Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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SATURDAY, Le 28, 1053

OIL CRISIS TAKE: Prepur

Quick Decision Can Avert Complete Breakdown For War

a






ESTABLISHED 1895



+; PRICE: FIVE CENTS













wees Senate KARACHI, Pakistan, Juby 27

darkened over
hie government

Reds Take Time Off] 825



THE DOLLARS ARE Hii






d the
ot special powers for



Britain Wants Pledge



—_—— —--









From Mossadegh ‘To Studv UN ‘Buffer| ® oo. —

By J. C. THALER | foe Guard had beed called into teting

THE ANGLO.IRANTAN OL, CRISIS tok Zone Proposal cme Tose ue ee aie
urn for the worse on Friday night, and Britain TOtin, 12th, 14th ama 16 be

ros cna i e-aeg aee alow iasneng Sores ey a [Sale toni oe

on-the-spot consultations. , | ‘TWO SPECIFIC DEVELOPMENTS which may}irom July 26, 1951." “ss ote

speed the hour when troops along the 135-mile |{/OK@2" 88k that this getion

y ; places the units, named under
Korean war front will be told to halt shooting, naiary law, =
, he mobilization order followed

emerged from the meeting of United Nations and {quickly the government announ
Communist cease-fire negotiators in Kaesong mens Sremetnening tie

lefence special powers ordinance

An agreement was reached in principle on]‘‘en account of the present emer-

_ The scheduled trip to London of Averell Har-
riman, Truman’s special envoy to Iran, was also
viewed in diplomatic quarters as an indication of a
hitch in the current efforts to bring about talks in|
Teheran on the oil dispute.



Histiaat he nok aan eeeneis [ae a Gan ae “administrative and procedural matters designed | rhe ordinance provides for the
asked to come to Léndon, and that U N PI q to expedite the final achievement of a military nstitution of civil defence and
his decision was his own. Harri- e e anes armistice and cease-fire.”’ ¥ fair raid precaution services, a

man was expected to meet For- lene e the government wide
nd



eign Secretary, Herbert Morrison aha rou A Committee of fficer fer _for civil defence measures

soon after his arrival here on ast e ~e s staff assistants of both sides wer Simultaneously, the governnen:
e ‘ . a é : Zi 4 4 1 ~ ppointed at one ) rk out | delegated powers der the or-
crip cer Reis inneuiee 4 ASENNOWET S vias “Vice samira!” craenes inane to ‘chiet niisters ne
. aioe a ce in ure 30 oad e . loy, chief U.N. negotiator pre various provincés,” This action
BA ccciakes’ Gat’ cooaie ositions rmy Gaining, ae nee the chiet Cor m in st re des nef oo ae meeting of al}
tions in the oilfields for British 7 etic” mcaee asttnain ! ‘Minister, Lisquat Ali Khan,

jdetailed maps setting f oth his | Prime Minister, Liaquat Ali Khan,
Momentum jideas of the proper line to be |!@st Sunday, when they consider-

personnel would be improved] ®IGHTH ARMY H.Q., Korea
immediately. Failing such a prom- _ 7

1
|




























iq site’ : July 27, is : idrawn between the two armies | °4 the situation, brought about by
a ann ae ae The Korean war front quiet was rege wae Pee ae Currency Officers check the wooden | with a demilitarized zone separa! he movement of Indian armed
eatel seat e ROC en : Or; broken with sharpened Com- ad, _ “ — currency notes which arrived at Seawell j - a ‘ Mé RSHALL ing them ovee ilong Pakistan's border
settle it of the oil dispute. munist thrusts on the Eastern! yes yy. a eee ERE RS W / C wr _ ‘ | Nam II asked for a rece that Practice blackouts and ~ other
N A zone and increased Red activity ss p Poesy Oethred hg 2 ponding vy & Police van under ee U. rency WASHINGTON, July 27 his delegation could stud the ivil defence trials have been car-
Oo ssurances on the central sector. “ eee ee Bee ee eet eee e Defence Secretary, Geotge Mar- |™2ps and reply and agreed to mect | ‘ted out already in, some interior
: ‘ U.N., war planes used _ the { oy 18 hall, told Congress § 6 gain at 10 aa. Saturday. It is| ‘ities, Meanwhile, “Defence Day”
‘ ‘ a s yr shall, ’ gress that 1,600 :
eae eta ps clearing weather to blast Com-| + “ e + 4 rriv 28 shiploads of arms had already | Understood that Joy maps call} vas being observed in the eapital
ey harlabetiaa Bont bog ani |munist marshalling yards at) Bod been sent by the U.S, to the Allies |/0r fixing the ceasefire line rough lay. All shops were closed, and
officials stated on Friday night | bynsyang, rand made more 1 e e l e en n I ty-six sealed wooden cases al road, and that General Dwight | y along the presem battlefront sal prayers were — being -said
that Shepherd had not been able 800 sorties against the Red targets of the new West Indian Curr y| E:senhower’s Atlantic Pact army | hich is almost entirely nerth o Pakistan's safety. :
= aa ent : 1 as {aiming by radar through low} Hear arT from Trinidad by a Special} 'S gaining “real momentum.” the 38th parallel. A line along the —U.P
so far to obtain required assur- | ojouds | e e B.W.I.A. Charter flight’ yesterda Marshall urged the Senate For- rallel itself which Communist paneer
ances. A_ Foreign Office state- As the cease-fire talks moved’ afte ”n rhe aircraft nie ‘at| Cign Relations Committee to ap-! were expected to demand, woul ‘ .
ment on Friday night announced | oy in Kaesong, the Reds were stili/ : J Seawell at 2.47 p.m. R cool party - prove without delay a new $8,500,-|:ive them enormous advantage ( row Pp . a
that the recall of the ambassador $144 oa oa oe : { et pn a tot fae “ke L000 ai ata 5 a ah ; : . r A 4 i I nee
building up forces south of Kum- d . ing new currency were Mit 0,000 mutual aid programme in| because there is no good defense
ee ae toa, eee song, on the east central front, witn| WASHINGTON, July 27 | ed Brown and Mr, William| order to meet the “Communist| territory on the U.N. side Dp °
“ons ra ; inal decis- : ca. oe eek es ~ pee ‘ i 1 ‘ aig Clarke o 2 4 ¢ . in by ‘rballenge o ver Pr . ae Ke » t efire rneatin Co
: Soman ; 7 entire Communist companies mov Secretary. George arsh: |? .Glntas A f the Trinidad Currency | cP atlenge n every front i corean easefit negotiator I
ion so far had been taken. ing down to the Reds’ front-line oad Secr ta Y, George Mat hall told the we nate Department. aid that any delay would block | discussed the location of a buffer P ro essin
_ Harriman made it plain to both positions, Foreign Re ations Committee on Friday that the United At Seawell to meet the ’plane| Eisenhower's current mobilization | zcne across Korea at their elev
sides that a speedy decision we Major action was centred on States which “can’t do everything at once” would depend | were the two Currency Commis- | Schedules enth conference to-day and reac! GENEVA, July 27
required to avert a if comp ete |the eastern front again today, Two on Britain for aid in building up the defences of the Middle} worc's Mr W. D. Charlton, Mé shall said that funds asfed agreement “in principle ol British physician who accoa
breakdown in the Iranian oil in- Rea battalions counter attacked East ‘ Acopuntant General and Mr, J. A.| /arge as the present request will be” gaministrative matters to speed anied the Jordan Crown Prince
dustry. His visit to London was advanced Communist forces north os Reterts, Manager of the Govern-| required in the next two fiscal | up an armistice, The meeting at) “Mh Talal from Beirut, | lett

believed to have been intended to
emphasize this position on Brit-
ish government leaders. Exper
here estimated that the refinery
Abadan would have to be closed
completely before the end of next
week, because of storage space
filling up rapidly.



| Marshall said Europe’s share of the propos foreign ht. Savings Be , ; years 1952 and ‘53, for the overall eturn to his Beirut clinic’at 8
of Yanggu yesterday, after Allied E ; pes she the propo oreign { ment, Savings Bank. They watch-| Years 1994 and 93, for the overall) Kaesong lasted one hour and {if ae wee yet &
troops 1cok two hills. Heavy Red| aid funds was greater than the Near East's because it is of | 4 Vl shecked the unloading of a ae FO 000. the of morel icon minutes and adjourned unti) | 7 on Friday aboard a Prenc's
range pet anertar fire] — mcre.“‘eritieal importance.” ; SSB RS aircraft, inte al than. $25.000,000,000, He said that | io a.m. to-merrow , \emgab arrive In Beirut between
a "ior aa ., forces off the} —— — But he emphasized that the} jp, TE tie UN. said Allied. delegates de-
ills after a 10-hour battle. Middle East was vital to the , 0 ; izviled with words and maps their re ia ; er
e ; ae 7 F ‘ine@asrured é roxime ,|and oppression,” which aims tol... : ear eh is norning. Before leaving he said
West of Kunsong, U.N., patrols Reds Built [ defence of Europe and said plans} y x 9 x 18”, ; approximate'y | dominate the free world by “force| ews cn the =o mult rized zone | “His Royal Highness is. progress-
|for possibly inereasing its share of ” which will separate Communist

te"Van which had an| this is the price of meeting the



iWmed Police escort, The cases} “growing threat of Soviet tyranny i and 8& o'clock” on” Saturday



probed toward the Pyonggang The olane returned to Trinidad|0rby any other means ing under treatment, He is a will-



Reports from Teheran on Friday apex of the old Communist “iron| g~+ \a d are “under consideration pty about an hour after it ar- He claimed that any delay in the and U.N eee Com! 1unise ing and helpful patient as he i
night intimated that Harriman had triangle without meeting any 1orees Durin ;where we hope the British can] piyeq ; appropriation “will mean that asked an overnight re ( inxious to make a full reeovery
encountered difficulty from both | resistance. U.N. naval forces back- jdo a great deal for us.” a General Eisenhower will not have pare thei repls ;} Meantime, part of the curé Is. rest
sides of the conflict. Earlier this|¢d up ground forces and land Marshall said in a global de the trained and eauipped forces on| U-N. said both sides named jand quiet. Therefore he ig, not

week a formula evolved by Har-

e . |
based planes with a steady C f L II {fence programme it was neces ® 4 which he is basing his plans. It is | taff officer: to work out “admini eeing visitors for some time.’
ease- ire u f jsary to emphasise ig'l hree Plan t Ww . mavite trative and procedural matter rhe physician who asked th



















riman with Iranian Government |pounding of the eastern coast. | ome area essential that place 1
7 " ritish li -ruiser ¢ ri : more than others. I sutting this responsibility on him, provide} Cesigmed to expedite the fin il his name be not published fo:
‘ rs, £ sared to have es- A British light cruiser and three 1 here | In cutting MM iis responsibili I } :
teed ie basis tor}U.S. destroyers bombarded the US. ARMY CHARGE Burope s aid to increase the Near | ® } ‘ | him with the means of accom-| achievement of a military ' professional reasons said he woulc
the speedy resumption of negotia-|Red port of Wonsan for the 161 WASHINGTON, July 27 East’s he said he might trim the] | eeting hi ei e | Plishing his mission, It is the] uce and ceasefire ido his best to persuade-—-the
ee. -“a final settlement, Brit-|consecutive day yesterday. Thh Aimy sna eth UsY 4. = ntinental programme to the ) security of the U.S, as well as that] United Nations said that the; Amman Government, to ue
tions oF & spe Frid: : ht in- as —vU-P. i say and State Depart- |point of waste He recalled tha = St ‘ in of our Allies that is at stake.” ground covered in talh as {statement giving a picture-nt the
ish officials on. ] ri ay nig cote 5 Ate ere charged the Communists in|the United States had to pour it te WASHING T' IN, July 27 | He said that by the end of last purely military” but it appeared | whole case in the next 48”h6urs.
sisted that Br itain was So oe with having used the lull |main effort into Europe during th: The big three Western Powers | month the U.S. had shippedjthat the meeting had progressed |= deemed this necessary in view
to reach a séttlement, but she 1, . T' ik * during the ceasefire talks to build | last war, even though it had beer re considering a possible For-! abroad more than 1,600,000 meas- | more thar’ was expected Loca |, e the eitnation antl. DP,
does not want to ey nnolney roops, anks up theif forces for possible later |deeply and “tragically” invowec | °ign Ministers meeting here in| urement tons equal to 1,600 ship-|tion of the demilitarized zone
breakdown. “We mus nw” ae aggression. in the Pacific. id-September following the sign-| loads, in addition to aircraft and | the toughest item on the ceasefii t
edvance that there is some chance Ex:force Law coe enya that fresh Chin- The Secretary's testimony came’ 0 of a Japanese peace treaty in naval vessels delivered under tne ir | agenda | The “ADVOCATE”
of success,” one official said. aa ope rac moved in, and all |i: response to questions fror san Francisco it was disclosed on, own power It had been expected that this | f NEWS
—U.P. TEHERAN, July 27. ri dory ey ay ona 7 tremendous Democratic Senator Guy M iday Diplomati informant j —U.P point, number two on the pro pays for
Troops, armed police, and tanks ae Ss secretes open eae Gillette who wanted to know wh id that under tentative plans the | ramme would be argued out t Dial 3113
were massed in Central Teheran ne rents ce Of |the proposed aid for the Nea) Foreign Ministe ; ettlement before point number
: . . America broadcas at . \ . all ; gn Ministers would try pri x , ss ee y
COMEDIAN DIES - to enforce the law against a big saecaitas ee an eae E : t “ i 159 times les than th arily to reach a joint agreement N +h Lik 5| ay hree—-cetails of the actual cease i Day or Night.
ne. gone ra n Porikiunist Be a A pee tow foreign troops out of Koren wa ‘ aj esa yOG Ame nares n Westerr?® Germany's participa- INE ru IKely Oo, eo
Rmil Boreo, 66, died here o , $ > ited ates : > i Wess —U.P 7 ; eT an ¢ mn page 7 |
Brot) oT ‘The Polish born ore dcbsedes. “scheme” to put them in a position UE | on in North Atlantic treaty forces} R f ae I a . ;
ss tal al dia arnt dean Hil - Snes isan dea an eter -cops| @ Start later aggression. j oder General Dwight Eisenhower, | CLUSE nvitation
was a familiar figure ap | Two hundred helmeted Tomes American jofficials have. been GI bl P | Will The Allies are anxious to settle a"
Americon and European theatri- | with bayonetted rifles, police} “" . ol pee stare Noe vit > ashi i Pitvies.-'9 ar anxious to ' rat ni es
cal circles between the two world ]armed with carbines and swords,} ‘“arning for some time that the la German issue in advance of l'o Talk I eace

Reds are building un their forces, 1 e an ? 12 nation North Atlantic
but never before in such strong} Continue I oO Sery e suncil meeting expected to be NEW DELHI, July 27
terms as the Army spokesman id in Canada late September Political quarters and news-

said, They also said that the U.N. Abdullah’s Family, It was understood that forma’) Paper commentators, here said,
f s \

wars. He gave up the profession |and four tanks guarded Parlia-

atter he had suffered a heart attack ;ment Square and the vicinity.
two years ago.—U.P, —U.P.







forces were prepared to deal with its that the Prime Migister, Jawa-
2 ‘ 7 vitations to British Foreign Min .
vw Re ffensive E irely . Sarlal Ne ; 10t cely t
a each be “limehed it the tl uce AMMAN, July 27, ter Herbert Morrison and French Sent the Pakisten Timeeitinias
tate e u ees talks broke down. + Major General John Glubb | Foreign Minister Robert Schuman A, oP onditional invitation” fot
The Defence Department an- | ‘asha, the British Commander oi ve not been sent although the} him to visit Karachi for peace
nounced that Communist casual- |-he colourful st vowe roposal has been discussed by the | talks









© ‘ ties in Korea now total 1,221,434 [28 will faithtu famil tate Department and British and} Newspapers did not carry — the
fe, ension from the beginning of the war f the erase lah ench Embassies here. The final} full text of the Pakistan Prime
& au e through July 19th ue Seer § pas cision may be forthcoming next} Minister, Liaquat Ali Khan’s
American casualties are about |*+ ¥°o's ; . week, communication to Nehru detailing
ubb Pasha in an interview in

Morrison has already disclosed! the fiye-point peace plan which he
ans to attend the Japanese treaty wanted to discuss with Nehru,

WASHINGTON, July 27, 80,000.

* ime »side ‘ruman’s mall, but busy
President Truman said on Friday that one of the Meantime, President Truman

1dquarters office



Aftab Legion































: ; : ; increased hope for peace. express- said he has t ere foat ston of in sh-! after the withdrawal of troop:

princypal causes of tension in the Near East is the miserable] eq on Thursday afternoon, was tion of retiring “especiall a cee pee ee ah socentrations-an. thecinioeiales

tate of hundreds of thousands of Arab refugees from Pales- wae as uray iding important 3 ve Te a ae tad a aotare of Stele Dean Acheson., stan borders had been carried out.|
: ’ : : . ’ the ommunists of Y spi ( edouln iegion~ : aos . ' , ; 7.

tine.’ The President’s statement was contained in letters e peewee perenne ee ee ote de a een ur. | The Hindustan Times, which]

A Ss, a } ar= | > | reflects he Cs res arty
addressed to the Chairman She Senate and House Appro-} gaining at Kuesong.—U.P. |svith submachine gun sdescsieacgipeliniaceciainicin doihion Pie Liaguat'e letter al
priations Committees, in which he urgently requested Con- — |; Glubb : esha, sa saa ae \“propaganda stunt”, and eorn-|
eress to appropriate $2,000,000 for August and $3,000,000 Tits Goes U To had eer d andes i. otsche 1 ries I @ | plained against its being published
for September for Palestine refugee relief. a z p 13 . and he was a charming mz 4 i i Cone | mareen before its receipt ir
aceniide eanemncenstiine penn — Congress is currently consider- S e to work fc 4 ‘ ae ew 2th, .

; ing the administration's giant The Mountains | Praia ths {Bea ARES | Kind Cabine t Crisis | —UP.
x 5 : a 2 il rve |
; re $8,£ 000 rei Aid Pro- et LU ‘ Abdullah's far . ii!
Prey € nits Trade Eee Phin an item of MM BELGRADE, July 27, \ aueotion t : | F i PARIS ae Ma AID FOR Ol
- ¢ arshal Tito returned on Friday! ormer Finance Minister Maur-
. . $50,000,000 for Palestine refugees ars ; Abdullah fo | ee. eet Z 4
2 ysnian Mour: vh ‘ a e Pe he agreec to head a
With omen et xplained in a_ letter he “Ted “his tagged partisans. to sofda iriends { WASHINGTON, July 27, that the refuges feliet programme| Victory over the Germans in World! } . Pee | ap a net Pr ee American aid for Mexico’
Senator Herbert R. O'Conor,!) 54 been curried on during July War II, and told his people they| But ata uate 2 ee oeteche, | nationalized oil industry is “immi-
Panama has acted to prevent the through the use of existing stocks should be no more frightened of} P. aint id. infepe: jent Con-|nent” as a result of the Unites
ships of Panama’s huge merchant] snq funds from other sources, , Stalin today than they were off ———— | obbative netused to take over the | Sinee Interior Secretary Osea
fleet from carrying cargo 10] But the available resources were Hitler 10 years ago. y | STEEL FOR OIL i ae oe ‘ esignate at}Chapman's inspection of Mexica
Communist ports in Asia. now nearly exhausted, the Presi- Starting on Thursday afternoon) WASHINGTON. July 2 ve installations, Government official
He siid the Panamanian Em-! gent added the Marshal toured a series ott Secretary cf the Interior, Oscar Auriol decid to cull party}said on Friday Tney said bot}
bassy told him that Panama would| ‘Truman told legislators that a local celebrations commemot erie ‘hapman said on Friday that the|!caders into a special committee in| Senator Antonio Bermudez heac
-evOKe e registry of any of its ; e “iar ad been re-] the 1941 uprising. He gave brie \tnited State i ropa: new approach to hasten the end, cf the Petroleum Mexicano Officia |}
revoke th gi F major step forward hi A talks at each of the celebrations } il tt i k 1eW apy n n _ ch
ships destinea for Red China Or| cently made when the rab) taiks « acn ° avon illocate all the steel it can possi-| of the Cabinet crisis at a time {Oil Monopoly anc japman werce|} ‘“t
Noith Korea. League went on record in favou: He on sot on es join 1) bl pare for the build-up of! when important foreign faire} “pleased” with the results of their |f} Now / know why he always smokes
; why ates et _\similar celebrations in Crotia fexicai nroductio i Te ae ; Ball |
Panamanian Consulates — all| of a massive io pyle ie 5 ror OUP | Mexic oil produ ye. cisions are pending aks al a r ‘a h h h
over the world had been ordered | settlement of Palestinian 1 ; ; a ] RUM PETERS. T! ey ave suc a





to examine papers of ships head-} in Arab states. Grave damage to

ry? :

sd for Red ports and cancel their| this programme 1s likely to nesult | .
Panaraniat-rextity if shipown-|if the present aid programme D / aH. ‘side Fie = icbiibiea, ps
ers refuse to unload cargo. } collapsed because of the temporary } D ‘s ’

The Panamanian Embassy said | shortage of funds. au 2, smooth and FRESH y


























orders were only the first SCC DU) NEW YORK, July edal .« e i 4 Jniteq Natic ca t itever ena Z legislation the
preventing the use of the Pana- A bronze medal with blue ar * ef ‘ ¢ Red aggression ial Government
manian fiag to smuggle strategic! , white striped ribbon h Ce! Ta I eC nal ke.
materials behind the Iron Cur- To-day s devised for the award to Unitec ‘i non- N. membe be eli- The general expectation that °
tain, Weather Chart Nations soldiers, sailors and air- f t it ement adde like campaign ribbons of World “BY , ‘Rp ay “a .
He said a general decree gov- Sunrise: 5.49 a.m. men figh Communist 1 0 suth Korean ‘War II the medals will go t fle J af
ae x» ee would Sunset: 6.24 p.m Korea, it was ounce ossed laurel der General all people who have see \ a tive
i issuer ni anama Friday. United Na service n the United Nat ¢@nsj ¥ ¥ ’ ~~ -m 7m ~” My
O’Conor said the new Moon: Last Quarter The United Nations wil The United Nations ; nce tions cormman ich nation- Korean campaign é ga q, a a a: £ a #: %
anian crackdown aiready Lighting Up: 7.00 p.m. award its fighting men a rect - ment d_ regulatior n tt 1 ; Ttalliar erving in Italy The original General Assembly | F . a 4h.
prever ted x ships from sailing High Tide: 1.13 p.m ular ribbor th the same nur éligibilit r the 5 eld spit hen approved proposal that led to the estat 1~|
Two shit have been halted at Low Tid 6.42 m. 415 ber of vertical tripe under consideratior € ep ior © a t ment of the me yas p for-| @
at Karachi, any oe Ste 8m —? blue, eight white—for use v Ger { k we t : i thr } ze ’ ‘a's , . ~ ¥
4 I yhi 0 ike ward by the FE ine Us 1 7 yi +
Cee ae blue, eight G ry gv United way wit ig,make on ward by the Philippines trough | ORT AINABLE EVERYWHERE
| One side of the bronze } tr te t {3 woul ) Litic r eral Carlos Romulo,—U.P !

a ee en ne a tn ee RN ee a en nt a

S NEW TURNZetet

>

%

2



PAGE TWO









BARBADOS ADVOCATE
® 2 Why do so many well -dres { women wear such
| / 4 J
IS EXCELLENCY the Gov- . I - —4





























Ja maicam, Violinist




































































SATURDAY, JULY

































——

ee —_
AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)

TO-DAY at 5 p.m

ai
ry _ MATINEE
TO-NIGHT To MONDAY
Universal-International’s New Release





28, 195

1

“|
ae |







NIGHT at 8.30










































”
wanlpead eas wady Savuge acd 1 soc athering with an SOME k I Pari _ THE GIRL IN THE PAINTING OM
1ied by Major snnis ~~ Gir SOME lucky wor none Ry SLIS F p that aris i wring . TTERLING P — Herbert Li
Py rns ee ee ~ te eu flavour in Earls and TASTE Ot : by SUSAN DEACON 7 cad fashion g Mai ZE ao aes
ah e oe « s ss Doreen 4 ‘ 1 New al
tended the opening of the School Court last week, wa ; Mis = a money A ! i nts J usan Deacon writes about t say that New oS Se aa wen silks hcalatngninietesiaiiios
for Blind people t the Hurd Eon Naar "Ja rae i : She en- cer. t a ur. Perring, whose hobby is a ell ts By Special Request: MATINEE this Morning (Saturday) 9.50 o'clock
Memorial School, James Street “pean gee aie ate ye Spoiled | over-rimmed na | ki u a ea pear a sd
yoterday er terio'ned guests by playing Pieces ‘smageless. hat aking wou wat more | France tor restaurant clothes JIGGS AND MAGGIE IN COURT
a aan present were the Hon’ble from Bach and Beethoven on the MODEL HATS in Lond | comfortable, E i for tailor-made and with Joe YULE Renie RIANO
the C sles ial Secreta . a Mrs violin. Doreen says she is in Eng- anything from £12 to £50 € t rica for play clothes (defined Also the British Short: “INTO THE BLUE”
tod eee vgn Bena ipaerks land for a_ teachers’ training 4g, ; arse set the 4 CHERIE SAYS inything you wear without a (The Story of B.O.A.C.)
Turner, Sir AHan Collymore, the rarer but she.is, workiie in ai * this price 7 get 7 me E : » hat) 3
Rt. Rev. Bishop G. L. G. Man- urse, but a _ exclusive (you hope). But the eshrsitclg ——
deville, M "fle a Ibber. oh Social @flice until the a mic year COM~ women who wear them 1 de COMING emncw Coming Next Week
Bere ete ar poe cg 7 ces in October. srminéd to get good value | an EAT LOVER TOWN SINNER OF
Welfi.re Adviser to C.D. and ‘ ™ : termined, to £ v nd tor ae
Dr. I. P OM ihony Direcies r No Protests uiling on the trimming. — “J axalh agiccees Len PLAZA) Dial 2310 cee eerie
MI ii Services, Hon. Dr. C. H T the W.1S.U. dance and - P ' " 3 » the end. of TO-DAY — 445 & 830 pm. & Continuing Solty: tee Fee (To Tuesday)
a Mr. Cc. A. L A eatdret in honour of West The busine girl who spen hat I went Paramount's Techn color Dratna
y. J. Adams-Cooper, Rev Indivn visitors to the Festival of £6 a year on h its could ‘
val Mr. John Beckles, Britain lest week, was the Hon, many of the modei hat brigade cut fré A Howard Da SILVA.
sen Moore, Mr. and Mrs, V. W.-O. R. Kendall, a member of thing or:two on h ri 2 Also the Cartoon
im, Mrs. H. A. Vaughan the Legislature of British Guiana. hat—and how to wear .
A. K. Tucker, Mr. Ne- Askea about a report suggesting © WHERE DO society women bu, om the same eo ee nope)
nell, Miss 1, Pickering he and the Hon. T. Thompson their over-trimmed h “a | from museum SreciA v7 3p
* would register a protest with tne tour of the shops convinced m« idney TOLER as Charlie Chan in & Jimmy WAKELY in
Closed For Reconstruction LADY LOWSON Commonwealth Relations Office that they do not buy them, They | “Hey J—Who's been eating “THE TRAP" saree ia i SUING ot On RAM
5 lage British Council Centre «i Making Pilgrims’ history inst the British Governments “improve” then t hor | dog biscuits in bed?” “ _— ——
“Wakefield.” White Park,, ” a 8, nanishment of Tshekedi Khama, All I found were a few le anc L NORM fe wey E L L, wh 2 iF > OISTIN il G a I E
will be closed during the month of Seretse and Ruth from Bechuana- fruit-draped Henley hats, rac 1 as £141f are a et | “tl LAZA Dial 8404 Ri TY
August for reconstruction: the First Time For Women _iand, Mr. Kendall said, “This shaped cartwheel with velvé From Brussels “ene of sy best se ers as || | TO-PAY & TO-MORROW 5 & 8.20 p.m. THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
office will be manned by a skeletor OR the. first time since iheic news to me.” “We have made no ev gbcip err ue ST OnL alee 'HE Belgian Fashion Feder hig ‘ is | a Hives Tike it"| Elyse 2 nox. -~ Rw ord. Norris and ver ae ant nen ch
staff. FE + Ratan 3 he pj. protests about anything to any- and a garden party hat gui! Otte iclnecn ‘herr oaa ae Pa 1as nothing it.” | ene Canines | AT.—Sun. — pan.
Normal services will be résumed “.,. ee > vor the : iby. We have been kept ex- feather chiffon and fruit trimmings per gee “eg Ad ah Pi Sate er designers continue to go Barry Sullivan and Belita I wont or's Action See $i
at the beginning of September Freche a a aee pad vain i" tremely busy in this official Fes- (it tied under the chin for goo ier cneminattens the| to Paris — but it i wid fey Pk aPECIAY. THOW “TO-DAY v Se LANCASTER MAYO _ in
nied aa ll oe eae OMEN 1¢ or =the a5. aoe ebate eS -asure 7 aes. as a 1abit and make less and less of the APE MAN’ FLAME and the ARROW
and the Reading Room, Pocket sppis is in honour of Lady Lowsen, tval visit. ee ae St of the modelico! Oe ee WEOTTENE A! FT oe of Franti ideas aeleR Bela LUGOSI ‘and Color by Technicolor
Thez , Library and Gramophone nie SuAbe tacsan $ B To Secretary n fact, most of the model col- ysic art of dressing themselves | | MESTWARD BOUND’ Ken Maynard
. . ‘London's Lady Mavoress. ice oyv lec 4 ; }

