Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


ESTABLISHED 1895



2

7) -.
Barbad
fran Completes Oil |»
Grab Operation As ||

Teehnicians Evacuate

Mossadegh Will Fly
To New York Sunday

TEHERAN, Oct. 3
‘THE IRAN GOVERNMENT completely took
over the $1,000,000,000 Anglo -Iranian Oil
Company as the British cruiser “Mauritius’’ sailed
for Basrah with the last of the British technicians
who once ran the huge installation at Abadan.
Reports reaching Teheran from Abadan said
that only four British executives including Alec E.
Mason, former Assistant General Manager of the
Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, still remained at
Abadan. They plan to leave by 3 air tomorrow.

The evacuation See = 7 es
men proceeded without inciden
Dulles Visits
The President

Persian troops saluted the Mauri-

tius as it steamed out for Basrah
WASHINGTON, Oct. 3
Foster Dulles, Republican

with the last remaining British
policy advisor to the Administra-

who ran the oil company for 50
tion on Foreign Affairs, paid a

years.
The evacuation was completed
brief visit to President Truman
or Wednesd: Ay, the first since the

at noon.
A recepticn last night was given
conclusion af the Japanese Peace
Treaty Conference in San Fran-

at the home of the Iranian en-
cisco last month.

John

gineer N. Bazargan who is on the
Managing Board of the National-
ised Oil Company.

Government officials reported
that the few British executives
who were invited, attended.

Dulles told reporters after his
ra” ypeneran US. Ambsssador] visit that ‘Pruman may have a

| 4 s ) bi *SY{ statement later, but i
| call on the Soviet Ambassador Se ed Bot

indicate what the statement would
be. Well informed sources how-
ever, said the reason for Dulles’
ezll on Truman was to relinquish
formally the post as chief execu-
tive’s special representative on
the Japanese Peace

added that Dulles

President that he

negotiating

Treaty. Source

informed the

would be available at any time
for consultation om matters con-
nected with the Javanese Peace

and other Legation chiefs today.

Meanwhile Deputy Premier Hos-
sein Fatemi told the press that
Premier Mohammed Mossadegh
would fly to New York on Sunday
to attend the Security Council
session which will act on Britain’s
complaint that nationalisation of
the British Oil Company was a
threat to peace and was in viola-
tion of the ruling by the Interna-
tional Court of Justice.

He said Mossadegh will be ac-
companied by 12 Persian officials

Treaty which the Senate is ex-
pected to ratify next January.



including members of his Mixed —U.P
Oil Commission. He said, in New Recei Ss ts
York Mossad, will stay at a iving ecre
hospital so tha’ able. to

BONN, Oct. 3.

Chancellor Konrad Adenauer’s
Government formally charged on
Wednesday that Socialist Opposi-
tion Leader, Kurt Schumacher,
was among those receiving copies
of secret Government
allegedly stolen
own office.—U.P.

maintain the diet { nétestary for hi:
ailing health.

The Premier’s son Hasson Moss
sadegh, who is a physician, will
I accompany his father to attend to

his medical needs.—-U.P.

TO-DAY’S WEATHER
CHART

Sunrise : 5.49 a.m.

Sunset : 5.55 p.m.

Moon : New

Lighting ; 6.00 p.m.

High Tide : 6.14 a.m., 6.00
p.m,

Low Tide : 11.46 a.m.



documents

from Adenauer’s



KING’S CONDITION
STEADILY IMPROVES

LONDON, Oct. 3.
Buckingham Palace announced
King George continues to show

improvement
lung operation.
bulletin said:
night the
further

from his

The daily
“After

King’s condition |
improvement.”
—U.P.

recent
medi-
cal

good
shows



Reds het Off |
U.N. Attacks

[ EIGHTH ARMY HEADQUARTERS, Korea, Oct. 3.

COMMUNISTS battled attacking United Nations
forces to a standstill along most of the 135-mile Korean
front and rushed the biggest offensive buildup since last}
spring.

In the air, however, 12 U.S. Shooting Stars — U.S.
slowest jets — caught a dozen crack Communist M.1LG.
15 jet fighters over North Korea, probably shot down two
of them and damaged another.

Vietminh Rebels
Launth Big Attacks

HANOI, Indo-China, Oct. 3



ae,

The air victory ran the Fifth
Air Force's toll of Red jets in three
\days of air battles to seven shot
lown, three more probably des-
troyed, five damaged:

No U.S. losses were reported.

On the ground U.N. attacks into



ioe rom All Quarters : £

another }



U.S. Investigate
Gunfire Accident

The U.S. Navy is investigating
a freak gunfire accident which
killed six men and injured 15
athers aboard the U.S. destroyer
Gathing. The accident happened
Monday while the ship was carry-
ing out firing exercises in manoeu-
vres in Guantanamo Bay. The
navy said a five inch anti-aircraft
gun went off accidentally. The
shell hit the barrel of another gun
mount and steel fragments sprayed
nearby men.

Mass For Eva.—Hector Madero
Argentine Ambassador in Paris
and Members of the Embassy to-
day attended mass it was said in a
local Spanish church for the health
of Madame Eva Peron.

Russian Troops go to Manchu-
ria.—More deployment of Rus-
sian troops to Manchuria was
reported by the China Union
Press here. The Agency said the
entire Seventh Division of the Red
Army originally stationed in the
vicinity of Moscow had been
deployed to Manchuria around
September 20.

It added this was the fifth time
in the year that Soviet Russia
had dispatched troops to Red
China,

Spy Network.—United States
and British counter intelligence
agents have uncovered a Czech
espionage network operating
throughout western Austria and
arrested at least seven persons
according to official sources,

Coal: According to an authori-
tative source Japan is only inter-
ested in receiving cooking or
metallurgical coal from India. Last
year India sent 30,000 tons of
cooking coal to Japan as part of
the barter arrangement in return
for spindles.

New Job: Harold Minor, United
States Minister Designate to
Lebanon, told _ reporters on
Wednesday that he expects to ar-
rive at his new post next Tuesday.
He paid a.farewell call on Tru-
man,

Berlin Raid: Several thousand
Communist youths invaded West
Berlin on Wednesday night and
clashed with West Berlin police
to inaugurate the Communist
“fighting month,” The Communists
crossed the border into West Ber-
lin at Brenauer Street in the
French sectois

Greetings: Radio Peiping said
on Thursday morning that Mosshe
Sharett, Minister of Foreign Af-
fairs, was among those who sent
greetings to China on the occasion
of the second anniversary of the
founding of the Chinese Peoples
Republic.

More Nazis: Social Democratic
Deputy Dr. Franz Josef Huber on

| Wednesday charged that there are

“more and more” Nazis in the
Bavarian judicial system. During
the debate in the Budget Commit-
tee of the Bavarian Landtag, Huber
enid that 80 per cent. of all Ba-
varian judges and _ prosecutors
were former members of the Nazi
party.

11 Estonians
Flee Sweden

FORT PIERCE, Florida,
Oct



Eleven Estonians who fled from
Sweden because they _ believed
Russians would invade that coun-
try landed here on Wednesday in
an ancient and ragged sailing
schooner with a hole in its side.
The band of refugees boarded
the 64 foot Walprio for the
perilous Atlantic crossing on
July 22 at Wainborg, Sweden
after they decided they would be
safer in America.

‘ ae the Communist build-up area ran} They told the immigration
Pele a ee che into a stonewall Communist de-jguthorities who took them in
avtacking Communis ietminh | fence and vicious counter-attacks,

division south of the Red River

custody they were afraid Russia

Even one of the heaviest artillery | w. 4 a s
delta today as French and Viet- bombardments of the war failed a aes on een
nam a mate ap gg cart to discourage the Reds. The group included three
ee Ss to oor e ee Reds everywhere put up bitter/ehildren, five men and three
drive. ommunists opened — A) resistance. Hand to hand fighting |} women
large-scale offensive in jungles|+sged west of Chorwon on the 5
and mountains south of the delta.) west Central front below Kum-} Captain William Ilves, 48 told
French pilots reported seeing) sony on the East central front and|interpreters he came to the

numerous dead and wounded be-

j ing carried back to Communist
villages from the fighting area.
Communist rebel Vietminh

forces have launched a “al

J

aorthwest of “Punchbowl valley”
on the eastern front.

Allies were up against Commun-
ist positions of strength during the
truce talks and Reds were trying

hard to complete their buildup for
the expected Fall offensive.

United Nations pilots reported
heaviest Communist traffic behind
|the front since Red offensives last
| May. Airmen spotted 4,355 trucks
|} Tuesday and destroyed or dam-
| aged 606 of them

One hundred and seventy

! scale offensive ‘against French
| Vietnam positions situated
jungles and mountains south
the Red River delta.

An announcement said light)
Franco Vietnam forces are fight-
ing retarding action against Com-
munist rebel forces estimated at
almost a division strength ad-
,

Naniale Se as Pare rienne massed British Commonwealth and
tively northwest of Hanoi. U.S. guns from 25-pounders to

Ten battalions — about 8,000 155 mm “long toms” gave Red de-
men—of Vietriamh regulars have| ifences at the western end of the
invaded the Thai country of north-

in
of

| front their heaviest pummelling ot
the war during the night. —U.P.



west, Tonking in Indo-China,
French Army Headquarters an- age
nounced today. —UP.



| U.S. Casualties








> re. } WASHINGTON, Oct. 3
Good I rog 8S \ 1¢ Defence Department Wed-
Meg? ese Ve nesday reported a new total of
Seite 3 dpi eae ik 87,650 American battle casualties
iec x¢ a conference iy Cores crease 2
lay » groundwork of a “peacc ven ‘ re oe Ret ate eee ae
ay Br get caustic A kaa over t Cc. number reported lasi
cont “a “SUCIT) week rt tot represents cas-
Ger many eae up rd On| ualtic hos n of ir ive
y A communique sa hee ot throu last Fri-
encour progr ich
Kx Adenaue he fi tif nex aes
‘ —U.P, i U.P



EL



United States to be with his twe
brothers Hans and John who live
near Albany, New York. Aboard
the vessel with him were his
pregnant wife Alide and _ their
two daughters Eva, eight, and
Helgi, nine. The captain’s broth-
er Edward Ilves 46, and his wife
Elvine; August Raudsepp 40
and his wife Zofia and their five-
year-old son Jacob; Voldemar
Raudsepp and Eskold Kalme both
single. —U.P.



By R, H. SHACKFORD Commonwealth and Empire ties, |The party manifesto which tion of Abadan, he we sup-
opposing a_ united Europe and | Chur: hill wrote recalled nostal-; port. the 'U.N. When dispute
LONDON, Oct. 3. showing no initiative in trying to}gically the “hour of victory’) arise we take them to the U.N
Britain's decision to withdraw) deal wilh Russia. : » whe it was hoped cc-operation| That's right policy.
completely from Iran, set the| Labour party leader Clement! ‘for peace with Russia was possi- ‘We are always hearing
Stage for an unprecedented gen- | Attlee had his say at a party con-| ble clamour for a trong foreign
eral election campaign contro-|ference at Sc: arborough Monday.| ‘Even now in pite of the policy People who use that
versy over foreign policy. |e again proclaimed his party as|clouds and confusion into which, phrase live in the past Those |;
The Labour party claims to be | the party of peace and ibtatnaad tere have since fallen”, Churchill's) days have gone forever.’
the party of peace and indirectly j} those who would seek a “tough-| manifesto read “we must no
accused the Conservative party of|er” foreign policy as out of date| abandon supreme hope and Churchill ha called _ for i
old fashioned imperialism and jand out of step with the trend in! design.” | strong policy in Iran. “Phe im
“war mongering.” | world affairs. On the — othe ide Attice| pression he t rot about the
The Conservative party on the | ement ied Britair e or have to be
other hand claims it knows the Churchill’s party wife ‘ n k ke ed to clear out
ad to peace and accuses |hinted that the wartime | ilatiy t f edit fo i pl Churchill said
Labourites not only of bungling may again promise an attem; t the spring peak of the
foreign affairs generally, (citing |another meeting with Stalin teady yurse } endangered | I crisis in a statement
and Egypt as examples ) but Conservatives win. by nervous teria printed in the Con
of jeopardizing Anglo- Churchill promised it in 19 Anticipating ¢ t ( campaign booklet Tuc

ar relations weakening





Tories Know The





THURSDAY, focToRER 4, 1051
MAY RETIRE







ps

ae



*

INDIAN PRIME MINISTER) P? NDIT NEHRU (right) talks to members of a Kashmiri tribe.
has told a public meeting at mcknow that he
responsibility after the General “lections.
Presidentship but also the Prinieé Ministorship.
which is dear to Titty,

He
is thinking of working from the outside and without
This doesnot only mean that he may give up the Congress

He wishes greater freedom to enable him to do work

U.K. Gold. $ Defici ”

t Labour Party
Is $638,000. 000 : pane 4

e
Churchill
THE LABOUR Govern nent announced Sati

LONDON, Oct, 3,

The British Labour Party reiter-
iting the charge that Conse Tva-
lives have a “warmonger” tem- |
perament ehallenged Conservative
Party leader Winston CKurchili to
sey whether Britain shotld have
4one to war with Iran. The cam-
paign far-the Oetober 25 election

‘sleih

Britain’s latest gold and dollar deficit totals $638,000,000-
the largest quarterly figure in four years.

‘ a deficit is for the Mhree months ending Septem-
er 3

Labour Chaneéellor of the Ex-|
chequer Hugh Gaitskell announc-|



’ ed the figure showing the great

ADVOCATE J CA seriousness of Britain’s financial Hoa: one oy eee Soe with ar
position at a banquet in his hon-|"” Be ALITIGC
RELIEF FUND esd (i ike on Téataons 1On a Conservatives and Conserva~
: ; The ‘Treasury f@leased f ive cries of “peaee at any price’

$11,969.53 COLLECTED 1 fig eel ihg the” dean ee vimed at Labourites
The Advocate Jamaica lar position and on the re-ap-|, British Labour Foreign Secre-
Relief Fund closed yester- pearance for the first time since} ty. Herbert Morrison told a La-
day with the figure standing the end of 1949 of the dreaded} our conference at Scarborough
at $11,969.53. This repre- ‘dollar gap”. that the use of teree in Iran would
sents the efforts of the Setious Position have alienated Britam from the
people of this colony to Gaitskell told bankers thet in United States because the US.

render financial aid to those was opposed to forcible measures,

stricken by the hurricane of £ ova Gian: Pee. prs by Morrison ae *T don’t accuse
August 17. Ugaeervative shoul! make a da-}!he averake Conservative of betng
Within a week of the on whether to ask a warmonger bat’ it is their tem-
tragedy, this newspaper for a waivi uated peraniont, Pols the : background
sponsored this fund, and at | p Mise: on the e - their aa the old
once people in every walk loan . periwtist= rae ror eee
of life, led by H.E. the Gov- The loan and lend lease settte-| 1 want from Mr. Chure! is: We
on Sir Al Savage, bill totalled $4,350,000,000, | 4 say in his judgment we should
have given so ing every have gone to war with Persia?
day. due December 31. It totals $138,- Morrison's speech was a reply to

Churchill's bitter denunciation of
the Labour Government at Liver-

Now it has been closed,
and the Hon. V. C. Gale,

500,000
interest

of which

| nent
The first repayment instalment is
$87,000,000 is







M.L.C., Treasurer, desires Interest can be waived under | Pool last night for allegedly break-
to thank all those who so certain circumstances if the|ing its word in the evacuation of
readily and generously sub- British so request. The deficit} Abadan and for precipitating the
scribed. compares with a surplus of $54,-] ‘fall and decline of the British
‘ace, SEM. fa $11,754.21 100,000 in the previous quarter ee i a renee a er
vecate Co., Lid. nd a surplus of $360,000,000 i tritain’s complete withdrawal has
ey ab Bove s fit st anties ok SE, . a now become a major election issue,
aineroe! paige ad ‘ 4.08 Included in the gold figures —UP.
a , Pupils of St oo for the third quarter was $40,-
pee chee MONROE. |< Pay: 4 0000 redainte diadee Marshall!
St. Mary’s Boys’ School 4.28 tid allocated before Britain gave
§ is of rther aid ¢ > > ‘ ,
ee wpe a, up Potties aid at the end of last Attlee Broke
Sehool . 20.00 ur
St. Mary's Girls’ School pe = ii P e
Gb % “19 : is Fromise
‘elip 5. o :
Bie seat | Russia Has
i 25.00
Rad seicece $50 Whe. cae CHURCHILL
(tan ee Second Atom \ LIVERPOOL, England Oct, 3.
Canadian Bank of Commerce Winston Churchill warming up
mee, eeias arlene 98.78 ° ‘ his campaign for the October 25
M. B. 2.00 Vp oston General Election last night at-
Royal Bank of Canada tacked the Labour Government
= Y, 2. 1.00 Ts a savel ty opiate
sc. 8s 2.00 | WASHINGTON, Oct. 3. bow fe eae bw — oil crisis
Lem 5.00 || TRuesia’ ; in clun.sily and tardily.
Darey_ Scott ooo 4} ae’, Reco a cee ~— @usaking at mg Conservative
John W. Clarke 2.00 explosion in nearly two years was ; ee
Staff, Elec. Co. 13.34 ennounced by the White House on Rally, the Wartime Prime Minis-
cs Wednesday and one Congressman]‘er said Labour leader Clement
‘Fatal $11,069.53 1 said it may mean the Soviet Union} Attlee had broken his promise not
‘is working on guided missiles,jto evacuate Abadan oil fields
The terse announcement issued|wjthout first consulting Parlia-
e e lby the White House Press Secre-}ment: “{ do not remember any
Quiri1o In Spain ltary gave no details of the new/case where public men _ have
[Soviet test beyond the bare fact]broken their word so abruptly’
MADRID, Oct. 3 |jithat “another atomic bomb hasthe said.

President Quirino of the Philip-jrecently been exploded within the] Churchill called for a period of

pines will visit,on Thursday the |Soviet Union,” steady stable administration by a
Superior Council of Scientific R« Congressional leaders emphasiz-|proadly based Government, con-






search in the company of Minis-'e ive United States is still farfrent to serve the Nation's interest
ters of Education and Industry ead of Russia in the atomic rather than give party satis-
Later he will attend a city lunch-{srms’ race, but the new test shows] action , F
eon. In the afternoon Quirino will Iiussii is making ominous progress He called for a tolerant non-
motor to Toledo in the company,'They added it underscores the partisan non-doctrinaire system
of Generalissimo Franco to vis't' need for civil defence preparations! | ciiey for a considerable time.
Alcazar Cathedral and the Milis) jp the United States. His word were immediately
tary Academy. Quirino is scherl-| Representative James Van Zandt, te tod by same sources as @
uled to dine on Tharsday at E! member of the Congressional}! ery eC ast a saith é the
Pardo Palace.——-U.P. | Atomic Energy Committee said he vuarded Cait tor - YevUse yO a
had received information indicat-| wartime Coalition Government.
ping that the latest Soviet experi- eae ee os peg a
2 ¥ @ ments involved two atomic|indication that he 5 ct
Ships Collide weapons. He said one explodea;» Cabinet of Sree ere ees
successfully and the other was|'sts and Liberals but Sir Davie
ae, NEW YORK, Oct, 3. either a dud or a partial success.|Maxweit Wyfe top Tory = strate-
Military Sea Transport Service|yan Zandt said it is believed the|ist denied there was amy plar
here said that the ship which col- testing was done in the remote! for an all out Coalition. —UP
lided with a cargo boat off the) wostetinds of Siberia —U.P.



coast of England on Wednesday







was classed as a troopship but it °
was not certain. whether there Q e ! St. Kitts
were any troops aboerd. A ASKS FOR DEATH ? uak In

spokesman at the MSTS office BUENOS AIRES, Oct. 3. | (From Our Own Correspondent)
here said the chip sailed from the| The death penalty was asked | ST. KITTS, Oct. 9.
United. States.. He said further!for General Menez, accused of} A severe earthquake shock was
details were not available im-|leading last week's revolt againsthexperienced here at 10 o clock



medately. —U. Pe



President Peron: P. last night,

Way To Peace

said







but lost that election b

a

Advocate

































PRICE: FIVE CENTS

Barbados Bats
Fall 25 Short O
B.G.’s 368 Runs

S. COPPIN)

GEORGETOWN, Oct. 3

BARBADOS today made a gallant effort to reach

B.G.’s first innings score of 368, eventually
failing to do so by 25 runs. Having scored 93—2
yesterday, the batsmen added 250 today for the
remaining 8 wickets on a wicket that was still
playing perfect. Tup Barbados effort came from
Farmer who scored 73 runs in two and a quarter
hours, showing commendable courage and deter-
mination when cramp forced him .to finish the
_innings with the aid of a runner.

B.G., entering upon their second
innings, scored 5 without loss after
a single over was bowled before
the end of play and it se as
if the stage is set for a tame”
when the game ends to-morrow.

B.G.’: right arm slow offs

Fg



(From O.

Bradley Flies
Back To U.S.A.

TOKYO, Oct. 3. bowler Norman Wight
General Bradley left aerially tremely steady to-c
for Washington to-night after his} the best bag of ea
was” poor

final conference with top United] But B.G.'s catchin,

Nations Commanders, on the Ko-]| fewer than four ¢ bes fires
rean war and the stalled truce} them sitters havi ¢en_ mis:
talks. wtherwise. Barba

Bradley. Chairman of the United }oeen — considerabl

States Joint Chiefs of Staff and }had they been hel
Charles Bohlen, top State Depart-
ment expert on Russia and Com-
munism took off from Tokyo's
Haneda airport at 7.29 p.m,

General Ridgway and Vice-Ad-
ora ©. ove Joy, head of the

lied truce team and Commander
of the United States naval farces
in the Far East were at the air-
port to see them olf.

Flying with Bradley and Bohlen})' © —
was Mrs, Bradley, Bradley told '
newsmen he had heard ‘‘no late de-
velopments” from either war or
truce fronts in K- rea. ;

Bradley had just come from
conference with Hidgway, Bohlen,
Joy, Lieut.-General P. P, Weyland,
‘ommander of Far East air forees,
Major General R. R, Allen, Com-
mander of the Sixteenth Corps and
Major General Walter L. Weible,
“ommander of Japan's Logistical
‘ommuandy

U.N. Strategy

Smith a and Proverbs iT re~
sumed Barbados’ first innings that
stood at 93 for 2 yesterday. Smith
confident at once sent up the
century with a lovely cover drive
off een for four, .

On page 8

It was presumed they discussed
United Nations strategy both in} °
he event truce talks are resumed
ind should they be broken off for
wood

Ridgway is still waiting for
Communist answer to his formal
proposal last Thursday that the
suspended armistice conference be
shifted from Kaesong to Songhyon
eight miles to the southeast and
be resumed at once,

Bradley told newsmen he
and =m

in their
ceasefire

(thought both Ridgway
had “done wonderfully”
attempt to negotiate
with the Communists.

He said he also was “greatly im-
pressed with the spirit and morale
of troops of the Eighth Army’
vhich he visited at the Korean
ront Monday and Tuesday.

Altogether he and Bohlen spent
five days in the Far East,



: e “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS
Dial 3113

Day or Night

Red China Is Two
Years Old This Week

By A. FERGUSON
NEW YORK, Oct. 3.

COMMUNIST CHINA celebrates her second birthday
this week. Like mpst two-year-olds, she gets into lots of
trouble, she can't travel far under her own power and
she complains constantly.

But in the two years since Chairman Mao Tze Tung
of the Chinese Communist party stood at the Gate of
Heavenly Peace in the eapital of Peiping and proclaimed
himself ruler of 475,000,000 persons, China has changed
things worldwide.

Hardly a nation has been left
untouched by Mao’s proclama-
tion. Millions of Americans haye
been affected directly or indi-
rectly, Faraway nations such a
Fihiopia have sent to Korez
troops who probably never hear-



Hurricane In
The Atlantic :



of Mao Tze Tung until they go .
their sailing orders. MIAMI, Oct, 3.
Chinese Communist leaders re- A tropical storm that swept
ived birthday greetings from [across orida developcyt into a
il ever the world but one they ffuli hurricane in the Atlantic te-
probably valued most was from }day with winds of 95 miles an |
Sialin. Unless Stalin keeps send-fhour near the centre. | Storm |
ing gifts and eneouragement warnin, Ss were ordered up from \

Communist China is in danger of | ‘ape Hatteras to Virginia. Small

dy%g in infaney. Bad news for}-raft on the North Carolina coast |
the Western world is that there fwore told to remain in port. Grady
ppears to be no prospect of that }Norton, ehief storm forecaster at













appening any time soon Miami Weather Bureau, said that 7
No Immediate Threat itrong winds possibly up to gale i
China has her troubles but all }force were expected to lash the
ef them put together don’t bulk Jcoast but hurricane force winds
large enough to constitute an im- Pshctild pass off the shore. j
nediate threat to Mao Tze Tung’s j
Government, Damage along the lower east ;
coast was confined to small eraft
China's troubles in order of [awnings and shrubbery but in the
their urgency are: Firstly she has]}righ Lake Okeechobee farming
committed herself to war in}country an estimated 11,500 acres in
Korea and learned the costlyqof beans, tomatoes and young :
lesson that manpower alone does} potatoes were flooded.—CP) :
not make a modern army invinci-
bie, She can’t devise any me
of extricating herself from the
war without running the risk of BIG DEFENCE BILL FOR
losing face which is a serious 7
matter to Orientals ACTION BY CONGRESS
Secondly there’s opposition to 4
the Communist NG inside WASHINGTON, Oct. 3
China It is loosely organized A $57.200,000,.000 defence
but it remains a threat money ‘ill which carries a
Mao has been meeting the}modest down payment on a 14
threat with the standard Com-|wing air force is re ady fo
munist technique—he tiquidates|final action by the Senate and
opposition wherever he can find House. The huge’ Appropriation
Bilt, the largest ‘ever to hit Can-
There's no such thing as fac-| gress im a period short of all-out
tual news out of Communist}way cleared the Senate Housins
China but there are some esti-}Conference Committee l@te yes-
I; tes that 1.500.000 persons have }terday
i} il b Red It will provide working capi-
i 1 the inter »nomy ;tal for the Army, Navy and Ai
| China ; Force in the current scal ye
Landow? \ eer epviv-}/The Army and Air Force woul
‘ f the fax hich were'get little more than $20,000,000,-
distributed ur f fee eacf. under the nfer
rhere Aas been wide ;. |Committee compromise. The Navy
Chiang’ er ‘would get aim¢ $15,003,0-0 600
; U.P







Â¥

PAGE TWO

vee



Caub Calling

s® ROBERT W. URQUHART,
British Ambassador to Ven-
ezuéla is at present holidaying in



Barbados, Accompanied by one of
his daughters he flew over from
Maiquetin over the week-end by
B.W.1.A.

Sir Robert who was born i

1896 is the son of the late Robert
Urquhart, He was matried in
1925.

Before his appointment to Ven:
ezuela this year, he was H.M
Consul-General at Shanghai from
1948 to 1951.

He entéred the Levant Consilar
Service im 1920 and in 1934 wos
made Consul at Tabriz. He was
transferrdd to the Foreign Office

in 1938 Smad was appointed as
Inspector-General of Consulates
1939. .

He was seconded to the Home
Office fram 1940 to 194i and
appomted Consul-General, Tabriz
the following year. In 1943 he was
transferrdd to New Orleans, La.,
U.S.A., then re-appoinied Inspec-
tor-General of H.M, Consular
Establishment in 1945. In 1947 he
was H.M, Minister at Washing-
ton. :

Sir Robert and daughter are
guests at the Paradise Beach Club

Safe Delivery
A LETTER for this newspaper
despite its misleading address
was delivered to the editorial de-
partment yesterday. The address
was “The Editor, Barbados Adve-

eate, 34 Bridge Street, George-

town, Barbados, B.W.1.
Martinique

5 ARTINIQUE” will be the

theme of a talk given by Mr.
Val McComie when the Alliance
Fiancaise meeting takes place at
the B,itis) Council, Wakefield at
8.15 o'clock on Thursday night,
October 11,

With T.L.L.

M* G. *Bunny” Gill arrived
from Trinidad early yester-

day atlernoon by B.W.I.A. to
spend just over two months’ holi-
day in Barbados, His wife and
family who came over six weeks
before him were at Seawell to
meet hini, They are staying with
relatives at Rockley.

Mr. Gill who is a Barbadian is
with Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd., in
South Trinidad. He has been liv-
ing in Trinidad for eleven years

Here for A Month

MESS MARISSA PLUMMER

flew over from Trinidad
yesterday by B.W.LA. to join her
mother Mrs. Mercedes Plimmer
who is at present holidaying in
Barbados. Marissa is staying with
her mothe; at “Sea Gaze” Max-
wells. She-plans to be in Barbados
oe month,

She told Carib that quite a few
other Trisidadinas would be com-
ing over towards the middle of
Ocvober for a holiday. Among those
coming - 3 Rhona Bar-
¢ant and Miss . hine Gateliffe.

Miss Plimmer was a member of
the Trinidad water polo team
which rerently played against a
ladies’ water ‘polo team from

Barbados...
Meeting
yes Barbados University Wo-
men’s Club will be holding
an open meeting to-night at 8.15
o'clock at ‘the British Council
headquarters; Wakefield,

The first speaker will be Mr,
J, BD. Agricultural
Chemist at the Barbados Depart-
ment of Science and Agriculture.
His subject will be “The soils of

Barbatios,” The second speaker
will be Mr. G. C. Stevenson,
Cytogeneticist of the B.W.I

Sugar Cane Breeding Station. He
has chosen for his subject, “Sugar
Cane Varieties,”

The aim of this meeting is to
encourage’ higher education for
women in the island.

. .
Will Visit Her Son
RS. EDITH M. EMBERSON,
méther of Mr. Eric Emberson,
Branch Manager of B.W.I.A. in
Caracas, Venezuela, was a passen-
ger in the Colombie from England
yesterday morning. She is on a
visit to her son and daughter-in-
law in Caracas and will be leaving
en Saturday by B.W.1.A.
Mrs. Emberson is staying at the

& Marine Hotel.

e

v

“t .

To See Hurricane Damage
R.*=C. C. GEORGE, local
director of Barclays Bank
in the West Indies and British
Guiana with headquarters in Bar-
bados, was intransit from England
yesterddy in the S.S. Colombie
on his way to Jamaica. He was

accompanied by his wife,

Mr. ge told Carib that he
spent ree months’ holiday in
the U.K. and while there he

underwent a serious operation and
is getting on quite well.

He said that the purpose of
his visit to Jamaica is to see the
results Sof the hurricane and to
give adyice. While there, he will
probably visit the Bahamas and
Belize. .

Mr. George expects to be in
Trinidad for Christmas, He will
afterwards pay a visit to British
Guiana"before returning to Bar-
bados in February.

90 Seater Aircraft
R. RALPH A. BEARD, city
real estate agent who spent
two weeks in Canada, returned
ever the week-end by T.C.A, He
said that while in Montreal, he
had consultations with T.C.A.
Officials and they informed him
that they had on order, 90 seater

aircraft, some of which they are four months’ holiday in the
hoping to put on the Canada- United Kingdom and on the
Barbados run in the near tuture. Continent.
I i a as ee ——_— ee
SEB EBEBBBR eee

Kents ’ a
ah tN LADIES’ SPECTATOR





Social Welfare Ufticer

FTER six months’ leave in te
United Kingdom, Miss Betty
Arne, Social Weare Officer, re-

turned yesterday morning in the
Colombie.

She said that she had an
enjoyable stay and was glad to be
back. Whilg in England she
visited fifteen hospitais and saw
everyone of the Barbadian girls
who are working there. They are
all very happy.

B.C. Representative
RISLEY TUCKER,

M®* H
British

Council Representa-

tive and Mrs. Tucker, returned
from England yesterday morning
in the Cotombie after spending

four months’ holiday, They will be
in residence at “Wakefield,” White
Park Road,

Trinidad Civil Servants
NTRANSIT to Trinidad in the
Colombie yesterday morning

fiom England were Mr, Albert
Lumsden, Road Officer of the St.
Ann's and Diego Martin Road

Board and Mr. E. R. Arrindell of
the Income Tax Department, They
had both spent six months’ leave
in the United Kingdom,

To Take Up Appointment
EV. FR. ROBEX'! BULBECK
S.J,, arrived from Englana
yesterday morning in the Colembie
intransit for British Guiana wherc
he will take up an appointmer
in Georgetown,

This is Fr, Bulbeck’s first visu
to the West Indies and during his
brief stay in Barbados, he calec
on Fr. Sellier, S.J. and Fr. John
Quigley, S.J. at the Romar
Catnolic Presbytery in Jemmott’s
Lane,

Fr. Quigley who is stationed
at Beterverwagting, East Coast
Demerara, has been holidaying

here for the past three weeks, He
is due to return to Demerara on
Wednesday by B.W.I1.A.

Director of Y.W.C.A.
FTER spending two weeks.
holiday in Barbados, Mis:

Clare Sloane-Seale returned
Trinidad over the week-end bj;
B.W.IL.A. to resume her duties a:
Associate Executive Director o
the Y.W.CjA.

She was staying at ‘‘Leaton-on-
Sea,” The Stream,

Trinidad K.C.

FTER spending six months
holiday in England, Mr. G. M
O'Reilly, K.C., Mrs, O'Reilly and
their daughter Miss Pamela
O'Reilly who were intransit in the
Colombie yesterday morning, re-

turned home later in the evenin
by the same vessel.
Mrs. O'Reilly told Carib thai

England had*made great strice.
and was far from being decadent.
Miss O'Reilly is a member of
the staff of the Trinidad Publish-
ing Company of which her fathe:
is a Director . ee
Film Unit Chief
R. WILLIAM SELLERS, hea
of the Colonial Film Un
with headquarters in London, lett
for Trinidad on Monday by
B.W.LA. Mr, Sellers had brough

over the. films made by .Wes
Indian students which were
shown at Harrison College on

Friday night.

While in Barbados, he was. stay-
ing at the Marine Hotel,
Accountant In Venezuela

ETURNING to Venezuela over

the week-end by B.W.J.A.

were Mr, and Mrs, Percy Dicke:

and their little daughter, Thx

had spent two weeks’ holiday

here staying at the Ocean View
Hotel,

Mr, Dicker is an Accountant
working with the Shell Caribbean
Petroleum Company in Maracaibo

Headmistress of Queen’s

College
RS. I. RANDALL, newly
appointed headmistress of
Queen’s Collese, arrived from

England yesterday morning in the
SS. Colombie accompanied by her
two small sons Adrain and Julian.

She said that she was delighted
to get to Barbados and was looking

forward to taking up her new
duties at the earliest possible
opportunity.

Back from U.K. Holiday |

R. PAT ROACH
and Wireless, returned
Barbados yesterday morning in
the S.S. Celembie after spending

of Cable



WHITE/TAN

+ ereeeeeerie

WHITE/NAVY
WHITE/BLACK

WHITE NUBUCK...
BLACK SUEDE.

x me mm ee ee

See OEDR. 8

I a

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606

YOUR SHOE STORES



:

to

Commonwealth Supply
EST INDIAN represen juves

Wis. nding the C

minvuw earl



Supply Conterence during UU
past week found themselves in-
volved in not only lengthy busi
ness sessior but a4 pleasant rouns
of social activity. Among other
functions they attended im ih
evenings was a reception by the
Government at Lancaster Hous

Trinidad’s Albert Gomes, who has
now returned to Trinidad, one eve-
ning had just returned from busi-
ness talks in Whitehall just in
time to get ready for the Lancaster
House engagement. He had time to
say -however, that the previous
evening he had thoroughly enjoyed
a party given by the Indian offic-




ials. The following day he was
lunching with Pakistan represen-
tatives in London and the evening

of the same day was due at a re-

ception given by the Singalese.
The finale to the week was the
the reception on Friday in the

Royal Pavilion at the South Bank
Fxhibition attended bv all the
delegates from the Dominions and
the Colonies et the Supply Con-
ference.

After Six Months

ee to Barpados yes-

terday morning in the
Colombie after six months’ holi-
day in Englcad were Rev. Frank
Lawrence of the James Street
Speightstown Methodist Circult
and Mrs. Lawrence.

Rev. Lawrence who went up to
the U.K. in the interest of his
health said that he consulted a
Harley Street specialist in con-
nection with his eyes which are
still under treatment.

While in England, he spent a
great deal of his time travelling
and addressing many meetings
His wife and he were staying with
their son Ulric who is employed
at Electra House.

Rev. Lawrence went on to
Trinidad yesterday evening on his
way to Tobago as a_ missionary
deputation for ten days. He will
be staying with Rev. and Mrs
Derek Lyder, Mrs. Lawrence did
not accompany him

f SAS

1);
in

i
Rupert looks so worried and
miserable wondering what will hap-
pen to him that the two men burst
ou: laughing and the Sorcerer lifts
bin, up. ‘ Nay, methinks the little
beer has learnt his lesson and needs
oe further punishment.” he smiles.







ro

SHE LOVED IN SPITE OF
SCORN, BECAUSE

A GUN WHERE
HER HEART
SHOULD

HAVE BEEN ¢ g
BECAUSE |;

SHE ACCEPTED
SHAME AND RAN




{






i
i )
: oe

ECO



WENT Se

STEVE COCHRAN "a:

PLAZA ||

BRIDGETOWN

| CONTINUING DAILY 4.45

ee ee oe

SHOES as

' ARCOLA & WINDSOR HRANDS

&9.20—14.22
$14.24
$13.39
$13.90
$14.94

¢

DIAL 422C






top Rank Support |

ay CHAPMAN PINCHER |
ST. LOUIS, |
NEW DRUG, claimed to be| T

highly effective in the treatment! the
the
i $m in o'd people, was announc-|
t in St. Louis recéntly.
1t has bees hailed as the most)
iapo.ton. advance reported so fa
the international conference oh
8)0 coctors and scientists studying
the problems of old age. -

The drug, an amber-coloured}
liquid extraciea from cows’ liver, |
vas developed by a team of New
York doctors led by Dr. William
Collens.

Tests were cartied out on 110
patients with ostearthritis, a crip-
pling form of rheumatism.

After daily injections for a fort-.
night 84 per cent. of the patients |
showed mitked improvement, Dr.;

he two most precious letters of

commonest form of rheu-| millions of dollars—
That

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



rug Secures American Column :

DX Equals Millions

NEW YORK

to industry worth
are DX.

Government’s

alphabet

is the new



CROSSWORD

Leal |

;



eel

code rating for top priority on
scarce raw materials and finished
products. It will go only to manu-

facturers of the most vital defence ,
and atomic energy goods, and will ;

get them scarce materials.
The Government plans expan-
sion of aluminium production to
1,600,000 tons a year, more
double pre-Korea. August stech
production totalled 8,722,000 tons,
the biggest ever for the month.
All industrial production



than ;

rose |

last month five per cent. to 218)

per cent. of the 1935-9 averayue.

40,000 JOBS CUT

THE SENATE put its foot down
and bang!—40.000 civilian jobs
must be cancelled by the Defence
Department. It wanted to hire
540,000 out-of-uniform emplovee:
The Senate says the limit will bx
500,000. By law.

* by Out of America’s most vivid chapters
.©\F crime and corruption comes the stark story
of the Private Lady of a Public Enemy!

STARS OF ‘FLAMINGD ROAD MEET IN

icp]

i a

OPENING TOMORROW (rripay 5TH)
: 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. AND

Collins ciaims. Pain and swelling
of the joints were almost com-
pletely abolished for one in five
patients, he says.

Five-year-test

Most of them needed a further
injeenon every fortnight to keep

em free from pain.

The drug has been under
development for five years and
seems to have no unpleasant aite-
effects.

it is useless against rheumatoid
wrthritis, a complaint which attacks

1

BASSO S Oe ae

Acruss
DJarenhcarecd. :Â¥)
~~ ver, OUL could be. (9)
at (a
ap the engineers. (4)
Mugiciap he was tops (6)
S| for @ horse? (3)

CROWDED OUT
BRITISH YACHYTSMEN Stanicy
Smith and Charles Violet cam
ashore in New York to reap a
dollar harvest from their four-













Alte: tur a change, (5) month Atlantic crossing.

a” stvendee, io ota. cas | They originally planned to be

Cnstarted task. (3) here in July. And they found that

Ro eernaline sectors. (5) Macy’s Store, which was to have
Down + put their Nova Espero on show

ftiga ruler. (anag., ¥) had had to make room for a4

itime seems Lo put to sleep. (Â¥)
You cas get more from here. (4)
DSeics uldy be, as well as dust. (8)
From here you get @ national
embiem (9 4)

fleet. (4)

planned Italian fair.
no room for the Nova Espero.

MORALE CRASHES

Hent to the











younger people. Makes ine a snake. (8) grounded in Alaska for “morale
but it is dramatically effective anne 4 ge reasons.” Since July, 14 aircraft
s * ‘ Bu vw vu “ - " 7 . e :
n relieving severe nerve inflam- | {5 [Pisce for tapestry. 15) jhave crashed in Alaska, killing
mation often suffered by diabetics: Cadeer oO takes pen gue 45 nearly 100. Four crashes have
‘ol Y orts, 1 d ce am .werd, (3) ’ Aanaitninis said a :
big eg nna indepe So oterdayes muzzle ~ Across; | been Privateer bombers of Navy
his finding 1s pendently Reservoir; 8 Avail: | Squadron Nine.
confirmed by the Canadian diabetes ¢ 13 Bwe: 15 Photo: |T privateer is one of the
specialist, Dr. I. M. Rabinowii vows? d ler, 2 fteversion: | 3 Navy’s sturdiest planes, is used to
4 sar Neiwnd ore. 7. Vertic: avy Ss 5st . ’
oi Montreal. — |. alae B . eonera: ae 42 Wav out: 15 fly in hurricanes on weather-
we n aT : S

Unnamed

When he tried the extract on
20 severely afflicted patients
who had to take morphine re-
gularly to relieve their pain, 18

got astonishing relief, he re-
ported today.
The drug which is still un-

named, is not net available for
general use, But Dr, Collens and
his team are trying to get it into

commercial production soon.
—L.E.S.





Opening Soon
Sandy SADDLER &
Willie PEP Fight

“My Forbidden





Bud ABBOT & Lou COSTELLO in
Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap

James



Friday 2.30 — 4.45 &
$30 p.m
THE DAMNED
DON'T CRY
Joan CRAWFORD





P

DIAL 2310

i TO-DAY (ONLY)

MASON Valerie HOBSON in

A PLACE OF ONE’S OWN
SCHOOL FOR HUSBANDS

with HARe ASUS

&

Also

RAZA B'TOWN |

4.30 & 8.30 p.m.

AND

Past”



a a
Sensational Double-Bill!
Rod CAMERON in

BOSS of BOOMTOWN





Special To-day 1.30 pm





PLAZA vi 5105





OISTIN

GAIETY













PATROL SQUADRON NINE is)



THURSDAY,

arning missions No one knows

hy so man) lanes are crashing
“ une sub-Arctie colomy just across
(ae water from Siberm. ‘ne nav)
calls it “baffling.”

DREAM WORLD







OCTOBER 4, 1951



B.B.C. Radio

Programme

IVES > 4g / THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1951
e *
WIV Es" ae live = ic: Holly 11.15 am. Frogramme Paraae, 11.30
wood dream world” are responsi-|, ».° Jazz Music, 12.00 noon The News,
tie tor half the divorces, says Dr.] 12.10 p.m. News Analysis

*.. S. Church. “Every girl expects
live in luxury and raise beauti-
en who will never be ill.
fter marriage they discover hus-
ands are bald, have false teetn,
nd like to stay out at night. Kids
st do get ill. Then wives crack
p and come to me.
WAISTLINE WORRIES,
PLAGUE of Hollywood’s male
siars is fat. At one studio alone
Mario Lanza is chopping wood
Red Skelton has gone into a clinic,
Vag Johnson worries aloud about
his waistline, Walter Pidgeon just
had to have his suits let out. And
Clark Gable is dieting heavily.
TV IS A ‘RIGHT’
MILLIONS of Americans were
eprived of their “constitutional
right” to see Robinson beat Turpin
on their home TV sets, says Rep-
resentative Pat Sutton. He wants
2 law to compel promoters to allow
telecasts into homes, not just into





fal chil
4

| heatres where veovle’must pay. i

|

|
So there i:

|
|

TO-Da¥ (Only) 5 & 8.30 pm. THE GARDEN — ST: JAMES
Anna NEAGLE in TONITE (Only) 8.30
“ELIZABETH of LADYMEADE” “RIVERBOAT RHYTHM" &
Color by Technicolor “FIRST YANK in TOKYO"
with Hugh WILLIAMS ——“Triday (Only) SO Dm.
itn - - aetmemenapameie “TIMBERLAND Treason”
with Frank LEIGHTON &
Friday & Cont'g}) SAT. 9.30 “URAREING 5 ERM
$ & 8.30 p.m “Wisitul, Widow Whip ~ I _— ——
oe 2 2 p ae S.9 Nee of mAUUALs
OTE deer Clb asab at Tare ithe story of Christ and. Mary
CONQUEST’ Boomtown” Magdalene
‘ \
GLOBE !
To-day, 445 and 8.15 p.m, Last Shows \|
flying pee ae give him DANA ANDREWS
back his satchel a igerlily s ‘ + ”
past of tie way home wah fim... | MY FOOLISH HEART
“| say, it was folly good, of you to | GEO. O’BRIEN
send the Sorcerer forme,” he cries. “MARSHALL OF MESA CITY”
* But for we T might never have oy
come back!”

















of




OemECTEO BY

NT SHERMAN JERRY WALD

reer play By Mar okt Megiord oad Jerome Wedmes + Same Qy Cotes eae

VINCE

& 8.30 Pm.





The World’s Greatest

SKIN OINTMENT:



| Zam-Buk

Soothing, Healing, Antiseptic | {};
heep a box always handy tt
Me Rae a arene et














OPENING GLOBE

WITH
THE ALL STAR TALENT SHOW

> FOR GOLD-
their men had lett them unprotected!

, FORTHE SECRET-
_ the outiaws came!

TO-MORROW









A true -
story of

six women’s
amazing battle
against the
desperados!




aD "1a STL

PIONS

a | Barbara Bates « Cyril Cusack
+ Richars Hytion « Hatem Westcott + Jeanette Nolan
*romens FRANK P. ROSENBERG. Ovsts »» MICHAEL GORDON

Severn Pigy by OSC SAUL « Aduptation by VICTOR TRIVAS + From a Story by Anna Yciser ond inch Pollexten

Will our Customers please note
that our Departments will be

CLOSED FOR STOCK-TAKING

as follows:

Lumber and Hardware—TO-DAY (Wednesday) and
TOMORROW (Thursday) 3rd and 4th October

Plantation Supplies—TO-DAY (Wednesday) 3rd Oct.

Our office will be open to business as usual.

THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.









| 20

LLL LLLP LE EPEC POOP

EMP

Daily
45
Composer of the Week, 5 15 p m
Northern
MacPherson,
zine, 6.45 p.m,
” p m

Analysis, 715 p m
p.m.
Books to Read, 8.00 pm As 1 Knew
Him, 8.15 p m
Special Dispatch, 8.45 p.m Composer of
the Week, 9.00 p m. Ring Up The Cur-
tain,
J

Farm,

led
tax concessions to firms construct-

4.00—6.45 pm. — 19.76 m.



4.00 p.m. The News, 410 p.m, The

Service, 415 pm Jazz Music,
p.m. Sporting Record, 5 00 p m
BEC
Orchestra, 6.00 p.m. Sandy
615 pm. Scottish Maga-
Programme Parade, 6.55





‘today’s Sport.
7.00—1045 p.m. — 25.55 m., 31.32 m.
7.00 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. News

We See Britain, 7.30
Light Orchestra Music, 745, p m

Radio Newsree}l, 8.30 p.m,

10.00 pm The News, 10.10 p m

rom The Editorials, 10.15 p.m. On The

10.30 p.m. Barchester Towers.
C.B.C. PROGRAMME
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1951

10.05 p.m. — 10.20 p.m. — News

10 20 pm. — 10 35 p m —This Week.

11.72 Mes., 25.60 M,





REAL WOOL AGAIN
WOOL PRICE declines have
the Government to abandon
ng new mills for wonl substitutes.

OCP

IRE

LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY — 4.45 & 8.30



Louis DEBRA JEFF



JOURDAN- PAGET- CHANDLER .2°:



Opening FRIDAY 2.30 & 8.30

EMPIRE





GARY COOPER
Naxeaaee.




EDDIE ALBERT
MILLARD MITCHELL
John Mcintire: Ray Collins

ROXY

|

| TO-DAY only — 4.30 & 8.15
Lon CHANEY in - - -
“WOLF MAN”

— and —

“BLACK NARCISSUS”

FRIDAY only — 4.20 & 8.15

Brod Crawford — B. Rathbone
in

“THE BLACK CAT”
— and —

“THE CAPTIVE HEART”



TO-DAY only — 4.30 & 8.15
Bud Abbott — Lou Costello

“IN THE NAVY” with
The ANDREW Sisters

— and —

“THE CAPTIVE HEART”

LLAGO CGS OSLO,

JUST WHAT

CHILDREN
ADORE ! !

FOR BOYS

These are so made

Your Children will





*

: 4"
°SOCSSEES ECC CS BOE BB 9B OOOO OPPO POOPIE P OPO

TRICYCLES

converted into BICYCLES.

EMPIRE

SPECIAL SHOW

SATURDAY
9.30 a.m.

AT

Universal Double - - -

ABBOTT — COSTELLO

“IN THE
NAVY”

— and —

“ODD MAN
OUT ”

James Mason

ROYAL

TO-DAY only — 4.30 & 8.15
P.R.C. Action Double
Dennis O’KEEFE
in
“T-MEN” aod
“LAW OF THE LASH"”

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THURSDAY,

OCTOBER 4,

1951



Second Reading Of Fisheries Bill Passed

Debate Postponed
Until Tuesday

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY Tuesday passed the
Second Reading of a Bill to consolidate and amend the
existing legislation for the promotion of the fishing indus-
try in this island. Some members wanted to get a better
chance of perusing the Bill to be satisfied that no restric-
tions would be placed on fishermen and it was for this
reason that the Bill was not continued with, but left until

next Tuesday,
_Mr.>.F. L, Waleett said he be-
lieved everybody would welcome
the Bill. He said that any Gov-
ernment which had spent as much
money as the Government had
spent on the fishing industry
would endeavour to provide legis-

lation for the protection of the
people who worked in the in-
dustry.

One of the main recommenda-
tions of the adviser for the Secre-
tary of State for the colonies was
that there should be legislation so
that an investigation would be
made whenever a life was lost at
sea in the fishing industry.

No Investigation

In an ordinary ease, when a man
died, an enquiry was set up, but
when a fisherman was missing, no
investigation was carried out, The
other members of the fishing fleet
or boat were not required to give
any statement, That was net good
enough in the twentieth century.

In the Objects and Reasons of
the Bill is stated;

Clauses 3 and 11 of the Bill pro-
vide respectively for the keeping
of Registers of fishing and of li-
censes issued to fishermen.

Clause 4 provides for the appli-
cation for registration by the own-
er, and for the inspection of fishing
boats by the Fishery Officer, or an
inspector and the issue of certifi-
cates of registration'on payment
of a fee of one dollar, while clause
5 makes provision for the issue of
a new certificate on the sale or
transfer of a fishing boat.

Clause 6 provides that no fishing
boat shall be put to sea unless in-
spected and registered and Clause
7 gives the Fishery Officer or an
inspector powers of _ inspection
without notice and of cancelling
the certificate of registration if a
fishing boat is found to be unfit
for purposes of fishing.

An appeal lies from the decision
of the Fishery Officer to the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee
whose decision shall be final.

Clause 9 requires all persons de-
sirous of exercising the trade or
calling of a fisherman to obtain a
license on payment of a fee of
twenty-four cents—the licensing
year to start on the first October
in each year,—and clause 12 re-
quires that each fishing boat shall
have a registered skipper.

Clauses 14 and 15 re-enact the
provisions of the Defence (Fishing
Boat Loan) Regulations, 1942, and
clause 16 provides for the making
of regulations.

Clause 18 requires the Police
Magistrate of a parish in or near
which a_ fishing boat casualty
occurs, to hold an inquiry and
clause 19 provides for the sum-
moning of such witness as the Po-
lice Magistrate may think fit.

When the Police Magistrate is
holding an enquiry under clause
18, he may, under the provisions

Worthy of Support

Mr. W. W. Reece (E) said that
everything should be done for the
fishing industry in Barbados and
anyone should support a Bill which
was with a view to helping the in-
dustry.

It was a good provision to cause
every fishing boat to be expected
to make sure it was sea-worthy,
but when they made it imperative
for every fisherman to have a li-
cence, he thought they were going
too far.

“It is wrong,” he said, “to sug-
gest that a fisherman should be re-
stricted in any way.”

Reduced Profits
Mr. O. T. Allder ts it
ting in a clause whic

for licences was reduc th@ pro-
fits of fishermen. The was

not at all hucyative.

“This Clause would hamper
many an innocent man from catch-
ing a fish along the wharfside to
appease his hunger as there would
be the possibility of going before
the Police Magistrate,” he said.

As far as St. Andrew, St. John,
St. Philip and St. Lucy were con-
cerned, it was difficult to send in
a notification of a change in skip-
per within the few days stipulated
that the notification should be sent
in. That would mean that a fish-
erman would have to keep his boat
on the beach without going out.

He said it was not needed to
safeguard a fisherman from going
out in a boat which was not sea-
worthy. It was the natural ‘in-
stinct of human nature to safe-
guard himself.

“It would be better for the in-
dustry,’ he said, “if Government
bought some large sehooners in
which fishermen could go further
afield and bring in larger weekly
supplies.”

Agrees to Postponement

Mr. F, L. Walcott said there was
no fee for registering a boat. There
was no restriction clause in the Bill
and members would notice that
when they got a little more time to
go through the Bill. For that rea-
son he was willing to allow the Bill
to be postponed until the follow-
ing Tuesday.

No one would expect a Police
Magistrate to suspend a fisherman
unless he had pe reasons for
so doing, he said.

“In Barbados we mak® provis-
ions for fishermen on a_ higher
scale than is done in other West
Indian islands and it was not reas-
onable to say that the same Gov-
ernment which provided the best

rovision would-try to» ereate a
hardship on the fishermen by
naming restrictions.

Mr. L. E. Smith said it was good
to stress that fishermen should go
out in sea-worthy boats.

The second reading was passed.





BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



IN THE LEGISLATURE

COUNCIL

The Legislative Council met at

+ 200 p.m. Tuesday
The Hon'ble the Colenial Secre-
tary laid the fellowing Messages:
No. 39/1951 Dissolution of the
Legisiative Session 1948-51 and the
holding of the General’ Election.

No. 34/1951 Regarding a Meme.
randum of Agreement dated the
18th ef September, 195), between
the Sugar Producers’ Federation of
Barbados and the Barbados Work-
ers’ Union.

The following documents were
also laid:

Memorandum of Agreement
dated the 13th of September, 1951,
between the Sugar Producers’
Federation ef Barbados and the
Sarbades Workers’ Union regard-
ing certain prepesals concerning
the finances of the Sugar Indus-
try of Barbados.

Report of the Commission
appointed by His Excellemey The
Gevernor to enquire inte and
report upon the establishment of

® the Princess Alice Playing Field
and other matters connected
therewith, si}

The Public OfMicers Lean and
Travelling Allowances (Amend-
ment) Regulations, 1951.

The Travelling Allewance
(Amendment) Regulations, 1951.

Annual Report of the Depart-



mont of Sconce and Agriculture
for the year 1940-50

The Council concurred in the
following:

A Resolution to place the sum
of $40,090 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Exeeutive Committee
to supplement the Estimates, 1951—
e@, Part I, Current, as shown im
the Supplementary
Ii, Ne. 2, whieh form the
Schedule to the Resolution.

Resolution te place the sum of
$870 at the disposal of the Gev-
ernor-in-Executive Committee to
suppleâ„¢ent the Estimates, 1951-~
ot, Part I, Current, as shown in
the Supplementary Estimates,
195t—82, No. M4, which form the
Schedule to the Resolution.

The Council passed;

A Bill to amend the Government
Scholarships and Exhibitions Act,
49

Reply to His Excellency the
“overnor’s Message Ne. 28/1951
regarding the Establishment of @
Club and Ce in Lenden for
West Indian Students.

Bill to amend the Saint Lucy's
(Barbades) Lean Act 1060
(1950-6).

Estimates,



The Council referred to a Select
Committee the Sill to amend the
Employment of women, Young
Persons, and Children Act, 1988,

The Council postponed;

Bill intituled An Act te make
provision for the protection of

wages of workers.

Resolution to approve of the
compulsory acquisition by the
Governor-in-Executive Committes
of all that certain parce! of land
(Part ef the tenantry lands of «#
Place called Bosvigo) containing
by estimation 13.870 sq. ft... fer
the purpose of establishing a dis
trict market.

The Council adjourned sine die.

HOUSE

When the House of Assembly
met Tuesday, Mr. Adams laid the
following papers:

The Public Officers’
Travelling Allowances





Loan and
‘Ameond-

ment) Regulations, 1951.
Travelling Allowance
1951.

The
(Amendment) Regulations,

Memorandum of
concerning proposals
the Sugar Industry of this Colony.

A Message from His Excellency
the Governor to the House re-
garding the prorogation, dissolu-
tien and re-opening of the
Legislature.



Another Message regarding «
Memorandum of Agreement dated
the i8th September, 1951.

Annual Report of the Depart-
ment of Science and Agriculture.

Mr. Adams presented « petition
from the Highways Commissioners
of St. Joseph and St. John asking
that the House pass a Bill author-
ising them te tmerease the salary
ef their respective Inspector of
Highways.

Mr. BE. K. Walcott presented @
petition from the Vestry of St
James asking the Howse to pass
a Bill authorising them to borrow
$4,320 to be used in replacing the



reef ef the chancel of the parish
church.

Mr. Adams gave notice of the
following:

Resolution to place the sum of
$370,000 at the disposal of the
Governer-in-Executive Committee

to supplement the Estimates,
i9vi—se, Part 1, Current, as
shown in the Supplementary

Estimates 1951—52, No. 2, which
form the Schedule to the Resolu-
tien.

Resolution to place the sum of
$16,380 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates 195)
ot, Part 1, Current, as shown in
the Supplementary Estimates
951-32, No. 27 which form the
Schedule to the Resolution.

Resolution to place the sum of
$300 «at the dispesal of the
Gevernor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates
1961-62, Part 1, Current, as shown
in Supplementary Estimates 1\1-—
52, No. 28 whieh form the Schedule
to the Resolution,

Resolution to place the sum of
$26,000 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Exceutive Committee

te supplement the Fatimates
D2, Part I, Current, as shown
in Swpplementary Estimates, 1951—
52, N6. 28 which form the Schedule
to the Resolution

Resolution te pay with effect
from the léth day ef June, 1951,
a eost of living allowance to
oMicers employed under Colenial
Development and Welfare
Schemes at the rates, and subject
te the terms and conditions set
out in the Schedule >

Resolution to pay with effect
from the With of Jume 1951, a cost
of living allowance to officers in
the full time service of the Savings
Bavk who receive their salaries
from the funds ef the Bank
and officers whe retired from
the, full time service of the Bank
at any time between the 6th day
of June, 1951, and the date of
the passing of this Resolution in
circumstances rendering them
eligible for the grant of a pension
or gratuity,

A Bill intituled an Act to amend
the Goverament Scholarships and
Exhibitions Act, 149.

This Bill was tater dealt with
« Passed,

he House agreed to the amend-
ment of the Legislative Ceuneil
to the Bill to provide fer the in-
stitution ef «a Public Servict
a aud the amendment,
to the il te emoourage the es-
tablishment and development of
new Industries, ete.

The amendments in beth
stances were trivial.

in-

The House ‘passed: A Resolution
to make it lawful for the
Gevernor-in-Exeeutive Committee
to lease to the Vestry of the
parish of St. George a parcel of
land formerly part of Carmichael
Plantation, situated at Ellerton in
St, George and centaining about
five acres, two reeds, for the
purpose of extablishing a playing
field.

A Bill to amend the Old Age
Pension Act, 1997

A Bill to amend
Health Act, 1908.

A Bill to amend the Package
Tax Act, 14,

A Bill to amend the Trade Act
ite

A Bill to authorise the Com:
missioners of Highways of St
Philip to increase rates of pay and
travelling allows: s to Inspector
pnd Assistant In or of High-
wayr of the said parish.

the Public





A BI to authorise the Vestry
of the parish of Christ Church to
raise a loan not exceeding $7,200,

The House passed the second
reading of a Bill to encourate thy
fishing Indtstry in the island,

The House adjourned until
Tuesday next, In moving the
adijournmept Mr. Adams told

members to come prepared to deal
with the matter of the Sugar
Agreement.



Fees Of Pension Claims

Committee

» Mr, W. A. Crawford (C) sugges-
ted to the Government before the
House of Assembly passed an Act
to amend the Old Age Pension Act,
1937, Tuesday, that pension should
be sent to the pensioners. He
said it was a dreary, weary, hard
time the old people had, trudging
many miles to get their pension,
Other members and he said that
the age at which people were
eligible for pensions should be
decreased,



is to increase the fees payable to
each member of the Pension
Claims Committee from $1.20 to
$2.40 for attendance at each meet-
ing of the Committee.

Speaking on the Bill, Mr. O, T.
Allder said he noticed that it was
proposed to increase the fees of
members attending the committee
by 100 per cent., but though he
had expected to see some revis-
ion of the old age pension rate,
he had seen none, If the mem-

Increased

The object of the pill passed member at the moment, in Trini-

dad it was 65.
The

three years.

ing a further cost af

bonus to Government

week,” he said.

