Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text




avbades Ge Advorate

ESTABLISHED 1895 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 22, 1951 PRICE : FIVE

JAMAICA DEATH TOLL REACHES 155

H URRICANE HEADING | sealed FIGHTING AMMASSADOR Agricultural Instructor
FOR MEXICAN COAST — Tells Of Jca Hurricane

(From Our Own Correspondent & U.P. Tt"
KINGSTON, Jamaica, ri 21 H E P « MR. C. A eae Peasant Agricultural
BY LATE AFTERNOON TODAY 155 persons! X-rFremiuer sha See aee We "cue in on the fae puaeaae tan

were known to be dead as a result of the biggest} CQharoed With Palisadoes
hurricane in Jamaica’s history which smashed the £ Mr. Beckles, who attended a course in Co-operatives

: : ; T Js ° at the University College of the West Indies, was stayin;
south coast of the island on Friday and immense aking Bribes | at “Irvine Hall’, on the grounds of the College, at the time
damage throughout the island to crops, buildings,

of the hurricane. It was the first time he had ever ex

















and services is now estimated at $80,000,000 (W.I. naib TOKYO, August 21, } perienced a hurricane and he told the Advocate yesterday : ‘
money). was "7 haves ; tormaliy’ anars ' “I thought I could imagine before what a hurricane would

be like, but the experience surpassed anything Pimagined.

Deseribiig the mornag pelore, sae whole day on-.Saturday at the
the hurricane, which was the] College except for a walk he took
morning of Friday, August 17,]/ into the neighbouring village of
Vr. Beckles said ‘It openec | Papine. “At Papine houses were
with heavy showers of rain which | °Xtensively damaged. Several

ntinued for the greater part otf vere wooden structures and must
the morning, By 10.00 a.m. how-| ®@ve been reduced to ruins withir

Thousands are still homeless, and Port Royal,|°*Pti"s bribes totalling 2,000,000

: yen, as the head of Japan’s fourtt
the famed buccaneer city, Morant Bay, the capital] pst war Government He ae
of St. Thomas Parish was blown flat, while the city |P°°\" | with 37 other defendants

n the Tokyo district court for

of Kingston suffered damage to buildings, wharves, | tria!
warehouses and services estimated at $65,000,000.) There have been mere than twe































more than two-thirds the total island damage. years of preliminary hearings ever the rain had ebatea and un! 2 Short time, Among these were
oink His cabinet fell as soon as the intense heat which had been en vo shops. At another shop, whict
The Government, acting speed- 7 charges came to licht veloping the St. Andrew and ethe. | “85 Partly damaged, there was a
ily with hurricane relief measures, } r , ia low-lying ¢ if ong queue waiting to purchas
- : > prosec s accuse ow . &@ parts of the island fo ;
is housing the homeless, providing Egy pt Plans To eo DI ers accused the ex- nay Ghee nteolmuate Gael at i ooustuffs which were being sold
food, and clothes, while the work E a l eae ibe a ' Bia Rie ted as 1,000,000 | woxst through a window These luck.
of reorganisation proceeds | ne irc e British ee coe am ee of er “The stmosphere os bai iess geen aed have ot lude
a. hice - a s anec y} a -onstruction ? , . ' > Ww 1 t ake )-
It is now clear that banana ;? . x firm to the Goverkinent Yoshida Sugar Ray Robinson was presented with a scroll for his Goodwill Ambassador work. New York's ind still, Overhead were masse es st “puch: my weend as all
cultivation throughout the island} (zarrisons In Suez allegedly’ took: aliather 1,000,00 Mayor Vincent Impellitterie, holds up Sugar Ray’s hand in token of his sporting spirit throughout 1? heavy black clouds. Shortly tHosa-who ‘tas: awe Qe? thelr
has been destroyed almost totally; yen from a Pninher of his 'Serno- Europe, where he fought to earn Money for cancer projects and acted as a good will ambassador fox before sunset an unusual purplist eas during the husein ane.” :
heavy damage has also been done ALEXANDRIA, Aug. 21. cratic Party who —w ere cee American ideals. With him proudly holding the scroll are his wife and mother...BXPRESS low could be seen in the sky. Ar{ Mr. Bec vp went bo: Kingston
to cocoanuts and other crops, al-;} Informed sources said that the special favours.—U.P. a - . — _ _ ~ {mosphere of tenseness and ex in Sunday morning to make en-
though the main force of the'!FEgyptian War and Marine Minis- “ e { pectaney could be felt By 2.0C]} juiries about his passage to Bar-
hurricane was confined to St.{try plans to encircle British gar- ‘ 1 } U. N. Forees p.m, mort of the business places | sados He was due to return to
Thomas, Kingston, St. Andrew,:risons in the Suez Canal with : . e e 7 n the Cit ‘re oe \ r ; ados » Se é ut
t Kung ; ; h Sj D a . | t ity were closed and the sarbados on the Saturday, but
St. Catherine, Manchester, Clar-|:tring of observation posts, ana] SOLA eny Plotting e | Y . sensible people headed homeward} ould not attempt to go to Kings-
endon, and all the south side|to restrict the movement of Brit- , " é | ose roun to prepare for the worst while? on as all communications were
parishes, St. Thomas is cut off|ish troops outside this area. The Abdullah s Death 9 | hoping for the best.” cut
from Kingston, and reports tell,of}sources said that the Foreign oO es ro osa | BIGHTH ARMY Warnings Walls Blown Down
widespread damage throughout | Ministry is drafting measures in- AMMAN, Aug. 21. K | i HEADQUARTERS KOREA The iid that throu shout the He described Kingston: “Every
na fica parish, and ¢ dial fo - control — = rt ae of 7 : men accused of the ‘ } = : a aie as lay there were regular broadcast: | Where = in Kingston ign
dea oll. |Pritish troops in key ugyptian[{ plotting of the assassination of Ts ri ne 9 | Reintorced Communist sto sj} over Radio Jamaica warning the jestruction were seen. A certa
The yovernment, last night cities such as Cairo and Alexan-}]King Abdullah denied that they + 1 : MAZAMDI, Teheran, August a > the Allied offensive eA its aetes cople about the aDproNNhiti ection of the town—South Camp
despatched the Harbour Master’s|dria. Military personnel would] Were implicated, or refused ti BRITAIN withdrew on Tuesday its Eight Point I r0- | in Eastern Korea and threw South torm and giving them advice or | '%d Ray Town districts—appeared
Jaunch on an agate to Mor-jbe required to have special per- a on cyesdny when questionea posal for the solution of the Iranian oil crisis, after Iran}! Korean forces off two important] security measures o have suffered worst. It i
ant Bey, Ane amare perrhis |i The sources said that the] >¥ tne ilitary Tribunal. The rejected a last minute compromise attempt by the chief} hills in savage counter attacks That Friday evening, after: | ‘hese districts that many of the
nel, food, and __ clothing. Egyptian Government _ believes} Prosecuting attorney brought 4( Britist esotiator Richard Stokes. S 2s flatly < : The Reds had rushed reserves{ tinner, I left “Irvine Hall” a poorer classes live, Lots of house
morning. the military sent out @ 41.2) contro! must be kept on| Witnesses, attempting to prove iush negotiator Richard Stokes. Stokes flatly announc- | end munca on th to ¢ . . "Rai eery, co were fevelled with thewroutia aha
large convoy of Bren gun car | et eee et Ot ow ‘pt pnjamong other things that’ the ed that his mission had failed, but gave Iran until noon on| }j,5 duties hs clit a inet nee ‘batia no as cm Callee | ii Some cases houses were hall
‘iers ¢ rucks wi s Sra ce si family ms re . 4 ad tas sa : 7 3 ; s-fother building on 1 §©6Colleg ¢ ow é
ee. aie towards the stricken |déteriorating Anglo-Egyptian re- tate Kine onan an ania Wednesday to change its attitude and agree to the British gest truck convoys—more than] srounds which is us to Setabe way across the streets, The walls
s z : : > s rder, ; ) ans 304 ¢ ‘ § ; ; ve ; ; Ae es ; : : ses were ’
area Tomorrow morning, H.M.S.}!stions over the Suez Canal. they knew of the plot beter, settleme nt plans. He said that he had agreed to eliminate | 3,400 vehicles—since the abortive } animarried professor; and lec ! nis ae . re blown down.
Bigbury Bay will go on to Mo-|{ —U-P. ba) ae i be from the eight points the provision that a British operating [Red spring offensives in April and | urer Mr. Loinsworth, of the} gmp ie, gw .
j ay tai arger s 2S r, avic ul, Ousini vigor- ¢ nev r intai ¢ . . ci aay. Mduc *‘partme i \ . waowe
rant Bay aking ares — ousiy denied in a adounitian tc agency would maintain and produce the oil in Iran and, Ay, Bighth. Army _ apokesmar roe ation Department of Trini nearly every house was dam-
S<, © 3 "rie e “Cc - °, - a = : _ at " * ‘ me * » 1 . ’ . 1 ° den at th I ) one
Fee material anc U.S. Confident Of the court that he was connected substitute a British General Manager instead. He said|said Communist counter attacks | aery, = ; eo NUA aged. The Myrtle Bank Hotei
‘Kingston is still largely with- : ; vue crime, He claimed that Iran rejected this. and stubborn resistance had stalled ‘We were all chatting on vari seed ae riple’ bons a fhich
ight, electric power, and ‘ e did not even know three of} ——— ~--- ——————- The operating provision has|the four days old lt offensive | j,)¢ « " [Sager Jo th, secondary girls’ school, which
ape Aap bed in Pe part of Spanish Bases hin other defendants, and his re- Cc 4 1 been one of the anes barriers | ll along the 25-mile front stretch- me fight anon tae in Roi a alr sompinent wa, Weess
ar yt ne ‘ane ; ations with the dead monarch . Q agreeme . ., ing from above Yangg saat i; : ; : an AOUS previously, was blown off.
i Boj po ep gr Uni ieee ane Aug. 21. 1 had been good for the last three emmunist I olice Rains eile a pritish central tront “almost. to. the ° St s eh as eae Ved two schools which
in Sir im. fully nite tates officials appeared} years. . ‘ . ee {coast near Kansong, 27 les t 1 strong breeze sprang up ! were turned into emergency
invenoa ens ‘neve yo hese fy confident they will get to use} Dr. Moussa El Housini, an- Seek Youths Who foneres BABA RC! not an opera- | °F the 88th asatlie ate. nor |chought it was time to return t centres, In one there were 450
and rural areas, but road clear-|Spanish air and naval bases inlother defendant, is David’s cousin, i ieee ete ows Ge named _ Irvine Hall’ so after saying | men, women and children, About
ing and telegraph repairs are ex-|Peturn for military and economic] ‘Witnesses said sthat severai] Deserted Festival «echnical attain snd bom soodnight to the: others 1 put or}, 400 people were in the other.
ne ono allow the resumption of/id to Spain. The Defence De-|prominent members of the Hou- 7 nica affairs, and be respon- Ho fi P ana| 1%, cloak and left the Nunnery The Red Cross and other volun-
novell communication within the|Partment yesterday sent a seven-|sini family had attended the BERLIN, Aug, 21. Com he ee ee pe or eace ane en wary wetkers ware dams. & goad
next few days officer military survey to Madrid. derupatens Sa where Ab-| Refugees arriving’ here said Company. y ie he direction of what I though job to the homeless and sick.”
7 S ukeerinn wat. tart dullah was killed, on the Friday] Rast Germany’s C es "| . wal ; ay ; I a I ‘ | was “Irvine Hall” but I soon di Mr. Beckles said “Despit
Be ng ee tumrionne ited An economie team is already|previous to the ‘dne on which at ee io ta ale Ene avaae Badeioces ee S ac ng 4as overed that I was going in the | warnings it was evident that inary
strike the lower Mexican] &” route to check on Spain’s non-|the assassination took place, but... . cate “ a eee ramier ; am ; re vrong direction and retraced my | veople were caught unprepared
a bos : 1 hi ft military needs, The military sur-]not that Friday, July 30 against Russian zone youth who|ian Premier, Mohammed Mossa U.N. ADVANCE BASE Ry tl { Thad} i | ‘hough it ust | i }
mainland late this afternoon or ae ™ ae . meee . feserted the recent Red Worla |degh He said. “I’ve bee t - ave BASE, we y, were be @ Jost @ ee te PAU e aamilted ‘that
a vey group has the dual responsi- f } San 2 vor wat e been in thc} Below Kaes ; a a) ense o satin oles 7 quate pare 2 ya a
early tonight. bility of checking on air and naval According to the testimony,| Youth Festival to visit Alliea|closest touch with the British The K aesong, Korea, Aug, 21 n f direction and was head idequate preparations in the wa
Orleans Weather Bureau : ; P ; ahd cian i di ; P 1e =Armistice Subcommittee} ing away from my intended de wf storage of food and fuel and
New on T { ‘dian | West ar] nly y ays 4 r0ic : led d
said if the hurricane continues inj bases, and seeing what equipment/¢even Toufik El Housini, guardian! West Berlin. Only two days |staff, and I am voicing their un- spent two more hours in dead. | tinatic Fortunately th ‘attening down of windows and
Pasi sualees oi 0 Ainated nokia" its|Spain’s armed forces need of the Holy Places, had left the! after the close of the Festival, 50/animous opinion in sayine they’L flocked debate and ieee ted i Z EMRE Ute) ue loors were pr wctically pi ousible
ear gatos- wilt hit uetuean ‘Naut-| The dispatch of the military;Mosque to go to the Dead Sea for| East German youngsters had flea] not stay and work in [ran, i] Nation: spokesman hinted th , 7 iy a . ee Bar pe veme crs or a large number Son : people
ie ana Tuxpan probably between|team indicated that United States Hd El ta ; ; _ | back to Berlin to beg asylum be-|the Iranian Government insist: 4 Moscow is dictating the Reds’ re- hie te vedihs this Waal “ie ore a in the other hand took the warn.
5 ey OY and 9 m. to-night | officials were fairly certain that} * BYoe a ousini explained his| cause they said Communist police |on impossible working ind man-j|fusal_ to compromise. Hope of! inont 9 4 : : was NOW | ings lightly. But the informatior
6p 19 p 4{O0wn absence from the mosque by|; ; ~ I bout 9.30 p.m
In an Advisory issued at 5 a.m |an agreement could be reached dabiig. Warinetele ae I by) are seeking them agement conditions. The sad agreement is fading fast but the ' , hroadeast was both accurate and
Weather Bureau said the centre of | With Generalissimo Franco for via’ I Ses es ely or unfortu-| Western refugee authorities |fact is there is no more efficient|Subcommittee arranged a sixth Floor Under Water lefinite.”
@ On Page 3 U.S. use of Spanish bases.—U.P. | by pray. UP quoted youths as saying that op ja staff in the world anq if thei: |meeting for 11 a.m. tomorrow I went up to my dormitory } ashi ;
—U.P. | the way back to their homes they Isex vices are lost to Iran, they can~| It spent more than half of| hese dormitories are strong new ae Foodstuff Essential
were denounced by Communist | not be replaced and the oil will|teday’s session over map reading - uildin 48 and stood up stoutly to : Speaking of Barbadians,
not flow.” lin an effort to find a mutually| te hurricane. Even so one coula | Beckles said: “In such an even

e9 qj \ V/ ° :
WS: ali Fae colleagues and that when they
“Black Paet ors¢ | Austrians e | reached home they received police H 1 eee is , #eceptable ceasefire line i the terrific force of the gal pon Riegel take ae warning
i summonses. Thereupon they fled e said that he did not know] Vice Admiral C. Turner Joy,.| without as it whistled and roar seriously ove other things it i
Meatless Days Jsecretly back to West Berlin to}Wben the British staff workers |chief U.N. truce negotiator con-{ own the corridor 1 changed | essential to have a surplus of
| appeal for permanent haven. would leave Iran, He said that|ferred with Supreme U.N, Com | into my pyjamas but througn| foodstuff. Matches, storm lanterns
ever

s
f rri Ca ne “ VIENNA, August 21. UP. he had withdrawn the eight point | mande General Ridgway — in} y opening and crevice in t ie | and torches should be kept in ;
an . 5 Austrians will have to do with- ae proposal, but the Jran Govern-|Tokyo on the worsenivg situation; structure of “Irvine Hall” the rain | 58fe_ place Windows and door











ah res for ie days a week yee p 7 t ment insisted on reading into it|and then gi back to his Head-|came in with terrific force, With | Then a + hen ant foto

he rest o is summer. The °ecEe « » intentions whict re spe | Quarters at this base camp n a short time the floor ‘nm, and only en, can Barba-
> oY A i, § . cess Vi re which were not there a ! 1@ floor is un

DAILY EXPRESS |Cabinet’s economic directorate rincess | arpa land which were never in his mind Chinese Communist radio said] ler two inches of water and “48 hope to Survive the wrath

decided to overcome the current Come Of xo |when he put the proposals for-|@#tlier today that there would be erything in the room, including, 0f,2 burricane

Fr oO Own Corres ondent) country wide meat Shortage Ss e jward. He said that his comprom- |@0 armistice, unless the United! nyself wa wet Occasional He thinks that if Barbados wa

(From Our Own Spone se stemming both from cattle dealers “ scotl ise would have meant the virtual|N@tioms agreed to a _ceasefire|‘here would be a lull for a few} Dit by @ hurricane, the m tgam~

LONDON, August 21. unwillingness to sell at Govern- BALMORAL, air ve 93 “Joan” of some 3,000 British oil | ine along the 38th Parallel. The conds only to be followed by nog Md dg be done to roofs. Tree

iTAIN’S G { N YT does more damage t0O/ment ceiling prices, and from in- Ugust and oe ae eres '|Allies have refused to accept the ids of greater violence close to houses would cause dam

BRITAIN’S GOVE RNMENT § & I a Princess Mangaret, vivacious technicians to Iran to be paid by | parallel Gn arcunde hat if ie t ns aaetee eee age and overhanging sn teeta
” y a.m 1 ory

Jamaica than the hurricane, the independent Daily Express ‘creased consumption caused by a sweetheart of the British Com-|that country for their services would collapse

' E tod alten Pad .-;_jlarge numbe of rists, y tains no natural position in which ed to be arin }
said to-day in an editorial commenting on Friday’s hurri- | dering all admtiinle sea pre a athe re Gea a | A British Embassy ann runce-| the United Nation could make ¢ aa eeran ls terrific po ye Gn arrival af Felsadoes fo
cane. vate houses not to serve meat on Her Sist birthday was BERK 3 DY ment said: “Mr. Stokes follow-|*t#nd if the armistice agreement) thunder and the wind vhipped take the plane, Mr. Beckles saw
The newspaper said the news will arouse the deepest |Tuesdays and Fridays. Britons everywhere, but cele bra-| ing his discussions with|collapsed Brigadier General | ‘tself into a tury unknown before the Administration building, whict
i : : can Britain and funds will no doubt be raised —UP. tions at Balmoral Castle were | iadian Praniter kihiemad William Nuckols, the official he ound of splinte ir clagech formerly a big hangar, flat
sympathy here in Britain and funds quiet—just a family affair. | United Nations’ spokesman, said sapekcoanlays Mt and but a mass of twisted steel



rien, A . . : Mossadegh has with deep regret |
‘ rate ; srings of these good people of the , ‘ists ve ade oe ere ‘ , tenert she C Tower w id
to alleviate the suffering g peo} Tourists and local folk made a| Come to the conclusion that tho|that the North Korean General ve branches being knocked off | 10¢ Control Tower was badl

y . a e . > re ‘¢ i rie 3 » | . » ‘ t aged The
Empire. Chinése Celebrate festive occasion as friends of the} Jranian Government is not pre-;Nam Ul, the chief Communist] its of masonry and wood being| damaged. The only foodstuff o1

Royal family, including some wh« | negotis “vers of} sly the plan was ty ges of
; . oe >] pared to agree to any arrange-| @8otlator, i very definitely in own about by the gale gave the he plane was two package

ge trees being uprooted, mas



— ‘The paper which recently has!




. ; ; . oe Se hn? sees Bren NEW YORK, Aug. 21 sey BS eligiele: un Margaret's | ments under which British! he Soviet sphere.” He said that mpression that a thousand devils bis¢ uits o Mr. Be did not «
\ arsity Students campaign against pritain’s trade Diplomatic reports receiver hand, came to take part in the; technicians whose continued Nam I] once was a teacher ir id been let loose and were seek for that day
° }pact with Cuba, added: Yet iti, oi PL is birthday party. ed X {Russia and i also a Soviet citi . : He attended the first all-Carit
: ‘ b. . ; stheth coat Aes sect that the from Peiping on Tuesday saio Local postal officials were brac service to Iran was so urgentls UP rt our everything in their], nO c ve ; a
6 o” was strange c re é 'that P: ie . an ey i na s0CE é Meclals were brac- é “ - gas oo al LOY PP, . en ooperative f 1
Get Godfathe i blind. tualioe caf schittive, cuaworen | ts Premier Chou En Lai order ing themselves’ for. the expected? isked for by Mossadegh would ; ; vath, the University College rt tapas



ed the annual celebration of the The safest position was a corn

sponsored by the Jamaican Cr

$6 2 9 r within the building, more or] 5PODS8or I
Hate America ess sheltered from the terrible] Operative Development Council
vind By about 2.00 am. on ind the Extra Mural Department

Campaign On saturday the wind had dropped| Pf the U.C-WiI. and was attendert

by students from other island

beeprepared to remain in shied

INDIANA, Aug: 21, - | SPectacular, does less hurt to Ja- industry.”

: victory over Japan to begin on
‘.a| maicans than the single wrong ry telegrams and presents
y anonyn 3 rich man ed| : , Ww) ; “ as y Sev- . j i
ee ot Se te Ruition, | done by the policy of Whitehall. oe aa Bp. fen oe Saat Sr 9s Court circles did not disclose} Conditions under which _ the
a F UnnaRS, 20 Pee aatie. ae | Tne Cuban Pact alone over the Di _ ad iethdaitid anti tn| stan what the presents are. It is knownl British staff would remain i
room, and board a years will produce more day to iplomats believed it is signi-} that she ‘is getting a convertibles iran have been the main stumbling

flood of congratulatory letters, |









On eee om 9 me Oe vee ae day misery in Jamaica than any ficant that the Chinese celebra- coupe and the traditional pearl|bleck to agreement on the oi JAPAN, Aug. 21 til oereve: ore eds ie and British Guiana
West Point ee Sheakeor a Dee eee wea Tete Pisanece nono and matched string starter when)}ctisis, Britain proposed that oi Diplomats familiar ‘with Chin- | myself, were able to turn over | The C :

A Notre Dam > official agreed to Sense aie ee os aes treaty Gobiesaee a6 whith’ Rec aa born. experts and former employees > | se Communist practices said or heir mattresses and get some The cour or sien Br, A t
the plan with certain provisions, ee ene ae i ok ‘is See teahine is not invited or Ne Lain a J pes considered the nationalised _Anglo-Iraniar fuesday, the execution last Fri nuch needed sleep |g to A mat 18. Tt spl wget
including one preventing any of | S190 os 3 ; a uction to raise | a d. are most | likely claimants for Mar-|9il company remain in Iran a lay of Ipilians and Japanese ac Ns oe cae oe es lec
the cadets from engaging in any] a ee feat Are Res ata a ot | ‘**+ ‘garet's hand were present for the/employees of the British ru used of having plotted again Trees Uprooted | ee Sen jie teeta

Tutor of the Cooperative Lough

I birthday celebration, They arejorganisation which would supe the life of Mao Tse Tung is on The scene of desolation and |, rough College, England
M: 7 ing one ,0roug slege, England, and he

inter-collegiate sports while at;



































Tirtcsemattar |Empire interests made by_ the ‘AKER 7 : , | William Billy Wallace, 24-year-|vise the oil marketing of < il tcl oe ; estruction which greeted the eve
MOA aioe issued the fol-| Signing of the Anglo-Cuban Trade OL 'AKES SHAKE HAWAII old polo playing stepson of the|the West ’ b < ) 7 ae most one ant emotiona d irate we " Saturd oe eat } was assisted by eleven other le
F ae os greement is made is - eet rie sSRinas a ly . aspects of 1@ «current “Hate s : — ee oe turers,
lowing statement on behalf of the Agre mE oe ees this Sree HONOLULU. Aug. 21. | American writer Herbert Agar Some British supervisors woule de a! catoea tote? Was af ive moved a heart of stone. The Th Paes tal tact s ,
anonymous berefactor— “Because|! 2 Lord wg np ve A series of sharp earthquakes] 24 the 27-vear-old Earl offalso stay in the fields and refin-|, “a ‘1 i : aieeity Pts eae, POneAed lege surroundings, whic hf... re ott nbmietes ae with t " +Ory
t ymous b rairm » \pire s- , : ; alke : ry ip ‘ writies cooperatic tartir with ~ the
I, with millions feel that in Amer-| = eta oe or iat Ay de Britis! rocked the Hawaiian islands to-| P4lkeith.—(C.P.) erjes. Iran insisted that eact It sign ae Antonio Riva an velve hours before had been a Rochdal . ic tah ee ) rpaeaah
ica any man who makes a mistake 'Tles Association and the British! a.) and police reported “exten- ‘ Briton sign an individual contract i etal g R oti yy ‘va ane | hing of beauty, was now forlorn ecarba tin i P id edaieadtin
! qT vv *, . 4 . n ‘ ‘ di é 2 yolc ¢€ agt we Ke i str 10: n
should have the chance to rehab- Fmpire Le«gue sive damage” to stores and roads Yl i i with the nationalised “Iranian is aii ; nt r a y ’ ama guc its nakedne Massive tree " 47 at aS age ee n :
: . v + "4s z : ; S 9 vere § £ »xecution saquac 7 : ‘ lanage » Oo cooperative
ilitate himself, I make this offer Concessions on the westernmost island of B.G. RAISES LOAN National Oil Company i Pei this ets " the ra ; 4 f ‘isn ere shorn of their leaves and marketing society) “fis ich of
to the cadets, who have been| yw, Se ee } address in|Hawaii. Tremors were recorded ‘ ae Seer ft " a inches while the trunks stood] ~ Aa arti :
recently detached from the United | y sot Sa yan a at 12.57 a.m. Hawaiian time T - The Stokes announcement broke] guilty by the court of Peiping th bare limbs raised heaven-|CoPerative society and coopera-
20 tac’ 1e Whitenal o the S, word | ® oT a.m, alle 6 I j 7 ep axes * 4 ‘ont ‘ tt , ‘ . ‘ tive accounts, cooperative trad
States Military Academy Ip: lfc ti oa hasises the fact that . LON DON the. three-day silence, during Militar y Control Committee « ard ste _ ‘a See site Ee
A University spokesman esti- ek eee ee See Another sharp series was re- which, behind the scenes efforts] plotting to assassinate Mao durin “In many cases the trees had|S¥rPlus and price policy,
ated that hoard room. . tuition concessions given to Britain bY | corded at 1.31 am. Roland F (From Our Own Corréspondent) had been made by the United]the parade celebrating the seconc en torn from their roots and operative law, 3 ooperative and
ane eo Id come to $1.300 ae oe fhe result of the agreement] white, chief observer at the coast LONDON, Aug. 21 |States Presidential adviser, W.Janniversary of the Chinese Pec ww lay stretched out across the/YUth, cooperative — wholesaling,
Coated vot ana annually gt Notre!Mave also to be given to more) ang geostatics magnetic observa-|_ Pritish Guiana has been success-}Averell Harriman, to bridge the] ples’ Republic on October, 195: ds and roadway While all] Cooperatives and the family, judg-
$1,400 per man annually at Notre ‘ : & g D cs I : the efficte ‘ ; sik
en POE igh ty fi than 30 other nations under thej¢ion station said quakes were “at| ful in its attempt to raise a loan|gap between the British and UP. new buildings, ich ys} +8 the efficiency of a cooperative
yanec-UE: |terms of the agreement. least as large’ as the one that|im London. Subscription lists/Tranian points of view. This dif- Irvine Hall,” were but little |#0clety and the social responsi:
| AVE _Eeeseny ena cope Na preceded the eruption of the| Were open and closed within five ference in viewpoints existed] HEAVY RAINS INTOKYO}] temaged except for broken glas my <2 ina nes b a te
+ . countries, including Western Ger- M : minutes this morning, and it is]sinee the talks began TORY A ied. 184 vindow almost all temporars was opened by the Govern
z, , auno Loa volcano in June, 1850. . ni & ; rOKYO, Aug I . isha ae
Nehru Receiv es | many with the unasked for, un- , antes —vwU.p,| understood that te issue was The Iranians insisted on basin One of the heaviest rainst oder tructur } ' z J tic r air Hug } om at
‘ i. expected and unearned position of heavily over-subscribed their claims on the detailed nine- scant vente hit. Toleve It ther completel destroye or cuneron. wich was etvended —
\ ote Of Confidence }an equal competitive opportunity | point oil nationalization law.|’2 recen frtvic an : Prey i! were severely batterec nd ex-|the Vice Principal of the U.C.W.I
~ | > \ Jisrupted transportatior ind > :
with Britain,” says Lord Balfour, | which completely dispossessed the! @rupte: Een eens ltensively damaged Mr. Phillip Sherlock, Hon, D
NEW DELHI, Aug. 21 |\“They give nothing.” j ommunication ana = endec ‘ 7 Sangster and presided over

The Governmental Congress He adds th

it the Angto-Cuban|| TO-DAY’SWEATHER |! 2/ FAMILIES RESCUED |(yiletranian Ol Company, while roan lon haat wav! Wer’ Iitering. the “place. tor| Rev. Br. J. P. Sullivan

based their stand on;


















party bloc in ®arliament ©; Agreement signe despite ’ FROM BANDITS {the Harriman formula ; UP | rd i nd. Here once stood At a social function held at
Prime Minister Nehru an over-| protests from sugar producers in " ay CHART | ' me dit Roof thjend of the course on August 1
whelming vote of confidence Tues-/ A British Guiana, Mauri-! nace pi yg a BOGOTA, Colombia, Aug. 21 } Stokes appeared tired ind r t mere tudents were addressed | M
day in his dispute with the party) t nd South Africz The ars Sig De omens Twenty-one families i iding,sOlemn when he met rrespond- “ Tk’ f r n.|N. W. Manley, ofte referrec
olen ve ove : authority Fr Car anetey ha j ihe Moon : — yen 24th 48 itldcen held t cata See 1 ents in the luxuriou ta nae pal The ADVOCA P ‘ The ‘ the f it ( f ope ive
ninodiin ‘in minut ’ s , me rk ee te, Lighting Up: 7 pm. Thais alone hg a : ‘ as I
1 @Xy ined in 90-minute ta low bandit gang were res > r ce where née é eC stay 7 F: . I } t
ny he x ed fron a “Tt t High Tide: 7.28 a.m. and ' lice aden ha ‘ 33 k mae a He toe ae iifferont alae pays for NEWS te Students ‘

y he resigned from € to oo. olice during » week-end I a ren o Z v1 I en ed to Student en
part exe € Work how our (G t tow Tide: Rais bce an Puebl feuvo, 100 miles southwest from the hard hitting businessman Dial 3113 } e the homel. fter the] seve cooperative
Cor e to tk p his demandjcan declare their belief E re er P of Bog who arrived 18 days ago He . torn 1 I lerive great bene
( k 1.01 p.m Select Giitsa a8 patie Pi i ih le a Day or Night tanta tie 4

> ba

UP I Empire trade ' tured several re CC.P.) @ On Page 3 ‘ ‘ ’ t @ On Page 3,







PAGE TWO





THEIR NEEDLE CRAFT

ACTRESSES SHOW

Actresses Dorothy Lamour



(left)

and Ginger Rogers compare

dolls they have made and brought along to a Hollywood party.

Miss Rogers won a prize for her bold

went to a children’s hospital.

needlework. All the dolls

—L.E.S.



IS EXCELLENCY the Gov-
ernor, accompanied by Lady
Savage, Mr. Denis Savage and
Miss Pat Savage attended the Vic-
torian Exhibition at the Barbados
Museum yesterday afternoon.
The Exhibition | 1837 1901,
which opened at the Museum on
August, will continue until Sun-
day, August 26.

Was Here Last Year

R. REGGIE ROSE, a Canadian

who works with the Canadian
3ank of Commerce in Port of
Spain flew in from Grenada on
Monday evening by B.W.LA
After a week’s holiday in that
colony he has come over to spend

the remaining two weeks of his
vacation in Barbados,
He was here last year for his

holidays, when he made a number
of friends. Mr. Rose is staying
with Mr, and Mrs, Alban Johnson
at Worthings.



THE



ADVENTURES

Delegate Arrives

H°. J. B. RENWICK, Grena-
da’s delegate to the Regional



Economic Committee meeting
which opens this morning at
Hastings House, arrived from
Grenada on Monday evening by
B.W.LA.

He is a guest at the Marine
Hotel.

British Films For Japs
R. NAGAMASA KAWAKITA,
48-year-old boss of a 500-

cinema chain in Japan, has ar-
rived in London in search of more
British films to show to the Japa-
nese,

Says Mr.

Kawakita: “The Japa-

nese people like British films
better than American produc-
tions.”

Mr. Kawakita is hoping to take
Tales of Hoffman back to Tokio
The Red Shoes has. already
earned £70,000 there for its Brit-

ish producers.

OF









1%. jinicenas General

H°’ J. C. WOODING, Attor-
t General of the Leeward
Islands is at present holidaying|
n Barbados He will be intro-

ced to the
Aucust 24th.

local Bar on Friday,

Due To-day
‘UE back from England this
morning by the Rice
re Mr. and Mrs. J. Phillip
und family who have = Me there
n heliday Mr. Phillips is witt
Bath” Estate in B.G. = wife
parents, Mr. and Mrs E, Mc.-
Kenzie who are at pre a in Eng-
land will be returning to Barbados
towards the middle of next montt
by the “Gascogne.”

Komarice Began At Party

O* her way to service in
Korean waters, HM=e
‘Jamaiea” stopped at Singapore
Officers attended a party, Ana
there one of them, Lieutenant
Michael Thomas, met Miss Ann
Kirby Green, Last week they

became engaged.

Miss Green 22,
vith her parents, Her father
Lieutenant-colonel P. K. Green
was formerly stationed in Malaya
She is studying art.

Mr, Thomas, 24,
BOAC boss Sir Miles Thomas
He is secretary to the Court of
Inquiry into the loss of the sub-
marine “Affray.”

The two will
next year,

WRAF Chief To Marry

‘ROUP OFFICER NAN

JF DINNIE, one of the two
Deputy Directors of the WRAF,
is to marry. Notice of her wed-
ding to Mr. Roger Edward Hunter,
a regional director of the British
Council, has been given at Ken-
ington register office,

Mr. Hunter is 37, lives in
Kensington, Group Officer Dinnie
is 35. She has been in the Service
since 1939, has served in the Far
East

Many recruits knew her
she commanded the WAAF
ing school at Wilmslow, Since
then she has commanded the
WRAF depot at Hawkinge, former
Battle of Britain airfield, is now
at the Air Ministry in Kingsway.

Caribbean Cruise

HEN the “Colombie” leaves

Barbados today, on board
making the ten-day Caribbean
Cruise, will be Mr. and Mrs, W.
Patterson, their daughter Sally
“ son Patrick, Mrs, Richard-
, Mr, Vere Redman, Mr, Arthur
Miss Carmen Archer, Miss
Hutchinson, Miss Kath-
Mr. and Mrs, Rob
Charlie Peterkin
Gale.

lives in Putney

is only son of

probably marry

when
train-



Daphne
leen Sargeant,
Peterkin, Mr.
and Mrs, C. C,
Incidental Intelligence
ey one: one who
takes infinite pains and gives

around him.—
—LE.S.

them to everyone
Bennett Cerf.



PIPA

Copyright - P91. Vaz Dias Int Amsterdam



BY THE WAY eee By Beachcomber

IMAGINED, in my innocence,

that I was satirising the scien-
tists and chemists who look after
our foretold
years ago, the coming of fossilised
food.

food, when I some

But it appears that they have
been busily preparing fossilised
fish, and the lucky Mr. Chapman
Pincher, using a screwdriver to
prise his meal off the slab with
which he was presented, was one
of the first to taste this delicacy
I assumed that bolmenol F would
be used to make it tasteless, but
I had reckoned without the dis-
covery of bolmenol G, which
leaves a faint after-taste of in-
ferior rubber. This is most stimu-
lating to the glands (especially
Matheson’s Gland), and is a sub-
stitute for a whole range of car-
bohydrogenics.

Pre-fossilised Fish

R. STRABISMUS (Whom God
Preserve) of Utrecht has, of
course, gone further than this. He

has succeeded in manufacturing
pre-fossilised fish. The absence
of any flavour is so pronounced

that nobody can tell it from the
more conventional form of fossil-
ised fish. But the advantage in
the Strabismus article is that the
dreary business of catching fish
for fossilisation is done away
with. The stuff is made in enor-
mous vats, and Charlie Suet is
already preparing a schedule of
mass-production. The new secret
formula produces a food which ic
an even more powerful brain-
stimulant than real fish. «a parrot
fed on it recited twelve hundred







lines of Wordsworth and hummed
the first nine bars of Handel's
Largo. a

in Passing

ANY unmarried girls who go

to expensive restaurants in
London have decided to look
under the table before the meal
begins. This means that the
ubiquitous lads who report each
mouthful, and interpret the offer
of a cigarette as the beginning of
a “romance,” will have to find
some other hiding-place. One
such girl and her eseort recently
suspected that the waiter was not
a waiter, and she said to him,
with a charming smile: ‘Look,
I'll tell you a secret. We are just
friends. Now you can go away-”

Varkover and West Point
A SINGULARLY ill-timed pro-

? test, by Headmasters and
Governors of Public Schools,
against a recent case of wide-

spread cheating during examina-
tions at Narkover, is_ printed
without comment in the current
Narkover School Magazine. But
beneath it is the statement made
by the dismissed cadets of West
Point, and their parents, that such
cheating is an old West Point
custom, Dr. Smart-Allick has
sent fraternal greetings to West
Point, and has offered to exchange
“the best methods of cir-
the intolerable tyr-
amination system.”

views On
cumventing
anny of the ex



Rupert and

Reaching schoo! Tigerlily suc saucer flying this way.’ " “ Ther
ceeds in alicniin into her place, bur it few the other way,'’ interrupts
the master spots Rupert and Algy Algy. "Yes, and then it disap
and he calls them to him,” What peared and made us_ forget the
is the meaning of this? You're time."’ adds Rupert, * That'll do,

“Please sir,

late," he growls.
says Rupert, * s

was early really,"

I went to meet Algy and we saw a



the Sorcerer—7



* You're excuses

| says the master.
time. Mind

> per more odd every
you don't do it again.

MEN'S SHIRTS
MEN'S SHIRTS
MEN'S SHIRTS
MEN'S SHIRTS ‘

DIA! 4606

“Arrow” White
“B.

V.D.” Grey, Tan, Blue

MEN'S PYJAMA SUITS
BOY'S PYJAMA SUITS.



!

ete. SttewOd ee ae

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

$7.10

$7.31
$4.89 5.23

$5.72

DIAL 4220



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



‘

‘Do
best with




|
|

}

|

WHAT i
ly eally hard
li swing down?
: BR

the best
thinging?
Walking about?
all depends on your



jfeet on the mantelshelf In th
|Way gravity will help your bra
to get a better ood supply.

2. People w



MISS MARIA LUISA HUARTE, talented Max Factor Hollywood
make-up artist will be arriving shortly to conduct the famous Max
Factor Hollywood Art School of Make-Up classes. |

MISS HUARTE will be giving free demonstrations in Barbados from
Monday, 27th August to Friday, 3lst at Cave Shepherd & Co. Ltd.,|
Bruce Weatherhead Ltd., The Barbados Aquatic Club, and The Cot-
tage Gift Shap.













SS
B.B.C. Radio |"... | =
am Zs m , 23rd, 1.30 p.m.
. e e Red ceen P i B'TOWN “Lawh Breed” &
javeake aa A a A DIAL 2310 “Apa. Cyclone”







TODAY & T AY &

Paramount

TOMORROW

Gay Pomantic

(Only)
Action

150 & 4.90 pom
Double!

Programme

Color by Technicolor



































WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21 1951

eee ANogtaoue Parade ti 211 RIDING HIGH @& WHISPERING SMITH
am. Listeners’ Choice, 11.45 a.m. State- + .
ment of Account, 12.00 noon The News.||| —Biné CROSBY. Clarence MUSE Alan LADD, Robert_ PRESTON
iseckie > sews. ee FRIDAY 250, 445 & 830 pm, & Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
eee eee ee eae : MITCHUM'S Newest......Actually Filmed in Romantic Mexico!

4.00 p m. The News, 410 p.m _ Inter- br ’
lude, 415 pm. Star’ Time, 4 30 pm THE BIG STEAL. STARRING ROBERT MITCHUM
Educating Archie, 5 00 pm. Composer with Jane GREER, William BENDIX Patric KNOWLES ({

LES (RKO RADIO)
of the Week, 5.15 pm. Theatre Music = - metres
6.00 pm. Music Magazine, 6.15 p.m — a
Marcel Gardner, 6 45 pm. Programme |
Parade, 6 55 p.in s Sport | PE AZ! OISTIN a3 ALE ry
7.00—10.41 5 pm 41.32 m 4 4 Dial 8404

= ar rare inteneie day & Tomorrow 5 & 8.30 p.m THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
700 pm. The News, pm. News ISLE :
Analysis, 715 pm. Twenty Questions, hore sates REaP | Today & Tomorrow 8.39 p.m
7.45 pm. The Changing Tone of Public ZOMBIES ON BROADWAY | SMART POLITICS
Controversy, 8 00 pm Radio Newsreel, Wally Vernor Al en Freddie Stewart and the Teenagers &
815 pm. Serious Argument, 8 45 p m ; Alan Carney UNA OLIPPER
Interlude, 855 pm. From The Editori- Special SAT Midnite Sat. 25th SONS Seen
als, 900° pm David Copperfield, 9 30 %th., 9.30 a.m. | Bons of ” Roddy_McDowa
p.m. Melody Mixture, 9.45 p.m. State- a .
ment of Account, 10 00 p.m. The News, oe Breed" | Lonely Valley Friday (Only) Midnite Bat, ee
10.10 p.m. Interlude, 10.15 p.m. Crazy rhy Grant & Buck Jones & 8.30 p.m vu are age
People, 10 45 pm. Mid Week Talk, ‘Arizona Cyclone . mereene ce Jiggs & neste iE ta |
: | » P | n
; na Johnny Mack | Johnny Mack ||| ‘Saddle Serenade’ Johnny Mack
he Silent Partner |!" = ous Sens ad
ODP POOOSSES SO%
OPP E ee 5°. SES 666,66 6,646 ,6,
PEOPLE .... By JON HOPE a, POPFPPPOPES COS Gasp se eGo VO ee POT TOO

The things you can do on a
bicycle! Take mystery writer-
traveller Bernard Newman. He
has a bigycle he calls George.

Georg@: and Bernard go every-
where. ‘Together they have pro-
duced many books — and made

GLOBE T HEATRE

TO-DAY, 5.00 & 8.15 P.M. LAST SHOWS

THE OUTLAW .

36s08e FOOSS

a_ lot f money for Newman. ¥
a thes Roe done it again, x “TO MORROW ONLY, 4.45 & 8.15 P.M.
but We must wait until nearer % MIGHTY JOE YOUNG

year’s end for the book; To be X

called Oberammergau Journey it xX

— AND

ig a from-the-saddle record of als
trip through the Rhineland and s THE SECRET FURY

Bavaria to Oberammergau, where

Newman saw the Passion Play. LLL EAA

AGED



How much did all this cost’ ae
About 15s. a day. 7 1aY Y .
@ Publishers fight shy of AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)
ae, Honoree eres oan. TO-NIGHT & TO-MORROW NIGHT AT 8.30
weer. MATINEE : TO-DAY AT 5.00 P.M.



for
Yet

serving their spending power
the coming autumn spate.
this was not always so.

That giant among best sellers
Sir Hall Caine, believed in issuing
his books at this time of the year
—and beating his own drum
simultaneously. Gilbert Frankau
reminisces : “I used to taunt Hal
Caine about his publicity methods
Once I called him The Boomster,’

Continues Frankau; “I had
just hit the big money with my
Peter Jackson, Cigar Merchant
and Hall Caine said to me at
unch.- ‘How lucky you are Mr
Frankau, to live in an age when;
an author does not have to be al
gentleman,’ ”

@ Slow to follow up her first-
novel success has been American)
Anita Loos, Since she won the
publie’s faney with Gentlemen |
Prefer Blondes more than 20
years ago, much of her time has
been spent in Hollywood. Now,
in October, Cape’s plan to isSue
A Mouse Is Born, her second}
book. The theme? Say Cape's :|
“The life story of Effie Huntriss,
a film star known as The Bust.”
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S.

|
iccauee eee
CROSSWORD

ABBOTT Lou COSTELLO

“IN SOCIETY”

‘TREACHER MARION
KIRBY GRANT

A Universal Picture

GLOBE
BB 4

PLUS

Bud

with ARTHUR

|
Big book buyers are con-
HUTTON







OPENING



FRIDAY

The ALL










MIGHTIEST OF ALL
WESTERN
ADVENTURES!







Color by
TECHNICOLOR

A Paramount Picture starring

RAY MILLAND - HEDY LAMARR
MACDONALD CAREY



Special Offer

Across
Make !t one gate and settle.
Confine in rotation? (6)
» This lock was hard to
. Remedy. (4) 10. Pointer
. Plesh | find tn fairyland.

’ What possesses ‘t. (3) STAINLESS STEEL COMBINED SINKS AND
. Room for free outlook. (5)

Leak in a cap ty DRAIN BOARDS. Only $45.00 Each
Maue by the. i ALUMINIUM SINKS AND DRAIN BOARDS
Only $30.00 E

(9)
turn. (8
(4)

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ca eo-ceor

see

am)

Made by the hard
aton. (8) 26 St
dentical, (4)

Down }

One short of (4)
The lock rests.
Part of the fout,
An end to that hump
Isiet for iaces * (6)
Cluster. (4)

Obviously wity (3)
Sort of knife to hold
Vexed that ts tar (5
. Pré-final test. (4) 15

. A rope can be musica
A hundred before
From the orenard
0. Frequentiy called mi
23. A model neart. (3



=



Each
x 12%4”
@

Hardware Department

a doubte
(8)

(4) |

(5)

Size ;. 36” se"
from

Telephone No. 2039

(5) Obiainable our

1.
2.
3.
4.
6

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8
Â¥
2

Muney, (5








“ or
> SCRA

1 Bimannon Ys Beir THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
® Aue COTTON FACTORY LTD.













you think

your feet up?

position for
Sitting? |

blood- |

i average blood-
|pressure usually think best sitting

SOC CES SCC OCCPO CSO,



STAR TALENT COMBAT



WEDNESDAY,

EMPIRE



Today & Tomorrow
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

THE LAUGH SHOW

?

M-G-M presents

Red SKELTON
Arlene DAHL
Ann MILLER

m

pressure, says London psychiatrist
Dr. J, R. Rees.* You have three} “
[eps WATCH THE
1. If your bleod-pressure is on ”
jthe low side you should do your | BIRDIE
|best thinking lying down or sit-
ting in an armehair with your | They've got RED standing

at}
in

on his head—when you see
RED he'll have you rolling
in the Aisles







jon a hard seat with an upright | Coming FRIDAY 31st.
j|back. An armchair is fatal to}
ldeep concentration for them. It} * FATHER’S LIT TLE
jrelaxes their muscles so much}
that the legs absorbs blood whic | DIVIDEND i
hould be coursing through the |
brain | ;
. . } A Riot of Fun .
3. Those with high blood-| beginning to end
pressure are often over-alert | from bee 6
mentally, whatever their posture. | ——_—__— ——
Their brains have a eee
blood supply, whichs keeps them
awake even when they are worn} ROYAL
jout physieally. |
' In his excellent book, *The i . .
llealth of the Mind” (Faber,| Foday & Tomorrow
19, 6d.) 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

|
}
Republic’s Double
|

“1 JANE DOE”

“DARK COMMAND”

Starring

John WAYNE
Walter PIDGEON

Roy ROGERS

FRIDAY

20th Century Fox presents
Burt LANCASTER

iy his first BIG Technicolor
WESTERN

with

Robert WALKER
Sally FORREST

OPENING
5.00 & 8.15 p.m.
|

Adventure, Drama, in its

‘* VENGEANCE
Rugged Best

VALLEY ”
x

ROXY

Today & Tomorrow
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

The Fox Super Double...

Jeanne CRAIN &

3 William LUNDIGAN
x
2 in

| “ PINKY”

and

“THE CLOCK”
Starring

Judy GARLAND
and Robert WALKER

FRIDAY—4.30 & 8.15 p.m.



Rex HARRISON
Linda DARNELL in

‘*UNFAITHFULLY
YOURS”

AND

‘* BOOMTOWN ”

with Spencer TRACY
Clark GABLE

OPENING SATURDAY
4.45 & 8.15 p.m.












STICK-UP! PICK-UP!)
MURDER !

WARK EDMOND

sivas ABRIEN- STORM

Roland
A COLUMBIA PICTURE

Sereea Play by Eugene Ling » Produced by HUNT STROMBERG
Oirectes by Gordes Dougtes





| Starring
|
John CARROLL
j Vera RALSTON
| and



The BARBADOS FOUNDER i Lee.
White Park Road,

AUGUST 22, 1951

STARTING FRIDAY
30 p.m

2.30 &

RAYA
TUNED

OL YMPIC

4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Last 2 Shows Today
Republic's Action Double
Roy ROGERS &

DALE EVANS
in

“YELLOW ROSE
OF TEXAS”

and

“TUCSON RAIDERS”

Starring

Wild Bill ELLIOTT
Gabby HAYES
Riotous Action

4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Republic Double

Tomorrow

Adele MAREA
Robert ARMSTRONG
in
“EXPOSED”
and

“THE LAST
BANDIT ”’
Starring
Wild Bill ELLIOTT
Forrest TUCKER
SUSPENSE ACTION
MURDER !}

FRIDAY, SATUR} AY,
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.









AND
“PANIC IN THE
STREETS ”

Starring

Richard WIDMARK
Paul DOUGLAS

MURDER!
OPENING

SUSPENSE!
Friday, 7th September

A’ EMPIRE i‘

The Loves and Ti:
RUDOLPH VALEN

‘*“VALENTINO ”

Starring Eleanor PARKER
Anthony DEXTER
Story the Romantic Idol of a
Fabulous Era!

nes of

TINO



of





“HOPPER”
BICYCLE

aye

_~oOoFEREFEFEFREREFE0E—REOqOQNQQ LEE ESS
. - on

oma





TL

me

WEDNESDAY,

AUGUST 2



Dewey Leaves For
Visit To Alaska

SEATTLE, Arscust 2
Governor Thomas E. Dewey of
New York left by air on Tuesd
om a six day tour Alaska 1
he described as the “keypoint,”
in the Pacifie crisis. The New
York Governor scheduled t
visit southeastern Alaska on Wed-
néesday and Thursday.

hich



Governor Ernest Gruening of
Alaska who will be Dewey's ho
during his tour of the territory
said that Dewey would fly north




of the Arctic circle to visit the
Eskimo village. Dewey said he
planned to inspect military in-
stallations in the territory. Had

said “Alaska is a crucial area in
the Pacific because it is only a
few miles from the best armed

aggressor in the history of the
free world.” He explained that
he was referring to the Soviet
Union. He said Russia may
launch a peace offensive in the
néar future. “Now they found
they can’t scare us off with

afmed might.” He said that the
Soviet Union in time might even
aSk the world to disarm. —U.P.

Suspends Officer

TAIPEH, Aug. 21.

Chiang Kai Shek suspended
Lieutenant General Mao Pang-
Chu as Deputy Commander of the
Chinese Nationalist Air Force and
delegate to the United Nations
Military Staff Committee, and
ordered him to return to China
immediately. The Nationalist
President in a mandate accused
Mao of “dereliction of duties and
disobedience of orders.”

Mao, otherwise known as Lieu-
tenant General P. T. Mow had
been the Nationalist Air Force
representative in Washington
since the spring of 1943.

The yovernment spokesman
Shen Chang-Huan said that Mao
was accused of:

1. Failure to give a clear ac-
count of funds for the purchase
of air force equipment.

2. The dereliction of
causing the
fighting power.

3. The espoysal of the cause of
disloyal staff members.

4. The refusal to hand
public funds.

duties,

loss of air force

over

—U-P.

Romulo Will! Sign
U.S.—Philippine Treaty

MANILA, Aug. 21.

Foreign Secretary
Romulo will leave by air on Wed-
mesday for Washington for the
signing of the new United States-
Philippines Mutual Defence
Treaty to strengthen Pacific de-
fences against Communist aggres-
sion.

