22nd October accepting cargo for St. John. Halifax. Quebec and Montreal _.,_______ GARDINER AUSTIN A CO., LTD. Agent.. ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Ml IN.. Ill.i-I |.|:iUI I 1 HTIIBA— IMh Urlnber, 1M1 n a AGAMEMNON—Mth Ortuber. IMI MAII.INfl TO FI.VMOI TH A!SB AMSTESIIAM I g "in-iiMin llth i. ii.. IMI 'i WllflHtrtn olh Ni.yeenbrr IMI -AIIINfl TO FABAMAMBO ANI> tiKIII-ii UHIANA •I i riitllliON-inn i>i tuber IMI •. AOAMEMNON-Ttli November. IMI MI INI. TO TBINUIAP, FABAMAAaaTO a iiniii-ii miANA HiniiA-rji-i tictnber. IMI %  \IIJN1, fU TBINILIAD A CCBACAO .1 %  NTDM-llh November. IMI S P MUSAON. BON A CO LTD Aa-enU Tho M v CAKinnrx win acco-pt Car| i and Passenger* lor SI Kilts tuning Friday IOUI l*M -nM v SI Lucia, l.l.n.t'l 1 A.. 1... inly for St vineenl sailing Fr* IV 11 111.1 Tha M V MiiNTKA will accapl >nd BI Kll Montaerrat. NeM. ,.. .t tried nuii" ottMii. "COLOMRIB" 14lh *>ber. I9S1 via Martlnlguo. and Gaudrluupe -GASCOGNE'' 3rd NovOHber 1051 via St. Lucia, IVftir--J Unique, Guadeloupe a-**l. Ill .AIMI.X tl tO. A.F.S., F.VJt. FOR REAL I SI A I I AND AITTIOX SALES 'Phone 4640 — Plantations' Building f Oppression and VIctiiT./ ONE GOD, ONE AIM ONE DES'-iNY" MOTTO — U.N.I.A. Complete this list of Stalwart' | by Voting Dee. 13th. 1Q51 MAYNARD V Albert Augustu' %  ** %  Albert Gomes, port-of-Spain. Trinidai' Albert Marrysho Grenada Albert Maynard, Bridg'town. Barb;. 27790 27798 27800 [78M 27836 7847 27888 MM8 27108 .0221 t.,2'.7 H)270 10292 %  ".I 30305 10322 IMM 30362 MMM 3 Gold Rings C.I-: Ring Gold Ring Gold Ring Camera Gold Ring 27868 Gent's RG.W. Watch 27874 1 Gold Bangle Camera Binocular Gold Ring Gold Ring OoM Ring & Watch Guld Ring Gnld King Guld Ring Gold Ring Silver Set Leather Case Gold Ring Gents' Gold Pocket Wntch Gents C. W. Watch Gent's Gold Pocket Watch 10. 10, 51—In '30467 Gold Ring i2827 12880 321,96 32104 32903 32916 • 2922 '. ">••>> 12945 .2931 :l -l2 U( 32978 32999 33000 33009 Gold Ring Qold Sloiie Ring G<>ld Ring 8 Silver Bungles Camera Guld King Clock Cold Urouch Gold Necklace <* Cruettls 2 Gold Rings; 2 Gold Linkj l.ady'a H.G.W. Watch 2 Gold Bangles 1956 Qold Nacklace It PeodAQt Gold Ring Gold Necklace 4c Pendant 2 Gold Baby Bangles 33034 Gold Ring 33054 Gent's C. Pucka*. Walch 33057 Gent's C.W. Watcu 33061 2 Gold Rings :i3Q67 Ladies C W YV %  I .VCiil Gold King Mill did King 33117 Gold Stone Ring 13121 Gnld Ring 3314(1 Owtlt'a R G. W. Watch 33170 GentS C W. W.itcli 3J11H GentS C.W. Watch 33214 Gold King .13224 1 Gold Bangle: 3 G RingA 2 prs. G EarringBroocheii; Gold Necklet tPendant SPECIAL CONTRACT 32320 Gold King 32333 Gold Rto| 32371 Ladles' R. G. W. Walch 32370 Gold Ring M47I Otatd Ring 32480 Gold Signet Ring 32461 Gold Ring 12530 Gold Ming 32366 Gold Watch. Chain an • Pendant 32383 GentaR. G W. Watch 32585 Ladies' R. G. W Watch 32M7 Gold Ring 32594 2 Gold Earrings. G Necklace & Pendant 32659 GoIc> iNecgutte 4 Pendant 32662 I (Sold Bangle 32663 Cold (Jem Ring 32664 Vulcanizcr 32677 Gold Necklace 32733 Gold Ring 32738 2 Gold Rings 32748 Gold Necklace; 2 Gold Earrings 32730 Gold Ring 3:737 Camera 32788 Radio 32803 2 Gold Rings; 2 Go.d Earrings 32817 Gold NeckUoetV Pendant. G. Ring; G. Bracelet 32822 Gold Ring 32826 Gold Ring 26252 275S6 mil J7S40 . 27M1 28240 :837 --86M 29904 10065 30173 .0219 M 7703 I062S M 7281 10222 M 8675 11345 34.983 14900 33M1 18176 .. Uj048 18902 10185 HUM 10244 10629 406M 13M0 M 8642 J uly 7. IM9 M 7663 O et 20. I94-M 7721 Nov. 1 IMI M 0705 Dec. 3. 1949 M 8223 l >ee. 5 1949 M 8092 J an 9. 11W0 M 9073 J an. 24. 1950 M 8724 Mr, 14, 1950 M 3363 Sept 17. 1949 M 1051 O ct 15. 1949 M 4488 Oct 29. 1949. Nov. I. 1949 Nov. 7. l4f>. Nov. I. IP49. 8723 Feb. 13. 1W0. G 998 J an. 12. 1951 M 9655 J an 14, 1951 X 1551 M arch 17. 195! M 343R Jan M M 8912 A ug. 17. 1930 M 134'i Sept. 11. 1950. P 081 .... Jan. 27. 1951. M 9381 Jan M 0509 F. h 3. 1901. S 793 M arch 19. 1951 M 3580 March 24. 1861 Radio tick, can be redeemed before tho day of sale SALE. 12 o'clock. Terms: Cash BRANKER, TROTMAN I I AUiUOOSSPgi



    PAGE 1

    I'M.I lot 11 BARBADOS AOVOCATt IHIIMMIW CK IOBIR 111. i;i BARRIOS Am^GffE %  M hr S* Alwrti C*. ft. 1 \Vrdm->day. October 10. IS5I llaiiiferoii* I'rarlirr WHIN the Legislature was asked to controlling %  in tl > %  ...sembly thai sometlunj; b done to control the impromptu and dangerous contraptions used on motor lorries for reiigloUl OUtJngl and bank holiday picnics. The discussion resolved itself in IWO fesBtl ipfMftUkJ, the 'bus nwneis who had complained that they were tBBBte (uivm-ss and the other supporting the lorry owner who paid taxes and was entitled to indulge in any trade which brought him revenue. Tin-re is ;i point .it which the exercise of CtHeUsl riflhts *letenerates into a license to indulge in selfishness at the probable expense of the public. That point has now been reached in connection with these fi ind the Government should take cognisance of what la an obvious public danger and find means of checking it. It may be that the difficulties which many people experienced m obtaining 'buses for %  us outine.s ami picnics, because of the regulations dealing with concessionled to this contrivance to accommodate the faithful. It was alleged that cer tain 'bus owners me* great difficulty in obtaining permission to use a number of 'buses outside their route But it was known that in some cases the granting of this population would have upset the schedule on the particular route. And it was now alleged that other 'bus owners were refused permission to rent 'buses to other owners who bad contracts for transporting outing parties. All this cannot outweigh the fact that the method of circumventing the regulabtt now led to a positive daner to the public. The contraptions which are fitted on to the platforms of lorries when occasions demand are in many instances, old. dilapidated, and badly adjusted They are not subject to any inspection by the Inspeclors provided by Government to work In the Highways and Transport Department. The motor lorry itself is inspected and must conform to certain specifications and answer certain engineering lests for reliability before if can be put on the road. On this lorry however, an owner can put any contraption made of pine, oak, or shingle and he has the right to crowd as many people into it as will subject themselves to the danger. Public evidence is overwhelming to support the fact that many of these "tops" which are now fitted to the lorries are out of alignment and look as if they would topple off. In many instances the services of a carpenter has to be summoned just before they move off and even then they seem to defy the law of gravitation along the journey. On a recent outing by one of these religious bodies one passenger fell from the top and suffered injuries. 1.1 is true that a passenger might fall as easily from a 'bus but the fact remains that the protection winch he CM eel from a properly con structed "bus is not available in one of t)M se JI %  : What constitutes a scandal is that tbOM contraptions are not subjected to any inspection and can carry as many passengers as the owner cares to carry. The owner who provides a proper 'bus according to the regulations is therefore penalised to the %  octant o| having to limit the number of his passengers and to keep his vehicle in Mich A condition, mechanical and otherwise M is laid down by the law and enforced by the Transport Department. It might be that in view of the necesto %  libra' the public some means of tranaporl it will be desirable to allow vehicles of this type on the road at intervals when there is great pressure on the bus service hut the le.ist fluGovernment can do Ifl to provide that they be subject to inspection and conform to some rule of %  The \.hides theni—lvw ennstitute a dam.. i I i othl i Utett of the road. The Kintf THK announcement that there will be no further daily bulletin concerning the ill ness of His Majesty the Kiny would seem to indicate that the period oi anxiety has passed end that His Majesty is on the road to recovei> This conclusion is further fortified h-. the visit of H B H Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edlnburgr to CaUWil The humble thanks of the peoples "( the Hi Itlsh Empire and Commonwealth will be * the recover,of the King. The Empire is already faced with %  etbecl 1 nature and even the continued His Majesty with the con Of state affairs being conducted by %  Council of State would havi added I %  the inconvenience. t thit H n* in the footstep* of hi* father has endeared himself in i his human Interesl in theh strain H ha* been km his own personal uppc.il to 1 bond of alTcL-tlou which kl I poaslbl forge between Sinai i nd comn %  The prayer.* of a loyal and fnithful people have been answered .mi the I -hut quick and I" 1 **! health t. I!.Ma)< m further causu fur laa n k f ui n sss. MY BROTHER ...THE KING /\s the watchful hopeful eyes of Britain are turned on Buckingham Palace, a book is published which reveals with warmth and intimate knowledge much of the character of the man whose health holds so much for us all Here, from "A Kings Story." by the Duke of Windsor, are some glimpses of the King Bertie fc his brother—as the Duke sees him H.R.H. v the Duke x oi Windsor )ur boyhood . . and my .'his marriage 'abdication 11KKTIE came into my room alone that evening (the evening of the abdication, December It, 1030) foi a tail talk. I wai In the midst of packing my mod personal possessions .. I closed the door, and pushed aside the Ihings on the sofa to make place for him to alt down Shy and retiring by nature, he shrank instinctively from She gregarious life I had lived with some rest. Yet he possessed admirable qualities -qualities that may not have been r-o marked In me. He would make a fine King; I wa* ronfldent of that. During these last days we had ipoken to each other with a frankness recalling the untroubled com pan) on %  flip of our youth. The situation seemed to cry mutely for u symbolical Inying on of hands, a pasaing of the torch. But there Is not much that a former Monarch can tell his successor. "You are not going to find this %  difficult job at all." I assured him. "You know all the ropes and you have almost overcome that slight hesitation In your speech which used to make public %  porting so hard for you.' Words do not come easily to Bertie on occasions of groat emotion; without hli having to tell me so. I knew that he felt my going keenly. At the same time he ^mW aj he could not •rin^ marstesi (rclinii" : ui? i.mt. This. aftaf aJ] for Si Had mot: a: Ha *:i.< *ju!ii %  %  : concern i left, and i for me • %  ( dread if i fa ship Hr *i led a tew 1 ng •houjn 'i u ;e:*er He ie l.'igeU for mr u> be happy i:*d.nt 'hat rw jf all people n;u'c or able %  . : the i lsump days He .. [>,,-. % % %  %  ha* % %  i wouia M i intei-asj %  %  • As that late hour the question -f another title seemed of little consequence to a man who had been King. Immediate reflection told me ahat. as the son of the Sovereign, 1 was by right of birth a PrinceHi* Royal Highness the Prince, Edward Hut Ilertie had evidently pondered the quest if m and no doubt judging It only proper that I should bear a title ;it least equal to that of my younger brothers, Harry, Duke of Gloucester, and George. Duke of Kent, he sold thoughtfully "I shall create I a Duke. How about the family name of Windsor?'* "Duke of Windsor,' 1 I said, half to myself. Liking the sound of it, I nodded in agreement. "It shall Inthe first act of my reign." Outlook . I TOOK comfort from the fact that my bt other BtrUt, to gdJHMB the succession would pass, was in outlook und temperament very much like my father. The patterns of their livsas. were much the same, with the steady swing of habit taking them both veir after year to the same places at the lump time ond with Uhe same associates. Strongly rooted each In his own existence, they tended to be wlthdrawn^from the hurly burly of life that I relished. Both were devoted family men a quality that goes a long way for a king in a constitutional monarchy My father was grently beloved. And the undoubted popularity of my brother Bertie, whose lite Is so much like that which my father led. suggests that Irrespective of whatever other forms the monarchy might have taken under the impress of a different personality, the British people are rightly pleased with his faith' %  .. i uivmg on of my father's ways. I.f-MHI. . THE SCENE rnanoes, 9>.s..n. Uchtly. In one of the Professor's weekly reports to my father on OUT separate progress he once wrote under Bertie's column luattsAtrTC and playful." The next time the Professor returned to Marlborough House mj fats* I s"Ql for h*m to ask precisely what he meant. The Professor, embarrassed, finally explained: "Your Royal Highness, it isn't only that Prince Albert is loattttsUvo, but. sfban I seold him. Its pullUJ lml Ou Osborne DURING my last school term. my brother Bertie joined tea College (Osbomc). Since the | school's rigid caste system did not permit a senior to be seen In •he company of a llrst termer 1 .mild (tot establish there the %  lose companionship we had always known. However he was soon beset b> ihe same r.ew-boy difficulties thai had nearly overpowered me; and bar arrangement we used to ao I for walk. Ijeyond the playing I Melds. Bertie would tell me his trou-' hies and I would try to advise him on the basis of my own experience. Power Of t .nl. MY sister Mary's threat, "I'll tell Mama," although seldom carried out, had a powerfully subduing • Heel upon us. In this manner Bertie and I discovered for the flnH powers that little girls the world over exert over their brolhir On Marriage IN 1923 my brother Oertic had married the daughter of a Scottish earl. Lady Elizabeth Howe l.\ •<.. who had brought Into the family a lively and refreshing spirit. One Blessing AND from that last broadcast speech on thv abdicailoo evening. A FEW hours ago 1 discharged my last duty us King and Emperor and now that I haw been succeeded by my brother, the Duke of York, my ttrst word* must be to declare my allegiance to him with all my heart. This decision has been made less difficult.•<> me by the sure knowlixlge lhat my. brother with his long training In the publi %  affairs of thicountry and with his tine qualities will be able to taka ii.v place forthwith, without interruptifHi or injury to the life and progress of the Empire And he has one matehlesblessing, enjoyed by so many of you and not bestowed on me—.i happy hnrnc with his wife and children. • FltOM "A King's Story." VflfMOirS of the DuJcc of Wind-ior fC'flsseff, 29(.J, out (odav. —L.E.S. WHY WE NEED NOT BE ALARMED ABOUT Slailiii s 300 Siilimai im s By think of the last r FOR some time it has been fe^aVSasffiS" 1 "M,A,KLCTON ^WVJaSBBmjr.no.. Wo a ,c ,old >hoy havo .„.,„,,,.„„, ,,„,„„, Whon ,, boc.mo !;. d.nwrnjj, M.Ll ,^11,0,,, !" ^,r .„,.„ ">o ofllol.l account o( tho II ,lllo ol ll h, ' .rcrtl which homod In &&. SSSyfta il,rc.m o Ub .r'l.L""'" ?rtl A.uc h .nd Cur.*, 'Handful' on Patrol Wh ,f n lhp (: m n "d ra,ljr The RuM I noaaesa ri %  ••"' h receivers which gave h.vo .w.r inn %  iilZp.iSi.TT i lhc areo wiIn *> nwny a.reran Secret lli K h.Spd Ship ,'„„ucUon b "'"""-' "•"<" "rtl h.gh with .h.nrada, Reported Bl,.„„ l'p !" -J?>?._?*. •* £5?£tt22 ZlSVtZ iiinam on the surface. :une the U boats stayed n the surface by day and fought Included in the 300 arc number of small coastal submarines — which might not be solete boats. have over loo i on li uclwn Yet. having said all this. there is na reason il all |o be alarmist. The majont.s of Hussiu's submarines are old. Itussia. according to "JancY Fighting Ships," seems to have a policy of never scrapping a ship. The reel core of the fleet are """ are oia b k .nvthlnff uo to Ten the -K" and "Stitch." class sub. £g* *^"'-ine, boldly „ lht fhTk^ns* To counter Ihk marines but the performwtc. of ? !" d ., e !" ,d UB,n T J l c hom '>*-" "^"g csnnon and rocket ever. these relatively modem ffJiK*^, !" *£ **^ !" project.les were fitted to aircraf. boats is not out of the ordinary, """f" 0 ''But could the Russians M „ TU pi---The important question to """'ate the Germans in "wolf.f. —**. %  "* ." %  % %  in naval warfare. It is certain "*£* £S?S Tw* 1 t' W hc thai the number of submarines "*?* nircr _ 'or the job. ntain on patrol The w-type techRAINBOW'S END Britain's Elet-tion stirs tin* Americans... They say it is *in the bag" for the Tories I r. la NEW YORK. | THE Americans thi.s time are not even pom^ through the motions of honouring the 'urn fiction that a British election Is MNH 'if their affair. They think it is^—espei ..illy this one. Right across the U.S.A. theyi are quite openly hoping for a Tory victory. And most of them think it is in the bag. Writing from London. Scripps-Howard | columnist Parker La Moore warns, however.' %  t may prove easier to turn the Socialists out[ than to repair the damage they have done. | Fuel and power shortages this winter may be aa serious as in 1947. There is the short-1 Age of train crews threatening transport breakdown. There are rising living costs, meat ration cuts and the widening gap between imports ml exports. The Socialists, say La Moore, can be condemned for not facing up to these problems earlier but the incoming Government will find them difficult to solve. IF THEY WIN . LUDWELI. DENNY. Washington columnist for the same paper, believes, that a Tory victory would bring no basic change in British policy, but "the Conservetives would bring more needed administrative efficiency to the Government than the Labourites." What happens could be important for Americans, says the Wall Street Journal. ''A Labour victory might mean more baillrui out of Britain s ailing economy—a Tory victory, fewer drains on the American taxpayer." The Journal expects no new Socialist projects and thinks nationalisation schemes are now stuck away for fear of offending fli6 middle-class, whose votes will be decisive. Says the influential "Kansas City Star"; "The people are tired of controls, evermounting taxes and the failure of Labour to >irive the major problems. The temper of the people places Labour on the defensive and it is inconceivable lhat Mr. Churchill will allow ihem to get off." OPTIMISTS? NO i Even on the American Left there is no I optimism about Labour's chances. In the New York Post, for instance, Dr. Frank Kingdon, just back from London. writes: "I expect the Conservatives to win a majority of 25 to 30. The one group that may profit politically from the present situation is lhat of Anmtrin Bevan. The struggle of this group for control may well be the most ilrnmatic political story out of England in the coming months." In the Hearst newspapers. Washington political columnist George Brown says: "The British people have reached the end of their rainbow. "Socialism has been given a fair and very long trial and has proved a delusion." In St. Louis, Missouri, there is unanimity The Courier Journal says bluntly: "Labour's chances don't look bright. There's little doubl Anglo-American relations will be improved by a Tory victory." And the Globe Democrat says: "British Socialism is at its lowest ebb. Unless there is a revival of Socialist fervour, .-labour': supremacy looks doomed." The Boston Herald feels the coming Social:st rejection may be in name only but add:;. "Even that is important in the Anglo-American partnership. A Conservative Government will smell sweeter on this side of the Atlantic". %  tUBOO&S II #. Ii.it M: THK BEST i.X I Oil \ ADVOCATE STATIONERY %^'-^^-,V,0'/,v^V^%V.'-',',-,',V.-,',-,*,'-',',V-*//*,.V/V//*VV. must have Germi r' r ^X"\T,JL^ 5i %  '"„ u rd-m"mUm-o"„" "p.'SS Co-U. Command t, MU! ^££^S§ afiaV-tPsTf §tSS£ effectiveierafl tactics ron. and we expect soon to get 1 and weapons th„t wore resaon,ne Neptune, a first-class Ameri—n anti-submarine aircraft. Meanwhile the Navy is conren%  But we do not stand still Naw tratlng its main resources on. types of radar may enable a plane preparation* for anti-submarine, more easilv to detect | Schnorkel, warfare. Bunv Thitt Listens ur own submarines have here! There is the Suno-Buoy. I com^,J m Ef r ? an, l > >ar, # lo la > ** hined hy,'-ophone and „„i lo i*>'>"> liunlcrs of enemy ,„>transmitter which relays the """v^"* md of the war. It curries its own oxygen in the is said to be capable of under water speeds of 25 Knots. Bui hydroirn peroxide ks mk* and unsUMr stuff, and there sre reports that the onr u .ii!,. %  ii,.,i on which the IU' — I.HIwere eaperlmeutlnK Mew p and sank with all hands. sound of %  -uhmarine to an aero, "" *" '* cc anli-siibm.mne We might be on safe grounds, plane. II can be dropped in ,,,rc B |* bfm strengthened b y therefore, if for the present we numbers to cover a wide area nrw buUUin *' tlscounted this os a serious Its tactirsl use is exceedingly A Double Weapon langer. complicated, and there are many The Asdic, the famous under., noises In the KM, including llsh tvatgg oss te c t| M apparalus. wOJ Ne rears of Atom-Sub. which Iraik. squeal, and cvm be vital. There is also Ulk of an atomicimitate the thud of a submarine'* One im,>ortant new [towered submarine of unlimited engine. locks the Asdic lo the anti-subrange and endurance, but we Sometimes. too, the radio marine weapon protector. So the have nothing to fear here, so far. operator hid been startled to submarine is simultaneously A force we must reckon with hear not a propeller but dance PkVSsssd and the anti-submarine is the new. fssl. German-type music XXI V boats. These large subFurther, we are progressing In the long run the Hung thai marines have improved Schnorwith homing torpedoes which. If really counts Is, the brains of one kels. and their maximum subdropped in the urea, pursue the scientists and the skill, courage, merged speed l something like submarine and des' n„l adaptability of our seamen 15 knots, with a cruising speed There are. too. undoubtedly and ., of eight knots. new and startling <.. .-hnllengt should come we I The Germans were actually vices and weapons which must shall be ready to meet It. urefi-bneating the type XXIi on remain secret. New York Herald Tribune's London correspondent. Joseph Newman, believes Mr. AltIce is basing his hopes on the belief thai Labour will hold its following while th: Tones will fail to increase theirs. Opinion polls do not support this, com ments Newman. Reporting the Evening Standard's prrposal that the Tories should enter the lists tvithoul anv fixed programme Newman says: "I Ins Hits .HI indirect warning to ConservII lives to refrain from making promises which they will not later be able to fulfil. The Con•erVBllVM inuy win but the economic renlllics will remain." In the Middle West the Cleveland Plain Dealer agrees that odds a*-e against the Socialibis and says. "What the Tories really want full terms as Government, one to i ten out world problems, the second lo put Britain a-^ far as pract.cr.ble back on a free enterprise basis'' World Copyright Reserved. — L.E.S.


