Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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See RR

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Hav bad0os

TUESDAY, JULY



ESTABLISHED 1895



Ol Morrison tells Commons Britain
e agrees in principle on nationalisation



PEACE Allies and Communists stand





firm on Buffer Zone issue



{
wAR U.N. troops capture Red held





31, 1951











mountain top after stiff fight



. BAST ©









PRICE FIVE



CENTS
oe



hurchill asks U.S. for help

to regain lost. prestige, oo

WORLD'S BIGGEST OLL REFINERY CLOSE

Britain will send mission to fran

U.K. Accepts Principle

Of Nationalisation

LONDON, July 30

FOREIGN SECRETARY Herberi Morrison told;

the Commons today that as “soon as certain|
points’’ have been settled, Britain will send a.

special mission to Teheran to discuss settlement}

of the bitter Anglo-Iranian oil dispute.

Morrison made the announcement a few minutes
before W. Averell Harriman, President Truman’s
special oil envoy took plane back to Teheran efter

a week-end of conferences in London.

Morrison said the mission would be headed by
Richard Stokes, Lord Privy Seal and Minister for
Raw Materials. Stokes 54, is a wealthy Socialist

industrialist.

He said, “We have every sym-

pathy with the natural desire of
the Iranian people to control the 8 TH ARMY
mineral wealth of their own soil, . J

and we have agreed to accept the
principle of nationalisation. What
we have asked is that the agree-
ments freely entered into under
internationai auspices, should not
be broken unilaterally without dis-
cussion and negotiation.”

Morrison referred to the week-
end exchange of British and Iran- h
ian views made through Harri-] ~
man, and added: “Certain points
remain to be settled. Meanwhile,
His Majesty’s Government has
made arrangements as soon as
those points have been settled, to
dispatch a mission to eee led Tis: iasiibel aiteeral Simareent. 6
by the Lord EEIVY are: F Stokes’ ; appre iation crediting the Eighth
_ Morrison said that one nT wee !Army with winning for him the
ar eas brs Sorta’ |promotion he gained recently.
largest oil refinery to “familiarise | , ene both from ere and

Ase vith sonditions there, and] **> nde vashington have to d of the
pumaele wee mom? massing of formidable Communist
in the oil fields a sched-| forces in the battle zone, ready to
‘ ae ee oder 1S Schec=/Jaunch a powerful offensive if and
IEC Oo close * rhe > Caes ~

The Foreign Secretary discussed et one eS Aig
Iran in the opening speech of a|° ‘Ware Fleet enka: vain h rs
major Foreign Affairs debate in miistice ne Htisttons ates rid di a

i the Middle s g tions are being dis
the Commigny. 08 cussed, the Eighth Army will

Eastern situation. maintain its constant vigils
a é s s gilance.
On. Tuesday British engineer | We srenguve of the good faith

Donald Blair Bs soae ree under which U.N, delegates are
close down the a o aay his|OPerating and we hope for the
finery in the world. title it | Same from the Communists. How-
orders, the great dis wee eee ever, in spite of our hopes every
known to workers b — od man must be alert at all times.
“Bench Eighty,” will be trickt Every one is hopeful that (truce)
off. That will cut off the t ie conferences will come to a suc-
of oil on which the remaing cessful and honourable end sg
of the plant has been TA ea that peace may be restored.

for the last few wee ae “No one is more conscious of
bring the whole of 7 ele Kas peace than a soldier. Our army is
1 refinery to a 8 stronger than ever. Our morale is
sulk. : _|high. Together we will keep
“Bench Eighty” normally ene the best fighting team the world
500,000 gallons of crude o has ever known and I am sure
every man will continue to give
his best as has been done so will-
ingly in the past.”—U.P.

Eighth Army will maintain
ccnstant vigilance regardless of
truce negotiations at Kaesong. He
said: “We must not and will not
permit this great United Nations
army to bécome the victim of a
Communist ambush,”







y-

For the last two weeks only
2,500,000 gallons have been flow-
ing through the pipes daily and
on Monday night this will be cut
down to 1,500,000 preparatory to
the shut-down.

The last time the Abadan re-
fnery shut down was for three
cays in August 1941 following
landings by Allied troops.—U.P.





nen CURRAN eee ieesatteetermmanetees GMa ee

India, Pakistan
Are Prepared

LONDON, July 30.
Armed forces of India and



. > Pakistan ranged against each
India Asks Removal , other on the hot plaing of the
‘Punjab and along hundreds of

Of American Troops miles of the mountain truce line

in Kashmir on Monday as reports

WASHINGTON, July 30. ‘from both sides said there was

India on Monday formally little hope of the United Nations
asked the United States to elim- ‘mediation settling differences.
inate from the Japanese Peace New Delhi and Karachi re-
Treaty any provision for the perted that neither side wanted
stationing of American forces “in +, go to war but both resented
and around Japan” after the zny cutside condemnation of
Pact is signed. their action in massing troops.

They said the final Indian —_U.P
enswer cn this score would ve
given after Dulles and_ other —_-—_---- —
American officials advanced their STOCKS GO UP
arswers to Indian “suggestions.”

The United States and the NEW YORK, July 30.
United Kingdom have asked 49 Stocks continued their current
othes countries to attend the San
Francisco meeting and ratify a best levels since mid May in mod-
Treaty which the Anglo-Ameri- mrately ac‘ive trading totalling
can’s powers put the finishing 1,590,000 shares.







touches to July 3 The day’s rise was elective with

Meanwhile a State Department mest of the force generating in
spokesman Michael McDeimot® chemicals and oils. —U.P
id so far only one country New
Zealand had formally aceeeted



the Jnited States — United :
pg aoa invitation to participate To-day a
in the San Francisco Peace Con- Weather Chart
mp: AAS Sunrise: 5.49 a.m.







CHURCHILL ATTACKS Sunset: 6.23 p.m.

Moon: Last Quarter
LONDON, July 30 Lighting up: 7 p.m.

Churchill strongly attacked the High Tide: 1.16 a.m., 3.35
Government for releasing sterling p.m.
balances to Egypt at a moment Fall Tide: 8.54 a.m., 8.30
when Egypt was blockadnig the nm.

Suez and trying to force Britain
cut of the Canal Zone, —U.P.



Labour Frittered. Away Prestige

By ROBERT E. JACKSON. | SAYS CHURCHILL

LONDON, July 30

Winsten Churchill ced
United States Monday to play
great new role in the Middle E
to help the West recover the rres-
tige and power w th he said the
Labour Government had frittered





ving tn-



in Korea, After pz



n Korea he added:









a promontory jutting cut into salt









away there t } t nerice
. vater ruled b American sea-
cS > rin for he r < ion i “
Speaking ac the Opposition in 1 power under iir canopy con-
the major deoate on the | trolled in the by American
East in the Commons, Ch

jair forces
said Britain alone could not a a:

trieve the losse all gedl\ spread in a physical





be
i in
f ) War
More vital. than Korea
I rove re dam- d p hick

wing with prices advancing to



ng to the United States than!
American acrifices and

“But in the rmnaterial and geo-
sense Korea after all is

a place from which

> main interests of

TERS, Korea, July 30 |
senerai James Van Fleet said;

See eee

ant Britain and the Dominions ]Government

;|part in the Mediterranean, and

E

sition in Parliament,

turn to civilian life.

$$ -—

Paateinicint

Dissolved
IN GREECE

_ ATHENS, Greece, July 30.

King Paul dissolved Parliament
and proclaimed a general elec-
jlion for September 9.

‘The move came as the weak
Greek government faced threat-
ened strikes in most industries
as various party leaders bickerec
among themselves and as _ the
United States sought some stable! lishment of peasant. co-op-
-C.uuon to the political situation | eratives for the wefking of
in the hope that Greece could! such esta es

Acquisition Of
B’dos Estates

LOND Gs, July

In the House of Comm
on July 25, Mr. Joy
kin (Socialist, Gl
asked we Secretary of State
for the Colonies what are
the plans of the Govern-
ment of Barbados for the
acquisition of estates owned
by people in this country;
and whether they will give
consideration to the estab-




Fs caeterinmegpsigiemaenetiiannmssn coachella jensen

take her place in Western de-| The _Under-Secre ary of
fence, ; State for the Colonies, Mr

Greece had a general election ir T.. *. Covs, soptied: “I am
March, 1950 and Parliamen} nfcrmed that the Barbados
should have sat until 1954. Bui Geverameént have no plans
no party received even one-fourth for compulsory acquisition
of the 250 seats and squabblina of estates owned by persons
party leaders could not get to- in this country.”

gether in a firm coalition, > B.U.P.

Sophocles Venizelos whose Lib-
eral party had 56 seats and George
Papandreous Social Democrats

with 35 were “permitted” to form Nie P, P
a Government. But this Govern-| J oO rogress

ment was at the mercy of othe:

pa. ties In Ceasefire

Papages Resigns

. ; ; ; : ? e e

The climax of party bickering IN £ t p
came early last month when Mar- ego ta toms
shal Alexander Papagos, prob-
ably Greece’s most popular figure] ADVANC’E BASE, KOREA,

next to the King, resigned as July 30,
Supreme Commander of the} The fourteenth and lengthiest
armed forces. His resignation}single session of Kaesong military

came amid reports that Papagos|armistice conferences to-day pe-
. and eight

Papagos who led the army|Minutes with both sides holding
against Communist guerillas wis firm to their views on item num-
highly thought of by the American] ber two of the agenda, which deals
Ambassador who flew froia|With the establishment of a de-
conference from Washingtcn to] â„¢Militarized zone.
try to patch up the rift.

and the palace were feuding, cessed after three hour





said it was also his definite under
standing that hostilities would be
SAN FRANCISCO, July 30. continued during current armistice

Lieutenant-General A 1b er t| negotiations.
Wedemeyer, one time United

it; States special envoy to China and The fifteenth session will meet
Korea ended his 32 year military to-morrow morning at 11 o'clock
eareer on Monday as he gave up United Nations troops will
command of the Sixth Army to|needed in Korea for at least one
year after the ceasefire, according

After a short formal ceremony |to a South Korean Government
at Sixth Army Headquarters in|spokesman, Dr. Clarence Ryee be-
San Francisco he drove to Hamil-]cause it will be at least a year
ton Field where he was scheduled | before South Koreans can guaran-

to depart by air for Omaha, Ne-|tee their own security
braska his home town.

Manufacturing Co

the Board of Directors of the

American Bureau for Medical Aid The withdrawal of Chinese
Communist troops, to Manchuria
Disarmament of the North Ko-

to China Incorporated.—U.P



rean army as the aggressor.

Ben on military and economic |

Fantastic Reports aid to North Korea and Commun-

ist China

NEW DELHI, July 30. ,

A Nepalese Embassy statement Korea in
called “fantastic” reports that the Korea

Indian Press was regarding con-

tacts made by Pakistan leaders

with some political parties and in-

dividuals in Nepal. It said “these

canards seemed to be undermin-



j rity of Korea,.—U.P

| T « ste iC
ing the very happy relations sub- \to the United st t in anot |
sisting between india and Nepal.” ies a e! oun ain: in Augu ee
Reports frontpaged here on | Crew member aid during |\«

Monday said seven political par-

high quarters in Pakistan asking



> WASHINGTON, July 30

see with his tongue lashed Wi Nis
Â¥

000,000 foreign arms and econon
aid bill

j the Bliursitses to conduct further
jhearings on the bill with the
{Armed Services Committee _ sit-
ting in — this step he opposed. , CARLOS, Maria Bster, Maria

plets of the Argentine celebrate their 8th birthday

of his wrath. Foster testified that
Western Europe now is producing!



fellows spend all your time think-!
ing how to spend money” while| The Australian Sugar Produc-
Congress is “squeezing” the tax- ers’ Association has again ex
payer for more revenue.

nally became angry. Connally said
the United States

itself’ Now you want to build up

trie

United Nations senior delegate
Venizelos however accepted] Admiral Joy in a series of prepa
Papagos’s resignation. A handful]ed statements made a detail
of army officers however staged|a@nalysis both of Communist con-
a brief #revolt” which Papagos| tentions as well as the United Na-
himself stopped. A large section} tions position on the subject un-
of the nation remained behind cer discussion.
Papagos however, and Venizelos} He then once again invited
came up against increasing opp0-| comment by Communists on tha
basic concept of the United Ni-

—U.P. }tions on a demilitarized zone “so
that a final solution to this item

= may refiect our mutual views.”
Wedemeyer Shortly before noon General
Nam Il, senior Communist dele-

gate replying to an earlier clari-

Resigns Army fying statement by Adugiral Joy



peace treaty and the end of the — |
Russia Is Ready For,

the Japanese intend to continue Big Power Talks

issuing to the U.S. army, barbed
wire, machine parts and other war bie
items as they have since July SAYS JAKOB MALIK

1950.

“repair shop” of Asia.

ready to board contracts for war

e said the Korean army needs
He seid Kores et ravaged Korea.

He will vacation there before |artillery and planes. Government
going to New York where he will] has been asking for arms for all
take over a civilian job as Vice-|forces and for men to train them
President and Director of Avco}he said, but United Nations Corm-
mand has not met these requests

The General also announced that|Ryee said Government believes
he also accepted membership on any armistice shquld provide for

eoncrete plans as yet
of the Ministry of International
Trade and Industry told me, Mali k,

country with the technical experi-
ence to build up under-developed
areas whenever the United Staite
Congress appropriates money un-
dev President Truman’s propose Li
IP A
programme UF

Official representation of South
all matters. concerning



Guarantee of the administrative
sovereignty and territorial integ-



Oppose US.
Aid For Asia |

CONNALLY URGES



CGhsirman Tom Cenlally oi ine

Scnate Foreign Relaiuiors Comn



(
‘

{

‘

|

ter, Administrator of the M |
ig funds to

in Asi |
The unexpected outburst by ihe!
vetersn senator occurred in =
|

‘

(

!

|



shell Plan for see

bedster “little countr



open session of the Committees
Foster testified on the $8!

mnea se apparently had been

\ettled by an earlier decision of



But Foster caught the full blow home.

Aussies Insist

14 per cent, more industrial good

than before World War Il. Then; . .
he urged Congress to authorize | On Completion

$980,000,000 in military and eco

nomie aid for Asian countries | Os Agreement

Connally roarea in protest; “You
BRISBANE July 26

pressed concern at the British
Government's delay in complet
ing long-term sugar agreements
i with Empire producers
Annot “subsist The Association said it had be-
lieved that the draft agreement
reached on December 8, 1949,
. between the British Government
Foster, a successful businessman|and an Australian delegation

When Foster tried to reply Con-



ind take care of these little coun-



until he went into Government] provided a firm basis for thé
service tried to explain that he|eavy capital expenditure to
thought the threat of Communism] which the sugar industry

is a global one and south-east] committed to inecreuse exports i
Asia can be immeasurably] the Ministry of Food. The failure
strengthened against Red penetra-] 0f the British Government to ex-
tion with a relatively small tend the Australian agreement
amount of aid. Foster said |
south-east Asia’s rich raw | to the. 4
materials were vital to the defence
of the United States and the free} accepted in 1949,
sorld—U.P.

into comprehensive agreements
with Empire suppliers gave rise
suspicion that Britain wa
disposed to reduce the obligations

This suspicion thas been aggra-

etualiaiias vated, said the Association, by
the negotiations on sugar under-

taken by Britain with Cuba,

Japan: Repair without the knowledge of Empire!

suppliers. These factors make it

e imperative for the Austral
Oop Sla Government to insist at the ta

on sugar in London !ate







TOKYO, July 30 that the agreement be completed

- : B.U.P
Japan is looking beyond the




It Korean cease fire talks fail,

LONDON, July 30
If there is peace Japan stands Jakob Malik, the Soviet Deputy
Foreign Minister, told a visiting
delegation of British Quakers, that
Russia is ready to enter into Great
Power negotiations at the highest
level

“We haven’t really made any
" an official

The Japanese whose present in- Russia’s willingness to disc uss th

dustrial production is now 140 Korean armistice was followed |
per cent. of the so-called 1932- the cease fir negotiations, w
1936 “norm”, but still 15 per replying to the Qt |
cent, short of what it was in 194u {gramme for “a real
also hopes to fill some “Point | understanding.—-U.P
Four” orders in south-east Asia.



3 TON ELEPHANT
FOR TRUMAN

SINGAPORE, July 30

They feel they are the closes!

Truman from the King of Car
bodia arrived here on Monday
iship. The elephant will be tale

|voyage here the animal ehnavea





ties in Nepal were opposed to| jwell and roam 1 the dec
the Nepali Congress Party which | - r chained,—-U.P.
when in power got a letter from ron oO

for help from the Gurkhas against
India. The letter allegedly said
“India is our common enemy





Diplomat Cleared
WASHINGTON, July 30

Paton Davies, Jr. was cleared on
Monday of security charges after

REGENT OF IRAQ

= Bitter Fighting | GOING TO LONDON

ROME, July 31
The Regent of Iraq, Abdul J}

EIGHTH ARMY HEADQUARTERS, Korea, July 30. stopped briefly at Rome’s Cian
UNITED NATIONS fighting men climaxed five and ajpino airport on Monday enr«
half days of vicious and bitter battling to-day with the cap- }|'@ London
The career of diplomat John ture of a mountain top northeast of Yanggu.

He was accompanied by a n
ber of Iraqui Government offici

Veteran Communist troops entrenched in solidly bui.t An official of the Regent

a week long State Department trenches and bunkers poured down a shower of mortar, |tourage said the Prince was goi
investigation. He was immediately machine-gun and small arms fire on slowly advancing ten-|t? Lendon to see your K
restored to his post on Secretary acious Allied units. ad nothing to do witt t



Dean Acheson’s policy and plan-
ning staff. —v. P

not requesting appropriation

of the Commonwealth are all
| joined,”

Churchill said that because of the
West's declining pres*ige in. the
Middle East: “I have been most
anxious to encourage the United
States navy to take the leading

theory that Japan is now able

Secretary, Frank Pace, te

that is why welcome so stro r ;
the senoant aay hase earns mittee made public today, that
Greece and Turkey and the atten-|{unds will be requested for
tion they are giving to Lranian and {©Conomic support of Japan
Iraq affairs 1952

The strategic aspects of the des-
ation of oil supplies and the



called counterpart funds
US., are



countries is of immense im- :
t to Britain but to |led by th





h sse in 1 and already
It vl part in their plan of }scheduled for economi
ever-increasing deterrents {tation programme |

NoFunds For Japan:

WASHINGTON, July 30
The Department of the Army

{ eftorts to take the mountain
gtronghold were unsuccessful
R eds took full advantage of thei

roneewne| Eey Were Trained In Moseow

and relief in occu-
pied areas, this year, on th

finance all occupation costs on
pay-as-you-go basis, it was re
vealed on Monday The os m

recently in closed hearings which
the House Appropriation Com

the

He said that approximate

jimmediate future of Middle East- }$149.000,000 in Japanese yen Reds offe ring

smashed at }

sl



| Feisal of Iraq. He said the
| 1st. — U.P
|



P c = > ' '
For more nan five day8 their/+ion in the Middle

|
and demoralizing artillery bar-}
rages, | U.N. ADVANCE BASE













First Allied battalion to reach Korea, Jul
githe crest of the hill engaged in At least three of the 2 C

deadly hand duels with fanatic; munist delegate egoti
Communist defenders. But 43 @ cease-fire in Kore
more and more U.N, men reached} trained in Mosco\ und the
the top Reds finally broke ani:two are veterar of Comr
h {fled politic

Adjoining hills linked into t The backgro €
defence of the mountain pez it) tithe of the five me
dominates the astern front for, vealed by officia here
miles round feil Sunday to Al ' The Red negotiator are
lied assault. Action on other sec- General Wam sta
tions of the front was limited the Supr f ft
mainly to patrol engagements with, Nort} Kore



ght resistance
Allied jets and fighter bom



tly broker



ARGENTINE QUINTUPLETS





Maria Carene



yesterday,
Milton King, a
policeman

Ontario, July

planned on Monday to move 1,50
swiking gold miners

solidated Gold

Union's plan,

s one-industry
into a ghost town,

Sunday night by C., I

was announces

and settled fast,
» transported

S meeting of s
will il to. great length

providing «

to comment
whose recent speech on | the

TRUMAN INTERESTED
IN AID FOR ISRAEL

SHINGTON

MeCormack talked

three-ton elephant, a gift tc] sident expressed th

consideration

CLOSING DO DOWN
SAN FRANCISCO, . ‘
The National Convention of

The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS
Dial 3113
Day or Night.









», the famous Dilligenti quintu

moreman in the gar 7 of their
rpress
da esi sr“ aersresrseesiessigpnsteninnnniieieasinaneedalineems

Prokest Death
Of Milton King

LONDON, July 30

THE DAILY EXPRESS to-day featured a story about
the League of Coloured Pcoples’ meeting held in Holborn
In protest against the alleged murder of

West Indian seaman, by a South African

The blavked-out name on a
hand poster advertising the meet-

Gold Miners " i "ie im Sees € z featured
Will Leave

IF THEY ARE NOT PAID

TIMMONS,

On the hand poster, one was Miss
Mary Attlee, the missionary sister
of Premier Attlee. The other
name blacked-out was that of
Mrs. Monica Felton, whom the
government dismissed from the
chairmanship of the Stevenage
Development Corporation after
she returned from North Korea
this year,

The League's secretary, Sam
Morris, explained to the Express,
it should have read Miss Monica
Whately” a socialist who has
expressed strong anti-Malan
views

But there was a printing er-

Mia Mori icke vii
Whately could not be present al
the meeting after all.”

The secretary, Sam Morris said
today “IT am very annoyed abou
the whole affair yesterday. But
we have not finished yet. This
is only the beginning of our pro-
test against the death of this
West Indian seaman —L.E.S

israel Go To Polls

TEL-A-AVIV, Israel, July 30
Israel's 900,000 eligible voters







went to the polls today to choose
120 members of the nation’s par-
liament, (the Knessit) from a list
of nearly 1,000 candidates

Voting was orderly as the first
voters cast ballots at 6 a.m. All
Isreelis, except those in essential
ervices, observed the holiday
proclaimed for the election.

Main election battle was viewed
here as a toss up between Premier

David Ben Gurion’s party and the
Zionists of Israel

These parties are the only two
depending largely on the popula
vote, Most of the other partie
count mainly, on their organised

membership.—-U.P.



Chances Slump
PARIS, July 30







For Finance Minist Maur
ice | ‘ il of formin
a ne Coalition Ca net le en
France Zil-day pol cr

imped on onday whet
he failed te t the ¢ » Part
l to I to r 0
G romer yrary

I che i hope C

roo ee” ¢ Viiddle «

I mca Pp le 1cle ORCW
,{on Tuesday to map out a com-
f}mon programme for P

;seventeenth Government since tt



| but fter the preliminary
eling on Monday night with a
u of former premiers and
e! repre ng parties, he
' 1 tnat e would insteac
er or or
merry-g
round ¢ talk i
{ ( e
U.P





n ! ned for
' Liae Mi
¢ vith th
’ efo the
14 t
t ( i \
( retar a
h n-
i Le he
t
ic
cf lL Le i {
N Ke
)
@ on pa ;

~~



PAGE TWO





cp Calling

OF MAGDALA

IS LORDSHIP, Rt

G. Mandeville
an audience of over five
people who saw a prev
film, “The Sinner of Magdala” at
the Plaza, Bridgetown,
morning,

Members of the clergy of almost
all denominations throughout
island and several lay
of the various congregations
saw the film, which tells the story
of Christ and» Mary Magdalene.

The film began at 9.40 a.m. and
lasted for just under two hours.
It opens at the Plaza on Friday

Rev ; ‘
was among

hundred

i@w Ot the

terday



Grenada Police Force

M®: HUGH BRATHWAITE,
1 son of Mrs

Dorcas Brath-
waite of St. Philip and the late
Mr. Alonza Brathwaite arrived
from Grenada over the week-
end by B.W.LA. on four weeks
emergency leave. His father died
on July 2ist.

Hugh, who is a Barbadian,
here three months ago to join the
Grenada Police Force. He was
one of eight Barbadians. He told
Carib that they have just com-
pleted their training and they
are now assisting with the train-
ing of two hundred Grenada re-
cruits of the Grenada Reserve
Force, ,

left

Antipva Prize Giving

RIZE-GIVING in Antigua was

held on the lawns of the
Antigua Grammar School last
Thursday. It was the first occa-
sion on which the new Head
Master Mr. J. Foote, M.A., de-
livered his report of the work of

the schoo} for the past year. Theref

are at present two hundred
thirty-three boys
and Mr. Foote made it clear that
owing to shortage of staff the
school is now limited to two hun-
dred and forty boys.

Speeches were made by His
Lordship Bishop Nathaniel Hugiies
of Antigua and Mr. R. St. J. O
Wayne, the Administrator. Prizes
were presented by Mrs. D. E.
Jackson, wife of the Chief Justice.

Among the guests was the
3ishop of Puerto Rico who was
interested in the school, as many
people he has met in Puerto Rico
and the American Virgin Islands
were educated there.

Short Visit

and

R. OLIVER JOHNSON, Act-
ing Assistant Branch Mana-

ger, B.W.1A., who was in Trinidad
on a three-day visit, returned
yesterday morning by B. Ww. I. A,



THE ADVENTURES

the
members
also

in the school M «: ushter of
a B 0

SAW PREVIEW

BISHOP G. L.





. MANDEVILLE leaving the Plaza, Bridgetown,



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Wot No Houses? |

HERE is a housing dilemma for |
Washington officials arrang-

ing the visit of Prince Philip and
Princess. Elizabeth, at President
‘Truman's invitation

Usually,

distinguished visitors
> accommodated at Blair House, |

just across the street from the
White House. The U.S. Govern-
ment maintain it as an Official
guest house.

But the Trumans are now
living there while the White

House is being rebuilt.

In recent}

months, official guests have usual-|
ly stayed one night at Blair House.
then moved to their own Embas-}|

Sy.
in Washington
Princess and her husband will be
the guests of the President.
are

A White |
asked what sort of accommodation
was available at Blair House,



But a British Embassy official
has said, “That!

They
not expected to stay here.” |
House official when

re-





STARTING

FRIDAY

AT

EMPIRE

|
|
|
|
AND }
|
1
|







———S

EMPIRE

NOW iia:

TO PACKED CAPACITY
3 AND’ CONTINUING
¢ DAILY.

ROYAL

the
Bae

SIMULTANEOUSLY
Nise eo=





























TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1951









|| AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only!
TO-NIGHT TO THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
MATINEE: TO-MORROW at 5 p.n
Universal-International presents .. .

“PIRATES OF MONTEREY”

in Technicolor

Starring Maria MONTEZ
i MIKHAIL RASUMNY

Rod CAMERON
PHILIP REED







'
Thurs, — 1.50 p.m.
“Phantom of

BRIDGETOWN
Chinatown
“Saddle Serenade

eee arma ae ee and
Continuing:
- po "
2" \ PLAZA piai 2310 ]_ ea
Last Two Shows TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.10 p.m.
Paramount's Technicolor Drama
= .
INTENTS vowsraby sta
" Pat Sot Color by Tec hy inteolor





Also the Cartoon

“HOW GREEN IS MY SPINACH”



. (Popeye)
WEDNESDAY an THSDAY —

‘alypso-Color Musical































plied “Cramped, very cramped. | parenowet os pase! : ¥ “HAPPY-GO-LUCKY”
; - ‘one ni ob Hope ronda Fleminit & ary Martin — Dick Powell
- ~ It is not yet known whether SS - = a
Princess Elizabeth and Prince PLAZA ioene | | AT ETY |
Fhilip will visit New York If| Dial 8404 |]
they do, they are expected to stay | Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p m \}) Tas oannan — ST. JAMES
a‘ the Waldorf Towers, the resi-| “FRENCH LEAVE’ | OW TONITE — 8.30
dential part of the Waldorf As-| ‘ Jackie Coozan — Jackie Cooper | KISSES FOR BREAKFAST”
teria Hotel on Park Avenue | and Dennis Morgan Jane Wyman and
ia » é 1 LAW OF THE JUNGLE” “WHIPLASH”
John King Mantan Moreland Dane CLARK Alexis SMITH
r Wed. & Thurs. 5
' R di p & 5 & 8.30 pan Wed. & Thurs. 8.30 p.m.
SARONG GIRL’
B.B.C. Radio Programme | Howard K seg, on a “PORT APACHE”
x ‘ uy E PALOOKA MEETS John WAYNE and
Tuesday, July “3, 1901
11.15 “ayn, Programine Parade, 12 20| Cot la ofp, Lott olfman played by LON CHANEY Leon ERROL — sollUMEuBers |] “WESTERN HERITAGE”
am Asian Survey 11 45 a.m Report ORS: Dracula played by BELA LUGOS! 4 — Joe woop |f) Tim HOLT
fr Britain 12.00 noon ne ews 4 ce “A = a
from mui ee Sea a _MUS ICAL AS The Monster played by GLENN STRANGE a PPP EO EEE CPP EPPS OS OPPS SOPOT FS CPF EEOC OCF OPO POOP,
4.15—6.45 19.76M _ - } Lenore Aubert + Jane Randolph j\¢
a a | % : nt %
4.15 pm The Glory Road 500 pm Tgvwas tax s$ GLOBE 7 HEA TRE Bs
England v South Africa. 5 05 p m ro | MAI GH! LAUGH! : 4 x
men's Cricket 510 pm. Interlude 515) BOOK THE DATE. ’ S Tod ‘x can 42 ef %
pm New Records 600 pm Muste | GH o-day 5. an 15 p.m, an i x
Magazine. 615 pm. Welsh Magazine LAUG e x ae p Continuing x
6 45 p.m. Programme Parade. 6 55 p.m x
To-day's Sport , a y M.G.M. RUDYARD KIPLING’S 8
7,00—10.45 25.58M. 81. 32M | 8 x
7.00 pm ~The News 7.10 pm. News| Rees eres. , % K i Mi
Analysis 715 p.m Re endezvous—Com- | R A Py
monwealth Artists. 745 pm. A Street | % %
Through the Past 800 pm Radio | Bee X4 as AT Uy = r %
ee TT My § Erol FLYNN Laurette LUEZ
wealth 845 pm _ Interlude. 8 55 pm 3 eee ae 3
From thd Editorials. 9 00 pm reese ta | BB Th) WY % L T ii E A T R E 1s Special Short : %
romenade oncerts oS pm Ppo! \ a ~ ay ¥
from Britain. 1000 p.m. The News | 8 SATURDAY EVENING PUSS x
1010 p.m. Interlude. 10.15 p.m hi | % 365 totes, eo 446% %
Heritage of Britain, 10.45 pm. Festival | 7 . WY > z 5 PM. OCS PPA POSS COOGEE 6 OOOO
of Britain Pa pl ge Fee ee ee ll a nae es PPLSOSEE LOE PLSOOP POE OPP IPO SO OF + DOD oo
4 ” . 7 4 4 PaN? awe é , “i

yesterday s oiea after seeing a preview of the film “The Sinne,
of Magdala”
Off to US _ Immigration
° AJOR FRED STENT, Trini-
S ARLENE CUMMINS, dad's Chief Immigration
Dr. and Mrs. Officer who had been holidaying
G. Cummins of “Gothmare”, ir. Barbados since July 16th re-
a Hall, left on Sunday by the turned to Trinidad over the week-
Lady Nelson for the U.S end by B.W.LA.

Miss Cummins was Domestic He had been staying with Mr.
Science Mistress at Queen's Col- and Mrs Woodley Anthony at
lege Patter House, St. Lawrence,

Water Polo Players Incidental Intelligence

R. ENRIQUE LOPEZ and his NE rainy night in New York

sister Marie Therese flew to when ‘there were no. taxis
Trinidad over the week-end en- to be had, Monty Woolley started
route to Venezuela. Marie Therese down the stairs of the Times
will be returning to school after Square subway. Halfway down
the long holidays, but Enrique he slipped, a stout lady toppled
will shortly be going to the U.S zainst him, and they ended up
to study engineering. on the bottom step with the lady

Both of them are keen water sitting in Woolley’s lap. He
pelo players and they were sorry tepped her briskly on the shoulder.
to have to leave Barbados at the “]J’m sorry, madam,” he rasped,
height of the water polo season but this is as far as I go.”

Their father runs a commission

Age ney in Carupany, ven vezuela,

Or



—Bennett Cerf
—L.E.S.

PIPA



P98 . Vaz OF

Copyright =

+ Int Amsterdam

BY THE WAY eee By Beachcomber

TURDY drinkers, in my
is an account of a man who
went into a public house and at-
tempted to eat 50 hard-boiled
eggs in an hour.

Why a public house? I suppose
he drinks his beer in a hen-run.
And was there nobody to tell him
that it would be quicker to eat
50 eggs in the form of that
delicious dust called Eggijoy?

“Oh, mother, what's this lovely
taste,

Half fish and half adhesive
paste?”



CROSSWORD













Across

i a night lamp. (

7 as YOU can find out. (Y)
1. » of a mixed articie. (4)
12 Perl) outraged. 46)

13 Bargains ere compieted by such
earnest money, (5)

15 Found even in state enclosures
(3) 17 Once a main (5)

18 May oe a record. (3)

20. This ts ingenuous (5)

21. Eat nerves he weakens. (Y)

22 It’s your intention undoubtedly
(3) 23) A tuneh aboard? (6)

Down
a bull. (B)

1 » give bya :
2 1 grass 7)
8 int outdoor dependant
4 “ad of
2



VESTS 79¢ 89¢ $1.00
SILK VESTS $1.37 1.47

PANTIES 89¢ 98¢

paper “

ei nia acsenlbieenrnannnsassiaiaertet NOE



My love, it's processed egg, news moment when the egg is the
laid, right (or wrong) way up. The

And comes by freighter from layman will do well to go on as
Port Said, before.

So little one, do not forget, Oriental Intruder

vow or nce, holds us in he RS. McGURGLE has com-

Strabismus and the gg
eectay spheroidal har-

monics to the egg, the sage
has discovered that the potential
of an egg-mass at any given
point is three times the surface
of a circle drawn round the eir-
eumference, as in all confocal
elliptic cylinders, (See Bogimann
Theorie der Kungelfuktionen und
Integralisches Gestuck.) In plain
language, this means that
everything is in motion in relation
to everything else, there is no
moment when an egg is absolutely
at rest. Therefore top and bot-
tam are merely academic expres-
sions of the state of becoming or
non-becoming as the case may be
Thus, though one can establish,
in pure mathematics, the two
ends of an egg, for practical
purposes of everyday life top is
always tending towards becoming
bottom, and vice versa, even if
the egg is laid sideways or
sloping, between joists. Only the
highest mathematics can seize
the infinitesimal fraction of a



Rupert and

plained to the police that a
swarthy rug-seller ambled into
her private sitting-room at Marine
House and, without any provoca-
tion, called her Nightingale among
the Branches, Rose of Thurrali-
bad, and Jasmine Blossom of Ten
Thousand Delights. He then
tried to sell her a_ genuine
Bokhara rug, saying, “One kiss,
Moon of the Fountains in the
Court of Suleiman the Magnifi-
cent, will purchase my whole
unworthy stock of priceless treas

ures,” At that moment Mr, Fred
Bockett came in to complain
about the portions of gravy ut

yesterday’s lunch, The indignant
lodger drew back as though stung
by a hornet, crying, “An Orient-
al!” “Wa-wa Magali,” retorted the
rug-seller, winking at the land-
lady, whose pretty face was by
now like a Beetroot of Tem Thou:
and Delights “Foul-enough,” she
whispered in horror, Call mé
Abdul,” vouchsafed the Oriental,
as he slipped his arm round her
reluctant waist and drew her to
him

Simon—42



wpe and Simon are thrilled to
think that they are going to be
driven home. They are packed
inside and, after waving goodbye to

theer ae, fas » are soon eaten
away. say,’ says s after a
while, «then sa seek of some-

99¢ $1.07 113 129

SLIPS $2.20 2.52 488

BRAS. $181 164 195 240 2.70 340 440 4.43

113 115 118 134

mace Tee
ahs on the seat.

put there to keep your jar of irises
from _ slipping, ae there's a label

I thought it was

on it and,
addressed to
they've given ~ a soteed too ?
Hew splendid |”

io is



$1.41 152

NIGHTIES $4.10 416 429 426 452 495 497 5.33

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606



YOUR SHOE STORE

DIAL 4220

{





TWO YEARS
IN THE

MAKING ! II
THE STORY
OF
ALL



mime f
A MESSAGE OF PEACE
AND FAITH FOR
EVERYONE — -

THE GREATEST
STORY OF ALL!

THE LAVISH FEASTS
OF THE UNBELIEVERS !



DA VINCI'S MASTERPIECE.
“THE LAST SUPPER’ COMES TO LIFE!



THE CONVERSION OF THE
FAMOUS SINNER OF MAGDALA!



THE STORY OF CHRIST
AND MARY MAGDALENE

Storing

Medea de Novara

(ALL- TALKING)
BASED ON THE GOSPEL.
HOW BEAUTIFUL IS

THE GosPeL!







THOUSANDS IN THE CAST!
Coming :—FRIDAY August 3rd
BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310)

THE ISLAND'S MOST
POPULAR SHOW HOUSE!





P |
aa
, @EEBEEEEIsER See,



GENTRY ~

JUDY CLARK
THRILLS ....

- BRUCE

Starring TOM NEAL
ACTION .... AND

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY, 4. 30 AND 8. 15 P. M.








!

| REPUBLIC ALL ACTION DOUBLE

| —

S sworn 10 66 THE
iA KILL A MAN

WE'D REVER

FABULOUS
< TEXAN”

Starring—-

William ELLIOTT —
John CARROLL and
Catherine McLEOD



ast starring:

roe WILLIAM ELLIOTT
ee BRENNAN - MARIE WINDSOR

A REPUBLIC PICTURE
Inside Her Arms, he forgot he was outside the law

SPECIAL .. . SPECIAL .. . SATURDAY AT 9.30 A.M.

PAGAN LOVE SONG”

ESTHER WILLIAMS with HOWARD KEEL



Starring :



SPECIAL : SATURDAY NIGHT AT MID-NIGHT
REPUBLIC ALL ACTION WHOLE SERIAL

DESERT AGENT”
Starring : ROD CAMERON

“EERE



|
|
|
}
|

(ADRES,

ROX Y THEATRE

TO-DAY



LAST
445 &

TWO
8.15

SHOWS WED. & THURS,

| 20th

It’s All About Airline Stewardesses !
M-G-M's Fowr-Stin Fum Hit!

C-Fox Double
BURT LANCASTER

* MISTER
aon
“BLACK HAND”

Starring

880)”




WYMAN JOHN

who is S comnaaeaet ae GENE KELLY &

J. CARROL = NAISH
MYSTERY — THRILLS

STARTING SATURDAY
4th AUGUST

“SWORD OF
MONTE CRISTO”

HOWARD KEEL SULLIVAN

Bite. Mike os nee

mewn ey > a>

“tne Guys Th

The First Supercinecolor
~ Ug | Picture to Show in
ils hamed. Mie Barbados.
Neerreapecsmes BOOK THE DATE.



OLYMPIC THEATRE

TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW, 430 AND 8.15 P.M.
REPUBLIC ALL ACTION WHOLE SERIAL

“DESERT AGENT”

Starring : ROD CAMERON
And Thrills .. From Start to Finish



Action .......



WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY,
REPUBLIC ALL
JOHN WAYNE

“WAKE OF

4.30 AND 8.15 P.M.
ACTION DOUBLE
and GAIL RUSSELL in

THE RED WITCH”
— AND —
SALTLAKE RAIDERS ”





OPENING FRIDAY, 4TH AUGUST

Columbia Serial

*‘ DEADWOOD DICK ’

VEREEEORKCERRREReRe

OPENING GLOBE FRIDAY

“THE PIN UP GIRL IN PERSON”

. 10? DKA: We

VUHCAL & 5)
Ww y
ya nS # '
THE STAR-CRANMED, ;
SONG-FILLED, LAUGH-PACKED,
7 HIT OF THE Year!



JUST RECEIVED

Selling Fast

Canadian Hardwood Chairs
and Rockers

and

SECURE YOURS
e

THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.
Tel. No. 2039

Now.

Hardware Department

You should read

all about

FERNOXONE

and apply it

at once



INDICATION FOR USE. Fernoxone is a selective Hormone
weed-killer and is recommended for control of Nutgrass
on lawns, golf greens, gravelled and asphalted paths and
drives. All weeds are most easily killed when growing
vigorously,

Fernoxone has the advantage over arsenicais in that it is

| net dangerous to humans or animals.

METHOD OF USE, Used as a liquid 4 % acre active ingred-
lent is the recommended application rate. A 1% stock
solution is made up by adding 1.25 15 Fernoxone to 10
gallons: water, or 24 ozs. Fernoxone to 10 pints water.

| Use 40 gallans per acre, or % pint per 100 sq. ft., diluting

the stock solution with a further quantity of water to
cover the area. :

PRECAUTIONS.... Broad-le
damage by Fernoxone i
applying z it to avoid drift on

rowing nearby.

PLANTATIONS LTD.



ived crops are very susceptible to
necessary in

to such crops which may be



great care is















eee

TUESDAY, JULY 31,



1951





Latin America Sets
Pace In Expansion

LATIN AMERICA is se

etting

WASEINGTON, July 30.
the pace for all geograph-

ical areas of the world in the expansion of commerce,
resources, and the development and solution of all regional
diplomatic problems, according to some impartial diplo-

matic experts here.

While the acute ideological struggle in the Northern
Hemisphere has distracted the world’s attention from Latin
America, in the post war period that area has made aston-
ishing economic gains relative to other continents.

Despite the fact that U.S. fin-
aneial grants to Latin American
Republics have been a negligible
percentage of world aid since the
war, inter American commerce
has outstripped the trade between
the U.S. and other geographical
areas.

Far Advanced

Experts agree that the U.S
point four programme for techno-
logical co-operation is already
further advanced in Latin Ameri-
ca than in any other region of the
world. The Venezuelan iron ore
industry has attained a rapidly
expanding commercial stage while
Brazil and Chile are pressing for
gains in their steel production.

Fourteen Latin American
eouniries produce an over-
whelming share of the worlt’s
coffee at the present profitable
level of prices.

Iranian oil troubles
shadow the expansion
petroleum industry throughout
the Caribbean area, while
larger copper and manganese
production in South America is
in the near prospect.

Food production is increasing
relative to the population in most
Latin American countries, with
further gains indicated by the
wholesale adoption of mechanical
improvements aided by the Insti-
tute of Inter-American Affairs and
the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture.

fore-
of the

Population
The total population of 20 Latin
American Republics is at present
estimated at 158,000,000 and at the

normal rate of increase the Latin
American population by the end
of the century will be over
200,000,000.

The diplomatic observers of the
European and Asiatie countries
have been slow to recognize the
rising relative importance of Latin
America in the world economy.

The Department of Commerce
cumulative statistics for the Janu-
ary—aApril trade 1951 as compared
with the same period in 1950
showed that the U.S. imports from
20 other U.S. Republics amount-
ed to $1,326,000,000 against
$869,400,000.

Imports from the European Re-
covery Programme group of coun-
tries in the corresponding period
were $686,000,000 as against
$313,100,000,

Confidence
Proposed United States econo-
mic aid to Latin America indicates
confidence here that Latin Ameri-
ca will maintain its economic
strength © throug: the hormial
course of commertial investment,







From the geographical stand-
point the Latin-America area is
still regarded as the most attrac-
tive region for U.S. private: in-
vestment.

Diplomatic observers pointed out
that: Republics of the Western
Hemisphere have already ab-
lished a mutual security em
while the North Atlantic system

js in the process of
tion and the

implementa-



Pacific dete nce sys-
tem is still at an early stage.
The large majority of Latin

American countries already ac-
cepted organised technological as-
sistance offered by U.N,

the organization of

agenc ies
Americ an

\\\\\\ \
Wa \\
N )

states, and the U.S. Government.

The United States has ratified
und deposited the charter of the
Organization of American States
which gives permanence to doc-
trines of judicial equality and
non-intervention within the Hemi-
sphere,

The organization is a regional
group of nations within the United
Nations. The Latin American re-
publics, although not voting as a
bloc in the United Nations can
exert large group influence be-
cause of their substantially similar
political philesophies and econo-
mic interests.—U.P.



U.K.—Argentine
Trade Proves
Disappointing

LONDON, July 30.

British trade and financial
quarters expressed anxiety that
Angio-Argentine trade would re-
main considerably below’ the
levels stipulated in earlier and
more recent agreements.

The Financial Times feared Ar-
gentina’s recent announcement on
reduction of slaughtering for ex-
port would make delivery to
Britain of the envisaged 200,000
tons of frozen and chilled meat
“very doubtful.”

He added that
of this, Argentina
er of sterling than
pected,

It was assumed that Argentina
would spend much of her avail-
able sterling on the purchase in
Britain of essential goods such as
cil, coal and tinplate. British ex-
perts of non-essentials, including
icxtiles and motor cars, were ex-
pected to reach £17,000,000 in the
lirst year of the 1949 agreement
but only reached £250,000 the
Financial Times argued,

It said “it was commonly be-
lieved as the result of recent pro-
visions that Argentina permits
for imports of British textiles and
other essential goods would
speedily be given to the value of
at least £5,000,000. Hopes for de-

in consequence
will be short-
she had ex-

velopments along these lines
however are now rapidly fading.
—UP.

R.C. PRIEST DIES

(From Our Own Correspondent)

DOMINICA, July 30.
The Very Rev. Canon Gustave
Tavernier C.8.S.R., died on July
28 at the age of 70, at the Roseay
hospital, after a month's illness,
He arrived in the West Indies
in 1908, and was stationed in tha
then Danish Virgin Islands, until
1916, when he was attached to
the Roseau Cathedral. He was
director of the Cathedral choir

during a quarter of a century.

CLERK DISMISSED

From Our Own Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 26.
Mr, Rudolph Griffith, City Coun-

cil Legal Clerical Assistant to Mr.
Murchison Rigsby who was under
suspension since December last for
certain irregularities was dis-
missed from the service of the
Corporation, Seven members voted
for his dismissal while four were
against.



MACDONALD

& MUIR LTD

Distillers
Leith, Scotland







— —



Hobby of Mr. Frank Silsby, of

Werthing. is to reproduce in
miniature the Sussex windmills
of the past 100 years. Each
mode! is built from more than





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



1000 parts. Razor _— blades,
tweezers and a pair of pliers are
the only tools used.

Londen Bayress Service.



17 Give Evidence
In Murder Case

SEVENTEEN WITNESSES gave evidence yesterday
at the Court of Grand Sessions in the case in which Joseph
Beresford Holligan of St. Philip is charged with the mur-
der of Samuel Beckles on May 10, 1951.

The Honourable the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Collymore

is presiding.
associated with Mr. E.
Bai,

When hearing started yesterday
the court room was packed and
to-day the prosecution will call
three more witnesses which will
bring the number to twenty, be-
fore closing its case.

Outlining the case to the jury
Mr. Reece said that Joseph Holli-
gan stood indicted for the murder
of Samuel Beckles at St. Philip
on May 10, 1951.

Samuel Beckles was a
son of Keturah Holligan an old
lady 91 years old. Beckles got
married about 14 years ago and
from that day he lived with his
wife away from the old lady
However the accused continued to
live with the old woman, but
during the last few years he left
the island on at least two occa-
sions.

grand-

Went Abroad

He went to America and also to
Aruba. Although he was married,
the deceased still used to visit the
old lady, bringing breakfast for
her every three days. The old
lady owned a little land in St
Philip and she sometime
made a_ will disposing of this
land and left the will in her
bedroom. This land was looked
after by Samuel Beckles who also
looked after the reaping of the
canes, but the accused assisted
him with the reaping. There had
been some little talk between the
old lady and the accused as to her
disposing of the land but there
was nothing to show that there
was a strong feeling between both
of them.

There was some quarrel
tween the grandsons
ing to the old lady the accused
asked his two cousins including
Beckles not to go back to the old
lady’s place.

On May 10, Beckles went to
see the old lady and the accus-
ed came in the same time and
found him there. Holligan
asked Beckles if he had heard
what he said about coming to
the house and as the old lady
said, the accused had a bright

ago

be-
and accord-

thing in his hand and she heard ~

a click and smoke came out of
the bright thing and then she
saw Samuel reel back and
heard him shout ‘murder.’ After
that Beckles left the house and
went up the road on a bicycle,
but fell off. He was taken to

Dr. Hutson’s.

The first witness called for the
prosecution yesterday was Una
Beckles who said she lives at
Marley Vale, St. Philip. On May
10 her husband — Samuel Beck-
les — was lifted out of a car
into Dr, Hutson’s office and while
there he died.

His body was removed to th
St. Philip’s Almshouse where a
post mortem examination was
performed; she identified the body
to Dr, Hutson,

Dr. C. Hutson told the court
that on May 10 about 11,22 a.m
Samuel Beckles was brought to
his office in a car, He was in
dying condition; his skin was
cold, breathing was weak and ir-
regular, He had a small wound
on the right side in front of the
chest about two and a half inche
from the breast bone. This
wound was small and blood wa
oozing slightly. He telephoned
the Hospital and Police telling
them he had a man dying in h
office. After telephoning he went
back and saw that he was dead.

Later the Police van came and
removed the body, A Post mor-
tem examination was performed
by him on the body which »
identified by Una Beckles, wile
of the deceased.

Heart Wound

From the post mortem exam-
ination he found that there
also a wound at the base of tt
heart and another at the back
the pulmonary artery. The first
wound was external, The wound
were not connected but corres-
ponding. He Could not find any
foreign body. The whole boay
was examined. The organs of
the chest were healthy, The
stomach, intestines and _ spleen
were taken out. The skull cap
and brain were removed, The
brain was normal and no foreig
matter was present. All the or-
gans were healthy

An X-Ray photograph
taken of the body. As a resuit
of the photograph he opened
the back of the chest and

unable to find any foreign m

ter.

In his opinion
haemorrhage
sulting from
heart, The

been caused b bulle

deatt

to and





wour




Counsel for the defence are Mr.
W. Bz
Solicitor General, is appearing for the Crown

G. H. Adams

irrow, while Mr. W. W. Reece,

There were blood stains on the
clothes which the dead man
was wearing, A bullet was not
found nor was there an_ exit
wound found in the body.

X-Ray

Dr, A. S. Ellis told the Court
that she took certain X-Ray
photographs of a body from the
waist upwards on May 11.

Dr. E, Smith told the court that

she was present on May 1! when

the X-Ray photographs were
taken of a body of a corpse. As
a result of the examination she
was unable to discover any for-
eign matter,

Ormend Gaskin, a shoemaker
of Marley Vale, St, Philip, said
that he knows the accused. On

May 10 he was working in a field
ebout 100 yards from Holligan’s
house He heard an _ explosion
and saw Samuel Beckles coming
out of the house. He was shout-

ing “Murder, Murder, he shoot
me.” Beckles went to the next
side of the field and showed
some one his chest. He saw the
accused come from above the
house and Beckles ran after him.

Joseph Holligan got on a bicycle
and Beckles also got on a bicycle
but fell to the ground,

Joseph Holligan returned to
Keturah Holligan’s house. Beck-
les was taken from the ground
and placed in a motor car Be-
fore Beckles was put in the car
he noticed that he was foaming
at the mouth

To Mr, Barrow:—The field he
was working in was about 100
yards from Holligan’s house,
There is a field of ratoons grow-
ing between the field he was
working in and Keturah Holligan’s

house.

Analyst's Statement

tr. J. Robinson, Acting Gov-
ernment Analyst, told the court
that a piece of clothing was sub-
mitted by Cpl. Goring on May 12.
It was a khaki shirt and at the
top: by the chest there was a small
hole with blood stains. ‘There
were no marks to indicate any
corching on the khaki shirt.

He formed an opinion that the
hole in the shirt and also in a
white vest he saw after could bave
been caused bullet. There
were no exit holes on the vest nor
the shirt. The hole on the shirt
was small and round such as from
a bullet.

To Mr. G. H. Adams: Mr. Robin-
son said that he knew nothing at
all about the case when he re-
cetved the clothing.

Opi. James Brathwaite said that
he took photographs of the house
of Keturah Holligan on May 11
The first photograph showed the

by a



2 shedroof and interior of the build-

ing. The second was of the house
itself and the third was the whole

fete sth of the house taken at a
greater distance.

Calvin Jordan of Marley
Vale, St. Philip, said that
at about 10.30 a.m on
May 10 he was cutting canes
in King’s land about 100 yards
from Holligan’s house, He heard
an explosion as from a firearm

and saw Samuel
ing from Holligan’s house and
heard two old women shout
murder’

About three minutes after he
saw Joseph Holligan riding a
bieyele. A car came and took away
Samuel Beckles.

Explosion Heard

Wilbert Blades of Bayfield, St.
Philip, told the court that he has
2 motor car On May 10 about
10.30 in the morning he heard
an explosion while he was in his
land and after hearing the ex-
plosion he saw Samuel Beckles
coming from his grand-mother’s
house and he went to him.

While he was going to Beckles







he saw Joseph Holligan running
to hi mother’s house. Beckles
ct od Holligan, but did not catch
him and seeing this he turned
back.

There was blood on Beckles’
shirt; he got his car and with the
help of ies he put Beckles ir
the car. Beckles died shortly
after

Clair Mason said that on
May 10 about 10.45 a.m. he was
in a canefield. While there he
héard the report of a gun and a
shout of murder. He looked ar
Bay S 1el Beckle and = twe

‘ 1en come out of a }
ph Hollige i

‘ he
tried



Beckles com- a e went to Dr. Hutson’s Surgery at

Aid To J’

Would Cost U.K. Nothing
Col. De Cordova’s Parting Shot



can Cigars

i,

LONDON, July 25.

LT.-COL. MICHAEL DE CORDOVA, who has been in|

has left for Jamaica after his brief but very active visit.

As a result of his discussions
with Members: of Parliament and
the Press, the issue of
v Cuban cigars”

“Jamaican
has been raised

deerease the need for subsidies,
increase the Island’s ability to)
purchase goods necessarily from |

ihe U.K. encourage tnose who

‘
London to press the case for the Jamaican cigar industry,
x

PAGE THREE

9998969036000" SPOOCS 4 FOO9%, |
Please Take Notice |
ara |

THE HOLLYWOOD

to eat

DRESS SHOP









1 guarantees her usual stand-
several times in the House of contend against subversive influ- ard of ability; situated as it
Commons and has been given ences, help to maintain peace and | was at No. 7 Swan Street
wide publicit® in British news- security in Jamaica and strength- | Will be removed to No. 3 (about '4 cu

papers. Col. de Cordova distri-
buted his broadsheet,
for the Jamaica Cigar Industry,”
to anybody who could help his
cause and, last thing before leav-
ing London, sent out this message
as his parting shot

“It cannot often be that a Col-
ony’s request for assistance to its
economy would cost the Mother
Country little or nothing, would
perhaps even increase the U.K.
revenue and would at the same
time both assist the Colony’s em-
ployment and make a contribu-
tion to the ease of the working
and middle classes in Britain.

Government's Desire

“All this can be claimed for the
pleas by Jamaica, now before His
Majesty's Government, with re-
ga to the Jamaica cigar indus-
try and further, that this indus-
tr# in Jamaica fulfils the Gov-
ernment’s expressed desire, on
the one hand, that the Colony
shall diversify its interests, par-
ticularly by industries based on

“The Case

the soil, employing its own capi-
tal, brains, working-power and
on the other hand, that things

enjoyed by the rich shall be made
available to all.

“It must be pointed out that
Jamaica’s request recognises that
Britain must develop its export
trade and also the claim that an
increase of preference would be
contrary to Britain's obligations;
it complies with both. Further, it
not only meets the contention
that under G.A.T.T. some Cuban
cigars should be admitted to the
U.K., but suggests that Cuba’s, as
well as British cigar manufactur-
ers shall be given a share in the
advantages expressly conceded
for the sake of Jamaica's econo-
my and employment.

tort must be further cited that
assistance to this industry will

— rl

his grand-mother’s house. Holii-
gan went out of sight on the
bicycle.

Mr, Blades car came and took

Beckles to the doctor.
Deceased Fell

Ethelbert Jordan said that he
knows the accused, Holligan. On
May 10 he was loading canes in a
field about 100 yards from Holli-
gan’s home. He heard an ex-
plosion and then heard some
women shout ‘murder’, He looked
up and saw Beckles make an
attempt to get on a bicycle but
fell, He also saw Joseph Holli-
gan mount a bicycle and ride out

of sight.

Mr, Blades brought his car and
took away Samuel Kes,
Gastiile Jordan that on
May, 10, 1951, about 10

o'clock he was at his parent's

place, He saw Samuel Beckles

with a basket on a bicycle.

He passed him and after he

saw him again at the pipe

with two buckets.

He heard an explosion and
he walked slowly on his way
back to his home. He saw
Samuel Beckles lying down
with a towel over his face
and he was groaning. Mr.
Blades came with his car and
took away Samuel to the doc-
tor, Samuel died on the doc-
tor’s bed.

Capt. Grant said that on May
10 he was at Central Station and
received a telephone message and
had a conversation with Dr. Hut-

son. He saw motor car M--351
drawn up inside the yard. He
went to the car. He cautioned

Holligan and told him that he
was charged with the murder of
Samuel Beckles. Holligan said “f
don’t want to say anything what-
soever,” While he was taking
the statement down Inspector
Bourne was present.

On the same day he went to

St. George and saw a bicycle
which he took.
To Mr. Adams: Capt. Grant

said that he wrote down exactly
what he was told by Rev. Gen-
tles.

Cpl. Goring attached to District
“C” Police Station said that he
handed a khaki shirt and vest to
Mr. Robinson, Acting Govern-
ment Analyst on May 12, On
June 4 he received them back
from the Analyst.

Saw Site

Sgt. N. Gaskin told the court
he went to Bayfield, St. Philip, on
May 10 where certain spots of
lands were pointed out to him by
«Wilbert Blades, Ethelbert Jordan
«and others, Later the same day

sterling, St. Philip, where he saw
the dead body of a man which
was removed to the St. Philip
Mortuary. Dr. Hutson performed
a post mortem.

The next day Joseph Holligan
was brought to District “C” Sta-
tion. Keturah and Mildred Holli-
gan pointed out a spot to him on
Bayfield Road,

At this stage Wilbert Blades
was recalled. He said that he
pointed out a spot in the field
where he was to Sgt. Gaskin

when he heard an explosion

Rev. H. Gentles of the Pentecost
Mission said he lives at Bar-
barees Hill, St. Michael. On May
10 he was driving his car M—351
going to Chureh Village, St.
Philip. On his way Joseph Holli-
gan stopped him. He asked him
to take him to Bridgetown and
afterwards explained that his mat-
ter was of a serious nature as he
had shot after a man who he be-
lieved was dying

Getting A Lawyer
He wanted to go to town so that
he could get a lawyer. He then
decided to take him to Bridgetown.

On his way to Bridgetown, Holli-
gan said that somebody ran
after hirn with a knife, At Cen-
tral Station he saw Capt. Grant
and heard him say something
about a man dying 15 minutes
after he reached the doctor. Holli-
gan told } that was the man
He told Capt. Grant what Holli-

en the Colony’s loyalties to the
King and to the Mother Country. |

Drug Store, reopening
‘Lastly, it must be emphasised |$ on the ist August. x
that all that Jamaica asks the| % The general Public can be x
U.K. Government to risk is a

possibility of loss of part of the}
cigars (now |

present revenue on
enly_ about £500,000) as against |
Jamaica’s cigar industry—plus
‘Cigars for All’—plus a_ possible |
increased U.K. revenue |
Not Difficult |
“Jamaica does not, of course, |

presume to suggest how things |
which would achieve these ends |
would be enacted or regulated
Once the decision has been made |
to save the Jamaica cigar indus-
try and to make cigars available |
Â¥ all by inclusion of these in the}
‘ial pr oe the ways and
means of i accomplishment
could not ee very difficult, It)
would, of course, require a breach
with the U.K. practice that “AS [qusauesesuseussnaneeueeueedsnensassnacaseumcnss
and other tobacco duties Gre simi-
lar but the U.K, is today about
the only country in the world in |
whigh this is the case.’ |
Col. de Cordova concluded by
reiterating Jamaica’s three-point |
plan to save its cigar industry:
1. That in order to increase the
market, duty on cigars shall be |
reduced back to the 1939 rate of

14s 24d., preferential rate
2. That for the years 1952/3-
1953/4, Cuba shall be even a}

quota of $280,000 dollars or 2,000,- |
000 cigars, (whichever is the less)
and that for each subsequent
year up to 1962/3 the Cuban
quota shall be 20 per cent of the
total U.K. import of the preced-
ing year.
3. That
must be distinctly
banded to show
machine-made,

}
|
|
}

machine-made cigars
labelled and
that they are

—B.U.P

gan told him while Holligan sat
next to him in the car.

Inspector Bourne came up anu)
he overheard what he ‘@ld Capt.
Grant, Capt. Grant later charged
Holligan with murder. |

To Mr. Adams; Rev. Gentles |
said that he did not know Holli-
gan before.

Inspector Cecil Bourne said that
on May 10 about noon he was at)
Central Police Station when he |
paw Capt, Grant. Rev. Gentles |
was in a car ond Holligan was
sitting next to him and later Holli-
gan was arrested. He took away |
Holligan under arrest. |

ROVERS BEAT |
OLYMPIA 11—9 ©

A fairly big crowd saw the |
touring Grenada Rovers ee
team beat Olympia by 11 goals to
nine in a netball match played at |



Olympia grounds, Black Rock
yesterday afternoon. The game
war keenly conteste¢ and fast

irom the beginning to the end,

Yor Rovers, Joyce Blache, Cap-
tain scored six goals and Eileen
Le Hee five. The Olympia goal
scorers were Sylvia Maxwell sev-
en, and Gloria Ramsay two.

At half time Olympia led with
four goals and Rovers had two to} ,
their credit,

The teams were:—

Grenada Rovers—Joyce Blache,
(Capt); Dorothea Sylvester, Myra
Callender, Doreen Gittens, Eileen
La Hee, Pearl Mendes and Angela
Andrews,

Olympia — Kathleen Connor,
(Capt.); Maria Barrow, Isa Quin-
tyne, Patricia King, Patricia Best,

Gloria Ramsay, Sylvester Max-
well,

The referees were Mr. R. Daniel
and Mrs. Wotton.

The Island match which was|

fixed for Saturday will take place
on Friday.

