Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
ESTABLISHED 1895

Hour



General Backs

Bone Of Contention) Aid To Japs

U.N. ADVANCE

BASE, Korea, Aug. 16.

"THE CEASE FIRE negotiators turned the dead-

locked problem of

an armistice buffer zone to

a four-man sub-committee for solution and then
recessed to await its report. The sub-committee will
begin work in Kaesong at 11 a.m, on Friday, under

a virtual news blackout.

The Communists accepted

the United Nations proposal for the sub-committee

on the 16th day of the

deadlock over the location

of a cease-fire line across Korea, and the establish-
ment of a demilitarized buffer zone between the

opposing armies.

The biggest step yet toward,

breaking the stalemate on the
conference agenda was taken
at the 55 minute meeting, one
of the shortest sinee the truce
talks began on July 10. The
Reds suggested onky one

change in the UN proposal—!

that the sub-Committee com-
prise two delegates from each
instead of one.—U.P.

Commission Chief
Sees Lebanese

Y . a rs
Foreign Minister
BEIRUT, Aug. 16.
Leon Marechal, Chairman of the
Conciliation Commission who ar-
rived at Beirut, saw the Lebanese
Foreign Minister, Charles Helou,
0 “hursday in an attempt to per-
suade Lebanon to accept even in-
direct talks with Israel.
Informed sources said Helou left

de







Lebanon’s answer in the balance
until a joint decision had been
taken by the Arab states. Mare-
chal left for Damascus on Thurs-

day on a similar mission return-
ing to Beirut on Friday and then
leaving for Jerusalem, Tel-a-viv
and Cairo. Marechal stressed that
direct negotiations is not a “sine
qua non” condition. He said the
Arab sgates already negotiated

1948 at Geneva on the same
isis. —U.P.



Colonies Invited
To Supply Talks

LONDON, Aug. 16.

Britain Thursday invited other
Commonwealth Governments to
confer here in September on prob-
lems connected with the supply

nd production of raw materials
and manufactured goods.

The Treasury in announcing the
invitations said the Colonial Em-
pire also would be represented.
The conference is expected to he-
gin on September 24, and last
about a week. —U.P.

Storm Threat Gone

MIAMI, Aug. 16.

The tropical storm that started
out to look like a hurricane, and
which crossed the Caribbean to-
ward Puerto Rico is no longer a
serious threat to the island, Con-
the Weather Bureau had
expected to rebuild the storm to
hurricane strength, failed to ma-
terialise during the night

Forecasters said this still might
occur later but it would be north
and west of Puerto Rico,

The centre of the disturbance
located at 5 a.m. about 30 miles
south of the island of St. Croix
or some 1,400 miles from the
southern tip of florida. It appeared
to be moving west-northwestward
about 18—20 miles per hour.
—c.P

cition



TO-DAY’S WEATHER
CHART





Moon; Full.

Lighting Up: 7.00 p.m

High Tide: 2.29 a.m. and
3.36 p.m.

Low Tide: 9.25 a.m. and 9.31

p.m.



U.S. Oil Industry Only Needs Supplies

‘Ttaly Asks US.
To Extradite
Secret Agents

_ ROME, August 16.

_ The Italian Court asked the
United States about the extradi-
tion of two formers American
secret Agents who are charged
with the killing of their wartime
ge behind German lines in
aly,

One of these agents subsequent-
ly studied law at Lima, Peru, and
was employed by Panagra. The
Court of Assizes at Novara in
Northern Italy, demanded the
former United States Army Lt.
Aldo Icardi of New York City
and Sergeant Carl G. Lodolce of
Rochester, New York, to be ex-
tradited and tried under Italian
law for the murder of Major
William Holohan.

The body of Holohan 41 years
old, now en route to the United
States by ship was recovered from
Lake Dorta, last year, with a bul-
let hole in the base of the neck
Holohan headed the office of
Strategic Services Mission which



WASHINGTON, August i6

Top army officials told Con-
gress recently the United States
must continue its “Reorientation”
rogramme to keep the Japanese
rom succumbing to Communism.

Brigadier General A. L. Ham-
blen, special assistant for the
occupied areas, testified on funds

needed for occupation costs in
hearings before the House of
Appropriations Committee in

June. Testimony was released on
Thursday. Hamblen told the
Committee the Army is not ask-
ing for money for economic aid
for Japan, but he said indoctrin-
ation programme must go on.

U.P.



parachuted into Italy behind the

German lines late in 1944,
a radio operator, They succeeded
in making such contact and es-
tablished headquarters at the lone-
ly village of Niovo on the shore
of Lake Dorta.

Holohan carried a black brief-
case containing $100,000 in gold
On December 6, 1944 according
to a police report, Icardi and
Lodolee were playing cards in the
kitchen of a villa with several
Italian partisans,

Loser Was to Kill

Major Holohan was asleep in
the bedroom ill from attempted
poisoning by the plotters, The
loser in the card game according,
ite the report had to go upstairs
[end kill the Major.

Holohan was shot twice through
the head while he was sleeping
and his body was dragged to the
lake shore and dropped into the
water,

The gold, which was to have
been used to finance Anti-German
activities disappeared. Both Icardi
and Lodolce succeeded in return-
ing to the Allied lines and told
police that Holohan was ambushed
and killed by Germans.

The two American soldiers re-
turned to the United States, but
Italian police followed up the case
and finally got confessions from
several partisans that the Major's
body could be found in the lake

In Washington the Government



said Icardi and Lodolce were
questioned by U.S. army agents
with “negative results” .in 1947

But in the summer of 1950 the De-
fence Department said two Italians
and Lodolce confessed,

—U.P.



Wrong Drug Kills
Two Volunteers

VERMILLION, South Dakota,
Aug. 16.
Dr. Donald Slaughter, Dean of
University of South Dakota Medi-
cal School, said Thursday the
“wrong drug” was given by mis-
take to two volunteers who died
during pain relief experiments.
; Slaughter said the unidentified
medical seientist who administered
the drug “recognised his mistake”
{and saved his own life and that
‘of a third volunteer.—"J.P.

ennemasteenser racine ean ES

with
Lt. Icardi and Sergeant Lodolcé,

On Indo-china

By EDWARD M. KORRY

PARIS, August 16.
France will press for an agree-
ment to end fighting in Indo-China
as part of a general Korea peace
settlement talks are
successful, to an au-
thoritative Government

if Kaesong
according
French

Agreement

source,

This source in outlining the
foreign policy of the new cabinet
of Premier Rene Pleven also made
jthese points in
ora foreign
by

emphasizing that
policy is guided
the desire to maintain peace:
.
; 1. France will not accept the
linclusion of Spain in the North
‘ Atlantic Treaty Organization
{(N.A.T.O.) As a result of uni-
lateral United States negotiations
with the Franco Government and
other major problems concerning
N.A.T.O. members, France will
plump for a permanent N.A.T.O
political council,

2. France’s view of the rearma-
ment of Germany remains ute
changed—-the formation of Ger-
;man units is necessary but they



must be included in European
‘army divisions including contin-

gents from other countries



3. The Atlantic Treaty Organ-
isation must always be careful to
keep characteristics of a defence
organisation.



On the Far East question the
source said. “Korea fighting and
the question of Indo-China where



jFrance has paid such a heavy
price in men, cannot be dis-
sociated when peace discussions
start.”

In connection with this state
ment, it was learned from othe
sources that the

French Govern-
ment wants a firm guarantee fron
Communist China that further aic
to rebel] forces of Ho Chi Min!
jin Indo-China will end ,

—U.P.

To Combat Oil Shortage

By WILLIAM GILBRAITH





WASHINGTON, Aug. 16.
If the United States oi] indus-
Vv ge IT rials it can make up
1€ WV shortage. If it doés
et motorist faces gasoline
That is the simplest form of one
of the toughest problems in the
Cefence emergency—a question
va licated by the British









Iran lispute
A é¢ cesman ft Petroleum
imir itic fo Defence
»AD e oil industry like
I ther trying to exr i





try gets these supplies it will be
able to. meet all U.S. needs for oil
in the near future and also help
produce some of the refined pro-
| ducts which U.S. friends overseas
need to make up for lost Iranian

oil
43,400 New Wells

Without vital supplies they fear
the U.S. petroleum industry may
fall so far short of its goals that
gasoline rationing would have to
be ordered at home. The petro-
|leum industry is producing about
6,100,000 barrels of crude petro-







leum daily. P.A.D. never has said
ihow much it wants that figure

tepped up, but it f said the in-
dustr must drill least 43,400
;new wells this ye to meet U.S

28,500 would

gac-—t} re

The industry has said it is will-
ing to drill far more wells but it
is certain not to get the equipment
needed to drill any more than the
43.400 P.A.D. has requested

It is impossible exactly
how much oil these wells will pro-
duce owing to varying state regu-
lations Wells usually produce
anywhere from 50 to 100 barrels
of oil per day depending upon the



lo say









|
|

Hharbados

Will





| France Wants |



State in which they are located
Actuall they would yield au
more, but oil-producing St
limit the ount that well oper
tor can k ou of tr
he oil i i cut of the
c ever i to the
bott’enec} Il—trans-|
i —U.P

FRIDAY,



OILS AND FATS

The Fifth Meeting of the
Oils and Fats Conference,
held at Hastings House

|
ended August 15 |

Recommendations of the
Conference will now be
transmitted to the Govern-
ments concerned .

U.S., PHILIPPINES
AGREE ON TREATY

WASHINGTON, Aug. 16.
The United States and the Phil- |

jay

Man,

Tt is the first time since he g
| the two sides talking

Truman's
jhas stepped directly into negotia-

}dent

AUGUST 17, 1951

Make Bid To
End The Peace Deadlock

Buffer Zone Still







Harriman To

Try Again

TEHERAN
British
have scheduled informal talks to-
Averell

and

at which
is. expected

tions,
Observers fee] that results from

Iran Aug

Iranian

Ww.

to

trouble

16
negotiato

Harr,
make a

that Py





last
teh. effort to solve Iran's explo
e oil crisis

shooter

ippines announced agreement to- } ‘ (
day on a mutual defence treaty {informal talks will determine
pledging each country to act to whether there is any chance of
meet common dangers in the | reaching a settlement at the
event of an armed attack on the | scheduled full dress conference on
other.—-(CP) Saturday —CP)

years, (Story on page five). > *



RUSSIA

H.M.S. “Bigbury Bay” returned to Barbados after an absence of two

RELATIONS BETWEEN
AND CHINA

BECOMING STRAINED

By K. C. THALER

LONDON, Aug

16,

Perceptible differences in Sino-Russian relations are
beginning to strain the young Moscow Peking axis accord-

ing to diplomatic reports

The rift is not only ideological

but affects the national interests of both countries.
There is no question at present

40m Muslims
In Grave Peril |

NEW DELHI, August 16,

Fourteen prominent Muslims
including members of Parliament
the former Governors province
under the British regime led by}
Zakirhussain, Vice Chancellor
Aligarh of the Muslim University
where the most Pakistan leader:
received their education submit-
fed a memorandum to the Uniter
Nations mediator Frank Grahan
saying “We should like to im-
press you with all the emphasis |
at our command that Pakistan’s
policy on Kashtir is fraught
With the gravest peril to 40,000. |
600 Muslims in India and if the
Security Counci] really is interes-
ted in peace, human brotherhood
ind international understanding
it should heed this warning
hile there is still time.” —U.P

Told To



U.S.







however

of a break between

Tse Tung’s regime and the Krem-

lin nor is the ideologieal dev

lation

comparable to the Tito dispute



Outwardly, relations appear cor-
rect atid friendly
to lack

id

any

though they
marked demon

stration of cordiality and intimacy

But

relations
munist giants in Asia are not quite

indications are that actually

betw

harmonious

een

the

Com-

two

Nationalism

‘
Growing nationalism in China
and
the

| advisors

outside

causes of existing tensions

if

it does not it

Chinese hostility.
policy-makers
to

3ritish
Heve China
independent li
Soviet

tates

hould
diplomacy

abandon

hn

“extreme

agalr
are

its h

wi

East

sensitiveness
part of Mao Tse Tung and his
dictation

ist

among

old

ltr
ne

or

in
European
They think
exploited
when and j

this

)

will face

I

on

from
chief

and of

the

possible future repercussions
The real test of Sino-Russjar
eo-operation will come next vPar
when Russia, in accordance with
treaty obligations, is supposed

Manchuria
outright

still
retain an
contrast. to
satellite
situation
»y Westerr

the Korean

be-

; conflict is settled
Pay Up | Mao Tse Tung’s Communist
4 | Pa y won its victory in China
_. WASHINGTON, August 16. stant and the new Communist
_ South Korea asked the United state which emerged in 1948 owes
states on Thursday for prompt) ittle to Russia. From the sta
vayment of $100,000,000 for goods Russian advice has been ignore<
and services furnished United! with impunity; Moscow apparent|
slates forces during the Korean agreeing that at least internal
war. South Korean Ambassador! matters must be left to the

Yu Chan Yang presented the bill’ Chiriese.
Closer



o assistant Secretary of State!
Dean Rusk during a conference











Yang said the bill covered food-' lished by the recent pact ol
stuffs, repairs to equipment and friendship which has lead to the
‘ents on buildings occupied py! cOncluson since of agreements for;
United States Forces | both tlose military collaboration
—U.p. | and economic assistance
| But China is understood to be}
disappointed over the slackne of}
» Soviet military and economic aid
i M | Russia also apparently was reluc-
Russians ust {tant to go ail out in support of
is China in Kor and these hesita-
Sig. Draft Pact | tions were said to have been
élearly noted by China's Commun-
WASHINGTON, Aug. 16 | ist_rulers ps A edt ans
The State Department on Thurs-| â„¢ aoe aM si Ea
day formally notified the Soviet e. ee A 3
Union that Russian delegates to|"' eae -
Japanese Peage Conference in San ba ent rr f -rang
Francisco must sign the Anglo-; nent
American draft of the pact or ye! uP
nothing at all, j
|
Depar t announced that } APPROVA
Ambassador n Kirk, in Mo
ec delivered the note to t } BUENOS RI ‘ 1¢
Soviet Minister of Foreign Aff | ee Cha ;
declaring the San Franciseo Cor proved tt atior
ot nference t tate « Ge
egotiat A i
—U.pP Sehate. ~U.P





co-operalion









estab-







Mao



\
and
fe struck heavily at Commun
ist truck convoy speeding rein-{,
forcements and supplies to West+] |ikely to recover
ern and central fronts. Low lying Athol Rowan I
clouds gave the Reds some cover while making 41
but returning pilots said that they Ny the | nes closed
had attacked 300 vehicles today Masiee eae See : 7
They said that they had destroyed The absence of Mann with a
)

PRICE: FIVE CENTS

iS HERE



THE NAVY



|

EIGHT of the Officers of ths ‘Bigbury Bay” aboard their ship
W. W. R. Bentinck, O.B.B., R.N., the Commanding Officer sit,
middle of the front group

Springboks Routed
For 202: England

Lose 2 For 51 Runs

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 16

Honours rest fairly evenly between England and Sout
Africa after the first day’s ploy in the final Test here today
On a wicket which has taken 2 considerable amount of spin
for the first day, England are 151 behind South Africa’s
total of 202 and have lost both members of their all-York-
shire opening partnership, Hutton and Lowson

Capt
in the

South Africa’s innings was one apes
of two distinct phases. In the, : »
arly morning when the wicket Sugar W orkers
played very easily, Rowan and/
Endéan (playing in place of the Strike ly Berbice
injured Weite) concentrited « | : a
most entirely on defence. (From Our Gwn Correspondents
Having won the toss the South |< EORGETOWN, B.G. Aug; 16
Africans, wanted to make sure| Taetory workers at three Be

they did not thrown away the ad+|bice sugar estates went on “strike



vantage and the result was sueh a|Rosehall cane warkers went out
; crawl that when Endean was oul|\in Ssyvhppathy with sugary porters
Uj N B I just before lunch only 66° run: }who Qemanded wage increases
r m a | were on the board, ,At Blaifmont, the strike bega
Je e oO yeTS s »veith the dismissal of two factory
e COLLAUSKL hands *
‘Strike Red Afterwards Rowan and Van Workers demand the reinstat
tvneveld took the score along to |ment and one the oe al ¢
on ° 16 » a startling srtain staffmen ortmou
106 and then came a startling col- peer’
Supplies). workers also went ott in sym
Rowan was caught at first slip, /pathy. : : W .
Van Ryneveld was neatly stumped Labou L el nals RE aiitins
8TH ARMY HEADQUARTERS, | and Cheetham was leg before to] Bissell and en mean ;
Korea, Aug. 16 Laker without any addition to the |have arrived in Berbi ; z Oe
United Nations bombers core conferring with the managemen
, and estate joint committee

The wicket continued to take

pin and South Africa never looked



The ‘““ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS
| Dial 3113

bravely
after

hung on
but shortly

pulled shoulder muscle meant that
Vielle

50, and damaged 30 others
largest volume of traffic
ighted near Sinmak on the
Pyongyang-Kaesong highway in
Western Korea and in the Song-
chon and Yongdok areas in Basterr
Korea ‘The
fround wa
days,

The
was
main

included in a South

@ On page 8

was

Day or Night

Situation on the
the quietest in recent
according to an 8th Army
spokesman

The fighting front
Kaesong diplomatic
sub-Committee
patrol action furnishing most of
battle activity. While United
and Communist delegates
the

of

followed the
front
with only

into
minor

he
Nations
ed at
in favour
actions

rece main
mall

on

conferences
eale discus
ion the front line
also decreased

Instead
with
units
lay
size

of the
company

usual contact
size Communis
Allied elements on Thurs-
Red patrols and platoon
almost exclusively

met
groups

Three Charged With
\bdullah’s Death

rEL AVIV, Aug. 16
Cairo radio reported Thursday
that Egyptian lawyers secking te







assist defendants charged with the |
murder of King Abdullah, have |
feceived no reply from Amman |
authoritic :
: rat zoe ’ nl +
radio viper mouitesd hee) PRROUETDE $TAYS WHIRE
predicted that the progecuto
ask a military court for death
sentences against Dr. Mousa Ab lhere is a strange fascination about gleaming white paint — Perat
tullah, Hussein’s father, Ibrahim a :
Ayada and Abdul Kadel Frahat| “*pecially lhis Berger white marine enamel is hard, glossy and yet
‘dire re ic an “o- |
for direct relatior to ar d co | resistant to the destructive influence Of een ‘air And salt water ht
yoperation in the murder |
—U.P. | therefore, ideal for outside woodwork on houses, where it : kbd



lurability provid









Polish Official amart and protective. Try
Flees To Germany | on
A young of ial of the Polish MADE BY
lum in West Germany, today BERGER PAINTS
jeeeupation authorities here, de AT ALL
: a s'wee| HARDWARE STORES
CP GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.-—-Agents





PAGE TWO




























Z Ee BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 1951
a tC CL ET CNC | ‘
ates 2 > at ‘ _ omesien > ée ‘
° e Visiting Her Daughter Ba. RADIO PROGRAMME OPENING TO-DAY ae Ping —_
; AND CONTINUING DAILY AT 4.45 & 8.36
M&S, MARJORIE HAYNES FA eT eee oe 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 6.55 5 AND LSINEE: TO-MORROW AT OAM.
left yesterday by the Golfite P an A aay 's Sport cites c " :
for England on a visit t io : , ¢ . ne Parade il - 7010 OG pom 25.52 M. 31.22 M _ 9
daughter and son-in-law. " She con News 12.1 a. 7 p.m, 7 Nev 7.10 p.m, New E M P i R E
PRUARMACY week ends témor- expects to be away for about four | \nalysi ; is, 7.15 p.m. West Indian Dia
i i ight with a social at months ee ete es ome ;
Queen’s Park for members of the Leaving by the same ship were The News, 4.10 p1 tertude a a a i Se @
Pha wceutical Society and their M Kathleen Hawkins i ; Flint of the i on "Sq mt » the Editorials, 9 p : Tr
expects to return in time for the eo g Record, 5 p.n boad, 9.45 p World Affair
lecture at Queen’s November races, Mrs. Merivale Se eens Oe PRs eee. eee, 12.20 im. Rare \
Park will be the last of a series of Austin, Mrs. E. Centano and Miss sp og eae fans ae Liter Quarter, 10.48 pm ae Years of
lectures which began on Sunday M. Jones who are all going on 6.15 p.m ne

Transatl.



> Quiz, Achievement

with a broadeast lecture by_Mr, holiday.





































A. W. Smith, introducing Phars | te Coming Soon
° ; co 4 - . oy “RIDES ;
1 week Intransit | Jane GREER PF i. aw az aA B'TOWN inate ive *
The lecture tonight will be ee Due Soon! } Dial 2316]}-whispering smith
iven by Dr. E. B. Carter. The NTRANSIT on the Golfite yes~ - a —_
sease. baa i ‘ i a 1.50, 445 & 8.50 P.M AND CONTINUING
bject is venereal disease. terday was Miss Jacqueliné TO-DAY : DAILY 4.45 30 P ;
Chan, whose father is head 0 BETTY FRED re eee oe

Back to Africa
Ao almost two and a half

Chan’s Photo Studio in Trinidad
Miss Chan who is easily Trini-
dad’s most popular Chinese ballet

HUTTON -— asTAIRE ** LET'S DANCE

Color by Technic or




















































. | 1 Roland YOUNG—Ruth WARRICK—Lucille WATSON Greg ‘ MOFF ETT
months holiday in Re rbados dancer has just left Bishop’s High ~SPECTAL SATURDAY 3.0 AM A 1 PM
N n Mrs. Pat Duke lef School and is on her way ta 2 Action Westerns! |
tome on the Golfite for Eng- y * | “BOSS OF LONELY VALLEY”
esterday he Gelfite for Eng- Tondon to study - dramatics ané BUCK JONES — DICK HOLLAND &
ad. dap. thelr way Deck’ to * dancing. She is cne of Trinidad’s “CHEY E ROUND-UP" |
fpoast Ww a ge } ee leading ballet dancers. JOHNNY MACK BROWN — FUZZY KNIGHT
The Police oree § | - a
tl ighter of Mr, and B Arrivals Sas Og } SS
a | PLAZA oii sa GALETY
Venue, Belleville R. J. A. CHABROL, Manager|} a4 4% Dial 8404 ae SS E -e |||
— 1 f' Booker’s: (B’d Drug | TO-DAY (Only) 5 & 830 P.M. THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES |/)
Off to England - o »0ker's dos) 4 “NEWS HOUNDS" FRIDAY to SUNDAY 8.30 P.M. |
nen 5 areas Stores Ltd., accompanied by his}||/Leo Goreey and East Side Kids and Mat: SUNDAY 4.30 P.M.
Ny RS: CYRIL LYNCH, ner sol son John returned from B.G, on|]|"J1IGGS AND MAGGIE IN SOCIETY Bis Triple Attraction
LY 1-4) iaughter-in-law Mi Wednesday evening by B.W.LA i Joe Yule—Renie Riano World's Heav yresiens Championshir
ind Mis. Michael Lynch, and her They had been away for two cr > Chai a rae TRAE | Ezzard A Sake tae
nd=so th were z assen- 4 7 harlic an in“ iT P* and 7 +s - VALC rg
rand3s John were all passe weeks. SONG of the RANGE Jimmy Wakely {CHARLE and WALCOTT & :
gers for England by the Golfito ~ Opening SATURD , 2 ae » Features ae
Oh a The are going to Mr. Chabrol told Carib that owe A ; 1 50 p.m. “SQUARE DANCE KATY
ra They are § ing - Reece ven : TYCOON” (Color) John WAYNE Vera VAGUE Phil BRITO &
ive in: York, Yorkshire, where with regard to water polo in MIDNITE SATURDAY 18TH “KILLER SHARK” Roddy McD FN V1
Michael will study farming and Georgetown, swimmers there told Victor JORY “UNKNOWN = Guest Tip NITE"SATURDAY iaTH | V
John 2y will attend St. Peter's him it would be impossible aan ae ae LAWLESS BREED" | @, t ‘
Cm av s srare rer Johnny Ma 3. Iw fe h CcvoLe A, '
Publie School PASSENGERS for England yesterday by the “Golfito” are seen Sa an tee aie aed ete sili errr |
d 3 L boarding the launch at the Baggage Warehous. Judge J. W. B. bit essa" Gabenateae saat "a ‘ prize-winning
Presréetirement Leave Chenery is on the extreme left of the picture ality was a swimming | 8

. mPa _pyT “s he Georgetown Football Club,

AR:AND MRS. H. P. P. TRIM ;

ree ; ° b 6 ‘ out the shallow end was only a

Micra tert for —— Hopes to Go to Australia Joins Wife and Family foot or two deep. He left a copy
rday afternoon by the Golillo. “iupGEe J. W. B. CHENERY,

v . . of the rules of water polo «vith
ngham who had ere! Judge of the Assistant Court R. C. PHILLIP BROOKS, one of B.G.’s leading aa nmers,
2 sip ae SUS oa Appeel was among the passen- 7 representative of C aterpillar Mickey Da Silva and Mickey is
gers leaving for England yester- Tractor Co., for Venezuela, the going to see what can be done
day by the Golfito. This is his GUjanas and Trinidad, with ead-

firet visit to England after twenty Quarters in Caracas arrived fron New Reverend Mother

AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only) |}
MATINEES: TO-DAY & TO-MORROW at 5 P.M
TO.NIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT at 8.30
ANN TODD — CLAUDE RAINS — TREVOR HOWARD

in



“Comedy





{ Nt pending her pre-

poent leave in England,
i Carib shortly before
t ter twenty years







. oo years and he hopes to go “Down Trinidad yesterday by the Golfito ONE WOMAN S STORY James) ‘Fred’ Alan’ 2 Patricia Natalie « Tommy™ Robert’ _ Lyle
ye at Queen's College, he ty ey to gee the West Indies-- to join his wife and two children LSO arriving on the B.G. Based on the Novel “The “assionate Friends” by H. G. Wells ||| GLEASON =CLARK : MOWBRAY = MEDINA - WOOD - RETTIG - GIST - TALBOT
: % ; overs ee oe or das Australia cricket games. acew Ria Phillip Tat a z ahee ' plane was Rev. Mother Ursula A Universal-Internationai Kelease | om Screen Pay by PHOEBE and HENRY EPHRON-Based _ Directed by LANG Produced by ENGEL 20.
CNnovo and 1e ype < yeen here since mid-July. 1€Y Wilkie. O.S.U., the new Reverend | q +c HENRY EPHRON -' g A ter es 2
eae ak a ‘ fine Father and Son are staying at the Four Aces Flas other for the Ursuline Convent tar tee | | eee 1 an atc The New Yoke ya Meaty 4 WALTER ane
y PuliL On S €



ee nn mF
in St. Lawrence Gap. Fee ee amas G EXPLOSIVELY TO-DAY & CONTINUING | @&



the t. She beg- R. W. H. ALLAN of Messrs.
¢ gir, VA's.





: ah ‘ ise I ar Stanislaus Wilkie, O.S.U., ad rid 7 " Y 7
9: say good-bye to the girls, Rice and Co. and his | Mrs, Brooks’ sis ter. Miss Pepe tenet te of BG GLOBE THEATRE |
; pr rt of Queen’s young son left by the Golfito Eugenia Glover of Florida is also : pee R at Mot! a ae ee al Uae : | ;
( id to express her grati- yesterday for England. They ex- in Barbados. She too has been or. isl: oar ree i. Rt aed, FOUR BIG SHOWS TO-MORROW vm ine . a “ee
tude--for the thandsome and pect to be away two and a half here _ since maideduly. they ad aes Birbadcs. ere Brae 9-30 A.M., 1.30 P.M., 5 & 8.15 P.M. Naa tle eRe et PTS FE SAt-Â¥i ay
} t eived from them. months returning by way of the expect to remain ere until = . — tei aan . wn ; ‘ } -
} ived. from U.S. 1. , Bctebar Ist. Miss Glover spent }=—= SPECIAL PRICES FOR KIDS AT 9.30 & 1.30 |







After Thirteen Years

L L one week in Caracas with her Ay
Me AND MRs. T. J. “BERTIE” ong Leave sister, before coming over to Cunon FIALGAY
|



Positively Your Best Movie Bet cae AEN ate



FL SELLS MELE I TILSEN OT

FINALLY, at last, after a
3 year delay, you can see

STOCKER are en route to R. AND MRS, ALBERT Barbados, 2 %
and by the Golfito which LAKE who arrived from St. ° . LenS) G ee
cailed : yeste edn Mr Stocker Kitts a few days ago left yester- U.S. Foreign Service o ?
ho is an engineer with Cable day by me See for England on Inspector To THE SCREENS
Mr. Lake

ind Wireless had been stationed holiday who is with

ROXY

TO-DAY ONLY 4:30 & 8.15
20th Century Fox Double





er > ae
with their branch h«re for the the St. Kitts Sugar Factory is’ on R. AND MRS. EDWARD T. BIGGEST TH E Ou T L wi | Bower G. ROBINSON James: LYDON
‘past four years. This is his first long leave WAILES who have been in ENTERTAINMENT A | Victor McLAGLEN in me Charles RUSSELL in
visit home’ in thirteen years, He Barbados on a short visit are due , ; ‘ - ‘ 7
is on-four mwths long leave Here For a Month to leave this -morning for BALL HOWARD HUGHES TAMPICO <

di R . RS. MICHAEL LAING and Martinique by B,.W.1.A. , - “ TUCSON”’
Mathematics at Cambridge I three children arrived from Mr. Wailes is a U.S. Foreign OF THEM ALL My production | Spy Drama.
R. VIVIAN HUTSON, son of Trinidad yesterday by the Golfite. Service Inspector and is on a *
il Pr. and Mrs. Lindsay Hutson She is spending a month’s holiday routine inspection tour ef the vit, @
¢ gt abel 2

|
— fe : OPENING TO-MORROW 4.45 & 8.15
i By oe 5 | 20th Century Fox Presents - - -



“S$¥erling”’, St. Philip, will read with her parents Mr. and Mrs. U.S, Consulates through this



matics at Queen’ College Sanderson Mr. Laing who was area, having already visited .
Cat idee, when he arrives in a former Manager of the Redif- Venezuela, Curacao and Aruba. Es F

Eneldhd. He left yesterday by fusion system here is coming up His headquarters are in Washing- 7 A
the Golfite. later this month for two weeks. ton. aoe

THE ADVENTURES OF PIPA

* VENGEANCE VALLEY”







STARRING

JANE
RUSSELL

te Mae 2
THOMAS MITCHELL: #

Starring...

BURT LANCASTER
In His First Big ' Technicolor Western
with ROBERT WALKER — SALLY FORREST
An Adventure Drama in its Rugged Best

|
An Raentare
|



ROYAL



Paramount presents. WALTER HUSTON mene z anne gigi ea ee
The perfect song-and-dance pair! aT tn} 1 ; 3 : | Republic “Smashing Double ,
BETTY FRED we | Republic Deuble - - -
|“ LIGHTS OF OLD ; es
Z | x Sunset CARSON in - -
SANTA FE
i] ia g Starring... “DAYS OF BUFFALO
| DALE EVANS and ”
Se Lets J [ae ava BILL
oe |

BY THE . WAY eee Beachcomber

ppowewine the illness of so nowhere. I do not agree. I re- shipped the very grounds he

EXTRA ATTRACTIONS TO-NITE AND
‘ rm aay : " | AND
ty LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
TECHNICOLOR / EDDIE HALL issue. Singing “Begin the Beguine” | “WAKE OF THE ‘““KING OF
jor NEVILLE PHILLIES ... “IT Apologise”

Ca! ; se | ” +99
ST OND YT CHESTON HOLDER ........ . “Be My Love” RED WITCH GAMBLERS







“many elephants comes news member the case of a small and walked on. + re : i ’ A Sa ae | Hah ngs ave er ae
of a Sahay leaded elephant. insignificant suitor who was int- = ——-—— — ———$—__—— {UDLE WAISGR CRO MOFFETT eee WILTSHIRE ....... Pe Count Every Star JOHN wAcNE ee with ee See and
Evidently this is what is called a midated by a large lady. Feeling meee as + ecm tse MARTIN HAYNES ....... ee “Confess” | GAII RU SELL SHOE I s
“horsy elephant, with a straw in that he was not big and strong! CROOSSWORD nae atl 9 Mla Seat | FRANCIS HYPOLITE .... f Because” | 4 RUSSEL: : i 3 i :
mouth. It probably got like enough to roar “Will you “ed ct ee GUEST STAR | Two Pictures COME ON’ KIDS ~
that by riding too much. mine?” he whispered, “May I be | prez HAREWOOD : li Mftone Lise? | With a single thought to and enjoy .
rl ere easel. She. eMBpy Lea yours” The lady was so ee L «ks Peale ar | please vou ei Castile aad. notion
t f at angry ’ ch eke AAiaaiel ‘. a - : ss rills
tings out from a public stuffed years of gratitude. “Cyril, 1 never | | A Hot Musical Short “PACKAGE OF RHYTHM [ee Steen! Ene! To Your Liking

ills with common sense,
a baby, it rode horses
the horse-riding giraffe,
ch I wrote recently, it
uldshot have to dismount when
wsing under a bridge, Another Ape stunned by giant melon
cplenation is that a very heavy m
mahafujah rode this elephant Frxcouracep by American
—s

vhen was small, and bent its
; it divorce customs, a man com-
If only I cared more about



knew you felt like that about me,
you silly boy.’ “Big one, may I
put my arm some of the way
round your waist?”

BRIDGETOWN ie a ace
TO-DAY (FRIDAY) 230. | PRICES TO-NITE

2 20¢e, s . Balcony 48c., Boxes 60c. | > ‘
4.45 and 8.30 p.m. | Pit 20c., House 36c., )
: MATINEE TO-DAY USUAL PRICES 0 L Y M i i ¢€

Ss a
TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW 4.45 & 8.15
Ist Instalment

SUNDAY & MONDAY 445 & 8.15 Final Instalment
The Republic Action Serial

“ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN MARVEL ”

|
|
|
| Starring - - -
|
|



















—





ae ak ; ; plained that his marriage had
is sake of thing, I would buy the jy oken when his wife “poured the

clephattt a jockey-acp. dregs of a cup of coffee into *
|



Across
1. Was one speed you'll find. (Â¥)
Y How a mole carried the girl, 17
10. A real meit of fairy butter. (8)
14. Gang aboard. (4)
14, Biack guard, (4)
15. Long past the best. (1. 3, 4)
16. Much may turn on it. (3)
18, New Zealand parson oird, (3)

Love dawns shoe”, If I was not above trivial
A SAGE, giving advice on jokes which, one feels, detract
{ courtship, says that timidity from one’s integrity, actually, 1
1Wnility will get a young man mean, I could say that she wor-

TOM TYLER

T 4 ;
| You’ve Read About Him in the Comics now see Him Come to Life
? On The Screen
‘ e THE BEST OF FUN FOR YOUNG AND OLD
I praca cre tatiana tc tnt errs acta nnindinee











test Stra Bem,







b

‘Rupert and the Soreerer—6






a ty n ve OF ties te Q a
Sy BC sN ie atic weste waver | oh JANETTA DRESS SHOP
, ‘ Down

Q

t All wrt of a tour-footer ) Upstairs Newsam & Co.
(So

2 A surgical performance
Entities. (5)




» pursue. in Watery (4)
» wonder vou get one fretn |
}
}
|
}
|
|

Lower Broad Street

DRESSES

READY MADE AND MADE TO ORDER



meal. (7)
ther meal. (3)

REL OB He

Sboat’s hesitant claim to cover?

(6

%& A roguisn nobieman ? (8)

1 Carge-sizea Inexactitude = from
Germany (6)

12. Nothing extracted trom the

6. Layer (3)























‘ ’ Tree.
D'you another word

"Yes, me see.” says the Chinese she says **Me already talk too oH : sp omen 5
git! placidiy, “I: was distant (much, All yo school now.’ And zi mRce ve Oewe by Reet
sorcer He come to talk to my although. the others follow and 7 Mend: & Solo; 12. Mun
4gd4y of wonder ew magic.’’ beg her to explain she won't say Moe: 16, Taint: 17 Ink



Whar





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7 ei al .. mean to say that there was some- + 20 Gently drop the bait. (3) : |
* Z 4 Pre entiy calle ailiy 3) |
Dic 1 hat queer thing one in thar th Where is it? } 21 Prequentiy called silly | j
} » through. the. sky?" Who was. ..?" But Tigerlily | viluion of yesterday § puzzle —Acruss |
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FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 1951

THE GA

NOW LEAVE THI6 TO ME
- ————_—
PAK








PUERTO RICO TO

MANUFACTURE
CORTISONE

PUERTO RICO, August 14.

Yet another new industry comes
to Puerto Rico. This time it is
the manufacture of Cortisone,
the new drug used against arth-
ritis. . . . . The discovery of a
new source of material, abundant
and cheap, was recently announ-
eed jointly by American Syntex
Incorporated, Syntex S.A. of
Mexico and Chemica) Specialities
Incorporated of New York. ....

The discovery was mae in the
laboratories of Syntex S.A. of
Mexico when a group of investi-
gators found that one of the
necessary constituents in the
manutacture of synthetic Cortis-
one could be easily extracted
from the roots of yam grown in
Mexico. .... This yam is not fit
for human consumption ...,.
It is expected that the production
of Cortisone by the new process
will shortly be started in Puerto
Rico at the plant of American
Syntex Incorporated at Hato Rey
(A-to Ray). .

According to Dr. 1. V. Sollins of
Chemical Specialities of New
York and President of American
Syntex of Puerto Rico, the new
process wil] eliminate the neces-
sity of having to depend exclus-
ively on raw material from
animal sources, .... The pro-
cess is much simpler than any
used before and it is believed
that it will open up to thousands
of sufferers the use of Cortisone
in large qyantities and at a price
not more” than, and probably
much less than the present

Egypt Denies
Reports

ALEXANDRIA, Egypt, Aug. 16.

Egyptian Foreign Minister, Salah
E) Din Pasha, denied reports
Thursday that Egypt has told the
United States and Britoin she will
ignore any Security Council in-
junction to lift the Suez Canal
blockade.

Salah El Din aiso denied that
Egypt warned the United States
that American oil companies in
Arab countries would be ordered
to halt their oil production unless
they guaranteed that no part of
their oil would reach Israel.

He said Egypt's attitude would
be determined by the kind of reso-
lution which the Council would
finally adopt. Arab League Secre-
tary, Abdul Rahim Azzam Pasha,
also speaking in Alexandria, saia
Thursday he was “very hopeful”
that Turkey would uphold the
Arab world by siding with Egypt
in the Security Council debate on
the Suez Canal blockade.—U.P.

LOO



a TRADE MARK

VASELINE is the registered trade mark
of the Chesebrough Mfg. Co., Cone"d





MBOLS



Field Will Have Pavilion

The Christ Church Vestry will soon be erecting a pavilion

at Sarjeant’s Village Playin

g Field. It was originally esti-

mated that this pavilion would cost $9,600. The present cost
is now estimated to be $10,800.

The Vestry, at their meeting
yesterday evening,
letter from the Colonial Office in
which the Financial Secretary as-
sured members that the Govern-
ment would make an additional
grant to the Vestry.

Additional cost of $5,010 which
was submitted by the Playing
Field Committee was accepted,
and Mr. Fred Goddard, M.C.P.,
moved that the tender for build-
ing the pavilion, which at their
last meeting was awarded to Mr.
Arthur Evelyn, contractor, be con-
firmed.

Mr. Evelyn’s tender of $9,934
was the lowest of four submitted
to the Vestry, The other tenders
were for $11,760, $13,560 and
$15,360.

According to the revised esti-
mate, the Playing Field, complete
with pavilion, will cost $18,935.
The original estimate was $13,925
Erecting the pavilion will cost
$10,800; enclosing the field $1,820;
roads and turning in water $2,625;
levelling the field $3,340 and dig-
ging a new suck $350, The sum of
$1,597.85 has already been spent
on levelling the field and $637.41
on turning in water and roads.

Change of Estimate

Mr, C. B. Brandford said that
he did not see why they should nct
go on with the erection of the
pavilion because, as he understood
from Mr, Goddard, if within 2i
days théy did not accept the
tender, Mr. Evelyn could change
his figure. Mr. Evelyn should be
allowed to make a start because
the cost of material was increas-
ing daily. They have a Playing
Field Committee and nothing has
been done without the Commit-
tee’s knowledge. The money has
been released so that they could
make a start.

Mr. Fred Goddard, M.C-P., said
that so far they had taken every
precaution te account to Govern-
ment for the funds, There was
no reason why the Vestry should
not believe that the additional sum
would be forthcoming, because,
in submitting the first estimate,
the Vestry made it clear to Gov-
ernment that this was subject to
revision.

The Sarjeant~ Village Playing
Field had been accepted in prin-
ciple and Government had gone
further and at their last meeting
in the House of Assembly given
sanction to a Resolution giving
the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee power to lease the land
to the Christ Church Vestry.

He said that they had never
made a false move in the matter
The Financial Secretary assured
that provided the funds are there
for Christ Church, there was no
reason why the money should not






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eit hea” a \
SQ Mi NT ym
> J



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AA
Every spoonful gives you £4
more and more LE

energy and










& BURROUGHS WELLCO
ee ee cneecmeee mt aeaenrare a




@ Every spoonful of Kepler’ gives you a rich
supply of vitamins A and D,

@ These vitamins are sature’s wonder workers,
assuring health and freedom from iliness,

@ Men, women, children—all should start
taking tasty ‘Kepler’ to-day.

‘KEPLE

COD LIVER OIL WITH MALT EXTRACT



ME & CO. PRODUCT ral

se Sele Agents for Bari edos ; Collins’ Ltu., 28 Broad Stree

be forthcoming. He said that the

received a contractor would like to know at

an early date if he had been
granted the tender or not. He
suggested that they confirm the
award of the tender at that meet-
ing.
* ‘
Hurricane Relief

In dealing with the question of
appointing a Chairman of the
Hurricane Relief Committee, the
Vestry decided to write the Colo-
nial Secretary telling him that it
was impossible to appoint a chair-
man and asking for any sug-
gestions as early as possible.

Mr. G. C. Ward of Warners Planta-
tion, Christ Church, was appointed Road
Clearance Officer of the Hurricane Re
lief Organisation Other appointments
were: Mr. H. St. G. Ward of Durants
Plantation, Supply Officer; Mr. W. E. R
Hurte of Sheridan, Maxwell Road, Shel-
ter Officer, Mr. H. D. Cole of South
Winds, Maxwell Coast and Mrs. Joyce
Hotchkiss of Dayrells Road Christ
Crurch, Rescue Officers; Mr. C, S. Mac-
Kenzie of Dalney, Maxwell Coast, Sani-
tation Officer; Mr. G. A. FitzGerald of
Graeme Hall Terrace, Damage Assessment
Officer

Present at yesterday's metting were
Rev, A. F, Mandeville, Chairman, Mr
t. St. G. Ward, Mr. C. S. MacKenzie
Mr. Fred Goddard, M.C.P., Mr, C. B
Brandford, Mr Cc Tfill, Me George
Ward, Mr. A. G. Gittens, Mr. J. Webster
and Mr. Wood Goddard, Clerk of the
Vestry



Communist Youths
Mass Within
West Berlin

BERLIN, August 16.

West Berlin police rushed to the
East-West border as Communist
youths massed at three points
within the western sector in an
apparent effort to hold new anti-
western demonstrations.

Police said that several thous-
ands blueshirted members of the
“Free German Youth” were con-
centrated within West Berlin neai
the Soviet sector border.

The youth were massed at the
Potsdamer Platz where the Soviet,
British and United States sectors
meet in the American occupied
Neukoelln—U.P.

HITLER’S YACHT
FOR SCRAP HEAP
BORDENTOWN, New Jersey,

Aug. 16.

Adolt Hitler’s $4,000,000 yacht
Grille will be cut into scrap to
aid the United States hunt for

steel for its defence programme.
—U-P.



/ bake the modern





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For Your Health's Sake—try



NEEDS NO REFRIGERATION —AS EASY TO USE
| AS OLD-FASHIONED PERISHABLE YEAST

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Y

The antiseptic for general use in the home should be high!s
germicidal yet gentle on delicate tissues, non-poisonous and.
preferably, should not stain clothes or the skin. * Dettol ”
fulfils every one of these conditions. Absolutely reliable,

* Dettol’ can be safely used on even very young children.

‘DETTOL

0 THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Sarjeant’s Village Playing CUBAN SENATOR |

DIES AT 43
Ajter Shooting Himself

HAVANA, August 16.
Senator Eduardo Chibas, 43, the |
so-called ‘stormy petrel” of }
Cuban politics in the last two de-
cades, died on the operating table |
from complications of the post-
operative condition. He had been
at the medical surgical centre since
the night of August 5th when an
emergency operation was per-
formed for a bullet wound self-
inflicted following a regular Sun-
day night broadcast.

|
|
}
|

Chibas, who played a leading
role in the overthrow of ex-Presi-
dent Geraldo Machado in 1933,
died surrounded by leaders of the
Cuban People’s Party of which he |
was President. As soon as hun-|
dreds of his adherents, men and ;
women, who crowded .the hospi- |
tal’s lawns heard the news, they |
wept openly over the passing of
the United States educated Cuban |
political leader. It was announced
that the corpse would be trans-
ferred to the National Capitol !
building where it will lie in state, |
pending funeral arrangements |
which are expected to be made in
the next 24 hours.—U.P.

. ~
Explosion Shakes
Standard

. .

Oil Refinery |

BATON ROUGE, Louisiana,
August 16.
An explosion which rattled
windows and awaked sleeping
residents in homes five miles
away rocked the Standard Oil

Refinery in North Baton Rouge.
State city police rushed to the

refinery . \



Residents in downtown Baton
Rouge reported a blue grey
column of smoke rising from the |
huge refinery,

The explosion killed two men
at the refinery and caused dam-
age estimated at $300,000.

W. B. Cotten, Junior, Public
Relations Director for Standard
Oil said the blast badly damaged
three 37,000 gallon tanks and two|



distillate trating units,

Nine Esso workers were injw
and “three or four” railroad
employees hurt. The fire raged
through gasoline and tractor fuel
tanks and blanketed the country-!
side with black greasy smoke |
until it was controlled two hours
and 45 minutes after the ex-
plosion,

—U-P.





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RAF ~



4G2¢GLGLGGG DGG GGG G GGLGLGGGGO

yy



Ny
K
&
&

The burning question of the Day is how to survive the High
Cost of Living and what a worry this is to you, dear Reader.
Every month you find yourself in ever-increasing difficulties.
You simply can’t make two ends meet. This question is of
vastly greater importance to you than the “Black Pact” that
Britain concluded with Cuba, the Persian Oil Dispute or even
Trinidad’s recently announced Immigration Policy because it
affects those nearest and dearest to you.

An even more serious raatter is at hand, involving as it does
increases in the Cost of Living, and we ask you to give it urgent
and earnest thought. There are people in our midst who, with
good intent but without realizing the serious consequences to
you, are endeavouring to cut off a valuable source of supply
because of Racial policies of the present South African Govern-
ment. These people say “STOP DEALING WITH SOUTH
AFRICA”, because of this Racial Policy.

We tell you that there are many thousands of South Africans
of European descent living in South Africa who are not in favour
of the present South African Government's policy. These South
African people are fighting in South Africa ‘tooth and nail’
against the Racial Policies of the Government and so are the two
well-known and influential South African newspapers—"Cape
Times” and “Cape Argus”. The South African Government is
well aware therefore of the opposition to its policy.

We point out further that the Australian Government
prohibits the settlement in Australia of any Coloured person: in
the Southern States of the U.S.A., the negro suffers humiliation
because of Racial Discrimination.... It has never been sug-
gested—and indeed how ridiculous it would be to suggest,
especiaily in times like these when food supplies are difficult to
obtain,—to refuse to buy Austral.an and American foods and
other goods. EQUALLY RIDICULOUS AND SUICIDAL AND
TO NO PURPOSE WOULD IT BE TO CUT OURSELVES OFF
FROM SOUTH AFRICAN SUPPLIES. Let us tell you something

ys may not know about South Aftican Trade with the West
ndies.

South Africa buys Lime Juice, Arrowroot, Spices from the
West Indies and enquiries were received this Year for thousands
of tons of Sugar which, because of the West Indian Contract
with Britain, could not be entertair:ed.

Enquiries were also received for GINGER, which, if grown
io a much greater extent, would prove to be a valuable export
ot Barbados.

It takes 18 to 19 days only to get goods from South Africa
directly to Barbados. It takes 6 weeks and more from Australia.

South Africa is within the Sterling Area which means that
supplies from that country COST LESS than similar supplies from
Canada and other Dollar Areas—because of the much higher
value of Canadian Currency in relation to the pound Sterling.
This is particularly noticeable in the case of CANNED FISH of
which South Africa is now supplying to Barbados many
thousands of cases of excellent PILCHARDS. These Pilchards
are sold at 22c. per } lb. tin and 38c. per 1 lb. tin as against
CANADIAN SALMON at 66c. per 1 lb. tin and 86c. for } lb. South
Africa has supplied ONIONS and POTATOES at a time when
these staple foods were unobtainable elsewhere. South Africa
supplies us with CANDLES, MOTOR-CAR TYRES, WINES,
CANNED FRUITS, JAMS, CANNED VEGETABLES, CUSTARD
POWDERS, JELLY CRYSTALS, DRIED PEEL, ESSENCES, FRUIT
JUICES AND SQUASHES, and the very important item of
CANNED FISH, all of excellent quality and at very much lower
prices than similar goods, from elsewhere.

A glance at the Map will shew that in case of War, South
Africa would be the only Sterling Country that could supply us
with foodstufts.

A shipment of South African Butter will be arriving in
Trinidad soon and will sell for close on 20c. per lb. less than the
current price of Butter.

The fact is that South African goods, because of quality and
bargain prices, are of immense value to us in Barbados and to
all other West Indian Colonies. South Africa's Canned Products
(Jams, Fruits, Fish) are very popular and in great demand iri
many countries of the World and certainly South Africa would
have no difficulty in diverting her Canned Fish, which West
Indian Dealers have secured for us, to Great Britain.

WE NEED SOUTH AFRICAN GOODS MORE THAN EVER
BEFORE to help relieve you Mr Reader of the financial strain
imposed by the Cost of Living, and WE ASSERT WITHOUT
EXAGGERATION THAT the Cost of Living will mount steadily
higher and higher if you are deprived of them.

TIMES ARE DIFFICULT, YOU ARE SUFFERING AND
GROANING UNDER the Load—the High Cost of Living—There-
fore, DON’T MAKE THE MISTAKE OF “CUTTING YOUR NOSE
TO SPITE YOUR FACE”.

THE FEEDING OF YOUR FAMILY AND OF YOURSELF
SHOULD come before all Political issues, particularly those of
other Countries, over which you have absolutely no Control.

IT IS IMPERATIVE IN YOUR OWN INTERESTS TO TRADE
WITH SOUTH AFRICA, just as it is to trade with Australia
and with the Southern States of America. We cannot afford
in these days to be deprived of ANY SOURCE OF FOOD;
SUPPLIES.

FAMILY!!!

ZESSGSSSSSY HULL & SON Z4ASSERASRER



; ;
‘FOOD FOR THOUGHT! ;
Re THE HIGH COST OF LIVING §

»»

OFF

WAKE UP BARBADOS TO REALITIES!
FIGHT THE GOOD FIGHT FOR YOUR



EL ES Ue Le ee RAS SESTOGSS PTT TTS

PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS sib ADVOCATE

l= {<= _ {snared

===

Printed by the Advocate Co., Bridgetown

Ltd., Broad St,



Friday, August 17, 1951

SURCHARGE

FOR some time now there has been gen-
eral dissatisfaction with the handling of
cargo in the port of Bridgetown, That
dissatisfaction is not limited to local mer-
chants and consumers but includes the
captains of ocean going vessels.

It is clear now from a letter published
in this newspaper on Tuesday from Hon.
F. C. Hutson that in addition to the loss of
prestige which the Barbadian worker had
gained for himself, steamship companies
are taking steps to protect themselves.

The letter giving publicity to an excerpt
from a circular communication te shippers
from one steamship company says: “Ship-
pers are hereby informed that unsatis-
factory despatch at Barbados and the
high cost of handling cargo there make it
necessary to add a delivery surcharge of
10,/- per freight ton on all cargo shipped
from U.K. to Barbados from 1st September
next.”

It is not the first time that complaints
have been made against the slow turn
round of ships in this port and skippers of
some of these vessels have even been heard
to express the view that some of the port
workers take part in a go slow campaign.
One skipper about two years ago went as
far as saying that he had actually seen
men playing cards in the ship’s hold while
others were loading cargo into the slings.
These charges will be strenuously denied
and counter charges will be made
against those who even give publicity to
them; but there are figures which show
that there has been a gradual decline in
the rate of handling cargo.

The Report of Sir Douglas Ritchie pub-
lished in this island show that in 1941 the
rate of removing cargo per gang was 20.1
tons per hour and this declined gradually
until 1944 when it stood at 11.8 tons per
hour,

To-day with increased rates of pay the
rate of removal stands at 5 or 6 tons per

_ hour,

There are other factors which prove
that this general decline in the rate is not
mere accident. Earlier this month a ship
of the Furness Line, which has been oper-
ating here for years before the war and
which resumed its regular service in 1949,
was put two days off her schedule because
labourers refused for the first time to han-
die her cargo at night. It is likely that
with a new schedule being drawn up
Bridgetown will be left out.

In addition to the decline in the rate of
handling there has been an increase in the
cost and recent figures show that in com-
parison with Trinidad at the rate of 8/-
and British Guiana 9/- the cost of hand-
ling a ton of cargo at Bridgetown was 22/-
per ton.