    PAGE 1

    \ P.\<;E TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATF. WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 10. 151 CcUiib Calling M"„ W. S. JONES. Prwiiieni the FIG. Cricket Board of Control, fi v, slag luncheon part> at ~Xhv Ci il> ilntd last Friday. Ufe guaati Charlie To? I Ki % %  -. W4Icolf a ..ios Cricket Mr" "FoOt w I %  aiutt*! -* the team. M Ti-dilJ O. S. < %  s %  %  ton from Barbados 111 Mr Kenny Wiahnrt Mid Mr. Frank Orm, meinbcis ot the B G Cricket Board of Control. Messrs. B. Gasktn and L-rnme Thomas of the 11 Q M Mr. C. R. Browne. The following evening there .. part) at B.G's.. Press AsaaCtaUflfl OB BOOO 8tl"Mt taaour ••< Profi-it-xir Rudolph Uunbar ami Mr O. S. Coppm. Sports Editor of the Barbados Advocate. New Exhibition T HE next exhibition at the Barbados Museum will be one of achool children'.' Ai* and Handicraft's. It opCAl on Friday October 12th and continues unt.l November tth. To-day Begins 5712 "po-DAY. lb* Jews of BarbaX (k,s eeJcfa ata then New Year and Jewish stores in the City will be closed for the rntirday. On the Jewish calendar thi is the opening of the year 5712. Auction Sale iWomen Every Time I I I %  I 11 I ro-n\. a TOMORROW Eden s Niece M ISS ANN EDEN. 28-vcar-old „ T "• "EBETT, head of Ne* daughtei of Sir Timothy Yorl f Botanical Gardens, has bci. and Lady Eden, and niece of Mr. V1BI ln BrilUh flower shows Hr Eden, will hsve a courttp Pn lhat while British gardentry wedding when she marries lov *f *** ahead of Americans In hU Petal Negroni on October 27. ati.ndards of cultivation and] Pateenal \. u.* Doabu rill : plants shown, America! dots better in flower arrangement. Reason? Women dom 1 n a t e, American -hows and "women arc more colour and composition-' co iscious than men ACTRESS TELLS HOW ACTRESS Gertrude Lawrence is going to At an academic teachjob Into her stane engageKeeping Together T HERE are to be eng. Mpajgajl igagementK for Prince** en **V n ? Elizabeth and Prince Philip dui* M the ing their tour of Canao.v Saturday OctoHamUton (Ont: rio) had augU be at All Saints Ch M instead, in the New Forest. Altai ihe wedding thtit %  MaM Edi r*om. Fnthi>m House, near I.yndhurst. In pan of the house I-ad> Edjti runs I girls' school She has another school, for younger rMldren, in Kensington Miss Eden, slim and aubui haired, has done th? secretarial in* and accounting work for her met tdy Edon w lookUlm Lewro^. who ls %larTUil ,n li r rT^.n"^!!! n I--,-HHi M t a thtf Broadway musical m ..h dross of cream and gold brocade. ••,_ _,_. _ _T .1. •_ W -. , „, ., the part of an English governess .1. Mudents Welfare who attended the court of the WHILE he was In Englunu. King of Slam—has so Impreasei Mr. . C Sangater. Jamaica's New York's Columbia University Minister of Social Service, apart that it has asked her to deliver from his pre-occupation with the g course of lectures on "Theory Ministers Supply Conference, and practice of acting made enquiries regarding west Indian students welfare in Britain THAT MAN COLl'MBl'S and addressed public meetings on FIFTH-AVENUE merchant! alJamatca affairs. Before he left he most wish Columbus had never had talks witft the Director of diicovered Amenc.i. There Is a Colonial SrhoUr*. Mr. Keith. Mr. gTcmt p t de down Fifth-aeenue bangs*; reeli.allowances touavln hll honour t October 12ernment scholar, should l>e , fa ^ m ^ Increased. Among other lecture ROD CAMERON — FUZZY KNIGHT in THE OLD TEXAS TRAIL AND "MADONNA OF THE SEVEN MOONS 4 STEWART GRANGER — PATRICIA HOCK ^ST'l&SZf.l ...11 BTOWN <• in** r m* at / 0(AL 2SH SAT • 1 in,* 11 ro OUU. 1310 "--• 1 TQ • loaaon> .o> loimiAn Tun — %  1 • %  r Fuuawn mmcAL. ACTSOM ooiraut THE FLEETS IM i "EL PASO k^Mk; William ItaaSan Jhn f*>> OBII HJI"I DomUk' Lavnour. William HOUIOT EtM" Brrli.o Ju CODE Of THE' LAWLESS a ARIZONA TRAIL %  ft week-end S:.n Hirrr 'i_l,.„ merchants lose thousand iteming Un ^ ( ~i3 Like. It s going to IKa gcited '.hat Prince Phll.p should \MR R. L, NEDD of St. Vincent. • and Mr. Bladon visit ^n^al headquarters thefe. 1VI who la In England on holiday tomers out of the stores. dotthll year they are asking the city officials to stop the parade t 60th street. There are no shops bove the 00th. ORAND OPENING FRIDAY al ?.*0 A *• 'THEBACIS^V PLAliA IHaJ MM ODAY • %  IOMOBBO* lilS>> MVSTSBT OP MAJMB ROOST Haru Mor.lM. Patrlc Knoaln MASI MAS!. MONSTSS Lon Chana>. Dick Fontn Mla>IM SM. I Ml %  INIUUir* •( Ik* RIO iiKANnr taitrv THE GARDEN — 8T. JAJsTE> TSar (• %  If) %  > r %  JIMS Mruto wMiKi.11 jirrrsa Jo* YuW ft K*n Rlano *. HOT ftODJsim* L>do. Art D*kr VM FH S*rtnW&+'***fS*'+'*"&*SS**''****' 1 '****'***' GLOBE D I lilNG he dance Crane Hotel l-cr 13th there is going to be a gested '.hat Prince Phil.p x.ould m* small auction sale and Mr. Bladon visit ""val headquarters there, JV1 %  red lO auction articles HMCS Star. wlnl. Princess Llif rom Nigeria, was in London last APPLE PERr'l'ME whuh BR i.<-mg collected. These xabeth was havir .ea with the Wv ^k. He is a Magistrate in the WOMEN may soon oi> usin. ot the thing* which will A.gyll ond SuUwiI-tnd HighlandE si ^ rn provinces of that colony, more American than French perbe wi bale—a lx*tle of champagne, ers of Canada. SI 0 is Colonel-lnMr. N-dd says he likes it very tunas) and the perfume they use :i box of chocolates, o saucepan. Chief of the reg>. *nt. much It. Nigeria and expresses ,„., ^ ma( ie of jpijl a large doll, a aU>'.ci**c and there But officials in Ot'awa have the hope :hat West Indians und nre many other useful items. told the Mayor of Hamilton. Mr. West Africans will become yet Proceeds f-om .he dance will Lloyd Jackson, that the Princess closer friends, Ro to ihe V.nter Memorial Fund and" her husbend preferred to Three Talks —to help build a school hall at remain together at all functions Codrington Hltfi School. planned for the tour. So the I On Five Months Usve naval DONIO O'CONNOR P,^ LAURIE @ ~i FRANCIS*#**•*< %  CECILRELUWAT IESSE WilTt • A JNIVERSAL INTERNATIONAL PICTURE pLYING Officer Julian A. Mar'lait has been cancelled; Loth will visit the Highlanders On* Seriout Note son of tho Hon. T. A. Marry*how, CUE. of Grenada, ssun.jra !%?%?*£ p Nc v s r comed, ; n T ?,, is ot present in Barbados. Ac^^ raU •„ trop !'* lHU n * gpsnpaniad by his wife and baby ^ e nc, P . r .. **' t ,nd they arrived from Grenada on Monday by B.W1.A. and are ^i"^?^* ,..„ 11'^ The Agriculture Depart being asked by the apple t. develop the flavour oils obtained from apples Into perfume baso* UNDERSTAND ?hat after the The name of the new perfume h> publication of the Waddingbeen chosen—"Eve ton Commission Report on British Guiana, the BBC. ptens S9 COOLING OFF include in Its Home and General HOUSEWITII in America hnvi Overseas Service, three talks caught the frozen orange Julct RO P_ V about current trends in the West habit so hard that they "* Indies. The speakers in the series ioome five slaying at Athl TonUbelle Mr. Marryshow mon'hs* leave from the R.A F. which he enlisted in 1941, hav, Ing the distinction to be Grenn„„] da's first volunteer for JU combat when ha li-ft the island for Tnnidod shortly r-fter the outbreak of hostilities to Join the Air Training Scheme there. Going over to England, he rose from Aircraftsman to flhe commissioned rank in 1944. He saw action from 1941 as a fighter pilot, operating in "Spitfires till Ihe Invasion of Europe, in which he took p-.rt, when he was transferred to dive-bomber types, piloting these craft over Frunce. the Low Countries and Germany. On II of hostilities. he served as ;• lu ison omcer for th? Colonial Ofllcc for about six months. being •l.ilionerl wttl) about 120 J.m.H.iif. with whoar welfare lie was entrusted. He was then gecondco to Has aflntBi'.' of labour .it Cambridge. serving in n similar rapacilv connected with the selection of vocational trainees from the Culorlps who hnd ended thai war service. At the end of 1946 he entered Hull University, rt ,th RA.F. Ismvs, doing Social S< Iwo yenrj and during the next three years studied Economics and Political Science at the London School .4 Economics. After his final sjureliiaUon be stunted to the AII Porce .t."i is now on rtvmonths 1 loavc Hmed sales fantastically 1 talks will include two West retr-nl week they bought 12.000,001 McD..nald Hailey on the Sular '^'^LSjfca Roft "" %  '? frozen orange concentrate. radio show "Calling All Forces" Writing A Book In June July, and August they in l^mdon IJBI week. Ray gets a *T*HE London Evening New* accounted for 120 million • eg prominent sportsman along eaoh J. last week published a short elusive ot what hotels anc' week for a witty chat dunng the story written by Gordon Woolre-taurants wkre doing—one-th,n programme and enlisted Bailey ford, son ol BfWeta OeaaassfSiTflBrs) than in the same period list this time. Mac got a big reception famous K.C. Gordon, who is mar] year. In the MOT wh I the studio audience and ried to a French artist, wrltes|on Julv 31, 34.O00.ui" gaUoni of %  nme through the "interview" regularly for the B B.C. "Cartbconcentrate were prodiiced. like a seasoned performer. During bean Voices Programme". He is ana %ertous note, he said his now wnting a book of short j THE GENIUS %  mbttlon was to win two ttttasat geotisi wnkli ji hopes win %  %  ASKI:I> || ihe SSMSSJ thtf the Olympic Gamos in^Helsinkl accepted by n London Publishing ;ch.irlie Chaplin is one of Hollvood' 'real geniuses."" Claiiv xt year—the 100 and 220. House Rupert and the Lion Rock — 1 ihe former English WIT* girl who haicturr.the United Stales to play •ite Chaplin in hi* next film "Hie worlds!" TO-OAV It TOMORRtlW 4.34 & S.15 Universal DOUBLE — "NAKED CITY" Starring : BARRY FITZGERALD "SCARLET Stan IM'IMNO MAT! DAV 4.45 & 8.11 FRIDAY ONLY 4.39 A 9.15 Universal Double . Rod CAMERON —Fuzzy KNIGHT TO-DAY A TO-MORROW 4.45 £ 915 P.M. An M 1. M Het Doable . CLARK GABLE .in ANY XI Mill II CAN PLAY AND KBED ASTAIKE In THREE LITTLE HOIIIIS GLOBE OM;\I\I. 1 it in 11 .7 and if. 1.7 p.m. SOME SWEET RACKET' No Cop CouM Touch Him... IKU^WORD F~~ 1 r I r 1 r-rI" 1 J One wiim lumiiid di F Ruprn gOH to ih Common to SM il ht tin find any rip* bliNF4DAV OCTOBTH II II am PiQir.nuiic jB\ m Uualca Brllannlca 11 N.-.I. II lO p m as—1 is .ge. geL_ SouwnliL _. D m Snuih CaMarn Cotinim Sprlnabn-.. 5 l p m Interlud. o in Nw Heeort.. %  p m Sand. PherMMi at thTlwatrr <>raar.. 11.,, UIMw M-.lne. t 43 p m IT^.am..,. Today'i ^p<>ii | p m p in N*M Anal nils P m Callliif Ihe W.i! Indir 1 m Twenty Question! 4-ia P si n H u u M DEAL AT No. 13, ROEBUCK STRFET HINGS KOI.LKU OATS — FRY'S COCOA HI IN/ BAKED BEANS — NEMPRAY POWDERED MILK ll'NTLEY A PALMER SWEET BISCUTS niKDS t I sr.VRII POWDER Al'IK l'l.AM 1 111 TTI R KMtlRGKN'K VIENNA A OXtOKII SAl'SAtil S KELLOGG S CORN FLAKES OVALT1NE (\Mrnni s sorrs JACK STRAWS r-KlLL-IT BUC1IITI — PREPARED MUSTARD A n..rii Welrcine AwalU You JOII1V D. I AVI OH A SO>S LTU. Otm anui paper acl MUHKI claaalllrd *ir* ?B stw?^ Reaoleeo • rnia date ia if. sat i sa (Si legai comma,,. No SM ttila 41 the orsseat 1:1 lor i\-. (4) %  n are tMtenea > i pMaat irom Tro> i pcocrex was nm Deere up lv la • duett dead r.u nraiv irl vn r u %  %  SOU le-elowf. i: taateasrT i*. 1 i Me. kaaeu: To-night at 8 o'clock and honouf every night this of the visiting wttk U S. Navy CLUB MORGAN will be open with the I I I II* >IOIM.\\ MM III snt \ Playing from 8 p.m. to dosing Dslicion Sleek DMwan teived ihrogghout the nioht. B.B.C. RADIO PROC.RAMME 1 Asthma Mucus Dissolved Isf. Day f DIKE FT ••o-en.t,.' pul t ... . . •• alvip.line mum. * Wan oi ..KI H.1... ,:., M....,: nlendacb :^S^ . J, i.,y,„ .,fcaaalMi 11.. i,.~ Eczema Ifch | Killed in 7 Minutes Your akin haa nearly SO million llnr | N 1\0 home should be package of this ful detergentwithout a most wonderi-nd rnuM tarrlbhi h.-hin. truchlnir. Bcaaaaa, Pa-Ilm iiurnin-, ACM. iL.ntworm I'x.rlaala. Ilia, khxnili. IMmplaa, Pool Ilrh and other Meini-nea. thillnarr ir-atmenu B lv* o B )r I.-. ,m— Ida? .1., p,,, %  -xTi >auaa. The new dlar> :dcreei, kill. Ihe B erme In T ami tift-uarMit-*.! to give Pas — iiirariu*. mo.>th akin r money buck an rat urn kate ;:,.t cuarante<-l REMEMBER you get 40'i more washing with Psfkftjw ai 30r. OREFTParkas al BOr. I w..k. < C IIH'K VOILE PLAIN Ml \\ IINGS— C.rey. Blur. Fwn. Pwch PBSSS CABKRDINK in all ..hades tVIIITK SHARKSKIN FLANNI I.I II) SPUNS SI.15 $1.3(1 11.57—SI.3S 52.18 51.37—SMS Fine sliipmrnl of Ladies Shoes a T. II. EVANS A WSM I I SS I IIS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES 4606 M :'t'..r,". Nixoderm '"•>;•' **ar Serin TrBMklci Pains in Back uonein3Hoars if rou auirer tarribla, •hart r-lns r .l.il wearin, down ^^Tll CM 7Z %  %  rdinfciT madVlnaa ImLZLfVS?^USt r&& ££3iJ5&3 *naor. S-.IMM. XikiaaT^-^'^^•'•'^^^ •'•'-'•' %  ''''''^' %  '''•'''''•'''•'•'''• '•'S.'SSSS.RIDE A "HOPPER" BICYCLE >.V/.V,V/,V/.VV/-//^V,V///VVV/-V/V/.'lV>; Win. FOGARTY II rlahl or In Si hour. on Ouaranfee m p u t .Kiney h,k. Act Now* iu_lll fa| balirr and ona weaK. stex Ihr It Mil IIIOS I III \Hit y I ,,, White Park Road, TAILORS Oil MM I V RELIABILITY AA'R EXCELLENT FITTERS There's a Wealth of Experience behind Our Tailoring Craftsmanship and also that Talent for taking Care. rurry nunprfhvnsitf Tweeds. Worsteds. Tropicals. Doeskin & Gaberdine WE INVITE till II INSPECTION Win. FOGARTY w ITD. V,*. UV*WSS*'S*'*'S**S>






    fharvbados



    ESTABLISHED 1895



    Britain Will Stay In
    uez Canal And Sudan

    t's Decision To Drop

    Treaty Called Mlegal

    LONDON, Oct. 9
    BRITAIN Tuesday night denounced Egypt’s decision
    to junk the Anglo-Egyptian treaty as illegal and announced
    her intention to stay in thé Suez Canal Zone and the
    Anglo-Egyptian Sudan until satisfactory Middle East
    defence arrangements are made.

    Britain also accused the Egyptian Government indirect-
    ly of double-dealing inasmuch as Egyptians were advised
    on September 21 of a new Anglo-American and French
    plan for settling the Anglo-Egyptian dispute and setting
    up an overall Middle East defence plan.

    The official British Government statement was issued
    in the name of Foreign Secretary Herbert Morrison after
    a day of conferences at the Foreign Office.

    Morrison said Egyptian Prime Minister Nahas Pasha had
    been informed by a personal message on September 21
    that a new western proposal was forthcoming shortly,
    aimed at a satisfactory solution of the dispute over Brit-
    ain’s position in Egypt.

    MIDDLE EAST. DEFENCE



    The new proposal to Egypt was understood to propose:
    Firstly, mutual abrogation of the Anglo-Egyptian 1936
    treaty in contrast to Egypt’s proposal to junk it unilater-

    ally.

    Secondly the creation of a Middle East defence system
    in which Egypt would play the major role. It would in-
    clude the U.S., Britain, France possibly Turkey and British
    Commonwealth nations which age vitally ‘interested in
    the Suez Red Sea life line. :

    Informed sources said exchanges that have taken place
    so far on the proposed Middle Eastern plan have empha-
    sized it would be “unrealistic” for Egypt to pretend she
    could defend the area herself without the help of the big
    Western Powers.

    The new British, American and French proposal how-
    ever would not solve the Sudan problem. The British
    position on that is that the Sudanese people themselves
    must decide their future in due course.

    The text of Morrison’s statement read: “His Majesty’s
    Government take the strongest exception to the action of
    the Egyptian Government in introducing legislation seek-
    ing to abrogate the Anglo-Egyptian treaty of Alliance of
    1936, and the 1899 Anglo-Egyptian condominium agree-
    ments relating to the Sudan,

    The Egyptian Government aware that new and far
    reaching proposals were about to be presented to them
    which would have direct bearing on the improvement of
    Angiy-Reyptian relations and the security of the Middle

    ast”,

    “In a personal message to Egyptian Prime Minister on

    ..such proposals were under urgent consideration: and he
    expected to be in a position to arrange for their discussion
    with the Egyptian Government in the near future. This
    was confirmed in the last week by His Majesty’s Ambas-
    sador in Alexandria in a personal communication to the

    Egyptian Foreign Ministér anticipating an early present-

    ation of these proposals.
    NO RECOGNITION

    “His Majesty’s Government do not recognize the legality
    of the unilateral renunciation of the 1936 treaty and of the
    condominium agreements and they maintain their full
    rights under those treaties. pending a satisfactory agree-

    ment with Egypt on the basis of the proposals referred
    to above”—(U.P.)

    re





    Reds Battle U.S.
    Troops To A Halt

    EIGHTH ARMY H’QRS,,
    Korea, Oct. 9.

    Fanatic Reds battled attacking

    U.S. troops to a standstill on two
    | vitai ridgelines in East Central
    Korea to-day.

    Another U.S. unit captured a
    strategic hill in an adjacent sector
    however. On the Western front
    the U.S. First Cavalry Division
    smashed ahead more than a mile
    against mounting resistance.

    Heaviest fighting was above
    Yanggu on the East Central front
    where the Eighth Army was trying
    to break through Communists
    “Little Siegfried Line” to the val-
    ley approaches to the East coast.

    The U.S. Second Division's 38th
    Infantry Regiment checked stub-
    born North Korean Reds with
    fixed bayonets on “Kim Il Sung
    Ridge” named for the North Kor-
    ean Premier and Commander-in-
    Chief.—U.P.

    Roman Party
    ROME, Oct, 10,

    President Elpidio Quirino of the
    Philippines was honoured at a re-

    Se ee
    LORD ROWALLAN

    CHIEF SCOUT
    TO TOUR
    CARIBBEAN

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    LONDON, October 9, |
    Chief Scout Lord Rowallan!
    flies from London January 29, to
    carry out a tour of the Caribbean.
    Bermuda and the Bahamas. He





    U.K. Presents Case

    made it clear that}

    WEDNESDAY,



    Te World Court

    THE HAGUE, Oct. 9.

    Britain has put forward her
    written arguments against nation-
    alisation of the British owned oil
    industry by Iran to the Interna-
    tional Court of Justice, it was
    announced on Tuesday.

    Britain took the case to the
    Court last spring but has since
    been forced to evacuate her oil
    experts from Iran, Z

    The Court announcement said
    Sir Eric Beckett delivered the
    British memorial on the case
    within the October 10 deadline,
    and that it was “confidential” and
    not related to “recent develop-
    ments in Iran”.—U.P.

    FISH FOR LUNCH edo al










































    TWO FOR TWO—Shortly after the arrival of the American naval
    vessels these two sailors standing in the shade of the “Stars and
    Stripes”, hooked two fish, They’re smiling at the prospect of fresh
    fish for lunch.





    21 Guns Welcome |

    The Royal Couple |
    To Quebec Province

    QUEBEC, Oct. 9
    PRINCESS ELIZABETH and the Duke of Edinburgh
    stepped from a private railway car at 9.47 a.m, E.S.T, and
    formally began their Royal tour of ten Canadian provinces.
    Bells in every Roman Catholic chureh and school and the
    whistles of shops and fire stations sounded as the Royal
    couple left the train.







    en nemneneeinmione The Princess and oe Duke are
    the first British Royalty to visit
    |
    Chiefs Of Staffs ead pe of French Canada in 12
    ‘ Wi A royal salute of 21 guns start-
    Confer ith ed booming over the old fashion-
    . sed provincial capital as the Prin-
    Eisenhower cess placed her feet on a red =
    et stretching 150 yards from the
    SUPREME ALLIED HEADQUAR- Gain through a long shed to a
    TERS, Rocquencourt, rae raised dais on the dock alongside
    Chiets of Staffs of the US,| Metall stations stent
    Britain and France conferred ati aoe eee on ale Pi ae
    length with General Eisenhower |. ; s i a
    amid growing tension over the|Y'"ce of Quebec by French spea
    Middle Sast's role in Western | ing Lieut.~Governor Gaspard Fau-
    defence teux, Premier Maurice noe
    Talks occurred on the eve, of|Mayor Lucien. Borne and other
    the flight by Chiefs to Greece and|civic and Prench seeeperion |
    Turkey for exploratory talks on} The Princess face a heavy
    the: part those two nations will schedule of 11 major appearances
    play in Western defence. | before leaving tonight for Ottawa,
    Those attending the conference —UP.



    Chairman of the U.S. Joint Gniefs

    hopping off the bar;

    silver piece fell into



    u
    Ss
    » Oarlisle Bay on a three-day visit,

    ‘ three other naval craft.



    ’

    PRICE: FIVE CENTS










    CARGO TRANSPORT, U.8.S. ALSHAIN of the U.S.A. Navy now in

    arrived yesterday accompanied by

    LOCAL STEEL BAND

    ENTERTAINS _U.S. NAVY

    ; THE U.S. NAVY invadedBarbados yesterday. Some
    §60 enlisted men and 47 officers came in with the US.S.

    ., Alshain (AKA55), LST 509, LST 980 and LST 525.
    4 With a strong southeast wind blowing across the har-

    The tour mouse-coloured ships

    /-—in no way as sparkling as the

    English navy ships which call
    here~jeresented a formidable pic-

    ture in the harbour,
    Throughout the day sailors were
    and cut-
    ters—some in all white and others
    in khaki of a soft texture. They
    hanged out” in the streets and in
    es places of amusement in the
    ity.
    Calypsoes
    But some sailors who had to
    stay on board enjoyed intervals of
    musie from a local steel band—
    calypsoes—-and silver piece after
    he boat for
    he players. The band stole
    the sh ut over two dozen
    divers. who made their way out to

    @ ships in small boats
    ' wp as they

    red into the sea by the sail-
    ors before they reached five yards
    down,

    The sailors kept some of their
    coins for the “Advocate’s” repre-
    sentative, No sooner had he
    alighted on the deck than a crowd
    of officers and men gathered
    around him, each apparently
    wanting his newspaper first,

    This was the kind of reception
    the newspaperman got on each
    ship and he made some brisk sales,

    Aboard the ships, members of
    each crew were doing routine
    work but everybody seemed at
    ease, The Press Relations Officers
    said that they were just from
    Vieques, Puerto Rico, where they
    were carrying out landing exer-
    cises and now they have) begun
    their Caribbean recreation period
    at Barbados, Three days of shore-~
    leave they will spend at, Barba-
    dos before going on to Trinidad,

    Cargo Transport

    Tue Aisnain, 14,907 tons, a cargo
    transport under Captain , 5
    Field, U.S.N., is the command ship,
    LST 609 is under Lt. W. A.
    McNamee, U.S.N.R., LST | 980
    under Lt. J. D. eee U.S.N.R.,
    and LST 525 under Lt A, N, Volk,
    U.S.N.R. Most of the officers and
    men are reservists and temporar-
    ies. Few of the Officers have seen
    active service before.

    Alshain carries a keel while the
    three LST’s are built a flat
    bottoms so that they can sail right
    up on the land, q

    Alshain has quite a history at-
    tached to her, She was named
    after the star “Alshain” and
    during World War IL and the
    Korean War won the battle stars
    of Guam, Leyte, Lingayen, San
    Felipe-San Narciso, Okinawa and
    Inchon.

    Assault Cargo Ship

    The ship was built in 1944 by
    the Federal Shipbuilding and Dry~-
    dock Company, Kearney, New
    Jersey as an assault cargo ship.
    She first took cargo from Norfolx
    to Pearl Harbour, in 1944 and
    later carried out an ag@sault on













    struggle ty

    will arrive in Jamaica in time for
    the First Caribbean Jamboree at
    Kingston March 5 to 17.

    This news was. released from
    Boy Scouts’ Headquarters today.
    It is expected that the route of
    the Chief Scout will include
    Nassau, Kingston, Antigua, Barba-
    dos, Trinidad, St. Vincent, Grenada
    St. Lucia, Georgetown, Cayman
    and Belize.

    Accompanying him will be
    Lieutenant-Commander E._ P.
    Mallinson a Yorkshire Field
    Commissioner. Since becoming
    Chief Scout in 1945, Rowallan has'
    travelled nearly 120,00C miles on
    visits to seouts in the Common-
    wealth.

    ie sales ‘ a
    A-Bomb’s Cousin
    WASHINGTON, Oct. 9.
    About six weeks ago the U.S.
    Air Force announced it had a new
    mission, This was to use atomic
    weapons against ground troops.
    The atom bomb has been some-
    thing that needed a big expensive
    target. The Air Force announce-
    ment
    the at
    whict
    result

    emplacer





    m bomb had been developed



    oon or

    against



    Nts) ot

    j
    |

    ception at Rome City Hall on Tues-
    day night with a cocktail party
    attended by some 600 selected
    guests. —U.P.

    PLANE CRASHES

    MEXICO CITY, Mexico, Oct. 9.
    A D.C.3 transport plane, with

    21 persons aboard, crashed near

    Cerro Banco in the State of Vera



    Cruz, according to Aero Trans-
    portes Airli: The number of
    dead in the sh was not imme-
    diately avai:..' .e from the remote

    area. An airiine spokesman said:
    “It is known there, were four sur-
    vivors.”—U.P.
    15,000 WORDS
    JAKARTA, Oct. 9.

    Halmar Schacht, former Nazi
    financial wizard who has _ been
    studying Indonesian financial and
    economic conditions,
    15,000-word report to
    Sukiman on Tuesday.—wU.P.

    were General Omar N. Bradley |

    of Staff, British Field Marshal,
    Sir William Slim,
    Imperial General Staff and Gen-
    eral Charles F. Lecheres, Chair-
    man of the French Chiefs of
    Staff, Lord Fraser First Sea Lord
    of the British Admiralty, and
    Admiral Jacques Messoffee,
    Frenah Chief of Staff for the Mid-
    dle East.

    A Headquarters spokesman dic
    not disclose the agenda of_talks
    but informed sources saidthe
    views were exchanged on the
    possible Command Structure for
    the Middle East. —(U.P.)

    BOWLES APPOINTED

    WASHINGTON, Oct. 9.
    The Senate approved the ap-
    pointment of former OPA Chief
    Chester Bowlés as United States
    Ambassador to India on Tuesday



    presented ajnight despite Republican charges
    Premier| that he is

    not qualified for the

    post.--U.P.



    S. Africa Wants Airmen

    méant that little cousin: off

    be used with good} The South African ¢ err

    force a civiliar

    citizen

    mott
    mot




    ermanent force

    Chief of the Air Staff. I

    JOHANNESBURG Oct. 9
    ll for * teers fr tt
    ice in Korea said Brigatiier

    ery e na



    been confined

    Chief of |

    King’s Tour Off

    LONDON, Oct. 10.
    Buckingham Palace announced
    today King
    able to make a tour of Australia
    and New Zealand next year. The
    announcemyent said Princess Eliz-
    abeth and Prince Philip would

    make the tour instead.—U.P.

    US Tanker Rammed

    NORFOLK, Virginia, Oct. 9

    The U.S. Navy tanker Suamico
    was rammed amidships by the
    free freight vessel S.S. Saxon be-
    fore dawn about 12 mils off the
    North Carolina coast.

    Early reports indicated there
    were casualties and that neither
    ship was in danger. There were
    47 men aboard the Suamico. The





    number aboard the Saxon is not
    learned,—U.P.
    WOUNDED THIRD TIME

    WASHINGTON, Oct. 9
    Army said on Tuesday that
    William Clark, son of

    the Chiei f the Art Field

    The

    Mark (¢ t

    ni third Vvounda

    UP

    Guam in the Marianas. ;

    After the war years of rigorous
    operating activities, the welcome
    break came when she made a stop
    at Tulagi to pick up cargo ana

    George will not be while at Noumea, New California

    —far from the combat area~—news
    of the war’s end came to her.

    Alshain reverted to the role of
    cargo ship, typhoons being her
    only immediate postwar ad-
    ventures, During the postwar
    days she continued her operations
    in the Pacific.

    But in 1948, Alshain was in touch
    with another war. Her first jot
    was to deliver 2,200 tons of am-
    munition for Chinese Nationalists
    fighting the Reds. Three or four
    times she was 60 to 100 miles
    within her Formosa destination
    and each time was ordered not to

    @ On Page 3
    CALLA

    TO-DAY'S WEATHER
    : CHART
    Sunrise: 5.47 a.m.
    Bunset: 6.54 p.m.
    Moon: First Quarter
    6.00 p.m

    High Tide
    Low Tide

    12.58 p.m

    Lighting:
    6.36 a.m., 7.05 p.m

    From Codrington

    | !



    bour giving rise to many swells while navy landing barges
    and cutters “skated along” from ship-to-shore, Carlisle Bay
    was an attraction for many Barbadians.

    From Alt Quarters :

    ‘Garman J owe
    Are Satisfied

    The Central Council of German
    Jews expressed satisfaction with
    the Bonn Government's desive te
    make restitution for Nazism’s
    vast Jewish persecutions,

    Tt announced simultaneously a
    nine-point programme which i
    hoped Government would fulfi:
    including a constant and thoroug!
    ae eee against

    tis n all its forms te
    aetna te entire educa,
    nal system and by the’ Press aric
    Radio,
    Not Elk—During the elk-hunt-
    ing season in Soberga, Sweden s«
    many cows have been shot that ¢
    peasant painted “cow,” “horse”, ir
    big white letters on his livestock

    Russian Resolution Defeated—
    The Russian Resolution to invite
    Communist China, Poland Czecho
    slovakia to the Far East Economi:
    Conference (ECAFE) was reject:
    ed by fourteen votes to two at th
    conference’s opening session,





    U.S. Naval Losses—The Unitec
    States Navy said at least 27 mer
    were killed or wounded when tw:
    U.S. naval vessels were damage
    by Communist action off th
    northeast coast of Korea last week
    end,

    Mass Withdrawal — Argentin:
    delegation withdrew en mass
    from the Inter-American Pres
    Association Conference at the
    opening of the second

    [HOUSE PASS
    SUGAR BILL

    The House of Assembly yester-
    day passed a Bili to impose a
    Special levy on sugar and fancy
    molasses manufactured in this
    island in certain circumstances,

    The Bill arose out of an agree
    ment between the Sugar Pro-
    aucers Federation and the Barba-
    dos Workers’ Union and sought w
    give effect to clauses C and D
    (except in the part of Clause C
    relating to the levy in respect of
    a Harbour Fund) of the agree-
    ment.

    Section C of the agreement
    refers to the payment, when tne
    Sugar crop of any one year (in
    the years 1951, 1952 and 1953)
    exceeds the average of the five

    Welfare Fund,
    Section D relates to the reduc-

    alent, of the present
    $6.00 per ton payable to
    Price Stabilisation Fund by 60¢
    per ton or $1.20 per ton accordin;
    to whether the crop is below or
    exceeds the previous five-yea
    average, and the increase by a)
    equivalent amount of the presen
    cess of $2.40 per ton payable to
    the Labour Welfare Fund.

    The Opposition opposed Claus
    3 of the Bill dealing with the
    additional levy of $1.80 per ton
    and suggested that it be taken ou
    from the Biil.

    Government members pointe:
    out that if this was done, it woulc
    destroy the whole principle oi}

    cess 0)

    the Bill.
    The motion for the retentior
    of the clause was then put t

    the vote and,agreed to by a 9 to (
    majority.

    Voting for the retention were
    ‘Mr, Miller, Mr. Mapp, Mr. Lewis
    Mr, Bryan, Mr. Cox, Mr, F. L
    Walcott, Dr, Cummins, Mr. Adam:
    and the Speaker.