HARBOUR LOG

.
In Carlisle Bay
Beh Lady \Noe.cen, Sch. Rosalie M
M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. ‘Sunshine R., Seb. |
Marea Henrietta, Sch. Rainbow M., Sch. |
Mildred Wallace, Yacht Marsaitese,
Sch. Cyril BE. Smith, Sch. Henry D |
Wallace, Yacht. Marianne, Sch. Marion
Belle Wolfe, Sch. W. L. Eunicla, M.Vv
Lady Joy, Sch Molly N. Jones, Yacht
Keskidee, %.S, Barbara, M,V, Antares, |
$.5. Inventor, §.8. Student }
ARRIVALS
M.V. Blue Star, 130 tons net, Capt |
Fergusson, from Nassau via Antigua
Sehooner Rosarene, 60 tons net, Capi
Olivierre, from British Guiana,
Schooner Luciiie M. Smith, 74



tons



net, Capt. Hassell, from British Guiana. |
S.S. Prospector, 4.624 tons net, Capt. |
Harnden, from Trinidad |
8.8. Alcoa Pilgrim, 3.931 tons net, |
Capt. Haagensen, from New York.
DEPARTURES

8.8. Mormacgulf, 4,521 tons net,
Vinnon, for Trinidad
M.V. Caribbee, 100
Gumbs, for Dominica,
Schooner Franklyn D.R, 82 tons net,
Capt. Sealy, for British Guiana
2s Adviser,

Capt

fons net, Capt. |

3,886 tons net, Capt

Robertaon, for Trinidad

$8 Oak Hill, 4,229 tons net, Capt
Suttie, for Trinidad

M.V. Dearwood, 94 tons net, Capt
Mulzac, for St. Lucia

ss Lady Nelson 4,655 tons net,
Capt. Roavh, for St. Lucis

In Touch with Barbados
Costal Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.,
advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Station:-

$8, Valkrrie measter, 5S 8S
SS. Tista, 8S. Sheafmead,
con Hills, SS Berge Chief,
$8 Celilo, 8S Can Challenger, 8 S
Maas, 8S. Bresle, SS Federal, s
Arickaree. S$. Mormactaga, 8 S James
Funimore Cooper, 88 Bonaire, S&S
Mormacteal, 8S. Esso Sao Paulo, 8S
Alcoa Pennant. 8S Mourinho, 88
Williamsburg, 8.8. Republicade,
bia, SS. Casablanca, 8 S. Carbet,
Ancap, S 8 S$ Paula, 8 S
8 8. Brazil,

Seulptor
858 Rin-
SS ima,



ss

Lady Nelson, |
$8. Naviero, 88. Skottas, |
8.8. Rangitoto, 8 S. Cape Cumberland
ss Monte Altube. ss Almir:
Alexandrino, 838. Matarao, 8S. IL |
Mexico, 8S 8. Rosa, SS ct

RATES OF EXCHANGE |





CANADA i
JULY @, 1951 }
63 2/10% pr. Cheques «
Bankers 61 2/106
Demand
Drafts 61 06% pr
Sight Drafts # 9/10 pr
6 2/10% pr. Cable
61 7/10 Curren 9 7/10% pr
Coupons yw pr
> ive a

< High Street, upstairs of John

ALL-BRAN

OLLECLLLLLGELLEI SF

Gil





a: SSCeeenese The name speaks jor itself

Helps to cleanse the system
‘rans blood impurities

impurities in the blood may cause rheumatic
aches and pains, stiff and painful joints,
boils, pimples and common skin disorders.
Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
the blood, cleanses the system and assists
in restoring good health.



nothing

smells

so good

as a
good cup
of coffee!



Especially if the cup holds Chase &

Sanborn. For here's coffee as coffee

should be~rich, hearty, and satis-

fying. Just sniff that inviting aromo
then sip that heavenly coffee

flavor. That's real coffee!

Ask for Chase & Sanborn today!



Haze. Court
(J. Arthur Rank Organisation)
+

says lo you












have

water with

be yours!

THE FRAGRANT WHITE SOAP OF THE





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4
1



users. If you suffer
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harsh laxatives before she
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immediate results ,

THE NEW HOLLYWOOD amazed us, She

DRESS SHOP | hasn't been, consti

The trade name alone im- } pated since."’ Fred

lies the latest in Ladies \ A. Moody, 625 Park

resg and a perfect fit, } Ave., Greensboro,

The proprietor, Iris Cath- N. C, One of many
cart, the former Cutter of unsolicited letters iy
the Modern Dress Shop from ALL-BRAN Hey

Get DOUBLE

the

of Lux Toilet Bons
with cold. New

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oveliness will

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Liquid er
Tablets





NO MORE HARSH
LAXATIVES!

“My wife had tried many kinds of
started
The



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drink plenty of
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return empty box to Kellogg Co.

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PLL LALLA AALS








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You can be as lovely as
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the clinging fragrance it the natura yeauty of your
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"
7







PAGE FOUR

eer mencerrnae e

BARBADOS KP ADVOGAT

Greene i fase ad

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid, Broad St., Bridgetown,



Tuesday, July 31, 1951



Medical Services

THREE years ago the House of Assem-
bly passed a bill to reorganise the medical
services in this island. The change was to
be effected by the provisions contained in
two bills: one for the government control
of medical departments and the other for
the establishment of medical centres
throughout the island. Little appears to
have been done since the bill was lost at
the end of the Session.

It was largely due to the energy and
initiative of Dr. H. D. Weatherhead, then
Chief Medical Officer, that the changes
were then Dr.
Weatherhead who was promoted to Borneo
has retired on pension and at the instance
of the Colonial Office will soon take up
the post of Chief Medical Officer in the
Leeward Islands.

Barbados is stil
tres.

It was proposed that the island should
have been divided into districts with a
Medical Officer in charge and with the
necessary staff.

The only service in the outlying districts
is that supplied by the Poor Law Guard-
ians via the Parochial Medical Officers and
the almshouses, It has been found that
there are hundreds of people who are com-
pelled to Bridgetown, either
bearing the discomfort of travelling by ’bus
or the expense of car hire, to get regular
treatment at the Hospital. This would not
have been necessary if the medical dis-
tricts, as envisaged under the Medical Ser-
vices Bill, had been established. There is
now in the island a sufficiently large num-
ber of trained and qualified Sanitary In-
spectors capable of filling the posts in
these new services.

One of these bills which provided that
control of the General Hospital be trans-
ferred from a Board of Directors to the
Government was passed. The Staff has
been increased to provide for Specialists
and a Medical Superintendent has been
appointed. It was found that the provisions
of that bill improved the administration of
the Hospital; but the bill which would
provide for the essence of proper medical
services has been forgotten,

At the time when the Vestry of St.
Michael decided to increase the number of
Parochial Medical Officers and to provide
for a clinic in the City, it was objected that
the bill providing Medical Services was
before the Legislature.and the new clinic
might clash with ‘the provisions of “that
bill, It was fortunate that the Vestry did
not allow itself to be deterred. Since then
thousands of sick people and children
have been attended at this clinic.

The Vestry now needs to go one step
further and find some means of chanelling
the services of the District Nurses now
employed by the Sanitary Commissioners.
These Nurses render an important service,
and to a section of the community who
needed the advice and help they can give.
But these nurses are now included in the
list of Sanitary Inspectors and report to
laymen. This is because of the lack of the
Medical Services which would have been
provided in the bill lost at the end of the
session.

It is true that there has been a large
volume of legislation during the last two
sessions but its enactment was delayed be-
cause of an unnecessary amount of debate
and the failure to give priority to measures
which deserved it. The Legislative Coun-
cil did not discuss it and it was lost at the
end of the Session.

The end of the session approaches with
the Legislature chasing the clock with such
measures as the Election Bill and the
Pioneer Industries Bill still in the throes
of discussion,

It is not possible to add the Medical Ser-
vices Bill ar diseussion of the Maude Re-
port to the list at this late hour, but judg-
ing from its impprtance to the island, and
the necessity to remove as far as possible
the hardships endured by aged and infirm
country folk, it deserves priority over other
early in the next session.

EW PING
NEW SHE ;
IN’ PHRESE
ENTERPRISE

LONDON, July 26.

even discussed. Since

without its medical cen-

come to

measure









A new British shipping company, to be known
as the Sugar Line, will soon be carrying raw
sugar in bu!k from Empire and other growers
te refineries in Britain. It will be backed joint-
ly by Messr Tate and Lyle and by United
Molasses

The new line is being formed as a result of
the experiments in the bulk shipment of sugar
started by Tate ang Lyle two years ago, when
s found that up to £600,000 a year could be
y dispensing with the two-ewt. jute sacks
alway shipped to





sugar has been



Not only the cost of the sacks themselves
would be saveda considerable item at to-day’s
prices—but handling costs at the docks would be
lower, it was fc Dockers at British ports,
who are paid for handling heavy
» plan. at first, but now that problem





extra loads,
opp
1 overcome.

The Sug Line will build fleet of six
They will be

by Mol s, already an important shipowner

special

managed by



roval of it
proval of the

7 ' at i
Wii f De





NEWS

Mr. Herbert Morrison’s fate as

| Foreign Secretary is to be pre-
| sented with a series of problems

week by week, each more prickly
than the last. This week, a car-
|toonist has drawn the prickly
faspects of Britain and France
shaking hands with General Fran-
co, who is caricatured in the form
of a cactus in the midst of an
arid, barren landscape, represen-
tative of Spain. It is Mr. Dean
Acheson who invites the British
Foreign Secretary to shake hands
with General Franco. Herbert
Morrison has an expression of
alarm and consternation on his
face. And this sums up accurate-
ly the average British reaction at
having to call Spain a friend, even
at second remove. This attempt of
Mr. Dean Acheson to “introduce”
General Franco in a friendly man-
ner to the North Atlantic Treaty
Club is likely to be the cause of
more bitterness and bad feeling
between Britain and the United
States—and there is plenty of sus-
picion of motives on both sides
already.

Two British views need to be
distinguished about Spain. One is
a strong emotional one. Most Bri-
tish_ public opinion feels a sense
of guilt about the Spanish Civil
War in rather the same way that
many are guilty about the Munich
Agreement. Emotionally, they feel
that the Spanish Republican Gov-
ernment was let down, and the
hangover of this guilt is passion-
ate antagonism to General Fran-
co in the post-war era. That ac-
counts for British Trade Union
resolutions, but it does not ex-
plain the Foreign Office antago-
nism to what is, after all, no more
than a bilateral military agree-
ment between the United States
and General Franco’s Govern-
ment. But in the last analysis,
leaving emotional factors on one
side, the British Government's
opposition to the United States
military aid to France is based on
the fact that the Communist vote
in Italy and France is high and
does not diminish. In the view of
the British advisers, agreement
between the United States and
Spain is such grist to the Com-
munist propaganda mill that it
will drive a large part of the non-
Communist working class of
Europe back to Communism, and
undermine those countries politi-
cally and militarily to such an
extent that the Atlantic Pact will
‘be weaker rather than stronger
for the inclusion of Spain among
its associates.

One point that does not seem
to have been emphasised in the
week's news from Spain—or from
Washington — is that this large
military assistance to Spain may
be quite slow in coming. Certainly
the United States will meet a re-
doubtable revolt in the North
Atlantic Treaty Council if it tries
to give priority to Spain. The pre-
sent United States commitment in
the arms delivery is the North
Atlantic Treaty powers first, a
tnew West German Army-—if that
is agreed to—second, and then
Spain at the end of the line. A



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





FROM BRITAIN

ify David Temple Roberts

i
}
}
| LONDON, July 20.

marked change from this order
would result in the United States
Josing important friends and
elienating people in Western
Europe. General Franco is obvi-
ously gaining popularity at home
with the prospect of American aid.
And it is very much in the inter-
est of his government to give the
imypression that at least a billion
dolbars is on the way immediately.
But it is not so, Indeed there is
a grave prospect that the Spanish
opposition to General Franco
which has recently included more
of the Church and the middle-
class—confused by the new agree-
ment, will be dispersed. But the
situation within Spain will not be
improved at all.

Herbert Morrison does not find
himself in a weak position in
making representations to the
United States on the subject of
Spain. All of a dozen European
countries are in agreement with
him—and in particular Italy is
envious of American aid to Spain
that might better go to build an
Italian army, and Italian bases,
and provide capital for Italian
land reform schemes.

At The East End

At the East end of the Mediter-
ranean, on the other hand, Her-
bert Morrison finds another situa-
tion in‘the desert that is quite as
prickly. But here he has made
the gesture of going along with
ar. American scheme. There has
been speculation all the week
whether the decision to support
the application of Turkey and
Greece for admission to the Atlan-
tie Pact is one-half of a bargain
with the United States — or a
straight concession. The other half
of the bargain might be American
support for the British in the Mid-
dle East, in return for British sup-
port for the United States scheme
to call Turkey an Atlantic coun-
try. All this is connected with
this year’s long drawn-out wran-
gle on the appointment of Admi-
rals. The British case is for keep-
ing the Eastern Mediterranean
under British command because
the majority of troops in the area
are British and so a British Admi-
ral must control their supply
lines. At the time of writing, the
murder of King Abdullah of Jor-
dan is still a “Whodunnit” crime
fiction in which we have not
reached the last chapter. Never-
theless, whoever did the murder,
it is a grievous blow to British
prestige and British influence in
that part of the world. King
Abdullah was the last of the men
whom T. E. Lawrence carried to
power as successors to the Turkish
Empire. I expect newspaper cor-
respondents will spend the week-
end telling how they played chess
with him, and everywhere he will
be spoken of as “Mr. Bevin’s last
little king”.

Success at Last

Also on the diplomatic front,
for -this has been very much a
foreign affairs week, Herbert
Morrison has scored a real success
at long last in persuading the
Egyptian Government to open the
oil tankers tg go to the refinery
at Haifa, in Israel. Behind the

incident of a british ship being
stopped by the Egyptians, was the
Arab embargo on Israel, Not long
ago, the Israel Government decid-
ed to provoke an incident in this
very channel! leading to the South-
ern Israel port, where the British
ship was stopped. They decide?
to send a very much bigger ship
through carrying building mate-
rials. If Egypt intercepted it,
there would be publicity for the
blockade; if not, there would be
buffding materials for Elath. But
in fact the Egyptian action in
stopping the British ship sited
the Israe] Government even bet-
ter.

Who Wants Welsh Poetry ?

The British Broadcasting Cor-
poration is terribly difficult to
explain to anyone who has never
listened to it—as 1 found to my
cost during a recent North Ameri-
can visit. 1t is a nationalised mono-
poly governed by a panel of un-
democratically appointed govern-
ors, who themselves appoint about
a dozen national and regional con-
trollers, who have virtually com-
nlete power to decide what is
good for us to listen to in this
part of the country and that. In
this strange world where so many
people talk about the unity of
Europe and world government,
there are much more powerful
drives for the splitting up_ of
nations into little fragments. The
Welsh want this; the Scots want
thar; and the Irish have almost
everything they want, but never
realise it. So naturally there was
a move to give the Welsh control
over what programmes they have
All the distinguished Gaelic schol-
ars came out of hiding, found
their way on to regional advisor
councils, designed to advise, bu
not to order, the regional control-
ler. So there was a struggle in
the West, with the enthusiasts
trying to thrust more and more
Welsh bards and, Welsh poetry or
the Welsh listeners. The regiona!
controller, fighting back, tried tol
satisfy the needs of people living
in Wales who just want to be
entertained. In order to win this
battle and protect the Welsh resi-
dent from the horrors of his own
language, the B.B.C. thought up
the idea of keeping all the self-
appointed experts of these advis-
ory councils, and putting on them
instead, a number of local govern-
ment town councillors, and the
like, who are elected representa~
tives. Now this has caused a first
class national issue. If it has to be
done for Wales, then, reasonably it
has to be done for everywhere else
as well. The result is that in the
end the B.B.C's programmes ul!
over the country would be con-
trolled by the “voice of the
people” speaking rather drearily
through the mouths of mediocre
town councillors Ags a result, the
B.B.C. would, in the end, lose that
character of superiority, of moral
uplift, of teaching the British
what is good for them, and the
right accent, that its great founder,
Lord Reith, first gave it. Lip-
service would have been paid to
democracy, but would that be a
gain? At least. it would make the
B.B.C. easier to explain.



Point Four And Liberia’s
Expanding Economy

A GENERAL AGREEMENT for
technical assistance and co-opera-
tion between the United States
and Liberia was signed in
Washington, D.C., on December
22, 1950, In signing the agree-
ment, Liberia became the first
country on the African continent
to participate in the Point Four
Programme, first outlined by
U.S. President Harry S. Truman in
his inaugural address in January
1949.

To Liberia, however, Point Four
is new in name only. Since 1944,
two American technical missions
—the U.S. Economic Mission and
the U.S. Public Health Mission—
have been working closely with
the Liberian Government on a
programme of economic. and
social development.

AS a result of its experience
with those two Missions, Liberia
was among the first to submit its
request for technical assistance
under the new legislation. This
request is embodied in a proposed
5-to-10-year programme of over-
all economic development that
was worked out during 1950 by a
joint committee of Liberian and
United States officials. This long-
range programme, it is estignated,
will cost approximately $32,000,-
000, The salaries and allowances
of the technicians requested under
this Point Four Programme will
be paid by the United States. The
other costs, which are by far the
larger share of the programme,
are to» be borne by the Liberian
Government out of its current
revenues it is s@tting ‘aside 20
per cent. of all revenues for five
years for this purpose—ahd from
loans that it is now negotiating.
About $4,500,000 of .the — total

Jamount is to be spent directly on
agricultural activities. Among
these projects will be the building
of an agricultural research
laboratory, the establishment of
an agricultural credit corporation,
the expansion of research and ex-
tension, and the development of
pilot projects for improved pro-
cessing of Liberian products. The
expenditure of more than $11,000-
000 for roads might be considered
indirectly a part of the agricul-
tural programme since these roads
are being built to open inaccess-

ible areas of the country for
agricultural and forest develop-
ment,

Although the U.S. Department
of State has carried the major
responsibility for the work of the
U.S. Economic Mission in the past,
the new programme will become
a joint responsibility of a number
of agencies of the United States
Government. For example, the
U.S, Department of Agriculture
will assume technical responsibil-
ity for all assistance provided in
the agricultural field, and the
U.S. Public Health Service will
continue to be responsible for the
technical aspects of public health

istance. Of the total estimate,

8,700,000 were allocated to public
vement, Anothe
been set aside io
educational facilities



1eaith



$7,150,000 has
levelop the
of Liberia

{

Signing of agreement with the
United States for technical co-opera-
tion under the Point Four Programme
promises improvement of Agricultural
end forest resources of African
country

By OSCAR W. MEIER

From Foreign Agriculture

Simultaneously with the signing
of a General Agreement for techni-
cal co-operation, the two govern-
ments also signed a Memorandum
of Understanding for the estab-
lishment of a Joint Commission for
Economic Development, Liberia
will appoint a maximum of seven
members on the Commission and
the United States a maximum of
six members. The Commission is
expected to make periodic reviews
of the development programme's
progress, advise the two govern-
ments of its findings, and make
recommendations which will in-
crease the effectiveness of the
programme through its successive
stages.

Through its traditional open-
door policy, Liberia has for many
years attracted private capital in-
vestment. In 1926, Harvey Fire-
stone, the American industrialist,
selected Liberia for the establish-
ment of his rubber plantation
operations, These plantations,
totalling nearly 100,000 acres, sup-
plemented by the planting of
several Liberian rubber growers,
now produce the principal export
of the country. Exports of rubber
in 1951 will amount to about
35,000 tons, most of which is being
shipped as liquid latex for special-
ized use, Even though small in
relation to America’s total need,

the United States was most thank-*

ful for the natural rubber that
came from Liberia during World
War II. In 1948, when Far Eastern
Supplies were almost entirely cut
off, about one-half of the natural
rubber that entered the United
States came from Liberia.

For many. years, coffee was
Liberia’s principal export, but
production has fallen off greatly
during recent years. A major
activity under the technical co-
operation programme will be. the
re-establishment of coffee as an
important crop in the Liberian
economy. Cacao production also
has attracted much attention re-
cently. During the past three
years, the Liberian Department of
Agriculture and Commerce assist-
ed by the U.S. Economic Mission
has stimulated the planting of
more than 10,000 acres of this
crop. The economic development
plan proposes to expand cacao
plantings to at least 150,000 acres
in the next 10 years.

Another of Liberia’s important
products is palm oil. The oil palm
grows wild throughout Liberia,
but at the present time most of
this crop is harvested and pro-





cessed by the simplest of hand
methods. A pilot. project using
small presses fof extracting the
pericarp oil, hand-operated crack-
ing machines to crack the nuts,
and 80-gallon kettles for cooking
the oil is now in operation If
the pilot project prove iccessful
it is anticipated that mar mall
village-type co-operatives will be

developed throughout the country

‘

to acquire these units and make
them available to the people in
each village.

of the U.S. Economic Mission
who served with the U.S. Forest
Service prior to his work in
Liberia and who has __ since
returned to that agency, has laid

A forest survey, by a member | food and fibre,” he said.

the basis for the development of | climate combine to favour its growth, sugar-

Liberia’s forest resources. This
survey, made from aerial pihoto-
graphy supplemented by hundreds
of miles of ground cruising in
the forested areas,
more than one-third of Liberia!
is still covered with high forest.|
Many new woods, a number of
which were previously unknown
commercially, were identified in
this survey, Under the Point Four
Programme, it is proposed that
the forest survey work be con-
tinued and that a programme for
conserving its forest resources be
developed by the Government of
Liberia,

The work which has_ been
under way to improve Liberia's
domestic food supply will be
continued and expanded under
Point Four. With the foundation
already laid, the increase of the
food supply both in quantity and
quality is expected to be rapid.

No story of modern Liberia
is complete without some reference
to the excellent new harbour and
free port at Monrovia, which was
opened to commerce in July 1948.
This harbour with its 30-foot
channel was built under a lend-
lease agreement _ between the
United States and Liberia and
gives Liberia one of the finest
harbours on the West Coast of
Africa. Ships of all nations may
enter this harbpur in the order
of their arrival at the harbour's
entrance. Many shippers and ship
operators are learning the advan-
tages of a free port (a designated
area into which ods may be
brought for transhipment, stor-
age, mixing, blending, packaging,
or actual manufacture without
payment of duty or any customs
formality) and are routing cargo
through this port from many
points along the West African
Coast. A Dutch ship, for example,
in loading cargo for the Nether-
lands at a number of small ports
along the West African Coast,
may encounter an isolated ship-
ment or two for the United
States. Such a shipment may be
so small that it is unprofitable for
an American-bound ship to call for
it. With Monrovia operating as
a free port, however, it is a sim-
ple matter for the Dutch ship to
lift the cargo at the port of!
origin, carry it to Monrovia, and
unload it for trans-shipment on a
United States-bound ship. The
advantages of operations of this
type, plus the increasing flow of
trade originating in Liberia and
adjoining French Guinea and the
Ivory Coast, promise to make
Monrovia one of the most active
ports on Africa’s West Coast.

It now appears that the hardy
little Republic, which for more
than a hundred years had to
struggle for its very survival, may!
become one of the best examples |
of how free and democratic
nations can work to the mutual|
advantage of each other under the
Point Four Programme

‘ral ‘Sugar In Industry’

reveals that! and west until it reached the West Indies

‘



Is Approaching =|

WASHINGTON.

SUGAR is no longer just a foodstuff. It is | {
fast becoming an important organic chemical | '
for use in industry and the day is approach-
ing when sugar will be the basis of thousands
of little manufactured articles which the |
world uses in everyday life.

This is predicted by the U.S. Department |
of Agriculture’s Year-Book for 1951, just |
published in Washington, which prints a re- |
view of sugar research. Extensive research,
into the various uses of sugar has been con- |
ducted at the Southern Research Laboratory, |
in Louisiana.

Since the last war, shortage of manpower
has compelled research at every stage of)
sugar production from the field to the mill)
in order to keep down production costs, says |
the review, which adds: “If the 1951 costs of |
producing the crop are to be justified, every
substance of value, as well as every ounce of
sugar, must be extracted.”

Sugar research has produced develop-
ments favourable to the more economical
production of paper, plastics, shoe polish,
hair tonics, adhesives, photographic materi-
als and insecticides. Organic chemists have
prepared and described 10,000 derivatives of
sugar or its molecular halves, dextrose and
fructose.

9S SSS F9S9 F989 FFF

OF

“The first great era of synthetic chemistry
was based on the discovery of the almost
limitless possibilties of obtaining useful de-
rivatives from coal tar,’ wrote Mr. L. F. Mar-
tin, chief of the agricultural chemical re-
search division of the Southern Laboratory.
“In more recent times, the petroleum age
has brought even more products. But coal
and petroleum are irreplaceable raw mate-
rials,

“Sugar takes it place with cellulose and
starch in the ‘Big Three’ of the carbohydrates,
which provide a renewable source of raw
material for chemical synthesis, industrial
uses and food. I think it is almost certain
that industry will increase its utilisation of
carbohydrates and that sugar will steadily
become more important as we advance in
the carbohydrate age.”



_Mr, Martin said that sugar attracts chem-
ists’ attention more and more as the cheapest
and most abundant pure organic chemical
available to industry and that its use in syn-
thetic chemicals is growing. The research, he
said, extends to every part of the sugar-cane,

“Sugar-cane can excel all other plants as
a converter of the sun’s energy and the car-
bon dioxide and water of the air into energy



“All round the world, wherever soil con-
ditions and semi-tropical or sub-tropical

cane has established itself as the major crop.
From its homeland in India it travelled east

with Columbus.”

Mr. Martin reported the development of
the manufacture of “sugar-cane wax,” re-
covered froii the clarification mud of the
refining process. Manufacture of this wax
started in South Africa in 1916, but was dis-
continued after the Great War when natural
waxes became cheap.

Manufacture was revived jn Cuba during
the last war and more recently, improved
manufacturing methods have been developed.
The wax-making process is being carried out
at the Louisiana laboratory, using crude wax
imported from Cuba.

The manufacture of a moulding plastic
from sugar-cane has already become a firmly-
established industry. Now new methods are
being investigated for the manufacture of
cellulose from sugar-cane bagasse, the aim
being to reduce costs to a point at which they

are competitive with cellulose made from
wood,

“Current experiments on new pulping pro-
cesses,” wrote Mr. Martin, “promise to bring
nearer to realisation the dream of paper pro-
duction and possibly still more valuable ap-
plications of cellulose from bagasse.”

Sugar-cane molasses have long been used
for the manufacture of industrial alcohol,
with volume of production rising during
periods of economic emergency. During the
last war, much of this aleohol was used in|
the development of the U.S. synthetic rubber
industry.

~ 68399393



A new sugar by-product is aconitic acid, |
found in sugar-cane juice and molasses. Its!
existence has been known for 75 years, but |
only recently have large-scale uses been
found for it in plastic manufacture. This |
acid gives moulding properties to transparent |
plastic materials and is also being used in |
cleaning compounds.

Another new sugar derivative, known as |'$
allyl sucrose, is insoluble in water and new
uses for it have been sought for in the manu-
facture of protectis waterproof
materials.—B.U.P.

coating

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TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE







} oe

House Pass Bill To *
Control Elections

THE House of Assembly yesterday passed with amend-
ments a Bill to make provision for the direction and super-
vision of the election of members to serve in the General

THE HOUSE |
YESTERDAY

When the House of Assembly |
|

St. Michael’s Vestry Will Ask Govt. To
Control Building At Welches Playing Field

THE ST. MICHAEL'S VESTRY unanimously decided
at their meeting yesterday tc ask Government to use their
building departments for the future development of the |
site at Welches as a playing field. The Vestry was dealing c ey |

met yesterday, they passed with
amendments a Bili-to make pro-
vision for the direction and super-
vision of the election of members
to serve in the General Assembly |
of this Island, the procedure at
such elections, the expenses at
such election and for other pur-
poses in connection therewith.



House Tribute

with correspondence from the Acting Financial Secretary

Assembly of the island, the procedure and the ex
‘such election and for other purposes connected

mses in
erewith.

One of the provisions is that any person who is in-
capacitated by blindness or any other physical cause from

voting in the prescribed man

ner, would be allowed a friend

to accompany him into the voting compartment and mark

the electors’ ballot paper for

When the section which provid-
ed for incapacitated voters was
being discussed, some members
expressed fhe view that the same
provision should be made for il-
literates, Mr. Allder suggested
that symbols should be used.

It was put to the vote whether
illiterates should be allowed a
friend, but this section was pass-
ed without the inclusion of illit-
erates, by a 7—6 majerity.

Mr. Adams said that they had
to preserve the secrecy of the bal-
lot.

For the inclusion of illiterates
‘were: Messrs. Brancker, Mottley,
Dowding, Gill, Haynes and God-
dard. Against the inclusion were:
Messrs. Cox, Adams, Bryan, All-
der, Miller, the Speaker and Dr.
Cummins.

The Bill contains 50 sections.
Section 21, the one which provid-
ed for the permitting of a friend,
had been postponed when the
House last met and was the last
section dealt with yesterday.
When the House met last Thurs-
day they passed 33 sections and
yesterday the remaining 17 were
passed,

Section 36 reads:

No person shall during an elec-
tion call together, hold or address
ny election meeting in any pub-
lic place unless notice of the in-
tention to hold such meeting at
buch place has been given not
less than three hours before the
commencement of such meeting
to the Officer of Police in charge
of the parish in which such place
it situate or to the Officer of Police
in charge of the Police Station
nearest to such place.

Every notice under subsection
(1) of this section shall specify—

(a) the person in support of
whose. candidature the
meeting is to be held;
the place and approximate
time at which such meet-
ing is to commence,

Every person who contravenes
subsection (1) of this section shall
be guilty of an offence against
this section and, on conviction by
p Court of Summary Jurisdiction,
6hall be liable to a_ fine not ex-
ceeding twenty-five dollars or in
default of payment to imprison-
ment for thirty days.

In this section “public plgce”
means any street, road, lane or
highway and any park, garden,
field or sea beach to which the
public has access whether as of
right or upon. payment of any
pum of money or otherwise.

Mr. Gill (E) wanted to know
what was meant by “during an
election”. That expression he
said was not clear to him.

Mr. Adams (L)_ said that the
expression although vague, meant
from now on. If a candidate
happened to lose out at a General
Election and bought a drink for
anyone saying he was coming
back as a candidate for the next
Elections three years’ hence, the
section would apply to him.

Mr. Miller (L) did not agree
with having.to give the Police
three hours’ notice before the
beginning of a meeting. He said
that he might be in the district
where there was a meeting by
his opponent. At the end of that
meeting there might be something
which needed an explanation. If
he was asked to explain the
matter by say a few individuals
and in doing so a crowd gathered,
that would be another meeting
and he would be guilty of an
offence if the Police came along,
because under the section, he
would not have notified them.

He said that part of the section
should be deleted as it would
create a hardship on candidates,
particularly during the last two
weeks of the election.

Mr. Bryan (L) said that in sub-
section 4 of the section there
was a definition of ‘public place.”
At election time, there were pop-
ular meetings called cottage
meetings which could be held in
schools or homes. He wanted to
know if the section had any con-
trol over them,

Mr. Brancker (C) moved that
three hours in sub section one be
deleted and the words one hour
be substituted. He said that some-
times at very short notices, one
had to convene a meeting on the
ppot to contradict and counter-
act some erroneous statements
made by one’s opponents before
-the crowd who had heard those
statements had actually dispersed.

(b)

He said that three hours’ prior
notice would be too long. One
hour was about the most one
could reasonably expect to give.

OSS S49SSS




for 2.

BASKETS

ATTACHMENT CASES
ZIPP" CASES ...ceseerses

8
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%
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Reduction of 3313 %
After Stock Taking |

THERMOS PICNIC SETS

3. & 4 people



him.

He noticed that in section two
of the bill, there were definitions
of election, election documents,
election officer etc., but there was
no definition in that section or
any other of “election meeting.”

He pointed out that in sub-
section 3 of this section, refer-
ence was made to a fine not ex-
ceeding $25. He reminded the
Committee that at the last mect-
ing when he proposed that the
words “not exceeding” be in-
serted before $1,000" or before
“imprisonment for one year” in
another section of the bill, it was
said that nowhere in the bill did
the phrase “not exceeding” oc-
cur, It would therefore be out
of order to insert the words “not
exceeding” in this particular sec-
tion,

_Mr. Adams (L) said that he
did not notice the words “not ex-
ceeding” in the section, nor had
the Acting Attorney General
Having had it pointed out to him
by the honourable member, he
proposed to amend the section by
deleting those words, and _ in-
——* in place thereof, the word
“of.”

Referring to the remarks made
by the senior member for St.
Gearge, he said that the whole ob-
ject of a section like this was not
to create hardship on the people
who conducted themselves in an
orderly manner. There were po-
tential murderers in this world
and provision had to be made for
such things,

As regards to the question made
by the junior member for St.
Michae] he said that a man keep-
ing a meeting in his own house,
was responsible for order there
as it was his own private prop-
erty, but having the meeting in
a school would come under this
section.

M.. E. K. Walcott (E) referred
honourable members to section 31
which said that any person who
before during any election, for
the purpose of affecting the re-
turn of any candidate at such
election made or published any
false statement in fact in re-
lation to the personal character
or conduct of such candidate shall
be guilty of an illegal practice.

That section he said made it
plain that the offence could take
place any time whereas this sec-
tion only spoke of during an elec-
tion.

He reminded honourable mem~=
bers that section 36 applied not
only to candidates having to in-
form the police, but anyone who
was having a meeting on behalf
ef a candidate.

He agreed that the Police should
be notified of any meetings to be
kept and that they should be given
sufficient opportunity to get to the
meetings. .

Mr. Mottley (E) was also in
agreement that the Police should
be present at the meetings as they
should be carried out in an order-
ly manner.

He however felt that if a person
got a number of people around
him at the end of a meeting and
started to explain certain things
which were said at that meeting,
that in his considered opinion
would be another meeting.

Mr. Adams (L) said that the
point raised by the honourable
member could not possibly come
under the head of a meeting. The
section must me taken as a whole
as if referred to the person in
support of whose candidature the
meeting was to be held.

Mr. O. T. Allder (L) said that
the point the hon, senior mem-
ber for the City had raised was
definitely a logical one. While the
provision in sub-clause 1 might
appear to be workable to the hon
senior member for St. Joseph, a
lot of snags could creep up.

The fact was that as soon as a
meeting was ended many people
assembled into small groups and
started fresh discussions. “It just
depends on the outlook of the
particular constable to determine
whether or not it is a continua-
tion of the same meeting or whe-
ther there are several meetings
out of the one which was held by
the particular candidate.” 7

“T am influenced by the point
made by the hon. member for the
City because there is the possi-

bility of such a thing taking
place.”
Mr. Mottley (E) pointed out

that he was not prepared to
pursue the point as the honour-
able senior member for St. Joseph
and the honourable senior mem-
ber for St. James had assured him
that in this matter a magistrate
had the power to use his discre-
tion and not inflict the maximum
penalty.

The clause was then passed.

The next clause—37, dealt with



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The House also passed a Reso-
lution to place the sum of $36,-
800 at the disposal of the Govern-
or-in-Executive Committee to
supplement the Estimates 1951-52,
Part 1—Current;

A Resolution to sanction the
Scheme of Government for the
Coleridge and Parry School made
by the Director of Education on
the fourteenth day of July, 1951,

under the provisions of section 22

— Education Act. 1890 (1890-
The House adjourned until

August 7, at 3pm



the penalty for participation in
an election campaign by election
officers.

Every election officer who—

(a) canvasses for votes on be-

half of any candidate or
political party; or

(b) addresses any meeting on

behalf of any candidate or
political party; or

(c) in any way actively asso-

ciates himself with the elec-

tion campaign of any candi-

date or political party,

shall be guilty of an offence
against this section and on convic-
tion by a Court of Summary
Jurisdiction, shall be liable to a
fine of two hundred dollars or to
imprisonment with or without
hard labour for six months.

Mr. Adams (L) asked to delete
the words “a fine of two hundred
dollars or to” occurring in the sec-
ond last line of the clause. This
took out the fine, but Mr. Mottley
argued that the offence would be
a very serious one and the term of
imprisonment should be increased.
This should read: “not exceeding
twelve months.”

These amendments were agreed

to and the Clause was then
passed.
Clause 38 dealt with the total

amount of expenditure that may
be incurred in respect of the can-
didature of any person. On the
suggestion of Mr, E. K. Walcott,
10 cents per elector was amended.
The amendment reads: “Where the
number of voters is in excess of
10,000 the amount is ten cents per
elector, where it is less than 10,000
fifteen cents per elector.”

The argument put up by sev-
eral members was that the figyre
of 10 cents per elector as originally
set out was but a farce.

The Clause was
amended.

A section allows for the prose-
cution of an agent or candidate if
certain provisions are not carried
out. The original Bill intended to
make the candidate prove that he
was not guilty when he was
charged and that the guilt of an
agent would involve the guilt of
the candidate,

Mr. Mottley called for amend-
ment which was finally accepted.
Mr. Mottley said that the onus
should be on the prosecution to
prove their case. He said that an
over zealous agent might do things
he was not instructed to do and
one should not be bound by what
one’s agent did.

The other sections were after-
wards passed, some with amend-
ments.

Bryan Asks About
Flood Victinis

Mr. T. O. Bryan at yesterday's
meeting of the House of Assem-

passed as



bly gave notice of questions
about flood victims of 1949.
These read:

“Is government aware that

there are a considerable number
of persons who claim that they
have suffered damage to property
and for loss of household effects
during the “floods” of 1949, and
whose names were not included

among. those selected for com-
pensation?
“Has government’s attention

been drawn to an article appear-

ing in the Press claiming that
there is disappointment and
dissatisfaction caused by these
omissions?

“If the answers are in the

affirmative will Government set
up a committee to investigate the
claims of these people with the
view to sending down legislation
to effect immediate compensation
for deserving cases?”

Chief Justice
Congratulated

Before the business of the Court
of Grand Sessions was started
yesterday morning, Mr. W. W.
Reece, K.C., drew the attention of
the court to the new mode of
addressing judges in the Colonial
territories.

He said that he had noticed in
the paper the title of the Chief
Judge of this colony has been
changed and is to be addressed as
His Lordship, He said they were
proud of the fact that the title
had been conferred upon him who
is the Chief Judge both in Civil
and Criminal matters and also the
Chief Judicial Officer of this
island.

The Honourable the Chief Jus-
tice then thanked Mr. Reece for
his kind remarks.



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Late Reporter

Tribute was paid by members of
the House at their meeting yes-
terday in memory of Mr. E. A.
Maynard, late Official Reporter of
the House of Assembly

A resolution of sympathy to be
transmitted to his widow was
moved by Mr. G. H. Adams and
seconded by Dr. H. G. Cummins.

Mr. L. E. R. Gill spoke on be-
half of members of the Electors’
Association,

Mr. Adams said: “I wish to
make a motion that the House put
ym» record its sorrow at the death
of the late Official Reporter who
was always known to us as Mr.
Gussie Maynard,

He was a very faithful servant
of the House and a very efficient
reporter who never pretended to
go outside the realms of reporting
to be a sort of freelance know-all
journalist.

I do not think that anyone of us
could say that he has been ac-
quainted with anyone in the island
with the exception of Mr. Charlie
Rock, who was a more efficient
reporter—not that we do not have
excellent reporters in our midst.

Mr. Maynard and Mr. Rock had
more experience than the ones I
see at the present moment and I
hope that the latter will follow in
their footsteps and become the
outstanding men that they were

Mr. Maynard will always be re-
membered by all of us as a real
true friend. He seemed able to mix
with absolute ease in any com-
pany. He was at home and made
others feel at home,

I am sure every member of the
House will wish me to say on their
behalf—and it should be recorded
in our deliberations—that we ex-
press our sorrow at his passing. 1
also move that expression of our
sorrow be transmitted to his
widow.”

Dr. H. G. Cummins seconded.

Mr. L. E. R. Gill said; “I would
like on behalf of the members of
this side of the House to add my
quota to what has been said by
the Leader of the House.

I have known Mr. Maynard for
the past 23 years. I first got to
know him as a reporter in the
Courts of this island, I can say of
all those years and during the
past three years that I have had
the honour to be a member of this
chamber, that he always dis-
charged his duties zealously,
faithfully and impartially. He dis-
charged those duties to the ad-
vantage of this honourable cham-
ber.

I feel sure that the honest and

sincere sympathy of each and
everyone of us will go out on
this occasion.”

Members then stood in their

places for a few
mark of respect.

moments as a



They Were Trained
In Moscow

@ from page 1

soon became an official of
North Korean Labour Party.

Three years later, he was named
Minister of Commerce.

Lt. General Teng Hua, 51, the
Deputy Commander of the Chi-
nese forces in Korea—he is prob-
ably the oldest Red delegate in
Kaesong, and has been active in
the Chinese Communist move-
ment since 1930, serving as a
political officer in the First Army.

A graduate of Kang Ta Uni-
versity in 1934, he dropped his
political army job in 1940, when
he assumed his first command
over the 120th Division.

Major General Fang, reported
tc be a propaganda expert. He
praduated from Moscow Univer-
sity, and joined the Chinese
Communist forces upon his return
to China, confining his activities
te the political devartment. |

Officials here also furnished |
information on two top ranking!
Reds not present at the truce
tulks, but undoubtedly key fig-
ures in master minding Commu-
nist strategy.

They are

the

Kim Il Sung, the
Premier of North Korea and
Commander - in - Chief of the
North Korean Army, and General
Peng Te Suai, Commander of the
Chinese “Volunteers.”

Kim joined the Korean guerilla
forces when he was 19 -fighting
the Japanese in Manchuria. In 10
years as a guerilla, he rose to the
post of Secretary of the North-
east Manchuria Communist Party

In 1941 his guerilla uncle died
in Russia, where he had taken his
band including Kim. He had been
born Kim Song Ju.

In 1948 he led his regiment in
revolt against the national, gov-
ernment. During the last days of
the Japanese war he commanded
the 18th Army greup, and later
took command of the Northwest
Peoples’ Liberation Army, now
the Chinese Communist Field
Army.—U.P.



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in respect to a playing field at Welches.
MC,

Mr. E. D. Mottley, P., in
making his motion, said that he
sat and listened at the Public En-
quiry of the Princess Alice Play-
ing Field. In view of the state-
ment made by a member of the
Government that “the St. Mi-
chael’s Vestry was a most cor-
rupt body”, he thought that the
vestry should inform the Gove
ernment that they as a body were
perfectly willing to co-operate
with them by looking after the

administration of the playing
fields.

But, he said, the Vestry had
no machinery with which they

could properly undertake the
erecting of Buildings on and the
laying out of grounds and roads
at playing fields. The vestry was
therefore suggesting that the
Government use their building
departments for that purpose and
they, the Vestry, would be will-
ing to admintster them.

.Mr, A. R. Toppin, in seconding
the motion, said that he entirely
agreed with what Mr. Mottley
said, and Mr. D. G. Leacock jnr.
rose in support of the motion,

Criticism

Mr. Leacock said that he sat
for three days on the Princess
Alice Playing Field Enquiry
and he had come to the conclu-
sion that whatever the Vestry did
in their handling of funds from
Government to develop the play-
ing field, would be criticised,

Mr, F, C. Goddard said that in
Christ Church and all the other
parishes, only one playing field
was being established, while
there were five in St. Michael.
He knew that the Vestry of
Christ Church did not have suf-
ficient time to supervise the de-
velopment of the playing field at
Christ Church and it would be
five times aS much work in St.
Michael.

The Vestry awarded Anette
Beckles a vacant exhibition at
the St. Miahael’s Girls Schoo!
and 13 boys were given exhibi-
tions at Combermefe School
They were Harold Brathwaite
Winston Bayley, Louise Vaughn,
Cuthbert Garnes, Clyde Henry,
Joseph Hinds, Leroy Inniss, Win-
ston Maynard, Timothy Brome,
Glyne Bryan, Vere Howard, Al-
lan Boyce and Beresford King.

Joe Louis Fights

‘Tomorrow Night

SAN FRANCISCO, July 30,

Joe Louis said that he probably
would weigh between 210 and
212 pounds for his fight on Wed-
nesday night with Cesar Brion
which would give him about i6
pounds advantage over the Ar-
gentine heavyweight,

The Brown Bomber himself is
not saying how much he\ weighs
now but his camp is worried about
the fighter’s weight which is said
to have gone several pounds below

210. He said, “I weighed 207 for
Andy Walker last February.

That was a little fine. I couldn't
put any combination punches
against Walker, I’m not kidding
myself that co-ordination is there
But I think I’m stronger around
212 at my age. Anything lower
drains my legs.

Louis planned his finai drill on

Monday afternoon, nen to do
only limbering up exercises on
Tuesday. Brion is in Lafayette

where he held the final workout
at the ranch of a fellow country-
man Silvio De Anglis. Promoters
Jimmy Murray and Lou Thomas
anticipated $50,000 house for the
10 round battle. This is the sec-
ond match between the 37-year-
old Louis and his 24-year-old
opponent, Louis won the oe

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Bishop Says
Farewell
To Vestry

Bishop Mandeville, who during
his tenure of office as Dean of the
Cathedral was Chairman of the
St. Michael’s Vestry, said ‘“fare-
well” to the Vestry yesterday
just as they convened their meet-

ing

The Chairman, Mr. M. D
Symmonds, said that the Lorc
Bishop had asked their indul-
gence to bid them farewell. He
the Bishop — had not got the
Ppportunity to have done s¢

before, he said and he was quite
sure that all of them would have

been quite happy to afford him

the opportunity.

Bishop Mandeville said tha
their meetings were not held ot
regular days and he was unable
to be present at the last meeting
He however could not leave the
Vestry without saying “farewell,”

He said that he was quite glad
to see how the business of the
St. Michael’s Vestry was being
conducted and the amount of
work that the Vestry had done
for the people of the parish,
adding that he was grateful tha
the work of poor relief was in
the hands of so responsible a
body.

Mr. A. S. Bryden said that, as
the oldest member of the Vestry,
he would have liked to say that
they appreciated the fact that His
Lordship had come down _ that
day to say farewell to the mem-
bers of the Vestry.

“We do not only wish him
success in his new undertaking,”
he said, “but we are sure that he
will be successful.”

Mr. T. Miller said that he
wanted to associate himself with
the remarks of Mr. Bryden. Mr,
Bryden was the oldest member of
the vestry, but he was
youngest,

It was a happy moment
them to know that His Lordship
one of the soil, had been elected
Bishop. “He has not only got
it because he is the able man that
he is, but because of his
goodwill,” he said,



Frittered Away
Prestige

From Page 1
direct or indirect to the spread of
Communism, and thus preserve
the peace of the world by reaching
conditions on which a lasting ana
friendly setthkement may be made
with Soviet Russia, on a basis no\
of weakness and divided policy
but of strength, unity, and well
concerted measures.”
Main Causes
Churchill said Britain’s decline
in the Middle East could be at-
tributed to three main causes:
The loss of India and Pakistan
and their armies,

‘The supposition that becomes
widespread throughout the Middle
East that Britain has only to be
pressed sufficiently by one powe:
or another to abandon her rights
and interests in that, or indeed in
any other part of the world.”

“Mistakes and miscalculations
in policy which led to our winding
up of our affairs in Palestine in
such a way as to earn in an almost
equal degree the hatred of Arab
jand Jews.--U.P.





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PAGE SIX




MICKEY MOUSE

OTT ry







Me NUTS! LE
Toes

NOT ME!
Cum STAYIN’ HERE! 4







THE LONE _ RANGER

" WELL SEND TUE zd

THAT COLISIN OF MAGGIE'S
16 THE PIO} Bi -
KEEPER I EVER HIRED -

fe Wh. he.

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PROOF, EH ? YOU
TOO ARE SKEPTIC /
AY HAVE... PROOFS
..STOPAY IN SEA I



7” WE IBY ONY HE
MATTERS WORSE...
MEAT itty TRUST THAT SWe |

HE WAS TOO GUAVE... 7



| HOPE SO# I'VE |
TYOU\ HAP ENOUGH
CH\_ MOSQUITOES!







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

BY CARL ANDERSON

BY WALT DISNEY

H NUH DION'T “THINK WORE OLD PAL GOOFY
rs ea LET YOU GO BON





“4
'

| Coes
YOU POST THE parr
ON THIS SIDE AND TH
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NOW







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AY ACCEPT YOUR
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y eh si ~






THAT'S A GRAND (DEA. teen
BUT FIRST LLL Fay A /
CALL ON MRS, LEILA
STAFFORD

A




SUSTING PRES (DES SLICK, YO
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#7 ANY TEETH AND SHE'S
CTT $0 TIRED SHE
Hn CAN HARDLY
STAND UP!

MAYBE WE COULD MAKE
{T BETTER* HAVE
"HONEY" KILLA COW.

OR









TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1951

Gums Bleed!

Teeth me mean that. you Se keee as ‘have Pyorthes,
later. cause your Oreeth
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mou
and Biesaing the et tightens ax teeth. Iron iad
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outh well and save your se ane -
mmeney, Amosan from your chemis:
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<2 fal ot
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TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN



















































































































Sees ipa apal
| |
. Ten cents per,agate tine on week-days| “Tr ape a
i € ermentioned *perty will be set > for sale at the Registration Office
YELEPHON ind 12 cents per agute lin Sundays, | satiainne a peapetse :
a 2508 ; mininum charge a an woes ~ ae < z « cae . ae 7 . — { oe a a . io
} @nd $1.80 on Sundays, | 1 the ome 5 d ; i : * Hi art } j : a iy hour uli ¢ ieuk
The charge for announcements of FOR RENT | | af pplication to me
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknowl- * REAL | af FREDERICK ARCHIBALD CONRAD CLAIRMONTE Plaintiff
edgments, and In Memoriam notices is ESTATE | ’ &
$:.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays Minimum charge week 72 cents and) ———————————— | JOSEPH FITZGERALD CLAIRMONTE O’NEALE Nefendar
for auy number of words i —_ 96 one Sendeue Me words — over 4 eae St. LAWRENCE suitable | | PROPERTY: ALL. THAT certain ¢ parce iand of Checker Hal
3 cents per word on w ys and| words 3 cents a word week—4 cents q/ for building sites. For particulars apply | - re S OF WASTEFUL GOVERNMENT FYPE TU , } Plantation) situate in the parish of Saint I vnd@ Island aforesaid containing
@ cents per word on Sundays for each) werd on Sundays; to K, R, Hunte, telephone 8187 or 4611. | ILL EFFECTS OF WASTEFUL GOVERNMENT PXPENDITURE | b dines: Bever Wiyee peed thirty two sepehen Ruting and
additional werd. 1NIB—.t.n. | i ing on li ‘ on Mr. Walaa lands now or late of —s
—_—_ cad Plantation o r late of OW mC oure Fintage and Ernest
DIED LAND: 11,298 sq. ft. of land, situated NEED FOR INCENTIVES TO INCREASE PRODUCTION j Aug uw A a Public Read SECONDLY ALL THAT certain
: HOUSES at; Clevedale Road, Black Rock, piece pareel ¢ und ‘part af Checker Hall Plantation) situate tm the parisn
aoe ot ae 30, aay ag Si Michael. Por fuil particulars, Phone o La and Island pforesaid co i imeasurement Two Acre
idence, Qua’ . . ' 4523 31.7.51—1n SIR Al EXANDER ROGER ON THE TAXATION H AZARD ! o roo@ eighteen perches Butting and b ee lands « Oliv Decoure
Charies Leopold Egwards. His funeral
eeiey for the AN eee tiutee P| s0b1. New Bunedlowe Moby Bethe | ygAND—Quarter Acre of land, with 3 ppon new plant... In July, 1950, on) iene of Way or however cite the nme may butt end. bound THINDEY Asa
to-day for the All Saints Church, i A ee . avy Gardens. / Nari hold, Tudor Bridge Gap, near , iia aes siimakeoais tne application of the company THAT certain piece or parcel of land (part of Checker Hall Plantation) situate
Edwards, York Rdwande Deaiios | Dial’ 4192 Bite | whe Beli Comer, with tues Bus) THE TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING of tnder the terms of its franchies y | GUAT Sertain piece or Barcel of land ‘part of Checker Hall Plantation) situate
Edwards, Fitz Edwards, (Sons); Beryl - a | Tad, OE APply Stuart, Fairfield} the Telephone and General Trust, Limited, was held on ates Board was a ppointea aoe scte suel'xpur perches BAtiWEenE sevEding On other, lands st ie ie
Sgt, (Dawenter): Alert ‘aitkes,| BEDROOM: [One comfortable bed | —T—_ Set Mey Sand in London by the Governor. to con-| Sguey, Rniage ane Bnew huavelie Mipsis on,0 Rand ove wiih Sere
. > and running water we ae fi rs Jer Ci a i of Way on other lands o said Oliver Cc §
jean and B.G, Papers Please Copy.| With a dulet, family’ in Hastings. For | D. F. DeABREU Sir Alexander Roger, K.C.LE., chairman and managing /,‘ . . . : . > the telephone ts S—esse: . I ALL A slace, “ce or p pl of la tel t
sete Fhone S00 ar Dial 3111 director, who presided, said:— 5 : ee eR. Ms Garden situate in the parish of Saint Lucy in this IsMind containing by ade
THANKs 31.7.51—In | BE HEEDPUL! Time Tells which is Sure- Y ill : h a I doa . tie company because of increased measurement five acres sixteen perches of land or thereabouts bounding on
BUNGALOW-Newly built’ Bungalow | 'Y Approaching. Re-Sale Values are My ou will notice that this is our twenty-fifth annual general! \age rates agreed by negotiation Bromefield, Babbs and Checker Hal) Plantetions and on the Public Road 9¢
GUrTeNe The | Gittens family | beg] on long lease on St. James’ Coast, (7 | S!08an which should be a Mascot for| meeting and I think you will agree that our balance-sheet Wtn the Trade Union Council ot however eise the same bound Together with the messuage and all and
through this medium to return thanks| niles from town). Fully furnished, ali | #!! Keen Buyers. Inspect these Attrac- da ik x 7 ar : % Jamaica and because f singular other buildings thereon and thereto belonging
te all thats kind frienga who sent modern conveniences from September ar Serene Boosting—C for emonstrates we have cause for satisfaction at our progress | sneral ving in the ro a of the | Unset PRICE: £3,600-0-0d
reaths, ters of condolence, or in| Ist. Dial 2472. 7.5L ourselves an Sompare Prices sore 7 ar. : ] a Pe ya ibe 5e cost of materiais | DATH OF SALE: 10th August, 1951
any way expressed their ‘sympathy in| ————— ST S138 | AP MAXWELL COAST Two Stone Built | OVer the years. We have maintained an 8 per cent. dividend ““anq increases as lixed by the} H. WILLIAMS,
our recent bereavement through the; “EBENEZER"—Crumpton Street, from | BUngalow Type—One has 3 Bedrooms, on the Ordinary capital since 1930—an unbroken record of itates Soard came ini nee’ iv Registrar-in-Chancery.
death of Joseph Gittens, Two Mile] ist September, a two storey family | the other 4, an Orchard to Admire 21 years—and in additic to a cé tal panerie £ 325.000 a Steines ‘ teas © mto force in
are Michael. residence, containing 4 bedrooms upstairs @!4 about 2 Acres 7 $ q ac on oa capital reserve ot 825,006 “ary, Tt Fs
Caroline Gittens (Wife), 31.7.51—1n and back gallery “overlooking Harrison's | AT, ST. LAWRENCE GAP. A Seaside plus an appreciation of £469,837 over the book value of Trinidad
_—_ rounds, room and dr i Stone u Bungalow a i . ‘ . ” a Ga ‘
“Rie Seat tera se, cee | ewig cattle: RE [Ane gm Cs A Sia SBadts| Lotalling LITHTS2.” All this deeeie Ue eee AegeEVES ced mating a total ot iase
. raw and usua Ls, pply on : ve ota P 2 i pit ar rorld-wia , 4, “ § 4 total of 14,79 iy ‘f
ways expressed thelr aprapathy itr oor | froma. SFsi—sn | (Lerce) Stone "Built Bungelow toes o ing £273,75 3 All this des vite the accute world-wide j;,, service at the end af Gee z 5
recent ‘bereaverment which Was OC | pm | Fine View of Sea and Land, about 2 epression of the early 1930s and six years of war and its 1950 During the 22 >
sat oe the death of Walter ONE (1) large airy room at Bel Airy, | “cre aftermath ' 180.000 8 1€ ate nearly | -———__—_--_— " ano eee ree en
Egber: ing (Furnished or unfurnished). Dial 3663, | ABOUT 7 MILES FROM CITY, Ch. Ch : 7 : was expended upon ad-
The Gooding fam. 31,7. 51—1n 28,.7.51—2n | A New 3 Bedroom Stone Built Bun Profit And Allocations were added, bringing the total citional automatic exchange e a . VG
. i ‘ s “ ’ d, § a 2utome > ange equip- 4 TE
Sn EpEP ees aw re} : - t on oan 12 . y ¢ ; ,
SEAIB: geal de Sole on coke Oe nr haley hn oe yg eA men Turning to the 1950 accounts, nur ‘ber to over 100,800 at Decem- nent, and the extension of the SAGUENAY RMINALS Ce
Miss Doris Scale of U.S.A. grate-| Ray Street, Inmeciny we ee ee Bedroom Stone Hull Durga e the profit at £85,837 after charg. P°! 31 last. cable network throughout _ the ie yoo & SE ewe Se
ttinaed te fore be Mette oe Ppt ayet 28.7 51—Sn | NEAR THE GARRISON. Almost New|ing profits tax and income-tax Venezuela Cclony, Here again inereases i, — - m = ae m er * Ln
a ie » Sent wreaths or ee | nd Nearly 100% Stone Built 3 Bedroom i : 2») ROT ‘ eee kak + eosts. of operation due to rises . + -@
expressed sympathy with them on| PLAT on Blue Wolere Perrece, newly | BunEaOw Tine Crane ,bullt 3 Betiroom mown a slight reduction of £2,797. The Trust's association with aserials aid tnkeoe hab . y 7 CANADIAN SERVICE
the passing of their beloved Sister! built with spacious cupboards. Phone|AT HASTINGS MAIN RD. A 3 Bedroom:| Dividends and interest at £245,134 Venezuela dates back to 1928, It natte i Pp evels From Halifax, N & Montreal
Gladys Seale, late of Bush Hall, St | aea0. 25.7.61--t.f.n, | (possible 4) Partly Stone Built Bungalow | Were up slightly, while sundry has a substantial investmeny 84° it necessary for the com- al bats %
Michael. statin iw oe meepempeaesiigs ~ |Type and A 2 Bedroom Almost New |yrepeipts were down by £4,520. interest in the te lephone opera- P*"Y to apply for an inerease ir
Mother Seale; Cyril and Gordon Seale, ROOM: Furnished or unfurnished, large, | Stone Built Bungalow; both yield about iv ae wee ’ . A 2 opera- the tele f ; : vr ' oy Se “Sr reenrnameeemrest cesta terete em ee ae
{Brothers, UB: Mrs. Boucher, Mrs.| cool Room. Apply: Holyrood, ee $109 pm, and oan be bought os Management expenses decreased ting service there through — thé arated ars : vatees Phis was LOADING DATES
egall, Mrs. Cuffley and cemtiver: ia St. Matthias, Hastings a1.7 ti—in | Lew ss under £3,500. . A £761, The reduction of ae ea cs Trenane rata mak C ‘ foe lr ao &
ESET | openers S MA D. A Seaside 828 in interest paid on loans Properties, damited, anc the tates came into force as from | Expected Arrival
——~—| SOMERSET-—St. Lawrence Ga 2/4 Bedroom Partly Stone Built 3 storey, |... 3 the 4 i Penezuel: - . ‘ August 1, 1950 Montreal | Halifax Dates, Bridgeto
I bedrooms. Fully furnished Rurtning enough Land to Convert or Build a 60-|#%4 deposits reflects the repay- hehe auele Seer, , eee ' ; Barbador
\nonima Nacional Telefonos d Barbados ‘ ‘
water; electric light. From ist August, | oom Hotel or Guest House ment of the bank loan. Profits 47. ate ‘ ii oe arbados Pak HIUL + Jy ® suis | a July
ItGPE: In loving memory of our be.| APP!’ next door Mrs. R. Lynch AT ROCKLEY MAIN RD,, Near Blue|tax and income-tax at £87,400 is Venezuela. In Barbados the Telephone SS ONee ienth 8 | 23 July # August
loved one Elsie Ev 31.7.51—2n | Waters; A 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type. ai : ae . In March last 1 returned Compan vhict Laut na” hele Tan SUNPRINCE i t 6 AUR .« 22 August
loved one Elsie Evelyn Hope, died AT NAVY GARDENS, Almost New 2{QUr contribution towards the iosether with Mr. Hollyer, chair. Gor Pany: Which provides service i 1 August 16 August | 1 ‘Sept
k F — 7 > wether w Mr. oll rc P= Hire s ari anine ’ . us §
ls Winnie Tele amd lite depart| ,,"“SNUG CORNER” — Palm Beach, | Bedroom (Possible 3), Stone Byilt Bun-|GOvernment’s spending depart- . an of me servintrins ares satin ! ke all the companies in which we ar * a ee
You'll live forever in our hearts, | Hastings. Comfortable Seaside Bunga- | galow ments and swallows up more than |. : + pany, are interested, by the most mod- U.K SERVICE

