Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


Hav badros

ESTABLISHED 1895



SATURDAY,

AUGUST 4,







1951





Compromise

On Truce Below The!
hirty-eighth Parallel] |

"THE BREAK in the deadlock seems Seaeridnapt
one way or another. For eight days, Allied and |

Red negotiators have argued fruitlessly. The 19th!

cease-fire meeting starts at 11 a.m. Saturday.

For several days, the official line in KaeSonz has
been that the U.N. Command holds owt for the!
truce line on the present front, and the Communists
have demanded the line along the 38th parallel}.
boundary, hetween South and North Korea. The|’
U.N. Command has never, even though the present
battle line has been virtually unchanged for weeks,
permitted U.N. correspondents to say exactly where
it is. Thus, it seemed vossible that the comvromise
might be reached on the line below the 38th parallel.

It was disclosed in Tokyo that——








the U.S. Army issued a Press r e
release. to Japanese newspapers | U. e Determined
three days ago saying that the .

truce line ought to be fixed To Car *
somewhere between the present ry On

front and the Manchurian-Sibe-
rian border. I
A U.N. briefing officer in Seoul
asked about the report that the :
U.N. demanded a truce line north Cements t. 3.
> + * _ E - a Vay
* — 2 a oat — J ere and top Washington officials Twere
ceuhineat? ie te o ‘‘reported determined to carry on
‘ : the Kz + € . io sane
Brigadier Genera] William Nuc- ig CBee, an
kols. the briefing officer at this}... q,, Ae are wilt
cease-fire base, said of the state- This n
ment By Communist correspon- scan ceapieente rosie. he-
dents in Kaesong that it concern- Y on e

5 side seem to be up against a com-
das Z0~
ed a substantive part of the nego-| bination of familiar Soviet Com-

Truce Talks

By J. M. HUGHS

a that he could not niunist stalling tactics and the
comment. , traciti

Apparently reliable reports in-| 6; iS a timeless patience of the
dicated that the U.N. Command

Even so officials privately de-
clared, United States and its U.N.
allies must stick it out — first be-
cause they deeply want peace in
Korea if that can be had on reas-
onable terms, and second because
ai this stage at least they do not
want any responsibility for break-
ing off talks,

A check among well informed
officials here showed no evidence
that Ridgway had been trying to
get a date set for ending talks if
the present deadlock persists. On
the contrary it is said that Ridg-
way and Washington see eye to
eye on the need for patience and
persistence in dealing with North
Korean and Chinese Reds.

Reds Want Peace
Among authorities here there
is in fact a moderately strong
belief that Reds really want to

has laid down a demand in the
Kaesong cease-fire talks for a
truce line far north of the present
battle front. Reports which came
from both Communist and Allied
sides indicated that a compromise
to break the deadlock in the ne-
gotiations, now in its ninth day
might soon be in sight. The devel-
opment which introduced an en-
tirely new factor into the nego-
piagne included:

. In Kaesong, Communist news-
a permen said that they had been
permitted to “reliable”? Red
sources as saying that the U.N.
demanded a truce line “far north”
of the present front.

90 VIOLATED ARMY’S
CODE OF HONOUR

WASHINGTON, Aug. 3







Eee eee aegis

The Army charged 90 West/end the Korean war, At the
Point eadets including some West|same time they want to end it
Points football players of viclat-|on terms as favourable as they
ing the Army’s code of honour by}; can get.
accepting outside help to pass | Hence it is expected that they
class-room tests. will hold out to the last and per-

No names were announced and /haps threaten resumption of tight-
the Army said none would be. jing on each major point on which
A spokesman said the number | they would like concessions from
discharged was the largest involv- | the U.N. side.
ed in any single investigation since State Department officials who
the founding of the Academy. have had‘ years’ experience in
—U.P.| negotiating with Russian diplo-
mats assert that the only way to





; deal with tactics of this kind is
To-day’s to be just as firm and just as
Weather Chart patient as Communist representa-|}
| tives.
|

So far as the issue of the pres~
ent deadlock is concerned—that is,
| the location of an armistice buffer

zone in Korea—what the U.N. side
‘has been demanding for almost

Sunrise: 5.50 a.m.
Sunset: 6.22 p.m.
Moon: New

Lighting Up: 7.00 p.m.



— 4.25 a.m., 5.40 i+. weeks is that the Reds agree
Low Tide: 11.04 a.m., 11.11 to base the truce on the present

battle line, rather than centre it

pa on the 38th parallel.

—UP

Truman Calls For
Showdown With

Britain And France
(By HAROLD aE





August 3.
PRESIDENT TRUMAN has called for a diplomatic

showdown particularly with Britain and France to bring

Western policy more closely into line in the danger areas




















‘tion of the island landed at Hako-



Likely

Poles Seek
Asylum
In Sweden

STOCKHOLM,

Four Polish refugees-

and a woman—-staggered out of a
‘flying junk yard" to-day and
asked for political asylum after a
hazardous four-hour zigzag flight

Aug, 3.
-three mer















AN



a



ATTENDANCE



PRICE: FIVE CENTS

Allies Take Million
Doliar Mountain

EIGHTH ARMY _ICPS., Korea, Aug. 3

UNITED NATIONS figit:ng men stormed and

captured the strategic heights south of Kum-
song on the central Korean front in the face of
Communist machine gun mortar and artillery fire.

Allied infantrymen at midday captured the
heights known as the “imillion dollar mountain’’ as
a result of an enormous amount of fire power that
poured into it before the assault. An Allied spokes
man said: “The operation was a complete success.
We inflicted heavy loss»s on the Reds.”






U.N. troops inched up the slope -——
under a hail of Communist ma e
chine eun mortar and artiller Hi; i ‘ I .
’ fire aided by a fleet of eight je arrinan S
fighters which plastered Re e e e
positions with jellied gasoline Optimistic

This followed an advance of mor.

than three miles in the same sec-



across the southern Baltic } 2. C
The clothes of the refugees were | tor. ‘ By = s LARK ‘
soiled an@ torn and the revolvers i For two days before the fina 1 T “HERAN, Aug. xi
they carried had been fired several j attack, air and artillery bombard p Inited States Presidential En-
times. They said they had “elim- ments had been hurled at the hill voy... W Averell Harriman | told
inated” guards watching the plane | The Fifth Air Force announcec | * aoe conierense Friday: “I am
after crawling up behind them on P that 53 American B26 light bomb atisfied that both sides are enter-
their hands and knees. ers hit the North Korean capita |i these negotiations with a
There was at least one bullet of Pyongyang on Thursday nigh }SP!tit of good will”; commenting
: > & :
hole in the plane—a fantastic sin- n one of the heaviest raids ir [O" the resumption of the Angl
gle-engined merger of parts of MEMBERS of the Trinidad Ail Steel Percussion Orchesira pictured im action at the South Bank recent weeks They destroyed} iranian oi talks. “Because ot
every known type of aircraft. Festival of Britain. huge supply dumps and left the that, I am optimistic that a solu
It is understood that the refu-}| ity wreathed in flames tion will be worked out.
gees had been fired upon as they. Harriman said he had been
made their break for freedom P i » » » A flight of 80 jets paved the Jasked by Richard Stokes head of
With their landing + Bull- ra w ar i eS ¢ V en B s u € ¢ vay for the United Nations grounc [the British mission now flying to
tofta to the south of Malmo they roops to capture a heavily de- | Teheran to remain here adding
became the second group of Polish | F G lL. fended hill in the Kumhwa area. }“I am very glad to do so. It may
refugees te come under Swedish 0 orm sOV The jets plastered the crown of |mnot be necessary for me to stay
Oe on a two days. mor. A} he e alte PARIS, August 3 the hill with jellied gasoline anc | throughout the negotiations.” IL
ay ‘olish seamen mutinied in hea aoe Allied forces wrested the peak | will stay as long as I can be useful”
; r A ren reside sas é $ é B $
shies sal alan os. ree P hp Brie Feb from dug-in Reds after nearls But he specified that he “wont
. - ‘ " . r ‘ et ae : vem | jay- z fight sarticipate in negotiations.” Har-
litical asylum, 7 MOSCOW, August 3. Pleven, 50, to try to form 7 as = "Nat rplane rift . retusbd to a a wllioes
% : Bee te SOVIET PRESS” t its ECE ate | Goverr nit hich woul . pnitec ations warplane an retus col e r
They were questioned today at THE S c ESS"pPiit its unprecedented debate}Government which would cell mounted 224 sorties by 6 pam, 5 [as the first order of business nego-
Waa te kl cha ihe with the British over comparative freedoms in the tw en to France's 25 day politica | 4¢ them did light bomber attack: [tiators will re-open the Abadan
The Polish seamen are under- countries on a running basis, Pravda published a dispatch!” pjeyen has not yet giver} pre-dawn rae ' pred Pg ie ae the we ge
» to be eadi sin- from its Lo 9: by ee : S Pilot ciaims for the day includ- rut saic 1e longer the flow o
sexity of cele reqaats te ne Saas > = wore Correspondent saying British authorities} Auriol a definite reply. ed 16 supply and troop building Joil is delayed, the more the pre-
the ri sht t st +o Swed me adioar were encroaching steadily on the freedorn of the Press and Auriol’s action came afte: | destroyed or damaged, and on | vious market of Iranian oil will
2 right to stay in Sweden, rz Ps the ‘movement of peoples. Maurice Petsche 55, non-part)], aridc . ved ; be absorbed by other produc-
than be sent back to Communist am This same Communist party] c g ft oad bridge damagec ee : I
. : _ A nascar t Sé 1 Ss arty | Conservative and former Fiaanc tions.” He said so far there had
ph behind the Russian iron eon staged the —<_ by eee Minister failed to win the As A Sena supply ane i }been no shortage of crude oil,
‘cdsies " . ; yy . rome. ip the challenge of British Foreign | sembly confidence vote Andori on the Eastern battlefron [adding however that certain re-
The airplane refugees said that To-da Ss Winners Secretary Herbert Morrison to| Premier o aa ; vas left in flames after a shor | fined products. ort. Dis-
at one point in their flight the door lias) & niabeen ag T Premier early today fined products were short. Di
f the plane ripped open and . |] Hour Book FOOTPAD peviish a statement by him. The Pleven said he must first con- | Ut vicious jet strike. cussing general United States
° plane ripp pen ana one ; a é Morrison - Pravda exchange was], Fifty-three B26 light t ber: { sistance * Tre ar
of the men was almost swept away ||! * Sweet Rocket iss Panic lmdioublished ati neti car sult various party leaders t ! Smet HERE /pOmot economic assistance for Iran Har-
before the other pulled him into neon ne The ‘enir ardisseey att ration that aswartain his chances of succes |S™Mashed at Pyongyang last nigh [riman said “I hope while here to
the plane. 9 10 : Célleten didliaian eo ac c o ae “er ue before replying to Auriol in one of the heaviest raids it Thave the chance to familiarise
They were detected by a pur- The Eagle Apollo aete See neat oie attair re] Most observers opined tha |Tecent weeks on the Communis }myself with the problems of
2 ¥ % 1e se ous °SsS Cc it o "g t 7 » > Di 4 og LP * . ave >
suing plane and managed to take Osea ands’ tveas eine | Russians were attaching to the} Cleven’s chances of success ii capital The y de atroyed hug |Iran’s economic development,
their own ship up to a dangerous thes “ae atte & t« ; a mee supply dumps and left the city ir wake
ro ship up ad gerous Best Bishes Vanguard exchange and their probable forming a Government were fai flames
9,000 feet where they hid in the aa hie willingness to continue it from bright “The, rdier Capté
clouds, 3.30 Elizabethan Gan Site e Dur } ae te Che Bombardier Captain, Tom is
The plane bore no military Rebate Elizabethan It seemed reasonable to assume| During the recent French elec {4 Grimm said: “About 10 minute: | 9 - Re
Pp A that very Tit sovie 7 tions he was committe t e 1
identification but ‘“Pozam”, name] ]4 1 Notonite Aberford ny Gvery tetate Soviet citizen— } © ons, vas committed ' yafter our bombs dropped, ther. ua Ss
of a Polish Aviation Club was dis- Flieuxce High & Low ene . official a ne a adi We chure! | was a mighty explosion. The ex
cernfble.—U.L. > icy s been wipec out—wi x2 | SC. 01S, a § ep which observer plosion seemed to light up a five
455 Mary Ann Bow Bells familiar with the debate said most certainly will lose hit le. radius.” ( oO cano
Suntone Suntene Ph ‘ a tad “dT mile. radius.
‘ @ exchange will be reprinted] Socialist support should he at-
s ‘
Reds Undergoing "[5 40 Harroween — Harroween “ih Suzany~ papers “in Russia, and} tempt to form a Cabinet. Another large explosion prob- |MANAGUA, Nicaragua, Aug. 3
High and Low Sun Queen Mescow Radio broadeasts several Informed sources theugh [ably of a large ammunition dump Strong earthquakes split open



Vigorous Training
SAPPORO, Hokkaido,



Japan, Aug. 3.

More than 10,000 Soviet air- e }
force personnel and _ paratroops Pr
garrisoned at Saghalin are under- ‘ ze |
going vigorous training dailv,
according to a Japanese who _ For the second year in succes-
arrived here after fleeing there | Sion the Barbados Turf Clut
two weeks ago. Sweepstake run on the Summer

Juaji Sato, 51, lumber yard meeting will be paying a prize

higher than any other paid out on
similar sweepstakes run anywhere
in the B.W.I. The exact amount
this year will be $40,392

Although this is not as high

employee working under Russian
management after Soviet occupa-~-
before visiting

date on July 21

here, os

j aid s the record amount of over $43,000
4 8, said there still are at least | jig out last vear yet It still topped
2.000 Japanese remaining on |the second highest mark of $36,000

Saghalin.—-U.P. paid out by the Trinidad Turf Club

from their sweepstake run on the
recent June meeting. The Barba-
dos Turf Club sweep was closed
last Thursday afternoon but until
the draw sometime next week
tickets may be obtained from sell«
ers. It is therefore not too late



Koreans Protest
Againsi Cease-fire
PUSAN, Korea Aug. 3

South Koreans again demon-/to get one’s chance at such a grand
strated against the cease-fire| prize. The sweep ended off at
agreement which would leave|}BBB which is about five serie:
their country divided while in|} less than last year. .
Kaesong. United Nations and Red ie
negotiators were trying to come; The lesser prizes will also be a
together on a division line. Un- few hundred dollars below last
der a hot sun 3,000 people of all|¥€ar’s amount but tnese too will

be quite substantial. Point money
to be added to each stake will be
$117.00 per point. The Stewards’
Stakes, biggest stake of the meet-
ing, will therefore be worth $1,568
to the winner while the Barbados
Derby with subscriptions added
, Should be worth over $2,000 to the
winner of this event. The first race
to-day starts at 1.30 p.m

massed in the downtown
public square and listened te
speeches assailing their allies,
charging them with appeasement
with the Communists on_ the
brink of a total defeat, A fana-
tic member of the Greater Korea
Young Men’s Corps appealed tc
his audience “why did our broth-
ers die? Not to leave the father-
land divided at the 38th parallel
but to achieve unified independ-
ence.”—U.P

CHILEAN JOURNALISTS

ages



U.K. Oil Mission
Leave To-day











Pacific Pact Will Be. Signet Sept. |

Kicken}

sentative














times the daily contents of news-
papers.

Diplomatic
lieved such



sider




they

Morrison,

section

Els

se

why §
edented world publicity ?

inprec
It i

Russians have

qu

he



dealing

give t

parti

jarters

got the
cularly

here
an exchange of ideas

be-



edge

m

or

the

Socialists might support his nom

i
I
k

Company

in foreign affairs. ,

he exchar

es

pointed out here that













adul





lived through two!

reported, Bombers made their

vargoes of 500-pound demolitior

bombs through clouds by radar
Other B26 bombers destroyed ot

was the sides of the long dormant Co-
siguina Voleano on Friday send-
ing tons of Water crashing down
from the crater in its centre and

nation Premier but baulk
yarticipating in any Governmen’
leven might try to form







co widely publicized could be con- | In view of the length of t lamered 40 Communist vehicle: finundating the small Pacific coast
aucive ty m 1iual Eenefit fpresent crisis, some observer ravelling North Korean roads. Or port of Potosi

Some hope was _ voiced | that thought Pleven might attempt t the ground, two U.N. units whicl _ The town was reported to be
other statesmen of Morrison's! >... a Government without) Shoved eff on Thursday in a minor|virtually destroyed and casualties
stature would follow his lead and] use this unique clearing house of ea pat DRED RMN lcontral front, captured their ob-]Earthquakes which rocked the
diverse viewpoints, Prav@a print- | jectives in a three-mile advane: farea early on Friday morning
en new London dispatch with- BR. GC. Gets New within two hours. The tank in-7Wwere. reported to have opened
oul referring specifically to Mor- ? { ntry patrol moved out from the |huge eracks on the side of the
rison The dispatch was by V “i i newly won positions, but returned |voleano inactive since 1835
Mayevsky Bauxile Kiln {i ifter ocaiiing under Communist —U.P

Among the ‘sins of omission From Our Own Correspondent fire from the north. 7
with which he charged the Britist GEORGETOWN, August 3. | Farther west, an Allied uni ”
press was the accusation that i‘ A new million and a half dole battled 11 hours in a futile at- “ADVOCATE
consistently ignored the brilliant|}lar bauxite kiln plant capable of! ternpt to dislodge Communi: pays for NEWS
Soviet fulfillment of post-wer| producing 38,000 tons of dried| troops entrenched on a hill Ii -
economic planning a reduction in} bauxite goes into oper: es on | finally withdrew under smal Dial 3113
the cost of living, and achievc-| Saturday at the Demerar: 40ux-| arms machine gun and hand gren .
ments in Soviet culture ite Company's McKenzie aan |ade fire, Day or Night

A. Mayevsky wrote that the}sions on the Upper Demerar U.P
British Government increasingly | River
persecutes partisans of peace, dis- It is one of the two kilns bein ee
eharging many of them from their|erected by the Company in ai
jobs and causing the arrest of|effort to increase the bauxite
others for participation in pe ce} production ta meet world deman aft"
demonstrations. He added the |The second kiln is already unde
schools and Government office*|construetion, estimated to cos
are subjected to constant obser- | $2,000,000 and will be the world’
vation by the Secret service largest bauxite kiln and ig 2h

Not one-sided feet long nine feet external di

Observers suggested that while | amete; and will produce a supe
Morrison may be jubilant fo calcined commodity required i
getting such an immense Soviet] the industry
audience read his views, it is far The Acting Governor and press
from being a onesided affatr. men inspected the new plant to

PTavda's editors doubtless con-|day as guests of the Bauxite



Storm Reported
Off Bermuda







devastating wars within one; MIAMI, Aug. 3
generation and are facing another j A ship discovered a 50 mile a
holocaust according to evexything | hour storm southeast of Ber
they have read and heard and be-|â„¢muda on Friday which showe
Neve that Anglo-Americans are|signs of growing into the fil
planning to unleash it. jhurricane of the official trepica

Civil liberties sume relatively | Storm season The centre of th
minor importance against the apes ae ate eet oe

1 $ 4 aracteristic
baekground of such beliefs but- aie ina Sete aes aot ify
tressed repeatedly by public ition | ar harm’s w in the open At
of maps, articles and speeches re lantic.
printed from the Western Press The federal storm warning set
showing how the war against the} yjcoo here said the storm wa
Soviet Union must be fought. about 500 miles southeast of Be
—UP. nuda
5S. ASKS FOR ‘OR PEACE The torm’s centre ‘
northwestward about 18
WASHI“GTON, Aug fan four and probably woul 1

Authoritative ‘ources reveaicd ast of Bermuda, etir hat
‘on Wednesday that the United |‘ sa day
States has urged India and Pakis- Grady Norton, Chief Foreca
tan to halt their border dispute for the Storm Warning Servi
over the state of Kashmir “in oy said that the torm pose I
interests of general peace in As | immediate threat to anything ey
ae ss —U.P. : Lee! hips in the area ue 9

Sir

Democri

that “each party
armed attack in
of the arties
to it vn
declares it
commor
its constitutiona
In additior
declared tk
jointly by mez
Te elf

itic
field
pact, | sentative Walter

a

and

1a



i

tepublicar
Judd

In the tripartite pact it i

|
of the world. | \t
Informed sources said that after studying his National VISIT NEW LOND:
Security Council's Report of Soviet preparedness, Prurhan | SCOTLAND YARD The British gree see ?
decided the time had come to close all gaps politically and Lord Privy Seal Richard Stokes,
militarily in the defence system against Soviet aggression. LONDON, Aug. 3, . [will leave for Teheran at 3 p.m,,
He straightaway made _ five preparations and the apparent Four Chilean journalists tour-|GMT to negotiate with the Iranian
challenging moves: failure to face up to the brutal|ing Britain, to-day visited New Government on the settlement of
1. Publication of the Anglo-|facts of Russian strength Scotland Yard. the oil crisis which has shut down
American draft treaty for Japan | Informed sources said Truman The group has been shown] Vital Abadan refineries of the
on a take it or leave it basis would seek to put the deadline! the Festival of Britain, television Anglo-Iranian Oil Company.
2. Ending of the state of warjon co-ordination of anti-Soviet | studios, the Houses of Parliament
with Germany to speed remili-;policy in all fields and leave no} aircraft factories newspaper Stokes and his diplomatic legal}
tarization {room for bic&ering over the ; offices and the British Broadcast-|@"4 financial experts take off in|
3. Turkey's introduction into}location of Commands in vitall ing Corporation what is officially described as an|
the North Atlantic treaty organi-|defence areas or political, obsta- Yesterday they Visited the Royal | atmosphere. i
sation, cles to military planning. rere oh a ba 2 “tq aM 4
4. Open negotiation fo ais Informed saardee said that it os ooers. a One Both Britain and Iran, prodde d|
in Spanish bases. | would be wrong to assume that oars verry wil be, giver by the U.S., have each receded a!
5. Direct intervention in the;Truman plans to work thing all| An morrow evening by Chile; little from positions which had
Anglo-Iranian oil erisis as ich|his own way, and overawe apie Ambassador Emanuel vo | Previously made agreement im-|
threatened to wreck the western: matic advisers of other countries possible.—U.P.
nations power houses. |As an example, they said that rt) ahe, P ayer ee
San Francisce First the has considerably revised his
Informed sources said there|assessment of the Middle and
has already been an exchange of Near East treaties which previ-
diplomatic advices aimed ously = hd om negeries ore
leari the ground for th fal | as a Britis responsibility . t ,
coertes. They said the San}was indicated, now that in re- Ce eee Aug. 3 tS _The American de legatio n or
Francisco conference for signing|turn for the British agreement to art matt sources said on| sign the Tripartite Pact as well a
a Japanese peace treaty would{Turkey jointng the N.A.T.O., the tan t a signing of the|the Japanese peace and bilateral | Man
provide the first results of Tru- US _ would in future support eee ‘acifie Security Pact | Japanese-American defence
man’s challenging moves and give;Britain'’s policy in the Middle} 4S been definitely set for Sep-|is to be led by Secretary of State
fair indication of where non-jEast “more energetically.”—U.P. tember 1 in San Francisco. In the! Dean Acheson.
Commiunists’ political weaknesres | pact, Australia, New Zealand, and |
Jay, particularly with regard } DISQUALIFIED he United States bind themselves] Membership also includes Sen-
where Asian participants oO - in a mutual defence against any | ate Foreign Relations Committee
stand in relation to Weick a | LIVERPOOL, Aug. 3 iggressor in the Pacific area {Chairman Tom nd
icy lf LOU Rare iat) Ae anne ‘The Triparte signing is expect- Alexander Wile » five
After San Franc siid | feather ed to oceur just three days before gislators have A a
there would be 5 y | West I | the opening of the Japanese peace | attend especially gnir
talk Washing } riference in San Francisco to|of the tripartite r
WoO! eek to the United States and tha| Democratic Se I s
liff cau ag U Kingdom invited 49 other} mar falter G ce. R
¢ rpc —(CP) icar ¥ é









the f

aa



ie

recognise
Paci

would be

lope

ath ke

n



langerou

ind

tk

re]
Ee

their indhr

idua}





and i
epacity t resist armed tack
a ee had it i pti in th | wy
fe istralia and Ne Zea
} sand that Japarr which is not to t |
res Biri re as to rearr migt
The U.S. agree to itsel :
with two othe intrie il j
| this fear provi {
at Iw +c ' ’ ~ 9 ae TO
Seanabane’ ot | IT’S THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS
American officials have ( j
the hope th 1 rtite tr
on Pp Re a St NH MAID) 57 CA EES ST at a Ae ae



PAGE TWO









Carib Calling |

A.V. The Venezuelan Govern-
ment’s airline will be opera-
ting a special flight from Venezuela



to Barbados today. It i

to arrive at Seawell at 4

There will be another {
flight by this airline on Wednes-
day August 8th. 3eginning Fri-
day August 10th. L.A.V will
operate a regular flight from
Venezuela to Barbados twice a
week. These flights will be made
every Friday and Sunday. The

aircraft will stay overnight at Sea-
well and return to Venezuela the
following day.

Agents for L.A.V. in Barbados
are Airlines and General Agencies
Ltd. Their office will be at Man-
nings’ Corner Store. Mrs. Vernon
Knight will be in charge.

Three Sisters

M®* and Mrs. David Sneddon-

Law and their four children
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
by B.W.1.A. to spend a month’s
holiday here staying at Ashton-
on-Sea, Maxwell's. Mr. Law is
Manager of U.B.O.T’s, Port-of-
Spain office.

Mrs. Wilfred Maingot accom-
panied them over for the holiday.
Mrs. Maingot's daughter Sally is
already in Barbados. She arrived
earlier this week and is staying
with Mr. and Mrs, Gordon
Nicholls of Rockley New Road.
Mrs. Law, Mrs, Maingot and Mrs
Nicholls are sisters.

Photography

A IRMAN E. DAWNS, of Jamai-

ca, is now in London on
holiday. Hobby is his photography,
and, camera in hand, he hopes to
take pictures of all the principal
buildings in London before re-
turning to his unit in Wiltshire.
Dawns is due to be demobbed ear-
ly next year, but has not decided
yet what civilian occupation he
will follow,

Trinidad Turfites

R. AND MRS. ALEX CHIN

and Mr. and Mrs. William
Scott, Trinidad turfites arrived
from Trinidad yesterday by
B.W.LA. for the Barbados Turf
Club’s mid-summer meeting which
opens to-day. Mr. and Mrs. Chin
are staying at “Super Mare” Guest
House while Mr. and Mrs. Scott
are guests at Hotel Royal. They
expect to be here for ‘about two
weeks.

Three Weeks
R. EDDIE TELXEIRA and his
friend, Mr, Leonard Olli-
vierra were among the passengers
arriving from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. Eddie is with
B.W.1A. in Trinidad and Leon-
ard is with Alston’s in Port-of-
Spain. They plan to spend three
weeks’ holiday in Barbados,

THE



WITH THE WAY WE WON THE
DERBY - VOURE WOT CHANGING
THE NAME OF THIS HOUGE



Four Days
M* V. CORBIN who works
with Reform Estate in San
Fernando arzived from Trinidad
yeterday on a four day visit. He
is staying with his relatives at
Sandridge, St. Peter,

Will Be Held At Y.M.P.C.

‘HE Olympia Club are having

a dance tonight in honour
of the visiting Grenada Netball
team. The dance was originally
to have been held at the Sea
Scouts’ hut, Needham’s Point,

As they expect a terrific crowd
the Olympia Club has now ar-
ranged to have the dance at the

Y.M.P.C. club house instead
A Son
SON is born to Mr. Jeffrey

international
Stollmeyer
told

Stollmeyer,
ericketer, and Mrs.
Our Trinidad correspondent
me this yesterday.

Second ‘Appearance

OW showing at the Water
gate Theatre, London, is a
demonstration of “Dances of the
Tropics”, by Trinidad-born Boscoe
Holder and ,his troupe. This is
Boscoe’s second appearance this
year at the Watergate. The show
is attracting many Festival visitors
now in Britain

Knowing Dr. Moody
ANY West Indians, are keen-
ly interested in the recent-
ly-published, “Negro Victory”,
the biography of the late Dr.
Harold Moody, Author is the Rev.
D, Vaughan, of Camberwell Con-
gregational Church, and a close

friend of Dr. Moody.

OF

ADVENTURES

In England

CHEDDIE, JAGAN, leader
of the Progressive People’s

Party in British Guiana, and his
wife, arrived in England last
week. They plan to stay in Liver-

pool for a fortnight before visit-
ing London

Louise Bennett. well-known Ja-
maican dialect writer and broad-
caster, returned London _ last
week from holiday in Switzerland.

The Rev. Caleb Cousins of Ja-
maica is among overseas represen-
itatives iat ing the Methodist
Conference in Sheffield, England

President of Appeal

R. S. W. P. FOSTER SUT-
TON, Chief Justice, Federa-
tion of Malaya, and at one time
Solicitor-General. Jamaica, ha:
been appointed President of the
West African Court of .Appeal
The King has conferred the hon-
our of Knighthood, but Mr, Foste-
Sutton has not yet received the
accolade. His daughter, Jean,
works at the Research Departmen’
of the C.O.1,, London.

Back to Aruba

I EAVING by B.W.1.A. for
- Aruba via Trinidad on Tues-
day night\ ‘were Mr. and Mrs.
George Chase.

Mrs. Chase who is an employee
of Lago Hospital was here for two
weeks on her second visit.

Mr. Chase former Empire full-
back and son of Mrs. Irene Chase
of Upper Bay Street had returned
from Aruba seven months ago.

Teachers Become Students

ISS S. HALLETT, headmis-
tress of Hamilton High
School for Girls. Bermuda, Miss
J, Campbell, mathematics teacher
in the same school, and Mr, R.
Chambers, of Jamaica, are among
68 overseas teachers attending a
British Council Festival of Britain
course. The theme of the course
is “Education in England to-day.”

Queen Mary’s Holiday

UEEN. MARY contemplates

spending her summer holiday

at Sandringham. She feels the

ourney to Scotland is toe exact-
ing.

According to present arrange-
ments she will go to Sandringham
early this month, stay there about
a month. A suite of rooms in
the south-west wing of the house
is always ready for her use. 5

Incidental Intelligence
OT all men go through a

daugerous age. Some never
get out of it—-Franklin P. Jones.

LES,
PIPA



Copyright - P 107 . Var Dias int Amsterdam



BY THE WAY eee By Beachcomber

OW that there is to be a
correspondence, course for
dogs, giving the owners guidance
tn ‘how to bring up their animals,
may | suggest one or two supple-
mentary’ points?
1. Teach your to

dog bark

CROSSWORD
errr
Cheer]
Roe ds ed





Across

1. Hate brine? Well,
7. Fit the girl to P.T.
» Split pea. (3)

. Sort that you can trust. 48)
. Gardeners’ friend, (4)

. In the iater editions, (3)

- Room afloat. (5)
it’s another tax.
Against (4)
Could be a rout,
A new star (4)
Coloured nannie, (4)

. Sat to watch the little beast.
. Shows lack of knowledge, (9)

do this, (9)
» (5)

ober

(5)
(4)

neh sini baperse
SISOe

19
(5)

1. Parching
Martha tan, (Â¥)

2. Absolute sameness, (8)

3. Is ib true all bet on it? (6)

4. Mohammedan official without a
shilling. (5)

5. Out of hate especiaity, (3)

6. Prociaim. (9)

8. No cricketer would like to see it
on it. (5)

0. Should be readily understood. (5

6. A neat sort of bet. (4)









Solution of yesterday's puzzie

Across
1, Flower-pot: 6, Imperator.

9. Sailor




10, Era Trend; 15. Btiquette 15
Oil, 16 el; 17, Nee: 18. Idoi 9
Altercate; Navigator Down; }

|Pishermu pinion, 5. Welt; 4, Rare

Mantilla: 8. Tent;

i2

‘
vown
land-wind that made



SILK SHANTUNG

BORDERED TAFFETA 36”

SILK PLAIDS

temporarily,
task of destruction, is worth while.
| I like to see them playing the fool
, like happy

courteously when an old woman
gives it her seat in a bus.

2. Teach it to confine its atten-
tion to its own plate at table.

3. Reprimand it if it bites some-
one who has tried to stroke it.

4. If it worries sheep, remember
that it may be feeling ill-used.
Take it to an animal psychiatrist.

5. If it gnaws hats and gloves, ‘

try to get to the
restlessness.

6. If it bites strangers, do not
ask them again. It is a sign that
your dog objects to them.

In Passing

NYTHING which diverts thea
minds of the scientists, even
frony the primary

cause of its

children, and I have
read with delight of an experi-
ment made in Texas. They have
built a room in which “the noise
contained in any object,” is assess-
ed. They put in this room a piece
of cloth. Then, later, they “squirt
in a sound cocktail,” which con-
tains all audible sounds, Delicate

instruments register all this, and
even reveal the contribution of
the piece of cloth to the uproar.
This may seem ridiculous, but who
does not prefer it to experiments
in germ-warfare?

Letting his father down
CHICAGO man who fed his
son on raw meat, “to make

him an_ intellectual superman,”
was irritated when the boy failed
to answer quickly enough the
question; “How much is 435,621,-
789 times 1,234,567?" What a
humiliation for him when people
asked: “How is that boy of yours

shaping’

Invisible exports

WROTE the other day of the

tiny ball-bearings being made
for export, and I said, in my
churlish way, that if they were
lost they were too small to be
found. I now eat my words: it
appears that several million of
these little loves were mislaid,
and then found lurking shyly in
a corner. Reading from left to

right, their names were



Rupert and









When the two triends are over
the hill Simon pauses. Held or
minute, Rupert."* he calls. ‘* There's

someone coming. ! believe it’s my

Daddy." He waits until the orher
comes siowly along looking very
tired and dispirited ‘Have you

36” @

®

36” ©

<_— a So ee se,

BLACK and WHITE

TWINKLE CREPE

DIAL 4606

36”



YOUR SHOE STORES

sinahileiid acins Ch iht thas dies

eciickceiidlid a ioiceinniceenshiiaele er

Ae ee ss oa
All New and the Latest Fashions

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Simon—4



bought wha: you wanted?" asks
the boy No."' sighs his Daddy.
“It's earl sng day and | couldn’:
buy aay ig: lt looks as though
we m starve unnl tomorrow.”
Bur S.mon sales and holds up his

ull sack



oiijncenepielaiikaaaan

DIAL 4220



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Princess Margaret ; B.B.(. Radio Programme
Keeps Out Of | Si Rattttie hs
Fashion Limelight

Lancashire 12.00 noon The News

_ News Analy



19.76M





LONDON, Aug. 3 4.15 p4m. Flint of the Flying Squad. 4.45

The Daily Mirror suggests on|p.m. Montmartre Players, 5.00 p.m. Com-
Friday that Princess Margaret may | Poser of "ie eis ino

have received Royal instructions} Music for Dancing, 6.45 p.m. Programme
to “soft pedal the leader of fashion} Parade _ ii, -
business, and keep out of the|7-—'# © srsenssces SEEM MOU
limelight for a while.” 700 pm The News 710 p m. News
Analysis. 7.15 pm. Behind the News

745 p.m. Sandy MacPherson at the

Theatre Organ 8 00 pm. Radio News-

The Mirror says in a newspa
story, that the Princess has rr

= reel. 815 p.m. Composer of the Week
peared three days in successionf‘at| 5°30 pm. Radio Theatre 1000 p im
the fashionable Goodwood »s,|The News. 10°00 pm. Interlude. 10 15
“in the same yellow dress, m Just Fancy 045 pm. Yours

Pp
has not done any the old spes- | "aithfully.
tacular things she used to do at
Goodwood.



|
ire |
|

— |}



of champagne, and has taken such
a back seat in the Royal box that
a lot of race-goers have not even
realised that she was present.”

—(CP)

She has not danced down to the
paddock after almost every race,
she has not been with her escorts
to any of the little bars for a glass

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE : TO-DAY AT 5.00 P.M.
TO-NIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT AT 8.30








MICKEY ROONEY -- PAT O’BRIEN

in “THE FIREBALL”
with
BEVERLY TYLER : JAMES BROWN : MARILYN MONROE
Released by 20th Century-Fox



WATCH THIS ‘-- BRIDGETOWN || "LET'S DANCE”

SPACE?||PEAZA bial 2310 Free Ae SUTTON
==.

Betty HUTTON
TODAY 445 & 4.30 pm on ,Continuing Dally 4.45 & 8% pm

“The SINNER of MAGDALA”

The Story of CHRIST and Mary MAGDALENE oan
Special Today 930 am. & 1 30 p.m

|





Special Tonite & Tomorrow nite (only)







at 10.45 “ARIZONA CYCLONE”
2 New Hits - - Johnny Mack Brown, & Fuzty Knight
“SQUARE DANCE KATY” & and “LAWLESS BREED’
“CRASHING THRU” Kirby Grant & Furry Knight
So —_ ———
PLAZA wuts |||, GALET
T0-DAY TO MON. 5 & 4% PM ||!|| THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES

Today & Tomorrow 8 0 p.m
Matinee Sunday 5 p.m,
“FORGOTTEN WOMEN”

Warner's Exciting Technicolor Musica)

“TEA ror TWO”

Doris DAY Gordon McRAE Elyse KNOX — Edward NORRIS
Gene NELSON | van on NGsTER”
ae kon a aoe itl Barry SULLIVAN — BELITA
“PAANTOM OF || Charlie Chan tn ——TIDNITE TONITE Sat 0
CHINATOWN” THE TRAP “TRAIL to GUNSIGHT
Keve LUKE & and Eddie DEW Fuzzy KNIGHT
“SADDLE “SONG of the and ze
SERENADE” RANGE” “THE OLD CHISHOLM TRAM

Jimmy Wakely Johnny Mack BROWN



Jimmy Wakely
eee









CRASHING THRU with Auother
BOX-OFFICE SMASH DOUBLE f

TO-NIGHT AND TO-MORROW NIGHT AT 10.45









WILDCAT THRILLS
WITH THE NEW
WESTERN STAR
SENSATION !
wip ~WILSON
(his first Caribbean

appearance) in

“ CRASHING
THRU”

with



ett

DAVIS
Leah

TTT

f





ANDY CLYDE











aiid rata A DYNAMIC — DARING
NTTUCMOLOS
Produced by LINDSLEY PARSONS - Deced by san Yong

PLAZ

B'town }

arene ead

DIFFERENT THRILLS !

2 NEW FEATURES!





SPECIAL : 'TO-DAY 9.30 A.M. AND 1.30 P.M. }

“ARIZONA CYCLONE”
Johnny MACK-BROWN — Fuzzy KNIGHT and
“LAWLESS BREED” }
Kirby GRANT Fuzzy KNIGHT



To-night

visit
as

CLUB MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night Club from Miami to Rio
with a world-wide reputation for good food

Music, Dancing
Entertainment

throughout the night
Dial 4000 for reservations



JUST RECEIVED

and Fast

Canadian Hardwood Chairs
and Rockers

SECURE

Selling

YOURS
a
THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON FACTORY LTD.
Tel. No. 2039 }

Vow.

Hardware Department

SS SSS SS











aes






Tourist Industry A#7TER THE

From Our Own Correspondent

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 31
The British West Indian Air-
ways marked another step to-

wards the further development of!
the tourist industry of the Eastern
and other Caribbean islands

There is a first direct Grenada-
Venezuela flight which is on from |
today. With their two services per}
week from Veneztela direct to}
Grenada and their other services |
via Trinidad and Barbados, it is |
expected that Grenada will enjoy |
a boonviin her tourist trade. |

TWO YEARS
IN THE
ll

MAKING ! II

NOW PLAYING

4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
AND CONTINUING DAILY





THE GREATEST |
STORY OF ALLE



a

| THE LAVISH FEASTS
OF THE UNBELIEVERS !






DA VINCI'S MASTERPIECE)
“THE LAST SUPPER" COMES TO LIFE! |



THE CONVERSION OF THE
FAMOUS SINNER OF MAGDALA!



Ps ‘

THE STORY OF CHRIST
- AND MARY MAGDALENE

Starring

Medea de Novara

(ALL-TALKING)
BASED ON THE GOSPEL.











THOUSANDS IN THE CAST!
BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310)

PLAZA

THE ISLAND'S MOST
POPULAR SHOW HOUSE!





GLOBE

To-day 5 & 8.15 p.m. and
Continuing








Extra Short:

‘ALONG THE RAINBOW
TRAIL”



SATURDAY,

RBRACESm=
SEE A PICTURE

TO-DAY 9.30 A.M., 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

EMPIRE
AND 9.30 AM., 5.00 & 8.15 PM

ROYAL

and continuing Daily at Matinee and Night Shows

BG-Rl’s BIG
SOUTH SEAS
MUSICAL!

AUGUST 4, 1951



at







cee

ee

¢
iS

CECE

a
ad

Gq

oe

+
«
~







Screen Play by ROBERT NATHAN aid JERRY DAVIS
HEAR Based on the Book “TAHITi LANDFALL” by WILLIAM S. STONE

opagane \ Music by HARRY WARREN + Lyrics oy ARTHUR FREED
| Love sono” Directed by Produced by ;
AC and otmers ROBERT ALTON + ARTHUR FREED

s A METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURE



ROYAL

MIDNIGHT SHOW TO-NIGHT

Republic All Action Whole Serial

“ DESERT AGENT
Rod CAMERON
Thrills !

Starring :

Action ! Suspense '

AGREE EES SER.
OLYMPIC THEATRE



Last Two Shows TO-DAY, 4.45 and 8.15 p.m.

First Instalment Columbia Seria!

TO-MORROW AND MONDAY, 4.45 & 8.15 P.M.

Final Instalment Columbia Bullet Streaked Serial

“DEADWOOD DICK”
Starring :
Don DOUGLAS and Mystery “SKULL”

All Action .. . Thrill . . . Suspense .. . Not A Dull Moment



TO-NITE ACTION AT MIDNIGHT
Republic Whole Serial

“BRUCE GENTRY”

Starring :

Tom NEAL and Judy CLARK

ROXY THEATRE



TO-DAY TO TUESDAY, 4.45 AND 8.15 P.M.

ane RRR aaa eeta

OST DESIRED WOMANIN FRANCE...

Most daring of the
King’s Swordsmen...

{LENA A” NN ER aI ENE 0 CARROT RE



ALEXANDRE DUMAS’

&





é Directed by
UCE GERAGHTY

Contury- Fos

GEORGE MONTGOMERY: PAULA CORDAY

ee ee EDWARD L. ALPERSON, JR





Come and See the First Picture Filmed in New Super Cine Color



> 6 erences “Silly EEE eoeeooooooerrmrerenen — _ _ _ eee


SATURDAY, AUGUST 4,

1951














W i SWALL BE ABLE TO
SEE EVERYTHING FOR MYSE
= —_ ' =




THEY'RE LOVELY GLASSESE FOO
DEAR - | CAN SEE J

BEAUTIFULLY )

TRAT
STANDING 8Y [HE WINNING POSTS

BARBADOS

You S@é THAT WOMAN 'N
LOVELY BLUE MINK 51014



Cost Of Living

Increases

The ever-increasing rise in the
cost of living presents a daily
problem to the Barbadian house-
wife who does her utmost,
though not always with success,
to make ends meet

A few days ago in reference to
some essential commodities, it was
shown how difficult her task has
become in these days as compared



with what it was in 1939, before
the war cast its ugly shadow
across the globe. It may be in-
teresting to refer to a few more
of these items to-day

Before October 1939, our most
important product, sugar, was
bought at 24) cents per lb, At that
time: although wages were very
low, a housewife would lose no

energy in pondering over the giv-
ing away of three cents to any
beggar so that he could secure a
pound,

Times have altered considerably
since, and to-day he would be a
fortunate beggar who could hope
to be similarly treated. The pres-

ent minimum price of 7 cents per




lb. is a big jump from 2}.

Salted fish is supposedly almost
as necessary an item to the aver-
age worker as sugar, but no long-
er can the wife of such a worker
regard this item procur-







able from the point of view of
price. With just 6 cents in 1939
she could purchase 1 lb. ‘To get

the same quantity now, however,
she has to pay 22 cents, an increase
of nearly 300 per cent. As can
easily be imagined, this too is an
item which the housewife would
not readily dispose of without due
consideration,
Oil Problem

3ut what al edible oil



sout her



problem? She finds it
difficult to get item. though
to-day she pays cents per pin
for it In 1989 the price was 6
cents. This is an er item the





price of which has gone up some
300. per cent since 1939.

Almost évery housewife must
have her stock of charcoal, and
more often than not, at week-ends
In 1939 this was procurable at a



little over a cent a lb. To-day
the price is 4 cents :

One item which has not in-
creased considerably when com-
pared with others, is kerosene oil,
Before October 1939 this was 3
cents per pint. To-day it is 4}
cents.



, the price
ng has gone
and in some

Like everything el
of clothing and hou
up in recent years {
cases, alarmingly The time was
when a serge suit—-a suit whick
almost every maic Barbadian likes
to own—would cost little more than
$22 including the making. To-day
this is insufficient to pay for the
making alone. One now has to get
something like $54 to be the owner
of such a suit.

Housing is especially a problem
for all classes. In 1939 a labour-
er paid 3s. per week for the rental
of a house that had a shedroof at-
tached to it. He enjoyed a reason-
able amount of comfort, for such

houses, for the most part, were
kept in good repair. The same
kind of house now fetches 8, 10

or 12s. per week, and the condi-
tion of it at times is such that the
occupier not infrequently makes
appeal after appeal to the owner,
for the carrying out of necessary
repairs. Probably this should not

be wondered at, however, when it





;AMES Bi

me ee

CHANAN & CO.

4 Students Will
Be Ordained
On Monday

Four students from Codrington
College will be ordained Deacons
at 8 o’clock on Monday morning
August 6—The Feast of the Trans-
figuration of Our Zetd—by the
Lord Bishop, Rt..Rew«G: L. G.
Mandeville at St. Michael's Cathe-
dral.

They are Mr. Shallson Chhangur
of British Guiana, Mr. Edward
Gatherer of St. Vincent, Mr. Mal-
colm Maxwell of Barbados and
Mr. Foster Pestaina of Antigua.

Mr. Chhangur will be attached
to the St. Michael’s Cathedral as
a Curate, Mr. Gatherer will spend
a few months at St, Mary's before
he leaves for British Honduras,
while Mr. Pestaina. a brother of
the Rector of St. Lucy, will be
going on to Nassau and Mr. Max-
well, son of Mr. R. D. N, Maxwell,
City Merchant and Mrs, Maxwell
of “Maxwell Court”, Spooner’s
Hill, will be going on to Castries,
St. Lucia.

Another Boys’ Club
Opened”

The Police have taken over
another building at Bay Street for
a Boys’ Club. This building, which
has a large acreage of land at-
tached, is situated opposite the
old Bay Street Boys’ Club.







Colonel Michelin said: We will
use this new building as a club
for the senior boys the Bay
Street Boys’ Club. Only'’those boys
under the age of 12 will be in the
old club. I have found it unsat-
isfactory to have the senior and
junior boys using the same prem-
ses.

“The new elub is spacious and
it is hoped that before long
sleeping accommodation will be
available to those boys who live in
the country, but work in Bridge-
town’, he said.



Another ‘Window
By The Sea

Another “window by the sea”
is being opened along Bay Street,
This is at a spot of land between
the Gas Company and the Barba-
dos Ice Company.

The lana is owned by Govern-
ment, but was formerly leaseq by
the Gas Company and used for
storage purposes. The wall sur-
rounding the spot is being demol-
ished and labourers are clearing
away all bush and weeds,

It is very high and nw being
brought on a level witn the road.
Truck loads of mould are being

given away. The mould has a
hard crust, as if tarred on the
surface,



is remembered that in 1939 lum-
ber was sold at something like
5 or 6 cents per foot while to-day
it is 26 cents or thereabout.

The renter of a $10 per month
house in 1939 now finds himself
having to pay $25 or $30 for the
same house,

o

We never
let go!

Traffic Lights
For Broad Street

Broad Street may be the first
street in Barbados to have traffic
lights. Colonel R. T. Michelin,
Commissioner of Police, told the
Advocate: “We are now going into
the possibility of placing traffic
lights in Broad Street.”

He said that they would be very
suitable for Broad, Street jand
would assist in the control of
traffic and pedestrians.

“At present the traffic Consta-
ble on point duty has to attend
to the control of both traffic and
pedestrians who are apt to walk
into the path of traffic.

“This is noticeable especially at
the Canadian Bank of Commerce
corner where it is very difficult
for the point duty Constable to
direct traffic and pedestrians at
the same time,” he said.

The traffic light will be on the
same system as that used in
England. The red light stops
vehicles and the amber light in
the centre notifies them to pre-
pare to move on. When a green
light comes en they can move.

A Barbadian who visited Eng-
land told the Adveeate: “I have
noticed that the traffic lights are
the only control of traffic and
pedestrians in London, When the
red light signals the car to stop,
this is an indication that the pe-
destrian can cross, As soon as
the pedestrian sees the green light
he immediately knows that he
has to wait until the red light
comes on again.

Only traffic control

“Very few motorists in London
try to break the law by running
through the red or amber light.
The lights are the only control of
traffic and on many occasions no
policemen are in sight.” :

He felt that if the Barbadian
motorists would use the same dis-
cretion and honesty as the English
motorists, the traffic lights’ system
would be a success here.