Romulo will be followed on
Friday by ambassador Cowen and
on Monday by the Philippine
President Elpidino Quirno, for
pact signing ceremonies scheduled
for August 30.

—U-P.

MAIL NOTICES

Mails for St. Vincent, Gre
dad, British Guiana by the
Constructor will bh







clostd at the Gene




Registered Mall at
Mail at 10 a.r

Parcel Mail
9 4.m., Ordinary
23rd August, 1951

Mails for St. Lucia, Dominic
serrat, Antigua, St Kitt E
Boston, Halifax, Montreal by the
Lady Rodney will be closed
General Post Office as under

Mont






Parcel Mail and Pegistered Mail ay
10 a.m., Ordinary Mail at 10.15 a.m. or
the 25th August, 1951



RATES OF EXCHANGE

21ST
63 5/10% pr

AUGUST,
CANADA
Cheques on
Bankers
Demand Drafts
Sight Draft

1951

615/10% pr
61.35°- pr
612/10% pr

635/10°% pr. Cable
62% pr. Currency 60% pr
Coupons 59 3/10% pr.





Carlos: @

Joiner Guilty Of
Battery Theft

Sentence of
prisonment

two months’ im-
with hard dabour was



yesterday ssed on Clarence
Grant a ear-old joiner of
Dayrells Road, Christ Church by

Mr. C. L. Walwyn, Acting Police
Magistrate of District “A”.

He was found guilty of the lar-
ceny of a battery valued at $42.26

and the property of Cole & Co.
on_August 7. Grant appealed at
the bar.

Police Constable
said that about 4.10 p.m. on Au-
gust 7 he was on duty along
Swan Street when he saw Grant
with a battery. He became sus-
picious and asked him how he
came by the battery. Grant told
him that aman named Herbert
Haynes ‘of Dayrells Road had
given him the battery,

The Police checked with Haynes
who said that he never gave a
battery to Grant. After this Grant
said that he was wrong and that
the battery was given to him by
a man named Wiltshire who works
at Cole’s Garage.

Wiltshire also denied that he
gave a battery to the defendant.

249 Springer

Bad Memory
Darlington attached to the
Central Police Station told the
Court that on August 7 Police
Constable Springer reported to
him that he had arrested Grant
with a battery

He asked Grant to tell him
about the battery and Grant said
that a man named Jones, a motor
mechanic, had given the battery
to him. About 6.30 p.m. the
same afternoon, Lionel Jones
came to the Station and was
shown the battery and Grant.

Cpl

Jones denied that he gave Grant
a battery. The defehdant then
aid that his memory was. bad
and that a man by the name of
Wiltshire had given it to him.
Later the battery was identified
s the property of Cole & Co.



Mossadegh Rejects
Stokes’ Proposal

From Page 1.

the eight points, because they



were “so messed about, that it was
better to withdraw them, than
leave them on the table.” He

summed up the failure of his mis-
sion this way. “The Iranian peo-
ple must make up their minds
whether they want to play poli-
tics and ruin themselves, or to
conduct their affairs on the sound
and accepted commercial princi-
ples embodied in the proposal
which was widely acclaimed as
fair in newspapers throughout the
world outside Iran, and which
will bring an era of prosperity to

the Iranian people for a long
period and friendliness and co-
operation between Iran and Brit-
ain.”

—U.P.

Twenty-Eight Dead

SINGAPORE, Aug. 20.

Twenty eight people are be-
lieved dead following a violent
explosion and fire early to-day

aboard the British tanker Dromus

while it was loading gasoline at

Pulan, Bukon Igland near here.
—(CP)



iT 6

?h [oie tuoay



BARBADOS

way

REMEMBER °
cu



Suit Adjourned
Until September 17

THE CHRISTIAN MISSION Chancery Suit has been

adjourned until September 17. When the hearing resumes "eported that

on that day, Mr. Adams and Mr. W. W. Reece. counsel for

the two parties, will put their case to His Lordship the’

ADVOCATE



DARLING — DON'T :
ITS STewaRDs’
P DAY AT GOOPWOOD



Christian Mission Rain Hinders

Work

A steady rain from 3.2
im, to 9.45 a.m. yesterday held
up work in most parts of the is-
land Up to 2 p.m yesterday
workers and shoppers walkec
Wah their rain coats slung over
their shoulders or arms.

The various police sub-Stations !

no damage was
done by the rain. District “C”|
had the heaviest rainfall up to}

6 a.m. yesterday when 35 parts

Vice Chancellor, Sir Allan Collymore, who is presiding, of rain were recorded,
Little more evidence remains to be taken.

Contesting the suit are : Rev. Frederick Barrow and
others against Rev. Hoyte and others,

The two patties are seeking a
declaration as to who were the
legally constituted General Su-
perintendent and Board of Man-
agement of the Christian Mission
during 1949, 1950 and who are

the présent General Superintend- opened, Rev. Barrow, Rev. Larrier residents in the area are

ent and Board of Management.

Rev. Barrow and his group are
represented by Mr. W. W. Reece,
K.C., associated with Mr, J. S. B
Dear, instructed by Messrs.
Hutchinson & Banfield,

Rev. Hoyte and the others are
represented by Mr. G. H. Adams
associated with Mr. D. H.
Ward, instructed by Messrs. Car-
rington & Sealy.

Did Not Attend

The ease is that after a break-
up on New Year’s Day, 1949 when
a service was scheduled to take
place, Rev. Hoyte did not attend
a meeting on January 6 when a
General Superintendent was to be
elected. Hoyte is explaining that
he did not attend that meeting
or two subsequent meetings be-
cause he was advised that they
were illegal. He said in evidence
that he notified other representa-
tives that the meeting was illegal-
ly convened and that they should
not attend.

Complainants from the other
side said that Hoyte gave other

reasons for not attending the
meeting, one being that he was
informed from reliable sources
that they intended injuring him.

Involved in the issue is whether
the going out of existence of the
Mission's Herald which gave no-
tice of meetings for appointments
of General Superintendents, meant
that the Supérintendent whose
election was last published would
continue to be Superintendent,

After evidence was finished, the
question of bringing pleadings up
to date was considered in Cham-
bers.

Awaiting Settlement

head.

Mr. Adams told him that there
was a misunderstanding about the
nature of the disturbances which
oecurred on New Year's day, 1949,
and he said when the door was

and Rey. Hoyte went in the pulpit
Which is normally only occupied
by one and there was much stone
throwing about the church
“Peace” Conference

Elder Lowe, Secretary of the
Christian Mission from June 27
1948 also gave evidence. He said

that on January 1, a religious ser
yice was scheduled to take place
When he arrived there was a
great commotion. Hoyte was there
and when he left, the disturbance
got worse with people from out-
side walking about the church

While they were in the taberna-
cle, because of a rumour, they
hurried to the office to secur:
documents,

‘I went to the meeting on Jan-
uary 6,” he said. “Ramsay wa
not asked to deputise for Hoyte
Ramsay went with the object of
seeing whether the two side
could get together. It was more
or less a peace conference

Ramsay informed the gathering
on what he had promised Rev
Hoyte—whether they would meet
to reach a_ settlement. He also
informed them that Rev. Hoyte
had informed him that the meet-
ing was illegal. He said that he
himself had discovered that and
had got legal confirmation of it

Mr. Eustace Clarke continued
with his contention that a Super-
intendent be appointed and Ram-
say resisted. This resistance dis
qualified him from being Chair-
man and he was asked to leave
the Chair. His brother Rev. EB.
Ramsay took the Chair.

“At this stage I told them,” he
said, “that it was a childish way
of getting on and I left.”

In cross-examination to Mr,

Other figures were Central Sta-
tion 10 parts, District “A” 15
parts, District “B” Boarded Hall
13 parts, District “D” 4 parts,

District “E” 23 parts, District
“F’ 18 parts, Holetown four parts
Four Road, St. John 25 parts and
Crab Hill, St. Lucy 10 parts

Around the flood area of River
Road, St. Michael most of the
on the

alert for any hurricane + arning

Life Belt
In one house some of the house-
hold essentials which were de-
posited.in the basement have beet
removed, A few housewives whx

hadn’t a storm lantern bought
one last week.

One woman has gone so far
as to secure a life belt in the
case of flooding. Speaking to the
Advocate yesterday she said “I

cannot swim and in case I have
to do so there is where the belt
will come in useful.”

The life belt hangs over her
bed. In Martindales Road most
of the gaps leading from the
street were well soaked



Custom Clerks
Work Overtime

Custom clerks were hard press-
ed during the past few weeks
with bookwork The reason, a
new warehouse tax has been
enforced which calls for much
more calculating and handling of
money in that department,

It is a 60c per ton tax or 1%e
per cubic feet tax payable for
every day over 10 days, on goods
kept in the warehouse, after they
have arrived in the island.

Cashbook Officers and cashiers
of the departments have been
spending hours overtime so as to
keep in stride with the inerease
of work in the department.

Clerks of the various
of the City have been



offices
spending

Yesterday Mr. Reece continued Reece, Lowe said that the meeting longer periods at the Customs for

cross-e€xamining Rev. Hoyte for for January 6 had been summoned the three weeks than

about 20 minutes when many of
the old points were again brought
out. Rev, Hoyte said that he had
been advised that he was still
Superintendent of the Christian
Mission and as long as there was
no meeting of the representatives,
he would continue to be Superin-
tendent.

He was waiting, he said on a
final settlement by legislation and
the present suit.

To Mr. Adams, he said that he
eould not remember when that
suit had been set down for hear-
ing, but when it was set down,
he had already petitioned the
Legislature. He was only served
notice a long time after the suit
was served. i}

He tried to get the Registrar to
bring it on for hearing so there
sould be no suggestion that he
did nothing to bring things to a

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by Rev. Hoyte and was to be a
meeting of the representatives

Protests Issued

He learnt afterwards that the
Superintendent was not appointed
at that meeting. He was not told
that Rev. Hoyte was willing to
admit wrongs, and throw himself
at the mercy of the representa-
tives.

He saw Rev. Hoyte and Ramsay
perhaps a day or two before Jan-
uary 6

“T did go back to report to Rev.
Hoyte,” he said, “but I cannot
remember the date.”

He said he took part in the issu-
ing of the protests. He saw them
before they were sent out He
could not remember taking them
out to representatives to get them
signed.

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Not Yet Complete

JAKARTA, August 20
Indonesian Foreign Minister
Achmad Subardjo said on Monday
morning the Government has
not yet completed its study of
the final draft of the Japanese
Peace Treaty and extensive dis-
cussions on the matter would be
held on Tuesday, the Aneta News
Agency reported. It said Subar-jo
made the statement during a

plenary session of Parliament.

—U.P.







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———_——————— ee re cee,

Jamaica Death Toll

w

2,000 population It

that hurricane

Reaches 155

@ From Page |
the storm was about 240 miles ea
of Tuxpan
at about 14

ard
Nautla

felt as

Mexico, city of almost 100,000
Squalls
extend to the lower
the Weather Bureau said in cay
tioning small craft to take co\
intil the storm has passed
Weather
ised ships in the southwest of th¢
Gulf of Mexico to remain in po

until all dangers have passed. Th
storm developed hurricane force
six days ago on moving into th
Caribbean Sea, from the Atlant
ind since has travelled = almos
2,300 miles along in directior
west-northeast The hurricat
truck Yucatan Peninsula yvester
jay with 100 mile an hour force
Jut no deaths were reported o

he Peninsula
Lightly built palm thatched hut
Coryemel
oast of the Peninsula were blown
Merida
northwestern
Peninsula,
and heavy rains but no great dam

WY

ic
or

The

wn
1 the

age

Jamaican

yetween
Jamaica’s

source of income
id about
island's other crops was ruined

ar

is

h

nar

ive
ntroduction to a
All

«

vere loud in their praises of the MADE BY X
hospitality extended them by the THE MONKS OF 4
Jamaicans on all sides, A resolu | BUCKFAST i

ion was unanimously adopted ABBEY )|

that such cooperative course

should be held annually at dif v q y
ferent centres and it was recom N ¢ y a
mended that the next such course

should take place next year | °
Puerto Rieo where rapid _ |

have been made in cooperative de

velopment, \ ce a ae

EI

h

:

|



Instructor Tells |
Of Jea Hurricane

well as

ey saw
Mr
as very
and

Jurse







gO



70) and 80 pet

Beckles



and was moving west
miles an hour
town of ‘less than
is expected
would

Tampic

is a

winds
far north as
heavy seas ma
Texas

and

coa

Bureau has

Island off the east
capital of Yucatan
tip of tl
reported high wind

\
aid that
cent of |
crop, major |
was destroyed
cent, of the |

suthorities
banana
30 per

From Page 1
the places of

|
said; “The cour |
interesting and informs |
has served as a good]
more extensi\
student

interes!

overseas |



PAGE THREE

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AaRs00S

PAGE FOUR





Saye SSeS FS

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown



Wednesday, August 22, 1951



ECONOMICS

THE Regional Economic Committee met
in Barbados in May.this year. Today they
begin another round of discussion in an-
other aspect of the economy of the Carib-
bean area. Earlier this year,
synchronsied with that of the Caribbean

Commission and the topics were then sugar
and dollars for expanding West Indian
trade with Canada.

their meeting

Today with an even more tense inter-
national atmosphere and the diversion of
British industrial power from peace time
production to the re-armament programme
there are greater difficulties in the way of
trade and commerce and dollars to
expand our trade with Canada. That trade
has dwindled, as a result of British trade
policy following devaluation of the pound
sterling, from a total of 85 million dollars
to a mere token.

less

It is in the light of these conditions and
the issues arising from the variations in
trade that the Committee begin their sec-
ond meeting. One item on their agenda
which will demand serious attention is the
Report of the Oils and Fats Conference
which has just concluded its consideration
of the present price of copra,

There is more than the mere price adjust-
ment of cooking oils and fats in these con-
siderations. The price of copra the basic in-
gredient must of course affect the price of
the finished article as supplied to the West
Indian market, and it is with this aspect of
the question that the Committee will be
primarily although not solely concerned.
The industry which has just been estab-
lished has given excellent service and with
the Conference keeping its finger on the
factors of trade, has been able to save the
West Indian market from the uncertainty
and continuously rising prices demanded by
overseas manufacturers

The Oils and Fats Conference met to con-
sider in detail the figures in connection with
the industry. It has been argued that its de-
liberations should have been made public,
but it might be said in reply that as the
report was to be furnished to the Regional
Economic Committee publication might’
well have been until it had been finally
discussed.

This is only one phase of the work of the
Regional Economic Committee charged
with the all-important task of watching
over the economic health of the area. It is
true that its decisions are subject to ratifi-
cation by the Governments of the various
colonies but they nevertheless give direc-
tion as to the course which might be fol-
lowed in finding solution to the various
problems.

When the West Indian Conference met
for the first time in 1944 in Barbados it was
realised, and emphasised by the late Mr.
Charles Taussig, one of the architects of the
Conference, that the only hope for the
West Indies was to have the problems of
the area settled on a regional basis. Since
that time sincere and sometimes success-
ful efforts have been made to follow this
course,

Too often has it been overlooked by the
architects of West Indian destiny, that sat-
isfactory political progress can only be
achieved on a basis of a healthy West In-
dian economy. This.is not an easy task in
an area hopelessly under-industrialised and
thickly populated. But it is such a task the
Regional Economic Committee has essayed
to perform. Its work will be followed with
the greatest interest in this island where
it has already proved its worth, and
throughout the Caribbean by the peoples
whose fate hangs on its decisions.



Plastic Surgeons Chalk Up A New Success

By CHAPMAN PINCHER

















LONDON, Aug
This article is founded on ne
more than an impression Sut
many news stories, and informa-
tion from the other side of the
Tron Curtain add to this im-

pression,

The Governments
Europe and North America are
deeply afraid of war—immediate
war. While the people of Western
Europe are taking their holidays

of Western





and rejoicing in glow of pos
sible peace—truce in Korea and
easier relation. with Russia
their Governments are¢ taking
actions that can only be in-

terpreted as indi
anxiety.

And in Eastern Europe Gov
ments are “clearing the

iting immediate

m-
decks” as









if for violent movement

Here are some of the pieces of
news which, when recalled, and
argued to their conclusion, point
te fear in high places.

First, there was the sudden
activity of the United States, last
month, in pressing for an im-
mediate agreement on bases in
Spain. Thousands of words have

been written justifying this course,
und attacking it I do not want to
take up these rights and wrongs,



at the moment. All I want to
point out is the timing of the late
Admiral Sherman's dramatic visit
to Madrid. In the last year the
Atlantic Pact Command has come
uwlong nicely General Eisenhower
has made a wreat success. At
Jast there is satisfaction with what
the French are doing to re-arn

And the long-drawn wrangle about
the joint command in the Mediter-
ranean, which would protect his

Southern flank, progressing to
an equable conclusion, In the
months of September and October
there was every reason to believe

that the question of Germany’
contribution to Atlantic Pact
Defence would be settled ata
meeting of Foreign Ministers in
Washington, and of the North
Atlantic Treat Council, after-
wards. To settle this question it
was necessary to instil confidence
in the United States intention to
defend all Western Europe—and

of Washington’s real understand-

ing of its Allies. The sudden
haste in seeking Spanish bases
upset this timetable. Western
Governments were appalled; the
Mediterranean Command is in
confusion again; the question of
German units is likely to be diffi-
cult to resolve. The only con-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





By D. T. ROBERTS

clusion i x.nish bases could




not be waitec there was some
need to have an agreement this
Summer rather than wait until
the winter which was the pro-
gramme any cautious and knowl-
edgeable diplomat would have
suggested.

That is one pointer to the war
fear of this month of August

Then there are two questions
centering in Berlir

Who would have thought that

Western Governments would have

ordered their police forces to stop
a thousand or 80 young peopie
from going to Berlin with vaud
passports? Who would have
thought that the spirit of youth—

‘ould nave been
Who would ex-

albeit misguided—
defied so clumsily?
pect Mr. Morrison, who wrote an
article in Pravda calling on tne
Russians to give freedom of move-
ment, to permit such a violent in-
terference with the movements of
small number of harmless and
confused boys and girls? Frankly,
the way to turn students into
members of Communist parties is
to treat them with a heavy hand.
for youth, naturally, revolts first
hand against the interference it
knows, before discovering, in later
years, the facts of the tyranny it
does not yet know. And if it was
to dissuade West Germans from
going to East Berlin, and to stop
them having a bad example—then
West

a

our policies in Germany
must be feeble if East Berlin is
© attractive, And the way to deal
with the problem is surely to

make West Berlin a show place,
give its people full employment
and prosperity.

The alternative
the Governments fear war this
month, and do not want thousands
their own peovle blocking the
way, right in the front line

reason is that

of

And the little blockade in
Berlin? 1 question whether the
exact story has yet become pub-
lic It is not possible that both
sides are seeking to close the
loopholes for trade, trade in
information, and the. travel of
agents one way and the other?
Until now Berlin—and Vienna
have been a meeting ground, a
bill valuable to both sides. If a
curtain closes round Vienna-
as I expect from day to day. es-
pecially ‘since this incident of
the travelling youth—then that
will be another sign that these



anor Tension. East and West

}

| awk



ibn Saud, King With 150

cities have ceased to be an ex-|
changing post for esplonage—
the secret service of all ye |
world will go over to a war plan. |
iwo oil tankers were being |
built, under contract, for the
Polish Government. The con-}
tract specificially mentioned |

that no political hindrance would |

be put on the delivery of the
tankers so long as the commer-
cial terms of the agreement were
fulfilled. The British govern- |
ment has an interest, particular- |
ly in Persia, in upholding the}
sanctity of international com-
mercial contracts against requi-|
sition in times of peace. The
justification for taking over two
oil tankers—a small matter, in|
proportion—is the exigency
approsching war.

And now we must pass to the |

shadowy world on the other side
of Europe. While Moscow has
been releasing well-frained
doves of peace from their cages

-—dand would they were all that|
been |
at |
in- |
The |

lived in cages!—she has
breathing fire anq slaughter
her satellite, Poland. Iron
structions have gone forth.
Polish Army, under its Russian |
Commander, has been
again. The dangers of
were roundly denounced
Molotov, to the Poles; while
Malik, almost at the same
stant, was amiably receiving
delegation of British quakers in
Moscow.

On the Danube
smoothly, In Hungary we did
not know that so many Barons,
Counts,
Judges,
agers,
lived

”

“titoism
by

in-

capitalists, business nan-
and other “carrion” still
until the news was re-
vealed last week that so many
had been arrested—the “last
remnants of the Porthyite re-
gime.” Many are in Hungary no
jonger.
tral European
those gay baronesses and_ their
shakoed officer escorts of yes-
teryear—have been grimly gath-
ered in. They were harmless
people, already broken, most of
them living as petty traders, on
puffrance. Why? Even a
tarian government must
reason for arresting
people.

These are straws that blow in
the wind. The wind is blowing
in the face of all the world.

aristocracy

have



Journey Into 1964

Dr. Goldmark throws a new weapon into the cold war....
and zero hour is 8.30 to-night in divided Berlin

BERLIN.
Dr. Peter Goldmark, the man
who likes to play chamber music

on his ‘cello, quietly entered the
Berlin cold war.
While thousands of young

Communists are marching, sing-
ing and demonstrating under pic-
tures of Stalin, he is preparing a
soft answer with fashion parades,
blonde cabaret stars and rhythm



bands. Already news of Dr
Goldmark’s magic has gone
round the Russian half of this
divided city, ene many of the
youths after yesterday’s maffick.
ing have ouatee acr the bor-
der on reconnaissance.

The magic is television.

Tonight Berlin will become a TV
city as a hundred TV sets in shop
windows in the busiest thorough-
fares and two cinemasize screens
each worth £25,000 begin to
show black and white pictures,

But in Berlin’s White City, Dr.
Goldmark has his own particular
magic—colour TY. He has
brought into Germany for the
first time a £10,000 unit shipped
across from the USA, And in
bringing it he has anticipated by
precisely 33.years the George
Orwell world where the battle of
ideologies is fought by television.
To enter Berlin today is to enter
1984, with the cathode ray tube
as the newest weapon of the cold
war.

Just Coincidence

Columbia and the Radio Cor-
poration of America, the two
rival TV companies in the U.S.A,,

are collaborating in the most
spectacular TV demonstration
ever held in Europe: Ostensibly
it has nothing to do with the
Communist Youth Festival
“across the road” the Economic

Co-operation Administration,
sponsors, describe it as a strange
coincidence that the two events
happened together.

But they are making it known
that visitors from the Eastern
sector will be welcome, and they
have impertinently set up one of

its

their big screens facing the Rus.
sian sector.
Every night for two weeks

there will be four hours of black
and white pictures two and a half
hours of colour transmitted by
£175,000 worth of equipment. A
transmitter has been hauled to
the top of the town hall from
which the Croydon-cast freedom
bell rings to encirele the West











By GEORGE CAMPEY
of Berlin with TV.
For most of the Iron
youths this will be
ight of television, for
TV will be a novelty.

part
Curtain
their first
all colour

Dietrich Too

They will find the Western
ipproaches unusual, A little
Marshall plan propaganda, yes. A
film satire on life under Russian
influence. But for the most part
what they will see will be enter-
tainment—comedy, sports items,
quiz shows and probably Marlene
Dietrich in colour,

Berlin’s film, stage and radio
artists have been jostling to take
part. An appeal which went out
for Nordic blondes filled the
radio stations, and executives
had to fight their way to their
offices through corridors packed
with fair-haired girls, many of
whom, remembering the needs of
TV in pre-war days, arrived with
blue-painted lips.

Today I found Dr.
working in a pavilion which 10
months ago I saw being stormed
by Germans anxious to see our
television. But the BBC ‘could
show only standard pictures

Goldmark now carries the
magic further with a _ colour
camera which a few months ago
was being used to televise hos-
pital operations,

This Hungarian-born scientist
is the world’s colour genius, In
the New York laboratories of the
Columbia company, he invented
and developed the world’s first
colour TV service. Eleven years
ago he started work on it; today
his system has been accepted by
the U.S. Government and two-
hour transmissions are now going
out each day, with sponsors
clamouring to lay down. their
dollars.

Goldmark

Britain? No
For two years Goldmark work-
for an English company for
the development of colour TV.
Then Britain lost him. He took
his expert knowledge from the
land of broadcasting monopoly,
where the advent of colour TV is
as remote an eventuality as the
end of meat rationing.

Now this cello-playing scientist
with his thick glasses and retir-
ing manner is spreading his col-
our creed and his caravan across
Europe.

From Berlin his TV team
equipment will go to France

ed

and
and







probably Switzerland;
travels are over he will have
travelled 15,000 miles, But
Britain is not in the schedule.

Goldmark, 45, married with
three children, is a man who yes-
terday was building tomorrow.
He invented the long-playing
gramophone’ record. He talks
quietly of his next big project—
colour vision on cinema screens
—which will start, in association
with Hollywood, in the autumn.
And today, in shirt-sleeves, sur-
rounded by his technicians, un-
eonvincingly dressed in Tyrolean
outfits, he prepared his 1984
world for 1951 to see,

In Studio Six

Will this TV cold war be effec-
tive? Will the Iron Curtain youth
be tempted westward to see for
themselves?

Perhaps Studio Six provides an
indication. Here at RIAS, the
American-sponsored radio — sta-
tion, politically minded youths
from the Eastern Sector are
gathering to listen to the voice
of the west.

They are not invited they just
arrive still wearing their Festival
blue shirts. They come in large
numbers, boys and girls whose
average age is 14, to study the|
newspapers they never see. They
come to sit in the studio and ask
questions that children should
never ask; questions like: “How
many labour hours does it take
to provide a suit?

MPs and others answer the
questions warn them not to take
any western papers back across
the thin Red Line. But the con-
versations are never broadcast.

I have watched their faces.
They are tense, unchildlike. They
are 1984 faces. Perhaps Dr. Gold-
mark anticipating the Orwellian
world can help to prevent it act-
ually happening.

Into Action

One thing is certain. In Berlin
today a new phase is opening in
the battle of ideas. A television
reporter does not expect to be-
come a war correspondent. But
that is what he is in this divided
city today, where television has
made its first appearance on the
world’s psychological warfare
front.

And zero hour is 8,30 tonight,
when Dr. Goldmark and nearly
40 technicians go into action.

World Copywright Reserved

—LES.

when his

|
|
|
|
|



aru. the anti-rheumatism If skin-transplants from several his own leg remarking. “Noni soit
asp Crus. inimals are grafte i i 3 :
, cas eal peo - animals are grafted on at the same qui mal y pense.”
W sot . x¢ ? ting discoveries 5 Cortisone also delays the tight- time the body disperses its de- Dr. Murray asked: “Why
eee oy enable wiaiio ge which normally takes place fences in an attenipt to attack should Lady Salisbury be wear |
surg Ss to save many more lives round a bad burn, causing them al . ac “oft ff ; . * r *
; ; ; ‘ ’ : - . » Ce t all, So each graft gets a ing a garter > a es :
and rebuild injured faces with This delay might give a longer life zy steckinaar ayn eery Enmore
“vad disfigurement, were disclosed more time to prevent d The two discoveries are now to The reason ted by D
»y Britis ssociz scientists 2 d : ab he reas sugges y r.
oe owe scientists ment be combined in hospital tests on Murray was iat tna anes cat
ee g -day. burned patients who will get the syn i h
ee a c SCOVERY N ‘ +} ; » symbol of the S >
Until BOW Skin grafted from DISCOVERY No. 2 is the fact cortisone injections and grafts coven (or co - Shieh ofathe
ene person to another has never that small patches of skin, grafted from several donors s council), a pre-Chris-
survived for “more than a few mosiac - fashion ovey large : tian organisation of 13 people,. in
days* .So scores of badly burned Wound, last much longer if they That Garter Britain’s old religion, Had the
patients have dieq from shock be- are taken from several donors in- Mae aval! Periag pa priests discov-
cause their wounds could not be stead of one. erec rat Lady Salisbury wore
ly * tg covered. joth discoveries were made * _ ar ae eae of et oer life would have been
Now as a result of ingenious the Birmingham Unive shor we age “er -
2x me ie Aare eo cee py St eAty« SADOE> e Garter ar Sing Edwar , iy
~~ riments with an S, thers atories of 3 ear-old Professor sad 5 ‘fed ES Ros ti aan 7 Edw ard. by his quick-
is hope that burned op) may Peter Med Behir ; y Dr. inking in putting the garter on
be able to get life-saving “tr a ee A. Murray. She retired his own leg, saved Lady Salis-
fusions” of skin from relat rafte fr re from the post of bury’s life. In founding ~~ the
and friends k Egypt La Garter Order in groups of 13,
BISCOVE RY No. : er K ng Edward still adhered to the
t th ri ane 1 < ’ . i structure of the cove
v $ ‘
i r A ‘ .
vv a bet €
ngop i ’ ept 8
ti ve t ( ! r L.E.S
i «

of |

purged |

M.\
M. |

a}

The last pillars of Cen-;

an air of the

The 44-year-

Sons And £50,000 A Day

By GERALD SCHEFF
A TALL, hook-nosed Arab prince brought

desert to the Sussex Downs

jrecently, when he visited Lewes races.

-old Emir Feisal, Viceroy of|

the Hedjaz, Foreign Minister of Saudi-Arabia,
emissary of his powerful father, King Ibn

Saud, is acclaimed the handsomest Arab of |

jall.





_EMIR FEISAL
/10,000 Arab
King Abdul

He is King of t

Wounded 60



He has a pale bronze com-

plexion, grave mien and bold, |

dark eyes. He wears flowing
robes with white and gold
headdresses.

A Nubian bodyguard, armed

with bejewelled dagger and)

Mauser
him.

pistol, accompanies

10.000 Horses
Feisal’s day at the races
was a day off during his ten-
day visit to Britain as guest
of the Government.

| A dashing rider himself—his father owns}
nothing flows |

horses—Feisal today mostly

| journeys by plane and car.
former Ministers, former |

Aziz Ibn Saud, now over 70,

| has been called “the Cromwell of the Desert.”

he Nejd and the Hedjaz, Imam

lof the Wahabis, Guardian of the Holy Cities
| of Mecea and Medina and Lord of Arabia.

He is an autocratic ruler, a warrior-states-
;man fearing no foe but always seeking peace.

times in his fighting days, the

| king now devotes his life to fostering the

totali- |
a |
harmless |

|
|
|
|

prosperity of

Saudi-Arabia—one of the

richest oil empires—and his dream of an
Arab Federation.

NO DANCING
His rule is based on the Koran, His sub-

Penalty for

for the second.

The US. oil
Saudi-Arabian

Moslems.

ance.
works, includ

pipeline.

fence

ernment posts

4

nits.

‘n picturesque
crs.
across their k

| cloisters.

Talal,

sons,



| life—

a Cairo report.

Ibn Saud’s w

| jects are the most religious of all Moslems.
|There is no smoking, drinking, or dancing,
and only martial music.

theft is mutilation—the left

hand cut off for the first offence, the right

Murderers are still publicly beheaded in
the captial city of Riyadh,

company which now pays the
Government (largely Ibn

Saud and Sons) half its profits for the con-
cession employs no Jews for fear of offending |}!

The 3,000 Americans in the oil centre of
Dhahran have
prayer-books are banned.

GOOD WORKS

Ibn Saud is said now to have an oil-income
of more than £50,000 a day. Half the money
|is reported to

no church, and Christian

go into his personal treasure,

or in subsidies to sheiks owing him allegi-

The other half is being spent on public

ing a 600-mile railway, a

£ 2,000,000 road to Medina being built by a
British firm, new harbour buildings, hospitals
and schools, and a new British-built water

Heir-apparent and Prime Minister is 46-
year-old Emir Saud, who once saved his
father from an assassin's dagger.

Another son,
Minister
brother, Mansour. Yet other sons held Gov-

the Emir Michel is nov. De-
following the deatn of his

at Mecca, the holy city.
HOURS’ SLEEP

hitewashed coral palaccs have

There are ramps which enabie the king
tc diive his ear into the palace reoms.

The king is 6ft. 4ins. He starts work before |
cawn, sleeps four hours a night, ard drinks}
cup after cup of scented bitter coffee. Soldiers |

OSE PEP PPEPLLLPPLLL SLEEP ES PSE LSS LOPES.

|











robes line the palace corrid-|

nees. Doves flit through the)

200 WIVES?

He has an extensive harem. One of his %
has admitted that he does not
know how many brothers he has.

A reference book credits the king with 32/%
sons, but official registers in foreign missions | 8
at Jeddah record about 150 sons, according to |

No mention is made of a large number of |

daughters.

He has probably had 200 wives, but many

| of the marriages have been political, At one, |
40 sheiks said “I do” for him by proxy.

SOLACE

When in 1945 Ibn Saud presented Mr. |

dagger,
perfume.

It was a wise choice.

| Churchill with a gold and jewel- encrusted |
he received in return six bottles of |

The king has said

that, like the Prophet, he has three solaces in

“Women, perfume and prayer.
He prays five times daily.

”
|

He once spent

£1,800 on perfume for the ladies of his harem
for a special occasion.
British economic influence is growing in;

Saudi-Arabia.
Footnote:
Middle

Feisal’s visit
East problems, the Anglo-Saudi-

is concerned with

Arabian treaty of friendship, and minor

frontier

rectifications.

London Express Service.

Bodyguards squat with golden swords}

%
%,
g

The king wears only home-spun robes and | % %
likes grey British Army socks.

:

IS
iss

12 3
%

3

ys
‘

1y

“6

+4 4 44,4,« 24 ¥
, LALA AAP OED FOS err OE ete ere



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AUGUST 22,

1951



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4



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST



ad

os,

1951

House Agree To
Utilities Bill

THE House of Assembly after much discussion yester-

day, agreed to the amendme

to the Bill to provide for

Utilities.

Members were especial]

24 which reads:

“Provided always that for the
purposes of this section “sufficient
business” shall mean such busi-
ness 2s will yield such gross
revenue within the extended area
of supply at the rates for the time
being authorised as will produce
a sum not less than the cost of
maintenance and _ depreciation
will produce a reasonable return
on the capital outlay in respect of
such extension.”

Mr. Adams _ (L) in going
through the amenaments as sent
down by the Other Place, made
observations on each. He agreed
with few of the amendments
while he strongly criticised most
of them.

He said that the Other Place
acted wrongly in that they, in
making amendments to the bill,
destroyed more than anything
else, the principle of the bill as it
was passed by the House. “The
Other Place has the right to sug-




gest means which will endeav-
our to make clear or earry out
the principles outlined in a bill

us it is passed by the House”, he
said, “but should not destroy the
principle.”

The Government, he said, was
accepting the amendments rather
than lose the entire bill. The
bill was to provide for the regu-
lation of public utilities and it was
better to have it on the statute
book with the amendments from
the Other Place and let it be
known that théy decided to ac-
cept it rather’ than lose it en-
tirely.

Mr. Adams said that
the amendments were verbal,
some unduly ridiculous and
scme merely expressions of points
of view. He was most annoyed
over section 24. It meant that
there would never be lights in
far out places except the Electric
Company saw the possibility of
making revenue. In that case,
the electric service would hardly
ever be extended to St. Lucy, St.
Joseph and other far out parishes

The Government, he said, had

some of

never departed from the princi-
ple of nationalisation as they
were convinced that it was the

only salvation of any community.
The Public Utilities Bill was a
temporary measure until the
treasury could afford to purchase
those public utilities that were
necessary.

Mr. Haynes (E) said that he
was hoping that the Government,
when they were appointing their
Public Utilities Board, would put
men on it that would not bow to
the various companies and will
see that some action is taken,

Mr. Garner (C)_ said that he
felt the electricity of this colony
should be so cheap that every-
body should have it. He thought
it ridiculous that in a parish like
St. Philip, only few people had
electricity. He wanted to know
if a company, which had -the
monopoly of a service in an island
21 x 14, could not find enough
money to electrify it.

He said that he wanted to regis-
ter his protest against the amend-
ments of the bill although he
was going to vote for it.

Mr. Crawford (C) said that the
bill was somewhat complicated
but in the final analysis its utility
to the colony could be expressed
in simple terms. “Everything will
depend on the manner in which
the Board executes its duties, the
manner in which it interprets its
responsibilities to the commun-
ity,” he said. He thought that the
personnel should therefore be
selected with utmost care.

He said that he did not propose
to say much about the question
of nationalisation. But, the pub-
lic wes promised three years ago
that if a certain government were
returned, the Electric Company
would have been nationalised
within six months. Now, he said,
the people are being promised it
at some distant date in the un-
known future.

He was hoping that the Board
would concern itself at once with
the immediate expansion of elec-
tricity in the rural areas and see
to it that public utility services
should be provided at the cheap-
est possible rate.

In neighbouring West Indian
colonies, the rural parochial
authorities provide electricity for
their areas, Mr. Crawford said.
He knew that amendments were
made to that Act but he felt that
the position with regard to per-
mitting the parochial authorities
to electrify their respective areas
needed some _ consideration and
action.



Mr. Reece (E) referring to the
Hon. Senior Member for St.
Joseph’s remarks about the Gov-
ernment’s policy towards nation-
alisation, said they had national-
ised water in Barbados and after

many long years, they were in
the same position as they were
before nationalisation. “It is ex.

ceedingly difficult to get anything

of the Government if they say
no,” he said.

The Hon., Senior Member for
St. Joseph has said, nationalisa-
tion meant spending of money.
He would have preferred to see
the money spent on the East

Coast Road and on a deep water
harbour. “A deep water harbour
is the very life blood of the
people of this colony,” he said.
Mr. Reece criticised some of the

amendments. He said that if
they (the House) said that they
did not agree with the amend-

ments to the bill, they should re-
ject the bill rather than to accept
it with the amendments.

Mr. Mottley (E) said in agree-
ing with the amendments of the
Other Place to this bill, he would
say at the outset he was one of






those who thought the Other
Place as part of the Legislature
of this colony, should have the
right to make amendments, pro-
vided that they did not
destro inciple of the bill
There certain amend-
ere I b3 the Ir





nts of the Legislative Council
the regulation of the Public

y opposed to amended section

(and indeed democracy flourished
on compromise and free and just
criticism). He therefore did not
see how this amendment could be
considered just when it was
known that the public utilities in
this country enjoyed monopoly.
“The fat must be mixed with
the lean”, he said. “If your ser-
vices are carried to well to do
people who can pay for exten-
-ons, you must make money,
The idea of this bill, he said,
was to see that rich, poor and
middle class alike got the bene-
fit. of public utility services. It
was more necessary, in his opin-
jon, to run the electric service
in slum areas and in areas where
‘here were small houses and bad
roads for the purpose of illum-
inating streets than even in the
areas where there were _ people
who could appreciate and under-

stand the ethics of social condi-
tions.
He wanted it made clear that

when an amendment came to de-
lete that part of section 24, which
dealt with gross revenue, he
could support it.



Ilouse Accept

Amendments
By Leg. Co.

The House of Assembly yester=
day accepted the amendments of
the Legislative Council to the Bill
to make provision for holidays
with pay for employees.

Mr. G. H. Adams explained the
amendments in detail and asking
the House to agree to them, said
that the Bill was not now as good
a Bill as Government would like
to see. It was a sort of begin-
ning however to have it put on
the Statute Book until it could be
improved.

He was sure that they were
certain amendments of the Bill
which did not find complete
favour with hon, members. The
amendments, however, did not
differ so much as ta satisfy the
Government in asking hon. mem-
bers not to accept them. He asked
that they do so,

Among the amendments were
the following:

“Year of employment” in rela-
tion to an employee means any
period of twelve months during
which the employee has actually
performed labour or rendered
services for the same employer for
an aggregate of at least two hun-
dred and fifty days in the case of
employees employed on a weekly,
fortnightly, monthly or yearly
basis, and at least one hundred
and fifty days in the case of any
other employees.

Every employee being in em-
ployment at the date of the com-
mencement of this Act shall at
the end of the first year of his
employment computed as though
his employment commenced on
the date of the commencement of
this Act, and at the end of each
succeeding year of his employ-
ment, be entitled to an annual
holiday of at least two weeks. |

Every employee not being in
employment at the date of the
commencement of this Act but
thereafter being in employment
shall, at the end of each year of
his employment, be entitled to an

annual Holiday of at least two
weeks.
The annual holiday shall be

given and taken in one period of
two weeks or if the employer and
employee so agree, in two periods
of one week each and not other-
wise,

If the employer and employee
so agree, the annual holiday or
either of such separate periods
may be taken wholly or partly in
advance before the employee has
become entitled to such holiday.

Provided that the giving and
taking of the whole or any sep-
arate period of such holiday may,
with the consent in writing of the
Labour Commissioner, be further
postponed for a period to be
specified by him in any case
where hes of opinion that cir-
cumstances render such postpone-
ment necessary or desirable.

Where the annual holiday or
any part thereof has been taken
before the right to such annual
holiday has accrued, the right to
a further annual holiday shall not
commence to accrue until after
the expiration of the period of
twelve months in respect of
which the annual holiday or part
thereof has been so taken,



House Pass $11,000
For Radios

The House of Assembly passed
yesterday a Resolution for $1 1,000
for the. purchase of V.H.F. ra-
dio equipment for the Police De-
partment.

The Addendum explained that
the wireless equipment at the
Police Headquarters and out-
stations which was _ installed in
1937 is now completely unser-
viceable. In view of the hurri-
cane season it is proposed to re-
place as a matter of urgency the
transmitters at Headquarters and
at District Stations “C”, “E” and





W.1. CENTRE
IN LONDON
PLANNED

Plans for the establishment of
a non-residential club and centre
in London for students from the
Caribbean Area were revealed to
members of the Legislative Coun-
cil at their meeting yesterday in
a message to that Chamber from
His Excellency the Governor.

The message read: —

His Excellency the Governor
has the honour _ to inform the
Honourable Legislative Council

that the Secretary of State for the
Colonies is sponsoring an applica-
tion by the West Indian Students’
Union for financial support from
British West Indian Colonies for
the establishment in London of a
non-residential club and centre
for students from the Caribbean
area. In his despatch the Secre-
tary of State has pointed out that
the West Indian Students’ Union
has the support of the majority
of the 1,200 West Indian students
now in the United Kingdom, of
whom more than 600 are in Lon-
don.

It has been represented by the
Executive Committee of the Union
that besides providing a_ centre
which West Indians could look
upon as their own to help them
foster healthy social activities,
the proposed club would offer
facilities where, apart from West
Indian students meeting each
other, they could return the hos-
pitality which they have received
from friends in the United King-
dom and could meet people from
the West Indies and elsewhere.

Estimates

According to tentative estim-
ates, it is expected that the initial
Capital Expenditure for acquiring
a property and for conversion and
adaptations would amount to be-
tween $48,000 (£10,000) and
$72,000 (£15,000) and that the
deficit on maintenance would
probably be $9,600 ( £2,000)—
$14,400 (£3,000) per annum.

In respect of mainienance, the
students themselves would be ex-
pected to contribute by means of
membership dues, and the man-

agement would be expected to
seek ways and means of raising
revenue. It is not anticipated,

however, that the establishment
could be completely self-support-
ing. The Secretary of State is
also giving consideration to a pro-
posal that West Indian business
interests might be willing to make
financial contributions to the es-
tablishment of the Club and Cen-
tre.

At this stage, however, the Sec-
retary of State wishes to learn
whether West Indian Govern-
ments would agree in principle to
the establishment in London of

such a club for West Indian Stu-

dents, and if so whether they
“would now give sympathetic
consideration to contributing to-

wards capital expenditure and
maintenance, possibly on a_ basis
proportional to the number of stu-
dents from each territory at pres-
ent in the United Kingdom and
having regard to the general
financial position of each Colony.”

On this “Student basis” the
Barbados contribution towards the
capital cost would be in the region
of $5,500 and that towards main-
tenance expenses would be $1,100
per annum. If it is agreed that
contributions should be assessed
on a population rather than on a
“Student basis”, Barbados, share
would be under 6.6% as qppcsed



to approximately 7.8% on the
“Student basis.”

Accordingly, the Honourable
Legislative Council is invited to

indicate whether it agrees in prin-
ciple with the proposal to estab-
lish a Club and Centre in London
for West Indian Students and
whether it would-be prepared to
approve contribution towards
the capital and annually recurrent
costs.



Public Service
Bill Passed

THE House of Assembly yes-
terday passed a Bill to provide for
the constitution of a Public
Service Commission and matters
incidental thereto.

The establishment of a Public
Service Commission for the pur-
pose of advising the Governor on
the selection and appointment of
candidates in the island, to posts
in the public service was advo-
cated by the Secretary of State
for the Colonies. :

The main purpose of setting up
Public Service Commission i

a
to ensure that the Governor is
afforded suitable advice on the

selection and appointment of local
candidates for the public service
as well as (inter alia) the inter-
departmental transfer of officers,
their dismissal, disciplinary control
and retirement, and the award of
study leave to officers.



In the Legislative
Council

The Legislative Council met at 2 p.m
yesterday. The Hon'ble Robert Challenor
presided

The Hon'ble the Colonial Scereta
presented a message from His Excellency
the Governor re the establishment in
London of a Club and Centre for Wer
Indian Students

The Hon'ble the Colonial Secretary pre-
sented the Annual Report of the Organi-
zition and Administration of the B a
Police Force for the year 1950

The Council passed resolution

To place the sum of $17.4











posal of the Governor-ir
Committee to supplement

1951—52, Part II, Capital, as shown ir
Supplementary Estimate 52, No
13, which form the to the



Resolution;

“F”’, and to equip two mobil To place the sum of one hundred and

units ighteen thousand six hundred and

2 es ifty dollars (118,650) at the disposal of
Dr. H. G. Cummins (L) whe he Governor-in-Executive Committee to

moved the pussing of the Resolu- supplement the Estimates 1951-52, Part

tion told members that the equip-ff4—Capital, as shown in Sanaa ae?

‘ ; htai Ma Jazstimates 1951—52, No. 14, which forr

nent was to be obtained from they ve 'Schedule to the Resolution

United Kingdom and would be} phe Council passed bills

here in about three months. Hon amend the Vestries Act 1911
wend ares ay ie 5)

members would have noticed an sited’ 4M
advertisement in the loca] Press
offering to rent local equipment,-
he added. This would be used for
the purpose desired in the intervai.

$13,792 For R.E.C.

The House of Assembly



vester-



passed a _ Resolution for
in connection with the
11 Economic Committee;




r





(1990—5) .
The Council replied to His Excellency
the Governor's Message regarding the
Ecenomic Co-operation Agreement
The Council adjourned









August 28

PARKING PROHIBITED
Cars, taxis, etc., are no long-

er allowed to park along the}

in fror of the O n

View and Hastir Hotel

Police Notices one just

Hastings Hotel and the

be thie Oce € r





until Tuesday |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Pine Plantation May

Get $17,000 Equipment

_ CANE CROP PRODUCTION at the Pine Plantatipn
for 1951 was 4,700 tons and production for the past five
years 1946—1950 averaged 2,875 tons which is 1,825 tons

or an average of 63°%

increase, more than the average of
the past five years, the Hon:

the Colonial Secretary yester+

day told members of the Legislative Council















He was moving the passing of than motor lorries and are much
a resolution for $17,000 for items more lent in wet weatner
of additional equipment at the The ést ited cost of the tractor
Pine Plantation and the Central and f eane carts is $12,000, of
Livestock Station. which $4,000 would, it is estimated,

The addendum to the resolu- be re by the sale of two
tion reads as follows of the motor lorries

(1) It is proposed to purchase Far ird n e is an inevi-
an area of approximately 4 acre table -product of a dairy herd.
adjacent to the Shrewsbury Boys’ Moreover. sanitary regulations re-
School, St. Philip, for use as i quire the removal of manure
playeround for the School The from the farmyard within four
site is at present leased at the days its production, There is
rate of $16. per annum and is the much more farmyard manure to
only place available for playfield be handled and disposed of than
and garden purposes, The owner there was a year or tWo ago, as
is now willing to sell it and, if the full complement of animals
purchased by the Government, it tc be maintained under the ac-
will become a valuable amenity ceptec rogramme is approached.
of the School. becoming increasingly

(2) The increase in the ca to get farmyard manurt
crop cultivation over the past by hand jabour and to
years and especially the record with the sanitary regula-
crop which has recently been tions to which I have referred
reaped at the Pine Plantation has More« yer, much of the value of
shown the urgent need for the manure is lost if it is merely
following items of additional removed from the yard and
equipment at the Pine Plantation stacked for long periods by the
and the Central Livestock Station field side until labour becomes
in order that the efficiency and available. Crop production can
the revenue-earning capacity of pb. considerably and _ profitably
me i age might be in- jnereased by the timely applica-
creased:— tion of farmyard manure to the
TRANSPORT 2 feld. It is proposed that the

1 Wheel Type Tractor $ 5,600 Pine Plantation and Central

4 Cane Carts 6,400 Livestock Station should possess

$12,000
Farmyard manure

leader and spreade. 2,000
IRRIGATION ‘
Pipes and Fittings 2,400
CONTINGENCIES 600

Totat $17,000

Weaknesses

The Hon, the Colonial Seeretary
said the Director of Agriculture
has represented that the experi-
ence gainéd during the reaping of
this year’s record sugar crop at the
Pine and the additional informa-
tion which he has pe@sonally col-
lected in operating the plantation
during the past year have revealed
certain weaknesses in the organ-

isation for the production and
reaping of sugar cane and fodder
grasses and have led him to the

conclusion that certain alterations
and additions, involving capital
expenditure could be effected with
economic advantage and are imme-

diately required. He has added
that this information was not
available at the time when the

estimates for 1951/52 were under
preparation and that in view of
the need for early attention to
these weaknesses, it is undesirable
to defer consideration until next
year’s Estimates,

The average sugar cane produc-
tion at the Pine for the four years
1946—49 was 2.700 tons, Pro-
duction in 1950 was 3,548 tons,
bringing the average for the five
years 1946—50 up to 2,875 tons
Production in 1951 has been esti-
mated at 4,700 tons which is 1,825
tons or 63% more than the aver-
age of the last five years. In
terms of money this represents a
gross revenue trom sugar canes
of $21,900 more than that calcu-
lated on average production fox
the last five years and $13,800
more than that calculated in the
crop of 1950. As a result, organ-
isation, better drainage and _ soil
management, irrigation and
higher yielding varieties the Di-
rector does not consider it too
optimistic to expect that average
annual production in the future
will be less than 4,000 tons
may even read 5,000 ton



and

Transport System

The existing transport system is
based on three motor lorrie
These have proved not only to be
extremely expensive to maintain
and repair, but also to be inade-
quate for meeting transport re-
quirements, especially the haulage
of the sugar cane crop which is
now so much longer than in previ-
ous years. The Director has pro-
posed that, instead of purchasing
extra lorries, the transport system
should be modified by basing it
on modern type cane carts draw
by a wheel-type tractor These
vehicles are cheaper to operate
and very much cheaper to run















{ Ae



|
|

It cleans,

Nothing else

12k

a an
ee ALueys tu Good Tae

a farmyard
spreader
by the

manure
which would
Fordson tractor

loader and
be drawn
now at

the Station and would serve the
twofold purpose of getting the
freatest value and benefit from

the manure and demonstrating the

use of such implements to cOm-
mercial dairies. Possession of
these implements will ensure
compliance with the sanitary

vegulations.

Portable Equipment

W.R.T. Irrigation, the Major
Aluminum Company of Canada,
presented Government with por-
table aluminum equipment to
demonstrate overhead irrigation
of large scale commercial produc-
tion of sugar cane. Such a
demonstration, together with the
collection data to determine
the economies of commercial ir-
rigation, has been accepted as a
part of the programme of inves-
tigational and demonstration work
at the Pine.

It also necessary that
intensive system of fodder
production be investigated and
demonstrated. For this purpose
irrigation water is needed during
spells of dry weather. Moreover,
it is necessary that well-grown
crops of Indian corn and Guinea
corn be produced us catch crops.
During a spel, of dry weather ali
these operatives compete for the
limited irrigation equipment
available, and they cannot be
effectively undertaken unless ad-
ditional distribution of equipment

of

an
grass







is provided

It is considered that the pro-
visions of these items vy en-
hance the revenue earning
capacity of the Tine and that
they will pay for themselves in
a relatively short time. It is, of
course, nec ary to place orders
now for the transport equipment
if it is to be delivered in time
for the 1952 reaping season

+
House Express

. x ‘

Sympathy For Jca

THE House of Assembly yester.
d passed a Resolution express-
ing sympathy for the island of
Jamaica.

The Resolution which was mov-
ed by Mr. G. H. Adams seconded
by Di. H. G. Cummins reads

The House of Assembly places
on record its profound sense of
regret at the catastrophe which
has befallen te island of Jamaica,
an its willingness to consider

pathetically, any Resolution
fc financial or other help which
the Government may send down
to it for its consideration.

The House requests His Excel-
lency the Governor to send to His
Excellency the Governor of
Jamaiea a copy of this Reso'ution.

