Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




fhavh



ESTABLISHED 1895







Iran Rejects U.K’s

Eight Point

TEHERAN, August 15.

PERSIAN delegates cross-examined Britain’s
oil envoy, Richard Stokes, for two and a half

Plan:
But Stokes Says No

Communists

hours to-day on his “peace” proposals, then one of PJrjven North

them said, “they are incomplete.’’
Stokes, himself, denied that Premier Mossa-

degh had turned down his eight point plan, offer-!

ing Persia the control of operations inside the

country. “Nothing has been rejected, nothing has

been accepted,’’ he stated. “I am convinced that
these proposals are as good as any Persia could
get.’”’

The Education Minister, Karim —--— ~ ——_— =

Sandjadi, one f the Persiz re .
Geiigattbwha waid'that een! Mitra Sinanan
Questions Colonial

posals were not complete, added:!
“The position is virtually un-
changed.” Dr. Hussein Fatemi,
Mossadegh’s Assistant, gave a ver-
sion of the British plan, which he
said was not in accordance with
nderstandings reached with the
United States oil envoy, Averell
Harriman

Dr. Fatemi said that Premier
Jossadegh had last night rejected
British proposals, and made these
counter proposals:

c

ecretary
ON IMMIGRANTS




x



PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 13.

The first shot in what may turn
out to be an attack by the Parlia-
mentary Group on the Govern-
ment’s newly initiated campaign
against prohib@t#d immigrants
was fired by the Hon- Mitra Sin-
anan, Group spokesman:

1, Persia agrees to sell Britain
ali the oil she vgants

2. The claims of both sides are
subject to study and discus-
sion

3. The British oil] staff is to
keep on working.—U.P.

Arab States May

Mr. Sinanan sent the following
question to Hon. P. Renison,
Colonial Secretary:

“Will the Hon. the Colonial

'

!

Atta oe Ts = custody at the Royal Jail await-

+3 itend Paris lalks ing deportation? Will he state

ALEXANDRIA, Egypt, Aug, 15. further as to what is the expendi-
An Arab League source said on | ture incurred by the taxpayers in

Wednesday that the Arab States | Maintaining the said immigrants
are expected to attend the Paris |in prison; the period of time they
mecting of the Palestine Concilia- |have been detained and the cost
tion Commission on September
9th. 4t added that the Arab States
want to prove their goodwill and
their desire to co-operate, and to
implement the United States reso-
lutions for the partition of Pales-
tine and the repatriation of Arab
refugees. It said, however, that
the Arab delegates would refuse
to sit at the same table with Israel

t the conference

respective countries?”
“An oral answer is required.”

A Government release esti-
mated that there were about
6,000 ihtegal immigrants in the
island who were causing unem-
ployment to Trinidadians and
taking away foodstuffs and other
essential commodities from Trini-
dadians. It has also been ascer-
tained that at the moment there
are 23 illegal immigrants impris-
oned in local jails. The average
number of prisoners in this Colo-
ny per day is 1,050. The cost per
prisoner is a minimum of $1.20
per day




—UP.



$292m For Defence

CANBERRA, Aug. 15.
Prime Minister Robert G
said on Wednesday
sustralian defence expenditure

?
A cable requesting a debate in

1 .
Menzies



this vear would be astronomical.|the House of Commons on Trini-
Australia last year spent £133,-|dad’s economic cfisis was sent by
000,000—about $292,000,000 on de-| the Parliamentary Oppositior
fence.—U.P. today August 13.





U.S. Colonel Disrupts
Communist Union

By DAN F. GILMORE
LEGHORN, ITALY, Aug. 15,
The Communist controlled Union of Port Workers here
has been undermined by United States army methods ana
if successful Communist direction of other port cities
throughout Italy may also be shattered.
——— - This Tyrrhenian port city,
. * ° battered during the war and still
feeling the effects seven years
U.S, Plan To Bar later, thas become the “test?
° ° centre of Communist strength
Czech Airliners So far Communists are losing
and it is becoming almost :
WASHINGTON, Aug. 15. national issue for them as far a:
The United States State|“tace” is concerned.
Department is preparing to bar}; The man responsible for this




Czech airliners from flying over lis Colonel Norman Visering, once
the U.S. zone of Germany in;a farm owner in Florida and now
retaliation for the imprisonment | commanding the 7656 U.S

of merican newspaperman } logistical command here. A
William Oatis, it was disclosed! softspoken man with engaging
Wednesday. Planned action is;personality he knows how t
part of the general strategy ot! handle workers as he did witt
bringing economic pressure to); 1,000 persons on his own payroll
bear on Communist Czechoslo- Visering came here two
vakia to release Oatis. months ago after directing the
U.S. supply line to Korea to
The Department has already | establish at Leghorn a_ disem-
moved to cancel all Czech trade|parkation base for troops and
concessions in the United States/ material en route to U.S. occupa-
and restore the high tariff|tion forces in Austria and Ger-
barriers that will seriously ham-}many. He was then and still is
that country’s $25,000,000} faced with formidable problems.
rly sales to the American!Leghorn is one of the “Red”
1arket |strongholds of Italy. More than
ee - _lany other city in Italy it has a
_ The House voted 363 to one ' bitter memory of war after almost
Tuesday to cut off : all commer-! daily bombardments by Germans,
cial relations” with Czechoslovakia! 4 erjcean and English.
until Oatis is freed. The resolu- | oe

tion isn awaiting Senate action Last Port Left
which m: not come for several It vas the last port evacuated
week coos « profitable | PY_U-S. forces two years after the
Czechoslovakia ee a De te **€\war, Visering has already work-
airline industry whic maintains! 64° wonders. In two months he
iles fanning out over most of|has built up headquarters com-
vestern Europe hag aoe routes!mand nere and a nucletis port
OVER WRAL. Gey: jarea which successfully handled
action will not he entirely j the ee Saturday and Sunday
ffective unless Britain and | of the first earge and troop
Frances whi of | transports.











control two
three occupa-! o
nove. and was himself a port worker.








follow the U.S



B French tudes Following the party line he first
vhs 1 the US will] told Visering that people of the
seole thelr co-operation.—-U.P. ; Leghorn district did not want any

ae | troops.”’ Then after looking around
at unemployment and when Viser-

JAP TREATY PUBLISHED ing announced that America



\planned to give jobs to 3,800

Aug. 15. “|Italians, Jackoponi had a second
tau thought. He tt
t port worke1

to work for

workers woul

\SHINC









sering





Secretary state for the inform-|
ation of the House the number of;
prohibited immigrants now _ in!

of deporting these persons to their,

——<$—$_$_$—$—_$—_——

Jackoponi 51, was born here

jpart of “American Imperialist

8TH ARMY HEADQUARTERS,

Korea, Aug, 15,
United Nations patrols attacked
three Communist groups en-
trenched on hills southwest of

Kumsong today and drove the}

Reds to the north.

Heavy casualties were inflicted
on the Reds as Allied fighting men
braved intense machine-gun fire
and mortar fire to take the heights.

Kumsong, one of the most im-
portant Communist held cities in
Central Korea, is reported to be
the centre of a large buildup of
Red troops and battle supplies.
UN, patrols rahging south of the
city have contacted numerous
Communist groups from platoon to
company in size

Allied patrols farther to the east
made several contacts with Reds
northwest of Hwachon Red
units all ranging from 20 to 30
men in size were taken under U.N.
fire and quickly dispersed

There were four contacts made
in the area northeast of the Hwa-
chon reservoir but no heavy fight-
ing was reported. :

One of the contacts occurred in
the “punchbowl” valley north of
Inje. A U.N. officer said: “Out-
side those four encounters our
sector was very very quiet.

—U-P.







Mao Tse Tung
Sabotaged Saviet

Interests In Korea

WASHINGTON, Aug. 15.

The Voice of America said on
Wednesday that the Soviet repre-
sentative has sent a top secret re-
port to Moscow accusing the Chin-
ese Communist leader Mao Tse
Tung of deliberately sabotaging
Soviet interests in the Korean
war. The Voice said that report
was written by Vladimir Rogov,
the chief correspondent for Tass,
the Soviet News Agency in Pei-
ping. The said top secret report
“was intended only for official
Soviet eyes.”

The Voice said that the report

states that the Korean campaign

of the Chinese Red forces has been
persistently slowed down by ideo-
logical deviations in Mao’s “in-
ternal clique”. fj
Rogov added that the “plain
unwillingness of the Chinese Com-

munist General to utilize alll‘

methods and resources of combut
was one prime reason why so
many decisive Korean operations
had failed.” ;
How the report reached Ameri-
can hands was not penny ‘-



Prisoners Sabotage
Soviet Troop Traits

MAINZ, GERMANY, Aug. 15,

Eight French and four Saar
prisoners of war ongtheir way
home from Russia said on Wednes-
day that thousands of partisans
roaming the Baltic countries are
sabotaging Soviet troop trains
and military installations.

The 12 men still clad in black
Russian prisoner of war pants and
coats refused to give their names
because they said it might affect
some 1,000 French prisoners still
in Russia.

The men looked healthy and
said that after the first three years
“which were just awful” they
were given a chance to work and
living conditions improved UP.



Weather Threatens
Antigua Again

(From Our Own Correspondent?
ANTIGUA, Aug. 15,

To-day Antigua is experiencins
mildly that familiar threatening
weather so fresh in people’s mem-
ories of exactly a year ago. Early
this morning there were cloudy
overeast, gusty blea vinds and
intermittent sharp heavy shower
were persistent throughout the
day. It is just five days short oi



termed a small hurricane which
proved to be merely the introduc-

tion to a severe thrashing of 3ist)

August. To-night the wind’s veioc-
ity is increasing and the baromecer
has dropped 17 points, but the in-
habitants are not alarmed or bat-
tened down as a tropical] disturb-

Antigua.

SOVIET WAR

By R. BUCKINGHAM
BERLIN, August 15.
Returned prisoners of war from
Russia released on Monday, after
six years of captivity, said that
the Soviet Union’s war factories
are humming night and day,
that the Soviet Union “is a
for war as Germany was in 1
They said that
sidings across Ru








THURSDAY, AUG?



oo
* FOR SAFETY

SOME of the yachts which
reported that a storm was passi

brought into the inner basin yesterday for safety after it had been
southeast of the island.

itain Can Build
Own Atom Bomb

LONDON, Aug.,

Britain ean build her awn atomic bomb any time she
chooses, but there appears to be two schools of thought on
whether the British should. broadcast the atomic bomb. |
Some feel that they should go on and produce a bomb t
show the world that they d@ not need atomic help from the
United States. Others contend that she should not yo to th
expense of making an atomic bomb because one is not
necessary in view of her friendship with the United States.













Britain has kept pace in Atomi
research, and now

First Hurricane Of
The 1951 Season

MIAMI, Florida, Aug. 15.

The weather
on Wednesday that the first hur-
ricane of the 1951

near London which produce
radio-active
that Britain uses,

The prospects are that she, als¢
have enough fissionabl



Uranium, reportedly, will go inte



boiled up in the Leeward Islands
near Chester.

Atomic Piles

moving in a ,
Additionally,

northwesterly direction at about
15 miles an hour,
Reconnaisance

charged that
understood
Y,roducing

bomb droppec
{on Nagasaki
Martinique.
\urricane of the

Unofficial Reports
the official

able material

hurricane, which
was spotted east



the Florids |July that Britain's

plans to produce



| 1"
in the world. The American at mic}
Brookhaven,



Rockefeller
Marries Again

NEW YORK, Aug.
John D. Rockefeller junior, VW-
-year-old millionaire philanthro-|

Fuel Shortage
~) Necessity
tish toward
power plant,
fuel shortage,
vreek coke went on the ration list.;

Standard Oi!
married Wednesday
the widow of an old college chum

Rockefeller,

human welfare have totalled mil-



experimental :
George Hear



Providence, Rhode Island to Mrs

erve workers
New York
Publie Relations firm of Lee and
announced here
mid-morning ceremony
vate attended only by immediate
members of the two families,

commereial

heat generated
is used to make steam and stear

relations firm said John D. Rocke- }98@ of coal or oil,

Rockefeller’s earlier date than in countrie

It was the bride’s third |

Rockefeller
of his attention to the foundation
started by his famous father,

BOMB DAMAGES
RED BOOKSHOP



a * rim .
On Business Trip
LONDON, Aug.

Villanueva,
Manager of the Manila Chronicle,
arrived in London on Monday on

Communist

| Wednesday night for a short sta
in Dundee, Scotland.
an anniversary of that which was; }

Philippines
rather than

100 DEAD

ANKARA, TURKEY



Egypt and
United States



the San Francisco Treaty Confer-
in September
ance is expected to pass. by | of the Philippine delegation



| after Tuesday's s€vere eart)

FACTORIES

names and nationalities

ardising the scheduled
their countrymen still
Russian prisoner



and |

Russian citizens they

Russian populatior
expressed doubt



the atom bomb
Factory Work

They worked in Rus

ovocat





Nations Commis-

tudying the problem of more
and a half million

announced on Wednes-

contact with Soviet officials at the
session. The Commission
written United Nations mem-
stressing it intends to seek a

purely a humani-

point of view and in close
ilaboration
vents directly concerned
Completing

with the govern-

ihe first stage of

three-member group
meet again, probably
in. Europe at the end of the year.

notice “hat when

the time and place has been de-
invite the Govern-
concerned to send repre-

that joint studies

might be made fer possible solu-

Italy, and Japah
Russia is still hold-

of thousands of

II prisoners, Russia
satellites denounced the
ssembly resolution set-
Wer Prisoner Com-

so far refused te co-

efforts to get de-

on the prisoners’ situation

HEARST WILL BE
BURIED FRIDAY

FRANCISCO, Aug. 15
Randoiph Hearst will
probably on Friday
the resting place of his par-
Cypress Lawn Cemetery
home town it was an-
‘nounced on Wednesday

The funeral

was scheduled ten-
pm. Friday. The

the farmed publisher was
from Beverly Hills
where he died peacefully from in-
of old
will be entombed near that of his

age. Hearst’s body

Phoebe Apperson

his father Senator
t—U.P.



Veisal Extends
Visit To Britain

LONDON, Aug. 15

of Saudi Arabia
extend hi visit
further discussions

authorities on
mutual interest in

East" the Foreign
announced Wednesday
was learned that Feisal who

this week origin-

cheduled to leave this
negotiation ran into

will be represented
Committee which met
night at the Foreign

first time. --U.P

‘| Heat Wave In Texas

DALLAS, Aug. 15
nder if 195



a year of big
temperature-

4) degree A

iea vave threatens
from the Gulf
Panhand's. Seared
ire ending lank

wiy market. At least

ind no relief is

“HUM NIGHT AND DAY

|
—|

y m ” 2 Ta int t lise » of [ill-fated United Nations decis
Lak a point by point discussion o 1 ions ecision
' Se ¢ Kk Solution the treaty Dulles said neither the | to internationalize Jerusalem, will

will be



PRICE: FIVE CENTS

Dulles Warns Reds
|



About Saboiage |
Over Jap Trealy

WASHINGTON, Aug. 15.

JOHN FOSTER DULLES in a nationwide radio

_ address Wednesday night warned the Soviet
Union not to send a ‘wrecking crew’’ to the San

anese Peace Treaty, declarihg: “If such tactics
would be tried we are confident they would fail.’

Dulles made it clear that nations attending the
San Francisco Peace Conference will not be per-
mitted to alter the text of the Japanese Treaty
made public in Washington and London.

| Francisco Conference to try‘to sabotage the Jap-
|

The President's special repre-

sentative told a press conference

that 50 nations invited to the San owdown On

*rancisco meeting had been given rf

‘o understand that the purpose of = -

i antetiee on ee ae ear East

‘ext released Wednesday which he

described as an absolutely final | Tod

focument \

Dulles reported that so far 934 ay

nations have formally accepted “

he Anglo-American invitation to FLUSHING MEADOW, |

San Franses New York, Aug. 15,
_ One of the biggest showdowns
in the deteriorating Near Rastern

. e * .
Significant situation since the partition of

Palestine and the passage of the



Inited States nor the United be unveiled here Thursday when
Kingdom considered any of the | the U.S., Britain, amd France plan

To Prisoner Of; ecent changes in the text of [to request the Security Council to
War Problem

NEW YORK, Aug. 15

najor character But he added | order Egypt to lift the blockade of
tit every one of them was of |the Suez Canal on the grounds
significance to one or more coun- that it violates the spirit of armis-
tries tice vureements, and threatens the

He opined that re-wording of | Matntenance of peace in the Mid-
the reparations section might | dle East

make it somewhat more palatable Rig Three Western powers are

ito the Philippimes. Indonesia anc expected to table a draft resolu-

Burma jon to that effect when the Caun-

allegediy still held | Dulles said none of the three ‘il reconvenes here after a two-

; would be completely satisfied buf | wrok res diving which several

it will seek to establish direct | that there would be a growing re woall powers delegations unsuc-
ilization that as a practical mat- essfully sought to persuade Egypt

lter the formula worked out for ]{o agree to seme compromise

reparatOns was the oply possible formula that would obviate the
nethod by which claimant coun- [reed for chiding Egypt publicly

tries would secure any restitution Exypt claims that maintenance
from Japan of the blockade is necessary to
The formula eall for the Jassure her security in the face of

Japanese to negotiate agreement Jwhat Cairo contends to be the

under which they will provide [aggressive designs of Israel
processing services for raw ma- uypt has already served im-
rials from claimar\ countric’ Pplied notice on the Council’ that i:
and send back both consume [is not planning to lift the block-
vods and capital goods. ade which is part of Arab econa-
) i mic warfare against Israel until
> ¢ 2 peace treaties are signed and an-
Some uc stion nounced in the same breath that
peace is impossible as leng as
Israel refuses to repatriat® most

salvage operation in waters of 7 tall

Allied powers if the latter wished if not all, of nearly 1,000,000

© Dulles said the insevtion.in the| “tab Palestine retygees, . :
treaty of a paragraph calling upon An Envy esSkesmnan Sinae

all nations to carry out provisions | clear Egypt would be unable to
of the Potsdam proclamation of | abide by the resolution and the
July 26, 1945 which deals with the | Arab League promised to support
return of Japanese war prisoners all Arab states in Egypt's expect.
was made because there is some |e ane if defiance to the Coun-
suestio whether the Russians | ¢! order
en aos to this agreement, This will place the U.N, as well
He pointed out that the U N. | as spotisors of the Tésolution in an
has undertaken to look into the awkward position in so far as no-
question, so it, was felt it should | Sedy here has any idea how to go
be mentioned in the treaty about enforeing the Council's pre
American and Japanese officials posed call upon Egypt to lift the
have estimated some 340,000 of Canal restrictions
the Japanese who surrendered tor A _ Spokesman for the sponsors
Soviet forces in Manchuria are! admitted “it is the $64 question all
till unaccounted for right But he refused to specu
—UP late on how the resolution would

be implemented once it is. ap
Se | proved by the 11 nations body,



Japanese also would assist in



Failure of the U.N, to impose
The “ADVOCATE” its authority on Egypt would, ac-
pays for NEWS

cording to diplomatic observers



have the immediate effect of
| weakening the whole structure of
Dial 3113 armistice agreements and makin
Israel feel free to adopt reprisal
Day ar Night againg Egypt ee




hut the
| beginning of
a tragedy

Yet it would be idle to calculate the number of
‘ fires caused by carelessly discarded cigarettes,
because the habit will apparently persist despite

the serious loss of life and property resulting

| from these outbreaks
It is the work of a few minutes to protect your-
self from risk of loss through fire, by consulting
from the effects of| at your earliest opportunity the local agents of
| Guardian Assurance Co. Ltd. And, if the oppor-
tunity does not seem to present itself, MAKE
it do so immediately. Tires don’t usually give
much warning

idustry w¢
d Western

hn es, efficiency,

{ ¢ - ~ |

New ories and
pp tn deep air
O ex-prisone

in could not

arming, but!

thiy afraid of

The subt whether
ent the ator
+he

@ ON pase 5

j
i
|

Local Agents



_§.P. MUSSON, SON & Co. Lia.

BROAD STREET .. P.O. Box 227, Phone 446$

ei ak a NS ONES a NO RN aaah eee Keil ieee



PAGE TWO

Carub Calling





































BARBADOS ADVOCATE

B.B.C. Radio





















IT’S WORTH 1T





































I rogramme “1 believe there is nothing quite really ruatter, if in return you get
| so deeply satisfying as a happy large dividends in a way of
‘ . 4 1arriage, a to achieve it love’and happiness, and you are
Ol 1 THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 1+ marriage, and if », See
C : . 2 toys pa «te Barefoot dancers Bergman’ 8 Visit 11.18 a.m. Programme Paeka a 2s} you ere the one who has to hold secure in the knowledge _that
Si Ltd ae 1 no: ‘the URIN Land — eee nee — a.m.| Cut a hand more often, if you are your husband would certainly
itd wi n z the J °r y Specia ispe 2 ‘noon s , as i ac i
. a2 + 2 Pas sritish RING her visit to London eae ua re eee ne News,i the one who has to bite back choose you again? wre
lee ) ar etiSs to see her 12-year-old | s‘gg_4 70 inese famous last words in a Phyllis Digby Morton speaking
Guiana yesterday by B.W.LA. daughter, Pia, Miss Ingrid Berg- : ee ee euaerel and give in more often on “Would He Choose you
He expects to be away for about marr has been staying in Kensing-| 4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. Interluda, and» more generously — does it Again?” in a B.B.C. programme
one week He has gone to joh tca at the home of film director |4-15 ».m. Top Score, 5 p.m. England val
ante % om ‘ South Af m Oa "=" a“
his wife fo went to B.G. a David )Lean and his actress wife, |SO'" Ditties, 5.08 pom. Interlude, ot es
week ago During his t tay " former husband, Dr. Lindstrom. | Pipes Drums, 6.15 p.m. ‘Scottish | * ur ae DANCE’ ‘| P i A Zz a» BTOWN Boss of Lonely
Georgetown he will be a guest at Ann Todd. Miss Bergman’s | Magazine, 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade,||| $4h 3S DANCE Dial 2310 Valley and
e Tov Hotel visited her there with Pia. 6.56 p To-day’s Sport Betty HUTTON LAST # ange TODAY | Cheyenne Roundup jo ma
David is el ‘ 7 0O—10 15 pm 2.53 M. sia? M sneitinepenaiiiniameen 4.30 & 8.30 p
ee . . : avid Lean and his wife are |.— - = > ‘Two New Features! (Triple Attraction)
Married in Jamaica friends of Miss Bergman and her} .7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. News| “ , I IN MY HEART”
er es friendy-of Mins Beremen and beet 2 iPss, 1.10 9.0. We om icin, 1 THERE'S A GIRL HEA
. KENRIC r. MURRAY, ii T > ith the F p.m. Selecting a Detective, 8 p.m with Lee BOWMAN—Elyse KNOX—Gloria JEAN—Lon CHANEY and
1 Director of Barbados Redif- am hey stayed with them in| Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. | Books to “JIGGS AND MAGGIE IN JACKPOT JITTERS” '
See i . narried Italy last year. Read, 8.30 p.m. The Arts, 8.45 p.m. | (From the Famous Comic Strip By George McManus)
fusion Service Ltd., was married Says Lean: “She is as beautiful | Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the Editorials Joe YULE as Jiggs—Renie RIANO as Maggie and Cartoonist
I aica a few days ago t vs ever, Her baby is a fine 9 p.m. Tuneful Twenties, 9.30 p.m. Do George McMANUS
Mr Norah Beddow, widow ot child.” - You Remember, 9.45 p.m. Special Also “CHARLES vs, WALCOTT” FIGHT FILM |
S Leader T. Beddow and ; eal 7 m. The moe 10 7 WORLD'S HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP FIGHT |
oe : i terlude, 5 p.m Mducating Archie Sree eseeenantae ew 4 ee j
c t f Prof. and Mrs. John- . 10 43 ig ne Spectal Today 1 p/m |
: 79 aie Gl a ester. Bui Sunny Weather in 10.45 p.m. Here and There “KELLER SHARK" & “SONG OF THE RANGE” |, |
i Mr. and Mrs. Murray will Trinidad Cigarette Ends Roddy McDOWALL o Jimmy wASee te |
be returning to Trinidad in a day |
or two Ss arriving | from e z ve ee ee >
ri ‘
i. Trinidad early yesterday! Surprise Girl PLAZA osu GALETY
Via Trinidad afternoon told Carib that they r,s shew heh amt 8404
I-ft Piarco in sunshine. Very L d . s To-day 5 & $20 p.m.
, : From SMART P , y .
unlike the weather they found or ondon OLITICs” Last Show TODAY — 8.W p.m.

f* CHARLES W: ATKIN of
I Messrs. T. Sydney Kinch

Ltd. who left Barbados on Jul
7th, returned from Trinidad oa
Tuesday night by B.W.I.A

He also _ visited Bermuda,

Nassauand Jamaica.

40 Years at Eton













Mc": K. MARSDEN, senior
1 n smatics ! t Eton,
I Y lel ts on
the colle He is 64 His
pupil Lord Hallsham Australian dancers Elizabeth
a ud , Permanent Russell. Mardi Watchorn ane
= ey Kl Coralie Hinkley, all 24 have
~ i 445 wuoy a Lion 1e
uv onte ir arrived in London. They will de
; s contemporary of Mr. Hugh thei dancing bareloot. and train
: on Australian food parcels
irsden s many changes London Eipress Seritee
Eto > be . he says, tire °
ui than they used to; Off To St. Vincent
Via rst thinks this may be RS. HAZEL MacKINN leaves
ause of the difference in today by B.G. Airways for
feeding: St. Vincent to join four other
Fo the masters, he says, the girls from Barbados who have
place i a shadow of what it gone to St. Vincent for a holiday.
was i 91 ), “Life for_the master They are, Miss Gwen Cecil, Miss
then luxurious and the Wine Joan Knight, Miss Hazel Inniss
used to flow; now it is spartan.” and Miss Gloria Cheeseman.
Returning Today Useful
- F 2 ODERNISING the City and
M 2 liek: Nee MRS. ; ALVIN taking down the old fashicr-
4 TUCKER and their daughter ed verandahs is all very well,
i vnette who have been holidaying someone told me yesterday, but
in Barbados for the pact few the old verandahs come in very
veeks. expect to return to Trini- useful on rainy days such as

dad today

yesterday.



THE



ADVENTURES OF

arrival at Seawell:
wind
That was at 1 p.m, yesterday.

overcast, little

and an occasional drizzle.

Holiday Over

R. CYRIL GOMES who is

with Barclays Bank in Domi-
nica has been holidaying § in
Barbados sinee July 31st. Today
he is due to return to Dominice
by B.G. Airways.

Hon. H. D. Shillingford, Mr
Hugh Redfern and Mr. John Rose
who arrived from St. Lucia on
‘Tuesday are due to leave by the
same plane,

‘Copy Boy’

ILM actor Frederic March
on his way to the U.S. from

Penelope









{

They Are So Much tenon)
By FREDERICK COOK |

NEW YORK,
TWENTY million television
watchers heard late last night

from a smiling 20-year-old Lon-
don typist what really impresses'
the visitor to New York for the
first time.
the food. It was not the high build-
ings or the lights on Broadway—
it was the cigarette ends,

To Judy Breen, from Campden
Hill Road, Kensington, nothing
illustrated the difference between
London and New York more than
the fact that over here people
crush a-+cigarette a moment after

is|they have lit it.

Said non-smoking Judy: “In

England with his wife Fiorence] London you never see a cigarette

in the Queen Elizabeth.

Mrs. March says théir daughter
Penelope (18), left
summer, wants to become ;
writer. “She has taken a job or

1

the New York Post,” says Mrs
March. “She is a ‘copy boy.’

ee fetches tea for the
staff .’’

Incidental Intelligence

HANK heaven this is still <

free country and a man can

do as

his wife pleases.—Wirecc
Life,

U.S.A.
—L.E.S.



PIPA

Copyright . P 111 . Vaz Dias Int Amsterdane

BY THE WAY e eee By Beachcomber

is, highly — satisfactory
know that one more
legal point has been obscured by
the Law.

A recent court ruling said that

‘Tt




to
doubtful

bark of the hited dog in cir-
cumstances either normal or ab-
normal, And finally: What con-
stitutes a dog within the meaning
of the Act?

It is: legal for a normal dog to

bark in a normal manner under Book Review

circumstances which would nor-

nally produce a_ bark.” That Obviously destined to be the
leaves the way open for long and standard work on the subject.
eestly arguments about what N these words the publisher
constitutes an abnormal bark on announces Vol. VI of the
the part of an abnormal dog in “List of Huntingdonshire Cab-
circumptances which would not men,” the final volume in a
normally produce a bark. Then brilliant series. It is the ideal
there is the abnormal bark of bedside book, to be dipped into,
the normal dog, and the normal rither than to be read from. cove:



Aeooes
HS iw i tea on ash (9)

fio we? (4)
Â¥ we in misery. made cioth. (4)
Tord (9)
Lotu- that meade Leo numb. (7)




® vernacular (9)
Ss not say where the
for this music. (6)
inds “ pop"
(4)

1 Bachelor of Surgery it may
geat cricket (8)
(4)

Uow timed rage went

offspring

)

you of

«)

Down
; You'll fina it true in fur. (8B)
’ ULiecé up number six, please.
4 Possess in town markets. (3)
+ seeh wnen iced (3)
stays when Le
(3) 6.
in'l pass as a be gar.
% Game from Norway ?
} This Kind 1s human 3)
{t's irritating (4)
Grimace (3)
idiomatically 1t is not. (5)
T ling le Oniv intimation.
at Jessop did. (4)
jeputy 7 (4)

She
team
i Tinetec





re; 10. Atones;
Mare. 16 Kase;
Lens’ 25 Name
Tret Dewn: 1,
Fasten: 4 Roe
Consomme:

1S. Miliet: 18, Year:



to cover at a
at random
Gr Hut

sitting, Opening il
one finds “Stanfield,
and on almost every page
there is, if not a surprise, at any
iate food for thought, The seven
Tatlows on page 213 suggest that
in certain Huntingdon families
the trade of cabman is traditional,
although a footnote tells us that
an eighth son of old “Cabby,”
Tatlow went into an ironmongery
business in Sedley Vale. But there
are between these handsome
covers names for all tastes. Space
forbids lengthy quotation, but, as
an earnest of What is in store for
readers, one notes Ubstone, P.,
Varley, H. F., Varper, B. L.,
Wickershaw, K., Willett, N.. and
Yelpine, C.M.

Up To Date

PPARENTLY several

people

were surprised at my revela-

tion that the
tattooed has spread. It
longer confined to sailors,
well-known hostess

appearec
recently in the stalls

at a firs

night with the names of her four

husbands on her
three were crossed out in marking
ink. Another fashionable back
of generous proportions, is bein;
used for mere tattoo gossip,
1s “Millicent is After George,”
“Watch Tony and Muriel.’

In Passing

AM constantly astounded b)

the amount of completely use
less knowledge within everybody’:
reach today. For instance, I havc
just read a_ self-confident pro-
nouncement that the men o
Cardiff wear the smartest hats ir
England, If it is true, it doesn’
matter twopence. If it is un fu
it doesn't matter twopence. Any-
how, there can be very few peo
ple in a position to confirm or

back. The first

such

“| A Choice Of Scents

deny such a statement, Substitute

Hornehurch or

Or the less wise?



|
|



|
!
| The two friends stand and fee!
| thoroughly puzzled, ‘' | do wish |
| could see wt again,’’ says Rupert.
But he wants to go one way and
Al wants to go another At
> the little bear turns to his
| "We mustn't waste any more
| We'll be late for school if
i

Rupere and np Sorcerer—S



we don't hurry.’

nip knows the
way so they stride o'

over a little

hill. — All at once Rupert spies a
small figure going in the same
direction. ‘* Hullo. there's Tiger-

lily the Conjurer’s daughtre he
says. “She krows ail s

queer things. Let's ask her.”’




S@RBSGeOGQeaensepeBeBeBBeBeBRBaBaeHERE SB SE
a eee) Me. QO eas ee A ee

st
8 PLAIN SPUNS

In Pink, Lemon, Peach, Green,

Py FLOWERED SATINS 33"____.. cinlais

@ SHANTUNG
a

DIAL 4604

36”

36”


EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

ee ee NaS Ne SS Se

Blue and White

Beautiful Designs and Colours

$1.10

Be.

$1.40

——

DIAL 4220

Berkhamsted for}
Cardiff, and who is any the wiser? |

}



end longer than half an inch, That
one thing tells me more than any

college this|thing else I have seen.

Still Dancing






Judy is the girl who won a trip}

In her case it was no ==



|

round the world, six complete out-,

fits of stylish new clothes and
£800 spending money by taking
first place in Mr. Rank’s compe-
tition for the title of Miss Festi-
val of Britain

They are moving her from
continent to continent so fast that
she had only one day in New
York.

Hardened experts in the art of
welcoming visitors to Manhattan
fell out one by one before hei
packed 16 hours were ove

But early this morning Judy
was still dancing in a night-clup
four hours before she took off
for Canada on her way to Hono-
lulu, Australia, India, Italy and
home again.

On Top Of Parapet
In her whirlwind one-day visit

here she had held two Press con-
ferences, been rushed in a caval-
cade of British cars at 70 m.p.h.
for a morning television appear-
ance, been’ backstage at the
world’s largest cinema,

She had appeared” on news
reels, posed for Press photo-
graphers, climbed on to a para-

pet 100ft. above the street for
more pictures, toured New York

from one end to the other by car,
She had visited the United Na
tions, been guest of honour at
ocktail party, made another TV
appearance last night and starred
on a mid-night radio show.
This Time, Chicken
The girl they could not tire out
made one other record that im-

craze for being| pressed New Yorkers.

is no
One

She refused to eat a steak for

lunch, She had a 15s, dish of
old salmon, And for dinner she
ygain turned down steak in

avour of chicken—at 32s.

“There is only one thing I have
missed,” she said, “and that’s 2
banana split, There simply has not

»een time.”
—L.ES...

“If we bend low and seek for
it we will find the smell of dung
on every road; but if we hold
our heads high and open our nos-
trils to the winds of heaven we
will know only the sweet scents
of, the countryside. That is my
earnest belief.”

Robert Gubbings talking

B.B.C. programme called

Speak for Myself.”





TO THE SCREENS
BIGGEST
ee

OF THEM ALL {I





Paramount presents
The risa song-and-dance pair!
FRED

| HUTTON: ASTAIRE
| 7 Lets /
Jpance ee

ot

© NS 0G:
UUCKE MAISON RORY MOET



Produced oy Owected by
ROBERL CLGCNS + NURMAN 2 MCLEOD
tay Allan Scott



206 by Dane Lussier

PLAZA

BRIDGETOWN



Tomorrow (Friday) 2.30—
4.45 and 8.30 p.m



|





“BOY WITH GREEN HAIR”
Pat O'Brien
“BORN TO KI
iday to
Mat. Sunday 4
Triple Attraction!
World's Heavyweight Championship
Film . “CHARLES vs, WALCOTT”
Ae sten Maatures
“SQUARE DANCE KAtt
Phil Britto—Virgina Welles and
KIDLER SHARK” Roddy MeDowall

Freddie Stewart and
aU NA CLIPPER” Roddy McDowall
~~ Friday Tonly) & and” 8.30 a.

“NEWS HOUNDS”

Leo Gorcey and East Side Kids and

“JIGGS AND MAGGIE IN soc TETY"

Joe Yule— —Rente Riano

‘Speciai “sat, % T-30-A-m

arlie Chan in “THE TRAP”

“SONG OF THE RANGE"
Jimmy Waket

and

Lawrence Tierney
5 penance

0 pom

30 p.m





;
||| PHE GARDEN — ST. JAMES |
with The Teenagers and } }
1 i
| |

and







AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA< (Membeis Only) |||
> SHT 8.30 |
BING CROSBY — JOAN FONTAINE |

“THE EMPEROR WALTZ”

Color by Technicolor
BING’S BEST SONGS!

Commencing FRIDAY 17th—
ANN TODD, CLAUDE RAINS in.
“ONE WOMAN'S” STORY.”

GLOBE THEATRE

TO-DAY 5 and 8.15 p.m. LAST SHOWS
Richard Widmark, Mark Stevens in—

“THE STREET WIThl NO NAME”





IN























—- and -—
“ORCHESTRA WIVES”
GRAND 2 P.M. MATINEE TO-DAY—
BOMBAY TALKIES present:
Ashok Kumar — Mumtaz Shanti in

“KISMET’

Our first Iadian Talking fiim.
EVERYBODY WILL ENJOY THIS PICTURE

Indians $1.00; Non-Indians 12c¢., 24c., 36¢.















Opening GLOBE Tomorrow

NEVILLE PHILLIPS ,
PRANCIS HYPOLITE .

A FULN MOTTER THAN THE

KOREAN FRONT
A G

PNOUINE SUPER-DUPER

FINALLY, at haat after a
3 year delay, you can see

; THE OUTLAW?
EVM lich |

Peay

wld

PEAT ieee







RUSSELL

Te ge at ae 4
MOU OM TRe@ haa s
WALTER HUSTON

Om. Com tela)

»
Plus:
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
EDDIE HALL .................... Singing “Begin the Beguine” |
MAVIS WILTSHIRE . “Count Every Star” |

“I Apologise”’
“Because”

MARTIN HAYNES “Confess”
CHESTON HOLDER . “Be My Love”
Plus:



i

———

——e

A Hot Musical Short ‘PACKAGE OF RHYTHM
For this show you gotta be here early. Cause it’s the
GRANDEST WEEK-END ENTERTAINMENT









|
|
|
|
|



So

Wseful tenas im...

EARTHENWARE jf

Tea Cups & Saucers
Lunch, Breakfast, Soup & Dinner Plates

=<,

=







|

Vegetable Dishes with Covers |
Meat Dishes

Milk Jugs

1-Pt. Cups with Covers

/“A DATE WITH JUDY”

Decorated Tea Pots
Decorated Bowls—with & without Covers.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON FACTORY LTD. {
Tel. No. 2039 ‘\

a ——————————

Hardware Department













THURSDAY,
TO-DAY

YOUR LAST CHANCE
TO SEE

MIDDLE WEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP

AUGUST 16, 1951

THE WORLD’S

SUGAR RAY ROBINSON

VS.

RANDOLPH TURPIN

FIGHT.

AT
one tie masdnion., . Ta ior > 2 Ss ©
EMPIRE ROXY
4.45 & 8.30 4.30 & 8.15
with the
with the Action Double

Republic Musical Sunset —,

HIT PARADE| «pays oF BUFFALO
1951 a

and
z (Allan (Rocky) LANE
Songs—Dances
Music—Mirth

“SALT LAKE RAIDERS”

SLARTING TO-MORROW 2.30 & 8.30 and CONTINUING
DAILY AT 4.45 & 8.30 MATINEE: SATURDAY MORNING at 9.30





AT

EMPIRE

JAMES STEWART Hits Again!
win Barbara HALE in



ROX Y

TO-MORROW ONLY 4.30 and 8.15
20th Century Fox Double

Edward G. ROBINSON
McLAGLEN in

James LYDON

Victor Charles RUSSELL in

AND

“TAMPICO” “TUCSON ”’

OPENING SATURDAY 4.45 & 8.15
20th Century Fox Presents - - -

“VENGEANCE VALLEY”

Starring .
JOHN IRELAND — SALLY FORREST

«xROYAL

TO-DAY LAST TWO SHOWS 4.50 and 8.15
Another Fox Double

BUD ABBOTT
LOU COSTELLO

JAMES CAGNEY
RICHARD CONTE

in 9 in
“LOST IN A HAREM” " “13 RUE MADELEINE”
Bi LAUGHS DRAMA



OPENING TO-MORROW 4.30 & 8.15 and CONTINUING to SUNDAY
Republic Smashing Double

“LIGHTS OF OLD “WAKE OF THE

SANTA FE” 9 RED WITCH”
Starring... =

DALE EVANS and
ROY ROGERS

with

JOHN WAYNE and
GAIL RUSSELL





SPECIAL SATURDAY AT 9.30
tepublie Deuble - - -
| Sunset CARSON in - - ** KING OF
a 299
“DAYS OF BUFFALO 2 escaaraiied

with William WRIGHT and
Janet MARTIN

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY LAST TWO SHOWS 4.30 and 8.15
Twentieth Century Fox Double

Merle Oberon
George Saunders

BILL”

Wallace Beery
Jane Powel:

m

“THE LODGER”
MURDER DRAMA

in 2

‘<

MUSICAL

FRIDAY and SATURDAY 4.45 & 8.15
Yirst Instalment

SUNDAY and MONDAY 4.45 & 8.15

Pinal Instalment—Republic Serial

«“ ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN
MARVEL”

Starring...
TOM TYLER

=

og







'



THURSDAY, AUGUST

16,

1951



1 £

GARy,



Cuba Doubles Sugar



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

DF to the Seaside..... win Gueé

“Mum! That man's thrown all our toffee and oranges out of the window.”

Sales To U.K.

LONDON,

Cuba sold twice as much sugar to the United Kingdom
in the first five months of this year as in the corresponding
period of 1950, according to new figures just released by the
Cuban Sugar Stabilisation Institute, covering sales up to the

end of May.

The figures show Cuban exports to Britain

totalling 285,121 tons in this year’s five-month period, as
against 142,508 tons in the same period last year.



7,000 Sydney
Dockers Will Strike

SYDNEY, Aug. 15

Nearly 7,000 Sydney dockers to-
day decided to strike from to-
morrow until Monday in protest
against the suspension of 75 work-
ers who refused to work on the
midnight shift yesterday

New South Wales miners stop-
ped work today to hold. pithead
protests on the Government's re-
ferendum to outlaw the Commun-
ist Party

An executive said in a state-
ment that it regarded the suspen-
sions as a “savage sentence” The
men considered the conditions on
the midnight to dawn shift very
bad, and the shift as unnecessary
anyway .—U.P.

US Tightens Control
On Imports

WASHINGTON, Aug. 15.

The United States cracked down
Wednesday on imports of goods
from Communist China that are
“processed” in other countries to
escape U.S. embargo. The Treas-
ury Department’s customs Bureau
instructed collectors to block fur-
ther imports of any articles orig-
inating in Communist China or
North Korea, even if they passed
through another country where
the manufacture of the goods was
completed.

It yas learned that many of the
articles entering the U.S, under
the disguise of non-Communist
products were filtering through
Hong Kong. Macao and Italy. The
Treasury said that among. the
goods Which will be affected by
the crackdown ate Chinese fur
skins and straw braid.—U.P.

Fishermen See
. * os
Flying Missile
OSLO, Aug. 15.
Four fishermen in Northern
Norway reported yesterday they
had seen what appeared to be a
guided missile zoom over them
possibly “from across the Arctic.
Fishermen were besides a fjord
when the object shaped “like a
torpedo six to ten feet long with a
sharp point and steering fins
went over their heads at a height
of about 200 feet.





The missile disappeared over
a headland about half a mile
away.

They said there was a rattling
noi “like a tram car” as it passed
overhead, ; 1 :

The local officials are investigat-
ing.—U.P.





Greetings From U.S.

WASHINGTON, Aug. 14.

President Truman on Tuesday
sent the following message to
Kwaja Nazimuddin, Governor-
General of Pakistan, “the people
of the United States join in send-
ing to Your Excellency and to the
people of Pakistan the good wish-
es and felicitations on this na-

tional anniversary of Pakistan”.
—U-P.

COMMUNISTS FIGHT
FOR POWER IN ALBANIA

ROME, Aug. 14

Albanian refugees c.aimed a
serious fight for power broke out
within the Communist party in
Albania and Interior Minisict

Mehmet Shehu may replace Pre-
mier Enver Hodja, as the rea!
power there. They also reported
more than 10,000 Albanian “ku-
laks”—well-to-do peasants had
been imprisoned or sent to labour
camps because of their resistance
to Communist programmes

A newsletter said the Albanian
Communist party was shaken up
last spring but dissension in top
leadership still existed. It siid re-
lations between Hodja and Shehu







were sté y wor Rela-

tions ached tt t where

Shehu’s security t od

Stinok ‘ isits ‘i
—U.P.



Board of Trade returns, pub-
lished in London, put the figure
for this year even higher, with a

big rise in U.K, sugar imports
from Cuba in June. Over the
first six months of this year,

according to these figures, Britain



bought 355,375 tons of Cuban
sugar, including 159,216 tons in
June. These figures compare
with a total of 172,988 tons of
Cuban sugar in the first six
months of last year and 67,610
tons in June, 1950

B.W.I. Exports Drop

But the same statistics show a
big drop in British sugar imports
from the British West Indies.
Whereas the total for the British
West Indies was 205,913 tons in
the first six menths of last year,
it dropped to 147,387 tons in the
comparable period, of 1951. A
big increase in British imports
from Mauritius and smaller
increases in purchases from Aus-
tralia and British Guiana kept
the total from falling far below
last year’s, but still Britain
obtained only 459,134 tons of
sugar from Empire sources in the
first six months of 1951, as against
461,464 tons in the corresponding
period last year.

June figures show some im-
provement in the B.W.I. position,
with British imports up to 48,886
tons, as against 41,246 tons in
June, 1950. Corresponding fig-
ures for British Guiana, listed
separately, show that British
purchases rose from 4,173 tons
in June, 1950, to 5,219 tons in
June, 1951.

The whole of the
Britain’s sugar ration this year
has come from foreign sources,
the figures show. Imports from
foreign sources totalléd 657,655
tons in the six-month period. as
against 410,253 tons in the corres-

increase in

ponding period last year. June
imports from foreign sources
totalled 260,666 tons, as against
126,594 tons in June last year.

Apart from purchases from Cuba,
imports from San Domingo rose
from 237,183 tons in the first half
of 1950 to 282,291 tons in the first
six months of this year. Also
shown in the Board of Trade
figures are 6,271 tons from Puerto
Rico and 1,000 tons from Haiti.
—B.U P.

Tray Makes New
Oil Agrecments

BAGHDAD, August 13.

It was announced Monday that
Traq reached a new agreement
with three. foreign oil companies
with concessions in its fields
under which Iraq receives 50 per
cent of all profits.

The agreement signed with the
Iraq Petroleum Company, the
Basrah Petroleum Company and
the Mosul Petroleum Company
provides Iraq will get that share
of profits retroactively to the be-
ginning of this year.

Plans were also made for three
companies holding eoncessions in
Iraq to step Up production, From
1952 onward oil production is ex-
pected to reach about 30 million
tons annually with Iraq’s earning
about £59,000,000,

—U.P.



Reduced Imports
Will Cut Metal

WASHINGTON, Aug. 14
Reduced imports of tin may
eventually foree a cut in the
United States domestic consump-
tion of metal, but current alloca-
tion levels will probably be
maintained through 1951 2 high
official of the national productior
authority said on Tuesday He
said tin is now being allocated t



consumers at 90 per cent of the
normal annual consumption rate
cof about 65,000 tons. He said the
domestic production of some
import tonnage and withdrawal
from stockpiles are expected

permit N.P.A. to fulfill tin alloca-
tions at that rate through the

quarte 951.—U.P

Spanish N “ye
Essential

For Vocational Scholarships

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 13.

Knowledge of Spanish is no
Jonger necessary for candidates
applying for the Point IV scholar-
Ships to the Metropolitan Voca-
tional School at Rio Piedras,
Puerto Rico, Mr. Lawrence W.
Cramer, Secretary General of the
Caribbean Commission, told the
Press to-day.

Mr. Cramer said that he had
heard from Dr. Rafael Pico, Chair-
man of the Planning, Urbanising
and Zoning Board of Puerto Rico,
and a_ United States member otf
the Caribbean Commission, and
from the Director of the Point IV
Office of the Puerto Rico Training
Programme, Samuel E. Badillo,
to the effect that candidates will
be accepted, provided that they
speak and understand the English
language.

More Applications

Meanwhile, applications fot
these scholarships are being re-
ceived by Mr. Cramer. Thirty have
been received, of which number
five have already been granted.
It is hoped, Mr. Cramer said, that
students who have been reluctant
to apply beeause of the Spanish
language requirement, will now
avail themselves of this opportu-
nity, and get in touch with him
as soon as possible.

Under these scholarships, stu-
dents will enjoy free tuition at
the Metropolitan Vocational
School and will be granted, in
addition, $1,000 U.S., a year to
help meet their living and other
expenses.

The fields of training available
at the Metropolitan Vocational
School include: air conditioning,
automobile mechanics, baking, cab-
inet-making, drafting, electricity.
machine shop, printing, radio and
refrigeration. The duration of
these courses varies from one to
two years. The present scholar-
bhips are of one year duration,

but it is probable, Mr. Cremer
said, that students pursuing a
two-year course will be given

similar assistance during the sec-
ond year of their studies.

Hope Seen For
End Of Squabble

LIMA PERU, Aug. 14.
Diplomatic observers were hope-
ful on Tuesday that Ecuador and

Peru. may halt their latest
frontier squabble before the
incident becomes serious. These

impartial onlookers greeted with
signs of relief the request made
by Peru on Monday to the United
Stater, Brazil, Argentina and
Chile 1s mediating c~~ “tries that
they investigate the incident and
establish the responsibility fer it.
The Ecuadorean Government
charged that during the week-end
Peru launched a series of attacks
on Ecuadorean outposts along the
long disputed border, Peru coun-
tered that “drunken” Ecuadorean
troops had fired on Peruvian
watchposts and an Ecuadorean
plane strafed Peruvian troops.
—U-P,

Cotton Down
NEW YORK, Aug. 14.

Cotton prices gave ground per-
sistently after hesitant opening.
Finishing at a low level for the
session, the list showed losses of
22 to 28 points. The failure of the
Government weekly crop sum-
mary to particularly emphasize
the Texas drought © situation
brought a flood of liquidation by
recent buyers at the close. But
most of the offerings through the
session were coupled with hedging
cither against new crop beginnings
or additional purchases out of the
Government’s pooled stock The
weekly crop report said that while
the Texas heat and drought
“checked fruiting and develop-
ment,” they favoured weevil con-
trol.—U.P.





5,000 POUNDS OF FISH
DUMPED

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 13,

About 5,000 pounds of fish were
dumped in the sea over the week-

because



of fa cold stor-
Hous yes experi-
difficulty in getting

but things have got





Yugoslavia
Building Big
Power Station

By Helen Fisher.
JABLANICA, Yugoslavia,
Aug. 14

Ten thousand men and women
are toiling night and day, seven
days a week in this strategic
mountain valley to complete what
will be the second largest hydro-
electric power station in Europe
Exact figures have not been pub-
lished but Yugoslay planners
claim the station, due to start
operating in 1953, will be surpass
ed only by Russia’s monster Dyne-
prostroj in size and power

It will furnish power to towns
and industries throughout the
whole of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
The huge underground power
plant blasted out of solid rock in
the side of a towering cliff is al-
most completed and ready for (he
installation of machinery. The
tunnel which will bring watér to
six monster turbines (only three
will operate at the beginning) is
also near completion.—U.P.





3 Jets Collide:
Pilot Missing

VALETTA, Malta August 14.

An American pilot was reported
missing, after two United States
and one British jet fighter planes
collided, at high speed yesterday,
in the biggest manoeuvre ever
in the Mediterranean Sea.

One British and one American
pilot were rescued after the
crash, but no trace of the third
pilot was found despite intensive
search by the sea and air forces
of four Atlantic’ Pact nations,
testing the defences of the Atlan-
tic Army’s southern flank, The
missing pilot was not identified.

Meanwhile, the American con-
voy ploughed through the Medi-
terranean, hauling American
marines, scheduled to assault the
vital British island of Malta, and
blast a safe passage through the
Sicilian narrows for American
ships.

A broadcast message warned all
other ships and planes in the area
to keep clear of the planes and
warships of America, Britain,
France and Italy, massed for giant
exercise,

British naval aircraft blasted
the Ametican convoy with mock
torpedoes, rockets, and bombs, at
dawn to-day, in the wake of the
attack on Malta by American jets

yesterday, which caught many
defending British planes on the
ground,



POLISH OFFICERS
IMPRISONED

By Charles Ridley.

WARSAW, Poland, Aug. 13

Nine Polish officers were sen-
tenced to prison terms ranging
from ten years to life imprison-
ment on Monday on charges of
plotting to overthrow the Govern-
ment and spying for “Imperialist
powers.”

Four Generals were sentenced
to life imprisonment; three Colon-
els to 15 years; a Major to 12 years
and a one-time Lieutenant-Com
mander in the Navy to ten years,
One of the defendants was also
found guilty of co-operating with
Germans during the war—U.P

Dalai Lama Going
Back To Capital

LONDON, Aug. 14
The official Chinese Communist
news agency Said on Tuesday that



the Dalai Lama, spiritual leader
of Tibet has started back to the
capital at Lhassa after conferring
with Chinese representatives in
peer

ontier

rated I «
a bl UE U.P,

B.G. Threatens
To Retaliate

On Immigration

GEORGETOWN, B.G., August 13,

Trinidad’s drive to strip tne island of “prohibited immi-

grants” reported to be at present underway, may produce

repercussions in British Guiana, as is likely to be the case

regarding other West Indian islands, natives of whom may
be affected by Trinidad’s action.

i ‘Cuba Can’t
ee) Complain

WASHINGTON,

The United States should bear
in mind Cuba's action in increas-
ing her tariffs on U.S. made tex-
tiles from 100 per cent to 700 per
cent, sai@ Mr, John MeMillar
(Democrat, South Carolina), ad-
dressing a meeting of the Agricul















of Representatives, which is con
sidering new sugar purchasin;
policies.

“If Cuba feels she has the righ
to throttle our traditional trade ir
textiles,” he declared, “surely sh
cannot complain if the Unitec
States reserves the right to buy
sugar when and where it chooses
Cuba admits that the United State.
is the most important outlet for
its sugar. On the other hand, Cub:
seems to ignore the fact that Cub;
is the most important foreign
market for American rayons anc
the second most important marke
‘for American cotton goods.”

C.O.L. Increases

He pointed out that the highe
tariffs will mean big increases Ir
the cost of living for Cuban con-
umers, most of whom depend upo:
the sugar trade for a livelihood
He continued; “Cuban cane field
workers will be paying 60 per cem
more for their overalls and dun-
garees than highly-paid Americar
industrial workers.”

Referring to a statement by the
President of Cuba that Cuba wil
seek commercial agreements witt
European countries whereby those
nations may be extended certain
preferential rates hitherto re-
served exclusively for the Unitec
States, Mr. McMillan added: “We
have to make up somehow the
deficit in our goods created first,
by the high tariff rates just im-
posed on textiles, and second, by
the goods which Cuba intends to
buy from Europe which were pre-
viously bought from the United
States,” —B.U.P.

Committee Will Advise Govt
On Local Production

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 13.