The Hope's Family. 81.7.51—1n





low, all Modern Conveniences. Available











NEAR NAVY GARDENS: Almost New 3



half our gross profits,



and our consulting engineers from

ern type of automatic equipment,





ist August. Apply C, E. Clarke, 7/ Bedroom Stone Built Bungalow visit to Venezuela and the , 37 aur ate . he : . * +
Swan St. Phone 2631 or 3020 “ "| AT LOWER FONTABELLE, A New 2| We have transferred £10,000 to British West Indies, having spent acded 378 new stations during the From Swansea, Liverpool and Glasgow
$1.7,51—3n | Pedroom Concrete Bungviow, Going as | revenue reserve and £25,000 to ;ye weeks he former ¢ ~y Year, making a total of 4,330 at Expected Arrival
ANNOUNCEMENTS —|Low as Under £1,100 contingencies reserve, bringing fe feos ae onmer country the end of 1950. Nearly £55,000 Swansee Liverpsel Glassew sigs, Beldgetawa,
“VOLENCY” — Prospect, St. James. | ABOVE GOVERNMENT HILL. A new 3 fee Tt £100,000 a; u ® and several weeks in Jamaica, was spent upon indoor and t ‘LONDON VENDOR 11 Jul 17 July 8 July 10 August
HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—isle of} Comfortable @ Bungalow, ali| Bedroom Concrete Bungalow. Going as ae ' and £75,000 ‘yrinidad, and Barbados. ite et , and Oul- | os, “BAST WAVE if suffeient = 14 Aug. = 18 Aug. 4 August
Spices. SANTA MARIA—ioveliest hotel| ™0dern conveniences. Available | from | LOW as under £1,200 respectively. After these transfers Caracas, the capital, and all the side prant extensions and. recon- SUNRELI tind wee 9 Aug 3 Sept, 20 Sept
in Caribbean. Rates from 87.00 per head| }*t September. Apply C. E. Clarke, 7|! HAVE ALSO SEVERAL PRopeRTiEs | tnd providing for the usual 7 per tanks ay > Venezuela are *truction {offers , ee
per day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi-| Swan St. Phone 2631 or 3029 in Belleville, Fontabelle, and at Brighton |cent. Preference and 8 per cent. ‘~bortant towns of Venezuela are “the number of telephones in
dential district ufder Government House 31,7.51—3n | —Seaside and Facing Sea; City Business ; : ; per ,. undergoing a process of moderni- ,, : sontneatcparemonpiiieliaabiiceh staat cia aoe SOs
hill, Rates from $5.00 per head per day. Premises—a Large one with Residence |O'dinary dividends, £08,752 _ is zation and expansion which has ‘Me Overseas companies in which , a 7 9 gece
SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing AUTOMOTIVE and Eman Gountey ‘Hetses ieee Gee | brought ine” MEAinst £100,094 to be seen to be believed. Wide by deena ieee U.S. & CONTINENTAL SERVICE
Beach, Rates from $4.00 per head per untry Houses, Zar Cane ‘0 it in. - » steel s . -rete < . yy nearly 18,000 during 1950 to a
Pl tions, B 2 avenidas, steel and concrete struc- ; ( Expected Arrival
day. Enquiries to D, M. Thi, Pransce. AUTO-CYLE—A Norman Auto Gycle Rincon. ca a Oe eae Balance-Sheet tures and new urbanizations are tal of over 198,000, and the ster- London Antwerp Rotterdam Dates, Bridgetown,
my E % oe in good condition. Apply to | Hastings. 29.7.51—1n. Investments in our general port- appearing in all directions and /i%g value of their gross telephone ; PREve
. Moore, “Plaza,"’ Barbarees Hill or foli ‘ 11 * » eee Y i we ci yn buildings and pl needa 4 . | @y. “BUNO 18 July 23 July 27 July 6 August
EDUCATIONAL Brittons Cross Road. AUCTION ae at £1,118,024 show little these developments have been gsa ae ant assets amounts |». ssuNJEWEL Aug 14 Aug 17 Aug 2 Sept
change. farried out at a great speed to some £13,000,000, They form























CAR: Morris Oxford. Excellent con-

























































Loans and debentures in sub-







during the past two or three years,























valuable overseas assets to Britain











Agents:







































PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703






















cate dition, Phone 2393. 31.7.51—In sidiary companies re jj reas y
n ) nies have increased > ping é 0 xdern for investment and export, z
MODERN HIGH SCHOOL | ——— ~ag. |UN@ER THE IVORY HAMMER |b, ‘efaa. ose all by way of Verte ene ee ee oe he ERGY et eee, Bae
(Registered and Approved by Dept of ] ne (1) Standard Sedan 12 H.-P. : ‘ A 1 > ay mac une ¥ anc apphances, oe ei a ; 6 naies, in : saiiicankia eee oe Be:
Education) oat in Toy condition, new tyres and| By Sue an ene from the In- etal oans to aid the telephone It is hard for the public services, Whieh these companies operate
There have bee: 1 | battery. A bargain at the figure asked. | Surance Co,, I will sell at my_ Auction ; operatin, companies in their i as kee ace the eleco “ rvices
plicants for Go nchoet Wear tee oon Apply Thomas House, Brighton, Black | Mart, Shepherd Street, on Thursday, ania. Dp es t eng ee wae? oo ie witht tenn on ae oe °
meneing 2nd September 1951, all of whom | eek. or Phone 3174. 31.7.51—3n | August 2nd, a quantity of Lacquer Paints The loz Mathie is al aA with the new demands, particular- \ 10U & a burden either to ‘0.
we cannot accommodate. This necessi- | | Sitable for painting Cars and Buses; | e loan by the Trust to asso- jy as all public services have the Colonial Development Fund Oc *
tates several entrance examinations. CARS—Renault "760" formerly M—6s2, | Sunflex--in 1 gallon, ‘4 gallon and 2-pint | ciated company — The Anglo- cuffered some disruption and dis- 4Nd the British taxpayer, or to
The first will be held on Friday, 3rd] t¥™€S_ and condition excellent. 38—40| Sizes, Ready Mixed Putty, Rope, Wrap- Portuguese Telephone Company— F = > he var . San.)
August, 1951, at 10 a.m. Those who ‘have| M-P.G. Only 7,000 miles. Reason for | PiN® Paper, Toilet Seat with Covers in which amounted to £768 oy ~, turbance by removals of plant the various Governments of the FAC.
already beer allocated to the second en-| *¢iling—owner bought a Mayflower. To| Bakelite, Aluminium Pots, Pans, Kettles, | (V Ze 137 at necessitated by the Government's islands they serve ;
trance exam on August 2ist must not| be Seen at Chelsea Garage (1950) Lid.,| Various sizes Enamel Chambers, Allumi-|the end of 1949, was repaid — lans Effect O . NEW YORK SERVICE
Dement thembakeas on thas Sed, Pinfold Street nium Pressure | Cookers, Sandpaper, | during 1950 from part of the pro- ae ane, om ate ect Ot Defence Programme 3S. TRYA sails 20th July Arrives Barbados lst July, 1981.
ee a A. LYNCH. (abla aeciacaa ee Soeeenss, Cates deine Ease hukeinnine Ot oa Ne eG ee ee wha lthiont of the Sous Acechedl We are living in a time when [| * TRAMER sails 10th August Arrives Barbados Qist August, 1951
” anh . ; " , ' aap ‘| of further capital by that company W® ‘ e aM the problems oR ers a ——teteerteceen an = whaaitanptieatemiydiominnseveints nl. eiplacehieieetliealintiest adi
Principal, CARS—Just arrived!—Mayflowers & | Window Glass panes 16 ins by 12 ins. as 1 p at company Republics, the major source I be ms | of the world call NEW ORLEANS SERVIC
29.7.51.—8n, , Vanguards in Grey, Maroon, Blue, Black. | #%4 ™any other items. referred to later. vy ; a. tor statesmanship, foresight, faith eae Pera sEANS ICE
Cash prices $2,300.00, $2,800.00 respec-| Sale at 1 p.m. Terms: CASH, The bank balances at December *Ti8ing from oil. Its menetary ang courage of the highest degree. |. eGENERAL ARTIGAS sails 1900 Jul Arnived Bprbados “aivt July, 196t,
tively. Just advised of further increase VINCENT GRIFFITH. 31, 1950, amounting t 364,258, System is based on the gold mp at Gueree: TRAMER sails Ist August rrives Barbados 14th Auguat
aa in prices cutautite. Eilomistic. cho A\ictionese. 4 1950, amounting to £664,258, §¥ amen sold: pauian ts he need for the expenditure of | \ STEAMER sailn 15th Auqiet Arrives Barbados 2th August, 1051
LOST & FOUND Garage (1950) Ltd., Pinfold Street 29.7.61.—4n. | Will be used during 1951 by the standard and its gold reserves are vast sums on defence cannot be ater anor e watemes —or~-—y -ensheeaRRRESDEEReEeS
‘és 28-7.51--3n. | 7 veritatis Seorenhg companies con- aa in on * its oe apo denied, and we as individuals and CANADIAN SERVICE
LOST nected with the Trust. tis a strong dollar country with as a nation realize that we must | ©UTHBOUN
PiCK-UPS—Two new Vanguard Pick- PUBLIC NOTICES . no external debt, and there are 4) . ey
; ’ . shoulder the adde rde Name of Bhi Sall
SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS. Series F ue. Cash price $2,600 00. Next shipment Valuation Of Investments Tick restr tituiealt FEA camer itera pete : Rosell burde ns thus , ails Montreal Salle Halifax Arrives B'dos.
7001 and 7003. Finder please return same | Wilh ge 5° ey, ietested. pexsoris — The valuation of £1,432,535 for A record. number of stations Se S by events. At the} ss, “ALCoA PENNANT July a4th ‘Aunués an
to Frederick Greenidge, Lower Greys|Snould seize = this opportunity now. | ip ‘ f Rosia ted i Sa eae * : same time, we are entitled to ex-| 8S. “ALCOA PARTNER Aug. 6th au ;
Tenantry, Ch. Ch. Reward offered. | Chelsea Garage (1980) Lad... Pinfold St. | aagMia conte ver nate na one Sedans | quoted investments represents an namely, 7,877-—weve added during ject that the leaders at the nati 8. “ALCOA PILGRIM" Ae ake, August 130
31.7,51—1n |. 5 28.7.51.—3n, me horas BL 80 an week aut; |appreciation of 48.8 per cent.-om 1950, bringing the total to 64,853, ijt, eRe asa On ud. 27th Septr, Gth
“= * minimum charge $1.50 on week-days the net book , bringing the’ total tc “393, will take every step to mitigate] sOntHnouND eee
er ae ee aaomentan KAISER, 1949, Six seater Saloon, | @"4 $1.80 on Sundays. , Ook cost of £962,608. The put this has not diminished de- and avoid permane t damase 8.8, “ALC LGR
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET: Series T. fo inl “gine” Beso ls directors consider the valuation of Sie stil) n heady ¢ § I é nt damage to] 5.4. LCOA PILGRIM due Rarbedos July: 80th for St. Lawrence River
2602. Finder please return saame to Rita | mayeq ‘Dial o-74 worurely as new. NOTIC unquoted investments at their mand, and-there is still a heavy the whole machinery of industry Ports.
Cotlyn, Sweet Bottom, St. erg. : , i 31.7.51—6n E book cost of £155,326 to be ite a and growing wailing list. and international commerce by| ~* These vessels have limiled nace San
-T.51—In : WW air & The c ij : ree an : o ae ® limited passen cer accammodation
MOTOR CYCLE: One Velocette Motor The Estate of reasonable ~ The company has important ex~ which we as an island people live
LOST CERTIFICATES Cvele gimost new. Apply to L. M. ATHELSTON WATSON Of the Trust’s total investments P?@™Si0" plans to meet the situation and to which we owe our entire ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW ¥¢
THE WEST INDIA BISCUIT COMPANY | °!""*¢: Jeweller, No. 12, James Street (deceased) including interests i i fae whieh I discussed at length with strength AP NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
2..4.51—1n | NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ail \ rests in subsidiary , trates Whi ined Ae as " : ; PLY:—DA COSTA & CO. LTD—c
Saiob Ie Hen RS i, é Healt persons having any debt or claim against |COMpanies, 23.44 per cent. are in his Excellency the os President, Dr. The continuation of lavish and , » LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE
has been made to the Board of Directors the Estate of Athelston Watson who died |Ioans and debentures, 10.67 per German Suarez Flamerich, and wasteful Government expenditure
Pe ees teeny we Eee Or arectors in England on the lith July, 1935 0e: i -efe at te I the Ministers of Development and by experiments ¢ a athe -~
of the above-named Company for the cent, in Preference stocks and te Minister pr y experiments and expedient i
issue of duplicats Share: Certificates tor; | —————————-—— —_—_________ | re hereby required to send particulars 65.89 r - a. Bp Communications, with whom I added to the tial See . MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA,
10 Shares Nos. 4724 - 4743 inclusive |. PHWCO REFRIGERATOR: 9% cubic | f their claims duty attested to the un- | 5-89 per cent. in Ordinary stocks ns, at o the essential needs of} NEW ZEALAND Sing witiren, |i
M4 are ga lag RB i ft, Full width freeging chamber. Brand | 46T8igned Eustace Maxwell Shilstone and | (Which includes 31.49 per cent. in 2/80 discussed the extent of the the defence programme inevitably : (M.A.N,Z.) "
3¢ Shares Nos. 11749 — 11784 inclusive | R@W unit, Reconditioned throughout, | Lindsay Ercil Ryeburn Gill the qualified | subsidiaries), Geographically 83.46 financial requirements for carry- !eads to constantly rising costs anc 5S. “ARABIA ecteduled to sail
24 Shares Nos. 14865 — 14888 inclusive | M&Y be inspected at Leo Yard, Chkeap- | 4¢ministrators cum testamento annexo of | ner cent. are in the British Com- ing out these plans These dis- prices with all the harmful results | (vt MelPovene 12th June, Brisbane 22nd
i f Franci . side. Apply H. L. Smith, Sandford,|the Estate of the deceased, in care of . ra Push Com. ink i Beare pie : 1 Oe Mae ver TERS POBUITE une, Port Alma 28th June, Sydney
pple sy eon ty See Groavee, | at bliin i ae 4.1 lett’ | Messrs. Cottle Catford & ‘Co,, No, 17|™MOnWealth and 16.54 per cent. in cussions are vroceeding actively. which flow therefrom ily 4th, arriving Trinidad end duly, Me Gle 'T tlanti
have been lost or ‘misplaced, and. Motice : — | High Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors on | foreign countries. West Indies Burden Of Taxation id gDarbados early August | | See ie Sere
. * rt re or before the 22nd day of August, 1951, ‘ - ~_ . £ ‘FO FAIRY" is scheduled to
Tees Peet iar nae We aha’ Us after which date we shall proceed to Group Accounts During my visit to our associated Tne sribpsition of -excessively al from Hobart late June, North Queens. |} ue
i . distribute the assets of the deceased The group reserves—capital ar le > orati , ies » Peavy burdens of taxation, pre- ind mid July, Brisbane end July, Sydney
Original, Certificates, * ‘naw Owen Sisk Seed ate he hon saving = Portes wipes ns phentic hav- sents : total : £913,494", im 5 fain woe ican Ta; = venting as they do the adequate rt t ate land mia men on ee oe
, . Amm-~ ing regard only to such claims as we a eee el ‘ s . = ‘ a ie i aa rriving a rinidad mid September, "
wae ee is Gaiss ot) eadesiAan peste Boxes, Within a short while you shin theo bave had notice oe and we | increase of £76,804 over 1949, This much that gives reason for satis- Provisions to meet the greatly in-| ‘Cargo ‘accepted on “throug mee ot |} ENGLAND & FRANCE
order 8 st CLAIR HUNTE. * may be the winner of one of the follow- | will not be liable for the asseis or any |is equal to 71,5 per cent. of the faction, and can confirm that ¢ré@sed costs of maintaining ma-| ord frozen cargo | a laa
. St. ing:— ist Prize $50.00, 2nd Prize $15.00, | part thereuf so distributed to any per-|issued Preference and Ordinary .. i . ;- chinery and of its replacement by | J" dition to general cargo these} ))) S.S. “GASCOGNE 1th
FT 3rd Prize $5.00. 1,7.51—26n | son of whose debt or claim we shall capital totalling £1 277 KON ak ane effort is being made to ex- more modern nad YMicient plant | ;22els have ample space for chitled and August 1951, Via St. Lucia,
dy ; -|not have had notice. . alng £1,277, or One yind and improve the telephone ay ; emcient plant,| Vading for transhipment a: Trinidad Martinique. G adaloupe and
BABYS PRAM in Food condition, ‘And all Berets widethed 06°8haenia aoa 8 quarter times the amount services in Jamaica, Trinidad and ™USt inevitably damage the pros-]| 1 British Guiana, Leeward and Wind- ar Ne ee oupe 3
: price. pply: Mrs. Seale, - issu rdinary stoc * ‘ ey eC is c ry aini yard Islands . é
T d S G A Son Navy Gardens, Phone 4128. aries witha aeare saree thes See e727 000 sued Ordinary stock of Tobago, and Barbados, The = caine. “a? en ees “rot aries particulars apply :
0- ay oh 31.7.51—2n | Dated this 22nd day of June, 1951, oe Portugal | » voare id managements of these e iy the Saar as cartel jelent FURNESS, WITHY & CO, LTD, { ee
“FARM” POWDERED FULL E. M, SHILSTONE, “~ e » realize full well that the raw materials and TRINIDAD {i
“I want to be happy ” Y, ms tl ares Stee a a a ond. The Trust has been directly i reba nis pantie Felations fast food which we require BW. SOUTH BOUND.
3 . ualified ministrator i . er wbthie 4. spe P . . 8 ave sé “ occa~ « ‘ ar
per §-Ib tin and $1.00 per 1-Ib tin. cum testamento annexo of sepecege 24 ane The sng OOF Ors nnly be maintained by a ceaseless oe i eee copa Reiley DA COSTA & CO. LTD 5.S. “Gascogne” 2nd August
ut I can appy Watson, deceased. r and has continuec dor Arat.tlasn earvine ) hard-won experience and to the BWI. Trinids »me “gl and
milk obtainable. The 5-Ib family size is 23,6.51—,4n.|to hold, as it does to-day, a sub- rend¢ r first-class servic si ,, merchant adventuring spirit, to | @=RReeees ee ee WD a Demerara
-+, ‘till T have a Gas Cooker | ]7¢ally economical. Insist on “Farm” for | —_____. ———— | gtantial share investment, and has DP¥ring the year the Trust ad- | ovide real incentives for in-i\i §6©3~>SP”———COCC ) rench Guiana,
@ sake of your health and your pocket. > 0 . wear) ae oa : onary 6-2 . 1 5 e :
too! If your dealer cannot supply. phone 2229. NOTICE | supported the company with wet nS; a ie ary joan ny he om creased production and efficiency || The MV. “GARIBB | ) (
... Hubby take note ! 27,6.51—t.f.n. onowenee Tea webLee temporary loans as occasions ae ei O18 000 timavde eis eae and to encourage and protect sav- ecept Cargo and .P Accepting Passengers,
RECORDS: HINDS-HOWELL required. tonal £218, mes cap!= ings which alone can supply the Dominica, Antigua, M Cargo and Mail
‘CORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing , Associated ith this inancial tel development programmes, ,,. mA, " ata Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Fr
LSS | ....and we will order for you if we (deceased) sociated wi this financia capital needed to maintain, im- , of
haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,; NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all|relationship is the technical man- upon which collectively they ex- prove and expand our industries th August 1951
Ltd. 6.7.81—t.f.n.| Persons having any debt or claim against |ufacturing support which, through pended neerly £350,000 the Directorate | rhe M.V. “DAERWOOD" wit Ut
e rey Llewellyn Hinds- a 7 je ¢ ave avails < . av » rovide rory PB B J : LERW wii
WALTER BABB Howell who died in this Island on the the Trust, is always available to ice having been provided from Following upon the resignatior cept Cargo and Passengers for } {
19th November 1948 are herevy | the company, own resources. Considera- Fi Lie C ' b ol “, en F ’ it. Luella, G ad wt Aruba,
ROCK HALL ST. LUCY WANTED required to send particulars of ae With the conclusion of the tion is being given to furthe) D “ ri M oi * ei 1980. 4 ay engers 0 for St Vip.
claims duly attested to the undersigne egotiatior bet e ce ety tnannds f aa aman @ "a vite D W >» mn elober, 50, cent, Date of sailing to be notifier
Experienced Painter, recent- Minigum, sherds ee 72 cents and) Kustace Maxwell Shilstone and Lindsay aan th Po me Goctaaniee Tea a alte ape : sevital which we accepted with regret,
dy returned to the Colony 96 cents SuNdays 24 ‘ds — over 24) Ercil Ryeburn Gill the duly constituted | NC [ie Lae ae nen’ by these companies as may be ex- ere pleased to welcome Mr B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS {
y re iil words 3 cente a word week—4 cents a/| attorneys in this Island of Lioyds Bank | OM 4 mutually satisfactory basis, pedient to fund or repay their : H Crieht c alee i 7, ; i
tone “ke C Saeate “tc lattb adhe Limited of England, the qualified execu- | resulting in an increase of tariffs +o, yporary loans from the Trust a of he Trig * in a il tas es
under e ontrac or tor of the will of the deceased, in care} as from May 1 1950, together - ae ro 44 2 director of the Trus n pr . ra ,
: - . ; vhich at the end of 1950 amounted 4 Ts eh, ae . . Consignde. Tele, 4047 t * “ ’
Painting HELP nigh Buoe. Bricgwoea Msoncitors, a with a clarification of the oe fo some £643,000. The advantage cod ‘og, E pulley who he a \ Be Wise ... ADVERTISE
: we or before the 22nd day of August, 1951,| tract, the company during the aes eae. s to Sided in Venezuela as representa~ | payee eterna
Reasonable Terms invlie Rae ee mentor a after. which date wo sitall proceed to| year was able to replace existing #0. er ee, pact |° tive of the interests of the Trust, se
eenenees tectrie eats fi “th distribute the assets of the deceased loans from the Trust by perma- the publie. they serve, © aVIDE aise retired from your board. We| --————--—-———— ‘2
Guaranteed Workmanship — experienced electrical engineers for the) jong the parties entitled thereto, hav- : behind them a continuous flow of 9 ‘ , eae fy DAFF FFE EPP PEEP PPLDL-POPP
in minica and ent financing in the form of an : wish him a long and happy retire- —— 7 ——
post of Engineer/Manager Do ing regard only to such claims as we | â„¢ g . new capital is obvious ac- id
31,7,51—In }}}] St. Vincent Hydroelectric Systems. Reply| S)8y" “then ‘have had notice of, and|issue of 400,625 Ordinary shares aA SHAE! Haheey tasinienn ee \ You will be delighted with our new models of
giving details of Career .and stating| VP wii not be liable for the assets or and the placing of £1,000,000 of companied as it is by technical Thanks To Staff
SSS Salary required to Mr. G.' \Hoddam, any part thereof so distributed to . nt. Fi bentur tock assistance of the highest order, anks To LA
Se ee teeta a hres ae any person of whose debt or claim we 5 Per eee “i Her bebenture 6 ‘ MHOPO: Nase MAS WERES., FO Beit shall not have had notice. Both issues, which were sponsored an nt of rn ‘ . lern t e join with the board of directors 4 4 4 BH
10 DAY'S NEWS FLASH oe git Aad all parsons indebted de, ime pale Se Trust, were highly suc- ment of the most modern typ Se aecebenti thats these to Ga
- e are ue: P . i Tyrie
HARRISON COLLEGE itasotednain svithout delay . Since the settlement of these Jamaica 5,500 men and women of the Trust Inspect them at
Required in September, 1951, for at/ Dated this 22nd day of June, 1951. outstanding political matters, the . 1" Jamaica development has and its associated companies over- 5 So mi
Outstanding books on our Islands least one term, an Assistant Master or E. M. SHILSTONE, aes BP ancinn nen, been well maintained with a gain seas for their loyal and efficient VHE Cn ¥ Vk V7. x %
Mistress to teach General subjects in L. E. BR. GILL development and expansion pro- 1.438 se Necia takal’ of; chccicg KURauEh Oe tam tees ry MG. d 4 v4
Marston Sbeat the Carisbean | te, Lower School. Attorneys for Lloyds Bank | gramme of the company has been of 1,408 stations to @ total of service throughout the year Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets
information about the baie Selary according to qualifications and Limited, the executors of | proceeding with great energy and !3437 in service at the end of The report and accounts were
Sanne ir Guin sbi — beater Wl Moen, ay the will of | Geoffrey | during 1950 over 7,400 stations 1950. Some £115,000 was spent adopted
a ’ . ewellyn nds-Howell, ‘ ’
to the above. Book full of rich Michael. 29.7.51—2n deceased,
information .......-..++.+++ 18/6 | 23.6.51—4n. | }2 == SaaS
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY | + 1}
Clear Glass in Plastic,. Heavy MISCELLANEOUS | y ’ |
guage for car windshields. NOTICE
Unbreakable, Sn ae ean, RAFFLE IN AID OF THE ST. PHILAP
BEE’S WAX. — Dial 2628, BABY WELFARE CENTRE
JOHNSON’S HARDWARE 21.7,.51—8n P :
, *ve The draw was made by the Rev.
, hroyy H, V. Armstrong, Rector of St. Philip, 4 4
: Re - - am WANTED TO RENT on Saturday, July 28th. The following 2 Ww 1 T
S| BUNGALOW. by marta Couple, ne | Sie he""Srne‘Wisnit minbers with the heel Tractor } |
i . c ‘ comp! ished ’ a
‘ vulow, on the sea, with garage, for iong | ina "bios es it |
SHOP-KEEPERS. )F 0c" sot ’ |
= “Ws ae * " " 4 Prizes of $25.00: I. 100, G. 164, A. 254
wees M. 27 |
ANOTHER IMPORTANT TRAILER—Second Hand a 8 Prizes of $10.00: J. 222, L. 108, { {
able to be diawn by tractor. e lJ 377, C. 61, I, 149, I. 179, I, 319, K. 1,
MEETING $5273. “10 Prizes ‘of $5.00, F. 148, G. 270; iti ne OO un fe m
28.7.81—8n. | F292, A. 155, D. 183, K. 194, M. 116,
will be held at | 3. 305, 4. 386,, BD. 324 % :
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE) elders of ‘winning Tickets should ste With the Ferguson System your

QUEEN'S PARK



The application of Germaine Phillips,

licerse at a wall building near the Round

Polite Magistrate,Dist A

31.7.$i—in

| communicate with N. G. Daysh, Mapps,

partnership heretofore existing between







EMIL TAYLOR

61









rields

can



is.one-third that c

~



satisfactorily



a Track Trae-

holder of Liquor License No. B80 of 1951 | St. /*hilip. iivia wt ; tha dicbe eee lable
granted to Joseph St. Hill in respect | ploughed and the unit is available P ILING USES
on Thursday, 2nd August of a toed and shingle same attached | DISSOLUTION OF as a transport Vehicle. A
at 2.30 p.m. to residence at Tweedside Rd,, St, Mich- PARTNERSHIP
. vei, for permission to use said liquor NOTICE 8 HEREBY GIVEN that the The price of this versatile Tractor



SEE and ATTEND Hiouse, Bay Sreet, St, Michael SIMEON ST. GLAIR HUNTE, GEORGE | race
f Dated this 30th day of July 1951 | LAWRENCE FARMER and EDWARD tor, and you ll be amazed at
miss To: E. A. McLeod, Esq | EMIL TAYLOR carrving on business its performance.
Don't this last Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” at Trafalgar Street, Bridgetown under. I 19 erin ‘ Tal 1
of the Series. GERMALYE PHILLIPS, | the style or firm name of THE ENTER- Further information on applica- » V if \( UJ ING; i ()
Applicant. | PRISE TRADING CO. has this day been 1 \ | ANUPFAL NG i
AGENDA: N.B.—This application wili be consid-| dissolved insofar as the said George a ke | ;
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at; Lawrence Farmer is coneerned, who} 110.4 |
Unfinished Business Police Court, Dist. “A” on Thursday! hereby retires from the said Partnership i GOVERNMENT HILL }
New Business. the 9th day of August 1951, at 11 o’elock.| Dated the 30th day of July. 1961 a 4 a {\ | , GOVERNME! eka |
a.m S. ST. CLAIR HUNTE BB % d . |
29.7 .51.—2n. EB. A. MehEOD G. L. FARMER i és zB. (ROBT. THOM. LTD.) Dial 4616 I)





| __PAGE EIGHT



BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1951

ee en A TT TT
























T {¢ PRORPUDDS SSS OS9SOSSOOO", lie _—
_ ENGLAND FALL 33 RUNS SHORT ) 22 ===
| 3 MECCANO SET ! ame company
es nine 7 and 8 1
Communicate Vivian Hutson, i ANNUAL DANCE
Bailey. Hilton Put Up Worrell, ‘Ramadhin Near College Beat TOF Muslims | eysck heute 2 || Seomaes ipa
sliims LSC SOE OOOO! Roebuck Street

| Last Wicket Stand More Records—smrm ¢ wucorr Sy opafigh 72) 21 sain en vane








on Saturday, 4th AUGUST, 1951







dos are notified that at the Annual SUBSCRIPTION .... 2/6
7. > . * : - — =o Was General Meeting of the Juma CRYPTOQUOTE NO. 61 m. s a
(Prous Cin Oiew’ Carcoinaia) ie afm a scored another century for Rad Harrison College playing in| Masjid (Barbados) held at 1.30 DiS BUEAT BQ HCDE © UZAL Music by Mr. Keith Campbell's
LONDON, July 30 clifie in the defeat of Oldham. His 106 makes his total 1.180, fine form convincingly defeated] p.m. on 27th July, 1951 at which ZAHCBZV-—-QAWPDHY@. Strietly by Invitation
‘ 5 Ny JULY oN. only 322 short of the League’s all-time record. Oldham, Swordfish seven goals to two in (28) persons were present, Mr. |
A GREAT last wicket stand between Bailey and Hilton batted first and were all out for 163. Frank Worrell took their 7 water polo match at the]M. Y. Degia who had been elect- Kast Crypt: He gains Windom Re
A; which came as a fitting finale to the centuries scored by 4 wickets for 52 runs. Radcliffe had no difficulty in passing ~o gaa Club yesterday after- ed Chairman accepted be resig-| Patty Sere ee Sane 3s by
. Hutten and May enabled England to creep within 33 runs the score as Frank Worrell took most of the bowling pee nation of the Secretary Moham- |
“ ae Se aie “f i & anc aa ; ua : med Sayed Piprawala. | J. A. CORBIN &@ SONS. | BARBADOS CLERKS’
| ot South Africa’s first innings’ score of 538 during the was undefeated at the end of the innings. Billy Manning playing at cen-| “mppe meeting then proceeded to | OT eae oe UNION
fourth day's play in the Fourth Test at Leeds. is ——- Sonny Ramadhin is on his way ‘@, forward turned in a good }

By close South Africa had in-
creased their lead to 120 without
loss, but as only one day remains
for play and the wicket is show -
ing no great signs of wear, it
appears hardly possible for any
result other than a draw to be





appoint a new Secretary and the CALLING ALL

CLERKS & SHOP
SE HABLA ESPANOL ASSISTANTS

ORLENTAL [13 special MEETING

CURIOS, SOUVENIRS, AN-








formance for Harrison Col- : ; ;

jn Ber Sos ; to 100 wickets although he siarted P°& following were nominated: — |

apparent desire to score quickly, S h etty k nico, lege. He scored the first four M. Y. Degi opo | |
and although Rowan reacned 50 c OOo oO y Ss 56 Statetie baud te has ow taken goals of the match. The first two ts ae we ae te Dee

en ; . Patel, seconded by M. E. Navsa.
OF tes, M . :
Br oe cae niete te casing Ht secure 24 wickets with 9 matehe: SinNtes oP eine the first) 'E. 3. Hafigee proposed by I. A.

: to be played. Crompton batted two minutes of play. Kothdia Valla, seconded by A. S.|
to theii lead 2 iy, Win Matches first against Ashton and declared , The third goal went in after] pandor.
tailey, after bowling one over, at 169 for 5 wickeis. Ashton were four minutes and the fourth came These nominations were put to}

OPPOSE OOPS EPSP OSS PPP PER,

was compelled to give up with a







|
|






























































































at sea against the spin bowling of 19 line minutes, “Mortimer" | the vote and it was agreed that|{} TIQUES, IVORY, JEWELS,
achieved. recurence of his back trouble _ Lodge defeated Y.M.P.C., and Ramadhjh and were all out for Weatherhead sent in goal number|M. Y. Degia and E. I. Hafigee ||} SILKS Ete. ; his ae
The stand between Bailey and soya arRica IST INNINGS six Foundation Wanderers when the 106. “Ramadhin took 6 wickets for five, 30 seconds before.half time. | should be joint secretaries for the ||| bskcaonwenndied | Y.M.C.A. (HOSTEL)
Hilton was by far the most ex- ENGLAND FIRST INNINGS fourth series of Second Division 60 runs. + After the interval Billy Manning] ensuing year. | | TO-NIGHT AT 8.00
citi cricket produced during L. Hutton b Van Ryneveld 100 Cricket ended last Saturday, Tne In the Ribblesdale League Dar- lined up in the back line. meeting then accepted the ||} sa 7 .
ng Pp 0 y- The g Pp | ,
the previous three and a halt Ff. Cowsen ¢ Mansell b A. Rowan -. “6 Empire—Police match finished in Wen had an casy win against Bar- | _ laudited Statement of accounts} O'CLOCK
days When they came to- % May b A: Rowan oo 3 No decision, Empire scoring 110 Nldswick who were all out for 76 an oe half was, three min-| ang all documents etc. have been| Every Clerical Worker
gether England were 445 for 9 W Watson b Chubb sz for 5 wickets in reply to Police ‘2 about two hours, Darwen lost utes old when Herbert Portillo! handed over to the undersi-med: |. 6sse66 $6 = should attend as important
snd South Africa appeared set 1 Baiicy b Mann % 172 for 9 wickets, Leeward and tWo early wickets before 10 was Opened the scoring for Swordfish 1% POPSOESOOOOS eee dectitata: wi be ae
for a satisfactory first innings F: Brown ¢ FE. Rowan b A. Rowan 2 fYarrison College mataged to st the board, but Ken Rickards Allan Taylor fn the Harrison Col- M. Y. DEGIA, 1% the meeting
lead, But Bailey who had left 5: Brennan. ee 16 secure first innings lead oe th ‘© brought his team out of danger lege forward line scored next E. I. HAFIGEE i% Get These Tast
the field on the second day with R. Tattersa!l c BE. Rowan b A. Rowan 4 pes aetioe 8 te ‘Sr their with a sparkling 56 not out. Rick- with a lovely back hand shot; Joint Secretaries | COME AND PROTECT x
nat bee 1 leverly M. Hilton not out 9 re , Opponents, Comber- ards has now scored 700 runs and taken when his head was. partial- THE JUMA MASJID % YOUR INTEREST !
a strained back muscle, cleverly Extras (b, 10; Lb. 7,n.b 1) 18 mere and P* -kwick. with sonable luck shoul; ly submerged and backing the Barbados); * ik
: 7 oe CARNE PRE i reasonable luck should get |; 8 ig ( . ell t 29.7.51.—In.
shielded Hilton from the bowling yt i The Lodge boys scored 108 his 1,000 by the end of the season, goal. s Ss
and between them they added 60 =~ 7 against Y.M.P.C. who scored 75 Everton Weekes hit 69 not out. This was Harrison College’s | ———————— enna OOOO OOS 45606}
of which Ballay's ne was oe BOWLING ANALYSIS 3 in each innings. Lodge then to play a big part in Bacup’s sixth goal. oo For Your
He was eventually out when Piet o M. i W. knocked off the runs with six eight-wickets triumph over thcir : * 5 ‘ OTie® et
only 5 short - his hundred are McCarthy 43 12 99 1 Wickets still standing. J. Riley Rawtenstall neighbours. With nine senate penia.apt “= in a “NO ee Comp ete your List
ie pall aS papaall eo RE a Be RE SS I MR in Re cg A Ag Enjoyment Th
ae Ms 60.8. . 3 . .M.P.C’s s innings wickets, Mittin verton now needs 306 > al 2 - ba
Earlier in the day Peter May, Manse sa . - 7 =e Woucaaiion tele were runs S beat his 1949 record of tillo once more scored for Sword-} To my Customers and from ese
‘ ‘ 3 | ¢ "nye. 1 ne 5 @ § ‘ et Nase +. fie arris
making his test debut, had car ORR ERICA bho Seis eatin out Wanderers for 52. and 49, 470 in a season. J. Ashworth’s fish. a ay oa ee. % _—" e Tins CARROTS, (whole,
ried his score to 138 compiled in ¢ Rowan not out © Foundation scored 100 in. thei 5 wickets for 48 runs was chiefly Were still not content and shor % sliced and diced)
six and a half hours without one J. Waite not out 0 ae a eae heir responsible for Rawtenstall reach- ly before the final whistle ‘“Mor- Ris PEAS
: Lb. 2 2 first innings and 79 for the loss of ; 7 i 2 Wy , i , % ¥
chance. He was eventually bowled —-Pxtras (1b. 2) 7 wickets: in their second inane, 18 Only 107 runs, and they would timer” Weatherhead again found) ® The Ritz bat Salon % » MIXED VEGETABLES
by Athol Rowan when trying to TOTAL (for no wkt.) 87 8, second innings. have been in a perilous position the Swordfish nets to register the ; 1 tin Danish 1 . TOMATOES
force the pace. It had been a —— The ie een So as to secure but for T, Incles’ gallant 56. ga goal for Harrison Col-|$ will be closed for the month eo ~ ams ¥ s ” TOMATO JUICE
brilliant performance by so young BOWLING AN SL ISIS Gort an outright victory. Weekes took 2 wickets for 33 runs lege. , I of August. » Swifts Luncheon Beef s = CAMPBELL’S SOUPS
: 2 Mr. Callender took 10 wickets in 13.6 overs Geoffrey Foster in the Sword- ~ =
batsman, odse 3 5 — . ed : eat 7 ? >
* ine Rowen by bowling Brown Rane : . 8 in the two innings for Foundation East Lancashire kept up their fish back line was Outstanding tebe Mack. » Vienna Sausage g x ae bi: rea
claimed his fiftieth test victim. Brown iM 2 2% — for 33 runs. C. Gay, besides scor- reputation of not being bowled throughout the game and gave his No. 7 Swan St. % : % c en n le, an
‘When South Africa batted a Tattersall 6 =~ 1}-« sing 29 in Foundation’s second in- out as yet this season when they ae repeated opepriuntiies 8 * s ‘Black Buck” Sauce % ead yulce
; ‘ ne ee “ates on t ; nings, t Haleate: A ,o met Lowerhouse at the Meadows.|with his powerful bac hand | Sesseseee ODA 1,665 h ” a
second time there was again no Compton 7 1 16 epi ook 8 wickets in the two They detlared at 19 fee e wickets, |cleary. ESOS OSES $ Tins Lamb Tongues g ” PEARS
hist at 2 re Roy Marshall took 3 wkts for 73 The referee was Mr. Peter <4 a Tw ? » PEACHES
+ Follaelag. are ae Gani runs in 13 overs, The Lowerhouse | Patterson, x » Cocktail Biscuits .» APRICOTS
d Ledge 108 and for 4 wkts, 4 batsmen were skittled out for 76); The teams were: FREE ROOK % Salted Peanuts Pkes. Q. OATS, (large &
In war n oo ¥M.P.C. 75 and ; 75 in under two hours. Roy Marshall = > small)
* Ledge Ist Lonings _. was caught in the slips off Hop-| SWORDFISH: Albert Weath- which makes Sliced B ¥ CORNFLAKES
V. Deane 37. F. Hutson 24, Lodge's . “ ” srhead Ca ffir Foster. ” ce acon ”
J. Riley took 6 2nd innings wickets for 00d for another “duck.” Doo-|erhead, (Capt.) Geoffrey Foster, “ GOD’S WAY OF x 2 Tins HAMS
ie e 32 and Outram 4 for 23 land took 4 wickets for 15 runs in Peete FitzGerald, = Herbert % AND OUR POPULAR & CHEESE per Ib.
n oO in ame 4.3 overs and Hopwood 3 for 14|Portillo, Nesta Portillo, David SALVATION % %
| OsI 1 ba ee a WAND ERERA in 7 overs. Bladen and Mickey Jordan, % Five Star Rum — 1.13 Bot 3 . .
i vhneeer cf i Maal 7# — At Church the home team beat y %
° Waneeress 28 ome 1 i Rta HARRISON COLLEGE; John,, PLAIN ”’ s S| ’
. Cc ; ea fiat th the ast two bats- - ; ’ e Ris
Against Wanderera intigs wickets doe na"and's fra men at the wicket. Bowling un-|Chabrol, Frankie Manning, Chas. : ° Si STUART & SAMPSON
c ae veya innings’ for 19. C, Gav took 3 Ist in- changed Tommy Lowe (5 for 43) |Evelyn, Billy 2 anning, , (Capt. ). Please write for one to $ $1 R
WINDWARD are ina good position to beat Wanderers mings for 10 and § and innings’ tor 28. and Pred Hartley (4-for 95) dis- A}lan Taylor, Mortimer Weath- Samuel Roberts, Gospel bi IN z x (1938) LTD.
in their Intermediate Division Cricket match at Congo , Por Fomndation in 2 et ® posed of Enfield for 78 runs of |¢rhead, and Geoffrey Jordan. Book and Tract Service, {t | CE & Co. Ltd. % g Headquarters for Best Rum.
Road next Saturday. To prevent defeat, Wanderers would , a oilslibabs aa 2 which Clyde, Walcott finimed 40. oe ee ae 30, oye Avenue, Ban- ¥ %
POLICE T : er r e. los- : f E F ' . e Y
have to score 171 runs and they only have five second pottce for # whts > an cag thete vet Sie Raleiaen for 31 Snappers vs Bonitas and Harrison ae arcland | Yososssoes: SSEGESSORN
innings wickets standing. ene oe olics 37 ‘wot out at? runs. Harry Pilkington's 35 not|College vs Whipporays. Referee} ‘ ee eaters
Although the wicket was wet , allo, ee Sih Re a FE. Denny 31. , out saved the game for Church.|Mr. Jack Knight. =
on the first day of play, Windward *~*® 5~%8, €~41, A ‘ 2. Beckles of Empire took 4 for 82 With the score at 78 and the last The Whipporays—Flying Fish
still scored 187, After they bowled BOWLING ANALYSIS TC otnbare A. Daniel scored 39 and two batsmen at the wicket, the|/match will be played on Friday, > 7
| Wanderers for 90, they put up a o mM Rw Malt 2.5) clice’s C. Grifith took 3 mnfeld wicket-keeper missed an|August 3. The Ladies K.O, Com- NOTICE I Ri- WAR
brisk 124 for the loss of 7 wickets, D. Wilkie.......... 11.5 5 26 5 easy stumping chance. Clyde Wal-| petition begins on Wednesday
declared and now have Wander- H. Farmer 13 ‘+ @ 4 COMBERMERE VS LEEWARD cott took 4 wickets for 26 runs in} August 8. VALUES
ers 44 for the loss of 5 wickets, ff Karmer eh eae ee Pepeeraeers, OS 888 seek whts. "8 13 overs.
The Windward bowlers D. Wil- “ A'Kinsen -- CASS ar ae ae ane eae “The West Indies XI played at
kie eg. 3. Farmer a chiefly WINDWARD — 2ND INNINGS B. K, Thornton 22, W. Maxwell took 4 Hanging neon < Bo doeu OAK The Committee of the
rs for 30. é pau 4 shall opened 4
fire innings collapse, Wilkie took. E; Eyelin.c Skeete » M, Proverbs... 2“ "” Combermere ist Innings the innings for the West Indies. Barbados Automobile Asso-
SVe wickets for 26 in 11.6 overs’ Zhouiton ©. wkpy..Mayers BS Pte tt le k wickets cilkes a7 Both batsmen were pretty cautious has a flavour of ciation announce to its mem-
and Farmer four for 40 in 13 R. Atkinson © Ht. oppin b B. Rolfe a and 22 runs respectively against wv pace Sone but as FRESH cow's MILK bers that on each day of the
overs. 7 armer b e . oC b re tnd Inni soon as e slow bowlers came on -
Opening bat N. Thornton scored }- Durant b M; Clarke A ae Husghes scored 4,0 Marshall was caught at deep Midsummer Meeting of the
7 ath Ae B H rmer not out ... on ‘ pHa set, Sap ae ‘ sa tnd ak . -
BD por wvanaward in thet stcond A gece 5 provecke b.G. Bhecte “0 “PIGK WOK. VEO HARRISON COLLETE square leg for 18. Worrell seine i Turf Club a Car Park on the
Bey od Staiitm nd H. V. Farmer -b Paoker....... f 2 Harrison College .. 165 eae a ie ora eae parade ground at the Garri-
oarded Hall, Empire are Extras orp 16 Pickwick . itt deau was bowled for 42. eekes 4 oes :
for 8 wickets in reply to Cable & i ; -—— Tae Harrlien C elieRs Ist Innings and Worrell indulged in some lofty son will be reserved for
Wireless’ 155. &, L. Branker of Doral (for: 7 wickets), s.: 196 ae Le F.C, Tudor 32, F. Field hitting and Worrell was eventual- [ their use together with a
Cable & Wireless took five wickets Fail of wickets: 1-2, 2-14, 3-58, 4-90, Pickwick's L, Foster scored 32 and M, ly caught on ue aes “¥ a taxi service between the
»spital—Pickwic i & § ,
match is likely to end off in a BOWLING - ANALSSIS w “| Weekes was caught on the bound- free of charge. ‘
as cae ‘— Hospital m. proverbs eed 1 ary Ae Wael oer a aes with EXCELLENT QUALITY
rine widicets, ett ee ctahbiaed “4 Teor 5 : FH WHAT'S ON TODAY Walcott 35 not out. At the close Oa nay a A B.A.A. patrolman will
Regiment bowled out Spartan M- J; Clarke Gem, OR Colirh et Grand: Bausions 1000. acn, of play Hanging Heaton scored 190 oak. pws be in charge of the Car Park. ONLY
for 33 after scoring 60. Brath- j° “packer + ea aT 2 Police Courts 10.00 a.m, for 6 wickets. SNES Sake
waite of Regiment took five for 12 Pree acid uae 5 a Samoan peveye. Ey E. A. WAY
runs, WANDERERS 2ND INNINGS founell 2.00 p.m. your family 5. A. |
Regiment scored 144 for the loss , peiree jb.w. H. Farmer is ee trare tainigtion «sate out CLUB PREMIERE ye ae Hon. Sec, and Treasurer,
of seven wickets in their second ,° packer b Farmer ou John at 7.30 p.m, TENNIS RESULTS rich in B.A.A. *
innings. H. Toppin b Wilkie ..... ; 0 CINEMAS vitamin and
M. I, Clarke t Ys i : 1 4 ” . mineral salts
Following are the scores; B. Rolfe Waign } Thornton 0 Seosiiie Mest frankensveln” vy : Mixed Doubles . which goes to THE FINEST SHIPMENT SINCE
4 Skosts b Thornton 0 pm. and 8.30 y= . Fr ot ‘ os Grimes. oe C ai eases pene strong =
EMPIRE vs CASLE & WIRELESS leyne not ou 3 Globe: “Kim” 445 and 8.80 p.m. ‘orde bea ss E. Parris an
Cable & Wi at 155 Extras 6 Roxy: “Three G Named Mike” . rds 6—3. 6—2 for the cows that pro-
| Empire kee ahi 5 * ‘ " ¥ . 4a eri and. 38S ath F. E, Edwards 6—3, 6—2. duce Oak feed on the 2 co ES WORLD WAR Il
B. Bourne -1.b.w. -b Branker 22 Total (for 5 -wkts.) # 44 Plaza (Bridgetown); “Pripoli’ 4.45 Men’s Doubles luscious green grass of 7 HERE IT M
F. Tayler b Branker 29 . pom, and 8.20 pm C. B. Forde and W. D. Forde} s¥eny Australia all year t ssleniguiaiiauiadaseubinaas ee
| rena hte eeealate ) MENTAL HOSPITAL V8 PICKWICK Pee ee eee Ue teen nn beat L. Blackett and. J.B. ‘| (tas tne’ richest ‘and a THE
Mie tie te fo peace 190 pan and SIS pam | Hoynes 6—2. 60, the best milk in the FIGHT-OF-THE
©. Barrow ¢ wkrr b Lawless 2 riekw ict ine ees ) “. : Olymp'e: ae ee Agent” 4.30 wanes 2 CENTURY ave e er 0 t
GA y Lbw. b Lawles 2 Wiekwick (for 5 wkts« 76 a 8.15
; c Harper b Branker x 9 he meet me — Ist Innings ns Aquatic: “The Pirates of Mont- ‘ 7 .
S oO y a oyce > ore . i a * ,
C. Soaer ae at BORN ede Whe bor belies a PER Se Yesterday’s e
xtras a - D * 20 —_
oie ie eS ccia ik Weather Report sd di cacanks 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
Total 14 Jordon 1 BOWLING ANALYSIS FROM CODRINGTON 7
C. Best b Jordon ‘ 7 oO M R Ww Rainfall: .01 in of
. viekets 5, 2-6 3—§ Bi e . ‘ Phillips 9 5 8 2 vee 7 . .
: 80 Bh, ye 7 ‘68. 8 aria ee & Biyinper sick ct 1 Barts. 4 3 1 1 Total Rainfall for month to terrific fighting
: , t Extras ‘ 7 Richards 4 1 ‘ 1 date: 5.45 ins. Prices: SSS =
ANG ANALYSIS 1) eS eine. 2 i : SSSSSSSSSOSO
Cone ee ew Total for $ wickets) .... 7 Brathwaite 2 3 if 5 | Hilshest Temperature: $-Ib 12-02. ROBINSON ee
R. A. Lawless 5 18 ~ — Crawford : 3 1 2 86.5°R. $2.88 per tin 80c. per tin 4
. F. lL, Branker 122 6 5 Fall of wickets: 1-13, 2—41, 3—42, fe ig : Lowest Temperature: FOR YOUR LEATHER NOVELTIES
; Cc. B Lawless 8 1 20 3 4-52, 5—75. EGIMENT — 2ND INNINGS 76.0°F.
: A, wshmael b Skinner 1 . " vs
WINDWARD VS WANDERERS SPARTAN VS REGIMENT i Brathwaite Hari 8 — elocity: 14 miles per O A K SHOP AT....
Windward tk} and for (7 wkts 0 atts Lb.w, Hanfs \ _ Bt
24 Regi t ist Innings “0 A. Phillips b Sealy ... “s ‘8 are : .m. A ; e@' ee
ae oY @ and for (5 wkts) .. oh ove + Crawford L.b.w. MeComie 6 sa Poa awe” $0.001 FULL CREAM POWDERED TURPIN ee B oO oO KER Ss
Wanderers — Ist Innings Spartan — Ist Innings V. Bispham b Sealy 2° ° p.m. ” MILK
A. Peirve ¢ Evelyn b H. Farmer 5 O. §, Coppin bp w ah , H, Rowe 1.b.w. Skinner 1 a 9 We have just received:—
| e Lb . Farmer A. D. Gittens I.b.w chards 8 G. Pinder not out ce sateen .
wy gone si Ate ey ; ~ , i teats b "Brathwaite " 5 i, Extras : 9 = SS e 1% Leather Book Markers .
G, Skeete b Wilkie . 7 N. Wood c Watts b Phillips 6 te his bi ) ae ‘ The whole fight x ” ony 3 ceendine Sets
M. I. Clark K. F b Wilki 6 J. Browne Lb.w. Brathwaite,. 2 ‘otal (for 7 wkts ecid.) lid ‘e x *: ; Ladies 0 Purses
V.. Le aaa “Wilkie Parmer b Wi e 6 K. Roberts |.b.w. , Brathwaite 9 ) JAN ETTA DRESS SHOP Nothing left out . ” Tobacco theta Deel
B. Rolfe c H. Farmer }) D. Wilkie 2 N. Harris cere b peace ; i ais on Waccneat < B d St will ee aera 24 » aiss eee ey es
M ers l.b bH. Farme t A. F, C. atthews (absent) 4] . LYSIS aa, stil
a &. Seale Thotnien b Wilkie 0 W. Jemmott Lb.w. Phillips 1 oO M R Ww - Per. Aron reet sie ies . Ladies Compacts, & Cigarette Cases
H. L. Toppin b Wilkie 17 +E. G. McComie not a 3 Gittens 5 2 ging a i at . with
r . ‘ 2 *, Skinner lLb.w, Brathwaite McComie 2 3
| ee ee a eae aes ; ss DRESSES of all Tvt es. : COLOURED VIEWS OF BARBADOS
| s ; 5 Bethe ee ar ti YP i , s These make Ideal Gifts . . .
Total 90 tock 2 Dna aN oy) | EMPIRE & ROXY . REMEMBER IT’S ALWAYS BEST TO SHOP
Theyil Do It Every Ti Hatl ee Boe ee August 10th to 16h) § Ps :
: ugus o a
ey t yey ime By Jimmy Hatlo cba Ph tls bes . '$ BOOKER’S (B’dos) DRUG STORES LTD. &
7 7 Tgaae ‘ ’ , . ! | BROAD STREET & HASTINGS (Alpha Pharmac: :
WHAT? NO BLIMP-O 8 THIS HECK! NEVER HEARD OF IT! WH Book the Date! {1/9 (Alp y)
1S A ONE- HORSE STORE! CUSTOMER THATS ASKED BUT IF IT'S SUCH A HOT. ‘a "0 OO OPO OOO
XX SHALL TAKE fy Macau FOR THAT NEW PRODUCT_f NUMBER I'LL ORDER ! SSS SSS