Mr. J. &, ‘I. Brancker (©) said

present pension of 5/- a
week had been fixed for neacly
Since then the cost
pf living had risen considerably
“We are now om the verge of giv-
living
servants,
With things as they are, the pen-
sion should be at least 10/- per



EE,

W.1. Student
Centre |
Approved —

By Legislative Council

Ihe Legislative Council Tues-
day passed an Address in reply to)
the Governor’s Message relating to,
the establishment in London of a)
centre for West Indian students in|

the United Kingdom. | Bill

ihe Governor’s Message reads:

His Excellency the Governor has}
the honour to inform the Honour-
able the Legislative Council that
the Secretary of State for the
Colonies is sponsoring an appli-
cation by the West Indian Stu-
dents’ Union for financial support
from British West Indian Col-
onies for the establishment in
Londen of a non-residential club
and centre for students from the
Caripbean area. In his despatch
the Secretary of State has pointed
out that the West Indian Students’
Union has the support of the ma-
jority of the 1,200 West Indian
Students now in the United King-
dom, af whom more than 600 are
in London. It has been represented
by the Executive Committee of
the Union that besides providing
a centre which West Indians could
look upon as their own to help
them foster healthy social activi-
ties, the proposed chub would offer
facilities where, apart from West
Indian students meeting cach
other, they could return the hos-
pitality which they have received
from friends in the United King-
dom and could meet people from
the West Indies and elsewhere,

According to tentative = esti-
mates, it is expected that the ini-
tial Capital Expenditure for ac-
quiring a property and for con-
version and adaptations would
amount to between $48,000
(£10,000) and $72,000 (£15,000)
aud that the deficit on maintenance
would prabably be $9,600 ( £2,000)
~~$14,400 (£3,000) per annum. Ip
respect of maintenance, the stu-
dents themselves would be ex-
pected to contribute by means of
membership dues, and the man-
agement would be expected to



seek ways and means of raising|*

revenue, It is not anticipated,
however, that the establishment
could be completely self-support-
ing. The Secretary of State is also
giving consideration to a proposal
that West Indian business inter-
ests might be willing to make
financial contributions to the es-

tablishment of the Club and
Centre.
At this stage, however, the

Secretary of State wishes to learn
whether West Indian Governments
would agree in inciple to the
establishment in ndon of such
a club for West Indian students,
and if so whether they “would
new give sympathetic considera-
tion to contributing towards cap-
ital expenditure and maintenance,
possibly on a basis proportional to
the number of students from each

Colony.” On this “Student basis”
the Barbados contribution towards
the capital cost would be in the
region of $5,500 and thet towards




















territory at present in the United
Kingdom and having regard to the
general financial position of each



Council Consider

The Legislative Council Tues-
day began consideration of and
postponed a Bill to amend the
Employment of Women and

Young Persons and Children Act,
1938.

This Bill on the suggestion of
Hon'ble G. B. Evelyn was refer-
ved to a Select Committee: which
comprised Hon’bles G. B. Evelyn,
J. Mahon, Dr. A. S. Cato ana
K. R. Hunte.

Tne objects and reasons of the
read:—.

This Bill seeks to amend the

Employment of Women, Young
Persons and Children Act, 1934,
to implement the terms of the

Conventions relating to the Night
Work of Young Persons and the
Night Work of Women in Indus-
try. It extends the definition of
“Young Persons” to include per-
sons up to the age of eighteen
years and substitutes the Con-
ventions as amended and adopted
at the 3ist Session of the Inter-
national Labour Conference in
1948 for the 1919 Conventions set
out in Parts Il and IIl of the
Schedule to the Prineipal Act,
The amendment to the Night
Work of Women Conventions pro-
vides a more flexible definition
for “night,” so as to allow for
working hours to be fixed which
will be preferable from the point
of view of the workers and at the
same time will be consistent with
the terms of the Convention,



>



PAGE THREE

LORRIES
COLLIDE

Shortly after 10. 15 p.m. yester-



day on Baxters Road the motor
lorry X—576 owned by S. FE. Cole
& Co., Ltd., and driven by Beres-
ford Parris of Maxwell,. Christ
Church was involved i. an.acel-
dent with the motor lorry “M—1}21
owned by A. Bryan of Roebuck
Street, and driven by A. Black-
man.

The radiator of the lorry X—576
was damaged.

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the p bers of the Committee deserved that it would be as well if it were On 1 Loox

of clause 20 enquire into any T d il ar theveaec. (tne old tage er os i @ page SMARTS
aa on atenc i . A m dm r é ase, > people were realised that a large number of ;

Le eos eabear en nogneenrs en ent oO Juv enl e also entitled to an increase in people in Barbados favoured the How. J. D. Chandler AlWwaye
; ania abel ? f the rise in the cost of reduction of the age to 64. use Pluto.

of investigation against the skip- ree ss ? te ait ,

per or any member of the crew as Offenders Rules pprove pedi ees ine. last time an in- eae he fase = eed — W eleonied Back

, i any w ful act , a . pointed out, a wou COs a 4

ar into any wrongful act or He said he noticed some regu- £50,000 or £60,000 more, the Hon'ble R. Challenor on behalf ae



of other members of the Council,
welcomed back the President

In enquiring into such charge . Major A. R. Foster, Superinten- dren were spoken to by the Officer jations to give increase to other large number of people would
and himself no more complaints

the Police Magistrate shall_ apply
the Steering and Sailing (Fishing
Boat) Rules set out in the First
Schedule to the Bill and on con-
viction, the licence of the skipper
or member of the crew may be
suspended for such time as the
Police Magistrate may think fit.

Clause 21 makes it an offence
punishable by fine or imprison-
ment for a fisherman whose license
has been suspended, to take out or
to be in any fishing boat.

Clause 22 requires the skipper
or person in charge of a fishing
boat which collides with another
to render such assistance as is
practicable to the other beat and
if the skipper or person in charge
fails to comply with the provisions
of this clause, without reasonable
cause for such failure, he shall be
guilty of a misdemeanour.

The Bill repeals subsection (1)
of section 18 of the Harbour and
Shipping Master Act, 1907, and the

Fishing Industry Control Aet,
1947,
Should Go to Select
Committee

Mr. B, D. Mottley said that for
years in Barbados fishermen or
persons engaged in the fishing in-
dustry had pursued that. business
unmolested by Government, Then,
suddenly the Bill was being
brought in which a man would be
charged a dollar to get a licence
for the purpose of fishing. The
definition of a fishing boat as set
out in the Bill meant anything
that eaught fish for gain and there
would be some hardship too on
those who might go out in a small
rig to catch a little.

He moved that the Bill be sent
to to a Select Committee.

Mr, D. D. Garner (C) seconded
the motion for sending the Bill to
a Select Committee. He said he
thought that before they brought
in that Act which called on the
fishermen to buy ‘licences, they
should first build sheds on the
beaches where the fishermen could
sell their fish. c

Mr. F. L. Walcott on a point of
explanation challenged any Hon-
curable member to show him
where in Section 4 of the Bill there
was a charge. The Objects and

dent of Glendairy Prison, is in
agreement with the new Juvenile
Offenders (Amendment) Rules,
1951, No. 2, which came into op-
eration from July 5, 1951, These
rules previde that where any
person up to the age of 16 years
is being charged before any Court
with an offence, the complainant
must, before lodging the complaint
with the clerk of the Court, notify
the Probatios Officer of the nature
of the charge and furnish him
with such other particulars c\ the
case as may be required,

The rules have the force of law,
and any ane Vailirig to observe the
requirements of the rules makes
himself liable, on the complaint of
the Probation Officer, to a fine
not exceeding twenty dollars.

“These rules will prevent many
people from dragging little chil-
dren inte the courts,” Major Foster
said.

He said that in some cases little
children may be playing when one
injures the other. The annoyed
mpther of the injured boy or girl
brings a case against the other
unfortunate child. In such a case,
the Probation Officer could go into
the matter and very often he can
settle it before it goes to the
Court.

Degradation

He said that the fine of $20 is
a means of enforcing these rules
which “save a lot of unnecessary
degredation, especially to the
children.” '

Mr. John Beckles, who has been
connected with child welfare for
many years, told the Advyoeate
that he too was in favour with the
new Juvenile Offenders (Amend-
ment) Rules, but in his opinion it
was not fair to impose a fine of
$20 on the person, who on the first®
occasion broke these rules,

He said that on the first occa-
sion the person should be caution-
ed and the law explained to him.
If he committed a second offence
of the same nature he then had
no excuse, ’

On many occasions, said Mr.
Beckles, he had taken the Proba-

Reasons, he said, was not part ofF:ion Officer to the homes of

the Bill.

unruly children. After the chil-





















A beautiful girl callec
alene in
she deear

her to-mad







3
———,
o>
Melinda lived
mali cottage. For 3 nights
idsome Prince asked




One day, who should knock on her door
but the Prince. “I must invite him to
dine,” thought Melinda, “but on what?”
Then she remembered Royal Pudding.

were heard.

“There was once a very rud@
boy who was in the habit of in-
terfering with butchers in the
Publie Market. I spoke to the boy
and also got the Probation Officer
to talk to him. Now, he is never
seen in the market.”

Beaten With Stick

Mr. BecKies said wnas on several
occasions the parents, and not the
coudren, are guilty. The parents
speak indecent language in the
presence of the children, When
ine children repeat the words they
are brutalised py the parents, The
children are beaten with a stick
or any weaggn that is nearby. “If
you investigate the cases you will
most likely find that the parents
are to blame,” he said,

He said that once a boy from
Cook’s Alley refused to go to
school. The parents came to him.
He spoke to the boy and after-

ewards asked the parents to allow

the boy to stay with neighbours.
“The boy is at present with neigh-
bours and is doing well at school,”

Sgt. Major C. F. Torrezao, Chief
S.P.CA. Inspector of British Gui-
ana, said that he is in agreement
with the Amendment Rules but
“prevention is better than cure.”

Much, he said, depends on how
ihe children are trained and
brought up in their homes. The
parents should try to train their
children in such a way as to make
them worthwhile citizens.

“If parents would pay attention
to the training af their children,
there would be no need for the
Probation Officer,” he said.

A Police official said that the
Amendment Rules, i951, No, 2 was
an excellent thing. “Instead of
bringing children to the court on
trivial offences, the Probation
Cfficer should make enquiries and
only those which merit the atten-
tion of the court should be brought
there,” he said. “This is done in
other countries.”

He did not think that the age
of 16 was too high as some might
think, he said. “Some boys and
nirls may look like women and
men but they still have the mind
of a child.”



When she served the Royal Pudding,
the Prince cried, “Truly a Royal treat.

In fact he was so pleased that her dream
came true and he married her









pensioners of the Government and
he was hoping that Government
consider increasing the amount to
othervold age pensioners.

Sometime ago, some promise
was made to consider blind per-
sons and to make it possible for
them to enjoy the benefits of the
scheme at an earlier period than
was provided under the Old Age
Act. He had not heard of any
change and he hoped Government
did not forget that.

Worth Considering

Mr. E. DBD. Mottley (E) said that
the sentiments expressed by the
last speaker might appear pre-
mature at that stage, but he
thought they were worthwhilc
considering.

“What amendment I would like
to see made to this Act,” he said,
“is to allow the people of 65 to
qualify.”

It might not be very popular
if some people had to contribute

more taxation, b: felt that i!
people in the rvice and
those who wor ‘generally for

Government, could . F@sign at 50
and 55, so much more sooner
should those who toiled for years
in the fields get old age pension.

He had heard it mentioned
sotto voce that’ it would mean an
additional £50,000 to, £60,000
but he would say that though it
meant that, the decrease in the
qualifying age should still be
made. The money would be spent
in a deserving cause,

Dr. Cummins (L) mentioned a
this stage that Government was
making examinations with a view
to increasing the old age pension.

Should Be Mailed

Mr. W. A. Crawford (©) said
that he thought that anyone who
had seen the distressing condition
of old age pensioners who had to
walk to the payment office to re-
ceive their small pension would
agree that the pension should be
mailed to the homes of pen-
sioners.

With regard to the qualifying
age, as he had said before, 68 was
too high. As far as he could re-

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still be satisfied.

If many were not so shamelessly
employers,
go into a run

underpaid by their
they would not
down condition so quickly.

He agreed with the

for it, a

idea of
sending the money as sometimes
an old person was not able to go
having to send for it,
was by that sixpence poorer as

Hlon’ble J, D, Chandler to the
Couneil at Tuesday's meeting.

The President who went up to
the United Kingdom as a represen-
tative of the Legislature to attend
the Festival of Britain was a guest
of the British Government for
three weeks. He afterwards spent
a holiday in England.

The President thanked

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PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS Sap ADVOCATE

fn a yyy 1)

Printed by the Advocate Co,, L'4., Broad St, Bridgetows



Thursday, October 4, 1951

SCHOLARSHIPS

BOTH
agreed to an amendment of the Act gov-
erning the award of Barbados Scholarships
and Exhibitions in order to grant all five
scholarships to boys instead of retaining
one for girls alone.

The amendment was subjected to a most
critical analysis although there was no
strenuous opposition. Any objection which
was raised was in an effort to make it cer-
tain that the, Government had not created
a dangerous precedent which might in
future adversely affect the award of these
scholarships.

As was pointed out by the Colonial Sec-
retary in the Legislative Council an
awkward predicament has arisen. It has
now happened that five boys have quali-
fied for scholarships and the number lim-
ited to boys are four. Two of the boys who
have so qualified took classics and have
done equally well; the examiners felt it
difficult to decide on the winner in this
section and so the tie remained.

As if to aggravate this position, the
examiners report states that no girl quali-
fied for scholarship.





Houses of the Legislature have

It Was geferally felt that as no girl had
qualified and as there were five eligible
boys, it would be well to award the five
scholarships to boys. It was found that the
Act specifically provided that one of these
scholarships must be awarded to a female.

The alternative to a non-award in this
section would be that the scholarship
would lapse and this was regarded as most
undesirable. It was then suggested that the
only remedy lay in an amendment to the
Act. Here it was that another difficulty
presented itself. If the act was permanently
amended then it would mean shutting out
the girls for whose benefit this section was
specifically inserted. It might be that an
act could have been passed providing that
for the year 1951 the scholarships should be
awarded to boys alone. Each amendment
had its peculiar’ merit. The insertion of the
proviso that in the event of no girl quali-
fying as has happened, the fifth scholar-
ship should be awarded to a boy might well
be supported by another alternative pro-
viding that!im the event of no boy qualify-
ing all the scholarships should be awarded
to girls, This point was raised in the Coun-
ceil.
| The objection that the scholarship should
not be awarded as no girl had qualified and
should be allowed to lapse, met with no
support.

The amendment which has now been
accepted does not mean that there will be
any change-in the principle of awarding
the scholarships. There will always be four
scholarships principally provided for four
boys and the fifth for girls; but it will be
convenient im future, if no girl qualifies as
has occurred this year, for the five scholar-
ships to be awarded to five boys.

The public will be generally satisfied
with the result inasmuch as it is now known
that one of the boys involved has also been
awarded an exhibition to the University
College of the West Indies. If he is given a
Barbados Scholarship the exhibition can
be awarded to another pupil. No harm will
have been done and another Barbadian will
have an opportunity to get university train-
ing. If the scholarship had been allowed to
lapse there would have been one less.

For the satisfaction of the more mate-
rial minded the arrangement has given the
maximum result and has not involved the
Government in any greater expenditure
than would normally have been spent if
the award had been in consonance with the
original provisions of the Act.



BUSTAMANTE?

LONDON, Sept. 27.

A GOOD deal of comment will no doubt
be raised by the publication within the
last week or so of the Penguin Special,
entitled “Attitude to Africa”, to whith the
contributors are W. Arthur Lewis, Michael
Scott, Martin Wight and Colin Legum. In
an early chapter, which was not written
by Lewis, but to which, it is stated, he has
subscribed agreement in respect of the
general argument, comment is made on
nationalists who “grow irresponsible and
when at last they have won power, do not
know how to use it constructively.”

The authors continue: “But if they are
made to Yovern and to cope with the real
problems of their countries, they will he
sobered by the challenge. And if they are
not, it will not be long before their peoples
discover their hollow incompetence, as is
happening to Bustamante in Jamaica.”

The hon. D. B. Sangster of Jamaica, now
in London, it connection with the Com-
monwealth Supply talks, takes exception
to this passage in the book. He said : “Bus-
tamante is one of the greatest men the
West Indies has produced. He has done
for the West Indies what will never be
done by any West Indian in this century.
He has revived in West Indians the desire
to live.” “Itis easy to criticise Busta from
afar’, he continued, “but when you work
with him as I have done, you realise his
efficiency and shrewdness as a politician.
As a Labour leader, Busta ranks among
the world’s best.”

BA

RBADOS ADVOCATE

~~

oe a — —

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1951



“Princess Alice Playing Field.”

The report addressed to the
Governor, Sir Alfre:'! Savage reads:
Your Excellency,

Under the provisions of the
Commissions of Enquiry Act, 1908,

of Barbados, a Commission was
issued on the 3Cth June, 1951, by
Your Excellency’s Deputy in

Executive Committee, whereby I
was appointed sole Commissioner
and authorised to investigate cer-
tain matters connected with the



nn een acca ncaa achat panelist ait ec: linithpseacntancigemcassitis

establishment of the ‘Princess
Alice Playing Field”. My terms of
reference were to enquire

“Into the establishment of the

“Princess Alice Playing Field,”

the conduct and management

exercised by the Vestry of the
parish of Saint Michael in con-
nection therewith and the ex-
penditure of moneys granted by
the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee from the Labour Welfare

Fund for the purpose of estab-

lishing such playing field and the

purchase and removal of certain
buildings from the Seawell Air-
port to the said playing field and
the erection and disposal of such
buildings,”

and to report thereon.

2. The Enquiry was commenced
on Monday the 2nd July, 1951,
when I was welcomed by the
Acting Attorney General, the
Honourable F. E. Field. I replied
to this welcome and then stated
that the procedure which I pro-
posed to follow was that normally
adopted in a Court of Law except
that ithe strict rules of evidence
would not be observed. I invited
persons who wanted to give evi-
dence to communicate with the
Secretary. All sessions were open
to the public and were held in the
Legislative Council Chamber at
the Public Buildings in Bridge-
town on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th,
7th, and 9th days of ‘uly, 1951. It
was not found necessary to hold
anypart of the Enquiry in private.
During the last four days there
were fairly large attendances of
the public. The Acting Attorney
General appeared before the Com-
mission, placed the services of the
law officers at its disposal, con-
ducted the examination of wit-
nesses and greatly assisted the
Commission in eliciting the facts.
A transcript of his opening re-
marks appears in Appendix 1.
E. K. Walcott, Esq., K.C., appeared
on behalf of Mr. H. A. Tudor, who
had been Churchwarden of the
St. Yichael’s Vestry and Chair-
man of the St. Michael’s Playing
Fields, Committee in the years 1949
and 1950, when the Playing Field
was being established and the
pavilion was being erected.

Mr. E. D. Mottley, M.C.P., was
permitted, at the request of the
Vestry, to -represent the St.
Michael’s Vestry, of which body
he is a member, and to examine
and cross-examine witnesses and
to address the Commission on. be-~
half of the Vestry.

33 Witnesses

3. Notices were published » in
the Press inviting persons who.
could assist the Commission by
giving any information germane to
the matters under enquiry to send
to the Secretary a short note con-
taining the substance of this in-
formation, Thirty-three witnesses
were examined, a list of these wit-
nesses will be found in Appendix
II. In addition, the Commission
had the advantage of reading
certain official files and cor-
respondence, and memoranda by
the Social Welfare Officer relating
to the Playing Field; minutes of
meetings of the St, Michael's
Vestry and the minutes of the
Playing Fields Committee. All
information sought from official

sources was readily supplied, The *

Commissioner, accompanied by



the

It will be published every day until completed.

mittee, and that seven sites had
been selected (see Appendix IV).
Among these was the site known
as the “Reef Grounds” (sub-
sequently renamed the “Princess
Alice Playing Field”. This land
is situated about one mile from
the Public Buildings in Bridge-
town, and ts approwtmately 8
acres in area, It is stated to be
the property of the Government
of Barbados. A great deal of it is
reclaimed land, and it is partly
bounded by the sea. In the letter
of the 18th June, 1949, to whiah
reference has been made. the
cost of erecting buildings, etc., on
the “Reef Grounds” was estim-
ated by the Vestry ‘at $6,720.00
and the estimated cost of levelling
the land at $3A00.00. The Clerk
of the Vestry wrote “It is felt by
the Vestry that the estimated cost
of buildings and also that of
levelling the land is liberal. and
the actual expenditure should not
exeeed the amounts stated.”

Reef Grounds
6. On the 29th August,

the Financial Secretary
from the Colonial
Office, to the Clerk
Michael’s Vestry (see Appendix
V) and informed him that the
Governor-in-Executive | Commit-
tee had approved that action
should proceed immediately with
regard to the “Reef Grounds”,

1949,
wrote,
Secretary’s
of the St.

and that expenditure might be
incurred in connection therewith
in accordance with estimates
which were to be agreed with
the Social Welfare Officer, who
would be responsible for the
direct administration of the

grants on behalf of Government,
and that in the meantime a pay-
ment of $5,000.00 had been
approved on account of work on
this site. In the last paragraph

of his letter, the Financial Secre- fhis gentleman certainly had no, ago, Sir Norman Birkett figured promine

tary i stated “On the general
question of grants from the
Labour Welfare Fund, I am to

SIR CLEMENT MALONE

report of Commissioner.

the Acting Financial Secretary, the inform you that these are made
Clerk of the St. Michael's Vestry, on the understanding that expen-
the Secretary of the Commission diture will only be incurred in
and others paid a visit to the accordance with the detailed
“Princess Alice Playing Field” estimates which are agreed with
and examined the pavilion which the Social Welfare Officer, and
had been erected there. that Vestries will on the comple-
The Establishment of the “Princess tion of the work, or at appropri-
ate intervals, furnish audited

Alice Playing Field.” accounts of expenditure of all

4. The Government of the moneys received from the Fund.”
United Kingdom has for some The receipt of this letter was
time past purchased the sugar! acknowledged by the Clerk of the
produced in Barbados at a price St.‘ Michael's Vestry on the 2ist
fixed by agreement, and it has September, 1949. After further
been stipulated that a part of the correspondence a sum of $5,000.00
price so paid must be utilized on on account of the grant to be
labour welfare. Payments in pur- made from the Labour Welfare
suance of this stipulation have Fund was paid to the Vestry. The
been made to the Government of establishment of the . “Reef
Barbados and a fund has been Grounds” as one of the Playing
created known as the “Labour s in the St. Michael's parish,
Welfare Fund”, which is_con- the terms upon which a grant
trolled by the Governor-in-Exec- ww, be made from the Labour
utive Committee. By regulation 2

of the Labour Welfare

und, erecting ili z
(Playing Fields) —_ Regulations, incidentals wete this exttled Rel
1949, of Barbados, “The Gov- “The best laid schemes O’mice
ernor-in-Executive Committee

and men
Gang aft a-gley.”
and it will be seen later that al-
though levelling and preparation of
the grounds and roads (exclusive
of the amount spent on fencing)
cost $1,255.28 less than the sum
estimated, owing to the fact that
the use of a!bulldozer had been

may make block grants out of
the Labour Welfare Fund to the
several Vestries of the Island to
be applied by them (subject to
such conditions as the Governor-
in-Executive Committee may im-
pose) in making payments_ for
the purpose of providing, Main-

PRINCESS ALICE _ Mili chive Experts
ENQUIRY REPORT

TODAY the “Advocate” begins the publication of
Malone who conducted an Inquiry into certain miiters connected with the establishment of the |

\

justly aggrieved if the

public

thought or was allowed to think |

without just cause, that they were
parties to any,action which could
be called in question.”

The Conduct and Managemen

Parish of St. Michael in Connec-
tion with the Establishment of the
“Princess Alice Playing Field”.

8. By section 2 of the Vestries
(Amendment No. 5 Act, 1948, the
St. Michael's Vestry is empower-
ed to ‘provide, maintain or man-

age playing fields’ for the use of!

the ‘public. The Churchwarden is
the Chief Executive Officer of the
Vestry, and he is also the Chair-
man of the Playing Fields Com-
mittee. This . Committee
appointed by the Vestry (as the
minutes of a Vestry meeting held
on the 10th January. 1949, disclos-
ed) “to make
with regard to sites, costs thereof,
exnendituree to be inctirred in
preparing the playing fields, and
the recurrent estimated expendi-
ture”. It app@ars also from the
orrespondence between the Social
Welfarea Officer’ and the Clerk of
the St. Michael’s Vestry, and from
the minutes of its meetings that
the Committee was also expectext
to be interested in the actual werk
done, and in the expenditure in-
curred in preparing the playing
field at the “Reef” site and in
constructing the pavilion, If this
was not so the Committee would
have been dissolved when the

Vestry adopted its report at a

meeting held on the 16th June,

1949. But the Committee contin-
ued to hold meetings up to March
1950. Having selected the “Reef”
site it took little interest in the
work to be done there and appears
to haye been complacently satis-
fied to leave this in the hands of
its Chairman, Mr. H, A. Tudor,

disposition to lean upon others, for
apart from laying certain corre-
spondence before the Committee
and discussing {tf with the mem-

bers, he did not seek their co-|

operation or approval in carrying

out the werk even though quite!

extensive alterations had beea
made in the plan originally pro-
posed for the pavilion involving
increased expenditure of over
$5,000.00 on. this item. Between
July, 1949, and March, 1950, ex-
pendituré of about $16,588 was
incurred in connection with the
work at this playing field includ-
ing the erection of a_ pavilion
which when completed cost
$12,046.11 as shown by the letter |
of the 24th June, 1950, from the.
Auditor for the parish of St. Mich- |
ael (See Appendix VI). During
the period just rdferred to the
Playing Field Committee held four
meetings. Mr. Tudor was present
at all of these but he made no
report at any of them as to the
progress of the work. . No ques-
tion was raised by any member
as to the terms of any contract
for preparing the ground or build-
ing the pavilion; or as to whether
tenders had been called for in
accordance with a decision of
the Vestry at a meeting held on
the 18th April, 1949 (with Mr.
Tudor in the Chair) that tenders
should be invited for any work
estimated to cost $1,000.00 and
over, Those members of the Com-
mittee who were members of the
Vestry knew, from the Financial
Secretary's letter of the 29th
August, 1949, the contents of
which had been communicated to |
the Vestry at a meeting held on)

the 19th September, 1949, the
terms upon wich a_ grant of
money for the establishment of

this playing field had been made
and yet they never regarded it as
aecessary to furnish the Vestry
with a report of the activities of
the Committee or of its Chairman.
This disinterestedness of the Com-
mittee resulting almost’ in inepti-
tude cannot escape censure.

9. The inert’ attitude of the
Playing Fields Committee was in
startling contrast to the activities
of the Churchwarden-Chairman.
He and the Acting Governor (Mr.
Perowne) were very anxious to
get on with the work of preparing
the ground and_ building the
pavilion, and Mr. Tudor proceeded
to do this, without seeking the co-|
operation of the Playing Fields}
Committee or of the Vestry, even
though the original plans submit-
ted by the Vestry were being
altered; without inviting tenders

for the work of levelling *sthe¢:.

ground or building the pavilion,-«
this in open disregard of the ex-
press directions of the Vestry—;
by embarking wpon construction
work without proper plans and by
arranging to pay for the work

Sir. Clement

t/Travers Humphreys’s retirement caused a
Exercised by the Vestry of the, vacancy, has occasioned some surprise.

was,

recommendations |

kilo

;violin, appeared in many notable trials as

| which that judge was so closely associated.





ON THE BENCH

MONTGOMERY HYDE, MP,
the - distinguished criminologist, exam-
ines the new judicial appointment and
asks—

‘bo WE NEED MORE CRIMINAL JUDGES?

|

HAVE we enough criminal judges?
The promotion of 52-yeaz-old Mr. Colin
Pearson, KC, to the King’s Bench, where Sir



| It was thought in the Temple that an Old
| Bailey practitioner in the tradition of Sir
Travers himself might have been selected.
| Although the new judge will undoubtedly
bring considerable legal learning and ability
to the High Court Bench it is noteworthy
|that his practice as a barrister has chiefly
lain in the commercial courts.

This would seem to indicate that Lord
Jowitt the Lord Chancellor, on whose re-
commendation our judicial appointments are
made is satisfied that the King’s Bench Divi-
sion is already sufficiently staffed with crimi-
nal lawyers.

Yet only one of the 23 judges who at pres-
ent sit in this division was exclusively en-



‘phone Pitchor's!
4472
for avorything in
HARDWARE

wit

OPEL CPLECLEL LLLP

28

gaged in criminal work before coming to the */ ' JD3 f . s
f J $
“bench. This is Mr. Justice Byrne, who was|% C. S. Pitcher & Co. x
senior prosecuting counsel at the Old Bailey * sciaibiiiities %
te POOSOPSSS




at the time of his appointment at the com-
paratively early age of 49 in 1945.

Unfortunately, by the elevation of Lord
Justice Birkett to the Court of Appeal last
year the King’s Bench lost another excep-
ionally distinguished authority on criminal
matters.

HE TYPED IT OUT

Before he reached the Bench ten a
ntly

| ‘nm many criminal trials. In particular, his de-
' ‘ence of Mrs. Pace for murder was outstand-
ing as also his prosecution of Alfred Arthur
'Rouse, the blazing car murderer. On the
Bench he has always taken great trouble
with his judgments. At Nuremberg, where he
was one of the British judges in the War
Crimes trials, he typed out the whole of his
‘engthy judgment himself.

Two of the present King’s Bench judges,
besides Mr. Justice Byrne, have had much
experience of criminal work in their practis-
ing days—Mr. Justice Oliver and Mr, Justice
Cassels—although their practices were not
exclusively criminal.

Mr. Justice Oliver, whose hobbies are carv-
ing oak doors and playing Handel on the

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\Mr. Roland Oliver, KC. He was one of the
prosecuting counsel in the celebrated
Thompson-Bywaters murder case, and he
suegessfully defended Mr. Aleck Bourne, a
surgeon, on sensational charges of abortion
at the Old Bailey in 1938, when a more
humane interpretation of the law on this
delicate subject was established. He was one
of the three counsel who investigated the
leakage of Budget secrets. .

Mr. Justice Cassels is a Yorkshireman who
began his career in London journalism and
was not called to the Bar till he was over 30.
He quickly built up an extensive practice in
the criminal courts, prisoners he defended
cn capital charges including Field, Thorne,
Patrick, Mahon and Fox.

Mr, Justice Pearson should rapidly acquire
the knowledge of criminal law and procedure
which he may lack at present, and he will
no douht make an excellent criminal judge
as those with little or no experience in the
criminal courts have done before him. Never-
theless the view has been expressed in some
juarters that the Lord Chancellor might have
done bciter to have appointed a successor to
Sir Travers Humphreys from the field with

@
from

o.A49

TROPICALS
of
superb quality

at DA COSTA'S

‘rhe present alarmingly high criminal
iutistres and the consequently }ary2 number
cf criminal cases which come before the
courts every week would seem to support this
siew.
vIn the Court of Criminal Appeal, which 3s
composed of King’s Bench judges, more t’aan
1,100 applications for_leave to-appeal-ayainst
conviction and sentence were heard last year.

}











done at ‘day ratep’ instead o:
entering into a femal contract

elfare Fund for levelling the with the builder; and also did not) criminal w

requisition’ the services of the
Building Supervisor (Mr. Ramsay).
The Vestry employed on _ its
permanent staff.a Building Super-
visor Whose duties include super-
vising the erection of any new
buildings, checking quantities ana
making sure that proper materials
were being used; seeing that the
workmanship was satisfactory and
that reasonable prices were being

in addition nearly 200 appeals were heard by
he Court or otherwise disposed of,

All this represents an immense w ume cf
ork for the judges of tne Kifig’s
Pench. Furthermore, as there must always
be three niembers of this division sitting in
the Court of Criminal Appeal, the availability:
ci those v ith criminal experience tur work at |
assizes or in the Central Crimiz:al Court is
further limited, |

Sooner or later it would seem that the
| King’s bench will have to be reinforced from
the criminal bar. At present ther? i; no lack

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taining, or managing playing Mt. aid. : a ose Ss "
fields, parks, open spaces or other obtained free of charge, the con- _ eee rie . eae po alent there. ) nts |
places of public resort or recrea- struction of the pavilion actually Siereleor’ aes ae - a Saieee] King’s Counsel who specialise in criminal
tion for the use of the public.” 70St_ $12,046.11) or $5326.11 more fF omittins to do so, that he and |WCLX include Mr. John Maude, MP, Mr. G. D TASTY BITS

5. In furtherance of the Gov- than estimated (not including the ‘°F ° ing to do so, that he an “Khoki’ ’ . . .
ernment’s general licy of SUM of $1,936.00 the price of two Mr. Ramsay “did not get on.”;,. It | (Khoki’) Roberts and Mr. Deter Curt:s-
Labour Welfare the Colonial Sec-\ 9Uts bought ‘at public auction at #8 not without significance, how- | Bennett, all in a large way of practice. , Canadian Red Cheese
retary of Barbados wrote a circu Seawell Airport by the Church- ever, that he did in fact tell Mr. Meanwhue at the Old Bailey itseif there is | Edam Cheese € ompare These
lar letter, dated the 7th February, Warden and not paid for), It Ramsay that he was required to). strong prosecuting t fi hi oo Sone
1949 (see Appendix III) to the Must be borne in mind, however, supervise the work, and it was |< 4 ain eo § team rom which such a| Tuborg Beer Prices
Chairman of each Vestry in the that the building originally plan- only when Mr. Ramsay insistea | Selection might be made, This is headed by Bass’s Ale ee
Island, pointed out the terms of "€d was enlarged and rearranged. (quite rightly) upon seeing plans | Mr. Christmas Humphreys, son of the retiring | Anchor Table Butter—88c per
regulation 2 referred to ebove ane eee 7 will be cbserved that the of the proposed Pe that his}judge, who is the senior crime counsel. The: Ib.
requested the Vestries to forward grant of money from the Fund services were not requ itioned. At|other “seniors” are Mr. TEND! Anchor Full Cream Milk-—2}
to him any aos ~~ ao at a ween > oe ws auch a meeting of the Vestry on the|R BF. Seaton Henry Elam and me. y ER MEATS jib—$2. 24
which they mig esire to sub- acl’s Vestry, and that under the 28th August, 1950, Mr. Tudor at- : tine en nchor Full Cream Milk 1 Ib.
mit, In eply. to. this circular terms set out in the Financial tempted to excuse his delinquency | Now that Sir Travers Humphreys has left|}{ Lamb, Liver, Tails, Tripe, tin 96c.
letter the Clerk of the St, Secretary's letter of the 29th Aug- by saying thatthe did not think the bench, the senior judge with the greatest Tongues, Brains, Garlic, Vege- | Anchor Skimmed Milk — 40c.
Michaet's "Vestry wtite "on he ust, 108. inat Body was reaulted IC wa the. Building. Supervisor’s| criminal experience is Mr. Justice Oliver. {fest Cuil Apse mer Ih

job to see after this matter as he

Red, White and Blue Coffee—












the Sit. Michael's Vestry, under ©xpenditure of the money so grant- Considered the preparati , the| He has sat on the bench for the past 13} aheenene | 90c. per }-Ib. tin
the uuthority of the ‘Vestries ed. It was incumbent upon the piaving Fiel Ee a rene (os years and is now nearly 70, Mr. Justice Cas- | Red, White & Blue Beans—24c.
| (Amendment) No. 5 Act, 1948, Vestry to keep proper accounts aying Field wés the work of the) <4. rho has b iu PHONE per tin
; Savi Mes a tate) eral Thc Me nppertec pa Governor-in-Executive Committee, | 5@45; Wo has been a judge for one year less Re t 2
| had appointed a Playing-Fields’s, and to exercise strict supervision ats : is six Vv ld ¥ 4 Processed Peas—3-oz. size 30c.
Committee, and that in due over the expenditure of this He also stated in evidence that he} 'S oo years older. per tin
| course application would be made money The Acting Attorney a the eoune we When either of these judges decides to } Cook's Pastes—Gc. nor tin °
for grants from the Labour Wel- General! very aptly observed in his (Mr. Perowne) ‘as the execu ive| retire I would say t se é inti GODDARDS Roce eile has ee oak
| fare Fund. On the 18th June, opening remarks “Public bodies Officer and felt he should obey his | a successor seas eS ale ped Tre el | Carrots in tins 3-02. size 36e.
11949, he wrote again to the which are called upon to adminis- orders. Coming itom one who has], : consiaerable experience as/ | per tin )
Colonial Secretary informing hin: ter wublic fufds must be above been a Vestryman for eighteen | Criminal lawy < will be unanswerable. : WE DEL IVER | Cucumbers in tins—3-oz. size ;
that the te ah had oe the spt i m and the. I ; b, ho year nd twice a Churchwarden, | World Copyright Reserved. 14) " | 48c. per tin t
Report of the Playing Fields Com- constitute e bodie: d fee @ On Page 8 wLF.S. ( cee
i 4 ! .



THURSDAY,

OCTOBER 4,



1951



In Many Elementary Schools

Say» Major Glindon Reed,
Director Of Education

THE BUILDINGS of many of our elementary schools
and the teaching conditions in them are very bad. More
children attend them than ever before, but in recent years
we have not been able to increase the number of teachers
to deal with them. In the last four years Government has
built two new schools for elementary schoo! children, one

large one and one small one.

Some other schools have had ad-
ditions made to them, but in
Barbados I should say that there
is only one elementary school
building which approaches the
minimum requirements laid down
by the Ministry of Education in
England. That is the new St.
Leonard’s School for Girls at
Richmond Gap. This school was
designed and built for the senior
girls from the elementary schools
of the vicinity.

Progress in the provision of
additional elementary school ac-
commodation has _ unfortunately
been far slower than I was led to
expect when I first came to the
Colony.

Fortunately for Barbados,
schools are not a matter of stones,
concrete and wood alone. The
strength of a school lies in its
teaching staff and the teachers,
working sometimes in very poor
conditions, have done their best
to maintain and improve former
standards. This does not mean
that we are yet up to English
standards,

I gather that when Mr. Hayden
came to the island in 1943 he
found ‘the elementary schools
badly housed and crowded with
children who were placed in
classes according to their attain-
ments (irrespective of age) and
taught by teachers many of whom
were untrained.

HAYDEN’S POLICY

He drew up a policy for edu-
cation with a building programme,
recommended a training college
for teachers, introduced the placing
of children into classes according
to age as the first stage towards
inaugurating a system of education
under which children would be
taught, as in England, according to
Age, Ability and Aptitude.

Apart from other considera-
tions the introduction of “age-
grouping” as it has come to be
called in Barbados allowed the
standard of education in the
elementary schools to be mea-
sured for the first time. Pre-
viously it was not possible to
know what the standard was,
nor whether it was going up or
down. Assessments had to be
made by subjective judgment,
without a measuring-stick and
this kind of assessment can
often be very unreliable.

The measuring-stick in educa-
tion is, and has been for years in
countries other than Barbados, the
attainment ofthe. average child at
a certain age. If, for example,
you do not know what the average
Barbadian child of 7 years can do,
you cannot tell for sure whether
your little boy of 7 is good, bad
or indifferent. We do know now,
what the average Barbadian child
of 7 can do and each year we mca-
sure the children and see whether
the standard is going up or down.

GREAT PROTECTION
If they only realised it “age-

grouping” is the greatest protection
to parents that has been introduced
into the schools, for no intelligent,
hard-working child can be kept
back because he doesn’t happen
to get on with his teacher or,
because he happens to be feeling
unwell when the Inspector calls.
Under the “age-grouping” system
retarded children should receive
more individual attention now
than they would have done before
that system was introduced.

But “age-grouping” is merely a
stage in the introduction of a sys-
tem of education under which
children will be taught according
to Age, Ability and Aptitude. The
measurement of Ability and Apti-
tude is not an easy business, It re-
quires the special training of the
teachers who are to do the mea-
suring. We now have a body of
teachers trained in this work
and so we are entering the second
stage. Children are being
“streamed”. as it is called.

NOTHING NEW

This means in a large school for
example that all the children in a
certain age-group will be placed
in parallel classes according to
their Ability. The A classes will
contain the children who have the
best ability, the B classes will con-
tain the children of normal abil-
lity and in the C classes will be,
found those of less than average
ability. There will be in addition
special classes for retarded chil-
dren, —_
There is nothing new in this

organisation. The school I went

to 36 years ago in England was

organised on these lines. But a

system of organisation based on

Age and Ability is new in the

elementary schools of Barbados.

Perhaps I should point out
that Ability is not quite the same
thing as Attainment, I may have
the natural ability to do mathe-
matical calculations, but if I
have never been taught to do
them, my attainments in this di-
rection will be low. But if I
have the ability and a good
teacher I shall soon be able to
make up for lost time. ,
The third stage will be the in-

clusion of Aptitudes in our scrt-
ing of the children into classes.
When the rebuilding of St. Leon-
ard’s Boys’ School is finished we
shovld be able to organise at Rich-
mond Gap a model unit in which
840 boys and 735 girls will be
taught according to Age, Ability
and Aptitude. For there will be
provided facilities for training ‘in
various practical subjects such as
metal-work, wood-work, arts and
crafts for those pupils who show
they have the aptitude for them.

The introduction «f education
pecording to Age, Ability and Ap-
titude fis within sight. Nothing
should be allowed -to interfere
with its realisation

BELOW STANDARD

One of the first things I was told
by some of the Heads of) Second-
iry Schools when I first to
Barbados wa that the
ferring from the

came
pupils

slementary
trar el entary

schools to the secondary schools
were not up to standard. I had
been hearing this, and saying it
myself in England when I was a
secondary schoolmaster, ever since
I had started teaching, so this
criticism was no new thing to me.
In sy'bsequent years I was told by
Heads that there was an improve-
ment in standard. I gather now
that ‘ere may have been a drop
again, a

_ In connection with’this fluctua-
tion which ma¥ or may not be
true I think it would be as well to
realise that many more children
enter secQndary gchools than. for-
merly.. In other-Words we cannot
expect all the children now trying
to enter secondary schools to be of
the same calibre as those brilliant
few who were successful a few
years ago. And in parenthesis one
might add that for the same reason
the children left behiad in the ele-
mentary schools are likely to be
on average of a lower calibre than
they used to be. I think it is ne-
cessary to say too that some Ves-
tries have said that they prefer to
select children for scholarships and
exhibitions on a means test alone
irrespective of ability. The cahdi-
dates are presented by their pa-
rents and not by Headteachers and
are nt necessarily the most able
children. The number of exhibi-
tions has increased but in some
vestries the methods of selection
have not changed for many years,
although a reform has been re-
commended by this Department on
more than gone occasion,

COMMON COURSE

At the St. Leonard’s Boys’ and
Girls’ Schools the children between
the ages of 11 and 18 will be fol-
lowing the Common Course, so
perhaps I had better say a word
or two about that.

First of all-I shoulda explain
that the English educational sys-
tem (unlike the American) works
downwards from the top. In other
words the work we do in —=_
secondary schools and the stand-
ards we have to maintain are de-
termined for us by the British
Universities, Similarly the stand-
ards of Work which we try to reach
in our Primary (or Elementary )
Schools are set for us by our Sec-
ondary Schools, The’ Common
Course is a course of instruction
which is suitable for children be-
tween the ages of 11 and 13 wheth-
er they attend elementary or sec-
ondary schools.. The standard of
knowledge required of these child-
ren is set by the Secondary Schools
and it is up to the elementary
schools to do their best to reach
it. Although many of the elemen-
tary schools cannot attain it yet
the Common Course places before
them the standards they should
strive for.

SYLLABUSES

The syllabuses devised by Spe-
cialist Secondary Teachers in Bar-
bados in co-operation with this
Department are arranged for the
three streams of children I have
already mentioned:— A _ stream
which are the best pupils, B stream
for the normal or average children,
C stream for chi'yiren below aver-
age. A retarded child is not ex-
pected to do the work of those in
the A stream. But the opportun-
ity is there for the schools to give
education at the highest standard
to the pupils who are capable of
benefiting from it.

Children are not taught foreign
languages unless first they have
shown a_ special ability to learn
them and secondly there are the
teachers available to deal with
these subjects. At present very
few pupils indeed are being taught
foreign languages.

STRONGER
INSPECTORATE

This is one way in which we are
doing our best to raise the stand-
ard of education in the elementary
schools, In addition we are
strengthening the Inspectorate so
that teachers may receive more
help in their work, It is proposed
that Inspectors will visit elemen-
tary, secondary and private
schools, as in England, check on
the school organisation and teach-
ing and draw the systems of
schools together to help one an-
other and understand each other's

difficulties and lems.
Although — th artment is
striving by ev ans to raise
the level of at in elemen-
t ry, tepocls, pro ill be sl
until school buil d condi-
tions of work for c en and

teachers are improved. I hope that
nothing will be put in the way of
improving elementary school ac-
east ec: amenities. These
must rded for some years
as the first priorities.

FILM SHOW

oe the courtesy of the
British Council representative the
following films will be shown at
the Monthly Reunion of the Com-
bermere School Old Boys’ Asso¢i-
ation at Combermere tomorrow
night at 8 o’clock:
British News.
Making The Ball.
Wordsworth’s Country.
Looking at Sculpture,



e







Housing Loatis
Granted To 2,008

Since housing loans were
made available to sugar in-
dustry workers about a year
ago, 2,008 workers have
been granted loans which
amount to $570,000, Mr.
D. A. Haynes, Manager of
the Labour Loans Depart-
ment said to the Advocate

yesterday.
However, he said, the
Department has approved

of loans to 2.395 people over
the same veriod, amounting
to $632,000. They have
been applications from 4,900
people.

Mr. Haynes said that the
workers were navine
the loans very well. He had
absolutely no complaint to
make. The -everage lone

took four verve before ite
s AANYA Say ft hank

hacer

horensen
fl, No Joon excreted
$1.440 or was ers th n $48

“Conditions In
U.K.Very Bad”

Mr. Leslie Little, an English-
man wno 1s now uving in reure-
my}. a “krin,’ Hoietown, St.
Jaines, returned from England
yesterday morning by the Colom-
bie after spending tnree montns’
holiday. He was accompanied by
nis wite.

He told the Advocate that he
was very glad to be back as he
had a miserable summer. The
weather was cold and he did not
see the sun while he was there.

Conditions in England, he had
been told, were better, but he
failed to sec that. As a matter of
fect, he said, he would not live in
England if one volunteered to pay
his rent.

“Prices of some articles are ris-
ing every day and there are still
restrictions,” he said.

To compare the cost of a few
articles in England with the cost
here he said that 20 cigarettes cost
3/9, the price for which he could
get 50 here. A bottle of rum cost
88/6 as against a gallon for 20/-
here.

Altogether he thought that life
and the people in Barbados were
more pleasant than in England.

Mr, Little will be remembered
by many of the older people in the
island as the successor to Colonel
Yates who started the Oil Company
at Turner's Hall and was General
Manager 28 years ago.

Mr. Little drilled all the oil wells
at Turner’s Hall and was iri charge
of the eompan: for three years.
After living in Trinidad for seven
years, he returned to Barbados
four years ago where he has been
residing.

“Colombie” Takes
20 On Caribbean
Cruise

in





The French passenger liner
Colombie (7,554 tons), now on
fer Caribbean cruise, arrived
here yesterday morning from
England via Martinique and
Dominica. She brdught ‘hinty-

eight passengers for Barbados and
had on board 141 oth2r passen-
gers.

Twenty passengers joined the
Colombie here before she left port
during the evening for Jamaica
via Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao
and Cartagena.

Relatives and friends crowded
the Baggage Warehouse pier
yesterday evening waving to the
passengers as launch after launch
took them off to the ship.

Employees Ask
Pay Revision

The subordinate employees of
the Civil Service Association held
a meeting at the Town Hall yes-
terday. The subject discussed was
the Cost of Living Bonus. After
a stormy debate the meeting
passed the following resolution:

“Whereas the Government has
shown open disdain and disregard
for our rights and sympathy with
our deplorable financial condition,

“Be it resolved that we the
subordinate employees of the
Government Service take this
opportunity to acquaint the Gov-
ernment of our very strong dis-
approval of the attitude adopted
towards our Association in by-
passing our Whitley Council and
sending a Resolution to the House
1eating to our conditions of
service without first having our
comments on same.

2. Sending a Resolution to the
House for an amount ef mone
which is in our opinion an insult
to us in view of the arguments
produced showing the necessity
for a Cost of Living Bonus.

3. That we urgently request a
royision of salaries before the
prorogation of the present Leg-
islature—retroactive 1/4/51.

4. That an immediate answer
be given our representatives on
whom we have placed the onus of
presenting this Resolution,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Teaching Conditions Are Very Bad



Legislature Get
Message On Sugar Pact

A MESSAGE regarding a Memorandum of Agreement
dated September 13, 1951 between the Sugar Producers
Federation of Barbados and the Barbados Workers Union

was received by

The Message reads :

His Excellency the Governor
has the honour to refer the at-
tention of the Legislature to a
Memorandum of Agreement dated
the 13th September; 1951, which,
in accordance with its terms, has
been submitted to the Sugar
Producers’ Federation of Barba-
dos’ and. the Barbados Workers’
Union for their consideration
and which, it is understood, has
been confirmed by these organi-
sations. Copies of this Memoran-
dum of Agreement are being laid
in the Honourable the House of
Assembly to-day.

Labour Welfare

Legislation is being urgentiy

prepared to implement

(1) that portion of paragraph
1 (c) of the Memorandum
of Agreement which refers
to the payment, when the
sugar crop of any one year
(in the years 1951, 1952
and 1953) exceeds the aver-
age of: the five preceding
years, of an additional cess

both Houses of the Legislature Tuesday.

ment, which relates to the

reduction, whenever the

Island’s crop exceeds 120,-

000 tons or its equivalent,

of the present cess of

$6.00 per ton payable to

the Price Stabilisation Fund

by 60c. per ton or $1.20 per

ton according to whether

the crop is below or exceeds

the previous five-year aver-

age, and the increase by an

equivalent amount of the

present cess of $2.40 per

ton payable to the Labour
Welfare Fund,

It has been decided not to im-

plement during the Calendar year

_ 1951 that portion of paragraph

1 (c) of the Memorandum of
Agreement which relates to the
payment of a cess of $2 per ton
to a Harbour Fund. Further con-
sideration is being given to the
question and separate legislation
will be prepared as soon as a
decision has been reached.

His Excellency understands
that the improved bonus scheme,



of $1.80 per ton to the to which reference is made in

Labour Welfare Fund; paragraph 1 (a) of the Memo-
(2) paragraph 1 (d) of the randum of Agreement, is already

Memorandum of Agree- being implemented.

, E “ * ss
October Is Less Polyriver

Squally Brings Luntber

The month of October has been The Saguenay Terminals’

welcomed in by quite a number
of schooner captains and seamen
who ply their small boats be-
tween the islands with cargo.
Some schooner captains say
that they feel safer sailing during
October than they do during Sep-

tember when hurricanes are
furious around the Caribbean,
Some,’ however, say that they

are still on the look out until
after mid-October when the hur-
ricane period expires.

Vessels arriving over the week-
end enjoyed quiet trips to Bar-
bados. Except for occasional
lulls in the wind, good breezes
favoured their sailing. The
weather was always fair and the
sea reasonably smooth.

One schooner captain said that
October is usually calm. Novem-
ber and December will _ bring
back squally weather, but not like
the weather they encountered in
September.

S.P.C.A. Inspector
Lectures At YMCA

Sgt. Major Torrezao, chief
S.P.C.A. Inspector of British
Guiana, held an instruction class
at the Y.M.C.A,. between 8.30
and 10,00 o'clock yesterday
morning for the benefit of local
S.P.C.A. Inspectors.

The principal subject was ‘Du-
fies of an _ Inspector of the
S.P.C.A." This included points
on the detection of cruelty and
relieving animals from their suf-



fering. He also explained the
proper procedure to be adopted
when investigations are being

made after a case of cruelty is
reported to the S.P.C.A.

Present were: J. Williams,
Chief Inspector, Barbados S.P.-
C.A., Graham Licorish, Inspec-
tor for the Windward District and
Westerman Ifill, Sub-Inspector
of the Leeward District.



S.P.C.A. CONCERT

To mark the end of Animal
Welfare Week the Barbados
S.P.C.A. has organised a children’s
concert which will take place at
Queen's Park on Friday afternoon
at 4.30 o'clock.

Polyriver called here from Hali-
fax yesterday with a shipment
of lumber made up cf 16,036
pieces of pine, 13,999 pieces of
spruce and 6,440 pieces of bireh

This new shipment of lumbe:
has found part of a_ shipment,
which arrived over three weeks
ago, still on the waterfront.
Waterfront workers were trying
to clear the waterfront of the old
shipment yesterday so as to make
ample space for the new ship-
ment. The cause of the lumber
remaining On the waterfront for
such long periods is the fact that
the lumber yards are now always
congested.

The Polyriver has also brought
1,495 bags of wheat flour and
700 bags of Queen flour for Bar-
bados. The entire shipment of
lumber came for Messrs J. B.
Leslie & Co., Ltd., while the
flour came for Messrs A. S, Bry-

den & Sons, Ltd. and Messrg
Robert Thom Ltd. The Wolyriver
is consigned to Messrs Planta-

tions Ltd.

Sold Pear Too Dear

Sybil Griffith of New Orleans
St. Michael, was ordered to pay @
fine of £3 to be paid in twe
months or in default two months’
imprisonment, by Mr. Cc. b
Walwyn, Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A” for violating the
Price Control Act,

The offence was committed on
October 2. Griffith sold Courtney
Springer a pear for 14 cents, six
cents more than the schedule
price.

PLACED ON BOND

Mr. H. A. Talma, Police Magis-
trate of District “A”, yesterday
placed Leslie Chase of Bath Vil-
lage, Christ Church, on a _ bond
for three months in the sum of
£5 for using threats to Etheline
Callender on September 5.

Mr. D. H, L. Ward who appea;-
ed on behalf of Callender submit-
ted that the defendant should be
placed on a bond as the threats
used were of a serious nature. He
also said that his client had
grounds for fear,

One witness said that Chase
threw a knife at Callender anc
told her that he was going to kil
her.





Victor Chase
Political
A large and enthusiastic crowd
attended the Political Meeting at
Chapman's Lane: last night by the
Electors’ Association in support of
their candidate Mr. Victor Chase
who is offering himself for the
City of Bridgetown at the forth-
coming general elections.
“First of all I feel that the time
has arrived when the Govern-
ment of Barbados needs more

members with a sound commer-
cial experience,” Mr. Chace said.

Outlining tne glaring mistakes
of the present Government, Mr.
Chase said that Jamaica, which
at one time was extremely poor
and difficult to live in, the Gov-
ernment has now been able to
introdute canning factories and
other industries to relieve the un-
employment situation,

He said that Barbados had the
same resources and some of these
industries could also have been
introduced here if the Govern-
ment was mindful enough. He
noticed that in Trinidad a milk
canning industry was new being
introduced.

“Barbados has previously suf-



Lodge Win Quizz Contest

Lodge School won by the nar-
row margin of one point from the
Ursuline Convent in a quizz con-
test which was held at thé Record-
ing Room of Rediffusion yesterday
morning. “The quizz was of three
rounds duration and after the
third round the score was Lodge
School 17 points and Ursuline
Convent 16 points.

At the end of the first’ round the
score was nine points to six in
favour of Lodge and in the second
round the Ursuline Convent took
the lead with ten points to eight

i i ee et ee Ae i i is

No points were awarded in round
three.

The teams were comprised of
four girls from the Convent and
four boys from Ledge. The team
captain of Lodge was F. Cheese-
man and the Ursuline Captain
was G. Payne.

In the first round both teams
weve asked questions dealing with
Parbados. One boy was stumped
when he was asked to name
three fruits beginning with the
letter “P” that grow in Barbados.
On the whole the result in this
round was considered bad

ot
nov

The second round questions
were on the West Indies and one
question—“Name three United
States islands in the Carib’ 7*
—Wwas unanswered.

Asked to name five West Indian
cricketers who are going to play
in Australia, one boy quickly an-
swered giving seven names,

The third round questions were
on General Knowledge. The two
question masters were Mr. J.

lor and Colonel Oliver. The next
quizz contest will be between
Combermere and St, Michae
Girls’ School.

Tay- j

Holds Second
Meeting

fered from many milk shortages
‘This would not have happene
if the Government we have, hac
a milk canning industry,” he
said,

He also felt that it was neces-
sary that a refrigeration plant be
installed in the ‘island. Fisher-
men would have somewhere t
store their fish. People are pay-
ing high prices for meat but i
this was done they could easily
buy fish instead, which would be-
come much cheaper,

He said that a refrigeratior
plant is one of the things to whict
he would attend immediately
and he knew the Fisheries Office:
was, anxious to have such a plant
tn, the island.

lie said that the Utilities
Board, which is appointed by
Government, was there to regu-
iu.e charges for water, laght, etc.,
und also look after the erection
ot road lights and the installa-
tion of water in the various ten-
autry areas and other districts,
i.¢ did not know the members of
the Board but he knew the Gov-
ernment had appointed them.

“If | should ever be given the
power I will endeavour to see
that the tenantries have priority
atteition. The Road Board must
pive these areas proper roads,’
he said.

He said that as a member of

e Vestry, that body has on many
occasions requested the Road
Board to fix tenantry roads. Very
few were done. Certain remarks
he had made previously dbout
the water situation in New Or-
leans, he had since heard that
they were lies but this was not
80.



water mains were laid with-
sy reach of the householder
required water, under
Vater Works Act, 1895, Sectior
32, the Executive Committée
@ On page 8





the}

“Damages” Suit Adjourned

CLERK CLAIMS OVER
$1,000 DAMAGES

HEARING of the Earl
& Co. Ltd. ‘damages’ suit i

was adjourned until the tenth of this month by The Hon

The Chief Judge, Sir Ailan
a clerk of Black Rock, is
money lost as a result of h
26 iast year with a punchec
& Co. Ltd. or their agent

lost $799.68 as overtime through illness.

Carver is represented by Mr,
E. K. Walcott, K.C., associated
with Mr. J. S. B. Dear, instructed
ty Messrs Carrington & Sealy.
Jason Jones & Co, Ltd., is repre-
sented by Mr. W. W. Reece asso-
ciated with Mr. Farmer, instructed
by Nicholls & Co.

A special jury will hear the case.
* The Bill of complaint states that
Carter is a clerk employed by Da
Costa & Co, Ltd. Jason Jones & Co.
Lid., has its registered office at
Lower Broad Street. On Septem-
ber 26, Carter was going
the wharf when, owing to the
negligence of Jason Jones & Co

Litd.’s servant or agent in unload-

ing puncheons laden with syruy
trom a lorry then parked on the
wharf one of ~ the
struck and injured him.

He claims he was put to loss anc
expense and suffered much pain
inconvenience and damages

No Warning
He

claims the Company was
negligent in that they unloaded
the puncheon by rolling it from
the lorry on the highway. They

failed to give warning to other
people who might have been pass
ing or expected to be passing
along the wharf. They failed to
maintain control of the puncheon
and caused or allowed it to roll
a considerable distance without
supervision or control,

The Company is sifpposed to
have known that it might cause
injury to passersby and yet al-
lowed it to fall or roll. They did
not keep any proper look out with
rerard to passersby

Carter will also rely on the fact
that the lorry and the puncheon
were at all material times under
the management and or control
of the company or its servant or
agent and that the accident was
such as in the ordinary course of
things would never have happen
ed if proper care had been used

As to the injuries there wer

a Pott's fracture of

third degree



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PAGE FIVE

allegea in the claim, the Com-
pany still deny that they, their
servant or agent were guilty of
negligence as is alleged or that
Carter met with an accidént as
alleged or at all. zi

tne Cumpany deny that-Carter
sustained the alleged- or any in-

. Cs . versie oe
C. Carter versus Jason Jones juries Or damages.

n the Court of Common Pleas

Besides, if any aceident had
happened to Carter as Was al-
Collymore yesterday. Carter, tesed, then he would by the

exercise of ordinary care and dis-
cretion have avoiaed the same.

On the other hand, Carter was
negligent. The Company are
claiming that he failea to keep
proper look out and to use reason-
able care when he attempted to
cross the road behind the lorry
at the time the lorry was being

claiming $1,044.48 damages as
is being injured on September
on, the property of Jason Jones
or servant. Carter claims he

tne right ankie and a torn .acernal
ligament of the left knee.



The particulars of the special Unloaded.
damage are: hospital treatment They say he did not give any
5100.80, X-Ray examinations °F Sufficient warning to those en-

gaged in unloading the lorry af
his intention to pass behind the

559,00, electrical treatment $10.50,
iweyance to the hospital $8.00,

airs to spectacles $6.00, mis- lorry at the time. ;
laneous items $10.00, one pair _ The Company hold that the
trousers $22.00, doctor’s fees facts surrounding the accident
2.50, over wages lost through were not such that the proper
ilness $799.68. and natural inference ingmedi-

In the defence, Jason Jones & @tely arising from them was that

. Ltd., do not admit that th.. the injury complained of was
, or their servants or agents were caused by their neglagence,
gaged on September 26, last Carter knew or ought to have
car or at any other time in un- Known that an attempt to cross
) iding puncheons laden with or recross the road behind the
» s\tup from any lorry on the lovry at the time it was being
‘arf as was alleged in the | aloaded would involve a risk of
im, injury and acting as he did he
i Assuming, but not admitting consented to the running of the
\' they or their agents or ser- risk.

ats were engaged in unloading
icheons: laden with syrup as

The case is expected to go on
for about three days.



“BARBADOS S5.P.C.A.
Animal Welfare Week’”’

NO FLEAS
ON THIS
DOG .



,
ANIMALS NOW AND ALWAYS
‘Lorexane’ Dusting Powder, containing pure
gamma B.H.C., is a potent killer of insect
pests on domestic animals and poultry. It is
pleasant and non-irritant to animal or user,

LE KIND TO

Equally effective
against parasites
on poultry,

In convenient sprinkler-top containers of 100 grammes.
of 500



Also in packings grammes and 3 kilos.

“LOREXANE’

TRADE MARK

DUSTING POWDER

MPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED

A subsidiary company of Imperial Chemical Industries Limited
VILMSLOW MANCHESTER
‘ole Agents and Distributors

»S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LIMITED

Ph.s?





FOR BEST RESULTS
USE

PURINA CHOWS
IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS

H. Jason Jones & Co,, Ltd—Distributors

et
aa





pote,

YOUR LAST
CHANCE!!

CLL IO. OL



‘
,
:
“A
‘ .
BUY NOW AND SAVE!
HOUBIGANT’S CELEBRATED FRENCH COLOGNES and
i VERFUMES; Assorted Scents. Overstocked and Reduced to
: fear ;—
} Colognes Scented Large Size Orig. Price $3.60 NOW $1.50
” ” Med, _,, . 2.40 ” 0
: ” ” Small 1.56 ” 60
Lavender Water Large .,, ; 3 3.60 1.50
” ” Med... io S 2.40 40
” ” Small . * 1.56 60
i% Queique Fleur Perfume ,, 8.00 6.00
3 ” ” ” ” ” ” 6.00 ” 4.00
8 ” ” ” ” ” 4.00 vs 3.00
a”

Sore

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

as

oe

+e



PVA PP IPP SLPS PPP LPAI PPO

Painted Skirt Hangers, Each
Painted Dress Hangers, Each
Khus Khus Dress Hangers, Each

$1.00
24c.
$1,00





&
Pair,

Each_,



$1.08
48c.,
14c.

” " ”





$$





& 13 BROAD STREET.







PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1951
ee TE LL sss sees esses

@ZuG GHT NING






| WHETHER YOU ARE A

=
$
re
$

LARGE
USER kg
OR A ~ . 7 TES

Se FSS reliadle slide

=F fastener. Look
“© for the name on
the slider pull.