    Against were Mr. Dowding,
    Mr, Haynes, Mr. Goddard, Mr
    Gill, Mr. Reece and Mr, E. K
    Walcott,

    Mr. Adarns said that he hopec
    honourable members had beer

    He spoke att meetings i
    preceding years, of an additional }own constitue or

    cess of $1.80 per ton to the Labouyjeest af

    th: |Labour leaders that

    “Too Little

    }

    Too Late”
    Says Churchill

    LONDON, Octobe, 9,
    Winston Churchilf charged
    Tuesday night that the “peace at
    ny price” advocates have captured











    ont. ol of the Bri @bour Party
    and a Labour vig Nees
    tion would Ae |
    nti-agitatid ee a

    mM Ul
    of World WHex i

    Churchill
    little ahd fitg
    Government" lic’ ididld
    East whet ley
    evacuate Ir \
    important Egypt.
    nis/

    Londo, sho.
    Labour Foreign Sec
    Morrison declared Egypt's ffiten-”

    tion, whenever the island's crop jtion to junk the Anglo-Egyptian
    jexceeds 120,000 tons or its equiv. |treaty was illegal.

    Churchill caustically reminded
    six months
    ago he had proposed a joint Anglo-
    American French solution of the
    Viddle Eastern problem especially
    he Egyptian one

    The three powers had planned
    © present the joint plan to Egypt
    his week but Egypt acted first.
    “hurchill said, “One gets quite
    ired of saying things which are
    it first mocked at, and then adopt-
    ed sometimes, alas too late,”—-U.P.,

    RUSSIA WILL

    NOT CONTROL
    IRAN’S OIL

    UNITED NATIONS, New York,

    October 9,
    Hossein Fatemi, Iran Vice-
    Premier pledged that his country’s
    41 will not fall into Soviet hands
    jue to the dispute which Britain
    1as brought to the United Nations
    While Mohammed Mossadegh
    76-year-old Lranian Premier,
    rested at the New York hospital
    or his appearance before the
    jeeurity Council, his 34-year-old
    aid and chief adviser said in an



    able since last Tuesday to read Jexclusive interview:

    carefully the Memorandum oi
    Agreement = which had beer
    reached between the Sugar Pro-
    ducers Federation of Barbados

    and the Barbados Workers’ Union, } satistied

    affecting the sugar industry with

    respect to wages and profits o:
    the industry for the next three
    years,

    He would repeat that he hoped
    honourable members had read the
    Agreement carefully because | it
    was of great importance anc
    there were points in it with which
    doubtlessly they might differy.

    The House and Legislature were
    only concerned, however, with
    whether they were going to
    approve of the transfer of cer-
    iain conditions on some of the
    Stabilisation Fund of Labour Wel-

    “Britain has sought to spread
    false propaganda that Iran will
    fall or be pushed into the Soviet
    voit if her demands are noy

    Mossadegh began a series of
    jedical tests Tuesday and U.N,,
    sources said the scheduled Thurs-
    jay meeting of the Security
    Souncil might be postponed until
    Saturday,

    Concern was voiced that the 76
    year-old Premier might be suffer-
    ing from something more serious
    than fatigue -and ernotion, but
    there also was spéculation that any
    Couneil postponement might be
    purely for diplomatic reasons.

    Weary though he was, from his
    33-hour flight from Teheran Mos-

    fare which was one of the terms sadegh was able Monday to spend
    4 the Agreement, and that there}@most an hour conferring with

    ihould be imposed a levy for the, 4merican

    hree years to be taken out of
    -he profits of the sugar industry
    o go to the Labour Welfare Fund,
    Majority Vote

    “It was, however, obviously
    1ecessary that members of the
    fouse should have before them
    he whole _agreement out of
    whieh this Bill has arisen, It was
    with the object of officially put-
    ing the Agreement before them
    that the Legislature has been
    ‘urnished by Government with
    copies of it.”

    The preliminary agreement had
    xeen reached between some of
    hem representing the Barbados

    delegate Ernest Gross
    and Assistant Secretary of State
    George McGee,
    Furthermore he
    long

    scheduled a
    list of diplomatic appoint-

    ments for Tuesday in his six-room
    $240 per day suite in the Baker
    pavilion of the New York hospital.

    —(U.P.)
    Hopes Revived For
    Korean Ceasefire

    U.N, ADVANCE BASE, Korea,
    Oct. 9.
    Agreement on Pan Mun Jom as



    Workers’ Union and other parties |the site for resumption of Korean

    -epresenting the Sugar Producers

    plenary , Federation, said Mr, Adams. The

    pession this morning after the ; Federation had accepted it by a

    Board of Direetors had declined to

    for membership.

    Bomb Exploded — Unidentified
    attackers exploded a plastic bomb
    at the entrance of the Communist
    newspaper Le Patroite early to-
    day. The blast shattered windows
    over a wide area in the centre of
    Nice and wrecked the entrance to
    the hall of the newspaper buil7
    ing. No casualties were reported.

    Would Be Glad — The White
    House said Tuesday that Truman
    will be glad to see Iranian Premier
    Mossadegh while he is in this
    country, but no definite appoint-
    ment has been made so far,

    War Inevitable — Italian Com-
    munist leader Palmiro Togliatti
    said Tuesday “war cannot be
    avoided” between Western Powers
    and Russia if the rearmament of
    the Allies continues and “while
    atomic bombs are at hand.”

    Faith in Turkey—President Celer
    Beyar of Turkey informed Truman
    Tuesday that Turkey will fulfil the
    latter’s confidence that it will
    “maintain her independence and
    territorial integrity in the face of
    all pressure and threats.”

    Anglo—U.S.

    By W. G. LANDREY

    LONDON, Oct, 9.
    Britain’s relations with the U.S
    are emerging as a big issue in the
    October 25 elections — more than



    in any other British election in
    history. :
    On one side of the fight are

    Winston Churchill and his Con-
    servatives who charge that Labour
    is responsible for “ill-natured
    criticisfns” of U.S. policy that have
    lost much of the goodwill Britain
    gained in the U.S. during the war

    On the other side are Aneurin
    Bevan and other Leftwing Labour-

    ites and their side was put for-
    ward when Bevan opened the
    fcampaic: in Liverpool and the



    beg ing Sunday Pietorjal warned
    he U.S. to “stop kicking Britair
    } around.’

    Silent
    Prime Minister Clement Attlee
    nd the Rightwing of the Labou

    admit all Argentine =a the Union had aceepted it by

    majority vote just as the Council

    i majority vote, He was saying
    Hat in order that it might not be
    that an

    thought Agreement

    armistice talks revived hopes for
    an early cease-fire agreement.
    High officials believed there
    would be a “stop shooting” agree-
    ment within 30 days or at most be-
    fore winter grips the fighting front.

    of They pointed to the note of com-

    ‘hig sort could easily have met|Promise on the site of the con-

    with
    sides.

    It was a
    agreement between
    ind employees, not merely as
    regards what one might call the
    naterial advantages which might
    be obtained on one side or the
    cher, but as regards the effect
    which it must necessarily have
    in continuing peace, in the sugar
    industry, he should say, for

    universal approval on

    most
    employers

    fiable for Barbadians to remem-
    ber sometimes that industrial

    all [ference and the softened tone in

    the last Communist message to

    outstanding |General Ridgway.-—U.P.

    Australia And Suez

    SYDNEY, Oct. 10.
    The Conservative Sydney Tete-
    graph on Wednesday demanded
    a stronger Australian say in the
    Suez. “Britain has no right to

    ajact as if she is the sole custodian
    period of three years, It was justi- |of

    relattons in this island were on|gacrificed would be disastrous for

    the whole more devoid of friction
    than their Jess unfortunate neigh-
    bours of the Caribbean area.
    Stupendous

    “Tt is Lecause this very spirit
    ‘has been created for the past ten
    ‘years or go, that it has been pos-
    sible to achieve what I would

    the British Commonwealth's
    interests and honour. The sacri-
    fice of the Suez as Abadan was
    the whole Commonwealth and
    the end of British power and
    prestige throughout the Middle

    East.”"-——U.P.



    The “ADVOCATE”

    pays for NEWS.
    Dial 3113

    call this ‘stupendous agreemén’’
    |stupendous in the history of rela-





    itions between employer and ‘
    ‘employee in any part of tihe Day or Night
    world. Certainly, one may say.t

    @ On Page 5 "



    Relations Is Big Issue

    |Party are strangely silent jn the| repeat in China the same folly in
    cispute but they are solidly in 1951 we committed against Ru sia
    t tevour of western rearmament in|in 1918.” He referred to Western
    close co-operation with the U.S | intervention after the
    Criticism against the U.S. is bept revolution. i
    demonstrated in Bevan’s speech Co-operation Needed
    and the Sunday Pictorial editorial. | He said: “Believe me if we 2%
    Bevan told nearly 6,000 persons | Western civilization will eom
    {in the Liverpool stadium that if; down in ruins and no amount ¢
    Conservatives win “there will be! atom bombs will enable it to sur-
    no one to pluck the coat tails of} vive. You can’t keep. modern
    some impetuous statesman wh¢ | civilization together by threats c
    {will want to solve the problem in| mutual destruction. You can oniy

    | in Russia

    some old bloody war.” | keep it together by co-operation
    Bevan said :“One historical truth The Sunday Pictorial began
    hat our American friends must | editorial with the statement
    learn is that the world is disturbed | the future of Britain and her Co
    today not because there was any- ; monwealth “would be bleak inde
    thing intrinsically nwlevolent| were it net linked with the futur

    nbout the Soviet system in 1918. of that other great English speal

    It is disturbed and threatened|ing nation the Unfted States
    ie le America”
    ed p--ts of the world at that} He added
    “, mlowes the US rv
    ur f y€

    rid.’ lleast we can do i
    ‘ ly »*
    her

    nod now face a Fors j
    isd o






    PAGE TWO



    Carubh Calling

    R. W. S. JONES, President
    of the B.G. Cricket Board

    of Control, gave sa stag luncheon
    party at.the Carib Hotel last
    Friday. “His guests were, Messrs
    Charlie ‘Taylor and Keith Wal-
    cott of. the Barbados Cricket
    team, Mé&. “Foffie” . Williams,
    Manager of the team, Mr. Teddy
    Jones, Dr.eLouis Ward and Mr

    QO. S. Coppin, visitors from Bar-
    bados, Mr. Maurice Green, Mr
    Kenny Wishart and Mr. Frank
    de Caires, members of the B.G.
    Cricket Boar@ of Control, Messrs.
    B. Gaskin and Lennie Thomas of

    the B.G. team and Mr. C. R.
    Browne.

    The following evening there
    was a party at B.G’s., Press As-
    sociation on Robb Street in
    honour of Professor Rudolph
    Dunbar and Mr. O. §S. Coppin,

    Sports Editor of the Barbados

    Advocate.

    New Exhibition

    HE next exhibition at the

    Barbados Museum will be
    one of school children’s Art and
    Handicrafts. It opens on Friday
    October 12th and continues unt.!
    November 9th.

    To-day Begins 5712
    -DAY, the Jews of Barba-
    dos celcbrate their New

    Year and Jewish stores in the
    City will be closed for the entire
    day. On the Jewish calendar this
    is the opening of the year 5712.

    Auction Sale
    URING ‘be dance at the
    Crane Hotel on Saturday Octo-
    ber_13th~there is going to be a
    smuil auction sale and Mr. Bladon
    has offered to auction articles
    which are being collected. These
    are some of the things which will
    be on sale—a bottle of champagne,
    a box of chocolates, a saucepan,
    a large doll, a suitease and there
    are many other useful items.
    Proceeds from ‘the dance will
    go to the Vinter Memorial Fund
    -—to help build a school hall at
    Codrington High School.

    On Five Months Leave
    LYING Officer Julian A. Mar-
    ryshow, son of the Hon. T. A.
    Marryshow, C.B.E. of Grenada,
    who hed been holidaying in
    Grenada with his wife and baby
    is at present in Barbados. Ac-
    companied by his wife and baby
    they arrived from Grenada on
    Monday ‘by B.W.LA. and are
    staying at Athlone Guest House
    Fontabelle.

    Mr. Marryshow is on _ five
    months’ leave from the R.A.F. in
    which he enlisted in 1941, hav-
    ing the distinction to be Grena-
    da’s first volunteer for air com-
    bat when he left the island for
    Trinidad shortly after the out-
    break of hostilities to join the
    Air Training Scheme there.

    Going over to England, he
    rose from Aircraftsman to the
    commissioned rank in 1944. He
    Saw action from 1941 as a fighter
    pilot, operating in “Spitfires” till
    the invasion of Europe, in which
    he took purt, when he was trans-
    ferred to dive-bomber _ types,
    piloting these craft over France,
    the Low Countries and Germany.

    On the cessation of hostilities,
    he setyed as v lisison officer for
    the Colonial Office for about six
    months, being stationed with
    about 120 Jomaicans with whose
    welfare he was entrusted. He
    was then §econdec to the Minis-
    try of Labour at Cambridge,
    serving in a similar capacity con-



    nected with the selection of
    vocational trainees from the
    Colonies who had ended their

    war service.

    At the end of 1946 he entered
    Hull University, with RAF.
    leave, doing Social Science for
    two years and during the next
    three years studied Economics
    and Political Science at the Lon-
    don School cof Economics. After
    his final examination he returned
    to the Air Force and is now on
    five months’ leave. He may re-
    sume his R.A.F, duty in January
    next if he so chooses.



    CROSSWORD

    rt tt LP
    ok ee ed
    Hy Pee tol
    Pie

    1”
    Bd
    ba eed ig
    tT
    oe eel
    el ae
    Across
    Ung artist paper seller y
    Mixea as classified. (8)
    A Mard sort of mateh pera;
    (4) . 12. Halt-company. "
    Resolved.-in canvas? (6)
    This dave is a iegal commana
    (3) 17. Sat in the blot. jo)
    No walter this. (4)
    A tree tor the present.
    Music for two. (4)
    How tines are fastened +
    indian peasant trom Troy
    Rool room. (5)

    Your missus sir! (4)
    His progress was filmed '

    Down
    Side is fat (ana contented
    + to) in Passing. (3%)
    Ad@ea up to lea (4)
    sdueh Qsed club, 14)
    Heart of the trunk. (3)
    ide gets ten lines. (8)
    He cin 3 Down obviously
    May. tine shows disiike. (6)
    Beyond recall. (4)
    Aro’ as | see (talian mosaic (4)
    The'French tent upset. i6)
    Just a notion. (4)
    LIOt «as though
    sold’ you teetotal,
    flair fastener? (4)







    i ie Diet

    | 4





    Ww

    ‘

    (3)

    (5)
    (a

    New
    15)



    CHECK VOILE

    DIAL 4220












    DRESS GABERDINE in all shades
    WHITE SHARKSKIN
    FLANNELLED SPUNS

    EY
    Pc oTke? CARTOON
    by OSBERT LANCASTER

    gat
    =










    neavens sake Sop say

    ut At wast wr Ministers

    doat burst mto tears '—there

    ve moments when it would

    1 make o fot more sense tf some
    otcem didt’

    Keeping Together

    HERE are to be no separate

    engagements for Princess
    Elizabeth and Prince Philip dur-
    ing their tour of Canada.

    Hamilton (Onturio) had sug-
    gested that Prince Philip should
    visit naval headquarters there,
    HMCS Star, while Princess Eli-
    zabeth was havir, cea with the
    Argyll and Suthr rind: Highland-
    ers of Canada, Ste is Colonel-in-
    Chief of the regi: »nt,

    But officials in Ottawa have
    told the Mayor of Hamilton, Mr.
    Lloyd Jackson, that the Princess
    and her husband preferred to
    remain together at, all functions
    planned for the tour. So _ the
    naval visit has been cancelled;
    toth will visit the Highlanders.

    One Serious Note

    NGLISH comedian Ted Ray
    raised a crop of laughs with
    the help of West Indies sprinter
    McDonald Bailey on the pular
    radio show “Calling All Forces”
    in London last week. Ray gets a
    prominent sportsman along eaalr
    week for a witty chat during the
    programme and enlisted Bailey
    this time. Mac got a big reception
    from the studio audience and
    came through the “interview
    like a seasoned performer, During
    one %erious note, he said his
    ambition was to win two titles at
    the Olympic Games in Helsinki
    next year—the 100 and 220.



    Rupert and the L

    One warm summer: day Rupert
    goes to the Common to see if he
    can find any ripe blackberries,
    though it is still rather early for
    them, ile he is searching he
    hears a cheery shout and he spies
    his friend Rollo, the Gipsy boy.
    coming up from the direction of the



    DEAL AT No. 33,

    WINGS ROLLED OATS — FR



    Eden’s Niece
    ISS ANN EDEN, 28-year-old
    daughter of Sir. Timothy

    and Lady Eden, and niece of Mr, V!8iting British flower shows,
    Anthony Eden, will have a coun-
    try wedding
    M

    when she marries
    r. Peter Negretti on October 27.
    It Will be at All Saints Church,

    Minstead, in the New Forest.

    After the wedding there will
    be a reception at Miss Eden's
    home, Fritham House, near

    Lyndhurst. In pari of the house
    Lady Eden runs a girls’ school
    She has another school, for
    younger children, in Kensington.

    Miss Eden, slim and auburn-
    haired, has done the secretarial
    and accounting work for her
    mother. Now Lady Eden is look-
    ing for another assistant.

    Miss Eden will wear a wedding
    dress of cream and gold brocade.

    W.I. Students Welfare
    HILE he was in England,
    Mr. B, C. Sangster, Jamaica's
    Minister of Social Service, apart
    from his pre-occupation with the
    Ministers Supply Conference,
    made enquiries regarding West
    Indian students welfare in Britain
    and addressed public meetings on
    Jamaica affairs. Before he left he
    had taiks with the Director of
    Colonial Scholars, Mr. Keith. Mr.
    Sangster feels allowances to Gov-
    ernment scholars should

    increased. Among other lecture
    engagements of Mr. Sangster wus
    in Birming-

    last week-end
    Likes It

    one
    ham.

    R. R. L, NEDD of St. Vincent, apove the 60th.

    who is in England on holiday
    from Nigeria, was in London last
    week. He is a Magistrate in the
    Easiern Provinces of that colony. more American than French per-

    Every Time

    i

    BARBADOS ADVOWATE

    ‘Women

    T. H. EVERETT, head of New
    York’s Botanical Gardens, has been
    He
    reports that while British garden-
    lovers are ahead of Americans in
    standards of cultivation an
    variety of plants shown, Americ
    does better in flower arrangement,

    Reason? Women dominate)
    American shows and “women are
    more colour and composition?
    eonscious than men.”

    ACTRESS TELLS HOW

    ACTRESS Gertrude Lawrence
    is going to fit an academic teach-
    ing job into her stage engage-
    ments.

    Miss Lawrence, who is starring
    in the Broadway musical smash
    hit, “The King and I’—she plays
    the part of an English governess
    who attended the court of the
    King of Siam—has so impressed
    New York’s Columbia University
    that it has asked her to deliver
    a course of lectures on “Theory
    and practice of acting.”

    THAT MAN COLUMBUS

    FIFTH-AVENUE merchants al-
    most wish Columbus had nevet
    discovered America. There is w
    great parade down Fifth-avenue
    in his honour every October 12.
    It blocks the traffic and lures a
    customers out of the stores. Thi
    merchants lose thousands of dol-
    jars. So this year they are asking
    the city officials to stop the parade
    at 60th street, There are no shops


















    APPLE PERFUME
    WOMEN may soon be using

    Mr. Nedd says he likes it very fumes—and the perfume they use

    much in Nigeria and expresses ma
    the hope that West Indians and
    West Africans will become yet bei

    closer friends.

    Three Talks

    be made of apples.
    he Agriculture Department i
    ng asked by the apple growers
    to develop the flavour oils obtained
    from apples into perfume bases

    UNDERSTAND that after the The name of the new perfume hes
    publication of the Wadding- been chosen—“Eve.”

    ton Commission Report on aete
    o
    include in its Home and General
    three talks caught
    about current trends in the West habit so hard
    Indies. The speakers in the series joomed sales fantastically. In one
    of talks will include two West recent week they bought 12,000,006
    tins of frozen orange concentrate.

    In June, July, and August they
    Evening. News accounted for 120 million tins ex-
    anc

    Guiana, the BBC. plans

    Overseas Service,

    Indians, :
    Writing A Book
    ‘HE London

    last week published a short clusive

    COOLING OFF
    HOUSEWIVES in America havc
    the frozen orange juice
    that they have

    of what hotels

    story written by Gordon Wool- restaurants were doing—one-thir«

    ford, son of

    ried to a French artist,
    bean Voices Programme”. He i
    now writing a book of
    stories which he hopes will

    House,

    ion Rock—1





    “Hullo Rupert, you're just
    the sort of person | want,"’ cries the
    boy. ‘ Are you fond of mysteries?"
    = Soh, ves rather.”

    river.

    Rupert.
    “What mystery ‘% chere?”
    Before Rollo can answer there 1s
    another call and they see an elderly
    gentleman approaching in» hurry

    * says

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    ~4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m Daily
    Service, 4.15 p.m, Rugby League Foot-
    ball, 4.25 p.m. Souvenirs of Music, 6
    bm. South Eastern Counties v. The
    Springboks, 5.05 p.m Interlude, 5.15
    o.m. New Records, 6 p.m, Sandy Mac-
    pherson at the Theatre Organ, 6.15 p.m
    Ulster Magazine, 6.45 p.m. Programme
    Parade, 6.55 p.m. Today's Sport, 7 p.m
    The . News, 7.10 p.m. News Anal sis
    7.15 p.m. Calling the West Indies; 7.4°
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    #.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m
    Statement of Account, 8.45 p.m. Com-
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    "rom the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Mid
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    Music
    C.B.C PROGRAMME
    WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1951

    time evacuee girl who has return-
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    10.05—10.20 p.m, News
    10.20—10.35 p.m Canadian Chronicle.
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    B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME
    i Asthma Mucus
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    WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1951

    Leg. Co.

    Fencing

    Will Be Strictly Enforced

    THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL yesterday passed with

    minor amendments, the Bill to amend the

    actories Act,

    1947, in order to give effect to the recommendations of the
    Secretary of State for the Colonies and of the Labour

    Commissioner.

    The Secretary of State has
    advised the Government that the
    Factories Act, 1947, does not ade-
    quately provide for the fencing of
    machinery and for the inspection
    of every type of steam boiler and
    the Labour Commissioner has
    pointed out that the administrative
    machinery for carrying out the
    provisions of the Act are cumber-
    = = Sun Liaednes will be

    untered when car

    ss reer one of the Mm wry

    n moving the second readi
    the Bil, the Hon. the Colenial
    oe said: —
    _ The Factories Act, 1947, which
    it is the purpose of the ‘present
    Bill to amend, has never been
    brought into operation, The rea-
    sons for not bringing it into opera-
    tion immediately, which were
    published at the time were, first
    the lack of a substantive Labour
    Commissioner, on whom the brunt
    of the work of carrying out the.
    provisions of the Act in ‘the early
    stages would fall; second, the lack
    of a Factory Inspeetor; and third,
    the inconvenience of bringing the
    Act into operation during the erop
    season, The first lack was soon
    remedied but the second was not,
    and it was decided to defer pro-
    claiming the Act under Clause 35
    until a suitable Factory Inspector
    could be recruited.

    2. In accordance with the
    usual procedure the Act was for-
    warded for the signification of His
    Majesty’s pleasure, and early in
    1949 a reply was received to the
    effect that, although His Majesty's
    power of disallowance would not
    be exercised, there were several
    features in the Act, relating to the
    fencing of machinery and the in-
    spection of boilers, which contain-
    ed dangerous weaknesses.

    Doubts Discussed

    3. In the meantime the Labour
    Commissioner, (Mr. Burrowes)
    had begun t6 entertain doubts
    about the workability of the Bill.
    In 1950 he diseussed these doubts
    with Miss Ogilvie, the Assistant
    Labour Adviser to the Secretary
    of State, who shared them.

    4. In view of the contin-
    ued failure to secure the ser-
    vices ofa Factory Inspector
    the amendment of the Act was
    not given high priority, but
    earlier this year the Acting
    Attorney General was able to
    devote attention to it, and the
    Bill which is before the Coun-
    cil to-day represents the stm
    of the amendments which
    have been proposed by the
    Secretary of State and the
    Labour Commissioner.

    5. To take the points raised, by
    the latter first. The present defi-
    nition of “factory’ in Section 2
    of the Act does not include work
    places where no power is used,
    out includes places where no
    workers are employed, It is con-
    sidered that factories in which no
    power is used are greatly in need
    of inspection, as sometimes very
    bad conditions, such as overcrowd-
    ing, exist in such factories. ‘The
    definition of factory, which is in-
    cluded in Clause 3 of the Bill, and
    is based on that contained in the
    Trinidad legislation, ‘is compre-
    hensive and includes any factor-
    ies owned or operated by the
    Barbados Government or by any
    parochial or other public body.

    Sections Repealed

    6. Clause 4 of the Bill repeals
    Sections 3, 4 and 5 of the Prin-
    cipal Act. These set up a Factory
    Board, consisting of the Chief
    Medical Officer (now Director of
    Medical Services), Colonial Engin-
    eer, Labour Commissioner, Gov-
    ernment Electrical Inspector, and
    two others, to supervise all factor-
    ies and machinery in the Island,
    a Factory Appeals Board to hear
    and determine appeals against the
    Factory Board and the Registra-

    tion of Factories.

    The Labour Commissioner con-
    sidered, and Executive Committec
    agreed, that the s ui e of
    a Factory Board and a Factor;
    Appeals Board was very cumber-
    some. Not only could the officers
    concerned ill afford the time to
    spend on a Factory Board, but
    they would find it a practical im-
    possibility to carry out all the
    supervision imposed on them by
    the Act.

    It seems far preferable that the
    responsibility for the administra-
    tion of the Act should be vested
    in the Labour Commissioner, sub-
    ject to delegation of his s
    to the Factory Inspector, n he
    is recruited, and they will ob-
    viously eall in ether officers as and
    when they need advice and assist-
    ance,

    It has been argued that the
    Labour Commissioner himself has
    got the technical knowledge to
    sarry out the responsibilities which
    Clause 4 of the amending Bill
    would give him, but it is the in-
    tention that, if the services of an

    experienced Factory Inspector can |

    be obtained from the United King-

    dom on secondment, these duties

    sae in fact be largely delegated to
    im.

    Registration

    Mis Ogilvie saw littie point in

    introducing registration in_terri-
    tories where the practice did not
    exist already, and foresaw “the
    risk of members of staff being in-
    volved in nothing but registering,

    checking, registration, and re-reg- |
    It is considered that it |

    istering.”
    will be sufficient if owners of fac-
    tories notify the Labour Commis-
    sioner of the existence of factories
    within the time limits set out in
    the bill.

    7. I have nothing to add to the
    Objects and Reasons regarding
    Clause 5. Clause 6 is incidental.
    Clause 7 repeals Sections 6, 8 and
    9 of the Act, which relate to the
    machinery for registration and
    duration of the validity of certifi-
    eates of registration, and sets in
    their place provision to enable a
    court of summary jurisdiction, on
    the complaint of the Factory In-
    spector to make orders as to dan-
    gerous conditions and _ practices.
    Clause 8 of the Bill extends the
    power of the Factory Inspector in
    the manner set out in the Clause.

    8. So much for the amend-
    ments proposed by the Labour
    Commissioner to make the Bill
    less cumbersome to work. Clause
    12 of the Bill refers to criticisms
    by the Secretary of State. In Sec-
    tion 19(a) of the Act, which was
    based on Section 14 of the U.K.
    Factories Act, 1937, certain. words
    were added which were not in
    the U.K. Act,

    They are the following:—‘so as
    to prevent bodily danger to per-
    sons employed er working on the
    premises,” The Secretary of State
    regarded these words as of doubt-
    ful value as they tend to weaken
    the absolute requirement to fence
    securely which is a feature of
    the U.K. Act and might be
    regarded as a loophole in the
    requirements of the Section.

    Accidents

    Section 19(b) is also considered
    to be unsatisfactory, and in the
    experience of the U.K, Factory
    Department some of the most
    serious accidents occur when
    guards are removed while
    machinery is under repair. Sec-
    tion 19 of the Act, whigh in its
    prmeent form is considered by the

    ecretary of State to contain dan-
    gerous weaknesses, has accord-
    ingly been re-drafted.

    9. The Secretary of State
    eommented on two points in Sec-
    tion 20(1). The first was that
    the sub-section only applies to
    boilers used for the purpose of

    |

    a









    THEIR

    een







    wre



    Socialists
    from the

    HE Tories still hold a |
    commanding lead of 12
    in the election |

    |

    T

    per cent. |
    race. Stil! the same |
    number of people

    are
    voting for them.