THE STUFF-BUT
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Full Text

PAGE 1

TVESDAY. JULY 31. 1*51 BARBADOS ADVOCATP PACE FIVE House Pass Bill To Control Elections IN THE HOUSE YESTERDAY THE House of Assembly yesterday pmed with amendments a Dill to make provision for the direction and supervision of the election of members to serve in the General Assembly of the island, the procedure and the expenses in such election and for other purposes connected therewith. One of the provisions is that any person who is incapacitated by blindness or any other physical cause from voting in the prescribed manner, would be allowed a friend to accompany him into the voting compartment and mark the electors' ballot paper for him When trie section which providHe noticed that in section Iwo cd for incapacitated voters was of the bill, there were • :< being discussed, some members of election, election documents, expressed flic view thai the same election officer etc., but there waj provision should be made for ilno definition in that section or literates. Mr. Allder suggested any other of "election meeting." thai symbols should be used. He pointed out that in subll.e penalty for purticipation in It was put to the vote whether section 3 of this section, referan election campaign by ifcwllon ma. i n alw J aj. UMJ %  nu-ndmenta a Bill ti • %  .tn. %  St. Michael's Yesiry Will Ask Govt. To Control Building At \\ elclies Playing Field MM in. %  m m ,,i L3C UM Oanvrai Aawiabb* j| ihi. i*und in* NN*n at auti. (IrctloiK Ihr • •urh election and lor oUwr pur* I Bin pauwl a bv>luliitn to plan lh* .un, of SM POMLI or Uw Qv>ra. ur in Eircitivr CummlUr* i<> %  upptvnwnl lha Katlmatsn. 1M1-51. Pan 1—Currant, A Rnolulinn to -.(-IK* tha %  cham* of (juvjiiiMiii r>>i OM Colandaw and Parry School m4* b. the Dim tor ol EducaUoii on DM ( jrU-rlUli da> of July. |M1. ZSH —— H I Art iSo "Iff."lw House Tribute Late Reporter ; election officer who— an vanes for votes on bndldate or etiveh illiterates should be allowed a ence wus made to • fine not exofiWers. frieiwi, but this section was passceeding $25 He reminded the Iver Cd without the inclusion of illltCommittee that at the last meetfa) crates, by a 7—a majority. Ing when he proposed that the Mr Adams said that they had words "not exceeding" be into preserve the secrecy of the balserted before $"1,000" or before lot. "imprisonment for one n | For the inclusion of illiterate* another section of the bill. It was were: Messrs Brancker, Mottley. aid that nowhere in the bill rii* inrehalf of any political party; %  i .,.;.ii,---i,,i behalf of any political party; (c) in any way a elates himself with the election campaign of anv candidate or political party, shall be guilty of an offence R„ against this section and on convic-eDortcr—not thai we do not hav taon by a Court of Summary excellent reporters In our midst Jurisdiction, .shall be liable to a fine of two hundred dollars or to Mr. Maynard and Mr. Rock had imprisonment with or without more experience than the ones 1 THE ST MICHAEL'S VESTRY ungotinmuly dtafcted at their meeting yesterday to ask Government to use their building departments for tbe future development of the site at Welches as a playing field. The Vestry was dealing with COI rt'bpt %  IHUMUV from the Acting Financial SgjBffUtT) in respect to a playing field at Writhes. Mr. E. D. Mottley. M.C.P, In — SvsS SB? &% &stMr£ terday in memory of Mr. t A ,,,,,, ,,< .,,. n!" ,, Aiii-,i ri.v OJ&U B W .r.,, at ,;.,, %  lvi f u "•„,' ;:;;:„ ;„ v ; SSS,S > bJ Dr 0 H H i; A Cu !" !" Eg b ""' •,",• %  ,h "" h •*"'"" Mr i v H ran „.d. .... II vejtrji rimuld iiif"rm halfof iwmbm of ffr EI.MmmMa ""' *• •* %  %  AMocUMon Electors p,.,,,,.^ wllUn| ,„ ,„.„, H r „ ( ,,„,„„ MandPVlUr wh „ dutln Mr Adam, *.id "I wish lo w i:h ,h, m hy 1 ,,l ,n R %  '."", the his tenure of office as Dean of th* make a moUon thai lh.Mouse pul J.ljninMi.iUon of lie plajinn Cathedral wa Chairman of lh, m record Its sorrow at the death ,, : ,. ., .. ,, . SI. Michael's Vestry, said "lareol lh, lat. Official Bepurter who '"" %  "f. *•"'. *' zS*l .L 1 "" """ '•> "•' Veatrv rOUrdw was always kaowi I" Ul M Mr "" '" % % %  '""• %  <> with "Jilch Ihcv M ,„ ,.„ n vened their mc-T llussle Maynard. uro^-ibundertake ihc II, ., a verj faithful servanl ".vtinit of Buildino or and Ihc Tl chairman Mr M D Of lh. House and ; very efflcienl .tX.ne .icld!"^ *e^r"w2: Symmonl "Z '.ha, the Lon reptirti-r wtin never petitm., to ". l ''V Cla "" votij ,i<. K I,*.I .I.— ... .. i t the reabnsol wporUnl ft** sugge-rt.ng thai the h "i '* • J** "" ' %  nit of mtlanct no* Ot w -Mi u ugu t use n,-ir bulsdlni fC** Bishop bad not got Uu 1 do riot think thai anyone of us *•>-. *he Vestry, would OS -nilPPPOTtunit] to UT1 done at could *ay lhat he has been ac"f. 1 adn.u^st.-r them. before, he said and he was quit. qtialntod with anyone in Ihe island L J* r A. R. Toppin. in seconding ure that all of them would hav. ith the •XCepUon Ol Mr Charlie lr motion, said that lu"-iitnely been quite happv to afford him efficient -'greed With what Mr. Mottley ihe opportunity saM. and Mr l> t: leaeock jnr. Uishup Mandev ille said ihn>se in ^uppo^ of the mot If m. Bishop Says Farewell To Vestry Criticism place unless notice of tl.. tcntlon to hold such matting Such place has been given not less than three hours before tti commencement of such mating to the Officer of Police in charge of the parish in which such place it situate or to the Officer of Police in charge of the Polire Station nearest to such place. Every notice under subsection (1) of this section shall (aI the person In support of whose candidature the meeting is to be held l .un nmmn nambtr of UM HOUtf %  ili %  ItB BW to %  on thcii lnihllf and it should be recorded ir deliberations--th.-ii ra <\i OUT sorrow at hli pai .Mr. Leariinmfl sir t!< 11 jinm f.i-UI %  ( . bj" a passed "of." argued that the offence would be true Mead a* *eemed able to mix Section 36 reads: Referring to the remarks made a verv seriou-; one and thf term ol With •baoluti taM In an) COTONo person shall during an elechy the senior member for SI. imprisonment should IH> increased pan> lit was nt home and made tion call together, hold or address tieorije. lu*aid that the whole obThis sliould read: not ixicediiii; otheri feel ;.: home any election meeting in any pubJecl of a section like this was not twelve months to create hardship on the people These amendment > IVCn agjroad who conducted themselves In an to and the Clause was then orderly manner. There were popassed. teulial murderers in this world Clause 38 dealt with Ihe total end provision had to be made for amount of expeiidiluie that may : |( VUfita things he Incurrefi in respect of the canAs regards t 0 the question made * %  %  * W Pa O" thp bv the Junior member for St. f" 8 !" 10 at ,,• fc K Michael he said that a man keepJ4iKi?L£ 1 ? £lZ ing a raeetlng in his own house. Th m j""''"'* n 'j '".J 8 „, ^SS*f3 hke on behalf of the members o( wa 8 responsible for^ order Ujje ^TtM amouTt ff £ oSTjS -his side of the House lo add my w^^TZmTmAiSSPi as it was his own Pr'vate prop,.,„.„. whori „ lrf |ess thnn l0OOQ (|lI0la lo what has been said by [g K £? MiahS (S tu crty but having the meeting in IlftP€ n rmXi pr r Sector." the Ua4 at V. a House. L^ T, J?' K ',* '„, *?'>' a school would come under this Ttw argu „I; nl put up by levI have known Mr. Maynard to ^* ^CwSnutf? Shoo. section. eral members was lhat the flgu/e the past ^3 years. I first got to Tin were Harold Uraihwaite M. E K. Waleott (E) referred "''nts iier elector as origlnaTly know him as a reporter in the Winston llayley, Louise Vaughn. CourU of this 'sland. 1 can say of Cuthbert Ciarnes. Clydl passed as a j| !hoj.e years and duriiiK 1b J. lisph Hinds. I^-roy Inniss, Winpast three years that 1 have hud st their meetings were nol ln-1.1 Hi regular days and he was unahk to be present at the last iiifetinti i-ver could not leave ihe Vi-tii without saying farewi'll' He said that he was quite glad Ml bow the business of the Si Michael's Vestry was being t(.ruiiictrd and the amount of work thai the Vestry had done lor the people of the psU Igfa adding that he wa* grate In I lh tha work 'f poa iei*f ami n hands of so responsible | Waleott. s gmendad "Where the move tiiat exprevM irrow be transmitted Mow." Dr. H. O. Cummins seconded. five times a* much work In St Mr. 1. K R. GUI said: "1 would MMiael M uld have liked t> : said that. ; ui the w-ti | S^VS^K 1 W" ,, .''; l i I'^lship had come down Christ Church and it would I, , i( ^ ay farcwr|| „ ( „„. f the Vestry. ,..T %  I w. H eon • fal.-i lh) the place and approximate honourable members to section 31 T K TV. time at which such meetwhlch rttd na t any person who irncil dcd H to commence. before during any election, for A SP ,tion allows foi ihe Every person who contravenes lhe purpose of affecting the recsjtion Of an IgWll or candidate if •subsection (1) of this section snail i urn 0 | any candidate at such ,.,.,,;,,„ ( ,„, vr> ioiis annot carried Tinoriginal Hill Intandad to Shall be liable to a fine not exor conduct of such candldaWshall ehargrt and thai tha guilt of an the cmll of be guilty of an offence against election made or published any this section and. on conviction by false statement in fact In reft Court of Summary Jurisdiction, lation U> the personal character or conduct of such candidate ceeding twenty-live dollars or In be guilty ol nil illnital practu default of payment to imprisonThat section he said made it menl for thirty days. plain that the offence could take In this section "public pl-jcc" place any time whereas this secmeans any street, road, lane or tion only spoke of during an elechighway and any park, garden, tion. held or sea beach to which the Me reminded honourable - public has access whether as of hers that section rr.ake the not %  ndldata prove that he guilty wtM right or upon payment of any Sum of money or otherwise. Mr. GIII IE> minted lo know what was meant by "during an election". That expression he Said was not clear to him. Mr. Adams said that Ihc expression although vague, meant from now on. If a candidate happened to lose out at a General Election and bought a drink for anyone saying he was coming back as a candidate for the next Elections three years* hence, the section would apply to him. agent would invo) ili-candidate Mr Mottley called for amendment which WM Snail) accept e d Mr. Mottley said that the onus should IKOO Utt prOMUttOn to prove their COM He Mid 'hat an applied not ov ,, r ZCillous .„.,,„. mlgh ,,„ „ img!l mark of respect, only to candidates having to innp WM |lul lll llul ed u, Uo and _____ form the police, but anyone who om sho|ll| not ^ | Hlund by wha was having a inoetlng on behalf om >)( ThfV WtW* TrftttUti ,( %  ctnilidate The other sect am. were „ft,-r* "* J WHM U He agreed that the Police should Wftr(|s S(1(j wl||i l notified of any meetings lo be _,_„,_ Klf.; the honour to be a member of this clmmbcr, that he always discharged his dutlc~ zealously, faithfully and impnrdally Hidischarged those duties to the advinlage nf tills I uiioui :i 11!• %  eha-nbar. I f.'.l -ure thai Ihe honest and •inc. re svmpo'hy of each and iveryone of us will go out on this occasion." Members then stood in theli places for a few inomi'iits Maynard. Timothy Brume Olyna Bryan, VOra Howard, Allan Boyce and Bcresford King J6e Louis Fights Tomorrow iNiphl do not only wish him n his new undertaking." %  OUt we are SLIT.lhat r•will be successful." Mr T Miller said that b i associate himself wlt'i the remarks of Mr Ilryli-n M llivdeii was the oldest memltet > ] the vestry, but he was the youngaal It was a happy moment fi Ihetn |0 know lhat Htl Lordahlp one of the soil, had been electe a n ^Jj Ulin ^ with having to give the Police which wer0 Mi<1 a th .. t meeting. J* three hours notice before the thn m ^j,, emisidered opinion w beginning of a meeting. He said W0(J i d bc another meeting, that he might be in the district Mr. Aaasns (L( said that the where there was a meeting by po,,,, ra u*d by the honourable his opponent. At the end of that mern ber could not possibly come meeting there might bc something under the head of a meeting. The which needed an explanation. If section must me taken as a whole he was asked to explain the an if referred to the person in matter by say a few individuals support of whose candidature the und in doing so a crowd gathered, meeting wag to bc held, that would be another meeting and he would be guilty of an .. mi offence if the Police came along, because under the section, he would not have notified the Brvun Asks About Flood Victims O. Bryan ut yesteii.. g at the House of AssemDeputy Commander of the Cliillut 1 thick 1 nese forces in Korea—he is prob212 at quest it of 1949. Ml meeti bly gave notice of about flood victims The-e read: Is government aware that are a considerable number of persons who claim that they have suffered damage to property nnd for loss of household effects during the "floods" of 1949, und SAN PRAJICISCO. July 30 .1 e laouis -.aid that he |>rol.ablv would weigh between 110 and 212 poUDda for his fight on Wi-dM daj night with Caaar Brton winch would give him about .'I |x.inuls advantnuc uvn Ihe Ai %  lull tn i a\yivei. lit The Brown BODUMT t net Mylng hov nueh hi now but hi i amp i i ned about the fighter*! weight which Is said to have gone seveiai pounds beta* 110, He Mid, "I weighed 207 for scon became an official of the Andy Walker last February. North Korean Labour Party. lhat was a little line [ couldn't Three years later, he was named put any Combination punches Minister of Commerce. against Walker I'm not I Lt. General Teng KtM, 51. tha myself that CO-ordinaUan la tlici %  Frtttartfd Awuv PlrtMtige In Moscow a> from pace I il.lv the oldest Red delegate Kaesong, and has been actlvi the Chinese Communist mo) nt.iwjii. garvlng M political officer in the First Army. drtlna m] Louli pla m od ins Monday iftO) noM >nly Ibnoerlng g> i %  .! %  Pair I .liiei t in iiuilli-et lu the (if I 0. Communion, ami thus preserve ihe paaci <>f the world by raa chl ni condition! on which a uuUng ina lin-iitil. ss-ttlfiuent inn IHmod) .-. un Ho\ let II i -i.i. on i i i ,.t wi akness and divided |H>1I< > imi oi itrengtb, unity, and wail i oncerti 11 I > I in Main <'ati>es Churchill Mid Biilnin's de.lini in the Middle East could be alIrlbutOd to three main causes: The loss of tndl I i'..ki-'..i "'""" and then armies. Anything low., fhp wp poeitinn thai bei-ome widespread throughout the Middl. East that Britain has only to U A graduate of Kang Ta uni'rucsduy. Brwn U ty in 1934, he dropped his where he held BnaJ dnii mi ^nen u. do e\i'l< lsi's "li III I '.,'.! %  final workout pressed sufficiently by one po" or another to abandon her rightami Intoraatg In that, oi : p.ut n( the world Mistakes and miscalculations £ political army' job" m"itHv7 when* at the ranch of a fellow country(|1 ; ijU( wmch lcd „, mi| ill „ 1 n lt; r?mSg "hS ^Meid*for*eo1S ^ assunu-d his nm command *SU&*.*&2 t 3S!E P "< *" aflal '" &*"?' ponMUon Has government's attention the 120th Division. Jimmy Murray and Iu Thoma Major General Fang, reported anticipated S5O.0O0 hoiua h been drawn lo rticle appeart< be a propaganda expert. He s . > fl.ajlltnl.J f^j.r.v Ifneru.t.i llnllliLl such %  qual O T Allder (L) said that ioint the hon. senior member for the City had raised was definitely a logical one. While the provision ing In lhe Press claiming that faduated Irom Moscow Univerthere is disappointment and "'>'. ""! joined the ChlneM dissatisfaction caused by these Communist forces upon his ntuni omissions? to China, confining his BCtmuog "If the answers are in the u the political deoartment. affirmative^ win Qovonunant set up a committee to bivaaugate the OfflciaLs here also furnished claims of these people with the Information on two top ranking view to sending down legislation Rod! not present nt the 10 round bottle. This is the MC-, i match between the tT^roar-l. vay as to aai D In i tha hatn i .in i.—V P Id UHIIS i.pptHient and Louis 2i-w-..i -,,1.1 i the nrst. —U.P to effect Immediate compensat for deserving rases?" Chief Justice Congratulated ... sub-clause 1 might He said that part of the section nppcar t 0 be workable to the hon should be deleted as it would s ,. mor member for St. Joseph, a create a hardship on candidates, lol 0 f Sf a g,j could creep up. particularly during the last two The fact was that as soon as a weeks of the election. meeting was ended many people assembled into small groups and Mr. Bryan P -^ U nXen'c e a id bTthe point ,rU Mrn>sneaer (C) moved that -de by the hon three hours in sub section one be *-"? deleted and the words one hour j""j be substituted. He said that some•* times at very short notices, one Mr. Mottley (I.) pointed out Judge of this colony has been in Pussia. where he had taken bai had to convene a meeting on the that he was not prepared to changed and is to be addressed a s band including Kim. Me had been Bpot to contradict and counterpursue the point as the honourHis Lordship. He said tlicv were bom Kim Song Ju art some erroneous statements able senior member for St. Joseph pnnic | 0 f „,,. fa ,., lna ,^,. |M( Iri 194B he iffd hls rr B i m ent In made bv one's opponents before and the honourable senior memhad been conferred upon him who revolt against the national, govthe crowd who hod heard those bor for 8 ^, Ja ^,, !" d a ^J' n ^ l J !" the Chief Judge both In Civil eminent, During the loot talks, but undoubtedly key Iures in master minding Communist Btratogy. They are Kim II Sung, the Prenuor i>f North Korea ind Commander in • Chief of the North Korean Army, and General Peng Te Suai. Commander Of the the business of the Court Chines,"Volunteers.was started Mr. W. W. Kim joined the Korea" guerilla attention of forces when he was IB -lighting because the of such Beta of Grand Sessions yesterday morning. Beece, K.C.. drew th> Tiember for the the court to the new mode of the Japanese In Manchuria. In 10 I is the possiaddressing judges In the Colonial years as a guerilla, he rose to the i thing taking territories. post of Secretary of the NorthHe said that he had noticed in east Manchuria Communist Party the paper the title of the Chief In l4l his guerilla unel. rtalemrnt* hid actually dispersed, that in this JOlUO %  <*• had the power to use his discreHe said that three hours' priof tion and not inflict the maximum notice would be too long. One penalty, hour was about the most one The clause was then passed could reasonably expect to give i////,V////'.'.'/ ( '/,v.wv. id Criminal matters and also thn the Japanese war he commanded Chief Judicial Oftiecr of this trie 18th Armv group. I Island. took command of the Northwest The Honourable TinChief JusPeoples' Liberation Army, now tire then thanked Mr RcOC* for tte Chinese Communist Field The next clause—3.. dealt uiih 1|v ki ,,j remarks. Army.—U.P. After Stork Taking THERMOS PICNIC SETS for 2. .'I. A I pt'nplf BASKETS VALISES ATTACHMENT CASES ZIPP CASES Original Price $36.24 now 25.00 „ Price 18.68 now 13.00 „ Price 2400 now II.OO Price 18.69 now l.l mi Price 29 52 now 2 Price 26 00 now 18.00 Price 1868 now 13.00 H.Ml. Ml IS Mill, SIIUII.S mill, ii i on i it FINE FOODS FINE DRINKS .lf###-fr// Jiranctfj DANISH SALAMI SAUSAGE—per lb CAHEMBERT CHEESE per tin OOROONZOLA CHEESE -per lb. .. CRAWFORD'S CFILUT BISCUITS per tin CRAWFORDS CLUB CHEESE STRAWS per tin ... PLANTERS COCKTAIL PEANUTS pai tin SUN PAT COCKTAIL PEANUTS per tin SUN PAT SALTED CASHEW NUTS -per Un SUN PAT SALTED ALMONLS per tin COCKTAI fJai DUTCH ASPAR pel tin BALLANTINF.S WHISKY PERLSTEIN BEER lHc per bottle — t* 00 per Ci 0 itrkiulf ttutn tl 41 11.19 $1 14 $1 47 $1 12 Me SI 06 •0 SSr. rton STAXSFELD, SlOfl A III. I.TII. i MORNINGCOUGHS 1. I I : rl, Illlt Hli.1 lna. aturki uf lii.iinl.il. i jln nl.Tp aii tunr >>•' %  li lUrti'-"*'' pirlud peculiar to iM-U jraarai Uo4a Ihla tiiaNa iuu auStr If tun DM FUali*". !•*! au •intwui. I.I,'I-'I..I.K IHdf Thfn ilo UT LrdM B ril.*n'i Vt^rUi-lo .1 tu rali'va auoh aTmptomat ,<• or e: %  ;.ain • ('utfii-iuMl .,..! OB IStSIMSl BSSliLil Uill %  i.iii.)inn fiiHM.i-asa duirna' HMtSMI -LYDix E. PMaers IIII. IMII1E REDUCTION iv OF HUM 5 lb Tin 1 lb Tin NOW NOW 95M INSIST ON %  iriu\ \ mows fl THEY ARE THE BEST H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. Agents .v/AMv//,y,v.',v^v/.v/// A SIMPLE LOOK WILL CONVINCE YOU OF THESE TWO SPECIAL VALUES FERG0MATT $2.02 4 tVldr Kjns Yd. pmoussoN I'AIIICII CREPE R0MAINE $2.07 In l.lmr. lorjl, KM>. Wine Dartfeftj Hi.i.l. Slirtu \,,u. Sk> Mu-l.i-.l Ko>jl hLik d nd Hhlt' Yd. HARRISON'S Broad St. Dial 2664 ;X-V.','.',.V'^ TURTLE SHELL NOVELTIES THE FINEST RANGE NOW OFFERED IN OUR HOME PRODUCTS DEPT. ion LAMES Necklaces Bracelets Cinarelte Cases HUT Combs Scenery Brooches SI 000 $4.00 MM, $18.00. 2000. $25.00 $3.00 $1M, $120 Brooches with Barbados cV Initials Engraved $1 20. $1.00 toil GENTS Turtle Shell Salad Servers $4.50 a set Confea $1.68 Paper Wei K hts $5.00 „ Kn vi.. $2.00, $1.00 Book Uarka $ 1 50. $1.20 OII IHI HOI SI lllll II lanrti %  S1 I'u-kle Fork 8l Sj.->.,n S<-1 | Salt Spool 72c. each CAVE & SHEPHERD Co.. Ltd. 10. 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET


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TUKSDAY, Jll-V III. 1SJ1 HVKBADO^ AD\OCATI PACE TIIKU Latin America Sets Pace In Expansion w KTll AM raphmo impart...: Wfalb that acute kteOeOgscaj 1 ;he Northern Hemisphere has distracted the world's attention Irom Latin •I war period that area has made astonishing economic Ulna relative tc. other continents De.'piio the (;, | iht U.S. Government i nited States hi and depo : :• i of the pern %  % %  • % %  • to doc... non-intervention within tin; HcmiThe organization is a regional (croup •>( nations within tl The LiUn Am I though oof, i Ui [tod N He group Influence beibatantatD* itanllar ; hilosophies and econo.. 'iICStS.—II.I*. U.K. — Argentine Trade Prone* Disappoin ting MR. SILSBY I ..•'ILL ancial grants to Latin Republics havr been a negligihi.percentage of world aid since ihe war. inter AM ha* outstripped the irude bet tlie t S and oUwt ideographical areas. Far Advanced Expert* agree that the U s point d.ur proti logical co-oper.it. t .n I rufthoi advanced in Latin America UMn in any othei t-cion of the world The Venezuelan iron ore industry ha* attained a rapid]v expanding eonunar twins b production. niWI Latin -American eountrir* pr.alui-r i whelming -lure of thr world I coffer jt tinpre*.iH |.r. hi I %  level of orlces. Iranian oil trouble*. leMShadow the rviHiKiui, ,f the pelrolrum Indu-tr* IbrSBgheal LONDON, July 30. the Caribbean argB, irBBaO %  *.'. It trade and larger eopprr and manganese quartan expressed anxn-ly thai production In South An.cric.t gantilM trad* would ioIn thr nr..r MOSSJIlt %  %  Foot! production ll increasing %  •* %  -"uulated in earlier and relative to the popular '' %  "' agreements. 1-atin American < financial Ttaaae feared Ai further galiu Indicate) %  nn ou nc amant on wholeieli ido| %  I reduction ol ighfc rii inn rovemeni % %  M %  %  tute of Inter-American Adah % %  200,000 the U S Dpartn %grl ulof frozen and chilled Aid To J'can Cigars W'outii Ciosl L.k. Sothing Col. De Cordova's Parting Shot LONDON .' %  LT.-COL. MICHAEL Dl CORpOVA who baa baa London t<> praaaj the case fur the Jamaican cigar industry., has left for Jamaica after his luief but very active vigil Aa a (emit of Ins discussions decrease lb* need lor vilh Members of 1'arlunienl and imrease the Island's ability lo I 1 -1'rcs*. MM hsMM at "Jamaican i ih-tse ,[ 1 >..i>. iir^e-.-anl.v (I.KII v Cuban cigars" has been raised the IK Inoae who several lime, in the HOUM ttl %  ilcnd against subversive mtluand ha* been given rncee, bain I atntala peace and I licit* in British aewai urftj \m Jaieeics and strengtht ipen I UM t'ohmji loyalties to she ned hibroadsheet, "The Case Umg and to the M ( i UM Jjman.i Cigar Industry," 'Lastly', it mut be i It) anybody who could help hiLhaj all that Jam.uca ask) the .: < %  r K Oovoriunani %  • n*h ' ii | l.nilon. ent out this message ,, sslhlltty of loss of part of the ,.. dgan (W" "It cannot often he Uiat a Col, ,iv about CS00.O00) .i against roquart fO iistnnce to its .Taniisfl clar indUfti' pHu would CO1 the M.ither *ClgM1i for All'—plus a pcmible \ Please Take Notice lilt miinnuim URLSS SHOP THE NEW HOLLYWOOD DMM BHOl The tude ma Ladles I>ii*C ..nd a perfi i: m : Tin. : ins cathcart. the former Cutter of the Moder:< Die-.* Shop guarantee' hei ard of ai'ility. %  itiuted ** it was St No 7 BwaM Street Wiil h* removed hNo I In >>f Jolu NO MORE HARSH LAXATivES: "My wife had tn-d njin' bteda .,( harsh laaa ivt* bef si i.. .. AI : lastia %  mas-d Si,\ Hi,)! Stieet. upst.m I Drug Store, reopening * ^ on the i-t Augu-t 1 'I'!. Ugll.-1 r i'tieral Public ( of coiivrnimi • hiuui't le• %  %  I \ V' I A.Ql< N Om untaittiteJ ltttr\ from All BRAN from o>i dietary bulk, try ibu i.ilnimilaboul '. KeUogg'f .1 wstwr' ll'iMd satuuedafs return empty l>ox to kVfoa Co. o' &•*) Itl'sla, Ltd. MgaifcssNt la fai a. r,n DOUH %  IOIK MONCK H\('KI rrvi' i.iea^l t' K Noi Diniciili Mrtar al Mr hiU Subby. ut KHKl |urU lt*iui k Hi • Uorthlni |. in reproduce in riimtiiirr the Su-ev nirimilK taeeuld be enat-tto. or roculalnl %  IK I1*1* .ifVt'l.Hl I '-H'll II Hi' save the Jamau* rlfjir liidiu..1 In u.c v .inn ~ It* al tiuUI nol be veiy iliftiioli. ll! vould. ,r course, require u Lreiicli J uiti the U.K practice tlul .Han 1 ,11 dfvaraUj Hi micau. parnd ojbar tob* c i.iau-inM liaseu on lar but tlie U.K. i i l lu .1. mm .-ui"> " roun ', 1 ?. "' '^ "'"" '" orin-pnwei and 111* tlua l tne " ',''•• '* !" r, is prt'Sldmij. Oiunscl for Ulc .,",, ( nHula*| ohl.salinn.H! %  .-*. Cubo h"(l txpvtO i' elated with Mr. E. W. Barrow, while Mr. W. W i ,-. lth boUi Purthar. H ouotaof |ao^.fm dollars or a.o CW&*tt******' Hateg in efassooooi •'"• yi*wn fram hlonil itttpuritir* impurliin inih* olood mav cause rhsumatlc acaaa and padin, -nit Mtg sauatfal kttBHa, bolls. pimpU-i sad common skin dlsarderv. ClarhVs Blood Mlsturs hrlp. to purlly the Mood, cleaners the sysirm and assists In restotini good health. %  boul ture ll.tflll %  %  Ling than l K.C.. Sohctn.i 0 I'liouliition Thr lot % %  %  estimated at 158^00.000 norm;il rob American population I crling 'i Iha | of the ceiiturv sriu be ovor Britain of % % %  ontlol good 200.000,000. %  %  %  British When hoorlng Mortod % %  i had oatto-day the prooocutlon orill call more witnesses which will %  I %  •d stains l he dead \ bullet there 01 the body. X lt.i> . ( lb) exit Igars. (whichever it the 1* that for %  m h %  ID to 1962'S tho <'uua:> 0d tl I Uno bring the numlwi io twot roro closing its case. D Outlinmw the x 1(i %  M] Keeee said Uut JOOOph HolUp notographs of a boo. %  gan stood Indicted for Ihc murder The diplomat;, ol non-essential-., includm* of Samuel Heckle, at St. Philip r.aava-ka\em neirl \rii.li.. aheu in.rtA.. 4 UIL!.. ..Ill a ilu L1 J*a* nnrv il>Jll -|1 muol he further cited that machine-made, .iitistanre to thl* industry will ,-.; -B.U P have been stow I teted to i-each tl7.ooo.onn Ul Ufa iisitiu relative lmportanca of LaUn Ural rooi ol Iha i4! aggoornan! Amencn in the world econori but I -'i.tHM) the The Deportmanl of Commeree l-'lnwiefail Time* argued, cumulative statistics for the Janu|old it wai commonlv bomil of recent prowlth : id In t!i0 vlaioni thai Argentina petti. thowrd thnt the U.S import* of British textiles on i rlQWOVOT the Q CCU OOd 001 %  20 other US. Republ ,OQMIIIIO. goods would I've with the old woi' ed to $1,326,000,000 against meedll) (-• given to the vlU0 of duriim the last few veer* he left M... lu ho om fl.400.000. the island on at leasl two oeca%  huut i I i May io, 1951. ., grondaon of Keturnh HnlliKan an old lady 91 roai i' Boeklej got marriad about n yean ago and from thai daj be Uvod with hla wile away from the old lad) Dr. K —— on Ifaj Whan ..mother's housAHollinan lold him while llolliaan sal n went " oI tiS OB Ihe next lo him in the cor. ol .i euruae. As a !" !" Ul inspector Bourne caOM fie exnminati.m site !" T ^,. J r tmf and tooh he overheard what he tgJId Capt %  any forM ad in aafiaaaaaaa|aaaaaaiaaaj |W Her. toj^ **"• .. ounar Deeea>ed Fell Vak W Philla >aiJ Elheluert Jordan said that he Iha accused. Holligao. On orking In a Held May io he was l> adiiiK canta m iralopmenti aionu these lines however are now rupidlv fading —V P. R.C. PRIEST DIES Ovi Own Correapamdcnl• i Ouatava lady owned : C-SiUL, died on July Philip and Imports from the European RerOVi n Pt tries iii ilu "ILH period ware $886,000,000 at *313 lon.noo. ConHdence Proposed L'niii inle aid to Latin A 1 confidence here that 1-.. ca will maintain strength througrs lh-normal coursu of commertul ll From Ihe geographi.. jioint the Lalin-Ameni;i area IS • % %  1 tiviregion for 1' %  >. %  1 %  Ihot: Hepubhcs Ol „. ". ....'. > ww iien.. CLERK DISMISSED lished %  mutual am ,r ,n u " n c.fi.n4.Bi Whllf me North Al l"..T-oK-SI'AIN. Jul js m the proca */ %  Uon nnd the Padftc dl tem is still at an i .1 The laraja 1 As HollUju'i 11 an explosion ... • %  1 ^ind saw Samuel Pocklai OOBBlng h,. went I,, America .. ill |a| ha shoot Aiuba. Althouah he was msriK n ,,,,. BaeJUaa went lo tinnext Grant. Capt. Grant later QharSOd Holligun with murder. To Mr. Adams; llev. GentU-nt.l th,.t he did not know Holligan before. Inspector Cecil Bourne said that on Moy 10 about noon ba Central Police Station when M taw Capt. Grant. Rev. Gentles car and Holl'g"" *' %  *' the deceased still uaad !" old lady, brineiv ovary Ihaai 1 Uttli at ma an %  aae of 70. at the Roseau made a will du.puuiK 1 mooth'i illness. i„|, d y.,,1 )eft Ihl w .jn ,„ n( He arrive.! in tho West Indies bedroom. Thin land wat in 106. and was stationed In thj u fi„. by Samuel Baolllas who al* KaturS then Danish Virgin Islands, until looked after ihe reaping ol tha las was lab I nit.1 the liel'i ,ind showcii • H| %  ocuaed eoroa Iron .iixn-e tha Klaa ran .f the optad organlaad %  ,, Seven memb. %  .siatanee afferad ,.hikfour were the organization of a*\# Qiiffn hut the accused 1'him with the reapnuj Their had f re .'. % %  kit 1 been Mime little talk between t!.. ) %  noU %  fonmuK old lady and the accused a.s to her ., disposina of the land but than was nothing to show thai tli. % %  • t-*ui I0u 'M.ng feeling between both yard I house. Of them. growTharc was H 1 %  %  bami batwean Iha m-Kt he w.>tween tha grandsons and accoi I HoUigao'i ing to the old .i.sked hi* two cousins Inelui lli.klis ool to go back i" ihc ou AsUlyai'l Statement lady's place. pjf j • ng CovOn May 10. He.klr* wriit In (1| toM the court see Die old lady and Ihe arm'hhig was sub* ed MMl IheIBUM lin.r and :1|t , M a> 12 found him there. Holliitan 1 .,, the asked it,-, ki, if he had heard what he said %  1 1 romini: to Ihe house and as the old lid\ ii'i Ihe .. u .it had a briaht Ihinc In his hand and site heard a ellrk and smoke came out of the bright thin*, and thrn she saw simurl reel back and heard him shout 'murder.' After that Beekles left Ihe house and went ip the mad on a blryrle. Mil frll off He was taken to Dr. Ilu The first witness cilled (Or Iha prosecution vo-i,-:il;.v was I'n 1 Becklr-f who ,1 I Marias Vale Bt Philip. On M %  10 her husband — Sarnuo) Backted out of .1 car into Dr Hutaon''* oftlrc there he died. Hl £. **?? *?* removt ind Inta ibout 100 yards from Holli1 M.lii-aid an explosion and then heard aoaaa W oimn shout •murder', lie looked p„ mount a bicycle and ride out Holligan under arrest. ol sight. 1 .h njaflaa tnuught his cat and ,. .. 1* Baniinl Ba>oUa| GaaWla Joraan said 1n.1i %  > May. IO. 1MI. abaul l o'rloek he was al his parent's place. He aaw Samuel Beekles with a basket on a bicycle He passed him and after he saw him .ii.oii at Ihe pipe inli two hurkels He heard an explosion and he walked slowly on his way hAck lo his In.iin He "...i,i,-l Heckles lying down With s towel over his face jnd He was groaning. Mr. Blades rainc with hia ear and took ..way Samuel %  <> Ihe doctor. Samuel died on the doctor's bed. Capt. Grant paid thai on May 10 he was ut Central Station and HOVERS BEAT OLYMPIA 11- A (airly but crowd tawthe tooting Grenada Bovera Netbell %  gt Olymnla bj 11 goals to nine in a netouil match played at Jlympfa around.. Black Rock %  ftarnoon Tingarni wukaenly Contaatad and last 1,0m Ihe beginning to Ihe end. Ftel Rovers. JoyCO Hh he. Capudn aaorad Ua goals -n>i Bllaan 1 m Hi • i" 1, i 1 Oj BDorara wenBy 1 via Maxwell sev. two. AI hall lima '>i.ivP'.' lad wlUi four goals and Hovers had two to mak credit. The teams ware (•rrnada Rover* -Joyce Itlachr. received a telephone message and i>„„n,. s. ., h.,4 u .l.e,al...i. — US IS* llllt. *•" %  *" %  *^ .. .. .. 1-... had a convei salion with Dr Hut son He aay motor car M 351 drawn up Inside the yard He SSSaal IO the tar. He BlUtionad li-dlignn and '"'d him that be wu charged with the murder ul BocJdea Holligan said 1 <,i„, don't want to say anything whatwell While he was taking The referees • the itotesnenl danwn inspecio. and Mrs woUon me laland m On (he same day he went to fixed for Salurd; Tticif %  %  %  a that the 1 .ilso 10 a .(|l . I .IV >, let. Thare ti the veal Ror noh as from ^"j; !" ^V-rJIT a bullet. 11, Mr. a Aaaawa i knew nothing al -i ba reS ,. ii.ii ,. ,0.1 -tj-"k uhotogj-auhs of the huu Kan on May II ~2P££?%ZZr7*J' X2FZ1 • v ****** Tl„. first „n-.!.ul .oh .huWOd the C ^^^ i > W,nn ald """ "' SOM-W Ml llS U s o( U* build,,UI ii, ' ;l l 1 **^ ,nl i ,d VeBt l ?• %  '•"•?W ,Ur callendei. Dqraan ultti a La Has Pearl Mindes and Angela I Andrews. Olymola — Kathleen Connor, (Capt ). Maria Harrow. I-a QulnI Patricia Kng. I'atr.e.., Real 1 Ramsay, Sylvester MaxMi it Dai el %  i,„ i. ha took. To Mr. Adams: sai.i that ba wrote bicycle on Friday. itch which WM f will take plate 1 Capt. Grant down exa.tlv l.y In %  ties. CpL Goring attached b) DeMai C Police Station said that he IIAItBOUH LOG In Carlisle Bay PhUfa/i A: tha house posi morn-.1, examlnaUon Qaa whole • ken at 1 %  %  n ,.f blarlaj Dr. HuUson Dr. C. Huts-Hi that on May 10 about 11.22 a.rSamuel Beekles his OBBOa in a car. Ha dying condition; hla *kin ri •hing was weak and iireaular. He had %  small on the right side in front of tl. cheat about two and u hall Inch) fiom the breast bone. This wound wan small and blood WM %  •osing alighiiy Ha Ihe Hospital and 1\.L. 1 laid :, man dying in hu ofAaa. After telephonma he wen'. hack and taw that he 1 : .removed She body A PoM mnrxamination ana periorraed n on the Ixxly whl I idenuiled by Una Beekles, of the deceased. Heart VYminrl From tho porf saot i.e found that there also a wound at the base of tl %  iha bark %  Vale, si i-n.iip. aald Utal %  .it ia to Mr Itobmson Acting Governmrnt Analyst on May 11. On June 4 he received them back from the Analyst. San Site Sgt. N Oaakfai n.iii iha eoun he went to Baydeld. St Plnllp. on May 10 where certain spota of Cyril %  Hoiiih. *r. I .fin HartaajN Balls w..ifH.11 w 1. laay -*ov a.Mk*aj N KaHle*. *s ll. %  I -.%  AJUUVALB M v nt.i* 'r tat Mm tViBuma-,,, from Naau artiiMHsar a~ir.r> so In, I... "rt tinputanonar) wound waa external F %  not connected but com fjondinj; I And %  forelgi. body. Tho whole bos)] was examined Tho organ* u the cheet were healthy. Tl stomach, intestines and eplaei The skull c,| and brain were removed. Th. . normal and 1 1 aa present. A gans were healthy X-H-iy photogriiph ay 1.K 1 o pointed 'Kit to him by from ii ii' heardi,Wllbart Blades, Ktheibert joroaui %  rm nnd others l^U-r the same day OJ %  bo Dr, Hulsoo's Surgery .it ,11k! frorn HoUlajan'i bouse and JbarUng, St. Philip, where he saw ..lit women shout the dead body of a man which murder'. was remove,! to the Si. I'hillp VHmoi About %  after he Mortuary Dr Hutson pi HaDlgan riding a p**l aaoriem. :t'a>knwny The next day Joseph Holhgn war brought to Distrnt "C St.,IIOP. Keturah and Mildred Kolllkftd out spBC .|c. to take him to Bridgetown and ^J^'^ %  waa blood on Bet-ki' .;'tMi( I Ml laaa MI. Capt 11,1 TiK.id^a Cs> 1—inn (ot.i IMH. CasS t I K. imaur Hatiklyn U ft. SI Ions n-l ua>iy. fur Britiih OUUIM Ad-iwr. 3SM lona ns*. Cp" HoliarlMin for Tiln-SSil H claH Mill. I Ion* Ml. C'Spi aasua <" Tri.,iaad M V pasiwiwl. M int.. nri. Cp* Mul/^r la* Si < 1.*4V Kal 4.SM In Touch with Barbadoj Costal Station 1W.1i Indiaai Lid I %  H B Vnikir.!. me S.a TuiM. Celile i it* 1 the eai iva dyinp 1 that on .. taken of the body A m srj ;. i.holograph he the back of the chest and unable to find any foreign ma woo ter. 1 of tl:< In his opinioi to haemorrhage and sulUng from .1 wound to heart. The wound oould ha< : '.ppoii.e gar. a a m.n.. ^ a r*iri 1 n a S stermseaafa. a 8 JOT** i-api. s a a auira. a .. -I. 11 K**o Baa Psulo. a S n dnra |] he Alms Pnnml a % MwiftnKo. B B „K(\ ha tu> Wlllirn*liiB I S K*obhr-'k>. Colo", who he beN ,, cssaalanra. %  c.rla-, S B Aneap. • a % Paula. B 1 tad>Nalxxi, 1 fteaae, n ae**sra •• a BkMSM f.otluvo V I JV*HT %  ** Hniwa.. is OSM Cumaarlntl. t.ellirH; .* 1-aWyer B R ^ nU AlUll „ He wanted to go lo town s/> that **" %  he could get a lawyer. He then **' decided to take him to Bridgetown. On his way lo Bridgetown. Holligan id that somebody after hiin Iral S' 1 ..pt Grant R/aa. B •) RATES OF EXCHANGE I A V til A I ay lomething about a msn dying 19 %  ached the doclor Holli.1' i> the man. He told Cspt Grant whit Holli•a 7 l p. I MIIIKllllll Mm-m! nothing smells so good as a Eipst.a'.y


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PACE TWO BARBADOS ADVIX ATI i I F *DAY. JULY 31. 1951 fyahib falling H IS LOPDSHIP. Ht Ri %  iunion R re hundred %  '.". ^daia" al momtM Members of tha cVargy of almost %  11 dennmlnation* throughout lha members -rtoua congregations also •" the fllni. : 11 Chrtfl and M The film began at P.40 am and %  for just under two hnurv I: opens at the pia*;i on I s\u rin \ ii u 01 >I\I.I\I\ Grenada Police Force M HUGH UHATHWAITF son .i Mi %  ram of si Philip and Mr. Alonza Bratnw.nte arrived from Grenada over th> H.W.I.A. in four weeks %  %  on July 21st. Hugh who W .. Barbadian, left i months ago to Join the Grenada Pi lo Forct Ha was ah| Barbadians. He told Cartb that they have just computed their training and the) -re now assisting with I ing of two hundred Grenada rciruits of the fl Anti'-f, Prize Giving P ilVINO in Antigua was luld on the lawna i>r the Antigua Grammar School last Thursday. It was the lirat occasion on which the new Haul Mr. J. Foolc, M.A.. delivered his report of the work of ehODl for the past year. TlMiafl are at present two hundred and thirty-three boys in On and Mr. Foote made it claw thai awing to shortage of staff the school is now limited to two hundred) and forty boys. i.. Bishop Nathaniel Hughes of Antigua BM Mi It. St. J. o he Ariministi %  i cacnted by Mis I) | .!.-,( %  :< ;nn, wifa i [ DM Cti af Ju ti i Among the guests was the Pt> lad m the school, as many people n has RMl in PuMtO Rico V rgtn Islands tba long holidays. ucatad there. HrUI *intiv .*• gMng to the UJ Wot No Homes? *T* STARTING FRIDAY AT EMl'IKE AND ROYAL SIMULTANEOUSLY ll.ll.l. Itadio Programme It 11 : I '!*)*• % %  Program from Britain II SO ii is P in i is—s.ia .Una the I'laia Rrldirtown. vtrw of the lilm "The Sinn* M Off to U.S. ISS ARLENfc CUMMINS. BlSIIOI' Q 1 (• MWIIIMI.U It wtlerda> morning after seeing a prr of MagdaU" Immigration M AJOR FHEU STENT, TnniRj*a Chief Immigration ughter of Di and Mrs. om.er who had been holidaying Barbados aloca July 16lh re%  Trtnldad over the wcekiW.I.A. iii had bam staying with Mr. n i ay Anthony at Hottai Si 1.i raoea. n Q Cununira of "OothmarC, Bank Hall, Ukfl or Sun i I Latfj Nefaea foi UM U B MI-Con i Sctanca Murtraai %  %  Water Polo Playera M l NRIQUI L47PB in %  i .i rh< re. Incidental Intelligence O lO) nlghl m New York when there were no taxis on to !%  had, Monty Woollay started HI tba stairs of the Tunes returning to school after Bqui Halfway down ppt i %  toui lad %  %  %  ngalnst him. and thai ended uu ring on the bottom step with the lady Both Of them ata i WOOlhVa LaB lie M R. OLIVER JOHNSON. A; -o the shoulder. Itig Assistant Bnineh Mannbj hnvr to leave Burbadc. gt rnadjun,*' he rasped, i i, U.W.I.A.. who rat In Trinidad I •lgbl ol lha aratai polo geaaon. bul thli iai rnr at l K->" ll, returned Then —Rrnnetf C>r| ii.w.i.A. ag> nay in —L.R.S. I III: tMlrMIIIIS Ol lllA Short Vilit EMPIRE NOW SHOWING TO PACKED CAPACITY AND CONTINUING DAILY The minis I are tfter ,** WD i AMI ATM l-l K M.M;MA MembarsOnh/) TO-NfOHT TO THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30 MA: p.m. I'nlvrrsal-lnternittonai prrsrnU . j "PIRATES OF MONTEREY %  tucolor 3lrnng Hi BIOS ,11 RANIUNY I'llM.IF UD "" %  — %  \\RI..\W.A IH^I mi BHIfflJl!!3M[ffl TRIPOLI oilman ptirM %  ION CHN[Y Dracula %  ,m n Bill LUGOSI iwMonslernrtHftWHSIHHK IM W*t-JMM laMfk / i.in.ii! i.xn.ii! I.MUM! i" I>j\aK/\ Dtei I,M i. AII; iv THF. i M in '. ST. IAMBI l-AST SHOW TONITE IN aaaaaa roa H* •.*.** % %  i Wi roar *PA %  sanata au TWO YEARS IN THE MAKING!!! run srttHY OF M.I. TIMKl A MESSAGE OF PEACE AND FAITH FOR EVERYONE THE GREATEST STORY OF \ i ii i: IO-|l%\ DM) .-..Oil I'M. \M> II. I'M. I %  > %  l VIIIA mill IIN\L 1NSTVLMI M •UHtCh UEXTHY" St.irniiK TOM NEAL, — .TCDY CI^RK ACTION .... AND THMI.LS .... IMIIM-IIW \VII TIIIRSIIW. Ill INS 115 r.M. Ill l-l 111 II ALL ACTION IMirill.F i ^4?55r m IIU'SEIU OTTI f WALTER 8RENNAN MSRIE WINDSOR I I HFUIUC PICTUII r BY THE WAY... % •,.%•*• S TURDY drinkers, in my iwi|>cr is an aeeount of a man who went into a publie house and attempted lo ent &0 hnrri>boiled ernts in an hour. Why a ptiblte house' I suppose lie drink:; hi I ho | i: And was iheie nob*Kly to tell him that it would hi' iiuii'ker to eat 50 eggs in the form of tltat • dull called Efilfijoy*' %  ner. irhui'j I'lis Im-elu last p. Half fltti and half iidhesie %  paste'"' CROSSWORD I — n i i ....|.. i V • I! W\ 'f : 1 I' 1 i 1 I %  • Si r 'Una tetn in 111 li OTH Sl O* i '•• I %  1 %  • My lore, it's procused coy, nvic* i laid. And cowaaa by fraishl Pflffl .Sind. So lllll.iitii-. do >".! lo'uif. /in,,Sctanc a rtoldi n hat d %  ht." Strnhitmu* anil Ihv /,.. %  A PPLYING ipharoidal barinoiues i,i ti' vtg. the MIII<* has dlsco\eii that the potential o( an euii-nia** at MII> pjlvan %  %  i tha atu taca of it circle drown round the ciicwnAnranot) is in all confucal elliptic cylinders, ti'rc ttoglmannrfcaorii dar Ktwawtfakh iiKi'trrailsrhes Geslurh.) In plain languaga, thia maani thai %  varyttilni hi In motion in raUUoti %  • TtmiK else, tin | I hen an aaj i I l'l;eletn:e tOfl I ton ara narals acadarnlc expras noa-bacomina as tha aaat n .i> ba Thus, though one can < %  i i in pure mathematics, tha IWi IHirpoaeh ol Lfca Wp la l>eromitv bottom, and ui. >iisa, rv.n if tha viol Is laid sideways or ioptnK. patwaarj [oiati only tii %  -inltTinati.. can at&f hi iniinite-imal fraction of a • Costl* 'o '*• %  *> %  %  I | mat in Mr-.ai I %  II I %  %  v n oil %  • ... M V aomanl whvn the eg* ii righi (or wrong) way up. layman iii do asall ta fn baroffo. Ihi.-iilal Intrtiilvr M RS. MeCl'RGl.E has plained to the poUoO that a Ilia aallai ambled into he. juivate sittint{-iiKini at Miiiur House and. without any provocation. called her NiKhtinRale among the Branches. Rose of Thurralil...d. and Jasmine HUstsom of Ten Thousand Delights. He then triad In sell her %  genuiitv Bokhara rug; saylns. •'One kiss. Kaon of the Fbuntuina in the Court of Suleiman the M.innii', rent, will purchase m> v huh UI.WOI thy itook ol prloat) U thai moment Mr. Prod liockeii oiDM in to complain aboul tha jmrtions of gravy wl yaatarday'i lunch The %  l %  bach al thouKh stuns nat, crying, "An i %  lant.1 Wa-wa Magali." reiottei tha rvinung al tha um I %  lady, whose pretty face wn> I %  : i \\ Uka ,i B aa tr ool ol ; %  h".-.ii-it.'• %  .igli," sht %  .I "0111 ip.Abdul,*' vouch.-s.ifen or THI me ^K- M Rupert and Simon — 42 AB,: THE LAVISH FEASTS Of ThEUNBtLltVHSI DA ViNCI S MASTERPIECE THE LAST SUPPER COMES TO It'El Kiapau tad Simon an thrilled to ituok liut tit*. %  / coim IO bf drivsfi home. Tbtv *r* pukrd mawSr sod. aaur wiving fuodby* to thajt Sind intndt. .• tossi sp^duia ..... 1 MV. >. Sasnn slter a h.>. |KM'< I SMR Mid MflM%  hui(j on 'lit tru. I ihou|hi put tho io ksrp yout |M at trom suppiriB. but thm's a on II and. good S/MDLaS jddtesMd i "w.' D'you tiny'v* givn ass I rw(d Ho* v. %  .i .i I w bvbr. (Jim* VESTS 79? 89? $1.00 1.13 1.15 1.18 1.34 SILK VESTS $1.37 1.47 PANTIES 89? 98s 99? $1.07 1.13 1.29 $1.41 1.52 SLIPS $2.20 2.52 4.88 BRAS. $181 1.64 1.95 2.40 2.70 3.40 4.40 4.43 NIGHTIES $4.10 4.16 4.29 4.26 4.52 4.95 4.97 5.33 TIIEATRE TODAY LAS' IWO SHOWS 4 41 & SIS It's All Ahout Airline Stewardesses! M-G-Msfoufc.StVVi.fwi Hit! BARRY HOWARD KEEL SULIIVAN" "Tkm, Guy* |l WfD t. 1HU8S 20i C lex Ooubli BURT LANCASTER in •MSTr.l( 880" AND "HACK HAND" GINS KRLV £ I CARROL NASH MYSTtHY rHMIIS STARTING SATURDAY 4rii AUGUST •SWORD OF HOME (RiSTO 'Ha First Soparcinacolor Pitlure lo Show in Barbados. BOCK THE DATl. ,:-: -' : -to JUST RECEIVED tint! Sflliiif/ I'II si Canadian Hardwood Chairs and Rockers SF.1TRE HU Its XO\%: • Tilt: IIAIIII vnos i II-OI-I it \ i n i 'OTTO.\ IV Et |.TI. Hardware Department Tel. No. 2038 T. R. EVANS & WHITFTELDS DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORE DIAL 4220 (ALL-TALKING) BASED ON THE GOSPEL. HOW BEAUTIFUL IS THE GOSPEL 1 THOUSANDS IN THE CAST! Coming -FRIDAY Auguit 3rd BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310) PLAZA THE ISLANDS MOST POPULAR SHOW HOUSE! l YPI'I< I III V I III TO-IMY AN1 TO-MORKOW. 4 30 AN1> 8.IS P M. KFri'RLIC ALL Al TION WIIOl.i: SI KIAI. "BS8BMT AGE\T" BUarlBf : ROD CAMERON Ai-lion And Thrills From Start lo Fini. WHIM sn\\ VMI un K-IM\ i :o \vn s \P.M RKIM BUG All. %( TION IHIIHI.I JOHN WAVNT and GAIL RUSSELL in • WAKE Of //// RED WITCH" — AND — "SALTl UK HilMRS "I'lMM. FHIOAV 4TW 40O0ST CahDBtMi Nrtal . %  • /'/ MiWitnh DICK 1 tm shtmltl vftitl ail II him I FERNOXONE mill apptff it at i m i'iINDICATION FOR I %  * Feraoaaar U I MaMUva Hcrmone wccd-ktllfr -nI iracnmmcndwi for cunlrol of Nutgrr*^ oa l,.wns. ..lf Bi.-ens, cr.vpllcd nnrl asphalttvl paths and at. All wrrds aro most easily killed when growing vigorously Frrnovomli.,T,„. ; „) antaaa over arsenicnls in that it Is not dangci-ous to hum.ir.k MFTIIOD (IF USC. Uaad as I liquid 4 1ft acre active ingredient a the recommendetl appUeatlon rate. A V. stock solution Is made up by adding 1.25 Tr Feraaxaae to 10 gallons wan Fernoxwne to 10 pints water. Use 40 gallons per acr. or t pun per 100 sq. ft., diluting the stock solution with a further quantity of aratar to cover Ihe area. PBECAVTION8 "tTT fRananllhla to damage by Pataanaaw and gre.t car* is necessary In applying it to avatd drift on to such crops w!ti


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PAGE FOl R BARBADOS ADVOCAtF. TUESDAY, Jli.Y 31. 1951 BAKBADOS t.. 1 AmocttTE XEW* IIUMI IIIII I \l\ —t -i l,„,d -I Kr4t'l-B lll.Ml^. JlllS It* H..*i.l I...,! lUbtrl* THHr : < BMdkal two bills: utic (or the government of medical department* and the Dthtt far the establishment of medical centra throughout the island. LitI have be< a the ID wa the end of tl I; wai iar. el) m, Initiative of Df H n old, then 1 the changes nee ih*n Dr. %  •< %  Borneo hns retire I ft! the instance take up Of, r in the Leeward |guu ,. IT WI Island should have been tricta with a Officer in charge .md with the necessary staff. %  supplied by the Poor Lew Guard%  TOChial Medical Officers and bean Eound Dial %  I iaimBrldgi town, either beat: %  i by 'bus or Hi i car hire, to '..<'t regular .'. This would not have edical ou> : under the Medical SerBIU, had been i -t;i Wished. There is large numI trained and qualified Sanitary Inable "i BlUng the imsu in %  One "i theoe bills which provided that i ol the General Hospital bo transDiroctore to the rnment wai peaeed. The Staff has Ide for Specialists ami a Medical Superintendent has been appointed. It was found thai the provisions > idminii tvattori of the Hospital; but the bill which would ; proper medical RM gotten, At the time when the Vestry of St. Uichi a the number of chlal Medical Omcel %  and la provide leCil II wai abjfctad that the bill provldin services was nd the new clinic i with the provlsiona df that bill p, wa hal the Vestry did m ,i allow i erred Since then thousands >l sit tnd children have been Linie. The Vestry Dow Deads to go one step further and And some means of chanelling the services oi the District Nurses now employed by ihe Sanltar) Comroisaioners. tai i service, and ; I %  %  community who needed thi i elp they can give. But ,; w included in the list of Sanitary tnd report to i ;i. This is because of the lack of the \1Ucai Sei vices which would have been Aed In the bill lost at the end of the session it is true thai there has been a large volun lation during the last two %  nactment was delayed bece irj amount of debate and the [allure t<> rue priority to measures which deeerved it. The Legislative Council did DOt dlSCUSS it and it was lost at the end oi The end of the %  OMlOll approaches with the I^>i:is)alure cliasin:' the Clock with such measures ai the Election Bill and the PiOQI : Bill Still in the U of dlacu ble to add the Medical SerdisQJftSSi '' >>f the Maude Rete hour, but Judg m Its Importance to the island, and Ity to remove as far as possible -i and infirm PI ioi ity over other I < |n ma next session. NEW SMUNPKN11 I:VII;IIIHISI: LONDON, Ju i. bs knewB %  : i cam leg raw th ; rowei .... i.i. :, nd by United l result of %  when I' could be %  I shipped lo %  themselves %  in ..l to-day's ks would be %  i i %  %  %  II I i\ Ih( tfr Israel Clovi-mmcnt betLONDON, July 20. narked change from this order incident of a feritis!. ship beinfc U srould re pad by the Egyptians, was the •try is t" bs prefeeing important Mends and Aiab im!>ano on Israel. Notions %  i %  | people in Weitem ago. the Israel Oovfnnfcsnt sal %  I • prlskta ESBTOCH H.eneral Franco is obvied to provoke an incident In thi* Ttu> %  %  uly gaining popularity at home very channel leading to Ih* Southtoonlst has drawn the prickly v ith the prospect or American :•< % %  "it, where the Briliah aspects of Britain and Franca And It la very much in the intership stopped They decide,* shaking hands with General Franest of his government to give theJ to .send a viy n;uch bigger ship ;. l0J*d :n the form Unpreaalon that at least %  billion through carrying building matethe midst of an dollars Isthe way lmm< **&& intercepted it, %  ron landscape, rcpn-SSI i not so Indcc.t | %  ' would be publicity for the Spain I! \a Mr. Dean n grave prospect that th. "•"•, there would be I v.h.. LntUW llritish opposition to General Franco bulMing materials for Elath But Foreign Secretary l<. sluke hands wtuch ha* recently tnclui. "'• ""' "-gy-pnan action in PniMOs Herbert ,,j the Church and the middle"uppin* the British ship stuteri 01 expression of class—confused by the new agree 00 on his ntnt. will be dispersed But the face. And this >ums up accuntentUSUOfl within Spain will not ho i> un' averaes Brtttsh reseuon at iraseoved at all. to Call Spnlna frlrtiri. even HgcbtTl MOtTiSOn does BOt ftnd at second remove Thiv mself In a weak position n to "introduceI( ,, tk nc ,, i.ndlymani jlll i ed states on the subject of l,er lo the Norm Atlantic Treaty Spa | n A ll of a dOBSI BUTOP" ID i l.kely to be the cause of toU ntries are in ngreenient with „ and bad feeling Um and m particular n.iiIs ZSJEX^ni ? and the United ,. IIVIOUS ,,f American sad te States—and there K plrnty of suslr Bt m ight beUer SO t-> build i-th sides itaiia,, army, and Italian bases. and provide capital (Of 1' ill Two Brwaa views need to bo ia na reform schet i at Spa,. On.}. Al The E, M ,; nrf pSofV eeuniv^ndV.'t. In %  Ironsj emi tlonSj ^ the ot her hand. Herpeople talk about the unity ol of guilt about the Spanish Civil ^^ Vorrison flnds anotbe, iltuaF.urope and world government. Wai in rattMl ihe same way that ,,„„ |n thc drsort Ihat is quill „ h ,„ an much more poweriu: many are guilty uboul the Munich prM kJV | )llt n ,.,,. |„. has ni..de> drives, for thi splitting up of AsMBrnent. Emot real }ie gesture t gang ulong with naUons into little fragments. The BpaalStl mpubUeaa Civ. (f American Seheme, There has Welsh want this; the Scots want eminent was let down, and the \ )Cer speculation all the week thar; and the Irish have almos' of this guilt is passionwn cther the decision to support everything they wont, but never 1 i. lo General Franthp application of Turkey and realise it. So naturally thre wa tea. That acGreece for admission to the Atlana move to give thc Welsh (ontrol trltlstl Trade Union y c |<1( ,. ono>hall of a bargain over what programmes they h. resolutions, but it does not exiV|lh h( ( jniied sutes — or a Alt the tf s fl fi sMlshed Oaelic the Foreign Office anUgoatraight concession. The other half ars came out of hiding, i %  all. re „, „„. bargain might beAmerican 'hfir wy on to regional %  I mlUtai %  , pon f, the B* tutn In the Mid" %  %  : nt between the United return for Brmah sup" Era Of -Sugar In Industry* Is Approaching WASHINGTON. SUGAS i.s no liHitier just a foodstuff. It is fast becoming un important organic chemical for use in industry and the day is approaching when sugar will be the basis of thousands of little manufactured articles which the world uses in everyday life. M he H "nU Welsh Poetry ? Thi British Broadcasting Corporati^n i<. terribly difficult to \ ntplaln to anyone who has nevei listened to it—as 1 found to my cost during a recent North American visit. It is a nationalised monopanel of uni tlcaUy a'ppointed governIhnmash % %  appoint about a do/en national and regional conIxollers, who have virtually comolete power to decide what Is holfound IVl-nl, advise, I i not to order, the regional control•l.i struggle i in'.', saasti and more CLOSED FOR REPAIRS Advocate Stationery ///W.'A'.V*V#V*V CONGOLEUM la roloun and detii.it. li or lone with ai M lirnitThis is predicted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Year-Book for 1951. just 9 published in Washington, which prints a reX view of sugar research. Extensive research \ into the various uses of sugar has been con; ^OIIARF^ ducted al the Southern Research Laboratory. | ^V*** %  %  "•' in Louisiana. Since the Laat war, shortage of manpowct has compelled research at every stag-sugar production from the field to the mil' in order to keep down production costs, say: the review, which adds: "If the 1951 costs of $ producing the crop are lo be justified, every substance of value, as well as every ounce of sugar, must be extracted." 3 yds x 3 yds. and 3 yds x 4% yds 6 ft. wide, mi lo yoar Requirement* PLASTIC TABLE COVERING Ins. wide. WHITE and ALL COLOURS WILKINSON & IIAiM.S CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phono : 4472 & 4687 BECKWITH STORES d Q< port for the United 81 jg 1 J.**pL* ment. But in In* to eall Turkey ;,n Atlantic COUD'he "est. with raving i ors on one (, ,m . that this large ,.,„[ Idling bow they played chess people" spenking rather drenrlly inihtai> assbunce to Span, mas with mm. and everywheeiihe will through the mouth* of mediocre ,. slow in coining CerUU of U "Mr. H< n councillors Mn result, the UM Unit! d states will meat •< rebule king". B B.C. would. In the end. lose that doubtable revolt m the North Success al Last character of superiority of moral Atlantic IDCll If It trtSS Also on |ha diplomatic front, uplift. Of teaching the British M gtve priority tO Spain. The prettll !hj h a-> been very much a what is good for them, and the ..m United States commitment In foreign affairs week. Herbert right accent, thai its great founder H.,. arms delivery is the North Morrison has SCOTed a real SUCCesS Lord Heith, flrt gave It. LJpAtlanlle Treaty powers first, s at long last In persuading the set vice would have been paid lo i nan Annv if that Euvptljn Covemmint to open the democracy, but would that be and then on tankers to go to the refinery gain'' At leiist it would Sugar research has produced developments favourable to the more economical production of paper, plastics, shoe polish. ^ hair tonics, adhesive*, photographic mater,^v^^^^v^,^,.,-,^.^^^ I prepared and describe' A l ',;,. -\^ :; loo ls %  %  ''. working closel) with ( V|l| ., ....... ,„.,,.. periodic levlawi to icquire these units and mak them available to the people II Beeh village. A finest aurvey. by a member of the U.S. Economic Mission who served with the U.S Forest Service prior to his work in Liberia and who has since Simuitmeousiv with thesujnlne returned to thai agency, has laid nf a Qeneral Agreement for tecfanlthe basis for tic development of cal co-opei.iiion. the two governLiberia's forest resources. This ments also signed S Memorandum !"!" *. made from aerial photoof Understanding foi "The first great era of synthetic chemistry \ was based on the discovery of the almost limitless poeaibiltiee ol obtaining useful derivativee from coal tar," wrote Mr. L. F. Mar-1 tin, chief of the agricultural chemical re, search division of the Southern Laboratory. "In more recent times, the petroleum age has brought even more products. But coal and petroleum are irreplaceable raw materials. "Sugar takes it place with cellulose and %  tarefa in the 'Big Three' of thc c-rbohydrates. which provide a renewable source of raw material for chemical synthesis, industrial uses and food. I think it is almost certain Ihat industry will increase its utilisation of carbohydrates and that sugar will steadily become more important as we advance in the carbohydrate age." Mr. Martin said that sugar attracts chemists' attention more and more as the cheapest and most abundant pure o-ganic chemical available to industry and that its use in synthetic chemicals is growing. The research, he said, extends to every part of the sugar-cane. "Sugar-cane can excel all other plants as a converter of the sun's energy and the carbon dioxide ami water of the air into energy food and fibre." he said. MB§ MABAMtt you *// bv
  • is CRYSTALS PEAS By ttm. P HARTLEY Llil. MARMALADE .. .. .. 41c. (mil STRAWBERRY .. .. 55c. MX 11 ill 45C. DAMSON 42c. RED rill .. 4HC. GREENGAGE 51c. JELLY CRYSTALS ,\wirli- Utt IT and St (.Alt Obtainable al all (irocers bgraphy supplemented by hundred Of miles of ground rruisi the forested areas, reveal that' %  nd the Libcr.an Government on I Mine of economic ent which were previously unknown lommereially. were Identified in this survey. Under the Point Fou and hich vwll in, "I IM I tlllff lt£* I'M b %  encs* nf the ,| ovl .|,,. M .^ | n tl lc Giwcrnmcnl proa-uiium thnnmli lt ucccifivc "i.irV. ''"' This ThroUKh II* traditional openconscrvintf ili'vrliij Liberia. Thc work programme for forest resources be f which ha.* been .",'" ",' ,. I 1 ?,,'!"'.'.'. ,..,!!.'.i tloor oolicy. Liberia has for many under way lo improve Liberia'. ,e. sen.-lied in u proposed „"S, ra cl „, „ nv .,„. ,,,„„,, „,. domwtlc food supply will be S2LSSI. i" IM. H.r, FIICc-"' m iE. %  '!: i. .r' !" ul ?>"*r „;;;" '" %  JETS. &f?£££ r !" "£Z. u P ropod a>.i pionms. ..dvi.c the two o>eni^ ^ fc IMMl "I U : i diims. and make ,,„„„, „ nd ha A! run o< in npKtn '•'""""';i: LtZ, II, iluisc 1-v.i Missions, Liberia cre.se th. is among the first to submit its request for Iribnical under Ih* m 1,-Kisl lUOl request o-v.'-'lopment "t! .1 '';.'""',',',. injnean'mdu.'trl'ai'ivr •'" %  "' *W. With the foundation during 1KMI by a £SttdLlh.rU to JZTMSMZ f* 1 "4 ">' increase of the joint onmm.il.v „f l.ibcrlan and ""••< cd Lilxi" JJ>"> > % %  £> • lnod _~gj [.,,„ n qU anUtv and %  Jtdll (UM ofrtalRII XMl I...m !" ' " **•' /'"""' quality Is expivted to be rapid. inge programme, It Is estimated. ?f "'"""• !^,,„,, V ^ "' No story ,.f m.irrn l.il.iu.r ill COM ,q, 1 .:...im..tcK SJJ.iwi,totalling nearly 1110.000 acres, supI, complrte without some reference lino The .... .ues and allowances' plemenled by the pl.ntlng of w lhr „^|„, „„. halb „ r M ofthclecllliici.il requested under several Lioerian nil.l-i powan, free port at Monrovia, which sra this Polnl r...ir Programme wnll now produce Ihe principal satgcl opened to euinmercc In July 1948. IHpaid bv Ihe Unlaid Matt*. The "' ' • c """"'E*""" 1 "' '"hlx-r This harbour with IK SO-fool olher cosli which are by far the "> l951 Wl11 <"" % %  ""< < %  < -ihout channel was built under a lend.1..,'-. „( the oi, cra.ttme 3S.0O0 Ions, most of which is being lease aijreement between the Ihe i.V. ii ahlppedag liquid lal for speclhlUnited State, and I. la ano ( \ %  „ ,.,,• it of Its current '"••' ". Ev !" l< nM ln ,,vp ,J ort ""*„'" '"" '"""' Itta settlna n-de in relation lo Aincnca", total need, harbour, on Ihe W.-l Cooal of II lAc nut" f. I llv.. Ul. Onlted Stale, was most thankA^lca S hlp , nU nations may .,, iln...u. !" ,i,,l f !" "" '"' "" ""'""' cuhher that "'" this harlpur In the order ,pe directly „ gttJSttttSi S Ei 5LtWS% hrniixht for ii.innhipment, storaite. mixing, blending, packajrlng. Or actual mamifacliiiv fdthoul payment of dtltj or any iiisliiii.' fni-mality) and ;.re routing cargo through iln. perl from many potnta iilonj: Ihe West African Coast A Dutch -nip. for exempli In loading c;ir t -i> for the Nelherlands nt n nur.ber of small port. hete projw-ts will be the rAlUdtU '"hber ftal entered the United :uullural res. ii.li St.ites e.ime from Uberi.i. ihe aatabUihmenl of F "" many reaw, caRM in aiiiieullur.il credit corporation. Liberia's principal exporl hu thaeatpni %  of reseinh jiiui espnluclion has billet, on i i tl> 'II.IMIIII. %  Ihe dhw lopin.nt tif during recent yean. A n pilot projwts f... unproved proaetitvHj under the technical coI rlaa predUCtaV The OperatlOII programme will Nthe lendltureof more than Sll.iiotl re-esI.tblishnie.it of coffee .1an iw. fur %  mid. mtijht I* considered important crop in the Uberlan indirectly 1 perl "f the aartceler^nfrtro Caeac produeuon also along tne vic-.i African coast. tmal p........-.:.,.s.nceth.-.ei.^.n. bin attracted much attention remay encountn an itxilatcd ahip1 to .,1-.,. jnaccaocentlv. During the put tinntcnl or two for the United L^eaUtrTE >'— *• %>&* Apartment of J^fJ* %  "feSanmfi & i forW developApiculture and Commerce anlfltw small that u 1* unprofitable foi ^nt edl.> theUS E.-onomic Miwion Ar^Tuan-hn.nd ship to call for haa emulated the planting of "With Monrovia operating a* MOmiak th. rs ivp.i-.unt „,.... than 10,000 aces ol tl • I*'^?e Dutch rJii^ • ""S V ,P Th ,H '"" BS th" cargo'"at V9S S 1 the work -Coast, pronJsa t" make Ity for all assl lance 1 of M .... 1 field, nnd the methods. A pilot : port* on At \V. | Ooaat .... ~ little RepuX Ihich for "in'" e "• ] than had iS ivmk to the mutual nitage of each other 1. of Liberia developed throughout the country Point Four Programme. "All round the world, wherever soil conditions and semi-tropical or sub-tropical climate combine to favour its ijrowth. sugarcane has established itself as the major crop. From its homeland in India i* travelled east and west until it reached the West Indies 1 more than one-third of Liberia 1 w ,th Coliimhm Is still covered with high forest." Il LolumDus Many new woods, a number of w __ . „ [i Mr. Martin reported Ine development of the manufacture of "sugar-cane wax," re-1 covered from the clarification mud of the, refining process. Manufacture of this wax \ Started In South Africa in 1916. but was discontinued after the Great War when natural waxes became cheap. Manufacture was revived in Cuba during the last war and more recently, improved manufacturing methods have been developed. The wax-making process is being carried out at the Louisiana laboratory, using crude wax imported from Cuba. The manufacture of a moulding plastic from sugar-cane has already become a firmlye-uablished industry. Now new methods are being investigated for the manufacture ofj cellulose from sugar-cane bagasse, the aim I being to reduce costs to a point at which they are competitive with cellulose made from wood. "Current experiments on new pulping processes," wrote Mr. Martin, "promise to brim, nearer to realisation the dream of paper pro'8 duction and possibly still more valuable applications of cellulose from bagasse." Sugar-cane molasses have long been usex! for the inanufactun of industrial alcohol. 1 with volume of production rising durin: periods of economic emergency. During th I last war, much of this alcohol was used 11 the development of the U.S. synthetic rubbet industry. NORTH BOUND STUDENTS AND OTHERS... PLK.xst: NOTE ^m ll' 4i"" mm Shniriitfi ^= JAEGER ALL-WOOL Fj TRAVEL RUGS and ALOMA ALL-WOOL BLAJNKETS a/so ALL-WOOL WORSTED OVERCOAT MATERIAL 28 ozs. 58" wide in Black only Da I osl a A Co.. lid. DRV GOODS DIPT. U&rifaOftf *W1 1 A new sugar by-product is aconitic aeir 1 found in sugar-cane juice and molasses. Its existence has been known for 75 years, but only recently have large-scale uses < %  found for it in plastic manufacture. Tl> 1 Ivea moulding properties to trans) plastic material! and is also being used In compounds. CAXABA IMY msem 1iOI.lt It It lilt lOXIIIMIXIS Keep a ham on hand. %  aland s^uoaje* Frankfurter Suaxacr* Luncheon Beef R>d Salmon NenPtgdna Sardine* Norwegian Kipper Snarkt Neattei Milk Gloria Milk Butter In IUM Heal rant** •• Htwtek Bread #*/f*##' Another new sugar derivative, know I allyl %  u eroae, is insoluble in water and new ^ i for In the manu5 facture of proti materials— B.l'.l*. 60DDARDS •/. II Ml SAC8AOBS MILK III I lilt J A It BHK.XII Beer in Bottle* Beer In (an* Bed t heee Hutch Cheese Qoaii Cheese i'arrs Crarkeri in sealed lln* fairs BKeuiU In ; tb I'kgs. ( Ufl ( liccsr lie.! mi, I"re|i4red Mutard llrled Mini Mi^rd Batha Celery Halt II ^^VCC