A nine-man committee has
been appointed by the Minister o!
Agriculture and Lands, Hon. Vic-
tor Bryan, to advise Government
on the production of local vege-
tables, fish and animal products
with the idea of making the Colo-

London Express Service



Already in British Guiana
labour leaders are suggesting thai
retaliatory measures should be

taken by this Government, iif ®y a5 self-sufficient as possible
natives of this gountry living in} Thies is the first move by Govern-
Trinidad are affected by this} ment in its poliey of tackling the
move alleged to be aimed a ‘ising cost of living in a practical
easing ‘Trinidad’s housing, fooc ] manner. Mr, C. J. Muir wil, head
and unemployment situation the Committee

British Guiana has up to the =
present adopted rather an “open AR OU
road” policy regarding all West H B R LOG
Indian immigrants and according

to Trade Union Council Secretary
RB, Brentnoll Blackman “We

In Carlisle Bay












were informed by Government or M.V. Sedgefield, Yacht Marsaltese;
one occasion that we could not Sch. Cyril E. Smith, M.V. Antares,
make restrictive regulations on Sh. Mary aoe Pr Saline.
. . ty ch Initec igri sch ‘lorence
Te tea Emmanuel, Sch Philip H. Davidson,
inders Federati M.V. Velvet Lad/, Sch, Zita Wonita,
H at t di ration ou 1 MV. Daerwgod, Seh. Gardenia W.,
€ added that it is obvious from} § § Explerer, Sch, KEverdene, Seh,
the ty pe of action being taken by ; Wonderful Counseflor, — Seh MARISA
Trinidad that the reaction and} renee
repercussions : mia % Sch i/dia Adina S., Sch. Mandalay
epercussions would, to say fihe| 4." '§\s," Agamemnon, 8.8. Canadian
least, pot do anything to promote Challenger, M.V. Lady Joy
West Indian federation, ARRIVALS
i Pres mart of the British Guiana oe . "t nee + 4 = or:
s ssociati s Supt, raeant, fram Trinidad, ments:
Guiana tndustter Heke 7 bee OF! Senodher Owners’ Association,
ene stria orkers Union shooner Mandalay Il, 30 tons, Capt
Dr. J, P. Lachhmansingh declared | Grant, from St Vincent, Agents:
that British Guiana should stop] Schooner Owners’ Association
sending supplies o: ice t »! 8.8. Agamemnon, ¢ tons, Capt
; e supp tr © to Trini= | dimdiion, . trem. Amaterdagh, Agente
dad or insist on world market | hase. 3. ©. Midian, 8 & Co.. Lid
price $8, Canadian Chaile 35 tons
“I propose to raise the question | Capt. Anderson, trom " , Agents
of Trinidad’s kicking out of other Mosars Gardiner Austin & Co,, Ltd
ret / Rete ye ; jotor Vessel Lady Joy, 46 tons, Capt
West Indians and Guianese with Parsons, from St. Lucin, Agents: Messrs
the Trade Union Council and 1} Hanschell, Larsen & Co., Ltd
am sure the Council will throw DEPARTURES
its whole weight behind #ny Oil Tanker Inverrosa, 1,285 tana, Capt.
stand against this arbitrary action rr Vt a ho. wen —e
by socalled responsible people in Schooner Lindsyd Iv, 36 tons, Capt
Trinidad to brand others-in the] Barnes. for Fishing Banks, Agents:
Caribbean area who happen to| © heoner Owners’ Association
be in that island as prohibited S.S. Lady Rodney, 4,908 tons, Capt
immigrants a i ted) TeRlanc, for St. Vincent, Agents:
migran as a preliminary | Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co., Lid
move, and then to repatriate

In Touch with Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.,

them”, he said
It seerns certain that unless
Trinidad relaxes pressure will be









A

brotight to bear against Trini-| ®4v!se that they can now conmunicate
ans in this country the ee we Sant tee through their

: : Jarbado vast § ni-
7 ber of whom could not yet S.S. Trya, 8.S. Opequon, §.S. Yam-
@ jascertained.—(Cp) tii, S.S. Brazil, $.S. Adriatica, 8.8
Guscogne, S.S. Tindrs, S$ 8 Ocean
oe aeeeneneenrene Novigator, S.S. Agameranon, S.8. Alcoa
Id 2 Pioneer, 8.5. Argentinu, S.S. Fredrika,
§.S. Fort Amherst, $.S. Alabama/Fntp,
ad Oil Shares s.s Aleoa Planter, 8S oO
2 4 Rogenzes, S.S. Quilmes, $8. Alcoa
Ptnnant, S.S. Carina/Lmgp, 8.8. Tire.
Still Good Buy less, S.S. Carraibe, 8S. Alcon Corsair,
}.$. Golfito, SS. Helicon, $.S. Argobee,
LO C S.S. Esso Languedoc, 8.8. Isfonn, 9.8
Sharés a NDON, Aug. 9. Arizia, S.S. Willemstad/Pjet, | $.S
_ Shares in Trinidad Leaseholds| gonaid M. Schobie, S.S. Paparoa, 8.S
are still a good buy, in spite of| Delores, $.S. Gascony, S.S. Macoris,
the British Government's decision| 8-5. Roads, $$. Urania, $8 Capo
to restrict dividends, writes 9| chrmanciia, $3, "Lect yan, “8 8
correspondent of the London Fin-| Atheimere, '$.S. Pétter 2, 5.5. Whittier

ancial Times.
good on their own
writes, but also
potentialities of
incursion into the
produeing field, ,
For some years, the company
has operated a_ refinery neat
Toronto on oil shipped from
Trinidad, Recently, it has taken 9
small interest in the big Leduc
oilfield in Alberta, which may
well be the beginning of an im-

Not only Hills, 8.S. Axtell J. Byles, $.$. Kanan-
goora, §.S. Raban, 8.8, Afghandstan/
Ginj, 3.8 8 Teresa/Wdwe, SS.

American Eagle/Ktam

MAIL NOTICE

3.5 Golfito will be closed at
General Post Office as under

Parcel Mati at 10 a.m., Registered
Mail at 2 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at
2.20 p.m. on the 15th August, 1951

are they
merits, he
because of the
the company’s

Canadian oil-





the

!
Mails for Bermuda, St. John, N.B, 4.

Halifax, Quebec and Montreal by the
M.V, Canadian Challenger will be closed

: at the General Post Office as under:

portant expansion programme, Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at

“At any rate,” says this writer) 9%. Ordinary Maib at 10 # Mm, to-day
“it opens up possibilities for the} ‘th Aueust 1951
future whieh can hardly be} Mails for British Gufina by the Sen;
ignored by the long-term investor,] Frances W. Smith will be closed at the
whe ove z ‘ stte,,| General Post Office as under:—
t 7 eventually may do better Parcel Mat! and Kegistered Mail at
than, some spec ulatofs who have’ 1 a.m. Ordinary Mail at 12.15 p.m,
been rushing to buy Canadianjon Priday, 17th August 1951
shares with oil interests.” {

—B.U.P.



Bus Plunges Into y

Bottom Of Lake |

ITALIAN RIVIERA, Aug. 14. \
; Police and army. rescue teams |
began attempts to raise the wreck-
age of a tourist bus that plunged
into icy lake Resia in mountains
north of here last night with an
estimated 36 Italian and Swiss
men, women and children aboard

‘Only one person, a woman, es-
caped from the big Pullman which |
ettled on the bottom cf the lake





ture Committee of the U.S. House












PAGE THREF

After a tiring day

BOVRIL





When the long wearying day is over at last a cup of Bovril is
cheering and refreshing—Bovril’s beefy, energising goodness
banishes exhaustion and lassitude amd sets you up wonderfully.

REMEMBER, BOVRIL makes delicious sandwiches,
and improves all dishes.

nee



fo
EQUIP’ YOUR TRACTOR- DRAWB
AND, ANIMAL - DRAWN VEHICLES

Nau. IMPLEMENTS
wth

DUNLOP

FARM TYRES

WHEELS « HUBS « BRAKES

@ PERMIT GREATER
LOADS

e REDUCE FUEL
CONSUMPTION

@ ELIMINATE DAM-
AGE TO CROPS

@ PERMIT LOWER
LOADING LINE

e@ RUN SMOOTHLY
AND SILENTLY



t weer ~*~
A NEW TYRE DESERVES A NEW DUNLOP TUBE
4 "ase ae

DUNLOP RU ENGLAND



ca. LTo. BIRMINGHAM,



ACCESSORIES

RIBBED RUBBER MATTING
TYRE PRESSURE GAUGES

BATTERY HYDROMETER

SIMONIZ WAX & CLEANER

CHAMOIS

Qrt. Tins HYDRAULIC BRAKE FLUID

VALVE GRINDING COMPOUND

FLUXITE

GASKET CEMENT

BLACK TOP DRESSING

STEERING WHEEL COVERS

ELECTRICIAN PLIERS & SCREWDRIVERS

SPITFIRE LIGHTER FLUID

FRONT SPRINGS FOR FORD 8 HLP. & 10 ELP.
PRONT SPRINGS FOR MORRIS 8 HLP. & 10 ELP.
ENGINE VALVES FOR ALL MODELS ENGLISH CARS
DECARBONIZING GASKET SETS FOR ALL MAKES



ECKSTEIN Bros.

BAY

STREET





eas — SO
Bae SE j

NOTICE

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE ASKED TO NOTE THAT OUR
WORKSHOP AND SERVICING DEPARTMENTS WILL BE
CLOSED FROM MONDAY, 3RD. SEPTEMBER AND WILL
RE-OPEN AGAIN ON MONDAY, 17TH. SEPTEMBER, 1951, (
SO AS TO ENABLE OUR PERSONNEL TO HAVE THEIR {



45 feet below the surface.—U.P. ANNUAL LEAVE. }
Pl }
feurist Receipts | OUR GASOLINE, SPRAYPAINTING, PARTS AND
‘rom Our Own Corresponden f “ESS - 7 “NTS 7 . IPEN rOR
Ch ay oa ACCESSORIES DEPARTMENTS WILL BE OPEN 1
a U.S. dollar receipts at the} BUSINESS AS USUAL
Tourist Boards’ four centres for | }
he period January to July 1951 if cemntaainapinatemninastitions
totalled $93,440 compared Ww yi % . sie “ 5 pene
arc toe COURTESY GARAGE :
seas ie een tes toe a oe t WHITE PARK ROAD on DIAL 4616
i t 33,82 j
Januar » July and $3,729 ’
July j ~ — =











PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS #9) ADVOGATE.



|



= see Sey ve ‘Ysnasce) =e

Pripted by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown

Thursday, 16, 1951

SEAWELL

THE resolution for the sum of $1,000 to
meet the cost of preparing roads and
house sites at Seawell was defeated in the
House of Assembly on Tuesday. Public
regret in this matter will be greater be-
cause the rejection was based on an appar-
ent misunderstanding by the opponents of
the scheme

August



-

The Government had at its disposal
acres of land at Seawell and formulated a
scheme to lease it in four-acre lots. It
was intended to establish economic agri-
cultural holdings in that area and to en-
courage the initiation of a co-operative
tmovement between bona fide agricultur-
‘ists. The land was not to be let to people
following other callings.

The Opposition seemed to have been im-
bued with the idea that the Government
was attempting to establish another hous-
ing scheme by which it was proposed to
furnish house spots to people who wanted
to carry their houses there.

The merit of the scheme and the fact
that co-operatives were long over due in
Barbados did not weigh with the Opposi-
tion even although it was admitted by Mr.
Crawford that if the Government wanted
to initiate a co-operative scheme it should
do so, It did not even matter that the
Department of Agriculture was prepared
to give the scheme all possible support
and assistance by supplying modern
equipment for cultivation and advice by
the officers of the Department on the care
and rotation of crops.

The Opposition argued blindly that in-
asmuch as there was great land hunger
in this island, the land at Seawell should
be divided among as many people as pos-
sible whether or not they were economic
holdings.

It is true
people in this island not now in possession
of land, and who are anxious to acquire
small plots for housing, and it is also true
that there are not enough spots to accom-
modate all those who are now searching
for places to remove their houses. But
the majority of these are confined to St.
Michael; and one point which has been
overlooked is, that this problem, having
assumed the proportions causing the pres-
ent alarm,
of land settlement.

The two issues are @istinct even if
closely related. In one there is a need for
housing space. In the other there is a
need for economic agricultural holdings
where agriculturists can live and support
their families without having recourse to
other and supplementary forms of em-
ployment.

Above all this, the Government intended
to give a healthy lead to the establish-
ment of co-operatives in this island. An-
other means of introduction had already
failed. A Co-operative Officer had been
seconded for duty and trained in England,
legislation had been passed, and the
Director of Agriculture had even had
added to his already numerous duties
those of Registrar of Co-operatives. Still
nothing had been achieved. The Govern-
ment realising the necessity for and the
benefit of co-operatives now attempted to
launch such a scheme while giving oppor-
tunity to agriculturists to acquire lands
under lease.

The opponents of the scheme were under
the erroneous impression that it would
have been better to supply 20 odd people
with house spots than to give seven agri-
culturists an oportunity to cultivate eco-
nomic holdings and to launch an agricul-
tural co-operative scheme which might
have been followed by others,

It is singularly unfortunate that so valu-
able a scheme should have been lost
especially because of a misunderstanding
of the issues at stake. This does not how-
ever mean that this is the end of co-opera-
tives in Barbados or that the Government
will not formulate other proposals for
their establishment. Such schemes are too
valuable to the economy of this island to
be abandoned.



Local Food

To The Editor, The
SIR,—I read your
headed “Local Food”
ever make no
of arable acres
important point.
I cannot agree with the
agraph three of your
cane cultivation in favour of provision crops would
not affect the revenue. It generally agreed
that a sugar crop better paying proposition
but the production of food is essential
During the war period under the defence
tions, speaking from memory 30% of our
acreage was planted in provisions and one

Advocate
editorial of the
with great interest,

reference to the actual
at present planted

14th

which is
suggestion made in par-

is a



stock to every twenty acres had to be raised on
the plantations; this I understand, has now been
considerably reduced
Under the existing conditions I consider that the
acreage originally planted in food should be rein-
stated by government and strong measures bé
taken to see that the order made under the defence
regulations be trict] adhered too
PROGRESS
t 9.



B



Furniture



A

ARBADOS ADVOCATE

urnishings |
(1337—1901)



these
and

and

were
furniture
small objects
Bamboo and = pa-
tables covered with
and woolwork
jardiniers, plant

Victorian Exhibition at
with its reconstruc-
tion of a typical sitting-room
illustrates. the decay of taste
|which occurred during that age. pier mache
|With the Gothic revival an “age chenille cloths
| of darkness, both literally and jostled with

jculturally, was slowly creeping stands, sociables, conversation
|over domestic architecture, and chairs and love seats draped
it was fortunate that as the with anti-macassars. Pictures
illumination of good taste was crowded the walls; china plates
extinguished the material forms jn plush roundels vied with wa-
}of artificial illumination were tercolours and family photo-
greatly improved.” By 1851, graphs. The colours of fabrics
|when the Great Exhibition took were often crude, for brilliant
place, the elegance and grace of analine dyes tad taken the

The
the Museum

ty, cluttered
with massive

quantities of
photographs.

so



that there are hundreds of

can only be solved by a policy

inst.
you how-
percentage

the j see,

editorial that a reduction in
| free

regula-
arable

the Regency interior had almost place of softer vegetable dyes.
vanished. Together with Queen William Morris attempted in
Anne, Sheraton and Chippen- the last quarter of the century
dale, Regency furniture was to guide public taste to an im-
banished to the Servants’ Hal!) provement in design in Britain
lor the attic. In their place mas- His most successful production
|sive and monumental mahogany was his wall-paper, which sur-
land rosewood furniture was to vived his furniture and_ iron-
lbe found. work. An oriental touch was
The Exhibition of introduced in interior decoration in
{the taste that prevailed of chinese ginger-jars,
ito the close of the century. Satsuma ware and fans; furni-
| Furniture became clumsy, and ture became more frail as the
| the atmosphere of rooms frous- result of oriental inspiration.
|

1851 = set
almost the form







success for Mr.

Jane Graham





By SEFTON DELMER meant nothing less than the
Â¥ lifting of the Iron Curtain,

How far, I wonder, are mem- What in fact takes place un-
bers of the executive of the Na- der the auspices of ‘Progressive
tional Union of Mineworkers Tours” today is the exact re-
aware that they have allowed verse of any such sanguine ex-

themselves to become the stoog- pectations.

es in a major operation of Com- In London — all prospective
munist political warfare’ And tourists are carefully screened
all for the somewhat nebulous But Miss Graham, not even a

prospect of collecting a promised
£40,000 gift from Czechoslo-
vakia.
If they have any
I suggest they
have just done,
Jane Graham, of 105, Great
Russell-street, London, W.C.1.
Miss Graham is one of the
British tourists who have
returned from a fortnight’s holi-
day in Czechoslovakia. (Price
£37 10s., inclusive of fares and
everything, ) ;
Hers was the first of four
parties which are to visit Czech-
oslovakia this summer under the
auspices of the Communist-run *"
“Progressive Tours’ Travel of it
Agency, 2nd with the blessing “Tt
ot the National Union Mine- **ys
workers. arrived at

trade unionist, slipped through.

Many applicants are found
suitable and turned away
the information that the

are “already fully booked.”

As for travelling freely
Czechoslovakia, these touri
are given a bulk visa, said J
Graham,

“It was specially explained
us that this meant that we
to stick together in one party
our papers were not valid
we were just by

From the moment
they become objects
nist propaganda and

un-
with
tour

about
talk,

doubts
have a

it,
with Miss

as I





300
just

to
had

as
when
ourselves,”

they arrive
of Commu-
instruments



the evening,”
“when we
Marianske Lazne, the
Czech spa where we were told
we were going to have exactly
the same kind of holiday as or-
dinary Czech trades unionists.

“A brass band was waiting to
play us in. A _ party of Czech
youth brigadiers swarmed all
over us chanting ‘We want
peace.’ They pressed bunches of
fiowers on us and wrung our
hands. It was startling.”

late in
Graham,

was

of Miss

The Scheme
all

sounded fine
ago when

miners’
“Progres-
before his

No doubt it
and dandy 18 months
Arthur Horner, the
secretary, first put the
sive Tours” scheme
executive.

He had at last found a way,
he told them, of transferring to
Britain the £40,000 subscribed by
Czech miners for the victims of
the Whitehaven pit disaster in
Britain.

The “Progressive
agency, said Mr,
arrange trips to Czechoslovakia
But, instead of the money paid
by the British tourists being sent
to Czechoslovakia, it would re-
main here. And it would be used
to pay the outstanding £40,000
to the Cur:berland Avea branch
of the Miners’ Union,

Speeches

found
and

the
But
ng

adds: “I
of youths
station doing

week later

Miss Graham
the same party
maidens at the
same thing a
‘his time they were swarmi
cver a party of Germans.”

At every ‘meal they are sxt
jected to ptopaganda speeches—
often from Mrs. Pollitt, who, in
addition to explanations of what
they have seen and are going to

gives them little bulletins
world news.

“You will be
hear the = folloy
news,” said Mrs.
the third day cf the trip
items were \ work

5 £ in’ Laneashire truce
talks in Ka@song: and, a spe-
cial treat, the shootin: down of

Tours” travel
Horner, would

an



Screened of
interested u

ing items cf

Pollitt at lunch

Now, of uld
be more
British tourists

access to

nothing ct
desirable’ than that
should be given

Czechoslovakia,
and be allowed to travel around
it freely without prescribed itin-
eraries, and without having i

course,

rs’



as





head of

seven out of a ;roup cf
U.S. planes that bed flown
China.

terpreters and escorts imposed
on them by the authorities.
And, perhaps, that was what
members of the executive ant I
cipated when, enthusiastically, Nhe :
they gave comrade Horner au was a tribute
thority to proceed wit! “Pro- the screening
gressive Tours” cheme their feet and cre
If they then the

n amazir lack of



tion of

to th

reac





did, owed

pe No Surprise



on holiday there mean a neat
‘

A Victorian conversation chair.

close of the century

the vogue,

waist line which |
dominated furniture and wall dec-
cration, Waterlilies rose from the

floor covering walls and furniture
alike with their leaves anc

blossoms. Here and there a Jap-
anese print was to be seen.

‘Towards the
Art Nouveau became
with its high

time lag which existe
architecture in Britai
and the West Indies existed aiso |
in furniture and furnishings. This
time lag was accentuated as the
result of low price of sugar which
prevailed during the first quarter
of the 20th. century, Neither the

The
between

designs of William Morris, the
influence of “greenery yallery’
or of Art Nouveau appears to)

have hid the slightest influence on
Barbadian interiors. Little change
occured to oust the Victorian in-
terior here until the
style popularised by the Wembly
Exhibition 1924 and the Paris
Exhibition of 1 reached this
island in the thirties.







iss Jane Graham



| seace of the Cambridge Backs.

| is unimpressed;

modernistic |

THE MASTER

MO VES OUT

. M. Trevelyan (who made history a
aa goes into retirement with a

sigh for the human race.
By KENNETH TYNAN

ALMOST unobserved, the most eminent

| historian of our time has moved gently into|%
George Macaulay Trevelyan,|%

retirement.
OM, Honorary Litt. D. of two American and
five English universities, High Steward of

the Borough of Cambridge, Chancellor of|%

Durham University, and Master of Trinity
College, Cambridge, has decided, at 75, that

it is time to court a little oblivion.

From the Master’s Lodgings at the college
-o which, in 1893, he had come as under-
traduate, he has just moved his goods to a}
arge red-brick house in West Road, not a
nortar-board’s skim away from the formal
One of the
most private of public lives has ended.

Trevelyan is “sensational” only to his pub-
ishers, his English Social History has sold
nore than 410,000 copies in seven years a
‘ecord among history books which is
ipproached only by his great-uncle, Macau-

ay—and Macaulay, after all, has been in|
he field for more than a century.

TAX: £39,000

Confronted with such figures, Trevelyan}
he thinks the Social History |
ar from his best work. (It was first pub-

ished in the U.S.A. during the war; and of |

£42,000 which he earned from it £39,000
vas paid back
axes).

Early in his teens at Harrow, Trevelyan
letermined to become a historian; to him

history is a
; romantic busi-
ness, and it
still strikes
him as mir-
aculous that
>t her men,
iow dead,
worried and

throve where
we now walk.



‘This is the
|most familiar

1nd_= certain

‘act about THE SIFTER
life,” he has G. M. Trevelyan

Comes Bae
From Prague

Does what she saw and found out

Arthur Horne ?

was any sense of criticism amour

the British visitors. “It did no
seem to occur to anyone as pF
culiar,” said Miss Grabam, “tha
there were so few Czeen work-
ers staying at this spa, if, in fact
it was the Czech trades union-
ists’ Blackpool.

“One big recreation contr,
we visited—the Leningrad -.was
completely empty.”

Nor did anyone show

an)
the fae-
we



signs of surprise when
tories the party visited



ne

said, “but it is also the most poetical.”

In 1896 he took his First in history, fol-
| owed in 1898 by election to a Fellowship at
Trinity. Six years later he married ‘the

| lood of books appeared, including his three-
| volume study of Garibaldi and his History
jof England. In 1928 he returned to Cam-
| oridge as Regius Professor of History, a post
ae held until his appointment, in 1940, to the
Mastership of Trinity.

I have been to see him. He beckoned me
| nto the study, a lean, sagacious old eagle of |
}aman. He is bowed now, his neck grizzled
and creased. His skin, depressed with age,
‘'s wrinkled even on the ball of his thumb. |
He stoops sadly, standing as if one shoulder
iad been wrenched out of place.

FOOLS, BRUTES

nimself carefully into an armchair, and

crossed his heavy black boots. A tarnished











8 ’Phones: 4472 & 4678 — BECKWITH STORES §
| ‘ow $569S9SSSOS 99 OSS5S66G60%

in English and American)

second daughter of Mrs. Humphry Ward; a|\

THURSDAY, AUGUST. 18, 1951













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72 INCHES WIDE
At $7.43 per Yard.

J GREEN WATER-PROOF CANVAS

72 INCHES WIDE

=

Wearing a severe indigo suit, he lowered |

| At $8.25 per Yard.



















either closed for the holidays (sc | tiepin tugged together the wings of his | e
that no workers were present) | 4), . : i. took hi
as at the glass factory in Kar- | collar, Authoritatively, he talked of trivi- | { DA COSTA fe co LID.
Lov Vary, or almost desertet ot | alities; momentarily amused, he would laugh i e
workers, as at the open-cas li : : . 2 :
mine in’ Sokolov and at the saw- | ™S high gasping laugh, incisive and delight- J DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT
mill in Marianske Lazne. led. The eyes were smoky and deepset, the, i
| * . A ‘ |
No one dreamed of suggesting | Voice biscuit-crisp. | ag
that the workers might have | | *
ae at tee ae a” ‘ne | I asked him, point-blank, the historians) 3 SOOO EPOOPOOEOS SSOP POPPE OOO
: or a > party | : : ‘ : 9” % x
should have no chance of talk- | classic question: “Is war unavoidable ? R
ing to any but the hand-pickea | r : * &
trades unionists presented ti His forehead shrank: “I end my career,”| < x
> : ¢ i . q . . : . > 1%
them by Mrs, Pollitt & Co. ie said, “with a somewhat less optimistic! Ny
Wha the Bryish party viaiven | view of the human race than when I began e 3s
a collective farm outside Mai'- eo ‘ a %
& tne Letne. nayone caked whai|it: D wish to God 'T thought mankind were | & %
had happened to the four Czech | less of a fool and a brute than it is.’ & x
farming families who had stayec s SPE ‘ E +
out of the collective when th: | 2, ‘ CIAL AUSTRALIAN FRESH V GETABLES »
other 27 in the district joined 2t. | Trevelyan is able to dignify such meagre | & CHEESE—73c. Ib. Kensitiston Grown %
Nor did anyone see fit to com- | platitudes. \? = "A RT t SRN a %
ment on the fact that many c | * £E Just arrived from x
the houses in the formerly Su-| His life-work has been to link us with our * Meni. Fon %
deten-German villages they saw | | ge Waste +
were being left empty and al-| Past, and he does not complain if his pains-|*- J > 9-01.00 0°35" \ OSG oa AUSTRALIA y
lowed to rot. taking anonymity of method is sometimes‘. 7% ‘= | PEARS ¢
mi hag Britisey” said Miss! mistaken for dullness. Men without preju- 3 Woe Soe she ses nor Ge a: | 8
Ste he ten canine nie jdices tend to have unmemorable personali- (7, he RAB RRA PEACHES %&
1 is n h 7 ao
orthodoxy of their views and in} ties, and Trevelyan is one of them. ~~ COCKTAIL SAUSAGES S %
the completeness of thelsbae . 3 ig COCKTAIL ONIONS APRICOTS %
thusiasm.” * CARR'S CHEESE TIT BITS pila ac JR ag as
ECCENTRIC? NO {| DANISH CHEESE x
Afterwards + LOBSTER Just arrived - - - x
; Ss CRAB x
Czechs ahve so far been re- In part, we trust him for his lack of col- |S PRUNES | FROM CANADA NS
ported as having paid £800 of our, He has never been the don of eccentrics} PEANUTS x
the £40,000 to the Whitehaven . |S. JACK STRAWS | +
fund. anecdote—like Dr. Buckland, of Christ S PATI DE FOIS GRAS | FROZEN SALMON 3
They could now well afford to Churct ; . ni ~. . | =
pay many times that amount for] ,_ ah, .Whd. 5VRe @ Seaeeee,, & Pen“ gy CANADA DEY GINGER | SMOKED HADDOCK x
the magnificent proganda they jackal and a monkey in his dining room, 1x ‘ALES | ~
are getting. j _.. | Trevelyan is a quiet and moderate sifter of %: GOLD BRAID RUM | FILLET OF SOLE x
Progressive Tours pare een te: the Haale at ohh ‘s hig |<} TOP NOTCH RUM " ae .
number two has just begun its ents; e receptacie of other mens Nis-)}, SMOKED KIPPERS s
trip. Two more will follow this | tories. ‘J 8
summer, * %
. < ‘ me ~
And es Mrs. “itarry Pollitt Dons of this kind cannot save the world; ys >
proudly aia “The men and wo-| but while they live in it, it is not wholly 2 %
men go thes rs to Czech- ‘ > : ¢ -
Bilseakia Vall ot honk ree lost. From their complex labours of refer-| ¥ x
ain id tell in schools, work-|ence and cross-reference, corroboration and % %
eee : ea ind mines! proof, we emerge as our descendants will) % a en — Sa 2S
It remains to be seen how many | know us i“ "@ %
ii tae wen ee Se St eae > PHONE GODDARD'S to-vay §
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED . s
at x
I —L.ES. 8 PIOSCSSS SS SSOS SO SOOSS SSS SOS OOO SSS 5SOSS999S 9999S



THURSDAY, AUGUST



1951



Labourers May

Get Land At Dodds

ABOUT five acres of land at Dodds Plantation may be

rented by Government to ]

Resolution to that effect was passed by the House of Asse

bly on Tuesday last.

Death By

Misadventure

EATH BY MISADVENTURE
was ‘the verdict returned by
a nine-man jury when the inquiry
into the death of McDonald Mapp,
a 76-year-old inmate of the St.
Michael's Almshouse was conclud-
ed at District “A” Police Court
yesterday.

The Coroner was Mr. C. L. Wal-
wyn Acting! Police Magistrate of
District “A”. Mapp met his death
when he fell over the gallery of



the Male Quarters at the St.
Michael’s Almshouse on August 3.
Dr. A. S, Cato who performed

the post mortem examination said
that the spine of the decease? was
fractured, but death was due to
pneumonia and the fracture of the
spine could have been caused by
a fall from a building.

Eliro Cox, a 67-year-old inmate
of the Almshouse said that on
August 3 about 2 p.m. he went
upstairs to the Male Quarters and
saw Mapp standing by a gallery.
Suddenly he heard a groan and
saw Mapp jump over the gallery
rail which is about three feet six
inches high.

He went to the gallery and saw
the body of Mapp lying in the
gutter below.

Nurse Sybil Haynes siid that
she was called by one of the in-
mates of the Almshouse on August
3 and saw the body of Mapp lying
in the gutter outside the Male
Department. His body was re-
moved by two patients.

Leotha Lawrence said that on
August 3 about 12 noon she saw
Mapp on the gallery of the Male
Quarters. While he was standing
there she noticed that he took of}
his shoes and placed one foot on
the rails of the gallery, Then he
fell into the gutter below.

R. G. B. GRIFFIVH, Acting
faa Police Magistrate of District
“B” Court, St. George, yesterday
fined James Bostic of St. George
$96 to be paid forthwith or in de-
fault three months’ imprisonment
with hard labour for having in his
possession a quantity of liquor
without a licence.

Mr. E. W. Barrow appeared on
behalf of Bostic who committed
the offence on June 6.

ENTENCE of six months’ im-

prisonment with hard labour
Was yesterday passed on Samuel
Alleyne of Maxwell, Christ Church
by Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting
Police Magistrate of Distriet “B’

for stealing a wrist watch, the
property of Mrs. J. Drew of
Welches, Christ Church.
Alleyne pleaded guilty. The
value of the watch is $48.
EMBERS of the Windward
.Cricket and Football. team

and the Queen’s College team of
British Guiana who are here to
take part in the Triangle Schools’
Tournament will be entertained
to-morrow night by the members
of Number Six Club of the Girls
Industrial Union at Queen's Park.

The Y.M.C.A. has also planned
other entertainments for the vis-
itors who will play cricket and
football and will take part in

omens against the local school-
DOYS,





SOVIET WAR
FACTORIES

@ From Page 1
West does have it, and fear that
it will be dropped on them.

“I never met anyone who had
heard a foreign broadcast. The
Russian workers with whom we
associated did not own radios,
They were too poor”. None of the
released prisoners had themselves
worked in war factories, but they
emphasised that many of their
fellow prisoners had. Most of
them had worked in Russian in-
dustrial factories including the
October Revolution Factory at
Odessa where they helped to con-
struct plows and tractors.

They said that they had lived
‘in a prisoner of war camp in
Odessa and were taken back and
forth to the factory under guard.

At the factory, however, they
worked next to Soviet citizens,
and most of them during their
years of captivity had learned
enough Russian to carry on a con-
versation,

In Goed Health

They were transferred to Kiev
and suddenly for no announced
reason they were segregated from
the Russians in factory work.

The men appeared in good
health and ‘said they were well

fed, Some were husky and tan-
ned.
They said there was a lot of

grumbling among Russian work-
ers who were dissatisfied with
their low wages and high prices,
They said many of the Russians
with whom they struck up friend-
ships had seen the West during
the war and expressed desires to
return.

The prisoners arrived in West-
ern Berlin on Monday night, and
spent several hours just among
the neon-lit streets of the batter-
ed city “window shopping”:

One said: “We just couldn't be-
lieve it could be so wonderful.
it was like stepping from hell into
heaven-’—U.P.



How Aladdin’s Lamp
won the Princess



rubbed the lamp a g
and grant his every v

was in





iful princess

abourers at the plantation. A

m-

The Addendum to the Resolu-
tion states that the Attorney for
Dodds Plantation has recommen-
ded the rental of small spots of
land om the Plantation to certain
of the labourers there at their
request. This practice is gener-
ally followed on privately owned
plantations to the mutual benefit
cf both sides. It provides the
plantation with a permanent
labour force whereas at present
Dodds Plantation is entirely
dependent on transient labour.

The Executive Committee
(Amendment) Act, 1951, author-
ises the Execytive Committee
with the approval of the Legisla-
ture to lease any lands which
they may possess.

This resolution is to seek the
necessary legislative approval.

The House of Assembly on
Tuesday passed a Resolution to
authorize the Government to
lease the Princess Alice Playing
Field to the Vestry of St.
Michael.



Board Of Health
Revoke ‘Animals’

Regulations

THE General Board of Health
yesterday revoked their regula-
tions dealing with the importation
of animals. This became necessary
because of the new Diseases Ani-
mals Ordinance which is similar
in character. The Department of
Agriculture having the services of
a qualified veterinary officer, will
be entrusted with the responsibil-
ity of ensuring the enforcement
of the regulations of that ordin-
ance.

The Director of Medical Ser-
vices yesterday explained to mem-
bers of the Board, the reason for
the revocation. He said that under
the present Public Health Act, the
Board had certain powers as re-
gards the importation of animals.

The new Diseases Animals Or-
dinance also had these powers,
and inorder to prevent dual

action by two authorities on the
same subject, it was now neces-
sary for the Board to revoke the
regulations they had, so that the
matter might be proceeded with
in the new Act. There was unani-
mous agreement

The Board approved the appli-
cation. for the divicing off of
133,543 sq. ft. of land in one lot
from an area of land at Workmans,
St. George, by Mr. S. J. Goodman.

The Board considered the appli-
cation for the division and sale of
Jand in lots at Porters, St. James,
by the executors of the estate of
S. Manning, deceased. They also
gave consideration to the altera-
tion of the approved plan by the
present owner Mr. W. D. Phelps, by
dividing off 307,400 sq. ft, from
10 acres 2 roods 24 1/6 perches of
land, the remainder of lot No. 4.

Decision on this application
was deferred, pending inspection
of the land by the Sanitation
Officer.

The application for the division
and sale of 3,792,230 sq. ft. of land
in lots at Mount Dacres Planta-
tion, St. Joseph, by Joes River
Sugar Estates Ltd., was consid-
ered, but decision was deferred
pending the receipt of more in-
formation about the roads.

Consideration was postponed as
regards an application for the
dividing and letting of 505,744 sq
ft. of land in lots at the Pine
Estate, St. Michael, by the Hous-
ing Board.



In The House
On Tuesday

The House rejected a Resolution
for $1,000 in connection with a
land setlement scheme at Seawell.

They passed:

A Resolution for $19,469 in con-
nection with the lighting of
Seawell runway. The money is
a revote

A Resolution to authorise the
Governor to enter into an agree-
ment with a person to serve in
the Department of Science and
Agriculture in the Office of Gov-
ernment Analyst, subject to the
conditions set out in the schedule

The amendments of the Leg-
islative’ Council to the Bill t
amend the Government Scho!-

arships and Exhibitions Act 1949

With minor amendment, the Bill
to amend the Income Tax Act,
1921.

A Resolution to make it lawhw
for the Vestry of Christ Church
to lease a pare 1 of land com
taining by admeasurement 1 acre
2 roods 10 perches, part of Kem
Plantation to the Government, fou
a period not exc ing twenty-
one years at a pepper corn rert
for the purpose of establishing a
Playing Field

A Resolution to authorise the
Governor to enter into am agreé-
ment with a person to serve in
the Department of Science and
Agriculture in the office of Gov-
ernment Analyst

A Resolution te authorize Gov-
about. five acres cf land to
labourers at Dodds, Plantation

A. Resolution to allthorize the
Government t6 lease the Princess
Alicé Playing Field to the Vestry







of St. Micha,!
A Bill (to authorise the Vestry
of St. Andrew tq borrow $6,000

to be applied in erecting suitable
quarters for the 'intursing staff at
the almshouse at Bellepiaine
With amendment, .«. Bijl to
amend the St. Lucy*’s (Barbades)
Loan Act 1949 (1950—6). ‘
The House adjourned
Tuesday next 3pm

uni
at



One day Aladdin asked the genii how he

could get the Princess to marry him
Here, Master,” said the genii, and hand-

ed him a package of Royal Pudding

HORSE



BARBADOS A

GUARDS PAR.

DVOCATE



ADE



Christie
Dis

Rev. Hoyte Gives

an Mission
pute Continues

Evidence Today

THE CASE for the plaintiffs Rev. Frederick A. Barrow

and others against Rev. Dalton Hoyte and others
Christian Mission Chancery

in the
yesterday



Suit, was closed

before His Lordship the Vice Chancellbr, Sir Allan Colly-

more,

Rev. Hoyte began to give evidence and will continue

when the Court sits again today.
The issue to be decided is who was the General Super

intendent of the Christian M

ission Church in 1949 and 1950

and who is the present General Superintendent

The dispute started in 1949
when Barrow and _ the _ others
wanted to have certain matters

made clear concerning the Mis-
sion and when Hoyte did not
attend a meeting when summon-
ed, another General Superinten-
dent was appointed,

Rev. Hoyte told how the church
key was snatched from shim by
one of the Rev. Barrow’s faction
on New Year Day, 1949.

Mr. G. H. Adams _ associated
with Mr. D. H. L. Ward, instruct-
ed by Carrington & Sealy for Rev
Hoyte and others, led questions
which tried chiefly to bring ou
that Rev. Hoyte did not attend
the meeting because he had beer
advised that the meeting was
illegal and not because he felt he

would have been injured if he
attended. He wanted to show
that Hoyte. wanted to get @#

proper meeting summoned.

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., asso-
ciated with Mr. J. S. B. Dear
instructed by Messrs. Hutchinson
and Banfield is appearing for
Frederick Barrow and the others.

Herald “Fades Out”

Another question to be disputed
is whether the going out of
existence of the Christian Mission
Herald which normally gave
notice of meetings for and
appointments of General Super-
intendents meant that the General
Superintendent whose election
was published last would con-
tinue to be General Superinten-
dent.

Answering questions from
cross-examination by Mr. Adams,
Rev. Larrier said that he could
not remember if Rev. Ramsay,
another plaintiff and go-between
when Hoyte would not attend tnr
meeting, had said that Hoyie
would not be coming because the
meeting was illegal.

The meeting was scheduled for
January 6, 1949. Rev. Hoyte was
notified by a representative from
overseas to call a_ meeting to
discuss his mal-administration
and for mortgaging the Christian
Mission,

“I”, Rev. Larrier said, “was a
representative sent from Panama
to enquire into the matter.”

On New Year’s Day mission-
aries came from abroad and went
to Hoyte’s office and he silenced

them. When he did this they
called a meeting to discuss the
wrongs. Notice was. served in
December.

“IT do not know,” Rev. Larrier
told Mr. Adams, ‘whether the
keys were snatched out of his

hands.
to me that day.
the keys were taken out
loek that day.”

Ammunition
Rev. Hoyte said that he was
informed from reliable sources
that the brethren had ammuni-
tion to injure him and that was

The keys were not give
I did hear that
of the



why he did not attend the
meeting which was held on
January 26. Up to then and

not until long after he had not

heard that Hoyte’s reason for

not coming to the meeting wes
because he was advised that it
was an illegal meeting.

At the meeting then the majori-
ty of the delegates were not absent
He was present at the meeting of
February at which the Board of
management purported to dismiss
Rev. Hoyte.

Sometime later Rev. Hoyte and
his Board petitioned the House of
Assembly. seeking that the law
be sot amended that they could
hold a proper meeting, That peti-
tion was behind the backs of some

f the Christian Mission body an






1 protest was made against his
ying to mortgage acain,
He got the delegates to attend

the meeting by summoning through
ihe churches, he said, He could
not remember how many churches
were on Hoyte’s side and how
many on his own. There was

S

The Princess had refused many suitors.
But when Aladdin offered her a dish of
Roy ried, “It's delicious!
lwilr promises to ser

me Roya r





delegate to every 25 members
Counter-Petition

To Mr. Reece, he said that his
Board counter-petitioned before
the case then going on was lodged
in the court. A Senior Superin-
tendent or an Assistant Super-
intendent was permitted to act

Rev. M, Ramsay who had
ready given evidence was
called so that he could be cros
examined as to Rev. Hoyte’
reason for not attending the meet-
ing.

To Mr. Adams he said that Rev
Hoyte told him he was not pit
pared to come to the General
election because of wrong. Up to
January 26, he did not know that

al-

re-

Hoyte’s reason for not attending
the meeting was because he wa

advised that the meeting w
illegally convened

He was appointed Acting Supe
intendent and he appointed a
Board to go into the rights and
wrongs of the matter betore they
could proceed with the othe:
meeting. After the 15tk when he
did net turn up, he met him after-
wards and told him that a con-
fidential friend had told him that
they had ammunition to injure
him, o

Mr. Adams at this stage read'a
notice appearing in the news-
paper before the 26th in which
Hoyte explained why a meeting
could not be held. Immediately
beneath that was Ramsay's notice
for the meeting

To Mr. Adams he said he could
net remember whether he cern
ec

at the newspaper which contain
his notice.

At the meeting they had 50
representatives from 21 of 23
churches out of 28.

Next to give evidence was Rew
Frederick Barrow, a member of
the Christian Mission for 57 years

who was ordained in 1941

Supt. In °45

He said that Rev Leon Hoyte,
Rev Dalton Hoyte’s father, was
General Superintendent in 1945.
He did not complete his year of
office because of illness, When
he was sick he requested ,six
of them to allow his son to finish
out his term of office, Four
agreed, but he did not agree

In 1946 Dalton Hoyte was ap-

pointed General Superintendent,
The Christian Mission Herald
went out of existence after
October 1946 when the last
issue was published

On the meeting of the 26th,

Ramsay was acting Superintend-
ent, Attempts were made to con-
tact Hoyte but he did not come.
“I was appointed General Super-

intendent for the ensuing year’
he said.
In 1950 Rev. Larrier was ap-

pointed and was again appointed

for this year.

To Mr. Adams he said that at
the meeting on the 15th it was de-
cided to summon everybody for th
next meeting. It was not men
tioned at that meeting that !
reason for not attending was be-
cause he was advised it was illegal

“I cannot remember the pro
portion as regards to those for

Hoyte and the others who att nd-
ed the meeting,” he said
On January 28, 1950, there was
a protest from different churches
Ex-police Sargeant Jones gave
evidence as to Rev. Larrier’s ap-



pointment in 1950 and 1951. He
was secretary. It was generally
known, he told Mr. Adams, that
the Mission’s press wa old t
Mr. Cole.
Last Witness

Dalton Hoyte, last to give evi-
dence yesterday, said he was fir
General Superintendent in 194
At that time the Christian Mission

Herald was functioning. The pres
had been bought second hand anré

awhen its condition was bad,





Yes,
They’re so rich and smooth. So nutritious,
too. 3 wonderful flavors: chocolate, va-

everyone loves Royse:

Puddings

nilla, and butterscotch. Try one today

oil

the

INTO London rolled a 20-ton

tank transporter—and on its
| back was B (in the Russian
alphabet that means V_ for

Vassily). Vassily came from
the Urals by way of Pyong
yang, North Korea, where
United Nation forces captured
him. He was put on parade
with 12 other pieces of Rus
sian equipment captured in
Korea. The public will be
able to see them for a week.
Vassily, built in 1935, is a 134
TEE standard Russian medium
tank and weighs 311, tons.



Can. Challenger
Brings Meat

THE Canadian Challenger,
which anchored in Carlisle Pay
yesterday morning, brought 311
carcasses of lamb, 38 b: 0

lamib legs, 147 packages of tr

roze.\
sundries 121 bags of boneless beet
64 sides of veal, 623 quart
beef, 130 carcasses of mutton
37 bags of beef tripe, nine b
of ox tongues and eight cart

of calf livers. This cargo was all
aranshipped at Trinided from th

S.S. Corinthine which brought i
from New Zealand.

Also arriving yesterday was the
S.S. Agamemnon which brought
groundnuts, chairs, cheese, pota-
toes, milkpowder, hams in tins,
traw hats, rolled oats and frozen
ducks, chickens and hens from
Amsterdam.

The rain delayed the unloading
of the Challenger and only a few
lighters were able to get
with cargo,

The Schooner
brought copra
In the hatches
Adina 8S. were
ind other items for the Gas
Company and colas, vanorising
il and storage tanks for DaCosta
& Co. Ltd The Motor
Lady Joy brought coal, cocoanut:
plaintains, honey, raw cocoanut
and fruit from St. Lucia

$10,000,000 LOAN

From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Aug. 15
British Guiana Government an-
nounced to-day the underwritir
of $10,464,000 initial issue’ of
$14,400,000 B.G, Development loan

shore

Mandalay
from St.
of the
coal

i
Vincent,

Lydia
in bulk

Vessel





commenced in U.K. to-day, The
loan i redeemable, in 1966—t8
and will bare three and a half pei
cent interest per annum The
Prospectus is being advertised in
London on Frida Application
for the loan will open and close
in London on Tuesday August 21

3oard met and decided that before
they lost everything, it would have
been better to sell it
“The Herald went out
tence,” he said, “because subscrip
tions to the magazine’ were
irregular. The position was reachec
when they had to take out of tn

of exis-

general funds from the church
He expressed his unwillingne
to continue running it at a loss

and it went out of publication, He
was elected in 1947

On New Year’s Day 1949 there
was to have been a service at 12
o'clock. When he arrived and pu
the key in the door, it was snatched
by one of the plaintiffs. A di
turbance was then caused,

Rev. Hoyte will continue to give





> saw

PAGF FIVI

TQ i > be
OYS ARRIVE
THE QUEEN’S COLLEGE team of Briti Gu
which will take part in the triangular schools tournamer
between Harrison College, Windward Islands a Quer
College, arrived here yesterday morning by the S.S. Cana.
dian Challenger.







DMS Talks To B.G. SCHOOLB

Pharmacists

The medical institutes of Barba
dos have developed magnificently
hoth from voluntary and Govern

































oo Suede ae . _ - en Arnold Gibbon cricket ¢ nd Arnold Gibbon
ny, ireetor of Medical Service gel, wt Pi =¢ t
told a group of chacracigt and ton: the, Aancere; “Ws " " ear os te _ ‘
their friends at Queen’s Park last extremely rough tip cron ” thl coe ee
night “These institutes give ex dad to: Barbedes. We encounper¢ eer
cellent service to the island and high winds and rough sea B Leroy Jackman, who is on the
I am glad to know that Govern- °aUse of the weather, the n " ericket team repre nted British
ment is interested in increasin; fo mo Seen ee sick.” ana against Jamaica earlier
the accommodation at the Genera pli steeple ip huang ET rary Lee, : her -
Hospital. More accommodation j; ‘i!! do well »gainst the Windward ie oF ae ta —" or inidad
1eeded and I hope a decision wil’ !slands and Harr son Coltege. The bi oni Ww ith’ a hockey team
be reached shortly,” he said ‘eam were only promoted to th rom B.G
Br. O'Mahony was g sale First, Divi A last year and th
ture on "eGovernniont tiedies rine ro eee eens ' Maurice “‘“Monkey” Moore, who
Institutes” as part of the Phar ; — ilso on the team, represented
macy Week programme Irving “Bud” Lee of ee i at the Caribbeqt
Dr, O'Mahony said: “All drug re football team *] Le a ee ee ee
gists should have a knowledge oi ason we won anh of the J 0 PEC een years ao piers
elr medical services.” Cups in British Guiana Thi: yer a er en airs ie on
7 t 1 1G fdodtb: tou NV *h
There are. four medical insti- N® team will play ainst P s x } a ots és SAdite 7 foes
tutes in the. island: the Generrc’ Ofice and Medical Sports Club gt inside left for the colony, but
Hospital, the Mental Hospital, th. ‘OF the Junior Cup. I feel that sor Queen's College, he will be at
Lazaretto and the Maternity Hos ur team will hold their own tre half. He has already met
pital gainst the Windward Island nd -nd defeated Loui Stoute, the
a Ph spirit of Bar Tennis and looking forward to
bedos is that attached to the Gen Last Tour me Stoute and other local
eral Hospital,” he said Lee, who is a Vice-Captain of player before he returns to B.G.
He said that in 1838 there wa e cricket team, is enjoying his °
such a thing as a Town Hall i st tour He will be leaving The team is staying at the
Bridgetown A public meetin ueen’s College this year for the Savoy Hotel, Bay Street. The tour
8 of nae Wear, the chakmaie ee aa College of the West opens this evening with a football
the then Lord Bishop of Barbado Rona Jacek ric ely Windw' S tgane : ee
é jacchus, Victor Ludo- and the Windward Islands at Har-
At this meeting a resolutio mm Of Queen’s College in 1950 vison College at 5.00 o’clock.
wat passed. It had two sectio 2" LRTI NORRIE he NAEP ERLE 6 AN TRIED,
which were (a) Due to 1 ey
altered conditions of the cor
munity it is absolutely an
urgently necessary that ther
should be an institute for th
treatment and care of the sic
poof, and (b) that public sul

scriptions should be advocated fo
the upkeep of this institute

On June 1, 18388 an act wa
passed incorporating a society f R

the care of the sick poor and j FOR a ed
Erovided for trustees that in wood FLOORS





cluded the President of the Legis
! tive Council, the Speaker of th
tHlouse of Assembly, the Attorne

AND FURNITURE



d Solicitor Generals and three
Vders Up to the time of th
opening of the General Hospit:
on July 4, 1844 they had col
‘ted $32,000 and Government
which became interested, pro
vided a large sum HYGIENIC WwW Xx
Dr. O'Mahony = said ae 4
rather interesting that they de
cided on the spot where th
present General Hospital stands
The building was there; it was
enclosed by a wall; it had abou
an acre of land, it was near the
sea; it was quiet and had a gooc
water supply. The property wa FOR BRIGHT ZS)
owned by the Earle of Carlisle and
what is now the main building HEALTHY HOMES
at the General Hospital was known |
as Carlisle House i
In 1844 the General Hospitai

could only accommodate 77, Be
tween 1844 and 1858 an intereptin
development took place Gov-
ernment was particularly — in-
terested in sick seamen It gave
special grant for the enla
ment of the Hospital to accom-
modate sick seamen, “Govern-
ment gave well during the course
of years to the building develop-
ment ef the General Hospital”, he
In 1869 it apportioned grant
were frequent—sometime:
yearly. Between 1869-7:
the development of specia
quarters of the matron and non O———————————————————
wards were built By 1918 the |
Hospital had 232 beds. Later th :
Tercentenary Ward Pay War
A and the Nurses Home wer
built Then came the V.D. Clini
in which the Women’s Social Wel
fare League played a eat pat
Today the Hospital has 326 bed
with 10 infant cots Betwee
1945-46 7,500 cases were admitter
Lost year 9,500 cases were
mitted and 75,000 people pa
through the doors to the crsualt
ind out patients departments, Th
Hospital has all services, includin
the casualty with a 24 hour pé
eoy service Approximately 90°
ef the are free and tt
charges made for the Tercentenars
ind Pay Ward are reasonable



a

paid
which
twice







“~

n~
=
=
S
=
2
~
=
=
>
=
=



ad

1 WROTE

ser

oR IT”? (
i &

services



Death From Skies







NIGHTS LTD
s id, ‘ 4 °

It's odd how one simple actior brir ich long-lasting
Many and many a woman, hearing & e modern minded friend praising
. 7 a ” . ‘ ' r ing diff ence in her
TEHERAN, 7 f ‘aumpax, has sent for a sample, and fou izing
N TEHERAN, Aug: 16 life, Undreamed of comfort, Simplicity in use Buc nendous ad-
Newspapers reported on Wednes- vantages over old-fashioned method And ch security!
cay that meteorites poured down
from the skies near Shiraz ou Sanitary Protection Worn Internally
Monday destroying 62 houses | TAMPAX K















evidence to-day when the case hilling 12 and injuring 19 person:
continues. ; Ue. DISTRIBUTORS
ROUND-WORLD BOY a2nSinah @ @ eee as
x Fi. a INSIST ON wi
IS LEARNING YOGA
2 PURINA CHows *
He Has Saved £100 le 4 ° Pa
| ‘
HIS mother and father are up- clean the radar mast in’ the | THEY ARE THE BEST
set about it, but on September Navy,” he says
16 young William Gill, of King And his final word I want | a ere a
: y Avenue, Kettering, sets off on learn all about Yoga first-har \
is life’s ambition—to hitch-hike in India, and find some ideal plac
ound the world and learn about | can go back to and settle whe iA H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. = Agents a
Yoga. the trip is over.’ i
William is 22, has everything L.ES ‘a a Bw Gad i @ | a 6a a a &
arranged. He has been ingcu- , tain oso
lated and _ vaccinated against | -
phus, typhoid, smallpox, yellow}}
fever and cholera, and had at |
X-ray,
He says I had a dummy- E
in a year ago when I spen
i fortnight hitch-hiking aroun,
E pe for £12,’
This trip he will take £100, z i.
icksack leeping bag, cooking H
kit, and a few clothes, The jour-
ney will la t two years
Adventure? No ”
His route will be across Europe WONDERFUL VALUE
Persia, India, Tibet, Burma,
‘iam, Sumatra, Australia, New ™
Zealand, Japan, and then the

American continent from north to









outh, stm
Adventure? That's not how
ok at it,” William says. “I am
King this trip as an education
Preparations have cost £50
cost two guineas, He
think inoculations will be
sovered by the Health Service
Money for the trip has been
aved since William swapped a
£4-a-week clerking job to go
tee! erecting which brings him
£10 to £11 a week,
A spot to settle in
it tough at first, but I am
C he t I ha





72x90 —$14.50 ea.
72x54 — $7.50 ea.
52x52 — $5.11 ea

DRESSING
TABLE
SETS

at $1.55 Set

RUNNERS — 15x45 — 1.85 ea.
OVALS, ROUNDS & SQUARES
at 84c.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

10, 11, 12, 13, Broad Street

















BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 1951





BY CARL ANDERSON









LONOON



SEND YOUR



;
=.

herri ngs



> 646 < 666666666 OCCOOY
OOOO PO SSE OPES PDGF LIFES EIS FES SPILL

\ “ey FRESH orin ! ORDERS:
7 _—~_. TOMATO SAUCE §
Vay ‘oo z : T O 5
co a rer Li %

: s ¥

* ADVOCATE §

ie >

| xs x

< PRINTERY

§

S DIAL 2620 &




BY CHIC YOUNG

s
4,569 69 C966 OSS OOOO COS
a

PLL LL LL FLIES LDIF




dah alae Say at Nt mtv ttt ttt iva tm nie ee
] {ities oe ee ed

j

Hi

‘
8?

'§ TO-DAYS NEWS PLASH
book

Man
st




PRERRAS SO





mene ene tit

SEED OI IIIT



a 2

z a eeee i
z a opened at %
3 JOHNSON'S HARDWARI %
5

R, OOS nonin nite












ated OS
THE LONE RANGER





# Si i 8 ae = SSE :
BY FRANK STRIKER | “ AL H fs RE
, SPECIAL o



“TONTO. WHEN COLONEL WADE GOES THERE oy
WITH THE SOLDIERS, HE WILL CAPTURE A aROXs @ ieee a \
SCORE OF MEN WANTED - JOB! ;

MIOB ffers to all Cash and!














he Usually Now Usually NOW
PEEK FREAN'S CREAM BISCUITS ONIONS 4 lbs. for 80 60

any two packets for 102 b0
EVAPORATED MILK (2 tins) 58 52 POTATOES Glbs for 96 42

BEER HEINEKENS 26 28 CHEESE 73 «65












LL LEAVE THE AH! FOUR HOURS HAVE | WHEN IT COMES TO
CARPET BEATER PASGED -HE DIDN'T COME MAKIN’ A PLACE TO
RIGHT BY THIG IN-I GUESS HE SAW TH! SLEEP -HE'S A GENIUS!
od. ~ RUG=- JUST THE RUG AN’ BEATER-
BSS) SuScESTION OF ALL RIGHT--I'LL (__, 4 yh SQ f
: VILL 6 - 5 oe 4 SSS =>
{ i ps3 1D yeas At oe BRING IT IN NOW +h ve . f A — oS







1) {9} BROTHER AWAY-
a4 :



|
IMPERIAL LEATHER © LINDEN BLOSSOM e__ BLUE HYACINTIt
sere th il a ne ecm eee Sah cee aa
ess AH, NO, DEAR CABLE...
Se] | BOT YOU DO THEM MORE
~}f OH, TNL... YOU'RE S44 | JUSTICE THAN SOME
7 JUST BLINDED BY THE DUMMY IN A NORSE
\ BRILLIANCE OF YOUR...
GIFTS /









UH-UH...GOMETHING TELLS
ME THAT THAT “OPERATION CUPID” J
BOPES NO GOOD FOR HAZARD.’

WHY, T.N.T. ... YOU
GAY THE NICEGT










ARR, GABLE EVEN \
THE MOON iS SHAMED
BY YOUR BEAUTY









Fly to Britain in Festival Year ! |

BY B.0.A.C, CONSTELLATION 5
IN CONJUNCTION WITH B.W.LA.
Get There Sooner! Stay There Longer!