The cost of the traffic lights
is very high. It is expected to
start the system in Broad Street
but if funds are available it will
be extended to other City streets.

WILLS ADMITTED
TO PROBATE

The Hon. The Chief Justice. Sir
Allan Collymore yesterday admit-
ted the following wills to probate:
Margaret Trotman Boyce, Christ
Church, Frederick Adolphus Ca-
rew, St. Michael, William Henry
Payne, St, Michael, Harriet Louise
Francesca Odle, St. Michael,
Olivia Theodora Brewster, St.
Michael, Joseph Devonish, St.
George, Helen Sealy, St. George,
Moses Nathaniel Crichlow, St.
Michael and Claudius Augustus
Thompson, St. James.

Cee

Alcoa Pennant Here

The S.S. Alcoa Pennant arriv-
ed here yesterday with flour, to~
bacco, cornmeal, pickled pork and
other general cargo. Its last stop
was at St. Lucia. The Pennant,
which is commanded by Captain
Dunlop, is consigned to Messrs.
DaCosta & Co., Ltd.

Also arriving yesterday was the
Schooner Everdene which brought
firewood and charcovls from
British Guiana.





Vigilance over the high quality of
“Black & White” is never relaxed. Blended in
the special “* Black & White ” way this truly
outstanding Scotch is in a class all its own.

SCOTCH WHISKY
Dee Scovt t3 tn the B
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GLASGOW, SCOTLAND

Grenada Girls
Leave Monday

The Grenada netball players
who have been playing a series of
netball matches against various
teams in the island will leave for
Grenada on Monday by the 10.20
plane.

Twelve came—10 regular play-
ers, one extra and their manager

The players arrived here on
July 25 and since then were hav-
ing a busy programme.

On July 27 they attended a local
talent show at the Globe Theatre
and the following day defeated
the Island at netball.

They went on a pienic and sight-
seeing tour last Sunday and were
entertained the following night by
the Empire Club.

There will be a farewell party
at “Lisledale”, Worthing, by the
Rovers Club to-morrow,

Tag Day Yesterday

The Barbados Nurses Associa-
tion held their annual Tag Day
yesterday. People walking in the
streets yesterday were asked
“Will you have a tag?” by some
of the nurses who were carrying
around with them small tins
marked B.N.A.

Miss E. Gibson, Secretary of
the Association told the Advocate
yesterday that about 130 girls
were on the job distributing the
tags to people. There was no



fixed price for a tag and those
who took one put what they
could afford into the tin.

Girls were also sent to the

parishes of St. Thomas, St. James
and Christ Church with the
tags. It is hoped that on the
next Tag Day represefhtatives will
be sent to all the parishes in the
island,

About 14,00C tags were dis-
tributed to the girls. The response
last year was good.

HARBOUR LOG
In Carlisle Bay



Sch. Rosaline M. M.V. Sedgefield, Sch,
Rainbow M Sch Mildred Wailace,
Yacht Marsaltese, Sch. Cyril E. Smith,
Sch. Henry D. Wallace, Yacht Marianne,
Sch. Merion Belle Wolfe; Sch. W. L
Eunicia,

8.8

8.8. Alcoa Pennant, 3,945 tons, Capt.

Dunlop, from St. Lucia, Agents; Messrs
DaCosta & Co., Ltd.

Schooner BEverdene, 68 tons, Capt
Phillips, from Georgetown, Agents;
Schooner Owners’ Association,

DEPARTURES

Schooner Sunshine R., 25 tons, Capt
Barnes, for Trinidad, Agents: Barbados
Import & Export Co., Ltd

Schooner Marea Henritta, 43 tons
Capt. Selby, for St Lueia, Agents.

Schooner Owners’ Association.
Schooner Lady Noeleen, 41 tons, Capt
Noel, for Dominica, Agents: Schooner
Owners’ Association *
S.S. Trya, 4,360 tons, Capt
for St. Vincent, Agents:
Thom & Co., Ltd.
S.S. Sheaf Mead,
Bell, for Port Alfred,
Plantation Ltd

RATES OF EXCHANGE





Messrs. Ri

4,453 tons, Capt
Agents: Messrs

Srd August, 1951
CANADA
63 7/10% pr Cheques on
Bankers 61 7/10% pr.
Demand Drafts 61 55% pr,
Sight Drafts 61 4/10% pr,
63 7/10% pr. Cable oe
62 2/10% pr. Curreney 60 2/10% pr.
Coupons 59 5/10% pr

St 4,4,

43455*e".

Yacht Keskidee, M.V. Antares,
Inventor, Sch, Enterprise S$. $.S,
Alcoa Pennant, Sch, Everdene, ¥

ARRIVALS

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SYRUP

Obtainadle in two sizes — from all chemists or stores,

Trade enquiries to —

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BRIDGETOWN. |

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THE RACES


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or

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PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR

peek batt

Printed by the Advocate Co,, Ltd., Broad St, Bridgetown,





Saturday, August 4, 1951





Seawell Control

THE traffic during’ +the
last twelve months has had the effect of
focussing public attention on the services
at Seawell Airport. As a result of this in-
Chamber of Com-
the Government the
airport authorities to allow
of a plane some months
there was not
allow a 24

increase fin air

creased attention, the

took up with

merce
refusal of the
the night landing
ago The answer that
enough staff
hour service.

It has now been announced that F1/Lt.
W. K. Hynam D.F.C., D.F.M. a Barbadian
has been appointed Contro] Officer and
after a course in England will join the
staff later in the year.

Lieut. J. L. Parris, formerly Acting Ad-
jutant of the Barbados Regiment and who
was appointed Assistant Manager of the
Airport has just returned to Seawell after
a course traffic control in Trinidad,
This will bring the staff up to three and it
is proposed, on the recommendation of the
Seawell Airport Committee “to provide
another Control Officer whose salary will
be provided by resolution until the next
financial year is ended and the sum can be
voted in the Estimates,

For some time now the public has been
clamouring for the admission of other air-
lines to Seawell Airport. It was disclosed
that applieation had been made by French
and Venezuelan lines but that the ultimate
decision rested with the British Govern-
ment. But events have proved that even
if such permission had been granted at the
time the applications were filed, it would
have been impossible to cater to their
needs because of this shortage of staff.

The appointment.of the first Control
Officer will go a long way towards bring-
ing the staff up to the required standard. If
the airport is to render a 24 hour service
it is essentiak that there should be a staff
large enough to allow the requisite num-
ber of shifts.

When the requirements of the job are
considered and the demands which its
execution makes on human energy and
concentration, and further that the lives of
passengers and the safety of aircraft cost-
ing millions Of dollars will be dependent
upon the judgment and skill of the control
officer it is clear that long stretches of duty
would not be conducive to efficiency.

The criticisms against the Government
for unsatisfactery conditions at Seawell
have been so many and so frequent that it
is good to find that improvements are
being made. Recently, new fire fighting
equipment and some additional staff were
supplied, The remaining need of greatest
importance however is a terminal building
which can accommodate the traffic which
will be attracted when these other amen-
ities and services are supplied at Seawell.

Was

at the airport to

oi air



The index

IN a report published yesterday the
Cost of Living Committee among other

things pointed out that the index which
has been followed from the early years of
the war was incorrect. The adjustment
has now been made and the figure changed
from 265 to 272.

It is true, as the report shows by infer-
ence that part of the reason for the differ-
ence in figures is that the standard of liv-
ing of the average working class family
has been raised; but it is also true that the
consumption level has been raised. At the
time of the compilation of the original
figures the index was publicly challenged
as being inaccurate for the simple reason
that it did not include rent.

It is singularly unfortunate that this
should have been proved to have been in-
correct and that no attempt was made
during the intervening years to revise it.

This cost of living index was the basis
on which salary inereases and profit mar-
gins were calculated.

It is hoped now that the new investiga-
tions might lead to some method of finding
methods for cushioning the effects of the
various changes on the earnings of average







THE science of economics has
been _ wrapped around by the
theorists in a series of many veils,
which have caused the plain maa
,to Suppose that there must be
something indecent about ie
|naked form, I think the only thing
to do in this predicament is to
begin again at * beginning with
matters of such @implicity that you
may be indignant at hearing them
mentioned. .

Ec@nomists inthe past laid more
stres# upon cornpetition than upon
anything else. ‘Competition’ in the
sense in which it is used in classi-
cal economics, depends upon the
existence of commerce regulated
by law. It has, in theory, nothing
tc do with that more primitive
competition w!ich has become the
function of armies, and which
decides the ownership of land. It
exists in theory only within a
fixed framework of law. Given a
numbe; of men Who all independ-
ently produce a certain commodity
and expect to live by exchanging
it for other commodities, they will
obviously all try to get as much
of other commodities in exchange
as they can. But each will be
limited in his @emands by the
fact that his competitor may ask
less. This limitation only arises
when the produeers of the com-
modity in question between them
can produce more of the commod-
ity than can be sold at a profit,
or at any rate without loss. The
whole system only works where
there are law-courts and police-
men to enforce contracts, And as
soon as the stage of primitive bar-
ter has been surpassed, there must
lg be a more or less stable



also
|currency which is legal tender,

There are all kinds of elaborate
legal restrictions of methods of
competition, You must not assassi-
nate your leading competitor; this
form of competition is the prero-
gative of the state. You are
allowed to tell the public how
good your product is, but you
must not tell them how bad the
other man’s is,

All sorts of wonderful things
were thought to result from ‘free’
competition. It was thought that,
at a given price, the better com-
modity would get the larger sales,
and it was thought that any im~
provement in methods of produc-
tiom would enable the man who
made the improyement to under-
sell his competitors, Thus com-
petition would result in improving
quality and cheapening methods
of production, There may possibly
have been some small element of
truth in this theory 150 years ago
in the cotton trade, Certainly the
production of wage-earners was
cheapened to the utmost, and so
was the production of raw cotton
by means of plantation slavery.
The system worked admirably,
except for the cotton operatives
and the plantation slaves; but they
did not write the economic text-
books.

But gradually things ceased to
work out as the classical econo-
mists had supposed, though it
was a long time before economists
noticed this. Marx had foretold
that free comipetition among
capitalists would issue in monopo-
ly, and this was found to be true
when Rockefeller acquired a
virtual monopoly of oil, The devo-
tees of free competition were
shocked and made laws to disrupt
his monopoly. But it is difficult to
compel people to fight when they
would rather not, and anti-trust
legislation in America, after a
uumber of immensely expensive
and ineffectual suits against
monopolies scored only one victory
—Eugene V. Debs, the labour
agitator was sent to prison, This
was not quite what had been
intended by those who agitated for
such laws.

Competition within a country
belongs to an early stage of in-
dustrial development, In all the
more important industries, the
tendency towards virtual monopoly
is irresistible, and there comes a
moment when either the indus-
tries take over the state, or thq@
state takes over the industries,
The former course is favoured by
those nostalgic devotees of the
past who imagine that they are
thereby serving the god of free
competition. But the other course
is the one which is increasingly
being adopted in practice, even
where in theory it is being avoided,
Consequently, competition in the
modern world is between nations,



By BERTRAND RUSSELL, O.M.

(Distinguished Philosopher and Nobe!)
Prizewinner, who received the Order
of Merit in 1949)

not between individual producers,
The British, for instance, wish to
sell motor-cars in America; this
is a governmental matter to pe
decided between Whitehall and
Washington. Whitehall has to
decide how much in the way of
raw materials can be allocated to
the manufacture of motor-cars,
and Washington hag to consider
how much irritation in Detroit 1s
less harmful to the United States
than the bankrupt:y of tae Britisn
Government. If the British were
too successful in the export of
ears, the American Governmeat
would raise the tariff. If they were
too unsuccessful, it might conceiv-
ably suggest lowering the tariff.

Modern industrial technique has
made competition far less impor-
tant than it used to be, and has
made different industries and
different parts of the world far
more interdependent than they
formerly were. The emphasis
upon competition has led many
people to suppose that whatever
is disadvantageous to A must be
advantageous to B, This comes of
thinking that competition is a
more fundamental and more
frequent economic relation than
co-operation, But such a view i3
completely out of date, and where
it persists it is very harmful,

Economic co-operation has two
main forms; one is exchange, and
the other is the fitting together of
different stages in the production
of one commodity. As for the first,
it should be fairly easy to under-
stand that if you ruin your cus-
tomer, he will not buy as much
from you as he did when he was
prosperous.

The other modern form of co-
operation, namely that between
different stages in the production
of a given commodity is more in-
teresting and more complex ir. its
workings. Modern industrial tech-
nique requires a great deal of very
expensive fixed capital which is
only capable of certain uses. If
the finished product which it is
intended for, is no longer in de-
mand, this fixed capital becomes
useless, and all the labour that has
gone into producing it does noth-
ing to increase the amount of con-
sumable commodities.

Modern methoas of mass pro-
duction require an immense
amount of labour before they
yield any return whatever in the
way of finished products; but
when they begin to yield a
return, the return is very large.
If in the meantime, circumstances
have changed so that the product
is no longer required, the elabor-
ate work of preparation is wasted.
Consider the sort of thing that
happened at the beginning of the
great depression. Everybody had
felt rich and had expected to be
able to buy all sorts of expensive
things. Preparations were made
for producing all these expensive
things, and then it turned out that
the preparations had been exces-
sive. The men who had made
preparations for one sort of com-
modity could not sell their pro-
ducts, and therefore could not buy
another sort of commodity, and
so the makers of the other sort of
commodity could not buy yet a
third sort, and so the depression
spread, Vast amounts of prepara-
tion for the production of com-
modities suddenly became useless.
The men who should have been
at work were unemployed, and in
their turn could spend much less
than had been expected. And so
what had been expected to be the
means of producing wealth be-
came suddenly useless, and every-
body was poor.

In such a situation, everybody's
apparent private interest is dia-
metrically opposed to the public
interest. The banks which have
lent money are afraid that their
debtors will go bankrupt and
therefore call in loans left and
right, thereby causing the bank-
ruptey that they fear, Dread of
disaster makes everybody act in
the very way that increases the
disaster. Psychologically the situ-
ation is analagous to that of people
trampled to death when there is
a panic in a theatre caused by a
ery of ‘fire’, In the situation that
existed in the great depressiou,



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

> anowre Conflict and Unification:

things could only be set right by
causing the idle plant to work
again. But everybody felt that to
do so was to risk almost certain
loss. Within the framework ot
classical economics there was no
solution. Roos@Velt saved the sit-
uation by bold and _ heretical
action. He spent billions of public
money and ¢ a huge public
debt, but by doing he revived
production and brought his coun- 4
try out of tite depression. '
The princi which Rooseveli
apclied in the Néw Deal is tne
same principle. which is now
needed in international affairs.
Althcugh it is paradoxical, it
s nevertheless, the fact that the
way to avoid poverty is to spenc
This, of course, does not apply to
governments, Which alone have
the privilege of not paying their
dekis. Americans have a greai
desire to sell their goods abroad,
but they cannot do so unless for-
eign nations can afford to buy. |
do not wish to say anything tha
may sound ungenerous about Mar-
shall Aid, but I shall only be re-
peating what its American advo-
cates have urged, when I say that
it serves the interests of America
as well as those of Europe. I
do not mean only, what undoubt-
edly is true, that it has halted the
spread of communism in western
Europe; I mean that actually
America is better off financially
owing to spending money on reviv-
ing Europe. Truman's Point Four
which was to Mave revived coun-
tries outside Europe by similai |

methods, has unfortunately no

been understood by Congress, anc
has been very inadequately im-
plemented. It is to be hoped tha‘
further experience will leac
America to see its wisdom.

I have spoken of the wasteful-
ness of industrial plant lying idle
but the enforced idleness of
human beings is even worse. Idle
plant and idle human beings are
alike useless, but the idle humar
beings also suffer. The older eco-
nomic theory was quite unable t
deal with the problem of unem-
ployment. Trade cycles were re-
garded as a law of nature. We
now know, however, that they can
be controlled. We owe this know-
ledge chiefly to Keynes. The broad
principle is that governments
must spend and encourage spend-
ing when private people fee!
inclined to save, and must en-
courage saving or compel it by
meals ef taxation when private
people feel inclined to spend.

There is a general conclusion to
be drawn from modern economic
development, and that is that any
nation which desires to prosper,

must seek rather co-operation
than competition with other
nations. The world is economi-

cally unified in a way in which it
never was at any earlier period.
And even in terms of hard cash,
it is seldom profitable nowadays
for one nation to ruin another.
Nay, more, if another nation is
ruined, it is almost always profit-
able for a nation which can afford
it to help the ruined nation on
the road to recovery. This is be-
cause, broadly speaking, nations
ore more important to each other
as customers than as competitors,
and also because unemployment
is a waste of which the disadvan-
tages are felt, not only in the
nation in which the unemploy-
ment exists, but in varying de-
grees throughout the world.
Although Cengress finds this a
little hard to understand, many
people in international organis-
ations now realise this. A start in
the direction of a world where
economic co-operation replaces
competition has already been
made not only in the Marshall Plan
and the Organisation for European
Economic Co-operation, but also
in the Colombo Plan,

This doctrine, which is promul-
gated by hard-headed economists
for hard-headed reasons, encount-
ers obstacles that are psychologi-
cally derived from the fetish of
competition, and inherited with
far too little change from our sav-
age ancestors who knocked each
other ou the head with clubs. If
the modern economic system is to
work, we have to learn a less pug-
nacious and more co-operative
outlook than that which tradition
has made familiar.

—The Listener, June 14, 1951.



First Atom Defenee Fortress

STOCKHOLM.

Burrowing 100ft. down in the
granite below the Swedish capital
engineers are blasting out the
world’s first defence headquarters
designed to be completely proof
against atom bombs,

The existence of these fantastic
flood-lit caverns, where helmeted
men work day and night, was
kept secret until I inspected them

today.

The rough-hewn entrance
leads into a 30ft.+wide dummy
tunnel, designed to absorb the
blast of any bomb which smashes
the concrete doors.

The main tunnel curves to the
left, and then gives off side
branches in which yellow bull-
dozers and giant green grabs are
clearing the dynamited rock,





Hewn Out

Three-storey concrete buildings
are to be put in these offshoots.

They will house a radar H.Q.,
anti-aircraft control, telephone
exchanges and map rooms.

The caverns will have their
own electric power. ventilation system will keep out

radio-active dust and poison gas.

They Said—

Stockholm people, who saw the
tunnel mouth behind a rough
pine hoarding in Sodar Marlar-
strand, were told was an
extension to the underground
train system.

The credentials of my guide—
Herr Gosta Smitt,, Sweden’s top
civil defence engineer — were





carefully checked before we were
allowed to enter the tunnel,

But after our visit the defence
chiefs decided that the project
is too far advanced to be con-
cealed any longer.

Work on a 100+ft, deep tunnel-
shelter, to hold 12,000, is being
started in Stockholm this week.

It will serve as a garage for 500
cars in peacetime. Parking fees
will help to pay building costs.

Thirty-six more granite shel-
ters, which will serve as garages,
hotels or gymnasiums are
scheduled to be builtâ„¢ soon.

More than 400,000 Swedes have
been trained in civil defence
under a compulsory scheme.

The building of | atom-proof
shelters has been given high
priority in Sweden In Britain it
has been shelved.





NOBODY'S
DIARY

SUNDAY—The weather has been kind to us so far
this year and the young crops are in lovely
condition. Taking a drive through St. George,
St. Philip and St. John’s today, I could not be
but struck with the different shades of green,
the darkest and. most luscious shade was to
be seerr opposite Halton, where a field of young
canes appeared to have been given an extra
dose of artificial manure.» While the cane crop
was all to be desired the food crops were scant.
If we are to rely to a greater extent on feeding
ourselves it will be necessary to bring a greater
acreage under food crops.

On my homeward Journey about 9 p.m. the
only flaw in an otherwise perfect evening wa-
provided by the Highways & Transport Depart-
ment. It had been raining and some invisible
stop studs at the junction of a road leadinz
from Massiah Street--the only street with a
name in those parts even though it is not dis-
played—and a road leading to Ashford, nearly
ended my life. Stop studs that cannot be seen
are a greater menace than no studs. The driver
of the oncoming vehicle on the main road who
knew the country like the back of his hand
expected me to stop. Surely the Highways &

Transport Department can remedy this state | ¢

of affairs.

MONDAY—I have often read about the hazards of

running the gauntlet but today was my_fir,
experience. I used Busby’s All@y as a short cu
only to be met with a barrage of women’s
tongues. “I thought you was a different sort ot
gentleman”, howled the first Madame, “but
you ain't no gentleman at all, you want we to
go down Temple Yard, a place wha ain’t fit for
pigs”.

Number two Madame wanted to know why
anyone should think that poor hucksters—flesh
and blood as wonah—could exist amongst the
obnoxious smells in Temple Yard; and number
three Madame said that the hucksters’ eardrums
would be burst by the noise from the cooperage
in Temple Yard and that only a person lower
than a savage would suggest that ‘humans’
should be sent to that spot.

It was difficult to understand why they all
wanted to stay in Busby’s Alley—a filthy lane
bounded by dirty gutters—where lettuce is
exposed to all the germs that a bacteriologist
has ever dreamt of. While in these salubrious
surroundings I did discover some of the causes
for the astronomical prices of vegetables. I
was told, on good authority, that the vegeta-
bles pass through these hands before getting
to the consumer. Someone comes from the
country with produce. He sells it to someone
in Busby’s Alley who then sells it to the

hucksters,
* *

TUESDAY — There must be something in the

U.S.A., atmosphere that makes one forget.
This is the only explanation for the strange
letters that I get from time to time from Bar-
badians domiciled in the U.S.A. Only to-day
such a letter arrived from a Barbadian laud-
ing the opportunities open to coloured West
Indians in the States. I have seen for myself
and I know that the opportunities in the West
Indies are hundredfold in comparison with
those in the U.S.A. where the colour line is
rigidly enforced, And even in New York
where there is a slight relaxation the coloured
man has not yet begun to enjoy freedom as
we know it in Barbados.

But my visit was fleeting so I prefer to give
a factual report of one who has lived there for
many years and has had the opportunity to
investigate the matter thoroughly.

Mr. Don Iddon, the American Correspondent
of the London Daily Mail, in his American
Diary has this to say about the living condi-
tions of the coloured population of New York:

“It is generally accepted that the Negro in
New York is treated with greater lenience and
tolerance than in any other section of the coun-
try. If this is so, then it is a bitter commen-
tary on their status elsewhere.

For here in Manhattan they are hewers of
wood and the drawers of water, the shoeshine
boys and floor scrubbers, the liftmen and the
hash slingers, the bag-carriers, porters and
servants, the door openers and weight-lifters.

Their job, with a few startling exceptions
like the athlete Joe Louis and the dance band
leader, Cab Calloway, is that of a menial. And
at night when the white peoples’ shoes have
been shined, their dishes washed and _ their
floors polished, the coloured man retires to
Harlem, a tightly packed tenement of 500,000
people his specially alloted living quarters,
the Black Ghetto.”

Why do these American Negroes and expatri-
ate coloured West Indians attempt to paint
the picture in the West Indies so black when
they know that they are deliberately lying.

* *
WEDNESDAY—-The increased cost of living is
alternatively blamed on the Government or
the big merchant but no one seems to realise
that the small man Ts equally responsible,
Coconuts were sold a few weeks ago at 8c.
apiece, today I saw them sold at 10c. apiece.
The vendor had paid 4c. apiece off the tree
a few weeks back and he is still paying the
same price. He is now getting a profit of 150%
but no one holds up his hands in horror, Imag-
the pandemonium that would be let loose if a
big merchant made that percentage of profi'.
The breadfruit vendors have nothing to learn
from the coconut vendors.

*

THURSDAY—A more accurate method of arriving
at the cost of living index is being devised, but
there is no suggestion put forward that will
prevent prices sky-rocketing. Nor are we any
nearer to finding the $14,000 lost.

FRIDAY—To-day is an extra busy day. Before
mid-day to-morrow first hand answers must be
received straight from the horse’s mouth. Is
Red Cheeks really as hot as painted or are
Teddy's friends flattering him? Are Bright
Lights’ batteries fully charged? Is Best Wishes
as depressed as she looks or is she staging an
act? Favourable answers to these questions
might make all the differences between success
or failure at the Races to-morrow,

enteral



SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1951



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working class families.

“The Idea of West Indian
History” was the subject of a
lecture given by Professor J, H
Parry, who holds the Chair of

Modern History at the University
College of the West Indies, at the
Extra-Mural Summer School last








ThelideaOtwWw.L

similarity between the West Indian few people

1 were outstandingly
colonies and those of North

wealthy while it was possible for



America, It was interesting to the indentured servant to make
week, compare Spanish and British styles good. Sugar had changed the
He said that there were certain in colonisation, On the whole the situation; it required plenty of
difficulties in the way of the study Spanish cities in the West Indies land, it was not in those days
of this subject. Little was known had been better planned than the possible to organi it on the
about Arawaks and \Caribs, and English. On the other hand the pattern of central lamge factories,
effective history began with the fine country houses of Barbados and it required hard labour which
immigrations from the Old World, and Jamaiea had no parallels in had to be, carried out rapidly. Al-
The modern history of the area Cuba or Puerto Rico. Spanish though Oliver Cromwell and
had been interrupted by two major civilisation was essentially urban Judge Jeffreys both sent political
social revolution The first of in type; the country house was prisoners to the West Indies, the
these was the introduction of sugar always an important influence in latter set his face against’ the
planting;. the second was the English history. wholesale kidnapping which was
emanc ipation of the Slaves “ ith Plantations then proceeding. The cheapest and
the collapse of the old style sugar The coming of the sugar easiest form of finding labour for
plantations, He knew of no coun plantations entirely changed the the plantations however was by
try in Europe which could show hattern of West Indian history, means of slavery,
such cate mic ch ‘Ss In IS ‘The importance of the local Legis- This led to a state of society in
history latures is noticeable. The West which the white population
Duri the XVI and early XVII Indian Assemblies really possessed steadily diminished, and absentee
cen “1 immigrants me financial power in those ownership and control by attorneys
E d over their Governors than became common, Lack of skill
Engli House of Commons among the slaves also led to de-
i " had over the Stuart Kings. The pendence on Europe for manu-
Di ioneer society, before the coming factured goods, though some
I f r, was on the whole healthy; furniture was made by slaves

Professor Parry considered that
emancipation was not so serious
a blow to the plantations as has
sometimes been contended; or at
least that the plantation economy
need not have suffered so greatly
if the planters had made a fair
attempt to use wage-labour. Slave
labour towards the end of the
XVIIL century had become in-
ineffi-

History

trained by imported Englisa
craftsmen. The prosperity of the
islands now depended entirely on
the price of sugar. Wars sent the
price of sugar up, but also in-,
creased the cost of freight insur-"
ance, which sometimes offset the sreneing’y exyensive snd

Our Readers Say:

edith elie a
Needed |

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I shall be very grateful

Lamps



if you would publish ti letter, |
so that those who are in Seah?
to see after our street lighting,



“HIGH *CLASS

|







s

rise of prices, The capture of other cient. The real cause of declining may read it and lighten ne
: E prosperity was the fall in the] darkness along Barbarees Road. | & |
islands in the XVIII century wars price of sugar. England was ye LIQUEURS '
sent the sugar price down, and ; fe or oon 12

oe " beginning to prosper through Free; After a pedestrian has passed |
this explains why, thanks to the iti H ; : > hee | Prunier Brandy
influence of the West India J'ade, but the abolition of sugar;the light by Dr. R. H. King’s|® Martel Brand
interest, island tured fr the duties and of imperial preference|residence, which reflection is g a a

st, Often handed back 12 1846 and 1849 were heavy blows| Very poor in the upper direction|% Vielle Cure

French were often handed backs, “the sugar planters. Th XIx|of the road, one is at th oy| ts Bristol Cream Sherry
at the close of wars. The colonists ‘° Seo potas any traits « aner’y|% Bristol Milk Sherry
themselves disliked sendi an century saw their ruin; it was the|of any individual who may be|@
a gga we estier, 24 ee _ end of a society, Speaking of a XIX|lurking in the dark to do mis-|‘ Dry Sack Sherry
islands F ‘oo ne" local Assemblies and the Colonial! chief, until the other light by | Gilbey's Port
os gah as Office, Professor Parry said he was! 5Pringfield comes into view. 1% Cold Breet pam

Emancipation in agreement with the view ex-; : x aerent orn in Bois. of

Emancipation came in a clash pressed by Judge J. W. B. Chenery},. I should like to suggest that a x ere aren arc te

of economic interests in which the in another lecture that reversion light be placed just below the) X Re ee
West India planters were defeated, to Crown Colony Government had ne tree oy es — X
There may have been certain probably been in the interests of Q2'QUElY oppose Sgr’ ae i)
somewhat negative economic Jamaica, but that Barbados had > sat +} ee eee apotney 8 i hone
motives for the emancipation, but rightly insisted in 1876 on the wrerheher canes *
the humanitarian motive was preservation of its legislative EXPECTANT »
obviously present and genuine, freedom. I suty 31, 1951. 3

i



GODDARDS To-day for
These & Phone Tuesday for Meat






DESSERTS

Kraft Ice Cream Powder
Corn Flour in Pkgs.

Bird's Custard

She 's Puddings

Guavas in tins.

Grapes in tins

Ginger in Bottles

SPECIALS

2% Tin Sweet Biscuits
$1.80 each
Processed Gouda Cheese
$1.00 per Ib
Cook’s Paste @ 6c. per tin
Tea Time Paste 15 cents
per Bottle





TURDAY, AUGUST 4,



Increasing World Pric

1951

Of Living Rise

BARBADOS has been faced for some months with the
problem of rising world prices. The rising cost of living

in the United Kingdom, in

Canada and the United States,

in Australia and in the other countries from whom Bar-

bados receives its imports,

has necessarily resulted in an

increase in the local cost of food and other goods.

Each Government is making its best endedvours to:

sclve the problem, but most experts agree that it is most

janlikely to be solved until wor

improve.



Airport Officer
Appointed

Mr. Winston Kitchener (Pony)
Hynam, a Barbadian, who is at
present resident in the United
Kingdom has been selected as
Control Officer, Seawell Airport,
the Advocate learnt at a Press
Conference yesterday,

Before leaving England to
take up his appointment at Sea-
well Airport Mr. Hynam will un-
dergo a six weeks course in Air
Traffic Control beginning in Sep-
tember. This course will be im-
mediately’ followed by an eight
weeks attachment to a large aero-
drome so that he may gain ex-
perience in Civil Aviation pro-
cedure.

Mr. Hynam is 34 years of age.
In 1940 he enlisted in the Royal
Air Force in which he attained
the rank of Flight Lieutenant,
subsequently receiving the awards
of D.F.C. and D.F.M.



HOUSING PLANS
APPROVED

The Executive Committee has
approved the plans submitted by
the Housing Board for the erec-
tion of 50 houses to be built at
the Bay and Pine Estates,

After making careful investi-
gation into the family _ struc-
tures of potential tenants, the
Board recommended the build-
ing of 14 two-roomed houses, 24
three-roomed houses and 12 four-

roomed houses, which will be
constructed of 6-in. limestone
blocks for external walls and

4-in. for internal partitions, Cor-
rugated asbestos sheets will be
used as roofing.



187,000 TONS OF SUGAR
PRODUCED THIS CROP

In his final report on the sugar
cane reaping season, 1951, the
Labour Commissioner has report-
ed that the reaping season began
on 8th January and came to a
close on July 7th, Thirty-six fac-
tories were engaged in the pro-
cessing of sugar and fancy mo-
lasses and the record crop of ap-
proximately 187,000 tons of sugar
and syrup was produced. This is

approximately 30,000 tons over
the previous record.
Relations between employers

and workers hhave been good. The
latter have worked with enthusi-
asm and harvested the biggest
crop in the history of Barbados,
taking on the average only two
to three weeks longer than for a
very much smaller crop.



SEAMAN’S DEATH
INVESTIGATED

The Government, the Hon, the
Colonial Secretary said yesterday,
is in touch with the solicitors in
South Africa who, at the request
of the Government of Barbados
through the Secretary of State
for the Colonies and His Ma-
jesty’s High Commissioner in
Capetown, are advising regard-
ing the procedure to be adopted
in the interest of the relatives of
Milton King.

Details are being collected by
the King’s Solicitor with a view
to lodging a formal claim for
compensation against the Govern-
ment of the Union of South
Africa.

Due For Course -
In Co-operatives

Mr. C. A. E. Beckles, Senior
Peasant Agricultural Instructor,
has been selected to attend a
course in Co-operatives in Ja-
maica, sponsored by the Extra-
Mural Department of the Uni-

versity College of the West Indies
in collaboration with the Jamaica
Co-operative Development Coun-
cil. The Course will last from
August 6th to 16th.



DIED SUDDENLY:

Edith Sobers of Deacon’s Road
St. Michael died suddenly at her
residence yesterday about 2.30
am. Her body was later removed
to Burton’s Funeral Parlour,
Pinfold Street where a post mor-
tem examination was performed
by Dr. A. S. Cato,



SAVE s $ §

Id security conditions

The Government of Barbados by
direct subsidization
$1,000,000 a year, by the utiliza-
tion of certain stabilization funds
and by price control, has endeav-
oured to cushion the price in-
creases of the more important
foodstufls, but the pressure of in-
creasing world prices has caused
an therease in the cost of living
and there are signs of further in-
creases. ;

In particular, we have to face
a considerable increase in the
price of rice which we import
from British Guiana, e.g., the
present contract price of first
quality rice is $10.80 per bag and
it is unlikely that the new contract
price will be less than $16.00 per
bag, an increase of nearly 50%.

Complicated

The problem of prices is further
complicated by pressure from the
importers and distributors that
the specific profit margins allowed
under price control are inadequate
to meet the increasing operating
costs and to meet the claims of
their employees for higher wages

te meet the increasing cost of
living.

The Price Control Committee
made certain recommendations
in July, 1950. Subsequent events
made it clear that prices were

rising and Government indicated
in March, 1951, that it was not
prepared to accept the Commit-
tee’s recommendations but pro-
posed to examine the comparative
profits of the Commission Mer-
chants, the wholesalers and the
shopkeepers.

That enquiry has. now been
undertaken and the recommen-
dations made by the investigator
for an increase on some “fixed
mark-ups” have been accepted
by the Government. The details
are in preparation and when
completed the Controller of
Suprlies will be authorized to
effect the necessary adjustments
as opportunity offers.

One of the _ supplementary
recommendations made will be
adopted forthwith, viz., to remove
the control on the price of bags
which should give some immediate
relief to retailers. Also, any ad-
justments possible within the
present range of the equalization
tund will be effected immediately.

Merchants’ Claim

It is appreciated by Government

that the claims of commission
merchants have not been recog-
nised and that the claims of

wholesalers and retailers have not
been fully met, but it is hoped
that it will be generally accepted
that Government has made a
genuine attempt to find an equit-
able solution of the problem of
profit margins in relation to both
the distributor and the consumer.

As ragards future policy, Gov-
ernment proposes to give further
consideration to the effective use
of the subsidization vote, to the
present and future position of the
equalization funds, to the inci-
dence of “import taxation” in re-
lation to essential fonds and to
local production of foodstuffs,

Proposals continue to be made
to Government for the de-control
of certain commodities, This op-
portunity is taken to reaffirm the
policy of Government that it is not
prepared to remove price con-
trols until it is reasonably satisfied
tnat the result would not be an
increase in the prices of essential

commodities. Subject to this pre-
requisite, the schedules of con-
trolled items will be examined

with the object of removing price
control wherever possible.

C.D.W. Adviser Will
Not Come By
“Golfito”

Mr. Philip Hewitt-Myring, Pub-
lic Relations Adviser to Colonial
Development and Welfare, will
not be arriving in the Elders and
Fyffes S.S, Golfito when it reaches
Barbados today as was originally
planned,

Due to illness, he did not sail
on the vessel when it left Eng-
land last month,

Mr. Hewitt-Myring went up to
the United Kingdom to attend a
Conference of Public Relations
Officers in London,

costing over





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



CAR PARK AT RACES



es Cause Cost



THE BARBADOS AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION'S car
members of the association who are attending the B.T

Transportation to
Canada Dry station wagon.

Site of the car park is the Barbados Regiment's Barrack Square.

B.A.A. Will Arrange
Car Park At Races

The Barbades Automobile As-
sociation has arranged by mutual
agreement with the Barbades
Regiment's Commanding Officer
that the Regiments Barrack Square
will be the official car park for
members of the Barbados Auto-
mobile Association, during the
Barbados Turf Club’s four day
mid-summer meeting which opens
today.

The Canada Dry Bottling Cc,
have lent the Association their
station wagon and a driver, free
of charge to assist in transporting
members of the Association to and
from the Grand Stand.

The Association’s Patrolman
Herbert will among other duties
show members where to park.

Civil Service
Appoiniments

His Excellency the Governor
has approved of the following ap-
pointments and transfers of clerks

in the Public Service:—

G. M. Barnes, I. Headley—Customs.

E. F. Burke, W.McD. Rogers, C. E
Maynard—Colonial Secretary’s Office

B. R. Collymore, G. H. Edwards—Cur-
rency Department

R. V. Goodridge, N. R. Gill—Audit

E Forde, A, E



Bonnett, K
mc; s
General's Office
E. McD. Russell, E,
Drayton, J. A Millar,
Agriculture Department

Richards--Accountant



H
Fr

Clarke, J, K
B. Taylor



J.S, E. Marshall, H D. Wilson, A. R
Blackman, L, G. V. Cave, K, Springer,
R A_ Hall, Post Office

LS. Deane—Public Trustee's Office

E. H L. Thorpe,—Petty Debt Court

J H Campbell, Police Magistrate's
Court, District “A.”

L. Thomas—Police Magistrate’s Court,
District “B,’

D. T, Daniel—Police Magistrate's Court
District ““C

K. W. King—Harbour & Shipping Mas
ter's Office

Cc. Ifill—Income Tax Office

H. A. King—Education Department

S E Parris—Labour Office

F, DeC. King—, Registrar's Office

F.D. W_ Phillips—Regis ‘s Office

C. R. Phillips—Savings Bank

B. K. F. Bowen—Medical Services

H W_ Walcott, E, R. Barrow—Water
works Department

G.A Social Welfare Off

cer

Collymore
TRANSFERS

K L Morris
Debt Court, to Police

itade Clerk, Petty

Long G
Magistrates Courts,







District “F", from Ist August, 1951

BD. Morris—Long Grade , Clerk,
Public Trustee's Office, to Petty Debt
Court, from ist August, 1951

0, StC. Smith—Long Grade Clerk,
Registrar's Office to Public Trustee's
Ofive, from ist August, 1951

C. S_ Daniel—Senior Clerk, Police
Magistrates’ Courts, District “F" to Reg

istrar's Office, from Ist August, 1951
D. N. Lewis—Long Grade Clerk, Say

ings Bank, to Labour Department, from
Ist August. 1951

F. A_ Parris—Long Grade Clerk, Cur
rency Department, to Savings Bank,
from Ist August, 1951

Vv. H. Sealy—Long Grade Clerk, Cur-
rency Department, to Government In
dustrial Sehools, a oon a can be
released

H E Walcott—Longe Grade Clerk
Police Magistrates’ Courts, District “A”
to the Airport, from 10th October, 1951

C Evelyn—Long Grade Clerk, Harbour
& Shipping Master's Office, to Post
Office, from Ist August, 1951

M B Walkes Temporary Clerk

Department of Medical Services, to Police



Magistrates’ Courts, District “A”, from
Ist August, 1951

G_E Clarke—Temporary Clerk, Pub-
lic Trustee's Office, to the Petty Debt
Court, from ist August, 1951

K B Howard Temporary Clerk,
Police Magistrates’ Court, District “C
to Registrar of Friendly Societies, from
Ist August, 1951

C. K. Holder—Temporary Clerk, Wa-
terworks Department, to Public Works

srom Ist August, 1951



6 I.D’s

Notifications of Infecticus Di-

AVIATI

park goes into operation to-day for the use of
C’s four day mid-summer's meeting.

and from the Grand Stand will be provided by the association assisted by a

ARE DISCUSSED

WING COMMANDER L. A. Egglesfield, Director Gen-
eral of Civil Aviation in the Caribbean area, has just re-
turned from Trinidad where he met the Hon. J. Ajodha-
singh, Minister of Works and Communications, and the
Director of Civil Aviation and discussed the best means
of carrying out the recommendations of the International
Civil Aviation Conference which was held in Havana last

vear.

Referring to some of the air-
felds in the area, he said: “We
want to improve Vigie in .St.
Lucia by removing the small hill
at the western end which forms
an obstruction to an aircraft ap-
proaching to land. We also want
to extend the airstrip at Golden
Rock airfield in St. Kitts.

Appeal Judges
Confirm Decision

A decision of Police Magistrate,

Mr. S.. BH,

Nurse whx

» dismis

ON PLANS |

sed

on its merits a case Iretha Chand-

ick
of

It is not, of course, possible.to ler brought against Freder
reach a final decision in either case Grant, an island constable
until the cost of the projects gre Roaches, St. Lucy, accusing him

known; to ascertain this, detailed
surveys will be necessary and it is
hoped that these will be arranged
shortly.”

“It is anticipated that the same
survey party will carry out a
detailed examination of Pallisa-
does airfield in Jamaica to as-
certain if a third runway, pro-
viding sufficient length for all
types of aircraft, can be con-
structed.”

was

Appeal,

Grant

for

and Mr

H

Mr. G

Grant,

yesterday

Mr.

J. W.

B.

by

A. Vaughn.
Chandler's case was that she was

her

drew to t

on

the rc

he

of inflicting bodily harm on her,
confirmed
Judges of the Assistant Court of
Chenery

the

holding the rope to her cow when
dragged
along the ground.
H. Adams who appeared
Judges’
attention that when Chandler at-

ype

Off to Miami tended the doctor, she told hii
On Sunday, Commander Eggles- -thaty the cow dragged her,

field will be proceeding to Miami Mr, J. E, T. Brancker repre-
to attend the bi-annual meeting sented Chandler He did not ap-
of aeronautical agencies in the pear for her from the beginning
Caribbean area interested in of the case
Aeronautical Teleccmmunications Iretha Chandler told the Court
and Navigational Aids which will that Cardinal Griffith, a watch-

be held by International Aeradcic |man, had held her cow and said

(Caribbean) Ltd. that Grant and he were going to
At this meeting, there will bejsell it She and her husband

discussions on matters of general }held it. Grant then held the cow

interest with particular refererce}and told Cardinal not to let it

to the continued implementati; )

of recommended I.C.A.O, stand- They had taken it off her land

ards and practices as they apply e said

to aeronautical telecommunica-

t
tions and navigational aids. ‘

activi-|

V

h

The case for Grant was
vas asked to escort Cardinal who

that

he

It is expected that the vas taking a cow to the Police
ties of International Aeradio L!4.|Station, The cow had been caught
since it began operation in 1hls}on a Mr, Knight’s land, “Hilary
area a little over a year ago, will|Chandler came to me,” he said,
be reviewed. ‘ “and told me to take Cardinal

He said that wherever practi-|Grifith in charge for stealing the
cable, suggestions from airlines in | egw,”
the area which are using the Grant said he later had to a:
facilities afforded by the company, |rest both Iretha and Hilary fo:

will be examined at the meeting,
with a view to improving the
efficiency of the service provided

r



Down For Sessions
For Larceny

Cleveland Jones a painter ol
Hanson, St. George was committed
to the next sitting of the Court
of Grand Sessions by His Wor-
ship Mr. H. A. Talma_ Police
Magistrate of District “A’’ yester-
day when the preliminary hear-
ing in the case in which he is
charged with larceny of $135
belonging to Stanley Sealy was
concluded.

The offence is alleged to have
been committed on June 29.
Mr. J. S. B. Dear appeared on
behalf of Jones in the prelimin-
ary hearing, while Sgt. E. King
conducted the case for the
prosecution

DR. WASE-BAILEY DIES

News has been received that
Dr. Basil N. V. Wase-Bailey, who
was Chief Medica] Officer in this
Island from May 1939 to October
1943 and who retired from the

seases for the month of July are, Colonial Service in January, 1950

as follows:—Enteric Fever

uberculosis 4,





8

with the FERGU SON Wheel Tractor

WORLD'S MOST COPIED TRACTOR

dl

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Further inform:

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2;) died on July 7th. 1951,

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ert LBS

ZOFLORA |
fragrant with str
oils, especially m
atmosphere’ by

5068
LLLLLELLLESCLSELSESESSS SESS APAPP PEATE

houses and in the



Available in th

{
Zouquet, Jasmir
Lavender and Pir
|
|



Zo

654 ¢
SCLC CLL LK I

“oe

naking a



mH. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. - Agents
Seugdgs

CLE E



a powerful
gly
rade

for
praying

Home.

OF

antiseptic

disturbance,

THEY ARE THE BEST

germicide,
floral

purifying the

in Public

Rooms, Offices, Shops, Factories, Ware-

e following perfumes

c Lilac,

1e

Carnation,

flora |
(Verfured DISINFECTANT ~~

I

COLT SN RT RS NT ae

Sor

INSIST ON

"PURINA CHOWS

or

k

i

‘

Le

eo

POLO POSE

s

e

SCSSSSSSSSSUGSE SSSSOSSSY

oS

6

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Att tA ttt ttt tt 44 434,4,4,¢,t,t tA
LCP A PPC CCK PP PCP CEP CC EP EO} \

PAGE FIVE





Brewster Gets |
Physical Education. |
scholarship |




nw






When Mr,. Harold G. Brewster |
returns to the island in 1953, |
Combermere School will be the,
only school in the island with}

two specialists in Physical Educa- }
tion.

lhe Governing Body of the
School recently;received informa }
tion that Mr. Brewster has been |
awarded a two-year scholarship
under Colonial Development and

Welfare scheme to complete his |
}

Physical Education course at
Lowghborough College, England, |
tenable from October next. 14

Mr. Brewster left the island for |
England in September 1950 under |
his own arrangements to study |

Physical Education at Loughbor- |
ough College. |
The Headmaste: of Comber-
mere School told the Advocate:

Since that time his progress has |
been so satisfactory that the Co-
lonial Office has awarded him this |
scholarship to enable him to com- |
plete the three-year course.” {

Mr. Brewster joined the staff of }

Combermere School in 1944 after |
returning to the island from!
Dominica where he served in the |
Dominica Grammar School. On|}
many occasions he has represented |
the school at cricket.





OBTAINABLE AT

{
The other Physical Education |
specialist is Mr. Bruce St. John
who qualified at Loughborough |
College in 1947. He was awarded
a British Council scholarship, |
When asked if there was }
necessity for two Physical Edu-|
cation specialists at Combermere
Major Noott, Headmaster, said:!
There is a very great need in
the whole island for specialists in
Physical Education,”




| ALL LEADING DRY GOOD STORES
| J

PPLLPCLEFFSSFSECSLESSE >
‘.

HA ISON’S — BROAD STREET
PIECE

| DECORATED

' TOILET SETS

YOUR CHOICE OF THREE ATTRACTIVELY
COLOURED DECORATIONS.

ONLY $18.51 PER

e
“VEITASAVOUR™

WATERLESS
COOKERS

OS

{9599955955

PROPEL SEE SPOTS

:





Driver Fined

His Worship Mr, E. A, McLeovt
Police Magistrate of District “A”,
yesterday fined Herman Jordan
of Airy Hall Land, St Michael,
$72 to be paid by seven instal-
ments or three months’ imprison-
ment with hard labour for driv-
ing the motor lorry M—1002 the
property of S. E, Cole & Co.,
without an appropriate license

Jordan on the morning of Aus
ust 2 about 2.15 o'clock drove ot
the lorry M—1002 which Gar-
nett Caddle of Hindsbury Road
St. Michael left parked opposite
the Barbados Taxi Co. to Bay
Street and it ran into the veran-
dah of the house of Mrs. I[renc
Chase and also knocked down
guard wall on the opposite sic
of Mrs, Chase’s house.

A further
smposed on
the lorry
consent.
he will
month's
labour,

Police Constables 362 Brathwaite




if
SET

fine of $1440 wa
Jordan for driving
without the owner’
Failing to pay this fine,
have to undergo one
imprisonment with hard

and 3&8 Marshall carried out in-

vestigations which finally led to .