There is an erroneous belief that mat-
ters of controversy at the port should be
left to the ships labourers and steamship
agents alone with the labourers having the
advantage of stating their own terms and
appealing to the Labour Commissioner
through the Unions when it suits them.
It is not so. This matter affects vitally
the interests of every section of the com-
munity. The middle class worker is the
greatest sufferer. The merchant has the
opportunity to increase his scale of profits
in order to pay his extra overhead or
current expenses; the ship labourer has
his rate of pay increased; while the con-
sumer must be content to be the meat in
the sandwich.

The matter has now gone one step
further and as Hon. Mr. Hutson’s letter
shows, this reduction in the rate of hand-
ling of catgo causing the slow turn round
of ships will now cost importers ten shil-



-

lings more per ton of cargo brought to ,;
this island from tHe United Kingdom. If)

this is the attitude of British steamship
owners it might be that foreign compan-
ies will adopt an even more penalising
one.

This is where the Trade Unions can do
a lot for the fair name of Barbados and
the reputation of its worker,

A BIG JOB

NEW YORK.

America’s biggest telephone firm has
just finished six months’ work. In that
time it has instailed 1,000,000 telephones.

The firm is the American Telephone and
Telegraph Company — so big it has
1,000,000 shareholders

Part-of the credit goes to its president,
58-year-old Cleo Craig.

He started as a boy delivering news-
papers. And he went to work for the tele-
phone firm by accident.

Cleo had just graduated from college as
an electrical engineer. He was in love
with a schoolgirl sweetheart, Laura Heck,
and reluctantly took his first job far
away from her in Utah,

Just before he set out, the hometown
branch of the telephone company phoned
and said it had a job for him. He accepted
this job to be near Miss Heck and they
were married

He started at £5 7s. a week. Presidency
of American TelephOne and Telegraph
usually pays £44,000 a year.

Mr. Craig loves telephones











B.



ARBADOS ADVOCATE

Vietorian Dress

(1837 —

During the long reign of Queen

Victoria women’s aress' under-
went many change;. Al the
Victorian Exhibition at the

Museum a wide range of costume
is apparent, and it is interesting
to compare two of these to set
how the pendulum of fashion
moved. One is an evening dress
from the early years of the reign,
cut on the classical lines of tne
Regency of Chinese silk trimmed
with bands of red ;atin Taois
elegant gown has a square neck,
high waist and puffed sleeves-

which later developed into the
fabulous leg-of-mutton sleeves
The other, an evening dress, is
made in two pieces — a blouse
and a_ skirt, instead of the
simplicity of the earlier gown,
over-decoration has*taken place.
This pink satin gown of, the nine-
ties is a tangle of black lace, net
and bugle-bead embroidery. The
bodice has a yolk of dotted net
and bead embroidery, on the
shoulders there is bugle-bead
embroidery and the short sleeves
are covered with lace and beads.
The skirt has a panel of bead
embroidery in front with a three-
ovarter over-skirt of black net,
against lace and bead embroid-
ery. It is a skirt to be worn
over many petticoats. The change
in style is remarkable

No crinoline has survived for
exnipidon; tnat graceful gorment
wnicn Monsieur Worth invented
to conceal the pregnancy of the
Empress Eugenie, and which
necessitated tne arms of chairs
reaching only three-quarters of
the way along the seat, so that
the wearer could be seated in
comfort. But the counterpart of
the crinoline — the poke-bonnet,
is represented at the Museum by
an excellent example of straw,
lace and beadwork, for it is the
most characteristic head wear of
the reign, and survived until al-
most 1870.

Bonnets of various kinds are to
be seen at the exhibition includ-
ing the extraordinary Mutch bon-
net, executed in muslin or knit-
ted wool with long strings. Also
on exhibition are widow's weeds,
a white blouse and skirt with a
black belt and silver buckle, and,

a striped
with a square
jaunty,
and sleeves terminating in frills



A Match Cap



two-piece bathing suit
collar = givi a

touch, its legs



nautical

with white, feather - stitched
bands.

There are also various costume
appurtenances and fripperies,
petticoats, fichus, Indian scarfs,
slippers, stoles and a tippet. An
interesting relic of the days of
the unhygienic long dress
is the dress-suspender, which
was __ fastened to the trail-
ing skirt and attached by
a chain to the waistband. The
infants’ clothes look strange to-
day. Long robes embroidered

and flounced with lace covered
the young Victorian,
a chemise and binder

even in the tropics.

were w<

The names of the fabrics u-.i
reads like a poem: Bombazin >,
mull-muslin, foulard, Cashmer
tarlatan, organdie, gauze, jacone

velvet, alpaca. Fashion plat s
were at the height of their pop i-
larity. Hair styles varied from
the smooth, plastered hair of i..c
widow with her “Molly”, ’

frivolous styles where the h-. x
was “dyed red, the colour of a
cow’s tail, and is curled cr!
frizzed like a lap dog's’.



A Steel Band at the BBC

LONDON.
Even the B.B.C. raised its eye-
brow. Producers, announcers,
commentators and engineers,
whose daily job is to deal with
unusual and interegting people
from all parts of the world and
from all walks of life, wandered
over to have a look.

Cause of the excitement was the
Trinidad All Steel Percussion
Orchestra, making its first ap-
pearance in a B.B.C. studio for an
“In Town Tonight” broadcast. It
was an historic occasion—the
first opportunity for millions of
listeners in Britain to hear a real
steel band.

An announcer cautiously picked
up a rubber-headed hammer and
tried an experimental “ping” on
a first ping-pong, while somebody
else rumbled a string of notes
out of a bass boom. Others, wide-
eyed, expressed their amazement
and asked how it was done.

Mai Zetterling, the film star,
tapped daintily at an oil drum
with her foot. Jack Warner, the
radio and screen comedian, quiet-
ly studying his script at the other
end of the studio, came over to
see what it was all about.

And little Mr. George Brown-
ing, 93 years old and a regular
visitor to the “In Town To-night”
studio, said he had never heard
anything like it in a lifetime of
following the trends of the British
entertainment world.

It was a great day for TASPO
when it was invited to make its
first broadcast in England, A
B.B.C. man, invited to hear the
band, dropped his jaw in amaze-
ment as the first notes were struck
and immediately arzvanged for a
broadcast two nights ,ater.

So, shortly after five o’clock
that Saturday evening, a lorry
drew up outside Broadcasting
House and the bandsmen carried
their oil-drum instruments into
the studio, where other people
taking part in the programme
were already gathering.

There was a happy, family-
party atmosphere in the studio,
For most of the people who were

“In Town Tonight,” it was their
first broadcast and the B.B.C. was
careful, as always, to do every-



By BUTE HEWES

thing possible to put them at ease
before the microphone.

There was a young Scottish
singer, just back from a_ night-
club engagement in Holland.
There was a motor-coach driver,
snatching a few hours off from
his work among the _ holiday
crowds, and a_ pleasure-steamer
skipper, doing the same thing.
There was a girl athlete and there
was a young schoolmaster who
flies his own ‘plane. And there
was TASPO.

People wandered about the
studio, chatting informally, while
the producer, perched high above
in his glass-panelled control room,
twiddled knobs and boomed in-
structions through a loudspeaker
to his assistants who were arrang-
ing the microphones

Beside him sat Edric Ccnnor,
the baritone from Trinidad who
had done more broadcasts from
that very studio than he cared to
remember. The only member of
the TASPO party who knew his
way through the B.B.C. procedure,
he helped to direct the compli-
cated process known as “balanc-
ing.”

While the band played, micro-
phones were arranged before
them, behind them, beside them—
even swung high over their
heads. Once, Mr. Connor stopped
the band and told Philmore
“Boots’ Davidson to move his
three big bass »s0oms to one side,
so that their music would be
picked up better by the micro-
phones,

All the tisac, people wandered
in and out of the studio, staring
in fascinated amazement to hear
such sweet music coming out of
the oil-drum band

Finally, the producer was satis-
fied that the microphones had been
arranged to the best advantage. In
an adjoining studio, Mr. Connor
listened through a loudspeaker to
the band, as it would be heard in
millions of homes in Britain and
throughout the world. It came
over as clearly as if it were play-
ing in a concert hall,

Without fuss, the other peop!
taking part in the programm
were put through their paces
the microphone. Then, wit!
three-quarters of an hour to g)
before the programme went o.
the air, the producer called fo
the final run-through.

Out of the loudspeaker cam
the famous signature tune, th
Knightsbridge March, followe,
by the roar of traffic, the chatie
of the Piccadilly flower-seller:
the sudden bellow of : “Stop!”
The run-through was on,

Announcer Ronald Fletcher and
interviewer John Ellison glides
from microphone to microphone
round the big ‘studio, while th
guests in the programme were
shepherded one by one to their
places ready to be interviewed.

Gathered round one microphone
with Edric Connor were Lt
Joseph Griffith, the steel band’s
conductor, with bandsmen Elliott
Marinette and Philmore Davidson.
Between them, they told how the
steel band movement was born
how the instruments are madc
and tuned and how they aro
played. To round off their spo
in the pilogramme, the banc
played Mambo-Jambo

The run-through over, the
bandsmen slipped down to the
B.B.C. canteen, meeting-place of
stars, for a quick cup of tea. Ten
minutes later, they were back ir
their places, for it was nearly
time for the broadcast to begin.

All eyes were on the big studic
clock as its second-hand swepe
round the final minute before tne
broadcast was to go on the air.
Precisely at 7 15 p.m. the sig-
nature tune boomed out again,
a green light winked, and Ron-
ald Fletcher stepped up to the
microphone to announce ; “Once
again we halt the mighty roar ot
London’s traffic to bring to you
some of the interesting people
who are in Town Tonight.’

And TASPO played to the
biggest audience a steel band has
ever had.—B.U.P.



Miss Hennoeck Wants A °*Third
Programme

aakor The U.



on

From FREDERICK COOK

NEW YORK,

AMERICAN Frieda Hennock
thinks so highly of Britain’s Third
Programme that she has thrown
up a £13,000-a-year career and
taken a £5000 Government job to

campaign for a similar pro-
gramme in America.
Miss Hennock, brown - eyed

blonde, has dedicated herself as
a member of the Federal Commu-
nications Commission to the pro-
position that at least a quarter of
of the United States’ 1850 televi-
sion stations should be set
for something other than
mercialised cowboys and

plugging
finding the going heavy.
leagues—there are seven
missioners and she
woman—have not exactly turned
her down. But they have indicated

com-
beer-

Her col-
Com-

that 10 per cent. of the stations is

sufficient ‘for non-commercial use,

14-Hous Day

To gain her point, Frieda
Hennock (who “simply has never
had time to get married” though
she is now 46) is putting in a
14-hour day making at least one
speech for her idea every week
taking her lunch (butter milk and
fruit) at her desk every day
India Edwards, boss_ of
woman’s side of the Democratic
Party—who specialises in getting
women into jobs that only men
held before—brought her name
to President Truman's. atte:



aside

comedians. She is

is the only

the early

Miss Hennock is as unhappy
over American TV programmes
as she is over American radic
She says; “Ah, if only we had
something like your Third Pro-
gramme! You get the greatest in
drama and music. I'd do almost
anything to have it over here.”

Not that she is for “Govern-
ment control” over radio or TV.
“I'd rather have it in private
hands,” she says, “but I'm afraid
that commercial radio, finding it
financially unprofitable, will
never of itself. sponsor pro-
grammes appealing to a minor-
ity. And I’m afraid that unless
something is done now, TV will
go the same way. Once the sta-
tions are assigned we'll never get

them back.”
Just Three Rooms
In New York, when she was 2

wealthy lawyer, she lived in a
Park Avenue penthouse flat. Now
she has a three-room place in
Washington which sees her when
she is not stumping the country
on speaking tours or tied to her
desk at the office long after most
of the rest have gone home

What sort of TV programme
would she like, if she could have
her way?

“Well it would begin in the
with something

farmers—new

methods and so on. Then visual

morni



of interest t



educ ife, fe



Programmes would go into (the
schools: science films, geography,
‘xperts in various. fields who
would reach#thousands of chil-
dren. simultaneously, something
quite impossible in ordinary class
rooms. Moth at home could
follow the Teston and know what
the child was learning. Perhaps
she’d learn something herself.”

Miss Hennock does not explain
how Mother could be persuaded
to switch off the mannequin
parades and the love stories and
switch on to Junior in the class-
room,

But in the evening, she thinks
there could be courses for work -
ing adults and cultural pre-
grammes like ballet and opera.

She has i programme all
worked out, . the
years’ research dnd. preparation.

Insiders in Washington think

they know why she is willing, to |.

put so much tOil into what many
call a lost cause already, Says
one with a smile, “Frieda is very
ambitious, politically. She knows

a good white horse when she sees

one, and how to ride it for all it’s
worth, She has her eye on the}
FCC chairmanship.”

Mr. Truman has already nom-
inated her fora New York
Federal Judgeship. Some lawyers
oppose the appointment. The
matter is still to be thrashed out

Miss Hennoek, meantime, is
eontent with her campaign, her
one feminine weakness (“a taste
for hats on the daffy side”) and
her one remaining hobby: taking
crippled children to the circus on
Saturday afternoor

WORLD COPYRIGHT

RESERVED
+—LE.S.







under whi.1}
‘|ing crossed themselves, entered the ring.

.|sad eyes and straw-thin calves.

result of two}

MATADOR

They call him the bravest youth in
Spain El Atomico Litri earns £1000 in
| an afternoon.

(By KENNETH TYNAN)

| VALENCIA, on the Mediterranean coast
|of Spain, is normally a cramped and fetid
‘industrial town, but last week it became the
/centre of a pilgrimage.

Valencia’s deafening annual fair erupts
every summer, but last week the excitement
was sharper, because the bravest youth in
Spain, the 20-year-old matador, Miguel
| Baez Litri, was to appear three times in the
|bullring for the purpose of ruling and then
‘killing six fighting bulls.
| The people of Valencia treat Litri as a
|son; he was born near-by in Gandia, and he
| ovaduated from novice to full matador in
| their bullring last October, a week after his
twentieth birthday.

£3 A SEAT

They call him “el atomico Litri” because
|he is tiny, and they revere his valour: Litri
makes his bulls charge closer to his body,
| more repeatedly and perilously, than anyone
| alive.
| His life is like tightrope-walking, with the
| difference that, though one tightrope is much
\like another, no bull is like any other bull.
|Except, of course, that they ara all bred to
| fight and to weigh around half a ton.
| I went to Litri’s first fight at the fair. The
|bull-ring is not cheap: a front-row seat now
costs 300 pesetas—nearly £3.

The band played, and the matadors, hav-

| This was my first view of Litri—a gnome-
like boy, withdrawn and old-looking, with

Dominguin was there, too, tall and pre-
ciously smiling. He was awarded the ear
| of his first bull.

Soon after that Litri was gored. With back
proudly arched like a bow, he was complet-
ing some passes with an untouched, high-
_| horned bull; jolted once to the ground, he
had viciously attacked the bullring attend-
ant who leapt over the barrier to help him
up. He finished the series of passes, sculp-
|tured with a flick of the cape, and walked
away for his applause.

At this point the bull charged, piercing
him twice on the inner side of his left thigh.
He was carried from the ring. Dominguin
killed-his bull for him, while the bats that
infest that part of Spain began to whisper
| and scutter in the smoky air.

LUCK? NO

Though he had his first formal bullfight
only in 1948, there is already a substantial |
literature about Litri; and I went to see
him at his hotel next morning feeling as
much cheated as sympathetic.

I was wondering whether he would still
be unconscious, when he passed me on the

suit a size too large for him.

Of course he had recovered, he said, and
of course he would fight again that after-
noon. “I switch off like a motor when the
horn gets me,” he said, sitting with hands
clasped between his knees and looking un-
winkingly at them. “You can tell how far
it will go in, you can guess to a centimetre.
Yesterday was a scratch. You feel it, you
switch off, and when you switch on again
there is no pain.”

His manager joined us, prosperously
plump: a manager receives 20 per cent. of his
fighter’s earnings, and Litri gets 100,000
pesetas—almost £1000—every afternoon he
fights. “Yesterday was unlucky,” I said. “In
Spanish,” said the manager, ‘‘there is no
word for luck. It is the same word for luck
and destiny.”

‘AN INSECT’

Litri looked at neither of us; in his docile,
tobacco-brown face, with its huge gipsy nos2,
you could find no hint of the explosive pride
he feels in the presence of bulls. With them
hoe will shout, stamp, challenge and com-
mune; without them he says little, and that
quietly, with the smallest of shrugs.

stairs, calm and kempt, wearing a gaberdine|

DA COSTA © CO.



He prefers large bulls, “because then,”

am an insect.
and that is the pleasure.”

He has no rivalries, not even with Domin-
}guin, and when I asked which of his con-

only a judge of bulls.

judge of fighters.”
“He is too brave”,

ed to me as I left. “He will not see thirty.”

|the history of the Valencian ring.

Such’ gravity, such a bee-line intensity of

|

seen before, and neither had the crow: .
With the red cloth and sword he was tre-
mendous, turning like a revolving door.
ushering the bull through him. That day he |
dominated, with stitches in his thigh and n
fear.

He killed in one stroke, and was awarded
| Soth ears, the tail and a hoof.



| explaining how much they had been moved
| by his wristwork, by the straight, plunging
line along which he killed, by his firm and
clean cut footwork .. . ‘‘If you noticed all
these things separately,” he said, “then I
| have failed.”

I have a conviction that Litri’s perfect
fight, the one that most truly satisfies him,
will be the one that ends in his death.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

—L.ES.

”

he said, “they cannot see me—they think 1)
I have to grow as I fight them, |



temporaries he.most admired, he said: “I am |
The public is the |

the hall porter remark-
That afternoon in the first of his two bulls..|

}
| Litri fought one of the greatest bullfights i: |
}

| feeling between man and bull, I have never.’

TEMPTING HIGH
‘DELICACIES

White Cheddar Cheese. CLASS
Canadian Cheddar Cheese, LIQUEURS

1 Ib. Blocks.
Vienna Sausages, 4 oz.
Carr’s Cream Crackers.

Carr's Sweet Biscuits.
‘Carr’s Water Biscuits.

I saw him afterwards, when admirers were |

Chickens,
Tongues, Ox Tails, Ox

FRESH VEGETABLES.

ie & R SANDWICH _ BREAD

PHONE

iP SSOSSSOOS SSS SOS OCS SOS FSSC SCCSS

PRAM EL od

.

x
«

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 195i



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FRIDAY, AUGUST

ev. Hoyte Cross-
In Christian Mission Suit

17, 1951

REV. DALTON HOYTE, chief defendant in the Rev.

Frederick Barrow and others—Rev.

Hoyte and others

Christian Mission Chancery suit, was cross-examined for

nearly two hours by Mr. W

when he took the witness stand all yesterday.

W. Reece, counsel for Barrow,
Mr. Reece

will continue his cross-examination when the case contin-
ues on Tuesday before His Lordship the Vice Chancellor,

Sir Allan Collymore.

A decision is to be made as to
the = rig/tful General Superin-
tendent of the Christian Mission
Church in 1949, and 1950 and
who is the present General Super-
intendent.

Mr. Reece’s cross examination
tried to break down Rev. Hoyte’s
claim that"he did not attend a
meeting called by the Barrow and
others’ group to elect a General
Superintendent in 1949 because
he was advised that it was illegal.

Mr. G. H. Adams _ associated
with Mr. D. H. L. Ward, instruct-
ed by Carrington & Sealy is
appearing for the Rev. Hoyte
division. Mr. Reece is associated
with Mr. J. S. B. Dear, instructed

by Messrs. Hutchinson and
Banfield.

The ‘Herald’
At issue, too, is whether the
going out of existence of the
Mission’s Herald in which the

election of a General Superin-
tendent had to be published meant
that Rev. Hoyte whose _ election
was last published before the
Herald went out of existence,
continued to be General Super-
intendent. Mr. Reece questioned
him as to why he made the
Herald go out of existence.

Earlier Mr, Adams was attempt-
ing to bring out that Rev. Hoyte
did everything he could to try
and get the law amended so that
a legally convened meeting could
be held to elect a General Super-
intendent,

Evidence was given yesterday
too about the church being mort-
gaged to buy a car.

The Court was packed every
day of hearing of the case, with
members of the Christian Mission.
They sat in two sections.

Giving evidence, Rev. Hoyte
said that he got advice on January
1, 1949, and from that advice he
told church representatives not
to attend a meeting scheduled to
be held on the 6th because it was
illegally convened. He also told
Rev. Ramsay that the holding of
a meeting would be illegal.

“As I had already notified
various members,” Rev. Hoyte
said in reply to the Vice Chan-
cellor, “I did not think it neces-
sary to go to the meeting and tell
them that I thought it. was
illegal.”

No Confession

He had not told Rev. Ramsay
to go and take this place at the
meeting. He had had no talk of
confessing wrongs, though in the
course of a long conversation he
said he had heard a rumour that
he was likely to be injured if he

to produce a letter which he said
Rey. Hoyte had-sent the other side
at the time of the dispute. stating
the case of the illegal meeting.

Atter counsel failed to produce
the letter on the grounds that it
Was not received, Mr. Adams pro-
duced a signed document by
Davis, one of the Barrow group
showing he acknowledged receipt
of the letter.

He petitioned both Houses of
the Legislature asking that the Act
be amended, As far as he knew,
there was a counter petition. The
House of Assembly passed the
Bill, but it was not continued in
the Other Place. He was doing
this to try and get the meeting
held later in the year.

Credentials Received

When a meeting was to be held
credentials would be received for
representatives of various church-
es showing that a meeting had
been held to elect the representa-
tives. He was still in possession
of credentials he received when he
was Superintendent in 1948-49.

After he had petitioned Govern-
ment and the suit had been lodged
in court, he waited on the out-
come of the case.

There was a short break at this
point to allow George Morris,
clerk of the Public Library, to
produce an Advocate’s file, Janu-
ary to March, 1949 and give evi-
dence as to certain notices being
in the papers concerning the
Christian Mission.

Mr. Reece then began to cross-
examine Mr. Hoyte. In 1949, he
told Mr. Reece, neither Rev. Bar-
row nor Rev. Ramsay was on his
Board of Management. A _ fev
delegates’ who came from overseas
came to him and reported their
arrival.

“I did happen to silence them,”
he said, “but for their misconduct,
not for their asking me about fin-
ances, One of them asked wheth-
er the Mission's car was bought
in my-name, My reply was to
show them the receipt which was
marked, ‘credited to the Christian
Mission, sum of $2,000 for a car.’

“He said he understood I cred-
ited the car after mortgaging the
church. The way they spoke im-
plied they gave no respect to
whom they were speaking.”

They might have asked him to
meet them for a discussion, but he
could not remember, he said.
Whenever they wanted him they
came to him and he told them
what they wanted to know .

At The Tabernacle

He could not remember them to
have asked him to meet them at

attended the meeting. 10 o’clock on New Year’s Day at
“But that was not my reason the Tabernacle. He was there
for not attending,” the said. “My sometime between 8 and 9.30

reason as I had told them pre-
viously, was because of my advice
that it was illegal.”

He saw a notice informing the
late Board of Management that
an Acting Chairman had _ been
appointed afd upon that he
inserted a notice in the Advocate
stating his position. He stated
also that he held the documents.
He then told the representatives
that he would await an amend-
ment of the Act.

Mr. Adams at this point asked
the counsel for Barrow and others



o'clock, but he saw no delegates
there,

“T went for something from the
office,” he said when the Vice
Chancellor enquired why he went
to the office so early that morning,
“but I cannot remember for what
I went to the office. It is nothing
unusual—my going to the office.”

At 12 o’clock, he said he arrived
for the service. He saw. general
faces, but no particular face.
saw Larrier, Davis—I saw a fleet
of sisters and
brethren.”

‘Bigbury Bay’ Returns

Here After

Two Years

STOKER-MECHANIC CLARKE, who is undergoing
training with the Bay Class Frigate Bigbury Bay, now
anchored in Carlisle Bay, was perhaps the happiest man
of the ship’s complement when she dropped anchor at
Barbados on Wednesday evening.

Clarke was coming home to
his Welsh mother, Barbadian
father and sisters of Spooners, St.
John, after he was away from the
island for 16 years. He was taken
to England by his mother when he
was six. He was schooled in Eng-
land and worked at the mechanic’s
trade before joining the British
Navy.

“T am overjoyed to be back
home again to see my mother and
father and my other relatives”, he

said. Barbados was just a new,

place to him as he was too young

Since the Bigbury Bay’s visit
here in 1949, she went home to
the U.K. and was recommissioned
with a new complement of officers
and ratings, She returned to Ber-
muda about October 20, 1950.
After a two months’ stay at Ber-
muda, she went on a cruise to
South America which lasted three
months. She called at Cuba on the
way, as well as paid visits to
Brazil, Uraguay, Argentine, Rio do
Janeiro and Montevideo and sailed
1,000 miles up the Amazon.

Trinidad and St. Lucia saw little

when he left the island to recol~j of her when she was returning to

lect anything.

The Bigbury Bay is here on her
second visit. Captain W. W. R.
Bentinck, O.B.E., R.N., is in com-
mand on this eruise, The Bigbury
Bay first came to Barbados on
August 8, 1949, under Lt, Com-
mander G. R. P. Goodden, R.N.

Nine Officers

Of the nine officers on this
eruise, Lt. O. P. Sutton, Navigat-
ing Officer, and midshipmen R. Ww.
Kent and P. P. L. Wells have
been to Barbados before. Sutton
was here with the Bigbury Bay
in 1949 while the two midshipmen
were ratings of the Devonshire
when she was here about two
years ago.

The Bigbury Bay will be leaving

Barbados on Wednesday | for
Pointe-a-Pierre where she will
spend the night taking oil ‘and

then she will sail for Trinidad on
a five-day visit. From Trinidad
she will go to Grenada for five
days and then continue to Jamai-
ca, Nassau and Savannah, at each
of which ports she has planned a
week’s stay. The Bigbury Bay
hopes to be back at the America-
West Indies Station, Bermuda, by
October 1.

Her sistership, H.M.S. Burghead

Bay, has been commissioned to re-|

lieve her on October 15. The Big-
bury Bay will return to England
on October 26,

from the America-West Indies}
Station for about a year. t
At The Station j
Stationed with the Bigbury|

Bay at Bermuda is the Flag Ship
H.M.S. Superb, a cruiser. The ships
do six months of cruising and six}
months at the station. During the,
eruising period, they pay visits to}
the East coast of the States and
Canada. The main purpose of their



after operating |




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Visit The General Hardware Supplies To-day
FOR

@ PYREX WARE

@ ELECTRICAL
including FOOD MIXERS

@ ENAMEL WARE

And Many







He opened the side door
which had to be opened be-
fore the main one could be,
and it was then that the keys
were snatched from him. A
pandemonium started. When
the members went into the
church there wag singing be-
cause of opposition, the one
section starting one song and
the other beginning «nother:
besides people from outside
were shouting.

In most cases he used to make
arrangements for the church doors
to be opened before he arrived,
but because of trouble with Rev.
Larrier, he had for sometime been
going with the key himself.

“It was not that on that day
things were to come to a culmina-
tion,” he told Mr. Reece. “There
is the General Meeting and every-
thing is settled then.”

No Legal Advice

He had appointed Ramsay on
his original Board, but had got
legal advice to take off members
from overseas. He saw Ramsay
on January 5 at the Bay House
where he was put up, but he could
not remember whether anyone
else was there. There was a wo-
man, he knew, though, who used
to be there.

Rev. Ramsay asked him to al-
low him to be a judge and go into
the various vexations which had
occurred. One was the dismissal
of Rev. Larrier, There was a
question of finance, but that had
always been a question even be-
fore he was born,

The Christian Mission Herald
went out of publication late in
1946. He made efforts to revive
it, efforts such as checking up the
possibilities of its revival. A case
of type came from Americ, after
the Herald had gone out of exist-
ence, but the type were not ade-
quate and were evidently sent by
people who did not know the re-
quirements,

He disposed of the plant to Mr
Cole. It could be true that it was
being then used, but that would
be because Mr. Cole would have
other type and necessary parts.

“It is true that they paid off the
mortgages even before the time”,
he said, “but that was purely be-
cause of opposition.”

The Herald, he said, had been
since revived.

The case continues on Tuesday



Injured In Accident

Willie Sisnett, a tally clerk of
Country Road, St. Michael was
rushed to the General Hospital
where he was detained after he
was involved in an accident_with
the motor car M-881 on Roebuck
Street just before 8 p.m. yester-
day.

The drivér of the car was John
Alleyne of Whiteman's Village,
St. George.

DIED OF BURNS

Seventy - six - year - old Ida
Lavine who was detained at the
General Hospital on August 14
for burns or. her body died on
August 15 about 8.50 p.m. A post
mortem examination was per-
formed at the Hospital Mortuary





«rt at 11 am. yesterday by Dr.
Shomorock.
there were An inquiry has not yet been
fixed.
Bermuda. She reached Bermuda

by April 1951. May found her
\aving Bermuda again for Halifax.
Nova Scotia, where she spent
three weeks undergoing repairs
and she was back at Bermuda by
the end of June to carry out anti-
submarine exercises.
Cruising

The Bigbury Bay left Bermuda
on August 1 on this cruise. She
has spent four days at John’s,
Antigua, and five days at St. Lucia.
She left St. Lucia on Wednesday
morning for Barbados.

The name Bigbury Bay was
given her after a small bay in the
south of Devon. Her crest em-
bodies a small toasting fork which
is representative of the toasting
fork on which the patron saint of
Bigbury was roasted because of
his religious convictions.

Lt, R. G. A. Fitch, the Corres-
pondence Officer, said that he
thought the climate of Barbados
fine. He found Rio de Janeiro
hottest of all the places he visited.
“I am looking forward to a fine
stav here.”

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BARBADOS ADVOCATE

examined Cumberland Square

_Wanted For Marketi

BUSES MUST GO

The Director of Highways and Transport and the Commis-

sioner of Police were asked

yesterday by the Commission-

ers of Health of St. Michael, to consider the possibility of
finding some place for the accommodation ‘of the ‘buses
which now park on the area of Cumberland Square which
is above the Parochial Buildings. They are to do so with
a view to the possibility of making the site a temporary
district market. These officers will report back to the Board.

The decision was taken after the
Board had discussed correspond-
ence from the Director and Com-
missioner relative to the sugges-
tion that had been initiated by
Mr, E. D. Mottley a few weeks
ago, of making Temple Yard a
temporary district market. At the
meeting also were the two officers
mentioned, the Director of Medi-
eal Servi¢es and the Colonial
Engineer.

The suggestion came from the
Director that the parking spot for
cars at Cumberland Square could
be done away with for that pur-
pose, and the site used for a tem-
porary market.

Two suggestions came from the
Commissioner. In one he recom-
mended the provision of the mar-
ket at Temple Yard with shelters,
and pointed out that he was mot
in favour of the Cumbe' id
Sonare site,

The other suggestion which had
been forwarded to the Co -
sioners some days after the {ifst,
presented a change of mind” In
it he pointed out that he thought
the old Public Market could be
remodelled and improved for the
ing could be found for the rum
market, and that some other build-
bond.

In this connection he said yes-
terday that he had received a re-
port from the Fire Officer drawing
attention to the danger of fire as
a result of the stowing of rum in
that building, and he had for-
warded this report to Government.

“Tf this building be re-condi-
tioned for a market,” said the
Commissioner, “we will then have
a proper and permanent market,
and in my opinion that would be

the solution to the whole prob-
lem.”
Some members stated that as

far as the latter point was con-
cerned, an effort to use the build-
ing in that respect had been tried
in the past and found unwork-
able. This would happen again
In any case, however, there wad
no question of a permanent mar-
ket to accommodate the hawkers
in the entire City area. The pro-
vision of district markets was
what was required to suit the con-
venience of the public.

They agreed though that the use
of the old Public Market as a rum
bond constituted a fire hazard and
that it should be discontinued

Mr. Mottley expressed agree-
ment with the suggestion about the
Cumberland Square site, provided,
he said, that the parking place for
the "buses be included and some
covering erected there.

While he agreed with the Com-
missioner of Police that the old
market presented a fire hazard be-
cause of the stowing of rum there,
there were several reasons why
he could not agree to making it a
market today. To mention only
two, the building was definitely
unsuitable for a market in a
tropical land, and the site was no
more central than any other,

The thought that the whole
thing now depended upon the
Commissioner of Police and the
Director of Highways and Trans-
portsin getting together and seeing
what could best be done in the
finding of some place for the
Speightstown ‘buses to park so
that the site could be used as a

market.
Difficult

For fear there should be no mis-
understanding, he wanted it to be
known that it was not intended
that this should be a market for
hawkers from all over the City,
but for those within the area from
Busbey Alley, James Street,
Milk Market and other nearby
areas, where a difficult problem
was presented for the regulation
of traffic and for sanitation.

Mr, Victor Chase, supporting
the suggestion, said that he con-
sidered the Cumberland Square
site proposal the best put forward,

Of course he appreciated the
jesire of the Commissioner of
Police to have removed the fire
hazard from the old Public Mar-
ket but to force the hawkers back
into that building which had
proved itself unsuitable in the
past, would be a very grave hard-
ship on those persons, as well as
the public in general It would
be going against the decisions ar-
rived at by the District Markets

district markets were
necessary for the convenience of
tne puolic. Besides, the building
could not by any stretch of the
imagination be described as cen-
tral

He was in agreement with the
suggestion of the Director because
the site was within easy reach of
all those people who now mace
heir purchases in James Street,
Busbey Alley and the other alley-
ways
He thought, however, that the
old Public Market could be so re-
constructed that it could be used
as a parking place for the ‘buses
that would be removed from
Cumberland Square. Temple Yard
could be used similarly for the
cars.

He was entirely opposed to the
giving up of the principle of pro-
\Qling district markets, because
these as he had said, were very
necessary, He was being con-
fronted with one worry now, and
that was that the Cumberland
Square site might become so

popular as a district market, that
the efforts for making the Milk
Market site one, might be neg-
lected

Members having agreed in fav-
our of this site and Mr. Mottley’s
added suggestion, the Board then
made the request of the Commis-
sioner of Police and the Director
of Highways and Transport as
already stated.

The suggestion
of Highways and Transport
the first suggestion of the Com-
missioner of Police were dated
July 27 and August 4 respectively

Directo
and

of the

They were addressed to thf
Chairman and read
Director’s Letter
Sir,
Further to the motion arising
out of the meeting held on the

26th, instant concerning the possi-
ble use of the Temple Yard as a
temporary Vegetable Market, may
I suggest that consideration be
given to the following alterna
tive suggestions: —

That the Car Park presently
located at Cumberland Square be
done away with.

That a Car Park be made in the
highway known as Temple Yard
(it would accommodate about
thirty (30) cars) making it a one-
way street if necessary.

That a Car ‘Park be made in the
highway lying between the trian-
gular garden and St, Mary’s
Church wall (it would accommo-
date about 14 cars); and that this
highway be declared a Car Park,

That the present site of the Car
Fark at Cumberland Square be
vsed for a temporary market.

This proposal has the following
advantages :——

The market would be located on
a more suitable site near the bus
stand and the public conveni-
ences, and would be shady,

It would be less inconvenient
to have a Car Park rather than
a market in Temple Yard, and thi®
highway would not have to be
closed to vehicular traffic.

By creating the highway be-
tween the triangular garden and
St. Mary’s Church wall a Park-
ing Place, the present nuisance
from vegetable carts and hueck-
sters, complained of by the
Reverend Hinds, 5

To drive one’s car to Tempe
Yard and walk to market at Cum-
berland Square would be no mo
onerous than driving to Cumbe’-,
land Square and walking to ma--|
ket in Temple Yard.

Dear Sir,
Commissioner's
I do not

Cumberland Square as @
When it

iO

Letter

of
Vegetable
rains, the hawkers will have

take shelter. After the rain ha
stopped, they will still suffer for
some time with rain drops
falling from the trees.

This square will only
accommodation for 150 to
hawkers, whereas Temple
will be able to hold a
many more.

I recommend the saneme for
the provision of a market with
shelters in Temple Yard and the
retention of Cumberland Square

Market.

provide

200
Yard
great

Committee who had decided thatas a parking place.

SeaeaeuekeGRGoeue aes
INSIST ON

=
# PURINA

THEY ARE

H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. - Agents






CHOWS

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. PAGE FIVE



Charwoman
Loses Lawsuit

IN THE PETTY DEBT COURT
of District “A” yesterday
Judge A. J. H. Hanschell
ed judgment to
and Mrs. H. G. Mahon of Worth-
ing, Christ Church, in the casc
which plaintiff, Gwendoline Dawe
ot Sargeants Village, Christ
Church, claimed the amount of $5
owed to her by the defendan:
for scrubbing floors in their hou
on June 19
Dawe appealed against the de-
cision of Mr. Hanschell Mr
Denis Malone appeared on behalf
of Mr. and Mrs. Mahon,

Mrs. Mahon toid the court that
she employed Dawe to look after
the yard and the drawing room
and paid her no extra money {
any work

Norman Woods employed as
butler at Mrs Mahon's gues
house, said that all of Mrs. Ma-
hon's servants were paid by thr
week. Dawe was employed as
yard woman—that is, her duty
was to clean the yard and some-
times she might have to scrub the
drawing room

Acting
award-
defendants My



























He was present when Mrs. Ma
hon took her on to work for her
She was paid $2 a week for the
work. One morning Mrs. Mahor
told him to tell Dawe to scrut
around the carpet in the drawing
room

Dawe did _ this. When Mrs
Mahon returned that afternoor
Dawe told her that she was leav-
ing and wanted her week’s mone»
and also extra pay for serubbins
the floor in the drawing room
Mrs, Mahon told her that she
never took her to pay her extra
for work and offered her the day’
pay, but Dawe did not take it





POSSESSES EP POSS OSOS

HARRISON'S — BROAD STREET





Dawe left the house making
much noise and said that she
would put Mrs. Mahon in the TERT eee i ote ee ete er eee
Petty Debt Court for the money
Mrs. Mahon’s house has | S( ALES a
bedrooms, three upstairs, and ty
{:wostairs. There are four }

nanent guests in the
the others come and go

place

SCALES |
SHOP SCALES |

Hardware Dept.

HARRISON'S — Mosdvere 0

CLS LLL LPL LPP ED

One witness for the plaint } . nN ViTee? 7 11

aid that she heard when Da: 10-1) CAPACITY FITTED WITH

* Mrs eon that she wants SEAMLESS BRASS PAN, COM- $29 44
$5 for serubbing the floo M) -LETE TT TEIGHTS
Mahon dahieed to yo at ai u PLETE: Wits erases. 3
money saying that she neve
ranged with Lee. oe anies ae KITCHEN SCALES

Mr. Malone in his addre " . SA MING ry
pointed out that bettie the aan i-th CAPACITY WITH STRONG
tiff was taken on she was tol SEAMLESS TIN PAN, COMPLETE $9 39
exactly what she had to do an WITH WEIGHTS
what she would have been e :

pair
for these duties

He submitted that there was n¢
evidence to show that the plain
tiff was paid in any different way

We also hold large Stocks of...

from the other servants in the
place, There was no evidence
against Mr. Mahon Assorted widths and Mesh sizes (14” to 14”)
IS WORSHIP Mr, H. A. ‘Tal- for Fish Pots.
ma Police Magistrate of Stout Wire—Heavily Galvanised
District “A” yesterday fined

Robert
bourer

Rouse, a la-
of Salters St.
$14.40 for wounding Errol Johnson
with a knife on his left arm

The fine is to be paid by month-
ly instalments or in default two] %
months’ imprisonment with harc| §

31-year-old
Michael

HARDBOARD

TERMITE PROOF WOOD SUBSTITUTE
3/16” thick Sheets; 4 x 6, 8, 10, 12 feet
‘e” thick Sheets: 4 x 8 and 10 feet.

tod-on Apel 14, 1951. S EXPANDED METAL

ted. on April 14, 1951,
_IN SHEETS 4 x 8’ —ASSORTED MESH
Sizes: From 1%" to 2” across narrowest part of

diamond shaped mesh,

HE FRONT FORK and tyre o
the motor cycle X-1140 own
ed and ridden by Agustus Castill
of Hastings, Christ Church wer
damaged when it was involved i
an accident with the motor am
bulance M-1694 owned by th
Governor-in-Executive Committe
and driven by Frederick Webst¢
of Seaview, St. James about 74
a.m,, yesterday at the junction «
Streets





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y %,

| TO-DAY'S
' SPECIAL

DELIGHTFUL
AND
DELICIOUS

PRUNE CREAMS

aT Ms

PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN



There is no need for you to suffer
agonising discomfort after meals
* BISMAG ° (Bisurated Magnesia) will
bring you quick relief by neutralizing
the excess acid in your stomach
which in most cases is the cause of
the discomfort, Modern conditions
which give rise to nervous stress and
strain often cause stomach discomfort
which should not be neglected
*“BISMAG ' quickly and efficiently
relieves stomach pains, heartburn or
flatulence due to excess stomach
acid, Try it today.



4

you
NEED

‘BISURATED’ MAGNESIA

| Tablets and Powder Sold by all Chemists
t
i
i
|

GOSPR DOOOSSS CSG SP OPSOO OFS



ee









| RECENTLY ARRIVED!
.

EARTHENWARE |





| ;
) | in
YOU WHE SELECT THESE EAREY | eunpvotan sa aentes
MARTELL BRANDY Soere oe | CREAM and WHITE
For your sick Child or invalid MARTELL BRA? Ce ‘pe 4 / . "|
miniature sizes . ae sete 36c. 48c. and 96e. | SpEee with FLORAL PATTERNS
SLICED BACON . 5 Per lb. 1,00 | PLAIN WHITE
1 DANISH CAMEMBERT CHEESE Per Tin 1.19 |
i pamisH CREAM CHEESE in Pkts. of 6 otagrig 7 \}} Each Piece Priced Separately
ANISH SALAMI SAUSAGE er lb. 1 | i , ‘ es
| ) SWIFTS VIENNA SAUSAGES Small Tins 43 —Thus making Replacements Easy
CANADIAN RED CHEESE Per lb 1.15
SOUTH AFRICAN FIG JAM 2-lb. Tin 54 f j
| K.W.V. DRY GIN ... Per Bottle 2.00 |
| BAHAMAS CRUSHED PINEAPPLE Per Tin 24 \|
eo CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD
Per Bottle 18c. iva Per Carton $4.00 {| - °
C ii]
i | 10, 11, 12, 13, Broad Street
Ti ~ ay, + = i} |
STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.
}
_ See SSS] RN Ya ey - —_











PAGE SIX





BY CARL ANDERSO

HENRY















MY LODGE BROTHERS \

LAD! }
CORRECT, IN THE *FRATERNAL

1 WASN'T VERY

“TRANSPARENT... AND

RATTLING CHAINS GAVE ANE A
- HEADACHE!

UM A SOF THEARTED

SPOOK! AS FOR HAUNTING
DARK OLD HOUSES...

lL PREFERRED HANGING



AROU!



BY CHIC YOUNG

, ye
THING LIKE GOOD OLD
SPARERIBS AND SAUERKRAUT.
Ss











I SMELLED IT
THE MOMENT I
_ TURNED THE js

x? CORNER IN !
R-\ OUR STREET

Papas



TO
<







C#

THE

THE RISK AS WELL AS THE ACT WILL BE JUSTIFIED
\F THE CROOKS IN BATESVILLE ARE PUT WHERE THEY

(IT DANGEROUS TO
‘TRY TO HOLD
UP TRAIN/

YES. WELL TRAVEL LIGHT. IF OUR MISSION
y \S SUCCESSFUL, WE'LL RETURN, AND
\F WE PAIL, WE'LL HAVE NO

ben FURTHER USE FOR
Ss pt_OUR GEAR/



BY GEORGE MC. MANUS

}

A

iit
|
}

Wa

THAT I AM--
TELL. ME -WHO
IS THAT PRETTY
GIRL IN THE
ROOM WITH
TH’ WEDDIN'
PRESENTS? | 4





AH/ WZ. JIGGS! | OH! SHE'S THE
ENJOYING

| YOURSELF AT
THE PARTY ?








DETECTIVE WE
| HIRED TO WATCH | |







THE GIF VS -YOU
KNOW-THERE’S



LOTS OF




THIEVES | |
pists AROUND | |
% say eats
, on J

Lass +8

g
















/
I]
LI com 1951, hing Features Syndicate. Inc, Worhd rights reserved




OH! TNT. / T WOULD
SAY YES INA MINUTE, PEAR...
BUT 1 KNOW THAT LOVE
PROSPERS BEST IN
...PROSPE
SURROUNDINGS /

I KNOW IT GOUNDS
UNROMANTIC... BUT,
DARLING... TWO CAN'T
REALLY LIVE AS CHEAPLY






SAYING THINGS... ESPECIAI.LY

TOA GORL...A GORL THAT

4Y LOVE... BUT VILL YOU
MARRY WITH ME 27







any
BY ALEX RAYMOND

=

oS

Y AGIKANR

Cope 1991, King Feainges Syndigte, Ve

THE PHANTOM
WOUNDED BY THE REPORTERS
SHOT AND FRIGHTENED BY

THE SOUND THE TIGER BOUNDS

P UHs ITALLWENT WRONG! IF

> THAT GUY DIES «BUT THEV CANT)
BLAME ME! IT -zc—= es
WAS JUSTA 7



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 1951



The natural way to

ano FIT
u want to attractively
with brig radiant
fitness,
that you keep
cleansed of
im i Clinical tests by
doctors confirm that Bile Beans
lo this, gently and effectively.
I Beans are keeping millions
healthy and youthful in looks
nd figure Start taking them











Nature's Gentle Aid

BILE BEANS

ust a couple at Bedtime

x

-

4,650 .65¢ Ft tittle gt gt gt 6g
PPPs 454 5% 5 oto,

.







, Delights

Cae oie
Aled



Lietel a

For Your

Enjoyment



rd
eT aa
Ct PT oa



-lb tin Danish Hams

5 < a
6669666666 OOOO OOOPOOD

SOOO PS OSS OPES POPS EE PFE SD

» Swifts Luncheon Beef
» Vienna Sausage

% “Black Buck” Sauce

Ting Lamb Tongues

PO

% ,, Cocktail Biscuits
, Salted Peanuts

», Sliced Bacon

% AND OUR POPULAR
Five Star Rum — 1.13 Bot































Usually NOW
80 60

Usually Now
PEEK FREAN'S CREAM BISCUITS

any two packets for 102

ONIONS 4 lbs. for
ao

52 POTATOES 6 lbs. for 96

EVAPORATED MILK (2 tins) 58

21 CHEESE

26

BEER HEINEKENS



=—=_——_

————









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CHILDREN PLEASED
WITH THEIR

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> Get These Tasty 3



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INCE & Co. Ltd.
| IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
| ‘SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only

v

= = SS =
~ 5 S544, 654,05 5449 9 OOOO
LLL LLCS SSS SSS OSS SSS CSO CPOE PFE EPPS PEP LPL IPP IIS I III

PPPOE EES

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Pa
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| ¥ Let your Children come in and x
2 °
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: select some of the following:=~ %
1% %
} ‘
\% %
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% THE SHIP OF ADVENTURE—by Enid Blyton %
%
is %s
| > ‘co y 7 {er %
| % CHILDREN'S NEW ILLUSTRATED ENCYCLOPEDIA x
1% ¥%
¥ “ >
x GIMLET BORES IN—by Captain W. E. Johns 3 %
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% THE WESTOW TALISMAN—by Percy P. Westerman : Aag\ he %
Ss . e A ac oe %
i%® a z x
% rl Sik = —s is *
* vm rihanna x
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| ‘ PPLE SDPO PPD PPPSCPEP CIEE PE LEP DOSED ECP PLES VPPPVOP PEP PPP PLLPPPLPLPLPPPPAPPLLVPPP PLL PPPS,
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x “ied bs
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x THESE FOODS WE OFFER! :
1X :
x ) Mice | Y
1% ’ r 7 _ x
| x Call up *+Your Grocers” Torday x
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: BE KIND TO x
%, ernst + , %
1% TINNED FRUIT pone x
is ‘ YOUR %
Tims Peaches 2\'s & I's =
| Pears 2}'s - * x
» Bahama Pineappk PALATE %
is Pieces $
@ i. Tins Bahama Crushed Pine -
ie Sa . ste o apple Tz %
de DRINK 3
§ SAUSAGES HARY FOODS SPECIALS ‘
| %
< ra. aes Oxford Pkgs. Clapp’s Baby Oat- 8 i ine frome, Duffs A L L E WN KE S
ce Mange in Flavours x
ig Tauro Beef Saus- meal Van Houten’s Drinking x
% Tins Smorgan’s Vienna Pkgs. Clapp’s Baby Cereal ; 7 oe eee 4 RTH U RSs *
1% sane Fresh Pearl Barley per Ib. Bots. Demerara Casserree} . $
g tt he on Pork Sausages, Pkgs. Camembert Cheese x
x » pkgs. Fresh Oat Flakes per Ib 8 ez. Pkgs. Stoned Dates ‘ "a :
~ pe &
x 5 ae Pea in nh ts Se K 4 § A L %
‘ALLEYNE ARTHUR & € ce :
AL NE , TW & Co.. Lid mare $
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OP SOEOS SOE $54.4 < 5 ;

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PPPSIOSCES

ttt, SOOO ee +,¢ 436,454 44¢ 406
PLPF SEES SPOR SOO OD PDD PSOO PSS O SSPE FP PSE EPPS SE EEE GEESE LS ECOL PEEPLES





FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
GOVERNMENT NOTICES

PAGE SEVEN “

NOTICES



FOR RENT











!

PUBLIC SALES

—~

SHIPPING






































































































TAKE NOTICE

Ltd.