STA

| TOUGH YOUNG
ue \ DOES Know so

NG.
\ YOu'LL HAVE TO GET
tT OUT OF HIM,
RiP!

/









> manne }
From B'dos to Fiying Time Flights Return Fare
Weekly



i | B.W.L $

y B ermuda | 17.10 hours 2 649.80 |
OF THE CHAUFFEUR Lisbon | 33.25 ,, P | 1,396.80 ;

WHO DROVE MRS. CARSTAIRS London | 37.25 » | 4 t+ 4474200 =f

HOME FROM DINNER THAT ~ le cates a
NIGHT... IT WAS ; . ~eting Services , ,

JEFF KING/ Also Connecting Services to the Whole World. ee



wise

NJOW’S the time for this young
~ “ man to learn the safe, gentle
way to Inner Cleanliness! A glass
of sparkling “‘fizzy’’ Andrews is
a delightfully refreshing drink.




CA PRs ere YP eee nin akc a 2 Dee! pop baeet” mv Same F More important still, however,
THE PHANTOM it ensures everyday good health

by cleaning the mouth, settling
the stomach and toning up the
liver. Finally, Andrews gantly
clears the bowels.



/OU'RE THE TIGER GIRL« RAISED BY TIACKED BY THE PLAYMATE! ty 7 iy? Ts Vae* 1 |
( ad oo j =
Oey ee -
ee! Sa A Se “? J ° : |
eS ae IRN Tie
sZ3 » is, ve ND \F \ f [A Ke Aa \
| QE ES ea mma |
| = ia LUGE ar | :
i , a } >,
fi BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION | i
i BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED }| || LIVER SALT
: PLANTATION BUILDING, LOWER BR CAD ST. PHONE 4585 | Pid Sure b

WHESIDEAL:» FORM *=OF! LAXATIVE

Fa ETL PRA OE EY TPS




be.
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES Ir F

[
    __ PUBLICITY SCHEME FORTEAN. eas FNS A PLAYMATE| |WAITING TO SNAP THE "TIGER GIRL” Hy I
    | Just a teaspoonful in a glass of
    | cold water and here’s an excit-
    ing, sparkling drink — here’s

    the way to Inner Cleanliness !















    eee ee

    THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 1951



    CLASSIFIED ADS.

















































    BARBADOS

    LS Le

    PUBLIC SALES FOR RENT













































    ADVOCATE
    TAKE NOTICE




















    PAGE SEVFY

    ——

    SHIPPING NOTIC”















































    Minimum charge week 72 cents and
    TELEPHONE 2508 Ten cents per agite line on week-days} 96 cents Su"days 24 words — over 24
    Crtelnaiecnaiee me @nd 12 cents per agete line on Sundays, ,; “ords 3 cents a word week—4 cents a = |e ee a
    3 minimum charge $1.50 on week-days| word on Sundays; | MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, |
    For Births, M4rriage or Engagement FOR SALE and $1.80 on Sundays, NEW ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED. SS a SOE
    announcements in Carib, Calling the —— ee That GENERAL FOO " i (M.AN.Z,) |
    charge % $3.00 for any number of #vords sa REAL ESTATE vise tak tater Of tae Sie ae ee a corporation organized and existing] ss. “PORT FAIRY” is scheduled to THE MV. “MONTK\
    up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each Minimum charge week 72 cents and tp ieainaans _! HOUSES isiness address is 250 Park Ateae ss ae of Americ B. wix trade or | sail from Hobart June 28th. Bowen July Will accept Cargo and | }
    additional word, Terms cash. Phone 2506| 96 cents Sutdays 24 words — over 24| LAND-S443 sq. ft. situate at Ponce| America, Manufacturers, has applied for an pcan fork: United States of | 12th, Mackay July 20th, Brisbane July for Dominica, Antigua
    between 830 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death| Words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a) of Wales Road, Bank Hall, suitable for] oA Of Rewister in respect of cereal foods, and will be entitied ta egies part | sist. Sydney “August 4th, Melbourne | errat, Nevis, St. Kitts
    Netiees only after 4 p.m word on Sundays; the erection of a Bungalow, Apply:| CLIFTON TEI maeaie after one month from the 16h day of August 196l) unless ae a the son | August 11th, arriving at Trinidad Sep Friday 17th. wrepEt
    | A. P. BROME, Brittons Hill. Dial aio » ERR/ -—To an approved/ in the meantime giv * 2 naam bih 1 — erson shal) tember 8th, and Barbados September THE MY. “
    | ; 5 tena ‘ ee a @ notice in duplicate to me at fice of op t of suc? o 4 7 ys
    ‘eee oe qenconcynints e j 15.8. 51—4n Cemosite Yockt tng sia eee, Bee in reeieasian The trade mark can be seen on "paepiiontldet at my p's se contig neg ~ paiieton tw wer 1 thi ay ae ai eae. {
    urths, . aths cknow!l- penile 7 ted this 8th day of August 1951. nh addition to general cargo , rec )
    @dgments, and In Memoriam notices is UTO modern conveniences Apply on premises. , » vessel has ample space for chilled anc inica : tt
    @:.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays A MOTIVE OR EXCHANGE_Ower fine Home §.8.51—t£n. Registrar - eae ret: hard: Oem Caren | ts i
    for any number of words up to 50, and | convenient, Government Hiil area. Em-| FARWIN—Maxwell } 16.8 Sac | eee gerne on through | Bile “ot a .
    & cents per word on week-days and) CAR--1949 Kaiser Saloon done only 5,500| Wnently suitable largish family, obliged | Septembe. et Road, from, Ist —— ———————___--_-_ ee Lentee =~ trenanininent at Trinidad to M ¥, D er onr 2
    4 cents per word on Sundays for each| Milks in A-1 condition FORT ROYAL | ©X¢hange smaller place preferably on| ardvene Plante pe Bae rarmet: ritish Guiana, Leeward and Windward cept Cargo and Passengers
    ditional word. iGA 5E Tele rt “ lsea or s@ll co: - ; fndrews Plantation Phone 95267 Islands, | Luc Grenada, Arub
    ad RAGE LTD. Telephone 4504 st price. Exceptional and NOT R
    ni 1G ity 16.8.51—4n For further particu apply Passengers or for St. Vincent
    6.8,01-08 (ios deal” Gert “bent” Seen ns — { FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD | ing date to be notified
    _ | ou: ea ect private artie; > > oo ee: _ . a oe “ee ci
    CAR—Morris {. 1947 Model in good | through responsible Agents Ping 2395 base ee Spa re eee new) TREND, | LW. 8, SOOONEEs Een
    ANNOUNCEMENTS working order, tyres very good. Dial| ®fter 3 p.m. daily, © 11.8.51—12n. | gego or eee eG oe ry ore a 7
    4253 E 16.5. 51—3n —_ es ‘ tin and co No. 4047
    — ¥ ARS eens DA COSTA & CO. LTD, |
    oe ws "| “ROOSEVELT” —Maxwell © Roa .
    ce ARK 10 Fiat 18h B avery goed | AUCTION dull? Surnishaa——Prinigete Const Read BARBADOS,
    . on. easonable . edford Cot-/ —_. rte 3. s ¥
    ALL THIS GREAT HELP tege Bedford Ave. (Phone 4894, 7 am. | es | NEC eon sta-bathing. Available from ‘ sik hill sidoetiac tidal -ldapeammanesi ee $$ __—__—_——
    from ASPRO. Colds and ‘flu dispelled| 4 pm.) 6 8 binen | UNDER THE SILVER St October, Phone 22% .
    headaches cleared-soothing swift relief} ——H__ ad = whee 16.8.51—3n | e >
    from Rheumatic and Neuralgic Pains MOTOR CYCLE - 1% hp. BS.A HAMMER Ae | “O.
    Nerviness Sleeplessness. Let ASPRO! good as new; done only 1700 mice DC. SUGAR SELBY HASTINGS—4 bedrooms, 3 with | '*
    come to your aid NOW! --8.8.51—10n. | Gwner buying bigger Cycle. Telephone By recommendation of Lioyds Agents Onkn water, all modefn conveniences. ,
    ee H. O. Ramsey, Jnr., — 3891 we will sell on FRIDAY the 17th 102| \" urnished. Available ist September
    MADE to measure within day if 15.8.51—4n Begs Dark Crystal Sugar commencing at Apply on premises between 4 p.m. and |
    necessary Shirts, Pyjamas, Pants, Shorts, | «—. : 30 o'clock at the following Ware-|% P:™. everyday. 16.8.51—5n | FLL.
    & Ladies’ Slacks. Guaranteed fit and STATION WAGGON 1951 H ouses :— a —— {
    , ; > ill aes SUNSET",
    Workmanship pno¥ AL STORE, No. 12| Station Waggon. First Registered April, es, Traders as - Roebuck St Pere 7 ap ORAS * | NEW YORK SERVIC
    e Pa 2 * 3 : . + for st a | se . ‘ . 51
    -gashbetomph alot cas) ee pita Wit ee aon Rew price $2,150. | head. rm eld, Steel Bldg: Pier-| seniember only. Furnished 8.8. TRYA sails 20th July Arrives Barbado t July, 1951.
    ve e 5 wher purchasin f , That © IN \ STEAMER, sails 10 gus Arrives Ba nist August, 195
    a - ————— | larger vehicle. Apply Ralph Bani . S. P. Musson Son.& CO. — Bridge | YEARWOOD & BOYCE, the State ae Re ENTAL FOODS, IWC., a corporation organized under the laws ot | oa sells 0th August , aie
    HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—Isle of} Lower Bay Street 15.8.51—8n. | app pale, 12.30 o'clock — Terms CASH James Street. s 1800 Hudson Benet United States of America, whose trade or business address | Pee reece “4
    Spices. SANTA M.\RIA- joveliest ote} | ——___ BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. | _ #-@-01—8-2.0.| turers, has anpiied te Se ekeane TE: United Staves of America, ‘Manutac NEW ORLEANS SERVICE i
    . m , SERS: | ve, : ion of a trade mark In Part “A” of Register in | $.S. GENERAL ARTIGAS sails 18th July Arrives Barbadc Mist Juls Si
    per day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi- ELE Auctioneers hie en the Sea, St. Lawrence. | 10 tanbite fooderatte, including soups and ingredients of soups, and will be entitle, | A STRAMER sails Ist August Arrives Barbados 1th A t
    Gential district under Government House CTRICAL ully furnished. Dial ‘ ' Ster the same after one month from the 16th day of August 1951, unless | A STE : 5 pus Arrives ados 29th August, 1951
    : | 16.8.51—3n ome person shall 3 & nie A STEAMER sails 1Sth August
    bill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day. 14.7 51.—t fn. | Onsale all in the meantime give notice im duplicate to me at my office o2 raperareemesisasnin enine
    SEASIDE INN—On Grana Anse Bathing sraieeien tannin rf on of such registration, The trade mark can be seen on application at my CANADIAN SERVICE
    ach. ates from J per head per a y S. Just recei ss
    day, Enquiries to D. M. Slinger, Grenada | Oprim Electric Ironing Machines, “se | Dated this 8th day of August 1951. ‘SOUTHBOUND
    26.6.51—78n, | Sheets, Shirts, Collars, Dresses etc. The e HW. WILLIAMS, Name of Ship Sails Montreal Salis Halifax Arrives Barbados
    complete home Ironer. Dial 3878, Da - | Registrar of ‘Trade Marks
    PYE RADIO CATALOGUES: Clearly | Costa & Co., Ltd., Electrical Dept ] 16.8. 51~-an SS. “ALCOA PARTNER" August Sra August 6tt August 16th
    illustrated colourful leaflets describing! 12 8 51.—6n. tt _ — 8.8. ALCOA PILGRIM . August Mth August 271) September 6t!
    cach of the new 1951—52 Pye Radios ' $.S. ALCOA PEGASUS September Tih September 10th September X
    fia sadioutartophonee. wit be. iullca;, FRCERIC SEWING MACHINES CHANCERY SALE oe .
    to you without obligation, for the, The all Electric Machine that makes Sew- BARBADOS. VORTHBOUND
    asking. No salesman will call, Maii a|'%% and Darning easy Dial 3878. Da/| Th . S.S. ALCOA PEGASUS due Barbados August 16th for St. Lawrence
    card to PYE LIMITED P.O. BOX 260 | Costa & Co., Ltd., Electrical Dept | punt a Seeementiqnsd property will be set up for sale at the Registration Office, River Port
    Bridgetown 15,8.51—3n. | 12.8.51—6n | de - uildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and or ee
    e date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding These vessels have limited passenger accomodation



    PUBLIC NOTICES

    Ten cents per agate line on week-dau?
    and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
    minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
    and $1.80 on Sundays,

    bulbs a full range at General Hardware
    Supplies, Rickett Street. Dial 4918
    14.8. 51—3n

    FURNITURE

    OFFICE CHAIRS: Just received a
    shipment of Office Posture Chairs with
    three point adjustment. See them today
    ai T. Geddes Grant Ltd., or Dial 4442.
    2.8.51—t.f.n.

    MECHANICAL z

    NOTICE

    Neither the Master nor the Consignees
    oi the Motor Vessel “VELVET LADY”
    are responsible for any debt or debts con-
    tracted by the crew during her stay in
    this Port







    MANNING & CO., LTD
    16.8.51-—8n

    LOST & FOUND

    Roberts Steel Sack Trucks and Trol-
    leys, also Spare Wheels and Tyres.
    Trolleys $80.00, Trucks $48.00 and $36.00

    S. P. MUSSON SON & Co. Lid
    Dial 3713, 9.8.51—Tn

    MISCELLANEOUS

    CAMERA—Kodak 35, As New, price
    one hundred dollars. Fitt, Knights Ltd
    City Pharmacy. 11.8.51—T F N

    ————
    ENAMEL WARE at competitive prices
    at General Hardware Supplies, Rickett







    LOST





    outside
    offered

    GLASSES.
    Government

    Pair of
    building

    Glasses,
    Reward





    Lynch, Cottle Catford 15.8,51—2n. | Street. Dial 4918. 14.8,51—3n
    EARTHENWARE, dishes, plates, cups, |
    bowls etc., at General Hardware Sup- |
    TAKE NOTICE plies, Rickett Street. Dial 4918 |
    14,8,51—3n.

    GALV. BUCKETS 10” $1.00 each, 11’



    and 12 $1.20 each, These are at special |
    Pp OS T prices’ at Ralph Beard’s, Lower Baj |
    Street. 15.8.51—3n



    GALVANISED SHEETS. New 24 gauge

    TOASTIES



    6ft $4.68 each 7ft $5.44 each &ft

    $8.21 each. At Ralph Beard, Lower Bay

    That GENERAL FOODS CORPORA- | Street 15,8.51—3n
    TION, a corporation organized and | ———————————————————————
    existing under the laws of the State of MILNERS Wall Safes and Steel Office
    aware, United States of America,| Equipment — comprising Desks, Filing
    whose trade or business address is 250] Cabinets, Stationery and Pigeon Hole
    Park Avenue, New York, New York,| Cabinets, Cash Boxes, Plan Files for

    Architects, Card Index Cabinets, Waste-
    peper Baskets, Letter Trays ete

    S. P. MUSSON SON & Co. Ltd.
    Dial—3713 9.8.51—Tn,

    ———
    RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing

    United States of America, Manufacturers,
    has applied for the registration of a
    trade mark in Part “A" of Register in
    respect of cereal foods, and will be en-
    titled to register. the same after one
    month from the 16th day of

    —
    ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIFS, wire and

    By BEVERLEY BAXTER

    | SOMEONE, probably Dr, John-

    Supreme Court of Ontario, who
    — wrote to an old friend: “Afterfhas come to hear Chancellor
    orty years of deep friendship 1] Gaitskell’s variations on an old
    }am as fond of you as a new] theme,
    | acquaintance.” Th
    | e judge, who was _badl
    a In ried = vd days, as July{wounded in the first war, is :
    ;Has raced towards its final hours,}yreat authority 3 i
    ty awe cee y On Shakespeare,

    | " sO many friends,
    acquaintances, and new faces that
    |memory becomes blurred.

    IN time everyone comes to Lon-
    ;don, or so it would seem at this
    |time of the year, and why not?

    “Milton wrote his works on a
    vocabulary of 7,000 words,” he
    told me earnestly. “Shakespeare
    used 17,000 words, a great number
    of which he added to our lan-
    guage.”

    London is still the centre of the > has such ¢ 2 . Augustus Hinkson or howéver else the same may butt and bound ana
    world and draws mankind like alt HE has such a deep respect FOURTHLY ALL THAT place, piece or parcel of land now or lately called th.
    |magnet. And j ; é}for British institutions that I Garden situate in the parish of Saint Lucy in this Isfind containing by ad-
    | genet. ne judging by last] was somewhat horrified when measurement five acres sixteen perches of land or thereabouts bounding or
    week Westminster is the centre] shortly after he had sat down i Bromefield, Babbs and Checker Hal! Plantetions and on the Public Road o
    of the gentre’ So—up with the] th all na Bas Gown 1D however else the same may bound Together with the messuage and all and
    tant p e} the Gallery the following dialogue singular other buildings thereon and thereto — belonging
    curtain: broke out:— UPSET PRICE: £3,600-0-0d.

    . Dr. M Nn ntn tae \ DATE OF SALE; 10th August, 1951,
    The Rise of Mr. Weston eee (Socialist): On a H. WILLIAMS
    HERE on the Terrace are 50 po. of order. Did you hear, Registrar-in-Chancery,
    re Mr. Deputy Speaker, the re- ©

    pretty Canadian girls, all dressed
    |alike, singing “The Maple Leaf”
    and the French-Canadian “Alou-

    mark made by the honourable
    member for Kidderminster

    : I when he sai â„¢
    ore while M.P.s applaud from Genaadanwe’ =
    e open windows. De ut Spe: : i
    Garfield Weston sent them here . sedi mccgidtMrametin die.
    and has taken 50 British girls Mr. Nabarro (Tory)—who sits] on
    to visit Canada, ee : for Kidderminster and has a
    He is, of course, a millionaire, voice like a giant calling for

    which does not reduce the gen-
    erosity of this scheme.

    HE came from Canada to the
    first war as 4 very young, pale,
    wistful sapper in my section, hav-
    ing lied about his age.

    After the war, being the sor
    of a baker, he decided to buy @
    lot of family-owned bakeries in

    a barrel of rum): I must pro-
    test most vehemently. I did not
    use any bad language at all.

    Mr. Follick (Socialist): Could the
    honourable gentleman tell us
    what word he used that sound-
    ed like “bloody” ?

    Deputy Speaker: Order!

    Friday at the same place and during the same hours until sold
    on application to me,

    PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land (part of Checker Hal)



    BARBADOS,

    Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m
    the date specified below.
    Friday at the same place and during the same hours until sold
    application to me.

    PROPERTY: ALi, THAT certain piece

    Pull particular

    FREDERICK ARCHIBALD CONRAD CLAIRMONTE
    v

    JOSEPH NTZGERALD CLAIRMONTE O’NEALE

    - Plaintiff
    Defendant

    Plantation) situate in the parish of Saint Lucy and Island aforesaid containing
    by admeasurement Seven acres three roods thirty two perches Butting and
    bounding on lands now or late of Mr. Watson on lands now or late of Babbs
    Plantation on other lands now or late of Oliver DeCourcy Emtage and Ernest
    Augustus Hinkson and on the Public Road SECONDLY ALL THAT certair
    piece or parcel of land (part of Checker Hall Plantation) situate in the paris?
    of Saint Lucy and Island aforesaid containing by admeasurement Two Acres
    One rood eighteén perches Butting and bounding on lands of Oliver Decoure:
    Emtage and Ernest Augustus Hinkson and on a Road ov which there is «
    Right of Way or however else the same may butt and bound THIRDLY ALI
    THAT certain piece or parcel of land (part of Checker Hall Plantation) situate
    in the parish of Saint Lucy and Island aforesaid containing by admeasurement
    One acre and four perches butting and bounding on other lands of Oliver Di
    Courey Emtage and Ernest Augustus Hinkson on a Road over which there is
    a Right of Way on other lands of the said Oliver DeCourcy Emtage and Ernest









    CHANCERY SALE

    The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at the Registration Office
    for the sum and or
    If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding
    Full particulars |

    KENNETH CARLTON O'NEALE

    Vv

    RUTH ELIZABETH O'NEALE Defendant

    or parcel of land situate near Colletor
    Plantation in the pacish of St. Lucy and Island of Barbados abovesaid contain
    ing by admeasurement three acres and thirty-eight perches be the same more
    or less (made up of four separate parcels of land containing by admeasure
    ment Two roods and twenty-four perches, One acre one rood, One rood and
    fourteen perches, and one acre respectively) butting and bounding as a whol

    Plaintift







    |
    | ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
    | APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE
    )
    \





    aA
    S|
    BUSINESS NOTICE

    We wish to advise our custome



    Auction Sale

    {


















    that our Business will be closed

    from 20th August, will reopen

    27th August a :

    H. A, GULSTONE & CO., LTD Sale of Mr. J. C. Hotchki
    \{ 18.8. 51—-In Excellent Modern Furniture }
    Nee = and Household Effects will
    SS SS take place at Flat 7, “Aber-

    Keldie,” Dayrell’ Road,

    Christ Church on

    Wednesday, 22nd August

    FOR SALE
    LAND

    Building Site

    AUCTIONEERS

    John 64. Biadon

    Excellent in

    one of the best residential fe Co.
    Districts
    PRICE: £600. A.F.S., F.V.A.
    Come and Get it ! Phone 4640
    Phone 8503. PLANTATIONS BUILDING

    KEEP FOOD FRESH
    with

    = LUNCHWRAP”

    MOISTURE VAPOUR PROOF WAXED PAPER



    on Jands now or late of Thomas Jordan, on lands now or late of Mrs. S. Lowe
    on lands now or late of L. Griffith, on the public road and on lands now or
    late of the said Colleton Plantation or however else the same may butt ang
    bound; Together with the Messuage or Dwelling House thereon and all ane
    singular other the houses and outhouses on the said land erected and buil
    standing and being with the appurtenances belonging thereto
    H. WLLLIAMS,
    Registrar-in-Chancery



    August 1951 unless some person shall in
    the meantime give notice in duplicate
    to me at my office of opposition of such

    registration The trade mark can be
    seen on application at my office
    Dated this 8th day of August, 1951
    H, WILLIAMS,
    Registrar of Trade Marks
    16.8.51—3n



    TAKE NOTICE

    JELL




    Thet GENERAL FOODS CORPORA-
    TION corporation organized and
    (x isting under the laws of the State of
    Delaware, United States of America
    whose trade or business address is 250



    Paik Avenue, New York, New York
    United States of America, Manufacturers
    has applied for the gistration of 4
    trade mark in Part “A” of Register ir
    respect of foods and ingredients of foods;
    velatine, jellies, desserts, puddings and
    pudding powders, ice cream powders, ice
    cream mix, freezing mix, fruit extracts
    confectionery, and will be entitled t«
    register the > after né month fron
    the 16th day of August 1951
    unless some person shall in the meantime
    give notice in duplicate to me at my
    office of opposition of such registration
    Tne trade mark can be seen on application
    at my office
    Dated this 8th day of August, 1951.
    H. WILLIAMS,
    Registrar of Trade Marks.
    16.8. 51—3n









    €



    ARTICULOS De ORTENTAL

    CURIOS, SOUVENIRS
    ANTIQUES, IVORY



    (KASHMERE) Dial 3466





    MEP OROPGOOPROSOE ORFS wo
    & FOR SALE ¥
    <* One G.E.C. Refrigerator, one ¥
    ys year old, $420.00, One Premier \
    <* automatic electric kettle, new, %
    s* $18.00. One electric clock, $12.00 %
    ss One 1/8 H.P. A.C. electric &
    y Archville, Upper Clapham, Christ
    S. Church. Apply: H. W. Webster, ¢%
    S$. B.M.L.A. Society, Phone 4238 or ¢
    Q 6542 15,8.51—t.f.n.
    \OPEOSOOPSPSPSODOSSSES
    ee ——



    FURNISH
    in Style...





    STYLISH New and Renewea
    Mahogany and o Bur s.
    Bedsteads, Wardrobe: Chests-of-
    drawers, Beds, Springs, Laths,
    Separate siderails Washstands,
    Nightchairs Cheval and other
    Mirrors, China, Kitchen and Bed-
    room Cabinets, Tables for Dining,
    Kitchen, Radio and Decoration,

    Tea Trolleys

    MORRIS Furniture
    and Springlike Cusiions, #.50
    up, Caned and Rush Furniture,
    Stools in Mahogany and Rush
    $1 up

    Morris Spring

    SINGER and other Sewing
    Machines in Hand and Treadle in
    regular and chainstitch, Gramo-
    phone, Wardrobe and other
    Trunks e Box—BUY NOW

    L.S. WILSON

    SPRY ST.

    DIAL 4069



    I

    {







    j haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,

    ....and we will order for you if we
    Ltd. 6.7. 51—t,f.n.

    SPECIAL OFFER OF 3 PIECE TERRA
    COTTA BUTTER COOLERS. Just the
    thing for this hot weather, A simple
    operation ensures cool firm butter all the
    year round Instructions with each
    Cooler ONLY 48 CENTS EACH, OB-
    TAINABLE FROM HARRISON'S HARD. |
    WARE STORE, BROAD ST
    ——————

    SUNFLEX in all shades at General
    Hardware Supplies, Rickett Street.
    Dial 4918. 14.8.51—3n.

    TREES—Three (3) Large Almond
    Trees standing, excellent fire wood
    Apply: R. P. Gooding, C/o Fort Royal
    Garage Ltd 15, 8.51—6n.













    a full}
    Supplies,

    GLASSW ARE—See
    General Hardware
    Dial 4918

    PYREX
    range at
    Rickett Street

    14.8.51—8n,.





    PAINTS—By Peacock and Bucham in
    ali sizes and shades at General Hardware
    Supplies, Rickett St. Dial 9918.

    14,8.51—3n

    WANTED
    HELP

    POSITION OFFERED
    LADY with knowledge of Book-keep-
    ing and Cash, to work in our office,
    $40.00 per month Applicant must live
    within 3 miles of City, Appky in person
    at 1 p.m. any day except Saturdays.











    idea to backers and got the money.
    NOW his enterprises extend to
    Canada and the U.S.A.

    His recreation? Buying
    nesses, including Fortnum
    Mason. His favourite
    Balance sheets.

    His way of resting?

    busi-
    and:
    reading? |



    Flying on; di



    he hardly ever sees them.



    JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
    15, 8.51—3n.



    WANTED TO RENT
    BNGLISH GENTLEMAN requires

    sea, within



    England and modernise them. Harold Wilson (who had the
    The. cniy snag was that he] floor): Whatever. the boy
    had no money, but he sold the soprano from Kidderminster,

    said, or did not say,
    hate to think

    nitions of what
    means,
    Yet the judge stayed

    | hours. Tough fellows, these Cana-

    ans!

    powerful new men emerging

    that he
    agreed in our respective defi-

    UPSET PRICE; £4,512-10-0d.



    I should | DATE OF SALE: 10th August, 1951, 26.7. 51—4n
    and I
    harids with the cook. the Gevernment since it pointe.
    nonsense} “] gm afraid,’ said Mr. Welen-| at notching particular, had mm
    sky’s wife, “that you will have| visible foundation, and was hel
    for six]to shake hands with me.” in place by wire-pulling. How

    deplore these gibes at our masters

    y r. Fukuda
    A Bow For M COLONEL CLIFTON BROWN

    Now let us have “One Fine Day”





    siness. is ate: » a $ y ; 8 ft “rfec s re forgav
    pote aa New Power in the Empire [from Madam Butterfly, or “My | io pe - ee ne Sonia ve
    th iy re = iec : eo” fr fhe mi for tellin s on e previous
    That is the story of Sapper} NOW let us adjourn to the Cent See rere e yb Be night that we were really be-
    Weston up to date. The girls on|town house of Sir Dennistoun Mr Pie orca! aici ‘i the t| coming hysterical.
    the Terrace are just a pleasant| Burney, whose inventions were so! Kyosuke Fukuda, the most| '
    interlude. valuable in the first war and ae in ae bering has| Puring the last two years he
    Pare sigars are be-|cOme to my house for lunch, has entertained at dinner parlia-
    iF’ Victor, Pro-Sassoon ha igh Age mr Pe He is gravely courteous, yet! mentary delegations from France
    WHO is this suave, elegant man] The most interesting guest at |S # Sense of fun. Bres0 * B yet Sealand, tat ael
    who has come to hear the For-|his party is the burly, highly in-| For MacArthur he has nothing | piniand, ‘and Indonesia tT vettien-
    age {Sai Danas i at, a vpemsars Longe ot ut praise. He tells me that the}. ine indonesian dinner par-
    Is Sir Victor Sassoon, whose} Northern odesia, r. OY |Emperor has now become a Con-| 4) ng olga ese
    horses run in his name although| Welensky, C.M.G., one of the |gtitutional monarch and that full| Ucularly for Mr. Chuter Ede's sh,

    infauthority has passed to Parlia-| 8 when he said in mock solem-

    He had big interests in Shang-|the Colonial Empire. ment. Yes, there has been much By “The sk Mia > Parlis
    hai and refused to pay the sums] He was born of Swedish parents {rebuilding in Japan because the - fe aie cian?
    which the invading Japanese de-}in Southern Rhodesia, pecame a|houses are of wood. os: tt 7 ‘esouite $y) tadiie Tae
    manded when they took Shanghai| heavy-weight boxing champion,} We shake hands and bow, for pee eign we '
    in their war against China. then an engine driver, a trade|peace has restored to the land of] 6). guests were much im

    “Why are you so anti-Japan-| unionist, a newspaper editor, and | cherry blossoms and scented mists} co cug and so were the Con
    ese?" asked the victorious com-] finally “Prime Minister.” its ancient courtesy. a idatives ;
    mander-in-chief. Sassoon replied:| For years he has been agitating| House of the Perfect Host
    “I am not anti-Japanese. I amffor a union of, the Northern and} THERE is just space to go t The Post Bag
    pro-British and very pro-Sas-]Southern Rhodesias. When it, Mr. Speaker's house, where he is To ail those who have writter
    soon.” come about, as it will, he will have | holding a reception. offering to clip my dog Disraeli a

    Now he lives in the Bahamas ]the honour of chief architect. | What a marvellous view of the| their own expense, may I than}
    When I asked him why, he said:] HIS wife is as lively and sensi-|river one has from this window,| them, but also explain that the
    “I gave up India and China gave] ble as himself. jand how attractive the terrace| photograph which appeared re
    me up.” When Mrs. Creech Jones, the | 'ooks from that altitude. j cently was taken in March He



































    focaenacie Tee ae Retatte Club A Judge at Westminster wife of the then Colonial Secre- We can gaze at the -nearby| has since been clipped almost t
    Long tenant. Ring 4204 or 4207. NOW let the Empire drum: | tary, dined at the Welensky home Skylon, which some miscreant| the point of indecency
    15.8.51—3n. | roll for Judge MacKay of the'she asked to be allowed to shake said epitomiseq the character of - LES
    T A KE NOTI CE SCLC OA OOP POPOL EEK VL,
    &
    ; 4
    ~ x
    AXWell S % |
    % i
    | x % |
    xg ¥
    x x
    % %
    $ 8
    %,
    oe § WITH THEIR
    ett cece *
    x.
    That GENERAL FOODS CORPORA- |
    TION, a corperation organized and S
    existing under the laws of the State of | &
    Delaware, United States of America, | ¥
    whose trade or business address is 250 | $
    Park Avenue, New York, New York,/ %
    United States of America, Manufacturers, | % x
    has applied for the registration of a x HY %
    trede mark in Part “A” of Register | . %
    in respect of tea and coffee, and will) . “ x
    be entitled to register the same after) & %
    phe me 1 from the 16th day of August | @& e m ?
    Gosi unless some person shall in the mean- | gS Let your Children come in and %
    time give notice in Snorer Ae ae at x 3
    ray office of opposition of such registra- x :
    tion The wade mask can pe wen on g@fect some of the following:=- 8
    “Ppated this &th day of August 1951 ist
    H. WILLIAMS, | % 3
    Registrar of Trade hab & %
    16.8.51—2n. | \ :
    (¢ THE SHIP OF ADVENTURE—by Enid Blyton 3
    Santas . 3
    ADVERTISE & CHILDREN’S NEW ILLUSTRATED ENCYCLOPEDIA :
    in the %
    in 6 $ GIMLET BORES IN—by Captain W. E. Johns 3
    7, > x
    ADVOCATE x f y
    % THE WESTOW TALISMAN—by Percy P. Westerman x
    §
    s %
    RACES--|! :
    *
    RESULTS $ %
    », %
    A re what x AD %
    C ounts! the Most % V/
    4
    E fficient and % %
    ; 5 nett ‘ ~ 1 . ’ 7 $ ‘ ?
    S peediest method on & the cooking track 112 :
    is GAS for Cooking tie :
    LLL, Be | GLE NGfL OPA AAPM PERO OER ALALLLL LLL POLL ILLIA AMAL





    THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

    Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets

    =~ ae on




    Es T= SPSS
    ae EAL A EO EE PEOPLES.
    *

    % %,
    * IS YOUR SAVINGS ACCOUNT INCREASING? &
    ‘ Did you save as much as you anticipated during the past year? x
    De How much have you saved in the past five or ten years? ss
    ‘ If your savings plan is bogging down you need a systematic *
    s* method—something along the lines of a Sun Life Endowment
    % Policy. »
    % Start saving this sure way to-day x
    : ANADA *
    § SUN LIFE ASSURANCE CO. x
    ‘ Head Office: Montreal &
    x R. M. JONES & COMPANY LIMITED »
    % Representatives for Barbados. *
    st Gabriel Gonsalves, Jnr.,)
    and Canvassers |

    D. L, Crichlow | s

    toto OE CO PRO foto “ toe MG : A oes



    4

    Z Hundred Empty Barrels |

    FOR PALING USES

    FOR SALE





    ROBERTS) MANUFACTURING 00.

    HILL.

    GOVERNMENT



    You should read

    all about

    FERNOXONE















    -
    and apply it |
    | |
    at once
    | INDICATION FOR USE. Fernoxove is a select Iiormone
    weed-killer and is recommended for control of Nutgress
    on lawns, golf greens, gravelled and asphalted paths and
    drives. All weeds are most easily killed when growing
    vigorously.
    Fernoxone has the advantage over arsenicals in that it is $
    not dangero to humans or anim j
    METHOD OF USE, Used as a | 4 Ib acre ve ingred- |}
    ient is the recommended appl ion rate. A 1% stock
    | solution is made up adding 1.25 Ib Fernoxone to 10 }f
    | gallons water, or 2!) 0; Fernoxone to 10 pints water. |
    | Use 40 gallans per acre, or % pint per 100 sq. ft., diluting '
    | the stock solution with a further quantit f water to |}
    cover the area
    PRECAUTIONS. road-leave are vé ble t i!
    damage by Fernoxone and great care
    applying it tc avoid drift on to ch croy e
    growing nearby
    PLANTATIONS LID.



    PAGE EIGHT

    DON COCKELL SAYS:







    l use my left... they
    know they've been hit










    Lieyd Marshall gave

    me my
    only sear
    By DON COCKELL

    as told to
    JOHN MACADAM

    HME young gentleman lays his

    hand on his wife's arm and
    looks dreamily across the
    promenade lo the dazzling blue of
    the Medilerranean.

    He is a good-looking young man with
    a scar below the left eye. He is relaxed
    under his umbrella, and plucks under the
    neck of his shirt at the loose flesh as he
    says, “See what I’ve got to






    work on!” He goes on to
    Wd 5 + the blitz in Glasgow and Carshal-
    on and back in Battersea again
    YOU couldn't I was any- It seemed almost to follow m«
    thing extraofmina at school 1, about. I wasn’t a blitz baby. but



    Batt ea I wa particularly guess I spent most of my grow-

    good at any subject. None of that ing-up years in the noise

    Gene Tunney husiness of being

    Shakespearian scholar or an In My Stride

    thing, Now I take them all as they
    I was just average with the come in my stride, Even in

    books, and besides I was this place like this.

    fellow I've told you about who was You get used to the idea of

    too big to fight with anybody my having a lot of people around you
    age all the time, When you’re in the

    The sear? 1 got that from Licyd ying there’s only one follow acros
    Marshall, and a broken nose stom you but a terrible lot around
    playing cricket when I was 13. You get used to the feeling o!
    Never had another mark in the them being there and it’s good to
    ring, but this one was something. pe in a place like this where you

    It was just a park game and the feel alone.





    ball came off the ground a bit The only guy here who knows
    fast—it was the usual park ground J'm 2 fighter
    1d caught me in the face. Na‘,
    a bit annoyed, He gizes a bear-hug to the
    waiter who js bringing me

    another fin a eau and makes a

    In The Blitz




    Nan? She's my grannie wi mock pretence of defence. .
    brought me t in the little houx ... is Pierre, and he sees I gt
    in Mendip-crescent, Battersea, plenty to eat. I like to eat, and I
    Me and Tim, the cat who never know I'll get it at home fron
    mew? Tim did not. Maybe it Irene. I think I'll take Pierre
    new? Tim did not. Maybe it home to Weybridge with me. He'd
    was the blitz I went through it be a riot in my barber’s shop.
    as a kid in Battersea. The same And with Nan. She’s only 74.
    bomb blew up Johnny Peters and Officially? Mrs. 30lster, No
    Git. 6 < Wever sees my fights, Irene’s the

    He smiles at the recollection. only one I like to have at the
    although I can recall from per- ringside.

    sonal recollection of blitzes in Here the fighter fight for a

    word and finds something fro:
    tne scented air and makes a

    Battersea that there was nothing
    much there to smile about
    and then I went through

    Glamorgan
    First To Beat
    S. Africans
    HOW IT WAS DONE

    N 45 minutes Glamorgan beat

    Gonzales Wins 193
    Mile Auto Race

    PESCARA, Italy Aug, 15.
    Fangio Gonzales of Argentina
    won the $35,000, 193 miles Grand
    Prix of Pesc\va, roaring home to
    victory almost eight minutes ahead
    of his nearest rival.
    Gonzales drove the 12 lap grind




    in’a Ferrari with the time o1 twO'ihe South Africans the first

    hours 14 minutes and 594/5 secs. eounty team to do it And

    for an average speed of 86 miles straightaway 25,000 cheering

    per hour. Welshmen surged across the. field
    Second was Louis Rosier of at St. Helen's, Swansea, in bril-

    France driving a Talbot with the liant sunshine

    time of two hours 22 minutes “Sospah Fach”, the old battle

    song of the Rugger field, swelled
    to a great roar.

    And Wilfred Wooller, the burly
    Glamorgan skipper, was grabbed

    20 1/3. seconds,
    Third was Phillip Etancelin of
    France driving a Talbot, in two
    hours 24 mins. 10 secs ; ;
    Fourth came Louis Chiron of pat a | aia al high by men
    France, also in a Talbot doing it in ~~ Tt’ suad. “Land .of
    two hours, 24 mins, 28 4/5 ,



    My Fathers”

    secs

    now, with hats and caps soaring

    Gonzales registered the best lap jnto the air.
    time ofthe race on the third At teatime, when they had
    circuit. with 10 minutes and 484 knocked off 54 of the 148 runs

    seconds for an average speed of required without losing a wicket,
    90 m.p.h. the South Africans seemed certain
    Gonzales actually pulled ahead to win
    in the fourth lap when the Italian — Then
    Villoresi had to stop at the pits to Minutes.

    ane cya th ae . MecCornon,
    changes, Fear wheel Aston Villa centre half, and Len

    e

    came the astonishing 45

    28-year-o1a ex

    y . > ¥ > 2} .
    oe ee ae tatten Ja, Muncer, a Hampstead man. dis-
    7 “3 Le Aisc ae ao missed all 10 South Africans
    meeces A sh scari and Bra with their off-spinners for 29,

    dropped out on first lap. —U.P to win by

    enabling Glamorgan

    64 runs.
    eae ak i fe In his aftertea spell McConnon
    Channel Race Today with six for eleven took the

    wickets of Melle, Cheetham, and

    , ; Mullerton with successive balls.
    The Daily Mail announced that Gjamorcan'e fret hatetrick of the

    a mass channel race will start from Glamorgan 8 frst, hat-trick of the

    Cap Gris Nez Thursday between | ata nag ee first by anybody

    13 men and seven women, gath- neha: 0 ia eg Middlesex

    acon. Se Sreneh coast wetting llowed to join Glamorgan—and

    s S ’ > 4 ‘ stor > or

    Hot favourites for the race are . has been a bowling star ever

    ‘io stavotians who: are expected “ce -joined in the Welsh magic

    teaante os ae o a baraaren . by taking four wickets for 10

    | Pete ate urea . Afterwards the health of Me-

    coe hoe fh ae panes Connon and Muncer was drunk in

    eet the Bea td while the champagne in the members’ en-

    third piers of the’ team will closure, and a collection was made

    eee Ae 4 for the players on the spot

    oe Se ee oe Seog © Then, and not till then, the rain
    y om ete g —L.E.S.

    of the Egyptians is last year’s win- came.—L.E

    ner Hassein Ad El Rehi. â„¢ My:
    Second favourites are the was reported that King Farouk of

    Frenchman Roger Morvan, and Egypt promised 8,000 francs to the

    Egypt promi

    Sweden's Lars Warle. Le Morvan Egvptian winner.

    came second in last year’s con- Briefing was

    test. show of hands

    DOVER, Aug. 15.

    concluded by a
    as to who would

    Argentina is offering a cup in eat boiled eggs and whe would eat
    the name of Evita Peron, wife of
    the Argentine President; and it

    [ They'll Do It Every Time

    | ALL WEEK LONG MOM HAS TO
    |
    \

    fried eggs before the take off early
    on Thursday morning. —U-P.

    Regierered US Potent Ofte





    HAVE THE VIGILANCE OF AN MR
    TO KEEP THE KIDS IN THE YARD-:



    4 7)
    BiSmuUTH! SEIDLITz!
    COME BACK HERE!!
    BOTH OF You! STAY

    IN THE YARD AND
    PLAY! Go YOU HEAR?



    punch—unlike the orthodox boxer.
    demonstrating the punch—with Mark Hart on the
    receiving end,

    motion which is how the French

    EExcert ON WASHDAYS, THAT IS+s
    THEN YOU COULDNT DRIVE ‘EM
    OUT WITH A SWARM OF BEES +



    Don Cockell says he uses his left for a finishing

    Here he is

    say, formidable There is a mos- | ening
    around | last werds 1

    quito that goes madly

    and he hooks at it with his le



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    Bannister

    And Co, On
    Right Track

    STRICTLY speaking there are
    only two basic sports; athletics
    and boxing. After all, if you
    can’t fight you run—it’s ag simple
    as that.

    And even “Kid” Neanderthal,
    the earliest recorded “sport.” -
    his work with a club would have
    put even Bobby Locke in the
    shade, but permanently — would
    recognise the principles of track
    } and ring work.

    I don’t have to tell you that
    we're doing better in world
    boxing than we have for morc
    thar 2@ quarter of a century.

    Yet I'm net sure that British
    athletics aren't even more heart-





    |
    PETER WILSON says athle-
    i has made greater pro-
    ¢ ; than any other branch
    of sport since the war and
    thinks our track stars will
    make next year’s Helsinki
    Olympics Britain's best-ever.



    | eeempmaeysisbainnansine piiteneiessetentetataneenes

    than British boxing. The
    wrote before going
    ft\ on holiday were: “How good it is
    British athletics these

    hand, grins, and says. to watch
    I am a left-hander, I did all my| days.”
    chores in school, like writing and And despite the inevitable
    trawing with the left hand and| mudlarking which typical August
    never used my right hand at all} Bank Holiday weather produ ec
    always the left. }at the off-White City, the first
    | sporting event I saw on my

    Surprised

    Now, when I fight, I always use
    I didn’t have
    as the normal
    ighter uses his right hand as the
    they get
    left-
    -

    hand as if
    use it

    my left
    a right, I

    When
    me being a

    finishing punch.
    my left hand,

    handed man, they’re surprised vy

    the strength I have in it.

    I stand in the ordinary way b
    when I produce my left hand they
    know that I have hit them with
    box-!

    omething that left-handed

    return proved that it is good to
    see our track stars nowadays.

    Athletics has undoubtedly made
    bigger strides in this country
    than any other branch of sport
    since the war.

    Then... And Now

    | Before the war if you mention-
    itled a track and field meet to
    anyone except an athletics “nut”
    you were likely to get the reply:
    “Oh, you mean the thing Sydney

    ers do not normally possess. 1! Wooderson goes in for.”
    have a punch in the left hand It was essentially a “one-man
    because | am a left-hander. That} pand” affair.
    is out of the ordinary and I am Now if you go to any big meet-
    not sticking out my chest when] jing the stars who are making
    I say that. Britain really great in athletics
    The young gentleman 4p-| have become almost household
    praises a passing acquaplaneur | names.
    takes another sip of his orange There’s the towering Marine
    juice, smites once more into) gohn Savidge, so_ like heavy-
    the blue and goes on weight champion Jack Gardner,
    1 would have liked to havel J), right up there with the

    played football but I knew fairly



    best weight-tossers in the world.

    oon that I wae not good enough. There’s the magic of ‘Mac’
    { played for junior teams after 1 Bailey—if ever he can get a
    left s¢ hool, and had a chance of straight track he'll crack the
    being a fairly useful centre half, world’s furlong record. Bill
    but I knew that wasn't good! Nankeville, that mercurial miler,
    enough, L.r.g,| can Tun the spikes off anyone on
    oe | his day.

    eT ar area There's the towering Artnur

    “Wintmill,” who threatens to

    Cricket Results

    Aug. 15

    Scores in English

    cricket games today were
    follows
    Middlesex y. Kent at Lord’s,

    Middlesex: 148 for 5 wickets;
    Kent: 147.
    Derbyshire v, Surrey at Derby.

    Derbyshire: 171; Surrey:
    for 3 wickets.
    Gloucestershire = v.

    at Cheltenham.

    First Class

    101

    Glamorgan

    snip off the odd tenths of seconds
    in Wooderson’s one remaining
    world record—his 1 min. 49.2 secs.
    for the half-mile.

    a And what about the “new boys”



    distance runners Gordon Pirie,

    with the classical style, and the

    shamble-shanked Walter Hesketh.
    Best Miler

    Don’t forget the lanky Alan

    Paterson, who can jump his own

    height — and he stands nearly
    6ft. Giins. Qr plodding Harry
    Whittle, who runs between hur-

    Glcucestershire: 195; Glamor-| dles as though he had dried peas

    gan: 78 for 1 wicket. in his running pumps, but gets
    rashire v tition obarneht there just the same.

    Lancashire v. Nottinghamshir« ‘Above all, don’t forget Roger

    at Manchester,

    Nottinghamshire: 167 for
    wickets.

    Leicestershire v. Essex
    Ashby.

    Leicestershire: 180; Essex:

    for 4 wickets.
    Somerset v
    S-M
    Somerset’ 260; Sussex 116.
    Warwicks v. Northants
    Coventry
    Warwicks:
    Yorkshire v.
    Scarborough.
    Worcestershire:

    Sussex

    Worcestershire

    268 for 8.



    WHAT’S ON TO-DAY

    Victorian Exhibition at Bar-
    bados Museum — 10 a.m
    to 6 p.m.

    Court of Chancery (Chris-
    tian Mission Case)—10.30
    am.

    Meeting of the Sanitary
    Commissioners of St. Mi-
    chael—2 p.m.

    Meeting of Christ Church
    Vestry—2 p.m.

    Football (Harrison College
    vs. Windward Islands)—
    5 p.m.

    Water Polo af Aquatic Club
    Harrison College vs
    Snappers ; Whipporays vs.
    Bonitas)—5 p.m,

    CINEMAS:
    Aquatic Club “The Emperor
    Waltz” 8.30 p.m
    Plaza (Bridgetown) “There's A

    Girl In My Heart’; Jighs And
    Massie in Jackpot Jitters”;
    Oharles ws. Waleott’ 430 &
    4.50 pom
    Empire—"Sugar Ray Robinson va.
    Randolph Turpin’ 430 &
    8.30) pom,
    Olympic “A Date With Judy and
    “These Lodger’—4.50 and 8.15
    pm,



    By Jimmy Hatlo





    at Weston-

    466 for 5 wickets.



    7| Bannister, who is undoubtecls
    the world’s best miler.
    These men, and many

    look like making next

    more,

    at ,
    year’s

    62} Helsinki Olympics Britain’s best

    ever, And what little encourage-
    ment they have enjoyed.

    The worst facilities, in tracks

    and equipment, of any leading
    a | nation:

    That monstrous grab by the

    Chancellor from the profits of the
    at! Wembley Olympics so that, again,
    we shall have to go cap in hand
    and crawling to raise a team for
    Helsinki.

    Oh! for a breath of sanity.
    with “broken-time” payments for
    working-men athletes, and a
    proper track for every town of
    50,000, —L.E.S.



    BOYS FROM ST. MARY’S
    COLLEGE GOING TO B.G.

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 13
    Eighteen St. Mary's College
    3oys will fly to British Guiana to
    renew intercollegiate rivalry with
    3t. Stanislaus College this week.
    The programme of the tour in-
    ludes a three-day cricket match
    ind two football games, and an
    ithletie meeting. The boys will
    return on Sunday August 26
    |, S9CDPSGS FRCP POPP PFO O OO
    COMBERMERE SCHOOL

    THE
    re OCIATION

    OLD BOYS

    %

    %

    e e »

    Annual Reunion Dinner 3
    %



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    August 25th,

    *

    2 Saturday,

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    BOOKED TO HELP JACK
    GARDNER RETAIN TITLE

    By GEORGE WHITING

    Really big spar-mates for heavy-weights are a rare and
    of Jack
    Gardner, is taking no chances of our champion being short
    of praetice partners for the defence of his European title
    against the German giant, Hein Ten Hoff, in either Berlin

    dwindling species, but John Simpson, manager

    or Dortmund, on September 23



    THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 1951

    LD GA

    AU 4

    RACE HORSES
    LEAVE BARBADOS

    Eight race norses left the island
    on Tuesday by the S.S. Canadian
    Cruiser. Cavalier, Bright Light
    and Cross Bow are on their way
    to St. Vincent after taking part
    ir. the B.T.C. Mid-Summer Mec:
    ing.

    Monsoon, Nan Tudor, Cross
    Roads, April's Dream and Miss
    Friendship left for Trinidad where



    Even at this early date he has three years ago, will be preparing ber ee er ee ee nein
    booked the services of the big- himself for what must surely be a Tee e:
    gest gymnasium “targets” in the the most complicated and intens-
    country—Eddie Vann, Shoebury- ive big-fight arrangements of all JOCKEY DIES
    ness, holder of the British knock- time
    out record (12 seconds) and In London on September 25, LEWES, ENGLAND, Aug. 15.
    Frank Bell, the Yorkshire games- Coeckell hopes to fight for the F. B. Freddie Rees,-one of the
    master, who put paid so summar- world cruiser-weight title against greatest steepleckase jockeys of
    ily to Tommy Farr. the winner of the forthcoming all time died at his home on
    With Bell for long-range Joey Maxim-Bob Murphy battle Wednesday. He was 57. Reese

    punching, and the ever-improving
    Vann supplying the “inside stuff’,

    in New York.



    champion Jack will not lack ade- Don must then defend his | Se ete eee
    quate preparation for the reput- British championship against GALA OF
    ediy heavy onslaughts of the 6ft Croydon’s Albert Finch by
    Gin, Ten Hoff. October 27; and his European |
    Now 2 seven years older crown against Germany’s Con-|
    ner, the German has’ ny Rux by the end of Novem-
    the kind of background that bet
    spells toughness—and trouble How long is it since a British
    for anyone foolish enough to poxer was asked to battle for the!

    under-estimate him. eparate championships
    Impressive Record within the space of two months?
    He began boxing as a railway- I doubt if the

    man amateur in Oldenburg 14 [’m-going Cockell is worrying

    years ago became German :cham-~- nut the historical aspects of the!

    pion with a list of 130 conquests, situation. But, shrewd business-

    won all but one of his 21 repre- man that he is, he. will not be

    sentative bouts and roughed it under-estimating the cash poten-

    with a Panzer division in Russia i of this crowdea engagement
    As a post-war professional, it ‘ist



    took Ten Hoff only eight fights to
    lick the cream of Germany’s othe:
    heavy-weights, and he was dur-
    able enough to stay 10 rounds
    with Jersey Joe Walcott, current

    To-day’s Water
    Polo

    possessor of the world title
    (American version). i |
    ‘faken all round, Herr Ten Hoff jue to choppy seas at the
    hes done pretty well for himself, “duatic Club yesterday afternoon
    He now lives with his wife and ! was no Water Polo. The
    son in a sizeable mansion in Ham- * inals of the Ladie KO. Com-
    burg. He drives a Mercedes, and P°&tition Starfish vs. Sea Nymphs
    he lords it over a prosperous hote! vill be played tomorrow after-
    oon, followed by a Men’s Island

    at a place called Sasel

    Busy Don
    While our heavy-weight cham

    am versus
    Bigbury Bay.

    This afternoon's fixtures are;

    pion gets in trim for Ten Hof Harrison College vs. Snappers
    stable-mate Don Cockell, Gar« ogether and Whipporays — vs
    ner’s tutor-partner-companion BPonitas.

    since Jack first quit the amateurs Major A. R. Foster

    Referee:



    TOUT aa Ce
    First step to slam

    ‘he slam try can usually be



    HE earliest of all slam j






    iddi ata is sti made below the level of
    bidding devices is still came. After the above sequence.
    the most efficient and South will sign-off in Four

    Spades if he has no feature

    the most widely used by
    good players.

    Cue bids can only be used
    under certain conditions, but
    wherever possible they should be °.
    preferred to Blackwood as a fir: ~
    step to investigating a slam
    subject to the following proviso
    The cue bid must be clearly
    recognisable as no more than an
    attempt to show the Ace, a void
    the King or a singleton in the
    suit named, with no danger o!
    the call being passed by the
    partner.

    Any mention of a suitin which re
    there can be no intention of he
    playing the hand is a cue bid.
    particularly if the trump suit has



    worth showing. With Blackwood,
    the hand must be played in Five
    Spades even though the response
    unfavourable.

    North’s cue bid conveys
    information. Blackwood
    merely demands information,
    $3-—Controls are specified by
    e means of cue bids. With
    Biackwood they can rarely be
    jentified

    4 The exchange of informa-
    ‘ ion often allows the final
    on to be made by the
    yonder. Playing Blackwood,
    is @ mere automaton.

    The following example shows
    the contrast between the two






    ed nore agreed. If North methods:
    bids ne ade, South ‘Three ; . ‘
    Spades, North Four Clubs, the 3 49,9 84; VAK6; 2;
    last call carries an entirel ~ Py

    @KIT5; 9539; A873;

    natural meanin No one in
    ‘fl & K 108

    their senses would wish to play






    in a minor. suit after being When North’s One Spade is
    assured of fine support for to Three, he_ will get
    major. Four Clubs, therefore f he uses Blackwood,
    says in effect: “I am _ proo slam can be safely





    he aid of cue bids.
    he bidding will be
    in this week’s example

    against an attack in Clubs: can v
    you look afier one of the other Details o
    unbid suits? " nalysed

    This method differs fron
    Blackwood in four main resvect



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    —— —

    L A +
    (4 #4

    GAME TO
    ‘ai Mm

    RUSSIANS
    BERLIN, Aug. 13.
    German Communist
    sports writer accused a Soviet
    referee of handing a German-
    Soviet Soccer match to the Soviet
    team. The sports writer for the
    Soviet licensed “Berliner Montag”
    said the Soviet referee had his
    back turned when he penalized
    East Germany and disallowed two
    East German goals. As a result a
    Soviet team won.

    The referee’s decisions were
    booed by many of the 80,000 fans
    who watched. Booing was criti-
    cized By “Neuves Deutchland,
    official Communist party news-
    paper as a display of “old nasty
    nationalistic arrogance.”—U.P.

    LONDON’S.