    PAGE 1

    TUESDAY JULY 31, IsSI BARBVin* \i.\tu \ ; i CLASSIFIED ADS. ZT*%  *" %  The 'barge tor >nncur i H .U o! •mM. UxruiH. DNtM. Aeknowl•d*jm*r.i>. and In K'norltm ** U C— %  t-.M on week-da* fad) HBO on Sunday* for *uy n_mb*r of word* up lo M. and I cenU tar out on ff OJ'I and rent ,*i word un Sunday! lot •mil ad.li'i. .1 DUD llMi>Da J.i. Jo. isf.i at hi. t**. wets*. Mile and a Quarter. Bt Peter. ('"i*. Leopold Edward*. Hit funeral Wave* the above r**ienc*> al 4 M B I* the All Saint* Church Victoria Bra th wait* Daughiey.. King Edward*. Yor* EdwardDeBiKe % OOI>tNO—We beg i who f*dl -ream. way* fiprciiM I recent Ni'iim raetened through Egbert Coodlng The Goodlng Ian : all iho*e ml which .. PAGI M VKN EI*NC.AUJW. .\.w Duill fein*? -i long IMB* on St Jam*. Coaat Jlr* From tOWIIi Fully (urn la had conv,n*ivc* iron. Vp'.'ii 1),.' MT; %  nisrr.R Crumpton S.„< i,„ HI September, a two *4**1 mUlning 4 brdiuu.i* upat.ii artd back gallon uve,looking II Ma College-r-unda. I bedroom and dream %  itiilr* logethri ilh dlmn drawing and ulual ..I** A*i||i %  prenuae. F. n \i:!:i i Dial 3111 T "~'" P Mfc-eDFtX! Tima Tall, which la SurfI> Approaching Be-Sat, V|l un an My i.h ahauld L-. a Maecrt (or M he... Bmn I Rpatl it.rw Attractive rropertlr* No Boo.Cn C BN %  I and Compare Price* AT MAXWELL COAST Two Stone Built Bungalow T*po on* h. 3 riedrnwr... | In* ..Iher 4. -., Orch.rd to Admire AT ST I_AWHENtE UAf A -—-'1 "' %  .!" T,| MEAH ENTERPRISE HD fh Ch about rule* from Oly. A SacluUv* I flnlm— •Lawg< Store I) ,il| Bungalow Type. LMbf about I Bvl All. ... ..... m T al In Mlu D*M|a Cat* of f B A pat* •lam liank. to all ho -it r,dd tho funaral anil wrralh* or •apiMaod ivmpalhy with Ihatn on ir* p>*.i..g .A thru Iwluvad Btaw* OUdv Sc.tr l.u .4 rtu-i. Hall, Bl HOL'BB r~>> Slrrrt Tial D4T Drdlard Avanuv. Uppar Inapcctlon bv Appoi'tmrni J 1 .1 .In BLAT on Blua Water* T.rrac*. tatwl buMI wnh ipacloua cupt>oar 11 7 al i t MollMr Sa.lr C..i Brothr V 8 A %  I.*fall. MrCuracy BourKar M IN MEMOKIAM tfi: In loving mavnory of our b* lavad on*. El*l* l\ly., Hour, rtnBHa of Ji,. %  law Tin mmmmrt i-d and m* dapai AWIIIMIHIMS imilliAY KBBOHTS Granada 1.1 Bpkf* SANTA MABIA-.ov.llan hotat In Caribbean Rst*a hum BT 00 prr head par da> GRAND HOTEl^in D*it rcudmllal IILMII.I mi.1.-r G been allnr.ird to Ihe tecond nirance e.am on Augunt ll*t mii*l aat the 3rd. %  XB LYNCH, •elpal MJiT A FOUiVD %  WFEI-STAKt: TICKETS •^•1 and WK.3 Finder pkaaeI to rtedertck Oreenldge. Ixi Tarantrv. in Ch Rtward BWaXPBTAXB TK'KI % %  * Finder ple^ae ratut I'.llw Sweet BntUtm, 31 T 5t— In LOST CERTIFICATES mi -i-i IMII v ni^i i 11 i imnvi I.IMIIr.11 Notl.-e 1> herebi given lhal ..^plirutiui haa bean made to the Board of Director* nl Ihe above-named Compao for Ihe iwe of dupli. .• %  Sh .lerlirk.te* for: 10 Share. Noi ITU 4T4-1 Inrliialva M Shar>a No. 4TT9 4BBB inrluilve If Sharei No. UTW 117(4 Inrluilve M Share* N, rt 14M1 14UH irirlmtlve In Ihe name of Fianri* Wood areavea. Ihe original* of whirti. of various data*. I.ave lieen 1<-I i.r i"M.ln-.l. and NoIKe .hereogiye.i ln:it -Hhiti 14 day* front Ihe dale hereof. II no claim or repre%  enlalHin la made In reap-cl of aorh original Cert Ideate*, a new Certificate will be luued Bv order of Ihe Beard of Direriar* S Si rt-AIB HUNTR. Becretary )l T M-Jn ^ To-day's G. A. Song "I v. j ni to be hBBBT "but I csn't be happy 'till I have a Ga* Cookar too! . Hubby take note! WALTER BABB ROCK HALL ST. LUCY Experienced Painter, recently returned to trie Colony from British Guiana will undertake Contract.* for Painting Hi .-.MI. LI. IVi-iiii. ...r im-.-d Horkmanahlp 31 7.51In TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH Ovii'ianding book) on our tali CABIBBFAN I 1111 t IT r.ill of | aaafaM about Ihe Caribbean Iiland* MLANns IN TB> nt'N Similar lo Ihe above Book lull of ANOTHER IMPORTANT MEETING will bf held at QUEENS PARK nn Thursday. 2nd August t 2.30 p m. SEE and ATTEND Don l mi lln. |al f the fterlf*. AGENDA Unnnlihed Business Nov\ nulnes. 29.7 51.—2n. HOOU FUmlahed or cool Room Apply 't Mallhiac. H.itmi i.fumlahrd. I.r Holvrood. C JI f II HOMEHSFT , i .'groom. Fin:. iJtei eleatnr light from |. pp: net dir Mr. >l T SI 2n • % %  ••->> rmoM cm c* CK A ^ew 3 Bedroom Stone Built Bun•ai. ..!-, i. Acre GARRISON A Seclu.ive 3 Bedroom Stone nuill Rungalow KBAH THE GAHBISOK Almual New and Neatly I0o-. BtaaH Bllll 3 |a, flr0o ,„ I i 'l.i."T ... AT HASTING* MAIN MD A S Bedr.um • pnraibla 4. P...II) Stone It.nit Iking.,.. l>pe and A 3 B.di.-.rn Almo.t Njaai %  lunjalow: both yield aoout %  100 pn. IH | ran be bought ... ! %  I. I AT HASTINGS MAIN BD A Stand* 4 Bedroom p.m> sione Hum 3 Morrv, enough land to Convert or Build a fWHoom Hotel oi Gu<.' AT ROCBXCV MAIN HD Near Blue W.ter. A 1 Bedroom Bungalow Type AT NAVY OAltDENS Abnuat \* w S Rrdroom iPooihla Ji |..n* |) u iit Bun'wMTM CORNER" Palm Beach, [ait.ng. ComforUble Baaalde linngaiw. all Modern Convenience* Available •I Auguat Applv C B Clarke 7 wan Si Phone BUI or 3080 31 7 al—Sn 'I' — I'w .. 1'i.rfer j-1,100 • %  YOIXNCV'' — Prospaet. St J.mea I nBDVB COVfJtfMI'.NT III! Se.aide Bungalow. all %  oBfOOIII C.n.reti NEAlt NAVY GARDENS Almoat New 3 %  .. li.iii ,, AT I.UWKH FONTAI lable I Cl. BO AUTOMOTIVE-: CYLE A Norman re. -plaM. llarbaiern Hill Uw I HAVE ALSO SEVERAL I'KdPFRTIF^ in milenlle. Fonlafoelle, and .11 Rughl'ii %  oaal d a ai .1 % n* s*„ 1 ., n... ,.... fWI B MII a Large one with lle.id*.,,* Going a* uow aa undn C8.U0. Iaia< and email rvtunm Ho i.r• Sugm COOM r-laatatior.' -waude at a Ilaewli'-re Call J! Olive Bough", St 1 M In TELEPHONE AND GENERAL TRUST QUARTER CENTURY OF PROGRESS II I. EFFECTS i>! WAHTBTUL GOVEBNMBN1 v "i Mill 1 Id NEED FOR INCENTIVES TO INCREASE PRODUCTION US AIIWMIIll |(l)(,IK OS Till I \N IllON BAZABD TIlFTOKNTYKlrn, X.-. the 1 MJ> *22ml in London. 1* tlw Governor to nSir Ak'Mindrr Rogr, K.CJJ tlirector. who presided, saui. You will nniitc thai this is our meetlne and I think you will a lit that our bit la: . %  U 1 1 Iho OrdJi 11*3 1 11 11 1! lino i %  I i i -'i s %  ond m .iddith.j) to %  capita] re* plui an %  ppraciattofi of t M l quoted Invnatmenta wa haw built up revanua • total],: depression of the early 1930 .iltermath Prolit And Alhiaiimis Tiinum! to the IBM) accrni.. at, inn prorttji tux ami nicMiir \'i'ii,'/iit-la %  vlillht rwduetlOt I C 'IK Dividends Bnd li I 1 ;i \ CHANCERY SALE %  I rrfcipi* wi-ndown bv C4.8S0. IntBWBl In Ihe telaphona %  %  . bi I 111* iTie iwdncUofq 1 %  £3.828 in interest paid .11 loan. ''"I"'!"**. Limited, ami Ihe depoaila rertii I t ., ".iit of tha bank 1 m pp tax and income-tax nt £87.4011 la lowanb itM Gnvernmenl'it ipending dapartmen'^ and awal|owi up more th half our BT0BI [: %  %  tniinima Nam nal T< h %  %  in March Last raturnad tfr. 1 ,.;iii nf 1 %  hair our KTOSS 1: ern lyp* of uut.nn AUCTION CAB-One ||t Slandanl (at in good condltloj.. bnllary A bargain at I Appl> Thoma* Houar hoek. or Phone 3174 : UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER 11, ...1 Bn JI I a CARS—Renault "TOO' foimeilt M — lyrae and condition excellent MMP.O. Onl* TOO* rrile* Reaann a,hig owner bought a Mayflower be aeeri al Chelae* Oarage U 1 will aell _. Mart. Sl.tpl.eel Sticel .1. Taajnwal Auguat Ind. a quOnl %  unable lor i>. .iln.g Car* and Buae* Sunne>--.n I gallon. ', gallon and J.pini lre*. Ready Miaed Putl>. Rpr. Wrap ring P.pn Ti-Urt fte.-ii a-M BakeliM. Aluminium Pot*. Pan*. Kettle* vaiu.n. .| (r Enamel Chamber.. Allumlnium Preaaure Conker*. Sandpaper unable lor Fart.ny H9—Jut arrived MayBowera A uard* In Grey. Mt.roon. Blue Black price. (3.300 00. 03*10 no P .,,., Jual advlaad ol lurthcr Increaar rlcea on future shipment* Chelae. r> for the com %  %  %  H 11 h.idos I 1 1 which u, %  %  I %  %  r 4430 .ii %  1 %  I oaaaa TLAT certain %  I Emiagr mid Eri.'W y-at> thereon and UK %  1 : r3.B0o-fl.0d KATE, tit 11MV and on %  ii the m wiage and all md 11 1 ' %  %  j .1 procvSs I inaion wnli d I 1 asan b %  %  tidt. by £222.234 nil bv „ %  parary loans to nld the telephona I Og companies ,n • %  l %  • BBO clatcfl [,„. Ati.l... ... PortuRiierv TclcphomCompBI which amounted to (TM 181 .it Uga end of 1949. w.i 11 1 sph In which %  %  % %  ,i .! the stai 1 %  %  % %  ... 1 %  %  1 %  to lit Italn %  *.. 1 (Vast I mi 1 ant Fi mill iht., 1 .„ f PiTK.UPS—Two new Vai Upa C'aBh price 03.600 cm N, will k| 03.000 00 %  hi.ild aelre (hi* opportunity Clilac* G*>* HOT%  I'l.K per win* .1 M I Sl.-Jt. rimu vinin.s KA1SF.K %  i. mi lea Ta*d ,. Tan eawla per apale llae o and 13 real* per ovate line miMntam cko-je II SO O0 nnd SIM on Sundayi ,... %  ,;mi ... 11*4 *, i^ ... ,:.. t I 1 will the neu il. %  il pii' >n and dis .io| ptai t tl* neci duuiiK iwo'Viom IK"-l"oVthr'|"'^ "Whet **eii Slillatone and l.inda-iy Broil llyhun a_j.ll Hie qualified admlnialiator* earn U*taa**ata anaeae of th* F>tate of ihe doc* ad. W i no % %  ( Meetrfo'tle C.itlord A CO High Street. Bridget-.-iv BO lata AMM-I-BENT TOOTHPASTE Start laving your A*u.i-l-dant Tooth %  SJBI Bo.e*. Within i ahorl while you mar b* the winner of ona nf the following;— lit Prlta MOM. Sad J*m* SIS 00. 3td Prla* MM I.TSl-IBn •eD jtrliei rntiticl 1 had ikot ice BABYB PBAM In S*CI •%  onabie price Apply: MrReale 'nvy narde-v* Phone 4130 31 7 SI -In 'TARM" POWDERED FT-U. OOLAM M-Ut-auprem* quality and onlv M S3 par O.to lln and 11 00 par l-IB tin Got a tin to-day from vour grncri or Drug Rtor* and Ir* tha beat milk obtainable The S.tb family alia I* really economical Inilal on -'Farm" for tfie lake of your health and vour pocket If your dealer cannot aupply. phone 3130 tT 0 01—t f n Mabli part there.,! *., oi.inl._ird lo any peraon of olioac debt or claim or* 'hall not have had notice. And all pern.ru Ind*I.leu to the -aid tftate are requeued lo i.tilr il.rir indabtrdnc** -1100111 delay Dated i RECORDS: Charll* Kunr, Blng. Swing and wa will order for you If we laveat got II In atack A. Bamee S Co day of June. 1631 B M RHIIJ-TONF, L E. n. un i quallSeil Adn.i ran* l**4am**t* anaaie %  >' the Ealatr of Athrlatun Walton, decrat-xl 33.0 SI n BWTIrli Minimh"! fhater u-oek T3 ir f real* Sa-klanjt 14 tawrdt — eoedf 3 crate a laord week 4 MOTICI is HtKUtV GIVEH tli-t -II per*., i i..v.ng on* daht or claim agalnrl In* Batata ol ie.,frre^ 1 ewellvn limd* Unwell arfca died m mu l*Und on thi Ir I0M required lo -end parltr-laia of Incir claim* di.lv iitteatrd |a lit undenlgned Euat-ie Mai* bland of I II.M1I Hank .mited ol England, the qualtrled exetuHELP or i "Colonial Development Corporation' irtvllea appllralion* from qualified and' experienced elerlrlcal engineer* for the j iHMt of Fjigineer Manager Dominic* and St Vincent Hydroelectric Syiien,* Reply I giving deialte of Career and aUling I %  alary required to Mr G Bodtlam Colonial Developmenl Corpor*!"-' H> Hope Road. I-g'ianea. P O Jamaica ~ .6.7 01 -n I HAHUSON COLLEGE Required in September 1*51 for -i leaat on* bum. an AaalaUnl Maner or Mlnreea to teach General aubjeri* un the Lower School B-lary according to quallflcallon* aid i-penenre Apply immediately to th' Headmartcr. Harriaon Collage. St HKhael St 1 Sl-tn ..i A 1 cur* C T'l. -11..Ml n (ugh Street, IV ruga, .. BoBi lion ,., n',.,.. n SB 1 .1. a Auaufl. 1091. Ban which BBBI a•!'. 1 |.r..,.it to m of tha oe-l %  cl i aw I Ma egaid II ,lv X ..h launt M • %  %  Fall aha II not %  And all raUte an r ..,, l ,i %  • bo liable for the aaart* thereof ao dl-lu 1 i of whoa* debt or claim w_ate ha-d day of -un*. IMI. } L E f(.Ml. Attorney* lor Lloyd* Bank Untiled. Ihe executor* ol the will of (_roffrr> Llewellyn Hlndi-tlowell. de-ea*ed NOTICE i .1 i i i is Aiu or IHI mrt %  viiiii. i Umkcoolof ri-s:i-il ....!>. i .„ „i "Ml *rowln w.lUni luu % %  (If lhTrurt't lolal In. %  It— _.. E.lb .......I 1 1—11 '1. .'.Il 1. 1 Uveludlno Intereeto In . companies, 2$A* DM onl ire i '' ,: '" 1 '' '" cent. u. J'.,.f. reoh..,.,.., M t and I '..'iB per cent. In Ordlria %  H bOH I Ifjad to lh'(which Includes I1A0 pel %  iihsldlaiio per cent, ar.m the Brltl h CM out the* PI tin monwaaltc. %  (-roun IfMOtuiti isltful Govcrnm .onl i i C" !7.orn PortoBjaJ uZ 1 T BUf-SC T'l 'vt-ry aitort is hinB load i smont bs ?,l. !,'! %  '. .."r K ,. £ V '' I ' Improve tha I ... ........ nd msnaaomenu ol lln u ;

    • I id %  ..i' %  %  %  t Ii :,,.,: ... ii programme*. .-. %  ]. %  %  %  %  %  %  o: ..... I nl nnanelM In ilo in ol SHIPPING NOTICES SACUENAY TERMINALS t \N till AN SERVICE Pram Halifax, VS. & Montreal i i %  %  \ IS.I.. I OADING MATES M.nlK.I N.ltfaa %  I %  > • Aug. II Ann I l-i Si.lCVICK Prom BwBJuea. I n.rjiooi .mil <;hisi>ou la>.l.il Arrleal % % % % % %  l .u..iw ii.i., BoHaoioaa i ..\ C.K. *V (DM'IM MAI. SI ItVK I Mpaaaed Arriral Me* n>lda/*i.n. Ha'k.O** Aurnts PLANTATIONS I.IMITI l> IMinnr 47UT -% Mcoa, Siumukfr C V a* r y. TRVA %  NtW YORK BKKVICa %  M.I:.. %  Np;\nitUCAMI KERVICF ill*. IMI. 1 in Aitgixt %  i TiinnrsB Beat* el Ship I CANADIAN SIHVKK mlrral **ll* lifHIKKT TIIOM LTD. NEW YIIRK AND Citl.F HtRVICl API-I.V-DA OOsTTA a IO. ITD-< WM.HN SIUVK B MONTI r \i \l STSMLtft, M W /ni IND I IVI i nun p. *• \ v / SS. "ABAI ,: j |„ a.1 %  • rt AH 4lh. il.ti.il %  .-duled I d Augu* i.rgo acctptad ... IBlwBgl i -. %  for in.lied ami I I %  %  .I 1.1... .1 lAJUNQ f0 I M1I.AM) A FRANCE H l ii.'.1 llth %  l.uiia. Btartlnlqua, (lundalotiiic and .\ minus. I tUnce tha lattleRMnl of Utaaa %  giiinimr <.f the eon proceedinit with gn :i-,!i over 7,i;)'i .. Jamaicn i. -ii well maintained with .i 1,433 11 Thanks To Stall i wish to Joan with director) %  1,(00 mei %  ... f SM %  ind WANTED TO BBWT BUNOA1XXW by married couple .„ Hldr*n On* rorr.pl*Wlv lurnlahad bun %  low. on ttte *e.. with S*r*e* lor long period. Addreo porUCuUri to III M.14I -On lull1.1 Bl Philip the following %  3rd Pri 111 110 I.IQl'OR LICENSE NOTICI of BBO* I H. O t Ptnea of lie 00 J S3 SH C l. I 100. I IT*. I IO litre* of M f*> F 141 3*9 A IM I) IO K II 300. A *•*.. %  334 Holder* of wim.uig Ti.ki •' Me i Hill m la hop r T-*rd* de d S !>-•" i MRh day of J. E A M.-t*od q Police OEBMALNE I I aeen.mg C*au1 to be held at Police Court. DUN A a* Thurfd.v the 0th day c' A >g -1 IMI at 11 o rlol N B IIISSOLI THIN OF rARTM-RSHII' ifOTKO M HEBEBV (ilVEN thai lh* p heretofore eniiting oetweei. iOaVON SJT CI-MB IUNTI <.t*>Ht.r. E FARMTR and EDWARD run. TA': .1 Trafalgar Street. Bridgetown under 04 firm name of THE EN TEHI-BUU: THADINfi C IMI I dieaotvea inaofar .* the aaid Oaorge %  Dat-d ihe 30th day of JuL' IM! 8 ST CLAlli II SAVE 099 with Ihe I I 114.1 SO\ Wataal Traelor WORLD'S MOST .OPiEO TRACfOR the 1 %  %  r available Vehicle. .e TracVir rack Tracl t>" amazed at i nppUei I'OI'KTFSY *. All \4.i: CROBT. THOM. LTD.) Dial -leie %  eafaatafal I OH SALE 5 Hundred Empty Drums FOR PA1L1NG USES ROBERTS" MANUFACTURING (I). C'lVI K.WII.NT HILL.





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    PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JULY 31. isil HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON % :' 0 o o2 S^ DO--*-; MUST BE CARRIED ON ATOR n^ POM AtUST BE CARRIED ON ESCALATOR. MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY _1 PIVI> .-%  • .' SuTSl -ST ~ X BLONDIE A rcu.c-/ 3fM %  \\0_JL.? LffT SOW <3C> XWN 7P YUM 7 BY CHIC YOUNG %  %  Jv" THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER CZ.H&L %  -rT I SH.VER avE-UM SIGN Of IES >03 CVES POT-.* AS ) WT-^MK WtNSER ^f v< 5 • BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS %  & m y%fLl fVST "Vfc Cfc"BfT*' ON :n 60G ND TVtfi CtfErXT 1 CH TV T SlJti NOW DO MJJ RJ1>>V we? ,. C JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS PffOC*. ( '„vrx> TOO An 4KtPTC *VM^ peooff ...TOP** INA I ^Z :^sz ipt, UO AV CAPf NOT (OR IfcTACUM... WHAT Wt FINP6OK10 NA"tlOr*AL •AUCtUM t 4A*£ /% KMT A NATIONAL **tTiTL)TION...*UT ^| 4JTEN TCftAAUKE LCTKW •CUTUCE-'' RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND A Day! n v %  wvuuy N-CBOF JO*j i^ -o MBtP "SB PQOOLtM -*C^ CWLO, gf>2 *= UA> CO -< **€ WATTERB C*rS .. I CON T -TUBT T-*e... P$UJOH. 9wT = =*:":_-• S3 1 w 4 ^ M§ #' #% %  KUTHE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES [PU22lN<,ABa'T\CU.( UAPUJ0U6H l T t RUMOftlL GEflCM\MOwauiWES.' lkMJlNAWV.IittJ Gums Bleed! made by 'pHEIR good look* tell yoo they're fust right. V >i i know, loo, when you look at the price tag. that you ran*t get finer value. Illustrated is a Tan Oxford *hoe for Boya and Youths. Tied to every pair i* the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign which means just right *t Look fur it in leading store* in Barbados. WHITE means made just right J th>t * *•*• •*••" Tun.*. Mow** or PrtJ HMi *• a *F, %  **."^_T?f' J %  M wfcfci? IIM <• !•• % %  > r m "* a |Mf*tU *-!••• %  • mul m ro>'' atk wall > %  •-• ' '•*''' '' %  • %  VIM* tB*h •" rurit Of •mplx I— %  *f 0*1 %  ••••• If*-. •"•' %  %  Amonii;: -•'•-• IW ff-f>-f ril M~i •.V.VV.-.W.V/1KKV.#0#4? SEND YOUR ORDERS TO ADVOCATE PRINTERY 1 DIAL 2620 I IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only Usually Now Usaally NOW Tins JAC. CREAM CRACKERS 1.71 l.ttQ Tins PETERS COCOA 44 3d Tins GRAPE FRUIT JUICE 24 H Tins BATCHELOR PEAS 38 tf Pkgs. QUAKER OATS 54 18 Tins KLIM 51b. 3.3 D. V-! SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street r. 0& 0&J EUXURY TOILET SOAPS IMPIUUI I ( V I ft I H %  I 1NDIN HI O DM • HI I I lt\ M IMH D00S18 the only feature ihul r08 Ml improve the Apply 'Dettol' at once on insect stings 'DETTOL' THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC S*FF'NNCJLN PLFA*NT SMHLI.-CLI-AN Dons r PAINDofeiN-r ST* Four*la'n.f ll iiT speed., wanof ior n I he world supreme small, llw RQ AM | ChatM>n.l -si. %  %  %  tiaflk. Baiy n part Pasi i %  %  '. ii nutiur.dini pe'fnnr mor at I I .1 .1 %  :: % %  world's beat smull-rar FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phoo. 23SS bul Ui.tnbuu.. Phone 4S04 WE WISH TO ADVISE OUR CUSTOMERS THAT OUR... WORKSHOP DEPARTMENT WILL BE CLOSED FROM Tuesday 7th Angnst, 1931 to .Monday 20th August, 1951 BOTH DAYS INCLUSIVE, IN ORDER TO GIVE OUR WORKSHOP STAFF THEIR ANNUAL VACATION. THERE WILL BE A SMALL RELIEF STAFF FOR ANY EMERGENCIES. OUR OFFICE, PARTS DEPARTMENT & PETROL STATION WILL REMAIN OPEN AS USUAL Yours faithfully. IMIWIHM, ESTATES & III VIM \t. 1(1 I I I.-•• I>ksi. in BVo."



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    PAGE KKillT HAKIIAh.K ADVOCATE TUESDAY, Jll.V :il 1S51 ENGLAND FALL 33 RUNS SHORT IJaiifN. Hilton Put Up Worrell, Ramadhin Ntxir College Beat General >1 r Unp Last Wicket Stand **•* ***—&-—* G WMMrr Swordfish 7-2 FOR SALE 1; MECCANO SET Ik* IV-.id.M and TOSH It*** Reque-i ih. |>1. i 4*B*r. •( tk> (From Our Own Correspondent I LONDON. July 3D A GREAT lost wakel stand between Baile> and Hilton iiin^ 1 finale to the centime.-, scored by Hutt* n ind Mav enabled England to creep within ;t,'i runs •t South Africa's first innings' score of 538 during the fourth dav\ nlav in the Fourth Test .il Leeds. in quiekly readied 5t m US minute*, the tour* ...UllIlK K^ %  : %  %  %  ;•' ili'll lu give Up \\ Ith i %  ui tut lurk Inmhlv By el.iae South Afri;.. bad Ul • %  !I • iso without .'"-I although Row nh one day %  m..irt for piny and the tnekCi me no p wear, ii %  result ottH I I •chtaved Hilton v ruing ROtket produced during; %  i.. %  > Whet: the. gelhoE' %  * for and South Africa appeared set tM lory first innings lead, llui Belie} urao hud lelt tbc field on tt* act.-nd day with it strained back muscle, cleverly shielded Hilton from the bowlUU and between thom they added 6" ..I which Bailey** Aan He was eventually nut when :.is hundred afto. baiting tor three ind a quarter hours Earlier in the day Peter May. making his loM debut, bad cari ore to 138 compiled 1 i %  ',x and .i hall boun without one chance. He mi ><" %  tally ixiwii-J by Atho| Rowan when | (bra the pace. It had been :i brilliant parfOrnuuico b; it batsman. Athol Rowan by bowling Brawn nglan rlaimed his fiftieth test victim. E r wn When South Africa batted a J*" !" second time their wns again M Oans-I Schoolboys Win Matches Billy .\l.nnnig playing at centre for*.ml turned in a good performance for Harrison College. He scored the first four fcoals of the match. The first two OfOd during the first two nthMltl %  >if play. third goal went in after loui mlnutag and the fourth tame ID bint rn mutes. •'Mortimer" '".i l iiumbe %  01 in \tnn lei ISM-.... i M i \M> i tn-i Dnrwaa L Mutton ii \m> n.i,p..id i | Us .11 t> A II.. —i, V Mai b %  ,. Ml l" Ii A Rr.tf.ail W WatanrB I FOTAJ. WWUMO ANALl ;.'• .11 111 llu-ai. Wallr tin .ib n TOTAL ISM now MM; ANALYSIS u Windward In Good Position To Win Game Against Wantforert* WINDWARD are In B BOOd position to beat WohdtTOH in their Intermediate Division Cricket match at Congo Rood next Saturday To prevent defeat, Wanderers would have to Koto 171 run: and they only have five second innings wickets standing. Although the wicket wan wet on the Brat day of piny. Windward still scored 187 After they howled Wanderers for flu. thi-v put up a brisk 124 for the lit; of 7 wickets, declared and now have Wanderers 44 for the low of 5 wickets. The Windward bowlers l> WilMe and H Farmer were ehieflv responsihle for the Wandtnri ilrst tnninut collapse. Wilkle took flva wickets for 2fi in ) I 5 overs ind PaiTfli i bin loi 40 In 13 Opening bet N Thornton scored 51 for Windward In their second innings At Br.nrdtd Hull Empire nre 74 for 8 Wickets in redly to Cable L Wireless" 159 E l. Branker of Cable i, Wireless t'>k live wickets for 27 runs In 12 overs. The Ment.il Hospital Pickwick match is likel.\ to end off m | tnm draw Mental Hospital scored Ifi6 and Piekwiek Is 78 for dve wtckeli Kegiment !-.led out Spartan for S3 after .-coring 80. Brathwoite of Regiment took live for 12 m sut eni lorod HI for the loss van icketi In their second mnin i^ i-.ii.i !•. ANAI TSI4 XIVOH \st< PRANK W' antT the .score as Frank W-.irell took most <.f the bOWluu and was undtfeated at the end of the innmgs. Kamadhin is 00 ••> loo wickets %  lUVtugh | %  % %  lakat 78 wickets end is ..linos; sure l< secure 24 wtckct with t timtchf: Son bailed tirst against Ashton .md deelari": at 169 for 5 wickets Ashton were 1 , at sea against the spin bowling or I.'KII,.' .(.icai.,, nii'.r, and Ramadhth and wtie all otM foi Weal ei foundation WandereiN when the LO | [,„ -half tmie rourti, %  BSCOnd Division 80 iuns. %  After the interval ItilU U N < in k.t ended last Saturday Tiie In the Hibbksdale League Darlined up in the back line. Empire—Police mat. h hiushed m wen had .in easy win against Bnr" o Bo deilsion. Empire scoring 110 ""'dswiek who were all out for 7b I %  U WM three mlnxi for wtoketa in ieplv to police ln al "ut two how Dai VOB kM '"• l *hen Herbert Portillo •• 172 for 9 vickets Ifewarri >.*wllh ^ **•% b-ck hand shot rnrT a IV," 1 *" 1 '"'*' ton '"erarda has now scored 700 runs ;u lU Uken when hli head was parlial" "' ', kwick. with reasonable luck should get I' %  ubrnerssd and backing the — The Uxlgc lK>ys goored 108 his 1.000 by the end of Ihe season agamsi VMl'l in I \ > Bverlon nTaekl I 68 BO) OUl Toil was Harrison Colleges hi tick Innuus, l>dgc then to play a big part in Bacup's *ixlh goal. rt knocked off the nilU with six eight-wi.kets blumph over their wicket* still standing. J. Rilev Rawtenstall neighbours. With nine SwceoneO again got -... n %  lings remaining (weather perwaleo in iTOnl of the Harrison tting) Bvwton now needs 308 College goal and Herbert Porrun to heat his 1049 record of "Ho once more scored for Sword1,470 in l season. J. Ashworlh's lU* Harrison College hI • % %  .. k.i.s for 48 runs was chlefiv were still not content and shortresponsible for Rawtenstall reachly before the final whis'.h ing only 107 runs, and they would timer" Weotherhead again found have been in %  |Krilous position the Swordflsh Q*U to register the but for T Incles' gallant 56 seventh foal tOl Harrison ColWeekes took '-' n k.ls for 33 runs lege. i 13 6 overs. Clsof7rej Instec In the SwordKast Lancashire kept up their 'Ish back line was outstanding reputation of ii"t beans liowled throughout the game and out as yet this season when they forwards i .peated oprtpi-rufiilies met Lowerhouse at the Meadows. They declared at 212 for 6 wickets. Roy Marshall took 3 wkts for 73 The I-owerhousc batsmen wen skitili-d out for 76 in under two hours Hoy Marshall caught in the slips off Hopwood for another "duck." l tunland took 4 wiikrls for 1.1 runs in overs and Hopwood 3 for 14 i At Church the home team beat Enlield with their lust two botsii. n at the wlcJtel BowUiU] unchanged Tonuiiv Lowe (5 for 431 and Prod Hartlev i I for 35) disposed of EnfMd for 7H runs of Which Clyde Walcott claimed 40. Then Church were In trouble, losing their Itrst live batsmen foi runs. Harry Pllkington's 35 not out saved the name for Church. With the score tit 78 and the last !" two batsmen at the wicket the BJ H alien. S< Ptiilip. Teb-phonc HIS a: si in the Lodge bowler look Y M.P.C's second Irinlnf The Foundation boyout Wanderers for 52 and 49. Foundation scored 100 m their first Innings and 79 lor the lOM ol i t Innuuu declared so an outright victory Mr (allrider took 10 wickets in the two innings for Foundation for ranC Qay, besides acoi jng 29 in Foundation's second || nuj look 8 wickets in the ta Innings Following are UM detaiK VM.ci* VI L084II l>4 t in. ,nd l.r i -.1. t nr. :\ ... l-4ir 1.1 iMfestS rniMniios vt..unri.li.i. I-. .,,,1 |. "...iln.i.. %  I Mi Oa l l ni isi KMI r.ir round*!* %  'Mi-isir v. i B Allrlnr E Donn* 31 l„ II AUdnm K Diiram It Kmnin ( II Toppln b R. II..K.l> Holl* I. M ClariM Follo< .'ing j Total i(.i7 lrmi. 1M Kdll of WH-kPta 11.1-1* SB.* S k-UI, •—111 IMini IM, ANALYSIS XniH -Ml ISNINO* i. ii noM I'iK.r. b raimrt Toppln Wilklr I ClntkP not out %  a % %  i .. u i. T i %  IkvFtff b Thomlon sun IIMI m %  rp .1 %  >< %  i... I IM anal lar .1 1 '•. .id Li T Thotnloii loch WL.'hUa ." %  > | I *bl. A Wlr.l." Implr. I la. %  kl. II II IM I Ii* Ii n.alik.. a Bronkri i.i.tii \^ s %  M Arr Harpc H %  %  v-" %  i % %  otter tFro>l t> lu...it. iw b C Lawk^a •ttpr b I^WlaaM It 1 —IP" Urankri m si \ i ra KHiiii %  ..>-I. I. Ul I.-.I.,-. 1'i.k.i.k .1-. I Khi.a -i. II.I n-,.11-1 — ui ii,,,..., V < B*w b Jorrioti ..-I .wkpr b O Lathlcv 1.1."i mn \s M -iK A l-.-... ...iiiow e R Jordott llrtl l. J,v.l.m Chan> ttot out H|.riiirr not ul I (til Tolnl .lot C-larhp h II WHAT'S ON TODAY (• %  Il af I.Pana TT~lT tii tan a %  I-..I..P lanrla luaxi a n M'rllawf al Ibp ........ 11 U| p.n UabllP Knpma ( l... aba at al 1 ..II. Inn .I.H iar at '•' %  %  ; %  • oonnsAi Inipf. Had Abh.lt • >.d 1 aaj 1 a.l'lla *l--t riMhl tllabP -Rim %  IM a H..T It..*, oat. >imrt Mil" 1 11 > m. and a -i %  flii. ...... -.I >.h 1 It • n. and M v "> Ratal All Tn. Kl., M-n ai.d A I ho a.and anal 11 P \l|ail. LU p... % %  .' HI. p .. a.d LU p an "** SM a* Knfleld wl mussed easy slumping chance. Clyde WalCOtt took 4 wickets for 26 runs in overs. The Wefl Indies XI played at llangin Heaion on Sunday Palrnudeau and Marshall opened Ihe Innings for the West Indies. iinth batsmen were pretty cautiou* pace Iftwling. but as the slow bowlers Marshall wai caught at decj leg foi IB Worrell Pairaudeau but won afb deau was bowl.-tt for 42 Weekev and Worrell indulged in some lofty UtUn| UM) Worrell was •ventui iy caught on the boundary lor 80 Walcott joined Weekes and the em on Hindu i..r. re Wi.ki was caught on ITH ary for 62. The W. M [i ,. clared at 250 for 4 wn Walcott :t^ not out At the close | i..... Hanging Heatori i i .i 0 wickets. powerful WM Ml ith h clears. Tinrefen %  The teams '. %  SWOHDFISH: Albert Wealherheud. (Ciipl.) Geoflrey Foster, Usuries Kit/(ierald. Herbert Portillo, Ncsla Portillo, David lUaden and Mickey Jordan. HARRISON COLLIDE: John. Chnbrol, Frankle Manning. Chas. Evelyn, Hilly Manning, (Capt ). Allan Taylor. "Mortimer" W.-.i erhead, and Geoffrey Jordan. All Muslims resident in Barba, notified that at the General Meeting of the Jumii Mnsjtd (Barbados) held at 1.301 p.m. on 27th July. 1951 at which (26) poisons were nreo M. Y. Degia who had been electnan accepted the resignation of the Sccretar> M med Sayed I'iprawala The meeting then proceeded U %  rapotnl a new Secretary and the following wen nominated: — M. Y. Degia proposed by M Y Patel. seconded by M. E. Navsa. E. 1. Haflgee proposed by I. A Kothdia Valla, seconded by A. S. pander. n in.Ir.ution % %  •< re put to %  he vote and it was agreed that M Y. IK'gia and E I Hallgee •hould be, joint seeretsrles for the ensuing >...i The meeting then accepted UM audited Statement of accounts and all documents etc. .have been handed over to the andM. Y DEOIA F. I. KAJTOD Joint Seeretarie.THE JUMA MAS.IID (Bartado< (STPTOOIOTI HO SI njj B eZAI BQ HCOH B VZAI | %  / \tll srV-QAWPDHVq La.t tm la j a haaa. aar wfca aala* Ii hi ir,ilh". -apPiMn"— flaatii. SE HABLA ESPASOL gMWa ,. .. kM %  < I IkM %  H faniiBr Hi.l'P M 1 b w b H | o Oamto Thorniaw b Wun, i. rOpDii b WI1BM %  n .(,. ...i i b Br.Thw.ll li ,. ...... I. — i %  < M..„h... i rt i m They'll Do It Every Time WHAT? NO BUUP-O ? MS ,S A ONEWORSE STORE! I SMALL TAKE Mf TRKX EtSEW.IERE !' B3SS-TVATS l^E 6* OJSIOMeR TU*TS KX TVAT NEW 'a..p-o'...wET?e LOSNS Bus^ess 'CAjse c CARRY STOCK UP OJ THE STUFF-BUT REALLY TO THE CEl_'Ne-SD WOT HOPPEN? ySJESSEO IT, PAL.YG JESSED IT eoop SICIEF!,, /co SOMETHING!. 1 JieCTA HUNNERT 1 • %  FIFTY 8UCKC V .TIED UP IN 7XEM THINGS I mw =!**>CLUB FREMIERK TENNIS RESULTS MiM'il Doubles G. Grimeand C beat Miss E Harris Edwards 8—3. 8—2. Men's Doubles C. B. Forde and W. D Po A beet L Hlaekit! and J E H. ynas I %  <• I' Ml Ford. F I mm i is.. \s ii i -I11 1 Crawford • RgUlkfgNr Ml \\ I Hralriwallr l Ila ,. \. ,Mi i. p IU.^. A PMUipt l> S-l> ira.lord lb* \\.f .. V BWahasn i -,.l. 11 ii,-. 1 b u •-. .... ti l*ind*r ..ol rxlra. Total ... •M, .i aowi.iM. \*. >-i M OJOSM MK\.„... i | 1 1 By Jimmy Hatlo HeC RED HAND HARD OI.OSS Tulip Green, 'S' Cream. 'S* While. RED HAND TROPICAT. WHITE ReUInt ii. whiten RED HAND SPECIAL PUNTS For exteriors and Interiors. Orey, Dark Grev. !'.,'... Light Slone Oak llri RED HAND PERMANENT GRLIN Wllli Grey undereoallng. RED HAND MAT1NTO FLAT OIL PAINT lor Interior-. Cream. While REP ll\ND CON'CRETE FLOOR PAINTS. Grev Mid fjraes. Rrlght Red. WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO., LTD.



    PAGE 1

    Oil. ,'V.orrison tells Commons agrees in principle on nationalisation I'lUfc II and Communists stand firm on Huff r Zone issue U.N. troops captur I mountain fop af': Red held r stiff fight KAST Churchill ...In U.S. for h.'lp to retain lolt prcsIiRi power WORLD'S BIGGEST OIL REFINERY CLOSES Britain will send mission to Iran \m.i:\ i ivt: oi 'i.vn I'lir U.K. Accepts Principle Of Nationalisation LONDON, Julj JO J.'OREION SECRETARY Herbert liorrison told! the Commons today that as "soon as cci'am points" have been settled, Britain will send a special mission to Teheran to discuss settlement; of the bitter Anglo Iranian oil dispute. Morrison made the announcement a few minutes „ before W. Averell Harriman, Pre3ident Truman's special oil envoy look plane back to Teheran ifttr a week end of conferences in London. Morrison said the mission would be headed by Richard Stokes, Lord Privy Seal and Minister for Raw Materials. Stokes 64. is a wealthy Socialist industrialist. 8TB ARMY MUST BE VIGILANT Parliament Dissolved IN GREECE July 3(1 ParUameni . Ho said, "We I. pethj with the natural .HI people lo control tin %  %  %  iiml wc have agreed to principle of nsnonaUaal i Wl WO have usked Is that the agreemanti treeb snMrajd ii tuu auspices, should no* bo broken unilaterally without dis%  nd rssgottstton." %  '. | : 10 • %  >. weekend exchange of British ... I IronIan views made through rUlTiaddM "I'll'.. remain to be settled. Mi csly's Government haa ..ngements tl QtS have been dispatch a mission to T< I pj tbi Lord Privy Seal/' '.1. n %  aald that lOJ in Iran, would tf tol vi'ii Abadan, slta of U i %  %  l fields area.'* The Abadan refinery is scheduled to close tomorrow. The Foreign Secretary discussed ITU ITI the opening speech of .i major Foreign Affairs debate in UM commons on the Middle. I i .i o Hluation. On Tuesday Urltlsh engineer i)..,,.,M m... w win sasals lly close down the largest oil rrimrrv iii Uic world. Inder his orders the areat distillery unit bnuwii to workers here IB H nth Kilil>." will he turned off. That will rut off the trickle of oil oi wlilch Ihe remainder of Hie pUnt has hecu r.imiiiiK (,ir the laat few week*. aDd will bring the whole of thivast sprawling refinery lo a *tandstill "Bench Eighty" norms iiioo gallons of crude <>it dau) I i ihe last two week s only ,v,. I..-.,. %  %  %  ing through the pipe* d.nlv and on Monday nlghl this will le cul down to I.500.0IK1 preparatory to the shut-down. The last time the Abadan rent down was for three August 1941 folio*; Ing landings bjf Allied tmops.—U.F. TEHS. Korea, Jul, ft) | Ith AIM JT will maintain vigilance iu*tardless of ... i %  K %  \\ %  ''..i-i not and a 'I' not ptrnm this arcdi United Nations ie.otnc the victim of .< Communist .imhush," tatemeol .f i'.n ireditiiiK the Eighth %  | : %  : mm the tie gained recently, in.th iroin Korea and : Id of the n.utsing of formidable Communist ti i ihe battle gone, readj U launch poworful olfen when the Kacsong conference should Indicate such .. Van Fleet said: "Although aragorlttlons are being disOUaWdi UM Eighth Army will maintain its constant vigilance. ... MMt.f the Hood faith under which UN. delegates arc operating and we hope fur the same from the Communists. However, in spile of our hopes every man must be alert at all tuneEvery one is hopeful that (truce) a omeckcas a Ul %  oeoa ha %  sucftOUrahla end sy %  %  "No one is mOI Ha army ii stronger than ever. Our morale fa high. Together we will keep it fighting team the world la on %  and I am sure every man will continue to gh DC SO will irgly in the i i IT. India Asks Removal Of AinrrUanTroops WASHINGTON. July 10 India on Monday formally United State* to elim%  Inate from the Japatu-.r. ten vision for the stationing of Amertcai | aftai thai %  i the final Indian • rnawer n this aoora would DO Dull) g n d other official* advanced then" lO Indian "sUggl United Stateg and tha %  .mgdom have asked 49 ottiea eo lend tha 8 ' %  Trent-, vhlch the A'AmenmUlv a, %  I 'v 3 i il,. a Slate !) %  leDcimoi i intry New ;-, had form illy accepted United Invitation to participate in the San Fraii I' 1 "Conference. —I'.P India, Pakistan Are Prepared LONDON. July 30 Armed forces of India and Pakistan muted against eaci other on ihe hot plains "f tr* ..nd along hundreds < tha mountain truce lin* In Kashmir on Monday as reports from both sides said there was United Nations • tattling 'tiff' :i ' New Delhi and Karachi repcrtad thai Ida wanted t gu to v;u but tth resenU-d ;i\ i utsfde condemnation of troops, —U.P. ATHENE G %  I %  %  >n bar September ova i ame as the weak %  tacad threatInduatrlat various i ..its laadea among thenuelves and 0 i Statea .-.Might Mime sUbli • t uuon t< UM poUtlcal situation I in the hope that Orsace could take bar plaea In Wi fence. tad .i lenaral election U March, IfM and ParUameni %  hOUld hive sat until I9M. Bui %  of the 250 HKit* and .squabbling party leader s could not get tnLtton. Sopho.le. Veiu/elos whtise UK . I 1 1.. 1 Democrat i with 35 ware parmlttad" to form i Ooverronanl luu lhi^ Gm-emiiu-n; .v.i~ gt the merea of ethai i*apag<;s Resigns The climax of party Mckarlng % %  last iiK.ntli when Marshal AlexundeiPopagos, proliabrj Oreooe s akoat popular iigme next U> the King, resigned .is Supreme Commander of the ui-med f'-Ti %  Ih lesl.nalii i came amid reports, th.-t and the palace ware feuding Papagos who led the arm> •gjnlnst Communisl guerilla^ w. s highly thought of by the Americnn Ambassador who Hew from %  h ma sVaaiilngton 'o tiv lo patch Up the lift. Veni/elos bOV Papagos's resignation. A handle! ol army officers however stiigel a brief '"revolt" which HipaM> himself stopped. A lurge section of the nation remained behind Papagos however, and Yeniteios came lip .ignnst increasing opposition in Parliament. —ti.r. Wedemeyer Resigns Artny SAN FRANCISCO. Jnl> 30 I kM t-<;eiu-iLil A I b e r t A %  one tune United i.voy to China and Korea ended his 3L' year rnlUtar) ,.,: % %  .1 \'. % %  >., %  I. 1I..V. ... command af the Sixth Army to turn tu < h Ulan Ufa After a short formal ceremony %  t Sixth Armv Meadcpjaiters in San FranclSCO he drove to Hamilton Field where he vrai scheduled to depart by air for Omaha. Ne., homo Iowa He will vacation there before going to New York where he will take over B civilian lob as VlcePrcsldent and Director of Avco Manufacturing Co. %  I .iso announced that l;c .i 1 i. acccptl I memlwr-hip on the Hoard of Directors of ihe American Bureau for Mediral Aid to China UKOrtsM itad I I* STOCKS GO UP NEW YOIlK. July 30. continued their current th prices advancing to ''. • %  in mtxl%  i totalling Th. day'i a • %  i B actlva with m -i of the force generating in IP CHURCHILl ATTACKS :.; >N. Jul] N Churchill strongly attacked the %  balances to E>Pt at a monent when Egypt "nM MiKkadnig the Suez and trying the Canal Zone. -If. To-day's Weather Chart %  oris',.l:i i.m. INswef M i p m M .on Loot Qiurlcr L'ghllnj up: pjn lllch lidI.II a.Ti 3.3. Iin F.i'l TH%M j.m. "30 > l %  jili-ilMU) ( >f B*d0fl Eaytastef In Kt ~ i n July M. i.i' I the plans 01 tha G mem of Bi i I < % %  % %  i %  pie io this in. ^ hatl i %  Ue) win give esiahMfbrnani ol pe %  >; .•.-operative for I %  rgtn %  .r i 7"ie Undei -*veirMi T. '. Coi "1 am lhal ih Barbados ,. \ .i unen: bav no plans fo? ecu ihutton %  in this country." HUP lunlUhlic Ur|MirlNEW DELHI, July 30 A Nepali I itatemen called "fantaath icportthiit iha Indian Pi i mUng eon tacts made by Pakistan leaders %  • %  p Itlcal partlas and ln-| dividuals in Nepal. It : canards seemed to lie undermining tha voi. hasp] ratal sistiug between India and Nepal "| M (paged bare on y even pi llrical : % % %  lies in Nepal were opposed P> the Nepali Congress Part when in power got a letter from Ink:.' quart er s In Pakistan asking for help from the Gurkha* agaiu*i India. The letter allegedly said "India Iour common enemy*" U P I\o Progress In Ceasefire Negotiations AUVANt E BASE, KOREA. July 30. In fnurlienth and lengthiest Ion of Kiiciini; uiilltar'. rmlstlce conferences to-day sriftet three hours and elglit inutewith both sid.-hoidlru. firm to their views on item iniii-bai two ot the agonda, which deals with the establishment of a demilitarized rone. United N .ic-lcgate dmiral Joy in .i ed Ktatements made a detailed analysis both of CommuniM eolitentlons as well as the United Nations position on (lie BUbjaet iii'ii rU a -.ion lie than once again invited "M IT., nt by Communists on '' %  basic ctmcept Of the IMM N I Hons on a demilitarized gone "so that a dual solution to this ilen i .-. %  BBt our mutual views Shortli before noon Oanaral Nam II. senior Communist del* [ate replying to an earner clarllent iAdsalral J.^ aid it a ialso his defli lb A Ung thai hoatllltlei wouli I continued duimg current n l naajotJatlona. The fl'tccnth session will meet i-morrow mornmy at ll a Unitol Nations Iroops will be i. -I. | II: Korea for at least one year after the ceasefire. .,. a South Korean Q spokesman. Dr Clarence Hvee because it will !• .it leaal before South Koreans CBB tee their own security Ma said the Kor d artillery and planes. GoVi has been asking for am, forces and for men to train them he said, bul United Nnte mand has not met ihest> i I Government I any armistice shojuld pr The withdrawal of Chin. Communist Iroops, to Manchurls Disarmament of the North Korean army ,is the aggressor. Bi"! on military and i i Cnmrnunlat Chi Offici.ii re p re aen tatlon of South Korai matters < Korea Guarftnt'. i inistrativc %  rial integK.ite.i t I' Oppose IJ.S. Aicl For Asia CONNALLV URGES fc a/ASH 11 0 p S. nalp 1 I %  v The UDI gpeeti eter.i %  i I .... .'i.i bUI %  ct [urthes on the lull %  JUI Map ha oppoa 'II caught the lull blow Of tils wr.ltl: V •< Euros) %  -i than hefore World W-i I] II urged Congraai to authorlic SMO.ooo.oou in mOltan and aco Uuan ii ".MM ,| d all y.i pniti -' You ir time think ingf* the t.ix| .1.11..Ill : ing how i" 1 nun %  is payer for more %  When Ki'ster triad to i %  nail* became angry Con i i the United Bi Iti --•ir N..w you want to build up nd take i are %  |hi %  little couni "ntll he went mlo Q atrvles tried lo explain thai hi •houRht the threat %  •! Con 'I Ml' t Asia can be !mu itfaagthened against Rei 0l the Ministry of It." I Trade anH Industry told me. I'll. J.,p..t..;e 11. '.ii.il production is 0O 140 M i cent of the so-called iIfAM "norm", Mil rent short of what it WM In IfH I .,! %  In.p<' n. i Pou ordan in siwth-eafl Asia. fool thi eountrj wtlb tha I* bnlcal eapori•nee to huild up undei%  !.. %  %  % %  I Congress appropriates in'in.v nude.President Truman'mn D P A assies Insist On OampleHan Of .\greement BRISBAN1 The Au A %  ....•,. H hi . %  nt s dalay in • ompletg l(Nig-leiin -i. with Empire prod %  '. %  % %  had i Moved th.it ih.draft i. ,. had on Dacembei I, 1MB, between the Britlsl < kn i m Auatralian b legation idad .. mm i;i .-• S c.ipll ll I the nigar indu mltted %  i %  the Ministry of Food Ii %  .( the British t lovernment to •••tend tin> Australian with Emi.i i gave n*e lo ii s <• %  ) n tl %  !'. %  %  i I to raduei Hi i i %  pb >i in ia. This susineton rinr been mtgrsthe negotiations on sugar undertaken by Britain with Cuba, adthoul the knowledge of Empire Ml '.. I Unpei itlve f<>i the V (loin rnmenl hi IruuH si the talk %  Protest Death Of Milton King I .".IH I', ,l mi i",ii.\ I \l'i;i -~ i • %  i %  ol ( Ii :n..i Peopled mttllng bald In Holborn Hall •..-.!, i.i. IN. in pi ,,,., ,,, Milton King, ,i Wait Indian naman, bj .1 S poucaman Gold Miners Will Leave IF THEY ARE NOT PAID hat th.agri 1 %  (•lit IN .lliplc1.il It U P Russia fa Ready For Big Power Talks b4VS JAKOB MALIK LONDON J 1 %  1 TIMMl ' %  CIO UJ ... %  %  I %  >Uikhi u gol.i iituuTK out ot Tuu ihe rfonii %  fines pva in i Union secu %  \ • luati l town, ws .1 Bund 1 h a %  I ing miners will i %  I • %  I base 1 II nion holds mgerllni <>f strlkei .. %  %  1 Tl pla< when I iore rk thai i linger mil Wi • %  i' nto Qrc powi t r „ -,. hlgm %  1 Malik %  i Kor 1. ..'.-. %  1 gramme ft* i real I II I.i.. C I" Hard did not tod %  %  of a ma 1 1 P 1 1 .ii-. i ftuttei %  %  of Premier AtUee, The other that ol bora tha from the 1 u after hi n tuu.. %  from Noirlb Korea Ihe I %  %  ,iy. Sam '., the l-sprew. 1! ihould have n atonies Milan view %  1 %  II. bad ret Thi> %  ..f thi—I..K I I)i|)loillut ( l %  iirctl WASHINGTON, July 30 The ciii-i r ..f diplomat John Paton Oavies, Jr. was cleared on <.: security charges alter weak long state Dep ar t m ent investigation. H e was immediately t<> his post on Da u AIM 0 tafl —r p Labour Frittered Away Prestige Bi lumiKi i J\( K.(i>. LOND' H lice and power which I %  there. Dg for the Oi • i for delate on the Middle \ Id not rait* ^rs of Sorialu*. "mistakes and miscalculations" In %  •It can onlT be re%  Mora vital than Ka8M SAYS > lit R< lllll. %  \fte: paying tribute 1 nertcai ertl %  added: Tiu; m. The material and geoitUag out Into salt American seapower und> I %  I %  l can spread in %  %  The moral and Iran and Egypt Churchill isM event" in Iran* Ami ..ould prove more daIn which lain and the Dominions of the Commonwealth are i.ll 1'nnert laid that bat %  West's declining prcs-ige in the Baat: "I have been most anxious to encourage tttt States nav> to take the leading part in the Mediterranean, and that is why I welcome so the support they have given to il Turkey and the attenUon they wo giving to Iranian and Iraq aSl i .teglc aspects of the desiipltes and the port-I immediate future I the'ern i ma lm:*.jnce not onlv to Britain bul to untrles to the Atlantic! the United Ihefi [ ever-increasing g, on page 5 AlliesTake Mountain Stronghold After Bitter Fighting l GHTH ARMY HEADQUARTERS, Korea. July M>. UNITED NATIONS hi'htini; men climuxcfl five find i half dayi ol vicious and bitter battling to-day with U | i : .i mountain top nortaseaaat of Yanggu. ". Communist troops entrenched In solidly bul t trenches and bunker* poured down a shower ol nwrtati machine-yun and small aim* fire on slowly advancing tg:i%  .. Allied units. ~ %  %  — poi more than —, __ [affOrtS to take the mount, e ^* I'iiilns ror Jaoaii [h0,d w,r WASHINGTON. .1. poaltloo even The Department of the Arm •.-.I requestiiiK spfg '""' B f noi liung %  rtluarj barQovarii m a nl and relief ,,„ pa-*! aie.i this year on th %  Finl Allied bat! crest ..( ihe hill •;'>*uted in ,ii occupation costi or. i "• %  •' llv ,l "" ,t dl pay-as-you-rfo be 3 TON ELEPHANT FOR TRUMAN %  A ihr> %  n Truan in I I %  lo thi i %  teasel .... %  %  1 11 .. i i r REGENT OF IH io GOING TO VONDOh %  %  ; H< .-.. %  %  i. ni iraqul Government offii i %  . X K %  %  %  %  %  i r TRUMAN INTERESTED IN AID FOR ISRAEL V/ASHING rON. 1 %  i . %  r | I r the White Ho %  %  %  %  . CLOSING DOWN >-. niAHCMCO Ion %  ( %  ie ft del Uon of Ani'-i • Oeneral Hluu i< ,i %  i pn t>... group v-;ll net i.s I, 1 I* The "ADVOCATE" pays for NEWS Dial 3113 Day or Night. Israel <; To Polk %  II 1. \ \VI\. I 1 %  : I' %  om .. Ual ... \ % %  .i All %  %  i i... i .II. .i t i i . %  %  %  hen Ben G %  i i • depending large! vote M"' t of thi IT. Chances SI amp PAslI i i i %  %  %  %  i i %  ; I hi with .' of I ; %  ul %  t P They Wen; Trained In Moscow %  U N ADVAMl I B K %  %  vaalad -m Monday The Arm f BI I' recently h I'IEI whirl the House Am mlttee mwlo puhlie today, Ihjt |. %  '..i foi thi economie BUppOti "I 1852 He said th.it Bppn 1140.000,000 in .1. nterpurt fundl lad I'Y OM dlahta f' r %  1 %  -UP %  %  M. men n %  Re I Adjoli %  %  • mile* around fall Suradav lo AI-. Had assault Action on rroni .... %  I %  %  i %  slightly %  %  %  — Ui\ %  : i] %  sfam i %  %  %  %  %  %  I %  %  %  i %  % 




    |
    |
    |

    See RR

    arama NL ane eee tieL ttc

    Hav bad0os

    TUESDAY, JULY



    ESTABLISHED 1895



    Ol Morrison tells Commons Britain
    e agrees in principle on nationalisation



    PEACE Allies and Communists stand





    firm on Buffer Zone issue



    {
    wAR U.N. troops capture Red held





    31, 1951











    mountain top after stiff fight



    . BAST ©









    PRICE FIVE



    CENTS
    oe



    hurchill asks U.S. for help

    to regain lost. prestige, oo

    WORLD'S BIGGEST OLL REFINERY CLOSE

    Britain will send mission to fran

    U.K. Accepts Principle

    Of Nationalisation

    LONDON, July 30

    FOREIGN SECRETARY Herberi Morrison told;

    the Commons today that as “soon as certain|
    points’’ have been settled, Britain will send a.

    special mission to Teheran to discuss settlement}

    of the bitter Anglo-Iranian oil dispute.

    Morrison made the announcement a few minutes
    before W. Averell Harriman, President Truman’s
    special oil envoy took plane back to Teheran efter

    a week-end of conferences in London.