For léather
of every colour—

preserves—-and how it

polishes! Ask your retailer for Propert’s.

quite the same. Watch

the difference it makes to your shoes!

, PROPERT'S

2D) woe CREAM

'
MMU





PAGE FIVE














Evelyn Disagrees |
With Poliey

Of Sugar Industry
Agricultural Bank

The Hon. G. B. Evelyn told ‘eal

FOR THE BEST IN

MATCHES



Legislative Council yesterday that | — 9

he did not agree with the policy | A ae R
f the majc , of the Directors Ss ro

f the Sugar Industry Agricultufal

Bank on which Board he repre-

sented that Honourable Co,incil.
He offered to resign if the . "
Council feit that they should get ||
another member to represent them rit hl oy,
Members of the Council expressed . PL toll §
agreement and satisfaction with rf ;
Mr. Evelyn’s work on the Board
wnd asked him to continue to re-
present that Council. He agreed.
Mr. Evelyn said that he wanted

EN

to draw the attention of the |
Chamber to the fact that tne
policy of the majority of the
Directors of the Sugar Industry

Agricultural Bank was opposed to
his

He quoted a recent instance in
which the Bank had _ recently
loaned a large sum of money to a
company to purchase the Joes
River Group of Estates on the
Security of those plantations
He was opposed to that because
considered that the funds of the



THREE PLUME

he

bank should not be used for pur-
chasing land or be tied up in
groups of plantations. The funds

should be kept liquid for financing
work on plantations and work of
that nature.

However the majority
ihe day, Mr. Evelyn said,
the loan was made

carried
and

ON SALE
EVERYWHERE

Repayment
The next point that arose with
which he disagreed was with the
method of repayment. When the
loan was made it was secured by









mortgage and made payable on
December 31.
The Bank had now been ap-
proached and asked by that
Company for permission to ‘@'ll
some of the land comprising wine 667 BLESS THE DAY

estates and in consequence of this
the purchase mouey would be paid

to the Bank in reduction Of that
loan,
That proposition to his. mind

was not a sound one. In that case
the estates and the factory were
one entity and a factory could not
be economically worked unless it
had certain amount of land on
which it could @aly for canes.

In that instance also he had
ugain been outvoted and he felt
that that chamber might prefer
someone else to represent them on





the Bank. if so he was ;:villing

to resign. It's odd how one simple action can bring such long-lasting benefits!
Hon. Dr. Massiah said that hon- Many and many a woman, hearing some moaern minded Stone prataing
€ 2 er of the Council ‘Tampax, h sent for a sample, and found an amazing difference in

ee ae S elyn's state life Undreamed of comfort Simplicity In use Such tremendous ad-

ac receive . Evelyn's state.

vantages over old-fashioned methods And such security!

TAMPAX KNIGHT'S LTD.

ment and his desire to resign with
great regret.

Experience

Mr. Evelyn had had a_ great
deal of experience in the running
of agricultural enterprises both
from the agricultural as well as
the economie and financial point
of view.

When Mr. Evelyn had been ap-|
pointed as that Council’s represen-
tative on the Sugar’ Industry
Awricultural Bank they all felt
that he was the man best qualifyed
for the post. They very much
regretted that circumstances had |
prompted him to offer his resigna



| OAK Milk

tastes just like

Fresh Cow's

tion, but in the interests of that! Milk

Council and the Agricultural Bank |

itself he would like Mr Evelyn |

to reconsider his decision to] ?}

resign Oak Milk tastes just like fresh
Hen. F. Hutson and Hon. R, cow's milk and this flavour is due

Challenor supported Hon. Dr, to the fact that cows which pro-



Massiah’s remarks and also asked duce Oak Milk, feed on luscious
rfon, Mr, Evelyn to reconsider his green grass in sunny Australia all
decision to resign year round — This feed produces

Hon. G. B. Evelyn agreed to the richest and the best milk in

continue to represent the Council

» world, and year round pastur-
on that Board, the wo 1

age ensures @ uniform flavour
Oak is rich in vitamin and mineral
salts which goes to building strong
bones and teeth. Buy Oak Milh
Powder for your family to-day.





“BIGBURY BAY”
SAYS THANKS

The following telegrem has
been received by His Excellency
the Governor from the Comimand-
ing Officer, H.M.S. Bigbury Bay.

‘Much regret Hurricane

Guardship duties necessitated

the ship’s abrupt departure.

Please convey thanks to all con-

cerned for their warm hos-

pitality”.

12 07,
80c, per tin

3b.
$2.88 per tin

FULL CREAM POWDERED MILK

ae sei

PRICES:



Doctors & Nurses Recommend

‘am-Buk

the World-famous Herbal

SKIN OINTMENT

Soothes-—Purifies~- Heals

eee ooo









a
INSIST ON

PURINA CHOWS

THEY ARE THE BEST



g 4. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. - Agents
Benupaceseeuwneea ae

BUYS
ror

MOLIDAY TIME

CANE LILY
thand plaited;}

HATS
$1.50 $1.44 $1.20

each
SKULL CAPS
96c. & 72c. each

PEAK CAPS
$1.00 each



Keep a box always handy









FINE CANE LILY

HANDBAGS

A fine



IN OUR

HOME
PRODUCTS
DEPT.

assortment

at
$6.00
$3.60

$5.00
$3.20

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

10, 11, 12, 13, Broad Str







eet

wir




















hil a are eee ea



WHETHER YOU ARE A



inde you sont ae poten your time or suffer
aut & in
ow will Rea tew, new hay ess and hi =

LARGE
USER

MICKEY MOUSE

oh Put it to the test. See the
bi t “ Take the
rf hy ae Pitt eke

uu full of ae nergy and vitality,
tna feel 10 20 yoo younger or
Py Sock on re

at.
ee tabs conte, tittle,
Vi-Tabs f:







DON’T SIMPLY FEET

THE PAIN - -

YOU DESIRE THE
BESI TEA =~ SO USE

RED ROSE TEA!

IT IS GOOD TEA.






WHO 10 erse )
EXPECTING ME on



RUB IT AWAY WITH --

SACROOL

Get a bottle from

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES




















NOW! Dental Science Reveals
PROOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING
IS THE SAFE; EFFECTIVE WAY TO

HELP STOP
TOOTH DECAY

ee mane Cream



Every Spoonful gives you Ss

THE SHADOW'S A WF et THAT TRAIN ROBBER
: GIVEAWAY / : COME! WERE RE NY,
OR HIM

more and more ) A

besietathiealt sien
_ —

ener gy an ad BB xz
|
‘| 6






fitmesst J

@ Every spoonful of ‘Kepler’ gives you a rich
supply of Viena tye id D.

@ These viramins are nature’s wonder workers,
assuring he salty and freedom ftom illness.
Men, v omen, children—all should start

taking tasty ‘ Kepler’ to-day





















AUNT MINNIE GT PHONED -
SHE THOUGH E WOULD BE
HURT a7 BeCALZE HER Peo tee

1) TO yisit Us--
ink NMS = fo; ” He DECIDED TO
COME NSTEAD! y
as Vows
; Wet ¥

LISTEN T NTENO 70 Cam GHS WELLCOME & CO. PRODUCT &
aN = E INT nO OST

a ine














Quis T INSTEAD OF

ENTERTAININ' YOUR

VISITIN' RELATIVES!
'

sole Agents for Bartados : Co *Led.. 28 Bs 78 Breas Streee











CARRY THE OTHER
TO THE

DEPOT: »



| |

L |

WHY DIDN'T IT DEC PS JO |
GO AWAY INSTEAD Cc ||
STAYIN’ HOME ON ! |
VACATION ?/ f |

|



an! THAT'S GOOD
NEWS-MAYBE MY
QUIET. VACATION 4
AT HOME WILL
TURN OUT O-KAY/





iT PAYS you 7 TO DEAL ‘HERE

"SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credi* customers for Monday to Wednesday only







Usually Now Usually NOW
Vienna Sausages 61 54 Ovaltine 154 132



HWM... HES GOT A ME IN THE LEAD-OFF SPOT AGAIN/ SOMETHING ME TO PASS..WITH HIS HAN?
TELLS ME THIS 19 GOING TO BE ON HIS KNIFE/ IT MUST
AN EXPOSED POSITION TODAY / STRIKE...

BETTER WATCH OUT/ OWS :




Silver Shred Marmalade 47 42 Macaroni Cheese 40 36

















Als THE STALKER ANP “THE PREY DESCEND INTO THE
WATERY DEPTHS, EVEN THE OCEAN Aprs 5 TS 5 OWN THREAT.



Jacobs Cream Crackers (Pkgs.) 49 40 Vegetable Soup 31 28 |

RR RN



HE PJLLED A GUN ON ME! I DOUBT IF HE
HAS A PERMIT FOR IT... YOU COULD
PICK HIM UP ON A CONCE ALBD

ARE

_ GOOD COMPANIONS

NOVELS JUST OPENED...




Cli OF
CLOTHES! LOOKS }/}h=
LIKE YOUR BIRD / PSF

THE MINISTRY OF FEAR
— by Graham Greene

> i “~~ C) ~~ CREATURES OF CIRCUMSTANCES
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES | Te ey — by W. Somerset Maugham

(OT COMING BACK: K*HES DITCHED US, HONEY ~ aia WILGON,
id AN OUTCAST OF THE ISLANDS
» = by Joseph Conrad

IBLICITY STUNT FOR] [ SLICK Ne
KR] | SLICKS T : NEYâ„¢
| eciet ne ae NS eee 7
fe) ela
AT THE

| ADVOCATE STATIONERY

THE MOST MODERN IN TOWN

} jt NERY. “Wh JAT | L
. ~ meal on i aA sinclar, igen ee ee ee
SSS : = — = = SSS















WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 1951





TELEPHONE 2508

FOR







For Births, Marriage er Ergagement
announcements im Carib Calling the
charge js $3.09 for any number of words |

SALE






















up te £0 and 6 cents per word for each Minimum, charge week 12 cents andi |
additional word. Terms cash, Phone 2506 sone autdeve 24 words — over 24| Belleville Fulls |
patwech $.3 olla 3113 for Death oe one week—4 cents 4) f.rniched. Garage "henna possession. | |
Notic a 5 | Phone 3926 or 3450 19,8. $1—2
spoeioe ole |
DIED AUTOMOTIVE | CLIFTON TERRACE—To an approved
illo ceiisiochametiei tenant. Furnished House, Upper Bay St .
HAYTER—Suddenly on Saturday, August} CAR—Chrysler 1939 Model in perfect | Opposite Yacht and Aquutic Clubs. A s
llth, 1951, at Portland, Maine, William] Condition. Engine, paint, upholstery and | â„¢odern conveniences. Appiy on premises. |
Hayter, dear husband of Marion Mc tyres, all good, far cas apply: 3.8.51—t.f.n. 1S
askill and father of Lyle and David,| Bdos Agencies Ltd. Ring 4908 ———— ‘'s
all ef Monutal. Funeral from the 17.8.51—6n, | FLAT on Blue Waters Terrace, new): | ”
Chape! of Tees & Co. on Wed. at 2] ——————_____ ___ —— | built with spacious cupboards. Phone | S
p.m. to Mount Royal Cemetery CAR: One (1) Dodge, condition good, | 228. 25.7.61—t..n.| S.

Ba 2 8511 Ls 24,000, Apply: G.’ Greenidge, N
et a ee ts eee 1a ae Hale Gnsist ann” i
21.8.51—3n

|

CAR— 1949 Kaiser Saloon done only 5.500
Miles in A+] condition. FORT ROYAL
GARAGE LTD. Telephone 4594
16.8.51—6n
SS Seen

_CARS: (1) 1946 Plymouth Car, (1) 1938
Vaux Hall 14-6. Apply: Cosmopolitan
Garage, Magazine Lane. Dial 3915
21.8.51—5n

FARKSS—On August 21, 1951, at her
residence Sweet Bottom, St. George. Ida
Edith Parris, age 74. The funéral will
leave the above residence at 4.30 p.m
to-day for Mount Tabor Church

Millicent Parris, (U.S.A.},
(daughter), Clement Parris’
22.8,51—1n



IN MEMORIAM

BRANCH: In Loving Memory of my
dear Mother, Ethel Branch, who died







~~
CAR—One 10 H.P. Vauxhall Car in

excellent candition Apply Straughn’s

on the 22nd of August 1948 Garage, Reebuck Street of October.’ Apply to Mrs. Gill, Martiv: |

‘Gone but not forgotten” 22.8.51—2n | Poorly & Co 21.8. 51—2. |

St. Clair Branch (Son), Jerez, Wapee) | acc eee B Serraino
ged June (Grands! 22.8.51— ga HILLMAN 1951. Six months ola (first | “POINT VIEW", newly built Bunga







|, censed February 1951) Condition as

ANNOUNCEMENTS: (ic bind Sh Se

















business hours 22.8.51—2n | Harden. Dial 8310. Mrs. Stuart Bynot Sails Sails Sail Arti Sail
s s ves ails
aaa as ee Montreal Halifax Boston Barbad Barbad
—_—_—— z ', os ados
HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—isle of ELECTRICAL “SUNSET",—S8t. James, belonging to| Lany NereyeTOR oe Ao og. = us
Spices. SANTA MARIA—ioveliest hotel Mrs. A. C. Worswiek. for August and! CAN. CRUISER op aun) cae Ue # Ave * Beek
in Caribbean, Rates from $7.00 per head ELECTRICAL: Several good second-| September only. Furnished. CAN. CHALL ENGER 7 ae a pp . 1} Seve
per day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi-| hand Fridges in good working order at | YEARWOOD & BOYCE, LADY RODNEY __ 19 Sept, 22 Sept. 24 Be On
dential district under orn an Rolph Beard's Showroom, Lower Ray ! James Street. CAN. CONSTRUCTOR 28 Sept “2 am re ve 10 Oct 1 Set
hill, Rates from $5.00 per head per day. | Sireet, Phone 5010 21.8.51—3n | 14.8.51—t f.n LADY NELSON 10 Oct. 13 Oc 15 0 2 i 2 .
SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing cerierenhcenrcesrneieningeentiagueeiia- siemens | CGS Nieminen enhoanatinetlnaanipetatiadi ihiatcneenei, a NELS 10 Oct 3 Oct 5 Oct 24 Oct 25 Oct
Beach. Rates from $4.00 per head per EL ECTRIC FANS—Ceiling and Desk THE CAMP-—On the Sea, St. 1 a
ray, Enquiries to D. M. Slinger, Grenada. ‘Types. Get one to-day and keep cool, |Pully furnished. Dial 89st, "Tene ore te ers ee
26.6.51—T8n. ee janes y Costa & Co, Ltd 1447.51.—t in Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
VAEAMINNOS | wercyener wer 17,8, 51—n, TE Barbados bados Boston Halifax Montreal
< as ans ! ai anes GLEN—St Lawrence Gap. Apply | LADY RODNEY 26 Aus 27 Aug 6 Sept 8 Sept 11 Sept
Spend your Summer ays on the Sea MECHANICAL Johnson, Hotel St. Lawrence LADY NELSON 16 Sept 18 Sept 27 Sept. 28 Sept 2 Oct
ot Sete nerd Sia bist eeeee 18.8.51—t.f.n.| LADY .RODNEY 16 Oct 18 Oct 27 Oct 28 Oct 1 Novr.
e ace: noda 8 jal-—27§ “ on ree Lo eondy—reedeenr one
Ralarentione, 18.8.51—3n _ ADDING MACHINES—‘Just received | “WINSLOW, Catilewash. for ihe

4 shipment of Addo Adding Machines,

latest model, Apply T. Geddes Grant Ltd.,
Phone 4442.’ 22.8.51—1n

| ADDING MACHINE—“One second
hand Adding Machine, small keyboard,
and two second hand Remington Type-







LOST & FOUN













writers 14",
LOST P thine. 4443. apply T. Geddes See ie ‘| Purrished or unfurnished. For Viewing
ei ive a meee aa | Palph Beard, Lower Bay Street
WATCH: One (1) Ladies Gold Wrist rone 4683. 22.8.51—3n
Watch with gold Strap ‘Birks Made) { MISCELLANEOUS mt
on Tweedside Rd., Pine R0ad 30d
ore Rock. Finder will be suitably ANTIQUES — Of every description. -

Bern- Glass, ina, old Jewels, fine ilver

va 1 by returning same to L
rewarded by retu ig san (Matera, Karis = pg

stein, No. 1, Swan Street. Phone 2384







21.8.51—2n Autographs etc., at Gorringes Antique| Ten cents per agate line on week-cdays|
Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht Club. and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, | !95
| 3.9.50—t.f.n.| minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
Ic NOTICES eae ey re
PUBL . eco —All sizes “Reliance” Car M
Batteries just received
Ten cents per agate line on week-days | “" ——
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, ear canrand i oe eae Phone us REAL ESTATE s
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days| 7... iene R en les Service Ltd, | —~— M.S
and $1.80 on Sundays. tedside Road. Phone 4371. | an| (-SHED—1 new gabled shea 34° x a0.|
. n Coversn ie new best quality heavy
4 SS a nan enieeonemay uy, ” "
NOTICE BATH TUB — Full size cast iron bath| and white pine with wtene pillars, 2 | ES
tub. Price $25.00. Apply Sandyfields, 1 New Shed 22” x 14’ Covered with
Estate of St. Peter. 21.8.51—3n W







CLIFFORD AUSTIN FIELDS —deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all per- CAMERA—Kodak 35, As New, price
sons having any debt or claim upon or, one hundred dollars, Fitt, Knights Ltd.
affecting the estate of Clifford Austin; City Pharmacy.

CLASSIFIED ADS.

| low, Worthing, Ch Ch

FOR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Su™days 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a/
word on Sundays;





| HOUSES















——— eee

FUPNISHED BEDROOM With use ©
kitehen, for lady or couple. Situated sea
side Rockley. Phone 4796 before 12. 855"
after 12 ; 22.8. 51—2n

IRISDALE. Barbarees, St
adjoining Barbarees House. Moder:
Stone Bungalow. 3 bedrooms an
all usual offices. Garage and servants
room and all services including gas
Also orchid approximately half an acre
For appointment to view, phone Mrs
Bellamy, 8365. 22.8.51—t.f 1

——
“MALTA”, Cattlewash, for the mont





Michae!









(Opposite Cac
drawing, dinin
porch, three bedrooms, garag<

rabank)-—— containing
rooms,











months of October, November and
December. Apply to Mrs. W. T. Gooding,
Strong Hope, St. Thomas.

19.8. 51—-3n





WORTHY DOWN—Top Rock, Christ
Church. Available from September Ist



PUBLIC SALES

Everite Sheets a” x 4” fir and white
pine with heavy ~vallaba posts. vow
CLARKE, Ivy Lodge, Ivy Road
~'21.8.51—mn
_—_



;

|

|
|

|
|
|
|
|
|

| Por further information apply te - -



ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

FROM AMSTERDAM
STENTOR—30th August 1951






n



S.S. “ADVISER”







BONAIRE.-7th September 1951
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND
AMSTERDAM
WILLEMSTAD—11th

TO PARAMARIBO
AND BG

SAILING TO TRINIDAD,
PARAMARIBO AND B.G
COTTICA—27th August 1951 ‘
BONAIRE—24th September 1951.
SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND
CURACAO
HERA—27th August 1951
M.S. HELENA-—23rd September 1951
MUSSON, SON &

Se oe

THE MV. “MONEKA”"

Fields, late of Harmony Hall, Saint;
Michael who died in this Island on the]
15th day of March, 1951 are hereby re-
quired to send in particulars of their |
claims duly attested to us Charles Carl- |
ton Browne, Douglas Norman Robinson |
and George Lawrence Farmer c/o Hutch- |
inson & Banfield, Solicitors, James Street, \
Bridgetown, on or before the 7th day
of October, 1951 after which date we |
shall proceed to distribute the assets of

11.8.51—T F.N
———_——— 0
DRUMS—Five hundred empty drums ae saat ep a

at $1.50 each, Apply K. R. Hunte & 4
Co. Ltd. Dial 8027 18.8.51-én SEAN Price reasonable
_—
conn fades right out when you take eae
PRO. Actions speak louder than
words ASPRO action is safe and effec-
tive. ASPRO relieves Backache—Head-
ache—Pains in the limbs and joints—





The Ebony
and Commission Agency Dial
22.8.51—I1n





HOUSE; One Chattel House with shop
attached, standing on 1,997 sq. ft of land
in Tweedside Road, there is a mortgage
which purchaser can assume. Vacant pos-



Friday ith.
THE M V. “CARIBBEE”
THE M.V “CARIBBEE
Will accept Cargo and Passengers
for i
serrat,
Frida
T EB Mv

Feverishness, Remember there is only one

the said estate among the parties ares ASPRO. 19,8.51—lin
thereto, having regard to the debts and| ~pfiecorps: Charlie Kunz Binge Seine
‘claims ‘only of which we shall then} | ea ae eit aediae tee eee rue

have had notice and that we shall not 7) * stoc
be liable for the assets so distributed aera aan eo ae eater rut

‘to any person of whose debt we : .



tot have had notice at the time of such TO keep the hair looking its best. at
distribution. ; all times try “Danderine”, no trouble to
, AND all persons indebted to the said Price 1/3 and 2/-
Estate are requested to settle their ac- 21.8.51—2n
‘counts without delay.

Dated this 3rd day of August, 1951
CHARLES CARLTON BROWNE
DOUGLAS NORMAN ROBINSON
GEORGE LAWRENCE FARMER,

Qualified executors of will of Clifford
Austin Fields, deceased.

use—just put it on.
bot. Knights Ltd,

WOOLLEN SOCKS: Heavy quality
Woollen Socks in Grey only good for
footballers 60c, per pair. Broadway
Dress Shop. 21,.8.51-—-3n







8.8.51—4n.

EDUCATIONAL

CODRINGTON HIGH SCHOOL







GOVERNMENT — NOTICE.



+ Grammar School, St. Vincent

Required for September term, Casta CA eR ae Che Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets
MATRON. Nursing qualifications de-| $2.8.51—6n SSS SS = SSS
sirable. Salary $80.00 a month with ORR ERDF DGG OG POCO ODOT AOE ee

board residence. Incre€ased if applicant
is fully trained nurse or has excep-

invited for
tionally good experience

Master,
and two

Applications are
the posts of Science
Mathematical Master, 3 Apply with details of qualification and
Masters for General Subjects. experience to Mrs. Greaves, Belmont,

2. The Mathematical Master) St. John, Tel, 95—249.

will be required to teach Mathe- 19 8.51—3n
matics, and the Science Master COMBERMERE SCHOOL,



to teach Chemistry and Botany, BARBADOS, BW.L

up to the Higher School Certifi-/ pr@uiRED, in September if possible,

cate Standard. or not later than January, 1952,
3. Applicants should be Grad-| Graduate Teacher of Modern Languages—

uates or holders of the Inter Arts|French and Spanish—up to Ordinary

‘ : Level of the General Certificate, with
or Inter Science or Higher School | possibility of Advanced Level work in
The salaries offered

near future,

Salary Scales :

Graduate ;— £360 x £15 £450 x £25—
£610 pa.

Ist. or 2nd. Class Hons, :— £400 x
£20 £600 x £30—-£720 pa.

Position on incremental scale subject
to adjustment for War Service and pre-
vious recognised service,

Teacher's Diploma (or recognised
equivalent) £45 p.a. above the mini-
mum and maximum of the above scales.

Applications for the above post ino
special form) stating age, qualifications,
experience, married or single, and en-
closing a photograph, ta be sent as
early as possible to The Headmaster,
Combermere School, from whom further
particulars may be ROE

Certificates.
are:

(a) For Graduates

$96 to $1920.

(b) For Inter Arts etc.

by $72 to $1440.

The commencing salaries will
depend on experience and standard
yof work.

» 4. Ability to take charge of the
Cadet Corps will be taken into
consideration .

5. Application should reach the
Education Office as soon as
possible, as the successful candi-
dates will be expected to assume
duty at the beginnin of next
Term on 10th September.

Cc. V. D. HADLEY,
Education Officer.
St. Vincent, B.W.I.
7th August, 1951.

$1440 by
$1200

9. 8, 51—3n.





Mobwinc CoucHs

Don't let morning and night cough:
ing, attacks of Bronchitis or Asthma
ruin sleep and energy another day
without trying MENDACO, This great
internal medicine works thru the
blood, thus reaching the bronchial
tubes and lungs. Starts helping nature
immediately to remove thick, sticky
mucus, thus alleviating coughing and
promoting freer breathing and more
refreshing sieep. Get MENDACO
from your chemist today. Quick satis<«
faction #r money back guaranteed,

17.8.51—3n,



ADVERTISE
in the
ADVOCATE





GOVERNMENT NOTICE









UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE LOCAL EXAMINATIONS SYNDI-
CATE OVERSEAS SCHOOL CERTIFICATE EXAMINATION 1952.

All persons desirous of sitting for the 1952 Cambridge School
Certificate Examination and who do not fall within the following
categories:

(i) Full time pupils of schools approved by the Department of

Education as eligible to present school candidates for the
School Certificate Examination;

(ii) Candidates who already hold a School Certificate or Junior
School Certificate;

(iii) Unsuccessful entrants for the 1950 School Certificate Exam-
ination who have not re-entered in 1951, but who obtain an
authorisation from the Syndicate to re-enter in 1952;

(iv) Candidates who will be taking the School Certificate Exam-
ination in December 1951, (Such candidates will be allowed
to retake the examination in December 1952 unless they are
notified that their performance in the 1951 examination does
not qualify them to re-enter in 1952.)

(v) Candidates who passed the Qualifying Test held in January
1951 but who are not taking the School Certificate Examina-
tion in December 1951

must first sit the Qualifying Test to be held on the Sth January, 1952.)

Forms of entry for the Qualifying Test may be obtained on appli- |



Permanent guests
cation te the Department of Education, Garrison, and are to be re- welcome,
iurned duly completed together with the sum of $2.40 and a copy| Dinner and Cocktail
of the Birth Baptismal Certificate te the Department not later than parties arranged.

Tuesday the 2nd October, 1951
Department of Education,
9th August, 1951 18,8.51—2n

|

session one month. Price reasonable. The
Ebony Realty and Commission Agency

Dial 5001 22,.8.51—In



HOUSE—One House 20 x 12 x 9 built of
rine, has double sash windows, in Bush
Hall, must be removed by purchaser

The Ebony Realty and Comnnissior
Agency, Dial 5001 22.8.51—1n



LAND—House spot 2224 sqr. ft. at
Advent Road, Bank Hall. Price reason-
able. The Ebony Realty and Commission
Agency. Dial 5001. 22.8.51—I1n
—

The undersigned will set up for sale at
their Office, No: 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Wednesday, the 29th day of
August, 1951, at 2 o'clock:

200 Shares Barbados Shipping &

Trading Co. Limited

163 Shares Barbados Foundry Ltd.

300 Shares -— Barbados Co-operative

FOR SALE
To an approved purchaser 2 Building
Sites, size 13,338 & 14,420 feet, situated
to the north east of Brittons Hill reser-
voir. Price 16 cents per foot. Electric
service, @” water main on boundary,
also good road. Apply Yearwood &
Boyce. 29.7. 51—t.f.n
That very desirable business premises
known as No. 22 Swan Street occupying
a corner site and standing on 2520 square
feet of land.
Inspection on application to the tenant
Mr. F. S. Nicholls
This property will be set up to Public
con petiiton on Friday 3ist August 195)
at 2 p.m. at the office of the undersigned
CARRINGTON & SEALY
18.8.51—12n



AUCTION
UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received from the In-
surance Co, I will sell on Friday August
24th at the General Motor Bus Co.,
Nelson St a) A-40 Austin Vani.
{Damaged in accident). Sale at 2 p.m
Terms Cash VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer, 21.8.51—4n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On THURSDAY 23rd by order of Mr
J. K. K. Christie, we will sell his Fur-
niture at “Bweredish' Blue Waters Ter-
race, which includes:—

Very nice Round Tip Top Table, Up-
right Chairs,, Morris Suite, Settee, 2 Arm
Chairs, 2 Rockers, Nest of Tables, Plant
Stand all in Mahogany, Oak Sideboard,
Prescold Refrigerator 742 Cub ft. 6 months
ol¢; Deal Tables, Rush Chairs, Glass &
China; Double and Single Iron Bedsteads,
Double Dunlopillo Bed; Dressing Tables,
M.T. Washstand dong Mirror, Mosq. Net,
Troning Board, Elcetric Toaster, One
Burner Valor Oil Stove & Oven, Kitchen
Utensils, Oil Stoves, Scales and other
items. Sale 11,30 o'clock, TERMS CASH.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.





ly Auctioneers
19. 8.51—2n
UNDER THE DIAMOND
HAMMER

~ HAVE_ BEEN instructed by the
Insurance Co. to sell by public auction
at Messrs. Mc Enearney & Co. Ltd,
Garage on Wednesday next the 22nd
August at 2 o'clock, One 1947 Ford V-&
Car with only the front part damaged
by acrident, but the engine is intact
and the tyres good
DARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer.
17.8.51—4n





| ARTICULOS De ORIFNTAL
| CURIOS, SOUVENIRS

ANTIQUES, IVORY, |

JEWELS, LINENS, |

ETC., ETC |



SEA VIEW GUEST



HOUSE

|

| HASTINGS BARBADOS
| Under new management.
| Daily and longterm rates
| quoted on request

J. H. BUCKLAND.
Proprietor

SSSA



Will accept Cargo and Passengers
9 * 8 with for Dominica a, Antigua, Mont-
homas Land, serrat, St. Kitts. Sailing





SLIIS DOE OG GG DOG FS TODO RO OOO S
POLLO PI PCR FRESE LA PPOCPOOE

SALE - -

—

Wim. FOGARTY’S (B'dos) Ltd.

Will accept Cargo and Passengers
Lucia, Grenada, Aruba,
Passengers only for St
Sailing date to be notified,
SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSO. Inc.,
Consignees, Tel



RALPH

SALE

SALE

Flowered Cretonne .....
Ribbed Repp.

H.B. Towels 12 x 22.....
Lace Table Cloths 50 x 70 $2.25 ,,



Linen Glass Cloths



SALE oo

SELAEEIEM:

8

B: ARB. ADOS ADVOCATE

SHIPPING NOTICES
LINE

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM >



HARRISON



Vessel From Leaves Due
Barbados
“ASTRONOMER” Newport
& Glasgow 8th Aug. 2ist Aug.
“FRESNO STAR” Liverpoob 10th Aug. 24th Aug,
“PLANTER” Lendon 18th Aug. ist Sept.
“SCHOLAR” London 22nd Aug. 14th Sept.
“SELECTOR” Liverpool 25th Aug. 9th Sept.





HOMEWARD FOR TRS“ UNITED KINGDOM

Closes in
Vessel For Barbados
London End. Aug.





DACOSTA & CO.. LTD,—Agents



Canadian National Steamships







SOUTHBOUND









GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.

| FRENCH LINE

Cie., Gle., Transatlantique





7th September 1951

ut

SAILING TO

ae ENGLAND & FRANCE

September

13th September 1951.
“COLOMBIE” September 2,
1951. via Martinique, Guada-
loupe.

ee
tt

co., LTD.,
Agents.

SOUTH BOUND.

“COLOMBIE” 22nd August,
1951,

Cailing at Trinidad, La

Guaira, Curacao, Cartagena

and Jamaica,

ausiaiona Passengers,

Mont- t Cargo and Mail

Sailing

Antigua,
st Kitts

\ RM. JONES Co., Ltd.

AGEN'S
Phone ::; 3814

“DAERWOOD"

Vincent.

No. 4047,





‘ope 1f’S ANYTHING GALVANISED, SEE i" ta Sen RUSS Sinea aes War Oe

BEFORE BUYING ELSEWHERE

Sheets, Washpans, Watering Cans, Buckets,
Down-pipes,

Ridging Caps, Fittings, Ete.



THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM











REAL ESTATE

A. BEARD

F.V.A,

REAL ESTATE AGENT AND AUCTIONEER
LOWER BAY STREET

*PHONE 4683

SALE



aTVS

OO

Announcing the most

thrilling eyeful of

BARGAINS

in years.

86c. per yd. |
$1.55,
60 each

a1VS

6S 6SSSOS OSS GOGO OSS IS OG SODGIGGISE SIS POOO POSS SSG PPPEE oo
~ SSF
| iOEA _
; Se ky :
4]

ul

if

—ET_™-_j7w7w tee eo OO SSS

-

” wc) Gentes ovis 2
o> Tray Gintks-.: io ee
$07 MNEs days eee » 0 alee ee

e
FOR MEN
B.V.D. Briefs .......°2% $1.85 pr. pr.
South Sea Sport Shirts D
$3.74 & $4.12 each a.
White Broadcloth Under Shorts -—
$2.00 pr. pr. x
Cotton & Nylon Ankle Socks =
$1.02 ,,



SALE









perro ttt nd,
POOR ROO

GSO OOOO OOOO OG?

Oe MOOI,

x

Se

os

SOSSSOS

PLP PLVPLPLLEEEPPEPPE POY



WANTELY

PAGE



. AnBOL ge OBLGDd,

In Carlisle Bay






















HELP
ARRIVALS
ail naiae ate aa 3,93 or t
Y e% ' i ym Martinique
office at Hotel Roya ; : 4 ant
Apply in writing and in person to tt Zita Wontta d dae 1 \ omer, 4,625 tor ue
Mane ger 19 ‘ \ s jlase
Cea — —_— es Oo,
NURSE-~Experienced Nurse wit > - - . - a . = Se
refe . middle aged. Must sleep ) — :
Good Salary. Apply Mrs. Freicdman,! ()) LET US. SUPPLY vol WITH
Rockley Road No. 10, Blue Waters | {\} . 7
Terrace 22. 8.51—1 y
a Jeliv ¢ stals Cheese i tin *elothornpe Sauss “Ss,
Giants mentee’ cota Wale, 1}) el yst i nm ti t vor ue 8 AUsaAg
| Knowledge of lathe work heipfui.!(} Car lake Swift's Luncheon Beef Tins Perches,
. o , :
Aply Manager, Lower a a tory » Hams in ting I Cocoa Heinz Souns Lssorted {\
| reermees eneeriemeainieresinet terior | 1) Sweet Biscuits Icing Sugar, Jacob's Cream Crackers, t
» A - Ixperieneced sery } . . ' 2
| wanted @ cook'and a butleremaid’ Apply | \\$ Lactogen Krafi Cheese Spread Andrew's Liver Salts
in person 8-10 a.m. Newton Lodge, | })) - T @
| Maxwell's Coast : 21.8. 51—2 | })) PEANUTS
| 55
— |)
j
5 e
MISCELLANEOUS iii

) BOQEN BD.



i |

HAND ROLLER One heavy Hand |
Roller, suitable for use in Colas work

Phone 8152 21.8.51—3n |

!

|

'

TAYLOR & SONS LTD.







WANTED to rent, by Quiet En





| couple, small house or groundficor fat
unfurnished, two bedrooms garag
| Hastings, district or near. Apply Ads i)
cate Office, Box C.G. C/o Advocate | |i) SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH
Advtg Dept 22.8.51—1n | })) ,
Siegineingatettal 1) \
WANTED TO BUY i} GALV. OFL CANS i, 2 & 5 Glns, Sizes
HOUSE with land or Building Site | {i
| Pear Sea preferred Leave fancy ¢ « } e
out. Looking for good bargain. Call
| with particulars



Established

{
X
20.8. 51—t \
1860

’ EERPRDOT 1 ated
WANTED i. HERBERT itd. wreeien "

| FOR THE HURRICANE RELIER 10 & 11 ROEBUCK STREET.
ORGANISATION \
Sixty (60) Battles to hold not le tha

~TUNOR “CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH







|

@ Wks @2®

WE SOLD IT
JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

LPS F.V

REAL ESTATE
AUCTIONE!I

Killed in 7 Minutes

Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny
seams and pores where germs hide
and cause terrible Itching, Cracking,
| Eezema, Peeling, Burning, Acne,
| Ringworm, Psoriasis, Blackheads,
| Pimples, Foot Itch and other blen
| ishes, Ordinary treatments give

temporary rellef because the
| kill the germ cause. The new discov-
| ery, Nixoderm, kills the germs in 7

minutes and is guaranteed to give you

| a soft, clear, attractive, smooth skin

| in one week, or money back on return
of empty package. Get guaranteed |

| Nixoderm from your chemist todayand

real cause

‘Nixoderm eause

of
| For Skin Troubles trouble. #







AGENTS
its



remove the

‘Phone 4640 — Plantations’ Building

\
4 pints Communicate with—Vestr
| Cverk Parochial Buildings, Phone 30:
21,8.51—2n














porvncccecteseccanattsonet SS = ee
& TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH § i THE 1952 ISSUE OF THE
| bid t a a |
1 v y+ ))
is ae a See | TELEPHONE DIRECTORY |
(Manual for Cane Sugar Manu- & )
| facturers and their Chemists) ¢ |
| By SPENCER and MEADE $
|% ath Edition, Revised, Rewritten % IS NOW BEING PREPARED
and enlarged y L
| One Copy only left $20.00 )
at
| JOUNSON’S STATIONERS ' }
| Plastic Glass opened at | SUBSCRIBERS
JOHNSON'S HARDWARE | be '
» | ih “xXamine your listings ind notily us aS soon as
SOOO D ER A T . ‘ Z .
LOCO Da possible, in writing, of any alterations you may
% i require, No changes can be mede after the
| us| Sist of August, 1951.
% Extra Listings ave made for a charge of $2,00
Ammident Toothpaste | bie insoe.
%
Competition % sia ial
° THE BARBADOS TELEPHONE 0. )
ee iat : 8 THIRPHONE 00, MID,
SECOND PR $15.00 ;
THIRD PRIZE $ 5.00 James Street = Bridgetown
In 25 words or less just \ P.O. Box 272
finish this sentence |
“I prefer Ammident 14 since desis
TOOTHPASTE becaust of)
ee ; : Siesta te EL , .
and send in your entry with x \\) ADV ERTISERS
a flattened AMMIDENT s} 1K -
toothpaste box to K. R. ‘ i Please apply to The Colonial Advertising Co
is" & Co., Ltd. x ))) (Barbados) for all information regarding
ou can send in any num- X |?) dvart 12 1 the 1952 Tele . Directory
i ber of entries but each entry x i a hiss is ing it ey i re le phone [ irectory (}
g must be accompanied by an sj); waien. Wil Inemde the nev Classified Section {
AMMIDENT toothpaste box. \ ({) (Yellow Pages)
x Entries will be judged on ¥ | })) i“ a i ae }
% their ability to describe the ¥ i ‘
excellent qualities of AM- % | |i! THE ¢ , RPTICING . }
% MIDENT Toothpaste, The > i rue COLONIAL ADT Es Caen CO.
x three winning entries and % iy (BARBADOS) (
the names of winners will $)) ‘i ~
% Ne published in oe local $ i Shepherd Street _ Bridgetown \\
Â¥ newspapers. Competition %s i) Dial 5134 i}
| ends December, 1951, 2) - fe _l\}



i OE LLLP PPPOE \





— Ol OOOOOGe_O_CG__5_G_eeeee eS



S=SS=S—S=—=

0 ream,

GB.1-50.1

THE LONG-LIFE HARDEST-WEARING CryREY
7



Bd cot— 4 “a8? es deep

THE CITY GARAGE TRADING
i}: VICTORIA STREET

co., LTD.









PAGE EIGHT



Ladies In Table Tennis Finals Tonight |



Island Champion Beaten

In Semi-Final Upset











































































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE



































| New Industries
| Bill Passed















THE House of Assembly yes-
Barr EL Ba (By P.A 7) i passed a Bill to encourage
THE FINALS of the 1951 Table Tennis Championships the establishment and develop-
will be held at Y.M.P.C. at 8.15 o’clock tonight. For the jment of new industries and to
first time in the history of local table tennis ladies will be oe F pee Pars oo a ae
; : j er le elie acke a
eontestin His Excellency the Governor will be attending. ad eee - ee a gi = v4
Mae major upset of the Table Greenidge took the lead in the T: : 5 % ee nF pe =
Tennis games Y.M.P.C on opening stages of the second 7 to person establishing =
Monda night was caused by game. Stoute pur up a good fight tories in connection with such
Campbell Greenidge of Barna but was never able w catch industries, This is also for pur-
Club The « wd was | greatly Greenidge who wor 21 19 poses incidental to or connected
urprised Greenidge de- Stoute won the next game 21 with any of the foregoing pur-
feated his mate 17 to regain the lead bu the poses
: ~2 in semi-finals for the followmg game went to Green-
1951 ! lan Championship, Stoute idge who brought honours even Such a Bill has already passed
car e Island Champion in 1949 by winning 21 -19 the House but not the Legislative
and re a he title last year. Final Game Council. Then it did not make cer-
a‘ one ge is an unorthodox In the final game there was tain provision for some tax ex-
play A opinion his style very little smashing 30th men emptions. ,
voul dt bes His smash- were defending and every point
es have tle ; but ae counted. The game stood at 15
E t will be each but Greenidge managed to as ry OE
will win get the lead. Service changed at Miss MARGARET WOOD. (left) and Miss PATSY HOWARD will '
Norman 916 in his favour. He had meet for the Ladies Table Tennis Championship of the island at | =; |
and Iam gtoute 20—17 but Stoute did not __Y-M.P.C. to night. ie | 4 By M. Harrison-Gray
who is a yive up. The score was soon 20 : Dealer’ West
19 in favour of Greenidge. He ca e e $ Love all
c got the next point and won 21 : N.
: from “be ginnin £g 19 tos ocket to tne finals. e 1 Cc er 1 : eo?
His Excellency the Governor 3 VR a4ee 2
First Game will attend the Finals at Y.M.P.C. : 3 : K 085
: 2 at 8.15 o'clock to-night j : Ww E
. ; on : The games are Boys’ Cham ea ar a OSs eam 5 AOSEA @i75
ape eR Sera 7 « it was pionship: D. Guiler of Modern > vy ws 9QI392
= hag [ st I nae ae sre High School vs H. Bourne of ‘ 3 ke er 3 oe 4
ge oe eae bin Ge~ Lynch’s Secondary School. . 7 ° ) i i ‘
a ate Phillips oe : e, Ladies’ Island Championship Teams To Be I icked To-day : ot RJ 103
pior mriine - si Miss Margaret Wood vs Mi : WATE
a > or 1undred pe ve owar “B” Class Cham- 5 i :
cent ¢ time, turned the Sloanhin Oe es Pe, ees PEGGY PITCHER, Captain of the Goldfish Water} 3 ee
= i ae cist tte "eeu 31 vs E. Goodridge (Barna); Island Polo Club has been selected Captain of the Barbados Ladies] § ppe Norin-South piddin
doing t. ue spouse Championship: Norman _ Gill team which will tour Trinidad next month. Frieda Car-} ; on clus World Olympic hand
joing é ey , ~~ ee . Snr. ; i. 7 . : 10) start
From early in the first game he tiec (Berney. Sehdeny: en michael, Captain of the Starfish Water Polo Club, has been 3) Diamond—One Spade; Three
took the lead. Soon the score was ye’. Murray. ‘thosen Vice-Captain. This announcement was made by| #: Plamonds— Three Spades:
19—11 in his favour. He went on at Pee pes e et i ‘] : : Four Spades, from whict
to beat Corbin 21—12 y the Selection Committee at the Aquatic Club yesterday] { point a final contract of Six
o beat Corbin 21—I2. : Rowing aft anaes $ Spades is inevitable. South
Corbin had the edge early in arternoo! $ is just short of a forcing
ete ae, Pree ae The Barbados teams will be begin punetually at 4.45 o'clock | 7 LikEaut, and, Yisuaitee, 8
and took the lead. He eventually lil 2 Cx I id selected this afternoon followin 4 Players are asked to be ready| # a strength-showin pO
won 21—15 d 7 4 S am yr ge the practice matches, when, Pegg) on the bridge by 4.30 o'clock. 3 Sant man ai - aod
Philli who was playing a and Frieda along with the Barba- Yesterday’s Game 2 against Ned teas. 0, guard :
defensive game all the time, be- V ersus dos men’s captain “Boo” Patterson There was only one game at the| § Diamond is ledfrom Dummy
gan the third game in in ag ; will assist the Selection Commit- Aquatic Club yesterday afternoon, $ at trick 2, or @K followed by 3
gressive manner. This did not + L tee, Maj. A. R. Foster, Mr. Peter when Flying Fish defeated Police} & wad prese DeOe allowed to ;
pay dividends and the score read Euro e Now Patterson and Mr. Kenneth Inc® eleven goals to one. For Flying : If @K and @A are :
17—13 in Corbin’s favour. Corbin in the selection of the teams. _ Fish, Peter Potter scored four, Tim $ played, and South then ruffs 3
won 21—19, frustrating a last Ath h tt ht t mi The teams for this afternoon's Yearwood three, Mark Conliffe] ? $2 With @ 3.60 ovar-Futt by
minute effort by Phillips. _Although the eight to represent games are, two and Arthur Hazell and Harold| ¢: {%°&5 no atal. Bu
Corbin quickly got off the mark Great Britain in the European ” : . Weatherhead one each, Police got ; pene ROO prieacyinn tbe
in the fourth game but Phillips, Rowing Championships at Macon, — Men’s ‘Team “A”. M. Foster, C. their lone goal mid-way through| { length in trumps, and refuse
who went back to his old game, France, is drawn entirely from Evelyn, B Patterson, G. McLean, the first half. L. Best scored with $ the over-ruff.
Jater took the lead. He had the Cambridge Universit it will be O, Johnson, K, Ince and D. a lovely left hand shot from th« \oo-sncccesccecenessnesecssusnaseusesesnuenc®
edge on Corbin and went on to known as “Goldie Bannister. right wing. ioddon Biniess satuies,
win 21—16, qualifying to_meet Three of the crew are not Blues; Men’s Team “B”. A Weather- fyery member of the Flying
Gill in the semi-finals but they were in the magnificent bead, F. Manning, T. Yearwood, Figh team scored at least one goal —_-—-—-
Z Lady Margaret crew which won G. Foster, G. Jordan, B. Manning ang at half time the score was six m
The Ladies the Grand Challenge Cup in July. and M. Weatherhead. : one in their favour. In the second Soceer Results
Mic ohrcuce dtinuc . _, . The three men who were not Ladies’ Team “A”, A. Eckstein, aif Flying Fish took their score
- ef 7 Be a Cea ra = in this eight are D. M. Jennens A. Sutherland, D. Warren, M. t¢ eleven LONDON, Aug. 21
oan Sonal 49 ane Ma Mar. (Clare), J. G. Crowden (Pem- Knight, J. MacKinnon, M. Taylov Results of soccer games English
Cae Wood. 3 r Mi s Dol oe broke) and W. A. D. Windham and P. Fitzpatrick. The game yas inclined to be League.
inward ce, PSY. WUPS t0reS (Christ’s), all of whom, together a a y muddled as each team played ypjyision 1.
“ Consic ring the ladies games with bow, two and cox, were Ladies Team “B " Be Fane, 2 with a man short, This made Stoke City 1, West Brommwich
anak cnt ae rt d th = ier iaue with the Cambridge eight in the Williams, Gale, 'T, Browne, P. positional play difficult. Police at- Albion 1. Tottenham Hotspur 1
bid a very | igh tutl lard. Mics U.S.A. Chandler, P. Pitcher and Jean tacks on the Flying Fish goal Fulham 0
€ « , 1 § € ss . c .
: ay 5 is crew is x- Chandler. were not frequent but whenever i
Wood “specially ‘i fas Although this crew is not ex 1 ut whenever pjyision 2.
Joan tee table aa Soaeon at pected to show the cohesion of the Due to the meeting w hich they did get through they were
use of her footwork, Miss How- Cambridge eight or of LMBC follows these games, play will always dangerous. Cardiff City 2, Rotherham United
ard has a powerful forehand slam being @ mixture of both, it will The referee was Mr. P. Patter- 4 Coventry City 3, Swansea
but on many occasions Miss ‘OW With distinction. > . ae Town 2. Leicester City 3, Sheffield
Wood ably returned her oppon- The crew, with indicating What Ss On The other fixture scheduled for Wednesday 1: Queens Park Ran-
ent’s smashes. Miss Wood won the Blues, are: *H. H. Almond ; yesterday was Swordfish vs. Bar- gers 1, Hull City 1. Sheffield
3—1 (LMBC), (bow), “D, D, Macklin Toda , racudas, Due to illnes in the Bar- {jnited 3, Luton Town 0.
In the first game Miss Howard, (LMBC), N. B. M. Clack (LMBC), y racudas ranks, they were forced pjvision 3.
who had won the toss and taken J. S. M. Jones (LMBC), J. R, Victorian Exhibition 1837 to forfeit the match, The teams — Bristol Rovers 1, Swindon Town
the service, lost the first five Dingle (LMBC), *W. A. D 1901 at the Barbados were ‘ 0. Newport County 2, Northamp-
points. She recovered some lost Windham (Christ’s), “J. G. P Museum — 10.00 a.m. to Flying Fish.—P. Foster, (Capt.), ton Town 0.
ground but was never able to Crowden (Pembroke), *D M. . H. Weatherhead, T. Yearwood, M. iwici 9
: y Bb rit) 6.00 pam, Reve as Division 3 (Northern).
catch | up with Miss Wood who Jennens (Clare), “J. F. K, Hinde Police Courts and Court of ee A. Hazell and P. Potter Hartlepools United 3, Crewe
won 21—15 (Pembroke). Original Jurisdiction 10.00 Po ce. L. Shannon, M. Frank- Alexandra 0. Stockport County 1
Rribe.. dod did ten: better Rov Meldrum is coaching them a.m. ; lyn, L. Best, M. Richards (Capt.), Bradford 0. York City 1, Tran-
t} ie aa ae Sh : oF 2 this at Cambridge, and they are Cricket — Harrison College |! &. Alleyne, W. Phillips. mere Rovers 1.—(C,P,)
Gis. Mise THiAcee aie a Sree twice a day. Tony Fox vs. Windward Islands at = ~ SE
great secovery in the third game cs With the party to trv to add College 12 noon. Re ee j
which she wen 21—17, Miss Wood ‘he Furopean title to the Diamond Meeting of the Barbados
won the fourth game 21—13 and W ingfield sculls, which he has Flying Club at the Ch m- 1
From the beginning of this game W°" this season. ber of Commerce Building ||
she appeared confident and al- i 5 p.m. |
though Miss Howard fought hard " Table Tennis Finals at
it was to no avail Cricket Results Y.M.P.C. — 8.15 p.m | 1
Louis Stoute defeated Blair Scores in Englis aia ete CINEMAS |
wo, RC ip hii name | eee inglish First Class PLAZA (Bridgetown) Riding
ye Hide wie capsaten cricket games to-day, were as High” and “Whispering Smith” |
: . : . f 8: 45 d 8.40
be always concentrating on the gan ; . " i wihmh (Owtiand an male of. the |
Badd, « Sie ANGE. D110, (Bien gt ee Somerset at Dead" and “Zombies On Broad- |
and 21—18. Lord’s Middlesex 402 for 2 way’ — 5 and 8.30 p.m, POWDERED
Norman Gill played Ralph Wickets declared, and 165 for 1 “tea 8 ry ae Outlaw” — 5,00
Phillips and defeated him three wicket declared; Somerset:—231, MP: Watch ‘The Birdie" MILK
one, Phillips put up a stubborn and 199. Middlesex won by 137 y and 8.30 pom \
fight and I am quite sure that runs. OLYMPIC {Yellow Rose of |
next year Phillips will be a fin- Essex vs. Nottinghamshire at ROE RH ATONE i
alist. Clacton Essex:— 593 for 7 Doe” and : ONE OF
rickets clare : é . 4.80 and |
Stitt Fight wickets declared; Nottingham 818 p.m !
£ shire:— for 9 wickets de- RoXY — The || {
After a stiff fight Gill won the Clared. The match was drawn. Ctock' 1{{ HOLLAND
first game 23—21. 1 the second Gloucestershire vs. Worcester- Son a “In Soctety” ie: iN
game Gill opened with a barrage Shire at Cheltenham Glouces- Tenet ee | )
ef forehand lams which com- tershire:—417 for 8 wicketS G@- eee ——"|
pletely threw Phillips off his bal- clared; Worcestershire:— 318, and LEADING
ance. Phillips howeve1 taged a 74. Gloucestershire won by an XV LEMP
come back and Gill was only > innings and 25 runs. i uwaRDEW wowee -
to win 21 19 fe fe ~ oo
In the third game Phillips took eee an Sear ana eit, YESTERDAY'S ; BRANDS
an early lead. Service changed at ny, rthamptonshire;—222, and 27¢ WEATHER REPORT i EV ERY 5 H RE
18—12 in his favour and he got * § wickets i
the next three points to beat on rae are FROM CODRINGTON % J ERE.
Gill 21—12 ii iidiaaie Wear Patt aia
“ail from ‘early in she fourth Lancashire vs Glamorgan at Rainfall: 1.08 inches .
game "had a four point ead. He Manchester . Lancashire: 141, Total Rainfall for month up
kept this throughout and went on and 194; Glamorgan:—226, and to date: 5.95 inches
te beat Phillips 21—16. 143. Glamorgan won by 34 runs. Highest Temp: 83.0°F
The next match was. between Warwickshire vs. Combined i Lowest Temp: 76.5°F
Stoute and Greenidge, Stoute had Services at Birmingham War- Wind Velocity : 4 miles
the edge from early in the first wickshire:—322 for 9 wickets de- Barometer: 29.916, 3. p.m. '
game, Greenidge had not yet clared; Combined Services:—279 29-848,
struck form and Stoute won 21 ind 100. Warwickshire won by 8
12. wickets.—C.P.
{very qt ime Rocisteied U. Patent OFtee By pay HLlatlo ENVY
tif) = UF ~ %
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Full Text