    This {ts shown by a Daily |
    Express Poll of Publiie |
    Opinion conducted in the

    he Socialists have gained one per
    cent, from the Liberals in the
    last fortnight—so the Tory Jead |
    over the Socialists is reduced by
    one,

    futest figures put the Tortes at
    514 per ecent.; Socialists 39) per
    cent.: Liberals 8 per cent,

    Question one
    The first question put was:—
    ‘1 a General Election, were held

    second hal! of September.

    mimediateiy, lor which warty |
    vould you vote ?” |
    Che result wa3si— j
    July Aug. Sept. |
    a) @) @) a) @)

    ® & &% &. SoS

    Tory 49) 50 50 50 S514 614
    Soe. 49, 41 405 “3 38) 39) |

    Lib 9 8 8 8 4 8

    Others 1 1 1 1 1 uN
    Although 97 per cent, of those who
    voted Torv at the last General
    Election intend to do so again
    onlv 801 oer cent. of Socialists

    THE TORIES HOLD

    ZyVelen
    Z x 4 oe 7

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE




    VOTE



    q
    5

    wae





    ie




    win point
    Liberals

    remain steudiast. Ten per cent.
    have turned Tory and 14 per

    cent Liberal. The other eight
    per cent. are undecided.

    Two out of three Liberals say they
    will vote Liberal ay vin, but one-
    fifth have turned Tory.

    The second question was :—

    " Regardless oj how you would
    vote yoursel/, which party do
    you think would win tf a
    General Election were hela
    immediately ?

    July Aug. Sept.

    @ (2) M™) ¢)
    Tory win .. 45 45 47 45) 50
    Soc, win .. 36 35 37 33 By
    - “SPPGRS Ades, : 4 4
    ndecided .. 19 20 16 21 18

    *Less than half per cent,

    More thun three-quarters of

    Tories are confident of victory,
    but 1) per cent. take the view

    that the Socialists will hold on
    to office.

    Of Socialists, 62 per cent, are
    optimistic about their party's
    chances of being returned
    against 18 per cent, who foresee
    a Tory come-back. MHalf the
    interviews in the second
    Septembe: investigation were
    completed before Mr. Attlee
    announced a General Election
    (Tne Daily Express will take

    further polls every week until
    election day—October 25.

    ee

    driving machinery and not to
    steam boilers used for other pur-
    poses, such as boilers for pressure
    vessels, e.g., steam tubes in ovens,
    calendars, boilers for injection,
    ee, into vats or boilers for cook-
    ng.

    It was felt that steam boilers
    should be covered by the section,
    The second was that no power is
    given, even to the examining
    engineer, to require boilers to be
    fitted with safety attachments
    such as a safety valve and a
    pressure gauge, and an amend-
    ment to Section 23 is accordingly
    proposed in’ Clause 14 to meet
    this point.

    Disciplinary Measures
    10. The Secretary of State

    also considered that Section
    25(4) was of doubtful value
    since the giving of the notice
    was made to depend on the
    opinion of the o or manager
    of the factory, and that Section
    26(5) was undesirable, since the
    failure of an official to do his
    duty should be a matter for dis-
    ciplinary measures and not for
    prosecution, and should be de-
    leted.



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    In fact Clause 16 repeals Sections
    25 and 26 relating to the notifica-
    tion of accidents, which it is pro-
    posed to include in a separate Bill,
    and also mpkes provision to im-
    pose a penalty on persons actually
    committing the offence for which
    the occupier is liable afd to énable
    the occupier or owner to exempt
    himself from liability on the con-
    viction of the actual offender. I
    have no comments on Clauses 19
    and 20 of the Bill.

    11. It is unusa] to amend an Act
    before it has been brought into
    operation, but the Assistant Labour
    Adviser to the Secretary of State
    supports such ation in this
    instance.

    Inavequaie Salary

    12. It may be asked when the
    long awaited Factory Inspector
    may be expected to arrive. In
    this connection, I will not weary
    Honourable Members with the
    various proposals that have been
    considered during the last three
    years and the difficulties which
    have been encountered in securing
    a suitable serving officer from the
    U.K, Factory Service.

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    These difficulties relate to the
    inadequacy of the salary offered
    (8800 per annum) and the in-
    ability, ynder the conditions gov-
    erning the employment of Factory
    Inspectors in the U.K. of securing
    the services of an officer on second-
    ment for a period of more than
    one year.

    The possibility of getting an
    active retired officer to come here
    for, say, a couple of years in the
    first instance has accordingly been
    taken up with the Secretary of
    State, and I hope that I will soon
    be in a position to submit con-
    crete proposals to the Legislature.
    I myself hope that it will be
    possible to complete arrangements
    for a Factory Inspector to arrive
    in time for the next crop season.
    I should not like, at the present
    stage, to give any commitment as
    to when the Act will be brought
    into force.

    Minor Points

    Hon'ble J. A. Mahon said that
    he was not in any way opposed
    to the principle of the Bill, but

    }there were some points which
    had him a little worried, He had
    listened most carefully to the
    Hor’ble the Colonial Secretary
    when he stated that the services
    of an experienced factory in-

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    LECTIONARIES, AND PURSE CALENDARS

    NOW ON DISPLAY

    BIBLES, PRAYER & HYMN BOOKS A. & M. in assorted
    leather bindings, and in ivory.

    “IN STILL WATERS”; “IN GREEN PASTURES”; “COME YE
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    e ’
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    NIGHTBOUND—Robert Hichens
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    JUNGLE CHASE—Roy Farran
    LATE FINAL—Lewis Gibbs

    MAY WE BOOK YOUR ORDER FOR THE DUKE OF
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    Steck already consigned to this bookshop,

    spector had not yet been obtained

    “I am a litthe chary about this
    Bill where it says that a factory
    inspector must be appointed. If
    we pass this Bill to give the La-
    bour Commissioner power to
    appoint the inspector, unless we
    insert some clause to say that the
    inspector has to be appointed
    with the necessary qualifications,
    we might find ourselves landed
    with someone acting as a
    factory inspector without the
    slightest idea of what he is do-
    ing” Mr. Mahon said,

    He could not see what they
    were possibly going to do with a
    whole time factory inspector. His
    work would be cut out for the
    first two years while he was get-
    ting the necessary machinery
    feneed. After that machinery had
    been fenced, his sole job would
    be to inspect boilers of 24 D.C.
    factories and six cyrup plants.

    Accidents

    He did not think that the num-
    ber of aceidents reported in Bar-
    bados as a result of the operation
    of factories justified the Govern-
    ment in undertaking the expen-
    diture of appointing a factory in-
    spector.

    Hon'ble G. B. Evelyn agreed
    with the principle of having a
    factory inspector rather than the
    old Factory cord, He however
    wanted to know if this inspector
    was going to be, employed per-
    manently and the colony saddled
    with another man in the civil
    service establishment.

    The Hon'ble the Colonial Sec-
    retary said that originally it was
    intended that the post of factory
    inspector should be on the prin-
    ciple of shared secondment, J.e.,
    work between Barbados and the
    Windward and Leeward Islands.
    That idea did not however seem
    to be working out.

    The Government intended get-
    ting a fully qualified factory in-
    spector from secondment from
    the United Kingdom, If they had
    to get ® man from the Home Ser-
    vices, then they would have to
    provide a gratuity so as to offset
    the loss of certain pension rights,

    He was in communication with
    the Secretary of State for the
    Colonies and he had however
    hoped to get a retired man so that
    the gratuity would not be neces-
    sary in that case.

    He said that the Legislature
    would have the privilege to con-
    sider the matter again because he
    doubted they could get a good man
    for £800 and they would have to
    come back with a resolution for
    additional money.

    Two Years’ Work

    In addition, the Colonial Secre-
    tary said that Government realisec
    that the work of the factory in-
    spector would be over a_ period
    of two years and the Legislature
    at the end of that time would
    have to reconsider the matter in





    4427





    Pass Factories Act Amendment Bil
    Of Machinery

    }











    the light of existing cireumstances.

    The President said that the
    Hon'ble the Coloniai Secretary
    had mentioned £800. He wantec
    to know if the Government woulc
    take into consideration the fact
    that they would have to provide
    passage money to ang from the
    United Kingdom for this man anc
    maybe his family, as well as
    travelling allowance for doing hi:
    work in Barbados.

    He did not agree with the
    Hon'ble Mr. Mahon when he talked
    about getting a fully qualifiec
    man, because looking at it from :‘
    financial peint of view, it mean
    that Government would have to
    pay a salary commensurate with
    full qualifications,

    Hon'ble Mr. Mahon replying to
    the President said that he was not
    \Ninking of finance from the Gov-
    ernment’s point of view, but from
    the point of view of the industry,
    because, if they had an inspector
    not fully qualified who did not
    know what he was doing, he might
    call on industries to instal un-
    necessary safety gadgets etc.

    In Committee

    The Bill then went into Com-
    mittee during the course of which
    Hon. Mr. Mahon raised the ques-
    tion as to whether there should
    be a fully qualified inspector rather
    than just any ingpector occurring
    in the section where it stated thai
    the Labour Commissioner might
    delegate the powers to inspectors,

    Hon'ble F, E, Field pointed ou
    that no other inspector was re-
    ferred to in the Bill except the
    factory inspector and therefore
    the word “any” oceurring before
    inspector in the section would of
    necessity have to refer to the
    factory inspector.

    He however admitted that thr
    word “the” rather than the wor,
    “any” would make the section
    clearer and suggested that it shoul:
    be amended along those lines.

    ‘Hon'ble Mr. Mahon accepted
    that suggestion,

    The Bill was then passed with o
    few minor amendments.

    Steel Band

    @ From page 1

    enter because of the fierce fighting
    in the vicinity. She touched
    many new parts, including Subic
    ay, Yokohama, Shanghai and
    Tsingtao, covering about 30,001
    miles in 1948 and about the same
    mileage in 1949.

    The years 1949 and 1050 were
    heetie for Alshain and in Novem-
    ber 1950 came another break in
    her activities, She proceeded to
    the East Coagt and on April 30,
    1951, at Norfolk, Virginia, she was
    assigned to the Amphibious Force,
    Atlantic Fleet, That called for a
    larger crew, an addition of land-
    ing boats, operational training and
    drills to prepare for her not un-





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    PAGE FOUR

    BARBADOS #9 ADVOCATE

    Green SS Se Ss
    Printed by the Advocate Co., L*4., Broad 8t., Bridgetown

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    MY BROTHER RAINBOW'S END
    : : THE KING | Britain’s Election stirs

    | the Americans... They
    say it is ‘in the bag’
    for the Tories

    WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1951





    ata



    Wednesday, October 10, 1951





    Dangerous Practice

    WHEN the Legislature was asked to
    consider the new regulations controlling

    A; the watchful, hopeful eyes

    motor traffic in this island, it was suggested
    in the House of Assembly that something
    be done to control the impromptu and
    dangerous contraptions used on motor
    lorries for religious outings and bank holi-
    day picnics. The discussion resolved itself
    in two factions, one supporting the ‘bus
    owners who had complained that they were
    being denied legitimate business and the
    other supporting the lorry owner who paid
    taxes and was entitled to indulge in any
    trade which brought him revenue.

    There is a point at which the exercise of
    certain rights degenerates into a license to
    indulge in selfishness at the probable ex-
    pense of the public. That point has now
    been reached in connection with these vehi-
    cles and the Government should take cogni-

    of Britain are turned on Buckingham
    Palace, a book is published which
    reveals with warmth and_ intimate
    knowledge much of the character of
    the man whose health holds so much
    for us all. Here, from “A King’s
    Story,”’ by the Duke of Windsor, are
    some glimpses of the King—Bertie to
    his brother—as the Duke sees him.

    Jur boyhood ... his marriag:
    -.-.and my abdication

    BERTIE came into my room
    alone that evening (the evening

    BERTIE

    aa s

    Le :
    Rael t-] ae



    Frederick Cook

    NEW YORK. |
    THE Americans this time are not even|Â¥
    * |going through the motions of honouring the} }
    os |time-worn fiction that a British election is
    |none of their affair. They think it is—espe-
    cially this one. Right across the U.S.A. they
    |are quite openly hoping for a Tory victory.
    | And most of them think it is in the bag.



    So ae

    %



    me | Writing from London, Scripps-Howard | ¢
    |columnist Parker La Moore warns, however,)$
    | it may prove easier to turn the Socialists out
    | than to repair the damage they have done.
    |Fuel and power shortages this winter may
    be as serious as in 1947. There is the short-

    , |
    returned to! age of train crews threatening transport

    father

    time the Professor
    Marlborough House my











    on the particular route. And it was now
    alleged that other ‘bus owners were re-

    bled companionship of our youth.
    The situation seemed to cry
    mutely for a symbolical laying

    to -understand my feelings

    had nearly overpowered me; and}

    ist for the same paper, believes, that a Tory

    victory would bring no basic change in

    . '
    «ree : was 380! . i
    sance of what is an obvious public danger of the abdication, December 11, § taken aback by my} sent for him to ask precisely | breakdown. |
    ar 1936) for a last talk. : : news that in his soy} what he meant. {
    and find means of checking it. I was in the midst of packing way he could not* The Professor, embarrassed, |
    ; : hich my most personal possessions. . .. ; bring himself tot finally explained: “Your Royal! There are rising living costs, meat ration |
    It may be that the difficulties which many I closed the door, and pushed § express his innermost} Highness, it isn't only that Prince : : 3 ’ : |
    people experienced in obtaining "buses for aside the things on the sofa to ; ar ~ magne ne mi Albert. is inattentive, but, when cuts and the widening gap between imports : |
    religious outings and picnics, because of — a place for him to sit} .oohsing for’ ‘next to I scold ye he as my beard.” | and exports. ' %
    ah . ra own. 73 Bertie had most at orne peti ic , ‘
    the regulations dealing with concession- Shy and retiring by nature, he Te ee eae iar atthe Ce The Socialists, say La Moore, can be con-
    ri : ; s shrank instinctive rom © §} have to wear crown if I? “ gy : : }
    aires led to this contrivance to accommo- Gvenmirtotas jife I bed lived. with i eee ait noes womeicl ‘concern my brother Bertie joined the piss naa a facing up to these ao ee
    t . fe aye ; for me was mixed with the ° s . ne rlier i i
    date the faithful. It was alleged that cer some zest. fee ose Bnei Stade: Kala adeba:: Sten aia earli ut t e incoming Government wi
    Yet he essed , admirable 3
    tain’ ‘bus owners met great difficulty in qualities—-qualies that may not } - responsibilities of king: not pérmit a senior to be seen in find them difficult to solve.
    ee mie an ot : ; the company of a_ first termer I;
    obtaining permission to use a Bie ta of ere eee oe ine king = i fle, waived a, few days | wise = Ree establish thons the sig ine
    *buses outside their route. But it was known confident of -that Ligsouaite toe: teten” Bet close companionship we hag | TH WIN...
    ; . rate thar he oe 4 lways known.
    i 5 uring these last days we had $ wrote that he loaged for me a ys |
    that in some cases the granting of this sian . — or Whar "4.1 5 be bene wie’ wasnt However he was soon beset by | permission would have upset the schedule frankness recalling the untrou- } 2f all people snou'd be able i the same new-boy difficulties that ‘ ’
    4

    fused permissien to rent "buses to other
    owners who had contracts for transporting
    outing parties.

    All this cannot outweigh the fact that
    the method of circumventing the regula-
    tions has now led to a positive danger to
    the public?

    The contraptions which are fitted on to
    the platforms of lorries when occasions
    demand are in many instances, old, dilapi-
    dated, and badly adjusted. They are not
    subject to any inspection by the 4Jnspec-
    tors provided by Government to work in
    the Highways and Transport Department.
    The motor lorry itself is inspected and
    must conform to certain specifications and
    answer certain engineering tests for reli-
    ability before it can be put on the road.
    On this lorry however, an owner can put
    any contraption made of pine, oak, or
    shingle and he has the right to crowd as
    many people into it as will subject them-
    selves to the danger.

    Public evidence is overwhelming to sup-
    port the fact that many of these “tops”
    which are now fitted to the lorries are out
    of alignment and look as if they. would top-
    ple off. In many instances the services of a
    carpenter has to be summoned just before
    they move off and even then they seem to
    defy the law of gravitation along the
    journey.

    On a recent outing by one of these reli-
    gious bodies one passenger fell from the
    top and suffered injuries. It is true that a
    passenger might fall as easily from a
    *bus but the fact remains that the protec-
    tion which he can get from a properly con-
    structed "bus is not available in one of
    these jitneys.

    What constitutes a scandal is that these
    contraptions are not subjected to any in-
    spection and can carry as many passengers
    as the owner cares to carry. The owner who
    provides a proper ‘bus according to the
    regulations is therefore penalised to the
    extent of having to limit the number of
    his passengers and to keep his vehicle in
    such a condition, mechanical and other-
    wise as is laid down by the law and en-
    forced by the Transport Department.

    It might be that in view of the neces-
    sity to afford the public some means of
    transport it will be desirable to allow vehi-
    cles of this type on the road at intervals
    when there is great pressure on the ‘bus
    service but the least the Government can
    do is to provide that they be subject to
    inspection and conform to some rule of
    safety. The vehicles themselves constitute
    a danger to other users of the road.



    The King

    THE announcement that there will be no
    further daily bulletin concerning the ill-
    ness of His Majesty the King would seem
    to indicate that the period of anxiety has
    passed and that His Majesty is on the road
    to recovery. This conclusion is further for-
    tified by the visit of H.R.H. Princess Eliz-
    abeth and the Duke of Edinburgh to
    Canada.

    The humble thanks of the peoples of the
    British Empire and Commonwealth will be
    offered for the recovery of the King. The
    Empire is already faced with setbacks of an
    alarming nature and even the continued
    illness of His Majesty with the consequence
    of state affairs being conducted by a Coun-

    cil of State would have added to the incon-
    venience.

    But above all this there is the fact that His
    Majesty following in the footsteps of his father
    has endeared himself to millions of his people by
    his human interest in their affairs. He has been
    able through the science of radio tomake his own
    personal appeal to their loyalty and to create that
    bond of affection which it is possible in these
    days to forge between kings and common people.

    The prayers of a loyal and faithful people have
    beén answered and the hope now is that quick
    recovery and good health to His Majesty will be
    a@ further cause for thankfulness,

    on of hands,’ a passing of the
    torch. But there is not much
    that a former Monarch can tell
    his successor. F
    “You are not going to find this
    a difficult job at all,” I assured
    him. “You know all the ropes
    and you have almost overcome
    that slight hesitation in your
    speech which used to make public
    speaking so hard for you.”
    Words do not come easily to

    Bertie on occasions of great
    emotion; without his having to
    tell me so. I knew that he felt

    my going keenly, At the same
    time he can be extremely practi-
    cal. |

    “By the way David,” he asked
    me, “have you given any thought
    as to what you are going to be
    called now?”

    This question took me aback.

    « * a

    As that late hour the question
    of another title seemed of little
    consequence to a man who had
    been King.

    Immediate reflection told me
    that, as the son of the Sovereign,
    I was by right of birth a Prince—
    ue Royal Highness the Prince

    ward.

    But Bertie had evidently pon-
    dered the question and no doubt
    judging it only proper that [
    should bear a title at least equal
    to that of my younger brothers,
    Harry, Duke of Gloucester, and
    George, Duke of Kent, he said
    thoughtfully: “I shall create
    you a Duke. How about the family
    name of Windsor?”

    “Duke of Windsor,” I said, half
    to myself. Liking the sound of
    it, I modded in agreement.

    “It shall be the first act of my
    reign.”

    He waz sure that
    Whatever I ceeided !
    would ibe in the ‘bes
    interests cf the coun {
    and the Empire hi

    try

    eeaneunee aneeenens!

    Outlook ...

    I TOOK comfort from the fact
    that my brother Bertie, to whom
    the succession would pass, was
    in outlook and temperament very
    much like my father. Tihe pat-
    terns of their lives were much
    the same, with the steady swing
    of habit taking them both year
    after year to the same places at
    the same time and with the same
    associates. Strongly rooted each
    in his own existence, they tended
    to be withdrawn from the hurly
    burly of life that I relished.
    Both were devoted family men a
    quality that goes a long way for
    a king in a constitutional
    monarchy.

    My father was greatly beloved.
    And the undoubted popularity of
    my brother Bertie, whose life is
    so much like that which my
    father led, suggests that irrespec-
    tive of whatever other forms the
    monarchy might have taken
    under the impress of a different
    personality, the British people
    are rightly pleased with his faith-
    ful carrying on of my father's

    ways.
    Lessons ...

    THE SCENE changes, swings

    back to boyhood days...

    I LIKER German and studied
    diligently, and profited from the
    hours I spent with the Professor.

    However, Bertie did not share
    the same partiality and treated
    the lessons lightly.

    In one of the Professor’s week-
    ly reports to my father on our
    separate progress he once wrote
    under Bertie’s column: “In-
    attentive and playful.” The next



    WHY WE NEED NOT BE ALARMED ABOUT

    Stalin’s 300 Submarines

    FOR some time it has been
    known that the Russians are
    building a powerful fleet of sub-
    ee: We are told they have

    We cannot ignore the rise of
    this new striking force, But, for-
    tunately, we do know something
    about these submarines.

    Most of them are of conven-
    tional types, many are of pre-
    war design and probably less effi-
    cient than the German U boats.

    Included in the 300 are a large
    number of small coastal sub-
    marines — which might not be
    dangerous — and some quite ob-
    solete boats.

    Secret High-Speed Ship

    Reported Blown Up

    Russia, according to “Jane’s
    Fighting Ships,” seems to have a
    policy of never scrapping a ship.

    The rez! core of the fleet are
    the “K” and “Shtcha” class sub-
    marines, but the performance of
    even these relatively modern
    boats is not out of the ordinary.

    The important question to
    answer is: What progress have
    the Russians made with new-type
    submarines ?

    They must have German tech-
    nicians working for them. It is
    therefore reasonable to suppose
    that they are pressing on with the
    revolutionary “Walther-boat,” a
    submarine on which the Germans
    were. experimenting towards the
    end of the war.

    It carries its own oxygen in the
    form of hydrogen peroxide, and
    is said to be capable of under-
    water speeds of 25 ‘knots.

    But hydrogen peroxide is
    tricky and unstable stuff, and
    there are reports that the one
    “Walther-Boat” on which the
    Russians were experimenting
    blew up and sank with all
    hands,

    We might be on safe grounds,
    therefore, if for the present we
    liscounted this as a _ serious
    langer.

    Ne Fears of Atom-Sub.

    There is also talk of an atomic-
    powered submarine of unlimited
    range and endurance, but we
    have nothing to fear here, so far.

    A force we must reckon with

    is the new, fast, German-type
    XXI U boats. These large sub-
    marines have improved Schnor-
    kels, and their maximum sub-

    merged speed is something like
    15 knots, with a cruising speed
    of eight knots.

    The Germans were actually
    prefabricating the type XXIs on

    By
    EDWARD SHACKLETON, MP,

    Son of the famous explorer,
    late Anti-U Boat Intelligence
    Coastal Command

    a big scale, and in the words of
    the official account of the Battle of
    the Atlantic: “The advent of these
    new U boats would have revolu-
    tionised submarine warfare”; but
    they came too late.

    ‘Handful’ on Patrol

    The Russians possess a dozen
    type XXIs and should be building
    others. Indeed, they are said to
    have over 100 submarines under
    construction,

    Yet, having said all this,
    there is no reason at all to be
    alarmist.

    The majority of Russia’s sub-
    marines are old,

    Such submarines boldly
    handled and using acoustic hom-
    ing torpedoes could be a_ serious
    nuisance. But could the Russians
    emulate the Germans in “wolf-

    pack” tactics? That is cebateae
    The Russians in modern ti x

    have not achieved much success
    in naval warfare. It is certain
    that the number of submarines
    they could maintain on patrol
    would be a handful compared
    with the size of their fleet.

    It is true that new high-speed
    submarines might neutralise the
    effectiveness of the aircraft tactics
    and weapons that were. r -
    sible for more than half the Ger-
    man U boat killings. a.

    But we do not standstill. New
    types of radar may enable a plane
    more easily to detect a Schnorkel.

    Buoy That Listens

    There is the.Sono-Buoy, a com-
    bined hycerophone and radio
    transmitter which relays the
    sound of a submarine to an aero-
    plane. It can be dropped in
    numbers to cover a wide area.

    Its tactical use is exceedingly
    complicated, and there are many
    noises in the sea, including fish
    which bark, squeal, and even
    imitate the thud of a submarine’s
    engine.

    Sometimes, too, the radio
    operator had been startled to
    hear not a propeller’ but’ dance
    music !

    Further, we. 4re_ progressing
    with homing torpedoes which, if

    dropped in the area, pursue the
    submarine and destroy it.

    There are, too, undoubtedly
    new and startling detection
    vices and weapons which
    remain secret.

    de-
    must

    by arrangement we _ used to go
    for walks beyond the playing
    fields.

    Bertie would tell me his trou-
    bles and I would try to advise
    him on the basis of my own ex-
    perience.

    Power Of Girls

    MY sister Mary’s threat, “I'll |
    tell Mama,” although seldom,
    earried out, had a powerfully |
    subduing effect upon us. |

    In this manner Bertie and 1}
    discovered for the first time the}
    powers that little girls the world
    over exert over their brothers,

    On Marriage

    IN 1923 my brother Bertie had |
    married the daughter of a Scot- |
    tish earl, Lady Elizabeth Bowes-
    Lyon, who had brought into the
    family a lively and_ refreshing,
    spirit. |



    One Blessing |

    AND. from that last broadcast)
    speech’ on the abdication evening.

    A FEW hours ago I discharged
    my last duty as King and
    Emperor and now that I have
    been succeeded by my _ brother,
    the Duke of York, my first words
    must be to declare my allegiance |
    to him with all my heart.

    This decision has been made
    less difficult to me by the sure
    knowledge that my- brother with
    his long training in the public
    affairs of this country. and with
    this fine qualities will be able to
    take my place forthwith, without
    interruption or injury to the life
    and progress of the Empire,

    And he has one matchless
    blessing, enjoyed by so many of
    you 309 not bestowed on me—a
    happy home with his wife and
    children,

    *“ FROM “A_ King’s _ Story.”
    Memoirs of the Duke of Windsor
    (Cassell, 258.), out today,

    —L.E.S.



    We can think of the last U
    boat war as a_ sequence of
    measure and counter-measure,

    When it became too dangerous
    for the Germans to travel on the
    surface by day, they surfaced by
    night.

    We replied by fixing search-
    lights to aircraft which homed in
    on their radar, switching on the
    light for the actual attack,

    Attack, and Counter

    When the Germans fitted radar |
    search receivers which gave)
    warning of the presence of air-
    craft we retaliated by flooding
    the area with so many aircraft
    flying high with their radar}
    switched on that the U boat com-!
    mander never knew when it was!
    safe to remain on the surface, |

    At one time the U boats stayed
    on the surface by day and fought
    back, using anything up to ten
    light flak guns. To counter this,
    forward firing cannon and rocket
    projectiles were fitted to aircraft.

    Must Have The Planes
    All tiis equipment calls for
    like a flying Christmas
    tree, afiq Coastal Command and
    Naval Aviation must have the
    right aircraft for the job.

    _ Coastal nd is _ still
    equipped mainly with Lancasters
    and old pre-war Sunderlands.

    But at last the Shackleton, a
    specially designed maritime air-
    craft, is coming into the ‘squad-
    rons, and we expect soon to get
    the Neptune, a first-class Ameri-
    can anti-submarine aircraft.

    Meanwhile the Navy is concen-

    trating its main resources on
    preparations for anti-submarine
    warfare.
    Our own submarines have here|
    an important part to play as
    potential hunters of enemy sub-
    marines.

    Our _ surface anti-submarine
    forces are being strengthened by!
    new building.

    A Double Weapon
    The Asdic, the famous under-



    water detecting apparatus, will]
    be vital. i
    One important new device!

    locks ‘the Asdic’' to the anti-sub-|

    marine weapon projector:

    submarine is simultaneously |
    Yocated and the anti-submarine
    weapon fired, |

    In the long run the thing that}
    really counts is, the brains of our
    scientists anq ‘the skill,
    and adaptability of our seamen)
    and airmen. }

    If the challenge should come we
    shall be ready to meet it

    —L.E.S,

    British policy, but “the Conservatives would
    bring more needed administrative efficiency
    to the Government than the Labourites.”

    What happens could be’ important for
    Americans, says the Wall Street Journal. “A
    Labour victory might mean more bailing out
    of Britain’s ailing economy—a Tory victory,
    fewer drains on the American taxpayer.”

    The Journal expects no new Socialist pro-
    jects and thinks nationalisation schemes are
    now stuck away for fear of offending thé
    middle-class, whose votes will be decisive.

    Says the influential “Kansas City Star”:
    “The .people are tired of controls, ever-
    mounting taxes and the failure of Labour to
    selve the major problems. The temper of the
    people places Labour on the defensive and
    it is inconceivable that Mr. Churchill will
    allow them to get off.”

    OPTIMISTS? NO

    Even on the American Left there is no

    optimism about Labour’s chances.

    In the New York Post, for instance, Dr.
    Frank Kingdon, just back from London,
    writes: “I expect the Conservatives to win a
    majority of 25 to 30. The one group that may
    profit politically from the present situation is
    that of Aneurin Bevan. The struggle of this
    group for control may well be the most
    dramatic political story out of England in

    the coming months.”

    In the Hearst newspapers, Washington

    political columnist George Brown says: “The
    British people have reached the end of their

    rainbow.

    “Socialism has been given a fair and very
    long trial and has proved a delusion.”

    In St. Louis, Missduri, there is unanimity.
    The Courier Journal says bluntly: “Labour's
    chances don’t look bright. There's little doubt
    Anglo-American relations will be improved
    by a Tory victory.”