*. ‘Lightning’ fasteners
s= ate manufactured by

LIGHTNING FASTENERS
; LIMITED

x A subsidiary company of
“s tmperial Chemical Indust ies
: Luniteds

8

Tt. GEDDES GRANT LTP ,





YOU DESIRE THE
BEST TEA — SO USE

RED ROSE TEA!

IT IS GOOD TEA.
















LBs

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

CRUDE
BLACK MOLASSES
The Natural a Food”









BLONDIE,



WHY ¥ DO %



HHT

i Ou ae sa
hl! ! uP TI 3 ROOM }

CYRIL SCOTT 2/6 At
JOHNSON’S
| STATIONERY



TEA CUPS & SAUCERS
t

JOHNSON’S
HARDWARE





IT PAYS You TO DEAL HERE

—————————————————————————————————
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only








YOU GAVE GATES l HE PROBABLY ; YOUR GUE’ GUESS 1S RIGHT, BUT IT WONT >
HE TOOK "TEM AWAY AND FILLED HIS. WAREHOUSE WIT FURS G00! i:
LESS FURS LIKE THESE WOLF AN i| beam: ;





USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
Pkgs. Quaker Corn Flakes 38 34 #8 Pkgs. Jack Straws 61 536

Tins Klim Powd. Milk (5lbs) 5.98 5.40 ‘Tins Apricot Jam 65 60}
Bottles O’Kiefe’s Beer




Tins Heinz Tomato Soup 34° «46068380






VD GIVE A HUNQRED DOLLARS ‘ta — Mt av: IT KEERS NOW-IGN'T THAT —
ven f 4 ' F SO THOUGHTFUL!

eau OUT OF SON ae THAT Nie ! by Be wer a ifs , s Ber cea

iF IT HAD THE HUNDRED | i ‘he NOW AGGIE Vv \e TO RAIN YOU 144




FING!
THERE t Riv 4 y

Your Hair can be
Radiant and
Dandruff-free

— all you've got to do is



Give yourself
strength
with daily
BOVRIL

When there’s a job to be done or a game to be played—a
cup of Bovril is the very best of drinks. Its rich beely \}
flavour sends a welcome glow through you; its beefy
goodness puts new life into you. There's nothing like

Bavgil to build you up and sustain you. | _ EMERALD CLEAR SHAMPOO

BOoOV Ri L IS THE SHAMPOQ FOR YOUI!

HEALTH IN EVERY BOTTLE | On Sale at all Leading Stores

COCOA i wall serve DUNLOP



take me home and squ-e-e-ze me!

JOHNNY HAZARD
“if, i?

16 MOST USELESS STRAIN
ON EVES,..DOES TABRIZ THINK
THAT MEN CAN LIVE UNDER
WATER LIKE FIGH










UNIVERSAL
MOTOR CYCLE TYRES

YOUR UTTLE BREAK FO!
FREEDOM ae oe
i,







THEY EXPECT ME +TO TURN INTO AY

TIGER? WHAT A STORY, WHEN | GET

HOME To one “Ft Var
GET HOME!

1 “ m1" r
Z Na ei
Te

Ht

ee

Cocoa going overside Lone,
: hip | Dag

from a ship in the Port

ef London Docks with - E t
what looks like little or is the most difficult, | or x ra

ceremony, but the staff it is safest in the experi

of the Port of London en:zed hands of the Port | ‘Reliabilit
Authority know the de- of London Authority— y
gtee of care required /sherr it has the added

to handle this valuable czdvantage of reaching

geome eayeupcie’: wickitin Ok sac. ‘DOW DING ESTATES & TRADING (0., LTD.

i i Nii







THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPK SHB 24508



-_



For Births, Marriage er
announcements in Carib
sharge is $3.00 for any number of words}

tp to 50 and 6 cents per word for each |
2508

additional word. Terms cash. Phon-
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

The charge for snnouncements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths,

1 50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays |
fow amy number a! words up to 50, and-
3 cents per word on week-days and)
4 cents per word cn Sundays for each
additional word.



DIED
FORDE—O~ October 3rd, 1951, at her
residence, Horse Hill, St. Joseph,
Beatrice Forde. Age 68. Her fun-,
eral leaves Mrs. Ada _ Holder's’
residence, Horse Hill, at 4.15 p.m.

to-day for St. Joseph Parish Church.
Lisle Holder, Walter Hoider, Clarence
Holder (Nephews Morine Holder
(Niece); S. E. Holder (Brother-in-law).

_
ROBERTS—On October 3rd 1951, at her
residence Silver Sands, Anna Laura
Roberts (better known as Chic)

above residence at 4 p.m. to-day for

Brother Leacock's Mission and thence

to_the Christ Church Cemetery.
Matthias Roberts and family,
Cephas Clarke (Messa).

4.10. 51—In
a
SEALE — On October 3rd, 1951, at her

residence, Spooner’s Hill, Irene Seale,
mother of the late Gladys Seale. Her
funeral leaves the above residence at
415 p.m. to-day for the Christian
Mission, Tudor Street and thence to
the Westbury Cemetery. Friends are
asked to attend.

Doris Seale, Gordon

York), Cyril Seale.

New York Papers Please Copy.

4.10.51.

Seale (New



ce SEs

‘The undersigned beg through this medi: ‘e undersigned beg through this medi-
um to return thanks to all those kind
friends who sent wreaths, letters of
condolence or in any way expressed
their sympathy in our recent bereave- !

ment.
May Clarke, Elize Taylor, Jennie
Goddard, Louise King, Roy Clarke,

Kathleen Lear, Gwen Jones.
4.9.51—In
—————
HASSELL: Through this medium the
undersigned beg to return thanks
to all those kind friends who sent
wreaths, letters of condolence or in
any way expressed their sympathy in
our recent bereavement caused by
the death of Deara Elizabeth Hassell,
(Grandmother) .

The Cole Family 4.10.51—I1n



IN MEMORIAM





ALLEYNE: In loving memory of our

beloved one Cecil W. Alleyne, who | watch
rest on October 4, | basin,

was called to

1948.

Rest eternal grant unto him, O| wire, 100 ft.



Ergagement}
Calling the!

Acknowl- |
etgements, and ‘n Memoriam notices ie;

'

14 burner

|

} current

|

Age 91 years. Funeral leaves the |

j:

ete



and let light perpetual shine | brass ends and other useful items.

Lord,,

upon him (
The Alleyne Family, 4.10 Birla)
GILL—In loving memory of Mix dear

beloved husband and father Fitz Gerald
Gill who died on October 8th, 1949.
The shock was great the blow severe
We never thought that death was near
Only those, who love can tell
The pain of parting without farewell
The Lord has given
The Lord has taken away
TI'ver to be remembered by Iris
Joan, Thelma, Patricia, Hallam,

(wife),
Peterson,

Derniey (children), Albertha Clarke and
Loucretia Bascom (sisters-in-law), and
femily. 9.10.51—1n



PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife BERYL. CHASE
(nee LYNCH) as I do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone alse con-
tracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

TLFRED CHASE,
Nr. Kendal Hill,
Christ Church.



2.10.51—2n





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife LEOMEOME
CHANDLER inee HERBERT) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order

signed by me a
ARTHUR CHANDLER,
Government Hill,
St. Michael,




4.10.51—2n





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife LOUISE
ARTHUR (nee MERRITT) as & do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts in
my name unless by a written order signed

by me
ALLAN ARTHUR,
Haggatt Hall,
St. Michael
4.10.51—2n
————$— —————————
The public are hereby warned against
riving credit to my wife MAUDE
HOLDER (nee COX) as I do not hold

myself responsible for her or anyone
«.se contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed

by me.
VERNON HOLDER,
Todds Corner,
St. Joseph.
4.10,51—2n





See
=

FOR SALE
WORTHY

DOWN
TOP ROCK





Having three bedrooms with
connecting toilets and baths,
lounge-dining room, large
front balconies, breakfast
balcony, modern built - in
kitchen, two-car garage, ser-
vants’ quarters and laundry.
Fully enclosed with all con-
veniences including tele-
phone.

For quick sale — nearest
offer to £4,500 : mortgage
available for half amount.

Apply to

RALPH A. BEARD

\ Lower Bay Street
"Phone 4683
4.10.51.—+4.f.n,







| of the undersigned on Friday Sth Octo-





FOR SALE



Land and Buildings formerly occupied
by the West India Biscuit Co. Ltd.
situated in Spry Street,



For particulars apply to -

RK. R. HUNTE & Co. Lid.

i Lower Broad





FOR SALE



Mininum charge week 72 cents and |
96 cents Nvtuays 4 were. ~ over we!
wns 2 hele 4 word week-—4 cents @

wort on Sundays,

AU TOMO TIVE

CAR. One il) 1949 Hillman Car in good
cond.tion. Phone 2353 cr 5105.
30.9.51—4n

ELECTRICAL

ELECTRIC STOVE: Cne Westinghouse |
with oven, practicaily new
Owner selling because unable to obtain
Dial 5096 4.10.51—In

FURNITURE

STEEL FURNITURE.—Complete range
of steel furniture including Senior and
Junior Executive Desks, Typists Desks,
Stationery Cupboards, Filing Cabinets,
Executive Chairs, Typists Chairs, etc
On display at K. R. HUNTE & Co. Ltd.
New Showroom, Dial—5136. or 5027.

3.10.51—6n.

LIVESTOCK

Thoroughbred Mare—“THE DOVE”, 16
Hends, ner of two races and placed
in nearly) all starts, covered by Jetsam
and believed to be in foal. Owner willing
t» accipt promising 2 Y.O. in exchange
Write A. Abraham—48 Queen Street,
Trinidad. 30.9.51—3n

MISCELLANEOUS
SCALES: 500 1b and 1,000 1b Cake Plat-
form Scales. The General Agency Co.,
B'dos. Ltd. Phone 4517. High St.

4.10. 51—4n

ene SALES

‘en cents per agate line un week-days

and 12 cents per agate line un Sundays,

minimum charge $1.59 on week-daya
and $1.80 on Sundays.

REAL ESTATE

By order of M. M. Abbadi, Esq., I
wili_ sell at 69 Roebuck Street on
THURSDAY 4th October from 11.30 a.m,
the following Glass show case, Wouu-
stock Typewriter, Typewriter desk,
Remington Rand 17 Typewriter, Double !
writing desk with 20 drawers, Phillips 8
tube Radio, Austin 10, (1940) with new
battery, Upright steam boiler, burns oil
or coal, complete aerated water plant
form scale, Football playing machine,
with accessories and spare parts, Plat-
Drum (80 gals.) Lemon grass oll 130
doz. Worcestershire sauce, 1500 French
Face Powder assorted, Carrier Bike,
Vinegar making plant, 1200 Ibs, new
cotton rests and ends, suitable fur clear-
ing machinery, dusting cloths, Galvan-
ised drums, Fancy and Vacuum pan
molasses, Demijohns, breakers, carboys
sealing wax, Plastic necklacts, belts,
buckles. Electro plaited necklaces and
chain lengths, porcelain wash
wood shelvings, tool trunk, flat |
trunk, well conditioned electric
Rubber Hose %” with 2





























cabin

DON'T MISS IT, bargains for every-
one. Terms cash. |

R. ARCHER McKENZIE,
Auctioneer.
27.9.51—4n.
ee
By public competition at the Office

ber 1951 at 2 p.m,
50 B'dos Shipping and Tracing Co
Ltd. Shares.
G. L, W. CLARKE, & Co.,
James Street.
3.10.51—3n.



AUCTION



BARBADOS AD





FOR RENT

HOUSES In Carlisle Bay











eee a Yacht Marsaltese, Sch L le M
CARD Si y . . uci
Paves mae = Su ae eee Smith, Sch. Agustus B. Compton, Sch.
are 3.10.51_-2n Furtie Dove, Sch. Mary M. Lewis, Sch
- as __. | Laudalpha Sch Everdene, Sch. Rosalinc
WALFORD—St. Lawrence (near Cable! fy, MV. Lady Joy, Seh. Mandalay I
Office). From Nov. ist, For information| | punicia. Ss a" M eae
hee te 3.10 51—2n! f Eunicia ch. Marea Henrietta, Sct
Se Lady Noeleen, Seh. Marion Belle Wolfe
wk ile Sd a Sen, Lucille M. Smith
ARRIVALS
PUBLIC NOTICES | 20 6 PENS os so,
Capt. Davis, from St. Vincent
SS Polyriver, 688 tons net, Capt
ant ta em, agate aes aaa Sorrang, from Halifax,
| min 7 renee S.S. Colombie, 7,554 tons net, Capt
om eee 3 on week-days | Dupont trom Martinique
| and $1 on Sundove M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt
Gumbs, from Dominica,
DEPARTURES
} = a OMCE ur _§.S. Colombie, 17.554 tons net, Capt
ARI Dupont, ‘or Trinidad.

| Applications for the post of Nurse at
| the St. Philip's Almshouse will be re-
| ceived by the undersigned up to Tuesday

Passengers
S.S. Cotembie.
From Southampton :

arriving yesterday by the





VOCATE

APPROVED

@ From page 3
}Maintenance expenses would be
.v0 per annum. If it is agreed

hat contributions shoula be
assessed On a population rather
jthan on a “Student basis’, Bar-

bados’ share would be under 6.6%
as Opposed to approximately 7.8%

/on the “Student basis.”
Accordingiy, the Legislative
Council is invited to indicate

whether it agrees in principle
with the proposal to establish a
Club and Centre in London for
West Indian Students and whether
it would be prepared to approve



%th October 1951. Joh ;
| Applicants must be fully qualified as} yZonn, Comber. Ireland, “Harrs “Late, 82d annually recurrent costs.
o Kure and Midwife, with certificates} Pelagia’ Little, Ivy Randall, John Ran.| The Address as passed by the
“a. meee vided Tiby- ‘thin. iebads aan, sae Randall, May Sunderland.| Council reads:
o Oo S$] Henry ucker, Audrey Tucker, Betty ‘ isle C
| $00.00 ber month Arne, William Armstrong, Jacqueline | The Legislative Council
Unitormne, ‘including thoes, and quart-| David, Reginald Johnson, Mildred John-| the honour to acknowledge re-
ers prov son. Patrick Roach, Edith Embereson,| ceipt of Your Excellency’s Message
The successful Candidate must assume | Maude Lawrence, Joseph Maynard, som 28/1951 and to aS wax
| duties on the 25th October 1961 James O'Toole, Sheila O'Toole, Bridget |
oe Toole. Excellency in reply that they
Applications for the post of Junior Nurse | oe os owre : agree in principle with the pro->
att St. Philip’s Almshouse will alsc ur’ essnler. 0! to i a entre
be received by the undersigned up tof tom Dominica : Pi 0 enn eiub Mode . ,
Tuesday 9th October 1951. Emmanu, Bertrand, Georges Bruney ondon for est Indian stu-
Salary attached to this post will be} mis Fandor, Thirza Rose, Shillingford|dents and would be prepared to
fixed between $33.00 and $44.00 per ons Yoeen fauetl | approve a contribution on a stu-
pavciiarmenty soa Keck gy £2 datahan Augustine Alatre, Gaston Athanase, dent basis towards the capital and
Uniforms, including shoes, and quarters | Lowlse Danisa. Renco Narbonnais, Liza| annually recurrent costs.
provided en a Zobda, Gaston Paul. 5. | The Hon'ble the Colonial Sec-
an worbesetal Candidate rage assume wae caving yesterday "by 8.1 retary in moving the passing of
uties “aunt ean we ee Le On Cruise; the Address gave the Council a



E. S. Larrier, Phillips and wife, Marie
Violet Taylor,
Yor Trinidad ;
| Grithth, +. mec Muriel Branch, Murie)
riffit innie Wells, John F, Cameron,
NOTICE | Durham C. Dixie, Kothwright Downes,
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS | Enid Edwards, Geraldine Kellman, Agnes
are reminded of the regular Monthly | Patel, Fatima Patel,
Meeting to be held at the Church House | Fer Jamaica :

Clerk to the Board of Guardians,
St. Philip.
29.9.51-—Tn































on Saturday next October 6, at 12 o’clock F. Skinner, F. Skinner, Fitz G. Green,
The Agenda include Matters of vital | Erville E. Green,
Importance For Dominicay™ —
Please make a special effort to attend. R. Tavernie
F. H. BARKER, a. Sheet
asi Hon. Secretary! In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station
Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd
WANTED advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Station
S.S. Campestre, s.s. Polyriver, 8.8
HELP Stugard, ss. Wilehief, s.s. North
a Haven, 8.8. Seapearl, s.8, Colombie, s,s
STENOGRAPHER & TYPIST: Experi- Aleva Corsair, s.s, Alcoa Polaris, s.8
enced Stenographer and Typist, Apply by | E*re, ss. Citta Di Viareggio,
letter and in person, L. M. B. Meyers & | Urania, ss. Santa Luisa, s.s, Burbank,
Co., Ltd 4.10.51—t.f.n]% 5. Rosario, s.s. Alcoa Puritan, s.s
Esso Knoxville, 8.s. Dolores, s.s. Bacha
en quero, s.s. Liss, Mary Adams, s.%
MISCELLANEOUS Reg.nt Tiger, s.s, Eagle, s.s. Christian
—_——————— 8.8 ntie Dealer, 8.9
TRUCK: One Ford V-8 Model 1946 Tiberius 8.8 ifito, 8.8 Emphe
or 1947 with dual gear. Apply W. B.| Windrush, 5.8 ritish Pilot,
Hutchinson. Dial 4484 30.9. 51—6n .



SEAWELL

ARRIVALS BY B.W.LA.L.
ON TUESDAY
From Trinidad :

M. Taylor, E. Taylor, D, Prazeod,
Todd, E. Tong, U. Tong, V, Prima, G
Charles, D. Knox, P, Knox, W. Nurse, C

A.

3.10.51—t.f.n a rington, V. Bostic, A, Christine,

WANTED TO RENT

BUNGALOW — From beginning of
December to April. Fu'ly furnished two
bedroom bungalow or apartment on sea.
All modern conveniences required. In-
cluding linen, cutlery and china. Apply
to Ralph A. Beard, Lower bay Street
Phone—4683.— Urgent.







aylor, P. Chandler. A. Muller, A. Mul-
ler, T, Muller, T. Muller, O. Mute, D











Duboulay
|

From October 3rd
to October 16th
inclusive



Mails for S$, Lucia by the M.V. La@y

|} Joy will be closed at



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER
By instructions received from
Insurance Co. I will sell on Friday
October Sth at Messrs. Redman & Tay-
lor’s Garage, opposite (Cathedral, St
Michael's Row: (1) 1951 Singer Car; 3
months old; only done 4,000 miles,
(Damaged in accident). Sale at 2 p.m.
Terms Cash. Vincent Griffith, Auc-
tioneer. 30.9.51—4n.

UNDER THE DIAMOND
HAMMER

By instructions received from Mrs
Deighton Sullivan, I will sell at her
residence “Camelot”, Chelsea Road, St.
Michael on Thursday next the 4th
October beginning at 12.30 p.m., her
cutire lot of household furniture which
includes Mahog. Couch, Morris chairs
and Settee with spring-filled cushions,
Rockers and upright chairs, plant stools,
Mahog. tables, Simmons bedstead with
spring, Mahog. wardrobe, nightchair.
cupboard, child's crib, play pen and
cupboard, Mahog. dining table with 4
chairs, china cabinet, sideboard, Prest-
cold Refrigerator, ping press, electric
iron, vacuum cleaner electric washer,
two-burner stove and oven, scales,
kitchen utensils, garden implements,
collection of books, telescope, and many
other tems of interest too numerous to







mention. Terms cash.
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer.
29.9.51—4n.



—_ — ——

ADVERTISE
IN THE



Peers eo ere eee ee

‘,

% “WESTWOOD HIGH

%

SCHOOL”

Jamaica, B.W.1.



&

First Class Boa School
for girls. Want aduate
Headmistress with experi-
ence in Boarding Schools, to
take up duties as early as
possible. 1952, School strong
Christian tradition. Cool
climate. Salary according
to scale. Apply by air mail
‘with “Testimonials etc. to :

Rev. I. C. PARSONS,

Chairman Board of
Governors.

‘ Stewart Toen, P.O.

4.10.51.—2n,





Bridgetown.

Street









Jamaica, B.W.I. 3

:

SPSS OOOO

|

. FLABBERGASTED
|

|

\

|



the Gene

Office as under : enereree
Parcel Mail and Registered Mail jat/9

a.m, Ordinary Mail: at 10 am,

4th October, 1951, ¢

BARBADOS. —_——_—_ ———_————.

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

im pursuance of the Chancery Act 1906, I do hereby giv
having or claiming any estate right or interest to any lien
affecting the property hereinafter mentioned (the property
before me an account of their claims with their witnesses documents and youchers
to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of 12 noon and
3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings, Bridgetown,
before the 2lst day of November, 1951, in order that such claims may be
reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof respectively
otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be
Geprived of all claims on or against the said property

| MAIL NOTICE
|

3.10.51—3n









‘e notice to all persons
or encumbrances in or
of the defendant) to bring

Plaintiff; CLIFTON HENRY WHITE
vs
Defendant: CLARENCE BELFIELD LAYNE

ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Bath Village
(formerly part of the lands of Maxwells plantation) situate in the
parish of Christ Church and island abovesaid containing by ad-
measurement twenty-six perches or thereabouts (inclusive of three
perches in roadway) abutting and bounding on lands formerly of
Bertina Miller but now of F. Clarke, on lands formerly of Maxwells
Plantation but now of A, B. Skinner and 8. Kinch on lands formerly
of Joshua Bourne but now of Graeme Hall Co. and on the public
road or however else the same abut and bound together with the
messuage or dwelling house called ‘‘Esme" and other the, erections
and buildings both freehold and chattel on the said land eree and
built standing and being with the appurtenances, es
August 1951,

PROPERTY:

Bill filed:

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrat-in-Chancery.

ARE

AT THE

GENUINE KNOCKED DOWN
PRICES at THe BIGGEST EVER

Knock-out
SALE

Now in Full Swing at.. .

THANI BROS.

Dial 3466
3® Free Gifts for those who spend $5.00 and over

Pr. Wm. Henry Street _

.—Thousands are taking advantage of this SALE !
What about YOU ? ?

rane

99

—_





% clarke, N. Vaughn, Rev. Vaughn, P.
SS | Garsonnin.
DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA.L.
| KINGSLEY | Yor Trinidad ;
.| Willy Lutz, Chuma Averboukh, Chi
RESIDENTIAL on Avec oukh, Homaid wenn i |
CLUB Pierre, intfred Gittens, David Lue, |
| Phyllis Lue, nee Ahong, Winsome Ber-
;amsingh, Hugh Webber, Stella Webber,
e Harold Bagot
For St. Lucia;
Closed | Elsie Mullins, Sylvia Mullins, Frances
Mondesir, Everton Clairmonte, Andre
































background of the project saying

| that the students expressed desire
to have the centre which would
include a library, reading room,
bar, kitchen and a room for sport,
etc.

Uniformity

He said that the Message had
\§ suggested that Barbados’ contribu-
| tion would either be on a student
| basis or a population basis. He
had not very strong views on that
| part of the matter, but he thought
| that as the Other Place had passed
| the Address to the Governor
pointing out that the proposal must
be on a student basis, he thought
that the Council would stick to
that for the sake of uniformity.

Hon'ble Mr. Evelyn said that the
centre might be a \good thing, but
one point that should not be for-
gotten was that being a member
}of a club, would add slightly to
\the students cost of tiving.

Hon'ble Mr. Gale said that whiie
he agreed to the principle of the
Address, it did seem to him that
jvhen students go abroad, they
should not be segregated, He felt
that they should mix more with
people of other nationalities.







COCFSD

He knew that the first couple
| of weeks the students would be
| lonely, but looking at the mat-
ter from a broad point of view,














| 1

IMPORTANT
To Ges Consumers,
Dear Friends,

It is expected to turn on
the supply of Neat Natural
GAS on the night of Octe.
ber 10th. Every effort will
be made to cause as little |
inconvenience as possible to
consumers. A_ portion of
jets will be changed for
each customer before the
turn over and the remainder
afterwards.

Schedule of rates will be
forwarded as quickly as pos-
sible,






We remain,
Always at Your Service,
THE BARBADOS GAS

co, LTN.



milling experience

to be
outweigh
cost.

He said that having the centre
for these students, was not a ques-
a col i i tion of West Indians being segre-
a Contre eeneree, Wr aaeente gated although he agreed with the
Hon'ble Mr. Gale that they shouk
mix with other people.
have that it would be a good thing fo
them to have this place, becaus«
could meet fellow West In-
dians and discuss problems con
cerning the West Indies.

he thought

gated.

Hon’ble Dr. Cato said that witi
point
Evelyn, he agreed tha
centre would
the cost a/ living, but the benefit:
derived from it would fa.
question of

rugard to

Hon'ble Mr.

having a

they

that the students!
should mix with the people and
learn something
rather than have them segre-

any

PAGE SEVEN



Harbour Log' W.1. STUDENTS CENTRE | 8HIPPING NOTICES



MONTREAL, AUSTRaLlA, NEW
ZEAIAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A NZ. Line)

CCC



“Port ADELAIDE”
from Hobart September

s.s
interesting] to sai!

is scheduled
25th,



LLLP SE EO

Melbourne October 4th, Sydney October The a V “CARIBBEE” will. ac-
10th, Gladstone October iéth, Port Alma re argo pd pace on:
October 20th, Brisbane October 27th, hoses ona se Sere ne on.
arriving at Trinidad about November day Sth October =. ing »
Zist and Barbados November Mth. 7s aaee. .
In addition to general cargo this
made by vessel has ample space for chilled and BW. SCHOONER OWNERS’
hard frozen cargo. ASSOCIATION (INC)
increase Cargo accepted on through Bills of as

Consignee, Tele. No.

Lading for transshipment at Trinidad to
Eritish Guiana, Leeward and Windward
islands.
For further particulars apply—
FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD.,
DaCOSTA & CO. LTD.,
Trinidad,
B.W.I,

extn
anc

Barbados,
B.W.I.

He fel









Future Leaders ’ mone NEW *¥YORK SERVICE
He took that view especiall,]| S.S. “MARIO C.” salis 1st October arrives Barbados 13th Oct., 1951
because the West Indians who are] 4 STEAMBR sails 12th October arrives Barbados 23rd October, 1951
being educated England a 2 eae” Pea — " wet
present would the men anc NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

women who would be guiding th

future of the West Indies and thr
would come when the West
Indians would think of this cen-
as Demerarians or Trini-
dadians or Barbadians, but as West

time
tre, not

Indians.

He felt that it was a very
laudable idea and personally did

| mot see any objection to it. He
lived in England as a student

S.S. “ALCOA PURITAN” sails 12th September

5.8. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE” sails 26th Sept

A STEAMER sails 10th October arrives Barbados
A ee neem

CANADIAN SERVIUK

arrives Barbados 1ith
arrives Barbados Lith
25th October, 1961

SOUTHBOUND

Name of Ship Sails Montreal Salls Halifax

I
“ALCOA PILGRIM" due Barbados September 17th
and St. Lawrence River Ports

s.s Sallis for St

and would have welcomed the

existence of such a centre in his

time.

Hon'ble
the
and

Hutson
remarks of Hon'ole Dr. Cato
that West
students who were not actually in

suggested

These vessels have limited passenger accommodation



supported

Indian

London but might be elsewhere in

England should be allowed to be-

members of ei |
|
ih
Ii
| (

come associate

club.

a a a a a a ae
. USED POSTAGE STAMPS

fountain

Box

3 $9596495656666664466000
siiieedatahediubies anand OCH OO SOOO OOOO SOOO OOOS

MAVE YOU PLACED
YOUR ORDER FOR
*. MASSEY HARRIS
HEAVY DUTY
DIESEL TRACTOR ?

Shipments are once again coming forward and

you are advised to book early.

NOTE SOME OF THE MAIN FEATURES

42 B.H.P. PERKINS Heavy "uty
Diesel Engine

Replaceable

Press button

5 forward speeds

Belt Pulley & Power Take-off

Lights

Hour-meter

Steel wheels are obtainable for ploughing

really heavy going

SF

oe









OGILVIE

ANNIVERSARY



“CANADIAN QUEEN”

Predetermined quality FLOUR
backed by 150 years of flour

Prompt cash paid for used stamps,
handise such as
meras,

If you wish,



ete., will
Send 200 oy more stamps

DAYTON STAMP COMPANY,
128, Centerville, Ohlo U.S.A

6 cyl.
"oretaet liners

whilst for

are available,

THE TROUBLE-FREE TRACTOR -- BACKED
BY OUR SERVICE ORGANISATION

PSCC DALAM CLG



AT LENGTH AND AT LAST

we are in a position to offer
SAIL CANVAS NO. | THROUGH TO NO. 9

clothing,
exchange



4.10. 51-—1n



Your enquiries are invited!

COURTESY
GARAGE

ROBERT THOM LIMITED.—Agents.

tarter

“half-tracks”

White Park Road = ::: Dial 4616







1951

From the New Royal Mill of
The Ogilvie Flour Mills Co.,
Ltd. at Montreal — Canada's
Most Modern Mill, direct to
your Wholesaler Grocer and

Baker, a better Flour for you



THE OGILVIE FLOUR MILLS, Co., Ltd.

ROBERT

MONTREAL, CANADA
THOM

LIMITED = Agenis

POS



Octs
Oet.,





2991.
195

S.S. “ALCOA PEGASUS" September 7th
8.8. “ALCOA POINTER” September 28th September 30th October 10th
S.S. “ALCOA PEHLGRIM" October 12th October 15th October 25th



Arrives Barbadoy - —
September 10th September 20ta -



John, N.B

ee

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE

el CENTRAL. FOUNDRY LTD. — PIER HEAD

SIE,
PLAY







ort vrs uted,



PAGE EIGHT

Fifth Regatta
Won By

Vameoose

(By Gur Yachting Correspondent
Vamoose scored anowier vicwry,
beating the second boat by two
minutes, when the Fifth Trial
Regatta im preparation for the
Intercolonial ‘Tornado Yachting

Series in Trinidad was sailed in
Carlisle Bay on Monday (Bank-
Holiday) at 10.30 a.m, The sixth
and final race was scheduled to
take place in the afternoon at

3.30 o'clock but owing to the
very light wind this had to be
postponed.

Teddy Hoad, skippering

Vamoose, was again exception-
ally good at the helm. He steered
Vamoose into the lead between
the western mark and the buoy,
coming up from fifth position.
Gerald Nicholls at the helm ot
Cyclone also gave a good per
formance. Cyclone sailed steadily
throughout and, along with
Vamoose, will most likely make the
Trinidad tour,

Ten boats started. They sailed
north about in the light wind and
calm sea. At the start Comet,
skippered by George Allen, went
into the lead. Tempest was next.
followed by Vamoose, Cyclone,
Thunder, K. 36, skippered by Tom
Wilkinson, Edril, Zephyr, Break-
away and Swansea. Cyclone soon
passed out Vamoose, Tempest and
Comet and went into the lead. She
was first around the Bay Street
mark, followed by Tempest second
and Thunder third. Edril was now
in fourth position.

Cyclone kept the lead and wa
first around the western marl
bout ten seconds ahead of Thun-
cer which had overtaken Tempes..
Teddy Hoad, by some clever
tacking, took the lead on the run
to the buoy. Vamoose was first
to complete the first round about
25 seconds ahead of © Cyclone,
second. Zephyr was now third, a
few seconds behind Cyclone. Next
was Tempest, then Thunder,
Edril. Swansea, Comet, Break-
away and K. 36.

Increases Lead

Vamoose increased her lead.
When she was completing the
ge¢ond round, Cyclone, whicn was
sull second, was routding the
puoy. Vamoose completea tnis
round over a minute ahead of
Cyclone. Third was Zephyr, 40
seconds behind Cyclone. founder
passed 35 seconds later, followed
py Tempest, Edril, Swansea,
Breakaway, Comet and K. 36.

Vamoose went out to lead
around the Bay Street mark. It
was while Swansea, skippered by
Noc, “mptage, was going around
this that she overturned. It took
many seconds before the crew
got her again on even keel.
Breakaway and Comet took this
opportunity to pass her out but
she managed to join the race
again before K,. 36 could get
ahead of her.

It could now be clearly seen
qhat the race was going to
Vamoose. She went even farther
into the lead. She quickly got

und the buoy and went on to
defeat Crclone! second, by two
minutes and 20 seconds, Zephyr,
which also sailed steadily, was
third, 30 seconds behind Cyclone.
Thunder was fourth, beating
Earil, fifth, by about ten seconds.
The others, in order, were Tem-
pest, Breakaway, Swangea, K. 36

Comet. :
anne sixth and final race will
now be sailed on Sunday morn-
ing at 10.30 o'clock. After this
it will be known which three
boats will visit Trinidad, From
what I read in the Guardian the
Tyinidadians are anxiously look-
ing forward to the tour and hope
to make it a yearly feature. Next
year the series are expected to

take place here.

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Police Courts — 10 a.m.

Court of Original Jurisdic-
tion — 10.68

Camera Club

a.m,
Exhibition at

Barbados Museum — 10.00
a.m. :
Combermere Old Boys’

Cricket Match at Comber-
mere — 1.30 oe iis
bile Cinema iv
agnor at Oldbury Planta-
tion Yard, St. Philip —

7.30 p.m.
NEMAS
Ps Foolish Heart” and

1 oe 6.45

GLOBE:
“Marsha! of Mesa City
pm, and 8.15 p.m.

PLAZA (Bridgetown): Ms

’ Widow of Wagon Gap
“Boss of Boomtown’ —
m. and 8.15 p.m. . a

ony MPIC. “Zorros Black Whip
and “In The Navy" — 4 30 p.m,
and 8.15 p.m

RUXY: “Wolf Man” and “Black
Narcissus” — 4.30 p.m and
8.15 p.m.

ROYAL: “T-Men” and “Law of
The Lash” — 4.30 p.m. and 8.15

“Wistfal
and
4.45

an Sd ”
ghrine : “Bird of Paradise’ —

4.30 p.m. and 8.15 p.m.
“Elizabeth of

PLAZA (Oistin) =
Ladymeade” — 5.00 p.m. and
8.30 p.m.



‘They'll Do I

























HELLO
UH-WHERES
AR. DILLBERRY &
NOT SICK IS HE $
HE SAID HE'D BE
READY TO PLACE

NZ





minutes to complete.
soon overfell Barbados.
brilliant one-handed piece of field-
ing by Persaud at cover resulted
in Proverbs being run out, Smith
powerfully past
short extra cover and the batsmen
attempted a single
covering
down fielding with ome hand and
returning to Gaskin.

ciove

Persaud

powerfully
for a single opening his account,
but edged high through the slips
off Gaskin soon after barely miss-
ing Camacho’s hand, Smith play-
ing grand cricket hit Gaskin wide
ef midon skilfully placing through
then
straight drove two balls later for
piloting his
individual score to the seventies.

the

another

who had been

t Every Time
. G7 ints sais)

IS NO LONGER,

WITH THE FIRM»
YOU_CAN LEAVE



SERLIN:
two teams of riders, consisting of a goalkeeper, a left and right back and three forwards, fight for the

outsize airfilled leather ball, which has to be pushed forward by the horses’ legs.



this soccer match on horseback at the Olympic Stadium, British sector.

@ trom page 1.
Proverbs Run Out
The century had _ taken

Gaskin
but
beautifully

The batsmen
fielded

hesitated
and

man in
to extra

next
down

Farmer

two onside fieldsmen,

boundary

Smith had a life at 74 when
steping out to slow spinner Patoir
he drove high and straight

Leslie Wight at long-off the latter

putting down a sitter.

Unperturbed Smith soon tucked
slow spinner Seaforth
the pad to backward
for three making his
80 and the total

130,
Smith Bowled

But without addition, Smith in
the next over from Patoir jumped
down the wicket und had a good
swing at one that beat bim through
the air, then also beat him with
the break back from leg, bowling

him meek and crop for 80,

Smith’s batting was an excellent

and promising effort, playing
erisp and confident strokes with
graceful fluency, His innings

lasted exactly three hours and he
hit ten fours,

Marshall now partnered Farmer
batting 45 minutes
for 13 runs. Marshall punished a
short ball from Patoir with a hara
pull to the long on boundary for
four.

131/4/80,

Behind Clock

Barbados was now well behind

the clock, 150 coming in 211
minutes,

Farmer forsook his patient role,
smashing a pile drive to
long on boundary § making
score 24, but without addition

drove back hard to Patoir

carpet.

Persaud the

who bowled

ever before lunch with success in
the first Test was brought on in
the last over but one before lunch.

The erowd cheered as this was
stpposed to have some psycholog-
Marshall
destroyed the bogey with two hard
feurs to the on boundary and a
single while Farmer scored a sin-
gie tor making a total of terptaken
off the over. Marshall was now in
‘he twenties and Farmer celebrat-

ical significance. But



YESTERDAY’S
WEATHER REPORT

From Codrington
Rainfall: .17 ins.
Highest Temperature

865° F,

Lowest Temperature :
12.5° F.
Wind Velocity : 5 miles per

hour
Barometer : (9 a.m.) 29.935
(3 p.m.) 29.865





THE NEW Uy
GUY, WOULDN'T
GIVE HiS MOTHER
AN ORDER FOR
~_ CATNIP =

143
But disaster

Another the Barbados’

Persaud
swooped

when
Proverbs
trying to regain his ground was
tun out by yards, 102/3/19,

high

drove

cover Farmer

stroke for four as well, then back
drove to extva cover for a single
sending up 200 runs in 241 min-

neatly off
square leg
own scére

who
put a high chance down on the



THAT SALESMAN HAS
HIS COMMISSION SPENT
ALREADY BUT THE :
ONLY ORDER DILLY
IS GIVING OUT NOW
IS *GO AWAY AND
LET ME SLEEP’

2nd B.G.—Barbados Test |

ed his own entry in the thirties by
pulling an offbreak
forth high to the deep square leg

from Sea-
boundary. Luncheon interval saw
score at 177/4,
Farmer 35 not out, Marshall 20

not out,
After Lunch
Rain during terval cut fifteen minutes off

playing time but the wicket was

covered and only the outfield was
dampened. Marshall too entered

his thirties soon after the game
restarted lifting Norman Wight
to the unpoliced long-on
boundary for four and the Bar-
bados_ total reached the 190’s.
brought off a_ similar

utes.

Later Farmer twice drove Pa-
toir, down to the long off bound-
ary off powerful strokes off the
back foot afid completed his im-
dividual half century in 90 min-
utes batting, hitting five fours.

Gaskin ‘took the new ball him-
self and Marshall greeted his
first delivery which was short
with a hook to the square leg
boundary for four. Next over,
however Marshall was out to
Gaskin in the leg trap. He turn-
ed. one that swung outside the
pad for Wight at first leg slip to
make a good catch to dismiss
him. Marshall was at the wicket
batting freely, hitting six fours
in his 69 minute stay.

216—5—43

Atkinson partnered Farmer and

the latter_.was almost out to

Gaskin, in the leg trap too. He
he pads but the

too turned one off
ball fell a few inches from Ca-
macho’s outstretched hand,

Farmer off drove for a brace
making the score 219 removing
the threat of a follow-on, With
the score at 228 and Farmer’s
individual score at 56 Farmer was
stricken with cramp and had to
retire to the pavilion, Walcott
filling the breach.

Farmer walked off the field
unaided so it seemed as if it was
quite possible for him to return
later in the batting order.

Walcott dispelled any fears of
falling a victim again to Gaskin’s
leg trap since the ball was still
new and still swinging and Gas-
kin was still bowling inswingers.
He cover dtove for two then

is “wept Gaskin to the pull bound-

ary for four and later neatly late
cut another Gaskin delivery for
four. He hit the second six of
the match when in the same over
he lifted another ball from Gas-
kin high over the long-on bound-
ery.

This sent up 250 im 3806 min-
utes and took Waleott into the
twenties. The next ball Gaskin
flighted well and Walcott hit out
again but he skied to mid-on,
Gaskin had no orthodox mid-on
set and Seaforth at backward
mid-on could not cover ground,

Walcott late cut for four off
Norman Wight, the ball going
down to deep third man but was
eut the next ball when in get-
ting back on to the wicket to late
éut in the direction of third man
he hit the wicket too in making
the stroke.

Walcott had scored 30 in 29
minutes and his innings included
one six and three fours.

267—6—30

Wood partnered Atkinson help-
ing himself to a lofty four off
Patoir but later skied the same
bowler dangerously near Thomas
fielding at dcep mid-on.

Next over from Wight, Atkin-
son was beaten and bowled with
a well pitched off break.

Atkinson had been batting for
69 minutes.

218 —I—18

Greenidge next man in was

_ By Jimmy Hatlo |
GI)







THAT GUY TOOK
DILLBERRY OUT TO
LUNCH SO OFTEN
HIS WALLET
BURPS!













{HAS His Own |
PALS TO WORK |
HIS LITTLE



Sat
xe ely

»

Warcuine THE GALES-
MAN'S 6-MONTHS’ SPADE
WORK GO IN THE ASHCAN=
a wv
=| THANX TO LARRY LOVELL,
5126 M€& DONALD AVE
MONTREAL CAN,






tennessee
given
crowd after singling off the first
breaking his
run of ducks. Tea interyal soon
after saw Barbados score 282—7,
Wood 11 not out, Greenidge 1 not

ball

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Something new jin “soccer” is demonstrated by West Berlin police on horseback. The

The police will stage

—Eupress.



Sports Window
WATER POLO

The two water polo games
at the Aquatic Club this
afternoon are Swordfish vs.
Harrison College and Whip-
porays vs. Flying Fish. Play
begins as soon after 4. 45
o’clock as possible.

The Swordfish—Harrison
College fixture is the decid-
ing game for the league
Cup. Whichever team scores
an outright victory wins the
Cup. If the match is a draw
‘Swardfigh, will still have
one point more than Har-
rison College, so the Col-
Jegians must win or lose the
Cup.

a great ovation by

from Wight

out.

game restarted.

After Tea

Greenidge had a life with his
score at a single soon after the
I He drove out at
Wight who did not get well over
the ball putting up a dolly catch
to Gibbs at mid-off but the lat-

ter dropped an easy catch.

held by Umpire Gillette.
93—8—

innings

ley from Patoir to the mid-on buco eAeplcsusime etnias 8 rroken had raised the ‘queshan
boundary for 4 sending up 300 Weigh 2 oat Or 4 omyrehensive insurance
in 365 minutes. — scheme and that was a seheme
Greenidge batting more con- Goskt e uw OR 7 which had to be brought in by

fidently took several singles with Thomas... “o's 1 3 Government,
late cuts then on-drove Patoir Seaforth .......... 15 4 26 © The Bill was then passed.
for four, N. Wight i Moe 4

Farmer alto on-drove Wight tor ita’ ccs 8

four but was nearly out to Wight
He attempted to hit
out, then stopped the stroke half-
way, cocking the ball to mid-off.
Gaskin made a good effort get-
ting one hand to

next over.

11

Farmer 56 not out resumed his
Walcott as
runner. Farmer lifted a half vol-

earrying in

fail holding it.

added nine runs before he drove chosen to represent the Present foreign currency between Bel-
out to Thomas not getting well boys who will play Past boys at sium, Western Germany and
over the ball, raised it into the Combermere School today at 1.30 South America. ,

safe waiting hands of Persaud 9.m.:—Grant, G. N. (Capt.) Wil- Werner Aprath, Director of

Farmer was than 65 runs. He

at cover.



Satake ed anda quarter hours Maxwell, W. W., Lewis, K. H., customs men, arrested an uniden-
Pare ‘3 and hitting eight fours, Francis; .L.. G., King, N. M., tified man at Roettgen, trying to
a 333—9—7 Beckles, H. O. and Fields, R. A. cross the Belgian border with 600
Hintder’. laats <1 ; Old Boys are invited to tea at carats of diamonds hidden in

r vost -man in late cut bookends with hollow bases in his

Gaskin courageously for a brace


















nutne A 4
LLLP LCE CLV PELL SED

Parmer had been at the wicket

—————<—$

AVE

SHEPHERD |

& Co,, Ltd.

10—13, Broad St.

J& R BAKERIES

VBE OLIODEA OOOH
POS DISCOS

FSIOSS

the

A
snick by Greenidge through slip
for a single sent up Wood to face
Wight but the former played back
to an off-break was struck on the
pad, and a Lb.w. appeal was up-

the ball, but

Such natural beauty with
products by

morny.



SOO OSS COCO R OS OG) 606646660906"



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1051.













Chase Holds Meeting x 4 =
a > . >|
X 4 . ~ ,
@ From page 5 business he sold rice at a penny a] D A N G E y BARBADOS LABOU R {

taken from members of the pint. He believes that his exp- $ At %! PARTY
present Government, has power erience in that line of business] ¥ . i
io allow anyone to deposit three would be of benefit to the people.| THE BARBADOS 3 | Will Hold A
months water rates and then have He has got 30 years experi- $ AQUATIC CLUB 3 |
water put in under reasonable ence supplying foodstuff to the! ¥ (Members Only) 3 |
térms. “Why this Act has not people who canaoct afford heavy |¢ On f 4
been mentioned to you by the spending. His building up came 3 ‘ ‘ >|
yarious politicians is a mystery trom the people and if he got into] & Saturday, October 6th, >|
ierme,” he said. the House of Assembly he would | % 9.00 p.m, ys.

“If the Government wants to do everything in his power to re- > ¥ ||
give water to you at 25 cents per ciprocate by helping them in|S Musie by Mr. Sydney Niles | i
month it could do it. If they can- eyery way possible. He respect-|% and thie Gbchent % | 3
iot get water for you, yOu come fully asked that they give him al # 8B A See | Near
to me and I will show you how chance as one of their “epresenta- > \ } ST. GEORGE'S
to get it,” he said. ‘ _. tives to show if he has the qual-| ¢ Members are cordially CHURCH

He sgid that he had noticed in jties to carry out the promises ne invited Se: Canoe
the newspaper that from January jas so solemnly made. (Free: Ad to St. George
next the price of rice will be going He said that the programme x al ues On
wp to 11 cents per pint, “rice, an which the Electors Association is| % ‘ Friday Night. 5th Oct
item which is a necessity on the going to put forward is not yet % 4.10.51.—3n. riday . ight, 5t ; 0-
menu of our homes.” completed. It might be disclosed | ¥ ber, 1951, at 8.00 o'clock

He said that it was sad that no- shortly.

body in Government could think
of some method in which to keep
down some of the rise in the cost
of rice. There has been established
for a long time an Equalised
Scheme. There are lots of food-
staff which are not as necessary
ag rice. This scheme provided that
efter these goods have arrived in
the island the cost could go up.
This profit could, along with the
sum given by the House of Assem-
bly for subsidisation, keep down
some of the rising price of rice.
He said that when he first started

Mr. C. G. Elder acted as Chair-
man. Other speakers were Mr.
G. Foster and Mr. Yarde. Mr. S.
Skinner moved a vote of thanks.

Play Field Enquiry

@ From page 4
these observations indicate that Mr.
Tudor was completely at a loss for
even a plausible reason for ignor-
ing the directions of the Vestry.
He knew quite well that the grant
from the Labour Welfare Fund
had been made to the Vestry, that
audited accounts of expenditure
had to be furnished by the Vestry,
and that the Vestry and not the
Governor or the Governor-in-
Executive Committee was respon-
sible for expenditure on the Play-
ing Fielq and the pavilion. Mr.
Tudor would like the Commission
to believe that he yielded to the
blandishments of the Acting Gov-





to open his account.

Greenidge late cut too beauti-
fully, to make his score 25 the
crowd applauding the quarter
century, sympathetic ever since
he broke the spectacle spell.

Greenid, ad the luckiest
break of his short career. Holder
drove out hard, Gibbs fielding
magnificently at extra-cover and
catching Greenidge yards down
the wicket but Thomas dropped
the ball and pulling up wic-
ket stump without the ball still
gave Greenidge another chance
to. regain the crease. The score
was then 338, still 30 runs behind
British Guiana’s first innings
total. Holder sent the Barbados
score into the 340’s with a power-
ful on drive off Gaskin.

Barbados’ innings closed for 343
soon after this when Holder lifted
one from Thon.as high overhead
and Gibbs running from extra
cover took a magnificent running
catch to dismiss him. Score read
343, Holder 10 while Greenidge
carried out his bat for 25 runs.
The time was then 4.15 and the
innings had lasted 415 minutes.

.G.’s SECOND TRY

is not now in Barbados and was

cause he felt that the Acting Gov-
ernor controlled the purse strings
and could influence the grant of
extra money from
Welfare Fund.

@ Continued To-morrow



Pension Claims

@ From page 3
person who went for it in case
there was no relative.

Mr. A. EK. S. Lewts said that a
glance through the Order paper
would show that no Honourable
Member had notified Government
to do that about which they were
just speaking. It was a really

|

ernor (unfortunately Mr. Perowne % KINDNESS

not available as a witness) be-'}



|



In support of the
candidature of

MR. FB. MILLER
AND
MR. BE. W. BARROW

Speakers :

Mr. G. H. ADAMS, M.C.P.
Dr. H. G. CUMMINS, M.C.P.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT, M.C.P.
Mr. R. G. MAPP, M.C.P.
Mr. F. E. MILLER, M.C.P.
Mr. E. W. BARROW, B.Sc.
Mr. E. HOLDER

Mr. J. C. TUDOR, M.A.

»

LEPC LEOOPESS",

CALLING
ALL SCOUTS

























4,

POOPIE E PLP PLESSIS

-

s

x BARBADOS
x TO ELECTORS
the Lavour/® =» ANIMALS ASSOCIATION

By
SGT. MAJOR
Cc. F. TORREZAO

POLITICAL
MEETING

TO-NIGHT

On

x
v
x
At
Scout Headquarters
Friday, 5th October







Bir he ge, roe 7 RS vital thing they were talking At 6.00 p.m. 8 O'CLOCK
facing Marshall on-drove the fret {DOU =, {04 pension Wii) WO." f seauennonnemonononnee At
a © four and later singled and Te? :

ta . people’s door. : > =
ee oe, me ee He said that he would have| BARBA SP ( A LOWER DAYRELLS
against light. B.G.’s . liked to hear the Senior Member, DOS .
Wight 5 oak and! Gibbs 0 not hab for St. Andrew saying that instead ory ROAD





BG. a pines Innings ..,..... 368 of keeping people in the factory
thados — First Innings , g a 2
ayior cb. Wisht b Gukin’... 4 Until they got too old and me
unte c wk. Jordan b N. Wight 16 turn them on Government, e
mith b Patoir . #0 would put aside something to
Proverbs Pubsalh 6 akcuae. 19 give them
‘armer c Persaud b depo Sere ai, i
arshall ¢ L. Wight b Gaskin .... 43. Mr. W. W. Reece (E) said that
re HL wlan S waiaal dick .... 18 he agreed it was a matter of vital
vale it wkt. b Wight ........ 30 i a 2 ie a
Wood Ibw .b Wight ees a and he bel _ vor
ogbidae not out 25 7overnment was conscious 0! at.
folder ¢ Gibbs b Thomas .... 9 The second last member who had







Smuggler Held

COLOGNE, Oct. 3.
West German
announced on Wednesday
had smashed a big

Old Boys’ Match
At C’bermere Today

The following team has been

kinson, O. H., Alleyne, I. McD.,
Licorish, L. E., Brathwaite, L. K.,

4 p.m. and cocktails at 6 p.m.

Subscriptions will be $1.00. car.—U.P.

including
Baby Powder
in boxes with
puff,

Tins of Talcum, Bath Salts, Boxes of Soap
(3 cakes each) Hand Cream.



And for men there are Shaving Bowls.



It’s Delighthul!!

NICE SPECIAL
SLICES OF
PUDDINGS :

te S SLPS oP ate

? 344, OO COOOOOCCOCOOLw"

PISSISSOSSS PLESSIS

customs police
they
smuggling
ring which funnelled $20,000,000
worth of diamonds, narcotics and

Cologne City Finance Department
said the ring was uncovered when

BAKED BY % |

OCP VOGOT,

-































ST. FRANCIS DAY
October 4th

Christ Church
In support of the



BRIDGE AND CANASTA
QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE,
4.00 P.M.

candidature of

Messrs. Fred Goddard,
M.C.P.



Special Children’s Pro-
gramme produced by
Auntie Betty from RE-
DIFFUSION at 6.00 p.m.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5TH
4.30 P.M.
CHILDREN’S CONCERT

AND
W. W. Reece, M.C.P.



Speakers :
At Sata y ie
QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE Messrs, F. ©. Goddard, M.C.P.
Tickets (Reserved) 1/6
from Mr. Arthur, Bay Street
Boys’ School
Admission 1/- (Adults)
6d. (Children)

W. W. Reece, M.C.P.
E. D. Motiley, M.C.P.

L. E. R. Gill, M.C.P.



BRITISH COUNCIL

Hi. A. Dowding, M.C.P.
presents
over REDIFFUSION at 9.00

‘ Rev. Vineent Griffith
p.m. a Programme of Music,

Prose and Verse connected
with

ANIMALS

Sydney Walcott
Miss L. Reid



N.B.—Will Bridge and and others
Canasta players please bring
their own Cards, Pencils and } 4.10.51.—1n:

Markers ?