Fonda fron tes ae ene 3 ae The “Vitasavour” Roasts, Boils, and Fries—it
Jordan, aid ¢ ory ser $ . > . . >, wey iscuitce ate .
Thing and You Gould. have. iilind also Bakes Cakes, Pastry, Biscuits ete., In short
the people living in the house anything that can be cooked on an ordinary stove,

when the collision took place,” can be cooked in a “Vitasavour” easier and quicker,

Sgt. Forde attached to the Cen-
tral Police Statio osecuted foi niet sid dia: “al cuit eh y aan aie ae
inp Silica. Weccas biseeenain a. WATERLESS COOKING IS BETTER BECAUSE
ceived, IT EMPLOYS THE NATURAL FOOD JUICES AS

A COOKING MEDIUM THUS PRESERVING THE
NATURAL VITAMIN CONTENT SO ESSEN-
TIAL TO GOOD HEALTH



DECREE ABSOLUTE

The Hon, the Chief Justice, Si
Allan Collymore, Kt., pronounce

FOR DELICIOUS ANP NUTRITIOUS, FOODS











decree absolute in the Court for USE A “VITA VOUR”
Diverce and Matrimonial Cause y
in the case of C, O. De C. Cai 5
" e « ° ‘ '

rington, Petitioner, E, A, Carring $24.36 EA ll
ton, Respondent and G. Walke:
Co-Respondent

Decree Nisi had been pro-
nounced on June 1. Mr. W. W *
Reece, K.C., instructed by Mr HHA RISON Hardware Dept.
D. L, Sarjeant appeared for th
petitioner, Tel 2364

8 6 eB OCCBOOCO 989869990046 6404 SOLA POOLS

POOP OCGSS

ORDER THESE EARLY

Hot- Water Bottles & Combination Syringe

B Hot-Water Bottles es Dunlopillo Cushions
Ice Caps e Air Cushions
a Enamel Douche Cans yy Enema Syringes ¥
.
a Enamel Bed-Pans e Kidney Dishes %
Feeding Cups e Atomizers, ete. x
Glass Food Measures S
x
$
>
°
>





‘s . _— i.
% KNIGHTS DRUG STORE:
Seen m8): I







charm on
your table

CLOVER LEAF
CORK

MATS

WASHABLE &

HEAT-RESISTING
®

Sets wrapped in Cellophane

at $4.79, $3.32
& $2.91 per get

Sa arctccsaeaananenemaeanenmanemne





CAVE SHEPHERD & C0., LED.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET























BARBADOS ADVOCATE “ SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1961



SEND YOUR
‘ORDERS:

TO :

ADVOCATE
PRINTERY

DIAL 2620

Cristian Scene |
iq Reading Room





$e
=

nase ne ASRS
Sater se OM) ein |
Metes Co oF YOUN
mot . (

COME ON! L
WHATIS BEHIND




>!



i



Hours: -m.
eee MUSTARD OR VIN EGAR Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Piridayn,
i a.m, —12 o'clock Saturdays.

At this Room the Bible and

the Christian Science text-book

Science and Health with key to

the Scriptures by MARY BAKER

EDDY may be read, borrowed.
or pu

re!
é VISITORS ARE WELCOME a
or ear Va ee ee ae a

S YOU TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credi* customers for Thursday to Saturday only





Usually Now Usually NOW
Pkgs. Jersey Cream Biscuits 47 40 Tins Grapes 32 28

Tins S.A. Pineapple Jam (21lb) 66 G60 Bot. Frontenac Beer 26 20



Bottles Green Seal Rum (Qts) 108 9@ Bot. Davis Stout 28 22





BY GEORGE MC. MANUS




















| ime “AN! YOUR BROTHER
POLICE HEARD | HEARD THAT THE CHIEF
YER BROTHER | HEARD - s ‘

WAS COMIN! || HEARD HE’S NOT
TO TOWN - | \ COMIN’ ru |
seen 1] CLE tQ MOM ANG



YES-I HEARD FROM THE CHIEF OF
HIM YESTERDAY -MY
DARLING BROTHER

1S COMING TO TOWN

WELL=WELL- HELLO-MRS
JiIGGS! HOW ARE YOLI-MY
DARLING?- I HEARD THIS

FROM MRS. KUMQUAT- WHO
HEARD IT FROM MRS. _
CARRIE TALES / ft * i 5 }
i Cort ha ny ae i] [Pe
* AZ, ot
Som ‘



WELL. -
STUPID -
WHY





















ON SOME SECRET THAT
BUSINESS / IDIOTIC,
p LALIGH ?










I Pour some
“Windolene’on a se

—~¢
——

Don't risk your charm
with old-fashioned
ineffective deodorants.





Sparkling glass

ONLY NEW ODO-RO-NO CREAM











- - Bostic thedieina in GIVES YOU ALL THESE ADVANTAGES:
= Spread it over % Polish lightly half the time, just use 1 —Stops perspiration quick- %—Absolutely harmless to
the glass and — that's all iy and safely all fabri
give it a moment Windolene, Grease, ¢

BEGING TOAGITATE HIS 2—Banishes odour instantly. —New, exclusive formula.














to dr he NZ
/ THE MAIN | ACTIONS... 4 1, if a 4 iy S> _ Al dirt and fly: macks go 3 —Gives full protection for Never dries up, never

THIS LOOKS LIKE THE AH! NOW TH \\ sap pf | On tb.
PAY-OFF/ LNT. MUST ) RESEARCH STARTS! HERE = ; \ “fF >’ ke! Df, in a flash and leave one to three days. gets gritty or cakes in the
REALLY KNOW THE 16 WEALTH OF MATERIAL / iin 7 F Se \ WZ <=> “Ay + your glass sparkling 4—Never irritates normal jar as ordinary deodos
LAYOUT OF THESE BUT AY MUST BE CAREFUL... , ‘3 iy | \ () id ob ‘ A Ke skia-- use it daily. ants often do.

i GAY: “ GOLD ( rs db, 3 . f | \ indoten a ~~ | and spotlessly clean,

; COR@UPT. MEN!” AND ; y ~ a | I~ a a Windle TROY ©

THIS HAZARD. .. j ( \ag 4 x fa

FOR WINDOWS, MIRRORS,
BATHS, REFRIGERATORS—

Ww i d i IN FACT ANY GLAZED SURFACE
| naorene "â„¢
| cleans glass casily « guiikely

5 Bf

_ HEALTH BENEFITS

| * FREE FROM HARSH IMPURITIES
* NO INJURIOUS AFTER-EFFECTS
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

WoNGENE Bry ”) liga BEET VOL





MAGING! NOW HE ASKS |
FOR A DATE! HE SAID
HE'D WAIT AT THE
DRUGSTORE ON THE
CORNER UNTIL IT
SHOWED UP...THE
DOPE! HE CAN SIT
THERE FOREVER
FOR ALL T CARE!

ip petit






pore) %® SAFE IN ACTION
=| |BUT THATS A STRANGE YARN. !'VE > | LOOK INTO IT WI PHOTO OF THE GIR ;

| NEVER HEARD IT 93> | GET ASHORE WHERE THERES | JAND TIGER? DIDN'T ( ANYTHING+UK~

‘ BEFORE. sagt | | SMOKE, THERE'S USUALLY YOU BRING RIFLEG? | ABOUT DANGER
C RE. ,

i [SEE THi¢ DEVIL? NEW FROM How] k 0B







VALUE FOR MEN

* Celanese ' Sports Shirts are popular for both work
and play because they look and fee! good and are
, economical. Made from ‘Celanese’ Jersey, they
Made by ALLER @ BANBERYS LTB, LONDOR are obtainable in various shades and sizes.



}
SPORTS SHIRTS + ATHLETIC UNDERWEAR
'

ee a







SATURDAY,





The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknowl-
edgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$:.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4@ cents per word on Sundays for each
additional ward.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
additional word, Terms cash, Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3143 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.
_—_———

THANKS

——
BARROW —We the Wright's family take
this opportunity to thank those who
attended the funeral, sent wreaths and
showed sympathy in any way through
the death of our beloved sister Mrs.
Venetta Barrow who died on July
23rd 1951.
John Barrow
(brothers),
(sisters),
(nephew),

(husband), John,
Reita, Doris, Ursula
Evan, Erald, Cecil Anthony
Elma, Dalorise, Coral (nieces) .
4.8.51—in

Martin



MADE to measure within a day if
necessary Shirts, Pyjamas, Pants, Shorts,
& Ladies’ Slacks. Guaranteed fit and
Workmanship ROYAL STORE, No. 12
High Street. Phone 4359

4.8.51—lan





THE NEW DENTURE HOSPITAL
Broken Dental Plates skillfully re-
paired. Specials @elivered within three
hours. Square Deal Dental Lab, Magazine
Lane, 2. 4.8.51—%

HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—Isle of
SANTA MARIA--ioveliest hotel
in Caribbean. Rates from $7.00 per head
per day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi-
dential district ae Government Pret’



Rates from $4.00 per
day, .Enquiries to D. M. Slinger,

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife M
HOLDER (nee Best) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting an/ debt or debts in my
neme unless by a written order signed
by me.

HERBERT ALONZA HOLDER,
6th Ave. Beckles Rd





3.8..51—2n

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sutdays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word on







HELP





MAID—English Lady requires Compe-
tent middi¢aged General Maid, able to do
plain cooking. Only those with first
class references considered. ba ~ ar

—in

IMMEDIATELY
HOUSEKEEPER with experience, for
Guest House, References essential.
Apply Box XX. c/o Advocate Advtg.
Dept. 3.8.51—2n.

MISCELLANEOUS

260 feet six-inch bore Cast Iron or
Steel Pipe. Apply: D. M. Simpson &
Co. 2.8.51—6n

MOVIE FILM PROJECTOR: One (1)
16 m.m. Movie Film Projector without
sound. Phone 95275. 2.8.51—6n

PLAY PEN, 40 ins. x 40 ins, Folding,
with legs and castors preferred, Write
“Playpen” P.O. Box 92, state finish and
price. 26.7.51—t.f.n

WANTED TO BUY
OLD SEWING MACHINE out of use.
Good prices paid, Apply to Mrs, Vaughn,
Corner of Fairchild and n Streets.
21. "1. 51—8n.

WANTED TO RENT
BUNGALOW by married couple, no
children. One completely furnished bun-
galow, on the sea, with garage, for iong
period. Address particulars to: M.B.,
P.O. Box 124. 24.7.51.—5n.

FOR RENT

* Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents SuNdays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word on Sundays;















ananassae AiagNRaaEeeen cement
HOUSES







BAY VIEW —St. Lawrence Gap. 2
bedrooms. .Fully furnished, .Running
water; electric light. Immediate posses-
sion. Apply next door Mrs. R, Lynch.

4.8.51—In
BEACHVILLE— Furnished Room in
Fitts Village, St, James, with dressing
room and all conveniences, cool and
quiet. Apply Mrs. L. Cumberbatch.

3.8.51—6n
~ BUNGALOW—Newly built Bungalow

on long lease on St. James’ Coast. (7
niles from town). Fully furnished, all
modern conveniences from ee et

lst. Dial 2472. 7.51—3n.

Nee Re a Se et ce

CHANDOS, 2nd Ave., Belleville, Fully
furnished, Available ‘Ist August, Dial
3450 or 3926, 1.8.51—3n

CLIFTON TERRACE—To an approved
tenant. Furnished House, Upper Bay St.
Opposite Yacht and Aquatic Clubs. All
modern conveniences. Apply a a eaten:

LAKE ViEW: Constitution Road,
bedroom House and several fruit trees
Apply to T. J. Bynoe, Enterprise House,
Ch. Ch. 4.8.51—2n

ee
HOUSE: 3-bedroom Modern House.
All conveniences. Situated Top Rock.
Available furnished or unfurnished on
long lease. Apply: Ralph Beard, Lower
Bay Street. Phone 4683. 3,.8.51—3n

—$—$<$—$————

RIPLEY-ON-SEA, Maxwell Coast, fully
furnished, 2 bedrooms, refrigerator and
Phone, for September and from November
on. Dial 8476. 4.8.51—2n

“SUNSET VIEW", situated at Rockley.
Furnished with 3 bedrooms dining and
drawing rooms and all other conveniences.
Servant room and garage in yard, For
particulars, Ring 2455. 4.8.51—2n

_——$—S[—$——— ee
THE Coa bar bf St. Lawrence.
a
hc ears 14.7 51.—t f.n,
BOF

NOTICE
This is to notify the public
that I have appointed Mrs,
Winifred King of Cane Vale,
(Christ Church, with a power
of Attorney, to act for me
in the mattet.of the estate
of the late Joseph N. Prescod
of Hopewell, Christ Church.
Signed,
IRVIN PRESCOD,
Qualified Executor,
352 Washington St.,
Cambridge 39,
Mass., U.S.A.

POSSESSES SPOS OSOES,
[FORRES
TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

—_—__—
Outstanding books on our Islands

CARIBBEAN CIRCUIT — Full of
information about the Caribbean
Islands 14/-

ISLANDS IN THE SUN — Similar
to the above. Book full of rich
information 13/6

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

Clear Glass in Plastic. H
gauge for car windshields
Unbreakable.

JOHNSON'S HARDWARE

us

AUGUST 4,

CLASSIFIED ADS.

1951

FOR SALE





AUTOMOTIVE
CAR: Austin 40. In good condition
Phone 2330 4.8.51—1n

CAR: Bantam Singer Saloon Car. good
working order, Owner ieft island. Price
$275.00 Seen at Redman & Taylor's ane



age Lid. 4.8.51—3n
CAR: 1951 Hillman Station Waggon.
Mileage 2,000. Condition as new, Owner
buying large vehicle. Apply; Ralph
Beard, Lower Bay Street. Phone 4683
3.8.51—3n

KAISER. 1949, Six seater Saloon.

5,006 miles only. Absolutely as new.
Taxed. Dial 91-74. 31.7.51—6n
—————————
CAR: M.G. Sports 1950, T.D. Model,
Excelient running condition—and how it
can run! Two-seater; independent front
wheel suspension gives perfect ride at
any speed. Owner leaving island. No

reasonable offer refused. Phone 4877.
1.8.51—t.f.n.

ONE well-cared 1947 Chevrolet Car as
as new. Apply to D'Arcy A. Scott,
agazine Lane, 2.8.51—3n

ELECTRICAL
One G.E. REFRIGERATOR tin good
order) one Coolerator, Ice Boxes. Owen
T. Allder. Dial 3299. 4.8.51—1n









One (1) Phillips six-tulbe RADIO” and

a Pick-Up fitted into cabinet with

doors and record apa etc, santa
cendition. Griffith, Photographer, Brittons
X Road. ‘ 3.8.51—3n





FURNITURE

OFFICE CHAIRS: Just received a
shipment of Office Posture Chairs with
three point adjustment. See them today
a: T. Geddes Grant Ltd., or Dial 4442.
iva: ty 2.8.51—t.f.n.

MECHANICAL

TYPEWRITER: Smith Premier (noise-







J) Corona Portabie. ¥:, Owen
‘Allder, Roebuck St. Dia asad |
4.8.51—In



MISCELLANEOUS

BARN DANCE | SHIRTS: They will
make your girl fall for you—they are
pure Silk—they are hand-painted with
Barbados sceneries and views, THANI'S
Dial 3466,

4.8,.51—I1n
BABY’S PRAM in good condition,
reasonable price. Apply: Mrs. Seale
Navy Gardens, Phone 4128.





31.7.51—2n
DOMINICA MARKETING AGENCY



Carrots 2c per Ib. Tomatoes 24¢ &
36c per Ib. Fresh Lettuce and large
Peppers. 2.8.51—2n

eens eee
ESCHALOT—A fresh lot. Come any
JOHN D. TAYLOR & ar
x 8.61—In





HAIR. BRUSHES: English Hair Brushe,
Good Aue § Gon 69c. Ladies 77¢, each.
THANT'S, Dial 3466. 4.8.51—In

ICE BOX—GapaeiVad ibs, only $10.00,



Phone 3577 between 6 to 9 a.m. and 5
to 10 p.m. 3.8.51—2n
JOHN WHITE SHOES: In many

Styles and Prices for Men. Our prices
are unbeatable and unrepeatable.
THANT'S. Dial 3466. 4.8.51—1n

—~—.
JOHNSON’S PASTE WAX: Sunshine



from a tin, Cleans, Polishes, Protects
all Floors, Furniture and Leather.
4.8.51—5n



JOHNSON'S AUTO WAX: Try it today
and join the ranks of satisfied motorists.
4.8.51—5n

UE EEEeEEnEee
JOHNSON’'S CARNU: First class Car
Cleaner. To be used in conjunction with
CAR-PLATE, 4.8.51—5n
———
JOHNSON'S CAF. PLATE: Sensational
Car Polish. A boon to motorists. Get
a tin and try it today. 4.8.51—5n

JOHNSON'S TING FLOOR
SEALER. Seals out dirt and all moisture
and protects the floor against wear.
Very economical. 4.8.51—5n

JOHNSON’S LIQUID WAX: Dries,
cleans and Polishes your Floors in one
action. 4.8.51—5n

JOHNSON'S GLO-COAT. Sunshine
without rubbing. Ideal for Floors. Elimin-
ates drudgery. 4.8.51—5n



JOHNSON'S Cream Wax. Sunshine as
you clean Especially for furniture. It
cleans, it Wax Polishes, it gives Wax
Protection, in one easy application,

4.8.51

——

JOHNSON'S WAX PRODUCTS. Obtain-
able from all Leading Hardware Stores
ie garages, Distributors. K. J. Hamet-
4.8.51—5n

LORRY SKIDS: One (1) pair of Lorry
Skids. Finder will be rewarded on
return to Messrs. H. A. Guistone & Co.
Ltd. Roeb: x 4.8.51—2n

MEGASSE at Lower Estate ae:
Telephone 2488. 2.8.51—6n

—5n





PEARL NECKLACES: 1, 2 and 3 Strand,
Lovely for Races and Holiday, THANI'S
Dial. 3466. 4.8.51—I1n

PUMPS: One (1) 3” Centrifugal Pump,
and one (1) 7 x 12” Fan Mill Pump
Phone 91-05. 4.8.51—2n

RECORDS; Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing
»...and we will order for you if we
haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,
Ltd. 6.7.51—t.f.n.

SCARVES: Barbados Scarves with Bar-
bados Views, Map and Scenery of the
Island, made frorn 100% pure Silk.
$3.98 each. THANI'S Dial ee Ae

4.8.51—In









-S





SWIM TRUNKS: Gents! Its just what
you're looking for. They are All Wool
@ $3.38 each, THANT'S Dial 2466.

4.8.51—1In



TROPICAL FISH: Siamese Fighting
Females, Good Community Fish, also
Pearl Danios and Giant Danios. Archie
Clarke, Phone 5148. 3.8.51—4n

a

TRAILER-—One Trailer. Suitable to be
drawn ty Tractor. Dual Rear Wheels,
Hydraulic Brakes, Rear end attachment
for another Trailer. No Tyres specified,
Call, any day or Phone 3671. Bolden’:{
Garage. 4.8.51—2n

WHITE WOOD oe a boats,
ready cw Ap) to Joseph Kellman,
Chureh vitere T somepn: 4.86.51—3n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Miriam Briggs of
Six Mens, St. Peter, the holder of Liquor
License No. 1057 of 1951 granted in re-
spect of a board and shingle shop with
shedroof attached at Connell Town, St
Lucy to remove said License to a board
and shingle 7 with shedroof attached
at Grape Hill, St. Lucy and to use it

at such last deserted pretnises.

Dated this Ist day of August, 1961.
NEVILLE CADOGAN,
for Miriam Briggs.
Applicant.
To:—SYDNEY H. NURSE, Esq .
Police Magistrate,

B. “Dat, applieatio li be consid
a? a in wil on
we at a@ Licensing Court + . held on
Sao aan. at Police Courts, District

= SYDNEY H. NURSE,
Police Weagisirate, Dist. *
4



NOTICE

This is t6 notify friends and
customers that the work shop wil!
be closed for two (2) weeks be-
ginning from 4th Septembty

MR. D. RUS6ELL.
Genera! Upholsterer
48.51—In

esti tt POS ONC



SE HABLA ESPANOL

ORIENTAL

c OS, SOUVENIRS, AN-
TIQUES,
ILKS

[
|
| IVORY, JEWELS,
THANTrS

Etc,





PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days |
| @nd 12 cents per agate tine on Sundays, |
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days |
| and $1.88 on Sundays.



REAL ESTATE

eS
BUILDING SITE—Situated at Maxweil, |
Ch. Ch. 70 ft. frontage. Price reason-
eble, also Modern Houses and a large
spot of Land, suitable for dividing
Apply to B. A. Brooks. Phone 8335 o
8162. 1.8,51—5



LAND AT ST. LAWRENCE Suitable |
for building sites. For particulars appiy -
to K. R. Hunte, telephome 8137 or 4611.

17.7.51—t.E.n. |

——————

HOUSE in the Garden Land, 3 be--!
rooms, shower bath and domestic ta!
in the kitchen ete. Apply to T. A
Headley, Dunkirk House, Hindsbun; Red





ONE 20 x 10 Chattel house with sheJ
at Brandon's Beach. $700.00. You ex
deposit $240.00, and pay the © balan
monthly.

One small property at Mahogany
$2200.00. Deposit $600.00,
ance monthly.

For further particulars apply to D’A:
A, Scott, Magazine Lane 2.8.51- at



Lane |
re the bat



AUCTION

|
UNDER THE DiAMOND
HAMMER

I_have been instructed by the Govt-
in-Executive Committee to sell by Public
Auction on Tuesday I4th August, 1951
at the Water-boat enclosure on tha
Pierhead, One Motor Launch with Singer
engine. Size 2357 x 12 x 6 it.

D’Arey A. Scott, Auctioneer,

4.8.51—én

LOST & FOUND





LOST



One B.T.C. RACE TICKET, Series
V. No. 0604. Finder kindly return same
to the Advocate Advt. Dept

4.8.51—la



SWEEPSTAKE TICKET Series X
6978 Finder please return same to
Prince C. Gregoire Roebuck Street
Reward Offered 8.51—19





LOST.
SHARE CERTIFICATES
NOTICE is hereby given that H. M
Greaves, Executrix to the Estate ot
Francis Wood Greaves, Decd.; has made
application for the issue of Share Cer-
tificates in place of following Share
Certificates which have been lost:—
Certificate No, 714 30 Shares No, 22149
to 22178.
Certificate No. 839 3 Shares No,
to 23919,

ea Certificate No. 1106 11 Shares No, 27995

to

23917

28005.
Certificate No, 1428 11 Shares No, 36363
36373.

If no objection to this application is
made by the 3rd day of August, 1951,
new certificates will be issued.

By Order of the Board of Directors.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON FACTORY, LTD.
E. M. LEACH,
Secretary.
22.7.51—3n

LOST CERTIFICATE
THE WEST INGIA RUM REFINERY
Notice is hereby given that application
has been made to the Board of Directors
of the aboyenamed Company for the issue
of a Duplicate Share Certificate for twen-
ty (20) shares, Nos, 7133 to 7152 inclusive,
ia the name of W. R. St. C. Redman,
the original of which has been lost or
misplaced, and Notice is hereby given
that within fourteén days from this date
hereof, if no claim of representation is
made in respect of such original Certifi-
cate, a new Certificate will be issued,
By order of the Board of Directors,
H.R. LEACH,
Secretary.



2th July, 1951,
25.7.51—3n



PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,







minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.
NOTICE
The owner of the yaeht “MARSAL-

TESE 121", now lying in this Port, serves
Notice that he will not be responsible
for any debts incurred on behalf of the
Yacht unless they are contracted with his
knowledge and written authorisation,



4.8.51—3n
NOTICE
Re Estate of
FRANCIS EDWARD CRAIG
Deceased

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim against
the estate of Francis Edward Craig late
of the parish of Christ Church who died
in this Island on the 28th day of April
1951 are hereby required to send par-
ticulars of their claims duly attested to
the undersigned Mrs, Nita McLean Har-
vey Read the qualified executrix of the
deceased in care of Messrs R. 8. Nicholls
& Co., Roebuck Street, Bridgetown,
Solicitors on or before the fifteenth day
of September 1951, after which date |
shall proceed to distribute the assets of
the deceased among the parties entitled
thereto having regard only to such claims
of which I shall then have had notice.
and that I will not be liable for the
assets or any part thereof so distributed
to any person of whose debt or claim |
shall not then have had notice.

All persons indebted to the said estete
are requested to settle their indebtedness
without delay

Dated this 6th day of July, 1951

INITA Mc LEAN HARVEY READ

Qualified Executrix of the Estate of

Francis Edward Craig (deceased)
7.7,51—4n.

PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE

1904



(The Provost Marshal's Act,
(1904—6) § 30).

On Friday the 10th day of August, 195'
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon
will be sold at my office to the highest
bidder for any sum not under the ap-
praised value All that certain piece of
Land containing about 2,640 sq. ft. situ-
ate in Parish of St. Michael butting and
bounding on lands of Susan Yearwood,
a private road, on lands of gne E
Holmes and on a Road of Sufferance, at
Goodland together with the Chattel-
Dwe'ling House, Buildings, &¢., ap-
praised as follows:—

The whole property, chattel house and
land, appraised to one thousand t'vo
hundred and ninety dollars and seventy-
six cents ($1,290.76) attached from
Martin Beresford Stewart and
towards satisfaction, &c

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day

of purchase.
T. T. HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal
Provost Marshal's Office,
24th day of July, 1951

for

25.7.51—3n



WE ARE BUYERS

We buy anything connected with
STAMPS. Sheets, Single Stamps,
Collections, Accumulations and
Covers, Good prices Paid at the
CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY
ard Floor, No. 10, Swan St.







Mrs. HATCH’S Jumble Sale will
take place on Monday Bank Holi-
day 6th August in the Boys’ Schooi
Halil on Holders Hill a
at 12 mid-day Gifts






still

are
needed. Please ‘phone 3423, and we
will collect



All proceeds in aid of the
Viearage Fund



———

BARBADOS

)

ADVOCATE

GOVERNMENT NOTICE





Canadian Trade
With Jamaica





Drops By i/3 \PPLICATIONS from Sanitary Inspectors and Registered Nurse
WINDSOR. ONTARIO. Aug. 2 i (Hospital Trained) for Course of Training at the Public Healt
Canadian trade with Jamaica, Training Centre in Jamaica.

j has dropped off by one-third sinc |
B. Palmer, tanedien Some Grane! Applications are invited from Sanitary Inspectors and Registere:
| missioner to Jamaica said Wednes.| NUrses (Hospital trained) who are willing to be considered for ad
day. vaneed courses which are expected to last about eleven and ten manth
rie said about 40 per cht of Ja-| respectively at the Public Health Centre in Jamaica.
maica’s imports came fr Can-
ode ond p hy Ree | com- Applicants should apply in writing before the 20th Augu
: i produc 2 to the Director of Medical Services, Governme: Buildings
Pane are imported from Canada The Wharf, and a full curriculum shouldbe included it
| the situation probably will con ina application. The scholarships for these coursés, if approved, pro-
j\inue. “We have hopes that it will] vide: —
eventually become brighter but
it’s anybody’s guess just when that | (a) Free air passage to end from Jamaica.
with os.) ue Said.—C.P. | (b) Subsistence allowance at the rate of $4.80 per night, if
married, or $2.40 per night, if single
| (c) Travelling expenses in Jamaica at the rate of $14.40 ; |
yum sm month. |
| (ad) Contingencies at the rate of $4.80 per month. |
eep 3 The scholarships will only be granted on the following con- }
| ditions: ~ ° \
a. nae eo JI stabbi }
ned |

if joints are sven &
your blood Is poiso:
trout faulty Tidneymmetion ,

That the Commissioners of Health agree ‘to pay to the





Giher’ sees ot iaeae officer, his or her salary while absent on study
Diseraass are Beehocke, Aah | leave, where the applicant is employed by the Com

Nouritis, & . Getting missioners .
” yes: i Itehing (b) That the officer selected agrees to enter a bond to cdn-
revere eae se. er hotee sot ty tinue in the service of the Commissioners or of some
cause of the oagewe you must | ether body or Board in the Island whose function is t

‘Cysten treatment is specially compound: | administer Public Health
tone and clean raw, sore, sick kidneys 4.8.51.—8n



your Kidneys,

human tissue.
2. Gets rid of health-destroying, deadly poison-
ous acids with which your system has be+
* come saturated.

* protects from the ravages of disease-attack
on the delicate filter organism, and stimu-

Cystex is approved by Doctors and Chemists in
3
troubles shown above, Mr. J. C. writes
ro



night, and, thanks to Cystex J am much better
than I have been for years.” Mr. P. D
wonders Cystex has worked with me seem al-
most impossible, I/ they were t1 a box they

acids and poisons from
quickly and surely, yet con<
dangerous drugs. Cystex
ways to end your troubles

iMing the germs which attacking
Bladder and Urinary System
in two hours, yet is absolutely harmiess to







hens and reinvigorates the kidneys,





Sprinkle health on >

your food every day sill
countries and by one-time sufferers som tne ~_
“lI am
years old and have suffered with terrible
and pains, continually getting up at

“The

it’s amazing what a differ

would still be worth double.” «. - ence a daily spoonful o
* Guaranteed to Put You Right Bemax can make to your
or Money Back u general health and vitality








Easy to take—just sprinkle it on your
food. Bemax is the richest natural source
of vitatains, protein and minerals, It sup-
nutrients especially necessary to

people who live in the tropics.

Get Cystex from your chemist
today. Give it a thorough test
Cystex is guaranteed to make
you feel younger, stronger,
better in every way, in 24
hours and to be completely
well in 1 week or your money
back if you return the empty
Nes package. Act now!

ee
es
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. Prom Chemists and Stoves
TASTRIBUTORS















bs o KID Shy BRAIDSHAT & € PALMETTO STRERT, BRIDGETOWN,
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fight your
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Shipment of .

=

SMITMWS ELECTRIC

When headaches Start —
due to worry, overwork, over in-
dulgence —be smart, take Alka-
Seltzer right away. Sparkling
effervescence makes Alka-Seltzer
pleasant-tasting, helps its pain-
killing analgesic go to work
fast. Keep it handy. et

Tre

CLOCKS
... Just Received

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets

Sao
So





a





————



ee









Al —— ae



NOTICE

The New Testament Church at
Long Bay St. Philip. will celebrate
its 19th Anniversar on Sunda
August 5th, 1671

E. A. BANNISTER
Deaco:
4.8.51

POLICE NOTICE t

In

HAVE YOU RENEWED)

Your

DRIVING LICENSE.

IF NOT. PLEASE DO 80

JOIN
BEARD'S

RALPH

TOY AND FURNITURE
CLUB
WHAT you
WHAT YOU Ke
LOWER BAY S&T

4.8.51

1
I

PAY
HAVE
CALL

SS

6







“To-day's G.A. Song

“I want to be happy ”

“but I can’t be happy
‘till I have a Gas Cooker |

too!
Hubby

——
oo

WITHOUT DELAY

take note !





SSL SPSS POPES SSO OGIO SPO PPPP PPD FIPOS

3%



PAGE SEVEN







AUSTRALIA,









MONTREAL =
NEW ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED.
(M._A.N.Z.) ribbee wil ac-
3 \BIA creduled to sail r and Passengers for
Melbourne 12 Tune, Brisbane 22nd Doininiew, Antigua Montserra
Port Alms 28th June, Sydney i mad St Kitts Sailin
4th i * Trinidad end July, Friday 0th
\ arbad ar August ee neksa wiht ac
! FC Yr FAIRY eduled ‘to Pa ngeta for
silt H rt late June, Nc oth Queens- ntigua, Montserrat
i mid Juiy, Brisbane end July, Sydney St Kitt Sailing
Augu Melbourn: id August,
j arriving a nidad eptember dacrwood it ae
Cargo ted on through fuss of ept ¢ « sgerigers for St
ard fre cargo. uel Grenada and Aruba. Pas-
} In add t eneral cargo these sengers onl for St Vineent
@sseis have ample space for chilled and g due be notified
Ading for transhipment st Trinidad BW.I oe HOONER OWNERS’
te B 3 ‘ : Tind-
oe Son, Leeward and Wind ASFOCIATION ine.)
For further particulars apply— Consignee. Tele, 4947
FURNESS, WITHY #& CO. LTD.,
TRINIDAD
B.W.1,
&
DA COSTA & CO. LTD. nis ”
BARBADOS Be Wise ... “‘ ADVERTISE.
B.W 1.





HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THY UNITED KINGDOM



















Vessel From Leaves Due
eee Barbados
YOVELIST London 26th July 9th Aug.
PLAN ER” London 3rd Aug 16th Aug.
“FRESNO STAR” Liverpool 4th Aug, 18th Aug.
‘ASTRONOMER Newpot
oe & Glasgow 8th Aug 18th Aug.
5.S. “SCHOI! AR” i 8th Aug 29th Aug.
rete lee teen ellen coe cae aah wn
HOMBWARD FOR Tis UNITED KINGDOM
Closes in
Vessel For Barbados
iS STATESMAN” London 8th Aug
.S. “EXPLORER Liv ool 10th

Aug

For further information apply te

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents

Y= Ao Sinema

NEW YORK SERVICE





2s






TRYA sails 20th July Arrives Barbados ist July, 1061
\ SEAN wis 10th August Arrives Barbados 2ist August, 1951
re a oe bite
NEW oRLE ANS SERVICE
8 NERAL ARTIGAS sails 18th July Arrives Barbados 31st July, 1951.
\ MER rails ist August * Arrives Barbados 14th August
A STEAMER agails tth August Arrives Barbados 29th August, 1961



CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND

Name of Ship Sails Montreal Salles Dalffax Arrives B'doe.



5.8 ALCOA PENNANT” J oth July 24th August 4th
38 ALCOA PARTNER A ra Aug. 6th August 16th
5.5 ALCOA PILGRIM A Mth Aug. 27th Septr. 6th

SS a ne ee
ORTHBOUND





§.S “ALCOA PILGRIM du BR fos July 90th “for St Lawrence River
Ports,
ern sation eee Ree, eee +
* These versels have limited passenver accommodation





ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE

CORE REE PEGE OEE IGT TE

FYFFES LINE

T.8.8. Golfite

arriving



The

will be from ‘Southampton on



4th August, at 6.00 a.m. and will be
6.00

Saturday,

Sailing at p.m. the same afternoon for

Trinidad,

There is ample Ist Class Accommodation

available for Trinidad

Apply :

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.



4654504 ‘ 5 ;

ye POPC D PEE LPP PP FGPPOS POCO O 4
>

%

; Gnee Again...

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OPENING TO-DAY—Varicus Styles in Shoes at
different prices.



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Nightgowns, Slips, Children’s Socks, Vests,
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PAGE EIGHT



Cross Roads Picked



Other Races All
Very Much Open

By
TC-LAY we shal] go to

whatever horse we back will be a potential winner.

BOOKIE

the races with the feeling
Never



before has there been such an array of favourites, and due

to recent rains matters only

If it

upset:

seem to be more complicated.

rains to-day then we will not have to worry about
as in. any case picking the winners will depend so

much on the tuck of the individual!











My advice is therefore to pick
weaanaon a one’s 1ancy Gice
yates, ——wacethei Delur one
bikes because tne
Worse with orange
i, ch g00a as

More you
i to blame
ana certain!

‘The m i races on
the card sre the Barbados Derby
and tne Stewerds’ Stakes which

come in that order ut numbers 3
and 4. In the Derby the position
has been somewhat cleared cur-
ing the past week due to a gooi
gallop done by Cross Roads, This
gelding was recently ill when he
racad. at the Trinidad June meet-
ing and indeed he is not looking
altogether in the pink. However
it is obvious that he has recovered
sufficiently to be made favourite
for the race for two other
reasons.
Chief Rival

The first is that his chief rival
is Best Wishes, who was also ill
in Trinidad, and has not made as
rapid a recovery The second,
because he is so much better than
the other three starters that he
need not be one hundred per cent.
fit to beat them. Cross Roads also
demonstrated last March that nine
furlongs is a distance over which
he-can win very comfortably
with light weight it was true
But I see no reason why thé
difference between the 111 Ibs
which he carried in March, and
the’ 120 lbs. which he will carry
to-day, should make it any more
difficult for him to stay the dis-
tance again, He is also _ five
months older, should be stronger,

and if the track is dry shou.J
easily repeat his time figure of
1.663/5, the fastest that any

three-year-old” has ever returned
for this distance in. Barbados.

In Best Wishes we have a filly
whom we know to be exceptional
when she is fit. “Few will forget
the ease with which she disposed
of the same Cross Roads in ‘the
Barbados Guineas last March and
if she can again reproduce this
form then [ have no doubt she
will be the winner. But she has
not Shown the promise which
Cross Roads has at exercise and
although she has been recovering
from her misfortune in Trinidad
it is an open question whether
She will be fit enough. I must
warn, of course, that she is not a

filly who impresses very much
at exercise and last March she
was in a similar position. Those

who think that class will always
tell should therefore stick to her.

Only Three

The rest of tre brigade number
only three. These are Usher,
Vanguard and Hi-Lo, Of these I
dike Usher in spite of the fact that
he gives no particular signs of
stamina. Vanguard, who one
might have thought on pedigree
would be a natural stayer disap-
pointed much over ‘all distances
last March. In as much as he has
done nothing to suggest that he
will not do so again I must con-
cede him a very slender chance.
With regard to Hi-Lo it’s just a
case of not having any opinion

Water Belle and Soprano I un-
derstand are not going.

The Stewards’ Stakes is the
second of the three annual A

class weight-for-age races over 9
furlongs which take plece in this
island. On the list are Atomic UJ,
Slainte, Gun Site, Burns, Rebaté,
Flieuxce, Drake's Drum and
Elizabethan, *rake’s Drum might
be eliminated at once because he
will probably not start and even
even if he does the distance ie
far too unsuited to his talents.
Even without Drake’s Drum it
is a larger entry than usual but



there again it is very indefinite
if Burns will start and that will
reduce the field to 6. If the C
class mare Flieuxce is also with-
drawn ond kept for her own

division this will bring it down to
5. Of these five then we might
be sure.

I like the two meres Rebate and
Elizabethan best. On past per-
formance the latter has the edge
and if she can reproduce her form
of a year ago I see no reason why








Gi GALS WERE

VERY COOPERATIVE
WHEN THE BOYS
ASKED TO PLAY

THROUGH »>++



US PLAY THROUGH







zh nould not win it easily.
née 1s now six years old
BiG yuestion of age is a factor
to be considered. Kebate o. Use
other hand should be in ter prime
at 4 years old but for tne faci
th t she recently hed a difficult
time at the Trinidad races I would
make her my favourite,
Second S.ring
A cond siring I pick Slainte
and Gun Site while Atomic I
car the usual question mark
eg inst his starting. If one can
wait until Atomic II goes to the



sate end shortly before the white
flag, is raised determjne whether
he is going to jump off or not, this
is about the only method IT can
advocate for buying him on the
Pari Mutuel. But then you will
have to rush to the Pari in a great
hurry and even then you
not get there in time

Gun Site

might

has a long record of
victories over this distance but
not one, I believe, in a_steke
race. This is mainly because of
his regular habit of turning up
for a meeting short of work. On
this oceasion however he has had
Burns as a companion at exercise






and this might have had the
effect of making him fitter than
usual as the meeting opens. Yet
it is very problematical

Old Slainte must also figure
prominently in the betting be-
cause of his doggedness. His
weight is also lower than he is
generally aceustomed to at. this
time and this may make a de-
cided difference. The going must
however be harj as he likes it
best like this,

Elsewhere jin this issue will be
found complete, tips for each

race. There is a new tipster this
time and my advice is to try his

first, not mine, and the best of
luck to everybody.
a



SUMMERHAYES TENNIS
TOURNAMENT

YESTERDAY’S RESULTS
Men’s Singles

V. H, Chenery beat M. A. Harri-
son 6—3, 6—0.

The draw for ‘the semi-finals
which will be played next week
are as follows:—

D. W. Wiles vs. J. S. B. Dear.

Dr. A. S Cato vs. V. H, Chenery



CLUB PREMIERE’S
TENNIS RESULTS

FRIDAY’S PLAY
Men’s Singles

N. Symmonds beat C M
Thompson 3—6; 6—4; 6—4.
C, B. Forde beat F. Edwards
6—3; 6—2.
Ladies’ Doubles Finals
Miss A. Griffith and Miss E.

Parris beat Miss G. Grimes and
Miss C, Alleyne 6—2; 6—4.



DAVIS CUP MATCHES
POSTPONED

MONTREAL, Aug. 3

The opening singles matches in
the Davis Cup competition be-
tween Cuba and Canada _ have
been postponed until tomorrow
because of rain,

Lorne Main of Canada
Jose Aguero in the first
singles matches, with Brendan
Macken of Canada playing Dr.
Juan Weis in the second singles.
The doubles match is now listed
for Sunday, with the concluding
singles on Monday.—vU.P.

meets
of the



Yesterday’s
Weather Report

FROM CODRINGTON
Rainfall: Nil
Highest Temperature:
86.5°F.
Lowest Temperature:
74.0°F,
Wind Velocity: 7 miles per
hour.
Barometer; (9 a.m.) 29.984
(3 p.m.) 29.922



en

ivery ‘Time

46 LADIES=WOULD
DSO

i

| They'll Do It E en a By Jimmy, H

KIND AS 7 LET

/



oO

i
LS Mey. 5°

~ hay af
Av ;

YOU BE Y YES.SURE-
CERTAINLY»

" ———-— Y .
ETHING TELLS vite Y THE ONLY SAFE
BE A LONG, LONG/ PLACE 1S INSIDE
~_NMEs | ~ (THE ROCKER ROOM

MONSOON GETS A NEW SET OF SHOES in preparation for the

To Win Derby

BARBADOS



ADVOCATE



REW SHOES

Race



12

Rovers Beat |
Barbados 13—8 8

The Rovers Club Netball team Q
of Grenada completed their series &

of games in the island with a
match against an Island team at
Queen’s College yesterday eve-!

ning. They defeated the Barbados
side by 13 goals to eight.

Rovers won all their
here. Their positional play was
good and their passing accurate.
At the end of the game each|
member of the visiting team was/
presented with a souvenir, a gift! $

oe
trom the loca! Netball Association. | %

POO SSO FOFOSOOOP

matches

Mrs. G. H. Adams, after the!
game, told the girls that they|
caeserved a rousing welcome when %
they returned to Grenada, in spite X
of Gairy. &

She hoped that such matches] ¢
would be held every year so as to De
give Netball a colonial atmos- x
phere. *

Mrs. W. A. Redhead, Manager- x
ess of the team, who replied, said |
that the team had enjoyed very %
much their stay in Barbados. The} &
games were ail keenly contested, SS
She hoped to welcome a Barbados %

team in Grenada soon.

The Game

For the visitors, skipper Joyce
Blache netted 11 and ene LaHee
two. All the goals for Barbados
were scored by Sylvia Maxwell.
Only one accident occurred. A
Barbadian player was injured
Her place was taken by a reserve.

The game was fast throughout.
When it was only five minutes
old, Joyce Blache opened the sco-ve
for her team with a_ beautiful
shot. Shortly afterwards Sylvia
Maxwell equalised but within th«
iext ‘five minutes Blache scored
again. It was Maxwell who shot
the next goal to make the score
Rovers 2, Barbados 2.

Ten minutes later, Maxwell put
Barbados in the lead and soon
afterwards she sent in the fourth
tor the island. This two jgoal lead
sent the Grenada girls into

$3666} 466666 ot OS









Blache shot two more to bring x
honours even. mY
At half time, the ‘score was]
six—five in favour of Grenada. In x
the second half the Grenada side st
showed definitely that they were] %
superior. They went on to score] &
seven goals in this half while the |
local side were only able to put %
in three. ix
The visitors will return to)
Grenada on Monday. 1%
: |
ne teams were as follows ls
The t > as foll BS
Grenada: Joyce Blache, (Cap!t.) 'S
Ilene LaHee, Doreen Gittens, An- 9»
gela Andrews, Myra Callendar %
Dorothea Sylvester and Pearl ¥&
Mendes es
Barbados: J. Best, I. Quintyno, &
K. Connor, M. Barrow, P. Ki ws
S. Maxwell and G, Ramsay.. %
X%
\
’ s
WHAT’SON TODAY |
Meeting of the Housing ‘
Board 9.00 a.m, *
Police Courts 10.00 a.m. x
First Day's Racing in ss
B.T.C. Meeting at %
Garrison Savan- ve
nah : 1.00 p.m
CINEMAS
Empire: “Pagan Love Song
5.0 pom. and 815 pm
Plaza: “The Sinner of Magdala
445 pm. and & 30 pm
Globe: “Call Me Mister” — 5.0
Pm. and &§U pm
Olympte; “Deadwood Dick’
445 pom and 8.15 pm
Roxy: “The Sword of Mant
pm
Cristo” — 445 pm and 8.15
p.m,



a

atlo |

THERE'S ONLY 1W0.0F ¥
THEMâ„¢AND THEY MUST
BE VERY GOOD GOLFERS.
ester,
LD |
Sere ye

Sinaia











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PROUDLY

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ORANGE,

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BOTTLED

nd unde

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On

166A

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pote 54,

ANNOUNCES
“REVERAGES”
THE

BY

44

“

ROEBUCK

Tuesday,

c

Y

MELEE EEE

THAT

WILL BE ON

Meeting

656 tt ot ol otet,



slarting

44,64

CO MEA PPI FSD

The “Deluxe Bottling Co.”

STREET

THEIR

SALE TO

it
7th August, 1951
&
Flavours of
rINGERS and SODAS
FLAVOURS to follow
e
REFRIGERATED SYSTEM
mos Hygienic Conditions
8

Out
Your

<

54 54S54, 6 %e%,

For The
Bottle !

PMA

645654044

“G.S.M.”

PPE? OPP PRP PRP PE

PPO PEPE AEP EPP PPS PPP

6566 tb tO %

19?



cy

ry
AT THE
e
By kind permission « he Commissioner of Police
MUSIC by
THE POLICE DANCE ORCHESTRA
e@ +
4
: .
Fancy Dress Optional Dress Informal ‘
y
Admission $1.00 including Light Refreshment .
: %
Dancing 9.00 p.m. to 2.00 acm. ‘
.
POL LLPLOL PPL PELL LLLP LAL ELA LAA AMANO pr gates

STAMP

to-day.

“4
*

666665
LPP LLLP PPPS PLL LPL LLL LLL

GIGOSA,

4,4
PPPOE,

¢
-

4 4 4,44,6,6,4,4
66 LILLE LLLP PPLE LLLP LLL ALA



wr oe



Toda;



Flying Fish Win

Flying Fish notched their second
wit fcr the season when they
jefeated Whipporays five goals to








n thei water polo mateh at

i A atic Club yesterday after-
noor It was a slow ga witl
the forwards on both sid r
t take antage of seve
portunities given them tt
defence.

At half time Flying Fish \
three up. These goals were scored
by

Peter Potter, Harold Weather-
. si Af



h Arthur Ha:





ad



the int al Fiying Fish got iwe
more goals—a well placed sli;
shot by rk Conliffe and a
aceurate long shot by Tim Year
wood.

The referee was Mr. J. Knigit

rie teams were:—

Flying Fish: P. Foster (Capt.).
H. Weatherhead. T. Yearwood, B
Malone, M. Conliffe, P. Potter

A. Fiazell
Whipvorayvs: cS
O'Neal, L. Spence, R.
Re yan, S. Gipson,

(Cz )





ENGLISH CRICKET RESULTS |

Seuth Africa vs Somerset at Taunton |
Ss 1 Africa 235. and 189; Somerset |
ind 86 South Affica won b of



in English County Cricket games
s follows
Essex vs
Evs’x 314, ¢
clared; x 134
Mateh drawn
Glamorgan vs
Middiesex 277
wickets. No play
Match drawr
Lancashire



Sussex at Southend
235 for 3 wickets,
and 124 for 5 wi



de-
kets

4
id







Middlesex at Swansea
Glamorgan 382 for 4
yesterday due to rain

vs Gloucestershire at
Blackpool
» 279, and 211 for 1 wicket
jloucestershire 148, and 24 for
Match drawn

ash





no wicket





ou THIRSTY

Your

BOY

OR NOT }
Thirst

will be quenched,
Your passion cooled at

HAROLD SCANTLEBURY'S

DANCE

| MR
At QUEEN'S
TO-NIGHT, SAT. 4TH AUGUST,




Ist Races Night

me. 2 Green's Ork, of course

ADMISSION

& Bar
Worry ?

Refreshments

Se! Why











YORK BARBELL OLUB
Request the pleasure of
Company

to their

The President and Members of the
your

ANNUAL DANCE

at the
MODERN HIGH
Roebuck Street

4th AUGUST,

2/6

)
SCHOOL,
Music by Mr. Keith Campbell's
Orchestra
Strictly by Invitation

on Saturday 1951









Contains

D.D.T.,



Caused by High
lood iicats

If you have pains around the heart
palpitation, dizziness, headache
top and back of head and ;
shortness of breath, feel nervy, or suf-
fer from pocr sleep, loss of memory
and energy, indigestion, worry and
fear, your trouble is probably caused
by High Blood Pressure, This is a
mysterious disease that causes more
deaths tha ancer, because the
symptoms are so common and usually
mistaken for some simple ailment. If










you suffer from any of these symp-
toms, your life may be endangered by
Heart Trouble or a paralytic stroke,
and you should start treatment at
once. The very first dose of Noxco
(formerly known as Hynox), a new
medical discovery, reduces High Blood
Pressure and makes you feel years
younger in a few days. Get Noxco
from your chemist today. It is guar-
anteed to make you feel well and
strong or money back on return of
empty package,



Pe
lkesp fresh all day...!



/use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP

You'll feel so fresh and full of vigour after

you've washed with Lifebuoy Toilet Soap
frees you of weari-
you tresh the whole day
2 tablet of Lifebuoy Toilet

Its deep-cle
ness, and
through. Kee;
Soap handy and use it res



keep



day freshne

FOR

PERSON

)

nsing lather

I



ularly —for

FRESHNESS

all

{LWAYS





a.
4

Lf it
/



AUGUST 4,

1951

SATURDAY,





-——



TP? i VEL ; tty.
RIGHT -

is





With The New

| ALUMINUM
SUIT CASES

Light — Roomy — Excellent for Air Travel
‘ From 24” to 30”,

$16.27 $18.31

$20.34

<

| CAVE SHEPHERD & CO,, LTD.