Record Library will again be open f B . ‘al AIT Be *¢ before ections showed ecleg simp A exciting black and white wy oe Z a. ~| MIDNITE TONITE IDNITE TONITE
to th bl Sir Denys Lowson and _ his WENTY-FOUR hours before shapes, which most sm lom« ; k { r | “TRAIL TO GUN SIGHT” “PHANTOM OF CHINA TOWN"
o the public. of fes i at + Tt . Mente ” a it a . a < . OS ae ISI. g \ triking and perma- Ex idie DEW &
‘wife will visit the United States the dinner given in his hon- : am Keye LUKE and - -
* ‘ would want to wear. ” r It r fil “THE OLD CHISHOL ”
To-night next September on their way our by the West Indian Club, > i efte mh mer t t Johnny MACK-B: M TRAIL “SADDLE SERENADE”
u : ae , jul Johnny MACK-BROWN ;
HE ANNUAL Dinner ofthe home from New Zealand. The Mr. George Dent, M.B.E., Secre- THE QUEEN’S milliner. Aag register on even ‘ auiles. sons aeasausnges Teas” Jimmy WAKELY |
} z : ; , : : Paiaod ; JEEN’S inet ag : id? oe pd ee
Old Harrisonian Society takes the Wal ater a tot rN oe a" ‘" nee cnowe what 2 Thearep (oversee prite for. 8 dim oe Sandman
place at the Marine Hotel tonight {the aldorf-Astora Hotel, New man, “I do no no : sixteen guineas) shows lots of vos ; $SSooseoeasasauune 54566664
at 8 o'clock. The Guests of honour York, on the night before they talk about” he confessed. Like his Vaivet in his new colladtion: : RALPH PERRI of tt “a en ee eee ORR POON O08S 900 SN IO OK
are, Mr. J. C. Hammond, M.A., sail for home. ‘victims’, however, 7 ee ara There is a tendeney in this oem pes CEE Sepa * a eee | * Gi OBE THEA 7 g
Headmaster of Harrison College. Invit itions have gone out to to the oceasion and deliverec e collection for higher crowns, long- Public Sandman. No Me ae ts od 4 RE %
Mr. T. E. Went, M.B.E., Major the 800 members of the Pilgrims. very interesting, amusing and } aired “bearskin’” felts, and sharp. “@Pby is beds. He spends hi $ xy
A. R. Foster, M.B.E., Mr. K. N. R. Members will pay £4. 10s, for sincere speech. vivid colours : es. trying to make your bed more » >
Husbands, Speaker of the House “heir meal, and an additional There was great amusement ee Ca for table. - & TODAY 5 & 8.15 and Continuing %
of Assembly, Mr. John Goddard, .£4 !0s. for each woman guest. when Mr. Dent recalled how his N-E-W-S r. Perrir ys: “Many peopk * %
O.B.E., Mr. M. O’N. Campbell, en guests will cost £5. 7s. apiece. connections with the West Indies World Round-Up For Womea in be Which; are: 199 * , $
eo gaeeiten Barbados inion New York’s Mayor, Mr. Vincent first commenced, through his du- From N oe York and too short Unless x ERROL FLYNN — DEAN STOCKWELL X
and lecturer at Achinot Impellitteri, and Mrs, Impellitteri ties at the West India Committee. Awae m New cere by is 8 inches wider 8 bee. x
: : ‘will be guests, Mr. John W. Davis, He was engaged by the Committe: ; , YORK milliner has de- girth and you have a 7-inch X %&
Butlin’s Promise former Ambassador to London, ag office boy, in the year 1904 aes ‘ a turban. of white fox in which to wriggle your “S $
‘who is president of the American after the previous boy had spent oo a er with a moonburst you are not sleeping com % M %
here is no likelihood of But- side of the Pilgrims, will be in the some of the petty cash on sweets ©! rhinestone s. This can also be ably, Across 1% %
lin’s camps being seen in any parts chair and had been sick in the office of ae as for each 4 “Everyone shifts between 20) 1. precursor of the harmonium. (9) | % s
of the Caribbean area for some PF Sir Algernon Aspinall, then Se pe fame for each mon'h 10 times a night, so vou must ped. tier or bird trainer ? (6) 1% - 2 %
time to come. This was stated by Summer Holidays retary of the Committee. of tHe aoe as sale in le ding ve room in bed to move around 1% Barbados Agencies Ouis Flash x
Mr. Butlin himiSelf"at the Annuale ISS DAPHNE PILG KIM, Town Clerk or s ‘ begins with Carnation When you are 1eV 1 . %
Meeting of His English Company daughter of Mr. and Mrs. §S, R. H. W. FARRELL, Town Ne eet iP y Aouad cide ves with mattress never poke it iY % $
in Yorkshire recently. He was O. Pilgrim of Bay Street, flew in Cle oie ae "Port ~ Spain gs arcissus rr wy et st. The only at you S ; (3) 1% MRS CAROL SKINNER won the Quiz on Wednesday last at %
"Or o pias ae outes Jamaice n rsday Te > ihe si 2 Abs mae om Paris vhat attire ike i y - romantic . | the . E .
replying to a share holder who ask- from Jamaica on Thursday Q after England for talks with Sir John eit Senee sen = ay samt dae it eee a ceenaro ee ty | $ aes slobe. She failed how ever to answer the Jack Pot Question 2
ed that in view of the writing off noon by B.W.A. to spend the 7 Gity Chamberlain of Edin- ,o~ Pe ep Se ete ate OR tT cat ea eae .,| 22. One hundred and fifty trees tor | at is the highest recorded mile ner hour on the Speedo- %
of the company’s £200,000 stake summer holidays with her parents, mrie, : AMDET LE “*y,,,, being sold in Paris. WHAT IS THE FASHION IN cover. (6) % «meter of the Citroen Car ?”—100 M.P.H. %
3utlin’ 2 > ring burgh, who leaves in September A Champs-Elysees dog shop EDS? The majority of married| 23. Adds reeds to envelope. (9) x %
Butlin’s (Bahamas) the Board Daphne is studying for her Arts Teac ‘ I 5 I ‘ s
in Butlin’s (Bahgmas)ithe Board degree at the University College for Trinidad to take up appoint- phathing white poodles in milk. uples over 40 buy single bec Down Dail ances tai %
should underté ikeeno~further for- of the West Indies in Jamaica and ment as Commissioner of Locai At a sale in Dior’s salon a well- h a wooden headboard 1. Let shy at a small pony. (6) LELPPPPLLLPPPLLPLPPPPP LPP LL ALLL SOOO,
Ai oy Government in Trinidad. Mr. yy, Kile: oh: aah? ia | 2. 8)
eign busi Ms. Butlin pointed has just finished her first year at 5 ; 4 cake. Ont suit afte eirhe Oe et eaee 3 (4) rane
out that although he had lost some the Valveteiey , Farrell has ay ee ee £180 to £25: he under 40’s prefer doubl 4 tate | (9). G00 8058 S20neneeee
- ¥ over > i » y “lerk’: ‘ ‘ hie ear. (6
$200,000 of his owiimeney in the Ns ey se own I From Johannesbure beds with a padded he ‘d= | 7 % (4) q> i Y Ni Pp | Cc T ll
venture, he had no regrets about Off To New York ICe avers AN ex-Paris dress designer hz rd and no foot, Re tenOG aaribs tos Caspar, i) 4 4 / E A TR E
; : : — ‘ ae uhie pean oe : "we ) : a foot short. (:
his part in it. The Board of But- i >. For Barbados Holiday started a shop where she cuts and Opposition Al AY 1 useless to sprinters. (4)
lin’s (Bahamas) was still trying R. OSWALD STREAT is on iSS CLAUDIE bBEUZELIN, tacks dresses to fit, ITH the Paris collections due} 16. money ? (4) ae eeeceeeeons
to save the public’s money al- his way to New York via M woul brother Andre was in customer does her own stitchi this month, news com 19. This Rt patted 44
fhough there was not a lot of this Trinidad. He left yesterday morn- ¥ ad Seki at home New York that American | 21. It is often snookered, (3)
money involved ing by B.W.LA. In New York, he Barbados a few weeks ago, arrived

sprint
successful debut at the White City
in the Women’s A.A.A. Champion-
has been
not to re-
Now, I under-
stand, she has decided to, do. juste’
this and McDonald Bailey says that weeks’
efforts are being made to obtain a turned to U.S.A. by B.W.1VA.
is enjoying Sunday.
herself very much and is proving
wherever
the past few days she has
stle,
am- staff of the Daily News New York.
During his stay here he was the
back (o guest

ships

ma

job

pop
Dut

been
Stoc

bitic
Trir

A

ant

ing
t



da



end
London

ivelled

Eileen Will Stay

ORE news of
King,
champion,

recenily,

in in England.

for her.

ular
ing
appearing
kton
on is

ridad

Trinidad’s
Since

Kileen
wondering whether or

Eileen

at
and Darlington.
to bring the
title at the 1952 Olympics

Miss

her

she



Newc
He!



P.R.O.

NEW
week

Publie

arr

is Llu

the Festival

will go

Wales. He

1s

of Bri
to Canterbury last we
later "0, Cambridge
m

val in London last
d Cywar,
Relations
ish Guiana. He is in Paes Visit= accompanied by their two daugh-
He ters April and Bobby. Here foy two
at Acvra

offlesr,



‘k

due back

in mid-October.

Eileen

un-

runs.

100 metres

Assist-
Brit-

will join his wife who is a nurse

Leaving by the same plane for
William Ban-
Heather.
young 'They had been in Barbados on six
Banfield’s
husband is with the Alcoa Steam-

Mrs
caughter,

Trinidad were
field and her
weeks’ holiday. Mrs.

ship Co., in, Port-of-Spain,

Back To The U.S.

R. SYDNEY A. THORNE who
two
re-
on

had been ~— spendin

holiday in Barbados

Mr. Thorne, who is
dian has been absent from
colony for the last
at present

is

employed on
Mrs,
St. Michael

Trinidad Solicitor
R. AND MRS:

of his sister
Ellis of Bibby’s Lane,

dad yesterday morning by B.W.1.A.

weeks they are

Guest House,
Mr. Power

Trinidad,

staying

is a solicitor









THE







ADVENTURES







a’ Barba-
the
24 years, and
the

Edith

FRANCIS
POWER arrived from Trini-

in

OF

from Martinique on Thursday by
B.W.LA. to spend a week’s holiday
in Barbados. She will then pe going
on to Trinidad for two weeks
before returning to Martinique on
August 16.

Miss Simone Rougery and het joccey
sister Maud who are from Mar- pm
tinique are also in Barbados on
holiday. They are here for two
months staying at Bagshot,
Stream.

Short Transfer

R. EDDIE LYDER of Barclays

Bank in Trinidad, just back
from England where he had beer
on four months’ long leave, ar-
rived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. He is on his
way to St. Lucia on a short trans-
fer. He leaves Barbados by the
Lady Nelson,

Arriving by the same plane were
Mr. and Mrs. D. H. L. Ward’
little davghter Heather. Othe:
arrivals from Trinidad were M.
and Mrs. Clark Elder and thei!
daughter Sybil. Here for abou
four days, they are staying at th
Ocean View Hotel. They aré
Americens living in Barcelona
Venezuela. Mr. Elder is a druggis
with one of the oil companies dow,
there,

PIPA

Saturday, fuly 2&8,
rlude; 1130 am = Pre
Parade; 1145 a Women
12 00 noon Tt Yew 12
Ww Analysi i

1958
1120 a
framme

m Int

>

Promenade
Fourth Test Match;
Cricket; 4 10 p mn



pm
men's

of bri
will

laughs.
get them ir
hers |"

lady “lust you wait

Ceavrinht

P 88 . Vaz Diss Int. Amstordam

CU B



















* Chole
Yancing: 6 45

re; 600 pm

pm Programme

-10.45 p.m 25.58
710 pm
Behind
vel; 8 15
30 pm
10.10





Yours





AL
Tae

ue



i

indoors
hear the
ne indoors
1 fine jar in
* This would suit those

flowers better than a cracked
he smiles.

appears





Lo=sighd

visit

MORGAN

Miami to Rio

ation for good food

¥ the young adventurers who ’ BY THE W A Y
tt repo. at OW hite | ¥. ©.% By Beachcomber T he A ost lub {rc m
‘ Ke 22 f Africa « 3 y - '
ee their lees os Ses ; aa 9 Pittsburg, squaw Giggling “What on earth do you mean
shi aie ison bers call he take i gle. Umpum umpum wa wa. asked the patient. The docto I : ° a
& scien! Ta ; oe SSS" Me Chinee dwarf, no likee flre- pointed to a correr of the room J Jusic, Dancing
. cep B jet water, no likee Aflican tlibes. “I see the saddle and bridle ove *
_‘shey may run across Big Cite Gentlemen, Governor Fullbath there,” he said complacently, 9 ° >
Stegnant Water Bogart. Him ‘he 1D Ysends an inyite to us all to a fivsta es Enter tainment
- \ a ah. Hin ree at his estancia. Saddle the camels! ‘a wo Epitaphs
it ter bust when squaw Bacall, We ride Horse Neck! -
off-white Queen uv the Kuppakaw- we _ pene ig 7 we ay Sant uh ae throughout the night
fee Injuns, puttum foot in croco- Uneircumstantial Victim of his bohemian tenden
ake nt eel 1 8 cies, : .
dile's mouth. Evidence yoyo an unwary missionary lie Dial 4000 for reservations
Say, don’t them tribal drums do See words in a correspon- The cannibals had sent a note t
omep'n to’a guy? Cap'n Corn- dence column, about jumping —_8@y



the
goa

pois



all f



Tretia
Water

VESTS 79¢

fluke,

ride. to. Fort
curned:

ned bullets
il? Waal,

Pigsnout
womett, and children.
Redskins
Red
Blackskins.
en I’m midy praoud o’ them-

met the fust wor he

vith
Them
is shoot’n
kins, mon
Tell



ov bultdin’ this lil ole Cana-
n-Pacifle railroad. Stagnant
riff



89¢ $1.00 113 115 118 134

c

t@ conclusions, prompt me to teli
this story A doctor ordered a
man to stSy in bed, and on no
account to eat meat. Next day he
led again, and said sternly:
ou've been eating meat!”
“No such thing,” said the patient,
“Well, horse is meat, isn’t it?
And you've been eating horse.”







SILK“ VESTS $137 147

PANTIES 89¢ 98¢ 99% $1.07 113 129 $1.41 152

SLIPS $220 252 488

BRAS. $181 164 195 240 2.70 3.40 440 4.43
NIGHTIES $410 416 429 426.452 495 4.97 5.33

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Yous

DIAL 4606

REeSQGReREREEREREURBHEUEREAES GB



YOUR SHOE STORE

“Drop in and take
us today.”

pot-luck with

* ® =F TOY
Shed, passer-by, a silent tear; SUS }
A champion glass-blower lies here c
Challenged one day to do hi
worst, y
He blew a greenhouse, and the? 48 728 €&
burst,

Canadian Har
and R

SECURE
®

BARBADOS
COTT@N FAC
Hardware Department

TUE

DIAL 4220

}

i
)
}



|



RECEIVED
Selling Vast
dwood Chairs
ockers

WOVRS NOW.

CO-OPERATIVE
TORY LID.
Tel. No. 2039

M 31.32

the N



Par



p.m

Music

M

Radio

Faith fil?





BB. CR Radio. Programme |

| To-day at












of yesterday's puzzle. —Acrosst
A Brey 9, p) Ate; 11











Bar Wi Toe: 14,
16, Amuse; 20, Pat.





ae ES, SWORK TO
— pera =| P/ MILL A MAN
EMPIRE THEATRE | eee:
|
To-day special 9.30 Show

4.45 and 8.30 and con-

4.45 and 8.30 p.m,

BUD & LOU

tangle with
TITANS of

., TERROR!

ONAL presents

tinuing

Daily

cain” ee ELLIOTT
WALTER BRENNAN MARIE WINDSOR

Rervess une A REPUBLIC PICTURE. csee =




UNIVERSAL INTERNAT!

ROYAL



the Wolfman





sla aalae TA
Dracula CCLUMBLA PICTURES presents
BELA LUGUSI POOUCTION at ENT

the Monster
GLENN STRANGE

ALL |



ENPLOSIVE
THRILLS!

THUNDEROUS
ACTIONS!

AT






Three Shows TO-DAY 4.30 — 8.15 and 12 (Midnight)

SUNDAY & MONDAY 4.30 & 8.15

“THE

FABULOUS
TEXAN” )

Starring-—-

William ELLIOTT
John CARROLL and
Catherine McLEOD

Inside her arms, he forgot he was outside the law,

“NEESER
ASERRERS SER
THEATRE

_—_—
TO-DAY and TO.“ORROW

4.30 and 8 15
Colombia Smashing Double

“A THOUSAND
AND ONE
NIGHTS”

Starring :



Evelyn Keyes
F ora Phil Silvers and
4 \ Broderick CRAMTORO Soins oe)
Sot] NS) “ite a Cornel Wilde
Welitan for the Screen and Directed by ROBERT ROSSER
BRIDGETOWN SapAee tees
SPECIAL SHOWS TO-DAY Republic Double” “Red ‘CAMERON —"t wait

All-Aetion Double

** BRIMSTONE”

1.30 P.M.
TOLER
ie CHAN in

“THE TRAP

With Mantan MORELAND

9.30 &

and



as



The Ever Wendie R Ox Y
“JIMMY WAKELY i
SONG OF THE|| TODAY TO TUESDAY

4.45 and 8.15pm.
It's All About Airline Stewardesses?
— Four-Stan, Fum Hit!

PLAZA-oisrn|| ge

SPECIAL TO-DAY 9.30 a.m,

RETURN OF |)
APEMAN

BELA LUGOSI — John
CARRADINE &

WESTWARD ||
BOUND . |.









JANE VAN
lL AN JOHNSON

who is Mike-cra: i
ies zy No, as M me



BARRY \
vow KEEL SULLIVAN

with
KEN MAYNARD — Hoot see, se See
GIBSON — BOB STEEL = z

or)





BREATH-TAKING |
THRILES £2

ROUSING ‘|

oX CITEMENT £ fy







Rod CAMERON -

* Walter BRENNAN

“ ener dg

in

Starring William MARSHALL — Adele MARA



WED. & THURS.

20th C-Fox Double

BURT LANCASTER

* MISTER
AND

BLACK HAND ”

STARTING SATURDAY
4th AUGUST

“SWORD OF
MONTE CRISTO”

880”

The First Sypercinecolor
Picture to Show in
Barbados.



a, IES AMS

SATURDAY, JULY. 28,





1951

Re-arming France
Is Critical Problem

(By EDWARD M. CORRY)

The problem of transfor
tary force is reaching the cr

PARIS, July 27,
ming France into a strong mili-
itical stage for U.S. planners.

Grave political problems have taken some of the lustre

off France’s pledge to supp

ly 10 divisions to the Atlantic

army by the end of the year—a promise which President
Vincent Auriol repeated only last Monday to General
Eisenhower, as he formally handed over the site of SHAPE

headquarters.

Ships Don’t Get
Enough Meat

From Argentina

LONDON, July 27.

The Lendon Times commenting
on the Argentine meat situation
said: “British shipping com-
panies, long accustomed to bring-
ing Argentine meat to this coun-
try in refrigerated space, are dis-
appointed with the limited quan-
tities made available for shipment
so far this year.

These have filled only a fraction
of the space which was fully con-
ducted on ordinary business lines.
From the resumption of ship-
ments at the beginning of May to
the end of this month, not more
than 55,000 tons of Argentine meat
will have been brought forward
for shipment.

Exports from Argentina to all
destinations are now restricted to
10,000 tons a month, and lines es-
timate that only 5,000 tons a month
will be available for shipment to
the U.K. during August, Septem-
ber. and October.

Out of the total authorized ship-
ments of 10,000 tons a month, ex-
ports are made to Brazil and other
countries. If the total expected
quantity of 15,000 tons for the U.K.
during the ensuing three months is
realized, this will make a total of
70,000 tons in the first six months
of the new trade agreement

The agreement stipulated for
exports of not less than 200,000
tens of carcass meat and offal,
during'the 12 months after its sig-
nature,

For this quantity to be supplied,
130,000 tons must be shipped dur-
ing six months from November to
April, a period when supplies are
normally at their largest. This
would provide an average monthly
export of over 20,000 tons.
Shipping, owned by British
lines, is capable of carrying 500,000
tons a year or more than 40,000
tons a month. Consequently, even
during the height of the shipping
season, refrigerated space will only
be half filled.

Ships carrying passengers
mails must be maintained in the
service, and they would be able
to carry all the limited shipments
likely to be offered.



and

—

TAKES OVER FROM
BRIGADIER PAGE

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 25.
Brigadier A. C. S§S. Jackson,
newly-appointed Commander of
the British Army in the Caribbean
area, arrived in Trinidad this
morning to pay his first. official
visit to Trinidad. He has taken
over from Brig. E. K. Page. He
will spend five days here, Before
coming to the Caribbean, he was
Officer Commanding, Northern
Area, East Africa.





Assistant Librarian
Accepted By Leeds

Mr. Carlyle A. Burton,
Assistant Librarian, Public Library
has been accepted by Leeds School
of Librarianship for a one-year
course beginning early in Septem-
ber and leading to the Library
Associations’ Registration
Examination,

Mr, Burton will be returning
from Trinidad at the end of this
month after having completed
three months training at the
Eastern Caribbean Regional

Library (British Council).





The truth of the military situa-
tion here, as it is being expressed
more and more openly by all poli-
tical parties as well as U.S, ex-
perts is, that as long as war in
Indo-China continues to bleed
France of equipment, and huge
sums of money, she will not be
able to play her traditional role of
defender of the continent.

As of today, France has barely
three and a half divisions ready
for Eisenhower. Its airforce is
past the blue print stage, its arma-
ments’ industry has been very
slow in increasing output.

While its morale has improved
considerably, the army still lacks
the support of France’s 41,000.000
citizens, not to mention whole-
hearted opposition of a large sec-
tion of the population which form
the leftwing.

In terms of money and raw ma-
terials the drain is tremendous on
this economically weak country.
With the threat of sabotage always
lurking behird a crisis such as
France is now again experiencing,
the cost of turning out divisions—
modern divisions with high priced
equipment—is something which
any French Government trembles
to ask of the country.

French officials note the cost of
raising and equipping a modern
armoured or airborne division 15
$285,000,000—about one seventh of
France’s record 1951 arms budget
of $1,115,000,000. Even an ordin-
ary infantry division costs about
$142,000,000.

High Price

The U.S. is paying a huge price
for rejuvenation of the French
army. In arms and equipment a
total of $2,200,000,000 is to be de-
livered this year. In addition an-
other $275,000,000 has been ear-
marked for Indo-China and finally
some $400,000,000 has been credit-
ed France for the purchase or
manufacture of arms.

The list of equipment delivered
to France in the first six months of
this year comprise 50 different
categories and range from aircraft
carriers to tractors and include
jets, artillery and tanks.

The 1939 army was mostly an
army of recruits armed _ with
equipment that was soon to be-
come obsolete. By the end of the
war, the French army had for all
practical purposes disappeared.
For four years nothing was done
about replacing it.

Now she has to start from the
beginning, equipping. and training
a medern striking force. To train
this foree she desperately needs
25,000 army officers and non-com-
missioned officers fighting among
155,000 troops in Indo-China —a
potential core for a new French
army.

She also needs an armaments
industry to equip recruits. In light
weapons, the French are once
again turning out equipment in in-
creasing numbers but in heavy
stuft it is going at a craw!l.—U-P.





ws

INQUEST WILL
CONTINUE TO-DAY

FURTHER hearing in the
inquiry into the death of Charles
McConney of Brereton, St, Philip

will be resumed today before
Coroner C, W. Rudder at the
District “B”’ Court, St. George

at 10 a.m.

McConney met his death when
he was involved in an accident on
Stepney Road, St. George with the
motor car M-669 owned and
driven by Carl Fields of Roebuck
Street, St, Michael about 7.45
p.m., on July 21,



T

means made just.right

HEIR good looks tell you they’re just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price
tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
is a Full Brogue Oxford. Tied to every pair is
the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign
which means ‘ just right’!
leading stores in Barbados.









Wild Confusion
On Stock Market

LONDON, July 27.

Scenes of wild confusion marked
the Stock Market confronted by
the new Gaitskell proposal for
three years control of dividends
and fortunes lost overnight. High
priced industrials tumbled right
and left at the opening.

Ford metors fell five shillings to
53 shillings nine pence, Dunlop
rubbers three shillings to 61 shill-
ings three pence, United Molasses
nearly four shillings to 83 shill-
ings six pence and Vickers six
shillings to 47 shillings.

Worst hit section‘as trading con-
tinued was rubber shares. They
‘were then without dividends for
years and have only just begun to
reward their patient holders when
this blow fell,

Dealers were completely at sea
and reluctant to buy at any price.

The Brooke family controlling
shareholders of Brooke Bond and
Company tea merchants, lost more
than £100,000 when £1 ordinary
shares fell from £11. 15 shillings
to £10. 10s.—a 25 shilling loss on
each share. At one time shares

fell to £10. —U-P.

Debate On Price
Rollbacks

WASHINGTON, July 27.

Exhausted Senate and House
conferees ended an all-night ses-
sion early today with only two
issues blocking agreement on the
compromise bill to extend econo-
mic controls for one year.

Conferees said they reached a
tentative agreement on the amend-
ment permitting price rollbacks to
pre-Korean levels provided in-
creased costs may be added to
ceiling prices.

The other issue still in doubt
was the controversial beef slaugh-
tering quota question.

Chairman Burnet R. Maybank
said conferees reserved the right
to reopen discussion of the roll-

back amendment. He said the
Committee also would continue de-



art slaughter quotas “to pre-
vent black market.”
Maybank scheduled another
meeting at 2 p.m. today.
—U-P.



$10,542 Collected
At Piarco Airport

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 25.
Revenue collected at Piarco Air-
port during the month of June was
$10,542.13 which was $428.74 less
than the previous month, stated a
release from the Director of Civil
Aviation. This amount further in-
dicates a continuous drop in rev-
enue at the Airport from April.
Of this amount aerodrome charges
realised $9,856.96 and $684.17
came from rentals.





Look for it in





IMN:

{MERICAN COLL

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE .

“To Mr. Bevan—the Order of Lenin, and to Mr. Harold Wilson we might give the same—er, 2nd class ..



Ghost Town Lives

TO THE STRAINS of grand opera, a ghost town comes

to life in the high Rockies.

mond jubilee they are putting on M
house at Central City—once the cen:

To celebrate Colorado's dia-
art in the old opera
e of a gold-mining

boom. Saloons have re-opened to serve drinks.





~ Call For
Islamic

Solidarity

From HAROLD GUARD

LONDON, July 27.

Leaders in Central Asia, Soviet
Asian republics, and in Iran, Pak-
istan and Egypt are reportedly
calling to the faithful for “Islamic
solidarity” in a combined “libera-
tion movement” against Western
imperialism.

A Chinese Communist broad-
cast from Hankow said a meeting
of Chinese Moslems had sent tele-
grams to “Moslems and workers
of Persia and Morocco expressing
support for their liberation move-
ments. ' ae

The message said: “Moslems in
China cannot sit idly by and see
Moslems oppressed elsewhere. We
must oppose imperialism in uni-
son with all Moslem countries and
all oppressed nationalities.”

In Sinkiang province, the chair-
man of the People’s Democratic
League broadcast a declaration on
behalf of Moslems of Asia in sup-
port of Moslems in Iran.

Sympathy

He said: “The sympathy of
people of Asia and the Moslem
masses lies with the Persian
people.”

Last week Moscow Radio
brought |to the microphone the
“Grand Mufti of Central Asia’,
who said the international situa-
tion was “favourable to the Per-
sian people in their fight for in-
jependence.”

In Iran, Ayatollah Kashani,
leader of Fidayan Islam last week
published correspondence between
himself and Altaf Hussein in his

counterpart in Pakistan. Hussein
wrote to Kashani, “Pakistani
people have complete sympathy

with your sacred struggle.”

Kashani said he had_ invited
“statesmen of Arabia and the Isl-
amic world” to a conference for
the purpose of establishing Isl-
amic solidarity. Pakistan news-
papers give |prominence to the
message sent by the Grand Mufti
of Palestine to the Prime Minister.
Liaquat Ali Khan which said, “All
Moslems believe it is their duty
to see that the defence of Pakistan
is not the burden for Pakistan
alone, but one to be shared by al)
Moslems who must by law and re-
ligion fight to the death in defend-
ing Pakistan and Kashmir.”

Soviet broadcasts in Turkish
and Arabic languages monitored
here recently, urged the establish-
ment of the Union of the whole
Islamie world.—wU.P.



New Piant Comes
Into Operation

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, July 24.

The first section of the Agricul-
ture Department's new processing
plant has come into operation,
while other sections continue to be
installed at the Kingston premises.

The section in operation is mix-
ing stock feed mechanically, hav-
ing taken over this job from the
Government Produce Depot, where
stock feed used to be made by
hang. The mechanically mixing
of stock feed ensures a better dis-
tribution of the ingredients within
the mixture.

When the plant is completed it’
will increase the Government's

‘drive to improve the Colony’s
peasant farming economy. It will
be having units for canning pine-
apples, grapefruit and oranges,
and for the conversion of corn
cassava or the like into flour.

It is hoped that the flour manu-
facturing unit will be ready in
time for the next corn crop, whick
is expected to be around 800,000
lbs. The new plant will also sup-
ply storage and drying facilities
which will render surplus produce
less liable to attacks by insects and
moulds,



CLUB PREMIERE TENNIS

Yesterday’s Results
MEN’S SINGLES
A. W. Symmonds beat
Blackett 6—0, 6—0.
F, Edwards beat J.
6—1, #—6.
LADIES’ SINGLES
A. Griffith beat Miss G
y Pe 6—1, 6—2.
Monday’s Fixtt\res
| MEN’S DOUBLES
| C. B. Forde and W, DeC. Forde

LeR.

Robinson

Miss

vs. J. E. Haynes and LeR. Black-
ett

MIXED DOUBLES
Grimes and C. B. Forde
E. Parris and F, Edwards

Miss G.

vs, Miss



DOPE ADDICTS in New York
may tot 90,000, reports the
Municip Committee on Drug
Addiction to Mayor Vincent Im
pelliteri. That would mean ont
out of every 90 New Yorkers. The
committee wants to spend millions

of dollars to prevent drug addic-
tion and cure victims.

CONSTABLE SAM SAPAN is
New York's busiest cop. He has
recovered 33 stolen cars, including
a mail truck. He has rescued *
drowning man He has fallen
downstairs chasing burglars.

He joined Sergeant William
Cotter in saving the life of actress
Joyce Matthews, found with her
wrists slashed in producer Billy
Rose’s apartment.