    An East



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TIUKM.W Ml,1ST IK. 1*51 R.\RRAIM>S M)V• period of 1950. accurdm;' t.i new lii-urcs jusl released by the .hip* to the MMnpoul Cnb:it! Sic':n Stahiliviition Institute, coverinil sales up to the l.onal School al Rto Plodras. end of May. The figures show Cub-n exports to Britain I*"''.!.' Hico. Mr. Lawrence W. Intalline. jfe,12l tOM in Ulla year flvr-month period, ir ""'""' s "V" or >, General ol ihe : % %  .nsinlhes. me perio I last jWtt pSS1?.;.y? • Ronrd ..f Trade return-., pubMr Cramer •'•' ">"< be had UsI.tMl 111 IxMidiMi, put Uw ngurc beard from Dr. Rafael Pico. Chairfor thf< y.'jr even higbci. with u m %  Phtnali i I big rise in U.K. sugai bnporl -ii'i Zoning Hoard of Pucim Rico (SIM In June. Ovei Uw and n United States member ul rlrn fix months of thl rear, tinCaribbean ('cinmrt-ion, arm nrrordrng to these figure Britain from fhe Director of the point IV uouoht S59.179 toiu ol Cuban Office of the Puerto Rico | .eluding 159.216 torn In p, outl E. Baditlo %  ?• *f"J % %  the effect that candid.. f be accepted, provided that thev 7.000 Sydney Doekera Will Sirik< SYDNEY. AUK !5 N. : rum Sydney dockers 10• % %  Ii;k.n. m tomorrow until Monday In proti .. against the suspension of 75 work^^ (0 refUMd to work on the ( |]|)iin nit ^ r midnight shift yesterday. ,. f ,-,,, ycri New South Wiles minan j Q50 ped work today to hold pithead RAVI. Kxport* Drop In the Aral and I speak and understand the Engl language, Mora Application* .ition* the* %  ill iff belni Ctlvcd by Mr. Cramer. Thirty tl bant received, of which nun rive have '•< edy Man pu I Mi. Cramer said. that \*~ ul i' 1 i"'" 1 >"i(ussi ictanl |)ni 1 It will furnish powt 1 nduttrtas tnrouajnut students who ha I %  <". (' 1 But the BUM Statis'i talehiM drop 1 i| 1 tnt BrtlUh Wen Indie, lance" The Wht-r.-iithe total for irti Brtdrl IU on West Indie* was M5.f13 tons in h\tfi verj tha Urat six months bad, and the ihifl ai 11 dropped to 147.38V tot "Pply because of the |r (arable period of issi. i\ language requlretnent, will now big bicreaae in British Imports av .1 thamtalvat ol thin upportuwhole of Bomb, nnri Hir—rw tf^ ,, from M.u-liiu. an-2 smaller mty. „nd get In touch with him The huge umlergroun.. ,-. %  , f^nilnSstruTwSSer, I II enjoy free tuition ;it most completed and read. 1 i % %  of rl B.G. Threatens To Retaliate On I in in igra linn GEORGUfTCra N B.G., AUMUBI ::*. Trinidad's dliva 10 strip CM Catend <>f "pn'lnbiti-.l iinnn% %  rep :.i iin i-i.w renardiifi other West lnduin tsl.nuts. natlVM "I" whom may be affected by Trinidad's artn>: %  i reec m iintisii 1 I • 1 ihli Govemn ItVlBI 11. ilTeetea bj ihti aged to be %  -i %  earing %  %  Ing, fiH . %  lo the %  ...... ,,. : .ill West Indian 11 :. %  Union Council n Brent m %  W. •rare in! .. %  !. %  1 ion thai tee make restrictive regulation* n v I lllnilris leilerition Ha idrd thai the t>|.i ot action l m* taken hi 1 Eh At lh< 1 %  %  f< ill i.iVi.n Cuba Can't Complain WASHING I The United Staaas >hould ueai mind Cuba'* % %  I LOfl DM rant t 700 p.•ent. snfd Mr. John McMtll 1 Ilemocr.it, South t'.' 1> itmsmg a mM-tina ,.f the AKHCUI %  Uvalihood He continued <"\ibon enne field workers a/Ill iw paytiig 90 1 more foi then overalls and 't I %  %  %  HI hlahly-pald Amarlew lndustral worker" RefemnR to a statement by ttu President of Cuba thai I seek cimiinei.ul %  ajaOBMnU Wltl European countries wheroby those .-.,. be extended ertali preferential rates hitherto reserved excluslvetj fo • States. Mr. MrMllUn ad 1. W ^ iii;i-l;i v in ItliilJii^ LUg Power Station By Helm Usher JAHLAMICA. Yugostavla. Aug 14 BOuaand nen ami arotttan ire toiling muni and da) a week In this itrateajk inauntaui vaUej 10 comi will t>, the second largest hydra ; not been pub'' lished but Yugoslav 1 riehn the station, due to start operating m 1953. will be surpassike up |b* %  aled tit I s bj Ihe high tariff later. )us: impj -,-.i on laxtUaa, and laeond, bj the goods which Cuba DUJ fiom Europe which m • vloual* i"ifht from the united st.ite*." B D i' Committe* Witt AdviseGovl On Local Ptoduction PORT-OF-SI'AIN. Aug II A ntne-m,.n .oninuttee has aeen appointed by the K. Agriculture and Lands, lion. Vlc'.t Bryan, lo idvlei Ojovarnaaant on the pro.luction of l--al vegetablea. tl*h and animal | With the idea ot making the Colony as telf-mifn. ictn %  11. nove by Qovarsi nan! in 1" aai*** of tacximg th.e ..i living in .. |.i."Vt .1 Mi 1 J Mint wi 1 head the Committee HARBOUR LOG In Carlisle Bay After a tiring oVt) BOVRJL ( \^yp restores Xr£s you When ihe long srearvmg dav h over at bit a .up of Bovrtl is cheering and refreshing—Bovrd's hecf>', energising goodness hanithci ggkaaaCkal and Umituda and \ets Tu "P wonderiuilv. HIHIHHFH. HOVKIL miM drlieivui unSwuhn. and Improves all d.ihn. EQUIP YOUR TRACTOR-DRAWN AHD ANIMAL DRAWN VEHICLES S^kp IMPLEMENTS with DUNLOP FARM TYRES WHEELS HUBS BRAKES 1 %  1 1 .1 S.li \l,r, M l*, HCl MI nv I'h 1 t 4 *" M V IWii-t—1 VI(I . S fJ.Hl.Ut-l. Sfcl. 1 .'>,. %  „ h Mr.. Ii 1 I 1. PERMIT GREATER LOADS REDUCE FUEL CONSUMPTION 1 ELIMINATE DAMAGE TO CROPS 'PERMIT LOWER LOADING LINE RUN SMOOTHLY AND SILENTLY US Tightens Control On Imports aaiwinw, M v 1 . ftaMVALI 1 ^,-^| l :rx-'.. %  r %  %  falling f.n but 'till below dents Britain !tll tun ^ 1 the htained ofthf 459.134 Ligai fn m Empire ^-in g 1 < 1951, as against 161461 tons in the eorreepofkdlng period la %  June figure W ^8HINQTON. Aug. 15. The Unl ed States 1 if goodi that are escape us embarao. The TreatUl V I > %  p..l til I %  •1 led 11 Ilex %  ther imports 1 1 < %  > '*:i^,„ > in CoauaUtMal China or Juni ]950 North Korea, even If they passed urw for Brl ,| 5n aiilana. l|s:e help meet thetr livinn and other expea • %  The iiei.is of braining .0 -how some imat the Metropolitan V onl in the it w.i. position, School Include oil eondiiirmini-. with liiiitsh imports up to 4R.8hb %  utomoblu against 41.240 tons In (net-making, drafl ponding fign-arhine shop, printing, radio and mm where *"*" ', "" '~ h "V,*" 1, ^ 1,s refrigeration. The duration of as IKES?J !" ZJK ,JKS these course, vane, from n„e ,0 nstallation of machinery. T 1 %  tt.r.nel which will bring fl\ monster turbinei (only th wlD operate at the beginning) %  %  %  1 n 1 .. ii 1 ai|>pln I houl 1 stop. Trim. on woiiii market. gmpleted W june7 iwo"; to" 54'iani "m I* yvan 7 he prwrM It / ,s learned that many of the Jll|10 851 Pnlpt are of one year dur-itmn. Ing ihe U.S. t inder but it ii probnble. Mr. 1 the disguise of non-Communm xhe whole of the Inereane in geld, that aludenta pursuing a B roduct!" were filtering through Rrrtuin-a sugar ration this year hro-yeai ong Kong Macao and Italy, ihe has romft froni f 0rc |g n Treasury said thai among the lh(1 ngures show. Inip4*ti fnn goods which Will be affected by •„„,„, ,ource lotalleTi 887.OTS the crackdown atfe Chinese fur ,„„. m h ^ ||x-nWnUl per* .•.kins and straw braid.— 110,268 tons In the ponding period last year, Juno imports from foreign sourrcs 1 MS as against i t.ms in June last real Apart from purchases from Cuba, imports from San Domingo rose from 237.183 tons in the first half of 1950 to 232.291 tons in hhe llrst l ttthe of this star. Abu | rhown 111 the Board of Trade ligun Rico and 1.000 tens bom Haiti. —h t %  Eaautermen See Flying iHisiile OSLO, Aug. 15. Four fishermen U) Northern Norway reported 1 terday they had seen what appeal %  guided missile room over them possiblv "from across the Arctic. Fishermen were besides a fjord when UN ' llkt %  torpedo six lo ten feet long with a sharp point and steering tins went over their heads at I heigh. r f about 200 f. • The missile %  headland about half a mile They Mid there wai A rattling i.oi:!' -'like ;. tr.i'i overhead. Thi local official lnf.-7. similar assl-tnncc %  of their stnd:i-s Hope Seen For End Of Squabble LIMA PBHJ *Ug 14 Diplomatic observers were hope, %  Of Trinii, ma and Cm. nea MM TI |g uni 1Conni II % %  1 1 mcll \-iii throw iimd 'n> stand agaln-1 this arhilr..-. action %  %  1 .., i era in the bbeaa area who happen (0 VALETTA. Malta August tl. '~, .!!'^>' An Am.-i lean two United Slat ','!"" ,n "P*rtrt %  n..t.*h ,rt fighu., ,.1-nes iTaeerne certain thai untaei peed_ yesterday y .„.,.„, „.;.„ hi to bear against Trini:Jels Collide: I'ilol \liHsing 'ollided. al high in the biggest In the Mediterranean Sc 1 "I ore Ameiivaii Tilot were reK OM afi the crash, but no trace of U round datipite Intan Ivi -earch by the tea of four Atlantic pact nation*. testing tho defences of the Atlantic Army's southern nanll T'ie nursing pUot vai not identified. Meanwhile, the American Mm* . ^ S! P' cu nt tl > h, ; o '3n "" % ', ,s nalt their laMA rane n „J?" l uhn American squabble before the marines, gchedlUOd t in this rduntry, th.. bei of whom could aaseertain.^i icP 1 Mil Oil Shares Still Good Buy OfeetaaigaFroni t>BAGHDAD, August 13. It was announced Monday ta-it oed a new agreement With three foreign oil companies v itn concessions in its fields under which Iraq receives SO per cut of all profits. The agreement slaiied with the Iraq Petroleum Company, th1 WASHINGTON. Aug. 14. Baerah Petroleum Company and President Truman on Tuesday (ho Mniil Petroleum Company cnt the following message to provides Iraq will get that share Naiimuddin. Governorut profits retroactively to the be| of Pakistan, "the people ;mmng of this y. Of the United State }Oln in sendplans were also made for three nig to Your Excellency and to the companies holding concessions in neonle of Pakistan the good wish| ra q to step up production. From .u:. -. .,,^2 ,„ wl r< nl | production is LONDON, Aug 9. %  .sehuhi "1 i buy. in spite <>, fi.271 tons from Puerto '<-v Income* serious. These !" "^ TSffJgfifir. "H '" '••tf.et dr.He.;, impartial onlookers greete-i with ^ '*" %  '*LS_ "r '"", '"*" ' %  i "'"'"-'' ol Ihe l..i. ( | (in Firingns of relief the request made **">" n-rrous for ARstriCaO ,,.„„, ? '| Not only are they b] Pfl (Ml Monday U> the United P"^ .d on their own merits, he IrgenUna and A broadcast message warned all wrltMi bu t O? the ll „. (li:it i] r .,,-fhaT !" ^"> ?"•" ? • *tae potantteutias 3 the coming ihev investigate the mr.dent and J k "-P "'' r ihe planes and inursion int., the Canadian oUFcr It S^JiP* ,*>' Ai '""p during fV I ladorean oovarnmanl Jraneajand Italy, massed for gm..i ,-..• Ul( ,„„,,„„.. eharged that during the week-end !" "I ** %  ,„. „ I • refiners Pen, launched a series of attacks "" s %  „, from &^oreanoutpoit _riongth*:h?_A^ ..K !" small interest m the big I*di U %  %  .inch may ill be the hemming of in 1111li'aq Mukes New Oil Agrerinents British navi the An • long disputed border. Peru eoun'<-.pedoes rockcU. and bombs, at terarJ that -drunken" Ecuadorean *nr to-day..!" .the wak< troops had fired on Peruvll 1 an Ecuadorean ,[< %  Peruvian troop*. — U.P, Malta by American |eU which cnight many dcfendniK British planaa on the ground. Cotlon Down NEW YORK. Aug. 14. Cotton price, gdve ground pi*ristently after htsiunt opening POLISH OFFICERS IMPRISONED R> Charles Ridlr* WARSAW. Poland. Aug 13 Nine Pol.sh oflicers i % % %  : %  !. „;.%  11 it opens up poa^btllUai for the luture whleh oan hardly be Investor do bettei tl an amne soaculatOtl who have *-ien rushini! to buy Can ... .'.are* with oil Interests." —BUP. i.ydu uiil. In.... rn.iiO-J. Aarnl'Itwr, A.-.-i.tl.Hi M.inl • 11 <" toiw. t'mpl 1 rMII 01 In ml. Alrnli. S S AaaXHtimon. MI Um.. .'pl Vrilr#lr du-i. A" %  '• %  •in. A,-.i. t-w S r M A lo ml 1 US lt-n. 1 %  • %  1-%  %  1 1 ii % % %  .a. AOtfita M.i. a-olnri A...IIM f.. II I . I. I ,| Nitnx-hrll Oil Twite '.-,. a Co IM lltrSKM HI s i*ii AB.P.Il a OB 11,1 ii.il.nl I. .V Ion iKiun. Ii r,*,. Mnai AuiiH> Ijidv M .M K,< irlllunr. Aa>" 1. Caat s •• 1 In Touch with Barbados Coattal Station (•(•!> and WlNkM IWMI hmiM> I id llaithHko CMH Slatiuf. Tr. *l S iii>rM. s nriii s Tindr. M H aaaae s s ,1.. %  %  $ ArfenUna si rminki ... 1 Ak-. naaast, si N O Bjuurnaa a AI.I Clnnanl. SS Carina. Ungp. SH Tlr. im, R 8 1 •naitw. a s A %  1 a. Ueini.. 1 I a Ait.a^. -. H Faau Ij.niuc-'ur, % t I Arm. HI WIllMnaud/P}**, HI 1 1 % %  S. iv-t.H-. s S PaS l.i„.. SH Uaae-iii. HS Maroan s H Ii—I.. > a Uranta. s s < ( Cat Ii—.1* s s ci.li Campanplla, S, l/arh H Al--lmrr. 8 S Peltrr I. %  %  WhllW Htlla, N S Anvil J H.W-. H H Kai.an tUlHI,. a S All...r.l.ln \|. r*lr MAIL NOTICE an DolliM "til ! %  rloaed al <1.-I.P.I l^iM Offlre na iindar M M>ll .1 10 a %  \ ail *l I n in aiul Ordll 7 at p m. on thr isu. Aaguat, ir %  gatli Hnmiirt.. SI J.,Mi. %  ,, ,1 _,.... J'-n-i Mall aM • 1 tn Oiaiimi. Mtl ta Mam lor Beliiah Oulam. i.v il* F.a.a-a W Him th v.il1 tim loaa-l fcwial IX*t Offiee aa umlrt: Parcel Mall -nd Mr.. -the^roMUtfo^theM k NEW TYRE DESERVES A NEW DUNLOP TUBE THESE AUTO ACCESSORIES 1 %  "inn 11 111 11111:11 inni". TVRK PBfiCltl Rl *.\IEH BATTBKf iivnRdMirTEft SIMflNI/ WAX A CI.KANEk CHAMOIS Url. Tin* IIVIlKAULIC HRAKF Fl.t'lfl VAl.Vr; c.RiNiiiN'i GOaaTOQIfD rvuttn f.AHKKT (T.MKNT Bl.\< K rop DaaaaWINQ MlfKKINd Wlllhl. ((iVKItS FI.l.tTRICIAN PlBftl A --rnliUllRIVKRS si rr 11 lit: IK.inn; IIIID fRONT IPUKai I'H' POaUl a HI*. 10 H'' IKIIM SPRINt.S (OK MORRIS K II I* A 10 III'. Bram tii/nu POI ILL MOfMn-i BKOLMH CAM DM VHHOVI/INf. QAIKBTT ftfft R ALL MAKFS ECKSTEIN BAY STREET •ros. and tional annivcrs; nnPakistnn". —t'.P. COMMUNISTS FIGHT FOR POWER IN ALBANIA ROME. Aug. 14 Albanian ref.,.. serious fight (Or the Communi-t Albania and I Mehmet Shehu may replace PieEnvei Hodja, u the rea pected to reach about SO million ions annuallv with Inq". earning BbOUt C59.CK1G.0U0. —U.P. Reduced Imports \\ ill Ctll Metal WASHINGTON. Aug. 14 tin may oom"there. T& in S* 1 %  Of metal, but current allocal afj will probably Ix* n t th.oujM 1951 n high cfTlcial of the national productive '%  id on Tuesday. He %  a (cmumers al 90 per cent of the inptlon rate %  f om" it tonnage en em stockpile* are expected to ShehuHocana at Uiat rate through the fi*h supplies but thing II' —1 P. more than 10.000 Alba |jka"—well-t..lo I been Imprisoned or sent to laU.11 camps because of thetr re*Ut;.r.rc I Mimunlst programme* A nevwletter said the Albanian Commun.-t party was shaken up %  1 It > %  RelaPmishina at a low level for the u-ncad 1.. prison terms ranging showed losses of from ten years to life In 1 21 to 28 pointThe failure of the ment on Monday on thai G'vernment weekly crop sumplotting to overthrow the Governn.ary to particularly emphasize raent and •pviiig for • %  Imperialist the Texas drought lltlMtlon powt brought a Hood of liquidation by Pour Generalrecent buyers at 'he eloai But to hfc uni 1 mest of the oflei to 15 years; a Majoi b *.h hedginand ,, on. Bt-Cott) rithor against new crop beginnings mander in the Navy to U or additional purchases out of the One of the defendants was also Governm p ooled ~ crap report said that while r,r rmin-. during the wei I P beat and drough' 'checked fru '"pment." thev favoiire-l weevil canDaliii I ..11.in Goidg Back To Gupilul LONDON. A Th-. off Cornmunist Has I'liiiiiics Into Bottom Of Luke ITALIAN RIVIERA. Aug 14 Police and arm) reacue teams l rgan attempt* to rais be*-i ineuHy m getting nenr the Indian fl have ; .udless coup —t'.P. Touribt Receipti POHT-OP-SPAIN. Aug. 1 .1 loader rotn the be pere.,1 January to July 1951 representatives in $93 440 • .d S12.19J Ith W.5.1fl :4. %  1 Ot It M'HTO.MFKS AKI rsnsKBD TO NOW THAT 01 fl WORKSHOP AM> SKRVIMM. DaVAKTMI.NTS WILL Bl < IflSKI) FROM MONDAY. (Rl> SFITIMIII-R WO IVllal Ki:-OPKN AGAIN ON MONDAY. I7TII SIPTI MHKII tMl, SO AS TO DfAaVel OIK I'KKSOWI I. To II IVB THUK ANNUAL taUVB. bUat GASOLINK. SPKAYI'AINTINf.. PART tf MD UaCBaWMaaaal DEPARTMF.NTS Will Bl OPUS TOR Bt'SISKSS AS 1 SL'AL


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PACK WH:R I! \lilt.\DOS ADVOCATE Tlll'RshAV AK.IST I* I Ml BARR\0C_AB\ r QgE I Mr..4 SI. nilr(.l Thursday. AqguM Ifi. 1931 SI WVII.I. THF. illution for the sum of $1,000 to meet the cost of preparing roads and house sites at Seawell mi defeated in UM M.mse of Assenw lay. Public regret in this mutter will be greater because the rejection was based <>n an apparent misundarstandiiif by the opponents of the scheme The Government had at its disposal 28 I „t land M Seawell and formulated a nie to lease it in four-acre lots. It Intended to establish economic agricultural boldingl in that area and to encourage the initiation of a co-operalive %  movement between hona tide ngricullurTlie land was not to be lei to people following other callings. The Opposition itemed t<> have been imbued With the idea that the Government was attempting to establish another housing soti erne by which il was proposi*d to furnish hot! e spots t" people who wanted %  I <-ir houses there. The merit of the scheme and the fact that cooperatives were long over due in Barbados did not weigh with the Opposition even although it was admitted by Mr. Crawford that II the Government wanted to initiate a co-operative scheme it should do so. Il did not even matter that the Department of Agriculture was pnpacnd ive the schemo all possible support and assistance by supplying modern equipment for cultivation and advice by the officer* of the Department on the care and rotation of crops The Opposition argued blindly that inasmuch as there was K*va\ turn! banner in this island, the land at Seawell should be divided among as many people as possible whether or not thev wen economic holdings. It is true that there are hundreds of people in this island not now in possession of land, and who are anxious to acquire small plots for housing, and it is also true that there are not enough spots to accommodate all those who are now searching for places to remove their houses. But the majority of these are confined to St. Michael; and one point which has been overlooked is, that this problem, having assumed th* proportions causing the present alarm, can oi 6 by %  policy of land settle The tWO issues are distinct even if closely rel a ted. In one there 11 a need for housing space. In the other there is a need for economic agricultural holdings where Agriculturists can live and support their families without having recourse to other and supplementary forms of employment. Above all this, the Government intended to give a healthy lead to the establishment of CO-operatives In 'his island. Another means of Introduction had already failed. A Cooperative Officer had been seconded for duty and trained in England, legislation had been passed, and the Director of Agriculture had even had added to his already numerous duties those of Registrar of Co-operatives. Still nothing had been achieved. The Government realising the necessity for and the benefit of co-operatives now attempted to launch such a scheme while giving opportunity to agriculturists to acquire lands under lease. The opponents .1 the scheme wore under the erroneous impression that it would have been better to supply 20 odd people witii house spots than to Ive •even agriculturists sn oportunity to cultivate .. nomic holdings and u> launch tn agricultural co-operative %  cheme which might have been followed by others. It is singularly unfortunate that .so valu able a scheme should have been lost especially i.i misunderstanding of the issues at stake. This does not however mean that this is the end of co-operatives in Barbados or that the Government will not formulate other proposals for theii men! Such schemes are too valuable to *he economy of this island to be abandoned Furniture And Furnishings (1837-1901) Local I-'IHMI To The Editor, SIR.-i read your editorial ol n Mih In* headed %  i i Food" with *i howam i malu no rtf< ran i u< UM actual i i i of arable sen planted which I tni Important point. In paragraph i editorial tn.it a reduction m ri in favour of provaBOn crops would not afteii Ui reveaui it li panar a lly agreed ihiii JI lugai crop i> • %  bettei psytni %  it %  U %  ; roducllon "of fo During Onwar period un •• %  ragula. i>ei>klnit ti"" t our arable acreanc Was plantad In provisions and one c ,i leSbs that prevailed almost go the dose ..f UM century. Funilture beciinc clumsy, and ti, ionosphere of rooms irousty. ao cluttered WSffl ,-.i! mastlve ntmnuni and quantities of amull obji phuii>Kraph*. Bamboo pier maefafl tabl %  U chenille cloili* and jotled with janhnii stands, sociables, c chairs and lOVS Mitt UsU-macaSMrs. Pictures rowi brliuani analine dyes iud takei pli I at* %  %  .etabti dy< WlUlsm HorrU the lust enutai <>r the In Hindi* publb %  Britain His most successful production was his wall-paper, whJ turnRurs and ironwork. An oriental touch •••'UM form Of Chinese glnger-)nrs, Satsuma ware and fans; furniture became more fral result of in lental Insj Irs An Nanveau bet %  UaS vogue. Its high Une wnn-h', dominated furnltur and w-aii decI from th %  Tine w '" 1! '* a"d furnltur;* ..lik,. with their leaves am blossoms. Ksre ind there a Jpr Im •* %  to be seen. the thna lag which exlste %  ( hlf i turs In Brltal %  nd th* Wi-t Tidies existed also in furm'uiv Mid funi'shings* Thi% tune l. lfc ; was accentuated a* the result of low prise of suaai which i (innni; the first quail, i Of tha 20th eeanary. Neither tl. tiesien* oi wmisu Morris, th Influence of "itreenery yallery" or of Art Mseeass -piH-an t" hava i id the slightest influence on llarbitdion int.r: r Little Change to Oust %  %  Vh torlan fnlartor here until the nwderntetit atvle popularlstxl by the Kxhlbitkn 1924 25, and the Parti Exhibition of IW, reached this Island in the Qilrts >liss Graham (onus Bark B iMii Prague l><4*% nlial sli %an .mil founts m Oil llolicllIT linn % %  ! MI a ii.:.I %  Mfaai for Mr. Arflnir %  lriis*r? TMI SIFTIS C. M. T,..,.!. ,/^ t By BEFTON OKI Ml K How far, I wonder, are nun ben ol tinexecutive ol the NeUonal Union ol Mlneworhers %  ware thai they have sltowe MM tl es in a maim upeialnm < %  %  < % % %  nmuiusl political w irfsre' And ill (' %  !Il"' .somewhat liebUlOUl prospect of collect] i JLU.U00 gift from t vakia. If they have am doul I it. I suggest lliey have a talk, as I have just done, wluh MUM Jane Oranaaa. "f I0J Qreat Itu selldieel, I on Ion, W.C'.I. hss Graham ii one of tin. 3041 British tOUriSUl Who have ]U8t letiiriHil from %  fortnight's holila ,,. i u cbo lovakla (PrR-e i;:i7 UK, Lnchislre % %  < fan Inf.) Hers was the Hi t of foul parttM wsuch are to visit < eel oslovakla thii lununei , of the Commu i>,,,..,,. n. [ %  ,. ,t.r .. i ind with the itlonsl I'm.in ol Hlne.akeis. The gc h s n aS N<> douat H '>t seended dne .ixi dandy 18 months an,, when Arthur Homer, the miners H reury, first put the %  Pregrc iviI'DUIS' %  cherne bt I x.-i uttve He hud at last found | way, he told them, of Britain the E4o,ooo subscribed bj ih miners for the victims <•< the eThltehavefl it dtsi b Britain. The Pi %  image trips t I the mom-, pi id bj the iiutish tourist;* being sent lovaki.i. it would ( %  m. wre, And d would be used to pay the i iMO.ooo to the Cu Of the Miner*' UWOn. Screened Now, of course, nothli be Dsore deslrsble than thai Biitish tourist;; should be greSil i r travel around M (reety arlUwut cranes, and wlthoui having ind i on them bj ti" 1 %  itl oi lUi %  shana, that the t itlvc %  %  * ; the) K'i> % %  conu I did, then thi an amarini; lack ol meant DOthlni UsH than the the Iron Curtain. What in tad der the ;..! %  !.: %  e it P ihe exact reV ri i Of I I In London all tourist! arc ranfnll' not i tiade unionist, siii-i'i d througlL Man) sj found unuliatue iwaj with bhc Inlormatlon thai tiv are "already hi As for travelling freely m ..,kia. UHfeSS UMtflStg are given %  bulk visa, said Miss (.'.ilian. %  i* v\ H ipedally explained ha n that thli iiii.inl that we had to stick together In one party n* in. pauun "I 1 "' not valid when .>.< weie ni-t !>> oui %  From f %  . mi Instruments ol it i,a. in the %  %  i . A ban we %  Mi rlanske 1 Cgech spa where ^e were told m lining HI havi kind ni hoUda) M in dinar} Cteeh tradei unionists. %  \ brass band was waiting to plaj us In A partj of Csecl youth brlgadli ovai n chanting "We want i>eace.' The) preae I nowen on us end wrung our I tt %  larUlngV 1 Bpceenes i tout %  part) ol tnslaeru n the il same Uun) itai Bui %  : i parts ' : At ever) %  sal Uw 1 i MUM Hum MiPoUitt, who. iii %  %  lanatlonj of what ;hi-v have stea .. | ..: %  .Wiem httie buUetine of world news, • Y HI mil he int.-:. bear t l .... Her Itee % %  irtu ra" i . talk, in K ,. ss a spe, bti ireat, the ih i ssven out t.'.s. plani that I Chins I No Surprise missed was ana aw i of ci Itlci the Bntlah visrlors. It did no %  asm to occur to i %  > % %  i* cuilar," said MaM Oraham, "tha a .-I wors t '. spa >'. ni fed the Cteeh, One bl| aaaraitlon r trtri wi tho Lanlnarad was completely empty." Nor did anyone aaOW m; signs of surprise when th" I.-teries thi party aialted wen i-iiher closed foe the noUaayi '• that no workers were present as at the glass factory in Karlor) Vary, n almost deserts I oi workers, as at She open-cas mine In Sokolov and al Ins iwmill m pfariaiuats Lasne. N.. one dreamed ol lh.it the workers might hSVi been kept dallfaantolj from tii* sceno in order that Ihe part) should have no chnme of L'lking u any but the nand-plekeo u rOniaai preasnted b %  hem i>j Mis. PolUtl a Co, When ihe lirlilsh perl a collective farm out %  Kl Lame no one asked wh.u IL.I i iiapix-ncd t the four Czech fanning families who .'ind stayed out of Ihe collective when th other 27 in the district joined ll Nor did anyone sec lit to con meat on the fact that many i %  i in Me formerly Sudeten-German villages they sa* were being left empty and allowed to rot The B UIBBJ 1 l to be outdo Un thi orthodoxy of their vhra Ihe completenc's of then en%  '. Bssaaai Afterwards . %  : %  ported %  -.In ltd Lii 1 ol the £40,000 to UnWhitehall. Thev could now well afford to pay many limes that an BUhent pro ga nda they tting. Toira" p.I" :> %  number two has just begun Its ttSp Two m ire .*. tit follow this -iimnier. And .)>MrIt.nn poll.:: proudly men go on tin % % %  %  %  tin and tall in achoi week'hops and hospitals, il they have aaan It remains to b,> seen how many %  iraham. Confronted with such hi.;ures. Trevelyan ,s unimpressed; he thinks the Social History^ ar from his best work. (It was lirst pub-l ished in the U.S.A, during the war; and or C 42.000 which he earned from it £39.000; vag paid hack in English and American axes). Karly in his teens at Harrow. Trevelyan' letermined to become a historian; to him history is a romantic busine*t. and it still strikes him as miriculous that • t h e r men. low dead, worried and throve where ,ve now walk 'This is the most familiar i n d certain act about life." he has I aid. "but it is also the most poetical." I In 1896 he took his First In history. fOt-j owed in 1898 by election to a Fellowship at I | Trinity. Six years later he married the. : :econd daughter of Mrs. Humphry Ward; a lood of li\ l/lll. MASTERFORM DESKS TYPISTS DESKS TYPISTS CHAIRS DESK CHAIRS CUPBOARDS FILING CABINETS (Foolscap) Mrs HERE AGAIN LIONIDE LEATHER CLOTH \l KOI I If QtUlITi 50 INCHES WIDE Yard. Al 92.37 pt-r ALSO BIRKMYRE GREEN CANVAS 72 INCHES WIDE At S7.lt i„r Yard. GREEN WATER-PROOF CANVAS 72 INCHES WIDE At Sit.'2.1 p*>r 1'ggrsl. DA COSTA BCCENTEK ? M> i In part, we trust him for his lack of colour. He has never been the don of eccentric anecdole—like Dr. Buckland. of Church, who kept a guinea-pig. a bear, jackal and a monkey m his dining room. £ Trevelyan is a quiet and moderate sifter of v the receptacle of other men's his*! tories. ;; %  if this kind cannot save the world; £ but while '.hey live in it. it is not wholly ; Prom their complex labours of refer£ ence and cross-reference, corroboration and proof, we emerge as our descendants will £ 'KMOW US. > COCKTUI. SUsAGIs \ COCKTAIL ONIONS S (ARR'S < III I -I TIT BITS J DANISH i III I -I S LOBSTER 1RAB ; I'RINFS v I'EANl'TS rhr < ;-IA'K STRAWS ^nrisi j x PATI DE FOIS r.RA Mr n ** ravin.i imv rK I II I I i OF SOLE -MUM C KlPI'tftS s WORIll I'Ul'VHHIHT KEHRBVKD BAKERY GOODS PHONE <.OIl AIIIIS TO-DAY —I..E s .• ._ ,,_,_.,.,.,.,.,., ...„;:;;..;;;:;-.:;;:<,;;:;;;::::::::'.::-'



PAGE 1

nil RSDA, \1 GUM Hi. IJI UARBADOS AllVOt VTI PAOI FIVI Labourers May Gel Land AtDodds ABOUT five acres of land al Dodds Plantation mav be rented by (Jmernment to labourers at the plantation! A Resolution to that effect was passed by the Houae : AMtR) bly on Tuesdav last. IIOIISI: I.I tines i\H \IM Death By Misadventure ry vni BV MISADVLSTIR K* !" *%  ** was the verdict returned by a nine-man jury Brhen the inquiry Into tlir death of Mi Donald Mapp, % %  • Mich* The Addendum u> the Resolution laic Sf. y .. (Amendment) Aet. 1931. authoiTh^toronrrwasMr ( I.. Wa!I*. thc ExecuUve Committee wyn Acting-Police Magistrate of with the approval of the LegwlaDistrlct -A' Mapp met his death turc lo lease any lands which ; %  !! over the gallery ol they may possess the Male Quarters at the S:. This resolution is to seek the August 3 necessary legislative approval. Dr. A. S. Cato whe performed The House of Assembly on the post merlem examination Mid Tuesday passed a Resolution to that the spine of Hw decease^ WJS authorize the Government to. fractured, but death was due to lease the Princess Alice Playing pneumonia and the fracture of the Field to the Vestry <•' St. DMS Talks To B.G. SCHOOLBOYS ARK I \ I Pharmacist* %  %  I Bervio i.id a group of phariti i t'aik last nlahl '"These instltdlea give n%  I I am glad to know In H i M Ic I spine could have been rause<1 bv Michael a fan rraca a building, Eliro COX, a 67-year-old inmate of the Almshouse said that on August 3 aboul 2 p.m. he went upst.irs to UM Malt ijuai ter.,,., %  saw Mapp standing by a nallerv. Suddenly he heard a groan and %  BW Mapp jump over (he n.illei. rail which is about three feet six high. He went to the gallerv and saw iuef£lw MaPP iyin '" U,C ''"WdVa'llnVw'urihrTrn^^au'on iallr-,1 b, on. „f iho „,. „,„,, 0rdl „ jncl „„,,.„ 8 |mn> m Amur: In character. The Ojpartnxni ol Hoanl Of Health Revoke 'Animals' Regulations THE General Board o( Health yesterday revoked their ram)*mates of the Almshuus. Department. His body was re moved by two p i Ietwhen Barrow and the oAl ( iter-Peliliuil wanted tu .have certain mailers T „ Mr { . ,., that his made clear concerning :(• Mis|.,., , ,.,,,,. %  ion and when Hoyto did not ti„. k ,.,. then g>iattand a rnasrttng when summon, n ,,; o C(iuin A INT London %  rollrd 1 m and -" ion 1. In the It unman V for V H> i %  UM JraU by wy ol Pjrong ym N Uli Uiuted N..I101 %  •lUtl.lCli mm 1.. put M Witt 18 othi Of fill' Man ediiiument captured In Kor, The malic nu b able awal Va-s ly. built i %  ... a 134 TEE -tanduiii Ki:JJII medmni tank anil wen n'. aaj Can. < h.iili ni;. i : M HI.".Meal I HI l Jiiadian 'iialhnsrr. Carltib r .. morningf 1 %  • i sundries 121 bav of boil 64 side-. M i byef, 1X0 can :i i . %  %  | fell into the gutter belo . fi. Poll. Osurvini %  "' Dtotrtct Iu,t„" ,fW ,„ D '!* 8 j t '* Al "B" Court, si. George, ya ata rda lined James Bostu of si. Qcona. $96 to be paid forthwith or in dtfaui: thraa month-' Impriaonnwr with hard labour ff liquor without a licence. Mr. E. W. Harrow appeared on behalf of Bos tie who committed the offence on June 6. S KN-TCNCE of six months' Iraiiment with hard labour was yesterday paastd on Ehunutl dinance also had these powers, and In order lo prevent duil i etion by two authorities on the same subject, il was now necesaary ("r the Board to revoke the regulationthrv bad, s.. lhat the mailer might be proceeded with in Uw new Act. There ..*; unanimous agreement The Hoard approved the application for the dlviclng off of I33.M3' sq. ft. of land in OM lot from an area of land at Workmai ed. another General SupennU-n„.,„;,.„, ',„'";„," A _,'.",.,.,, "L" 11M .\'. of OS longuei and elgh nl was appointed. inlende.n WM permitted %  I O* cell livers. This cargo wa Rev. M Ranasay who Mldcd fror y ready gi\ r en evidence w\< S s tWrlulhlne which called so lhat he could \cam I Memi /• died as to Rev. If*al ih : said. Ail drug a'*ts should havr a kr^ %  leal imu the Island: Ihe Gener:' iiospitoi. th. Mental M*pital, th %  < Ine nf the i nHaaati monk at n" ihe In %  || „f n,, r %  eral Hospital.*' he said He said tit d In 181h %  uota i mini %  %  Brtdeatpwn A ou.. was hold at this Hall on Qatohe a of thai ye,.i The rh.dm.an wa i Lord Bash pot Ai thi* rneetine i We passed It h d tWO WhlCh Weir (A) DUO condttle %  %  munlh it is absohiti ursanuji neoeeaery that ihei ;.hould be an Inatltub treatment and i are oil id (bl thai i u scrlpUoni Ihe upkeep ni this inatHute On June i i M:IH BI pot %  %  %  %  %  %  ii. the Sneaki Aaatmbly, the Attornc lenerel %  Ina ol the fjon ora l rlos) | iJuu < %  IH* mej had col %  -led m.OOO and Qovem m e u t I whld) became ntertated, pro %  lares sum THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE team of Brit v hieh 'Ani take perl In the triafftgutei namen' ir.,ni:;ii. D) Uv 5.S ('ana di.m < halleimer Arnold Gib X.lv..,.!, be thi tgh w i ii I ..f UW II %  %  i III do wel! "gad Mem were mii\ real lhe\ i %  Irvlni %  %  %  Le< Trinidad %  I brillsh I asr.il WO WOO one % %  { < %  ,j JB... T „, _, th : %  ", 1 .mpinn. at Table d is looking foe* ftoub returns t Lael Tour 1 .. \. i i M I"... He will bo rtni at the %  %  evening with a football %  H Ronald Bacchus, Victor i %  >.' %  % %  i %  %  • 'i FOR LINQLEUM WOOD FLOORS AND FURNITURE Alleyne of Maxwell. Christ Church Sl Goor e h > Mr s JGoodman by Mrc Q Orifflth, Aotlna The Board considered the apphPnhce Mag.strate „f District B" cation for the division and sale of ror stealing a wrist watch, the land In lots at Porlers. St JaTrHM properly of Mrs. J Drew 3 ( by the executors of the Welches, (.hnst Church. s. Manning, deceased. They also Alleyne pleaded guilty. The gave consideration to the altersy !" £. f lh w,Uh 48 tion of the approved plan by the \4LMBr.ks of the Windward present owner Mr. W. D. Phelps. by •i**.Cricket and Football team eividing aff 307.400 sq. ft. from and the Queen's College team of 10 acres 2 roods 24 1/6 perches of British Guiana who are here to land. Ihe remainder of lot No. 4 take part in the Triangle Schools' Decision on this application Tournament will be entertained was deferred, pending inspection to-morrow night by the members of the land by the Sanitation Of Number Six Club of the Oirla* Officer Industrial Union at Queen's Park. The application for the The Y M.C.A. has also planned and sale of 3.702,230 sq. ft. of land other entertainments for the visin lol at Mounl Dacres Plantaitors who will play cricket and tion. St. Joseph, by Joes River T?: 6 ^" a Wl U kc i,n in Sugar Estates Ltd.. was consldatnlettcs against the local schoolred. but decision was deferred %  in CMahonj mid i .! %  rethei interesting thai Uw i with Mr. D H. L. Ward Instructreason Tor not attending the me-t s UamemiHni whirl, brought iide.1 <>n ihe ,,..ed by Carrington & Seai\ for Rev '"'*. ., . Oeneral Hoepiul rtand Hoyle and others, led' questions .. ''' "' u ** !" i( "Jj ,: '' "' which iried chiady lo bun.: ou Ho >' 1 uUl h,m v ;" "'} '' '" h '"' '""' ,| that Rev. Hoyle did not attend P ,,r !" ,( comr u ""' a fSr ni ducha, chickenand hens from the meeting; because he had beer. ^"^ 0 b ^ ,il ^ ,S( J '. *"'" P AmMerdam. advised lhat the meeimg was %  %  <""•"> M. he did not know II, it T ,„. raln U .|„ V(M| „ u un |oadlng illegal and not because he fell b M " ,l %  "•• %  "> %  ol the challenger and onl .. few would have been injured if he the rneeOnj was oecauae he w n |, Khu r wrrt llUli attended. He wanted to how advlaed that the meeting that Hoyte wanted to gel luafWV convened, proper meeting summoned. He was appointed Acting Sup. Mr. W W. Recce, K.C aSSOmtendcnl and he .i|.|xiinted dated with Mr. .I S n Dear Board to |0 into the rtghls on< Inslruclod by Messrs. Hutchlnson Kol the mat and Banileld Ll %  ppeaimi; foi eould proceed with the othi Frederick Barrow and the Others, meeting; Alter the lath when b Herald "l''ade\ Out" did < 11 turn up, he met him afterAnother question to be disputed wardl and Ulld him that a conis whether Ihe going mil of Ildential friend had loM hi %  0-1 existence of the Ohrl M >hey had ammunition Herald which normall) gavi him notice of meetings for and Mr. Ad.m at this appointments of O on erol SUIMInotice appearing in ino "ewsintendenta meant that the General paper before ihe 26th In OdUCB Superlntirttetit arnoet elc.tion Hoyte ex p l a in ed why was published last would eoncould not be held. Inn Untie to be General Superintenbeneath that war Ramsay • natJM dent. for the meeting Answering questions from To Mr. Adams he said cross-examination by Mr. Adams, net remember whether he lookr Rev, i-anii't ndd Ui %  i tho ran not remcmlicr if Rev Ramsey, i K notice. i From Page I Weal does have it, and fes it will be dropped on them "I never met anyone who had heard a foreign broadcast. The Russian workers with whom we associated did not own radios. They were too poor". None of the released prisoners had themselves worked in war factories, but they emphasised lhat many of their fellow prisoners had. Moat of them had worked in Russian industrial factories including the October Revolution Factory at Odessa where they helped to conitrucl plows and tractors They said that they had lived (in a prisoner of war camp in Odessa and were taken back and forth to the factory under guard. At Ihe factory, however, they worked next lo Soviet eiti/ens, and most of them during their yean <>[ captivity had learned enough Russian to carry on a eon,ii atlon, In Gone. Health They were u*ansferntd t" Kiev and .suddenly for no announced reason they were segregated from the Russians in factory work. The men appeared in good health and said they were well fad, BOOM were husky and tanned. They said there was a lot of grumbling among Russian workers who were dissatisfied with their low wages and high prices. They said many of the Russians with whom they struck up friendships had seen ihe West during the war and expressed desires t) return. The prisoners arrived In Wesl%  %  %  venal noun iu>t among Ihe neon-lit street* of thebalteri .1 city "window shopping" One said; We just couldn't belleve il could be so wonderful. It was like stepping from hell mlo II' pending the receipt of more information about the roads. Consideration was p o stp oned a* regards an application for the dividing and letting of 503.744 so. ft. of 'land in lots at the Pine Estate. St Michael, by the Housing Board. In The House On Tuesday SMW1I luaVwaj TMmonry !• A RvaoluUniIn ant turner Ihr Governor i<. mitr into %  • % %  nwni wtlh m ptraon to Mrva hi Ihe rvimrlmeul ol •loirnc* %  nd Ancultur In Ihe Onto* ot ttov,„ndil "i I .,.!.,.-, net. A Kc4uhllH.il I <..< uw Vaatrj ..i Ctiraa ia k-* P^r. i ot tan lasMM i i i.K-U II inr.-hr*. p-lt i.< ihf tlfivrrnnv ., period not CKrr.-dlnS I Playing r %  • %  i A Mm..lull. Governor to with • Ol C-l.lUll.hlr. %  i. to author.•• Ui. -nlcr into mm a !" cth* Dtpartmcnt of Some* Md Asrlcultur* in th ofSr* ot Oov nnmri,'. Al & A BMOIOII.." I. aurhoriw Govnbol Hvc acr*i ol land to -.buunrr. ai UOTM> plan tot Wti A IU-ol -|.~ c;*t > rniii.e>il to IcaM Ote ftiaet-* AMe* PtaylrW Plftd to Ol* Vwtr> Anflft% %  ai.au> to b* n ."-i %  n fl i,. irM n oi U.r al -1 u*.irp"4 • %  liiO" >narbad*t i-oan Ai' )•• • it** -ai Tha Kinix NUaunve (.II. ii Tund. n ither plaintiff and go-between when Hoyte would not attend U* meellng, bad said hhat Hoyui would ii"t IKMining, i' %  meeting was Illegal. The meeting was Khedulea W" January 6, 1949. Rev. Hoyte voJ notified by a represenlallye from overseas to call a meeting '.•• discuss his mal-.idmini'ti.itlor and bar mortgaging the Chrl 'i..n Mission. "I". Rev. I^rrier said, "w.n a representative sent fr.vn Panama ! oidnined in 1941 K44 ihe Oeneral Ho pli.. i modate T7 B> 1844 and IHSH an Mt< deveiopnieni look plat a ii"> mment was pamcui.n lj in %  pat lal giant (in the mem ,.t ine Hi II imidate nick neitrmm. OoVernmi rit gave well during lha ngfntC building devetop%  %  the General H< pita %  aid In I860 n 100011101 %¡ EORGETOWN. Aug. 15. which were frequonl •ometlme %  h aulena Oovernnv al .. irlj Btw nounced u„ developmenl %  or SKI.4fl4.QOO initial Issue f ,,,.,,(,, ho n. IIMHI and mOT tU.400.iNHi 11 c. Develoi men) %  ,|ll h , 1 I-K 10-day Thi Later tl In ion-R ,. half peInjure 1 %  %  ..%  .„ ..I .1 1 fruit from M LAKSI luge re Re4 Larrlei %  d pointed and ami aajabi I year. To Mi Ad urn hi aald thai ai %  %  %  ,., ,1 ., fttJ %  %  Hot ni'-" Al the mrolln( thcji Ihr mal.in' •-'""•' ''"',", ,',.,„. rrtruary al which the Board „! m .<• nufrlin. < %  '';"" manamnr-nl pu:prlnl ... di..,.i., <>" Januar.v 28 laid, u Rev Hoyte %  l''"'esl frcm diftpient rhurrhea. I old a proj-er mee!in rii-.t tn-'.i**"" tf the Chrl M "•' { %  hi. Last V*lines* Dalton H . %  to give oviHe got the delefate la attend dence yesterday. ngthfougn Oe nera l .superintendent In i84r .he churches, be I Hi Id At that til %  :ul remcm'er hoi H %  were on Hoyte*i Ida and h had bean bough* • 00 hi. own There was a when ltd condition was. Lad. the I Supl. In "45 the* Ion frverythlnc it would bi ,1, that A U I bet b> 'i' 1 lo aril d Rev Dalton Hoyte's father, was -Th. 1.... % %  .iierintendent in 1U4'>. lance." he Hid. "bet %  He .(id not oomplete M i >••• i •-' t %  %  Uw rnaaulni office because of lllneai MM I. he was sick he requested lx w ,,en they had lo take out ol mof them to allow his sun t.i iiniMi aaaneral funda rrem tho cl > out hii term of office. rour u,. txpressed i nwfH ngrecd, but he did not aifrie 0 „ m iinue running it at a loss In 1946 Dnltoii Hoytl I It Want i itl He pointed Oen< ral S '..•.. elected In ThChn Uan Hlaston it' ;>I:i and i holera, ami had M





fhavh



ESTABLISHED 1895







Iran Rejects U.K’s

Eight Point

TEHERAN, August 15.

PERSIAN delegates cross-examined Britain’s
oil envoy, Richard Stokes, for two and a half

Plan:
But Stokes Says No

Communists

hours to-day on his “peace” proposals, then one of PJrjven North

them said, “they are incomplete.’’
Stokes, himself, denied that Premier Mossa-

degh had turned down his eight point plan, offer-!

ing Persia the control of operations inside the

country. “Nothing has been rejected, nothing has

been accepted,’’ he stated. “I am convinced that
these proposals are as good as any Persia could
get.’”’

The Education Minister, Karim —--— ~ ——_— =

Sandjadi, one f the Persiz re .
Geiigattbwha waid'that een! Mitra Sinanan
Questions Colonial

posals were not complete, added:!
“The position is virtually un-
changed.” Dr. Hussein Fatemi,
Mossadegh’s Assistant, gave a ver-
sion of the British plan, which he
said was not in accordance with
nderstandings reached with the
United States oil envoy, Averell
Harriman

Dr. Fatemi said that Premier
Jossadegh had last night rejected
British proposals, and made these
counter proposals:

c

ecretary
ON IMMIGRANTS




x



PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 13.

The first shot in what may turn
out to be an attack by the Parlia-
mentary Group on the Govern-
ment’s newly initiated campaign
against prohib@t#d immigrants
was fired by the Hon- Mitra Sin-
anan, Group spokesman:

1, Persia agrees to sell Britain
ali the oil she vgants

2. The claims of both sides are
subject to study and discus-
sion

3. The British oil] staff is to
keep on working.—U.P.

Arab States May

Mr. Sinanan sent the following
question to Hon. P. Renison,
Colonial Secretary:

“Will the Hon. the Colonial

'

!

Atta oe Ts = custody at the Royal Jail await-

+3 itend Paris lalks ing deportation? Will he state

ALEXANDRIA, Egypt, Aug, 15. further as to what is the expendi-
An Arab League source said on | ture incurred by the taxpayers in

Wednesday that the Arab States | Maintaining the said immigrants
are expected to attend the Paris |in prison; the period of time they
mecting of the Palestine Concilia- |have been detained and the cost
tion Commission on September
9th. 4t added that the Arab States
want to prove their goodwill and
their desire to co-operate, and to
implement the United States reso-
lutions for the partition of Pales-
tine and the repatriation of Arab
refugees. It said, however, that
the Arab delegates would refuse
to sit at the same table with Israel

t the conference

respective countries?”
“An oral answer is required.”

A Government release esti-
mated that there were about
6,000 ihtegal immigrants in the
island who were causing unem-
ployment to Trinidadians and
taking away foodstuffs and other
essential commodities from Trini-
dadians. It has also been ascer-
tained that at the moment there
are 23 illegal immigrants impris-
oned in local jails. The average
number of prisoners in this Colo-
ny per day is 1,050. The cost per
prisoner is a minimum of $1.20
per day




—UP.



$292m For Defence

CANBERRA, Aug. 15.
Prime Minister Robert G
said on Wednesday
sustralian defence expenditure

?
A cable requesting a debate in

1 .
Menzies



this vear would be astronomical.|the House of Commons on Trini-
Australia last year spent £133,-|dad’s economic cfisis was sent by
000,000—about $292,000,000 on de-| the Parliamentary Oppositior
fence.—U.P. today August 13.





U.S. Colonel Disrupts
Communist Union

By DAN F. GILMORE
LEGHORN, ITALY, Aug. 15,
The Communist controlled Union of Port Workers here
has been undermined by United States army methods ana
if successful Communist direction of other port cities
throughout Italy may also be shattered.
——— - This Tyrrhenian port city,
. * ° battered during the war and still
feeling the effects seven years
U.S, Plan To Bar later, thas become the “test?
° ° centre of Communist strength
Czech Airliners So far Communists are losing
and it is becoming almost :
WASHINGTON, Aug. 15. national issue for them as far a:
The United States State|“tace” is concerned.
Department is preparing to bar}; The man responsible for this




Czech airliners from flying over lis Colonel Norman Visering, once
the U.S. zone of Germany in;a farm owner in Florida and now
retaliation for the imprisonment | commanding the 7656 U.S

of merican newspaperman } logistical command here. A
William Oatis, it was disclosed! softspoken man with engaging
Wednesday. Planned action is;personality he knows how t
part of the general strategy ot! handle workers as he did witt
bringing economic pressure to); 1,000 persons on his own payroll
bear on Communist Czechoslo- Visering came here two
vakia to release Oatis. months ago after directing the
U.S. supply line to Korea to
The Department has already | establish at Leghorn a_ disem-
moved to cancel all Czech trade|parkation base for troops and
concessions in the United States/ material en route to U.S. occupa-
and restore the high tariff|tion forces in Austria and Ger-
barriers that will seriously ham-}many. He was then and still is
that country’s $25,000,000} faced with formidable problems.
rly sales to the American!Leghorn is one of the “Red”
1arket |strongholds of Italy. More than
ee - _lany other city in Italy it has a
_ The House voted 363 to one ' bitter memory of war after almost
Tuesday to cut off : all commer-! daily bombardments by Germans,
cial relations” with Czechoslovakia! 4 erjcean and English.
until Oatis is freed. The resolu- | oe

tion isn awaiting Senate action Last Port Left
which m: not come for several It vas the last port evacuated
week coos « profitable | PY_U-S. forces two years after the
Czechoslovakia ee a De te **€\war, Visering has already work-
airline industry whic maintains! 64° wonders. In two months he
iles fanning out over most of|has built up headquarters com-
vestern Europe hag aoe routes!mand nere and a nucletis port
OVER WRAL. Gey: jarea which successfully handled
action will not he entirely j the ee Saturday and Sunday
ffective unless Britain and | of the first earge and troop
Frances whi of | transports.











control two
three occupa-! o
nove. and was himself a port worker.








follow the U.S



B French tudes Following the party line he first
vhs 1 the US will] told Visering that people of the
seole thelr co-operation.—-U.P. ; Leghorn district did not want any

ae | troops.”’ Then after looking around
at unemployment and when Viser-

JAP TREATY PUBLISHED ing announced that America



\planned to give jobs to 3,800

Aug. 15. “|Italians, Jackoponi had a second
tau thought. He tt
t port worke1

to work for

workers woul

\SHINC









sering





Secretary state for the inform-|
ation of the House the number of;
prohibited immigrants now _ in!

of deporting these persons to their,

——<$—$_$_$—$—_$—_——

Jackoponi 51, was born here

jpart of “American Imperialist

8TH ARMY HEADQUARTERS,

Korea, Aug, 15,
United Nations patrols attacked
three Communist groups en-
trenched on hills southwest of

Kumsong today and drove the}

Reds to the north.

Heavy casualties were inflicted
on the Reds as Allied fighting men
braved intense machine-gun fire
and mortar fire to take the heights.

Kumsong, one of the most im-
portant Communist held cities in
Central Korea, is reported to be
the centre of a large buildup of
Red troops and battle supplies.
UN, patrols rahging south of the
city have contacted numerous
Communist groups from platoon to
company in size

Allied patrols farther to the east
made several contacts with Reds
northwest of Hwachon Red
units all ranging from 20 to 30
men in size were taken under U.N.
fire and quickly dispersed

There were four contacts made
in the area northeast of the Hwa-
chon reservoir but no heavy fight-
ing was reported. :

One of the contacts occurred in
the “punchbowl” valley north of
Inje. A U.N. officer said: “Out-
side those four encounters our
sector was very very quiet.

—U-P.







Mao Tse Tung
Sabotaged Saviet

Interests In Korea

WASHINGTON, Aug. 15.