PAGE 1

in DNE8DA1 \i (i -i • 1SS1 RARilAOON UiVIK ATI'. PAOf FIVE House Agree To *•*• CKNTRK Pine Plantation Max Utilities Bill PLANED Get $17,000 Eqiripmenl !" K %  '''> • jftCI much Ol* •'TPlans l„r Ihr ...IAI,I..I %  %  • reed to lh( amen Inwi I ., Council n, to the Bill lo provide for the regulation of the Public '" tendon tor rtud. Utilities. Car1 M .pp-Md to .mended section T3P&£ an wura ma %  message to that Chambci ".I democracy noun.hed J. of supply ;it the -iites (or the time known thai the public ulili:.,-* In !,l,: ,h Beeretarj of State for the being .luthorised as will produ .njoycd monopoly Colonies |g suonaormij an a sum not l>-s* than the coat of "The fal must be mixed with u liv ln *' Wfst %  maintenance and depreciation the lean", he said. "If your serL* 111 "" f^r financial support from I | ..... 1 I i crew mvn I i n I' %  i' He was 'i for $17.00b : win pi-. on the capita] outlay m m pact of i-copie ,'uch ex*. Mr. Adam* nw ...il Dial only __ iii i.i' ...mi. .. the nest liiiii.m Stiidi.oiv i i inn .mil %  with law of the amendment* while he strong.. Ol them. He said that the OUUH I %  vrongly in l': making .. destroyed more Ik utility II %  i III pui poses The Ion, t in slu ica 2i !" *iJtH iiSRifW-fi"* 11 !? ""ly'v^ b in, was passed bjj the H %  wanted it made %  our to make clear or can %  the --.we of two %  %  %  Hun ("in I I %  ed ol than year or two ago. as n tmUn mSSa roiuias? sasrsfji sac arA-SJatTS ssw . ft. s=&upon looter in ..hi. 'ear ,,u 1 the pi pr rillUi club lo help them shown tl followinc addit i o n al nyrvad from the yard and m '^'"pn" 1 at ii"Pin bill > %  . I . ( r . I IT. ... tho piiiK.pIo outlined In a bill its it Is passed by tlie 11 i %  principle." The Government, ho bccvpting the nmui-Inn the entire bill. Tbt Lill wai lo provide for the regulation of public utl better to have It on the statute book with the amandmanti from the Other Place and UM I bt known that they decided to 1Ccept It rather than %  i lircly. Mr. Adams %  aid truverbal, some unduly rt vith nd the Oeni StaUoii %  House Accept Amendmenls Ify Leg. Co, Indian -Hud. • %  each he other. U : boal " lU ''' 'hut th. pltalitj a bi b from mando m the United Km*the Plantation dom and could meat people from creased: — %  % % %  Indus and cltewhere. TRANSPORT Eslim.iirs I VVheel Typi According to tentative e-tim%  Cane Carl la expecti al the initial Capital Expenditure tor a property and fa adaptaliuns would amount to beS48.000 (£10.000) $72 000 (£15,000) and that thl I HOUH of AaMinbly raatierdeiicit on %  naintenaiice would day %  ccepted the amendments of probably be 19.600 (£2.000) %  Council to the Bill *l*.*00 (£3.100) p--r annum. [a holidays I" "'-! %  %  I of man i nance, : „. with pay to. employees. £>* Mr n ii srf.L-'„v,,i ,..w, i ti> pevted lo eontnhiitf i i 11 -""' men : „f iH.mt-1 !" .' ? T\ and the mm\aot antl I and IRRIGATION I'll*. ONTINOBNCIB rotal over section M It meant that there would m %  n I. light %  in far out places except tni Company m the poaalbnity oi making revenue. In that case, mid I ever be extended to St. Lucy. St. Joseph and other far out The Government, he Mid. bad v] new departed from Uv ;.„. W1 h (mt| mombm T ni pie ol iiatiimuiisation as the) pm^ndmenti however, did not 'Ve.iki -v The Hou the Colonli I I said the Direi-toi uf Ajrrtculture %  %  -".-i.L.i thai u U du -ecord %  ugar i lo until UuJoo prontabh be Ii . „„ • I %  %  i Cenb il B wo I I laid possesJ* gnure loader and siz.ooo spreader which would I by* I Pord %  %  twos %  • neni Erorn %  a of sin ii iniplemante to com* iTW 1 man %  i hen. em< %  %  \\\ elyn Disagrees \\iih Polk) Of Sugar Industry Agricultural Bank • t; B KAVUH U.I.I n lt u rdaj that %  %  %  : ngricultural lank on which I %  enled thu I He ocTered to raajgi %  %  i I Mi Bvelyn'i work on U nue to reI that he wanted of the %  -v .if the %  I bu %  cent which Uw inad .i lai ge Bum of D on the i to thai • i lea pui be 1 led up %  %  %  %  work on plantat %  jocit) can lai Ml Kvt-I'ii said, and Kepuynienl %  A'hlcn he dlaagreed was wllh the lyi tenl When the %  %  %  nd made payable on n :u I uk had n i I i by thai pern to < the land compi 1 nee of tic pui %  tlon ;>i the a Houae Ind nuMjw"oi^iWnii has rrpr eas n ted"'tha Portable Eoulpmenl thai the Bin was not no ... u i, no t anilcip;.;ad during the r< p ns W R T %  Bill u Government would like however, thai the %  etabllaninenl thlayear'tn Alum Company ol i in see. it was a sort of begincould lie complete!] Mlf-iupportpine and the additional Inl waver in hive ii put on ing. The Secretary of state u don which he baa pvaonalh col'abli tUtute Book until it could bo also giving consideration to aiproUfctod In operating the plantgi f X ", %  roved pol that West Indian business durIn| lh( ( ,, st ,,.„,. hiA ,. ,,.„. eial produc Ho was sure that the? wee interest* .might he willing to_make „., Ull n^hneaiei In Uk irtabl atm-ndments of the Bill ln a nc J ul i-;"i'ribuiiiiiis to tpe ea, :t 1(in f0T h( production and dei with the Inch did not find compjete labllshm.-nt of the C lub and Conirai>tIlK „ f SUK<)| ,. i(|1( .„ .III?I* • % %  •' .„i,...u„_ retary i ( state West %  Indlalf Govejiand "dditions. involvin,: capital i n.inline of Inves..„..-. %  HI principle to •'"P""""'"' coui.i be effected wll bet* not to ajocapt thCCn Heaamd Ull , | .,, econumir advantage and are inlinet tl %  I'n. it They do so. iucn n dni, f,, r West Indian Studlatel.v ic.ntiTo.1 He I....i i IAmong the amendments were dents, and if so whether they lhal thi. infoin. • of fodder era iwing; '"would now give enltaWa at the time when the i' invi 1 ii of empluyment" in relaconsideration to contributing toeatiiii.* %  .•! : tion to an employee meanany ward* capital exnendii Boded during •Ive months during malntenan %  poaalbl] on a basis the need foi earl] atUaitlon to ipaJI ol di which the employee has actually proportional to the number of xtuUM %  fOnnad labour or rendered dents from each terr. 1 %  • consideration until i>l I men on il that would not boa iployer for ent in the United Kingdom and \ Mites. the vanou east two hunhaving regard lo I During a see that some action is t.iken :•; dnys in the case of financial position of a %  .. | | ,. ,,„ ,,. Mr. Garner in M.I thai M emp* -i on a weekly. On this ••Student basis ,-.. -,, WM 2 .700 tot Pro-limil felt the electricity of this colony fortnight I v, monthly or yearly Barbados contrlDUUoni toward lion In 1950 was 3.S4H lo ..nd ih.v i ihuuld be so chear thai Mnurt one hundred capital.>st wulId be in the reg on br.nslnK UM average foi the flv rieettveh hfty days In Ihe case of any of *•"<* •"' "'" "*•"* 2 \ ink W 'MO—50 up to 2,875 tons dil ince OXpaneao woul d \_trn 1.IOO Production in 1851 has bean estii %  i DflSldi The Public Utilities Bill \vas miaaura ^ntii the treasury could afford to purchase those public utilities. I nece*sary. Mr. lUynea (E) said that he was noping that the Qen when :ney were appointing the: body -hould have It, He thought Il ridiculous that in a ; St. Philip, only few people had electricity. He wanted to know if a company, which monopoly of a %  erviCO In 21 x 14, could not find money to electrify it nd other employees. Every • ployment at Ihe date of thL ent of this Act shall at em per annum. If it contributions should population rathe I ._. id than on I i r ploy the date of Hu ent of %  He said that he wanted to i, .In lOM whid Pn-11-...1 j-.ni. ,„. !" I a led the las) ..nd $13,R00 than that calculated in the II 1 the proof th< %  . tho !'n.. 1 •'Ml 1 %  lime it is-, of -B&-. -tti-avsM %  s-s (or 1 ry dor %  1 to b %  1 %  (. %  %  n d Mr frawford (O said that the '.V uTof^thc'loi Wesllndt.mSl "';' .. K ... 1 >..* ,i ,.,i 1 to higher Mei' Public Service Hill Passed %  %  annual production in the future will % %  ; %  %  nay t i bill was somewhat complicjitid ron^mumenmenV Of"" this Act but whether it but Inthefli 1 Iti uulity thereafter " """" ,nwa,,,s to the colony could be expressed innll, at the and of each 'ear of UM capital and ann in simple terms, "Everything will his i depend on the mannei b) which annual rlolldaj of at least two M the Ii-1 ird execv Ihe v aeki mann.T i'i which il interprets its The annual holiday -hall bC reaponsibihiies to Ihe com in u 11given gnd lakan in one period of ity." v. ;i -night that the two weal amployer and ,-.. .. personnel should therefore ixemplovee s-> agree, in two periods hi 11 I Itss'i! lorrii selected with i of at %  aat S* h and not otherThese have proved not onl He said that he di>' wise. THE House of Assembly yeextremelj i to maintain to say much about U If thi employai r*e trrdflY passed a 111II to provide for i'^l repair, but al of nations I isat ion. Bui. the pubso agree. Ihe annual holiday or constumion of %  Public qua'. rneeUi 'i.-n-ixtrt rcl promised three years ago either Of such separaie penMHl Si |VKr C(irnml s u m an d m.tter, iui" .... that if ... menl ware may be taken wholly or ,l '" u> ."' mc ,HenVil I . cam crop which is returned, th. tfieetrk company adVanca brtora ^_"5P*2S,!" T T b.est dihshmen' of a Public BOW so much tonger I would have be^.natlonau^d become^anntW^ „ Th. Bh*c4or ha, proHousf Exprosfl Sjmpath) Poi* Pea one in thai i 1 the factory v\ .' ..f land winch it 00 ud aslj (Or eaiws In that 0 be outvoted nd he fall i-1 ...hi pref -it them ii so he %  Hon, i>i M ( lhal hoi %  1 ol the Council %  ed Mi Bvel i in* tn resign wit greal rega Kvperience Mi Bvalyn had had a great deal "f experience In the ol agricu lu hum she wall M m la I point %  I • lew When Mr. Bvalyn ha rvpreaen1 ittva on the Bugjai .. 1 L.ullui..l ItHiik they all tell tii.it he was UMI man beet qiiaiffbH) ti t the 1 % %  1 bej vary mm n 1 H:I • .... lion, bul .n the Council and the A, 1 M uitui .i Ban would like Mr Bvalyn ;., reeonsidei hi di.-i ion t.i %  Mr 1 Hutaon and Hon 11 Challenoi Hon. I>r %  Bvt ivii to 1 let hi %  11 fen |yn 1 fie Council %  Board 1 %  Transport Svslem Phc 1 .1 1 s Resolution whld %  by Di. H. G. Cu %  %  %  11 %  v. ""'" %  :.r:::? posed ths He WOJ hop,n B .ha. Ihe Board %  >'':"" J^, !" '":'""^^ ,„ S '".'I'' J^' C £ £u ^ %  '***** niild concern ..-•II .11 nn Wllh l".|'"fl ' %  t*, 1 !" „'" ra ""l"' '"' ?: ,el r> "' S "" %-ehicle. i I the Immediate expansion of elecs l* c lf V_5* trtcity >n the rural areas and see ~ bin for the • and varj much Hour.ol A %  t whirl, I I 1 which 1 F,d to His BICBURY BAY" SAYS THANKS illowlng taleap ... t H Ba %  %  HMS Baaban n-.> Much 1 < 1 > %  1 Hurricane I i.,|,\ ahrnpt Please UMI hos* %  1 %  Dorfoni A V11 it'tlial public Utility sen now !" de t ^-fflP* 011 *" a Public Service Con:. gtssas -t wall aykatrr all..'.. mill after departmenUl tran ,,f the period of their dismissal, d.sciplina, twelve months In respect of and retirement. Mid the • ,annual holiday or part study leave to officers, -f has been -f. taker.. ^___^_^— to B est possible rate. In neighbouring We colonies, the rural parochial authorities provide electricity for Mrl He knew that amendments were made to that A't but he felt that .1 I to permuting the parochial cut hon ties to electrify then* respect needed some nxttddeaanion end action. Mr. Baaee ( %  ) < %  < %  H senioi M sm be i for St. Joseph's remarks about Ihe Oovernment's policy toward aJlsallon, said they had nationalised wale, in B irl many long years, they were In %  before nationalisation. "II Boose PM $11,000 For Radios The Ho %  II. solution for 111.000 for the purchase of V II K radio equipment for the Police DaIn the Legislative Council %  %  m-THu. It;. %  %  t %  tad ... cecdingiy difficult to get anything The Aaacnaum explained 'hat |] m MI tailed in |M 1937 1 inaarthe hurri•• %  • %  %  1 %  place as a matter of urgency the H ..*. Illsti .. %  %  F". and to equip two mobil %  in II f. ( 11 mm ms ,1.) wtl moved the passing of the Resolu members that the epnj to b) obtained frthe Bon.] Senior Men,her for %  *fjS OB .'" h ." h S' Joseph I I ling "f money. i %  Ihe money spent on the BaS 1 harbour. "A deep water harboui is the very life blood of Ihe people of Ihis colony." he said Mr. Rei ma of the %  %  Ihe bill. Ihey shoul.l , JJ „,,„. mMh „„, ....... n awesi %  in 4 mudenU Hon'bl* Ihri thf Aimi.nl 1 Hid AdmlnMnllon o( Ih* n.rl.adn* ror in* inr 1 tea 1 %  < To ptocs II%  rui 01 iiw (. 1 B-limiilf. IMI-at. Part II. Capita: IM it..would have I urn: in the local PrCSS %  11 n*nt local l This would be used for c purpose desired in the interval. %  1 £ Frri.omic Co-op< The Council J AuS-nl )• iect the 1 : than to accept u with the Mr Matttaj 'i ing with the amendm.i Other Place to this bill, he would say at the outset he was one of those who thought the Other Place as part of the 1 of this colony, should amendments, proi not The Houseof Assem. of the bill dav parsed a B There tain amendSI3T94 in connection with the highway ' %  I not agree T-. pU> %  t ISHI*n It %  .nop Ir mm I Ihj EatlnulM ISSI *iopiu]. *t aaewn M S BsUMsMi ISS1 'i ilhr Srbreulr lo Iho Krv, i Th* Coooc.l paSBSS TO Sliwnd It"Vr.ln Ail ti.* 1.1.792 For R.E.C. PARKING PRQHIEITED %  to park along the %  ttee; View and Hastingj N Canada and n %  t Kingdom. in the parking igns. yamBuk Ihe M..//.//.HII..H. Herbal SKIN OINTMENT -.,..(/,... I'lir,],,: ll.nl. FOH inn BEST IX MATCHES is* f'Off THREE PLUME MATCHES OX SAMJS I.MHYW HI III •! Ml ISS THK U If i tt in, i i %  Tameae. baa nl t*>r %  %  %  TAMPAX KJMiMTW LT. Fresh Cow's Milk n md "... ii" 1 *"• ... pro%  i ..'! %  %  %  "" l/.ar . i .1 UM %  • "• %  I" ti... i. %  it* Ool -"' """.' a...' I „.. I(< th. ii powder foi ...%  : %  PRICE S IM pr. in. Me. prr ll.i OAK Mil (HUM POWDERED MILK %  INSIST OK %  ri HIW CMaws B THEY ARt THE BEST H. JASON JONES & CO LTD Agents IIIBBIEISIS •um of onr tiunarxl and l.nndi S.flMi at Ihr dl FMJVE Hi YS ffagaj KKOhiiHY TiME BUS) ...in T Mass TENDER LEAF TEA 4%&/ tdotJft Iti&tAawL ^ : ^ CANF LILY 'hand plaited) HATS $1.50 $1.44 $1.20 each SKULL CAPS 96c. & 72c. each PEAK CAPS $1.00 each IN OUR HOME PRODUCTS DEPT. CANE LILY HANDBAGS A fine assortment at S5.00 S5.00 $3.60 $3.20 CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10. II. 12. 13. Broad Slroot r



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IMt.l I II.Ill HAKHAIMIS \l>\ < > All. "IhMMIlV Air.lsT 22. US1 Ladies In Table Tennis Finals Tonight island Champion Brain In Semi-Final Upscl fB] I* A V ) THE FINAJ UN f local table i rnor w ill be atl %  muni %  %  %  0 %  %  %  Stoute 17 1 | IStS by wmtiinK 21 |fl Final Q mi.In d I there N %  i n.i.ig to I %  %  He had %  %  thet His Fxci table i, fern :; Veto Industrie* Kill Passed I M ,*c of Assembly yes•< i...(. establishing facI onmctlan with such %  rot pur,pones Incidental to or %  : %  %  %  but not the I Council Then it dirt not make ccr%  .i am i ton [oi torn las aa> • Minn MARUARET WOOD (left) and Hll I'M HOWARD Will net f< I ; i Tabtl Tennis Cliampim. >-i..ia at Y.H.PC t-. nuht be got the m m ... .. „ will rirsl t.ame i B i> Gutter % %  ii Bourne or I IcB ->l I %  in Gill v* Campbell Ore. n%  1 ..irray. %  %  %  '..Hip... who %  I .1 3—1 v rouble in I game he 19—11 in his favour. He went on to bent Corbtri II II %  ought |Kini; %  son the 17—13 in Corbln'i tavo u ... I i PhiUlpa. mi • at Haci who Wl ihc Cambridge Umvcsit; on to I Ciill in kh< Ii bCambridge Versus Europe Now Although the eight to I Peggy Pitcher Will Lead Barbados Team trams Tit lie licked Tn-day PEGGY PITCHER Captain Q % %  ldi'sh Water lo, ud Captain of the Barl Mm whi.ii will UMll Trinidad next n la Car: Ihe Starflah Walei I'lo Club, has b-.i i laplain. Thu announo mem I mltl lha Aquatic Clul r..!inson-Gr*y W*OM The Ladies %  Chain; i. Mai,,,,, %  .,., Reward. %  %  %  Gold not Blues; %  i td %  M ii*%  "< l en the Grand < ballcng< Cup In July. %  BC rmn M ii \i Jenneni i c Crowden i Pernvi n D grindhBm Mil uf whon I>UM. two and o • with the Cambridge eight In the !• A AIVK L .1. '"of Hi;%  ardhai '" wiu .-, oppon? M,<.i.-u. with • indicating W n %  %  '" M H ftWlr 4 . %  Men's Tram "B". A WVathi-ri tod, P Manning. T. Veer* I* . <;. Jordan, l* Mannln | and M Weatherhead. Ijdir. LYaga \ A D, warren, M. Mai Klnnon, M Taylo %  nd P Piupatrick. UgJaa*Taaaa "B". B. Hunt*-. D. T Browne, P. | .i. ., %  i handlei DM to thr mrrltMK Mhirh fuii. thr-w laaaea, alas II xnr\ 21 — 15 (Pembroke), Rot Meldrum coaching (hem r e day. Tom F< x with the nartv to ti I 1 i i • in title tn the Diamond Criehei Pint i .. to-day, %  Howard mad. I i M :M 13 n k nhe api %  and al' %  %  nil Louli i Blali %  %  %  J W H lornaraat at Norms I ph %  %  T Phiilm. ; 'i declared; Bomeraet^-gfll, Phllllpi pul up .L % %  %  Mniiih'M'x \>'vm Kmt 205, echa t Ncrthampl hln IS, -...i :•-.• 18-12 In hll favour and ho — the next three points to Gill 21 — 12 Q Kamp hi throughout ani 21 — Ifl. TI next matci between %  Stoute had Service* Stiff Fight \\ Imi's OB Today \ i, I run I \ III billon l' :: t!>oi JI the DaraaiM >lu-'um — 10.00 4.ni. la 1M pm. Pollea Courts aad Ceart uf Orlgtaal Javladletlaa i.o t rleket — llarrlaon College vUimtwjiil I.Uml.it t OIU'S.' I? IHMIIT MeeUaa of ihr Bareaeea I hmt t luh il Ihr ( !i inIMT ni Caaaaiiffti Huiirffne S p.m. IJIIUTrnni-i Unalat \ MI'i I.1B p.m lies in puii al i.V> oi'lock Hlavrn arr a*>ki-d t* be read* mi thr hrldir by 4.30 o'clock Yesterday %  Game "ip at lh< Kftemooti ted PaUce eleven goal? lo one. POT Klyuu i i otter •cored I %  Vearwood ihre Mark m nd HaroM Wi lUn i • id %  % %  -> %  'i I their loir ij throug' thefkratbal "red with ft hand shot from th, right wing. K>. i men : 1 %  i .1 time 'he %  core was six cue in tl" half Plying Plan took U i %  m ,i to be Hud !i> i with a mi i pU) d Efteull Police atn the Flying Plah goal [roQuont but whenevei %  ... rao wai Mr. P. Patteron i, %  %  %  i i lllnei In the Bfr%  %  r.> f< if.-ii were, Ptylag Plat P i %  % %  ll. Weatherhead, T, Yew COnlllTe, A. lln/i'll and P Potti reUee. U Sham yn, L. Beat, M. lichen !.. Alleyne, W. Phillips. 5 q J t a • <4 J 7 1 us lull! The Noitn-Soudi bidding Wot '1 o:vmp.c hand inotl d star: w.ih Out D.aniond—One Spade; Three D.dmondi —Tliree Spades; t'ur naoaa, trom Mx.-i (Ki ru a final cootract of Six Spade* u inevitable. South inu: Anon of a forcing laKe-out and vjua:i.*w a M IfOI :.: nu:Sou'Ji mas: play to guard t J oreau. A small D ainocd J led frum Dummy a: trick 1 or K followed by O I East be .tig allowed to tioid the trie*. If OK and e A are played, and South then ruffs • I with a l. an over-run by wi win not be fatal But Weac should recognise [lie imoirtance of preserving tit* %  %  %  the over-run*. BAMBOO CAN ttEPLA(:i; STEEL As Reinforcement WASHINGTON. a In 1 show that bamboo cur. fully reptai % %  %  %  trucUon. Reported here In Ihe Wa**tin>IM r*at. th taeti baea % %  ducted over %  pertod iiglneering %  xparlClagnaon Agricultural College. Clems-1 Th,. U S. Department of Agriculture has cooperated m the pro>ect thniugh its bomuoo t \p.-inii l i t %  Savannah Oeorg!i There appaara u, W no danger .i iloloiiioiale |n who helped direct the Clemson i xperiment A r bamlxxi as reinforcenn | %  •tress. It can be bent, rat QOt break, Al. Uimbo,, poles ran he raatMied together with a kind of metal Joint that (Its into tfkt ends of the bamboo. A efaldtng makes the coupling eacura Mr Glenn said "In the Orient and South AinciM.i wtstn bam* leal la warce. .ught that bamboo as a rtlnforcan ant ry %  uitabli substitute for steel" I! is doubtful that bamboo will he widelv used in the UnM< as long as steel Is available RUGBY RESULTS LONDON. Au nia lanwt in UM United Klnvdom I Halifax 26. Ratify 9 Hall 28. I York 22, W..rkinxl..ii Town IB, Whitrhavon 2 —(C.P.I .1 BAttGAMJV FOR MEXt GENTS' READY MADE SUITS In lllii. uM Brown Tin siri|-.i Twaad S73.03 The MUM |iialil> Miil lnili.reil linallj would tost \W?, mure. • CAVE SHEI'ilrl.l> I !.. I.HI. HI, 11. 12. & 13, Kruud Street Soccer Results LONDON. Aug. 21 %  •I Kami's KHflllh Dlvtnea t. %  ,iy l. Wist Brorntwlch Album i. Tottanham itutspur I, Pulham D. Ilivistan B. i • City 2. Hotherham United | t nliv City 3. Swansea Town 2. Leiceatav City *<. SheflleUl q ... %  Park Itangen 1. Hull City I. Shcfnclrt United .'1, Luton Town o. Dlvarlea 3. Bristol Hovers i. Swindon Town i Newport County 2. Northampton Town 0. Hi vision 3 (N.ruiernl Hartlc Ii United 3. Crewe %  .1 Stockport Count) I. 0 V->rk City I. Trailii lie Hovers ].— Revitalise Your KIDNEYS Anal Yc'll *..'l Young look Ti-xn, taaaacB*Bir>'k. Art N In |l InU: a • %  •II Wl I 1 .. Cy stex 'KH((.,Tpi.,mHi>a>, BlialiH ln.l you. It-lay's (i. A. Sun); %  v "You're the cream in my coffee.... ... %  CONGOLEUM We can suppiv yom with UM Mlasring siies : SIM Ull IJI Ml" I I Ml" *( yds. \ !'.. >dv 3 yds. x 3 yds. S yds. %  BH yds. 3 yds. x 4 ids. 11*1 IIII *i \KI': 't feet whir fl feet uide 3 ft. wide 30 Inches wide 24 .mlii". wide ALL AT BEA80NABLI PUCB8 Pay t's a Visit TO-DAY, and see Our largr ranjie of ATTKACTIVi; IHSIIiNs ()S DISPLAY BARBADOS HARDWARE LTD. I i;\H\ DANCF oi s. Mary, Church .ii HUI.IIOKN. HIM Mill I 1 S.1TIHUA1. lall. Srpl uctinninx 9 pjn. DANCI OBCHTSTRA .1 STEEL BAND Tlrkru JI.00 I III HOI SI. HIK IIAIKIXINM Corner of Swan & Lucas Street* %  MtaMataiaapat USE BOWRANITE VMICOIMIOSIM. PAINT Iron and Steelwork ciniml riirrndt benealh coat of KDtVIt iNlTK. I"rool je.ihisllii.il or cold. Ihr corrotlv.^ airoi big citb-.. salt %  garai and lea-water, BOWKAIITR io used hy encinern. shipping lims. d>M-k .uilhorftle* and public ami indtistria' eeatrae*ori everywtMte. .01 SIIOI i II i si: IT. TOO Teuch. Flexible. el WOB OragklBI KntMlAMTI t, iii.id' in iii.nn llllMOlln sh.ideo. Mocked in . PERM \\i \ i i.Kilv KID i. Ii I i BLACI and SI PI;R Bl. tt'K (lle.it K-slsHiim In lins of lmperi.il Measure. • %  r UM OAl.l.ON UILI. COVER 1.000 SQ. Tr*T. PIMIM-: tUt g> \(.l N I WILKINSON * HAVNES Co., Lid. ?*•* %  >*,*, ',*-*****•; //.cy.r.;,. y,yf ; Fine Things FOR THI. REFINED LADIES! EMBI). ANfW.AISE In White. Pink, Blue. Lemon Trom $2.35 & up B1RBAIIOS nm ( l.tlTH—Asad. Colours —12.32 a sq ROatAOll CKEt-E —S2.12 a >d. JERSEY SILK Striped and 1'laln from IK to 54 Ins. —from SI.34 up I'lain A Stamped (.EORGETTE —from SI 0s >d. \lso Minis II \ i-.. i SDII;WEAR. 1 IN| t OSTt Ml H l I I I KV. BI.OI Si.o NTLONX, run i I I:I m 1 sill 4 KM 1^ HWKIIs. PANS III IHOPPINC < I M i;i THANI BROS. ONCE AGAIN IX STOCK. STRIPED SHIRTS I — WITH — WITH 2 SEPARATE COLLARS — BY — AUSTIN HEED — AT — C.B. RICE & CO.



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ESTABLISHED 1895 WEDNESDAY, .'GUST, 22. IM1 1'iiii't mm JAMAICA DEATH TOLL REACHES 155 HURRICANE HEADING FOR MEXICAN COAST I 11.MUM. AMIIASS \IIOK (Prom Our Own Correspondent & U P ) KINGSTON, Jamaica, Aug. 21 BY LATE AFTERNOON TODAY 155 person!, were known to be dead as a result of the biggest, hurricane in Jamaica's history which smashed the south coast of the island on Friday and immense damage throughout the island to crops, buildings, and services is now estimated at $80,000,000 (W.I money). Thousands are still homeless, and Port Royal, the famed buccaneer citv, Morant Bay, the capital of St. Thomas Parish was blown flat while the city of Kingston suffered damage to buildings, wharves warehouses and services estimated at $H5,000.000 more than two thirds the total island damage. Egypt I'luns To I .in in %  !• Itrili-li arrisoils In Suez. Ex-Premier Charged With Taking Bribes TOKYO. All* Thi> fo.mr, Premier. Yushida MU charged formally with .,, OtpUng brlbM totalling 2.0O0.0OC %  %  %  wai Govanun nt He i| Ith 37 othei riefendanu okyo district i Tc Govern m ent, acting speedily with hurricane rellel i U housing the homeless, providing food, ami elOthW, Whll* Ihe work of reorganisation pro* It Is I I cultivation throughout has been destroyed alnv %  !, % %  lift to cocoaniitand othei i though the main forci hurricane was confined to St Thomas. Kingston. St. Andrew St Catherine. Maneh. • endon. uiid all the south bidi' parishes. St. Thorn J from Kingston, and report* I'll ol widespread damage tfaroufhQUl th. whole parish, and r rlaliig death toll. The Government. last nigh! ALEXANDRIA, Aug. 21 Informed sources said that Ihi War and Marine Mlnlstry plans to encircle British garI n J with • i observation posts, anc t.. eYstrlct the movement of Brit,h '.roops outside tin aTSJ Tbl %  Id th.it tlM ftsreJgn fUng measures intended to control more and more British troops in key B The tiovernmeni, last nifl and Altxai dcspotehed the "Harbour Master' Military personnel wouli required to have special parlaunch on an expedtU .ml IJ.is. taking medical pei iiel, food, and clothing. Thlf morning, the mtlrtar) i lurge convoy of Bren gun carriers and trucks with the roods towards Hi" stricken area. Tomorrow morning, H.M.B Blgbury Bay will go i rant Bay taking larger supplies of essential material and technicians Kingston || still largely without light, electric pow hardly a dry be iM oa reached Weathei Bureau said the centrt ol|wlth Generalissimo Franco roi g) On Face 3 US. Use of S. h IF "Black" Pact Worse Than A Hurricane DAILY EXPRESS (From Our Own Correspondent) LONDON. August 21. BRITAIN'S GOVERNMENT does more damage to Jamaica than the hurricane, the independent Daily Express Hid to-day In an editorial commenting on Friday's hurricane. The newspaper said the news will arOUgC the deepest .sympathy heir m Britain and funds will no doubt t>< leviatc th suffertngg ol these good people ol the fanpin Men recently bat bean running an editorial proton %  %  pact With Cuba, added lies .it nature, however urt to Jatnan the stngh done by the policy of Wnitehall. Tne Cuban Pact alone over the produce more day to than any I.ai | ir.iiif. It tSkl I exploding cigar and the hope of expani r prod on to raise %  %  la made by the Signing of the Anglo-Cuban Trade • t* made thi* morning by Lord Half F the I % %  IndusA %  % %  and the British Fmplrc i There hai than twr, years of piellminary I His cabinet f,-l| as *oon a* the %  |[;hl "i he prbi la used the ex %  Premier of H epUng I.000.IMH yen to hasicn tinrc p a jin anl •.: %  flrni to the (invernment. Yoshida loon .011 yen from a ihernl i rty who w %  i —r.p. V^i iniiliiral Instructor Tells Of JVa Hurricane Ml! c A BECKLBS, Sanloi Peeaauil Agjrtcultural Inatru eavt ana the hurricane He nune >' on the tiist plai %  Paliai -it the Unlvai ail j ('.'in'... of the \ I .it "Irvine Hall on the grounds ol the <: %  ol the hurriowie. it vnu the drat tiitB ha I periencod %  hurt icane and he told the Advocate "1 thought 1 could imagm< I e like, but the experience siurpa.sed anything 1 im. tne moi %  tiafuA II ' Becfctea aald 'II opanai I n .'I lain whirf %  i pait ol Ing liv Ml Do %  %  In had bab i .1 which had i >< loping the st Andri %  • d] nil S Varsit} Students Got 'Godfather' INDIANA .. on Tuc'• .'•' UlltWO, i boai d at Noi %  0% t iU of tne til coders wn< %  d nuaaed from H %  i 1 tint A No'i. %  . %  .p'irt' while at the l/n The Vad the following staternenl on behalf ol tha %  l. with mil art that to Amer%  i mistake %  llitate himself. I in iiueadeti s/ho have been recently detached from tl %  A University apokaarnan e*ti•n-ited that hoard, room %  < Concessions Writing from his ad Whltenall ... 'he Times. Ixird Balfour . the fact that D to Britain bj ut the agreement "*• "!. *'? ."(have slso to be given to more • 1.400 per man annual Of tinagreement. 'We present most foreign %  : many With the unakeo*ition r,f an euual i i>i>ortunit> l "*They n :hat the AM | %  i despite Igar producer* in %  idustry had been Six Donj ri.-iiiu-i Abdullah's l>i*ath AMMAN. Aug. 21 Six of tl„. io men Hccused of the plocang of the Bauaadnatlon ol King Abdulldh denied thai Uie\ plicated, or reruaad u talk on Tuesday when questioned b) the M'iit.K> Tribunal. The ,: attorney broughl 4i witnesses, attesnpung % %  provi among other things that the HiHisim family was respiaiNiblc for HM King\ murder. In that 'hey know of the plot beforehand Dr. David Kl Houatnl vigoriHisiy denied in a depO the court that he was tuiiu^li.i with the crime, lie claimed that he did not even know three ol the oUkH defendants, and his relattoni with the dead monarch had lcen good for the last UUSM lit Uouasa El Ihu-ini. another defendant, Is David's cousin Wltne I 'thai sever, i. prominent members of the Housini family ),-.) iftended hHt Jerusalem mosque, win m Ah lullah was killed, on Uw Kiid.n previous to the <>ie on which the aaaasslnatinn took place hut %  im ThaFriday, July in According to the u : nik El llousinl, guardian of the Holy Place*, had left the motique to go to the Dos %  atrnent, David El H(ni>.iiii explained hit %  '" a from the mosque In laying, "fortunately or unfortu%  %  —U.I*. \ it strums Face Meal less Days VIENNA. AUgUt 21 Austrlaru wdi have to do with l meat for two days a week fo ..f this summer Th. Cabinet'* economic directorate decided to overcome Qv country wide meat shortage both from eettle dealers urmUUnjpkeai to sell at GovernoeQlng ifrices, and from Increased consumption causcil by ., large number of ton rl all restaurants and prl vate houses not to nerve meat oi and Fridays. — l\P. CMntfse Celebrate NEW YORK. Allg 21 Diplomatic report', receive) from I'eiping on Tuesday saiu that l^emier Chou En hat ordered the annual celebratio-i of Iht victory over Japan to begin on September 3 and to last for several days. Diplomats believed it i s significant that the < %  tee ahri tlom* nhould coincide with the San Francisco .lapam-Mpcm< %  ferenee t which itc< not Invited. —r.p augsr Rsy Robin-.on waa %  rinataj Mayor Vincant Iinprlbttenr. holds, i Cnrop. wlu-ie hr foiucht to mm in Am*run laeah With him proi i roll f Ray hiUoudwill AjaastfsMOOl work. New York'* band lu token of his iH>rIiim spirit ihiouwlioiit ci projectand acted a* a itood will dor for the -Cioll at* IdWit* 4iif the Iranian oil cruua, aftai Iran rejected -i last minute etjrapi imise attompl by the ohiel British negotiator Kir hard Stokes Stokea flat!) announced thai hla rruaalon had failed, but gave Iran until noon on We im-Miay to change its atlttu.le and agree to the British senlem.ni plans II. s.nd that he h;:d agreed to eliminate from the eight points the provision that a BriUah operating KN I """ : '" agenoy would maintain and produce the oil in Iran and A,, L-,„, ,. aubatituta :i Brltiah aw Iran rejected this Ci'imnunist Plice Seek Yortha Wlw Decried Festival] li. laid The Ea %  Quniianj'i Conumini.t | H ii..n lakinii %  ir-i.ii • Itussian none youth who I %  recent i Youth PS tlVI | .ii Alhix! I.%  lin Only two dayh •rtei the eloee of the pe I had lb n %  % %  %  -. in |t<-ihi< I (v said Cornntunl Ing tnern W< %  tei %  %  < l quoted rouths >, irra %  %  %  aren denounced by Consmunui colleagues and thai VrtMO Ihaj reached borne they reei hn %  I.I .! %  aneei Thi reup n thej t 1 i %  acretly back to West Hcrlin ( %  appeal for permanent haven t r Nehru Hee-i\*. > oil' Of Confidence QUAKB88HAKBHAWAB HONOLULU. Aug 21. of sharp earthquakerocked the Hawaiian island* today and police reported "extcn-ivc oan on the westernmost island >( Hawaii Tremors were recorded at 12.57 a.m. Hawaiian I b %  Another sharp series was recorded at 1.31 a.m. Kolaml F ei ver at the coa*l and geostatlcs magnetic observation station said quakes were "at Itast as large" a* the one that the eruption of the Mauno I.oa volcano In June. [gM. —IP HEW DELHI. AUK 21 The Governmental party bloc in Ptrliaioent gave I'rime MlnlftTT Mehni wh.'limnii vote of confkai %  the party %  Nehrt speech why he resigned fr.n thej |f< %  <,r Ihe Workinn understand how i Committee to back up his demand|<-^[. . wound on En TO-DAYS WEATHER < IIAHT -Linri-r : 3.M a.m. --.in.et S.05 p.m Moon : l-.s-t Quarter 'In Uehtlns I'p :7 pm. Illrh Tide : 7.2S a.m. and 7.23 pm Law Tide: 1.11 am and 1 01 p.m Princess Mur^art'i (iouies Of Vgf itALMOKAL. Beolland, August II I v*. i im ail >i hTM Bi I %  i %  %  Ha II %  birthday wai %  %  %  Uom ..: Balmoral i i %  .. quiet jii't .i family affair. Tourists folk mada t< Hi aalon tuding some who may be eligible for Margaret* art in the party. i Ing then, flood of congratulaloi telegrams and presents. Court I • diielo" 1 what the presents ^iv ll thai "lie I* ettin convertible soups and the ti.iiiitn.oai pearl and matched Klein* start born. The two rouag men i %  I |] .lam..mt| garei i band were preeent tot the hirthday nelelaTallna. They m William Hilly Wallace i old polo playing stepson of the (CI Hrrbrrt A|(a ^n-i thi27-vs I Dalkelth. -rr.P i B.C.RAISES LOW IN LONDON LONDON. Aua;. 21 BO successful in its attempt to raise a loan Ion. Bubacrlpta were open and dopgd within ftva Cnlag, and II understood that DM issue k heavily ovcr-subscrlb.-'! tl FAMILIES HIM III> FROM fl|\///.s rl A. C.l'mibia. Aug. 21 Twenty-one famillc *8 children held hostages by bandit gang, were during the provision has > %  "' the n ..].n barriers agnomen) undei the eompfoimM', .i lii Hi anoral aianagei not ..n opor tine agency — would be nannnl to tke the itvcruU ehm^c nl aaahaBoaJ aifxir*. and be reaponSlBBS 10 IN.' Iranian National Ol Company. %  Id that his ise ha,| teen rejected hv HitIranIan Prem.rt. Mohammed Mo i bgh. -! %  i u -est touch with tinBritish jtafl. .mil I am voicing tl I ID* I %  %  not stay and work in Iran, I tinIranian Government in ivt oo impossible working agauneiU oondHions, i.it | ^ ti„.,, i a staff In the woi i i i M„ U %  %  not be replaced u not Bow lg that he did not knn'nt %  I bul 'Ui Siilxomn itt meeting foi n ii penl mm. iii. in ball ol %  %  % % %  >', t" find a mutually %  %  vice Admiral C Turnei #oj I %  I N truce negotiato) con lem %  %  i and thi n % %  Hi d quai ii rs at th Chinese Comn rauld be mless th. United ii.i Th* lilies hi %  %  parallel, • i natural p %  %  1 N land If the .. i. William Nuckol %  North Korean Main II. |he I % %  %  %  Nam n H • rtn IM'. I ... the West %  : %  also stay in the fields an Iran insisted u Mriton sign ... %  iridJi Idu ith lha i stlon I National (l Company." Th. s-okev aiuiouneernent broke he three-day silence, during A-hieh. behind the an m % %  i b States Pi idvi Averell Harrinwn, t.. bridge th'j leap between ihe Btrttl I Iranian p ints of view This dlf ''. %  i l In viewpoints exlstcl %  1 %  lion vhn h eon l eased the Anglo-Iranian Oil Compel %  %  •nan formula appeared tired and ovrospond. i %  gas be<-n slaying %  nl perso. "Hale America" < UlilfHii;;n On JAPAN. A q .its familiar wll I as Communist prs tl be i %  r / KM Ufa .^ M.H. Tss i %  %  motions the cum %  %  Hah i .. beti PMplng authorities. II .... y iverc tool n Pi iping aftei they guilt) by lha i ourl ol I %  plotting to ST**— h •'• M %  [he I i r HEAVY RAINS INTOKYO POKY %  %  %  %  %  %  %  hit Tokyo i trararportatloi i! boat v i r %  ind % %  tin Overhead .... black cloudi unusual purplW I %  %  %  %  lanej could hi fell Bj LO) awn need ind lh< sensible people beaded %  re foi u> woi hoping tm tin i. Warnltujs l that tin.muti. -nt DM gular warnli %  ll the iftci ind giv %  rtiat n i tefl ^Irvine li ll Ihe Nui iwry, sn> ilding itri th. (rounds whu n I Him. uiicd professor, and Lou ii Intent 1 lerj t n I %  gJM Ofl II d| in bom st< i ihe rain began to fall sn< i %  houghl %  Irvine Hi 1 put oi i i toaa and ifi Mi. Nunnery i an off in tin .i irki oi In lion ol whai I %  i. II. iii' bul i ovi red lhal I wa rang dlrei lion and reti %  | .in.. id raj Iron %  i suing %  t.lv tll. i %  %  ich the II ill ll mut B M |i ti, Floor Under Wati pi %  %  mjkllngs i I up sloe %  .. i-ei id. lerrlnc I t lot I p-verj opi • Iructure -if Irvine Hatl %  me m srlth lerrlAi rot i '. %  n ., ... /erythlng in Ihe room, including uld be a lull : %  onl] to be foil %  %  it% IHIO a.m thi At tin%  %  nd tii. wbi f into s fury urdutov i %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  tverytl ng In the! illi %  %  within "; %  building, i wrribli i iboul laN am M .i i dropped ,\"i %  .-..%  ill nil %  •nyself, were %  ( %  : turn ovei hole lay at Ihc into lha oeighbouring -. I'apmc "At Papine houses were Ktenatvelj riamaged %  IT. sroooV have been red i sd to i uns within i khorl tiiiu* An %  %  %  through s window Tha • rho did not make pi oi I %  Mi Beckts weni to %  morning to i Hi era me to i •i attempt in ti-> l| i onununlc itloi il Walls Blown Down 1 where in Ktngatoi n strucuon u %  %  %  \ rth Camp i ll nt thi %  ... level li rl with thi ne ca %  aero "he waUs i >< I'ewple .milil IM-rcn drv in c ih.1i m.iltr.-H4-s Mir rmif ol ne.rlt r.rn II.IIK. mU d.mi aged ib. Myrtls Beak Basal eras bacOi im TBH reel ot a asaeaaari itrai ssskeal. which area aali caaiplessd sis weeks |irr\ iiil|ol>. H.I. IdiiVIII off i rssMad two lahesls irak h wers titrii.d late eesstgaa e i seasrasi in our than wers lae men. women nut blldn a UM*M aa i>t-ein> erars in thr asstee The n>,i < fn.. .inrf ullier mliin lary uorken> were dolna a good kih l Ihe i i. .iiitt hick Mr Beckles said "l> i % %  ... people wers %  sughl ui i idequale pret .f fOOd and | down .f wind %  praetlcaIN %  i people m tii. otnei hand look the wai nn lightly Put Hoinfo least • I oodslull lAwiilial i i. .i i I they shoui.i |aki Uw warnings -nously plus of luff. Matches, %  %  bousd e % %  %  %  %  %  %  He thiri %  ... age and WOUld %  il lapse. On ..II lake th %  . the Add, In. and bul a mast ol Iwlsi Tl B I damaged Thi onl] r biscuits so Mr. B< %  li. stteri led i the I onaored I 1 1 of thi U.C.w.1 and Brl1 I I loop gel Neuvo, 100 miles south. %  killed IS bai captured several more i< r g> o Page 3 The "ADVOCATF/ pays for NEWS Dial 3113 Day or Night Trees l'proofed I %  %  tone The a* h 11 before bat %  forlorn %  i'i nf their leaves and %  | %  II from 'hen rOOl Iretchi roads %  uch a* ii i. mnged • . tun %  1 %  %  The ( MU -< %  8 to August IB. The chief Ice* '.t \ T il f the I i %  • ir.i %  %  .ith tin %  i %  I %  liey, co%  youth, i Ing the ."; %  % %  .... %  I %  %  root ai %  %  Mi Phiino She Bangsti %  %  by Mr. S*. W Manlcy. %  % %  : %  contacts If* g Oa rase 3.






avbades Ge Advorate

ESTABLISHED 1895 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 22, 1951 PRICE : FIVE

JAMAICA DEATH TOLL REACHES 155

H URRICANE HEADING | sealed FIGHTING AMMASSADOR Agricultural Instructor
FOR MEXICAN COAST — Tells Of Jca Hurricane

(From Our Own Correspondent & U.P. Tt"
KINGSTON, Jamaica, ri 21 H E P « MR. C. A eae Peasant Agricultural
BY LATE AFTERNOON TODAY 155 persons! X-rFremiuer sha See aee We "cue in on the fae puaeaae tan

were known to be dead as a result of the biggest} CQharoed With Palisadoes
hurricane in Jamaica’s history which smashed the £ Mr. Beckles, who attended a course in Co-operatives

: : ; T Js ° at the University College of the West Indies, was stayin;
south coast of the island on Friday and immense aking Bribes | at “Irvine Hall’, on the grounds of the College, at the time
damage throughout the island to crops, buildings,

of the hurricane. It was the first time he had ever ex

















and services is now estimated at $80,000,000 (W.I. naib TOKYO, August 21, } perienced a hurricane and he told the Advocate yesterday : ‘
money). was "7 haves ; tormaliy’ anars ' “I thought I could imagine before what a hurricane would

be like, but the experience surpassed anything Pimagined.