    And the Globe Democrat says: “British
    Socialism is at its lowest ebb. Unless there
    is a revival of Socialist fervour, Jvabour’s
    supremacy looks doomed.”

    The Boston Herald feels the coming Social-
    ist rejection may be in name only but adds,
    “Even that is important in the Anglo-Ameri-

    can partnership. A Conservative Govern-

    ment will smell sweeter on this side of the
    Atlantic”.

    New York Herald Tribune’s London corres-

    pondent, Joseph Newman, believes Mr. Att-
    belief that |

    lee is basing his hopes on the

    Labour will hold its following while th)
    Tories will fail to increase theirs.
    Opinion polls do not support this, com

    ments Newman.

    Reporting the Evening Standard’s pre-
    posal that the Tories should enter the lists
    without any fixed programme Newman says:
    “This was an indirect warning to Conserv-
    atives to refrain from making promises which

    ities will remain.”

    In the Middle West the Cleveland Plain



    | they will not later be able to fulfil. The Con- |
    \servatives may win but the economic real- |

    |

    So the| Dealer agrees that odds are against the Social- |

    ists and says, “What the Tories really want!

    is two full terms as Government, one to

    i

    straighten out world problems, the second

    courage,|to put Britain as far as practicable back on a}

    |

    free enterprise basis”
    World Copyright Reserved.
    —L.E.S.



    “JAEGER TIME”

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    NO ADDATIVES — Only FRUIT and SUGAR
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    OUR LADIES’ JAEGER COATS
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    ARE DESIGNED FOR TRAVEL

    CEREALS

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    MEAT Dept.
    Fresh Sausages
    Minced Steak

    SQUASH
    « Calves Liver
    24e. per Ib. Fresh Vegetables

    PHONE GODDARDS 1To-DAY

    SSF






    WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1951

    HOUSE PASS SUGAR BILL ‘

    @ From Page 1
    EE in an island like
    Barbados and an industry like the
    sugar industry which is a symbol
    of free enterprise.

    “At this stage I may say,” said
    Mr. Adams, “that it would be chur-
    lish in me not to start by saying
    that in some respects I have been
    surprised at the fact that this
    agreement has been achieved, be-
    cause if I had the misfortune to
    be a capitalist and sugar planter
    for 300 years; to have complete
    and absolute dictation over the
    terms J] am going to emplo: peo-
    ple on; how much money I am
    going to make and keep out of
    the sugar industry, I too might
    have had the misfortune of not
    wanting te conclude an agreement
    of this sort.”

    A very important thing’ about
    whe agreement was that the pro-
    fits of the industry would be lim-
    ited, and out of the money that
    the ‘industry would not be taking

    , as its own by way of profits, cer-
    tain provisions would be made for
    the benefit of others. There would
    be a higher rate of production
    bonus than had been given the
    workers for the past few years; a
    certain portion of the money would
    go to the Labour Welfare Fund,
    and a portion would be earmark-
    ed for the proposed harbour if
    and when Government decided to
    - tegaee with the construction of

    Mr. Adams said that the agree-
    ment had been the subject of
    negotiations existing for roughly
    nine months and that there had

    nm much give and take. “But
    I do feel” he said “that the House
    will agree with me, that if for
    no other reason, the establishment
    of the principle of profits being
    shared between employer and em-
    ployee is in itself an outstanding
    achievement.”

    In one respect, said Mr. Adams,
    it might be said that the idea
    arose as a result of the compara-
    tive stability which the long term
    agreement with the Ministry of
    Food to take West Indian sugar,
    provided. It was felt that as a
    result of this long term contract,
    stability at the production end
    should also be attempted.

    Profits Shared

    Both sides that had subscribed
    to the agreement had agreed that
    there should be reasonable wages
    and reasonable profits in the
    sugar industry in relation to the
    average crop, that being taken for
    some years now as 110,000 tons;
    that when the sugar crop exceed-
    ed that average, its extra profits
    should be shared, and that the
    Stabilisation Fund should be care-
    fully guarded when the crop did
    not exceed that average.

    It was also felt that something
    should be done to bring a sense
    of stability to peasants as far as
    the price paid for their canes
    vere concerned, Perhaps equally
    outstanding was that the public
    should be given information of
    the financial position of the eco-
    nomic situation.

    Hon, members would remember,
    said Mr. Adams, that when the
    Moyne Commission came out here,
    the sugar industry said that~they
    had no objection to the publishing
    for the benefit of the public, fig-
    ures showing what the industry
    was making, in order that em-
    ployees in the industry could see
    that they were speaking the truth
    when they said that they could
    not afford to pay more than Is. 6d.
    2s. or half a crown a day or
    whatever it was. The industry
    hati forgotten that ever year
    since.

    After some persuasion in some
    cases, a little in others and none
    in others. seventeen of the twenty-
    four loval factories had now
    agreed to allow their figures to
    be seen in order that from an
    analysis of those figures a reason-
    able profit could be computed,
    and so on:

    He knew they would all agree
    that it was an excellent thing for

    Leg. Co.

    BARBADOS will be represented
    at the British Industries Fair in
    1952. A resolution approving the
    expenditure of funds for this pur-
    pose was concurred in by the
    Legislative Council at its meeting
    yesterday.

    The resolution js for the sum of
    $2,520.

    In moving the concurrence of
    the resolution, the Hon’ble the
    Colonial Secretary said that in
    1950, Barbados was not represented
    at the British Industries Fair. In
    1951, it was originally proposed
    that Barbados should again not be
    represented and the daily news-
    paper came out with an article on
    October 4, 1950 entitled “Barbados
    out again.”

    “7 am glad to say that about
    the same time that the article ap-
    peared in the Paess, the Chamber
    of Commerce decided that they
    would go in for the British In-
    dustries Fair of 1951 and the West
    India Committee in, London was
    notified Se ee a erineeerers eee RNASE



    It's delicious!

    the agreement to be made volun-
    tarily @md he hoped that the other
    factory owners would realise that
    a voluntary agreement was pref-
    erable to compulsion.

    Continuing Mr. Adams said
    that one of the reasons of stabili-
    sation as it originally was, was to
    provide against bad years. Not
    merely drought or disease but bad
    years as regards prices, Now
    however, there was some guaran-
    tee as regards prices.

    Labour Trouble

    The sugar industry, if he might
    disclose some of what had been
    discussed. seemed fearful to touch
    the Stabilisation Fund at all, and
    one could well see that if they
    encountered the reverse of what
    they had been experiencing the
    last few years and they did not
    have a substantial Fund there
    might possibly be labour trouble.
    One of the chief points of differ-
    ence was, therefore, whether the
    Fund should be touched at all.
    It was eventually felt that in a
    good year—and they had only
    agreed on a figure of five years—
    if the cron exceeded the five year
    average, the industry out of its
    profits would put 7s. 6d. per ton
    to Labour Welfare and in addition
    there would be taken out of the
    Stabilisation Furid a further 5s.
    If the crop of any particular year
    exceeded the previous five year
    average, the sum agreed on was
    the sum to be taken out and it
    was with that object that the Bil!
    was brought before #2 House. If
    the crop on the other hand, did
    not exceed the previous five year
    average, only half a crown would
    be taken from ‘the Stabilisation
    Fund and given to Labour Wel-
    fare. If in any year the crop
    dropned below 120000 tons, the
    Stabilisation Fuad would not be
    touched. “The Stabilisation Fund
    and Labour Welfare Fund were,
    so to speak, twe aspects of the
    same thing. You get the Labour
    Welfare Fund to repair your
    houses and therefore you do not
    have to take it out of your wages.
    I hope hon, members will have
    read the agreement and I hope
    that I have made it clear about
    the Stabilisation Fund.”

    Referring to the payment of the
    Production Bonu", Mr. Adams paid
    tribute to the last Labour Com-
    missioner and the Secretary of
    the Workers’ Union. “Production
    Bonus is something new to Barba-
    dos and it is now well established
    and well accepted by both sides,”

    he said. The present arrange-
    ment was for 19 per cent., be
    added. ,

    Deep Harbour

    Or, the matter of a harbour, Mr.
    Adams said that this would un-
    doubtedly benefit the sugar indus-
    try more than any other section of
    the community, even more than
    the merchants, it was therefore
    only fair that the necessity of find.

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    ing the huge sum of money for the
    purpose — certainly more than
    £5,000,000—the people who would
    benefit from it most should sub-
    scribe over and above the average
    taxpayer. Thig was the payment
    of a cess of $2 per ton. Agreement
    had been reached however; in view
    of two facts. The Government
    had agreed in principle to examine
    carefully the possibilities of con-
    structing the harbowr, but the
    financial implication and in view of
    the fact that the agreement before
    them had only recently been arriv-

    ed at, it was felt that in a matter
    of the sort with its repercussions
    on other people besides the large
    landowner, it should be presented
    to the public for di-cussion before
    implementation this year.

    It was for that reason and for
    that reason alone that Government
    were not proposing that day to ask
    for legislative sanciion of that pro-
    vision. Of course everything «
    pended on the fiscal survey They
    must know how much money they
    could afford for a harbour or
    whether they could get a loan
    floated.

    Mr. Adams said thai he was
    trying to be persuasive rath>r .aan

    le.

    yield to the temptation of saying
    things that might stir one or .wo
    members to writh. He would
    merely say though that election
    or no election, it was not playing
    the game to start rumours and
    try to persuade peasants in the

    island that the agreement
    do them some everlasting harm,
    That was not true. “So far as the
    agreement is conc erned a certan
    measure of praise ip due to “ie
    Sugar Producers Federation, for
    30) years we have never had a 1y~
    thing like it in this island. There
    has been profit sharing among the
    shareholders but not among the
    workers, Now I can only say that
    i: the ee, thir tho far ory
    owr a Id havo g¢y them
    more this year for their canes but
    for this agreement they have been
    dreaming for 300 vears,”

    would

    Mr. Waleott (E) said that there
    was one point of the Memorandum
    of Agreement that he had com-
    plained of. It was Clause 3 of
    the bill which dealt with $1.80
    per ton to be allocated to the
    Labour Welfare Fund when the
    sugar crop exceeded the average
    of the five preceding years.

    Taking the agreement on a
    whole, he felt that it was a matter
    worth congratulations when in the
    island, one could find interests
    coming together when concerned
    with an industry and arriving at
    an agreement which is supposed
    to last three years,

    In 1947, he shid, there was
    never found to be too much diffi-
    culty in effecting negotiation be-
    tween the planters and the Bar-
    bados Workers’ Union when they

    came to discuss year after year
    the question of “would any bonus
    be given the workers in arrears
    of the Wages which were just
    earned.’

    He pointed out that, so far as
    sharing in the profits of the indi
    try were concerned, the bonts
    was bound to be considered as a
    share in the profits, Since 1947,
    he said, the question was always
    to determine what the excess
    amount was likely to be.

    Mr. Walcott said that when the
    Hon. Senior Member for St. Jos-
    eph regarded it as a great achieve-
    ment, wjth which he _ entirely
    agreed, -he felt that the Hon.
    Member would admit that, sinee
    1947, he had ‘ound no difficulty
    in realizing and recognising t
    the sugar workers, as distinct
    from the owners and producers,
    could. not say what benefit they
    would accrue.

    In the sugar industry in these
    days, he said the producer relied
    on the good weather to get a good
    crop. As regards the percentage
    or bonus paid out this year, there

    had been an increase,

    He was of the opinion that it
    was not so great an achievement.
    There was no doubt that they had
    hed good weather and conse-
    quently good crops. It was agreed
    ihree years by both parties that
    the workers should share in the
    profits of the sugar industry, The
    only thing new was that the
    —* had got a bigger percent~

    “erie pointed out that if one got
    20 tons of sugar, representing a
    little profit, and over the same
    period of time he got 32 tons of
    sugar, which is 12 tons more,
    there would obviously have been
    an. increase.

    Referring to the additional cess
    of $1.80 per ton allocated to the
    Labour Welfare Fund, he said
    that when they made that alloca-
    tion, they were only reducing the
    amount that went into the work-
    ers’ pockets. They would not be
    affecting the producer or the mer-

    chants,

    He said that there was no one
    way that they could get it out of
    the profits. As regards the $2 that
    was to be paid towards a Harbour
    Fund, England had never allowed
    taxation within taxation. But he
    wanted to say that there was
    nothing that would be more use-
    ful to the community than a har-
    bour because it was to be used
    by all.

    He said that there was little in
    the agreement to quarrel over,
    but he felt that nothing should
    have been allocated to the Wel-
    fare Fund which grows and grows
    from year to year and cannot sink.

    Mr. Watcott further pointed out
    that the person who contributed
    hundreds of tons of sugar to the
    industry should be given better
    treatment than the others who
    contributed comparatively little.

    In The Legislature Yesterday

    ‘ oot, Legisia
    p.m. yen'
    The

    Council met




    the Colonial Sec-

    COUNCIL
    at lishment (General) (Amendment)
    No, 2 Order, 1951" made by the

    Governor-in-Executive Commit-

    tee on the S0th a. of eee



    4 +4 ent of the Director 1951, under the ovisionn of
    ~ and Transport as an sects 3 of the clu Establish
    'y of the Seo. ment Act, 1949,



    ment,

    The Hon'ble the Colonial Sec-

    Dis vation Board
    and the Domestic Sugar Agree-

    Resolution to make it lawful
    for th Governor-in-Executive
    Committee to lease to the Vestry
    of the parish of 8t, George a

    retary laid the Report of the parcel of land formerly part of
    Comptroller of Customs on the _ Carmichael Plantation, situate at
    Customs Revenue, Trade, Ship- Ellerton in the parish of St.
    ping and Excise of the Island George and containing by ad-
    for the year 1950, ‘mtoasurement five acres, two

    The Council concurred in

    the

    roods for the purpose of estab-

    Provision
    wages of workers,

    Bill intituled an Act to amend

    the Trade Act 1910,

    Bill to authorise the Vestry of
    the parish of Christ Chureh to
    raise a loan not exceeding $7,200.

    The Council postponed the fol-

    lowing :—

    Bill to authorise the Commis-

    sioners of Highways of St, Philip
    to increase the rates of pay and
    travelling allowances to the In-
    spector
    of Highways of the said parish,

    and Assistant Inspector

    Bill intituled An Act to
    for the

    make
    Protection of

    following :— lishing a playing fleld. Resolution to approve of the

    Resolution to place the sum of The Council passed the follow- compulsory aequ)sition by the
    $2,520 at the disposal of the Gov- ing :— Governor-in-Executive Commit-
    ernor-in-Executive Comngittee to Bill to amend the Factories tee of all that certain parcel of
    supplement the Estimates, 1951— Act, 1947. land (Part of the tenantry lands
    52, Part I, Current, as shown in Bilt to amend the Public of a place called Bosvigo) con-
    the Supplementary Estimates, Health Act, 1008, taining by estimation 15,870 sq.
    1951—52, No, 25, which form the Bill to amend the Old Age ft, for the purpose of establish-
    Schedule to the Resolytion. Pension Act, 1937. ing a district market,

    Resolution to approve the Bill to amend the Package Tax The Council adjourned to Tues-

    Order entitled

    “The Civil Estab-

    Act, 1941.

    day next at 2.00 p.m,



    Approve B.IL.F. Expenditure

    “T think it has been agreed that
    participation of Barbados in the
    British Industries Fair of 1951
    which coincided with the Festival
    of Britain, was a success.

    A Success

    The Colonial Secretary then
    quoted from the West India Com-
    mittee Circular supperting the re-
    marks that Barbados’ participa-
    tion in the B.LF. had been a suc-
    cess,

    The specific report relating to
    Barbados which was prepared by
    the West India Committee, point-
    ed out that many overseas and
    home buyers had never heard of
    Barbados rum and had associated
    all West Indian rum with Jamaica,
    To those acquainted with the good
    quality of Barbados rum, it came
    as a serious surprise that it had
    not been seen. at the B.I.F. before.
    ‘The same thing applied to fancy
    molasses and the rest.

    A week or two ago, the Cham-

    It's cooked

    VALOR

    a reputation for good
    ve the fallowing models:

    TABLE MODEL

    2 Burner with

    The stove with
    cooking. We ha

    WICKS No. 200 44c.



    stands

    No, 300 80c.

    $25.21 & $17.50

    AON Ne ak cass

    No. 21 $1.00



    ber of Commerce which had been
    asked whether they would partici-
    pate in the 1952 Fair, reported
    that owing to lack of funds, they

    _would be unable to do so, It

    seemed to the Executive Commit-
    tee that it would be a crying
    shame if Barbados did not
    participate.

    There were occasions when a
    light should be hidden under the
    bushel, but it was thought that
    there were other occasions when
    the good name of a colony or a
    country required that it should
    take its proper place in an ex-
    nibition like the British Industries
    Fair.

    Rum, Molasses

    “T have already referred to ru$
    and faney, molasses, I am sure
    that from the impression given at
    the Fair, the result can be nothing
    but good to Barbados,” he said.

    As regards tourism, owing to
    shipping difficulties since the war,
    there were not many people com-

    on a

    ing from the United Kingdom to
    Barbados,. but they had been told
    that ships were coming. He was
    convinced that the attractive stalls
    proposed for 1952 at the B.I.F.,
    would put Barbados on the map
    and encourage people to come here,

    He said that the Executive Com-
    mittee had decideg that in as much
    as the Chamber of Commerce had
    gone to the full expense of bear-
    ing the cost of the stand at this
    year’s Fair, it was only fitting that
    the Government should come for-
    ward next year to bear the cost.

    He was very glad to say that the
    Chamber of Commerce had said
    that if the Legislature providec
    the necessary funds, the Chamber
    of Commerce ‘vould be only toc
    please to co-operate with the Gov-
    ernment by supplying the exhibits
    at the Fair.

    He had much pleasure in moving
    that the resolution be concurred
    in,

    Hon'ble F. E. Field seconded.

    a



    ‘}10th and 12th July, 1951 addressec

    Suit

    Mr. E. A, McLeod Police Magis- Guiana,
    ment Centre on

    trate of District‘A”, discharged



    PAGE

    FIVE







    Chief
    Briti
    Move
    evening

    Sgt.
    S.P.C.A,

    Major Torrezao,
    Inspector of
    visited the Youth
    Monday

    Elsie Aimes of Beckles Hill, St. and gave a lecture to 25 boys an

    Michael, when the preliminary
    hearing in the case in which she
    was charged by the Police with
    throwing corrosive acid on Car-

    men Marshall on June 16, ended the Centre

    yesverday.

    G. Springer prosecuted on behalt
    oi tue tviice. Before discharging
    Aimes Mr. McLeod said that on

    the evidence before him he could Chief

    girls on
    Animals.” A
    parents also attended the lecture

    playing games,
    Mr. E. K. Walcott appeared on part in other activities.

    behalf of Aimes while Inspector jecture a

    Be Kind Tx
    number o

    “How To
    large

    When the Sgt.
    the
    typing,

    Major arrived at
    members wer

    and taking
    After the

    of thanks wa
    A, Young

    vote
    moved by Rev. C

    The Sgt.
    Inspector

    Major, aiong wit!
    Williams an

    no. cend up the ease and the one Inspector Licorish visited Walk
    witness rur the prosecution—Mr. ers Plantation, St. George yeste!

    A. Durant was not lying.

    she did not recognise threw the
    acid on her,

    day.
    It seemed to him that Marshall there. He told the Advocate tha‘
    went by the window that night the cows were all clean and the

    . pens
    and looked out and someone whom Somaition.

    He inspected the animal

    kept in a very sanitar

    Along with Inspector Licoris!

    Mr. Torrezao called at Glendair

    After the preliminary hearing prison and was shown around |

    Carmen Marshall was taken to the

    Major Foster,

    Governor of thc

    Central Investigation Department prison. He saw the poultry anc

    when a container filled with liquid
    was knocked out of her hand by
    Clyde Boxhill while Marshall was

    approaching Aimes who was talk- poultry
    ing in the courtyard after she was Inspector

    discharged.

    A sample of the liquid and the
    container have been sent*to the
    Government Analyst for a report.

    Forty-eight-year-old Charles
    Austin of Dunlow Lane, St. Michael
    was bound over for a period of
    six months by His Worship Mr.
    E. A. Me)

    pig farms

    , Police Magistrate | giving

    in the prison com-
    ound. “The pigs are well fed anc
    ook in the pink of condition. Th«
    too look fine,” Chie’

    Torrezao told the
    Advocate.

    He said that the Governor ha
    made arrangements for him t
    ive a lecture to the prisoners o1

    Friday next.

    Although Animal Welfare Week
    is past, Chief Inspector Torreza
    is continuing his tour of the island |
    lectures at schools an

    of District “A’ when he was found | other institutions,

    guilty of the larceny of a quantity
    of plants valued at $5.00 the
    property of Clifford Mayhew.

    The offence was committed on
    October 2.

    The Office of the Police Traffic
    Branch which was the first office
    on one’s left while going into the
    Central Station is now behind the
    Charge room opposite to the Re-
    creation Room.

    ERRATUM

    A MESSAGE from the Governot
    concerning an error made in
    paragraph 1 of the Domestic
    Sugar Agreement was put before
    the Legislature yesterday.

    The Message reads:

    His Excellency the Governor
    has the honour to inform the
    Legislature that his attention has
    been drawn to an error in para-
    graph 1 of his Message No,
    34/1951 of the 2nd of October, on
    the subject of the Domestic Sugar
    Agreement, in the reference to
    the different organisations con-
    cerned,

    2. His Excellency has the
    honour to notify the Legislature
    that paragraph 1 of Message
    No. 34/1951 should have read as
    follows: —

    “His Excellency the Governor
    “has the honour to invite the
    “attention of the Honourable the
    “House of Assembly to a
    “memorandum of Agreement
    “dated the 13th September,
    “1951, which, in accordance
    “with the terms, has been
    “submitted to the respective
    “organisations mentioned there-
    “in for their consideration and
    “which, it is understood, has
    “veen confirmed by these
    “organisations, Copies of this
    “Memorandum of Agreement
    “were laid in the Legislature
    “yesterday.

    Another Message telling of an
    eddition to the proposed member-
    ship of the Scotland District Con-
    servation Board also went before
    the Legislature.

    The Message reads:

    His Excellency the Governor
    hus the honour to refer to his
    Deputy's Message No, 21 of the



    to the Legislature in connection
    with the proposed membership o
    the Scotland District Conservatior
    Board and to inform the Honour-
    able the Legislature that the
    Director of Highways and Trans-
    port has been added to the list of
    members set out in that Message.

    New Boys’ Olub

    Major R. A. Stoute, Deputy
    Commissioner of Police will open
    a Boys’ Club at Belleplaine, St.
    Andrew at 4.30 p.m., today, This
    Club will be housed in the Com-
    munity Hall which has been made
    available by the Rector and
    Parochial Treasurer of the Parish.}

    The Club brings the number of|
    Boys’ and Girls’ Club to 13, Thirty-|
    eight boys have already seated
    for membership in the
    plaine Club,



    |

    EE)

    Ly" ( WONDER WiMicdi THE >|





    ople is the tire for you to buy?

    THE SAFEST RIDE!

















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    Sliustrated is Goodyear’s great new tire, the /
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    BLINDING

    HEADACHES

    MADE HER HELPLESS |



    KRUSCHEN
    brought relief

    People who
    suffer from
    severe head-
    aches will be fnterested in
    reading how this woman
    ended her troubles ;—

    pouey in my hands anc
    © lie dowa for hours at a time,
    My aunt, who has taken Kruschen
    Salts for yoars, suggested my
    trying them. so, and I've
    not had a return of those terrible

    and to the unsuspected retention
    in the syitern of stagnating
    waste material, which poisons
    the blood, Remove the poisonous
    accumulations — prevent them
    from forming again—and you
    won't have to worry any more,
    And that is juat how Kruschen
    brings swift and lasting relief-
    by SrOA IS the system thor-
    oughly of all harmful, pain-giving
    waste.

    Ask your nearest Chemistor
    Stores for Kruschen.

    =
    ie



    are |
    : YOU }
    ; x
    : SCARED }:
    By i
    RHEUMATIC 3
    PAINS? x
    Here's the sure and certain X
    way to vonquer them, Rub
    in
    ind it's penetrating powers
    will act quickly and effec-
    tively
    sbi :
    » On Sale at 3
    KNIGHT'S DRUGSTORES
    \ eenmnmnannnnmnecenss

    cs





    » most

    /oman Discharged S.P.C.A. Inspector’: ¢
    1» Acid Throwing Lectures Continue

    “I was subject to terrible
    headaches. While they lasted, |
    seemed to lose my alg t and all

    was forced |

    headaches for months. In fact,

    T feel quite cured,"'— ‘
    Headaches can nearly always |

    be traced to a disordered stomach

    FOR THE BEST IN

    MATCHES |

    ASK FOR :



    THREE PLUMES |
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    | ON SALE
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    evr) fi Bones want

    SEPTIC OINTMENT






    -_ ~ Children’s accidents LS uickly te-

    >, spond to the soothing and healing

    Doropertis of Gern Eien which
    ¥ 4? draws out the dist aad stinnalates
    ay the growth of new skin over
    the damaged area, Keep.a tin
    handy for family use.



    Fon
    SPOTS, BRUISES,

    - > RASHES,

    ea ABRAGIONS, Ete.












    \

    hi



    BeSATHG .. te deen ++. the antiseptic vapour from
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    at night or use the
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    handy for daytime
    Easily recharged from
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    On Sale at KNIGHT'S
    DRUG STORES



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    ACTOR Eo a

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    Compass Saws 12” & 14” (Claw & Engineer
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    Hand Drills

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    va
    Q


    PAGE Six BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1951

    FOR LASTING —Vigour Renewed

    QUALITY & SHADES Without Operation

    It you feel old before your time or suffer
    trom nerze. brain and ness and te in
    ret oe ‘nedt discovery Which re-

    INSIST ON Ihan gland See ig a simple home













    HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



    ee



    REGISTERED














    e that must mak

    i you of . energy and vitality,

    f STA D and feel OM Fee ee or

    VOICE! ... (T TOLD] [ANYWAY... IT’S A GOOD PLACE TO IT'S A GOOD THING I'M A GHOST | toner back ntl aenpty pecenat:
    TO GO INSIDE! || LOOK FOR THE GHOST THAT'S CAUSIN MYSELF ...OR 1 MIGHT BE ALITTLE special, double-strength bottle of #8 \i-
    MICKEY AND ME ALL THE TROUBLE.... | | SCARED! - Vi-Tabs and “the ‘uarantes

    Restores Manhood and Vitality

    OCO s
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    el cosa A NEW SCHOOL GEOMETRY



    WITH TRIGONOMETRY VOLS 1 & 2
    By ANDREW G. J. CAMACHO, B,A., (LOND.) with a foreword
    by Sir Alan Collymore, Chief Justice of Barbados
    NOW ON SALE AT THE ADVOCATE STATIONERY







    ee



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    USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
    , Tins Kraft Macaroni & Cheese 40 36 Bottles Strawberry Jam 54 40 }
    Bottles Marila Olives (120z) 125 120 Pkgs. Chivers T. Jellies 23 20
    Tins Vienna Sausage (40z) 38 34 Pkgs. Bird’s T. Jellies 20 18 \
    ‘Tins Aspargus Soup 33 28 Pkgs. Jello Puddings 23 20



    a WILL you Gve THIS |
    I'S BEEN My || SSI Sais COULD HAVE CANE - SSG #
    : | LEFT IT ON THE
    PLEASURE // { TO THE OPE a Bae Ar ONTy'S—T
    za THOUGHT HE'D NEED



    q Q H#O4 LOOK / YUST YEAH... ONLY 1 GOT A
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    Lee



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    ae a (NATURALLY HE WAS UNDER A
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    CONGRATULATIONS? WE WILLSING
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    i pie Bsaibs Cag eit 2 eee

    Sh


    WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER

    CLASSIF

    10, 1951

    IED ADS.

    TELEPHONE 2508.