    Morrison said the mission would be headed by
    Richard Stokes, Lord Privy Seal and Minister for
    Raw Materials. Stokes 54, is a wealthy Socialist

    industrialist.

    He said, “We have every sym-

    pathy with the natural desire of
    the Iranian people to control the 8 TH ARMY
    mineral wealth of their own soil, . J

    and we have agreed to accept the
    principle of nationalisation. What
    we have asked is that the agree-
    ments freely entered into under
    internationai auspices, should not
    be broken unilaterally without dis-
    cussion and negotiation.”

    Morrison referred to the week-
    end exchange of British and Iran- h
    ian views made through Harri-] ~
    man, and added: “Certain points
    remain to be settled. Meanwhile,
    His Majesty’s Government has
    made arrangements as soon as
    those points have been settled, to
    dispatch a mission to eee led Tis: iasiibel aiteeral Simareent. 6
    by the Lord EEIVY are: F Stokes’ ; appre iation crediting the Eighth
    _ Morrison said that one nT wee !Army with winning for him the
    ar eas brs Sorta’ |promotion he gained recently.
    largest oil refinery to “familiarise | , ene both from ere and

    Ase vith sonditions there, and] **> nde vashington have to d of the
    pumaele wee mom? massing of formidable Communist
    in the oil fields a sched-| forces in the battle zone, ready to
    ‘ ae ee oder 1S Schec=/Jaunch a powerful offensive if and
    IEC Oo close * rhe > Caes ~

    The Foreign Secretary discussed et one eS Aig
    Iran in the opening speech of a|° ‘Ware Fleet enka: vain h rs
    major Foreign Affairs debate in miistice ne Htisttons ates rid di a

    i the Middle s g tions are being dis
    the Commigny. 08 cussed, the Eighth Army will

    Eastern situation. maintain its constant vigils
    a é s s gilance.
    On. Tuesday British engineer | We srenguve of the good faith

    Donald Blair Bs soae ree under which U.N, delegates are
    close down the a o aay his|OPerating and we hope for the
    finery in the world. title it | Same from the Communists. How-
    orders, the great dis wee eee ever, in spite of our hopes every
    known to workers b — od man must be alert at all times.
    “Bench Eighty,” will be trickt Every one is hopeful that (truce)
    off. That will cut off the t ie conferences will come to a suc-
    of oil on which the remaing cessful and honourable end sg
    of the plant has been TA ea that peace may be restored.

    for the last few wee ae “No one is more conscious of
    bring the whole of 7 ele Kas peace than a soldier. Our army is
    1 refinery to a 8 stronger than ever. Our morale is
    sulk. : _|high. Together we will keep
    “Bench Eighty” normally ene the best fighting team the world
    500,000 gallons of crude o has ever known and I am sure
    every man will continue to give
    his best as has been done so will-
    ingly in the past.”—U.P.

    Eighth Army will maintain
    ccnstant vigilance regardless of
    truce negotiations at Kaesong. He
    said: “We must not and will not
    permit this great United Nations
    army to bécome the victim of a
    Communist ambush,”







    y-

    For the last two weeks only
    2,500,000 gallons have been flow-
    ing through the pipes daily and
    on Monday night this will be cut
    down to 1,500,000 preparatory to
    the shut-down.

    The last time the Abadan re-
    fnery shut down was for three
    cays in August 1941 following
    landings by Allied troops.—U.P.





    nen CURRAN eee ieesatteetermmanetees GMa ee

    India, Pakistan
    Are Prepared

    LONDON, July 30.
    Armed forces of India and



    . > Pakistan ranged against each
    India Asks Removal , other on the hot plaing of the
    ‘Punjab and along hundreds of

    Of American Troops miles of the mountain truce line

    in Kashmir on Monday as reports

    WASHINGTON, July 30. ‘from both sides said there was

    India on Monday formally little hope of the United Nations
    asked the United States to elim- ‘mediation settling differences.
    inate from the Japanese Peace New Delhi and Karachi re-
    Treaty any provision for the perted that neither side wanted
    stationing of American forces “in +, go to war but both resented
    and around Japan” after the zny cutside condemnation of
    Pact is signed. their action in massing troops.

    They said the final Indian —_U.P
    enswer cn this score would ve
    given after Dulles and_ other —_-—_---- —
    American officials advanced their STOCKS GO UP
    arswers to Indian “suggestions.”

    The United States and the NEW YORK, July 30.
    United Kingdom have asked 49 Stocks continued their current
    othes countries to attend the San
    Francisco meeting and ratify a best levels since mid May in mod-
    Treaty which the Anglo-Ameri- mrately ac‘ive trading totalling
    can’s powers put the finishing 1,590,000 shares.







    touches to July 3 The day’s rise was elective with

    Meanwhile a State Department mest of the force generating in
    spokesman Michael McDeimot® chemicals and oils. —U.P
    id so far only one country New
    Zealand had formally aceeeted



    the Jnited States — United :
    pg aoa invitation to participate To-day a
    in the San Francisco Peace Con- Weather Chart
    mp: AAS Sunrise: 5.49 a.m.







    CHURCHILL ATTACKS Sunset: 6.23 p.m.

    Moon: Last Quarter
    LONDON, July 30 Lighting up: 7 p.m.

    Churchill strongly attacked the High Tide: 1.16 a.m., 3.35
    Government for releasing sterling p.m.
    balances to Egypt at a moment Fall Tide: 8.54 a.m., 8.30
    when Egypt was blockadnig the nm.

    Suez and trying to force Britain
    cut of the Canal Zone, —U.P.



    Labour Frittered. Away Prestige

    By ROBERT E. JACKSON. | SAYS CHURCHILL

    LONDON, July 30

    Winsten Churchill ced
    United States Monday to play
    great new role in the Middle E
    to help the West recover the rres-
    tige and power w th he said the
    Labour Government had frittered





    ving tn-



    in Korea, After pz



    n Korea he added:









    a promontory jutting cut into salt









    away there t } t nerice
    . vater ruled b American sea-
    cS > rin for he r < ion i “
    Speaking ac the Opposition in 1 power under iir canopy con-
    the major deoate on the | trolled in the by American
    East in the Commons, Ch

    jair forces
    said Britain alone could not a a:

    trieve the losse all gedl\ spread in a physical





    be
    i in
    f ) War
    More vital. than Korea
    I rove re dam- d p hick

    wing with prices advancing to



    ng to the United States than!
    American acrifices and

    “But in the rmnaterial and geo-
    sense Korea after all is

    a place from which

    > main interests of

    TERS, Korea, July 30 |
    senerai James Van Fleet said;

    See eee

    ant Britain and the Dominions ]Government

    ;|part in the Mediterranean, and

    E

    sition in Parliament,

    turn to civilian life.

    $$ -—

    Paateinicint

    Dissolved
    IN GREECE

    _ ATHENS, Greece, July 30.

    King Paul dissolved Parliament
    and proclaimed a general elec-
    jlion for September 9.

    ‘The move came as the weak
    Greek government faced threat-
    ened strikes in most industries
    as various party leaders bickerec
    among themselves and as _ the
    United States sought some stable! lishment of peasant. co-op-
    -C.uuon to the political situation | eratives for the wefking of
    in the hope that Greece could! such esta es

    Acquisition Of
    B’dos Estates

    LOND Gs, July

    In the House of Comm
    on July 25, Mr. Joy
    kin (Socialist, Gl
    asked we Secretary of State
    for the Colonies what are
    the plans of the Govern-
    ment of Barbados for the
    acquisition of estates owned
    by people in this country;
    and whether they will give
    consideration to the estab-




    Fs caeterinmegpsigiemaenetiiannmssn coachella jensen

    take her place in Western de-| The _Under-Secre ary of
    fence, ; State for the Colonies, Mr

    Greece had a general election ir T.. *. Covs, soptied: “I am
    March, 1950 and Parliamen} nfcrmed that the Barbados
    should have sat until 1954. Bui Geverameént have no plans
    no party received even one-fourth for compulsory acquisition
    of the 250 seats and squabblina of estates owned by persons
    party leaders could not get to- in this country.”

    gether in a firm coalition, > B.U.P.

    Sophocles Venizelos whose Lib-
    eral party had 56 seats and George
    Papandreous Social Democrats

    with 35 were “permitted” to form Nie P, P
    a Government. But this Govern-| J oO rogress

    ment was at the mercy of othe:

    pa. ties In Ceasefire

    Papages Resigns

    . ; ; ; : ? e e

    The climax of party bickering IN £ t p
    came early last month when Mar- ego ta toms
    shal Alexander Papagos, prob-
    ably Greece’s most popular figure] ADVANC’E BASE, KOREA,

    next to the King, resigned as July 30,
    Supreme Commander of the} The fourteenth and lengthiest
    armed forces. His resignation}single session of Kaesong military

    came amid reports that Papagos|armistice conferences to-day pe-
    . and eight

    Papagos who led the army|Minutes with both sides holding
    against Communist guerillas wis firm to their views on item num-
    highly thought of by the American] ber two of the agenda, which deals
    Ambassador who flew froia|With the establishment of a de-
    conference from Washingtcn to] â„¢Militarized zone.
    try to patch up the rift.

    and the palace were feuding, cessed after three hour





    said it was also his definite under
    standing that hostilities would be
    SAN FRANCISCO, July 30. continued during current armistice

    Lieutenant-General A 1b er t| negotiations.
    Wedemeyer, one time United

    it; States special envoy to China and The fifteenth session will meet
    Korea ended his 32 year military to-morrow morning at 11 o'clock
    eareer on Monday as he gave up United Nations troops will
    command of the Sixth Army to|needed in Korea for at least one
    year after the ceasefire, according

    After a short formal ceremony |to a South Korean Government
    at Sixth Army Headquarters in|spokesman, Dr. Clarence Ryee be-
    San Francisco he drove to Hamil-]cause it will be at least a year
    ton Field where he was scheduled | before South Koreans can guaran-

    to depart by air for Omaha, Ne-|tee their own security
    braska his home town.

    Manufacturing Co

    the Board of Directors of the

    American Bureau for Medical Aid The withdrawal of Chinese
    Communist troops, to Manchuria
    Disarmament of the North Ko-

    to China Incorporated.—U.P



    rean army as the aggressor.

    Ben on military and economic |

    Fantastic Reports aid to North Korea and Commun-

    ist China

    NEW DELHI, July 30. ,

    A Nepalese Embassy statement Korea in
    called “fantastic” reports that the Korea

    Indian Press was regarding con-

    tacts made by Pakistan leaders

    with some political parties and in-

    dividuals in Nepal. It said “these

    canards seemed to be undermin-



    j rity of Korea,.—U.P

    | T « ste iC
    ing the very happy relations sub- \to the United st t in anot |
    sisting between india and Nepal.” ies a e! oun ain: in Augu ee
    Reports frontpaged here on | Crew member aid during |\«

    Monday said seven political par-

    high quarters in Pakistan asking



    > WASHINGTON, July 30

    see with his tongue lashed Wi Nis
    ¥

    000,000 foreign arms and econon
    aid bill

    j the Bliursitses to conduct further
    jhearings on the bill with the
    {Armed Services Committee _ sit-
    ting in — this step he opposed. , CARLOS, Maria Bster, Maria

    plets of the Argentine celebrate their 8th birthday

    of his wrath. Foster testified that
    Western Europe now is producing!



    fellows spend all your time think-!
    ing how to spend money” while| The Australian Sugar Produc-
    Congress is “squeezing” the tax- ers’ Association has again ex
    payer for more revenue.

    nally became angry. Connally said
    the United States

    itself’ Now you want to build up

    trie

    United Nations senior delegate
    Venizelos however accepted] Admiral Joy in a series of prepa
    Papagos’s resignation. A handful]ed statements made a detail
    of army officers however staged|a@nalysis both of Communist con-
    a brief #revolt” which Papagos| tentions as well as the United Na-
    himself stopped. A large section} tions position on the subject un-
    of the nation remained behind cer discussion.
    Papagos however, and Venizelos} He then once again invited
    came up against increasing opp0-| comment by Communists on tha
    basic concept of the United Ni-

    —U.P. }tions on a demilitarized zone “so
    that a final solution to this item

    = may refiect our mutual views.”
    Wedemeyer Shortly before noon General
    Nam Il, senior Communist dele-

    gate replying to an earlier clari-

    Resigns Army fying statement by Adugiral Joy



    peace treaty and the end of the — |
    Russia Is Ready For,

    the Japanese intend to continue Big Power Talks

    issuing to the U.S. army, barbed
    wire, machine parts and other war bie
    items as they have since July SAYS JAKOB MALIK

    1950.

    “repair shop” of Asia.

    ready to board contracts for war

    e said the Korean army needs
    He seid Kores et ravaged Korea.

    He will vacation there before |artillery and planes. Government
    going to New York where he will] has been asking for arms for all
    take over a civilian job as Vice-|forces and for men to train them
    President and Director of Avco}he said, but United Nations Corm-
    mand has not met these requests

    The General also announced that|Ryee said Government believes
    he also accepted membership on any armistice shquld provide for

    eoncrete plans as yet
    of the Ministry of International
    Trade and Industry told me, Mali k,

    country with the technical experi-
    ence to build up under-developed
    areas whenever the United Staite
    Congress appropriates money un-
    dev President Truman’s propose Li
    IP A
    programme UF

    Official representation of South
    all matters. concerning



    Guarantee of the administrative
    sovereignty and territorial integ-



    Oppose US.
    Aid For Asia |

    CONNALLY URGES



    CGhsirman Tom Cenlally oi ine

    Scnate Foreign Relaiuiors Comn



    (
    ‘

    {

    ‘

    |

    ter, Administrator of the M |
    ig funds to

    in Asi |
    The unexpected outburst by ihe!
    vetersn senator occurred in =
    |

    ‘

    (

    !

    |



    shell Plan for see

    bedster “little countr



    open session of the Committees
    Foster testified on the $8!

    mnea se apparently had been

    \ettled by an earlier decision of



    But Foster caught the full blow home.

    Aussies Insist

    14 per cent, more industrial good

    than before World War Il. Then; . .
    he urged Congress to authorize | On Completion

    $980,000,000 in military and eco

    nomie aid for Asian countries | Os Agreement

    Connally roarea in protest; “You
    BRISBANE July 26

    pressed concern at the British
    Government's delay in complet
    ing long-term sugar agreements
    i with Empire producers
    Annot “subsist The Association said it had be-
    lieved that the draft agreement
    reached on December 8, 1949,
    . between the British Government
    Foster, a successful businessman|and an Australian delegation

    When Foster tried to reply Con-



    ind take care of these little coun-



    until he went into Government] provided a firm basis for thé
    service tried to explain that he|eavy capital expenditure to
    thought the threat of Communism] which the sugar industry

    is a global one and south-east] committed to inecreuse exports i
    Asia can be immeasurably] the Ministry of Food. The failure
    strengthened against Red penetra-] 0f the British Government to ex-
    tion with a relatively small tend the Australian agreement
    amount of aid. Foster said |
    south-east Asia’s rich raw | to the. 4
    materials were vital to the defence
    of the United States and the free} accepted in 1949,
    sorld—U.P.

    into comprehensive agreements
    with Empire suppliers gave rise
    suspicion that Britain wa
    disposed to reduce the obligations

    This suspicion thas been aggra-

    etualiaiias vated, said the Association, by
    the negotiations on sugar under-

    taken by Britain with Cuba,

    Japan: Repair without the knowledge of Empire!

    suppliers. These factors make it

    e imperative for the Austral
    Oop Sla Government to insist at the ta

    on sugar in London !ate







    TOKYO, July 30 that the agreement be completed

    - : B.U.P
    Japan is looking beyond the




    It Korean cease fire talks fail,

    LONDON, July 30
    If there is peace Japan stands Jakob Malik, the Soviet Deputy
    Foreign Minister, told a visiting
    delegation of British Quakers, that
    Russia is ready to enter into Great
    Power negotiations at the highest
    level

    “We haven’t really made any
    " an official

    The Japanese whose present in- Russia’s willingness to disc uss th

    dustrial production is now 140 Korean armistice was followed |
    per cent. of the so-called 1932- the cease fir negotiations, w
    1936 “norm”, but still 15 per replying to the Qt |
    cent, short of what it was in 194u {gramme for “a real
    also hopes to fill some “Point | understanding.—-U.P
    Four” orders in south-east Asia.



    3 TON ELEPHANT
    FOR TRUMAN

    SINGAPORE, July 30

    They feel they are the closes!

    Truman from the King of Car
    bodia arrived here on Monday
    iship. The elephant will be tale

    |voyage here the animal ehnavea





    ties in Nepal were opposed to| jwell and roam 1 the dec
    the Nepali Congress Party which | - r chained,—-U.P.
    when in power got a letter from ron oO

    for help from the Gurkhas against
    India. The letter allegedly said
    “India is our common enemy





    Diplomat Cleared
    WASHINGTON, July 30

    Paton Davies, Jr. was cleared on
    Monday of security charges after

    REGENT OF IRAQ

    = Bitter Fighting | GOING TO LONDON

    ROME, July 31
    The Regent of Iraq, Abdul J}

    EIGHTH ARMY HEADQUARTERS, Korea, July 30. stopped briefly at Rome’s Cian
    UNITED NATIONS fighting men climaxed five and ajpino airport on Monday enr«
    half days of vicious and bitter battling to-day with the cap- }|'@ London
    The career of diplomat John ture of a mountain top northeast of Yanggu.

    He was accompanied by a n
    ber of Iraqui Government offici

    Veteran Communist troops entrenched in solidly bui.t An official of the Regent

    a week long State Department trenches and bunkers poured down a shower of mortar, |tourage said the Prince was goi
    investigation. He was immediately machine-gun and small arms fire on slowly advancing ten-|t? Lendon to see your K
    restored to his post on Secretary acious Allied units. ad nothing to do witt t



    Dean Acheson’s policy and plan-
    ning staff. —v. P

    not requesting appropriation

    of the Commonwealth are all
    | joined,”

    Churchill said that because of the
    West's declining pres*ige in. the
    Middle East: “I have been most
    anxious to encourage the United
    States navy to take the leading

    theory that Japan is now able

    Secretary, Frank Pace, te

    that is why welcome so stro r ;
    the senoant aay hase earns mittee made public today, that
    Greece and Turkey and the atten-|{unds will be requested for
    tion they are giving to Lranian and {©Conomic support of Japan
    Iraq affairs 1952

    The strategic aspects of the des-
    ation of oil supplies and the



    called counterpart funds
    US., are



    countries is of immense im- :
    t to Britain but to |led by th





    h sse in 1 and already
    It vl part in their plan of }scheduled for economi
    ever-increasing deterrents {tation programme |

    NoFunds For Japan:

    WASHINGTON, July 30
    The Department of the Army

    { eftorts to take the mountain
    gtronghold were unsuccessful
    R eds took full advantage of thei

    roneewne| Eey Were Trained In Moseow

    and relief in occu-
    pied areas, this year, on th

    finance all occupation costs on
    pay-as-you-go basis, it was re
    vealed on Monday The os m

    recently in closed hearings which
    the House Appropriation Com

    the

    He said that approximate

    jimmediate future of Middle East- }$149.000,000 in Japanese yen Reds offe ring

    smashed at }

    sl



    | Feisal of Iraq. He said the
    | 1st. — U.P
    |



    P c = > ' '
    For more nan five day8 their/+ion in the Middle

    |
    and demoralizing artillery bar-}
    rages, | U.N. ADVANCE BASE













    First Allied battalion to reach Korea, Jul
    githe crest of the hill engaged in At least three of the 2 C

    deadly hand duels with fanatic; munist delegate egoti
    Communist defenders. But 43 @ cease-fire in Kore
    more and more U.N, men reached} trained in Mosco\ und the
    the top Reds finally broke ani:two are veterar of Comr
    h {fled politic

    Adjoining hills linked into t The backgro €
    defence of the mountain pez it) tithe of the five me
    dominates the astern front for, vealed by officia here
    miles round feil Sunday to Al ' The Red negotiator are
    lied assault. Action on other sec- General Wam sta
    tions of the front was limited the Supr f ft
    mainly to patrol engagements with, Nort} Kore



    ght resistance
    Allied jets and fighter bom



    tly broker



    ARGENTINE QUINTUPLETS





    Maria Carene



    yesterday,
    Milton King, a
    policeman

    Ontario, July

    planned on Monday to move 1,50
    swiking gold miners

    solidated Gold

    Union's plan,

    s one-industry
    into a ghost town,

    Sunday night by C., I

    was announces

    and settled fast,
    » transported

    S meeting of s
    will il to. great length

    providing «

    to comment
    whose recent speech on | the

    TRUMAN INTERESTED
    IN AID FOR ISRAEL

    SHINGTON

    MeCormack talked

    three-ton elephant, a gift tc] sident expressed th

    consideration

    CLOSING DO DOWN
    SAN FRANCISCO, . ‘
    The National Convention of

    The “ADVOCATE”
    pays for NEWS
    Dial 3113
    Day or Night.









    », the famous Dilligenti quintu

    moreman in the gar 7 of their
    rpress
    da esi sr“ aersresrseesiessigpnsteninnnniieieasinaneedalineems

    Prokest Death
    Of Milton King

    LONDON, July 30

    THE DAILY EXPRESS to-day featured a story about
    the League of Coloured Pcoples’ meeting held in Holborn
    In protest against the alleged murder of

    West Indian seaman, by a South African

    The blavked-out name on a
    hand poster advertising the meet-

    Gold Miners " i "ie im Sees € z featured
    Will Leave

    IF THEY ARE NOT PAID

    TIMMONS,

    On the hand poster, one was Miss
    Mary Attlee, the missionary sister
    of Premier Attlee. The other
    name blacked-out was that of
    Mrs. Monica Felton, whom the
    government dismissed from the
    chairmanship of the Stevenage
    Development Corporation after
    she returned from North Korea
    this year,

    The League's secretary, Sam
    Morris, explained to the Express,
    it should have read Miss Monica
    Whately” a socialist who has
    expressed strong anti-Malan
    views

    But there was a printing er-

    Mia Mori icke vii
    Whately could not be present al
    the meeting after all.”

    The secretary, Sam Morris said
    today “IT am very annoyed abou
    the whole affair yesterday. But
    we have not finished yet. This
    is only the beginning of our pro-
    test against the death of this
    West Indian seaman —L.E.S

    israel Go To Polls

    TEL-A-AVIV, Israel, July 30
    Israel's 900,000 eligible voters







    went to the polls today to choose
    120 members of the nation’s par-
    liament, (the Knessit) from a list
    of nearly 1,000 candidates

    Voting was orderly as the first
    voters cast ballots at 6 a.m. All
    Isreelis, except those in essential
    ervices, observed the holiday
    proclaimed for the election.

    Main election battle was viewed
    here as a toss up between Premier

    David Ben Gurion’s party and the
    Zionists of Israel

    These parties are the only two
    depending largely on the popula
    vote, Most of the other partie
    count mainly, on their organised

    membership.—-U.P.



    Chances Slump
    PARIS, July 30







    For Finance Minist Maur
    ice | ‘ il of formin
    a ne Coalition Ca net le en
    France Zil-day pol cr

    imped on onday whet
    he failed te t the ¢ » Part
    l to I to r 0
    G romer yrary

    I che i hope C

    roo ee” ¢ Viiddle «

    I mca Pp le 1cle ORCW
    ,{on Tuesday to map out a com-
    f}mon programme for P

    ;seventeenth Government since tt



    | but fter the preliminary
    eling on Monday night with a
    u of former premiers and
    e! repre ng parties, he
    ' 1 tnat e would insteac
    er or or
    merry-g
    round ¢ talk i
    { ( e
    U.P





    n ! ned for
    ' Liae Mi
    ¢ vith th
    ’ efo the
    14 t
    t ( i \
    ( retar a
    h n-
    i Le he
    t
    ic
    cf lL Le i {
    N Ke
    )
    @ on pa ;

    ~~
    PAGE TWO





    cp Calling

    OF MAGDALA

    IS LORDSHIP, Rt

    G. Mandeville
    an audience of over five
    people who saw a prev
    film, “The Sinner of Magdala” at
    the Plaza, Bridgetown,
    morning,

    Members of the clergy of almost
    all denominations throughout
    island and several lay
    of the various congregations
    saw the film, which tells the story
    of Christ and» Mary Magdalene.

    The film began at 9.40 a.m. and
    lasted for just under two hours.
    It opens at the Plaza on Friday

    Rev ; ‘
    was among

    hundred

    i@w Ot the

    terday



    Grenada Police Force

    M®: HUGH BRATHWAITE,
    1 son of Mrs

    Dorcas Brath-
    waite of St. Philip and the late
    Mr. Alonza Brathwaite arrived
    from Grenada over the week-
    end by B.W.LA. on four weeks
    emergency leave. His father died
    on July 2ist.

    Hugh, who is a Barbadian,
    here three months ago to join the
    Grenada Police Force. He was
    one of eight Barbadians. He told
    Carib that they have just com-
    pleted their training and they
    are now assisting with the train-
    ing of two hundred Grenada re-
    cruits of the Grenada Reserve
    Force, ,

    left

    Antipva Prize Giving

    RIZE-GIVING in Antigua was

    held on the lawns of the
    Antigua Grammar School last
    Thursday. It was the first occa-
    sion on which the new Head
    Master Mr. J. Foote, M.A., de-
    livered his report of the work of

    the schoo} for the past year. Theref

    are at present two hundred
    thirty-three boys
    and Mr. Foote made it clear that
    owing to shortage of staff the
    school is now limited to two hun-
    dred and forty boys.

    Speeches were made by His
    Lordship Bishop Nathaniel Hugiies
    of Antigua and Mr. R. St. J. O
    Wayne, the Administrator. Prizes
    were presented by Mrs. D. E.
    Jackson, wife of the Chief Justice.

    Among the guests was the
    3ishop of Puerto Rico who was
    interested in the school, as many
    people he has met in Puerto Rico
    and the American Virgin Islands
    were educated there.

    Short Visit

    and

    R. OLIVER JOHNSON, Act-
    ing Assistant Branch Mana-

    ger, B.W.1A., who was in Trinidad
    on a three-day visit, returned
    yesterday morning by B. Ww. I. A,



    THE ADVENTURES

    the
    members
    also

    in the school M «: ushter of
    a B 0

    SAW PREVIEW

    BISHOP G. L.





    . MANDEVILLE leaving the Plaza, Bridgetown,



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    Wot No Houses? |

    HERE is a housing dilemma for |
    Washington officials arrang-

    ing the visit of Prince Philip and
    Princess. Elizabeth, at President
    ‘Truman's invitation

    Usually,

    distinguished visitors
    > accommodated at Blair House, |

    just across the street from the
    White House. The U.S. Govern-
    ment maintain it as an Official
    guest house.

    But the Trumans are now
    living there while the White

    House is being rebuilt.

    In recent}

    months, official guests have usual-|
    ly stayed one night at Blair House.
    then moved to their own Embas-}|

    Sy.
    in Washington
    Princess and her husband will be
    the guests of the President.
    are

    A White |
    asked what sort of accommodation
    was available at Blair House,



    But a British Embassy official
    has said, “That!

    They
    not expected to stay here.” |
    House official when

    re-





    STARTING

    FRIDAY

    AT

    EMPIRE

    |
    |
    |
    |
    AND }
    |
    1
    |







    ———S

    EMPIRE

    NOW iia:

    TO PACKED CAPACITY
    3 AND’ CONTINUING
    ¢ DAILY.

    ROYAL

    the
    Bae

    SIMULTANEOUSLY
    Nise eo=





























    TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1951









    || AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only!
    TO-NIGHT TO THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
    MATINEE: TO-MORROW at 5 p.n
    Universal-International presents .. .

    “PIRATES OF MONTEREY”

    in Technicolor

    Starring Maria MONTEZ
    i MIKHAIL RASUMNY

    Rod CAMERON
    PHILIP REED







    '
    Thurs, — 1.50 p.m.
    “Phantom of

    BRIDGETOWN
    Chinatown
    “Saddle Serenade

    eee arma ae ee and
    Continuing:
    - po "
    2" \ PLAZA piai 2310 ]_ ea
    Last Two Shows TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.10 p.m.
    Paramount's Technicolor Drama
    = .
    INTENTS vowsraby sta
    " Pat Sot Color by Tec hy inteolor





    Also the Cartoon

    “HOW GREEN IS MY SPINACH”



    . (Popeye)
    WEDNESDAY an THSDAY —

    ‘alypso-Color Musical































    plied “Cramped, very cramped. | parenowet os pase! : ¥ “HAPPY-GO-LUCKY”
    ; - ‘one ni ob Hope ronda Fleminit & ary Martin — Dick Powell
    - ~ It is not yet known whether SS - = a
    Princess Elizabeth and Prince PLAZA ioene | | AT ETY |
    Fhilip will visit New York If| Dial 8404 |]
    they do, they are expected to stay | Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p m \}) Tas oannan — ST. JAMES
    a‘ the Waldorf Towers, the resi-| “FRENCH LEAVE’ | OW TONITE — 8.30
    dential part of the Waldorf As-| ‘ Jackie Coozan — Jackie Cooper | KISSES FOR BREAKFAST”
    teria Hotel on Park Avenue | and Dennis Morgan Jane Wyman and
    ia » é 1 LAW OF THE JUNGLE” “WHIPLASH”
    John King Mantan Moreland Dane CLARK Alexis SMITH
    r Wed. & Thurs. 5
    ' R di p & 5 & 8.30 pan Wed. & Thurs. 8.30 p.m.
    SARONG GIRL’
    B.B.C. Radio Programme | Howard K seg, on a “PORT APACHE”
    x ‘ uy E PALOOKA MEETS John WAYNE and
    Tuesday, July “3, 1901
    11.15 “ayn, Programine Parade, 12 20| Cot la ofp, Lott olfman played by LON CHANEY Leon ERROL — sollUMEuBers |] “WESTERN HERITAGE”
    am Asian Survey 11 45 a.m Report ORS: Dracula played by BELA LUGOS! 4 — Joe woop |f) Tim HOLT
    fr Britain 12.00 noon ne ews 4 ce “A = a
    from mui ee Sea a _MUS ICAL AS The Monster played by GLENN STRANGE a PPP EO EEE CPP EPPS OS OPPS SOPOT FS CPF EEOC OCF OPO POOP,
    4.15—6.45 19.76M _ - } Lenore Aubert + Jane Randolph j\¢
    a a | % : nt %
    4.15 pm The Glory Road 500 pm Tgvwas tax s$ GLOBE 7 HEA TRE Bs
    England v South Africa. 5 05 p m ro | MAI GH! LAUGH! : 4 x
    men's Cricket 510 pm. Interlude 515) BOOK THE DATE. ’ S Tod ‘x can 42 ef %
    pm New Records 600 pm Muste | GH o-day 5. an 15 p.m, an i x
    Magazine. 615 pm. Welsh Magazine LAUG e x ae p Continuing x
    6 45 p.m. Programme Parade. 6 55 p.m x
    To-day's Sport , a y M.G.M. RUDYARD KIPLING’S 8
    7,00—10.45 25.58M. 81. 32M | 8 x
    7.00 pm ~The News 7.10 pm. News| Rees eres. , % K i Mi
    Analysis 715 p.m Re endezvous—Com- | R A Py
    monwealth Artists. 745 pm. A Street | % %
    Through the Past 800 pm Radio | Bee X4 as AT Uy = r %
    ee TT My § Erol FLYNN Laurette LUEZ
    wealth 845 pm _ Interlude. 8 55 pm 3 eee ae 3
    From thd Editorials. 9 00 pm reese ta | BB Th) WY % L T ii E A T R E 1s Special Short : %
    romenade oncerts oS pm Ppo! \ a ~ ay ¥
    from Britain. 1000 p.m. The News | 8 SATURDAY EVENING PUSS x
    1010 p.m. Interlude. 10.15 p.m hi | % 365 totes, eo 446% %
    Heritage of Britain, 10.45 pm. Festival | 7 . WY > z 5 PM. OCS PPA POSS COOGEE 6 OOOO
    of Britain Pa pl ge Fee ee ee ll a nae es PPLSOSEE LOE PLSOOP POE OPP IPO SO OF + DOD oo
    4 ” . 7 4 4 PaN? awe é , “i

    yesterday s oiea after seeing a preview of the film “The Sinne,
    of Magdala”
    Off to US _ Immigration
    ° AJOR FRED STENT, Trini-
    S ARLENE CUMMINS, dad's Chief Immigration
    Dr. and Mrs. Officer who had been holidaying
    G. Cummins of “Gothmare”, ir. Barbados since July 16th re-
    a Hall, left on Sunday by the turned to Trinidad over the week-
    Lady Nelson for the U.S end by B.W.LA.

    Miss Cummins was Domestic He had been staying with Mr.
    Science Mistress at Queen's Col- and Mrs Woodley Anthony at
    lege Patter House, St. Lawrence,

    Water Polo Players Incidental Intelligence

    R. ENRIQUE LOPEZ and his NE rainy night in New York

    sister Marie Therese flew to when ‘there were no. taxis
    Trinidad over the week-end en- to be had, Monty Woolley started
    route to Venezuela. Marie Therese down the stairs of the Times
    will be returning to school after Square subway. Halfway down
    the long holidays, but Enrique he slipped, a stout lady toppled
    will shortly be going to the U.S zainst him, and they ended up
    to study engineering. on the bottom step with the lady

    Both of them are keen water sitting in Woolley’s lap. He
    pelo players and they were sorry tepped her briskly on the shoulder.
    to have to leave Barbados at the “]J’m sorry, madam,” he rasped,
    height of the water polo season but this is as far as I go.”

    Their father runs a commission

    Age ney in Carupany, ven vezuela,

    Or



    —Bennett Cerf
    —L.E.S.

    PIPA



    P98 . Vaz OF

    Copyright =

    + Int Amsterdam

    BY THE WAY eee By Beachcomber

    TURDY drinkers, in my
    is an account of a man who
    went into a public house and at-
    tempted to eat 50 hard-boiled
    eggs in an hour.

    Why a public house? I suppose
    he drinks his beer in a hen-run.
    And was there nobody to tell him
    that it would be quicker to eat
    50 eggs in the form of that
    delicious dust called Eggijoy?

    “Oh, mother, what's this lovely
    taste,

    Half fish and half adhesive
    paste?”



    CROSSWORD













    Across

    i a night lamp. (

    7 as YOU can find out. (Y)
    1. » of a mixed articie. (4)
    12 Perl) outraged. 46)

    13 Bargains ere compieted by such
    earnest money, (5)

    15 Found even in state enclosures
    (3) 17 Once a main (5)

    18 May oe a record. (3)

    20. This ts ingenuous (5)

    21. Eat nerves he weakens. (Y)

    22 It’s your intention undoubtedly
    (3) 23) A tuneh aboard? (6)

    Down
    a bull. (B)

    1 » give bya :
    2 1 grass 7)
    8 int outdoor dependant
    4 “ad of
    2



    VESTS 79¢ 89¢ $1.00
    SILK VESTS $1.37 1.47

    PANTIES 89¢ 98¢

    paper “

    ei nia acsenlbieenrnannnsassiaiaertet NOE



    My love, it's processed egg, news moment when the egg is the
    laid, right (or wrong) way up. The

    And comes by freighter from layman will do well to go on as
    Port Said, before.

    So little one, do not forget, Oriental Intruder

    vow or nce, holds us in he RS. McGURGLE has com-

    Strabismus and the gg
    eectay spheroidal har-

    monics to the egg, the sage
    has discovered that the potential
    of an egg-mass at any given
    point is three times the surface
    of a circle drawn round the eir-
    eumference, as in all confocal
    elliptic cylinders, (See Bogimann
    Theorie der Kungelfuktionen und
    Integralisches Gestuck.) In plain
    language, this means that
    everything is in motion in relation
    to everything else, there is no
    moment when an egg is absolutely
    at rest. Therefore top and bot-
    tam are merely academic expres-
    sions of the state of becoming or
    non-becoming as the case may be
    Thus, though one can establish,
    in pure mathematics, the two
    ends of an egg, for practical
    purposes of everyday life top is
    always tending towards becoming
    bottom, and vice versa, even if
    the egg is laid sideways or
    sloping, between joists. Only the
    highest mathematics can seize
    the infinitesimal fraction of a



    Rupert and

    plained to the police that a
    swarthy rug-seller ambled into
    her private sitting-room at Marine
    House and, without any provoca-
    tion, called her Nightingale among
    the Branches, Rose of Thurrali-
    bad, and Jasmine Blossom of Ten
    Thousand Delights. He then
    tried to sell her a_ genuine
    Bokhara rug, saying, “One kiss,
    Moon of the Fountains in the
    Court of Suleiman the Magnifi-
    cent, will purchase my whole
    unworthy stock of priceless treas

    ures,” At that moment Mr, Fred
    Bockett came in to complain
    about the portions of gravy ut

    yesterday’s lunch, The indignant
    lodger drew back as though stung
    by a hornet, crying, “An Orient-
    al!” “Wa-wa Magali,” retorted the
    rug-seller, winking at the land-
    lady, whose pretty face was by
    now like a Beetroot of Tem Thou:
    and Delights “Foul-enough,” she
    whispered in horror, Call mé
    Abdul,” vouchsafed the Oriental,
    as he slipped his arm round her
    reluctant waist and drew her to
    him

    Simon—42



    wpe and Simon are thrilled to
    think that they are going to be
    driven home. They are packed
    inside and, after waving goodbye to

    theer ae, fas » are soon eaten
    away. say,’ says s after a
    while, «then sa seek of some-

    99¢ $1.07 113 129

    SLIPS $2.20 2.52 488

    BRAS. $181 164 195 240 2.70 340 440 4.43

    113 115 118 134

    mace Tee
    ahs on the seat.

    put there to keep your jar of irises
    from _ slipping, ae there's a label

    I thought it was

    on it and,
    addressed to
    they've given ~ a soteed too ?
    Hew splendid |”

    io is



    $1.41 152

    NIGHTIES $4.10 416 429 426 452 495 497 5.33

    T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

    DIAL 4606



    YOUR SHOE STORE

    DIAL 4220

    {





    TWO YEARS
    IN THE

    MAKING ! II
    THE STORY
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    mime f
    A MESSAGE OF PEACE
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    THE GREATEST
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    THE LAVISH FEASTS
    OF THE UNBELIEVERS !



    DA VINCI'S MASTERPIECE.
    “THE LAST SUPPER’ COMES TO LIFE!



    THE CONVERSION OF THE
    FAMOUS SINNER OF MAGDALA!



    THE STORY OF CHRIST
    AND MARY MAGDALENE

    Storing

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    BASED ON THE GOSPEL.
    HOW BEAUTIFUL IS

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    THRILLS ....

    - BRUCE

    Starring TOM NEAL
    ACTION .... AND

    WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY, 4. 30 AND 8. 15 P. M.








    !

    | REPUBLIC ALL ACTION DOUBLE

    | —

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    iA KILL A MAN

    WE'D REVER

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    < TEXAN”

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    William ELLIOTT —
    John CARROLL and
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    ast starring:

    roe WILLIAM ELLIOTT
    ee BRENNAN - MARIE WINDSOR

    A REPUBLIC PICTURE
    Inside Her Arms, he forgot he was outside the law

    SPECIAL .. . SPECIAL .. . SATURDAY AT 9.30 A.M.

    PAGAN LOVE SONG”

    ESTHER WILLIAMS with HOWARD KEEL



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    REPUBLIC ALL ACTION WHOLE SERIAL

    DESERT AGENT”
    Starring : ROD CAMERON

    “EERE



    |
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    (ADRES,

    ROX Y THEATRE

    TO-DAY



    LAST
    445 &

    TWO
    8.15

    SHOWS WED. & THURS,

    | 20th

    It’s All About Airline Stewardesses !
    M-G-M's Fowr-Stin Fum Hit!

    C-Fox Double
    BURT LANCASTER

    * MISTER
    aon
    “BLACK HAND”

    Starring

    880)”




    WYMAN JOHN

    who is S comnaaeaet ae GENE KELLY &

    J. CARROL = NAISH
    MYSTERY — THRILLS

    STARTING SATURDAY
    4th AUGUST

    “SWORD OF
    MONTE CRISTO”

    HOWARD KEEL SULLIVAN

    Bite. Mike os nee

    mewn ey > a>

    “tne Guys Th

    The First Supercinecolor
    ~ Ug | Picture to Show in
    ils hamed. Mie Barbados.
    Neerreapecsmes BOOK THE DATE.



    OLYMPIC THEATRE

    TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW, 430 AND 8.15 P.M.
    REPUBLIC ALL ACTION WHOLE SERIAL

    “DESERT AGENT”

    Starring : ROD CAMERON
    And Thrills .. From Start to Finish



    Action .......



    WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY,
    REPUBLIC ALL
    JOHN WAYNE

    “WAKE OF

    4.30 AND 8.15 P.M.
    ACTION DOUBLE
    and GAIL RUSSELL in

    THE RED WITCH”
    — AND —
    SALTLAKE RAIDERS ”





    OPENING FRIDAY, 4TH AUGUST

    Columbia Serial

    *‘ DEADWOOD DICK ’

    VEREEEORKCERRREReRe

    OPENING GLOBE FRIDAY

    “THE PIN UP GIRL IN PERSON”

    . 10? DKA: We

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    ya nS # '
    THE STAR-CRANMED, ;
    SONG-FILLED, LAUGH-PACKED,
    7 HIT OF THE Year!



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    and Rockers

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    Now.

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    You should read

    all about

    FERNOXONE

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    at once



    INDICATION FOR USE. Fernoxone is a selective Hormone
    weed-killer and is recommended for control of Nutgrass
    on lawns, golf greens, gravelled and asphalted paths and
    drives. All weeds are most easily killed when growing
    vigorously,

    Fernoxone has the advantage over arsenicais in that it is

    | net dangerous to humans or animals.

    METHOD OF USE, Used as a liquid 4 % acre active ingred-
    lent is the recommended application rate. A 1% stock
    solution is made up by adding 1.25 15 Fernoxone to 10
    gallons: water, or 24 ozs. Fernoxone to 10 pints water.

    | Use 40 gallans per acre, or % pint per 100 sq. ft., diluting

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    eee

    TUESDAY, JULY 31,



    1951





    Latin America Sets
    Pace In Expansion

    LATIN AMERICA is se

    etting

    WASEINGTON, July 30.
    the pace for all geograph-

    ical areas of the world in the expansion of commerce,
    resources, and the development and solution of all regional
    diplomatic problems, according to some impartial diplo-

    matic experts here.

    While the acute ideological struggle in the Northern
    Hemisphere has distracted the world’s attention from Latin
    America, in the post war period that area has made aston-
    ishing economic gains relative to other continents.

    Despite the fact that U.S. fin-
    aneial grants to Latin American
    Republics have been a negligible
    percentage of world aid since the
    war, inter American commerce
    has outstripped the trade between
    the U.S. and other geographical
    areas.

    Far Advanced

    Experts agree that the U.S
    point four programme for techno-
    logical co-operation is already
    further advanced in Latin Ameri-
    ca than in any other region of the
    world. The Venezuelan iron ore
    industry has attained a rapidly
    expanding commercial stage while
    Brazil and Chile are pressing for
    gains in their steel production.

    Fourteen Latin American
    eouniries produce an over-
    whelming share of the worlt’s
    coffee at the present profitable
    level of prices.

    Iranian oil troubles
    shadow the expansion
    petroleum industry throughout
    the Caribbean area, while
    larger copper and manganese
    production in South America is
    in the near prospect.

    Food production is increasing
    relative to the population in most
    Latin American countries, with
    further gains indicated by the
    wholesale adoption of mechanical
    improvements aided by the Insti-
    tute of Inter-American Affairs and
    the U.S. Department of Agricul-
    ture.

    fore-
    of the

    Population
    The total population of 20 Latin
    American Republics is at present
    estimated at 158,000,000 and at the

    normal rate of increase the Latin
    American population by the end
    of the century will be over
    200,000,000.

    The diplomatic observers of the
    European and Asiatie countries
    have been slow to recognize the
    rising relative importance of Latin
    America in the world economy.

    The Department of Commerce
    cumulative statistics for the Janu-
    ary—aApril trade 1951 as compared
    with the same period in 1950
    showed that the U.S. imports from
    20 other U.S. Republics amount-
    ed to $1,326,000,000 against
    $869,400,000.

    Imports from the European Re-
    covery Programme group of coun-
    tries in the corresponding period
    were $686,000,000 as against
    $313,100,000,

    Confidence
    Proposed United States econo-
    mic aid to Latin America indicates
    confidence here that Latin Ameri-
    ca will maintain its economic
    strength © throug: the hormial
    course of commertial investment,







    From the geographical stand-
    point the Latin-America area is
    still regarded as the most attrac-
    tive region for U.S. private: in-
    vestment.

    Diplomatic observers pointed out
    that: Republics of the Western
    Hemisphere have already ab-
    lished a mutual security em
    while the North Atlantic system

    js in the process of
    tion and the

    implementa-



    Pacific dete nce sys-
    tem is still at an early stage.
    The large majority of Latin

    American countries already ac-
    cepted organised technological as-
    sistance offered by U.N,

    the organization of

    agenc ies
    Americ an

    \\\\\\ \
    Wa \\
    N )

    states, and the U.S. Government.

    The United States has ratified
    und deposited the charter of the
    Organization of American States
    which gives permanence to doc-
    trines of judicial equality and
    non-intervention within the Hemi-
    sphere,

    The organization is a regional
    group of nations within the United
    Nations. The Latin American re-
    publics, although not voting as a
    bloc in the United Nations can
    exert large group influence be-
    cause of their substantially similar
    political philesophies and econo-
    mic interests.—U.P.



    U.K.—Argentine
    Trade Proves
    Disappointing

    LONDON, July 30.

    British trade and financial
    quarters expressed anxiety that
    Angio-Argentine trade would re-
    main considerably below’ the
    levels stipulated in earlier and
    more recent agreements.

    The Financial Times feared Ar-
    gentina’s recent announcement on
    reduction of slaughtering for ex-
    port would make delivery to
    Britain of the envisaged 200,000
    tons of frozen and chilled meat
    “very doubtful.”

    He added that
    of this, Argentina
    er of sterling than
    pected,

    It was assumed that Argentina
    would spend much of her avail-
    able sterling on the purchase in
    Britain of essential goods such as
    cil, coal and tinplate. British ex-
    perts of non-essentials, including
    icxtiles and motor cars, were ex-
    pected to reach £17,000,000 in the
    lirst year of the 1949 agreement
    but only reached £250,000 the
    Financial Times argued,

    It said “it was commonly be-
    lieved as the result of recent pro-
    visions that Argentina permits
    for imports of British textiles and
    other essential goods would
    speedily be given to the value of
    at least £5,000,000. Hopes for de-

    in consequence
    will be short-
    she had ex-

    velopments along these lines
    however are now rapidly fading.
    —UP.

    R.C. PRIEST DIES

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    DOMINICA, July 30.
    The Very Rev. Canon Gustave
    Tavernier C.8.S.R., died on July
    28 at the age of 70, at the Roseay
    hospital, after a month's illness,
    He arrived in the West Indies
    in 1908, and was stationed in tha
    then Danish Virgin Islands, until
    1916, when he was attached to
    the Roseau Cathedral. He was
    director of the Cathedral choir

    during a quarter of a century.

    CLERK DISMISSED

    From Our Own Correspondent
    PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 26.
    Mr, Rudolph Griffith, City Coun-

    cil Legal Clerical Assistant to Mr.
    Murchison Rigsby who was under
    suspension since December last for
    certain irregularities was dis-
    missed from the service of the
    Corporation, Seven members voted
    for his dismissal while four were
    against.



    MACDONALD

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    Distillers
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    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    1000 parts. Razor _— blades,
    tweezers and a pair of pliers are
    the only tools used.

    Londen Bayress Service.



    17 Give Evidence
    In Murder Case

    SEVENTEEN WITNESSES gave evidence yesterday
    at the Court of Grand Sessions in the case in which Joseph
    Beresford Holligan of St. Philip is charged with the mur-
    der of Samuel Beckles on May 10, 1951.

    The Honourable the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Collymore

    is presiding.
    associated with Mr. E.
    Bai,

    When hearing started yesterday
    the court room was packed and
    to-day the prosecution will call
    three more witnesses which will
    bring the number to twenty, be-
    fore closing its case.

    Outlining the case to the jury
    Mr. Reece said that Joseph Holli-
    gan stood indicted for the murder
    of Samuel Beckles at St. Philip
    on May 10, 1951.

    Samuel Beckles was a
    son of Keturah Holligan an old
    lady 91 years old. Beckles got
    married about 14 years ago and
    from that day he lived with his
    wife away from the old lady
    However the accused continued to
    live with the old woman, but
    during the last few years he left
    the island on at least two occa-
    sions.

    grand-

    Went Abroad

    He went to America and also to
    Aruba. Although he was married,
    the deceased still used to visit the
    old lady, bringing breakfast for
    her every three days. The old
    lady owned a little land in St
    Philip and she sometime
    made a_ will disposing of this
    land and left the will in her
    bedroom. This land was looked
    after by Samuel Beckles who also
    looked after the reaping of the
    canes, but the accused assisted
    him with the reaping. There had
    been some little talk between the
    old lady and the accused as to her
    disposing of the land but there
    was nothing to show that there
    was a strong feeling between both
    of them.

    There was some quarrel
    tween the grandsons
    ing to the old lady the accused
    asked his two cousins including
    Beckles not to go back to the old
    lady’s place.

    On May 10, Beckles went to
    see the old lady and the accus-
    ed came in the same time and
    found him there. Holligan
    asked Beckles if he had heard
    what he said about coming to
    the house and as the old lady
    said, the accused had a bright

    ago

    be-
    and accord-

    thing in his hand and she heard ~

    a click and smoke came out of
    the bright thing and then she
    saw Samuel reel back and
    heard him shout ‘murder.’ After
    that Beckles left the house and
    went up the road on a bicycle,
    but fell off. He was taken to

    Dr. Hutson’s.

    The first witness called for the
    prosecution yesterday was Una
    Beckles who said she lives at
    Marley Vale, St. Philip. On May
    10 her husband — Samuel Beck-
    les — was lifted out of a car
    into Dr, Hutson’s office and while
    there he died.

    His body was removed to th
    St. Philip’s Almshouse where a
    post mortem examination was
    performed; she identified the body
    to Dr, Hutson,

    Dr. C. Hutson told the court
    that on May 10 about 11,22 a.m
    Samuel Beckles was brought to
    his office in a car, He was in
    dying condition; his skin was
    cold, breathing was weak and ir-
    regular, He had a small wound
    on the right side in front of the
    chest about two and a half inche
    from the breast bone. This
    wound was small and blood wa
    oozing slightly. He telephoned
    the Hospital and Police telling
    them he had a man dying in h
    office. After telephoning he went
    back and saw that he was dead.

    Later the Police van came and
    removed the body, A Post mor-
    tem examination was performed
    by him on the body which »
    identified by Una Beckles, wile
    of the deceased.

    Heart Wound

    From the post mortem exam-
    ination he found that there
    also a wound at the base of tt
    heart and another at the back
    the pulmonary artery. The first
    wound was external, The wound
    were not connected but corres-
    ponding. He Could not find any
    foreign body. The whole boay
    was examined. The organs of
    the chest were healthy, The
    stomach, intestines and _ spleen
    were taken out. The skull cap
    and brain were removed, The
    brain was normal and no foreig
    matter was present. All the or-
    gans were healthy

    An X-Ray photograph
    taken of the body. As a resuit
    of the photograph he opened
    the back of the chest and

    unable to find any foreign m

    ter.

    In his opinion
    haemorrhage
    sulting from
    heart, The

    been caused b bulle

    deatt

    to and





    wour




    Counsel for the defence are Mr.
    W. Bz
    Solicitor General, is appearing for the Crown

    G. H. Adams

    irrow, while Mr. W. W. Reece,

    There were blood stains on the
    clothes which the dead man
    was wearing, A bullet was not
    found nor was there an_ exit
    wound found in the body.

    X-Ray

    Dr, A. S. Ellis told the Court
    that she took certain X-Ray
    photographs of a body from the
    waist upwards on May 11.

    Dr. E, Smith told the court that

    she was present on May 1! when

    the X-Ray photographs were
    taken of a body of a corpse. As
    a result of the examination she
    was unable to discover any for-
    eign matter,

    Ormend Gaskin, a shoemaker
    of Marley Vale, St, Philip, said
    that he knows the accused. On

    May 10 he was working in a field
    ebout 100 yards from Holligan’s
    house He heard an _ explosion
    and saw Samuel Beckles coming
    out of the house. He was shout-

    ing “Murder, Murder, he shoot
    me.” Beckles went to the next
    side of the field and showed
    some one his chest. He saw the
    accused come from above the
    house and Beckles ran after him.

    Joseph Holligan got on a bicycle
    and Beckles also got on a bicycle
    but fell to the ground,

    Joseph Holligan returned to
    Keturah Holligan’s house. Beck-
    les was taken from the ground
    and placed in a motor car Be-
    fore Beckles was put in the car
    he noticed that he was foaming
    at the mouth

    To Mr, Barrow:—The field he
    was working in was about 100
    yards from Holligan’s house,
    There is a field of ratoons grow-
    ing between the field he was
    working in and Keturah Holligan’s

    house.

    Analyst's Statement

    tr. J. Robinson, Acting Gov-
    ernment Analyst, told the court
    that a piece of clothing was sub-
    mitted by Cpl. Goring on May 12.
    It was a khaki shirt and at the
    top: by the chest there was a small
    hole with blood stains. ‘There
    were no marks to indicate any
    corching on the khaki shirt.

    He formed an opinion that the
    hole in the shirt and also in a
    white vest he saw after could bave
    been caused bullet. There
    were no exit holes on the vest nor
    the shirt. The hole on the shirt
    was small and round such as from
    a bullet.

    To Mr. G. H. Adams: Mr. Robin-
    son said that he knew nothing at
    all about the case when he re-
    cetved the clothing.

    Opi. James Brathwaite said that
    he took photographs of the house
    of Keturah Holligan on May 11
    The first photograph showed the

    by a



    2 shedroof and interior of the build-

    ing. The second was of the house
    itself and the third was the whole

    fete sth of the house taken at a
    greater distance.

    Calvin Jordan of Marley
    Vale, St. Philip, said that
    at about 10.30 a.m on
    May 10 he was cutting canes
    in King’s land about 100 yards
    from Holligan’s house, He heard
    an explosion as from a firearm

    and saw Samuel
    ing from Holligan’s house and
    heard two old women shout
    murder’

    About three minutes after he
    saw Joseph Holligan riding a
    bieyele. A car came and took away
    Samuel Beckles.

    Explosion Heard

    Wilbert Blades of Bayfield, St.
    Philip, told the court that he has
    2 motor car On May 10 about
    10.30 in the morning he heard
    an explosion while he was in his
    land and after hearing the ex-
    plosion he saw Samuel Beckles
    coming from his grand-mother’s
    house and he went to him.

    While he was going to Beckles







    he saw Joseph Holligan running
    to hi mother’s house. Beckles
    ct od Holligan, but did not catch
    him and seeing this he turned
    back.

    There was blood on Beckles’
    shirt; he got his car and with the
    help of ies he put Beckles ir
    the car. Beckles died shortly
    after

    Clair Mason said that on
    May 10 about 10.45 a.m. he was
    in a canefield. While there he
    héard the report of a gun and a
    shout of murder. He looked ar
    Bay S 1el Beckle and = twe

    ‘ 1en come out of a }
    ph Hollige i

    ‘ he
    tried



    Beckles com- a e went to Dr. Hutson’s Surgery at

    Aid To J’

    Would Cost U.K. Nothing
    Col. De Cordova’s Parting Shot



    can Cigars

    i,

    LONDON, July 25.

    LT.-COL. MICHAEL DE CORDOVA, who has been in|

    has left for Jamaica after his brief but very active visit.

    As a result of his discussions
    with Members: of Parliament and
    the Press, the issue of
    v Cuban cigars”

    “Jamaican
    has been raised

    deerease the need for subsidies,
    increase the Island’s ability to)
    purchase goods necessarily from |

    ihe U.K. encourage tnose who

    ‘
    London to press the case for the Jamaican cigar industry,
    x

    PAGE THREE

    9998969036000" SPOOCS 4 FOO9%, |
    Please Take Notice |
    ara |

    THE HOLLYWOOD

    to eat

    DRESS SHOP









    1 guarantees her usual stand-
    several times in the House of contend against subversive influ- ard of ability; situated as it
    Commons and has been given ences, help to maintain peace and | was at No. 7 Swan Street
    wide publicit® in British news- security in Jamaica and strength- | Will be removed to No. 3 (about '4 cu

    papers. Col. de Cordova distri-
    buted his broadsheet,
    for the Jamaica Cigar Industry,”
    to anybody who could help his
    cause and, last thing before leav-
    ing London, sent out this message
    as his parting shot

    “It cannot often be that a Col-
    ony’s request for assistance to its
    economy would cost the Mother
    Country little or nothing, would
    perhaps even increase the U.K.
    revenue and would at the same
    time both assist the Colony’s em-
    ployment and make a contribu-
    tion to the ease of the working
    and middle classes in Britain.

    Government's Desire

    “All this can be claimed for the
    pleas by Jamaica, now before His
    Majesty's Government, with re-
    ga to the Jamaica cigar indus-
    try and further, that this indus-
    tr# in Jamaica fulfils the Gov-
    ernment’s expressed desire, on
    the one hand, that the Colony
    shall diversify its interests, par-
    ticularly by industries based on

    “The Case

    the soil, employing its own capi-
    tal, brains, working-power and
    on the other hand, that things

    enjoyed by the rich shall be made
    available to all.

    “It must be pointed out that
    Jamaica’s request recognises that
    Britain must develop its export
    trade and also the claim that an
    increase of preference would be
    contrary to Britain's obligations;
    it complies with both. Further, it
    not only meets the contention
    that under G.A.T.T. some Cuban
    cigars should be admitted to the
    U.K., but suggests that Cuba’s, as
    well as British cigar manufactur-
    ers shall be given a share in the
    advantages expressly conceded
    for the sake of Jamaica's econo-
    my and employment.

    tort must be further cited that
    assistance to this industry will

    — rl

    his grand-mother’s house. Holii-
    gan went out of sight on the
    bicycle.

    Mr, Blades car came and took

    Beckles to the doctor.
    Deceased Fell

    Ethelbert Jordan said that he
    knows the accused, Holligan. On
    May 10 he was loading canes in a
    field about 100 yards from Holli-
    gan’s home. He heard an ex-
    plosion and then heard some
    women shout ‘murder’, He looked
    up and saw Beckles make an
    attempt to get on a bicycle but
    fell, He also saw Joseph Holli-
    gan mount a bicycle and ride out

    of sight.

    Mr, Blades brought his car and
    took away Samuel Kes,
    Gastiile Jordan that on
    May, 10, 1951, about 10

    o'clock he was at his parent's

    place, He saw Samuel Beckles

    with a basket on a bicycle.

    He passed him and after he

    saw him again at the pipe

    with two buckets.

    He heard an explosion and
    he walked slowly on his way
    back to his home. He saw
    Samuel Beckles lying down
    with a towel over his face
    and he was groaning. Mr.
    Blades came with his car and
    took away Samuel to the doc-
    tor, Samuel died on the doc-
    tor’s bed.

    Capt. Grant said that on May
    10 he was at Central Station and
    received a telephone message and
    had a conversation with Dr. Hut-

    son. He saw motor car M--351
    drawn up inside the yard. He
    went to the car. He cautioned

    Holligan and told him that he
    was charged with the murder of
    Samuel Beckles. Holligan said “f
    don’t want to say anything what-
    soever,” While he was taking
    the statement down Inspector
    Bourne was present.

    On the same day he went to

    St. George and saw a bicycle
    which he took.
    To Mr. Adams: Capt. Grant

    said that he wrote down exactly
    what he was told by Rev. Gen-
    tles.

    Cpl. Goring attached to District
    “C” Police Station said that he
    handed a khaki shirt and vest to
    Mr. Robinson, Acting Govern-
    ment Analyst on May 12, On
    June 4 he received them back
    from the Analyst.

    Saw Site

    Sgt. N. Gaskin told the court
    he went to Bayfield, St. Philip, on
    May 10 where certain spots of
    lands were pointed out to him by
    «Wilbert Blades, Ethelbert Jordan
    «and others, Later the same day

    sterling, St. Philip, where he saw
    the dead body of a man which
    was removed to the St. Philip
    Mortuary. Dr. Hutson performed
    a post mortem.

    The next day Joseph Holligan
    was brought to District “C” Sta-
    tion. Keturah and Mildred Holli-
    gan pointed out a spot to him on
    Bayfield Road,

    At this stage Wilbert Blades
    was recalled. He said that he
    pointed out a spot in the field
    where he was to Sgt. Gaskin

    when he heard an explosion

    Rev. H. Gentles of the Pentecost
    Mission said he lives at Bar-
    barees Hill, St. Michael. On May
    10 he was driving his car M—351
    going to Chureh Village, St.
    Philip. On his way Joseph Holli-
    gan stopped him. He asked him
    to take him to Bridgetown and
    afterwards explained that his mat-
    ter was of a serious nature as he
    had shot after a man who he be-
    lieved was dying

    Getting A Lawyer
    He wanted to go to town so that
    he could get a lawyer. He then
    decided to take him to Bridgetown.

    On his way to Bridgetown, Holli-
    gan said that somebody ran
    after hirn with a knife, At Cen-
    tral Station he saw Capt. Grant
    and heard him say something
    about a man dying 15 minutes
    after he reached the doctor. Holli-
    gan told } that was the man
    He told Capt. Grant what Holli-

    en the Colony’s loyalties to the
    King and to the Mother Country. |

    Drug Store, reopening
    ‘Lastly, it must be emphasised |$ on the ist August. x
    that all that Jamaica asks the| % The general Public can be x
    U.K. Government to risk is a

    possibility of loss of part of the}
    cigars (now |

    present revenue on
    enly_ about £500,000) as against |
    Jamaica’s cigar industry—plus
    ‘Cigars for All’—plus a_ possible |
    increased U.K. revenue |
    Not Difficult |
    “Jamaica does not, of course, |

    presume to suggest how things |
    which would achieve these ends |
    would be enacted or regulated
    Once the decision has been made |
    to save the Jamaica cigar indus-
    try and to make cigars available |
    ¥ all by inclusion of these in the}
    ‘ial pr oe the ways and
    means of i accomplishment
    could not ee very difficult, It)
    would, of course, require a breach
    with the U.K. practice that “AS [qusauesesuseussnaneeueeueedsnensassnacaseumcnss
    and other tobacco duties Gre simi-
    lar but the U.K, is today about
    the only country in the world in |
    whigh this is the case.’ |
    Col. de Cordova concluded by
    reiterating Jamaica’s three-point |
    plan to save its cigar industry:
    1. That in order to increase the
    market, duty on cigars shall be |
    reduced back to the 1939 rate of

    14s 24d., preferential rate
    2. That for the years 1952/3-
    1953/4, Cuba shall be even a}

    quota of $280,000 dollars or 2,000,- |
    000 cigars, (whichever is the less)
    and that for each subsequent
    year up to 1962/3 the Cuban
    quota shall be 20 per cent of the
    total U.K. import of the preced-
    ing year.
    3. That
    must be distinctly
    banded to show
    machine-made,

    }
    |
    |
    }

    machine-made cigars
    labelled and
    that they are

    —B.U.P

    gan told him while Holligan sat
    next to him in the car.