6.7.51—t.f.n,





































NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the

Statutony Meeting of the members of



















Izal
Keplars Malt and Oil





















to register the same after one month from the 16th day of August 14
some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at r

opposition of such registration

1, unt
y office of
The trade mark can be seen on application at ry
































































LTD

you serve :-













Minimum charge week 72 cents and
TELEPHONE 2508 Ten cents per agate line on week-days| 96 cents Su"days 24 words — over 24 Attention is draw F q <
ie and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, | words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a] pions TOA) wnt tO the Price of Goods (Defence) (Amend
minimum chBrge $1.50 on week-days| word on Sundays; : ) Order, 1951, No, 4 which will be bl Tet 2 - Ms $s
DIED FOR SALE and $1.80 on Sundays. Gazette of Thursday, 16th August, 1951 Ee en oe ae Sea dian National! Steamships
: een ' ys August, 195 j GA. & “
tae era rans REAL ESTATE 2. In this Order the items:—
bHoOWNE On August 16, 1951. Dore Minimum charge week 72 cents and ‘ee soi pee ee HOUSES | Bise 7
Atheline Browne, mother of sr | 96 cents Sumdays 24 words — over 24) _ LAND--S445 sq. ft. situate at Princo | Scults—Sweet and Soda iis ce Ser
langle wee ee voran ® cgnts a word week—4 cent a) of Wales Road, Bank Hall, suitable for | Brassieres SOUTHBOUND
ae. ee sheet ee’ Pict at oie undays; | the erection of a Bungalow. Appiv:| CLIFTON TERRACE—To an approved Cigars Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails
»m. today for the Holy Trinit? 4 ME, Brittons Hill. Dial 4191. | tenant. Furnished House, Upper Bay St. Clean: | Montresi Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
Church | 17.8.51—4n. | Opposite Yacht and Aquatic Clubs. Al Cont sers | SAN CONSTRUCTOR 9 Aus a ‘ ZA 22. Aug
- | ja e. oe a ne » cti , * y ‘ELSON 20 Avg 4
Golbourne Browne, Ottis Brath- | — | COUN : . a“ | modern conveniences Apptiy on premises on ectionery i: R.. SO 2
waits, Claudine Davis, Octavia} AUTOMOTIVE | ,, COUNTRY HOUSE FOR SALE 3.8.51—t.£.n Haberdashery (H ‘ ; : | CAN. CRUISER 29 A
: | at St. George in perfect con- abil Shery (Hard):—Pipes, Cigarett i | CAN. CHALLENGER 8 Scot
Kirton, Willie Browne dition, and stand —- -apEE Eee : > garette holders and| LADY RODNEY 19 8.
WW i | % and stands on 13 Acres of good] MARWIN — Maxwell Road, from 1 cases, lighters and metal soap dishes CAN. CONSTRUCTOR 28 Sent
inemnastinmeginay | p CAR —1950 Hillman. Apply at Cliftom arene land. Appi to D'Arcy A. Scott, | September: Apply gE. H Farmer, } Haberdashery (Soft): i 6 aoa | LADY NELSON 10 O
PASH—On August 16th 1951, at her resi- Terrace, Upper Bay Street. Telephone | M&éazine Lane 158.51—2n. | Andrews Plantation. Phone 95267 . a * —- Artificial flowers, Tobacco | o
dence dsbury Road, Julietta May | ~~ 17.8.51—4n FOR SALE. St. Elmo at Maxwell 16.8. 51—4n ae es, Purses, Sponge bags, Paper Serviettes and saprapenpnnatinteaausani—daeatssisamsisneocisieemncesdnetenibatisnnsinaitionseuiaompiicntiite ‘ns aoliiececai
i fune tav the . | . re! _e a el tattle 2 a !
cnet ce ts om aoe for | ,.cAR—Chrysier 1939 Modei in perfect | RO#d. Just 5 mins. walk from the sea PLAT on Blue Waters Terrace, newly 7 Tigeues. NORTHBOUND
2 nemoe ot ae > ecnaition. Engine. paint, upholstery and toe ae Drawing and Dining | built with spacious cupboards. Phone Insecticides | Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
Mro. M. Whittaker, Mrs. M. Ford! i} Gos euton caer = asare apply: | Sirame. and ee ae oe we ¢ 25.7. 51--t.f n Leather goods manufactured | Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal
isisters), Frederick Blackman | : ase ah ee | For further information apply to D'Are , Maxwell C Serviettes : | LADY RODNEY 26 Aug = 28 Aug 6 Sept 8 Sept. 11 Sept
(brother, Trinidad), W. M.. Ford, ae 1p te eit ieee Ory ae ae oe, ae Road rviettes (all kinds) LADY NELSON 16 Sept 18 Sept Sept ept. - 2 Oct
Barton Vord \nephews), Jehovah") CAR—One Vauxhall 14,6 in pectect| 15.8.51—-2n, | ete. Good sea-bathing. Available’ trom h Toilet Requisites, | LADY RODNEY a6 Ges.’ | 20 Ont, aY Ons Oct 1 Nov
‘ aeonrage TE , | condit.on. Apply: C. St. Hill, & ate — ——_—._ | Ist October, Phone 2 7 ave been de ; ; Bae } 4
Trinidad and U.S.A. Papers please COPY.) peiitan Garage, Magazine es Cosmo-4 ann FOR SALE one Same ‘ea Sica (Aeeoguaa eee ae from the Price of Goods (Defence) |
7 - £915 17.8.51—3n. ‘CHANGE—Owner fine Homie | em, . rder » No, 2. }
LESLIE: On August 17, 195] at his resi- a Seno aan Government Hill area. Em SELBY HASTINGS—4 bedrooms, 3 with | !6th August, 1951, 6 | GARDINER AUSTIN & Co LTD.—Agents.
dence Joses Hill, James Walter Leslie. Sette iy eee Saloon done only 5,500 | euhuces ot area farally, obliged Guywing water, all modern conveniences 17.8.51—1n, |
we ‘ ats te resi. | Mules in_A-1 condition. FORT ROYAL | smatler piace preferably on | Unfurnished. Available Ist S ce re —
Funeral will leave the above resi ' GARAGE LT s ‘Al ; e ist September
; : jARS JTD. Telephone 4504 ea or sell cost price. Exceptional and | Apply on premises between 4 m. and SaaS
or oe. "Clamsate Onmbel, hai 16.8.51—En | aoe deat eee highly advantage- | 6 p.m. everyday. 168. 51—Sn. APPLICATIONS from Sanitary Inspectors and Registered Nurses ROYAL NETHERLANDS { te eo eee
Angalina, Leslie: (Wite); Brersteis CAR—Morris 8. 1947 Model in good | through responsible Agents "Ring 3095 | SUNSET"—st James. belonging 1 (Hospital Trained) for Course of Training at the Public Health STEAMSHIP CO. {
is en as | Marking order, tyres very zood. Dial after 3 p.m. daily Mast—itn. | Mr. A.C Worswiek. for August and oe Centre in Jamaica. 5 a AMLANG TERDAM .
a i p 's). 25 6563a—0—————— September only ‘urnished Pplications i . bee - . ae .
VO ere hl | eek A eke sat Z| YEARWOOD & BOYCE, Misines tae ns are invited from Sanitary Inspectors and Registered | â„¢ S. HBLENA-5Sth September 1961 Cle Gle Transatluntiaue !
ect CAR—1949 Fiat 15 hp. Very good | AUCTION Janie ‘werent. Ses (Hospital trained) who are willing to be consider 1 toe SALLING TO PLYMOUTH AND
IN MEMORIAM j condition. Reasonable. Bedford ‘Cot- 14.8.51—t.f.n. | Vanced courses which ar : sidered for ad- MSTERDAM ae
j te ge Bedford Ave. (Phone 4894, 7 a.m. | ——. Ue es seiiossieamieienion —— | respectively ; the P ray Saas ted to last about eleven and ten months | 4-8. WIALEMSTAD—11th_ Sept. 1951 ont
FENTHAM—In loving memory’ of our | pom.) 15.8.51—an ae TO LET : ely at the Public Health Centre in Jamaic: SAHLING TO FARAMARIRO AND 7
dearly beloved mother Mrs. Helena | —————— Bare ae UNDER THE SILVER ONE FURNISHED BEDROOM on Sea Applicants should ; ly re in Jamaica, BRITISH GUIANA SAILING TO
Bentham who fell asleep on the 17th} MOTOR CYCLE 1% hp. B.S.A HAMMER side at Rocklay, use of kitchen. Phone t , @ apply in writing before the 20th August | 8:8. AGAMEMNON--I5th August 1951 ENGLAND & FRANCE
August 1950 | good as new; done only 1,700 miles D.C, SUGAR 4796 — 8553 after 12 o'clock o the Director of Medical Services Giverniecht Bullet |S 8. STENTOR—13th September 1951 ‘NGLA) ANCE
Rest eternal grant O Lord Owner buying bigger Cycle, Teleph , : 17.8. 51— T : case aings, SAILING TO TRINIDAD SABC ACONE
ne ee cai as tt mae: eee re Oe? | Far teocdartendation. of -Slgvds Agents | sccsmncincdpesiccunneianinn he Wharf, and a full curriculum vitae should be included if PARAMARIBO AND BOG “GASCOGNE” 11tt
SO6 tat Mee eevee, eed Ab aces we will sell on FRIDAY the 17th 102 the application, The scholarships for the N) ss. COPTICA-—ath August 1981 1951 via St. Lucia
seein atin Eee Wiasiea’ Ghee 15.8.51—4n | Begs Dark Crystal Sugar commencing at a I ps for these courses, if approved, pro-|" SAMLANE RINIDAD AND ied
Children: Eileen, Charles, George, Chris- | °° 12.30 o'clock at the follow w vide: — +t | ANG TO TRINIDAD AN ique Guadaloupe
tina, Christina’ Parris (sister), Mrs.| STATION WAGGON 1951 Hillman| hocees” re eee | ee Nee Antigua. -
Constance King (cousin) } Station Waggon. First Registered April. General Traders Ltd. — Roebuck St (a) Sion ais passage to and from Jamaica iM 5 MELENA aint September 1951
7.8.5 Mile Y = . * a. MSs e = s ember 19% in
Se any alt appease aaa Bh Me lll netanning & Co , Lid. Steel Bldg: Pier- (b) Subsistence allowance at the rate of $4.80 per night, if} 8. P MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD
ANNOUNCEMENTS. (225) S2Se,. APP! Raph, Beard, | “S''p. Musson son & CO. — Briage| GTAMMar School, St, Vincent rs wee or $2.40 per night, if single. PaaS AMIE, SOUTH BOUND
a > : a. —tn. | St Sale 12.30 o’clock Terms CASH. eae ae ¢ ravelling expenses in Jamaica at a a
ALL THIS GREAT HELP |. VAN—A Twelve Horse Power peatorg) BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. perenne, Se invited for month. a at the rate of $14.40 rer aus iy. “mONRKA" COLOMBIE” 22nd August,
from ASPRO. Colds and ‘flu dispelled Van in first class condition, Priced to | Auctioneers Math pos is 0} ience Master, (a) Conti ‘ees Will accept Cargo and Passengers : 1951,
headaches cleared-soothing swift relief | sell. Apply: Courtesy Garage oe Dint| athematical Master, and two R ngenc es at the rate of $4.80 per month, for Dominica, Antigua, Mont Cailing = at Crinidad, Ta
from Rheumatic and Neuralgic Pains 3111 17.8.51—1in. | 16.8.51—3n | Masters for General Subjects. 3%. The scholarships witt only be granted on the following serrat, Nevis, St. Kitts, Sailing Guaira. Curacao, Cartagena
Hcianes steklemnaes. Lat Aden | Oerninadi i ee te ee an) 2. The Mathematical Master | ditions; — : mi ROW Cone. ay Srtiay Teh. vine
| “ ematica aster ions: THE MV. “CARIBBEE i and Jamaica.
come to your aid NOW! —8.8.51—10n | NDER THE DiAMOND jwill be required to teach Mathe- (a) That the C fie GQ) THE MeV.) “CARTBBEE a3
MERE AS coandata. within’ a dae tet ELECTRICAL _ HAMMER matics, and the Science Master offs € jommissioners of Health agree to pay to the |} Will accept Cargo and Passengers Accepting Passengers,
necessary Shirts, Pyjamas, Pants, Shorts, NAVE BEEN instructed by the to teach Chemistry and Botany, cer, his or her salary while absent on study for Dominica, | Antigua, — Cargo and Mail
aiiee fine are : OO ance Co. to se v blic auc i + if. a : re . errat, evis, & Ss. Se ‘
WS MUnEN HOYAL ROME, iso ae |, MUG | VAIE-—Colllig and fneak| St Masta. (S00 Bheayney Men eee ee Higher School Certifi leave, where the applicant is employed by the Com-|}) Friday 4th. ot
High Street. Phone 4359 P , a pes. Get one to-day and keep cool. | Garage on Wednesday next the 22nd a arnt > missioners. _ THE MV “DAERWOOD" nt
4.8.51—14n | Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co., Ltd. | August at 2 o'clock, One 1947 Ford V-8 . Applicants should be Grad- (b) That the officer selected ¢ . Will accept Cargo and Passengers maon 5
jbl ctlaaaliiiat eeeniimcenemmatitiaintnaas i Electrical Dept 17.8.51—6n, | Car with onhy the front part damaged uates or holders of the Inter Arts ti i * Ire oy onthe ede Mee Se Holt Passengers oniy fc "st. yincent” K M JONES & Co itd
HOLIDAY RESORTS _Grensdactule ot by accident, but the engine is intact |or Inter Science or Higher School nue in the service of the Commissioners or of some se eenetialere only, SUF Bea penonne te o se
Spices. SANTA M.\RIA—ioveliest hotel ELECTRIC IRONERS. Just received|@nd the tyres goad. Cc ; . * other bod . Sailing d to be notified |
in Caxibb Rates fron $700 cer navy] QPrim Electric Ironing Machines. Irons DARCY A. SCOTT ertificates. The salaries offered r body or Board in the Island whose function is to B,W.'. SCHOONER OWNERS i AGENTS
i Cast aan. Reaves. tnomn $78 Har rest | Sheets, Shirts, Collars, Dresses etc. The Atta [ote administer Public Health, } ASSO. Inc., | Sines ss Nake
dential district under Government House eee Nore seer Dial 3878, Da 17.8,51—4n (a) For Graduates $1440 by ; 405i Consignees, Tel. No, 4047 e@ 3: 384
hill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day.!| ~”” Mid. Electrical Dept _ $96 to $1920. hihi aS ao -8.51.—3n.
eet ae can enue ane Sathine 12 8 51.—6n. UNDER THE SILVER (b) For Inter Arts etc. $1200 eee eee
each. ates rom . per ea per E ¥ ”) ,
day, Enquiries to D. M. Slinger, Grenada. | The "all Heeetrie tasction thet maken HAMMER T mean + Age i i TAKE OTICE
26.6.51—78n.| ing and Derise ane nue TAs Sow: ON TUESDAY 2ist by order of the he commencing salaries will Send us your orders for - - -
Costa & Co, Ltd, Mectrioet ae Da Executors to the Estate of the late Miss | depend on experience and standard
PYE RADIO CATALOGUES: Clearly ine 6 sty E. Simpson we will sell her|of work. = 1 VDED VWSET AL
illustrated colourful leaflets describing 1—6n | Furniture at Waverly, Fontabelle which| 4, Ability to take charge of the - 4m 4 4 +e an.
cach of the new 1951--52 Pye Radios includes adi he ant :
and sualourataonhenes: wilt. .baxinaiiad FURNITURE Round Tip-Top Table, Upright ana|Cadet Corps will be taken into We have it in sizes too numerous to mention
to you without. obligation, for" the Tub Chairs, Rockers, Settee, Couch, | Consideration, That GENERAL FOODS COR
dy, asking. No salesman will call. Mall a| ~orerce cuatna; > Sort received 7 ee eee Ornament Tables, Lounge,} 5. Application should reach the | under the laws of the State of Dalswire, Orics eens Sra ined Cee Ya My”, . y
2 o PY ID E : us rec ahogany: Ss a h " ° ‘¢ t, United State f America 5 ‘a YT
aa ae LIMITED P °.. BOX 250 slipchent of Ofsee Bosmiin Guat aie Sarchas Cena ante ae Educat on Office @s soon as busses address is 250 Park Avenue, New York. ie i riratenee ot THE CENTRAL EMPORIEL MM
3 at ccelaliees me peat adjustment. See them Cutlery, Pictures, Congoleum; Mird a as tihe successful candi- | ‘\" ‘of Regi ar tn peat at cereal? ae} MARE HIT ee cette ence mark nT art
S ao eC y | am _ ster » » a” .
ai T, les Grant Ltd, or Dial aaa. | Pree ae sian Single Bedstead. ae fhe ee to assume | after one month from the 16th day of Aemiiees fees nitene eee ee on Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets
TAKE NOTICE _ —| Lady's Desk and Arm Chair; Morris | Term “xe 10th eponing OF “net | in Bie meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my’ office of opposition ul ».¢ ~
Chair all_in Mahogany: Single Iron . eptember. w Dea The trade mark can be seen on application at my office RRR REAR RR RAR $54595%5%5> 5%
MISCELLANEOUS Bedstead, Medicine Cabinet, Canvas Cot, ei 8 Bth day of August 1951 OOO SOS PPS PSAP EE FoF FPS OSS °
Pp OST Nice Enam. Top Table, Step Ladder, Cc. Vv. D. HADLEY, H WosTAMS, » iS YOUR SAVINGS ACCOUNT INCREASING? 3
2-Burner Florence Oil Stove and Oven, , Education Officer. Registrar of Trade Mark a ys
CAMERA—Kodak 35, As New, price ano iene ae, Seana St. Vincent, B.W.I. ee 5D aS 16.8.51—3n | % Did you save as much as you anticipate d during the past year? &
TOA STI ES ene hundred dollars. Fitt, Knights Ltd.| BRANKER, TROTMAN 7 oo 7th August, 1951, — - x How, much have you saved in the past five or ten years? 7
City Pharmacy. 11.8.51—T FN f a : 17.8.51—3n TAKE NOTICE % If your savings plan is bogging down you need a systematic ¥&
A rer r * " fg > T Ps “4 P, * >
That GENERAL FOODS CORPORA- } GALV. BUCKETS 107 $1.00 each, 11’ OT Rate —— $ me thod something along the lines of a Sun Life Endowment »
TION 4 corporation organized and| 4nd 12 $1.20 each. These are at special | % Policy. ‘ i %
Delawera Unitor ahia oe oe a pie at Ralph Beard’s, Tower Bay i Attention is drawn to the De- % Start saving this sure way to-day. %
Rione ade: oe busine adgeos eT agoy eee”) ULE NOTICES | fence (Control of Drug and Patent SUN LIFE ASSURANCE CO. OF CANADA *
Park Avenue, New York, New York, | GALVANISED SHEETS. New 24 gauge a“ Proprietary Medicine Prices) . Head OW Mont al %
United States of America, Manufacturers, | 6ft. $4.68 each 7ft. $5.44 each &ft Ten cents per rder, 1951, No. 14 which will be * eac Ice; ontrea ‘
ite Phe be ee : . agate line on week-days ry l, No, which will 8 .. : ; sii 5
has applied (£0r, the, resistration | of 2 | S21 each. At Ralph Beard, Lower Bay and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, published in the Official Gazette 1g R. M. JONES & COMPANY LIMITED 8
respect of cereal foods, and will bs en- teen eae ae 31.80 aie Teaaoe on week-days|/of Thursday 16th August, 195]. Representatives for Barbados %
titled to register the same after one KOSSOLIAN—We have ‘‘Kossolian” " 2. Under this Order the Gabriel Gonsalves, Jnr., 3 we
month from the 16th day of|Pcultry Tonic in stock recommended for con eacenininsinantiar Articles: — and Canvassers y
August 1951 unless some person shall in| Chicks, Fowis, Ducks and Turkeys, and NOTICE Agarol D. L. Crichlow |
the meantime give notice in duplicate} also assists in the E roducti: ‘ 4.6s6s656 4.664 6.66.4,.66 004
to me at my office of opposition of suen | Price 4/6 box Knight's Lia sai Alophen Pills LLL LL APL SOOO GOSS FOS
registration. The trode hark can be 17.8.51—2n, sa inte, See veneer Fan te Consignass Beecham's Pills—Pearl coated Ls el
ad siti a ‘ . SE PSSA SSE SGOT : ae
; Dated this Re ag 1961, KURBICURA—We also have ‘“Kurbi-| @T¢ Peaponsibis For any debt or debts con- Betaplexin, = Oe PLE EEL LLL “%
, LIAMS Sura” it tracted by the crew durin Betaxin . s
H, WIL! . cura’ in stock, an absorbent dressing iy rew during her stay in r ss
Registrar of Trade Marks. for Animals. Knight's Ltd. this Port Betaxin Tablets » | »
16.8.51—-3n. 17.8, 51—2n. MANNING & CO., LTD Dettol That CONTINENTAL FOODS, IViC., a corporation organized under the laws o We wish to advise our customer om! ‘
acs iid a claenichitimallinsss sik appl acon. his 16.8.51-—@n Ferrol-plai the State of Delaware, United States of America, whose trade or business addrovs that our Business will be closed ss
RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing | ——————————- —___--__--___-— errol-plain is 1500 Hudson Street, Hoboken, New Jersey, United States of America, Manuf: : from Wth August, will reopen | . ny >
....and we will order for you if we NOTICE Ferrol-compound turers, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in 27th August It’s delicious when %
haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co., Irradol “A” respect of foodstuffs, including soups and ingredients of soups, and will be entit. a Hf. A. GULSTONE & CO, %
%
| ul ~



Joes River Sugar Estates Limited will



WANTED



JELL

HELP



That GENERAL FOODS CORPORA-

TION, a corporation organized and; —— OE
«nisting under the laws of the State of POSITION OFFERED
Delaware, United States of America, LADY with knowledge of Book-keep-
whose trade or business address is 250] ing and Cash, to work in our office,
Px Avenue, New York, New York, | $40.00 per month Applicant must live
United States of America, Manufacturers, | Within 3 miles of City. Appky in person
has applied for the registration of a|at 1 p.m. any day except Saturdays
trede mark in Part “A" of Register in JOHNSON’S STATIONERY



15.8.5



respect of foods and ingredients of foods;





velatine, jellies, desserts, puddings and | ———
pudding powders, ice cream powders, ice} COMPANION for middle age la
cream mix, freezing mix, Good accommodation in pleasant resi-

dential area. Apply: P.O. Box 143

17,8.51—t.f.n.

confectionery, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from

fruit extracts, |

the 16th = day of = Atagst 1995) | em
unless some person shall in the meantime GARDENER — Experienced Gardener,
give notice in duplicate to me at my | Préferably one who also could serve
cfice of opposition of such registration, | ceeasionally as chauffeur. References
Tne trade mark can be seen on application | indispensable good salary and lunch
at my office Apply: Medmenham, Pine Hill.

Dated this 8th day of August, 1931 17.8.51—In

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
16.8. 51—3n.



FURNITURE |

BARBADOS TURF CLUB
PAYMENT OF PRIZES

| 6d. Consolation, Cash Prizes,
AUCTION | 2/- Stand Sweep, Pari-Mutuel
;and Forecast Competition Prizes

‘will be paid on and from Monday
| 20th instant.
| Horses and_ Serial

Wednesday, 22nd August

at 11.30 a.m. Prizes on

be held on Saturday, the 25th day of
August 1951, at the above named office
at 38 p.m. for the following purposes:—
1. To consider the Statutory Report
2. To consider any matter relating
thereto.
By Order of the Board,

O. E, MÂ¥LLINGTON,

Secretary
17.8.51-—-In



NOTICE

Re Estate of

ALBERTINE CARTER Deceased,

persons having any debt or claim against
tne Estate of Albertine Carter, otherwise
known as Druscilla Albertine Carter, late
of McClean’s Land. Brittons Cross Road,
Saint Michael, who died in this Island on
the 6th day of September 1950 intestate,
are requested to send particulars of their
claims duly attested to the under signed,
Eustace Maxwell Shilstone, of No. 17,
High Street, Bridgetown, the qualified
administrator of the said estate on or
before the 25th day of September 1951,



Dated this 19th day of July, 1951.
E. M. SHILSTONE,
King's Solicitor
20.7.51—4n



and from Monday 27th instant.



_———————————

RATES OF EXCHANGE







We have been instructed by ‘
Mr. J. C. Hotchkiss to sell by Payment will be from 12.00
Auction his Furniture and House- noon to 3.00 p.m. daily. |
hold Effects at Flat 7 “Abergeldie” {| G. A. LEWIS, |
Dayrell’s Road | Secretary. |

Viewing morning of sale at | 17.8.51—2n.

9 a.m. |
Tip-Top Dining Table, 4 Dining
Chairs, Tea Trolley, Large Serv- TAKE NOTICE

ing Table, Small Flat Top Writing








Desk, Sideboard, Coffee Table,

China Cabinet, Dressing Table |

with long Mirror, Set 3 Adjustable |

Easy Chairs with Cushions,

Dressing Table with Large round

Mirror and = Stool, Wardrobe

(Cedar Lined with full length

inside mirror), Bedside Cabinet,

Bedside Table, Standard Lamp

with Shade,—ALL THE ABOVE

IN MAHOGANY,— Folding Card

Tabel, Pr. Folding Canvas a

Metal Picnic Chairs, Cordea Arm iu

Chairs, 3 Piece Pine Morris Suite rete

with Cushions, Pine Coffee Table

with Book Shtives, Pye Radin- That GENERAI FOODS CORPORA-
gram in Mahog. Case, McMichael TION, a corporation. organized and
Radio 8 Tube (Set spare Tubes), existing under the laws of the State of
Birch C'tail Tables, Medicine Delaware, United States of America,
Cabinet, 2 Simmons Deep Sleev whase’ trade GF Duninine eadiens 15 900
and 1 Hypnos Single Mattress, Park Avenue, New York, New York,

2 Origonal Pictures by Antiguan United States of America, Manufacturers,





Leeward Association of
Cultural Societies) .



|

|

| Artist, Glassware, Heat Master bas applied for the registration of a|
| Coffee and Tea Pots, Elec, Clock, trade mark in Part “A” of Register|
| Elec. Kettle, Elec. Stove (Cana- || i, respect of tea and coffee, and wili|
| dian), 6 Cu. Ft. English Flee be entitled to register the same after
| Fridge, (2 vrs. old), 3-Burner (1) one month from the 16th day of August
| Valor Stove and Oven, Enamel [| i951 unless some person shall in the mean-

Top Table, Small Kitchen Table,

time give notice in duplicate to me a

| Ironing Table, Larder, Mise my office of opposition of such registra-
| Kitchen Utencils, Servant's Furni- | tion. The, trade mark can be s€en on|
ture and many other interesting | application at my office |
} items | Dated this 8th day of August 1951
2 H. WILLIAMS, |
Nearly all fhis furniture is Registrar of Trade Marks
modern and not more than 2 yrs 16 ,.8.51—3n

| old ‘ |

A LECTURE

PPO PTSS

*





CASH ON FALL OF HAMMER

AUCTIONEERS

John 4. Biadon
& co.

To-Day'’s G. A. Song |

) “I Love You”...

|
|
“I love you I do.”] |

That's

what every

AF .8., FV A. woman says when
Phone 4640 |

! she sees the modern

Plantations Building Chad Gases
' aad J er.







:
% — will be given by —
g Mr. LIONEL HUTCHINSON
g (Librarian, House of As- >
x sembly, Author of “Behind
& The Mace”), ¥
s —on— %
% SIR CONRAD REEVES, Kt., %
% At the SPEIGHTSTOWN 3
ist LIBRARY %
1% — on — x
$ MONDAY, August 20th % |
1% at 8 p.m %
% YOU ARE CORDIALLY § |
s INVITED ! % 1}
% 17.8.51—3n. $
ȴ,

%
z *
SLL LLL EO >

Listerine Antiseptic

Lysol

Neko Soap 1%

Palatol-plain

Palatol-compound

Phospherine (from
Kingdom)

Phyllosan

Polytaxin Capsules

HARBOUR LOG

Sch
M.V

Sapsworth,

Mails for British Guiana by

In Carlisle Bay

Mandalay HU,
Lady Joy, M.V. Sedgefield, Yac




from Trinidad



MAIL NOTICE

the

Post Office as under:—





MIXED FRANCHISE
BILL

recently enacted by the Leg-
islatures of the Government
of South Africa arranged to
take place on Saturday, 18th
August, by the

BARBADOS WORKERS’
UNION

has been postponed until
SATURDAY, 25th August,

at 1.30 p.m





United

have been deleted in their entire-
ty from the Defence (Control of
Drug and Patent and Proprietary

otherwise known as Medicine Prices) Order 1951,
DRUSCILLA ALBERTINE CARTER No. 7
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all ts 17.8.51—I1n

S.S. Agamemnon,

as after that date } shall proceed to dis- | Marsaltes Cyril BE, Smith, M.V
tribute the assets of the deceased amon | Antares, Mary M. Lewis, Sch
the parties entitled thereto having regard | Emeline United Pilgrim S., Sch
only to the claims of which I shall then | Florence Emanuel, Sch. Philip H. David-
have had notice and that I will not be| son, M.V Velvet Lads, Seh Zita
liable for ass€ts so distributed or any | Wonita, M.V. Daerwood, Sch. Gardenia
part thereof to any person or persons] W., S.S. Explorer, Sch, Everdene, Sch
of whose debt or claim I shall not then | Wonderful Counsellor, Sch. Marea Hen-
have had notice And all persons indebted | yietta, S.S. Lydia Adina S

to the said estate are requested to settie ARRIVALS

their accounts with me without delay ss Golfito, 4,505 tons net, Capt

Sen

Frances W. Smith will be closed at the
General










office,
Dated this 8th day of August 1951.
WH. WILLIAMS |
of Trade Mark
16.8.8

Registrar



an







THE FAST, COMFORTABLE I
CONVENIENT WAY

TCA specialize in the transportation of unaccom- |
panied students.








Take advantage of our special
student fares, They'll enjoy the trip back to school
aboard a great, smooth-flying “North Star” Sky-
liner that saves so much time on the way and
makes possible those precious EXTRA

days at home.

a

Normal lay-over
expenses and arrangements

handled by TCA,



SPOSSPOOF

+








Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at %
AUGUST 16, 1951 16 a.m, Ordinary Mail at 12.15 p.m. %
CANADA on Friday, 17th August 1951 s
62 6/10% Pr. Cheques on ~
Bankers 61 6/10% pr = | x
Demand
Drafts 61.45% pr. ARTIOULOS De ORIENTAL |
Sight Drafts 61 3/10% pr. CURIOS, SOUVENIRS | %
63 6/10% pr. Cable ANTIQUES, IVORY, } %
62 1/10% pr. Currency 60 1/10°% pr JEWELS, LINENS, |
Coupons 30 4/10% pr ETC., ETC | .
Dee THANTrS | ;
OOOO SPOS OPO SP OP SPIER (KASHMERE) ::: Dial 3466 |
% FOR SALE %
- One G.E.C. Refrigerator, one \ 1y
% year old, $420.00. One Premier % |
@ automatic electric kettle, new, } Fe \¢
S $18.00. One electric clock, $12.00. & |
y One 1/8 H.P. AC. Electric $ 1%
% motor, $30.00. To be seen at 4s NOTICE me |
, Archville, Upper Clapham, Christ x For full information, se 2 14s
Church. Apply: H. W. Webster, ¥ GA e 1
B.M.L.A. Society, Phone 4238 or ¥ 7 aan AUSTIN& CO, LTD. Low AIPCARGO ta >
cus SL S1—t fn. & Phones sgn eet Bridgetown, | now in effect to all poits a i¢
BOE THE DEMONSTRATION eo: 4518 throughout the world. %
Â¥
Sy ee oe wreneet TRANS-CANADA 71, /, 8
(Under the auspices of the RE Yl JHIECS

International . Trans-Atl antic . Transcontinental



OC COCOPSPECLLEOPOPOOOE SLEEP ELELA LAA LPT



x
Sty
) VARNISH
* LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS V ef
,
SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH x %
— Also — % g
GALV, OI CANS —1, 2 & 6& Gin, Sizer . %
‘ :
Established HERBERT Ltd Incorporates =} SS
1860 T. ’ 4 uM 1928 * %
10 & 1\ ROEBUCK STREET, x
91%
> ‘
1 PRICE 9SO 999999999960 F000 9 9OO Ye,





SSSSSSS ISOS EGS








y
pereand | Cneadreooot

GGG ORO SSLLP OEE

Oot

6,.64,56660%9

SOPQGGPPESEE LAPP PELLET

WILLIAM FOGARTY (B'b0S) LED.

( Ree 84 STILL
: ns cl ON
GENUINE BARGAINS IN EVERY DEPT
°

FLOWERED SUELK-~

Exquisite patterns and Quality

—

$1.27 yd.

FLOWERED

Lovely

LINEN-~

Designs_ $1.56

yd.

NUIANMYA LINEN-
12 Beautiful



Shades

NEW ARRIVALS INCLUDE -- -

STRIP. ° SHIRTS



BD ARROI



MADEIRA WICKhKER = (1 picce)
DRAWING=“ROOM SUITES

Attractive, Comfortable, Economical

4,644 666066

ttt OO OOOO OOOCOOL OOO.

POLLS POOP POCO

POOLE LAE

PICS

$466 64O446
PLES OES

See I tae: Aplpaletas man
(POORER PERT ETG © Oxtord Sausage Pa Thorpe R
i Pork Sausages, Smorgons Viennete ¥
10-DAY [S bene ona coon ©

- S FLASH | Swift Potted Meat, Alymer Port %

| and Beans, Three Da Tomatoc x

—__ Three Di foraato Juice } %

(' . o Oat Morte ' ~
ane Sugar Handbook Xeallogs Corn Fishes, %
(Manual for Cane Sugar Manu-* Gate. tor %
facturers and their Chemists) %

By SPENCER and MEADE a %

8th Edition, Revised, Rewritten i ) AND
and enlarged % STUART & SAMPSON »

One Copy only left $20.00 % »

ut >

1 erat wey ‘+ LID o

JOuNEON'S STATIONERY x (1938) . %

astic Glass opened at % for Best Rum %
JOHNSON'S HARDWARE x Headquarters for Be %

‘
6665600 OOOO.

4
GOPORT R

POCO OOOO

<
POS

-
eo

CA ff O A tb bbb AL EA LS Cyt ytgt,

LLSSESSSSS ISAS ASE IAA EOLA

*

LESSEE ESE SSD



PAGE



EIGHT

Barbados Turf Club

Sixpenny Consolation Sweep

























BARBADOS ADVOCATE

WINDWARDS HOLD
COLLEGE TO DRAW





Springboks
Routed

@ From page |





































PUERTO RICAN LEADER
CONVICTED

|
|
Rico, Aug. 16.
|

Pedro



e Nationalis eader
yizu Kampos, was /¢

nvict





























FRIDAY







AUGUST 17, 1951
































































































































































































Series Series hevien Sanne H arrison College and the Windward islands played to a agiicar, 7 ar Pow t) ni of seeking to overthrow |
t es L” “M" ‘\.3 draw yesterday when the first football match in the time and was he | the Government of Puerto Rico by
“E a Prize Ticket Nos Amount a . . . ’ ’ ¢
Prize Ticket Nos Amount == | xt 0558 7323 $140.00 Triangular Schools Tournament ended at the Harrison Col- new ball with Me Carthy who as- | force ‘
ist 1402 8849 $140.00 ond 581 1418 100.00 lege grounds. ed the tourists back it M he jury found Albizu guilty of
2nd 5398 = 5417 100.00 3y4j 7738 890 80.00 PE Se Pe BER I 5 pias ara 1158 9244. «80.00 4th ae an ae A fair crowd watehed the match which provided thrills, "Win only two runs on lhim, in violation of Law 58 mod- oO)
4th 2093 60.00 5th 2937 7907 50.00 C. Tudor, K: Griffith and C. Smith scored one each for Har- joard he caused Lowson to play jelled after the Smith Act, under 7
5th 6342 50.00 eth 6068 1590 30.00 ‘vison College while the Windward Islands goal scorers were hastily at pne pitched well up to| Which the United States Commu-
6th 9455 30 00 ath 4689 9826 20.00 B. Auguste, Skipper J. McIntyre and L. Franklyn. and Endean made a good we iad we aes aoe oh oe
poy “ 3p 2 8th 5472 0677 20.00... The game opened with Harrisor —_ behind eee icket , | 0 a a for ine ie eerie
h 447 0 2 9th 9968 5466 20.00 Ss ‘ D College defending the goal at the Uttam, and May ‘wete forced |p ae Nees aa nee
9th 1279 5415 =! 16th 0034 5832 20.0C nappers raw southern end. About 15 minutes to watch the off spinners of Athol |™en®—ten years on €SCR COUT,
a OD saat H+ oo Lith 1203 20.00 ye after play started, Tudor at centré Rowan with the greatest care and} weige Fable. Snen acta
11th : 2 12th 1406 10.00 / . forward drew first blood for Har- although Hutton was able to t |August 29 for sentencing.—U.P.
12th 4389 8115 10.00 3 34h 5058 10.00 W ith College orward ¢ : ar- a! gh é as able to ta
7 pe one n 00.2 50% : rison College by kicking the bal] tree very fine four off Var ar i
ve aaa > a <3 14th 5982 10.00 well into the right corner of the Ryneveld he was lbw to the nal Remember, a comfortable
i anon (aaa 3 ob 15th 10 - Over three hundred people nets away fron. the Windward ball of the day from Rowan ; fitting SUIT is our first con-
a, 3100 $587 10.00 en ie = eee the Antatie c ~~ pier and Islands’ custodian Riviere, i | ms ee sideration. There are in-
Pie ots 14k ivt sallroom yesterday afternoon tc Short z ee > e@ . SCORES | } : :
17tl 8940 1850 10.00 8th 40:0) oak Ghai es the 'udles gamiion Bud I ad: Auguste exer SOUTH AFRICA'S—ist Innings | Ss creasing numbers who
18th 3222 5323 10.00 9th Fe eR : : {ng at right wing kicked in thes. Rowan ¢ Hutton b Brown 5 th and Loose ise for themselves
19th 9704 8174 10.00 ooh {oo weet polo match of the season. equaliser. At half time the score W R. Endean c Brown b Laker 31 |, Bleeding Gums, Sore Moutn ov orrhea, rerognis¢ .
20th 9113 7 10.00 Sy 10.60 aoe = ara : a was unchanged. CB Van Ryneveld stpd. Brennan Teeth icuth or perhaps some bad dagase the eee” cut,
7493 10.00 59na 26.00 hae eer ene Sy eee ee , 7 A ji: Mauree Lbw. Brows ; | that will sooner or later cates vvumatism | fit and finish of the....
5006 10.00 54, , The result of this game puts When the second half was ten 4 seas 10.00 23rd 10.00 swordfish one point ahead of minutes old Skipper McIntyre by rk ‘ it Yin Eke 7 OO a our aay, enae te wat
448 10.00 24th 10.00 sither Snappers or Harrison Col- some clever beating got himseir P eda |and quickly tightens the teeth. on Our IDEAL TAILORING
“* 25th 10.00 ‘ t A b Bedser uarantee. Amosan must make y
0053 10.00 Seth 10.90 2¢8¢ im their race for the cup. a on oe nae Noid hard G W. Chubb b Bedser 10 | mouth well and save your ee
7704 10.00 5. With two minutes to go when and accurately into the right corn- M G_ Melle b Shackleto j money back on return pels ge A py Ps :
6644 10.00 aaah a the score was four all, Ken Ince ¢r of the College goal completely . ¥ “t as aie est. is i vibe 8 aah AE today. ‘The ‘guar- We will welcome the We
8642 10.00 conn ! ay the Snappers centreforward put deceiving goal keeper Roach to put ERE Rm cae MS : Amosan antes protects portunity of proving this to
2686 10.00 Sot 10.00 his team one in the lead with a two up for the Windward Islands Total 202 | , , th you in our...
: } ea—Trench Mow
8808 10.00 7 —_____. determined swim through; a move Big = oars at = nae BOWLING ANALYSIS | Ter Pyorsh * |
fade $750.00 Which threatened to take the game Of the Windward Islands the Col- — oO M RR WwW} ————— ei iz
$750.00 mee ve away {tom their young rivals. lege players went on the attack Bedser |. et: Bt} TAILORING DEPARTMEN
—ne Series Series Harrison College however fought and after a melee in the Wind- Fyttersail 14 7 2 14
a a - “Raum: 7% , back in a last desperate attempt ward area K. Griffith at centre Makar ee ae, ene d Digestive on the first floor of
“G! on ist “ees "8857 $140.00 and scored the equaliser a couple half scored the equaliser. Bests - ‘es et U ts
Prise Ticket Nos Amount JS oe i , of seconds before the final whistle Play now quickened up. Afte ENGLAND—1tst Innings se LTD
ist 8718 6670 $140.00 2nd ., 0743 100. 06 Billy z ing was scorer ‘another melee in the Windwards & Hutton |.b.w Athol Rowar 28 Pp CAVE SHEPHERD & (C0. ‘
; 49 . Bra 2784 80.99 Billy Manning was the scorer. ane pate ews : owson ¢ Endean b Melle
3re JO62 t > r mr ter {te ‘Ce ¢ s fen ¢ snalty to arrison College Kx @ inb 1 | After extensive research,
; BO4e 0.00 5th 2048 0774 50.00 ter netted three goals and Ken & Pé frag, (nb. 1 | / ; 10—13, BROAD STREET
bana 5 $0 oo 66th 5976 2933 30.00 Ince two, ‘Mortimer’ Weatherhead oonee Williams ete ball sigh tiesds Tangs 5 pst abn gh gerne obo 0 3,
i 79316 9586 30.00 Tt 1418 0477 20.00 Scored two for Harrison College Straight at Riviere the Windward Seale ; roduced De Witts ,
Sth cn cant 4 0 Bth 3041 0056 290.00 “Nd Charlie Evelyn, Geoffrey Islands goalkeeper who saved by _ To bat Compton, Watson, Brown, | ablets, new | men ec
ath 4740-7830 20.00 9th 9080 7528 20.00 Jordan and Billy Manning one pushing the ball back into play Shackleton, Brennan, Bedser, Taker, = re coe
9th 2161 4959 20.90 10th 9438 7760 20.00 each. The Collegians got all five thus causing Smith to put the ~~" powLinG ANALYSIS af a eantaie oay Of checking "7 A
10th 6275 1918 20.00 11th 6296 0014 20.00 of their goals in the second half. third goal in for Harrison. tcCart ee ae ee digestive disorders away from ¢
: naan . ‘ 504 37 ( , , ; Five minutes before the blow * aFENS . | ‘ ived—
ith 764 5189 20.00 d2th 8504 4137 10.00 THE GAME Biv Melle A : 2 home. No water require
12th $032 71720 10.00 18th 1019 0470 10.00 Snappers were first on the at- off Franklyn at inside right for A Rowan 8 4 | just dissolve one or two on the 2
13th 4345 6547 10.00 14th 6924 = 4773, = 10.00 tack as the referee Maj. Foster Windward Islands scored the Ghubh es | | tongue for prompt relief
14th 0224 5618 10.00 15th 6617 5918 10.00 whistled the two teams into action third goal for his team ee " | anywhere. Pleasant tasting
15th 6841 8743 10.00 16th 2535 1730 10.00 Harrison College defended well The teams were: De Witt's — ra
16th 7585 5953 10.00 ibe pve a . oe and it wasn’t until the game was Harrison College: Roach, Morri- ee aah
17th 1138 0881 io a 19th 8273 8094 10.09 five and a half minutes old that gon, Forde, Dash, Griffith, Sim- WHAT’S ON TO-DAY strips for pocket or handbag.
18th 3876 $981 00 ‘oOtK 9289 0607 10.00 Snappers got their first goal, Ken~ j,onds, Williams (Capt.), Smith Try them today.
19th 2621 3002 1 4 eave vue Tt neth Ince scored with one of his ~ 4) ‘ Fe Court of Ordinary—10 a.m. |
7614 10.00 21st 4363 5933 10,00 ‘ C. Tudor, Hope and F. Tudor. |
20th 3522 76 ' oe +¢) deceptive shots. Three minutes ; ; ; Rote hey Police Courts—10 a.m. | f
21st 1178 2620 10.00 22nd 9637 9144 10.00 ister Delbert sent thois ehoond Windward Islands. Riviera, Victorian Exhibition at Bar- || j
22nd 3414 1139 10.00 23rd 2568 0098 10.00 (3° i rt a at ra ee Theta Baird, Sandy, Drakes, McIntyre a ergy Muar dihat peal |
23rd 5540 9871 10.00 24th 6987 6182 10.00 che sha, na kobe en (Capt). Anderson, Auguste, Frank- Football (Windward Islands ||
2 = - 7 5G BAS ; » goalke Pg san=- jy e arring es 4 }
Bein <<. ape $042 10-00 36th <<< BORE SRB 10.00 None he aecal the seers 2 Moore, Warrington and L- |. va: Sich Guana) pa D | |
e 4 216 = — rf remaine . avne ¢ “rte . * ° o we a "
26th 6946 = 6 102 10.00 27th 9603 3402 10.00 Balinese DS rest 2 ar ison ‘The referee was Mr. Wilkes. at Queen's Park on ‘“Vener- ANTACI |
¢ 3 10.00 28th 8468 349 10.00 : in e ime. 1 Disease’—8 p.m. {
27th 9491 2388 29th 989 ‘ With the resumption of play bia ” euneeha: TABLETS rd TONES UP DIGESTION
2Btl 2763 «—«-2516 10.00 29t 4989 3331 10.00 1 p play
39th 1047 4574 10.00 o¢th 7457 2831 10.00 Harrison College came down with Were. Odsal Fer § a2 No water needed cs
30th 8431 5616 10.00 ' aia a well eeee ‘four forward’ LADIES PLAY TO-NIGHT 830 pom “ Easily carried anywhere — Cell-seale x ENRICHES THE BLOOD
’ —— ‘ $750.00 movement which bore fruit when Roxy:— “'Tampleo” and Tucson’ —_____—
$750.00 hia cs a va well and made no mistake getting for the Ladies Island Champion- and “Wake of the Red Witch” ee 7 .
iis wiokes 8 k , the ball well into the nets. Short-,ship which was to be played on 1.30 pm. and 8 40 p.m @ Quick!y soothes DeWITT’S * RESTORES NERVOUS ENERGY
ae ist 4595 6396 $140.00 ly after this, however, Bannister|Wednesday night and was post= | O\ZMPI J Adventures of Cap: and seltles | ANTACID
Pri Tieket Nes. Athouat'] ond 2188 2491 100,00 again scored for Snappers with «}pened due to the inclement pom, upset stomach 2
Prine ‘ket Nos, Ue: aos BabA ‘ ! Il flighted ‘back hand’, Har-| weather will be played to-night Plaza:—“Let’s Dance” 2.40 pm, i POWDE
‘ 5 0287 $140.00" 3rel 3526 0433 80.00 2 we ghtec hand’, Har a , played 5 ‘ @ Lasting effects
ond se 9962 9597 100.00 * 4th 5925 2346 60.00 rison College were not dismayed ig o'clock at Y.M.P.C., Beckles 445 Bm, ond. 8.00..p.m . * BUILDS UP THE BODY
5670 6558 80.00 5th 5616 4193 50.00 and they got their second goa'} oad, as
baag 1374 60.00 6th 1753 6698 30.00 when ‘Mortimer’ Weatherheac Sees
5th 9658 8795 50,00 7th 3667 8735 20.00 scored after four minutes play ir pe poe ee ~ -- —- “ “===
: 3515 9081 39.00 8th 1161 9976 20.00 the second half,
7th 0389 5371 99,00 9th 3875 1247 20.00 Their equaliser came a minute A |
8th 7241 1469 90.900 10th 1549 9019 20.00 and a half later when Geoffrey ‘ >
9th 7118 1441 20 00 11th 7463 9118 20.00 Jordan scored. With the scofe a
1Oth 7388 2668 30.00 12th 8560 3956 10.00 three all the crowd were frantic q
ith 7640 4764 30,00 13th 2283 9212 10,00 with excitement, and when Har- . .
19th 0061 2506 10.00 ar ar oan rer rison College went into thé leac » = Bum : 9
& Sth 997 93% ith a snapshop by ‘Mortimer ‘ ’ ‘
13th 3620 7539 10.00 {9 wi pshop by r arty AT
13th act, Tattoo 26th 759 1808 10.00 Weatherhead, the Harrison Col: mee eee: RS lacs
15th 9982 6840 ~—10.00 7th ste 10 ee ee ee Ze tae: fom he apy 2%, BYNIN AMARA
I 9803 7594 10,00 aaa a ~, amidst a roar of applause. ‘ ’ le
Ith 0076 ©5424 ~—«10.00 anit ae, Okars «le 0g ,.. Hardly had the ball been back PATENT’ GROATS
18th 9139 2981 10.00 Sre¢ 3736 2482 10.00 into play than Delbert Bannister makes weaning a happy thme for baby—
19th 5390 8785 10.00 donq °°" got) 9530 10.00 equalised and this time it was the and mother f | Gade by ALLEN & HANBURYS LT9., LONDON
20th 5186 8112 10.00 53 rq 7707 9502 10.00 Snappers hailers who yelled )
21st 9551 6405 10.00 d4th 8160 9920 10.00 themselves hoarse. There was .
22nd 5059 6802 10.00 5th 2461 9231 10.09 €ven more applause from their} — a ————— a. IF RRR RIERA RANA RENEE OEIEE rs
23rd 5503 7720 10.00 96th 7105 5819 10.09 Guarter when two minutes before ie Cie ate | %
24th 8283 3069 = 10.00 27th We. OD. Oe Re ee ee eee ee Pre Wel *
25th 5384 6028 10.00 28th 4239 4146 = 10.00 Ince made his forcing swim e have received i ; :
26th 2246 7692 10.00 v9th 5881 4545 10.00 through to make the score Snap- _ new stocks ote
27th 2336 0421 ~=—-:10.00 30th 7581 3139 10.00 pers: 5, Harrison College: 4. =a
28th 0810 4701 10.00 _..... Then with seconds to go Billy GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS
29th 5392 4185 10.00 $750.00 Manning the Harrison College ’ ’ ,
30th ........ 0938 3409 10.00 ——__—. Fkipper got the much needed ©, 45 MR 8 Gutge
——- Government Tax $200.00 on each equaliser for his team.
$750.00 Series The other game of the after- ite GALVANISED NAILS — all sizes
BOVELL & SKEETE, nen yiieh Wee played end- ‘ANACIW, contains four well-proven medicines, i.e., Phenacetin, | Magnificent Photo Cards
# ner L. B. GILL. e with onitas snatching a {ANACH) | ; ; et | * i
*‘Beries K A t : narrow win from Whipporays oo Caffeine, Acetylsalicylic Acid—and QUININE. These four | of Modern ‘British Cars! EXPANDED METAL SHEETS
Prize re sons For Bonitas ‘Boo’ Patterson medicines, scientifically balanced, work synergistically—that is why yi", 1” 2” 37 M
e a see “100. 00 E tian Wins played an excellent game, scoring they relieve pain fast, restore your s:nse of well-being ! “as # , esh
both goals, Dudley O’Neal t 4
gra - +e SYP scored the lone goal for Whip- [ANACIW7 ee my ad Over fu “POILITE” FLEXIBLE FLAT ASBESTOS
60 ws porays. in Great Britain alone use it in their sufgeries! Fevers, >
aaa bb Channel Swim Bonitas opened the _ scoring colds, headaches, toothache, rheumatism, Neuralgia—this wonderful CEMENT SHEETS 4’ x 8’ at $6.40 Sheet
4 ‘Gann aA. within the first thalf minute ot new specific brings you amazingly quick relief from all of them !
wth 2666 20.00 DOVER, August 16. ‘he game. Whipporays equalised oe — “EVERITE” CORR
BE iviene 7031 20.00 ware ey omar” ugu 4 early in the second half and the ; costs little. You can buy it ahs UGATED SHEETS
566 90.00 Egyptian Mareeh Hammat 34, ) and ANACIW; y / Wy iw
ime ae 20.90 Member of King Farouk’s Royal Stay, oh Tipe ene in a in two-tablet envelopes— Every S-ounce packet conteins 2 6’, 7’, 9’, 10’ Lengths
76 ‘ ee : aoe ri vw when Patterson got away ;
ce 9603 20.00 bodyguard won the France to down the field and a well pinged Proust ee. UTNE SUC peel irom photo cards. (Full set, 40 cards ;
12th - 8843 10.00 ens ra ; c ne : sw im . 2 2 long shot gave his team victory. bout of pain. Or in handy 20-tablet e 3
13th 4757 10,00: pares An. Me, ROUTE. Ay “ The referee was Maj. A. R boxes. Or in 50-tablet bottles—keep | a ee eee ‘
14th 6584 16 een ee Le Morvan ©! Foster, Ohe of these in your house. | Se ae Phone 4267 3
15th 9977 LO; 00s Scr ec, awqe «he teams were: — | SRB ZEYR FE XEBORC DBO 4
1gth 7386 10.00 chin and Wag timed 12 hours Parersit (capt). iM” Richangion’ pane torreeer | Bitiavie—teshcrus” PY PAC WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LED. &
7A e i . ‘ ; 25 25 Grace, M. Konisberg and G. Atwell ast “ryp They 2a g
18th 5893 10,00 lacstnn etna ane ‘ioe ia Whippofnys: C O'Neal, 1. Spence, AGAINST PAIN ni, but in, wth wate . me
18th 8838 10.00 hours and 12 minutes after he Wantharnene a DON wees GET ‘ ANACIN’ TODA Y! | enema cenraiteetieeee eam ¥
20th 5387 10.00 ond 19 other swimmers from 10 Harrison Collece: T Clarke, F. Man- : ; J. A. COKBIN @ SONS.
21st 3416 10.00 *. t i 1 4 * } sg rater at TP C. Evelyn, A_ Taylor, G. Jordan, ‘ANACIN’ is sold in Great Britain and South Africa under the name ‘ANADIN | call
22nd ’ 4836 10.00 an ate we eae er at Mo var eh a manning ene Saas eas 1Pa
= oe 7 ' ap Tis ez i rance. Snappers: ‘aylor, zell, G | 6656566 a
28rd .. 4799 10.00 Le Morvan; 27, landed at Saint McLaaq wee wr McLean, D- Bannis i { } siete |
24th . OORT skein 10.00 Margaret's bay ‘six miles away. '*fs,%:,pwe,ene Browne \ AKE T Hl IS A 1}) 1 \ x
= r z VLE é : 0 Sb = Sowers This afternoon's games are the finals o |) 1} D ANC 4 ;
2 BAIS) ic 10.00 ‘The sate ants rath in ’ , Al ;
26th 5370 10.00 ¢11000 offered “by the, London ‘Ses Npmphs, Referee in Mi, Bi Putte Hy ao E D FOR THOUGHT %
27th 7493 10.00 Daily Mail for the first place on. The other game will be an island |) Friends and Their Friends! ‘
28th 10.00 First wonkh Anisher will pel a vs. a team from H.M.S. Bisbury { Remember the Grand From October, 1950 to %
29th 10.00 the same amount. Le Morvan | The Barbados team is: A. Weather. | ( . ’ ) 1 1, June, 1951 the price of ~
30th 10.00!¥got £500 for the second place and Nennise, C. Bvelvn’ G. gordan ant’ Me ({} COSMOPOLITAN DANCE %
all other finishers will get £250. Browne »
ae 4 U M M i it | | Sponsored by Mr. Everton Woollen %
nee ae a ee RE a ne ered 1h, ee " } | Greenidge x
They'll Do It Every Tune Sepinerd US Poteni OMe Ov jimm Hatlo “a i} SATURDAY NIGHT, 18th sae >
ee es agenda sieealiacs siictineccaee | uitin x
: <= EEA e = == = — August, 1951, gs sS
; cu : ol i) AT GEORGE V. PARK. x
The BARBER |S THE YONKS | Bur — COMES i | has advanced over 100%, M
TALKATIVE, ALL GOT THE POWER: THE SHAVE AND. a SSpoLeSeeeSeSEeeSee |% and these higher priced ¥
RIGHT BUT THE DEED YOU EVER | | WHO'S THE GABBY A x | materials are now begin- g
MAGAZINE-READING SSE BABE ROOTS? ONE NOW? ov VS py ' x % ning to arrive in Barba- s
Sono (femme |e a AU AnTENTION = {cee
~~ - C c im s, >
GIVE HIM A ROOTS. ¢ ; WY I 1 % ~ : by
a SEB BASE RO { DODGERS NEED PITCHIN'= Y% ( OOPS: g wie We still have a good x
TUMBLE THE YONKS j § { ¢
ad Nel | # OD YOU HEAR THE ONE? is | * selection of R
7 Ql MY EAM ey ti wail TELL you. * ik : * 3k ; 8
~ | Up agout MY KID~.-HEY! ie Si 3 | $
a WHERES TH8 PICTURE 1 We beg to remind you of the 3! q A $
y You U AVE | % |
yO We THERE i FREE : AND :
. ui
° | % 8
Come in and DEMONSTRATION OF :
| 4 J *
7 ALL WOOL
let us fit you ig : .
| wine 6 ; x
with a Fine % JOHNSON'S = CAR 8 SUITINGS $
le 3 .
LIGHT suIT {I PLATE 3X at last year's pri :
He h 3 at last year’s prices, x
$5] 9 hich is being a % 50 x
i & which is being held . r 2
wehaveawide ji} $ sig NOW 1s TER IRE s
\ + .
5} TO-DAY > to select vours at x
IS wn. x S
range of Patterns S ¥ 3) x
S 9 4 x
; hes i] FRIDAY, 17th. at 2.00 p.m. $| 0 :
THANX TO. . * I % . » PS
NICK ABATE, » AKFRK [. “ q 1}S at Messrs. ESSO SERVI- 3 °
| UNITED NORTHWESTERN ) I ° C. S. a MAE k El & Co )., LT D. i x CENTER, Reebuck St. 3 High Class Tailors, %
ae gO ; OP SCORERS IN TAILORING IS 3 5
oS EEE ame " Prince Wm. Hy. St. - pial 2787 —«j|$' “COME ONE! COME ALL? $ BOLTON LANE. =
——— rete eae Ce : Hig y x

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ESTABLISHED 1895

Hour



General Backs

Bone Of Contention) Aid To Japs

U.N. ADVANCE

BASE, Korea, Aug. 16.