    4



    The charge for ts |
    Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow!l- |
    edgements, and ‘n Memoriam notices is






































    FOR SALE



































    oF OR RENT

    te ee hee

    UNE” Cattlewash. Fully fur-

    ee Four bedrooms, all modern con-
    iz veniences including Refrigerator. October
    15th —November 15th. Dial Mrs. Stuart











    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER |

    TAKE NOTICE
    CLOVER LEAF

    That BRITISH COLUMBIA PACKERS
    | LIMITED, @ corporation organized under
    the laws of the Dominion of Canada,
    | Packers,

    |
    |
    }
    |
    j

    whose trade or business address
    is Foot of Campbell Avenue, Vancouver,
    | Canada,























    ON TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY, 16th and 17th of October, 1951,

    we will hold a Pawnbroker’s Sale at our Rooms,
    the following items left in pledge with HOLDER BROS., of Swan} To:





    Nov. 1949

    17 High Street, when |

    v.
    7th day of December 1951 at 11 o'clock in the forenoon by the Petitioner for
    a Decree for the dissolution of Marriage,





    PAGE SEVEN

    In the Court for Divorce and Matrimonial Causes

    BARBADOS
    GARNET GORDON

    MATELDA IPFLL i -Reeibediins
    and

    ae

    JAMES INNISS—Co- -respondent

    INNTISS, the Co-respondent
    NOTICE that this Honourable Court will be moved on Friday. the

    ~

    JAMES
    AKE

    and that you are required to file



























    |: an Appearance in this Cause on ar before the 2%rd day of November 1951 and
    An Answer within fourteen days thereafter, otherwise the Court may. proceed
    30475 1 Pr. Silver Bangles E hear and determine the charges alleged in the Petition, your not
    30495 2 Gold Rings ; | wera thle Sth aiy of pbptenier 1861 ,
    30498 Gold Rin ; Solicitor for the wut oF be ewe 5 Street.
    H op sa ran {Evidigetown, Barbados om
    10.10. 51—3n
    30512 Gold Ring .
    30533 Gramophone ' ann.
    30536 Gold Ring | CES.
    30541 1 Gold Bangle :
    30546 Ladies’ R.G. W. Watch SSeS RE sts a: ae
    30548 2 Gold Pins (Gold Cameo) nae)
    — tgs HARRISON LINE
    27958 Gold Necklace
    27972 Gold Signet Ring
    27994 Gold Ring | OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
    28012 Camera : :
    28068 Gold Signet Ring Due
    old Ring |
    28117 Ladies C.W. Watch j Vessel Bran Sees Benet
    28134 Gold Ring S. “SCHOLAR” .. ..London 25th Aug. 5th’ Oct.
    28138 Gold Necklace & Pendant S, “SCULPTOR” .. Liverpool and
    Gold Ring . Newport 27th Sept. 12th Oct.
    28160 Gent's R.G.W. Watch S.S. “STATESMAN” . London 15th Oct. Ist Nov.
    28165 Cake Stand | S.S. “STUDENT”... . Liverpool 27th Oct. 10th Nov.
    S icteshibeies ail,
    Dec. 1949 HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM a
    30581 Camera ch
    30567 Gold Rin loses in
    30590 Gold Ring | Vessel For Barbados .
    4 Gold Ring os. “SCHOLAR” f . Liverpool end Oct.
    30665 Gold Ring . “TRIBESMAN” : Caen end Oct.
    auras ee Te W. Watch — pomeenpoontit
    es ng For further Informa’ , a
    $0743 Ladies’ RG. W. Watch — -
    30779 Gold Ring resi yae DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents
    80793 2 Gold Rings ccaniblbeiciancejiihueieatninilihtepe taint itis isang ii 8
    30823 Gold Neck!
    ngs Gold Neckiet & Cros | Canadian N I hi
    s0871 Gold ing ational Steams ps.
    Jan. 1950 SOUTHBOUND
    a peed = CAM, CONSTRUCTOR | - Sept ib Get ie a oct wae
    NELSON 4 t. 15 Oct. 24 ~
    28229 Gold Necklace & Pendant |°A%: CRUISER 1 Oc. 58 Ont So Ewer. Nov”
    28243 Gold Ring
    28246 1 Pr. Gold Earrings NORTHBOUND
    28248 Gold Ring Syrveten Rertetes “Mets teliee tances
    aoe aa LADY RODNEY 16 Oct 17 Oct 27 Oct. 28 Oct. t neve
    0!
    28363 Gold Signet Ring The M.V. “CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR?” is expected to arrive
    28367 1 Gold Bangle aoe ad ot October, atcepting cargo for St. John, Halifax,
    28407 Gold Ri ue! ani ‘on! ‘
    28451 Gold Ring a
    5087s Gola Rin | GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents. ~~ —
    one Gold Ring |
    0910 Gold Ring
    30960 Gold Ring ROYAL NETHERLANDS \\
    30981 Gent's C. W. Watch | STEAMSHIP CO.
    31010 Gold Ring SAILING FROM KUROPE FRENCH LINE
    sigs ad Bing LHR, ASR Set:
    e Tr,
    nee ie Roe Bangles SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND Cie., Gle., Tri tlantique
    31117 re Ring ms ORANIROTAD IMA October, 1951 383
    31120 Pr. S. Bangles; Gold | M.8. WILE2MSTAD—6th November 1951
    Sroka SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND Sailings to England &
    31151 Gold Ring A. 8. PORREERIEI ia ents abs France.
    $1152 Gold Bracelet .i 8. AGAMEMNON—Tth November, 1951 5
    81202 2 Gold Rings CAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO ‘COLOMBIE” 14th t=
    31214 Gent’s C.W. Watch re & BRITISH yore 196i ber, 1951 via Marti
    $1229. Gold Rin SATLING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO [jf #4 Gaudeloupe,
    31232 Gent's R.G.W. Watch 8 HYDKA—Sth November, 1951. “GASC a
    31246 White Gold Stone Ring P. MUSSON, SON & CO,, LTD... OGNE” 3rd Novénte.
    31255 Ladies’ C.W. Watch Agents. ber 1951 via St. Lucia,
    21256 Gold Ring BECO EOSEECLOSTSS, nee Guadeloupe
    31278 Gold Ring a, ae ait
    Feb. 1950 Dominica, “Antigua, ‘Momtaerrat, om
    eal cde Nevis and “St. Kitts, Salling SOUTHBOUND, s=- Hy"
    ic ng = CoD “GASCOGNE” 25th October
    The M.V. ’
    aio soa ine accept Cargo, and "Passengers for Arh calling + shee mae
    28544 Gold Necklet & Pendant Licdgers' onle Sor, ai.” Visoont. nided and British “wy
    28567 Gold Ring galling Fiiday 18 inet French Guiana,

    $199 on week-dayy and $1-80 on Sundays os cee tena ag ae ie eee 3,40 BheoGn | Pe trdae winks ie maine Sgt es Street, and are overdue will be sold,
    mumber = eRaIRGe cere
    2 tease per wat ae ance = words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a} ae On St. James" sea coast, ! respect of fresh fish. frosen ~ 2... ee ee
    word ¥ wes from t Full: e an
    4 cents per ward on Sundays for each on Sundays. Light and water. Dial Oreo, ore" | pastes of all varieties, and will be entitled Jan. 1949
    9-29.51-—Gn jy ong Rae re Guten 1951, ‘aie }23698 Ty pewriter
    F Births, ’ y
    eletuniaeis rs Se —_ ___ AUTOMOTIVE MALTA, Cattlewash. From Nov. ist a Po rote _ the — +h
    . —————a= to 15th Dec. and J. Apaty notice in duplicate to me at my office
    Sharae is 63.00, for ny number of wards | “CARMorng_Minor converte Tose [1° ‘Weathehesd” “anstri, “PB pits | Uppontioa” ef sock sopitation. “te | May 1849
    additional word. Terms cash. Phon- 2508 running order Newly Serevent First ana 6.10.51—4n | 3" m wake ang ee eer Gold Rin:
    between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death offer (subjct to approval on pur-| “pomNT lew". “pated this 26th day of t September Lg 288: Gold N et
    Notices only after 4 p.m. cheser’s inspection and trias) will secure. | Cacrabank), ¥ Newi: en (opposit. 289 Gen ac
    Car now in St, Lucia but wall be avail- bungalow—Unturnished hy bedroom Registrar ot Trade Marks. 3old Ring
    able Barbados about Uctober 9th. Cash | stuart Bynoe “ $310. Mrs. 9 10. 51—3n | 28949 Gold Ring
    offers oniy. HKepty Box No. B.B. U/o 3.10.51—3n | 28963 Gold Ring
    DIED Advocate Co. 7.10, 51—4n CAMP—On the Sea, St. La -
    CAR—One #1) 1946 Plymouth Car ain | *WHY furmushed. Dial 6357, TAKE NOTICE June 1949
    ARCHER: On October 9th 1951 at his| Perfect condition, eee new. Appiy: 4.7. 51.—t fn. é
    residence 4th Avenue Bay Land, Cosmopautan Garage, agazine Lane WEYMOUTH, s. - , 29079 1 Gold Ban le
    Beckles Beas, Wilfred Archer better | Phone Svs. ¥.10.51—3n. | Se. James Coast abi e GRANDEE 291 Gold Ring .
    . 1 q *
    pigs Br Tee catee. ak sudorsl OARS: Gus 1NY Chavrolet Suis Master at Jor Bog pk Write to Mrs 2 That at BRITISH COLUMBIA PACKERS | 29132 Gold Ring
    ym. today for the St’ Michael's] ®Md one 1948 Ford Prefect. Both are iy tee Tae {IMITED, @ corporation organized under | 29133 Ladies’ R. G. W. Watch
    Cathedral and thence to the West-| im, sound condition right through. Dial See eckere: Wines rege nn of Canede. 196185 Gold. Iden, Bracelet
    bet w a. da 4 7 aim ~ xf
    bury, Gematent. aT ea abi rs O-, Oe diet 51 PUBLIC s tts Zoot “ Campbell Avenue, Vancouver, oa aoe ar Gee
    4 rma’ < —an A a ES ; Canada, has appli or the registration ent’s C. ; atch
    10.10.51 pe ens Rs CAR—One (1) Ford Prefect + of a trade mark in Part “A” of gut 29247 Gent's C. W. Watch
    further particulars Phone 4231. H. Ten cents per agate line in respect of fresh fish, frozen fish, salt
    Coke hare meta bhaote and 12 cents per noote ie ae fish, enoked fish, canned fish and fish July, 1949
    0 + | pastes of all varieties, and will be entitled ,
    ee 10.10, 51—t.f.n. a te aes $1.50 on week-days|to register the same after one month
    THANKS MOTORCYCLE—One 1) BSA.) BSA. Shonee- one from the 9th day of October 1951, unless | 96185 Gold Stone Ring
    pices excle 244 hp. O.H.V. in good cond- REAL ESTATE notice in duplicate to 'me at my. omee | 26233 Gold Ring
    tion. pply: H. O. Edwards C/o M/S « 7
    ALLAMBY—The undersigned beg through | Oot ade natin Ge io” Lika, " of copogttion of such registration, The | 26339 Gold Ring
    this medium to return grateful thanks 9.10.51—2n The undersigned will set Up fac sale trade mark can be seen on application 26376 Two G Rings; One Iden.
    te all those who attended the funeral, at his office 12 James Street, Bridgetown, hate rage 3 f Septe Ss Bracelet :
    gent wreaths, cards or in other ways * at 2 p.m. on Friday the 12th day of . Cay. of Baptemiber 1961, ; .
    Seo terran, Corte ce te ne ete ELECTRICAL October 1951, ALL THAT dwellinghouse iegisttar ot HO eee =Cle Ring
    occasion of our recent sad bereave- | ————————————_-_——— | called * "GLENWOOD" situate at Ventor, caer a eas ised 26421 Gold Ring
    aaa. CLIMAX" ELECTRIC WASHING | Rockley. Christ Church comprising open 26481 Ladies C.W. Watch & Strap
    Fronk, Violet, Ivy and Jenny Inniss. | MACHINES.—A smali shipment of these ' verandah, dra’ , dining bed- oo 265 Gent’ &
    Airlie, just received from Canada and at our rooms, Kitchen, W.C. and ent’s R.G.W. Watch
    Cave Hill, price of $247.12 represents outstanding | 6@rege and servant's room, ere an TAKE NOTICF Strap
    St. Michael. 10.10.51—1n. | Value. Dial—3878 or 4710. DA COSTA &| water services. All standing on 377/10 29 1
    Co., Ltd. Electrical ea et piace perches in. y of u ta’ * -
    c tim: ct: ee 29385 Gold
    PERSON AL BATTERIES—Torehlight Batteries at} For inspection apply to the Tenant on 29403 Gold Ring
    14 cents each. Also small Batteries and | Premises. 29404 Gold Ring
    Penlights at llc each. G. W. Hutchinson For all further Sreenantre and con-
    —_———_—_——— | & Co. Ltd. 10.10.51—3n. | ditions of sale, apply t 29413 Gold Ring
    Pi Rubiie are nereby, warned against D ioe SARJEANT 29428 Gold Ring
    ving credit to my wife, OLIVE
    (nee Ward), as I do not hold myself FURNITURE 39.0 Shan io488 Gola Ch Pendant
    responsible for her or anyone else con- a A rs ain and Pendan
    tracting any debt or debts in my name| STEEL FURNITURE.—Complete range} Offers in writing are invited Tor the 29492 Necklace & Pendant
    unless by a written order signed by me. | Of steel furniture including Senior and] purchase and removal of dwell 29498 Gold Ring
    Go . Junior Executive Desks, ‘Typists Desks, | house known as “Wakefield” aback ot 29529 1 Gold Baby Bangle
    Dunscombe, St. Thomas. iP » Filing Cabinets,/the Y.M.C.A. Headquarters, Pinfold g
    9.10.51—2n. fn aiacaay Cae ee Chairs, aa aes Street
    ee | ON display at HUNTE & Co. Lid.) Offers will be accepted Aug, 1949
    The public are hereby warned against |New Showroom, Dial—5136. or 5027. including 15th inst. The purchaser wil
    giving credit to my wife, CLARISSA 3.10.51—6n. | be required to take down and remove }
    WEEKES (nee Haynes) as I do not hold the Dwelling House from the premises 26535 Gold Bangle
    myself responsible a: her oe spvone NIC by noon 10th November 1951. Inspection 26540 Gold Ring
    else contracting any debt or nm my AL cia’ ay 654 i
    name unless by a written order signed MECHA Signed BOARD OF eon EL S { E pee fie ming pane
    by me. SINGER SEWING MACHINE almost
    FITZ WEEKES, net al” SMaboeany “Surateare Puone Per HERBERT WILLIAMS, 26611 Gold Bangle
    Spooners Hill, Butler's Gap, her General Secretary That THE BORDEN COMPANY, a cor-| 26623 Ladies C.W. Watch & Stra
    10, 10.51—2n. 's . p
    St. Michael. 9.10,.51—6n, | poration organized and existing under the 26644 Gold Rin
    6.10.81—an “SROSEEET TO nine ce pad of — a fs New Jersey, United 26651 Gold Ring
    aes A ENS—A tates © merica, whose trade or 7
    The public are hereby yrarned agatast MISCELLANEOUS a a A Sool gat comfortable cae atacess e La Riaact Avenue. | 26685 Gold Stone Ring
    giving er my wife, LILIAN medium-s: ouse at avy Garden ew York, New York, United States of
    WOOD (nee Sylvester) as I do not hold) ANTIQUES — Of every description] built of stone with verandah, drawing | America, has applied for the registra- | 28097 Machine
    myself responsible for her or anyone|Givss, China, old Jewels, fine Silver] #%d dining rooms, 2 very spacious bed-|tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of | 26702 Gold Ring
    else contracting any debt or debts in/ Watercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto-|T@oms, toilet and bath, kitchenette, | Register in respect of substances used | 26729 Gold Ring
    my name unless by a written order) graphs etc, at Gorrings Antique Shop| #4rage and servants’ room, and about| #8 foods and as ingredients in foods: |9@751 Ladi R.G.W. Watch
    signed by me. adqoining Royal Yacht Club. 11,000 sq. ft. of land with bearing fruit | infants’ and tnvalids’ foods, and will be es eave ate
    WHAtAM H. YEARWOOD, | 3,10.51—t.f.n nes. A home with everything. Why not entitled 2 segister the same after one ee Ges Ring
    ar’ oad, us! ali, 00! a a rey A. Scott, \ mon rom er jay oO ctober
    S. Michael. COCOANUT PLANTS—Selected cocoa-| Magazine Lane. 10 io. 6).28n 1851 unless some péreon ’ shall in the 26872 mar ae la Earri
    10,.10.51—2n. | nut plants. Apply: Niagara Factory, meantime give notice in duplicate to me ie ‘ 0) rings
    Spry Street. Dial 4322 REAL ESTATE AGENT at my office of opposition of such regis- | 26896 Ladies R.G.W. Watch
    9.10.51—3n.] L, BERESFORD BRATHWAITE tration, The trade mark can be seen on} 26910 Gold Ring
    ANNOUNCEMENTSE “GALVANISED NAILS Email Guan. |.BLACK ROCK—One (1) Bungalow Reece Oa doth dar ot September, 1961,/20800 Gold ing
    tity of Galvanised Nalia 1 inch to 4 Inch | Consisting of three (3) bedrooms, drawing “H. WILLIAMS, — | 26935 Gold Ring
    Hy . ene ee eee cant neal room, dining room, and all modern con- Registrar of Trade Marks 26946 Gold Bangle
    To meet numerous requests of our & € “itd, or 4 d Roeb . Bt mats, veniences, standing on 1 rood ad 23 9.10. 51—3n *, ng!
    customers, we have opened a section se ia yes O10 10.81 gn, | Perches of land with possibilities for 26953 Gent's C.W. Watch
    for custom made shirts, pyjamas, pants, two (2) other Bungalows cttininihineeanestinsnitcaines 29541 Gent’s C.W. Watch
    shorts, ladies slacks, boys clothing ete. OOD CUT.OPEN MBELLO-KREEN_|..NAVY GARDENS—One (1) Bungalow 29550 Camera
    Having at our disposal the facilities of a SAib.) tins 3/- per dos, Also old card-1o sisting of two (2) bedrooms, drawing 29574 Gold Rin
    modern factory we are able to offer! poor boxes 1/6 per doz. Call at Ro¥erts room, dining room, servant rooms, c is
    prompt services at exceptionally reason-| jiunufacturing Co, Bay Street garage, and all modern conveniences, 29582 Camera
    able prices, ng iy 10. 10.51—8n Standing on 13,000 sq. ft. land, Land 2963) Lady’s R. G. W. Watch
    Reliance Shirt Factory, Shirt Depot.} Jo J containing. plenty fruit trees. 29651 Gold Ring
    Palmetto Street, Phone 4764. TORNADO — international K.4l. oo o = of Land can accommodate 29672 2 Gold E
    10.10.51—19n.. | Recutiful condition, excellent equipment, COUBANMENT HILL—One (1) New 9 29682 Gold Rin
    — | good racing record. Cost $700.00 new Bungalow with three (3) bedrooms. 7 B
    = No offers. Leacock. Telephone | drawing room, dining room, and ali 29696 Gold Ring
    TAKE NOTICE 10,10.51—t.f.n. | modern conveniences Hl Co Ltd 29703 Gold Ring
    BORDEN’S IN Iv¥—One (2) Spot of Land consisting 9 ° 29765 Gold Ring
    of 7, sq. ft.
    That THE BORDEN CoMPANY, a cor-| PUBRLIC NOTICES UPPER DAYRELLS ROAD—One (1) Inform their Customers and Sept. 1949
    poration organized and existing under the » | Bungalow with three (3) bedrooms, Friends that th h i 7
    laws of the State of New Jersey, United] Ten cents per agate tine on week-days| ing room and drawing room and ail riends a ey have in-
    States of America, whose trade or] and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,| Moder conveniences standing on 1/8 of ||] stalled a Private Telephone |}| 26975 Ladies R,G.W, Watch
    business address is 850 Madison Avenue, minim: char $1.00 k-days | A" acre of land. Another Bungalow Exchan thei ffices in
    num ge on wee Peri scad cay’ mos A init’ seinhern xchange at their offices 27019 Gold Ring
    New York, New York, United States of] and $1.80 on Sundays. w ° rooms and all moder Rickett Street as fro 10th
    America, has applied for the registra- conveniences. cc m. 27028 2 Gold Rings
    tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of RITTONS HILL—One (1) Bungalow October. 27051 Ladies R.G.W. Watch
    Register in respect of substances used NOTICE with three (3) bedrooms, dining room, 27052 Gold Ring
    as foods and as ingredients in foods:]1s HRREBY GIVEN that it is the in- drawing room, standing on 3,000 sq. ft. Please Dial No. 3584 or
    infants’ and invalids’ foods, and will be} tention of the Comznissioners of High-| °f land. 3585 for:— 27070 Gold Necklet & Pendant
    entitled to register the same after one] wars for the parish of SAINT JAMES|_,JAMES| STREET—One (1) Business 27085 Gold Ring
    isl foe tanta pereen steal October} in this Island to cause to be introduced ee ah eo eae ae good DIRECTORS 27108 Gold Ring
    un h 1; ad
    meantime give notice in duplicate to me nto duthovata’ team 65 teedanee the REAL ESTATE AGENT AND SALES DEPARTMENT 27119 Gold Ring
    at my office of opposition of such regis-] saiary payable to the Inspector of High- , AUCTIONERS, ACCOUNTS 27146 Gold Ring
    es Se ege aee can be seen On) ways for the said parish to a sum not] oycne Aare No. 6 sweat Pl INSURANCE 27168 Gold Stone Ring
    applica ¥ exceeding £500 per annum, and the ; se ae
    Dated this 26th day of September, 1951 | travelling allowance payable to the said Mhaietacs >} we ‘ GENERAL OFFICE. 27212 Gold Ring
    H, WILLIAMS, inspector of Highways to a sum not oe at RaSniay | ertnes, cero 27238 Gent.s Signet Ring
    Registrar of Trade Marks. exceeding £100 per annum, such in- £3,500 to £8,000. Also houses at aE ore 27253 Gold Ring
    9.10.51—3n'| creases to take*UHect as from the 1st goer we gr or Ee Pat The Provisions Store a 27346 Gold Ring
    ~_ Oy et naa of October 1951. For particulars about building, selling Marhill Street remains the 29780 Camera
    y or buying Phone B. A. Brooks at 8335. same 4672. 29790 Lady’s R. G. W. Watch
    PEAT COD ROYCE, Pi leave Phone Number or Address ye Se : atc
    TAKE NOTICE | soctora’tor'the:Comntasonors ot | Fieneeietve. Phone My 20707 Gold Necklet & Pendant
    Highways, Saint James. e age 3 ; inane 29814 Gold Rin
    9.10. 51—3n. 9.10.51—Tn. Please adjust your Direc 2 ts) gz
    DRYCO aetna iligpidonneiadp-amcetenes are tory accordingly. ares toe nee
    That THE BORDEN COMPANY. « cor! DUBTIC OFFICIAL SALE eg cana | 59849 Camera
    poration organized and existing ae ed By ORDER OF THE INSURANCE CY oo —————hRm_——SESSEeeee ~ ’,
    jaws of the State of New Jersey } will sell at CHELSEA GARAGE, | 29860 Gent's R.G.W. Watch
    States of America, whose trade “or (The Provost Marshal's Act 104 PINFOLD STREET ON FRIDAY 12th} Advertise for Results aoe? Gold Necklace
    business address Is 350 Madison Avenue, a )» 8 30) at 2 p.m. one (1) Standard at 12 h.p. 2 Gold Ring
    New York, New York, United States of On Friday, the 12th day of October,| cogan Car. Damayed. Terms Cash. on Gold Ri
    America, has applied for the registra-|1951 at the hour of 2 o'clock in the R. ARCHER McKENZIE, eee terry ie ng
    tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of | afternoon will be sold at my office to the fr ‘Auctioneer. 29952 Gold Ring
    Register in respect of eee ene nisnae ae fs) ny gum mot “Under |... ceieserssdenennineiunennetineimeniiaasionn Fiectors of nm “City”
    foods and as ingredients in foods, |the appra’ value.
    infants’ and invalids’ foods, and will be All that certain piece of Land contain- UNDER THE SILVER Oct. 1949 ig
    entitled to register pe Beare aoe ing by manesh Pe aueeces 8s Rerchey | { B e d to
    th from the 9th day of! ictober | situate in Parish o: hrist ure! ut- ' 6 in:
    i881 unless some person shall in the| ting and bounding on lands of Yorkshire ee eee ie by peeks rae 0 ridgetown 27397 oes poet W. Chain; G,
    nieantime give notice in duplicate to me | Plantation, on lands of Prince A, Scott,| ¥- ‘- ton otis Britton: Cr aad 2 . Wate
    at my office of opposition of such regis-|on lands of Kate Rose and on the Public; ®t “Denfor hy a nud — ‘ | 27485 2 Gold Earrings
    tration. ‘The trade-¢ark can be een On | Roads appraised “St folly ot Gaod Extension Dining “Table, Upright| MEET YOUR CANDIDATE = | 57503 1 Pr. Gold Earrings
    offi whole area of land appral ‘0 . .
    are ed this Win aay of September, 1951.| SIX HUNDRED DOLLARS ($600.00), At-|{9d Arm Chairs, ornament Tables; 27533 Gold Nugget Brooch
    H. WILLIAMS, tached from Matilda King for and to-| Couch, Pedestal Sideboard in Mahogany: |) the Coming General Elections.| 27542 Gold Bracelet
    { Trade Marks. wards satisfaction, &c. Uphols. Spring Rockers, China Cabinet, £4
    een 9.10,51—3n | N.B.—-25% Deposit to be paid on day|Long Wali Mirror, Glass and China, [27860 R.G.W. Watch
    of parchase. Dinner and Tea Services; Platd. Ware, | 27563 Gold Ring
    BSS T. 5 HEADLEY. | | Broome. Table snd Chairs, Clocks) 27572 Gent's R.G.W. Watch
    Provost Marshal. Breakfast Table and Chairs, Clock, 27578 Gold SI Ri
    Provost Marshal's Office, Double Irom Bedstead, Three Quarter ate 0. tone ng
    27th September, 1951. Mahog. Bedstead with Vono Spring, 27616 Gold Necklet
    ADVE TIS. ee —— _| Peinted Presses, MT. and wooden 27618 Gold Ring
    Waabstants,. Cheniber) “Warv, Saecers | 27619 2 Gold Rings
    , f Tables, Springs, ye 0; lectric 4
    IN THE WANTED Stove, Kitchen Table, Oii Stove ' i 27636 Clock
    Freezer, Lawn Mower, Fowl Runs, Goat r 27659 Gold Ring
    Pens, Plants, Orchids, Ferns and 27672 Gold Coin B h
    f ADVOCA TE HELP Anthuriums, very good Deck Chairs and i) ‘oin rooc'
    ne __| Chest of Drawers in Mahogany, Norge 29970 Gold Ring
    GENERAL SHRVANT — Immediately. Refrigerator in Working onder. | 29982 Gold Ring
    SS | Alp Beard Ye crton”, “Top Rock 1S TROTMAN & CO. | 30005 Gold Ring
    Between 4.30 and 5.30 4m BRA 30021 Gold Ring
    1y.10/£1—2n Auctioneers yore gh 30026 Gold Ring
    a 30034 Gold Necklet
    ' TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH 3} MISCELLANoUS Oe RP eas ie 80078 Gold Watch Chain; Gold
    ld Street ‘ ‘ 4
    ete nea Dee eren yt unaailaned monet ‘Age ebountiy TGverhaulen) in good 30078 Ring ate hain; 0
    L yan y. ie couple oC ren
    WINSTON CHURCHIL Be ar), SOW rey: Weta. Box cocking ‘condition. 1637 V-8 Ford Car 79084 Gold Bracelet
    THE SECOND WORLD H, H. C/o¥Advoeate Co: = Ne dae in good working argeeetels make aReee gas — ‘
    rend R. ARCHER ver bangles
    WAR — Volume IV Auctioneer. 30092 Gem Ring .
    THE HINGE OF FATE TAKE NOTICE FR 51—Sn | 30093 Silver Vanity Case
    At Johnson's Stationery PE ee ieee at 30094 Gem Ring
    ———$—$—$—— JEPP Fina paar A na renys ners oe nae 30095 Ladies’ R.G.W. Watch
    y wo
    CARPENTER RULES That RECKITT & COLMAN LIMITED, | jgsi. at 2 em we 30118 Gramophone
    ‘At a British Limited Liability Company. | 70 Barbados Fire Insurance Co. Ltd |“ 30176 Gold Necklet & Pendant
    Manufacturers, of Kingston Works, Dan- | snares 30179 Gold Ring with Stone
    At Johnson’s Hardware om Lane, Hull, England, has applied G W. CLARKE & CO. \ ALBERT A. MAYNARD
    c for the registration of a trade mark in James ees | |
    Part “A" of Register in respect of 10.10. 51- FEARLESS, ENERGETIC | Nov. 1949
    pharmaceutical and medicinal prepara- | p=: — —~- DYNAMI
    one, and will be entitled to register 0 nq c 27692 Gold Ring
    the same after one month from the $th
    Cay of October 1951 unless some person DENTAL NOTICE 1 The toiling masses of this City 27699 Gold Necklet & Pendant
    shall in the-meantime give notice in|], My office will be closed from |1| need FORCEFUL representation. |27749 Gent's C. Stop Watch
    ance y Guplicate tame at my office of opposition |}/ MONDAY 15th inst. and re-opens ||) decl t|27760 Gold Ring
    of such registration, The trade mark can on MONDAY 29th. We must re ahi Tei agains 27790 3 Gold Rings
    licati t fice. I! si ictimization.
    nli ht Pfonted this Bath day of September. 1981. ||| E, F, i ed | Oppression and Victi 27798 Gold Ring
    Moo H. WILLIAMS, | entist i “« 27800 Gold Rin,
    ; g Registrar of Trade ante | | ONE GOD, ONE AIM 127830 Gold Ring
    9.10,51—3n of ie rm C
    and the POLICE BAND . ONE DESTINY. (io cana
    er 27847 Ring
    i. ‘JOHN M. BLADON & CO. |....... 5. ws feet esata
    | ae |27874 1 Gold Bangle
    Crane Hotel ey pore me light Stalveer's | dress Camera ,
    y Voting eC. -—-
    APS, F.V.A. || [See Beneneer
    SATURDAY, 13TH re |, MAYNARD | YX” |30226 Gola Ring
    | } oO ing
    OCTOBER, 8.30 P.M. OR | Albert Augustus | 130257 Gold Ring & Watch
    130270 Gold Ring
    . in aid of REAL EST A 4 E || Albert Gomes, Port-of-Spain, poags Gola Ring
    . MEMORIAL Trinidad | 30 ing
    § THE VINTER 0 AND 30305 Gold Ring
    FUND . | Albert Marryshow, St. George’s, |a0222 Silver Set Leather Case
    AUCTION SALES | Grenats|20800 Gold Ring
    & 4 | | 30382 Gents’ Gold Pocket Watch
    | i ildi a Maynard, Bridgetown, 20452 Gent's C. -
    - ADMISSION — 3/- Sif} Phone 4640 — Plantations’ Building NT eee ne, eT Adda HEE cote Gould Peeleat’ Witeh
    RENEE GE 50008 | Re hai 10. 10, 51—In 130467 Gold Ring