Just before Sam and the ser-
geant were to go off-duty one
night, a radio call summoned them
fifth-floor

to a bedroom = in
Broadway's Hotel Woodward.
There, cach grabbed one leg of
Mrs. Estelle Ryan and pulled her
pack into the room as she was

about to hurtle into the street
Carmen is ‘layzee’

ACTRESS Carmen Miranda,
highest paid woman in the
United States in 1946 ($201,458
£71,950) scorns this honour in
1951. Says the Brazilian dancer:
“In 1946 | work on stages and
make two films. I go on radio
and be |ike atomic bomb. Then

I go to hospital. That I don’t like.
My health is too important. Now
I be layzee. If I got 200,000 dol-
lars in nk I wouldn't know
what to do with them.” In other
words she wants to be poorer to
be healthier.

LONDPOS DOCTORS advised
12-year-old Henry Hooke’s par-
ents to take the delicate boy to
Canada if they wanted him to live
a few years more. They did, and
to-day in Lemnia New Jersey, he
celebrated hs 104th birthday. He
has outlived his wife and two
children.

Growing a record

BIGGEST cotton crop in_ his-
tory is now a possibility. Cotton
bales for future delivery are down

40 cents
York.
MISSING — one Atlantic Blue
Riband. It was actually a silver
gilt, onyx, and enamel trophy
given by the late Harold Keates

to three dollars in New

Hales, Tory M.P., for the ship
that crossed the Atlantic th
fastest

The Queen Mary holds the re-

cord (average speed 31.69 knots)
but never got the trophy because

it was presented earlier to the
French liner Normandie, When
the Normandie burned at New
York in 1942 the trophy was
probably burned, too.

Now Americans are taking an
interest in it again, Next year
the new liner United States may
have 1 crack at the Queen Mary’s
record

Turpin’s gloves
THE GLOVES whick Randoiph
Turpin wore in the big fight ap-
peared on a New York TV pro-
gramme “It’s News to Me.” The
B.O.A.C. flew them over and will

fiy them baek to-morrow.
New York is discussing an
official weleome for Sugar Ray

Robinson with a ticker-tape
shower down Broadway.

GENERAL MOTORS plan to
make 36 per cent. fewer cars in
the next three months than they
made in the same time last year.
The steel saved will go for de-
fence. Yet they will still be mak-
ing 513032 cars during those 90-
odd days.

The last fling

ROULETTE WHEELS, dice
tables, patrons and all could sink
into the basement by winch and
ceble machinery whenever the
police threatened to raid a
gembling-house at Cheboygan,
Michigan. But one night police
fooled the doorman and got in
before he could throw the lever
and. cause the place to vanish.



More Rice In B.G.
Means Less Cattle

(From Our Own Correspondent)

_ GEORGETOWN, July 24
Rice expansion being carried
eut on the coastal belt of British
Guiana has had an unfavourable
effect on cattle production. Fig-
ures for the past three years show
® progressive drop in the number
of animals slaughtered

In 1948 the number slaughtered
was 19,600; in-1949 it was 17,745;
and in 1950—16,043. The amount

of bee! consumed in Georgetown
in 1950 was 2140,000 lbs., com-
pared With 2,300,000 Ibs in 1949

Of thee quantities the Rupununi
supplied 520,000 lbs. in 1950, and

364,000 lbs. in 1949 Production
continues to drop and during the
past two months there have been
sever meatless days in George-
towr

t

PAGE THRLE

ne

Reduction



of

London Express

Series XX
On Sale

THE Barbados Turf Club are
now selling Series XX for the
Mid-Summer race meet, A record
number of 75 horses will be taking |
part in this four day meet and in|
groups about the city men daily |
Ciscuss the coming races, |

At the turf horses are regularly |
seen getting their workout. They |
are taken to the sea, too, on}
mornings





|
|
|
|
|
|

51b tin
NOW.....-

hopeal Judges 11b tin

rT * ¢ |
\ ary Decision NOW

Found guilty of stealing three < cm Se mem Se e e
breadfruit, one soursop, six paw-
paws and some _ tomatoes, all}
valued 96 cents, Sarah Johnson |
of Connell Town, St. Lucy was |
yesterday fined £1 by the Judges
of the Assistant Court of Appeal,
Mr. G. L. Taylor and Mr. J. W. B.
Chenery.

Sarah also has to pay 1/6 to
Mortimer Johnson from whom she
utole the fruit and vegetables. In
imposing the fine, the judges
varied the decision of Police |
Magistrate Mr. S. H. Nurse. Mr. |
Nurse had fined Sarah £2

The background of the case was}
a claim by Sarah Johnson that
she was in charge of the land on |
whieh the things were growing}
and it was not Mortimer Johnson's
land. She did not deny picking
the fruits.

She produced papers to try to
prove that the land previously
belonged to her grandfather and

Take pure water, add KLIM, stir

and you have pure, safe milk

ran

ala

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER











was handed over to William e
Johnson from whom she produced e paced
1 power of Attorney. We, 2





Fined 7/- More

WHEN he lost his appeal against
Police Magistrate Mr. E. A,
McLeod’s 5/- fine decision for
failing to produce his driving
licence to a policeman Hamilton
Bayley of Villa Road, Brittons Hill,
had to pay an additional 7/-
appeal costs, The Assistant Court
of Appeal Judges who heard the
appeal yesterday, were Mr, G, L.
Taylor and Mr, J. W. B, Chenery
The Court told Bayley he was
lucky in only being fined 5/-

The offence was committed on
May 22, when Bayley was driv-
ing the car M-1920 on the Pine}
road, |

P, C. 230 Gladston Bradshaw
who reported Bayley said that the
car came down the Pine Road
without a head light burning, “I
put out my hand to stop him, but
he only stopped after he got past
me and had turned on his lights.
He then asked me if I were blind.”

Pc. Bradshaw said, Bayley
was unable to produce his licence,

APPEAL WITHDRAWN

Winsion Walcott of Maxwell
Hill, Christ Church, yesterday
withdrew an appeal he had made
against Police Magistrate Mr. C
D. L. Walwyn’s decision of £1 in
14 days or 14 days imprisonment
when he found him guilty of em-
bezzlement.

Walcott used to work with Cecil
Edwards delivering milk for him
and he fraudulently embezzled
3/6 he received from W. Thomas
who took milk from Edwards,

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

fg see i ,
My,cough has‘quite gone...
f ~





I'can enjoy smoking now!

6 My cough bothered me for years until
finally | was forced to give up smoking.
But the cough didn't go and | missed my
smokes. Then | heard about Zubes Cough
Mixture. It was amazing! My ‘ chronic’
cough didn't last to the end of the bottle.

How | enjoyed my first pipel 9 REG?

Warming, comforting Zubes Cough
Mixture soothes the faw throat,
stops irritation and invigorates the
chest. It's excellent for coughs
arising from colds, bronchial inflam-
mation, throat dryness and over-

smoking. Zubes Cough Mixture gets

cata mae MEK TURE
The cough remedy for adl the family





Sch Lady Noeleen, Sch. Rosaline M, s
M V. Sedgefield, Sch Sunshine R_, Sch. So
Marea Henrietta, Sch. Franklyn D. R.,







Bch
Yacht Marsaitese

Rainbow M., Sch, Mildred Wallace,
Sch, Cyril E, Smith,

Sch. Henry D. Wallace, Yacht Marianne,
Sch Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. W. L
Eunicia, MV. Lady Joy, Sch. Molly N.
Jones, Yacht Keskidee, 8 8. Mormacgulf,
SS Barbara, MV. Antares, 3S. In-

ventor, 8 8. Adviser, 8.8. Oak Hill, 8.8.

Strategist, 55S Student, 5 5 Lady
Nelson
ARRIVAL
Motor Vessel Daerwood, 94 tons net,
Capt. Mulzac, from St. Lucia

DEPARTURES
& S Ganymedes, 1,532 tons net, Capt
Drijver, for Trinidad
Schooner Freedom Fleary, 23 tons net,
Capt DeRoche, for Grenada
S 8. Polycrest, 720 tons net, Capt, Nor-

CREAM
CRACKERS

CRISP
&
CREAMY

They're Simply Delicious
N. B.

sett, for Montreal
MV. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt
Gumbs, for Dominica



In Touch with Barbados
Coast Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd |
advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their |
Parbados Coast Station:—

S.S. Charmouth Hill, 8.8. Missionary
Ridge, S.S. Theodoxus, $8.9. Cillope, 8.8
Celilo, 8.9. Kelletia, $.S. Dingledale, 8.5
Critish Fortitude



SS. Trajanus, $58
rmocmoon, S.8. Guifpride, 8.S. Sam
. $8. Argentina, $.8. Carina, 8.5
diddiefjord, S.8 fonian Pioneer, $.S
Brazil, 8.8. Aleoa Ranger, 8.8. Chan
gellorsville, $.S, lonannis P. Goodlandria,
6&8. Skotaas, S.S, Dolores, 8.5. Epo
Cardiff 8.8 John Chandris, 38.8
jakonia, $5. Tista, 8.8. Esso Rotterdam,
8 S$ Valkyrien Marsk, 8.8. Nyholt, 8.5
F.nrmark, S.S. Ancap, SS. Stanvac,
Pretoria, 8.8. Colombie, $.5. Myrto, 8.8
6.8. Yvoming, S.S. Edith Berthen, 8.5
Imperial Charlottetown, 5.58 Lauela
Brideman, 8 S. Astrea, 8.8. Alcoa Point-
er, 8.8. John Chandris, 5S. S. Rosa,
S.8. Alcoa Pilgrim, 8.8. Pollycrest, $3.8
Lions Gate, 5.5. Cab 8.8. Ringvilde
8.8 Chemawa, &%5S aturalist, 8.58
Woensdrecht, 8S. Bonito, SS. Therma



Cream
ill effects.

Diabetics Crawford's

Crackers

can
without

enjoy

fear of any

ASK FOR:

CRAWFORD’S










| CRAWFORD'S



& S. Albaro, 8S.S. Seabreeze, 5.5. Jane

Stove, 8.8. Bonito, 8.8. Bosario, 3.5

Hallanger, S.S. Macoris, 5.8. Monteal- . ~

lure, 85, Del Sud, $8. Lolde Mexico CREAM CRACKERS
& 8. Adriatica, $ S. Frinton, 8.S. Britan- A 4 A A 4 Ls
ny. 9.8. Prospector, 8.8. Clare Park '

S.S Everett, 58.5 Ldbreville, $.S.]

Alpha, 3.8. Hatcreek SSS







PAGE FOUR

FAREADOS GB

_~ += —_—





Printed by the Advocaie Co., Ltd, Broad 8t., Bridgetown,



Saturday, July 28, 1951





TEMPLE YARD

THE need for a public market in the
City has been the subject of public discus-
sion for some time and the Sanitary Com-
missioners of St. Michael decided this week
to recommend to the Vestry “that Temple
Yard be taken over as a public highway,
that it be covered and converted into
temporary market for hawkers; and that
if possible the building at the western
corner be acquired to provide space for
sanitary conveniences.”

The Director of Medical Services, the
Director of Transport and Highways, the
Colonial Engineer and the Commissioner
of Police were invited to take part in the
discussion of Mr. Mottley’s motion. They
agreed that if this temporary arrangement
would relieve the congestion and insani-
tary conditions caused by the presence of
hawkers in the side streets and alleys of
the City it was worth while.

It will be remembered that the Commis-
sioners after investigating several spots in
the City decided that the area between
Tudor Street, Suttle Street, and Watkins
Alley would be a suitable area for a
market. They recommended that the land
and buildings should be acquired for this
purpose. Owing to the legal difficulty in
the titles of some of the properties, the
Commissioners in an interim report recom-
mended that the Government should
acquire such of the properties as were
available. The scheme was estimated to
cost a sum in the vicinity of £40,000.

a

It had not been found possible for the
Government to embark on the scheme
owing to the amount of capital expenditure
involved and in the meantime, Mr. Mottley
has suggested the temporary scheme for
the conversion of Temple Yard into a
vegetable and fruit market.

The new proposal has the merit of estab-
lishing a market in the immediate city
area and putting it in a spot where there
is a driveway all round, where there is a
*bus terminus for country lines, where
th@re is a parking area and where the
vegetable market will be adjacent to the
meat and fish markets.

It is now left to the Vestry to recom-
mend to the Central Government the
adoption of this scheme, the cost of which
has been estimated roughly between two
and three thousand pounds.

The Commissioners made it clear that
this was not to be an alternative scheme to
the one for the establishment of a market
in Tudor Street. It was merely an attempt
to remove the unsightly and insanitary
conditions now existing in Tudor Street,
Milkmarket, Busby and Luke’s Alley.

These conditions have been the cause of
much public criticism against the Sanitary
Authority and the Government.

The Police have desisted from driving
these hawkers from their improvised
markets on the streets because of the ab-
sence of proper market space.

This point was not overlooked by the
Commigsioners who made it clear that if
and when the temporary market is estab-
lished in Te:mple Yard it will be necessary
to compel hawkers to use it.

The public too will be asked to co-oper-
ate. It will then mean that the insanitary
conditions fn the alleys will be removed
and the fourteen side streets between
Broad Street.and the Wharf and Broad
Street and Swan Street would be available
for parking and pedestrian traffic.



Agricultare In Cuba

THE establishment of special govern-
mental agencies for the financing of econo-
mic development is being firmly written
into the economics of under-developed
areas. Under the Law for the Agricultural
and Industrial Development of Cuba of
December 20, 1950, Cuba has recently
established a Bank of Agricultural and
Industrial Development of Cuba,

This bank has an initial capital of 15
million pesos and a development fund
of 10 million pesos, divided equally be-
tween its Agricultural and Industrial
Divisions. Both capital and development
fund may be increased by further govern-
ment contribution and by earned profits.
The loans eccntemplated in the law may be
on long, medium, or short term.

The first major operation of the new
bank in the agricultural field is to be the
financing of coffee production. To secure
funds for loans for this purpose, the bank
will issue bonds which will be guaranteed
by the security offered for the loans, In
this manner the bank hopes to avoid using
its capital for loans.

The law also prescribes the establish-
ment of rural credit associations and
boards. These are to be local stock co-
operatives organised to extend credit facil-
ities to their members; to facilitate the
production, processing, conservation,
transportation, distribution, sale and con-
sumption of products; and to carry out
financial operations which may aid
agricultural production.

other

DVOGATE s >

ae ne ae

|

i





«
*z 6
q’ aa
nsport t

State T finished the
year wit! lo ef £14,100,000

So tt reat S i f
ours emobrac ter
tacles e railway nationalised
road ! lage, and t waterways,
records total lo f £39,600,000
in its first three years of nationali
sation.

Put thet besid hat is happen-
ing to coal, elec ity, gas, and
cables, the other niajor national-
ised businesses and what does it

all add up to?

SIMPLY THAT SOCIALISA-
TION HAS FAILED. WHY?
BECAUSE THE GENIUS WHO
MIGHT MAKE IT WORK
CAN'T BE FOUND.

Members of the Government no

longer trouble to conceal thei
anxiety. Trade-union leaders are
equally unhappy. Mr. Joe Scott,
of the engineers, say

“The British Electricity Authori-
ty is a democracy run stark, star-

ing mad....Let’s go back to the
good old days.”
Mi Arthur Deakin, biggest

trade-union boss of them all, gives
this frank warning
“Any considerable
nationalisation proposals
shall get the biggest
we've ever had,”

What has happened to call forth
such condemnation?

COAL

Dearer, Poorer, Scarcer
Coal now costs between two and
three times as much as it did be-
And it is poorer in

extension of
and we
whacking

fore the war.
quality.

Even with these so much higher
prices the Coal Board is still
£4,000,000 short of wiping out its
year’s loss of £23,500,000
‘ t is likely to lose money





first
This y
again.

Its failure so lamentable
that last winter we had to import
foreign coal at a loss of £4,500,000
to keep going. And already we
are warned that we shall have to
do the same next winter.

The nationalisers claimed that
when coal belonged to the State
the miners would work with a
zest they never displayed when
they served the private capitalist
employers.

But what in fact has happened?

The men like their new imperson-

al managers so little that they are

leaving the pits by the hundred,
The New Man

Put the responsibility for that
on Lord Hyndley. He was the first
He built

was

head of the Coal Board
the system.

It proved to be a system that
had no place in it for those human
relationships which must be the
foundation of every flourishing
industry.

Now Lord Hyndley goes. In his
place will sit Sir Hubert Houlds-
worth, a legai-Civil Service mind.

Can he restore what is missing?
Will he make nationalisation
work?

You can give the answer in one

guess.
RAILWAYS

Dearer, and Worse
According to Lord Hurecomb,
head_ of the State Transport:
“All the principal indices of efft-
ciency on the railways have im-
proved.” But no traders—- and



very few travellers—share that
view. ; en
Indeed the Federation of British



Industries declares that “despite
inereased charges the railways do
not serve traders as well as in
pre-war days.”

Traders say they can never be
sure when or where their goods
will arrive.

Three recent instances of the
odd things that happen on our
nationalised railways are:

Twelve pedigree heifers

consigned from Lanark to a

farm in Sussex were delivered

at a Sheffield slaughterhouse
Ten tons of potting sand was



Low Living Standards Hold Back —

BARBADOS

By
BERNARD HARRIS

or a month on the jour-
from St. Austell, Corn-
wall, to Croydon,

A truck of urgently wanted
steel took 37 days to reach
Bury St. Edmunds from Car-
diff.

lost

ney

Always Excuses
Even the coal workers are com-
plaining about the railways. and
congestion at railway junctions,
they vay, is making another coal
crisis more probable.
The Railway Executive replies

that the congestion is due to “a
shortage of trained locomotive
crews.”

One year the excuse is lack of
coal; the next lack of men, Always
excuses and always deterioration
of service.

it is not merely that the Trans-
port Commission already records
accumulated losses of £39,600,0uUu,
but this year there will certainly
be a further loss.

How are these losses to be met?
In the usual way — the customer
and the taxpayer will be milked
again.

Already a 10 per cent. increase
in freight rates has been pushed
through. It is proposed to make
yet another increase in mainline
and London Transport .« fares,
which will hit particularly heavily
those who must travel daily to
their work.

The minimum fare on London
buses, trams, and trains will be
2d. Monthly return rail fares will
cost another 2s. in the £ more.

jn the London area the cost of
travel will be 15s, in the £ more
than before the war; outside Lon-
don it will be nearly doubled.

‘Patching’

Would it be better policy to re-
duce fares and tempt more pas-
sengers? Lord Hurcomb, brus-
quely, says “No.” He forecasts
higher fares still,

AND WORSE STILL HE
DECLARES THAT THE RAIL-
WAYS HAVE SO LITTLE
MONEY TO SPEND ON RE-
NEWALS AND REPAIRS THAT
RE-EQUIPMENT IS VERY
DIFFICULT. “IN THE MAIN
ASSETS ARE BEING PATCH-
ED INSTEAD OF REPLACED.”
That is a very serious state of

affairs, A disquieting commen-
tary on the efficacy of nationalisa-
tion.

Why has Lord Hurcomb failed?
Because he is a great civil servant
and runs the railways the way
Whitehall runs its departments.
State Transport is top heavy with
administration, and its adminis-
trators not necessarily big enough
for so big a job,

It is one of the defects of social-
isation that you can’t always give
the important jobs to the men best
fitted by experience for them.

The waiting queue is always a
long one, and too often men have
to be selected for reasons other
than their competence.

ELECTRICITY
High Prices, Less Juice
Electricity made £4,391,000
profit in its first year of national-

isation, followed by £7,163,000 last
year.

But was that due to better ser-
vice? Far from it. The profits
came from higher charges.

In the three years’ before

nationalisation the price of elec-
tricity gradually fell, Within a
few weeks of the installation of
Lord Citrine as electricity chief
prices started going up.

IN SOME AREAS CONSUM-
ERS HAVE HAD THREE PRICE
INCREASES IN THREE
YEARS OF STATE OWNER-
SHIP.

DESPITE THAT, LORD
CITRINE FORECASTS STILL





ADVOCATE

HIGHER CHARGES — AND
POWER C(TS THAT WILL)
GO ON FOR YEARS.

Why has Lord Citrine, with a|
high reputation as a trade-union |
leader, failed” Partly because the
other nationa).sed industries like}
coal and transport make success |
impossible. Partly because quali-|
ties other than those developed -in
trade unionism are necessary for |
success. chiefly because only!
an excepti | genius could cope
with the job, Such a man hasn't
appeared, and if he did it would
be most unlikely that he would
get the job.

» GAS
Soak The Customer
Gas made « minute rrofit of |
£2,663 in its iirst year. Where}
caoes the Gas Board lay the blame? |
Like electricity on its near rela~-

tions the Coal Board and the
railways. -
The gas chicfs complain of 13)

per cent. ash in their coal, against
10 per cent, before the war. “Be-|
cause we have only one coal mer-
chant it.is a little difficult to get
what we want,” they say, like all
ordinary citizens

They complain of profiteering by
Lord Hureomb’s railways, and
threaten to meet it by sending)
more of their coal the cheap way
—by free-enterprise coastal ships.

Up 6s. IN &

Gas had been nationalised only
two days Whé@n the policy of soak- |
ing the consumer started. |

Some of the increases are more |
than even the supporters of social- |
isation can stomach. The Bristol |
Socialist Party has called for a}
probe into. the running of the
South-West Gas Board. |

Traders in that city have pro-!
tested about rate increases of up
to 6s. in the &£.

One small parish in Nottingham |
is so incensed at being charged 13s. |
in the £ more by the East Midland |
Gas Board that it has told the
board to take away the gas lamps.

AIRWAYS
£40,000,000 Losses |

Since 1946, when the airways |
were socialise’, the taxpayer has
had to meet losses of more than
£40,000,000. |f the costs of the,
Ministry of Civil Aviation are}
added, the privilege of owning the |
air lines has been costing the tax- |
payers about £2,000,000 a month. |

What prevents a profit being}

made? It is the old story, State
interference and administrative |
overloading. |

CABLES |
Now ‘Unreliable’

When a non-political board of |
experts took over the Cable and}
Wireless network in 1947 it con-|
tinued to be reasonably well run—
though profits of £1,722,000 were
little more than half those earned |
under free enterprise. |

Then, last year, the Post Office}
became responsible for the admin-|
istration. And the rot set in. One
firm wrote to Cable and
Wireless:— }

“Your cable service has be-
come completely unreliable
and is a menace to any firm
engaged in overseas business.

“The delays complained of |
are beyond anything which |
can be excused on the grounds
of temporarily heavy traffic)

ava . . They are due toa
complete indifference on the
part of your organisation as
it now evists.”

With second-rate service has |
gone the usual story of steadily
declining profits.

a *

x |
No wonder that even Aneurin
Bevan is re-discovering the vir-
tues of private enterprise and has
just declared publicly: “If the
State administrators can’t do a
job, then private firms should be
allowed to do it.”
—L.E.S.



Tropical Industries |

LONDON.

Is there a greater chance for
processing industries to be devel-
oped in self-governing countries
than in colonies?

Dr. Charlotte Leubuscher poses
this question in a new publication,
“The Processing of Colonial Raw
Materials—"“A Study in Location,”
Sometime Research Fellow of
Girton College, Cambridge and of
Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, the
author says that without more
thorough research, it hardly
ible to give a conclusive an-

Is

“But,” she says, “from the avail-
able evidence as well as from gen-
eral considerations, it would ap-
pear that governments able to de-
termine their own trade policy and
usually guided by the desire for
a high degree of self sufficiency,
will find it easier to adopt a
policy of protection than colonial
governments.

“The latter will feel seldom
driven to encouraging the setting
up of industries in the colonies
which might turn out competitors
to industries in the home country,
even if they refrain from positive-
ly counteracting such a develop-
ment, Against this, colonies may
find it easier—though not necess-
arily—to, obtain outside capital.
In times of instability of exchange
in particular, the absence of trans-
fer difficulties between the mother
country and the colonies may
prove advantage to the latter.”

Dr, Leubuscher points out earlier
in her exhaustive review of the
ituation that a great many of the
processing and other industries in
tropical countries are highly pro-

an



tected. There is little doubt, she
maintains, that their growth and
survival have depended on the

willingness
and

to make consumers,
sometimes the revenue, pay

the price of such a policy, The
manufacture of white sugar in
India and of coconut oil in Trini-

dad and Jamaica

examples
Processing industries established

in the tropies would without doubt,

ire mentioned as

according to Dr. Leubuscher, have
to eckon with protectionist
obstacles, should their products

threaten to enter into serious com-
petition with home produced goods
That this applied even to the posi-
tion in the metropolitan markets
of products from the colonies was
evident from the following

the penal duty imposed in this

country on high
sugar which has

Mauritius sugar industry to turn
out a sugar of lower polarisation
than it used to do;

the threatened prohibitive
duty on binder twine manufac-
tured in Tanganyika, should it
be exported to the U.K.,

the imposition in the U.S.A.,
of fairly narrow import quotas on
white sugar from the dependen-
cies.

Dr, Leubuscher gives in this
180-odd page volume a detailed
analysis of the prospects of pro-
cessing in five main categories of
colonial »roducts—cocoa; copra,
oil plant products and groundnuts;
sisal; sugar cane; and timber.

grade white

The idea that it is a simple
matter to secure a_ diversified
colonial economy by setting up

plant for processing locally pro-
duced raw materials is dispelled
by Dr, Leubuscher, Few of the
advocates of such a course, she
says, stop to enquire why so few of
these industries have so far been
established in the colonies, The
general background had to be faced
—tropical climatic conditions
which, if not barring manufactur-
ing activities altogether, tended to
inerease production costs; econo-
mie and technical backwardness
resulting in lack of trained and
reliable labour; inadequate trans-
port. and port facilities; and the
historical set-up. not only of the
manufacturing but also of, the
shipping and trading organisations

For centuries the temperate zone
had been regarded as the natural
locetion of all kinds of manufac-
turing industries. Exploration of
methods suited to the different
conditions of the tropics had been
neglected.

The slow advance made in
working out processes which en-
able cane sugar to be refined in
continuous process in the raw
sugar factories and the little
attention given to making saws
particularly adapted to converting
timbers in the tropics are cases in
point.

Various economic and technical
considerations which explain the
present predominant location of
processing industries in manufac-
turing centres are provided in the
book. In the case of some materials,
facilities are lacking in the pro-
duetivg tropical countries for the
utilisation of, the residue after
processing, such as the extraction
of theobroming from cocoa cake
or the recovery of glycerine from

soap stock, In many tropical |

forced the countries, too, the output of al

particular raw material is insuffic-
ient to feed a modern plant of an)
economic size. |

While her special studies have
shown Dr. Leubuscher that there |
are ample reasons to explain the |
present predominant situation in}
the manufacturing countries of}
industries processing raw mater-|
ials from the tropics, she notes
that the permanence of that situa- |
tion is being inereasingly ques- |
tion, That, she comments,
may be taken as proof-of gradually |
evolving changes in the division |
of labour between countries of the}
temperate zone and the tropics. |
“But it remains”, she Says, “to
look for more tangible signs of
such changes.” The organisation
of shipping, whether carried on}
under monopolistic or competitive
conditions, must have a deep effect
on the location of processing
industries, |

In view of reversion from belief |
in the superiority of large-scale
production in all circumstances, |
and a tendency towards decentral-|
isation in industrial organisation |
in making headway, Dr. Leubus-
cher regards the prospect of
technical progress to aid tropical |
industries as brighter than in the
past. “She sees possibilities in the



building up of local markets in
processed material in tropical

countries. Process for local market |
and for export could often inter-|
lock, |

Dr. Leubuscher discusses to-
wards the end of her reyiew what)
she calls “the root cause for the

absence of processing for such
materials as oilseeds or timber.”|
She blames “general economic



backwardness and a low standard)
of living in many tropical coun-|
tries especially in Africa.” Over-)
coming of the _ fundamental
economic deficiencies in the}
producing countries would on the|
broad view appear the most}
promising way to development of}
processing industries, she says.
She thinks that an individual
territory will often be too small
a basis for the development of an
efficient industry. “The market}
to be supplied would therefore |
have to be regional, comprising |
several territories, and a pre- |
requisite of such a development!
would be the removal of obstacles |
at present impeding the free flow |

of trade between the territories]
of an economie Tegion, such as
high customs duties and other)
import regulations, lack of trans-|

port, etc.



lisationHasFailed NOBODY'S |

DIARY |

SUNDAY — Alive with steamships, the harbour
was a pleasant sight to me it not to a boatman
friend of mine. He complained bitterly that
he couldn't get a fare for his rowboat, yet the
launches were crowded and most irregular in
their trips to and irom the French liner.

It seems strange that the row boat owners
have failed to see the writing on the wall
although it has been there so long that it should
almost be erased. Why haven't they ganged up
in twos and threes and purchased outboard
motor boats? It would be a paying investment.
When not employed in transporting passengers
in the shipping the owners could take visitors
on fishing trips along the coast.

The day of the row boat for harbour work
is over.

“ONDAY — Who is it that said the hands of the
clock cannot be put back. Today there was
an alarm of fire on the Pierhead and the hands
of the clock were put back for me. I became
a schoolboy on the roof of the three storey
building at Harrison College watching a fire
on the water front which lasted more than two
days. The fire sticks in my memory chiefly
because the school could do no lessons. Luckily
the fire this morning was quickly brought
under control.



UESDAY — Have the car agents heard the latest
regulations? I am afraid that it will affect
their pockets. No one who has to do business
in Bridgetown will find it profitable to purchase
a car if these new regulations remain in force.

This morning my car was blocked in by
another car in the car park opposite the
B.M.L.A. Building. I immediately looked for
the friendly “Peggy” to extricate my car, but
he had been removed to pastures new. Two
newly appointed car attendants informed me
that I would have to stay put. It was none of
their business to move cars. In fact they had
been given strict instructions that they were
not to touch a car, I suggested to them that if
they had indeed been given such an order
there must have been a preceding order: not
to allow any ear to park in front of another
ear, They emphatically denied that they had
been told that cars should be parked in such a
manner that drivers would have access to
leave when they wished.

I can hardly believe that anyone with the
slightest acquaintance with this particular car
park could have given the car park attendants
the instructions which they said they received.
Three lines of cars, one behind the other and
all facing in the same direction, are parked at
this car park.