"THE CEASE FIRE negotiators turned the dead-

locked problem of

an armistice buffer zone to

a four-man sub-committee for solution and then
recessed to await its report. The sub-committee will
begin work in Kaesong at 11 a.m, on Friday, under

a virtual news blackout.

The Communists accepted

the United Nations proposal for the sub-committee

on the 16th day of the

deadlock over the location

of a cease-fire line across Korea, and the establish-
ment of a demilitarized buffer zone between the

opposing armies.

The biggest step yet toward,

breaking the stalemate on the
conference agenda was taken
at the 55 minute meeting, one
of the shortest sinee the truce
talks began on July 10. The
Reds suggested onky one

change in the UN proposal—!

that the sub-Committee com-
prise two delegates from each
instead of one.—U.P.

Commission Chief
Sees Lebanese

Y . a rs
Foreign Minister
BEIRUT, Aug. 16.
Leon Marechal, Chairman of the
Conciliation Commission who ar-
rived at Beirut, saw the Lebanese
Foreign Minister, Charles Helou,
0 “hursday in an attempt to per-
suade Lebanon to accept even in-
direct talks with Israel.
Informed sources said Helou left

de







Lebanon’s answer in the balance
until a joint decision had been
taken by the Arab states. Mare-
chal left for Damascus on Thurs-

day on a similar mission return-
ing to Beirut on Friday and then
leaving for Jerusalem, Tel-a-viv
and Cairo. Marechal stressed that
direct negotiations is not a “sine
qua non” condition. He said the
Arab sgates already negotiated

1948 at Geneva on the same
isis. —U.P.



Colonies Invited
To Supply Talks

LONDON, Aug. 16.

Britain Thursday invited other
Commonwealth Governments to
confer here in September on prob-
lems connected with the supply

nd production of raw materials
and manufactured goods.

The Treasury in announcing the
invitations said the Colonial Em-
pire also would be represented.
The conference is expected to he-
gin on September 24, and last
about a week. —U.P.

Storm Threat Gone

MIAMI, Aug. 16.

The tropical storm that started
out to look like a hurricane, and
which crossed the Caribbean to-
ward Puerto Rico is no longer a
serious threat to the island, Con-
the Weather Bureau had
expected to rebuild the storm to
hurricane strength, failed to ma-
terialise during the night

Forecasters said this still might
occur later but it would be north
and west of Puerto Rico,

The centre of the disturbance
located at 5 a.m. about 30 miles
south of the island of St. Croix
or some 1,400 miles from the
southern tip of florida. It appeared
to be moving west-northwestward
about 18—20 miles per hour.
—c.P

cition



TO-DAY’S WEATHER
CHART





Moon; Full.

Lighting Up: 7.00 p.m

High Tide: 2.29 a.m. and
3.36 p.m.

Low Tide: 9.25 a.m. and 9.31

p.m.



U.S. Oil Industry Only Needs Supplies

‘Ttaly Asks US.
To Extradite
Secret Agents

_ ROME, August 16.

_ The Italian Court asked the
United States about the extradi-
tion of two formers American
secret Agents who are charged
with the killing of their wartime
ge behind German lines in
aly,

One of these agents subsequent-
ly studied law at Lima, Peru, and
was employed by Panagra. The
Court of Assizes at Novara in
Northern Italy, demanded the
former United States Army Lt.
Aldo Icardi of New York City
and Sergeant Carl G. Lodolce of
Rochester, New York, to be ex-
tradited and tried under Italian
law for the murder of Major
William Holohan.

The body of Holohan 41 years
old, now en route to the United
States by ship was recovered from
Lake Dorta, last year, with a bul-
let hole in the base of the neck
Holohan headed the office of
Strategic Services Mission which



WASHINGTON, August i6

Top army officials told Con-
gress recently the United States
must continue its “Reorientation”
rogramme to keep the Japanese
rom succumbing to Communism.

Brigadier General A. L. Ham-
blen, special assistant for the
occupied areas, testified on funds

needed for occupation costs in
hearings before the House of
Appropriations Committee in

June. Testimony was released on
Thursday. Hamblen told the
Committee the Army is not ask-
ing for money for economic aid
for Japan, but he said indoctrin-
ation programme must go on.

U.P.



parachuted into Italy behind the

German lines late in 1944,
a radio operator, They succeeded
in making such contact and es-
tablished headquarters at the lone-
ly village of Niovo on the shore
of Lake Dorta.

Holohan carried a black brief-
case containing $100,000 in gold
On December 6, 1944 according
to a police report, Icardi and
Lodolee were playing cards in the
kitchen of a villa with several
Italian partisans,

Loser Was to Kill

Major Holohan was asleep in
the bedroom ill from attempted
poisoning by the plotters, The
loser in the card game according,
ite the report had to go upstairs
[end kill the Major.

Holohan was shot twice through
the head while he was sleeping
and his body was dragged to the
lake shore and dropped into the
water,

The gold, which was to have
been used to finance Anti-German
activities disappeared. Both Icardi
and Lodolce succeeded in return-
ing to the Allied lines and told
police that Holohan was ambushed
and killed by Germans.

The two American soldiers re-
turned to the United States, but
Italian police followed up the case
and finally got confessions from
several partisans that the Major's
body could be found in the lake

In Washington the Government



said Icardi and Lodolce were
questioned by U.S. army agents
with “negative results” .in 1947

But in the summer of 1950 the De-
fence Department said two Italians
and Lodolce confessed,

—U.P.



Wrong Drug Kills
Two Volunteers

VERMILLION, South Dakota,
Aug. 16.
Dr. Donald Slaughter, Dean of
University of South Dakota Medi-
cal School, said Thursday the
“wrong drug” was given by mis-
take to two volunteers who died
during pain relief experiments.
; Slaughter said the unidentified
medical seientist who administered
the drug “recognised his mistake”
{and saved his own life and that
‘of a third volunteer.—"J.P.

ennemasteenser racine ean ES

with
Lt. Icardi and Sergeant Lodolcé,

On Indo-china

By EDWARD M. KORRY

PARIS, August 16.
France will press for an agree-
ment to end fighting in Indo-China
as part of a general Korea peace
settlement talks are
successful, to an au-
thoritative Government

if Kaesong
according
French

Agreement

source,

This source in outlining the
foreign policy of the new cabinet
of Premier Rene Pleven also made
jthese points in
ora foreign
by

emphasizing that
policy is guided
the desire to maintain peace:
.
; 1. France will not accept the
linclusion of Spain in the North
‘ Atlantic Treaty Organization
{(N.A.T.O.) As a result of uni-
lateral United States negotiations
with the Franco Government and
other major problems concerning
N.A.T.O. members, France will
plump for a permanent N.A.T.O
political council,

2. France’s view of the rearma-
ment of Germany remains ute
changed—-the formation of Ger-
;man units is necessary but they



must be included in European
‘army divisions including contin-

gents from other countries



3. The Atlantic Treaty Organ-
isation must always be careful to
keep characteristics of a defence
organisation.



On the Far East question the
source said. “Korea fighting and
the question of Indo-China where



jFrance has paid such a heavy
price in men, cannot be dis-
sociated when peace discussions
start.”

In connection with this state
ment, it was learned from othe
sources that the

French Govern-
ment wants a firm guarantee fron
Communist China that further aic
to rebel] forces of Ho Chi Min!
jin Indo-China will end ,

—U.P.

To Combat Oil Shortage

By WILLIAM GILBRAITH





WASHINGTON, Aug. 16.
If the United States oi] indus-
Vv ge IT rials it can make up
1€ WV shortage. If it doés
et motorist faces gasoline
That is the simplest form of one
of the toughest problems in the
Cefence emergency—a question
va licated by the British









Iran lispute
A é¢ cesman ft Petroleum
imir itic fo Defence
»AD e oil industry like
I ther trying to exr i





try gets these supplies it will be
able to. meet all U.S. needs for oil
in the near future and also help
produce some of the refined pro-
| ducts which U.S. friends overseas
need to make up for lost Iranian

oil
43,400 New Wells

Without vital supplies they fear
the U.S. petroleum industry may
fall so far short of its goals that
gasoline rationing would have to
be ordered at home. The petro-
|leum industry is producing about
6,100,000 barrels of crude petro-







leum daily. P.A.D. never has said
ihow much it wants that figure

tepped up, but it f said the in-
dustr must drill least 43,400
;new wells this ye to meet U.S

28,500 would

gac-—t} re

The industry has said it is will-
ing to drill far more wells but it
is certain not to get the equipment
needed to drill any more than the
43.400 P.A.D. has requested

It is impossible exactly
how much oil these wells will pro-
duce owing to varying state regu-
lations Wells usually produce
anywhere from 50 to 100 barrels
of oil per day depending upon the



lo say









|
|

Hharbados

Will





| France Wants |



State in which they are located
Actuall they would yield au
more, but oil-producing St
limit the ount that well oper
tor can k ou of tr
he oil i i cut of the
c ever i to the
bott’enec} Il—trans-|
i —U.P

FRIDAY,



OILS AND FATS

The Fifth Meeting of the
Oils and Fats Conference,
held at Hastings House

|
ended August 15 |

Recommendations of the
Conference will now be
transmitted to the Govern-
ments concerned .

U.S., PHILIPPINES
AGREE ON TREATY

WASHINGTON, Aug. 16.
The United States and the Phil- |

jay

Man,

Tt is the first time since he g
| the two sides talking

Truman's
jhas stepped directly into negotia-

}dent

AUGUST 17, 1951

Make Bid To
End The Peace Deadlock

Buffer Zone Still







Harriman To

Try Again

TEHERAN
British
have scheduled informal talks to-
Averell

and

at which
is. expected

tions,
Observers fee] that results from

Iran Aug

Iranian

Ww.

to

trouble

16
negotiato

Harr,
make a

that Py





last
teh. effort to solve Iran's explo
e oil crisis

shooter

ippines announced agreement to- } ‘ (
day on a mutual defence treaty {informal talks will determine
pledging each country to act to whether there is any chance of
meet common dangers in the | reaching a settlement at the
event of an armed attack on the | scheduled full dress conference on
other.—-(CP) Saturday —CP)

years, (Story on page five). > *



RUSSIA

H.M.S. “Bigbury Bay” returned to Barbados after an absence of two

RELATIONS BETWEEN
AND CHINA

BECOMING STRAINED

By K. C. THALER

LONDON, Aug

16,

Perceptible differences in Sino-Russian relations are
beginning to strain the young Moscow Peking axis accord-

ing to diplomatic reports

The rift is not only ideological

but affects the national interests of both countries.
There is no question at present

40m Muslims
In Grave Peril |

NEW DELHI, August 16,

Fourteen prominent Muslims
including members of Parliament
the former Governors province
under the British regime led by}
Zakirhussain, Vice Chancellor
Aligarh of the Muslim University
where the most Pakistan leader:
received their education submit-
fed a memorandum to the Uniter
Nations mediator Frank Grahan
saying “We should like to im-
press you with all the emphasis |
at our command that Pakistan’s
policy on Kashtir is fraught
With the gravest peril to 40,000. |
600 Muslims in India and if the
Security Counci] really is interes-
ted in peace, human brotherhood
ind international understanding
it should heed this warning
hile there is still time.” —U.P

Told To



U.S.







however

of a break between

Tse Tung’s regime and the Krem-

lin nor is the ideologieal dev

lation

comparable to the Tito dispute



Outwardly, relations appear cor-
rect atid friendly
to lack

id

any

though they
marked demon

stration of cordiality and intimacy

But

relations
munist giants in Asia are not quite

indications are that actually

betw

harmonious

een

the

Com-

two

Nationalism

‘
Growing nationalism in China
and
the

| advisors

outside

causes of existing tensions

if

it does not it

Chinese hostility.
policy-makers
to

3ritish
Heve China
independent li
Soviet

tates

hould
diplomacy

abandon

hn

“extreme

agalr
are

its h

wi

East

sensitiveness
part of Mao Tse Tung and his
dictation

ist

among

old

ltr
ne

or

in
European
They think
exploited
when and j

this

)

will face

I

on

from
chief

and of

the

possible future repercussions
The real test of Sino-Russjar
eo-operation will come next vPar
when Russia, in accordance with
treaty obligations, is supposed

Manchuria
outright

still
retain an
contrast. to
satellite
situation
»y Westerr

the Korean

be-

; conflict is settled
Pay Up | Mao Tse Tung’s Communist
4 | Pa y won its victory in China
_. WASHINGTON, August 16. stant and the new Communist
_ South Korea asked the United state which emerged in 1948 owes
states on Thursday for prompt) ittle to Russia. From the sta
vayment of $100,000,000 for goods Russian advice has been ignore<
and services furnished United! with impunity; Moscow apparent|
slates forces during the Korean agreeing that at least internal
war. South Korean Ambassador! matters must be left to the

Yu Chan Yang presented the bill’ Chiriese.
Closer



o assistant Secretary of State!
Dean Rusk during a conference











Yang said the bill covered food-' lished by the recent pact ol
stuffs, repairs to equipment and friendship which has lead to the
‘ents on buildings occupied py! cOncluson since of agreements for;
United States Forces | both tlose military collaboration
—U.p. | and economic assistance
| But China is understood to be}
disappointed over the slackne of}
» Soviet military and economic aid
i M | Russia also apparently was reluc-
Russians ust {tant to go ail out in support of
is China in Kor and these hesita-
Sig. Draft Pact | tions were said to have been
élearly noted by China's Commun-
WASHINGTON, Aug. 16 | ist_rulers ps A edt ans
The State Department on Thurs-| â„¢ aoe aM si Ea
day formally notified the Soviet e. ee A 3
Union that Russian delegates to|"' eae -
Japanese Peage Conference in San ba ent rr f -rang
Francisco must sign the Anglo-; nent
American draft of the pact or ye! uP
nothing at all, j
|
Depar t announced that } APPROVA
Ambassador n Kirk, in Mo
ec delivered the note to t } BUENOS RI ‘ 1¢
Soviet Minister of Foreign Aff | ee Cha ;
declaring the San Franciseo Cor proved tt atior
ot nference t tate « Ge
egotiat A i
—U.pP Sehate. ~U.P





co-operalion









estab-







Mao



\
and
fe struck heavily at Commun
ist truck convoy speeding rein-{,
forcements and supplies to West+] |ikely to recover
ern and central fronts. Low lying Athol Rowan I
clouds gave the Reds some cover while making 41
but returning pilots said that they Ny the | nes closed
had attacked 300 vehicles today Masiee eae See : 7
They said that they had destroyed The absence of Mann with a
)

PRICE: FIVE CENTS

iS HERE



THE NAVY



|

EIGHT of the Officers of ths ‘Bigbury Bay” aboard their ship
W. W. R. Bentinck, O.B.B., R.N., the Commanding Officer sit,
middle of the front group

Springboks Routed
For 202: England

Lose 2 For 51 Runs

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 16

Honours rest fairly evenly between England and Sout
Africa after the first day’s ploy in the final Test here today
On a wicket which has taken 2 considerable amount of spin
for the first day, England are 151 behind South Africa’s
total of 202 and have lost both members of their all-York-
shire opening partnership, Hutton and Lowson

Capt
in the

South Africa’s innings was one apes
of two distinct phases. In the, : »
arly morning when the wicket Sugar W orkers
played very easily, Rowan and/
Endéan (playing in place of the Strike ly Berbice
injured Weite) concentrited « | : a
most entirely on defence. (From Our Gwn Correspondents
Having won the toss the South |< EORGETOWN, B.G. Aug; 16
Africans, wanted to make sure| Taetory workers at three Be

they did not thrown away the ad+|bice sugar estates went on “strike



vantage and the result was sueh a|Rosehall cane warkers went out
; crawl that when Endean was oul|\in Ssyvhppathy with sugary porters
Uj N B I just before lunch only 66° run: }who Qemanded wage increases
r m a | were on the board, ,At Blaifmont, the strike bega
Je e oO yeTS s »veith the dismissal of two factory
e COLLAUSKL hands *
‘Strike Red Afterwards Rowan and Van Workers demand the reinstat
tvneveld took the score along to |ment and one the oe al ¢
on ° 16 » a startling srtain staffmen ortmou
106 and then came a startling col- peer’
Supplies). workers also went ott in sym
Rowan was caught at first slip, /pathy. : : W .
Van Ryneveld was neatly stumped Labou L el nals RE aiitins
8TH ARMY HEADQUARTERS, | and Cheetham was leg before to] Bissell and en mean ;
Korea, Aug. 16 Laker without any addition to the |have arrived in Berbi ; z Oe
United Nations bombers core conferring with the managemen
, and estate joint committee

The wicket continued to take

pin and South Africa never looked



The ‘““ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS
| Dial 3113

bravely
after

hung on
but shortly

pulled shoulder muscle meant that
Vielle

50, and damaged 30 others
largest volume of traffic
ighted near Sinmak on the
Pyongyang-Kaesong highway in
Western Korea and in the Song-
chon and Yongdok areas in Basterr
Korea ‘The
fround wa
days,

The
was
main

included in a South

@ On page 8

was

Day or Night

Situation on the
the quietest in recent
according to an 8th Army
spokesman

The fighting front
Kaesong diplomatic
sub-Committee
patrol action furnishing most of
battle activity. While United
and Communist delegates
the

of

followed the
front
with only

into
minor

he
Nations
ed at
in favour
actions

rece main
mall

on

conferences
eale discus
ion the front line
also decreased

Instead
with
units
lay
size

of the
company

usual contact
size Communis
Allied elements on Thurs-
Red patrols and platoon
almost exclusively

met
groups

Three Charged With
\bdullah’s Death

rEL AVIV, Aug. 16
Cairo radio reported Thursday
that Egyptian lawyers secking te







assist defendants charged with the |
murder of King Abdullah, have |
feceived no reply from Amman |
authoritic :
: rat zoe ’ nl +
radio viper mouitesd hee) PRROUETDE $TAYS WHIRE
predicted that the progecuto
ask a military court for death
sentences against Dr. Mousa Ab lhere is a strange fascination about gleaming white paint — Perat
tullah, Hussein’s father, Ibrahim a :
Ayada and Abdul Kadel Frahat| “*pecially lhis Berger white marine enamel is hard, glossy and yet
‘dire re ic an “o- |
for direct relatior to ar d co | resistant to the destructive influence Of een ‘air And salt water ht
yoperation in the murder |
—U.P. | therefore, ideal for outside woodwork on houses, where it : kbd



lurability provid









Polish Official amart and protective. Try
Flees To Germany | on
A young of ial of the Polish MADE BY
lum in West Germany, today BERGER PAINTS
jeeeupation authorities here, de AT ALL
: a s'wee| HARDWARE STORES
CP GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.-—-Agents


PAGE TWO




























Z Ee BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 1951
a tC CL ET CNC | ‘
ates 2 > at ‘ _ omesien > ée ‘
° e Visiting Her Daughter Ba. RADIO PROGRAMME OPENING TO-DAY ae Ping —_
; AND CONTINUING DAILY AT 4.45 & 8.36
M&S, MARJORIE HAYNES FA eT eee oe 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 6.55 5 AND LSINEE: TO-MORROW AT OAM.
left yesterday by the Golfite P an A aay 's Sport cites c " :
for England on a visit t io : , ¢ . ne Parade il - 7010 OG pom 25.52 M. 31.22 M _ 9
daughter and son-in-law. " She con News 12.1 a. 7 p.m, 7 Nev 7.10 p.m, New E M P i R E
PRUARMACY week ends témor- expects to be away for about four | \nalysi ; is, 7.15 p.m. West Indian Dia
i i ight with a social at months ee ete es ome ;
Queen’s Park for members of the Leaving by the same ship were The News, 4.10 p1 tertude a a a i Se @
Pha wceutical Society and their M Kathleen Hawkins i ; Flint of the i on "Sq mt » the Editorials, 9 p : Tr
expects to return in time for the eo g Record, 5 p.n boad, 9.45 p World Affair
lecture at Queen’s November races, Mrs. Merivale Se eens Oe PRs eee. eee, 12.20 im. Rare \
Park will be the last of a series of Austin, Mrs. E. Centano and Miss sp og eae fans ae Liter Quarter, 10.48 pm ae Years of
lectures which began on Sunday M. Jones who are all going on 6.15 p.m ne

Transatl.



> Quiz, Achievement

with a broadeast lecture by_Mr, holiday.





































A. W. Smith, introducing Phars | te Coming Soon
° ; co 4 - . oy “RIDES ;
1 week Intransit | Jane GREER PF i. aw az aA B'TOWN inate ive *
The lecture tonight will be ee Due Soon! } Dial 2316]}-whispering smith
iven by Dr. E. B. Carter. The NTRANSIT on the Golfite yes~ - a —_
sease. baa i ‘ i a 1.50, 445 & 8.50 P.M AND CONTINUING
bject is venereal disease. terday was Miss Jacqueliné TO-DAY : DAILY 4.45 30 P ;
Chan, whose father is head 0 BETTY FRED re eee oe

Back to Africa
Ao almost two and a half

Chan’s Photo Studio in Trinidad
Miss Chan who is easily Trini-
dad’s most popular Chinese ballet

HUTTON -— asTAIRE ** LET'S DANCE

Color by Technic or




















































. | 1 Roland YOUNG—Ruth WARRICK—Lucille WATSON Greg ‘ MOFF ETT
months holiday in Re rbados dancer has just left Bishop’s High ~SPECTAL SATURDAY 3.0 AM A 1 PM
N n Mrs. Pat Duke lef School and is on her way ta 2 Action Westerns! |
tome on the Golfite for Eng- y * | “BOSS OF LONELY VALLEY”
esterday he Gelfite for Eng- Tondon to study - dramatics ané BUCK JONES — DICK HOLLAND &
ad. dap. thelr way Deck’ to * dancing. She is cne of Trinidad’s “CHEY E ROUND-UP" |
fpoast Ww a ge } ee leading ballet dancers. JOHNNY MACK BROWN — FUZZY KNIGHT
The Police oree § | - a
tl ighter of Mr, and B Arrivals Sas Og } SS
a | PLAZA oii sa GALETY
Venue, Belleville R. J. A. CHABROL, Manager|} a4 4% Dial 8404 ae SS E -e |||
— 1 f' Booker’s: (B’d Drug | TO-DAY (Only) 5 & 830 P.M. THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES |/)
Off to England - o »0ker's dos) 4 “NEWS HOUNDS" FRIDAY to SUNDAY 8.30 P.M. |
nen 5 areas Stores Ltd., accompanied by his}||/Leo Goreey and East Side Kids and Mat: SUNDAY 4.30 P.M.
Ny RS: CYRIL LYNCH, ner sol son John returned from B.G, on|]|"J1IGGS AND MAGGIE IN SOCIETY Bis Triple Attraction
LY 1-4) iaughter-in-law Mi Wednesday evening by B.W.LA i Joe Yule—Renie Riano World's Heav yresiens Championshir
ind Mis. Michael Lynch, and her They had been away for two cr > Chai a rae TRAE | Ezzard A Sake tae
nd=so th were z assen- 4 7 harlic an in“ iT P* and 7 +s - VALC rg
rand3s John were all passe weeks. SONG of the RANGE Jimmy Wakely {CHARLE and WALCOTT & :
gers for England by the Golfito ~ Opening SATURD , 2 ae » Features ae
Oh a The are going to Mr. Chabrol told Carib that owe A ; 1 50 p.m. “SQUARE DANCE KATY
ra They are § ing - Reece ven : TYCOON” (Color) John WAYNE Vera VAGUE Phil BRITO &
ive in: York, Yorkshire, where with regard to water polo in MIDNITE SATURDAY 18TH “KILLER SHARK” Roddy McD FN V1
Michael will study farming and Georgetown, swimmers there told Victor JORY “UNKNOWN = Guest Tip NITE"SATURDAY iaTH | V
John 2y will attend St. Peter's him it would be impossible aan ae ae LAWLESS BREED" | @, t ‘
Cm av s srare rer Johnny Ma 3. Iw fe h CcvoLe A, '
Publie School PASSENGERS for England yesterday by the “Golfito” are seen Sa an tee aie aed ete sili errr |
d 3 L boarding the launch at the Baggage Warehous. Judge J. W. B. bit essa" Gabenateae saat "a ‘ prize-winning
Presréetirement Leave Chenery is on the extreme left of the picture ality was a swimming | 8

. mPa _pyT “s he Georgetown Football Club,

AR:AND MRS. H. P. P. TRIM ;

ree ; ° b 6 ‘ out the shallow end was only a

Micra tert for —— Hopes to Go to Australia Joins Wife and Family foot or two deep. He left a copy
rday afternoon by the Golillo. “iupGEe J. W. B. CHENERY,

v . . of the rules of water polo «vith
ngham who had ere! Judge of the Assistant Court R. C. PHILLIP BROOKS, one of B.G.’s leading aa nmers,
2 sip ae SUS oa Appeel was among the passen- 7 representative of C aterpillar Mickey Da Silva and Mickey is
gers leaving for England yester- Tractor Co., for Venezuela, the going to see what can be done
day by the Golfito. This is his GUjanas and Trinidad, with ead-

firet visit to England after twenty Quarters in Caracas arrived fron New Reverend Mother

AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only) |}
MATINEES: TO-DAY & TO-MORROW at 5 P.M
TO.NIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT at 8.30
ANN TODD — CLAUDE RAINS — TREVOR HOWARD

in



“Comedy





{ Nt pending her pre-

poent leave in England,
i Carib shortly before
t ter twenty years







. oo years and he hopes to go “Down Trinidad yesterday by the Golfito ONE WOMAN S STORY James) ‘Fred’ Alan’ 2 Patricia Natalie « Tommy™ Robert’ _ Lyle
ye at Queen's College, he ty ey to gee the West Indies-- to join his wife and two children LSO arriving on the B.G. Based on the Novel “The “assionate Friends” by H. G. Wells ||| GLEASON =CLARK : MOWBRAY = MEDINA - WOOD - RETTIG - GIST - TALBOT
: % ; overs ee oe or das Australia cricket games. acew Ria Phillip Tat a z ahee ' plane was Rev. Mother Ursula A Universal-Internationai Kelease | om Screen Pay by PHOEBE and HENRY EPHRON-Based _ Directed by LANG Produced by ENGEL 20.
CNnovo and 1e ype < yeen here since mid-July. 1€Y Wilkie. O.S.U., the new Reverend | q +c HENRY EPHRON -' g A ter es 2
eae ak a ‘ fine Father and Son are staying at the Four Aces Flas other for the Ursuline Convent tar tee | | eee 1 an atc The New Yoke ya Meaty 4 WALTER ane
y PuliL On S €



ee nn mF
in St. Lawrence Gap. Fee ee amas G EXPLOSIVELY TO-DAY & CONTINUING | @&



the t. She beg- R. W. H. ALLAN of Messrs.
¢ gir, VA's.





: ah ‘ ise I ar Stanislaus Wilkie, O.S.U., ad rid 7 " Y 7
9: say good-bye to the girls, Rice and Co. and his | Mrs, Brooks’ sis ter. Miss Pepe tenet te of BG GLOBE THEATRE |
; pr rt of Queen’s young son left by the Golfito Eugenia Glover of Florida is also : pee R at Mot! a ae ee al Uae : | ;
( id to express her grati- yesterday for England. They ex- in Barbados. She too has been or. isl: oar ree i. Rt aed, FOUR BIG SHOWS TO-MORROW vm ine . a “ee
tude--for the thandsome and pect to be away two and a half here _ since maideduly. they ad aes Birbadcs. ere Brae 9-30 A.M., 1.30 P.M., 5 & 8.15 P.M. Naa tle eRe et PTS FE SAt-Â¥i ay
} t eived from them. months returning by way of the expect to remain ere until = . — tei aan . wn ; ‘ } -
} ived. from U.S. 1. , Bctebar Ist. Miss Glover spent }=—= SPECIAL PRICES FOR KIDS AT 9.30 & 1.30 |







After Thirteen Years

L L one week in Caracas with her Ay
Me AND MRs. T. J. “BERTIE” ong Leave sister, before coming over to Cunon FIALGAY
|



Positively Your Best Movie Bet cae AEN ate



FL SELLS MELE I TILSEN OT

FINALLY, at last, after a
3 year delay, you can see

STOCKER are en route to R. AND MRS, ALBERT Barbados, 2 %
and by the Golfito which LAKE who arrived from St. ° . LenS) G ee
cailed : yeste edn Mr Stocker Kitts a few days ago left yester- U.S. Foreign Service o ?
ho is an engineer with Cable day by me See for England on Inspector To THE SCREENS
Mr. Lake

ind Wireless had been stationed holiday who is with

ROXY

TO-DAY ONLY 4:30 & 8.15
20th Century Fox Double





er > ae
with their branch h«re for the the St. Kitts Sugar Factory is’ on R. AND MRS. EDWARD T. BIGGEST TH E Ou T L wi | Bower G. ROBINSON James: LYDON
‘past four years. This is his first long leave WAILES who have been in ENTERTAINMENT A | Victor McLAGLEN in me Charles RUSSELL in
visit home’ in thirteen years, He Barbados on a short visit are due , ; ‘ - ‘ 7
is on-four mwths long leave Here For a Month to leave this -morning for BALL HOWARD HUGHES TAMPICO <

di R . RS. MICHAEL LAING and Martinique by B,.W.1.A. , - “ TUCSON”’
Mathematics at Cambridge I three children arrived from Mr. Wailes is a U.S. Foreign OF THEM ALL My production | Spy Drama.
R. VIVIAN HUTSON, son of Trinidad yesterday by the Golfite. Service Inspector and is on a *
il Pr. and Mrs. Lindsay Hutson She is spending a month’s holiday routine inspection tour ef the vit, @
¢ gt abel 2

|
— fe : OPENING TO-MORROW 4.45 & 8.15
i By oe 5 | 20th Century Fox Presents - - -



“S$¥erling”’, St. Philip, will read with her parents Mr. and Mrs. U.S, Consulates through this



matics at Queen’ College Sanderson Mr. Laing who was area, having already visited .
Cat idee, when he arrives in a former Manager of the Redif- Venezuela, Curacao and Aruba. Es F

Eneldhd. He left yesterday by fusion system here is coming up His headquarters are in Washing- 7 A
the Golfite. later this month for two weeks. ton. aoe

THE ADVENTURES OF PIPA

* VENGEANCE VALLEY”







STARRING

JANE
RUSSELL

te Mae 2
THOMAS MITCHELL: #

Starring...

BURT LANCASTER
In His First Big ' Technicolor Western
with ROBERT WALKER — SALLY FORREST
An Adventure Drama in its Rugged Best

|
An Raentare
|



ROYAL



Paramount presents. WALTER HUSTON mene z anne gigi ea ee
The perfect song-and-dance pair! aT tn} 1 ; 3 : | Republic “Smashing Double ,
BETTY FRED we | Republic Deuble - - -
|“ LIGHTS OF OLD ; es
Z | x Sunset CARSON in - -
SANTA FE
i] ia g Starring... “DAYS OF BUFFALO
| DALE EVANS and ”
Se Lets J [ae ava BILL
oe |

BY THE . WAY eee Beachcomber

ppowewine the illness of so nowhere. I do not agree. I re- shipped the very grounds he

EXTRA ATTRACTIONS TO-NITE AND
‘ rm aay : " | AND
ty LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
TECHNICOLOR / EDDIE HALL issue. Singing “Begin the Beguine” | “WAKE OF THE ‘““KING OF
jor NEVILLE PHILLIES ... “IT Apologise”

Ca! ; se | ” +99
ST OND YT CHESTON HOLDER ........ . “Be My Love” RED WITCH GAMBLERS







“many elephants comes news member the case of a small and walked on. + re : i ’ A Sa ae | Hah ngs ave er ae
of a Sahay leaded elephant. insignificant suitor who was int- = ——-—— — ———$—__—— {UDLE WAISGR CRO MOFFETT eee WILTSHIRE ....... Pe Count Every Star JOHN wAcNE ee with ee See and
Evidently this is what is called a midated by a large lady. Feeling meee as + ecm tse MARTIN HAYNES ....... ee “Confess” | GAII RU SELL SHOE I s
“horsy elephant, with a straw in that he was not big and strong! CROOSSWORD nae atl 9 Mla Seat | FRANCIS HYPOLITE .... f Because” | 4 RUSSEL: : i 3 i :
mouth. It probably got like enough to roar “Will you “ed ct ee GUEST STAR | Two Pictures COME ON’ KIDS ~
that by riding too much. mine?” he whispered, “May I be | prez HAREWOOD : li Mftone Lise? | With a single thought to and enjoy .
rl ere easel. She. eMBpy Lea yours” The lady was so ee L «ks Peale ar | please vou ei Castile aad. notion
t f at angry ’ ch eke AAiaaiel ‘. a - : ss rills
tings out from a public stuffed years of gratitude. “Cyril, 1 never | | A Hot Musical Short “PACKAGE OF RHYTHM [ee Steen! Ene! To Your Liking

ills with common sense,
a baby, it rode horses
the horse-riding giraffe,
ch I wrote recently, it
uldshot have to dismount when
wsing under a bridge, Another Ape stunned by giant melon
cplenation is that a very heavy m
mahafujah rode this elephant Frxcouracep by American
—s

vhen was small, and bent its
; it divorce customs, a man com-
If only I cared more about



knew you felt like that about me,
you silly boy.’ “Big one, may I
put my arm some of the way
round your waist?”

BRIDGETOWN ie a ace
TO-DAY (FRIDAY) 230. | PRICES TO-NITE

2 20¢e, s . Balcony 48c., Boxes 60c. | > ‘
4.45 and 8.30 p.m. | Pit 20c., House 36c., )
: MATINEE TO-DAY USUAL PRICES 0 L Y M i i ¢€

Ss a
TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW 4.45 & 8.15
Ist Instalment

SUNDAY & MONDAY 445 & 8.15 Final Instalment
The Republic Action Serial

“ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN MARVEL ”

|
|
|
| Starring - - -
|
|



















—





ae ak ; ; plained that his marriage had
is sake of thing, I would buy the jy oken when his wife “poured the

clephattt a jockey-acp. dregs of a cup of coffee into *
|



Across
1. Was one speed you'll find. (Â¥)
Y How a mole carried the girl, 17
10. A real meit of fairy butter. (8)
14. Gang aboard. (4)
14, Biack guard, (4)
15. Long past the best. (1. 3, 4)
16. Much may turn on it. (3)
18, New Zealand parson oird, (3)

Love dawns shoe”, If I was not above trivial
A SAGE, giving advice on jokes which, one feels, detract
{ courtship, says that timidity from one’s integrity, actually, 1
1Wnility will get a young man mean, I could say that she wor-

TOM TYLER

T 4 ;
| You’ve Read About Him in the Comics now see Him Come to Life
? On The Screen
‘ e THE BEST OF FUN FOR YOUNG AND OLD
I praca cre tatiana tc tnt errs acta nnindinee











test Stra Bem,







b

‘Rupert and the Soreerer—6






a ty n ve OF ties te Q a
Sy BC sN ie atic weste waver | oh JANETTA DRESS SHOP
, ‘ Down

Q

t All wrt of a tour-footer ) Upstairs Newsam & Co.
(So

2 A surgical performance
Entities. (5)




» pursue. in Watery (4)
» wonder vou get one fretn |
}
}
|
}
|
|

Lower Broad Street

DRESSES

READY MADE AND MADE TO ORDER



meal. (7)
ther meal. (3)

REL OB He

Sboat’s hesitant claim to cover?

(6

%& A roguisn nobieman ? (8)

1 Carge-sizea Inexactitude = from
Germany (6)

12. Nothing extracted trom the

6. Layer (3)























‘ ’ Tree.
D'you another word

"Yes, me see.” says the Chinese she says **Me already talk too oH : sp omen 5
git! placidiy, “I: was distant (much, All yo school now.’ And zi mRce ve Oewe by Reet
sorcer He come to talk to my although. the others follow and 7 Mend: & Solo; 12. Mun
4gd4y of wonder ew magic.’’ beg her to explain she won't say Moe: 16, Taint: 17 Ink



Whar





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Beautiful Designs and Colours

|
\
drawn caricature, (6)
1
- 7 1 Nothing short of a 21. (4)
7 ei al .. mean to say that there was some- + 20 Gently drop the bait. (3) : |
* Z 4 Pre entiy calle ailiy 3) |
Dic 1 hat queer thing one in thar th Where is it? } 21 Prequentiy called silly | j
} » through. the. sky?" Who was. ..?" But Tigerlily | viluion of yesterday § puzzle —Acruss |
ae ogee : turns away. Me no tell more,” 1 (2; Fashioned: 7, Mist: 9, Wove: 10. Re
'
{
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COTTON FACTORY LTD.
Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039

®
Buy early from... THE CORNER STORE

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 1951

THE GA

NOW LEAVE THI6 TO ME
- ————_—
PAK








PUERTO RICO TO

MANUFACTURE
CORTISONE

PUERTO RICO, August 14.

Yet another new industry comes
to Puerto Rico. This time it is
the manufacture of Cortisone,
the new drug used against arth-
ritis. . . . . The discovery of a
new source of material, abundant
and cheap, was recently announ-
eed jointly by American Syntex
Incorporated, Syntex S.A. of
Mexico and Chemica) Specialities
Incorporated of New York. ....

The discovery was mae in the
laboratories of Syntex S.A. of
Mexico when a group of investi-
gators found that one of the
necessary constituents in the
manutacture of synthetic Cortis-
one could be easily extracted
from the roots of yam grown in
Mexico. .... This yam is not fit
for human consumption ...,.
It is expected that the production
of Cortisone by the new process
will shortly be started in Puerto
Rico at the plant of American
Syntex Incorporated at Hato Rey
(A-to Ray). .

According to Dr. 1. V. Sollins of
Chemical Specialities of New
York and President of American
Syntex of Puerto Rico, the new
process wil] eliminate the neces-
sity of having to depend exclus-
ively on raw material from
animal sources, .... The pro-
cess is much simpler than any
used before and it is believed
that it will open up to thousands
of sufferers the use of Cortisone
in large qyantities and at a price
not more” than, and probably
much less than the present

Egypt Denies
Reports

ALEXANDRIA, Egypt, Aug. 16.

Egyptian Foreign Minister, Salah
E) Din Pasha, denied reports
Thursday that Egypt has told the
United States and Britoin she will
ignore any Security Council in-
junction to lift the Suez Canal
blockade.

Salah El Din aiso denied that
Egypt warned the United States
that American oil companies in
Arab countries would be ordered
to halt their oil production unless
they guaranteed that no part of
their oil would reach Israel.

He said Egypt's attitude would
be determined by the kind of reso-
lution which the Council would
finally adopt. Arab League Secre-
tary, Abdul Rahim Azzam Pasha,
also speaking in Alexandria, saia
Thursday he was “very hopeful”
that Turkey would uphold the
Arab world by siding with Egypt
in the Security Council debate on
the Suez Canal blockade.—U.P.

LOO



a TRADE MARK

VASELINE is the registered trade mark
of the Chesebrough Mfg. Co., Cone"d





MBOLS



Field Will Have Pavilion

The Christ Church Vestry will soon be erecting a pavilion

at Sarjeant’s Village Playin

g Field. It was originally esti-

mated that this pavilion would cost $9,600. The present cost
is now estimated to be $10,800.

The Vestry, at their meeting
yesterday evening,
letter from the Colonial Office in
which the Financial Secretary as-
sured members that the Govern-
ment would make an additional
grant to the Vestry.

Additional cost of $5,010 which
was submitted by the Playing
Field Committee was accepted,
and Mr. Fred Goddard, M.C.P.,
moved that the tender for build-
ing the pavilion, which at their
last meeting was awarded to Mr.
Arthur Evelyn, contractor, be con-
firmed.

Mr. Evelyn’s tender of $9,934
was the lowest of four submitted
to the Vestry, The other tenders
were for $11,760, $13,560 and
$15,360.

According to the revised esti-
mate, the Playing Field, complete
with pavilion, will cost $18,935.
The original estimate was $13,925
Erecting the pavilion will cost
$10,800; enclosing the field $1,820;
roads and turning in water $2,625;
levelling the field $3,340 and dig-
ging a new suck $350, The sum of
$1,597.85 has already been spent
on levelling the field and $637.41
on turning in water and roads.

Change of Estimate

Mr, C. B. Brandford said that
he did not see why they should nct
go on with the erection of the
pavilion because, as he understood
from Mr, Goddard, if within 2i
days théy did not accept the
tender, Mr. Evelyn could change
his figure. Mr. Evelyn should be
allowed to make a start because
the cost of material was increas-
ing daily. They have a Playing
Field Committee and nothing has
been done without the Commit-
tee’s knowledge. The money has
been released so that they could
make a start.

Mr. Fred Goddard, M.C-P., said
that so far they had taken every
precaution te account to Govern-
ment for the funds, There was
no reason why the Vestry should
not believe that the additional sum
would be forthcoming, because,
in submitting the first estimate,
the Vestry made it clear to Gov-
ernment that this was subject to
revision.

The Sarjeant~ Village Playing
Field had been accepted in prin-
ciple and Government had gone
further and at their last meeting
in the House of Assembly given
sanction to a Resolution giving
the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee power to lease the land
to the Christ Church Vestry.

He said that they had never
made a false move in the matter
The Financial Secretary assured
that provided the funds are there
for Christ Church, there was no
reason why the money should not






Bina diy

eit hea” a \
SQ Mi NT ym
> J



“









AA
Every spoonful gives you £4
more and more LE

energy and










& BURROUGHS WELLCO
ee ee cneecmeee mt aeaenrare a




@ Every spoonful of Kepler’ gives you a rich
supply of vitamins A and D,

@ These vitamins are sature’s wonder workers,
assuring health and freedom from iliness,

@ Men, women, children—all should start
taking tasty ‘Kepler’ to-day.

‘KEPLE

COD LIVER OIL WITH MALT EXTRACT



ME & CO. PRODUCT ral

se Sele Agents for Bari edos ; Collins’ Ltu., 28 Broad Stree

be forthcoming. He said that the

received a contractor would like to know at

an early date if he had been
granted the tender or not. He
suggested that they confirm the
award of the tender at that meet-
ing.
* ‘
Hurricane Relief

In dealing with the question of
appointing a Chairman of the
Hurricane Relief Committee, the
Vestry decided to write the Colo-
nial Secretary telling him that it
was impossible to appoint a chair-
man and asking for any sug-
gestions as early as possible.

Mr. G. C. Ward of Warners Planta-
tion, Christ Church, was appointed Road
Clearance Officer of the Hurricane Re
lief Organisation Other appointments
were: Mr. H. St. G. Ward of Durants
Plantation, Supply Officer; Mr. W. E. R
Hurte of Sheridan, Maxwell Road, Shel-
ter Officer, Mr. H. D. Cole of South
Winds, Maxwell Coast and Mrs. Joyce
Hotchkiss of Dayrells Road Christ
Crurch, Rescue Officers; Mr. C, S. Mac-
Kenzie of Dalney, Maxwell Coast, Sani-
tation Officer; Mr. G. A. FitzGerald of
Graeme Hall Terrace, Damage Assessment
Officer

Present at yesterday's metting were
Rev, A. F, Mandeville, Chairman, Mr
t. St. G. Ward, Mr. C. S. MacKenzie
Mr. Fred Goddard, M.C.P., Mr, C. B
Brandford, Mr Cc Tfill, Me George
Ward, Mr. A. G. Gittens, Mr. J. Webster
and Mr. Wood Goddard, Clerk of the
Vestry



Communist Youths
Mass Within
West Berlin

BERLIN, August 16.

West Berlin police rushed to the
East-West border as Communist
youths massed at three points
within the western sector in an
apparent effort to hold new anti-
western demonstrations.

Police said that several thous-
ands blueshirted members of the
“Free German Youth” were con-
centrated within West Berlin neai
the Soviet sector border.

The youth were massed at the
Potsdamer Platz where the Soviet,
British and United States sectors
meet in the American occupied
Neukoelln—U.P.

HITLER’S YACHT
FOR SCRAP HEAP
BORDENTOWN, New Jersey,

Aug. 16.

Adolt Hitler’s $4,000,000 yacht
Grille will be cut into scrap to
aid the United States hunt for

steel for its defence programme.
—U-P.



/ bake the modern





Ory Yeast

@ With Fieischmann’s wonderful
new Dry Yeast—you can bake
deliciows buns and rolls any time
at all. Fleischmann’s stays fresh
for weeks. If you bake at home—
keep a big supply on hand, Get
Fleischmann’s Dry Yeast today.

For Your Health's Sake—try



NEEDS NO REFRIGERATION —AS EASY TO USE
| AS OLD-FASHIONED PERISHABLE YEAST

| Keen 2 supply on hand - bake at. moments notte



Y

The antiseptic for general use in the home should be high!s
germicidal yet gentle on delicate tissues, non-poisonous and.
preferably, should not stain clothes or the skin. * Dettol ”
fulfils every one of these conditions. Absolutely reliable,

* Dettol’ can be safely used on even very young children.

‘DETTOL

0 THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Sarjeant’s Village Playing CUBAN SENATOR |

DIES AT 43
Ajter Shooting Himself

HAVANA, August 16.
Senator Eduardo Chibas, 43, the |
so-called ‘stormy petrel” of }
Cuban politics in the last two de-
cades, died on the operating table |
from complications of the post-
operative condition. He had been
at the medical surgical centre since
the night of August 5th when an
emergency operation was per-
formed for a bullet wound self-
inflicted following a regular Sun-
day night broadcast.

|
|
}
|

Chibas, who played a leading
role in the overthrow of ex-Presi-
dent Geraldo Machado in 1933,
died surrounded by leaders of the
Cuban People’s Party of which he |
was President. As soon as hun-|
dreds of his adherents, men and ;
women, who crowded .the hospi- |
tal’s lawns heard the news, they |
wept openly over the passing of
the United States educated Cuban |
political leader. It was announced
that the corpse would be trans-
ferred to the National Capitol !
building where it will lie in state, |
pending funeral arrangements |
which are expected to be made in
the next 24 hours.—U.P.

. ~
Explosion Shakes
Standard

. .

Oil Refinery |

BATON ROUGE, Louisiana,
August 16.
An explosion which rattled
windows and awaked sleeping
residents in homes five miles
away rocked the Standard Oil

Refinery in North Baton Rouge.
State city police rushed to the

refinery . \



Residents in downtown Baton
Rouge reported a blue grey
column of smoke rising from the |
huge refinery,

The explosion killed two men
at the refinery and caused dam-
age estimated at $300,000.

W. B. Cotten, Junior, Public
Relations Director for Standard
Oil said the blast badly damaged
three 37,000 gallon tanks and two|



distillate trating units,

Nine Esso workers were injw
and “three or four” railroad
employees hurt. The fire raged
through gasoline and tractor fuel
tanks and blanketed the country-!
side with black greasy smoke |
until it was controlled two hours
and 45 minutes after the ex-
plosion,

—U-P.





Fleischmann’s dissolved in fruit
juice, milk or water, Like foil yeast,
it helps tone up your system.

SO EASY TO USE
1. Sprinkle into lukewarm’ water.
2, Let stand 10 minutes. Stir. When
dissolved, one package equals one
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6
Tell me
doctor ..

What do
you mean by
a safe antiseptic?’

RAF ~



4G2¢GLGLGGG DGG GGG G GGLGLGGGGO

yy



Ny
K
&
&

The burning question of the Day is how to survive the High
Cost of Living and what a worry this is to you, dear Reader.
Every month you find yourself in ever-increasing difficulties.
You simply can’t make two ends meet. This question is of
vastly greater importance to you than the “Black Pact” that
Britain concluded with Cuba, the Persian Oil Dispute or even
Trinidad’s recently announced Immigration Policy because it
affects those nearest and dearest to you.

An even more serious raatter is at hand, involving as it does
increases in the Cost of Living, and we ask you to give it urgent
and earnest thought. There are people in our midst who, with
good intent but without realizing the serious consequences to
you, are endeavouring to cut off a valuable source of supply
because of Racial policies of the present South African Govern-
ment. These people say “STOP DEALING WITH SOUTH
AFRICA”, because of this Racial Policy.

We tell you that there are many thousands of South Africans
of European descent living in South Africa who are not in favour
of the present South African Government's policy. These South
African people are fighting in South Africa ‘tooth and nail’
against the Racial Policies of the Government and so are the two
well-known and influential South African newspapers—"Cape
Times” and “Cape Argus”. The South African Government is
well aware therefore of the opposition to its policy.

We point out further that the Australian Government
prohibits the settlement in Australia of any Coloured person: in
the Southern States of the U.S.A., the negro suffers humiliation
because of Racial Discrimination.... It has never been sug-
gested—and indeed how ridiculous it would be to suggest,
especiaily in times like these when food supplies are difficult to
obtain,—to refuse to buy Austral.an and American foods and
other goods. EQUALLY RIDICULOUS AND SUICIDAL AND
TO NO PURPOSE WOULD IT BE TO CUT OURSELVES OFF
FROM SOUTH AFRICAN SUPPLIES. Let us tell you something

ys may not know about South Aftican Trade with the West
ndies.

South Africa buys Lime Juice, Arrowroot, Spices from the
West Indies and enquiries were received this Year for thousands
of tons of Sugar which, because of the West Indian Contract
with Britain, could not be entertair:ed.

Enquiries were also received for GINGER, which, if grown
io a much greater extent, would prove to be a valuable export
ot Barbados.

It takes 18 to 19 days only to get goods from South Africa
directly to Barbados. It takes 6 weeks and more from Australia.

South Africa is within the Sterling Area which means that
supplies from that country COST LESS than similar supplies from
Canada and other Dollar Areas—because of the much higher
value of Canadian Currency in relation to the pound Sterling.
This is particularly noticeable in the case of CANNED FISH of
which South Africa is now supplying to Barbados many
thousands of cases of excellent PILCHARDS. These Pilchards
are sold at 22c. per } lb. tin and 38c. per 1 lb. tin as against
CANADIAN SALMON at 66c. per 1 lb. tin and 86c. for } lb. South
Africa has supplied ONIONS and POTATOES at a time when
these staple foods were unobtainable elsewhere. South Africa
supplies us with CANDLES, MOTOR-CAR TYRES, WINES,
CANNED FRUITS, JAMS, CANNED VEGETABLES, CUSTARD
POWDERS, JELLY CRYSTALS, DRIED PEEL, ESSENCES, FRUIT
JUICES AND SQUASHES, and the very important item of
CANNED FISH, all of excellent quality and at very much lower
prices than similar goods, from elsewhere.

A glance at the Map will shew that in case of War, South
Africa would be the only Sterling Country that could supply us
with foodstufts.

A shipment of South African Butter will be arriving in
Trinidad soon and will sell for close on 20c. per lb. less than the
current price of Butter.

The fact is that South African goods, because of quality and
bargain prices, are of immense value to us in Barbados and to
all other West Indian Colonies. South Africa's Canned Products
(Jams, Fruits, Fish) are very popular and in great demand iri
many countries of the World and certainly South Africa would
have no difficulty in diverting her Canned Fish, which West
Indian Dealers have secured for us, to Great Britain.

WE NEED SOUTH AFRICAN GOODS MORE THAN EVER
BEFORE to help relieve you Mr Reader of the financial strain
imposed by the Cost of Living, and WE ASSERT WITHOUT
EXAGGERATION THAT the Cost of Living will mount steadily
higher and higher if you are deprived of them.

TIMES ARE DIFFICULT, YOU ARE SUFFERING AND
GROANING UNDER the Load—the High Cost of Living—There-
fore, DON’T MAKE THE MISTAKE OF “CUTTING YOUR NOSE
TO SPITE YOUR FACE”.

THE FEEDING OF YOUR FAMILY AND OF YOURSELF
SHOULD come before all Political issues, particularly those of
other Countries, over which you have absolutely no Control.

IT IS IMPERATIVE IN YOUR OWN INTERESTS TO TRADE
WITH SOUTH AFRICA, just as it is to trade with Australia
and with the Southern States of America. We cannot afford
in these days to be deprived of ANY SOURCE OF FOOD;
SUPPLIES.

FAMILY!!!

ZESSGSSSSSY HULL & SON Z4ASSERASRER



; ;
‘FOOD FOR THOUGHT! ;
Re THE HIGH COST OF LIVING §

»»

OFF

WAKE UP BARBADOS TO REALITIES!
FIGHT THE GOOD FIGHT FOR YOUR
EL ES Ue Le ee RAS SESTOGSS PTT TTS

PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS sib ADVOCATE

l= {<= _ {snared

===

Printed by the Advocate Co., Bridgetown

Ltd., Broad St,



Friday, August 17, 1951

SURCHARGE

FOR some time now there has been gen-
eral dissatisfaction with the handling of
cargo in the port of Bridgetown, That
dissatisfaction is not limited to local mer-
chants and consumers but includes the
captains of ocean going vessels.

It is clear now from a letter published
in this newspaper on Tuesday from Hon.
F. C. Hutson that in addition to the loss of
prestige which the Barbadian worker had
gained for himself, steamship companies
are taking steps to protect themselves.

The letter giving publicity to an excerpt
from a circular communication te shippers
from one steamship company says: “Ship-
pers are hereby informed that unsatis-
factory despatch at Barbados and the
high cost of handling cargo there make it
necessary to add a delivery surcharge of
10,/- per freight ton on all cargo shipped
from U.K. to Barbados from 1st September
next.”

It is not the first time that complaints
have been made against the slow turn
round of ships in this port and skippers of
some of these vessels have even been heard
to express the view that some of the port
workers take part in a go slow campaign.
One skipper about two years ago went as
far as saying that he had actually seen
men playing cards in the ship’s hold while
others were loading cargo into the slings.
These charges will be strenuously denied
and counter charges will be made
against those who even give publicity to
them; but there are figures which show
that there has been a gradual decline in
the rate of handling cargo.