10, 11, 12, 13, Broad Street



Make sure you ask for Sloan’s Liniment







You cannot get anything better

for your muscular pains than

| Sloan's Liniment. Simply apply it

lightly — don’t rub — and relief Is
quick and certain.

LOOK FOR THE PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN ON THE PACKET.

From all chemists and stores.

RICHER
SMOOTHER
CREAMIER










SIMONDS
MILK STOUT @&)

C. L. Gibbs & Co. Ltd.,

P. O. Box 56 °
BRIDGETOWN - Dial 2402 —











|
|
|
|



Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE KU.IIT HAKIIAIlOs ADVOCATE >\HUDAY. AlCl'ST I. 1951 Cress Roads Picked To Win Derby Today Other Races All Very Much Open I'lving Fish aYiIliHIhll ,Y an *hslJ go to the raoei whatever hone wi blscE will he a potential wlnnM bri i. %  :... there bffii such an array of favourite*)! and due h • 11 %  s matter* only aeem to be more rtempfleatad Ji it ram: to-day than are aril 1W piekmy the winners will depend so on the luck of the individual. re to i i ..* % %  ol am* i* fat-tor the i HIM aha t.i Ki in i inge. otht: hand shojla ue in :.er prune i .. mi % %  %  recen u hi much belter than for meeting short Of work On the other three starters thin It'' !| oi-cisioo howavei hp has had nee*! nni be one hundred pel U a companion nt exei I i tit to beat them Cross Roads also generally accuatpmad to nt Ihls tame, told the girls th 7RAVU it THA99t,>'£. 23£HT Wiih Th.Mm ALUMINUM SUIT CASES Light — lEnuiiiy — Kxcelleitl lt are Atomic II. Slainte. Gun Site. Burns. Rebaft, Flieuxce. Drake's Dm Elizabethan. Iraki D %  SUMMERHAYES TENNIS TOURNAMENT VKSTKRDAYS RESULTS Men's Singles V II Chencrv beat M. A HarriSOB 8 3. 8—0. The draw for 'the semi-finals which wtli t)e nliiyiNl next week %  '' %  %  l> W Wiles vs. J S B Dear f)r A S Cato vs V II Cherwiv CLUB PREMIERE'S TENNIS RESULTS FRIDAY'S IM-AY Men'* Singles N Symmonds beat C Thompson 38: 6A; 6—4 (' 11 Forric beat F. Ed 1 1 li ii 2 LMHM' Doubles Finuls Miss A. Gnfflth and Mis* E beat Miss (i. Grime* and Alleyne 8—2; t, I M wards DAVIS CUP MATCHES POSTPONED MONTHEAL. Aug 3 The opening singles mat the Davis Cup eotnpeUUon btheean Cuhn and Canada have been postponed until because of mm. I.oriie Main of Canada meets Dor""* Jose Afuero m the first of th."•"J" singles matches, with Brendan Macfcen of Canada playira/ Br. %  V. %  v ight The doubles match Is now listed be elhnmated at once because be i,,, Sunday, with the concluding will probably not stun -nhot. shoitiy afterward S I .(ll.dl.snl lult Kit] \\ nve minutes Btaeha scored %  Bun. it was Kaxwef) whi shot the Mid goal Io make %  li -A. i J lt.nl... Ten muuitea later, Maxwal] put Barbados In ths %  11 afterwards she sent in the fouith for the island. TMs LWC sent the Grenada girls li I Dtacba shot iwc honours even. At naif time. th aeon a .x live n favoiu id Greim I • In the i rtd half tbi Oi showed definitely ihet I uienoi ii ay warn goals in tins hall while the local side wen only Sbl lO put iv. three The visitors will return (a Orenada The teamweiC ns [Olio Graavkts fCai llcne Lall--. Doreen 01th Andrews. Myra C.-illend .. i .md iv II : BARN DANCE i 0-M4. AT THE CRANE HOTEL H s Maxwell .! Best. 1 yumtv M Harrow. P, K and c. K far too UD Even ithout Dn ke Drum 11 is a laraci entry than usual hut there agam It a ery indefinite if Burns will start and 'h*t srlU redoce thi ti th* C %  11nare l*lk %  i drawn nd Kept for he. 0W1 division tfaH Will brlnj 5. Of these tive then we might be sure. i !ii< iIwo meres debate and Eliubetitan tn-st, Oti past perI %  , %  i tier form .1 r Yesterday's Weather Report r'KOM C ODKINGTON Kalnfall: Nil Hi IM I rrm pi i .Um MJ*P. Lowest Temperature: T,a*r Wind Velaelly: 1 nnh. per hour. li ii ,,o,, t.-: <9 a.m.I 29.981 (1 p m I tit WHAT'S ON TODAY Mretlns ol the llnushit Board 9 00 .* m ( %  • % %  ire Oearts io ua First Day'* RSCIIIR In R.T.C. Merlins at ..ir ri-ini S4vanii.di i un p.in t INFMAS >>"i" "ragsa i- --in liI. m .i .1 %  . P ... n.i. ii,. BSaaN i bUttata lilab* 1 ill Mr Ml.l.. Ml HO b> THE POLICE DANCE out BBSTRA Dress Inlorm.d \.'iniiie 9.90 p.m. to 2.0* a.m. heart Troubic Caused by High Blood Pressure palplUllUMV ili**iii-.. hi I %  (. ..n.t M I • %  i inarUM %  .%  hn sib, (•sin— rer from !*" %  "i-T. teas L. .._ .ind rii-r*). Initijc-ii.,n. worrv anil iMr, vaur ittmblr Is pmlml.l. nu.,.1 iiy li tin iti i PraMure, This i.. %  %  iloatha tlinn oi %  m atoms an so ..il.iak. n f..r n.-riMi slmPI you MilTi>r from i lalli DPI' IIIITII. of th.. %  ymr%  !!* may b~ rnrl-nti-rnl bl llr-rl troubte Of a psrahlle ulrok.:ina yoii >h..uii -in matmaat ai "" r Tha MM flr-i d- ot Noaco itoriinrly hi..mi. H. H)IM., „ i,. meaaaaieasoeyars', rronrf. llishDItMVJ lTrwii(r -ml MUMS, yuu r M | mi, >'iinfr In u t-w .lava. V.n Noio from your ili-n.l-t ifHlny. It in auar ii(ed io naks see ftal wrti and %  troofj or ntoiic/ ba.-k on rtiuia ol *mriy pnekaae. SIM0NDS MILK STOUT Theyll Do It Every Time fcfe S4LS WERE VERT CCOPEPATi. WuEH THE BOYS ASKE5 TO PLAY THSOUSH4 L/Wes-WOULD )OU BE •*', SOKlHD AS X> LET .~-~ By Jimmy p Hado >cs-URE-Y^THeRrs CNLV mo OF T CERXAWLy1} TUE/MA-V TUey UST f BE VERy COCO (XXFERS I IT? FEEL LWXWFOSWiJ^E V HOLDING THEM UP—, C. L. Gibbs & Co. Ltd., P. O. Box 56 BRIDGETOWN Dial 2402 %  \'M{' \ WE..: HE A U3NS,UKM*Ce 6 iSOC. %  'rI use UFtBUOy TOILET SOAP You'll led so fresh a: .: axtCT viui'vc assabed srirJi I itebacrv Toilet Soap. %  %  ihrouc' Toilet Soap handy and use it rcgulath tor all roil PERSOS U //.7-//\y -1/ WAYS \ w* $6.60 % 



PAGE 1

I'AI.I 1(11 K BARBADOS ADVOCATE BARBADOS &§ ADVOGWE r3 •---•—t— .1 ltd II,.. . : it,id,.!.<. Saturday, August l. INI i on i I id I and Inifieation SATtRDAV AUGUST 4, 1951 Scatarll i oiilrol tntiofl i,n iha 4 lltls III%  I i moathi %  %  hour s-: 11 has I thai Fl/Ll. W. K 1! ,1 a Harbudian appointed i I A iU ji'in the %  [ormei Actii Adjutant o Lmenl and who i1 of tha i Sea wal l after i ontrol in Ti InidaoV tefl up io three and it ition their I i eauac oi wk ihoi tag* ol The appointment ol the first Control %  .. I f way towarda bring in? the staff Up U) the required sfandurd. If the airport is to render a 24 hour aarvice .. that there should be a staff to allow the requisite number of ihiftj When the requirementa of the job are citnsici n demands which its ii energy and ition, anil further thai the lives of an and the safety of aircraft coating millions oi dollars will be dependent upon itn nd ikUl to 272, it is true, as the upon sfaowi by inference that par! on for the difference in ird of livi .. i Is i family : raised, but it is also true that the consunt] I .is hern raised Al the the compilation of the original Bgures the Index was publicly challenged tor the simple ran on that it did not include rent it i.s singularly unfortunate that this should I : i: ive been incorrect and thai no attempl was made years to revise it %  was the basis 81 ch salary increases and profit mar%  the new inveel %  athod ol finding %  i seta of the various cl Lngi i I average lliea, %  pped around by the %  %  Mad the plain m-i.i %  to suppose that there must bjf %  something indecent about lu %  ..;ik the only thing do In this intcncni al aV hminninfcwith %  %  Hi hen ring them %  ihej i laid asore Itii n :hn uj-on i %  Uompotmon' in the %  : in i laasl ke, depends upoa Hi. n mere* regulated thw.iy, nothing primitive %  i whtcn loeldes the ownershu of land, it %  %  iheorj only within i %  vorh ol lav f. of me i who all Ind and expect to live by a* thei onuaod ties, they will obviously all try to get a$ much f other i exchange i'i &W ''."Ii will be Demand* iy the fact Hint I etltoi may ask Un Itsnon only artsas M prodaaar i ot the commodity in queatlan between ihem can produce nrnra or th< i ti it profit, oi nl any rate without loss. The hot* system only ..rks where than inlaw-court* ,ind policemaa to enforce aontraets Ami si i ot prtrotrJva bar: i o ba -i more ot h which is legal tender There are ull kinds of elaborate i. ictioiLs ot methods of a ou must not asaaseinate your leading competitor; this fotl "f CompeUWMI is the prcrogafdva >f tin Mate. You are allowed to tell the public how good your product is, but you Dot tell them how bad the I.S IAll s,irls o! wonderful things ware thought to result from 'free' competition, II was thought that, Bn price, the better commodity would net the larger sales, i'i it was thought that any nuprovemeni In methods of production Would suable the man who made the improvement to undersell bis competitors. Thus eompattUoa would result in Improving quality and cheapening methods of production. There may possibly bave basa some small element of truth in this theory 150 years ago in the cotton tiade Certainly the production of wane-earners was cheapened to the utmost, and so was the production of raw cotton by means of plantation slavery The system worked admirably, ""pi tor the SOttOfl operatives and the plantation slaves; hut they did not write the aCOBQaUC textbooks. Hut gradually things ceased to work out as the classical economist a had supposed, though it prUB .i long lima before economists aouoad this. Mara had foretold tli..t (TM I'.iiipctilion among ipli .lit. would aatue la nn?twpnly. and this was found to iw true wiiiii Roekefelhlr scqulred :i virtual rnonopob of oil. The devotees of free u>polltion were Shocked and iiht when they would rather not, sad anii-tm>i legislation In America, after a umber of imini and inefTcciu.it lulti saaloat rnonopolka scored only our victory Eugene V. IJebs. the labour agitator was sent to prison. This not quite what had bean Uatendad by those who agitated for R RtKIKAM) Rl'SMBLL, ll>..llr l|a |.b(d rilll>apfcrl >uld only be Ml ripht bj aslng the idle pl.uit to worK o.d', aaafaL Hut everybody felt that to •i BMU m i* do so was to risk almost certain i producers, ''u.;,.-*,''^!^ "^"r^ 2 Th.. Rrtaai ( ..." ,.,-v. .,: ^>*"Ci" economics there was no •OlUUOn. housavett saved the Situation by bold and heretical action. He -pent billions of pul.lt wish to lotor-ca A', %  in,, ihi ; Ml .. governmental matter to Whitehall and Waahlratlon Whitehall tui. •"^ igepubh. %  i now much in the way „f "' %  %  %  ' .-w materials can I* al' *"" '' <•" d. f ... %  -, nd Washmaton I ... : prinripfj woch Ronaevelt how much IrrlUUon la : ln ^ f"*** '^a! "' less harmful Io the United States %  principal which Is no\.' than the bonkrup' y of Lie Brltlsn needed In International affair Government H the ilrilKh were Altlu-ugn it U paradoxical, it •BSful in the ex|K>rt of n w ""' f*ct that thcars, the American Govemme.it • evoid povarty is to spen. would raise the tariff, If they were Thi*. .if couine, doas not apply n too unsuccossful. it might conct n imcn Which atone have .,niy Maasat knverinj the uu-rfl th prlvOaas of not paying iheii Modern n. inlqui tu ricatu have a greu. made eonpetrllOn far less impordMh*e to oil their goods abroad lant than it used to be, and has l.m they cannot do so unlens formade different industries and eign nations ei afford to buy. different parts of the world lar do not wish to say anything tha more interdependent than they may sound ungenerous about Marformerlv were. The emphasis shall Aid. hut I shall only he reupon competition has led many pealing what lb American advo people to pappose thai whatevir cates have urged, when I say thit is disadvantageous to A must be it genres the interests of Amen. : %  •dvantaasoui to B This eansa %  >' H well as those of EuroiH-. t thinking that competition Is a do not mean only, what undoubt %  Mrs fundamental and more edly is true, that it has I frequent economic relation than spread of communism In wester>. co-operation But Mich a view i< Europe; I mean that aetuallv >f date, end where Amenci is better off financlull> it persists It is very harmful. owing to spending money on revivEconomic co-operation haa two i n ^ Europe. Truman's Point Fom main forms; one is exchange, and which was to have revived counthe other ll the fitting together of ries out ,ide Europe by similai different alages in the production methods, has unfortunately no of one commodity. As for the first, bre,, understood by Cong, it should be fairly easy to underhas been very inadequately imstand that if you ruin your cusplemented. It is to be hoped lha: tomcr. he will not buy as much further experience will lea. from you as he did when he was America to tee its wisdom, prosperous. I have spoken of the wastefulThe other modern form of collM!i uf nr i U5lr j,| p | ant \ ying ,,|| f operation, namely that between hut u^ enforced idleness ol ditferent stages in the production humm beings is even worse. Idh of i given commodity is more inplant and Idle human beings are terestmg and more complex ir its alike useless, but the idle humai workings. Modern industrial techbeings also suffer. The older ecOniquo requires a great deal of very n0 mic theory was quite unable ti expensive ftxeii copitnl which is aea | wll h the problem of unm %  onlj capable uf .. it.tin uses. If ploymei.t. Trade cvcles were rethe flinxiied produet which it is gnrded as a law of nature. W( intended for, is no longer in denow Know> howcvei, that they en mand. this Oxed capital becomes be controlled. We owe this knowuseleta, and all the labour that has i^gp chiefly to Keynes. The broait gOne tiito producing it does nothing to increase the amount of consumable commodities. NOBODY'S DIARY been kind to us so far crops are in lovely principle is that govei must spend and encourage spending when private people hat inclined to save, and must encouragi saving or compel it bj nie;n, %  ( taxation when private people feel inclined to spend. There is a general conclusion to he drawn from modern economic development, and that is that ch la Competition within s country belongs to an early stage of Indevelopeaent, in all the more important Industrie, the tendency towards virtus! awnepeTj Ubto, and then moment when either the indun< over the stole, or thaj '.it,takes over the indiujtrie*. Thi fbrmei course is favoured by devotees of the paat who bnagins thai they ara therabj sarvina the to.i >r bee e.>mpetltlon. Hut the other course ll the one which is increasingly being adopted in praiti even where in theoi ) it is being avoided. Consequently, nxnpctillon in the modern world U between nations. Modern methoos of mass production require an immense amount of labour before they yield any return whatever in the way of finished products; but when they begin to yield a return, the return is very large. If In the meantime, circumstances nation which desires to prosper. hive changed so that the product must wk rather co-operation is no longer required, the elaborthan competition with other ale work of preparation is wasted. BaMona The world is economiConsider the sort of thing that .ally unified in a way in which it happened at the beginning of the neve, was at any earlier period great depression. Everybody had And von in terms of hard cash. felt rich and had expected to be U is wldom profitable nownday able to buy all sorts of expensive f<>r me nation to rum anolhcr. things. Preparations were made Nay. more, if another nation is hi produehU all these expensive ruined, it is almost always proflttlungs. iiul then ii turned out that :ble for a nation whieh can afford thi preparations had been exec it to helu the ruined nation on sive. The men who had made UK roml to recovery This is bepmiar.itions foi on. -.on of ..in.t.ie. broadly speaking, nations modify could not sell their prore more Important to each other duels, and therefore could not buv M customers than as competitors, i Ot commodity, and and also DSCflUM uii-mpluyment so the makers of the Other sort of i> a waste of which the disadvancommoditv could not buv yet a t-'g*'s 'ire felt, not only In the third son. and -> the depression nation In which the unemploy%  i... i Vast sraounta of preearaatanl sxjsta, but m varying detuti for the pradUCUon "f COmPass throughout the world. uddenly raaarne uselsss Although cngress finds this a The men who should have been UMIa hard lo unt.tn,l. DUUIJ U work were unemployed, and In psople la international organisIheir turn could spend much less alions now reulise this. A start in than had been expected And to UM direction of a world where i been expected to Le UM economic c->-operation replaces means of producing wealth becompetition has already been cine suddenly useless, and everymade not onlv in the Marshall Plan body was poor. *nd the Organisation f"" European ., i mat ion. everybody's Economic Co-operation, but also s ppar enl private Interest i> dtam use Colombo Pisa. iiictin.iK opposed le the pubuc Tnto doctrine, which Is promulThr banks which have gated by hard-headed economists lent money are afraid that their lot < .asons, encountdebtors will go bankrupt and ers obstacles that are psychologitramrore call in loans left and eally derived from the fetish o( right, thereby causing the bankcompetition, and inherited with ruptcy thai thej fear Dread of far too little change from our aavdlsastei makei everybod] id In -'ge ancestors who knocked each Ihe very wny thnt "increases the other on the head with clubs If Psychologically the situthe modern economic system is to ation is anslagoui to that of people work, we have to learn a less pugtrampled lo death when there is naclous and more co-operntive a panic in %  theatre caused by %  outlook than that which tradition cry of lire'. In UM rituatlon that has made familiar. existed In the great iteprBSSlOH. —Thr Listener. June 14. 1951. First Atom IH'feiirc Fortress STCKKilOI.M. Burrowing 100ft. down in the aranlta below the Swedish capital are ('lasting out the lefeno bead q uartera dcmlaned i" ii cornpasteli praal atom bombs. The existence of these fantastic Bood*Ut caverns, weiere heunated en work day and night, was • %  until I inspected thein fli k %vii On I Three-storey concrete buildings era lo be imt u thass offshoots, They wjll house a i.,dar II / Ill IIII I, III. JAMS CRYSTALS PEAS By 'm. T. HARTLEY Ltd. MARMAI.AUK .. .. .. tie. bottl HTRAWBLRRY .. . JSc. APRICOT . .. 4Sc. ,. DAMSON tu. RED PLUM toe. GREENGAGE .. . 51c. H JELLY CRYSTAIS Assorted Flavours .. 20c. Pkg. GARDEN PEAS .. .. 14c. NO ADDATIVFK — Only FRUIT and M (.AH Obtainable at all Grocers %  %  • %  % % %  %  i %  I about Ai I %  %  %  two laajor Bra) ol %  %  : %  I J The Idea Of W.I. History L,tna wan Indian tnd thus f North it was interesting ~. wish .nut British style I >n the whole the tha WrM Indies better I'l.mncd than Ihe 1 hand lha Barbados ..TH Jamini. i i iraual i in Puerto iti.ii Spanisn lly urb.m tl ' country house wn i important influence in history. Plantation Ins %  I lbs SUR.II anansls > hanged the \v. i fndJ r or the I MM Wasl %  %  A, their C.ov.-: ihe Stuart Kings. The %  v health). few people were outstandingly "c.ilihv while it ua> possible for UM) indentured tenant to make good. Sugar had changed the situation; it required plenty of land, it nms not in, those days possible |o organi*4) ii the pattern "t cararal larga ractorlas, anil it required hard lalxiur which had tn bo. carried Hit rapidly. Although oiivor C r o M wan and Judge Jeffreys both sent i>olltical prisoners to the West in.tics. ihe hi, face against the wholesale kidnapping which was ihen proceeding The ,-heapest and cosiest form of finding labour for tlM plantations however was by %  %  i to a state of which the whi'.e |-.puh,;i,m steadily dlmlntsbi %  nd control by attorneys lvalue DOnunOO among the pendence i>i\ K.i furniture tiiiincd b) inipivleil English i T-IIIMIU'II. The prosperity of the i-i.iii.inow depended entirely on the price of sugar. War* sent the price of sugar up, but also in v creased the cost of freight insurance which M.mclinieoffset the i ise of prices The capture of other Island! in ihe XVIII century wars wnt the sugar price down, and this explains why. thanks to the influence of the West bMttS IntSrOSl IsUin.ts c.iptircl f.t.m |li> French were often handed bac at the close of wars. The colonlsK % %  disliked sending men on expeditions against oths i .l.ni %  Emancipaiion Ema nci pation came in a clash %  hn'h if'.c A i' defeated certain economic 'ition. but the hum.. i Mil and genuine. Professor Parry considered lhat emancipation wa* not SO serious a blow to the plantations as has sometimes been contended; or at least that the plantation economy need not have suffered so greatly If the planters had mads %  lai attempt to use wage-labour. Slave labour towards the end of tho XVI11 century had become Increasingly expensive and inefficient The real cause of declining prosperity was the fall in the C | of sugar England was nnlng to prosper through Free Trade, but the abolition of sugar duties and of imperial preference in 1848 and 1R4P were heavy blows to the sugar planters. The XIX century saw their ruin: it was the end of a society. Speaking r Nix local Assemblies and the Colonial Office. Professor Parry said he was in agreement with the pressed by Judge J. W. R Cheneryi In nnother lectur. to Crown I incut had probably been in ihe Inti 1 thai rightly insisted In iflTti on proa trvatiori of i'. freedom. I July SI, 1951. Our llraderaj Say : CMUM Tssalirl To the Editor. The ,ldroraie— SIR.—1 „hall be very gratefi I if you would publinh this laHer, ao that those who are In auihont to see arler our street llghtlni I It and lighten 55 %  %  long Barbarees Road. After a pedestrian has passed the light by Dr. R. H. King'^ "huh nOaeUon it very poor m ihe upper direction of the road, one Is at the matey of any Individual who maj K lurking in the dark to do mischief, until the other li?ht b) Sprmgilelii comas into vtow. 1 ihould like to suggest that a light t>e placed lust i • tree on the a ol Imueiv Oppos %  : %  • %  %  3CPBCTAMT.





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SATIKP \\ \l -.1 >l I. 1931 BARBADOS ADVOCATE I'M.I. I'URtK T ^C" & M B 0 L <3 . . -V /3a^W Aee4**^' A f'TTt -.-V. 6. A6O '\ II %  I %  %  i : .< -' %  "-. •, rCJ ] %  I — M " I •STCost Of Living Increase-. Tin r\( ftl of II in house%  rtfa %  | itfepott, %  %  to mukc ends %  A few days JR.I in n-fortncc to seme ossrnlial conimodr %  %  with what ll WHS In 11*39. IWnrc the war cast IU ujtlv shadow across the nlobe. It m i to refer to n few mop* %  Before October 1939. our mo*! important produ bought at 2J rents per lb, At that time although a low ii i.. UftgwU energy In ponderi: inn away of three cents to any baggar so that hi pound. Time* hsvr n!1ere.i ron'iricnibly Am, and to-day he wou fortunate batgar who could hope to bo .similarly In ent minimum price of %  lb. is a bin Jump from 2L Baited I .:an item to ib%  "< %  :igr worker ;i-> nuBsT, but no long%  .. i %  . %  regard lb: %  able from the i Inl price. WI1 BI %  -he could : I To gat the lama quanttb she has to pay 22 rents, an increase MO per e<-nt \i i easily ba linaalnanl. ihla tuo is an Item which the housewlfo would Ithout due %  %  aUon Oil Problem i ... : illffk-ult to for It In B %  canta Tl i>r % %  I i %  % %  hWi I Ahi... \' TV.. >.,-• more oftIn 1B39 tt) er i a n1 ;< lb, To-oaj the pri. > i One Item whn-h h.i n pared with othi i Before October 1939 v.. cents per pint To-il.iy it Is 41 l l.ikr everythli of clothing and i up in recent veari and In iomi eases. alarmin.:i when :i almost t i1 Barl idian llkps •.,. Duldeosl litile more than an Including the this is Ini ... soniflhin : I of such I Housing is especially tor all clauses. In 1939 a labourer paid 3s. per week for 1 of ;i him ( • ,[< %  able amount of comfoi I I %  ;irt, were kept in food "-pair kind of house i or 12s. per week, and I ilon of it at Umaa la such thai the % %  . %  appeal aiti '^* owner. for the earning out ol repairs Pro snouhl not be woniii-i% % %  '>'. when it Student* Will Be Orclaiut'd On Monday Tour stuoeitti front Codrlm;U>ii %  at 8 o\ 1> .. day morning t I Of the Transit < %  ,, Lord—bv the 1-ord Bishup. Kt R*v G. 1 %  % %  i Cathee Mr. Shalloon Clihanjiur of British Guiana, Vr Edward Gatherer of Si VLncenl Mr. Mal.i lm Maxwell of Barbados and Mr, Potter Pestalaa of Antigua Mi Chhangur will be attached to the St. Michael's Cathedral ax AIII spend a few months at St Mary's before u i British Honduras, while Mr. Ptftalna. a brother of the Rector of S* Lu.y. will be RI Ing on to Nassau and Mr. Maxwell, son of Mr R D N M City Merchant and Mrs Maxwell of "Ma* Npooner's Hill, will bo toinn on to Castries. Sj Uucta, Anotht'r Hoys' Club Opened* 9 The Police have taken over %  mother building it I Hay Street for tub. This building, which has a large acreage of land atll situated opposite thu old Bay Street Boys' Club. %  1 h.hn saidWe will use this new building as a club enior boys ol the Bay *' Club. Only thow boys %  aft ol IS will be In the iild c'ub. I have found it unsata mlor and ra usUta, the same premThe new club is Kpacious and pad that before long sleeping, aeciininoriarion will be lo those buy* who live in 'iv. but work in BridgeAnother 'Window By The Sea Another "window by tne xea" la lieing opened along Bay Street. This is at a spot of land between the Gas Company and the Barbados Ice Company. MI is owned by Government, but was formerly leased by the Gas Company and used for storage purposes. The wall surIha spot is being demolished and labourers are clearing away all bush and weeds, ary high and T "-')i Deing :.:. .. li'Vcl A ,(1) the io id. Truck loads of mould axe being HVeti away, The mould lias a hard crust, at if tarred on the surface. U remembered that in 1939 lumv .i Mild at (imething like : pei foot while to-day tiiereabout. Tin nnter Of %  *Hl per month 1018 now fUMS himself having lo pay 138 W MO ior the house Truffle Lights For Broad Street Broad Street may be the first street in Barbados to have traffic lights. Colonel R. T. Michel.n. Commissioner of Police, told the Advocate: "We are now going into the possibility of placing traffic lights In Broad Street." He said that they would be very suitable for Broad Street amd would assist In the control "' traffic and pedestrians "At present the traffic Constable on point duty has to attend to the control of both traffic and pedestrians who are apt to walk into the path of traffic. "This is noticeable especially at the Canadian Bank of Commerce corner where it is very difficult for the point duly Constable to direct traffic and pedestrians a! the same time." he said. The traffic light wdl be on the same system as that used in England The red light stops vehicle* and the amber light in the centre notifies them to prepare to move on When a green light comes en they enn move. A Barbadiar. who visited England told the Advocate: "I have noticed that the traffic lights are the only control of traffic and IH'deslrians in London. When the led light signals the car to stop, this is an indication thsl the pedestrian can cross. As soon as the pedestrian sees the green light he immediately knows that he has to wait until the red light comes on again. Only traffic control Ad v few motorists in London try 10 'break the law by running through the red or amber light. The hghu are the only control of traffic and on many occasions IM policemen are in sight." He felt lhal if the Barbadian motorists would uso the same discretion and honesty as the English motorists, the traffic lights' system would be a success here. The cost of the traffic lights U very high. It is expected tu start the system in Broad Street but if funds are available it will be extended to olher City streets W.LLS ADMITTED TO PROBATE The Holt The Chief Justl..' Sir Allan Colly mure yesterday admitted Ihe following wills to probate Margaret Trotman Boycc, Christ Church. Frederick Adolphua Carew. St. Michael. William Henrj Payne. St. Michael. Harriet 1-uuise Franccaca Odle. St. Michael. Olivia Theodora Brcwster, Si Michael. Joseph Devonian. St Georsit., Helen Sealy. St George. Moses Nathaniel Crichlow St Michael and Claudius Augustus Thompso n. St James Alcoa Pennant Here The S S Atcoa Pennant arrived here yeslerduy with flour, tobacco, cornmcal, pickled pork and other Reneral cargo. IU last slop was at St. Lucia. The I'ennsnt. which is commanded by Captain Dunlop, Is consigned to Messrs. DaCosta & Co.. Ltd. Also arriving yesterday was the Schooner Everdeno which brought llrewood and charcoals I British Guiana. Grenada Girls Leave Monday The Grenada netball players who have (wen playing a series of nelball matches ugainst various saanu In the island will leave for Grenada on Mondaj bj the 10 2D plane. Twelve came10 regular playone %  Ktra and their manage! The players arrived here oa July 25 and since then were having a busy programme On July 27 they attended a local talent show at th< Globe Theatre and the following day cti-fented the Island at netball. rpey mnj llU j picnic and sightseeing tour laat Sunday and were entertained the following night by Ihe Empire Club There will he a farewell party at "Iasledale" Worthing, by the Hoverciub UMBornra ONLY ONE SOAP GIVES YOUR SKIN THIS 1XCITING FRAGRANCE Your skin will bo coaler, swaeter... desirobly dainty from hood-to-tee Iff you botho with fragrant Cashmere Bouejuet Beauty Soap PIRIUWIO BUUTY SOAP Why not be More comfortable f .. .. i. trail %  nary, %  nip I, ntt springs of stall .., ,,r weal it our. DiMiit.j-r.. ha i • lenj i„ r i n tad Kttea sealsm fjct wherever supreme comfort us ptxofjty ll M p*i -,01c fbr Tag Day Yesterday The Uarbados Nurses Asaocia-i .it lield tbafa annual Tag Day ... %  '.>•• .: '. i'<-.j!liwalking in Ihe streets yesterday were asked "Will you have a tag?" by some of the nurses who were carrying around with them small tins marked B.N A Miss E. Gibson, Secretary of the Association told trTe Advocait yesterday that about I SO girl: were on tho jnh distributing ihi tags lo people. There waa m flJMd price for a tag and those who took one put what the?' could afford into the tin Girls were also -ent to the parishes of St. Thomas, St. Jame* and Christ Church wilh ihe tags. II is hoped that on Hi. nest Tag Day represent..: (*• sent to all the parishes in -he island. About H.Oui tags were distributed to the girK The roj^OtsM l;iil venr was good ^iri. Duniuptlli nplcfel) odours) Ouing tu hot cUmatcs. ^W TENDER LEAF TEA B*8HHWBa*saye l 1 hi uriginat Latt.x Foam Mattress ASl -. HARBOUR LOG In Carlisle Bay s. h. Rowiifxe M M V Mi. Ill I'AHTUniS SAMtff OunUilr.* R.. lon. Cn< Uan-r*. tor Trlmdart. Ai.lHuli^lo* in.non %  r1%  %  i Li Sclmow Maic. Hrnrlll43 lofts Cap* SMbr |. S\ Lucia. Ait'i StlfKHiM Ownrn Ao>4atMi> Brtvounac l*d> Nochwn. 41 lor* Cspt Nufl for n...i.lni<. AMtU. ttOioonrH S TVs. 4.SS0 lont Ca'pl Mafdi.M tot 8t VliK^til, Aaanta14*m.r R1>M. Thont a C. Ltd r Cbla COOCHS World's Finest Small-car gives even greater value! Famous British -Buill MINOR scores new success Rat pfj family ••loon ,i sinal vsrv big way witii at i ilon tor four adult-* i itilti,'. twav In jiurk. .n in .it,.. WIBf. VIII AND fINUlt LIGHT ftriihtNu i.odth. T7AME1. lu conquer?I tens ol ^ i.wui.aoa ot kuu|th%. For Bail i bat batn iccomincodcd r.11 %  : %  Nuriet. Hospitsl and Ssoatori,' evenwhere. The ii-j a .' Simply itm. If conH r.. -olnbli s>tO-tcoHc -Pttt Cf td in the l-amel laboralorici — anil ihis ingrcdirm i vour bloodstream and stta li the (rouble at its rtx.it. That u whv I.iiu'l is Miclfi-vtiMand why ir acts ->o quickly and so thoroughlv l-'rom ihchmuotc I-amcl tasci the inlUmcd biun hi-il rassdjiirs anJ huilJ* up >our |Hirr* ol' rcM'tanit flUl it is dntroyiiu; the germ* which have caused the cough or cold. Ihe moment you Mnpevt 'flu,or catch .i cough or cold, tal %  Famcl Syrup and you will lu\ started on flic rojd to recovery Alwiys keep a bottle in the noun. FAMEL SYRUP OtlMii.itf/i M IUJO afagf — /;OMI all iktnmtt or ifores, froJi; gaaganaj la :— Frank B. Armstrong Ltd. BRIDGFfOWN. '/.V////VV///////nKV//////V/VV^/AV//V'.V/.V^^^ FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sola Diatribulort Pbonr 4504 WISHING YOU GOOD LUCK Vigilance over the high quality of "liladt & White" is never relaxed. Blended in vul Black & White way tin's truly outstanding Scotch is in a class all its own. AT mACK&WHITE' SCOTCH WHISKY Ohe Sictttb in the Blending %  VABBSBNBBM SMS* ws.m o..s* i.~a—n.-."icsi BUCHANAN & CO. LTD.. GLASGOW. SCOTLAND THE RACES (y) BEVERAGES WILL BE ON SALE "THMRSTY or HOT" .W.'.-W.V'.'.V'./'.W.W^^



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-\Tlltll\\ UI.IST 4, U51 — ItARHAIiOS ADVOCATE I'M.K FIVE Increasing World Prices Cause Cost Of Living Rise ('All IMIIK AT HA(IS Brewster G l ls Insical I lmalion Scholarship BARBADOS has boen faced for some month* with the problta ol risin:; vorld prices The nsin>: c*wt ,f jfvinaj in Hit Urriftd Kingdom, in Canada and the United Stated HI Australia and in the other countries from whom Barbados receives its import*;, has necessarily resulted In an increase in the local cost of food and other"poods. Each (Jnvernment is making its best endeavours toy-lve the problem, but most experts agree that it is most Unlikely to be solved until world security conditions Improve The Government if Barbados i,v direct subsidization costing over Sl.uuu.uuo a year. b> the utilization of certain siabllLtatiun (Uodi and by price control, lias endeav"ui.-.i ui cushion the price increases ot the more Important (ocdstuiT*. but the pressure of increasing world prices has caused .MI Increase in the cost of livlni and then; ir.signs of flitl eraaai in partkular, m bave t,. faca a considerable Increase In the price of rice which wr import from British Guiana, e.g.. the present contract price of first rice is SI0.80 per bfiit Airport Officer Appointerl yu Winston Dtehener (Pony) ilynain, a Barbadian, who is at present resident in Vie United Kingdom hu* been lateetad %  Control Officer. Seawell Airport, the Advocate 1. t 'imfi ivn.c stei i.it Before leaving England to take up his appointment at Seawell Airport Mr. Hynam will undergo a sin week, course in Air -.Tram. Control beginning in Sepqualit' This course will be imit is unlikely that the new contract followed hy an eight price will be lew than $1600 per bog. an increase of nearly W*l tember. mediate!] weeks attachment to a'large aer_ drome so that he rnav gain experience in Civil Aviation ,„,,. ccdure Air Pore. In whEh'V .tt2K EK52* t pW-JWftJ. in It* rank „f Flight Ueuton.nl. .^afnaW l^aaB eak^aeBBnaVr' ^*l ^^^^ a 1 aa* a%V 1 ^HKf-fjaf^j anaa! aP^^^^^aaaararr *- — •J9MM aV "^a** ^^ th %  iriu to the island b nbermera lohool will i in.md with i nyttcal MucaComplicated THE BARBADOS AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION t car p.i mem'>*r of the *ociation who are attending the B T C Transportation to and from the Oranrt Stand will l.< Csn.iiii Dry station wagon Rite of the car park is the Barbados Regiment'* Barrack Bqii; k BOO* into fj four day nu> provided bjr I leeting. subsequently receiving the ; of D F.C and It F M %  Idg B.A.A. Vt ill Arrange Car Park AI Races HOUSING PLANS APPROVED The Executi iippiuvt-d the pla live Housing Board for ... lion of 50 houses to be built the Bay and Pine Estates. Afte importers and distributors that the specific profit margins allo under price control are inadequato to meet the increasing operating The Barbados: Automobile A costs and to meet the claims of aoclation has arranged by mutual their employees for higher wages agreement with the Barbad s to meet the increasing cost of Regiment's Commanding Officer living. that the Regiment! Barrack Bqui The IVice Control Committee will be the ottdal mi park for made certain recommendations members uf the Barbados Aulommittec has :n July. I95u. Subsequent .-vrnh mobile Association, dimt. ubmitted by niade it clear that prices were Barbados Turf Club's four uav AVIATION PLANS ARE DISCUSSED ruing Bod) Suhool lion tii.M Mr Irewstei has bean .. ;wo-.i ,,r D*v< lopment and Welfare ir.M,.,i Briu .iiion ceutw .. • Fngl.m. from t& 8c .1^ & $& OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING DRY GOOD STORES ising and Government indicated mid-summer mooting which opens in March, 1951, that it was not today. prepared to accept tho i prollts of the Commission Me WING COMMANDER L. A. Efiglegfleld, Direcioi General of Civil Aviation in the Caribbean area, has |v I i lurncxl froni Trinidad where tic met the Hon. J. Aiodhasingh, Minbrtei .it Worka ami Communioationa, and the %  Director ol Civil Aviation and dlernaoiicl the beel rnetni r u ol cnrryinn oul the recomingtidgtioni ol the [nternational Civil Aviation Conference which waa held In Havana last year. Driver Fined hires of potential tenants, tin; Board recommended tho building of 14 two-roomed houses, 24 three-roomed houses and 12 fourroomed house*, which will be constructed of 6-in. limestone blocks for external walls and 4-in. for internal partitions. Corrugated asbestos sheets will be u*ed as roofing. station wagon I,I i .niv.'i frea .'hants liopk' the vholesalcrs and the of charge to USMSI in tranapbrUj Referring to some of the airelds in the area, he sam v. %  187,000 TONS OF SUGAR PRODUCED THIS CROP In his Bnal report on the sugar cane reaping season, 1951. the labour Commissioner has reported that tlie reaping .season began on 8th January and came to a close on July 7th. Thirty-six factories wore engaged in the processing of sugar and fancy momembers of the Association to from the Grand Stand. That enquiry has now been Tri0 Association's PatrollM! undertaken and the reeommenHerbert will among other dutie dations made by the Investigator "hw member* where to iwirk. lor an Increase on some "fixed mark-up*' have been accepted by the Government. The detail* are hi preparation aiul when rompieted the Controller of Suprliet will be authorised to effect the neeeaaary adjustment* a* opportunity offer*. to improve Vigie in St. One of the supplemcnlar recommendations made will b adopted forthwith, viz.. to remove the contr.il on the price of bags £ which should give some immediate M relief to retailers. Also, any ad" just meats possible within the M '[ ( and the record crop of appresent range of the equalization omi pruximately 187.000 tons of sugar fund will bo effected Immediately, and syrup whs prtKhircd. This is __, B ppruximately 50.000 tons over MerCllUniH C.Uuill Civil Service Appoint men In His Excellency tho G< has approved of tho following appolntTAanti ind branaferi of clerks ni the Publa S.i laicia by removing the miall hill ..t tne west,-m and which rernu an Obstruction to an aircraft apprOBching to i tad. Wt klaa want 10 extend the airstrip ;>t golden M Itcck airfield in St. Kitts. It is not. of course, possible to le Worship Mr E A McLeo. Magistiate (> f Distn. t \ %  leiil.u ilno.1 Merman Jordlc %  Hall lamd. St. Michael 17] to Inpaid by seven laetal meiits or three months* linprlsoo menl with hard labOer Ittf dJ* ing the in >t.n |.. i M ni.> ,,, ol S I cola t, t'. uitluHit .ui .i|>pro|Hiate lueiis.1 bin "ii tho m.-iuing of Au. usl 2 about Lll o'clock grove %  lecisfcw ol i*.>!tce Magunrale, th '' i""ry M— iotr. adileh i;.> S. H. Nurse who dismissed ** Caddie of lllndsl.urv It...,. -ase Irelha (handSl Michael lrf| parked uf>|M>*II brought against r*red0l kl l 2* Harbiidos Taxi Co. A|l|M'iU .lml:-.i Confirm Division M IMmri. r Burkv, .1.1 c..i .. R Collynio D.p.llnin .i Rod S^ 'hat these will t-e ui i t the \' ; "('o..t t ",'.| -r Mrs. Chase's b ernor gfaOrtJa A|>|*..l. Mr J W Chenerv "It is anUCIpatedi that the MW tnd Mr H A. Vaughn. further line of 114-10 w. survey party will carry out a chandler** ease waathai bawaa ,m '*' M *' 1 l,n Jrdun br drlvmg detailed examination of Pallis.iholding th< und 39 Marshall carried oul inMUgatloOg which tlnally led to n is|.,i. t table uf Sl !" *'' "nl it ran into the verauSt. Luey, accusing him dah of the house of Mis i,. r of milicting liodily harm on her. <'hae and also knocked down n yesterday confirmed by the uard wail on the oelte sld. Audit Idlng •\ 11i. -tun '. i %  Off lo Miami ten lad the doctor, she tld him On Sunday, Commander Egaje*. ug*a cow dragged bee. J K A H. fleld will be proceedirig "to M*iaml Mr J E T "M"VII"I. k'. "i" i, ,.i. -'""fan's arrest. Mr MCI'XHXI lo attend the bi-annual meeting rented CnandJei tie >li.l not M r "'l"> "You did a very MTH if aeronautical igenclei In the peai to, net t i Lho beginnnu u "" 11 t l<, %  vu coul nuv *' h Caribbean aiea u ti-reHed i i of tin i ., i J TnwtM'a OIRrr DaM M—Itiasj Tl i.i mal>l..-.Maai-itala'i Couit. inn im..TiH> Ta unu* A Kim IducaUOII DrwHiiim 1 fc I'altl* UlM.r (IITi^f DSC Km* Kr.ist.arv nfllrc D W Phillip* llr!-trar -. Offl. B i'lullii" Sa.iinBank K > I W Wah-r.o I H | S Department A Oonjrawn I ) IK WSIIH. i*w n f *.> nn . nn t v_ u !" .*.,. 8 rogards future policy. Gov, iii too.-, w.ll. ,n s'onMderat on to the erteetlve use South Africa who. at the request of the ub f ,d, ?fl^ n v u le to ]}"' of the Covernmcnt of Barbados P" -;' and future position of the through the Secretary ..f Stale eQUallMtlOB funds, to the inctfor the Colonies and His Madenee of "import taxation in rejetty's High Commissioner in '"*"> to essential funds and to Capetown, are advising regardlrtc al production of foodstuffs, ing the procedure to be adopted Proposals continue to be made m the interest of the relatives of to Government for the de-control Milton King. of certain commodities. This opDetails are being collected by porlunilv is taken to reaffirm tho awaWwAi lho King's Solicitor with a view policy of Government thai It is not lodging a formal claim for prepared lo remove price eon^ •>trols until it is reasonal ",t : onic. mm i-i Aueast, isfli ulh that the result would not be an n N ii.-iw oade CM bicreaai la the prteej of earentUI ;'. %  ,'; % %  k '^J -1 1 " commodities. Subject to this pref A mils la— r.radr riet^ Carrequisite, the schedules of conrrncv Drpnn inea Bank, trolled items will bo examined itJoi compensation against tho Go menl of the Union of So Africa. .. Miirrla LonS Clladr Clerk. P.-lt> I' i % %  I ... %  %  % %  bisio.i %  %  ". ini it 4m 'i Itorrh i %  .. 0 •.iblir Ti-i-Tri Oflka la Pifl Court, from 1-t Au,..-t. IHI. %  tc gmlui Loos On %  t-. Publir Traatw'i •> ... %  1091. n. .i I i Maal.irair-' Court D I I • I A< ron luUcal TV 11 IUI i I %  nd N.IVI.' it v.. frhlch will be held by International Aeradli (Caribbean) Ltd. At this meeting, there will i>< Ini %  %  %  % %  i'.b |.iiin ulai rent %  %  i.. the conl entat*, . I 1.1 A i I ards and practices as they apply to %  erooautlcal tek corni al! tions and navigalionul aids. ll is expected that the activity nf %  '* %  since it I i a ai Inn %  n i %  little ovet i yi ii m ooi bo reviewed. if. .I.I that wherever prw ilfrom airlines in tho area which are iHtng the radlttlei afforded by the company will be examined at v meeting, with a view to Improving the :!,. || | -i the -i i vii-f provid.'il control wherever possible. Due For Course In Co-operatives Mr. C. A. E. Becklcs. Senior Peasant Agricultural Instructor, has been selected to attend %  p rW WT gVafarlaulBi \V ill course in Co-operatives in JaUI* W. iVaVlSt r III maica. sponsored by the ExtraMural Department of the University College of the West Indiein collaboration with the Jamaica C)-operative Development Council. The Course will last from August 6th to 16th. ate>' OMlta, ni.tr.rt A", from l.t Aulmt. IMI. O K ClarkeTemporary I I lie Truttee'i Ofnee. In tlie % %  Dffbl C..UM. (mm I.i Attaint IHI Mr. Philip Hewilt-Mvring, PabX 1 Howard Temporarr Ckrk. lie BelaUons Adviser to Colonial p l>evelopment and Welfare, will Not Come By "Golfito" oet i t„ Ragta DIED SUDDENLY ra ( D r. ,< %  lb %  f, IK1. II Ttrnpn Spa Aaeu 1. ISM not be aniviiiK In the Elders and Fyffcs SS Golfito when It reaches Barbados today as was originally Edfth Sobers of Deacon's Road planned. St. Michael died suddenly at her Due to illne. he did nut tall residence yesterday about 2.30 on the vessel when It left Enga.m. Her body wag later removed land last month. to Burton's Funeral Parlour, Mr. Hewitt-Myring went op *... NotlAcaUong of Pinfold Street where a eaat marthe United Kingdom to attend a sea-.es for the moi.!"of July are leas examination was performed Conference of Public Relations a* follows:—Enteric Fever 2; by Dr. A. S. Cato, Officers in London. tuberculosis 4. Down For Sessions For Larceny Cleveland JonOg a |ainler ol i mmluetl lo the next silting ol the COUI >4 Grand Soaslom by HK Worship Mi II. A Talma PoUc MagMrate ol DUtriei A" p "A| day whciL the laeliimiary hearing in the caag lo "inch he is r h rgsd ^ it ii larcenj of aias l-elonging U. Slanlev Belly OnM concluded. Thi'*** "ad who retired fmni the Colonial Service in Juiuary. IBaO dieii on July 1th. 1051. teetgageweasM S gJ SAVE with the I IIH.I SO.\ Wheel Tractor WORLD'S MOST COPIED TRACTOR heth.i thai c.i man. hi that tit It. held ll tnd tol Chandlei told U lira 'i .iiniv a watch.1 held In i tit wort going i.. hot nu bai > Omni then hold the cow I] fiol I" let ,• people living In the .-hen the collision IH.K place." %  i ie %  tlached hi the Cen i i i'..ii.. Station pi-be Mice from uiformatlon n olved> DECREE ABSOLUTE taken it --IT h< e said it,,, iion the Chlel Juatlea Bl Ulan Collymore, Kt. pronounci -1 i olute n> the Court foi ow to the Police Diw rce and Mabimonl iiation. Thai %  • had been caught la the ease ,.t < %  •> \hc Ce Mr. Knii-hl's land •'Hilary %  liuttou. Petitioner, V. A. < i %  it.poti o ol md Q Walk* (i told me to take Cardinal Pn llaapondanl Griffith ui ehargjB for ie.dn lk tho Deerea Kill had been procow." i.ouncwl on June I Mi \V W uranl aid he late bad lo %  Recce, KC. instructed by Mr tl I • % %  %  i Hllarj I ii L oarjeanl appeared for th dJaturhanca peUtlonJ i •%  -'%  ,•--,'-'-',--'.--',-3*,'.'*'. ,',','. -,',•,','.-. I lltAI l-l M %  %  %  INSIST ON %  ITIUVI mows %  THEY ARE THE BEST %  %  B H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. Agents With the Ferguson System your fields can be satisfactorily ploughed and the unit is available as a transport Vehicle. The price of this versatile Tractor 01 one-third that of a Ti tor, and you will be amazed at Its performance. Further inforir.atiot. on applicat tM It I ISV 4. Alt At.I (ROBT. THOM. LTD. 1 W//w,w.v/,vw.v.v/,w laWAlai tifur-t tM pah**//OFI.OKA I pewerittl Benmcide, fragrant with .'n floral oils, especuilly made for purifying the atmosphere by praying in Fubllr Koomv OgJhMa, >hopa. Fartoriei. Warehouaes and in the Homr. Available in the following pi Lilac, Carnation, Lavender and Pino. Zoflora • DISINFECTANT •** HARRISON'S V///-//rt7M, BROAD STREET . PI MIDECORATED TOILET SETS VOIH CHOICE "I TOMES .VITK \( TIVKI.Y OOLOURSD DECOB xniiss OXI.Y HIU..-.I l-l It SET "VITASAVtM'lf WATERLESS COOKERS Tl... •Vil.iHi.i„nr" Itonsts. Il„i|s. mid I'rloN—it %  In BUM Cakw PaUrr, Bbeata .-ir. In tharl uylhlag il.ui can be eooatd mi un ordlaar) ilava, an ir.Kik.-.i in „ "Vllanroor" win mid quicker. WATERLESS COOKING IS BETTER BECAUSE IT EMPLOYS THE NATURAL FOOD JUICES AS A COOK Nc; MEDIUM THUS PRESERVING THE NATURAI VITAMIN CONTENT SO ESSENTIAL TO cl' II ID IIIAI TH FOB DELICIOUS AND NUTRITIOUS FOOD* I si; \ "VITABAVOUB" •34.96 i:\4ii HARRISONS Hnrdwure Dept. Tel 2364 i hMf.HI-> IHI I 1. SI IHI I S W.V.V^^.V^.'.'.V.V^AV,V.-.-.'.'.'.-.V,v.'.v.V,V.V.'.V. ''>'.'-••'.•.'.:•.'.•.•.: %  .::::•.:%•. cKariaa ataa % % %  I •> %  • % 