After an extensive argument the attendants

were good enough to let me out, otherwise I;

would be still there. Instead of issuing such
regulations, the authority in charge would be
better employed in publishing a notice telling
all drivers that they must not lock the doors
of cars on car parks or alternatively if they
have valuables in the car and lock the doors
for safety they must leave the keys with the
car park attendants. Many a time the best
efforts of car park attendants are defeated be-
cause selfish motorists lock their car doors and
wander away on their own busineess.

| \ /EDNESDAY — Is there a shortage of paper for

printing sweepstake tickets, or has the Turf
Club decided that the sweepstake has reached
saturation point? I ask these questions be-
cause, to-day, no less than four sweepstake
ticket vendors asked me to buy a ticket from
them and on each occasion not only was it the
last ticket in the book but the very last that
the vendor had. Each one told me that I must
not miss the opportunity, his last ticket was a
certainty for the first prize, the combination
of 9s., 6s. and 3s. was just right. As I am a
kind hearted man I decided not to deprive the
| poor men of certain winners so I told them
to guard the ticket with their lives seeing that
| so little respect is shown for property today
that even the Government is being robbed.

Instead of thanking me for my forbearance
and good advice these men gave me such an
icy stare that I had to have a pick-me-up to
defrost my blood,

THURSDAY — I am heartily sick of the tale I
heard this morning. There was little variation
in the conversation between three men. Each
one was trying to impress on the others his
love of hard work. The first speaker worked
all day in the office, he worked all afternoon
in the garden, he put the baby to bed and then
he did carpentry for half the night. There's
nothing like work said the others it keeps the
doctor away, There might be some truth in
that, who knows? certainly the doctors don’t
recommend it, but why should they? I’ hear
these tales so often that I am almost beginning

to believe that there may be some people who!
After all, fifty thousand |

really relish work.
Barbadians can’t be all liars!

For myself I prefer an easy job—no heart
strain, no eye strain and the minimum of brain
strain are the doctor's recipe for longevity.
Today I saw what appeared, at first blush, to
be the ideal job, I almost decided to be a
farrier. Theré he was in the shade of a spread-
ing sandbox tree — not a chestnut tree—carry-
ing on a cheerful conversation with a groom.
His patient, the horse, as docile as an over-
grown turtle, was having his hoofs manicured
while listening to the conversation.
peace, when suddenly a bee stung the horse
and he lashed out with his hind legs narrowly

missing the farrier who was indolently trans- ! ’

ferring his attention from the port to the star- 1s

bord side of the horse. I had seen enough, The
profession is too fraught with danger. I am
looking for a safer job,

* *

FRIDAY — My dear old friend “F. G.” must be
happy today. The Government of Barbados
hopes to have a law on the Statute Book that
will give us a real sabbath even though it
doesn’t fall on the seventh day of the week and
only oecurs once in three years. Still it is a
beginning! This sabbath, made to measure for
“F. G.”, falls on Election Day. That day is to
be set apart: no brass bands, no steel bands,
no liquor shops, no loud speakers, no posters to
annoy the eyes of the tourists and no one shall
bear false witness against his neighbour: only
the soft tread of the voter, as he wends his
way to and fro between his castle or cottage
and the polling booth, shall be heard on that
day of days,

The Bill fails to ban rolling the bones on
that Red Letter Day, so it is just possible that |
there may be an amendment.

SPF FOF



SATURDAY, JULY 28, 1951








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FOR

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in colours and designs to
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3 yds x 3 yds. and 3 yds x
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also

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45 ins. wide, WHITE and ALL COLOURS





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S

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STRAWBERRY .. 55c. »
APRICOT 2-40 oe, #
DAMSON iy ac.
RED PLUM .. 420. »,
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JELLY CRYSTALS

Assorted Flavours 20c. Pkg.
GARDEN PEAS 34e,



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LUNCHEON BEEF
MEAT PASTES
SALMON
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TABLE BUTTER
COOKING BUTTER
sIPTON’S TEA
LIPTON’S COFFEE

CEREALS
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CARR’S WATER BISCUITS

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GUAVAS in tins
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SCS 9SCESSOOOSSOOOSOS OS OOSOSOOOSE SECS

aS



SATURDAY, JULY

28,





Tribesman Sails
From Speightstown |

WO WEEKS of activity for Speightstown ended on!
Wednesday evening when the Harrison Liner

1951

Tribes-

man sailed from that port U.K. bound.
During the two weeks, Speightstown received two calls

from ships for sugar and over 7,900 tons of sugar were)
First to call of the two ships was the Canadian

shipped out.

Constructer which loaded about 5,800 tons for Canada and
then the Tribesman came for over 2,000 tons.

Temple Yard
Unpopular —
With Hawkers

THE idea of making Temple’
Yard a temporary district vege-!
table market is not popular with}
quite a number of hawkers of City
streets,

Over a dozen hawkers of Busby
Alley gave their reasons for object-
ing tu a vegetable market at that!
site yesterday while others gather-|
ed around them uttering phrases}
of agreement with their views,

“Give us a proper market and
we will be glad to make use of ji;!
but not in Temple Yard or any-|
where near Drumm Street.” This
was a sort of slogan of the Busby
Alley hawkers,

Daisy Hall, who has been selling}:

vegetables in Busby Alley for 27
years now, said that she is all
comfortable at the spot where she
sells and does not want to be
moved from there to be carried to
“raw Temple Yard.”

“How do they expect us to
stomach the rawness coming from!
the fish market?” she asked. “And|
then there will be the coopers
keeping a lot of noise all day with
the puncheons.” ‘

Daisy said that -she noticed ‘in!
the paper, a suggestion that it was
not necessary to spend money ia
covering. the spot, “It would be
useless moving us from Busby
Alley to carry us to an uncovered
spot in Temple Yard”, she said
“There will be no place to shelter
when the rain falls—we can find
shelter now that we are in Busby
Alley—and we would be exposed
to much more sun”,

Mildred Jordan, another hawker
of long standing in Busby Alley,
said that the idea of making
temporary district vegetable mar
ket is a good one but the site was
badly chosen,



on the seaside”, she said. “I will
be willing at anytime to move my
tray from Busby Alley to a market,
but not in Temple Yard.

Bad Site

Mildred said that she _ his
travelled among 11 West Indian
islands and in every place, except
Barbados, a vegetable market was
one of the first things that she
saw as she stepped ashore, She got
the others to agree with her when
she said “i would not mind if they
put up a market at Tudor Street
because wit would be a good area
for trade,”

A hawker joined in “Do you
think that a clerk of any of these
stores that wants something would
go all the way down to Temple
Yard for it?” “It would be much
easier for her to just come into
the alley and get what she wants.”

Nicey Belgrave, who sells at the



corner of Messrs. C. F. Harrison| there to pass.

said that she has been Senne
vegetable for over 25 years and! +
has never known Barbados to

have a proper vegetable market.

She said that she has always|Mr. Lambert Archer is now in
\ charge of the library.

associated Temple Yard with fish
and pigs and not a place for a

vegetable market. She knew of
about 300 other hawkers who
would be glad to get a proper



market where they would be well]
protected from the rain and sun,

These hawkers would, however,;
“prefer to get wet by rain and then
dried out by the sun at their
spots in the alleys than to be well}
covered at Temple Yard anc
getting few sales when the days |
came.”

Nicey felt that ,with the number
of people that might be going
down to Temple Y
would be always
uncomfortable.



congested

}any stir in the port.

a, with small catches of flying fish

, | fishing boats on the beaches, but
“Why don't they make a market) they still go out daily in ‘moses’

The: port was quiet yesterday.

{Only fishing boats returning. with
‘moses’ |
going to bring the fishermen and |

their catches of fish and

their fish to the market caused |
|
Hand earts, which during the |
two busy weeks were laden with |
sugar time and again and rushed
through the streets to the jetties
by groups of men, were motion- |
less at their parking spot in
Messrs. R. & G. Challenor’s yard.
Trollies were not running the
lines of the jetties as frequently.

Sugar workers of Speightstown,
most of whom are now idle again,
are anxiously awaiting the arrival |
of another sugar ship at that port. |
A shipping clerk said that he did}
not know when another ship was
going to call at Speightstown, but
he did not think the Tribesman
would have been the last to call.

AIN FELL every day this
week up to Thursday in St.
Peter, the greatest fall being on}
Tuesday when an inch of rain}
was recorded at »District “E”’ |
Police Station. |
The rainfall’ returns at that
police station were | inch, 78 parts
up to Thursday evening. Forty-
five parts were recorded | for
Thursday. 3
Planters of the parish said that
the. showers ..were timely and
most welcome! They fiad just got
through the crop and were wait-
ing for~showers to plant food.

The early part of the month
was dry and in some parts of the
parish, ratoons had begun to look
withered. The showers of rain
have given those flelds a “greener
look.” .

PEIGHTSTONIANS have been
getting little fish during this

month, Fishing boats have been
going to the banks but returning



and bigger fish.
Fishermen are hauling up their

nots and
catches

in seavch of their fish
they bring back large
some days.

Some fishermen are using ineir
nets for catching fry, pilchards {|
and other stnall fish. Fry are be-

{
!

coming plentiful.
HE HIGHWAY COMMIS-

SIONERS, of St..James are
still widening and levelling their
road along Highway 1.



Most of their activities yester-
day » were \concerttated on the}
strip of road covered by Sandy}

Lane trees. One half of the road
was blocked by colas' drums,
heaps ‘of* fine stones and the road
workers’ tools, while a _fock
crusher was levelling ‘the other
half,

Vehicles could not move along
thet road freely. At sometimes, a
vehicle had to stop before enter-
ing the strip of road under repairs
so as to allow another already

ISS ELAINE JORDAN, Litea.|
rian of the Speightstown
Free Library, is on a week’s leave. ;

GET COMMENDATION
CERTIFICATES

THE Commissioner of Police
Colonel R. T. Michelin presented
Harbour Police Constables Gill
and Philips of the Bridge Post,
Bay Street, with commendation
certificates on Thursday morning,
at a parade at Central Station.

They received these certificates





ard, the market |for detective work and zeal which
and!they showed when they success-
lfully investigated a ase of lar-

A man who was selling fruit injceny of a bicycle from the Empire
a push cart was not very interested | Theatre.

because

he could “go around
selling.”

Two hundred and five officers
and men attended the. parade.



RAINS HOLD UP FOOD
CROP PLANTING

SGME MANAGERS of plantations in country districts,
told the Advocate vesterday that they are now planting
food crops and that ratoon canes are coming on very well

indeed,

in some cases.

Mr. J. N. Wilkie of Cottage
Plantation, St. George, said that

they had started to plant 11 acres
of yams. They had also planted
4 acres of corn. ‘We should have
done mere planting,” he said, “but
on account of the late reaping of
the crop and the recent rainfall,
ploughing was held ‘up. These
conditions have the same effect on
adjoining plantations and also on
small landowners, the ploughing
of whose land done by the es-

totes’ tractors
Good Outlook
Mr. Wilkie said that the ratoon
canes were doing well. When

asked about the prospect of next
year’s crop, he said: “If the rains
continue satisfactorily, I feel sure
that the crop next year will be as
good as it was this year. |

Mr. G. A. Corbin of Sturgess
and Bloomsbury plantations
Thomas, said that they had s
to plant yams; potatoes and other
food crops. At Sturgess they had
fortunately got through with their




Recent rains, however, have held up ploughing

were coming on very well indeed.
Plougnhing

Mr. C. Clarke of the Rock Plan-
tation, St. Peter said that many of
the agricultural labourers are now
engaged in ploughing the field and
setting manure to the young canes.

Good progress is being made in
regards to this work on the plan-
tation so that a good crop can be
had, such as the last one. Not
all the labourers are working on
the setting of manure, and perhaps
the majority are working on the
trash, clearing it away and then
storing it

About three and a half acres of
the field are taken up with the
growing of yams, The_ receht
heavy rainfall has impeded the
progress of work on the plantation
as the majority of workers stay at
home on a very rainy day.

The rain has also held up the
ploughing of the field and there is
still much work to be done in re-
gards to this branch of work.

No complaints have been com-

ploughing before the recent rains. | ing from _ the labourers and no
The contrary was the case at) fights in the fields have occurred
Bloomsbury. lately. 7
The ratoon canes were respond- Another planter of Christ
ing nicely to the weather Church said that they are also

“I think that the weather in the
months of August and September
will have a decided effect on next

year’s crop,” said Mr. Corbin,
“Certainly if we get a dry August
there will be a set back.”

Mr. Hunte of Ball’



Christ Church, saic
now

ing fo

and and plant-
> ratoon canes



a

preparing for the next crop. The
field at present is undergoing a
“major overhaul” and labourers
are working well clearing away
excess trash

There is still some ploughing to

| be done but the young ratoons are

springing up well. If the weather
permits, a good crop like t

is expected.

he last | kindly



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



FOR

|
|
}
|
|

}
}
|

THE

KLIND

THE GOVERNOR, Sir Alfred Savage, declares the first school for the
School, James Street, yesterday.

H.E. Opens School For Blind



_————




lind open at the Hurd Memorial

At Hurd Memorial School

THE FIRST SCHOOL for blind people in Barbados was )

cpened yesterday at the Hurd Memorial Schoo] in James |

Street by the Governor Sir

Alfred Savage.

This has been done mainly through the efforts of Miss

Betty Arne, Secretary of the
the Deaf and the Dumb.
Sir Allan Collymore,

welcomed the Governor and Lady Savage after which Mrs.
H. A. Vaughan, Acting Honorary Secretary, gave a short

history of the Association.

After the Governor’s Address,
the Rt. Rev. Bishop G. L. G
Mandeville blessed the building

This was followed by the Report
of the Honorary Treasurer Mr. V.
E. Cobham and a vote of thanks
by Mr. C. A. L. Gale, Vice Presi-
dent of the Association.

Sir Allan Collymore said: “It is
my pleasant privilege to welcome
Sir Alfred and Lady Savage here
to-day. My Committee and I are
grateful to you for your presence
and to the Governor for having
consented to open this centre.

From small beginnings, it
hoped to expand, enlarge and to
give greater service to a small, but
very deserving section of the com-
munity

The aim of the centre is to
instil greater self confidence in
the pupils to provide them with
occupational interests, and in-
deed to endeavour to make their
lives happier and more pleasant.

Thanks

The establishment of this centre
is largely due to the initiative and
enthusiasm of Miss Arne who is
away on leave, and unfortunately,
cannot be present to-day. She has
been ably assisted by Mrs.
Vaughan who now | takes
place as Secretary of our Com-
mittee and has made all

is

mony.

The efforts of these good ladies
would have proved in vain, had it
not been for the ready co-opera-
tion and kindness of the Building
and Property Board of the James
Street Methodist Churc/. We are
deeply grateful to them for having
granted us the use of this build-
ing for the nurpose of housing the
centre.

There are several others to
whom debts of gratitude are due,
but I shall not detain you at
length. I would However mention
this: The Treasurer gives willing
service and his only regret which
is shared by all members of the
Committee is, that
sufficient funds to handle.
heing the case, we hope efforts will

her |

the !
| arrangements for this simple cere-

Association in aid of the Blind,

President of the Association

more can be sent at present as the
School has reached the limit of
its capacity. The School however
is expecting anew and larger
building in the near future when it
will continue its policy of accept-
ing other handicapped children
from the neighbouring islands for
training there.

Teaching the Deaf is a long and
arduous task, and Miss Yuille the
Principal of the School in Trini-
dad has worked wonders with our
youngsters who have all improved
since their stay there.

Training for the Blind—In 1948
a Blind Barbadian, George Scott
was sent by the Association to
Trinidad for training. Our thanks
go to the Trinidad & Tobago Blind
Welfare Association who were re-
sponsible for Mr. Scott's training.
George Scott, aged 38 resides at
Eckstein’s Village, St. Michael, 10.
In his early years he assisted in
teaching at St. Stephen’s Boys’
School, Later he worked at Ovid's
Mechanical Shop. In 1932 he join-
ed the C.N.S. on the S.S.
Prince Henry. While at sea he lost
his sight.

On his return to Barbados by his

own efforts he taught rfnself to
;read braille in the short space to

jat a centre in Trinidad.



He has now returned
small training centre for blind
adult persons was started at the
Hurd Memorial School, Jame
Street.

The centre opened with 6
dents but since work has started
we have had applications fron

by

Cro

t!
S

Garrison.

The

ipport

the last war.





| Fined $14.40

| For Woundittg

His W
Police Ma
yesterday



imposed of $1

at



to.be paid ,by instaiments
default two months’ imprisonn
; With hard labour or Alberthe
Grant of Flint Hall, St Mict
{tor wounding Evans Husband
| July 7
{ Mr. D. H. L. Ward appeared «
j behalf of Grant In |

to the court Husbands said tiiat
}July 7 he and Grant ha o
|thing” and Grant struck him
| the head with a hoe

As a result of the blow w
‘forced to go to the General He
' pital Maud Pinder, a ne
jfor the defence said that
{not,see when Husbands 1¢
;the wound on his h

not say that Grant had
‘with a hoe

Grant admitted. in her ev ice
j that she hit Husband with he
hx but said that he attack el
vith a piece of slick

Mr. Ward—for defendant Grant
|} —said that it was clear that~the
}two people had a_ fight in ‘
norning of July 7 and as a result

| of this Husbands was wounded on

case she was entitled to defend
:

Obi :
Mr. E. A. Maynard



ary







re =Financial Treasurer, The death oceurred at his resi-
ocial Welfare Office, the} dence, Black Rock, on ‘Thursday
night of Mr. Eugene Agustus May-
Happy nard, Official Reporter of the

G = - “ -,| House of Assembly. He was 57

iovernor said My wife ’

a Tate vers hanpy to wide Mr. Maynard who will best be
in: 7 AREY “he our) remembered as Reporter of the
: yee at work, more! Barbados Advocate was born i
rticularly, because we have haa this island in the parish of St
ersonal contact with a very dear] ‘~numas and was taken in his ear-
iend of ours who lost his signt} ), years by his parents to Brit-
J | ish Guiana where his early educa-
What surprised both of us so| tion was fostered by the iate Rev

age,

that

in
to

Mrs.



{

ne

possible

ver
iKe




the

life.
learn

may

n and

1? an

by

d

energy

ma

be used

and
ny

been

t

so pleased
similarly,
George Scott, by his energy and
by his drive, has put himself in
a leading position in this islan:
in relation to his fellow men and
women who are similarly handi-
capped and I hope that his ex-
ample will be to all others, such
that will enable them with that
same courage and energy to take! of this island
their normal places in the life of
the community
Vaughan
ecessity for us all to help these
eople to cross the road.
peal that these words ‘cross the
i in more than
sense. That we help by our
ntributions, that we help where
articles

buying the

g this school open.”

| Lady
and a!today and you, Sir, for having con-
sented to open the centre and also

for th

1 believe
tu-) operation

S

e

avage

for

continued }
have taken in the Association.

of

the

he

referred

coming

much, was the tremendous cour-

drive
others

came in contact with, had m
to get as it were that fresh

have
that

May I



interest

we

t

Mr

the

hich are made, but we can help
iinly by taking a real interest in
group of citizens and when-
we have an opportunity, we
that opportunity to sp
find out

ik to
how they are
gresssing in their new life
I have great pleasure in declar-

Sir, that with the co-
1 community,
jthis centre will help to give eyes
4)to the blind and will at the same

other blind persons. It is proposed |time, add a number of useful citi-
in the first instance to teach the'zens to Barbados.”

blind how to re-seat chairs in Rush

he has notj to cane chairs, and later basketr) |
That| Arrangements are being made to}

teach braille to those who arc}

be made to secure more contribu-| capable. |

tions and donations to our fund.

All the students are provid

We have with us this morning| with white walking sticks, so\jhat

apart from the Committee, Miss|they can perambulate independ

Pickering. She has shown tre-
mendous interest in the centre
from the time of its inception and
attends almost daily to assist in
this good work. I think that is all
I need say. In a short while and
in gratitude to you, Sir, for com-
ing and taking an interest in the
work, I shall ask you to formally
declare the centre open.”
Mrs. Vaughan in giving a
history of the centre said:

hort

Voluntary

‘The proposal to form the Bar-
bados Association in aid of the
Blind, the Deaf and the Dumb
was accepted at a public meeting
after the need for such an asso-
ciation was shown by the Rev. F.
W. G. Gilby, M.A. during his
visit to this colony in the latter
part of 1944 and a
Committee was appointed.

The Barbados Association in
aid of the Blind, Deaf and Dumb
is a voluntary Association working
however in close cooperation with
government. Constitutionally the
Committee is still in a formative
stage with the Social Welfare
Officer as Hon, Secretary, The
Association has a Committee of 12
members: —

Sir Allan Collymore—President;



Mr. Louis Gale—Vice-Presdient;
Mr. John Beckles, Dr. J. P.
O'Mahony, Mr. Kenneth Tucker,
Cr. H. G. Cummins, Dr. C. H
St. John, Mrs. Ben Moore, Mr. C

G. Reed, Miss B. L. Arne—Hon
Secretary, Mr. V. E. Cobham
Hon. Treasurer, Miss [. Pickering

—Co-opted,

The Association started by -com-
piling a register of all the Blind,
Deaf and Dumb in the island. In
this effort teachers, ministers o!
religion, doctors and other public-
ninded citizens helped. In 1946
the register showed a total of 502
blind and deaf people.

Training

Deaf and Dumb—The Associa-
tion agreed that it would concen-
trate in the first instance on the
training of the juvenile Deaf.
There are now five children at-
tending the School for the Deaf
and Dumb in Trinidad, This was
agreed to as it was found much
| too expensive for the society with



‘limited funds to launch out into | %
having a school of its own when,
facilities existed in a nearby |
island. The Association for the]
Deaf and Dumb in Trinidad has | %
consented to accept our) 9
deaf children. Unfortunately ‘no 9596999660064906090000000™"



Formative}

|
ently of human guide. The Com-
mittee asks the public therefore |
to assist in every possible way any |

person it sees carrying a white)
walking stick, helping them t
cross the road. hoard buses, et
Finance
The Association is a volu
tary Society which is partly |

financed by government, but the
Committee must also depend o
the goodwill of the public an
any subscriptions will be grat

,‘NELSON’’
ON SUNDAY

The S.S
port taking

Canada

Barbados

ern

by
wood,

aay

about 164 packages of fresh fruit.



LEAVES

Aiso arriving by the Daerwood

were

350

fully received and acknowledged cocoanuts





ZOFLORA
fragrant with
oils, especially made for purifying the

i

SABC SR HAT eee
POSSESSES SSS SSPSES SES SPP PSS POPE PAP AA. LAA



atmosphere by

!

} houses and in tt

Available
Bouquet,
Lavender and Pir

J





in the
Jasmine

powerful

666 oto



germicide,

mngly antiseptic floral

Spraying
Rooms, Offices, shops, Factories, Ware-

Home.

a SOC

Lilac,

in

Lof lora
(Despumed D\S\NFECTANT

Public

following perfumes:
Carnation,

1%



feet of mahogany,
| bags of copra and a quantity of

mH. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. - Agents
BEBHEBSBea&Baas &B

POLES LSELPEOOOP PEPE LLL LLL ALLL APD

PA APSA

270

BaeoeseeekteaSGQage ase & B
a INSIST ON

= PURINA CHOWS

THEY ARE THE BEST

ty

“8



OS SOS SC POO PODS OSES GDI EPEAT



Dingwall of the Moravian Chureh

He returned to Barback in 1915
and became a pupil teacher at
the Buxton Boys’ School, Later
¢ went to Carriacou as an over-
seer and after a_ short period
returned to Barbados

he entered the fleld of journal-
ism when he joined the staff of the

now defunct Agricultural Report
er. Then he came to the Adyocate

where he remained as Senior Re-
porter for 26 years. He was a pro-
| ficient shorthander and it was his
| life’s ambition to become an Offi-

of the Legislature
The cup of his am-
bition was filled in 1946 when he

cial Reporter

| succeeded Mr. E. J. Taylor

»| Within recent months he. was
struck down by a malignant dis-
ease and after weeks of painful

illness the end came on Thursday
His funeral took place at Sharon
Moravian Church yesterday
presence of a large gathering
He leaves a widow and a brother



Mr. John Maynard, to whom
deepest sympathy will be = ex-
tended

=

AT .

WEA





|
|

THERIEAD'S

|about three weeks, and later on Pleased You SAVE $1.00 a tin on
also taught himself to write. Not}. Moving the vote of thanks

allowing his blindness to be alyr, Cc. A. L. Gale said: “I am KLIM
handicap, he helped himself inppjeased to see that I have very J

various ways, by teaching and}pleasurable and brief duty of )

peddling, Scott spent ten months thanking Your Excellency and POWD Vi ED M I

Fresh Stock at...

REDUCED PRICE

YESTERDAY'S PRICE
$6.98 per tin

TO-DAY'S PRICE
$5.98 per tin

also

DELICIOUS SWEET



Lady Nelson, now in i

a load of sugar for]) BISCUITS i}

, is expected to leave }) 4 tt

on . Sandy » night 10c. per pk. in cellophane i

|for Canada via the British North- } CUSTARD CREAMS )
Islands and Bermuda i} mee i
peiealiah, i MILK AND HONEY ;

)) UNG) . Cc }

FRUIT COMES i GINGER SNAPS tH
CURRENT PUFFS Ni}

A good supply of mangoes ar- ' (i
rived here from St. Lucia yester- i\
the motor vessel Daer- NEILSON S ))

The Daerwood brought ut {

Rose Buds 12c. bar
Nut Rolls 12¢. bar
Cherry Creme 12¢
Malted Milk 12c.

MOIRS'

Pineapple Ile. bar

Buddies Ile. bax

Peppermint Patties
Ile. bar

JACOBS CREAM

Crackers $1.64





BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LAMUTED

FINEST
BEDROOM





in the |

his head. His client was. first
attacked by this man who was
rmed with a stick and in. that}

|

|

i





DRINK

Tn

TTT LP PY Ce”

‘WE

PAGI



COOLING &

DTS

‘n Cream,

REFRESHING

ZAc. TIN







FIVE

& ENJOY







PEEPS GSE SSIS IDPSD9OSTSVSD GODS SODGTPGOTO TOY
. s
* « ° . / %
» Reduction of BBU36% x
M , n= = x
s After Stock Taking %
*
s e
s $
. . ;
: for 2 3 & Ff people x
> y
sy ta aaah ‘ se bd
s BASKETS Original Price $36.24 8
. now 25.00 &
. Price 18.68 &
% now $118.00 &
“ Price 24.00 2
oar a now 16.00 &
* VALISES Price 18.69 &
f now | 13.00 $
S Price 29.52 &
% ae now 20.00 &
ss ATTACHMENT CASES Price 26.00 %
a: now 18.00 &
ZIPP CASES Price 18.68
;
“ now 13.00 %
:
‘. %,
ss Y ‘ reve 5
x KNIGH SE LY. %
s,
%) ,
PALO. 39 OSCOOCOONSB995OO666665°4 set
PPS SS90s9696%" PROC EOOIOOOF, ADONIS OOM»
: :
= %
x net ws ine al g
s e ti >
\ wWret «Bar pe ” 3
a“ aces %
* ne x
ot %
%
‘ :
§ >
&
% we have the ¥
3 3
ss
’ SPORT
» i
%
‘
% ‘1g ren
ge i
x
x
% YOU'LL WANT
>
% fO WEAR
8
>
%
x
ss
% @
ys
%
X SHIRTS ‘ de.
) ¢
; err
”

SOS

FURNISHINGS

In Our Linen Dept.

fC mo ae
M4
} et 55,
Lah’
| ra Z 1
fi 4
i" r A
; |
%
ed
e | <
ook Se

ueru, Brown,
cellow, Rust, be

ireen,

Vark Brown

ttt GOCE

*










t

$5.21 & $5.98

other Floral Patterns from

$2.91 to $5.58

1 OOOO OE Ot

PCE ALL LPL APLAA”D

SHEETS
(REXWEAR)







COTTON SHEETS

80 x 100 $7.86 each
(REXWEAR)

70x 90 @ $7.77 each
(REXWEAR)

63x 90 @ $5.99 each
TICK
DAMASK TICK

56 ins. wide @ $2.58 yard

Blue, Green

FANCY TICK

56 ins, wide @ $2.18 yard
BLACK & WHITE TICK

56 ins, wide @ $2.46 yard

PELLOW CASES
COTTON PILLOW CASES

19 x 30 G $1.45 each
Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd,

1G; it,



12, 13 Broad Street

neers eae seers sen



PRINTED DESIGNS including Africa Prints and

HARRISON'S — sroan strcex

6965 OE SOA

«
PPLAPS SLOPES ©





PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, JULY 28, 1951
Se ee Si asians

ee 1 Rheumatism
Dreadful, Choking, Spasms Of and Backache

BRONCHIAL Gonein i Week

Feel Fine
Cystex—the prescription of a famous
ad t

y } r—endas all troubles due to faulty
EASED IN | kidney action in double quick time, so,

if you suffer from Rheumatism, Sciati-

. ca, Neuritis, Lumbago, Backache, Ner-

A FLASH |B | vousness, Leg Pains, Dizziness, Circles

| under Eyes, frequent Headaches and
Colds, Poor Energy and Appetite, Puffy

| Ankies, Burning, Smarting Passages,
| or have frequently to Get up Nights,

go to your chemist today for Cystex
| and be fit and well next week.

Cystex Helps Nature 3 Ways

The Cystex treatment is highly scien-

tific, being specially compounded to

| soothe, soe sae clean rem, sore, sick

z ‘ A ‘ Ws j kidneys and bladder and to remove

ease that choking, smothering spasm in seconds! Buckley’s | acids and polsons from your system
safely, quickly and surely, yet contains
no harsh, harmfvl or dangerous drugs,

Cystex works in these 3 ways to end

your troubles:—

(1) Starts killing the germs which are
attacking your Kidneys, Bladder
and urinary system in two hours,
yet is absolutely harmless to human
tissue.

(2) Gets rid of health destroying,
deadly poisonous acids with which











HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON
ese | | eee teen









NIGHTS When one dose of the amazing Mixture will

BY WALT DISNEY
7.1 FIGGEZ TO SCARE THUH GHOSTS)
WITH MUH RELATIVES... BEFORE THEY
P SCARE 8! |

Mixture is no ordinary medicine—its different from any
Cough Remedy you have ever tasted—Triple Strength—No

Syrup—All Medication.

your system has become saturated.