    :
    ’

    Gold Necklet & Cross



    The M.V. MONEKA will accept

    Cargo and Passengers for Domin- as





















    +
    *
    >






    %
    .
    >
    28620 Lady's R. G. W. Watch 3 and St. Kitts. Sailing date to be
    28621 Gold Nugget Brooch Antigua, M . N
    28656 Gold Ring (ome er R. M. JONES & Co., Ltd.
    28739 2 Gold Rings iy B.W.t. SCHOONER iownmns
    28762 Camera m Aan. Co AGENTS
    28773 Gold Ring ‘ TEL. NO, 4047 Phone 3814
    28829 Gold Necklet & Pendant | r
    31393 Gold Necklace
    21400 Gold Ring
    31407 Gold Ring —-s SSS
    31435 Gold Stone Ring To ensure that your car is given the best lubrication—USE . . «
    March 1950 GERM LUBRICATING OILS
    31444 Gola Ring Obtainable from - - - -
    31455 Go n.
    31461 Gold Ring Nt CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Trafalgar St.
    31553 Gold Tie Clip
    31580 2 Gold Rings REMEMBER
    31624 Gold ae DON'T ONLY OIL IT — GERM IT
    31643 1 Gold Bangle iN
    31653 Gold Ring =
    31662 Ladies’ R.G.W. Watch |
    41693 Gold Ring NOTICE | “ORIENTAL i om
    31705 Gold Ring sou iRs |=
    81711 Cutlery VEN :
    We shall be glad if any Cus- if! Curios, Jewels om
    April 1950 tomers whose burners have , Coane Ivory, Silks m
    || not yet been changed will { Ete., Ete. Ete. :
    ates gaa nae. Ring notify the Company today. Z
    0 f ohn
    31779 Gold tang Gold a Telephone No. . 4308 ¥ ss
    81791 Gold Signet Ring ; ; ve ts pues 2608 [ee
    31814 Gent's R.G.W. Watch The Barbados Gas Co. Ltd. Pr. Wm. Ury /
    81822 Gold Necklace & atc | seeeeeeeceeeeenets ee eS a+
    $1828 1 Gold naate wes | r
    $1907 Gent's Gold Pocket Wate. 33034 Gold Ring y
    ld Ri
    81914 Gold Iden, Ring sae eae tices Wks 33054 Gent's C. Pocket Watch
    $1919 Gold Ring | 32880 Gold Ring 33057 Gent's C.W. Wate
    May 1950 32696 8 Silver Bangles 33061 2 Gold Rings ne ~
    ries Gena i a3104 Geld Ring
    ‘e; Gold| 32905 Gold Ring i 3
    31956 oltn, Chain é Pendant | 32016 Clock 23113 Gold Ring
    31975 Gold Ring {32922 Gold Brooch 33117 Gold Stone Ring
    32011 Camera 32929 Gold Necklace & Crucifix] 33121 Gold Ring
    32017 Gold Iden. Ring 32945 2 Gold Rings; 2 Gold Links 33146 Gent's R. G. W. Wateh
    32084 Gold Signet Ring | 32951 Lady’s R.G.W. Watch 33170 Gent's c.W. Watch
    32087 , Gent’s C. Pocket Watch 32952 2 Gold Bangles 35191 Gent's C.W. Watch
    32114 Gent's R. G. W. Watch | *ug. 1950 33214 Gold Ring : ¥
    32147 Gold Ring \ sears qa Necklace & Pendant} 23224 1 Gold Bungle; 3G. Rings
    32198 Gold Ring 2 prs. G. Earrings; 2 Gok!
    32237 Gold Rin | aaee Gold Ni & Pendant Brooches; Gold Necklet & :
    32240 2 Gold Rings 33009 2 Gold Baby Bangles Pendant er
    June 1950 1 Sree ore a RTE AL RETR SYR EC IIR ORR “Ter ae
    SPECIAL CONTRACT
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    PAGE EIGHT

    C. Smith Batted Well In Second

    is mcf

    How The Barbados— ferbiceDraw Police Defeat
    Bonitas

    B.G. Game Was Drawn

    By O. S. COPPIN
    : WED. Oct. 3

    BARBADOS today scored 343 in reply to B.Gs first innings
    total of 368 in a day of exciting cricket in which the for-
    tunes of the game fluctuated with intriguing regularity.

    I predicted yesterday that Bar- 7 SE es
    bados would have been able to
    reach the B,G. total when they
    finished the day with 93 runs for
    the loss of two wickets, since the
    eight remaining batsmen includ-
    ed at least five seasoned players.

    B.G. offered handsome assist-
    ance to them when five chances
    went abegging in the day’s play
    but ironically enough a magnifi-
    cent running catch at the long off
    boundary by Gibbs, one of the
    offending players who had put

    This is the detailed 3.9200
    of the fourth and last day of
    play in the second Barbados-
    B.G. game which was left
    drawn when rain washed out
    the final , fifth day. Barbados
    scored 343 in reply to B.G@'s
    368,

    The Barbados team is ex-
    pected home this evening.

    down one of the five catches some other indiscretion if he
    dropped, endeq the Barbados took it for an inswinger, for six
    innings. runs high to the Jong on bound-

    The most heartening aspect of
    the Barbados innings today was
    the fine effort by Smith who
    scored 80, marred only by one
    real chance at 75.

    Freedom
    Smith batted with such com-
    plete freedom, fluency and sang-

    ary, the second of the match, the
    first having been struck by Far-
    mer in the First Test.

    The end to a bright innings,
    which I agreed with him on
    this occasion was just the thing,
    came when he broke his own
    wicket in getting back and late
    cutting one from Norman Wight.

    Wood

    froid that quite a few British
    Guiana supporters twere willing (

    re : 7 Gerald Wood, fighting off an
    acioaltey. _ cee Pe BS on attack of tonsilitis that has since
    “Gaskinitis”, played Gaskin on Put him to bed while the rest of
    his merit “and punished him ‘he teem hes.gone to Berbice, did
    whenever the DP not play his usually forceful

    doing. 80 wether tee fie He seemed unable to

    i ; ‘ i ball as hard as is his wont
    With his considerable reach heg®it the
    was able to play forward com- in Saturday afternoon ames,

    fortably and on the offensive to 294 he went at 11 after still try-

    balls that would have forcea iS, hard. i
    7 " . Greenidge, determined to
    carers. ier: | Seana Fear, | 38 break his string of “ducks” from

    play right back defensively or
    play a cramped half cock stroke
    which is still a defensive stroke.

    The first real setback to Bar-
    bados came with the dismissal of
    Proverbs with but nine runs
    added to Barbados’ overnight
    score of 93—2. This was perhaps
    the most pardonable run out suf-
    fered by the Barbados team for

    the first Test got off the mark
    with a do or die single but after
    that was a model of cheeky,
    hustling, determined batting. He
    got into double figures with a
    series. of railroaded singles but
    after that he batted quite well,
    executing two good drives that
    earned him the plaudits of the

    the series. crowd,
    i y _ Holder, last man in at 833 was
    an ae Se aad eee we entirely ' uninfluanced by the

    tenseness of the situation or at
    least his batting gave one to be-
    lieve this, .
    Free Cricket

    He was right down the wicket
    driving fast medium bowlers
    Gaskin and “Bruiser” Thomas
    correctly and without a_ care.
    Free cricket and forceful too. He
    added nine of the badly needed
    35 runs before he was magnifi-
    cently caught overhead in the
    gathering darkness in a fine fun-
    ning effort by Glendon Gibbs to
    a stroke that deserved a pound-
    ary—a solid punch off a_half
    volley from a medium fast bow-

    inimitable Persaud at cover
    effected a Lghtning one handed
    pickup and return to the bowler
    and Proverbs was run out by
    yards trying to regain his wicket
    as both batsmen tried to get back
    home after Persaud’s brilliant
    piece of fielding.

    ; Farmer

    Then came another valuable
    Farmer innings that was halted
    at 56 because of cramp that ne-
    cessitated. his retiring ‘io the
    pavilion until later in the batting
    order, finally ending with a tame
    catch to cover off omas. This
    was another good combination of ler. :
    aggressive and restrained bat-, Thus ended Barbados’ first
    ting. ‘innings for 343 just 25 runs be-

    It was unfortunate for Farmer hind B.Gis total and Greenidge
    that he was so handicapped that had carried owt his bat for a use-
    he had to use a runner after re- ful 25 runs.
    suming his innings otherwise it it was touch and go and Gas-

    seem as if he would reach kin himself told me that he had

    the coveted three figure mark, almost given up the hope of pre-
    He did not use his feet to the venting Barbados from gaining
    stroke which got him oufy and first innings honours when they
    had he been able to do so it had scored 216 with half! the
    would have been a regulation team still available for batting.

    cover drive. A Tribute
    Norman Marshall was the key 1 must here pay tribute to a
    man now and he appeared as if commendable steadiness in the

    he would be instrumental in
    placing the issue beyond doubt.
    He was at once comfortable and
    his good timing earned him quick
    runs along the carpet but when
    Gaskin took the second new ball
    he fell victim to one of Gaskin’s
    enticing but deadly inswingers.
    His lapse was similar to that of
    Charlie Taylor, Hunte and all the
    batsmen caught in the legtrap
    to- Gaskin this series. They are
    quite conscious of the three men
    in the leg trap and the wicket-
    keeper making a fourth “custo-
    dian of the swing” and they leave
    quite a few alone. There is a
    momentary lapse in concentra-
    tion and—presto—there is a nice
    inswinger beautifully floated
    from leg and centre going away

    B.G. bowling even wh@ it was
    not offensive, the honours going
    to Gaskin who sent down 41
    overs and had 81 runs struck off
    him, capturing 2 wickets. Twen-
    ty-three year old Norman Wight
    who first played Intercolonial, he
    told me, at the age of 16, is a
    young old player end his 41 overs
    for 81 runs with 4 wickets to his
    cred was the chief factor re-
    sponsible for keeping the Barba-
    dos scoring down,
    Not far behind was “Bruiser”
    Thomas’ good figures of
    Oo M rn WwW

    14.5 5 19 2
    As a matter of fact he struck
    two strategic blows for B.G. in
    the fight for first innings hon-
    ours when he claimed the wicket

    off the pad. It is made to order of Farmer at 78 and that of
    for gliding and they do so and— Holder, last man who looked
    presto—Gaskin chalks up an- every bit like helping Greenidge
    other wicket. to add the necessary runs.
    Atkinson Rain washed out the fifth day

    Erie Atkinson fought for form
    con:cientiously striving to get
    the range of the bowlers but he
    wos out in this process before he
    had accomplished it. He played

    of play and this game was left
    drawn B.G. 368 and (for 1 wkt.
    5) Barbados 343.



    forward inquiringly to a good %
    length =< Ga oe pores YESTERDAY s
    Wight e t of whic t

    him through the air and he was WEATHER REPORT
    bowled, beaten in playing a for-

    ward stroke to the full extent of From Codrington

    his considerable reach,

    Keith Walcott, an_ entirely
    aggressive batsman this tourna-
    ment, entertained no fears for
    Gaskin. He flogged those well
    up with powerful coverdrives
    and cut the short ones hard down
    to deep third man.

    In one over he lifted a straight
    one from Gaskin on the leg
    stump, obviously designed to
    lure the batsman into padding or

    They'!l Do It Every Time)

    WHUPS! pov'r WorRy
    I_KNOW HOW TO HANOLE
    KIDS “HE'S M’PALRIGHT,
    CHEDDAR? SEE THAT2
    HE LOVES IT! HERE ff
    We ooh Tw fs

    Rainfall: .49 in,

    Total Rainfall for Month to
    Date: 1.22 ins.

    Highest Temperature: 86.5 °F

    Lowest Temperature>. 74.0 °F

    Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
    hour v4

    Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.018
    (3 p.m.) 29.917














    {

























    BLADES
    A MET WHAT IS HEF
    f APIANO

    ans DAY OFF
    ans Cf BIG LUG!

    Game With
    Barbados

    (From Our Own Corresponder.ty
    GEORGETOWN, B.G. Oct. 9.

    The three-day Barbados vs
    Berbice match ended i a draw at
    Fort Canje ground, New Amster-
    dam, yesterday, Berbice declaring
    at 250 for eight wickets, Milne 81,
    and Ganim Khan 52, top scoring.

    Barbados entered upon their
    second innjngs to make 193 in 90
    minutes but at the drawing of
    stumps had lost six for
    Taylor 23, Hunte 27, Smi:h 15,
    Marshall not out 16, Proverbs 5,
    Farmer 0, Atkinson 0, Williams
    not out 1, Extras 7.

    The Barbadians returned to
    Georgetown today and will be
    guests at a farewell dinner tonight
    at Hotel Tower.

    Basketball Team
    To BePicked Today

    The local basketball players are
    preparing for the visit of the
    ‘Trinidad team. A practice match
    was held last night and the Selec-
    tion Committee which comprises
    Messrs. Rudolph Daniel, “Dinky”
    Alkins and “Algie’ Symmonds,
    will today announce the players
    for the first Test.

    The visiting team, Seigerts
    Tigers will be arriving on Satur-
    day. Three Test matches and two
    games against local clubs will
    be played.

    Arrangements are being made
    to have two basketball matches
    against teams from the U.S. Navy
    ships at present in port, at
    Y.M.P.C. on Thursday night.

    Melwi Beat YMCA

    Melwi met Y.M.C.A., yesterday
    at Belleville in the first round of
    the Inter-Club Tennis Tournament
    which is being held by the Barba-
    dos Amateur Lawn Tennis
    Association,

    A fair crowd saw some good
    tennis played.

    In the Men’s_ 5S M.
    Crichlow of the Y,M.C.A,,. beat’
    Albert Williams of Melwi to the!
    tune of 6—2, 6—4. Melwi however
    came back to beat Y.M.C.A., in. the



    Doubles fixture 8—4, 8—1, after
    Y.M.C.A., «had forfeited two
    doubles to Melwi.
    TRUMPETER
    CUP SHOOT

    Continuing their series for the
    Trumpeter Cup at the Govern-
    ment Rifle Range yesterday,
    marksmen of the B.R.A, took
    part in Event 3—The Civil Ser-
    vice and Event 13—The Cadets.
    Shooting took place at 600 yards
    with seven rounds. For the Civil
    Service the highest possible score
    was 35, while the Cadets’ maxi-
    mum was 28. For the Civil Ser-
    vice four 32’s were counted out.

    Results were: —

    The Civil Service
    “A” CLASS

    Major J. E. Griffith ,......... 33
    Mr. P. A. Cheeseman ..,....- 32
    Mr, G. E. Martin ........+... 32
    Mr. J. M. Cave: oi. s cise cnser 82
    “BY” CLASS
    Mr. H.C. Bovee unk biave vie 34
    gg he ME cle a cakes 33
    yp, eee Se Bancrote sy i .ieciys 32
    Cpl. FE Sembee si sai veces 32
    The Cadets

    Cadet Lt. G. M. Rudder (H.C,) 19
    C.Q.M.S. J. G. Outram (L.S.) 15
    Cadet A. M. Archer (L.8.) .. 18



    WHAT'S ON TODAY |

    Court of Common Pleas-—10.00

    Court of Original Jurisdiction
    a.m.

    —10.00 a.m,

    Police Courts—10.00 a.m.
    Meeting of the Chamber of
    Commerce—2.00 p.m.
    Meeting of the Board of

    Health—2.00 p.m.

    Police Band gives concert at
    Christ Church Almshouse
    —4,30 p.m.

    Table Tennis at Bush Hill.
    Cable & Wireless and
    Strathclyde—4.30 p.m.

    Mobile Cinema gives show at

    St. Catherine’s School Pas-
    ture, St. Philip at 7.30 p,m.

    Gramophone Concert of Brit-
    ish Music at Wakefield—
    8.15 p.m.

    GLOBE: The Seeret df Convict
    ‘und gre puw g oyey
    5 & 8.15 pm.
    PLAZA (Bridgetown): The Fleets
    In & El Paso 4.45 & 8.30

    P.m.

    PLAZA (Oistin): Mystery of Marte
    Roget & Man Made Mon-
    ster 5 & 8 p.m

    OLYMPIC: Doctor and the Girl
    & Message to Garcia 4 30
    & 4.15 p.m

    ROYAL; The Lady Objects and
    Aretic Man Tunt 4.30 and

    4.15 pom
    ROXY: Naked City and Scarlet
    Street 4.30 and 8.15 p.m.
    EMPIRE: Old Texas Trail and
    Madonna of the Seven
    Moons 4.36 and 880 p.m.



    ON fox THE CEILING



    TIME THEIR VISITS
    WITH BABYS EATING
    SCHEDULE ++



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    Police defeated Bonitas by the
    wide margin of six goals to two
    in their water polo match at the
    Aquatic Club yesterday afternoon.

    This gave Police their first win
    for the season and was their last
    scheduled appearance in this year’s

    6—2

    This was the only game of the
    afternoon as Barracudas forfeited
    their game to Snappers. The final
    Jeague game, Flying Fish vs. Boni-
    tas, is scheduled for tomorrow
    afternoon. Bonitag however are as
    yet undecided as to whether they

    Match |

    * through the second half,







    | @esigned for the job. Correct support,
    1
    '
    |

    league series.

    Lorenzo Best the lanky Police
    centre-forward scored all six goals
    for his team, five in the first haif
    and the remaining goal mid-way

    can ‘field’ a team.
    K.O. Opens October 16

    The Knock-Out competition
    opens on Tuesday, October 16th.
    The draw for this competition
    was made yesterday and Tues-
    day’s games are Barracudas vs.

    mapper and Flying Fish, vs.
    Whipporays. Referee is Mr. Archie
    Clarke. Games to be played on
    Thursday October 18th are, Bo-
    nitag vs. Police and Harrison
    College vs. Swordfish. Referee is
    Maj. A. R. Foster.

    It is under consideration that
    the Knock-Out © competition
    played by floodlight, as the eve-
    nings ¢lose in too early at this
    time of the year to enable two
    matches to be played per after-
    noon. However the final deeision.
    has not ‘yet been made.

    p Aaatedienaraiane ena wie

    BADMINTON
    The teams were:—

    Bonitas: N. Warren, T. Year- In an effort to popularise the
    wood, G. Atwell, C, Johnson, Brgame of Badminton demonstration
    Lucas and B, Patterson (Capt). _ matches will be played in the

    Police: L. Shannon, W. Phill Combermere Hall this evening.
    M. Richards (Capt.), M. Fran! ‘The times are for present pupils
    and L. Best. ' 4 p.m. i 5

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    got their two goals in the d
    half, when Cliff Johnson Jd
    a pass from Bonitas ceritre ick
    Patterson, Johnson made no mis-
    take scoring from close range.
    Their second goal came soon after
    when Neville Warren, who was left
    unmarked on the right wing swam
    the ball down-field about four
    yards to score, The ball hit the
    cross-bar and rebounded inside the
    nets. Best scored Police’s sixth
    goal shortly afterwards.
    Muddled Game

    It was rather a muddled game;
    inclined to be rough and with no
    teal combination shown by either
    team.

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    Important Soccer
    Decisions Made

    LONDON, Oct. 9.

    Two important decisions regard-
    ing soccer in Colombia and Ger-
    many were reached during the re-|
    cent meeting of the Federation of}
    the International Football Associa-|
    tion. At the end of the 4-day meet-
    ing, the Executive Committee of
    the F.1.F.A. said an agreement)
    was reached among the delegates |
    by which the major league -of;
    Colombia now recognizes the
    authority of the Football Federa-|
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    F.I.F.A. |

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    The communique also revealed |
    that the Committee accepted pro-
    visional affiliation of the “Foot-|])
    ball Section of the German Demo- |
    cratic Republic”. But it stressed
    there can only be one entrant for
    the World Cup.

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    —_—_ ————




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    added to the list of compulsory }
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    Olympic Games.—U.P. |



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    INTERCOLONIAL

    BASKET BALL

    TRINIDAD v. BARBADOS ,
    SEIGERT TIGERS i%

    v. Harrison College, Sat, Oct. 15
    v. Bidos. (ist Test) Mon. Oct. is
    v. ¥M.P.C, Wed. Oct. 1.

    v. B'dos. (2nd Test) Thurs, Oct 18
    v

    . Bdos, (3rd Test) Sat. Oct.

    All games at ¥.M.P.C.,” Beckles
    Ra at 8 p.m Admission “Mec,
    48c. Season Tickets $2.00,



    COCKTAIL DANCE
    AND PARTY

    At
    THE BARBADOS

    AQUATIC CLUB
    (Members Only)



    on
    SATURDAY, October 13th
    6 — 8 p.m.

    In

    VICTORIOUS WATER
    POLO TEAMS

    Music by Mr. KEITH
    CAMPBELL and his
    Society Five

    Honour of the

    A Special MENU is being
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    Price of Tickets for Dance
    and Party $1.20 each
    These Tickets may be pur-
    chased at the Office in ad-
    vance, and not later than
    Friday, October 12th