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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. AUGUST 4, .Ml HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE L'-TTT" BY WALT DISNEY I A_y BLONDIE 0>* OR 1 -I-N__ "NT ^6 T BY CHIC YOUNG ILL HAVE VOO KM> IM 6USV DONG L ( IS LETT.NS ME USE _*> HOT KW RWCKK: 5 5T V W*SV*NG MACH SiE THE LONE RANGER FRANK STRIKER BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS WEULr* £i-LMCLLO-M06 J-GO&' "OW ACH; "OU-WV ect>" M06 u'.-iaATWMO CAffB E TALEO VM-1 -* %  >MOM " VEO.TEeCWV-MV UAQLfMd BOOT.*.? S CO**JO TO TOWN WBLL-%  i THAT nc LAUGH* 46 ,„ i B MBA0D TPNM ^\ -An' NOJO BCOT^CB HBAPO THAT THE C* MHAODOO I Jj3T HfJAOD >-E'6 WOT COVIN' "' JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS r N0 TKX-lt OPtNiNC.. rriCROTTt#4.. SC? / 2O4A0P MT7V RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND COHT T5L'. 'i"t RK' in A. eLTOP**...'3ieDTO J I. M, iV Ml 0*Ti; ^E 3A'D \9Kfi£ CNTH6 JNEH uMTlu X CMED UP...THE ME CAN SlT fOBEvES AU.I CASE I *t,r F-O Tf L? -• %  je a.* %  _•-:"• AND I MAVE A DKSE-; DATE. THE! PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES AT&A ABCAC: <: % %  r. + i, ^B !• ...'„.i M ...a. — PKB*aiVAii HOHKHK Bur\ WEU ICC* IKK) IT WHIN W£ S6IA40(1E WHERE TMECH / JMOrt.THEtt* UiL'ALVV <—^ — 'fWOftWIVESiS. I\Ct,DlOI.'l!iAV IA.1HTSEKDDM %  '. SP^.? ton... Delicious Pickles SEND YOUR I ORDERS! TO ADVOCATE PRINTERY DIAL 2620 W*"VA*. .IN MUSTARD OR VINEGAR [Christian Science [ Reading Room i 1ST FIJOOK BOWBN a SOPS k %  Bnd Sltart) %  "1 Hour.; 1C •.!!.- p. I TMliin, W4nUyv niOJV*. ft 10 am. —11 e'rlocR SalurU-V* %  Al IbM Roam •" Bibt* an4 k
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tsTABLlSHED m5 Compromise Likely On Truce Below The Thirty-eighth Parallel I'HE BREAK in the deadlock seems imminent one way or another. For eight days, Allied ami Red negotiators havs argued fruitlessly. The 19th cease fire meeting starts at 11 a.m. Saturday. For several days the official line in Kaesor h i been that the U.N. Command holds ot for the' truce line on the present front, and the Communist;; Poles Seek Ab\ I urn in Sweden have demanded the line along the 38th parallel %  U.N. Command has never, even though the present m battle line has been virtually unchanged for weeks, permitted U.N. correspondents to say exactly where it is. Thus, it seemed possible that the compromise might be reached on the line below the 38th parallel. I lOOBd in Tokyo that %  i" B Aims Japanese IM I • .'.go nyttuj U M the UUCP line ought In •oroawhero between U front and UM MOIHIHIM.III-S I — flan border A V N l ilcfing oOcl In Seoul asked about the report Ihot (be rjjf, dauumded a truce UM north •>t the p r a nni front said. "I hin beard such reports, but I BATUMI commont." Brigadier General William Nuckola, the briefing officer at Ihll MM M l base, said of the statemem by Communist correspondenU in Kaevmg that it fpnoft ed a substantive part of the invalid that he o comment. Apparently reliable MI dicatad that the U.N. Command has laid down a demand In UM KMMOfl cease-tiro talks f..i %  truce UM far north of the present battle frOOt, Reports Wt from both Communist and Allied %  Idea Indicated that a compromis." tn break the deadlock in th negotiation*, now in its ninth day might soon be in sight. Thdevelopment which introduced an en*; ..h mm factor into the negui included; I, In Kacsong, Communist newspapermen said that they had been. permitted to "reliable" R %  d >ource* as saying that the U N_ demanded a truce line "far north" of the present front. 90 VIOLATED ARMY'S CODE OF HONOUR WASHINGTON. Aug. 3 The A 90 Waal Point cadets including some West Points fooii.ih player* uf violating the Army's code of honour by accepting OUtatd* help to pas* i., oom Mats. Nn names were announced and the Arm.v said none would be, A spokesman said the number discharged was the largest Involved III any single investigation sine* (he founding of the Academy U,1S\ Determined To Carry On Truce Talk* B> J M IHGHs WAbMINCTuX Aug 3. General M.itthow u. Ridgwav Mid top Washington 90* %  eportod dote.mined U> i.,u> -, 'he Kacsong truce talks just aa MQf as C. n.muni-t, are willing '" rt. so. This may be many weeks because i.cgrthiturs on the U N sine seen: to be up against ,. conipf familiar Soviet Communist stalling tactics and the traditional timeless patience of th" %  %  Even so utBctall privately declared. United States and its U.N. .Hies mint tUck it out — first because they deeply want peace :n Km.., if that can be had on reasonable terms, and second because •I this stage at least tl.. want any responsibility for break ;ng off talks. A check among well Informed %  re sht>vved no evidence that Ridgway had been trying to get a date set tor ending talks if the present deadlock persists. O.i the contrary it is said that Ridgway and Washington see eye t> eye on the need for patience and persistence in dealing with North Koroan and Chinese Reds. Kedk Want Pence Among authorities here there In in fact ,i moderately strong belief that Heds really want to end the Korean war At the same time they want to end it on terms as favourable can gel. Hence it is expected that they Will held out tu the List and |*ihaps threaten resumption of lighting on onch majopoint on which they would like concessions from the UN. side Statr Department officials who now agxag flight H n 'he southern B. life The clothes of UM refugi soiled anil torn and the revolveis ltd had been tin Htnoa T' had "elio mated" guard watching the piarw them on their hand There was at least one bullet hole in the plane %  %  (.intjslic single-.-ngined merger of parts of every known type Of aircraft. It Is understood that the refugees hod been And upon ai ihc\ made then l-n .ik for freedom With their landing i Hull lofla tn UM M>uih of Maimo thev became the Recond group of Polish refugees to come under Swedist i' Veati %  day 12 Polish seamen mutinied In a bloodless toup on a Polish mine* i weeper and ant also sacking pclllical asylum. The* >*cre questioned tsfeja) Bt Malmc. i.ui f,n from the airport where the new refugees landed The Polish stamen arc understood to Le pleading for the sincerity nf their requaUtl tn he given the right to stay in Sweden, rather than be sent hack to Communi'i 'hind the Russian iron curtain. The airplane refugeeat one point in their flight the door Of UM plane ripptd open ami one of the men was almost swept away before (he other pulled him irrt<. the plane They were detected by a pursuing plane and managed to take their own ship up to a dangerous B000 feet where they hid In the clouds. The plane bore no military identification hut "Poram". nnme %  t .. Polish Avi.ition I'luh iva ili-cernrole UT. Today' a Weather Chart SunrUi 1 : 5.50 t m Sunxet: .2! p.m. Moon: New IJRlilhis t'p: 7.00 p.m. High Tide: 4.25 s.m have had year?* experience —t'.P. I negotiating with Russian dipl,~ mats assert that the only way to m oI (nc "'and landed n deal with tactics nf this kind is, date on July 21 before p.n Tide: 11.04 firm and Just %  pratanUbe just u patJant as 0 lives. I So far as the Lffaua of the pgaa f ent deadlock is concerned—that Is. I the location of an armistice buhTei I /one in Korea what the U.N. side has been demanding for almost I two weeks is that the Reds agree to base the truce on the present battle line, rather than centre it on the 38th parallel. i r Reds Undergoing Vigorous Training SAPPORO. Hokk-ido. Japan, Aug. 3. More than 10.000 Soviet atrtorca i-'i-onnel and paratroops g.irrisoiuil at Sagtuilin UI %  Dial vigorous ti .iiimg dait 1 -'. according to a Japanese who arrived here after fleeing there two weeks ago. Juali Sato, 51. lumber yard amnsoyea working under Russian management after Soviet occupa Hako.siting PRICK PIVE CENTS M VRIKS ill the Trinidad All -il"l Per es'fval "i Britain. i flrrheotn pleluii d In Pravda Carries /.^.V" ^ k< CeaMsa 1U I'tu Raid. n.i m>k>> vaswaaH 1 %  HasOfaaaa %  asaaaaaa 1 1* PtJaaaaa aaarasH Hlak A l..w ia> 1M *"n %  asnsaa M. B.I1. M --.,".'..Truman Calls For Showdown With Britain And France (By HAROl.l) GUABD) LONDON \ [DENT TRUMAN has called for a diplomatic %  howdown parUcularly with Britain and France to brinj* ciii policy more eloaely Into Una In UM I of the world. Inf'tiiiicd sources said that after itudyinfl hi| National Security Council's Report oA Soviet ptepai edne's. Truman de< IdfJ I I ha time had come to close alt gaps politically and militarily in the defence system sgainst Sovtel Rfj n lie auaigntswa) mad ih> apparent failure to face up to the hmtal He said there still are nt least 2.000 Japanese reinalnlnii on Saghalm.— IT.p. S. Koreans Protest Against Cease-fire PUSAN. fvoreii AUK. 3 South Koreans attain tratad against the cease-lire .... %  ; %  %  < n • nt which would leave their country divided while in Kaeton^. United Nations and Red L'Kotlators were trying to come mtntr on %  division i der a hot sun 3.000 people of all ge massed In the downtown public square and listened t< speeches assailing their allie* rharRing them wii appeasement with the Communist* on the brink uf a total defeat. A fan,.„ member of the Clreater Ko young Men's Corps appealed tc audience "why did our brothdie" Not to leave the f,iinorland divided at the Mth parallel but to achieve unified independence "—V.P. i ballanatag move 1 Publication of the Anglofor Japan or. a take it or leave it bsi 2. Kiidinn of tl fact* of Russian tttrength Informed sources said Truman would eek t. put the oe.Klli %  o-ordination of ontl-Sovlal 3. Turkey'! Introduction into treaty organlCiC-rmnny to speed remill-.policy in all lields and leave tarutation. itekarlng ovei ihi location of Commands in vital defence area* or poli'n ties to military planninE. Inforrr.t Bid that would be wrong to assume th Truman plans I i waj arc dipio1 the North .VI.m! 4. Open negotialinn for ri^hl s 5. Direct mwi vtuiioM ui thi Anglo-lrannin oil llch Ms tned to wreck the western mainnations power houses San Kr-ncisn I'M .1 InroRnad toureai has already been an exel diplomatie .idvice-miM ai ilearing the ground for the Imal showdown. They said the San Francisco conference ft a Japanese peace treaty would provide the rust reauli man's challenging moves and g.'< fair Indication of where nonCommunists' political l lav. particularly With regard I \sian parllciDir.* stand in relation to Waal After San Francisco -old le foreign policy talks at Washington Truman then would seek to iron out political In* the' -'dribbr As an example, they said that he has considerable re assessment of ll i Near East treaties which previousl> have been regarded purely %  a British reFpon-ibiiiV.H SOW tliat in Itlsh agreement to Turkey joining L-ie NATO, the I I ..uld in future support Britain's policy in the Middle l i • tactically." —I DISQUALIFIED I.IVKRPOOL. Aug. 3 %  : %  $40,000 First Prize or the second year it. i the Barbados Turf Club Sweepstake run on the Summer meeting will !> % %  paying %  prise n ant Dinar patd out on SHIIIIJI %  Waepitaltei run nnvwhere In the II W I II u this year will IH$40,392 Although thin is not as high as Ihe record amount of over $43 000 paid out last veai rat I tin aocond highest mark of |M,OO0 paid .ut by the Trinidad Turf Clul from their sweepstake run on the racam June inaauna. The Barb* dos Turf Club rwaap a last Thursday afternoon but until drew sometu, MXI vaal tickets may be obtained from sellem. It |f therefore not too late to get one'i chan %  ..'. au prize The sweep tfUaMl ofl BBll which Is about Sv< less than last year. r prizes will iilo be a rod dollart bdow last year's am<,unt but tnaaa loo wl ba qulti point mane) to be added lo each stake will t Sll. DO p will bo ffUVM to-morrow evening by Chilean Ambasnadcr Emanucl Bytncb: —U.P. U.K. OH Mission Lea re To-ilay I' INDOJf. AUK. 3 The B i Madad by Lara IN i stoktwiii leave ror Ttharan it ;i pja OMT lo neaotlati Covernmeni on Uv UMJ ''il %  ri i which has shut down vital Abadan ronn.-ries of the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company. and financial experts bal %  %  %  phere< Both BiItaln ..-.(I ii; | ta the I'.s ha\ i,'.ue rrorn poutlona which previously made at" %  oasfb* i-.r. %  %  ould f'il|n w %  nn, Pravcf* pi nit %  %  p The dupatcb %  M ,i.\ kj with whw %  I 1 %  i luction in I %  .-.I i nment Inoi %  %  ..in. i-f paace dlsii i.m it job* and causing the other* foi p nt.' 11 i kyranunoni ofln %  %  N le-sitletl %  M i \M h an IIIIIIK ; %  view. I i El l |ng a onesided affair. P ->l i %  i nl.ily in the' 1 Else why %  ft ui polnli tred through WO svastai llhin one %  %  %  • ird and be%  %  %  %  1 %  tressed n, publlc-itloi pVJDtad from the Western Prcs^ showing how the war against the Soviet Union must be f'>ught —IP. PV v i. N.. :. % %  • rat I Amioi *. aeUon can i %  I %  %  %  -i .1 : %  I %  ."icmbry confidence > %  > t i %  %  Pleven nhj ha mual Bull eai h %  Mhu .i M*M1 nn Incliatin. %  % %  hit ; %  %  i ...i %  tempt lo foi m i tnioriiied loofetl llipugh Prei .nee IMK Imtill rernmen Pleven might Irj t< (oral %  %  thought Pleven might %  ttetnpl ti it i i i> Uties Take Million Dollar Mountain EIGHTH ARMY jtePS., Korea, Aug. 3 l_fNITED NATIONS Bg.. ..nt M stormed and captured the strategic heights south of Kum song on the central Korean front in the face of Communist machine gun mortar and artillery fire Allied infantrymen at midday captured Ihe heights known as the ".Million dollar mountain" as a result of an enormous amount of fire power that poured into it before thr assault. An Allied spokes man said: "The operation war, a complete success. We inflicted heavy los; -s on the Reds." li.C. Gels Mew Itauxito kiln I Ol P ''.VN August 3 A new million and .1 hall %  > lar bauxite kiln plant producing U > loni ol dried %  itlllTl %  taturda) %  >' Ihi I Iti 1 %  pany' M< Kai % %  gions on the r< > RrvA of no i\-'i*iitibain '" In 1* afl increase tec bauxtti I md kiln Ii uhiady nim conatruetl 4 t2.000,OOO and will be Ov laignst ba u al t e htln aa : %  : prod uee a au 1 mod] hd u %  %  %  : %  'hull pUsti %  With willed gasoliiH Tin.-. loliowed an sdvai I (ban three miles in th.I Fni IWI the Una (tack, an and .II till* 1 i \ : 1 .<< ;.;i Arm 1 I 16 111 hi tomb rv I.it the North KOT< an i iptta 1 11nigh raids 11 1 .1,' u. tkj Ttu 1 %  1 \ iiiyin ui N |eu paved tin -. %  Me a heavily defended hill la Ihe Kumhwi area I n< |e(l pl.sten-il ttie eruWn of Ihe hill with rallied *.< /Ulted torcea wrartad the peal fronri dug-ta Rjagg afV lay-hmi tiKbting United N uv %  m< unted tM aorllai i^ I p m B Id lathi bomb* 1 Pilot 11 ilnv foi Ihe day includ1 pi) and trooi I leatroyed %  •! damaged and nn %  Upfkly dump 1 : leit HI M.inn' aftai .1 -ii"i 1 nt vldoua |at itrika i ftj thr* ii.'.. in' • bomben ..: % %  in .1 ..1 py n % %  laat nigh one of Ihe heaviest raids h racenl wee ki on tha Cananunli %  pUal They at rtrayi <1 hug upplj dump* end toll ,! %  .Ha' The Bi a %  ardh %  I %  ; %  Aarlnuniald "About 10 mlnute> t'.' 1.in I...ml* dropped, thcr. Ighty eapiOi l on The n %  1 %  %  %  t. 1 1 ii up a flvi ., le radlu AnaUhn taiK" es ualcaton arob ihlv of m large ininiun tmn ilunip %  made tnali . demotltMi 1 ugh (loud\is radai aher BM bornl M Ci mmu ravi liini N..111 Ki ,.. N ..( %  %  %  :,.!.. I 1. i ntral hronl eapturad uSeii ol ..•,-. 1 m 1 threa-mlli n The tank in ml rv red out Iram th ne* ly won p but reti ,.ci 1 conung u.idei i fire from Ihe Ilk i gn Allied jni battled II hnun in %  futile aturmpt to -ii loda) ConmunU 1 n 1 .in MI had on a hill li finally withdrew undM 1 %  % %  ... Una gun and h 1 id> nn — \ v .in had U.S. ASKS rOR PEACE WASHINGTON, Aug 1 %  on Wednesday that 1 Stales hai urged i T lan bo halt U "in Uu Intereel t . 1 f .in id pei tad % %  lueeui '.* tin roatpany Storm Reported Off Bermuda [AM I IT udg '" %  ahowe %  %  Lorm m ire of Uv .... ,1 %  1 ted ine wa wvtl ou way m tha lantlc %  1 %  re said the ito %  %  inti n<>rt).. I %  1 V. 1 I TO) mi llarrimaii is Oplimislic I I I \RK TFHKKAN. Aug. :) Jnitad State* Presidential EnW \v.nii Harrunan told "l am %  %  'umwith .1 -pun of good wiii" cot "f the Angh 111.m ".1 t iikBe* %  tmn will be worked out" immi iald ba tuv aaked by P head ..1 n now lying to %  %  \ llad to do so. It may %  %  ; throughoul the Daantial III Etay U llut he s|-vincd that he wont partu ip.de m naanu a tloi nunent whatlv %  %  %  r.i %  m re open the S lei'ineiv and gaq the lanle the hnige, the flow df 1 Ina pi' vloua '""' 1 1' "i' aill piodui 1 ii. dd aa 11 uaara had : .... ui 11 uile >>il adding howevar that uatnuopinant. —\ P 'Quakes Split OIiig tmi'. nf water trashing down from tincralet in tl centre ami niidaliti. %  goal Die lOWD was npnited \<> ! %  virtually destroyed ai d .• ba U tvad to b baavs Barthquakai whMi rocked the rea earlj on Kmi... morninv il.1 ti> have opened the „ of the vol...11.. Inactive attico IBM —I' P The "ADVOCATE" pays for NEWS Dinl 3113 Day or Night %  i P Pacific Pact Will Be Signed Sept. I .-.nal sources said _p.rlsTn.hr T WASHINGTON, Aug. 3 The A mal source. • %  rrlday thai the .signing of th.Trip.irt.tc Psciflc Security Pact I Japanese -\ has been definitely set for Sep-1 „ u> be 1. < : in San Francisco. In th.Deal Acheson. pact. Australia, New Zealand, and %  %  'he United state* bind thanaaetvai •n a mutual defence against anv agarcssor in Uie Pacific area. The Tnpartge lignmg is expect%  i some Wettcrn nations Foran of Liverpool.—CP) featherv %  ltl occur )ust Uiree days before West Indie*, was disqualined of the Japanese peace Thursday nigh*fcr a low blow in i?ft B in Francisco to Dd of the schedvi.United State* and the round contest au. .-i Kingdom invited i nations. %  -ises thai Membership a i w |ncl %  ling with legitUt. peetall) ror the rigrima Ii %  Democratic Benati %  man and U lican Scnaton M Alexa lei '.hey will p i i' %  %  'I .Tl ITI Ih %  %  %  .: nt mlgh Th. t with two %  Ual bulwark against Co %  tytouftt IT'S THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS




Hav badros

ESTABLISHED 1895



SATURDAY,

AUGUST 4,







1951





Compromise

On Truce Below The!
hirty-eighth Parallel] |

"THE BREAK in the deadlock seems Seaeridnapt
one way or another. For eight days, Allied and |

Red negotiators have argued fruitlessly. The 19th!

cease-fire meeting starts at 11 a.m. Saturday.

For several days, the official line in KaeSonz has
been that the U.N. Command holds owt for the!
truce line on the present front, and the Communists
have demanded the line along the 38th parallel}.
boundary, hetween South and North Korea. The|’
U.N. Command has never, even though the present
battle line has been virtually unchanged for weeks,
permitted U.N. correspondents to say exactly where
it is. Thus, it seemed vossible that the comvromise
might be reached on the line below the 38th parallel.

It was disclosed in Tokyo that——








the U.S. Army issued a Press r e
release. to Japanese newspapers | U. e Determined
three days ago saying that the .

truce line ought to be fixed To Car *
somewhere between the present ry On

front and the Manchurian-Sibe-
rian border. I
A U.N. briefing officer in Seoul
asked about the report that the :
U.N. demanded a truce line north Cements t. 3.
> + * _ E - a Vay
* — 2 a oat — J ere and top Washington officials Twere
ceuhineat? ie te o ‘‘reported determined to carry on
‘ : the Kz + € . io sane
Brigadier Genera] William Nuc- ig CBee, an
kols. the briefing officer at this}... q,, Ae are wilt
cease-fire base, said of the state- This n
ment By Communist correspon- scan ceapieente rosie. he-
dents in Kaesong that it concern- Y on e

5 side seem to be up against a com-
das Z0~
ed a substantive part of the nego-| bination of familiar Soviet Com-

Truce Talks

By J. M. HUGHS

a that he could not niunist stalling tactics and the
comment. , traciti

Apparently reliable reports in-| 6; iS a timeless patience of the
dicated that the U.N. Command

Even so officials privately de-
clared, United States and its U.N.
allies must stick it out — first be-
cause they deeply want peace in
Korea if that can be had on reas-
onable terms, and second because
ai this stage at least they do not
want any responsibility for break-
ing off talks,

A check among well informed
officials here showed no evidence
that Ridgway had been trying to
get a date set for ending talks if
the present deadlock persists. On
the contrary it is said that Ridg-
way and Washington see eye to
eye on the need for patience and
persistence in dealing with North
Korean and Chinese Reds.

Reds Want Peace
Among authorities here there
is in fact a moderately strong
belief that Reds really want to

has laid down a demand in the
Kaesong cease-fire talks for a
truce line far north of the present
battle front. Reports which came
from both Communist and Allied
sides indicated that a compromise
to break the deadlock in the ne-
gotiations, now in its ninth day
might soon be in sight. The devel-
opment which introduced an en-
tirely new factor into the nego-
piagne included:

. In Kaesong, Communist news-
a permen said that they had been
permitted to “reliable”? Red
sources as saying that the U.N.
demanded a truce line “far north”
of the present front.

90 VIOLATED ARMY’S
CODE OF HONOUR

WASHINGTON, Aug. 3







Eee eee aegis

The Army charged 90 West/end the Korean war, At the
Point eadets including some West|same time they want to end it
Points football players of viclat-|on terms as favourable as they
ing the Army’s code of honour by}; can get.
accepting outside help to pass | Hence it is expected that they
class-room tests. will hold out to the last and per-

No names were announced and /haps threaten resumption of tight-
the Army said none would be. jing on each major point on which
A spokesman said the number | they would like concessions from
discharged was the largest involv- | the U.N. side.
ed in any single investigation since State Department officials who
the founding of the Academy. have had‘ years’ experience in
—U.P.| negotiating with Russian diplo-
mats assert that the only way to





; deal with tactics of this kind is
To-day’s to be just as firm and just as
Weather Chart patient as Communist representa-|}
| tives.
|

So far as the issue of the pres~
ent deadlock is concerned—that is,
| the location of an armistice buffer

zone in Korea—what the U.N. side
‘has been demanding for almost

Sunrise: 5.50 a.m.
Sunset: 6.22 p.m.
Moon: New

Lighting Up: 7.00 p.m.



— 4.25 a.m., 5.40 i+. weeks is that the Reds agree
Low Tide: 11.04 a.m., 11.11 to base the truce on the present

battle line, rather than centre it

pa on the 38th parallel.

—UP

Truman Calls For
Showdown With

Britain And France
(By HAROLD aE





August 3.
PRESIDENT TRUMAN has called for a diplomatic

showdown particularly with Britain and France to bring

Western policy more closely into line in the danger areas




















‘tion of the island landed at Hako-



Likely

Poles Seek
Asylum
In Sweden

STOCKHOLM,

Four Polish refugees-

and a woman—-staggered out of a
‘flying junk yard" to-day and
asked for political asylum after a
hazardous four-hour zigzag flight

Aug, 3.
-three mer















AN



a



ATTENDANCE



PRICE: FIVE CENTS

Allies Take Million
Doliar Mountain

EIGHTH ARMY _ICPS., Korea, Aug. 3

UNITED NATIONS figit:ng men stormed and

captured the strategic heights south of Kum-
song on the central Korean front in the face of
Communist machine gun mortar and artillery fire.

Allied infantrymen at midday captured the
heights known as the “imillion dollar mountain’’ as
a result of an enormous amount of fire power that
poured into it before the assault. An Allied spokes
man said: “The operation was a complete success.
We inflicted heavy loss»s on the Reds.”






U.N. troops inched up the slope -——
under a hail of Communist ma e
chine eun mortar and artiller Hi; i ‘ I .
’ fire aided by a fleet of eight je arrinan S
fighters which plastered Re e e e
positions with jellied gasoline Optimistic

This followed an advance of mor.

than three miles in the same sec-



across the southern Baltic } 2. C
The clothes of the refugees were | tor. ‘ By = s LARK ‘
soiled an@ torn and the revolvers i For two days before the fina 1 T “HERAN, Aug. xi
they carried had been fired several j attack, air and artillery bombard p Inited States Presidential En-
times. They said they had “elim- ments had been hurled at the hill voy... W Averell Harriman | told
inated” guards watching the plane | The Fifth Air Force announcec | * aoe conierense Friday: “I am
after crawling up behind them on P that 53 American B26 light bomb atisfied that both sides are enter-
their hands and knees. ers hit the North Korean capita |i these negotiations with a
There was at least one bullet of Pyongyang on Thursday nigh }SP!tit of good will”; commenting
: > & :
hole in the plane—a fantastic sin- n one of the heaviest raids ir [O" the resumption of the Angl
gle-engined merger of parts of MEMBERS of the Trinidad Ail Steel Percussion Orchesira pictured im action at the South Bank recent weeks They destroyed} iranian oi talks. “Because ot
every known type of aircraft. Festival of Britain. huge supply dumps and left the that, I am optimistic that a solu
It is understood that the refu-}| ity wreathed in flames tion will be worked out.
gees had been fired upon as they. Harriman said he had been
made their break for freedom P i » » » A flight of 80 jets paved the Jasked by Richard Stokes head of
With their landing + Bull- ra w ar i eS ¢ V en B s u € ¢ vay for the United Nations grounc [the British mission now flying to
tofta to the south of Malmo they roops to capture a heavily de- | Teheran to remain here adding
became the second group of Polish | F G lL. fended hill in the Kumhwa area. }“I am very glad to do so. It may
refugees te come under Swedish 0 orm sOV The jets plastered the crown of |mnot be necessary for me to stay
Oe on a two days. mor. A} he e alte PARIS, August 3 the hill with jellied gasoline anc | throughout the negotiations.” IL
ay ‘olish seamen mutinied in hea aoe Allied forces wrested the peak | will stay as long as I can be useful”
; r A ren reside sas é $ é B $
shies sal alan os. ree P hp Brie Feb from dug-in Reds after nearls But he specified that he “wont
. - ‘ " . r ‘ et ae : vem | jay- z fight sarticipate in negotiations.” Har-
litical asylum, 7 MOSCOW, August 3. Pleven, 50, to try to form 7 as = "Nat rplane rift . retusbd to a a wllioes
% : Bee te SOVIET PRESS” t its ECE ate | Goverr nit hich woul . pnitec ations warplane an retus col e r
They were questioned today at THE S c ESS"pPiit its unprecedented debate}Government which would cell mounted 224 sorties by 6 pam, 5 [as the first order of business nego-
Waa te kl cha ihe with the British over comparative freedoms in the tw en to France's 25 day politica | 4¢ them did light bomber attack: [tiators will re-open the Abadan
The Polish seamen are under- countries on a running basis, Pravda published a dispatch!” pjeyen has not yet giver} pre-dawn rae ' pred Pg ie ae the we ge
» to be eadi sin- from its Lo 9: by ee : S Pilot ciaims for the day includ- rut saic 1e longer the flow o
sexity of cele reqaats te ne Saas > = wore Correspondent saying British authorities} Auriol a definite reply. ed 16 supply and troop building Joil is delayed, the more the pre-
the ri sht t st +o Swed me adioar were encroaching steadily on the freedorn of the Press and Auriol’s action came afte: | destroyed or damaged, and on | vious market of Iranian oil will
2 right to stay in Sweden, rz Ps the ‘movement of peoples. Maurice Petsche 55, non-part)], aridc . ved ; be absorbed by other produc-
than be sent back to Communist am This same Communist party] c g ft oad bridge damagec ee : I
. : _ A nascar t Sé 1 Ss arty | Conservative and former Fiaanc tions.” He said so far there had
ph behind the Russian iron eon staged the —<_ by eee Minister failed to win the As A Sena supply ane i }been no shortage of crude oil,
‘cdsies " . ; yy . rome. ip the challenge of British Foreign | sembly confidence vote Andori on the Eastern battlefron [adding however that certain re-
The airplane refugees said that To-da Ss Winners Secretary Herbert Morrison to| Premier o aa ; vas left in flames after a shor | fined products. ort. Dis-
at one point in their flight the door lias) & niabeen ag T Premier early today fined products were short. Di
f the plane ripped open and . |] Hour Book FOOTPAD peviish a statement by him. The Pleven said he must first con- | Ut vicious jet strike. cussing general United States
° plane ripp pen ana one ; a é Morrison - Pravda exchange was], Fifty-three B26 light t ber: { sistance * Tre ar
of the men was almost swept away ||! * Sweet Rocket iss Panic lmdioublished ati neti car sult various party leaders t ! Smet HERE /pOmot economic assistance for Iran Har-
before the other pulled him into neon ne The ‘enir ardisseey att ration that aswartain his chances of succes |S™Mashed at Pyongyang last nigh [riman said “I hope while here to
the plane. 9 10 : Célleten didliaian eo ac c o ae “er ue before replying to Auriol in one of the heaviest raids it Thave the chance to familiarise
They were detected by a pur- The Eagle Apollo aete See neat oie attair re] Most observers opined tha |Tecent weeks on the Communis }myself with the problems of
2 ¥ % 1e se ous °SsS Cc it o "g t 7 » > Di 4 og LP * . ave >
suing plane and managed to take Osea ands’ tveas eine | Russians were attaching to the} Cleven’s chances of success ii capital The y de atroyed hug |Iran’s economic development,
their own ship up to a dangerous thes “ae atte & t« ; a mee supply dumps and left the city ir wake
ro ship up ad gerous Best Bishes Vanguard exchange and their probable forming a Government were fai flames
9,000 feet where they hid in the aa hie willingness to continue it from bright “The, rdier Capté
clouds, 3.30 Elizabethan Gan Site e Dur } ae te Che Bombardier Captain, Tom is
The plane bore no military Rebate Elizabethan It seemed reasonable to assume| During the recent French elec {4 Grimm said: “About 10 minute: | 9 - Re
Pp A that very Tit sovie 7 tions he was committe t e 1
identification but ‘“Pozam”, name] ]4 1 Notonite Aberford ny Gvery tetate Soviet citizen— } © ons, vas committed ' yafter our bombs dropped, ther. ua Ss
of a Polish Aviation Club was dis- Flieuxce High & Low ene . official a ne a adi We chure! | was a mighty explosion. The ex
cernfble.—U.L. > icy s been wipec out—wi x2 | SC. 01S, a § ep which observer plosion seemed to light up a five
455 Mary Ann Bow Bells familiar with the debate said most certainly will lose hit le. radius.” ( oO cano
Suntone Suntene Ph ‘ a tad “dT mile. radius.
‘ @ exchange will be reprinted] Socialist support should he at-
s ‘
Reds Undergoing "[5 40 Harroween — Harroween “ih Suzany~ papers “in Russia, and} tempt to form a Cabinet. Another large explosion prob- |MANAGUA, Nicaragua, Aug. 3
High and Low Sun Queen Mescow Radio broadeasts several Informed sources theugh [ably of a large ammunition dump Strong earthquakes split open



Vigorous Training
SAPPORO, Hokkaido,



Japan, Aug. 3.

More than 10,000 Soviet air- e }
force personnel and _ paratroops Pr
garrisoned at Saghalin are under- ‘ ze |
going vigorous training dailv,
according to a Japanese who _ For the second year in succes-
arrived here after fleeing there | Sion the Barbados Turf Clut
two weeks ago. Sweepstake run on the Summer

Juaji Sato, 51, lumber yard meeting will be paying a prize

higher than any other paid out on
similar sweepstakes run anywhere
in the B.W.I. The exact amount
this year will be $40,392

Although this is not as high

employee working under Russian
management after Soviet occupa-~-
before visiting

date on July 21

here, os

j aid s the record amount of over $43,000
4 8, said there still are at least | jig out last vear yet It still topped
2.000 Japanese remaining on |the second highest mark of $36,000

Saghalin.—-U.P. paid out by the Trinidad Turf Club

from their sweepstake run on the
recent June meeting. The Barba-
dos Turf Club sweep was closed
last Thursday afternoon but until
the draw sometime next week
tickets may be obtained from sell«
ers. It is therefore not too late



Koreans Protest
Againsi Cease-fire
PUSAN, Korea Aug. 3

South Koreans again demon-/to get one’s chance at such a grand
strated against the cease-fire| prize. The sweep ended off at
agreement which would leave|}BBB which is about five serie:
their country divided while in|} less than last year. .
Kaesong. United Nations and Red ie
negotiators were trying to come; The lesser prizes will also be a
together on a division line. Un- few hundred dollars below last
der a hot sun 3,000 people of all|¥€ar’s amount but tnese too will

be quite substantial. Point money
to be added to each stake will be
$117.00 per point. The Stewards’
Stakes, biggest stake of the meet-
ing, will therefore be worth $1,568
to the winner while the Barbados
Derby with subscriptions added
, Should be worth over $2,000 to the
winner of this event. The first race
to-day starts at 1.30 p.m

massed in the downtown
public square and listened te
speeches assailing their allies,
charging them with appeasement
with the Communists on_ the
brink of a total defeat, A fana-
tic member of the Greater Korea
Young Men’s Corps appealed tc
his audience “why did our broth-
ers die? Not to leave the father-
land divided at the 38th parallel
but to achieve unified independ-
ence.”—U.P

CHILEAN JOURNALISTS

ages



U.K. Oil Mission
Leave To-day











Pacific Pact Will Be. Signet Sept. |

Kicken}

sentative














times the daily contents of news-
papers.

Diplomatic
lieved such



sider




they

Morrison,

section

Els

se

why §
edented world publicity ?

inprec
It i

Russians have

qu

he



dealing

give t

parti

jarters

got the
cularly

here
an exchange of ideas

be-



edge

m

or

the

Socialists might support his nom

i
I
k

Company

in foreign affairs. ,

he exchar

es

pointed out here that













adul





lived through two!

reported, Bombers made their

vargoes of 500-pound demolitior

bombs through clouds by radar
Other B26 bombers destroyed ot

was the sides of the long dormant Co-
siguina Voleano on Friday send-
ing tons of Water crashing down
from the crater in its centre and

nation Premier but baulk
yarticipating in any Governmen’
leven might try to form







co widely publicized could be con- | In view of the length of t lamered 40 Communist vehicle: finundating the small Pacific coast
aucive ty m 1iual Eenefit fpresent crisis, some observer ravelling North Korean roads. Or port of Potosi

Some hope was _ voiced | that thought Pleven might attempt t the ground, two U.N. units whicl _ The town was reported to be
other statesmen of Morrison's! >... a Government without) Shoved eff on Thursday in a minor|virtually destroyed and casualties
stature would follow his lead and] use this unique clearing house of ea pat DRED RMN lcontral front, captured their ob-]Earthquakes which rocked the
diverse viewpoints, Prav@a print- | jectives in a three-mile advane: farea early on Friday morning
en new London dispatch with- BR. GC. Gets New within two hours. The tank in-7Wwere. reported to have opened
oul referring specifically to Mor- ? { ntry patrol moved out from the |huge eracks on the side of the
rison The dispatch was by V “i i newly won positions, but returned |voleano inactive since 1835
Mayevsky Bauxile Kiln {i ifter ocaiiing under Communist —U.P

Among the ‘sins of omission From Our Own Correspondent fire from the north. 7
with which he charged the Britist GEORGETOWN, August 3. | Farther west, an Allied uni ”
press was the accusation that i‘ A new million and a half dole battled 11 hours in a futile at- “ADVOCATE
consistently ignored the brilliant|}lar bauxite kiln plant capable of! ternpt to dislodge Communi: pays for NEWS
Soviet fulfillment of post-wer| producing 38,000 tons of dried| troops entrenched on a hill Ii -
economic planning a reduction in} bauxite goes into oper: es on | finally withdrew under smal Dial 3113
the cost of living, and achievc-| Saturday at the Demerar: 40ux-| arms machine gun and hand gren .
ments in Soviet culture ite Company's McKenzie aan |ade fire, Day or Night

A. Mayevsky wrote that the}sions on the Upper Demerar U.P
British Government increasingly | River
persecutes partisans of peace, dis- It is one of the two kilns bein ee
eharging many of them from their|erected by the Company in ai
jobs and causing the arrest of|effort to increase the bauxite
others for participation in pe ce} production ta meet world deman aft"
demonstrations. He added the |The second kiln is already unde
schools and Government office*|construetion, estimated to cos
are subjected to constant obser- | $2,000,000 and will be the world’
vation by the Secret service largest bauxite kiln and ig 2h

Not one-sided feet long nine feet external di

Observers suggested that while | amete; and will produce a supe
Morrison may be jubilant fo calcined commodity required i
getting such an immense Soviet] the industry
audience read his views, it is far The Acting Governor and press
from being a onesided affatr. men inspected the new plant to

PTavda's editors doubtless con-|day as guests of the Bauxite



Storm Reported
Off Bermuda







devastating wars within one; MIAMI, Aug. 3
generation and are facing another j A ship discovered a 50 mile a
holocaust according to evexything | hour storm southeast of Ber
they have read and heard and be-|â„¢muda on Friday which showe
Neve that Anglo-Americans are|signs of growing into the fil
planning to unleash it. jhurricane of the official trepica

Civil liberties sume relatively | Storm season The centre of th
minor importance against the apes ae ate eet oe

1 $ 4 aracteristic
baekground of such beliefs but- aie ina Sete aes aot ify
tressed repeatedly by public ition | ar harm’s w in the open At
of maps, articles and speeches re lantic.
printed from the Western Press The federal storm warning set
showing how the war against the} yjcoo here said the storm wa
Soviet Union must be fought. about 500 miles southeast of Be
—UP. nuda
5S. ASKS FOR ‘OR PEACE The torm’s centre ‘
northwestward about 18
WASHI“GTON, Aug fan four and probably woul 1

Authoritative ‘ources reveaicd ast of Bermuda, etir hat
‘on Wednesday that the United |‘ sa day
States has urged India and Pakis- Grady Norton, Chief Foreca
tan to halt their border dispute for the Storm Warning Servi
over the state of Kashmir “in oy said that the torm pose I
interests of general peace in As | immediate threat to anything ey
ae ss —U.P. : Lee! hips in the area ue 9

Sir

Democri

that “each party
armed attack in
of the arties
to it vn
declares it
commor
its constitutiona
In additior
declared tk
jointly by mez
Te elf

itic
field
pact, | sentative Walter

a

and

1a



i

tepublicar
Judd

In the tripartite pact it i

|
of the world. | \t
Informed sources said that after studying his National VISIT NEW LOND:
Security Council's Report of Soviet preparedness, Prurhan | SCOTLAND YARD The British gree see ?
decided the time had come to close all gaps politically and Lord Privy Seal Richard Stokes,
militarily in the defence system against Soviet aggression. LONDON, Aug. 3, . [will leave for Teheran at 3 p.m,,
He straightaway made _ five preparations and the apparent Four Chilean journalists tour-|GMT to negotiate with the Iranian
challenging moves: failure to face up to the brutal|ing Britain, to-day visited New Government on the settlement of
1. Publication of the Anglo-|facts of Russian strength Scotland Yard. the oil crisis which has shut down
American draft treaty for Japan | Informed sources said Truman The group has been shown] Vital Abadan refineries of the
on a take it or leave it basis would seek to put the deadline! the Festival of Britain, television Anglo-Iranian Oil Company.
2. Ending of the state of warjon co-ordination of anti-Soviet | studios, the Houses of Parliament
with Germany to speed remili-;policy in all fields and leave no} aircraft factories newspaper Stokes and his diplomatic legal}
tarization {room for bic&ering over the ; offices and the British Broadcast-|@"4 financial experts take off in|
3. Turkey's introduction into}location of Commands in vitall ing Corporation what is officially described as an|
the North Atlantic treaty organi-|defence areas or political, obsta- Yesterday they Visited the Royal | atmosphere. i
sation, cles to military planning. rere oh a ba 2 “tq aM 4
4. Open negotiation fo ais Informed saardee said that it os ooers. a One Both Britain and Iran, prodde d|
in Spanish bases. | would be wrong to assume that oars verry wil be, giver by the U.S., have each receded a!
5. Direct intervention in the;Truman plans to work thing all| An morrow evening by Chile; little from positions which had
Anglo-Iranian oil erisis as ich|his own way, and overawe apie Ambassador Emanuel vo | Previously made agreement im-|
threatened to wreck the western: matic advisers of other countries possible.—U.P.
nations power houses. |As an example, they said that rt) ahe, P ayer ee
San Francisce First the has considerably revised his
Informed sources said there|assessment of the Middle and
has already been an exchange of Near East treaties which previ-
diplomatic advices aimed ously = hd om negeries ore
leari the ground for th fal | as a Britis responsibility . t ,
coertes. They said the San}was indicated, now that in re- Ce eee Aug. 3 tS _The American de legatio n or
Francisco conference for signing|turn for the British agreement to art matt sources said on| sign the Tripartite Pact as well a
a Japanese peace treaty would{Turkey jointng the N.A.T.O., the tan t a signing of the|the Japanese peace and bilateral | Man
provide the first results of Tru- US _ would in future support eee ‘acifie Security Pact | Japanese-American defence
man’s challenging moves and give;Britain'’s policy in the Middle} 4S been definitely set for Sep-|is to be led by Secretary of State
fair indication of where non-jEast “more energetically.”—U.P. tember 1 in San Francisco. In the! Dean Acheson.
Commiunists’ political weaknesres | pact, Australia, New Zealand, and |
Jay, particularly with regard } DISQUALIFIED he United States bind themselves] Membership also includes Sen-
where Asian participants oO - in a mutual defence against any | ate Foreign Relations Committee
stand in relation to Weick a | LIVERPOOL, Aug. 3 iggressor in the Pacific area {Chairman Tom nd
icy lf LOU Rare iat) Ae anne ‘The Triparte signing is expect- Alexander Wile » five
After San Franc siid | feather ed to oceur just three days before gislators have A a
there would be 5 y | West I | the opening of the Japanese peace | attend especially gnir
talk Washing } riference in San Francisco to|of the tripartite r
WoO! eek to the United States and tha| Democratic Se I s
liff cau ag U Kingdom invited 49 other} mar falter G ce. R
¢ rpc —(CP) icar ¥ é









the f

aa



ie

recognise
Paci

would be

lope

ath ke

n



langerou

ind

tk

re]
Ee

their indhr

idua}





and i
epacity t resist armed tack
a ee had it i pti in th | wy
fe istralia and Ne Zea
} sand that Japarr which is not to t |
res Biri re as to rearr migt
The U.S. agree to itsel :
with two othe intrie il j
| this fear provi {
at Iw +c ' ’ ~ 9 ae TO
Seanabane’ ot | IT’S THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS
American officials have ( j
the hope th 1 rtite tr
on Pp Re a St NH MAID) 57 CA EES ST at a Ae ae
PAGE TWO









Carib Calling |

A.V. The Venezuelan Govern-
ment’s airline will be opera-
ting a special flight from Venezuela



to Barbados today. It i

to arrive at Seawell at 4

There will be another {
flight by this airline on Wednes-
day August 8th. 3eginning Fri-
day August 10th. L.A.V will
operate a regular flight from
Venezuela to Barbados twice a
week. These flights will be made
every Friday and Sunday. The

aircraft will stay overnight at Sea-
well and return to Venezuela the
following day.

Agents for L.A.V. in Barbados
are Airlines and General Agencies
Ltd. Their office will be at Man-
nings’ Corner Store. Mrs. Vernon
Knight will be in charge.

Three Sisters

M®* and Mrs. David Sneddon-

Law and their four children
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
by B.W.1.A. to spend a month’s
holiday here staying at Ashton-
on-Sea, Maxwell's. Mr. Law is
Manager of U.B.O.T’s, Port-of-
Spain office.

Mrs. Wilfred Maingot accom-
panied them over for the holiday.
Mrs. Maingot's daughter Sally is
already in Barbados. She arrived
earlier this week and is staying
with Mr. and Mrs, Gordon
Nicholls of Rockley New Road.
Mrs. Law, Mrs, Maingot and Mrs
Nicholls are sisters.

Photography

A IRMAN E. DAWNS, of Jamai-

ca, is now in London on
holiday. Hobby is his photography,
and, camera in hand, he hopes to
take pictures of all the principal
buildings in London before re-
turning to his unit in Wiltshire.
Dawns is due to be demobbed ear-
ly next year, but has not decided
yet what civilian occupation he
will follow,

Trinidad Turfites

R. AND MRS. ALEX CHIN

and Mr. and Mrs. William
Scott, Trinidad turfites arrived
from Trinidad yesterday by
B.W.LA. for the Barbados Turf
Club’s mid-summer meeting which
opens to-day. Mr. and Mrs. Chin
are staying at “Super Mare” Guest
House while Mr. and Mrs. Scott
are guests at Hotel Royal. They
expect to be here for ‘about two
weeks.

Three Weeks
R. EDDIE TELXEIRA and his
friend, Mr, Leonard Olli-
vierra were among the passengers
arriving from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. Eddie is with
B.W.1A. in Trinidad and Leon-
ard is with Alston’s in Port-of-
Spain. They plan to spend three
weeks’ holiday in Barbados,

THE



WITH THE WAY WE WON THE
DERBY - VOURE WOT CHANGING
THE NAME OF THIS HOUGE



Four Days
M* V. CORBIN who works
with Reform Estate in San
Fernando arzived from Trinidad
yeterday on a four day visit. He
is staying with his relatives at
Sandridge, St. Peter,

Will Be Held At Y.M.P.C.