YES

We have just received - - -



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Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGI I HI i: ItARUADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. CKTUBKR 4. 1951 BARBADOS ffi|AW / D6SrE I,.,— ^.-t =*= 1 1 r.in. r !*• A*iau i M...4 •. M4U llnii-Hi.%. Orlhr 4 1951 M IIOI Aitsiurs BOTH Han* agreed to an UMndmtnl "i the Act govi nbig the award <>f Barbados Scholarships and ExhibiUona in order to gram all five hipg to boyi instead of retaining one foi The amendment was subjected to a most critical analysis although there was no strenuous opposition. Any objection which ,-d was in an effort to make it certain that the. Government had not created a dangerous precedent which might in fattm adversely affect the award ot these scholarships. As was pointed out by the Colonial Secretary in the Logbtetfvo Council an ..\vkw.ii\l predicament has aiisen. It has now happened that five boys have qualified lor scholarship* and the number limited to boys are four. Two of the boys who have so qualified took classics and have equally well; the examiners felt it difficult to decide on the winner in this section and so the tie remained. As if to aggravate this position, the en report states that no girl qualified for %  cholaishlp. It waw generally felt that as no girl had I and as there were five eligible boys, it would be well to award the live scholarships to boys. It was found that the • %  ideally provided that one of these scholarships must be awarded to a female. The alternative to a non-award in this section would be that the scholarship would lapse and this was regarded as most undesirable. It was then suggested that the only remedy lay in an amendment to the Act. Here it was thai another difficulty presented itself. If the act was permanently amended then it would mean shutting out the i',irls for whose benefit this section was specifically inserted. It might be that an act could have been passed providing that for the year 1951 the scholarships should be awarded to boys alone. Each amendment had its peculiar merit. The insertion of the that in the event of no girl qualifying as has happened, the fifth scholarship should be awarded to a boy might well be supported by another alternative pTOv idn % %  Uiai m the ev. n! of no bo) qualifying all Ihe gcholarships should be awarded to ('iris. This point was raised in the Council. The objection that the scholarship should not be awarded as no girl had qualified and should be allowed to lapse, met with no support. The amendment which has now been accepted does not mean that there will be any change in the principle of awarding the scholarships. There will ajwayg I a four scholarships principally provided for four I the fifth for girls; but it will be convenient hi future, if no girl qualifies as has occurred this year, for the five scholarships to be awarded to five boys. The public will be generally satisfied with the result inasmuch as it is nowltnown that one of the boys involved has also been awarded an exhibition to the University College ol the West Indies. If he is given a Barbados Scholarship the exhibition can be awarded to another pupil. No harm will have been done and another Barbadian will have an opportunity to get university training. If the scholarship had been allowed to lapse there would have been one less. For the satisfaction of the more material minded the arrangement has given the maximum result and has not involved the Government in any greater expenditure than would normally have been spent if the award had been in consonance with the •i.d provisions of the Act. PRINCESS ALICE ENQUIRY REPORT puhhi itton of the intu ccrutn HI <\er\ %  TOI1AV ihr "Advocate' brctnMalene ho n.ndurU-d an Ingulf, i'" MM ruting Field." II IM hr MMMWI tOn d*> until rmtvletnl. The repot: adi'ieceed to the Governor, Sir Alfred Savage re. %  •'!• irte*Vd if the public been elected (MC Ap,><-mlix IV%  ni.uaht or was allowed Among these waa the Uioul just cau. that they were aa the %  Reef Oroufl dies to any •etloo nod the "PrlnceM Incalled in question Alice Playing Field". This land The (•HdMci and ..."...,:• THE CRIME EXPERTS ON THE BENCH IfONTGOMBBI HYDIC MP. the dislinuuiihed criminolog-ist, examhata the new MMII. i.,1 appointment and DO Wr. NKKI1 MOKK CRIMINAL Jl'UOBH HAVK we enotia*a. rrimmal judges? The promotion of 52-ye*>oid Mr. Colin blek could p P arson. KC. to the King's Bench, where Sir ii Travers Humphreys's retirement caused a •visa* IT *tr Cn*nwnl .-l.l.l.^iii.. nl ot thr BOOKS WE HAVE THE BEST f.V /Oil ADVOCATE SI A IIOMItY i xrrrurd b> the \esUy of the. vacancy, has occasioned some surprise. P.rtaJi of 81 Michael In Canrtee[ n wag thought in the Temple that an Old v.%^^^o^^^',^^v/,r/////V/,v////,*.',v*v.v/-v-v/.'/*.', indicate that Lord mMtlng bald Jowttt the Loid Chancellor, on whose reteaued on me wr, Jim mi. oy ^ llu-lw j .Bout one mile from VMU Kx' practitioner in the tradition of Sir &i%2£ t Js£Ei'Z ^rjss&A^^rsm ,.&j*w?%vs T rave !" him ~" m Kh h ovc bten ^ establishment of the "Princess reclaimed land, and it is partly g t Michael* Vr-'r. Is empower! Although the new judge will undoubtedly ..,..m Field-• My !" "' *""**r *lr*.J? !'" ',' m,n ; bring con.ider.ble leR.l learning and ability rafavenca were to enquire of the loth June. iv*v. in •im.i a g f playing field* 'ir the use of Inio the establishment of the ratal hi be tho DUIIIIC The Chu r c h wrdei to to the High Court Bench it is noteworthy P i I n IBM Altoe Piaymg Field." "•( of en on [h( Chief Executive oncer <•' the h hj nrartiee as a barrister has chiefly tha conduct and management the "Reel Grounds... ., v nnti h u ,i Ml lh Chair-' 1 "* 1 "'* P rjtlllt • ,: "lister !" cnienj cRercised by II OH ,; '" 1 ''' *• *• "' ,; **•'20.00 msil or lhe p| -vu K rieids Comlain in the commercial courts. f££2^*fi3$Ei BS%3 TH, S w„u,d seen, „, ^5£SSS^ STp&2"£ SSsTWfe ,-;co m rnenda,ion,,ur J udi rin ,r r r en,s. r e mill !" fromi lhe Labour Wcl are i,. v< .n,n K lhe land I. In ..,,. rcHrd ,„ „,, I ma de is satisfied that the King's Bench DmpurckLie and removal ol certain 5>e>eeorren* e.llm.te.1 ..pendl,„1 lawyers. g%S SSta.^ on ^int-. ,. %  2XU£ £%& Ve, „n,y one o£ the S judge, who a. pros' the erection and ditipoxui of such lnc rtnencial Sacntan •'rote, WaUaratOoVet r:d the Clerk of e nt aJt in this division was exclusively en-' building.." from the Colonial Secretary'* the St. Michael's Veatry. and from rriminal work before COmine to the ,.nd to report B* Office, to the Clerk of the SI Qaa mbHiUB of Itl meetinaa thai &&%*<* in criminal work ueiore conrniR to uw, 2. The Enquiry was commenced MUtiucCVestry (aae Appendix ihe Committee was tin ex pec tut %  .bench. This is Mr. Justice Byrne, who was|N on Monday the 2nd July. 1951. V) BOd informed him that the to be Interested in the actual war I: l when | arms welcomed by lha Oo*ajnio ln-Executlv% Acting Attorney Gener,.!. thi '"' >""< BpproWd that Honourable F. £.' Field. 1 ri|hed -hnul.i proceed immedi.iti to tin. welcome and then state.1 "*H a 'a **> lhe Reef HARDWARE C S. Pitcher & Co. Senior prosecut^g counsel a. the OKI BaUey ^ w _._ w ,,,,,,,, w ^^v, WW ^W i I aeUeo urrad in prepnr.n< the playing |{ the time ot his appointment :it the com wvw>' %  "•- ;i'.'l> with ftcW at the "Riot" Mte and In . .„ ,(... .-r-r-s-r-rr^..-j =^,^ : ^.— JF^ja g—-i -r~• u^c^ .'i Ground.-, cmutructlmj th. p.,v,li...,. It tin..natively early age ol 49 in IMS. | ^^ ^^ y**, 'fikom fiUtchah'A! ; W72 noaa\d U |o follow waa that nnrnla'lTv tn ^ rna '" eonnecuon therewith have "bee" diasbl^ when* U. ErtSalTin /. ?,TrI nl' law ret '" ^''•^>i < ...March persons who wanted to give evidirect adminislniUon of the 1950 Having selected the "Reefdence lo communicate with the grant-, on behuH • i. hlU lX tool, little ni!eii-t in thr Secretary. All sessions were open and that 111 the meantime I "•,..„, k lo IKdone ll.ere and appears to the public and were held in the nicru of $5,000.00 had been lo nmy ^ he,,,, coiiiplScenlly saUsIx-gislative Council Chamber at approved on account of work on ft c< i „, leave this in the hand* of us site I Unfortunately, by the elevation of Lord Justice Birkett to the Court of Appeal last ionally distinguished authority on criminal matters. UK TYPED IT OUT the Public Building* in Bridgeth (own on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th. 5th, 0th, 7th, and 9th days of 'uly. 1951. It waa not found necessary to bold ""***"' unypart of the Enquiry in private. "" lXirlng the last four day* there %  rare l.ntly l.mattendances of the public' The Acting Attorney General appeared before the Commission, placed the service* of the law officers at itn disposal, conducted the examination of witnesses and greatly assisted the Commission in eUcttloa. the (Seta. A transcript of his opening remarki appears in Appendix 1E. K. WelOOtt, Ksq.. K.C.. appeared on behalf of Mr H. A. Tudor, who had been Churchwarden of trust, l^ichael's Vestry and Chairman of the St. Michael's Playing utmlttee In thcyeara 1M9 and 1950, when the Playing Field was being established and the pavilion was being erected. Mr. E. D. Mottlcy. M.C.P., was permitted, at the request of the Veatry. to .represent tha St. Michael'* Vestry, of which body he is a member, and to examine and cros*-examine witnesses and to address the Commission on behalf of the Vetry. accoun: of In the last paragraph ft. Chairman.' Mr. II. A. Tudor of his letter, the Financial Bccrefhis gentleman tary stated "On tfw K-M-I .1 diMK-sitton to li it i ;i n >" iml,,al ,r,als l n p" icul . his d *'o spondence befuro the Committee 1 once of Mrs. Pace for murder was outstandS? d 'h :: U 3uV*.i" S* uLr^Sri'ng aa also hia prosecution of Alfred Arthur. operation , Africa". \which the contributors are W. Arthur Lewis, Michael Scott. Martin Wight and Colin Legum. In an early chapter, which was not written by Lewis, but to which, It is stated, he has subscribed agreement in respect ol the general argument, comment is made on nationalists who "grow irresponsibly and when at lust they have won power, do not know how to use it constructively." The author! continue: "But if they are made |Q govern and to cope with the real problems of their countries, they will Se sobered by the challenge. And if they are not, it will not be long before their peoples eovtr their hollow Incompetence, as is happening to Bustamante in Jamaica." The hon. I) U. Sangster of Jamaica, now in London, it connection with the Commonwealth Supply talks, takes exception to tins peaeage in the book. Re %  aid : "Bustamante is one of the greatest men the West Indies has produced. He has done (or the West Indies what will never be K by any West Indian in this century. He hi in West Indians the desire to live" "It 1easy to criticise Busta from afar", he continued, "but when you work with him as I have done, you realis.his efficiency end shrewdness as a poll* As a Labour leader. Busta ranks among Having Fields Committee *.. I j ^i_ ,>IHI. 1 JI uiujr mill IIMIC vi mi i.\i/nniiiii( MIC TT* SSK^cSK '"n,l tout, have done before hun. NeverHe and the Acting Governor (Mr. 1 'hcless lhe view has been expres'-rd in some Peroeme) were very anxious to 1 ,uartrs that the Lord Chancelloi ni'-ht have and examined the pavilion which the Social Welfare Om.ci, and K*'i on with the work o( preparing jonf bUter to have appointed a auccagaor to had been erected there. that Vestries will on the complethe ground and j bu,ld n ! nc J Sir Ti avers Humphreys from the Held with The EaUWUhment of the "Princes. Hon of trie work, or at appropnpavilion, and Mr. Tudor proceeded I ate interval.*. furnish audited to do this, without seeking the COAllee Flaying Field." ac c ouagg ol expeadttura of all operation of the Playing Fields 4. The Government of the money* received from the Fund." committee or of the Vestry, even United Kingdom has for some The reetjjM ,.; triiletter was though the original plans submitlime past purchased \*w sugar acknowleilgx-d by lhe Clark of the tt ,, by the V-Wtry were in-mk labour welfare. Payment. In purmade from the Labour Welfare thib "* A £2 t ££TS? t j r v -Mr %  uance of this stipulation have Fund was pud to the Vestrv The P"**" directions of the vestry—. been made to the Government of csUblkdunent of the "Reef oy ,,friuarkin 8 n V n construction Barbndo-. and a fund has been Ground*" as one of the Plavi^u M rk wdhout proper plan* and by u.Ml',l known as the -Ijibour Kiobis in the Rl MirhaelV BarUh. "'ringing to pay for DM aaa Welfare Fund", which IM conaMU term* UIHMI which ;i grant done Bt 'day rates' instead o, trolled by the Governor-iu-ExeewrngV be made from the Labour entering into a formal contra*! uttoa t'mnmittei'. By regulation 2 WclLuc Fund for levelllnfi lhe with the builder; and also did not ihe i-iboui Welfare Fumi Houlg), ens'.m, .. parlllon iod raonlBHIon the %  arvKas of the nying Fld") twilatlons, incidentals wenihus settled. But Building Superviaor (air. Ramsa>>9. or_Barbado. The Gov-The best laid schemes O'mice The Vestry employed on its inant staif a Budding SupeiUm hosc duties include superising tht! erection of any new nlttec. ^_eaaBBsl (Pla llM i-KrecuUve Committee may make block grants out of cjaiig art a-iflev ** L-.^.-W*" !" ?y* t J ,h and It will l,e se.n later that aland men which lhat judge was so closely associated. The present alarmingly I >: %  .:. criminal .1 ""<> and the consequently langa number t t irntna] cases which come before the i y week would seem to support this in the Court of Criminal Appeal, which is fompor-ed of King's Bench judges, more titan 1.100 applications fur leave to appeal oj>ain?t conviction and sentence were heard last year. in addition nearly 200 appeals ware heard by 1 e C( ui 1 or otherwise disposed of. All ihis it presents an immense Pulomu cf criminal work for the judges of tne King's Bench Ftifhermore, as there must always "three r.t.-r.bers of this division sitting in srsursrjs^^sa s staftrtrw^appt auch conditions as the Governorn-F.xecutive Committee may tm. of the amount %  ngnl 1 fur cost ll.2H.2S I.-, than fencing! lhe sum AND THE BEST t\ BUYS TOO!! JAMS CRYSTALS PEAS B T Wm. P. HARTLEY Ltd. NO ADDATIVE8 — Only Rl'lT nd SUGAR %  • %  Obl.lnabl. u all c,.,,.... aii f tvooi from $5.49 TROPICALS 0/ superb quality atDACOSTA m S Of bulldoaat had b-en talning. or managing playing ltcld>. parka. <>oen spaces or other T i: tSiXSJL"* affSov*" •rtnau's %  £ %  % %  ** ernmenl* general BOUel 0< %  ' I B *W" ** PHc. -fcedal Sec uU b /. ,u ,lt t puWle auction at Uie Court f Criminal Appeal, the availabilit 1 thoea v i'.l criminal experience lor work a; assizes or Ln the Central Criminal Court is further In.nled. Sooner or later it would seem that the King's ben-h will have to be retnCorced i 1 —rr 1 jbie pn.. ware batngll'te trim! ia! bar. At present ther- it no la-.k Mr. Tudor failed to UtUtaC IUIII 1i:t re. buildings, checking uuantities ann making sure that proper materials were being used; seeing lhat thi_ workmanship w-is satisfactory and (sat [Mid IHRiFIV SHOPPER SWEET COUNTER SSSJS+2 ^& a *r'*&£? ws tf**5 r aM b T dc T his •; : ,ra HM N < '"'i-'mas Humphreys, son of Ihe retirinit \£%'tXZ^£Stt?J!!£i* .,,;: ever, that he .lid Lf,,. :,1, M, ", l.-tle, daied ihe 71h F."lmu.rv paid for! It H.m^T thai h. %  required %  1849 (m Apiiendix lilt to the ""f 1 "' h" r n f. "' Chairman of each Very in the 'hat lhe hulldintr Island, pointed out the terms ol "ed WM KUartMl rciculation 2 referred to above and %  '• wl '"• l>erved thai the nt Ihe proposed work that requested the Vestries to forward Bram r( moMn tram Ihe Fund servieev were not requisilioned. Al to him .nv npplienlion for funds was hein made '.n the St Ifieha tm-llnt: of the Vestry on the which Ihev miht desire to"sub"el's Vestrv. and lhat under Ins 28lh Auau.l. It50. Mr. Tudor otmit. In replv lo this virvular terms set out in the Financial tempted lo excuse his delinquency letter lhe Clerh of the SI. Secretary s letter of the 29th Aubv ,,>„„ that he did not think Michael's Veslry wrote on the ''t. '. that Body was required „ Wi „„. „„ w ,„ t s IMh February. 1949. .Utln, that I" liuni-h amli e,l acenunls of the |ob to m „„„ lhl m „„ rr „ hp S^'^icaill.!:" ^"jM for grants from the Labour W, llil <^ r "rowne) as the Execu Iva fare Futiil n the IBih ,'.. %  .shoulit obey his IM9, le wrote ajfnin to the %  i vipon to admlnisorders. Coming ltom one who h.n i Se-retar%informing him d en a Vestryman for eighteen tr had adopti.-. I ire, an ( ( twice a Churchwarden. Report of the Playing Fields ComvotlM (•*! oj On Page I JRL.SIX1' !" . 1 .. '1' K, B ""f" KU W* Corat-l who specially ia crimnal, ..... -iH-iudo Mr. John Maude. MR Mr. G Q. Mr. Ramsay did not get on."/ R] TltteM I KoberU and Mr. De:e.: Curfsjs not without slgniflc.tnre. how^Bennett, all in a large way of practice. u wiiiie at the Old Bailey Itaatf there is a 'trine, prosecutinn team from whieh auch a 11 ,i: by who is lhe senior crime counsel. Theifi other seniors" are Mr Henry Elani and Mr. ll R E. Beaton. Now that Sir Trovers Humphreys has left the bench, the senior judge with the greatest criminal experience is Mr. Justice Oliver. He has sat on the bench for the )-;, years and is now nearly 70. Mr Justice Cassels, who has been a judge for one year less. ,| M-ars older. When either of these judges decides to iciue I would say tha*: the case for appointing a successor with considerable expenei criminal lawver will be unanswerable. World Copyright ReserveaU —I..F.S. Oarr'a Crackernarr'a SwMt Biscuits Boxes Chocolates Barley SUcks After Dinner Mlats TASTY BITS Canadian Bd dm** Bd&m OhMM Danish Oouda Tuborj Ber Bass's Ala TENDER MEATS Lamb, Liver. Tails. Trlpa, Tongues. Brains. Oarllc. Vg#Ublas, Chiliad Apple-, PHONE G0DDARDS WE DELIVER Fvimm Anchor Table Biitur ** %  per lb. Anchor Full Cream Milk '2. lb. S3 2* Anchor roll Cream Milk 1 lb. t;n i Anchor Skimmed Milk— 40c. per lb. Red. White and Blue Coffee— 90c per |-lb. tin Bed. White a Blue Beans—24c. per tin Pi %  i sue 30c per tin OMk's PastesOc. aai Ha Tea Time Pastes—15c. per hot. Carrots In tins—3-o-i. site 36c. per UB Cucumbers in tint—3-otitaa 48c per Un





PAGE 1

TIII'RSIIAV. OCTOBER 4 ISS1 BARBADOS \I>\IM \ll PAGE FIVE Teaching Conditions Are Very Bad In Many Elementary Schools ~ Tegislature Get Message On Sugar Pact •• Damages" Suit Adjourned KLERK CLAIMS OVER $1,000 DAMAGES Say* Major Glindon Reed. Director Of Education THE BUILDINGS of many of our elementary schools and the teaching conditions in them are very bad. More children attend them than ever before, but in recent years we have not been able to increase the number of teachers to deal with them. In the last four years Government has huilt two new schools for elementary school children, one large one and one small one. 'her schools have had nilschooU to the secondarv school* c Additional elementary school ac'rue I think it would be as cll ho (ommudution has unfortunately realise lhat many more chJMren been far slower than I waa led lo pnU " %  eeondary gvhooi* than f^rexpect whan 1 nrt came to the merlv. in other words we cannot Colony. expel all the chilsatm now trying Fortunately for Barbados. ' enler "eeondary schools to be of schools are not a matter of stones. ">* % %  "?* "lion as those brilliant concrete and wood alone. The ww who were successful a few strength of a school lies in Its *•""' %  **• win parenthesis one teaching staff and the teachers, !" h %  *' ,h f t , . e ln * mr reason working sometime, in very poor "* n c hdren left r*hi ad mine ele. dona their best m *"!f„ 7 .• ch ? oU e l,k 5£ lo ** to maintain and improve former T.v !5 d VL Ubr lhan -*•" used to be. I think U is ncHousiiig I. (winGrantedTo 2,008 Since housing loans were made available to sugar industry workers about a year ago. 2,008 workers have been grmted loans whir', i.mount to (570.000, Mr. D. A Hsyncs. Manager of the Labour Loans Department said to the Agraeate yesterday. However, he said, the DM iilmeni has approved of l.-ans to 2.395 peaptt the same ocriod. amounting lo 5632.000. They have been applications (rim 4.9CC people. Mr. Hivnesaid thai :h i worker* •fare r> %  ins *e the loanw*n well Mh K. ahpoiatflv no complaint to make TV% %  %  •-.? % %  | i i t In-", -v, tl.440 or was '"•' 1*1 n Uf| A MESSAGE regardm^ a Memorandum of A... dated September 13. 1951 between the Sugar ftod Federation of Barbados and the Barbados Worfcam I'nion was received by both Housa of the Ltgntlatur* T,.. The Message reads ; His Excellency the Goveri; has the honour to refer the attention of the Legislature to a Memorandum of Agreement dated the 13th September. 19SI. whUh. in accordance with its terms, has been submitted lo the Sugar Producers' Federation of Barbados' and the Barbados Workers' Union for their consideration and which, it Is understood, has been confirmed by these orgamsations. Copies of this Memorandum of Agreement are being laid in the Honourable the House of Assembly to-day menl. which relates tu the reduction, whenever the E Islands crop exceeds 120.w 000 tons or its equivalent, t Labour Welfare Legislation h being urgenuj prepared to implement or the present cess 5600 per ion payable ._ the Price Stabilisation Fund fa) 0c. per ton or > ton according to whetne. the crop below oi i %  the previous flve-ve.ii ,.v i age, and the increase by i equivalent amount of tl present cess of $2.40 per ton payable to Ihe Labour %  It has been det ,de,i not \ Ml plemcnt during Ihe Calendar yew IBM thai portion ol parser .iph 1 (C) Of the Mem... ThJ* do * £*t£EZ ^ir l o My lo hi "• veto uignsn lncs naV| ^^ (nal thc> rtandanai thru we are yet standards. I giilher that when M came to the island In 1943 found the elementary schools Hate* badly housed and crowded with rents whi "Conditions In U.K.Very Bad" Mr. Leslie LitUc. an Englndiden wle ^^^ hi,drfnfot ^ho'srthVpVand m .,.i '-. arm, lioieiown* St j exhibitions on a means last alone Jam-*, returned from England irrespective of ability The candiyesterday morning by the ( olom5 ^T"^ i? *? iT Pa * *" ,c *P*nd.ng free montm' y Heedleachers and noiia-,. he was accompanied by at Jason Jones gi Co. Ltd repn I n> Mi W W it,... Itki Mi r.,i mai. insti m ted i l Nlcholli ft Co ia| jurj mil in.ii The BUI of rotnj clerk %  mcftayad bo i< 0 Ltd. Jason J. I %  : %  a fotnfl aloni tie wharf whei negligence .>f Ja <\ Jongg f. Oo i ant oi isw in log PU IW aaWna laden with syrup %  (I) thai portion of par-graph Agreement whuh iwtotgsTtO ihr JJKS ^d kM^Hi*KiJS?"" 11 *"" 1 (c> Of the Memorandum payment of a cess of $2 per ion He claims he was put lo loan and of Agreement which refer* to a Hartanir Fund. Further conexpense sUsd BUfNfld much mu\ to the puyment. when the aideralion is being given lo the sugar crop of any one year question and separate legislation \„ Warning On the vears 1951. 185/ will 1Mprepared as soon as %  H<* claimt the < and 1953. exceeds the ave.decision ha^ been reached. neghgent ,n thai : age of the five prccedHiw His Excellency understands tne puncheon h\ rolling it from years, of an additional cess that the Improved bonus scheme, the lorry on ItM MgsVsnU They of si.80 per ton to the to which reference hj made in failed to give warning Labour Welfare Fund. paragraph 1 (a) of the Mem.peopla who might have!' <2> paragraph 1 (d) of the random of Agreement, is alreadv ing or expected to be passing HEARING .ii tha Earl C C*WVM varaus Jai loneg S Co l.M %  .i lha Court >i t' rnon Pton was adjourned until the Lanlh oi Ihai BOitth by The Hon Su Allan L'<*llymore yesterday i I i <-ik of Black Rock, kg t-Uirrung $1,044.4H damages as loal as a result of hi being injured on September 26 iast year with a puncheon, ihe property oJ Jason Jones negligent. The company gga St Co. Ltd. oi then ftgajnt n servant Carter tljiris htc l aaM M that he faiieu lo keep lost |79M| m oM-rhme thn Ugh illness proper look out ai|d to use reasonLai iei M raprafitad ba Mi !£.?,?* *. Jll. attem*>i*i ^ K. Walcott K.C. assoctaied : "ghl ankie and a v ,OM "• road benind the lorry ith Mi I S. B Dear instructed '-ament of the left knee. at the time the lorry was being Messrs Carrlngton & Seiily. rh particulars of Ihe special u !" ded the anj till clan) hhat DM) guuTy oi as Is alleged or thai an aoakpht as %  I all. deny that Carter i any in>ies. if any acilssaat had happened to Carter ai leged. than he w.nild by Ihe exeuise . ro and ducietion have avoiued Ihe same. On the otner han.i. carter was hospital ireaiment They say he did not give any X-Uay examinations !" surncient warning to those en%  %  liealiaanl |I0JM. saged in unlo.iding the ksfl iveyuwi th< hospital WOO. bis intention to pass behind the .les i&oo. .ni*l'"ty at the time. lanoous items siOtHi. one pah The Ctonpaoy hol.i that taa ling t h e accident L',50. over wages lost througl" seara not such thai the proper ness $799.68. and natural inference inamcliIn ihe defence. Jason Jon.ft "telj Rrtsing from I.id ,U< not admit that th.. the mtury complained of waa %  BO SepteinU-. tfl '' % %  ""•• "' OUght t., haw ir or at any other tun • in un Hi Dt '•> croaa idmg puncheons laden with 'r recrosa the road behind th M any lorr> on tl-.. • II WSJ being nded would involve a risk of mjury and acting as he did he \>cpartmanj DO cation wiih a building programme, Tlorc •£""**": '""-aMon. ,.-. ..minended u training college CO.W.m.\ COlkSk' nil i October Is Leas Squally He told the Advocate thai he was very glad to be back as he The month of October has been bad a miserable summer. The welcomed in by quite I number weather was cold and he did not of **'nooner captains and seamen see the sun while he was there wno P* v 'Iwir small boats fc-Condltmns | n England, he had lweon **• i*lnds with cargo. been lold. wcro belter, tut he .J^ !" f h ? ont ; r **&*"" Wv failed to seo that. As a mailer of tni thc > fwl !U,rer M ls n during !TiSa^£S[ 0 3u^iafiS JS^AJffVSt ^ d ^ ** **"** would not live to 0e4ahar th.n they do during Sep. of %  hlldren Into classes according Girls 1 Schools Ui< chiidren iViweV-n RnaiaVid Tone^olujiuwrert VnTJv '""bcr when "hurricane.." are which to age as the first stage towards the ages of II and IS will be foihis rent "..umecreo o pay furJou( aro und Ihe Carihbesn. ago. -till inaugurating a system of education lowing th( Common Course, %o -Prtees nf inme >rrirl M *.r* H. Some, however, say lhat they Waterfront under which children would be perhaps I had better sav a wrrf <„ SMZ. i£TZZ*tS2E! 'V"*i are still on the look out until to clem "Pokrivttr" Brings LuiitlW The Saguenay TerminalPol>river called here from lidlifax yesterday with a ahipmei.l of lumber made uu f 16.03d pieces of pine. 13.999 plao I spruce and 6.440 pieces of birch This new shipment of lumbci found pait of • %  stilpinent ihaag th.h;nr tlsej faded matDtaln eontrol ol the puncheon, and caused or s^lowod \\ uroUl liable distance VMtho.i i persislon n oontrol rial i 'iin.inv i.Kilppogad to have known that it ntH I I I ] V I lOWt I It *D Mil 01 roll Tties did not keen anj propel hank out arlUJ I 11. %  -'i vh, farter will also rely on the Cact that the lorry and tin| were at alt matai tnaaafg %  ed three weeks' n( lnc conipany or Us servant 01 the aratavfraal 'larnt and t*iai the icctden Aorkero were taught, as In England, according to Age. Ability and Aptitudi two First ibout that word ing every day and there are still watei front of the old *"*"• %  trying uc h ns in Ihe ordinary Id : should explain restrictions," he said. imparc the cost uf a few after mid-October when She hurshlpnv ricane period expires. ample space for the nsva ihlpil The cause of the lumbe:' nlning on the walcrfmnt for such long periods is the fact thai the lumber yards are now always ... congealed elementary sehaoss ie DO —*ards we'ha've uVma'intain'ariTdc"I !" "* aRainM B "' IO, for 20 '" weather was always fair and the The Polyrlver has also brought sured for Ihe limt time. Pretermintd fur us bv the British AI. „.^„ ^ .i,,,.-*,, ,K— i.r SCB """'"nnhly smooth 1.495 hags of wheat flour and vloasly It waa not possible to mversiUes Similarly the sUndAl """" "* thought that life Q ne schooner captain .aid lhat 700 bags of Queen flour f Barknow hat the sUndard *-. H Of work which we try to reach iinri "'V pP P 1 U ; 1 in V mT l? d ? '£*** >,oti ' "y '""" Noven. badM The ,-„!„. ihiptraMi Of nor helher it was E oln up or '" OUT Primary (or Elementary" '"I? P' !" "" n! ""Jin in England. ber and Deiember will bring lumber came for Messrs J B d.wn. *essmenls had to be Schools are set for us by our Sec, M '' Ll '" W '^ !" !" ** !" back %  qUliy wither, but not like Lealfg ft Co Lfl white the made n> subjective Judgment, nndarv Schools. The Common by many of the older people In the the weather SSey encountered in flour came for Me without a measurlng-stleh and Course Is a course of instruction 1M,md "' th < %  ''''""' i"/'"!"'""' Septembei den I. S-is. Ltd and Messrs eaa which is suitable for children IK'* JUI w'ho started the Oil Company Itobert Tlmm Ltd Th.1 olyrh-rr inslgnetl to Messrs I'liintn^.r.l^.A. IllslH^lor tion. Ltd I wells %  happen I if |iro|M i I in os-'.i As io the injui %  ihen thir.i iti free this king of assessment ran WBIon is siul.il I. (,,i children IH..ii.-n be very unreliable iween the ages of II and 13 whethal Turners Hull and was General The measuring; lUrsT In educa" r "'ey attend elementary or secManager 28 years ago. tlon Is, and has been for years in ondarv schools The standard of r Little Hr-llcd ll ih, countrU other than Barbados, .the knowledge requfrwt of these childa'Turner s Hall i..H ... ... i> n g,. [^CtUn'S At YMCA S*.##l /Vir Tai Iki-m atlninment o.'eghe average child at %  •>'*.* hy the Seconqar, Schools ^' 1 ^" n, J* J 2 22* KJ%r ^ %UK ^ ^* a i a-iart .Viif' I till I iH> I/V1U a certain age If. for example."'!' 1 !' '* "P * the elementary Aer living In Trinidad for seven & Maf ^. Torre „ 0 cn(rI you do not know what Ihe average *f ho ? l l *• lheir "f. 8 ,! IO nach %""' re, rn ' " Barbados s p \ A ,^,,^,0, o( HriUih Barbadian child of 7 years can do, L* llh UBn "wriy of the elemenfour years ago where he has been Gullin-i held aTinstruct al Ihe Y M.C.A. bet "Colombie" Takes 20 On Caribbean Cruise nnd 10 00 o'cinck yeIrrd.v '' ,onlh mornlnK for Ihe bcnrfll of local '""l"'^" S.P.C.A. Iiuprrtore. Thr |il Inripiil -ul.ji'rt u Dulics o( all iMPMtor of '.'" S.P.C.A." Thl* Inrluripd ^ilnL. Although many ... cannot tell for iure whelhet 1 'W ichnoli cannot attain It ,.t rnlding. your llttlo boy ,,f 7 i. good, bad SLrS?^.2KS "!!"" b !"".'', Ir indilt^nnt. Wdo know now. %  •"• 'Jj "ndord 8 the, should what the mnm nuibiclim child lrlvp ""•_„., ,„„ cr o of 7 can do end each year wc menO %  %  iimmvnmO sure the children and see whether The syllabuses devised by Spethe standard is goinn up or down, clalist Secondary Teachers in BarCHKAT nOTECTHUS ^-' >" co-operation with this If they only realised It 'aePnmnl :un arranfed for Ihe ^^^tS^S!S^& ni ^^^ 1 '^ The French passenger line. .r ll Z U 'for n,i m l < h rc ""' bf %  s, H , ,I| %  ll I, ''" n falamtle (7.554 Ions), now on when Investigations hJrrt worbmT rhHH en. hi K 'or Ihe normal or average children. .er Caribbean cruise, arrived made after a case of c. hard-working child can be kept g strcam foi chl > litcn |)c|ow nvcr (H rr tcw6 morning from reported to the S I' C A P en age. A retarded child is not exEngland via Martinique and Present wenJ Will! peeled to do the work of those In Do.nink-a She brdught thiatyChief Inspector, llarbadi Bui the opportuneight passengers for Barbados and C A Graham Licorish, 1 to give had I M Sybil Onfllth of New Orlear St. Michael, was urdcied to pay line of [3 lo be paid In twe months or In default Iwo months' iment, by Mr C. b Wahvyn, Acting Police Magistral' of District "A" for violating th. Price Control Act The offence was eonimitt.d UrifThVi sold Courtne) 1 pour for H cents, sis -e than the schedule back becau: 10 get on with his teacher or. because he happens to be feeling .(,,. unwell when the Inspector calls llv B hcr( for hesc h ooi; ... ? j-i ianf*' 8rW i pm .' t fe^f wlucB t''>n at the hlgh*-sl standard gers !" the delcclion of crueltv ano get 1 relieving anirn.il from then <.ufSpringe fering He also explained the ccn proper procedure to l>e adopted prtca. '-" PLACED ON BOND Mr H A T..lma. Police Magisir.ite of District "A", yesterday c t. placed Ix.*lle Chase of Bath VIIInspcc'** p Christ Church, on a bond board 141 oth?r passentor for the Windward District and J, r WeMcrman Kill Sub-Inspector *? nUrdad thildren should receive Io the pupils who \,r< "capable of "Twenty passengers lotmd the of the Leeward District more individual attention now benctlUng from it. folomhie here before %  hleft port tbH -.,.". Bfould have .lone before Children are not laiaJM fjngsjjm during Ih.aTMfBg DOff JamaaCS that system was introduced. languages unless first they have via Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao But '•age-grouping is merely a shown a special ability to learn and Cartagena stage m the introduction of a sysUiem and secondly there are Ihe Relatives and friends crowded S.P.C.A. CONCERT tern of education under y-'il.b teachers available to deal with the Baggage Warehouse pier ,., children will be taught according ihese subjeeu. At present very yeerday evening wnvirnto the 1W" lo Age. Ability and Aptitude The f cw pupil, indeed are being taught passengers as launch af.ei launcft s PCA. r ship Employees Ask Pav Revision mark the end Week the haa organised a concert which will take plac Queen's Park on Frlaay aften a< 440 o'clock measurcmenl of Ability and Apllforeign languages tude is no! an easy business. It re\~l IMt\1' h'H yuires Ihe special training of the vcnaviirsia*.. teachers who arc to do the meaMbPELTORATh. luring. We now have a body of This Is one way In which we arc teachers trained In this work doing our best lo raise Ihe standand so wc nre entering the second ard of education in the elementary *. ." stage. Children are being schools. In addition we are TnP subordinate employees of "slreamed". as il is callel. drenglhenlng ihe Inspectorate so lh tiv Service Association held WtittNG .ViV* that teachers may receive more meeting at the Town Hall yeaThi m.w, m n Lime school for hel P in their w r K. It il proposed '*'"day. The subject discussed was wSSBO^SfU^Sl i hfll IPoc !" win visit "eleventhe Cost of Uvlng Bonus. After certain uge-group will be placed "[>• %  ondary and private %  f 0 1 ^ ( d bat ,he R V in parallel classes according to I?" 00 '*V ln ^>nd. check on Puad the following resolution: chapman's Lane hut night by'the their Ability The A classes will hp vt !" ?* organisation aad teachWhereas the Government has EI^O-V Association in support of contain the children who have the m £Jf nd dr .t w ,he >'' l rn ' "**" "Pen disdain and disregard tneir ,. andldaU Mr victor Chase ths in the ing threats i<> Ktin-l, ts Caltender on September 5. Mr. D. H. L. Ward who appci • faj on behalf of Cullender submitted that the defendant should %  > placed on a bond as the threat: used were of a serious milurc. Ih of Animal also sold Ihnt his client hau II11-grounds for fear. hlldien'j Ona witness said that Chaw at threw a knife at Callender ant on told her that he was going to kll Victor Chase Holds Second Political Meeting iik A large and enthusiastic crowd fered from many milk wg attended the Political Meeting .1 This would not have Chapman's Lane hist night by the if the Government %  wll the school organisation a_-.d f who have the ,n g • nd ar w th systerr best ability, the II classes will con*jj &££. } i"' lp l onc L an ror ur 1 rt *V n nH •ymp*lhy with who „ offering himself for LgJn the chOdren of normal abilother and understand each other's our deplorable financial condition. Citv (lf Bridgetown M the rorttliiy ^nd in the C classe-j will be. <, "Jj 1 1 ( !" and %  *""*, '^* resolved -hat we the conunK ^ n rd ***** f-.und those of less Ihnn average *' """Rn tn^partment is subordinate employees of the Fu ,, ( n ,,.,., ha ,„_ im 111 b. ....addition SSSSL^ !XS2E a ':?. ^ a l^SSJIV^^ fS h -rrivVd^nhen ih! opportunity to acquaint the Oovme „t of Barbados needs more rnmeni of our very strong disniembers with 11 sound commershorugcv happene, nave, hndustry." hi for retarded chllllie level of .ittalkhieiTt in elementary schools progrcv* will be slow until school buildings ta*i,l „.ditkons of work for chladr. r. nnd special cli dren. There is nothing new In this organisation. The school I w* to 36 years ago In England w ..ig..ni*ed un these lines. But system of organisation based 1 Age and Ability Is new in ll elementary schools of barbadt perhaps 1 should poinl o lhat Ability is not quite the same p.. u Qunur thing as Attainment. I may have ru,m 3HUW the natural ability to do matheThr .ugh the courtesy of the tnatlcal calculations, but if I BntUh Council representative the have never been taught to do following films will be shown at them, my attainments In this dithe Monthly Reunion of the Comtra Hut if I bermere School Old Boys' As*oCihave th* sbUlty and a good utioii JI Combermere lomorro* t .rogation teachers are improved. 1 hope that p,ii4ng nothing will be put in the way of sending 1 improving elementary school acrommod*Jton and amenities. These must be*w%arded for some years as the first priorities. pproval of the attitude adopted ,.j. t | %  -—-ds our Association In by(perience." Mr. Chai He .ilso fell that It waa necesury that a refrlgerulion plum b. installed In the Islan-t men would have somewhere |i %  tore their ilsh. People are paying high prices for meal but I ihe '.v.ii. ".me they could e-asil Whitley Council and Outlining tne glaring mistakes %  Jd buy Bs| -me 11 H1 instead, which would be I .iper. that %  refrigerull Resolution to Ihe House of the present Government. Mr | anl lg on( o( |h) ~ thi ," wn|<>1 eating to Our conditions Of Chase said that Jamaica, which £e would attend invnedlately vice without first having our omments on same. it one time was extremely p>-r, nd difhcult to live in, the GovImmedUtely knew the Fisheries Ofncci Sendlr< a r^oluUon to th. ernment ha. now b~n .We to .T.'S,.".!^ '" h ""~ '""' "'"" House for an amount rf money introduce tanning factories and which la In our opinion an Insult other industries to relieve the unto us In view of the arguments employment situation. p'oduced showing the necessity In;a Cost of Living Bonu< He said that Barb..d< hi-.i ihe 3. That we urgently request a same resources and sum. of Ihesfl ision of salaries before the industries could al He aald lhat the UUUtt Board, which is appointed b> ..ivt inmeni. was there to regu .e charges for water, leght. etc., .. d also look after tne erection i.;;iit and the teacher I shall soon be able lo make up for losf time The third stage will be the inclusion of Aptitudes in our scrtl-ig of the children into classes When (he rebuilding of St. Leonard's Boys* School Is finished we thodld be able lo organise al Richmond Gap g model unit in which 840 boys and 73i girls will be laught according to Ane. Ability .•ml Aptitude For there will be jrovided facilities fur training in various practical night at H o'clock British News. Making The Ball. Wordsworth's Country. Looking at Sculpture. uf the present Legintroduced here if the Govern., ,, %  ,{ wate. in tl lilafure rstroactlusi I/4/S1. ment was mindful enough. He That an immediate answer noticed that in Tnn.dad .. r .1 Be i£.ven our rep r es en tatives on canning industry was new bum: wh an we hjv* plai-ed the onus of iilroduced. %  %  :.tinit this Resolution. "Barbados has previously nifLodge Win Quizz Contest 1 ten 1 in 1 .i.i other districts. > %  i.l not know the members of the Board but he knew Ihe Gov.;.pointed the "If 1 should ever be give 1 will endeavour t tli.it the tenantries have priority iillei tlon. The Road Board must jvive these areas proper roads,' he saidHe said thai as a member of leeord round questionw.lrv. that body has on many -asions requested the Road lAdge School won by Ihe narNo points were awarded In round The bjects such as row margin of one point from the three. were on the West Indies and one metal-work, wood-work, arts and Ursu'ine Convent in a quizs coi,The teams were comprised of ,,„e-tn>n— "Name three Untted <• ...d to fix tenant !" anadn Verv rrafti for tboae pupils who show ,, whlch w „ hC | d „, lhfi Reconi tour ,...„ rom the Con ^ nt and {„„, |-|mndl |n thl CariW^F' f w were don,' Ce inierrere, school 17 points and UrsuUne In the flnst round both teams swered giving seven namas. Bllh n ,'. r i. l 1 .' TivniBn Convent 16 poinU. wo e asked questions dealing with The third round question UbOR ol I yiflftlt I'arbados. One boy was stumped 1 --wledge. The to f waler mains were laid wilhOne of the first things I was told At Ihe aad of Ihe first round the when he was iisked lo name question masters were Mr. J. TVIn easv reach of the householder bv some of the Heads of •Second:cnre was nine points lo six ln three fruits beginning with the lor and Colonel Oliver. The next ho reo arv Schools when I flrv' Mr of Lodge and in theaeeoiii letter "P" thai grow ln Barbados, qulzz contest will be bet won Water Works Act 1895. Sectior Barbados was that Ihe pupils round the Unuline Convent took On the whole the result In this Combermere and St. Michael's 32, ihe Executive Committee eg from the elementary the lead with ten points to eight, inund was not considered bsd. Girls' School. 0 On page I leans, he had since heard lhal :hey were lies but this was not WONDERFUL TRIP" That's how ihousands of experienced travelers deio.br their Bights VIA NO FLEAS ON THIS DOG.. KIND TO ANIMALS NOW AND ALWAYS 'l.orcuraV Hinting rWdce. containing pure gamma Bill is .1 potent Iillei of inwvi pcM% on domestic annuals and poultry. |l is plc.ivinl and non-imtanl to animal or uwr. Ii c.iH'tmrmi iprtnklrrh'p cuntainm of \0 trmmm*> Alto Im jxi.'w'w. tl Sll t'ammri ami 1 gfgsj 'LOREXANE' DUSTING POWDER ll'l Kl \l 1 HI Mil M .I'llMniMM .11 MSKIW S. HIM HI \ SONS l|IAMH\l>OSi I IMIllli V ltVVrVVVWVVftrV\WVrtrVWVVW NEW YORK Nca-slop service by ths hinirlous "'.•'A I'lesidente" or vis Ssn Jusn b^ repulir, money -saving "El Turlits. EUROPE n.-gular servfes by gisnt double•Jerked "Strsto" Clippers'-world's l^f.-it sirhneri to Paris. Roma. Knjoy ttopuvrrt m Fnglsnd, Ireland Venezuela Frcqural flight, to ,11 mala dtM ly twllt Convau.|>[w Cllppcn. Foi (rirriaiinnl, is. yrui B FOR BEST RESULTS %  „ USE > II iti\ \ rinsus ij IN THE CHECKE.? BOARD BAGS Jai H. Jaion Jonet & Co., Lid—Dutnbuion WVrnrnnrVkWkWWkW f' 9 e o o oao ao i i nsa ia ocooooo <*o ^w^w ^.v^.v^y/y/oooy^ YOIH LAST CHANCE!! Ht'Y von l.V## SAVBt I'llirBlfiANT'S (H.tHHATUl KRKNt II C Ol DOM ^ old %  'HHMIS; Assorted S.enU. IKrr-t


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— %  ESTABLISHED 189S THL'HSDAY Iran Completes Oil Grab Operation As Technicians Evacuate Mossadegh Will Fly To New York Sunday TEHERAN, Oct. 3 THE IRAN GOVERNMENT completely took over the $1,000,000,000 Anglo Iranian Oil Company as the British cruiser "Mauritius" sailed for Basrah with the last of the British technicians who once ran the huge installation at Abadan. Reports reaching Teheran from Abadan said that only four British executives including Alec E. Mason, former Assistant Oeneral Manager of the Anglo Iranian Oil Company, still remained at Abadan. They plan to leave by air tomorrow. 3SO The i r~!* % %  Mble to . n Mini. Will •tend In hat TO-DAY'S WEATHER CHART Sunrise | ft, 4 9 a.m. Sunset : .1.55 p m. Moon : New Minting : 6.00 p.m. Illili Tide : C.I4 a.m.. Hull p.m. I.ow TWr : 11.46 a.m. Dulles Visits The President WASHINGTON. Oct. 3 John r Republican ; i i taw A lion ..pi Foreign Affairs, paid a Truman since the %  Japanese Peace %  : visit that Truraan may have I tit na did noi nt would be. Well iiicej he r. % %  •Hid the reason for Dulles' %  .. fart ... Pi ica i | v the President would ba available at Itntlon or m.i" I %  %  %  Treiilv whi.lt the R-i : oiuaiy. l IK*voivii.g Secret* BONN. Oct. 3. Chancellor Konrad Adenauer's % %  iged on Wednesday that Socialist OpposiBumachar, was amonji those receiving copies of secret Govanuuanl A allegedly -tuleu from Adenau own office—ll". KING'S CONDITION STEADILY IMPROVES LONDON. O.I :< Buckti .mnouncc King (ienrge continues to --hoi nil recent he dailv medi%  %  /'ram Ml Quarter*: U.S. InvestigaJe Gunfire Accident The U.S. Navy la investigating i freak gunfire accident whi killed six men and injured aboard the U.S. destroy.. Gaining. The accident happencn Monday while the ship Km • .i i ^ ing out firing exercise* in manoeiinaj in Cuantanamo Bay The navy said a live Inch anti-aircraft ' Thursday morning that Mosshe Bhanft, Minister of Foreign Affairs, was among those who sent greetings to China on the occasion %  ond anniversary of the 'minding of the Chinese Peoples Republ Mere N'ailg: Social Democratic PRICE FIVE CENTS \."IMI MAI in imi INDIAN PRIME MINMTUR 1/NIIIT NKHRi Jtt Ullto members of s Kohmln trio* || r ha* told a pubUc nesUug t |Vut\iio that hi lalakiai a) smkuuj fmm the outside and without responsibility sfUr the OentTSl llecUBBS This g*ta not ,. lt ly menu Mial hr ni.y mvi> up the Ooogrem Prsidtit*ti11> hut also the Prim• MUUS him la do wot* which I* daar to him. U.K. Gold, $ Deficit ^bourParfy Is $638,000,000 i Challenges Churchill Barbados Bats Fall 25 Short Of B.G.'s 368 Runs ft'rat* 0. S. COrPIN) GEORGETOWN, Oct 3 IJARBAD03 today made a gallant effort to reach B.G.'s first innings score of 368, eventually fiuling to do so by 25 runs. Having scored 93—2 yesterday, the batsmen added 250 today for the remaining 8 wickets or. a wicket that was still playing perfect. Tup Barbados effort came from Farmer who scored 73 runs in two and a quartor hours, showing commendable courage and deter mination when cramp forced him to finish the innings with the aid of a runner. B.G.. entering upon their second Innings, soured 5 without loss after , sinuk iiver was bowled befoiv the end of play and il seems a if the stale Is set foi %  laast) oral hen the game ends to-morrow. B.O.' 11*' "m slow offjj lnw'ii Norman Wight, Uatnal) %  i. il n<; icwpi ih..' ihcm -Itters Bradley Flies BackTolJ.S.A. jahl the King's condition 'Deputy l>r Franz Josef Huber i .1 iBOi intpTOvantnl. 1 — V.r. Reds Beat Off U.N. Attacks EIGHTH ARMY HEADQUARTERS. Korea, Oct. 3. COMMUNISTS battted aituckinu United Nations forces to a standstill along most of the 135-mile Korean front and rushed the biggest offensive buildup since last spring. in UM air, bowsver, l^ L'.s. ShoottBg Stars — U.S. slowest jets — caught a dozen crack Communist M.I.G. l.t |.r ftghttn <>vcr North Korea, probably shot down two of them and damaged another. The un 'inFiltr Air F Jays of air buttles to m i town, three more probably desWednesday chnrged that thi "more and Tl.v.irian Judicial system. During the debate in the Budget Committee of the Bavarian Landtag. Huber i<| th.n 80 per cent, of ill BaV )i>dges and prosecutors were former member* of the Na*t porty. Viotminh If IMN Luuiioh Big Attacks HANOI. Indo-Chnia. Ot. 3 iFranch u.irplanes blasted an n-lackin,: Vietmiiih liir lied Hiver darta today ai Prench and VJe*nam troops fituaht 29 separate engagements to MOW the cnetnv drive Communists opened a large-scab In jungle', and mountains south of U pilot* reported leeing dead and wounded lx'ing carried back to Communist villagefrom the BajsrU Commiiin r*tm Vietminh forces have launched a large scale offensive Vietnam positions situated ir jungles and moojBtain'i south of the Red River delta. An announcement said light' .ire fightIns retarding action agrunv Conv miinisl rebel torcea estimated at almost a division sii-ength advancing from dire. i %  . , >. tlvaly northwest of Hanoi iboul 8.000 man—of Vietnamh regulars hjvc invaded the Thai count r in Indo-Chlna. French Armv Headquarters announced today. I r • agao> N" L K'liorted round U N. attacks mto nfat build-up area ran 1 munist de%  %  Evan on of the I I artillery imbardrnents of thr war failed iReds everywhere put up bitter ii> hand lighting raged west "I Cborwon on the ...I fionl below Kum Slbcri.1. he group iiidiided three dicn, live men and three CaptaBfl Willmni lives. 4K tr.1,1 interpreters he came to the United States to he with riis two brothers Hans and John who It near Albany. Now York. Aboard the vessel with him wen pragnant wife AUde and their two daughters Eva, eight, and Kelgi. nine. The captain's brother Edward lives 46. and nis wife Brine; August Raudepp 40 nd his wife Zofia und their fiveyear-old son Jacob; Voldemar Raudsepp and Eakotd Kalme both ingle. —U.P. ADVOCATE J'CA RELIEF FUND S1I.M9.53 t'Ol.LMTr-11 The Advocate Jamaica llrlirl luml i IO-M-,1 yesterday with the Havre aUndini at Sll,aaa.a3. This rcpr-••r nk> the effort* of the aeeale of thlm colon) In rrnder financial aid to those slrtrken by the hurrtranr ol August 1? Wlthbi a week of the trageg> thbi newspaper >Mr'i this fond, and at mice people m every walk •>f life, led by H.E. the Governor. lr Alrsed havage. hove given something ever* day. Now It haa been rioted, and the Hon. V. f Oals MIC. Treasurer, desireto thank all thete who MI readily and generously subscribed. Ami pre< .. k tniMii \*...lr < . I i,l I'd ip HIM* BMly W O Hutrlnn>..n siiB Piii.il. nl Wf l— IUII ll..' Scha O nvmw I ...!.*.* ..( • .,., I)d Hank af OBe*4)a LONDOfl 11 THK LABOUR Govrrni u-nt annnunced tida> lltat Britain's latest old and dollar deficll toUll 1938.000,000— the largest quarterly Htjure m fnui The deficit Is for the |)ii' i ber :(0. Uabou i Ilugii Claltskell announc-i*'" ci the A| ... M tin groat %  %  %  %  i %  %  la IIMUMII and n,, UM 'TO since %  I HMD of tii. pap" Serious pHsition M told liiinkoi \ • ol '"• varHM %  iition thai %  %  M • (' 1 %  I nuere. I the nrV, p 1 hv h ID ..n 1 lend UM pi nt in i loUlled S4.3y.(Hiii.OOO U in %  It totals MM.if which SR7.MO.000 is t can be waived under %  I.I. n •.niees If the : %  ii rrquaat, The deficit %  with .i suratui of M.n the prevlou> i|uartcr II "toon in r 1951 %  il in (lie gold figures Ihlrd quaitei eeeipta under Marshall baton Britain lavs up furtl %  i ir I'IMMIN o.t a 1 %  Bi %  *" h i..( i Part] rottei %  %  i ihai Cons* i waive %  .-. .it i ihaii.-ngi-d (-•narrv.itit. fe ti i church ill (" H %  .in ahotild haw with Irga pic can) Baagn fi the Oetobri Jfl elecuori I with U. %  i I %  %  si valive. and I average rftnaervallvr nl berni nger bo* k then |esni -rmnent. It la lb* liuekgiiiuii.l ol (Mir nsrnUIUy. n is the old 'VneTisrlti* nuHonfc." The siwwfr I want from Mr (hnivhill %  %  "Will or say In his judgment we should I ava gOSM to war with Il-rnln'" i peeeh ,i replt to 'hun lull i MUM (II'IIIH"..II. n M ,, < ; %  .. II nrnffnl .•' Uvar i :^tLi r.T glh gadl> braakrd In 'in avai ual |.c i.ipittilinu the dorllna ol tha British KM. pin The Iranian crisis and Hritalns contpnrhl wMhdji ... i 1. %  i Ouirii i. In Spuin Russia Has Second Atom Explosion WASHINGTON. Ott 3 Rugala'l ecood .itomlbomb %  %  %  White House on %  %  %  %  n %  aid it may mean the soviet Union i. working on uulde:! missiles. i I'd lamed I by the vTblta Houw r-rosa SecreIts y gavi t the new bare fact boron ha : within th MADRID, ih Preside;d Quuino of the pines will visit on Thursday the|ft Superior ("ouni-il of Scientific I search In the company ol Minis( tin of Education ami |m Pi if 'r la Mia atoml l-.,tr he will attend a city lui" h-| eon. In the afternoon Quinno -.' nou motar t< Toledo in th done 'be n i r Attlee Broke Hits Promise CHURCHILL !'.'hi:POOL, Batata*! OaJ 3. WinsU>n ( | m I, i M .,.inning up his campaign for the October 23 an last night lucked the I,nlw>ur Government mi handling lbs Iranian i clun.sily and Ui'lilt Speaking at a Conaervatlvi Rally, Ino Wiirtniie I'rlme Minis Labour leader Clemen* i bfOton his promise not to evacuate Abadan oil held: w;tl\'nit first timsulting Parliament, i dO nut r ember ant ei g .tnere public men ).v< broken their word MI ubruptly' he said. rhunhiii ealh I anlnlairation b] % %  il' Imsed Oovernment. ronUM Nation 1 Interest %  faction. Ha ...lied hi .t'ler-ni n non-die'rin;iirr i nollci li" .i '. %  %  nlweir hm %  .ii tin ratura t> ti i ..iiinienl S-.ine tinned all SBSSCTI %  • SSM IndicaUon that ha wantto head I I but Sn D.tvi'' %  fy(| u p 'I-" i there agas Bar* pass •or MI all "..' Coal as P %  i ixwsmen ho RMll had "dona wondarrulu In lhaii .ittempt to neiioii.iii' .i caaastrra ilh tin ( iiimniinistv lir aM bl %  'tit im%  ii tin ipirii and ii"iala in.ni s • %  baa sagritl %  in i. M VIM), d •'• it' 1 Karaan i nt btoastal and Tuesday. Altogether he and llohlen "pent too dayi in the Fin Eal. ASKS TOR IJRATH Tha dejth partaltj -. revolt igaln l< i ssgigm BMi last night. .Quake In Si. Kills ST KII1 %  hock in o'clock Tories Know The Way To Peace U.S. Casual! i^ WAS Oct 3 total of Iwtlle casualties raasa of 2.181 ted lasi ...•(I U P P wl ^in have at n-i eighl |, higher -I.p. 1 f By R. H. HHACEFORD iCommonwaalt (opposing a united Europe and LONDON. Oct. 3. ( showing no initiative In to Britain's decision to withdraw Ideal wbri Russia, eompletely from Iran, set the I^I->UI parti beadei stage for an unprecedented genAttlee had his as) .mpalgn contro1 caign posspy, The labour party claims to be m •and indirectly th* Conservative party of >nej imperialism and •wir mongering." *v on the other hand claims it knows the 1 isd to peace and accuses I-aaourilcs not only of bungling foreign affairs genrroli ference at Scarborough Monday He Mgain proclaimed his parly tithe pjrtv of peace and denounced 0 would avafe arl of date %  nd out of :.tep with tl Tuirs. Chorrhlll's party man*a>i %  hinted that the may again promise an attempt %  nother meeting with "lanifeslo whk h IsOH ol A' II wrote recalled noslalport tha U.N. When disputes rlaa we taka them to th'uJl Basal 10 ogaaTstion Thai TOKYO. OVt 3 1 Bradley 1fl tar WasMngton to-night n'lii-i with top Umtrrt Nations t tli. Knur and ihe itarasa Irurc Inlks. Bradiev Charrtnan ol thi Statu Joint ChMfi ol Hal .m.i Chartas Dehasa, lop State Depart' 1.1 -pert on Russia and Cominunism look all from Tokyo'i M ini-ii. .HI Mrt .it H General Mdgjwaa %  '"" i ra V| iplral C Turner Io| boad "' ibi Aitiiii tun-., laam mid Commander ol the fii' .1 l-lP.s m the Fin Baal wen >! the air1%  to see ti.cn. off. Flying with Bradtej and Bohlen M Bi III nradley lold MI -wMTien ho had heard no late dev 1 l..pmeet% frmri cfthci W>f "i %  nil m K MM Bradley had |UBt COtrta from nnfaranea with KUdgwaj Bnhlen Iny, i.i.ni -*;,.,„ %  ,..1 p p w. rhwtd. '.min.iii.il 1 i.r Kit Bast air f reaa, <4ttm Oenaral it it Alfc 1 I an % %  > nwli'i of Hit Sisieciilli I y;.j..i OooeraJ warlct 1 Welata % %  mmandtt of J.psu1-ngi-Mi .1) 11 a VS Slmleyy ... %  ] %  ,%  rllsi 'i C both ui 11 event It iru n sunud d ii'.ui.t tiw ba broken off ">i IK still w ill ; inniiiunist angwai to nU tarn ihn > %  i Fl. nl .t..p..-,ii las a aaan dad ai blrted frop Ighl ii." ir %  .. Bradh t that Ihe nSonghyon jtncist and v \ t UtM TWS„.„ Smtm St ar.fi Pi.i...|(* 17 rflumed Barlu.1105' llr-t iriiiings Ihit %  toad .it H3 lot2 yevtrrdar Smitn ...itlldi'nt .it ituc *pnt up th'. ... tin. wlUl ^ lovtljr ,o<.i drive rr Gii.kiti fin fo.M. On M. • The"ADVOCATE" p.y. for NEWS Di.l 3113 D.y or Night Red China Is Two Years Old This Week By A. 1 1 H(.I sns NEW YORK. Oct. *. COMMUNIST CHINA celefcrales her second bfrthdav this week. Like rr>st iwo-year-old?; she gets into lots OT trouble, she can't travel far under her own poWtT nrd llH i-iiiiiil.iin. ciiNstantly. Hut in the two years since Chairman Mao T/e Tun. of the Chinese Communist party stood at the date ol Heavenly Peace in the capital ol Peipinn and proclaimed himself ruler of 475.000.000 persons. China has erhWgtd things worldwide been lelt_ Hurricane In The Atlantic nidi%  Korn Kardl] > nation has b> Mao 1 11 H ion ..r Ai 1' in %  BhTi %  %  !..w.ij nation 1 hjopla ii.ivpsrd i> %  %  o| Mao T.I Tussg ttnlll thoy u %  %  ,, .,1 %  %  ,1 %  ..i tin world but one Ihe] i.-i.iv valuad raoaf -. um rnte BsaUn b %  1 %  ad H rouragemaid 1 t China 1in dangan ol %  ".*im m infancs iiti 1 w. t. bat 'i era %  pSOBBBI t <>f H1.1l .; uenlng any time anon No Immediiitc Tlireal China has h.-i I : %  log* ihat don't bulh ite .ni lm %  1 .ii' i.'i vlnciway %  with Hussia a clouds and %  •iw and I %  %  ig Anglo' Churchill promise weakening* but lost that election by 1 We %  laailour fa Irot f iraagn ponQ Pi ana that %  %  days have gone %  ylron*? r-' 1 prsjasion he has gt abO 'Hiiv *wv.' t-> bo ring peak of ihe 1 inn.1 ihetr uraa .11 to m ores ind a Mr n a d Ontl %  owai Blon -ii in army •! DM Shr caar*l -h-vi ai I %  1 fl Hi.'.nt 1 UflrUTU] 'I • .. % %  • tvsiich iv u ftl i"ii* u, Oricot-h %  11 1 regime buss** %  %  %  %  • %  ting the .. h thinn as factual ne oag i>f C o m aiusiia t MIAMI ( %  L 3 inipit'.ii rtorrn thai nortde rt< velinKrl into ,. full hurricane In ihe Atl • InA ..( if. miles or bout man the rentn StornorafffshUi w,re ordered up from '-W-' II > %  )' 1 jiIn Virginia. Small %  r.ift on iha Care Ina coast vi re told '•• remala m iin trractj Vnitnn 1 i.ief il"i 111 fnmaster at Miami Wi -tii, j BUm IU il>h up lo K.ii' ixpei-tetl U> lash thr iiiiiiii.im force -wfndr' lUiLi i'.1 Damage iilong thv lower ens: .o.'ut en1 aamll er.if: %  wiutucs ami iraTuasbar) nut in the n*h Lake O fc aaohobea fannm(Tiininr an assmsatad II.AOO acrr. 1 your. BIG DEFENCE BILL FOR ACTION BY CONGRESS WASHIM.TON. Oet 3 A |A7 200,000.000 d 1 : money iii ark owdeht down payment on a 14u wing ..Ir torCS is ready fa llnal iclio House. The huge Api Hill, the nrsfBat e^-er ;.hit Canerosk in a period shprt of all-ou'. „.,. eioaran the Baaagi H IAi >esItprdaty It w,U Xhlrdl %  i ,jl r,M '* K u t' (hm. 1 ni -haos Irnn • ,,„ I30.000.0f onsarvaUve. win. onThere-has been wiue*ored 'haoa IComrnlW comprtnnise 1 also of Jeopardlrtng AngloChurchill promised it In Iftf.o Anuetaatinr C> '" campaign booklet N would get jim" i sn.11. . <