    Admission to Ballroom by
    Ticket Only





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    FILES



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    HI I1NK8DAY, OCTOBER 111. IttSt BARBADOS ADVOCATE FACE THREE Leg. Co. Pass Factories Act Amendment Bill ^^"""^ %  — ** .iiiW^iili i.w r.l 2 I.I tn *KII iKiln-hl n( • %  i .tliu cirri: Fencing Of Machinery Will Be Strictly Enforced THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL yesterday passed wit! I minor amendments, the Bill to amend the Factories Acl IW7. in order to give effect to the recommendations of the • Secretary of Stale for 11* Colonies and uf the Uboui commissioner. rii.S,, ,....,,., „, Su „ r has tion of Factories. JJ.'^L" 1 ; p".)' "<• The Labour Commissioner conauMsS >£,£> V ** not •**Ulen-.l uM Kxcn.ve Commute. ituauiy provide for id*, fencing uf agreed, thai ih* -.ujxratructure for n„ ,i ,..?„ Kelor, Uoard .UKI a iFaeto, i'iHaf Meant I jr d was very cumberi/ie Labour Commissioner has wme. Nol only could the officer pointed out that the administrative ncerned ill %  fTord th time to machinery for carrying out the *P*-'id on a Factory Board, bu; provisions of Mie Act are cumber****> would find it a practical lin•ome and that difficulties will be P"*"ty to carry out all the tog untered when carrvinr out "iprvision impoa.-d on them by ill "f the Act ,ne Acl In moving the second rcadine a* u mFrm %  %  preferable thai the Kit t!lU. ih,. Mnn. ihiColonial '•MeanlblllW' far the sdmlnl-tra Secntarv said: — Uon .t the Art should be vrMed The Factories Art. IMT, which iu "^ '^iMur I ommU-HHtrr BBjfc %  % %  • pra Mri Jwt U> delagaUea of hi. pow*r meiMl. ii., iM'ver t„ ,.„ to lay Factor* lawp.. lot tkrn !• THE TORIES HOLD THEIR VOTE ?' %  50" r-* f i Ii %  to operation Kmg ,t nilu opt-riiUon ^mediately, hi.h were time ware, Ant, r£L . r a fiubrt ntive Labour C onmijuiunrr On whom the brunt of the work of carrying out the of m. Act'dr^raaS m th £*"= kf ,w1 -Id tall! ,..., 1 ... ', K %  ;'"> %  -1< Ihe.e^nsib.hllc: .f a Facto, v Inspector: an., third l ,:,U *V 4 ?J*. •""' %  ""' actor y Inspector; and third, the inconvenience of bringing the recruited, And thr> will vioutly •all la ether sftleert aa and when they need advice and assist anee. It has been argued lh.il the Labour Commissioner hbnarU haknowledge to Will! Il I amending Dill I >*ould give him, but It is the InI tention that, if the service* .-f an 1 SOCIALIST I • ... I... I ill 138: •j IH !" SCT'S !" l"!!"'."" -"J >WM Factory I„pM0T e.n I •? !" beobtained from iho Unilod KinI r ^ rtom on secondment, these dutw will in Fad inlarfalj da la fted to •raaon. Thifirst |jck WJS %  and II waa decided u, dafar pn>launini '.hi Ad under t'hiukc 3S <">'" %  Me Fad .. Inapectot , _, .. b recruited. KvKistralion 2. In accordance with the M '* Ogllvle saw little point in usual procedure the Act was forintroducing registration in ternwarded for the tJgnIdeation of His lorleg when the practice did not DICHSIIH. and curlv in exiat already, and foresaw 'the 1949 o reply was received to the r,B t * members of staff being; lneflct that, although Hi %  '* 11 '" nothing but registering, power of dlsallownnce would not checking, registration, and n-rcb exeretaed ihara ware -i-vcral isienng ** It ia considered that it E UM Aet, ratettng to Uli ll1 bf auffleient if owners of racol machinery and Ihe Inlories notify the Labour Commisspection of boilars. which containuoncr of the existence of factor! ocialists win point from the Liberals Three diffWulin'relate la the the u^tii oi > inadVquacy of the salary offered The r n a W ia l said that tn (SB00 per annum) and ihe inHon'ble the Colonial itid.i ihe conditions govpad mentioned WOO. He wanM %  Inapecton-in the U.K. of aecui I the aai v m-s of an officer on secondthat they would have to provide a i*liod ot more than passage money to and from tlu United Kingdom for this man an< ,,,-ailuiily af getting an n.aybe hla family, aa well gl 1 active ratlrad officer to eOOM Uon 'ravelling allowance for doing hi' [ for. aay. a couple of years in the work in Barbados. t first Instance has aeeordingly been He did not agree with U> taken up wilh the Secretary ,f Hon'ble Mr Mahon when he talke. State, md 1 hope thai I will soon about jelling a fully yualitto .mint conman. because looking at it from ,,.. niiaiulal point of view, it mran bop* IBBM II will be thai Coveniment wMsld have f nls ly a salary commeiisuistUM itl for a Fael i lo arriva ,l '" Muahiications. in time f.u Lba next cro,i aaasasB HenaJe Mr. Make* replying t< 1 should not like, at the peasant ">* PreeMent aald that he was not slag*, to glva any ...mmitment ns linking of finance from the Govto when the Act will be brought •rnmenfs point of vtow. but from Into force. postal pg view of the industry. Minor Masti b *!^! T; lh ^Tal!? d 2 '" Hofi'ble J A. Malm I0ld that " <-lly qualified who did %  III BU my oppused know what he was doing, he i> .i ipta of the itdi. but %  i" .i %  which lilllfl worried. H,..it. fully tu the UM iiilonial Secretary salad that lb .1 an i'\pv; ii'iii'ii lactory in"MTtor had not yet been obtained i m litua chan about this hjn )u i, ttn inspect,.. u ;:; cu^Tt?'-^ & £ ~ "'"".^rrr 25 r hns to he aupnur. l *• "'" "'P J"' nacssaan aualuVaUoni : <""> 'napactor and therefor. night • all on industries to inslal onlecassary safety gaSslM 111 IHUIIHI.. Tba Hiii thin wami Into c 1 Niaa during iri.aatu ^ uf which Ion. Mr. Mahon raised the queston as lo whether tlu I m fully ut includes places where no, riiey are .taa^kMaotaja^-^O^ workers are employed ll bj CODto prevent Irfxilly danger to perddcred thsl factories In which no •""> ^Pl'Cf* "J wo k nB —„--....^ „,„ —„,.„ ,„ nu i ui-ifinisus." The Secretary of State %  ales of registration, and their place provision to enable a rourt of aummary jurisdiction, on the complaint of the sTssCtory '"spector to make orders as lo dangerous conditions and practices. Clause 8 of the Bill extends Ihi power of the Factory Inspector in the manner sat out In the Clause. 8. So much for the amendnents proposed by the %  •about i %  ...-.,, :|. r..-i • % %  %  : %  > %  less cumbersome to work. Clause \2 of the ffill refers to criticisms by the Secretary of Slate In Section Ifi(a) of the Act. which was rr-AE runes -till Mold a I commanding lead or 12 per cent in to* election race. Still the lame number or people are voting lor them. I'm is shown by a Daily Expresi Fou oi Public Oplniot, conducted In Ihr tecood hall oi f>t*ptemb*r l .>ne uei aanti li'Mii '.he L.bcraU in 'he lay tonnign*—as ins Tor(eaa %  lit Socialist* la rediire-1 | <>ne. Tsr win nraa put 'he Tones al SK. ln ill per cent., Socialist W| pet jiji, m u* .. Liberals I oer cent. I'nareiara .. 1 Xt 16 il Question on. M question pu: was: — II m flrncrnl i'l'tion were h*ld H 'n, 'i j>ar/t 4ag. _S.pt. reman stea.Ul-^1 lei. p*i csiil nave turned 'Jury and II per cent Liberal The other elghi per cent, are undecided. Two OUI ol three L.Vrsts say Ihev will roie Liberal ssUn but on.*lllih have turned Toryrhe second question was : — ffreo'itr. uoaat loir ymrieli. uhic'i ua'ta do you Ukral itiifai<( um if a Ikm icerc lefo imm'diafelii Jsl* "< > %  ' 11) .. U tt il U| M 30 B n a in .5; %  '> 1 H tHhafo I l I •', pi cen: .orecl Da inli Rli iwr rrnt ilHI m again BoeUhsti Mora iii.ui iniee-guai'ters of DM sra coufidenl ui • but II per cent take the eiew dial ilie Soclailala will hold on to office OI Socialists bi pci cent, ate op;ini.slic aiMHit llu'ir pan\ of i pel CBOI. alio tore* e ime-back. Half the a I.leplciubei invmugauoa acre cooiplcted tefore Mr Ui announced u General BlscUon Da aaami aitl lUlthcr poll-, evenweek unill .i I aana*wdad alnnf thong Una first two years while he was get'Mon'blo Mr. Mahon accepted ting ihe neceasary machinery Hint M_faa1 feaaasd. After that machinery had TinHill v been fenced, his sole job would i.'.. nistH-ci boilers of 2* D.( factories and six vrup plants Jaawewaastt rt & not think that the numportad in Baibados as a result of the operation km justified the GovernnuTit in undertaking Ihe expendiUue ol appointing a factor] In%  ygfta r lUa'hlr ii. H. Evelyn ftfrw I 'Mill the pimople of having a factor) iiupactnff rather than tha ohj FaCtorj Inil He howvviri %  i then p.i' %  -•.I v. itli amendments the civil The prcs'ent defi_£52 "" A^^'Xi'^tJlTwords driving machinery and not to ory" ,n Section 2 ^ctortej Act. lM7 certain woida | e-m ^^ ^^ [(M 9Qm puf power Is used nrc greatly in nee.1 premises. .. %  f inspection. ,is sometimes vc.v reuarded theae words as of doubthad condition* such aa overcrowdfI value as Ing. exlsl in such faclones. The the absolute definition of raetory, whkh is inaecurciy whici. .. -----irunnaa eluded in Clause 3 of Ihe Bill, and the U.K. Act and might bo j,,-^ Is based on that contained In the regarded as a aMphole in the guch 1( q MWy ya v Trinidad legislation, 'Is comprerequirements or the Soetion. pressure gauge, and an amendhansive and includes any factorAccidents rmjll u> BeeUon 23 is accordingly bef. rnaneni wjtn another man service vstabli>hmenl. The llnn'ble the t elsaUl Seciriai | thai .iiigm-ily it w,i hat the post of LicUm hiiiild be ttfi the principle i.f shared secondment, i.e.. woik brlweeu Barbados and tin In fact Clause 16 repeals Sections Windward and Leeward Islands, pur25 and 26 relating to the notillcaThat Mjteo did not however aeem poses, sucl as boilers for pressure lion of accidents, which it is proto be working out. vessels, e.g.. steam nibes In ovens, posed to include in a separate Bill, The Government intended getcalendars, boilers fur injection, and also nrsjikes provision to imting fully qualified factory ine.g. into vats or boilers for cookpose u penalty on persons actually sjiector front secondment from ng. ... ,. committing tnc ottence lor which 'ho United Kingdom. It they had fell that sleam boilers |h # occupier is liable and lo enable i ff> i man I" Steel Hand • Pram asuja I enter because of the fierce ilghtini n the vicinity. She toucheo many ne w parts, including Siihi. Hay, Yokohama, Shanghai ana l'stngtao, covering about 3d,lHM miles in I (Hit and about Ihe asms mltaatasj in 14V The years 1040 and 105(1 wen tu for AlsTiain and In Novemwantr,i i< know if' this inspector ,,r ,B5 vam an"U""i |Oing lo be, employed perJjr aclivities. She proceeded U % %  tl-. and the colonv saddled "' Cd,t t.oagt and on April 30. 1951, at Norfolk, Virginia, she w..> assigned to the Amphibious Force, AUauiic Fleet. Thai called for a larger crew, an addition of landing boats, operational training and ii ills lo prepsie for her not unfnmiliar role. %  SB) woros a* oi nouui .. ^ ., ^^.ti !" *" %  "" u i"" •'--"" • i' lh-v l^nd 10 weak,-,, 8g !" *^S7^* J !" Ti ""' <>-'">'• %  '• r !" " ' •>"' rcmiliement lo li-ncc !,„'"" "•J* "It "S^Z" hinnlf from llabillly on thr oon, to require boilers to be iith safety atuichmenU and owned or operated by the section 10(b) is also considered propofcxl Barbados Guvas^unatst or by anv lo ^ unsatisfactory, and in the '• parochial or olher public hody. experience of the U.K. Factory Sections Repealed Drpartmen*. some of the most 6 Clause 4 of the Bill repeals serious accidents occur when Sections 3. 4 and 5 of the Pringuards are removed while ripal Act. These set up a Factory machinery is under repair SecBoard, consisting of the Chief lion 19 uf the Art, which In its Medical CdHcer (now Director of present form it considered by the Medical Services). Colonial F.ninSecreKuv of Stale to contain dancer. Labour Commissioner. Govgerous weaknesses, has accordfrnment saactlical Inspector. ft,ld Ingly bei*n re-drafted. IW0 othi all factor0. The Secretary of State les and machinery in the island, commented on two points in Sec%  Factory Appeals Board lo hear tion 20(1). The first was that nod determine appeals against (he the sub-section only applies to Factory Board and the ftcgtstraboilers used for the purpose of have no comments on Clauses 10 and 20 Of the Bill. It is unusal to amend an Act been brought inh Clan the 111 Ihen they would have to provide a gratuity so us lo offset tinh,sid certain pciimo'i rights. II. am III communication with the Secretary of Slate for the .,,. i ha ii.ni bsyawrai h |i-.i |s) get a retired man so thai tha m.ilimy wOUld not lie liecesaari In 'hat case. He said that Ihe Legislature ,ve the privilege to consider Ihe matter i.gain because he doubted they could get a good JUST ARM WD meet operation, but the AaMHIt I-ibour Advlfer to the Secretary of State Dlsriplinury .MeuMirus pupporl-'' ""eh iftion in this 10. The Secretary of 8Ule ln.'t..i. Jlwi considered thai Section -%  u-|__.. () w of doobUul luc n m ;?^. Lke,t when the '"' %  "" •" • m -' a h '" ' since the ,ivlnr ol Ihe notice 12 m > %  %  f l d "" cn "" ,.,,„,. h-ck with o reKilutlon fur a made lo depend on the l" W, "LI, ,c or >' £?*"." lumal money """"""" opinion of Ihe o-her or mana.er " be ..peeled to nrr.v. %  T,,. V.',.' Work „f ihe l.,.nr. ,nd th.i IUML* Utu connection. I will not wear) Tim Yram Work %  Sun J ..mieirihle .In !" \Z HonowSS Memberw.th IM In oedll tb. C fillip %  nonicUll^d^ I i. varlou, propc*,l that have bM> %  -. v ai.l that (i „ve,nnw.t eah-e. elpllnary measures and not for and the difficulties which spector would be ..rw^-aii,^ LsZl .h„ B i4 w. *. have IJBOT encounteredIn securTng of .w.. Irt^l *• 'uitnble serving officer from Ih. si the U.K. Factory Service. nave t, perliHl j ,iiit the Legislature end uf llii.i lime would I i raconsidar the mailer In IF YOUFEEL LIKE THISTAKE ?! WINCARNIS TONIC WINE AND FEEL I LIKE THIS! BE HEALTHY & HAPPY. New Loveliness For You WITH JV Follow thl Simple Hvmtv Plan ff"v. *.h rasa 1st r •ua r>im>iu hi,. Diuii fur sa tttonda, r*i—ngr with r r-inrii* aslt.lasssi i4ri..f gaaat • / %  H ii .. i .1.. I. I4*a. %  I l.i> l..l.-lg niJUf • %  %  C i .km ,'jlm.a... lull HI iu.... asset I I'S I.>i li.ili.ii (shower, tf.i il.-ihnliv Hath ii/e I'ah D0CI0RS PROVED PALMOLIVfS BfAUfY RESUITS 5 %  • \s mK. BOOK DEPARTMENT CF. HARBISON A CO LTD—Tel.: 44Z7 CHItlHTMAS (ARUM A ANNt'ALH. IHAHIKS LECTIONARIF.H. AND ITR8K HIIMHIINOW ON IHHrLAV RlflLKS i i: \. I K AMVMN HOOKS A. A M. In ....ii.il 1.tin binding*, and In Ivor* "IN STILL WATERS*. "IN QUas* PASTURES' : 'COME VE APART"; "FAITH WORSHIP "THE KING'S HIGHWAY A Few tilled from our Fiction 1-1*1:— :i IM.I Ml s I ON IKTLTf HEV—Erie Ambler NltiflTBOt NO—Robert Hlcheiu. I IO MASK Robert HanVst t til II I ~~M. Naur* Mitford MARRIED LOVERS — San la Draae II NCI I ( HAKE— Roy Farran LATE FINAl.—I-rwW Otbb* MAY WE DtMJK VOII ORDER FOR THE DI'KE OF HIMlsOR'h MFM'Hlts-'\ KINOS STORY Stsek already aanslgned to Ihls bee ANOTHER SHIPMENT OF TURNER DIESEL TRACTORS COMPARE SPECIFICATIONS! SEE US FOR A DEMONSTRATION AND PLACE YOUR ORDERS NO> tut nut sins eV siitYiri: THl:i:l)SH)K in i M) -• I MICHAEL Fishing Time Ii Near Again!! SELECT YOl'H TACKLE EAHI.Y VfE an in--. • (.III. FISH NET • CORK FLOATS (Round) • SEINE TWINE • MULLET TWINE • HEMP FISHING LINES—S Ih to 3d PI • COPPER PAINT • I". 5". 6" BLOCKS • SISAL ROPE • TARD ill Mlson • CANVAS MANNING & CO. LTD. -P.Head



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    PACK IK.Ill BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. OCTOBEB 10 IS51 C. Smith Batted Well In Second Match How The Barbados— B.G. Game Was Drawn By O. S. t OPPIN WED. Oct. 3 BARBADOS today scored 343 in reply lo B.Gs llrat Innings total of 368 In a day of exciting cricket In which the fortunes of the name fluctuate d wi th intriguing regularity. I predicted yesterday that BarBerbice Draw Game With Barbados Police Defeat Bonitas 6 — 2 Important ifeeoav Decisions Made defeated BonlUu by the noi LONDON. Oct. ft Two ImportaM de ck kwj regard Ins soccer in Colombia and Ger,ly gum* of the many Waft reached during the reThe port ( -i %  neb margin of six goal* to l-' afternoon aa Barracuda* forfeited nn i meeting of the Federation of n„' h ,L ... in their water polo match at the their game to Snappera. The final the International Footbt.ll Assoct*airh ended ':. a draw at JIground. New AmsterAciuati Th Club yesterday aflernoo. Potlea their first bedos would have been abl a* B.G. total when they linuhed th-ta* with 93 runs for tha loss of two | right rem.-iining batman mclurii-il at least live seasoned players. B.O. .offered njndsome assist:hem when five chances went abacaing in tha day's play but ironically enough a magnificent running rnteh at the Ions; of? by Gibba, one of the %  1 had put This Is the **tall*d t..r_i:t of tha reurth and last day of play In th* lerond BarbadoaB.O. gama which wan la ft drawn whan rsin washed eet the final Bfth day. Barbado* •cored 343 In reply to B.O's Ma Tha Barbado* team u ex pected home tats svenliig. for the seaaon and was their 1J> year zss. ssw sssgxzsa "r.. G |J!d"" K "„".'^' "' !" *.1,'I;, I^renzo Beat the lanky POIiie Atainann 0. Williams B „ (rom 11<)iut „ M T. VJASI"-'; —.._,-. . Patteison. Juhnaon mad. The Barbodinns returned to k Georgetown today and will b* Tn %  eatin g from eloaa rang* second goal came soon aft ornTHUtig piayers wno na the second of the match, the the Barbado* innings today WHS in t having been "truck by Farthe fine effort by Smith who rirI in ihe First Teat, scored BO. marred only by one Tha end lo a bngh' real chance at 75. which 1 agreed with him ihis occasion was Just the thing. The local basketball player rreeautn came when he broko his own preparing for the visit of Smith batted with such comM icket in getting back and late Trinidad team. A practice match plele freedom, fluency andsangcutting one from Norman Wight, wai hold last night and the Sclecteam. Basketball Team To BY Picked Today ked on the riaiht wing iwam the ball down-field about four ards to scora. The ball hit UV Iso decided to !/ %  IntrnuiM ,.U U nd.r" 5 l .S-lder.Uo„ thaj ^OfW~ cross-bar and rebounded UMd. th. ^S-a^tiSSSH^StaS'^ <""•' Committee tha. nets. Best scored PoUce's slath „_ ,^ ,„„ early „ uu, 'd.kd ... the list of cnmpulsory ** %  """;> %  £"":* %  timf of *e year to enable to so^ in tteprwmm, of full.-.MuH.II.-.l ( ..inn. matches to be played per afterOlyn-p.c Ciiwt"• It was rather a miiil-tlcl k..nv. ,.o..n llowi-vr r the final ilreuaonl "*• inclined to be rough and with no ha, no t Vet been made. ••a! combination shown by either ^ BADMINTON that t.uite a few British V\' tonsllltis that has since Alkins and Algie Symmonds, WO od, G Atwell. C. Johnson. B. pame „t B.nlminton demonstration schoolboy. __ He fiuffered from no h(m {l> ^ whll(1 ^g resl o( will today announce the players i Jicas an d B Pattarson (Capt). mau-hes will ba played m the played a_ax*in_ on ^ |r-m nM %onr to u.rbKe. did f'-r the (irst TestPolice: L. Shannon, W. Phailpa. Gombermeft Hall this eveninn. piny hiit usually forceful The visiting team. Seigerts M. Richards (Capt.), M. Franklyti The times are for present pupils I i it and punished whenever the opportunity for. doing so presented itself. L. With his considerable reach hegj "r innings. He r it the ball was able to play forward com-' loitably and on the offensive tn hnlU thai would have forced players with shorter reach tn hi bagk dafati play a cramped half eok stroke whkli is .still di'feiisive stroke. The UrM teal setback to Barbados came with the dismissal of Proverb* with but nun runi added to Barbados' overnight •core of S—2. This was perhaps the most pardonable run out suffered by the Barbados team for the series. Smith drove |iowerfully widish of cover and called but the inimitable Pcrsnud at cover The seemed unable to Tigers will be arriving on Saturhard as Is his wont day. Three Teat matches and two afternoon games, fames against local clubs will nd he went at II after still trybe played, tni hard. Arrangements aft l-rimmatH Idge, determined lo to have two baakelball matches break Ml stung of "ducks" from against teams from the U.S. Navy ihe llrsl Test got off the mark shipa at present In port, at with ,i do or disingle but after V M.P.C. on Thursday night, that was a model of cheeky, ... > • n x/aav* 4 hustling, determined bafing. He MeltVl tfeat YIftLA got Into double figure* with a r railroaded singles but Melwi met Y.M.C.A. yesterday after that he battel quite wel). ; ,t Belleville In the first round of %  xaeutlDI two good drives that ihe Inter.Club Tennis Tournametil •Hrned him Ihe plaudits of the which is bemu held by the Barbariiiwfl. doi Amateur Lawn Tennis Holder, last man In at 131 was Association, entirely uninfluenced by the *, f HH crowd saw some good tenseness of the situation or_ at tennis played. In he Men* Singles M. Crichlow of the Y MCA., beat Free trkket Albert Williams oi Melwi to the was right down the wicket tune of fl— 2. i>—4. Melwi however L Best %  iiul Old Hoys S P-"'effected lightning one handed !* ^ batting gave one to bapteaTUp iind relurr. to the bowler heVt in und Proverbs was run out by as bui^ n tlfmenTrted n to gerback flriving fast BKdjum bowlers came back to beat Y.M.C.A In tha home after Pemaud's piece of fielding. farmer Then niM anothc innings that at 56 because of cramp that eessitaled his itimnu inilliant Gnskin and "Bruiser" Thomas Doubles fixture 8— A, 9 —1. after correctly and without a care. Y.M.C.A.. had forfeited Free cricket and forceful loo. He umihlcs to Melwi. added nine of the badly needed TRUMPETER valuable SS runs before he was magniflCUfWr luiii,,] cently etught ovrrheaid tn the tUr otll/Ul neSithcring darkneas in a fine furC'oniuniing their series for the DM Dln| ''ffnit t>y Glendon Gibhs to Trumpeter Cup at the Governpavilion until later in the balling a stroke that deserved a soundment Rifle Range yesterday, order, flnnUy ending with u tame ary-a solid punch off i hill marksmen of Iho BJU. took catch to cover off Thomas. This vollev from .. medium fast bowpart in Event 3 —The Civil Serwu another good combination tl.ASS man now and he appeared as if commend able steadiness in the Mr. H. C. Boyca M he would be instrumental in B.Q. bowling even wh* it WHS N v J Pjirry gf placing the issue beyond doubt, not offensive, tho honours going *"•£*"" • He was at once comfortable and to Gasktn won sent down 41 (l>i K,J,? „ his good liming earned him quick overs and had 81 runs struck off The C adet runs along the carpet but when him, capturing 2 wickets. TwenCadet I.t. G. M. Rudder (H.C.t 19 Oasatill look the second new ball tv-three year old Norman Wight C.Q M.S. J. G. Outram (l*S.) 15 he fell victim to one of Gaskin's who first played Intercolonial, he Cadet A. M. Archer (L.8.) IS enticing but deadly iiuwingers. told me. at the age of 16, is a am was similar to that of young old player and hi* 41 overs Charlie Taylor Hunte and all the for 81 runs with 4 wickets to his batsmen caught in the legtiap creds) was the chief factor reto Gaskm this series. They are sponslble for keeping the BarbnMuiie .-..nsclous of the three men djoa 'coring down. in the leg trap und the wicketNot far behind was "Bruiser" keeper making a fourth "custoThomas' good figures of dian of the swing"' and they leave O M Tl W quite, a few alone. There is a 14.5 5 10 2 momentary lapse in concentraAs a matter of fact he struck tion and—presto—there IJ. %  nice two strategic blows for B.G. In mswinger beautifully floated the fight for first Innings honlg and centre going away ouni when he claimed the wiekct ulf ;he pad. It is nuide to order ,,f Farmer at 78 and that of for gliding and they do so and Holder, lust man who looked presto— Gaskut chalks up anevery bit Ilk* helping Grcenidge Miai to add the necessary runs. Atkinson Rmn washed out the fifth day Atkinson fought for form of play and this game was left drawn B.C.. 368 nnd (for 1 wkt. 51 Barbados 343. Erie con u-ntiously striving ;he rang* of tha bowlers but h< wsi out in this process before he held accomplished it. He played forward Inquiringly lo a good length off break from Norman WlgM the flight of which beat him through the sir and he was bowled, beaten in playing a forward stroke to Ihe full extent of his considerable reach. Raits. Walcott. an entirely aggressive batsman this tournament, entertained no fears for Gaskin. He (legged those well up wilh powerful coverdnves and cut the short ones hard d< to deep third man. In one over he lifted a iti.uuht one from Gaskin on the leg klump, obviously designed to lure the batsman into padding or YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT From Codringtoo Rainfall: .49 In. Total Rainfall for Month to Date: 1.22 las. Ilighe-t Terapsrstnre: B6.fi -F LOWSM Taraparauiras 74.0 *F iVin.l Velocity: 8 aUlea per bour Barometer. (9 i.m ) 30.018 (S pas ) 20.617 WHAT'S ON TODAY Court of Common PUa*~-10.00 Court of Original Jurisdiction —10.00 a.m. Police Courts— 10.00 a.m. MfieUng of taa Chamber of Commerce2.00 B.m. MeeUrtg of the Board of Hi-.1 th 2.00 () in Police Band gives concert at Christ Church Auasbouoe -4.30 pas. Table Tonal* at Bnh Hill. Cable a Wireless sad Strathclyde4.30 p.m. Mobile Cinema gives show at St Oatherlna'a School Pasture, St. Philip St 7.30 p.m. Oramopbone Concert of Brit lib Music at Wbfleld B.15 p.m. CINEMAS oi.om Th* Saaial II f'*n*li m a tn e>* e •lift a %  it a. I'LAZA lBfM|iWnl: Tt llsrli hsil rut es a ass ni.VMNl Dstsl-t III SI.\I:SS >ii:x!i You have been romplslnlng aboal net being able l* get to your eaUsfaeUoa yoar TYPEWRITERS a^DING MACHINES CALCULATING MACHINES SERVICED With eur comprehensive nets of American and I imh.h tools aleng with our several years of meehsnkal knowledge we are ronlldenl of living you entire satisfaction. We are proud la say that amons our satisfied rustomrrs who have tsfcen advantage of our ANNUAL lHAIhrTENANCE AND SRRVUE CONTRACT are: Advocate Coras-way .Limited Allerae. Arthur Ceaapoay l.lmlted A. ssarnee a Ceanpany Limited Barbados Trlephone Company Limited Brltlsh-Amrrlran Tohaceo Compinv (Barbados) Limited R. Sf. Joaes A Ceaopsny Limited Robert Thorn Limited (Just to mention 4 few) All machines for service and minor adiu'-lment* are returned wlthla one da). For full particulars or our ANNL'AL MAINTENANCE AND SERVICE CONTRACT Phone Mtin OFFICE I:II II>II:M SERVICE <0*1IA\Y MI \ i II IH-:A< ii CASINO renovated and under New Management Flourrseent Lighting Water InsUlled A Hea Bathing FaelllUes Mike vourd;>'. Ain Is 'i I. D. CAHEW. 10.10.51.—2n. BASKET BALL Mirrl<*n I % % %  •' %  '. Sal Oit I) rlaj-Mai THU Man On I: Y M r I W.S Oei It. %  % %  i -xal Trait Titan Ocl 1 ar stwm Tteke ti i R*m*mb*r. a comlortabie httmg SUIT is our tint consid*tation Thara ara inct*asinq numbers who iecognise tor th*mslv*s th* consistently aup*ib cut til and finish oi the> IDEAL TAILORING W* will welcome the opportunity oi proving this to you In our . TAILORING DEPARTMENT on the first floor of CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10—13, BROAD STREET COCKTAIL DANCE AND PARTY' At THI BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB SATIRDAY. October ISth — R p.m. VICTORIOUS WATER POLO TEAMS Mi. KEITH CAMPBtXL anil his live COLERIDGE STREET BBIDGETOWN A Bpaclal MENU is being [n..pi.M-.t (SnacKs A: Drinks) i' Tidna '" %  .:. .a.h Thwe TickeW may b' pur.. m adi.ir.i... and nut lain Hm MAW. llrlabfr I21U Admii"lii lo Btllroom b> Tlrkrl Only At I.ii HI I II f hurt' rvrvif-ii POLISHED M I MIMI .1 COUNTER EDGE MOULDINGS in 10 fl. knglrn RED FLOOR TILES 6" % 6" RED & BUFF COLORCRETE CEMENT WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT TEMPERED HARDBOARD 4ft. x 811.. in x mil STANDARD HARDBOARD 4(1. x 6ft.. 4ft. x 8ft.. 4ft. x 10ft. IIIVK TIIONE 4287 WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. 1 *' A crianipioci mui hr "on tin toes Ttrr I tf the garrh*. Cor speed and agility of footwork are fundamental to good (able irani*. Tbai*s hy so many ihampioni AMBER FLASH: ute* >„. White Crepe Sole. Dwntop.lto X Latex Fo*rn Imole W tab ohoose Dunlop thoev which are spccifkaUy -£ WHITE FLASH : Oxford. Blick 'leiiSned for the |ob. Correct supp-n. ^V ta d ( '""' So'""!. Dnnlop.il* perssct fit, VaaeisB canvas uppen n. keep %  L ,x Fo ^ lni0,e tool and vajraalsted, piniho M ftuhles^cuhic*\ficpmuotDunlopillo A %  *'! | l? WOMCHi 6 1 iawe, ; ihcijarebutsfem'ofthefei''.rci %! Mr% 1#f >>i iliese mj-.tcrly 'porti lhoe*. Vimhp SPCRTS SHOES -ftub^. Of #, tffa6/ DJNICP auiIEK C ITD.. IfOOTWEAR CIVISIONI. SPtKE. LIVERKXM. STOKES & BYNOE '.TO **ani> '.•.'.v.'-'...'*'.*.'.... DON'T ENVY THE LOOKS OF THIS . WELL-DRESSFD MAN you SIMPLY CAN ORDER YOUR SUITS TAILORED AND FITTED BY P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co. Ltd. Top Scorers in Tailoring CHEATE A GOOD HABiT BY HAVING THE BEST IN CLOTHES TAILORED TO YOUR PERSONAL REQUIREMENTS MAMJVTAMJV THIS GOOD HABiT BY HAVING YOUR CLOTHES TAILORED BY C. B. RICE & Co. OF BOLTON LANE -V',',0'**,W,V. %  %  %  %  ,::::v.::


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    %  AGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. (KTOIilR 10. 1M1 HEN^Y BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSC BY WALT DISNEY fe BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG FOR LASTING QUALITY & SHADES THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER L A U<^ '"^ ^-. : k ^ •* -. %  P *! h : .--v-7L RIP KIRBY •wer* •.-€ ..-O-C fTMt *ai£*sT .>oM ONO, -SRi OrtTt IC ^-AM4tO TO KILL •rt.fT5 VVJS 5-AP-CPO COT TV*( M* MTITJ. A •OiW* L*PSCT W*U lOMC **>0 \:iW'' Tu.f.. ( 4TU S tlOU >4'4 N(N CCCUTINS bPOu.3 %  jr kMKiTv trastto/ouTsioe. ray* M^WIM CAM AS* *T MJH / 6T"*03 IU*§. FA/X^S-* '.T4FB035 /COULWT POg.fc.Y kA/e *D na c* TVftr nuco -rue BY ALEX RAYMOND MMt*r* THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES INSIST ON STAG BRAND READY PAINTS AN I. C. I. PRODUCT A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BDOS) LTD. AGENTS GlandsMadeYeunq -Vigour Renewed Without Operation U you r*al oM klor yor ti~ <>< %  "*•* • mUM •• >M tAllr< cbd oa-ratloa* It lft _^M* %  ,-nt in i>lki |— %  .. — J T*!? -f u> M M>** 5>* jrr??* ?f*ZE •v.4 br tfc—M IMI „ ._> %  avallabN al All ZZ(M.r Ful II la . •nd rtl !• !• M yaara yavnft or 1I1IT back %  return of ••nply PU|> Yi-Tobs •,£.;;: .S-V.to-tISTEN FOLKS! if You want to keep Food Fresh nnd improve your roukiiiK use .... MIRAP Till MIRACU, HYGIFNIC FOOD WRAP Buy a Roll To-day From Your Grocer H. JASON JONES & CO., ITD. CITY A NEW SCHOOL GEOMII HV v.... A NEW SCHOOL GEOMETRY WITH TRIGONOMETRY VOLS 1 & 2 By ANDREW G. J. CAMACHO, B.A., (LOND.) with a foreword by Sir Alan Collymorc, Chief Justice of Barbados NOW ON WALK AT I III AIIVOr VII. SI VI HIM 111 IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credi* Customers for Monday to Wednesday only USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW Tins Kraft Macaroni & Cheese 40 : Bottles Strawberry Jam 54 I Bottles Marila Olives (12 oz) 125 120 Pkgs. Chivers T. Jellies 23 20 Tins Vienna Sausage (4oz) 38 M Pkgs. Bird's T. Jellies 20 18 Tins Aspargus Soup 33 20 Pkgs. Jello Puddings 23 M D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street NATURAUV Hfc WAS UNDER A 6REAT STRAIN. ITS VERV t VHWJSTI He %  %) CHANSE A INTO A TIGER CONGPATUlATlOfcSf WE WILLING HURRAH. SOUR PRAI9E6 THRU THE JUN6LE. OUC PEOPLE WCT P HONOR SOU. THANK OU, A— K*minhef that your l%ht hoi.-r.nl.,mral> Bte % % %  Mum .,itti, irnils nourithine III irplin-iliferrrgwmi ')X-M.I -•> tr.di %  %  • %  Of 'OvafciaB' C*U nukf tr.r ltjh!i in.-.| much more now-lttiinn WklrvvliBliiinf So do not JrU> the h*ppv Kpr 'Ovallinr' i\.IJ i. m-d, m ri (umk Juac add 'Ov.liuwto cold milk, or "nlk .i",l vjicr. and mia uiih B whl-k— or In a thakvr. • The Ideal ffof-weafher Drink