‘HE Olympia Club are having

a dance tonight in honour
of the visiting Grenada Netball
team. The dance was originally
to have been held at the Sea
Scouts’ hut, Needham’s Point,

As they expect a terrific crowd
the Olympia Club has now ar-
ranged to have the dance at the

Y.M.P.C. club house instead
A Son
SON is born to Mr. Jeffrey

international
Stollmeyer
told

Stollmeyer,
ericketer, and Mrs.
Our Trinidad correspondent
me this yesterday.

Second ‘Appearance

OW showing at the Water
gate Theatre, London, is a
demonstration of “Dances of the
Tropics”, by Trinidad-born Boscoe
Holder and ,his troupe. This is
Boscoe’s second appearance this
year at the Watergate. The show
is attracting many Festival visitors
now in Britain

Knowing Dr. Moody
ANY West Indians, are keen-
ly interested in the recent-
ly-published, “Negro Victory”,
the biography of the late Dr.
Harold Moody, Author is the Rev.
D, Vaughan, of Camberwell Con-
gregational Church, and a close

friend of Dr. Moody.

OF

ADVENTURES

In England

CHEDDIE, JAGAN, leader
of the Progressive People’s

Party in British Guiana, and his
wife, arrived in England last
week. They plan to stay in Liver-

pool for a fortnight before visit-
ing London

Louise Bennett. well-known Ja-
maican dialect writer and broad-
caster, returned London _ last
week from holiday in Switzerland.

The Rev. Caleb Cousins of Ja-
maica is among overseas represen-
itatives iat ing the Methodist
Conference in Sheffield, England

President of Appeal

R. S. W. P. FOSTER SUT-
TON, Chief Justice, Federa-
tion of Malaya, and at one time
Solicitor-General. Jamaica, ha:
been appointed President of the
West African Court of .Appeal
The King has conferred the hon-
our of Knighthood, but Mr, Foste-
Sutton has not yet received the
accolade. His daughter, Jean,
works at the Research Departmen’
of the C.O.1,, London.

Back to Aruba

I EAVING by B.W.1.A. for
- Aruba via Trinidad on Tues-
day night\ ‘were Mr. and Mrs.
George Chase.

Mrs. Chase who is an employee
of Lago Hospital was here for two
weeks on her second visit.

Mr. Chase former Empire full-
back and son of Mrs. Irene Chase
of Upper Bay Street had returned
from Aruba seven months ago.

Teachers Become Students

ISS S. HALLETT, headmis-
tress of Hamilton High
School for Girls. Bermuda, Miss
J, Campbell, mathematics teacher
in the same school, and Mr, R.
Chambers, of Jamaica, are among
68 overseas teachers attending a
British Council Festival of Britain
course. The theme of the course
is “Education in England to-day.”

Queen Mary’s Holiday

UEEN. MARY contemplates

spending her summer holiday

at Sandringham. She feels the

ourney to Scotland is toe exact-
ing.

According to present arrange-
ments she will go to Sandringham
early this month, stay there about
a month. A suite of rooms in
the south-west wing of the house
is always ready for her use. 5

Incidental Intelligence
OT all men go through a

daugerous age. Some never
get out of it—-Franklin P. Jones.

LES,
PIPA



Copyright - P 107 . Var Dias int Amsterdam



BY THE WAY eee By Beachcomber

OW that there is to be a
correspondence, course for
dogs, giving the owners guidance
tn ‘how to bring up their animals,
may | suggest one or two supple-
mentary’ points?
1. Teach your to

dog bark

CROSSWORD
errr
Cheer]
Roe ds ed





Across

1. Hate brine? Well,
7. Fit the girl to P.T.
» Split pea. (3)

. Sort that you can trust. 48)
. Gardeners’ friend, (4)

. In the iater editions, (3)

- Room afloat. (5)
it’s another tax.
Against (4)
Could be a rout,
A new star (4)
Coloured nannie, (4)

. Sat to watch the little beast.
. Shows lack of knowledge, (9)

do this, (9)
» (5)

ober

(5)
(4)

neh sini baperse
SISOe

19
(5)

1. Parching
Martha tan, (Â¥)

2. Absolute sameness, (8)

3. Is ib true all bet on it? (6)

4. Mohammedan official without a
shilling. (5)

5. Out of hate especiaity, (3)

6. Prociaim. (9)

8. No cricketer would like to see it
on it. (5)

0. Should be readily understood. (5

6. A neat sort of bet. (4)









Solution of yesterday's puzzie

Across
1, Flower-pot: 6, Imperator.

9. Sailor




10, Era Trend; 15. Btiquette 15
Oil, 16 el; 17, Nee: 18. Idoi 9
Altercate; Navigator Down; }

|Pishermu pinion, 5. Welt; 4, Rare

Mantilla: 8. Tent;

i2

‘
vown
land-wind that made



SILK SHANTUNG

BORDERED TAFFETA 36”

SILK PLAIDS

temporarily,
task of destruction, is worth while.
| I like to see them playing the fool
, like happy

courteously when an old woman
gives it her seat in a bus.

2. Teach it to confine its atten-
tion to its own plate at table.

3. Reprimand it if it bites some-
one who has tried to stroke it.

4. If it worries sheep, remember
that it may be feeling ill-used.
Take it to an animal psychiatrist.

5. If it gnaws hats and gloves, ‘

try to get to the
restlessness.

6. If it bites strangers, do not
ask them again. It is a sign that
your dog objects to them.

In Passing

NYTHING which diverts thea
minds of the scientists, even
frony the primary

cause of its

children, and I have
read with delight of an experi-
ment made in Texas. They have
built a room in which “the noise
contained in any object,” is assess-
ed. They put in this room a piece
of cloth. Then, later, they “squirt
in a sound cocktail,” which con-
tains all audible sounds, Delicate

instruments register all this, and
even reveal the contribution of
the piece of cloth to the uproar.
This may seem ridiculous, but who
does not prefer it to experiments
in germ-warfare?

Letting his father down
CHICAGO man who fed his
son on raw meat, “to make

him an_ intellectual superman,”
was irritated when the boy failed
to answer quickly enough the
question; “How much is 435,621,-
789 times 1,234,567?" What a
humiliation for him when people
asked: “How is that boy of yours

shaping’

Invisible exports

WROTE the other day of the

tiny ball-bearings being made
for export, and I said, in my
churlish way, that if they were
lost they were too small to be
found. I now eat my words: it
appears that several million of
these little loves were mislaid,
and then found lurking shyly in
a corner. Reading from left to

right, their names were



Rupert and









When the two triends are over
the hill Simon pauses. Held or
minute, Rupert."* he calls. ‘* There's

someone coming. ! believe it’s my

Daddy." He waits until the orher
comes siowly along looking very
tired and dispirited ‘Have you

36” @

®

36” ©

<_— a So ee se,

BLACK and WHITE

TWINKLE CREPE

DIAL 4606

36”



YOUR SHOE STORES

sinahileiid acins Ch iht thas dies

eciickceiidlid a ioiceinniceenshiiaele er

Ae ee ss oa
All New and the Latest Fashions

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Simon—4



bought wha: you wanted?" asks
the boy No."' sighs his Daddy.
“It's earl sng day and | couldn’:
buy aay ig: lt looks as though
we m starve unnl tomorrow.”
Bur S.mon sales and holds up his

ull sack



oiijncenepielaiikaaaan

DIAL 4220



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Princess Margaret ; B.B.(. Radio Programme
Keeps Out Of | Si Rattttie hs
Fashion Limelight

Lancashire 12.00 noon The News

_ News Analy



19.76M





LONDON, Aug. 3 4.15 p4m. Flint of the Flying Squad. 4.45

The Daily Mirror suggests on|p.m. Montmartre Players, 5.00 p.m. Com-
Friday that Princess Margaret may | Poser of "ie eis ino

have received Royal instructions} Music for Dancing, 6.45 p.m. Programme
to “soft pedal the leader of fashion} Parade _ ii, -
business, and keep out of the|7-—'# © srsenssces SEEM MOU
limelight for a while.” 700 pm The News 710 p m. News
Analysis. 7.15 pm. Behind the News

745 p.m. Sandy MacPherson at the

Theatre Organ 8 00 pm. Radio News-

The Mirror says in a newspa
story, that the Princess has rr

= reel. 815 p.m. Composer of the Week
peared three days in successionf‘at| 5°30 pm. Radio Theatre 1000 p im
the fashionable Goodwood »s,|The News. 10°00 pm. Interlude. 10 15
“in the same yellow dress, m Just Fancy 045 pm. Yours

Pp
has not done any the old spes- | "aithfully.
tacular things she used to do at
Goodwood.



|
ire |
|

— |}



of champagne, and has taken such
a back seat in the Royal box that
a lot of race-goers have not even
realised that she was present.”

—(CP)

She has not danced down to the
paddock after almost every race,
she has not been with her escorts
to any of the little bars for a glass

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE : TO-DAY AT 5.00 P.M.
TO-NIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT AT 8.30








MICKEY ROONEY -- PAT O’BRIEN

in “THE FIREBALL”
with
BEVERLY TYLER : JAMES BROWN : MARILYN MONROE
Released by 20th Century-Fox



WATCH THIS ‘-- BRIDGETOWN || "LET'S DANCE”

SPACE?||PEAZA bial 2310 Free Ae SUTTON
==.

Betty HUTTON
TODAY 445 & 4.30 pm on ,Continuing Dally 4.45 & 8% pm

“The SINNER of MAGDALA”

The Story of CHRIST and Mary MAGDALENE oan
Special Today 930 am. & 1 30 p.m

|





Special Tonite & Tomorrow nite (only)







at 10.45 “ARIZONA CYCLONE”
2 New Hits - - Johnny Mack Brown, & Fuzty Knight
“SQUARE DANCE KATY” & and “LAWLESS BREED’
“CRASHING THRU” Kirby Grant & Furry Knight
So —_ ———
PLAZA wuts |||, GALET
T0-DAY TO MON. 5 & 4% PM ||!|| THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES

Today & Tomorrow 8 0 p.m
Matinee Sunday 5 p.m,
“FORGOTTEN WOMEN”

Warner's Exciting Technicolor Musica)

“TEA ror TWO”

Doris DAY Gordon McRAE Elyse KNOX — Edward NORRIS
Gene NELSON | van on NGsTER”
ae kon a aoe itl Barry SULLIVAN — BELITA
“PAANTOM OF || Charlie Chan tn ——TIDNITE TONITE Sat 0
CHINATOWN” THE TRAP “TRAIL to GUNSIGHT
Keve LUKE & and Eddie DEW Fuzzy KNIGHT
“SADDLE “SONG of the and ze
SERENADE” RANGE” “THE OLD CHISHOLM TRAM

Jimmy Wakely Johnny Mack BROWN



Jimmy Wakely
eee









CRASHING THRU with Auother
BOX-OFFICE SMASH DOUBLE f

TO-NIGHT AND TO-MORROW NIGHT AT 10.45









WILDCAT THRILLS
WITH THE NEW
WESTERN STAR
SENSATION !
wip ~WILSON
(his first Caribbean

appearance) in

“ CRASHING
THRU”

with



ett

DAVIS
Leah

TTT

f





ANDY CLYDE











aiid rata A DYNAMIC — DARING
NTTUCMOLOS
Produced by LINDSLEY PARSONS - Deced by san Yong

PLAZ

B'town }

arene ead

DIFFERENT THRILLS !

2 NEW FEATURES!





SPECIAL : 'TO-DAY 9.30 A.M. AND 1.30 P.M. }

“ARIZONA CYCLONE”
Johnny MACK-BROWN — Fuzzy KNIGHT and
“LAWLESS BREED” }
Kirby GRANT Fuzzy KNIGHT



To-night

visit
as

CLUB MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night Club from Miami to Rio
with a world-wide reputation for good food

Music, Dancing
Entertainment

throughout the night
Dial 4000 for reservations



JUST RECEIVED

and Fast

Canadian Hardwood Chairs
and Rockers

SECURE

Selling

YOURS
a
THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON FACTORY LTD.
Tel. No. 2039 }

Vow.

Hardware Department

SS SSS SS











aes






Tourist Industry A#7TER THE

From Our Own Correspondent

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 31
The British West Indian Air-
ways marked another step to-

wards the further development of!
the tourist industry of the Eastern
and other Caribbean islands

There is a first direct Grenada-
Venezuela flight which is on from |
today. With their two services per}
week from Veneztela direct to}
Grenada and their other services |
via Trinidad and Barbados, it is |
expected that Grenada will enjoy |
a boonviin her tourist trade. |

TWO YEARS
IN THE
ll

MAKING ! II

NOW PLAYING

4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
AND CONTINUING DAILY





THE GREATEST |
STORY OF ALLE



a

| THE LAVISH FEASTS
OF THE UNBELIEVERS !






DA VINCI'S MASTERPIECE)
“THE LAST SUPPER" COMES TO LIFE! |



THE CONVERSION OF THE
FAMOUS SINNER OF MAGDALA!



Ps ‘

THE STORY OF CHRIST
- AND MARY MAGDALENE

Starring

Medea de Novara

(ALL-TALKING)
BASED ON THE GOSPEL.











THOUSANDS IN THE CAST!
BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310)

PLAZA

THE ISLAND'S MOST
POPULAR SHOW HOUSE!





GLOBE

To-day 5 & 8.15 p.m. and
Continuing








Extra Short:

‘ALONG THE RAINBOW
TRAIL”



SATURDAY,

RBRACESm=
SEE A PICTURE

TO-DAY 9.30 A.M., 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

EMPIRE
AND 9.30 AM., 5.00 & 8.15 PM

ROYAL

and continuing Daily at Matinee and Night Shows

BG-Rl’s BIG
SOUTH SEAS
MUSICAL!

AUGUST 4, 1951



at







cee

ee

¢
iS

CECE

a
ad

Gq

oe

+
«
~







Screen Play by ROBERT NATHAN aid JERRY DAVIS
HEAR Based on the Book “TAHITi LANDFALL” by WILLIAM S. STONE

opagane \ Music by HARRY WARREN + Lyrics oy ARTHUR FREED
| Love sono” Directed by Produced by ;
AC and otmers ROBERT ALTON + ARTHUR FREED

s A METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURE



ROYAL

MIDNIGHT SHOW TO-NIGHT

Republic All Action Whole Serial

“ DESERT AGENT
Rod CAMERON
Thrills !

Starring :

Action ! Suspense '

AGREE EES SER.
OLYMPIC THEATRE



Last Two Shows TO-DAY, 4.45 and 8.15 p.m.

First Instalment Columbia Seria!

TO-MORROW AND MONDAY, 4.45 & 8.15 P.M.

Final Instalment Columbia Bullet Streaked Serial

“DEADWOOD DICK”
Starring :
Don DOUGLAS and Mystery “SKULL”

All Action .. . Thrill . . . Suspense .. . Not A Dull Moment



TO-NITE ACTION AT MIDNIGHT
Republic Whole Serial

“BRUCE GENTRY”

Starring :

Tom NEAL and Judy CLARK

ROXY THEATRE



TO-DAY TO TUESDAY, 4.45 AND 8.15 P.M.

ane RRR aaa eeta

OST DESIRED WOMANIN FRANCE...

Most daring of the
King’s Swordsmen...

{LENA A” NN ER aI ENE 0 CARROT RE



ALEXANDRE DUMAS’

&





é Directed by
UCE GERAGHTY

Contury- Fos

GEORGE MONTGOMERY: PAULA CORDAY

ee ee EDWARD L. ALPERSON, JR





Come and See the First Picture Filmed in New Super Cine Color
> 6 erences “Silly EEE eoeeooooooerrmrerenen — _ _ _ eee


SATURDAY, AUGUST 4,

1951














W i SWALL BE ABLE TO
SEE EVERYTHING FOR MYSE
= —_ ' =




THEY'RE LOVELY GLASSESE FOO
DEAR - | CAN SEE J

BEAUTIFULLY )

TRAT
STANDING 8Y [HE WINNING POSTS

BARBADOS

You S@é THAT WOMAN 'N
LOVELY BLUE MINK 51014



Cost Of Living

Increases

The ever-increasing rise in the
cost of living presents a daily
problem to the Barbadian house-
wife who does her utmost,
though not always with success,
to make ends meet

A few days ago in reference to
some essential commodities, it was
shown how difficult her task has
become in these days as compared



with what it was in 1939, before
the war cast its ugly shadow
across the globe. It may be in-
teresting to refer to a few more
of these items to-day

Before October 1939, our most
important product, sugar, was
bought at 24) cents per lb, At that
time: although wages were very
low, a housewife would lose no

energy in pondering over the giv-
ing away of three cents to any
beggar so that he could secure a
pound,

Times have altered considerably
since, and to-day he would be a
fortunate beggar who could hope
to be similarly treated. The pres-

ent minimum price of 7 cents per




lb. is a big jump from 2}.

Salted fish is supposedly almost
as necessary an item to the aver-
age worker as sugar, but no long-
er can the wife of such a worker
regard this item procur-







able from the point of view of
price. With just 6 cents in 1939
she could purchase 1 lb. ‘To get

the same quantity now, however,
she has to pay 22 cents, an increase
of nearly 300 per cent. As can
easily be imagined, this too is an
item which the housewife would
not readily dispose of without due
consideration,
Oil Problem

3ut what al edible oil



sout her



problem? She finds it
difficult to get item. though
to-day she pays cents per pin
for it In 1989 the price was 6
cents. This is an er item the





price of which has gone up some
300. per cent since 1939.

Almost évery housewife must
have her stock of charcoal, and
more often than not, at week-ends
In 1939 this was procurable at a



little over a cent a lb. To-day
the price is 4 cents :

One item which has not in-
creased considerably when com-
pared with others, is kerosene oil,
Before October 1939 this was 3
cents per pint. To-day it is 4}
cents.



, the price
ng has gone
and in some

Like everything el
of clothing and hou
up in recent years {
cases, alarmingly The time was
when a serge suit—-a suit whick
almost every maic Barbadian likes
to own—would cost little more than
$22 including the making. To-day
this is insufficient to pay for the
making alone. One now has to get
something like $54 to be the owner
of such a suit.

Housing is especially a problem
for all classes. In 1939 a labour-
er paid 3s. per week for the rental
of a house that had a shedroof at-
tached to it. He enjoyed a reason-
able amount of comfort, for such

houses, for the most part, were
kept in good repair. The same
kind of house now fetches 8, 10

or 12s. per week, and the condi-
tion of it at times is such that the
occupier not infrequently makes
appeal after appeal to the owner,
for the carrying out of necessary
repairs. Probably this should not

be wondered at, however, when it





;AMES Bi

me ee

CHANAN & CO.

4 Students Will
Be Ordained
On Monday

Four students from Codrington
College will be ordained Deacons
at 8 o’clock on Monday morning
August 6—The Feast of the Trans-
figuration of Our Zetd—by the
Lord Bishop, Rt..Rew«G: L. G.
Mandeville at St. Michael's Cathe-
dral.

They are Mr. Shallson Chhangur
of British Guiana, Mr. Edward
Gatherer of St. Vincent, Mr. Mal-
colm Maxwell of Barbados and
Mr. Foster Pestaina of Antigua.

Mr. Chhangur will be attached
to the St. Michael’s Cathedral as
a Curate, Mr. Gatherer will spend
a few months at St, Mary's before
he leaves for British Honduras,
while Mr. Pestaina. a brother of
the Rector of St. Lucy, will be
going on to Nassau and Mr. Max-
well, son of Mr. R. D. N, Maxwell,
City Merchant and Mrs, Maxwell
of “Maxwell Court”, Spooner’s
Hill, will be going on to Castries,
St. Lucia.

Another Boys’ Club
Opened”

The Police have taken over
another building at Bay Street for
a Boys’ Club. This building, which
has a large acreage of land at-
tached, is situated opposite the
old Bay Street Boys’ Club.







Colonel Michelin said: We will
use this new building as a club
for the senior boys the Bay
Street Boys’ Club. Only'’those boys
under the age of 12 will be in the
old club. I have found it unsat-
isfactory to have the senior and
junior boys using the same prem-
ses.

“The new elub is spacious and
it is hoped that before long
sleeping accommodation will be
available to those boys who live in
the country, but work in Bridge-
town’, he said.



Another ‘Window
By The Sea

Another “window by the sea”
is being opened along Bay Street,
This is at a spot of land between
the Gas Company and the Barba-
dos Ice Company.

The lana is owned by Govern-
ment, but was formerly leaseq by
the Gas Company and used for
storage purposes. The wall sur-
rounding the spot is being demol-
ished and labourers are clearing
away all bush and weeds,

It is very high and nw being
brought on a level witn the road.
Truck loads of mould are being

given away. The mould has a
hard crust, as if tarred on the
surface,



is remembered that in 1939 lum-
ber was sold at something like
5 or 6 cents per foot while to-day
it is 26 cents or thereabout.

The renter of a $10 per month
house in 1939 now finds himself
having to pay $25 or $30 for the
same house,

o

We never
let go!

Traffic Lights
For Broad Street

Broad Street may be the first
street in Barbados to have traffic
lights. Colonel R. T. Michelin,
Commissioner of Police, told the
Advocate: “We are now going into
the possibility of placing traffic
lights in Broad Street.”

He said that they would be very
suitable for Broad, Street jand
would assist in the control of
traffic and pedestrians.

“At present the traffic Consta-
ble on point duty has to attend
to the control of both traffic and
pedestrians who are apt to walk
into the path of traffic.

“This is noticeable especially at
the Canadian Bank of Commerce
corner where it is very difficult
for the point duty Constable to
direct traffic and pedestrians at
the same time,” he said.

The traffic light will be on the
same system as that used in
England. The red light stops
vehicles and the amber light in
the centre notifies them to pre-
pare to move on. When a green
light comes en they can move.

A Barbadian who visited Eng-
land told the Adveeate: “I have
noticed that the traffic lights are
the only control of traffic and
pedestrians in London, When the
red light signals the car to stop,
this is an indication that the pe-
destrian can cross, As soon as
the pedestrian sees the green light
he immediately knows that he
has to wait until the red light
comes on again.

Only traffic control

“Very few motorists in London
try to break the law by running
through the red or amber light.
The lights are the only control of
traffic and on many occasions no
policemen are in sight.” :

He felt that if the Barbadian
motorists would use the same dis-
cretion and honesty as the English
motorists, the traffic lights’ system
would be a success here.

The cost of the traffic lights
is very high. It is expected to
start the system in Broad Street
but if funds are available it will
be extended to other City streets.

WILLS ADMITTED
TO PROBATE

The Hon. The Chief Justice. Sir
Allan Collymore yesterday admit-
ted the following wills to probate:
Margaret Trotman Boyce, Christ
Church, Frederick Adolphus Ca-
rew, St. Michael, William Henry
Payne, St, Michael, Harriet Louise
Francesca Odle, St. Michael,
Olivia Theodora Brewster, St.
Michael, Joseph Devonish, St.
George, Helen Sealy, St. George,
Moses Nathaniel Crichlow, St.
Michael and Claudius Augustus
Thompson, St. James.

Cee

Alcoa Pennant Here

The S.S. Alcoa Pennant arriv-
ed here yesterday with flour, to~
bacco, cornmeal, pickled pork and
other general cargo. Its last stop
was at St. Lucia. The Pennant,
which is commanded by Captain
Dunlop, is consigned to Messrs.
DaCosta & Co., Ltd.

Also arriving yesterday was the
Schooner Everdene which brought
firewood and charcovls from
British Guiana.





Vigilance over the high quality of
“Black & White” is never relaxed. Blended in
the special “* Black & White ” way this truly
outstanding Scotch is in a class all its own.

SCOTCH WHISKY
Dee Scovt t3 tn the B
=



Scotch Whisky Distillers

¢ George Vi

LTD.

James Buchanan & Co. Lod,

GLASGOW, SCOTLAND

Grenada Girls
Leave Monday

The Grenada netball players
who have been playing a series of
netball matches against various
teams in the island will leave for
Grenada on Monday by the 10.20
plane.

Twelve came—10 regular play-
ers, one extra and their manager

The players arrived here on
July 25 and since then were hav-
ing a busy programme.

On July 27 they attended a local
talent show at the Globe Theatre
and the following day defeated
the Island at netball.

They went on a pienic and sight-
seeing tour last Sunday and were
entertained the following night by
the Empire Club.

There will be a farewell party
at “Lisledale”, Worthing, by the
Rovers Club to-morrow,

Tag Day Yesterday

The Barbados Nurses Associa-
tion held their annual Tag Day
yesterday. People walking in the
streets yesterday were asked
“Will you have a tag?” by some
of the nurses who were carrying
around with them small tins
marked B.N.A.

Miss E. Gibson, Secretary of
the Association told the Advocate
yesterday that about 130 girls
were on the job distributing the
tags to people. There was no



fixed price for a tag and those
who took one put what they
could afford into the tin.

Girls were also sent to the

parishes of St. Thomas, St. James
and Christ Church with the
tags. It is hoped that on the
next Tag Day represefhtatives will
be sent to all the parishes in the
island,

About 14,00C tags were dis-
tributed to the girls. The response
last year was good.

HARBOUR LOG
In Carlisle Bay



Sch. Rosaline M. M.V. Sedgefield, Sch,
Rainbow M Sch Mildred Wailace,
Yacht Marsaltese, Sch. Cyril E. Smith,
Sch. Henry D. Wallace, Yacht Marianne,
Sch. Merion Belle Wolfe; Sch. W. L
Eunicia,

8.8

8.8. Alcoa Pennant, 3,945 tons, Capt.

Dunlop, from St. Lucia, Agents; Messrs
DaCosta & Co., Ltd.

Schooner BEverdene, 68 tons, Capt
Phillips, from Georgetown, Agents;
Schooner Owners’ Association,

DEPARTURES

Schooner Sunshine R., 25 tons, Capt
Barnes, for Trinidad, Agents: Barbados
Import & Export Co., Ltd

Schooner Marea Henritta, 43 tons
Capt. Selby, for St Lueia, Agents.

Schooner Owners’ Association.
Schooner Lady Noeleen, 41 tons, Capt
Noel, for Dominica, Agents: Schooner
Owners’ Association *
S.S. Trya, 4,360 tons, Capt
for St. Vincent, Agents:
Thom & Co., Ltd.
S.S. Sheaf Mead,
Bell, for Port Alfred,
Plantation Ltd

RATES OF EXCHANGE





Messrs. Ri

4,453 tons, Capt
Agents: Messrs

Srd August, 1951
CANADA
63 7/10% pr Cheques on
Bankers 61 7/10% pr.
Demand Drafts 61 55% pr,
Sight Drafts 61 4/10% pr,
63 7/10% pr. Cable oe
62 2/10% pr. Curreney 60 2/10% pr.
Coupons 59 5/10% pr

St 4,4,

43455*e".

Yacht Keskidee, M.V. Antares,
Inventor, Sch, Enterprise S$. $.S,
Alcoa Pennant, Sch, Everdene, ¥

ARRIVALS

“ +6 46,
SLIPPER LEELA AD DPD IDS LLLP ERAS AGA

ADVOCATE









a



Tender
iad: Bh





tS cient |
re x slog Say
tt os

AMEL has conquered tens of
For
jcars it has been recommended
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reason? Simply this, It con-

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That is why Famel is so effective

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and why it acts so quickly andso
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Famel eases the inflamed bron-

your powers of resistance while
it is destroying the germs which
have caused the cough or cold.
The moment you suspect ’flu, or
catch a cough or cold, take
Famel Syrup and you will have
started on the road to recovery,
Always keep a bottle in the house.

SYRUP

Obtainadle in two sizes — from all chemists or stores,

Trade enquiries to —

Frank B. Armstrong Ltd. |
BRIDGETOWN. |

LAP RPPPPLLELLEPALPLLPLELELPPPP?PLPDPDAPLBPDPPEPELSLLEPE LAPP PELE PPR PPR POPRPLPPLPEAPPPPPBPPPPPLPPDPPLPLVVPAP A PPVPP?PLPPPATLVP AAA.

THE RACES


Att ttt 6tyts

AT

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BEVERAGES

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or

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PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR

peek batt

Printed by the Advocate Co,, Ltd., Broad St, Bridgetown,





Saturday, August 4, 1951





Seawell Control

THE traffic during’ +the
last twelve months has had the effect of
focussing public attention on the services
at Seawell Airport. As a result of this in-
Chamber of Com-
the Government the
airport authorities to allow
of a plane some months
there was not
allow a 24

increase fin air

creased attention, the

took up with

merce
refusal of the
the night landing
ago The answer that
enough staff
hour service.

It has now been announced that F1/Lt.
W. K. Hynam D.F.C., D.F.M. a Barbadian
has been appointed Contro] Officer and
after a course in England will join the
staff later in the year.

Lieut. J. L. Parris, formerly Acting Ad-
jutant of the Barbados Regiment and who
was appointed Assistant Manager of the
Airport has just returned to Seawell after
a course traffic control in Trinidad,
This will bring the staff up to three and it
is proposed, on the recommendation of the
Seawell Airport Committee “to provide
another Control Officer whose salary will
be provided by resolution until the next
financial year is ended and the sum can be
voted in the Estimates,

For some time now the public has been
clamouring for the admission of other air-
lines to Seawell Airport. It was disclosed
that applieation had been made by French
and Venezuelan lines but that the ultimate
decision rested with the British Govern-
ment. But events have proved that even
if such permission had been granted at the
time the applications were filed, it would
have been impossible to cater to their
needs because of this shortage of staff.

The appointment.of the first Control
Officer will go a long way towards bring-
ing the staff up to the required standard. If
the airport is to render a 24 hour service
it is essentiak that there should be a staff
large enough to allow the requisite num-
ber of shifts.

When the requirements of the job are
considered and the demands which its
execution makes on human energy and
concentration, and further that the lives of
passengers and the safety of aircraft cost-
ing millions Of dollars will be dependent
upon the judgment and skill of the control
officer it is clear that long stretches of duty
would not be conducive to efficiency.

The criticisms against the Government
for unsatisfactery conditions at Seawell
have been so many and so frequent that it
is good to find that improvements are
being made. Recently, new fire fighting
equipment and some additional staff were
supplied, The remaining need of greatest
importance however is a terminal building
which can accommodate the traffic which
will be attracted when these other amen-
ities and services are supplied at Seawell.

Was

at the airport to

oi air



The index

IN a report published yesterday the
Cost of Living Committee among other

things pointed out that the index which
has been followed from the early years of
the war was incorrect. The adjustment
has now been made and the figure changed
from 265 to 272.

It is true, as the report shows by infer-
ence that part of the reason for the differ-
ence in figures is that the standard of liv-
ing of the average working class family
has been raised; but it is also true that the
consumption level has been raised. At the
time of the compilation of the original
figures the index was publicly challenged
as being inaccurate for the simple reason
that it did not include rent.

It is singularly unfortunate that this
should have been proved to have been in-
correct and that no attempt was made
during the intervening years to revise it.

This cost of living index was the basis
on which salary inereases and profit mar-
gins were calculated.

It is hoped now that the new investiga-
tions might lead to some method of finding
methods for cushioning the effects of the
various changes on the earnings of average







THE science of economics has
been _ wrapped around by the
theorists in a series of many veils,
which have caused the plain maa
,to Suppose that there must be
something indecent about ie
|naked form, I think the only thing
to do in this predicament is to
begin again at * beginning with
matters of such @implicity that you
may be indignant at hearing them
mentioned. .

Ec@nomists inthe past laid more
stres# upon cornpetition than upon
anything else. ‘Competition’ in the
sense in which it is used in classi-
cal economics, depends upon the
existence of commerce regulated
by law. It has, in theory, nothing
tc do with that more primitive
competition w!ich has become the
function of armies, and which
decides the ownership of land. It
exists in theory only within a
fixed framework of law. Given a
numbe; of men Who all independ-
ently produce a certain commodity
and expect to live by exchanging
it for other commodities, they will
obviously all try to get as much
of other commodities in exchange
as they can. But each will be
limited in his @emands by the
fact that his competitor may ask
less. This limitation only arises
when the produeers of the com-
modity in question between them
can produce more of the commod-
ity than can be sold at a profit,
or at any rate without loss. The
whole system only works where
there are law-courts and police-
men to enforce contracts, And as
soon as the stage of primitive bar-
ter has been surpassed, there must
lg be a more or less stable



also
|currency which is legal tender,

There are all kinds of elaborate
legal restrictions of methods of
competition, You must not assassi-
nate your leading competitor; this
form of competition is the prero-
gative of the state. You are
allowed to tell the public how
good your product is, but you
must not tell them how bad the
other man’s is,

All sorts of wonderful things
were thought to result from ‘free’
competition. It was thought that,
at a given price, the better com-
modity would get the larger sales,
and it was thought that any im~
provement in methods of produc-
tiom would enable the man who
made the improyement to under-
sell his competitors, Thus com-
petition would result in improving
quality and cheapening methods
of production, There may possibly
have been some small element of
truth in this theory 150 years ago
in the cotton trade, Certainly the
production of wage-earners was
cheapened to the utmost, and so
was the production of raw cotton
by means of plantation slavery.
The system worked admirably,
except for the cotton operatives
and the plantation slaves; but they
did not write the economic text-
books.

But gradually things ceased to
work out as the classical econo-
mists had supposed, though it
was a long time before economists
noticed this. Marx had foretold
that free comipetition among
capitalists would issue in monopo-
ly, and this was found to be true
when Rockefeller acquired a
virtual monopoly of oil, The devo-
tees of free competition were
shocked and made laws to disrupt
his monopoly. But it is difficult to
compel people to fight when they
would rather not, and anti-trust
legislation in America, after a
uumber of immensely expensive
and ineffectual suits against
monopolies scored only one victory
—Eugene V. Debs, the labour
agitator was sent to prison, This
was not quite what had been
intended by those who agitated for
such laws.

Competition within a country
belongs to an early stage of in-
dustrial development, In all the
more important industries, the
tendency towards virtual monopoly
is irresistible, and there comes a
moment when either the indus-
tries take over the state, or thq@
state takes over the industries,
The former course is favoured by
those nostalgic devotees of the
past who imagine that they are
thereby serving the god of free
competition. But the other course
is the one which is increasingly
being adopted in practice, even
where in theory it is being avoided,
Consequently, competition in the
modern world is between nations,



By BERTRAND RUSSELL, O.M.

(Distinguished Philosopher and Nobe!)
Prizewinner, who received the Order
of Merit in 1949)

not between individual producers,
The British, for instance, wish to
sell motor-cars in America; this
is a governmental matter to pe
decided between Whitehall and
Washington. Whitehall has to
decide how much in the way of
raw materials can be allocated to
the manufacture of motor-cars,
and Washington hag to consider
how much irritation in Detroit 1s
less harmful to the United States
than the bankrupt:y of tae Britisn
Government. If the British were
too successful in the export of
ears, the American Governmeat
would raise the tariff. If they were
too unsuccessful, it might conceiv-
ably suggest lowering the tariff.

Modern industrial technique has
made competition far less impor-
tant than it used to be, and has
made different industries and
different parts of the world far
more interdependent than they
formerly were. The emphasis
upon competition has led many
people to suppose that whatever
is disadvantageous to A must be
advantageous to B, This comes of
thinking that competition is a
more fundamental and more
frequent economic relation than
co-operation, But such a view i3
completely out of date, and where
it persists it is very harmful,

Economic co-operation has two
main forms; one is exchange, and
the other is the fitting together of
different stages in the production
of one commodity. As for the first,
it should be fairly easy to under-
stand that if you ruin your cus-
tomer, he will not buy as much
from you as he did when he was
prosperous.

The other modern form of co-
operation, namely that between
different stages in the production
of a given commodity is more in-
teresting and more complex ir. its
workings. Modern industrial tech-
nique requires a great deal of very
expensive fixed capital which is
only capable of certain uses. If
the finished product which it is
intended for, is no longer in de-
mand, this fixed capital becomes
useless, and all the labour that has
gone into producing it does noth-
ing to increase the amount of con-
sumable commodities.

Modern methoas of mass pro-
duction require an immense
amount of labour before they
yield any return whatever in the
way of finished products; but
when they begin to yield a
return, the return is very large.
If in the meantime, circumstances
have changed so that the product
is no longer required, the elabor-
ate work of preparation is wasted.
Consider the sort of thing that
happened at the beginning of the
great depression. Everybody had
felt rich and had expected to be
able to buy all sorts of expensive
things. Preparations were made
for producing all these expensive
things, and then it turned out that
the preparations had been exces-
sive. The men who had made
preparations for one sort of com-
modity could not sell their pro-
ducts, and therefore could not buy
another sort of commodity, and
so the makers of the other sort of
commodity could not buy yet a
third sort, and so the depression
spread, Vast amounts of prepara-
tion for the production of com-
modities suddenly became useless.
The men who should have been
at work were unemployed, and in
their turn could spend much less
than had been expected. And so
what had been expected to be the
means of producing wealth be-
came suddenly useless, and every-
body was poor.

In such a situation, everybody's
apparent private interest is dia-
metrically opposed to the public
interest. The banks which have
lent money are afraid that their
debtors will go bankrupt and
therefore call in loans left and
right, thereby causing the bank-
ruptey that they fear, Dread of
disaster makes everybody act in
the very way that increases the
disaster. Psychologically the situ-
ation is analagous to that of people
trampled to death when there is
a panic in a theatre caused by a
ery of ‘fire’, In the situation that
existed in the great depressiou,



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

> anowre Conflict and Unification:

things could only be set right by
causing the idle plant to work
again. But everybody felt that to
do so was to risk almost certain
loss. Within the framework ot
classical economics there was no
solution. Roos@Velt saved the sit-
uation by bold and _ heretical
action. He spent billions of public
money and ¢ a huge public
debt, but by doing he revived
production and brought his coun- 4
try out of tite depression. '
The princi which Rooseveli
apclied in the Néw Deal is tne
same principle. which is now
needed in international affairs.
Althcugh it is paradoxical, it
s nevertheless, the fact that the
way to avoid poverty is to spenc
This, of course, does not apply to
governments, Which alone have
the privilege of not paying their
dekis. Americans have a greai
desire to sell their goods abroad,
but they cannot do so unless for-
eign nations can afford to buy. |
do not wish to say anything tha
may sound ungenerous about Mar-
shall Aid, but I shall only be re-
peating what its American advo-
cates have urged, when I say that
it serves the interests of America
as well as those of Europe. I
do not mean only, what undoubt-
edly is true, that it has halted the
spread of communism in western
Europe; I mean that actually
America is better off financially
owing to spending money on reviv-
ing Europe. Truman's Point Four
which was to Mave revived coun-
tries outside Europe by similai |

methods, has unfortunately no

been understood by Congress, anc
has been very inadequately im-
plemented. It is to be hoped tha‘
further experience will leac
America to see its wisdom.

I have spoken of the wasteful-
ness of industrial plant lying idle
but the enforced idleness of
human beings is even worse. Idle
plant and idle human beings are
alike useless, but the idle humar
beings also suffer. The older eco-
nomic theory was quite unable t
deal with the problem of unem-
ployment. Trade cycles were re-
garded as a law of nature. We
now know, however, that they can
be controlled. We owe this know-
ledge chiefly to Keynes. The broad
principle is that governments
must spend and encourage spend-
ing when private people fee!
inclined to save, and must en-
courage saving or compel it by
meals ef taxation when private
people feel inclined to spend.

There is a general conclusion to
be drawn from modern economic
development, and that is that any
nation which desires to prosper,

must seek rather co-operation
than competition with other
nations. The world is economi-

cally unified in a way in which it
never was at any earlier period.
And even in terms of hard cash,
it is seldom profitable nowadays
for one nation to ruin another.
Nay, more, if another nation is
ruined, it is almost always profit-
able for a nation which can afford
it to help the ruined nation on
the road to recovery. This is be-
cause, broadly speaking, nations
ore more important to each other
as customers than as competitors,
and also because unemployment
is a waste of which the disadvan-
tages are felt, not only in the
nation in which the unemploy-
ment exists, but in varying de-
grees throughout the world.
Although Cengress finds this a
little hard to understand, many
people in international organis-
ations now realise this. A start in
the direction of a world where
economic co-operation replaces
competition has already been
made not only in the Marshall Plan
and the Organisation for European
Economic Co-operation, but also
in the Colombo Plan,

This doctrine, which is promul-
gated by hard-headed economists
for hard-headed reasons, encount-
ers obstacles that are psychologi-
cally derived from the fetish of
competition, and inherited with
far too little change from our sav-
age ancestors who knocked each
other ou the head with clubs. If
the modern economic system is to
work, we have to learn a less pug-
nacious and more co-operative
outlook than that which tradition
has made familiar.

—The Listener, June 14, 1951.



First Atom Defenee Fortress

STOCKHOLM.

Burrowing 100ft. down in the
granite below the Swedish capital
engineers are blasting out the
world’s first defence headquarters
designed to be completely proof
against atom bombs,

The existence of these fantastic
flood-lit caverns, where helmeted
men work day and night, was
kept secret until I inspected them

today.

The rough-hewn entrance
leads into a 30ft.+wide dummy
tunnel, designed to absorb the
blast of any bomb which smashes
the concrete doors.

The main tunnel curves to the
left, and then gives off side
branches in which yellow bull-
dozers and giant green grabs are
clearing the dynamited rock,





Hewn Out

Three-storey concrete buildings
are to be put in these offshoots.

They will house a radar H.Q.,
anti-aircraft control, telephone
exchanges and map rooms.

The caverns will have their
own electric power. ventilation system will keep out

radio-active dust and poison gas.

They Said—

Stockholm people, who saw the
tunnel mouth behind a rough
pine hoarding in Sodar Marlar-
strand, were told was an
extension to the underground
train system.

The credentials of my guide—
Herr Gosta Smitt,, Sweden’s top
civil defence engineer — were





carefully checked before we were
allowed to enter the tunnel,

But after our visit the defence
chiefs decided that the project
is too far advanced to be con-
cealed any longer.

Work on a 100+ft, deep tunnel-
shelter, to hold 12,000, is being
started in Stockholm this week.

It will serve as a garage for 500
cars in peacetime. Parking fees
will help to pay building costs.

Thirty-six more granite shel-
ters, which will serve as garages,
hotels or gymnasiums are
scheduled to be builtâ„¢ soon.

More than 400,000 Swedes have
been trained in civil defence
under a compulsory scheme.

The building of | atom-proof
shelters has been given high
priority in Sweden In Britain it
has been shelved.





NOBODY'S
DIARY

SUNDAY—The weather has been kind to us so far
this year and the young crops are in lovely
condition. Taking a drive through St. George,
St. Philip and St. John’s today, I could not be
but struck with the different shades of green,
the darkest and. most luscious shade was to
be seerr opposite Halton, where a field of young
canes appeared to have been given an extra
dose of artificial manure.» While the cane crop
was all to be desired the food crops were scant.
If we are to rely to a greater extent on feeding
ourselves it will be necessary to bring a greater
acreage under food crops.

On my homeward Journey about 9 p.m. the
only flaw in an otherwise perfect evening wa-
provided by the Highways & Transport Depart-
ment. It had been raining and some invisible
stop studs at the junction of a road leadinz
from Massiah Street--the only street with a
name in those parts even though it is not dis-
played—and a road leading to Ashford, nearly
ended my life. Stop studs that cannot be seen
are a greater menace than no studs. The driver
of the oncoming vehicle on the main road who
knew the country like the back of his hand
expected me to stop. Surely the Highways &

Transport Department can remedy this state | ¢

of affairs.

MONDAY—I have often read about the hazards of

running the gauntlet but today was my_fir,
experience. I used Busby’s All@y as a short cu
only to be met with a barrage of women’s
tongues. “I thought you was a different sort ot
gentleman”, howled the first Madame, “but
you ain't no gentleman at all, you want we to
go down Temple Yard, a place wha ain’t fit for
pigs”.

Number two Madame wanted to know why
anyone should think that poor hucksters—flesh
and blood as wonah—could exist amongst the
obnoxious smells in Temple Yard; and number
three Madame said that the hucksters’ eardrums
would be burst by the noise from the cooperage
in Temple Yard and that only a person lower
than a savage would suggest that ‘humans’
should be sent to that spot.

It was difficult to understand why they all
wanted to stay in Busby’s Alley—a filthy lane
bounded by dirty gutters—where lettuce is
exposed to all the germs that a bacteriologist
has ever dreamt of. While in these salubrious
surroundings I did discover some of the causes
for the astronomical prices of vegetables. I
was told, on good authority, that the vegeta-
bles pass through these hands before getting
to the consumer. Someone comes from the
country with produce. He sells it to someone
in Busby’s Alley who then sells it to the

hucksters,
* *

TUESDAY — There must be something in the

U.S.A., atmosphere that makes one forget.
This is the only explanation for the strange
letters that I get from time to time from Bar-
badians domiciled in the U.S.A. Only to-day
such a letter arrived from a Barbadian laud-
ing the opportunities open to coloured West
Indians in the States. I have seen for myself
and I know that the opportunities in the West
Indies are hundredfold in comparison with
those in the U.S.A. where the colour line is
rigidly enforced, And even in New York
where there is a slight relaxation the coloured
man has not yet begun to enjoy freedom as
we know it in Barbados.

But my visit was fleeting so I prefer to give
a factual report of one who has lived there for
many years and has had the opportunity to
investigate the matter thoroughly.

Mr. Don Iddon, the American Correspondent
of the London Daily Mail, in his American
Diary has this to say about the living condi-
tions of the coloured population of New York:

“It is generally accepted that the Negro in
New York is treated with greater lenience and
tolerance than in any other section of the coun-
try. If this is so, then it is a bitter commen-
tary on their status elsewhere.

For here in Manhattan they are hewers of
wood and the drawers of water, the shoeshine
boys and floor scrubbers, the liftmen and the
hash slingers, the bag-carriers, porters and
servants, the door openers and weight-lifters.

Their job, with a few startling exceptions
like the athlete Joe Louis and the dance band
leader, Cab Calloway, is that of a menial. And
at night when the white peoples’ shoes have
been shined, their dishes washed and _ their
floors polished, the coloured man retires to
Harlem, a tightly packed tenement of 500,000
people his specially alloted living quarters,
the Black Ghetto.”

Why do these American Negroes and expatri-
ate coloured West Indians attempt to paint
the picture in the West Indies so black when
they know that they are deliberately lying.

* *
WEDNESDAY—-The increased cost of living is
alternatively blamed on the Government or
the big merchant but no one seems to realise
that the small man Ts equally responsible,
Coconuts were sold a few weeks ago at 8c.
apiece, today I saw them sold at 10c. apiece.
The vendor had paid 4c. apiece off the tree
a few weeks back and he is still paying the
same price. He is now getting a profit of 150%
but no one holds up his hands in horror, Imag-
the pandemonium that would be let loose if a
big merchant made that percentage of profi'.
The breadfruit vendors have nothing to learn
from the coconut vendors.

*

THURSDAY—A more accurate method of arriving
at the cost of living index is being devised, but
there is no suggestion put forward that will
prevent prices sky-rocketing. Nor are we any
nearer to finding the $14,000 lost.

FRIDAY—To-day is an extra busy day. Before
mid-day to-morrow first hand answers must be
received straight from the horse’s mouth. Is
Red Cheeks really as hot as painted or are
Teddy's friends flattering him? Are Bright
Lights’ batteries fully charged? Is Best Wishes
as depressed as she looks or is she staging an
act? Favourable answers to these questions
might make all the differences between success
or failure at the Races to-morrow,

enteral



SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1951



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working class families.