The Voice of America said on
Wednesday that the Soviet repre-
sentative has sent a top secret re-
port to Moscow accusing the Chin-
ese Communist leader Mao Tse
Tung of deliberately sabotaging
Soviet interests in the Korean
war. The Voice said that report
was written by Vladimir Rogov,
the chief correspondent for Tass,
the Soviet News Agency in Pei-
ping. The said top secret report
“was intended only for official
Soviet eyes.”

The Voice said that the report

states that the Korean campaign

of the Chinese Red forces has been
persistently slowed down by ideo-
logical deviations in Mao’s “in-
ternal clique”. fj
Rogov added that the “plain
unwillingness of the Chinese Com-

munist General to utilize alll‘

methods and resources of combut
was one prime reason why so
many decisive Korean operations
had failed.” ;
How the report reached Ameri-
can hands was not penny ‘-



Prisoners Sabotage
Soviet Troop Traits

MAINZ, GERMANY, Aug. 15,

Eight French and four Saar
prisoners of war ongtheir way
home from Russia said on Wednes-
day that thousands of partisans
roaming the Baltic countries are
sabotaging Soviet troop trains
and military installations.

The 12 men still clad in black
Russian prisoner of war pants and
coats refused to give their names
because they said it might affect
some 1,000 French prisoners still
in Russia.

The men looked healthy and
said that after the first three years
“which were just awful” they
were given a chance to work and
living conditions improved UP.



Weather Threatens
Antigua Again

(From Our Own Correspondent?
ANTIGUA, Aug. 15,

To-day Antigua is experiencins
mildly that familiar threatening
weather so fresh in people’s mem-
ories of exactly a year ago. Early
this morning there were cloudy
overeast, gusty blea vinds and
intermittent sharp heavy shower
were persistent throughout the
day. It is just five days short oi



termed a small hurricane which
proved to be merely the introduc-

tion to a severe thrashing of 3ist)

August. To-night the wind’s veioc-
ity is increasing and the baromecer
has dropped 17 points, but the in-
habitants are not alarmed or bat-
tened down as a tropical] disturb-

Antigua.

SOVIET WAR

By R. BUCKINGHAM
BERLIN, August 15.
Returned prisoners of war from
Russia released on Monday, after
six years of captivity, said that
the Soviet Union’s war factories
are humming night and day,
that the Soviet Union “is a
for war as Germany was in 1
They said that
sidings across Ru








THURSDAY, AUG?



oo
* FOR SAFETY

SOME of the yachts which
reported that a storm was passi

brought into the inner basin yesterday for safety after it had been
southeast of the island.

itain Can Build
Own Atom Bomb

LONDON, Aug.,

Britain ean build her awn atomic bomb any time she
chooses, but there appears to be two schools of thought on
whether the British should. broadcast the atomic bomb. |
Some feel that they should go on and produce a bomb t
show the world that they d@ not need atomic help from the
United States. Others contend that she should not yo to th
expense of making an atomic bomb because one is not
necessary in view of her friendship with the United States.













Britain has kept pace in Atomi
research, and now

First Hurricane Of
The 1951 Season

MIAMI, Florida, Aug. 15.

The weather
on Wednesday that the first hur-
ricane of the 1951

near London which produce
radio-active
that Britain uses,

The prospects are that she, als¢
have enough fissionabl



Uranium, reportedly, will go inte



boiled up in the Leeward Islands
near Chester.

Atomic Piles

moving in a ,
Additionally,

northwesterly direction at about
15 miles an hour,
Reconnaisance

charged that
understood
Y,roducing

bomb droppec
{on Nagasaki
Martinique.
\urricane of the

Unofficial Reports
the official

able material

hurricane, which
was spotted east



the Florids |July that Britain's

plans to produce



| 1"
in the world. The American at mic}
Brookhaven,



Rockefeller
Marries Again

NEW YORK, Aug.
John D. Rockefeller junior, VW-
-year-old millionaire philanthro-|

Fuel Shortage
~) Necessity
tish toward
power plant,
fuel shortage,
vreek coke went on the ration list.;

Standard Oi!
married Wednesday
the widow of an old college chum

Rockefeller,

human welfare have totalled mil-



experimental :
George Hear



Providence, Rhode Island to Mrs

erve workers
New York
Publie Relations firm of Lee and
announced here
mid-morning ceremony
vate attended only by immediate
members of the two families,

commereial

heat generated
is used to make steam and stear

relations firm said John D. Rocke- }98@ of coal or oil,

Rockefeller’s earlier date than in countrie

It was the bride’s third |

Rockefeller
of his attention to the foundation
started by his famous father,

BOMB DAMAGES
RED BOOKSHOP



a * rim .
On Business Trip
LONDON, Aug.

Villanueva,
Manager of the Manila Chronicle,
arrived in London on Monday on

Communist

| Wednesday night for a short sta
in Dundee, Scotland.
an anniversary of that which was; }

Philippines
rather than

100 DEAD

ANKARA, TURKEY



Egypt and
United States



the San Francisco Treaty Confer-
in September
ance is expected to pass. by | of the Philippine delegation



| after Tuesday's s€vere eart)

FACTORIES

names and nationalities

ardising the scheduled
their countrymen still
Russian prisoner



and |

Russian citizens they

Russian populatior
expressed doubt



the atom bomb
Factory Work

They worked in Rus

ovocat





Nations Commis-

tudying the problem of more
and a half million

announced on Wednes-

contact with Soviet officials at the
session. The Commission
written United Nations mem-
stressing it intends to seek a

purely a humani-

point of view and in close
ilaboration
vents directly concerned
Completing

with the govern-

ihe first stage of

three-member group
meet again, probably
in. Europe at the end of the year.

notice “hat when

the time and place has been de-
invite the Govern-
concerned to send repre-

that joint studies

might be made fer possible solu-

Italy, and Japah
Russia is still hold-

of thousands of

II prisoners, Russia
satellites denounced the
ssembly resolution set-
Wer Prisoner Com-

so far refused te co-

efforts to get de-

on the prisoners’ situation

HEARST WILL BE
BURIED FRIDAY

FRANCISCO, Aug. 15
Randoiph Hearst will
probably on Friday
the resting place of his par-
Cypress Lawn Cemetery
home town it was an-
‘nounced on Wednesday

The funeral

was scheduled ten-
pm. Friday. The

the farmed publisher was
from Beverly Hills
where he died peacefully from in-
of old
will be entombed near that of his

age. Hearst’s body

Phoebe Apperson

his father Senator
t—U.P.



Veisal Extends
Visit To Britain

LONDON, Aug. 15

of Saudi Arabia
extend hi visit
further discussions

authorities on
mutual interest in

East" the Foreign
announced Wednesday
was learned that Feisal who

this week origin-

cheduled to leave this
negotiation ran into

will be represented
Committee which met
night at the Foreign

first time. --U.P

‘| Heat Wave In Texas

DALLAS, Aug. 15
nder if 195



a year of big
temperature-

4) degree A

iea vave threatens
from the Gulf
Panhand's. Seared
ire ending lank

wiy market. At least

ind no relief is

“HUM NIGHT AND DAY

|
—|

y m ” 2 Ta int t lise » of [ill-fated United Nations decis
Lak a point by point discussion o 1 ions ecision
' Se ¢ Kk Solution the treaty Dulles said neither the | to internationalize Jerusalem, will

will be



PRICE: FIVE CENTS

Dulles Warns Reds
|



About Saboiage |
Over Jap Trealy

WASHINGTON, Aug. 15.

JOHN FOSTER DULLES in a nationwide radio

_ address Wednesday night warned the Soviet
Union not to send a ‘wrecking crew’’ to the San

anese Peace Treaty, declarihg: “If such tactics
would be tried we are confident they would fail.’

Dulles made it clear that nations attending the
San Francisco Peace Conference will not be per-
mitted to alter the text of the Japanese Treaty
made public in Washington and London.

| Francisco Conference to try‘to sabotage the Jap-
|

The President's special repre-

sentative told a press conference

that 50 nations invited to the San owdown On

*rancisco meeting had been given rf

‘o understand that the purpose of = -

i antetiee on ee ae ear East

‘ext released Wednesday which he

described as an absolutely final | Tod

focument \

Dulles reported that so far 934 ay

nations have formally accepted “

he Anglo-American invitation to FLUSHING MEADOW, |

San Franses New York, Aug. 15,
_ One of the biggest showdowns
in the deteriorating Near Rastern

. e * .
Significant situation since the partition of

Palestine and the passage of the



Inited States nor the United be unveiled here Thursday when
Kingdom considered any of the | the U.S., Britain, amd France plan

To Prisoner Of; ecent changes in the text of [to request the Security Council to
War Problem

NEW YORK, Aug. 15

najor character But he added | order Egypt to lift the blockade of
tit every one of them was of |the Suez Canal on the grounds
significance to one or more coun- that it violates the spirit of armis-
tries tice vureements, and threatens the

He opined that re-wording of | Matntenance of peace in the Mid-
the reparations section might | dle East

make it somewhat more palatable Rig Three Western powers are

ito the Philippimes. Indonesia anc expected to table a draft resolu-

Burma jon to that effect when the Caun-

allegediy still held | Dulles said none of the three ‘il reconvenes here after a two-

; would be completely satisfied buf | wrok res diving which several

it will seek to establish direct | that there would be a growing re woall powers delegations unsuc-
ilization that as a practical mat- essfully sought to persuade Egypt

lter the formula worked out for ]{o agree to seme compromise

reparatOns was the oply possible formula that would obviate the
nethod by which claimant coun- [reed for chiding Egypt publicly

tries would secure any restitution Exypt claims that maintenance
from Japan of the blockade is necessary to
The formula eall for the Jassure her security in the face of

Japanese to negotiate agreement Jwhat Cairo contends to be the

under which they will provide [aggressive designs of Israel
processing services for raw ma- uypt has already served im-
rials from claimar\ countric’ Pplied notice on the Council’ that i:
and send back both consume [is not planning to lift the block-
vods and capital goods. ade which is part of Arab econa-
) i mic warfare against Israel until
> ¢ 2 peace treaties are signed and an-
Some uc stion nounced in the same breath that
peace is impossible as leng as
Israel refuses to repatriat® most

salvage operation in waters of 7 tall

Allied powers if the latter wished if not all, of nearly 1,000,000

© Dulles said the insevtion.in the| “tab Palestine retygees, . :
treaty of a paragraph calling upon An Envy esSkesmnan Sinae

all nations to carry out provisions | clear Egypt would be unable to
of the Potsdam proclamation of | abide by the resolution and the
July 26, 1945 which deals with the | Arab League promised to support
return of Japanese war prisoners all Arab states in Egypt's expect.
was made because there is some |e ane if defiance to the Coun-
suestio whether the Russians | ¢! order
en aos to this agreement, This will place the U.N, as well
He pointed out that the U N. | as spotisors of the Tésolution in an
has undertaken to look into the awkward position in so far as no-
question, so it, was felt it should | Sedy here has any idea how to go
be mentioned in the treaty about enforeing the Council's pre
American and Japanese officials posed call upon Egypt to lift the
have estimated some 340,000 of Canal restrictions
the Japanese who surrendered tor A _ Spokesman for the sponsors
Soviet forces in Manchuria are! admitted “it is the $64 question all
till unaccounted for right But he refused to specu
—UP late on how the resolution would

be implemented once it is. ap
Se | proved by the 11 nations body,



Japanese also would assist in



Failure of the U.N, to impose
The “ADVOCATE” its authority on Egypt would, ac-
pays for NEWS

cording to diplomatic observers



have the immediate effect of
| weakening the whole structure of
Dial 3113 armistice agreements and makin
Israel feel free to adopt reprisal
Day ar Night againg Egypt ee




hut the
| beginning of
a tragedy

Yet it would be idle to calculate the number of
‘ fires caused by carelessly discarded cigarettes,
because the habit will apparently persist despite

the serious loss of life and property resulting

| from these outbreaks
It is the work of a few minutes to protect your-
self from risk of loss through fire, by consulting
from the effects of| at your earliest opportunity the local agents of
| Guardian Assurance Co. Ltd. And, if the oppor-
tunity does not seem to present itself, MAKE
it do so immediately. Tires don’t usually give
much warning

idustry w¢
d Western

hn es, efficiency,

{ ¢ - ~ |

New ories and
pp tn deep air
O ex-prisone

in could not

arming, but!

thiy afraid of

The subt whether
ent the ator
+he

@ ON pase 5

j
i
|

Local Agents



_§.P. MUSSON, SON & Co. Lia.

BROAD STREET .. P.O. Box 227, Phone 446$

ei ak a NS ONES a NO RN aaah eee Keil ieee
PAGE TWO

Carub Calling





































BARBADOS ADVOCATE

B.B.C. Radio





















IT’S WORTH 1T





































I rogramme “1 believe there is nothing quite really ruatter, if in return you get
| so deeply satisfying as a happy large dividends in a way of
‘ . 4 1arriage, a to achieve it love’and happiness, and you are
Ol 1 THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 1+ marriage, and if », See
C : . 2 toys pa «te Barefoot dancers Bergman’ 8 Visit 11.18 a.m. Programme Paeka a 2s} you ere the one who has to hold secure in the knowledge _that
Si Ltd ae 1 no: ‘the URIN Land — eee nee — a.m.| Cut a hand more often, if you are your husband would certainly
itd wi n z the J °r y Specia ispe 2 ‘noon s , as i ac i
. a2 + 2 Pas sritish RING her visit to London eae ua re eee ne News,i the one who has to bite back choose you again? wre
lee ) ar etiSs to see her 12-year-old | s‘gg_4 70 inese famous last words in a Phyllis Digby Morton speaking
Guiana yesterday by B.W.LA. daughter, Pia, Miss Ingrid Berg- : ee ee euaerel and give in more often on “Would He Choose you
He expects to be away for about marr has been staying in Kensing-| 4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. Interluda, and» more generously — does it Again?” in a B.B.C. programme
one week He has gone to joh tca at the home of film director |4-15 ».m. Top Score, 5 p.m. England val
ante % om ‘ South Af m Oa "=" a“
his wife fo went to B.G. a David )Lean and his actress wife, |SO'" Ditties, 5.08 pom. Interlude, ot es
week ago During his t tay " former husband, Dr. Lindstrom. | Pipes Drums, 6.15 p.m. ‘Scottish | * ur ae DANCE’ ‘| P i A Zz a» BTOWN Boss of Lonely
Georgetown he will be a guest at Ann Todd. Miss Bergman’s | Magazine, 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade,||| $4h 3S DANCE Dial 2310 Valley and
e Tov Hotel visited her there with Pia. 6.56 p To-day’s Sport Betty HUTTON LAST # ange TODAY | Cheyenne Roundup jo ma
David is el ‘ 7 0O—10 15 pm 2.53 M. sia? M sneitinepenaiiiniameen 4.30 & 8.30 p
ee . . : avid Lean and his wife are |.— - = > ‘Two New Features! (Triple Attraction)
Married in Jamaica friends of Miss Bergman and her} .7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. News| “ , I IN MY HEART”
er es friendy-of Mins Beremen and beet 2 iPss, 1.10 9.0. We om icin, 1 THERE'S A GIRL HEA
. KENRIC r. MURRAY, ii T > ith the F p.m. Selecting a Detective, 8 p.m with Lee BOWMAN—Elyse KNOX—Gloria JEAN—Lon CHANEY and
1 Director of Barbados Redif- am hey stayed with them in| Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. | Books to “JIGGS AND MAGGIE IN JACKPOT JITTERS” '
See i . narried Italy last year. Read, 8.30 p.m. The Arts, 8.45 p.m. | (From the Famous Comic Strip By George McManus)
fusion Service Ltd., was married Says Lean: “She is as beautiful | Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the Editorials Joe YULE as Jiggs—Renie RIANO as Maggie and Cartoonist
I aica a few days ago t vs ever, Her baby is a fine 9 p.m. Tuneful Twenties, 9.30 p.m. Do George McMANUS
Mr Norah Beddow, widow ot child.” - You Remember, 9.45 p.m. Special Also “CHARLES vs, WALCOTT” FIGHT FILM |
S Leader T. Beddow and ; eal 7 m. The moe 10 7 WORLD'S HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP FIGHT |
oe : i terlude, 5 p.m Mducating Archie Sree eseeenantae ew 4 ee j
c t f Prof. and Mrs. John- . 10 43 ig ne Spectal Today 1 p/m |
: 79 aie Gl a ester. Bui Sunny Weather in 10.45 p.m. Here and There “KELLER SHARK" & “SONG OF THE RANGE” |, |
i Mr. and Mrs. Murray will Trinidad Cigarette Ends Roddy McDOWALL o Jimmy wASee te |
be returning to Trinidad in a day |
or two Ss arriving | from e z ve ee ee >
ri ‘
i. Trinidad early yesterday! Surprise Girl PLAZA osu GALETY
Via Trinidad afternoon told Carib that they r,s shew heh amt 8404
I-ft Piarco in sunshine. Very L d . s To-day 5 & $20 p.m.
, : From SMART P , y .
unlike the weather they found or ondon OLITICs” Last Show TODAY — 8.W p.m.

f* CHARLES W: ATKIN of
I Messrs. T. Sydney Kinch

Ltd. who left Barbados on Jul
7th, returned from Trinidad oa
Tuesday night by B.W.I.A

He also _ visited Bermuda,

Nassauand Jamaica.

40 Years at Eton













Mc": K. MARSDEN, senior
1 n smatics ! t Eton,
I Y lel ts on
the colle He is 64 His
pupil Lord Hallsham Australian dancers Elizabeth
a ud , Permanent Russell. Mardi Watchorn ane
= ey Kl Coralie Hinkley, all 24 have
~ i 445 wuoy a Lion 1e
uv onte ir arrived in London. They will de
; s contemporary of Mr. Hugh thei dancing bareloot. and train
: on Australian food parcels
irsden s many changes London Eipress Seritee
Eto > be . he says, tire °
ui than they used to; Off To St. Vincent
Via rst thinks this may be RS. HAZEL MacKINN leaves
ause of the difference in today by B.G. Airways for
feeding: St. Vincent to join four other
Fo the masters, he says, the girls from Barbados who have
place i a shadow of what it gone to St. Vincent for a holiday.
was i 91 ), “Life for_the master They are, Miss Gwen Cecil, Miss
then luxurious and the Wine Joan Knight, Miss Hazel Inniss
used to flow; now it is spartan.” and Miss Gloria Cheeseman.
Returning Today Useful
- F 2 ODERNISING the City and
M 2 liek: Nee MRS. ; ALVIN taking down the old fashicr-
4 TUCKER and their daughter ed verandahs is all very well,
i vnette who have been holidaying someone told me yesterday, but
in Barbados for the pact few the old verandahs come in very
veeks. expect to return to Trini- useful on rainy days such as

dad today

yesterday.



THE



ADVENTURES OF

arrival at Seawell:
wind
That was at 1 p.m, yesterday.

overcast, little

and an occasional drizzle.

Holiday Over

R. CYRIL GOMES who is

with Barclays Bank in Domi-
nica has been holidaying § in
Barbados sinee July 31st. Today
he is due to return to Dominice
by B.G. Airways.

Hon. H. D. Shillingford, Mr
Hugh Redfern and Mr. John Rose
who arrived from St. Lucia on
‘Tuesday are due to leave by the
same plane,

‘Copy Boy’

ILM actor Frederic March
on his way to the U.S. from

Penelope









{

They Are So Much tenon)
By FREDERICK COOK |

NEW YORK,
TWENTY million television
watchers heard late last night

from a smiling 20-year-old Lon-
don typist what really impresses'
the visitor to New York for the
first time.
the food. It was not the high build-
ings or the lights on Broadway—
it was the cigarette ends,

To Judy Breen, from Campden
Hill Road, Kensington, nothing
illustrated the difference between
London and New York more than
the fact that over here people
crush a-+cigarette a moment after

is|they have lit it.

Said non-smoking Judy: “In

England with his wife Fiorence] London you never see a cigarette

in the Queen Elizabeth.

Mrs. March says théir daughter
Penelope (18), left
summer, wants to become ;
writer. “She has taken a job or

1

the New York Post,” says Mrs
March. “She is a ‘copy boy.’

ee fetches tea for the
staff .’’

Incidental Intelligence

HANK heaven this is still <

free country and a man can

do as

his wife pleases.—Wirecc
Life,

U.S.A.
—L.E.S.



PIPA

Copyright . P 111 . Vaz Dias Int Amsterdane

BY THE WAY e eee By Beachcomber

is, highly — satisfactory
know that one more
legal point has been obscured by
the Law.

A recent court ruling said that

‘Tt




to
doubtful

bark of the hited dog in cir-
cumstances either normal or ab-
normal, And finally: What con-
stitutes a dog within the meaning
of the Act?

It is: legal for a normal dog to

bark in a normal manner under Book Review

circumstances which would nor-

nally produce a_ bark.” That Obviously destined to be the
leaves the way open for long and standard work on the subject.
eestly arguments about what N these words the publisher
constitutes an abnormal bark on announces Vol. VI of the
the part of an abnormal dog in “List of Huntingdonshire Cab-
circumptances which would not men,” the final volume in a
normally produce a bark. Then brilliant series. It is the ideal
there is the abnormal bark of bedside book, to be dipped into,
the normal dog, and the normal rither than to be read from. cove:



Aeooes
HS iw i tea on ash (9)

fio we? (4)
Â¥ we in misery. made cioth. (4)
Tord (9)
Lotu- that meade Leo numb. (7)




® vernacular (9)
Ss not say where the
for this music. (6)
inds “ pop"
(4)

1 Bachelor of Surgery it may
geat cricket (8)
(4)

Uow timed rage went

offspring

)

you of

«)

Down
; You'll fina it true in fur. (8B)
’ ULiecé up number six, please.
4 Possess in town markets. (3)
+ seeh wnen iced (3)
stays when Le
(3) 6.
in'l pass as a be gar.
% Game from Norway ?
} This Kind 1s human 3)
{t's irritating (4)
Grimace (3)
idiomatically 1t is not. (5)
T ling le Oniv intimation.
at Jessop did. (4)
jeputy 7 (4)

She
team
i Tinetec





re; 10. Atones;
Mare. 16 Kase;
Lens’ 25 Name
Tret Dewn: 1,
Fasten: 4 Roe
Consomme:

1S. Miliet: 18, Year:



to cover at a
at random
Gr Hut

sitting, Opening il
one finds “Stanfield,
and on almost every page
there is, if not a surprise, at any
iate food for thought, The seven
Tatlows on page 213 suggest that
in certain Huntingdon families
the trade of cabman is traditional,
although a footnote tells us that
an eighth son of old “Cabby,”
Tatlow went into an ironmongery
business in Sedley Vale. But there
are between these handsome
covers names for all tastes. Space
forbids lengthy quotation, but, as
an earnest of What is in store for
readers, one notes Ubstone, P.,
Varley, H. F., Varper, B. L.,
Wickershaw, K., Willett, N.. and
Yelpine, C.M.

Up To Date

PPARENTLY several

people

were surprised at my revela-

tion that the
tattooed has spread. It
longer confined to sailors,
well-known hostess

appearec
recently in the stalls

at a firs

night with the names of her four

husbands on her
three were crossed out in marking
ink. Another fashionable back
of generous proportions, is bein;
used for mere tattoo gossip,
1s “Millicent is After George,”
“Watch Tony and Muriel.’

In Passing

AM constantly astounded b)

the amount of completely use
less knowledge within everybody’:
reach today. For instance, I havc
just read a_ self-confident pro-
nouncement that the men o
Cardiff wear the smartest hats ir
England, If it is true, it doesn’
matter twopence. If it is un fu
it doesn't matter twopence. Any-
how, there can be very few peo
ple in a position to confirm or

back. The first

such

“| A Choice Of Scents

deny such a statement, Substitute

Hornehurch or

Or the less wise?



|
|



|
!
| The two friends stand and fee!
| thoroughly puzzled, ‘' | do wish |
| could see wt again,’’ says Rupert.
But he wants to go one way and
Al wants to go another At
> the little bear turns to his
| "We mustn't waste any more
| We'll be late for school if
i

Rupere and np Sorcerer—S



we don't hurry.’

nip knows the
way so they stride o'

over a little

hill. — All at once Rupert spies a
small figure going in the same
direction. ‘* Hullo. there's Tiger-

lily the Conjurer’s daughtre he
says. “She krows ail s

queer things. Let's ask her.”’




S@RBSGeOGQeaensepeBeBeBBeBeBRBaBaeHERE SB SE
a eee) Me. QO eas ee A ee

st
8 PLAIN SPUNS

In Pink, Lemon, Peach, Green,

Py FLOWERED SATINS 33"____.. cinlais

@ SHANTUNG
a

DIAL 4604

36”

36”


EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

ee ee NaS Ne SS Se

Blue and White

Beautiful Designs and Colours

$1.10

Be.

$1.40

——

DIAL 4220

Berkhamsted for}
Cardiff, and who is any the wiser? |

}



end longer than half an inch, That
one thing tells me more than any

college this|thing else I have seen.

Still Dancing






Judy is the girl who won a trip}

In her case it was no ==



|

round the world, six complete out-,

fits of stylish new clothes and
£800 spending money by taking
first place in Mr. Rank’s compe-
tition for the title of Miss Festi-
val of Britain

They are moving her from
continent to continent so fast that
she had only one day in New
York.

Hardened experts in the art of
welcoming visitors to Manhattan
fell out one by one before hei
packed 16 hours were ove

But early this morning Judy
was still dancing in a night-clup
four hours before she took off
for Canada on her way to Hono-
lulu, Australia, India, Italy and
home again.

On Top Of Parapet
In her whirlwind one-day visit

here she had held two Press con-
ferences, been rushed in a caval-
cade of British cars at 70 m.p.h.
for a morning television appear-
ance, been’ backstage at the
world’s largest cinema,

She had appeared” on news
reels, posed for Press photo-
graphers, climbed on to a para-

pet 100ft. above the street for
more pictures, toured New York

from one end to the other by car,
She had visited the United Na
tions, been guest of honour at
ocktail party, made another TV
appearance last night and starred
on a mid-night radio show.
This Time, Chicken
The girl they could not tire out
made one other record that im-

craze for being| pressed New Yorkers.

is no
One

She refused to eat a steak for

lunch, She had a 15s, dish of
old salmon, And for dinner she
ygain turned down steak in

avour of chicken—at 32s.

“There is only one thing I have
missed,” she said, “and that’s 2
banana split, There simply has not

»een time.”
—L.ES...

“If we bend low and seek for
it we will find the smell of dung
on every road; but if we hold
our heads high and open our nos-
trils to the winds of heaven we
will know only the sweet scents
of, the countryside. That is my
earnest belief.”

Robert Gubbings talking

B.B.C. programme called

Speak for Myself.”





TO THE SCREENS
BIGGEST
ee

OF THEM ALL {I





Paramount presents
The risa song-and-dance pair!
FRED

| HUTTON: ASTAIRE
| 7 Lets /
Jpance ee

ot

© NS 0G:
UUCKE MAISON RORY MOET



Produced oy Owected by
ROBERL CLGCNS + NURMAN 2 MCLEOD
tay Allan Scott



206 by Dane Lussier

PLAZA

BRIDGETOWN



Tomorrow (Friday) 2.30—
4.45 and 8.30 p.m



|





“BOY WITH GREEN HAIR”
Pat O'Brien
“BORN TO KI
iday to
Mat. Sunday 4
Triple Attraction!
World's Heavyweight Championship
Film . “CHARLES vs, WALCOTT”
Ae sten Maatures
“SQUARE DANCE KAtt
Phil Britto—Virgina Welles and
KIDLER SHARK” Roddy MeDowall

Freddie Stewart and
aU NA CLIPPER” Roddy McDowall
~~ Friday Tonly) & and” 8.30 a.

“NEWS HOUNDS”

Leo Gorcey and East Side Kids and

“JIGGS AND MAGGIE IN soc TETY"

Joe Yule— —Rente Riano

‘Speciai “sat, % T-30-A-m

arlie Chan in “THE TRAP”

“SONG OF THE RANGE"
Jimmy Waket

and

Lawrence Tierney
5 penance

0 pom

30 p.m





;
||| PHE GARDEN — ST. JAMES |
with The Teenagers and } }
1 i
| |

and







AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA< (Membeis Only) |||
> SHT 8.30 |
BING CROSBY — JOAN FONTAINE |

“THE EMPEROR WALTZ”

Color by Technicolor
BING’S BEST SONGS!

Commencing FRIDAY 17th—
ANN TODD, CLAUDE RAINS in.
“ONE WOMAN'S” STORY.”

GLOBE THEATRE

TO-DAY 5 and 8.15 p.m. LAST SHOWS
Richard Widmark, Mark Stevens in—

“THE STREET WIThl NO NAME”





IN























—- and -—
“ORCHESTRA WIVES”
GRAND 2 P.M. MATINEE TO-DAY—
BOMBAY TALKIES present:
Ashok Kumar — Mumtaz Shanti in

“KISMET’

Our first Iadian Talking fiim.
EVERYBODY WILL ENJOY THIS PICTURE

Indians $1.00; Non-Indians 12c¢., 24c., 36¢.















Opening GLOBE Tomorrow

NEVILLE PHILLIPS ,
PRANCIS HYPOLITE .

A FULN MOTTER THAN THE

KOREAN FRONT
A G

PNOUINE SUPER-DUPER

FINALLY, at haat after a
3 year delay, you can see

; THE OUTLAW?
EVM lich |

Peay

wld

PEAT ieee







RUSSELL

Te ge at ae 4
MOU OM TRe@ haa s
WALTER HUSTON

Om. Com tela)

»
Plus:
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
EDDIE HALL .................... Singing “Begin the Beguine” |
MAVIS WILTSHIRE . “Count Every Star” |

“I Apologise”’
“Because”

MARTIN HAYNES “Confess”
CHESTON HOLDER . “Be My Love”
Plus:



i

———

——e

A Hot Musical Short ‘PACKAGE OF RHYTHM
For this show you gotta be here early. Cause it’s the
GRANDEST WEEK-END ENTERTAINMENT









|
|
|
|
|



So

Wseful tenas im...

EARTHENWARE jf

Tea Cups & Saucers
Lunch, Breakfast, Soup & Dinner Plates

=<,

=







|

Vegetable Dishes with Covers |
Meat Dishes

Milk Jugs

1-Pt. Cups with Covers

/“A DATE WITH JUDY”

Decorated Tea Pots
Decorated Bowls—with & without Covers.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON FACTORY LTD. {
Tel. No. 2039 ‘\

a ——————————

Hardware Department













THURSDAY,
TO-DAY

YOUR LAST CHANCE
TO SEE

MIDDLE WEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP

AUGUST 16, 1951

THE WORLD’S

SUGAR RAY ROBINSON

VS.

RANDOLPH TURPIN

FIGHT.

AT
one tie masdnion., . Ta ior > 2 Ss ©
EMPIRE ROXY
4.45 & 8.30 4.30 & 8.15
with the
with the Action Double

Republic Musical Sunset —,

HIT PARADE| «pays oF BUFFALO
1951 a

and
z (Allan (Rocky) LANE
Songs—Dances
Music—Mirth

“SALT LAKE RAIDERS”

SLARTING TO-MORROW 2.30 & 8.30 and CONTINUING
DAILY AT 4.45 & 8.30 MATINEE: SATURDAY MORNING at 9.30





AT

EMPIRE

JAMES STEWART Hits Again!
win Barbara HALE in



ROX Y

TO-MORROW ONLY 4.30 and 8.15
20th Century Fox Double

Edward G. ROBINSON
McLAGLEN in

James LYDON

Victor Charles RUSSELL in

AND

“TAMPICO” “TUCSON ”’

OPENING SATURDAY 4.45 & 8.15
20th Century Fox Presents - - -

“VENGEANCE VALLEY”

Starring .
JOHN IRELAND — SALLY FORREST

«xROYAL

TO-DAY LAST TWO SHOWS 4.50 and 8.15
Another Fox Double

BUD ABBOTT
LOU COSTELLO

JAMES CAGNEY
RICHARD CONTE

in 9 in
“LOST IN A HAREM” " “13 RUE MADELEINE”
Bi LAUGHS DRAMA



OPENING TO-MORROW 4.30 & 8.15 and CONTINUING to SUNDAY
Republic Smashing Double

“LIGHTS OF OLD “WAKE OF THE

SANTA FE” 9 RED WITCH”
Starring... =

DALE EVANS and
ROY ROGERS

with

JOHN WAYNE and
GAIL RUSSELL





SPECIAL SATURDAY AT 9.30
tepublie Deuble - - -
| Sunset CARSON in - - ** KING OF
a 299
“DAYS OF BUFFALO 2 escaaraiied

with William WRIGHT and
Janet MARTIN

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY LAST TWO SHOWS 4.30 and 8.15
Twentieth Century Fox Double

Merle Oberon
George Saunders

BILL”

Wallace Beery
Jane Powel:

m

“THE LODGER”
MURDER DRAMA

in 2

‘<

MUSICAL

FRIDAY and SATURDAY 4.45 & 8.15
Yirst Instalment

SUNDAY and MONDAY 4.45 & 8.15

Pinal Instalment—Republic Serial

«“ ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN
MARVEL”

Starring...
TOM TYLER

=

og




'



THURSDAY, AUGUST

16,

1951



1 £

GARy,



Cuba Doubles Sugar



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

DF to the Seaside..... win Gueé

“Mum! That man's thrown all our toffee and oranges out of the window.”

Sales To U.K.

LONDON,

Cuba sold twice as much sugar to the United Kingdom
in the first five months of this year as in the corresponding
period of 1950, according to new figures just released by the
Cuban Sugar Stabilisation Institute, covering sales up to the

end of May.

The figures show Cuban exports to Britain

totalling 285,121 tons in this year’s five-month period, as
against 142,508 tons in the same period last year.



7,000 Sydney
Dockers Will Strike

SYDNEY, Aug. 15

Nearly 7,000 Sydney dockers to-
day decided to strike from to-
morrow until Monday in protest
against the suspension of 75 work-
ers who refused to work on the
midnight shift yesterday

New South Wales miners stop-
ped work today to hold. pithead
protests on the Government's re-
ferendum to outlaw the Commun-
ist Party

An executive said in a state-
ment that it regarded the suspen-
sions as a “savage sentence” The
men considered the conditions on
the midnight to dawn shift very
bad, and the shift as unnecessary
anyway .—U.P.

US Tightens Control
On Imports

WASHINGTON, Aug. 15.

The United States cracked down
Wednesday on imports of goods
from Communist China that are
“processed” in other countries to
escape U.S. embargo. The Treas-
ury Department’s customs Bureau
instructed collectors to block fur-
ther imports of any articles orig-
inating in Communist China or
North Korea, even if they passed
through another country where
the manufacture of the goods was
completed.

It yas learned that many of the
articles entering the U.S, under
the disguise of non-Communist
products were filtering through
Hong Kong. Macao and Italy. The
Treasury said that among. the
goods Which will be affected by
the crackdown ate Chinese fur
skins and straw braid.—U.P.

Fishermen See
. * os
Flying Missile
OSLO, Aug. 15.
Four fishermen in Northern
Norway reported yesterday they
had seen what appeared to be a
guided missile zoom over them
possibly “from across the Arctic.
Fishermen were besides a fjord
when the object shaped “like a
torpedo six to ten feet long with a
sharp point and steering fins
went over their heads at a height
of about 200 feet.





The missile disappeared over
a headland about half a mile
away.

They said there was a rattling
noi “like a tram car” as it passed
overhead, ; 1 :

The local officials are investigat-
ing.—U.P.





Greetings From U.S.

WASHINGTON, Aug. 14.

President Truman on Tuesday
sent the following message to
Kwaja Nazimuddin, Governor-
General of Pakistan, “the people
of the United States join in send-
ing to Your Excellency and to the
people of Pakistan the good wish-
es and felicitations on this na-

tional anniversary of Pakistan”.
—U-P.

COMMUNISTS FIGHT
FOR POWER IN ALBANIA

ROME, Aug. 14

Albanian refugees c.aimed a
serious fight for power broke out
within the Communist party in
Albania and Interior Minisict

Mehmet Shehu may replace Pre-
mier Enver Hodja, as the rea!
power there. They also reported
more than 10,000 Albanian “ku-
laks”—well-to-do peasants had
been imprisoned or sent to labour
camps because of their resistance
to Communist programmes

A newsletter said the Albanian
Communist party was shaken up
last spring but dissension in top
leadership still existed. It siid re-
lations between Hodja and Shehu







were sté y wor Rela-

tions ached tt t where

Shehu’s security t od

Stinok ‘ isits ‘i
—U.P.



Board of Trade returns, pub-
lished in London, put the figure
for this year even higher, with a

big rise in U.K, sugar imports
from Cuba in June. Over the
first six months of this year,

according to these figures, Britain



bought 355,375 tons of Cuban
sugar, including 159,216 tons in
June. These figures compare
with a total of 172,988 tons of
Cuban sugar in the first six
months of last year and 67,610
tons in June, 1950

B.W.I. Exports Drop

But the same statistics show a
big drop in British sugar imports
from the British West Indies.
Whereas the total for the British
West Indies was 205,913 tons in
the first six menths of last year,
it dropped to 147,387 tons in the
comparable period, of 1951. A
big increase in British imports
from Mauritius and smaller
increases in purchases from Aus-
tralia and British Guiana kept
the total from falling far below
last year’s, but still Britain
obtained only 459,134 tons of
sugar from Empire sources in the
first six months of 1951, as against
461,464 tons in the corresponding
period last year.

June figures show some im-
provement in the B.W.I. position,
with British imports up to 48,886
tons, as against 41,246 tons in
June, 1950. Corresponding fig-
ures for British Guiana, listed
separately, show that British
purchases rose from 4,173 tons
in June, 1950, to 5,219 tons in
June, 1951.

The whole of the
Britain’s sugar ration this year
has come from foreign sources,
the figures show. Imports from
foreign sources totalléd 657,655
tons in the six-month period. as
against 410,253 tons in the corres-

increase in

ponding period last year. June
imports from foreign sources
totalled 260,666 tons, as against
126,594 tons in June last year.

Apart from purchases from Cuba,
imports from San Domingo rose
from 237,183 tons in the first half
of 1950 to 282,291 tons in the first
six months of this year. Also
shown in the Board of Trade
figures are 6,271 tons from Puerto
Rico and 1,000 tons from Haiti.
—B.U P.

Tray Makes New
Oil Agrecments

BAGHDAD, August 13.

It was announced Monday that
Traq reached a new agreement
with three. foreign oil companies
with concessions in its fields
under which Iraq receives 50 per
cent of all profits.

The agreement signed with the
Iraq Petroleum Company, the
Basrah Petroleum Company and
the Mosul Petroleum Company
provides Iraq will get that share
of profits retroactively to the be-
ginning of this year.

Plans were also made for three
companies holding eoncessions in
Iraq to step Up production, From
1952 onward oil production is ex-
pected to reach about 30 million
tons annually with Iraq’s earning
about £59,000,000,

—U.P.



Reduced Imports
Will Cut Metal

WASHINGTON, Aug. 14
Reduced imports of tin may
eventually foree a cut in the
United States domestic consump-
tion of metal, but current alloca-
tion levels will probably be
maintained through 1951 2 high
official of the national productior
authority said on Tuesday He
said tin is now being allocated t



consumers at 90 per cent of the
normal annual consumption rate
cof about 65,000 tons. He said the
domestic production of some
import tonnage and withdrawal
from stockpiles are expected

permit N.P.A. to fulfill tin alloca-
tions at that rate through the

quarte 951.—U.P

Spanish N “ye
Essential

For Vocational Scholarships

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 13.

Knowledge of Spanish is no
Jonger necessary for candidates
applying for the Point IV scholar-
Ships to the Metropolitan Voca-
tional School at Rio Piedras,
Puerto Rico, Mr. Lawrence W.
Cramer, Secretary General of the
Caribbean Commission, told the
Press to-day.

Mr. Cramer said that he had
heard from Dr. Rafael Pico, Chair-
man of the Planning, Urbanising
and Zoning Board of Puerto Rico,
and a_ United States member otf
the Caribbean Commission, and
from the Director of the Point IV
Office of the Puerto Rico Training
Programme, Samuel E. Badillo,
to the effect that candidates will
be accepted, provided that they
speak and understand the English
language.

More Applications

Meanwhile, applications fot
these scholarships are being re-
ceived by Mr. Cramer. Thirty have
been received, of which number
five have already been granted.
It is hoped, Mr. Cramer said, that
students who have been reluctant
to apply beeause of the Spanish
language requirement, will now
avail themselves of this opportu-
nity, and get in touch with him
as soon as possible.

Under these scholarships, stu-
dents will enjoy free tuition at
the Metropolitan Vocational
School and will be granted, in
addition, $1,000 U.S., a year to
help meet their living and other
expenses.

The fields of training available
at the Metropolitan Vocational
School include: air conditioning,
automobile mechanics, baking, cab-
inet-making, drafting, electricity.
machine shop, printing, radio and
refrigeration. The duration of
these courses varies from one to
two years. The present scholar-
bhips are of one year duration,

but it is probable, Mr. Cremer
said, that students pursuing a
two-year course will be given

similar assistance during the sec-
ond year of their studies.

Hope Seen For
End Of Squabble

LIMA PERU, Aug. 14.
Diplomatic observers were hope-
ful on Tuesday that Ecuador and

Peru. may halt their latest
frontier squabble before the
incident becomes serious. These

impartial onlookers greeted with
signs of relief the request made
by Peru on Monday to the United
Stater, Brazil, Argentina and
Chile 1s mediating c~~ “tries that
they investigate the incident and
establish the responsibility fer it.
The Ecuadorean Government
charged that during the week-end
Peru launched a series of attacks
on Ecuadorean outposts along the
long disputed border, Peru coun-
tered that “drunken” Ecuadorean
troops had fired on Peruvian
watchposts and an Ecuadorean
plane strafed Peruvian troops.
—U-P,

Cotton Down
NEW YORK, Aug. 14.

Cotton prices gave ground per-
sistently after hesitant opening.
Finishing at a low level for the
session, the list showed losses of
22 to 28 points. The failure of the
Government weekly crop sum-
mary to particularly emphasize
the Texas drought © situation
brought a flood of liquidation by
recent buyers at the close. But
most of the offerings through the
session were coupled with hedging
cither against new crop beginnings
or additional purchases out of the
Government’s pooled stock The
weekly crop report said that while
the Texas heat and drought
“checked fruiting and develop-
ment,” they favoured weevil con-
trol.—U.P.





5,000 POUNDS OF FISH
DUMPED

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 13,

About 5,000 pounds of fish were
dumped in the sea over the week-

because



of fa cold stor-
Hous yes experi-
difficulty in getting

but things have got





Yugoslavia
Building Big
Power Station

By Helen Fisher.
JABLANICA, Yugoslavia,
Aug. 14

Ten thousand men and women
are toiling night and day, seven
days a week in this strategic
mountain valley to complete what
will be the second largest hydro-
electric power station in Europe
Exact figures have not been pub-
lished but Yugoslay planners
claim the station, due to start
operating in 1953, will be surpass
ed only by Russia’s monster Dyne-
prostroj in size and power

It will furnish power to towns
and industries throughout the
whole of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
The huge underground power
plant blasted out of solid rock in
the side of a towering cliff is al-
most completed and ready for (he
installation of machinery. The
tunnel which will bring watér to
six monster turbines (only three
will operate at the beginning) is
also near completion.—U.P.





3 Jets Collide:
Pilot Missing

VALETTA, Malta August 14.

An American pilot was reported
missing, after two United States
and one British jet fighter planes
collided, at high speed yesterday,
in the biggest manoeuvre ever
in the Mediterranean Sea.

One British and one American
pilot were rescued after the
crash, but no trace of the third
pilot was found despite intensive
search by the sea and air forces
of four Atlantic’ Pact nations,
testing the defences of the Atlan-
tic Army’s southern flank, The
missing pilot was not identified.

Meanwhile, the American con-
voy ploughed through the Medi-
terranean, hauling American
marines, scheduled to assault the
vital British island of Malta, and
blast a safe passage through the
Sicilian narrows for American
ships.

A broadcast message warned all
other ships and planes in the area
to keep clear of the planes and
warships of America, Britain,
France and Italy, massed for giant
exercise,

British naval aircraft blasted
the Ametican convoy with mock
torpedoes, rockets, and bombs, at
dawn to-day, in the wake of the
attack on Malta by American jets

yesterday, which caught many
defending British planes on the
ground,



POLISH OFFICERS
IMPRISONED

By Charles Ridley.

WARSAW, Poland, Aug. 13

Nine Polish officers were sen-
tenced to prison terms ranging
from ten years to life imprison-
ment on Monday on charges of
plotting to overthrow the Govern-
ment and spying for “Imperialist
powers.”

Four Generals were sentenced
to life imprisonment; three Colon-
els to 15 years; a Major to 12 years
and a one-time Lieutenant-Com
mander in the Navy to ten years,
One of the defendants was also
found guilty of co-operating with
Germans during the war—U.P

Dalai Lama Going
Back To Capital

LONDON, Aug. 14
The official Chinese Communist
news agency Said on Tuesday that



the Dalai Lama, spiritual leader
of Tibet has started back to the
capital at Lhassa after conferring
with Chinese representatives in
peer

ontier

rated I «
a bl UE U.P,

B.G. Threatens
To Retaliate

On Immigration

GEORGETOWN, B.G., August 13,

Trinidad’s drive to strip tne island of “prohibited immi-

grants” reported to be at present underway, may produce

repercussions in British Guiana, as is likely to be the case

regarding other West Indian islands, natives of whom may
be affected by Trinidad’s action.

i ‘Cuba Can’t
ee) Complain

WASHINGTON,

The United States should bear
in mind Cuba's action in increas-
ing her tariffs on U.S. made tex-
tiles from 100 per cent to 700 per
cent, sai@ Mr, John MeMillar
(Democrat, South Carolina), ad-
dressing a meeting of the Agricul















of Representatives, which is con
sidering new sugar purchasin;
policies.

“If Cuba feels she has the righ
to throttle our traditional trade ir
textiles,” he declared, “surely sh
cannot complain if the Unitec
States reserves the right to buy
sugar when and where it chooses
Cuba admits that the United State.
is the most important outlet for
its sugar. On the other hand, Cub:
seems to ignore the fact that Cub;
is the most important foreign
market for American rayons anc
the second most important marke
‘for American cotton goods.”

C.O.L. Increases

He pointed out that the highe
tariffs will mean big increases Ir
the cost of living for Cuban con-
umers, most of whom depend upo:
the sugar trade for a livelihood
He continued; “Cuban cane field
workers will be paying 60 per cem
more for their overalls and dun-
garees than highly-paid Americar
industrial workers.”

Referring to a statement by the
President of Cuba that Cuba wil
seek commercial agreements witt
European countries whereby those
nations may be extended certain
preferential rates hitherto re-
served exclusively for the Unitec
States, Mr. McMillan added: “We
have to make up somehow the
deficit in our goods created first,
by the high tariff rates just im-
posed on textiles, and second, by
the goods which Cuba intends to
buy from Europe which were pre-
viously bought from the United
States,” —B.U.P.

Committee Will Advise Govt
On Local Production

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 13.

A nine-man committee has
been appointed by the Minister o!
Agriculture and Lands, Hon. Vic-
tor Bryan, to advise Government
on the production of local vege-
tables, fish and animal products
with the idea of making the Colo-

London Express Service



Already in British Guiana
labour leaders are suggesting thai
retaliatory measures should be

taken by this Government, iif ®y a5 self-sufficient as possible
natives of this gountry living in} Thies is the first move by Govern-
Trinidad are affected by this} ment in its poliey of tackling the
move alleged to be aimed a ‘ising cost of living in a practical
easing ‘Trinidad’s housing, fooc ] manner. Mr, C. J. Muir wil, head
and unemployment situation the Committee

British Guiana has up to the =
present adopted rather an “open AR OU
road” policy regarding all West H B R LOG
Indian immigrants and according

to Trade Union Council Secretary
RB, Brentnoll Blackman “We

In Carlisle Bay












were informed by Government or M.V. Sedgefield, Yacht Marsaltese;
one occasion that we could not Sch. Cyril E. Smith, M.V. Antares,
make restrictive regulations on Sh. Mary aoe Pr Saline.
. . ty ch Initec igri sch ‘lorence
Te tea Emmanuel, Sch Philip H. Davidson,
inders Federati M.V. Velvet Lad/, Sch, Zita Wonita,
H at t di ration ou 1 MV. Daerwgod, Seh. Gardenia W.,
€ added that it is obvious from} § § Explerer, Sch, KEverdene, Seh,
the ty pe of action being taken by ; Wonderful Counseflor, — Seh MARISA
Trinidad that the reaction and} renee
repercussions : mia % Sch i/dia Adina S., Sch. Mandalay
epercussions would, to say fihe| 4." '§\s," Agamemnon, 8.8. Canadian
least, pot do anything to promote Challenger, M.V. Lady Joy
West Indian federation, ARRIVALS
i Pres mart of the British Guiana oe . "t nee + 4 = or:
s ssociati s Supt, raeant, fram Trinidad, ments:
Guiana tndustter Heke 7 bee OF! Senodher Owners’ Association,
ene stria orkers Union shooner Mandalay Il, 30 tons, Capt
Dr. J, P. Lachhmansingh declared | Grant, from St Vincent, Agents:
that British Guiana should stop] Schooner Owners’ Association
sending supplies o: ice t »! 8.8. Agamemnon, ¢ tons, Capt
; e supp tr © to Trini= | dimdiion, . trem. Amaterdagh, Agente
dad or insist on world market | hase. 3. ©. Midian, 8 & Co.. Lid
price $8, Canadian Chaile 35 tons
“I propose to raise the question | Capt. Anderson, trom " , Agents
of Trinidad’s kicking out of other Mosars Gardiner Austin & Co,, Ltd
ret / Rete ye ; jotor Vessel Lady Joy, 46 tons, Capt
West Indians and Guianese with Parsons, from St. Lucin, Agents: Messrs
the Trade Union Council and 1} Hanschell, Larsen & Co., Ltd
am sure the Council will throw DEPARTURES
its whole weight behind #ny Oil Tanker Inverrosa, 1,285 tana, Capt.
stand against this arbitrary action rr Vt a ho. wen —e
by socalled responsible people in Schooner Lindsyd Iv, 36 tons, Capt
Trinidad to brand others-in the] Barnes. for Fishing Banks, Agents:
Caribbean area who happen to| © heoner Owners’ Association
be in that island as prohibited S.S. Lady Rodney, 4,908 tons, Capt
immigrants a i ted) TeRlanc, for St. Vincent, Agents:
migran as a preliminary | Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co., Lid
move, and then to repatriate

In Touch with Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.,

them”, he said
It seerns certain that unless
Trinidad relaxes pressure will be









A

brotight to bear against Trini-| ®4v!se that they can now conmunicate
ans in this country the ee we Sant tee through their

: : Jarbado vast § ni-
7 ber of whom could not yet S.S. Trya, 8.S. Opequon, §.S. Yam-
@ jascertained.—(Cp) tii, S.S. Brazil, $.S. Adriatica, 8.8
Guscogne, S.S. Tindrs, S$ 8 Ocean
oe aeeeneneenrene Novigator, S.S. Agameranon, S.8. Alcoa
Id 2 Pioneer, 8.5. Argentinu, S.S. Fredrika,
§.S. Fort Amherst, $.S. Alabama/Fntp,
ad Oil Shares s.s Aleoa Planter, 8S oO
2 4 Rogenzes, S.S. Quilmes, $8. Alcoa
Ptnnant, S.S. Carina/Lmgp, 8.8. Tire.
Still Good Buy less, S.S. Carraibe, 8S. Alcon Corsair,
}.$. Golfito, SS. Helicon, $.S. Argobee,
LO C S.S. Esso Languedoc, 8.8. Isfonn, 9.8
Sharés a NDON, Aug. 9. Arizia, S.S. Willemstad/Pjet, | $.S
_ Shares in Trinidad Leaseholds| gonaid M. Schobie, S.S. Paparoa, 8.S
are still a good buy, in spite of| Delores, $.S. Gascony, S.S. Macoris,
the British Government's decision| 8-5. Roads, $$. Urania, $8 Capo
to restrict dividends, writes 9| chrmanciia, $3, "Lect yan, “8 8
correspondent of the London Fin-| Atheimere, '$.S. Pétter 2, 5.5. Whittier

ancial Times.
good on their own
writes, but also
potentialities of
incursion into the
produeing field, ,
For some years, the company
has operated a_ refinery neat
Toronto on oil shipped from
Trinidad, Recently, it has taken 9
small interest in the big Leduc
oilfield in Alberta, which may
well be the beginning of an im-

Not only Hills, 8.S. Axtell J. Byles, $.$. Kanan-
goora, §.S. Raban, 8.8, Afghandstan/
Ginj, 3.8 8 Teresa/Wdwe, SS.

American Eagle/Ktam

MAIL NOTICE

3.5 Golfito will be closed at
General Post Office as under

Parcel Mati at 10 a.m., Registered
Mail at 2 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at
2.20 p.m. on the 15th August, 1951

are they
merits, he
because of the
the company’s

Canadian oil-





the

!
Mails for Bermuda, St. John, N.B, 4.

Halifax, Quebec and Montreal by the
M.V, Canadian Challenger will be closed

: at the General Post Office as under:

portant expansion programme, Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at

“At any rate,” says this writer) 9%. Ordinary Maib at 10 # Mm, to-day
“it opens up possibilities for the} ‘th Aueust 1951
future whieh can hardly be} Mails for British Gufina by the Sen;
ignored by the long-term investor,] Frances W. Smith will be closed at the
whe ove z ‘ stte,,| General Post Office as under:—
t 7 eventually may do better Parcel Mat! and Kegistered Mail at
than, some spec ulatofs who have’ 1 a.m. Ordinary Mail at 12.15 p.m,
been rushing to buy Canadianjon Priday, 17th August 1951
shares with oil interests.” {

—B.U.P.



Bus Plunges Into y

Bottom Of Lake |

ITALIAN RIVIERA, Aug. 14. \
; Police and army. rescue teams |
began attempts to raise the wreck-
age of a tourist bus that plunged
into icy lake Resia in mountains
north of here last night with an
estimated 36 Italian and Swiss
men, women and children aboard

‘Only one person, a woman, es-
caped from the big Pullman which |
ettled on the bottom cf the lake





ture Committee of the U.S. House












PAGE THREF

After a tiring day

BOVRIL





When the long wearying day is over at last a cup of Bovril is
cheering and refreshing—Bovril’s beefy, energising goodness
banishes exhaustion and lassitude amd sets you up wonderfully.

REMEMBER, BOVRIL makes delicious sandwiches,
and improves all dishes.

nee



fo
EQUIP’ YOUR TRACTOR- DRAWB
AND, ANIMAL - DRAWN VEHICLES

Nau. IMPLEMENTS
wth

DUNLOP

FARM TYRES

WHEELS « HUBS « BRAKES

@ PERMIT GREATER
LOADS

e REDUCE FUEL
CONSUMPTION

@ ELIMINATE DAM-
AGE TO CROPS

@ PERMIT LOWER
LOADING LINE

e@ RUN SMOOTHLY
AND SILENTLY



t weer ~*~
A NEW TYRE DESERVES A NEW DUNLOP TUBE
4 "ase ae

DUNLOP RU ENGLAND



ca. LTo. BIRMINGHAM,



ACCESSORIES

RIBBED RUBBER MATTING
TYRE PRESSURE GAUGES

BATTERY HYDROMETER

SIMONIZ WAX & CLEANER

CHAMOIS

Qrt. Tins HYDRAULIC BRAKE FLUID

VALVE GRINDING COMPOUND

FLUXITE

GASKET CEMENT

BLACK TOP DRESSING

STEERING WHEEL COVERS

ELECTRICIAN PLIERS & SCREWDRIVERS

SPITFIRE LIGHTER FLUID

FRONT SPRINGS FOR FORD 8 HLP. & 10 ELP.
PRONT SPRINGS FOR MORRIS 8 HLP. & 10 ELP.
ENGINE VALVES FOR ALL MODELS ENGLISH CARS
DECARBONIZING GASKET SETS FOR ALL MAKES



ECKSTEIN Bros.