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THURSDAY. OCTOBER *. 1931 BARBADOS ADVOCATE ru.i CLASSIFIED ADS. ~" "" %  llPKJUi !•*>• HOI s| s %  mi-. kAarrla*. m %  • %  in Carth < aMr* the *"!• '• W for any numh.tr of *.<•; tp to U end • nntt Mr word lor Hch eddiuonal word Tfnt. <•> Pno*. Wt tiwi w mMipH. 1111 i* •*•** •only after p m T* charfe tor •wiountrn-ni. eJ % % %  the. Uviitt*.. D-ihi. Atknrai-' Nrr>U and 'n Memortem MUM Bt w on >M(4m and II SB on Sunday* loo art* number a.' word* up to M. and FOH SAIr: CARDIFF •1T1 Harbour Log W.I. STUDENTS CKNTKE In Carliile Bay *nIUi. S.I, Agu.UII i Turtle Dm,. Seti MM> I APPROVED • AI.MHU) fl Lawrence MRcei From Nov 1M Foe Leudalpete ,:: i L %  .. %  n il. • S.', Al'lOMuriVE Fl" LK NOTICES -..a i Bur-lay. la. .e..-*,l It-em ch-Pp* DM M ELKCTRICAL • burner won oeei. prci,. 1 Uwiri ill.nd brcaua* uiubi la obtain current DUI M I le J| *e tad. mi .1 h., Ion* Hill. Si Jnh. He.ir'.e „rde Age W Her funeral le..*. Hit Ad. Holder'. r*-.*l*nce. Hore Hill. a | IJ p in io-da> lot It Joeeph Pari.h Church 1.4.1* Holder. Waliei H^fi 1 Clarence Holder 'Nephew..: HrerSRB Holder iWlee-.. S E Holder ..UoOtar-nvlaw. NOTICE r\ain or *r PNIIJP Application tar ihe pott of Hare* .1 Ihe SI ptullpa Alenahoaiee will he reel...! h> the undeevtgned „ p M i,.^ rUlMIXHE I I Ml. Hi her ... .m aw 1 anna* Ann* Leu Robert, better %  •* % %  .. rhic AB> si veor* Funeral leave* tl abov* rr.ldence al 4 p m to-da> 1 brnihre Lr*oiki Mlulun and than l lh*> Chrut Church Crmrirr> Ma! Una* Robaru and famil C.pha. Clarke (Meaaai A 10 M I funeral Mum." the w. eahed 1 Oh October 3rd. IBM. at bar a. Spoonrr. Hill. Iran* Seal*. of iha lala Olady. S..le Hrr leave* Ihr %  twir re-.dene* al nl-da% lor tn* Chrultan Tudor Street and (hence to .(bury Cemetery Friend* are STEEL rt'RNITVUC-Complata range oC *teel furniture including Bentue and Junior %  eMIUSI** l*k. 1 pl.t. Deekt. Stationery Cupboard*. Filing Cabinet.. 1 '"in. 't. On display al K R HUNTS %  Co. Lid. al-iljf or MSI 3 10 11Appllcanla mual ba fully ntHIMl m a Hu.aa and U>dalla. .Ith rartUaMlas •f compaHiwy Th* Mlari attuchad to th uoat %  L'mforrna rl p MM Tha aunaaatul Candida!* lull*, on Iha I .ncli.dln* hoa. and quartIW I.IVKSTfM'K TTioroujM>rad Mar*"THE OOVC". 1* It nd. Wlnnrr of Iwo racaa and ptairad r.-.l 1,. j r \%,„ ad 10 br in f.ui Ownat illimc ta ampl pmaiiUnl 1 VO in •• %  hang.WHI* A Abraham—4 Ifuaan Hlrvri. BmSM 3D I SIIn MISi.i.. n i iron, MarlHUajU* Capi 0 From pt* 3 intanataC* cxpetucs would bm hr thouchl Uul tha aludanla Hftuuld mix with Ihalaropl* add '• 1 1 1 11 MRM* thlm talht-r than naa U11 ..tad Hon'ble Dr. Cito j..i that will psM made bj lion Die Mi. BVwiyn, t>e attrred tha Sun*., fr* ss -... in r \KII sia ibay. tJta lona n*l. Cap' 1Mid Ad .in* •••'•'day hy Oar l.. ; |, Appla-alMaa for Iha poal of Junior NUIH ai Iha Bl Philip'. Almahouar will ah. ba raralvad b* th* undanurnad up to Turada* Hh Ortobar IM1 Salary altachrd to Ihl* post will ha f.*d brlwran US M and **t 00 par %  aurrrMf.ii cindldai* 1 .iudiiia ihop*. and quartafa 1 l-d I •( aaanrr dull** on U\t 3ftth Orlohrr IH) *i.in|i P S W SCOTT. Clark to Iha Board of Guardlana, Bl Philip am ii. Saala (Joid. 1. Cyril Saala rh Paa*r> Mraia Soak THANKS Tl • undoraumad ban Ihrough Ihla madlum lo irtk.ru thanka lo all tlioaa Hind IrMnda who arm wrrath*. irilrr. o! < oudolane* or In any way aapraaaad Ihrlr mpalh in our miMay CUrkr. Cilia Taylor, janru* (ioddard lauiaa Kiiuj noy ClfdiW. Kalhlcan l.aai. Gwen Jonra. t II in *->* %  !.!. Throuah th.. ir.adiun. Iha i.'idrraiinrd b*| to iclurn thanka t.. all tho>a hind frlanda who arnl -rratha Irtwr. of randolanaa or In "•piraard Ihrlr avmpalhv in our racant brraavrmrnl rautad toy r daath of Dr I 10 II Ii iGrandm Tha Colo Pat IN MKMOKIAM IBM Rail < Lord,. PI HI II SALES Tea emu par spate fine ..a week-dap* and U (•"•! %  p* apale Una oa Sanuu v a minim.,,,, chorpa |l.3n ua v-eeft-da b j and IIM en Sandapa REAL ESTATE NOTICE ELSMENTAHY BCHOOI. TKACHERS arr reminded of the rafulai afonlhly Mratina to b* hrld *\ tha Churrh Hou.* oosaliirdav ratal Oclobrr B. al II oclork Thr Aarnda include Matlera of vital Importance Fleaee make a aprrul aflort to alland I H I1ARKXH. 4 IB II — In rreaa BaathaapUa •ahn Comber. Thyra Comber l.nii-r Uaynaa. laabrl Ireland. Han. LMabJ FVlaai. Lull,. | v> HpralaU. John Ran lali. J.lim Ramlall. May %  • r. Audin Twefcer, R*ll. Ar„*. William Ariiulnuta J^qurbix "••id. ataainald Johiiinui. Hildi.^i John *n Patrick Ro^h. Kd lUl r.ml.areea. Maude Laarenca. Ju**ph Mayaard JJaaMi ) !.%  -•. Baedb) 01.. O Thole I li.a La Baeie Kurt CaiHlar %  %  -teralalee : %  mmanu Bartr B nd In... taodoi. Thir/a K. rlhillu.. !" .,. lunr. J.-eph 1.1.. fr-n MarUalaa* I Auauatlne Alatra. Ga>lon Athaiuaa. 1-. .... Ba n ket Rare Narbaau aia. Law Parian, Roar Zvbda. (la.liai Paul I'a.-.na*,ka. iru| yaatrrdai by S riiiaiiii On In., Y | LatlaW, l"iillip. iuid wda. Marie Vlohtf Taylor. -r TrlaMad I Oaoraa B Hairu. Muriel BiaiMh Muriel Griffith. Minnie Walla. John F Cameron. Durham c Olaia. KulhttMaht B Downa* bid tawaid.. GrraMinr Krllman. Aanc Petal. Patlma Palel t.l l.-ulc. Skinnar. Fif fl Oraaai llhl perpvlti .hin GUI wh The Alleyne Family 4 I" il % %  I.ILL |„ lovlna n,r...,r ..f n*:, d-..r and father Pita Gerald 1 OelobiT Ith. laaw Thr mhiH'k wii> arrat the blow arifr Wr nevrr thoulM thai drat), ahM aaal Only thoaa who love ran trll The tain of part in* sitho.it farewell Tha Lord hai given Thr li.r.1 ha. 1... I.e. IB bej remembered b> In. I Wife I, Joan, The.me. Paukm. H.illnii. IVter-.m. I^mlay •children,. Albertha Clark* and PERSONAL 1 hold 1 The public are herab' warned 1 rlvlna credit to my niee LYNCH 1 ai I iiaponatble for her trHtim aaj debt or daDta in my nam. unlr by a wnllrn Order Milled by me WIIJ-PED OlAST. Nr K.1..1..1 Hill. Chrlal Church I 10 II— In 4 10 11—2.1 %  >e hereby 1 lo my wif. • nee HKRBERTi %  I d< i*elf reaponaibl* for her 01 onlrirting ... %  debt "i debt' unlaaa by a written order AKTtlUH CHANDLJUL Government Hill. St Michael The public are herabware livlne credit lo my wife ^RTHirp nee MERHITTi i>< I old mvaelf reaponMbl* for hi one elae contracting any debt 1 m> name unlcea by a written 01 I 10 SI-In •.1 .1*11111 l.OLISK > do T>r public are httet IIOIDKR Hire COXi ,-n**if reaponatbla fa JB to-itractlng any di 1111* unlaaa by a w VI'ltMlN HOI I'U' FOH SAI i: WORTHY DOWN TOP ROCK Having three bedi conncciing toilets and bathi. lounge-dm ins room, large front balconies, breakfast balcony, modern built • In kitchen, iwo-car garage, servants' quarters and laundry Fully enclosed with nil conveniences including telephone. For quick sale — nearest offer to £4,500 : mortgage available for hilf amount. Apply lo rvALPH A. BEARD Lower Bay Street 'Phone 4S83 4.10 51.—tin. By order of M M Abbadl Eaq I *H' eelt at By Roebuck Street on THURSDAY 4lh October from II SB am Iha following QUa ahow C.K. W U .. %  lock Typewriter. Tvpewriler deak. Remington Rand IJ Typewnuv. Douhlr writing drek with 30 drawer a. Phillip. | lube Radio. Au.tli. 10. ilBeOi will, n*w b..tlery. L'prlaht iiram boiler, buina oil o* coal, complete aerated water plant form wale. Football playing machine, with acreaaorlet and apare parti, putDrum 1 aa gala 1 Lemon grau oil ll doa ttorraalarahlre aaura. 1J0O French PaSB Powder aaaorled. Carrier Blkr. Vinegar making plant. 1300 Ira new collon rralf and r,,di lultablf..r cleat %  ins machinery, duating clotha. Oalvaniaed drum*. Fancy and Vacuum pan mo l l tee*. Demltohna. break era. carbon aeeling waa. Plaitlc necklac**. balta. buckle* Electro plaited necklace* and watch chain length t. potn Imain. wood ahelvinds. tool ti ink. rut .. %  bin Irunk. wall condllloned electric wire, 100 ft. Rubber Hue* *,with 1 braaa end* and other uaeful Item* DON'T MUM IT. bargatna for everyone Term* raah. R ARCHER McKENZIE. Auctioneer 17 a si -an W AMIH HELP ^TEMXiltAPItCP A, TYPIST: Eapaeiicrd Ulrnographr' and T pl.t Appll b* etler and 1.1 p.--.!,, 1 M „ Haven *S MISCELLANEOUS nirtK one rord or |4T with dual iea Hulchinaon Dial 4404 - Model IBM Apply W B t SI Cn WANTED TO MSI BUNGALOW From bnflnnln. of December lo April Fu'ly fumiehed two bedroom bungalow or apartment on aaa All modern convenience* required In. c,..ding linen, cutlery and china Apply in Ralph A Heard. Lower bay Street Pod***-4083 Urgent 3 Ii SI tin rvlUe : F-, .. -tell! Touch With Barbadoi Coaatfll Station %  art idsOaafl Mauon SS Campeatrr. • r.d.rivn. .. nuajard. %  %  Wilchirf a 1 North %  OaBBaskta, . u .. %  I %  I ittHi ViarrC.io. a Utania. a %  Ranla LulM. %  %  Hurbank. • • Hoaano. a A Ira* Part I I Dolorea, * Uaraa BUare 1 l.i Mar, A dan,.. Reg m Tiger, a %  Fagle. • Ch.1.1 .n a*bados' share would be under 6 n I as opposed to .i|>i,ri>ximatel> 7 8 %  iii the "SltKtt-iit basis." Accordin.iv. the Legisidlivr '-'^ '"* %  *•****• :,. mdu-aUi u>,t cu;,, living, but the beneflti It agrees in prnuiulr '" tj ik-nvnl Iruni il would fa. with the proposal to establish ,. <>.itw.lgh any OHJ Club and Centre in London for ctMt lita aNHuallta gnd wfasdjbal %  *'d that having th. i-ntn II would be prepared lo approve <<" 'hese studenU, was not a quas.1 .-onttihulion towards the capital n v ,,; l'btina being segreur.,1 annually recurrent costs. gsted although he agreed with thi TlM Address as passed by the Hon'ble Mr. Gale that they shoulc Council reads: sain with other pe,i|i|i> }[,• f.-l THe Legislative Council hnvo **• %  < > l wuld be a good thing fot the honour to acknowledge le""" '" have thb place, becaust iTipt of Your Excellency's Messaate tn, '>' eould meet fellow West In No. 28 1951 and to inform Your dians and discuss problems con FxiOlli'iH > in reply Ihdl Iht> BaVllUU| UN W*M Inrties. .'gree in principle with th.nrp BraassoBMi l.^^ DOsMtoesUblishaelubaiul.vMtt,ruiure l-edder* In sawidon for West Indian Mil"' ,Ll ,k ,h **•* "*P^ Ok. would be prepare! M '" a/hoar approve a conlrtbulion tn a %  •1.1*** %  eduolaJ in Enj il< nt basis towards the capital .1 ul '' '"' l "" ; si nnaUs recurrent IHU "oii.t-u B/nO sniulfj be eiuidmg th rlon'bas th, t'.iK.nUl s.-. '"'" %  %  "' "*• Wag* fpdsWUkdJ* n nerving the passing of m *' *"hi """•; <'" '* Wen Uia Ail.tress gave the Council a lntlt.ui-. would i*unll Of thit-.ii nd ,,|hg p, d Uernerarlans ..1 Trlnlthat the students espmscd desire Indians or Bnrbiidlans. hut to have the centre which WMsU ,n,,ian include a library, reading ruorn, bar, kitchen and a room for sport, etr. I'niiormily He said thai the Message had 1 rhat Barbados' contribu1 sroukl citlicr be on a student hasis Of u population basis. He ii-itt nut very strong views on that PM1 "f the matter, but he thought thai as the other place haddsassed 'he Address to the Governor _. 1'iinliiig oul that the proponal must rngliitirt tudent basis, he thought SHIPPING NOTICES %  SSsaBatSd %  S %  Pt.Hi' ADELAIDE' to aail tram Hebai Melbourne Octabvi Ith. Sydney Urtobe' October lath. Part Akna 1, aaaMMna October STth Trsaassd t s raaasaM Mdaa November Nth %  Bl cepted on IhrMgh BUIa of Iranathlpnienl tl Trlmdal t. t**>rd and Windward Wi • He felt thai II was a very lauiUhlr hi' 1 and peraonally dlrl not %  ., IN. ohjectlon to II. Hr lived in hnsland aa a otudenl and would ha\r "rliomil the exUleitre of aurh a centre In his time. IV., llnn'Me I>r Hutafiri supported the remarks or rTonaaat l>r CaiO and suggested that West Indian ntudtnti wliii were nol actually In London bul might lyp ebu'win't. m hotild %  allowed to beoclato mtmbari ..* the thai tlie Council would stick thai for thr sake of uniformity. Hon'ble Mr. Rvelvn said Unit the jWaW/WA'WrVWVrVy CanUVj might be a igcaxl thing, but A one point that should not be forgottm was thai being a member ol a club, would add slightly lo the students cost of living. club. DaTOflTA A CO LTD. '-*,V*',V,V/,'.V.*.*.V/'.'-V/'^ i The M V T ARIBBEE will • Oat gOBBB T1 s.9nt tnrW VOKK %  flJ.VatS %  JfftSP I 'bade* 13th Oel ISt 1 STEAMBU Mlh. I Ith October ani.ea lurbadoa Urd Octobnr. NfH O MA ANN StlRVHI "ALCOA jnTRITANnU* llth Beptrmbe. ..,.. ft,,bad— I rTMNE RaatNADOTTt ...n. St.ll. s, ,., ,,„,,. Uarhado* I 1 hOrlober ...ive. Barbadn. SSlh Orloaaa 1SS1 STI-WII It ... SOI 11111,11 Ml CANAOIAN aaVafaVM A A/Mrr* n.ik.a. AliTlA PE1IASU8 Al.DA J1HNTFII -AirVtA PHXIRIM BapMB I BAaabM b tVtober September 10th SVplrnlir lot. S*pt aab*r 10th October 10th October ISth October Mlh Kimni r THUM LTD. %  Mill Ii A (HSU NEW YORal AND GULF SERVICE CO.. ITO—CANADIAN HMVICl SEA WELL AKBIVMJ. RT BWIAL ON TIEBDAY %  Mr. Gale s-ld that white lie agreed to the principle of the Address, n did laNni t" him that v/hen students go abroad, thev I should [th %  lAVTON BTAMP (OMPANt .-W/V-,V,',W,V//.'/ AT LENGTH AND AT LAST we are In a poalllon to offer NAIL CANVAM NU. I 1 Hi: 11 TO NO. 9 CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. PIER HEAD By public competition at the Office of the under Mined on Friday Sth October 1061 al S pm V B'doa Shipping, and Tr*'uig Co Lid Shire. O I. W CLARKE. A Co Jamea Slreet 3.10 M-.li. \UCTION UNDEH THE IVORY HAMMER Redman A Tay. e trihedral. 5t one LuSO mile* 1. Sale at S p.m I Griffith. Auc30 0.51—4n UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER BImtniction. received fi .,. Mi. Delghlon Sullivan I w II *ell al her raaldmra -Camalot". Chala.'* Road. St Michael on Thuraday neat Iha elh October belli i.ing at 13 SO p m her t lot of hour-hold furniture which da Mahog Couch. Morrt* chain Srlteewith M>rln|filled ruohloii*. er* and upruhl chaira. plant *tooI. Mahog table.. Slmnu>na benatead with aprlng. Mahog wardrobe. nlghtchHii cupboard, child* crib, play pen and -upboard. M-hoa: dining table wllh 4 hair* china cabinet, ildeboard. Prattold Refrlierator, pine, preee. electric waiher. .. but utenalU. garden implement! 1 of bonk*, teleerope. and man ma of littereat too numeroua I Term* caah DARCY A. SCOTT. Auctioneer %  I II—4n ADVERTISE /A THE ADVOCATE KINGSLEY RESIDENTIAL CLCB Closed Irom lb t.ihcr 3rd lo October I6th Inrlnuve 11 ';', He knew thai the lir.l rouplr Clarke. N Vaughn, He\ Vaughn.' P n f weeks the atudt'iiU would be """"''" %  -.,lonely, but looklni st thp mal1.. r-'.'-.V "* %  %  '•**• ter rrom a broad point of view. %  Ub %  .... pp|gaj| C.-BAW, > -' % %  Honatd RelJ. W.utrrad nerre. Wndlred Gltlrt.,. David Lwr • M-ome Be. H lh Webber, st.n. Webaer. Far SI iould not be segregabtL He fell ^•V^>iy-'#'-Vi'/V>VAV-V.'/V*W *'' ai they should mix more with v ^_ _.__ %  oplof other nationahlic. ,J UAVtC YOi' PLACED y////V.v/,v^w///,w/.v///A',v,v.'///r'.'.v,', Mull Sylvi MAIL NOTICE fur R Lurla by Ihe M V "" %  I Parrel v nary Mall H..-..I,,. 1 \;,,, %  Saai IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY the Chancery Ac! IBM. I do hereby give notice to ail ,., an, eauie rujhl or inter*.! to any lien or antun.brsne* havl •Betting Ole SSSUM %  pertv Bgfi ir'h"" "" '" ,v ""' *•' """ flalme wllh thel 10 be eaamined by me on any Tuaaday or Prtd. 1 o Clock in the afternoon at Ihe ReftlUatlbefore u,e li.t day of November IHI reported on .-nd ranked ai-cudlng to the r Mure ., other*-!** ppca peraon* will be precluded from Uic deprived of all claim* on er again*! the *ntd property PlalallB CLtPTON bdeadaal; CIJ HK.NCF. nElJ-lEIJI I AYNE PROPERTY^ ALL THAT certain piece c 'formerly part M ihe land* ol pariah of Chrlat Church and 11 maaauremenl twenlyila perche> iwrcrte* in ruedaai %  %  bBttlng 1 Bernna Miller bul now of F Clarke, on landa fonnerl. af Ma Plantal-a, bul now of A B Skim.-. ,.,.d S Klnch an laiala fa* _.. ot Jo.hu. Bourne but now of Uraenur Hall Co and on th* puhik road or however elae Iha aame abut and bound together with ine mtaau.gr or dwelling houae called %  Eenie" and oU.er Iha ere^Uoii. and buildlrura bout freehold and chatlel on tha ..Id land elected and built atandlnaj and being wllh the uppiKlenenOe*. Bill died Augu.t I Bill IMPORTANT To G'B Consuiiiers. De.n Flicn.ls, It Is expo* led |0 tun Ilio supply of Neat Natural GAS on the night of Oele. her loth. Every effurl will be made to cause as little iiuonvinien.e as ponfible tn eunsutnets. A portion of Ve;s will be changed fm each ttistonier before lh" turn over and the reiiiainHet afterwards. Schedule of rates will be forwarded as quickly as possible. We remain, Always at Your Service, THE BARBADOS GAS CO. LTD. i "WESTWOOD HIGH SCHOOL" Jamaica. B.W.I. irit Class Hoard'But School for girls. Wdiited. Graduate llesdmUlreaa with experience in Boarding Schools, to take up duties as early us possible. 1952. School strong Christian irjdltlon. Cool climate. Salary according to scale. Apply by air mail With Testimonials etc. to Rsj I. C. PARSONS. airman Board of Governors. Strwart Toen. P.O. Jjmiica. B.WI. FLA SH! AV///eV/V//////eV///AV: FOR KALE Land and Buildings formerly occupied by the West India Biscuit Co.. Ltd situated in Spry Street, Bridgetown. Ir gMtriiculurs upplff fo K. II. Ill VI I! A (o.. Lid. Lower Hroad Mlreet at^sr THE CttOWUS ,„| 3466 ^ %  T" Free Gifts for those who apend *5.fM and over I'S.—Thousands are tukint: advantage of Ihiv s\l.l What about YOL' '.' ? ? ? L tin it on in: 11 ion MISSI 1 11\11n1s HEAVY DVTY mi si 1 in 1 11 tins %  hlpnu nt. die nine .mam eon ln| forward and ami iire advised to book early. NOTE S(>MK or THE MAIN FEATURES 6 cyl, 42 BMP. PERKINS Heavy n u iy Dies*.') Engine Replacenhle cylinder lines 1'iess button Starter 5 forwurd speeds Bell Pulley *> Power Tnkr-olT Lights llnur-meter Steel wheels are oblaiiidl le for ploughing wUIal for rally heavy going "half-tracks" Ml available THE TROUBLE TREE TRACTOR RACKED BY OUR HERVICE OIUIANIHATION Your enquiries are invited' COURTESY GARAGE KOIIKKT TIIOM 1.1M1TKI).—SgaUa While Park Road Dial 46lli V.'.'.'.'.^'.'.'.'.'.O'.^^'.'.'.'.'.'.^-'.'-^'.*.^'.^-^^*'^^ OGILVIE ANNIVERSARY 1801 1951 From the New Royal Mill of The Ogilvie Flour Mills Co.. Ltd. at Montreal — Canada's Most Modern Mill, direct to your Wholesaler Grocer and Baker, a better Flour for you CANADIAN QUEEN rr ^ Predetermined quality FLOUR backed by 150 years of flour milling experience N^-^ THE OGILVIE FLOUR MILLS Co., Ltd. MONTREAL. CANADA HOItl II I TIIOM l.lliriLII Ar.Us



PAGE 1

Till RSDAV, IKTORr.R 4. 1*51 BARBADOS ADVOC ATE PACE I llltl.l. Second Reading Of Fisheries Bill Passed Debate Postponed Until Tuesday THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY Tuesday passed the Second Reading of a Bill to consolidate and amend the •aHttlng legislation for the promotion of the fishing industry in this island. Some members wanted to net a better chance of perusing the Bill to be satisfied that no restiutions would be placed on fishermen and it was for this reason that the Bill was not continued with, but left until i %  • • Tuesday. Worthy of Support latlon (or l dustry worked in the .*U£. 11,111 everybody would welcome fa w w "it -,..> /9Z m U thai !" ,', ^Si. !" ;• Cov ; " th"„ *h„ R ^rb. { 5i gr'K !" i* ... !SL ."H" !" !" "iWM aivukl uu.po.1 n Bill which th. prouxuon vl Th.„ n tooi provlaloI1 „ ,.,„„ •VW7 ttihlnn boat to u* expc.lpd saw ;r^ BSarffTi that an investigation would llt *. wnin %  • hfl „..,. ..,„ „ lff S^S^SSK '..!?*-*" l09,t *- t h^. nThcVmanSould be* !" sea In the fishing industr> rtricMd n .. No InvMtucalMHi In an ordinary ease, when a man Reduced Profits died, an enquiry was set up. but Mr. O. T. AUder and tl when %  fisherman was missing, no ting in a rlaust winch investigation was carried out. The for licences was reducing tha proother members of the Ashing fleet Jits of fishermen. The %adt was or boat wore not required to give not at alt lucrative any statement. That was net good "This. Clause would hamper enough m the twentieth century. many an innocen" man from catchIn the Objects nnd Reasons of ing a fish along the wharfslde to th* Hill is stated, appease his hunger as there would Clauses 3 and il of the Bill probe the possibility of going before vine respectively for the keeping lh* Policu Magistrate," he said, of Registers of fishing and of liAs far as St. Andrew. St John, censes issued to fishermen. St. Philip and St. Lucv were conClause 4 provides for the applicerned, It was difficult to send in cation for registration by the ownt noUftcaUon of a change in sklpcr, nnd for the inspection of Ashing per within the few days stipulated ( % oats by the Fishery Officer, or an that the notification should DO sent inspector and the issue of cerllfltn. That would mean that a fishrates of registration on payment erm:in wniild have to keep his boat t>f | fee of one dollar, while clause on the beach without going out. 3 makes provision for the issue ot He said it was not needed to n new ctrt.ticate on the sale or safeguard a fisherman from going transfer of %  fishing boat out In a boat which was not seaClause 6 provides that no fishing worthy It was the natural inboat shall be put to sea unless initinct of human nature to aafetpected and registered and Clause guard himself. T gives the Fishery Officer or an -It would be better for the ininspector powers of inspection dustry.' he said, if Government without notice and of cancelling bought some large schooners in the certificate of registration If a which fishermen could go further fishing boat is found to be unlit afield and bring in, larger weekly fur put poses of fishing. supplies." An appeal lies from the decision Ayrees lo Postponement Dl the Fishery Officer to the (JovMr F u U/alcott mid there erej mwr-ln-Exccuuye Committee no fcc for registering a boat. There whose decision shall be final wa no mtr i cl i on d, u se In the Bill Clause 9 requires all persons deand mvmbcn would notice that sirpus of exercising the trade or whcn thev got „ mile more tlmo to calling of a fishermen to obtain a go hrough he B,H. For that reaUcense on payment of %  CM of TCn he was willing to allow the Bill twenty-four cents the l'< !" u*ng to be postponed until the follow year to start on the first October iri Tuesday in each year.—and clause 12 reft, quires that etich fishing boat shall IN THE LEGISLATURE COUNCIL Un UH Ik* l.ll.-.a. klaaaaa** Ma. • %  IMI HIIMMUM *i Uaa LaatalaUa* •••• IH14I 4 l*f •I IS* l.""ll IIU|. H.l.lt*.> la .......%  .1 Ik' i.aaaal.ar, .. u .l.tit*i> a, Ik. I..IUI %  kifiiiirr i eaMMMea %  I .11 ik> *a*Vala •••.'! %  ( I.O.I ifa** •( Ik* i".."i la.ia. al %  kbaaa ..11.4 %  .*•! %  > ...lal-lai l>. ..Il-aallaa IBJM II far HOUSE A N ul| (11 I. al... Ika ..... .1 Ika dOaaaal al Ik. Oeraeer-hvl w et tM < —mm.. la •aaal*m*al Ik* • •llaaalia mil — %  rail I I in**! a. .ka-ra M Ifc* --.pl.rn.nl... r.llianl*. I..-I_\t Ka SB kl*k latm Ik* o.k.dal* la Ika K l .-l ul i. n R.wlallar la •! %  •* Ik* • %  • al ten % %  is* di*B**.i ai ih. u* .tn.r in l ...ix. l'a-a->lll* %  • %  ' %  -" Ik* tiinnal*. ISM— l-.M I .a.i.m m .kaw> IIha iHfBi* w"Un KiUmalaa. -ilmJa-k. la Ik* H*lall.i> Krply la Mia S**l ..mar. Mreasia M t*(ailnf Id. taUklUa il-.. •••< %  !• % % %  la I '•• %  > UaUn ".Imli -">( % %  ••• Tk* Pakli. flSi. l-.a .-laaee SSsg a-Mi.- •\Mia fftM Ii.,.lll., Allliii'i \m.aa —I. M'|.l.< l-SI >a*i. al \t*.,.-. .. .-ncaiala, >••• .-1...". I. iiSMaal l. al Iki. I .l.i>, *..••> %  • Ham Ml. H**H*n Ik. SllWr—II U Ik* IHH i* II.a .•• i'ifii">l al lk< '•••'• I %  !Analk.f -IIMI. %  •i.iali.f H*i— r.naaia •( ( >..a..ai •>!*< Ik* III* --pi. M.I... I-".! taaaal laaart el Ik* IXaa'l raaal al Srlfara and \'i.ai-i. fair. \i.m. ,...-i.a a ...i. ... Iiaaa Ik* milmii i •maliiHa'i Hlfk-.M %  aHHae Iteai <••• y eattl *i M mil ••iih.rKi.i ibaiM la kanaa Sl^" la .. ... a la %  !.. lai Ik* r-al al Ik* .k.a..l al Ik* Ban.k • kar.k Mr Aaaai. (r M.U.. al Ih. /.Il.al.. Stlaaaa al !' BaaSMaaS) al Ik* i......>.< i.i -.. .1 %  CeakSSHtM (a ..oH-m. i.l Ikt.li*aal*> M. rart I l Mfaaa a. .-.. %  ". aii> .kl ilk %  *..d. lar Ika para... *• *alaklHkik| a punai I lh> ....•Hill** Ik* la I kllalran Al. ISSB. iii-il Aa \.i la n|i I" %  BSSjaBSMM Ik* i 11....i. I'M 1! Part I lan %  .!• Ika ...„,.i. ,.,.„,.!, (.(I-.C1*41—J( ha tl ahlck laraa Ika Pcktaal* la Ik* KxalBllaa Biaalallan I. pl>* Ika aaaa al |pS .i ik* ai.a.a.1 at Ika oa.araar la lar.Blu. I aaaa-JIM* la .appl**n*l Ih. taUa-at*. I+U-+I. Parl I (u nan I M akaa-a In -,-i.|.l. .:...!... r.lln.al*. IMI— M. N. l a blah la'm Ih* ba*aal* I* Ih* K*.alallan BaaaluUaa la pi... Ik* aaaa af i-.a-a al Ik* alapa.al at Ika lia.aiaarla -liillir I taanlHa l-klllp I Il.a.a.r. la laaardai %  I laapaal.i al Hid. : aaia aanak aalaainaara. Ml Waal t*M ..iri-i.. ,. la ....... ,... ....a la aaal • Ilk lk> -...i.. al Ika ...... W.L SI in lent Centre Approved Bv Ltqislative Council Council Consider Hill On hmploynirnt I.ORKIKS COLLIDE n.ixters Hoad It X—476 owned T'L'i;u.!ative On,%  iieteaday beg..a 11lt s. riiiuioymei.t ,,f Woman and ***"< *'"' Young PeraOM ami CtUldrvo \ 11*38. This Bill on the suggestion of llunble G U Evelyn , icierTr red to a Select Committee which " dai The UgisUtiv* louncil Tues><>mprised Hot'bles O, R | wy passed an Adtln.% m reply to J. Mahon. Dr. A. S. Cato and the tiovemor's Message relating to K. ft. Hunte. tinestablishment in London of a eantn 1ST West IIH1I.UL students in' "lie objects and reasons of the UM tniii-d Kingdom. UiU read— .he (iiivrnwr'i Message reads Th|t m „ ...j, m lta i ,K. Colonies u spunaoririg an SBSkM-lgJV inl ?'L' "* %  " "' l '"' Nl "" 1 c-tton bl the W e.t Indian S^J 0 S Xf^'JT"* 0 "' "££? dento' Uniim for AjWOCtal support Night Work of Women in li-lu.Iroin British West Indian Col,r >'" oxtanda the dcllnition o* for ihe estabUsJunenl in'"'" u "n ffmoni. %  tctude per%  rSfSfJ Louis) S. .trt.il ^ alty Pr; have J registered skipper Clause* 14 and 15 re SDJCl IDS provisions of the Defenct ( Flshini: Boat Loan) Kegulationti. 1942. and clause 16 provides for the making of regulations Clause 18 r*4Ulres the Police '< of a parish in or which .. Mailing beat eas occurs, to hold an Inquiry and clause 19 provides for the summoning of such witness as the Police Magistrate may think fit. When the Police Magistrate Is holding .in enquiry under clause 18. he may. under the provisions ;W soqulre into any charge of incompetence, negligence or misconduct arising in the cOUfSS nation against the sklp| |hi sjtew ai well a? into any wrongful act or default In enquiring into such charge the Police Magistrate shall apply Ihe StetrniK an.l Sailing (Fishing agreement Boat) Rule* set out in the First Ollenuers Schedule to the Bill Fees Of Pension Claims Committee Increased I on,Um of a non-resIdentint club roi Baaaaae m i from the l iiiiliueiin arww. In hi* denpatrh I Been Uiv of SUite has point eil OUt that the West ISKUOB Students' riii.ni hm the support of the mkortb .1 ihe I.2UU West Indian Sludenu now in the l'mi.-.i Kuigliniii. •!.' whom more than 800 are in London. It has been represented b> the BBtscuUve COsaaiUttea dsntS Ihcmsielvefc would be ejtpeeted lo conlributo by means of n mtershlp dues i the mn.igiTui'iil would bo expected to Baagi w.iv and iMSini of levvuoiv It ik not Htilicipateil. however, that the e-iabllshni>t eiHil.t be >ompWtel.v .elf-suppiH tIng. The Secretary of State is also givuig cwtuideratkHi to a propiksal tlml West Indian buainess interup lo the age if eiaMiiii years and substitutes i amended nnd adopted 1 the SIsl Sessien of ihInt. i i r .il..nii i ..fileieitce In IS48 fr the 1919 COOventeMU Mtt out in Part.i II and Ml <>f UM Si'hedule to the l*rtneip*il Act. The .iineiiilment t.i the Night Work of Women CeflVenMotU pTSvide* a more flexible dettniti.m for "night." so as to allow BOf working hours to be fixed which will bS preferable from ths poUll .( rhrM "f the workers mil it ihe SUM time wiM bS r-'UM-ten' with tlKterms of the Convention. HORNIMAN'S TEA ask for CussonS I.I \l KY rOILET SOAPS IMI't Kl\l I I Mill S • I I MH HINSSHM HI I I Ml ti I Mil the I The ybjul of Hie B"'l PSS 1 || jo to li meetwould expect a Police Magistrate to suspend a fisherman unless he had good reasons for so doing. M said. Mr. W. A. Crawford tC) sugges "In Barbados we make provisted to the Government before Ihv i to increase inc icea ions for fishermen on a higher House of Assembly passed an Act each member of t Muie than is done In other West to amend the Old Age Pension Act. Claims Oosn Indian islands and it was not reasJQ3 1( Tuesday, that pension .huuld $2.40 for atlaudance at .mable tu say that the same C.ov^ xnl lo ^ yenjioncrs. He mg f the Committee rnment which provUled the best ( ,. dreary, woary, hard Speaking on the Bill. Mr. OT. i. would try to create a .. ., u < |J i t ^a i Iu dgUl*i AUder said he noticed th.it it vgaS "^"loametlor;, n hcrmen by many mUes iVgel their pension, proposed to Increase the fees of a Mr n f..T Smi^Lld it was good SB members and he ga.d that member, attending the —,H, to stress th*t fishermen should go "he age at which people out in sea-werlny boats. eligible lor pensions should The second reading was passed, deertsseded mem be i .>i the lad it w.is 65. .ST Ih. V-i Indian busir tghi be artlUng t nanctal contrtbutsoii i.ihluhnwnl • %  < tinClub ( imi.' At lhi stage, however, th i I.I.II. uf State wishes to learn v.ncthci Weal Indian tiiivernnv would agree in principle t" the iM.ibllahiiienl in laondon * I), -pi'.UM fact .is had be-n crease was made, Delated out, that It would coat He said he noticed some regut: ",0,000 or tflO.000 more, the Hon'ble K. ChaUenui ipokcn to by the Officer utlons to give Increase to olhci ].„ ^ r pumbei <>t i>eople would of other memtMrs 0 m. is in rmd himself DO more complaints naiaUfmetl Of Ihs nnifsmminl gflfl I Red. rttb tie new Juvenile were hoard. i , was hoping thai Govenungnl ...'.. (Amendment) Rules. "There was once a very rudo ronslder increasing the smoutrl U '* l,1 "> wc,v "^ •" a W gs W ie s s i i id on con1041. No. 2, which came into opboy who was in the habit of inolner ol() MC pensioners. underpaid n-i a large numoei ei _, __ Barbados favoured ihe Hoi. J. 1>. ( .MAlIf llrr „f Ihe age to M J O I \\ I'lt'oiiiod nark Major A. HFoster, Superir dent of lilamuuiiy t*ris skipptr vratiuu from July a. 1041 be rules provide mat These terferlng wllh butchers In the Sometn ago. some Dl C ded for such time as the poraon up to the age of 1$ years ,n.,i Magistrate may I being charged before think fit Clause 21 makes It an offence with an offence, the complainant punishable by fine or Imprisonmust, before lodging the complaint merit for a fisherman whose license w ,u, the clerk of the Court, notify where BO) Public Markit I -.poke to the boy WM m ade to consider blind per v i condition fl u 'V. rears and also got fhe Probation Officer 50IU an( ,„ ml|kc |t powible fur "* 'K 1 **^ 1 Wl,h lnB td# ol *•' %  Court to talk to him. Now. he is never t|wm frn]oy |he b^^nis ..f the SW '"": lll< money as Bometimes „r Q balwU Council 'resident tu the %  ting. it Dp l" You caai make your dull, gry, hurd-to-maaaga hair sparkle Hke dtamondt! I'se Ptuko Hair Ureaslngend see howlt brings out hlghllghta. t\lth Pluko your hair looks softer, longsr, silkier be< iT to arrange. tinrket.' ha* been suspended, to take out i lo be in any fishing boat. Clause 22 requires Ihe skipper or person tn charge of a fishing boat which collides with another lo render such assnt.H' practicable to the other boat and Probatioi Officer of the nature of the charge and furnish him with such other particulars i% vho ase as may be required. Beaten With Stick Mr. iiiu.o sam iSHH gS) SSWgffal occasion* the parents, aitU not the D, .inguilty. The parents 11 IK inaecent language in the lenee of the children. When ciuldren repeat the words they scheme at an earlier perio,! than an old pctson was not able to go provided under the Old Age f 't %  n J|._ n *** n .. l Q _r nd to pay tha Act. He had not heard of change and ho hoped Oovernn gtrj not forget that. Worth CoiiMderini; was by th-t siaper she or ha would have S> On pas* leoineU buck I llon'bta j. D. Chi l ounclt at Tuesday Tha President wh the United Kingdom ai e i'i.i'"tative uf the Legislature to attend festival of Britain was u guest the British Government for three weeks. He afterwards spent .. hOlMss in England The President thanked the Council for their words of welBLACK WHir^U^QH Ohtalaable from IWMlKtRS OKI (i SlOltls. |lui.id Sireet. and Al.rilA PHARMACY. Hastings uf this CITUW, without eaugf for such failure. h( shall be I u :i\ of a misilemcnoui The Bill repeals sulisection (1) of ggetlon U of the Harbour and Shipping Master Act. 1907. and the. %  *•* Fishing Industry Control I 9 7 . Should Go to Select Committee brings a case against the ot! Mr. E. D. Mottley said that for unfortulimt4) c Kll any wea.ap, that is nearby. "If mature at that stage, but h needing twrntv dollars. you mvestigat. the case, you wlU thought Ihey '-These rules will prevent many ,1ir "i likely find that the parents considering. people from dragging little chilare to blame." he said. "Whal amendment I would life dren Into the courts." Major Foster I' 1 SU1;•'.; r.iil.it ion dustry had pursued that I"ne ttleIt before it goes unmolested by Government. Then. suddenly the Bill was being <-oun brought in which a man would be cbarXd a dollar to let s Ue^nce tor the purpose of fishing. The JJ, ^ ld tflitl trte RlM of 2 o i; of a fishing boat as set means of enforcing these rales out In the Bill meant anything wnK n mve u ,„, „. unneceae,.!. thai caught fish for gain an-l then .Lgr^iatlon. eapecially to the would be some hardship too on t n„dren." those who might go out in a small Mr Jonn B^iij,^ who y^ „<*„ ng to catch a ""Je. connected with child welfare for there would be He moved thai iteBlll na s-"n> mflny J( arS( oid he Aivoemi,. r0D ,,„ (n om, lo lo a Select Committee Iht he too w Mr. D. D. Garner BBU that he thought thai anyone win had seen the distressing condition who r>ad to Ik lo the payment office Id rethcir small pension woulo age Hgree that the pennon should be ,i K hr mailed I" UPftOBIg "f pen1 wag a charge. The Object Reasons, he said, was not part ol Fly to Britain in Festival Year I BYB.0.A.C. CONSTtLLATION, IN CONJUNCTION WITH B.W.I.A. Get Thera Seencr Slay There I-eager 1 ii d... i. i ,,,.., Tlai* Lisbon London 17.IS hearsj i UM 1 37.ZS „ I K'la.a gars HUl. S US.SO l.g.gg L4HM Also Ceaoertlng gervlees '- the Whole WorldI FLY BOH tltlt HI I KIIS IIIKhl I I I'.irif .V i oiisl.iiilmi 1' '..h. i"ii.t..iitirie. UM lilgllsst paid cricket of thgame, rnlh-l by an Engl-nd Captain "the fastest bowl.-: of my time." a hurrn sj nicknamed in AustntUa "Bsetlic Hi-, gr" f ( >r his ilvldlng prowess. Is the right man. if ,\. there was one. t give Ticket hints. In C"' I %  tl he dues so in his own Individual and amusm.; The lM*ok covera every oh a*. aj |ha leetoasue 11 • k*-f it Is written with .. tlmplli II its points clear lo the boy who has Jut got into his Junior House Eleven, yet ii reveal the complex tactics of flrsf^cla** St in a way which will make the moat experienced reporter "f Teat Matches discover now and subtle points in Ihe game. The reader Is hown why Edrn h at last succeeded, and Is taken behind the acei tu Hammond's decisive encour• agwment He is Introduced to Muiton as a text book batsman, and ol lowed to overhear 'what i I I', illy, the beet attacker of the leg stump in the game, has to say about his bowling teettntflUe The auteror goes out of his way to encourage the ndd-boy-out In lass, and in his chapters u*i Captaincy and Fielding writes so that even the younge-t player may get a real grasp of pi pies. Throughout, he shows the tlreleis interest in his pupil and trial ... %  >' in absoI boundleaM Btore of knowl_ Htge that raa. 'eachLsgtrle Cor ganttne holds back no trlrks, he Illustrates hia with fascii lories) of the men against whom be has used the tactics he dtHi..dman, Ijirwood. VtrE

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I'M.I 111.Ill BARBADOS ADVOCATE mi HM> w ( HHH I i. IU.-.I By Fifth Regatta Won Vamoose %  beatnik, tne -. coming up fmm fifth Nlettoll al tne helm ol .ive a good P* M sailed stead tl> throufhout and. along witn Vamoo-e. will most likely make the Tiinidiid Ten boats started. They saile.' north about in the light wind and i-alm sea. At %  i t>\ George Allen, ivenl into the lead. Tempest was next, followed by Vamoose. Cyclone. ThundMr, K" 3U. skippered by Tom Wilkinson. E*!r away and Swansea. Cyclone soon passed out Vamooae. Tempest and Comet and went Into lh< i was Oral around tinBay Street mark, followed by Tempest second and Thunder third. Bdrfl WW nov in fourth position. \ I and wa %  r T1 marl hoi it ten second* ahead of Thun%  Tsjddy Hoad. by -wnc CStVBC look the lead on the run toy. Vamoose was first n complete the first round abou' ?5 seconils ahead of reconri. Zrphyr was now Blind, | few seconds behind Cv Tempest, then ceirmc lomv.inii Cltase Holds Meeting f> Frosa pair 5 business he sold rice at a penny present Government, has power enence U that line of business anyone to deposit three would be of benefit to the people, •tes and then have He has got 3u yew water put in under reasonable enee supplying foottttlfl lu* Act has not people who eejyuH -fiord heavy >**• im.niic.ned to you by the tptnding | ip came polrtkfkMU is a mystery irom the people and if he got Into the House of Assembl. hi la everything in his power to mlivwat.'i l<> you at 25 .-enls per ol ii..nth it could do it. If they <*nevery way pown.!.. He ivspctl.int get water for you. you come fully asked that they i IO me and I will show you how chance as oue of their %  epreeenta| gvt it.'' he said. ,ivss to show :l a* hag tne qualHr said that he had noticed in ltkeu ^ cairy out Ine promises n the newspaper that Irom January raa „, solemnly made next the price of rice will be going Ht Mld hat m prrt r fl nini,. p lc II cents per pint, "rice, an which the Electors Association i .tern which Is a necessity on the going to put forward is not yet .nenu of our homes." completed. It might be disclosed iM that it was sad that no. .hnrtly lody in Government could think ., acUxl u Cfta i,. •if some method in which to keep man. Other sp, .town some of thr rhM in the cost G. Foster attd Mi Van erf rice There has been establish.-.1 Sfclnnei moved a vote i long time an Equalised There are lots of food?U*ff which are not as necewsaiv afr.ce. This scheme provided that • the**goods have irrivsd Play Field Euquir\ 1 n i page i .F.I.LIN Something new xa 'soccer' 1* dsnenstrsted by W*t Bsrlm peiios an barisback The two texiDH of ridei"., coosistlng of a goalkeeper, a left nd right back ana lures forwards, fight for the nuWie airfiiled leather ball, which has to be poshed forward by the horse*' log-.. Tee polica will itage i horoback st Uw Olympic fttadiuai SrtUith saetor. I t'Tim. i the euai could go up. ,nese observations indicate that Mr Tl profit could, along with tho given by the House of \seem-ui, | 2nd B.G.-Iiarbados Test # from page 1. Proverbs ICilii Ou| The century had taken minutes t.. i d his own entry In the thirties by pulling an offbreuk from Seu43 forth high to the deep square )e# Uincnoon in i overfell Barbados. Anoih'i the Barbados' score at 177'4. i rUMani otsa-aanoad pfaco of BaldfaraatT 35 not out. Marshall 20 Ing by Pereaud I out. in Proverbs being run out Smith Qaakfci powerfuiiv past After Ltinrli cover and the batsmen ""in dtmax -.n< lt.Kwti inattempted n single hut Persnud terval cut fifteen mlDUwM OH bvuutifullv swooped playing) Una Dill thr wicket was %  ding with one hand and covered and only the outfield was %  , lS k| n Marshall too entered The balsmen hesitated when hl """•'' 1 -'" &M UU aMM P-rsoud fielded and Proverbs r *f r,pd '' ,Un *! onn n 1 W,Khl Thunder. rvlnf trt rfKllln hl5 sroum | wmB high to the unpollced long-on Comet. Break„„ out by yards. 102/3/19. K. 3fl. next man in drove Iiu-reuscs Ltral to ajetra covai '"', J 1 lif ^' K T"^ UK ^".'^T 1, ore d SmHh play%  rickrt hit Gasaui wide b-mndary fi>r four and the Barbados total reached bhc IM's F.irmer brought off a similar *troke for font us will, then hark drove to iN'i.t cover for a single 241 mknjtes Later Farmer twtot d/OVa PaSporls Window V. ATKR POLO The two water polo games at the Aquatu Oanb Uakl aJtaraooB arc Sworoi an College and Whipporays vs. Flying Fish. Ploy begins as soon after 4. 46 o'clock as possible. The Swordfish— Harrison College fixture is the deciding game for the league Cup. Whichever team scores an outright victory wins the i up if tho match is a draw SA „,i: fe .v J.I -i,n have one point more ihan Harrison College, -o ihe Optl must win or lose the Cup. DANCE At TIIK BAKIIAIM>S UMJATK CLUB i.bers Only) On I Jaw. Oclnlwr lh 9.(HI p.m. J ^lup.lr b> Mr. Mdnr. MW .•nd his Orchestra Bttj gJVI i a great ovation by d after singling yli the fin* 441 1 mi mnd Tudoi was completely al I loi avan %  plau a ignorl> for subsiduMition, kwp down in K lhr directions of the Vestry, some of the rising price of ricv. '<• ""7 MUUC wall thai the grant He said that when he first started fW" th Labour Welf. hud been made to tin* Vestry, thai audited accounts of expenditure 1 n M n hi an-mmt naf to turnishcd by the Vestry. cTaaniS SS cut too beauu""d "< " Vestry a.. I fully, to make his score 28 tho Governor or the Ooai crowd applauding ths quarter Executive Committee was rcsponcentury. sympathetic ever since Bible for expt-ndiiun* *n the Playhe broke the spectacle spell. Ing Field and the pavilii (.r.-enidge had the luckiest Tudor would Uka the Commission break of his short career Holder to believe thai i.e % tclded to the drove out hard, aibba fielding htandishments of the Arttng Covraagnificonlly at extra-cover and crnor (unforlunalely Mr. Perowne fascklngT Grecnidge yards down „ no now in B arbados and was the wicket but Thomas dropped BO ava ,i Bb i c as u witness) beX ,l!fil a ^ .K^V. .K* I ; P „ w c ."i easaai he fell thai the Acting c.ovto regain the crease The scoranvt-r %  inmuii aticad ol Cjfdone Third „„„,, w ,j,,,. ,„, %  nolhr undnr} pil<,Un( hii iou>. nuuvkiual icore u, lh ..vomits Edni, ^ W J' 1> *-Smith h.i.l i. lire in 74 whi.i Hnakaway. Comol and K. —• spin oul lo li.u iplnnn P.IOU „„, „„,.„, ^^-„ „„, „, VanooM wmi ou> ."" M drove inch and iti.n K hi m „.„,, ,, ,„„ K ,„ hr „.„„„. |,, -" *, •""" vr, .''•""* %  'lom-orl the latter boundlo I". Im,r. NAI ovei H ; drove out ,., while Swansaa. >klppmd > puttlna down :, However Marshall was out ,,, J^1 '''"' '',d not t ,.,w,ll over .urrauful appeal wa. made pla^ waa orn around UnpertuilKd Smith eoon lucked c ;.,, k in in lhr let trap He turn["JSU p "" '"h "J. J "> "•"'" ato"l Ha*!. B.G.'. Kre /0: Baatorth heatle oil ,,| ,„„. ,hat amvouttMa the ,-i, ,^ m .„ bu I't '"" Wl nl '"" out. Olbba not oul dividual half century in 90 minWood II not out, Orecnidge I not in. hiluiiK live lours. out. (iiiskin took the new hnll hiniAlt^e Tu -.11 and Marshall itrcclol hi. tint delivery which was short witti .1 how to ihe aquai*. h-n lMil.1lil.il V Ini I"111 N.'M tat — I, innings had Listed 415 minutes. BaG.'a SECOND TRY Wight nnd Gibbs openetl B-G.'s second innings Bt 5-25 p.m. Wight C.rccaidge had • life with his 1aeinfi Marshall on-drove the rtr.t ""-' ball for lour and later singled and j^f'^.J, L t Gil nfavarl out the Avnr A People s door. do that about which • just speaking. It was a really vital thing they were talking about — tiupciiMuii Which would the wolf from the old A LECTURE On KINDNESS TO ANIMALS By SOT. MAJOR C. F. TORKEZAO Al SCUUI Ili'lltl'III.H let • On Fridny. jlh October Al 6.00 p.m. Till. iiiniiniis i.Mitu I I' XKTY Will Hold A POLITICAL MEETING \e .1 ST GBOSGI t III 111 II si. GsWigi On Friday Mehl. Rfe Ihln her. I'ol. at x.w o'clock In supprnt ol ihe candidature of MK. F L MILLER MR. E. W. S,: B:\RK0W akers : Mr. (. M. AIIAM>. M.C.F. i>r ii i. (\ mum M i p Mr. F. I. \\ U.i'111 M I V Mr. R. G. MAPP. M.C.P. Mr. F. t Mil I (ir M.C.P. Mr. K. Vt. BhttLHMrW, ft Mr. t. HOI Dl I Mr. J. C. Tl'IXUt Ml. and lhen N. backwani scuar, isg ^ lor Wight at Br* leg sll,..... S*VR&&gXg&-& P:."i§£6?l>Lw j at au i his -ha. ohe overturned. It took jow splm cmds before the crew ihe pad t oi her again on even keel f,. r thn-c makiin* Braakaw.ef and C-met took thn. H and the Ms upportiiniiy u. pass hat out but Smith 5 l>e nmnaaad fc loin Ihe '•* %  Bui wilhojt again bafora K. 3ft couui •* ln|1 nrxl ^y^ f.„ m patolr jumped ahead of her. down ihe wkkrt and had ,i good U cuuhl now lw clearly seen SW | t ,j u i one tbjt beat i'im througn race was tolni > the air. then also Wat him with !" ,n ; '" „ !" i. ''^,|,T U ,',"'. 'o,n earr.i'n,^" Walcoi>"5 P l ff n fff Vnoo. She t even larther ,„„ Urjjfc back | !" „ lefc howUn, ^/^.^a ?ew incheSf tmm (a""""" Fa """' """' -" !" addition. Smith In "' his till nunute^ta> p ^ ,„ d ,_ Kw , ^JJ KM r nrugd a ta. lwi. ami n I.D.W. niipi'iii wa^ upAtkl^onwTuTfr^'F.,,,,,,, """ "> "" /'I r M W o,„ reamed M. "-•S.i _?a.T;.. ."Inning, earrvina In Walcim as K.iriiiir lifted a half volMk.i v lira .... L Wish! b G-km Wish, !C b Wltfl, wiaai mocho'Farm, !••> from P.iloir to the imd-on Si "dVov? f!!r a brae, l*"^, ** nd,„,, „ p ,. In 3(15 Into the lead. She quickly got him neck and crop for 80. around Ihe buoy nd went on to Smith", betting teas an exe -ccond. by two i, nd promising effort, playing maying |ht mre 2 „ ro moving „,„, and 20 seconds. Zephji. aMsp .,il conlldcnt stroke, with o[ ., Wl .'. %  '"""'B'hatting .no,,. ,.,„wBch alio sailed steadilj. was n.eeful fcency. His liutmp |||e Korr „, 2M „ nd r „ rn ,„ r s "dcnily i,K,k several singles with j a .,.. %  b i,. ayartl, three hour, aiul !• ,„ I SB Farme. wie ','•'' ,hon ""-"rove Patolr KSdS lour* '-^' "'L':;",.^'-....'^..'^.^..,-,,.., %  %  kon_ ,,.!, .ram,, and .had • %  Edril. nith, by it ten fours. 1JI/4-80 Marshall now paitnereil Farni.i ,„„„ ,„ ,„,. —fllpr, B/alcoU %  in oroVr, were Tent"ho had ueon batling 45 minuto ,-.n,.. — h ana The "'h'rs n '/" '; K ,g for Ii rung. Mai-h.ill ,„inile,l D F.iiiner walkM Ofl the field r ".' .. B !" \ Sw.ina. -horl tal| fM|m pil |h f „ n „„ |rd ,„ „ „„, „ „ „ w „ and t-oin.i. u .,11 !.i the long on boundary lor ,,„„,. possible r„, |„ m lo ..tun, ,^ SunlaTntoTn*"•• ., In the hrtlim .. in, ;,, li.W ii. le.k Alter „.„,,„,.. •..,.,„ .„.„„ lo 0 I", ^;;"V„ <* IM eonu.1 m 2.1 leg trap since the hall .1 visit i.inio.e. .. nullulcs new and slut swinging and (.. what I read in the " !" I, "J > ~ raniwt Ittraook his path"' role, kin wa. %  UaTbowUng itMwgggjr. Tri.ldadian, are anxiously look„. drtv „ ,„ ,„,. He „„,., drove for lari ,n, forward lo Ihe tour and hope an " .„ lilllk| „, g, „„„ ?M „,,. Son M but without additeu. • %  "* 'or four aiid I.ter neatly In;.. .,,,„. „„„ nt another Oaskln delivery to, put a high chance down on the four. He hit Ihe second Six ol .,,„„'";, the matt 'i when In the same over s .a i who bowled the last he lifted another ball frorn Gas-! "> luaeh wttk aucegga In J^ """' '"" " lon - n bound the (rst Test was brought on In the last over But one before lunch The aaowd rheernl as Ihls was K-'oposed to have some psjrchotogK..I sigiutU-jinciHut M.ushri'l I the bog*]! wltl 1, ,,, to tha on bound* single 'vhlli K..imer scored %  biIdag ,i total ">f IciStakrg l that he would have I liked to haar thtBacuor Member, for St. Andrew saying Hut laBtaad n( keeping people in the f.irlnry | until ihi. ; nd then, ;irn them OD Government, no would put aside something to Hive them Mr M. w. ttaaag (K) he agreed It was n matter of Vital Importance and he believed that Oovornment was conscious of that. The second last member who had .'-nw n hed ratnd ihe question (i on ^rehensive insurance %  ejaaaai and th:it wn< %  |gwrM which had to lie brought in by I The rill was then passed. iboul bra weanda, V car ii ( >ectert to •aM place ti Farmer alao on-drove Wight foe Potli but m nearly out to Wight nexl over, Ma attempt-.i to hit "Ut. then flopfied tha stroke hall"ig the ball to mid-ofl. made a good effort gwth.Pd to the ball, bul fail holding it. Ml ••> runs He .Ukvi mtic i-ijiis bafora he drove Old Boys' Maul. At Gormen Today Snt uggler Hold COLOC'tNE. Oat 3West German customs police! announced on Wednesday ihcyl ,n K which funnelled 20.000.000| irorth of diamonds, naiwttej j orcian currency bctwean F %  The following BBUB Bag been chosen to represent the ["resent inot getting well boys who will play Past boys at over the ball, raised it into the ("mbermere School today at 1.3u South America. r varting hands of Persaud a-ni.:—Grant. G. N. (Cap! I WaV Wnner Aprath. k ion, O. H., Alleyne. I. MeD. Cologne Cit t OH ring wag unaovared when| WHAT'S ON TODAY pullre Courli — !• %  -• Court of tlrlglnal Jurtsdlcllnn — le-00 am Camera flub Exhibition *t Barbado* Museum — IMI Combermrrr Bays userOld I rJahU Match at C mere — I SO p.m. Mohile Cinema gives film ,hw al Oldbury PlanUlion Yard. St. Philip : so p.m. CINEMAS . r. '•' -S 1,1 Ito,1 Alalllll H-,o<— ii \/ v Ola liatnt-flr l-.ta.l %  — gat .>. •* This sent up 25a in Kilt, min.ites I look Wulcott into th. The next hall tJnskii righted well and Waleott hit QU %  In bul he skied to mld-on QaaUn had no nrtthodox mid-oi i -t and Scaforth at bsckwart miii-i,n could not cover ground Waleott late rut for fou: r.mner had been %  ) lb wlckel I.corlsh. I* E Brathwaite. U K nd a quarter hours Maxwell. W W Uwis. K H rd hitting eight fours. Francis. L. G.. King. N. M. _,, . Heckles. H. O. and melds. B. A. -•—" Old Bovi are Invited to tea ain lute cut 4 p.m. and cocktails al 6 p.m. t.asftin courageously for a brace Sjbscrlptlons will be $1.00. Holder In* rusloms men, arrested an unidcn-| ifled min ;: Roettg-n. trying BfOM the Belgian border with 600/1 i diamonds hidden in Unikrnds with hollow bases in hi) eai.—u.P. BARBADOS S.P.CA ST. FRANCIS DAY October 4lh BRIDGE AND ( \N\M \ III On rARK HOI "I 4.M PJBL Special Children's Programme produce*! by Auntie Betty from REDIFPUSION at fl.00 p.m. FRIDAY. OCTOBER STH 4.3 P.M. CHILDREN'S CONCERT At l'KEN'S PARK HOI SI McketH iReserved) 1 / *i from Mr. Arthur. Ba> s-i Ih.ys' School Admlsoion I/lAdultn) i.,l i Children) BRITISH COI N( II presents avar UEl)lF"USION at 9.00 p.m. a Piogramme of Music. I'm %  ..til VYrsc connected with ANIMALS N.B.—Will Bridge and Caztaata players please bring their own C.irds. Pencils and Markers V ffthaotn i .'* now in Norm in v/ight. tha ball going I e tw I Ki celebral)( YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT From Cedrlngtan i alnfall : .1? Ins. llUhest Trmperalure : M-a F. I.awest Trmperature : tU F. Wind \ rti.tr. : 5 milper hilir Barometer : ( a.m. I 2S.WST (3 p.m. i 29.HR5 wn to deep third man but .it the next ball when in gels'nig back on to the wicket to ut in the direction of third man ha hit the wi.kel loo ul .n.ikiriK r.ike. Waleott had minutes and his innings Included ona sia and three fnui tn i w WIKKI partnered AtUnaOH hclp. %  hlntaelf to %  loft] I i I Palol but Bltci ikiad the same %  Thomas i.ehting at d-i'p mid-un. \. \i osnM tress Wight. Aikm%  on w.is luti.un nnd howled with ,. w-n pi*rhel
r.l. MI t tt. If. l!.T.r. -.1 I I' r II. Mnlll-v. M.c.r. II A. IM.M.I.n : M II Byiswi u.iii.-ii Miss L. Krltl 4 10 51.—III. Such natural beauty with products by morny CAVE SHEPHERD & Co, Ltd. 10—13. Broad Si. including Baby PowcUr in boxes with puff. Tin of Talcum. Bath Sails. Boxes of Soap (3 cakes each) Hand Cream. YES MT'S Hit I We have just received A Large Assortment of ... OIL CLOTHS at $1.43 Yd. Secure Yours Early As — — THIS IS A FAST M I.I.I i: "GENERAT HARDWARE SU PPLIES JAR BAKERIES V.VV/^V,V^'>#VAV.V/>/.V/->-V,V/*-.V.V.V,,'.V'-'-'--#V.*, tHMTTAIsL SMmXV FOLBBW STEEL MHMMS THF IDEAL DOOR FOR VIIIAMI\HThe whole Daar slide* snd fnld tn one side. ii two sires •— With I leaves g ft, Z In. wide x 1 fl I in hijli With Ii leaves — ft ft. 3 In. wide g 7 fl. I Is. tilth SWEDISH FUTSm IMMHtS 3 ft. vMt X 1 fl hlch The D | ' WISH Ian lie PulKhed. TanBavaaJ or Painted CIIONt. 4!tl7 WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD. '.',',V,'.',V / V//AW/MV,V// ) -,-,*-',*.-.--'-'-*-'-'-*.--*-*



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PACK TWO QcUxih QaUuiq BARB .DOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. OCTOBER 4. lSl SeM llrut; S^'Un-n Aim-ricMn Column: i. Ha„k sup,,„ri DX Equals Millions S W intQUHART, th Ambassador to Ven••. Aceompanie. Mnlqurli n w i A t.m i. I8S6 i. ihe son of th.; Urquhiirt. Hiwas mairicrt m 1923. his appointment to Venezuela this year, in' wu H M Conaul-Cenet ;iI sit ShaojLQsJ !iur: 1948 to 1951 He entered ihe I-evnnt Ossseulai Service If* 1S20 end In 1*4 wn made Consul at Tahnr He wut trWMfMrA to th* Foreign OnVt w I9M ,1.11,1 WU *i'i>intcd a* Inspectar-Grncrnl ..( Consulate* 1939. He v.,t seconded to the Honi>' Ofnct. from two lo iMi and appointedOnsul-C.enetaL Tabriz the folloWing year. In 1943 he M transferred to New Oi lean*. La., U.S.A. 'lip.-'' re^appoinced Inapec..I of KM Consular Esiablij.h-.iu.-ni ii. 1B45 In 19*7 h was KM; Minister al Washln-..ion Su Robert and daughter lit.' rueatl ut the Paradise lk-ach Clua Safe Delivery A LETTER f.. r this newspaper Re IU misleading addres. wa deUiBred to the M Ciirtnu-nt yesterday. The addrtv.s wu The Editor, Ua ihados Arivo-/ tow po*—pn *uu AON sent him pottr p-cfatrei ii'.n,'. lie thi by Mi. Aill.llKHpla oate. 34 Bridie Street. lown. Barhudo*. II.W I Martinique M AIiTlNigiK" will .' of a taiK filv. I ncaaa* .xUiig takes HI. O'clock on Thursday nisht. Ottohci II With T.L.L. |k*li. G Buna/* 1 Gill arrived %%  from Trinidad early ywter' ' : M W I.A. |o %  d.t. in Barravtos, Hia tails and iHimU *.i,.. rente over six week* %  • Seaweti to meet U.K. They art.laying wllh relative. U.W.I.A. to join her i. other Mr*. Mercedes Plimmci who Is at present holiday ma; in Baibado*. Murtasa Is slaying with JhT mother at -Sea Gaze" Maxwells. She plans to be In Barbados for one linniHi She told Cartb that quit.' ., taw Other Triaidndlan. v. mild be cumin* over towards the middle .f (Kiobrr for a holiday Ainnn* ihos,> tcming w&l he. Miafthona BarCMnt and Mis> JosephimGatcllfTe burnt i a a rnembci of tha Trinidad water polo team which recently played against a indies' water polo team from Barbados.. Open Meetiaf T HE Barbados University Women's Club Will U!; Lin, ; an open meeting to-night at 8.15 o'clock at Ukt British Council headquarters. WakefleM i"h. ii,t speaker will be Mr J. B. U Rf this meeting Is lo er.courasje higher ediiratlon for women In the island. Will Visit Her Son M RS. EDITH M EMBEKSON. mo>hn ..I Mi (v ,, Ktiii %  i Branch Munagor of B.W l.A. in Caracas, Venezuela, wu a passenger in the Colombia from England yesterday morning. She I visit lo her sou and daugmvi -.-esterdy in the S.S. Calomblr en his way to Jnmalca. H an iiccrimpantcd by his wife. Mr. Qeorge told Carib that hc SMBt three months' holiday In lbs U.S., and while there ho underwent a serious operation and is getting un quite well. He nld that the purpose .if his visli lo Jamaica Is to see th? letults of the hurricano and to give advice. While there, he will probably visit the Bahamas and Belize Mr GeorKe expect* to be In Trinidad for Christmas. He will af'erwardn pay a visit to British GulHiia'lteforireturning to Barbados In February. 90 Seater Aircraft M R RALPH A. BEARD, dt* real estate agent who spent two weeks In Canada, returned ever the week-end faa T.C A He said that while in Mont-vat. lie had i.-onsiilt.s with T (' A Officials and thc> informed biso that ihej had on order. 90 seater nircr.ift. souu' of which tnej ate hopiiii' t" i>..' it' Barbados run In the i.ear future. cocial Welfnre Officer A FTER six me United Kingdom. Miss Belly nlni In the (•Usnbte. id that she had an enjoyable stay ami was glad to :.c back Whil-i In England she %  tveryom .it un i %  U >tr, happy. B.C. Representative M l( H RISLKY TW K r R live and retursstd %  In the C'*Hnbie sftei four months' hollda) They will be in residcrur al Wakelleld." Whfta Park Road. Trinidad Civil Servants I NTitANSi P t.Trinidad m Iba c ofunihir y,. iiiii.) momins %  %  Ann's and Maajp MM tin Road Board and Mr K If. Arrlndell of the Incom. I... had both spent six months' leave m Hal Untied Kingdom To Take Up Appointment R EV. FR. ROBBHI BULBECK jeslerday morning in the CwUnibM intraiiMt for British Quiana wtVsn H will take up .in .ppoliMmen In Georget.-wn. This pi Fr. Bulbeck's first vis.. to the Ws I iii.ii.-.iii-i during hi i.i : :.'... ,ii n afl n Belber, S.J. and Fr. JoinQuiglay, s j ut the rVon a i J.-inmotf: Lane. IT QulfJey who is si at Bete r vei wasjUiis; ^ i % %  I 1141-1 here for the past three is due to return In Demi Wednesday by B.W i A Director of Y.W.C.A. \ FTEH siA'i.dun. vv. holiday In BaAado Clare 8k turned U Tilnidad over the week-e n d t> B.W.I.A lo reaunw ha* Associate ExacuUva Di ihe Y. W C in Sea." The Stream. Trinidad K.C. A FTER month) 1 O'Reilly. K( ,\!:s. o Heillv ami IhiM dauChtOI Mi's Pamela O'Heilly a uslt In th* Colombir yoatardai' morning, rolurned home laU i m f by ihe sume vessel. Mis. O'Reilly told Carib thai England hud made great stride. and was t Miss O'Reilly Is a mi ihe staff of the Trinidad ln| Company of which I I .. DlM.loi Him Unit Chief M R. WILLIAM sn.i | : of the Colonial Film UP nitfi headquarters. In London, left ha Tir.iilad un Mondaj b] B.W.l.A Mv S< Un bad over the dims made ,v Indian students Which wen 11 Friday night. While m Barbados ra ing ai the Marine Hotel Accountant In Venezuela R ETURNING to Vaneaueta ovei Ihe week-end t>% 11 W l.A. were Mr. and Mi l'. i.i.d Ihelr little daufhfc had spent i„ weeks' hollda-. hare staying at Un 0 Hotel Mr. Dicker Ll U woiking wiUi the .shell %  l*etroieum Com) an) to M Meadn-istress of Queen's College M M I RANDAl.l ll Doll England > %  in in uv ss t •inmbir aeeonapanli two small sons AdraTn and Julian I delight*) to jjet to Barbados and I lorward to taking up her duties at the %  epi)Huniti. Back from U.K. Holiday M R. PAT KOACH and wireless, returned to %  the S S ( %  1 1. 'our months' holiday fniie.l Krii.h.m ami „n the Continent. Commonwealth Supply W KDIAN repree %  ralved In %  %  evenings was .. Lssneastai rfous Trinidad's Albet' Oon one evening had Just returned ft IT Whitehall just in I.me to K< %  my h'.v. • %  evanlng bi hly enjoyed a party given by the Indian offlc%  n§; day he U lunching with Pakistan represeno-i „nd the evening of 'he same day was due at a re1 the Singalese. i gjjg i FriHav m tha Roval i' %  Handed delegates from the Dominions and l After Six Months R I-:rriiNING to Baruudos ye-ifjoiulsBj in Ihe roUissoir fter M* i'1'.i %  ii Knglid wenRev. Frank of the James Street Speightstvwn Methodist Clrcu and Mis Lawrenea Rev. Ijiwrence who went up lo itie u K h Has Insenel of hiH health said that he consulted a 1th Mi eyes %  still under tieatment. %  rhlhi In sni land, I time IraveUuiB Bd %  ddrsBBBlng many meetinc^ -in he were staying wllh %  hen -HI Ulne who is employetl it Deetra Hoi Hev Lawrence went TriiJdad ye-teida> .nening on his lo T..i. ... i i He aril Hev. nnd M-. bar Mrs. Lawrence did l not accompany hin B) effective rellevlni -vertnervt inflamn.ition often ut.'crcd by diabeticsCol lens leports. Tnis finding is independently confl rmed by the Canadian diabetes .elallst. Dr. I. M. Rablnowltch, .. Montreal. I nnamed When he tried the extract on 20 severely afflicted patients l to tase morphine regularly to relieve their pain, IB got astonishing relief, he reported today. UM %  a e j i n ia ia II -. %  ;1O1 .%  tiorae T i|l %  chant* '5) 1 ins -lioot. iB| ^ •tranavr u> inun ii i ,. %  rird UHUt ill nan in Maasa it. Si niter innaa.. ii %  pui i ba. a* well a* iat >><*> u-a out (41 IB '*, Ill .,.„ code rating for top pi i. n : products. It will guonl. noat vital defence Bk energy goods, and will get them scarce materials. -vemment plans expan%  more than genii le pre-Korea, Av.. production totalled H.722.000 tons. the higgest ever fa AM industrial production roM last month five per cent, to 218 per cent of the iaas-9 a*. 4*.te JOBS CUT THE SENATE nut lt< foot d > *" and bang!—-40 000 civili.oi ml • must he cancelled by t" 1 ant. It wanted to hir* MO.O'Ml nut-of-unlform i I da says the limit wll bS00.00O. B CROWDKn OI-T BRiiisii rACBTCHBM Btanlcj Bmi ... BaSaOri In MS* York to reap u Cl.ill.U tl..l\'-l fj month Atlantic crossing. Tin* .menially planned to be round thai pul their Nova Espeto San fot %  planned Italian fair. B no roum fur the Nova Espero. MORA1.F. t KASI1KS PATROL MCADBON rOKl a-rounde.1 in Alaska for "morale reasons." Since July, 14 aircraft have crashed in AsMkS, killinK nearly 100. FVUl vatoer bombers of Navy Squadron Nine. Tlie Irivateer is one Of the Navy's sturdiest planes, fly "in hurr,cane? on wcatheri armrrg missions No one knows crashin* oloaay )u acros* B calls it "bafl DBBAM vvoill.l) H/IVBg em world" are raspooiii lc tor i.. %  says Dr. .. : I expects %  ind rsise beauti%  nage they discover hus. .UKIS are bald, have false tech.. a* stay out at night. Kids st do get ill Thm wives crack ind i lo I WAISTLINE WOtteUfefl II ^'-. i iioiiywuods mast I ars is fat. At one llw ::no Lanza is chopping wood R( Skeltor. has gone Into a clinic, v"an Jennean wume* aloud about r s waistline, welter pidgeon just 1.id to have his suits 1st out. And Clark C.ahle is dieting heavilv. TV IS A 'RIGHT MILLIONS of Americans were < f their "constitutional I RoWnson beat Turpir •n 'heir home TV sets, says Repre Pat Sutton. He winb> i law to compel promoters to allow not past into %  %  %  B.B.C. Radio Programme THURSDAY. OCTOBER 4 IB31 l i^imn* l'.iMf. 11 M in Jau MKIU 110* noon Tha Km. <•> %  paa. — • i. i h> pi.. Th* Nwa. 4.10 p.m. Th. Duly BawMCT, I* p m Jasi UIMK. *} p m Spuitina Rroiid. i SS p n C owapo—r ol U>* Wark, S IS p m BMC HurilMrii OIIIW.UI. i> p.m. finll alaceharwn. I II ^ m Sculllah alaasBHhB, 4*5 pm. Proar.mm* rarsO*. t V. -ii. i. pa UAJ as., SI St i J4I0 v-n Th* Hw, IIS pm Nt. Analyw. 7 U p m W* SM Britain. IS < IICIIMUI Mii.it. 14 pm Boofea in RJI. S.M p in A> 1 Knaw Him. S IS p m Radio N.-.rwl. BSD p m. s.mui lii.paich. a 43 p IB Cumpuwi of the Wr*K, SM p m Rins Up TH* Curtain, I0 p m Tha N-*. 1014 p m r -..-,. TUr sailorlato. 10 11 p.m. On Th* hm, loss pm. Bart-heaicr Towart I in PBOUBAMMS. TIUBSDAY. OCTOaUUI 4. IBS! 1406 pn I0J0 pm Naari i.i sa aas i as p m -Vast wa. KKAI. \\ %  %  i II i LAST Z SHOWS TO-DAV — 4.45 S.30 n*' d :ii ( m e ^ OPENING TOMORROW 2.30. 4.45 ft 8.30 P.M. AND CONTINUING 0AILY 4.45 ft 8.30 I'M PL4I4 BRIDGETOWN LADIES" SPECTATOR SHOES AIHOI A VtlMISOII IlllWItS WHITE'TAN WHITENAVY WHITE/BLACK :<.20-l 1.22 WHITE NUBUCK_ 911.2 1 BLACK SUEDE. si:.:i! GREEN SUEDE SlSaW WINE SUEDE Si 1.511 T. . EVA1VS A nlllll III IIS DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES D!AL 422r The World's GrealesI SKIN OINTMENT 7am Buk ^oolh n; ( Healing, Antiseptic ,.v .il.rn,. li.iiul, Will our luvliiincrv i>I I'II siIII, !, %  thai our Dvparlntvnts trill hv CLOSED FOR STOCK-TAKING IIV lollou-H:mtm Lumber and Hardware—TO-DAV (Wrdncodnv) and TOMORROW (Thursday) ,1rd and 4lh October Plantation Supplif.-TO-DAY (Wednesday) :ird Oct. Our office will be open to business as usual. THE II Vllll VIM>\ 4MMMIIA IIVI riniiiv rACTonv LTO. ii'5 TRICYCLES FOH HOYS A 1.1III.S These are so made that they can be converted into BICYCLES. Your Children will be delighted with them. Secure your requirements tow from s PLANTATIONS LTD.