    Inspector Bourne came up anu)
    he overheard what he ‘@ld Capt.
    Grant, Capt. Grant later charged
    Holligan with murder. |

    To Mr. Adams; Rev. Gentles |
    said that he did not know Holli-
    gan before.

    Inspector Cecil Bourne said that
    on May 10 about noon he was at)
    Central Police Station when he |
    paw Capt, Grant. Rev. Gentles |
    was in a car ond Holligan was
    sitting next to him and later Holli-
    gan was arrested. He took away |
    Holligan under arrest. |

    ROVERS BEAT |
    OLYMPIA 11—9 ©

    A fairly big crowd saw the |
    touring Grenada Rovers ee
    team beat Olympia by 11 goals to
    nine in a netball match played at |



    Olympia grounds, Black Rock
    yesterday afternoon. The game
    war keenly conteste¢ and fast

    irom the beginning to the end,

    Yor Rovers, Joyce Blache, Cap-
    tain scored six goals and Eileen
    Le Hee five. The Olympia goal
    scorers were Sylvia Maxwell sev-
    en, and Gloria Ramsay two.

    At half time Olympia led with
    four goals and Rovers had two to} ,
    their credit,

    The teams were:—

    Grenada Rovers—Joyce Blache,
    (Capt); Dorothea Sylvester, Myra
    Callender, Doreen Gittens, Eileen
    La Hee, Pearl Mendes and Angela
    Andrews,

    Olympia — Kathleen Connor,
    (Capt.); Maria Barrow, Isa Quin-
    tyne, Patricia King, Patricia Best,

    Gloria Ramsay, Sylvester Max-
    well,

    The referees were Mr. R. Daniel
    and Mrs. Wotton.

    The Island match which was|

    fixed for Saturday will take place
    on Friday.

    HARBOUR LOG

    .
    In Carlisle Bay
    Beh Lady \Noe.cen, Sch. Rosalie M
    M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. ‘Sunshine R., Seb. |
    Marea Henrietta, Sch. Rainbow M., Sch. |
    Mildred Wallace, Yacht Marsaitese,
    Sch. Cyril BE. Smith, Sch. Henry D |
    Wallace, Yacht. Marianne, Sch. Marion
    Belle Wolfe, Sch. W. L. Eunicla, M.Vv
    Lady Joy, Sch Molly N. Jones, Yacht
    Keskidee, %.S, Barbara, M,V, Antares, |
    $.5. Inventor, §.8. Student }
    ARRIVALS
    M.V. Blue Star, 130 tons net, Capt |
    Fergusson, from Nassau via Antigua
    Sehooner Rosarene, 60 tons net, Capi
    Olivierre, from British Guiana,
    Schooner Luciiie M. Smith, 74



    tons



    net, Capt. Hassell, from British Guiana. |
    S.S. Prospector, 4.624 tons net, Capt. |
    Harnden, from Trinidad |
    8.8. Alcoa Pilgrim, 3.931 tons net, |
    Capt. Haagensen, from New York.
    DEPARTURES

    8.8. Mormacgulf, 4,521 tons net,
    Vinnon, for Trinidad
    M.V. Caribbee, 100
    Gumbs, for Dominica,
    Schooner Franklyn D.R, 82 tons net,
    Capt. Sealy, for British Guiana
    2s Adviser,

    Capt

    fons net, Capt. |

    3,886 tons net, Capt

    Robertaon, for Trinidad

    $8 Oak Hill, 4,229 tons net, Capt
    Suttie, for Trinidad

    M.V. Dearwood, 94 tons net, Capt
    Mulzac, for St. Lucia

    ss Lady Nelson 4,655 tons net,
    Capt. Roavh, for St. Lucis

    In Touch with Barbados
    Costal Station

    Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.,
    advise that they can now communicate
    with the following ships through their
    Barbados Coast Station:-

    $8, Valkrrie measter, 5S 8S
    SS. Tista, 8S. Sheafmead,
    con Hills, SS Berge Chief,
    $8 Celilo, 8S Can Challenger, 8 S
    Maas, 8S. Bresle, SS Federal, s
    Arickaree. S$. Mormactaga, 8 S James
    Funimore Cooper, 88 Bonaire, S&S
    Mormacteal, 8S. Esso Sao Paulo, 8S
    Alcoa Pennant. 8S Mourinho, 88
    Williamsburg, 8.8. Republicade,
    bia, SS. Casablanca, 8 S. Carbet,
    Ancap, S 8 S$ Paula, 8 S
    8 8. Brazil,

    Seulptor
    858 Rin-
    SS ima,



    ss

    Lady Nelson, |
    $8. Naviero, 88. Skottas, |
    8.8. Rangitoto, 8 S. Cape Cumberland
    ss Monte Altube. ss Almir:
    Alexandrino, 838. Matarao, 8S. IL |
    Mexico, 8S 8. Rosa, SS ct

    RATES OF EXCHANGE |





    CANADA i
    JULY @, 1951 }
    63 2/10% pr. Cheques «
    Bankers 61 2/106
    Demand
    Drafts 61 06% pr
    Sight Drafts # 9/10 pr
    6 2/10% pr. Cable
    61 7/10 Curren 9 7/10% pr
    Coupons yw pr
    > ive a

    < High Street, upstairs of John

    ALL-BRAN

    OLLECLLLLLGELLEI SF

    Gil





    a: SSCeeenese The name speaks jor itself

    Helps to cleanse the system
    ‘rans blood impurities

    impurities in the blood may cause rheumatic
    aches and pains, stiff and painful joints,
    boils, pimples and common skin disorders.
    Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
    the blood, cleanses the system and assists
    in restoring good health.



    nothing

    smells

    so good

    as a
    good cup
    of coffee!



    Especially if the cup holds Chase &

    Sanborn. For here's coffee as coffee

    should be~rich, hearty, and satis-

    fying. Just sniff that inviting aromo
    then sip that heavenly coffee

    flavor. That's real coffee!

    Ask for Chase & Sanborn today!



    Haze. Court
    (J. Arthur Rank Organisation)
    +

    says lo you












    have

    water with

    be yours!

    THE FRAGRANT WHITE SOAP OF THE





    %bTS 729-392-50

    4
    1



    users. If you suffer
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    immediate results ,

    THE NEW HOLLYWOOD amazed us, She

    DRESS SHOP | hasn't been, consti

    The trade name alone im- } pated since."’ Fred

    lies the latest in Ladies \ A. Moody, 625 Park

    resg and a perfect fit, } Ave., Greensboro,

    The proprietor, Iris Cath- N. C, One of many
    cart, the former Cutter of unsolicited letters iy
    the Modern Dress Shop from ALL-BRAN Hey

    Get DOUBLE

    the

    of Lux Toilet Bons
    with cold. New

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    to do is wash in warm
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    », then splash
    oveliness will

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    Liquid er
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    NO MORE HARSH
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    “My wife had tried many kinds of
    started
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    drink plenty of
    water! [f not satisfied after 10 days,
    return empty box to Kellogg Co.

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    % assured of convenience. » England.

    PLL LALLA AALS








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    You can be as lovely as
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    7







    PAGE FOUR

    eer mencerrnae e

    BARBADOS KP ADVOGAT

    Greene i fase ad

    Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid, Broad St., Bridgetown,



    Tuesday, July 31, 1951



    Medical Services

    THREE years ago the House of Assem-
    bly passed a bill to reorganise the medical
    services in this island. The change was to
    be effected by the provisions contained in
    two bills: one for the government control
    of medical departments and the other for
    the establishment of medical centres
    throughout the island. Little appears to
    have been done since the bill was lost at
    the end of the Session.

    It was largely due to the energy and
    initiative of Dr. H. D. Weatherhead, then
    Chief Medical Officer, that the changes
    were then Dr.
    Weatherhead who was promoted to Borneo
    has retired on pension and at the instance
    of the Colonial Office will soon take up
    the post of Chief Medical Officer in the
    Leeward Islands.

    Barbados is stil
    tres.

    It was proposed that the island should
    have been divided into districts with a
    Medical Officer in charge and with the
    necessary staff.

    The only service in the outlying districts
    is that supplied by the Poor Law Guard-
    ians via the Parochial Medical Officers and
    the almshouses, It has been found that
    there are hundreds of people who are com-
    pelled to Bridgetown, either
    bearing the discomfort of travelling by ’bus
    or the expense of car hire, to get regular
    treatment at the Hospital. This would not
    have been necessary if the medical dis-
    tricts, as envisaged under the Medical Ser-
    vices Bill, had been established. There is
    now in the island a sufficiently large num-
    ber of trained and qualified Sanitary In-
    spectors capable of filling the posts in
    these new services.

    One of these bills which provided that
    control of the General Hospital be trans-
    ferred from a Board of Directors to the
    Government was passed. The Staff has
    been increased to provide for Specialists
    and a Medical Superintendent has been
    appointed. It was found that the provisions
    of that bill improved the administration of
    the Hospital; but the bill which would
    provide for the essence of proper medical
    services has been forgotten,

    At the time when the Vestry of St.
    Michael decided to increase the number of
    Parochial Medical Officers and to provide
    for a clinic in the City, it was objected that
    the bill providing Medical Services was
    before the Legislature.and the new clinic
    might clash with ‘the provisions of “that
    bill, It was fortunate that the Vestry did
    not allow itself to be deterred. Since then
    thousands of sick people and children
    have been attended at this clinic.

    The Vestry now needs to go one step
    further and find some means of chanelling
    the services of the District Nurses now
    employed by the Sanitary Commissioners.
    These Nurses render an important service,
    and to a section of the community who
    needed the advice and help they can give.
    But these nurses are now included in the
    list of Sanitary Inspectors and report to
    laymen. This is because of the lack of the
    Medical Services which would have been
    provided in the bill lost at the end of the
    session.

    It is true that there has been a large
    volume of legislation during the last two
    sessions but its enactment was delayed be-
    cause of an unnecessary amount of debate
    and the failure to give priority to measures
    which deserved it. The Legislative Coun-
    cil did not discuss it and it was lost at the
    end of the Session.

    The end of the session approaches with
    the Legislature chasing the clock with such
    measures as the Election Bill and the
    Pioneer Industries Bill still in the throes
    of discussion,

    It is not possible to add the Medical Ser-
    vices Bill ar diseussion of the Maude Re-
    port to the list at this late hour, but judg-
    ing from its impprtance to the island, and
    the necessity to remove as far as possible
    the hardships endured by aged and infirm
    country folk, it deserves priority over other
    early in the next session.

    EW PING
    NEW SHE ;
    IN’ PHRESE
    ENTERPRISE

    LONDON, July 26.

    even discussed. Since

    without its medical cen-

    come to

    measure









    A new British shipping company, to be known
    as the Sugar Line, will soon be carrying raw
    sugar in bu!k from Empire and other growers
    te refineries in Britain. It will be backed joint-
    ly by Messr Tate and Lyle and by United
    Molasses

    The new line is being formed as a result of
    the experiments in the bulk shipment of sugar
    started by Tate ang Lyle two years ago, when
    s found that up to £600,000 a year could be
    y dispensing with the two-ewt. jute sacks
    alway shipped to





    sugar has been



    Not only the cost of the sacks themselves
    would be saveda considerable item at to-day’s
    prices—but handling costs at the docks would be
    lower, it was fc Dockers at British ports,
    who are paid for handling heavy
    » plan. at first, but now that problem





    extra loads,
    opp
    1 overcome.

    The Sug Line will build fleet of six
    They will be

    by Mol s, already an important shipowner

    special

    managed by



    roval of it
    proval of the

    7 ' at i
    Wii f De





    NEWS

    Mr. Herbert Morrison’s fate as

    | Foreign Secretary is to be pre-
    | sented with a series of problems

    week by week, each more prickly
    than the last. This week, a car-
    |toonist has drawn the prickly
    faspects of Britain and France
    shaking hands with General Fran-
    co, who is caricatured in the form
    of a cactus in the midst of an
    arid, barren landscape, represen-
    tative of Spain. It is Mr. Dean
    Acheson who invites the British
    Foreign Secretary to shake hands
    with General Franco. Herbert
    Morrison has an expression of
    alarm and consternation on his
    face. And this sums up accurate-
    ly the average British reaction at
    having to call Spain a friend, even
    at second remove. This attempt of
    Mr. Dean Acheson to “introduce”
    General Franco in a friendly man-
    ner to the North Atlantic Treaty
    Club is likely to be the cause of
    more bitterness and bad feeling
    between Britain and the United
    States—and there is plenty of sus-
    picion of motives on both sides
    already.

    Two British views need to be
    distinguished about Spain. One is
    a strong emotional one. Most Bri-
    tish_ public opinion feels a sense
    of guilt about the Spanish Civil
    War in rather the same way that
    many are guilty about the Munich
    Agreement. Emotionally, they feel
    that the Spanish Republican Gov-
    ernment was let down, and the
    hangover of this guilt is passion-
    ate antagonism to General Fran-
    co in the post-war era. That ac-
    counts for British Trade Union
    resolutions, but it does not ex-
    plain the Foreign Office antago-
    nism to what is, after all, no more
    than a bilateral military agree-
    ment between the United States
    and General Franco’s Govern-
    ment. But in the last analysis,
    leaving emotional factors on one
    side, the British Government's
    opposition to the United States
    military aid to France is based on
    the fact that the Communist vote
    in Italy and France is high and
    does not diminish. In the view of
    the British advisers, agreement
    between the United States and
    Spain is such grist to the Com-
    munist propaganda mill that it
    will drive a large part of the non-
    Communist working class of
    Europe back to Communism, and
    undermine those countries politi-
    cally and militarily to such an
    extent that the Atlantic Pact will
    ‘be weaker rather than stronger
    for the inclusion of Spain among
    its associates.

    One point that does not seem
    to have been emphasised in the
    week's news from Spain—or from
    Washington — is that this large
    military assistance to Spain may
    be quite slow in coming. Certainly
    the United States will meet a re-
    doubtable revolt in the North
    Atlantic Treaty Council if it tries
    to give priority to Spain. The pre-
    sent United States commitment in
    the arms delivery is the North
    Atlantic Treaty powers first, a
    tnew West German Army-—if that
    is agreed to—second, and then
    Spain at the end of the line. A



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE





    FROM BRITAIN

    ify David Temple Roberts

    i
    }
    }
    | LONDON, July 20.

    marked change from this order
    would result in the United States
    Josing important friends and
    elienating people in Western
    Europe. General Franco is obvi-
    ously gaining popularity at home
    with the prospect of American aid.
    And it is very much in the inter-
    est of his government to give the
    imypression that at least a billion
    dolbars is on the way immediately.
    But it is not so, Indeed there is
    a grave prospect that the Spanish
    opposition to General Franco
    which has recently included more
    of the Church and the middle-
    class—confused by the new agree-
    ment, will be dispersed. But the
    situation within Spain will not be
    improved at all.

    Herbert Morrison does not find
    himself in a weak position in
    making representations to the
    United States on the subject of
    Spain. All of a dozen European
    countries are in agreement with
    him—and in particular Italy is
    envious of American aid to Spain
    that might better go to build an
    Italian army, and Italian bases,
    and provide capital for Italian
    land reform schemes.

    At The East End

    At the East end of the Mediter-
    ranean, on the other hand, Her-
    bert Morrison finds another situa-
    tion in‘the desert that is quite as
    prickly. But here he has made
    the gesture of going along with
    ar. American scheme. There has
    been speculation all the week
    whether the decision to support
    the application of Turkey and
    Greece for admission to the Atlan-
    tie Pact is one-half of a bargain
    with the United States — or a
    straight concession. The other half
    of the bargain might be American
    support for the British in the Mid-
    dle East, in return for British sup-
    port for the United States scheme
    to call Turkey an Atlantic coun-
    try. All this is connected with
    this year’s long drawn-out wran-
    gle on the appointment of Admi-
    rals. The British case is for keep-
    ing the Eastern Mediterranean
    under British command because
    the majority of troops in the area
    are British and so a British Admi-
    ral must control their supply
    lines. At the time of writing, the
    murder of King Abdullah of Jor-
    dan is still a “Whodunnit” crime
    fiction in which we have not
    reached the last chapter. Never-
    theless, whoever did the murder,
    it is a grievous blow to British
    prestige and British influence in
    that part of the world. King
    Abdullah was the last of the men
    whom T. E. Lawrence carried to
    power as successors to the Turkish
    Empire. I expect newspaper cor-
    respondents will spend the week-
    end telling how they played chess
    with him, and everywhere he will
    be spoken of as “Mr. Bevin’s last
    little king”.

    Success at Last

    Also on the diplomatic front,
    for -this has been very much a
    foreign affairs week, Herbert
    Morrison has scored a real success
    at long last in persuading the
    Egyptian Government to open the
    oil tankers tg go to the refinery
    at Haifa, in Israel. Behind the

    incident of a british ship being
    stopped by the Egyptians, was the
    Arab embargo on Israel, Not long
    ago, the Israel Government decid-
    ed to provoke an incident in this
    very channel! leading to the South-
    ern Israel port, where the British
    ship was stopped. They decide?
    to send a very much bigger ship
    through carrying building mate-
    rials. If Egypt intercepted it,
    there would be publicity for the
    blockade; if not, there would be
    buffding materials for Elath. But
    in fact the Egyptian action in
    stopping the British ship sited
    the Israe] Government even bet-
    ter.

    Who Wants Welsh Poetry ?

    The British Broadcasting Cor-
    poration is terribly difficult to
    explain to anyone who has never
    listened to it—as 1 found to my
    cost during a recent North Ameri-
    can visit. 1t is a nationalised mono-
    poly governed by a panel of un-
    democratically appointed govern-
    ors, who themselves appoint about
    a dozen national and regional con-
    trollers, who have virtually com-
    nlete power to decide what is
    good for us to listen to in this
    part of the country and that. In
    this strange world where so many
    people talk about the unity of
    Europe and world government,
    there are much more powerful
    drives for the splitting up_ of
    nations into little fragments. The
    Welsh want this; the Scots want
    thar; and the Irish have almost
    everything they want, but never
    realise it. So naturally there was
    a move to give the Welsh control
    over what programmes they have
    All the distinguished Gaelic schol-
    ars came out of hiding, found
    their way on to regional advisor
    councils, designed to advise, bu
    not to order, the regional control-
    ler. So there was a struggle in
    the West, with the enthusiasts
    trying to thrust more and more
    Welsh bards and, Welsh poetry or
    the Welsh listeners. The regiona!
    controller, fighting back, tried tol
    satisfy the needs of people living
    in Wales who just want to be
    entertained. In order to win this
    battle and protect the Welsh resi-
    dent from the horrors of his own
    language, the B.B.C. thought up
    the idea of keeping all the self-
    appointed experts of these advis-
    ory councils, and putting on them
    instead, a number of local govern-
    ment town councillors, and the
    like, who are elected representa~
    tives. Now this has caused a first
    class national issue. If it has to be
    done for Wales, then, reasonably it
    has to be done for everywhere else
    as well. The result is that in the
    end the B.B.C's programmes ul!
    over the country would be con-
    trolled by the “voice of the
    people” speaking rather drearily
    through the mouths of mediocre
    town councillors Ags a result, the
    B.B.C. would, in the end, lose that
    character of superiority, of moral
    uplift, of teaching the British
    what is good for them, and the
    right accent, that its great founder,
    Lord Reith, first gave it. Lip-
    service would have been paid to
    democracy, but would that be a
    gain? At least. it would make the
    B.B.C. easier to explain.



    Point Four And Liberia’s
    Expanding Economy

    A GENERAL AGREEMENT for
    technical assistance and co-opera-
    tion between the United States
    and Liberia was signed in
    Washington, D.C., on December
    22, 1950, In signing the agree-
    ment, Liberia became the first
    country on the African continent
    to participate in the Point Four
    Programme, first outlined by
    U.S. President Harry S. Truman in
    his inaugural address in January
    1949.

    To Liberia, however, Point Four
    is new in name only. Since 1944,
    two American technical missions
    —the U.S. Economic Mission and
    the U.S. Public Health Mission—
    have been working closely with
    the Liberian Government on a
    programme of economic. and
    social development.

    AS a result of its experience
    with those two Missions, Liberia
    was among the first to submit its
    request for technical assistance
    under the new legislation. This
    request is embodied in a proposed
    5-to-10-year programme of over-
    all economic development that
    was worked out during 1950 by a
    joint committee of Liberian and
    United States officials. This long-
    range programme, it is estignated,
    will cost approximately $32,000,-
    000, The salaries and allowances
    of the technicians requested under
    this Point Four Programme will
    be paid by the United States. The
    other costs, which are by far the
    larger share of the programme,
    are to» be borne by the Liberian
    Government out of its current
    revenues it is s@tting ‘aside 20
    per cent. of all revenues for five
    years for this purpose—ahd from
    loans that it is now negotiating.
    About $4,500,000 of .the — total

    Jamount is to be spent directly on
    agricultural activities. Among
    these projects will be the building
    of an agricultural research
    laboratory, the establishment of
    an agricultural credit corporation,
    the expansion of research and ex-
    tension, and the development of
    pilot projects for improved pro-
    cessing of Liberian products. The
    expenditure of more than $11,000-
    000 for roads might be considered
    indirectly a part of the agricul-
    tural programme since these roads
    are being built to open inaccess-

    ible areas of the country for
    agricultural and forest develop-
    ment,

    Although the U.S. Department
    of State has carried the major
    responsibility for the work of the
    U.S. Economic Mission in the past,
    the new programme will become
    a joint responsibility of a number
    of agencies of the United States
    Government. For example, the
    U.S, Department of Agriculture
    will assume technical responsibil-
    ity for all assistance provided in
    the agricultural field, and the
    U.S. Public Health Service will
    continue to be responsible for the
    technical aspects of public health

    istance. Of the total estimate,

    8,700,000 were allocated to public
    vement, Anothe
    been set aside io
    educational facilities



    1eaith



    $7,150,000 has
    levelop the
    of Liberia

    {

    Signing of agreement with the
    United States for technical co-opera-
    tion under the Point Four Programme
    promises improvement of Agricultural
    end forest resources of African
    country

    By OSCAR W. MEIER

    From Foreign Agriculture

    Simultaneously with the signing
    of a General Agreement for techni-
    cal co-operation, the two govern-
    ments also signed a Memorandum
    of Understanding for the estab-
    lishment of a Joint Commission for
    Economic Development, Liberia
    will appoint a maximum of seven
    members on the Commission and
    the United States a maximum of
    six members. The Commission is
    expected to make periodic reviews
    of the development programme's
    progress, advise the two govern-
    ments of its findings, and make
    recommendations which will in-
    crease the effectiveness of the
    programme through its successive
    stages.

    Through its traditional open-
    door policy, Liberia has for many
    years attracted private capital in-
    vestment. In 1926, Harvey Fire-
    stone, the American industrialist,
    selected Liberia for the establish-
    ment of his rubber plantation
    operations, These plantations,
    totalling nearly 100,000 acres, sup-
    plemented by the planting of
    several Liberian rubber growers,
    now produce the principal export
    of the country. Exports of rubber
    in 1951 will amount to about
    35,000 tons, most of which is being
    shipped as liquid latex for special-
    ized use, Even though small in
    relation to America’s total need,

    the United States was most thank-*

    ful for the natural rubber that
    came from Liberia during World
    War II. In 1948, when Far Eastern
    Supplies were almost entirely cut
    off, about one-half of the natural
    rubber that entered the United
    States came from Liberia.

    For many. years, coffee was
    Liberia’s principal export, but
    production has fallen off greatly
    during recent years. A major
    activity under the technical co-
    operation programme will be. the
    re-establishment of coffee as an
    important crop in the Liberian
    economy. Cacao production also
    has attracted much attention re-
    cently. During the past three
    years, the Liberian Department of
    Agriculture and Commerce assist-
    ed by the U.S. Economic Mission
    has stimulated the planting of
    more than 10,000 acres of this
    crop. The economic development
    plan proposes to expand cacao
    plantings to at least 150,000 acres
    in the next 10 years.

    Another of Liberia’s important
    products is palm oil. The oil palm
    grows wild throughout Liberia,
    but at the present time most of
    this crop is harvested and pro-





    cessed by the simplest of hand
    methods. A pilot. project using
    small presses fof extracting the
    pericarp oil, hand-operated crack-
    ing machines to crack the nuts,
    and 80-gallon kettles for cooking
    the oil is now in operation If
    the pilot project prove iccessful
    it is anticipated that mar mall
    village-type co-operatives will be

    developed throughout the country

    ‘

    to acquire these units and make
    them available to the people in
    each village.

    of the U.S. Economic Mission
    who served with the U.S. Forest
    Service prior to his work in
    Liberia and who has __ since
    returned to that agency, has laid

    A forest survey, by a member | food and fibre,” he said.

    the basis for the development of | climate combine to favour its growth, sugar-

    Liberia’s forest resources. This
    survey, made from aerial pihoto-
    graphy supplemented by hundreds
    of miles of ground cruising in
    the forested areas,
    more than one-third of Liberia!
    is still covered with high forest.|
    Many new woods, a number of
    which were previously unknown
    commercially, were identified in
    this survey, Under the Point Four
    Programme, it is proposed that
    the forest survey work be con-
    tinued and that a programme for
    conserving its forest resources be
    developed by the Government of
    Liberia,

    The work which has_ been
    under way to improve Liberia's
    domestic food supply will be
    continued and expanded under
    Point Four. With the foundation
    already laid, the increase of the
    food supply both in quantity and
    quality is expected to be rapid.

    No story of modern Liberia
    is complete without some reference
    to the excellent new harbour and
    free port at Monrovia, which was
    opened to commerce in July 1948.
    This harbour with its 30-foot
    channel was built under a lend-
    lease agreement _ between the
    United States and Liberia and
    gives Liberia one of the finest
    harbours on the West Coast of
    Africa. Ships of all nations may
    enter this harbpur in the order
    of their arrival at the harbour's
    entrance. Many shippers and ship
    operators are learning the advan-
    tages of a free port (a designated
    area into which ods may be
    brought for transhipment, stor-
    age, mixing, blending, packaging,
    or actual manufacture without
    payment of duty or any customs
    formality) and are routing cargo
    through this port from many
    points along the West African
    Coast. A Dutch ship, for example,
    in loading cargo for the Nether-
    lands at a number of small ports
    along the West African Coast,
    may encounter an isolated ship-
    ment or two for the United
    States. Such a shipment may be
    so small that it is unprofitable for
    an American-bound ship to call for
    it. With Monrovia operating as
    a free port, however, it is a sim-
    ple matter for the Dutch ship to
    lift the cargo at the port of!
    origin, carry it to Monrovia, and
    unload it for trans-shipment on a
    United States-bound ship. The
    advantages of operations of this
    type, plus the increasing flow of
    trade originating in Liberia and
    adjoining French Guinea and the
    Ivory Coast, promise to make
    Monrovia one of the most active
    ports on Africa’s West Coast.

    It now appears that the hardy
    little Republic, which for more
    than a hundred years had to
    struggle for its very survival, may!
    become one of the best examples |
    of how free and democratic
    nations can work to the mutual|
    advantage of each other under the
    Point Four Programme

    ‘ral ‘Sugar In Industry’

    reveals that! and west until it reached the West Indies

    ‘



    Is Approaching =|

    WASHINGTON.

    SUGAR is no longer just a foodstuff. It is | {
    fast becoming an important organic chemical | '
    for use in industry and the day is approach-
    ing when sugar will be the basis of thousands
    of little manufactured articles which the |
    world uses in everyday life.

    This is predicted by the U.S. Department |
    of Agriculture’s Year-Book for 1951, just |
    published in Washington, which prints a re- |
    view of sugar research. Extensive research,
    into the various uses of sugar has been con- |
    ducted at the Southern Research Laboratory, |
    in Louisiana.

    Since the last war, shortage of manpower
    has compelled research at every stage of)
    sugar production from the field to the mill)
    in order to keep down production costs, says |
    the review, which adds: “If the 1951 costs of |
    producing the crop are to be justified, every
    substance of value, as well as every ounce of
    sugar, must be extracted.”

    Sugar research has produced develop-
    ments favourable to the more economical
    production of paper, plastics, shoe polish,
    hair tonics, adhesives, photographic materi-
    als and insecticides. Organic chemists have
    prepared and described 10,000 derivatives of
    sugar or its molecular halves, dextrose and
    fructose.

    9S SSS F9S9 F989 FFF

    OF

    “The first great era of synthetic chemistry
    was based on the discovery of the almost
    limitless possibilties of obtaining useful de-
    rivatives from coal tar,’ wrote Mr. L. F. Mar-
    tin, chief of the agricultural chemical re-
    search division of the Southern Laboratory.
    “In more recent times, the petroleum age
    has brought even more products. But coal
    and petroleum are irreplaceable raw mate-
    rials,

    “Sugar takes it place with cellulose and
    starch in the ‘Big Three’ of the carbohydrates,
    which provide a renewable source of raw
    material for chemical synthesis, industrial
    uses and food. I think it is almost certain
    that industry will increase its utilisation of
    carbohydrates and that sugar will steadily
    become more important as we advance in
    the carbohydrate age.”



    _Mr, Martin said that sugar attracts chem-
    ists’ attention more and more as the cheapest
    and most abundant pure organic chemical
    available to industry and that its use in syn-
    thetic chemicals is growing. The research, he
    said, extends to every part of the sugar-cane,

    “Sugar-cane can excel all other plants as
    a converter of the sun’s energy and the car-
    bon dioxide and water of the air into energy



    “All round the world, wherever soil con-
    ditions and semi-tropical or sub-tropical

    cane has established itself as the major crop.
    From its homeland in India it travelled east

    with Columbus.”

    Mr. Martin reported the development of
    the manufacture of “sugar-cane wax,” re-
    covered froii the clarification mud of the
    refining process. Manufacture of this wax
    started in South Africa in 1916, but was dis-
    continued after the Great War when natural
    waxes became cheap.

    Manufacture was revived jn Cuba during
    the last war and more recently, improved
    manufacturing methods have been developed.
    The wax-making process is being carried out
    at the Louisiana laboratory, using crude wax
    imported from Cuba.

    The manufacture of a moulding plastic
    from sugar-cane has already become a firmly-
    established industry. Now new methods are
    being investigated for the manufacture of
    cellulose from sugar-cane bagasse, the aim
    being to reduce costs to a point at which they

    are competitive with cellulose made from
    wood,

    “Current experiments on new pulping pro-
    cesses,” wrote Mr. Martin, “promise to bring
    nearer to realisation the dream of paper pro-
    duction and possibly still more valuable ap-
    plications of cellulose from bagasse.”

    Sugar-cane molasses have long been used
    for the manufacture of industrial alcohol,
    with volume of production rising during
    periods of economic emergency. During the
    last war, much of this aleohol was used in|
    the development of the U.S. synthetic rubber
    industry.

    ~ 68399393



    A new sugar by-product is aconitic acid, |
    found in sugar-cane juice and molasses. Its!
    existence has been known for 75 years, but |
    only recently have large-scale uses been
    found for it in plastic manufacture. This |
    acid gives moulding properties to transparent |
    plastic materials and is also being used in |
    cleaning compounds.

    Another new sugar derivative, known as |'$
    allyl sucrose, is insoluble in water and new
    uses for it have been sought for in the manu-
    facture of protectis waterproof
    materials.—B.U.P.

    coating

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    Salami Sausages
    Frankfurter Suasages
    Luncheon Beef
    Red Salmon
    Norwegian Sardines
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    Nestles Milk
    Gloria Milk
    Butter in tins
    Meat Pastes
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    Prepared Mustard
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    Celery Salt


    TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE







    } oe

    House Pass Bill To *
    Control Elections

    THE House of Assembly yesterday passed with amend-
    ments a Bill to make provision for the direction and super-
    vision of the election of members to serve in the General

    THE HOUSE |
    YESTERDAY

    When the House of Assembly |
    |

    St. Michael’s Vestry Will Ask Govt. To
    Control Building At Welches Playing Field

    THE ST. MICHAEL'S VESTRY unanimously decided
    at their meeting yesterday tc ask Government to use their
    building departments for the future development of the |
    site at Welches as a playing field. The Vestry was dealing c ey |

    met yesterday, they passed with
    amendments a Bili-to make pro-
    vision for the direction and super-
    vision of the election of members
    to serve in the General Assembly |
    of this Island, the procedure at
    such elections, the expenses at
    such election and for other pur-
    poses in connection therewith.



    House Tribute

    with correspondence from the Acting Financial Secretary

    Assembly of the island, the procedure and the ex
    ‘such election and for other purposes connected

    mses in
    erewith.

    One of the provisions is that any person who is in-
    capacitated by blindness or any other physical cause from

    voting in the prescribed man

    ner, would be allowed a friend

    to accompany him into the voting compartment and mark

    the electors’ ballot paper for

    When the section which provid-
    ed for incapacitated voters was
    being discussed, some members
    expressed fhe view that the same
    provision should be made for il-
    literates, Mr. Allder suggested
    that symbols should be used.

    It was put to the vote whether
    illiterates should be allowed a
    friend, but this section was pass-
    ed without the inclusion of illit-
    erates, by a 7—6 majerity.

    Mr. Adams said that they had
    to preserve the secrecy of the bal-
    lot.

    For the inclusion of illiterates
    ‘were: Messrs. Brancker, Mottley,
    Dowding, Gill, Haynes and God-
    dard. Against the inclusion were:
    Messrs. Cox, Adams, Bryan, All-
    der, Miller, the Speaker and Dr.
    Cummins.

    The Bill contains 50 sections.
    Section 21, the one which provid-
    ed for the permitting of a friend,
    had been postponed when the
    House last met and was the last
    section dealt with yesterday.
    When the House met last Thurs-
    day they passed 33 sections and
    yesterday the remaining 17 were
    passed,

    Section 36 reads:

    No person shall during an elec-
    tion call together, hold or address
    ny election meeting in any pub-
    lic place unless notice of the in-
    tention to hold such meeting at
    buch place has been given not
    less than three hours before the
    commencement of such meeting
    to the Officer of Police in charge
    of the parish in which such place
    it situate or to the Officer of Police
    in charge of the Police Station
    nearest to such place.

    Every notice under subsection
    (1) of this section shall specify—

    (a) the person in support of
    whose. candidature the
    meeting is to be held;
    the place and approximate
    time at which such meet-
    ing is to commence,

    Every person who contravenes
    subsection (1) of this section shall
    be guilty of an offence against
    this section and, on conviction by
    p Court of Summary Jurisdiction,
    6hall be liable to a_ fine not ex-
    ceeding twenty-five dollars or in
    default of payment to imprison-
    ment for thirty days.

    In this section “public plgce”
    means any street, road, lane or
    highway and any park, garden,
    field or sea beach to which the
    public has access whether as of
    right or upon. payment of any
    pum of money or otherwise.

    Mr. Gill (E) wanted to know
    what was meant by “during an
    election”. That expression he
    said was not clear to him.

    Mr. Adams (L)_ said that the
    expression although vague, meant
    from now on. If a candidate
    happened to lose out at a General
    Election and bought a drink for
    anyone saying he was coming
    back as a candidate for the next
    Elections three years’ hence, the
    section would apply to him.

    Mr. Miller (L) did not agree
    with having.to give the Police
    three hours’ notice before the
    beginning of a meeting. He said
    that he might be in the district
    where there was a meeting by
    his opponent. At the end of that
    meeting there might be something
    which needed an explanation. If
    he was asked to explain the
    matter by say a few individuals
    and in doing so a crowd gathered,
    that would be another meeting
    and he would be guilty of an
    offence if the Police came along,
    because under the section, he
    would not have notified them.

    He said that part of the section
    should be deleted as it would
    create a hardship on candidates,
    particularly during the last two
    weeks of the election.

    Mr. Bryan (L) said that in sub-
    section 4 of the section there
    was a definition of ‘public place.”
    At election time, there were pop-
    ular meetings called cottage
    meetings which could be held in
    schools or homes. He wanted to
    know if the section had any con-
    trol over them,

    Mr. Brancker (C) moved that
    three hours in sub section one be
    deleted and the words one hour
    be substituted. He said that some-
    times at very short notices, one
    had to convene a meeting on the
    ppot to contradict and counter-
    act some erroneous statements
    made by one’s opponents before
    -the crowd who had heard those
    statements had actually dispersed.

    (b)

    He said that three hours’ prior
    notice would be too long. One
    hour was about the most one
    could reasonably expect to give.

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    him.

    He noticed that in section two
    of the bill, there were definitions
    of election, election documents,
    election officer etc., but there was
    no definition in that section or
    any other of “election meeting.”

    He pointed out that in sub-
    section 3 of this section, refer-
    ence was made to a fine not ex-
    ceeding $25. He reminded the
    Committee that at the last mect-
    ing when he proposed that the
    words “not exceeding” be in-
    serted before $1,000" or before
    “imprisonment for one year” in
    another section of the bill, it was
    said that nowhere in the bill did
    the phrase “not exceeding” oc-
    cur, It would therefore be out
    of order to insert the words “not
    exceeding” in this particular sec-
    tion,

    _Mr. Adams (L) said that he
    did not notice the words “not ex-
    ceeding” in the section, nor had
    the Acting Attorney General
    Having had it pointed out to him
    by the honourable member, he
    proposed to amend the section by
    deleting those words, and _ in-
    ——* in place thereof, the word
    “of.”

    Referring to the remarks made
    by the senior member for St.
    Gearge, he said that the whole ob-
    ject of a section like this was not
    to create hardship on the people
    who conducted themselves in an
    orderly manner. There were po-
    tential murderers in this world
    and provision had to be made for
    such things,

    As regards to the question made
    by the junior member for St.
    Michae] he said that a man keep-
    ing a meeting in his own house,
    was responsible for order there
    as it was his own private prop-
    erty, but having the meeting in
    a school would come under this
    section.

    M.. E. K. Walcott (E) referred
    honourable members to section 31
    which said that any person who
    before during any election, for
    the purpose of affecting the re-
    turn of any candidate at such
    election made or published any
    false statement in fact in re-
    lation to the personal character
    or conduct of such candidate shall
    be guilty of an illegal practice.

    That section he said made it
    plain that the offence could take
    place any time whereas this sec-
    tion only spoke of during an elec-
    tion.

    He reminded honourable mem~=
    bers that section 36 applied not
    only to candidates having to in-
    form the police, but anyone who
    was having a meeting on behalf
    ef a candidate.

    He agreed that the Police should
    be notified of any meetings to be
    kept and that they should be given
    sufficient opportunity to get to the
    meetings. .

    Mr. Mottley (E) was also in
    agreement that the Police should
    be present at the meetings as they
    should be carried out in an order-
    ly manner.

    He however felt that if a person
    got a number of people around
    him at the end of a meeting and
    started to explain certain things
    which were said at that meeting,
    that in his considered opinion
    would be another meeting.

    Mr. Adams (L) said that the
    point raised by the honourable
    member could not possibly come
    under the head of a meeting. The
    section must me taken as a whole
    as if referred to the person in
    support of whose candidature the
    meeting was to be held.

    Mr. O. T. Allder (L) said that
    the point the hon, senior mem-
    ber for the City had raised was
    definitely a logical one. While the
    provision in sub-clause 1 might
    appear to be workable to the hon
    senior member for St. Joseph, a
    lot of snags could creep up.

    The fact was that as soon as a
    meeting was ended many people
    assembled into small groups and
    started fresh discussions. “It just
    depends on the outlook of the
    particular constable to determine
    whether or not it is a continua-
    tion of the same meeting or whe-
    ther there are several meetings
    out of the one which was held by
    the particular candidate.” 7

    “T am influenced by the point
    made by the hon. member for the
    City because there is the possi-

    bility of such a thing taking
    place.”
    Mr. Mottley (E) pointed out

    that he was not prepared to
    pursue the point as the honour-
    able senior member for St. Joseph
    and the honourable senior mem-
    ber for St. James had assured him
    that in this matter a magistrate
    had the power to use his discre-
    tion and not inflict the maximum
    penalty.

    The clause was then passed.

    The next clause—37, dealt with



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    The House also passed a Reso-
    lution to place the sum of $36,-
    800 at the disposal of the Govern-
    or-in-Executive Committee to
    supplement the Estimates 1951-52,
    Part 1—Current;

    A Resolution to sanction the
    Scheme of Government for the
    Coleridge and Parry School made
    by the Director of Education on
    the fourteenth day of July, 1951,

    under the provisions of section 22

    — Education Act. 1890 (1890-
    The House adjourned until

    August 7, at 3pm



    the penalty for participation in
    an election campaign by election
    officers.

    Every election officer who—

    (a) canvasses for votes on be-

    half of any candidate or
    political party; or

    (b) addresses any meeting on

    behalf of any candidate or
    political party; or

    (c) in any way actively asso-

    ciates himself with the elec-

    tion campaign of any candi-

    date or political party,

    shall be guilty of an offence
    against this section and on convic-
    tion by a Court of Summary
    Jurisdiction, shall be liable to a
    fine of two hundred dollars or to
    imprisonment with or without
    hard labour for six months.

    Mr. Adams (L) asked to delete
    the words “a fine of two hundred
    dollars or to” occurring in the sec-
    ond last line of the clause. This
    took out the fine, but Mr. Mottley
    argued that the offence would be
    a very serious one and the term of
    imprisonment should be increased.
    This should read: “not exceeding
    twelve months.”

    These amendments were agreed

    to and the Clause was then
    passed.
    Clause 38 dealt with the total

    amount of expenditure that may
    be incurred in respect of the can-
    didature of any person. On the
    suggestion of Mr, E. K. Walcott,
    10 cents per elector was amended.
    The amendment reads: “Where the
    number of voters is in excess of
    10,000 the amount is ten cents per
    elector, where it is less than 10,000
    fifteen cents per elector.”

    The argument put up by sev-
    eral members was that the figyre
    of 10 cents per elector as originally
    set out was but a farce.

    The Clause was
    amended.

    A section allows for the prose-
    cution of an agent or candidate if
    certain provisions are not carried
    out. The original Bill intended to
    make the candidate prove that he
    was not guilty when he was
    charged and that the guilt of an
    agent would involve the guilt of
    the candidate,

    Mr. Mottley called for amend-
    ment which was finally accepted.
    Mr. Mottley said that the onus
    should be on the prosecution to
    prove their case. He said that an
    over zealous agent might do things
    he was not instructed to do and
    one should not be bound by what
    one’s agent did.

    The other sections were after-
    wards passed, some with amend-
    ments.

    Bryan Asks About
    Flood Victinis

    Mr. T. O. Bryan at yesterday's
    meeting of the House of Assem-

    passed as



    bly gave notice of questions
    about flood victims of 1949.
    These read:

    “Is government aware that

    there are a considerable number
    of persons who claim that they
    have suffered damage to property
    and for loss of household effects
    during the “floods” of 1949, and
    whose names were not included

    among. those selected for com-
    pensation?
    “Has government’s attention

    been drawn to an article appear-

    ing in the Press claiming that
    there is disappointment and
    dissatisfaction caused by these
    omissions?

    “If the answers are in the

    affirmative will Government set
    up a committee to investigate the
    claims of these people with the
    view to sending down legislation
    to effect immediate compensation
    for deserving cases?”

    Chief Justice
    Congratulated

    Before the business of the Court
    of Grand Sessions was started
    yesterday morning, Mr. W. W.
    Reece, K.C., drew the attention of
    the court to the new mode of
    addressing judges in the Colonial
    territories.

    He said that he had noticed in
    the paper the title of the Chief
    Judge of this colony has been
    changed and is to be addressed as
    His Lordship, He said they were
    proud of the fact that the title
    had been conferred upon him who
    is the Chief Judge both in Civil
    and Criminal matters and also the
    Chief Judicial Officer of this
    island.

    The Honourable the Chief Jus-
    tice then thanked Mr. Reece for
    his kind remarks.



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    Late Reporter

    Tribute was paid by members of
    the House at their meeting yes-
    terday in memory of Mr. E. A.
    Maynard, late Official Reporter of
    the House of Assembly

    A resolution of sympathy to be
    transmitted to his widow was
    moved by Mr. G. H. Adams and
    seconded by Dr. H. G. Cummins.

    Mr. L. E. R. Gill spoke on be-
    half of members of the Electors’
    Association,

    Mr. Adams said: “I wish to
    make a motion that the House put
    ym» record its sorrow at the death
    of the late Official Reporter who
    was always known to us as Mr.
    Gussie Maynard,

    He was a very faithful servant
    of the House and a very efficient
    reporter who never pretended to
    go outside the realms of reporting
    to be a sort of freelance know-all
    journalist.

    I do not think that anyone of us
    could say that he has been ac-
    quainted with anyone in the island
    with the exception of Mr. Charlie
    Rock, who was a more efficient
    reporter—not that we do not have
    excellent reporters in our midst.

    Mr. Maynard and Mr. Rock had
    more experience than the ones I
    see at the present moment and I
    hope that the latter will follow in
    their footsteps and become the
    outstanding men that they were

    Mr. Maynard will always be re-
    membered by all of us as a real
    true friend. He seemed able to mix
    with absolute ease in any com-
    pany. He was at home and made
    others feel at home,

    I am sure every member of the
    House will wish me to say on their
    behalf—and it should be recorded
    in our deliberations—that we ex-
    press our sorrow at his passing. 1
    also move that expression of our
    sorrow be transmitted to his
    widow.”

    Dr. H. G. Cummins seconded.

    Mr. L. E. R. Gill said; “I would
    like on behalf of the members of
    this side of the House to add my
    quota to what has been said by
    the Leader of the House.

    I have known Mr. Maynard for
    the past 23 years. I first got to
    know him as a reporter in the
    Courts of this island, I can say of
    all those years and during the
    past three years that I have had
    the honour to be a member of this
    chamber, that he always dis-
    charged his duties zealously,
    faithfully and impartially. He dis-
    charged those duties to the ad-
    vantage of this honourable cham-
    ber.

    I feel sure that the honest and

    sincere sympathy of each and
    everyone of us will go out on
    this occasion.”

    Members then stood in their

    places for a few
    mark of respect.

    moments as a



    They Were Trained
    In Moscow

    @ from page 1

    soon became an official of
    North Korean Labour Party.

    Three years later, he was named
    Minister of Commerce.

    Lt. General Teng Hua, 51, the
    Deputy Commander of the Chi-
    nese forces in Korea—he is prob-
    ably the oldest Red delegate in
    Kaesong, and has been active in
    the Chinese Communist move-
    ment since 1930, serving as a
    political officer in the First Army.

    A graduate of Kang Ta Uni-
    versity in 1934, he dropped his
    political army job in 1940, when
    he assumed his first command
    over the 120th Division.

    Major General Fang, reported
    tc be a propaganda expert. He
    praduated from Moscow Univer-
    sity, and joined the Chinese
    Communist forces upon his return
    to China, confining his activities
    te the political devartment. |

    Officials here also furnished |
    information on two top ranking!
    Reds not present at the truce
    tulks, but undoubtedly key fig-
    ures in master minding Commu-
    nist strategy.

    They are

    the

    Kim Il Sung, the
    Premier of North Korea and
    Commander - in - Chief of the
    North Korean Army, and General
    Peng Te Suai, Commander of the
    Chinese “Volunteers.”

    Kim joined the Korean guerilla
    forces when he was 19 -fighting
    the Japanese in Manchuria. In 10
    years as a guerilla, he rose to the
    post of Secretary of the North-
    east Manchuria Communist Party

    In 1941 his guerilla uncle died
    in Russia, where he had taken his
    band including Kim. He had been
    born Kim Song Ju.

    In 1948 he led his regiment in
    revolt against the national, gov-
    ernment. During the last days of
    the Japanese war he commanded
    the 18th Army greup, and later
    took command of the Northwest
    Peoples’ Liberation Army, now
    the Chinese Communist Field
    Army.—U.P.



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    in respect to a playing field at Welches.
    MC,

    Mr. E. D. Mottley, P., in
    making his motion, said that he
    sat and listened at the Public En-
    quiry of the Princess Alice Play-
    ing Field. In view of the state-
    ment made by a member of the
    Government that “the St. Mi-
    chael’s Vestry was a most cor-
    rupt body”, he thought that the
    vestry should inform the Gove
    ernment that they as a body were
    perfectly willing to co-operate
    with them by looking after the

    administration of the playing
    fields.

    But, he said, the Vestry had
    no machinery with which they

    could properly undertake the
    erecting of Buildings on and the
    laying out of grounds and roads
    at playing fields. The vestry was
    therefore suggesting that the
    Government use their building
    departments for that purpose and
    they, the Vestry, would be will-
    ing to admintster them.

    .Mr, A. R. Toppin, in seconding
    the motion, said that he entirely
    agreed with what Mr. Mottley
    said, and Mr. D. G. Leacock jnr.
    rose in support of the motion,

    Criticism

    Mr. Leacock said that he sat
    for three days on the Princess
    Alice Playing Field Enquiry
    and he had come to the conclu-
    sion that whatever the Vestry did
    in their handling of funds from
    Government to develop the play-
    ing field, would be criticised,

    Mr, F, C. Goddard said that in
    Christ Church and all the other
    parishes, only one playing field
    was being established, while
    there were five in St. Michael.
    He knew that the Vestry of
    Christ Church did not have suf-
    ficient time to supervise the de-
    velopment of the playing field at
    Christ Church and it would be
    five times aS much work in St.
    Michael.

    The Vestry awarded Anette
    Beckles a vacant exhibition at
    the St. Miahael’s Girls Schoo!
    and 13 boys were given exhibi-
    tions at Combermefe School
    They were Harold Brathwaite
    Winston Bayley, Louise Vaughn,
    Cuthbert Garnes, Clyde Henry,
    Joseph Hinds, Leroy Inniss, Win-
    ston Maynard, Timothy Brome,
    Glyne Bryan, Vere Howard, Al-
    lan Boyce and Beresford King.

    Joe Louis Fights

    ‘Tomorrow Night

    SAN FRANCISCO, July 30,

    Joe Louis said that he probably
    would weigh between 210 and
    212 pounds for his fight on Wed-
    nesday night with Cesar Brion
    which would give him about i6
    pounds advantage over the Ar-
    gentine heavyweight,

    The Brown Bomber himself is
    not saying how much he\ weighs
    now but his camp is worried about
    the fighter’s weight which is said
    to have gone several pounds below

    210. He said, “I weighed 207 for
    Andy Walker last February.

    That was a little fine. I couldn't
    put any combination punches
    against Walker, I’m not kidding
    myself that co-ordination is there
    But I think I’m stronger around
    212 at my age. Anything lower
    drains my legs.

    Louis planned his finai drill on

    Monday afternoon, nen to do
    only limbering up exercises on
    Tuesday. Brion is in Lafayette

    where he held the final workout
    at the ranch of a fellow country-
    man Silvio De Anglis. Promoters
    Jimmy Murray and Lou Thomas
    anticipated $50,000 house for the
    10 round battle. This is the sec-
    ond match between the 37-year-
    old Louis and his 24-year-old
    opponent, Louis won the oe

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    Bishop Says
    Farewell
    To Vestry

    Bishop Mandeville, who during
    his tenure of office as Dean of the
    Cathedral was Chairman of the
    St. Michael’s Vestry, said ‘“fare-
    well” to the Vestry yesterday
    just as they convened their meet-

    ing

    The Chairman, Mr. M. D
    Symmonds, said that the Lorc
    Bishop had asked their indul-
    gence to bid them farewell. He
    the Bishop — had not got the
    Ppportunity to have done s¢

    before, he said and he was quite
    sure that all of them would have

    been quite happy to afford him

    the opportunity.

    Bishop Mandeville said tha
    their meetings were not held ot
    regular days and he was unable
    to be present at the last meeting
    He however could not leave the
    Vestry without saying “farewell,”

    He said that he was quite glad
    to see how the business of the
    St. Michael’s Vestry was being
    conducted and the amount of
    work that the Vestry had done
    for the people of the parish,
    adding that he was grateful tha
    the work of poor relief was in
    the hands of so responsible a
    body.

    Mr. A. S. Bryden said that, as
    the oldest member of the Vestry,
    he would have liked to say that
    they appreciated the fact that His
    Lordship had come down _ that
    day to say farewell to the mem-
    bers of the Vestry.

    “We do not only wish him
    success in his new undertaking,”
    he said, “but we are sure that he
    will be successful.”

    Mr. T. Miller said that he
    wanted to associate himself with
    the remarks of Mr. Bryden. Mr,
    Bryden was the oldest member of
    the vestry, but he was
    youngest,

    It was a happy moment
    them to know that His Lordship
    one of the soil, had been elected
    Bishop. “He has not only got
    it because he is the able man that
    he is, but because of his
    goodwill,” he said,



    Frittered Away
    Prestige

    From Page 1
    direct or indirect to the spread of
    Communism, and thus preserve
    the peace of the world by reaching
    conditions on which a lasting ana
    friendly setthkement may be made
    with Soviet Russia, on a basis no\
    of weakness and divided policy
    but of strength, unity, and well
    concerted measures.”
    Main Causes
    Churchill said Britain’s decline
    in the Middle East could be at-
    tributed to three main causes:
    The loss of India and Pakistan
    and their armies,

    ‘The supposition that becomes
    widespread throughout the Middle
    East that Britain has only to be
    pressed sufficiently by one powe:
    or another to abandon her rights
    and interests in that, or indeed in
    any other part of the world.”

    “Mistakes and miscalculations
    in policy which led to our winding
    up of our affairs in Palestine in
    such a way as to earn in an almost
    equal degree the hatred of Arab
    jand Jews.--U.P.





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    PAGE SIX




    MICKEY MOUSE

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    YOU POST THE parr
    ON THIS SIDE AND TH
    CREDITS ON THAT T SIDE -
    NOW







    YAH / SO NEAR-BY GHOULD BE HMm,..LI'L SABLE
    |AUST BE VIKING EXCITING. ..BET ISN'T A NATIONAL
    SUIPS./ BOT VORKING THEY'RE INSTITUTION ... BUT







    LOADED WITH
    TREAGURE /

    SUNKEN TREASURE
    SURE COULD BUY ME
    LOTS OF “CULTURE”/

    ALONE IS TOO SLOW...
    AY ACCEPT YOUR
    OFFER TO HELPS






    y eh si ~






    THAT'S A GRAND (DEA. teen
    BUT FIRST LLL Fay A /
    CALL ON MRS, LEILA
    STAFFORD

    A




    SUSTING PRES (DES SLICK, YO
    NEY CANT EAT MEAT CHE wean’
    #7 ANY TEETH AND SHE'S
    CTT $0 TIRED SHE
    Hn CAN HARDLY
    STAND UP!

    MAYBE WE COULD MAKE
    {T BETTER* HAVE
    "HONEY" KILLA COW.

    OR









    TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1951

    Gums Bleed!

    Teeth me mean that. you Se keee as ‘have Pyorthes,
    later. cause your Oreeth
    “and e or inter cau Rheumatism
    _—s on

    mou
    and Biesaing the et tightens ax teeth. Iron iad
    ceeenntes. Amosan must make your
    outh well and save your se ane -
    mmeney, Amosan from your chemis:
    antee Drotecte






    <2 fal ot
    and











    SEND YOUR :
    ORDERS |
    TO :

    ADVOCATE
    PRINTERY
    ¢ DIAL 2620



    oem good looks tell you they‘re just right.
    You know, too, when you look at the price
    tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
    is a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths.
    Tied to every pair is the John White Guaran-
    tee Shield—the sign which means ‘ just right *f
    Look for it in leading stores in Barbados.

    WHITE

    means made pie





















    IT PAYS ‘you TO rO DEAL HERE
    ‘SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only

    Usually NOW
    Tins PETERS COCOA + 44 38













    Usually Now




    Tins JAC. CREAM CRACKERS 171 1.60



    Tins GRAPE FRUIT JUICE 24 21 Tins BATCHELOR PEAS 38 35






    Pkgs. QUAKER OATS 54 48 Tins KLIM 5lb.



    5.50 |

    V. SCOTT & Co.



    Apply ‘Dettol'

    at once on



    IMPERIAL LEATHER e LINDEN BLOSSOM e BLUE HYACINTH

    ‘DETTOL'

    MODERN ANTISEPTIC

    Sare+Non-Potsonous

    THE

    Preasant Smpii+Ciean
    Dogsn't STAIN

    Doesn't Pain:



    |
    insect stings
    |
    |
    |
    |

    WE WISH TO ADVISE OUR CUS-
    TOMERS THAT OUR...