BAY

STREET





eas — SO
Bae SE j

NOTICE

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE ASKED TO NOTE THAT OUR
WORKSHOP AND SERVICING DEPARTMENTS WILL BE
CLOSED FROM MONDAY, 3RD. SEPTEMBER AND WILL
RE-OPEN AGAIN ON MONDAY, 17TH. SEPTEMBER, 1951, (
SO AS TO ENABLE OUR PERSONNEL TO HAVE THEIR {



45 feet below the surface.—U.P. ANNUAL LEAVE. }
Pl }
feurist Receipts | OUR GASOLINE, SPRAYPAINTING, PARTS AND
‘rom Our Own Corresponden f “ESS - 7 “NTS 7 . IPEN rOR
Ch ay oa ACCESSORIES DEPARTMENTS WILL BE OPEN 1
a U.S. dollar receipts at the} BUSINESS AS USUAL
Tourist Boards’ four centres for | }
he period January to July 1951 if cemntaainapinatemninastitions
totalled $93,440 compared Ww yi % . sie “ 5 pene
arc toe COURTESY GARAGE :
seas ie een tes toe a oe t WHITE PARK ROAD on DIAL 4616
i t 33,82 j
Januar » July and $3,729 ’
July j ~ — =








PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS #9) ADVOGATE.



|



= see Sey ve ‘Ysnasce) =e

Pripted by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown

Thursday, 16, 1951

SEAWELL

THE resolution for the sum of $1,000 to
meet the cost of preparing roads and
house sites at Seawell was defeated in the
House of Assembly on Tuesday. Public
regret in this matter will be greater be-
cause the rejection was based on an appar-
ent misunderstanding by the opponents of
the scheme

August



-

The Government had at its disposal
acres of land at Seawell and formulated a
scheme to lease it in four-acre lots. It
was intended to establish economic agri-
cultural holdings in that area and to en-
courage the initiation of a co-operative
tmovement between bona fide agricultur-
‘ists. The land was not to be let to people
following other callings.

The Opposition seemed to have been im-
bued with the idea that the Government
was attempting to establish another hous-
ing scheme by which it was proposed to
furnish house spots to people who wanted
to carry their houses there.

The merit of the scheme and the fact
that co-operatives were long over due in
Barbados did not weigh with the Opposi-
tion even although it was admitted by Mr.
Crawford that if the Government wanted
to initiate a co-operative scheme it should
do so, It did not even matter that the
Department of Agriculture was prepared
to give the scheme all possible support
and assistance by supplying modern
equipment for cultivation and advice by
the officers of the Department on the care
and rotation of crops.

The Opposition argued blindly that in-
asmuch as there was great land hunger
in this island, the land at Seawell should
be divided among as many people as pos-
sible whether or not they were economic
holdings.

It is true
people in this island not now in possession
of land, and who are anxious to acquire
small plots for housing, and it is also true
that there are not enough spots to accom-
modate all those who are now searching
for places to remove their houses. But
the majority of these are confined to St.
Michael; and one point which has been
overlooked is, that this problem, having
assumed the proportions causing the pres-
ent alarm,
of land settlement.

The two issues are @istinct even if
closely related. In one there is a need for
housing space. In the other there is a
need for economic agricultural holdings
where agriculturists can live and support
their families without having recourse to
other and supplementary forms of em-
ployment.

Above all this, the Government intended
to give a healthy lead to the establish-
ment of co-operatives in this island. An-
other means of introduction had already
failed. A Co-operative Officer had been
seconded for duty and trained in England,
legislation had been passed, and the
Director of Agriculture had even had
added to his already numerous duties
those of Registrar of Co-operatives. Still
nothing had been achieved. The Govern-
ment realising the necessity for and the
benefit of co-operatives now attempted to
launch such a scheme while giving oppor-
tunity to agriculturists to acquire lands
under lease.

The opponents of the scheme were under
the erroneous impression that it would
have been better to supply 20 odd people
with house spots than to give seven agri-
culturists an oportunity to cultivate eco-
nomic holdings and to launch an agricul-
tural co-operative scheme which might
have been followed by others,

It is singularly unfortunate that so valu-
able a scheme should have been lost
especially because of a misunderstanding
of the issues at stake. This does not how-
ever mean that this is the end of co-opera-
tives in Barbados or that the Government
will not formulate other proposals for
their establishment. Such schemes are too
valuable to the economy of this island to
be abandoned.



Local Food

To The Editor, The
SIR,—I read your
headed “Local Food”
ever make no
of arable acres
important point.
I cannot agree with the
agraph three of your
cane cultivation in favour of provision crops would
not affect the revenue. It generally agreed
that a sugar crop better paying proposition
but the production of food is essential
During the war period under the defence
tions, speaking from memory 30% of our
acreage was planted in provisions and one

Advocate
editorial of the
with great interest,

reference to the actual
at present planted

14th

which is
suggestion made in par-

is a



stock to every twenty acres had to be raised on
the plantations; this I understand, has now been
considerably reduced
Under the existing conditions I consider that the
acreage originally planted in food should be rein-
stated by government and strong measures bé
taken to see that the order made under the defence
regulations be trict] adhered too
PROGRESS
t 9.



B



Furniture



A

ARBADOS ADVOCATE

urnishings |
(1337—1901)



these
and

and

were
furniture
small objects
Bamboo and = pa-
tables covered with
and woolwork
jardiniers, plant

Victorian Exhibition at
with its reconstruc-
tion of a typical sitting-room
illustrates. the decay of taste
|which occurred during that age. pier mache
|With the Gothic revival an “age chenille cloths
| of darkness, both literally and jostled with

jculturally, was slowly creeping stands, sociables, conversation
|over domestic architecture, and chairs and love seats draped
it was fortunate that as the with anti-macassars. Pictures
illumination of good taste was crowded the walls; china plates
extinguished the material forms jn plush roundels vied with wa-
}of artificial illumination were tercolours and family photo-
greatly improved.” By 1851, graphs. The colours of fabrics
|when the Great Exhibition took were often crude, for brilliant
place, the elegance and grace of analine dyes tad taken the

The
the Museum

ty, cluttered
with massive

quantities of
photographs.

so



that there are hundreds of

can only be solved by a policy

inst.
you how-
percentage

the j see,

editorial that a reduction in
| free

regula-
arable

the Regency interior had almost place of softer vegetable dyes.
vanished. Together with Queen William Morris attempted in
Anne, Sheraton and Chippen- the last quarter of the century
dale, Regency furniture was to guide public taste to an im-
banished to the Servants’ Hal!) provement in design in Britain
lor the attic. In their place mas- His most successful production
|sive and monumental mahogany was his wall-paper, which sur-
land rosewood furniture was to vived his furniture and_ iron-
lbe found. work. An oriental touch was
The Exhibition of introduced in interior decoration in
{the taste that prevailed of chinese ginger-jars,
ito the close of the century. Satsuma ware and fans; furni-
| Furniture became clumsy, and ture became more frail as the
| the atmosphere of rooms frous- result of oriental inspiration.
|

1851 = set
almost the form







success for Mr.

Jane Graham





By SEFTON DELMER meant nothing less than the
Â¥ lifting of the Iron Curtain,

How far, I wonder, are mem- What in fact takes place un-
bers of the executive of the Na- der the auspices of ‘Progressive
tional Union of Mineworkers Tours” today is the exact re-
aware that they have allowed verse of any such sanguine ex-

themselves to become the stoog- pectations.

es in a major operation of Com- In London — all prospective
munist political warfare’ And tourists are carefully screened
all for the somewhat nebulous But Miss Graham, not even a

prospect of collecting a promised
£40,000 gift from Czechoslo-
vakia.
If they have any
I suggest they
have just done,
Jane Graham, of 105, Great
Russell-street, London, W.C.1.
Miss Graham is one of the
British tourists who have
returned from a fortnight’s holi-
day in Czechoslovakia. (Price
£37 10s., inclusive of fares and
everything, ) ;
Hers was the first of four
parties which are to visit Czech-
oslovakia this summer under the
auspices of the Communist-run *"
“Progressive Tours’ Travel of it
Agency, 2nd with the blessing “Tt
ot the National Union Mine- **ys
workers. arrived at

trade unionist, slipped through.

Many applicants are found
suitable and turned away
the information that the

are “already fully booked.”

As for travelling freely
Czechoslovakia, these touri
are given a bulk visa, said J
Graham,

“It was specially explained
us that this meant that we
to stick together in one party
our papers were not valid
we were just by

From the moment
they become objects
nist propaganda and

un-
with
tour

about
talk,

doubts
have a

it,
with Miss

as I





300
just

to
had

as
when
ourselves,”

they arrive
of Commu-
instruments



the evening,”
“when we
Marianske Lazne, the
Czech spa where we were told
we were going to have exactly
the same kind of holiday as or-
dinary Czech trades unionists.

“A brass band was waiting to
play us in. A _ party of Czech
youth brigadiers swarmed all
over us chanting ‘We want
peace.’ They pressed bunches of
fiowers on us and wrung our
hands. It was startling.”

late in
Graham,

was

of Miss

The Scheme
all

sounded fine
ago when

miners’
“Progres-
before his

No doubt it
and dandy 18 months
Arthur Horner, the
secretary, first put the
sive Tours” scheme
executive.

He had at last found a way,
he told them, of transferring to
Britain the £40,000 subscribed by
Czech miners for the victims of
the Whitehaven pit disaster in
Britain.

The “Progressive
agency, said Mr,
arrange trips to Czechoslovakia
But, instead of the money paid
by the British tourists being sent
to Czechoslovakia, it would re-
main here. And it would be used
to pay the outstanding £40,000
to the Cur:berland Avea branch
of the Miners’ Union,

Speeches

found
and

the
But
ng

adds: “I
of youths
station doing

week later

Miss Graham
the same party
maidens at the
same thing a
‘his time they were swarmi
cver a party of Germans.”

At every ‘meal they are sxt
jected to ptopaganda speeches—
often from Mrs. Pollitt, who, in
addition to explanations of what
they have seen and are going to

gives them little bulletins
world news.

“You will be
hear the = folloy
news,” said Mrs.
the third day cf the trip
items were \ work

5 £ in’ Laneashire truce
talks in Ka@song: and, a spe-
cial treat, the shootin: down of

Tours” travel
Horner, would

an



Screened of
interested u

ing items cf

Pollitt at lunch

Now, of uld
be more
British tourists

access to

nothing ct
desirable’ than that
should be given

Czechoslovakia,
and be allowed to travel around
it freely without prescribed itin-
eraries, and without having i

course,

rs’



as





head of

seven out of a ;roup cf
U.S. planes that bed flown
China.

terpreters and escorts imposed
on them by the authorities.
And, perhaps, that was what
members of the executive ant I
cipated when, enthusiastically, Nhe :
they gave comrade Horner au was a tribute
thority to proceed wit! “Pro- the screening
gressive Tours” cheme their feet and cre
If they then the

n amazir lack of



tion of

to th

reac





did, owed

pe No Surprise



on holiday there mean a neat
‘

A Victorian conversation chair.

close of the century

the vogue,

waist line which |
dominated furniture and wall dec-
cration, Waterlilies rose from the

floor covering walls and furniture
alike with their leaves anc

blossoms. Here and there a Jap-
anese print was to be seen.

‘Towards the
Art Nouveau became
with its high

time lag which existe
architecture in Britai
and the West Indies existed aiso |
in furniture and furnishings. This
time lag was accentuated as the
result of low price of sugar which
prevailed during the first quarter
of the 20th. century, Neither the

The
between

designs of William Morris, the
influence of “greenery yallery’
or of Art Nouveau appears to)

have hid the slightest influence on
Barbadian interiors. Little change
occured to oust the Victorian in-
terior here until the
style popularised by the Wembly
Exhibition 1924 and the Paris
Exhibition of 1 reached this
island in the thirties.







iss Jane Graham



| seace of the Cambridge Backs.

| is unimpressed;

modernistic |

THE MASTER

MO VES OUT

. M. Trevelyan (who made history a
aa goes into retirement with a

sigh for the human race.
By KENNETH TYNAN

ALMOST unobserved, the most eminent

| historian of our time has moved gently into|%
George Macaulay Trevelyan,|%

retirement.
OM, Honorary Litt. D. of two American and
five English universities, High Steward of

the Borough of Cambridge, Chancellor of|%

Durham University, and Master of Trinity
College, Cambridge, has decided, at 75, that

it is time to court a little oblivion.

From the Master’s Lodgings at the college
-o which, in 1893, he had come as under-
traduate, he has just moved his goods to a}
arge red-brick house in West Road, not a
nortar-board’s skim away from the formal
One of the
most private of public lives has ended.

Trevelyan is “sensational” only to his pub-
ishers, his English Social History has sold
nore than 410,000 copies in seven years a
‘ecord among history books which is
ipproached only by his great-uncle, Macau-

ay—and Macaulay, after all, has been in|
he field for more than a century.

TAX: £39,000

Confronted with such figures, Trevelyan}
he thinks the Social History |
ar from his best work. (It was first pub-

ished in the U.S.A. during the war; and of |

£42,000 which he earned from it £39,000
vas paid back
axes).

Early in his teens at Harrow, Trevelyan
letermined to become a historian; to him

history is a
; romantic busi-
ness, and it
still strikes
him as mir-
aculous that
>t her men,
iow dead,
worried and

throve where
we now walk.



‘This is the
|most familiar

1nd_= certain

‘act about THE SIFTER
life,” he has G. M. Trevelyan

Comes Bae
From Prague

Does what she saw and found out

Arthur Horne ?

was any sense of criticism amour

the British visitors. “It did no
seem to occur to anyone as pF
culiar,” said Miss Grabam, “tha
there were so few Czeen work-
ers staying at this spa, if, in fact
it was the Czech trades union-
ists’ Blackpool.

“One big recreation contr,
we visited—the Leningrad -.was
completely empty.”

Nor did anyone show

an)
the fae-
we



signs of surprise when
tories the party visited



ne

said, “but it is also the most poetical.”

In 1896 he took his First in history, fol-
| owed in 1898 by election to a Fellowship at
Trinity. Six years later he married ‘the

| lood of books appeared, including his three-
| volume study of Garibaldi and his History
jof England. In 1928 he returned to Cam-
| oridge as Regius Professor of History, a post
ae held until his appointment, in 1940, to the
Mastership of Trinity.

I have been to see him. He beckoned me
| nto the study, a lean, sagacious old eagle of |
}aman. He is bowed now, his neck grizzled
and creased. His skin, depressed with age,
‘'s wrinkled even on the ball of his thumb. |
He stoops sadly, standing as if one shoulder
iad been wrenched out of place.

FOOLS, BRUTES

nimself carefully into an armchair, and

crossed his heavy black boots. A tarnished











8 ’Phones: 4472 & 4678 — BECKWITH STORES §
| ‘ow $569S9SSSOS 99 OSS5S66G60%

in English and American)

second daughter of Mrs. Humphry Ward; a|\

THURSDAY, AUGUST. 18, 1951













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LIONIDE LEATHER CLOTH

IN A MEDIUM QUALITY



{

50 INCHES WIDE
| At $2.37 per Yard.
ALSO

BIRKMYRE GREEN CANVAS

72 INCHES WIDE
At $7.43 per Yard.

J GREEN WATER-PROOF CANVAS

72 INCHES WIDE

=

Wearing a severe indigo suit, he lowered |

| At $8.25 per Yard.



















either closed for the holidays (sc | tiepin tugged together the wings of his | e
that no workers were present) | 4), . : i. took hi
as at the glass factory in Kar- | collar, Authoritatively, he talked of trivi- | { DA COSTA fe co LID.
Lov Vary, or almost desertet ot | alities; momentarily amused, he would laugh i e
workers, as at the open-cas li : : . 2 :
mine in’ Sokolov and at the saw- | ™S high gasping laugh, incisive and delight- J DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT
mill in Marianske Lazne. led. The eyes were smoky and deepset, the, i
| * . A ‘ |
No one dreamed of suggesting | Voice biscuit-crisp. | ag
that the workers might have | | *
ae at tee ae a” ‘ne | I asked him, point-blank, the historians) 3 SOOO EPOOPOOEOS SSOP POPPE OOO
: or a > party | : : ‘ : 9” % x
should have no chance of talk- | classic question: “Is war unavoidable ? R
ing to any but the hand-pickea | r : * &
trades unionists presented ti His forehead shrank: “I end my career,”| < x
> : ¢ i . q . . : . > 1%
them by Mrs, Pollitt & Co. ie said, “with a somewhat less optimistic! Ny
Wha the Bryish party viaiven | view of the human race than when I began e 3s
a collective farm outside Mai'- eo ‘ a %
& tne Letne. nayone caked whai|it: D wish to God 'T thought mankind were | & %
had happened to the four Czech | less of a fool and a brute than it is.’ & x
farming families who had stayec s SPE ‘ E +
out of the collective when th: | 2, ‘ CIAL AUSTRALIAN FRESH V GETABLES »
other 27 in the district joined 2t. | Trevelyan is able to dignify such meagre | & CHEESE—73c. Ib. Kensitiston Grown %
Nor did anyone see fit to com- | platitudes. \? = "A RT t SRN a %
ment on the fact that many c | * £E Just arrived from x
the houses in the formerly Su-| His life-work has been to link us with our * Meni. Fon %
deten-German villages they saw | | ge Waste +
were being left empty and al-| Past, and he does not complain if his pains-|*- J > 9-01.00 0°35" \ OSG oa AUSTRALIA y
lowed to rot. taking anonymity of method is sometimes‘. 7% ‘= | PEARS ¢
mi hag Britisey” said Miss! mistaken for dullness. Men without preju- 3 Woe Soe she ses nor Ge a: | 8
Ste he ten canine nie jdices tend to have unmemorable personali- (7, he RAB RRA PEACHES %&
1 is n h 7 ao
orthodoxy of their views and in} ties, and Trevelyan is one of them. ~~ COCKTAIL SAUSAGES S %
the completeness of thelsbae . 3 ig COCKTAIL ONIONS APRICOTS %
thusiasm.” * CARR'S CHEESE TIT BITS pila ac JR ag as
ECCENTRIC? NO {| DANISH CHEESE x
Afterwards + LOBSTER Just arrived - - - x
; Ss CRAB x
Czechs ahve so far been re- In part, we trust him for his lack of col- |S PRUNES | FROM CANADA NS
ported as having paid £800 of our, He has never been the don of eccentrics} PEANUTS x
the £40,000 to the Whitehaven . |S. JACK STRAWS | +
fund. anecdote—like Dr. Buckland, of Christ S PATI DE FOIS GRAS | FROZEN SALMON 3
They could now well afford to Churct ; . ni ~. . | =
pay many times that amount for] ,_ ah, .Whd. 5VRe @ Seaeeee,, & Pen“ gy CANADA DEY GINGER | SMOKED HADDOCK x
the magnificent proganda they jackal and a monkey in his dining room, 1x ‘ALES | ~
are getting. j _.. | Trevelyan is a quiet and moderate sifter of %: GOLD BRAID RUM | FILLET OF SOLE x
Progressive Tours pare een te: the Haale at ohh ‘s hig |<} TOP NOTCH RUM " ae .
number two has just begun its ents; e receptacie of other mens Nis-)}, SMOKED KIPPERS s
trip. Two more will follow this | tories. ‘J 8
summer, * %
. < ‘ me ~
And es Mrs. “itarry Pollitt Dons of this kind cannot save the world; ys >
proudly aia “The men and wo-| but while they live in it, it is not wholly 2 %
men go thes rs to Czech- ‘ > : ¢ -
Bilseakia Vall ot honk ree lost. From their complex labours of refer-| ¥ x
ain id tell in schools, work-|ence and cross-reference, corroboration and % %
eee : ea ind mines! proof, we emerge as our descendants will) % a en — Sa 2S
It remains to be seen how many | know us i“ "@ %
ii tae wen ee Se St eae > PHONE GODDARD'S to-vay §
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED . s
at x
I —L.ES. 8 PIOSCSSS SS SSOS SO SOOSS SSS SOS OOO SSS 5SOSS999S 9999S
THURSDAY, AUGUST



1951



Labourers May

Get Land At Dodds

ABOUT five acres of land at Dodds Plantation may be

rented by Government to ]

Resolution to that effect was passed by the House of Asse

bly on Tuesday last.

Death By

Misadventure

EATH BY MISADVENTURE
was ‘the verdict returned by
a nine-man jury when the inquiry
into the death of McDonald Mapp,
a 76-year-old inmate of the St.
Michael's Almshouse was conclud-
ed at District “A” Police Court
yesterday.

The Coroner was Mr. C. L. Wal-
wyn Acting! Police Magistrate of
District “A”. Mapp met his death
when he fell over the gallery of



the Male Quarters at the St.
Michael’s Almshouse on August 3.
Dr. A. S, Cato who performed

the post mortem examination said
that the spine of the decease? was
fractured, but death was due to
pneumonia and the fracture of the
spine could have been caused by
a fall from a building.

Eliro Cox, a 67-year-old inmate
of the Almshouse said that on
August 3 about 2 p.m. he went
upstairs to the Male Quarters and
saw Mapp standing by a gallery.
Suddenly he heard a groan and
saw Mapp jump over the gallery
rail which is about three feet six
inches high.

He went to the gallery and saw
the body of Mapp lying in the
gutter below.

Nurse Sybil Haynes siid that
she was called by one of the in-
mates of the Almshouse on August
3 and saw the body of Mapp lying
in the gutter outside the Male
Department. His body was re-
moved by two patients.

Leotha Lawrence said that on
August 3 about 12 noon she saw
Mapp on the gallery of the Male
Quarters. While he was standing
there she noticed that he took of}
his shoes and placed one foot on
the rails of the gallery, Then he
fell into the gutter below.

R. G. B. GRIFFIVH, Acting
faa Police Magistrate of District
“B” Court, St. George, yesterday
fined James Bostic of St. George
$96 to be paid forthwith or in de-
fault three months’ imprisonment
with hard labour for having in his
possession a quantity of liquor
without a licence.

Mr. E. W. Barrow appeared on
behalf of Bostic who committed
the offence on June 6.

ENTENCE of six months’ im-

prisonment with hard labour
Was yesterday passed on Samuel
Alleyne of Maxwell, Christ Church
by Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting
Police Magistrate of Distriet “B’

for stealing a wrist watch, the
property of Mrs. J. Drew of
Welches, Christ Church.
Alleyne pleaded guilty. The
value of the watch is $48.
EMBERS of the Windward
.Cricket and Football. team

and the Queen’s College team of
British Guiana who are here to
take part in the Triangle Schools’
Tournament will be entertained
to-morrow night by the members
of Number Six Club of the Girls
Industrial Union at Queen's Park.

The Y.M.C.A. has also planned
other entertainments for the vis-
itors who will play cricket and
football and will take part in

omens against the local school-
DOYS,





SOVIET WAR
FACTORIES

@ From Page 1
West does have it, and fear that
it will be dropped on them.

“I never met anyone who had
heard a foreign broadcast. The
Russian workers with whom we
associated did not own radios,
They were too poor”. None of the
released prisoners had themselves
worked in war factories, but they
emphasised that many of their
fellow prisoners had. Most of
them had worked in Russian in-
dustrial factories including the
October Revolution Factory at
Odessa where they helped to con-
struct plows and tractors.

They said that they had lived
‘in a prisoner of war camp in
Odessa and were taken back and
forth to the factory under guard.

At the factory, however, they
worked next to Soviet citizens,
and most of them during their
years of captivity had learned
enough Russian to carry on a con-
versation,

In Goed Health

They were transferred to Kiev
and suddenly for no announced
reason they were segregated from
the Russians in factory work.

The men appeared in good
health and ‘said they were well

fed, Some were husky and tan-
ned.
They said there was a lot of

grumbling among Russian work-
ers who were dissatisfied with
their low wages and high prices,
They said many of the Russians
with whom they struck up friend-
ships had seen the West during
the war and expressed desires to
return.

The prisoners arrived in West-
ern Berlin on Monday night, and
spent several hours just among
the neon-lit streets of the batter-
ed city “window shopping”:

One said: “We just couldn't be-
lieve it could be so wonderful.
it was like stepping from hell into
heaven-’—U.P.



How Aladdin’s Lamp
won the Princess



rubbed the lamp a g
and grant his every v

was in





iful princess

abourers at the plantation. A

m-

The Addendum to the Resolu-
tion states that the Attorney for
Dodds Plantation has recommen-
ded the rental of small spots of
land om the Plantation to certain
of the labourers there at their
request. This practice is gener-
ally followed on privately owned
plantations to the mutual benefit
cf both sides. It provides the
plantation with a permanent
labour force whereas at present
Dodds Plantation is entirely
dependent on transient labour.

The Executive Committee
(Amendment) Act, 1951, author-
ises the Execytive Committee
with the approval of the Legisla-
ture to lease any lands which
they may possess.

This resolution is to seek the
necessary legislative approval.

The House of Assembly on
Tuesday passed a Resolution to
authorize the Government to
lease the Princess Alice Playing
Field to the Vestry of St.
Michael.



Board Of Health
Revoke ‘Animals’

Regulations

THE General Board of Health
yesterday revoked their regula-
tions dealing with the importation
of animals. This became necessary
because of the new Diseases Ani-
mals Ordinance which is similar
in character. The Department of
Agriculture having the services of
a qualified veterinary officer, will
be entrusted with the responsibil-
ity of ensuring the enforcement
of the regulations of that ordin-
ance.

The Director of Medical Ser-
vices yesterday explained to mem-
bers of the Board, the reason for
the revocation. He said that under
the present Public Health Act, the
Board had certain powers as re-
gards the importation of animals.

The new Diseases Animals Or-
dinance also had these powers,
and inorder to prevent dual

action by two authorities on the
same subject, it was now neces-
sary for the Board to revoke the
regulations they had, so that the
matter might be proceeded with
in the new Act. There was unani-
mous agreement

The Board approved the appli-
cation. for the divicing off of
133,543 sq. ft. of land in one lot
from an area of land at Workmans,
St. George, by Mr. S. J. Goodman.

The Board considered the appli-
cation for the division and sale of
Jand in lots at Porters, St. James,
by the executors of the estate of
S. Manning, deceased. They also
gave consideration to the altera-
tion of the approved plan by the
present owner Mr. W. D. Phelps, by
dividing off 307,400 sq. ft, from
10 acres 2 roods 24 1/6 perches of
land, the remainder of lot No. 4.

Decision on this application
was deferred, pending inspection
of the land by the Sanitation
Officer.

The application for the division
and sale of 3,792,230 sq. ft. of land
in lots at Mount Dacres Planta-
tion, St. Joseph, by Joes River
Sugar Estates Ltd., was consid-
ered, but decision was deferred
pending the receipt of more in-
formation about the roads.

Consideration was postponed as
regards an application for the
dividing and letting of 505,744 sq
ft. of land in lots at the Pine
Estate, St. Michael, by the Hous-
ing Board.



In The House
On Tuesday

The House rejected a Resolution
for $1,000 in connection with a
land setlement scheme at Seawell.

They passed:

A Resolution for $19,469 in con-
nection with the lighting of
Seawell runway. The money is
a revote

A Resolution to authorise the
Governor to enter into an agree-
ment with a person to serve in
the Department of Science and
Agriculture in the Office of Gov-
ernment Analyst, subject to the
conditions set out in the schedule

The amendments of the Leg-
islative’ Council to the Bill t
amend the Government Scho!-

arships and Exhibitions Act 1949

With minor amendment, the Bill
to amend the Income Tax Act,
1921.

A Resolution to make it lawhw
for the Vestry of Christ Church
to lease a pare 1 of land com
taining by admeasurement 1 acre
2 roods 10 perches, part of Kem
Plantation to the Government, fou
a period not exc ing twenty-
one years at a pepper corn rert
for the purpose of establishing a
Playing Field

A Resolution to authorise the
Governor to enter into am agreé-
ment with a person to serve in
the Department of Science and
Agriculture in the office of Gov-
ernment Analyst

A Resolution te authorize Gov-
about. five acres cf land to
labourers at Dodds, Plantation

A. Resolution to allthorize the
Government t6 lease the Princess
Alicé Playing Field to the Vestry







of St. Micha,!
A Bill (to authorise the Vestry
of St. Andrew tq borrow $6,000

to be applied in erecting suitable
quarters for the 'intursing staff at
the almshouse at Bellepiaine
With amendment, .«. Bijl to
amend the St. Lucy*’s (Barbades)
Loan Act 1949 (1950—6). ‘
The House adjourned
Tuesday next 3pm

uni
at



One day Aladdin asked the genii how he

could get the Princess to marry him
Here, Master,” said the genii, and hand-

ed him a package of Royal Pudding

HORSE



BARBADOS A

GUARDS PAR.

DVOCATE



ADE



Christie
Dis

Rev. Hoyte Gives

an Mission
pute Continues

Evidence Today

THE CASE for the plaintiffs Rev. Frederick A. Barrow

and others against Rev. Dalton Hoyte and others
Christian Mission Chancery

in the
yesterday



Suit, was closed

before His Lordship the Vice Chancellbr, Sir Allan Colly-

more,

Rev. Hoyte began to give evidence and will continue

when the Court sits again today.
The issue to be decided is who was the General Super

intendent of the Christian M

ission Church in 1949 and 1950

and who is the present General Superintendent

The dispute started in 1949
when Barrow and _ the _ others
wanted to have certain matters

made clear concerning the Mis-
sion and when Hoyte did not
attend a meeting when summon-
ed, another General Superinten-
dent was appointed,

Rev. Hoyte told how the church
key was snatched from shim by
one of the Rev. Barrow’s faction
on New Year Day, 1949.

Mr. G. H. Adams _ associated
with Mr. D. H. L. Ward, instruct-
ed by Carrington & Sealy for Rev
Hoyte and others, led questions
which tried chiefly to bring ou
that Rev. Hoyte did not attend
the meeting because he had beer
advised that the meeting was
illegal and not because he felt he

would have been injured if he
attended. He wanted to show
that Hoyte. wanted to get @#

proper meeting summoned.

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., asso-
ciated with Mr. J. S. B. Dear
instructed by Messrs. Hutchinson
and Banfield is appearing for
Frederick Barrow and the others.

Herald “Fades Out”

Another question to be disputed
is whether the going out of
existence of the Christian Mission
Herald which normally gave
notice of meetings for and
appointments of General Super-
intendents meant that the General
Superintendent whose election
was published last would con-
tinue to be General Superinten-
dent.

Answering questions from
cross-examination by Mr. Adams,
Rev. Larrier said that he could
not remember if Rev. Ramsay,
another plaintiff and go-between
when Hoyte would not attend tnr
meeting, had said that Hoyie
would not be coming because the
meeting was illegal.

The meeting was scheduled for
January 6, 1949. Rev. Hoyte was
notified by a representative from
overseas to call a_ meeting to
discuss his mal-administration
and for mortgaging the Christian
Mission,

“I”, Rev. Larrier said, “was a
representative sent from Panama
to enquire into the matter.”

On New Year’s Day mission-
aries came from abroad and went
to Hoyte’s office and he silenced

them. When he did this they
called a meeting to discuss the
wrongs. Notice was. served in
December.

“IT do not know,” Rev. Larrier
told Mr. Adams, ‘whether the
keys were snatched out of his

hands.
to me that day.
the keys were taken out
loek that day.”

Ammunition
Rev. Hoyte said that he was
informed from reliable sources
that the brethren had ammuni-
tion to injure him and that was

The keys were not give
I did hear that
of the



why he did not attend the
meeting which was held on
January 26. Up to then and

not until long after he had not

heard that Hoyte’s reason for

not coming to the meeting wes
because he was advised that it
was an illegal meeting.

At the meeting then the majori-
ty of the delegates were not absent
He was present at the meeting of
February at which the Board of
management purported to dismiss
Rev. Hoyte.

Sometime later Rev. Hoyte and
his Board petitioned the House of
Assembly. seeking that the law
be sot amended that they could
hold a proper meeting, That peti-
tion was behind the backs of some

f the Christian Mission body an






1 protest was made against his
ying to mortgage acain,
He got the delegates to attend

the meeting by summoning through
ihe churches, he said, He could
not remember how many churches
were on Hoyte’s side and how
many on his own. There was

S

The Princess had refused many suitors.
But when Aladdin offered her a dish of
Roy ried, “It's delicious!
lwilr promises to ser

me Roya r





delegate to every 25 members
Counter-Petition

To Mr. Reece, he said that his
Board counter-petitioned before
the case then going on was lodged
in the court. A Senior Superin-
tendent or an Assistant Super-
intendent was permitted to act

Rev. M, Ramsay who had
ready given evidence was
called so that he could be cros
examined as to Rev. Hoyte’
reason for not attending the meet-
ing.

To Mr. Adams he said that Rev
Hoyte told him he was not pit
pared to come to the General
election because of wrong. Up to
January 26, he did not know that

al-

re-

Hoyte’s reason for not attending
the meeting was because he wa

advised that the meeting w
illegally convened

He was appointed Acting Supe
intendent and he appointed a
Board to go into the rights and
wrongs of the matter betore they
could proceed with the othe:
meeting. After the 15tk when he
did net turn up, he met him after-
wards and told him that a con-
fidential friend had told him that
they had ammunition to injure
him, o

Mr. Adams at this stage read'a
notice appearing in the news-
paper before the 26th in which
Hoyte explained why a meeting
could not be held. Immediately
beneath that was Ramsay's notice
for the meeting

To Mr. Adams he said he could
net remember whether he cern
ec

at the newspaper which contain
his notice.

At the meeting they had 50
representatives from 21 of 23
churches out of 28.

Next to give evidence was Rew
Frederick Barrow, a member of
the Christian Mission for 57 years

who was ordained in 1941

Supt. In °45

He said that Rev Leon Hoyte,
Rev Dalton Hoyte’s father, was
General Superintendent in 1945.
He did not complete his year of
office because of illness, When
he was sick he requested ,six
of them to allow his son to finish
out his term of office, Four
agreed, but he did not agree

In 1946 Dalton Hoyte was ap-

pointed General Superintendent,
The Christian Mission Herald
went out of existence after
October 1946 when the last
issue was published

On the meeting of the 26th,

Ramsay was acting Superintend-
ent, Attempts were made to con-
tact Hoyte but he did not come.
“I was appointed General Super-

intendent for the ensuing year’
he said.
In 1950 Rev. Larrier was ap-

pointed and was again appointed

for this year.

To Mr. Adams he said that at
the meeting on the 15th it was de-
cided to summon everybody for th
next meeting. It was not men
tioned at that meeting that !
reason for not attending was be-
cause he was advised it was illegal

“I cannot remember the pro
portion as regards to those for

Hoyte and the others who att nd-
ed the meeting,” he said
On January 28, 1950, there was
a protest from different churches
Ex-police Sargeant Jones gave
evidence as to Rev. Larrier’s ap-



pointment in 1950 and 1951. He
was secretary. It was generally
known, he told Mr. Adams, that
the Mission’s press wa old t
Mr. Cole.
Last Witness

Dalton Hoyte, last to give evi-
dence yesterday, said he was fir
General Superintendent in 194
At that time the Christian Mission

Herald was functioning. The pres
had been bought second hand anré

awhen its condition was bad,





Yes,
They’re so rich and smooth. So nutritious,
too. 3 wonderful flavors: chocolate, va-

everyone loves Royse:

Puddings

nilla, and butterscotch. Try one today

oil

the

INTO London rolled a 20-ton

tank transporter—and on its
| back was B (in the Russian
alphabet that means V_ for

Vassily). Vassily came from
the Urals by way of Pyong
yang, North Korea, where
United Nation forces captured
him. He was put on parade
with 12 other pieces of Rus
sian equipment captured in
Korea. The public will be
able to see them for a week.
Vassily, built in 1935, is a 134
TEE standard Russian medium
tank and weighs 311, tons.



Can. Challenger
Brings Meat

THE Canadian Challenger,
which anchored in Carlisle Pay
yesterday morning, brought 311
carcasses of lamb, 38 b: 0

lamib legs, 147 packages of tr

roze.\
sundries 121 bags of boneless beet
64 sides of veal, 623 quart
beef, 130 carcasses of mutton
37 bags of beef tripe, nine b
of ox tongues and eight cart

of calf livers. This cargo was all
aranshipped at Trinided from th

S.S. Corinthine which brought i
from New Zealand.

Also arriving yesterday was the
S.S. Agamemnon which brought
groundnuts, chairs, cheese, pota-
toes, milkpowder, hams in tins,
traw hats, rolled oats and frozen
ducks, chickens and hens from
Amsterdam.

The rain delayed the unloading
of the Challenger and only a few
lighters were able to get
with cargo,

The Schooner
brought copra
In the hatches
Adina 8S. were
ind other items for the Gas
Company and colas, vanorising
il and storage tanks for DaCosta
& Co. Ltd The Motor
Lady Joy brought coal, cocoanut:
plaintains, honey, raw cocoanut
and fruit from St. Lucia

$10,000,000 LOAN

From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Aug. 15
British Guiana Government an-
nounced to-day the underwritir
of $10,464,000 initial issue’ of
$14,400,000 B.G, Development loan

shore

Mandalay
from St.
of the
coal

i
Vincent,

Lydia
in bulk

Vessel





commenced in U.K. to-day, The
loan i redeemable, in 1966—t8
and will bare three and a half pei
cent interest per annum The
Prospectus is being advertised in
London on Frida Application
for the loan will open and close
in London on Tuesday August 21

3oard met and decided that before
they lost everything, it would have
been better to sell it
“The Herald went out
tence,” he said, “because subscrip
tions to the magazine’ were
irregular. The position was reachec
when they had to take out of tn

of exis-

general funds from the church
He expressed his unwillingne
to continue running it at a loss

and it went out of publication, He
was elected in 1947

On New Year’s Day 1949 there
was to have been a service at 12
o'clock. When he arrived and pu
the key in the door, it was snatched
by one of the plaintiffs. A di
turbance was then caused,

Rev. Hoyte will continue to give





> saw

PAGF FIVI

TQ i > be
OYS ARRIVE
THE QUEEN’S COLLEGE team of Briti Gu
which will take part in the triangular schools tournamer
between Harrison College, Windward Islands a Quer
College, arrived here yesterday morning by the S.S. Cana.
dian Challenger.







DMS Talks To B.G. SCHOOLB

Pharmacists

The medical institutes of Barba
dos have developed magnificently
hoth from voluntary and Govern

































oo Suede ae . _ - en Arnold Gibbon cricket ¢ nd Arnold Gibbon
ny, ireetor of Medical Service gel, wt Pi =¢ t
told a group of chacracigt and ton: the, Aancere; “Ws " " ear os te _ ‘
their friends at Queen’s Park last extremely rough tip cron ” thl coe ee
night “These institutes give ex dad to: Barbedes. We encounper¢ eer
cellent service to the island and high winds and rough sea B Leroy Jackman, who is on the
I am glad to know that Govern- °aUse of the weather, the n " ericket team repre nted British
ment is interested in increasin; fo mo Seen ee sick.” ana against Jamaica earlier
the accommodation at the Genera pli steeple ip huang ET rary Lee, : her -
Hospital. More accommodation j; ‘i!! do well »gainst the Windward ie oF ae ta —" or inidad
1eeded and I hope a decision wil’ !slands and Harr son Coltege. The bi oni Ww ith’ a hockey team
be reached shortly,” he said ‘eam were only promoted to th rom B.G
Br. O'Mahony was g sale First, Divi A last year and th
ture on "eGovernniont tiedies rine ro eee eens ' Maurice “‘“Monkey” Moore, who
Institutes” as part of the Phar ; — ilso on the team, represented
macy Week programme Irving “Bud” Lee of ee i at the Caribbeqt
Dr, O'Mahony said: “All drug re football team *] Le a ee ee ee
gists should have a knowledge oi ason we won anh of the J 0 PEC een years ao piers
elr medical services.” Cups in British Guiana Thi: yer a er en airs ie on
7 t 1 1G fdodtb: tou NV *h
There are. four medical insti- N® team will play ainst P s x } a ots és SAdite 7 foes
tutes in the. island: the Generrc’ Ofice and Medical Sports Club gt inside left for the colony, but
Hospital, the Mental Hospital, th. ‘OF the Junior Cup. I feel that sor Queen's College, he will be at
Lazaretto and the Maternity Hos ur team will hold their own tre half. He has already met
pital gainst the Windward Island nd -nd defeated Loui Stoute, the
a Ph spirit of Bar Tennis and looking forward to
bedos is that attached to the Gen Last Tour me Stoute and other local
eral Hospital,” he said Lee, who is a Vice-Captain of player before he returns to B.G.
He said that in 1838 there wa e cricket team, is enjoying his °
such a thing as a Town Hall i st tour He will be leaving The team is staying at the
Bridgetown A public meetin ueen’s College this year for the Savoy Hotel, Bay Street. The tour
8 of nae Wear, the chakmaie ee aa College of the West opens this evening with a football
the then Lord Bishop of Barbado Rona Jacek ric ely Windw' S tgane : ee
é jacchus, Victor Ludo- and the Windward Islands at Har-
At this meeting a resolutio mm Of Queen’s College in 1950 vison College at 5.00 o’clock.
wat passed. It had two sectio 2" LRTI NORRIE he NAEP ERLE 6 AN TRIED,
which were (a) Due to 1 ey
altered conditions of the cor
munity it is absolutely an
urgently necessary that ther
should be an institute for th
treatment and care of the sic
poof, and (b) that public sul

scriptions should be advocated fo
the upkeep of this institute

On June 1, 18388 an act wa
passed incorporating a society f R

the care of the sick poor and j FOR a ed
Erovided for trustees that in wood FLOORS





cluded the President of the Legis
! tive Council, the Speaker of th
tHlouse of Assembly, the Attorne

AND FURNITURE



d Solicitor Generals and three
Vders Up to the time of th
opening of the General Hospit:
on July 4, 1844 they had col
‘ted $32,000 and Government
which became interested, pro
vided a large sum HYGIENIC WwW Xx
Dr. O'Mahony = said ae 4
rather interesting that they de
cided on the spot where th
present General Hospital stands
The building was there; it was
enclosed by a wall; it had abou
an acre of land, it was near the
sea; it was quiet and had a gooc
water supply. The property wa FOR BRIGHT ZS)
owned by the Earle of Carlisle and
what is now the main building HEALTHY HOMES
at the General Hospital was known |
as Carlisle House i
In 1844 the General Hospitai

could only accommodate 77, Be
tween 1844 and 1858 an intereptin
development took place Gov-
ernment was particularly — in-
terested in sick seamen It gave
special grant for the enla
ment of the Hospital to accom-
modate sick seamen, “Govern-
ment gave well during the course
of years to the building develop-
ment ef the General Hospital”, he
In 1869 it apportioned grant
were frequent—sometime:
yearly. Between 1869-7:
the development of specia
quarters of the matron and non O———————————————————
wards were built By 1918 the |
Hospital had 232 beds. Later th :
Tercentenary Ward Pay War
A and the Nurses Home wer
built Then came the V.D. Clini
in which the Women’s Social Wel
fare League played a eat pat
Today the Hospital has 326 bed
with 10 infant cots Betwee
1945-46 7,500 cases were admitter
Lost year 9,500 cases were
mitted and 75,000 people pa
through the doors to the crsualt
ind out patients departments, Th
Hospital has all services, includin
the casualty with a 24 hour pé
eoy service Approximately 90°
ef the are free and tt
charges made for the Tercentenars
ind Pay Ward are reasonable



a

paid
which
twice







“~

n~
=
=
S
=
2
~
=
=
>
=
=



ad

1 WROTE

ser

oR IT”? (
i &

services



Death From Skies







NIGHTS LTD
s id, ‘ 4 °

It's odd how one simple actior brir ich long-lasting
Many and many a woman, hearing & e modern minded friend praising
. 7 a ” . ‘ ' r ing diff ence in her
TEHERAN, 7 f ‘aumpax, has sent for a sample, and fou izing
N TEHERAN, Aug: 16 life, Undreamed of comfort, Simplicity in use Buc nendous ad-
Newspapers reported on Wednes- vantages over old-fashioned method And ch security!
cay that meteorites poured down
from the skies near Shiraz ou Sanitary Protection Worn Internally
Monday destroying 62 houses | TAMPAX K















evidence to-day when the case hilling 12 and injuring 19 person:
continues. ; Ue. DISTRIBUTORS
ROUND-WORLD BOY a2nSinah @ @ eee as
x Fi. a INSIST ON wi
IS LEARNING YOGA
2 PURINA CHows *
He Has Saved £100 le 4 ° Pa
| ‘
HIS mother and father are up- clean the radar mast in’ the | THEY ARE THE BEST
set about it, but on September Navy,” he says
16 young William Gill, of King And his final word I want | a ere a
: y Avenue, Kettering, sets off on learn all about Yoga first-har \
is life’s ambition—to hitch-hike in India, and find some ideal plac
ound the world and learn about | can go back to and settle whe iA H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. = Agents a
Yoga. the trip is over.’ i
William is 22, has everything L.ES ‘a a Bw Gad i @ | a 6a a a &
arranged. He has been ingcu- , tain oso
lated and _ vaccinated against | -
phus, typhoid, smallpox, yellow}}
fever and cholera, and had at |
X-ray,
He says I had a dummy- E
in a year ago when I spen
i fortnight hitch-hiking aroun,
E pe for £12,’
This trip he will take £100, z i.
icksack leeping bag, cooking H
kit, and a few clothes, The jour-
ney will la t two years
Adventure? No ”
His route will be across Europe WONDERFUL VALUE
Persia, India, Tibet, Burma,
‘iam, Sumatra, Australia, New ™
Zealand, Japan, and then the

American continent from north to









outh, stm
Adventure? That's not how
ok at it,” William says. “I am
King this trip as an education
Preparations have cost £50
cost two guineas, He
think inoculations will be
sovered by the Health Service
Money for the trip has been
aved since William swapped a
£4-a-week clerking job to go
tee! erecting which brings him
£10 to £11 a week,
A spot to settle in
it tough at first, but I am
C he t I ha





72x90 —$14.50 ea.
72x54 — $7.50 ea.
52x52 — $5.11 ea

DRESSING
TABLE
SETS

at $1.55 Set

RUNNERS — 15x45 — 1.85 ea.
OVALS, ROUNDS & SQUARES
at 84c.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

10, 11, 12, 13, Broad Street














BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 1951





BY CARL ANDERSON









LONOON



SEND YOUR



;
=.

herri ngs



> 646 < 666666666 OCCOOY
OOOO PO SSE OPES PDGF LIFES EIS FES SPILL

\ “ey FRESH orin ! ORDERS:
7 _—~_. TOMATO SAUCE §
Vay ‘oo z : T O 5
co a rer Li %

: s ¥

* ADVOCATE §

ie >

| xs x

< PRINTERY

§

S DIAL 2620 &




BY CHIC YOUNG

s
4,569 69 C966 OSS OOOO COS
a

PLL LL LL FLIES LDIF




dah alae Say at Nt mtv ttt ttt iva tm nie ee
] {ities oe ee ed

j

Hi

‘
8?

'§ TO-DAYS NEWS PLASH
book

Man
st




PRERRAS SO





mene ene tit

SEED OI IIIT



a 2

z a eeee i
z a opened at %
3 JOHNSON'S HARDWARI %
5

R, OOS nonin nite












ated OS
THE LONE RANGER





# Si i 8 ae = SSE :
BY FRANK STRIKER | “ AL H fs RE
, SPECIAL o



“TONTO. WHEN COLONEL WADE GOES THERE oy
WITH THE SOLDIERS, HE WILL CAPTURE A aROXs @ ieee a \
SCORE OF MEN WANTED - JOB! ;

MIOB ffers to all Cash and!














he Usually Now Usually NOW
PEEK FREAN'S CREAM BISCUITS ONIONS 4 lbs. for 80 60

any two packets for 102 b0
EVAPORATED MILK (2 tins) 58 52 POTATOES Glbs for 96 42

BEER HEINEKENS 26 28 CHEESE 73 «65












LL LEAVE THE AH! FOUR HOURS HAVE | WHEN IT COMES TO
CARPET BEATER PASGED -HE DIDN'T COME MAKIN’ A PLACE TO
RIGHT BY THIG IN-I GUESS HE SAW TH! SLEEP -HE'S A GENIUS!
od. ~ RUG=- JUST THE RUG AN’ BEATER-
BSS) SuScESTION OF ALL RIGHT--I'LL (__, 4 yh SQ f
: VILL 6 - 5 oe 4 SSS =>
{ i ps3 1D yeas At oe BRING IT IN NOW +h ve . f A — oS







1) {9} BROTHER AWAY-
a4 :



|
IMPERIAL LEATHER © LINDEN BLOSSOM e__ BLUE HYACINTIt
sere th il a ne ecm eee Sah cee aa
ess AH, NO, DEAR CABLE...
Se] | BOT YOU DO THEM MORE
~}f OH, TNL... YOU'RE S44 | JUSTICE THAN SOME
7 JUST BLINDED BY THE DUMMY IN A NORSE
\ BRILLIANCE OF YOUR...
GIFTS /









UH-UH...GOMETHING TELLS
ME THAT THAT “OPERATION CUPID” J
BOPES NO GOOD FOR HAZARD.’

WHY, T.N.T. ... YOU
GAY THE NICEGT










ARR, GABLE EVEN \
THE MOON iS SHAMED
BY YOUR BEAUTY









Fly to Britain in Festival Year ! |

BY B.0.A.C, CONSTELLATION 5
IN CONJUNCTION WITH B.W.LA.
Get There Sooner! Stay There Longer!





STA

| TOUGH YOUNG
ue \ DOES Know so

NG.
\ YOu'LL HAVE TO GET
tT OUT OF HIM,
RiP!

/









> manne }
From B'dos to Fiying Time Flights Return Fare
Weekly



i | B.W.L $

y B ermuda | 17.10 hours 2 649.80 |
OF THE CHAUFFEUR Lisbon | 33.25 ,, P | 1,396.80 ;

WHO DROVE MRS. CARSTAIRS London | 37.25 » | 4 t+ 4474200 =f

HOME FROM DINNER THAT ~ le cates a
NIGHT... IT WAS ; . ~eting Services , ,

JEFF KING/ Also Connecting Services to the Whole World. ee



wise

NJOW’S the time for this young
~ “ man to learn the safe, gentle
way to Inner Cleanliness! A glass
of sparkling “‘fizzy’’ Andrews is
a delightfully refreshing drink.




CA PRs ere YP eee nin akc a 2 Dee! pop baeet” mv Same F More important still, however,
THE PHANTOM it ensures everyday good health

by cleaning the mouth, settling
the stomach and toning up the
liver. Finally, Andrews gantly
clears the bowels.



/OU'RE THE TIGER GIRL« RAISED BY TIACKED BY THE PLAYMATE! ty 7 iy? Ts Vae* 1 |
( ad oo j =
Oey ee -
ee! Sa A Se “? J ° : |
eS ae IRN Tie
sZ3 » is, ve ND \F \ f [A Ke Aa \
| QE ES ea mma |
| = ia LUGE ar | :
i , a } >,
fi BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION | i
i BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED }| || LIVER SALT
: PLANTATION BUILDING, LOWER BR CAD ST. PHONE 4585 | Pid Sure b

WHESIDEAL:» FORM *=OF! LAXATIVE

Fa ETL PRA OE EY TPS




be.
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES Ir F

[
    __ PUBLICITY SCHEME FORTEAN. eas FNS A PLAYMATE| |WAITING TO SNAP THE "TIGER GIRL” Hy I
    | Just a teaspoonful in a glass of
    | cold water and here’s an excit-
    ing, sparkling drink — here’s

    the way to Inner Cleanliness !












    eee ee

    THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 1951



    CLASSIFIED ADS.

















































    BARBADOS

    LS Le

    PUBLIC SALES FOR RENT













































    ADVOCATE
    TAKE NOTICE




















    PAGE SEVFY

    ——

    SHIPPING NOTIC”















































    Minimum charge week 72 cents and
    TELEPHONE 2508 Ten cents per agite line on week-days} 96 cents Su"days 24 words — over 24
    Crtelnaiecnaiee me @nd 12 cents per agete line on Sundays, ,; “ords 3 cents a word week—4 cents a = |e ee a
    3 minimum charge $1.50 on week-days| word on Sundays; | MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, |
    For Births, M4rriage or Engagement FOR SALE and $1.80 on Sundays, NEW ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED. SS a SOE
    announcements in Carib, Calling the —— ee That GENERAL FOO " i (M.AN.Z,) |
    charge % $3.00 for any number of #vords sa REAL ESTATE vise tak tater Of tae Sie ae ee a corporation organized and existing] ss. “PORT FAIRY” is scheduled to THE MV. “MONTK\
    up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each Minimum charge week 72 cents and tp ieainaans _! HOUSES isiness address is 250 Park Ateae ss ae of Americ B. wix trade or | sail from Hobart June 28th. Bowen July Will accept Cargo and | }
    additional word, Terms cash. Phone 2506| 96 cents Sutdays 24 words — over 24| LAND-S443 sq. ft. situate at Ponce| America, Manufacturers, has applied for an pcan fork: United States of | 12th, Mackay July 20th, Brisbane July for Dominica, Antigua
    between 830 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death| Words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a) of Wales Road, Bank Hall, suitable for] oA Of Rewister in respect of cereal foods, and will be entitied ta egies part | sist. Sydney “August 4th, Melbourne | errat, Nevis, St. Kitts
    Netiees only after 4 p.m word on Sundays; the erection of a Bungalow, Apply:| CLIFTON TEI maeaie after one month from the 16h day of August 196l) unless ae a the son | August 11th, arriving at Trinidad Sep Friday 17th. wrepEt
    | A. P. BROME, Brittons Hill. Dial aio » ERR/ -—To an approved/ in the meantime giv * 2 naam bih 1 — erson shal) tember 8th, and Barbados September THE MY. “
    | ; 5 tena ‘ ee a @ notice in duplicate to me at fice of op t of suc? o 4 7 ys
    ‘eee oe qenconcynints e j 15.8. 51—4n Cemosite Yockt tng sia eee, Bee in reeieasian The trade mark can be seen on "paepiiontldet at my p's se contig neg ~ paiieton tw wer 1 thi ay ae ai eae. {
    urths, . aths cknow!l- penile 7 ted this 8th day of August 1951. nh addition to general cargo , rec )
    @dgments, and In Memoriam notices is UTO modern conveniences Apply on premises. , » vessel has ample space for chilled anc inica : tt
    @:.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays A MOTIVE OR EXCHANGE_Ower fine Home §.8.51—t£n. Registrar - eae ret: hard: Oem Caren | ts i
    for any number of words up to 50, and | convenient, Government Hiil area. Em-| FARWIN—Maxwell } 16.8 Sac | eee gerne on through | Bile “ot a .
    & cents per word on week-days and) CAR--1949 Kaiser Saloon done only 5,500| Wnently suitable largish family, obliged | Septembe. et Road, from, Ist —— ———————___--_-_ ee Lentee =~ trenanininent at Trinidad to M ¥, D er onr 2
    4 cents per word on Sundays for each| Milks in A-1 condition FORT ROYAL | ©X¢hange smaller place preferably on| ardvene Plante pe Bae rarmet: ritish Guiana, Leeward and Windward cept Cargo and Passengers
    ditional word. iGA 5E Tele rt “ lsea or s@ll co: - ; fndrews Plantation Phone 95267 Islands, | Luc Grenada, Arub
    ad RAGE LTD. Telephone 4504 st price. Exceptional and NOT R
    ni 1G ity 16.8.51—4n For further particu apply Passengers or for St. Vincent
    6.8,01-08 (ios deal” Gert “bent” Seen ns — { FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD | ing date to be notified
    _ | ou: ea ect private artie; > > oo ee: _ . a oe “ee ci
    CAR—Morris {. 1947 Model in good | through responsible Agents Ping 2395 base ee Spa re eee new) TREND, | LW. 8, SOOONEEs Een
    ANNOUNCEMENTS working order, tyres very good. Dial| ®fter 3 p.m. daily, © 11.8.51—12n. | gego or eee eG oe ry ore a 7
    4253 E 16.5. 51—3n —_ es ‘ tin and co No. 4047
    — ¥ ARS eens DA COSTA & CO. LTD, |
    oe ws "| “ROOSEVELT” —Maxwell © Roa .
    ce ARK 10 Fiat 18h B avery goed | AUCTION dull? Surnishaa——Prinigete Const Read BARBADOS,
    . on. easonable . edford Cot-/ —_. rte 3. s ¥
    ALL THIS GREAT HELP tege Bedford Ave. (Phone 4894, 7 am. | es | NEC eon sta-bathing. Available from ‘ sik hill sidoetiac tidal -ldapeammanesi ee $$ __—__—_——
    from ASPRO. Colds and ‘flu dispelled| 4 pm.) 6 8 binen | UNDER THE SILVER St October, Phone 22% .
    headaches cleared-soothing swift relief} ——H__ ad = whee 16.8.51—3n | e >
    from Rheumatic and Neuralgic Pains MOTOR CYCLE - 1% hp. BS.A HAMMER Ae | “O.
    Nerviness Sleeplessness. Let ASPRO! good as new; done only 1700 mice DC. SUGAR SELBY HASTINGS—4 bedrooms, 3 with | '*
    come to your aid NOW! --8.8.51—10n. | Gwner buying bigger Cycle. Telephone By recommendation of Lioyds Agents Onkn water, all modefn conveniences. ,
    ee H. O. Ramsey, Jnr., — 3891 we will sell on FRIDAY the 17th 102| \" urnished. Available ist September
    MADE to measure within day if 15.8.51—4n Begs Dark Crystal Sugar commencing at Apply on premises between 4 p.m. and |
    necessary Shirts, Pyjamas, Pants, Shorts, | «—. : 30 o'clock at the following Ware-|% P:™. everyday. 16.8.51—5n | FLL.
    & Ladies’ Slacks. Guaranteed fit and STATION WAGGON 1951 H ouses :— a —— {
    , ; > ill aes SUNSET",
    Workmanship pno¥ AL STORE, No. 12| Station Waggon. First Registered April, es, Traders as - Roebuck St Pere 7 ap ORAS * | NEW YORK SERVIC
    e Pa 2 * 3 : . + for st a | se . ‘ . 51
    -gashbetomph alot cas) ee pita Wit ee aon Rew price $2,150. | head. rm eld, Steel Bldg: Pier-| seniember only. Furnished 8.8. TRYA sails 20th July Arrives Barbado t July, 1951.
    ve e 5 wher purchasin f , That © IN \ STEAMER, sails 10 gus Arrives Ba nist August, 195
    a - ————— | larger vehicle. Apply Ralph Bani . S. P. Musson Son.& CO. — Bridge | YEARWOOD & BOYCE, the State ae Re ENTAL FOODS, IWC., a corporation organized under the laws ot | oa sells 0th August , aie
    HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—Isle of} Lower Bay Street 15.8.51—8n. | app pale, 12.30 o'clock — Terms CASH James Street. s 1800 Hudson Benet United States of America, whose trade or business address | Pee reece “4
    Spices. SANTA M.\RIA- joveliest ote} | ——___ BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. | _ #-@-01—8-2.0.| turers, has anpiied te Se ekeane TE: United Staves of America, ‘Manutac NEW ORLEANS SERVICE i
    . m , SERS: | ve, : ion of a trade mark In Part “A” of Register in | $.S. GENERAL ARTIGAS sails 18th July Arrives Barbadc Mist Juls Si
    per day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi- ELE Auctioneers hie en the Sea, St. Lawrence. | 10 tanbite fooderatte, including soups and ingredients of soups, and will be entitle, | A STRAMER sails Ist August Arrives Barbados 1th A t
    Gential district under Government House CTRICAL ully furnished. Dial ‘ ' Ster the same after one month from the 16th day of August 1951, unless | A STE : 5 pus Arrives ados 29th August, 1951
    : | 16.8.51—3n ome person shall 3 & nie A STEAMER sails 1Sth August
    bill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day. 14.7 51.—t fn. | Onsale all in the meantime give notice im duplicate to me at my office o2 raperareemesisasnin enine
    SEASIDE INN—On Grana Anse Bathing sraieeien tannin rf on of such registration, The trade mark can be seen on application at my CANADIAN SERVICE
    ach. ates from J per head per a y S. Just recei ss
    day, Enquiries to D. M. Slinger, Grenada | Oprim Electric Ironing Machines, “se | Dated this 8th day of August 1951. ‘SOUTHBOUND
    26.6.51—78n, | Sheets, Shirts, Collars, Dresses etc. The e HW. WILLIAMS, Name of Ship Sails Montreal Salis Halifax Arrives Barbados
    complete home Ironer. Dial 3878, Da - | Registrar of ‘Trade Marks
    PYE RADIO CATALOGUES: Clearly | Costa & Co., Ltd., Electrical Dept ] 16.8. 51~-an SS. “ALCOA PARTNER" August Sra August 6tt August 16th
    illustrated colourful leaflets describing! 12 8 51.—6n. tt _ — 8.8. ALCOA PILGRIM . August Mth August 271) September 6t!
    cach of the new 1951—52 Pye Radios ' $.S. ALCOA PEGASUS September Tih September 10th September X
    fia sadioutartophonee. wit be. iullca;, FRCERIC SEWING MACHINES CHANCERY SALE oe .
    to you without obligation, for the, The all Electric Machine that makes Sew- BARBADOS. VORTHBOUND
    asking. No salesman will call, Maii a|'%% and Darning easy Dial 3878. Da/| Th . S.S. ALCOA PEGASUS due Barbados August 16th for St. Lawrence
    card to PYE LIMITED P.O. BOX 260 | Costa & Co., Ltd., Electrical Dept | punt a Seeementiqnsd property will be set up for sale at the Registration Office, River Port
    Bridgetown 15,8.51—3n. | 12.8.51—6n | de - uildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and or ee
    e date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding These vessels have limited passenger accomodation



    PUBLIC NOTICES

    Ten cents per agate line on week-dau?
    and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
    minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
    and $1.80 on Sundays,

    bulbs a full range at General Hardware
    Supplies, Rickett Street. Dial 4918
    14.8. 51—3n

    FURNITURE

    OFFICE CHAIRS: Just received a
    shipment of Office Posture Chairs with
    three point adjustment. See them today
    ai T. Geddes Grant Ltd., or Dial 4442.
    2.8.51—t.f.n.