The Report of Sir Douglas Ritchie pub-
lished in this island show that in 1941 the
rate of removing cargo per gang was 20.1
tons per hour and this declined gradually
until 1944 when it stood at 11.8 tons per
hour,

To-day with increased rates of pay the
rate of removal stands at 5 or 6 tons per

_ hour,

There are other factors which prove
that this general decline in the rate is not
mere accident. Earlier this month a ship
of the Furness Line, which has been oper-
ating here for years before the war and
which resumed its regular service in 1949,
was put two days off her schedule because
labourers refused for the first time to han-
die her cargo at night. It is likely that
with a new schedule being drawn up
Bridgetown will be left out.

In addition to the decline in the rate of
handling there has been an increase in the
cost and recent figures show that in com-
parison with Trinidad at the rate of 8/-
and British Guiana 9/- the cost of hand-
ling a ton of cargo at Bridgetown was 22/-
per ton.

There is an erroneous belief that mat-
ters of controversy at the port should be
left to the ships labourers and steamship
agents alone with the labourers having the
advantage of stating their own terms and
appealing to the Labour Commissioner
through the Unions when it suits them.
It is not so. This matter affects vitally
the interests of every section of the com-
munity. The middle class worker is the
greatest sufferer. The merchant has the
opportunity to increase his scale of profits
in order to pay his extra overhead or
current expenses; the ship labourer has
his rate of pay increased; while the con-
sumer must be content to be the meat in
the sandwich.

The matter has now gone one step
further and as Hon. Mr. Hutson’s letter
shows, this reduction in the rate of hand-
ling of catgo causing the slow turn round
of ships will now cost importers ten shil-



-

lings more per ton of cargo brought to ,;
this island from tHe United Kingdom. If)

this is the attitude of British steamship
owners it might be that foreign compan-
ies will adopt an even more penalising
one.

This is where the Trade Unions can do
a lot for the fair name of Barbados and
the reputation of its worker,

A BIG JOB

NEW YORK.

America’s biggest telephone firm has
just finished six months’ work. In that
time it has instailed 1,000,000 telephones.

The firm is the American Telephone and
Telegraph Company — so big it has
1,000,000 shareholders

Part-of the credit goes to its president,
58-year-old Cleo Craig.

He started as a boy delivering news-
papers. And he went to work for the tele-
phone firm by accident.

Cleo had just graduated from college as
an electrical engineer. He was in love
with a schoolgirl sweetheart, Laura Heck,
and reluctantly took his first job far
away from her in Utah,

Just before he set out, the hometown
branch of the telephone company phoned
and said it had a job for him. He accepted
this job to be near Miss Heck and they
were married

He started at £5 7s. a week. Presidency
of American TelephOne and Telegraph
usually pays £44,000 a year.

Mr. Craig loves telephones











B.



ARBADOS ADVOCATE

Vietorian Dress

(1837 —

During the long reign of Queen

Victoria women’s aress' under-
went many change;. Al the
Victorian Exhibition at the

Museum a wide range of costume
is apparent, and it is interesting
to compare two of these to set
how the pendulum of fashion
moved. One is an evening dress
from the early years of the reign,
cut on the classical lines of tne
Regency of Chinese silk trimmed
with bands of red ;atin Taois
elegant gown has a square neck,
high waist and puffed sleeves-

which later developed into the
fabulous leg-of-mutton sleeves
The other, an evening dress, is
made in two pieces — a blouse
and a_ skirt, instead of the
simplicity of the earlier gown,
over-decoration has*taken place.
This pink satin gown of, the nine-
ties is a tangle of black lace, net
and bugle-bead embroidery. The
bodice has a yolk of dotted net
and bead embroidery, on the
shoulders there is bugle-bead
embroidery and the short sleeves
are covered with lace and beads.
The skirt has a panel of bead
embroidery in front with a three-
ovarter over-skirt of black net,
against lace and bead embroid-
ery. It is a skirt to be worn
over many petticoats. The change
in style is remarkable

No crinoline has survived for
exnipidon; tnat graceful gorment
wnicn Monsieur Worth invented
to conceal the pregnancy of the
Empress Eugenie, and which
necessitated tne arms of chairs
reaching only three-quarters of
the way along the seat, so that
the wearer could be seated in
comfort. But the counterpart of
the crinoline — the poke-bonnet,
is represented at the Museum by
an excellent example of straw,
lace and beadwork, for it is the
most characteristic head wear of
the reign, and survived until al-
most 1870.

Bonnets of various kinds are to
be seen at the exhibition includ-
ing the extraordinary Mutch bon-
net, executed in muslin or knit-
ted wool with long strings. Also
on exhibition are widow's weeds,
a white blouse and skirt with a
black belt and silver buckle, and,

a striped
with a square
jaunty,
and sleeves terminating in frills



A Match Cap



two-piece bathing suit
collar = givi a

touch, its legs



nautical

with white, feather - stitched
bands.

There are also various costume
appurtenances and fripperies,
petticoats, fichus, Indian scarfs,
slippers, stoles and a tippet. An
interesting relic of the days of
the unhygienic long dress
is the dress-suspender, which
was __ fastened to the trail-
ing skirt and attached by
a chain to the waistband. The
infants’ clothes look strange to-
day. Long robes embroidered

and flounced with lace covered
the young Victorian,
a chemise and binder

even in the tropics.

were w<

The names of the fabrics u-.i
reads like a poem: Bombazin >,
mull-muslin, foulard, Cashmer
tarlatan, organdie, gauze, jacone

velvet, alpaca. Fashion plat s
were at the height of their pop i-
larity. Hair styles varied from
the smooth, plastered hair of i..c
widow with her “Molly”, ’

frivolous styles where the h-. x
was “dyed red, the colour of a
cow’s tail, and is curled cr!
frizzed like a lap dog's’.



A Steel Band at the BBC

LONDON.
Even the B.B.C. raised its eye-
brow. Producers, announcers,
commentators and engineers,
whose daily job is to deal with
unusual and interegting people
from all parts of the world and
from all walks of life, wandered
over to have a look.

Cause of the excitement was the
Trinidad All Steel Percussion
Orchestra, making its first ap-
pearance in a B.B.C. studio for an
“In Town Tonight” broadcast. It
was an historic occasion—the
first opportunity for millions of
listeners in Britain to hear a real
steel band.

An announcer cautiously picked
up a rubber-headed hammer and
tried an experimental “ping” on
a first ping-pong, while somebody
else rumbled a string of notes
out of a bass boom. Others, wide-
eyed, expressed their amazement
and asked how it was done.

Mai Zetterling, the film star,
tapped daintily at an oil drum
with her foot. Jack Warner, the
radio and screen comedian, quiet-
ly studying his script at the other
end of the studio, came over to
see what it was all about.

And little Mr. George Brown-
ing, 93 years old and a regular
visitor to the “In Town To-night”
studio, said he had never heard
anything like it in a lifetime of
following the trends of the British
entertainment world.

It was a great day for TASPO
when it was invited to make its
first broadcast in England, A
B.B.C. man, invited to hear the
band, dropped his jaw in amaze-
ment as the first notes were struck
and immediately arzvanged for a
broadcast two nights ,ater.

So, shortly after five o’clock
that Saturday evening, a lorry
drew up outside Broadcasting
House and the bandsmen carried
their oil-drum instruments into
the studio, where other people
taking part in the programme
were already gathering.

There was a happy, family-
party atmosphere in the studio,
For most of the people who were

“In Town Tonight,” it was their
first broadcast and the B.B.C. was
careful, as always, to do every-



By BUTE HEWES

thing possible to put them at ease
before the microphone.

There was a young Scottish
singer, just back from a_ night-
club engagement in Holland.
There was a motor-coach driver,
snatching a few hours off from
his work among the _ holiday
crowds, and a_ pleasure-steamer
skipper, doing the same thing.
There was a girl athlete and there
was a young schoolmaster who
flies his own ‘plane. And there
was TASPO.

People wandered about the
studio, chatting informally, while
the producer, perched high above
in his glass-panelled control room,
twiddled knobs and boomed in-
structions through a loudspeaker
to his assistants who were arrang-
ing the microphones

Beside him sat Edric Ccnnor,
the baritone from Trinidad who
had done more broadcasts from
that very studio than he cared to
remember. The only member of
the TASPO party who knew his
way through the B.B.C. procedure,
he helped to direct the compli-
cated process known as “balanc-
ing.”

While the band played, micro-
phones were arranged before
them, behind them, beside them—
even swung high over their
heads. Once, Mr. Connor stopped
the band and told Philmore
“Boots’ Davidson to move his
three big bass »s0oms to one side,
so that their music would be
picked up better by the micro-
phones,

All the tisac, people wandered
in and out of the studio, staring
in fascinated amazement to hear
such sweet music coming out of
the oil-drum band

Finally, the producer was satis-
fied that the microphones had been
arranged to the best advantage. In
an adjoining studio, Mr. Connor
listened through a loudspeaker to
the band, as it would be heard in
millions of homes in Britain and
throughout the world. It came
over as clearly as if it were play-
ing in a concert hall,

Without fuss, the other peop!
taking part in the programm
were put through their paces
the microphone. Then, wit!
three-quarters of an hour to g)
before the programme went o.
the air, the producer called fo
the final run-through.

Out of the loudspeaker cam
the famous signature tune, th
Knightsbridge March, followe,
by the roar of traffic, the chatie
of the Piccadilly flower-seller:
the sudden bellow of : “Stop!”
The run-through was on,

Announcer Ronald Fletcher and
interviewer John Ellison glides
from microphone to microphone
round the big ‘studio, while th
guests in the programme were
shepherded one by one to their
places ready to be interviewed.

Gathered round one microphone
with Edric Connor were Lt
Joseph Griffith, the steel band’s
conductor, with bandsmen Elliott
Marinette and Philmore Davidson.
Between them, they told how the
steel band movement was born
how the instruments are madc
and tuned and how they aro
played. To round off their spo
in the pilogramme, the banc
played Mambo-Jambo

The run-through over, the
bandsmen slipped down to the
B.B.C. canteen, meeting-place of
stars, for a quick cup of tea. Ten
minutes later, they were back ir
their places, for it was nearly
time for the broadcast to begin.

All eyes were on the big studic
clock as its second-hand swepe
round the final minute before tne
broadcast was to go on the air.
Precisely at 7 15 p.m. the sig-
nature tune boomed out again,
a green light winked, and Ron-
ald Fletcher stepped up to the
microphone to announce ; “Once
again we halt the mighty roar ot
London’s traffic to bring to you
some of the interesting people
who are in Town Tonight.’

And TASPO played to the
biggest audience a steel band has
ever had.—B.U.P.



Miss Hennoeck Wants A °*Third
Programme

aakor The U.



on

From FREDERICK COOK

NEW YORK,

AMERICAN Frieda Hennock
thinks so highly of Britain’s Third
Programme that she has thrown
up a £13,000-a-year career and
taken a £5000 Government job to

campaign for a similar pro-
gramme in America.
Miss Hennock, brown - eyed

blonde, has dedicated herself as
a member of the Federal Commu-
nications Commission to the pro-
position that at least a quarter of
of the United States’ 1850 televi-
sion stations should be set
for something other than
mercialised cowboys and

plugging
finding the going heavy.
leagues—there are seven
missioners and she
woman—have not exactly turned
her down. But they have indicated

com-
beer-

Her col-
Com-

that 10 per cent. of the stations is

sufficient ‘for non-commercial use,

14-Hous Day

To gain her point, Frieda
Hennock (who “simply has never
had time to get married” though
she is now 46) is putting in a
14-hour day making at least one
speech for her idea every week
taking her lunch (butter milk and
fruit) at her desk every day
India Edwards, boss_ of
woman’s side of the Democratic
Party—who specialises in getting
women into jobs that only men
held before—brought her name
to President Truman's. atte:



aside

comedians. She is

is the only

the early

Miss Hennock is as unhappy
over American TV programmes
as she is over American radic
She says; “Ah, if only we had
something like your Third Pro-
gramme! You get the greatest in
drama and music. I'd do almost
anything to have it over here.”

Not that she is for “Govern-
ment control” over radio or TV.
“I'd rather have it in private
hands,” she says, “but I'm afraid
that commercial radio, finding it
financially unprofitable, will
never of itself. sponsor pro-
grammes appealing to a minor-
ity. And I’m afraid that unless
something is done now, TV will
go the same way. Once the sta-
tions are assigned we'll never get

them back.”
Just Three Rooms
In New York, when she was 2

wealthy lawyer, she lived in a
Park Avenue penthouse flat. Now
she has a three-room place in
Washington which sees her when
she is not stumping the country
on speaking tours or tied to her
desk at the office long after most
of the rest have gone home

What sort of TV programme
would she like, if she could have
her way?

“Well it would begin in the
with something

farmers—new

methods and so on. Then visual

morni



of interest t



educ ife, fe



Programmes would go into (the
schools: science films, geography,
‘xperts in various. fields who
would reach#thousands of chil-
dren. simultaneously, something
quite impossible in ordinary class
rooms. Moth at home could
follow the Teston and know what
the child was learning. Perhaps
she’d learn something herself.”

Miss Hennock does not explain
how Mother could be persuaded
to switch off the mannequin
parades and the love stories and
switch on to Junior in the class-
room,

But in the evening, she thinks
there could be courses for work -
ing adults and cultural pre-
grammes like ballet and opera.

She has i programme all
worked out, . the
years’ research dnd. preparation.

Insiders in Washington think

they know why she is willing, to |.

put so much tOil into what many
call a lost cause already, Says
one with a smile, “Frieda is very
ambitious, politically. She knows

a good white horse when she sees

one, and how to ride it for all it’s
worth, She has her eye on the}
FCC chairmanship.”

Mr. Truman has already nom-
inated her fora New York
Federal Judgeship. Some lawyers
oppose the appointment. The
matter is still to be thrashed out

Miss Hennoek, meantime, is
eontent with her campaign, her
one feminine weakness (“a taste
for hats on the daffy side”) and
her one remaining hobby: taking
crippled children to the circus on
Saturday afternoor

WORLD COPYRIGHT

RESERVED
+—LE.S.







under whi.1}
‘|ing crossed themselves, entered the ring.

.|sad eyes and straw-thin calves.

result of two}

MATADOR

They call him the bravest youth in
Spain El Atomico Litri earns £1000 in
| an afternoon.

(By KENNETH TYNAN)

| VALENCIA, on the Mediterranean coast
|of Spain, is normally a cramped and fetid
‘industrial town, but last week it became the
/centre of a pilgrimage.

Valencia’s deafening annual fair erupts
every summer, but last week the excitement
was sharper, because the bravest youth in
Spain, the 20-year-old matador, Miguel
| Baez Litri, was to appear three times in the
|bullring for the purpose of ruling and then
‘killing six fighting bulls.
| The people of Valencia treat Litri as a
|son; he was born near-by in Gandia, and he
| ovaduated from novice to full matador in
| their bullring last October, a week after his
twentieth birthday.

£3 A SEAT

They call him “el atomico Litri” because
|he is tiny, and they revere his valour: Litri
makes his bulls charge closer to his body,
| more repeatedly and perilously, than anyone
| alive.
| His life is like tightrope-walking, with the
| difference that, though one tightrope is much
\like another, no bull is like any other bull.
|Except, of course, that they ara all bred to
| fight and to weigh around half a ton.
| I went to Litri’s first fight at the fair. The
|bull-ring is not cheap: a front-row seat now
costs 300 pesetas—nearly £3.

The band played, and the matadors, hav-

| This was my first view of Litri—a gnome-
like boy, withdrawn and old-looking, with

Dominguin was there, too, tall and pre-
ciously smiling. He was awarded the ear
| of his first bull.

Soon after that Litri was gored. With back
proudly arched like a bow, he was complet-
ing some passes with an untouched, high-
_| horned bull; jolted once to the ground, he
had viciously attacked the bullring attend-
ant who leapt over the barrier to help him
up. He finished the series of passes, sculp-
|tured with a flick of the cape, and walked
away for his applause.

At this point the bull charged, piercing
him twice on the inner side of his left thigh.
He was carried from the ring. Dominguin
killed-his bull for him, while the bats that
infest that part of Spain began to whisper
| and scutter in the smoky air.

LUCK? NO

Though he had his first formal bullfight
only in 1948, there is already a substantial |
literature about Litri; and I went to see
him at his hotel next morning feeling as
much cheated as sympathetic.

I was wondering whether he would still
be unconscious, when he passed me on the

suit a size too large for him.

Of course he had recovered, he said, and
of course he would fight again that after-
noon. “I switch off like a motor when the
horn gets me,” he said, sitting with hands
clasped between his knees and looking un-
winkingly at them. “You can tell how far
it will go in, you can guess to a centimetre.
Yesterday was a scratch. You feel it, you
switch off, and when you switch on again
there is no pain.”

His manager joined us, prosperously
plump: a manager receives 20 per cent. of his
fighter’s earnings, and Litri gets 100,000
pesetas—almost £1000—every afternoon he
fights. “Yesterday was unlucky,” I said. “In
Spanish,” said the manager, ‘‘there is no
word for luck. It is the same word for luck
and destiny.”

‘AN INSECT’

Litri looked at neither of us; in his docile,
tobacco-brown face, with its huge gipsy nos2,
you could find no hint of the explosive pride
he feels in the presence of bulls. With them
hoe will shout, stamp, challenge and com-
mune; without them he says little, and that
quietly, with the smallest of shrugs.

stairs, calm and kempt, wearing a gaberdine|

DA COSTA © CO.



He prefers large bulls, “because then,”

am an insect.
and that is the pleasure.”

He has no rivalries, not even with Domin-
}guin, and when I asked which of his con-

only a judge of bulls.

judge of fighters.”
“He is too brave”,

ed to me as I left. “He will not see thirty.”

|the history of the Valencian ring.

Such’ gravity, such a bee-line intensity of

|

seen before, and neither had the crow: .
With the red cloth and sword he was tre-
mendous, turning like a revolving door.
ushering the bull through him. That day he |
dominated, with stitches in his thigh and n
fear.

He killed in one stroke, and was awarded
| Soth ears, the tail and a hoof.



| explaining how much they had been moved
| by his wristwork, by the straight, plunging
line along which he killed, by his firm and
clean cut footwork .. . ‘‘If you noticed all
these things separately,” he said, “then I
| have failed.”

I have a conviction that Litri’s perfect
fight, the one that most truly satisfies him,
will be the one that ends in his death.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED

—L.ES.

”

he said, “they cannot see me—they think 1)
I have to grow as I fight them, |



temporaries he.most admired, he said: “I am |
The public is the |

the hall porter remark-
That afternoon in the first of his two bulls..|

}
| Litri fought one of the greatest bullfights i: |
}

| feeling between man and bull, I have never.’

TEMPTING HIGH
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Canadian Cheddar Cheese, LIQUEURS

1 Ib. Blocks.
Vienna Sausages, 4 oz.
Carr’s Cream Crackers.

Carr's Sweet Biscuits.
‘Carr’s Water Biscuits.

I saw him afterwards, when admirers were |

Chickens,
Tongues, Ox Tails, Ox

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ie & R SANDWICH _ BREAD

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¢
FRIDAY, AUGUST

ev. Hoyte Cross-
In Christian Mission Suit

17, 1951

REV. DALTON HOYTE, chief defendant in the Rev.

Frederick Barrow and others—Rev.

Hoyte and others

Christian Mission Chancery suit, was cross-examined for

nearly two hours by Mr. W

when he took the witness stand all yesterday.

W. Reece, counsel for Barrow,
Mr. Reece

will continue his cross-examination when the case contin-
ues on Tuesday before His Lordship the Vice Chancellor,

Sir Allan Collymore.

A decision is to be made as to
the = rig/tful General Superin-
tendent of the Christian Mission
Church in 1949, and 1950 and
who is the present General Super-
intendent.

Mr. Reece’s cross examination
tried to break down Rev. Hoyte’s
claim that"he did not attend a
meeting called by the Barrow and
others’ group to elect a General
Superintendent in 1949 because
he was advised that it was illegal.

Mr. G. H. Adams _ associated
with Mr. D. H. L. Ward, instruct-
ed by Carrington & Sealy is
appearing for the Rev. Hoyte
division. Mr. Reece is associated
with Mr. J. S. B. Dear, instructed

by Messrs. Hutchinson and
Banfield.

The ‘Herald’
At issue, too, is whether the
going out of existence of the
Mission’s Herald in which the

election of a General Superin-
tendent had to be published meant
that Rev. Hoyte whose _ election
was last published before the
Herald went out of existence,
continued to be General Super-
intendent. Mr. Reece questioned
him as to why he made the
Herald go out of existence.

Earlier Mr, Adams was attempt-
ing to bring out that Rev. Hoyte
did everything he could to try
and get the law amended so that
a legally convened meeting could
be held to elect a General Super-
intendent,

Evidence was given yesterday
too about the church being mort-
gaged to buy a car.

The Court was packed every
day of hearing of the case, with
members of the Christian Mission.
They sat in two sections.

Giving evidence, Rev. Hoyte
said that he got advice on January
1, 1949, and from that advice he
told church representatives not
to attend a meeting scheduled to
be held on the 6th because it was
illegally convened. He also told
Rev. Ramsay that the holding of
a meeting would be illegal.

“As I had already notified
various members,” Rev. Hoyte
said in reply to the Vice Chan-
cellor, “I did not think it neces-
sary to go to the meeting and tell
them that I thought it. was
illegal.”

No Confession

He had not told Rev. Ramsay
to go and take this place at the
meeting. He had had no talk of
confessing wrongs, though in the
course of a long conversation he
said he had heard a rumour that
he was likely to be injured if he

to produce a letter which he said
Rey. Hoyte had-sent the other side
at the time of the dispute. stating
the case of the illegal meeting.

Atter counsel failed to produce
the letter on the grounds that it
Was not received, Mr. Adams pro-
duced a signed document by
Davis, one of the Barrow group
showing he acknowledged receipt
of the letter.

He petitioned both Houses of
the Legislature asking that the Act
be amended, As far as he knew,
there was a counter petition. The
House of Assembly passed the
Bill, but it was not continued in
the Other Place. He was doing
this to try and get the meeting
held later in the year.

Credentials Received

When a meeting was to be held
credentials would be received for
representatives of various church-
es showing that a meeting had
been held to elect the representa-
tives. He was still in possession
of credentials he received when he
was Superintendent in 1948-49.

After he had petitioned Govern-
ment and the suit had been lodged
in court, he waited on the out-
come of the case.

There was a short break at this
point to allow George Morris,
clerk of the Public Library, to
produce an Advocate’s file, Janu-
ary to March, 1949 and give evi-
dence as to certain notices being
in the papers concerning the
Christian Mission.

Mr. Reece then began to cross-
examine Mr. Hoyte. In 1949, he
told Mr. Reece, neither Rev. Bar-
row nor Rev. Ramsay was on his
Board of Management. A _ fev
delegates’ who came from overseas
came to him and reported their
arrival.

“I did happen to silence them,”
he said, “but for their misconduct,
not for their asking me about fin-
ances, One of them asked wheth-
er the Mission's car was bought
in my-name, My reply was to
show them the receipt which was
marked, ‘credited to the Christian
Mission, sum of $2,000 for a car.’

“He said he understood I cred-
ited the car after mortgaging the
church. The way they spoke im-
plied they gave no respect to
whom they were speaking.”

They might have asked him to
meet them for a discussion, but he
could not remember, he said.
Whenever they wanted him they
came to him and he told them
what they wanted to know .

At The Tabernacle

He could not remember them to
have asked him to meet them at

attended the meeting. 10 o’clock on New Year’s Day at
“But that was not my reason the Tabernacle. He was there
for not attending,” the said. “My sometime between 8 and 9.30

reason as I had told them pre-
viously, was because of my advice
that it was illegal.”

He saw a notice informing the
late Board of Management that
an Acting Chairman had _ been
appointed afd upon that he
inserted a notice in the Advocate
stating his position. He stated
also that he held the documents.
He then told the representatives
that he would await an amend-
ment of the Act.

Mr. Adams at this point asked
the counsel for Barrow and others



o'clock, but he saw no delegates
there,

“T went for something from the
office,” he said when the Vice
Chancellor enquired why he went
to the office so early that morning,
“but I cannot remember for what
I went to the office. It is nothing
unusual—my going to the office.”

At 12 o’clock, he said he arrived
for the service. He saw. general
faces, but no particular face.
saw Larrier, Davis—I saw a fleet
of sisters and
brethren.”

‘Bigbury Bay’ Returns

Here After

Two Years

STOKER-MECHANIC CLARKE, who is undergoing
training with the Bay Class Frigate Bigbury Bay, now
anchored in Carlisle Bay, was perhaps the happiest man
of the ship’s complement when she dropped anchor at
Barbados on Wednesday evening.

Clarke was coming home to
his Welsh mother, Barbadian
father and sisters of Spooners, St.
John, after he was away from the
island for 16 years. He was taken
to England by his mother when he
was six. He was schooled in Eng-
land and worked at the mechanic’s
trade before joining the British
Navy.

“T am overjoyed to be back
home again to see my mother and
father and my other relatives”, he

said. Barbados was just a new,

place to him as he was too young

Since the Bigbury Bay’s visit
here in 1949, she went home to
the U.K. and was recommissioned
with a new complement of officers
and ratings, She returned to Ber-
muda about October 20, 1950.
After a two months’ stay at Ber-
muda, she went on a cruise to
South America which lasted three
months. She called at Cuba on the
way, as well as paid visits to
Brazil, Uraguay, Argentine, Rio do
Janeiro and Montevideo and sailed
1,000 miles up the Amazon.

Trinidad and St. Lucia saw little

when he left the island to recol~j of her when she was returning to

lect anything.

The Bigbury Bay is here on her
second visit. Captain W. W. R.
Bentinck, O.B.E., R.N., is in com-
mand on this eruise, The Bigbury
Bay first came to Barbados on
August 8, 1949, under Lt, Com-
mander G. R. P. Goodden, R.N.

Nine Officers

Of the nine officers on this
eruise, Lt. O. P. Sutton, Navigat-
ing Officer, and midshipmen R. Ww.
Kent and P. P. L. Wells have
been to Barbados before. Sutton
was here with the Bigbury Bay
in 1949 while the two midshipmen
were ratings of the Devonshire
when she was here about two
years ago.

The Bigbury Bay will be leaving

Barbados on Wednesday | for
Pointe-a-Pierre where she will
spend the night taking oil ‘and

then she will sail for Trinidad on
a five-day visit. From Trinidad
she will go to Grenada for five
days and then continue to Jamai-
ca, Nassau and Savannah, at each
of which ports she has planned a
week’s stay. The Bigbury Bay
hopes to be back at the America-
West Indies Station, Bermuda, by
October 1.

Her sistership, H.M.S. Burghead

Bay, has been commissioned to re-|

lieve her on October 15. The Big-
bury Bay will return to England
on October 26,

from the America-West Indies}
Station for about a year. t
At The Station j
Stationed with the Bigbury|

Bay at Bermuda is the Flag Ship
H.M.S. Superb, a cruiser. The ships
do six months of cruising and six}
months at the station. During the,
eruising period, they pay visits to}
the East coast of the States and
Canada. The main purpose of their



after operating |




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Visit The General Hardware Supplies To-day
FOR

@ PYREX WARE

@ ELECTRICAL
including FOOD MIXERS

@ ENAMEL WARE

And Many







He opened the side door
which had to be opened be-
fore the main one could be,
and it was then that the keys
were snatched from him. A
pandemonium started. When
the members went into the
church there wag singing be-
cause of opposition, the one
section starting one song and
the other beginning «nother:
besides people from outside
were shouting.

In most cases he used to make
arrangements for the church doors
to be opened before he arrived,
but because of trouble with Rev.
Larrier, he had for sometime been
going with the key himself.

“It was not that on that day
things were to come to a culmina-
tion,” he told Mr. Reece. “There
is the General Meeting and every-
thing is settled then.”

No Legal Advice

He had appointed Ramsay on
his original Board, but had got
legal advice to take off members
from overseas. He saw Ramsay
on January 5 at the Bay House
where he was put up, but he could
not remember whether anyone
else was there. There was a wo-
man, he knew, though, who used
to be there.

Rev. Ramsay asked him to al-
low him to be a judge and go into
the various vexations which had
occurred. One was the dismissal
of Rev. Larrier, There was a
question of finance, but that had
always been a question even be-
fore he was born,

The Christian Mission Herald
went out of publication late in
1946. He made efforts to revive
it, efforts such as checking up the
possibilities of its revival. A case
of type came from Americ, after
the Herald had gone out of exist-
ence, but the type were not ade-
quate and were evidently sent by
people who did not know the re-
quirements,

He disposed of the plant to Mr
Cole. It could be true that it was
being then used, but that would
be because Mr. Cole would have
other type and necessary parts.

“It is true that they paid off the
mortgages even before the time”,
he said, “but that was purely be-
cause of opposition.”

The Herald, he said, had been
since revived.

The case continues on Tuesday



Injured In Accident

Willie Sisnett, a tally clerk of
Country Road, St. Michael was
rushed to the General Hospital
where he was detained after he
was involved in an accident_with
the motor car M-881 on Roebuck
Street just before 8 p.m. yester-
day.

The drivér of the car was John
Alleyne of Whiteman's Village,
St. George.

DIED OF BURNS

Seventy - six - year - old Ida
Lavine who was detained at the
General Hospital on August 14
for burns or. her body died on
August 15 about 8.50 p.m. A post
mortem examination was per-
formed at the Hospital Mortuary





«rt at 11 am. yesterday by Dr.
Shomorock.
there were An inquiry has not yet been
fixed.
Bermuda. She reached Bermuda

by April 1951. May found her
\aving Bermuda again for Halifax.
Nova Scotia, where she spent
three weeks undergoing repairs
and she was back at Bermuda by
the end of June to carry out anti-
submarine exercises.
Cruising

The Bigbury Bay left Bermuda
on August 1 on this cruise. She
has spent four days at John’s,
Antigua, and five days at St. Lucia.
She left St. Lucia on Wednesday
morning for Barbados.

The name Bigbury Bay was
given her after a small bay in the
south of Devon. Her crest em-
bodies a small toasting fork which
is representative of the toasting
fork on which the patron saint of
Bigbury was roasted because of
his religious convictions.

Lt, R. G. A. Fitch, the Corres-
pondence Officer, said that he
thought the climate of Barbados
fine. He found Rio de Janeiro
hottest of all the places he visited.
“I am looking forward to a fine
stav here.”

Q_ HERE'S
-” YOUR
CHANCE!!

GOODS —

Other Items

5% DISCOUNT ON ALL

CASH PURCHASES FROM
$1.00 UPWARDS
Until Saturday August 18th



GENERAL HARDWARE

DIAL:

4918





SSS



SUPPLIES

<2 Rickett St. {





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

examined Cumberland Square

_Wanted For Marketi

BUSES MUST GO

The Director of Highways and Transport and the Commis-

sioner of Police were asked

yesterday by the Commission-

ers of Health of St. Michael, to consider the possibility of
finding some place for the accommodation ‘of the ‘buses
which now park on the area of Cumberland Square which
is above the Parochial Buildings. They are to do so with
a view to the possibility of making the site a temporary
district market. These officers will report back to the Board.

The decision was taken after the
Board had discussed correspond-
ence from the Director and Com-
missioner relative to the sugges-
tion that had been initiated by
Mr, E. D. Mottley a few weeks
ago, of making Temple Yard a
temporary district market. At the
meeting also were the two officers
mentioned, the Director of Medi-
eal Servi¢es and the Colonial
Engineer.

The suggestion came from the
Director that the parking spot for
cars at Cumberland Square could
be done away with for that pur-
pose, and the site used for a tem-
porary market.

Two suggestions came from the
Commissioner. In one he recom-
mended the provision of the mar-
ket at Temple Yard with shelters,
and pointed out that he was mot
in favour of the Cumbe' id
Sonare site,

The other suggestion which had
been forwarded to the Co -
sioners some days after the {ifst,
presented a change of mind” In
it he pointed out that he thought
the old Public Market could be
remodelled and improved for the
ing could be found for the rum
market, and that some other build-
bond.

In this connection he said yes-
terday that he had received a re-
port from the Fire Officer drawing
attention to the danger of fire as
a result of the stowing of rum in
that building, and he had for-
warded this report to Government.

“Tf this building be re-condi-
tioned for a market,” said the
Commissioner, “we will then have
a proper and permanent market,
and in my opinion that would be

the solution to the whole prob-
lem.”
Some members stated that as

far as the latter point was con-
cerned, an effort to use the build-
ing in that respect had been tried
in the past and found unwork-
able. This would happen again
In any case, however, there wad
no question of a permanent mar-
ket to accommodate the hawkers
in the entire City area. The pro-
vision of district markets was
what was required to suit the con-
venience of the public.

They agreed though that the use
of the old Public Market as a rum
bond constituted a fire hazard and
that it should be discontinued

Mr. Mottley expressed agree-
ment with the suggestion about the
Cumberland Square site, provided,
he said, that the parking place for
the "buses be included and some
covering erected there.

While he agreed with the Com-
missioner of Police that the old
market presented a fire hazard be-
cause of the stowing of rum there,
there were several reasons why
he could not agree to making it a
market today. To mention only
two, the building was definitely
unsuitable for a market in a
tropical land, and the site was no
more central than any other,

The thought that the whole
thing now depended upon the
Commissioner of Police and the
Director of Highways and Trans-
portsin getting together and seeing
what could best be done in the
finding of some place for the
Speightstown ‘buses to park so
that the site could be used as a

market.
Difficult

For fear there should be no mis-
understanding, he wanted it to be
known that it was not intended
that this should be a market for
hawkers from all over the City,
but for those within the area from
Busbey Alley, James Street,
Milk Market and other nearby
areas, where a difficult problem
was presented for the regulation
of traffic and for sanitation.

Mr, Victor Chase, supporting
the suggestion, said that he con-
sidered the Cumberland Square
site proposal the best put forward,

Of course he appreciated the
jesire of the Commissioner of
Police to have removed the fire
hazard from the old Public Mar-
ket but to force the hawkers back
into that building which had
proved itself unsuitable in the
past, would be a very grave hard-
ship on those persons, as well as
the public in general It would
be going against the decisions ar-
rived at by the District Markets

district markets were
necessary for the convenience of
tne puolic. Besides, the building
could not by any stretch of the
imagination be described as cen-
tral

He was in agreement with the
suggestion of the Director because
the site was within easy reach of
all those people who now mace
heir purchases in James Street,
Busbey Alley and the other alley-
ways
He thought, however, that the
old Public Market could be so re-
constructed that it could be used
as a parking place for the ‘buses
that would be removed from
Cumberland Square. Temple Yard
could be used similarly for the
cars.

He was entirely opposed to the
giving up of the principle of pro-
\Qling district markets, because
these as he had said, were very
necessary, He was being con-
fronted with one worry now, and
that was that the Cumberland
Square site might become so

popular as a district market, that
the efforts for making the Milk
Market site one, might be neg-
lected

Members having agreed in fav-
our of this site and Mr. Mottley’s
added suggestion, the Board then
made the request of the Commis-
sioner of Police and the Director
of Highways and Transport as
already stated.

The suggestion
of Highways and Transport
the first suggestion of the Com-
missioner of Police were dated
July 27 and August 4 respectively

Directo
and

of the

They were addressed to thf
Chairman and read
Director’s Letter
Sir,
Further to the motion arising
out of the meeting held on the

26th, instant concerning the possi-
ble use of the Temple Yard as a
temporary Vegetable Market, may
I suggest that consideration be
given to the following alterna
tive suggestions: —

That the Car Park presently
located at Cumberland Square be
done away with.

That a Car Park be made in the
highway known as Temple Yard
(it would accommodate about
thirty (30) cars) making it a one-
way street if necessary.

That a Car ‘Park be made in the
highway lying between the trian-
gular garden and St, Mary’s
Church wall (it would accommo-
date about 14 cars); and that this
highway be declared a Car Park,

That the present site of the Car
Fark at Cumberland Square be
vsed for a temporary market.

This proposal has the following
advantages :——

The market would be located on
a more suitable site near the bus
stand and the public conveni-
ences, and would be shady,

It would be less inconvenient
to have a Car Park rather than
a market in Temple Yard, and thi®
highway would not have to be
closed to vehicular traffic.

By creating the highway be-
tween the triangular garden and
St. Mary’s Church wall a Park-
ing Place, the present nuisance
from vegetable carts and hueck-
sters, complained of by the
Reverend Hinds, 5

To drive one’s car to Tempe
Yard and walk to market at Cum-
berland Square would be no mo
onerous than driving to Cumbe’-,
land Square and walking to ma--|
ket in Temple Yard.

Dear Sir,
Commissioner's
I do not

Cumberland Square as @
When it

iO

Letter

of
Vegetable
rains, the hawkers will have

take shelter. After the rain ha
stopped, they will still suffer for
some time with rain drops
falling from the trees.

This square will only
accommodation for 150 to
hawkers, whereas Temple
will be able to hold a
many more.

I recommend the saneme for
the provision of a market with
shelters in Temple Yard and the
retention of Cumberland Square

Market.

provide

200
Yard
great

Committee who had decided thatas a parking place.

SeaeaeuekeGRGoeue aes
INSIST ON

=
# PURINA

THEY ARE

H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. - Agents






CHOWS

THE BEST

Yous a |
THRIFTY SHOPPER







absolutely ,

would cease |

- Stomach

recommend the usin ‘|
|

. PAGE FIVE



Charwoman
Loses Lawsuit

IN THE PETTY DEBT COURT
of District “A” yesterday
Judge A. J. H. Hanschell
ed judgment to
and Mrs. H. G. Mahon of Worth-
ing, Christ Church, in the casc
which plaintiff, Gwendoline Dawe
ot Sargeants Village, Christ
Church, claimed the amount of $5
owed to her by the defendan:
for scrubbing floors in their hou
on June 19
Dawe appealed against the de-
cision of Mr. Hanschell Mr
Denis Malone appeared on behalf
of Mr. and Mrs. Mahon,

Mrs. Mahon toid the court that
she employed Dawe to look after
the yard and the drawing room
and paid her no extra money {
any work

Norman Woods employed as
butler at Mrs Mahon's gues
house, said that all of Mrs. Ma-
hon's servants were paid by thr
week. Dawe was employed as
yard woman—that is, her duty
was to clean the yard and some-
times she might have to scrub the
drawing room

Acting
award-
defendants My



























He was present when Mrs. Ma
hon took her on to work for her
She was paid $2 a week for the
work. One morning Mrs. Mahor
told him to tell Dawe to scrut
around the carpet in the drawing
room

Dawe did _ this. When Mrs
Mahon returned that afternoor
Dawe told her that she was leav-
ing and wanted her week’s mone»
and also extra pay for serubbins
the floor in the drawing room
Mrs, Mahon told her that she
never took her to pay her extra
for work and offered her the day’
pay, but Dawe did not take it





POSSESSES EP POSS OSOS

HARRISON'S — BROAD STREET





Dawe left the house making
much noise and said that she
would put Mrs. Mahon in the TERT eee i ote ee ete er eee
Petty Debt Court for the money
Mrs. Mahon’s house has | S( ALES a
bedrooms, three upstairs, and ty
{:wostairs. There are four }

nanent guests in the
the others come and go

place

SCALES |
SHOP SCALES |

Hardware Dept.

HARRISON'S — Mosdvere 0

CLS LLL LPL LPP ED

One witness for the plaint } . nN ViTee? 7 11

aid that she heard when Da: 10-1) CAPACITY FITTED WITH

* Mrs eon that she wants SEAMLESS BRASS PAN, COM- $29 44
$5 for serubbing the floo M) -LETE TT TEIGHTS
Mahon dahieed to yo at ai u PLETE: Wits erases. 3
money saying that she neve
ranged with Lee. oe anies ae KITCHEN SCALES

Mr. Malone in his addre " . SA MING ry
pointed out that bettie the aan i-th CAPACITY WITH STRONG
tiff was taken on she was tol SEAMLESS TIN PAN, COMPLETE $9 39
exactly what she had to do an WITH WEIGHTS
what she would have been e :

pair
for these duties

He submitted that there was n¢
evidence to show that the plain
tiff was paid in any different way

We also hold large Stocks of...

from the other servants in the
place, There was no evidence
against Mr. Mahon Assorted widths and Mesh sizes (14” to 14”)
IS WORSHIP Mr, H. A. ‘Tal- for Fish Pots.
ma Police Magistrate of Stout Wire—Heavily Galvanised
District “A” yesterday fined

Robert
bourer

Rouse, a la-
of Salters St.
$14.40 for wounding Errol Johnson
with a knife on his left arm

The fine is to be paid by month-
ly instalments or in default two] %
months’ imprisonment with harc| §

31-year-old
Michael

HARDBOARD

TERMITE PROOF WOOD SUBSTITUTE
3/16” thick Sheets; 4 x 6, 8, 10, 12 feet
‘e” thick Sheets: 4 x 8 and 10 feet.

tod-on Apel 14, 1951. S EXPANDED METAL

ted. on April 14, 1951,
_IN SHEETS 4 x 8’ —ASSORTED MESH
Sizes: From 1%" to 2” across narrowest part of

diamond shaped mesh,

HE FRONT FORK and tyre o
the motor cycle X-1140 own
ed and ridden by Agustus Castill
of Hastings, Christ Church wer
damaged when it was involved i
an accident with the motor am
bulance M-1694 owned by th
Governor-in-Executive Committe
and driven by Frederick Webst¢
of Seaview, St. James about 74
a.m,, yesterday at the junction «
Streets





YOU WILL FIND OUR PRICES TO BE NOT
MERELY COMPETITIVE BUT DEFINITELY
ADVANTAGEOUS, YOUR ENQUIRIES WILL
BE APPRECIATED.

7

Probyn and Bay













cramp?

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4

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| Tablets and Powder Sold by all Chemists
t
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EARTHENWARE |





| ;
) | in
YOU WHE SELECT THESE EAREY | eunpvotan sa aentes
MARTELL BRANDY Soere oe | CREAM and WHITE
For your sick Child or invalid MARTELL BRA? Ce ‘pe 4 / . "|
miniature sizes . ae sete 36c. 48c. and 96e. | SpEee with FLORAL PATTERNS
SLICED BACON . 5 Per lb. 1,00 | PLAIN WHITE
1 DANISH CAMEMBERT CHEESE Per Tin 1.19 |
i pamisH CREAM CHEESE in Pkts. of 6 otagrig 7 \}} Each Piece Priced Separately
ANISH SALAMI SAUSAGE er lb. 1 | i , ‘ es
| ) SWIFTS VIENNA SAUSAGES Small Tins 43 —Thus making Replacements Easy
CANADIAN RED CHEESE Per lb 1.15
SOUTH AFRICAN FIG JAM 2-lb. Tin 54 f j
| K.W.V. DRY GIN ... Per Bottle 2.00 |
| BAHAMAS CRUSHED PINEAPPLE Per Tin 24 \|
eo CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD
Per Bottle 18c. iva Per Carton $4.00 {| - °
C ii]
i | 10, 11, 12, 13, Broad Street
Ti ~ ay, + = i} |
STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.
}
_ See SSS] RN Ya ey - —_








PAGE SIX





BY CARL ANDERSO

HENRY















MY LODGE BROTHERS \

LAD! }
CORRECT, IN THE *FRATERNAL

1 WASN'T VERY

“TRANSPARENT... AND

RATTLING CHAINS GAVE ANE A
- HEADACHE!

UM A SOF THEARTED

SPOOK! AS FOR HAUNTING
DARK OLD HOUSES...

lL PREFERRED HANGING



AROU!



BY CHIC YOUNG

, ye
THING LIKE GOOD OLD
SPARERIBS AND SAUERKRAUT.
Ss











I SMELLED IT
THE MOMENT I
_ TURNED THE js

x? CORNER IN !
R-\ OUR STREET

Papas



TO
<







C#

THE

THE RISK AS WELL AS THE ACT WILL BE JUSTIFIED
\F THE CROOKS IN BATESVILLE ARE PUT WHERE THEY

(IT DANGEROUS TO
‘TRY TO HOLD
UP TRAIN/

YES. WELL TRAVEL LIGHT. IF OUR MISSION
y \S SUCCESSFUL, WE'LL RETURN, AND
\F WE PAIL, WE'LL HAVE NO

ben FURTHER USE FOR
Ss pt_OUR GEAR/



BY GEORGE MC. MANUS

}

A

iit
|
}

Wa

THAT I AM--
TELL. ME -WHO
IS THAT PRETTY
GIRL IN THE
ROOM WITH
TH’ WEDDIN'
PRESENTS? | 4





AH/ WZ. JIGGS! | OH! SHE'S THE
ENJOYING

| YOURSELF AT
THE PARTY ?








DETECTIVE WE
| HIRED TO WATCH | |







THE GIF VS -YOU
KNOW-THERE’S



LOTS OF




THIEVES | |
pists AROUND | |
% say eats
, on J

Lass +8

g
















/
I]
LI com 1951, hing Features Syndicate. Inc, Worhd rights reserved




OH! TNT. / T WOULD
SAY YES INA MINUTE, PEAR...
BUT 1 KNOW THAT LOVE
PROSPERS BEST IN
...PROSPE
SURROUNDINGS /

I KNOW IT GOUNDS
UNROMANTIC... BUT,
DARLING... TWO CAN'T
REALLY LIVE AS CHEAPLY






SAYING THINGS... ESPECIAI.LY

TOA GORL...A GORL THAT

4Y LOVE... BUT VILL YOU
MARRY WITH ME 27







any
BY ALEX RAYMOND

=

oS

Y AGIKANR

Cope 1991, King Feainges Syndigte, Ve

THE PHANTOM
WOUNDED BY THE REPORTERS
SHOT AND FRIGHTENED BY

THE SOUND THE TIGER BOUNDS

P UHs ITALLWENT WRONG! IF

> THAT GUY DIES «BUT THEV CANT)
BLAME ME! IT -zc—= es
WAS JUSTA 7



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 1951



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EVAPORATED MILK (2 tins) 58

21 CHEESE

26

BEER HEINEKENS



=—=_——_

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is
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y

CHILDREN PLEASED
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FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
GOVERNMENT NOTICES

PAGE SEVEN “

NOTICES



FOR RENT











!

PUBLIC SALES

—~

SHIPPING






































































































TAKE NOTICE

Ltd.