(9) Strengthens and reinvigorates the
kidneys, protects you from the rav-
ages of disease-attack on the deli-
cate filter organism, and stimulates
entire system.

9 Weeks in Hospital—
Now Well

“T have suffered for five years with Kidney
| and Bladder trouble, also Rheumatic pains

end Stiff Joints. I was not able to raise my
arms and spent nine weeks in a hospital.
They said I would not be able to work, but
after Cystex I feel years younger, well and
strong.” (Sgd.) J. A. PF.

Health Improved in 2 Days
| «7 pad not felt really well for ages and suf-
fered continually from backaches and head-
aches. I had tried almost everything but I
could not get lasting relief. Finally I decided
| to give Cystex a trial, and wish I had tried
| it long ago and saved myself much pain and
expense. It has improved my health more in
2 or 3 days than other things have done for
months.”’—Mrs. B.
Gueranteed to Put You Right

or Money Back r
Get Cystex from your chemist today,
Give it a thorough test. Cystex is
guaranteed to make
you feel younger,
stronger, better in
every way, in 24 hours
and to be completely
well in 1 week or your
money back if you re-
turn the empty pack-
age. Act now! for

KIDNEYS
Cystexrinroore
The CUARANTEEL Remedy RHEUMATISM





ne One Dose Stops The Cough

= \ tg

; sy] ag 7 Mees a if When you feel a cough or choking bron-

ONS MLE IG SEL Fi ¢ re 2 ~ \° j chial spasm coming on, just take a dose of
Fh) (| ve 2 * ee - + | es 7 . . Buckley’s Mixture and swallow slowly.
You'll feel the powerful healing warmth
| spread down through your throat and bron-
chial tubes, soothing inflamed parts, easing
hard breathing and loosening tough phlegm,
making it easy to expel, Buckley’s Mixture is
made from rare Canadian Pine Balsam, and
other proven ingredients. There’s not another
cough medicine like it. Get a bottle TODAY,
and relief right away.

BUCKLEY’S

MIXTURE





! A SINGLE SIP TELLS WHY WE SELL A MILLION
i BOTTLES A YEAR IN ICE-COLD CANADA ALONE.













THE LONE RANGER




















ei meet AMASKED MAN ANDA ) (WE SHOT BATES, BY
REDSKIN FOUND BATES WHERE WE ( DON'T KNOW THA |

STAKEDHIM QUT TO DIE. THEY RODE on
AWAY WITH RIM. appre caave=

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only











Usually Now Usually NOW
Tins Kardomah Coffee (+) 95 86 Pkgs. Jack Straws 61 50

Pkgs. Custard Cream Biscuits 51 40 Tins Gloria Evap. Milk 29 26

Bottles Grolsch Beer 24 4&8 Cakes Ivory Soap 27 24
BRINGING UP FATHER



ma ian ae a “1 v , NOW IF I CAN ONLY {

'M GOING TO THERE'S OUR NEIGHBOR C “ | FIND GOME NOISE
REQUEST NOW - ILE TELL THAT S nN TH ET G | to DROWN our

HIM TO MIND GUY A THING OR TWO - WIFE ss) ; YOUR WIFE'S VOICE-
Lis CAA j












ADVERTISE

IN THE

|
4 EVENING ADVOCATE

| j GROWING CIRCULATION EVERY MONDAY
<
Â¥
Â¥

ask for

“Ciassons







JOHNNY HAZARD
eaten
THAT WAS FOOLISH TO
90, OMI! AY AM ANGRY /
YOU KNOW EQUIPMENT IS

VALUABLE! LETTING
AMATEUR USE IT 15







For Rates Apply Advocate Advertising Dept.

IF YOU'RE SHORT- : }
HANDER MAYBE YOU'LL EH 2/ HMMM... MAYBE |
LET ME MAKE UP MY AY CAN TRUST YOu / |

ROOM ANP BOARD/ my MAYBE... ‘ | £0
I CAN SWIM... Fis,
Sa | echt e

ofAre”

NBER pant?










ABOUT YOU, MR. HAZARD, AY
AM NOT CONCERNED’ BOT OMIR
JEOPARDIZES HIS LIFE TO GAVE

YOU FROM SHARK... ANP HE I¢
VALUABLE TOME / HIG INJURY
KEEPS HIM FROM HELPING ME
NOW WHEN AY NEED HIM












LOOK, TNT, (7
WAGN'T OMIR'S FAULT /
1 PUSHED HIM INTO
Usa

















WHY, MOTHER! YOU
HAVE IT UPSIDE DOWN!
THAT'S AU/! IT
MUST BE “THE
GREAT you”!





“It feels as if there's always some- ‘‘His sight is fine!” says Doctor. The

thing in my eyes,” cries John. Mother trouble is i
: in my eyes,” cr } inflammation cau b
worries: “Oh! Is his sight alright?’ v ol x





WHAT \ HE SAVS HE GAWA GIRL AND
3 BP ATIGER CROSS THE ROAD

TOGETHER? AGIRLIN >

TIGER SKIN?

So, every day Jonn bathes h ;
with Optrex, washing away all dirt




: = ae NV ISON, | 4 ‘ ta
FOOTPRINTS OF A m OS SS ee For swift deliveries and easy maneuvering in city and
FEMALE+« : | uburban areas, this van is unexcelled for the carrying of

many types of merchandise. It has an all-steel body with PROTECT YOUR EVES wth



d about Opirex—
-eyes’ now John!"






and germs, soothing tiny eye veins.



,

safety sliding doors, and provides excellent visibility for the
driver. Loading space is exceptional, no less than 150 cubic

feet! The low fuel consumpticn and negligible maintenance

costs ensure really economical operation. ‘sp

” we

bs s
J ae



LOTiON

mMORRIS-COMMERCIAL

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504







SATURDAY, JULY 28. 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.











TELEPHONE 2508
}

The charge for annoyncements of | RENT
Births, Marriages, Deatns, Acknowl- FOR
edgments, and In Memoriam notices is |

50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays / vimum charge week 72 ts and
for any number of words up to 50, and} °5 nts) Sut™deays 24 words mer 24
3 cents per word on week-days and| “ords 3 cents @ word week—4 cents a

4 cents per word on Sundays for eacn

additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement

announcements in Carib Calling
charge is $3.00 for amy number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each



the,

additional wo-d. Terms cash. Phone 2508

between 8.30 und 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 o.m.







DIED
CRAWFORD—On July 27th, 1951 At
her residence Saitters antry, St
George, Amelia Rose J Crawford
Age 82. The funeral | s the above



address for St. George

4 o'clock this evening
Clarence and Hillary
sons}; Mrs. Elsie
daughter); Loy and
grands).

Parish Church

Jones
Brown
Aldon

‘Grand-
(grand-
(Great-

28.7.51—1n
ee



THANKS







WILL"AMS—We the undersigned desire
to return thanks through this mediurn
to those who attended the funeral!
sent wreaths or letters or expressed
sympathy in any way during our recent
bereavement due to the death of Mary
A. Wiliams

Harold EB, Williams and Family
28.7.51-—1n



IN MEMORL

—,
CLARKE--We
through this



the undersigned
medium to extend

beg
a our
sincere appreciation to all those kind

friends who attended, sent wres ' “ l4-h.p. car in
cards and in any war sensed Wace [cee ondition. Engine has just been
pathy in our sad bereavement caused pasa ag Priced to sell. See or
by the death of Thomas Albert ‘Clarke. | 6 ay bake Applewhaite, Lakes Folly
The Clarkes’ Family, Capt. Grant and Pls
famil 28.7.51—1n 28.7.51.—2n
Seteent einen



ANNOUNCEMENTS

Seen

HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—Isle of
Spices. SANTA MARIA—ioveliest hotel
in Caribbean.
ber day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi-
dential district under Government House
hill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day.
SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing
Beach. Rates from $4.00 per head per













day. Enquiries to D. M. Slinger, Grenada,
+6.6.51—78n.
es
LOST & FOUND
LOST
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET — Series AA.
1885. Finder please return same to
Charles King. Ashby Alley, Nelson
Street. 28.7.51—1n

Lost in Canadian Bank of Commerce
and Broad Street a small black note book
with Index and a pocket to hold smal!
peper or cards.—Reward. Phone 8121

25.7.51—2r



WALLET—Black, with map on outside,





containing money and race tickets be- j Chelsea Garage (1950) Ltd., Pinfold St

tween Rockley & City
return to Herbert
and Bynoe

Finder please
Rogers, C/o Stokes
28.7.51--2n





GOVERNMENT NOTICES
APPOINTMENT OF DENTAL

SURGEON, GENERAL
HOSPITAL

‘:pplications are invited for the
part - time non - pensionable ap-
pointment of Dental Surgeon,

General Hospital, which will be-| â„¢&"

come vacant on Ist September,
1951. ®
The = salary....attached.. to..the

appointment is $960 per annum.

The duties’ of this officer will] ¢t.
consist of the treatment of in-| ma

patients referred to him and a

limited number of dental extrac-|

tions for out-patients.

Arrangements may be made
with this officer for additional
extractions for out-patients at a
fixed rate of payment.

Full particulars of the appoint-
ment may be obtained from the
Medical Superintendent, to whom
applications should be forwarded
by 31st July, 1951.



9.6.51.—3n.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOS-
PITAL OF THE WEST INDIES,
JAMAICA, B.W.1.

Applications are invited from |
Consultant Specialists for hon-
orery posts as part-time special-|
ists at the University
Hospital, in the departments of
Ophthalmology, Ear, Nose and
Throat Surgery and Dermatology.

Appointments will be for one}
year in the first instance.

The Specialists appointed may,
by special arrangement witn the
University College of the West
Indies, be required to lecture to
medical students in their particu-
lar specialty, remunerction for,
these teaching duties to be by)
honorarium payable by the Uni-|
versity College of the West Indies.



j

Further information may be
ebtained from the Registrar of
“he. University College of the

West Indies or from the Hospital

Manager and Secretary.
Applications should be sent to
the Hospital Manager and Secre-
tary, University College Hospital, |
Mona, Jemaica, B.W.1., before the

30th of September, 1951.
21.7,.51—2n. |





NO SHOOTING



Due to the Cadet Camp there | milk obtainable. The 5-tb family size is

will be no shooting practice at
the Small Bore Rifle Club today
or Wednesday.



WE ARE BUYERS
We buy anything connected with
| STAMPS. Sheets, Single Stamps,
Collections, Accumulations and
Covers, Good prices Paid at the

CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY
3rd Floor, No. 10, Swan St.







SE HABLA ESPANOL

ORIENTAL

CURIOS, SOUVENIRS, AN-
TIQUES, IVORY, JEWELS,
SILKS Etc.

THANTS

|

OSES

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

—_———-
Outstanding books on our Islands





“en

L

5

CARIBBEAN CIRCUIT — Full of
information about the Caribbean
Islands iy-

ISLANDS IN THE SUN — Similar
to the above. Book full of rich
information . 13/6

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

—_[———————



Rates from $7.00 per head | Kinch or 4569 Cyril Stoute,

j and Star-Delta with Single Phasing Pre-
| ventor. Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co., Ltd

ollege | or

| Tirst

Clear Glass n Plastic Heavy
guage for ear windshields
Unbreakable.

JOHNSON’S HARDWARE |

RONSON.

i



word on Sundays

ee

HOUSES



LIFTON TERRACE—To an approved
j tenant. Furnished House Upper
| Street ©pposte Yacht and Aquatic

Clubs. All modern conveniences. Apply
| on premises. 27.7.51—2n

































FLAT on Blue Waters Terrace, newly
j built with spacious cupboards. Phone
8282 25.7.51—t-f.n.
HOUSE in Bedford Avenue, Upper
B Street. Inspection by Appointment.
I 2347 28.7.51—3n
HOUSE called “Marnet” at the Ivy
Road It consists of drawing and
dining rooms, 3 bedrooms, kitchen, water
tcllet & bath. Vacant now. $35.00 per
month, Apply to D'Arcy A. Scott, Mag-
ezine Lane
28.7. 51—3n
ONE (1) large airy room at Bel Airy

‘Furnished or unfurnished),
28.7.51—2n
—_—_——— SS
THE CAMP—On the Sea, St. Lawrence.
Fully furnished Dial 8357.
147 51.—t fin,

FOR SALE











AUTOMOTIVE




Vauxhall



CAR—One Vauxhall Car 14—6, in ex- |
celient condition, For particulars Dial
3745. J. D. Evelyn, Audit Department. |

26.7.51—4n. |

CAR—One Vauxhall
10,000 miles, like new. P’





18 done only}
hone 2861. S. H, |

24.7.51—6n

ee

CARS—Hillman Saloons 1946, 1947 and
1949, Singer Sports Model, Wolseley 14|
Saloon and Morris 10 Saloon, Telephone |
4316 Cole & Co. Ltd. 21.7.51—7n,

——————————_—

CARS—Renault ‘760" formerly M—682,
tyres and condition excellent. 38—4)
M.P.G. Only 7,000 miles Reason fo}
sclling—owner bought a Mayflower. To |
be seen at Chelsea Garage (1950) Ltd., |
Pinfold Street |



28.7 .51—3n

CARS—Just arrived!—Mayflowers &
Vanguards in Grey, Maroon, Blue, Black.



















rr i a
Bay |

| BARBADOS

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
} Minimum charge $1.50 week-days
and $1.86 on Sundays.

on



REAL ESTATE

See
| BUILDING sITE—Situ

ated at Maxwell

|Ch. Ch. 70 tt. frontage Price reason
| able Apply to B. A. Brooks Phone
| 8335 or 8162, 26.7.51—4n

LAND AT ST. LAWRENCE suitable
| for building sites. For Particulars apply
to K. R. Hunte, telephone 9137 or 4611
| 17.7.51—t.4.n,
—___—

“HOLLANTHTE"—Standing on 8,000 sq
ft. of Jand at Two Mile Hill, Just ly
miles from town, and on ths i5 minutes
| Bus Service Large Drawing Koom, 2 Bed
| Rooms, Dining and Breakfast Rooms, W.C
| and Bath. Company's Water, Light and
| Telephone Services installed Garage
Servants’ Toilet and Bath, Spacious yard
With several fruit trees outside palings.
| The above has been recently remodelled
and is in A-1 condition. For further
particulars apply next door or Dial 95292
| or 2021



25.7.51—3n

rte,
HINDSBURY COT—standing on 1,756
Scuare feet of land at the corner of
Wellington and Bay Streets, For inspec-
tion apply on premises. For further
particulars apply HUTCHINSON & BAN-
| FIELD, Solicitors, James Street.
28.7.51—2n
— ages
House called St. ELMO at Maxwell
Road. It is a four bedroom house and
Stands on % of an acre of land, with
fruit trees. Only five minutes walk to sea,
Inspection any day except Sunday. Vacant
possession in a month's time Apply to
| Darcy A, Scott, Magazine Lane. Dial 3743,
28.7.51—3n.

PUBLIC NOTICES

a ees

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
Gnd 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.















GIRLS INDUSTRIAL UNION
There will be a General Meeting of

the G.I.U at the Union Rooms; on
Monday 30th Juby at 5 p.m
G. WILLIAMS,
General Secretary,
28.7.51.—1n
—_————
NOTICE

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF APPEAL
Re Workmen's Compensation Act, 1943

Notice is hereby given that Alonza
Gooding, an Engineer, former.y residing
at Fairview, Christ Church, died as a
result of injuries sustained when he fell

from a ladder during his employ at
Roberts’ Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Bay
Street, St. Michael and that compensa-

tion has been paid into Court

All dependants of the above-named
Alonza Gooding (deceased) are hereby
requested to appear at the Assistant

Court of Appeal on Wednesday the 22nd
day of August, 1951, at 10 o'clock a.m









Cash prices $2,300.00, $2,800.00 respec- | Dated this 26th. day of July 1951.
tively. Just advised of further increase A. W. HARPER,
in prices on future shipments Chelsea | Clerk, Assistant Court of Appeal
Garage (1950) Ltd., Pinfold Street joo -
28.7.51—3n
PICK-UPS—Two new Vanguard Pick-| NOTICE
Ups. Cas rice $2, , s ent | :
sai he enon Mh een ye Sp | 1S HEREBY ¢ ven that all persons having
sh . ; - ‘ any debt or ;
hould seize this opportunity now. | state of Desdemona Foster-Turton.. lat
28.7.51.—8n. | Cf Reed Street in the City of Bridgetown,
a who died in this Island on the 15th day
of April 1948 intestate, are hereby re-
ELECTRICAL quired to send in particulars of | their

ELECTRIC MOTORS — By Newman
from % H.P. to 7% H.P. 200 Volts 50

4
Cycles, 3 Phase, Dial 3878, DaCosta &
Dept, 24.7.51—4n



Co., Ltd. Electrical
-—

ELECTRIC FITTINGS.—A nice assort- |
ment including 2 & 3 light Chromium
Niectroliers, Semi-Indirect Bowis, 1 & 2
Light Brackets, Table Lamps in Chrom-
jum & Mahogany, Saving Mirrors with
and without het water heaters. Dial 3873
Da Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical Depart-
24.7.51.—6n







One G. EB. Refrigerator in good work-
ing condition. Ring Reid 2483.

claims duly attested to Timothy Theo-
philus Headley, the Public Trusteé of the
Island of Barbados, C/o Messrs. Hutchin-
son & Banfield, at their office at James
Street, Bridgetown, on or before the 3re
day of October 1951 after which date 1
shall proceed to distribute the assets o*
the said estate among the parties enti-
tle! thereto having regard to the debts
and claims only of which I shall then
have had notice and that I shall not be
liable for assets so distributed to any
person of whose debt or claim I shall
net have had notice at the time of such
distribution, .

And all persons indebted to the said
estete are requested to settle their ac-



E 28.7.51—2n,

x ‘ -

One NORGE REFRIGERATOR, 6 cubit
open type unit, to be seen at Red-
n & Taylor's Garage, 27.9,.51—3n
—_—
HILCO REFRIGERATOR: 914 cubic
Full width freegng chamber. Brand

new unit, Reconationed throughout,

may be inspected at Leo Yard, Cheap- |
L.

side. Apply
. Philip.

Hu. Sreith, Sandford,

7.7.51—t.f.n. |

Dircet-on-line









MOTOR STARTE

Electrical Dept.

FURNITURE

Ralph Beard invites you to inspect his
Stock of Furniture in his New Show
Rooms, Lower Bay Street. The follow-
ing Bargains are offered to you: Mag
Dining Chairs $22.00 a pr.; Birch Dining
Cheirs $18.00 a pr.; Rush Upright $8.00
a pr.; Rush Arm Chairs $10.00 a pr. Rush
Rockers $11.00 a pr., Steel Arm Chairs
$12.00 each; Rush Morris Chairs $30.00
4 Pair, Caned Morris Chairs $36.00 a Pair
Not forgetting a large variety of New
and Second Hand Furniture, Phone 4683
5010,

24.7.51—6n,



24.7.51--5n,

LIVESTOCK

GOAT—One Alpine Goat fresh in milk.
litter. Apply St. Clair Rayside,
White Hall, St. Michael, 28.7.51—2n

MECHANICAr

Seth sailplanes hina vet
BICYCLES—(2) Bicycles, one Gentle-

man’s and One Boy's. Phone 2886.
26.7 .51—2r

MISCELLANEOUS __

AMM-I-DENT TOOTHPASTE
Start saving your Amm-i-dent Tooth
frste Boxes. Within a short while you
may be the winner of one of the follow-
ing:— Ist Prize $50.00, 2nd Prize $15.00,
8rd Prize $5.00. 1.7.51—26n

BINOCULARS (for the Races)
“Schutz Model Heliolith Prism. 8 fold
x 22 MM with blue coating complete
with leather case, Made in Germany
New. Eruce Weatherhead Ltd.

26.7.51.—3n.

“FARM” POWDERED FULL CREAM
M*#LK—Supreme quality and only $4.32
per 5-t tin and $1.00 per 1-Ib tin.
Get a tin to-day from your grocer
or Drug Store and try the best













really economical. Insist on “Farm” for
the sake of your health and your pocket.
If your dealer cannot supply, phone 2229,
27.6.51—t.f.n, |

es
FLOOR POLISHERS Keep your
Floors in good condition with Johnson's
Wax Polishers. Dial 2878. Da Costa & Co.,



attached

counts. without delay.
DATED this 24th day of July, 1951.
TIMOTHY T. HEADLEY,
Public Trustee,
Qualified Administrator of the Estate
of Desdemona Foster-Turton,
deceased,
26.7.51—3n



NOTICE _

BARBADOS,
IN THE AS



TANT COURT OF
APPEAL

Re Workmen's Compensation Act, 1943.
Notice is hereby given that Clarence
Weekes of Packers, St. Patrick, in the
parish of Christ Church, an employee
at Hopefield Plantation, died as the





sult of a broken neck which he sus-
tained when he was thrown from a
tractor at Waldron Corr Ch. Ch. and
that Compensation has been paid into
Court.

All dependants of the above-named
Clarence Weekes, deceased, and other



parties Concerned are he by required to
appear at the Assistant Court of Appeal
on Wednesday, the Ist day of August,
1951, at ten o'clock a.m.
Dated this 4th day of July, 1951.
i, V. GILKES,
Ag. Clerk, A.C.A
7.7.51—2n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Victor Leon Hinds
of Durhams, St. Lucy. the holder of
Liquor Licens. No. 667 of 1951 granted
in respect of a beard and shingle shop



inttached to a house at Spring Hall, St

Lucey to remove said License to a
bovrd and shingle shop with shedroof
at Durhams, opposite Spring
Hall, St. Lucy and to use it at such
last described premises
Dated this 25th day of Juby, 1951
VICTOR HINDS,
Applicant
To: SYDNEY H, NURSE, Esq.,
Police Magistarte,
District “E." .
N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held on
Wednesday 8th August, 1951, at 11
o'clock a.m. at Police Court, District “E.’
SYDNEY H. NURSE,
Police Magistrate,
District ‘

Vigour Restored,
jlands Made Young
{n 24 Hours

It fa no longer necesrare to evffer
from loss of vigour and manhnod
memory and body,, nerve
pure sickly skin,
und pour sleep, because an American
i tor has discovered a quick, easy
y to ond these troubles,

This discovery ts in pleasant, easy-

















Ltd., Elec. Dept. %4.7.51—6n

KHAKI DRILL — Famous Stockport
Khaki Wigan quality $1.25 and Heavy |
thick quality $1.47 per yard special |
discount to wholesalers Kirpalani, 52
Swe Strect a



28.7.51—1n
“LACTOMETERS—For ascertaining the |
richness of milk, To be obtained from
Bruce Weatherhead Ltd.
26.7.51—3n.

—— ,

RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing
....and we will order for you we
haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,
Ltd. 6.7.51--t.f.n.

SUN GLASSES—For Children, Ladies
and Gentlemen—All shapes, new designs,
Prices from 2/- to $10.00, Bruce
Weatherhead Ltd. 26.7.51—3n.







QUAKER OATS—Large Packages 27
Pkg. All Bran 18. Pkg, Stanway Store, |
Lucas Street, Dial 4910





28.7.51.—In

a

VACUUM CLEANERS. Hand and Filec-
trically operated: Takes the drudge ‘out |
of drudgery. Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co.,

Lt¢., Electrical Dept. 24.7.51—6n





FOR SALE

FURNITURE
Drawers, 3 Rush Chz
Table, Ofte small K
Book Case, Electric Stove,
Baby’s Pram. Phone 8335.

One Press, Chest of
s, One Dining
itchen Table

ard One









‘Vi-Tabs

to-take tablet fori, is absolutely
harroless, does away with gland op-
erations and is bringing new you
and vigour to thousands, It works @
rectly on the glanc vl nerves, and
puts new, rich bicod and energy
your Veins, In 24 hours sou can se
and feel y ’ getting younge
Your eyes sp , You feel all an
full of youthful vigour and po ss
And this amazing. nev und and
vigour restorer, called Vi-Tabs, is
guaranteed, It has been proved by
thousands in America and Is now dis-
tributed by chemists here under a
uarantee of satisfaction or money
ack. Vi-Tabs must make you feel
full of vigour and energy and from
10 to 20 years younger, or you mere-
ly return the empty package and get
your money back. A special, double-
strength bottic of 48 Vi-Tabs costs
little, and the
Suarantee pro-
tects you.

Restores Manhood and Vitality
















To-day’s @. A. Song}

“I want to be happy ”

“but I can’t be happy
.» till I have a Gas
too!
- .. Hubby take note!
ee

Cooker



ent










BARBADOS ADVOCATE

WANTED
















| More Light Through |

Chemistry



| Minimum charge week cent an
96 cents Sunday 4 words — we a4
words 3 cents | word week4 € sa
| word on Stenduys; "
}
HELP
An Experienced Maid-Butler. Apply to ‘vahisitie cones
ae Solin aoddard Marine, ) Mange, ide fforts * tpeinee rti-
Marine Gardens 60a ahting, but the riddle of how
ae. Tee t efly and certain other creatures
Applications are invited for the post Wp St remains -unageyed,
of Head Master of the St. Andrew's 7
Anglican Secondary School, Grenada By JOHN A. ANGUS
Further information from the Archdea ‘
ton of Grenada, St, Ceorge’s, Grenada wrem Science Digest
24.7. 51—tn :
: Man, it would uppear, never has
“Colonial Development Corporation 2 willing to accept daylight’s

invites applications from qualified and
*sperienced electrical engineers for the
vost of Engineer/Manager Déminica and
St. Vincent Hydroelectric Systems. Reply
giving details of Career and stating
salary required to Mr. G. Roddam,
Colonial Development Corporation, 134
Hope Road, Ligvanea, PO Jamaica.”
25.7.51.—én

EFFICIENT CLERK, Hardware
Lumber experience desirable
ietter and in person.
Ltd

and
Apply by
A. Barnes & Co.,

20.7.51—t.f.n,

—_—_——
SALESMAN for Commission Business—
ene with experience preferred, but will
consider applications from bright young
men, who would like to enter this kind
* business. Applications from Salesmen
wanting to make a change will be kept

confidential. EBeply in detail to “Sales-
man", C/o Advocate
SALESMAN—A Junior Salesman or a

young Lad who has recenthy left School
bolds the School Certificate and is will-
ing to apply himself diligently to being
trained as a salesman

Apply in first instance by letter in own
handwriting to Hull & Son, P.O, Box 192
G.P.O 26.7.51—3n,

ee
WIDEAWAKE junior with knowledge
of Customs work and import and export
licences routine. Apply in your own
handwriting in the first instance to

HAROLD PROVERBS & CO., LTD
27.7. 51—3n

MISCELLANEOUS

WANTED TO RENT
BUNGALOW by married couple, ne
children. One completely furnished bun-
galow, on the sea, with garage, for iong
period. Address particulars to: M.B.,
P.O. Box 124. 24,.7.51.—5n,











WANTED TO BUY
OLD SEWING MACHINE out of use.
Good prices paid. Apply to Mrs, Vaughn,
Corner of Fairchild and Probyn Streets,
21.7.51—9n
TRAILOR—Second Hand Trailor suit-
able to be drawn by tractor. Phone
$5273.









28.7, 51—3n

Colonial Art
Debate

LONDON, July.

Traditional arts and crafts from
the Colonies now on show at the
Imperial Institute have led not
only to unstinted admiration but
some controversy in artistic circles
in London.

The view has been expressed,
for instance, that the Ife heads
from Benin (Nigeria) are the
works of Europeans and not Afri-



cans. In this school of thought is
Henry Moore, the well-known
sculptor.

Well now, who did make the
Ife heads? Were they made by
several artists or by one artist ?

A panel of art experts argued
the pros and cons at the Imperial
Institute this week. After con-
siderable academic jugglery, they
came to the conclusion that the
cea ae from Benin are the
work of African sculptors. |.

Mr. G.- Braunlotz, wee. of the
British Museum, raised another
controversial point when he stated
that in the Colonies, works of art
are not produced primarily for
aesthetic reasons. The fundamen-
tal prineiple of African art, he
claimed, is functional.

He was strongly opposed by Mr,
Kenneth Murray, Head of the
Department of Antiquities in
Nigeria; Mr. William Fagg, Assist-
ant Keeper, British Museum, also
took sides against his British
Museum Chief. “There is,” Fagg
said, “always some element of
aesthetics in all tribal art”. He
pointed out that there is no single
tradition in African art there
is a variety of tradition and he
claimed that the artistic excellence
of African art is comparable to
Western art.

During the debate questions dis-
cussed included the differences
between the emotional and intel-
lectual approach to art and’ the
aesthetic standards of European
and Colonial peoples.

The growing appreciation of
Colonial arts and crafts by people
in Britain was commented upon
by art critic chairman, Mr, F,
Wendy. He hoped that more en-
couragement would be given to
Colonial artists.

CABLE THIEVES
HONGKONG: Telegraph cable
thieves are at work in the South
China Sea. Last week they lifted
che Hongkong-Amoy undersea
sable to the surface and cut off a
jection three miles long. In 1946



he Navy had to be called out tu
guard repair work on the Hong-
song-Singapore line .after thieves
pinched a total oi over four miles
of cable.





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encroaching darkness, as
‘ning more than a challenge.
kens go home to roost at
most of natute is willing to

t a day when the sun goes
but from earliest times, man

to have wanted a longer
This meant more light, not
sarily to rival the sun's light



}

slow is called phosphorescence. If
the glow ceases “instantly when
the activating agent is removed the
Jight is called fluorescence. |

Looking back, it almost seems
that the fluorescent lamp emerged
complete after sufficient timse was
allowed for growth; more careful
examination, however, reveals}

that chemists were persistently att

work, steadily progressing toward)
The first step in the lone
was the brilliant flash of}
genius which visualised the possi-/
bility of dispensing with the metal
‘lament in the light bulb. Georg:

Claude, a French chemist who had
heen pioneering with a littl









bu t least enough to permit] !nown rare gas called neon, found
ex ing the day's work or play.] that a small amount of this gas
: ' substituted for the filament in the
A ‘s, from the time that the] conventional light bulb, could be
ca it domesticated fire to dis-] made to transport the electrical!
pe the fearsome shadows of his current, and, more important, emit
rc Shelter, the flame of fire 1 light of its own.
served as the only source of arti-
fieval illumination until well into} Further laboratory work with
the nineteenth century. Then the} other rare gases led to experiments
development of electric power] With materials which are not gen-
m possible for the first time} erally considered gases at all. Thus.
th complete change of ideas|S0dium, cassium, and, most im-}
Which has resulted in modern] portant, mercury were irtroduced |
acvances in lighting; the name] into the vacuum tube where their |
most closely associated with the|low vapour pressures readily pro-
beginning of this advancement is,] duced sufficient. material in the
of course, that of Thomas Edison,| gaseous state to serve as “wire-|
renowned American inventor. less filaments” with remarkable |
Z r ranges of colour, brilliancy, and
Late in December 1879, Edison inten dirrmartine srourw. |
gave his famous demonstration ot physical properties. The ea

@ complete incandescent lighting
System at Menlo Park, New Jersey,
not far from New York City
However, as early as 1838, Pro-
fessor Jobard of Brussels had sug-
gested that a lamp might be made
by heating a small piece of carbon
by electricity in a vacuum.