PAGE 1

PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, (KTOBfR 4. ISI HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE %  NONSENM: v.-v ^ITTLB aioeran-. s) ASJCu ivOZB AT -rj 9CAXF MV S-OSV—TUAN TUS JVOT... ->. ee... i MEAN.... ) — nrv< BY WALT DISNEY BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG m .... -L %  /,-ro tCUAOMM J* 1 HA>*TQ STOftiC-'C-. ^Twf 0OOM L-. <**N IM TAKING A H4P •= —' W I'M Juf i THtsi*.S >J v -; 1 ** V ^ WHETHER YOU ARE A LARGE USER OR A m ODD RtDROSE SMALL USER YOU DESIRE THE BEST TEA SO USE RED ROSE TEA IT IS GOOD TEA. rui'DE BLACK MOLASSES Te N .n.i 1 "WoiH>r-Food" CYRIL SCOTT !/• At JOHNSON'S STATIONERY TEA CITS SALCEKS At JOHNSON'S HARDWARE THE LONE RANGER IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash anc! Credi* Customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW Pkgs. Quaker Corn Flakes 38 :4 Pkgs. Jack Straws 61 .1 TinsKlimPowd.Milk(51bs) 5.98 ...-IO Tins Apricot Jam 65 60 Tins Heine Tomato Soup 34 SO Bottles OKiefe's Beer 26 20 D. VSCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street Give yourself strength with daily BOVRIL Whan there'• • job to be done or a game to be played—a gup of Bowil is the very be of drinks. In rich hedy flavour sends a welcome glow through you ; it' beefy nets puts new life into you. There's nothing lute Boyril to build you up and sustain you. BOVRIL HEALTH IN EVERY BOTTLE • HEALT/ Your Hair can be Radiant and Dandruff-free — nil ymi'w f(l lo do in Inkme homo rf fcyiw-r'-rf niW PRELL EMERALD CLEAR SHAMPOO /S THE SHAMPOQ FOR YOU/.' On Sal<> til all l.iiulini: Stttrv* COCOA is wall served DUNLOP UNIVERSAL MOTOR CYCLE TYRES Cocoa Koing overside from A >hi[> in iht !'• #! of London Dock* with whit looks hk c Imlc tercmonv, but the iart <. the Port ..i" London Authority kri'iw the deKit* oi can i tu hindlc dm valuable -Qtiunodily. VX ht-ihti %  product i* cisy tj otf-.Mil or i* ihc moil .i II it iataft in the cxpencn-cd lu ibm it In the Ur.-. market ID ;! For Extra V Reliability DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD. ICCIKTtIN ttrOS




ESTABLISHED 1895



2

7) -.
Barbad
fran Completes Oil |»
Grab Operation As ||

Teehnicians Evacuate

Mossadegh Will Fly
To New York Sunday

TEHERAN, Oct. 3
‘THE IRAN GOVERNMENT completely took
over the $1,000,000,000 Anglo -Iranian Oil
Company as the British cruiser “Mauritius’’ sailed
for Basrah with the last of the British technicians
who once ran the huge installation at Abadan.
Reports reaching Teheran from Abadan said
that only four British executives including Alec E.
Mason, former Assistant General Manager of the
Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, still remained at
Abadan. They plan to leave by 3 air tomorrow.

The evacuation See = 7 es
men proceeded without inciden
Dulles Visits
The President

Persian troops saluted the Mauri-

tius as it steamed out for Basrah
WASHINGTON, Oct. 3
Foster Dulles, Republican

with the last remaining British
policy advisor to the Administra-

who ran the oil company for 50
tion on Foreign Affairs, paid a

years.
The evacuation was completed
brief visit to President Truman
or Wednesd: Ay, the first since the

at noon.
A recepticn last night was given
conclusion af the Japanese Peace
Treaty Conference in San Fran-

at the home of the Iranian en-
cisco last month.

John

gineer N. Bazargan who is on the
Managing Board of the National-
ised Oil Company.

Government officials reported
that the few British executives
who were invited, attended.

Dulles told reporters after his
ra” ypeneran US. Ambsssador] visit that ‘Pruman may have a

| 4 s ) bi *SY{ statement later, but i
| call on the Soviet Ambassador Se ed Bot

indicate what the statement would
be. Well informed sources how-
ever, said the reason for Dulles’
ezll on Truman was to relinquish
formally the post as chief execu-
tive’s special representative on
the Japanese Peace

added that Dulles

President that he

negotiating

Treaty. Source

informed the

would be available at any time
for consultation om matters con-
nected with the Javanese Peace

and other Legation chiefs today.

Meanwhile Deputy Premier Hos-
sein Fatemi told the press that
Premier Mohammed Mossadegh
would fly to New York on Sunday
to attend the Security Council
session which will act on Britain’s
complaint that nationalisation of
the British Oil Company was a
threat to peace and was in viola-
tion of the ruling by the Interna-
tional Court of Justice.

He said Mossadegh will be ac-
companied by 12 Persian officials

Treaty which the Senate is ex-
pected to ratify next January.



including members of his Mixed —U.P
Oil Commission. He said, in New Recei Ss ts
York Mossad, will stay at a iving ecre
hospital so tha’ able. to

BONN, Oct. 3.

Chancellor Konrad Adenauer’s
Government formally charged on
Wednesday that Socialist Opposi-
tion Leader, Kurt Schumacher,
was among those receiving copies
of secret Government
allegedly stolen
own office.—U.P.

maintain the diet { nétestary for hi:
ailing health.

The Premier’s son Hasson Moss
sadegh, who is a physician, will
I accompany his father to attend to

his medical needs.—-U.P.

TO-DAY’S WEATHER
CHART

Sunrise : 5.49 a.m.

Sunset : 5.55 p.m.

Moon : New

Lighting ; 6.00 p.m.

High Tide : 6.14 a.m., 6.00
p.m,

Low Tide : 11.46 a.m.



documents

from Adenauer’s



KING’S CONDITION
STEADILY IMPROVES

LONDON, Oct. 3.
Buckingham Palace announced
King George continues to show

improvement
lung operation.
bulletin said:
night the
further

from his

The daily
“After

King’s condition |
improvement.”
—U.P.

recent
medi-
cal

good
shows



Reds het Off |
U.N. Attacks

[ EIGHTH ARMY HEADQUARTERS, Korea, Oct. 3.

COMMUNISTS battled attacking United Nations
forces to a standstill along most of the 135-mile Korean
front and rushed the biggest offensive buildup since last}
spring.

In the air, however, 12 U.S. Shooting Stars — U.S.
slowest jets — caught a dozen crack Communist M.1LG.
15 jet fighters over North Korea, probably shot down two
of them and damaged another.

Vietminh Rebels
Launth Big Attacks

HANOI, Indo-China, Oct. 3



ae,

The air victory ran the Fifth
Air Force's toll of Red jets in three
\days of air battles to seven shot
lown, three more probably des-
troyed, five damaged:

No U.S. losses were reported.

On the ground U.N. attacks into



ioe rom All Quarters : £

another }



U.S. Investigate
Gunfire Accident

The U.S. Navy is investigating
a freak gunfire accident which
killed six men and injured 15
athers aboard the U.S. destroyer
Gathing. The accident happened
Monday while the ship was carry-
ing out firing exercises in manoeu-
vres in Guantanamo Bay. The
navy said a five inch anti-aircraft
gun went off accidentally. The
shell hit the barrel of another gun
mount and steel fragments sprayed
nearby men.

Mass For Eva.—Hector Madero
Argentine Ambassador in Paris
and Members of the Embassy to-
day attended mass it was said in a
local Spanish church for the health
of Madame Eva Peron.

Russian Troops go to Manchu-
ria.—More deployment of Rus-
sian troops to Manchuria was
reported by the China Union
Press here. The Agency said the
entire Seventh Division of the Red
Army originally stationed in the
vicinity of Moscow had been
deployed to Manchuria around
September 20.

It added this was the fifth time
in the year that Soviet Russia
had dispatched troops to Red
China,

Spy Network.—United States
and British counter intelligence
agents have uncovered a Czech
espionage network operating
throughout western Austria and
arrested at least seven persons
according to official sources,

Coal: According to an authori-
tative source Japan is only inter-
ested in receiving cooking or
metallurgical coal from India. Last
year India sent 30,000 tons of
cooking coal to Japan as part of
the barter arrangement in return
for spindles.

New Job: Harold Minor, United
States Minister Designate to
Lebanon, told _ reporters on
Wednesday that he expects to ar-
rive at his new post next Tuesday.
He paid a.farewell call on Tru-
man,

Berlin Raid: Several thousand
Communist youths invaded West
Berlin on Wednesday night and
clashed with West Berlin police
to inaugurate the Communist
“fighting month,” The Communists
crossed the border into West Ber-
lin at Brenauer Street in the
French sectois

Greetings: Radio Peiping said
on Thursday morning that Mosshe
Sharett, Minister of Foreign Af-
fairs, was among those who sent
greetings to China on the occasion
of the second anniversary of the
founding of the Chinese Peoples
Republic.

More Nazis: Social Democratic
Deputy Dr. Franz Josef Huber on

| Wednesday charged that there are

“more and more” Nazis in the
Bavarian judicial system. During
the debate in the Budget Commit-
tee of the Bavarian Landtag, Huber
enid that 80 per cent. of all Ba-
varian judges and _ prosecutors
were former members of the Nazi
party.

11 Estonians
Flee Sweden

FORT PIERCE, Florida,
Oct



Eleven Estonians who fled from
Sweden because they _ believed
Russians would invade that coun-
try landed here on Wednesday in
an ancient and ragged sailing
schooner with a hole in its side.
The band of refugees boarded
the 64 foot Walprio for the
perilous Atlantic crossing on
July 22 at Wainborg, Sweden
after they decided they would be
safer in America.

‘ ae the Communist build-up area ran} They told the immigration
Pele a ee che into a stonewall Communist de-jguthorities who took them in
avtacking Communis ietminh | fence and vicious counter-attacks,

division south of the Red River

custody they were afraid Russia

Even one of the heaviest artillery | w. 4 a s
delta today as French and Viet- bombardments of the war failed a aes on een
nam a mate ap gg cart to discourage the Reds. The group included three
ee Ss to oor e ee Reds everywhere put up bitter/ehildren, five men and three
drive. ommunists opened — A) resistance. Hand to hand fighting |} women
large-scale offensive in jungles|+sged west of Chorwon on the 5
and mountains south of the delta.) west Central front below Kum-} Captain William Ilves, 48 told
French pilots reported seeing) sony on the East central front and|interpreters he came to the

numerous dead and wounded be-

j ing carried back to Communist
villages from the fighting area.
Communist rebel Vietminh

forces have launched a “al

J

aorthwest of “Punchbowl valley”
on the eastern front.

Allies were up against Commun-
ist positions of strength during the
truce talks and Reds were trying

hard to complete their buildup for
the expected Fall offensive.

United Nations pilots reported
heaviest Communist traffic behind
|the front since Red offensives last
| May. Airmen spotted 4,355 trucks
|} Tuesday and destroyed or dam-
| aged 606 of them

One hundred and seventy

! scale offensive ‘against French
| Vietnam positions situated
jungles and mountains south
the Red River delta.

An announcement said light)
Franco Vietnam forces are fight-
ing retarding action against Com-
munist rebel forces estimated at
almost a division strength ad-
,

Naniale Se as Pare rienne massed British Commonwealth and
tively northwest of Hanoi. U.S. guns from 25-pounders to

Ten battalions — about 8,000 155 mm “long toms” gave Red de-
men—of Vietriamh regulars have| ifences at the western end of the
invaded the Thai country of north-

in
of

| front their heaviest pummelling ot
the war during the night. —U.P.



west, Tonking in Indo-China,
French Army Headquarters an- age
nounced today. —UP.



| U.S. Casualties








> re. } WASHINGTON, Oct. 3
Good I rog 8S \ 1¢ Defence Department Wed-
Meg? ese Ve nesday reported a new total of
Seite 3 dpi eae ik 87,650 American battle casualties
iec x¢ a conference iy Cores crease 2
lay » groundwork of a “peacc ven ‘ re oe Ret ate eee ae
ay Br get caustic A kaa over t Cc. number reported lasi
cont “a “SUCIT) week rt tot represents cas-
Ger many eae up rd On| ualtic hos n of ir ive
y A communique sa hee ot throu last Fri-
encour progr ich
Kx Adenaue he fi tif nex aes
‘ —U.P, i U.P



EL



United States to be with his twe
brothers Hans and John who live
near Albany, New York. Aboard
the vessel with him were his
pregnant wife Alide and _ their
two daughters Eva, eight, and
Helgi, nine. The captain’s broth-
er Edward Ilves 46, and his wife
Elvine; August Raudsepp 40
and his wife Zofia and their five-
year-old son Jacob; Voldemar
Raudsepp and Eskold Kalme both
single. —U.P.



By R, H. SHACKFORD Commonwealth and Empire ties, |The party manifesto which tion of Abadan, he we sup-
opposing a_ united Europe and | Chur: hill wrote recalled nostal-; port. the 'U.N. When dispute
LONDON, Oct. 3. showing no initiative in trying to}gically the “hour of victory’) arise we take them to the U.N
Britain's decision to withdraw) deal wilh Russia. : » whe it was hoped cc-operation| That's right policy.
completely from Iran, set the| Labour party leader Clement! ‘for peace with Russia was possi- ‘We are always hearing
Stage for an unprecedented gen- | Attlee had his say at a party con-| ble clamour for a trong foreign
eral election campaign contro-|ference at Sc: arborough Monday.| ‘Even now in pite of the policy People who use that
versy over foreign policy. |e again proclaimed his party as|clouds and confusion into which, phrase live in the past Those |;
The Labour party claims to be | the party of peace and ibtatnaad tere have since fallen”, Churchill's) days have gone forever.’
the party of peace and indirectly j} those who would seek a “tough-| manifesto read “we must no
accused the Conservative party of|er” foreign policy as out of date| abandon supreme hope and Churchill ha called _ for i
old fashioned imperialism and jand out of step with the trend in! design.” | strong policy in Iran. “Phe im
“war mongering.” | world affairs. On the — othe ide Attice| pression he t rot about the
The Conservative party on the | ement ied Britair e or have to be
other hand claims it knows the Churchill’s party wife ‘ n k ke ed to clear out
ad to peace and accuses |hinted that the wartime | ilatiy t f edit fo i pl Churchill said
Labourites not only of bungling may again promise an attem; t the spring peak of the
foreign affairs generally, (citing |another meeting with Stalin teady yurse } endangered | I crisis in a statement
and Egypt as examples ) but Conservatives win. by nervous teria printed in the Con
of jeopardizing Anglo- Churchill promised it in 19 Anticipating ¢ t ( campaign booklet Tuc

ar relations weakening





Tories Know The





THURSDAY, focToRER 4, 1051
MAY RETIRE







ps

ae



*

INDIAN PRIME MINISTER) P? NDIT NEHRU (right) talks to members of a Kashmiri tribe.
has told a public meeting at mcknow that he
responsibility after the General “lections.
Presidentship but also the Prinieé Ministorship.
which is dear to Titty,

He
is thinking of working from the outside and without
This doesnot only mean that he may give up the Congress

He wishes greater freedom to enable him to do work

U.K. Gold. $ Defici ”

t Labour Party
Is $638,000. 000 : pane 4

e
Churchill
THE LABOUR Govern nent announced Sati

LONDON, Oct, 3,

The British Labour Party reiter-
iting the charge that Conse Tva-
lives have a “warmonger” tem- |
perament ehallenged Conservative
Party leader Winston CKurchili to
sey whether Britain shotld have
4one to war with Iran. The cam-
paign far-the Oetober 25 election

‘sleih

Britain’s latest gold and dollar deficit totals $638,000,000-
the largest quarterly figure in four years.

‘ a deficit is for the Mhree months ending Septem-
er 3

Labour Chaneéellor of the Ex-|
chequer Hugh Gaitskell announc-|



’ ed the figure showing the great

ADVOCATE J CA seriousness of Britain’s financial Hoa: one oy eee Soe with ar
position at a banquet in his hon-|"” Be ALITIGC
RELIEF FUND esd (i ike on Téataons 1On a Conservatives and Conserva~
: ; The ‘Treasury f@leased f ive cries of “peaee at any price’

$11,969.53 COLLECTED 1 fig eel ihg the” dean ee vimed at Labourites
The Advocate Jamaica lar position and on the re-ap-|, British Labour Foreign Secre-
Relief Fund closed yester- pearance for the first time since} ty. Herbert Morrison told a La-
day with the figure standing the end of 1949 of the dreaded} our conference at Scarborough
at $11,969.53. This repre- ‘dollar gap”. that the use of teree in Iran would
sents the efforts of the Setious Position have alienated Britam from the
people of this colony to Gaitskell told bankers thet in United States because the US.

render financial aid to those was opposed to forcible measures,

stricken by the hurricane of £ ova Gian: Pee. prs by Morrison ae *T don’t accuse
August 17. Ugaeervative shoul! make a da-}!he averake Conservative of betng
Within a week of the on whether to ask a warmonger bat’ it is their tem-
tragedy, this newspaper for a waivi uated peraniont, Pols the : background
sponsored this fund, and at | p Mise: on the e - their aa the old
once people in every walk loan . periwtist= rae ror eee
of life, led by H.E. the Gov- The loan and lend lease settte-| 1 want from Mr. Chure! is: We
on Sir Al Savage, bill totalled $4,350,000,000, | 4 say in his judgment we should
have given so ing every have gone to war with Persia?
day. due December 31. It totals $138,- Morrison's speech was a reply to

Churchill's bitter denunciation of
the Labour Government at Liver-

Now it has been closed,
and the Hon. V. C. Gale,

500,000
interest

of which

| nent
The first repayment instalment is
$87,000,000 is







M.L.C., Treasurer, desires Interest can be waived under | Pool last night for allegedly break-
to thank all those who so certain circumstances if the|ing its word in the evacuation of
readily and generously sub- British so request. The deficit} Abadan and for precipitating the
scribed. compares with a surplus of $54,-] ‘fall and decline of the British
‘ace, SEM. fa $11,754.21 100,000 in the previous quarter ee i a renee a er
vecate Co., Lid. nd a surplus of $360,000,000 i tritain’s complete withdrawal has
ey ab Bove s fit st anties ok SE, . a now become a major election issue,
aineroe! paige ad ‘ 4.08 Included in the gold figures —UP.
a , Pupils of St oo for the third quarter was $40,-
pee chee MONROE. |< Pay: 4 0000 redainte diadee Marshall!
St. Mary’s Boys’ School 4.28 tid allocated before Britain gave
§ is of rther aid ¢ > > ‘ ,
ee wpe a, up Potties aid at the end of last Attlee Broke
Sehool . 20.00 ur
St. Mary's Girls’ School pe = ii P e
Gb % “19 : is Fromise
‘elip 5. o :
Bie seat | Russia Has
i 25.00
Rad seicece $50 Whe. cae CHURCHILL
(tan ee Second Atom \ LIVERPOOL, England Oct, 3.
Canadian Bank of Commerce Winston Churchill warming up
mee, eeias arlene 98.78 ° ‘ his campaign for the October 25
M. B. 2.00 Vp oston General Election last night at-
Royal Bank of Canada tacked the Labour Government
= Y, 2. 1.00 Ts a savel ty opiate
sc. 8s 2.00 | WASHINGTON, Oct. 3. bow fe eae bw — oil crisis
Lem 5.00 || TRuesia’ ; in clun.sily and tardily.
Darey_ Scott ooo 4} ae’, Reco a cee ~— @usaking at mg Conservative
John W. Clarke 2.00 explosion in nearly two years was ; ee
Staff, Elec. Co. 13.34 ennounced by the White House on Rally, the Wartime Prime Minis-
cs Wednesday and one Congressman]‘er said Labour leader Clement
‘Fatal $11,069.53 1 said it may mean the Soviet Union} Attlee had broken his promise not
‘is working on guided missiles,jto evacuate Abadan oil fields
The terse announcement issued|wjthout first consulting Parlia-
e e lby the White House Press Secre-}ment: “{ do not remember any
Quiri1o In Spain ltary gave no details of the new/case where public men _ have
[Soviet test beyond the bare fact]broken their word so abruptly’
MADRID, Oct. 3 |jithat “another atomic bomb hasthe said.

President Quirino of the Philip-jrecently been exploded within the] Churchill called for a period of

pines will visit,on Thursday the |Soviet Union,” steady stable administration by a
Superior Council of Scientific R« Congressional leaders emphasiz-|proadly based Government, con-






search in the company of Minis-'e ive United States is still farfrent to serve the Nation's interest
ters of Education and Industry ead of Russia in the atomic rather than give party satis-
Later he will attend a city lunch-{srms’ race, but the new test shows] action , F
eon. In the afternoon Quirino will Iiussii is making ominous progress He called for a tolerant non-
motor to Toledo in the company,'They added it underscores the partisan non-doctrinaire system
of Generalissimo Franco to vis't' need for civil defence preparations! | ciiey for a considerable time.
Alcazar Cathedral and the Milis) jp the United States. His word were immediately
tary Academy. Quirino is scherl-| Representative James Van Zandt, te tod by same sources as @
uled to dine on Tharsday at E! member of the Congressional}! ery eC ast a saith é the
Pardo Palace.——-U.P. | Atomic Energy Committee said he vuarded Cait tor - YevUse yO a
had received information indicat-| wartime Coalition Government.
ping that the latest Soviet experi- eae ee os peg a
2 ¥ @ ments involved two atomic|indication that he 5 ct
Ships Collide weapons. He said one explodea;» Cabinet of Sree ere ees
successfully and the other was|'sts and Liberals but Sir Davie
ae, NEW YORK, Oct, 3. either a dud or a partial success.|Maxweit Wyfe top Tory = strate-
Military Sea Transport Service|yan Zandt said it is believed the|ist denied there was amy plar
here said that the ship which col- testing was done in the remote! for an all out Coalition. —UP
lided with a cargo boat off the) wostetinds of Siberia —U.P.



coast of England on Wednesday







was classed as a troopship but it °
was not certain. whether there Q e ! St. Kitts
were any troops aboerd. A ASKS FOR DEATH ? uak In

spokesman at the MSTS office BUENOS AIRES, Oct. 3. | (From Our Own Correspondent)
here said the chip sailed from the| The death penalty was asked | ST. KITTS, Oct. 9.
United. States.. He said further!for General Menez, accused of} A severe earthquake shock was
details were not available im-|leading last week's revolt againsthexperienced here at 10 o clock



medately. —U. Pe



President Peron: P. last night,

Way To Peace

said







but lost that election b

a

Advocate

































PRICE: FIVE CENTS

Barbados Bats
Fall 25 Short O
B.G.’s 368 Runs

S. COPPIN)

GEORGETOWN, Oct. 3

BARBADOS today made a gallant effort to reach

B.G.’s first innings score of 368, eventually
failing to do so by 25 runs. Having scored 93—2
yesterday, the batsmen added 250 today for the
remaining 8 wickets on a wicket that was still
playing perfect. Tup Barbados effort came from
Farmer who scored 73 runs in two and a quarter
hours, showing commendable courage and deter-
mination when cramp forced him .to finish the
_innings with the aid of a runner.

B.G., entering upon their second
innings, scored 5 without loss after
a single over was bowled before
the end of play and it se as
if the stage is set for a tame”
when the game ends to-morrow.

B.G.’: right arm slow offs

Fg



(From O.

Bradley Flies
Back To U.S.A.

TOKYO, Oct. 3. bowler Norman Wight
General Bradley left aerially tremely steady to-c
for Washington to-night after his} the best bag of ea
was” poor

final conference with top United] But B.G.'s catchin,

Nations Commanders, on the Ko-]| fewer than four ¢ bes fires
rean war and the stalled truce} them sitters havi ¢en_ mis:
talks. wtherwise. Barba

Bradley. Chairman of the United }oeen — considerabl

States Joint Chiefs of Staff and }had they been hel
Charles Bohlen, top State Depart-
ment expert on Russia and Com-
munism took off from Tokyo's
Haneda airport at 7.29 p.m,

General Ridgway and Vice-Ad-
ora ©. ove Joy, head of the

lied truce team and Commander
of the United States naval farces
in the Far East were at the air-
port to see them olf.

Flying with Bradley and Bohlen})' © —
was Mrs, Bradley, Bradley told '
newsmen he had heard ‘‘no late de-
velopments” from either war or
truce fronts in K- rea. ;

Bradley had just come from
conference with Hidgway, Bohlen,
Joy, Lieut.-General P. P, Weyland,
‘ommander of Far East air forees,
Major General R. R, Allen, Com-
mander of the Sixteenth Corps and
Major General Walter L. Weible,
“ommander of Japan's Logistical
‘ommuandy

U.N. Strategy

Smith a and Proverbs iT re~
sumed Barbados’ first innings that
stood at 93 for 2 yesterday. Smith
confident at once sent up the
century with a lovely cover drive
off een for four, .

On page 8

It was presumed they discussed
United Nations strategy both in} °
he event truce talks are resumed
ind should they be broken off for
wood

Ridgway is still waiting for
Communist answer to his formal
proposal last Thursday that the
suspended armistice conference be
shifted from Kaesong to Songhyon
eight miles to the southeast and
be resumed at once,

Bradley told newsmen he
and =m

in their
ceasefire

(thought both Ridgway
had “done wonderfully”
attempt to negotiate
with the Communists.

He said he also was “greatly im-
pressed with the spirit and morale
of troops of the Eighth Army’
vhich he visited at the Korean
ront Monday and Tuesday.

Altogether he and Bohlen spent
five days in the Far East,



: e “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS
Dial 3113

Day or Night

Red China Is Two
Years Old This Week

By A. FERGUSON
NEW YORK, Oct. 3.

COMMUNIST CHINA celebrates her second birthday
this week. Like mpst two-year-olds, she gets into lots of
trouble, she can't travel far under her own power and
she complains constantly.

But in the two years since Chairman Mao Tze Tung
of the Chinese Communist party stood at the Gate of
Heavenly Peace in the eapital of Peiping and proclaimed
himself ruler of 475,000,000 persons, China has changed
things worldwide.

Hardly a nation has been left
untouched by Mao’s proclama-
tion. Millions of Americans haye
been affected directly or indi-
rectly, Faraway nations such a
Fihiopia have sent to Korez
troops who probably never hear-



Hurricane In
The Atlantic :



of Mao Tze Tung until they go .
their sailing orders. MIAMI, Oct, 3.
Chinese Communist leaders re- A tropical storm that swept
ived birthday greetings from [across orida developcyt into a
il ever the world but one they ffuli hurricane in the Atlantic te-
probably valued most was from }day with winds of 95 miles an |
Sialin. Unless Stalin keeps send-fhour near the centre. | Storm |
ing gifts and eneouragement warnin, Ss were ordered up from \

Communist China is in danger of | ‘ape Hatteras to Virginia. Small

dy%g in infaney. Bad news for}-raft on the North Carolina coast |
the Western world is that there fwore told to remain in port. Grady
ppears to be no prospect of that }Norton, ehief storm forecaster at













appening any time soon Miami Weather Bureau, said that 7
No Immediate Threat itrong winds possibly up to gale i
China has her troubles but all }force were expected to lash the
ef them put together don’t bulk Jcoast but hurricane force winds
large enough to constitute an im- Pshctild pass off the shore. j
nediate threat to Mao Tze Tung’s j
Government, Damage along the lower east ;
coast was confined to small eraft
China's troubles in order of [awnings and shrubbery but in the
their urgency are: Firstly she has]}righ Lake Okeechobee farming
committed herself to war in}country an estimated 11,500 acres in
Korea and learned the costlyqof beans, tomatoes and young :
lesson that manpower alone does} potatoes were flooded.—CP) :
not make a modern army invinci-
bie, She can’t devise any me
of extricating herself from the
war without running the risk of BIG DEFENCE BILL FOR
losing face which is a serious 7
matter to Orientals ACTION BY CONGRESS
Secondly there’s opposition to 4
the Communist NG inside WASHINGTON, Oct. 3
China It is loosely organized A $57.200,000,.000 defence
but it remains a threat money ‘ill which carries a
Mao has been meeting the}modest down payment on a 14
threat with the standard Com-|wing air force is re ady fo
munist technique—he tiquidates|final action by the Senate and
opposition wherever he can find House. The huge’ Appropriation
Bilt, the largest ‘ever to hit Can-
There's no such thing as fac-| gress im a period short of all-out
tual news out of Communist}way cleared the Senate Housins
China but there are some esti-}Conference Committee l@te yes-
I; tes that 1.500.000 persons have }terday
i} il b Red It will provide working capi-
i 1 the inter »nomy ;tal for the Army, Navy and Ai
| China ; Force in the current scal ye
Landow? \ eer epviv-}/The Army and Air Force woul
‘ f the fax hich were'get little more than $20,000,000,-
distributed ur f fee eacf. under the nfer
rhere Aas been wide ;. |Committee compromise. The Navy
Chiang’ er ‘would get aim¢ $15,003,0-0 600
; U.P




Â¥

PAGE TWO

vee



Caub Calling

s® ROBERT W. URQUHART,
British Ambassador to Ven-
ezuéla is at present holidaying in



Barbados, Accompanied by one of
his daughters he flew over from
Maiquetin over the week-end by
B.W.1.A.

Sir Robert who was born i

1896 is the son of the late Robert
Urquhart, He was matried in
1925.

Before his appointment to Ven:
ezuela this year, he was H.M
Consul-General at Shanghai from
1948 to 1951.

He entéred the Levant Consilar
Service im 1920 and in 1934 wos
made Consul at Tabriz. He was
transferrdd to the Foreign Office

in 1938 Smad was appointed as
Inspector-General of Consulates
1939. .

He was seconded to the Home
Office fram 1940 to 194i and
appomted Consul-General, Tabriz
the following year. In 1943 he was
transferrdd to New Orleans, La.,
U.S.A., then re-appoinied Inspec-
tor-General of H.M, Consular
Establishment in 1945. In 1947 he
was H.M, Minister at Washing-
ton. :

Sir Robert and daughter are
guests at the Paradise Beach Club

Safe Delivery
A LETTER for this newspaper
despite its misleading address
was delivered to the editorial de-
partment yesterday. The address
was “The Editor, Barbados Adve-

eate, 34 Bridge Street, George-

town, Barbados, B.W.1.
Martinique

5 ARTINIQUE” will be the

theme of a talk given by Mr.
Val McComie when the Alliance
Fiancaise meeting takes place at
the B,itis) Council, Wakefield at
8.15 o'clock on Thursday night,
October 11,

With T.L.L.

M* G. *Bunny” Gill arrived
from Trinidad early yester-

day atlernoon by B.W.I.A. to
spend just over two months’ holi-
day in Barbados, His wife and
family who came over six weeks
before him were at Seawell to
meet hini, They are staying with
relatives at Rockley.

Mr. Gill who is a Barbadian is
with Trinidad Leaseholds Ltd., in
South Trinidad. He has been liv-
ing in Trinidad for eleven years

Here for A Month

MESS MARISSA PLUMMER

flew over from Trinidad
yesterday by B.W.LA. to join her
mother Mrs. Mercedes Plimmer
who is at present holidaying in
Barbados. Marissa is staying with
her mothe; at “Sea Gaze” Max-
wells. She-plans to be in Barbados
oe month,

She told Carib that quite a few
other Trisidadinas would be com-
ing over towards the middle of
Ocvober for a holiday. Among those
coming - 3 Rhona Bar-
¢ant and Miss . hine Gateliffe.

Miss Plimmer was a member of
the Trinidad water polo team
which rerently played against a
ladies’ water ‘polo team from

Barbados...
Meeting
yes Barbados University Wo-
men’s Club will be holding
an open meeting to-night at 8.15
o'clock at ‘the British Council
headquarters; Wakefield,

The first speaker will be Mr,
J, BD. Agricultural
Chemist at the Barbados Depart-
ment of Science and Agriculture.
His subject will be “The soils of

Barbatios,” The second speaker
will be Mr. G. C. Stevenson,
Cytogeneticist of the B.W.I

Sugar Cane Breeding Station. He
has chosen for his subject, “Sugar
Cane Varieties,”

The aim of this meeting is to
encourage’ higher education for
women in the island.

. .
Will Visit Her Son
RS. EDITH M. EMBERSON,
méther of Mr. Eric Emberson,
Branch Manager of B.W.I.A. in
Caracas, Venezuela, was a passen-
ger in the Colombie from England
yesterday morning. She is on a
visit to her son and daughter-in-
law in Caracas and will be leaving
en Saturday by B.W.1.A.
Mrs. Emberson is staying at the

& Marine Hotel.

e

v

“t .

To See Hurricane Damage
R.*=C. C. GEORGE, local
director of Barclays Bank
in the West Indies and British
Guiana with headquarters in Bar-
bados, was intransit from England
yesterddy in the S.S. Colombie
on his way to Jamaica. He was

accompanied by his wife,

Mr. ge told Carib that he
spent ree months’ holiday in
the U.K. and while there he

underwent a serious operation and
is getting on quite well.

He said that the purpose of
his visit to Jamaica is to see the
results Sof the hurricane and to
give adyice. While there, he will
probably visit the Bahamas and
Belize. .

Mr. George expects to be in
Trinidad for Christmas, He will
afterwards pay a visit to British
Guiana"before returning to Bar-
bados in February.

90 Seater Aircraft
R. RALPH A. BEARD, city
real estate agent who spent
two weeks in Canada, returned
ever the week-end by T.C.A, He
said that while in Montreal, he
had consultations with T.C.A.
Officials and they informed him
that they had on order, 90 seater

aircraft, some of which they are four months’ holiday in the
hoping to put on the Canada- United Kingdom and on the
Barbados run in the near tuture. Continent.
I i a as ee ——_— ee
SEB EBEBBBR eee

Kents ’ a
ah tN LADIES’ SPECTATOR





Social Welfare Ufticer

FTER six months’ leave in te
United Kingdom, Miss Betty
Arne, Social Weare Officer, re-

turned yesterday morning in the
Colombie.

She said that she had an
enjoyable stay and was glad to be
back. Whilg in England she
visited fifteen hospitais and saw
everyone of the Barbadian girls
who are working there. They are
all very happy.

B.C. Representative
RISLEY TUCKER,

M®* H
British

Council Representa-

tive and Mrs. Tucker, returned
from England yesterday morning
in the Cotombie after spending

four months’ holiday, They will be
in residence at “Wakefield,” White
Park Road,

Trinidad Civil Servants
NTRANSIT to Trinidad in the
Colombie yesterday morning

fiom England were Mr, Albert
Lumsden, Road Officer of the St.
Ann's and Diego Martin Road

Board and Mr. E. R. Arrindell of
the Income Tax Department, They
had both spent six months’ leave
in the United Kingdom,

To Take Up Appointment
EV. FR. ROBEX'! BULBECK
S.J,, arrived from Englana
yesterday morning in the Colembie
intransit for British Guiana wherc
he will take up an appointmer
in Georgetown,

This is Fr, Bulbeck’s first visu
to the West Indies and during his
brief stay in Barbados, he calec
on Fr. Sellier, S.J. and Fr. John
Quigley, S.J. at the Romar
Catnolic Presbytery in Jemmott’s
Lane,

Fr. Quigley who is stationed
at Beterverwagting, East Coast
Demerara, has been holidaying

here for the past three weeks, He
is due to return to Demerara on
Wednesday by B.W.I1.A.

Director of Y.W.C.A.
FTER spending two weeks.
holiday in Barbados, Mis:

Clare Sloane-Seale returned
Trinidad over the week-end bj;
B.W.IL.A. to resume her duties a:
Associate Executive Director o
the Y.W.CjA.

She was staying at ‘‘Leaton-on-
Sea,” The Stream,

Trinidad K.C.

FTER spending six months
holiday in England, Mr. G. M
O'Reilly, K.C., Mrs, O'Reilly and
their daughter Miss Pamela
O'Reilly who were intransit in the
Colombie yesterday morning, re-

turned home later in the evenin
by the same vessel.
Mrs. O'Reilly told Carib thai

England had*made great strice.
and was far from being decadent.
Miss O'Reilly is a member of
the staff of the Trinidad Publish-
ing Company of which her fathe:
is a Director . ee
Film Unit Chief
R. WILLIAM SELLERS, hea
of the Colonial Film Un
with headquarters in London, lett
for Trinidad on Monday by
B.W.LA. Mr, Sellers had brough

over the. films made by .Wes
Indian students which were
shown at Harrison College on

Friday night.

While in Barbados, he was. stay-
ing at the Marine Hotel,
Accountant In Venezuela

ETURNING to Venezuela over

the week-end by B.W.J.A.

were Mr, and Mrs, Percy Dicke:

and their little daughter, Thx

had spent two weeks’ holiday

here staying at the Ocean View
Hotel,

Mr, Dicker is an Accountant
working with the Shell Caribbean
Petroleum Company in Maracaibo

Headmistress of Queen’s

College
RS. I. RANDALL, newly
appointed headmistress of
Queen’s Collese, arrived from

England yesterday morning in the
SS. Colombie accompanied by her
two small sons Adrain and Julian.

She said that she was delighted
to get to Barbados and was looking

forward to taking up her new
duties at the earliest possible
opportunity.

Back from U.K. Holiday |

R. PAT ROACH
and Wireless, returned
Barbados yesterday morning in
the S.S. Celembie after spending

of Cable



WHITE/TAN

+ ereeeeeerie

WHITE/NAVY
WHITE/BLACK

WHITE NUBUCK...
BLACK SUEDE.

x me mm ee ee

See OEDR. 8

I a

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606

YOUR SHOE STORES



:

to

Commonwealth Supply
EST INDIAN represen juves

Wis. nding the C

minvuw earl



Supply Conterence during UU
past week found themselves in-
volved in not only lengthy busi
ness sessior but a4 pleasant rouns
of social activity. Among other
functions they attended im ih
evenings was a reception by the
Government at Lancaster Hous

Trinidad’s Albert Gomes, who has
now returned to Trinidad, one eve-
ning had just returned from busi-
ness talks in Whitehall just in
time to get ready for the Lancaster
House engagement. He had time to
say -however, that the previous
evening he had thoroughly enjoyed
a party given by the Indian offic-




ials. The following day he was
lunching with Pakistan represen-
tatives in London and the evening

of the same day was due at a re-

ception given by the Singalese.
The finale to the week was the
the reception on Friday in the

Royal Pavilion at the South Bank
Fxhibition attended bv all the
delegates from the Dominions and
the Colonies et the Supply Con-
ference.

After Six Months

ee to Barpados yes-

terday morning in the
Colombie after six months’ holi-
day in Englcad were Rev. Frank
Lawrence of the James Street
Speightstown Methodist Circult
and Mrs. Lawrence.

Rev. Lawrence who went up to
the U.K. in the interest of his
health said that he consulted a
Harley Street specialist in con-
nection with his eyes which are
still under treatment.

While in England, he spent a
great deal of his time travelling
and addressing many meetings
His wife and he were staying with
their son Ulric who is employed
at Electra House.

Rev. Lawrence went on to
Trinidad yesterday evening on his
way to Tobago as a_ missionary
deputation for ten days. He will
be staying with Rev. and Mrs
Derek Lyder, Mrs. Lawrence did
not accompany him

f SAS

1);
in

i
Rupert looks so worried and
miserable wondering what will hap-
pen to him that the two men burst
ou: laughing and the Sorcerer lifts
bin, up. ‘ Nay, methinks the little
beer has learnt his lesson and needs
oe further punishment.” he smiles.







ro

SHE LOVED IN SPITE OF
SCORN, BECAUSE

A GUN WHERE
HER HEART
SHOULD

HAVE BEEN ¢ g
BECAUSE |;

SHE ACCEPTED
SHAME AND RAN




{






i
i )
: oe

ECO



WENT Se

STEVE COCHRAN "a:

PLAZA ||

BRIDGETOWN

| CONTINUING DAILY 4.45

ee ee oe

SHOES as

' ARCOLA & WINDSOR HRANDS

&9.20—14.22
$14.24
$13.39
$13.90
$14.94

¢

DIAL 422C






top Rank Support |

ay CHAPMAN PINCHER |
ST. LOUIS, |
NEW DRUG, claimed to be| T

highly effective in the treatment! the
the
i $m in o'd people, was announc-|
t in St. Louis recéntly.
1t has bees hailed as the most)
iapo.ton. advance reported so fa
the international conference oh
8)0 coctors and scientists studying
the problems of old age. -

The drug, an amber-coloured}
liquid extraciea from cows’ liver, |
vas developed by a team of New
York doctors led by Dr. William
Collens.

Tests were cartied out on 110
patients with ostearthritis, a crip-
pling form of rheumatism.

After daily injections for a fort-.
night 84 per cent. of the patients |
showed mitked improvement, Dr.;

he two most precious letters of

commonest form of rheu-| millions of dollars—
That

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



rug Secures American Column :

DX Equals Millions

NEW YORK

to industry worth
are DX.

Government’s

alphabet

is the new



CROSSWORD

Leal |

;



eel

code rating for top priority on
scarce raw materials and finished
products. It will go only to manu-

facturers of the most vital defence ,
and atomic energy goods, and will ;

get them scarce materials.
The Government plans expan-
sion of aluminium production to
1,600,000 tons a year, more
double pre-Korea. August stech
production totalled 8,722,000 tons,
the biggest ever for the month.
All industrial production



than ;

rose |

last month five per cent. to 218)

per cent. of the 1935-9 averayue.

40,000 JOBS CUT

THE SENATE put its foot down
and bang!—40.000 civilian jobs
must be cancelled by the Defence
Department. It wanted to hire
540,000 out-of-uniform emplovee:
The Senate says the limit will bx
500,000. By law.

* by Out of America’s most vivid chapters
.©\F crime and corruption comes the stark story
of the Private Lady of a Public Enemy!

STARS OF ‘FLAMINGD ROAD MEET IN

icp]

i a

OPENING TOMORROW (rripay 5TH)
: 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. AND

Collins ciaims. Pain and swelling
of the joints were almost com-
pletely abolished for one in five
patients, he says.

Five-year-test

Most of them needed a further
injeenon every fortnight to keep

em free from pain.

The drug has been under
development for five years and
seems to have no unpleasant aite-
effects.

it is useless against rheumatoid
wrthritis, a complaint which attacks

1

BASSO S Oe ae

Acruss
DJarenhcarecd. :Â¥)
~~ ver, OUL could be. (9)
at (a
ap the engineers. (4)
Mugiciap he was tops (6)
S| for @ horse? (3)

CROWDED OUT
BRITISH YACHYTSMEN Stanicy
Smith and Charles Violet cam
ashore in New York to reap a
dollar harvest from their four-













Alte: tur a change, (5) month Atlantic crossing.

a” stvendee, io ota. cas | They originally planned to be

Cnstarted task. (3) here in July. And they found that

Ro eernaline sectors. (5) Macy’s Store, which was to have
Down + put their Nova Espero on show

ftiga ruler. (anag., ¥) had had to make room for a4

itime seems Lo put to sleep. (Â¥)
You cas get more from here. (4)
DSeics uldy be, as well as dust. (8)
From here you get @ national
embiem (9 4)

fleet. (4)

planned Italian fair.
no room for the Nova Espero.

MORALE CRASHES

Hent to the











younger people. Makes ine a snake. (8) grounded in Alaska for “morale
but it is dramatically effective anne 4 ge reasons.” Since July, 14 aircraft
s * ‘ Bu vw vu “ - " 7 . e :
n relieving severe nerve inflam- | {5 [Pisce for tapestry. 15) jhave crashed in Alaska, killing
mation often suffered by diabetics: Cadeer oO takes pen gue 45 nearly 100. Four crashes have
‘ol Y orts, 1 d ce am .werd, (3) ’ Aanaitninis said a :
big eg nna indepe So oterdayes muzzle ~ Across; | been Privateer bombers of Navy
his finding 1s pendently Reservoir; 8 Avail: | Squadron Nine.
confirmed by the Canadian diabetes ¢ 13 Bwe: 15 Photo: |T privateer is one of the
specialist, Dr. I. M. Rabinowii vows? d ler, 2 fteversion: | 3 Navy’s sturdiest planes, is used to
4 sar Neiwnd ore. 7. Vertic: avy Ss 5st . ’
oi Montreal. — |. alae B . eonera: ae 42 Wav out: 15 fly in hurricanes on weather-
we n aT : S

Unnamed

When he tried the extract on
20 severely afflicted patients
who had to take morphine re-
gularly to relieve their pain, 18

got astonishing relief, he re-
ported today.
The drug which is still un-

named, is not net available for
general use, But Dr, Collens and
his team are trying to get it into

commercial production soon.
—L.E.S.





Opening Soon
Sandy SADDLER &
Willie PEP Fight

“My Forbidden





Bud ABBOT & Lou COSTELLO in
Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap

James



Friday 2.30 — 4.45 &
$30 p.m
THE DAMNED
DON'T CRY
Joan CRAWFORD





P

DIAL 2310

i TO-DAY (ONLY)

MASON Valerie HOBSON in

A PLACE OF ONE’S OWN
SCHOOL FOR HUSBANDS

with HARe ASUS

&

Also

RAZA B'TOWN |

4.30 & 8.30 p.m.

AND

Past”



a a
Sensational Double-Bill!
Rod CAMERON in

BOSS of BOOMTOWN





Special To-day 1.30 pm





PLAZA vi 5105





OISTIN

GAIETY













PATROL SQUADRON NINE is)



THURSDAY,

arning missions No one knows

hy so man) lanes are crashing
“ une sub-Arctie colomy just across
(ae water from Siberm. ‘ne nav)
calls it “baffling.”

DREAM WORLD







OCTOBER 4, 1951



B.B.C. Radio

Programme

IVES > 4g / THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1951
e *
WIV Es" ae live = ic: Holly 11.15 am. Frogramme Paraae, 11.30
wood dream world” are responsi-|, ».° Jazz Music, 12.00 noon The News,
tie tor half the divorces, says Dr.] 12.10 p.m. News Analysis

*.. S. Church. “Every girl expects
live in luxury and raise beauti-
en who will never be ill.
fter marriage they discover hus-
ands are bald, have false teetn,
nd like to stay out at night. Kids
st do get ill. Then wives crack
p and come to me.
WAISTLINE WORRIES,
PLAGUE of Hollywood’s male
siars is fat. At one studio alone
Mario Lanza is chopping wood
Red Skelton has gone into a clinic,
Vag Johnson worries aloud about
his waistline, Walter Pidgeon just
had to have his suits let out. And
Clark Gable is dieting heavily.
TV IS A ‘RIGHT’
MILLIONS of Americans were
eprived of their “constitutional
right” to see Robinson beat Turpin
on their home TV sets, says Rep-
resentative Pat Sutton. He wants
2 law to compel promoters to allow
telecasts into homes, not just into





fal chil
4

| heatres where veovle’must pay. i

|

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So there i:

|
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TO-Da¥ (Only) 5 & 8.30 pm. THE GARDEN — ST: JAMES
Anna NEAGLE in TONITE (Only) 8.30
“ELIZABETH of LADYMEADE” “RIVERBOAT RHYTHM" &
Color by Technicolor “FIRST YANK in TOKYO"
with Hugh WILLIAMS ——“Triday (Only) SO Dm.
itn - - aetmemenapameie “TIMBERLAND Treason”
with Frank LEIGHTON &
Friday & Cont'g}) SAT. 9.30 “URAREING 5 ERM
$ & 8.30 p.m “Wisitul, Widow Whip ~ I _— ——
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OTE deer Clb asab at Tare ithe story of Christ and. Mary
CONQUEST’ Boomtown” Magdalene
‘ \
GLOBE !
To-day, 445 and 8.15 p.m, Last Shows \|
flying pee ae give him DANA ANDREWS
back his satchel a igerlily s ‘ + ”
past of tie way home wah fim... | MY FOOLISH HEART
“| say, it was folly good, of you to | GEO. O’BRIEN
send the Sorcerer forme,” he cries. “MARSHALL OF MESA CITY”
* But for we T might never have oy
come back!”

















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OPENING GLOBE

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their men had lett them unprotected!

, FORTHE SECRET-
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TO-MORROW









A true -
story of

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a | Barbara Bates « Cyril Cusack
+ Richars Hytion « Hatem Westcott + Jeanette Nolan
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Will our Customers please note
that our Departments will be

CLOSED FOR STOCK-TAKING

as follows:

Lumber and Hardware—TO-DAY (Wednesday) and
TOMORROW (Thursday) 3rd and 4th October

Plantation Supplies—TO-DAY (Wednesday) 3rd Oct.

Our office will be open to business as usual.

THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.









| 20

LLL LLLP LE EPEC POOP

EMP

Daily
45
Composer of the Week, 5 15 p m
Northern
MacPherson,
zine, 6.45 p.m,
” p m

Analysis, 715 p m
p.m.
Books to Read, 8.00 pm As 1 Knew
Him, 8.15 p m
Special Dispatch, 8.45 p.m Composer of
the Week, 9.00 p m. Ring Up The Cur-
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J

Farm,

led
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4.00—6.45 pm. — 19.76 m.



4.00 p.m. The News, 410 p.m, The

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p.m. Sporting Record, 5 00 p m
BEC
Orchestra, 6.00 p.m. Sandy
615 pm. Scottish Maga-
Programme Parade, 6.55





‘today’s Sport.
7.00—1045 p.m. — 25.55 m., 31.32 m.
7.00 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. News

We See Britain, 7.30
Light Orchestra Music, 745, p m

Radio Newsree}l, 8.30 p.m,

10.00 pm The News, 10.10 p m

rom The Editorials, 10.15 p.m. On The

10.30 p.m. Barchester Towers.
C.B.C. PROGRAMME
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1951

10.05 p.m. — 10.20 p.m. — News

10 20 pm. — 10 35 p m —This Week.

11.72 Mes., 25.60 M,





REAL WOOL AGAIN
WOOL PRICE declines have
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Louis DEBRA JEFF



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James Mason

ROYAL

TO-DAY only — 4.30 & 8.15
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Opening Friday — 4.30 & 8.15





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THURSDAY,

OCTOBER 4,

1951



Second Reading Of Fisheries Bill Passed

Debate Postponed
Until Tuesday

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY Tuesday passed the
Second Reading of a Bill to consolidate and amend the
existing legislation for the promotion of the fishing indus-
try in this island. Some members wanted to get a better
chance of perusing the Bill to be satisfied that no restric-
tions would be placed on fishermen and it was for this
reason that the Bill was not continued with, but left until

next Tuesday,
_Mr.>.F. L, Waleett said he be-
lieved everybody would welcome
the Bill. He said that any Gov-
ernment which had spent as much
money as the Government had
spent on the fishing industry
would endeavour to provide legis-

lation for the protection of the
people who worked in the in-
dustry.

One of the main recommenda-
tions of the adviser for the Secre-
tary of State for the colonies was
that there should be legislation so
that an investigation would be
made whenever a life was lost at
sea in the fishing industry.

No Investigation

In an ordinary ease, when a man
died, an enquiry was set up, but
when a fisherman was missing, no
investigation was carried out, The
other members of the fishing fleet
or boat were not required to give
any statement, That was net good
enough in the twentieth century.

In the Objects and Reasons of
the Bill is stated;

Clauses 3 and 11 of the Bill pro-
vide respectively for the keeping
of Registers of fishing and of li-
censes issued to fishermen.

Clause 4 provides for the appli-
cation for registration by the own-
er, and for the inspection of fishing
boats by the Fishery Officer, or an
inspector and the issue of certifi-
cates of registration'on payment
of a fee of one dollar, while clause
5 makes provision for the issue of
a new certificate on the sale or
transfer of a fishing boat.

Clause 6 provides that no fishing
boat shall be put to sea unless in-
spected and registered and Clause
7 gives the Fishery Officer or an
inspector powers of _ inspection
without notice and of cancelling
the certificate of registration if a
fishing boat is found to be unfit
for purposes of fishing.

An appeal lies from the decision
of the Fishery Officer to the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee
whose decision shall be final.

Clause 9 requires all persons de-
sirous of exercising the trade or
calling of a fisherman to obtain a
license on payment of a fee of
twenty-four cents—the licensing
year to start on the first October
in each year,—and clause 12 re-
quires that each fishing boat shall
have a registered skipper.

Clauses 14 and 15 re-enact the
provisions of the Defence (Fishing
Boat Loan) Regulations, 1942, and
clause 16 provides for the making
of regulations.

Clause 18 requires the Police
Magistrate of a parish in or near
which a_ fishing boat casualty
occurs, to hold an inquiry and
clause 19 provides for the sum-
moning of such witness as the Po-
lice Magistrate may think fit.

When the Police Magistrate is
holding an enquiry under clause
18, he may, under the provisions

Worthy of Support

Mr. W. W. Reece (E) said that
everything should be done for the
fishing industry in Barbados and
anyone should support a Bill which
was with a view to helping the in-
dustry.

It was a good provision to cause
every fishing boat to be expected
to make sure it was sea-worthy,
but when they made it imperative
for every fisherman to have a li-
cence, he thought they were going
too far.

“It is wrong,” he said, “to sug-
gest that a fisherman should be re-
stricted in any way.”

Reduced Profits
Mr. O. T. Allder ts it
ting in a clause whic

for licences was reduc th@ pro-
fits of fishermen. The was

not at all hucyative.

“This Clause would hamper
many an innocent man from catch-
ing a fish along the wharfside to
appease his hunger as there would
be the possibility of going before
the Police Magistrate,” he said.

As far as St. Andrew, St. John,
St. Philip and St. Lucy were con-
cerned, it was difficult to send in
a notification of a change in skip-
per within the few days stipulated
that the notification should be sent
in. That would mean that a fish-
erman would have to keep his boat
on the beach without going out.

He said it was not needed to
safeguard a fisherman from going
out in a boat which was not sea-
worthy. It was the natural ‘in-
stinct of human nature to safe-
guard himself.

“It would be better for the in-
dustry,’ he said, “if Government
bought some large sehooners in
which fishermen could go further
afield and bring in larger weekly
supplies.”

Agrees to Postponement

Mr. F, L. Walcott said there was
no fee for registering a boat. There
was no restriction clause in the Bill
and members would notice that
when they got a little more time to
go through the Bill. For that rea-
son he was willing to allow the Bill
to be postponed until the follow-
ing Tuesday.

No one would expect a Police
Magistrate to suspend a fisherman
unless he had pe reasons for
so doing, he said.

“In Barbados we mak® provis-
ions for fishermen on a_ higher
scale than is done in other West
Indian islands and it was not reas-
onable to say that the same Gov-
ernment which provided the best

rovision would-try to» ereate a
hardship on the fishermen by
naming restrictions.

Mr. L. E. Smith said it was good
to stress that fishermen should go
out in sea-worthy boats.

The second reading was passed.





BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



IN THE LEGISLATURE

COUNCIL

The Legislative Council met at

+ 200 p.m. Tuesday
The Hon'ble the Colenial Secre-
tary laid the fellowing Messages:
No. 39/1951 Dissolution of the
Legisiative Session 1948-51 and the
holding of the General’ Election.

No. 34/1951 Regarding a Meme.
randum of Agreement dated the
18th ef September, 195), between
the Sugar Producers’ Federation of
Barbados and the Barbados Work-
ers’ Union.

The following documents were
also laid:

Memorandum of Agreement
dated the 13th of September, 1951,
between the Sugar Producers’
Federation ef Barbados and the
Sarbades Workers’ Union regard-
ing certain prepesals concerning
the finances of the Sugar Indus-
try of Barbados.

Report of the Commission
appointed by His Excellemey The
Gevernor to enquire inte and
report upon the establishment of

® the Princess Alice Playing Field
and other matters connected
therewith, si}

The Public OfMicers Lean and
Travelling Allowances (Amend-
ment) Regulations, 1951.