6.7.51—t.f.n,





































NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the

Statutony Meeting of the members of



















Izal
Keplars Malt and Oil





















to register the same after one month from the 16th day of August 14
some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at r

opposition of such registration

1, unt
y office of
The trade mark can be seen on application at ry
































































LTD

you serve :-













Minimum charge week 72 cents and
TELEPHONE 2508 Ten cents per agate line on week-days| 96 cents Su"days 24 words — over 24 Attention is draw F q <
ie and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, | words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a] pions TOA) wnt tO the Price of Goods (Defence) (Amend
minimum chBrge $1.50 on week-days| word on Sundays; : ) Order, 1951, No, 4 which will be bl Tet 2 - Ms $s
DIED FOR SALE and $1.80 on Sundays. Gazette of Thursday, 16th August, 1951 Ee en oe ae Sea dian National! Steamships
: een ' ys August, 195 j GA. & “
tae era rans REAL ESTATE 2. In this Order the items:—
bHoOWNE On August 16, 1951. Dore Minimum charge week 72 cents and ‘ee soi pee ee HOUSES | Bise 7
Atheline Browne, mother of sr | 96 cents Sumdays 24 words — over 24) _ LAND--S445 sq. ft. situate at Princo | Scults—Sweet and Soda iis ce Ser
langle wee ee voran ® cgnts a word week—4 cent a) of Wales Road, Bank Hall, suitable for | Brassieres SOUTHBOUND
ae. ee sheet ee’ Pict at oie undays; | the erection of a Bungalow. Appiv:| CLIFTON TERRACE—To an approved Cigars Sails Sails Sails Arrives Sails
»m. today for the Holy Trinit? 4 ME, Brittons Hill. Dial 4191. | tenant. Furnished House, Upper Bay St. Clean: | Montresi Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
Church | 17.8.51—4n. | Opposite Yacht and Aquatic Clubs. Al Cont sers | SAN CONSTRUCTOR 9 Aus a ‘ ZA 22. Aug
- | ja e. oe a ne » cti , * y ‘ELSON 20 Avg 4
Golbourne Browne, Ottis Brath- | — | COUN : . a“ | modern conveniences Apptiy on premises on ectionery i: R.. SO 2
waits, Claudine Davis, Octavia} AUTOMOTIVE | ,, COUNTRY HOUSE FOR SALE 3.8.51—t.£.n Haberdashery (H ‘ ; : | CAN. CRUISER 29 A
: | at St. George in perfect con- abil Shery (Hard):—Pipes, Cigarett i | CAN. CHALLENGER 8 Scot
Kirton, Willie Browne dition, and stand —- -apEE Eee : > garette holders and| LADY RODNEY 19 8.
WW i | % and stands on 13 Acres of good] MARWIN — Maxwell Road, from 1 cases, lighters and metal soap dishes CAN. CONSTRUCTOR 28 Sent
inemnastinmeginay | p CAR —1950 Hillman. Apply at Cliftom arene land. Appi to D'Arcy A. Scott, | September: Apply gE. H Farmer, } Haberdashery (Soft): i 6 aoa | LADY NELSON 10 O
PASH—On August 16th 1951, at her resi- Terrace, Upper Bay Street. Telephone | M&éazine Lane 158.51—2n. | Andrews Plantation. Phone 95267 . a * —- Artificial flowers, Tobacco | o
dence dsbury Road, Julietta May | ~~ 17.8.51—4n FOR SALE. St. Elmo at Maxwell 16.8. 51—4n ae es, Purses, Sponge bags, Paper Serviettes and saprapenpnnatinteaausani—daeatssisamsisneocisieemncesdnetenibatisnnsinaitionseuiaompiicntiite ‘ns aoliiececai
i fune tav the . | . re! _e a el tattle 2 a !
cnet ce ts om aoe for | ,.cAR—Chrysier 1939 Modei in perfect | RO#d. Just 5 mins. walk from the sea PLAT on Blue Waters Terrace, newly 7 Tigeues. NORTHBOUND
2 nemoe ot ae > ecnaition. Engine. paint, upholstery and toe ae Drawing and Dining | built with spacious cupboards. Phone Insecticides | Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
Mro. M. Whittaker, Mrs. M. Ford! i} Gos euton caer = asare apply: | Sirame. and ee ae oe we ¢ 25.7. 51--t.f n Leather goods manufactured | Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal
isisters), Frederick Blackman | : ase ah ee | For further information apply to D'Are , Maxwell C Serviettes : | LADY RODNEY 26 Aug = 28 Aug 6 Sept 8 Sept. 11 Sept
(brother, Trinidad), W. M.. Ford, ae 1p te eit ieee Ory ae ae oe, ae Road rviettes (all kinds) LADY NELSON 16 Sept 18 Sept Sept ept. - 2 Oct
Barton Vord \nephews), Jehovah") CAR—One Vauxhall 14,6 in pectect| 15.8.51—-2n, | ete. Good sea-bathing. Available’ trom h Toilet Requisites, | LADY RODNEY a6 Ges.’ | 20 Ont, aY Ons Oct 1 Nov
‘ aeonrage TE , | condit.on. Apply: C. St. Hill, & ate — ——_—._ | Ist October, Phone 2 7 ave been de ; ; Bae } 4
Trinidad and U.S.A. Papers please COPY.) peiitan Garage, Magazine es Cosmo-4 ann FOR SALE one Same ‘ea Sica (Aeeoguaa eee ae from the Price of Goods (Defence) |
7 - £915 17.8.51—3n. ‘CHANGE—Owner fine Homie | em, . rder » No, 2. }
LESLIE: On August 17, 195] at his resi- a Seno aan Government Hill area. Em SELBY HASTINGS—4 bedrooms, 3 with | !6th August, 1951, 6 | GARDINER AUSTIN & Co LTD.—Agents.
dence Joses Hill, James Walter Leslie. Sette iy eee Saloon done only 5,500 | euhuces ot area farally, obliged Guywing water, all modern conveniences 17.8.51—1n, |
we ‘ ats te resi. | Mules in_A-1 condition. FORT ROYAL | smatler piace preferably on | Unfurnished. Available Ist S ce re —
Funeral will leave the above resi ' GARAGE LT s ‘Al ; e ist September
; : jARS JTD. Telephone 4504 ea or sell cost price. Exceptional and | Apply on premises between 4 m. and SaaS
or oe. "Clamsate Onmbel, hai 16.8.51—En | aoe deat eee highly advantage- | 6 p.m. everyday. 168. 51—Sn. APPLICATIONS from Sanitary Inspectors and Registered Nurses ROYAL NETHERLANDS { te eo eee
Angalina, Leslie: (Wite); Brersteis CAR—Morris 8. 1947 Model in good | through responsible Agents "Ring 3095 | SUNSET"—st James. belonging 1 (Hospital Trained) for Course of Training at the Public Health STEAMSHIP CO. {
is en as | Marking order, tyres very zood. Dial after 3 p.m. daily Mast—itn. | Mr. A.C Worswiek. for August and oe Centre in Jamaica. 5 a AMLANG TERDAM .
a i p 's). 25 6563a—0—————— September only ‘urnished Pplications i . bee - . ae .
VO ere hl | eek A eke sat Z| YEARWOOD & BOYCE, Misines tae ns are invited from Sanitary Inspectors and Registered | â„¢ S. HBLENA-5Sth September 1961 Cle Gle Transatluntiaue !
ect CAR—1949 Fiat 15 hp. Very good | AUCTION Janie ‘werent. Ses (Hospital trained) who are willing to be consider 1 toe SALLING TO PLYMOUTH AND
IN MEMORIAM j condition. Reasonable. Bedford ‘Cot- 14.8.51—t.f.n. | Vanced courses which ar : sidered for ad- MSTERDAM ae
j te ge Bedford Ave. (Phone 4894, 7 a.m. | ——. Ue es seiiossieamieienion —— | respectively ; the P ray Saas ted to last about eleven and ten months | 4-8. WIALEMSTAD—11th_ Sept. 1951 ont
FENTHAM—In loving memory’ of our | pom.) 15.8.51—an ae TO LET : ely at the Public Health Centre in Jamaic: SAHLING TO FARAMARIRO AND 7
dearly beloved mother Mrs. Helena | —————— Bare ae UNDER THE SILVER ONE FURNISHED BEDROOM on Sea Applicants should ; ly re in Jamaica, BRITISH GUIANA SAILING TO
Bentham who fell asleep on the 17th} MOTOR CYCLE 1% hp. B.S.A HAMMER side at Rocklay, use of kitchen. Phone t , @ apply in writing before the 20th August | 8:8. AGAMEMNON--I5th August 1951 ENGLAND & FRANCE
August 1950 | good as new; done only 1,700 miles D.C, SUGAR 4796 — 8553 after 12 o'clock o the Director of Medical Services Giverniecht Bullet |S 8. STENTOR—13th September 1951 ‘NGLA) ANCE
Rest eternal grant O Lord Owner buying bigger Cycle, Teleph , : 17.8. 51— T : case aings, SAILING TO TRINIDAD SABC ACONE
ne ee cai as tt mae: eee re Oe? | Far teocdartendation. of -Slgvds Agents | sccsmncincdpesiccunneianinn he Wharf, and a full curriculum vitae should be included if PARAMARIBO AND BOG “GASCOGNE” 11tt
SO6 tat Mee eevee, eed Ab aces we will sell on FRIDAY the 17th 102 the application, The scholarships for the N) ss. COPTICA-—ath August 1981 1951 via St. Lucia
seein atin Eee Wiasiea’ Ghee 15.8.51—4n | Begs Dark Crystal Sugar commencing at a I ps for these courses, if approved, pro-|" SAMLANE RINIDAD AND ied
Children: Eileen, Charles, George, Chris- | °° 12.30 o'clock at the follow w vide: — +t | ANG TO TRINIDAD AN ique Guadaloupe
tina, Christina’ Parris (sister), Mrs.| STATION WAGGON 1951 Hillman| hocees” re eee | ee Nee Antigua. -
Constance King (cousin) } Station Waggon. First Registered April. General Traders Ltd. — Roebuck St (a) Sion ais passage to and from Jamaica iM 5 MELENA aint September 1951
7.8.5 Mile Y = . * a. MSs e = s ember 19% in
Se any alt appease aaa Bh Me lll netanning & Co , Lid. Steel Bldg: Pier- (b) Subsistence allowance at the rate of $4.80 per night, if} 8. P MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD
ANNOUNCEMENTS. (225) S2Se,. APP! Raph, Beard, | “S''p. Musson son & CO. — Briage| GTAMMar School, St, Vincent rs wee or $2.40 per night, if single. PaaS AMIE, SOUTH BOUND
a > : a. —tn. | St Sale 12.30 o’clock Terms CASH. eae ae ¢ ravelling expenses in Jamaica at a a
ALL THIS GREAT HELP |. VAN—A Twelve Horse Power peatorg) BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. perenne, Se invited for month. a at the rate of $14.40 rer aus iy. “mONRKA" COLOMBIE” 22nd August,
from ASPRO. Colds and ‘flu dispelled Van in first class condition, Priced to | Auctioneers Math pos is 0} ience Master, (a) Conti ‘ees Will accept Cargo and Passengers : 1951,
headaches cleared-soothing swift relief | sell. Apply: Courtesy Garage oe Dint| athematical Master, and two R ngenc es at the rate of $4.80 per month, for Dominica, Antigua, Mont Cailing = at Crinidad, Ta
from Rheumatic and Neuralgic Pains 3111 17.8.51—1in. | 16.8.51—3n | Masters for General Subjects. 3%. The scholarships witt only be granted on the following serrat, Nevis, St. Kitts, Sailing Guaira. Curacao, Cartagena
Hcianes steklemnaes. Lat Aden | Oerninadi i ee te ee an) 2. The Mathematical Master | ditions; — : mi ROW Cone. ay Srtiay Teh. vine
| “ ematica aster ions: THE MV. “CARIBBEE i and Jamaica.
come to your aid NOW! —8.8.51—10n | NDER THE DiAMOND jwill be required to teach Mathe- (a) That the C fie GQ) THE MeV.) “CARTBBEE a3
MERE AS coandata. within’ a dae tet ELECTRICAL _ HAMMER matics, and the Science Master offs € jommissioners of Health agree to pay to the |} Will accept Cargo and Passengers Accepting Passengers,
necessary Shirts, Pyjamas, Pants, Shorts, NAVE BEEN instructed by the to teach Chemistry and Botany, cer, his or her salary while absent on study for Dominica, | Antigua, — Cargo and Mail
aiiee fine are : OO ance Co. to se v blic auc i + if. a : re . errat, evis, & Ss. Se ‘
WS MUnEN HOYAL ROME, iso ae |, MUG | VAIE-—Colllig and fneak| St Masta. (S00 Bheayney Men eee ee Higher School Certifi leave, where the applicant is employed by the Com-|}) Friday 4th. ot
High Street. Phone 4359 P , a pes. Get one to-day and keep cool. | Garage on Wednesday next the 22nd a arnt > missioners. _ THE MV “DAERWOOD" nt
4.8.51—14n | Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co., Ltd. | August at 2 o'clock, One 1947 Ford V-8 . Applicants should be Grad- (b) That the officer selected ¢ . Will accept Cargo and Passengers maon 5
jbl ctlaaaliiiat eeeniimcenemmatitiaintnaas i Electrical Dept 17.8.51—6n, | Car with onhy the front part damaged uates or holders of the Inter Arts ti i * Ire oy onthe ede Mee Se Holt Passengers oniy fc "st. yincent” K M JONES & Co itd
HOLIDAY RESORTS _Grensdactule ot by accident, but the engine is intact |or Inter Science or Higher School nue in the service of the Commissioners or of some se eenetialere only, SUF Bea penonne te o se
Spices. SANTA M.\RIA—ioveliest hotel ELECTRIC IRONERS. Just received|@nd the tyres goad. Cc ; . * other bod . Sailing d to be notified |
in Caxibb Rates fron $700 cer navy] QPrim Electric Ironing Machines. Irons DARCY A. SCOTT ertificates. The salaries offered r body or Board in the Island whose function is to B,W.'. SCHOONER OWNERS i AGENTS
i Cast aan. Reaves. tnomn $78 Har rest | Sheets, Shirts, Collars, Dresses etc. The Atta [ote administer Public Health, } ASSO. Inc., | Sines ss Nake
dential district under Government House eee Nore seer Dial 3878, Da 17.8,51—4n (a) For Graduates $1440 by ; 405i Consignees, Tel. No, 4047 e@ 3: 384
hill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day.!| ~”” Mid. Electrical Dept _ $96 to $1920. hihi aS ao -8.51.—3n.
eet ae can enue ane Sathine 12 8 51.—6n. UNDER THE SILVER (b) For Inter Arts etc. $1200 eee eee
each. ates rom . per ea per E ¥ ”) ,
day, Enquiries to D. M. Slinger, Grenada. | The "all Heeetrie tasction thet maken HAMMER T mean + Age i i TAKE OTICE
26.6.51—78n.| ing and Derise ane nue TAs Sow: ON TUESDAY 2ist by order of the he commencing salaries will Send us your orders for - - -
Costa & Co, Ltd, Mectrioet ae Da Executors to the Estate of the late Miss | depend on experience and standard
PYE RADIO CATALOGUES: Clearly ine 6 sty E. Simpson we will sell her|of work. = 1 VDED VWSET AL
illustrated colourful leaflets describing 1—6n | Furniture at Waverly, Fontabelle which| 4, Ability to take charge of the - 4m 4 4 +e an.
cach of the new 1951--52 Pye Radios includes adi he ant :
and sualourataonhenes: wilt. .baxinaiiad FURNITURE Round Tip-Top Table, Upright ana|Cadet Corps will be taken into We have it in sizes too numerous to mention
to you without. obligation, for" the Tub Chairs, Rockers, Settee, Couch, | Consideration, That GENERAL FOODS COR
dy, asking. No salesman will call. Mall a| ~orerce cuatna; > Sort received 7 ee eee Ornament Tables, Lounge,} 5. Application should reach the | under the laws of the State of Dalswire, Orics eens Sra ined Cee Ya My”, . y
2 o PY ID E : us rec ahogany: Ss a h " ° ‘¢ t, United State f America 5 ‘a YT
aa ae LIMITED P °.. BOX 250 slipchent of Ofsee Bosmiin Guat aie Sarchas Cena ante ae Educat on Office @s soon as busses address is 250 Park Avenue, New York. ie i riratenee ot THE CENTRAL EMPORIEL MM
3 at ccelaliees me peat adjustment. See them Cutlery, Pictures, Congoleum; Mird a as tihe successful candi- | ‘\" ‘of Regi ar tn peat at cereal? ae} MARE HIT ee cette ence mark nT art
S ao eC y | am _ ster » » a” .
ai T, les Grant Ltd, or Dial aaa. | Pree ae sian Single Bedstead. ae fhe ee to assume | after one month from the 16th day of Aemiiees fees nitene eee ee on Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets
TAKE NOTICE _ —| Lady's Desk and Arm Chair; Morris | Term “xe 10th eponing OF “net | in Bie meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my’ office of opposition ul ».¢ ~
Chair all_in Mahogany: Single Iron . eptember. w Dea The trade mark can be seen on application at my office RRR REAR RR RAR $54595%5%5> 5%
MISCELLANEOUS Bedstead, Medicine Cabinet, Canvas Cot, ei 8 Bth day of August 1951 OOO SOS PPS PSAP EE FoF FPS OSS °
Pp OST Nice Enam. Top Table, Step Ladder, Cc. Vv. D. HADLEY, H WosTAMS, » iS YOUR SAVINGS ACCOUNT INCREASING? 3
2-Burner Florence Oil Stove and Oven, , Education Officer. Registrar of Trade Mark a ys
CAMERA—Kodak 35, As New, price ano iene ae, Seana St. Vincent, B.W.I. ee 5D aS 16.8.51—3n | % Did you save as much as you anticipate d during the past year? &
TOA STI ES ene hundred dollars. Fitt, Knights Ltd.| BRANKER, TROTMAN 7 oo 7th August, 1951, — - x How, much have you saved in the past five or ten years? 7
City Pharmacy. 11.8.51—T FN f a : 17.8.51—3n TAKE NOTICE % If your savings plan is bogging down you need a systematic ¥&
A rer r * " fg > T Ps “4 P, * >
That GENERAL FOODS CORPORA- } GALV. BUCKETS 107 $1.00 each, 11’ OT Rate —— $ me thod something along the lines of a Sun Life Endowment »
TION 4 corporation organized and| 4nd 12 $1.20 each. These are at special | % Policy. ‘ i %
Delawera Unitor ahia oe oe a pie at Ralph Beard’s, Tower Bay i Attention is drawn to the De- % Start saving this sure way to-day. %
Rione ade: oe busine adgeos eT agoy eee”) ULE NOTICES | fence (Control of Drug and Patent SUN LIFE ASSURANCE CO. OF CANADA *
Park Avenue, New York, New York, | GALVANISED SHEETS. New 24 gauge a“ Proprietary Medicine Prices) . Head OW Mont al %
United States of America, Manufacturers, | 6ft. $4.68 each 7ft. $5.44 each &ft Ten cents per rder, 1951, No. 14 which will be * eac Ice; ontrea ‘
ite Phe be ee : . agate line on week-days ry l, No, which will 8 .. : ; sii 5
has applied (£0r, the, resistration | of 2 | S21 each. At Ralph Beard, Lower Bay and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, published in the Official Gazette 1g R. M. JONES & COMPANY LIMITED 8
respect of cereal foods, and will bs en- teen eae ae 31.80 aie Teaaoe on week-days|/of Thursday 16th August, 195]. Representatives for Barbados %
titled to register the same after one KOSSOLIAN—We have ‘‘Kossolian” " 2. Under this Order the Gabriel Gonsalves, Jnr., 3 we
month from the 16th day of|Pcultry Tonic in stock recommended for con eacenininsinantiar Articles: — and Canvassers y
August 1951 unless some person shall in| Chicks, Fowis, Ducks and Turkeys, and NOTICE Agarol D. L. Crichlow |
the meantime give notice in duplicate} also assists in the E roducti: ‘ 4.6s6s656 4.664 6.66.4,.66 004
to me at my office of opposition of suen | Price 4/6 box Knight's Lia sai Alophen Pills LLL LL APL SOOO GOSS FOS
registration. The trode hark can be 17.8.51—2n, sa inte, See veneer Fan te Consignass Beecham's Pills—Pearl coated Ls el
ad siti a ‘ . SE PSSA SSE SGOT : ae
; Dated this Re ag 1961, KURBICURA—We also have ‘“Kurbi-| @T¢ Peaponsibis For any debt or debts con- Betaplexin, = Oe PLE EEL LLL “%
, LIAMS Sura” it tracted by the crew durin Betaxin . s
H, WIL! . cura’ in stock, an absorbent dressing iy rew during her stay in r ss
Registrar of Trade Marks. for Animals. Knight's Ltd. this Port Betaxin Tablets » | »
16.8.51—-3n. 17.8, 51—2n. MANNING & CO., LTD Dettol That CONTINENTAL FOODS, IViC., a corporation organized under the laws o We wish to advise our customer om! ‘
acs iid a claenichitimallinsss sik appl acon. his 16.8.51-—@n Ferrol-plai the State of Delaware, United States of America, whose trade or business addrovs that our Business will be closed ss
RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing | ——————————- —___--__--___-— errol-plain is 1500 Hudson Street, Hoboken, New Jersey, United States of America, Manuf: : from Wth August, will reopen | . ny >
....and we will order for you if we NOTICE Ferrol-compound turers, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in 27th August It’s delicious when %
haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co., Irradol “A” respect of foodstuffs, including soups and ingredients of soups, and will be entit. a Hf. A. GULSTONE & CO, %
%
| ul ~



Joes River Sugar Estates Limited will



WANTED



JELL

HELP



That GENERAL FOODS CORPORA-

TION, a corporation organized and; —— OE
«nisting under the laws of the State of POSITION OFFERED
Delaware, United States of America, LADY with knowledge of Book-keep-
whose trade or business address is 250] ing and Cash, to work in our office,
Px Avenue, New York, New York, | $40.00 per month Applicant must live
United States of America, Manufacturers, | Within 3 miles of City. Appky in person
has applied for the registration of a|at 1 p.m. any day except Saturdays
trede mark in Part “A" of Register in JOHNSON’S STATIONERY



15.8.5



respect of foods and ingredients of foods;





velatine, jellies, desserts, puddings and | ———
pudding powders, ice cream powders, ice} COMPANION for middle age la
cream mix, freezing mix, Good accommodation in pleasant resi-

dential area. Apply: P.O. Box 143

17,8.51—t.f.n.

confectionery, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from

fruit extracts, |

the 16th = day of = Atagst 1995) | em
unless some person shall in the meantime GARDENER — Experienced Gardener,
give notice in duplicate to me at my | Préferably one who also could serve
cfice of opposition of such registration, | ceeasionally as chauffeur. References
Tne trade mark can be seen on application | indispensable good salary and lunch
at my office Apply: Medmenham, Pine Hill.

Dated this 8th day of August, 1931 17.8.51—In

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
16.8. 51—3n.



FURNITURE |

BARBADOS TURF CLUB
PAYMENT OF PRIZES

| 6d. Consolation, Cash Prizes,
AUCTION | 2/- Stand Sweep, Pari-Mutuel
;and Forecast Competition Prizes

‘will be paid on and from Monday
| 20th instant.
| Horses and_ Serial

Wednesday, 22nd August

at 11.30 a.m. Prizes on

be held on Saturday, the 25th day of
August 1951, at the above named office
at 38 p.m. for the following purposes:—
1. To consider the Statutory Report
2. To consider any matter relating
thereto.
By Order of the Board,

O. E, MÂ¥LLINGTON,

Secretary
17.8.51-—-In



NOTICE

Re Estate of

ALBERTINE CARTER Deceased,

persons having any debt or claim against
tne Estate of Albertine Carter, otherwise
known as Druscilla Albertine Carter, late
of McClean’s Land. Brittons Cross Road,
Saint Michael, who died in this Island on
the 6th day of September 1950 intestate,
are requested to send particulars of their
claims duly attested to the under signed,
Eustace Maxwell Shilstone, of No. 17,
High Street, Bridgetown, the qualified
administrator of the said estate on or
before the 25th day of September 1951,



Dated this 19th day of July, 1951.
E. M. SHILSTONE,
King's Solicitor
20.7.51—4n



and from Monday 27th instant.



_———————————

RATES OF EXCHANGE







We have been instructed by ‘
Mr. J. C. Hotchkiss to sell by Payment will be from 12.00
Auction his Furniture and House- noon to 3.00 p.m. daily. |
hold Effects at Flat 7 “Abergeldie” {| G. A. LEWIS, |
Dayrell’s Road | Secretary. |

Viewing morning of sale at | 17.8.51—2n.

9 a.m. |
Tip-Top Dining Table, 4 Dining
Chairs, Tea Trolley, Large Serv- TAKE NOTICE

ing Table, Small Flat Top Writing








Desk, Sideboard, Coffee Table,

China Cabinet, Dressing Table |

with long Mirror, Set 3 Adjustable |

Easy Chairs with Cushions,

Dressing Table with Large round

Mirror and = Stool, Wardrobe

(Cedar Lined with full length

inside mirror), Bedside Cabinet,

Bedside Table, Standard Lamp

with Shade,—ALL THE ABOVE

IN MAHOGANY,— Folding Card

Tabel, Pr. Folding Canvas a

Metal Picnic Chairs, Cordea Arm iu

Chairs, 3 Piece Pine Morris Suite rete

with Cushions, Pine Coffee Table

with Book Shtives, Pye Radin- That GENERAI FOODS CORPORA-
gram in Mahog. Case, McMichael TION, a corporation. organized and
Radio 8 Tube (Set spare Tubes), existing under the laws of the State of
Birch C'tail Tables, Medicine Delaware, United States of America,
Cabinet, 2 Simmons Deep Sleev whase’ trade GF Duninine eadiens 15 900
and 1 Hypnos Single Mattress, Park Avenue, New York, New York,

2 Origonal Pictures by Antiguan United States of America, Manufacturers,





Leeward Association of
Cultural Societies) .



|

|

| Artist, Glassware, Heat Master bas applied for the registration of a|
| Coffee and Tea Pots, Elec, Clock, trade mark in Part “A” of Register|
| Elec. Kettle, Elec. Stove (Cana- || i, respect of tea and coffee, and wili|
| dian), 6 Cu. Ft. English Flee be entitled to register the same after
| Fridge, (2 vrs. old), 3-Burner (1) one month from the 16th day of August
| Valor Stove and Oven, Enamel [| i951 unless some person shall in the mean-

Top Table, Small Kitchen Table,

time give notice in duplicate to me a

| Ironing Table, Larder, Mise my office of opposition of such registra-
| Kitchen Utencils, Servant's Furni- | tion. The, trade mark can be s€en on|
ture and many other interesting | application at my office |
} items | Dated this 8th day of August 1951
2 H. WILLIAMS, |
Nearly all fhis furniture is Registrar of Trade Marks
modern and not more than 2 yrs 16 ,.8.51—3n

| old ‘ |

A LECTURE

PPO PTSS

*





CASH ON FALL OF HAMMER

AUCTIONEERS

John 4. Biadon
& co.

To-Day'’s G. A. Song |

) “I Love You”...

|
|
“I love you I do.”] |

That's

what every

AF .8., FV A. woman says when
Phone 4640 |

! she sees the modern

Plantations Building Chad Gases
' aad J er.







:
% — will be given by —
g Mr. LIONEL HUTCHINSON
g (Librarian, House of As- >
x sembly, Author of “Behind
& The Mace”), ¥
s —on— %
% SIR CONRAD REEVES, Kt., %
% At the SPEIGHTSTOWN 3
ist LIBRARY %
1% — on — x
$ MONDAY, August 20th % |
1% at 8 p.m %
% YOU ARE CORDIALLY § |
s INVITED ! % 1}
% 17.8.51—3n. $
ȴ,

%
z *
SLL LLL EO >

Listerine Antiseptic

Lysol

Neko Soap 1%

Palatol-plain

Palatol-compound

Phospherine (from
Kingdom)

Phyllosan

Polytaxin Capsules

HARBOUR LOG

Sch
M.V

Sapsworth,

Mails for British Guiana by

In Carlisle Bay

Mandalay HU,
Lady Joy, M.V. Sedgefield, Yac




from Trinidad



MAIL NOTICE

the

Post Office as under:—





MIXED FRANCHISE
BILL

recently enacted by the Leg-
islatures of the Government
of South Africa arranged to
take place on Saturday, 18th
August, by the

BARBADOS WORKERS’
UNION

has been postponed until
SATURDAY, 25th August,

at 1.30 p.m





United

have been deleted in their entire-
ty from the Defence (Control of
Drug and Patent and Proprietary

otherwise known as Medicine Prices) Order 1951,
DRUSCILLA ALBERTINE CARTER No. 7
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all ts 17.8.51—I1n

S.S. Agamemnon,

as after that date } shall proceed to dis- | Marsaltes Cyril BE, Smith, M.V
tribute the assets of the deceased amon | Antares, Mary M. Lewis, Sch
the parties entitled thereto having regard | Emeline United Pilgrim S., Sch
only to the claims of which I shall then | Florence Emanuel, Sch. Philip H. David-
have had notice and that I will not be| son, M.V Velvet Lads, Seh Zita
liable for ass€ts so distributed or any | Wonita, M.V. Daerwood, Sch. Gardenia
part thereof to any person or persons] W., S.S. Explorer, Sch, Everdene, Sch
of whose debt or claim I shall not then | Wonderful Counsellor, Sch. Marea Hen-
have had notice And all persons indebted | yietta, S.S. Lydia Adina S

to the said estate are requested to settie ARRIVALS

their accounts with me without delay ss Golfito, 4,505 tons net, Capt

Sen

Frances W. Smith will be closed at the
General










office,
Dated this 8th day of August 1951.
WH. WILLIAMS |
of Trade Mark
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AUGUST 16, 1951 16 a.m, Ordinary Mail at 12.15 p.m. %
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PAGE



EIGHT

Barbados Turf Club

Sixpenny Consolation Sweep

























BARBADOS ADVOCATE

WINDWARDS HOLD
COLLEGE TO DRAW





Springboks
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@ From page |





































PUERTO RICAN LEADER
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Rico, Aug. 16.
|

Pedro



e Nationalis eader
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nvict





























FRIDAY







AUGUST 17, 1951
































































































































































































Series Series hevien Sanne H arrison College and the Windward islands played to a agiicar, 7 ar Pow t) ni of seeking to overthrow |
t es L” “M" ‘\.3 draw yesterday when the first football match in the time and was he | the Government of Puerto Rico by
“E a Prize Ticket Nos Amount a . . . ’ ’ ¢
Prize Ticket Nos Amount == | xt 0558 7323 $140.00 Triangular Schools Tournament ended at the Harrison Col- new ball with Me Carthy who as- | force ‘
ist 1402 8849 $140.00 ond 581 1418 100.00 lege grounds. ed the tourists back it M he jury found Albizu guilty of
2nd 5398 = 5417 100.00 3y4j 7738 890 80.00 PE Se Pe BER I 5 pias ara 1158 9244. «80.00 4th ae an ae A fair crowd watehed the match which provided thrills, "Win only two runs on lhim, in violation of Law 58 mod- oO)
4th 2093 60.00 5th 2937 7907 50.00 C. Tudor, K: Griffith and C. Smith scored one each for Har- joard he caused Lowson to play jelled after the Smith Act, under 7
5th 6342 50.00 eth 6068 1590 30.00 ‘vison College while the Windward Islands goal scorers were hastily at pne pitched well up to| Which the United States Commu-
6th 9455 30 00 ath 4689 9826 20.00 B. Auguste, Skipper J. McIntyre and L. Franklyn. and Endean made a good we iad we aes aoe oh oe
poy “ 3p 2 8th 5472 0677 20.00... The game opened with Harrisor —_ behind eee icket , | 0 a a for ine ie eerie
h 447 0 2 9th 9968 5466 20.00 Ss ‘ D College defending the goal at the Uttam, and May ‘wete forced |p ae Nees aa nee
9th 1279 5415 =! 16th 0034 5832 20.0C nappers raw southern end. About 15 minutes to watch the off spinners of Athol |™en®—ten years on €SCR COUT,
a OD saat H+ oo Lith 1203 20.00 ye after play started, Tudor at centré Rowan with the greatest care and} weige Fable. Snen acta
11th : 2 12th 1406 10.00 / . forward drew first blood for Har- although Hutton was able to t |August 29 for sentencing.—U.P.
12th 4389 8115 10.00 3 34h 5058 10.00 W ith College orward ¢ : ar- a! gh é as able to ta
7 pe one n 00.2 50% : rison College by kicking the bal] tree very fine four off Var ar i
ve aaa > a <3 14th 5982 10.00 well into the right corner of the Ryneveld he was lbw to the nal Remember, a comfortable
i anon (aaa 3 ob 15th 10 - Over three hundred people nets away fron. the Windward ball of the day from Rowan ; fitting SUIT is our first con-
a, 3100 $587 10.00 en ie = eee the Antatie c ~~ pier and Islands’ custodian Riviere, i | ms ee sideration. There are in-
Pie ots 14k ivt sallroom yesterday afternoon tc Short z ee > e@ . SCORES | } : :
17tl 8940 1850 10.00 8th 40:0) oak Ghai es the 'udles gamiion Bud I ad: Auguste exer SOUTH AFRICA'S—ist Innings | Ss creasing numbers who
18th 3222 5323 10.00 9th Fe eR : : {ng at right wing kicked in thes. Rowan ¢ Hutton b Brown 5 th and Loose ise for themselves
19th 9704 8174 10.00 ooh {oo weet polo match of the season. equaliser. At half time the score W R. Endean c Brown b Laker 31 |, Bleeding Gums, Sore Moutn ov orrhea, rerognis¢ .
20th 9113 7 10.00 Sy 10.60 aoe = ara : a was unchanged. CB Van Ryneveld stpd. Brennan Teeth icuth or perhaps some bad dagase the eee” cut,
7493 10.00 59na 26.00 hae eer ene Sy eee ee , 7 A ji: Mauree Lbw. Brows ; | that will sooner or later cates vvumatism | fit and finish of the....
5006 10.00 54, , The result of this game puts When the second half was ten 4 seas 10.00 23rd 10.00 swordfish one point ahead of minutes old Skipper McIntyre by rk ‘ it Yin Eke 7 OO a our aay, enae te wat
448 10.00 24th 10.00 sither Snappers or Harrison Col- some clever beating got himseir P eda |and quickly tightens the teeth. on Our IDEAL TAILORING
“* 25th 10.00 ‘ t A b Bedser uarantee. Amosan must make y
0053 10.00 Seth 10.90 2¢8¢ im their race for the cup. a on oe nae Noid hard G W. Chubb b Bedser 10 | mouth well and save your ee
7704 10.00 5. With two minutes to go when and accurately into the right corn- M G_ Melle b Shackleto j money back on return pels ge A py Ps :
6644 10.00 aaah a the score was four all, Ken Ince ¢r of the College goal completely . ¥ “t as aie est. is i vibe 8 aah AE today. ‘The ‘guar- We will welcome the We
8642 10.00 conn ! ay the Snappers centreforward put deceiving goal keeper Roach to put ERE Rm cae MS : Amosan antes protects portunity of proving this to
2686 10.00 Sot 10.00 his team one in the lead with a two up for the Windward Islands Total 202 | , , th you in our...
: } ea—Trench Mow
8808 10.00 7 —_____. determined swim through; a move Big = oars at = nae BOWLING ANALYSIS | Ter Pyorsh * |
fade $750.00 Which threatened to take the game Of the Windward Islands the Col- — oO M RR WwW} ————— ei iz
$750.00 mee ve away {tom their young rivals. lege players went on the attack Bedser |. et: Bt} TAILORING DEPARTMEN
—ne Series Series Harrison College however fought and after a melee in the Wind- Fyttersail 14 7 2 14
a a - “Raum: 7% , back in a last desperate attempt ward area K. Griffith at centre Makar ee ae, ene d Digestive on the first floor of
“G! on ist “ees "8857 $140.00 and scored the equaliser a couple half scored the equaliser. Bests - ‘es et U ts
Prise Ticket Nos Amount JS oe i , of seconds before the final whistle Play now quickened up. Afte ENGLAND—1tst Innings se LTD
ist 8718 6670 $140.00 2nd ., 0743 100. 06 Billy z ing was scorer ‘another melee in the Windwards & Hutton |.b.w Athol Rowar 28 Pp CAVE SHEPHERD & (C0. ‘
; 49 . Bra 2784 80.99 Billy Manning was the scorer. ane pate ews : owson ¢ Endean b Melle
3re JO62 t > r mr ter {te ‘Ce ¢ s fen ¢ snalty to arrison College Kx @ inb 1 | After extensive research,
; BO4e 0.00 5th 2048 0774 50.00 ter netted three goals and Ken & Pé frag, (nb. 1 | / ; 10—13, BROAD STREET
bana 5 $0 oo 66th 5976 2933 30.00 Ince two, ‘Mortimer’ Weatherhead oonee Williams ete ball sigh tiesds Tangs 5 pst abn gh gerne obo 0 3,
i 79316 9586 30.00 Tt 1418 0477 20.00 Scored two for Harrison College Straight at Riviere the Windward Seale ; roduced De Witts ,
Sth cn cant 4 0 Bth 3041 0056 290.00 “Nd Charlie Evelyn, Geoffrey Islands goalkeeper who saved by _ To bat Compton, Watson, Brown, | ablets, new | men ec
ath 4740-7830 20.00 9th 9080 7528 20.00 Jordan and Billy Manning one pushing the ball back into play Shackleton, Brennan, Bedser, Taker, = re coe
9th 2161 4959 20.90 10th 9438 7760 20.00 each. The Collegians got all five thus causing Smith to put the ~~" powLinG ANALYSIS af a eantaie oay Of checking "7 A
10th 6275 1918 20.00 11th 6296 0014 20.00 of their goals in the second half. third goal in for Harrison. tcCart ee ae ee digestive disorders away from ¢
: naan . ‘ 504 37 ( , , ; Five minutes before the blow * aFENS . | ‘ ived—
ith 764 5189 20.00 d2th 8504 4137 10.00 THE GAME Biv Melle A : 2 home. No water require
12th $032 71720 10.00 18th 1019 0470 10.00 Snappers were first on the at- off Franklyn at inside right for A Rowan 8 4 | just dissolve one or two on the 2
13th 4345 6547 10.00 14th 6924 = 4773, = 10.00 tack as the referee Maj. Foster Windward Islands scored the Ghubh es | | tongue for prompt relief
14th 0224 5618 10.00 15th 6617 5918 10.00 whistled the two teams into action third goal for his team ee " | anywhere. Pleasant tasting
15th 6841 8743 10.00 16th 2535 1730 10.00 Harrison College defended well The teams were: De Witt's — ra
16th 7585 5953 10.00 ibe pve a . oe and it wasn’t until the game was Harrison College: Roach, Morri- ee aah
17th 1138 0881 io a 19th 8273 8094 10.09 five and a half minutes old that gon, Forde, Dash, Griffith, Sim- WHAT’S ON TO-DAY strips for pocket or handbag.
18th 3876 $981 00 ‘oOtK 9289 0607 10.00 Snappers got their first goal, Ken~ j,onds, Williams (Capt.), Smith Try them today.
19th 2621 3002 1 4 eave vue Tt neth Ince scored with one of his ~ 4) ‘ Fe Court of Ordinary—10 a.m. |
7614 10.00 21st 4363 5933 10,00 ‘ C. Tudor, Hope and F. Tudor. |
20th 3522 76 ' oe +¢) deceptive shots. Three minutes ; ; ; Rote hey Police Courts—10 a.m. | f
21st 1178 2620 10.00 22nd 9637 9144 10.00 ister Delbert sent thois ehoond Windward Islands. Riviera, Victorian Exhibition at Bar- || j
22nd 3414 1139 10.00 23rd 2568 0098 10.00 (3° i rt a at ra ee Theta Baird, Sandy, Drakes, McIntyre a ergy Muar dihat peal |
23rd 5540 9871 10.00 24th 6987 6182 10.00 che sha, na kobe en (Capt). Anderson, Auguste, Frank- Football (Windward Islands ||
2 = - 7 5G BAS ; » goalke Pg san=- jy e arring es 4 }
Bein <<. ape $042 10-00 36th <<< BORE SRB 10.00 None he aecal the seers 2 Moore, Warrington and L- |. va: Sich Guana) pa D | |
e 4 216 = — rf remaine . avne ¢ “rte . * ° o we a "
26th 6946 = 6 102 10.00 27th 9603 3402 10.00 Balinese DS rest 2 ar ison ‘The referee was Mr. Wilkes. at Queen's Park on ‘“Vener- ANTACI |
¢ 3 10.00 28th 8468 349 10.00 : in e ime. 1 Disease’—8 p.m. {
27th 9491 2388 29th 989 ‘ With the resumption of play bia ” euneeha: TABLETS rd TONES UP DIGESTION
2Btl 2763 «—«-2516 10.00 29t 4989 3331 10.00 1 p play
39th 1047 4574 10.00 o¢th 7457 2831 10.00 Harrison College came down with Were. Odsal Fer § a2 No water needed cs
30th 8431 5616 10.00 ' aia a well eeee ‘four forward’ LADIES PLAY TO-NIGHT 830 pom “ Easily carried anywhere — Cell-seale x ENRICHES THE BLOOD
’ —— ‘ $750.00 movement which bore fruit when Roxy:— “'Tampleo” and Tucson’ —_____—
$750.00 hia cs a va well and made no mistake getting for the Ladies Island Champion- and “Wake of the Red Witch” ee 7 .
iis wiokes 8 k , the ball well into the nets. Short-,ship which was to be played on 1.30 pm. and 8 40 p.m @ Quick!y soothes DeWITT’S * RESTORES NERVOUS ENERGY
ae ist 4595 6396 $140.00 ly after this, however, Bannister|Wednesday night and was post= | O\ZMPI J Adventures of Cap: and seltles | ANTACID
Pri Tieket Nes. Athouat'] ond 2188 2491 100,00 again scored for Snappers with «}pened due to the inclement pom, upset stomach 2
Prine ‘ket Nos, Ue: aos BabA ‘ ! Il flighted ‘back hand’, Har-| weather will be played to-night Plaza:—“Let’s Dance” 2.40 pm, i POWDE
‘ 5 0287 $140.00" 3rel 3526 0433 80.00 2 we ghtec hand’, Har a , played 5 ‘ @ Lasting effects
ond se 9962 9597 100.00 * 4th 5925 2346 60.00 rison College were not dismayed ig o'clock at Y.M.P.C., Beckles 445 Bm, ond. 8.00..p.m . * BUILDS UP THE BODY
5670 6558 80.00 5th 5616 4193 50.00 and they got their second goa'} oad, as
baag 1374 60.00 6th 1753 6698 30.00 when ‘Mortimer’ Weatherheac Sees
5th 9658 8795 50,00 7th 3667 8735 20.00 scored after four minutes play ir pe poe ee ~ -- —- “ “===
: 3515 9081 39.00 8th 1161 9976 20.00 the second half,
7th 0389 5371 99,00 9th 3875 1247 20.00 Their equaliser came a minute A |
8th 7241 1469 90.900 10th 1549 9019 20.00 and a half later when Geoffrey ‘ >
9th 7118 1441 20 00 11th 7463 9118 20.00 Jordan scored. With the scofe a
1Oth 7388 2668 30.00 12th 8560 3956 10.00 three all the crowd were frantic q
ith 7640 4764 30,00 13th 2283 9212 10,00 with excitement, and when Har- . .
19th 0061 2506 10.00 ar ar oan rer rison College went into thé leac » = Bum : 9
& Sth 997 93% ith a snapshop by ‘Mortimer ‘ ’ ‘
13th 3620 7539 10.00 {9 wi pshop by r arty AT
13th act, Tattoo 26th 759 1808 10.00 Weatherhead, the Harrison Col: mee eee: RS lacs
15th 9982 6840 ~—10.00 7th ste 10 ee ee ee Ze tae: fom he apy 2%, BYNIN AMARA
I 9803 7594 10,00 aaa a ~, amidst a roar of applause. ‘ ’ le
Ith 0076 ©5424 ~—«10.00 anit ae, Okars «le 0g ,.. Hardly had the ball been back PATENT’ GROATS
18th 9139 2981 10.00 Sre¢ 3736 2482 10.00 into play than Delbert Bannister makes weaning a happy thme for baby—
19th 5390 8785 10.00 donq °°" got) 9530 10.00 equalised and this time it was the and mother f | Gade by ALLEN & HANBURYS LT9., LONDON
20th 5186 8112 10.00 53 rq 7707 9502 10.00 Snappers hailers who yelled )
21st 9551 6405 10.00 d4th 8160 9920 10.00 themselves hoarse. There was .
22nd 5059 6802 10.00 5th 2461 9231 10.09 €ven more applause from their} — a ————— a. IF RRR RIERA RANA RENEE OEIEE rs
23rd 5503 7720 10.00 96th 7105 5819 10.09 Guarter when two minutes before ie Cie ate | %
24th 8283 3069 = 10.00 27th We. OD. Oe Re ee ee eee ee Pre Wel *
25th 5384 6028 10.00 28th 4239 4146 = 10.00 Ince made his forcing swim e have received i ; :
26th 2246 7692 10.00 v9th 5881 4545 10.00 through to make the score Snap- _ new stocks ote
27th 2336 0421 ~=—-:10.00 30th 7581 3139 10.00 pers: 5, Harrison College: 4. =a
28th 0810 4701 10.00 _..... Then with seconds to go Billy GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS
29th 5392 4185 10.00 $750.00 Manning the Harrison College ’ ’ ,
30th ........ 0938 3409 10.00 ——__—. Fkipper got the much needed ©, 45 MR 8 Gutge
——- Government Tax $200.00 on each equaliser for his team.
$750.00 Series The other game of the after- ite GALVANISED NAILS — all sizes
BOVELL & SKEETE, nen yiieh Wee played end- ‘ANACIW, contains four well-proven medicines, i.e., Phenacetin, | Magnificent Photo Cards
# ner L. B. GILL. e with onitas snatching a {ANACH) | ; ; et | * i
*‘Beries K A t : narrow win from Whipporays oo Caffeine, Acetylsalicylic Acid—and QUININE. These four | of Modern ‘British Cars! EXPANDED METAL SHEETS
Prize re sons For Bonitas ‘Boo’ Patterson medicines, scientifically balanced, work synergistically—that is why yi", 1” 2” 37 M
e a see “100. 00 E tian Wins played an excellent game, scoring they relieve pain fast, restore your s:nse of well-being ! “as # , esh
both goals, Dudley O’Neal t 4
gra - +e SYP scored the lone goal for Whip- [ANACIW7 ee my ad Over fu “POILITE” FLEXIBLE FLAT ASBESTOS
60 ws porays. in Great Britain alone use it in their sufgeries! Fevers, >
aaa bb Channel Swim Bonitas opened the _ scoring colds, headaches, toothache, rheumatism, Neuralgia—this wonderful CEMENT SHEETS 4’ x 8’ at $6.40 Sheet
4 ‘Gann aA. within the first thalf minute ot new specific brings you amazingly quick relief from all of them !
wth 2666 20.00 DOVER, August 16. ‘he game. Whipporays equalised oe — “EVERITE” CORR
BE iviene 7031 20.00 ware ey omar” ugu 4 early in the second half and the ; costs little. You can buy it ahs UGATED SHEETS
566 90.00 Egyptian Mareeh Hammat 34, ) and ANACIW; y / Wy iw
ime ae 20.90 Member of King Farouk’s Royal Stay, oh Tipe ene in a in two-tablet envelopes— Every S-ounce packet conteins 2 6’, 7’, 9’, 10’ Lengths
76 ‘ ee : aoe ri vw when Patterson got away ;
ce 9603 20.00 bodyguard won the France to down the field and a well pinged Proust ee. UTNE SUC peel irom photo cards. (Full set, 40 cards ;
12th - 8843 10.00 ens ra ; c ne : sw im . 2 2 long shot gave his team victory. bout of pain. Or in handy 20-tablet e 3
13th 4757 10,00: pares An. Me, ROUTE. Ay “ The referee was Maj. A. R boxes. Or in 50-tablet bottles—keep | a ee eee ‘
14th 6584 16 een ee Le Morvan ©! Foster, Ohe of these in your house. | Se ae Phone 4267 3
15th 9977 LO; 00s Scr ec, awqe «he teams were: — | SRB ZEYR FE XEBORC DBO 4
1gth 7386 10.00 chin and Wag timed 12 hours Parersit (capt). iM” Richangion’ pane torreeer | Bitiavie—teshcrus” PY PAC WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LED. &
7A e i . ‘ ; 25 25 Grace, M. Konisberg and G. Atwell ast “ryp They 2a g
18th 5893 10,00 lacstnn etna ane ‘ioe ia Whippofnys: C O'Neal, 1. Spence, AGAINST PAIN ni, but in, wth wate . me
18th 8838 10.00 hours and 12 minutes after he Wantharnene a DON wees GET ‘ ANACIN’ TODA Y! | enema cenraiteetieeee eam ¥
20th 5387 10.00 ond 19 other swimmers from 10 Harrison Collece: T Clarke, F. Man- : ; J. A. COKBIN @ SONS.
21st 3416 10.00 *. t i 1 4 * } sg rater at TP C. Evelyn, A_ Taylor, G. Jordan, ‘ANACIN’ is sold in Great Britain and South Africa under the name ‘ANADIN | call
22nd ’ 4836 10.00 an ate we eae er at Mo var eh a manning ene Saas eas 1Pa
= oe 7 ' ap Tis ez i rance. Snappers: ‘aylor, zell, G | 6656566 a
28rd .. 4799 10.00 Le Morvan; 27, landed at Saint McLaaq wee wr McLean, D- Bannis i { } siete |
24th . OORT skein 10.00 Margaret's bay ‘six miles away. '*fs,%:,pwe,ene Browne \ AKE T Hl IS A 1}) 1 \ x
= r z VLE é : 0 Sb = Sowers This afternoon's games are the finals o |) 1} D ANC 4 ;
2 BAIS) ic 10.00 ‘The sate ants rath in ’ , Al ;
26th 5370 10.00 ¢11000 offered “by the, London ‘Ses Npmphs, Referee in Mi, Bi Putte Hy ao E D FOR THOUGHT %
27th 7493 10.00 Daily Mail for the first place on. The other game will be an island |) Friends and Their Friends! ‘
28th 10.00 First wonkh Anisher will pel a vs. a team from H.M.S. Bisbury { Remember the Grand From October, 1950 to %
29th 10.00 the same amount. Le Morvan | The Barbados team is: A. Weather. | ( . ’ ) 1 1, June, 1951 the price of ~
30th 10.00!¥got £500 for the second place and Nennise, C. Bvelvn’ G. gordan ant’ Me ({} COSMOPOLITAN DANCE %
all other finishers will get £250. Browne »
ae 4 U M M i it | | Sponsored by Mr. Everton Woollen %
nee ae a ee RE a ne ered 1h, ee " } | Greenidge x
They'll Do It Every Tune Sepinerd US Poteni OMe Ov jimm Hatlo “a i} SATURDAY NIGHT, 18th sae >
ee es agenda sieealiacs siictineccaee | uitin x
: <= EEA e = == = — August, 1951, gs sS
; cu : ol i) AT GEORGE V. PARK. x
The BARBER |S THE YONKS | Bur — COMES i | has advanced over 100%, M
TALKATIVE, ALL GOT THE POWER: THE SHAVE AND. a SSpoLeSeeeSeSEeeSee |% and these higher priced ¥
RIGHT BUT THE DEED YOU EVER | | WHO'S THE GABBY A x | materials are now begin- g
MAGAZINE-READING SSE BABE ROOTS? ONE NOW? ov VS py ' x % ning to arrive in Barba- s
Sono (femme |e a AU AnTENTION = {cee
~~ - C c im s, >
GIVE HIM A ROOTS. ¢ ; WY I 1 % ~ : by
a SEB BASE RO { DODGERS NEED PITCHIN'= Y% ( OOPS: g wie We still have a good x
TUMBLE THE YONKS j § { ¢
ad Nel | # OD YOU HEAR THE ONE? is | * selection of R
7 Ql MY EAM ey ti wail TELL you. * ik : * 3k ; 8
~ | Up agout MY KID~.-HEY! ie Si 3 | $
a WHERES TH8 PICTURE 1 We beg to remind you of the 3! q A $
y You U AVE | % |
yO We THERE i FREE : AND :
. ui
° | % 8
Come in and DEMONSTRATION OF :
| 4 J *
7 ALL WOOL
let us fit you ig : .
| wine 6 ; x
with a Fine % JOHNSON'S = CAR 8 SUITINGS $
le 3 .
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PAGE 1

FRIDAY. AUGUST 17. 1M1 HAKKAIMIS ADMH'Vrt: I' U.I FIVK Rev. Hoyte Cross-examined In Christian Mission Suit REV. DAhTON HOYTE. chief defendant in the Rev Frederick Barrow and others—Rev. Hoyte and others Christian Mission Chancery suit, was cross-examined for nearly two boun by Mr. W W. Reece. counsel for Barrow, when he took the witness stand all yesterday. Mr. Re^ce will continue his cross-xam'nition wi.en the case riuiiinues on Tuesday before His Lordship the Vice Chancellor. Sir Allan Collymore. A decision is to be made a* to to produce a letter which hr said tfu Ceneral SupetmRev Hoyte had sent the other tk&t tmdcnl ... %  >:: at Ihe time „f ihe dupn'.i Chuivh In IMS. and 1830 and the case of the illcu! meelinn who i-. the presto! GcQCral Sup-r* Alter raonaal failed lo pi-.ln,. .mention! the letttr on the grounds that i( Mi. RMW*I ero*s examination was not receiveit. Mr Adams protried to break down Rev. llo> le's duced a sinned doCWM claim that he did not attend a Davis, one of the Barrow croup meeting called bv the Barrow and showing he acknowledged receipt others' group to elect a General of 'he l.ti.i Superintendent in 1949 because He petitioned both Houses of h* was advised that It was illegal, the Legislature asking that the Act Mr G. H. Adams associated be amended. As far as he knew. with Mr. D H. L. Ward, instructthere was a counter petition. The ed hv Carrington It Sealy is House of Assembly passed the for t.he RtV. Hnvle Hill, but ; tini.e.1 in associated the Other Place He was doing with Mr. J s H. Daw, Instructed ,hls '" lr > und vt ,nc Hieetuig bv Messrs. llutchinson and h ld laUr m ,hc >*' fc a-d Credentials Receive The 'Herald' When a meeting was to be held At knit, too. is whether the i'7edenll> would be received for CDinf out nf exulenee of the repreaenlalives of varloui churehMI.3on-sHen.ld In whieh the ;' -"""'"It tht mertlnj had ..ft. Gfnerul Suue.ln",'" h'lu to elect the rereenllemlenl had rr. be publlaned .„eanl "," '. "• " POMfMion that ll.-v II,:. '...I. "' credential, he.received -'hen he .11.,. before the • %  • Su Pf n l '" l m "** %  ** %  Her.Id went oiil .if .'Xl.tei.c.' After he had petitioned Coci nintiiiileiit. Mr. Reece |iu sti..ii.il him as to why he made th Herald go out of exisie. the outcourt, ho come of U.< CM There was a short break at this Earlier Mr. Adams was attemptJ-JfJ l £^#2!^5J!2 Wta u 1 lirinw nut that Hnv HnCte c1 "* nI "". Public library Ins to bring out that Rev. Hoyte did everything he could to try and gel the law amended a legally convened meeting i produce an Advocate's file, Janu10 March. 1949 and give evillfll.J.d BBS Ijt ..*>t**ki<^ IhJ.llAAl llAltSlf Ul'l rtenee as to certain notices being the papers concerning the !Me h „'Jen', '"" "'""" S '"""" <**• '"'""' too about the church bein R mort, w M R „ R R gaged to buv a car. row ,,„, 1£l v (Umsaj was on his The Oiurt was packed everv ^rd of r.trr.agement A i. i day of hearing of the ease will. de Ug-nes who CUM Aram overseas mm Dtra Of the Christian Mission ca||U t „ h|(n and „„.,„, lhc i r arrival They sal in two sectic "I did happen to silence them." Giving evidence. Rev. Hoyte !*4.fly* h f. 8 ? a.Ki.e on Januarv ht iikilit -but" for their mLscond.„.. I, 1949. and from that advice he not ir r their asking me about lintold Church representaUvenot nnc „ One of them aske.1 whelhlo attend a meeting scheduled to or the Missions ear was bought Ixheld <>n Uie 6th htrtllf. it Wat ,„ ,„ v name My reply was to LUtgalb convened Me als told s how"lhem the receipt which *o Rev. Ramsay that the holding of marked, 'credited to the Christian a meeting would be illegal. Mission, sum of $2,000 for a car.' \ I had alreadv notified -He said hi understood 1 credvarious members." Rev. Hoyte ited the car after mortgaging the said in reply to the Vice Chanchurch The wav thev