In the United States, three
other men are prominently asso-
ciated with early attempts to pro-
duce the _ incandescent lamp
William E. Sawyer developed
s€veral lamps consisting of a piece
of graphite in a glass globe fillea
with nitrogen. A feature of these
lamps was that the globe was
cemented to a metal base which



id be removed when the
@raphite evaporated, Professor
Moses G. Farmer also developed



a lamp consisting of a graphite
rod heated in nitrogen, and Hiram



S. Maxim, another noted inventor,
later produced two lamps, one
consisting of a piece of sheet

platinum operating in air, and the
other of a graphite rod heated in



a hydrocarbon vapour.

One of Edison's principal con-
tributions toward improved arti-
ficial illumination was the result
of his realization that electrie
lamps would need to be operated
4S separate units if they were ta
be widely accepted, The carbon-
ized thread which was used in
Edison's lamps had the necessary
high resistance to make them
Suitable for use where needed.
Edison called this thread a fila-

men', and the name was generally
adopted. This first lamp gave
seyeral times the number of light
tits that could be obtained from
the candle
lamp.

The second great step in the
development of ihe electric light

bulb came in 1911 with the dis-
covery of a method for making
drawn or ductile tungsten wire,
The tungsten filament was much

more efficient, Yielding additional
ght units per watt. Two years
inter came the development of
the gas-filled lamp, a contribution
perfected by Dr. Irving Langmuir,
‘tinguished American chemist
iy introducing inert gas into the
mp, in place of a vacuum as in
rlier lamps, the evaporation of
e filament was retarded and the
life of the bulb extended.





Since the advent of the incan-
scent lamp, the greatest advance

in lighting undoubtedly has been
“fluorescent” lamp. Fluores-

ce, the giving off of radiation
bsorbed from some other source,
not a rare phenomenon in
nature, but until chemical re-
serch revealed the nature of the
roaterials involyed, and methods
cre developed for producing the
orescent substance synthetically,
was impossible to harness this
iree of illumination. It has long
reen known that fluorescence
ald be used for general illumin-
on by combining two essential
sredients — a material which
uld give suitable illumination

hen activated by an appropriate
activating agent, and this agent.

In general, there are two basic
ources of light. The first, and
most common, is that produced by
emission of heat energy from a
iot surface such as the sun, a
tungsten filament, a campfire, or
: candle. The second is lumines-
eence, by which, under certain
conditions, thousands of known
substances will glow in the dark
*ithout any apparent emission of

“"y

luminescence is caused by
some activating agent and the
glow may persist for minutes.
bouts, or days after the agent has



} beeh withdrawn, in which case the







NOTICE
Dr. Preseod B. O'Neale

begs to inform his Clients
that his Office will be closed
from Saturday 28th July,
and will be re-opened on



Monday 20th August.
25.7.51.—4n.



SRLS

»,

a

>
%,
iS NOTICE
‘

1 -

% x
S$ We beg to notify our customers x
4 that our Parts Department will be R
% Gesed for stock taking from Mon-

» day, 30th July, for a week. Also %
|% our Repair and Service Depart- 4
1% ments will be closed from the

% ame date for two weeks annual ¢

@ ‘oliday. There will be a skeleton


. %,

% COLE & CO., LYD., R

Sd ¥

$} BAY and FROBYN STREETS. %

. 7517 ?

‘ 22.7.51—7n %

tg z
GSO ty SSA FOS OCOOOD.

vapour lamp provides a good |
source of light in the ultraviolet |
irea of the spectrum. The first |
fluorescent lamps produced in the |
laboratory utilized ground natur a |
willemite, a zine orthosilicate |
which fluoresces green,

However, none of the thousands
of natural minerals are of suffi-
cient brilliance to be‘of commer-
cial use and the production ot
synthetic materials is complicated
by a curious situation: inorganic
substances in a pure state, gener-
ally, do not fluoresce,

Research has revealed that a
trace of some impurity, usually a
metal, is a requirement of fluores-
cence, When it is found in natural
fluorescent materials, this
activator is generally manganese
and this is the element frequently
used in the synthetics, although
silver, copper, and bismuth also
have their places. The synthetic
materials are coated directly on
the inner surface of the fluorescent
tube, and their development,
manufacture, and standards con-
trol are the result of outstanding
accomplishments in the field of
inorganic shemistry,

The public
chemical achievements are
cated by the efficiency of the
present day product, The light
output from standard ‘commercial
fluorescent tubes is better than 65
light units per watt, in contrast
to 12 light units per watt from
corresponding tungsten filament
lamps.

benefits of these

indi-

Somewhere in the story of fluor-
escence the name of Vincenzio

or from the kerosene] Casciarola, a cobbler in the city

of Bologna, Italy, about the year
1600, should be included, His
hobby was alchemy. Searching
for the philosopher’s stone, Casci-
arola one day climbed a mountain
near his city and gathered some
stones which looked promising ‘to
him. That night he powdered
them and roasted the powder. It
reemed to him that the powder
never would cool off. Hour after
hour the heated powder continued
to give off a reddish glow, and

finally Casciarola realized that. ti
was not a glow of heat. He haa
produced the first phosphor, by
transmuting barium sulfate tc

barium sulfide in the presence of
a few impurities of manganese or



bismuth Although Casciarole
undoubtedly was disappointed to
discover that his powder was not
the philosopher’s stone, his fame
spread far and wide, and it is
recorded that he did a profitable
business thereafter with alchem-
ists, sorcerers, and similar enter-
prising men of his time.

The biochemist just possibly
may be the individual who will
announce the next great step in
the scientific development of
lighting. In numerous laboratories,
studies are being made of th«

more than 40 orders of animals; |
ind of the two groups in the plant |
world which have the ability tc
luminesce. It is interesting t
note that all 40 orders of animal
ife which luminesce are either
earthworms, fireflies, or other
and creatures, or else they are
inhabitants of «the sea, such as
ellyfish, squid, and the like. For
ep as yet unknown reason, no
fresh-water luminous species have
found,

s



een



Christian” Science +
Reading Room

1ST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS
(Broad Street)
10 a.m.—2 p.m.
Wednesdays, Fridayn,
10 a.m, —12 o'clock Saturdays.
At this Room the Bible and
the Christian Seience text-boolt
Science and Health with key te
the Scriptures by MARY BAKER
EDDY may be read, borrowed,
or purchased

VISITORS ARE WELCOME a
OT OT Ee

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PAGE SEVEN
ere ee Se Rsteeaner

Reds Take Time Off



meeting proceeded

Preliminary handling of smaller
F details took only 18 minutes and
e rom Page 1




Joy then read a statement which
fire—was reached gut a U N. ee ee, _ oF Fe
spokesman said that both points Te eee oar



were taken up t ay.

The meeting started at 10 am
with General Nam II top Commun-
ist negotiator reading a statement
on administrative and procedural
introduced yesterday by
delegate Vice-Admiral

Turner Joy
Nam lI said he “agreed in prin-
cipte” with Joy's points. Both
Teams promptly named staff assist-
ants to get to work on these de-
uils while the big business of the



TOURIST RECEIPTS

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 25.

The Tourists Board receipts in
U.S. currency amounted to $76,170
for the half year ending June 30.
Sales at the Tourist Bureau for the
first six months amounted $30,095
B.W.I. compared with $29,993 in
1950 and $15,270 in 1949

Cc







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In addition to general cargo these of Sriling to be notified,
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A STEAMER sails Ist August
A STEAMER sails 15th August

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PAGE EIGHT

SOUTH AFRI

Opener Eric Rowan

Scores 236: New Record

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, July 27,

Starting the second day’s play with 282 for three
wickets to their credit, South Africa carefully amassed the
formidable total of 538 to-day, This beats their previous
highest Test score against England of 533 made at Man-
chester in 1947.

It was 2 personal triumph for Eric Rowan who took
his overnight score of 160 to 236 before being briljantly
caught in the gully by Bedser off Brown. He thus became
South Africa’s highest test scorer.



His innings was a model of one . —
patience and concentration and 7 7
he was at the wicket for over CO! | EGE

nine hours.

Twenty-one-year-old Me Clean







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

CA HIT 583 IN 4TH TEST



ENTRIES:

A RECORD 75

By BOOKIE

ENTRIES for the Barbados Turf Club August meeting
revealed that a new record high of 75 horses will be due to
take part at the meeting. Of these only three horses are
due to arrive from Trinidad but there are others already in
the island under Trinidad ownership while St. Vincent) St.
Lucia and B.G, will also be represented by horses owned
or bred in these colonies.

The three from Trinidad are The



Eagle, a winner of one race at ©#'ania 123

ToT oO > Demure 124
the recent T.T.C. June fixture, Topsy 109
Betsam, a well known half-bred Land Mark 132
and winner of a few races in

Trinidad, and Monsoon, a frequent SECOND DAY—Monday Aug. 6th

visitor to Barbados, who will also



































































Starfish Win Water
Polo ‘Trophy (1951

GOLDFISH revenged their first-round defeat by con-
vincingly beating Starfish four goals to nil in their water
polo match yesterday afternoon. For Goldfish, Marion Tay-|
lor and Phyllis Pitzpatrick scored two goals each. This was|
Starfish’s first defeat for the season. Goldfish still have one
more match to play, but Starfish with fourteen points to|
their eredit are the winners of the 1951 league and will be|
presented with the Y. de Lima Challenge Cup at the end
of the season. adjudged ofi-side and the goal was

In the other game of the after- dis-allowed. Joyce made up for
noon, Mermaids lost to Sea her mistake shortly after this)
Nymphs four goals to one. when she scored the fourth goal)

Play began at 5.20, with Starfish for her team. This proved to be
ccfending the shore goal, Goldfish the last goal of the match,




























R ! t f DEF ‘A 7 ’ be racing in class G rere ous Furs, 1h ORR ae ae “ae ee ee referee was Mir, Basi

was owan’'s partner for most of aio tan : \ Sun Queen ce ‘ . fever defended stub- 20KS j
the morning and he produced some The Barbados Derby, the feature aie Ween it bornly and for the majority of the The teams were:— _
delightful strokes in his innings ’ event of fhe meeting, attracted jrign ana Low 10g fiist half the ball went from one Starftsh: J. Ghent, F. Carmichael
of 67 before he was unfortunately LODGE oe get arrorienges Sg vg - — Gua ane 111 side of the field to the other with (Capt.) D. Warren, J. Chandler,

‘ sub- Gun Site : ; . ets , |
run out. He batted less than two list of those who had paid = Burrs . io neither side able to make a really C. McKinnon, P, Chandler and J.
cul ee Kit nn ate and. elavab scriptions. Favourite for this race Catania 115 ngerous opening. When the Hill.

Pubes ’ ? ren Harrison College defeated will be Best Wishes the Burning Nan Tudor 16 vome was five minutes and fifteen Goldfish: B. Hunte, P. Pitcher

Me Clean's dismissal brought in Lodge School by 103 runs yester= Bow—Felicitas filly from St, Vin- renun e econds old, however, Phyllis (Capt.) J, Gale, D, Johnson, P. |

a a : Lf - 1 a Us Pent day, the last day in their first cent, but due to her recent illness Topas too itzpatrick opened the score for Fitzpatrick, M. Lopez and M

rerey Manse making his c division cricket match which in Trinidad she is not the out- ranamark 120 qJoldfish with a shot from five Taylor.

Senee. Fe. ee last out for a fine was played at the Lodge School standing .choice she was a few Drake's Drum , 133 yards. outside the Starfish goal Mermaids: J Croney, J. Chandler

innings of 90 and in his stay of two grounds. months ago. Her chief rival was ¥— ERC Rae one (F870) ea F (Capt.) J. McKinnon, J. Hill, 37|

and a half hours hit 15 fours. — On the first day of play— Cross Roads, the big gelding by vanguara =e * 124 This brought the Starfish for- Ingram, A. Sutherland and. C

England bowling remained Wednesday July 25—Lodge win- Dunusk out of April Showers M7’ ward line down in a threatening Knight

rteady. Tattersall especially being ning the toss sent in Harrison owned by Mr. Alexander Chin of Sitncie Ts move and Phyllis Chandler se +) Sew Nymphs: A. Eckstein (Capt.)

difficult to score off. The England College on a wicket that was well B.G., but he too was ill in Trini- Glomorntinn rt HaL ecerind Like we certain soni? Beowhect teknac- at Vidoes]

attack was weakened when Bailey soaked and College ended their gad, Therefore others in the race River Mist dic tne Gan, g ae ier "Sak reece
had to leave the field after an first innings at 75 runs. Opening who were hardly considered some Water Belle 12) Goldfish sent the ball upfield; Williams

hour’s play with a strained back. batsman C, Smith topscored for \eeKs ago now appear to have yjccroy 124 m “ 2 ott

pray ; College by scoring 18 runs while iceroy nz fiom the resulting goal-throy
Grennan was steady behind the Mr % Headley — i R. Dash Detter chances, These include atin Marion Taylor in the Goldfish | i
wicket and only allowed one bye . . as a es nen ‘} . 4S. Soprano, Water Bell and Usher, W—VICTORIA arene OP AIR Orward dine got the ball and she | WHAT'S ON TO-DAY
In the hour remaining afte: “"0¢Kec Up té runs each. The Stewards’ Stakes for A class acai ‘ sn gdal # :
nthe 8 Best bowler for Lodge was J 2 it in the second goal for her bik i “om
uth Africa had been dismissec arte vey anes . attracted a larger entry than usual The Fagie 133 m with a well placed shot. At Inquiry at District “B” into
ngl ind scored 37 without a loss cae 4 ae eat ae A teleéts for ong there are 8 on the card for sam Flight 125 stage Starfi he basa "tee } Death of Charles Mc
ao 7 7 ; - mn, £4 runs after bowling five overs. ( > Lg ee, pollo 126 | Stage stars gan tk re, ap
et which Lowson making his Test Lodge in their turn at the wicket this event. Five of these are in April Flowers 125 but they were able to keep off any ; Conney 10 a.m.
~9O7 seul as = rT ; ; the top class, one in A2, one in B Duteibelia 130 iiaiad 2. ¢ fa | Police Courts and Juvenile
1 p
debut made 27. scored 35 runs. Their collapse ma A Vixen se iursher attacks until half time. | : 10
Scores follow:— as due mainly to some good and another from C2. The five Batts 198 The Second Half 1} Courts — 10 a.m.
bowling by M. Simmons who Class giants are Atomic a me — Pharos II 121 Soon afte othe ws cond half got || Meeting ae = Housing
SOUTH AFRICA—Ist Innit.es ’ r "S Burns, Elizabethan an rake’s Epieur ri ee a meee Board — 10.30 a.m.
; 2 bagged four of the Lodge Schoo) urns, B 8 mapigure — as 18. vitebaren. Cedi > McKinno: . S ae s

I Wane ie yb aeine 713 wickete for seven runs, Tie bowl- Drum, the last named staging a H-—st VENILE STAK 2 yo. colts | Rack - eo ae ee n, 04) | Old Boys’ Dinner at Marine

©. Van Ryneveld ¢ & b Hilton . 83 od six overs. comeback after nearly two years Gang * “tins” ie es eeliteh od ae, oH | Hotel

A. Nourse 1.b.w, b Brown 7 When played ended on the first off the track. | Rebate who did March Winds ES sunita: weed _ “top form Shal{ First Intermediate and Se-

z iesaen eam ‘ @7 day, Harrison College had scored well in Trinidad without winning Aptpnusk us ! wate . mae See e een cond Divisions Cricket at

P. Mansell ¢ Tattersall b Hilton 90 64 runs for the loss of two wickets. is the one from A2, the old gelding aoe y a0 » is & corner, Dut noting} the various grounds —

A. Rowan b Brown ® Due to heavy rains, play on the Slainte from B, and the French j»sparroRD HANDICAP —' ‘(Bolass) Goldfie ate at's. data | 1 p.m

Ni Mann b Tatteraall ; second day—Thursday July 26— bred mere Flieuxce from C2. To Furs, ioldfish were now showing First Division :

GP Snub 6: Lowsen } Biltan ) was washed out 7 Following are the entries for Sun Queen perfect understanding as several Wandeters i, Boaktan at
§ metres. ie 1, 6. 7 Resuming their second innings each race with the approximate Deanne’ Wiebe: ses their players interchanged Bay ‘ » peel
ons ja, At 64 for the loss of two wickets weights for the weight-for-age Harroween ae “a play es Empire ve. Y.M.P.C.. at
ota os sterday, College carried their socee Slainte ‘ oal came from Marion aylor 5 * 5 |
es y, é races. : . " Bank Hall

Fall of wickets: 1 for 40; 2 for 238; core to 148 runs for the loss of FIRST DAY oon, ‘Fikes who once again beat the Starfish ‘ riton ee! Tinling at Casas

for 267; 4 for 286; 5 for 392; 6 for 480; 7 seven wickets and declared, N. . a Lunways custodian Joan Ghent, | ton A
for 498; 8 for 500; 9 for 538 Harrison going in at number three !—MAIDEN STAKES (C & C2) 51% furs, Oatcake With the ball back into play ' i ; Caliegs at odve

BOWLING ANALYSIS tia: sy atts ns state 2 Miss Panic 128 Land Mark Starfish first on it. They ad-| | .odge vs College at Lodge

0.) M. R. w. inthe batting order scored 33 (Ming Princess 119 . oT rae Cones (ae tye aled a j Pickwick vs. Combermere
Bedser $s’ 14 113° 2 runs before he was caught and sweet Rocket 119 13--TRAFALGAR HANDICAP—(D class) V20C¢ed into the Goldfish goal aree| ! abiival
Bailey 17, 4 48 © bowled by Wilkie. Fuss Budget i 716 Furs. in a determined effort to score. | sudeedudinke >
Brown a a yt . Wilkie and Farmer both took oe 119 Three well placed shots from the 1, | Cele ae Wisdlese we, Jin:
mn. 60318 176 3 two wickets for 39 and 20 runs (apoure 119 Se on. Starfish forwards, however, were] | ate : senayvaet Hall
Compton . 1 Ae 4 0 respectively. Lunsway 119 DHulcibella well stopped by the Goldfish goal-]| ; Merital Hosvite) vs, Pidke |
Lodge was dismissed for 85 Topsy ; 124 Colleton kee Barbara Hunte. The bali] | Mental Hospital vs. Pic

Hutt pe AND it PEReY 9 runs in their second innings and#®?—-PLANTERS' fore cee eee ar pence 9 as once again transferred int ria ick at —s ee .

utton not ou > ee as ss le, a . oe iow Bells .. a . tegiment vs, Spartan a

Lowson not out 27 the only batsman who gave any rhe Eaule 126 Will O° the Wisp tt the Starfish goal area and after : aot |
Extras 1 resistance to the steady bowling offffirst Flight 118 Gross Bows melee in front of the Starfish goal sarrison ; |
: “3, Mr. Headley were Mr. V.{yApolio 7 Phyllis -Fitepatrick sent in the Windward vs. Pickwick at ||
Total 8 McComie 21, C. Grane 15 and Rane sewers 198 14—OISTIN STAKES—(G class) 516 Furs, fourth and fal goal of the match Congo Road. }
mh He : "Mr. Hes Pe bow), Duleibella oo Jewel ; 139 POUT é al Zoe * Se Seshin $
BOWLING ANALYSIS Reefer 14, Mr. Headley’s bowl-b coneton 128 Gavotte : iso | The referee was Mr. K. Ince. Se cond Div ision : : |
‘ 6, M. Fe W. ing analysis was ten overs, twoffpharos 11 at Miss Friendship 130 Second Game ait & ma i Lodge at
McCarthy maidens, 18 runs, five wickets “Betsam May Time 119 jeckles oac |
8. ae arene , Peas 3 11 The. sae ome was . “ . salle
aaron S pe eo Skipper Willams and C. Smith7P ie sansAbOS DERBY—0 Furlones hl Ba a The is bree ca ae ee, Foundation vs. Wanderers | |
' both took two wickets each, Vanguard , 120 Joan's Star ioe °° exciting as the first, but it we at Foundation |
Scores are as follows: — Hi-Lo iW Betsam 133 pcan th -_ sing e Central vs. Carlton at j
HARRISON COLLEGE—1st Innings Soprano ymphs_ with 1eir stronge Vaucluse
7 ’ 117 : aucluse
: : : 1 Bell 15—SU N 3 Vv r , ; “y 1 |
Crickei Results $ ce. sven bh Fatiner iC ao ICross Roads 120 PuMMee a ; C Blackman ec (wkpr. Mr. Wilkes) YaUsher 120 have been able to accomplish ha College vs. Pickwick at |
July 27. b Reefer uN ioe Wishes | 17 Thfusion . they been able to put in their Collage |
cores in English County Crick- Mr. Headley b Wilkie 12 ‘ ‘ ia ‘, Miss Panic strongest team in the water for 7 are
; ay were N Harrison b Farmer 2 §I—-STEWARDS' STAKES — (A) 9 Furs. pair Sally : jee en Combermere vs. Leeward
et games which ended to-day were R Dash c Williams b Farmer 12 #Atomnic 11 . 126 Dashing Princess every game, Mary Knig' nt anc at Combermere. |
as follows ° K Griffith ¢ Gill b Farmer cose 6 gSlainte iy Sweet Rocket Betty Williams in the Sea Nymphs CINEMAS

Gloucestershire vs -bevex at seristal, M nons b Mr. MeComie 7 (Gua Site 138 No-to-Nite back line played a fighting gam Aquatic: “The Girl in The Paint- !
Essex 243 and 183 tloucestershire 297 G er not out ® "sBurns runda . i s chi ir hare -—$b and 8.40 p.m.
“Witcriarstie Nanak ere ket Spa ane orien 108 APehe a that The Wbcatas tors nd Empire: ‘Abbolt, ‘Costello Meet |

I tershire won by nine wickets J. Williarns absent 7 eee Flieuxce erford ‘ a é § “ * As ine ,

Hampshire vs. prictiecse at eae! Extras see *sfiDrake's Drum 4 Fileuxce were kept at a safe distance, Dismete athe Fabulous Texan”— |
Middlesex 478 for 4 wickets; Hampshire ~—— [|*Elizabethan . : ota Doldrum me orm ; rhe net 30 a 8.15 j
256 and 287 for 8 wickets, Match drawn Total 75 [}0—SUMMER STAKES—(C class) 77 Furs. Vinways It was Mermaids who opene Placa (Bridvetowns: | ‘Teipot— |

Kent vs. Derbyshire at Folkstone —=— } {infusion | : 7 Oatcake the scoring early an the first hal! Sek nok 4a ca
Derbyshire 240 and 263 for 5 wicketS ~~ Fall of wickets: 1 for 11; 2 for 31; 3))Miss Panic ig Tiberian Lady Jean Chandler tried with a lon {|
ee gent 38 orarenr renee aa ek Debian Peinabes 101 shet from just inside the half-way |{__
won by 177 runs 68; for 75; 9 for 75 i The nd “7 666696,66666666 6666 COO OOO

e . G ‘ y ; 108 ark, The ball struck the cross- | (999GO9G99SCODGS9SSROO9OTS

Sussex vs. Glamorgan at Hastings BOWLING ANALY High and Low mark, Xe
Glamorgan 203 and 80 for 1 wicket; Sus- aM. R. W his tbe is bar and rebounded into play it & Messrs. CARDON TUDOR (well %|
sex 207 and 174, Match drawn Brookes 5 0 21 0 gjCatania # » direc f Jean McKinnon | & own shopkeeper of Baxters Road ¢{

Sear 101 the direction of Jea I know pe axte s

Yorkshire vs. Scotland at Scarborough. Reefer 4 6 14 1 MArunda renada Netball . . se range, Twc|%$ and ADOLPHUS (Cain! SEALY

2 272; Yorkshire 37% 116 ho scored from close range. Tw] ¥ and ADOL. ‘ ‘ s x
Scotland 121 and 272; Yorkshire 372 and wWiikie 4 1 4 1 BAberford Ww § “ ; . +
22 for 2 wickets : Farmer 5 0 20 4 _Flieuxce a Ti , minutes later Roberta Vidmer it x request the pleasure of your com- s
mareanite: won. by t-wiekets, Pu earners mais L ae coe i, £our Opens 7 oday a determined swim-through, sw op > pany to their Xx
Mr. Wilkes b Mr, Headle 5 Wiberian Lady ia : ball and goalkeeper into the] ANNES 74) %
AYES G Stoute b Simmons 0 Oateake nae team which has been goal to score the equaliser % ANNUAL NOR 2 |
RH C Grant b Simmons 0 ri class) Chosen to represent Barbados in At half time, the score was Ses] s ~)
: : sell PALG STAKES — (D class) é a j x : ee iy
Su Y’ FIXTURE oe es Bone é er eit Furs. the Netball Match against Gren- Nymphs 3, Mermaids 1. Joyes * At QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE %|
TO-DAY’S C Git ated: wkpr. Harrisohy 6 Suntone tae 4 today at 5.00 p.m. at Queen’s Pekstein and Pat Mahon sent in Se On Monday Night, goth July,1951 9
< . sines. _ Foster 19 Mary Ann us College is as follows: — the second and third goals for Ses] % ADMISSION 0:0 2/-

Rain prevented play on Wednes- 4 "Reefer pb Simmons 1 First Flight us Shooter: Thelma Barker, jg »mphs in that order. x Siunic be wee cos eens 3

. Yhursday this week in the ce Witiar t Duleibella 7 ympns ; 5,
day and Thursc ay h Ss wee nny ¢ Rudeins we ed 6 Vikert 115 Attack: Sylvia Maxwell, Attack- After the interval Mermaids] ss Orchestra $
Men's ae ae Nee Takin nade Uaioe Hainan) Clementing | 06 ing Centre: Jean Chandler, Cen- tried to increase their score. Jean x BAR SOLID Xs)
de Lima ‘Trophy aft aia deste Sep b_ Foster a: eet tees jay tre: Margaret Ramsey, Defending Chandler worked hard throughout] — pjoase extend this Invitation S|
hayes Lawn Tennis Tournament at J. Farmer not out 0 pee Re 130 Centre: Kathleen Connor, De- th me and she and Jean} S

» Te : 9 y ellis ‘ roy ’ é > - © aaa j
Belleville. meee: 72 WH othe Wasp il 115 fence: Patricia Best (Captain), °,.88 lade severdl attempts | 2699GGG9GG009999S9SS999F"
This fixture will take place Total 33 i=-STAFFORD STAKES — (B class) (Goalkeeper: Beverley Batson eee a were unfortunate
4 , Sly Furs. a . score y u 1 C
today at 4.30 p.m : ie 9. «= GRENADA ROVERS CLUB —&® SCOxe Dus ey we lefence would
The couples are. D, W. Wiles and | Fall of wiekets; 1 for 2; 2 for a, 3 pe Oks 119 TEAM The Sea ae as aeten . ;
ples D, Ww. \ sel pe Bi 6 tor if: : Ree : i 4 | ing through.
J. S. B. Dear vs C. R. BE. Warne fos toe fr Fit ist 10; 6 for 1h; 7 for ae ka Low 309 Shooter: Joyce Blache, Attack let nothing Rett as LADIES |
and L, A, Hutchinson, BOWLING ANALYSIS BP ng Harroween ~ Bileen La Hee, Attacking Centre i = Der aati in the
’ . M, Dy é ils ontre: ‘an s ste oe sae .
Yesterday's Results A oe eeriee i Elma Wilson, Centre: — Doreen — At this s i dicaraba: sine ean Another Addition to our
MEN’S SINGLES &immons.\... 6 eat: 4 Gittens, Defending Centre: Pearl Sea Nymphs forwar “arin Fast Selling Stock of ...
a S. Cato beat BE. R. At- Air. Headley C.eee Ae LODGE~2nd Innings Mendes, Defence: Angela Andrew, down and scored from near 1 ast selling + uh
we “ak 6. ae go wu Foster , 5 4 2 2 G Stoute b Williams oi aies 13 Goalkeeper: Dorothea Sylvester.’ However Joyce Eckstein. ws
us —6, 6—4, 6-2, ; ; 2 q : jams r. Headle f ; C A p , 4 , $5656060O,
ga : ehhidin coLi za E ond hits ? S etthinssn ° MS Headley b . SOP OP OSS GSES SOS IOS POP DOPE PPI FOOD POPPI PRD “<
ieeeelipcnnimeiernincaaneemencccmmcncecamcemsigll je 5 OUL - ; a <
©. Smith e wkpr. Mr, Wilkes) b Williams q =
Farmar we : 30 Mr, MeComie b Mr, Headley 21 * FOR YOUR LEATHER NOVELTIES st | f
Y t d ’s E Hope b Farmer 9 Me Wilkes c & b Mr. Headley . 0 . J ahs +
esteraay N. Harrison c & b Wilkie 33 6c: Gill e peck iae b aha 8 iy %
C Blackman run out 31° K Brookes c Blackman b SHOP AT.... a ‘ ; Y
Weather Report Karimi wot out Ts a a oe 4d % EMBROIDERED
; Mr. t tle & b Wilkie 7 © Williams ec Griffith b Smi ai aun .
FROM CODRINGTON Mr. Headley ¢ & b Wilkie LS FS wundies 0 1% BOOKER’: x 36” f $2.35 up
: 01 in. J Williams c Williams b Mr B Reefer run out ‘ 14 1 30° TrOM dé.ve
Total ht ‘ 2 N. Wilkie not out 2/8 %
Total Rainfall for month to McComie . ie : 111 We have just received:— ¥ ? :
, Retens 4 Extras ; s e have just received: ey ee ; js
date ; 4.94 ins. ate is ie — 1% Leather Book Markers x We have now oe
—" Temperature: 85.5 Total (for 7 wits, decid) 148 Total 8 * f Stocking Mending Sets x eotiorns and shades to
i ; ei call 3 5 c se from...
. , : Fall of witkets; 1 for 40; 2 for 41; Fall of wickets : 1 for 7; 2 for 21; 3 for} sf ” Ladies Shopping Purses eo choose
= Keppeeatare k “000 for 91: 4 Tor 117; 6 for 126; 6 for 129; 36; 4 ee rll Ha Bah. S08 BEd ” Tobacco Pouches .. . ete., etc. . x
7 for 148 8 for 55; 9 for . . — also — i .
Jelocity : iles BOWLING ANALYSIS BOWLING ANALYSIS ‘ _ "i Yours for Service
Wind Velocity : 9 miles we. ae OM ROW o,M. RW.) Ladies Compacts, & Cigarette Cases % "
hour. aberee E., Sesee Brookes $0 14 GC J Wiliams Rook at ie (ee with $
‘ : : : \
Barometer : ( cam) " HpeEe 3 hee an. ph en io akc ea | g COLOURED VIEWS OF BARBADOS $
(3 pam.) 29.89 yr. MeCo oS 3 oe Eee 4 9 Bw Ole These make Weal Gifts .. . x pros.
. Wilkie 14.5 330 2c. Smith . Sra ee ie % REMEMBER IT’S ALWAYS BEST TO SHOP 3
. . a . % ,
B Jimm Hatlo % me % Pr. Wm. Hny. St.
. ’ ’ y et onne
= 8 BOOKER’S (B’dos) DRUG STORES LTD. x Dial 3466
‘
BROAD STREET & HASTINGS (Alpha Pharmacy) y
ERFECT ALIBIS, PLAUSIBLE PLOTS UT NOT SO SUCCESSFUL*-ALAS! ‘ oD
MARK THE LITERARY EFFORTS IT THAT'S LIFEsARE THE STORIES SS BES SSCOSIVGSSSSSGOGO SG CGSSSS OVO OOOO OOOO IN <<
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Full Text