The Travelling Allewance
(Amendment) Regulations, 1951.

Annual Report of the Depart-



mont of Sconce and Agriculture
for the year 1940-50

The Council concurred in the
following:

A Resolution to place the sum
of $40,090 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Exeeutive Committee
to supplement the Estimates, 1951—
e@, Part I, Current, as shown im
the Supplementary
Ii, Ne. 2, whieh form the
Schedule to the Resolution.

Resolution te place the sum of
$870 at the disposal of the Gev-
ernor-in-Executive Committee to
suppleâ„¢ent the Estimates, 1951-~
ot, Part I, Current, as shown in
the Supplementary Estimates,
195t—82, No. M4, which form the
Schedule to the Resolution.

The Council passed;

A Bill to amend the Government
Scholarships and Exhibitions Act,
49

Reply to His Excellency the
“overnor’s Message Ne. 28/1951
regarding the Establishment of @
Club and Ce in Lenden for
West Indian Students.

Bill to amend the Saint Lucy's
(Barbades) Lean Act 1060
(1950-6).

Estimates,



The Council referred to a Select
Committee the Sill to amend the
Employment of women, Young
Persons, and Children Act, 1988,

The Council postponed;

Bill intituled An Act te make
provision for the protection of

wages of workers.

Resolution to approve of the
compulsory acquisition by the
Governor-in-Executive Committes
of all that certain parce! of land
(Part ef the tenantry lands of «#
Place called Bosvigo) containing
by estimation 13.870 sq. ft... fer
the purpose of establishing a dis
trict market.

The Council adjourned sine die.

HOUSE

When the House of Assembly
met Tuesday, Mr. Adams laid the
following papers:

The Public Officers’
Travelling Allowances





Loan and
‘Ameond-

ment) Regulations, 1951.
Travelling Allowance
1951.

The
(Amendment) Regulations,

Memorandum of
concerning proposals
the Sugar Industry of this Colony.

A Message from His Excellency
the Governor to the House re-
garding the prorogation, dissolu-
tien and re-opening of the
Legislature.



Another Message regarding «
Memorandum of Agreement dated
the i8th September, 1951.

Annual Report of the Depart-
ment of Science and Agriculture.

Mr. Adams presented « petition
from the Highways Commissioners
of St. Joseph and St. John asking
that the House pass a Bill author-
ising them te tmerease the salary
ef their respective Inspector of
Highways.

Mr. BE. K. Walcott presented @
petition from the Vestry of St
James asking the Howse to pass
a Bill authorising them to borrow
$4,320 to be used in replacing the



reef ef the chancel of the parish
church.

Mr. Adams gave notice of the
following:

Resolution to place the sum of
$370,000 at the disposal of the
Governer-in-Executive Committee

to supplement the Estimates,
i9vi—se, Part 1, Current, as
shown in the Supplementary

Estimates 1951—52, No. 2, which
form the Schedule to the Resolu-
tien.

Resolution to place the sum of
$16,380 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates 195)
ot, Part 1, Current, as shown in
the Supplementary Estimates
951-32, No. 27 which form the
Schedule to the Resolution.

Resolution to place the sum of
$300 «at the dispesal of the
Gevernor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates
1961-62, Part 1, Current, as shown
in Supplementary Estimates 1\1-—
52, No. 28 whieh form the Schedule
to the Resolution,

Resolution to place the sum of
$26,000 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Exceutive Committee

te supplement the Fatimates
D2, Part I, Current, as shown
in Swpplementary Estimates, 1951—
52, N6. 28 which form the Schedule
to the Resolution

Resolution te pay with effect
from the léth day ef June, 1951,
a eost of living allowance to
oMicers employed under Colenial
Development and Welfare
Schemes at the rates, and subject
te the terms and conditions set
out in the Schedule >

Resolution to pay with effect
from the With of Jume 1951, a cost
of living allowance to officers in
the full time service of the Savings
Bavk who receive their salaries
from the funds ef the Bank
and officers whe retired from
the, full time service of the Bank
at any time between the 6th day
of June, 1951, and the date of
the passing of this Resolution in
circumstances rendering them
eligible for the grant of a pension
or gratuity,

A Bill intituled an Act to amend
the Goverament Scholarships and
Exhibitions Act, 149.

This Bill was tater dealt with
« Passed,

he House agreed to the amend-
ment of the Legislative Ceuneil
to the Bill to provide fer the in-
stitution ef «a Public Servict
a aud the amendment,
to the il te emoourage the es-
tablishment and development of
new Industries, ete.

The amendments in beth
stances were trivial.

in-

The House ‘passed: A Resolution
to make it lawful for the
Gevernor-in-Exeeutive Committee
to lease to the Vestry of the
parish of St. George a parcel of
land formerly part of Carmichael
Plantation, situated at Ellerton in
St, George and centaining about
five acres, two reeds, for the
purpose of extablishing a playing
field.

A Bill to amend the Old Age
Pension Act, 1997

A Bill to amend
Health Act, 1908.

A Bill to amend the Package
Tax Act, 14,

A Bill to amend the Trade Act
ite

A Bill to authorise the Com:
missioners of Highways of St
Philip to increase rates of pay and
travelling allows: s to Inspector
pnd Assistant In or of High-
wayr of the said parish.

the Public





A BI to authorise the Vestry
of the parish of Christ Church to
raise a loan not exceeding $7,200,

The House passed the second
reading of a Bill to encourate thy
fishing Indtstry in the island,

The House adjourned until
Tuesday next, In moving the
adijournmept Mr. Adams told

members to come prepared to deal
with the matter of the Sugar
Agreement.



Fees Of Pension Claims

Committee

» Mr, W. A. Crawford (C) sugges-
ted to the Government before the
House of Assembly passed an Act
to amend the Old Age Pension Act,
1937, Tuesday, that pension should
be sent to the pensioners. He
said it was a dreary, weary, hard
time the old people had, trudging
many miles to get their pension,
Other members and he said that
the age at which people were
eligible for pensions should be
decreased,



is to increase the fees payable to
each member of the Pension
Claims Committee from $1.20 to
$2.40 for attendance at each meet-
ing of the Committee.

Speaking on the Bill, Mr. O, T.
Allder said he noticed that it was
proposed to increase the fees of
members attending the committee
by 100 per cent., but though he
had expected to see some revis-
ion of the old age pension rate,
he had seen none, If the mem-

Increased

The object of the pill passed member at the moment, in Trini-

dad it was 65.
The

three years.

ing a further cost af

bonus to Government

week,” he said.

Mr. J. &, ‘I. Brancker (©) said

present pension of 5/- a
week had been fixed for neacly
Since then the cost
pf living had risen considerably
“We are now om the verge of giv-
living
servants,
With things as they are, the pen-
sion should be at least 10/- per



EE,

W.1. Student
Centre |
Approved —

By Legislative Council

Ihe Legislative Council Tues-
day passed an Address in reply to)
the Governor’s Message relating to,
the establishment in London of a)
centre for West Indian students in|

the United Kingdom. | Bill

ihe Governor’s Message reads:

His Excellency the Governor has}
the honour to inform the Honour-
able the Legislative Council that
the Secretary of State for the
Colonies is sponsoring an appli-
cation by the West Indian Stu-
dents’ Union for financial support
from British West Indian Col-
onies for the establishment in
Londen of a non-residential club
and centre for students from the
Caripbean area. In his despatch
the Secretary of State has pointed
out that the West Indian Students’
Union has the support of the ma-
jority of the 1,200 West Indian
Students now in the United King-
dom, af whom more than 600 are
in London. It has been represented
by the Executive Committee of
the Union that besides providing
a centre which West Indians could
look upon as their own to help
them foster healthy social activi-
ties, the proposed chub would offer
facilities where, apart from West
Indian students meeting cach
other, they could return the hos-
pitality which they have received
from friends in the United King-
dom and could meet people from
the West Indies and elsewhere,

According to tentative = esti-
mates, it is expected that the ini-
tial Capital Expenditure for ac-
quiring a property and for con-
version and adaptations would
amount to between $48,000
(£10,000) and $72,000 (£15,000)
aud that the deficit on maintenance
would prabably be $9,600 ( £2,000)
~~$14,400 (£3,000) per annum. Ip
respect of maintenance, the stu-
dents themselves would be ex-
pected to contribute by means of
membership dues, and the man-
agement would be expected to



seek ways and means of raising|*

revenue, It is not anticipated,
however, that the establishment
could be completely self-support-
ing. The Secretary of State is also
giving consideration to a proposal
that West Indian business inter-
ests might be willing to make
financial contributions to the es-

tablishment of the Club and
Centre.
At this stage, however, the

Secretary of State wishes to learn
whether West Indian Governments
would agree in inciple to the
establishment in ndon of such
a club for West Indian students,
and if so whether they “would
new give sympathetic considera-
tion to contributing towards cap-
ital expenditure and maintenance,
possibly on a basis proportional to
the number of students from each

Colony.” On this “Student basis”
the Barbados contribution towards
the capital cost would be in the
region of $5,500 and thet towards




















territory at present in the United
Kingdom and having regard to the
general financial position of each



Council Consider

The Legislative Council Tues-
day began consideration of and
postponed a Bill to amend the
Employment of Women and

Young Persons and Children Act,
1938.

This Bill on the suggestion of
Hon'ble G. B. Evelyn was refer-
ved to a Select Committee: which
comprised Hon’bles G. B. Evelyn,
J. Mahon, Dr. A. S. Cato ana
K. R. Hunte.

Tne objects and reasons of the
read:—.

This Bill seeks to amend the

Employment of Women, Young
Persons and Children Act, 1934,
to implement the terms of the

Conventions relating to the Night
Work of Young Persons and the
Night Work of Women in Indus-
try. It extends the definition of
“Young Persons” to include per-
sons up to the age of eighteen
years and substitutes the Con-
ventions as amended and adopted
at the 3ist Session of the Inter-
national Labour Conference in
1948 for the 1919 Conventions set
out in Parts Il and IIl of the
Schedule to the Prineipal Act,
The amendment to the Night
Work of Women Conventions pro-
vides a more flexible definition
for “night,” so as to allow for
working hours to be fixed which
will be preferable from the point
of view of the workers and at the
same time will be consistent with
the terms of the Convention,



>



PAGE THREE

LORRIES
COLLIDE

Shortly after 10. 15 p.m. yester-



day on Baxters Road the motor
lorry X—576 owned by S. FE. Cole
& Co., Ltd., and driven by Beres-
ford Parris of Maxwell,. Christ
Church was involved i. an.acel-
dent with the motor lorry “M—1}21
owned by A. Bryan of Roebuck
Street, and driven by A. Black-
man.

The radiator of the lorry X—576
was damaged.

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the p bers of the Committee deserved that it would be as well if it were On 1 Loox

of clause 20 enquire into any T d il ar theveaec. (tne old tage er os i @ page SMARTS
aa on atenc i . A m dm r é ase, > people were realised that a large number of ;

Le eos eabear en nogneenrs en ent oO Juv enl e also entitled to an increase in people in Barbados favoured the How. J. D. Chandler AlWwaye
; ania abel ? f the rise in the cost of reduction of the age to 64. use Pluto.

of investigation against the skip- ree ss ? te ait ,

per or any member of the crew as Offenders Rules pprove pedi ees ine. last time an in- eae he fase = eed — W eleonied Back

, i any w ful act , a . pointed out, a wou COs a 4

ar into any wrongful act or He said he noticed some regu- £50,000 or £60,000 more, the Hon'ble R. Challenor on behalf ae



of other members of the Council,
welcomed back the President

In enquiring into such charge . Major A. R. Foster, Superinten- dren were spoken to by the Officer jations to give increase to other large number of people would
and himself no more complaints

the Police Magistrate shall_ apply
the Steering and Sailing (Fishing
Boat) Rules set out in the First
Schedule to the Bill and on con-
viction, the licence of the skipper
or member of the crew may be
suspended for such time as the
Police Magistrate may think fit.

Clause 21 makes it an offence
punishable by fine or imprison-
ment for a fisherman whose license
has been suspended, to take out or
to be in any fishing boat.

Clause 22 requires the skipper
or person in charge of a fishing
boat which collides with another
to render such assistance as is
practicable to the other beat and
if the skipper or person in charge
fails to comply with the provisions
of this clause, without reasonable
cause for such failure, he shall be
guilty of a misdemeanour.

The Bill repeals subsection (1)
of section 18 of the Harbour and
Shipping Master Act, 1907, and the

Fishing Industry Control Aet,
1947,
Should Go to Select
Committee

Mr. B, D. Mottley said that for
years in Barbados fishermen or
persons engaged in the fishing in-
dustry had pursued that. business
unmolested by Government, Then,
suddenly the Bill was being
brought in which a man would be
charged a dollar to get a licence
for the purpose of fishing. The
definition of a fishing boat as set
out in the Bill meant anything
that eaught fish for gain and there
would be some hardship too on
those who might go out in a small
rig to catch a little.

He moved that the Bill be sent
to to a Select Committee.

Mr, D. D. Garner (C) seconded
the motion for sending the Bill to
a Select Committee. He said he
thought that before they brought
in that Act which called on the
fishermen to buy ‘licences, they
should first build sheds on the
beaches where the fishermen could
sell their fish. c

Mr. F. L. Walcott on a point of
explanation challenged any Hon-
curable member to show him
where in Section 4 of the Bill there
was a charge. The Objects and

dent of Glendairy Prison, is in
agreement with the new Juvenile
Offenders (Amendment) Rules,
1951, No. 2, which came into op-
eration from July 5, 1951, These
rules previde that where any
person up to the age of 16 years
is being charged before any Court
with an offence, the complainant
must, before lodging the complaint
with the clerk of the Court, notify
the Probatios Officer of the nature
of the charge and furnish him
with such other particulars c\ the
case as may be required,

The rules have the force of law,
and any ane Vailirig to observe the
requirements of the rules makes
himself liable, on the complaint of
the Probation Officer, to a fine
not exceeding twenty dollars.

“These rules will prevent many
people from dragging little chil-
dren inte the courts,” Major Foster
said.

He said that in some cases little
children may be playing when one
injures the other. The annoyed
mpther of the injured boy or girl
brings a case against the other
unfortunate child. In such a case,
the Probation Officer could go into
the matter and very often he can
settle it before it goes to the
Court.

Degradation

He said that the fine of $20 is
a means of enforcing these rules
which “save a lot of unnecessary
degredation, especially to the
children.” '

Mr. John Beckles, who has been
connected with child welfare for
many years, told the Advyoeate
that he too was in favour with the
new Juvenile Offenders (Amend-
ment) Rules, but in his opinion it
was not fair to impose a fine of
$20 on the person, who on the first®
occasion broke these rules,

He said that on the first occa-
sion the person should be caution-
ed and the law explained to him.
If he committed a second offence
of the same nature he then had
no excuse, ’

On many occasions, said Mr.
Beckles, he had taken the Proba-

Reasons, he said, was not part ofF:ion Officer to the homes of

the Bill.

unruly children. After the chil-





















A beautiful girl callec
alene in
she deear

her to-mad







3
———,
o>
Melinda lived
mali cottage. For 3 nights
idsome Prince asked




One day, who should knock on her door
but the Prince. “I must invite him to
dine,” thought Melinda, “but on what?”
Then she remembered Royal Pudding.

were heard.

“There was once a very rud@
boy who was in the habit of in-
terfering with butchers in the
Publie Market. I spoke to the boy
and also got the Probation Officer
to talk to him. Now, he is never
seen in the market.”

Beaten With Stick

Mr. BecKies said wnas on several
occasions the parents, and not the
coudren, are guilty. The parents
speak indecent language in the
presence of the children, When
ine children repeat the words they
are brutalised py the parents, The
children are beaten with a stick
or any weaggn that is nearby. “If
you investigate the cases you will
most likely find that the parents
are to blame,” he said,

He said that once a boy from
Cook’s Alley refused to go to
school. The parents came to him.
He spoke to the boy and after-

ewards asked the parents to allow

the boy to stay with neighbours.
“The boy is at present with neigh-
bours and is doing well at school,”

Sgt. Major C. F. Torrezao, Chief
S.P.CA. Inspector of British Gui-
ana, said that he is in agreement
with the Amendment Rules but
“prevention is better than cure.”

Much, he said, depends on how
ihe children are trained and
brought up in their homes. The
parents should try to train their
children in such a way as to make
them worthwhile citizens.

“If parents would pay attention
to the training af their children,
there would be no need for the
Probation Officer,” he said.

A Police official said that the
Amendment Rules, i951, No, 2 was
an excellent thing. “Instead of
bringing children to the court on
trivial offences, the Probation
Cfficer should make enquiries and
only those which merit the atten-
tion of the court should be brought
there,” he said. “This is done in
other countries.”

He did not think that the age
of 16 was too high as some might
think, he said. “Some boys and
nirls may look like women and
men but they still have the mind
of a child.”



When she served the Royal Pudding,
the Prince cried, “Truly a Royal treat.

In fact he was so pleased that her dream
came true and he married her









pensioners of the Government and
he was hoping that Government
consider increasing the amount to
othervold age pensioners.

Sometime ago, some promise
was made to consider blind per-
sons and to make it possible for
them to enjoy the benefits of the
scheme at an earlier period than
was provided under the Old Age
Act. He had not heard of any
change and he hoped Government
did not forget that.

Worth Considering

Mr. E. DBD. Mottley (E) said that
the sentiments expressed by the
last speaker might appear pre-
mature at that stage, but he
thought they were worthwhilc
considering.

“What amendment I would like
to see made to this Act,” he said,
“is to allow the people of 65 to
qualify.”

It might not be very popular
if some people had to contribute

more taxation, b: felt that i!
people in the rvice and
those who wor ‘generally for

Government, could . F@sign at 50
and 55, so much more sooner
should those who toiled for years
in the fields get old age pension.

He had heard it mentioned
sotto voce that’ it would mean an
additional £50,000 to, £60,000
but he would say that though it
meant that, the decrease in the
qualifying age should still be
made. The money would be spent
in a deserving cause,

Dr. Cummins (L) mentioned a
this stage that Government was
making examinations with a view
to increasing the old age pension.

Should Be Mailed

Mr. W. A. Crawford (©) said
that he thought that anyone who
had seen the distressing condition
of old age pensioners who had to
walk to the payment office to re-
ceive their small pension would
agree that the pension should be
mailed to the homes of pen-
sioners.

With regard to the qualifying
age, as he had said before, 68 was
too high. As far as he could re-

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still be satisfied.

If many were not so shamelessly
employers,
go into a run

underpaid by their
they would not
down condition so quickly.

He agreed with the

for it, a

idea of
sending the money as sometimes
an old person was not able to go
having to send for it,
was by that sixpence poorer as

Hlon’ble J, D, Chandler to the
Couneil at Tuesday's meeting.

The President who went up to
the United Kingdom as a represen-
tative of the Legislature to attend
the Festival of Britain was a guest
of the British Government for
three weeks. He afterwards spent
a holiday in England.

The President thanked

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Learie Constantine, the high-
est paid cricketer in the history
of the game, called by an England
Captain “the fastest bowler of
my time,” a hurricane bat, and
nicknamed in Australia “Electric
Heels” for his fielding ‘prowess,
is the right man, if ever there
was one, to give cricket hints
In Cricketers’ Clicket he does so
in hi® own individual and
amusing style.

The book covers every phase
of the technique of cricke' It
is written with a simplicity that
makes its points clear to the boy
who has just got into his Junior
House Eleven, yet it reveals the
complex tacties of first-Class
cricket in a way which will make
the most experienced reporter of
Test Matches discover new and
subtle points in the game.

The reader is shown why Ed-
rich at last succeeded, and is
taken behind the scenes to listen
to Hammond’s decisive encour-
-agement. He is introduced to
Hutton as a text book batsman,
and allowed to overhear “what
O'Reilly, the best attacker of the
leg stump in the game, has to say
about his bowling technique.
The author goes out of his way
to encourage the odd~+boy-out in
the class, and in his chapters on
Captaincy and Fielding writes so
that even the youngest. playér
may get a real grasp of princi-
ples. Throughout, he shows the
tireless interest in his pupil and
that ability to convey an abso-
lutely boundless store of knowl-
edge that marks the born teach-
er Learie Corstantine holds
back no tricks; he illustrates his
advice with fascinating inside

tories of the men against whom
he has used the tactics he de-
scribes. Bradman, Larwood, Ver-
ity, Edrieh, Compton, Ponsford,

Hammond, Mailey, Oldfield, and
a host of others,

CRICKET

iv AT THE
ADVOCATE
STATIONERY



Obtainable from BOOKERS’ DRUG STORES, Broad Street, and
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PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS Sap ADVOCATE

fn a yyy 1)

Printed by the Advocate Co,, L'4., Broad St, Bridgetows



Thursday, October 4, 1951

SCHOLARSHIPS

BOTH
agreed to an amendment of the Act gov-
erning the award of Barbados Scholarships
and Exhibitions in order to grant all five
scholarships to boys instead of retaining
one for girls alone.

The amendment was subjected to a most
critical analysis although there was no
strenuous opposition. Any objection which
was raised was in an effort to make it cer-
tain that the, Government had not created
a dangerous precedent which might in
future adversely affect the award of these
scholarships.

As was pointed out by the Colonial Sec-
retary in the Legislative Council an
awkward predicament has arisen. It has
now happened that five boys have quali-
fied for scholarships and the number lim-
ited to boys are four. Two of the boys who
have so qualified took classics and have
done equally well; the examiners felt it
difficult to decide on the winner in this
section and so the tie remained.

As if to aggravate this position, the
examiners report states that no girl quali-
fied for scholarship.





Houses of the Legislature have

It Was geferally felt that as no girl had
qualified and as there were five eligible
boys, it would be well to award the five
scholarships to boys. It was found that the
Act specifically provided that one of these
scholarships must be awarded to a female.

The alternative to a non-award in this
section would be that the scholarship
would lapse and this was regarded as most
undesirable. It was then suggested that the
only remedy lay in an amendment to the
Act. Here it was that another difficulty
presented itself. If the act was permanently
amended then it would mean shutting out
the girls for whose benefit this section was
specifically inserted. It might be that an
act could have been passed providing that
for the year 1951 the scholarships should be
awarded to boys alone. Each amendment
had its peculiar’ merit. The insertion of the
proviso that in the event of no girl quali-
fying as has happened, the fifth scholar-
ship should be awarded to a boy might well
be supported by another alternative pro-
viding that!im the event of no boy qualify-
ing all the scholarships should be awarded
to girls, This point was raised in the Coun-
ceil.
| The objection that the scholarship should
not be awarded as no girl had qualified and
should be allowed to lapse, met with no
support.

The amendment which has now been
accepted does not mean that there will be
any change-in the principle of awarding
the scholarships. There will always be four
scholarships principally provided for four
boys and the fifth for girls; but it will be
convenient im future, if no girl qualifies as
has occurred this year, for the five scholar-
ships to be awarded to five boys.

The public will be generally satisfied
with the result inasmuch as it is now known
that one of the boys involved has also been
awarded an exhibition to the University
College of the West Indies. If he is given a
Barbados Scholarship the exhibition can
be awarded to another pupil. No harm will
have been done and another Barbadian will
have an opportunity to get university train-
ing. If the scholarship had been allowed to
lapse there would have been one less.

For the satisfaction of the more mate-
rial minded the arrangement has given the
maximum result and has not involved the
Government in any greater expenditure
than would normally have been spent if
the award had been in consonance with the
original provisions of the Act.



BUSTAMANTE?

LONDON, Sept. 27.

A GOOD deal of comment will no doubt
be raised by the publication within the
last week or so of the Penguin Special,
entitled “Attitude to Africa”, to whith the
contributors are W. Arthur Lewis, Michael
Scott, Martin Wight and Colin Legum. In
an early chapter, which was not written
by Lewis, but to which, it is stated, he has
subscribed agreement in respect of the
general argument, comment is made on
nationalists who “grow irresponsible and
when at last they have won power, do not
know how to use it constructively.”

The authors continue: “But if they are
made to Yovern and to cope with the real
problems of their countries, they will he
sobered by the challenge. And if they are
not, it will not be long before their peoples
discover their hollow incompetence, as is
happening to Bustamante in Jamaica.”

The hon. D. B. Sangster of Jamaica, now
in London, it connection with the Com-
monwealth Supply talks, takes exception
to this passage in the book. He said : “Bus-
tamante is one of the greatest men the
West Indies has produced. He has done
for the West Indies what will never be
done by any West Indian in this century.
He has revived in West Indians the desire
to live.” “Itis easy to criticise Busta from
afar’, he continued, “but when you work
with him as I have done, you realise his
efficiency and shrewdness as a politician.
As a Labour leader, Busta ranks among
the world’s best.”

BA

RBADOS ADVOCATE

~~

oe a — —

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1951



“Princess Alice Playing Field.”

The report addressed to the
Governor, Sir Alfre:'! Savage reads:
Your Excellency,

Under the provisions of the
Commissions of Enquiry Act, 1908,

of Barbados, a Commission was
issued on the 3Cth June, 1951, by
Your Excellency’s Deputy in

Executive Committee, whereby I
was appointed sole Commissioner
and authorised to investigate cer-
tain matters connected with the



nn een acca ncaa achat panelist ait ec: linithpseacntancigemcassitis

establishment of the ‘Princess
Alice Playing Field”. My terms of
reference were to enquire

“Into the establishment of the

“Princess Alice Playing Field,”

the conduct and management

exercised by the Vestry of the
parish of Saint Michael in con-
nection therewith and the ex-
penditure of moneys granted by
the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee from the Labour Welfare

Fund for the purpose of estab-

lishing such playing field and the

purchase and removal of certain
buildings from the Seawell Air-
port to the said playing field and
the erection and disposal of such
buildings,”

and to report thereon.

2. The Enquiry was commenced
on Monday the 2nd July, 1951,
when I was welcomed by the
Acting Attorney General, the
Honourable F. E. Field. I replied
to this welcome and then stated
that the procedure which I pro-
posed to follow was that normally
adopted in a Court of Law except
that ithe strict rules of evidence
would not be observed. I invited
persons who wanted to give evi-
dence to communicate with the
Secretary. All sessions were open
to the public and were held in the
Legislative Council Chamber at
the Public Buildings in Bridge-
town on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th,
7th, and 9th days of ‘uly, 1951. It
was not found necessary to hold
anypart of the Enquiry in private.
During the last four days there
were fairly large attendances of
the public. The Acting Attorney
General appeared before the Com-
mission, placed the services of the
law officers at its disposal, con-
ducted the examination of wit-
nesses and greatly assisted the
Commission in eliciting the facts.
A transcript of his opening re-
marks appears in Appendix 1.
E. K. Walcott, Esq., K.C., appeared
on behalf of Mr. H. A. Tudor, who
had been Churchwarden of the
St. Yichael’s Vestry and Chair-
man of the St. Michael’s Playing
Fields, Committee in the years 1949
and 1950, when the Playing Field
was being established and the
pavilion was being erected.

Mr. E. D. Mottley, M.C.P., was
permitted, at the request of the
Vestry, to -represent the St.
Michael’s Vestry, of which body
he is a member, and to examine
and cross-examine witnesses and
to address the Commission on. be-~
half of the Vestry.

33 Witnesses

3. Notices were published » in
the Press inviting persons who.
could assist the Commission by
giving any information germane to
the matters under enquiry to send
to the Secretary a short note con-
taining the substance of this in-
formation, Thirty-three witnesses
were examined, a list of these wit-
nesses will be found in Appendix
II. In addition, the Commission
had the advantage of reading
certain official files and cor-
respondence, and memoranda by
the Social Welfare Officer relating
to the Playing Field; minutes of
meetings of the St, Michael's
Vestry and the minutes of the
Playing Fields Committee. All
information sought from official

sources was readily supplied, The *

Commissioner, accompanied by



the

It will be published every day until completed.

mittee, and that seven sites had
been selected (see Appendix IV).
Among these was the site known
as the “Reef Grounds” (sub-
sequently renamed the “Princess
Alice Playing Field”. This land
is situated about one mile from
the Public Buildings in Bridge-
town, and ts approwtmately 8
acres in area, It is stated to be
the property of the Government
of Barbados. A great deal of it is
reclaimed land, and it is partly
bounded by the sea. In the letter
of the 18th June, 1949, to whiah
reference has been made. the
cost of erecting buildings, etc., on
the “Reef Grounds” was estim-
ated by the Vestry ‘at $6,720.00
and the estimated cost of levelling
the land at $3A00.00. The Clerk
of the Vestry wrote “It is felt by
the Vestry that the estimated cost
of buildings and also that of
levelling the land is liberal. and
the actual expenditure should not
exeeed the amounts stated.”

Reef Grounds
6. On the 29th August,

the Financial Secretary
from the Colonial
Office, to the Clerk
Michael’s Vestry (see Appendix
V) and informed him that the
Governor-in-Executive | Commit-
tee had approved that action
should proceed immediately with
regard to the “Reef Grounds”,

1949,
wrote,
Secretary’s
of the St.

and that expenditure might be
incurred in connection therewith
in accordance with estimates
which were to be agreed with
the Social Welfare Officer, who
would be responsible for the
direct administration of the

grants on behalf of Government,
and that in the meantime a pay-
ment of $5,000.00 had been
approved on account of work on
this site. In the last paragraph

of his letter, the Financial Secre- fhis gentleman certainly had no, ago, Sir Norman Birkett figured promine

tary i stated “On the general
question of grants from the
Labour Welfare Fund, I am to

SIR CLEMENT MALONE

report of Commissioner.

the Acting Financial Secretary, the inform you that these are made
Clerk of the St. Michael's Vestry, on the understanding that expen-
the Secretary of the Commission diture will only be incurred in
and others paid a visit to the accordance with the detailed
“Princess Alice Playing Field” estimates which are agreed with
and examined the pavilion which the Social Welfare Officer, and
had been erected there. that Vestries will on the comple-
The Establishment of the “Princess tion of the work, or at appropri-
ate intervals, furnish audited

Alice Playing Field.” accounts of expenditure of all

4. The Government of the moneys received from the Fund.”
United Kingdom has for some The receipt of this letter was
time past purchased the sugar! acknowledged by the Clerk of the
produced in Barbados at a price St.‘ Michael's Vestry on the 2ist
fixed by agreement, and it has September, 1949. After further
been stipulated that a part of the correspondence a sum of $5,000.00
price so paid must be utilized on on account of the grant to be
labour welfare. Payments in pur- made from the Labour Welfare
suance of this stipulation have Fund was paid to the Vestry. The
been made to the Government of establishment of the . “Reef
Barbados and a fund has been Grounds” as one of the Playing
created known as the “Labour s in the St. Michael's parish,
Welfare Fund”, which is_con- the terms upon which a grant
trolled by the Governor-in-Exec- ww, be made from the Labour
utive Committee. By regulation 2

of the Labour Welfare

und, erecting ili z
(Playing Fields) —_ Regulations, incidentals wete this exttled Rel
1949, of Barbados, “The Gov- “The best laid schemes O’mice
ernor-in-Executive Committee

and men
Gang aft a-gley.”
and it will be seen later that al-
though levelling and preparation of
the grounds and roads (exclusive
of the amount spent on fencing)
cost $1,255.28 less than the sum
estimated, owing to the fact that
the use of a!bulldozer had been

may make block grants out of
the Labour Welfare Fund to the
several Vestries of the Island to
be applied by them (subject to
such conditions as the Governor-
in-Executive Committee may im-
pose) in making payments_ for
the purpose of providing, Main-

PRINCESS ALICE _ Mili chive Experts
ENQUIRY REPORT

TODAY the “Advocate” begins the publication of
Malone who conducted an Inquiry into certain miiters connected with the establishment of the |

\

justly aggrieved if the

public

thought or was allowed to think |

without just cause, that they were
parties to any,action which could
be called in question.”

The Conduct and Managemen

Parish of St. Michael in Connec-
tion with the Establishment of the
“Princess Alice Playing Field”.

8. By section 2 of the Vestries
(Amendment No. 5 Act, 1948, the
St. Michael's Vestry is empower-
ed to ‘provide, maintain or man-

age playing fields’ for the use of!

the ‘public. The Churchwarden is
the Chief Executive Officer of the
Vestry, and he is also the Chair-
man of the Playing Fields Com-
mittee. This . Committee
appointed by the Vestry (as the
minutes of a Vestry meeting held
on the 10th January. 1949, disclos-
ed) “to make
with regard to sites, costs thereof,
exnendituree to be inctirred in
preparing the playing fields, and
the recurrent estimated expendi-
ture”. It app@ars also from the
orrespondence between the Social
Welfarea Officer’ and the Clerk of
the St. Michael’s Vestry, and from
the minutes of its meetings that
the Committee was also expectext
to be interested in the actual werk
done, and in the expenditure in-
curred in preparing the playing
field at the “Reef” site and in
constructing the pavilion, If this
was not so the Committee would
have been dissolved when the

Vestry adopted its report at a

meeting held on the 16th June,

1949. But the Committee contin-
ued to hold meetings up to March
1950. Having selected the “Reef”
site it took little interest in the
work to be done there and appears
to haye been complacently satis-
fied to leave this in the hands of
its Chairman, Mr. H, A. Tudor,

disposition to lean upon others, for
apart from laying certain corre-
spondence before the Committee
and discussing {tf with the mem-

bers, he did not seek their co-|

operation or approval in carrying

out the werk even though quite!

extensive alterations had beea
made in the plan originally pro-
posed for the pavilion involving
increased expenditure of over
$5,000.00 on. this item. Between
July, 1949, and March, 1950, ex-
pendituré of about $16,588 was
incurred in connection with the
work at this playing field includ-
ing the erection of a_ pavilion
which when completed cost
$12,046.11 as shown by the letter |
of the 24th June, 1950, from the.
Auditor for the parish of St. Mich- |
ael (See Appendix VI). During
the period just rdferred to the
Playing Field Committee held four
meetings. Mr. Tudor was present
at all of these but he made no
report at any of them as to the
progress of the work. . No ques-
tion was raised by any member
as to the terms of any contract
for preparing the ground or build-
ing the pavilion; or as to whether
tenders had been called for in
accordance with a decision of
the Vestry at a meeting held on
the 18th April, 1949 (with Mr.
Tudor in the Chair) that tenders
should be invited for any work
estimated to cost $1,000.00 and
over, Those members of the Com-
mittee who were members of the
Vestry knew, from the Financial
Secretary's letter of the 29th
August, 1949, the contents of
which had been communicated to |
the Vestry at a meeting held on)

the 19th September, 1949, the
terms upon wich a_ grant of
money for the establishment of

this playing field had been made
and yet they never regarded it as
aecessary to furnish the Vestry
with a report of the activities of
the Committee or of its Chairman.
This disinterestedness of the Com-
mittee resulting almost’ in inepti-
tude cannot escape censure.

9. The inert’ attitude of the
Playing Fields Committee was in
startling contrast to the activities
of the Churchwarden-Chairman.
He and the Acting Governor (Mr.
Perowne) were very anxious to
get on with the work of preparing
the ground and_ building the
pavilion, and Mr. Tudor proceeded
to do this, without seeking the co-|
operation of the Playing Fields}
Committee or of the Vestry, even
though the original plans submit-
ted by the Vestry were being
altered; without inviting tenders

for the work of levelling *sthe¢:.

ground or building the pavilion,-«
this in open disregard of the ex-
press directions of the Vestry—;
by embarking wpon construction
work without proper plans and by
arranging to pay for the work

Sir. Clement

t/Travers Humphreys’s retirement caused a
Exercised by the Vestry of the, vacancy, has occasioned some surprise.

was,

recommendations |

kilo

;violin, appeared in many notable trials as

| which that judge was so closely associated.





ON THE BENCH

MONTGOMERY HYDE, MP,
the - distinguished criminologist, exam-
ines the new judicial appointment and
asks—

‘bo WE NEED MORE CRIMINAL JUDGES?

|

HAVE we enough criminal judges?
The promotion of 52-yeaz-old Mr. Colin
Pearson, KC, to the King’s Bench, where Sir



| It was thought in the Temple that an Old
| Bailey practitioner in the tradition of Sir
Travers himself might have been selected.
| Although the new judge will undoubtedly
bring considerable legal learning and ability
to the High Court Bench it is noteworthy
|that his practice as a barrister has chiefly
lain in the commercial courts.

This would seem to indicate that Lord
Jowitt the Lord Chancellor, on whose re-
commendation our judicial appointments are
made is satisfied that the King’s Bench Divi-
sion is already sufficiently staffed with crimi-
nal lawyers.

Yet only one of the 23 judges who at pres-
ent sit in this division was exclusively en-



‘phone Pitchor's!
4472
for avorything in
HARDWARE

wit

OPEL CPLECLEL LLLP

28

gaged in criminal work before coming to the */ ' JD3 f . s
f J $
“bench. This is Mr. Justice Byrne, who was|% C. S. Pitcher & Co. x
senior prosecuting counsel at the Old Bailey * sciaibiiiities %
te POOSOPSSS




at the time of his appointment at the com-
paratively early age of 49 in 1945.

Unfortunately, by the elevation of Lord
Justice Birkett to the Court of Appeal last
year the King’s Bench lost another excep-
ionally distinguished authority on criminal
matters.

HE TYPED IT OUT

Before he reached the Bench ten a
ntly

| ‘nm many criminal trials. In particular, his de-
' ‘ence of Mrs. Pace for murder was outstand-
ing as also his prosecution of Alfred Arthur
'Rouse, the blazing car murderer. On the
Bench he has always taken great trouble
with his judgments. At Nuremberg, where he
was one of the British judges in the War
Crimes trials, he typed out the whole of his
‘engthy judgment himself.

Two of the present King’s Bench judges,
besides Mr. Justice Byrne, have had much
experience of criminal work in their practis-
ing days—Mr. Justice Oliver and Mr, Justice
Cassels—although their practices were not
exclusively criminal.

Mr. Justice Oliver, whose hobbies are carv-
ing oak doors and playing Handel on the

AND THE BEST
BUYS TOO!!

JAMS
CRYSTALS
PEAS

By Wm. P. HARTLEY Ltd.

NO ADDATIVES — Only FRUIT and SUGAR
S= Obtainable at all Grocers



=

all

swool

\Mr. Roland Oliver, KC. He was one of the
prosecuting counsel in the celebrated
Thompson-Bywaters murder case, and he
suegessfully defended Mr. Aleck Bourne, a
surgeon, on sensational charges of abortion
at the Old Bailey in 1938, when a more
humane interpretation of the law on this
delicate subject was established. He was one
of the three counsel who investigated the
leakage of Budget secrets. .

Mr. Justice Cassels is a Yorkshireman who
began his career in London journalism and
was not called to the Bar till he was over 30.
He quickly built up an extensive practice in
the criminal courts, prisoners he defended
cn capital charges including Field, Thorne,
Patrick, Mahon and Fox.

Mr, Justice Pearson should rapidly acquire
the knowledge of criminal law and procedure
which he may lack at present, and he will
no douht make an excellent criminal judge
as those with little or no experience in the
criminal courts have done before him. Never-
theless the view has been expressed in some
juarters that the Lord Chancellor might have
done bciter to have appointed a successor to
Sir Travers Humphreys from the field with

@
from

o.A49

TROPICALS
of
superb quality

at DA COSTA'S

‘rhe present alarmingly high criminal
iutistres and the consequently }ary2 number
cf criminal cases which come before the
courts every week would seem to support this
siew.
vIn the Court of Criminal Appeal, which 3s
composed of King’s Bench judges, more t’aan
1,100 applications for_leave to-appeal-ayainst
conviction and sentence were heard last year.

}











done at ‘day ratep’ instead o:
entering into a femal contract

elfare Fund for levelling the with the builder; and also did not) criminal w

requisition’ the services of the
Building Supervisor (Mr. Ramsay).
The Vestry employed on _ its
permanent staff.a Building Super-
visor Whose duties include super-
vising the erection of any new
buildings, checking quantities ana
making sure that proper materials
were being used; seeing that the
workmanship was satisfactory and
that reasonable prices were being

in addition nearly 200 appeals were heard by
he Court or otherwise disposed of,

All this represents an immense w ume cf
ork for the judges of tne Kifig’s
Pench. Furthermore, as there must always
be three niembers of this division sitting in
the Court of Criminal Appeal, the availability:
ci those v ith criminal experience tur work at |
assizes or in the Central Crimiz:al Court is
further limited, |

Sooner or later it would seem that the
| King’s bench will have to be reinforced from
the criminal bar. At present ther? i; no lack

Byouteca
THRIFTY SHOPPER

SWEET COUNTER

Carr’s Crackers
Carr’s Sweet Biscuits
Boxes Chocolates
Barley Sticks

After Diuner Mints



!









taining, or managing playing Mt. aid. : a ose Ss "
fields, parks, open spaces or other obtained free of charge, the con- _ eee rie . eae po alent there. ) nts |
places of public resort or recrea- struction of the pavilion actually Siereleor’ aes ae - a Saieee] King’s Counsel who specialise in criminal
tion for the use of the public.” 70St_ $12,046.11) or $5326.11 more fF omittins to do so, that he and |WCLX include Mr. John Maude, MP, Mr. G. D TASTY BITS

5. In furtherance of the Gov- than estimated (not including the ‘°F ° ing to do so, that he an “Khoki’ ’ . . .
ernment’s general licy of SUM of $1,936.00 the price of two Mr. Ramsay “did not get on.”;,. It | (Khoki’) Roberts and Mr. Deter Curt:s-
Labour Welfare the Colonial Sec-\ 9Uts bought ‘at public auction at #8 not without significance, how- | Bennett, all in a large way of practice. , Canadian Red Cheese
retary of Barbados wrote a circu Seawell Airport by the Church- ever, that he did in fact tell Mr. Meanwhue at the Old Bailey itseif there is | Edam Cheese € ompare These
lar letter, dated the 7th February, Warden and not paid for), It Ramsay that he was required to). strong prosecuting t fi hi oo Sone
1949 (see Appendix III) to the Must be borne in mind, however, supervise the work, and it was |< 4 ain eo § team rom which such a| Tuborg Beer Prices
Chairman of each Vestry in the that the building originally plan- only when Mr. Ramsay insistea | Selection might be made, This is headed by Bass’s Ale ee
Island, pointed out the terms of "€d was enlarged and rearranged. (quite rightly) upon seeing plans | Mr. Christmas Humphreys, son of the retiring | Anchor Table Butter—88c per
regulation 2 referred to ebove ane eee 7 will be cbserved that the of the proposed Pe that his}judge, who is the senior crime counsel. The: Ib.
requested the Vestries to forward grant of money from the Fund services were not requ itioned. At|other “seniors” are Mr. TEND! Anchor Full Cream Milk-—2}
to him any aos ~~ ao at a ween > oe ws auch a meeting of the Vestry on the|R BF. Seaton Henry Elam and me. y ER MEATS jib—$2. 24
which they mig esire to sub- acl’s Vestry, and that under the 28th August, 1950, Mr. Tudor at- : tine en nchor Full Cream Milk 1 Ib.
mit, In eply. to. this circular terms set out in the Financial tempted to excuse his delinquency | Now that Sir Travers Humphreys has left|}{ Lamb, Liver, Tails, Tripe, tin 96c.
letter the Clerk of the St, Secretary's letter of the 29th Aug- by saying thatthe did not think the bench, the senior judge with the greatest Tongues, Brains, Garlic, Vege- | Anchor Skimmed Milk — 40c.
Michaet's "Vestry wtite "on he ust, 108. inat Body was reaulted IC wa the. Building. Supervisor’s| criminal experience is Mr. Justice Oliver. {fest Cuil Apse mer Ih

job to see after this matter as he

Red, White and Blue Coffee—












the Sit. Michael's Vestry, under ©xpenditure of the money so grant- Considered the preparati , the| He has sat on the bench for the past 13} aheenene | 90c. per }-Ib. tin
the uuthority of the ‘Vestries ed. It was incumbent upon the piaving Fiel Ee a rene (os years and is now nearly 70, Mr. Justice Cas- | Red, White & Blue Beans—24c.
| (Amendment) No. 5 Act, 1948, Vestry to keep proper accounts aying Field wés the work of the) <4. rho has b iu PHONE per tin
; Savi Mes a tate) eral Thc Me nppertec pa Governor-in-Executive Committee, | 5@45; Wo has been a judge for one year less Re t 2
| had appointed a Playing-Fields’s, and to exercise strict supervision ats : is six Vv ld ¥ 4 Processed Peas—3-oz. size 30c.
Committee, and that in due over the expenditure of this He also stated in evidence that he} 'S oo years older. per tin
| course application would be made money The Acting Attorney a the eoune we When either of these judges decides to } Cook's Pastes—Gc. nor tin °
for grants from the Labour Wel- General! very aptly observed in his (Mr. Perowne) ‘as the execu ive| retire I would say t se é inti GODDARDS Roce eile has ee oak
| fare Fund. On the 18th June, opening remarks “Public bodies Officer and felt he should obey his | a successor seas eS ale ped Tre el | Carrots in tins 3-02. size 36e.
11949, he wrote again to the which are called upon to adminis- orders. Coming itom one who has], : consiaerable experience as/ | per tin )
Colonial Secretary informing hin: ter wublic fufds must be above been a Vestryman for eighteen | Criminal lawy < will be unanswerable. : WE DEL IVER | Cucumbers in tins—3-oz. size ;
that the te ah had oe the spt i m and the. I ; b, ho year nd twice a Churchwarden, | World Copyright Reserved. 14) " | 48c. per tin t
Report of the Playing Fields Com- constitute e bodie: d fee @ On Page 8 wLF.S. ( cee
i 4 ! .
THURSDAY,

OCTOBER 4,



1951



In Many Elementary Schools

Say» Major Glindon Reed,
Director Of Education

THE BUILDINGS of many of our elementary schools
and the teaching conditions in them are very bad. More
children attend them than ever before, but in recent years
we have not been able to increase the number of teachers
to deal with them. In the last four years Government has
built two new schools for elementary schoo! children, one

large one and one small one.

Some other schools have had ad-
ditions made to them, but in
Barbados I should say that there
is only one elementary school
building which approaches the
minimum requirements laid down
by the Ministry of Education in
England. That is the new St.
Leonard’s School for Girls at
Richmond Gap. This school was
designed and built for the senior
girls from the elementary schools
of the vicinity.

Progress in the provision of
additional elementary school ac-
commodation has _ unfortunately
been far slower than I was led to
expect when I first came to the
Colony.

Fortunately for Barbados,
schools are not a matter of stones,
concrete and wood alone. The
strength of a school lies in its
teaching staff and the teachers,
working sometimes in very poor
conditions, have done their best
to maintain and improve former
standards. This does not mean
that we are yet up to English
standards,

I gather that when Mr. Hayden
came to the island in 1943 he
found ‘the elementary schools
badly housed and crowded with
children who were placed in
classes according to their attain-
ments (irrespective of age) and
taught by teachers many of whom
were untrained.

HAYDEN’S POLICY

He drew up a policy for edu-
cation with a building programme,
recommended a training college
for teachers, introduced the placing
of children into classes according
to age as the first stage towards
inaugurating a system of education
under which children would be
taught, as in England, according to
Age, Ability and Aptitude.

Apart from other considera-
tions the introduction of “age-
grouping” as it has come to be
called in Barbados allowed the
standard of education in the
elementary schools to be mea-
sured for the first time. Pre-
viously it was not possible to
know what the standard was,
nor whether it was going up or
down. Assessments had to be
made by subjective judgment,
without a measuring-stick and
this kind of assessment can
often be very unreliable.

The measuring-stick in educa-
tion is, and has been for years in
countries other than Barbados, the
attainment ofthe. average child at
a certain age. If, for example,
you do not know what the average
Barbadian child of 7 years can do,
you cannot tell for sure whether
your little boy of 7 is good, bad
or indifferent. We do know now,
what the average Barbadian child
of 7 can do and each year we mca-
sure the children and see whether
the standard is going up or down.

GREAT PROTECTION
If they only realised it “age-

grouping” is the greatest protection
to parents that has been introduced
into the schools, for no intelligent,
hard-working child can be kept
back because he doesn’t happen
to get on with his teacher or,
because he happens to be feeling
unwell when the Inspector calls.
Under the “age-grouping” system
retarded children should receive
more individual attention now
than they would have done before
that system was introduced.

But “age-grouping” is merely a
stage in the introduction of a sys-
tem of education under which
children will be taught according
to Age, Ability and Aptitude. The
measurement of Ability and Apti-
tude is not an easy business, It re-
quires the special training of the
teachers who are to do the mea-
suring. We now have a body of
teachers trained in this work
and so we are entering the second
stage. Children are being
“streamed”. as it is called.

NOTHING NEW

This means in a large school for
example that all the children in a
certain age-group will be placed
in parallel classes according to
their Ability. The A classes will
contain the children who have the
best ability, the B classes will con-
tain the children of normal abil-
lity and in the C classes will be,
found those of less than average
ability. There will be in addition
special classes for retarded chil-
dren, —_
There is nothing new in this

organisation. The school I went

to 36 years ago in England was

organised on these lines. But a

system of organisation based on

Age and Ability is new in the

elementary schools of Barbados.

Perhaps I should point out
that Ability is not quite the same
thing as Attainment, I may have
the natural ability to do mathe-
matical calculations, but if I
have never been taught to do
them, my attainments in this di-
rection will be low. But if I
have the ability and a good
teacher I shall soon be able to
make up for lost time. ,
The third stage will be the in-

clusion of Aptitudes in our scrt-
ing of the children into classes.
When the rebuilding of St. Leon-
ard’s Boys’ School is finished we
shovld be able to organise at Rich-
mond Gap a model unit in which
840 boys and 735 girls will be
taught according to Age, Ability
and Aptitude. For there will be
provided facilities for training ‘in
various practical subjects such as
metal-work, wood-work, arts and
crafts for those pupils who show
they have the aptitude for them.

The introduction «f education
pecording to Age, Ability and Ap-
titude fis within sight. Nothing
should be allowed -to interfere
with its realisation

BELOW STANDARD

One of the first things I was told
by some of the Heads of) Second-
iry Schools when I first to
Barbados wa that the
ferring from the

came
pupils

slementary
trar el entary

schools to the secondary schools
were not up to standard. I had
been hearing this, and saying it
myself in England when I was a
secondary schoolmaster, ever since
I had started teaching, so this
criticism was no new thing to me.
In sy'bsequent years I was told by
Heads that there was an improve-
ment in standard. I gather now
that ‘ere may have been a drop
again, a

_ In connection with’this fluctua-
tion which ma¥ or may not be
true I think it would be as well to
realise that many more children
enter secQndary gchools than. for-
merly.. In other-Words we cannot
expect all the children now trying
to enter secondary schools to be of
the same calibre as those brilliant
few who were successful a few
years ago. And in parenthesis one
might add that for the same reason
the children left behiad in the ele-
mentary schools are likely to be
on average of a lower calibre than
they used to be. I think it is ne-
cessary to say too that some Ves-
tries have said that they prefer to
select children for scholarships and
exhibitions on a means test alone
irrespective of ability. The cahdi-
dates are presented by their pa-
rents and not by Headteachers and
are nt necessarily the most able
children. The number of exhibi-
tions has increased but in some
vestries the methods of selection
have not changed for many years,
although a reform has been re-
commended by this Department on
more than gone occasion,

COMMON COURSE

At the St. Leonard’s Boys’ and
Girls’ Schools the children between
the ages of 11 and 18 will be fol-
lowing the Common Course, so
perhaps I had better say a word
or two about that.

First of all-I shoulda explain
that the English educational sys-
tem (unlike the American) works
downwards from the top. In other
words the work we do in —=_
secondary schools and the stand-
ards we have to maintain are de-
termined for us by the British
Universities, Similarly the stand-
ards of Work which we try to reach
in our Primary (or Elementary )
Schools are set for us by our Sec-
ondary Schools, The’ Common
Course is a course of instruction
which is suitable for children be-
tween the ages of 11 and 13 wheth-
er they attend elementary or sec-
ondary schools.. The standard of
knowledge required of these child-
ren is set by the Secondary Schools
and it is up to the elementary
schools to do their best to reach
it. Although many of the elemen-
tary schools cannot attain it yet
the Common Course places before
them the standards they should
strive for.

SYLLABUSES

The syllabuses devised by Spe-
cialist Secondary Teachers in Bar-
bados in co-operation with this
Department are arranged for the
three streams of children I have
already mentioned:— A _ stream
which are the best pupils, B stream
for the normal or average children,
C stream for chi'yiren below aver-
age. A retarded child is not ex-
pected to do the work of those in
the A stream. But the opportun-
ity is there for the schools to give
education at the highest standard
to the pupils who are capable of
benefiting from it.

Children are not taught foreign
languages unless first they have
shown a_ special ability to learn
them and secondly there are the
teachers available to deal with
these subjects. At present very
few pupils indeed are being taught
foreign languages.

STRONGER
INSPECTORATE

This is one way in which we are
doing our best to raise the stand-
ard of education in the elementary
schools, In addition we are
strengthening the Inspectorate so
that teachers may receive more
help in their work, It is proposed
that Inspectors will visit elemen-
tary, secondary and private
schools, as in England, check on
the school organisation and teach-
ing and draw the systems of
schools together to help one an-
other and understand each other's

difficulties and lems.
Although — th artment is
striving by ev ans to raise
the level of at in elemen-
t ry, tepocls, pro ill be sl
until school buil d condi-
tions of work for c en and

teachers are improved. I hope that
nothing will be put in the way of
improving elementary school ac-
east ec: amenities. These
must rded for some years
as the first priorities.

FILM SHOW

oe the courtesy of the
British Council representative the
following films will be shown at
the Monthly Reunion of the Com-
bermere School Old Boys’ Asso¢i-
ation at Combermere tomorrow
night at 8 o’clock:
British News.
Making The Ball.
Wordsworth’s Country.
Looking at Sculpture,



e







Housing Loatis
Granted To 2,008

Since housing loans were
made available to sugar in-
dustry workers about a year
ago, 2,008 workers have
been granted loans which
amount to $570,000, Mr.
D. A. Haynes, Manager of
the Labour Loans Depart-
ment said to the Advocate

yesterday.
However, he said, the
Department has approved

of loans to 2.395 people over
the same veriod, amounting
to $632,000. They have
been applications from 4,900
people.

Mr. Haynes said that the
workers were navine
the loans very well. He had
absolutely no complaint to
make. The -everage lone

took four verve before ite
s AANYA Say ft hank

hacer

horensen
fl, No Joon excreted
$1.440 or was ers th n $48

“Conditions In
U.K.Very Bad”

Mr. Leslie Little, an English-
man wno 1s now uving in reure-
my}. a “krin,’ Hoietown, St.
Jaines, returned from England
yesterday morning by the Colom-
bie after spending tnree montns’
holiday. He was accompanied by
nis wite.

He told the Advocate that he
was very glad to be back as he
had a miserable summer. The
weather was cold and he did not
see the sun while he was there.

Conditions in England, he had
been told, were better, but he
failed to sec that. As a matter of
fect, he said, he would not live in
England if one volunteered to pay
his rent.

“Prices of some articles are ris-
ing every day and there are still
restrictions,” he said.

To compare the cost of a few
articles in England with the cost
here he said that 20 cigarettes cost
3/9, the price for which he could
get 50 here. A bottle of rum cost
88/6 as against a gallon for 20/-
here.

Altogether he thought that life
and the people in Barbados were
more pleasant than in England.

Mr, Little will be remembered
by many of the older people in the
island as the successor to Colonel
Yates who started the Oil Company
at Turner's Hall and was General
Manager 28 years ago.

Mr. Little drilled all the oil wells
at Turner’s Hall and was iri charge
of the eompan: for three years.
After living in Trinidad for seven
years, he returned to Barbados
four years ago where he has been
residing.

“Colombie” Takes
20 On Caribbean
Cruise

in





The French passenger liner
Colombie (7,554 tons), now on
fer Caribbean cruise, arrived
here yesterday morning from
England via Martinique and
Dominica. She brdught ‘hinty-

eight passengers for Barbados and
had on board 141 oth2r passen-
gers.

Twenty passengers joined the
Colombie here before she left port
during the evening for Jamaica
via Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao
and Cartagena.

Relatives and friends crowded
the Baggage Warehouse pier
yesterday evening waving to the
passengers as launch after launch
took them off to the ship.

Employees Ask
Pay Revision

The subordinate employees of
the Civil Service Association held
a meeting at the Town Hall yes-
terday. The subject discussed was
the Cost of Living Bonus. After
a stormy debate the meeting
passed the following resolution:

“Whereas the Government has
shown open disdain and disregard
for our rights and sympathy with
our deplorable financial condition,

“Be it resolved that we the
subordinate employees of the
Government Service take this
opportunity to acquaint the Gov-
ernment of our very strong dis-
approval of the attitude adopted
towards our Association in by-
passing our Whitley Council and
sending a Resolution to the House
1eating to our conditions of
service without first having our
comments on same.

2. Sending a Resolution to the
House for an amount ef mone
which is in our opinion an insult
to us in view of the arguments
produced showing the necessity
for a Cost of Living Bonus.

3. That we urgently request a
royision of salaries before the
prorogation of the present Leg-
islature—retroactive 1/4/51.

4. That an immediate answer
be given our representatives on
whom we have placed the onus of
presenting this Resolution,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Teaching Conditions Are Very Bad



Legislature Get
Message On Sugar Pact

A MESSAGE regarding a Memorandum of Agreement
dated September 13, 1951 between the Sugar Producers
Federation of Barbados and the Barbados Workers Union

was received by

The Message reads :

His Excellency the Governor
has the honour to refer the at-
tention of the Legislature to a
Memorandum of Agreement dated
the 13th September; 1951, which,
in accordance with its terms, has
been submitted to the Sugar
Producers’ Federation of Barba-
dos’ and. the Barbados Workers’
Union for their consideration
and which, it is understood, has
been confirmed by these organi-
sations. Copies of this Memoran-
dum of Agreement are being laid
in the Honourable the House of
Assembly to-day.

Labour Welfare

Legislation is being urgentiy

prepared to implement

(1) that portion of paragraph
1 (c) of the Memorandum
of Agreement which refers
to the payment, when the
sugar crop of any one year
(in the years 1951, 1952
and 1953) exceeds the aver-
age of: the five preceding
years, of an additional cess

both Houses of the Legislature Tuesday.

ment, which relates to the

reduction, whenever the

Island’s crop exceeds 120,-

000 tons or its equivalent,

of the present cess of

$6.00 per ton payable to

the Price Stabilisation Fund

by 60c. per ton or $1.20 per

ton according to whether

the crop is below or exceeds

the previous five-year aver-

age, and the increase by an

equivalent amount of the

present cess of $2.40 per

ton payable to the Labour
Welfare Fund,

It has been decided not to im-

plement during the Calendar year

_ 1951 that portion of paragraph

1 (c) of the Memorandum of
Agreement which relates to the
payment of a cess of $2 per ton
to a Harbour Fund. Further con-
sideration is being given to the
question and separate legislation
will be prepared as soon as a
decision has been reached.

His Excellency understands
that the improved bonus scheme,



of $1.80 per ton to the to which reference is made in

Labour Welfare Fund; paragraph 1 (a) of the Memo-
(2) paragraph 1 (d) of the randum of Agreement, is already

Memorandum of Agree- being implemented.

, E “ * ss
October Is Less Polyriver

Squally Brings Luntber

The month of October has been The Saguenay Terminals’

welcomed in by quite a number
of schooner captains and seamen
who ply their small boats be-
tween the islands with cargo.
Some schooner captains say
that they feel safer sailing during
October than they do during Sep-

tember when hurricanes are
furious around the Caribbean,
Some,’ however, say that they

are still on the look out until
after mid-October when the hur-
ricane period expires.

Vessels arriving over the week-
end enjoyed quiet trips to Bar-
bados. Except for occasional
lulls in the wind, good breezes
favoured their sailing. The
weather was always fair and the
sea reasonably smooth.

One schooner captain said that
October is usually calm. Novem-
ber and December will _ bring
back squally weather, but not like
the weather they encountered in
September.

S.P.C.A. Inspector
Lectures At YMCA

Sgt. Major Torrezao, chief
S.P.C.A. Inspector of British
Guiana, held an instruction class
at the Y.M.C.A,. between 8.30
and 10,00 o'clock yesterday
morning for the benefit of local
S.P.C.A. Inspectors.

The principal subject was ‘Du-
fies of an _ Inspector of the
S.P.C.A." This included points
on the detection of cruelty and
relieving animals from their suf-



fering. He also explained the
proper procedure to be adopted
when investigations are being

made after a case of cruelty is
reported to the S.P.C.A.

Present were: J. Williams,
Chief Inspector, Barbados S.P.-
C.A., Graham Licorish, Inspec-
tor for the Windward District and
Westerman Ifill, Sub-Inspector
of the Leeward District.



S.P.C.A. CONCERT

To mark the end of Animal
Welfare Week the Barbados
S.P.C.A. has organised a children’s
concert which will take place at
Queen's Park on Friday afternoon
at 4.30 o'clock.

Polyriver called here from Hali-
fax yesterday with a shipment
of lumber made up cf 16,036
pieces of pine, 13,999 pieces of
spruce and 6,440 pieces of bireh

This new shipment of lumbe:
has found part of a_ shipment,
which arrived over three weeks
ago, still on the waterfront.
Waterfront workers were trying
to clear the waterfront of the old
shipment yesterday so as to make
ample space for the new ship-
ment. The cause of the lumber
remaining On the waterfront for
such long periods is the fact that
the lumber yards are now always
congested.

The Polyriver has also brought
1,495 bags of wheat flour and
700 bags of Queen flour for Bar-
bados. The entire shipment of
lumber came for Messrs J. B.
Leslie & Co., Ltd., while the
flour came for Messrs A. S, Bry-

den & Sons, Ltd. and Messrg
Robert Thom Ltd. The Wolyriver
is consigned to Messrs Planta-

tions Ltd.

Sold Pear Too Dear

Sybil Griffith of New Orleans
St. Michael, was ordered to pay @
fine of £3 to be paid in twe
months or in default two months’
imprisonment, by Mr. Cc. b
Walwyn, Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A” for violating the
Price Control Act,

The offence was committed on
October 2. Griffith sold Courtney
Springer a pear for 14 cents, six
cents more than the schedule
price.

PLACED ON BOND

Mr. H. A. Talma, Police Magis-
trate of District “A”, yesterday
placed Leslie Chase of Bath Vil-
lage, Christ Church, on a _ bond
for three months in the sum of
£5 for using threats to Etheline
Callender on September 5.

Mr. D. H, L. Ward who appea;-
ed on behalf of Callender submit-
ted that the defendant should be
placed on a bond as the threats
used were of a serious nature. He
also said that his client had
grounds for fear,

One witness said that Chase
threw a knife at Callender anc
told her that he was going to kil
her.