Deseribiig the mornag pelore, sae whole day on-.Saturday at the
the hurricane, which was the] College except for a walk he took
morning of Friday, August 17,]/ into the neighbouring village of
Vr. Beckles said ‘It openec | Papine. “At Papine houses were
with heavy showers of rain which | °Xtensively damaged. Several

ntinued for the greater part otf vere wooden structures and must
the morning, By 10.00 a.m. how-| ®@ve been reduced to ruins withir

Thousands are still homeless, and Port Royal,|°*Pti"s bribes totalling 2,000,000

: yen, as the head of Japan’s fourtt
the famed buccaneer city, Morant Bay, the capital] pst war Government He ae
of St. Thomas Parish was blown flat, while the city |P°°\" | with 37 other defendants

n the Tokyo district court for

of Kingston suffered damage to buildings, wharves, | tria!
warehouses and services estimated at $65,000,000.) There have been mere than twe































more than two-thirds the total island damage. years of preliminary hearings ever the rain had ebatea and un! 2 Short time, Among these were
oink His cabinet fell as soon as the intense heat which had been en vo shops. At another shop, whict
The Government, acting speed- 7 charges came to licht veloping the St. Andrew and ethe. | “85 Partly damaged, there was a
ily with hurricane relief measures, } r , ia low-lying ¢ if ong queue waiting to purchas
- : > prosec s accuse ow . &@ parts of the island fo ;
is housing the homeless, providing Egy pt Plans To eo DI ers accused the ex- nay Ghee nteolmuate Gael at i ooustuffs which were being sold
food, and clothes, while the work E a l eae ibe a ' Bia Rie ted as 1,000,000 | woxst through a window These luck.
of reorganisation proceeds | ne irc e British ee coe am ee of er “The stmosphere os bai iess geen aed have ot lude
a. hice - a s anec y} a -onstruction ? , . ' > Ww 1 t ake )-
It is now clear that banana ;? . x firm to the Goverkinent Yoshida Sugar Ray Robinson was presented with a scroll for his Goodwill Ambassador work. New York's ind still, Overhead were masse es st “puch: my weend as all
cultivation throughout the island} (zarrisons In Suez allegedly’ took: aliather 1,000,00 Mayor Vincent Impellitterie, holds up Sugar Ray’s hand in token of his sporting spirit throughout 1? heavy black clouds. Shortly tHosa-who ‘tas: awe Qe? thelr
has been destroyed almost totally; yen from a Pninher of his 'Serno- Europe, where he fought to earn Money for cancer projects and acted as a good will ambassador fox before sunset an unusual purplist eas during the husein ane.” :
heavy damage has also been done ALEXANDRIA, Aug. 21. cratic Party who —w ere cee American ideals. With him proudly holding the scroll are his wife and mother...BXPRESS low could be seen in the sky. Ar{ Mr. Bec vp went bo: Kingston
to cocoanuts and other crops, al-;} Informed sources said that the special favours.—U.P. a - . — _ _ ~ {mosphere of tenseness and ex in Sunday morning to make en-
though the main force of the'!FEgyptian War and Marine Minis- “ e { pectaney could be felt By 2.0C]} juiries about his passage to Bar-
hurricane was confined to St.{try plans to encircle British gar- ‘ 1 } U. N. Forees p.m, mort of the business places | sados He was due to return to
Thomas, Kingston, St. Andrew,:risons in the Suez Canal with : . e e 7 n the Cit ‘re oe \ r ; ados » Se é ut
t Kung ; ; h Sj D a . | t ity were closed and the sarbados on the Saturday, but
St. Catherine, Manchester, Clar-|:tring of observation posts, ana] SOLA eny Plotting e | Y . sensible people headed homeward} ould not attempt to go to Kings-
endon, and all the south side|to restrict the movement of Brit- , " é | ose roun to prepare for the worst while? on as all communications were
parishes, St. Thomas is cut off|ish troops outside this area. The Abdullah s Death 9 | hoping for the best.” cut
from Kingston, and reports tell,of}sources said that the Foreign oO es ro osa | BIGHTH ARMY Warnings Walls Blown Down
widespread damage throughout | Ministry is drafting measures in- AMMAN, Aug. 21. K | i HEADQUARTERS KOREA The iid that throu shout the He described Kingston: “Every
na fica parish, and ¢ dial fo - control — = rt ae of 7 : men accused of the ‘ } = : a aie as lay there were regular broadcast: | Where = in Kingston ign
dea oll. |Pritish troops in key ugyptian[{ plotting of the assassination of Ts ri ne 9 | Reintorced Communist sto sj} over Radio Jamaica warning the jestruction were seen. A certa
The yovernment, last night cities such as Cairo and Alexan-}]King Abdullah denied that they + 1 : MAZAMDI, Teheran, August a > the Allied offensive eA its aetes cople about the aDproNNhiti ection of the town—South Camp
despatched the Harbour Master’s|dria. Military personnel would] Were implicated, or refused ti BRITAIN withdrew on Tuesday its Eight Point I r0- | in Eastern Korea and threw South torm and giving them advice or | '%d Ray Town districts—appeared
Jaunch on an agate to Mor-jbe required to have special per- a on cyesdny when questionea posal for the solution of the Iranian oil crisis, after Iran}! Korean forces off two important] security measures o have suffered worst. It i
ant Bey, Ane amare perrhis |i The sources said that the] >¥ tne ilitary Tribunal. The rejected a last minute compromise attempt by the chief} hills in savage counter attacks That Friday evening, after: | ‘hese districts that many of the
nel, food, and __ clothing. Egyptian Government _ believes} Prosecuting attorney brought 4( Britist esotiator Richard Stokes. S 2s flatly < : The Reds had rushed reserves{ tinner, I left “Irvine Hall” a poorer classes live, Lots of house
morning. the military sent out @ 41.2) contro! must be kept on| Witnesses, attempting to prove iush negotiator Richard Stokes. Stokes flatly announc- | end munca on th to ¢ . . "Rai eery, co were fevelled with thewroutia aha
large convoy of Bren gun car | et eee et Ot ow ‘pt pnjamong other things that’ the ed that his mission had failed, but gave Iran until noon on| }j,5 duties hs clit a inet nee ‘batia no as cm Callee | ii Some cases houses were hall
‘iers ¢ rucks wi s Sra ce si family ms re . 4 ad tas sa : 7 3 ; s-fother building on 1 §©6Colleg ¢ ow é
ee. aie towards the stricken |déteriorating Anglo-Egyptian re- tate Kine onan an ania Wednesday to change its attitude and agree to the British gest truck convoys—more than] srounds which is us to Setabe way across the streets, The walls
s z : : > s rder, ; ) ans 304 ¢ ‘ § ; ; ve ; ; Ae es ; : : ses were ’
area Tomorrow morning, H.M.S.}!stions over the Suez Canal. they knew of the plot beter, settleme nt plans. He said that he had agreed to eliminate | 3,400 vehicles—since the abortive } animarried professor; and lec ! nis ae . re blown down.
Bigbury Bay will go on to Mo-|{ —U-P. ba) ae i be from the eight points the provision that a British operating [Red spring offensives in April and | urer Mr. Loinsworth, of the} gmp ie, gw .
j ay tai arger s 2S r, avic ul, Ousini vigor- ¢ nev r intai ¢ . . ci aay. Mduc *‘partme i \ . waowe
rant Bay aking ares — ousiy denied in a adounitian tc agency would maintain and produce the oil in Iran and, Ay, Bighth. Army _ apokesmar roe ation Department of Trini nearly every house was dam-
S<, © 3 "rie e “Cc - °, - a = : _ at " * ‘ me * » 1 . ’ . 1 ° den at th I ) one
Fee material anc U.S. Confident Of the court that he was connected substitute a British General Manager instead. He said|said Communist counter attacks | aery, = ; eo NUA aged. The Myrtle Bank Hotei
‘Kingston is still largely with- : ; vue crime, He claimed that Iran rejected this. and stubborn resistance had stalled ‘We were all chatting on vari seed ae riple’ bons a fhich
ight, electric power, and ‘ e did not even know three of} ——— ~--- ——————- The operating provision has|the four days old lt offensive | j,)¢ « " [Sager Jo th, secondary girls’ school, which
ape Aap bed in Pe part of Spanish Bases hin other defendants, and his re- Cc 4 1 been one of the anes barriers | ll along the 25-mile front stretch- me fight anon tae in Roi a alr sompinent wa, Weess
ar yt ne ‘ane ; ations with the dead monarch . Q agreeme . ., ing from above Yangg saat i; : ; : an AOUS previously, was blown off.
i Boj po ep gr Uni ieee ane Aug. 21. 1 had been good for the last three emmunist I olice Rains eile a pritish central tront “almost. to. the ° St s eh as eae Ved two schools which
in Sir im. fully nite tates officials appeared} years. . ‘ . ee {coast near Kansong, 27 les t 1 strong breeze sprang up ! were turned into emergency
invenoa ens ‘neve yo hese fy confident they will get to use} Dr. Moussa El Housini, an- Seek Youths Who foneres BABA RC! not an opera- | °F the 88th asatlie ate. nor |chought it was time to return t centres, In one there were 450
and rural areas, but road clear-|Spanish air and naval bases inlother defendant, is David’s cousin, i ieee ete ows Ge named _ Irvine Hall’ so after saying | men, women and children, About
ing and telegraph repairs are ex-|Peturn for military and economic] ‘Witnesses said sthat severai] Deserted Festival «echnical attain snd bom soodnight to the: others 1 put or}, 400 people were in the other.
ne ono allow the resumption of/id to Spain. The Defence De-|prominent members of the Hou- 7 nica affairs, and be respon- Ho fi P ana| 1%, cloak and left the Nunnery The Red Cross and other volun-
novell communication within the|Partment yesterday sent a seven-|sini family had attended the BERLIN, Aug, 21. Com he ee ee pe or eace ane en wary wetkers ware dams. & goad
next few days officer military survey to Madrid. derupatens Sa where Ab-| Refugees arriving’ here said Company. y ie he direction of what I though job to the homeless and sick.”
7 S ukeerinn wat. tart dullah was killed, on the Friday] Rast Germany’s C es "| . wal ; ay ; I a I ‘ | was “Irvine Hall” but I soon di Mr. Beckles said “Despit
Be ng ee tumrionne ited An economie team is already|previous to the ‘dne on which at ee io ta ale Ene avaae Badeioces ee S ac ng 4as overed that I was going in the | warnings it was evident that inary
strike the lower Mexican] &” route to check on Spain’s non-|the assassination took place, but... . cate “ a eee ramier ; am ; re vrong direction and retraced my | veople were caught unprepared
a bos : 1 hi ft military needs, The military sur-]not that Friday, July 30 against Russian zone youth who|ian Premier, Mohammed Mossa U.N. ADVANCE BASE Ry tl { Thad} i | ‘hough it ust | i }
mainland late this afternoon or ae ™ ae . meee . feserted the recent Red Worla |degh He said. “I’ve bee t - ave BASE, we y, were be @ Jost @ ee te PAU e aamilted ‘that
a vey group has the dual responsi- f } San 2 vor wat e been in thc} Below Kaes ; a a) ense o satin oles 7 quate pare 2 ya a
early tonight. bility of checking on air and naval According to the testimony,| Youth Festival to visit Alliea|closest touch with the British The K aesong, Korea, Aug, 21 n f direction and was head idequate preparations in the wa
Orleans Weather Bureau : ; P ; ahd cian i di ; P 1e =Armistice Subcommittee} ing away from my intended de wf storage of food and fuel and
New on T { ‘dian | West ar] nly y ays 4 r0ic : led d
said if the hurricane continues inj bases, and seeing what equipment/¢even Toufik El Housini, guardian! West Berlin. Only two days |staff, and I am voicing their un- spent two more hours in dead. | tinatic Fortunately th ‘attening down of windows and
Pasi sualees oi 0 Ainated nokia" its|Spain’s armed forces need of the Holy Places, had left the! after the close of the Festival, 50/animous opinion in sayine they’L flocked debate and ieee ted i Z EMRE Ute) ue loors were pr wctically pi ousible
ear gatos- wilt hit uetuean ‘Naut-| The dispatch of the military;Mosque to go to the Dead Sea for| East German youngsters had flea] not stay and work in [ran, i] Nation: spokesman hinted th , 7 iy a . ee Bar pe veme crs or a large number Son : people
ie ana Tuxpan probably between|team indicated that United States Hd El ta ; ; _ | back to Berlin to beg asylum be-|the Iranian Government insist: 4 Moscow is dictating the Reds’ re- hie te vedihs this Waal “ie ore a in the other hand took the warn.
5 ey OY and 9 m. to-night | officials were fairly certain that} * BYoe a ousini explained his| cause they said Communist police |on impossible working ind man-j|fusal_ to compromise. Hope of! inont 9 4 : : was NOW | ings lightly. But the informatior
6p 19 p 4{O0wn absence from the mosque by|; ; ~ I bout 9.30 p.m
In an Advisory issued at 5 a.m |an agreement could be reached dabiig. Warinetele ae I by) are seeking them agement conditions. The sad agreement is fading fast but the ' , hroadeast was both accurate and
Weather Bureau said the centre of | With Generalissimo Franco for via’ I Ses es ely or unfortu-| Western refugee authorities |fact is there is no more efficient|Subcommittee arranged a sixth Floor Under Water lefinite.”
@ On Page 3 U.S. use of Spanish bases.—U.P. | by pray. UP quoted youths as saying that op ja staff in the world anq if thei: |meeting for 11 a.m. tomorrow I went up to my dormitory } ashi ;
—U.P. | the way back to their homes they Isex vices are lost to Iran, they can~| It spent more than half of| hese dormitories are strong new ae Foodstuff Essential
were denounced by Communist | not be replaced and the oil will|teday’s session over map reading - uildin 48 and stood up stoutly to : Speaking of Barbadians,
not flow.” lin an effort to find a mutually| te hurricane. Even so one coula | Beckles said: “In such an even

e9 qj \ V/ ° :
WS: ali Fae colleagues and that when they
“Black Paet ors¢ | Austrians e | reached home they received police H 1 eee is , #eceptable ceasefire line i the terrific force of the gal pon Riegel take ae warning
i summonses. Thereupon they fled e said that he did not know] Vice Admiral C. Turner Joy,.| without as it whistled and roar seriously ove other things it i
Meatless Days Jsecretly back to West Berlin to}Wben the British staff workers |chief U.N. truce negotiator con-{ own the corridor 1 changed | essential to have a surplus of
| appeal for permanent haven. would leave Iran, He said that|ferred with Supreme U.N, Com | into my pyjamas but througn| foodstuff. Matches, storm lanterns
ever

s
f rri Ca ne “ VIENNA, August 21. UP. he had withdrawn the eight point | mande General Ridgway — in} y opening and crevice in t ie | and torches should be kept in ;
an . 5 Austrians will have to do with- ae proposal, but the Jran Govern-|Tokyo on the worsenivg situation; structure of “Irvine Hall” the rain | 58fe_ place Windows and door











ah res for ie days a week yee p 7 t ment insisted on reading into it|and then gi back to his Head-|came in with terrific force, With | Then a + hen ant foto

he rest o is summer. The °ecEe « » intentions whict re spe | Quarters at this base camp n a short time the floor ‘nm, and only en, can Barba-
> oY A i, § . cess Vi re which were not there a ! 1@ floor is un

DAILY EXPRESS |Cabinet’s economic directorate rincess | arpa land which were never in his mind Chinese Communist radio said] ler two inches of water and “48 hope to Survive the wrath

decided to overcome the current Come Of xo |when he put the proposals for-|@#tlier today that there would be erything in the room, including, 0f,2 burricane

Fr oO Own Corres ondent) country wide meat Shortage Ss e jward. He said that his comprom- |@0 armistice, unless the United! nyself wa wet Occasional He thinks that if Barbados wa

(From Our Own Spone se stemming both from cattle dealers “ scotl ise would have meant the virtual|N@tioms agreed to a _ceasefire|‘here would be a lull for a few} Dit by @ hurricane, the m tgam~

LONDON, August 21. unwillingness to sell at Govern- BALMORAL, air ve 93 “Joan” of some 3,000 British oil | ine along the 38th Parallel. The conds only to be followed by nog Md dg be done to roofs. Tree

iTAIN’S G { N YT does more damage t0O/ment ceiling prices, and from in- Ugust and oe ae eres '|Allies have refused to accept the ids of greater violence close to houses would cause dam

BRITAIN’S GOVE RNMENT § & I a Princess Mangaret, vivacious technicians to Iran to be paid by | parallel Gn arcunde hat if ie t ns aaetee eee age and overhanging sn teeta
” y a.m 1 ory

Jamaica than the hurricane, the independent Daily Express ‘creased consumption caused by a sweetheart of the British Com-|that country for their services would collapse

' E tod alten Pad .-;_jlarge numbe of rists, y tains no natural position in which ed to be arin }
said to-day in an editorial commenting on Friday’s hurri- | dering all admtiinle sea pre a athe re Gea a | A British Embassy ann runce-| the United Nation could make ¢ aa eeran ls terrific po ye Gn arrival af Felsadoes fo
cane. vate houses not to serve meat on Her Sist birthday was BERK 3 DY ment said: “Mr. Stokes follow-|*t#nd if the armistice agreement) thunder and the wind vhipped take the plane, Mr. Beckles saw
The newspaper said the news will arouse the deepest |Tuesdays and Fridays. Britons everywhere, but cele bra-| ing his discussions with|collapsed Brigadier General | ‘tself into a tury unknown before the Administration building, whict
i : : can Britain and funds will no doubt be raised —UP. tions at Balmoral Castle were | iadian Praniter kihiemad William Nuckols, the official he ound of splinte ir clagech formerly a big hangar, flat
sympathy here in Britain and funds quiet—just a family affair. | United Nations’ spokesman, said sapekcoanlays Mt and but a mass of twisted steel



rien, A . . : Mossadegh has with deep regret |
‘ rate ; srings of these good people of the , ‘ists ve ade oe ere ‘ , tenert she C Tower w id
to alleviate the suffering g peo} Tourists and local folk made a| Come to the conclusion that tho|that the North Korean General ve branches being knocked off | 10¢ Control Tower was badl

y . a e . > re ‘¢ i rie 3 » | . » ‘ t aged The
Empire. Chinése Celebrate festive occasion as friends of the} Jranian Government is not pre-;Nam Ul, the chief Communist] its of masonry and wood being| damaged. The only foodstuff o1

Royal family, including some wh« | negotis “vers of} sly the plan was ty ges of
; . oe >] pared to agree to any arrange-| @8otlator, i very definitely in own about by the gale gave the he plane was two package

ge trees being uprooted, mas



— ‘The paper which recently has!




. ; ; . oe Se hn? sees Bren NEW YORK, Aug. 21 sey BS eligiele: un Margaret's | ments under which British! he Soviet sphere.” He said that mpression that a thousand devils bis¢ uits o Mr. Be did not «
\ arsity Students campaign against pritain’s trade Diplomatic reports receiver hand, came to take part in the; technicians whose continued Nam I] once was a teacher ir id been let loose and were seek for that day
° }pact with Cuba, added: Yet iti, oi PL is birthday party. ed X {Russia and i also a Soviet citi . : He attended the first all-Carit
: ‘ b. . ; stheth coat Aes sect that the from Peiping on Tuesday saio Local postal officials were brac service to Iran was so urgentls UP rt our everything in their], nO c ve ; a
6 o” was strange c re é 'that P: ie . an ey i na s0CE é Meclals were brac- é “ - gas oo al LOY PP, . en ooperative f 1
Get Godfathe i blind. tualioe caf schittive, cuaworen | ts Premier Chou En Lai order ing themselves’ for. the expected? isked for by Mossadegh would ; ; vath, the University College rt tapas



ed the annual celebration of the The safest position was a corn

sponsored by the Jamaican Cr

$6 2 9 r within the building, more or] 5PODS8or I
Hate America ess sheltered from the terrible] Operative Development Council
vind By about 2.00 am. on ind the Extra Mural Department

Campaign On saturday the wind had dropped| Pf the U.C-WiI. and was attendert

by students from other island

beeprepared to remain in shied

INDIANA, Aug: 21, - | SPectacular, does less hurt to Ja- industry.”

: victory over Japan to begin on
‘.a| maicans than the single wrong ry telegrams and presents
y anonyn 3 rich man ed| : , Ww) ; “ as y Sev- . j i
ee ot Se te Ruition, | done by the policy of Whitehall. oe aa Bp. fen oe Saat Sr 9s Court circles did not disclose} Conditions under which _ the
a F UnnaRS, 20 Pee aatie. ae | Tne Cuban Pact alone over the Di _ ad iethdaitid anti tn| stan what the presents are. It is knownl British staff would remain i
room, and board a years will produce more day to iplomats believed it is signi-} that she ‘is getting a convertibles iran have been the main stumbling

flood of congratulatory letters, |









On eee om 9 me Oe vee ae day misery in Jamaica than any ficant that the Chinese celebra- coupe and the traditional pearl|bleck to agreement on the oi JAPAN, Aug. 21 til oereve: ore eds ie and British Guiana
West Point ee Sheakeor a Dee eee wea Tete Pisanece nono and matched string starter when)}ctisis, Britain proposed that oi Diplomats familiar ‘with Chin- | myself, were able to turn over | The C :

A Notre Dam > official agreed to Sense aie ee os aes treaty Gobiesaee a6 whith’ Rec aa born. experts and former employees > | se Communist practices said or heir mattresses and get some The cour or sien Br, A t
the plan with certain provisions, ee ene ae i ok ‘is See teahine is not invited or Ne Lain a J pes considered the nationalised _Anglo-Iraniar fuesday, the execution last Fri nuch needed sleep |g to A mat 18. Tt spl wget
including one preventing any of | S190 os 3 ; a uction to raise | a d. are most | likely claimants for Mar-|9il company remain in Iran a lay of Ipilians and Japanese ac Ns oe cae oe es lec
the cadets from engaging in any] a ee feat Are Res ata a ot | ‘**+ ‘garet's hand were present for the/employees of the British ru used of having plotted again Trees Uprooted | ee Sen jie teeta

Tutor of the Cooperative Lough

I birthday celebration, They arejorganisation which would supe the life of Mao Tse Tung is on The scene of desolation and |, rough College, England
M: 7 ing one ,0roug slege, England, and he

inter-collegiate sports while at;



































Tirtcsemattar |Empire interests made by_ the ‘AKER 7 : , | William Billy Wallace, 24-year-|vise the oil marketing of < il tcl oe ; estruction which greeted the eve
MOA aioe issued the fol-| Signing of the Anglo-Cuban Trade OL 'AKES SHAKE HAWAII old polo playing stepson of the|the West ’ b < ) 7 ae most one ant emotiona d irate we " Saturd oe eat } was assisted by eleven other le
F ae os greement is made is - eet rie sSRinas a ly . aspects of 1@ «current “Hate s : — ee oe turers,
lowing statement on behalf of the Agre mE oe ees this Sree HONOLULU. Aug. 21. | American writer Herbert Agar Some British supervisors woule de a! catoea tote? Was af ive moved a heart of stone. The Th Paes tal tact s ,
anonymous berefactor— “Because|! 2 Lord wg np ve A series of sharp earthquakes] 24 the 27-vear-old Earl offalso stay in the fields and refin-|, “a ‘1 i : aieeity Pts eae, POneAed lege surroundings, whic hf... re ott nbmietes ae with t " +Ory
t ymous b rairm » \pire s- , : ; alke : ry ip ‘ writies cooperatic tartir with ~ the
I, with millions feel that in Amer-| = eta oe or iat Ay de Britis! rocked the Hawaiian islands to-| P4lkeith.—(C.P.) erjes. Iran insisted that eact It sign ae Antonio Riva an velve hours before had been a Rochdal . ic tah ee ) rpaeaah
ica any man who makes a mistake 'Tles Association and the British! a.) and police reported “exten- ‘ Briton sign an individual contract i etal g R oti yy ‘va ane | hing of beauty, was now forlorn ecarba tin i P id edaieadtin
! qT vv *, . 4 . n ‘ ‘ di é 2 yolc ¢€ agt we Ke i str 10: n
should have the chance to rehab- Fmpire Le«gue sive damage” to stores and roads Yl i i with the nationalised “Iranian is aii ; nt r a y ’ ama guc its nakedne Massive tree " 47 at aS age ee n :
: . v + "4s z : ; S 9 vere § £ »xecution saquac 7 : ‘ lanage » Oo cooperative
ilitate himself, I make this offer Concessions on the westernmost island of B.G. RAISES LOAN National Oil Company i Pei this ets " the ra ; 4 f ‘isn ere shorn of their leaves and marketing society) “fis ich of
to the cadets, who have been| yw, Se ee } address in|Hawaii. Tremors were recorded ‘ ae Seer ft " a inches while the trunks stood] ~ Aa arti :
recently detached from the United | y sot Sa yan a at 12.57 a.m. Hawaiian time T - The Stokes announcement broke] guilty by the court of Peiping th bare limbs raised heaven-|CoPerative society and coopera-
20 tac’ 1e Whitenal o the S, word | ® oT a.m, alle 6 I j 7 ep axes * 4 ‘ont ‘ tt , ‘ . ‘ tive accounts, cooperative trad
States Military Academy Ip: lfc ti oa hasises the fact that . LON DON the. three-day silence, during Militar y Control Committee « ard ste _ ‘a See site Ee
A University spokesman esti- ek eee ee See Another sharp series was re- which, behind the scenes efforts] plotting to assassinate Mao durin “In many cases the trees had|S¥rPlus and price policy,
ated that hoard room. . tuition concessions given to Britain bY | corded at 1.31 am. Roland F (From Our Own Corréspondent) had been made by the United]the parade celebrating the seconc en torn from their roots and operative law, 3 ooperative and
ane eo Id come to $1.300 ae oe fhe result of the agreement] white, chief observer at the coast LONDON, Aug. 21 |States Presidential adviser, W.Janniversary of the Chinese Pec ww lay stretched out across the/YUth, cooperative — wholesaling,
Coated vot ana annually gt Notre!Mave also to be given to more) ang geostatics magnetic observa-|_ Pritish Guiana has been success-}Averell Harriman, to bridge the] ples’ Republic on October, 195: ds and roadway While all] Cooperatives and the family, judg-
$1,400 per man annually at Notre ‘ : & g D cs I : the efficte ‘ ; sik
en POE igh ty fi than 30 other nations under thej¢ion station said quakes were “at| ful in its attempt to raise a loan|gap between the British and UP. new buildings, ich ys} +8 the efficiency of a cooperative
yanec-UE: |terms of the agreement. least as large’ as the one that|im London. Subscription lists/Tranian points of view. This dif- Irvine Hall,” were but little |#0clety and the social responsi:
| AVE _Eeeseny ena cope Na preceded the eruption of the| Were open and closed within five ference in viewpoints existed] HEAVY RAINS INTOKYO}] temaged except for broken glas my <2 ina nes b a te
+ . countries, including Western Ger- M : minutes this morning, and it is]sinee the talks began TORY A ied. 184 vindow almost all temporars was opened by the Govern
z, , auno Loa volcano in June, 1850. . ni & ; rOKYO, Aug I . isha ae
Nehru Receiv es | many with the unasked for, un- , antes —vwU.p,| understood that te issue was The Iranians insisted on basin One of the heaviest rainst oder tructur } ' z J tic r air Hug } om at
‘ i. expected and unearned position of heavily over-subscribed their claims on the detailed nine- scant vente hit. Toleve It ther completel destroye or cuneron. wich was etvended —
\ ote Of Confidence }an equal competitive opportunity | point oil nationalization law.|’2 recen frtvic an : Prey i! were severely batterec nd ex-|the Vice Principal of the U.C.W.I
~ | > \ Jisrupted transportatior ind > :
with Britain,” says Lord Balfour, | which completely dispossessed the! @rupte: Een eens ltensively damaged Mr. Phillip Sherlock, Hon, D
NEW DELHI, Aug. 21 |\“They give nothing.” j ommunication ana = endec ‘ 7 Sangster and presided over

The Governmental Congress He adds th

it the Angto-Cuban|| TO-DAY’SWEATHER |! 2/ FAMILIES RESCUED |(yiletranian Ol Company, while roan lon haat wav! Wer’ Iitering. the “place. tor| Rev. Br. J. P. Sullivan

based their stand on;


















party bloc in ®arliament ©; Agreement signe despite ’ FROM BANDITS {the Harriman formula ; UP | rd i nd. Here once stood At a social function held at
Prime Minister Nehru an over-| protests from sugar producers in " ay CHART | ' me dit Roof thjend of the course on August 1
whelming vote of confidence Tues-/ A British Guiana, Mauri-! nace pi yg a BOGOTA, Colombia, Aug. 21 } Stokes appeared tired ind r t mere tudents were addressed | M
day in his dispute with the party) t nd South Africz The ars Sig De omens Twenty-one families i iding,sOlemn when he met rrespond- “ Tk’ f r n.|N. W. Manley, ofte referrec
olen ve ove : authority Fr Car anetey ha j ihe Moon : — yen 24th 48 itldcen held t cata See 1 ents in the luxuriou ta nae pal The ADVOCA P ‘ The ‘ the f it ( f ope ive
ninodiin ‘in minut ’ s , me rk ee te, Lighting Up: 7 pm. Thais alone hg a : ‘ as I
1 @Xy ined in 90-minute ta low bandit gang were res > r ce where née é eC stay 7 F: . I } t
ny he x ed fron a “Tt t High Tide: 7.28 a.m. and ' lice aden ha ‘ 33 k mae a He toe ae iifferont alae pays for NEWS te Students ‘

y he resigned from € to oo. olice during » week-end I a ren o Z v1 I en ed to Student en
part exe € Work how our (G t tow Tide: Rais bce an Puebl feuvo, 100 miles southwest from the hard hitting businessman Dial 3113 } e the homel. fter the] seve cooperative
Cor e to tk p his demandjcan declare their belief E re er P of Bog who arrived 18 days ago He . torn 1 I lerive great bene
( k 1.01 p.m Select Giitsa a8 patie Pi i ih le a Day or Night tanta tie 4

> ba

UP I Empire trade ' tured several re CC.P.) @ On Page 3 ‘ ‘ ’ t @ On Page 3,




PAGE TWO





THEIR NEEDLE CRAFT

ACTRESSES SHOW

Actresses Dorothy Lamour



(left)

and Ginger Rogers compare

dolls they have made and brought along to a Hollywood party.

Miss Rogers won a prize for her bold

went to a children’s hospital.

needlework. All the dolls

—L.E.S.



IS EXCELLENCY the Gov-
ernor, accompanied by Lady
Savage, Mr. Denis Savage and
Miss Pat Savage attended the Vic-
torian Exhibition at the Barbados
Museum yesterday afternoon.
The Exhibition | 1837 1901,
which opened at the Museum on
August, will continue until Sun-
day, August 26.

Was Here Last Year

R. REGGIE ROSE, a Canadian

who works with the Canadian
3ank of Commerce in Port of
Spain flew in from Grenada on
Monday evening by B.W.LA
After a week’s holiday in that
colony he has come over to spend

the remaining two weeks of his
vacation in Barbados,
He was here last year for his

holidays, when he made a number
of friends. Mr. Rose is staying
with Mr, and Mrs, Alban Johnson
at Worthings.



THE



ADVENTURES

Delegate Arrives

H°. J. B. RENWICK, Grena-
da’s delegate to the Regional



Economic Committee meeting
which opens this morning at
Hastings House, arrived from
Grenada on Monday evening by
B.W.LA.

He is a guest at the Marine
Hotel.

British Films For Japs
R. NAGAMASA KAWAKITA,
48-year-old boss of a 500-

cinema chain in Japan, has ar-
rived in London in search of more
British films to show to the Japa-
nese,

Says Mr.

Kawakita: “The Japa-

nese people like British films
better than American produc-
tions.”

Mr. Kawakita is hoping to take
Tales of Hoffman back to Tokio
The Red Shoes has. already
earned £70,000 there for its Brit-

ish producers.

OF









1%. jinicenas General

H°’ J. C. WOODING, Attor-
t General of the Leeward
Islands is at present holidaying|
n Barbados He will be intro-

ced to the
Aucust 24th.

local Bar on Friday,

Due To-day
‘UE back from England this
morning by the Rice
re Mr. and Mrs. J. Phillip
und family who have = Me there
n heliday Mr. Phillips is witt
Bath” Estate in B.G. = wife
parents, Mr. and Mrs E, Mc.-
Kenzie who are at pre a in Eng-
land will be returning to Barbados
towards the middle of next montt
by the “Gascogne.”

Komarice Began At Party

O* her way to service in
Korean waters, HM=e
‘Jamaiea” stopped at Singapore
Officers attended a party, Ana
there one of them, Lieutenant
Michael Thomas, met Miss Ann
Kirby Green, Last week they

became engaged.

Miss Green 22,
vith her parents, Her father
Lieutenant-colonel P. K. Green
was formerly stationed in Malaya
She is studying art.

Mr, Thomas, 24,
BOAC boss Sir Miles Thomas
He is secretary to the Court of
Inquiry into the loss of the sub-
marine “Affray.”

The two will
next year,

WRAF Chief To Marry

‘ROUP OFFICER NAN

JF DINNIE, one of the two
Deputy Directors of the WRAF,
is to marry. Notice of her wed-
ding to Mr. Roger Edward Hunter,
a regional director of the British
Council, has been given at Ken-
ington register office,

Mr. Hunter is 37, lives in
Kensington, Group Officer Dinnie
is 35. She has been in the Service
since 1939, has served in the Far
East

Many recruits knew her
she commanded the WAAF
ing school at Wilmslow, Since
then she has commanded the
WRAF depot at Hawkinge, former
Battle of Britain airfield, is now
at the Air Ministry in Kingsway.

Caribbean Cruise

HEN the “Colombie” leaves

Barbados today, on board
making the ten-day Caribbean
Cruise, will be Mr. and Mrs, W.
Patterson, their daughter Sally
“ son Patrick, Mrs, Richard-
, Mr, Vere Redman, Mr, Arthur
Miss Carmen Archer, Miss
Hutchinson, Miss Kath-
Mr. and Mrs, Rob
Charlie Peterkin
Gale.

lives in Putney

is only son of

probably marry

when
train-



Daphne
leen Sargeant,
Peterkin, Mr.
and Mrs, C. C,
Incidental Intelligence
ey one: one who
takes infinite pains and gives

around him.—
—LE.S.

them to everyone
Bennett Cerf.



PIPA

Copyright - P91. Vaz Dias Int Amsterdam



BY THE WAY eee By Beachcomber

IMAGINED, in my innocence,

that I was satirising the scien-
tists and chemists who look after
our foretold
years ago, the coming of fossilised
food.

food, when I some

But it appears that they have
been busily preparing fossilised
fish, and the lucky Mr. Chapman
Pincher, using a screwdriver to
prise his meal off the slab with
which he was presented, was one
of the first to taste this delicacy
I assumed that bolmenol F would
be used to make it tasteless, but
I had reckoned without the dis-
covery of bolmenol G, which
leaves a faint after-taste of in-
ferior rubber. This is most stimu-
lating to the glands (especially
Matheson’s Gland), and is a sub-
stitute for a whole range of car-
bohydrogenics.

Pre-fossilised Fish

R. STRABISMUS (Whom God
Preserve) of Utrecht has, of
course, gone further than this. He

has succeeded in manufacturing
pre-fossilised fish. The absence
of any flavour is so pronounced

that nobody can tell it from the
more conventional form of fossil-
ised fish. But the advantage in
the Strabismus article is that the
dreary business of catching fish
for fossilisation is done away
with. The stuff is made in enor-
mous vats, and Charlie Suet is
already preparing a schedule of
mass-production. The new secret
formula produces a food which ic
an even more powerful brain-
stimulant than real fish. «a parrot
fed on it recited twelve hundred







lines of Wordsworth and hummed
the first nine bars of Handel's
Largo. a

in Passing

ANY unmarried girls who go

to expensive restaurants in
London have decided to look
under the table before the meal
begins. This means that the
ubiquitous lads who report each
mouthful, and interpret the offer
of a cigarette as the beginning of
a “romance,” will have to find
some other hiding-place. One
such girl and her eseort recently
suspected that the waiter was not
a waiter, and she said to him,
with a charming smile: ‘Look,
I'll tell you a secret. We are just
friends. Now you can go away-”

Varkover and West Point
A SINGULARLY ill-timed pro-

? test, by Headmasters and
Governors of Public Schools,
against a recent case of wide-

spread cheating during examina-
tions at Narkover, is_ printed
without comment in the current
Narkover School Magazine. But
beneath it is the statement made
by the dismissed cadets of West
Point, and their parents, that such
cheating is an old West Point
custom, Dr. Smart-Allick has
sent fraternal greetings to West
Point, and has offered to exchange
“the best methods of cir-
the intolerable tyr-
amination system.”

views On
cumventing
anny of the ex



Rupert and

Reaching schoo! Tigerlily suc saucer flying this way.’ " “ Ther
ceeds in alicniin into her place, bur it few the other way,'’ interrupts
the master spots Rupert and Algy Algy. "Yes, and then it disap
and he calls them to him,” What peared and made us_ forget the
is the meaning of this? You're time."’ adds Rupert, * That'll do,

“Please sir,

late," he growls.
says Rupert, * s

was early really,"

I went to meet Algy and we saw a



the Sorcerer—7



* You're excuses

| says the master.
time. Mind

> per more odd every
you don't do it again.

MEN'S SHIRTS
MEN'S SHIRTS
MEN'S SHIRTS
MEN'S SHIRTS ‘

DIA! 4606

“Arrow” White
“B.

V.D.” Grey, Tan, Blue

MEN'S PYJAMA SUITS
BOY'S PYJAMA SUITS.



!

ete. SttewOd ee ae

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

$7.10

$7.31
$4.89 5.23

$5.72

DIAL 4220



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



‘

‘Do
best with




|
|

}

|

WHAT i
ly eally hard
li swing down?
: BR

the best
thinging?
Walking about?
all depends on your



jfeet on the mantelshelf In th
|Way gravity will help your bra
to get a better ood supply.

2. People w



MISS MARIA LUISA HUARTE, talented Max Factor Hollywood
make-up artist will be arriving shortly to conduct the famous Max
Factor Hollywood Art School of Make-Up classes. |

MISS HUARTE will be giving free demonstrations in Barbados from
Monday, 27th August to Friday, 3lst at Cave Shepherd & Co. Ltd.,|
Bruce Weatherhead Ltd., The Barbados Aquatic Club, and The Cot-
tage Gift Shap.













SS
B.B.C. Radio |"... | =
am Zs m , 23rd, 1.30 p.m.
. e e Red ceen P i B'TOWN “Lawh Breed” &
javeake aa A a A DIAL 2310 “Apa. Cyclone”







TODAY & T AY &

Paramount

TOMORROW

Gay Pomantic

(Only)
Action

150 & 4.90 pom
Double!

Programme

Color by Technicolor



































WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21 1951

eee ANogtaoue Parade ti 211 RIDING HIGH @& WHISPERING SMITH
am. Listeners’ Choice, 11.45 a.m. State- + .
ment of Account, 12.00 noon The News.||| —Biné CROSBY. Clarence MUSE Alan LADD, Robert_ PRESTON
iseckie > sews. ee FRIDAY 250, 445 & 830 pm, & Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
eee eee ee eae : MITCHUM'S Newest......Actually Filmed in Romantic Mexico!

4.00 p m. The News, 410 p.m _ Inter- br ’
lude, 415 pm. Star’ Time, 4 30 pm THE BIG STEAL. STARRING ROBERT MITCHUM
Educating Archie, 5 00 pm. Composer with Jane GREER, William BENDIX Patric KNOWLES ({

LES (RKO RADIO)
of the Week, 5.15 pm. Theatre Music = - metres
6.00 pm. Music Magazine, 6.15 p.m — a
Marcel Gardner, 6 45 pm. Programme |
Parade, 6 55 p.in s Sport | PE AZ! OISTIN a3 ALE ry
7.00—10.41 5 pm 41.32 m 4 4 Dial 8404

= ar rare inteneie day & Tomorrow 5 & 8.30 p.m THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
700 pm. The News, pm. News ISLE :
Analysis, 715 pm. Twenty Questions, hore sates REaP | Today & Tomorrow 8.39 p.m
7.45 pm. The Changing Tone of Public ZOMBIES ON BROADWAY | SMART POLITICS
Controversy, 8 00 pm Radio Newsreel, Wally Vernor Al en Freddie Stewart and the Teenagers &
815 pm. Serious Argument, 8 45 p m ; Alan Carney UNA OLIPPER
Interlude, 855 pm. From The Editori- Special SAT Midnite Sat. 25th SONS Seen
als, 900° pm David Copperfield, 9 30 %th., 9.30 a.m. | Bons of ” Roddy_McDowa
p.m. Melody Mixture, 9.45 p.m. State- a .
ment of Account, 10 00 p.m. The News, oe Breed" | Lonely Valley Friday (Only) Midnite Bat, ee
10.10 p.m. Interlude, 10.15 p.m. Crazy rhy Grant & Buck Jones & 8.30 p.m vu are age
People, 10 45 pm. Mid Week Talk, ‘Arizona Cyclone . mereene ce Jiggs & neste iE ta |
: | » P | n
; na Johnny Mack | Johnny Mack ||| ‘Saddle Serenade’ Johnny Mack
he Silent Partner |!" = ous Sens ad
ODP POOOSSES SO%
OPP E ee 5°. SES 666,66 6,646 ,6,
PEOPLE .... By JON HOPE a, POPFPPPOPES COS Gasp se eGo VO ee POT TOO

The things you can do on a
bicycle! Take mystery writer-
traveller Bernard Newman. He
has a bigycle he calls George.

Georg@: and Bernard go every-
where. ‘Together they have pro-
duced many books — and made

GLOBE T HEATRE

TO-DAY, 5.00 & 8.15 P.M. LAST SHOWS

THE OUTLAW .

36s08e FOOSS

a_ lot f money for Newman. ¥
a thes Roe done it again, x “TO MORROW ONLY, 4.45 & 8.15 P.M.
but We must wait until nearer % MIGHTY JOE YOUNG

year’s end for the book; To be X

called Oberammergau Journey it xX

— AND

ig a from-the-saddle record of als
trip through the Rhineland and s THE SECRET FURY

Bavaria to Oberammergau, where

Newman saw the Passion Play. LLL EAA

AGED



How much did all this cost’ ae
About 15s. a day. 7 1aY Y .
@ Publishers fight shy of AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)
ae, Honoree eres oan. TO-NIGHT & TO-MORROW NIGHT AT 8.30
weer. MATINEE : TO-DAY AT 5.00 P.M.



for
Yet

serving their spending power
the coming autumn spate.
this was not always so.

That giant among best sellers
Sir Hall Caine, believed in issuing
his books at this time of the year
—and beating his own drum
simultaneously. Gilbert Frankau
reminisces : “I used to taunt Hal
Caine about his publicity methods
Once I called him The Boomster,’

Continues Frankau; “I had
just hit the big money with my
Peter Jackson, Cigar Merchant
and Hall Caine said to me at
unch.- ‘How lucky you are Mr
Frankau, to live in an age when;
an author does not have to be al
gentleman,’ ”

@ Slow to follow up her first-
novel success has been American)
Anita Loos, Since she won the
publie’s faney with Gentlemen |
Prefer Blondes more than 20
years ago, much of her time has
been spent in Hollywood. Now,
in October, Cape’s plan to isSue
A Mouse Is Born, her second}
book. The theme? Say Cape's :|
“The life story of Effie Huntriss,
a film star known as The Bust.”
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S.

|
iccauee eee
CROSSWORD

ABBOTT Lou COSTELLO

“IN SOCIETY”

‘TREACHER MARION
KIRBY GRANT

A Universal Picture

GLOBE
BB 4

PLUS

Bud

with ARTHUR

|
Big book buyers are con-
HUTTON







OPENING



FRIDAY

The ALL










MIGHTIEST OF ALL
WESTERN
ADVENTURES!







Color by
TECHNICOLOR

A Paramount Picture starring

RAY MILLAND - HEDY LAMARR
MACDONALD CAREY



Special Offer

Across
Make !t one gate and settle.
Confine in rotation? (6)
» This lock was hard to
. Remedy. (4) 10. Pointer
. Plesh | find tn fairyland.

’ What possesses ‘t. (3) STAINLESS STEEL COMBINED SINKS AND
. Room for free outlook. (5)

Leak in a cap ty DRAIN BOARDS. Only $45.00 Each
Maue by the. i ALUMINIUM SINKS AND DRAIN BOARDS
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Down }

One short of (4)
The lock rests.
Part of the fout,
An end to that hump
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Vexed that ts tar (5
. Pré-final test. (4) 15

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A hundred before
From the orenard
0. Frequentiy called mi
23. A model neart. (3



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Each
x 12%4”
@

Hardware Department

a doubte
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Size ;. 36” se"
from

Telephone No. 2039

(5) Obiainable our

1.
2.
3.
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6

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“ or
> SCRA

1 Bimannon Ys Beir THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
® Aue COTTON FACTORY LTD.













you think

your feet up?

position for
Sitting? |

blood- |

i average blood-
|pressure usually think best sitting

SOC CES SCC OCCPO CSO,



STAR TALENT COMBAT



WEDNESDAY,

EMPIRE



Today & Tomorrow
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

THE LAUGH SHOW

?

M-G-M presents

Red SKELTON
Arlene DAHL
Ann MILLER

m

pressure, says London psychiatrist
Dr. J, R. Rees.* You have three} “
[eps WATCH THE
1. If your bleod-pressure is on ”
jthe low side you should do your | BIRDIE
|best thinking lying down or sit-
ting in an armehair with your | They've got RED standing

at}
in

on his head—when you see
RED he'll have you rolling
in the Aisles







jon a hard seat with an upright | Coming FRIDAY 31st.
j|back. An armchair is fatal to}
ldeep concentration for them. It} * FATHER’S LIT TLE
jrelaxes their muscles so much}
that the legs absorbs blood whic | DIVIDEND i
hould be coursing through the |
brain | ;
. . } A Riot of Fun .
3. Those with high blood-| beginning to end
pressure are often over-alert | from bee 6
mentally, whatever their posture. | ——_—__— ——
Their brains have a eee
blood supply, whichs keeps them
awake even when they are worn} ROYAL
jout physieally. |
' In his excellent book, *The i . .
llealth of the Mind” (Faber,| Foday & Tomorrow
19, 6d.) 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

|
}
Republic’s Double
|

“1 JANE DOE”

“DARK COMMAND”

Starring

John WAYNE
Walter PIDGEON

Roy ROGERS

FRIDAY

20th Century Fox presents
Burt LANCASTER

iy his first BIG Technicolor
WESTERN

with

Robert WALKER
Sally FORREST

OPENING
5.00 & 8.15 p.m.
|

Adventure, Drama, in its

‘* VENGEANCE
Rugged Best

VALLEY ”
x

ROXY

Today & Tomorrow
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

The Fox Super Double...

Jeanne CRAIN &

3 William LUNDIGAN
x
2 in

| “ PINKY”

and

“THE CLOCK”
Starring

Judy GARLAND
and Robert WALKER

FRIDAY—4.30 & 8.15 p.m.



Rex HARRISON
Linda DARNELL in

‘*UNFAITHFULLY
YOURS”

AND

‘* BOOMTOWN ”

with Spencer TRACY
Clark GABLE

OPENING SATURDAY
4.45 & 8.15 p.m.












STICK-UP! PICK-UP!)
MURDER !

WARK EDMOND

sivas ABRIEN- STORM

Roland
A COLUMBIA PICTURE

Sereea Play by Eugene Ling » Produced by HUNT STROMBERG
Oirectes by Gordes Dougtes





| Starring
|
John CARROLL
j Vera RALSTON
| and



The BARBADOS FOUNDER i Lee.
White Park Road,

AUGUST 22, 1951

STARTING FRIDAY
30 p.m

2.30 &

RAYA
TUNED

OL YMPIC

4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Last 2 Shows Today
Republic's Action Double
Roy ROGERS &

DALE EVANS
in

“YELLOW ROSE
OF TEXAS”

and

“TUCSON RAIDERS”

Starring

Wild Bill ELLIOTT
Gabby HAYES
Riotous Action

4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Republic Double

Tomorrow

Adele MAREA
Robert ARMSTRONG
in
“EXPOSED”
and

“THE LAST
BANDIT ”’
Starring
Wild Bill ELLIOTT
Forrest TUCKER
SUSPENSE ACTION
MURDER !}

FRIDAY, SATUR} AY,
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.









AND
“PANIC IN THE
STREETS ”

Starring

Richard WIDMARK
Paul DOUGLAS

MURDER!
OPENING

SUSPENSE!
Friday, 7th September

A’ EMPIRE i‘

The Loves and Ti:
RUDOLPH VALEN

‘*“VALENTINO ”

Starring Eleanor PARKER
Anthony DEXTER
Story the Romantic Idol of a
Fabulous Era!

nes of

TINO



of





“HOPPER”
BICYCLE

aye

_~oOoFEREFEFEFREREFE0E—REOqOQNQQ LEE ESS
. - on

oma


TL

me

WEDNESDAY,

AUGUST 2



Dewey Leaves For
Visit To Alaska

SEATTLE, Arscust 2
Governor Thomas E. Dewey of
New York left by air on Tuesd
om a six day tour Alaska 1
he described as the “keypoint,”
in the Pacifie crisis. The New
York Governor scheduled t
visit southeastern Alaska on Wed-
néesday and Thursday.

hich



Governor Ernest Gruening of
Alaska who will be Dewey's ho
during his tour of the territory
said that Dewey would fly north




of the Arctic circle to visit the
Eskimo village. Dewey said he
planned to inspect military in-
stallations in the territory. Had

said “Alaska is a crucial area in
the Pacific because it is only a
few miles from the best armed

aggressor in the history of the
free world.” He explained that
he was referring to the Soviet
Union. He said Russia may
launch a peace offensive in the
néar future. “Now they found
they can’t scare us off with

afmed might.” He said that the
Soviet Union in time might even
aSk the world to disarm. —U.P.

Suspends Officer

TAIPEH, Aug. 21.

Chiang Kai Shek suspended
Lieutenant General Mao Pang-
Chu as Deputy Commander of the
Chinese Nationalist Air Force and
delegate to the United Nations
Military Staff Committee, and
ordered him to return to China
immediately. The Nationalist
President in a mandate accused
Mao of “dereliction of duties and
disobedience of orders.”

Mao, otherwise known as Lieu-
tenant General P. T. Mow had
been the Nationalist Air Force
representative in Washington
since the spring of 1943.

The yovernment spokesman
Shen Chang-Huan said that Mao
was accused of:

1. Failure to give a clear ac-
count of funds for the purchase
of air force equipment.

2. The dereliction of
causing the
fighting power.

3. The espoysal of the cause of
disloyal staff members.

4. The refusal to hand
public funds.

duties,

loss of air force

over

—U-P.

Romulo Will! Sign
U.S.—Philippine Treaty

MANILA, Aug. 21.

Foreign Secretary
Romulo will leave by air on Wed-
mesday for Washington for the
signing of the new United States-
Philippines Mutual Defence
Treaty to strengthen Pacific de-
fences against Communist aggres-
sion.

Romulo will be followed on
Friday by ambassador Cowen and
on Monday by the Philippine
President Elpidino Quirno, for
pact signing ceremonies scheduled
for August 30.

—U-P.

MAIL NOTICES

Mails for St. Vincent, Gre
dad, British Guiana by the
Constructor will bh







clostd at the Gene




Registered Mall at
Mail at 10 a.r

Parcel Mail
9 4.m., Ordinary
23rd August, 1951

Mails for St. Lucia, Dominic
serrat, Antigua, St Kitt E
Boston, Halifax, Montreal by the
Lady Rodney will be closed
General Post Office as under

Mont






Parcel Mail and Pegistered Mail ay
10 a.m., Ordinary Mail at 10.15 a.m. or
the 25th August, 1951



RATES OF EXCHANGE

21ST
63 5/10% pr

AUGUST,
CANADA
Cheques on
Bankers
Demand Drafts
Sight Draft

1951

615/10% pr
61.35°- pr
612/10% pr

635/10°% pr. Cable
62% pr. Currency 60% pr
Coupons 59 3/10% pr.





Carlos: @

Joiner Guilty Of
Battery Theft

Sentence of
prisonment

two months’ im-
with hard dabour was



yesterday ssed on Clarence
Grant a ear-old joiner of
Dayrells Road, Christ Church by

Mr. C. L. Walwyn, Acting Police
Magistrate of District “A”.

He was found guilty of the lar-
ceny of a battery valued at $42.26

and the property of Cole & Co.
on_August 7. Grant appealed at
the bar.

Police Constable
said that about 4.10 p.m. on Au-
gust 7 he was on duty along
Swan Street when he saw Grant
with a battery. He became sus-
picious and asked him how he
came by the battery. Grant told
him that aman named Herbert
Haynes ‘of Dayrells Road had
given him the battery,

The Police checked with Haynes
who said that he never gave a
battery to Grant. After this Grant
said that he was wrong and that
the battery was given to him by
a man named Wiltshire who works
at Cole’s Garage.

Wiltshire also denied that he
gave a battery to the defendant.

249 Springer

Bad Memory
Darlington attached to the
Central Police Station told the
Court that on August 7 Police
Constable Springer reported to
him that he had arrested Grant
with a battery

He asked Grant to tell him
about the battery and Grant said
that a man named Jones, a motor
mechanic, had given the battery
to him. About 6.30 p.m. the
same afternoon, Lionel Jones
came to the Station and was
shown the battery and Grant.

Cpl

Jones denied that he gave Grant
a battery. The defehdant then
aid that his memory was. bad
and that a man by the name of
Wiltshire had given it to him.
Later the battery was identified
s the property of Cole & Co.



Mossadegh Rejects
Stokes’ Proposal

From Page 1.

the eight points, because they



were “so messed about, that it was
better to withdraw them, than
leave them on the table.” He

summed up the failure of his mis-
sion this way. “The Iranian peo-
ple must make up their minds
whether they want to play poli-
tics and ruin themselves, or to
conduct their affairs on the sound
and accepted commercial princi-
ples embodied in the proposal
which was widely acclaimed as
fair in newspapers throughout the
world outside Iran, and which
will bring an era of prosperity to

the Iranian people for a long
period and friendliness and co-
operation between Iran and Brit-
ain.”

—U.P.

Twenty-Eight Dead

SINGAPORE, Aug. 20.

Twenty eight people are be-
lieved dead following a violent
explosion and fire early to-day

aboard the British tanker Dromus

while it was loading gasoline at

Pulan, Bukon Igland near here.
—(CP)



iT 6

?h [oie tuoay



BARBADOS

way

REMEMBER °
cu



Suit Adjourned
Until September 17

THE CHRISTIAN MISSION Chancery Suit has been

adjourned until September 17. When the hearing resumes "eported that

on that day, Mr. Adams and Mr. W. W. Reece. counsel for

the two parties, will put their case to His Lordship the’

ADVOCATE



DARLING — DON'T :
ITS STewaRDs’
P DAY AT GOOPWOOD



Christian Mission Rain Hinders

Work

A steady rain from 3.2
im, to 9.45 a.m. yesterday held
up work in most parts of the is-
land Up to 2 p.m yesterday
workers and shoppers walkec
Wah their rain coats slung over
their shoulders or arms.

The various police sub-Stations !

no damage was
done by the rain. District “C”|
had the heaviest rainfall up to}

6 a.m. yesterday when 35 parts

Vice Chancellor, Sir Allan Collymore, who is presiding, of rain were recorded,
Little more evidence remains to be taken.

Contesting the suit are : Rev. Frederick Barrow and
others against Rev. Hoyte and others,

The two patties are seeking a
declaration as to who were the
legally constituted General Su-
perintendent and Board of Man-
agement of the Christian Mission
during 1949, 1950 and who are

the présent General Superintend- opened, Rev. Barrow, Rev. Larrier residents in the area are

ent and Board of Management.

Rev. Barrow and his group are
represented by Mr. W. W. Reece,
K.C., associated with Mr, J. S. B
Dear, instructed by Messrs.
Hutchinson & Banfield,

Rev. Hoyte and the others are
represented by Mr. G. H. Adams
associated with Mr. D. H.
Ward, instructed by Messrs. Car-
rington & Sealy.

Did Not Attend

The ease is that after a break-
up on New Year’s Day, 1949 when
a service was scheduled to take
place, Rev. Hoyte did not attend
a meeting on January 6 when a
General Superintendent was to be
elected. Hoyte is explaining that
he did not attend that meeting
or two subsequent meetings be-
cause he was advised that they
were illegal. He said in evidence
that he notified other representa-
tives that the meeting was illegal-
ly convened and that they should
not attend.

Complainants from the other
side said that Hoyte gave other

reasons for not attending the
meeting, one being that he was
informed from reliable sources
that they intended injuring him.

Involved in the issue is whether
the going out of existence of the
Mission's Herald which gave no-
tice of meetings for appointments
of General Superintendents, meant
that the Supérintendent whose
election was last published would
continue to be Superintendent,

After evidence was finished, the
question of bringing pleadings up
to date was considered in Cham-
bers.

Awaiting Settlement

head.