PAGE 1

ru.i Kir.iiT HARBADOS A1>N OCATE 8 \il ill) W II IV :is. 1951 SOUTH AFRICA HIT 583 IN 4TH TEST Opener Eric Rowan Scores 236: New Record (From Our Own ('orre'.pondi nt 1 LONDON, July 27, ate) with 383 ton thrta irlckMl b thnr credit. Smith Africa carefully amassed th. formidable trtal of 538 to-day. This boats their ) hijiheft Taal score against Eneland of 5.*i3 made at Manchester in 1947. It mi i personal triumph for Eric Rowan who took his own i ICO to 236 before being britiiantly .• ii. the gulh by R BroWn. Ht South A: Jfls tin Starfish Win Water A RECORD 75 Polo Trophy (1951) By BOOKIE I s PRIES for the Barbados Turf Club August meeting lied that a new record hifih of 75 horses will be due to ike |>art at the meeting Of these only three horses are %  ...• f i om Trinidad but there are other* already in IhO Island under Trinidad ownership while St. Vincent. St Lucia and Bt;. will also be rep r.-sen ted bv horse* owned ' '"Mies. The Ihri i lion ami ll the wickt-t for over %  %  Ing and he prodV delightful Uuitngj run out I %  %  COLLEGE DEFEAT LODGE ntdad ini Th. I'lIC 1,111' .ll June lUn.ii vn half-bred Betawn i wall M:-(IM HAV-Monriai m Mil -I MM l-l | -, \h} •* fan l Quran i Mot i rtarbados, who be racing in iliiis O. The Barbadej Derby, the feature event of |he meeting, attracted „;,£ t ^'] nal acceptors from the lone H i a) Ihoaa who had paid nub' %  I vourib ini thu race ,' ll ha Heat Wishes the Burning Lodge School hi 103 run f' U • i* Ull] froi Bl %  rent. IHII due lo her recent illness '. %  efcet match Inldad ahe I not the out? he 1 oda> B I I nding choice aha was ., fe day of tw# grou up Her chief rival waa %  *€'"** frana. i i r and ahatf houra bit < >. Road*, the big gelding bv V.,—,*I.I L ijand b< m In* day July 2S—I,odnr win[>,inuk out of Apul Shower* Mil.. by Mr. Alexander Chin of J ... .... .— ....... .n ... n-,.„, afirwrki II i bcuii filnt the -Jiegp i,in Bailey after an bour*j pbq will lead) behind the %  11 without a loes wicket that nl which Lowaon maktni bis n too 27. A — ked and Co i in:< ipentnj C. s it •.. %  College by Bcorln Hi S needle, and It Dash knocked up 11 Loda) 1 % % %  I ... ;, %  | B.G bui he ton was ill in Trini,1 rtu ... %  Hi the in> c tl. hardlj < onatdi their turn ai the -cored as run due i ling by M. Bin gOOd who '.-.. :. %  It IIDtt.r i llrdr Van RyneiiChMttwn Maclean i .. III.HBO b BTOVII ratl#rall ~JI VI Ml I IIKI - .-l-,.,., HI, ran %  Wind. Fall -1 wlcaeK lr Ml; 4 for SM. '• !<•> JW 1 foi 491. %  fur .*-, lor i* HOHMM1VAI 1 "Is 40 ; 3 f.ir ail. 1-1.. .. Hilton Cm pWa rvni-AKnt llnlton IU>1 out Lo, Ml no' II %  MM am in Cricket Renuittt July 21. Score* in Bnallah County Cricket gain*** which ended to-day were as follows • OUun-to-lwiT Va. Hif> Bl Ml I rr :u and ii nii.im-ii-i-Mtf tn and 11J f %  Urnl OIni.r*terthire won tv nnir wlrhvtt Hanipohno v. MtddlnM •' Pori Middle>r< *T| for 4 wlofcrln. llanipafine SM and Hi fer I whkrl* M.i< n dm** | v. rW.V.^hire at I..ik-U.na r*tn)yihlrr r0 und MD lor S wirhtta d-Wr.-l K-i.l ll -rid 13^ l>rrb> .luta %  I These include Wit,. Bell and Usher. it—VMtoan STAKM — Btewarda' Stake* for A CIUBS 1 '' • %  "• i jartw antrj than usual na aaat* and there are 8 on the curd foi jnl rilBM ttl avanj hn f theae are in ?Hj the top claaa. one in A2, one in B Boatbtila nd another from Cl The live A V'-f ,„ |a M(ll anUareAlomicII GunSate ,.' haeced fOUl ilOOl HUIII-. Eluabetran and itrake s Kpia,., r wicketafoi seven run-. He bowl"i""' the Ual named staging a %  • baoh aftei nearly l#n years r< ,'. . %  t! the irack Kebate who did M. day, Harrison CoUen had %  cored weH in Trinidad without winning. Apromwi •he <" VI P4flh ist.im e *. tlie -tfadv bowlinx of in-M HIK-H Mr. lleadlei wen Mr V L'l McComle II. C. Oranc 15 und £SflJST*" Reefei 14. Mr Headley'^ bowlqJJnrtan .. . nig annlyslsWl 'we .t^aro11 maldtffli it runa, five wlekeis. .iwt.am ,£....„.„......-... Si.iies are as follows:— ni-l* n.MiitiviiN COI.1JK3E wi liunnti tomiu wuki* i, rai i Wat*, ii.li j n-uMan lAMin^r l HoM> inn owl 1 r,.,, Hoadu I fir. % %  IIU.... Wllhaa nvtv IAV i Panic %  %  itochn %  0M Bud art ho'li loot %  nd x> i %  -I M MU Ii II VS..I. M :• %  ran. Sun Una.'11 K.d Chorki I'.-i'iiia I'm-.,... Haiiuairn .. HUlnU> Ability Demur* I "Haiti %  oaicaaa I-and Mara OOUTISll ; %  cont im i!ii'l\ beal b nil ill then m Tav-; Icr and Phyllis Pitzpatrick scoretl %  Starfifhs Ifrsl defeol for the season. Goldfish still have one match to play, but Starti.sh with fourteen points to redit are the wlnjwri of tha I9S1 loguzua and will bo "d with the V di : up at the end "i 'he s< %  %  tin th goal . to be 'ending the shore go the last goal of the match. I i mediately w. : was Mr. Bain %  '.rook* I and ha tha niajorlty of the The UMMDJ am IK -' t half the ball arant from nt. F Carmich.V'i Chandltr, Id* abk to i iler and J. %  I i %  • Mill. p pit net ^ -indold, P i< k opened UM e l Fit and M th a Ml i lyl II i, .i :handkfi t I .1 M<•Klmioii. J HIU. f. i. This bnmithi ti %  Buu f. i ind C %  '.; I % %  n %  and i Cap* I in t.hni aaemed lik< I Id tdn.il Vldmer, W Uw DM P MahOO and B ;„ OoMflah •ant the ball upfleld tt i'. the le^ultiriK k".il-throw. m Tuyloi In the i i rward line K<>' '' %  %  baU at %  m ii %  acond 1 S i stage St iss I %  they were able i<> keep tteeki until ball ti in The Saeond Hall i*i >,.„, aftai >II* ' SUrflah l ft win JJJ %  Ooldfl h fJJ I rite Who was on top (O na needed a cornei. Iit IM i ulted. %  Cioldflsti were now showInK %  r. %  <' imdai tanduig ll I IIIISI in th** ADVOCATE High Blood Pressure Kills Men & Women far frmn lli S n Wi-.l I'r.uur., , laaa of memory aad taai p •aaily atcllad. frar and worry. IT you %  ufl-r an> or Ih'sa ayanpiotna. den I drla> Irpjln.i nt a alr.flr day. bacavBaa >'.ui l.f:r_. \, r m dangar Maac* lto.r.„fly known u H)iwil. a n*W -iiadiUl d.a. ...r> (rdi,, ,% Hl,1 Blood 1 i"un nun tnr-iiai duaa, (ara a luayy Uad off lf>r h-jrt. and makaa rau f-l yrat. .ounfr m a f.w daya. cmypro OM NDKO from ) ll H ii^r-nic.d la aui ya ar.J >uwn M money aa.1*. m }JJ ia—T*i*un IIANDK \r— m damn !> "• % % %  rm,%C '-PUMI %  > r*a\ta i", ra*. — ir • Sunlone J Mary Ann JJJ Dulclbella _' %  Collaion ii—oiariN aTAKia-iu Uavolte !!: Mi— roand.hip I. fail ItaUi Will,a,.,, b Kariiui Oiimiti r (..ll I. ralmar M Hrl % %  % %  i %  b i M out William> ^iKriit n flaaa > IIBtAI Tall ,.' -ukvi. hi m %  %  a TV, ami IT4 Ma'i-h da V..f.-hir.^ smtland at I BaeUand m and in. Varki gfl for I wlcfeai Voik.hlrp ..n U> 1 wWkal ill if... ll; a hH .1 l^lMlaa ii-atwABirAKt— *) i udAtaaai. H .11 am iaaMU (I a %  . r — itrhiabaihan 73 >V -at MMaa BTAKBa— h Bltiiim>n> • i la ii \ti lU %  < %  Qllt -U-1 w.i" HairLoni h Sally '•. .i.i >• I'I.I.I• ihah and Lw Nd lo Ntlr .tat. I. Rain pre..nt,.i ,.i n WedneaB r ; day and Tb ll \uek in the ,H imubUy rinabi tor the Y K n,.,.,K,., a deUm i Summer* •*;•* '*-" hayoa Lawn Tcnnli Tounuunant .ii j r*mm r-M aui Thl-s nature will take place today ut 4J0 pjn The couplea are l> W W %  J. S. B. Deai v C l< E, Warn* und L, A. ilulihins-.n Veslerdin's KesiiltVH \ ~ -IM.II •* Ir. "i F R. Att. 8 %  . t'.' Balm -TBAIAI.OAB BTAKF— < thin playen interi I during pla.v Ttn ..ii came from %  ho once again beat thi "4todlan Joan Ghent. With the hall back ll Itarflah were first on It I need into the Goldfish goal .i determine'! eflorl HUT well piaead allOUl from th' S'liflsh forwardi. how* i %  II plopiied by the (iolil kee it irbai i Hunt.Tha ha a at once again trans) Ihe Starfish goal area Bl i r elee in front of the St. i I%  1 urth and Ana! goal el Ihe match %  feree was Mt Second iiiinuia> Tha second guna IP I n itlng a& the first, but it vj J" neverthalaai .1 good matt Nymph* u iln tl < I %  seven showed woa) hive been able to BCCoUaPalSh h.i they iH'ii abui t" put In Un 1 rtronaeat team In the water '" every game. Mary Km I Hetty Willi.on. in tl iS i>ack line played a fighting garrn .ind it was chU'i!) due loth -•rf.i-.i work that l ''' %  were kept at a safe 01 "waTi, M • %  Ml irakr ihe scoring earl) 111 tha Brat half return Lady Jean Chandler trt %  *hct from just inside the half-wa) mark. The ball struck th bar and Into play Grenada Nelball minutes lab r Robot .1 determined awlm-through, ball and goa l k e ep er Into tha K oal to score tinI At half tin %  If] lapha ;' Met n al I. Joyo Kikstcm and Pal Manet 1 N.mphs in thai %  After the |nt< >" tnl^* n MiPanlr Fair Salh On-llit,K Pin Sweat Bi.k. No to-Hlb lour Opens Ttntuy The team which haa beer hoaan lo 1 nt I rbad the Nelball Mutch %  gall u.ut.i tinlay ut S.OO p.m. at gi ft Cotltae ,. .is follOWl — 111 S Ii 0 o 1 e 1 riiclma ll.HKci ; 1... .e Jea„ i handfe Cen^,4 ,„ ineraaoi then .score. J —sey. Defending ChBn(1 i er w ..ughoul Maine and she am %  i %  ,. %  11 ah and l.iBOWl IM. IN ml raiB Yesterday's Weather Report FROM HM.loN RBlnfall: .01 In. Total Rainfall lur nnuillt to dale : 4.M ins. IIUjhel Irmprrallire : 8i.S lolM-l I .Ill-.-IT lllll. : 14.S •F \. 111,1 \>loeil> : 11 mile* per hour. Direction V I M I I'. ....in-1. 1 (Sam) %  • %  1 Cl p.m.) J KIM I n : 11 vnm ft H,.|H. 1. Farmer %  1 ... a r> WUie .." run mil %  %  %  ., %  %  1: 11-.I. ,. I now MM. s*nni 1.11X1F. Ind lMUHa> ; KiAtilr I. William, (lianl %  • Wllllami li Mr lleaill llUlrlllX Mr. Ilradlr* .V .1II J". l.c I.1. Mr ll-adlei VTilktC Al b Mt llradN-i OKI c niaikitmi. I> Bmlth Margaret It nn Centre; Kathleen Conn "• Patricia It.-I (Captalnl W" ~ 'lialkeepei Bevel lei It ia OftatNADA ROVFRS CUR TSAU Shooter: Joyce ilia. >\\ Blleen La Hae, Attacking cent.. Uma Wiismi. Centra Doreei alttena, Defendlna Centra %  fence: Angela Andrew Ikeepei Dorothea Syl They'll Do It Every Time PbVBCT Auas, PlAUSBLZ xrs MARK TriE LITERAL EFFORTS OF RanoNey QUOTTS— • ll*adia> 1 1 II Ha. I.i N Wllhir WHAT'S ON TO-DAY I %  1. %  at IIMrirl "Hinto Deatt ol Charlea Mr ( BOBaj — 10 a.m. I'nliie CaaWta and Juvnillr ( ourls — 10 a.m. !lr-llrn of the llouiini: Board — 10.30 a.m. old Beys' Dinner al Marine I Intel I u^t Intermediate and Sreaad Mvaalaai Crtekei jt thr raeaaoa gnaaali — 1 p.m I iist Division | 9] artan al %  %  rnplra V M i' C. at Hall 1 nl1 al Carl%  llaga al Lodge %  Combermere % %  .I. .....;. ,! %  : Cabl. va. Emalrt t Boa lad Hall 1 ntal Hospital vs. Pickwick at Black Hock Spartan at Ga I : • I Se-md DIvKlon : ;r vs Lodge at %  Foundation vs. Wanderers at Foundation Carlton at FRENCH DRESSES I'la in (.0I11 in in Triplr .IITM'\ SijeIS. II. III. IS • Slri/ietl Jerseywith Rlatdc Wateti Si/t-i 12. II. III. IK • Slri/ietl Jersey wilh Hurril Skirls Si^es 12. U. 16. IK Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street PROVIDE lEIMAIII.r PROTHTIOV FOR F.XTFRIORS AND IIK.H II VM> BPBCOA1 PAINTS For exterior* and Interior*. Grey, Dark Orrr. B'doa Licht A Dark Slonr Oak Brown. RED HAND PERMANENT GREEN Willi Ore) underrostlna. RED HAND MVTINTO FLAT OIL PAINT For Inlrrlor*. Cream. While. Green. %  ED HAND tONCRFTE FI.OOK PAOfTfl Grei Mid Green. Brifh' Red. WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO.. LTD. 1



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-\il RDAY, Jll\ at, 1HI Tribesman SaiJs From SpeighlstoHii 'TWO Wl EK8 i activity I' Ird nn Tribeam HI .iiod from that port I' K. bourj. During the twu wraaka. Speightsb 7 90u tons shlppej : :ps was the Canmlii.ii CanrMktcr hich lode. %  !.'.r,i dMcnes. %  '! iih Md Tivwes' Koing to bring the frtheinien and i I'l caused .n the l>'>rl. arts, whuh .luring :hr v.K'ks were Lideri with sugar lime and again and rushec through the the Jetties TH1 MM of m-king T ll their p irking spot table market .s not popular with Mess>v i{ ft C i quite a number of hawkers of City of Husby %  their reasonI ; KM at 1 Tiolhe* ware no! running the %  :is frequently. Sugar wrkm Ol Speighlstown, i,i hc in an no tdli • %  daj while % %  :' • .. %  lag phraseJof another sug.ir ship at tl .( men) with Ihdi MOWA -luppinn clerk %  lid thai he dUl "Diva us .i piopei i; .knotj when gnothai ship was! we wilt i %  |ng to cay al Speiciitslown. bu; Id i al think the Tribesman ould have been tin l.ist lo call where near Drumoi StfO %  %  Alia) I.I. n ii .. In Bu > Alley for 27 I .-. moved from there to be carried to "raw Tempi,Y 'F!m^ do they expt I stomach the rawneei GOBkuu from the Us!' markot?" she asked. "An:l then there wlU 1 day wir ; i the puncheons." I the paper a %  thai n WH I covering lha spot, "II would be useless laovlng us from Busb" Alley to i spol in Tempi. V 1 when the iatn f.iils WO t.m Bnd %  i n Busby Alley—and we Wi lid iexposed to much more sun". Mildred Jordan. ..outlier hawk of long standing i said that thi %  kct is a good one but the site w.v BQggn. "Why don't tha on the seaside", she said. "I will be Hilling -it anytime to now* n ) %  Busby Allay lo but not in Taa i v R AIN FULL ever* daj weak; up tii TbunKbq %  THE GOVERNOR, Sir Alfred Ssvitgr. declare* \ht Br*t 'chool for UV ll id oprn t the Hnrd M'tnril School. JaniM gtrcot, yesterdayH.E. Opens School For Blind At Hurd Memorial School St Peter, the greatest fall being 'xi when an bit %  was recorded at District 'F.' Poiue Station. The rainfall returns at that police station were 1 inch. 78 parts Up to Thursday evening. Fort..!l\c parts were recorded for Thursday. Planters of the parish said tha' the showers jyg/% Urneh and come'Triey had just got through the crop and were waiting for showers to plant food. The early part of tin* m eith HTM dry and in some pirtof the parfalh i iToons had begun to look withered. The showers of rain have given those iieids a "greener h>Mk." S PFIGltTSTONIANS have been getting little fish 'luring this month. Fishing boats have been Busby Alley goinj; to the banks but reiurnuiK of m.kni. l.wtth small catches of flying rum and bigger fish. Fi'hcrmcn are hauling up their fishiim boat* on the beiches. but they still go out daily in *moscs' %  if their fish nots and they bring back large catches %  ami d '.vs. Some fishermen are U net fee catching fry. | and other small llsh. Fry are becoming plentiful. THE FIRST SCHOOL for blind people In !' < pened yi-;erday al the Hurd Mem. rial Scl 10I Ii I UK S':.' by the Qovernor Sir Alfred Sgva i TMs hag been done mainly through tht < Betty Aim-. S--.ivl.ny ol the AlSOCiatlOfl In aul of the Blind. the hiai" and the Dumb, Sir Allan Collymore, President of the AaaoctBtiOfl wi lo med tin 1 <: ivernojr and Lady Savage after which Mn H. A. Vaugtun, Acting H": rarj &KTtttx; -< ahoii history of the Association. more con be sent at pre^< School has reached |he iimd of its capacity The School however i^ eitpectlni a nt .in.l larger bulldlni ii tinnew futun win continue its pnllcj tn| other nandfcai ped children from the nalghbourini I training there. Teaching (he Deaf is a LoOsJ BBM arduous task, and Miss Yuille tho r II n *i.. s %  %  in Trinidad has worked wonders with our :s who have all improved since their stay there T in IIK;II\VAV OOHMISSIOMRS of SI J.i still widening and levrlluir. their road lony Highway i. Most of their activities yesterday were concetrtra1e<| on the %  i,P Lane Ba:l Site Mildred raid thai -ih travelled among II Wl Islands and in ever; i one .if tl that *he saw as sh> e the others to agree i'ii her win*he said "i wouki ni>t mind if tran put up a maiket at Tud i ii arould be a good area for trade." A hawker joined In "Do you thing that a clerk of any of thew More* that wants something would go all the wav dOWrl I Yard for it It would be much Be fur her lo Just come into the BUOy and g*t whul IB* wants." Ntoej I" Urave, who sells at the . cornet ol atentn ' F. Harriaon I there to paga, Mini ihai rite baa bean • V/flSS KLA1NF. JORDAN. I.ihr.'ihas never known Barbados to -Lvl nan of the Siipightstown proper vegetab:,market ; Free Library, is on a week's leave. She said that she has always; Mr. Lambert Archer is now in associate i I Yard with lishi charge of the library. aral pigs and not a place fur a' kmarket. She knew of about 300 other hawkers whj would be ill %  %  proper market where they would be well protected Iron the ram and sun. These hawkers would, however. "pri ft i io aet wet by rain nnd then dried out by the sun at their opotg In the alley* than to be well covered at Temple Y gettliv: fP* sulcs when the day* i-t".. Nicey felt that .with the number of people that might be going down lo Temple Yard, the murket would be always ionirestt-.t and uncooifortal i> A man who was selling fruit in a pu ii eaniwa because be ...uld >" I An %  'II Qoverri the Rt. Km Bl hop *. I. c; Mandevtlle bleeaed 'he buUdlns. followed by tiReport 11 eaaum Mi v I by Mr. C. A. L. r.aie. Vice Prealthe Association. sn All..ii Collymore raid: "It iUegja :<< welcome Sir Allred and Lady S..vage here to-day. My t'ommitte.grateful to you for yoUl and to the Governor for having •'. <>|>en this 1 email beginnmi;s, U m hoped to expand, enlarge and to give greater service to %  rvlngj s.',.i,or. 11 munity The aim of the centre Is to in-ill irrater self rontirienrr In the pupil>o preetie them with oeiupatinnal inti-ro-1na Indeed to endeavour to niakr their live* happier jnd more ulrisaiit. Thiinks I Tbe %  aabll hmeni eatn 11 largely due t" tin* inlu %  < %  who is ;iv.';r. mi leave, and urif" cannot be present to-day, Bl* ha been ably assisi.il by Mrs Vaughan who now .i our c Training for Uw Blind—In 1B18 o BUruJ Barbadian, Qei was sent by the Aaroctatlon lo Trinidad for braining. Our thanks go to the Trinidad & Tobago Blind welfare Aaaoctatlon who were reapo n alble (or Ur. Scott's 1 Oeorge Scott, aged 38 n Eckstein's Village, St. Midi-i-l. 10 In (us early years hiBaal ted %  teaching al si s-. Bog School, ijter he worked at ovid'i %  i Shop In IM3 he totn.l tlie INS on the Mam Hem* 9 his sight. On Inn return [<> (Torts he taught if (llltll 11' ......'..... -. .-... % ... O-O I % %  %  IS 111l.lll"i I I. ( roacl !" yerea by San.lv ,„UMand has mii.ie nil tho „.;„! bralllt in Ih. I I ipaci P tree I me half of the coad biockmi by coin* drama, In pft fine Hones und the roud workers' tools, while a rock oruahei waa levelling the other half. '.'eiiules could not move along tti t reed freely. At sometimes. .• vehle'e had to stop before entering the strip of road under repairs How another already GET COMMENDATION CERTIFICATES THE Commissioner of Police Colonel R. T. Michelm presented Harbour Police Constables Gill nd Philips Of the Bridge Post. Bay Street, with commerii(a'..u:i %  ertificatcs on Thursday morning. ale at Central Station. The) received these certificate"; for detective work and zeal winch wed when they successlull, investigated :i srase of larceny of a bicvele from the t'.mpirc Theatre Two hundred and five officer' IBd men attended the parade. inaarnente for thie simple cere(about three weaaa, and laiai on m ny__ .. .... /also taught himself lo writ) Not The efrorts of these , B | Uhe ; n |, owi ^ b |„ ll|nr would have piwved in vain, had d [ U milicai he heloe.l not been to -he read a. JSSut^nwa. bTnai. tion and kind. , c' „ y ,'. and Pro,>ertv Board ol the JamM PWllnf, Scott spent the I .,i Well ire i Ml %  Uarriaon. H;.pp> My Wife ipp) u> give out .ipport I.. | .t %  -ik. more %  %  %  tend of our> who toe) war. much, v..! Boergj that he and many Fined 81 1.10 For W ouiuliiii! %  default I" .m I I! 1 W.i. befanll "i %  %  %  %  %  %  %  I laud 1 %  I oi %  Grant adi %  I I %  ail (ii u that peoi in ; I H, man who wai Ol.iu.ii : \ir. E. \. Maynard %  %  %  Mi Mayn ird who will %  l.nlml". \il\n..itf%  tars 1 to tint* %  : %  %  111 191ft DRINK & ENJOY i COOLING ft REFRESBING /i 24''-IN •'-*''*'.'.'^,',-**,',o',',',',-,',',',' •,',''-'.'•.'. % -. %'.'. Ilfililrliim Xfl.-r f 331/3% Stwft # / §t in f§ e Bum %  %  %  it were that fR %  tn learn that ilmUarly, Mi . erg) nd %  I ive. hu put hi %  .'. poaluon In U In relation to big fellow men and women who ere i Iralli rlj handl' •hcitnt ihorti onple wUJ w to an otl i %  that will enable them with IIU 1 "abland The i up o1 I I icee In the life t.l bit! Hi wai %  %  %  tnd ifti i .... efuni t Auri.aHur.t Beperl > ei l'h. i idVO Ml i %  hi M nt ihorth %  THERMOS PICNIC SETS tnunlt) %  '.\ Vaughan rah rred to the >r us all to I < May i %  A-ords 'cross the l be uoed m more than %  That we help by our %  I we help where by buying the articles mar|e. but WO '."I help taking a real Ii %  I whenIT ...,nave in opportunity, wt opportunity tn i born and ond out how thej are imirresssing In their new life I have great pie m in oeclar•:l I. a '. P I M RAINS HOLD UP FOOD (MOP PLANTING SI'MK M WAGERS ol plantation! In country districts. told the Advocate veeiterday that they are now planting r. canes are coming on very well i .oiis, however, have held up ploughing in some i coming on very well indeed Mr. J. N tviikle of Cottage Plantation, Bl George, said thai they had lard 11 acrei They had also planted 4 acres of corn. "We should have %  %  on account of the late > • the crop and iin recent rainfall. | was held up. These have the sant. adioining plantations and also on %  • of whose %  • Good Outlook Mr. Wilki. .i Lag well When asked about the prospect of next :' the rum* continue ntudactorlly, I fee! sure will be as %  Mr. c; A O rl la Of Sturgess and Bloomsbm Thomas, said thai to plant yam*, notatoes and other %  fortunately got through with their ploughing befof The contrary was the case -* Bloomsbury. The rat< %  . %  itl.er I think that the weather in the months %  September will have .i derided enect on next said Street Methodist ChUJ h W. deeply grateful to them for h, granted us the uf CM %  • i There %  e reveral whom debts of gratitude are due. but I shall not length. I would however mention thl XI %  Trt uurei gtw service and his only regret i-^ shored bv all meml.' | Committee i. that he has not sufficient funds to handle. That '—inn the i be made to secure more Uona and doaetloni to our fund. We have with us *his momlng apart from the Comnuttee. Mi-.Pickering. She has shown tremendous interest in Uv from the time of its ine<-( %  attend 1 almost daily to assist in work. I think that is all i i r, in a abo in gratitude lo you. Su IIIK en • taking an Inter* work. I shall ask you to formally "! %  open Mrs. Vaughan in givll bJatol v of tl Voliinlarv '"The proposal to form the Ilarbados Association in aid of the Blind, the Deal .mo the Oumb 'cepti'd at a public aftir the need for siu.'i an USOcuitlOn was shown by the Rev, F W, O. 'oily. M A during hi ay In the latte part of 1844 I appointed. Association ii aid of the PUnd. Qea| and Dumb is J voluntary Aaaoclation buawei In cl ration witn government. Constitutionally the Committee is attll In a to .:h the S-. ,,il VV.-'f., Officer ai Hon s. retary, The Fsociatlon has a Committee of 12, '•mberf' — Sir Mian Collymore Pi Ml Louis: Gale— Vlcr-I Mr John Heckles. Dr. J. P O'Mohony, Mr. Kenneth Tucker. H <; Cumn bu nr c. H SI John. Mr*. Hen \*-. re, M C G need. Mis* B %  Hon. if i %  oiling a rej the Blind, Deaf nnd Dumb In I I. ] "his effoi' religion, doctora and other publiciitided citizens helped. In 1946 ital of 502 % %  . Training Itesl and Ihimb--The Association agreed that it would conceit%  training of the juvenile Deaf. 6ve doldren tending the School for the Deaf ind Dumb in Trinidad. This was [i l* i pleamraii lihai.kim: thank.-. ll. d) I 'tori iv cntre in Trinidad ih -i.is now returne I small ii.. for bUrn Illlt JH'I,.,. Hurd Memorial Bchool J n Street Tne centre opeo l with <> dents but since work hI n) have had applicatmi other blind pereoni It I n the lirst instance t.. ', blind how torc-. !" -.it efe Un ll li in i ane i bain an %  'I -...:,• teach braille to thoat who apable. AII the itudesd *ith while walking eticka, tOOhal -. they can perambulate Indep i ently of human guide i %  "" ''' ero kuand %  sees carrying walking stick, balplni them i cioss tinroad hoard bu* Pleased the vote i; i. Gale raid i am %  %  and brtet duty ad Yi in Cxcelk s v go %  •; comii I %  r.., i %  i \ ... latton I bellevi that with the cooperatlon of the communllv. I ;this centre Will help t f |to the blind and i)i el time, add a numbei ol useful eltl< l NELSON LEAVES ON SUNDAY %  La f.i i HU Nessaa ., load ol %  i t ti Bunday nllhl .. the British Northmudu FRUIT COMES Finance The Association H i vol tary Bociet) whan ad by gow %  '. bul u Committee must also depend i the goodwUl or the publh si %  fully received and aekno \ %  i her rrom Bl L i the motor veaeel liaerM*od. PhC llaerwoog brOU about mi p.n kage i < tn h ft uli UaO lUerwood 1.1 of rnal I7i tnd a quanta %  itINSIST I at ON hi %  I'lmighing; Ml • Clarke of the Itock Plantation. St Peter said that many of the JKI (cultural labourers are now gaged in ploughing the Held and setting manure to the young canes. Good progress is being made In regards to this work on the plantation so that a good crop can he had. such as the last H N all the labourers are working on ,:.aie. and perhaps working on the and then storing it About three and a half acres of the Held arc taken up with the growing of yarns. The receht heavy rainfall has impeded the progress of work on the plantation as the majority of workers stay at home on I very rainy day. The rain has also held up the ploughing of the field and there Is still much work to be done In regards to this branch of work. No complaints have been coming from the labourers and no fights m the fields have occurrtd lately Another planter of Christ Church said that they are also preparing for the next crop. The )afree ,| to as it was found much Held at present is undergoing a itoo expensive for Uie society with overhaul" and labourers limited funds to launch out into 'major era working well clearing away ccen trash. There is sUH some ploughing to I Hall's Plantali Hi the vnung ratoons arc *hev were springing up well. If the weather now manuring the land and plantpermits, a good crop like the last ing food crops. The raioon canes is expected. fiited %  chool of its own when existed in .. island. The Assoclatim Dumb in Trinidad has kindly consented to accept our deaf children. Unfortunately no I'I mvi mow* THEY ARE THE BEST I H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. Agents -but „ =nl V^ m %% Mm ; yloi Within %  trui h ii"i ease and iftet i hureday HU funeral took ptaci • %  Hi leavi repeal ih; be ex• i dad BASKETS VALISES ATTACHMENT CASES ZIPP CASES < ii i.'in.i! Price mm Price now Price now Price now Price now Price now Price 25.110 IBM i:i.im 24 00 Hi.lMl 13.M M.M IK.IHI 18.68 Ill.Otl KMI.III S I.I'll. .'.'-*,*-*,***-*,*-*.' ;--'-',-,',**',--*,• You SAW SI."It II tin Klhl 1'lHVIlHlf l Mil K Ir.-'h Slork III REDUCED PRICE VISII llll \Y PRICE SG.9K ptff tin TO-IOYS PUCE II.M ft Un DELICIOUS SWEET BISCUITS lllr. pi-r |ik. in ri-lloj.l, in CUSTARD ( REAMS MII.K AMI RONE1 OINOEB s\ U's c URRENT rom NEILS0NS Ran Boa i-r ku N.it Id.IK l.'< Ii... ( lnrr> Cram* lie i. i Hilled Milk lie. I..i M0IRS Pianppli li< l>... llllllllll'S II. r.'PiM'rniiiii Palliai Ih. I..,i JACOBS CREAM Crarkan si in nvrViiiMiiinii tfUBD vr& >\\* ox to* Qotvce ^ Paces we have the ZOI loll \ fragrant with M oils, sacs I powerful | rgly antiseptifloral ide for purifying the Lag i" I'ubllf Oftler*. MttiM, Faetorles. Wareind in tl HMie. Available In 1 perfumes Llll Carnation, i Zof lora