    WORKSHOP DEPARTMENT

    WILL BE CLOSED FROM

    thut (i cow LED improve the



    pettens, four speeds, epearteat Soe f Ir world’s
    oS aS shal et uy wth \ Tuesday 7th August, 1951
    - best ae
    ; I y i951
    e sanail-car Monday 20th August,
    de ae sia ta pl e BOTH DAYS INCLUSIVE, IN ORDER
    Sse ne aoe: aes TO GIVE OUR WORKSHOP STAFF

    THEIR ANNUAL VACATION.
    THERE WILL BE A SMALL RELIEF
    STAFF FOR ANY EMERGENCIES.
    OUR OFFICE, PARTS DEPARTMENT
    & PETROL STATION WILL REMAIN
    OPEN AS USUAL
    Yours faithfully,
    HOWDING ESTATES & TRADING
    CO.. LTD.= “Eckstein Bros.”

    age

    ) MINOR



    ors seaeiniinininatanadipihidiantin Lathes i as

    ROYAL
    Sole Distributors

    FORT
    Phone 2385

    GARAGE LTD. ||
    Phone 4504 |=






    TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN



















































































































    Sees ipa apal
    | |
    . Ten cents per,agate tine on week-days| “Tr ape a
    i € ermentioned *perty will be set > for sale at the Registration Office
    YELEPHON ind 12 cents per agute lin Sundays, | satiainne a peapetse :
    a 2508 ; mininum charge a an woes ~ ae < z « cae . ae 7 . — { oe a a . io
    } @nd $1.80 on Sundays, | 1 the ome 5 d ; i : * Hi art } j : a iy hour uli ¢ ieuk
    The charge for announcements of FOR RENT | | af pplication to me
    Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknowl- * REAL | af FREDERICK ARCHIBALD CONRAD CLAIRMONTE Plaintiff
    edgments, and In Memoriam notices is ESTATE | ’ &
    $:.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays Minimum charge week 72 cents and) ———————————— | JOSEPH FITZGERALD CLAIRMONTE O’NEALE Nefendar
    for auy number of words i —_ 96 one Sendeue Me words — over 4 eae St. LAWRENCE suitable | | PROPERTY: ALL. THAT certain ¢ parce iand of Checker Hal
    3 cents per word on w ys and| words 3 cents a word week—4 cents q/ for building sites. For particulars apply | - re S OF WASTEFUL GOVERNMENT FYPE TU , } Plantation) situate in the parish of Saint I vnd@ Island aforesaid containing
    @ cents per word on Sundays for each) werd on Sundays; to K, R, Hunte, telephone 8187 or 4611. | ILL EFFECTS OF WASTEFUL GOVERNMENT PXPENDITURE | b dines: Bever Wiyee peed thirty two sepehen Ruting and
    additional werd. 1NIB—.t.n. | i ing on li ‘ on Mr. Walaa lands now or late of —s
    —_—_ cad Plantation o r late of OW mC oure Fintage and Ernest
    DIED LAND: 11,298 sq. ft. of land, situated NEED FOR INCENTIVES TO INCREASE PRODUCTION j Aug uw A a Public Read SECONDLY ALL THAT certain
    : HOUSES at; Clevedale Road, Black Rock, piece pareel ¢ und ‘part af Checker Hall Plantation) situate tm the parisn
    aoe ot ae 30, aay ag Si Michael. Por fuil particulars, Phone o La and Island pforesaid co i imeasurement Two Acre
    idence, Qua’ . . ' 4523 31.7.51—1n SIR Al EXANDER ROGER ON THE TAXATION H AZARD ! o roo@ eighteen perches Butting and b ee lands « Oliv Decoure
    Charies Leopold Egwards. His funeral
    eeiey for the AN eee tiutee P| s0b1. New Bunedlowe Moby Bethe | ygAND—Quarter Acre of land, with 3 ppon new plant... In July, 1950, on) iene of Way or however cite the nme may butt end. bound THINDEY Asa
    to-day for the All Saints Church, i A ee . avy Gardens. / Nari hold, Tudor Bridge Gap, near , iia aes siimakeoais tne application of the company THAT certain piece or parcel of land (part of Checker Hall Plantation) situate
    Edwards, York Rdwande Deaiios | Dial’ 4192 Bite | whe Beli Comer, with tues Bus) THE TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING of tnder the terms of its franchies y | GUAT Sertain piece or Barcel of land ‘part of Checker Hall Plantation) situate
    Edwards, Fitz Edwards, (Sons); Beryl - a | Tad, OE APply Stuart, Fairfield} the Telephone and General Trust, Limited, was held on ates Board was a ppointea aoe scte suel'xpur perches BAtiWEenE sevEding On other, lands st ie ie
    Sgt, (Dawenter): Alert ‘aitkes,| BEDROOM: [One comfortable bed | —T—_ Set Mey Sand in London by the Governor. to con-| Sguey, Rniage ane Bnew huavelie Mipsis on,0 Rand ove wiih Sere
    . > and running water we ae fi rs Jer Ci a i of Way on other lands o said Oliver Cc §
    jean and B.G, Papers Please Copy.| With a dulet, family’ in Hastings. For | D. F. DeABREU Sir Alexander Roger, K.C.LE., chairman and managing /,‘ . . . : . > the telephone ts S—esse: . I ALL A slace, “ce or p pl of la tel t
    sete Fhone S00 ar Dial 3111 director, who presided, said:— 5 : ee eR. Ms Garden situate in the parish of Saint Lucy in this IsMind containing by ade
    THANKs 31.7.51—In | BE HEEDPUL! Time Tells which is Sure- Y ill : h a I doa . tie company because of increased measurement five acres sixteen perches of land or thereabouts bounding on
    BUNGALOW-Newly built’ Bungalow | 'Y Approaching. Re-Sale Values are My ou will notice that this is our twenty-fifth annual general! \age rates agreed by negotiation Bromefield, Babbs and Checker Hal) Plantetions and on the Public Road 9¢
    GUrTeNe The | Gittens family | beg] on long lease on St. James’ Coast, (7 | S!08an which should be a Mascot for| meeting and I think you will agree that our balance-sheet Wtn the Trade Union Council ot however eise the same bound Together with the messuage and all and
    through this medium to return thanks| niles from town). Fully furnished, ali | #!! Keen Buyers. Inspect these Attrac- da ik x 7 ar : % Jamaica and because f singular other buildings thereon and thereto belonging
    te all thats kind frienga who sent modern conveniences from September ar Serene Boosting—C for emonstrates we have cause for satisfaction at our progress | sneral ving in the ro a of the | Unset PRICE: £3,600-0-0d
    reaths, ters of condolence, or in| Ist. Dial 2472. 7.5L ourselves an Sompare Prices sore 7 ar. : ] a Pe ya ibe 5e cost of materiais | DATH OF SALE: 10th August, 1951
    any way expressed their ‘sympathy in| ————— ST S138 | AP MAXWELL COAST Two Stone Built | OVer the years. We have maintained an 8 per cent. dividend ““anq increases as lixed by the} H. WILLIAMS,
    our recent bereavement through the; “EBENEZER"—Crumpton Street, from | BUngalow Type—One has 3 Bedrooms, on the Ordinary capital since 1930—an unbroken record of itates Soard came ini nee’ iv Registrar-in-Chancery.
    death of Joseph Gittens, Two Mile] ist September, a two storey family | the other 4, an Orchard to Admire 21 years—and in additic to a cé tal panerie £ 325.000 a Steines ‘ teas © mto force in
    are Michael. residence, containing 4 bedrooms upstairs @!4 about 2 Acres 7 $ q ac on oa capital reserve ot 825,006 “ary, Tt Fs
    Caroline Gittens (Wife), 31.7.51—1n and back gallery “overlooking Harrison's | AT, ST. LAWRENCE GAP. A Seaside plus an appreciation of £469,837 over the book value of Trinidad
    _—_ rounds, room and dr i Stone u Bungalow a i . ‘ . ” a Ga ‘
    “Rie Seat tera se, cee | ewig cattle: RE [Ane gm Cs A Sia SBadts| Lotalling LITHTS2.” All this deeeie Ue eee AegeEVES ced mating a total ot iase
    . raw and usua Ls, pply on : ve ota P 2 i pit ar rorld-wia , 4, “ § 4 total of 14,79 iy ‘f
    ways expressed thelr aprapathy itr oor | froma. SFsi—sn | (Lerce) Stone "Built Bungelow toes o ing £273,75 3 All this des vite the accute world-wide j;,, service at the end af Gee z 5
    recent ‘bereaverment which Was OC | pm | Fine View of Sea and Land, about 2 epression of the early 1930s and six years of war and its 1950 During the 22 >
    sat oe the death of Walter ONE (1) large airy room at Bel Airy, | “cre aftermath ' 180.000 8 1€ ate nearly | -———__—_--_— " ano eee ree en
    Egber: ing (Furnished or unfurnished). Dial 3663, | ABOUT 7 MILES FROM CITY, Ch. Ch : 7 : was expended upon ad-
    The Gooding fam. 31,7. 51—1n 28,.7.51—2n | A New 3 Bedroom Stone Built Bun Profit And Allocations were added, bringing the total citional automatic exchange e a . VG
    . i ‘ s “ ’ d, § a 2utome > ange equip- 4 TE
    Sn EpEP ees aw re} : - t on oan 12 . y ¢ ; ,
    SEAIB: geal de Sole on coke Oe nr haley hn oe yg eA men Turning to the 1950 accounts, nur ‘ber to over 100,800 at Decem- nent, and the extension of the SAGUENAY RMINALS Ce
    Miss Doris Scale of U.S.A. grate-| Ray Street, Inmeciny we ee ee Bedroom Stone Hull Durga e the profit at £85,837 after charg. P°! 31 last. cable network throughout _ the ie yoo & SE ewe Se
    ttinaed te fore be Mette oe Ppt ayet 28.7 51—Sn | NEAR THE GARRISON. Almost New|ing profits tax and income-tax Venezuela Cclony, Here again inereases i, — - m = ae m er * Ln
    a ie » Sent wreaths or ee | nd Nearly 100% Stone Built 3 Bedroom i : 2») ROT ‘ eee kak + eosts. of operation due to rises . + -@
    expressed sympathy with them on| PLAT on Blue Wolere Perrece, newly | BunEaOw Tine Crane ,bullt 3 Betiroom mown a slight reduction of £2,797. The Trust's association with aserials aid tnkeoe hab . y 7 CANADIAN SERVICE
    the passing of their beloved Sister! built with spacious cupboards. Phone|AT HASTINGS MAIN RD. A 3 Bedroom:| Dividends and interest at £245,134 Venezuela dates back to 1928, It natte i Pp evels From Halifax, N & Montreal
    Gladys Seale, late of Bush Hall, St | aea0. 25.7.61--t.f.n, | (possible 4) Partly Stone Built Bungalow | Were up slightly, while sundry has a substantial investmeny 84° it necessary for the com- al bats %
    Michael. statin iw oe meepempeaesiigs ~ |Type and A 2 Bedroom Almost New |yrepeipts were down by £4,520. interest in the te lephone opera- P*"Y to apply for an inerease ir
    Mother Seale; Cyril and Gordon Seale, ROOM: Furnished or unfurnished, large, | Stone Built Bungalow; both yield about iv ae wee ’ . A 2 opera- the tele f ; : vr ' oy Se “Sr reenrnameeemrest cesta terete em ee ae
    {Brothers, UB: Mrs. Boucher, Mrs.| cool Room. Apply: Holyrood, ee $109 pm, and oan be bought os Management expenses decreased ting service there through — thé arated ars : vatees Phis was LOADING DATES
    egall, Mrs. Cuffley and cemtiver: ia St. Matthias, Hastings a1.7 ti—in | Lew ss under £3,500. . A £761, The reduction of ae ea cs Trenane rata mak C ‘ foe lr ao &
    ESET | openers S MA D. A Seaside 828 in interest paid on loans Properties, damited, anc the tates came into force as from | Expected Arrival
    ——~—| SOMERSET-—St. Lawrence Ga 2/4 Bedroom Partly Stone Built 3 storey, |... 3 the 4 i Penezuel: - . ‘ August 1, 1950 Montreal | Halifax Dates, Bridgeto
    I bedrooms. Fully furnished Rurtning enough Land to Convert or Build a 60-|#%4 deposits reflects the repay- hehe auele Seer, , eee ' ; Barbador
    \nonima Nacional Telefonos d Barbados ‘ ‘
    water; electric light. From ist August, | oom Hotel or Guest House ment of the bank loan. Profits 47. ate ‘ ii oe arbados Pak HIUL + Jy ® suis | a July
    ItGPE: In loving memory of our be.| APP!’ next door Mrs. R. Lynch AT ROCKLEY MAIN RD,, Near Blue|tax and income-tax at £87,400 is Venezuela. In Barbados the Telephone SS ONee ienth 8 | 23 July # August
    loved one Elsie Ev 31.7.51—2n | Waters; A 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type. ai : ae . In March last 1 returned Compan vhict Laut na” hele Tan SUNPRINCE i t 6 AUR .« 22 August
    loved one Elsie Evelyn Hope, died AT NAVY GARDENS, Almost New 2{QUr contribution towards the iosether with Mr. Hollyer, chair. Gor Pany: Which provides service i 1 August 16 August | 1 ‘Sept
    k F — 7 > wether w Mr. oll rc P= Hire s ari anine ’ . us §
    ls Winnie Tele amd lite depart| ,,"“SNUG CORNER” — Palm Beach, | Bedroom (Possible 3), Stone Byilt Bun-|GOvernment’s spending depart- . an of me servintrins ares satin ! ke all the companies in which we ar * a ee
    You'll live forever in our hearts, | Hastings. Comfortable Seaside Bunga- | galow ments and swallows up more than |. : + pany, are interested, by the most mod- U.K SERVICE

    The Hope's Family. 81.7.51—1n





    low, all Modern Conveniences. Available











    NEAR NAVY GARDENS: Almost New 3



    half our gross profits,



    and our consulting engineers from

    ern type of automatic equipment,





    ist August. Apply C, E. Clarke, 7/ Bedroom Stone Built Bungalow visit to Venezuela and the , 37 aur ate . he : . * +
    Swan St. Phone 2631 or 3020 “ "| AT LOWER FONTABELLE, A New 2| We have transferred £10,000 to British West Indies, having spent acded 378 new stations during the From Swansea, Liverpool and Glasgow
    $1.7,51—3n | Pedroom Concrete Bungviow, Going as | revenue reserve and £25,000 to ;ye weeks he former ¢ ~y Year, making a total of 4,330 at Expected Arrival
    ANNOUNCEMENTS —|Low as Under £1,100 contingencies reserve, bringing fe feos ae onmer country the end of 1950. Nearly £55,000 Swansee Liverpsel Glassew sigs, Beldgetawa,
    “VOLENCY” — Prospect, St. James. | ABOVE GOVERNMENT HILL. A new 3 fee Tt £100,000 a; u ® and several weeks in Jamaica, was spent upon indoor and t ‘LONDON VENDOR 11 Jul 17 July 8 July 10 August
    HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—isle of} Comfortable @ Bungalow, ali| Bedroom Concrete Bungalow. Going as ae ' and £75,000 ‘yrinidad, and Barbados. ite et , and Oul- | os, “BAST WAVE if suffeient = 14 Aug. = 18 Aug. 4 August
    Spices. SANTA MARIA—ioveliest hotel| ™0dern conveniences. Available | from | LOW as under £1,200 respectively. After these transfers Caracas, the capital, and all the side prant extensions and. recon- SUNRELI tind wee 9 Aug 3 Sept, 20 Sept
    in Caribbean. Rates from 87.00 per head| }*t September. Apply C. E. Clarke, 7|! HAVE ALSO SEVERAL PRopeRTiEs | tnd providing for the usual 7 per tanks ay > Venezuela are *truction {offers , ee
    per day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi-| Swan St. Phone 2631 or 3029 in Belleville, Fontabelle, and at Brighton |cent. Preference and 8 per cent. ‘~bortant towns of Venezuela are “the number of telephones in
    dential district ufder Government House 31,7.51—3n | —Seaside and Facing Sea; City Business ; : ; per ,. undergoing a process of moderni- ,, : sontneatcparemonpiiieliaabiiceh staat cia aoe SOs
    hill, Rates from $5.00 per head per day. Premises—a Large one with Residence |O'dinary dividends, £08,752 _ is zation and expansion which has ‘Me Overseas companies in which , a 7 9 gece
    SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing AUTOMOTIVE and Eman Gountey ‘Hetses ieee Gee | brought ine” MEAinst £100,094 to be seen to be believed. Wide by deena ieee U.S. & CONTINENTAL SERVICE
    Beach, Rates from $4.00 per head per untry Houses, Zar Cane ‘0 it in. - » steel s . -rete < . yy nearly 18,000 during 1950 to a
    Pl tions, B 2 avenidas, steel and concrete struc- ; ( Expected Arrival
    day. Enquiries to D, M. Thi, Pransce. AUTO-CYLE—A Norman Auto Gycle Rincon. ca a Oe eae Balance-Sheet tures and new urbanizations are tal of over 198,000, and the ster- London Antwerp Rotterdam Dates, Bridgetown,
    my E % oe in good condition. Apply to | Hastings. 29.7.51—1n. Investments in our general port- appearing in all directions and /i%g value of their gross telephone ; PREve
    . Moore, “Plaza,"’ Barbarees Hill or foli ‘ 11 * » eee Y i we ci yn buildings and pl needa 4 . | @y. “BUNO 18 July 23 July 27 July 6 August
    EDUCATIONAL Brittons Cross Road. AUCTION ae at £1,118,024 show little these developments have been gsa ae ant assets amounts |». ssuNJEWEL Aug 14 Aug 17 Aug 2 Sept
    change. farried out at a great speed to some £13,000,000, They form























    CAR: Morris Oxford. Excellent con-

























































    Loans and debentures in sub-







    during the past two or three years,























    valuable overseas assets to Britain











    Agents:







































    PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703






















    cate dition, Phone 2393. 31.7.51—In sidiary companies re jj reas y
    n ) nies have increased > ping é 0 xdern for investment and export, z
    MODERN HIGH SCHOOL | ——— ~ag. |UN@ER THE IVORY HAMMER |b, ‘efaa. ose all by way of Verte ene ee ee oe he ERGY et eee, Bae
    (Registered and Approved by Dept of ] ne (1) Standard Sedan 12 H.-P. : ‘ A 1 > ay mac une ¥ anc apphances, oe ei a ; 6 naies, in : saiiicankia eee oe Be:
    Education) oat in Toy condition, new tyres and| By Sue an ene from the In- etal oans to aid the telephone It is hard for the public services, Whieh these companies operate
    There have bee: 1 | battery. A bargain at the figure asked. | Surance Co,, I will sell at my_ Auction ; operatin, companies in their i as kee ace the eleco “ rvices
    plicants for Go nchoet Wear tee oon Apply Thomas House, Brighton, Black | Mart, Shepherd Street, on Thursday, ania. Dp es t eng ee wae? oo ie witht tenn on ae oe °
    meneing 2nd September 1951, all of whom | eek. or Phone 3174. 31.7.51—3n | August 2nd, a quantity of Lacquer Paints The loz Mathie is al aA with the new demands, particular- \ 10U & a burden either to ‘0.
    we cannot accommodate. This necessi- | | Sitable for painting Cars and Buses; | e loan by the Trust to asso- jy as all public services have the Colonial Development Fund Oc *
    tates several entrance examinations. CARS—Renault "760" formerly M—6s2, | Sunflex--in 1 gallon, ‘4 gallon and 2-pint | ciated company — The Anglo- cuffered some disruption and dis- 4Nd the British taxpayer, or to
    The first will be held on Friday, 3rd] t¥™€S_ and condition excellent. 38—40| Sizes, Ready Mixed Putty, Rope, Wrap- Portuguese Telephone Company— F = > he var . San.)
    August, 1951, at 10 a.m. Those who ‘have| M-P.G. Only 7,000 miles. Reason for | PiN® Paper, Toilet Seat with Covers in which amounted to £768 oy ~, turbance by removals of plant the various Governments of the FAC.
    already beer allocated to the second en-| *¢iling—owner bought a Mayflower. To| Bakelite, Aluminium Pots, Pans, Kettles, | (V Ze 137 at necessitated by the Government's islands they serve ;
    trance exam on August 2ist must not| be Seen at Chelsea Garage (1950) Lid.,| Various sizes Enamel Chambers, Allumi-|the end of 1949, was repaid — lans Effect O . NEW YORK SERVICE
    Dement thembakeas on thas Sed, Pinfold Street nium Pressure | Cookers, Sandpaper, | during 1950 from part of the pro- ae ane, om ate ect Ot Defence Programme 3S. TRYA sails 20th July Arrives Barbados lst July, 1981.
    ee a A. LYNCH. (abla aeciacaa ee Soeeenss, Cates deine Ease hukeinnine Ot oa Ne eG ee ee wha lthiont of the Sous Acechedl We are living in a time when [| * TRAMER sails 10th August Arrives Barbados Qist August, 1951
    ” anh . ; " , ' aap ‘| of further capital by that company W® ‘ e aM the problems oR ers a ——teteerteceen an = whaaitanptieatemiydiominnseveints nl. eiplacehieieetliealintiest adi
    Principal, CARS—Just arrived!—Mayflowers & | Window Glass panes 16 ins by 12 ins. as 1 p at company Republics, the major source I be ms | of the world call NEW ORLEANS SERVIC
    29.7.51.—8n, , Vanguards in Grey, Maroon, Blue, Black. | #%4 ™any other items. referred to later. vy ; a. tor statesmanship, foresight, faith eae Pera sEANS ICE
    Cash prices $2,300.00, $2,800.00 respec-| Sale at 1 p.m. Terms: CASH, The bank balances at December *Ti8ing from oil. Its menetary ang courage of the highest degree. |. eGENERAL ARTIGAS sails 1900 Jul Arnived Bprbados “aivt July, 196t,
    tively. Just advised of further increase VINCENT GRIFFITH. 31, 1950, amounting t 364,258, System is based on the gold mp at Gueree: TRAMER sails Ist August rrives Barbados 14th Auguat
    aa in prices cutautite. Eilomistic. cho A\ictionese. 4 1950, amounting to £664,258, §¥ amen sold: pauian ts he need for the expenditure of | \ STEAMER sailn 15th Auqiet Arrives Barbados 2th August, 1051
    LOST & FOUND Garage (1950) Ltd., Pinfold Street 29.7.61.—4n. | Will be used during 1951 by the standard and its gold reserves are vast sums on defence cannot be ater anor e watemes —or~-—y -ensheeaRRRESDEEReEeS
    ‘és 28-7.51--3n. | 7 veritatis Seorenhg companies con- aa in on * its oe apo denied, and we as individuals and CANADIAN SERVICE
    LOST nected with the Trust. tis a strong dollar country with as a nation realize that we must | ©UTHBOUN
    PiCK-UPS—Two new Vanguard Pick- PUBLIC NOTICES . no external debt, and there are 4) . ey
    ; ’ . shoulder the adde rde Name of Bhi Sall
    SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS. Series F ue. Cash price $2,600 00. Next shipment Valuation Of Investments Tick restr tituiealt FEA camer itera pete : Rosell burde ns thus , ails Montreal Salle Halifax Arrives B'dos.
    7001 and 7003. Finder please return same | Wilh ge 5° ey, ietested. pexsoris — The valuation of £1,432,535 for A record. number of stations Se S by events. At the} ss, “ALCoA PENNANT July a4th ‘Aunués an
    to Frederick Greenidge, Lower Greys|Snould seize = this opportunity now. | ip ‘ f Rosia ted i Sa eae * : same time, we are entitled to ex-| 8S. “ALCOA PARTNER Aug. 6th au ;
    Tenantry, Ch. Ch. Reward offered. | Chelsea Garage (1980) Lad... Pinfold St. | aagMia conte ver nate na one Sedans | quoted investments represents an namely, 7,877-—weve added during ject that the leaders at the nati 8. “ALCOA PILGRIM" Ae ake, August 130
    31.7,51—1n |. 5 28.7.51.—3n, me horas BL 80 an week aut; |appreciation of 48.8 per cent.-om 1950, bringing the total to 64,853, ijt, eRe asa On ud. 27th Septr, Gth
    “= * minimum charge $1.50 on week-days the net book , bringing the’ total tc “393, will take every step to mitigate] sOntHnouND eee
    er ae ee aaomentan KAISER, 1949, Six seater Saloon, | @"4 $1.80 on Sundays. , Ook cost of £962,608. The put this has not diminished de- and avoid permane t damase 8.8, “ALC LGR
    SWEEPSTAKE TICKET: Series T. fo inl “gine” Beso ls directors consider the valuation of Sie stil) n heady ¢ § I é nt damage to] 5.4. LCOA PILGRIM due Rarbedos July: 80th for St. Lawrence River
    2602. Finder please return saame to Rita | mayeq ‘Dial o-74 worurely as new. NOTIC unquoted investments at their mand, and-there is still a heavy the whole machinery of industry Ports.
    Cotlyn, Sweet Bottom, St. erg. : , i 31.7.51—6n E book cost of £155,326 to be ite a and growing wailing list. and international commerce by| ~* These vessels have limiled nace San
    -T.51—In : WW air & The c ij : ree an : o ae ® limited passen cer accammodation
    MOTOR CYCLE: One Velocette Motor The Estate of reasonable ~ The company has important ex~ which we as an island people live
    LOST CERTIFICATES Cvele gimost new. Apply to L. M. ATHELSTON WATSON Of the Trust’s total investments P?@™Si0" plans to meet the situation and to which we owe our entire ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW ¥¢
    THE WEST INDIA BISCUIT COMPANY | °!""*¢: Jeweller, No. 12, James Street (deceased) including interests i i fae whieh I discussed at length with strength AP NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
    2..4.51—1n | NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ail \ rests in subsidiary , trates Whi ined Ae as " : ; PLY:—DA COSTA & CO. LTD—c
    Saiob Ie Hen RS i, é Healt persons having any debt or claim against |COMpanies, 23.44 per cent. are in his Excellency the os President, Dr. The continuation of lavish and , » LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE
    has been made to the Board of Directors the Estate of Athelston Watson who died |Ioans and debentures, 10.67 per German Suarez Flamerich, and wasteful Government expenditure
    Pe ees teeny we Eee Or arectors in England on the lith July, 1935 0e: i -efe at te I the Ministers of Development and by experiments ¢ a athe -~
    of the above-named Company for the cent, in Preference stocks and te Minister pr y experiments and expedient i
    issue of duplicats Share: Certificates tor; | —————————-—— —_—_________ | re hereby required to send particulars 65.89 r - a. Bp Communications, with whom I added to the tial See . MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA,
    10 Shares Nos. 4724 - 4743 inclusive |. PHWCO REFRIGERATOR: 9% cubic | f their claims duty attested to the un- | 5-89 per cent. in Ordinary stocks ns, at o the essential needs of} NEW ZEALAND Sing witiren, |i
    M4 are ga lag RB i ft, Full width freeging chamber. Brand | 46T8igned Eustace Maxwell Shilstone and | (Which includes 31.49 per cent. in 2/80 discussed the extent of the the defence programme inevitably : (M.A.N,Z.) "
    3¢ Shares Nos. 11749 — 11784 inclusive | R@W unit, Reconditioned throughout, | Lindsay Ercil Ryeburn Gill the qualified | subsidiaries), Geographically 83.46 financial requirements for carry- !eads to constantly rising costs anc 5S. “ARABIA ecteduled to sail
    24 Shares Nos. 14865 — 14888 inclusive | M&Y be inspected at Leo Yard, Chkeap- | 4¢ministrators cum testamento annexo of | ner cent. are in the British Com- ing out these plans These dis- prices with all the harmful results | (vt MelPovene 12th June, Brisbane 22nd
    i f Franci . side. Apply H. L. Smith, Sandford,|the Estate of the deceased, in care of . ra Push Com. ink i Beare pie : 1 Oe Mae ver TERS POBUITE une, Port Alma 28th June, Sydney
    pple sy eon ty See Groavee, | at bliin i ae 4.1 lett’ | Messrs. Cottle Catford & ‘Co,, No, 17|™MOnWealth and 16.54 per cent. in cussions are vroceeding actively. which flow therefrom ily 4th, arriving Trinidad end duly, Me Gle 'T tlanti
    have been lost or ‘misplaced, and. Motice : — | High Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors on | foreign countries. West Indies Burden Of Taxation id gDarbados early August | | See ie Sere
    . * rt re or before the 22nd day of August, 1951, ‘ - ~_ . £ ‘FO FAIRY" is scheduled to
    Tees Peet iar nae We aha’ Us after which date we shall proceed to Group Accounts During my visit to our associated Tne sribpsition of -excessively al from Hobart late June, North Queens. |} ue
    i . distribute the assets of the deceased The group reserves—capital ar le > orati , ies » Peavy burdens of taxation, pre- ind mid July, Brisbane end July, Sydney
    Original, Certificates, * ‘naw Owen Sisk Seed ate he hon saving = Portes wipes ns phentic hav- sents : total : £913,494", im 5 fain woe ican Ta; = venting as they do the adequate rt t ate land mia men on ee oe
    , . Amm-~ ing regard only to such claims as we a eee el ‘ s . = ‘ a ie i aa rriving a rinidad mid September, "
    wae ee is Gaiss ot) eadesiAan peste Boxes, Within a short while you shin theo bave had notice oe and we | increase of £76,804 over 1949, This much that gives reason for satis- Provisions to meet the greatly in-| ‘Cargo ‘accepted on “throug mee ot |} ENGLAND & FRANCE
    order 8 st CLAIR HUNTE. * may be the winner of one of the follow- | will not be liable for the asseis or any |is equal to 71,5 per cent. of the faction, and can confirm that ¢ré@sed costs of maintaining ma-| ord frozen cargo | a laa
    . St. ing:— ist Prize $50.00, 2nd Prize $15.00, | part thereuf so distributed to any per-|issued Preference and Ordinary .. i . ;- chinery and of its replacement by | J" dition to general cargo these} ))) S.S. “GASCOGNE 1th
    FT 3rd Prize $5.00. 1,7.51—26n | son of whose debt or claim we shall capital totalling £1 277 KON ak ane effort is being made to ex- more modern nad YMicient plant | ;22els have ample space for chitled and August 1951, Via St. Lucia,
    dy ; -|not have had notice. . alng £1,277, or One yind and improve the telephone ay ; emcient plant,| Vading for transhipment a: Trinidad Martinique. G adaloupe and
    BABYS PRAM in Food condition, ‘And all Berets widethed 06°8haenia aoa 8 quarter times the amount services in Jamaica, Trinidad and ™USt inevitably damage the pros-]| 1 British Guiana, Leeward and Wind- ar Ne ee oupe 3
    : price. pply: Mrs. Seale, - issu rdinary stoc * ‘ ey eC is c ry aini yard Islands . é
    T d S G A Son Navy Gardens, Phone 4128. aries witha aeare saree thes See e727 000 sued Ordinary stock of Tobago, and Barbados, The = caine. “a? en ees “rot aries particulars apply :
    0- ay oh 31.7.51—2n | Dated this 22nd day of June, 1951, oe Portugal | » voare id managements of these e iy the Saar as cartel jelent FURNESS, WITHY & CO, LTD, { ee
    “FARM” POWDERED FULL E. M, SHILSTONE, “~ e » realize full well that the raw materials and TRINIDAD {i
    “I want to be happy ” Y, ms tl ares Stee a a a ond. The Trust has been directly i reba nis pantie Felations fast food which we require BW. SOUTH BOUND.
    3 . ualified ministrator i . er wbthie 4. spe P . . 8 ave sé “ occa~ « ‘ ar
    per §-Ib tin and $1.00 per 1-Ib tin. cum testamento annexo of sepecege 24 ane The sng OOF Ors nnly be maintained by a ceaseless oe i eee copa Reiley DA COSTA & CO. LTD 5.S. “Gascogne” 2nd August
    ut I can appy Watson, deceased. r and has continuec dor Arat.tlasn earvine ) hard-won experience and to the BWI. Trinids »me “gl and
    milk obtainable. The 5-Ib family size is 23,6.51—,4n.|to hold, as it does to-day, a sub- rend¢ r first-class servic si ,, merchant adventuring spirit, to | @=RReeees ee ee WD a Demerara
    -+, ‘till T have a Gas Cooker | ]7¢ally economical. Insist on “Farm” for | —_____. ———— | gtantial share investment, and has DP¥ring the year the Trust ad- | ovide real incentives for in-i\i §6©3~>SP”———COCC ) rench Guiana,
    @ sake of your health and your pocket. > 0 . wear) ae oa : onary 6-2 . 1 5 e :
    too! If your dealer cannot supply. phone 2229. NOTICE | supported the company with wet nS; a ie ary joan ny he om creased production and efficiency || The MV. “GARIBB | ) (
    ... Hubby take note ! 27,6.51—t.f.n. onowenee Tea webLee temporary loans as occasions ae ei O18 000 timavde eis eae and to encourage and protect sav- ecept Cargo and .P Accepting Passengers,
    RECORDS: HINDS-HOWELL required. tonal £218, mes cap!= ings which alone can supply the Dominica, Antigua, M Cargo and Mail
    ‘CORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing , Associated ith this inancial tel development programmes, ,,. mA, " ata Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Fr
    LSS | ....and we will order for you if we (deceased) sociated wi this financia capital needed to maintain, im- , of
    haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,; NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all|relationship is the technical man- upon which collectively they ex- prove and expand our industries th August 1951
    Ltd. 6.7.81—t.f.n.| Persons having any debt or claim against |ufacturing support which, through pended neerly £350,000 the Directorate | rhe M.V. “DAERWOOD" wit Ut
    e rey Llewellyn Hinds- a 7 je ¢ ave avails < . av » rovide rory PB B J : LERW wii
    WALTER BABB Howell who died in this Island on the the Trust, is always available to ice having been provided from Following upon the resignatior cept Cargo and Passengers for } {
    19th November 1948 are herevy | the company, own resources. Considera- Fi Lie C ' b ol “, en F ’ it. Luella, G ad wt Aruba,
    ROCK HALL ST. LUCY WANTED required to send particulars of ae With the conclusion of the tion is being given to furthe) D “ ri M oi * ei 1980. 4 ay engers 0 for St Vip.
    claims duly attested to the undersigne egotiatior bet e ce ety tnannds f aa aman @ "a vite D W >» mn elober, 50, cent, Date of sailing to be notifier
    Experienced Painter, recent- Minigum, sherds ee 72 cents and) Kustace Maxwell Shilstone and Lindsay aan th Po me Goctaaniee Tea a alte ape : sevital which we accepted with regret,
    dy returned to the Colony 96 cents SuNdays 24 ‘ds — over 24) Ercil Ryeburn Gill the duly constituted | NC [ie Lae ae nen’ by these companies as may be ex- ere pleased to welcome Mr B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS {
    y re iil words 3 cente a word week—4 cents a/| attorneys in this Island of Lioyds Bank | OM 4 mutually satisfactory basis, pedient to fund or repay their : H Crieht c alee i 7, ; i
    tone “ke C Saeate “tc lattb adhe Limited of England, the qualified execu- | resulting in an increase of tariffs +o, yporary loans from the Trust a of he Trig * in a il tas es
    under e ontrac or tor of the will of the deceased, in care} as from May 1 1950, together - ae ro 44 2 director of the Trus n pr . ra ,
    : - . ; vhich at the end of 1950 amounted 4 Ts eh, ae . . Consignde. Tele, 4047 t * “ ’
    Painting HELP nigh Buoe. Bricgwoea Msoncitors, a with a clarification of the oe fo some £643,000. The advantage cod ‘og, E pulley who he a \ Be Wise ... ADVERTISE
    : we or before the 22nd day of August, 1951,| tract, the company during the aes eae. s to Sided in Venezuela as representa~ | payee eterna
    Reasonable Terms invlie Rae ee mentor a after. which date wo sitall proceed to| year was able to replace existing #0. er ee, pact |° tive of the interests of the Trust, se
    eenenees tectrie eats fi “th distribute the assets of the deceased loans from the Trust by perma- the publie. they serve, © aVIDE aise retired from your board. We| --————--—-———— ‘2
    Guaranteed Workmanship — experienced electrical engineers for the) jong the parties entitled thereto, hav- : behind them a continuous flow of 9 ‘ , eae fy DAFF FFE EPP PEEP PPLDL-POPP
    in minica and ent financing in the form of an : wish him a long and happy retire- —— 7 ——
    post of Engineer/Manager Do ing regard only to such claims as we | â„¢ g . new capital is obvious ac- id
    31,7,51—In }}}] St. Vincent Hydroelectric Systems. Reply| S)8y" “then ‘have had notice of, and|issue of 400,625 Ordinary shares aA SHAE! Haheey tasinienn ee \ You will be delighted with our new models of
    giving details of Career .and stating| VP wii not be liable for the assets or and the placing of £1,000,000 of companied as it is by technical Thanks To Staff
    SSS Salary required to Mr. G.' \Hoddam, any part thereof so distributed to . nt. Fi bentur tock assistance of the highest order, anks To LA
    Se ee teeta a hres ae any person of whose debt or claim we 5 Per eee “i Her bebenture 6 ‘ MHOPO: Nase MAS WERES., FO Beit shall not have had notice. Both issues, which were sponsored an nt of rn ‘ . lern t e join with the board of directors 4 4 4 BH
    10 DAY'S NEWS FLASH oe git Aad all parsons indebted de, ime pale Se Trust, were highly suc- ment of the most modern typ Se aecebenti thats these to Ga
    - e are ue: P . i Tyrie
    HARRISON COLLEGE itasotednain svithout delay . Since the settlement of these Jamaica 5,500 men and women of the Trust Inspect them at
    Required in September, 1951, for at/ Dated this 22nd day of June, 1951. outstanding political matters, the . 1" Jamaica development has and its associated companies over- 5 So mi
    Outstanding books on our Islands least one term, an Assistant Master or E. M. SHILSTONE, aes BP ancinn nen, been well maintained with a gain seas for their loyal and efficient VHE Cn ¥ Vk V7. x %
    Mistress to teach General subjects in L. E. BR. GILL development and expansion pro- 1.438 se Necia takal’ of; chccicg KURauEh Oe tam tees ry MG. d 4 v4
    Marston Sbeat the Carisbean | te, Lower School. Attorneys for Lloyds Bank | gramme of the company has been of 1,408 stations to @ total of service throughout the year Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets
    information about the baie Selary according to qualifications and Limited, the executors of | proceeding with great energy and !3437 in service at the end of The report and accounts were
    Sanne ir Guin sbi — beater Wl Moen, ay the will of | Geoffrey | during 1950 over 7,400 stations 1950. Some £115,000 was spent adopted
    a ’ . ewellyn nds-Howell, ‘ ’
    to the above. Book full of rich Michael. 29.7.51—2n deceased,
    information .......-..++.+++ 18/6 | 23.6.51—4n. | }2 == SaaS
    JOHNSON’S STATIONERY | + 1}
    Clear Glass in Plastic,. Heavy MISCELLANEOUS | y ’ |
    guage for car windshields. NOTICE
    Unbreakable, Sn ae ean, RAFFLE IN AID OF THE ST. PHILAP
    BEE’S WAX. — Dial 2628, BABY WELFARE CENTRE
    JOHNSON’S HARDWARE 21.7,.51—8n P :
    , *ve The draw was made by the Rev.
    , hroyy H, V. Armstrong, Rector of St. Philip, 4 4
    : Re - - am WANTED TO RENT on Saturday, July 28th. The following 2 Ww 1 T
    S| BUNGALOW. by marta Couple, ne | Sie he""Srne‘Wisnit minbers with the heel Tractor } |
    i . c ‘ comp! ished ’ a
    ‘ vulow, on the sea, with garage, for iong | ina "bios es it |
    SHOP-KEEPERS. )F 0c" sot ’ |
    = “Ws ae * " " 4 Prizes of $25.00: I. 100, G. 164, A. 254
    wees M. 27 |
    ANOTHER IMPORTANT TRAILER—Second Hand a 8 Prizes of $10.00: J. 222, L. 108, { {
    able to be diawn by tractor. e lJ 377, C. 61, I, 149, I. 179, I, 319, K. 1,
    MEETING $5273. “10 Prizes ‘of $5.00, F. 148, G. 270; iti ne OO un fe m
    28.7.81—8n. | F292, A. 155, D. 183, K. 194, M. 116,
    will be held at | 3. 305, 4. 386,, BD. 324 % :
    LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE) elders of ‘winning Tickets should ste With the Ferguson System your

    QUEEN'S PARK



    The application of Germaine Phillips,

    licerse at a wall building near the Round

    Polite Magistrate,Dist A

    31.7.$i—in

    | communicate with N. G. Daysh, Mapps,

    partnership heretofore existing between







    EMIL TAYLOR

    61









    rields

    can



    is.one-third that c

    ~



    satisfactorily



    a Track Trae-

    holder of Liquor License No. B80 of 1951 | St. /*hilip. iivia wt ; tha dicbe eee lable
    granted to Joseph St. Hill in respect | ploughed and the unit is available P ILING USES
    on Thursday, 2nd August of a toed and shingle same attached | DISSOLUTION OF as a transport Vehicle. A
    at 2.30 p.m. to residence at Tweedside Rd,, St, Mich- PARTNERSHIP
    . vei, for permission to use said liquor NOTICE 8 HEREBY GIVEN that the The price of this versatile Tractor



    SEE and ATTEND Hiouse, Bay Sreet, St, Michael SIMEON ST. GLAIR HUNTE, GEORGE | race
    f Dated this 30th day of July 1951 | LAWRENCE FARMER and EDWARD tor, and you ll be amazed at
    miss To: E. A. McLeod, Esq | EMIL TAYLOR carrving on business its performance.
    Don't this last Police Magistrate, Dist. “A” at Trafalgar Street, Bridgetown under. I 19 erin ‘ Tal 1
    of the Series. GERMALYE PHILLIPS, | the style or firm name of THE ENTER- Further information on applica- » V if \( UJ ING; i ()
    Applicant. | PRISE TRADING CO. has this day been 1 \ | ANUPFAL NG i
    AGENDA: N.B.—This application wili be consid-| dissolved insofar as the said George a ke | ;
    ered at a Licensing Court to be held at; Lawrence Farmer is coneerned, who} 110.4 |
    Unfinished Business Police Court, Dist. “A” on Thursday! hereby retires from the said Partnership i GOVERNMENT HILL }
    New Business. the 9th day of August 1951, at 11 o’elock.| Dated the 30th day of July. 1961 a 4 a {\ | , GOVERNME! eka |
    a.m S. ST. CLAIR HUNTE BB % d . |
    29.7 .51.—2n. EB. A. MehEOD G. L. FARMER i és zB. (ROBT. THOM. LTD.) Dial 4616 I)


    | __PAGE EIGHT



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1951

    ee en A TT TT
























    T {¢ PRORPUDDS SSS OS9SOSSOOO", lie _—
    _ ENGLAND FALL 33 RUNS SHORT ) 22 ===
    | 3 MECCANO SET ! ame company
    es nine 7 and 8 1
    Communicate Vivian Hutson, i ANNUAL DANCE
    Bailey. Hilton Put Up Worrell, ‘Ramadhin Near College Beat TOF Muslims | eysck heute 2 || Seomaes ipa
    sliims LSC SOE OOOO! Roebuck Street

    | Last Wicket Stand More Records—smrm ¢ wucorr Sy opafigh 72) 21 sain en vane








    on Saturday, 4th AUGUST, 1951







    dos are notified that at the Annual SUBSCRIPTION .... 2/6
    7. > . * : - — =o Was General Meeting of the Juma CRYPTOQUOTE NO. 61 m. s a
    (Prous Cin Oiew’ Carcoinaia) ie afm a scored another century for Rad Harrison College playing in| Masjid (Barbados) held at 1.30 DiS BUEAT BQ HCDE © UZAL Music by Mr. Keith Campbell's
    LONDON, July 30 clifie in the defeat of Oldham. His 106 makes his total 1.180, fine form convincingly defeated] p.m. on 27th July, 1951 at which ZAHCBZV-—-QAWPDHY@. Strietly by Invitation
    ‘ 5 Ny JULY oN. only 322 short of the League’s all-time record. Oldham, Swordfish seven goals to two in (28) persons were present, Mr. |
    A GREAT last wicket stand between Bailey and Hilton batted first and were all out for 163. Frank Worrell took their 7 water polo match at the]M. Y. Degia who had been elect- Kast Crypt: He gains Windom Re
    A; which came as a fitting finale to the centuries scored by 4 wickets for 52 runs. Radcliffe had no difficulty in passing ~o gaa Club yesterday after- ed Chairman accepted be resig-| Patty Sere ee Sane 3s by
    . Hutten and May enabled England to creep within 33 runs the score as Frank Worrell took most of the bowling pee nation of the Secretary Moham- |
    “ ae Se aie “f i & anc aa ; ua : med Sayed Piprawala. | J. A. CORBIN &@ SONS. | BARBADOS CLERKS’
    | ot South Africa’s first innings’ score of 538 during the was undefeated at the end of the innings. Billy Manning playing at cen-| “mppe meeting then proceeded to | OT eae oe UNION
    fourth day's play in the Fourth Test at Leeds. is ——- Sonny Ramadhin is on his way ‘@, forward turned in a good }

    By close South Africa had in-
    creased their lead to 120 without
    loss, but as only one day remains
    for play and the wicket is show -
    ing no great signs of wear, it
    appears hardly possible for any
    result other than a draw to be





    appoint a new Secretary and the CALLING ALL

    CLERKS & SHOP
    SE HABLA ESPANOL ASSISTANTS

    ORLENTAL [13 special MEETING

    CURIOS, SOUVENIRS, AN-








    formance for Harrison Col- : ; ;

    jn Ber Sos ; to 100 wickets although he siarted P°& following were nominated: — |

    apparent desire to score quickly, S h etty k nico, lege. He scored the first four M. Y. Degi opo | |
    and although Rowan reacned 50 c OOo oO y Ss 56 Statetie baud te has ow taken goals of the match. The first two ts ae we ae te Dee

    en ; . Patel, seconded by M. E. Navsa.
    OF tes, M . :
    Br oe cae niete te casing Ht secure 24 wickets with 9 matehe: SinNtes oP eine the first) 'E. 3. Hafigee proposed by I. A.

    : to be played. Crompton batted two minutes of play. Kothdia Valla, seconded by A. S.|
    to theii lead 2 iy, Win Matches first against Ashton and declared , The third goal went in after] pandor.
    tailey, after bowling one over, at 169 for 5 wickeis. Ashton were four minutes and the fourth came These nominations were put to}

    OPPOSE OOPS EPSP OSS PPP PER,

    was compelled to give up with a







    |
    |






























































































    at sea against the spin bowling of 19 line minutes, “Mortimer" | the vote and it was agreed that|{} TIQUES, IVORY, JEWELS,
    achieved. recurence of his back trouble _ Lodge defeated Y.M.P.C., and Ramadhjh and were all out for Weatherhead sent in goal number|M. Y. Degia and E. I. Hafigee ||} SILKS Ete. ; his ae
    The stand between Bailey and soya arRica IST INNINGS six Foundation Wanderers when the 106. “Ramadhin took 6 wickets for five, 30 seconds before.half time. | should be joint secretaries for the ||| bskcaonwenndied | Y.M.C.A. (HOSTEL)
    Hilton was by far the most ex- ENGLAND FIRST INNINGS fourth series of Second Division 60 runs. + After the interval Billy Manning] ensuing year. | | TO-NIGHT AT 8.00
    citi cricket produced during L. Hutton b Van Ryneveld 100 Cricket ended last Saturday, Tne In the Ribblesdale League Dar- lined up in the back line. meeting then accepted the ||} sa 7 .
    ng Pp 0 y- The g Pp | ,
    the previous three and a halt Ff. Cowsen ¢ Mansell b A. Rowan -. “6 Empire—Police match finished in Wen had an casy win against Bar- | _ laudited Statement of accounts} O'CLOCK
    days When they came to- % May b A: Rowan oo 3 No decision, Empire scoring 110 Nldswick who were all out for 76 an oe half was, three min-| ang all documents etc. have been| Every Clerical Worker
    gether England were 445 for 9 W Watson b Chubb sz for 5 wickets in reply to Police ‘2 about two hours, Darwen lost utes old when Herbert Portillo! handed over to the undersi-med: |. 6sse66 $6 = should attend as important
    snd South Africa appeared set 1 Baiicy b Mann % 172 for 9 wickets, Leeward and tWo early wickets before 10 was Opened the scoring for Swordfish 1% POPSOESOOOOS eee dectitata: wi be ae
    for a satisfactory first innings F: Brown ¢ FE. Rowan b A. Rowan 2 fYarrison College mataged to st the board, but Ken Rickards Allan Taylor fn the Harrison Col- M. Y. DEGIA, 1% the meeting
    lead, But Bailey who had left 5: Brennan. ee 16 secure first innings lead oe th ‘© brought his team out of danger lege forward line scored next E. I. HAFIGEE i% Get These Tast
    the field on the second day with R. Tattersa!l c BE. Rowan b A. Rowan 4 pes aetioe 8 te ‘Sr their with a sparkling 56 not out. Rick- with a lovely back hand shot; Joint Secretaries | COME AND PROTECT x
    nat bee 1 leverly M. Hilton not out 9 re , Opponents, Comber- ards has now scored 700 runs and taken when his head was. partial- THE JUMA MASJID % YOUR INTEREST !
    a strained back muscle, cleverly Extras (b, 10; Lb. 7,n.b 1) 18 mere and P* -kwick. with sonable luck shoul; ly submerged and backing the Barbados); * ik
    : 7 oe CARNE PRE i reasonable luck should get |; 8 ig ( . ell t 29.7.51.—In.
    shielded Hilton from the bowling yt i The Lodge boys scored 108 his 1,000 by the end of the season, goal. s Ss
    and between them they added 60 =~ 7 against Y.M.P.C. who scored 75 Everton Weekes hit 69 not out. This was Harrison College’s | ———————— enna OOOO OOS 45606}
    of which Ballay's ne was oe BOWLING ANALYSIS 3 in each innings. Lodge then to play a big part in Bacup’s sixth goal. oo For Your
    He was eventually out when Piet o M. i W. knocked off the runs with six eight-wickets triumph over thcir : * 5 ‘ OTie® et
    only 5 short - his hundred are McCarthy 43 12 99 1 Wickets still standing. J. Riley Rawtenstall neighbours. With nine senate penia.apt “= in a “NO ee Comp ete your List
    ie pall aS papaall eo RE a Be RE SS I MR in Re cg A Ag Enjoyment Th
    ae Ms 60.8. . 3 . .M.P.C’s s innings wickets, Mittin verton now needs 306 > al 2 - ba
    Earlier in the day Peter May, Manse sa . - 7 =e Woucaaiion tele were runs S beat his 1949 record of tillo once more scored for Sword-} To my Customers and from ese
    ‘ ‘ 3 | ¢ "nye. 1 ne 5 @ § ‘ et Nase +. fie arris
    making his test debut, had car ORR ERICA bho Seis eatin out Wanderers for 52. and 49, 470 in a season. J. Ashworth’s fish. a ay oa ee. % _—" e Tins CARROTS, (whole,
    ried his score to 138 compiled in ¢ Rowan not out © Foundation scored 100 in. thei 5 wickets for 48 runs was chiefly Were still not content and shor % sliced and diced)
    six and a half hours without one J. Waite not out 0 ae a eae heir responsible for Rawtenstall reach- ly before the final whistle ‘“Mor- Ris PEAS
    : Lb. 2 2 first innings and 79 for the loss of ; 7 i 2 Wy , i , % ¥
    chance. He was eventually bowled —-Pxtras (1b. 2) 7 wickets: in their second inane, 18 Only 107 runs, and they would timer” Weatherhead again found) ® The Ritz bat Salon % » MIXED VEGETABLES
    by Athol Rowan when trying to TOTAL (for no wkt.) 87 8, second innings. have been in a perilous position the Swordfish nets to register the ; 1 tin Danish 1 . TOMATOES
    force the pace. It had been a —— The ie een So as to secure but for T, Incles’ gallant 56. ga goal for Harrison Col-|$ will be closed for the month eo ~ ams ¥ s ” TOMATO JUICE
    brilliant performance by so young BOWLING AN SL ISIS Gort an outright victory. Weekes took 2 wickets for 33 runs lege. , I of August. » Swifts Luncheon Beef s = CAMPBELL’S SOUPS
    : 2 Mr. Callender took 10 wickets in 13.6 overs Geoffrey Foster in the Sword- ~ =
    batsman, odse 3 5 — . ed : eat 7 ? >
    * ine Rowen by bowling Brown Rane : . 8 in the two innings for Foundation East Lancashire kept up their fish back line was Outstanding tebe Mack. » Vienna Sausage g x ae bi: rea
    claimed his fiftieth test victim. Brown iM 2 2% — for 33 runs. C. Gay, besides scor- reputation of not being bowled throughout the game and gave his No. 7 Swan St. % : % c en n le, an
    ‘When South Africa batted a Tattersall 6 =~ 1}-« sing 29 in Foundation’s second in- out as yet this season when they ae repeated opepriuntiies 8 * s ‘Black Buck” Sauce % ead yulce
    ; ‘ ne ee “ates on t ; nings, t Haleate: A ,o met Lowerhouse at the Meadows.|with his powerful bac hand | Sesseseee ODA 1,665 h ” a
    second time there was again no Compton 7 1 16 epi ook 8 wickets in the two They detlared at 19 fee e wickets, |cleary. ESOS OSES $ Tins Lamb Tongues g ” PEARS
    hist at 2 re Roy Marshall took 3 wkts for 73 The referee was Mr. Peter <4 a Tw ? » PEACHES
    + Follaelag. are ae Gani runs in 13 overs, The Lowerhouse | Patterson, x » Cocktail Biscuits .» APRICOTS
    d Ledge 108 and for 4 wkts, 4 batsmen were skittled out for 76); The teams were: FREE ROOK % Salted Peanuts Pkes. Q. OATS, (large &
    In war n oo ¥M.P.C. 75 and ; 75 in under two hours. Roy Marshall = > small)
    * Ledge Ist Lonings _. was caught in the slips off Hop-| SWORDFISH: Albert Weath- which makes Sliced B ¥ CORNFLAKES
    V. Deane 37. F. Hutson 24, Lodge's . “ ” srhead Ca ffir Foster. ” ce acon ”
    J. Riley took 6 2nd innings wickets for 00d for another “duck.” Doo-|erhead, (Capt.) Geoffrey Foster, “ GOD’S WAY OF x 2 Tins HAMS
    ie e 32 and Outram 4 for 23 land took 4 wickets for 15 runs in Peete FitzGerald, = Herbert % AND OUR POPULAR & CHEESE per Ib.
    n oO in ame 4.3 overs and Hopwood 3 for 14|Portillo, Nesta Portillo, David SALVATION % %
    | OsI 1 ba ee a WAND ERERA in 7 overs. Bladen and Mickey Jordan, % Five Star Rum — 1.13 Bot 3 . .
    i vhneeer cf i Maal 7# — At Church the home team beat y %
    ° Waneeress 28 ome 1 i Rta HARRISON COLLEGE; John,, PLAIN ”’ s S| ’
    . Cc ; ea fiat th the ast two bats- - ; ’ e Ris
    Against Wanderera intigs wickets doe na"and's fra men at the wicket. Bowling un-|Chabrol, Frankie Manning, Chas. : ° Si STUART & SAMPSON
    c ae veya innings’ for 19. C, Gav took 3 Ist in- changed Tommy Lowe (5 for 43) |Evelyn, Billy 2 anning, , (Capt. ). Please write for one to $ $1 R
    WINDWARD are ina good position to beat Wanderers mings for 10 and § and innings’ tor 28. and Pred Hartley (4-for 95) dis- A}lan Taylor, Mortimer Weath- Samuel Roberts, Gospel bi IN z x (1938) LTD.
    in their Intermediate Division Cricket match at Congo , Por Fomndation in 2 et ® posed of Enfield for 78 runs of |¢rhead, and Geoffrey Jordan. Book and Tract Service, {t | CE & Co. Ltd. % g Headquarters for Best Rum.
    Road next Saturday. To prevent defeat, Wanderers would , a oilslibabs aa 2 which Clyde, Walcott finimed 40. oe ee ae 30, oye Avenue, Ban- ¥ %
    POLICE T : er r e. los- : f E F ' . e Y
    have to score 171 runs and they only have five second pottce for # whts > an cag thete vet Sie Raleiaen for 31 Snappers vs Bonitas and Harrison ae arcland | Yososssoes: SSEGESSORN
    innings wickets standing. ene oe olics 37 ‘wot out at? runs. Harry Pilkington's 35 not|College vs Whipporays. Referee} ‘ ee eaters
    Although the wicket was wet , allo, ee Sih Re a FE. Denny 31. , out saved the game for Church.|Mr. Jack Knight. =
    on the first day of play, Windward *~*® 5~%8, €~41, A ‘ 2. Beckles of Empire took 4 for 82 With the score at 78 and the last The Whipporays—Flying Fish
    still scored 187, After they bowled BOWLING ANALYSIS TC otnbare A. Daniel scored 39 and two batsmen at the wicket, the|/match will be played on Friday, > 7
    | Wanderers for 90, they put up a o mM Rw Malt 2.5) clice’s C. Grifith took 3 mnfeld wicket-keeper missed an|August 3. The Ladies K.O, Com- NOTICE I Ri- WAR
    brisk 124 for the loss of 7 wickets, D. Wilkie.......... 11.5 5 26 5 easy stumping chance. Clyde Wal-| petition begins on Wednesday
    declared and now have Wander- H. Farmer 13 ‘+ @ 4 COMBERMERE VS LEEWARD cott took 4 wickets for 26 runs in} August 8. VALUES
    ers 44 for the loss of 5 wickets, ff Karmer eh eae ee Pepeeraeers, OS 888 seek whts. "8 13 overs.
    The Windward bowlers D. Wil- “ A'Kinsen -- CASS ar ae ae ane eae “The West Indies XI played at
    kie eg. 3. Farmer a chiefly WINDWARD — 2ND INNINGS B. K, Thornton 22, W. Maxwell took 4 Hanging neon < Bo doeu OAK The Committee of the
    rs for 30. é pau 4 shall opened 4
    fire innings collapse, Wilkie took. E; Eyelin.c Skeete » M, Proverbs... 2“ "” Combermere ist Innings the innings for the West Indies. Barbados Automobile Asso-
    SVe wickets for 26 in 11.6 overs’ Zhouiton ©. wkpy..Mayers BS Pte tt le k wickets cilkes a7 Both batsmen were pretty cautious has a flavour of ciation announce to its mem-
    and Farmer four for 40 in 13 R. Atkinson © Ht. oppin b B. Rolfe a and 22 runs respectively against wv pace Sone but as FRESH cow's MILK bers that on each day of the
    overs. 7 armer b e . oC b re tnd Inni soon as e slow bowlers came on -
    Opening bat N. Thornton scored }- Durant b M; Clarke A ae Husghes scored 4,0 Marshall was caught at deep Midsummer Meeting of the
    7 ath Ae B H rmer not out ... on ‘ pHa set, Sap ae ‘ sa tnd ak . -
    BD por wvanaward in thet stcond A gece 5 provecke b.G. Bhecte “0 “PIGK WOK. VEO HARRISON COLLETE square leg for 18. Worrell seine i Turf Club a Car Park on the
    Bey od Staiitm nd H. V. Farmer -b Paoker....... f 2 Harrison College .. 165 eae a ie ora eae parade ground at the Garri-
    oarded Hall, Empire are Extras orp 16 Pickwick . itt deau was bowled for 42. eekes 4 oes :
    for 8 wickets in reply to Cable & i ; -—— Tae Harrlien C elieRs Ist Innings and Worrell indulged in some lofty son will be reserved for
    Wireless’ 155. &, L. Branker of Doral (for: 7 wickets), s.: 196 ae Le F.C, Tudor 32, F. Field hitting and Worrell was eventual- [ their use together with a
    Cable & Wireless took five wickets Fail of wickets: 1-2, 2-14, 3-58, 4-90, Pickwick's L, Foster scored 32 and M, ly caught on ue aes “¥ a taxi service between the
    »spital—Pickwic i & § ,
    match is likely to end off in a BOWLING - ANALSSIS w “| Weekes was caught on the bound- free of charge. ‘
    as cae ‘— Hospital m. proverbs eed 1 ary Ae Wael oer a aes with EXCELLENT QUALITY
    rine widicets, ett ee ctahbiaed “4 Teor 5 : FH WHAT'S ON TODAY Walcott 35 not out. At the close Oa nay a A B.A.A. patrolman will
    Regiment bowled out Spartan M- J; Clarke Gem, OR Colirh et Grand: Bausions 1000. acn, of play Hanging Heaton scored 190 oak. pws be in charge of the Car Park. ONLY
    for 33 after scoring 60. Brath- j° “packer + ea aT 2 Police Courts 10.00 a.m, for 6 wickets. SNES Sake
    waite of Regiment took five for 12 Pree acid uae 5 a Samoan peveye. Ey E. A. WAY
    runs, WANDERERS 2ND INNINGS founell 2.00 p.m. your family 5. A. |
    Regiment scored 144 for the loss , peiree jb.w. H. Farmer is ee trare tainigtion «sate out CLUB PREMIERE ye ae Hon. Sec, and Treasurer,
    of seven wickets in their second ,° packer b Farmer ou John at 7.30 p.m, TENNIS RESULTS rich in B.A.A. *
    innings. H. Toppin b Wilkie ..... ; 0 CINEMAS vitamin and
    M. I, Clarke t Ys i : 1 4 ” . mineral salts
    Following are the scores; B. Rolfe Waign } Thornton 0 Seosiiie Mest frankensveln” vy : Mixed Doubles . which goes to THE FINEST SHIPMENT SINCE
    4 Skosts b Thornton 0 pm. and 8.30 y= . Fr ot ‘ os Grimes. oe C ai eases pene strong =
    EMPIRE vs CASLE & WIRELESS leyne not ou 3 Globe: “Kim” 445 and 8.80 p.m. ‘orde bea ss E. Parris an
    Cable & Wi at 155 Extras 6 Roxy: “Three G Named Mike” . rds 6—3. 6—2 for the cows that pro-
    | Empire kee ahi 5 * ‘ " ¥ . 4a eri and. 38S ath F. E, Edwards 6—3, 6—2. duce Oak feed on the 2 co ES WORLD WAR Il
    B. Bourne -1.b.w. -b Branker 22 Total (for 5 -wkts.) # 44 Plaza (Bridgetown); “Pripoli’ 4.45 Men’s Doubles luscious green grass of 7 HERE IT M
    F. Tayler b Branker 29 . pom, and 8.20 pm C. B. Forde and W. D. Forde} s¥eny Australia all year t ssleniguiaiiauiadaseubinaas ee
    | rena hte eeealate ) MENTAL HOSPITAL V8 PICKWICK Pee ee eee Ue teen nn beat L. Blackett and. J.B. ‘| (tas tne’ richest ‘and a THE
    Mie tie te fo peace 190 pan and SIS pam | Hoynes 6—2. 60, the best milk in the FIGHT-OF-THE
    ©. Barrow ¢ wkrr b Lawless 2 riekw ict ine ees ) “. : Olymp'e: ae ee Agent” 4.30 wanes 2 CENTURY ave e er 0 t
    GA y Lbw. b Lawles 2 Wiekwick (for 5 wkts« 76 a 8.15
    ; c Harper b Branker x 9 he meet me — Ist Innings ns Aquatic: “The Pirates of Mont- ‘ 7 .
    S oO y a oyce > ore . i a * ,
    C. Soaer ae at BORN ede Whe bor belies a PER Se Yesterday’s e
    xtras a - D * 20 —_
    oie ie eS ccia ik Weather Report sd di cacanks 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
    Total 14 Jordon 1 BOWLING ANALYSIS FROM CODRINGTON 7
    C. Best b Jordon ‘ 7 oO M R Ww Rainfall: .01 in of
    . viekets 5, 2-6 3—§ Bi e . ‘ Phillips 9 5 8 2 vee 7 . .
    : 80 Bh, ye 7 ‘68. 8 aria ee & Biyinper sick ct 1 Barts. 4 3 1 1 Total Rainfall for month to terrific fighting
    : , t Extras ‘ 7 Richards 4 1 ‘ 1 date: 5.45 ins. Prices: SSS =
    ANG ANALYSIS 1) eS eine. 2 i : SSSSSSSSSOSO
    Cone ee ew Total for $ wickets) .... 7 Brathwaite 2 3 if 5 | Hilshest Temperature: $-Ib 12-02. ROBINSON ee
    R. A. Lawless 5 18 ~ — Crawford : 3 1 2 86.5°R. $2.88 per tin 80c. per tin 4
    . F. lL, Branker 122 6 5 Fall of wickets: 1-13, 2—41, 3—42, fe ig : Lowest Temperature: FOR YOUR LEATHER NOVELTIES
    ; Cc. B Lawless 8 1 20 3 4-52, 5—75. EGIMENT — 2ND INNINGS 76.0°F.
    : A, wshmael b Skinner 1 . " vs
    WINDWARD VS WANDERERS SPARTAN VS REGIMENT i Brathwaite Hari 8 — elocity: 14 miles per O A K SHOP AT....
    Windward tk} and for (7 wkts 0 atts Lb.w, Hanfs \ _ Bt
    24 Regi t ist Innings “0 A. Phillips b Sealy ... “s ‘8 are : .m. A ; e@' ee
    ae oY @ and for (5 wkts) .. oh ove + Crawford L.b.w. MeComie 6 sa Poa awe” $0.001 FULL CREAM POWDERED TURPIN ee B oO oO KER Ss
    Wanderers — Ist Innings Spartan — Ist Innings V. Bispham b Sealy 2° ° p.m. ” MILK
    A. Peirve ¢ Evelyn b H. Farmer 5 O. §, Coppin bp w ah , H, Rowe 1.b.w. Skinner 1 a 9 We have just received:—
    | e Lb . Farmer A. D. Gittens I.b.w chards 8 G. Pinder not out ce sateen .
    wy gone si Ate ey ; ~ , i teats b "Brathwaite " 5 i, Extras : 9 = SS e 1% Leather Book Markers .
    G, Skeete b Wilkie . 7 N. Wood c Watts b Phillips 6 te his bi ) ae ‘ The whole fight x ” ony 3 ceendine Sets
    M. I. Clark K. F b Wilki 6 J. Browne Lb.w. Brathwaite,. 2 ‘otal (for 7 wkts ecid.) lid ‘e x *: ; Ladies 0 Purses
    V.. Le aaa “Wilkie Parmer b Wi e 6 K. Roberts |.b.w. , Brathwaite 9 ) JAN ETTA DRESS SHOP Nothing left out . ” Tobacco theta Deel
    B. Rolfe c H. Farmer }) D. Wilkie 2 N. Harris cere b peace ; i ais on Waccneat < B d St will ee aera 24 » aiss eee ey es
    M ers l.b bH. Farme t A. F, C. atthews (absent) 4] . LYSIS aa, stil
    a &. Seale Thotnien b Wilkie 0 W. Jemmott Lb.w. Phillips 1 oO M R Ww - Per. Aron reet sie ies . Ladies Compacts, & Cigarette Cases
    H. L. Toppin b Wilkie 17 +E. G. McComie not a 3 Gittens 5 2 ging a i at . with
    r . ‘ 2 *, Skinner lLb.w, Brathwaite McComie 2 3
    | ee ee a eae aes ; ss DRESSES of all Tvt es. : COLOURED VIEWS OF BARBADOS
    | s ; 5 Bethe ee ar ti YP i , s These make Ideal Gifts . . .
    Total 90 tock 2 Dna aN oy) | EMPIRE & ROXY . REMEMBER IT’S ALWAYS BEST TO SHOP
    Theyil Do It Every Ti Hatl ee Boe ee August 10th to 16h) § Ps :
    : ugus o a
    ey t yey ime By Jimmy Hatlo cba Ph tls bes . '$ BOOKER’S (B’dos) DRUG STORES LTD. &
    7 7 Tgaae ‘ ’ , . ! | BROAD STREET & HASTINGS (Alpha Pharmac: :
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    4

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