Mr. Adams told him that there
was a misunderstanding about the
nature of the disturbances which
oecurred on New Year's day, 1949,
and he said when the door was

and Rey. Hoyte went in the pulpit
Which is normally only occupied
by one and there was much stone
throwing about the church
“Peace” Conference

Elder Lowe, Secretary of the
Christian Mission from June 27
1948 also gave evidence. He said

that on January 1, a religious ser
yice was scheduled to take place
When he arrived there was a
great commotion. Hoyte was there
and when he left, the disturbance
got worse with people from out-
side walking about the church

While they were in the taberna-
cle, because of a rumour, they
hurried to the office to secur:
documents,

‘I went to the meeting on Jan-
uary 6,” he said. “Ramsay wa
not asked to deputise for Hoyte
Ramsay went with the object of
seeing whether the two side
could get together. It was more
or less a peace conference

Ramsay informed the gathering
on what he had promised Rev
Hoyte—whether they would meet
to reach a_ settlement. He also
informed them that Rev. Hoyte
had informed him that the meet-
ing was illegal. He said that he
himself had discovered that and
had got legal confirmation of it

Mr. Eustace Clarke continued
with his contention that a Super-
intendent be appointed and Ram-
say resisted. This resistance dis
qualified him from being Chair-
man and he was asked to leave
the Chair. His brother Rev. EB.
Ramsay took the Chair.

“At this stage I told them,” he
said, “that it was a childish way
of getting on and I left.”

In cross-examination to Mr,

Other figures were Central Sta-
tion 10 parts, District “A” 15
parts, District “B” Boarded Hall
13 parts, District “D” 4 parts,

District “E” 23 parts, District
“F’ 18 parts, Holetown four parts
Four Road, St. John 25 parts and
Crab Hill, St. Lucy 10 parts

Around the flood area of River
Road, St. Michael most of the
on the

alert for any hurricane + arning

Life Belt
In one house some of the house-
hold essentials which were de-
posited.in the basement have beet
removed, A few housewives whx

hadn’t a storm lantern bought
one last week.

One woman has gone so far
as to secure a life belt in the
case of flooding. Speaking to the
Advocate yesterday she said “I

cannot swim and in case I have
to do so there is where the belt
will come in useful.”

The life belt hangs over her
bed. In Martindales Road most
of the gaps leading from the
street were well soaked



Custom Clerks
Work Overtime

Custom clerks were hard press-
ed during the past few weeks
with bookwork The reason, a
new warehouse tax has been
enforced which calls for much
more calculating and handling of
money in that department,

It is a 60c per ton tax or 1%e
per cubic feet tax payable for
every day over 10 days, on goods
kept in the warehouse, after they
have arrived in the island.

Cashbook Officers and cashiers
of the departments have been
spending hours overtime so as to
keep in stride with the inerease
of work in the department.

Clerks of the various
of the City have been



offices
spending

Yesterday Mr. Reece continued Reece, Lowe said that the meeting longer periods at the Customs for

cross-e€xamining Rev. Hoyte for for January 6 had been summoned the three weeks than

about 20 minutes when many of
the old points were again brought
out. Rev, Hoyte said that he had
been advised that he was still
Superintendent of the Christian
Mission and as long as there was
no meeting of the representatives,
he would continue to be Superin-
tendent.

He was waiting, he said on a
final settlement by legislation and
the present suit.

To Mr. Adams, he said that he
eould not remember when that
suit had been set down for hear-
ing, but when it was set down,
he had already petitioned the
Legislature. He was only served
notice a long time after the suit
was served. i}

He tried to get the Registrar to
bring it on for hearing so there
sould be no suggestion that he
did nothing to bring things to a

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by Rev. Hoyte and was to be a
meeting of the representatives

Protests Issued

He learnt afterwards that the
Superintendent was not appointed
at that meeting. He was not told
that Rev. Hoyte was willing to
admit wrongs, and throw himself
at the mercy of the representa-
tives.

He saw Rev. Hoyte and Ramsay
perhaps a day or two before Jan-
uary 6

“T did go back to report to Rev.
Hoyte,” he said, “but I cannot
remember the date.”

He said he took part in the issu-
ing of the protests. He saw them
before they were sent out He
could not remember taking them
out to representatives to get them
signed.

mixed Cold.

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This scientific combination of

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ng vitamins, of the utmost value in
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An occasional glass of Cold ‘Ovaltine’ during
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they did
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these
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Not Yet Complete

JAKARTA, August 20
Indonesian Foreign Minister
Achmad Subardjo said on Monday
morning the Government has
not yet completed its study of
the final draft of the Japanese
Peace Treaty and extensive dis-
cussions on the matter would be
held on Tuesday, the Aneta News
Agency reported. It said Subar-jo
made the statement during a

plenary session of Parliament.

—U.P.







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———_——————— ee re cee,

Jamaica Death Toll

w

2,000 population It

that hurricane

Reaches 155

@ From Page |
the storm was about 240 miles ea
of Tuxpan
at about 14

ard
Nautla

felt as

Mexico, city of almost 100,000
Squalls
extend to the lower
the Weather Bureau said in cay
tioning small craft to take co\
intil the storm has passed
Weather
ised ships in the southwest of th¢
Gulf of Mexico to remain in po

until all dangers have passed. Th
storm developed hurricane force
six days ago on moving into th
Caribbean Sea, from the Atlant
ind since has travelled = almos
2,300 miles along in directior
west-northeast The hurricat
truck Yucatan Peninsula yvester
jay with 100 mile an hour force
Jut no deaths were reported o

he Peninsula
Lightly built palm thatched hut
Coryemel
oast of the Peninsula were blown
Merida
northwestern
Peninsula,
and heavy rains but no great dam

WY

ic
or

The

wn
1 the

age

Jamaican

yetween
Jamaica’s

source of income
id about
island's other crops was ruined

ar

is

h

nar

ive
ntroduction to a
All

«

vere loud in their praises of the MADE BY X
hospitality extended them by the THE MONKS OF 4
Jamaicans on all sides, A resolu | BUCKFAST i

ion was unanimously adopted ABBEY )|

that such cooperative course

should be held annually at dif v q y
ferent centres and it was recom N ¢ y a
mended that the next such course

should take place next year | °
Puerto Rieo where rapid _ |

have been made in cooperative de

velopment, \ ce a ae

EI

h

:

|



Instructor Tells |
Of Jea Hurricane

well as

ey saw
Mr
as very
and

Jurse







gO



70) and 80 pet

Beckles



and was moving west
miles an hour
town of ‘less than
is expected
would

Tampic

is a

winds
far north as
heavy seas ma
Texas

and

coa

Bureau has

Island off the east
capital of Yucatan
tip of tl
reported high wind

\
aid that
cent of |
crop, major |
was destroyed
cent, of the |

suthorities
banana
30 per

From Page 1
the places of

|
said; “The cour |
interesting and informs |
has served as a good]
more extensi\
student

interes!

overseas |



PAGE THREE

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AaRs00S

PAGE FOUR





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Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown



Wednesday, August 22, 1951



ECONOMICS

THE Regional Economic Committee met
in Barbados in May.this year. Today they
begin another round of discussion in an-
other aspect of the economy of the Carib-
bean area. Earlier this year,
synchronsied with that of the Caribbean

Commission and the topics were then sugar
and dollars for expanding West Indian
trade with Canada.

their meeting

Today with an even more tense inter-
national atmosphere and the diversion of
British industrial power from peace time
production to the re-armament programme
there are greater difficulties in the way of
trade and commerce and dollars to
expand our trade with Canada. That trade
has dwindled, as a result of British trade
policy following devaluation of the pound
sterling, from a total of 85 million dollars
to a mere token.

less

It is in the light of these conditions and
the issues arising from the variations in
trade that the Committee begin their sec-
ond meeting. One item on their agenda
which will demand serious attention is the
Report of the Oils and Fats Conference
which has just concluded its consideration
of the present price of copra,

There is more than the mere price adjust-
ment of cooking oils and fats in these con-
siderations. The price of copra the basic in-
gredient must of course affect the price of
the finished article as supplied to the West
Indian market, and it is with this aspect of
the question that the Committee will be
primarily although not solely concerned.
The industry which has just been estab-
lished has given excellent service and with
the Conference keeping its finger on the
factors of trade, has been able to save the
West Indian market from the uncertainty
and continuously rising prices demanded by
overseas manufacturers

The Oils and Fats Conference met to con-
sider in detail the figures in connection with
the industry. It has been argued that its de-
liberations should have been made public,
but it might be said in reply that as the
report was to be furnished to the Regional
Economic Committee publication might’
well have been until it had been finally
discussed.

This is only one phase of the work of the
Regional Economic Committee charged
with the all-important task of watching
over the economic health of the area. It is
true that its decisions are subject to ratifi-
cation by the Governments of the various
colonies but they nevertheless give direc-
tion as to the course which might be fol-
lowed in finding solution to the various
problems.

When the West Indian Conference met
for the first time in 1944 in Barbados it was
realised, and emphasised by the late Mr.
Charles Taussig, one of the architects of the
Conference, that the only hope for the
West Indies was to have the problems of
the area settled on a regional basis. Since
that time sincere and sometimes success-
ful efforts have been made to follow this
course,

Too often has it been overlooked by the
architects of West Indian destiny, that sat-
isfactory political progress can only be
achieved on a basis of a healthy West In-
dian economy. This.is not an easy task in
an area hopelessly under-industrialised and
thickly populated. But it is such a task the
Regional Economic Committee has essayed
to perform. Its work will be followed with
the greatest interest in this island where
it has already proved its worth, and
throughout the Caribbean by the peoples
whose fate hangs on its decisions.



Plastic Surgeons Chalk Up A New Success

By CHAPMAN PINCHER

















LONDON, Aug
This article is founded on ne
more than an impression Sut
many news stories, and informa-
tion from the other side of the
Tron Curtain add to this im-

pression,

The Governments
Europe and North America are
deeply afraid of war—immediate
war. While the people of Western
Europe are taking their holidays

of Western





and rejoicing in glow of pos
sible peace—truce in Korea and
easier relation. with Russia
their Governments are¢ taking
actions that can only be in-

terpreted as indi
anxiety.

And in Eastern Europe Gov
ments are “clearing the

iting immediate

m-
decks” as









if for violent movement

Here are some of the pieces of
news which, when recalled, and
argued to their conclusion, point
te fear in high places.

First, there was the sudden
activity of the United States, last
month, in pressing for an im-
mediate agreement on bases in
Spain. Thousands of words have

been written justifying this course,
und attacking it I do not want to
take up these rights and wrongs,



at the moment. All I want to
point out is the timing of the late
Admiral Sherman's dramatic visit
to Madrid. In the last year the
Atlantic Pact Command has come
uwlong nicely General Eisenhower
has made a wreat success. At
Jast there is satisfaction with what
the French are doing to re-arn

And the long-drawn wrangle about
the joint command in the Mediter-
ranean, which would protect his

Southern flank, progressing to
an equable conclusion, In the
months of September and October
there was every reason to believe

that the question of Germany’
contribution to Atlantic Pact
Defence would be settled ata
meeting of Foreign Ministers in
Washington, and of the North
Atlantic Treat Council, after-
wards. To settle this question it
was necessary to instil confidence
in the United States intention to
defend all Western Europe—and

of Washington’s real understand-

ing of its Allies. The sudden
haste in seeking Spanish bases
upset this timetable. Western
Governments were appalled; the
Mediterranean Command is in
confusion again; the question of
German units is likely to be diffi-
cult to resolve. The only con-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





By D. T. ROBERTS

clusion i x.nish bases could




not be waitec there was some
need to have an agreement this
Summer rather than wait until
the winter which was the pro-
gramme any cautious and knowl-
edgeable diplomat would have
suggested.

That is one pointer to the war
fear of this month of August

Then there are two questions
centering in Berlir

Who would have thought that

Western Governments would have

ordered their police forces to stop
a thousand or 80 young peopie
from going to Berlin with vaud
passports? Who would have
thought that the spirit of youth—

‘ould nave been
Who would ex-

albeit misguided—
defied so clumsily?
pect Mr. Morrison, who wrote an
article in Pravda calling on tne
Russians to give freedom of move-
ment, to permit such a violent in-
terference with the movements of
small number of harmless and
confused boys and girls? Frankly,
the way to turn students into
members of Communist parties is
to treat them with a heavy hand.
for youth, naturally, revolts first
hand against the interference it
knows, before discovering, in later
years, the facts of the tyranny it
does not yet know. And if it was
to dissuade West Germans from
going to East Berlin, and to stop
them having a bad example—then
West

a

our policies in Germany
must be feeble if East Berlin is
© attractive, And the way to deal
with the problem is surely to

make West Berlin a show place,
give its people full employment
and prosperity.

The alternative
the Governments fear war this
month, and do not want thousands
their own peovle blocking the
way, right in the front line

reason is that

of

And the little blockade in
Berlin? 1 question whether the
exact story has yet become pub-
lic It is not possible that both
sides are seeking to close the
loopholes for trade, trade in
information, and the. travel of
agents one way and the other?
Until now Berlin—and Vienna
have been a meeting ground, a
bill valuable to both sides. If a
curtain closes round Vienna-
as I expect from day to day. es-
pecially ‘since this incident of
the travelling youth—then that
will be another sign that these



anor Tension. East and West

}

| awk



ibn Saud, King With 150

cities have ceased to be an ex-|
changing post for esplonage—
the secret service of all ye |
world will go over to a war plan. |
iwo oil tankers were being |
built, under contract, for the
Polish Government. The con-}
tract specificially mentioned |

that no political hindrance would |

be put on the delivery of the
tankers so long as the commer-
cial terms of the agreement were
fulfilled. The British govern- |
ment has an interest, particular- |
ly in Persia, in upholding the}
sanctity of international com-
mercial contracts against requi-|
sition in times of peace. The
justification for taking over two
oil tankers—a small matter, in|
proportion—is the exigency
approsching war.

And now we must pass to the |

shadowy world on the other side
of Europe. While Moscow has
been releasing well-frained
doves of peace from their cages

-—dand would they were all that|
been |
at |
in- |
The |

lived in cages!—she has
breathing fire anq slaughter
her satellite, Poland. Iron
structions have gone forth.
Polish Army, under its Russian |
Commander, has been
again. The dangers of
were roundly denounced
Molotov, to the Poles; while
Malik, almost at the same
stant, was amiably receiving
delegation of British quakers in
Moscow.

On the Danube
smoothly, In Hungary we did
not know that so many Barons,
Counts,
Judges,
agers,
lived

”

“titoism
by

in-

capitalists, business nan-
and other “carrion” still
until the news was re-
vealed last week that so many
had been arrested—the “last
remnants of the Porthyite re-
gime.” Many are in Hungary no
jonger.
tral European
those gay baronesses and_ their
shakoed officer escorts of yes-
teryear—have been grimly gath-
ered in. They were harmless
people, already broken, most of
them living as petty traders, on
puffrance. Why? Even a
tarian government must
reason for arresting
people.

These are straws that blow in
the wind. The wind is blowing
in the face of all the world.

aristocracy

have



Journey Into 1964

Dr. Goldmark throws a new weapon into the cold war....
and zero hour is 8.30 to-night in divided Berlin

BERLIN.
Dr. Peter Goldmark, the man
who likes to play chamber music

on his ‘cello, quietly entered the
Berlin cold war.
While thousands of young

Communists are marching, sing-
ing and demonstrating under pic-
tures of Stalin, he is preparing a
soft answer with fashion parades,
blonde cabaret stars and rhythm



bands. Already news of Dr
Goldmark’s magic has gone
round the Russian half of this
divided city, ene many of the
youths after yesterday’s maffick.
ing have ouatee acr the bor-
der on reconnaissance.

The magic is television.

Tonight Berlin will become a TV
city as a hundred TV sets in shop
windows in the busiest thorough-
fares and two cinemasize screens
each worth £25,000 begin to
show black and white pictures,

But in Berlin’s White City, Dr.
Goldmark has his own particular
magic—colour TY. He has
brought into Germany for the
first time a £10,000 unit shipped
across from the USA, And in
bringing it he has anticipated by
precisely 33.years the George
Orwell world where the battle of
ideologies is fought by television.
To enter Berlin today is to enter
1984, with the cathode ray tube
as the newest weapon of the cold
war.

Just Coincidence

Columbia and the Radio Cor-
poration of America, the two
rival TV companies in the U.S.A,,

are collaborating in the most
spectacular TV demonstration
ever held in Europe: Ostensibly
it has nothing to do with the
Communist Youth Festival
“across the road” the Economic

Co-operation Administration,
sponsors, describe it as a strange
coincidence that the two events
happened together.

But they are making it known
that visitors from the Eastern
sector will be welcome, and they
have impertinently set up one of

its

their big screens facing the Rus.
sian sector.
Every night for two weeks

there will be four hours of black
and white pictures two and a half
hours of colour transmitted by
£175,000 worth of equipment. A
transmitter has been hauled to
the top of the town hall from
which the Croydon-cast freedom
bell rings to encirele the West











By GEORGE CAMPEY
of Berlin with TV.
For most of the Iron
youths this will be
ight of television, for
TV will be a novelty.

part
Curtain
their first
all colour

Dietrich Too

They will find the Western
ipproaches unusual, A little
Marshall plan propaganda, yes. A
film satire on life under Russian
influence. But for the most part
what they will see will be enter-
tainment—comedy, sports items,
quiz shows and probably Marlene
Dietrich in colour,

Berlin’s film, stage and radio
artists have been jostling to take
part. An appeal which went out
for Nordic blondes filled the
radio stations, and executives
had to fight their way to their
offices through corridors packed
with fair-haired girls, many of
whom, remembering the needs of
TV in pre-war days, arrived with
blue-painted lips.

Today I found Dr.
working in a pavilion which 10
months ago I saw being stormed
by Germans anxious to see our
television. But the BBC ‘could
show only standard pictures

Goldmark now carries the
magic further with a _ colour
camera which a few months ago
was being used to televise hos-
pital operations,

This Hungarian-born scientist
is the world’s colour genius, In
the New York laboratories of the
Columbia company, he invented
and developed the world’s first
colour TV service. Eleven years
ago he started work on it; today
his system has been accepted by
the U.S. Government and two-
hour transmissions are now going
out each day, with sponsors
clamouring to lay down. their
dollars.

Goldmark

Britain? No
For two years Goldmark work-
for an English company for
the development of colour TV.
Then Britain lost him. He took
his expert knowledge from the
land of broadcasting monopoly,
where the advent of colour TV is
as remote an eventuality as the
end of meat rationing.

Now this cello-playing scientist
with his thick glasses and retir-
ing manner is spreading his col-
our creed and his caravan across
Europe.

From Berlin his TV team
equipment will go to France

ed

and
and







probably Switzerland;
travels are over he will have
travelled 15,000 miles, But
Britain is not in the schedule.

Goldmark, 45, married with
three children, is a man who yes-
terday was building tomorrow.
He invented the long-playing
gramophone’ record. He talks
quietly of his next big project—
colour vision on cinema screens
—which will start, in association
with Hollywood, in the autumn.
And today, in shirt-sleeves, sur-
rounded by his technicians, un-
eonvincingly dressed in Tyrolean
outfits, he prepared his 1984
world for 1951 to see,

In Studio Six

Will this TV cold war be effec-
tive? Will the Iron Curtain youth
be tempted westward to see for
themselves?

Perhaps Studio Six provides an
indication. Here at RIAS, the
American-sponsored radio — sta-
tion, politically minded youths
from the Eastern Sector are
gathering to listen to the voice
of the west.

They are not invited they just
arrive still wearing their Festival
blue shirts. They come in large
numbers, boys and girls whose
average age is 14, to study the|
newspapers they never see. They
come to sit in the studio and ask
questions that children should
never ask; questions like: “How
many labour hours does it take
to provide a suit?

MPs and others answer the
questions warn them not to take
any western papers back across
the thin Red Line. But the con-
versations are never broadcast.

I have watched their faces.
They are tense, unchildlike. They
are 1984 faces. Perhaps Dr. Gold-
mark anticipating the Orwellian
world can help to prevent it act-
ually happening.

Into Action

One thing is certain. In Berlin
today a new phase is opening in
the battle of ideas. A television
reporter does not expect to be-
come a war correspondent. But
that is what he is in this divided
city today, where television has
made its first appearance on the
world’s psychological warfare
front.

And zero hour is 8,30 tonight,
when Dr. Goldmark and nearly
40 technicians go into action.

World Copywright Reserved

—LES.

when his

|
|
|
|
|



aru. the anti-rheumatism If skin-transplants from several his own leg remarking. “Noni soit
asp Crus. inimals are grafte i i 3 :
, cas eal peo - animals are grafted on at the same qui mal y pense.”
W sot . x¢ ? ting discoveries 5 Cortisone also delays the tight- time the body disperses its de- Dr. Murray asked: “Why
eee oy enable wiaiio ge which normally takes place fences in an attenipt to attack should Lady Salisbury be wear |
surg Ss to save many more lives round a bad burn, causing them al . ac “oft ff ; . * r *
; ; ; ‘ ’ : - . » Ce t all, So each graft gets a ing a garter > a es :
and rebuild injured faces with This delay might give a longer life zy steckinaar ayn eery Enmore
“vad disfigurement, were disclosed more time to prevent d The two discoveries are now to The reason ted by D
»y Britis ssociz scientists 2 d : ab he reas sugges y r.
oe owe scientists ment be combined in hospital tests on Murray was iat tna anes cat
ee g -day. burned patients who will get the syn i h
ee a c SCOVERY N ‘ +} ; » symbol of the S >
Until BOW Skin grafted from DISCOVERY No. 2 is the fact cortisone injections and grafts coven (or co - Shieh ofathe
ene person to another has never that small patches of skin, grafted from several donors s council), a pre-Chris-
survived for “more than a few mosiac - fashion ovey large : tian organisation of 13 people,. in
days* .So scores of badly burned Wound, last much longer if they That Garter Britain’s old religion, Had the
patients have dieq from shock be- are taken from several donors in- Mae aval! Periag pa priests discov-
cause their wounds could not be stead of one. erec rat Lady Salisbury wore
ly * tg covered. joth discoveries were made * _ ar ae eae of et oer life would have been
Now as a result of ingenious the Birmingham Unive shor we age “er -
2x me ie Aare eo cee py St eAty« SADOE> e Garter ar Sing Edwar , iy
~~ riments with an S, thers atories of 3 ear-old Professor sad 5 ‘fed ES Ros ti aan 7 Edw ard. by his quick-
is hope that burned op) may Peter Med Behir ; y Dr. inking in putting the garter on
be able to get life-saving “tr a ee A. Murray. She retired his own leg, saved Lady Salis-
fusions” of skin from relat rafte fr re from the post of bury’s life. In founding ~~ the
and friends k Egypt La Garter Order in groups of 13,
BISCOVE RY No. : er K ng Edward still adhered to the
t th ri ane 1 < ’ . i structure of the cove
v $ ‘
i r A ‘ .
vv a bet €
ngop i ’ ept 8
ti ve t ( ! r L.E.S
i «

of |

purged |

M.\
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a}

The last pillars of Cen-;

an air of the

The 44-year-

Sons And £50,000 A Day

By GERALD SCHEFF
A TALL, hook-nosed Arab prince brought

desert to the Sussex Downs

jrecently, when he visited Lewes races.

-old Emir Feisal, Viceroy of|

the Hedjaz, Foreign Minister of Saudi-Arabia,
emissary of his powerful father, King Ibn

Saud, is acclaimed the handsomest Arab of |

jall.





_EMIR FEISAL
/10,000 Arab
King Abdul

He is King of t

Wounded 60



He has a pale bronze com-

plexion, grave mien and bold, |

dark eyes. He wears flowing
robes with white and gold
headdresses.

A Nubian bodyguard, armed

with bejewelled dagger and)

Mauser
him.

pistol, accompanies

10.000 Horses
Feisal’s day at the races
was a day off during his ten-
day visit to Britain as guest
of the Government.

| A dashing rider himself—his father owns}
nothing flows |

horses—Feisal today mostly

| journeys by plane and car.
former Ministers, former |

Aziz Ibn Saud, now over 70,

| has been called “the Cromwell of the Desert.”

he Nejd and the Hedjaz, Imam

lof the Wahabis, Guardian of the Holy Cities
| of Mecea and Medina and Lord of Arabia.

He is an autocratic ruler, a warrior-states-
;man fearing no foe but always seeking peace.

times in his fighting days, the

| king now devotes his life to fostering the

totali- |
a |
harmless |

|
|
|
|

prosperity of

Saudi-Arabia—one of the

richest oil empires—and his dream of an
Arab Federation.

NO DANCING
His rule is based on the Koran, His sub-

Penalty for

for the second.

The US. oil
Saudi-Arabian

Moslems.

ance.
works, includ

pipeline.

fence

ernment posts

4

nits.

‘n picturesque
crs.
across their k

| cloisters.

Talal,

sons,



| life—

a Cairo report.

Ibn Saud’s w

| jects are the most religious of all Moslems.
|There is no smoking, drinking, or dancing,
and only martial music.

theft is mutilation—the left

hand cut off for the first offence, the right

Murderers are still publicly beheaded in
the captial city of Riyadh,

company which now pays the
Government (largely Ibn

Saud and Sons) half its profits for the con-
cession employs no Jews for fear of offending |}!

The 3,000 Americans in the oil centre of
Dhahran have
prayer-books are banned.

GOOD WORKS

Ibn Saud is said now to have an oil-income
of more than £50,000 a day. Half the money
|is reported to

no church, and Christian

go into his personal treasure,

or in subsidies to sheiks owing him allegi-

The other half is being spent on public

ing a 600-mile railway, a

£ 2,000,000 road to Medina being built by a
British firm, new harbour buildings, hospitals
and schools, and a new British-built water

Heir-apparent and Prime Minister is 46-
year-old Emir Saud, who once saved his
father from an assassin's dagger.

Another son,
Minister
brother, Mansour. Yet other sons held Gov-

the Emir Michel is nov. De-
following the deatn of his

at Mecca, the holy city.
HOURS’ SLEEP

hitewashed coral palaccs have

There are ramps which enabie the king
tc diive his ear into the palace reoms.

The king is 6ft. 4ins. He starts work before |
cawn, sleeps four hours a night, ard drinks}
cup after cup of scented bitter coffee. Soldiers |

OSE PEP PPEPLLLPPLLL SLEEP ES PSE LSS LOPES.

|











robes line the palace corrid-|

nees. Doves flit through the)

200 WIVES?

He has an extensive harem. One of his %
has admitted that he does not
know how many brothers he has.

A reference book credits the king with 32/%
sons, but official registers in foreign missions | 8
at Jeddah record about 150 sons, according to |

No mention is made of a large number of |

daughters.

He has probably had 200 wives, but many

| of the marriages have been political, At one, |
40 sheiks said “I do” for him by proxy.

SOLACE

When in 1945 Ibn Saud presented Mr. |

dagger,
perfume.

It was a wise choice.

| Churchill with a gold and jewel- encrusted |
he received in return six bottles of |

The king has said

that, like the Prophet, he has three solaces in

“Women, perfume and prayer.
He prays five times daily.

”
|

He once spent

£1,800 on perfume for the ladies of his harem
for a special occasion.
British economic influence is growing in;

Saudi-Arabia.
Footnote:
Middle

Feisal’s visit
East problems, the Anglo-Saudi-

is concerned with

Arabian treaty of friendship, and minor

frontier

rectifications.

London Express Service.

Bodyguards squat with golden swords}

%
%,
g

The king wears only home-spun robes and | % %
likes grey British Army socks.

:

IS
iss

12 3
%

3

ys
‘

1y

“6

+4 4 44,4,« 24 ¥
, LALA AAP OED FOS err OE ete ere



WEDNESDAY,

AUGUST 22,

1951



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4
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST



ad

os,

1951

House Agree To
Utilities Bill

THE House of Assembly after much discussion yester-

day, agreed to the amendme

to the Bill to provide for

Utilities.

Members were especial]

24 which reads:

“Provided always that for the
purposes of this section “sufficient
business” shall mean such busi-
ness 2s will yield such gross
revenue within the extended area
of supply at the rates for the time
being authorised as will produce
a sum not less than the cost of
maintenance and _ depreciation
will produce a reasonable return
on the capital outlay in respect of
such extension.”

Mr. Adams _ (L) in going
through the amenaments as sent
down by the Other Place, made
observations on each. He agreed
with few of the amendments
while he strongly criticised most
of them.

He said that the Other Place
acted wrongly in that they, in
making amendments to the bill,
destroyed more than anything
else, the principle of the bill as it
was passed by the House. “The
Other Place has the right to sug-




gest means which will endeav-
our to make clear or earry out
the principles outlined in a bill

us it is passed by the House”, he
said, “but should not destroy the
principle.”

The Government, he said, was
accepting the amendments rather
than lose the entire bill. The
bill was to provide for the regu-
lation of public utilities and it was
better to have it on the statute
book with the amendments from
the Other Place and let it be
known that théy decided to ac-
cept it rather’ than lose it en-
tirely.

Mr. Adams said that
the amendments were verbal,
some unduly ridiculous and
scme merely expressions of points
of view. He was most annoyed
over section 24. It meant that
there would never be lights in
far out places except the Electric
Company saw the possibility of
making revenue. In that case,
the electric service would hardly
ever be extended to St. Lucy, St.
Joseph and other far out parishes

The Government, he said, had

some of

never departed from the princi-
ple of nationalisation as they
were convinced that it was the

only salvation of any community.
The Public Utilities Bill was a
temporary measure until the
treasury could afford to purchase
those public utilities that were
necessary.

Mr. Haynes (E) said that he
was hoping that the Government,
when they were appointing their
Public Utilities Board, would put
men on it that would not bow to
the various companies and will
see that some action is taken,

Mr. Garner (C)_ said that he
felt the electricity of this colony
should be so cheap that every-
body should have it. He thought
it ridiculous that in a parish like
St. Philip, only few people had
electricity. He wanted to know
if a company, which had -the
monopoly of a service in an island
21 x 14, could not find enough
money to electrify it.

He said that he wanted to regis-
ter his protest against the amend-
ments of the bill although he
was going to vote for it.

Mr. Crawford (C) said that the
bill was somewhat complicated
but in the final analysis its utility
to the colony could be expressed
in simple terms. “Everything will
depend on the manner in which
the Board executes its duties, the
manner in which it interprets its
responsibilities to the commun-
ity,” he said. He thought that the
personnel should therefore be
selected with utmost care.

He said that he did not propose
to say much about the question
of nationalisation. But, the pub-
lic wes promised three years ago
that if a certain government were
returned, the Electric Company
would have been nationalised
within six months. Now, he said,
the people are being promised it
at some distant date in the un-
known future.

He was hoping that the Board
would concern itself at once with
the immediate expansion of elec-
tricity in the rural areas and see
to it that public utility services
should be provided at the cheap-
est possible rate.

In neighbouring West Indian
colonies, the rural parochial
authorities provide electricity for
their areas, Mr. Crawford said.
He knew that amendments were
made to that Act but he felt that
the position with regard to per-
mitting the parochial authorities
to electrify their respective areas
needed some _ consideration and
action.



Mr. Reece (E) referring to the
Hon. Senior Member for St.
Joseph’s remarks about the Gov-
ernment’s policy towards nation-
alisation, said they had national-
ised water in Barbados and after

many long years, they were in
the same position as they were
before nationalisation. “It is ex.

ceedingly difficult to get anything

of the Government if they say
no,” he said.

The Hon., Senior Member for
St. Joseph has said, nationalisa-
tion meant spending of money.
He would have preferred to see
the money spent on the East

Coast Road and on a deep water
harbour. “A deep water harbour
is the very life blood of the
people of this colony,” he said.
Mr. Reece criticised some of the

amendments. He said that if
they (the House) said that they
did not agree with the amend-

ments to the bill, they should re-
ject the bill rather than to accept
it with the amendments.

Mr. Mottley (E) said in agree-
ing with the amendments of the
Other Place to this bill, he would
say at the outset he was one of






those who thought the Other
Place as part of the Legislature
of this colony, should have the
right to make amendments, pro-
vided that they did not
destro inciple of the bill
There certain amend-
ere I b3 the Ir





nts of the Legislative Council
the regulation of the Public

y opposed to amended section

(and indeed democracy flourished
on compromise and free and just
criticism). He therefore did not
see how this amendment could be
considered just when it was
known that the public utilities in
this country enjoyed monopoly.
“The fat must be mixed with
the lean”, he said. “If your ser-
vices are carried to well to do
people who can pay for exten-
-ons, you must make money,
The idea of this bill, he said,
was to see that rich, poor and
middle class alike got the bene-
fit. of public utility services. It
was more necessary, in his opin-
jon, to run the electric service
in slum areas and in areas where
‘here were small houses and bad
roads for the purpose of illum-
inating streets than even in the
areas where there were _ people
who could appreciate and under-

stand the ethics of social condi-
tions.
He wanted it made clear that

when an amendment came to de-
lete that part of section 24, which
dealt with gross revenue, he
could support it.



Ilouse Accept

Amendments
By Leg. Co.

The House of Assembly yester=
day accepted the amendments of
the Legislative Council to the Bill
to make provision for holidays
with pay for employees.

Mr. G. H. Adams explained the
amendments in detail and asking
the House to agree to them, said
that the Bill was not now as good
a Bill as Government would like
to see. It was a sort of begin-
ning however to have it put on
the Statute Book until it could be
improved.

He was sure that they were
certain amendments of the Bill
which did not find complete
favour with hon, members. The
amendments, however, did not
differ so much as ta satisfy the
Government in asking hon. mem-
bers not to accept them. He asked
that they do so,

Among the amendments were
the following:

“Year of employment” in rela-
tion to an employee means any
period of twelve months during
which the employee has actually
performed labour or rendered
services for the same employer for
an aggregate of at least two hun-
dred and fifty days in the case of
employees employed on a weekly,
fortnightly, monthly or yearly
basis, and at least one hundred
and fifty days in the case of any
other employees.

Every employee being in em-
ployment at the date of the com-
mencement of this Act shall at
the end of the first year of his
employment computed as though
his employment commenced on
the date of the commencement of
this Act, and at the end of each
succeeding year of his employ-
ment, be entitled to an annual
holiday of at least two weeks. |

Every employee not being in
employment at the date of the
commencement of this Act but
thereafter being in employment
shall, at the end of each year of
his employment, be entitled to an

annual Holiday of at least two
weeks.
The annual holiday shall be

given and taken in one period of
two weeks or if the employer and
employee so agree, in two periods
of one week each and not other-
wise,

If the employer and employee
so agree, the annual holiday or
either of such separate periods
may be taken wholly or partly in
advance before the employee has
become entitled to such holiday.

Provided that the giving and
taking of the whole or any sep-
arate period of such holiday may,
with the consent in writing of the
Labour Commissioner, be further
postponed for a period to be
specified by him in any case
where hes of opinion that cir-
cumstances render such postpone-
ment necessary or desirable.

Where the annual holiday or
any part thereof has been taken
before the right to such annual
holiday has accrued, the right to
a further annual holiday shall not
commence to accrue until after
the expiration of the period of
twelve months in respect of
which the annual holiday or part
thereof has been so taken,



House Pass $11,000
For Radios

The House of Assembly passed
yesterday a Resolution for $1 1,000
for the. purchase of V.H.F. ra-
dio equipment for the Police De-
partment.

The Addendum explained that
the wireless equipment at the
Police Headquarters and out-
stations which was _ installed in
1937 is now completely unser-
viceable. In view of the hurri-
cane season it is proposed to re-
place as a matter of urgency the
transmitters at Headquarters and
at District Stations “C”, “E” and





W.1. CENTRE
IN LONDON
PLANNED

Plans for the establishment of
a non-residential club and centre
in London for students from the
Caribbean Area were revealed to
members of the Legislative Coun-
cil at their meeting yesterday in
a message to that Chamber from
His Excellency the Governor.

The message read: —

His Excellency the Governor
has the honour _ to inform the
Honourable Legislative Council

that the Secretary of State for the
Colonies is sponsoring an applica-
tion by the West Indian Students’
Union for financial support from
British West Indian Colonies for
the establishment in London of a
non-residential club and centre
for students from the Caribbean
area. In his despatch the Secre-
tary of State has pointed out that
the West Indian Students’ Union
has the support of the majority
of the 1,200 West Indian students
now in the United Kingdom, of
whom more than 600 are in Lon-
don.

It has been represented by the
Executive Committee of the Union
that besides providing a_ centre
which West Indians could look
upon as their own to help them
foster healthy social activities,
the proposed club would offer
facilities where, apart from West
Indian students meeting each
other, they could return the hos-
pitality which they have received
from friends in the United King-
dom and could meet people from
the West Indies and elsewhere.

Estimates

According to tentative estim-
ates, it is expected that the initial
Capital Expenditure for acquiring
a property and for conversion and
adaptations would amount to be-
tween $48,000 (£10,000) and
$72,000 (£15,000) and that the
deficit on maintenance would
probably be $9,600 ( £2,000)—
$14,400 (£3,000) per annum.

In respect of mainienance, the
students themselves would be ex-
pected to contribute by means of
membership dues, and the man-

agement would be expected to
seek ways and means of raising
revenue. It is not anticipated,

however, that the establishment
could be completely self-support-
ing. The Secretary of State is
also giving consideration to a pro-
posal that West Indian business
interests might be willing to make
financial contributions to the es-
tablishment of the Club and Cen-
tre.

At this stage, however, the Sec-
retary of State wishes to learn
whether West Indian Govern-
ments would agree in principle to
the establishment in London of

such a club for West Indian Stu-

dents, and if so whether they
“would now give sympathetic
consideration to contributing to-

wards capital expenditure and
maintenance, possibly on a_ basis
proportional to the number of stu-
dents from each territory at pres-
ent in the United Kingdom and
having regard to the general
financial position of each Colony.”

On this “Student basis” the
Barbados contribution towards the
capital cost would be in the region
of $5,500 and that towards main-
tenance expenses would be $1,100
per annum. If it is agreed that
contributions should be assessed
on a population rather than on a
“Student basis”, Barbados, share
would be under 6.6% as qppcsed



to approximately 7.8% on the
“Student basis.”

Accordingly, the Honourable
Legislative Council is invited to

indicate whether it agrees in prin-
ciple with the proposal to estab-
lish a Club and Centre in London
for West Indian Students and
whether it would-be prepared to
approve contribution towards
the capital and annually recurrent
costs.



Public Service
Bill Passed

THE House of Assembly yes-
terday passed a Bill to provide for
the constitution of a Public
Service Commission and matters
incidental thereto.

The establishment of a Public
Service Commission for the pur-
pose of advising the Governor on
the selection and appointment of
candidates in the island, to posts
in the public service was advo-
cated by the Secretary of State
for the Colonies. :

The main purpose of setting up
Public Service Commission i

a
to ensure that the Governor is
afforded suitable advice on the

selection and appointment of local
candidates for the public service
as well as (inter alia) the inter-
departmental transfer of officers,
their dismissal, disciplinary control
and retirement, and the award of
study leave to officers.



In the Legislative
Council

The Legislative Council met at 2 p.m
yesterday. The Hon'ble Robert Challenor
presided

The Hon'ble the Colonial Scereta
presented a message from His Excellency
the Governor re the establishment in
London of a Club and Centre for Wer
Indian Students

The Hon'ble the Colonial Secretary pre-
sented the Annual Report of the Organi-
zition and Administration of the B a
Police Force for the year 1950

The Council passed resolution

To place the sum of $17.4











posal of the Governor-ir
Committee to supplement

1951—52, Part II, Capital, as shown ir
Supplementary Estimate 52, No
13, which form the to the



Resolution;

“F”’, and to equip two mobil To place the sum of one hundred and

units ighteen thousand six hundred and

2 es ifty dollars (118,650) at the disposal of
Dr. H. G. Cummins (L) whe he Governor-in-Executive Committee to

moved the pussing of the Resolu- supplement the Estimates 1951-52, Part

tion told members that the equip-ff4—Capital, as shown in Sanaa ae?

‘ ; htai Ma Jazstimates 1951—52, No. 14, which forr

nent was to be obtained from they ve 'Schedule to the Resolution

United Kingdom and would be} phe Council passed bills

here in about three months. Hon amend the Vestries Act 1911
wend ares ay ie 5)

members would have noticed an sited’ 4M
advertisement in the loca] Press
offering to rent local equipment,-
he added. This would be used for
the purpose desired in the intervai.

$13,792 For R.E.C.

The House of Assembly



vester-



passed a _ Resolution for
in connection with the
11 Economic Committee;




r





(1990—5) .
The Council replied to His Excellency
the Governor's Message regarding the
Ecenomic Co-operation Agreement
The Council adjourned









August 28

PARKING PROHIBITED
Cars, taxis, etc., are no long-

er allowed to park along the}

in fror of the O n

View and Hastir Hotel

Police Notices one just

Hastings Hotel and the

be thie Oce € r





until Tuesday |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Pine Plantation May

Get $17,000 Equipment

_ CANE CROP PRODUCTION at the Pine Plantatipn
for 1951 was 4,700 tons and production for the past five
years 1946—1950 averaged 2,875 tons which is 1,825 tons

or an average of 63°%

increase, more than the average of
the past five years, the Hon:

the Colonial Secretary yester+

day told members of the Legislative Council















He was moving the passing of than motor lorries and are much
a resolution for $17,000 for items more lent in wet weatner
of additional equipment at the The ést ited cost of the tractor
Pine Plantation and the Central and f eane carts is $12,000, of
Livestock Station. which $4,000 would, it is estimated,

The addendum to the resolu- be re by the sale of two
tion reads as follows of the motor lorries

(1) It is proposed to purchase Far ird n e is an inevi-
an area of approximately 4 acre table -product of a dairy herd.
adjacent to the Shrewsbury Boys’ Moreover. sanitary regulations re-
School, St. Philip, for use as i quire the removal of manure
playeround for the School The from the farmyard within four
site is at present leased at the days its production, There is
rate of $16. per annum and is the much more farmyard manure to
only place available for playfield be handled and disposed of than
and garden purposes, The owner there was a year or tWo ago, as
is now willing to sell it and, if the full complement of animals
purchased by the Government, it tc be maintained under the ac-
will become a valuable amenity ceptec rogramme is approached.
of the School. becoming increasingly

(2) The increase in the ca to get farmyard manurt
crop cultivation over the past by hand jabour and to
years and especially the record with the sanitary regula-
crop which has recently been tions to which I have referred
reaped at the Pine Plantation has More« yer, much of the value of
shown the urgent need for the manure is lost if it is merely
following items of additional removed from the yard and
equipment at the Pine Plantation stacked for long periods by the
and the Central Livestock Station field side until labour becomes
in order that the efficiency and available. Crop production can
the revenue-earning capacity of pb. considerably and _ profitably
me i age might be in- jnereased by the timely applica-
creased:— tion of farmyard manure to the
TRANSPORT 2 feld. It is proposed that the

1 Wheel Type Tractor $ 5,600 Pine Plantation and Central

4 Cane Carts 6,400 Livestock Station should possess

$12,000
Farmyard manure

leader and spreade. 2,000
IRRIGATION ‘
Pipes and Fittings 2,400
CONTINGENCIES 600

Totat $17,000

Weaknesses

The Hon, the Colonial Seeretary
said the Director of Agriculture
has represented that the experi-
ence gainéd during the reaping of
this year’s record sugar crop at the
Pine and the additional informa-
tion which he has pe@sonally col-
lected in operating the plantation
during the past year have revealed
certain weaknesses in the organ-

isation for the production and
reaping of sugar cane and fodder
grasses and have led him to the

conclusion that certain alterations
and additions, involving capital
expenditure could be effected with
economic advantage and are imme-

diately required. He has added
that this information was not
available at the time when the

estimates for 1951/52 were under
preparation and that in view of
the need for early attention to
these weaknesses, it is undesirable
to defer consideration until next
year’s Estimates,

The average sugar cane produc-
tion at the Pine for the four years
1946—49 was 2.700 tons, Pro-
duction in 1950 was 3,548 tons,
bringing the average for the five
years 1946—50 up to 2,875 tons
Production in 1951 has been esti-
mated at 4,700 tons which is 1,825
tons or 63% more than the aver-
age of the last five years. In
terms of money this represents a
gross revenue trom sugar canes
of $21,900 more than that calcu-
lated on average production fox
the last five years and $13,800
more than that calculated in the
crop of 1950. As a result, organ-
isation, better drainage and _ soil
management, irrigation and
higher yielding varieties the Di-
rector does not consider it too
optimistic to expect that average
annual production in the future
will be less than 4,000 tons
may even read 5,000 ton



and

Transport System

The existing transport system is
based on three motor lorrie
These have proved not only to be
extremely expensive to maintain
and repair, but also to be inade-
quate for meeting transport re-
quirements, especially the haulage
of the sugar cane crop which is
now so much longer than in previ-
ous years. The Director has pro-
posed that, instead of purchasing
extra lorries, the transport system
should be modified by basing it
on modern type cane carts draw
by a wheel-type tractor These
vehicles are cheaper to operate
and very much cheaper to run















{ Ae



|
|

It cleans,

Nothing else

12k

a an
ee ALueys tu Good Tae

a farmyard
spreader
by the

manure
which would
Fordson tractor

loader and
be drawn
now at

the Station and would serve the
twofold purpose of getting the
freatest value and benefit from

the manure and demonstrating the

use of such implements to cOm-
mercial dairies. Possession of
these implements will ensure
compliance with the sanitary

vegulations.

Portable Equipment

W.R.T. Irrigation, the Major
Aluminum Company of Canada,
presented Government with por-
table aluminum equipment to
demonstrate overhead irrigation
of large scale commercial produc-
tion of sugar cane. Such a
demonstration, together with the
collection data to determine
the economies of commercial ir-
rigation, has been accepted as a
part of the programme of inves-
tigational and demonstration work
at the Pine.

It also necessary that
intensive system of fodder
production be investigated and
demonstrated. For this purpose
irrigation water is needed during
spells of dry weather. Moreover,
it is necessary that well-grown
crops of Indian corn and Guinea
corn be produced us catch crops.
During a spel, of dry weather ali
these operatives compete for the
limited irrigation equipment
available, and they cannot be
effectively undertaken unless ad-
ditional distribution of equipment

of

an
grass







is provided

It is considered that the pro-
visions of these items vy en-
hance the revenue earning
capacity of the Tine and that
they will pay for themselves in
a relatively short time. It is, of
course, nec ary to place orders
now for the transport equipment
if it is to be delivered in time
for the 1952 reaping season

+
House Express

. x ‘

Sympathy For Jca

THE House of Assembly yester.
d passed a Resolution express-
ing sympathy for the island of
Jamaica.

The Resolution which was mov-
ed by Mr. G. H. Adams seconded
by Di. H. G. Cummins reads

The House of Assembly places
on record its profound sense of
regret at the catastrophe which
has befallen te island of Jamaica,
an its willingness to consider

pathetically, any Resolution
fc financial or other help which
the Government may send down
to it for its consideration.

The House requests His Excel-
lency the Governor to send to His
Excellency the Governor of
Jamaiea a copy of this Reso'ution.

For léather
of every colour—

preserves—-and how it

polishes! Ask your retailer for Propert’s.

quite the same. Watch

the difference it makes to your shoes!

, PROPERT'S

2D) woe CREAM

'
MMU





PAGE FIVE














Evelyn Disagrees |
With Poliey

Of Sugar Industry
Agricultural Bank

The Hon. G. B. Evelyn told ‘eal

FOR THE BEST IN

MATCHES



Legislative Council yesterday that | — 9

he did not agree with the policy | A ae R
f the majc , of the Directors Ss ro

f the Sugar Industry Agricultufal

Bank on which Board he repre-

sented that Honourable Co,incil.
He offered to resign if the . "
Council feit that they should get ||
another member to represent them rit hl oy,
Members of the Council expressed . PL toll §
agreement and satisfaction with rf ;
Mr. Evelyn’s work on the Board
wnd asked him to continue to re-
present that Council. He agreed.
Mr. Evelyn said that he wanted

EN

to draw the attention of the |
Chamber to the fact that tne
policy of the majority of the
Directors of the Sugar Industry

Agricultural Bank was opposed to
his

He quoted a recent instance in
which the Bank had _ recently
loaned a large sum of money to a
company to purchase the Joes
River Group of Estates on the
Security of those plantations
He was opposed to that because
considered that the funds of the



THREE PLUME

he

bank should not be used for pur-
chasing land or be tied up in
groups of plantations. The funds

should be kept liquid for financing
work on plantations and work of
that nature.

However the majority
ihe day, Mr. Evelyn said,
the loan was made

carried
and

ON SALE
EVERYWHERE

Repayment
The next point that arose with
which he disagreed was with the
method of repayment. When the
loan was made it was secured by









mortgage and made payable on
December 31.
The Bank had now been ap-
proached and asked by that
Company for permission to ‘@'ll
some of the land comprising wine 667 BLESS THE DAY

estates and in consequence of this
the purchase mouey would be paid

to the Bank in reduction Of that
loan,
That proposition to his. mind

was not a sound one. In that case
the estates and the factory were
one entity and a factory could not
be economically worked unless it
had certain amount of land on
which it could @aly for canes.

In that instance also he had
ugain been outvoted and he felt
that that chamber might prefer
someone else to represent them on





the Bank. if so he was ;:villing

to resign. It's odd how one simple action can bring such long-lasting benefits!
Hon. Dr. Massiah said that hon- Many and many a woman, hearing some moaern minded Stone prataing
€ 2 er of the Council ‘Tampax, h sent for a sample, and found an amazing difference in

ee ae S elyn's state life Undreamed of comfort Simplicity In use Such tremendous ad-

ac receive . Evelyn's state.

vantages over old-fashioned methods And such security!

TAMPAX KNIGHT'S LTD.

ment and his desire to resign with
great regret.

Experience

Mr. Evelyn had had a_ great
deal of experience in the running
of agricultural enterprises both
from the agricultural as well as
the economie and financial point
of view.

When Mr. Evelyn had been ap-|
pointed as that Council’s represen-
tative on the Sugar’ Industry
Awricultural Bank they all felt
that he was the man best qualifyed
for the post. They very much
regretted that circumstances had |
prompted him to offer his resigna



| OAK Milk

tastes just like

Fresh Cow's

tion, but in the interests of that! Milk

Council and the Agricultural Bank |

itself he would like Mr Evelyn |

to reconsider his decision to] ?}

resign Oak Milk tastes just like fresh
Hen. F. Hutson and Hon. R, cow's milk and this flavour is due

Challenor supported Hon. Dr, to the fact that cows which pro-



Massiah’s remarks and also asked duce Oak Milk, feed on luscious
rfon, Mr, Evelyn to reconsider his green grass in sunny Australia all
decision to resign year round — This feed produces

Hon. G. B. Evelyn agreed to the richest and the best milk in

continue to represent the Council

» world, and year round pastur-
on that Board, the wo 1

age ensures @ uniform flavour
Oak is rich in vitamin and mineral
salts which goes to building strong
bones and teeth. Buy Oak Milh
Powder for your family to-day.





“BIGBURY BAY”
SAYS THANKS

The following telegrem has
been received by His Excellency
the Governor from the Comimand-
ing Officer, H.M.S. Bigbury Bay.

‘Much regret Hurricane

Guardship duties necessitated

the ship’s abrupt departure.

Please convey thanks to all con-

cerned for their warm hos-

pitality”.

12 07,
80c, per tin

3b.
$2.88 per tin

FULL CREAM POWDERED MILK

ae sei

PRICES:



Doctors & Nurses Recommend

‘am-Buk

the World-famous Herbal

SKIN OINTMENT

Soothes-—Purifies~- Heals

eee ooo









a
INSIST ON

PURINA CHOWS

THEY ARE THE BEST



g 4. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. - Agents
Benupaceseeuwneea ae

BUYS
ror

MOLIDAY TIME

CANE LILY
thand plaited;}

HATS
$1.50 $1.44 $1.20

each
SKULL CAPS
96c. & 72c. each

PEAK CAPS
$1.00 each



Keep a box always handy









FINE CANE LILY

HANDBAGS

A fine



IN OUR

HOME
PRODUCTS
DEPT.

assortment

at
$6.00
$3.60

$5.00
$3.20

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

10, 11, 12, 13, Broad Str







eet

wir

















hil a are eee ea



WHETHER YOU ARE A



inde you sont ae poten your time or suffer
aut & in
ow will Rea tew, new hay ess and hi =

LARGE
USER

MICKEY MOUSE

oh Put it to the test. See the
bi t “ Take the
rf hy ae Pitt eke

uu full of ae nergy and vitality,
tna feel 10 20 yoo younger or
Py Sock on re

at.
ee tabs conte, tittle,
Vi-Tabs f:







DON’T SIMPLY FEET

THE PAIN - -

YOU DESIRE THE
BESI TEA =~ SO USE

RED ROSE TEA!

IT IS GOOD TEA.






WHO 10 erse )
EXPECTING ME on



RUB IT AWAY WITH --

SACROOL

Get a bottle from

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES




















NOW! Dental Science Reveals
PROOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING
IS THE SAFE; EFFECTIVE WAY TO

HELP STOP
TOOTH DECAY

ee mane Cream



Every Spoonful gives you Ss

THE SHADOW'S A WF et THAT TRAIN ROBBER
: GIVEAWAY / : COME! WERE RE NY,
OR HIM

more and more ) A

besietathiealt sien
_ —

ener gy an ad BB xz
|
‘| 6






fitmesst J

@ Every spoonful of ‘Kepler’ gives you a rich
supply of Viena tye id D.