    MECHANICAL z

    NOTICE

    Neither the Master nor the Consignees
    oi the Motor Vessel “VELVET LADY”
    are responsible for any debt or debts con-
    tracted by the crew during her stay in
    this Port







    MANNING & CO., LTD
    16.8.51-—8n

    LOST & FOUND

    Roberts Steel Sack Trucks and Trol-
    leys, also Spare Wheels and Tyres.
    Trolleys $80.00, Trucks $48.00 and $36.00

    S. P. MUSSON SON & Co. Lid
    Dial 3713, 9.8.51—Tn

    MISCELLANEOUS

    CAMERA—Kodak 35, As New, price
    one hundred dollars. Fitt, Knights Ltd
    City Pharmacy. 11.8.51—T F N

    ————
    ENAMEL WARE at competitive prices
    at General Hardware Supplies, Rickett







    LOST





    outside
    offered

    GLASSES.
    Government

    Pair of
    building

    Glasses,
    Reward





    Lynch, Cottle Catford 15.8,51—2n. | Street. Dial 4918. 14.8,51—3n
    EARTHENWARE, dishes, plates, cups, |
    bowls etc., at General Hardware Sup- |
    TAKE NOTICE plies, Rickett Street. Dial 4918 |
    14,8,51—3n.

    GALV. BUCKETS 10” $1.00 each, 11’



    and 12 $1.20 each, These are at special |
    Pp OS T prices’ at Ralph Beard’s, Lower Baj |
    Street. 15.8.51—3n



    GALVANISED SHEETS. New 24 gauge

    TOASTIES



    6ft $4.68 each 7ft $5.44 each &ft

    $8.21 each. At Ralph Beard, Lower Bay

    That GENERAL FOODS CORPORA- | Street 15,8.51—3n
    TION, a corporation organized and | ———————————————————————
    existing under the laws of the State of MILNERS Wall Safes and Steel Office
    aware, United States of America,| Equipment — comprising Desks, Filing
    whose trade or business address is 250] Cabinets, Stationery and Pigeon Hole
    Park Avenue, New York, New York,| Cabinets, Cash Boxes, Plan Files for

    Architects, Card Index Cabinets, Waste-
    peper Baskets, Letter Trays ete

    S. P. MUSSON SON & Co. Ltd.
    Dial—3713 9.8.51—Tn,

    ———
    RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing

    United States of America, Manufacturers,
    has applied for the registration of a
    trade mark in Part “A" of Register in
    respect of cereal foods, and will be en-
    titled to register. the same after one
    month from the 16th day of

    —
    ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIFS, wire and

    By BEVERLEY BAXTER

    | SOMEONE, probably Dr, John-

    Supreme Court of Ontario, who
    — wrote to an old friend: “Afterfhas come to hear Chancellor
    orty years of deep friendship 1] Gaitskell’s variations on an old
    }am as fond of you as a new] theme,
    | acquaintance.” Th
    | e judge, who was _badl
    a In ried = vd days, as July{wounded in the first war, is :
    ;Has raced towards its final hours,}yreat authority 3 i
    ty awe cee y On Shakespeare,

    | " sO many friends,
    acquaintances, and new faces that
    |memory becomes blurred.

    IN time everyone comes to Lon-
    ;don, or so it would seem at this
    |time of the year, and why not?

    “Milton wrote his works on a
    vocabulary of 7,000 words,” he
    told me earnestly. “Shakespeare
    used 17,000 words, a great number
    of which he added to our lan-
    guage.”

    London is still the centre of the > has such ¢ 2 . Augustus Hinkson or howéver else the same may butt and bound ana
    world and draws mankind like alt HE has such a deep respect FOURTHLY ALL THAT place, piece or parcel of land now or lately called th.
    |magnet. And j ; é}for British institutions that I Garden situate in the parish of Saint Lucy in this Isfind containing by ad-
    | genet. ne judging by last] was somewhat horrified when measurement five acres sixteen perches of land or thereabouts bounding or
    week Westminster is the centre] shortly after he had sat down i Bromefield, Babbs and Checker Hal! Plantetions and on the Public Road o
    of the gentre’ So—up with the] th all na Bas Gown 1D however else the same may bound Together with the messuage and all and
    tant p e} the Gallery the following dialogue singular other buildings thereon and thereto — belonging
    curtain: broke out:— UPSET PRICE: £3,600-0-0d.

    . Dr. M Nn ntn tae \ DATE OF SALE; 10th August, 1951,
    The Rise of Mr. Weston eee (Socialist): On a H. WILLIAMS
    HERE on the Terrace are 50 po. of order. Did you hear, Registrar-in-Chancery,
    re Mr. Deputy Speaker, the re- ©

    pretty Canadian girls, all dressed
    |alike, singing “The Maple Leaf”
    and the French-Canadian “Alou-

    mark made by the honourable
    member for Kidderminster

    : I when he sai â„¢
    ore while M.P.s applaud from Genaadanwe’ =
    e open windows. De ut Spe: : i
    Garfield Weston sent them here . sedi mccgidtMrametin die.
    and has taken 50 British girls Mr. Nabarro (Tory)—who sits] on
    to visit Canada, ee : for Kidderminster and has a
    He is, of course, a millionaire, voice like a giant calling for

    which does not reduce the gen-
    erosity of this scheme.

    HE came from Canada to the
    first war as 4 very young, pale,
    wistful sapper in my section, hav-
    ing lied about his age.

    After the war, being the sor
    of a baker, he decided to buy @
    lot of family-owned bakeries in

    a barrel of rum): I must pro-
    test most vehemently. I did not
    use any bad language at all.

    Mr. Follick (Socialist): Could the
    honourable gentleman tell us
    what word he used that sound-
    ed like “bloody” ?

    Deputy Speaker: Order!

    Friday at the same place and during the same hours until sold
    on application to me,

    PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land (part of Checker Hal)



    BARBADOS,

    Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m
    the date specified below.
    Friday at the same place and during the same hours until sold
    application to me.

    PROPERTY: ALi, THAT certain piece

    Pull particular

    FREDERICK ARCHIBALD CONRAD CLAIRMONTE
    v

    JOSEPH NTZGERALD CLAIRMONTE O’NEALE

    - Plaintiff
    Defendant

    Plantation) situate in the parish of Saint Lucy and Island aforesaid containing
    by admeasurement Seven acres three roods thirty two perches Butting and
    bounding on lands now or late of Mr. Watson on lands now or late of Babbs
    Plantation on other lands now or late of Oliver DeCourcy Emtage and Ernest
    Augustus Hinkson and on the Public Road SECONDLY ALL THAT certair
    piece or parcel of land (part of Checker Hall Plantation) situate in the paris?
    of Saint Lucy and Island aforesaid containing by admeasurement Two Acres
    One rood eighteén perches Butting and bounding on lands of Oliver Decoure:
    Emtage and Ernest Augustus Hinkson and on a Road ov which there is «
    Right of Way or however else the same may butt and bound THIRDLY ALI
    THAT certain piece or parcel of land (part of Checker Hall Plantation) situate
    in the parish of Saint Lucy and Island aforesaid containing by admeasurement
    One acre and four perches butting and bounding on other lands of Oliver Di
    Courey Emtage and Ernest Augustus Hinkson on a Road over which there is
    a Right of Way on other lands of the said Oliver DeCourcy Emtage and Ernest









    CHANCERY SALE

    The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at the Registration Office
    for the sum and or
    If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding
    Full particulars |

    KENNETH CARLTON O'NEALE

    Vv

    RUTH ELIZABETH O'NEALE Defendant

    or parcel of land situate near Colletor
    Plantation in the pacish of St. Lucy and Island of Barbados abovesaid contain
    ing by admeasurement three acres and thirty-eight perches be the same more
    or less (made up of four separate parcels of land containing by admeasure
    ment Two roods and twenty-four perches, One acre one rood, One rood and
    fourteen perches, and one acre respectively) butting and bounding as a whol

    Plaintift







    |
    | ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
    | APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE
    )
    \





    aA
    S|
    BUSINESS NOTICE

    We wish to advise our custome



    Auction Sale

    {


















    that our Business will be closed

    from 20th August, will reopen

    27th August a :

    H. A, GULSTONE & CO., LTD Sale of Mr. J. C. Hotchki
    \{ 18.8. 51—-In Excellent Modern Furniture }
    Nee = and Household Effects will
    SS SS take place at Flat 7, “Aber-

    Keldie,” Dayrell’ Road,

    Christ Church on

    Wednesday, 22nd August

    FOR SALE
    LAND

    Building Site

    AUCTIONEERS

    John 64. Biadon

    Excellent in

    one of the best residential fe Co.
    Districts
    PRICE: £600. A.F.S., F.V.A.
    Come and Get it ! Phone 4640
    Phone 8503. PLANTATIONS BUILDING

    KEEP FOOD FRESH
    with

    = LUNCHWRAP”

    MOISTURE VAPOUR PROOF WAXED PAPER



    on Jands now or late of Thomas Jordan, on lands now or late of Mrs. S. Lowe
    on lands now or late of L. Griffith, on the public road and on lands now or
    late of the said Colleton Plantation or however else the same may butt ang
    bound; Together with the Messuage or Dwelling House thereon and all ane
    singular other the houses and outhouses on the said land erected and buil
    standing and being with the appurtenances belonging thereto
    H. WLLLIAMS,
    Registrar-in-Chancery



    August 1951 unless some person shall in
    the meantime give notice in duplicate
    to me at my office of opposition of such

    registration The trade mark can be
    seen on application at my office
    Dated this 8th day of August, 1951
    H, WILLIAMS,
    Registrar of Trade Marks
    16.8.51—3n



    TAKE NOTICE

    JELL




    Thet GENERAL FOODS CORPORA-
    TION corporation organized and
    (x isting under the laws of the State of
    Delaware, United States of America
    whose trade or business address is 250



    Paik Avenue, New York, New York
    United States of America, Manufacturers
    has applied for the gistration of 4
    trade mark in Part “A” of Register ir
    respect of foods and ingredients of foods;
    velatine, jellies, desserts, puddings and
    pudding powders, ice cream powders, ice
    cream mix, freezing mix, fruit extracts
    confectionery, and will be entitled t«
    register the > after né month fron
    the 16th day of August 1951
    unless some person shall in the meantime
    give notice in duplicate to me at my
    office of opposition of such registration
    Tne trade mark can be seen on application
    at my office
    Dated this 8th day of August, 1951.
    H. WILLIAMS,
    Registrar of Trade Marks.
    16.8. 51—3n









    €



    ARTICULOS De ORTENTAL

    CURIOS, SOUVENIRS
    ANTIQUES, IVORY



    (KASHMERE) Dial 3466





    MEP OROPGOOPROSOE ORFS wo
    & FOR SALE ¥
    <* One G.E.C. Refrigerator, one ¥
    ys year old, $420.00, One Premier \
    <* automatic electric kettle, new, %
    s* $18.00. One electric clock, $12.00 %
    ss One 1/8 H.P. A.C. electric &
    y Archville, Upper Clapham, Christ
    S. Church. Apply: H. W. Webster, ¢%
    S$. B.M.L.A. Society, Phone 4238 or ¢
    Q 6542 15,8.51—t.f.n.
    \OPEOSOOPSPSPSODOSSSES
    ee ——



    FURNISH
    in Style...





    STYLISH New and Renewea
    Mahogany and o Bur s.
    Bedsteads, Wardrobe: Chests-of-
    drawers, Beds, Springs, Laths,
    Separate siderails Washstands,
    Nightchairs Cheval and other
    Mirrors, China, Kitchen and Bed-
    room Cabinets, Tables for Dining,
    Kitchen, Radio and Decoration,

    Tea Trolleys

    MORRIS Furniture
    and Springlike Cusiions, #.50
    up, Caned and Rush Furniture,
    Stools in Mahogany and Rush
    $1 up

    Morris Spring

    SINGER and other Sewing
    Machines in Hand and Treadle in
    regular and chainstitch, Gramo-
    phone, Wardrobe and other
    Trunks e Box—BUY NOW

    L.S. WILSON

    SPRY ST.

    DIAL 4069



    I

    {







    j haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,

    ....and we will order for you if we
    Ltd. 6.7. 51—t,f.n.

    SPECIAL OFFER OF 3 PIECE TERRA
    COTTA BUTTER COOLERS. Just the
    thing for this hot weather, A simple
    operation ensures cool firm butter all the
    year round Instructions with each
    Cooler ONLY 48 CENTS EACH, OB-
    TAINABLE FROM HARRISON'S HARD. |
    WARE STORE, BROAD ST
    ——————

    SUNFLEX in all shades at General
    Hardware Supplies, Rickett Street.
    Dial 4918. 14.8.51—3n.

    TREES—Three (3) Large Almond
    Trees standing, excellent fire wood
    Apply: R. P. Gooding, C/o Fort Royal
    Garage Ltd 15, 8.51—6n.













    a full}
    Supplies,

    GLASSW ARE—See
    General Hardware
    Dial 4918

    PYREX
    range at
    Rickett Street

    14.8.51—8n,.





    PAINTS—By Peacock and Bucham in
    ali sizes and shades at General Hardware
    Supplies, Rickett St. Dial 9918.

    14,8.51—3n

    WANTED
    HELP

    POSITION OFFERED
    LADY with knowledge of Book-keep-
    ing and Cash, to work in our office,
    $40.00 per month Applicant must live
    within 3 miles of City, Appky in person
    at 1 p.m. any day except Saturdays.











    idea to backers and got the money.
    NOW his enterprises extend to
    Canada and the U.S.A.

    His recreation? Buying
    nesses, including Fortnum
    Mason. His favourite
    Balance sheets.

    His way of resting?

    busi-
    and:
    reading? |



    Flying on; di



    he hardly ever sees them.



    JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
    15, 8.51—3n.



    WANTED TO RENT
    BNGLISH GENTLEMAN requires

    sea, within



    England and modernise them. Harold Wilson (who had the
    The. cniy snag was that he] floor): Whatever. the boy
    had no money, but he sold the soprano from Kidderminster,

    said, or did not say,
    hate to think

    nitions of what
    means,
    Yet the judge stayed

    | hours. Tough fellows, these Cana-

    ans!

    powerful new men emerging

    that he
    agreed in our respective defi-

    UPSET PRICE; £4,512-10-0d.



    I should | DATE OF SALE: 10th August, 1951, 26.7. 51—4n
    and I
    harids with the cook. the Gevernment since it pointe.
    nonsense} “] gm afraid,’ said Mr. Welen-| at notching particular, had mm
    sky’s wife, “that you will have| visible foundation, and was hel
    for six]to shake hands with me.” in place by wire-pulling. How

    deplore these gibes at our masters

    y r. Fukuda
    A Bow For M COLONEL CLIFTON BROWN

    Now let us have “One Fine Day”





    siness. is ate: » a $ y ; 8 ft “rfec s re forgav
    pote aa New Power in the Empire [from Madam Butterfly, or “My | io pe - ee ne Sonia ve
    th iy re = iec : eo” fr fhe mi for tellin s on e previous
    That is the story of Sapper} NOW let us adjourn to the Cent See rere e yb Be night that we were really be-
    Weston up to date. The girls on|town house of Sir Dennistoun Mr Pie orca! aici ‘i the t| coming hysterical.
    the Terrace are just a pleasant| Burney, whose inventions were so! Kyosuke Fukuda, the most| '
    interlude. valuable in the first war and ae in ae bering has| Puring the last two years he
    Pare sigars are be-|cOme to my house for lunch, has entertained at dinner parlia-
    iF’ Victor, Pro-Sassoon ha igh Age mr Pe He is gravely courteous, yet! mentary delegations from France
    WHO is this suave, elegant man] The most interesting guest at |S # Sense of fun. Bres0 * B yet Sealand, tat ael
    who has come to hear the For-|his party is the burly, highly in-| For MacArthur he has nothing | piniand, ‘and Indonesia tT vettien-
    age {Sai Danas i at, a vpemsars Longe ot ut praise. He tells me that the}. ine indonesian dinner par-
    Is Sir Victor Sassoon, whose} Northern odesia, r. OY |Emperor has now become a Con-| 4) ng olga ese
    horses run in his name although| Welensky, C.M.G., one of the |gtitutional monarch and that full| Ucularly for Mr. Chuter Ede's sh,

    infauthority has passed to Parlia-| 8 when he said in mock solem-

    He had big interests in Shang-|the Colonial Empire. ment. Yes, there has been much By “The sk Mia > Parlis
    hai and refused to pay the sums] He was born of Swedish parents {rebuilding in Japan because the - fe aie cian?
    which the invading Japanese de-}in Southern Rhodesia, pecame a|houses are of wood. os: tt 7 ‘esouite $y) tadiie Tae
    manded when they took Shanghai| heavy-weight boxing champion,} We shake hands and bow, for pee eign we '
    in their war against China. then an engine driver, a trade|peace has restored to the land of] 6). guests were much im

    “Why are you so anti-Japan-| unionist, a newspaper editor, and | cherry blossoms and scented mists} co cug and so were the Con
    ese?" asked the victorious com-] finally “Prime Minister.” its ancient courtesy. a idatives ;
    mander-in-chief. Sassoon replied:| For years he has been agitating| House of the Perfect Host
    “I am not anti-Japanese. I amffor a union of, the Northern and} THERE is just space to go t The Post Bag
    pro-British and very pro-Sas-]Southern Rhodesias. When it, Mr. Speaker's house, where he is To ail those who have writter
    soon.” come about, as it will, he will have | holding a reception. offering to clip my dog Disraeli a

    Now he lives in the Bahamas ]the honour of chief architect. | What a marvellous view of the| their own expense, may I than}
    When I asked him why, he said:] HIS wife is as lively and sensi-|river one has from this window,| them, but also explain that the
    “I gave up India and China gave] ble as himself. jand how attractive the terrace| photograph which appeared re
    me up.” When Mrs. Creech Jones, the | 'ooks from that altitude. j cently was taken in March He



































    focaenacie Tee ae Retatte Club A Judge at Westminster wife of the then Colonial Secre- We can gaze at the -nearby| has since been clipped almost t
    Long tenant. Ring 4204 or 4207. NOW let the Empire drum: | tary, dined at the Welensky home Skylon, which some miscreant| the point of indecency
    15.8.51—3n. | roll for Judge MacKay of the'she asked to be allowed to shake said epitomiseq the character of - LES
    T A KE NOTI CE SCLC OA OOP POPOL EEK VL,
    &
    ; 4
    ~ x
    AXWell S % |
    % i
    | x % |
    xg ¥
    x x
    % %
    $ 8
    %,
    oe § WITH THEIR
    ett cece *
    x.
    That GENERAL FOODS CORPORA- |
    TION, a corperation organized and S
    existing under the laws of the State of | &
    Delaware, United States of America, | ¥
    whose trade or business address is 250 | $
    Park Avenue, New York, New York,/ %
    United States of America, Manufacturers, | % x
    has applied for the registration of a x HY %
    trede mark in Part “A” of Register | . %
    in respect of tea and coffee, and will) . “ x
    be entitled to register the same after) & %
    phe me 1 from the 16th day of August | @& e m ?
    Gosi unless some person shall in the mean- | gS Let your Children come in and %
    time give notice in Snorer Ae ae at x 3
    ray office of opposition of such registra- x :
    tion The wade mask can pe wen on g@fect some of the following:=- 8
    “Ppated this &th day of August 1951 ist
    H. WILLIAMS, | % 3
    Registrar of Trade hab & %
    16.8.51—2n. | \ :
    (¢ THE SHIP OF ADVENTURE—by Enid Blyton 3
    Santas . 3
    ADVERTISE & CHILDREN’S NEW ILLUSTRATED ENCYCLOPEDIA :
    in the %
    in 6 $ GIMLET BORES IN—by Captain W. E. Johns 3
    7, > x
    ADVOCATE x f y
    % THE WESTOW TALISMAN—by Percy P. Westerman x
    §
    s %
    RACES--|! :
    *
    RESULTS $ %
    », %
    A re what x AD %
    C ounts! the Most % V/
    4
    E fficient and % %
    ; 5 nett ‘ ~ 1 . ’ 7 $ ‘ ?
    S peediest method on & the cooking track 112 :
    is GAS for Cooking tie :
    LLL, Be | GLE NGfL OPA AAPM PERO OER ALALLLL LLL POLL ILLIA AMAL





    THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

    Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets

    =~ ae on




    Es T= SPSS
    ae EAL A EO EE PEOPLES.
    *

    % %,
    * IS YOUR SAVINGS ACCOUNT INCREASING? &
    ‘ Did you save as much as you anticipated during the past year? x
    De How much have you saved in the past five or ten years? ss
    ‘ If your savings plan is bogging down you need a systematic *
    s* method—something along the lines of a Sun Life Endowment
    % Policy. »
    % Start saving this sure way to-day x
    : ANADA *
    § SUN LIFE ASSURANCE CO. x
    ‘ Head Office: Montreal &
    x R. M. JONES & COMPANY LIMITED »
    % Representatives for Barbados. *
    st Gabriel Gonsalves, Jnr.,)
    and Canvassers |

    D. L, Crichlow | s

    toto OE CO PRO foto “ toe MG : A oes



    4

    Z Hundred Empty Barrels |

    FOR PALING USES

    FOR SALE





    ROBERTS) MANUFACTURING 00.

    HILL.

    GOVERNMENT



    You should read

    all about

    FERNOXONE















    -
    and apply it |
    | |
    at once
    | INDICATION FOR USE. Fernoxove is a select Iiormone
    weed-killer and is recommended for control of Nutgress
    on lawns, golf greens, gravelled and asphalted paths and
    drives. All weeds are most easily killed when growing
    vigorously.
    Fernoxone has the advantage over arsenicals in that it is $
    not dangero to humans or anim j
    METHOD OF USE, Used as a | 4 Ib acre ve ingred- |}
    ient is the recommended appl ion rate. A 1% stock
    | solution is made up adding 1.25 Ib Fernoxone to 10 }f
    | gallons water, or 2!) 0; Fernoxone to 10 pints water. |
    | Use 40 gallans per acre, or % pint per 100 sq. ft., diluting '
    | the stock solution with a further quantit f water to |}
    cover the area
    PRECAUTIONS. road-leave are vé ble t i!
    damage by Fernoxone and great care
    applying it tc avoid drift on to ch croy e
    growing nearby
    PLANTATIONS LID.
    PAGE EIGHT

    DON COCKELL SAYS:







    l use my left... they
    know they've been hit










    Lieyd Marshall gave

    me my
    only sear
    By DON COCKELL

    as told to
    JOHN MACADAM

    HME young gentleman lays his

    hand on his wife's arm and
    looks dreamily across the
    promenade lo the dazzling blue of
    the Medilerranean.

    He is a good-looking young man with
    a scar below the left eye. He is relaxed
    under his umbrella, and plucks under the
    neck of his shirt at the loose flesh as he
    says, “See what I’ve got to






    work on!” He goes on to
    Wd 5 + the blitz in Glasgow and Carshal-
    on and back in Battersea again
    YOU couldn't I was any- It seemed almost to follow m«
    thing extraofmina at school 1, about. I wasn’t a blitz baby. but



    Batt ea I wa particularly guess I spent most of my grow-

    good at any subject. None of that ing-up years in the noise

    Gene Tunney husiness of being

    Shakespearian scholar or an In My Stride

    thing, Now I take them all as they
    I was just average with the come in my stride, Even in

    books, and besides I was this place like this.

    fellow I've told you about who was You get used to the idea of

    too big to fight with anybody my having a lot of people around you
    age all the time, When you’re in the

    The sear? 1 got that from Licyd ying there’s only one follow acros
    Marshall, and a broken nose stom you but a terrible lot around
    playing cricket when I was 13. You get used to the feeling o!
    Never had another mark in the them being there and it’s good to
    ring, but this one was something. pe in a place like this where you

    It was just a park game and the feel alone.





    ball came off the ground a bit The only guy here who knows
    fast—it was the usual park ground J'm 2 fighter
    1d caught me in the face. Na‘,
    a bit annoyed, He gizes a bear-hug to the
    waiter who js bringing me

    another fin a eau and makes a

    In The Blitz




    Nan? She's my grannie wi mock pretence of defence. .
    brought me t in the little houx ... is Pierre, and he sees I gt
    in Mendip-crescent, Battersea, plenty to eat. I like to eat, and I
    Me and Tim, the cat who never know I'll get it at home fron
    mew? Tim did not. Maybe it Irene. I think I'll take Pierre
    new? Tim did not. Maybe it home to Weybridge with me. He'd
    was the blitz I went through it be a riot in my barber’s shop.
    as a kid in Battersea. The same And with Nan. She’s only 74.
    bomb blew up Johnny Peters and Officially? Mrs. 30lster, No
    Git. 6 < Wever sees my fights, Irene’s the

    He smiles at the recollection. only one I like to have at the
    although I can recall from per- ringside.

    sonal recollection of blitzes in Here the fighter fight for a

    word and finds something fro:
    tne scented air and makes a

    Battersea that there was nothing
    much there to smile about
    and then I went through

    Glamorgan
    First To Beat
    S. Africans
    HOW IT WAS DONE

    N 45 minutes Glamorgan beat

    Gonzales Wins 193
    Mile Auto Race

    PESCARA, Italy Aug, 15.
    Fangio Gonzales of Argentina
    won the $35,000, 193 miles Grand
    Prix of Pesc\va, roaring home to
    victory almost eight minutes ahead
    of his nearest rival.
    Gonzales drove the 12 lap grind




    in’a Ferrari with the time o1 twO'ihe South Africans the first

    hours 14 minutes and 594/5 secs. eounty team to do it And

    for an average speed of 86 miles straightaway 25,000 cheering

    per hour. Welshmen surged across the. field
    Second was Louis Rosier of at St. Helen's, Swansea, in bril-

    France driving a Talbot with the liant sunshine

    time of two hours 22 minutes “Sospah Fach”, the old battle

    song of the Rugger field, swelled
    to a great roar.

    And Wilfred Wooller, the burly
    Glamorgan skipper, was grabbed

    20 1/3. seconds,
    Third was Phillip Etancelin of
    France driving a Talbot, in two
    hours 24 mins. 10 secs ; ;
    Fourth came Louis Chiron of pat a | aia al high by men
    France, also in a Talbot doing it in ~~ Tt’ suad. “Land .of
    two hours, 24 mins, 28 4/5 ,



    My Fathers”

    secs

    now, with hats and caps soaring

    Gonzales registered the best lap jnto the air.
    time ofthe race on the third At teatime, when they had
    circuit. with 10 minutes and 484 knocked off 54 of the 148 runs

    seconds for an average speed of required without losing a wicket,
    90 m.p.h. the South Africans seemed certain
    Gonzales actually pulled ahead to win
    in the fourth lap when the Italian — Then
    Villoresi had to stop at the pits to Minutes.

    ane cya th ae . MecCornon,
    changes, Fear wheel Aston Villa centre half, and Len

    e

    came the astonishing 45

    28-year-o1a ex

    y . > ¥ > 2} .
    oe ee ae tatten Ja, Muncer, a Hampstead man. dis-
    7 “3 Le Aisc ae ao missed all 10 South Africans
    meeces A sh scari and Bra with their off-spinners for 29,

    dropped out on first lap. —U.P to win by

    enabling Glamorgan

    64 runs.
    eae ak i fe In his aftertea spell McConnon
    Channel Race Today with six for eleven took the

    wickets of Melle, Cheetham, and

    , ; Mullerton with successive balls.
    The Daily Mail announced that Gjamorcan'e fret hatetrick of the

    a mass channel race will start from Glamorgan 8 frst, hat-trick of the

    Cap Gris Nez Thursday between | ata nag ee first by anybody

    13 men and seven women, gath- neha: 0 ia eg Middlesex

    acon. Se Sreneh coast wetting llowed to join Glamorgan—and

    s S ’ > 4 ‘ stor > or

    Hot favourites for the race are . has been a bowling star ever

    ‘io stavotians who: are expected “ce -joined in the Welsh magic

    teaante os ae o a baraaren . by taking four wickets for 10

    | Pete ate urea . Afterwards the health of Me-

    coe hoe fh ae panes Connon and Muncer was drunk in

    eet the Bea td while the champagne in the members’ en-

    third piers of the’ team will closure, and a collection was made

    eee Ae 4 for the players on the spot

    oe Se ee oe Seog © Then, and not till then, the rain
    y om ete g —L.E.S.

    of the Egyptians is last year’s win- came.—L.E

    ner Hassein Ad El Rehi. â„¢ My:
    Second favourites are the was reported that King Farouk of

    Frenchman Roger Morvan, and Egypt promised 8,000 francs to the

    Egypt promi

    Sweden's Lars Warle. Le Morvan Egvptian winner.

    came second in last year’s con- Briefing was

    test. show of hands

    DOVER, Aug. 15.

    concluded by a
    as to who would

    Argentina is offering a cup in eat boiled eggs and whe would eat
    the name of Evita Peron, wife of
    the Argentine President; and it

    [ They'll Do It Every Time

    | ALL WEEK LONG MOM HAS TO
    |
    \

    fried eggs before the take off early
    on Thursday morning. —U-P.

    Regierered US Potent Ofte





    HAVE THE VIGILANCE OF AN MR
    TO KEEP THE KIDS IN THE YARD-:



    4 7)
    BiSmuUTH! SEIDLITz!
    COME BACK HERE!!
    BOTH OF You! STAY

    IN THE YARD AND
    PLAY! Go YOU HEAR?



    punch—unlike the orthodox boxer.
    demonstrating the punch—with Mark Hart on the
    receiving end,

    motion which is how the French

    EExcert ON WASHDAYS, THAT IS+s
    THEN YOU COULDNT DRIVE ‘EM
    OUT WITH A SWARM OF BEES +



    Don Cockell says he uses his left for a finishing

    Here he is

    say, formidable There is a mos- | ening
    around | last werds 1

    quito that goes madly

    and he hooks at it with his le



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    Bannister

    And Co, On
    Right Track

    STRICTLY speaking there are
    only two basic sports; athletics
    and boxing. After all, if you
    can’t fight you run—it’s ag simple
    as that.

    And even “Kid” Neanderthal,
    the earliest recorded “sport.” -
    his work with a club would have
    put even Bobby Locke in the
    shade, but permanently — would
    recognise the principles of track
    } and ring work.

    I don’t have to tell you that
    we're doing better in world
    boxing than we have for morc
    thar 2@ quarter of a century.

    Yet I'm net sure that British
    athletics aren't even more heart-





    |
    PETER WILSON says athle-
    i has made greater pro-
    ¢ ; than any other branch
    of sport since the war and
    thinks our track stars will
    make next year’s Helsinki
    Olympics Britain's best-ever.



    | eeempmaeysisbainnansine piiteneiessetentetataneenes

    than British boxing. The
    wrote before going
    ft\ on holiday were: “How good it is
    British athletics these

    hand, grins, and says. to watch
    I am a left-hander, I did all my| days.”
    chores in school, like writing and And despite the inevitable
    trawing with the left hand and| mudlarking which typical August
    never used my right hand at all} Bank Holiday weather produ ec
    always the left. }at the off-White City, the first
    | sporting event I saw on my

    Surprised

    Now, when I fight, I always use
    I didn’t have
    as the normal
    ighter uses his right hand as the
    they get
    left-
    -

    hand as if
    use it

    my left
    a right, I

    When
    me being a

    finishing punch.
    my left hand,

    handed man, they’re surprised vy

    the strength I have in it.

    I stand in the ordinary way b
    when I produce my left hand they
    know that I have hit them with
    box-!

    omething that left-handed

    return proved that it is good to
    see our track stars nowadays.

    Athletics has undoubtedly made
    bigger strides in this country
    than any other branch of sport
    since the war.

    Then... And Now

    | Before the war if you mention-
    itled a track and field meet to
    anyone except an athletics “nut”
    you were likely to get the reply:
    “Oh, you mean the thing Sydney

    ers do not normally possess. 1! Wooderson goes in for.”
    have a punch in the left hand It was essentially a “one-man
    because | am a left-hander. That} pand” affair.
    is out of the ordinary and I am Now if you go to any big meet-
    not sticking out my chest when] jing the stars who are making
    I say that. Britain really great in athletics
    The young gentleman 4p-| have become almost household
    praises a passing acquaplaneur | names.
    takes another sip of his orange There’s the towering Marine
    juice, smites once more into) gohn Savidge, so_ like heavy-
    the blue and goes on weight champion Jack Gardner,
    1 would have liked to havel J), right up there with the

    played football but I knew fairly



    best weight-tossers in the world.

    oon that I wae not good enough. There’s the magic of ‘Mac’
    { played for junior teams after 1 Bailey—if ever he can get a
    left s¢ hool, and had a chance of straight track he'll crack the
    being a fairly useful centre half, world’s furlong record. Bill
    but I knew that wasn't good! Nankeville, that mercurial miler,
    enough, L.r.g,| can Tun the spikes off anyone on
    oe | his day.

    eT ar area There's the towering Artnur

    “Wintmill,” who threatens to

    Cricket Results

    Aug. 15

    Scores in English

    cricket games today were
    follows
    Middlesex y. Kent at Lord’s,

    Middlesex: 148 for 5 wickets;
    Kent: 147.
    Derbyshire v, Surrey at Derby.

    Derbyshire: 171; Surrey:
    for 3 wickets.
    Gloucestershire = v.

    at Cheltenham.

    First Class

    101

    Glamorgan

    snip off the odd tenths of seconds
    in Wooderson’s one remaining
    world record—his 1 min. 49.2 secs.
    for the half-mile.

    a And what about the “new boys”



    distance runners Gordon Pirie,

    with the classical style, and the

    shamble-shanked Walter Hesketh.
    Best Miler

    Don’t forget the lanky Alan

    Paterson, who can jump his own

    height — and he stands nearly
    6ft. Giins. Qr plodding Harry
    Whittle, who runs between hur-

    Glcucestershire: 195; Glamor-| dles as though he had dried peas

    gan: 78 for 1 wicket. in his running pumps, but gets
    rashire v tition obarneht there just the same.

    Lancashire v. Nottinghamshir« ‘Above all, don’t forget Roger

    at Manchester,

    Nottinghamshire: 167 for
    wickets.

    Leicestershire v. Essex
    Ashby.

    Leicestershire: 180; Essex:

    for 4 wickets.
    Somerset v
    S-M
    Somerset’ 260; Sussex 116.
    Warwicks v. Northants
    Coventry
    Warwicks:
    Yorkshire v.
    Scarborough.
    Worcestershire:

    Sussex

    Worcestershire

    268 for 8.



    WHAT’S ON TO-DAY

    Victorian Exhibition at Bar-
    bados Museum — 10 a.m
    to 6 p.m.

    Court of Chancery (Chris-
    tian Mission Case)—10.30
    am.

    Meeting of the Sanitary
    Commissioners of St. Mi-
    chael—2 p.m.

    Meeting of Christ Church
    Vestry—2 p.m.

    Football (Harrison College
    vs. Windward Islands)—
    5 p.m.

    Water Polo af Aquatic Club
    Harrison College vs
    Snappers ; Whipporays vs.
    Bonitas)—5 p.m,

    CINEMAS:
    Aquatic Club “The Emperor
    Waltz” 8.30 p.m
    Plaza (Bridgetown) “There's A

    Girl In My Heart’; Jighs And
    Massie in Jackpot Jitters”;
    Oharles ws. Waleott’ 430 &
    4.50 pom
    Empire—"Sugar Ray Robinson va.
    Randolph Turpin’ 430 &
    8.30) pom,
    Olympic “A Date With Judy and
    “These Lodger’—4.50 and 8.15
    pm,



    By Jimmy Hatlo





    at Weston-

    466 for 5 wickets.



    7| Bannister, who is undoubtecls
    the world’s best miler.
    These men, and many

    look like making next

    more,

    at ,
    year’s

    62} Helsinki Olympics Britain’s best

    ever, And what little encourage-
    ment they have enjoyed.

    The worst facilities, in tracks

    and equipment, of any leading
    a | nation:

    That monstrous grab by the

    Chancellor from the profits of the
    at! Wembley Olympics so that, again,
    we shall have to go cap in hand
    and crawling to raise a team for
    Helsinki.

    Oh! for a breath of sanity.
    with “broken-time” payments for
    working-men athletes, and a
    proper track for every town of
    50,000, —L.E.S.



    BOYS FROM ST. MARY’S
    COLLEGE GOING TO B.G.

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 13
    Eighteen St. Mary's College
    3oys will fly to British Guiana to
    renew intercollegiate rivalry with
    3t. Stanislaus College this week.
    The programme of the tour in-
    ludes a three-day cricket match
    ind two football games, and an
    ithletie meeting. The boys will
    return on Sunday August 26
    |, S9CDPSGS FRCP POPP PFO O OO
    COMBERMERE SCHOOL

    THE
    re OCIATION

    OLD BOYS

    %

    %

    e e »

    Annual Reunion Dinner 3
    %



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    August 25th,

    *

    2 Saturday,

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    BOOKED TO HELP JACK
    GARDNER RETAIN TITLE

    By GEORGE WHITING

    Really big spar-mates for heavy-weights are a rare and
    of Jack
    Gardner, is taking no chances of our champion being short
    of praetice partners for the defence of his European title
    against the German giant, Hein Ten Hoff, in either Berlin

    dwindling species, but John Simpson, manager

    or Dortmund, on September 23



    THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 1951

    LD GA

    AU 4

    RACE HORSES
    LEAVE BARBADOS

    Eight race norses left the island
    on Tuesday by the S.S. Canadian
    Cruiser. Cavalier, Bright Light
    and Cross Bow are on their way
    to St. Vincent after taking part
    ir. the B.T.C. Mid-Summer Mec:
    ing.

    Monsoon, Nan Tudor, Cross
    Roads, April's Dream and Miss
    Friendship left for Trinidad where



    Even at this early date he has three years ago, will be preparing ber ee er ee ee nein
    booked the services of the big- himself for what must surely be a Tee e:
    gest gymnasium “targets” in the the most complicated and intens-
    country—Eddie Vann, Shoebury- ive big-fight arrangements of all JOCKEY DIES
    ness, holder of the British knock- time
    out record (12 seconds) and In London on September 25, LEWES, ENGLAND, Aug. 15.
    Frank Bell, the Yorkshire games- Coeckell hopes to fight for the F. B. Freddie Rees,-one of the
    master, who put paid so summar- world cruiser-weight title against greatest steepleckase jockeys of
    ily to Tommy Farr. the winner of the forthcoming all time died at his home on
    With Bell for long-range Joey Maxim-Bob Murphy battle Wednesday. He was 57. Reese

    punching, and the ever-improving
    Vann supplying the “inside stuff’,

    in New York.



    champion Jack will not lack ade- Don must then defend his | Se ete eee
    quate preparation for the reput- British championship against GALA OF
    ediy heavy onslaughts of the 6ft Croydon’s Albert Finch by
    Gin, Ten Hoff. October 27; and his European |
    Now 2 seven years older crown against Germany’s Con-|
    ner, the German has’ ny Rux by the end of Novem-
    the kind of background that bet
    spells toughness—and trouble How long is it since a British
    for anyone foolish enough to poxer was asked to battle for the!

    under-estimate him. eparate championships
    Impressive Record within the space of two months?
    He began boxing as a railway- I doubt if the

    man amateur in Oldenburg 14 [’m-going Cockell is worrying

    years ago became German :cham-~- nut the historical aspects of the!

    pion with a list of 130 conquests, situation. But, shrewd business-

    won all but one of his 21 repre- man that he is, he. will not be

    sentative bouts and roughed it under-estimating the cash poten-

    with a Panzer division in Russia i of this crowdea engagement
    As a post-war professional, it ‘ist



    took Ten Hoff only eight fights to
    lick the cream of Germany’s othe:
    heavy-weights, and he was dur-
    able enough to stay 10 rounds
    with Jersey Joe Walcott, current

    To-day’s Water
    Polo

    possessor of the world title
    (American version). i |
    ‘faken all round, Herr Ten Hoff jue to choppy seas at the
    hes done pretty well for himself, “duatic Club yesterday afternoon
    He now lives with his wife and ! was no Water Polo. The
    son in a sizeable mansion in Ham- * inals of the Ladie KO. Com-
    burg. He drives a Mercedes, and P°&tition Starfish vs. Sea Nymphs
    he lords it over a prosperous hote! vill be played tomorrow after-
    oon, followed by a Men’s Island

    at a place called Sasel

    Busy Don
    While our heavy-weight cham

    am versus
    Bigbury Bay.

    This afternoon's fixtures are;

    pion gets in trim for Ten Hof Harrison College vs. Snappers
    stable-mate Don Cockell, Gar« ogether and Whipporays — vs
    ner’s tutor-partner-companion BPonitas.

    since Jack first quit the amateurs Major A. R. Foster

    Referee:



    TOUT aa Ce
    First step to slam

    ‘he slam try can usually be



    HE earliest of all slam j






    iddi ata is sti made below the level of
    bidding devices is still came. After the above sequence.
    the most efficient and South will sign-off in Four

    Spades if he has no feature

    the most widely used by
    good players.

    Cue bids can only be used
    under certain conditions, but
    wherever possible they should be °.
    preferred to Blackwood as a fir: ~
    step to investigating a slam
    subject to the following proviso
    The cue bid must be clearly
    recognisable as no more than an
    attempt to show the Ace, a void
    the King or a singleton in the
    suit named, with no danger o!
    the call being passed by the
    partner.

    Any mention of a suitin which re
    there can be no intention of he
    playing the hand is a cue bid.
    particularly if the trump suit has



    worth showing. With Blackwood,
    the hand must be played in Five
    Spades even though the response
    unfavourable.

    North’s cue bid conveys
    information. Blackwood
    merely demands information,
    $3-—Controls are specified by
    e means of cue bids. With
    Biackwood they can rarely be
    jentified

    4 The exchange of informa-
    ‘ ion often allows the final
    on to be made by the
    yonder. Playing Blackwood,
    is @ mere automaton.

    The following example shows
    the contrast between the two






    ed nore agreed. If North methods:
    bids ne ade, South ‘Three ; . ‘
    Spades, North Four Clubs, the 3 49,9 84; VAK6; 2;
    last call carries an entirel ~ Py

    @KIT5; 9539; A873;

    natural meanin No one in
    ‘fl & K 108

    their senses would wish to play






    in a minor. suit after being When North’s One Spade is
    assured of fine support for to Three, he_ will get
    major. Four Clubs, therefore f he uses Blackwood,
    says in effect: “I am _ proo slam can be safely





    he aid of cue bids.
    he bidding will be
    in this week’s example

    against an attack in Clubs: can v
    you look afier one of the other Details o
    unbid suits? " nalysed

    This method differs fron
    Blackwood in four main resvect



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    —— —

    L A +
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    GAME TO
    ‘ai Mm

    RUSSIANS
    BERLIN, Aug. 13.
    German Communist
    sports writer accused a Soviet
    referee of handing a German-
    Soviet Soccer match to the Soviet
    team. The sports writer for the
    Soviet licensed “Berliner Montag”
    said the Soviet referee had his
    back turned when he penalized
    East Germany and disallowed two
    East German goals. As a result a
    Soviet team won.

    The referee’s decisions were
    booed by many of the 80,000 fans
    who watched. Booing was criti-
    cized By “Neuves Deutchland,
    official Communist party news-
    paper as a display of “old nasty
    nationalistic arrogance.”—U.P.

    LONDON’S.