Victor Chase
Political
A large and enthusiastic crowd
attended the Political Meeting at
Chapman's Lane: last night by the
Electors’ Association in support of
their candidate Mr. Victor Chase
who is offering himself for the
City of Bridgetown at the forth-
coming general elections.
“First of all I feel that the time
has arrived when the Govern-
ment of Barbados needs more

members with a sound commer-
cial experience,” Mr. Chace said.

Outlining tne glaring mistakes
of the present Government, Mr.
Chase said that Jamaica, which
at one time was extremely poor
and difficult to live in, the Gov-
ernment has now been able to
introdute canning factories and
other industries to relieve the un-
employment situation,

He said that Barbados had the
same resources and some of these
industries could also have been
introduced here if the Govern-
ment was mindful enough. He
noticed that in Trinidad a milk
canning industry was new being
introduced.

“Barbados has previously suf-



Lodge Win Quizz Contest

Lodge School won by the nar-
row margin of one point from the
Ursuline Convent in a quizz con-
test which was held at thé Record-
ing Room of Rediffusion yesterday
morning. “The quizz was of three
rounds duration and after the
third round the score was Lodge
School 17 points and Ursuline
Convent 16 points.

At the end of the first’ round the
score was nine points to six in
favour of Lodge and in the second
round the Ursuline Convent took
the lead with ten points to eight

i i ee et ee Ae i i is

No points were awarded in round
three.

The teams were comprised of
four girls from the Convent and
four boys from Ledge. The team
captain of Lodge was F. Cheese-
man and the Ursuline Captain
was G. Payne.

In the first round both teams
weve asked questions dealing with
Parbados. One boy was stumped
when he was asked to name
three fruits beginning with the
letter “P” that grow in Barbados.
On the whole the result in this
round was considered bad

ot
nov

The second round questions
were on the West Indies and one
question—“Name three United
States islands in the Carib’ 7*
—Wwas unanswered.

Asked to name five West Indian
cricketers who are going to play
in Australia, one boy quickly an-
swered giving seven names,

The third round questions were
on General Knowledge. The two
question masters were Mr. J.

lor and Colonel Oliver. The next
quizz contest will be between
Combermere and St, Michae
Girls’ School.

Tay- j

Holds Second
Meeting

fered from many milk shortages
‘This would not have happene
if the Government we have, hac
a milk canning industry,” he
said,

He also felt that it was neces-
sary that a refrigeration plant be
installed in the ‘island. Fisher-
men would have somewhere t
store their fish. People are pay-
ing high prices for meat but i
this was done they could easily
buy fish instead, which would be-
come much cheaper,

He said that a refrigeratior
plant is one of the things to whict
he would attend immediately
and he knew the Fisheries Office:
was, anxious to have such a plant
tn, the island.

lie said that the Utilities
Board, which is appointed by
Government, was there to regu-
iu.e charges for water, laght, etc.,
und also look after the erection
ot road lights and the installa-
tion of water in the various ten-
autry areas and other districts,
i.¢ did not know the members of
the Board but he knew the Gov-
ernment had appointed them.

“If | should ever be given the
power I will endeavour to see
that the tenantries have priority
atteition. The Road Board must
pive these areas proper roads,’
he said.

He said that as a member of

e Vestry, that body has on many
occasions requested the Road
Board to fix tenantry roads. Very
few were done. Certain remarks
he had made previously dbout
the water situation in New Or-
leans, he had since heard that
they were lies but this was not
80.



water mains were laid with-
sy reach of the householder
required water, under
Vater Works Act, 1895, Sectior
32, the Executive Committée
@ On page 8





the}

“Damages” Suit Adjourned

CLERK CLAIMS OVER
$1,000 DAMAGES

HEARING of the Earl
& Co. Ltd. ‘damages’ suit i

was adjourned until the tenth of this month by The Hon

The Chief Judge, Sir Ailan
a clerk of Black Rock, is
money lost as a result of h
26 iast year with a punchec
& Co. Ltd. or their agent

lost $799.68 as overtime through illness.

Carver is represented by Mr,
E. K. Walcott, K.C., associated
with Mr. J. S. B. Dear, instructed
ty Messrs Carrington & Sealy.
Jason Jones & Co, Ltd., is repre-
sented by Mr. W. W. Reece asso-
ciated with Mr. Farmer, instructed
by Nicholls & Co.

A special jury will hear the case.
* The Bill of complaint states that
Carter is a clerk employed by Da
Costa & Co, Ltd. Jason Jones & Co.
Lid., has its registered office at
Lower Broad Street. On Septem-
ber 26, Carter was going
the wharf when, owing to the
negligence of Jason Jones & Co

Litd.’s servant or agent in unload-

ing puncheons laden with syruy
trom a lorry then parked on the
wharf one of ~ the
struck and injured him.

He claims he was put to loss anc
expense and suffered much pain
inconvenience and damages

No Warning
He

claims the Company was
negligent in that they unloaded
the puncheon by rolling it from
the lorry on the highway. They

failed to give warning to other
people who might have been pass
ing or expected to be passing
along the wharf. They failed to
maintain control of the puncheon
and caused or allowed it to roll
a considerable distance without
supervision or control,

The Company is sifpposed to
have known that it might cause
injury to passersby and yet al-
lowed it to fall or roll. They did
not keep any proper look out with
rerard to passersby

Carter will also rely on the fact
that the lorry and the puncheon
were at all material times under
the management and or control
of the company or its servant or
agent and that the accident was
such as in the ordinary course of
things would never have happen
ed if proper care had been used

As to the injuries there wer

a Pott's fracture of

third degree



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PAGE FIVE

allegea in the claim, the Com-
pany still deny that they, their
servant or agent were guilty of
negligence as is alleged or that
Carter met with an accidént as
alleged or at all. zi

tne Cumpany deny that-Carter
sustained the alleged- or any in-

. Cs . versie oe
C. Carter versus Jason Jones juries Or damages.

n the Court of Common Pleas

Besides, if any aceident had
happened to Carter as Was al-
Collymore yesterday. Carter, tesed, then he would by the

exercise of ordinary care and dis-
cretion have avoiaed the same.

On the other hand, Carter was
negligent. The Company are
claiming that he failea to keep
proper look out and to use reason-
able care when he attempted to
cross the road behind the lorry
at the time the lorry was being

claiming $1,044.48 damages as
is being injured on September
on, the property of Jason Jones
or servant. Carter claims he

tne right ankie and a torn .acernal
ligament of the left knee.



The particulars of the special Unloaded.
damage are: hospital treatment They say he did not give any
5100.80, X-Ray examinations °F Sufficient warning to those en-

gaged in unloading the lorry af
his intention to pass behind the

559,00, electrical treatment $10.50,
iweyance to the hospital $8.00,

airs to spectacles $6.00, mis- lorry at the time. ;
laneous items $10.00, one pair _ The Company hold that the
trousers $22.00, doctor’s fees facts surrounding the accident
2.50, over wages lost through were not such that the proper
ilness $799.68. and natural inference ingmedi-

In the defence, Jason Jones & @tely arising from them was that

. Ltd., do not admit that th.. the injury complained of was
, or their servants or agents were caused by their neglagence,
gaged on September 26, last Carter knew or ought to have
car or at any other time in un- Known that an attempt to cross
) iding puncheons laden with or recross the road behind the
» s\tup from any lorry on the lovry at the time it was being
‘arf as was alleged in the | aloaded would involve a risk of
im, injury and acting as he did he
i Assuming, but not admitting consented to the running of the
\' they or their agents or ser- risk.

ats were engaged in unloading
icheons: laden with syrup as

The case is expected to go on
for about three days.



“BARBADOS S5.P.C.A.
Animal Welfare Week’”’

NO FLEAS
ON THIS
DOG .



,
ANIMALS NOW AND ALWAYS
‘Lorexane’ Dusting Powder, containing pure
gamma B.H.C., is a potent killer of insect
pests on domestic animals and poultry. It is
pleasant and non-irritant to animal or user,

LE KIND TO

Equally effective
against parasites
on poultry,

In convenient sprinkler-top containers of 100 grammes.
of 500



Also in packings grammes and 3 kilos.

“LOREXANE’

TRADE MARK

DUSTING POWDER

MPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED

A subsidiary company of Imperial Chemical Industries Limited
VILMSLOW MANCHESTER
‘ole Agents and Distributors

»S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LIMITED

Ph.s?





FOR BEST RESULTS
USE

PURINA CHOWS
IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS

H. Jason Jones & Co,, Ltd—Distributors

et
aa





pote,

YOUR LAST
CHANCE!!

CLL IO. OL



‘
,
:
“A
‘ .
BUY NOW AND SAVE!
HOUBIGANT’S CELEBRATED FRENCH COLOGNES and
i VERFUMES; Assorted Scents. Overstocked and Reduced to
: fear ;—
} Colognes Scented Large Size Orig. Price $3.60 NOW $1.50
” ” Med, _,, . 2.40 ” 0
: ” ” Small 1.56 ” 60
Lavender Water Large .,, ; 3 3.60 1.50
” ” Med... io S 2.40 40
” ” Small . * 1.56 60
i% Queique Fleur Perfume ,, 8.00 6.00
3 ” ” ” ” ” ” 6.00 ” 4.00
8 ” ” ” ” ” 4.00 vs 3.00
a”

Sore

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

as

oe

+e



PVA PP IPP SLPS PPP LPAI PPO

Painted Skirt Hangers, Each
Painted Dress Hangers, Each
Khus Khus Dress Hangers, Each

$1.00
24c.
$1,00





&
Pair,

Each_,



$1.08
48c.,
14c.

” " ”





$$





& 13 BROAD STREET.




PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1951
ee TE LL sss sees esses

@ZuG GHT NING






| WHETHER YOU ARE A

=
$
re
$

LARGE
USER kg
OR A ~ . 7 TES

Se FSS reliadle slide

=F fastener. Look
“© for the name on
the slider pull.











*. ‘Lightning’ fasteners
s= ate manufactured by

LIGHTNING FASTENERS
; LIMITED

x A subsidiary company of
“s tmperial Chemical Indust ies
: Luniteds

8

Tt. GEDDES GRANT LTP ,





YOU DESIRE THE
BEST TEA — SO USE

RED ROSE TEA!

IT IS GOOD TEA.
















LBs

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

CRUDE
BLACK MOLASSES
The Natural a Food”









BLONDIE,



WHY ¥ DO %



HHT

i Ou ae sa
hl! ! uP TI 3 ROOM }

CYRIL SCOTT 2/6 At
JOHNSON’S
| STATIONERY



TEA CUPS & SAUCERS
t

JOHNSON’S
HARDWARE





IT PAYS You TO DEAL HERE

—————————————————————————————————
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only








YOU GAVE GATES l HE PROBABLY ; YOUR GUE’ GUESS 1S RIGHT, BUT IT WONT >
HE TOOK "TEM AWAY AND FILLED HIS. WAREHOUSE WIT FURS G00! i:
LESS FURS LIKE THESE WOLF AN i| beam: ;





USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
Pkgs. Quaker Corn Flakes 38 34 #8 Pkgs. Jack Straws 61 536

Tins Klim Powd. Milk (5lbs) 5.98 5.40 ‘Tins Apricot Jam 65 60}
Bottles O’Kiefe’s Beer




Tins Heinz Tomato Soup 34° «46068380






VD GIVE A HUNQRED DOLLARS ‘ta — Mt av: IT KEERS NOW-IGN'T THAT —
ven f 4 ' F SO THOUGHTFUL!

eau OUT OF SON ae THAT Nie ! by Be wer a ifs , s Ber cea

iF IT HAD THE HUNDRED | i ‘he NOW AGGIE Vv \e TO RAIN YOU 144




FING!
THERE t Riv 4 y

Your Hair can be
Radiant and
Dandruff-free

— all you've got to do is



Give yourself
strength
with daily
BOVRIL

When there’s a job to be done or a game to be played—a
cup of Bovril is the very best of drinks. Its rich beely \}
flavour sends a welcome glow through you; its beefy
goodness puts new life into you. There's nothing like

Bavgil to build you up and sustain you. | _ EMERALD CLEAR SHAMPOO

BOoOV Ri L IS THE SHAMPOQ FOR YOUI!

HEALTH IN EVERY BOTTLE | On Sale at all Leading Stores

COCOA i wall serve DUNLOP



take me home and squ-e-e-ze me!

JOHNNY HAZARD
“if, i?

16 MOST USELESS STRAIN
ON EVES,..DOES TABRIZ THINK
THAT MEN CAN LIVE UNDER
WATER LIKE FIGH










UNIVERSAL
MOTOR CYCLE TYRES

YOUR UTTLE BREAK FO!
FREEDOM ae oe
i,







THEY EXPECT ME +TO TURN INTO AY

TIGER? WHAT A STORY, WHEN | GET

HOME To one “Ft Var
GET HOME!

1 “ m1" r
Z Na ei
Te

Ht

ee

Cocoa going overside Lone,
: hip | Dag

from a ship in the Port

ef London Docks with - E t
what looks like little or is the most difficult, | or x ra

ceremony, but the staff it is safest in the experi

of the Port of London en:zed hands of the Port | ‘Reliabilit
Authority know the de- of London Authority— y
gtee of care required /sherr it has the added

to handle this valuable czdvantage of reaching

geome eayeupcie’: wickitin Ok sac. ‘DOW DING ESTATES & TRADING (0., LTD.

i i Nii




THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPK SHB 24508



-_



For Births, Marriage er
announcements in Carib
sharge is $3.00 for any number of words}

tp to 50 and 6 cents per word for each |
2508

additional word. Terms cash. Phon-
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

The charge for snnouncements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths,

1 50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays |
fow amy number a! words up to 50, and-
3 cents per word on week-days and)
4 cents per word cn Sundays for each
additional word.



DIED
FORDE—O~ October 3rd, 1951, at her
residence, Horse Hill, St. Joseph,
Beatrice Forde. Age 68. Her fun-,
eral leaves Mrs. Ada _ Holder's’
residence, Horse Hill, at 4.15 p.m.

to-day for St. Joseph Parish Church.
Lisle Holder, Walter Hoider, Clarence
Holder (Nephews Morine Holder
(Niece); S. E. Holder (Brother-in-law).

_
ROBERTS—On October 3rd 1951, at her
residence Silver Sands, Anna Laura
Roberts (better known as Chic)

above residence at 4 p.m. to-day for

Brother Leacock's Mission and thence

to_the Christ Church Cemetery.
Matthias Roberts and family,
Cephas Clarke (Messa).

4.10. 51—In
a
SEALE — On October 3rd, 1951, at her

residence, Spooner’s Hill, Irene Seale,
mother of the late Gladys Seale. Her
funeral leaves the above residence at
415 p.m. to-day for the Christian
Mission, Tudor Street and thence to
the Westbury Cemetery. Friends are
asked to attend.

Doris Seale, Gordon

York), Cyril Seale.

New York Papers Please Copy.

4.10.51.

Seale (New



ce SEs

‘The undersigned beg through this medi: ‘e undersigned beg through this medi-
um to return thanks to all those kind
friends who sent wreaths, letters of
condolence or in any way expressed
their sympathy in our recent bereave- !

ment.
May Clarke, Elize Taylor, Jennie
Goddard, Louise King, Roy Clarke,

Kathleen Lear, Gwen Jones.
4.9.51—In
—————
HASSELL: Through this medium the
undersigned beg to return thanks
to all those kind friends who sent
wreaths, letters of condolence or in
any way expressed their sympathy in
our recent bereavement caused by
the death of Deara Elizabeth Hassell,
(Grandmother) .

The Cole Family 4.10.51—I1n



IN MEMORIAM





ALLEYNE: In loving memory of our

beloved one Cecil W. Alleyne, who | watch
rest on October 4, | basin,

was called to

1948.

Rest eternal grant unto him, O| wire, 100 ft.



Ergagement}
Calling the!

Acknowl- |
etgements, and ‘n Memoriam notices ie;

'

14 burner

|

} current

|

Age 91 years. Funeral leaves the |

j:

ete



and let light perpetual shine | brass ends and other useful items.

Lord,,

upon him (
The Alleyne Family, 4.10 Birla)
GILL—In loving memory of Mix dear

beloved husband and father Fitz Gerald
Gill who died on October 8th, 1949.
The shock was great the blow severe
We never thought that death was near
Only those, who love can tell
The pain of parting without farewell
The Lord has given
The Lord has taken away
TI'ver to be remembered by Iris
Joan, Thelma, Patricia, Hallam,

(wife),
Peterson,

Derniey (children), Albertha Clarke and
Loucretia Bascom (sisters-in-law), and
femily. 9.10.51—1n



PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife BERYL. CHASE
(nee LYNCH) as I do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone alse con-
tracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

TLFRED CHASE,
Nr. Kendal Hill,
Christ Church.



2.10.51—2n





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife LEOMEOME
CHANDLER inee HERBERT) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order

signed by me a
ARTHUR CHANDLER,
Government Hill,
St. Michael,




4.10.51—2n





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife LOUISE
ARTHUR (nee MERRITT) as & do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts in
my name unless by a written order signed

by me
ALLAN ARTHUR,
Haggatt Hall,
St. Michael
4.10.51—2n
————$— —————————
The public are hereby warned against
riving credit to my wife MAUDE
HOLDER (nee COX) as I do not hold

myself responsible for her or anyone
«.se contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed

by me.
VERNON HOLDER,
Todds Corner,
St. Joseph.
4.10,51—2n





See
=

FOR SALE
WORTHY

DOWN
TOP ROCK





Having three bedrooms with
connecting toilets and baths,
lounge-dining room, large
front balconies, breakfast
balcony, modern built - in
kitchen, two-car garage, ser-
vants’ quarters and laundry.
Fully enclosed with all con-
veniences including tele-
phone.

For quick sale — nearest
offer to £4,500 : mortgage
available for half amount.

Apply to

RALPH A. BEARD

\ Lower Bay Street
"Phone 4683
4.10.51.—+4.f.n,







| of the undersigned on Friday Sth Octo-





FOR SALE



Land and Buildings formerly occupied
by the West India Biscuit Co. Ltd.
situated in Spry Street,



For particulars apply to -

RK. R. HUNTE & Co. Lid.

i Lower Broad





FOR SALE



Mininum charge week 72 cents and |
96 cents Nvtuays 4 were. ~ over we!
wns 2 hele 4 word week-—4 cents @

wort on Sundays,

AU TOMO TIVE

CAR. One il) 1949 Hillman Car in good
cond.tion. Phone 2353 cr 5105.
30.9.51—4n

ELECTRICAL

ELECTRIC STOVE: Cne Westinghouse |
with oven, practicaily new
Owner selling because unable to obtain
Dial 5096 4.10.51—In

FURNITURE

STEEL FURNITURE.—Complete range
of steel furniture including Senior and
Junior Executive Desks, Typists Desks,
Stationery Cupboards, Filing Cabinets,
Executive Chairs, Typists Chairs, etc
On display at K. R. HUNTE & Co. Ltd.
New Showroom, Dial—5136. or 5027.

3.10.51—6n.

LIVESTOCK

Thoroughbred Mare—“THE DOVE”, 16
Hends, ner of two races and placed
in nearly) all starts, covered by Jetsam
and believed to be in foal. Owner willing
t» accipt promising 2 Y.O. in exchange
Write A. Abraham—48 Queen Street,
Trinidad. 30.9.51—3n

MISCELLANEOUS
SCALES: 500 1b and 1,000 1b Cake Plat-
form Scales. The General Agency Co.,
B'dos. Ltd. Phone 4517. High St.

4.10. 51—4n

ene SALES

‘en cents per agate line un week-days

and 12 cents per agate line un Sundays,

minimum charge $1.59 on week-daya
and $1.80 on Sundays.

REAL ESTATE

By order of M. M. Abbadi, Esq., I
wili_ sell at 69 Roebuck Street on
THURSDAY 4th October from 11.30 a.m,
the following Glass show case, Wouu-
stock Typewriter, Typewriter desk,
Remington Rand 17 Typewriter, Double !
writing desk with 20 drawers, Phillips 8
tube Radio, Austin 10, (1940) with new
battery, Upright steam boiler, burns oil
or coal, complete aerated water plant
form scale, Football playing machine,
with accessories and spare parts, Plat-
Drum (80 gals.) Lemon grass oll 130
doz. Worcestershire sauce, 1500 French
Face Powder assorted, Carrier Bike,
Vinegar making plant, 1200 Ibs, new
cotton rests and ends, suitable fur clear-
ing machinery, dusting cloths, Galvan-
ised drums, Fancy and Vacuum pan
molasses, Demijohns, breakers, carboys
sealing wax, Plastic necklacts, belts,
buckles. Electro plaited necklaces and
chain lengths, porcelain wash
wood shelvings, tool trunk, flat |
trunk, well conditioned electric
Rubber Hose %” with 2





























cabin

DON'T MISS IT, bargains for every-
one. Terms cash. |

R. ARCHER McKENZIE,
Auctioneer.
27.9.51—4n.
ee
By public competition at the Office

ber 1951 at 2 p.m,
50 B'dos Shipping and Tracing Co
Ltd. Shares.
G. L, W. CLARKE, & Co.,
James Street.
3.10.51—3n.



AUCTION



BARBADOS AD





FOR RENT

HOUSES In Carlisle Bay











eee a Yacht Marsaltese, Sch L le M
CARD Si y . . uci
Paves mae = Su ae eee Smith, Sch. Agustus B. Compton, Sch.
are 3.10.51_-2n Furtie Dove, Sch. Mary M. Lewis, Sch
- as __. | Laudalpha Sch Everdene, Sch. Rosalinc
WALFORD—St. Lawrence (near Cable! fy, MV. Lady Joy, Seh. Mandalay I
Office). From Nov. ist, For information| | punicia. Ss a" M eae
hee te 3.10 51—2n! f Eunicia ch. Marea Henrietta, Sct
Se Lady Noeleen, Seh. Marion Belle Wolfe
wk ile Sd a Sen, Lucille M. Smith
ARRIVALS
PUBLIC NOTICES | 20 6 PENS os so,
Capt. Davis, from St. Vincent
SS Polyriver, 688 tons net, Capt
ant ta em, agate aes aaa Sorrang, from Halifax,
| min 7 renee S.S. Colombie, 7,554 tons net, Capt
om eee 3 on week-days | Dupont trom Martinique
| and $1 on Sundove M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt
Gumbs, from Dominica,
DEPARTURES
} = a OMCE ur _§.S. Colombie, 17.554 tons net, Capt
ARI Dupont, ‘or Trinidad.

| Applications for the post of Nurse at
| the St. Philip's Almshouse will be re-
| ceived by the undersigned up to Tuesday

Passengers
S.S. Cotembie.
From Southampton :

arriving yesterday by the





VOCATE

APPROVED

@ From page 3
}Maintenance expenses would be
.v0 per annum. If it is agreed

hat contributions shoula be
assessed On a population rather
jthan on a “Student basis’, Bar-

bados’ share would be under 6.6%
as Opposed to approximately 7.8%

/on the “Student basis.”
Accordingiy, the Legislative
Council is invited to indicate

whether it agrees in principle
with the proposal to establish a
Club and Centre in London for
West Indian Students and whether
it would be prepared to approve



%th October 1951. Joh ;
| Applicants must be fully qualified as} yZonn, Comber. Ireland, “Harrs “Late, 82d annually recurrent costs.
o Kure and Midwife, with certificates} Pelagia’ Little, Ivy Randall, John Ran.| The Address as passed by the
“a. meee vided Tiby- ‘thin. iebads aan, sae Randall, May Sunderland.| Council reads:
o Oo S$] Henry ucker, Audrey Tucker, Betty ‘ isle C
| $00.00 ber month Arne, William Armstrong, Jacqueline | The Legislative Council
Unitormne, ‘including thoes, and quart-| David, Reginald Johnson, Mildred John-| the honour to acknowledge re-
ers prov son. Patrick Roach, Edith Embereson,| ceipt of Your Excellency’s Message
The successful Candidate must assume | Maude Lawrence, Joseph Maynard, som 28/1951 and to aS wax
| duties on the 25th October 1961 James O'Toole, Sheila O'Toole, Bridget |
oe Toole. Excellency in reply that they
Applications for the post of Junior Nurse | oe os owre : agree in principle with the pro->
att St. Philip’s Almshouse will alsc ur’ essnler. 0! to i a entre
be received by the undersigned up tof tom Dominica : Pi 0 enn eiub Mode . ,
Tuesday 9th October 1951. Emmanu, Bertrand, Georges Bruney ondon for est Indian stu-
Salary attached to this post will be} mis Fandor, Thirza Rose, Shillingford|dents and would be prepared to
fixed between $33.00 and $44.00 per ons Yoeen fauetl | approve a contribution on a stu-
pavciiarmenty soa Keck gy £2 datahan Augustine Alatre, Gaston Athanase, dent basis towards the capital and
Uniforms, including shoes, and quarters | Lowlse Danisa. Renco Narbonnais, Liza| annually recurrent costs.
provided en a Zobda, Gaston Paul. 5. | The Hon'ble the Colonial Sec-
an worbesetal Candidate rage assume wae caving yesterday "by 8.1 retary in moving the passing of
uties “aunt ean we ee Le On Cruise; the Address gave the Council a



E. S. Larrier, Phillips and wife, Marie
Violet Taylor,
Yor Trinidad ;
| Grithth, +. mec Muriel Branch, Murie)
riffit innie Wells, John F, Cameron,
NOTICE | Durham C. Dixie, Kothwright Downes,
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS | Enid Edwards, Geraldine Kellman, Agnes
are reminded of the regular Monthly | Patel, Fatima Patel,
Meeting to be held at the Church House | Fer Jamaica :

Clerk to the Board of Guardians,
St. Philip.
29.9.51-—Tn































on Saturday next October 6, at 12 o’clock F. Skinner, F. Skinner, Fitz G. Green,
The Agenda include Matters of vital | Erville E. Green,
Importance For Dominicay™ —
Please make a special effort to attend. R. Tavernie
F. H. BARKER, a. Sheet
asi Hon. Secretary! In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station
Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd
WANTED advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Station
S.S. Campestre, s.s. Polyriver, 8.8
HELP Stugard, ss. Wilehief, s.s. North
a Haven, 8.8. Seapearl, s.8, Colombie, s,s
STENOGRAPHER & TYPIST: Experi- Aleva Corsair, s.s, Alcoa Polaris, s.8
enced Stenographer and Typist, Apply by | E*re, ss. Citta Di Viareggio,
letter and in person, L. M. B. Meyers & | Urania, ss. Santa Luisa, s.s, Burbank,
Co., Ltd 4.10.51—t.f.n]% 5. Rosario, s.s. Alcoa Puritan, s.s
Esso Knoxville, 8.s. Dolores, s.s. Bacha
en quero, s.s. Liss, Mary Adams, s.%
MISCELLANEOUS Reg.nt Tiger, s.s, Eagle, s.s. Christian
—_——————— 8.8 ntie Dealer, 8.9
TRUCK: One Ford V-8 Model 1946 Tiberius 8.8 ifito, 8.8 Emphe
or 1947 with dual gear. Apply W. B.| Windrush, 5.8 ritish Pilot,
Hutchinson. Dial 4484 30.9. 51—6n .



SEAWELL

ARRIVALS BY B.W.LA.L.
ON TUESDAY
From Trinidad :

M. Taylor, E. Taylor, D, Prazeod,
Todd, E. Tong, U. Tong, V, Prima, G
Charles, D. Knox, P, Knox, W. Nurse, C

A.

3.10.51—t.f.n a rington, V. Bostic, A, Christine,

WANTED TO RENT

BUNGALOW — From beginning of
December to April. Fu'ly furnished two
bedroom bungalow or apartment on sea.
All modern conveniences required. In-
cluding linen, cutlery and china. Apply
to Ralph A. Beard, Lower bay Street
Phone—4683.— Urgent.







aylor, P. Chandler. A. Muller, A. Mul-
ler, T, Muller, T. Muller, O. Mute, D











Duboulay
|

From October 3rd
to October 16th
inclusive



Mails for S$, Lucia by the M.V. La@y

|} Joy will be closed at



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER
By instructions received from
Insurance Co. I will sell on Friday
October Sth at Messrs. Redman & Tay-
lor’s Garage, opposite (Cathedral, St
Michael's Row: (1) 1951 Singer Car; 3
months old; only done 4,000 miles,
(Damaged in accident). Sale at 2 p.m.
Terms Cash. Vincent Griffith, Auc-
tioneer. 30.9.51—4n.

UNDER THE DIAMOND
HAMMER

By instructions received from Mrs
Deighton Sullivan, I will sell at her
residence “Camelot”, Chelsea Road, St.
Michael on Thursday next the 4th
October beginning at 12.30 p.m., her
cutire lot of household furniture which
includes Mahog. Couch, Morris chairs
and Settee with spring-filled cushions,
Rockers and upright chairs, plant stools,
Mahog. tables, Simmons bedstead with
spring, Mahog. wardrobe, nightchair.
cupboard, child's crib, play pen and
cupboard, Mahog. dining table with 4
chairs, china cabinet, sideboard, Prest-
cold Refrigerator, ping press, electric
iron, vacuum cleaner electric washer,
two-burner stove and oven, scales,
kitchen utensils, garden implements,
collection of books, telescope, and many
other tems of interest too numerous to







mention. Terms cash.
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer.
29.9.51—4n.



—_ — ——

ADVERTISE
IN THE



Peers eo ere eee ee

‘,

% “WESTWOOD HIGH

%

SCHOOL”

Jamaica, B.W.1.



&

First Class Boa School
for girls. Want aduate
Headmistress with experi-
ence in Boarding Schools, to
take up duties as early as
possible. 1952, School strong
Christian tradition. Cool
climate. Salary according
to scale. Apply by air mail
‘with “Testimonials etc. to :

Rev. I. C. PARSONS,

Chairman Board of
Governors.

‘ Stewart Toen, P.O.

4.10.51.—2n,





Bridgetown.

Street









Jamaica, B.W.I. 3

:

SPSS OOOO

|

. FLABBERGASTED
|

|

\

|



the Gene

Office as under : enereree
Parcel Mail and Registered Mail jat/9

a.m, Ordinary Mail: at 10 am,

4th October, 1951, ¢

BARBADOS. —_——_—_ ———_————.

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

im pursuance of the Chancery Act 1906, I do hereby giv
having or claiming any estate right or interest to any lien
affecting the property hereinafter mentioned (the property
before me an account of their claims with their witnesses documents and youchers
to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of 12 noon and
3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings, Bridgetown,
before the 2lst day of November, 1951, in order that such claims may be
reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof respectively
otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be
Geprived of all claims on or against the said property

| MAIL NOTICE
|

3.10.51—3n









‘e notice to all persons
or encumbrances in or
of the defendant) to bring

Plaintiff; CLIFTON HENRY WHITE
vs
Defendant: CLARENCE BELFIELD LAYNE

ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Bath Village
(formerly part of the lands of Maxwells plantation) situate in the
parish of Christ Church and island abovesaid containing by ad-
measurement twenty-six perches or thereabouts (inclusive of three
perches in roadway) abutting and bounding on lands formerly of
Bertina Miller but now of F. Clarke, on lands formerly of Maxwells
Plantation but now of A, B. Skinner and 8. Kinch on lands formerly
of Joshua Bourne but now of Graeme Hall Co. and on the public
road or however else the same abut and bound together with the
messuage or dwelling house called ‘‘Esme" and other the, erections
and buildings both freehold and chattel on the said land eree and
built standing and being with the appurtenances, es
August 1951,

PROPERTY:

Bill filed:

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrat-in-Chancery.

ARE

AT THE

GENUINE KNOCKED DOWN
PRICES at THe BIGGEST EVER

Knock-out
SALE

Now in Full Swing at.. .

THANI BROS.

Dial 3466
3® Free Gifts for those who spend $5.00 and over

Pr. Wm. Henry Street _

.—Thousands are taking advantage of this SALE !
What about YOU ? ?

rane

99

—_





% clarke, N. Vaughn, Rev. Vaughn, P.
SS | Garsonnin.
DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA.L.
| KINGSLEY | Yor Trinidad ;
.| Willy Lutz, Chuma Averboukh, Chi
RESIDENTIAL on Avec oukh, Homaid wenn i |
CLUB Pierre, intfred Gittens, David Lue, |
| Phyllis Lue, nee Ahong, Winsome Ber-
;amsingh, Hugh Webber, Stella Webber,
e Harold Bagot
For St. Lucia;
Closed | Elsie Mullins, Sylvia Mullins, Frances
Mondesir, Everton Clairmonte, Andre
































background of the project saying

| that the students expressed desire
to have the centre which would
include a library, reading room,
bar, kitchen and a room for sport,
etc.

Uniformity

He said that the Message had
\§ suggested that Barbados’ contribu-
| tion would either be on a student
| basis or a population basis. He
had not very strong views on that
| part of the matter, but he thought
| that as the Other Place had passed
| the Address to the Governor
pointing out that the proposal must
be on a student basis, he thought
that the Council would stick to
that for the sake of uniformity.

Hon'ble Mr. Evelyn said that the
centre might be a \good thing, but
one point that should not be for-
gotten was that being a member
}of a club, would add slightly to
\the students cost of tiving.

Hon'ble Mr. Gale said that whiie
he agreed to the principle of the
Address, it did seem to him that
jvhen students go abroad, they
should not be segregated, He felt
that they should mix more with
people of other nationalities.







COCFSD

He knew that the first couple
| of weeks the students would be
| lonely, but looking at the mat-
ter from a broad point of view,














| 1

IMPORTANT
To Ges Consumers,
Dear Friends,

It is expected to turn on
the supply of Neat Natural
GAS on the night of Octe.
ber 10th. Every effort will
be made to cause as little |
inconvenience as possible to
consumers. A_ portion of
jets will be changed for
each customer before the
turn over and the remainder
afterwards.

Schedule of rates will be
forwarded as quickly as pos-
sible,






We remain,
Always at Your Service,
THE BARBADOS GAS

co, LTN.



milling experience

to be
outweigh
cost.

He said that having the centre
for these students, was not a ques-
a col i i tion of West Indians being segre-
a Contre eeneree, Wr aaeente gated although he agreed with the
Hon'ble Mr. Gale that they shouk
mix with other people.
have that it would be a good thing fo
them to have this place, becaus«
could meet fellow West In-
dians and discuss problems con
cerning the West Indies.

he thought

gated.

Hon’ble Dr. Cato said that witi
point
Evelyn, he agreed tha
centre would
the cost a/ living, but the benefit:
derived from it would fa.
question of

rugard to

Hon'ble Mr.

having a

they

that the students!
should mix with the people and
learn something
rather than have them segre-

any

PAGE SEVEN



Harbour Log' W.1. STUDENTS CENTRE | 8HIPPING NOTICES



MONTREAL, AUSTRaLlA, NEW
ZEAIAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A NZ. Line)

CCC



“Port ADELAIDE”
from Hobart September

s.s
interesting] to sai!

is scheduled
25th,



LLLP SE EO

Melbourne October 4th, Sydney October The a V “CARIBBEE” will. ac-
10th, Gladstone October iéth, Port Alma re argo pd pace on:
October 20th, Brisbane October 27th, hoses ona se Sere ne on.
arriving at Trinidad about November day Sth October =. ing »
Zist and Barbados November Mth. 7s aaee. .
In addition to general cargo this
made by vessel has ample space for chilled and BW. SCHOONER OWNERS’
hard frozen cargo. ASSOCIATION (INC)
increase Cargo accepted on through Bills of as

Consignee, Tele. No.

Lading for transshipment at Trinidad to
Eritish Guiana, Leeward and Windward
islands.
For further particulars apply—
FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD.,
DaCOSTA & CO. LTD.,
Trinidad,
B.W.I,

extn
anc

Barbados,
B.W.I.

He fel









Future Leaders ’ mone NEW *¥YORK SERVICE
He took that view especiall,]| S.S. “MARIO C.” salis 1st October arrives Barbados 13th Oct., 1951
because the West Indians who are] 4 STEAMBR sails 12th October arrives Barbados 23rd October, 1951
being educated England a 2 eae” Pea — " wet
present would the men anc NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

women who would be guiding th

future of the West Indies and thr
would come when the West
Indians would think of this cen-
as Demerarians or Trini-
dadians or Barbadians, but as West

time
tre, not

Indians.

He felt that it was a very
laudable idea and personally did

| mot see any objection to it. He
lived in England as a student

S.S. “ALCOA PURITAN” sails 12th September

5.8. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE” sails 26th Sept

A STEAMER sails 10th October arrives Barbados
A ee neem

CANADIAN SERVIUK

arrives Barbados 1ith
arrives Barbados Lith
25th October, 1961

SOUTHBOUND

Name of Ship Sails Montreal Salls Halifax

I
“ALCOA PILGRIM" due Barbados September 17th
and St. Lawrence River Ports

s.s Sallis for St

and would have welcomed the

existence of such a centre in his

time.

Hon'ble
the
and

Hutson
remarks of Hon'ole Dr. Cato
that West
students who were not actually in

suggested

These vessels have limited passenger accommodation



supported

Indian

London but might be elsewhere in

England should be allowed to be-

members of ei |
|
ih
Ii
| (

come associate

club.

a a a a a a ae
. USED POSTAGE STAMPS

fountain

Box

3 $9596495656666664466000
siiieedatahediubies anand OCH OO SOOO OOOO SOOO OOOS

MAVE YOU PLACED
YOUR ORDER FOR
*. MASSEY HARRIS
HEAVY DUTY
DIESEL TRACTOR ?

Shipments are once again coming forward and

you are advised to book early.

NOTE SOME OF THE MAIN FEATURES

42 B.H.P. PERKINS Heavy "uty
Diesel Engine

Replaceable

Press button

5 forward speeds

Belt Pulley & Power Take-off

Lights

Hour-meter

Steel wheels are obtainable for ploughing

really heavy going

SF

oe









OGILVIE

ANNIVERSARY



“CANADIAN QUEEN”

Predetermined quality FLOUR
backed by 150 years of flour

Prompt cash paid for used stamps,
handise such as
meras,

If you wish,



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Send 200 oy more stamps

DAYTON STAMP COMPANY,
128, Centerville, Ohlo U.S.A

6 cyl.
"oretaet liners

whilst for

are available,

THE TROUBLE-FREE TRACTOR -- BACKED
BY OUR SERVICE ORGANISATION

PSCC DALAM CLG



AT LENGTH AND AT LAST

we are in a position to offer
SAIL CANVAS NO. | THROUGH TO NO. 9

clothing,
exchange



4.10. 51-—1n



Your enquiries are invited!

COURTESY
GARAGE

ROBERT THOM LIMITED.—Agents.

tarter

“half-tracks”

White Park Road = ::: Dial 4616







1951

From the New Royal Mill of
The Ogilvie Flour Mills Co.,
Ltd. at Montreal — Canada's
Most Modern Mill, direct to
your Wholesaler Grocer and

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THE OGILVIE FLOUR MILLS, Co., Ltd.

ROBERT

MONTREAL, CANADA
THOM

LIMITED = Agenis

POS



Octs
Oet.,





2991.
195

S.S. “ALCOA PEGASUS" September 7th
8.8. “ALCOA POINTER” September 28th September 30th October 10th
S.S. “ALCOA PEHLGRIM" October 12th October 15th October 25th



Arrives Barbadoy - —
September 10th September 20ta -



John, N.B

ee

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE

el CENTRAL. FOUNDRY LTD. — PIER HEAD

SIE,
PLAY







ort vrs uted,
PAGE EIGHT

Fifth Regatta
Won By

Vameoose

(By Gur Yachting Correspondent
Vamoose scored anowier vicwry,
beating the second boat by two
minutes, when the Fifth Trial
Regatta im preparation for the
Intercolonial ‘Tornado Yachting

Series in Trinidad was sailed in
Carlisle Bay on Monday (Bank-
Holiday) at 10.30 a.m, The sixth
and final race was scheduled to
take place in the afternoon at

3.30 o'clock but owing to the
very light wind this had to be
postponed.

Teddy Hoad, skippering

Vamoose, was again exception-
ally good at the helm. He steered
Vamoose into the lead between
the western mark and the buoy,
coming up from fifth position.
Gerald Nicholls at the helm ot
Cyclone also gave a good per
formance. Cyclone sailed steadily
throughout and, along with
Vamoose, will most likely make the
Trinidad tour,

Ten boats started. They sailed
north about in the light wind and
calm sea. At the start Comet,
skippered by George Allen, went
into the lead. Tempest was next.
followed by Vamoose, Cyclone,
Thunder, K. 36, skippered by Tom
Wilkinson, Edril, Zephyr, Break-
away and Swansea. Cyclone soon
passed out Vamoose, Tempest and
Comet and went into the lead. She
was first around the Bay Street
mark, followed by Tempest second
and Thunder third. Edril was now
in fourth position.

Cyclone kept the lead and wa
first around the western marl
bout ten seconds ahead of Thun-
cer which had overtaken Tempes..
Teddy Hoad, by some clever
tacking, took the lead on the run
to the buoy. Vamoose was first
to complete the first round about
25 seconds ahead of © Cyclone,
second. Zephyr was now third, a
few seconds behind Cyclone. Next
was Tempest, then Thunder,
Edril. Swansea, Comet, Break-
away and K. 36.

Increases Lead

Vamoose increased her lead.
When she was completing the
ge¢ond round, Cyclone, whicn was
sull second, was routding the
puoy. Vamoose completea tnis
round over a minute ahead of
Cyclone. Third was Zephyr, 40
seconds behind Cyclone. founder
passed 35 seconds later, followed
py Tempest, Edril, Swansea,
Breakaway, Comet and K. 36.

Vamoose went out to lead
around the Bay Street mark. It
was while Swansea, skippered by
Noc, “mptage, was going around
this that she overturned. It took
many seconds before the crew
got her again on even keel.
Breakaway and Comet took this
opportunity to pass her out but
she managed to join the race
again before K,. 36 could get
ahead of her.

It could now be clearly seen
qhat the race was going to
Vamoose. She went even farther
into the lead. She quickly got

und the buoy and went on to
defeat Crclone! second, by two
minutes and 20 seconds, Zephyr,
which also sailed steadily, was
third, 30 seconds behind Cyclone.
Thunder was fourth, beating
Earil, fifth, by about ten seconds.
The others, in order, were Tem-
pest, Breakaway, Swangea, K. 36

Comet. :
anne sixth and final race will
now be sailed on Sunday morn-
ing at 10.30 o'clock. After this
it will be known which three
boats will visit Trinidad, From
what I read in the Guardian the
Tyinidadians are anxiously look-
ing forward to the tour and hope
to make it a yearly feature. Next
year the series are expected to

take place here.

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Police Courts — 10 a.m.

Court of Original Jurisdic-
tion — 10.68

Camera Club

a.m,
Exhibition at

Barbados Museum — 10.00
a.m. :
Combermere Old Boys’

Cricket Match at Comber-
mere — 1.30 oe iis
bile Cinema iv
agnor at Oldbury Planta-
tion Yard, St. Philip —

7.30 p.m.
NEMAS
Ps Foolish Heart” and

1 oe 6.45

GLOBE:
“Marsha! of Mesa City
pm, and 8.15 p.m.

PLAZA (Bridgetown): Ms

’ Widow of Wagon Gap
“Boss of Boomtown’ —
m. and 8.15 p.m. . a

ony MPIC. “Zorros Black Whip
and “In The Navy" — 4 30 p.m,
and 8.15 p.m

RUXY: “Wolf Man” and “Black
Narcissus” — 4.30 p.m and
8.15 p.m.

ROYAL: “T-Men” and “Law of
The Lash” — 4.30 p.m. and 8.15

“Wistfal
and
4.45

an Sd ”
ghrine : “Bird of Paradise’ —

4.30 p.m. and 8.15 p.m.
“Elizabeth of

PLAZA (Oistin) =
Ladymeade” — 5.00 p.m. and
8.30 p.m.



‘They'll Do I

























HELLO
UH-WHERES
AR. DILLBERRY &
NOT SICK IS HE $
HE SAID HE'D BE
READY TO PLACE

NZ





minutes to complete.
soon overfell Barbados.
brilliant one-handed piece of field-
ing by Persaud at cover resulted
in Proverbs being run out, Smith
powerfully past
short extra cover and the batsmen
attempted a single
covering
down fielding with ome hand and
returning to Gaskin.

ciove

Persaud

powerfully
for a single opening his account,
but edged high through the slips
off Gaskin soon after barely miss-
ing Camacho’s hand, Smith play-
ing grand cricket hit Gaskin wide
ef midon skilfully placing through
then
straight drove two balls later for
piloting his
individual score to the seventies.

the

another

who had been

t Every Time
. G7 ints sais)

IS NO LONGER,

WITH THE FIRM»
YOU_CAN LEAVE



SERLIN:
two teams of riders, consisting of a goalkeeper, a left and right back and three forwards, fight for the

outsize airfilled leather ball, which has to be pushed forward by the horses’ legs.



this soccer match on horseback at the Olympic Stadium, British sector.

@ trom page 1.
Proverbs Run Out
The century had _ taken

Gaskin
but
beautifully

The batsmen
fielded

hesitated
and

man in
to extra

next
down

Farmer

two onside fieldsmen,

boundary

Smith had a life at 74 when
steping out to slow spinner Patoir
he drove high and straight

Leslie Wight at long-off the latter

putting down a sitter.

Unperturbed Smith soon tucked
slow spinner Seaforth
the pad to backward
for three making his
80 and the total

130,
Smith Bowled

But without addition, Smith in
the next over from Patoir jumped
down the wicket und had a good
swing at one that beat bim through
the air, then also beat him with
the break back from leg, bowling

him meek and crop for 80,

Smith’s batting was an excellent

and promising effort, playing
erisp and confident strokes with
graceful fluency, His innings

lasted exactly three hours and he
hit ten fours,

Marshall now partnered Farmer
batting 45 minutes
for 13 runs. Marshall punished a
short ball from Patoir with a hara
pull to the long on boundary for
four.

131/4/80,

Behind Clock

Barbados was now well behind

the clock, 150 coming in 211
minutes,

Farmer forsook his patient role,
smashing a pile drive to
long on boundary § making
score 24, but without addition

drove back hard to Patoir

carpet.

Persaud the

who bowled

ever before lunch with success in
the first Test was brought on in
the last over but one before lunch.

The erowd cheered as this was
stpposed to have some psycholog-
Marshall
destroyed the bogey with two hard
feurs to the on boundary and a
single while Farmer scored a sin-
gie tor making a total of terptaken
off the over. Marshall was now in
‘he twenties and Farmer celebrat-

ical significance. But



YESTERDAY’S
WEATHER REPORT

From Codrington
Rainfall: .17 ins.
Highest Temperature

865° F,

Lowest Temperature :
12.5° F.
Wind Velocity : 5 miles per

hour
Barometer : (9 a.m.) 29.935
(3 p.m.) 29.865





THE NEW Uy
GUY, WOULDN'T
GIVE HiS MOTHER
AN ORDER FOR
~_ CATNIP =

143
But disaster

Another the Barbados’

Persaud
swooped

when
Proverbs
trying to regain his ground was
tun out by yards, 102/3/19,

high

drove

cover Farmer

stroke for four as well, then back
drove to extva cover for a single
sending up 200 runs in 241 min-

neatly off
square leg
own scére

who
put a high chance down on the



THAT SALESMAN HAS
HIS COMMISSION SPENT
ALREADY BUT THE :
ONLY ORDER DILLY
IS GIVING OUT NOW
IS *GO AWAY AND
LET ME SLEEP’

2nd B.G.—Barbados Test |

ed his own entry in the thirties by
pulling an offbreak
forth high to the deep square leg

from Sea-
boundary. Luncheon interval saw
score at 177/4,
Farmer 35 not out, Marshall 20

not out,
After Lunch
Rain during terval cut fifteen minutes off

playing time but the wicket was

covered and only the outfield was
dampened. Marshall too entered

his thirties soon after the game
restarted lifting Norman Wight
to the unpoliced long-on
boundary for four and the Bar-
bados_ total reached the 190’s.
brought off a_ similar

utes.

Later Farmer twice drove Pa-
toir, down to the long off bound-
ary off powerful strokes off the
back foot afid completed his im-
dividual half century in 90 min-
utes batting, hitting five fours.

Gaskin ‘took the new ball him-
self and Marshall greeted his
first delivery which was short
with a hook to the square leg
boundary for four. Next over,
however Marshall was out to
Gaskin in the leg trap. He turn-
ed. one that swung outside the
pad for Wight at first leg slip to
make a good catch to dismiss
him. Marshall was at the wicket
batting freely, hitting six fours
in his 69 minute stay.

216—5—43

Atkinson partnered Farmer and

the latter_.was almost out to

Gaskin, in the leg trap too. He
he pads but the

too turned one off
ball fell a few inches from Ca-
macho’s outstretched hand,

Farmer off drove for a brace
making the score 219 removing
the threat of a follow-on, With
the score at 228 and Farmer’s
individual score at 56 Farmer was
stricken with cramp and had to
retire to the pavilion, Walcott
filling the breach.

Farmer walked off the field
unaided so it seemed as if it was
quite possible for him to return
later in the batting order.

Walcott dispelled any fears of
falling a victim again to Gaskin’s
leg trap since the ball was still
new and still swinging and Gas-
kin was still bowling inswingers.
He cover dtove for two then

is “wept Gaskin to the pull bound-

ary for four and later neatly late
cut another Gaskin delivery for
four. He hit the second six of
the match when in the same over
he lifted another ball from Gas-
kin high over the long-on bound-
ery.

This sent up 250 im 3806 min-
utes and took Waleott into the
twenties. The next ball Gaskin
flighted well and Walcott hit out
again but he skied to mid-on,
Gaskin had no orthodox mid-on
set and Seaforth at backward
mid-on could not cover ground,

Walcott late cut for four off
Norman Wight, the ball going
down to deep third man but was
eut the next ball when in get-
ting back on to the wicket to late
éut in the direction of third man
he hit the wicket too in making
the stroke.

Walcott had scored 30 in 29
minutes and his innings included
one six and three fours.

267—6—30

Wood partnered Atkinson help-
ing himself to a lofty four off
Patoir but later skied the same
bowler dangerously near Thomas
fielding at dcep mid-on.

Next over from Wight, Atkin-
son was beaten and bowled with
a well pitched off break.

Atkinson had been batting for
69 minutes.

218 —I—18

Greenidge next man in was

_ By Jimmy Hatlo |
GI)







THAT GUY TOOK
DILLBERRY OUT TO
LUNCH SO OFTEN
HIS WALLET
BURPS!













{HAS His Own |
PALS TO WORK |
HIS LITTLE



Sat
xe ely

»

Warcuine THE GALES-
MAN'S 6-MONTHS’ SPADE
WORK GO IN THE ASHCAN=
a wv
=| THANX TO LARRY LOVELL,
5126 M€& DONALD AVE
MONTREAL CAN,






tennessee
given
crowd after singling off the first
breaking his
run of ducks. Tea interyal soon
after saw Barbados score 282—7,
Wood 11 not out, Greenidge 1 not

ball

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Something new jin “soccer” is demonstrated by West Berlin police on horseback. The

The police will stage

—Eupress.



Sports Window
WATER POLO

The two water polo games
at the Aquatic Club this
afternoon are Swordfish vs.
Harrison College and Whip-
porays vs. Flying Fish. Play
begins as soon after 4. 45
o’clock as possible.

The Swordfish—Harrison
College fixture is the decid-
ing game for the league
Cup. Whichever team scores
an outright victory wins the
Cup. If the match is a draw
‘Swardfigh, will still have
one point more than Har-
rison College, so the Col-
Jegians must win or lose the
Cup.

a great ovation by

from Wight

out.

game restarted.

After Tea

Greenidge had a life with his
score at a single soon after the
I He drove out at
Wight who did not get well over
the ball putting up a dolly catch
to Gibbs at mid-off but the lat-

ter dropped an easy catch.

held by Umpire Gillette.
93—8—

innings

ley from Patoir to the mid-on buco eAeplcsusime etnias 8 rroken had raised the ‘queshan
boundary for 4 sending up 300 Weigh 2 oat Or 4 omyrehensive insurance
in 365 minutes. — scheme and that was a seheme
Greenidge batting more con- Goskt e uw OR 7 which had to be brought in by

fidently took several singles with Thomas... “o's 1 3 Government,
late cuts then on-drove Patoir Seaforth .......... 15 4 26 © The Bill was then passed.
for four, N. Wight i Moe 4

Farmer alto on-drove Wight tor ita’ ccs 8

four but was nearly out to Wight
He attempted to hit
out, then stopped the stroke half-
way, cocking the ball to mid-off.
Gaskin made a good effort get-
ting one hand to

next over.

11

Farmer 56 not out resumed his
Walcott as
runner. Farmer lifted a half vol-

earrying in

fail holding it.

added nine runs before he drove chosen to represent the Present foreign currency between Bel-
out to Thomas not getting well boys who will play Past boys at sium, Western Germany and
over the ball, raised it into the Combermere School today at 1.30 South America. ,

safe waiting hands of Persaud 9.m.:—Grant, G. N. (Capt.) Wil- Werner Aprath, Director of

Farmer was than 65 runs. He

at cover.



Satake ed anda quarter hours Maxwell, W. W., Lewis, K. H., customs men, arrested an uniden-
Pare ‘3 and hitting eight fours, Francis; .L.. G., King, N. M., tified man at Roettgen, trying to
a 333—9—7 Beckles, H. O. and Fields, R. A. cross the Belgian border with 600
Hintder’. laats <1 ; Old Boys are invited to tea at carats of diamonds hidden in

r vost -man in late cut bookends with hollow bases in his

Gaskin courageously for a brace


















nutne A 4
LLLP LCE CLV PELL SED

Parmer had been at the wicket

—————<—$

AVE

SHEPHERD |

& Co,, Ltd.

10—13, Broad St.

J& R BAKERIES

VBE OLIODEA OOOH
POS DISCOS

FSIOSS

the

A
snick by Greenidge through slip
for a single sent up Wood to face
Wight but the former played back
to an off-break was struck on the
pad, and a Lb.w. appeal was up-

the ball, but

Such natural beauty with
products by

morny.



SOO OSS COCO R OS OG) 606646660906"



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1051.













Chase Holds Meeting x 4 =
a > . >|
X 4 . ~ ,
@ From page 5 business he sold rice at a penny a] D A N G E y BARBADOS LABOU R {

taken from members of the pint. He believes that his exp- $ At %! PARTY
present Government, has power erience in that line of business] ¥ . i
io allow anyone to deposit three would be of benefit to the people.| THE BARBADOS 3 | Will Hold A
months water rates and then have He has got 30 years experi- $ AQUATIC CLUB 3 |
water put in under reasonable ence supplying foodstuff to the! ¥ (Members Only) 3 |
térms. “Why this Act has not people who canaoct afford heavy |¢ On f 4
been mentioned to you by the spending. His building up came 3 ‘ ‘ >|
yarious politicians is a mystery trom the people and if he got into] & Saturday, October 6th, >|
ierme,” he said. the House of Assembly he would | % 9.00 p.m, ys.

“If the Government wants to do everything in his power to re- > ¥ ||
give water to you at 25 cents per ciprocate by helping them in|S Musie by Mr. Sydney Niles | i
month it could do it. If they can- eyery way possible. He respect-|% and thie Gbchent % | 3
iot get water for you, yOu come fully asked that they give him al # 8B A See | Near
to me and I will show you how chance as one of their “epresenta- > \ } ST. GEORGE'S
to get it,” he said. ‘ _. tives to show if he has the qual-| ¢ Members are cordially CHURCH

He sgid that he had noticed in jties to carry out the promises ne invited Se: Canoe
the newspaper that from January jas so solemnly made. (Free: Ad to St. George
next the price of rice will be going He said that the programme x al ues On
wp to 11 cents per pint, “rice, an which the Electors Association is| % ‘ Friday Night. 5th Oct
item which is a necessity on the going to put forward is not yet % 4.10.51.—3n. riday . ight, 5t ; 0-
menu of our homes.” completed. It might be disclosed | ¥ ber, 1951, at 8.00 o'clock

He said that it was sad that no- shortly.

body in Government could think
of some method in which to keep
down some of the rise in the cost
of rice. There has been established
for a long time an Equalised
Scheme. There are lots of food-
staff which are not as necessary
ag rice. This scheme provided that
efter these goods have arrived in
the island the cost could go up.
This profit could, along with the
sum given by the House of Assem-
bly for subsidisation, keep down
some of the rising price of rice.
He said that when he first started

Mr. C. G. Elder acted as Chair-
man. Other speakers were Mr.
G. Foster and Mr. Yarde. Mr. S.
Skinner moved a vote of thanks.

Play Field Enquiry

@ From page 4
these observations indicate that Mr.
Tudor was completely at a loss for
even a plausible reason for ignor-
ing the directions of the Vestry.
He knew quite well that the grant
from the Labour Welfare Fund
had been made to the Vestry, that
audited accounts of expenditure
had to be furnished by the Vestry,
and that the Vestry and not the
Governor or the Governor-in-
Executive Committee was respon-
sible for expenditure on the Play-
ing Fielq and the pavilion. Mr.
Tudor would like the Commission
to believe that he yielded to the
blandishments of the Acting Gov-





to open his account.

Greenidge late cut too beauti-
fully, to make his score 25 the
crowd applauding the quarter
century, sympathetic ever since
he broke the spectacle spell.

Greenid, ad the luckiest
break of his short career. Holder
drove out hard, Gibbs fielding
magnificently at extra-cover and
catching Greenidge yards down
the wicket but Thomas dropped
the ball and pulling up wic-
ket stump without the ball still
gave Greenidge another chance
to. regain the crease. The score
was then 338, still 30 runs behind
British Guiana’s first innings
total. Holder sent the Barbados
score into the 340’s with a power-
ful on drive off Gaskin.

Barbados’ innings closed for 343
soon after this when Holder lifted
one from Thon.as high overhead
and Gibbs running from extra
cover took a magnificent running
catch to dismiss him. Score read
343, Holder 10 while Greenidge
carried out his bat for 25 runs.
The time was then 4.15 and the
innings had lasted 415 minutes.

.G.’s SECOND TRY

is not now in Barbados and was

cause he felt that the Acting Gov-
ernor controlled the purse strings
and could influence the grant of
extra money from
Welfare Fund.

@ Continued To-morrow



Pension Claims

@ From page 3
person who went for it in case
there was no relative.

Mr. A. EK. S. Lewts said that a
glance through the Order paper
would show that no Honourable
Member had notified Government
to do that about which they were
just speaking. It was a really

|

ernor (unfortunately Mr. Perowne % KINDNESS

not available as a witness) be-'}



|



In support of the
candidature of

MR. FB. MILLER
AND
MR. BE. W. BARROW

Speakers :

Mr. G. H. ADAMS, M.C.P.
Dr. H. G. CUMMINS, M.C.P.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT, M.C.P.
Mr. R. G. MAPP, M.C.P.
Mr. F. E. MILLER, M.C.P.
Mr. E. W. BARROW, B.Sc.
Mr. E. HOLDER

Mr. J. C. TUDOR, M.A.

»

LEPC LEOOPESS",

CALLING
ALL SCOUTS

























4,

POOPIE E PLP PLESSIS

-

s

x BARBADOS
x TO ELECTORS
the Lavour/® =» ANIMALS ASSOCIATION

By
SGT. MAJOR
Cc. F. TORREZAO

POLITICAL
MEETING

TO-NIGHT

On

x
v
x
At
Scout Headquarters
Friday, 5th October







Bir he ge, roe 7 RS vital thing they were talking At 6.00 p.m. 8 O'CLOCK
facing Marshall on-drove the fret {DOU =, {04 pension Wii) WO." f seauennonnemonononnee At
a © four and later singled and Te? :

ta . people’s door. : > =
ee oe, me ee He said that he would have| BARBA SP ( A LOWER DAYRELLS
against light. B.G.’s . liked to hear the Senior Member, DOS .
Wight 5 oak and! Gibbs 0 not hab for St. Andrew saying that instead ory ROAD





BG. a pines Innings ..,..... 368 of keeping people in the factory
thados — First Innings , g a 2
ayior cb. Wisht b Gukin’... 4 Until they got too old and me
unte c wk. Jordan b N. Wight 16 turn them on Government, e
mith b Patoir . #0 would put aside something to
Proverbs Pubsalh 6 akcuae. 19 give them
‘armer c Persaud b depo Sere ai, i
arshall ¢ L. Wight b Gaskin .... 43. Mr. W. W. Reece (E) said that
re HL wlan S waiaal dick .... 18 he agreed it was a matter of vital
vale it wkt. b Wight ........ 30 i a 2 ie a
Wood Ibw .b Wight ees a and he bel _ vor
ogbidae not out 25 7overnment was conscious 0! at.
folder ¢ Gibbs b Thomas .... 9 The second last member who had







Smuggler Held

COLOGNE, Oct. 3.
West German
announced on Wednesday
had smashed a big

Old Boys’ Match
At C’bermere Today

The following team has been

kinson, O. H., Alleyne, I. McD.,
Licorish, L. E., Brathwaite, L. K.,

4 p.m. and cocktails at 6 p.m.

Subscriptions will be $1.00. car.—U.P.

including
Baby Powder
in boxes with
puff,

Tins of Talcum, Bath Salts, Boxes of Soap
(3 cakes each) Hand Cream.



And for men there are Shaving Bowls.



It’s Delighthul!!

NICE SPECIAL
SLICES OF
PUDDINGS :

te S SLPS oP ate

? 344, OO COOOOOCCOCOOLw"

PISSISSOSSS PLESSIS

customs police
they
smuggling
ring which funnelled $20,000,000
worth of diamonds, narcotics and

Cologne City Finance Department
said the ring was uncovered when

BAKED BY % |

OCP VOGOT,

-































ST. FRANCIS DAY
October 4th

Christ Church
In support of the



BRIDGE AND CANASTA
QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE,
4.00 P.M.

candidature of

Messrs. Fred Goddard,
M.C.P.



Special Children’s Pro-
gramme produced by
Auntie Betty from RE-
DIFFUSION at 6.00 p.m.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5TH
4.30 P.M.
CHILDREN’S CONCERT

AND
W. W. Reece, M.C.P.



Speakers :
At Sata y ie
QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE Messrs, F. ©. Goddard, M.C.P.
Tickets (Reserved) 1/6
from Mr. Arthur, Bay Street
Boys’ School
Admission 1/- (Adults)
6d. (Children)

W. W. Reece, M.C.P.
E. D. Motiley, M.C.P.

L. E. R. Gill, M.C.P.



BRITISH COUNCIL

Hi. A. Dowding, M.C.P.
presents
over REDIFFUSION at 9.00

‘ Rev. Vineent Griffith
p.m. a Programme of Music,

Prose and Verse connected
with

ANIMALS

Sydney Walcott
Miss L. Reid



N.B.—Will Bridge and and others
Canasta players please bring
their own Cards, Pencils and } 4.10.51.—1n:

Markers ?

YES

We have just received - - -



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