@ These viramins are nature’s wonder workers,
assuring he salty and freedom ftom illness.
Men, v omen, children—all should start

taking tasty ‘ Kepler’ to-day





















AUNT MINNIE GT PHONED -
SHE THOUGH E WOULD BE
HURT a7 BeCALZE HER Peo tee

1) TO yisit Us--
ink NMS = fo; ” He DECIDED TO
COME NSTEAD! y
as Vows
; Wet ¥

LISTEN T NTENO 70 Cam GHS WELLCOME & CO. PRODUCT &
aN = E INT nO OST

a ine














Quis T INSTEAD OF

ENTERTAININ' YOUR

VISITIN' RELATIVES!
'

sole Agents for Bartados : Co *Led.. 28 Bs 78 Breas Streee











CARRY THE OTHER
TO THE

DEPOT: »



| |

L |

WHY DIDN'T IT DEC PS JO |
GO AWAY INSTEAD Cc ||
STAYIN’ HOME ON ! |
VACATION ?/ f |

|



an! THAT'S GOOD
NEWS-MAYBE MY
QUIET. VACATION 4
AT HOME WILL
TURN OUT O-KAY/





iT PAYS you 7 TO DEAL ‘HERE

"SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credi* customers for Monday to Wednesday only







Usually Now Usually NOW
Vienna Sausages 61 54 Ovaltine 154 132



HWM... HES GOT A ME IN THE
LEAD-OFF SPOT AGAIN/ SOMETHING ME TO PASS..WITH HIS HAN?
TELLS ME THIS 19 GOING TO BE ON HIS KNIFE/ IT MUST
AN EXPOSED POSITION TODAY / STRIKE...

BETTER WATCH OUT/ OWS :




Silver Shred Marmalade 47 42 Macaroni Cheese 40 36

















Als THE STALKER ANP “THE PREY DESCEND INTO THE
WATERY DEPTHS, EVEN THE OCEAN Aprs 5 TS 5 OWN THREAT.



Jacobs Cream Crackers (Pkgs.) 49 40 Vegetable Soup 31 28 |

RR RN



HE PJLLED A GUN ON ME! I DOUBT IF HE
HAS A PERMIT FOR IT... YOU COULD
PICK HIM UP ON A CONCE ALBD

ARE

_ GOOD COMPANIONS

NOVELS JUST OPENED...




Cli OF
CLOTHES! LOOKS }/}h=
LIKE YOUR BIRD / PSF

THE MINISTRY OF FEAR
— by Graham Greene

> i “~~ C) ~~ CREATURES OF CIRCUMSTANCES
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES | Te ey — by W. Somerset Maugham

(OT COMING BACK: K*HES DITCHED US, HONEY ~ aia WILGON,
id AN OUTCAST OF THE ISLANDS
» = by Joseph Conrad

IBLICITY STUNT FOR] [ SLICK Ne
KR] | SLICKS T : NEYâ„¢
| eciet ne ae NS eee 7
fe) ela
AT THE

| ADVOCATE STATIONERY

THE MOST MODERN IN TOWN

} jt NERY. “Wh JAT | L
. ~ meal on i aA sinclar, igen ee ee ee
SSS : = — = = SSS












WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 1951





TELEPHONE 2508

FOR







For Births, Marriage er Ergagement
announcements im Carib Calling the
charge js $3.09 for any number of words |

SALE






















up te £0 and 6 cents per word for each Minimum, charge week 12 cents andi |
additional word. Terms cash, Phone 2506 sone autdeve 24 words — over 24| Belleville Fulls |
patwech $.3 olla 3113 for Death oe one week—4 cents 4) f.rniched. Garage "henna possession. | |
Notic a 5 | Phone 3926 or 3450 19,8. $1—2
spoeioe ole |
DIED AUTOMOTIVE | CLIFTON TERRACE—To an approved
illo ceiisiochametiei tenant. Furnished House, Upper Bay St .
HAYTER—Suddenly on Saturday, August} CAR—Chrysler 1939 Model in perfect | Opposite Yacht and Aquutic Clubs. A s
llth, 1951, at Portland, Maine, William] Condition. Engine, paint, upholstery and | â„¢odern conveniences. Appiy on premises. |
Hayter, dear husband of Marion Mc tyres, all good, far cas apply: 3.8.51—t.f.n. 1S
askill and father of Lyle and David,| Bdos Agencies Ltd. Ring 4908 ———— ‘'s
all ef Monutal. Funeral from the 17.8.51—6n, | FLAT on Blue Waters Terrace, new): | ”
Chape! of Tees & Co. on Wed. at 2] ——————_____ ___ —— | built with spacious cupboards. Phone | S
p.m. to Mount Royal Cemetery CAR: One (1) Dodge, condition good, | 228. 25.7.61—t..n.| S.

Ba 2 8511 Ls 24,000, Apply: G.’ Greenidge, N
et a ee ts eee 1a ae Hale Gnsist ann” i
21.8.51—3n

|

CAR— 1949 Kaiser Saloon done only 5.500
Miles in A+] condition. FORT ROYAL
GARAGE LTD. Telephone 4594
16.8.51—6n
SS Seen

_CARS: (1) 1946 Plymouth Car, (1) 1938
Vaux Hall 14-6. Apply: Cosmopolitan
Garage, Magazine Lane. Dial 3915
21.8.51—5n

FARKSS—On August 21, 1951, at her
residence Sweet Bottom, St. George. Ida
Edith Parris, age 74. The funéral will
leave the above residence at 4.30 p.m
to-day for Mount Tabor Church

Millicent Parris, (U.S.A.},
(daughter), Clement Parris’
22.8,51—1n



IN MEMORIAM

BRANCH: In Loving Memory of my
dear Mother, Ethel Branch, who died







~~
CAR—One 10 H.P. Vauxhall Car in

excellent candition Apply Straughn’s

on the 22nd of August 1948 Garage, Reebuck Street of October.’ Apply to Mrs. Gill, Martiv: |

‘Gone but not forgotten” 22.8.51—2n | Poorly & Co 21.8. 51—2. |

St. Clair Branch (Son), Jerez, Wapee) | acc eee B Serraino
ged June (Grands! 22.8.51— ga HILLMAN 1951. Six months ola (first | “POINT VIEW", newly built Bunga







|, censed February 1951) Condition as

ANNOUNCEMENTS: (ic bind Sh Se

















business hours 22.8.51—2n | Harden. Dial 8310. Mrs. Stuart Bynot Sails Sails Sail Arti Sail
s s ves ails
aaa as ee Montreal Halifax Boston Barbad Barbad
—_—_—— z ', os ados
HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—isle of ELECTRICAL “SUNSET",—S8t. James, belonging to| Lany NereyeTOR oe Ao og. = us
Spices. SANTA MARIA—ioveliest hotel Mrs. A. C. Worswiek. for August and! CAN. CRUISER op aun) cae Ue # Ave * Beek
in Caribbean, Rates from $7.00 per head ELECTRICAL: Several good second-| September only. Furnished. CAN. CHALL ENGER 7 ae a pp . 1} Seve
per day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi-| hand Fridges in good working order at | YEARWOOD & BOYCE, LADY RODNEY __ 19 Sept, 22 Sept. 24 Be On
dential district under orn an Rolph Beard's Showroom, Lower Ray ! James Street. CAN. CONSTRUCTOR 28 Sept “2 am re ve 10 Oct 1 Set
hill, Rates from $5.00 per head per day. | Sireet, Phone 5010 21.8.51—3n | 14.8.51—t f.n LADY NELSON 10 Oct. 13 Oc 15 0 2 i 2 .
SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing cerierenhcenrcesrneieningeentiagueeiia- siemens | CGS Nieminen enhoanatinetlnaanipetatiadi ihiatcneenei, a NELS 10 Oct 3 Oct 5 Oct 24 Oct 25 Oct
Beach. Rates from $4.00 per head per EL ECTRIC FANS—Ceiling and Desk THE CAMP-—On the Sea, St. 1 a
ray, Enquiries to D. M. Slinger, Grenada. ‘Types. Get one to-day and keep cool, |Pully furnished. Dial 89st, "Tene ore te ers ee
26.6.51—T8n. ee janes y Costa & Co, Ltd 1447.51.—t in Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
VAEAMINNOS | wercyener wer 17,8, 51—n, TE Barbados bados Boston Halifax Montreal
< as ans ! ai anes GLEN—St Lawrence Gap. Apply | LADY RODNEY 26 Aus 27 Aug 6 Sept 8 Sept 11 Sept
Spend your Summer ays on the Sea MECHANICAL Johnson, Hotel St. Lawrence LADY NELSON 16 Sept 18 Sept 27 Sept. 28 Sept 2 Oct
ot Sete nerd Sia bist eeeee 18.8.51—t.f.n.| LADY .RODNEY 16 Oct 18 Oct 27 Oct 28 Oct 1 Novr.
e ace: noda 8 jal-—27§ “ on ree Lo eondy—reedeenr one
Ralarentione, 18.8.51—3n _ ADDING MACHINES—‘Just received | “WINSLOW, Catilewash. for ihe

4 shipment of Addo Adding Machines,

latest model, Apply T. Geddes Grant Ltd.,
Phone 4442.’ 22.8.51—1n

| ADDING MACHINE—“One second
hand Adding Machine, small keyboard,
and two second hand Remington Type-







LOST & FOUN













writers 14",
LOST P thine. 4443. apply T. Geddes See ie ‘| Purrished or unfurnished. For Viewing
ei ive a meee aa | Palph Beard, Lower Bay Street
WATCH: One (1) Ladies Gold Wrist rone 4683. 22.8.51—3n
Watch with gold Strap ‘Birks Made) { MISCELLANEOUS mt
on Tweedside Rd., Pine R0ad 30d
ore Rock. Finder will be suitably ANTIQUES — Of every description. -

Bern- Glass, ina, old Jewels, fine ilver

va 1 by returning same to L
rewarded by retu ig san (Matera, Karis = pg

stein, No. 1, Swan Street. Phone 2384







21.8.51—2n Autographs etc., at Gorringes Antique| Ten cents per agate line on week-cdays|
Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht Club. and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, | !95
| 3.9.50—t.f.n.| minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
Ic NOTICES eae ey re
PUBL . eco —All sizes “Reliance” Car M
Batteries just received
Ten cents per agate line on week-days | “" ——
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, ear canrand i oe eae Phone us REAL ESTATE s
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days| 7... iene R en les Service Ltd, | —~— M.S
and $1.80 on Sundays. tedside Road. Phone 4371. | an| (-SHED—1 new gabled shea 34° x a0.|
. n Coversn ie new best quality heavy
4 SS a nan enieeonemay uy, ” "
NOTICE BATH TUB — Full size cast iron bath| and white pine with wtene pillars, 2 | ES
tub. Price $25.00. Apply Sandyfields, 1 New Shed 22” x 14’ Covered with
Estate of St. Peter. 21.8.51—3n W







CLIFFORD AUSTIN FIELDS —deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all per- CAMERA—Kodak 35, As New, price
sons having any debt or claim upon or, one hundred dollars, Fitt, Knights Ltd.
affecting the estate of Clifford Austin; City Pharmacy.

CLASSIFIED ADS.

| low, Worthing, Ch Ch

FOR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Su™days 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a/
word on Sundays;





| HOUSES















——— eee

FUPNISHED BEDROOM With use ©
kitehen, for lady or couple. Situated sea
side Rockley. Phone 4796 before 12. 855"
after 12 ; 22.8. 51—2n

IRISDALE. Barbarees, St
adjoining Barbarees House. Moder:
Stone Bungalow. 3 bedrooms an
all usual offices. Garage and servants
room and all services including gas
Also orchid approximately half an acre
For appointment to view, phone Mrs
Bellamy, 8365. 22.8.51—t.f 1

——
“MALTA”, Cattlewash, for the mont





Michae!









(Opposite Cac
drawing, dinin
porch, three bedrooms, garag<

rabank)-—— containing
rooms,











months of October, November and
December. Apply to Mrs. W. T. Gooding,
Strong Hope, St. Thomas.

19.8. 51—-3n





WORTHY DOWN—Top Rock, Christ
Church. Available from September Ist



PUBLIC SALES

Everite Sheets a” x 4” fir and white
pine with heavy ~vallaba posts. vow
CLARKE, Ivy Lodge, Ivy Road
~'21.8.51—mn
_—_



;

|

|
|

|
|
|
|
|
|

| Por further information apply te - -



ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

FROM AMSTERDAM
STENTOR—30th August 1951






n



S.S. “ADVISER”







BONAIRE.-7th September 1951
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND
AMSTERDAM
WILLEMSTAD—11th

TO PARAMARIBO
AND BG

SAILING TO TRINIDAD,
PARAMARIBO AND B.G
COTTICA—27th August 1951 ‘
BONAIRE—24th September 1951.
SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND
CURACAO
HERA—27th August 1951
M.S. HELENA-—23rd September 1951
MUSSON, SON &

Se oe

THE MV. “MONEKA”"

Fields, late of Harmony Hall, Saint;
Michael who died in this Island on the]
15th day of March, 1951 are hereby re-
quired to send in particulars of their |
claims duly attested to us Charles Carl- |
ton Browne, Douglas Norman Robinson |
and George Lawrence Farmer c/o Hutch- |
inson & Banfield, Solicitors, James Street, \
Bridgetown, on or before the 7th day
of October, 1951 after which date we |
shall proceed to distribute the assets of

11.8.51—T F.N
———_——— 0
DRUMS—Five hundred empty drums ae saat ep a

at $1.50 each, Apply K. R. Hunte & 4
Co. Ltd. Dial 8027 18.8.51-én SEAN Price reasonable
_—
conn fades right out when you take eae
PRO. Actions speak louder than
words ASPRO action is safe and effec-
tive. ASPRO relieves Backache—Head-
ache—Pains in the limbs and joints—





The Ebony
and Commission Agency Dial
22.8.51—I1n





HOUSE; One Chattel House with shop
attached, standing on 1,997 sq. ft of land
in Tweedside Road, there is a mortgage
which purchaser can assume. Vacant pos-



Friday ith.
THE M V. “CARIBBEE”
THE M.V “CARIBBEE
Will accept Cargo and Passengers
for i
serrat,
Frida
T EB Mv

Feverishness, Remember there is only one

the said estate among the parties ares ASPRO. 19,8.51—lin
thereto, having regard to the debts and| ~pfiecorps: Charlie Kunz Binge Seine
‘claims ‘only of which we shall then} | ea ae eit aediae tee eee rue

have had notice and that we shall not 7) * stoc
be liable for the assets so distributed aera aan eo ae eater rut

‘to any person of whose debt we : .



tot have had notice at the time of such TO keep the hair looking its best. at
distribution. ; all times try “Danderine”, no trouble to
, AND all persons indebted to the said Price 1/3 and 2/-
Estate are requested to settle their ac- 21.8.51—2n
‘counts without delay.

Dated this 3rd day of August, 1951
CHARLES CARLTON BROWNE
DOUGLAS NORMAN ROBINSON
GEORGE LAWRENCE FARMER,

Qualified executors of will of Clifford
Austin Fields, deceased.

use—just put it on.
bot. Knights Ltd,

WOOLLEN SOCKS: Heavy quality
Woollen Socks in Grey only good for
footballers 60c, per pair. Broadway
Dress Shop. 21,.8.51-—-3n







8.8.51—4n.

EDUCATIONAL

CODRINGTON HIGH SCHOOL







GOVERNMENT — NOTICE.



+ Grammar School, St. Vincent

Required for September term, Casta CA eR ae Che Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets
MATRON. Nursing qualifications de-| $2.8.51—6n SSS SS = SSS
sirable. Salary $80.00 a month with ORR ERDF DGG OG POCO ODOT AOE ee

board residence. Incre€ased if applicant
is fully trained nurse or has excep-

invited for
tionally good experience

Master,
and two

Applications are
the posts of Science
Mathematical Master, 3 Apply with details of qualification and
Masters for General Subjects. experience to Mrs. Greaves, Belmont,

2. The Mathematical Master) St. John, Tel, 95—249.

will be required to teach Mathe- 19 8.51—3n
matics, and the Science Master COMBERMERE SCHOOL,



to teach Chemistry and Botany, BARBADOS, BW.L

up to the Higher School Certifi-/ pr@uiRED, in September if possible,

cate Standard. or not later than January, 1952,
3. Applicants should be Grad-| Graduate Teacher of Modern Languages—

uates or holders of the Inter Arts|French and Spanish—up to Ordinary

‘ : Level of the General Certificate, with
or Inter Science or Higher School | possibility of Advanced Level work in
The salaries offered

near future,

Salary Scales :

Graduate ;— £360 x £15 £450 x £25—
£610 pa.

Ist. or 2nd. Class Hons, :— £400 x
£20 £600 x £30—-£720 pa.

Position on incremental scale subject
to adjustment for War Service and pre-
vious recognised service,

Teacher's Diploma (or recognised
equivalent) £45 p.a. above the mini-
mum and maximum of the above scales.

Applications for the above post ino
special form) stating age, qualifications,
experience, married or single, and en-
closing a photograph, ta be sent as
early as possible to The Headmaster,
Combermere School, from whom further
particulars may be ROE

Certificates.
are:

(a) For Graduates

$96 to $1920.

(b) For Inter Arts etc.

by $72 to $1440.

The commencing salaries will
depend on experience and standard
yof work.

» 4. Ability to take charge of the
Cadet Corps will be taken into
consideration .

5. Application should reach the
Education Office as soon as
possible, as the successful candi-
dates will be expected to assume
duty at the beginnin of next
Term on 10th September.

Cc. V. D. HADLEY,
Education Officer.
St. Vincent, B.W.I.
7th August, 1951.

$1440 by
$1200

9. 8, 51—3n.





Mobwinc CoucHs

Don't let morning and night cough:
ing, attacks of Bronchitis or Asthma
ruin sleep and energy another day
without trying MENDACO, This great
internal medicine works thru the
blood, thus reaching the bronchial
tubes and lungs. Starts helping nature
immediately to remove thick, sticky
mucus, thus alleviating coughing and
promoting freer breathing and more
refreshing sieep. Get MENDACO
from your chemist today. Quick satis<«
faction #r money back guaranteed,

17.8.51—3n,



ADVERTISE
in the
ADVOCATE





GOVERNMENT NOTICE









UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE LOCAL EXAMINATIONS SYNDI-
CATE OVERSEAS SCHOOL CERTIFICATE EXAMINATION 1952.

All persons desirous of sitting for the 1952 Cambridge School
Certificate Examination and who do not fall within the following
categories:

(i) Full time pupils of schools approved by the Department of

Education as eligible to present school candidates for the
School Certificate Examination;

(ii) Candidates who already hold a School Certificate or Junior
School Certificate;

(iii) Unsuccessful entrants for the 1950 School Certificate Exam-
ination who have not re-entered in 1951, but who obtain an
authorisation from the Syndicate to re-enter in 1952;

(iv) Candidates who will be taking the School Certificate Exam-
ination in December 1951, (Such candidates will be allowed
to retake the examination in December 1952 unless they are
notified that their performance in the 1951 examination does
not qualify them to re-enter in 1952.)

(v) Candidates who passed the Qualifying Test held in January
1951 but who are not taking the School Certificate Examina-
tion in December 1951

must first sit the Qualifying Test to be held on the Sth January, 1952.)

Forms of entry for the Qualifying Test may be obtained on appli- |



Permanent guests
cation te the Department of Education, Garrison, and are to be re- welcome,
iurned duly completed together with the sum of $2.40 and a copy| Dinner and Cocktail
of the Birth Baptismal Certificate te the Department not later than parties arranged.

Tuesday the 2nd October, 1951
Department of Education,
9th August, 1951 18,8.51—2n

|

session one month. Price reasonable. The
Ebony Realty and Commission Agency

Dial 5001 22,.8.51—In



HOUSE—One House 20 x 12 x 9 built of
rine, has double sash windows, in Bush
Hall, must be removed by purchaser

The Ebony Realty and Comnnissior
Agency, Dial 5001 22.8.51—1n



LAND—House spot 2224 sqr. ft. at
Advent Road, Bank Hall. Price reason-
able. The Ebony Realty and Commission
Agency. Dial 5001. 22.8.51—I1n
—

The undersigned will set up for sale at
their Office, No: 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Wednesday, the 29th day of
August, 1951, at 2 o'clock:

200 Shares Barbados Shipping &

Trading Co. Limited

163 Shares Barbados Foundry Ltd.

300 Shares -— Barbados Co-operative

FOR SALE
To an approved purchaser 2 Building
Sites, size 13,338 & 14,420 feet, situated
to the north east of Brittons Hill reser-
voir. Price 16 cents per foot. Electric
service, @” water main on boundary,
also good road. Apply Yearwood &
Boyce. 29.7. 51—t.f.n
That very desirable business premises
known as No. 22 Swan Street occupying
a corner site and standing on 2520 square
feet of land.
Inspection on application to the tenant
Mr. F. S. Nicholls
This property will be set up to Public
con petiiton on Friday 3ist August 195)
at 2 p.m. at the office of the undersigned
CARRINGTON & SEALY
18.8.51—12n



AUCTION
UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received from the In-
surance Co, I will sell on Friday August
24th at the General Motor Bus Co.,
Nelson St a) A-40 Austin Vani.
{Damaged in accident). Sale at 2 p.m
Terms Cash VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer, 21.8.51—4n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On THURSDAY 23rd by order of Mr
J. K. K. Christie, we will sell his Fur-
niture at “Bweredish' Blue Waters Ter-
race, which includes:—

Very nice Round Tip Top Table, Up-
right Chairs,, Morris Suite, Settee, 2 Arm
Chairs, 2 Rockers, Nest of Tables, Plant
Stand all in Mahogany, Oak Sideboard,
Prescold Refrigerator 742 Cub ft. 6 months
ol¢; Deal Tables, Rush Chairs, Glass &
China; Double and Single Iron Bedsteads,
Double Dunlopillo Bed; Dressing Tables,
M.T. Washstand dong Mirror, Mosq. Net,
Troning Board, Elcetric Toaster, One
Burner Valor Oil Stove & Oven, Kitchen
Utensils, Oil Stoves, Scales and other
items. Sale 11,30 o'clock, TERMS CASH.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.





ly Auctioneers
19. 8.51—2n
UNDER THE DIAMOND
HAMMER

~ HAVE_ BEEN instructed by the
Insurance Co. to sell by public auction
at Messrs. Mc Enearney & Co. Ltd,
Garage on Wednesday next the 22nd
August at 2 o'clock, One 1947 Ford V-&
Car with only the front part damaged
by acrident, but the engine is intact
and the tyres good
DARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer.
17.8.51—4n





| ARTICULOS De ORIFNTAL
| CURIOS, SOUVENIRS

ANTIQUES, IVORY, |

JEWELS, LINENS, |

ETC., ETC |



SEA VIEW GUEST



HOUSE

|

| HASTINGS BARBADOS
| Under new management.
| Daily and longterm rates
| quoted on request

J. H. BUCKLAND.
Proprietor

SSSA



Will accept Cargo and Passengers
9 * 8 with for Dominica a, Antigua, Mont-
homas Land, serrat, St. Kitts. Sailing





SLIIS DOE OG GG DOG FS TODO RO OOO S
POLLO PI PCR FRESE LA PPOCPOOE

SALE - -

—

Wim. FOGARTY’S (B'dos) Ltd.

Will accept Cargo and Passengers
Lucia, Grenada, Aruba,
Passengers only for St
Sailing date to be notified,
SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSO. Inc.,
Consignees, Tel



RALPH

SALE

SALE

Flowered Cretonne .....
Ribbed Repp.

H.B. Towels 12 x 22.....
Lace Table Cloths 50 x 70 $2.25 ,,



Linen Glass Cloths



SALE oo

SELAEEIEM:

8

B: ARB. ADOS ADVOCATE

SHIPPING NOTICES
LINE

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM >



HARRISON



Vessel From Leaves Due
Barbados
“ASTRONOMER” Newport
& Glasgow 8th Aug. 2ist Aug.
“FRESNO STAR” Liverpoob 10th Aug. 24th Aug,
“PLANTER” Lendon 18th Aug. ist Sept.
“SCHOLAR” London 22nd Aug. 14th Sept.
“SELECTOR” Liverpool 25th Aug. 9th Sept.





HOMEWARD FOR TRS“ UNITED KINGDOM

Closes in
Vessel For Barbados
London End. Aug.





DACOSTA & CO.. LTD,—Agents



Canadian National Steamships







SOUTHBOUND









GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.

| FRENCH LINE

Cie., Gle., Transatlantique





7th September 1951

ut

SAILING TO

ae ENGLAND & FRANCE

September

13th September 1951.
“COLOMBIE” September 2,
1951. via Martinique, Guada-
loupe.

ee
tt

co., LTD.,
Agents.

SOUTH BOUND.

“COLOMBIE” 22nd August,
1951,

Cailing at Trinidad, La

Guaira, Curacao, Cartagena

and Jamaica,

ausiaiona Passengers,

Mont- t Cargo and Mail

Sailing

Antigua,
st Kitts

\ RM. JONES Co., Ltd.

AGEN'S
Phone ::; 3814

“DAERWOOD"

Vincent.

No. 4047,





‘ope 1f’S ANYTHING GALVANISED, SEE i" ta Sen RUSS Sinea aes War Oe

BEFORE BUYING ELSEWHERE

Sheets, Washpans, Watering Cans, Buckets,
Down-pipes,

Ridging Caps, Fittings, Ete.



THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM











REAL ESTATE

A. BEARD

F.V.A,

REAL ESTATE AGENT AND AUCTIONEER
LOWER BAY STREET

*PHONE 4683

SALE



aTVS

OO

Announcing the most

thrilling eyeful of

BARGAINS

in years.

86c. per yd. |
$1.55,
60 each

a1VS

6S 6SSSOS OSS GOGO OSS IS OG SODGIGGISE SIS POOO POSS SSG PPPEE oo
~ SSF
| iOEA _
; Se ky :
4]

ul

if

—ET_™-_j7w7w tee eo OO SSS

-

” wc) Gentes ovis 2
o> Tray Gintks-.: io ee
$07 MNEs days eee » 0 alee ee

e
FOR MEN
B.V.D. Briefs .......°2% $1.85 pr. pr.
South Sea Sport Shirts D
$3.74 & $4.12 each a.
White Broadcloth Under Shorts -—
$2.00 pr. pr. x
Cotton & Nylon Ankle Socks =
$1.02 ,,



SALE









perro ttt nd,
POOR ROO

GSO OOOO OOOO OG?

Oe MOOI,

x

Se

os

SOSSSOS

PLP PLVPLPLLEEEPPEPPE POY



WANTELY

PAGE



. AnBOL ge OBLGDd,

In Carlisle Bay






















HELP
ARRIVALS
ail naiae ate aa 3,93 or t
Y e% ' i ym Martinique
office at Hotel Roya ; : 4 ant
Apply in writing and in person to tt Zita Wontta d dae 1 \ omer, 4,625 tor ue
Mane ger 19 ‘ \ s jlase
Cea — —_— es Oo,
NURSE-~Experienced Nurse wit > - - . - a . = Se
refe . middle aged. Must sleep ) — :
Good Salary. Apply Mrs. Freicdman,! ()) LET US. SUPPLY vol WITH
Rockley Road No. 10, Blue Waters | {\} . 7
Terrace 22. 8.51—1 y
a Jeliv ¢ stals Cheese i tin *elothornpe Sauss “Ss,
Giants mentee’ cota Wale, 1}) el yst i nm ti t vor ue 8 AUsaAg
| Knowledge of lathe work heipfui.!(} Car lake Swift's Luncheon Beef Tins Perches,
. o , :
Aply Manager, Lower a a tory » Hams in ting I Cocoa Heinz Souns Lssorted {\
| reermees eneeriemeainieresinet terior | 1) Sweet Biscuits Icing Sugar, Jacob's Cream Crackers, t
» A - Ixperieneced sery } . . ' 2
| wanted @ cook'and a butleremaid’ Apply | \\$ Lactogen Krafi Cheese Spread Andrew's Liver Salts
in person 8-10 a.m. Newton Lodge, | })) - T @
| Maxwell's Coast : 21.8. 51—2 | })) PEANUTS
| 55
— |)
j
5 e
MISCELLANEOUS iii

) BOQEN BD.



i |

HAND ROLLER One heavy Hand |
Roller, suitable for use in Colas work

Phone 8152 21.8.51—3n |

!

|

'

TAYLOR & SONS LTD.







WANTED to rent, by Quiet En





| couple, small house or groundficor fat
unfurnished, two bedrooms garag
| Hastings, district or near. Apply Ads i)
cate Office, Box C.G. C/o Advocate | |i) SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH
Advtg Dept 22.8.51—1n | })) ,
Siegineingatettal 1) \
WANTED TO BUY i} GALV. OFL CANS i, 2 & 5 Glns, Sizes
HOUSE with land or Building Site | {i
| Pear Sea preferred Leave fancy ¢ « } e
out. Looking for good bargain. Call
| with particulars



Established

{
X
20.8. 51—t \
1860

’ EERPRDOT 1 ated
WANTED i. HERBERT itd. wreeien "

| FOR THE HURRICANE RELIER 10 & 11 ROEBUCK STREET.
ORGANISATION \
Sixty (60) Battles to hold not le tha

~TUNOR “CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH







|

@ Wks @2®

WE SOLD IT
JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

LPS F.V

REAL ESTATE
AUCTIONE!I

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Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny
seams and pores where germs hide
and cause terrible Itching, Cracking,
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AGENTS
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remove the

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\
4 pints Communicate with—Vestr
| Cverk Parochial Buildings, Phone 30:
21,8.51—2n














porvncccecteseccanattsonet SS = ee
& TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH § i THE 1952 ISSUE OF THE
| bid t a a |
1 v y+ ))
is ae a See | TELEPHONE DIRECTORY |
(Manual for Cane Sugar Manu- & )
| facturers and their Chemists) ¢ |
| By SPENCER and MEADE $
|% ath Edition, Revised, Rewritten % IS NOW BEING PREPARED
and enlarged y L
| One Copy only left $20.00 )
at
| JOUNSON’S STATIONERS ' }
| Plastic Glass opened at | SUBSCRIBERS
JOHNSON'S HARDWARE | be '
» | ih “xXamine your listings ind notily us aS soon as
SOOO D ER A T . ‘ Z .
LOCO Da possible, in writing, of any alterations you may
% i require, No changes can be mede after the
| us| Sist of August, 1951.
% Extra Listings ave made for a charge of $2,00
Ammident Toothpaste | bie insoe.
%
Competition % sia ial
° THE BARBADOS TELEPHONE 0. )
ee iat : 8 THIRPHONE 00, MID,
SECOND PR $15.00 ;
THIRD PRIZE $ 5.00 James Street = Bridgetown
In 25 words or less just \ P.O. Box 272
finish this sentence |
“I prefer Ammident 14 since desis
TOOTHPASTE becaust of)
ee ; : Siesta te EL , .
and send in your entry with x \\) ADV ERTISERS
a flattened AMMIDENT s} 1K -
toothpaste box to K. R. ‘ i Please apply to The Colonial Advertising Co
is" & Co., Ltd. x ))) (Barbados) for all information regarding
ou can send in any num- X |?) dvart 12 1 the 1952 Tele . Directory
i ber of entries but each entry x i a hiss is ing it ey i re le phone [ irectory (}
g must be accompanied by an sj); waien. Wil Inemde the nev Classified Section {
AMMIDENT toothpaste box. \ ({) (Yellow Pages)
x Entries will be judged on ¥ | })) i“ a i ae }
% their ability to describe the ¥ i ‘
excellent qualities of AM- % | |i! THE ¢ , RPTICING . }
% MIDENT Toothpaste, The > i rue COLONIAL ADT Es Caen CO.
x three winning entries and % iy (BARBADOS) (
the names of winners will $)) ‘i ~
% Ne published in oe local $ i Shepherd Street _ Bridgetown \\
Â¥ newspapers. Competition %s i) Dial 5134 i}
| ends December, 1951, 2) - fe _l\}



i OE LLLP PPPOE \





— Ol OOOOOGe_O_CG__5_G_eeeee eS



S=SS=S—S=—=

0 ream,

GB.1-50.1

THE LONG-LIFE HARDEST-WEARING CryREY
7



Bd cot— 4 “a8? es deep

THE CITY GARAGE TRADING
i}: VICTORIA STREET

co., LTD.






PAGE EIGHT



Ladies In Table Tennis Finals Tonight |



Island Champion Beaten

In Semi-Final Upset











































































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE



































| New Industries
| Bill Passed















THE House of Assembly yes-
Barr EL Ba (By P.A 7) i passed a Bill to encourage
THE FINALS of the 1951 Table Tennis Championships the establishment and develop-
will be held at Y.M.P.C. at 8.15 o’clock tonight. For the jment of new industries and to
first time in the history of local table tennis ladies will be oe F pee Pars oo a ae
; : j er le elie acke a
eontestin His Excellency the Governor will be attending. ad eee - ee a gi = v4
Mae major upset of the Table Greenidge took the lead in the T: : 5 % ee nF pe =
Tennis games Y.M.P.C on opening stages of the second 7 to person establishing =
Monda night was caused by game. Stoute pur up a good fight tories in connection with such
Campbell Greenidge of Barna but was never able w catch industries, This is also for pur-
Club The « wd was | greatly Greenidge who wor 21 19 poses incidental to or connected
urprised Greenidge de- Stoute won the next game 21 with any of the foregoing pur-
feated his mate 17 to regain the lead bu the poses
: ~2 in semi-finals for the followmg game went to Green-
1951 ! lan Championship, Stoute idge who brought honours even Such a Bill has already passed
car e Island Champion in 1949 by winning 21 -19 the House but not the Legislative
and re a he title last year. Final Game Council. Then it did not make cer-
a‘ one ge is an unorthodox In the final game there was tain provision for some tax ex-
play A opinion his style very little smashing 30th men emptions. ,
voul dt bes His smash- were defending and every point
es have tle ; but ae counted. The game stood at 15
E t will be each but Greenidge managed to as ry OE
will win get the lead. Service changed at Miss MARGARET WOOD. (left) and Miss PATSY HOWARD will '
Norman 916 in his favour. He had meet for the Ladies Table Tennis Championship of the island at | =; |
and Iam gtoute 20—17 but Stoute did not __Y-M.P.C. to night. ie | 4 By M. Harrison-Gray
who is a yive up. The score was soon 20 : Dealer’ West
19 in favour of Greenidge. He ca e e $ Love all
c got the next point and won 21 : N.
: from “be ginnin £g 19 tos ocket to tne finals. e 1 Cc er 1 : eo?
His Excellency the Governor 3 VR a4ee 2
First Game will attend the Finals at Y.M.P.C. : 3 : K 085
: 2 at 8.15 o'clock to-night j : Ww E
. ; on : The games are Boys’ Cham ea ar a OSs eam 5 AOSEA @i75
ape eR Sera 7 « it was pionship: D. Guiler of Modern > vy ws 9QI392
= hag [ st I nae ae sre High School vs H. Bourne of ‘ 3 ke er 3 oe 4
ge oe eae bin Ge~ Lynch’s Secondary School. . 7 ° ) i i ‘
a ate Phillips oe : e, Ladies’ Island Championship Teams To Be I icked To-day : ot RJ 103
pior mriine - si Miss Margaret Wood vs Mi : WATE
a > or 1undred pe ve owar “B” Class Cham- 5 i :
cent ¢ time, turned the Sloanhin Oe es Pe, ees PEGGY PITCHER, Captain of the Goldfish Water} 3 ee
= i ae cist tte "eeu 31 vs E. Goodridge (Barna); Island Polo Club has been selected Captain of the Barbados Ladies] § ppe Norin-South piddin
doing t. ue spouse Championship: Norman _ Gill team which will tour Trinidad next month. Frieda Car-} ; on clus World Olympic hand
joing é ey , ~~ ee . Snr. ; i. 7 . : 10) start
From early in the first game he tiec (Berney. Sehdeny: en michael, Captain of the Starfish Water Polo Club, has been 3) Diamond—One Spade; Three
took the lead. Soon the score was ye’. Murray. ‘thosen Vice-Captain. This announcement was made by| #: Plamonds— Three Spades:
19—11 in his favour. He went on at Pee pes e et i ‘] : : Four Spades, from whict
to beat Corbin 21—12 y the Selection Committee at the Aquatic Club yesterday] { point a final contract of Six
o beat Corbin 21—I2. : Rowing aft anaes $ Spades is inevitable. South
Corbin had the edge early in arternoo! $ is just short of a forcing
ete ae, Pree ae The Barbados teams will be begin punetually at 4.45 o'clock | 7 LikEaut, and, Yisuaitee, 8
and took the lead. He eventually lil 2 Cx I id selected this afternoon followin 4 Players are asked to be ready| # a strength-showin pO
won 21—15 d 7 4 S am yr ge the practice matches, when, Pegg) on the bridge by 4.30 o'clock. 3 Sant man ai - aod
Philli who was playing a and Frieda along with the Barba- Yesterday’s Game 2 against Ned teas. 0, guard :
defensive game all the time, be- V ersus dos men’s captain “Boo” Patterson There was only one game at the| § Diamond is ledfrom Dummy
gan the third game in in ag ; will assist the Selection Commit- Aquatic Club yesterday afternoon, $ at trick 2, or @K followed by 3
gressive manner. This did not + L tee, Maj. A. R. Foster, Mr. Peter when Flying Fish defeated Police} & wad prese DeOe allowed to ;
pay dividends and the score read Euro e Now Patterson and Mr. Kenneth Inc® eleven goals to one. For Flying : If @K and @A are :
17—13 in Corbin’s favour. Corbin in the selection of the teams. _ Fish, Peter Potter scored four, Tim $ played, and South then ruffs 3
won 21—19, frustrating a last Ath h tt ht t mi The teams for this afternoon's Yearwood three, Mark Conliffe] ? $2 With @ 3.60 ovar-Futt by
minute effort by Phillips. _Although the eight to represent games are, two and Arthur Hazell and Harold| ¢: {%°&5 no atal. Bu
Corbin quickly got off the mark Great Britain in the European ” : . Weatherhead one each, Police got ; pene ROO prieacyinn tbe
in the fourth game but Phillips, Rowing Championships at Macon, — Men’s ‘Team “A”. M. Foster, C. their lone goal mid-way through| { length in trumps, and refuse
who went back to his old game, France, is drawn entirely from Evelyn, B Patterson, G. McLean, the first half. L. Best scored with $ the over-ruff.
Jater took the lead. He had the Cambridge Universit it will be O, Johnson, K, Ince and D. a lovely left hand shot from th« \oo-sncccesccecenessnesecssusnaseusesesnuenc®
edge on Corbin and went on to known as “Goldie Bannister. right wing. ioddon Biniess satuies,
win 21—16, qualifying to_meet Three of the crew are not Blues; Men’s Team “B”. A Weather- fyery member of the Flying
Gill in the semi-finals but they were in the magnificent bead, F. Manning, T. Yearwood, Figh team scored at least one goal —_-—-—-
Z Lady Margaret crew which won G. Foster, G. Jordan, B. Manning ang at half time the score was six m
The Ladies the Grand Challenge Cup in July. and M. Weatherhead. : one in their favour. In the second Soceer Results
Mic ohrcuce dtinuc . _, . The three men who were not Ladies’ Team “A”, A. Eckstein, aif Flying Fish took their score
- ef 7 Be a Cea ra = in this eight are D. M. Jennens A. Sutherland, D. Warren, M. t¢ eleven LONDON, Aug. 21
oan Sonal 49 ane Ma Mar. (Clare), J. G. Crowden (Pem- Knight, J. MacKinnon, M. Taylov Results of soccer games English
Cae Wood. 3 r Mi s Dol oe broke) and W. A. D. Windham and P. Fitzpatrick. The game yas inclined to be League.
inward ce, PSY. WUPS t0reS (Christ’s), all of whom, together a a y muddled as each team played ypjyision 1.
“ Consic ring the ladies games with bow, two and cox, were Ladies Team “B " Be Fane, 2 with a man short, This made Stoke City 1, West Brommwich
anak cnt ae rt d th = ier iaue with the Cambridge eight in the Williams, Gale, 'T, Browne, P. positional play difficult. Police at- Albion 1. Tottenham Hotspur 1
bid a very | igh tutl lard. Mics U.S.A. Chandler, P. Pitcher and Jean tacks on the Flying Fish goal Fulham 0
€ « , 1 § € ss . c .
: ay 5 is crew is x- Chandler. were not frequent but whenever i
Wood “specially ‘i fas Although this crew is not ex 1 ut whenever pjyision 2.
Joan tee table aa Soaeon at pected to show the cohesion of the Due to the meeting w hich they did get through they were
use of her footwork, Miss How- Cambridge eight or of LMBC follows these games, play will always dangerous. Cardiff City 2, Rotherham United
ard has a powerful forehand slam being @ mixture of both, it will The referee was Mr. P. Patter- 4 Coventry City 3, Swansea
but on many occasions Miss ‘OW With distinction. > . ae Town 2. Leicester City 3, Sheffield
Wood ably returned her oppon- The crew, with indicating What Ss On The other fixture scheduled for Wednesday 1: Queens Park Ran-
ent’s smashes. Miss Wood won the Blues, are: *H. H. Almond ; yesterday was Swordfish vs. Bar- gers 1, Hull City 1. Sheffield
3—1 (LMBC), (bow), “D, D, Macklin Toda , racudas, Due to illnes in the Bar- {jnited 3, Luton Town 0.
In the first game Miss Howard, (LMBC), N. B. M. Clack (LMBC), y racudas ranks, they were forced pjvision 3.
who had won the toss and taken J. S. M. Jones (LMBC), J. R, Victorian Exhibition 1837 to forfeit the match, The teams — Bristol Rovers 1, Swindon Town
the service, lost the first five Dingle (LMBC), *W. A. D 1901 at the Barbados were ‘ 0. Newport County 2, Northamp-
points. She recovered some lost Windham (Christ’s), “J. G. P Museum — 10.00 a.m. to Flying Fish.—P. Foster, (Capt.), ton Town 0.
ground but was never able to Crowden (Pembroke), *D M. . H. Weatherhead, T. Yearwood, M. iwici 9
: y Bb rit) 6.00 pam, Reve as Division 3 (Northern).
catch | up with Miss Wood who Jennens (Clare), “J. F. K, Hinde Police Courts and Court of ee A. Hazell and P. Potter Hartlepools United 3, Crewe
won 21—15 (Pembroke). Original Jurisdiction 10.00 Po ce. L. Shannon, M. Frank- Alexandra 0. Stockport County 1
Rribe.. dod did ten: better Rov Meldrum is coaching them a.m. ; lyn, L. Best, M. Richards (Capt.), Bradford 0. York City 1, Tran-
t} ie aa ae Sh : oF 2 this at Cambridge, and they are Cricket — Harrison College |! &. Alleyne, W. Phillips. mere Rovers 1.—(C,P,)
Gis. Mise THiAcee aie a Sree twice a day. Tony Fox vs. Windward Islands at = ~ SE
great secovery in the third game cs With the party to trv to add College 12 noon. Re ee j
which she wen 21—17, Miss Wood ‘he Furopean title to the Diamond Meeting of the Barbados
won the fourth game 21—13 and W ingfield sculls, which he has Flying Club at the Ch m- 1
From the beginning of this game W°" this season. ber of Commerce Building ||
she appeared confident and al- i 5 p.m. |
though Miss Howard fought hard " Table Tennis Finals at
it was to no avail Cricket Results Y.M.P.C. — 8.15 p.m | 1
Louis Stoute defeated Blair Scores in Englis aia ete CINEMAS |
wo, RC ip hii name | eee inglish First Class PLAZA (Bridgetown) Riding
ye Hide wie capsaten cricket games to-day, were as High” and “Whispering Smith” |
: . : . f 8: 45 d 8.40
be always concentrating on the gan ; . " i wihmh (Owtiand an male of. the |
Badd, « Sie ANGE. D110, (Bien gt ee Somerset at Dead" and “Zombies On Broad- |
and 21—18. Lord’s Middlesex 402 for 2 way’ — 5 and 8.30 p.m, POWDERED
Norman Gill played Ralph Wickets declared, and 165 for 1 “tea 8 ry ae Outlaw” — 5,00
Phillips and defeated him three wicket declared; Somerset:—231, MP: Watch ‘The Birdie" MILK
one, Phillips put up a stubborn and 199. Middlesex won by 137 y and 8.30 pom \
fight and I am quite sure that runs. OLYMPIC {Yellow Rose of |
next year Phillips will be a fin- Essex vs. Nottinghamshire at ROE RH ATONE i
alist. Clacton Essex:— 593 for 7 Doe” and : ONE OF
rickets clare : é . 4.80 and |
Stitt Fight wickets declared; Nottingham 818 p.m !
£ shire:— for 9 wickets de- RoXY — The || {
After a stiff fight Gill won the Clared. The match was drawn. Ctock' 1{{ HOLLAND
first game 23—21. 1 the second Gloucestershire vs. Worcester- Son a “In Soctety” ie: iN
game Gill opened with a barrage Shire at Cheltenham Glouces- Tenet ee | )
ef forehand lams which com- tershire:—417 for 8 wicketS G@- eee ——"|
pletely threw Phillips off his bal- clared; Worcestershire:— 318, and LEADING
ance. Phillips howeve1 taged a 74. Gloucestershire won by an XV LEMP
come back and Gill was only > innings and 25 runs. i uwaRDEW wowee -
to win 21 19 fe fe ~ oo
In the third game Phillips took eee an Sear ana eit, YESTERDAY'S ; BRANDS
an early lead. Service changed at ny, rthamptonshire;—222, and 27¢ WEATHER REPORT i EV ERY 5 H RE
18—12 in his favour and he got * § wickets i
the next three points to beat on rae are FROM CODRINGTON % J ERE.
Gill 21—12 ii iidiaaie Wear Patt aia
“ail from ‘early in she fourth Lancashire vs Glamorgan at Rainfall: 1.08 inches .
game "had a four point ead. He Manchester . Lancashire: 141, Total Rainfall for month up
kept this throughout and went on and 194; Glamorgan:—226, and to date: 5.95 inches
te beat Phillips 21—16. 143. Glamorgan won by 34 runs. Highest Temp: 83.0°F
The next match was. between Warwickshire vs. Combined i Lowest Temp: 76.5°F
Stoute and Greenidge, Stoute had Services at Birmingham War- Wind Velocity : 4 miles
the edge from early in the first wickshire:—322 for 9 wickets de- Barometer: 29.916, 3. p.m. '
game, Greenidge had not yet clared; Combined Services:—279 29-848,
struck form and Stoute won 21 ind 100. Warwickshire won by 8
12. wickets.—C.P.
{very qt ime Rocisteied U. Patent OFtee By pay HLlatlo ENVY
tif) = UF ~ %
tf r T )
IL WAS THERE! I Cl ity BOY FRIEND OMEBODY MUST THE LOOK
GEFORE IT } APPENED! IANTED TO GO HAVE BEEN MAK NG HE L¢ S
ft STAY FOR, SHEREâ„¢-BUT <7/// GOOD MOUSETRAP OF THIS
BUT LAST pie Ng SAID “LET'S IN THAT JOINT: ea
G@ TOLD ME 1? EVERYBODY WAS ‘
IOME = a. BEATING A PATH WELL-DRESSED
ex TO THE DOOR> :
nm MAN
TAL e





\
\

ABOUT LUCK.
I WOULD/‘VE

BEEN THERE
BUT I HAD TO
WORK LATEâ„¢:

| A\erer every
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YOU SIMPLY
CAN ORDER
YOUR SUITS
TAILORED AND
FITTED BY

. Top

Scorers

Tailoring "’





in



PLCS. MARFEI
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a



BAMBOO CAN
REPLACE STEEL

As Reinforcement

WASHINGTON, |
Tests made in the United States |

show that bamboo can success- |
fully replace steel as a reinforce- |
ment material in concrete con- |

struction.

Reported here in the Washing-
ten Post, the tests have been con- |
ducted over a period of seven |
years at the Engineering Experi- |
ment Station at Clemson Agricul- |
tura] College, Clemson, South |
Carolina, The U.S. Department |
of Agriculture has cooperated in
the project through its bamboo
experiment station at Savannah, |
Georgia. |

There appears to be no dang r|
that bamboo will deteriorate in |
cement, according to H. E. Gienn, |
who helped direct the Clemson |
experiment. An advantage of
bamboo as_ reinforcement its
tensile strength or resistance to}
stress. It can be bent, yet not}
break. Also, bambog poles can |
be fastened together with a kind}
of metal joint that fits into tne
ends of the bamboo. A welding |



is

process makes. the coupling
secure.
Mr. Glenn said: “In the Orient |

South America where bam- |

and |

boo is plentiful and steel is scarce,
it is thought that bamboo as a
reinforcement is a very suitable |
substitute for steel.” He said it}
is doubtful that bamboo will be |
widely used in the United States
as long as steel is available.



RUGBY RESULTS

READY MADE

In Blue and Brown
Pin Striped Tweed

per suit

The same quality suit
tailored locally would

cost 40% more.



CAVE SHEPHERD

10, 11, 12, & 13, Broad



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1951

9°







ror
GENTS’

= |
A BARGAIN
MEN!

SUITS

$73.03

& Co. Lid.

Street





LONDON, August 21.











$55606506000889

OY.



| ROSS 9 99999998999 OO FOOT OF +44,
Results of Rugby League anels °° eee SSS SPSS EFSF OSES $
in the United Kingdom follow: — |¢% y
Halifax 26, Batley 9. Hull 28, |% M MORE 3
York 22, Workington Town 19, 1g MAKE YOUR HO E O >
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1%
pesiseisniietiladss siesiicenelit le ATTRACTIVE
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And You'll Fedl Young—Look Young => .
Nothing ages man or woman more | %> >
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under Eyes, Swollen Ankles, Loss of | §S 3 yds y
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throw off acidsand poisons, nowcreep- | % .
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ystex is ney germs, strength- ate
ens kidneys and pals acids and poi- | 3 yds. e
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Guarantee to put you rfght or mone Ls. , . 7 2 7 . _
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feel Cy and be completely wall ir DN 6 feet wide x
one sek 1%
Cystex The Guar: | 3 ft. wide 8
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| be lost is Ae: OF a aaiae | ferenenennntie PPPS CES LOE LLL SEDY

i



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BARN DANC

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S. Mary’s Church |
at
}
{

BS HOLBORN, FONTABELLE |



n aid of

on
SATURDAY, 15th Sept.
beginning 9 p.m.
DANCE ORCHESTRA
STEEL BAND
Tickets $1.00 |
{

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Fine Things



FOR THE

REFINED
LADIES!

EMBD. ANGLAISE
in White, Pink, Blue,
Lemon from $2.35 & up

BARBADOS VIEWS
CLOTH—Assd, Colours
—$2.32 a sq

ROMAINE CREPE
—$2.12 a yd.
JERSEY SILK
Striped and Plain
from 48 to 54 ins.
—from $1.34 up

Plain & Stamped

POLE PEELE PLO ALPS AK GOOG poss 38S SHOR INI IRI IORI IIIIIIIS

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— Also — $
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%
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STRIPED SHIRTS





ttt t ttn tnd, 4 ett

uE BOWRANITE
ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT





Iren and Steelwork cannot corrode beneath a coat of
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YOU SHOULD USE FF. TOO

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PERMANENT GREEN, RED, GREY,
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m= ONE GALLON WILL COVER
"PHONE 4456

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AGENTS

1,000 SQ.

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.



OnSeOIISO TSS CCOS CSCIC
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55 OCOOOCOOO SN PORPOIOS

PPP POPPS LSA AS LOPS SE

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WITH

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BY

AUSTIN REED

C.B. RICE

AT

& CO.

TAILORS AND OUTFITTERS

OF

BOLTON LANE.