ke lltli-ellor. 1 did no! think it nece*piled they jiave no respect to "ary to go to the meeting and tell whom thev were speaking." them that I thought It was Thev might have asked him to illegal." Ml them for a discussion, but he N — .. -%  -„ could not remember, he said o t ..uh-si.,,1 Whenevtr thev wanted him they He had not told Rev. Ramsay cam( ((1 him an( ,„. ol() lhem tri go and take (dl place ..t the wha , h(1 wanll d t „ kni w %  no t.ilk Of confessing wrongs, tliough In the ., T T,,hertiacle course of a long con v er sa tion he saiil he had heard a rumour thai j| c „,\i\6 not remember lhem to he was likely to be injured if he hnvo a ,ke,l him to meet UMffl Bl •ttendtd the meeting 10 o'clock on New Year's Du ll "Bui that was Dot m> rM0n iiu TalM-rnacle He was there for not attending," *ie said. "My sometime between 8 and 9 30 reason as 1 had (old them preo'clock but he saw no delegates viously. was because of my advice there, thai it was illegal." "J went for something from the He saw a notice Informing the i.mcc," he said when the Vice late Board of Management that chancellor enquired why he went %  in Acting Chairman had been t„ the office so early thai morning, appointed and upon that he "but I cannot remember for what inserted a notice in the Ad vacate 1 went to the office. It Is nothing staling his position. He slated unusual—my going lo the office." also that he held the documents. At 12 o'clock, he said he arrived He then told the representatives for the service. He saw general that he would await an amendraces, but no particular face. "I ment of the Act. saw Urrier. DavisI saw a fleet Mr. Adnms at this point asked of sisters and there were the. counsel for Barrow and others brethren" He opened the tide ,i...i lin t. had lo be opened before ihe main one couU be. .'"i it WU then lhat Ihe keys were **alrhrd from him. \ paMeVmonlum started. When Ihe aaeanbeni went into the church there wa singlni because of opposition, the one -e-ti.ii surtlna one sorur ..mi Ihe nther beginning .mother; aeoldaa peaple from nuUide were t4.sutine In most ris^s hr used to make %  rranajimaiitg for the church doors lo be opened before he arrived, but because of trouble with Rrv I-arrler. he had for sometime been going with the key himself. "It was not that on that day thines were o eomr to a culmination," he Kild Mr Reece "There Is the General Meeting and everything la settled then No l> K aJ Advice He had appointed Ramsay on his original Board, but had got legal advice to take off members from overseas. He saw Ramsay on January 5 at the Bay House where he was put up, but he could not remember whether anyone else was there There w.is a woman, he knew, though, who used to be Ihcre. Rev. Ramsay asked him to allow him lo be a Judge and go into Ihe various vexations which had occurred One was the dismissal of (lev Larrier. There was a question of tiname hut that had UWayg been a question even be(OM he was born. The Christian Mission Herald went out of publication lale in 1946 Hr made efforts lo revive it. efforts such as checking up the possibilities of its revival. A case of type came from Americ i. after the Herald had gone out of existent..-, hut the type were not adequate and wen 1 evidently sent b] people who did not know the requirements. He disposed of Hie plant lo Mr Cole. II could be true that it wa* batnl then used, bul lhai would lie because Mr. Cole would have olher type and necessary parts. "It Is true that they paid off the mortgages even before the time". he said, "but th it was purely because of opposition." The Herald, he said, had been since revived. The case continues on Tuesday Cumberland Square Wanted For Market BUSKS MUST GO Charwoman Loses Lawsuit •• i\ nil ii i n in tit corn %  Judge A J II Ha c.l nnlfc • MrH -: Mahon ol ink ChrbM Churt • T' v Director of HiKhwavs and Transport ami the Commitwhi< n plaintiff, <; • aiuner of Police w*n asked yaatvnUi \ '"<• yuiaa)t, .of itauhof st MKhiiii. i %  u ..f ^-^n.r.r::finding some place lor the Mcommodatlon ..I the which now park on Ih, area of Cumberland Squatiwhich run, l Is above Ihe Parochial Buildings They anlo d I M will. "awe appealm .i view to the possibility of making ti"' li |?" •*,. dlMttetrnvtel Traffic. !" will report baekiotl Ren after the distrtd I Hoard had discussed correspondnecessary f.-i the convenience of Mrs Mahon MM the ( ,mrt \\ Ihe bulldlnj : Dawe to lk at: mlssionrr relative t< the Mggesrouk of ihthe rai Irawlnf ro tion that had bten InlUati Mr. E. D Mottlcy a !c weet ..v unb ago. of m.iktng Temple Yard ., He was in agreement \ kl temporary district market \' iha lunwllnil of the Dlractor because mawlng • reach ..r ruentiomd, the Director ol 1ediall those Daopla dw i M cal Services and the Colonial r.-i. puie&aaM in Jam. I nail ."-I Busbs>> Alley and : % %  The suggestion rame from the waj Director that the paiking -i>,i! f„ r He |houghl bowcvar, thst the ears at Cumberland Square culd old l"ublu M.n-,.' be done away with for (hat purconst I I ..: Id DO**, ;>'' the site used lor a ternus a parking place f"i I uorsry market tM .it would bi removed Two suggestions cams horn Ihe I Commissioner In t'tic he rccomcould be used tlmUarl] la tha mended the provision of the marcars. ket al Temple ^ -,-. Hl An ..Hi.eh opposed lo Ihe "'' mn t \ '" ,,U l>i, *V and pointed out that he was uot n.vtng "i> "' ihe principle o( proacown d Uia earpM in Ihi In f.ivou: of Ihe tumberMBd x|!n „,.., ..-, thMfl M m had ...i.l were very % li • • %  1 w, "•• l M'* The other suggestion which had rtecessai? lie w i^'inn canMahon returned thai %  been forwarded to the ComasisHunt..with one ran mm and pnwt lold hat thai ihe >< u laas %  loner some .ijj %  "<' the t*"'. th;it was thai Ihe Curnberla presented a change of rrunsl In Square -IN mighl ba< > %  ..., ; ,„ ., mil.: it he pointed out ih.d he ttmunht populai ai .. district market, that the floor m the drawing room the old Public Market could 1* me afltfll 4n Mahon tol.i her 111 1/ Norman Wno|s eny.li.> d H %  %  of Mi M l:on's seiv. .-1 : paid b) *'' week CMs yard iHKtuui that i>. her duty was to clean the yunl and someimies Nil,. BdflM have lo aerub UM drawing rnoni ; v> hen Mi M k her on t.. nik foi hei paid SJ .i week fr 111' %  rk One morning Mrs Maha imghi i • Memberh.i\-in,! |g w d In favour of this site and Mi Mottlcy s added suggestion the Hoard then made the ieo,ucsl ot Ihe CODUTUS. Pouce and 0l Hlghwayi BM Transport M ilreochj % %  The lupjaaUon <>i tn< ol Hlghwaji and Trai remodelled and improved for the Market -ite ing could b< found for the rum ic-ted market, and thai seme other build' bond. In this connection ha terday that he had received port from the Fire Offici attention lo the danger of Bra a result of the stowing of rum In that building and he had forwarded this report to Govcrnmenl •*li this buiuhnii be re eo n dilit* tioned for a market." said the ml Commissioner, we will then hnvc Juiv -'7 and AUK w a proper and permanent market. Tln-y "UTO and In my opinion that would 1* Chairman and n the solution to Ihe whoU ni'b, Km." Direclur s I.etl. r Some memliers slated ihsl a Sir. h.i .,tha latter puint wai conKiuther to Ihe BWtlon cornad, an afforl lo use tha : tiiiumrl of Iha maeting held ing in that respect had b>vn i Ihe past and found un r t.->k her to pav her e\tr %  %  %  but D IWS did iit take ..! Dawe left the IwHUg tnafcin| much noise l( n,| s-il ih.,1 sj MOUld put Mrs Mahon in the Pi It) l'i ht Courl for Ihi %  1 .i l %  UaWeattofi o ... ., a %  police in ft. i the ['I m I thai aha h< an !>.. %  ... .' M I Mahon rofuaad t.. give hat U 1 %  • %  ... I 2flth. Inaunt cncarniog ihe poaal%l1 M*low In addn use ol ihe Temple V n I >'.i.,i ,t,t th.t before h.. lift Injured In AroidYnt Willie Slsneti. a tally clerk of Country Road. Si. Michael was rushed to the General Hospital where he was detained after he was involved in an accident with the motor car M-881 on Roebuck Street lust before 8 pm. yesterday. The driver of the ear was John Allewie of Whlleman's Village. St George ble Trus would happen again temporary Veajatabk Market, In any ease, howovor, there wai j suggest that no question of a permanent n .ig{ V ket to accommodate the howkirs ^| Vl in the entire City area The p vision of district markets i what was required to suit the c venlence of the pubUe. Thc\ agreed though that the of the old Publi. rkel bond conatlluled %  Bra huard that It should lie dwconlinued JSja ': Si '<,.,.,r.„ Rsrkb. Until lakan on 'he v H II) .-. hal iha had lo do ani to the following alb aha would hath suggestions:— loi Ihaaa dul i lh.it the Car Park presentK Mo aubmltled thai then s located at Cumberland Square be evidence, lo ibow thai tha plain done away with. lilt w.is .tanl In anj dUTOronl wa) ,, That a Car Park be made in the from Ih. bj If) Ihi n highway known J> 'leniplV.n I pUHM Then \\n* IvldOnOl ,, lit would aeeornnwdate aboui aaajnel Mr Maboa tluity (301 can) making n -i OnO. wav street ,1 Ik |-|' s WOMeOT Ml II A T..I %  in.. Police Maglatrata %  A" yesterday lined That the parking "pine. I r nilar garden and St. Mary 1 Kntieit ROUSO, I 3!-yeai-old 1... the luises be included and some Church wall (II would occommoi ,,., ,,[ SailerSt Michael covering erected Iheie. la il.ul 14 ears): and thai this $14 40 (0) KfOUndlni arTOl Johnaon While h agreed with the Comhighway be d hW Cycle X-1140 OWI ences. and would lie shady. ,, lTli ,,,,,,,. M |n A It would be lesi, ineonvenu •, (>f |( ^ Dm.!,,., to have a Car Park ralhcr ll.an d-inJ|||rd wncn „ 'Bigbury Bay 1 Returns Here After Two Years Ilermuda. She reached Bermuda by April 1951. May found her ..ving Ilermuda again for Halifax Nova Scotia, where she spent three weeks undergoing repairs and she was back at Bermuda by Ihe end of June lo carry out antisubmarine exercises. Cruising The till bury Bay lefl Bermuda August 1 on this cruise. She be less Ineoavtnlani Park rather than ihin now LieiJeii'i.ii "i" 1 — ..* %  ., 'it:<"'i n"ii n vtna nivui>eu C, mnnUoiu-r 5 Polk. .,„ %  < Ih, I RWrlUI ill I.•.,.,.!.• V.ii.l ... ,1 IW. , wl|h ,,„. Direct,,, of Highways and Trail.hiKhwa, would BCJ Mv. ,, I,. ^^^ „ ,„„, 0WM ,..,„„ ^m,,^ ? .W. !" i r in ,!,_ M;^ v ^ ,, .,:„.,.•„, c, ^ %  'li || till' I I'tobyn and lli.v Street w in the loi the park so Her crest bodies a small toasting fork which is representative of the toasting fork on which the patron saint of Bigbury was roasted because of his religious convictions. I.t. R. G. A. Fitch, the Correspondence Officer, said that he thought the climate of Barbados line He found Rio de Janeiro hottest of all the places he visited. "I am looking forward to a line STOKER-MECHANIC CLARKE, who is undergoing training with the Bay Class Frigate Bigbury Bay, now anchored in Carlisle Bay. was perhaps the happiest man of the ship's complement when she dropped anchor at has spent four days at John'i Barbados on Wednesday evening. Aniig^a, arid five days at St. Lucia. Clarke was coming home to Since the Bigbury Bay'visit She left St. Lucii on Wednesday Ins Wel-h mother Barbadian here in 1949, she went home to morning for Barbados, father and sisters of Spooners. St. the U.K. and was recommissioned The name Bigbury Bay was John after he was awjy from the with a new complement of officers Riven her after a im island for 16 years. He was taken and ratings. She returned to BerCSSL J?!S2; to England by his mother when he muda ibout October 20, 1950. >. He "was schooled in EngAfter a two months' stay at Borland und worked at the mechanic's muda. she went on a cruise t.. trade before joining the British South America which lasted three -,;., months. She called at Cuba on UM "I am overjoved to be back way. as well as paid visits to home again to see my mother and Brazil. Uraguay, Argentine. Rio d > father und my olher relatives", he Janeiro and Montevideo and sailed ;-t ., i iv. 1.0(111 mile,ip tin' Arci/on. him as he was ton young i Trinidad and St. Lucia saw little when he left the island to reiol -| of her ^tien_she lect anything. The Bigbury Bay is here on hag second visit. Captain W. W. li Benlinek. O.B.E.. R.N.. is in com-, mand on this erulat. Thi Bigbury' Bay tint rime to Barfai a on August 8. 1949. under I.l I OnV mander G. RP. Goodden. R N. Nine Officer* Of the nine officers on thai ,,,. [.• O P. Sutton, Navigating Officer, and midshipmen R. W. Kent and P. P L. Wclb have been to Barbados before. Sutton was here with the Bigbury Bay in 1949 while the two midshipmen were ratings of Ihe Devonshire when she was here about two vears ago. The Bigbury Bay will be leaving Birbados on Wednesday for Pomte-a-Pieri e w here she •) ill spend the night lakinj II i"vl then she will sail for Trl a iive-dii\ visit. From Trinidad she will no to Grenada for five days and then continue to Jamaica. Nassau and Swannah. al eacn of which ports she has planned a week's stay. The Bigbury Bay hopes to be back at the AmericaWest Indies Station. Bermuda, by October 1. Her afataranlp, HJaLS. Burhead Bay. has been commissioned to relieve her on October 13 The Bigbury Bay will return to England nn October 26. after operating rMm the America-West Indies Station for about a year. Al The Station Stationed with the Blxhurv Bay at Bermuda Is the Flag Ship H.M.S. Superb, a cruiser. The ships do six months of cruising and six months at the station. During the cruising period, thev [ coast of the States and Canada. The main purpose of their being stationed at Bermuda Is for niving assistance in case of a hurricane. hat could Baal finding of some plac Speightstown 'buses to pat that the site could be used as a market. Ilifliriilt For fear there ahotlld be no misunderstanding, he wanted II to be known thai ii was r that this should be a hawkers from all over Ihi City. ,, m -i..w-. than driving to Cuml bul for those within the area from lnnd Square and walking to ma Busbey Alley. James Street. kc m T emple Yard. Milk Market and othei ne-iby ])|<(| S|| areas, where u difficult problem „ .„. ,. was presented for Ihe regulation 1 Comm i ron r '* of traffic and lot larUUtton I do not "J 0 !" 0 ^ Mi Victor Chase, supporting of Cumberland Bquars he suggosUon. said that he conVegetable v. .... V e hghway |s losed tO vi'hiui'.i ti. Bl lUng Iha highway bowren It St. Mary' ,. ;1 ptei.-. '.in i > i nl %  • %  from % %  ''"' mpbilnad of bj r %  Hinds, would cease ,• onri OBI lo TOmn i iniandod yard •>'"' wBi lo Dwrkol ..t Cun ri et for barland Square would be no ma %  %  Stomach crampl v,V/V*v,v*v^r.v,v/,^-/.vvv'.v//A'.v-i-,v'v*'/'/'//| HARRISON'S BROAD STREET SCALES — SHOP SCALES SCALES Hi". CAPACITY FITTED WITH -__ ., SEAMLESS BRASS PAN, COM >79 AA IT Fir-: WITH WEIOHTS #**." &f% &f KITCHEN SCALES 7 II. CAPACITY WITH STRONQ M \MI KSS TIN PAN COMl'l.KTK \Q ~tQ V. I III WEIGHTS WW-t I II • /.% //..// In,-,/,. Sl,,,l,s / . MESH WIRE Avorted width, ami Moah ilni I 1 %  to II") lor PUh Poll SI Win—lli-iixily Calvaniird HARDBOARD Tl llMin: PROOF WOOD SU BS TIT U TE :i/l thick sii.-.K: i v ii. s. HI. 12 ici.i W (hick Sh.-.-ls I x K mid ill l.'.l EXPANDED METAL IN SHEETS 4 v r—ASSORTED MESH Si*c*: Fn.ni %  /' I,. 2" ucniss narrow?*! purl of ilium..ml SIII.|I.MI im-sii. 1TOC wn.i. I IM) in II PRICES TO III NOT Mlllll.V COMPETITIVE Ht'T IIIHMTKI.Y ADVANTAOBOV8. VOI It i:\t,l lltns WILL BK APPRECIATED, HARRISON'S Hardware Dept. Tel 2364 m ntturs yV ~ .YOUR CHAJVCEI! Viail The General Hardware Supplies To-day FOR • PYREX WARE • ELECTRICAL GOODS including FOOD MIXERS • ENAMEL WARE Anil Many Othvr Itvms 5% DISCOUNT ON ALL CASH PURCHASES FROM Si.OO M'll ll#S Until Saturday August 18th GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES DIAL: 4918 Rickell SI. M.,rk..| W .. ii .1. .I. site propoui Ihe be" P<" (orwaTd. '..kr .heller. Ol course h. appr. laled Ihe Hopped,, UM". lejlre ol the Cornmisooner ol ne time with i Police lo hae mnmd ih.Br, tallini from ihe m hSird from Jhe old PubUc MarThi, nun wOJ ..n ket but to lorce th.I,„k.i >.' .... ..mm.latlou lor 150 to ioo into ihat buUdlni whk oroved ilM-lf .inuit..l.le in the wlU I I a irl past, woul.: be It vi-ry nr:,v.hnidn.,.ny moRI. ship on thopmon .11 ., the public III general II ould ih. provlB I %  ii.a.k.l .MI. I* Boinn analnsl Ihe .k.i-i..!.. a.|MU ', ,.,|,l. \ ....I -nl H • %  • rlveil ..' M-'ikel. nl. ..•..!. "f < nn . I.....1 Sini.ii.. CommlttM who had decided tmtn •• parklni ptoo, %  aiaiiitaiiB %  INSIST ON %  IH III*A CHOWS %  THEY ARE THE BEST OV.V,V/.V////////,V///A%V.'.'.V,''-'-'*V.'//.V.'-V.Ve'. Th*"r ii no ntwtf lor you to iu**i a|oniti(i| Oi.cotnlo'i Jiltsr mctl. %  liMAC, (ftnuritsd Mi|oiU) will briif you aWtk rsltsl Bf nutrilmn| tlur •! Mid m your ttomidi avrnth In moil -net It tha ciuta in th diltornlo'l. Modarn condioon, ttnin olian tiuia iiofnich dntoil' < -inn 1'iould not bt naalariail Hi,MAO qKVl r ntj a^ci* TO-DAY'S SPECIAL DELIGHTFUL AND DELICIOUS I -i uh pjint. Iiajiibu' Jif ii iodi) YOU NEED I H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. Agents <: if!lfc fi III ', II P A I I) M M. NISI A PRUNE CREAMS AT IMHIiMX SODA HHMAIN I '.*'.'.*-'-*-*-*-'-'--'-*.•.*-*•*•*-*-*-'•*-'' *x \m\m IHOPPER i(MI >MII MII4I HUM I illl > MARTKI.I, HRAMiV For jour sick Child or Inxlul minislurr ilsm SLICED BACON DANISH CAMKMBERT > Hi ESE ( IK K \tn P1NI HL'VI MARIKM BBAND1 i" 36e. *rand Mr. 1 .00 Per Tin 1.19 DANISH CKEAM CHEESE DANISH SAI.AMI &AU&AG1 SWIFTS VIENNA BAUSACI 3 CANADIAN RXO HEESE SOUTH AFHICAN nO JAM K W V DRY GIN BAHAMAS CRUSHED PINEAI'I'I.ImaMttm KMK Per Bottle 18r. | portion* Small Tint 2.1b. Tin prr Boll!.R2 I 41 43 1 IS Pi %  STAXSFELD. SCOTT4 CO. LTB. RECENTLY ARRIVED! EARTHENWARE II III,I "IM OIKI WIIITK CREAM and H'lllTK CREAM uiili FLORAL PATTERNS PLAIN WHITE I .. I. I'iece l-rited Separ.ili'U —Thus m.itsi'u K.'|il:n.'ineiils l.n CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10. II. 12. 13. Broad Street



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I'RID.H U GUST 17. 1951 BAKBAIH)* ADMHATr TUtQ A MB O L 3 PAQI THRKE PUERTO RICO roSarieanfs Village Playing, MANUFACTURE ^ WUi „£% Jfe&fa* CORTISONE PUERTO RICO. August 14. Yet another OSW IndU I to PlMTtO Wco. Thi* tune it b iifacture "f i drug used against arth!: %  d mvcry o| n in | nf material, abundant recently aiinounThe Christ Church Vestry will toon be erecting a pavilion Serjeant*! Tillage Playing Field. It was originally estimated thai this pavilion would coet $9,600. The present cost is now estimated tu be $10,800. Tbs Vastly, :t their rncetinJ be fort h coming He isld thai in* .inn. received a contrector would IIKto I letter from th.' Colonial Office in un early data it bs bed Uv bicll the Financial Secretary asgranted the tender or not l n\\ SENATOR DIES AT 43 After Shooting Himse// is red jointly by American Syntai KmVt> nwmber> that ths pflwrn. iiigga rt i d thai they conn. ment w..ld make Sn ."idilion.i! BWSrd M tinHniSM at that Incorporated. Svntex S.A. rid Chemical Specialities Incorporated of New York Kraut to the Vest! } Additional cost of S5.010 which /aS t • two !• %  ca d—i died on the optntlni table from computation! of the postrsttve condition, Ho had been i|, e at the im-iin il surgical centre since £{. the night of Aui'us: 5th when an snasrgetM i opsrstlon mi Hurricane Relief formed for a bulls) wound selfIn dealing with the question ,f inflicted following a irgular Sunppointtng a Cbalrmsn ol the da > "'•*! broadcast. n.:. the Ing Vsatrt dsctAsd to writs .he fcoioJ?£*fc o^ruSosT-l?ratt %  S fi" d,,u Gerafdo Ma/rTa^ ,n IM* hairdio<( Slirr0 undcd by lesdi >un(UDtn people's Party of iu,h h. was President. As soon H hunThe Uiscovory wag mad.. _. laboratories of Syntcx S.A. of nd Mr. Fted Godriurd. M.C.I*.. Hurries rp of Lnvsegtmovsd thai the londsi foi buildfound tliat on t of tint mn the pavilion, which constituents In the Isit meeting was nw.irded I H Dtanutacturs of synthetic CurtisArthur Evelyn, contractor, be conore eonld beasily extracted firmed. from the roots of vain grown in Mi Bvelynl tender of S9.93f Mexico. This yam is not fit was the lowest lor human consumption bo the Vestry. Th* other tenders It Is expected that the production were for SII.TGO. sia.seo and of Cortisons by the new process $15,360. win shortly b,started in Puerto According lo the revised eatl, Rico at the plant or American mate, the Playing Field, complete WUTM-X-I'II Gae* ana r. J* ih Incorporated at Hato Rej with pavilion, will cost $18,935. Itotehtia. at DemOa EtaaS Oni.t " ths eoiBea would De t (A-to Ray). . The original estimate was $13,925 Ct-uiii, Ru r omn. M. c a av %  I Mnell Coast. Sanl i OfrWel Mi ft A FlUOetald o uii Tat ran. Damaa* A**.-**"!*" -king for an ms aa early as possible. G C Won! ol Warn*.. V %  %  : %  lirt Ormmunon <>lh,-i .ipp>rti,i •lanUtlan. SupoH OAWr. Mr W M.i";i H.0. Sllr dreds of his adherent-, men and women, w HV Iwspltal's lawns heard the D) arapl openli over ths passing of the United Stairi Erecting the pavilion will — According to Dr. I, V. SolUn* of $10,800; enclosing the fleld $1,820. .,„ Chemical Specialities ;££ glng a new suck $350. The sun 197.88 hai %  Irsada bssri psn) % %  % % %  %  aesdaai ni Si i 1 iwi $637 41 i'-i*t.dfi.io Mi > ii Hi atom* OS turnilUJ In water and roads. *^ H Mr *J;; gyg^"^^*^?; Change ol Estimate Mr. C. B. Biandfoui said that he did not as*) why they should ith the erection of the povtnon iKK-aiise. as he understood fi-om Mr. Ooddard. ir within V. %  nid not accept the tender. Mi Evelyn could change l is figure. Mr E\elyn hould be allowed t<> make a start became the Cost of material was IncreosYork and President of American i Puerto lUoo, ihnew Is the necesT-I _. slty nt having t.. dsPSOd exclus,.„ levelling the field i Ively on raw material from animal SOUKS! T he pr' Cea s is much simpler than any i io and it is believed that it will open up U. thousands of sufferers the use of Cortisone I itities and at a price and probably much less than the present one. ,''* *"""1 political leader. It was | ferred to the Nation.I Capitol building where it Will lie in sUle. pending funeral arrangement:. %  i bs made In the next 24 houis I'.P. in largo quant Hie* % %  • than. Coniniunist Youths "Vi.— W itliin \\l0S10U >li:ikr^taiulurd Oil Refluerj BATON ROUOE, I-ouii:ma August 16. I An explosion which rattisd! windows and awaked sleeping! residents ID homes five miles I rocked the Stand.-id OU ould BERLIN. August B/i %  lUrlln police rushed t daily They have a Playing E.st-West border as Communist Reilnery m North Baton Rouge. Field Committee and nothing has youths masked at three point* Suite city police rushed la IBS — done without the Commit\ -. [Q an i"e'lner> .': % %  %  tofrn iiston Rouge reported ,. blue grey '*"'" % %  %  "' %  atvyrsJ *ous. eolumn of smoke .i-im; from th* ands him stni t..i members of the huge refinery, "Fie.* QsrVflJUl Vouih eri*-oncentrstsd within Wesl BerUn usai the Soviet sector bordsr. The youth were massed at the Plata where %  British and United Rtatt meet In the American occupied NiukoellnV.P. toowlsdes, Ttu if leased so that they i AiixANoniA. Egypt. Aug. id. maK i( sl .,n. nlster.l .. i c. l i El IJin Pasba, denied itporii 1 that so far they bad taken everv Ih* precaution to account t. InthowUI l(1 ent for the fundThi j ouncil U, m reason why the Vestry should lunction lo lift the Sue? Canal not believe that th.' • M. WOUkl bS iinlhcominK. t . in submitting the tlrst e^tm.ate. Salah El Dm also dented Uiat „„. vestry made It clear to Gov' %  % %  %  "'" %  I i : I N1 --' arnment that this was subjeci t that American Oil companies in r ,. vl llin Arab MM rod T hc BaulS SU l Village Playing to hall thou oil production unless f*, C |,i n ad MSU ac.i-pt.-n hi i-"isisntesd that nr part ol .-,,,!.and Qovsn Nrael. further and at their last meeting In the Mouse of Assembly given ** c lUoo gjrlni Grille will be cut into ,, "• '.". UN aovernor-ln-atecutlvs ComM1)1 hl Ulll(l a MilU ., hunt fo rbs \pinion killed two men at the relii:.*r> and caused damBgS estimated at $300,000. W H Cotton, Junior. Public Reiutiotis Director for Standard Oil said rfie blast badlv damage! IhrSa 17,090 gallon UUUU and two distillate tratlng unlla. HITLER'S YACHT FOR SCRAP HEAP BORDENTOWN. New Jersey Aug 1* Adcfi Hitler's $4.ooo.ooo htcti the Couot % % %  i 'tic land sltel foi anslly adopt Arsb usgua Seers, church Veal lm Anan P aha M( ., M ,, n; ,i ,|„, y had never u!-" i' %  made a Islse move In the mstter 0 i j Sirs Becrstar) assured k.y would uphold are there Christ Church, then' III the S i lefaat! " ,,,,,„, why the money should nut the Si % %  / on il blockedI'.P. il> t< net pioKramme. t r Nine Easo workers were Injiirtsa] and -three or four" tnUrosH hurt The tire raged ihi.iuKh gasoline and tractor fuel t tank! and blanketed the country-I with black greasy smoke. until It was controlled two houn and 45 minutes after the ex %  %  %  LOOK YOUR BEST %  %  %/ TRY IT! /fate tie modern DryYeast\ way ,>' t NEEDS NO REFRIOERATION-AS IASY TO USE At OlD-FAfHIOMID PIRISHABLI YEAST e W.th Fln-rhmnnn's wonderful new Drv Yeast ~yoo em, hsk* delicious buna and roll* ai at all. PleiKhmnnn's Stays fret* for wrefca. If vo\i hake at home— k'ep a big supply on hand. Get Fhvhm.ru. ihy YOH today. For your Haalth't laes--lry Flriwhmnnn' dissolved in fruit niirr, milk or water. Like foil yeast, it helpi tone up your system. SO IASV TO USf i titi) lukrwaim'walrr I. L*t >tand 10 mlnutn Sin When dUantvrd, .mpackaf equal* anr Every spoonful gives you /tydsapp/yoff/?3/H/-tite#j/Mx/?ts/wfice Tell me doctor. U DAI no • 1 .r/ ipoon' b o! %  Kpk'' livai ru a rich tu V pt,ol -.'immiAwdO. • Thaw vtt>" • Is '!"• kssse ahsU be kafjarj grriiu-iil.il %  I grnllr oil deln at! ti"U-'-. iKiii-iioi-'.tion iI |irelrraLI>. -hould o<.l Main elolh" or ilir .k,„. %  IVllol initiisvsrj saa of leeei saasshasas. Uastlassa) ISIBBUS, %  Dwttor .an be Mferj wad ea avae "-r> reeeg eaVtMm DETTOL THE MODERN ANTlSErTiC FOOD FOR i IIOl 4.111! Re THE HIGH COST OF LIVING The burning question oi the Day is how to survive the High Cost ol Living and what a worry this is to you. dear Reader Every month you lind yourself in ever-increasing difficulties You simply can't make two ends meet. This question is ot vastly qreater importance to you than the "Black Pact" that Britain concluded with Cuba, the Persian Oil Dispute or even Trinidac's recently announced Immigration Policy because it affects those nearest and dearest to you. An oven more serious matter is at hand, involving as it does increases in the Cost of Living, and we ask you to give it urgent and earnest thought. There are people in our midst who. with good intent but without realizing the serious consequences to you. are endeavouring to cut off a valuable source of supply oecause of Racial policies of the present South African Government. These people say "STOP DEALING WITH SOUTH AFRICA", because of this Racial Policy. Wo tell you that there are many thousands of South Africans of European descent living in South Africa who are not In favour of the present South African Government's policy. These South African people are fighting in South Alrica 'tooth and nail' against the Racial Policies of the Government and so are the two well-known and influential South African newspapers "Cape Times' and "Cape Argus". The South Airican Government is well aware therefore of the opposition to its policy. We point out further that the Australian Government prohibits the settlement in Australia ol any Coloured person: In the Southern States of the U.S.A., the negro suffers humiliation because ot Racial Discrimination .... It has never been suggested—and indeed how ridiculous it would be to suggest, especially in times like these when food supplies are difficult to obtain.--to refuse to buy Austral an and American foods and other goods EQUALLY RIDICULOUS AND SUICIDAL AND TO NO PURPOSE WOULD IT Bi: TO CUT OURSELVES OFF FROM SOUTH AFRICAN SUPPLIES. Let us tell you something you may not know about South African Trade with the West Indies. South Africa buys Lime Juice. Arrowroot, Spices from the West Indies and enquiries were received this Year for thousands of tons of Sugar which, because of the West Indian Contract with Britain, could not be entertaii ed. En -uirieK were also received lor GINGER, which, if grown io a much greater extent, would prove lo be a valuable export ol Barbados. It takes 18 to 19 days only to get goods from South Africa directly to Barbados. It takes 6 weeks and more lrom Australia South Alrica is within the Sterling Area which means that supplies from that country COST LF.SB than similar supplies lrom Canada and other Dollar Areas—because of the much higher value of Canadian Currency in relation to the pound Sterling, This is particularly noticeable in the case of CANNED FISH of which South Africa is now supplying to Barbados many thousands of cases of excellent PILCHARDS. These Pilchards are sold at 22c. per I lb. tin and 38c. per 1 lb. tin as against CANADIAN SALMON at 66c per 1 lb. tin and 36c. for I lb. South Africa has supplied ONIONS and POTATOES at a time when 'hesc staple foods were unobtainable elsewhere. South Africa supplies us with CANDLES. MOTORCAR TYRES, WINES. CANNED FRUITS. JAMS. CANNED VEGETABLES. CUSTARD POWDERS. JELLY CRYSTALS. DRIED PEEL. ESSENCES, FRUIT JUICES AND SQUASHES, and the very imporlant item ot CANNED FISH, all of excellent quality and at very much lower prices than similar goods, from elsewhere. A glance at the Map will shew that in case ol War, South Africa would be the only Sterling Country that could supply UB with foodstuffs. A shipment of South African Butter will be arriving In Trinidad soon and will sell for close on 20c per lb. lesB than the current price of Butter. The fact is that South African goods, because of quality and bargain prices, are of immense value to us in Barbados and to all other West Indian Colonies. South Africa's Canned Products (Jams. Fruits. Fish) are very popular and in great demand Irl many countries of the World and certainly South Africa would have no difficulty in diverting her Canned Fish, which Wes! Indian Dealers have secured for us. to Great Britain. WE NEED SOUTH AFRICAN GOODS MORE THAN EVER BEFORE to help relieve you Mr Reader of the financial strain imposed by the Cost of Living, and WE ASSERT WITHOUT EXAGGERATION THAT the Cost of Living will mount steadily higher and higher il you are deprived oi them. TIMES ARE DIFFICULT. YOU ARE SUFFERING AND GROANING UNDER the Load—the High Cost ol Living—There fore. DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE OF "CUTTING YOUR NOSE TO SPITE YOUR FACE". THE FEEDING OF YOUR FAMILY AND OF YOURSELF SHOULD come before all Political Issues, particularly those ol other Countries, over which you have absolutely no Control. IT IS IMPERATIVE IN YOUR OWN INTERESTS TO TRADE WITH SOUTH AFRICA. )ust as it is to trade with Australia and with the Southern States of America. We cannot afford in these days lo be deprived of ANY SOURCE OF FOOD; SUPPLIES. WAKE UP BARBADOS TO REALITIES! FIGHT THE GOOD FIGHT FOR YOUR FAMILY!! w\ ^ +i$$&&S3&&**$&$ZiZZ HULL & SON Z f2 i Z 2 2 ***!OR*****#^#



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PAG! M\ BARBADOS ADVOCATE I'KIIIW. M (.1 --r 17. 1951 HFNRV DO NOT DESTROY PUBLIC PROPERTY BY CARL ANDERSON 7—r cS^^t^jwS^BjTwjneT^ SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credi' customers for Thursday to Saturday only VITACUP" FOR HEALTH The natural way to KEEP SLIM AND FIT If you raduni %  irui you keep yiicm dfinuo ,-i impuntir( tMtiol tc*i* by dial Bile Bean. .vnily and cir Bilr Beam ur Kccpinj million t %  .mj vouihlul in look* Start ukina: them %  Gentle Aid BILE BEANS '.%%'.'. .','.;'.',' r '.-,:,-. ,*,-,,v ^ ; : : ; Get These Tiatj I Delights For Your I k Enjoviiient ;: -lb tin Danish Vl.im ., Swift s Luncheon Bwf ,. TIlBM Sausage ni.tclt Buthf Sauce Tin s Lamb TonfuM I ..: I i cuits ., Salted Peanuts ., Sliced Bacon AND OVR POPl'LAR live Star Rum — MS Bot •: INCE & Co. Ltd. I IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE Usually NOW 80 HO Usually Now PEEK FREAN'S CREAM BISCUITS ONIONS 4 lbs. for any two packets for 102 110 EVAPORATED MILK (2 tins) 58 M POTATOES 6 lbs. tor 90 Tl 26 •21 CHEESE 73 U D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street CHILDREN PLEASED WITH THEIR 1 FAVOURITE BOOKS!! #.## ifitiii lulil, • %  •, tinniin mill Mfl^fl slumIII I In(ill I mi ill prr lb Fre-di Oat llakrt, prr lb TIVMO nun Ttmm rWkM 211 V* .. Per* • %  Bahama Plnrjppl Plrm. TtM Bahltna (m.hH Hat •ipple SVA IAL* 8 of. tin* 1'rarrr HullRUr Maiicr In lliimuVan lloutrn't Drlnknn Chocolate prr lb. or ii I lb. tin*. Bat*. Drmerara GMMftMl PktkV Caincmbrti < hi 8 •>. Phia. stoned Date* '/,* ALLEYNE AIM III It A .. I i,l voi it i.itonits !•! %  Wi %  !• lii IT HI: MXII r YOIH I:\I..\TI-: MM Mil YM MM III It* SPECIAL III VI .y// f w^<.v.v.v jW .. J .^..,,,,. n -. r n ooonrj wn nowm u*m———m—w990K.



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rr.inw AUOUST IT, IMI BARBADOS ADVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS. rrmM ? ALFS FOK ntw Mlittmfc-. fW*. i.eek TI ft l'\.l TUCPHom MOB IH Ml %  %  mi Cniyi. ALTOMOTIW Ti. mu p*. | Minlmhm rhd'o* In-day for M roid %  : : %  ton -KII • in perfect con3 Acre* ..I good 4 I—M Model M w-rlr,! apply M M..-.-H TBUACI T.. an approve.! modern MIWrtM Apg*> on piwiMa n %  Apply ... I • *' II Farm... Phnnr P4BBT I -LIB On A iiuat IT. IM| a( hi. reaidnr> J"wtl>li. Jana Waller l.e.11* funeral wilt leu.e the above re*i%  :*nee at 4 p m todav for t'hapel A-faII"a Laal'i %  ..., Ruitv lean* and Mn B-eee • Daughter*, i 1 0II.O.. A. |M. > •MM Gar.,,. M.g.„ %  • I ill Coaino1-ne DUI IT %  SI In IN MFMOKI \M CARIMS Kn-er Sakton dononly W %  vw.flition FUBT KilYAI. BRAOB LTD Teleph...* 4S04 IS %  M n I'-loriiutuut uMl Brrtt V ___ 1 • M 3rt roB BAtr l>B EXCHANGE 0.r IW Home %  <.ov*rnm*nt Hill area Kin in*nUy auitabl* largl-h family .IIHJ*M ..change ..nailer piar, „,, ,, ** "' •* %  c " P"* Bueepllongl and ,.*nuin* o ( .| dvanl*g*"'* Ujl it.i i I I i L v .. T [j ttra a l.rcugh mpunaibV \. >fl*r i p i.. dailv u %  || %  COW Bnad . flood aea-Mthlng A.ailabl* from It Orioher pi !" „„ BKLBV HAwnNOB 4 bedroom*. J wui .(. all — .... — AMuil IK Raal eternal grant O Lord And Irl light parpftiii %  .i h • %  en. Charlra. Ororg*. ChraMtrl. Mr* Cflnatalvr King I I II i mii.m M MM I from ASPBO Coldi ami flu dlapallad haadachra clarrd->ooiMn> *m iclioi in ni Rheumatic and Nm*alie Pain* NarvlnrM Slf*p:nmi Lai ASPBO MOM to your aid NOW -• t il-lOn tAH IMS PlM ,;, h v ".OIULII K M HMiab| P Badhird i i"ii> tm*. c is i si ^. l MOTOR CYCLE 1 %  I, ,, BSA [food a. naa { Jon, on|> bifgcT Oil* THcphoii* AUCTION STATION INDEK THE SII.VKK HAMMKK D C HI GAB rHi>mni*ndatlOii of Uloydl AaWi -^ -ill H.11 M PBIDAV tlir |1 a %  31-4n ii f ij-ik Crvaui luda i — II JO orlork at Ihr fi Mi ll..nin C Won* i.k !<> %  Au,.l %  only rumiahrd %  'i noYCT. Ml III ONB n HMsunt (,...„ -, M on b. idr at HnkHi. o'rlork IT %  M-3n i,7H bouai i Oanrui Tijii kb M -,i 60VUNMENI XOIKIS IV : I.M S, P MUM Prict-d U. .%  %  %  ; i i a si in A CO Bndfa n. .. *. nv ..>.k T.:i: UJJ1 >> %  : \M,I TROTMAN CO. Vii. in mills MADI M mwutf aithin a da* If imaa. Panti. Short*, A LadlaV S'acki Gujianirod III ami H'orkmanihip ltc\ Hlfh llrrrl Pliono 43S9 4 B M-Mi. ELECTRICAL L'N'DER THE DIAftOND HAMMEK HAVE tirTN iil nn-lrd by the %  tXCTMC T< pri n.i Mai HOLIDAY RESORTS Gr*nada-HI of %  pl.* flANTA M/.HIA -.ovjllart hotel In Caribbean Rain from 17 00 pai par day. GRANO HOTEL In h*M mldontlal dlttrwt ur -. Mil lutri Iron. (3M per haad pT d*T. 8EASIDR INN On Grand Ann Rathln( Beach Ral from C4 On par haad per day Enq.lrlei I'VE RADIO CAT J %  . %  lach of the new IBS! SI l*>c Radio. i'nd faiiiiK i..!m ni'..in v will be mailed Id you without obllaallon. for U" lahlng No *lcri.n will call Mall it : Hrrmrj r %  BOX Ftridarlowa 15 a 51—*i TAKE NOTICE POST TOA STIES in \i. poon OOHFOIIATION %  %  %  bad Statea of H IIII.II*-.. addr><> i> I-KI P..I<< Avi-iiuc. N>w York. Hi | tinned Bute* of America. V KM applied for (he nvKlr.ilion of a i r.ip*ct of cereal toodi. ami lillcd to reffiitar tn* lame aftrr one IBth day %  ,., %  nil i tm.' IMH:I i %  nt dupii %  %  ik can be offer. Dated IhU aifi dav of Aufu.l, 1*1 H V.-ILIJAMH. of T. ..1. M-rk. i a si—an TAKE NOTICE JELL-O I NWLAL foODS COBPORA%  i.\ . Untied Slaiei M Arnn,-. u,-% i. rv . ..... . trrde mark In PM1 'A rrapevt ( looda and mricdiciiU of fond: %  i idoiiii powderi. lea cream powdara. • ctetrn ml.. Ircnnr mix. frail %  *>. and will be rut it led W . % %  lie 10th day of Audki-t IMI ii'ilraa aomr parSOt aMil HI Ilk glva rotl.r in dupllcaif to ma at ny rcfJatTkttan, Tne tradr mark can be aeen on applKatlon Dated thu sin dav of Augurt. IUI H WIUIAMS. HMM IB a si TANS—Cilina; ..i )d De-k nr to-dav nnd krep %  IH>1 kl Col la ft Co I lit trtcal Dap. „ SI „., IlMTkll IkONBB. J„ M ,, lv(d t^nm Eiectn. Ironing Machine. Irom She*... Shin*. ColUr.. Dm-n air The complM* horn, Ironer Dial 3fl7a Da Coau *4 Co.. Lid. Electrical Dept II a SI -*,. 1 r CO Carag* „, Wedi.rUas n W | Ul* Ungl Amnat al 1 o'clock. One IMT r.d V. I .ir -HI, eat! |M from p.,, damaffd b> accident, but Hie pngin* Ii ar.d the lym %  >%  DABCY A SCOTT T ... t I.I i I HH .1 HIV,. Fl'RNITVKK OrnCI CHAIRS J U ,| rec.lJ a .hipment of Offlee Poatur* Chglra with three point adjuitaa*ni Boa lh*n today ai T Gaddri Grant Ltd.. or Dial 4443. I a 51— tJ n. MJSCEU^\NEOUS UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER ON TUESDAY IUI bv order of ..^ Rsecufora to the Eatate of the late Ulu M.rv g; Slmpaon w* will irll I Furnitur* at Wavrrly. Eonubelle wh Include. Round Ttp-Top Table. Upright Tub (hair.. Rorkcn. Setter. Cou.i WHting and Ornaf* n i Table*, Louni ell in ttahugmny Ola., and China. Tea Omamenta. Mpo.11 'Imi kiln IAMBI v BU KITS |0~ „ ( rm .„ ||( ire ..1 I11. ir Ba %  IS a SI In H..I1.1 M...J.I %  OAItVAmnO SHEETS HM M Knur* M H na each Tfl as 44 each %  (( P. II each At Ralph B*ard !._.. BJn Street |j a j, ^ KOSSOL1AN We have Ko-.,llan" Ptultjy Tonic In atock reconwnended for v Ducki and TurtWYi. and aaanu In the Egg production r 4 a boil Knighf. Ltd II a 51 n Kl'FtBU-CKA W* aln have • Ku ura" In ilork. an absorbent dre. >r Aninuli Knlgtir. 1.1,1 IT a siPrMa, Drntamg Table Sinle Brd.tr^d -.1*1 VOM S|>rmg. Bedild* Table. L-dy Ikt-k and Arm Chair. Mo. u Chair all In Mahoganv Single iron rr oagtaad, Medicine Cabuwi. Canvaa Cot, MM I Top Table. Btep ladder 1-Burner Florence OH Stove and Oven. Trunk*. Screen and nther Item* Sal* II 30 o clock Tern. rlRANKrR TROTNAN A CO, IT M I'im.ll MM II is, Tn r*nf* per aoaia lln* c.a u>*ek-dab> awd 1) *(• p*r opal* line on Sund**! mlnlmifn chara* (| %  on w*tk-4*f and |l %  on Sunday. NOTICE 11 -• Manic. a th* Motor Vcaie railed bv the n1 nor th* ron-lgncei VELVn l\HV dining I, 1 BECORDS' Charlie Kiln: and w* will order fi invent lot II lr. rtock A Ding. Swing NOTICE WAVTMI lEBY GIVIJSmat the of th."ember, of r.f per month Apphcanl mu.l llv. 3 mil*, of City ApplIn perann I m nny day except Saturday! JOHNSONS STATION EH Y COM-'ANlOrf for middle age lady Apply r O BOM 143 17 11 si I f n \nm-NKR K.uerienrrd Gardener pr'feialily one who aUo could etv n rheuffeur indlipenaable food talary and lunch A|>plv Medmenham. Pine Bill IT B SI In FURNITURE AUCTION Wefinrsdny. 22nd Aumi.t at 11.30 a.m. Mr J C !. %  A 1 %  hold FrTeci %  %  Tip.Top Dining Table. 4 Dinlnf Chain. Tea Tr-> ...%  .%  nig T.I.. : Writing Deak BldabOOfd Coffee Table. Drrwinl Table | < nudra *nh cmhion*. Draulna; Table wtlh 1-irga round Mirror and Stun!. Wardrobe lC*tH Lli.e.1 nth full Unanh %  Badaade Table, Standard Lamp [j THE ABOVE IN MAlHKiAr.Y I tiding Card 1 ,1. i. i . i %  %  %  I-.. Arm la Suite with Cuahion*. I'ire Coffee Table uilh Bool I KedlnBr*n> i" Mabog Cat*. Ml H 1 : rikaill. 1 %BMH Deep Sleen M.ttie*. | AM." Olajaaoaiai Heat Man*r %  a Tea pou, Elec Clock. } .. Kettle, Elec Stove •CanaiI Cu rt ErifOUh Ele.2 m oldi. -i I Btova und Oven. Enamel • e Small Kitchen Table, larder. Mlar ServanC. Fumi. .-.her interegUrm atj ;h. fun CATBI ON FALL Or HAMMXH AUCTIONEERS Mmtmhim BiM.ofj. icm. A r S. F V A. Phone 44I) Plantuliinis RuildinK BARBADOS TURF CLUB PAYMEIifT OF PRIZES 6d. Consolation, Cash PritCf, 2 Stand Sweep. Purl-Muluel „iifl FoncBai Competition Prizes "ill IKpaid on anil fioin Monday 20th instant. and Serial Priyes on and from Monday 27th instant. Payment will be from 12.00 noon to 3.00 p.m. daily G. A. LEWIS. Secretary17.8.51—211. N m i %  H %  : %  Had .01 be held on Balurdav. the IMh dav of An|u*l lttOl. nl the above named ofnee at 3 p m I". IIi-,it To lb* Board Mil I.INGTON. NOTICE other wit* known a. DRt'STIIJA AUIERTINF CAKTEIf NOTICE IS HCRF.IIY G1M-. perumi having anv debt or claim ngmr l..e Eatate of AlbeitlnCarter I-I..,.I. known a. DruwMla Albertliv* Carter, late of MrClean't Ijnd Brlttom Croaa Boad Saint Michael, who died in I 1 the th dav of Se|.1>".b< i IbSn inle-l.le ilora of their claim, dul. Eirtic* Maxwell BhIKtone. of No IT. ii. Bridgi'town. the qualified admuo.in.tor of the uld ntale on oi before the IMh dm/ of faapti % %  after ih.it date .".Ml proceed to dm tribute the awt* of II. .1 ..1 the partlr. entitled Iherrlo having regard only lo the cUIrn. ol which I BMll th.it have had notice and that 1 will not be liable f.ir uei. % %  > dlitrib.t, ,t .. part thereof lo ad] i if whoae debt or ctjim I .hah not UVM have bad notice And all pet| to the *aid MUM If their account* with BM "rlUi Dated thl. ttlh dav of Jul*. list E V SHHJCTONF King.T l—4n RATES OF EXCHANGE GraMtnar Sehavsl. St. Vincent Applications are invited fc the posts, of Scieiu-v MaMei Matheinulical Master, and %  M % %  :. : ii,-'.,: 2 The Mathematical Master will be required to teach Mathematics, and the Scient,. Maitei 10 leacci chemistry and Botany up to the Higher School Certificate Standard. .1 Applicants should be Graduates or holders of the Irnffl ArK or Inter Science or Iflgbtr Si-hBOj Certitlcate*. The salancnrTereii are: .'I FI.I ci..,, In. ,!,--. (1 Hi, ,,.. sse to silo) For Inter Arts etc. $1200 by |72 to $1440. The commencing; salau.s win depend on experience and standard of work. 4 Ability to lake charge of the -iwill be taken Into consideration. 5 Application should reach Ihd K.in.atlon Office as sexm .,. P"s iMc, M rgic successful candii.iies will l expected to assume duty at the beginning II W. Web.'. B M L A SocieI hone tua 14U .1 f II I I ;.'e','e'e*e*,-e--*e-,-,-e-e'e*e->'.*.',*e-e-e^ > J 11 nder the aiupiceti of the N Leeward AMoclativn of *v < ultural Societies) Tn-Day\ (i. A. Song %  vI uBVfi You" "I love you I do" That's what every woman says when Gas Cooker! A LECTURE will be given l,\ — Mr. I.IONH, III T< IIINSON i House of A--cmbly. Author of "Behind The Mace"). -IK CONRAD REEVES. K> it the NPEICillTSTflWN I.IKKARV MONDAY. August ;tii VW/,'.W,W,W.V.V.-, -.-,--•" ARE (OKI'IAI.I.V INVITr.l> Attention is drawn to the DeIrol of Di uj; .nxl Patent %  'nl 1'iupnetaiy Medicine IMces) Order. IB5I. No. 14 which will be publtshBd In the Official Gatette of Thursday 16th August. 1951. Under this Order the Articles: — Al a-nl Alopher. PitU Beechnm's Pills—Pearl coatej Bet aple kin Met.,XIII Hetaxin Tablets Dtftol Ft-i inl-plaln Fi'i lul-i >.ui|nmrnl IrrBdol "A" [gal K M.,lt and Oil %  AataBfjpttfJ Lysol Nek,, S...IP i'; Pnlatol-plaiii I'alatiiUi-iinimunil Phuspherine tfiimi Kingdom) Phj ii,mi %  %  baVB >*i'u tieli'lcd ill their entirety from the Defence (Control .t Drug and Patent and Propriet.,iy Medicine Prices) Order 19''I No. 7. 17.8.51—in rporalro I9ZI nOEBLCK STRUT -'.'////.'/,"'.'.'.*-',W//AW///,W, SiiiitiS If AM tit 1 U tt htli m 4 I />/.#.•; tttt i II txi,-ttoo M st m:s Attractive, Comfortable. Economical /,v.v*y/-v/.w '--,-V-. ', *,-, '. r ',','S,' r ',',