“The Idea of West Indian
History” was the subject of a
lecture given by Professor J, H
Parry, who holds the Chair of

Modern History at the University
College of the West Indies, at the
Extra-Mural Summer School last








ThelideaOtwWw.L

similarity between the West Indian few people

1 were outstandingly
colonies and those of North

wealthy while it was possible for



America, It was interesting to the indentured servant to make
week, compare Spanish and British styles good. Sugar had changed the
He said that there were certain in colonisation, On the whole the situation; it required plenty of
difficulties in the way of the study Spanish cities in the West Indies land, it was not in those days
of this subject. Little was known had been better planned than the possible to organi it on the
about Arawaks and \Caribs, and English. On the other hand the pattern of central lamge factories,
effective history began with the fine country houses of Barbados and it required hard labour which
immigrations from the Old World, and Jamaiea had no parallels in had to be, carried out rapidly. Al-
The modern history of the area Cuba or Puerto Rico. Spanish though Oliver Cromwell and
had been interrupted by two major civilisation was essentially urban Judge Jeffreys both sent political
social revolution The first of in type; the country house was prisoners to the West Indies, the
these was the introduction of sugar always an important influence in latter set his face against’ the
planting;. the second was the English history. wholesale kidnapping which was
emanc ipation of the Slaves “ ith Plantations then proceeding. The cheapest and
the collapse of the old style sugar The coming of the sugar easiest form of finding labour for
plantations, He knew of no coun plantations entirely changed the the plantations however was by
try in Europe which could show hattern of West Indian history, means of slavery,
such cate mic ch ‘Ss In IS ‘The importance of the local Legis- This led to a state of society in
history latures is noticeable. The West which the white population
Duri the XVI and early XVII Indian Assemblies really possessed steadily diminished, and absentee
cen “1 immigrants me financial power in those ownership and control by attorneys
E d over their Governors than became common, Lack of skill
Engli House of Commons among the slaves also led to de-
i " had over the Stuart Kings. The pendence on Europe for manu-
Di ioneer society, before the coming factured goods, though some
I f r, was on the whole healthy; furniture was made by slaves

Professor Parry considered that
emancipation was not so serious
a blow to the plantations as has
sometimes been contended; or at
least that the plantation economy
need not have suffered so greatly
if the planters had made a fair
attempt to use wage-labour. Slave
labour towards the end of the
XVIIL century had become in-
ineffi-

History

trained by imported Englisa
craftsmen. The prosperity of the
islands now depended entirely on
the price of sugar. Wars sent the
price of sugar up, but also in-,
creased the cost of freight insur-"
ance, which sometimes offset the sreneing’y exyensive snd

Our Readers Say:

edith elie a
Needed |

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I shall be very grateful

Lamps



if you would publish ti letter, |
so that those who are in Seah?
to see after our street lighting,



“HIGH *CLASS

|







s

rise of prices, The capture of other cient. The real cause of declining may read it and lighten ne
: E prosperity was the fall in the] darkness along Barbarees Road. | & |
islands in the XVIII century wars price of sugar. England was ye LIQUEURS '
sent the sugar price down, and ; fe or oon 12

oe " beginning to prosper through Free; After a pedestrian has passed |
this explains why, thanks to the iti H ; : > hee | Prunier Brandy
influence of the West India J'ade, but the abolition of sugar;the light by Dr. R. H. King’s|® Martel Brand
interest, island tured fr the duties and of imperial preference|residence, which reflection is g a a

st, Often handed back 12 1846 and 1849 were heavy blows| Very poor in the upper direction|% Vielle Cure

French were often handed backs, “the sugar planters. Th XIx|of the road, one is at th oy| ts Bristol Cream Sherry
at the close of wars. The colonists ‘° Seo potas any traits « aner’y|% Bristol Milk Sherry
themselves disliked sendi an century saw their ruin; it was the|of any individual who may be|@
a gga we estier, 24 ee _ end of a society, Speaking of a XIX|lurking in the dark to do mis-|‘ Dry Sack Sherry
islands F ‘oo ne" local Assemblies and the Colonial! chief, until the other light by | Gilbey's Port
os gah as Office, Professor Parry said he was! 5Pringfield comes into view. 1% Cold Breet pam

Emancipation in agreement with the view ex-; : x aerent orn in Bois. of

Emancipation came in a clash pressed by Judge J. W. B. Chenery},. I should like to suggest that a x ere aren arc te

of economic interests in which the in another lecture that reversion light be placed just below the) X Re ee
West India planters were defeated, to Crown Colony Government had ne tree oy es — X
There may have been certain probably been in the interests of Q2'QUElY oppose Sgr’ ae i)
somewhat negative economic Jamaica, but that Barbados had > sat +} ee eee apotney 8 i hone
motives for the emancipation, but rightly insisted in 1876 on the wrerheher canes *
the humanitarian motive was preservation of its legislative EXPECTANT »
obviously present and genuine, freedom. I suty 31, 1951. 3

i



GODDARDS To-day for
These & Phone Tuesday for Meat






DESSERTS

Kraft Ice Cream Powder
Corn Flour in Pkgs.

Bird's Custard

She 's Puddings

Guavas in tins.

Grapes in tins

Ginger in Bottles

SPECIALS

2% Tin Sweet Biscuits
$1.80 each
Processed Gouda Cheese
$1.00 per Ib
Cook’s Paste @ 6c. per tin
Tea Time Paste 15 cents
per Bottle


TURDAY, AUGUST 4,



Increasing World Pric

1951

Of Living Rise

BARBADOS has been faced for some months with the
problem of rising world prices. The rising cost of living

in the United Kingdom, in

Canada and the United States,

in Australia and in the other countries from whom Bar-

bados receives its imports,

has necessarily resulted in an

increase in the local cost of food and other goods.

Each Government is making its best endedvours to:

sclve the problem, but most experts agree that it is most

janlikely to be solved until wor

improve.



Airport Officer
Appointed

Mr. Winston Kitchener (Pony)
Hynam, a Barbadian, who is at
present resident in the United
Kingdom has been selected as
Control Officer, Seawell Airport,
the Advocate learnt at a Press
Conference yesterday,

Before leaving England to
take up his appointment at Sea-
well Airport Mr. Hynam will un-
dergo a six weeks course in Air
Traffic Control beginning in Sep-
tember. This course will be im-
mediately’ followed by an eight
weeks attachment to a large aero-
drome so that he may gain ex-
perience in Civil Aviation pro-
cedure.

Mr. Hynam is 34 years of age.
In 1940 he enlisted in the Royal
Air Force in which he attained
the rank of Flight Lieutenant,
subsequently receiving the awards
of D.F.C. and D.F.M.



HOUSING PLANS
APPROVED

The Executive Committee has
approved the plans submitted by
the Housing Board for the erec-
tion of 50 houses to be built at
the Bay and Pine Estates,

After making careful investi-
gation into the family _ struc-
tures of potential tenants, the
Board recommended the build-
ing of 14 two-roomed houses, 24
three-roomed houses and 12 four-

roomed houses, which will be
constructed of 6-in. limestone
blocks for external walls and

4-in. for internal partitions, Cor-
rugated asbestos sheets will be
used as roofing.



187,000 TONS OF SUGAR
PRODUCED THIS CROP

In his final report on the sugar
cane reaping season, 1951, the
Labour Commissioner has report-
ed that the reaping season began
on 8th January and came to a
close on July 7th, Thirty-six fac-
tories were engaged in the pro-
cessing of sugar and fancy mo-
lasses and the record crop of ap-
proximately 187,000 tons of sugar
and syrup was produced. This is

approximately 30,000 tons over
the previous record.
Relations between employers

and workers hhave been good. The
latter have worked with enthusi-
asm and harvested the biggest
crop in the history of Barbados,
taking on the average only two
to three weeks longer than for a
very much smaller crop.



SEAMAN’S DEATH
INVESTIGATED

The Government, the Hon, the
Colonial Secretary said yesterday,
is in touch with the solicitors in
South Africa who, at the request
of the Government of Barbados
through the Secretary of State
for the Colonies and His Ma-
jesty’s High Commissioner in
Capetown, are advising regard-
ing the procedure to be adopted
in the interest of the relatives of
Milton King.

Details are being collected by
the King’s Solicitor with a view
to lodging a formal claim for
compensation against the Govern-
ment of the Union of South
Africa.

Due For Course -
In Co-operatives

Mr. C. A. E. Beckles, Senior
Peasant Agricultural Instructor,
has been selected to attend a
course in Co-operatives in Ja-
maica, sponsored by the Extra-
Mural Department of the Uni-

versity College of the West Indies
in collaboration with the Jamaica
Co-operative Development Coun-
cil. The Course will last from
August 6th to 16th.



DIED SUDDENLY:

Edith Sobers of Deacon’s Road
St. Michael died suddenly at her
residence yesterday about 2.30
am. Her body was later removed
to Burton’s Funeral Parlour,
Pinfold Street where a post mor-
tem examination was performed
by Dr. A. S. Cato,



SAVE s $ §

Id security conditions

The Government of Barbados by
direct subsidization
$1,000,000 a year, by the utiliza-
tion of certain stabilization funds
and by price control, has endeav-
oured to cushion the price in-
creases of the more important
foodstufls, but the pressure of in-
creasing world prices has caused
an therease in the cost of living
and there are signs of further in-
creases. ;

In particular, we have to face
a considerable increase in the
price of rice which we import
from British Guiana, e.g., the
present contract price of first
quality rice is $10.80 per bag and
it is unlikely that the new contract
price will be less than $16.00 per
bag, an increase of nearly 50%.

Complicated

The problem of prices is further
complicated by pressure from the
importers and distributors that
the specific profit margins allowed
under price control are inadequate
to meet the increasing operating
costs and to meet the claims of
their employees for higher wages

te meet the increasing cost of
living.

The Price Control Committee
made certain recommendations
in July, 1950. Subsequent events
made it clear that prices were

rising and Government indicated
in March, 1951, that it was not
prepared to accept the Commit-
tee’s recommendations but pro-
posed to examine the comparative
profits of the Commission Mer-
chants, the wholesalers and the
shopkeepers.

That enquiry has. now been
undertaken and the recommen-
dations made by the investigator
for an increase on some “fixed
mark-ups” have been accepted
by the Government. The details
are in preparation and when
completed the Controller of
Suprlies will be authorized to
effect the necessary adjustments
as opportunity offers.

One of the _ supplementary
recommendations made will be
adopted forthwith, viz., to remove
the control on the price of bags
which should give some immediate
relief to retailers. Also, any ad-
justments possible within the
present range of the equalization
tund will be effected immediately.

Merchants’ Claim

It is appreciated by Government

that the claims of commission
merchants have not been recog-
nised and that the claims of

wholesalers and retailers have not
been fully met, but it is hoped
that it will be generally accepted
that Government has made a
genuine attempt to find an equit-
able solution of the problem of
profit margins in relation to both
the distributor and the consumer.

As ragards future policy, Gov-
ernment proposes to give further
consideration to the effective use
of the subsidization vote, to the
present and future position of the
equalization funds, to the inci-
dence of “import taxation” in re-
lation to essential fonds and to
local production of foodstuffs,

Proposals continue to be made
to Government for the de-control
of certain commodities, This op-
portunity is taken to reaffirm the
policy of Government that it is not
prepared to remove price con-
trols until it is reasonably satisfied
tnat the result would not be an
increase in the prices of essential

commodities. Subject to this pre-
requisite, the schedules of con-
trolled items will be examined

with the object of removing price
control wherever possible.

C.D.W. Adviser Will
Not Come By
“Golfito”

Mr. Philip Hewitt-Myring, Pub-
lic Relations Adviser to Colonial
Development and Welfare, will
not be arriving in the Elders and
Fyffes S.S, Golfito when it reaches
Barbados today as was originally
planned,

Due to illness, he did not sail
on the vessel when it left Eng-
land last month,

Mr. Hewitt-Myring went up to
the United Kingdom to attend a
Conference of Public Relations
Officers in London,

costing over





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



CAR PARK AT RACES



es Cause Cost



THE BARBADOS AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION'S car
members of the association who are attending the B.T

Transportation to
Canada Dry station wagon.

Site of the car park is the Barbados Regiment's Barrack Square.

B.A.A. Will Arrange
Car Park At Races

The Barbades Automobile As-
sociation has arranged by mutual
agreement with the Barbades
Regiment's Commanding Officer
that the Regiments Barrack Square
will be the official car park for
members of the Barbados Auto-
mobile Association, during the
Barbados Turf Club’s four day
mid-summer meeting which opens
today.

The Canada Dry Bottling Cc,
have lent the Association their
station wagon and a driver, free
of charge to assist in transporting
members of the Association to and
from the Grand Stand.

The Association’s Patrolman
Herbert will among other duties
show members where to park.

Civil Service
Appoiniments

His Excellency the Governor
has approved of the following ap-
pointments and transfers of clerks

in the Public Service:—

G. M. Barnes, I. Headley—Customs.

E. F. Burke, W.McD. Rogers, C. E
Maynard—Colonial Secretary’s Office

B. R. Collymore, G. H. Edwards—Cur-
rency Department

R. V. Goodridge, N. R. Gill—Audit

E Forde, A, E



Bonnett, K
mc; s
General's Office
E. McD. Russell, E,
Drayton, J. A Millar,
Agriculture Department

Richards--Accountant



H
Fr

Clarke, J, K
B. Taylor



J.S, E. Marshall, H D. Wilson, A. R
Blackman, L, G. V. Cave, K, Springer,
R A_ Hall, Post Office

LS. Deane—Public Trustee's Office

E. H L. Thorpe,—Petty Debt Court

J H Campbell, Police Magistrate's
Court, District “A.”

L. Thomas—Police Magistrate’s Court,
District “B,’

D. T, Daniel—Police Magistrate's Court
District ““C

K. W. King—Harbour & Shipping Mas
ter's Office

Cc. Ifill—Income Tax Office

H. A. King—Education Department

S E Parris—Labour Office

F, DeC. King—, Registrar's Office

F.D. W_ Phillips—Regis ‘s Office

C. R. Phillips—Savings Bank

B. K. F. Bowen—Medical Services

H W_ Walcott, E, R. Barrow—Water
works Department

G.A Social Welfare Off

cer

Collymore
TRANSFERS

K L Morris
Debt Court, to Police

itade Clerk, Petty

Long G
Magistrates Courts,







District “F", from Ist August, 1951

BD. Morris—Long Grade , Clerk,
Public Trustee's Office, to Petty Debt
Court, from ist August, 1951

0, StC. Smith—Long Grade Clerk,
Registrar's Office to Public Trustee's
Ofive, from ist August, 1951

C. S_ Daniel—Senior Clerk, Police
Magistrates’ Courts, District “F" to Reg

istrar's Office, from Ist August, 1951
D. N. Lewis—Long Grade Clerk, Say

ings Bank, to Labour Department, from
Ist August. 1951

F. A_ Parris—Long Grade Clerk, Cur
rency Department, to Savings Bank,
from Ist August, 1951

Vv. H. Sealy—Long Grade Clerk, Cur-
rency Department, to Government In
dustrial Sehools, a oon a can be
released

H E Walcott—Longe Grade Clerk
Police Magistrates’ Courts, District “A”
to the Airport, from 10th October, 1951

C Evelyn—Long Grade Clerk, Harbour
& Shipping Master's Office, to Post
Office, from Ist August, 1951

M B Walkes Temporary Clerk

Department of Medical Services, to Police



Magistrates’ Courts, District “A”, from
Ist August, 1951

G_E Clarke—Temporary Clerk, Pub-
lic Trustee's Office, to the Petty Debt
Court, from ist August, 1951

K B Howard Temporary Clerk,
Police Magistrates’ Court, District “C
to Registrar of Friendly Societies, from
Ist August, 1951

C. K. Holder—Temporary Clerk, Wa-
terworks Department, to Public Works

srom Ist August, 1951



6 I.D’s

Notifications of Infecticus Di-

AVIATI

park goes into operation to-day for the use of
C’s four day mid-summer's meeting.

and from the Grand Stand will be provided by the association assisted by a

ARE DISCUSSED

WING COMMANDER L. A. Egglesfield, Director Gen-
eral of Civil Aviation in the Caribbean area, has just re-
turned from Trinidad where he met the Hon. J. Ajodha-
singh, Minister of Works and Communications, and the
Director of Civil Aviation and discussed the best means
of carrying out the recommendations of the International
Civil Aviation Conference which was held in Havana last

vear.

Referring to some of the air-
felds in the area, he said: “We
want to improve Vigie in .St.
Lucia by removing the small hill
at the western end which forms
an obstruction to an aircraft ap-
proaching to land. We also want
to extend the airstrip at Golden
Rock airfield in St. Kitts.

Appeal Judges
Confirm Decision

A decision of Police Magistrate,

Mr. S.. BH,

Nurse whx

» dismis

ON PLANS |

sed

on its merits a case Iretha Chand-

ick
of

It is not, of course, possible.to ler brought against Freder
reach a final decision in either case Grant, an island constable
until the cost of the projects gre Roaches, St. Lucy, accusing him

known; to ascertain this, detailed
surveys will be necessary and it is
hoped that these will be arranged
shortly.”

“It is anticipated that the same
survey party will carry out a
detailed examination of Pallisa-
does airfield in Jamaica to as-
certain if a third runway, pro-
viding sufficient length for all
types of aircraft, can be con-
structed.”

was

Appeal,

Grant

for

and Mr

H

Mr. G

Grant,

yesterday

Mr.

J. W.

B.

by

A. Vaughn.
Chandler's case was that she was

her

drew to t

on

the rc

he

of inflicting bodily harm on her,
confirmed
Judges of the Assistant Court of
Chenery

the

holding the rope to her cow when
dragged
along the ground.
H. Adams who appeared
Judges’
attention that when Chandler at-

ype

Off to Miami tended the doctor, she told hii
On Sunday, Commander Eggles- -thaty the cow dragged her,

field will be proceeding to Miami Mr, J. E, T. Brancker repre-
to attend the bi-annual meeting sented Chandler He did not ap-
of aeronautical agencies in the pear for her from the beginning
Caribbean area interested in of the case
Aeronautical Teleccmmunications Iretha Chandler told the Court
and Navigational Aids which will that Cardinal Griffith, a watch-

be held by International Aeradcic |man, had held her cow and said

(Caribbean) Ltd. that Grant and he were going to
At this meeting, there will bejsell it She and her husband

discussions on matters of general }held it. Grant then held the cow

interest with particular refererce}and told Cardinal not to let it

to the continued implementati; )

of recommended I.C.A.O, stand- They had taken it off her land

ards and practices as they apply e said

to aeronautical telecommunica-

t
tions and navigational aids. ‘

activi-|

V

h

The case for Grant was
vas asked to escort Cardinal who

that

he

It is expected that the vas taking a cow to the Police
ties of International Aeradio L!4.|Station, The cow had been caught
since it began operation in 1hls}on a Mr, Knight’s land, “Hilary
area a little over a year ago, will|Chandler came to me,” he said,
be reviewed. ‘ “and told me to take Cardinal

He said that wherever practi-|Grifith in charge for stealing the
cable, suggestions from airlines in | egw,”
the area which are using the Grant said he later had to a:
facilities afforded by the company, |rest both Iretha and Hilary fo:

will be examined at the meeting,
with a view to improving the
efficiency of the service provided

r



Down For Sessions
For Larceny

Cleveland Jones a painter ol
Hanson, St. George was committed
to the next sitting of the Court
of Grand Sessions by His Wor-
ship Mr. H. A. Talma_ Police
Magistrate of District “A’’ yester-
day when the preliminary hear-
ing in the case in which he is
charged with larceny of $135
belonging to Stanley Sealy was
concluded.

The offence is alleged to have
been committed on June 29.
Mr. J. S. B. Dear appeared on
behalf of Jones in the prelimin-
ary hearing, while Sgt. E. King
conducted the case for the
prosecution

DR. WASE-BAILEY DIES

News has been received that
Dr. Basil N. V. Wase-Bailey, who
was Chief Medica] Officer in this
Island from May 1939 to October
1943 and who retired from the

seases for the month of July are, Colonial Service in January, 1950

as follows:—Enteric Fever

uberculosis 4,





8

with the FERGU SON Wheel Tractor

WORLD'S MOST COPIED TRACTOR

dl

\

}

} COURTESY
{



i



GARAGE

flelds can

The price of this
is one-third that
tor, and you
its performance.

Further inform:

tion to..



will

(ROBT. THOM. LTD.)

With the Ferguson System your
be
ploughed and the unit is available
as a transport Vehicle.

satisfactorily

versatile Tractor

of a Track Trac-
be amazed at
ation on applica-
i
|
)

Dial 4616 }



2;) died on July 7th. 1951,

POO

POPPE ESOOOSS SOOO

5 lead Vl
j me fin

gent

ert LBS

ZOFLORA |
fragrant with str
oils, especially m
atmosphere’ by

5068
LLLLLELLLESCLSELSESESSS SESS APAPP PEATE

houses and in the



Available in th

{
Zouquet, Jasmir
Lavender and Pir
|
|



Zo

654 ¢
SCLC CLL LK I

“oe

naking a



mH. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. - Agents
Seugdgs

CLE E



a powerful
gly
rade

for
praying

Home.

OF

antiseptic

disturbance,

THEY ARE THE BEST

germicide,
floral

purifying the

in Public

Rooms, Offices, Shops, Factories, Ware-

e following perfumes

c Lilac,

1e

Carnation,

flora |
(Verfured DISINFECTANT ~~

I

COLT SN RT RS NT ae

Sor

INSIST ON

"PURINA CHOWS

or

k

i

‘

Le

eo

POLO POSE

s

e

SCSSSSSSSSSUGSE SSSSOSSSY

oS

6

s) |
Att tA ttt ttt tt 44 434,4,4,¢,t,t tA
LCP A PPC CCK PP PCP CEP CC EP EO} \

PAGE FIVE





Brewster Gets |
Physical Education. |
scholarship |




nw






When Mr,. Harold G. Brewster |
returns to the island in 1953, |
Combermere School will be the,
only school in the island with}

two specialists in Physical Educa- }
tion.

lhe Governing Body of the
School recently;received informa }
tion that Mr. Brewster has been |
awarded a two-year scholarship
under Colonial Development and

Welfare scheme to complete his |
}

Physical Education course at
Lowghborough College, England, |
tenable from October next. 14

Mr. Brewster left the island for |
England in September 1950 under |
his own arrangements to study |

Physical Education at Loughbor- |
ough College. |
The Headmaste: of Comber-
mere School told the Advocate:

Since that time his progress has |
been so satisfactory that the Co-
lonial Office has awarded him this |
scholarship to enable him to com- |
plete the three-year course.” {

Mr. Brewster joined the staff of }

Combermere School in 1944 after |
returning to the island from!
Dominica where he served in the |
Dominica Grammar School. On|}
many occasions he has represented |
the school at cricket.





OBTAINABLE AT

{
The other Physical Education |
specialist is Mr. Bruce St. John
who qualified at Loughborough |
College in 1947. He was awarded
a British Council scholarship, |
When asked if there was }
necessity for two Physical Edu-|
cation specialists at Combermere
Major Noott, Headmaster, said:!
There is a very great need in
the whole island for specialists in
Physical Education,”




| ALL LEADING DRY GOOD STORES
| J

PPLLPCLEFFSSFSECSLESSE >
‘.

HA ISON’S — BROAD STREET
PIECE

| DECORATED

' TOILET SETS

YOUR CHOICE OF THREE ATTRACTIVELY
COLOURED DECORATIONS.

ONLY $18.51 PER

e
“VEITASAVOUR™

WATERLESS
COOKERS

OS

{9599955955

PROPEL SEE SPOTS

:





Driver Fined

His Worship Mr, E. A, McLeovt
Police Magistrate of District “A”,
yesterday fined Herman Jordan
of Airy Hall Land, St Michael,
$72 to be paid by seven instal-
ments or three months’ imprison-
ment with hard labour for driv-
ing the motor lorry M—1002 the
property of S. E, Cole & Co.,
without an appropriate license

Jordan on the morning of Aus
ust 2 about 2.15 o'clock drove ot
the lorry M—1002 which Gar-
nett Caddle of Hindsbury Road
St. Michael left parked opposite
the Barbados Taxi Co. to Bay
Street and it ran into the veran-
dah of the house of Mrs. I[renc
Chase and also knocked down
guard wall on the opposite sic
of Mrs, Chase’s house.

A further
smposed on
the lorry
consent.
he will
month's
labour,

Police Constables 362 Brathwaite




if
SET

fine of $1440 wa
Jordan for driving
without the owner’
Failing to pay this fine,
have to undergo one
imprisonment with hard

and 3&8 Marshall carried out in-

vestigations which finally led to .

Fonda fron tes ae ene 3 ae The “Vitasavour” Roasts, Boils, and Fries—it
Jordan, aid ¢ ory ser $ . > . . >, wey iscuitce ate .
Thing and You Gould. have. iilind also Bakes Cakes, Pastry, Biscuits ete., In short
the people living in the house anything that can be cooked on an ordinary stove,

when the collision took place,” can be cooked in a “Vitasavour” easier and quicker,

Sgt. Forde attached to the Cen-
tral Police Statio osecuted foi niet sid dia: “al cuit eh y aan aie ae
inp Silica. Weccas biseeenain a. WATERLESS COOKING IS BETTER BECAUSE
ceived, IT EMPLOYS THE NATURAL FOOD JUICES AS

A COOKING MEDIUM THUS PRESERVING THE
NATURAL VITAMIN CONTENT SO ESSEN-
TIAL TO GOOD HEALTH



DECREE ABSOLUTE

The Hon, the Chief Justice, Si
Allan Collymore, Kt., pronounce

FOR DELICIOUS ANP NUTRITIOUS, FOODS











decree absolute in the Court for USE A “VITA VOUR”
Diverce and Matrimonial Cause y
in the case of C, O. De C. Cai 5
" e « ° ‘ '

rington, Petitioner, E, A, Carring $24.36 EA ll
ton, Respondent and G. Walke:
Co-Respondent

Decree Nisi had been pro-
nounced on June 1. Mr. W. W *
Reece, K.C., instructed by Mr HHA RISON Hardware Dept.
D. L, Sarjeant appeared for th
petitioner, Tel 2364

8 6 eB OCCBOOCO 989869990046 6404 SOLA POOLS

POOP OCGSS

ORDER THESE EARLY

Hot- Water Bottles & Combination Syringe

B Hot-Water Bottles es Dunlopillo Cushions
Ice Caps e Air Cushions
a Enamel Douche Cans yy Enema Syringes ¥
.
a Enamel Bed-Pans e Kidney Dishes %
Feeding Cups e Atomizers, ete. x
Glass Food Measures S
x
$
>
°
>





‘s . _— i.
% KNIGHTS DRUG STORE:
Seen m8): I







charm on
your table

CLOVER LEAF
CORK

MATS

WASHABLE &

HEAT-RESISTING
®

Sets wrapped in Cellophane

at $4.79, $3.32
& $2.91 per get

Sa arctccsaeaananenemaeanenmanemne





CAVE SHEPHERD & C0., LED.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET




















BARBADOS ADVOCATE “ SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1961



SEND YOUR
‘ORDERS:

TO :

ADVOCATE
PRINTERY

DIAL 2620

Cristian Scene |
iq Reading Room





$e
=

nase ne ASRS
Sater se OM) ein |
Metes Co oF YOUN
mot . (

COME ON! L
WHATIS BEHIND




>!



i



Hours: -m.
eee MUSTARD OR VIN EGAR Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Piridayn,
i a.m, —12 o'clock Saturdays.

At this Room the Bible and

the Christian Science text-book

Science and Health with key to

the Scriptures by MARY BAKER

EDDY may be read, borrowed.
or pu

re!
é VISITORS ARE WELCOME a
or ear Va ee ee ae a

S YOU TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credi* customers for Thursday to Saturday only





Usually Now Usually NOW
Pkgs. Jersey Cream Biscuits 47 40 Tins Grapes 32 28

Tins S.A. Pineapple Jam (21lb) 66 G60 Bot. Frontenac Beer 26 20



Bottles Green Seal Rum (Qts) 108 9@ Bot. Davis Stout 28 22





BY GEORGE MC. MANUS




















| ime “AN! YOUR BROTHER
POLICE HEARD | HEARD THAT THE CHIEF
YER BROTHER | HEARD - s ‘

WAS COMIN! || HEARD HE’S NOT
TO TOWN - | \ COMIN’ ru |
seen 1] CLE tQ MOM ANG



YES-I HEARD FROM THE CHIEF OF
HIM YESTERDAY -MY
DARLING BROTHER

1S COMING TO TOWN

WELL=WELL- HELLO-MRS
JiIGGS! HOW ARE YOLI-MY
DARLING?- I HEARD THIS

FROM MRS. KUMQUAT- WHO
HEARD IT FROM MRS. _
CARRIE TALES / ft * i 5 }
i Cort ha ny ae i] [Pe
* AZ, ot
Som ‘



WELL. -
STUPID -
WHY





















ON SOME SECRET THAT
BUSINESS / IDIOTIC,
p LALIGH ?










I Pour some
“Windolene’on a se

—~¢
——

Don't risk your charm
with old-fashioned
ineffective deodorants.





Sparkling glass

ONLY NEW ODO-RO-NO CREAM











- - Bostic thedieina in GIVES YOU ALL THESE ADVANTAGES:
= Spread it over % Polish lightly half the time, just use 1 —Stops perspiration quick- %—Absolutely harmless to
the glass and — that's all iy and safely all fabri
give it a moment Windolene, Grease, ¢

BEGING TOAGITATE HIS 2—Banishes odour instantly. —New, exclusive formula.














to dr he NZ
/ THE MAIN | ACTIONS... 4 1, if a 4 iy S> _ Al dirt and fly: macks go 3 —Gives full protection for Never dries up, never

THIS LOOKS LIKE THE AH! NOW TH \\ sap pf | On tb.
PAY-OFF/ LNT. MUST ) RESEARCH STARTS! HERE = ; \ “fF >’ ke! Df, in a flash and leave one to three days. gets gritty or cakes in the
REALLY KNOW THE 16 WEALTH OF MATERIAL / iin 7 F Se \ WZ <=> “Ay + your glass sparkling 4—Never irritates normal jar as ordinary deodos
LAYOUT OF THESE BUT AY MUST BE CAREFUL... , ‘3 iy | \ () id ob ‘ A Ke skia-- use it daily. ants often do.

i GAY: “ GOLD ( rs db, 3 . f | \ indoten a ~~ | and spotlessly clean,

; COR@UPT. MEN!” AND ; y ~ a | I~ a a Windle TROY ©

THIS HAZARD. .. j ( \ag 4 x fa

FOR WINDOWS, MIRRORS,
BATHS, REFRIGERATORS—

Ww i d i IN FACT ANY GLAZED SURFACE
| naorene "â„¢
| cleans glass casily « guiikely

5 Bf

_ HEALTH BENEFITS

| * FREE FROM HARSH IMPURITIES
* NO INJURIOUS AFTER-EFFECTS
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

WoNGENE Bry ”) liga BEET VOL





MAGING! NOW HE ASKS |
FOR A DATE! HE SAID
HE'D WAIT AT THE
DRUGSTORE ON THE
CORNER UNTIL IT
SHOWED UP...THE
DOPE! HE CAN SIT
THERE FOREVER
FOR ALL T CARE!

ip petit






pore) %® SAFE IN ACTION
=| |BUT THATS A STRANGE YARN. !'VE > | LOOK INTO IT WI PHOTO OF THE GIR ;

| NEVER HEARD IT 93> | GET ASHORE WHERE THERES | JAND TIGER? DIDN'T ( ANYTHING+UK~

‘ BEFORE. sagt | | SMOKE, THERE'S USUALLY YOU BRING RIFLEG? | ABOUT DANGER
C RE. ,

i [SEE THi¢ DEVIL? NEW FROM How] k 0B







VALUE FOR MEN

* Celanese ' Sports Shirts are popular for both work
and play because they look and fee! good and are
, economical. Made from ‘Celanese’ Jersey, they
Made by ALLER @ BANBERYS LTB, LONDOR are obtainable in various shades and sizes.



}
SPORTS SHIRTS + ATHLETIC UNDERWEAR
'

ee a




SATURDAY,





The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknowl-
edgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$:.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4@ cents per word on Sundays for each
additional ward.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
additional word, Terms cash, Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3143 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.
_—_———

THANKS

——
BARROW —We the Wright's family take
this opportunity to thank those who
attended the funeral, sent wreaths and
showed sympathy in any way through
the death of our beloved sister Mrs.
Venetta Barrow who died on July
23rd 1951.
John Barrow
(brothers),
(sisters),
(nephew),

(husband), John,
Reita, Doris, Ursula
Evan, Erald, Cecil Anthony
Elma, Dalorise, Coral (nieces) .
4.8.51—in

Martin



MADE to measure within a day if
necessary Shirts, Pyjamas, Pants, Shorts,
& Ladies’ Slacks. Guaranteed fit and
Workmanship ROYAL STORE, No. 12
High Street. Phone 4359

4.8.51—lan





THE NEW DENTURE HOSPITAL
Broken Dental Plates skillfully re-
paired. Specials @elivered within three
hours. Square Deal Dental Lab, Magazine
Lane, 2. 4.8.51—%

HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—Isle of
SANTA MARIA--ioveliest hotel
in Caribbean. Rates from $7.00 per head
per day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi-
dential district ae Government Pret’



Rates from $4.00 per
day, .Enquiries to D. M. Slinger,

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife M
HOLDER (nee Best) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting an/ debt or debts in my
neme unless by a written order signed
by me.

HERBERT ALONZA HOLDER,
6th Ave. Beckles Rd





3.8..51—2n

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sutdays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word on







HELP





MAID—English Lady requires Compe-
tent middi¢aged General Maid, able to do
plain cooking. Only those with first
class references considered. ba ~ ar

—in

IMMEDIATELY
HOUSEKEEPER with experience, for
Guest House, References essential.
Apply Box XX. c/o Advocate Advtg.
Dept. 3.8.51—2n.

MISCELLANEOUS

260 feet six-inch bore Cast Iron or
Steel Pipe. Apply: D. M. Simpson &
Co. 2.8.51—6n

MOVIE FILM PROJECTOR: One (1)
16 m.m. Movie Film Projector without
sound. Phone 95275. 2.8.51—6n

PLAY PEN, 40 ins. x 40 ins, Folding,
with legs and castors preferred, Write
“Playpen” P.O. Box 92, state finish and
price. 26.7.51—t.f.n

WANTED TO BUY
OLD SEWING MACHINE out of use.
Good prices paid, Apply to Mrs, Vaughn,
Corner of Fairchild and n Streets.
21. "1. 51—8n.

WANTED TO RENT
BUNGALOW by married couple, no
children. One completely furnished bun-
galow, on the sea, with garage, for iong
period. Address particulars to: M.B.,
P.O. Box 124. 24.7.51.—5n.

FOR RENT

* Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents SuNdays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word on Sundays;















ananassae AiagNRaaEeeen cement
HOUSES







BAY VIEW —St. Lawrence Gap. 2
bedrooms. .Fully furnished, .Running
water; electric light. Immediate posses-
sion. Apply next door Mrs. R, Lynch.

4.8.51—In
BEACHVILLE— Furnished Room in
Fitts Village, St, James, with dressing
room and all conveniences, cool and
quiet. Apply Mrs. L. Cumberbatch.

3.8.51—6n
~ BUNGALOW—Newly built Bungalow

on long lease on St. James’ Coast. (7
niles from town). Fully furnished, all
modern conveniences from ee et

lst. Dial 2472. 7.51—3n.

Nee Re a Se et ce

CHANDOS, 2nd Ave., Belleville, Fully
furnished, Available ‘Ist August, Dial
3450 or 3926, 1.8.51—3n

CLIFTON TERRACE—To an approved
tenant. Furnished House, Upper Bay St.
Opposite Yacht and Aquatic Clubs. All
modern conveniences. Apply a a eaten:

LAKE ViEW: Constitution Road,
bedroom House and several fruit trees
Apply to T. J. Bynoe, Enterprise House,
Ch. Ch. 4.8.51—2n

ee
HOUSE: 3-bedroom Modern House.
All conveniences. Situated Top Rock.
Available furnished or unfurnished on
long lease. Apply: Ralph Beard, Lower
Bay Street. Phone 4683. 3,.8.51—3n

—$—$<$—$————

RIPLEY-ON-SEA, Maxwell Coast, fully
furnished, 2 bedrooms, refrigerator and
Phone, for September and from November
on. Dial 8476. 4.8.51—2n

“SUNSET VIEW", situated at Rockley.
Furnished with 3 bedrooms dining and
drawing rooms and all other conveniences.
Servant room and garage in yard, For
particulars, Ring 2455. 4.8.51—2n

_——$—S[—$——— ee
THE Coa bar bf St. Lawrence.
a
hc ears 14.7 51.—t f.n,
BOF

NOTICE
This is to notify the public
that I have appointed Mrs,
Winifred King of Cane Vale,
(Christ Church, with a power
of Attorney, to act for me
in the mattet.of the estate
of the late Joseph N. Prescod
of Hopewell, Christ Church.
Signed,
IRVIN PRESCOD,
Qualified Executor,
352 Washington St.,
Cambridge 39,
Mass., U.S.A.

POSSESSES SPOS OSOES,
[FORRES
TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

—_—__—
Outstanding books on our Islands

CARIBBEAN CIRCUIT — Full of
information about the Caribbean
Islands 14/-

ISLANDS IN THE SUN — Similar
to the above. Book full of rich
information 13/6

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

Clear Glass in Plastic. H
gauge for car windshields
Unbreakable.

JOHNSON'S HARDWARE

us

AUGUST 4,

CLASSIFIED ADS.

1951

FOR SALE





AUTOMOTIVE
CAR: Austin 40. In good condition
Phone 2330 4.8.51—1n

CAR: Bantam Singer Saloon Car. good
working order, Owner ieft island. Price
$275.00 Seen at Redman & Taylor's ane



age Lid. 4.8.51—3n
CAR: 1951 Hillman Station Waggon.
Mileage 2,000. Condition as new, Owner
buying large vehicle. Apply; Ralph
Beard, Lower Bay Street. Phone 4683
3.8.51—3n

KAISER. 1949, Six seater Saloon.

5,006 miles only. Absolutely as new.
Taxed. Dial 91-74. 31.7.51—6n
—————————
CAR: M.G. Sports 1950, T.D. Model,
Excelient running condition—and how it
can run! Two-seater; independent front
wheel suspension gives perfect ride at
any speed. Owner leaving island. No

reasonable offer refused. Phone 4877.
1.8.51—t.f.n.

ONE well-cared 1947 Chevrolet Car as
as new. Apply to D'Arcy A. Scott,
agazine Lane, 2.8.51—3n

ELECTRICAL
One G.E. REFRIGERATOR tin good
order) one Coolerator, Ice Boxes. Owen
T. Allder. Dial 3299. 4.8.51—1n









One (1) Phillips six-tulbe RADIO” and

a Pick-Up fitted into cabinet with

doors and record apa etc, santa
cendition. Griffith, Photographer, Brittons
X Road. ‘ 3.8.51—3n





FURNITURE

OFFICE CHAIRS: Just received a
shipment of Office Posture Chairs with
three point adjustment. See them today
a: T. Geddes Grant Ltd., or Dial 4442.
iva: ty 2.8.51—t.f.n.

MECHANICAL

TYPEWRITER: Smith Premier (noise-







J) Corona Portabie. ¥:, Owen
‘Allder, Roebuck St. Dia asad |
4.8.51—In



MISCELLANEOUS

BARN DANCE | SHIRTS: They will
make your girl fall for you—they are
pure Silk—they are hand-painted with
Barbados sceneries and views, THANI'S
Dial 3466,

4.8,.51—I1n
BABY’S PRAM in good condition,
reasonable price. Apply: Mrs. Seale
Navy Gardens, Phone 4128.





31.7.51—2n
DOMINICA MARKETING AGENCY



Carrots 2c per Ib. Tomatoes 24¢ &
36c per Ib. Fresh Lettuce and large
Peppers. 2.8.51—2n

eens eee
ESCHALOT—A fresh lot. Come any
JOHN D. TAYLOR & ar
x 8.61—In





HAIR. BRUSHES: English Hair Brushe,
Good Aue § Gon 69c. Ladies 77¢, each.
THANT'S, Dial 3466. 4.8.51—In

ICE BOX—GapaeiVad ibs, only $10.00,



Phone 3577 between 6 to 9 a.m. and 5
to 10 p.m. 3.8.51—2n
JOHN WHITE SHOES: In many

Styles and Prices for Men. Our prices
are unbeatable and unrepeatable.
THANT'S. Dial 3466. 4.8.51—1n

—~—.
JOHNSON’S PASTE WAX: Sunshine



from a tin, Cleans, Polishes, Protects
all Floors, Furniture and Leather.
4.8.51—5n



JOHNSON'S AUTO WAX: Try it today
and join the ranks of satisfied motorists.
4.8.51—5n

UE EEEeEEnEee
JOHNSON’'S CARNU: First class Car
Cleaner. To be used in conjunction with
CAR-PLATE, 4.8.51—5n
———
JOHNSON'S CAF. PLATE: Sensational
Car Polish. A boon to motorists. Get
a tin and try it today. 4.8.51—5n

JOHNSON'S TING FLOOR
SEALER. Seals out dirt and all moisture
and protects the floor against wear.
Very economical. 4.8.51—5n

JOHNSON’S LIQUID WAX: Dries,
cleans and Polishes your Floors in one
action. 4.8.51—5n

JOHNSON'S GLO-COAT. Sunshine
without rubbing. Ideal for Floors. Elimin-
ates drudgery. 4.8.51—5n



JOHNSON'S Cream Wax. Sunshine as
you clean Especially for furniture. It
cleans, it Wax Polishes, it gives Wax
Protection, in one easy application,

4.8.51

——

JOHNSON'S WAX PRODUCTS. Obtain-
able from all Leading Hardware Stores
ie garages, Distributors. K. J. Hamet-
4.8.51—5n

LORRY SKIDS: One (1) pair of Lorry
Skids. Finder will be rewarded on
return to Messrs. H. A. Guistone & Co.
Ltd. Roeb: x 4.8.51—2n

MEGASSE at Lower Estate ae:
Telephone 2488. 2.8.51—6n

—5n





PEARL NECKLACES: 1, 2 and 3 Strand,
Lovely for Races and Holiday, THANI'S
Dial. 3466. 4.8.51—I1n

PUMPS: One (1) 3” Centrifugal Pump,
and one (1) 7 x 12” Fan Mill Pump
Phone 91-05. 4.8.51—2n

RECORDS; Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing
»...and we will order for you if we
haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,
Ltd. 6.7.51—t.f.n.

SCARVES: Barbados Scarves with Bar-
bados Views, Map and Scenery of the
Island, made frorn 100% pure Silk.
$3.98 each. THANI'S Dial ee Ae

4.8.51—In









-S





SWIM TRUNKS: Gents! Its just what
you're looking for. They are All Wool
@ $3.38 each, THANT'S Dial 2466.

4.8.51—1In



TROPICAL FISH: Siamese Fighting
Females, Good Community Fish, also
Pearl Danios and Giant Danios. Archie
Clarke, Phone 5148. 3.8.51—4n

a

TRAILER-—One Trailer. Suitable to be
drawn ty Tractor. Dual Rear Wheels,
Hydraulic Brakes, Rear end attachment
for another Trailer. No Tyres specified,
Call, any day or Phone 3671. Bolden’:{
Garage. 4.8.51—2n

WHITE WOOD oe a boats,
ready cw Ap) to Joseph Kellman,
Chureh vitere T somepn: 4.86.51—3n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Miriam Briggs of
Six Mens, St. Peter, the holder of Liquor
License No. 1057 of 1951 granted in re-
spect of a board and shingle shop with
shedroof attached at Connell Town, St
Lucy to remove said License to a board
and shingle 7 with shedroof attached
at Grape Hill, St. Lucy and to use it

at such last deserted pretnises.

Dated this Ist day of August, 1961.
NEVILLE CADOGAN,
for Miriam Briggs.
Applicant.
To:—SYDNEY H. NURSE, Esq .
Police Magistrate,

B. “Dat, applieatio li be consid
a? a in wil on
we at a@ Licensing Court + . held on
Sao aan. at Police Courts, District

= SYDNEY H. NURSE,
Police Weagisirate, Dist. *
4



NOTICE

This is t6 notify friends and
customers that the work shop wil!
be closed for two (2) weeks be-
ginning from 4th Septembty

MR. D. RUS6ELL.
Genera! Upholsterer
48.51—In

esti tt POS ONC



SE HABLA ESPANOL

ORIENTAL

c OS, SOUVENIRS, AN-
TIQUES,
ILKS

[
|
| IVORY, JEWELS,
THANTrS

Etc,





PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days |
| @nd 12 cents per agate tine on Sundays, |
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days |
| and $1.88 on Sundays.



REAL ESTATE

eS
BUILDING SITE—Situated at Maxweil, |
Ch. Ch. 70 ft. frontage. Price reason-
eble, also Modern Houses and a large
spot of Land, suitable for dividing
Apply to B. A. Brooks. Phone 8335 o
8162. 1.8,51—5



LAND AT ST. LAWRENCE Suitable |
for building sites. For particulars appiy -
to K. R. Hunte, telephome 8137 or 4611.

17.7.51—t.E.n. |

——————

HOUSE in the Garden Land, 3 be--!
rooms, shower bath and domestic ta!
in the kitchen ete. Apply to T. A
Headley, Dunkirk House, Hindsbun; Red





ONE 20 x 10 Chattel house with sheJ
at Brandon's Beach. $700.00. You ex
deposit $240.00, and pay the © balan
monthly.

One small property at Mahogany
$2200.00. Deposit $600.00,
ance monthly.

For further particulars apply to D’A:
A, Scott, Magazine Lane 2.8.51- at



Lane |
re the bat



AUCTION

|
UNDER THE DiAMOND
HAMMER

I_have been instructed by the Govt-
in-Executive Committee to sell by Public
Auction on Tuesday I4th August, 1951
at the Water-boat enclosure on tha
Pierhead, One Motor Launch with Singer
engine. Size 2357 x 12 x 6 it.

D’Arey A. Scott, Auctioneer,

4.8.51—én

LOST & FOUND





LOST



One B.T.C. RACE TICKET, Series
V. No. 0604. Finder kindly return same
to the Advocate Advt. Dept

4.8.51—la



SWEEPSTAKE TICKET Series X
6978 Finder please return same to
Prince C. Gregoire Roebuck Street
Reward Offered 8.51—19





LOST.
SHARE CERTIFICATES
NOTICE is hereby given that H. M
Greaves, Executrix to the Estate ot
Francis Wood Greaves, Decd.; has made
application for the issue of Share Cer-
tificates in place of following Share
Certificates which have been lost:—
Certificate No, 714 30 Shares No, 22149
to 22178.
Certificate No. 839 3 Shares No,
to 23919,

ea Certificate No. 1106 11 Shares No, 27995

to

23917

28005.
Certificate No, 1428 11 Shares No, 36363
36373.

If no objection to this application is
made by the 3rd day of August, 1951,
new certificates will be issued.

By Order of the Board of Directors.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON FACTORY, LTD.
E. M. LEACH,
Secretary.
22.7.51—3n

LOST CERTIFICATE
THE WEST INGIA RUM REFINERY
Notice is hereby given that application
has been made to the Board of Directors
of the aboyenamed Company for the issue
of a Duplicate Share Certificate for twen-
ty (20) shares, Nos, 7133 to 7152 inclusive,
ia the name of W. R. St. C. Redman,
the original of which has been lost or
misplaced, and Notice is hereby given
that within fourteén days from this date
hereof, if no claim of representation is
made in respect of such original Certifi-
cate, a new Certificate will be issued,
By order of the Board of Directors,
H.R. LEACH,
Secretary.



2th July, 1951,
25.7.51—3n



PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,







minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.
NOTICE
The owner of the yaeht “MARSAL-

TESE 121", now lying in this Port, serves
Notice that he will not be responsible
for any debts incurred on behalf of the
Yacht unless they are contracted with his
knowledge and written authorisation,



4.8.51—3n
NOTICE
Re Estate of
FRANCIS EDWARD CRAIG
Deceased

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim against
the estate of Francis Edward Craig late
of the parish of Christ Church who died
in this Island on the 28th day of April
1951 are hereby required to send par-
ticulars of their claims duly attested to
the undersigned Mrs, Nita McLean Har-
vey Read the qualified executrix of the
deceased in care of Messrs R. 8. Nicholls
& Co., Roebuck Street, Bridgetown,
Solicitors on or before the fifteenth day
of September 1951, after which date |
shall proceed to distribute the assets of
the deceased among the parties entitled
thereto having regard only to such claims
of which I shall then have had notice.
and that I will not be liable for the
assets or any part thereof so distributed
to any person of whose debt or claim |
shall not then have had notice.

All persons indebted to the said estete
are requested to settle their indebtedness
without delay

Dated this 6th day of July, 1951

INITA Mc LEAN HARVEY READ

Qualified Executrix of the Estate of

Francis Edward Craig (deceased)
7.7,51—4n.

PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE

1904



(The Provost Marshal's Act,
(1904—6) § 30).

On Friday the 10th day of August, 195'
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon
will be sold at my office to the highest
bidder for any sum not under the ap-
praised value All that certain piece of
Land containing about 2,640 sq. ft. situ-
ate in Parish of St. Michael butting and
bounding on lands of Susan Yearwood,
a private road, on lands of gne E
Holmes and on a Road of Sufferance, at
Goodland together with the Chattel-
Dwe'ling House, Buildings, &¢., ap-
praised as follows:—

The whole property, chattel house and
land, appraised to one thousand t'vo
hundred and ninety dollars and seventy-
six cents ($1,290.76) attached from
Martin Beresford Stewart and
towards satisfaction, &c

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day

of purchase.
T. T. HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal
Provost Marshal's Office,
24th day of July, 1951

for

25.7.51—3n



WE ARE BUYERS

We buy anything connected with
STAMPS. Sheets, Single Stamps,
Collections, Accumulations and
Covers, Good prices Paid at the
CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY
ard Floor, No. 10, Swan St.