PAGE 1

I'M. I TWO IIAItn\IM)S \l>\(>( Ml m l.\l SDAY \i c.i ST 2-' 1*51 igahib QaUinq ACTRESSES SHOW THEIR NEEDLE CRAFT L.I. Attorney Genera! H I : %  %  %  IB J4th. Due To-day D i %  M PMUifi .eei. lh.-r. Phil B.C H wife %  ll.irbadu%  v the (iairoEne Romance Began At Party () K KMl ..topped .it Singapunilt ended a parly Anc there <'ite oi them. LieutenaiV rhanaa. met MI* Am Qreen. Last weak the] I Oreea 22, live* In Putnej Ilk her pairnlv Hi 111 utenant-colomi p K Qreen eily atu tinned in Mulaya ta *t tidying art. Mi Thomas, 24, u only .m ;>! BOA1 bai Ml Mile* Thitmaa He IB secretary to the C Inqulo l "'" ">< %  '" %  "' """ ub.1 laa Affray." riio lu.i will probably marry WRAF Chief To Marry •!;. IUP OFFICER NAN V DINNIE, une of the two Deputy Directors of the WRAF. is io marry Notice of her wedding to Mr. Roger Edward Hunter a regional director of the ItrlUih Council, hu been given at Kenregmat office. Mr. Hunter % %  37. live* imp Officer Dinnn h 35 She ha* been In the Bat ll I since IMI ad In ">e Far ; H IS EXCELLENCY the Go*Delegate Arrives J u t P^SjfL bj u* |JON j B RENWICK %  Mr Dam. Savage ind fl i n .1 !.;. :* %  __ !" '* ool t h Miai Pat Savage attended the l meeting J;/; .,„,", 1 ^.kmle fni ...nan fchibjtjon .t ihe Barbedo ,,,„,, opan. Uui morning at EKJ ?*£..£.? .UTES?' i^EE Museum yesterday .ftc.no,.,. ,ve,i from ':'.... tu *,rv 1. K I. ? The Exhib.t.on 1837 1901. Gn i evening t ' the A, r Mim*U> In KtaS999J which opened at the Museum on B W I A Caribbean Cruise August, will continue until Sun)\,. ,. ., u %  .•. at the M ' W/" 1 "-^ llH "('"lombic" leaves ii,-.i W Barbados today, on in*rd British Films For Japs niiare Actre-Aeu Dorothy Lamour (left) and Ginger Hogs dollthey have made and brought along to a Hollywood party Mia* Roger* won a prise for hnr bold needlework. All the doll' want to a children'* hospital —L.E.S. day, Augunt 26. M Was Here Last Year R REGOIK ROSS, B I ith the l ik oi Cocnmeros In Pert M R N AC. AM ASA KAWAKITA. i -old I. i ii* I be M and Mi Patterson, theu daugnti '' ind mn Patrick, Mm Richard1 ', Mi Vere lt.-U.nan. Ml Arthu Spain .lew In from Gretu \\ "„'^ E\ s *, 'i.,:' ' %  k ' ( '-"""'" Archer. Misa Monday evening bv nv. : • hns Hutehlnaon, Hiss Kathlay oi thai S*. Mr Kav. ikn.. "The lana'"'" Bhrgeeiit, Mr and Mrs. Rob colony he has a . v uUke British Bin ''• %  terkm. Mr. Charlie ivterkin the remaining two weeks of in better than American produi ' Ml ( '"' u •war^K.w-du •... Jsg^irtr*.* ... %  |. i„ Tokli. pmN ll"MM one who „l iru-i. R • :i.linlte pnlns lind Kiveh wilh Mr. unil MrAlb;m Johnson MTlWd 170.000 Uwr, .01 its llniu "' m '*' ''veryone iiiound hin(.— ul WonhllltJ.. .Uicem. II %  '""• Cerf. — I..E.S TIIK AV9VSNTU9BS OF I'lPA Do you think host with your feet op? WIIA r the beu p>really har.l thinglng' Sitting* Walking about? %  Or. J. ft. H-tt You have three I If your blood-pressure Ii **< the low Ude you lh< uld do you. g lying down or ntlUfcg oi % %  ar.iunaii Aitlt vui.i In th.i k ,i i |] j mr bra.n; to tl'-i a betterabJood supplv. P eople wrtn average bloo-i-' Ihlnh best giiim, J %  % %  armchair la fatal to I II i ntration for them. It I isstei so much | orbs blood whu'i! n.g through th* brain high bloodera often over-sirn toe -efficient p|3 whlehj ket-p them etl "hen tngg %  ... %  %  I IfHur iFabcr. -I.F.S. I >l I* I II I MISS MARIA LU1SA IIUARTK, talented Max Fectm Hoilye make-up arust Mill bv aniving shortly to condun the lamoua Max Faeter Hollywood Art Srhool of Make-Up classva. tfjgfl HCARTE will be giving free deinonstratiuni. u Monday. 27th August tD Friday. 3Ul at C.tVifllnmllgl waelllSSltaeil Ud The Barbados Ai,uatlt Club, ann | age Oift Shop. B.B.C. Radio Pi'ogfamme i a v i f m Th* H< 10 p ..i In 4i.% | in Siai Tin*. 4 M p .< %  \ 00 |i m Compile We**, i l v m TiiMira Mm %  | :. p i i-.i.i.i. •Ii, C M V -mi\ pn. '^ B %  1.90 a m 0 in Th, N*. T 10 p m Nf n ,. n Tvtnty OueoBi p ni The ChJiiisina Tnr . I'ubll "00 p m Radi Aisumrtil. 0 p m %  Inn gen BY THE WAY .... % neaeae^aar \urkovrr ami Wed Point Wordsworth and hummed of Handel'i tlsts ani I ltok after largo. our food, when 1 lOtetold years ago. !he coming of fogfl iooii !V/1 ANY unmnrr, od girls who RO 1V4 to expensive restaurants in But it appear* thiit Btey ti.ive i.,, Ml ion have dertdad to been busily preparing the table before Ihe I IMAOINVD, in my iluil I nine bar* iii 1'iifsiiiff A SINGULARLY ul-Umad proii^.' t %  lloadnutatera and Oovernon of Public SchouU, ii"iil case Of Wldespreud rhoatlni during axamlna> lions at Narkover, is printed >* without comment in the current NorkOVei School Magazine. Hut tish. and the luckj Mr. Chapman heylni This rnee ni trv i d tinstaternent made I'incher. using a screwdriver to ubiquitous lada who report each by the dlsmlwed cadels of West prtee hi* meal off the RUto With ii.nMhful. ami interpret the offer point, and thetl pannt-.. Ihat such which he was presented, was one ,,t .i elgaratte •>the beginning of cheering )S an old We I of the i. Ihts delicacy a "romance," will have to find ,,,.,„„, i) r Smart-Alluk has I assumed tru:t bolmenol F would tome other hiding-place. One .,_„,,„„, .,, w „, be used to make it U Ii „ I, K "> • %  "< her eeeort recently %  *'" %  •^'"••' Breeimg.1 had reckoned without the dh> %  uspeeted that the waiter was not I'.oiii. and has offere,) to exchange covery of bolmenol G, which ,i waiter, nnd she said to him. views mi "the I*' -1 method* oi elfinwith % %  charming smile: "l-ook. ,..,.,...,..,,,.,,. .h e tneoirrable tyrtcnor rubber. This is mu.-t Itlmum u-u you e 'eci.i We an lust 10 Ihe gUndS (especially | SB BWaj in> n( the ex.Un.O.'t.u., si... Matheson's Cland), and Is a *ubutitute fur a whole range of carbohydrogenics. /'rp'/onMi'/ixi'il Finh D R. STRABISMUS (Whom God Preserve 1 of Ul .-. gene hirthei lawn tin He has succeeded in manufaeturuig pre-fossilised Bah The al of any flavour is SO pronounced that nobody can till it bom tha more conventional form of fossilised fish. But Ihe advantage In the Strabismus article is that the dreary business of catching hah for fossillsation k done with The stuff i< made in enormous vats, and Charlie Su. I already preparing a schedule pj mass-production. Trie new secret formula produces a food which i SB even more powerful brainstimulant limn real Bah, r\ parrot fed on it recited twelve hundred Rupert and the Sorcerer— 7 4^L The aienl Partnei PEOI'LE By JON HOI'E gh The things you can do on a bicvclr' Tak,. mystery writertraveller Bernard Newman He has a blyycle li*. calls George. Georgf) end Bernard Bo ..v,i>where. Together they have produced many books — and madt a lot of money for N Now they have don* it again. but */a U|sl %  *9lt n" : '< naarai year's end for th<. book; To M ailed Otieraminergau J frotn-the i aaddij n-cord of a trip through thp ruUni Bavaria t. Obeiammcrgau. where Newman saw the Passion PlBJ How much did all 11 rVboul 18s ;, day a) PuUishera nght any m launching important books l! wash, Big book buyers aic < %  >> %  serrtng their speisdlng power 11 the coming autumn 'pat* V not always so. That giant among beat Sir Hall Calne, believed in laaulni %  t tins Ume i.( th c y. n and beoting his own druifl strnulttuvaously. c.Uuert I BS i used in tauni ti Calne about hi* publicity method* Oneel eelladl I B Kianlcau i "i had mst hit the big money with m Clgai Merehen and Hall CaU9J "d to nie unch'How lucky you are M. Frankau. to live in an "Be ObBl ; an author docs not have to be i [ gentleman.'" gft Bow been spent in 11. re %  HI October, Cape's plan to issue A Miio-,. Is Horn. IIIT st-coii, book. The theme? Sa v Cape's The life story of Effl> Huntn. a film star known Bg Th,. Bust WUH1-II (OPVRIl.llI ItV'll P — L.I: s. PI 4#4 BT0WN *.., m.rmm.fm DIAL 2310 %  roHoaaon lOah RIDING HIGH & WHISPERING SMITH n u b.t pnjsTON IKIO. T .%  i is %  m p m. iaauaa O.ll, i i-. *, p ,„ MITt II -"Ml Actually Ptnes I Human lie Unlro! THE BIG STEAL •• STARRING ROBERT MITCHUM v .in Jan i;iu 1. William HF.ND1X PattW K^ OWI.KS HKO HAOIO. or .i" iIII IO III • n..n A niiotnu Alan CM i n. ni atk ii... .i. < hartsa %  aa Jeaaa, I.AIIIV THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES v MM Jen will..i II." Johnn* MS< W/VW>VA5WV//,VWAV/,V.'' .•.•.•S r '.'*'S'\ GLOBE THEATRE TO-DAY. VOO A H.li P.M. LAST SHOWS THE OUTLAW II)-JllllHim ONLV. 1.41 >. .IS P.M. MIGHTY JOE YOUNG >; — AMI THE SECRET FURY Todat 6. TomjrTou IM 1 t.3 put. TH! T.AIT.II SHOW M-G-M prcicTilM Red SKELTON ArlencHAIII. Ann •• WATCH THE BIRDIE" Th.v .gnl RED sUmiuiK ht'ail—when you see RED he'll nave foa rolling in !he Ailes <'omlnt FRIDAY 31U. •FATHER'S LITTLE DIVIDEND '• A Riot of Fun . from beginning to end ROYAL Today A Tomornm 4 10 a 8.1.% p.m. H bit Double "I JANE DOE" Starring John CARROLL _., Vera RALSTON* and •DARK COMMAND" Starring John WAYNE Walter PIDGEOK Roy ROGERS OPENING FRIDAY 5.M A 8.15 p.m. 20th Century Fox Burl LANCASTER la hi. first BIG Teehitlr.ilor UlSTIRS "VENGEANCE VALLEY" Robert WALKER Sally FORREST Adventure. Drama. In lb> Kussed Be*l IMI\1 Today Si Tomorrow 4.3S A 8.15 p.m. The Fox Super Double . Jeanne CHAIN & William LUNDIG .N ijffiatnignt Ellen went to the linage '.1...K AOIATH' lllll JIMIIA • %  • i. ..-.', Ill Ml.Ml I lil^nKKOW MC;lll' AT 8.311 MATINR1 in n \4 Al :.mi I'.M. l l GOSTBXO i\ aDCUTI" VRT..UH M;I:AI Mi;: MARION lll'TTON KIllliY GRANT A I nln'rsal I'll lure OLYMPIC 4.30 A' 8.13 r-n>. I.j-l HHMW Today iblc i •YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS" •TUCSON RAIDERS" Slnrnng Wild Uill ELLIOTT Gabby HAYES RiMoul Tomorrow i. 3d A 8.15 p.m. H. public Double Robert ARMSTRONG •EXPOSED" mid • THE LAST' BANDIT" Wild Hill ELLIOTT rorrcal TUCKER SUSPENSE ACTION MURDER I %  I IMIIM -Ml KllAi. -I 111" 4.30 A 8.15 p.m. FOX v; OPENING (.!(!£ I The ALL STAR TALENT COMBAT, MIGHTIEST OF ALL WESTERN ADVENTURES! TECHNICOLOR ^-9 P(a(). red* m ihe ma> JIM) lie i. ih. Im %  tupen II. ih 10. I\int il. plMii I nnd In ii.fviMfid : I. \vni poua*r* X iSi . noi.m T. I*H II %  M. Auiinm mi.i.iii n M I %  T. R. EVANS eV WIMIItlllA DIAJ. 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 11*. %  .re.la. .. i.mn I i II .teM im I. c.uaier. i*t J Ve*M -ii I*. I*r*-nii*i t V L>.' Ul A lui'idrtKi berurr IU Pmm Hie noiiai" ! SI3.04I Each ALUMINIUM >INKS AM) DRAIN BOARDS Only Si'.II.IKI Each Size i 3b" x 1114' \ 0 • Obtalaabbf Iron iu Hardware Department Telephone No. 20M a THE IIAIIIIAIIOK I O-OPERATIVE IOTTOX FACT99V vwn.



PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY ICGl'ST 22, IS51 IIMillMMIv \|l\n< \|T IWI.I BKVI..N CLASSIFIED ADS. !" "? !" L SHIPPING NOTICES wx nn TflLIPMONI I BO I Ml t^r O Callm* the %  .. .pel ...tJ far r.rh IVrnu ia*irhonr u*o b.twaen I a -'.0 4 i m n:j for Dni> 4pm FOR SALE Miatawiaa clu'oe iwt Ti mil a-d M rawla 9i.adai>t M leo'dt — uifr 14 wa-dj 1 *att a u-ord u<*--4 mil a u oH om 5n4avi. DIED AUTOMOTIVE %  %  %  IABTht!ir IM Mortal ,: p. r'ccl •M Mini u|*hol-ter> -rid RM 'ir parti, ul-.-apply: %  dm Aganrlai 1)4 Ring W i. U.IMH n MM. In '/arlisle Bay ri.irTov TORVE T. ..n apprwM I I1U4 RUN. Cppar (t.v SI ippc-iT* Yachl and Aq.,1. : • A(i|>4on premU*. i a M HAIiHISON LINE 00TWARD FROM TH2 UlftTED KINGDOM Veasc! Lear. %  %  I.' Swoet %  .1(1.1~ >. Puna, •• %  ihr above tnd-f il I I p } for MouM Tabor Churn MilliceM Par.l. if S A I. 'daughter-. Clement PartiHIM -It IN MEMOK1AM i • %  Mi %  Xu d*l :hBind of Ai.(u>l 1B4S ( %  one but not forgotten r Clinch >*o" Jrflrr R.ph. fill II AX MirM'i.ni:Ms HOI IDAV RESORTS-Grenada Ulc of Spire* SANTA MAHIA—ovalie*! hotel In Caribbean Ratal Iron* 17 00 per head per da. GRAND HirTaTL m b**l realdential dlrtriel under Gov-ininfil Houac I from |S CO per head per day SEASi:>l. MM <>n Grand Anaa Bathing t>ea.ri Hatei fit*" M 00 par head per r"aj. Ki.q.lrlr* lo D M Sllngrr. Grenada. IV Dream* Kali. Chstel Chuteh CAR itM.I', in t <;itAor %  K.. er ..•I condittaav TORT -TO Ta>pno v 44 I IM : It4* Plymouth Car. .1. IN %-u Hall 14—• AppH Coemopolila Carage VLifanne 1-ne Dial 3B1S %  1 a %  i Blue W.l.tm T. i* %  >" With •*"•. cupboardPT,.-,. jaaaai MTti-iii. PVrNlfMKO m.itRituM Win, Zm o %  iha* 1..1 lad* M •Ida Retrain *> or.* 4T before • % %  •"" aa 11—. KWDAl I ft. ,.. v ,, adjoining Barbara. MgajOO Model i Stone Bungalpw 1 In ill now j am I all ulual office* Garage ., "ASTRONOMER" S S FRESNO STAR \NTtR" s s •SCHOLAR*' TOR" \'l'V1"JI %  j Q BigDW 8lh Aug i l(Hh Aug. 18th Aug Bnd Aug. Mill AUK Due lln'^ii.i • 2ii Aim Mlk Aug. Hi Sept. Hth Sept 9th Sfpt HOMKWARD FOS TEH UNTT1D KIK&DOM Clntet in Prtf Oarbnd.'M Nv*m i %  %  Hatkiai Trit.ce o\rUHl ^.. %  ,.„ ., Ki.-ledae ol latlx *pl Manager. L4MM 1 %  %  UIVArfta F>i :.. %  r ii> peraon B10 a m loda. Mait.e.l < CoaM 11 1 n tin I ..I .At -. i H %  | I ... IV .!! %  .1 %  I i .i. i i .m i raw km < I I, /'/ I \ / / > Vraarl AHVISFi; MISni.l.WHU'N End Am ivhMl • M \i %  For further information apply tc DA COSTA A CO.. LTD. Afnti 111 rbil.lJ-.1i aiu %  31 • lAII.OI. A SO\S Mil. A pul %  StrauKtin • IIIUJriAH 1MI Six maaiin. aU inm • ••rni Irbruart 1M|, ( and 11 ion aa lue Pnone V de Vntenlle 4111 da> Dial HIV Mn Stuart Mnuitati it y I Canadian National Steamships i % %  ••. Rn. wMi DatM %  Babflp % %  -. • OJMTRICAl *e*-eKlid||ri in (i_m n Beard. S( J.I me* beloiiBtni i rrawMfe taf AI.. an WOOD A pores ajtrat i •OI'TBROt'NIl %  1-ADV Ml BOK CAN CRUISER CAS (111 I.ADV HdDMV CAN CtlKSTRl'tTiUt LADV Nl n *et I Ul n w.i viiiamu *.! A..U.. It-.l— 1 ., s,-37 Sept %  IB Cki %  aH. BMrhaa — r.raa.< • %  . iaSi H K. OCI 11 I.I %  1 I., w \MI i> to m \ HOURS itn lano %  %  -ill pate. TO I H.liKt a Kept M Bai Armei M.alreal II Repl I o,i I Nun LUXOR CLEAR (.IONS VARNISH man 1. VI \ nil IV. %  | c. ,„.. |.Llill~llrJ I M.l I. Illlltitill Ltd. i ,i ..i i.i.i it %  ii HI .\ 11 Kin 111 I MUM (rl. l>ararhial Eczema Ifch Killed In 7 Minutes I II I OH II \t -l.N til NOTICE H hereby given that all p tng any debt or claim upon urTactlng the eatate ol CIIITord Am Hall. S... i liland on 11" 1Mb day ol March. II ara hereby required to lend in particular* ol lhalt claim* duly aimlad to ui Charlea Carlton Brown*. Dougla* Norman Roblnuw. .md Georce Lawrence Farmer c O Hulcb1 4 RanfieUI. Boliulort. Jama* Rtreel. Brldgo*n. on or before Ihe 71h day t* Oc.ober. IK) after which data we •hall proceed lo diitrlbut* the aaBBta of the laid aatate amon Ihe parlie. enlltlr-l rt.< h.i-ina legard lo Ihe dcbti i* only of which r* ahall > had notice and that a .li.li b any prrnn of who** debt . ahall inot have had notice at ihe lime of auch glfltj IDUUO*, indebied lo tha aald 111* their Bt> gflUTral without delay. •> Dated tbla 3rd day of Augu.1. IM CHARUS CABLTON nB(>WNK DOUGLAS NORS4AN ROBINSON '.Mm.' LAWRIINCF KAHMEH. ij alillcd rarcuton ol Will Of Clifford Aufltn Fiald-. dacaatad YES WL SOLD IT .iOII\ M. KB. \IMI.\ A CO. lli:.\l. ESTATE \i.l\is til I IIIM IIIS t ii' i i ilallent' Bnildlaa i I I HI till TELEPHONE DIRECTORY MiU R| i I'KI IVXKt-l) MI may require No rhuigvs t;tn iRMtJaj afiei iba ;I^I ..I lusitst, IMI I \h.i LasUng*! %  S2 M K\KBM0S lill.l'HDNr fiOYERNMENT Pleas, ipply to The i I iit.ni id l I %  which will lm i latMifled Bctto 99 Bl iil:'i'tnN nl SI. Vlnrrnt Application* nw niviiwi ttW pott! Ol Sui'lllf MatftanT. Miitiiciiijticai Maator, and two Musters for General SubtvU 2. The Mathematical Musler will be required lo tettch liatbt* main's. :iinl T :n tOaion Chtinitta*) Uld Botany, up to the Higher Scho.il CwtUIi lt Standard. .1 Ai.i.licjitU should InC.raduales or holders of the Inter Ait* or li.tei Science or Higher Sch->o.l CatrtlliCaVtta. The salaries offered (a) For Graduates $1440 $00 to $1920. (b) For Inter Arts etc. $1200 by $72 to $1440. The commincing salaries will depend on experience and standard '.of work. i 4. Ability to take eharn ol UM Cadet Corp* will be taken into %  onsideration. 5. Application should reach the Education Office as soon * possible, aa Uie successful candidates will be expected to assume duty art the beginning of next Term on loth September C. V. D. HADLEY. Education Offlci St Vincent, B.W.I. 7th August. 1951. 17.8.5!ABVMmnSE in thf till COLONIAL .DVF.RTISINO \\W\KW .DOS) liriiiv tow it MOMINGCOUGHS blood, thua iiib-aand In, n 'i.-l ftU %  GOVERNMENT NOTICE I MVKKSI'fV OK CAMBRIDGE LOCAL EXAMINATIONS SYNDICATE OVERSEAS SCHOOL CERTIFICATE EXAMINATION 1S52. All persons desirous of sitting for the 1952 Cambridge School Certificate Examination and who do not fall within the following ( i.tegorie*: O) Full time pupils of schools approved by the LVpartmer' Education as eligible to present school candidates for I School Certificate Examination: (II) Candidates who already hold a School Certificate or Jua School Certii,. .r UaMUeoaaafful entrants for the 1950 School Certificate Exam-| inilion who have not re-entered In 1051, but who obtain an authorisation from the Syndicate to re-enter in 1952; (ivj Candidates who will bo taking the School Certificate Examination in December 1951. (Such candidates will be allowed ike the examination in December 1952 unless they an notified that their performance In the 1951 examination does not Qualify them to re-enter in 1952.) (v) Candidates who pa**d the Qualifying Test held in January 1951 but who are not taking the "tchool Certificate Examination in December 1951 -" t\X trie Qualifying Teat fo be held on rhe Srh Jdnnaru. I9i? Fmms of entry for the Qualifying Test may be obtained on appli.. the Department of Education. Garrison, and are to be returned duly completed together with the sum of $2.40 and a copy of the Birth Baptismal Certificate to the Department nm larer rhon Tuesday the 2nd October, 1951. Department of Education. 9th August 1*91. ll.a.Sl—in WORLD'S I CHOICE IM TYRES GOODYEAR I ^ "JO-LIFE hAPDLST.WFARiN'i.TYRE! UU II—IMI THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO.. LTD. VICTORIA STREET



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PACI SIX IIAKIIAIHis \I)V(K \TI WEDNESDAY. Al'CHST 22, 151 GlandsMadeYounq -Vigour Renewed Without Operation iMinai in IMM form. ""T "J EJABHSW nan: .bte 1 all •>MMI >' %  "* Vi-TM from i -L* l2Tii^t hour. T.I.. — ;(,• I-..IH*. p*f*Btr. thai It %  •* Mh* •eu lull * IUM. •"••* %  *• _T!^ !" 7: ... JZH S£&£ir£i'£X IHK MJ tin /7 tv i> im SACROOL Get a bottle from KNIGHTS HUH, STORES NOW! Dental Science Reveals PROOF THAT BBUSHINO TEETH RIGHT AFTER IATINO IS THE SAFE, EFFECTIVE WAY TO HELP STOP TOOTH DECAY with Colgate Dental Cream IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash anc' Credi 1 customers for Monday to Wednesday only dually Now Usually NOW 61 M Ovaltine 154 132 47 12 Macaroni Cheese 40 :I6 Jacobs Cream Crackers (Pkgs.) 49 10 Vegetable Soup 31 28 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street GOOD BOOKS ARE \ GOOD COMPANIONS r NOVELS JUST OPENED . *'V THE MINISTRY OF FEAR — by Graham Greene CREATURES OF CIRCUMSTANCES — by W. Somerset Maugham AN OUTCAST OF THE ISLANDS — by Joseph Conrad AT THE ADVOCATE STATIONERY THE MOST MODERN IN TOWN


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Ul DM Mi \^ M (.1ST 22. ItSI n\Rn.\i>os \DV1H \TF, r.\(.i; iiHti.f. I)t'\w\ \A\I\A-> For \ i-il To Vlaska SEATTI r Thomas E. DPWW u f New York Itfl c*l a ril he described u< \hin the Yerk Governor scheduled to atheastern All neaday and Thursday. tig of A1.--.1 who uill be !>• during hi%  • *>ald UM .lu ily norm r %  \ %  %  kin i tillage D* vi planned to inspect military insUIlni! triiitorv. Ha said "Alaska i %  CHI the Pacific because • few mile* frOBl UM bOM armed aggressor In the I free MrM Id He •'; %  ..' %  .. that he H referring to Union He may I Much %  i n#ar future. •rn armed mi*hl." He said that thf Soviet Union In time mighl even ask the world to dia*r I V 3o,tA4/ Agg-^^^" j,in,..-011111, of Christian Mission Rota Hind Suspends Officer TAIPEH. Au. 21. Chiang Kai sink Lieutenant Genei.il II Chu as Deputy Commander of the Chinese Nationalist Air I delegate to the United Nat ions Military Staff Committee, ami ordered him to return ••• China immediately. The President in a nu.nd.it-' Man or "drreli.tn,,, of d disobedience of orders Mao, otherwise known a.' Lieutenant General p T. Mow had been the Nationalist A.i POrc* A \.\\ since the *pr>ng of IW3. The Government shen Chang-Huan Mid I %  was accused of: 1. Failure to give %  clear account of funds for the purchase of air force equipment t. The detaUcUori <>r duties, causing the loss u\ lighting power. % The espousal of the cause of disloyal staff member*. 4 The refusal to hand ov*f public fund-; —r.p. Romulo Will Sign U.S.—Philippine Treaty MAN1I.A. Aug. U. FoieiKii S*erttry Carlos Romulo .. IL on Wednesday for Washington for the signing of the new United StatesPhilippines Mutual Defence Treaty to strengthen Pacific defence, against Commun. sion. Romulo will be Ml Friday by ambassador C ort Monday by the i President Elpldino yu pact signing ceremonies for August 30. —v.r. MAIL NOTICES M-lli I..; M \ Had Rnl. V.i %  POI Off.rp at under — Nresl v n am Ordinary v. H : i SM Ausuit. 1041 Mill. • % %  ; I —rt.i A iKMton Haiti l**v Rudnr^ arlll %  %  r %  • n m.. Ore in* wn Anavti, IMI Battery Theft ntha* IIIIh hard labour am Clarence rear-oii Dayrelli Road, cimat chuuh by MI. Acting Police I District "A*. found guilty of the larf v.itued M t*2 26 and the prawn* Of Cole Co. : 7. Grant appealed at Poilee Ceautable w> Springer i 10 pin. on August 7 h v.i on duty along Swan Strati whan be saw Grant Me liecame usi.'ii him how he Orant toui I man named Herbert %  Of I 11s Road had given him the bntterv. e ,'Kvked with Haynes who said that he never gave a After this Grant he wn wrong and that the battery waa given to him by a man nnmed Wiltshire who works %  Will hire nl*o denied that he UM liilinilani Had Memory n attached t> the Centra] Police Station told the Court lhat on August 7 Police Constable Springer reported to him thai ha had arrest* % % %  Red Grant to tell him : (Irani said thai %  Hum named Jones, n motor mechanic, had given the battery to him About 6 30 t> m the same afternoon. Lionel Jones came t., the Station and was shown the buttery anil Qrant J 1 denied thai he gave Grant a battery. The defendant Wien Mild lhat Ins m< and that a man by lh< liad gtvao It to him. %  i ry was identified •perty oi Cola & Co. ere Suit Adjourned Until September 17 THE CHRISTIAN MISSION Chancery Sun rub adjourned until September 17. When the h on that day. Mr. Adams and Mr. W. W. rUec*. oouna*l ta the two parties, will put their case to His Lordship the' Vice Chancellor. Sir Allan Collymore. who Is precidinj Little more evidence remains to be taken. Contesting the suit are : Rev. Frederick Birron MX. others against R-v. Huyte and Otbtn The two parties are seeking a head declaration as to who were the Mr. Adams told him th.it there legally lonstituted General Suwaa a misunderstanding about the jjerintendeiit and Board of Mannature of the dlaiurbanei agt-nunt of the Christian Mission occurred on New Yeai's d.iv ]U4: during Itutt 1M0 and who are and ht uld wl.ni the i the present General Superintendopened nev Barrow, Rev Larrlei ent and Board of Management. and Rev, Moyta wan! in Ihe pulpr Rev. Barrow and his group are which is normally only ocrupie represented by Mr. W. W Reece. by one and there was mil ~ throwing about the church Work niv !.. K.C.. associated with Mr. J. S. Dear. instructed by Messrs Hut.hlnson . Banfleld. RV Hoyta and the others are represented hv Mr O II Adams associated with Mr. DHL Ward. Instructed by Mctsr* Car* rlngton Sealv "Peare" Cunlerencc Eid(r Laws, Becretar} of th. ChrisUau laaiatoil from June 2" IMI %  ) gave avldanee. He aaiii that on January i. g religiou* sei MM anu aalawulid to take place When he arrivid there was a great commotion IUn was thenend when he left, the di.lui baiu< oicitnjj (l ^ worse willi nein la f. ., IMS when llU( w ) kln| flbcul th ,. hu „. h i-heduled lo lake While they were li ele. beeausF of a rumour. the. %  Did Not Attend The ease Is that after a breakup on New Y a service was scheduled to take placet R*T Hoyie did not attend srss KSd-ss-M Sw <& T:weie.Hgal He aaid In evidence !" ?!* ay -**^! w that he notified other representatives that the m e e ting was illefaily convened and that they rhould nut altend V *5 ., in ., 1 walkef. Il rain coats alll rloua poMea suh-Siatiom thai HO dan'.agr was dona i" the rain Daa ttl ci C" hod the haavlaal rainfall up t n ., m yetterdaj when 35 parts i re recordeil. Other lion 10 parta, Di-tn.t A" la part*. Dlatrtet n" Boarded H.iii 13 pin*. Dtatrid '-D" 4 parts. District "W 23 parU, District "P* 18 parts HoMown JOUI parti KIosHudogh Rejects Stokes 1 Proposal t f'rom 1'air I l points, because they nested about, thai it .K heller to withdraw them, than • Ml on the table H? summed up the failure of his mission this way. "The Iranian people must make up their minds whether they want to play polii \ % %  .. nu alvoa, or i< Conduct liieir affairs on the sound asman .M ptinclOdlad in the proposal eiafinad as i 'spapers throughmit the [ran, and which will bring an era %  •' td nun people (or %  lonfl period and friendliness mid %  "I between Iran and Brit— v.r. T^inh-Eighl Dead SINGAPORE. Aug 20. eight people are be%  id following a violent und fire early to-day UM Si %  h tankci nromus while it was loading gasoline at I B 1.' uid iic.n here. -JCP) be, i*!SS *nway .vid.-nce M ,., ni wht ., hri „„. A1( 44+ %  ould et together It W| •r less a peace ,.! %  ..• Hamsay informe.l tin gathatfSl rdmpiiin, nu i_. ,, %  .L " what he had i I i M<" t.omplalri.nts from the other Hoyte-whethci the) would Stet that Hoytc gave other to nmCh SP „ie m ,.,,i 1( informed tliein that Rev. Hoytc had informed him that the meeting was illegal. He said that he himself had ducovared thai and inflrniatKiii of it larke continued with his contention thai I Super uitendent In appointc Mr. ] i 'hat the meeting question of bringing pleadings ui to date w;is considered In Chambers. AwailhiK Settlement Yesterday Mr Recce continued cross-examining Rev Hoytc for for January ITRad batn about 20 minutes when many ol t>\ Hcv I! to b* a the old points were again brourht meeting of the reDreaentatlvt out. Rev. Hoyie said that he had been advised that he was still Protests Issued Superintendent of the Chrlriian ||,. |, .„ %  • Mission and as long as there was Superintendent .. no meeting of the representatives. „, na „„, ri... |,. he would continue to be Superin,b : ,t Rev llovic wai willing ID teiident. admlt WM>nRS> ami throw hlmscU He Wai ^llMUM on a ;il thc niM)> of h e raoti final settlement by legislation and Custom Clerks Work Ovesfhna %  larb %  an %  ... ed during the past few weekiih book work Th* raaaan, .. ne warehouse tax I enlOrcad Which culls for much mire calculating and handling of money in that department. It is a 60c per ton tax or IV per cubic feel t,,v |,;,vabio for 0 on goods kept in the wnrehouae after thev tived in the Island. < axhbook OnUers and cashiers of the departments have MM .p>eiirlinK hours overtime so us to keen in stride with the Increase of work In fche department. Clerks of the various officeof the Citv have been i %  i. Custom fw the Ihraa waafcs than thev did befwe the tax wn* enforced Some of these clerks try then 'ing bond ifl J.iuiaira Dt'iilli I uli !{.; In li g> r rum I'age 1 the storm wai at* I Nautla is a town al % %  j.ooo poBUlauon li i that hurt* %  Mexico. .u> .i almost Squ.il!> I .: mill 0M sell. %  hied shipit: :'i, Oulf of M'-vi. i iin in p<>i mill all dangers have p.. itorm developed huirl< %  'lx days aqio on moving into th 'aribbean Sea. from |ha Ml I atmo* 2.800 miles along in araat-northaaal truck ViK 100 mile an i lilt no deaths Ucntl) bulll pauv l nd off the east oaal of me Panlnnda wt town Martda capital I \ i %  p of •( % %  %  i",| be.iv y rains ige %  ramalcal majoi Ineorra v> mil ,'l'i'ut !to per cent of the i tand'i otiioi en % %  • 11 rulnad Instructor Telia Of JYa llurrit-ani a, 1 rui PgfS I s well 1 %  %  Mr H. %  %  Tha I i',i infi %  i g. Al %  '.o,.it.iinv extended them b) the v i ion mu unanunou t) adopti nut -in h Dooi i ratlve coursi -in .to*ion % %  •MHII. NeW! Stayt on longer than powder! n m %  it r And i' netSf drying. an"t Spill! %.r Pn..d An,.l Ti' H ll>* mail r hirdtus; m coror#ir4--ll maa#-up yU*e clotn*. ITS ertri to in* Y OU will ir dugJ>id wiih 'Ovaliina asiiad Cold. It li (ha idetJ hoi wMtbai drisk . dclictoualy cool, ourtshlng mJ iiiaiaiat%  II imiad iimr halih-|lTfata| Ihc world', OKI i i -. iag. BT preparioe OvaJUnc of boi — you enjoy th qmmlltim thai have ma popular food beverage. Tbli •cteetific combination of NatuiVi food* provide* important nutritl-a eLea Uadudlng vitamin*, of tha uta*o*t value in pinmutlog phviical 6tn** sod abuadaiit vitaUtvAn occnalonal |la** of Cold Ovsltine' during the da* will help qu.ckly (o revive nagging •trength and energy. It I* enellT pre pa r e d b\ adding Ovsltine to cold milk, ov milk and ,.-, wntor, and mixing (horoughly wtth a wblV a*^L ormathaknr. 7 1 f^~m_ OvaltineCoKd Eneryisiny-Reireshinij-Delieious prjJH SaU ta mrUgU •*• by aii C*e • The Angha is unsrl, "inp.n I. powerr^ by the lamoui Fonl 10 dp. engine, r.|inpp'd with fsrrllent brakes, in i I %  %  (.!. %  le nxitu for lour big peiiple and all tlicir luggage tan be tj accouiiiKMlatcd in tUr • IfajM loua DOOb I ha Anglia u • BriiainS lowest priced %  aaartco 'I 11 h I %  % % % %  %  */ Mllinmnll al .m furl HtMl • all on III faf I lull d. inni%  li.iiinu awl fur ilri.iili %  •! OUI KM ial -' rl r nV lUtaSSL CHAS. MC.ENEARNEY Co., Ltd. Sfc. CAN THIS BE POSSIBLE? YES! THE NEW "KITCHENCRAFT" WATERLESS COOKER • Cooks 4 Dishes with one Heat • Conveniently shaped for preserving boiling and stewing • Excellent for serving foods at picnicr, It,,,, ....I., Ir.,nt... I Hi: COmNEB SIOHE



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' PACK FOI'H BARBADOS ADVOCATE WF.DSKSDW AUGUST 22, IS1 BAKBADOSAmD€rfTE t,.~-—i -f—. -i PrlBlf4 hj Ih* A4>< %  Brtai II. flrldolawn WWIMMUJ ASSJUSI It is:,i ECONOMICS THE Ri in Barbados in M another round *f ditcUMton in another aspect of the economy of the Caribbean area. Earlier ihi jynchronsied with that of the Caribbean Commission and the topics were the and dollars fui expanding Weal Indian trade with Canada. Today with national atmosphere and thi British Industrial power from pee production to the re -.. there an trade and commerce and leM 'i expand our trad* with ranads That trade has dwindled. .1 1 result of Brttlal policy following devaluation of tl • sterling, from a total <>i BS million dollars 10 %  mere token. It is in the light of these condltl) the Issues arising tram the vaxis trade that the Committee begin then MCond meeting One Item on Iheii which will demand < tlotl lfl the Report of the Oils and Fall which has Just concluded Iti consideration of the presenl price ol copra, 'I'l 1 re is more than tl a me pel ment of cooking oils and fats 111 M Mdeiations. The price oi eoprs the basic Ingredient must of course aJtecl the price ol the finished article OS supplied to the West Indian market, and it is with thil the question that the Committee will he ly although n>t solely COt The industry which has just h. %  lished hi and with the Conference keeping Its finger an the •f trade, lias been able toss West Indian market from the um and continuously rising prices demanded by .is manufacturers. The Oils and Fata Conference met to convuler m detail the lie,ut vs in ronm-elion with the industry, if bai been argued thai Its deliberations should have been made public, but it might be Mid In roph; thai as the report was to be furnished to the i Economic Committee publication might 1 well have been until it had been finally discussed. This is only one phase ol the work of the Regional Economic Comn wiih the all-important task ol watching erven the economic health of the area, it 1 1 true that Its decisions an ratification by the Governments of the various colonies but they neverthelees give dlrec tion as to the course which might be followed in finding solution to the various problems. When the West Indian Conferei for the first time in 1944 in Barbados it was realised, and emphasised by the late Mr. Charles Taussig. one of the architects of the Conference that the only hope for the West Indie:; was to have the problt D the area settled on a regional basis. Since that time sincere anil sometimes sue* ful efforts have been mi d< to 1 Mow this course bai it been overlooked by the architects of West Indian destiny, thai isfactory political achieved on a basis of a healthy West Indian economy. This is not an easy task In an area thickly populated But II is such a task the i;< iona Bi non It Committet I to perform Eta arork will be followed with the greatest interest In this Island %  %  %  it has already proved its worth, and thro., h .' the Oai ibhaan by tl 0 p> | whose f ;t te ban] 1 "ii it:, decisions. Tension. I^isB and Wrsl %  %  IU 11 I ROM 11 %  %  MU %  \ bar ..1 %  %  and rejoD 1: %  their Governn %  . 1 %  ttaeauon for tait.ng trm %  Ball matter, in I I ] vlofc %  lid va ro ihintt war. \:.i MW we niusi DBS! t<> %  •• I'll** 4*rrul Lorl Of llir IhMri Ibn Saud, King With 150 Sons And £50,000 A Day Its <.l KALI) MJUffff A TALI., hook-nosed Arab prince brought an air of the desert to the Sussex Downs the comimi,, t (oi ret service o( all UM ill go OV< I I %  iviish Governmerr Thi menuonsd %  M put 0O die deliver? ol the Hilled. The British governMODERMSRD AND FULLY STOCKED WITH THE FINEST BANG! OF BOOKS • AIM 0< \ I I VIAIIOMIIV lV/AW////( u Interest, particularthe Hedjaz Foreign Mi ulster oi Saudi-Arabia in upholding the ,_, ,__, ,_„ f Pt-„„, mum emissary of his powerful father. King Ibn. elaimcd the handsomest Arab of time* of peace. Trie ..II The Comnuukdai, .ng, in later aaa in. The danger roundly dsni %  %  ma in%  of Briti-n quakerat In I On the Danube nothing flows monthly. In Hungary we did not know that so many BerOU He has a pale bronze comgrave mien and bold. dart ayes, He wears flowing ith white and gold r-e.,..i nt •A Nubian bodyguard, armed with bejewelled dagger and pistol, accompanies him. I Mill HISM. 10.IHHI Horses s day at the races was a day off during his tenday \Lsit to Britain as guest Qovernmant t ke up %  .e. the mem AH I point OUT : „„. to torn io 'ihr Pi b MaUk almost nl 'I ...K, aim .... %  I • know th.a so man> 11 n jotirnf>s b> plane ana car. rmar Ministers. lon.iei ^nig Alxlul Aziz Ibr. Saud, now over 70, Judgw, capitansis, PiiSjnaag -nao. ..tii "th.. I'mmwell of the Desert." i ti and other "carrion*' still has hetn <.iikd in. ciomweu oi ine uestn. rod until tinnea wa land the Hedjaz, Imami "'''"' '-'' wc *' k ,hul * many 1 ..f iho w-h-.hu CiiM-diari of Ihe Holv Cities tr-i.t the • I % % %  <-. trn i '" >%  "'•", , , \ i romnanti ol the Porthytto ro..t Mecca and Medina and Lord ot Arabia. %  % %  Many are n 11 : autocratic ruler a warrior-states-1 1 uue>tion whoUMf Hie longer. The last B I % %  %  <• ^ %  *•* v ton, and of ti.< No BuropMi inxearu no foe but always ISI ainfj pence. M III A P niraele wrap with a honored uses tn Kitchen and Home HYGIENIC. GREASEPROOF, MOtSTU REPROOF. FIREPROOF. ODOURLESS For protection and preservation of cooked and uncooked foods. For better, quicker and more economical cooking. For i msSSS %  alllll of spece in fngidalre and larder. Moulds to any shape and requires no tying nor fastening. washing-up and scouring to t>>e minimum. BUY A ROM. TO-DAY. WILKINSON & I1AYNES CO., I.TD. Successors to A dashiruj rider himself-his father owns ;* {> C PITl^HPP Rs C*C\ 10.000 Arab hor* FVlsaJ today in-' \-/. OrilV^nCIV Ot V^V^. > Phones: 4472 & 11187 — BBCKW1TO STORES | %  UH lie %  i travel ol i %  Until no %  %  i %  %  1 • %  1 I. ..!'.. I'' %  WOUKM DO time* in his flghttns days, th ., ...Hi.. Una now devotes hit lift to KxUrlng the^ %  red In, Thij wttm Mmdev proipcrlty of Suudi-Arubiu—one ol the ,„,„,, oil .mon^aod his ...can, „ta VI11 Ul suffranca Why? Even a total iu tari.nn government must haVS for arrest %  %  re straws thai blow In Arab Federation. NO DANCING is baaed on the Koran. His subHi-. nitthen thai the wind. The wlml is blowing ,,-t•. are the ITJOft n-luiious of all Moslems thai ii % %  %  "i -.11 the world. .loiiiin \> Inlo 1984 Hi. ( %  oliliii.irk llirs a %  •' a|ioii i ih. ...hi war.... %  ml /erii liom is Jt..iO l€i-iii|(1il i liili-il IsVrliii BERUN. the man who like* io play chamber mush b b lt> ..I OKfil t %MI'I V lln .Mln TV. i ii:.Iron Curtain i will !%  iii.u Rral .utit of iele> kshm, fi whan Mi iv III have But probably Switzerland. %  VtT 1 i travelled 15.000 mil Britain Is not in the schedule. ti .ik. 45. married with three Children, i* I man who yesMrda> wai bulloana loo %  Ha invented the tng-playinir gnuno) aaord us I da weetern ,,,,„.. lv nf hli n) X[ \, llt project— ''' in'mii* vision on cinema screens in —oclatton the autumn. OFFICE FURNITURE by SWKKi Sill I IMIN I.IU. WhiUth.u-..nri ,,i rouni TV will bo a novelty. Communist* %  tMsetieB i -i ; %  'ill lllKl the purades. „„„„:„,,,, unusual. A %  %  .. % % %  iUlT'. TOaSaS ronviricingly dressed in Tyrolean ..ulllls, he prepared his 1984 i 1951 Io see. : 7*u. ivWyi "'!'' art in: to lake ly. sporU items >-th. aft. ,„.,!,.,,:..|J.|, Malta UM I"':,„ I lllm, stuKc und rad The manic is television hundi %  %  %  |0 then '• %  '•" '•' %  ough rorrldon packed many ol iiut in Berlu . nd with magic %  I -' brought Utto Oern rfiltoo which 10 \ Ami m 1 stormed h. %  -.. MM our But Ihe BW Orwell %  %  I"' 1 '" "I I rial the i. i !!h '' 1 w h %  coleur l9M| with the col ""•*'' wnich %  %  ''"' %  '"' *" : • pita! Derations. %  __.-,... Hi lan-boni scientist Jmd ( oln. Idence ..i.i In Studio Si\ Will Lhl TV C. Id war be elfecUvel Win the Iron Curtain youth be tempti to see for LvoiT Perhapi Studio Sut provides an Here at MAS. the i ponsored i.utio station, politi-.illy minded youths tn.in the Bastern Sector are Kathcnng lo listen to the voice .if the west. They aro not invited they Just HUM' Mill wearing their Festival blue shirts. They come la large numbers, boys and girls whose %  use age is 14. to study th There la no smoking, drinking, or dancint;. ilv martial music. Penalty lor theft Is mutilationthe left hand Gut oft" for the first offence, the ri^ht for the second. Murderers aro still publicly beheaded in Ihe captial city of Riyadh. The U.S. oil company which now pays the SauoU-Arabian Government (largely Ibn Saud and Suns) half its profits for the COI „ cession employs no Jews for fear of offending i Moslems. The 8,000 Americans in the oil centre of Dhahran have no church, and Christian prayer books are banned. C.I> WORKS Ibn Saud is said now to have an oil-income of more than £50,000 a day. Half the money is reported to go into his personal treasure. or in subsidies to sheiks owing him allegiance. The other half is being spent <>n public works. Including a 600-mile railway, a £2.000.000 road to Medina being built by I id itiah tiiin. new harbour buildings, hospitals Chools, and a new British-built water ,; Heir-apparent and Prime Ministci is 40yaar-old Emir Saud, who once saved his father from an assassin's dagger. Another son. the Emir Michel is nov OeMinister following the doutn Ibro'her, Manaour. Vet other sons hold OovMASTERFORM DESKS TYPISTS DESKS TYPISTS CHAIRS DESK CHAIRS CUPBOARDS FILING CABINETS (Foolscap) DA COSTA & Columbia and the i;. % %  my, ne mv %  I ,... %  %  [V^ wvfce. Deren ye. %  i inonstraUon I % %  %  !' I i -11 -1> i Io do with thiComaiunlsl V null "ecroM Ihe road" UM I %  . coincidence thai the two seanti Uier, Bui -hey are making it known M-ttors ,,„. arorid ,..;„„ ,.,,„,,. hl roany labour hour; does it tnke i York laboratorlei ol the i'.ityvide a sultT • Mc., th. holy city 01 ihm children ShO %  I ask; questi as like "How I lltH'KS* Sl.KKP ]l€ ,i Mi's and others answer the Larted arork on It; today "" n ll, d Ll1 "' Bu the con .,..,: | .,,,,! Q, veraauons are never broa the US Oovemmanl and two' hi,ve watched their laces. lOM me now going They are tense, m.rtnldlike. They HM tan Pi hnps Dr. Goldtuj io iuv down their m ,rk anuelpatln the orwcllian doUars world can help t prevent ii actBrllata? No ,mlly "PP C "'nark work' n ' Aettesi HI to\ .HI ti for One thing Is certain. In Berlin • Be tvelopraoo) <>r colour TV. (odaj 1 •> new phase is opening in Item lost him He took Ihe baltlt I'uu Saud'a whitewashed coral palaces have %  it \ There are ramps which enabl* the king 11,-m Hiieslions warn thorn not to take JJJ .,, a j '' dllva his car into the palace rims The king is 6ft. 4ins. He starts w :k before dawn, sleeps four hours a night, arc. drinks tin. ifter cup of scented bitter coffee. Soldiers ii picturesque robes line the pnlo^e corndi rs. Bodyguards squat with golden .".words their knees. Doves (lit throunh the cloisters. IT'S III iti .ir.M/.v IJONIIH: II \IIHI: CLOTH L\ A tlBMM QUALITY 50 INCHES WIDE At s-J.r.7 ,,.-, Yard. ALSO B1RKMYRE GREEN CANVAS 72 INCHES WIDE At 7.i:t ,>• %  •• Yard. GREEN WATER-PROOF CANVAS 72 INCHES WIDE At SJt.jr, i„; Yard. • %  >VOM\ fy CO. LID. DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT .-***v*v>v,^.v^^ ,*,' f *,',*,*S,*SSSW a oil his expert knowledge from the (acto| UV Rue. led 1 Ol I opoly, .hw a war eorrr*pohdent. But where Ihe advent ol colour TV ii that is what he u m thidMdad ,.n eventuality ns ihe %  %  todar, arfaeri telavlalon has meal rationing. Is its nrat nppearenre on the and white pict i ...u Noe Ihhi cello-pUylni iclentiit world'i peychol ekal warfare tc Ith Ul Ihfc and retlrfront. KI7S,000 i i. A Ins mann* i iAmi rero hour is 840 tonight creed and bUi caravan aeroi whan Dr. Ooldr ,rk and nearly "' .'"'' OP* i.-chi *,, ,nto action. Berlin his TV learn and World Cop; [hi Rceerved %  tress t i II .-nl will K<> to France end —LE.s. I*II rlnsa Plastic Surgeons Chalk lip A New Success Bj CHAPMAN PiNCHEB : i Tfihug. art iti' winch ...| ij enable piaatta l did Injured bii %  -. %  %  l . %  ihetr woui %  %  %  %  I %  DI8COVER1 Ke I I %  %  %  %  %  DUCOVUtl Ne %  %  %  %  V I I r A I I ll<.ll-lH %  %  %  %  itclf%  So each graft gets a %  %  %  %  \-ii.> \. ill eat i Thai Garter . ^ \ BtsnTOBl %  II IH I shnma %  1 %  %  The king wean only home-spun robes and lbs battle <•( Ideas A bdevltloi ,. British Army socks. MU WIVES? He has an extensive harem. One uf his sons, Talal, has admitted that he does nut know how many brothers he baa. A reference book credits the kin^ with ;i2 -"ii-. hut ofitoial registers In tdraign missions at Jitldah record about 150 sons, accordin^ tc i Cairo report £ No mention is made ol ;t large number of's He has probably had 200 wives, *>u\ man) *• oi the marriagea have been political. At one. ; I said his OWn %  II ml si| iini nui peaae." Dr Murru lalted %  Why %  aid Ladj Balls) uq be wearinn a garter 100 ymn befoi T if n i ;, d or Dr. Hurra) v i strtsr wai UH W of the i council), K pn -ChnsinieaUon i 13 \ • .pi,-, in Old religion new Chi I | Ballsl ,.,. bsei %  %  %  i: In four Garter Ol %  I i ENJOY DELIGHTFUL SNACKS I <*$$ FOR SNACKS 1 : .ickcr: %  Red t'heeio rnnartlan CtterMet Che< n '. %  Cheese oi Tins DaaWi Ctaaasa i Cheese Tuborg pjssf r. A %  A.Worlhinglon Al,. I do" tor hint by pi ICJ %  OLACB i When In 11I4J Ibn Saud presented Mr. Churchill with a gold and Jewel-encrusted dagger, he received in return six bottles of > Dutch Ed. perfume. ;* It was a wj The king bai that, like the Prophet, he has three SOUU jj life—."Women, perfume and prayer." * He preys live times daily. He once spent ^ Qotden Tr.-o Bee 00 on perfume fur the ladies of his harem ^ British economic Influence Is growii I'liotnoie: Peisals tWl b toneerned w iih Middle liiist atvUeasa, the Analo-Kaurii\i.ihi.in in-.itv of friendship, and minor fronln i MI lilir.it n>n^ London b\pre-u Ser\ ice. I MEAT DEPT. SPECIALS IH tin Strawberry Jam .94 I '•_ %  tin Raspberry Jam .48 1J tin Orange Jam 48 Ieiris Kola Tome SI.00 per bottle Crushed Pineapple 48 CEREALS SBJSJf \I:I:I\ I l' Kelloa-g Corn Flake-i Kellog's All Bran Quaker Oats JhifTed Wheat PrutT Wheat Heinz Spaghetti & Cheese CORN! FUKEsI ..blei j raono COBBAMBS w e DOJVK* ;;