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PU.l I K.IIT HAKHXDOS ADVOCATF FRIDAY U (.1 M |7. mi Barbados Turf Club Sixpenii) Consolation Sweep 3rd 4th 5th 8lh 7 t*i 8Ui .3th %  inih ltth ltlh 201 h Mud %  271h 29th Hii %  •tih 5th Blh 7th Blh l*i ii 10th. nth nil. 141). 16th 16.h 1811. lfHli 21 Si %  24th 25lh 26th nth 28th Ml I %  Mir 1st 2nd Srd 4l)i 5th Cth 71b 8th ltth 10th Uth 12th iSih 141 15(1. 16th ltth I Nth 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23 rd ttth 25th MOl 27th 28th 29th 30th 2nd 3rd 4lh Mh 8th 7th Bth 9th imh u:h 12th 18th 14th 15th lOih 17th 18th 20th 21st ttrtd ttrd J4th Utfa JfJih jTth L'fftli J9lh :toth %  8342 9455 4. M %  1100 4381) ISM %  ' •MO axtt tw HI 13 %  3448 00 .:( 'i'44 8642 MOO %  1644 %  %  i i M 4740 2161 • I 8032 4348 I I.H4I ',585 I I:IH 3876 %  B84fl 5417 HM B11 9647 i no %  SMO 5415 tt 4SSI 8115 1244 1850 8)74 8178 il M 7 1104 5005 4537 %  A925 ,140 on loo no HO l"l M 00 sn mi 30.00 20.00 %  20 00 io mi 10 IN. 10 00 10 00 .. %  I 10 N 10 00 10 00 10 00 10 00 10 oo io on 10 on %  %  io on 10 00 in oo 10 00 I in (Ml I in. no 1411 "38 IH.01 4!h 7183 3319 Mi ;3: 79C7 6trt o 152(1 MM MM 1 %  5Mh 11 111 5520 1406 !H7I Hlh • l.Mli 0170 H IRtli 4154 • ::m j:M2 1571 I8th . 475 4561 ;ih 2887 2576 34gs 0116 !635 9469 641(1 1261 Urd MI, .... Mlh Mil I0J4 ,i, 446'. i Ho 1140 3mn 4M0 .'.193 A OMa-1 %  nil 00 80 no 60 00 10 M 30 00 20 00 M N 2(1 III* %  20 00 moo io oo 10 00 10.00 low ball iii N ..,. 10 00 wal in oo io oo \\IM)\\AMDS IK H.I) COLLEGE TO DRAW n Collage and the Windward kj .vhen the first football mat*: hoolo Tournament ended at the Ho UlUia. A fair crowd w a relied the match which pn i C. TuckU K (ii it!ith and C Smith scored one each foi H.irC I %  Windward Islands K"' H. Au pel J. Mclntyre and I. Franklvn. SnuppersDran Springboks Routed rotn p>|. I %  W ill. College BTted, I %  %  hell with He Cant %  beard hr lauw I %  •a good %  %  HOWJII With 1 'though Hutti.n was • %  after | %  risen ( oUao* bi IttV king the bJ into tinrfghl Rynseelel tie *M II.. Over l hundred people nP u flWB y Iron the Wind rowded UK I pta BM hhUUl wn r Bhon A iff ate < xcrll| wing Kicked in (he water polo match of the anaoi , At half time the wore %  na II..IIIOI, collese v .< thrilling five-all <| TO eJlLAN LtADER CONVICTED KJ %  /erthmw %  new of Puerto Rico by %  fuUty nf II 1? com ''.: against %  %  Commu%  .inprison%  %  ... %  I'JWI. Juan Y'Toro *' I T. MOKE* •*( IM \tRII A .--j., I.*!*, Kniiaati f Hn>i u I .i .-< Bin.!.... Gums Bleed! 10 00 II III 10 00 10 00 .:t 3414 • 3907 0491 %  1047 8431 I 4814 0303 5670 0358 0658 NOT 7241 71 IK 7HHK *.*> 0.161 MM 3210 006J 9803 i76 1*130 r,:t!"i 5186 !l:i.IQtJO r.5u:i 8283 5384 224i MM 0810 0938 Ink. Ml 23413 Ml 84U1I IViUI. 5361 !KI2K MM 7031 5660 9175 9603 8843 • 6584 MTI 7516 7106 5803 8838 5387 3416 4836 ITM OMI 6416 B170 745*3 1125 7035 71!*H 111 1 00 on 4th %  M '"1 Ml. BM 6Ui 2586 10 N H %  n Bll. 7630 M '0 9th %  lOUi 1018 %  II 00 lllh :, I HII 00 no '.720 10.00 lili 6547 1411. Ill Oil ifilh 3743 10 (Ml Itttl, t ltth (>88l 10 06 18th IM1 III 00 1 3002 io on :*nih 7614 10 on MM %  1139 io on 0871 Ml IHI 24th 1042 10 00 25lh 5788 io 00 i th %  in no U ISM 10 00 2811. 2510 10 00 %  'it, 4574 10 00 : U) in on 0287 *5W7 B 1374 8795 •HiHI 5371 1469 1441 2668 4764 I M 7?i3U 7781 0040 7594 B4M 2UHt 878!S 8112 0MB 6Ho2 tOM 6028 ;iii-2 0411 4701 I1M 3409 *i 4li i" 60(Mi 10 M .'ii 0 I i-' 2nd 4!h 5th Ath 7th 8th 01 h |Q M Ml 1 20 on 2" no 10.00 10.00 10 on lit rm II* oo in no i.i M :o no in oo io oil nth ltth ltth 14th ir.iii I8ih 19th 20th %  22nd jo SS i i lO.oo 2tth 10 M Mtl io no :9ih io on 10 in. i i %  %  tMfeW • M 21 KM MM 1418 3041 9080 94311 %  I 8MI4 • 0034 I,I, 2535 4 IMH I :t.i'., 8273 OMS : H13 7 .' m OM MM MOO 0603 8468 4989 7457 ; I I 5025 5616 1753 3657 1161 3875 1540 7463 8560 2M1 0360 2557 1758 1 I To MIS 8818 MM :i7:i 0011 7707 IM 2481 7105 5108 I M'l 5881 7581 01 II 2784 11191 HIT; 7528 %  I 'HI 14 413, 0470 %  i,, i TiWlH IT.to 0319 %  8094 H607 5933 91*1 ;: 8103 M 8546 3402 MM 3331 2831 ii:t', '..'in; IM:I3 Ii 4183 5098 'ATA 9976 9019 9i n %  3750 8933 11M 0522 MM 8216 2073 %  0530 I 8420 V231 i i a 8710 t thli game put Wl *" %  W %  w ' %  4 minutes old Sk|'l>*'^ HClntjm CO| DORM iliv. (i n ,OR *' '" "" ' : ml k '' %  rward put aeceivlnj goal keepei Roach to pu in the lead with a two up l<-i Ih %  Ikal V %  I iihor %  flil"M l n. "linn iha n lulh ll < % %  < ,,. I ,. k -T. r^ *oiao \l„„lh mm<\ 1^umr. Amoeast^-'•'•''-'' nOf Prarra.ee>—Treh Meol* rlarrtaon i i >• d %  • II ,.• nnd %  half minutes old tht tol their Aral noth ince leceptlve shots Three minutelater iX'ibi-i: sent in ii •Ikaepei srho saved pushing the hjii hoik Into ptay mg Smith to put the Ullrd i!i^il In fur Han .tmte-. before the blow off Ki.inklvn gl II Wo.dw.nd Ishuids BCOI third goal lot his The teosno wi re: Ti. h>( I Digestive Upsets nowt is'i \NM rei i i %  I,I, llJtriMMi ( • Hi i f i i.. Daeh, Orifl mooda, Wilhams. (Capt I, Smith, .red With one .if h I ,TuflW, Hope and P mmiitei wtnd ,rd uaadk. Rlvlei i, II second (mr(t sandy. Drakes. Mclntyre (Capt). Anl.i on. \ iguate, Fi H iv The refrrre i : Mi Wilkes io on 10 (M. 10 00 10 00 in oo 10 no >.l. an absolute sbttler, which loiofl ,,,IK '* t ""' geelawoBOr infl tefl10 oo " n, 'd Into the goeX Siuipitei 2. Harrison Mi no C o ll eejS: o until half lime. 10^00 With the resumption of play %  %  — ( no Harrison College came down with a well concealed four forward' LADIES PLAY TO-NIGHT $750 IHI movement which bore fruit %  i Charlie Evelyn iJi.MtK.iied himself ThTable Tennis Beml Ftnala Ud mi.il>' no mistake getting aaaieal ""' ,,i '" w ''" ln '" llu ' $140 01) '> alter this, however. Rannistci .nil 11(1 .,-.: % % %  %  : ( %  10 no well flighted "back hand'. Hur60 0 Haon College were not dismayed 50.00 nd they got their second goto 30.00 when 'Mortimer* Weotherheat 30 00 itemed ;.fter four minutes play ii e teeond half. 20 (Mi Tin n equaliser came a minutl 20.00 nnd a hall later when QcorTre} 20 00 Jordan scored. With ION 10 00 three ll the crowd were Irantii io IMJ with excitement, and when Mario. %  lison College went mln Hie leui VI !" wtln %  snapshou by 'Morlt 10 00 wentherhead. the Hat 10 00 ,, Id thl* hellers ime it i who i !h die, rrlson Colipedl Io (heir ICH-1 if api.i • Hardly had the ball I into play than Delberi |i ; .iin-'s-.,ua1ised a . 0 fu Snappers' 10 0(1 """'"selves hoarse. There 10 fhj even more applHiise from their io on 'o'arter when two minutes before in no ena end of the game Kcoiutl lO.OQ lr "<" in.iiic nis forcing swim 10 0(1 "'rough to niukv the score Snap10.00 pers: 5. Harrison College: 4 Then with seconds to no Hill |7M oil Manning the Harrison College fkip|H-r K't the moid for the 1-tilies l Ch.i 'ion ship which eras to be played btl %  nighl :m in Dr. E. B. Carter glvt" USOalSS at Qneen'H Park on "Vencr •al naaese H a p m Thf Oulla -•' i ... r. %  %  p H*al — I i t4 I • fot ho"i vi' ft Min'i .• rmiir i,4*y I I aOMHiMM De WITT'S I &"£ANTACID j I l.,i-, ,H„„ POWDER f ROBINSONS AS&Aftaf rrnlcnsife res**ucB, De Witt's Laboratories hae produced De Witfa Antaod Tablet*, oew companionuioduct to their renowned Powder. They are the most cotiTcment way of theckiag d.g-ttic disorders away from home. Notratirriquirwd Just dissolve one or two on the tongue for prompt re/itf F']'-a>Ant tsung De Witt Antacid TaWeU are separately itll*walrd for flldmil In h*ndy tear-oH tldps lor porkel o* handUag. Try them today Remember, a comlortable httinq SUIT is our lira! consideration There are incieaainq numbora who lecogniao lor themselvea ihe consistently superb cut. lit and finish ol the . . IDEAL TAILORING We will welcome the opportunity ol proving this io you in Our . TAILORING DEPARTMENT / on tho first floor ol f AVE SHFPHFRD & fO. Ll. 10—13. BROAD STREET f HEALTH BENEFITS LV • TONES UP DIGESTION • ENRICHES THE BLOOD • RESTORES NERVOUS ENERGY • BUILDS UP THE BODY •PATENUBARLBV mjtei milk more dtgeitlbfa for btbj •PATENT'CROATS makw weaning a happy time for ashy— and mother — Government Tag $200.00 on each equal Aat.uBl SUU.nj IIIU HII ..II llll fil) 00 %  III! 30 no 20.IW 30.00 20.00 B9,IM IQ II i 10.00 III III, 10.00 10.0.1 10.00 10.00 III on 10.00 10 0.1 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 IIOVEM. /v BKEETE per L, H OfiX ligyptian Wins Channel Swim DOWt, Anftist 10. Egyptian Mareeh Hammat 34. tncmher of Kln| K.ii'nik', Rojal iron the Franca to togland channi-l swim Derby Thursday in 1hours and 12 louti lint;.'' Li M Prance was IOCOM] %  Mrvan llnished SO yardnd vv.is Uroad i 13 m i niili-.s The 250 pound eroded ashore Jusi 1] hours nnd 12 inimiles alter hiend 19 other swlnunara from io %  I tli.w.iter i.i I.I Uiis Ni / In K II oi Li Morvan, 27. kudad al Balm ; %  _]•_> '*•' ;^"\ The other nmo of the astar11M111 which rt-s played hist eiu'ed with Bortltes snatching narrow win from Whipixirny fm bV nltas 'Boo' I pluvcit uii i-xiellent aai bath neii DudJe) •rori'il Mi porays, Ih'iutss n]M'iied the %  vlthln the iii>t tvatf the gatne, Whipporays equalised early In ihire c ond half ind ihe tfame looked like ending in draw when ratterfon e 1 down the tield nnd a well plaeeo lonu shol fave hii teen ncton Tinreferei u aflaJ. A. it Foster. Tiie teams a/era T1T.1IU. M Port*! T Vrmu,—1 I'uMrimn -Cap! I. M Hlcliatri R rtrilnian II Ward %  A.-..!(inha(i ..nd D U'Nral N^nMan l-ll.i. 1 ri. i i%  "% CONQUER PAIN SCIENTIFICALLY conu.m four wtll-p'oti" med.riiM. fa, Phenjcetm. Csffnne. Acetrhilicyli: Acid—and QUININE. TKSSS 'our Kianilficsllj' bjlinted. *>ork *xner|iM.cjll>r—th n why SOM Ha*i rcitora your imai o4 well-bting • u welcomed By Doctor: Over I2.000doctoninddenilttt n Great Britain alone SM K In their \urgerlti lin, coldi, headache*, toochac'ie. rtitum itum. neurilgu—(hit wonderful IpSCific br.ngi you amanngl)r qu.ck iclirf irom sll of thtm BYNIN AMARA it b| ilLfl k HaNBURVS LT 0.. LONDON ntle. You can buy it two-tabler envelopes— |h to brtng qukii rtllel from a of pain Or m handy 20-tablet Or in SO-iablet bottles—kM el these in you' house ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAH GET %  ANACIN TODA Yl i" %  ' Tha :u n r nU BgypUui 10 00 n.000 n(Tcrl l,v Ih,. l>.niton "' IJHT Mll fur Ih,11,-M pl.M.. lo.oo' publ mu BnlttMr wtn %  I0.00rui€> same amount !%  l|on 11 | Meond pta, %  ind 1— .ill olh*r nnUhrts will Bel £2R0. They'll Do It Every Time THE BARBCR. S TALhCATlVE, ALL RRjMT-eOT THE /VASiZ JE-REAI>^ CUSroWER. WON'T GJE Mi A TUMBLE' / THE KW? s frXT THe H3M54" 1I IXSD 1&J EVER / S^ BABE (CaisI iu see joa a \ BUT TM MEVER ( 5EE BAEC nxm \ run lev-.*; Masnilicenl Pfaato Cirtfi ol Modern British Cirt! Try ^ CORNFLAKES ounct P4ckl contain, f ..J.. (Fyll m. 40 cudO I .WI1HY" lr (; AI.VANISF.D CORRl'OATKD SIIF.ETS S', 7', 8' X 2 CausF OALVANISKD NAII.S — all sic EXr.WDKD METAI. SHEETS •/i". 1". r; 3" Mnh "POILITE" FLEXIBLE FLAT UBBMFOfl CI'.MENT SHEETS X *' l $6.40 Sli,',l •'F.VF.R1TF." CORRUGATED SHEETS 0', J', 9'. 10' Lengths •Phi.n. 42C7 WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO., LTD. .-7SSSSS33S* i'. ' ' A ? 5*SZeZ£SS& AK',',W.l : xsastxtttsaaxi; ~— '.'>•• )immy MILS A COOL SUMMER!! SJT TWCN CUMES IVS SHAVEAH9 \WO'S THE G>36/ OiE h*OW? [ &XKXRS M5ED PiTCWiM'1 91L3 K3U MEArt T4E ONE— V4IT_L I TELL >OJ / AoTOt'TAfy KjD-.H£y.' \ WHERE'S T-iS P-CRJI7E |N-~. XXI L'SCO ID HAVE steel b> Mr GfeeBaoafe 8AT1 RDA1 M.Ill Aucasl. IfSSl. \ i OBORQI v r.VKK %  Mil I \!Ul 01! IMS! Come in and let us fit you with a Fine LIGHT SUIT we have a wide range of Patterns MAURI & CO.. TOP fSOOBBU IN TAILORINO Wttl II. s* — LTD. '.• S1 lo rrniind MHI mi IHMdNSlllATIIIN JOHNSON'S CAR run "lii.li ii.cm. ii.iii TO-DAY raiDAi ittb. ..i %  11 I ISO KM l CENTS! li.rhu. k ^l i OMI ONI OF | FOOD FOR THOUGHT From October, 1950 to June, 1951 Ihe price of Woollen Suitings lias advanced over 100%. and these higher priced materials are now begin' ning to arrive in Barbados. We still have a Rood selection of TROPICALS AND ALL WOOL SUITINGS at la*l year's price*. so NOW IS THE TIME to select vours at K-B.RICE&C0 j i OMI UX I jj lliJi C'la^s Tailors. BOLTON LANE. --,*>*. ',C*^*-'-'^*-'-'-'rfWfMfMatfM a<0faBBe % B !W/A



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PAGI TWO B VKRUMI-. ADVOCATE rmnw. MT.IST II, IMI CcUtib galling Visiting Hrr Daughter M P 1 l :. 11 -i rial M .id their %  |ct ire 1 v Mi ieing marie tonight will be i. i: Carter, The Back to Africa rWH in.* a hull' Mr*. (M.ll.t.. ., to Ml** nuke iI ... i Mrs. %  %  I | %  ( if to England M l U %  i %  OeUW %  V rkahir*. where Bt tVra PA18EN0ERB tor England ytUtd*y by the "Oolftlo" lionrdliiR Uic Unnrli st th Bsggsge WsrehonJudgt Chantry ion -lie extreme l^ft of the pictnrt % %  MAitjoim. H/YNBfJ '..ll.lo •ad son-in-law. I*cavfng b) !h* Hawkins wha tO return in Ufl | M. n% ..1. %  'id MlH M. Jonei who are all coins on holiday. Intransit I NTRAN8IT on the Gll(i M Chan, whose fathf Chan's Photo Studio in Trinidad tan who Is easily Tnnl dad's mo*t popular Chinese balle* dancer has lust left Bishop's Higr Srhool and is on her way U I melon to study drnmnTi<>> .in. dancing. She is CM of Trinidad"! leading ballet dancers B.C. Arrivals A CHABROL %  Store i '..i M iompaiUad i>^ hb i returned tron !< %  I1WIA for iwo weeks. %  •>. .11. legai i '" %  % %  '< i pOiO In 1 licie told him It would l>e Impossible 'he Demerara River due MV, th> iiii rent The other 0*1 .. ,„,nrrnt Lc. ch..„„ at to. ,....,, ui of th. pier. " JS^^HSSbJE ; ., • „ V. ..... ,.. S3 11. -hallow ml wo, only 1*1 IN.. Hopea lo Go lo Auatraha Joint Wile and Family I,„I ,„ ,„„ ,i,..,, Ha Kfl %  %  %  "• %  iriKlh. .1 u, II 1 IIKNF.l'V. ,. „.„,,.,, „„,.,,,,.; -if thirulca of walcr l.li. "-'th 1 J Inn,.,. ,.f lh.. AuhUlil Court M K I' 1 "1 -" BROOK*. .„„ ,,, „,%  ,,. "' %  %  '' of Ao.Jal "" tallof Calorpillai „„.„„ ,,., g„ v . Co la V. .,„,, t„ soe what -o I I ',', V ... ; .' ••.m Caracas ...If. New Reverend Molher ,iam. Father and Son \MH w II ALLAN or Ml thiKin.. 1*1 1 11 in,.and Co in Mn Brook* >ltji %  f| D DM <;>lnt.i Bugania Qlovar of Florida Is al to join his wife and two rhildren 1,50 arriving ing at the Four Aces Fla't M,,,|,,., f thi Ui ullle < 1 si LMI 1 Oap. Thev n B;nli.i'l half here since ui of the expect lo Ch-toU-r 1st k in %  1 % %  '' %  %  "• I ( %  • %  ived from thorn, months returning by U s After Thirteen Yearg . M j. -BERTIE" Long Leave (War, KKR n route tn \MANii MBS. ALBERT Barba ( .„i hl „ ,,i, 1TI LAKE who uTlvodfi Kittf a ..J: ft yeater1. Oolftaa ta KtiRland on 1 %  who is with the the St. Kttli SUCBI Fartory ; %  I %  -• '" ih — %  C^. M„.L Mere for a Month '.itKen-ktici at Cambridge M h hlldren irrtved fn s^. toi bM been mi. The) remain here until %  Caracas with her %  Here. M.ithi Rev and coming U.S. Foreign Service Inspector M" R. AND MRS. EDWARD 1 WA1LES who have been in Barbados on a short visit an to leave this morning for d MjfftjjiUqua by n.w.i.A. Ml W.ult-s Is a U.S. Foreign M .IAN HUTSON, son ol Trlnld ' the QeUaa, Servlea Inmelor and %  Un Bee is ipenrllni Sl Philip, will read with hei 1 Mil on. M ., in .. N11 (Tin Irfi %  %  la> I" fusion ays i,-.liiUi. %  '" tnl on the hf>hd,i> routtne InabecUon tour Mr. and Mis. US CorUllUuH through I. I Who was urea, having already vMted Malta 11 ol tin Id.lifVeoeniele, Ourneao and ATIIIKI. MI %  ..M'.iiu: up 11^ he:iitquartera era lii Wartiin 1 !1 two waeke, ion llli: ADVENTURES OF IMPA at: 3'riif BY THE WAY .... /*c.W,6er 1 A iNfi the i.iu. ol M I .! 1 1 elephant. %  th 1 it |iini> ibl] got like .. uch. whal Phe iblk stuff*-'.! its with eornr L' nit kg 'in 1 hora %  %  %  nut when .1 1 ridge. Anothei iha 1 .'i* heavy %  %  .n. and bent Iti K only I cared n 1 thing. 1 would bus ;l %  |fl ; / %  ). % %  •Itlllll* \ JpAOB, giving \ kl timi.lii> 1 ii 1 agree. I reinwnber the ca* "I 1 small and ui suitor who %  targe lady. Feeling that IK* Wig not big and slroiig enough to roai Will you beI mine?" inwhispered "M ly 1 \ours" The lady wus so lourmd rpted the offer with U.n i .it gratitude "Cyril, I never 1 fell like th it about me. you silli boy." Big one, in <> 1 put my inn sorne <>t 'inwa> round you 1 \v llstf" 1/.' ..////ui. -if h\ giami mvlon E pfCOURAOEO by American marriage bad broken when hli wife "poured the mi,1 bM shoe". If I not s 0V trivial k< wl tcl 1 • %  el detract 1 %  .in.ui.. 1 I.. %  ..!:. 1 c wld saj thai -,iiip|>e(i tin walked on. < IIOONSWOIIII 1 | p I %  L 1 i| \ In 1) r • 1 J .'! 1 s> % %  1 % %  %  MI i: -. r StanisUui Wll 1 OB-tl HMhar Delegate of 11 %  1 %  : In Barbad TO THE SCREENS BIGGEST ENTERTAINMeiVr BAIL OF THEM ALL /// AQI VI U I.I II IIXKMA !Mmb.„OnV MATDilBSi rO>DAl i lO-HOUOW al 9 PJI lo.M<;IIT lo MIIMIAV MfillT at H.lll AW 10011 — € LAI 111 IS.AINS — TKIAIIII IIOM AKII ONE WOMAN'S STORY H-vsed o the tfeVtJ I lie ^-slonalr lr I. nils' Ii. II. {. Well-. A t'nlversal-l iteriiiillunal Itelease prize-winning C( ** d lofthe year! CT GLEASON -CLMIK -'MOWBRsT %  MLBINA ^jTrlb • d tM*^Hr>H(>4*osT0wai>i>Mi InS' km r*w>Ibt.k • TOMIT" aatrt' i*_ -1-BS-USI-WlBOI OPENINQ KXHI.OSIVLI.Y 1(1 DAY A. IIIMIMIMi 1.1 AHU THE. t lit I POI It BIG SHOWS lOMOKKOW Mt A M.. 1.30 I'.M a A 8 15 I* M Sl'KC IAL I'KKIiS FOR KIDS AT 9.3B A I.3S fosllivrlv feejff Be*l Movie Bet ., r'. n a %  *mi*MWm++>*.WlLnrlU.^vA. itffl,: *C '4&&i&S&'*£Z •'' '• •* A V" fa-wMuM r"i Beery wm-mt tJOiWJI BGSrBPn II Q X Y TO-DAY ONLY 4 30 J. 8.13 %  Mb CViiluo Fox Uoohlr Edward O. tinniNSON James LYDON : %  .. %  %  %  TAMPICQ" Si..; Drama. th iria RUSSELL • TUCSON" ^LPLAZA BBIBOBTOWN TO-OAY (FRIDAY) (M 1 I and 8 N P m OPFMM. TO-MORRfm l.t.1 A 8 15 | 20th Cenlur> Fox Pruents • VENGEANCE VALIE\ Starring . BL'RT LANCASI i;i( In lllo Flr>t Bis Trehnkeolcir '.Vrstern With ROBERT WALKER — SALLY FORREST An Adventure Drama in iL Rueted Beit It O V A L EDDIE HAUL NEVILLE PHILLIPS .. CHESTON HOLDER MAVIS WILTSHIRE MARTIN I1AYNES FRANCIS HYPOUTE EXTRA ATTRAC I IONS TO-N1TE LtH'AL TALENT ON PARADE S-.i'.irig "Begin the Beguinc" "I Ap<'> "Be My Love" mi Every star" "Confess" B< FITZ HA!.. QUEST STAR .... %  I % %  Rupert and the Sorcerer — 6 i . thai qum (Kinii — ..i, in, .k, : %  %  lam. .*.). ih. CbiatM h ,„ %  line tomr .' ..c I. il ? M. no nil ioat-' Mt Jliri.i) :. Ik ihool %  an ih. ChimM h „,, H j,.,,,, „| k ,„„ All ico Mhool no*." And ih'ii lollow ind he. \\t< n ^ol.in h won't My •Viv • -fin* i.ioih,... %  %  %  ..-. U.;,, %  b.i.tlil 141 B ir. miard. (i UniS i>l Itir be-[ II J Miieli m IUIII i £eaiaoa osr*n oird. Plu: A Hot Mttslral Short "PACKAGE OF RHYTHM PRICES TO-NTTI. Pit 20e., II.>ii.r 36e llaleony 48c Boxei 6>e. MATINEE TO-1IAY I St AL PRICES TO-BAY to S1MIVV 4.30 & 8.15 Republic Mii.t-iiM..! Double LIGHTS OF OLD SANTA FE" SPECIAL TO-MORROW al 9.311 AM Itcpublo* U.nblc Sunaot CARSON In Starring .. •DAYS OF BUFFALO HALF. LVANS and nOY ROGERS BILL" AND AND "WAKE OF THE KINC OF RED WITCH" GAMBLERS" wllli JOHN WAV.: GAIL RUSSKI.I. with William WRIGHT and Janot MARTIN Two I'll turp*. Hllh a %  .n-l,. Ihouaht lo plraa^ you .... Mu.ir! hxliii.,... Thrllla! COME ON MIIS .imi tnioy Thrill, ami Action To Your LlkhiK ftniniiis ihort oi %  > il. irop ui* MI i '' ' -\'~ ''"i; I' Ml" -* n.i.t-rni. IM>n I i i : • %  • %  II.. BORDERED SPUNS 36 SI...7 Beautiful Designs and Colours PLAIN SPUNS 36" SI.IO In Pink. Lemon. Peach. Green, Blue and White FLOWERED SATINS 33" BSc, SHANTUNG 36". SI.IO EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4604 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 CAN THIS BE POSSIBLE? YES! THE NEW "KITCHENCRAFT" WATERLESS COOKER • Cooks 4 Dishes with one Heat • Conveniently shaped for preserving boiling and stewing • Excellent foi serving foods at picnics O L V .M P I i TO.DAY AND TO-MORROW 4.45 lb 8.15 isi iii.i Umenl SI'NDAY & MONDAY 4 45 A 8 13 Final IntUlmrnt MuRepublic Action SerUI "AWKNTCXE8 OF CAPTA1IS UAMVEL %  j TOM TYLER v Read About Him in the < omlr* now see Him Come lr On The Screen THE BEST OF Fl N FOR VIII M; AND OLD JANETTA mir.ss SHOP Upstairs Newsam & Co Lower Broad Street DRESSES READY MADE AND MADE TO ORDER I i <=== Huti oar If/ I'm m. rui-: VOHXKH SIOttE i'svful tii-iii iti . EARTHENWARE Tea Cups & Saucers I.umli. Breakfast. Soup & Dinner Plates Vegetable Dishes with Covers Mill Dishes Milk Jugs 1-Pt. Cups with Covers Decorated Tea Pots Decorated Bowls—with & without Cimn, • THE IIAIIH \IIOS M-OI'!n\IIM IOTTOX i \rronv I.TIK Hardware: Department Tel. No. 2039



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$arbato tv\\" : islltu HUM FRIDAY, AU IGtJfT mi PRICE FIVE Cl Four Will Make Bid To End The Peace Deadlock Buffer Zone Still Hone Of Contention mi wvv is in HI U N ADVANCE BASE, Korea, Aug 16. | HE CEASE FIRE negotiators turned the dead locked problem of an armistice buffer ione to a four man sub committee for solution and then recessed to await its report. The sub committee will begin work in Kaesong at 11 a.m. on Friday, under a virtual news blackout The Communists accepted the United Nations proposal for the sub committee on the 16th day of the deadlock over the location of a cease fire line across Korea, and the establish ment of a demilitarised buffer zone between the opposing armies The bippMt stop ye! toward the stalemate on the ends was taken minuti meeting, one • I the shortest since the truce talks began on July 10. The • '.-i only one In the UN proposal — nib-Committee mm%  > delegates from each 1 I' C mmissioiT Chief 5068 LobttiM'st* Foreign Minister BEIRUT, AUK. 16. starechal, Chairman oi the %  KM who arIIW Ihe Lebanese Foreign ICInlMer, cherlai Halou, %  n attempt to perto accept even in%  %  pea said Helou left Lebanon's answer in the balance until %  Joint dOC ta lon had been i Arab itatee. Mareon Thursday on ,i i ing to Be Pi Id .ind then leaving for Jerusalem, Tal-a-vW that not :i "sine : ounclng the .,. %  %  if ( ' "Reorientation" progr-iiuue to keep u>e Apaneae onununum. Brigadier Oaneral A L llam! tial arfinUm RN d|a occupied areas. teeUfled on fund* needed for occupation costs in hearings before the House oi Appropriations Committee In June. TaaUmonj WM released on Thursday, llamblen told the Committee the Army is ins for money tor economic aid for Japan, but he said indoctrination programme must go on. — IP. OILS AND FATS The Fifth Merlins of tlir On .lui IJK OanfatiMeai held Jl llailiuo llnu>r • i %  i-ii V usual 15 Krronimrndalion* of the Ccnlaranaa win now he Iraimmllted l Ihr Govern ni. nis concerned llurriniuii To Tfy \ii.iin TIIIKII w ; .. \ %  talks to,> ,i whl % %  : II "i %  ran, i expected to inak<> . UM %  explnU.S.. PHILIPPINES AGREE ON TREATY WASHINGTON Aug. 16. The United Statei and lupines announced flgrei n day on %  mutual defem • I'ledgnig each eounvs meet common dangers in the event of on armed attack on the other ~a> oil It b tN %  %  %  the |w,i sidetalkin Pn %  .lent Truman nooter ihaa stepped direct!) Into nag) I Obsei'vci. Bat that Ita from %  I talks will whrtiirr then ianj ahanoi M reaching > %  attlaeaanl at the %  cheduled i Saturday — llaly Asks U.S. To Extradite Secret Agents ROME. August |. ,t ,.\ ,a,lnn (will oskod the United states about the extradition or two former American secret Agents who are charged with the killing of their warti % %  der behind Oennan lines Italy One of these agents suUsequentl.v studied law at Lima. Peru, and was employed by Panagu. The Court of Assizes at Novara Ul Northern Italy, demanded the former United States Army U, Aldo Icardi of New York Clt< and Sergeant Car] G l-odolce .'. NewYork, to be ex Iradited and tried undt law for the murder of Mi William Holohan. The body of Hulohan 41 yi old. now en route to the Un States by ship was recovered f Lake Dorta. last year, with a bullet hole in the base of the neck Holohan headed the oflkv U Strategic Services Mission which IMirariiuted into Italy behind the German lines late in 1944. whh Lt. Iriu-di and SergMuit L*dul.e. a radio operator. They succeeded in making such contact and established headquarters at the lonely viUaeja of RIDVO < The gold, which was to hav< i to (lnanic Anti-Gema actlvtttee disappeared. Both Icardi, and Lodolce succeeded in return-! ing to the Allied lines i uoUce that Holohan was ambushed! and killed by Germans. j The two American soldins %  < turned to the United States, but Italian police followed up the ease and finally got confessions from artlaam that the Maim %  body could l>c found In the lake In Washington the Government said Icardi and Lodol.c wen q u est io n e d by U.S. army aganti with "negative lesults" in 184; But in the summer of 1950 the Del< nee Department said two Ilali.n. and Lodolce eonfesaed. — f.P. France Wants Agreement On Inrio-china BJ KDWAH1) M KORRY PARIS, Augut 16. Prance will pre ment to end lightm* in [nd -China % %  ,1 K' e • •ettlc'nrnt if Kaesong talks ai accortflng 'i> an auKremh f3ow W rong Drag Kilk Two oloataen VEHMH.IJON. South Dakota. AUK. I Dr Donald Slaughter. Dean ol Unlventt) of South Dakota Medical School, MM Thur di aV sflvan by mistake to two volunteers Who died during pain relief experiments. slaughter MH! the unidentified medical scientist Mho administered the drug "recognised his mistake" and saved his own life and that of n third volunteer.—'Lp. This source In outlining the foreign policy of the ii> l at I'u'iiuei Rene Pleven ai M adi theee polnti In amnhaaiKing that France's foreign (lic-v is guided the deelre k maintain peace %  ince will not acrept the inclusion of Spain in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization M-A.T.O.J A ., t.-M.it of unilateral United Statinegotiations with the Franco Government and other mam: problema concerning N.A.T.O. memlteis France will |>lump for a pemianer: NATO political council. _> Ki... %  >. %  %  %  %  mem of German} remaina unchanged —the Formatton ol Oar* man Uflltl BaOl • %  | but MB| i. ad la army divisions Including contin• 11 ie3. The Atlantic Treaty Orgaul^atllll mi,' III keep char." %  On the Pai Baal a n source said. "Korea fighting and the question of Indo-China where Frame has paid sued .1 heavy BnCe in men. cannot be dls%  tart." in 1 ona % % %  %  1 ment. it waa learned '1 aources that the French Governraent wants a firm guarai Communist China that further ai. to rebel forces of Ho CM Mini In [ndo-China will end —U.P. U.S. Oil Industry Only \eeds Supplies To Combat Oil Shortage V. UIII.IAM GII.RRAITH %  1 tHINOTON, AUK '" If the 1 m moke up oil shortage If it does not tin gasoline the si molest form of one of the touahrst problems in the question implicated hv II : %  ivi'try like 1 %  %  1 1 10 transteel plate for rr-' try gets these supplies it will he able to meel 1 eda for oil in tht near future and alto help produce some of the refined proch US friennneed to make up for lost Iranian oil. 43.4M New H'elK Without vital supplies tnev fenr petroleum Industry mav %  li rilng uould have to red at home. Th l-'um industry 10 producing about M00.000 I le \'r P.A.D ever has said how much It want* that figure stepped up. but it has said the inBt lea.t 43.400 rear to meet US needs. Of those only 28,500 would %  I —the reThe Induitr) !.. % %  I lid it 1Willing to drill rile but ;t Is certain not to get the equipment needed to drill anv more 43400 p A D hag requeeted '' how much 01! theee MMIII e/lU pea•aie reguuaualli produce from .'i0 to 100 barrels pending upon the are located. %  I oil-producii %  : %  .mount that well opera%  Once ll.e oil 1. taken 1 ground however, it runs into the biggest bott'en*' Donation. -IP. H M S "Blthuty Bay" letarnrd to Barbado* iln y*r (Htoiy on page BVel. RELATIONS BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA BECOMING STRAINED By K. <*. THAU I I.* ''-DON. Aug. Ifi. PgfctpUble difftrenctfl In Blno-RuMlan rtlattoni wn ling n. strain the young Moscow Ptklng ;I\I ft 1 to diplomatic reports The riIt is not only Id* urn affceta the national interests of both count There 1 howevi T of .1 bn el eta 1 Tsc Tung's regime and u • Krent 1 ., . %  -. % %  -111 d : ,.. 1 reel ana' (Hend N ihi y *n i s.ii ( | to lark any marite -'ration <>f rnidi.ihu Mid intiiiui'v .• actually. %  1 .. %  %  munist giants in An., are trnt quite rutrrnonu 40m Muslims In Gfave Peril NEW DELHI. August 16 Fourteen prominent Muslim? |. eluding rnernbei ..i i' un forn > under the llntish legiino |it( t>\ EaUrtuiasahL Vice < %  Aliitm-h of the Muslim L'nivcr>.r\ where th r moat Pakanssn leadei received the* education submit'ed a memorandum to the Unite. \.i'i-nis mediator Frank Grahan laying We should like to impresw you with dil the amphaaia %  I .ur command thut Pakistan'.* policy ''' R i Iri.uelr -Mil, the gravest peril to 40,000 OOO Mustlina In India .. Korea asked the Ui tor prompt! ittti. ID RU I' III and aer\ie, furnlshad United with impunitv Mo* % %  ... %  v.ir sean Ru,-k uuring a conference said the bill covered food to eiuir>men; an ents on buildings occupied b U.S. Told To Pay Up WASHINGTON. August 16. 1 ing 1 tufts. ItusrVutns Wusf Sigh Draft Part WASHINGTON A The Stan on Thursday firmsltj rM Uruon that Russian del %  Pevaa ConlBrence Francisco mu'l clgn the Anglodrall "I the pud or nothing at all. The De| Ambassador Alan Kirk COW del,. %  ilelarlnr the Sm | %  %  open negotiations on peace —t" T Closer CO-O& lished hv l "Iriefldship whl it) ead Ince of 1 hot 1, I^P_ I and economic aaslstanei But China >" Idleapfj %  1 |g rt %  %  %  lions were said t" hava ie*-n ommun%  I .Y Bombers Strike Red Supplied 1 MY HKAOQU VRTER8, Korea, I ..-. 1 t truck %  force-menu nun upp %  • We mil %  .... covei b 11 returning pilot aid thai they n 1 t sttaehad nun vehli i They said that I to and damaged .'to ouv 1 1 .• roluraa el trail lighted neai Slnmak *m the % %  Kaaeong hlghe/u u Wi v rn Korea and ii 1 linn and Yongdoli areas MI Hi r.iitHT al UM 01! n %  fteauaaX UB B. %  IMIN OticSpringboks Routed l\>r 202: England Lose 2 For 51 Runs (Prom Our Own l 'rn 'respondent 1 ONDON, A 1 HIS real (ail u vonl) etw< en E Africa aitei LI pi. ) m thg Rnal V\ 1 h a wlckat which hag tajton i conaidoffabli amou l fbr thi I %  %  • I 1 • %  %  H behind Snutl total of 203 ind have loot both membi ihire opening partnerehlp, II itton and Lowaon s miii Amea'i innlngi • %  %  .• twn .iisiuii; ph aa ea in Use he wicket l in pine..f Ihe %  letera e %  %  the South Vfi ui wanted I k< lurl til-. din not thrown iwaj vantage and the 1 %  li'-i whn Kmwait *-• out 'li '.K IB r.ii' %  Bttl Ann %  I 'I -lit (nil llplomaUi '1 ittee with onlj minoi ii.dn 1 .1 lion fui tie ad • W| ;i. United ( %  %  %  %  %  it th** main pi ti • I 1 I null 1 .1I1 %  %  Instea. 'i' take %  pin and South Ad lea nevei looked %  kali i" re Athol Rowan I ui ..ing 41 bUI ShOI %  rhe ib inn with ; %  tent thai ... South g) 4>n |>Jir X Sugar W orkrm Strike In Berbice 1 %  u ivorkera al 1 nt.1 Rosehaii 1 ii* warhi ra 10 sysheau.) wtUA .ui-... %  %  . hands. %  Mth| 1 W. I 1 1 %  %  nferrtng wltn the m The "ADVOCATE" pay^ for NEWS Dial 3113 Day or Night Thi^CtogedWith MxlnllaliV DrulI. : I I. % %  . IV KUO n ported eking t< I .' King Abdull i '. Innii Ainiii.ii %  %  I %  llltarj 1 %  1 %  gain t 1 n .1.,', M I Ai' ii.! Kadel prahal U and eooperation in the murder" —IP. %  APPROVAL AIliF-S. August 16. j %  proved II %  %  goes to the Senate — vr Pollsll Offirial Mt-fs To i*'rinaii\ PRANSFUKT 0 A young Offll a of I 1 I %  %  r. Bogaa %  lo Allied %  %  ive been I Warsaw %  %  P Ili 1.) 1 I I 1 $ T A 1 S II // / 7' E I %  %  rn. 1/ 1 /< h 1: y BERGER PAINTS AT ALL HARDWARE STORES GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—A*.-nl..



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I'Ar.K FOl'R i:\KI!AIK)S A1HIK VII. KRIIiW. U'f.l St 17, iMl Printed r ka HllWll >* LM. •• *l BrMflVtewa Friday. AuRUat 17. 1951 M III I.AIM.IK FOB MOM time now there has been gen•isiaction with the handling of caryo in the port of Bridgetown. That dissatisfaction is not limited to local merchani.s and COMUQMM but includes the captains of ocean going vessels. h la clear now from J letter published in this m uspaper on Tuesday fmm lion F C Uuisun that in addition to the loss of • %  <• which the Barbadian worker had gained for himself, steamship COmpwill are taking steps to protect themselves. The letter giving publicity to an tlOOTpl from a circular communication t( ships In this port and skippers of some of thaw vessels have even been bggtfd rpregg Ihe view that some of the port •rorkafl take part in a go slow campaign. One skipper about two years ago went as far as Hying that he had actually seen men playing cards in the ship's hold while others were loading cargo into the slings. These chargn will be strenuously denied and counter charges will be made igainal tfaD*B who even give publicity to them; but th.'ie are figures which show that there has been a gradual decline in the rate of handling cargo. Tlir Report of Sir Douglas Ritchie published in [his island show that in 1941 the rate of removing cargo |>er gang was 20.1 inns per hour and this declined gradually until 1944 when it stood at 11.8 tons per hour. To-day with increased rates of pay the rate of removal stands at fi or 6 tons per hour. There are other factors which prove that ihis general decline in the rate is not mere accident. Earlier this month a ship of the Furness Line, which has been operating here for years before the war and which resumed its regular service in 1949, was put two days off her schedule because labourers refused for the lirst time to handle her cargo at night. It is likely that With a new schedule being drawn up Bridgetown will be left out. In addition u> ihe decline in the rate of handling there has been an increase in the cost ami recent ligures show that in comparison with Trinidad at the rate of 8/and British Guiana 9/the cost of handling a ton of cargo at Bridgetown was 22. per ton. There is an erroneous belief that matters of controversy at the port should be left to the ships labourers and steamship agents alone with the labourers having the advantage of stating their own terms and appealing to the Labour Commissioner through the Unions when it suits them. It is not so. This matter affects vitally the interests of every section of the community. The middle class worker is the gre^it.-i nifraru The merchant has the i pportunity to increase his scale of profits in order to pay his extra overhead or current expenses; the ship labourer has his rate of pay increased; while the consumer must be content to be the meat in the landwich. The matter has now gone one step further and as Hon. Mr. Hutson's letter •hows, this reduction in the rate of handling of cargo causing the slow turn round of ships will OOW cost importers ten shili par ton of cargo brought to this Island tram the United Kingdom. If this If the attitude of British steamship OOrnen it might be that foreign companies will adonj an even more penalising one Tins is where the Trade Unions can do a lot for the fair name of Barbados and thv reputation of its worker. Victorian Dress MATADOR iiiir, I'IIIII Duruifc : Victoria womfnl ore.-, went many lhangf i Ai Uv Victorian Exhibition -t int Museum a wide ranne <>t is apparent, and It is Into ITS two of the how Ihe, penduli. moved. One U an even inn 6nM liom the early years o 1 i 1 cut on the cJaaW %  with bands of ml raUa fJUl elejtanl gown has u iqiM high waist and pufJBd which |au-r davaleged Into n>< fiii.uiou* lag of-mutton laevai The other, an rvrnlng dress, imiide in two pit and a skirt, U nt ead <-f the simplicity of throve r-decoration has'taken plan ; ..Jin gown <>'. the nineties is a tangle of black lace, ne' %  nd buule-bead emhrnidery. Thr bodice tMs a yolk of dotted nrt ;inil bead emiii..iitet> on lh shoulders Ihcie in buKl'-l" •"' I .in.i UM ihoi | leave era covered wttl The iktal I I %  Milirunii'ry in front with %  ver-skirt of black net. avatnOt Inn* aM ln*nd emhroid'iv. it i a skirt to nver many prlUcon' Thchange ir style iramart No ri.i. HUlioluenj i'i.i( gmgaful K-rrnenl woHii MunaiiMi eforta lo Dance Emproa Eugenic, and which I UW .IIIIIreorhinn only three-qu.n I the way along the scat, so that the wearer could be seated HI comfort. But the counterpart <>' the ennnlinc %  the poke-bonnet. Is represented al the Museum by .HI excellent example of straw. lair and bead work, for ii i the most characteristic head wear of i. and .survived until almost 1B70. Itonnets of various ktfl i be soen al the exhibition including the extraordinary Mulch bonnet, executed In muslin or kniltc-d wool wilh inn* itrtngi Also OH exhibition are wldm a white blouse Hid skirt wilh I black belt and sliver buckle, and. A Malch Cap need with lace with a %  CfUOTC collar giving a tne young Victorian, undi lun!y. I 1IM ,, mr(( r „ and sir. %  eitti white, < %  baads. The names of the fabrici i. idl like ; i poem Bo iippurtenai i ill-muslln, Foulard, c'ashmepettteoato. Bcnut, Indian acarfs, larlaten, organdie ,'lippors. Llppet. A h %  %  Men P la: t the hi-mht of then* pn, the unhygiemi long I nu led Ii is the areai was fastened to the Ir.nlwidow wilh her "Molly". ing skirt and attached DJ frivolous sty!.--; where the I a chain to the waistband The %  i the colour of Infanta' clothe* took | II, and is curled .i day. Long robi %  lap dog's". .\M-ellfumlnlilu-lff 1 .ON DON Even the BBC raised its eyebrow. Producer*. annoum-t -. commentators and engine! r .. whose dally (ob Is to deal with unusual and iiitcrontinit people from all parts of the world and from ail walks of life, wandered over to have a look Cause of the excitement was (he Trinidad All Steel IVi.^-mn Orchestra, making Its first appearance in a BBC studio for an "In Town Tonight" broadcast. It was an historic occasion the first opportunity for millions of listeners in Britain to hear .i i.-, ( | steel band. An announcer cautiously picked up a rubber-headed hnmmei and tried mt ex|M-|-imeittal "pinu" on a first plriR-|H>nv. while somebody else rumbled a string of notes out of a bass boom Others wideeyed, expressed their amazement and naked how it was done Mai Zetterling, the film star, tapped daintily at an oil drum with her foot. Jack Warner, the radio and screen comedian, quietly studying his script at the other end of the studio, came over to sec what It was all about And little Mi. Oooraa Browning. 93 year* old and a icttular visitor to the "In Town To-night" studio, said he had never heard anything like U In a lifetime of following the trends of the British entertainment world. it was a great day for TASFO when it was invited to make its first broadcast In England. A B B.C. man. invited i,> hear the bond, dropped his jaw in nmarement as the first notes were struck nnd Immcdlmelv ar* in %  broadcast two nights .atei. So, shortly after five o'clock that Saturday evening, a lorry drew Up outside Hi o.tdeistini: House and the bandsmen carried their oil-drum instruments' Into the studio, where other peoplu taking part in the programme w.re already gatl There was a happy, familyparty atmosphere in tn For most of the people who were • In Town Tonight." II was their lirst broadeast and Ihe H It ('. \va %  careful, as always, to do everyrtv HITE IIEWEK thing possible to put them at ease before the microphone. There waa %  young Beoutefa singer. Just back from a nightclub engagement in Holland there % % %  >•> a motor-coach driver, snatching a lew hours off from his work among Ihe holiday i rowds, %  skipper, doing Ihe same thing; There was < girl athlete and there was a young .%  ii> ities hiown 'ptani And there was TASPO. P< i ii i' red -tixjut the %  tudlo, i halting informally, while I I %  Laid control room. twiddled knobi and liooiiiad Inrtrucuoni through a loudspeaker lo his .is.Mstaiits Ing >he mleropho i I him sat Edrlc O 111 OT. tone from Trlnidtd win had dune more broadcasts from th.it very itudlo than he remember, The onlv member of the TASfO party who knew his way through Ihe B.B.C. procedure, he helped to direct the compll* rated pro< m Ini/" While the hand pliyed. microphonei were arranged befor* thorn, hein uiig high over their heads. On" \ii Connor stopped i end told Ptturoorc Ha' 'Ti t*> move his three bis base toonu to one side, to that their nmsic would bo plokod up bouoi by 'i %  %  All the i i.-. p* phi waodarad %  III h i ing out of the oil di Finally, the pn l-cd that ti % %  arranged lo th< llftenad tnrou 1 ihe band, %  mlliioM %  I I thitMighoui the world. II i %  me ,\I-I .i>. ih-.ni; in I) wen pley* I hall. WI'.I.< fu ii oU i ,i • pi were put Birenar 1 ihefr paces i rophono TieIhree-quarters of an hour to a. • before tho programme went o Ihe producer C lUOd nn Out of the loudspeaker cam the famous signature tune, th Kniuhtsbridge Harch, follow e by the roar of trafnc, the chat;. Of the Piccadilly flower-. Ki: k beUov 11 The run-through wai on. Announcer Ho: int'-rviewei John Klhson glidea from o.eiophone to mierophon* round tha big aredloi wtiilo ib gUeaSl in UM prograinnu HIT shepherded i>ne by one to then iv to be Interviewed Gathered round one microphone with Edric Connor were Lt Joseph Griffith, the steel band's conductor, with bandsmen BlUotl Marinette and Philmore Davldeon Itetween Ihem, they told how tlu steel band movement was born instruments are inadi and tuned and how they ar~ played To round off th< in the ptogremme, the banr" played ManilKi-Jambo The run-through OWOI liandsmen supped down to t:e Hll.C. euilo-n, meeting-place of stars, for a quick cup of tea. Ter minutes Intel lhay %  *• back ii their places, for It was nearly nine for the nroadcast to begin. All eyea wefc on :hc big studic ClOCk as round ihe lloal minute before UM wgei to go on : -" i il 7. 1J p.m. the sigUM bK'ined out again. a green light winked, and RonaJd Kiel, her stepped p to the microphone to announce 'Once again ere bait tha mighty roar oi tnfflc to bring to you BOOM Of the interesting people Who ire In Town Tonight." : \B O played to the biggest audience a steel band h... -Bt.P. MiwK ll'iiiiM*k %%'anfs A 'Thinl l'i aaael or Thr I H. A. A UK. IOII NEW YORK. .fa's biggest telephone firm has just finished six months' work. In that time it nas installed 1,000.000 telephones. The firm is the American Telephone nnd raph Company — so bif; it has 1,900,000 Bhareholdei i Perl H! the credit goes to its president .ir-old Cleo ("i H* started as a boy delivering newsAnd be went to work for the telephone lirm by accident. Cleo had just graduated from college as an electrical engineer. He was in love with a schoolgirl sweetheart. Laura Heck, and reluctantly took his first Job far away from her in Utah. Jusi before he set out. the hometown branch of the telephone company phoned end geld it had a Job f>r him. He accepted need Migg Meek and they tied at £T> 7s, g week Pp Of American TelapbfttM and Telegraph usually pays £44,000 a year. Mr. Craiy loves teleplv n From FRi:i)K NEW YOUK. AMKltUAN Frieda llennock thinks no highly of Britain's Third I*rogramme that ihe has thrown up a tl3,000-a-year carear UMl l.tken a £3000 Government Job to campaign for a similar piegramme In America. .i Hennock. brown eyed blonde, ban dedicated bOTMll H a member of the Pederel CooununKatlons Comniission to the pmpOQitton that ;il HMUS • quarter of of the United Slates1850 talevlUon station* should be KM iak* for something other than comand hcerplugging comedians She is finding ihe going heavy. Her colleagues—there are raven Commhwioners and she i^ the only woman—have not exactly tamed her down. Bui they have jndfa lt that 10 per cent of the at sufficient *or non-com mere ia I US*. leVHoog Day To gain her point. Irloda Hennock ;who "sunpb b had 'ime tO BJtt ni'ined" though b ittlng In . 14-hour day making at least one iptech f"' t' 1 taking her turn h (: Hit i .it In I %  :. %  %  • India Edwards, boss of the woman*! ikli "' i i women Into jobs thai only. n.. i ndd before—brought her name to President TIUIIUJ, RICK (> have II ovei Not thai rho if>" i ItO or TV. m have it In hands.'" ihe bill ending II %  % % %  ivMI %  %  grammes te • nunoi ily. And I'm afraid thai unless something idone now TV will me w3 Ones flle •! itions are ualgned well never gel them beck.* Ju>i Three) Beemu In New York, when she was Q wealthy lowjft the fJvad In %  Park Avenue penthouse she has .Hue. -n>om ; .ne if, too which sees her when .. %  •. iturnptng ih< ill to her daok al the oniee long ftiT moot BOOM What tort of TV pi %  %  n in the %  %  %  .. %  relationship: and home I odd go into the In varloui Baldi wfio would reach Ithoea dren 'imultiineouslv. MMMhlng unit.unpossihie in ordinary elan father -it home could follow the l*-^>n and know what Ihe child Waa learning. 1'irhai.. %  he'd ii im something be i Mi-s Hi nnock does not expl dn how Molhei could be persuadeJ lo rwlteh % %  the mannoquln % %  %  : %  .. %  witch on to JunkM w Ihi caaaa%  ho thbuU fot work %  %  i cultural pro: diet and opera. Bhe I it the caault )-eirs* reeearcn end pn ln-i.lers in Washingto'i think they know whk she || willing t> put M much toil into what many call %  lost cause elrei one with i reuea, ^"lieda is vary DmUUoua. politically, sue knonra %  i good wh en aha MM how to ride it for all it's She has her c\e en UM .nmanship." Mr Truman hSS gin mated her for a New Yorl uiiwhip. St'me lawyer-* the appe;nlnient. The %  till to be thrashed out meantime, is % %  ltd her lampaign. her Ine weakness taffy aide") and : %  irrua on noon WOHI.I) (i -Ll-S. They call him the brave*! youth in Spun II Atonueo l.itri earns K I0MI in an aflernoui (By % %  IHIIH1 TYNAN) VALENCIA, on the Mediterranean coast of Spain, is normally a cramped and fetid i town, but last week it became the oentre of a pilgrimage. Vak-neia's deafening annual fair erupts every summer, but last week the excitement was sharper, because the bravest youth in Spain, the 20-year-old matador. Miguel was to appear three times in the bullring for the purpose of ruling and then killing six lighting bulls. The people of Valencia treat Litri as a sun, be was bo in near-by in Gandia, and he graduated from novice to' full matador In their bullring last October, a week after his th birthday. £3 A SEAT all him "el atomico Utri" because be is tiny, and they revere his valour; Litri makes his bulls charge closer to his body, more repeatedly and perilously, than anyone alive. His life is like tightrope-walking, with the difference that, though one tightrope is much like another, no bull is like any other bull. Except! <>f course, that they ar; all bred to light and to weigh around half a ton. I went lo Utri'a lirst light al the fair. The bull-ring is not cheap: a front row seat now ;iK) pesetas—nearly £3. The band played, and the matadors, haverossed themselves, entered the ring. This was my first view of Litri—a gnome., I like boy, withdrawn and old-looking, with %  sad eyes and straw-thin calves, Dominguin was there, too, tall and pre-| ciously smiling. He was awarded the ear' of his first bull. j Soon after that Litri was gored. With back proudly arched like a bow, he was complet-' !|ing some passes with an untouched, btgh-1 horned bull; jolted once to the ground, he| | had viciously attacked the bullring attend-) .ml who leapt over the barrier to help him up. He finished the series of passes, sculp-! tured with a flick of the cape, and walked away for his applause. At this point the bull charged, piercing him twice on the inner side of his left thigh. He was carried from the ring. Dominguin, killed his bull for him. while the bats that ; infest that part of Spain began to whisper and scutter in the smoky air. LUCK? NO Though he had his lirst formal bullfight only in 1948. there is already a substantial literature about Litri; and I went to see him at his hotel next morning feeling as much cheated as sympathetic. I was wondering whether he would still be unconscious, when he passed me on the I stairs, calm and kempt, wearing a gaberdine suit a size too large for him. Of course he had recovered, he said, and I of course he would fight again that after noon. "I switch off like a motor when the horn gets me," he said, sitting with hands clasped between his knees and looking unwinkingly at them. "You can tell how far it will go in. you can guess to a centimetre. Yesterday was a scratch. You feel it, you switch off. and when you switch on again there is no pain." His manager joined us, prosperously plump: a manager receives 20 per cent, of his< lighter's earnings, and Litri gets 100,000 pesetas—almost £ 1000—every afternoon he tights. "Yesterday was unlucky," 1 said. "In Spanish." said the manager, ''there is noword for luck. It is the same word for luck 1 and destiny." 'AN INSFXT* Litri looked at neither of us; in his docile. I tobacco-brown face, with its huge gipsy nos *. you could lind no hint of the explosive pride he feels in the presence of bulls. With them .*e will shoul, stamp, challenge and commune; without Ihem he says little, and thai quietly, with the smallest of shrugs. He prefers large bulls, "because then" he gaid, "they cannot see me—they think am an Insect I have to grow as I light shem. and that is the pleasure." He has no rivalries, not even with Dominguin, nnd when I asked which of his contemporaries he most admired, he said: "I am only a judge of bulls. The public is tin judge of lighters," "He is too brave", the hall porter remark ed to me as I left. "He will not see thirty." That afternoon in the tirst of his two bulls Litri fought one of the greatest bullfights li the history of the Valencian ring. Such gravity, such a bee-line intensity >. feeling between man and bull, I have nevr seen before, and neither had the crov.< With the red cloth and sword he was tr mendous. turning like a revolving door ushering 1 the bull through him. That day hi dominated, with stitches in his thigh and n fear. He killed in one stroke, and was awarded both ears, the tail and a hoof. I saw him afterwards, when admirers wert explaining how much they had been movec* by his wristwork, by the straight, plungim line along which he killed, by his firm and clean cut footwork . "If you noticed all these things separately." he said, "then I have failed." I have a, conviction that Litri's perfect tight, the one that most truly satisfies him. will be the one that ends in his death NOW OPEN I MODERNISED AND FULLY STOCKED WITH THE FINEST RANGE OF BOOKS • ADVOCATE STATIONERY JUST MBCEtVEB FRESH STOCKS OF SNOWCEM White, Cream in 56-Ir. Drums While, Cream, Silver Grey. Terracotta and Blue in 28-Ib Drums. 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