    An East



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    PAGE 1

    rw.l IK.ill' KAKitAIHlS ADVOCATE THl'HsllW. \l (.1 ~l Ik. IS.il OHCOCKELLSAYS::US Uoyd me on IT Marshall gave my sear By DON COCKELL as told to JOHN MACADAM 'T 1 ///. | uina gentleman laus Ins %  hand mi iii\ wife's arm and looks dreamily across the lo the dazilina /''//> ••/ the W> !i:<;rtinrtm. lie \t a good-looting young man with lie Is relaxed DTeUm, and plHCJM under the hlr. slttrt at the loose fteslt as he Hoe "' lie got to I • Hf ffuea on Ii. ea\i . Bannister And Co. On Right Track ml IL1 >peaking Iherr arr onlv two beate *p*rls i .ilhli-Urii d boxing MiT "M ii yen rjn'l liiht vnu ran—!!• ** -.Impli as H. it And cv. K' *>nndrrthal. %  I,, i arlaaal recorded baa work with J dub would have 1 • Mfmamntl? — would ih r principles of track work. I .I-n't hate 10 tell % %  Bang better in world IK.IC.II,. Uuttl *> have for more thr r i Yet I'm net Mire thi athletic aren't even more heart T P. C/? ,;/,' KkWI h. .,..* hi* left far hni.hint pum h-unhkr rhr orthodox, bnrr. Henhe ** tliitiiHi-iriiiiiE Hi* punch—with M.rfc Uart eft Use % %  %  ..Mli; ,,„|. paTTM WII..SON M> alhleI %  ,-. at' r pTO* ore-s ['ifin fluy other 6ro'ich UM -rar and fhinkl OUt 'rack SWf pegf i JMsfnk-i BOOKED TO HELP JACK GARDNER RETAIN TITLE RACK HORSES LEAVE BARBADOS E.ght race nor-f* left ihc bland i,, S S (4Udl>u Cruiser Cavahcr. Bright Ughl and Cross Bow are on lo St Vincent after taking .>•'•' 1 dn*t %  particular^ good :i( W Oene Tui "i being %  %  out who loo bin ..nybody %  %  when 'he bUtl in GlW| on and back in BaUei*-. I ,, %  sow. formidable There is a HMMqntto iti'it go< i mod and In' I Hi '' i 'I" •"! Iff! hand. u'ins. and sous. . h ft-handei i did all raj Uka writing and ivln* with the left hund and In Mt Si ride. (|r ,,.,, %  %  — %  %  %  ' .,....t.-Ml, Vl him.MI ictM Ml HHMta "But" boxOh. y..u mean Ihf lhm Sylnc "' not normally posses. i woodman (on Infer." /(, u i %  DUMB HI tlw lctl hand ,. orlnuiiiii %  R-kandtr, Tin.; Ill Tl'f Blltl nnorli.r fin :. I Unary nn d I Bin I chM when ... ... %  (4l a — .. . i*'l f Till I ll(>w 'i .. | v., ybridfle wt bllti i wenl t %  i' 1 And iti bomb blew up Jonnnj Tim . .... %  ctb'Hii . 'it UlTOUfh (MMW1IHM uj'prduei II ,"i.i-i'u acmiapawieiif oranoe once ora woo In my b>rbei I |h# blue vtd ooeiion. I would bavo iiii<- ",. ' Tan Hnff Now 9. lhan Gardner, the German hits the kind oi bad spells toughness—and Uah enough umlor-estimMe him. > i.roi;<;i. wmnNt. Really big fpw-matai for h tvy ire %  rare and if Jack |r. the B T.C. Mid-Summer MOC! la -..-lii-.i n % %  in| ihort "IB. 'if praetioe partnei European uile Monsoon Nan Tudk aaalnit the Oermai Holt. In either Berlin J^,^,^forTHnid nr Dortmund %  booked it' what mual gckt ayuaiaali in "tui M'* atad and mteni. .,' iv. VanUi, Shoeburplv Ma-flaw arianipatlil oi -• it i *sr. holder %  t the Brltl h knocktime onde) un Ihc Sweden's Lars Warle. Le Horvan 1 tame second in last year's conBriefing ded bj ; h.\v %  I II Argcc.t %  the nam* ol BvUa Peron, w do ol f >. led • %  atubi fi"ttii take off early the An.. I snt; and it in Thnroday morning. —V.P. BOO am anybody ngboks %  gan in" %  <: .1 be* fine i %  ed in tin Welsh v '.ikiiiB f.uii wlcketa for 10. %  drunk in bei %  enind •' i "Hi rtlon i %  %  . Then, and not nil then, the rain I I s. WHAT'S ON TO-DAY '. II li.l r. ludiio gMWllsn al Bar.% %  in,. — lo A.m court or faaaoao uiirk.Ilaii MKslon t'aorl —10.30 am Mretln* of the Ssnitary < %  iiimi"iim. i of HI. Mi char]—• p.m. Hseaaag .-t OhrM t harah Taatrr I p.m liHilhall illarriimn College va. Windward Itlandal — i p.m. tlilcr Polo a' Aquatic Club lUrrison Oellere v* Snapper* : WhipnorayTi va. Btejh aa )—< p.m. ri\iM \~ v.|.i.iii .lun fh ( Impnnr run % %  ... .. i i . A DM la M. H'.rl Jlfi. \„4 ">... %  In I.,> P .I Jin,., • i>..u. rs w.i-.H i a %  .. p m tmpl.t— (T )i|||v ( ||ih| llghv who's right up there w m tn *' be-t webjht-toasers In the *rtd There*] lha magic of "Mac" ( ever he can R"*t a straight track bell crack mo world's furlong record. Bui N.mkevillo. th.ii can run the spike* off anyone "' %  in. day, There' the towering Artnut %  Wtntmill." who |hM tat %  nip "II the mid tenths ol tconoa in Wooderson'* on P remaining world record—his 1 mln. 19 2 sees. for the half-imle Anil what about the I I I distance runni n ^' %  . k ill By le British Guiana to -enow InterooUeglote rlvair) • 1*1 Btanl ilaus College tinweek [•he programme of the boui '"-| three-day crlchi I ....i twa Eootbell aamea, and an I Phe bo i i turn OH Sunday AUgUSt M MOOI ^ ibjert to Hi*' In"oii..i HP cue i ; i % % % %  : ..!. .. I.il .'.f... .1 tlie King or n singleton in !!; % %  %  Ult naiui I. with nu danger ol tcie call being passed b. i!i partner. Any mention or a -uu. in which there can be no Inirniton o. playing the hand la a cue bxl alraadl bean agreed u N a <>: ,i North Four Clu las', rail earni animl meaning No one in %  I %  .. ... n In a minor u %  I ol fine support lor %  > %  major Four Club effect "I an against an attS i unhid Tins me'hod dif! %  BlncLwood n fo l IBB t*a can usually be 1 mad* below the level of Utet lite above sequence %  n-off in Four II he has no feature owing, with Biackwood i must be played in Five even though the region:* unfavourable. ,> Noruaa cue bid convey." %  information, uiacgwood Dknnand* information. •[-Controls are .specified bv •> means of cue bids. WlUi : %  ,--• %  4 .—The exchange of inform*OfMD allows U Dnal :o be made by the Plaj ng H: nek wood, he i* a mere automaton. I'!:c following cxumpli ttliows ilraal bvLweco lite two me'hods : A*,3iV ,4; ''* K,; J! K J IS S North's One Spade Is he will gel e lllj-kwood. lam can be safelv i .iid of cue b.d%  iD (Ming b* eat i % %  iffiTUfi 1 i %  il o I trios Annual liiunimi Dinnrr 11 I:.I They'll IX) It Every Time Bv Jinuny Hatlo Au"£&<• la "CM HAS TO HAVE THE VISLANCE OP AN M.R TO KEEP THE KIDS IN THE YARD %  BISMUTH.' SEIDLITZ.' COME BACK HERE!! 93TH OF >OU.' STAY iH THE yARD AMD nAY! 00 VOU HEAR? EXCEPT ON WASHCMYS. THAT ISTHEN M3U COULDNT C3RIVR 'EM OUT WITH A SWARM OF BEES-WILL YOU PUH-LEeSB GO SOWEWMiWe ELSE ANO Put* ?! — tj V WEST THAN i K. HAH> MPggffR i5lh. mm Saturds*. AUBUBI S.00 p.m. •tl'BsH^ftlPTlON: SOContact: (.. fOLK—Tel. No. 4340 V Vtll.lt VMS %  !#.: R. I'FHKINS as*' 1 i I.MI 4t a.anr.j.. Aaaan .*.; %  •.*. ***.'%  ^Ml Nil it OII: llll AIJ-I*MII*OHI:-III II d\ run B1 Rl NOTOftl. HICIIAK in lha Tallow Carton. .Mii.li iior children la Hat niur Garten, MCNTI KOI I nest iluh which NSTAN r hF.I.IFF ur COUGHS—CHEST COLDS SOW iliicovi .md .ill knuh 1.1 Ml •-( | | VK \' Ml > VND t UMfi. Ml STFROI.I reliot: %  Heativel> vnu saasaM aova* he wilhad . |ai afl MisTFRtii.E in the boUSe, lt> Ml Ml KOI I for both SdattS and children. KFTAI1. I'ltK i i. \ I \H OM^inahle at— Messrs BOOKERS (B'doa) DRUG STORES LTD. SoU A t t, f5% W&Hi tb(T Give your skin s new tint ... change your complexion tone at will with Gal* Face Colour.' Gala Tinted Found** ttons are made to suit every type of ikln, each has les matching Powder. Follow the Gala Colour Phn to be fashion right. Key lips to clothes with Gala Lipstick or Lip Line. Match nails to lips with Gala's jewel-bright Nail Colours, and see that you have a perfect skin by using Gala Face Creams. GALA OF LOXIMIX nd DaMraaaaar i F. s. NICHOU.V P.O.BOX 241 ; .ir triiANTU tlEGM FLORAL NYLON Real Beautiful lh for Kveninu Dfeaeee in Shades (if Orchid. Pencil •nd Smoke Blue 36" tvatfg UM yd. tm SHErllFRU \ (o.. ltd. 10. It. 12 6 USroadSf. CHECKED TAFFETA With um 1.1 i .i|..ni i A slriped border 36 wide UJl Pal J&R ENRICHED BREAD WKI.I. IIAI \:vi: HATI> SUPPLYING ALL THE VITAMINS YOU NEED : 4.oo run rni SVIIOII v4' FAMILY .-.-.-.•.-.•,-,-,-.-.•,-,•. %  .-.-. %  .-.•-,-.•.-,-.•.-.-.•.•.•.-.-.•.-.•.SI II 'm haiw i••••/• %  %  # in'iis/i-/. s ttf:CAI.VANISED CORRL'OSTKII SHKITS 6', T. 8' X 28 Gniice (i.M.VAMSFD NAII.S — ill METAL *", 3" SHEETS Mesh .-.-.-.-.-,•.-.-,-.-.',TOI1 1TK." FI.F.XIRI I' FI.XT ASBESTOS CEMENT SHEETS 4 X al tU* Stott IM.UITECOHBLC.ATH) SIUITS c. r, r, io' i.rnRih. •Phcnr 42G7 WILKINSON & HAYNES (0.. LTD. i





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    i> atIratw J&& ESTABLISHED 1895 TIU'KSDAY, A I'll" X PRICK f\\ Iran Rejects U.K's Eight Point Plan: But Stokes Savs No TEHERAN, August 15. |>ERSIAN delegates cross examined Britain's oil envoy, Richard Stokes, for two and a half hours to day on his "peace" proposals, then one of Ihem said, "they are incomplete Stokes, himself, denied that Premier Mossa degh had turned down hiB eight point plan, offer ing Persia the control of operations inside the ountry. "Nothing has been rejected, nothing has been accepted," he stated "I am convinced that these proposals are as good as any Persia could get The Education Minister. Karim — Mitra Sinanan %  'in -linnColonial Secretary CN IMMIGRANTS one of the Per* who mid that the pfo%  complete, added' ivirtually uni %  %  sion of the British plan, which ha ridings reaehad with the Stab Oil envoy. Avcrell i | that Pratnh r Kh had la*t night rejected British proposals, and •-. rjpoaals: U Britain he / 3 The claims of botl %  %  aton. 9 TV British oil Mnff is to k*-cp on worklni — V %  Arab Slalrs May Attend Paris Talks tNDRIA. Egypt Aug. IS. An Ar.b League source said on tl the Arab States lUend the Paris % %  : %  Concllia%  >ii SaMambar I thai thi want to prove their goodwill snd %  i ,nd [• . to. inpartUle n of Palcstlne and Ihe rpnlritiun of An refugees, it aaTd. now lelcgates w rtth Itrsal %  -II* $292m Fdr Defence Pi ERRA, AUK 1ft. to % %  •! %  Krencaalcal pent 1:1:1:1000,000 1 1 r i'<>irr-OF-SPAIN. Aug. 13. The Unit shot in what may turn out In be an attack by the Parliamentary Group on tinGovernment's newly initiated campaign agalnSt prohilftald immigrants WSJ Rrad by tl"' Hon Mltra Sinanan. Group spokesman: Mr. Sinanan sent the following question to Hon. P. Rentson, Colonial Secret.u\ Will the Hun. the Colonial Secretary slate for the informlUon "l the House the number of prohibited immigrants now in custody .a the Royal Jail ing further as to what is the expend ture Incurred by the taxpayers m tig the said immigrant* in prison; the period of time they have been detained and the coal Communists Driven NorI li BTH AIIMV HEAD^t'ARTEHS. Korat Aug. 15. United Nations patrols attacked 1 MI Communist groups entrenched on hills southwest ol i today and di Reds to the north. lb 1. % %  .'. were inflicted on the Redi u Allied lighting men braved intense machine-gun lire and mortar tire in take the heights K ing, one <>f the tnoal ImiKirtant Communist held cities in Central Korea, is reported to be the centre of a large buildup nf Red troops and battle %  upnUea i*.N. patrols ranging MM tl city have contacted Communist groups from platoon to tomnanv in site. Allied patrols farther %  i; Bjda tv* • %  ntacti with ned northwest ol Hwachon Red unltl III ranging from 20 to SO men in USO were ttk-n under U.W finand qubtkly dispersed There wet* foul contacts made in the area nmthesM Ol the Hwachon laartiriaT hut no heavy fighting was reported One "f the contacts occurred in the "punchbowl" valley north ol Inje. A UN. officer said: Outside those four encounters our sector was very very quiet." —UP Dulles Warns Reds Aboul Sabotage Over Jap VriHtly WASHINGTON, Aug 16 JOHN FOSTER DULLES in a nationwide radio address Wednesday night warned the Soviet Union not to send a "wrecking crew" to the San Francisco Conference to tryUo sabotage the Jap anese Peace Treaty, declaring: "K such tactics would be tried we are confident they would fail Dulles made it clear that nations attending tin San Francisco Peace Conference will not be per mitted to alter the text of the Japanese Treaty made public in Washington and London Mm TutTuitg dv at Die Royal Jail await-, !" -. %  <, .• deportation"' Will he -tat, Sabotaged OUVMl Intercuts In Koren WASHINGTON. AUK The Voice of America said on Of deporting these persons to their Wednesday that the Soviet repC*respeetivc countr An oral nnswer is required" A Government release estimated that there were about H.lWHt .0*l immi|rinl. in Uw Island who were causing unemployment to Trinidadlans and taking away foodstuffs and other fi Om Trimludi.niIt has also been ascertained tbat at ihe moment there are 23 illegal immigrants imprisoned In local lattk. The average number of pr la onarg in tl ny per day |g 1.050. The cost per !>n-me: m a minimum ot $1.20 ,. j A cable icquchliug a debate in %  i. House Ol Commons on Trinidad's economic ri :i, PaiHamentary Opposltloi •i da. August 13. U.S. Colonel Disrupts Communisl Union B\ DAN P. CQLMOBB LEGHORN. ITALY. Ail",. 15, Trf Communist controlled Union of Port Workers hci h;ts been undermined by United State* army methods ana ,1 BUCti muniit direction of other port cities ily may also be shattered. This Tyrrhenian potl Bit) battered duiiug the w.ii and BtU feriing the efrccts seven rear* later. *ias become She Tat*' centra of ComniuniM strength Bo rax Communists are losing. and it is becoming almost tar them as far a "lace" i* concerned HI responsible for thll is Colonel Norman Visenng. once farm owner in Florida and not mandmg the 7658 U S .illative lias sent a top port to Moscow accusing the ClimMao TM rung ot deliberately tal Soviet interests in the Korean war. Tt* Voice Mid that report was wrtitan by Vladimir iin:v. the chiel correapoodani tor Tns. the Soviet Nawi Agow i In PaJpmg The : I •VIM intended only 1< a Sot U < res i". Vo i thai the Korean i Ol the Chll I persistent, ; '" l 1 "" logical deviations Ul M U rn.il cliq „ Rngov added thai the wain unwlTlingi munist General to uullaa > methods H %  combat .,., DM prime reason rhf so I. %  How ihe report reached can hands was nut OXplal I Britain Can Build ^^' u ,i ''" r ... ss i lorYtoonertW Own Atom Bomb War Problem I'MMdenl v %  social tepreeni itivi ("ill %  presi i onfarann lo Um Baa i: hid tie#n given iini Unit (inpurpose of sraa t sign the A liiih hr %  baolutel) final tcKument Dulles reported that so far 34 ivo formally accepted he Anglo-American invitation to nelseo Significant in :.; I poll LONDON .v Krilnin can build hi bomb an> I .houses, bill IhgTe %  ppetrs |r> be two schools nf thought oi whether the Hritish shapc William Oatl P gai ad aei %  aral it he.,, mi Comma r*|e*M <>tiTne Department has already ii : nil Czech tnide titgn tarifl uslv hmin.in'iiv' $25,000,000 to the Amcncan %  %  Th. S63 Sovirl Troop Trains MAINZ. OKKMANV. Aug. IB. Eight French and four Baar „f ami I''." 1 home from RUBna day that thousands ol •aming the Baltk OOUI ..,bolaging Soviet troop iTallH and mililiry inst.iii The 12 men still dad Rufcslan prisoner of war parats refused to give Ihoi •4ey said it might afTect Mime 1.000 French prisoners still n Ku^ia The n iatd that after the first three years •which '*.'•! |utt iwful" they enpvan %  chance t'< ivlns condiudni tmprovt t I*. \\ ealhef Tlireatena Vi'liirua A^ain ANTIGl'A. Aug. IT.. To-daj Antigua %  expi i Udly thai familiar Ihl waathai to Crash I i peoph %  < n irs of eaacUj a year %  l-ast Port Left It was the last port evacuated b) I'.S. forces two years after f.*ie w.ir. Vlsertm hai already worked wonder*. In two monthbuilt up headquwitiid a run-.' %  gwaltlnf Sanati fee several .. .. %  •.,. '.inning out ovi F %  : %  All UK Oermanj first eargo and troop laeaS d WSJ h.m.clf a port woikei %  nj.fl Jackoponi 51. blmaelf Following the part* line he first C O Vlserlng that peopl ghorn district part of "Amii Troops." Then after looking around at unemployment and when VlSOtmg announced th*l A".i' T ,i iobs to 3.800 J .ckoponi had iff of j that po %  Muld %  (ilk for A. • ons Bui that Id have to n the Commui. I I IJAP TREATY PUBLISHED First Hurricane Of Th*" I').*>! Season MIAMI. Florida. Aug. 15. The wentht i bureau on Wednesday i.'iat Ihe *lr1 hurricane of the 1991 aeaton witi winds 100 miles an hour kai lolled up In the Leeward Inlands I Miami. The hurrh--. moving In nnrth westerly lUreeflon at .d-ni '.'. milean hour. Reconnaisanee aim I Miami locate,! the storm a.m. At latltU 10.1 "HI fU i ... .. | .if Port Di Martinique n snu the r tin i but v* i leal i* • baaii .!! %  South Atlantic area. The first %  which was | in g| waspotted east nf the Florid %  ut in ih th Atlantic In earls —IT Rockefeller Marries Again Britain I ke| in Atomi %  has lint g ..' i fui %  ludlng the one -it Hai tl it rtntam uses The pro|H?cls ; ue thsl she, alsi i i oon have ermu to Tl n k e %  ; i i I go inti Milt.iUi' nurd and sawast 1 %  llamk Plli Addltfmally, mmnii i t.. i. i n K plutonium from : Plutonium # %  NKW VORK. Aug John n. RocJrefeUei lunlor, ;T -vear-old milhonaue plulanthio^ nisi, srhose aeeantnc father lounded the vast Standard ^ empire, married WedneasnQ I the widow ol an old college chun. Rockefeller, who*e g advance huinin welfare have totalled millions of dollars was mat i"rovidencc. Rhode Island to Mri Hartha Balrd Allan, 56. retiret concert pianist. The Nl public Halations firm of Lac sm Moik announced here that th< ITUd-monung ceremony was private attended onl) '" laaroedtat* ,i.< nibcr Of Hie tWO f." A .spokesman fol the pubin John i> R osfce feller the .third, one of Sl| rhlldren bom of Rockefeller's Artl ervad as l>ralmun for; It a/as th. I.i. % %  IbKkcf, H of Ins attention to the foundation in, farnoui father. Unofflcull Keporis ire unonlJuly tint Britain as sen i oon %  i npowe %  %  %  %  HI Id blunt It V.'.. Lstroh Fuel Shortage ih" In I%  %  B I rel %  hortagi l %  %  reai 1 h< first expei set %  i %  %  rve ivortu •vv. 15 The Urn* one a hall million I'll helu %  v ituMia announi sd on I %  I.IK .It the j • . uted N .ti.nr. mam %  %  %  4utkNi from purely • humanl1 HI clone itx it ion i to the govern> %  Completing ihe flrat tage of •i < -U11 mi.-' again, piobably in Fui ope nl the end Of U lii.it when lime i bean dai ill in' Me the Oavarn to send reprei .ot studies nlight be made ••• ill Rerman; Italy ;>ni till hold.i %  %  U ,. i nara. Russia Kinred the \ %  '.'.' i Com* j %  —I .p. He.,!. •.. Itbei ...ii "i, Untied Kingdom consUeted sni of ini %  cam changes In the text if rnajoi i haractsi lint ha sddaC t thai ugnlncance to oiu oi n i ., ,i that !• %  .... %  II might to th. Pnllu>e*sMi flHei Uwvma me ..( th. ii re .ul.! bi con pleteli itlsAcd hul it HUM would be %  growing r mimi tinformula worked %  % %  | %  I.I lethod b\ which rlalmai %  ,i . The formula %  i 1 %  ndai which the) *ill i %  en Ices fi rraan n i | c tni i t H k both %  %  1 Some Question na.lv age 01 treaty %  HI naiions iJ ha. unde.tik.il to look %  .. ... Ml ii mould mentioned in Ihe neat. Amerlcfii and J HEARST Will. BE BURIED FRIDAY B iti FRAN! IfiV %  %  \uf. IS, dolpl H' probabl) o %  %  i i .. ii .' %  %  • i ,: | | %  %  %  %  i Bi arly HUb %  i peat efully from Ine. Hi Phot his fatht i Benator 1 j .II t — I'.P. In con ertli Into i-ou. %  %  %  i ....... la used to opera) . plant IT.. %  %  %  Feisal Extendi \ isil To Hrilain %  BOMB DAMAGES RED BOOKSHOP %  Intermittent >harp hi were persistent thi day. It !• lust Bve an annlvaraarj of Hurt which v- ermed a tmsii hurricane srhldi proved to be merely the Introdue. Uurashlng "f :t i (Jti KM % %  im %  % %  Trip I .J<(N, Aug. la. Itoberto Villanucva Ot Manager <-f Uks MsnIU (hraoUlr ii bondon on Mo i Its trip and i ,ghout th. Wedm for a *hort *ta • %  bg weekend. %  plans call f %  eturn to the Philippine* August To-night the wi. %  India rather than the Kg ii increasing and the barometer lias dropped 17 point', but the In%  alarmed or battened down as .. '.-d to pass b> Antigua. United State* Hi plans, however. 'he Han Framiwo Treat. ence In Septembai a member of the Pliilippmr delegation —v.r. I'AH IS A i Sda Iminl I %  %  %  pallet %  \ug la i An igtend hi visit I'n II 'llll Ill with i' of mutual II the Middle East", the foreign ... It *aa learne i r esented inch mot .. r r Showdown On Near Kast Today FUI8H1NQ MRAIMiW. York. Aug. is. %  :\ r til again .in i %  Ui thi di % %  i loral n§ r -. n Easteri hitUHtion ilnce the par i Palestine .mil ihe pauagr ol ih. Ill-fated United Nations lo internationalisi Jarusalem will inunvcih .. when the U.S., B kocc plai t ruest the Bet uii it^ C rwdei Egypl to lift 'be blot UM But i Canal on the ground ihji it vmi.il. the spini of armh i tteoa ti • ol (i-.n C Hi the Ml.li|. %  U... line. W. *.-i n ; %  %  aapoeted Ii rcsorq Oon t.i thai • ffc %  hen the Counii re .ifici .i TWO., .i -ill uo* ers deb flSU 1 0 %  ipromlse i obviate th-' %  • 'i ildtnj Egyi t pubHi ly Rgypt rla ol thi blockerit is %  ondi lo lie life I.I %  %  i • i i %  i % %  ii ihe Council that I: is not planniiuj to %  do hlch i parl ol Ai i i . %  I | %  %  JJ %  i, i. .., 'n.iti. i re 11| % %  nouncad in thi uim breath that i i* Unposslbsi i .. i • i ol 1 i M %  '• %  .' %  '.." %  t pre Knvpt would by unable 'iithm and tl^' \ .hit .. .II .it %  d i ..— to ini Cout %  11 i ,i.i ti it astu Thu will okci the U N in ii' ,i" i'i so f.ir as finidj s hey to % %  • iboul ei f i the Council % %  < hit thiii [>•! rnstrtelloni .,!,.,. | ... \ ipol scnun for (he • %  thi Japanese ... uvlet forces In Manchuria -. di unaecounted for The"ADVOCATE" pay* for NEWS Dial 3U3 Day or Night itt.ii 'it i thf Sll qw i.nht' hut he refuaea %  laUt "ii bow the i. i be intplemi d net I proved by the H notions bodgi %  i imr"i' Igypt would, aedipiuinatii observer* •i %  immt olatf effeel of weakening the whole rrti armlsUea igraamenti snd makln i %  ...i (. %  | trat ta adopi _. .• ... but the beginning ot a tragedy %  i thi "fi Hue Du Pont I i %  — II' 100 DEAD ANKARA TU1 KXV > %  I gied la %  leal Vv a\t* In Texas l A. 15 • l .1 1951 will be %  ; iwrature% threaten." %  ii kat. At least At .-lo %  I %  ti't no .clief iSOVIET WAR FACnrORIES IUM NIGHT WD DAY y H BKhlNf.IMM Tt I,Khl.IN. Augu>l 15. the Returned priioner* of war from the Soviet Union 1 war factories .lay. and th.it USe gag Mid that thi '"' openly expressed doubt sidings across Russia are jammed Ru**ia had the atom bomb, with m eight Factnrv Work bile Wort Rat cars roll along. They worked in Rimsukn factorla %  nen In a |W8for frar of jaop> | r drdbing the scheduled release ;f i. men still in wg Russian prisonei of war camp treated I I The pruoners said that th-y : nl ^ituatiOl found widespread fe ; ,i of %  t t) ,.. among Russian citizens thev n el 1 %  %  emeienry. • rie and %  %  it whethet %  that the, g> em gage I Yet it would be tdk noskualtt lb* mimhcr of l>rs camel hv iSfcic-.lv disLSrdad CalAMMIj because the hahit will appaienil> pct'i^t Jv-pitc the scnouv losv ot lite snd proper!v rc.uliini from ihc^cotilhresk.. Ii is the work of s lew minutes to protcu yourself from rek of loss through tire, hv consulting sf your earnest oppdrrunitv the local scents of Ousrdian AaanrsaXi Co I.id Ami,if the opportunity d not Men ha present rsaattj aansna r.rr. don't usually pee much .. i Local Agfnii S P. MUSSON, SON ii Co Lid nROAIl STBRET . P.ll Box !U. Phone <|6S



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    rv.i six BARBADOS ADVOCATE THI'RSDAY. VUGl'ST 16. 1931 VJOW'S th.'titne fir this young nun to learn the safe, comic vray to Inner CUa'ili'uts! A glass oftpaftflnf "tejr" Andrcu's it I deltphtfully refreshing drink. paraai sun, however, II ensure* everyday good health by cleaning the mouth, settling the otomsch and toning up the %  ully, Andrews pwtly touch. Just a teaspoonful in a glass of old *ncr and here's an exiting, sparkling drink — here's the way IO Inner Cltaniinest! ANDREWS UVERSMT iTHE^IDEAL fORM-OF LAXATIVE



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    THURSDAY, Al'i.rsT If.. 1S.-.1 UAItllADOS ADVOCATE I' >... CLASSIFIED ADS. IM,H " TIUKFMONI 1101 For Dim • Marriage rrarge "1(1(9 for any i up to 50 .r-d € cent* pt between %  *-d • pm RBBMgg i FOR SAI.I: ... I I ^'"U and In Mmiorlan* noOcea M •V H on week-dav* and (1 H M Sunday •or any number of word* up lo M, and I ceriti per word on weekl-dae* and • ttnu per word on Sunday, (or earn additional word. A.WOI'.MIAII.MS ASPRO Cold! and flu dlapelled reired-aoothing -will relief from Rheumal.c and Kf Nervlneaa Sleepleaanee* Let ASPRQ ram* to jour aid NOW —8 %  31-I0n ... „ ,„.„ M „ r „„ .„ MAL ESTATE S"da M u-o-J. over 34 LANT> 44e aq I u-o-d u'e.l Al.TOMOTIVr Ihe rierlHHi A !• iwu.vcr. Brillon* HUI at I-rinc.%  • A|F lo neaiure within a day 11 '" % %  '' Sti.ill 1 SL>rk* Guaranteed M Ihlp ROYAL STORK. No 1* I M.-tlon Waggo-i rir.1 K.g .1, -rt A Q ,|i High Street Phone M I Mlaiage under WOO \, p ,„. r n ;io •TAOOOM • Sal-Hn toiU ace.pi FOR *AI t OR EXCHANfiE-O. ner • ne-.ll. MUba. ktrftak famil. ohligr-l .achange anuule* pUc. prlr.iOI* .,%  ea or .eti MM p.... Ktrepuonai and Genuine appj.nu.ithUIbl. advantageou. deal direct prteato ,..„,..., .., "••'1i reaponaiblr AfrnU Ring ~jlB dally • ll) aft* AUCTION UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER %  I -I <.\N 1 ...,|. \0K • FOR RE.VT Minimum rHarae week Tl cnt* **d H cent* Iu*dav> 1 ieo-di — over M u-o-d 1 ,-e>r* a tro-d vceh-4 .eafa a •. %  wed on landau. I IIOISES TAKE NOTICE GRAPE-NUTS SHIPPING NOTIC • of AmThai CenatAl. IXHJWC COHIt'llATlON. %  CO.T "' "> %  •"" "' the State ol iv a .are Un.trd M* %  *• % % %  eddree* u ISO p. M-mufaeturer*, ha. applie.1 I %  of if.-;...,, | n lnM ,-i ,,( %  .,.„ IOl,.. ,„ „,,, ,„. ~ from it.unn *_, ... Aigru.l rrpw the urn %  I .. /i .1 \M. I IM I l-lll ll • notice in duplicate i n.r Irad* n.il can pa n Dated ihn go. day of Auav.1 I Ml \ |wat IH' July SMIi. Hrobane Jul> %  i %  lAHWr %  %  TAKE NOTICE FLAT o„ Blue W.u*. Terrace. ,• ..t will, apactou, v.phoa.d. Phor.* t -i I n UT Maaaell Co..) Read Fi idMair*, Trie-*.-.. (land *-balnmi AvaiUbkr Iron. sw.m KASTTJetM ibrdr. % %  g R n •-1 K • SpU-e* SANTA HARU In Caribbean Ha'ra l"i>n IT Ml < per day RRAND IK iTTI. In '—t faaldenllal dHIrlrt ur-lrr i; Mil r4--.tr. tnm Si C per head per dar SEASIDE INN On Grand An** Bathlns %  each Rate, (ram MOO per head perl da} Enqjirlr* to D M Slln-er. O'-nada I ad* Sl-TSn. | *e will Mil on DUOA Bfa Dark Cry.tal Sua. houaM :— I.der. lid Roeburk H hd"""" C Ua SU U "" P "' CO Bride. CASH i i*jH :.,. I* %  SI *Jn In addition ta e". C reptcd on Ifimufh BUI* -I Trinidad %  ram, li,.. | For furlh'T 11 KM -HIIM1 A t C niiMini' Tnr u 1 %  HI *. tHIRRII m IM •* v %  \nimii. 1 im •! OASI >. Jj) for St. I (j ( 1 1 I 1 (11 1 jj l:l.KCTRI('AI. BBANKBa. TKOTM.N a fo Aurllonerra IS I >l-an ii'ithed YEA II WOOD *> BOYCT. Jamea Street 1 THE CAMP On the Sea. Si fully l.irnuhed Dial BUT. 1* Tll-tl nrit im rate IPONI pvr ATAIT tarh of Ihe new IHSl—SI P\e Radlc 1 %  card t„ i . | niHii \ tilled lo leaieter uW un* aller oau. n ....(h fram the lath day ot la i %  ,.. %  :. on npui %  %  %  •JIM .1 | fUM, 11*1 II WI1.1IAMS %  TAKE NOTICE JELLO I-OOIW CORPORAT...N .. ,..l %  Snt the law* of Ihe Stale of %  .i % % %  • %  • %  %  Irad.or bualne* addfea* li ISO P..ik Av.iu. -.. ..New York li.lted Slale. of An H tij. applied for Ine t'al.tr.iiion of tr.de mark tn Part "A 1 o* ReaTlaier ll re pee t of food. ,.nd inredI i Staanrta, puddmi* ;.". ,-ov.der.. ic .r .it ewtrac! .i M> i month fron 1"iISlh day ol Annual IM) ii'ileaa *ome person alnll in Ihe ineanlunr I in dupllrale to me at nv itKxition of lueti In-lr.Ml.rniirkf.nWwnMii lulled Ihi* Ilh dav ol Au*uit. IfSl. ii tfOJutAMI H Mark*. )• B SI Hi TICI I.OB Ur ORIENTAl. II. -in t IM1M sruji rs. IIOKI II ll>. I IM *.* TIIA.\Fii \ I OB SAaJ I I i l.. | ? Pi.miei elertitr kettle, new. (ll 00 %  S3S€ T,. %  1'l.ipham, Christ J l. Church Appl> II W. Webater, J \ Ball, %  IM XIS cr i II I 11 t I %  FURNISH in Style... MJrl 1 l-itb. %  %  room Cabinet*. Table* I. r D I %  .. %  ..... %  MM up. Caned and Rum Furniture. snur.r.n md oihr sem Hand and Traadla I regular and ch*ln*tlteh. Olimc rhone. W.trdrobe and otlu l L. S. WILSON SPRY ST DIAL .068 Truly A City Of All The Talents II!' Ml. >|H1. I V( II1-.Itlial nuike>Se.. Dial 3STB p, IT ml Dept II %  11On ACC1>S.II i> %  >..I B> i.nmn RWIIK FURNITURE OFPflCI CBAIaU ]„.| received .. %  hipineni of Office Porture Chain wllh three point adjiattment tea them today MECHANICAL Robert. Steel Baeh Truck. 0 Sp.,r Wheel* an. Trolla.a Don no. -Truck* pll *i a S P UUSSON VON a. Co MISCELLANEOUS JJ. A* Now. pilra Flit. Knight* Lid 11 I Jl-T F N SOMKONE, probably Dr. Johnsoa, grtota to an old friend: -'After forty years of deep fTien,1.!i,,, ] 1 nm as fond of. you as a new as-yiijiiiuiice." In the last few days, as Jul> has raced towards iu n nal hours I have met Bg DUUky frleiiua, 'ices, and new faces thai mciniiry becomes blurred. IN UnittVdjrjOlal i Mines lo London, or so ll would seem at th time nf the year, and why not? I^indon is still tliicental world and draw* maitkin.i LUfl And ludRliiR by last week Westminster Is tlu..-ntn %  %  UHJ dm ••.-. Bo—up wild the RNAURl. WARX al I CAimiKNWARE rl: bnwla etc al Oenen %  ll Street OALV nucKrrs 1011 oo n. u> Dd It |l SO each Theie arc ,.i gap) pncea at Ralph Heard t Lower gav OAL* AMMJ) SHEETS New It fi 1gg M-h Tft (J n M -. tl IV ..r.l LdnM B USA m MILNKM Wall Safe-and Steel offce Er-ulpmenI romprulng Deaka, Filing t|.illoner>and Pigeon llnlr OBSk Bo.e.. Plan File, lot Architect*. Card Index Cabinet*. WMta> pKper Balket*. Letter Tuvi He S P MUSBON BON A Co Md Dial 311) b SI In BSCORDB: Charlie Kuna. Bin*. nwkrM and wa will order for you If wa avent got II in atock. A. Barnea S Co., id. g.T.iiii r II srrciAioiTRR or a picci: TFJUIA I'OTTA Rirrrn c-.ixss in.t ihe thn.fcfor U A -imple 'peralmn rn.iirea IOOI Arm butter -11 Ihe ONLY 4 'I M I VII iillIHl IRON'S HARDWARE STORE. BROAD -.T SUNF1JBX In all ahade* at General lardwnre Supplic. H.ckett Sire-1. Dial WIB. 11 S -1 %  3n • MIES ThTce -3i Lar ..cellenl .1 m c liarage Ltd fire ood .. IS g SI n 'RF.X OIASBWAKF. Se _e at Q wi fil Hardwar* VrtrvTHt HELP PtIHirlON OIIKKEII Y wilh knowledge of Book-keep. per month Applicant mini liv. 3 mile* ol City A pp..' In peraon i m any day except Saturday. STATIONERY 15 II SI 3n dlatancc of A1 The Riav ol Mr. WeMoii ,r.c* HERE on the TagTBCfl in N i Mty CBMdeBP girls, all UK-MI-U %  %  alike. sitiKin,! "The Maple Leaf' *""**• and the French-Cunadian "Alouette' while M.P.S applaud from i—3n the open waBfJowB, I i Weaton sent them hete and has taken 50 British girb. to visit Canada. He is. of course, u RillllonairB, which does not reduce the generosity of this scheme. HE caBM BtUB Canada to the lirst war as a very younk. pmlt, wistful sapper in my section, having lied about his age. After the war, bring the sol i>f a baker, he decided to buy f UU of |,imily-owned b| England and modernise them. Thn (.nly anas was that he had no money, but he Bold HM idea to b tckanTg and got lh,. rnntu-y NOW his tnteippises extend to C.in.Hi i Ukd Ulg US A M. rt> Mil :. Iluyim; bUlln ludini Portnum and Mason. Ilia favourite Balance she<'t-. H: gray i I r. img: Flying on business. His graatMi enthuBiasm"' The British Empire. That is the story of BappgH Weston up to dale. The girls on the Terrace are just a pleasant i nterl ude. Sir Virlnr. pro-Saloon WHO Ii this luave, elegant man who has come lo hear the Foreign Affairs debate? It la Sir Victor Sassoon. whose hb name although he hardly ever sees them. He had big interests In Shanghai and refused lo pay the sums which the invading Japanese demanded when they took Shanghai in their war against tlm..i "Why are you so ntt-Japanesc? asked the victorious commander-in-chief. Sassoon replied. "I am not anti-Japanese. I am pro-British and very pro-Sassoon." Now he lives in the Bahamas When I asked him why, he said "I gave up India and Chins gavi me up." A .luil i %  ( West.mn-.ler NOW let the Empire drum roll for Judge MacKay of th %  Court of Ontario, who BM com to hear Chan.ellor Gaitskell's variations on an old iheme. The judge, who was badly wounded in the llrst war. Is a -real authority on StlBaD "Milton wrote his works on a vocabulary of 7.000 words." he loid rne earnestly "tlhalmgugslH ised 17.000 words, a great number %  Which he added to our language." III. h.iMlCfa i ((, %  ; M Brtttth InsUtUl s that 1 was somewhat horrified when hortlj Rita i., had ,.,, down In thn OfaUftrs the following dialogui .'nk.' nut:— Dr. Morgan (Vocialist); On a point of order. DM \ Mr. Deputy Speaker, the remark made by the honouiable member for Kidderminster when he said "What bloody nonsense"' Deputy Speaker: I did not hear Mr. Vihirm (TOTy) who sit:for Kidderminster and has a voice like a Riant nlling for %  bai "i of rum): I must pro1 mosl vehemently. I li.l n..i ."I 1. riLii.u-.' al ;il|. Mr. Folllrk (Socialist): Could the honourable gentleman tell us what word he used that sounded like "bloody" 'irputv Speaker Order' Ilieold \MIa>n (who had the Door): Whatever the boy soprano from Kidderminster. said, or did not say. I ghould hate to Ihlnk that he ud I agreed in our n rutioris of what nonMtisa niejiis. vet ih** ""> ">e lain day of %  •• .-..on .hall In the meant.. BBkli leglH.atlon The lu.lc „,...!. Dated thla Mh day a* AugMM 1SSI. Renali.it "i - CHANCERY SALE The uitdermentNtned proper!. *ill b.< art up i„r tab. % %  | FUbUg Bulldlnaa. Undirlowii. between II noon and I p in UM dale .peclSed bebw If not ttvrn .old it will be .rl m Iridav at the an* place and during Ihe umr hour* until i \ %  Menu at.l. I' WIIUAMK FRXDCHR-K ARCIIIIIAIJI COMIAD CI_\IBMONTt il Hill i PI IIS josrjm iTT7orjtAU> < IAIIIMUNTI: CNF-AI* 1 IUIITRTY Al.l. THAT .. Pla..utioi.i .il..ate In the pari.r. of Saint l-ucy and it am %  .1 bounding on land. Plant.lion on other land* AugMUu* Itinkaon and oa piece or parcel of land to, of Saint Lucy and I*lai %  %  ..-.aid I %  II late ..f |l,i|.|.i IM n i.-. rood. ;..(e ol Mr W..I ,, ,n ow or lotr ..( oil... DM the l-ublic Road fll'IINDlV All THAT It of Checker Hall Planutio... aiiuale In thi ilotraald ..t i K %  ..i il Urn lupi In .:,.., %  H ,,.U % %  'HI RRJ Jim Dial SS1S II g II Jn Bile Club 4301 s I SI ^n One rood eighteen perchaa Hutting and bounding on kkndH 04 OHt bnlaae and Enieit Augu.tu. HBtuan ..ml on .< Road i llinlit nf Way or however elw the img M1 but! i i %  .1 HiiniM ,: | THAT certain piece or parcel ol lai.il .part ..I Cnaeher Hall %  In the pariah of Saint Luce and laUn.i .(..:. One acre and BBW tatrgfaag ixnimg and nn.11.du4 an .ither landi "i Oil Courcy gknlagr and Kfneal Augu.lulliiikanii on .-,.| ... w \.i. a Bight of Wa> . oiher land* ol the -aid Oliver Ibi Anenti. Hlnbaan 0) h u nn Ma* -ir -.,11 %  -.... btrtl 1 1 FrirKlHLV AIJ. THAT place, piece ..1 1.11.. %  %  .. %  .1 ... ... .1 Oanirrt altuale in Ihe pariah ot Maim Lury m ll. l<*>iul 1 1 five acres .ixleen p'i. i.e. of land or I hen 1 llmmefleld. Ilabb. and Checker II,.: Ptanl %  1 bound T.xeibrr wiib the ntcaaviaps md -11 ami ^Mco* S^nMpCNEW s Tin > A STCAMKR aalli In NEW SI. OKMRRAl. ARTKiAS .ail* > "Tl^MUt wilt l>l Augurt A STaUMEIt aall. YORK SEKVIir mu.fcws smvitr ill latniu MI CANADIAN ftERVHE %  all. tdenl.ral AIIIIK R.ih.4. UKCOA rARTNBRV 1 il (ilUM s s AUMA iwMSva A.gu.t l7t^ Beplemb. Aug i Ii Bel.l. 1 ..> 1 mini M. \i.tTD. — NEW VOUK AM* (ill.F SERVICE AI'I'I.V:—1A COSTA % CO. LTD — CAN \ll \N -.1 HVICB BUSINESS NOTICE %  %  will re-pen M %  I ll. 11 11 1 IAMB CHANCERY SALE HAUn.uiOB. Thi' under men I Mined property will be I'M" lluildlng.. Budget.. —1. Miami 11 date .peclfled below If not lh.11 gnM ll ail) F 1... -I II* aame place and du.lng the aame hmi ipplicatloii i<> ine KFJ1NETI1 CARl.Tor, I 1 r aale al UM liegl.l ration OnV H •uneoadir .... will —..I Full paitl..il.1 Plalubfl Hi:"!!! ra.l7AIIF.TII ONBAIJ: AIJ. THAT re.Uln pice ... 1 %  Plantalinti in the pa lah of St. Lucy and I.Und ol llaibadial log bv admeaaurement three acre* and thin 1 the um or leaa .made up of four *epaiale paicel* i.f lai..l Mfttali U n b] .nln 1 .r,i TV-i IDBfl j and ten, fun. prichea. One ai re %  1 . f.niitern perchel. and one acre ir>pertl\rl) 1 hutting and bounding a* on 'ond* now or late of Themaa Jordan, on l-mda i-. •>. lalg ..( Mi. | on land, now or Ule of I OfgfaU*, Ml inpuBIH late of tbe ..! Cull. l.'i. I'laiitatlon or larwever eUe Ihe aaina "... Ii bound. TngMlllll wllh Ihe Mewuage or Kweiimit Ii. I %  %  InguUr olhei the huuaaa and BUI SI Uv igld 1. .1 11 %  landing and being with Ihe apputtan-ncea belxiniii.M ibireui hands with the OOOfe 1 am afraid." said Mr W.-li-iiky'8 wife. that yOU will nBVB • 1 >hake hands with BM' A BuW lor Mr. Etiktida havs < m Fli i DBy* rom IfodaUII llolti itl>. Of M> QUflJBt AM Bubllme." h Mikado, for I smnl Ul iiitr.KUi.e Mr K'n'ikr KLiKu.i.1. ixirtaii'. 1 lokvo. v.hn ha. nine U) IT1J ItOUM (01 lUtath. ||. %  ,.. v--l-. 0W %  : fun. NOW let u* adjourn to the town house of Sir Dennistoun Huiniy. whose iiivn;!n.ti valuable in the llrst u..i KOd whoM eltplri and port are be%  The molt Interesting guest at 11s paVty is the burly, highly intelligent L'noffli i Northern Itho-lesi.i. Mr. Roy Welensky. CMC. one of the powerful new men enieruing In 'he Colonial Empire. He was horn of %  in Southern HIHKKM,!, oecamo a r*tBvy-Wfdgbt boxing champion. then an engine drive., j u i-.t..i.-.i to th< unionist, a newspaper editoi. and P. "^ ''IOSBOJ .inally "I'rime Minister." For years he has been agitatin. for a union of the Northcm sj Southern Hhodesias. When II come about, as It will, he will hatvi UM honour of chief architect. HIS wife is as lively II %  ; % %  ii: li.'.. < %  ]'. When Mrs. Creech Jones, the wife of the then Colonial Socn lury, dined at the Welensky hoini 1 to be allowed to shakf For IfacArUi .: Li.' j,i.. i Ho ti %  UMl ine ., 1 %  C tUUonal nioii.mh and that full Ithority has passed to I'arlion*nt. Y.-s. Iborg bai be* rrbulldi-ig in Japan because the ti BJIMS .IM %  of wm-l. We ahake hands and bOW, for id of %  nte.l mist:, ti ,IUI lent eOtirtBfiy. House of tbe Perfect llosl Mil. II 1 y, ...use. where he if holding a reception What a marvellous vk iiMi OtM has from this window. and how 'ooks froi 'h' <; ifBTi im 1 %  1 1 i-oiin.. %  I 1. oil. 1 -,. 1 had >>' .. i-ii-jtii.iitiitaiinii. ..ii.I vrM lul. n plaoa by wii.-jiiilhin:. llim .,.... %  ( OLOND. CUtTON HHtrWN .1 DM ''* %  '! hoT. ..rut 1 1 nlghi thai we winn coming hystfti leal UM last I 1 dinnei parllS' %  %  .1. . %  pj % %  *. l-i.iei Thailand Hollaod, Yugoslavia 1 ei the ii.' ..11. Man duun [or Mi d In rnock lotemi ,. 11. ; • oi .in Patila ll %  1 1 %  i.f tha majority) ao %  %  %  Our guests wrnmth h Un 1 . .1 . %  -I l %  %  The Post BH hO h.lV. Alltt.l olli-rmg U) ell) thin own axptfuw, may I thanj j that thi attraeUvtj UM U I I paarad ra that alUtUO* tn1 tahj n lO March Wican gaze at tbe neaiby hai Ine II %  Skylon, whi.li some miscreant the point said epitomised the character of I. I H TAKE NOTICE FIH. SALE LAND llenl Itinl I %  Mi IKIII: 1UA me anil •1 It I HOI Ci Auction Sale I : Mi .1 > II. :. %  %  %  I Urili.r-.il.1. "o.l \ii..u-l \l t IIOM t i;s Jggkaa VI. IK1...I0.. a> lo. \ 1 s I \ \ I'hnne I'.i-' ll \\ I MltiNs 1:1 11 DING 1.1 \ i 1 ro ID -M \niWIIAI'" %  i % %  > %  .: 1 %  IF WAXED l'M'i R rut: IMI'iHIII .If I.M r :,' fr.Vfff If Cornei t lb .1 .. \ IS YOUR SAVINGSACCOUNT INCREASING? Did H ..' I %  Pollcj %  . %  %  plan is boulnji down i %  otntrthlni along tha Ui I ,',%',;: SUN LIFE ASSURANCE CO. OF CANADA Head (J ireal K. H, lONBfl A< OMP \N L1M1TI l> Ri; %  %  B %  sdot, Q •+*,•,•,*,•.•.:•.:*.•.•. •>'. ''W''W'''W W' ,>! I OII S \ I. K 2 Hundred Empty Barrels FOR PALING USES ITial GENFJ1A1. rOODS CORPORATly^. a corporattim niranUed and ling under the laWl of the Stale of Delaaate. United State* of Aanenca y-o. trade or b.1.11 .-.. addreaa tl JS0 %  aril Avenue. New York. New York. Lniled SJUte* ol Amertca. Manufacturer.. haa applied for the reglitratlon of a rde mar* In Pa.t "A" of HfiiHr • 1 tea ond coBi* •""* alter 1 I'iOdav of Auguat %  %  %  la duplicate to n .,1 npvoMtwin of auch re BHUB ran be *>e 1,.... 1 M.,HI i. %  ftuaagt %  Begi. K WIIJJAMv !. ^ ark is a i a AMtVEHTMSB in thv ABVmCATB RACESKIsIITS A re what C ounts! the Most E mclent and S peediest method on the cooking track Is GAS for Cookinr CHILDREN PLEASED WITH THEIR FAVOURITE BOOKS!! £M ynur i /l..n ( IHUIKKN'S NEW H.I.ISTKATKII KNCVCl.OI'F.niA I.I.MI.KT BOBBS IN—b> O.ploin W. K. Johns TBE WKSTOIV TALISMAN—by Prrcv P. Weslerman ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE -THI-: MOST Minn 11 \ #.\rm%\" .{DBMS' MANUFACTURING GO. GOVKRNMKNT HILL. -tea. 0C-1r*e

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    rwo i:\KIMIHIs AliVOCATT TIII'RSDW. \I'-md. Dr Lind*lrom i. Todd. Miss Bergman') fed her thrrr with Pia nu wife nr 4 KJM Bergman Ms) h> %  nd husband. R..lwrt'j Ro*seltayed wtlh fchem In last ; %  0 "Cot | HIT baby bMuttfnl < a fine Sunny Weather in Trinidad P IS8ENGE1 M R. i.brir ERS arriving from %  noon laid Carlo ttu i Pierce in sunshine. Very ll'ke the weather they b 'rival at Sea well, overt i ' i i ortord Holiday Over CYRIL GOMES WOO U with Barclays Bank in Damt lmboon holidaying H. Brtitindos since July 31-' i i" roturn to | n< Airways. Hon. II I) Shilling-ford. Mr HuKh Rerifern and Mr. John !<"•-< %  %  arrived from St. LueU on %  ii.' Hue t. nsM %  B.B.C. Radio Programme THt UD4T l 01 It I tl IS am J*ro(T. lanes* ciw*. u w %  n %  i.nuh II >nn. Tha Naa. i %  u > InltrUid*. %  I says, tire n ilnki thi-. may be i of the dldcrcnce in feeding, %  Off To St. Vincent i(s HAZEL MACKINH leave* 'Copy Boy' Penelope F ILM on | Awttr %  .<*•> djKLtu II Russsll Mi.dt W a *ch D .n atW Coral's WOMH .I' M HI.. %  trivia* In louden The* will i, Ihtlt daneins bsielaoi ma* PaNP an Autl.jl.an lac* iKU I i lark March ay to Uhe U.S. from England with his wife Florem c in Use gin-on Elizabeth. Airways for Mrs. March says the"ir daughU i ... four otlir-i PtjrtOM (18), left college th|. HIP siirls from liarlwidns who have summer, wants to become >ne to St Vincent for a holiday, writer. "She has taken a job oi Owen Cecil, Miss the New York Post" sayt Mrs ml tin K %  MiH;,/H liitii-> March. She Is ft copy boy.' Is spartan" rh.-e*eman. "aVsO fetches tea for threturning Today Useful \i HN M OD£R ? ll ? INO ,h, '. r tv uml Incidental Intelligence today b] H (. St Virn.nt |0 )<>ll I ng down the OM ... In. r • M 1 > %  M told nu yooterdaV, but X free eouatrj and very wolL *T*HANK hea lay. hut 1 [or the pwi low the „in verandah* come In very do i '" M ,l l : Tri %  ei.v. ,i rr) a ra. ii.id tod ; -till I'.S.-l. wife pleases.—Win THI: \l\ I:.M I IIKS OF I'lPA 15^ THE WAY .... By Beachcomber CK03 i OlIU : P ,%  %  > f 1 .. rj lu %  — i i ] //* To Datv APPARENTLY several people /A. were itiniriaad at my revelation that the craze for beini tiittooed ii.iv spread. It Is no lOBEar eonflnod to aallors. Onr well-known hostess appearet rooanUj m the staik at ,1 On 1th the names of her foui husbands on hor back. The ftrs: are created out ID markin; ink. Ain.llu'1 fashionable back of generous proportions, u haln i i'l fur mere tattoo gossip, such n "MiHlcent is After ('ieorfe." i Watch Tony and Muriel.* I hlafalj %  auafactorj w borfe at Uu ahaonnal dog in eira doubtful i urn I cea either nonni i ad by i And Onallj what conlog within the %  court ruling laid that ol Ifaa Act! 1 i Diannor uhqai Ittmk Kfi-ii'w lefa would nor%  bark." Thai Oboidtulti drint,-d in be the a i %  u.i long and srandanf icurj on I'nflibjecf. ru> % %  : uh.it f \ tl i e irordj Ihe publl i \>\>< ii dog. and tho normal r. the. than t,. be read troro covet cover nt a ItUni i rpenlng n Itanfleld, l, II ^ III I.i ^, in: i not a lutprue, ,t uu thought The wvan I AM constantly %  dtounded ^ ratlowa on page 213 sucgest that %  the amount of completely use in Huntingdon familial l* s#i knowledge within everybody'' Uutrade Uoi aaebj today. Fur instance. I hav< ells us that Just lead a self-confident proeighth son "1 Old "'Cubby." noiuicement that the men a into On ironmongery Cardiff wear the smartest hats b > % %  V.ilf. Hut thi'it England If it is true. |i doesn %  %  than handsome matter twopence. If it In un|ii< s ; Ri it doesn't matter twopenrc. Any angth) tin"'-''! 11 ", but, aa bow, there can be very few pea i.iiii-'. of what is in stoic for pie in a i no note Ubetone, i' ,, : ''such Vaiiey, H. K. Varper, n l.. HeaTsehurch or Herkhamsted to\ ,w. K Will.M. N and t iirililf. ;in. CIS pm %l*t*i"*: Ml p IPrograms ft SS p in T<>-4->'a Mpurt im —wu pm aisa M p m Scwrling a DVIH-IIV* I p n. HMIW NV.OMI %  1 p tr Book* t RMd %  M p m Tlw Ail. S tl p in laaarluda. • SB P m mm ihr Eaiiurui t p m Tunrlul Twvfiii** IX pa D Von B ii f o ibai. I 41 D in Bparu Pwp-ich. io p m Th# Neva, IO to p n > Iitrrludr. 10 II p 1,1 0cliM.li, Airi,., n> I*. p i Hara ana Thatr Cigarette Ends Surprise Girl From London They Are So Much Longei By PSEDKUCK COOK '-\ ... roitK. TWENTY n ill watchers heard late last night from a smiling 20-yeai-o\i LOftdon typlat what really u k ftr the %  It waa not tinhlgta bulld%  i | .. oadwaj — it was the cigarette ends To Judy Itrren. from Hill Road, Keraangton nottatng tinduYen 11 London und New York i the t.ii-i that nvei bi re paanli they have lit it. %  aid tson-emohing Judyt -h : i %  %  one thing tells me mure thi .thing else 1 have Been." Still Daminu 1 Judy is the girl arho round tin Rlptato out %  nu of stylish new clothaa and £800 spending money by UklO %  I Ito Mr. Hank | tlllon for the title of Ml ival he had only one day in New York lUrdoni weteotnlng vUriton to Maunhattta fell out one h> one before he. parked 16 bowl were oval But early this RaOrnlna Judy was still dandni In a night-clun four hours before ihe i la on her Wa) to II • %  lulu. Australia. India. IUI) BIW home ngnin. On Top < ii I'arapet her whniwiNd one-day visit bare %  i-.*d held two P i ferences. ba cade of Brlttah eara .ii '*) m.p.n. 'or a morning tali oca, bean b i* kataga at the largest cln. She had ap|eaii'd raata poaed foi graphers. climbed mi to a parapet 100ft. above the %  treat I more picture*. Tourril New YovV irom one end to the other by cor She had visited the Unll tioni, been guust of honour al ocktail appearance last night ail on a mid-night radio show. This Time, thicken The girl they could Dot Basda 0DO other record that In pressed New Yorkers. Shi!%  .• %  %  lunch She hud a 15s. dish ol ohl salmon And for dinner UU Viiin turned down steak ir avour of chicken at Eaa "There is only one thing 1 nan nlaaed," she said, "and lhat'i i oenana split There simply has no **""""" -,.KS "I I hold scour* in the knowledge that -.and more often, if you ar and wiuld certainly, has to bite back choose you agofamous last words in Morton speaking F.ll grva in i -• '.i'i • .is!) does it .1 He Choose you %  B in programme 7*=^ ass ,n l DAM l i inu PI 4/4 i -r • >Mu*< n TOWN IHal till % 1 " %  "THERE'S A GIRL IN m HI \KT i i. I, CHAMBV %  IH,C,S M. M\l...!' IS JWKf-OT % %  Ml:.%  I s'..j, B> Cnrca M I i.l ntgS ''" %  %  alAKO M MiUI* -nd Cjrtihinlrt ro-n.i i YOUR LAST CHANCE TO SEE THE WORLD'S MIDDLE WEIGHT CHAHPIOSSHIP SUGAR RAY ROBINSON vs. RANDOLPH TURPIN *i %/.\ %  Sao. 1.. dn "aiaai ruinm liilOi%  v I i i, , a *i 'i • m "NBWS HOI si.' %  ••• IMl M M.C.II ,s -' < n mi i" -OM. or IHS HAM Jimn, OI>TtN lllal H vi4 t. All IV mi GAItDEN — ST. i \Mi l"i S* KiDII — a.v am iin oaaaM HAIR irnicr Tlan.'j %  ( HA.U. *S WAU-OTT" v.-i'"k*A.. jn, FIGHT. AT Aj>l VI II I.l II I l.\i;>IA (Member Only) TO-NIC.HT C at) BfNG CROSBY JO\N FONTAINE IN "THE EMPEROR WALTZ" Color h> Icchnirolor T SONGS' CommrnHng FRIDAY KihANN TODD. CLAI'DI-. RAINS In "ONE WOMAN'S .STORY" GLOBE THEATRE TO-DAY 5 411(1 1.18 P-m. Rids A %  m i: STREET II IIII LAST .rk Si, v V.llffV" -tHU III.SIH I II 1 1 'ES .KAM' r 'I 'I \ MM I IO-IIA1 HOMHAV TALKIES Ashok Kumar — tfumlu sh.m'i in KISMET Our tn-i Indian Talkinc film. BVKRYBODY WILL ENJOY THIS PICTURE Indian1.0: Non-Indians ISe., 2tr.. 36e. EMPIRE 4.4S A 8.3t with the Republic Mualral HIT I'AIIAIM l.l Songs—Iancrs Muale— Mirth IIOYi 4.30 It 8.1S arttt the A r lion a ....... -Sunset CAHSON •DAYS OF BUFFALO BILL" and (All..n ( %  ockjr) LANE •SALT LAKE RAIDERS'' MTARTINT. lO-.MORROlV 2..10 A 8.110 tnd I'ONTIM'INr. DAILY AT 1.15 A l.lt MATINEL: SAT1RDAY MORNING al 9.30 E Al l I II E JAMES STEWART Hits %.!! w,.h Barbara HALE,, Itpiitiuij i.l AHtt /..1.KH1..11 .1 FILM mull it III.W mi-: hOlll iv FRONT I f.KVII.YK >l I'I If-lit l-l It 0Md.th^th. aj 'f^ SOON! ..-.II IVI I 'Ii %  M miaarv mafia elota. Mi I '.! I0| I • nan. !,,. nunb I M III) %  | % %  %  t 1 %  | i mmarent Rupert and the Sorcerer — 5 poalUon to conn !" ~ rTHIllllV if* !" ^ TO THE SCREENS BIGGEST ENTERTAINMENT BALL OF THEM ALL /// \ U PI U[> %  s ailiaii lug. cavr. ma I 1) • I>MIW.I ... ornatlr.B 111 %  %  .mrailj II la n I*. Tn t Ii '0 illrt (I .. o -Y v 141 railffi fl->%  A Choice Of Scents %  if m it wo will Und UM .ii BI 11. raiidi bin [ %  our head, high und open our noctrlU to the winds of heaven i.i will know only Hi., nri ot the eountryside. That ts m) Robert UubuinRb talkinn in %  BS.C programm,. .idled 1 Speak for My-ill' Plus: LOCAL TYI.1NT ON PAtADI EDDIE HALL Btalinp "Btgln Ihe BeRUine" MAVIS WILTSHIRE ry Star" NIVILLI I'HII.l.ll s -1 Apolod %  PftXelCIS HYI'OI.ITK II MARTIN HAYNKS I I CHaSTON HOLDBI '' % %  H I A Hal Mmltal Shor. TACKAOI OF RHYTHM lor (111* show >ou solU or Here early t'auac IO the ORANDDST WEEK-END ENTIRTAINMINT SPECIAL SATIROM AT '..? Icpublic Double set CARSON in %  KING OF GAMBLERS BORDERED SPUNS 36" l..7 Beauiiful Designs and Colours PLAIN SPUNS 36" 81.10 In Pink. Lemon. Peach. Green. Blue and White FLOWERED SATINS 33 8:ir. SHANTUNG 36" SI. Ml EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4604 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 IWSI PLAZA KRiiMi ron N Tnmorroii (I'nd.iy) 2 30— 4 45 ind 8 30 p m EARTHENWARE Tea Cups & Saucers l.tuirli. Breakfast. Soup & Dinner Plales Veyelnble llishos with Covers Meal MfbM Milk Jue< l-Pl. Cups with Covets Hecoraled Tea Pots Iletontled Bowls—with & withottl Covers. a THE stviiii V IIOY ro-oiM:i:.\rivK