Mrs. HATCH’S Jumble Sale will
take place on Monday Bank Holi-
day 6th August in the Boys’ Schooi
Halil on Holders Hill a
at 12 mid-day Gifts






still

are
needed. Please ‘phone 3423, and we
will collect



All proceeds in aid of the
Viearage Fund



———

BARBADOS

)

ADVOCATE

GOVERNMENT NOTICE





Canadian Trade
With Jamaica





Drops By i/3 \PPLICATIONS from Sanitary Inspectors and Registered Nurse
WINDSOR. ONTARIO. Aug. 2 i (Hospital Trained) for Course of Training at the Public Healt
Canadian trade with Jamaica, Training Centre in Jamaica.

j has dropped off by one-third sinc |
B. Palmer, tanedien Some Grane! Applications are invited from Sanitary Inspectors and Registere:
| missioner to Jamaica said Wednes.| NUrses (Hospital trained) who are willing to be considered for ad
day. vaneed courses which are expected to last about eleven and ten manth
rie said about 40 per cht of Ja-| respectively at the Public Health Centre in Jamaica.
maica’s imports came fr Can-
ode ond p hy Ree | com- Applicants should apply in writing before the 20th Augu
: i produc 2 to the Director of Medical Services, Governme: Buildings
Pane are imported from Canada The Wharf, and a full curriculum shouldbe included it
| the situation probably will con ina application. The scholarships for these coursés, if approved, pro-
j\inue. “We have hopes that it will] vide: —
eventually become brighter but
it’s anybody’s guess just when that | (a) Free air passage to end from Jamaica.
with os.) ue Said.—C.P. | (b) Subsistence allowance at the rate of $4.80 per night, if
married, or $2.40 per night, if single
| (c) Travelling expenses in Jamaica at the rate of $14.40 ; |
yum sm month. |
| (ad) Contingencies at the rate of $4.80 per month. |
eep 3 The scholarships will only be granted on the following con- }
| ditions: ~ ° \
a. nae eo JI stabbi }
ned |

if joints are sven &
your blood Is poiso:
trout faulty Tidneymmetion ,

That the Commissioners of Health agree ‘to pay to the





Giher’ sees ot iaeae officer, his or her salary while absent on study
Diseraass are Beehocke, Aah | leave, where the applicant is employed by the Com

Nouritis, & . Getting missioners .
” yes: i Itehing (b) That the officer selected agrees to enter a bond to cdn-
revere eae se. er hotee sot ty tinue in the service of the Commissioners or of some
cause of the oagewe you must | ether body or Board in the Island whose function is t

‘Cysten treatment is specially compound: | administer Public Health
tone and clean raw, sore, sick kidneys 4.8.51.—8n



your Kidneys,

human tissue.
2. Gets rid of health-destroying, deadly poison-
ous acids with which your system has be+
* come saturated.

* protects from the ravages of disease-attack
on the delicate filter organism, and stimu-

Cystex is approved by Doctors and Chemists in
3
troubles shown above, Mr. J. C. writes
ro



night, and, thanks to Cystex J am much better
than I have been for years.” Mr. P. D
wonders Cystex has worked with me seem al-
most impossible, I/ they were t1 a box they

acids and poisons from
quickly and surely, yet con<
dangerous drugs. Cystex
ways to end your troubles

iMing the germs which attacking
Bladder and Urinary System
in two hours, yet is absolutely harmiess to







hens and reinvigorates the kidneys,





Sprinkle health on >

your food every day sill
countries and by one-time sufferers som tne ~_
“lI am
years old and have suffered with terrible
and pains, continually getting up at

“The

it’s amazing what a differ

would still be worth double.” «. - ence a daily spoonful o
* Guaranteed to Put You Right Bemax can make to your
or Money Back u general health and vitality








Easy to take—just sprinkle it on your
food. Bemax is the richest natural source
of vitatains, protein and minerals, It sup-
nutrients especially necessary to

people who live in the tropics.

Get Cystex from your chemist
today. Give it a thorough test
Cystex is guaranteed to make
you feel younger, stronger,
better in every way, in 24
hours and to be completely
well in 1 week or your money
back if you return the empty
Nes package. Act now!

ee
es
plies

. Prom Chemists and Stoves
TASTRIBUTORS















bs o KID Shy BRAIDSHAT & € PALMETTO STRERT, BRIDGETOWN,
ys Om eio8h yy; —— aT
The GUARANTEED Remedy RHEUMATISH

"















A = RS gi
,

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in the Caribbean

North and South, Hast and West, KLM routes over
the Caribbean measure more than six thousand miles. Twenty
different cities are brought within hours of each other by
fast, luxurious airliners, Make KLM your airline in the
West Indies and enjoy the same fine meals and su-

perb service that have made KLM famous

throughout the world.



For Information Call
Ss. P. MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD
Dial 4613

WORLD'S FIRST AIRLINE



fight your
RAYE HEADACHES
while they're slight!













Shipment of .

=

SMITMWS ELECTRIC

When headaches Start —
due to worry, overwork, over in-
dulgence —be smart, take Alka-
Seltzer right away. Sparkling
effervescence makes Alka-Seltzer
pleasant-tasting, helps its pain-
killing analgesic go to work
fast. Keep it handy. et

Tre

CLOCKS
... Just Received

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets

Sao
So





a





————



ee









Al —— ae



NOTICE

The New Testament Church at
Long Bay St. Philip. will celebrate
its 19th Anniversar on Sunda
August 5th, 1671

E. A. BANNISTER
Deaco:
4.8.51

POLICE NOTICE t

In

HAVE YOU RENEWED)

Your

DRIVING LICENSE.

IF NOT. PLEASE DO 80

JOIN
BEARD'S

RALPH

TOY AND FURNITURE
CLUB
WHAT you
WHAT YOU Ke
LOWER BAY S&T

4.8.51

1
I

PAY
HAVE
CALL

SS

6







“To-day's G.A. Song

“I want to be happy ”

“but I can’t be happy
‘till I have a Gas Cooker |

too!
Hubby

——
oo

WITHOUT DELAY

take note !





SSL SPSS POPES SSO OGIO SPO PPPP PPD FIPOS

3%



PAGE SEVEN







AUSTRALIA,









MONTREAL =
NEW ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED.
(M._A.N.Z.) ribbee wil ac-
3 \BIA creduled to sail r and Passengers for
Melbourne 12 Tune, Brisbane 22nd Doininiew, Antigua Montserra
Port Alms 28th June, Sydney i mad St Kitts Sailin
4th i * Trinidad end July, Friday 0th
\ arbad ar August ee neksa wiht ac
! FC Yr FAIRY eduled ‘to Pa ngeta for
silt H rt late June, Nc oth Queens- ntigua, Montserrat
i mid Juiy, Brisbane end July, Sydney St Kitt Sailing
Augu Melbourn: id August,
j arriving a nidad eptember dacrwood it ae
Cargo ted on through fuss of ept ¢ « sgerigers for St
ard fre cargo. uel Grenada and Aruba. Pas-
} In add t eneral cargo these sengers onl for St Vineent
@sseis have ample space for chilled and g due be notified
Ading for transhipment st Trinidad BW.I oe HOONER OWNERS’
te B 3 ‘ : Tind-
oe Son, Leeward and Wind ASFOCIATION ine.)
For further particulars apply— Consignee. Tele, 4947
FURNESS, WITHY #& CO. LTD.,
TRINIDAD
B.W.1,
&
DA COSTA & CO. LTD. nis ”
BARBADOS Be Wise ... “‘ ADVERTISE.
B.W 1.





HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THY UNITED KINGDOM



















Vessel From Leaves Due
eee Barbados
YOVELIST London 26th July 9th Aug.
PLAN ER” London 3rd Aug 16th Aug.
“FRESNO STAR” Liverpool 4th Aug, 18th Aug.
‘ASTRONOMER Newpot
oe & Glasgow 8th Aug 18th Aug.
5.S. “SCHOI! AR” i 8th Aug 29th Aug.
rete lee teen ellen coe cae aah wn
HOMBWARD FOR Tis UNITED KINGDOM
Closes in
Vessel For Barbados
iS STATESMAN” London 8th Aug
.S. “EXPLORER Liv ool 10th

Aug

For further information apply te

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents

Y= Ao Sinema

NEW YORK SERVICE





2s






TRYA sails 20th July Arrives Barbados ist July, 1061
\ SEAN wis 10th August Arrives Barbados 2ist August, 1951
re a oe bite
NEW oRLE ANS SERVICE
8 NERAL ARTIGAS sails 18th July Arrives Barbados 31st July, 1951.
\ MER rails ist August * Arrives Barbados 14th August
A STEAMER agails tth August Arrives Barbados 29th August, 1961



CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND

Name of Ship Sails Montreal Salles Dalffax Arrives B'doe.



5.8 ALCOA PENNANT” J oth July 24th August 4th
38 ALCOA PARTNER A ra Aug. 6th August 16th
5.5 ALCOA PILGRIM A Mth Aug. 27th Septr. 6th

SS a ne ee
ORTHBOUND





§.S “ALCOA PILGRIM du BR fos July 90th “for St Lawrence River
Ports,
ern sation eee Ree, eee +
* These versels have limited passenver accommodation





ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE

CORE REE PEGE OEE IGT TE

FYFFES LINE

T.8.8. Golfite

arriving



The

will be from ‘Southampton on



4th August, at 6.00 a.m. and will be
6.00

Saturday,

Sailing at p.m. the same afternoon for

Trinidad,

There is ample Ist Class Accommodation

available for Trinidad

Apply :

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.



4654504 ‘ 5 ;

ye POPC D PEE LPP PP FGPPOS POCO O 4
>

%

; Gnee Again...

ALIMAN’S BARGAIN
HOUSE

offers Something New.
®

Ht's New! It’s Striking!
Its Reasonable!

1. 42° SHEER DELIGHT—so utterly feminine, so
very cool in these colors—Nu Blue, Corn
Pink, Pearl Grey and Navy @ ............ . $Lss
2. 42” TISSU AND CANTON FAILE—look glam-
orous in a dress made from one of these
% lovely shades: Siam Royal, Black, Barbary
1% Taupe, Chinese Lacquer, Parma Violet, Wild
5 Huckleberry, Tangerine and Wild Orchid
: @ $1.95
% 3. 50” CROSS-DYED STRIPE SILK—here is some-
% thing every Miss and Mrs. has dreamed of:
18 Cray, Aqua and Chartreuse, Lilac Sky and
HI Honey Wheat, Pink Violence and Grenadure
8 @ $2.39
-
1% 4. 36” BORDERED SPUN in various patterns
8 @ $1.44 per yd.
Ig

OPENING TO-DAY—Varicus Styles in Shoes at
different prices.



PSCS

ACCESSORIES: Ladies Hosiery, Bras. Panties,
Nightgowns, Slips, Children’s Socks, Vests,
Panties and Kerchiefs.

os

1S
e
11%
Â¥.

y

& Unsurpassed is the word for Our New Goods

+34 ¢ ¢ 460506 64604
* PLA LPL EES SF CPS SOO CPOSIS >

: BARGAI N HOUSE

x

8 30. Swan Street ALTMAN, Proprietor x
% PHONE 270. x
>

{OOOO
SPSL CS? SLPS SESOSS a x
PAGE EIGHT



Cross Roads Picked



Other Races All
Very Much Open

By
TC-LAY we shal] go to

whatever horse we back will be a potential winner.

BOOKIE

the races with the feeling
Never



before has there been such an array of favourites, and due

to recent rains matters only

If it

upset:

seem to be more complicated.

rains to-day then we will not have to worry about
as in. any case picking the winners will depend so

much on the tuck of the individual!











My advice is therefore to pick
weaanaon a one’s 1ancy Gice
yates, ——wacethei Delur one
bikes because tne
Worse with orange
i, ch g00a as

More you
i to blame
ana certain!

‘The m i races on
the card sre the Barbados Derby
and tne Stewerds’ Stakes which

come in that order ut numbers 3
and 4. In the Derby the position
has been somewhat cleared cur-
ing the past week due to a gooi
gallop done by Cross Roads, This
gelding was recently ill when he
racad. at the Trinidad June meet-
ing and indeed he is not looking
altogether in the pink. However
it is obvious that he has recovered
sufficiently to be made favourite
for the race for two other
reasons.
Chief Rival

The first is that his chief rival
is Best Wishes, who was also ill
in Trinidad, and has not made as
rapid a recovery The second,
because he is so much better than
the other three starters that he
need not be one hundred per cent.
fit to beat them. Cross Roads also
demonstrated last March that nine
furlongs is a distance over which
he-can win very comfortably
with light weight it was true
But I see no reason why thé
difference between the 111 Ibs
which he carried in March, and
the’ 120 lbs. which he will carry
to-day, should make it any more
difficult for him to stay the dis-
tance again, He is also _ five
months older, should be stronger,

and if the track is dry shou.J
easily repeat his time figure of
1.663/5, the fastest that any

three-year-old” has ever returned
for this distance in. Barbados.

In Best Wishes we have a filly
whom we know to be exceptional
when she is fit. “Few will forget
the ease with which she disposed
of the same Cross Roads in ‘the
Barbados Guineas last March and
if she can again reproduce this
form then [ have no doubt she
will be the winner. But she has
not Shown the promise which
Cross Roads has at exercise and
although she has been recovering
from her misfortune in Trinidad
it is an open question whether
She will be fit enough. I must
warn, of course, that she is not a

filly who impresses very much
at exercise and last March she
was in a similar position. Those

who think that class will always
tell should therefore stick to her.

Only Three

The rest of tre brigade number
only three. These are Usher,
Vanguard and Hi-Lo, Of these I
dike Usher in spite of the fact that
he gives no particular signs of
stamina. Vanguard, who one
might have thought on pedigree
would be a natural stayer disap-
pointed much over ‘all distances
last March. In as much as he has
done nothing to suggest that he
will not do so again I must con-
cede him a very slender chance.
With regard to Hi-Lo it’s just a
case of not having any opinion

Water Belle and Soprano I un-
derstand are not going.

The Stewards’ Stakes is the
second of the three annual A

class weight-for-age races over 9
furlongs which take plece in this
island. On the list are Atomic UJ,
Slainte, Gun Site, Burns, Rebaté,
Flieuxce, Drake's Drum and
Elizabethan, *rake’s Drum might
be eliminated at once because he
will probably not start and even
even if he does the distance ie
far too unsuited to his talents.
Even without Drake’s Drum it
is a larger entry than usual but



there again it is very indefinite
if Burns will start and that will
reduce the field to 6. If the C
class mare Flieuxce is also with-
drawn ond kept for her own

division this will bring it down to
5. Of these five then we might
be sure.

I like the two meres Rebate and
Elizabethan best. On past per-
formance the latter has the edge
and if she can reproduce her form
of a year ago I see no reason why








Gi GALS WERE

VERY COOPERATIVE
WHEN THE BOYS
ASKED TO PLAY

THROUGH »>++



US PLAY THROUGH







zh nould not win it easily.
née 1s now six years old
BiG yuestion of age is a factor
to be considered. Kebate o. Use
other hand should be in ter prime
at 4 years old but for tne faci
th t she recently hed a difficult
time at the Trinidad races I would
make her my favourite,
Second S.ring
A cond siring I pick Slainte
and Gun Site while Atomic I
car the usual question mark
eg inst his starting. If one can
wait until Atomic II goes to the



sate end shortly before the white
flag, is raised determjne whether
he is going to jump off or not, this
is about the only method IT can
advocate for buying him on the
Pari Mutuel. But then you will
have to rush to the Pari in a great
hurry and even then you
not get there in time

Gun Site

might

has a long record of
victories over this distance but
not one, I believe, in a_steke
race. This is mainly because of
his regular habit of turning up
for a meeting short of work. On
this oceasion however he has had
Burns as a companion at exercise






and this might have had the
effect of making him fitter than
usual as the meeting opens. Yet
it is very problematical

Old Slainte must also figure
prominently in the betting be-
cause of his doggedness. His
weight is also lower than he is
generally aceustomed to at. this
time and this may make a de-
cided difference. The going must
however be harj as he likes it
best like this,

Elsewhere jin this issue will be
found complete, tips for each

race. There is a new tipster this
time and my advice is to try his

first, not mine, and the best of
luck to everybody.
a



SUMMERHAYES TENNIS
TOURNAMENT

YESTERDAY’S RESULTS
Men’s Singles

V. H, Chenery beat M. A. Harri-
son 6—3, 6—0.

The draw for ‘the semi-finals
which will be played next week
are as follows:—

D. W. Wiles vs. J. S. B. Dear.

Dr. A. S Cato vs. V. H, Chenery



CLUB PREMIERE’S
TENNIS RESULTS

FRIDAY’S PLAY
Men’s Singles

N. Symmonds beat C M
Thompson 3—6; 6—4; 6—4.
C, B. Forde beat F. Edwards
6—3; 6—2.
Ladies’ Doubles Finals
Miss A. Griffith and Miss E.

Parris beat Miss G. Grimes and
Miss C, Alleyne 6—2; 6—4.



DAVIS CUP MATCHES
POSTPONED

MONTREAL, Aug. 3

The opening singles matches in
the Davis Cup competition be-
tween Cuba and Canada _ have
been postponed until tomorrow
because of rain,

Lorne Main of Canada
Jose Aguero in the first
singles matches, with Brendan
Macken of Canada playing Dr.
Juan Weis in the second singles.
The doubles match is now listed
for Sunday, with the concluding
singles on Monday.—vU.P.

meets
of the



Yesterday’s
Weather Report

FROM CODRINGTON
Rainfall: Nil
Highest Temperature:
86.5°F.
Lowest Temperature:
74.0°F,
Wind Velocity: 7 miles per
hour.
Barometer; (9 a.m.) 29.984
(3 p.m.) 29.922



en

ivery ‘Time

46 LADIES=WOULD
DSO

i

| They'll Do It E en a By Jimmy, H

KIND AS 7 LET

/



oO

i
LS Mey. 5°

~ hay af
Av ;

YOU BE Y YES.SURE-
CERTAINLY»

" ———-— Y .
ETHING TELLS vite Y THE ONLY SAFE
BE A LONG, LONG/ PLACE 1S INSIDE
~_NMEs | ~ (THE ROCKER ROOM

MONSOON GETS A NEW SET OF SHOES in preparation for the

To Win Derby

BARBADOS



ADVOCATE



REW SHOES

Race



12

Rovers Beat |
Barbados 13—8 8

The Rovers Club Netball team Q
of Grenada completed their series &

of games in the island with a
match against an Island team at
Queen’s College yesterday eve-!

ning. They defeated the Barbados
side by 13 goals to eight.

Rovers won all their
here. Their positional play was
good and their passing accurate.
At the end of the game each|
member of the visiting team was/
presented with a souvenir, a gift! $

oe
trom the loca! Netball Association. | %

POO SSO FOFOSOOOP

matches

Mrs. G. H. Adams, after the!
game, told the girls that they|
caeserved a rousing welcome when %
they returned to Grenada, in spite X
of Gairy. &

She hoped that such matches] ¢
would be held every year so as to De
give Netball a colonial atmos- x
phere. *

Mrs. W. A. Redhead, Manager- x
ess of the team, who replied, said |
that the team had enjoyed very %
much their stay in Barbados. The} &
games were ail keenly contested, SS
She hoped to welcome a Barbados %

team in Grenada soon.

The Game

For the visitors, skipper Joyce
Blache netted 11 and ene LaHee
two. All the goals for Barbados
were scored by Sylvia Maxwell.
Only one accident occurred. A
Barbadian player was injured
Her place was taken by a reserve.

The game was fast throughout.
When it was only five minutes
old, Joyce Blache opened the sco-ve
for her team with a_ beautiful
shot. Shortly afterwards Sylvia
Maxwell equalised but within th«
iext ‘five minutes Blache scored
again. It was Maxwell who shot
the next goal to make the score
Rovers 2, Barbados 2.

Ten minutes later, Maxwell put
Barbados in the lead and soon
afterwards she sent in the fourth
tor the island. This two jgoal lead
sent the Grenada girls into

$3666} 466666 ot OS









Blache shot two more to bring x
honours even. mY
At half time, the ‘score was]
six—five in favour of Grenada. In x
the second half the Grenada side st
showed definitely that they were] %
superior. They went on to score] &
seven goals in this half while the |
local side were only able to put %
in three. ix
The visitors will return to)
Grenada on Monday. 1%
: |
ne teams were as follows ls
The t > as foll BS
Grenada: Joyce Blache, (Cap!t.) 'S
Ilene LaHee, Doreen Gittens, An- 9»
gela Andrews, Myra Callendar %
Dorothea Sylvester and Pearl ¥&
Mendes es
Barbados: J. Best, I. Quintyno, &
K. Connor, M. Barrow, P. Ki ws
S. Maxwell and G, Ramsay.. %
X%
\
’ s
WHAT’SON TODAY |
Meeting of the Housing ‘
Board 9.00 a.m, *
Police Courts 10.00 a.m. x
First Day's Racing in ss
B.T.C. Meeting at %
Garrison Savan- ve
nah : 1.00 p.m
CINEMAS
Empire: “Pagan Love Song
5.0 pom. and 815 pm
Plaza: “The Sinner of Magdala
445 pm. and & 30 pm
Globe: “Call Me Mister” — 5.0
Pm. and &§U pm
Olympte; “Deadwood Dick’
445 pom and 8.15 pm
Roxy: “The Sword of Mant
pm
Cristo” — 445 pm and 8.15
p.m,



a

atlo |

THERE'S ONLY 1W0.0F ¥
THEMâ„¢AND THEY MUST
BE VERY GOOD GOLFERS.
ester,
LD |
Sere ye

Sinaia











1-arenannangtdpncetnalte » tii.

}
‘ coed
_ +

‘




Pad
yer

o
s

*

opty te

PLES ELE LL EPPA DLA LP

iction. |

4p o%

ee

=

Oty -

TO-NIGH



APSE

AMM Mo oo oo,

UPPER

PROUDLY

On

ORANGE,

Othe

BOTTLED

nd unde

Look

On

166A

4, +f
pote 54,

ANNOUNCES
“REVERAGES”
THE

BY

44

“

ROEBUCK

Tuesday,

c

Y

MELEE EEE

THAT

WILL BE ON

Meeting

656 tt ot ol otet,



slarting

44,64

CO MEA PPI FSD

The “Deluxe Bottling Co.”

STREET

THEIR

SALE TO

it
7th August, 1951
&
Flavours of
rINGERS and SODAS
FLAVOURS to follow
e
REFRIGERATED SYSTEM
mos Hygienic Conditions
8

Out
Your

<

54 54S54, 6 %e%,

For The
Bottle !

PMA

645654044

“G.S.M.”

PPE? OPP PRP PRP PE

PPO PEPE AEP EPP PPS PPP

6566 tb tO %

19?



cy

ry
AT THE
e
By kind permission « he Commissioner of Police
MUSIC by
THE POLICE DANCE ORCHESTRA
e@ +
4
: .
Fancy Dress Optional Dress Informal ‘
y
Admission $1.00 including Light Refreshment .
: %
Dancing 9.00 p.m. to 2.00 acm. ‘
.
POL LLPLOL PPL PELL LLLP LAL ELA LAA AMANO pr gates

STAMP

to-day.

“4
*

666665
LPP LLLP PPPS PLL LPL LLL LLL

GIGOSA,

4,4
PPPOE,

¢
-

4 4 4,44,6,6,4,4
66 LILLE LLLP PPLE LLLP LLL ALA



wr oe



Toda;



Flying Fish Win

Flying Fish notched their second
wit fcr the season when they
jefeated Whipporays five goals to








n thei water polo mateh at

i A atic Club yesterday after-
noor It was a slow ga witl
the forwards on both sid r
t take antage of seve
portunities given them tt
defence.

At half time Flying Fish \
three up. These goals were scored
by

Peter Potter, Harold Weather-
. si Af



h Arthur Ha:





ad



the int al Fiying Fish got iwe
more goals—a well placed sli;
shot by rk Conliffe and a
aceurate long shot by Tim Year
wood.

The referee was Mr. J. Knigit

rie teams were:—

Flying Fish: P. Foster (Capt.).
H. Weatherhead. T. Yearwood, B
Malone, M. Conliffe, P. Potter

A. Fiazell
Whipvorayvs: cS
O'Neal, L. Spence, R.
Re yan, S. Gipson,

(Cz )





ENGLISH CRICKET RESULTS |

Seuth Africa vs Somerset at Taunton |
Ss 1 Africa 235. and 189; Somerset |
ind 86 South Affica won b of



in English County Cricket games
s follows
Essex vs
Evs’x 314, ¢
clared; x 134
Mateh drawn
Glamorgan vs
Middiesex 277
wickets. No play
Match drawr
Lancashire



Sussex at Southend
235 for 3 wickets,
and 124 for 5 wi



de-
kets

4
id







Middlesex at Swansea
Glamorgan 382 for 4
yesterday due to rain

vs Gloucestershire at
Blackpool
» 279, and 211 for 1 wicket
jloucestershire 148, and 24 for
Match drawn

ash





no wicket





ou THIRSTY

Your

BOY

OR NOT }
Thirst

will be quenched,
Your passion cooled at

HAROLD SCANTLEBURY'S

DANCE

| MR
At QUEEN'S
TO-NIGHT, SAT. 4TH AUGUST,




Ist Races Night

me. 2 Green's Ork, of course

ADMISSION

& Bar
Worry ?

Refreshments

Se! Why











YORK BARBELL OLUB
Request the pleasure of
Company

to their

The President and Members of the
your

ANNUAL DANCE

at the
MODERN HIGH
Roebuck Street

4th AUGUST,

2/6

)
SCHOOL,
Music by Mr. Keith Campbell's
Orchestra
Strictly by Invitation

on Saturday 1951









Contains

D.D.T.,



Caused by High
lood iicats

If you have pains around the heart
palpitation, dizziness, headache
top and back of head and ;
shortness of breath, feel nervy, or suf-
fer from pocr sleep, loss of memory
and energy, indigestion, worry and
fear, your trouble is probably caused
by High Blood Pressure, This is a
mysterious disease that causes more
deaths tha ancer, because the
symptoms are so common and usually
mistaken for some simple ailment. If










you suffer from any of these symp-
toms, your life may be endangered by
Heart Trouble or a paralytic stroke,
and you should start treatment at
once. The very first dose of Noxco
(formerly known as Hynox), a new
medical discovery, reduces High Blood
Pressure and makes you feel years
younger in a few days. Get Noxco
from your chemist today. It is guar-
anteed to make you feel well and
strong or money back on return of
empty package,



Pe
lkesp fresh all day...!



/use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP

You'll feel so fresh and full of vigour after

you've washed with Lifebuoy Toilet Soap
frees you of weari-
you tresh the whole day
2 tablet of Lifebuoy Toilet

Its deep-cle
ness, and
through. Kee;
Soap handy and use it res



keep



day freshne

FOR

PERSON

)

nsing lather

I



ularly —for

FRESHNESS

all

{LWAYS





a.
4

Lf it
/



AUGUST 4,

1951

SATURDAY,





-——



TP? i VEL ; tty.
RIGHT -

is





With The New

| ALUMINUM
SUIT CASES

Light — Roomy — Excellent for Air Travel
‘ From 24” to 30”,

$16.27 $18.31

$20.34

<

| CAVE SHEPHERD & CO,, LTD.

10, 11, 12, 13, Broad Street



Make sure you ask for Sloan’s Liniment







You cannot get anything better

for your muscular pains than

| Sloan's Liniment. Simply apply it

lightly — don’t rub — and relief Is
quick and certain.

LOOK FOR THE PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN ON THE PACKET.

From all chemists and stores.

RICHER
SMOOTHER
CREAMIER










SIMONDS
MILK STOUT @&)

C. L. Gibbs & Co. Ltd.,

P. O. Box 56 °
BRIDGETOWN - Dial 2402 —











|
|
|
|



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PAGE 1

I'\(.l TWO HARHADOS ADVOCATE SATIKDAV U(.l!-1 I IMI Ccudb galling L A V Tho Venezuelan Covernmcn' < opernting a spcnal tli|hl from X<' I 10 Barbados today. It I ii p.m 1 I 8th. Beginning KnAniat^l 10th. I.AV will operate a n*iular fliuhl from .'n*la to Barbados Iwice a week Thr-v flight-' will I Friil.iv .in,! Sundaj To aircraft will stay overnight at SeW4U ami rm.ni !>• VM • following day. Agent, for I. A V. in | nre Airliner .\ Ud. Their nrfiro will be il nings' Corner BtOVV Mi L Wrnon Knight will bo in charge. Three bitters M H. ud M Law and their four children arrived (com Trinidad yetUl I v H W I A to !j>cnd ,i month'v holiday here staving at Aihlunon-Sea. Maxwell'*. Mr. Law is Manager of U.B O Ts. Port-ofSpaln office/. ID Wilfred Malngol accon.e anled Ihcm over for the holiday Irs. M... U I Sallv is already In Barbados. She arrived i.ulici ll.is week and I* slaying with Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Nu-holls of Rorklev New Road Mrs. Malngot and Mr%  Photography A DtHAH f; DAWNS, of Jamalaow HI Loadn holiday. Hobby is his photography, and. camera in hand, he hopes 10 take pictures of all UM buildings in London baton n> turning to his unit in Wiltshire Dawns is due to be dcmubUu Mrly next year, but has m it civilian occupation bo will follow. Trinidad Turfite. THE QMPOLS .. In England DON'T Witt 111! Wiv Wr WON IHtr oww vou'tt mi cwwowt Tttfr NMAt Of TWC HOUCtM Four Day* It V CORBIN who works 1th Reform Batata in San Fernando arrived from Trinidad \ • u rday on %  tour day visit He il staying with his relatives at S.nomine Si IV.i Will Be Held At Y.M.P.C. npif IF" Ol.vnijii.i Club .ir h.ivniK .< %  tontflM HI honoiu of the vfatiinj Grenada Netbali learn Tin originally u> haVfl lie* n held ut tbr Sen Scouts' hut. Nrcdham's Point. As they expod ;i uirille crowd '.h.' nUnipia Club has now arranged, to have the dance at the V M i' C I lufa A Son A SON is born to Mr Jeffrey BtoUmOyor, international .eketer. and Mr. Slnllmeycr SIrDIMf l' %  %  People'* i and his %  MICK The* piatl Id %  : %  In liVOT" DDSl Ini %  fortnight icfore vi'itiuii A ell-known Jamaican dialect writer and broad< .HUT. returned lo I*ndon last wwek from holida* In Switzerland. The Rev. Caleb Couains of Ja-nalea is among overseai representatives attending *hc Methodist Conference in Sheffield. England r'rfiidrnt of Appeal S W. P FOSTER BUTTON. Chief Justice. Federation of Malaya, and at one timt Solicitor-General Jamaica, ha* been appointed President of thr Wri African Court of .Appeal The King has conferred the honour of Knighthood, but Mr Fostr Sutton has not vet received thi .lade Ills daughtei ,-orks at Ihe Research Departi f the CO.I.. London. Back to Aruba EAVING by day night were George Chase Mrs Chase who Is an employee of Lago Hospital was here for Iwo weeks on her second visit Mr Chase former Empire fullback and *on of Mrs. Irene Chase of Upper May Street had returned from Aruba seven months ago. Teachers Become Students M PlittCeM Margaret K|>S Out Of Tashion Limelight LONDON. Aug. S The Dally Mirror suggests on Friday that Princess Margait-t may have received Royal It soft pedal tbe leader %  business, and keep OUl "f |M limelight for a while."' The Mirror says in a newspB|ar slory, that the Prince.1 peared three days In successioqt"nt the fashionable Goodwood Ra*>v "In the same yellow dress. saa>l hss not done any of the old spectacular things she used lo do at Goodwood. She has not danced down to the paddock after almost every race, she has not been with her escorts my of the little bars for a glass R.B.4. Radio Projjraimr Tourist Industry -TI aim \i 01 -i • I*"' lu.irt-mn.' II 30 ... P.-> : %  !. %  Yrlu*iir ISM noon Th* w 11 M m m .is-* ** u-tm is pV ri.i.i %  # i* n s saj i"t PUvm. SSOpm Com.Weak. 1 11 m LHlen-r*' V %  !*ad>. S.B> p m :)*tcm*. • p.m. Prasjnawaa :••—!• %  %  H i M The N*. 1 It 7 11 p tn hrhn.rt in New* Sarjl. Htrl'l.aranit n' lh* S >n IMpHatfio Nrw. pm O^po^r of th* W~K*a>* Thealr* IS 00 p .-> lflS p m Inli rluoe 10 II p tn JxmFanrv M S P % % %  railnJuUy of thampagne. and has taken such a back seat in ihe Royal box thai a lot of race-goers have not even realised that she was proient." PORT-OP-SPAIN J i ways marked another step to• further (level I industry of ll i and other Caribbean Islands. (irenada%  nght winch i on from toda: \s ith iheir two m %  i >i service. via Trinidad and Barbados, il L . | (<:< %  %  Hu'.e Driae / Weil, do tnu. (W> Pit um gut u> p.T, (t Spilt peat. 13| Sort thai you can iroK. a)> uudrDrn criSDd. (> la the later ediiwiu, ISI Shows lack ot SDOwlMca. (9 UUKII aU 1 uV"'tan",|r ,B0 '"" '" d Alifci.UlP lUUTIMIMa, ll) • !? !. 1 trur n * 1 a ll '• Mohamroeaso ofllcial without a *OUUI 11KB t dalBUiH. til fut.l** .um4... I. l*lpi'f-pot: H. Imi-uior v IM: 5355 W2>courteously when an old anMBBfl gives it her scat in a bus. i. Ti-.ich it to .online it* tiltenUoo to Us own plate at table. 3. Kepilm.ind it if it biles someone who has tried lo stroke it. A. If it worries sheep, remember that it may be feeling ill-used. Take it to ,m animal psychiatrist. 5. If it gnaws hats and gloves, try lo get to tbf OaUSSj of ||sj 1< %  .111 -: •;. %  B. If it biles strangers, do not .,sk them again. It is a sign that your dog objects to them. //I Punning A NYTHING which diverts tho minds of the scientists, even temporarily, from the primal*) usk i f daatruetkm, la w rtn while. 1 like to BM Ihcm playin*. the tool hke happ) children, and i have read with delight of an expenn.ent Diada In Texas They have i mil .. room m which "the polsa innl.nmil m any object.*' is assessThey nut in this room .i pla ce floth Then, later, they "squirt & sound cocktail," which conU .ill .oidible sounds \> EJ£N MARY COntl i spending her sumnier holiday Sandringham. She (eels tha urney to Scotland Is toa exacting. According lo present arrangements she will go lo Sandnngha > this month, stay there about %  month. A suite of rooms the south-west wing of ^l\r house is always ready for her use. daagerous -'ige. Sour get out of it.—Franklin p. Jones. 4JLM, instruments register all this, and even reveal Ihe contribution of UM piece of cloth to the uproar This may seem ridiculous, but whi 0oaj ggsj prefer it lo experiments in germ-warfare? Letting hit futhvr down A CHICAGO man WBQ fed hi son on raw meat, "to ni.ik him an intellectual superman, was irritated when the boy failed lo anst\ei .jui.'kls enough gusaUon: "How much is 435,6*21.ttmm 1,234.S87.'" What i I umiliiitioii for him when peopli ulnd "How is that txq "t youn shaping"" fffpMMs vxport* I WltOTE the othar day of the u iv .iall-be.il ings being mult tin axport, and I said, in my Churlish SrBJTi ""il if the>* vv erc I'M Ihfv were too small to bifound I now e,u mj words U appears that several million of ti.i-Muttia i'.. i tvera mislaid, ,.rul then found lurking dtylj a corner. Heading from left light, their names were Rupert and Simon—45 %  ..f >, %  : %  ••• %  >. %  %  i 4 %  • 4 \ m >ii>-' A ::. ih Ml I i %  %  %  KldflV* "H'-. •""** • l 'l X '•<•* I-*' %  nrd *iul JuDinurf "Ms. f* iht boil fl s ..-:.. *nd hoi.', .p hi. No." . % hu Djdd, % %  Iraoldn'i -. aj ihouih SILK SHANTUNG 36 $1.40 BORDERED TAFFETA 36" $1.77 SILK PLAIDS 36' $1.39 BLACK and WHITE TWINKLE CREPE 36" o All New and the Latest Fashions .$1.02 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 CLUB MORGAN The moif Beautiful SiQht Club from Miami to Rio with a world-vitle reputation for good food Music, Dancing En tertain ment throughout the night Dial 4000 lor rtstnatlons JUST RECEIVED mill Sfllinff I usl Canadian Hardwood Chairs and Rockers SECIHI: toi IIS imw. • THE KAIIH VIMIS CO-OPERATIVE ('OTTO'S FACTORY ETIE Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039 PLAZA THE ISLANDS MOST POPULAR SHOW HOUSE I GLOBE T-di\y . & S.I5 p.m. nnrf CunlintiiiiK TO-NITF ACTION AT MIDVir.HT Ilepublic Whole Serial • iinn i 0,t \ / #* i Starring: Tom NEAL and Judj Cl^AHK H O X 1 TIM EA I HI, TO-HAY TO fUMBlAY, 4.45 AND HIS P.M. I l lBB gJajBJBMalMIII|l K IWII—I %  lYiOST DESIRED WOMAN IN FRANCE... Moat daring of the King'* Swordsmen... Exlra Short : ALONG THK RAINBOW TRMI. a ;"*jf*. A GtORGE MONTGOMERYP.HH.A CQMH1 ^^mr ssBBst -mi* n>AfclU. ALKKSOM . • -t %  .C C-.SAtMTT Come and *e thr lint t'irlure Mimed in New Super Cine Calor



PAGE 1

SATl'BDAY. AUGUST 4, 11S1 BARBADOS U>VO< I 11 P\OI l VI N CLASSIFIED ADS. ri !" ^ I* urn for i.Jt < urlaj M •nte, and In w>-il>i and also sat Bunrlayi BM any nun.bee of woe* up lo M. and I cent, per word on area*-day* • cents per word on Sunday* fat each adduiunal ward Car* charge ta BM lor ol „ up lo M and • reeita par we*d for each additional word. Tern-' caih. Won* SeOa brtweeel S and 4 p m S11J ( Death SHMt< only altar 4 p m THANKS B\BROK-We the Wright's family I ih.a opportunity to thank tnov i Ml ended lha funeral %r-\ imltu and •h<>*ed sympathy in anv way through the death of our beloved tls*er Mil Ymeita Barrow who died on *ulM %  •"' John Barrow .husband' John Martin (brother-> Relta Dona. Ursula meters' Evan. bald. Cecil Author.} • nrphrwi DIM Delorise Coral d Workmanship ROYAL STori M It High Slice, Phor>e UH • %  M—lti THE NBR DIMIII HUarTtAL Broke., Denial Plain alUlttulls raC l.rd Special! drli.eied witht-. thrw lira Square Dual Denial Let). Maa-nne Lana. 7. • M—B" HOLIDAY RXaORTS-arenada lala a* %  pleea. SANTA MARIA-iovelleat hotel In Car.bbean Bale, from ST 00 par head par day GRAND HOTEl—In baat residential dtatrtet tinder ':•><•< ntnent Hosier ni; K-.trs from Ml* par bead pai day. SEASIDE INN On Grand Anee Bathing Reach. Rauri from $4 00 par head oe). Evtq.nrtaa lo D M Slunai Orrn. "PEBSONAiT FOR SALE AUTOMOTIVE wn *oi* MM M Mk lm RIAL BSTATB CAB; Bantam Singer Saio. worltlna] ordrl Owner wit I HeUmai CAR IMI Hillman Sutmn vt^-on Mileage lOOt Condition aa new Ownai buying larga kchiele Appl> Ralph Lower Bat Street phona aau a %  11—Pa KAISER lose, sia eeatee Saloon. S.BH.miles only Abwl itrly aa nrw Ta.ed Dial "1-74 31 T.ll-fn. CAR M O Sport. 1M0. T D Modal. Enceiicnt r.mnmi roridltlon-and how It lan run: Two-seater, independent front herl niapensioii give* perfect nda al Owner laavins laland Noam t ll-tln. %  w mo SITT s,t,,.i Ch Ch 7 n fr rhw. alar. Uoltt, Houaaa apra of i-r. %  >i*pl to B A Bf** m LAND AT ST LAWRSMCE NUab r building aitei For partir jtt app. R. K. Hunle. tr.rv'taaaa nil or Ml i IT T II -1 f i Hoirac m i *ana. anowar bath in th# mtrhan tic Kaodlay. DAinktrk Houar Hlndibui REAL ESTATE ON EASY TERMS ONE SB x 10 Chat'. Branutui'i Baarh VTKO << • paatt "" lii.Klian Trade ^r\ it ll J.Mil.IK M Drops B) 1/3 MARIO. Au|. / Canaui.r BrtUm devaluro B Plmri Canmliau Tiidf Con.-i I'lltatorwr la Jattidu-* sa..i day. il#> ui.l about 4ii ptf .-Oil -.1 JR. ( :iiic"B import* CfJRN frum Caa* .ida and now only rurnti.il MBM : iodilie>. limit. BBJI, prwducls andj paper are imported from Canada,! The TradeCommissioner said i the actuation prooablv *il1 con>J unue. "Wf have hopes Uiat u wiill • vcnluallv become brighter bu< it's anybodv's guess just when th:.i | i UN — c r [ Eid Rheumatism While You Sleep > %  aal It f*a • %  .h.n .!..-. <;0\KU\ME\T NOTICE : %  %  K \IKN~ I il lliitlrdl RfM tn I 1 iBSgaSftatI .ni.i K-ii-'n-H Nursrr of Tralnind M SHIPPING NOTICES %  %  in Jamaica %  %  Tli* Wh.,1 mil tur < % %  • I.Haed if the applicalK.ii Thf scholarships for these n*urt if pproved. proiM in I %  Poll %  • %  [ %  ) Tiee sir paskage lo ; n.t from Jafl I Silence %  DowaMdj al ihr rfM married, or i? 40 p*i night if single (C) Tl.i %  -' 4*1 month (di Contingfn. Th* srholarhii>. win imi bg granH 11 EH BERT ALflggftA :ih A<. 3 1 51-In "\l?I.UCENT ... i hold t IT anyone i J.i.iin my ordar tlgnao HOLDDt. WAvri.n Minima.m rhaapa araak tl cmli pad M rrnia S>i*alava M i. <.-(• — m M %  "-il< g *ala a aaord iPtak 4 raaua a HELP MAID Enghah 1 %  lard middlmgad Gni nlain rooking raojulrra Compail Maid, able lo do inoae with Aral son 91—In idrrrd Phon I'IMI IIIMI I 1 IIOUsrKRTvrR with axpananca. for Cuaat Hmiaa. Rafaranra. aaaantlal Applr Bnx XX r o Adtocala Advtg Dani sail >n MISC'ELLA.M^OUS i faat aiK-lnch bora Caal Iron or Star I "mr Apply D M Sirnpaon A Co. I • M-*" MOVUE RIM PHIUECTOR' Or* und. Phona B1TJ . %  .!* %  PI^Y PFti. *iui kaga and "PUypan P O pr*ra. i ina 40 in. Poldlng. aaior* prafarrad. Writ* 1 Ron PI. mtata AnUh and JOT SI t I n WANTED TO BUT OLD SBTWINO MACHINE oul ol use. Good plica* paid Apply to Mrm. Vaughn. Cii'*r %  Fin-hiM ami Pudarn Straat ai si ot. WANTED TO RENT DUNOALOW rhiMtrei inialOW. %  n the %  FfM Addn M M P O BOK 114. M TAI %  an FOB BENT 1 Mialmum fharpe ireek Tl (* %  (• ead M cfiin .Vu"lui 14 wordf — mar 14 %  %  ..'JS raafa a word irr.k 4 centa a % %  -.; on .tnndni.i. HOUSES BAY VIFW Si U.wrarna Gap 1 Hadrooma Pulll.rrnhaj Runiiu.t •mar; alaclric light Immediate poaaaauon Apply r.e.t door Mn. R Lynch 4 I l—Ir qulel Apply Mrs L Cumberfaatch a a si -an liUNGALOW-Newly bulll Bungalow on long leeee on . Jamas' Cbaet. i7 i ,il from lowni Fully furnished, all iiiourrn convenience" from SrpiHT.bi i.t Dial >41? Jl 7 II -3n CHANDO*. M A. furni 3 0 SI—Sn HIPIJEY-ON-SEA. Maxwall Coaal. hilli 'urniahed. 1 badreoma. refrlgeialor an Phone, for September and from Novembet i>n Dial •• 4 a SI -*i SUNSET VIEW", ntualed at Rockier rvimiahed with 3 bedrooma dining iM %  rawing room* and all oshrr convrnleme. THE CAMP -On lha Sea. St Lawrence Fu,.y rurn-hed Dsa! 4^ ,„_,,„ .NOIK V. This in to notify the public that 1 have appointed Mrs. Winifred King of Cane Vale. Christ Church, with a power of Attorney, to act for me In the matter of the estate of the late Joseph N. Prescod of Hopewell. Christ Church. Signed, IRVIN PRESCOD. Qualified Executor, 332 Washington St.. Cambridge 39. Mass.. U.S.A. >-v'.W/////////AV,V.1'>',' TO-DAYS NEWS FLASH Hi-landing booka Inlands lARIRRBAN CIRC1TT Full of informauon about lha Caribbean It land. 14'. l-l^liIN TBE K'N Similar to the aBove Book Mil of rir JOHNSON ITATIONERr L'BfcreeJlBMe. JOBNBON H HASOWAII OFPICE CHAIRS Juat ... •hlpment el OBVe Pualure Chairs >nn three polni adjustmit See them tod a I GeeMee Orant Ltd.. or Dial ***J I %  • l.I.Sl-tfn. MECHANICAL T^I'PWRITEB SMih -*remier l0apS> Hi Coroia PorlabU Apply Oarn Rder. Roebuck Si Dial 33*0 been Inalimtcri U^ Ihr Gwv — __.ivr Committee to an; h> l\.b Auetion on Tueadav lain **gwM aj ihe W.ter^eal ancl.ure .. PlerlT-ao one Mole* Laui Oardens. Phone 4lla ai T ii i UOMIhlCt 'Hl'.iillM. AOENCt %  par lb Tomatoes 14c 4t per lb Fresh Leuuce and large ETW.-HAl.OT—A freah aM C*me -a.l JOftN D TAYLOR SONS 1.T1) a si— HAIK BRUSHES E-, t lt.r, Hal> Brualu ooU quaiily UenU OKLadle* lie ae. I> THANI'S. Dtal 9400 4 I atI tir: im\ (-Hw.n lb* l*na SSTT betweer i,. f • and %  tu 10 p m 9 g M ft. IHANrs DM] .144, WHITE WOOD for building boat, raaay cured. Apply to Joacph Bellman. Churrh Vlllaga. St Joaep^ 4 a V W LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of Miriam BrliUa < %  a. Si Peter the hoMter of 1'qm Ho I0PT ..f IMI granted in rSpact of • board a d .hinglr ahop H %  hadroof attached al Connsll Town, ft Uicy to remove said Ltccnae lo a boara %  nd shingle shnp %  >itri ahedroof attached il Grape Hill St Lucy and to uae f" %  t aiich Ion deacrl>ed pr<*nlsea. D.trd this IM de^ Of August I0SI NEVVLt-E CADOOAN. lor Miriam B-.fc Applicant To -*YDHEY H. RURSr F-q Police Moajatviair. Dial -r N B — ThaS Bpplkrotkon will hr rMiati arrd at a Licwnsing Co M m he t>nd a Wrdn*.day ISth Auguit l*l. o'ctock a.m at POlaM COUTH. Dmn.i ,^J>^>>*>99-VrOVX*'>VrV>V>^ NOTICE TTua Is 10) noiU' %  opj Hi'HeiFIJ STAMPH Shewta. single SUmpa. Collactlona. Aecunsuli Oood prkcara i. t ARIRRSAN MAMr %  II I I 3rd Floor. No 10. Swan SI SF. HABLA ESPANOL ORIENTAL CURIOS, SOUVENIRS. ANTIQUES, IVORY. JEWELS. SILKS Etc. THAXI'S HATOI'S ilace on M.mda, Bans H<>l h Aiigual In thr Boy*.,,,, •n Holders Hill '.I* 0I "tid-dat aaae pnone MIS. -d v aajBaBBl All praceaaa In aid el lh> \ i..u|# Fond rWl'/,V,V/ ( W///,W,WA To-day*s fi. A. Song \ "I want to be happy "but I can't be happy . till I have a Gas Cooker too! . lfubbv lake note DRIVING LICENSE IF \OT. PLEASE HO SO • I 11 HOI I OEM.. 11 offers Something New. • Ufa .*•#•/ ii\ SI, n.i,i,i! Il's Ht'iiMimuhlv i U sini.it DRLIGHT—aa aUarb faiiiMai so i.rv ,.i.l in Ihi'sr nilurs—Nil llltu'. Corn k. Furl On *M Navv 'a $I.B9 lls-1! Wll CANTON I \I1.K—l"k slam..mils in u drcaa muHifrom one of lhe*c lou'li shinies: Siiini ltn>iil. Illnck, Burharv 'l.nilu.. Cliini'sc Luciiller. I'urmu Violi'l, Wild lliirl.li bai i J. riiu:.:iitr and AVilil Orchid i *I.M i ROBB-DYBD STKIIM: BILK— ana i~ aaaaIhkM .-very .Miss mid Hit. Ii.idri'timcd cf: Cray, Aiiiln i.ni Chtirlreiise, l.il.u Sk> and Banal Whail, I'inlt X'inlence :ind (iicnndure .1 SI' !'l ::', BOROEBI I) '•I'l'N In varioei aaltaraj V Mil per vil. OPKNOfa HI 11 \V —\„ri.-i. Slyll i. ni prlcr^. ACCESSORIES I...I-. il iry, Braa Pantla, htfowna, Sllpi ChlldnMrS Backs, \'eis. g rtinli... and Kerchicls. J. Unanrn—iirl is lha unrd fr Our Nab Qacdl BARGAIN IIOISi: I J .10. Snu Slreel S Al TM \N. 1'rnprHMnr riioNK 27n: I