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SATURDAY, ll I V %  ,. -ajl KAK1IAIMIS MlVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS. ,,,,MM V%LKS *• TILCFMONi ISO* Tfca charge loi > r-4,fmruii Birtb*. MarriaBea. !..MUMnU. and In - DII w.e.-J... Ml N lac any numtor of >mw up to u 1 CWU per Word on 4 tMU per word on S. additional word rr Birth*. Martian a* BnCaaani WiixpbncanwnU i Cenb Cal.in* char,HUM for -i.. number l wo W < M and • rente per *ajSSsBaSatl --a lftmi caeh Pfcoaae UN *ef*een 130 .nd 4 p re. ML i...,,. Malic** aj| aft.' | DIED lltVWUKll itJ1 A %  A atM Ti . the abm, atfdreae for 81 C-. % %  | %  %  %  THANK-. I..*-,-.-' -,-:„. ron in M%  %  BEAL ESTATE BOUSES LAND AT ST kH i iMMfcM -,. %  CI.IPTON TWKf \ Uppri Bay iid Aqi.atlc E ...liable ilara n-ui> -lapho*. B ,j7 or *,„ -HOIJ^MnflK at-ndine, n •nd Bath i w I 'I -if n IB.. 1 I ihi and "' %  tailed Ciaieee %  | I. 1ST. ..I'.. ... I • ,.. -re* wry room at B#l Airy F tr rolled %  ind II-III. Iuw ., tm pallnei. n ba*" 1 i I iaajf m Du.1 ami:lONDixm-KV i-ol ••..-,,.. %  • of land .1 u-e ''%  %  i li.. lion apply on ,.., part.cuUr,^ppi, H IT. lli\s.,v Ml lni-*-. further A BAN I' On tlie fie*. St Lr*n* iVaTda DkaJ BJS7 tdr, m IX MEMORIAM t'l ARM: w. HM .:T .-,„,,.,-, %  '. *lr-eere appreciation In all th<>* friend* who attended. K ,.t I Oil SAI > AUTOMOTIVE %  %  pc>eeelon i "* and id wilh **.epi auaaj Apply lo '•"'in'lanf Dial M4J. T 91-3., %  •I'lH.M Ml 114 IS I %  r A.VXH.M >:Mi:vrs HCit.ifiAY RRAOBTS rr.,„da 1 ,lr ol Splrea. SANTA HA III raiibbe,.-. jr.-,*,.. Iraan 17 00 per head] par day GRAND MoTEI.in beat mldehUal dutrlct u> I. *SM par HMd pay day. id Aner IUthii.( MAStDR INN-Oi Be-eh II dav Cnqjinaa to li M s On iada. 51 Ian a.osr A FOi \i> LOST MKE TICKFT" S.., %  ler pleaac ralurn %  -frl-. Ki'K Ahl>Allev. Street "| WAMjrr gases iwaan Ho. %  hi Herbert %  VI 7 SI In GOVERNMENT \0TNES APPOINTMI M or DENTAL SOmOEON, GENERAL linsi-lTAL %  Uoni IN invited fut the part timv non pamloiialTic apM'Uilnu-nt of Driital SUIRCUII ticiu-,.,1 rlotpltal, will, %  >m WMUll -n 111 ScpU-niln-i ISSt. TI..* niiliiij alUtcltcU to Uic I'l'tMiintmcnt % %  $uBO per nnnum The duti.s of this officer will consist of the trentment of inpatients referred ty I, | limited number of dtntal extret'ons for out-pal Au.iriKvniciii.s may be made With thlf OffiCaW ff.r OaldltiotUl %  u for out-paltaou .it ;, flx>?d rate of payiTatnt. Full particulars nf the appointment mav be obtained from the Medical SupermteiHli'nt. ?,, whom applications %  bOUld :, rOTWOTdaMl by 31nt Julv. 1951. OH .51.—3n. 1MVIHSITV COLLEGI HOSPITAL OETBE Ulsr INDIES, : \i \it v it w.i. itod froas Consultant Specialists f"r honorary posts at iKirt-time specialists ,,t t.V I'niveisity College Hottpltail, [n tin' depart) Ophthalmology, Ear. Nose and Throat Surgery ind D for one In thr ilrst insian.'-. Tiie Specialists app" : by speci..: with the i College f,f iiic West IndaW, (-• raqi 11 %  i innjx clalt ; 'ion for %  ible %  • the UniC0llfH of the \V Further Lni on may be .btained fn>m be University Colleee of the %  %  Mai.ager and Sot I Applications ihOUld l>e sent to the Hospital Manager 11 lory, Um. i Hospital, Mona. J. n before the 30th of September. 1951. 21.7.51—2n. ill C-r 1* •>. in ondition. For paTriioiUr* t I r.v.!,n. Audit I>,panrnaiil ^^^^ asT.si— CHw Vauxhali IB done oi If*. Ilka %  . Photi, laui S 4af Cyril Stout,-. MT SI—I i ......a.,,,, M afa-da-,1. SELF An BU.p.r'anrrd V' %  r Manor li .. %  M Mead Ua on ol c( ;, i "HI to Mow Light Through Chemistr) I'M.I -IMV Reds Take Time Off %  UaM ,-•..' .-nn, ftmn -• for %  lUt Mill %  .otMal lad arl ^ld Ihr 3,-r, ,.,i CerHfj %  alnad a* a oaM ..mtdwillind to ll,i G PO %  %  3* T 51 3r> .... '" %  • %  Appt, m >aur on %  ndwrntnc in ti„ f : ., m.UMCe 1 HAll.illl PRirt-FIUIS A fii 1 TI) %  %  %  IVIH -IM ,, s ,,,s %  I be ., Clenaral Meelni| ,4 Mnndd) 30th J11I at 5 p m tl win : UfJ I SI CABS llillman Aaloon* 1MB, i(M7 at W. Slrufr Sporta Modal. Wolaalcy '.-5 %  nd Monit '• Saloon. Telrpho. IIS Cole \ Co Ltd. 11 7 tl 71 CARS Renault —,W i 're* and condition e; 7.000 nil, It ..% %  .-. ISM 1 employ •( : 11 |B •l-.wera tk %  .1 '. < M.,i. 11. 11..„ ih priCM UMO 00. IJUOOOO reaper. ilvlned ol lurtli. prkion future ahlpntrni* CMkai Caraie 1 IBWi Ud-. PlltfaM fitiert M 7 SIIn -> Varuruard Pick. PCaah pfffM .*. VI Ne.t %  hipmr.H will bB MOW 00. inters..' >Ppo,t unity *• %  1 OM tB* i""1 LH BXECTBIC \L FLECTRlC MOI'M HI* to 7', HP MO Volt* X ( ralM, 3 Phaw Dial 3a1 UaCoaU A % %  11.1 BMc tr l e al %  %  i-1 u T l| ;> BUSCT uc rtrrmofi .'in*-1 a* 1 ii(iit E-ertro4wra. Scenl-lndirert Mo* Llshl Brirkd*. Table Lunpt 1 1 a M h dj ."Strfi ^ Hu and without hot al. Da Co*U a Co. Ud. Electrical Oeparl 14 t 51 —Cn NOTFCK %  AJUi Mills Till AS.I-, tM til RT „l ll'l \t .., %  *" •• %  •••••H" Art. iaai Woiic-i. I* nere-by B"en thai Aloni* r.oodm-f. an Enmieer former y reatdlna ChurCBI. died a. a re* U |t ol W),.,, !" wiained .hen from a ladder dm %  %  tra* -.1 Michael and that oompenMnon n.ibeen paid inlo Court All dependant* of the aj %  Unar ideceaMd, W appear at u. Ara-Unt Court ol Appeal on Wednesday the and day „r Audu.t if£|. .1 m o-cioek am Dote-I lh„ Mm day of July 1041 A W HAlil'F.ll Clerk A..i.lant Court ol Appeal MISM-.I.I.A.Nr.OlS HANTEII TO R\T BWHOAI %  1 children One rp-nia* -" %  • %  % %  %  drlth %  r loni period. Addreaa particular* to MB P '> Be IM. M 7.51 -on "AMlli Hi ill > 1 "iood paleea paid Apply to Mr*. Vaua-hiCorier ol Pair-child and Pro! TRAiLOR Second II able to be drawn by tractor phone 1417) %  I || -. NOTICfc IS 'it Kl r.v 11..,1 n upon pan %  ITden-ioi*a Paatl I of Reed Street in Ihe Cit. „f Brld-feto-a-n. ho died In Ihi* laland 1,11 the ISO, dav of April 1MB Inteetatc. ... hereby rqurrd to „„)n particular, of their (irinu duly mte.ted to Timothy Theo. phiiu.11.Mn:. :,.tee of ihe l*U>*d of Ba M %  aon A> BanAeid. M Mreei I'lidHrtown. on or before the 3r. %  %  '..I U :Y. Tntatee. Qualified Adrr.mlftrator ol (he Fatal ol Ik.ui.-r I..,.a Foater-Turtor itaaaarj |S IM—I NOTICE i\ IHI --i-r un „, m 01 Mil kj Re s ha (n ( ,a,p,. tl ,|„ Arl la. I llOI-rfl, I p that Co.. Court. All ' %  %  %  %  laftl. at ter, o'clock J D.itcd thia .ii, daj c.id UM %  %  itant Court ol App,-. LIVESTOCK %  l.il.KhS AB Clerk. A t A %  > Alpine DM rii-t litter Applv St. M M raaadl 1 fie*l> In milk M 1 si-ai %  •"' LIQIOK LICENSE NOTICE MECIIAMCAr. %  I Hall. St MISCELLANEOUS A MM-1 DENT TOOTH PABTC larl uvlng your Amrn-l-derl Toot*te Do*ea. Wllhin a abort wblle you t be the winner of one ol the followl*t l*riie ISO 00. 2nd Prtre tIS 00. P"" * "* %  1.7.11-Mn %  M %  • % %  '! Hall. SI J*iey and to u.e it at • %  laal daaenbed premlarDatm thii )Mh day ol Jul', IMI VICTOR HINDS. Appluaril II M'HKC. taq. Dial Ma* NO SHOOTING ,iue to the Cadet Camp there ill be no shooting practice nt irSmall Ilore Rifle Club today Wednesday. WE ARK BUYERS We buy anvtiun* c-onitected wlUi STAMPS. Sheet*. SlnBle SUmpa. Collection'. AceuiLMiation* anl Cowojra, Good prlc-* Paid at the t \.iiu.l '. *-TAMP aOI'IKTY SE HABI.A Ci OIIILATAI. CURIOJ. SOUVENIRS. ANTIQUES. IVORY, JEWELS, SILXS lie. THAjrrs lilNOCUI^ns f or lrt (bare, l-i Hrllolllh Prlun. S fold • ?J MM with blue coal IT • i MM Made in Oerman* SSI I'M.ce Weather head Ud M.I SI ^-3i 1 .,ppiiratlo Un and !1 00 per Lib Un Get a Un to-day from your roeer or Drvi Store and try the be.t milk obtainable The B-Ib family MM 1. really economical. Inatat on ••Farm'' for the *ake of your health and your pocket If your dealer cannot aupply phone 2220 fi SI tf ,, Keep r*il n with Joh-iMn* i,. 1 .-1 a 1 M 1 M -Sn Vigour Restored, jSands Made Young !n 24 Hours %  k. aaaj ... 10 ...-I ti,..troutilee. %  %  to-tnko tablet 101 'arml-aa, ,].*. away with aJai.J operatlono aid l< Mil %  do Ionia l Art Debate LONDON. lul) Traditional arts and crsitl boa liM • 11, v. now on show at the Imperial Institute have le,l not -niy to unstinted ; • %  : in lAindon. The view haj iprt nee, that the Ife heads rrorn Benin (Nls>arla) an ihe works of BAiropaatu ind nol Afneauw. In this school of U ll'iuv Moore, the well-known sculptor. Wt-ii now. wiui .h,i make |fi it.h.. di %  Ware laas] rveral srtlsti or i>> one sri I A panel of art experts aiKued the pit's and ' "" at the Imperial Institnt.' tins ..,-,-k After COaa" %  (lei.ilikucademic Juit*" tl 1 '•"" % %  • '-" the conclusion th.it (haj sculptures from Rcnin are the work, of African sculpUna. Mr. O. HrniinlotE, Cumtor Of the British Museum, raised aaothei eonUvvenial point when he stated that in the Colonies. **,iks of 1.1 are not producetl primarily for aesthetic reasons The funil.nn.itt^l principle of AMCSI il.iiiiicil, is fum tiori.il. He vs.1-ttiini'.i; ,,(,,„-..,1 bs ^: Kenneth Murray, Head %  >( the Department of Antmuitie:. Nlgertsi Mr. William Flff, Assi11 • Keeper, Britlsfa Uu %  took sities ssjatnst h' Brli I .. %  aid, "always Bjorne in .ill |iih;il 1 1 it no singii iradhaon In AMean arl the • is .i variety ol tradition uiul t. %  Lslrnsd that the artl tie exceUei % %  of African art i* conipiinilile i. n art. Dui IIIB; the debate c-ueslions discussed included Ihe dilf.i-t... bet%veeO the emotional and inlel lectual approach lo art and the aesthetic standards of Europe and Colon! The Rrowing appreei.r.."ii nf Colonial arts and crafts by people IB Hnt un was commented upon by arl critic chairman. Mr r Wendy. He hoped that more enc-ourajiemcnt would lie KIV.II ti Coloni.il artists. Pt> I.IIIN \ (Mil s I %  % %  %  kens >,, hen Llling to 1 -tiled a longer %  %  r,ir pi "i ihe tune that the Ucated Bre t" das%  me n* fire .' -nun.,.f ,,iiillumtnation until iveli Into II.en the pmeni <*i eaectrie porwei e possil-hA 1 '-lie in %  I hrthiniK. ihe ...u-d with the kavancenMM is. n.rse, thai of r %  liter, 1 IH'.H. Edison > ; lni %  issc en i iig **"*^ m si Hi 1 1 r irk N< R fai froo Men iforl vet, -is earb %  i ||M pro. 1 .. 1 lh..t ., lamp irdghl I 1 It 1 tracity in ., vacuum. 1 %  du Un ll United st.I-. are pi .. dascenl iamp %  A % %  -tuuol Hi.-..the jtlobr was uled to a metal base which '.I when the ) -thl is II stlngaaanl I 10 am lltopi -: iieeoti.!. t reading a %  %  %  l Tin 1 J..-. gad Nem || s.ii,i he "aaread in BSBBB. jtamin.-i 11 • %  ,( : %  I nonius ,l I %  %  the liajhi bull Claude. %  r who ha %  1 mall amount of for Mold b" made to transport ihe %  %  < light ..f iU m.. %  %  Prelunuiary handlinsj of smaller details took only IN mit 1 r TOURIST RECEIPTS The T %  June 30. Sales at tl %  u f„ r the l B.W.I, com paired with •HIPPING NOTICES M I M rfe Witt %  .Mid materials *, i %  %  portent, inert ui -. were lr.troduced %  1 idU) pi duced sun in the %  .. ,. %  rangei ,,r NIOUI I'OUI I.imp 1 mi.-.* of 11h T m the ultras lolei % %  %  taf tl poet The HIST rtuortjsceni lamps produc* 1 ground n.iini ii illennte. /in, rfj Aiii.it fluoi aceg green, However, iione 1 1 HM thousands ii mittti.il IMIII.UIS Ue of aufnlenl inlh lonuneril use and Hie protluctlon ot %  ynthetk iriatanTlaJs is complicated iiiiiMiis %  -ittistion: irioimmic i.b*-tances in a pure sto*-ll sjo not tluoresce. MI IIS. IIMIIIII %  M K\ C.I 9>S "AKAlilA acr^duled to tail """' Mene nth June, nrubana End Alans Mth J.ne. Sydne-/ ''ily Blh. am, ire Ttnid-d and July, ,1 Itaibailo* aaalf Ausu-t -s FORT I-A1HY.whediiled ••> -411 from 11,-Oart late J..;.Nwth -. %  .. 1 nd mid Juiy. Itrlabana .-id Jul i .rly A11r.1t. Melbourne mid Au*>.i. irtVlnfl ii [%  .n.ber Carso ae.epwe OH IMooSh ft.aa .t I ars". In addition to BBaSSffSl rarao Uw-ae %  earela bave ample apace for chilled and .-.ILK I..1 traii.hlpme"! aTrinidad fllllMia, leeward N \ H.i.-I .rd l.landi 1 luasra apply II'"'* lt"V "I HO. IHIMl'tU %  HI a OA COSTA A CO. Ill' aABitA'itm B.W.I. "'Ir-day Tlih BaM. .*w.V -el Cars** an. %  BeWi. •ADVERTISF.' V 9nr. rBAMBB NEW MH Jultoo. Ai,|*i|SSFS FOB Chlldrer .-.. %  %  1 \ ;.-, %  Pocea from 2/to ||0 a AV.OI.rrr.ead Ltd. 3fl %  Bruce 81-Ja 04 AKUI OATS Ph All I ItMrt, Dal 1 -. PB St-,nway tBerr IS T SI -In 1 %  ; riamar n ; v Tiba. in tt.nua.ir,... |, | n <> din%  K Wan tee ,f .u' k -. %  jr and energy and from 10 to m >rari.nin;*r. 04 |y retur-i the %  i"P*> p'u kaprr, and • I your nvBtransth bollto -f 1* Vi-Taba coata Vi-Tabg^;rKe Umltl, n... ,,..( sup in thi* "l inelectric light 1 .ihi came in 1911 with I i nrerj of .. m. ihod i i i . il which ,i an ii'.iv.ited by an appropriate •ivating agent, and thl %  The nisi, and non, eiiiiif pro mtsBaOn 0* from n .. ti it. a i %  mpfire oi lumlnes... thousands ol SUtjstan.T-t will glow In I %  ".isslon of 1 luimi % %  w msy persl ars. r,r flays after the agent has %  • '. . gta-. KiLL3 PAIN Or. PrrMsf B. O'Xnlr '•egs to inform 'hat rail < rfl and will be *...nl.., iBIh Ausisat. II lie closed nu juiv. ' IXANEItS Hand and Bare, %  call, operated. TakeO.e drudcou| dfiirtsaey. Dial aSTB Da Coata A Co .J Dept M I ion SALE rVBsaTnmB One Prea., Cneat M %  K.lchen Tat,:, Boo* caaa a> d On* B-by 1 ITaoi Phone BUB A Iii-da) s (i. \ "I l. Jill !o I... 1 |aj| • I* happy %  ike note HAM:* H \t i>; JIKKFV WHIPS wi Secure Yours TODAY. %  Chains, etc. NEVVSAM & CO. •<'*'.:'.:*,'.',','< 25.7.51.--4ft. ,'/.V/,V,Vi t h i. %  'My manf naas %  rnenl froquenU) OMd in (he SMithelies. alUioiigl! Ad hismulh .ilsi have then places. The ivnthetli co ited tlirectly on >f the tliioresceiit Iheii tasvelopmenl Irol are the result of mil in the i ski of inorKaiii. i :i \. Ol Ihe-. I. mill eatsd iv Ihi i nil ieaey of tiie %  duct, Tho llghti radard oomrneareial Itl i Ih.m (ii liKhl unit | < i w ,lt. in eontuist iinlti pet watt from iiten lllamen' < Ol lima %  a % %  Vuviensi < ast larola, ., cobbler In the city %  BOtOI ... I' aim il the %  i-fii iW be Included ih Sesun ilng ioi the phiii.Mii hei's sioii... Casd i ibed %  inouiilain Id withered snni' %  %  i.i I mi Tl -.' I i hi be i.'ud.K.; I roasted tl i po w dej v Inin lli.it the powdej laid COOl oh* Hour aftci ii' r ihe heated powder contliwie I 00 I.TMI-.I, glow, ami %  i %  ih* bafl phor, b] mm sulfato li kill de in the i % %  a few Impurltie of mai blrmuth Although t. %  i,n..i. powder was nit %  I %  I that he did a rjroAteblt i irlth alchen) %  %  T ..i | may be the Ind %  %  %  lie s' icntlfic bora) 11. re being maile pi thi more than 4 oi %  nd of the I Ihe plsni world tvhli ii have the sblllty i It is Intetesitlna ti .-i %  ntm.: IfS Which luminesce are eithti llrellies, or othei nd %  i. it in-, or else they are. 1.1 tho sea, such as I. an.l Ihe hki For it unknown reason, no %  teen found. Ante** MM Ausu.l MB Aur-i't ISth Beptr. St*) RORt'RT T1IDM I.TI>. — NEW YORK AN1 OWI.r SERVICE AITI.Y:—DA COSTA a. CO. LTD—CANADIAN SIlRVH'at Jusl in Hmo for the Hurricane Season TABLE MODEL KEROSENE LAMPS #'###-; rav.vi m if. Corner of Ilroad an Tudor Streets 1 OR KALE 5 Hundred Empty Drums FOR PA1LING USES ROBERTS' MANlIFACTliRINi; CO. (,.. '.* I At thia Unoiii i I MAHY EDDY may be read, born re baaed |M ..l-d r .%  1 >rruwac>I J VISITOR'! ARE WEI.COMr 1 | M SM >k ulnniol thesi* li.irb.irv NOTICE Wa bas to notify our % %  >ay, Mth | "at Repair and Scrvl %  acne date for Iwo weeks annual 'ill be a skeleton art ,e, ^ .-, <„, r !" „, COL* S(O LTD. ii'tBTS ,-,'-•,-, ///.v//,v; SUNLIGHT SOAP has not BtfTtfffl l\0K\ Ml\l' 27t. Kill(i: \WMlS0li 10c. LAI Mini „, ION I I AHA) limn WAP 27<. mly at GRIFFITH'S ::., *M*J aeeeeeee. SHEER DEUORT—(0 ullrrly l.-ini.i.l \IT\ i-Hil ill tli.-sc colon.—Nil I'ltu' Pink, I'mrl (ircy and N.vy TISSUE AMI ( VNTON FADLE—1 orons in ii df*M inint,(rom m* loxi'ly shiidcs: Siiini Knyiil. Klji.l.. T.IIIIM'. < liinrsil.ut-i|ln-r. I'lirma Vi'.l-'l. U'ilil lluiklrhi-rrv. Tauter in. ;.n.l tVilil Orchid fl 51.95 CBOSS-DVED BTBIPE lllat %  tan is wmthin-: t-vcry Mis-, mid >lrs. hus dri-iimi-d of: Cray, Aquu mid .hurlri'UM-. I.iiin' Sk\ :..nl Hoar) Wheat, Pink Violence und Graaador* U N BOROIBKD M'l\ o \ am.ll|iiilti ', >in per vl OPENING TO-DAY—Varioni BlyUa I* Shoaa iii dilTercnl prices. ACCESSORIES) Ladies Hosiery. Bnl PaBtlHi Nlfhtfoama, Slips. Children'-. Sock*, V.-i1'anlles and Kerclii.-I-. 1'nsiirp.issed iIII. nrd for llm N (I IIIAIM. \i\ HOI si: s„ ,„ Street — S AI.T.M \N, Proprielor PHONE Z70Z >*-'.%'-'**-'*^'.'.---,--•,-, s TOT:. • — T. | s. ~ ;. %  1 : ;


/)



Ss



Barba

SATURDAY, Le 28, 1053

OIL CRISIS TAKE: Prepur

Quick Decision Can Avert Complete Breakdown For War

a






ESTABLISHED 1895



+; PRICE: FIVE CENTS













wees Senate KARACHI, Pakistan, Juby 27

darkened over
hie government

Reds Take Time Off] 825



THE DOLLARS ARE Hii






d the
ot special powers for



Britain Wants Pledge



—_—— —--









From Mossadegh ‘To Studv UN ‘Buffer| ® oo. —

By J. C. THALER | foe Guard had beed called into teting

THE ANGLO.IRANTAN OL, CRISIS tok Zone Proposal cme Tose ue ee aie
urn for the worse on Friday night, and Britain TOtin, 12th, 14th ama 16 be

ros cna i e-aeg aee alow iasneng Sores ey a [Sale toni oe

on-the-spot consultations. , | ‘TWO SPECIFIC DEVELOPMENTS which may}irom July 26, 1951." “ss ote

speed the hour when troops along the 135-mile |{/OK@2" 88k that this getion

y ; places the units, named under
Korean war front will be told to halt shooting, naiary law, =
, he mobilization order followed

emerged from the meeting of United Nations and {quickly the government announ
Communist cease-fire negotiators in Kaesong mens Sremetnening tie

lefence special powers ordinance

An agreement was reached in principle on]‘‘en account of the present emer-

_ The scheduled trip to London of Averell Har-
riman, Truman’s special envoy to Iran, was also
viewed in diplomatic quarters as an indication of a
hitch in the current efforts to bring about talks in|
Teheran on the oil dispute.



Histiaat he nok aan eeeneis [ae a Gan ae “administrative and procedural matters designed | rhe ordinance provides for the
asked to come to Léndon, and that U N PI q to expedite the final achievement of a military nstitution of civil defence and
his decision was his own. Harri- e e anes armistice and cease-fire.”’ ¥ fair raid precaution services, a

man was expected to meet For- lene e the government wide
nd



eign Secretary, Herbert Morrison aha rou A Committee of fficer fer _for civil defence measures

soon after his arrival here on ast e ~e s staff assistants of both sides wer Simultaneously, the governnen:
e ‘ . a é : Zi 4 4 1 ~ ppointed at one ) rk out | delegated powers der the or-
crip cer Reis inneuiee 4 ASENNOWET S vias “Vice samira!” craenes inane to ‘chiet niisters ne
. aioe a ce in ure 30 oad e . loy, chief U.N. negotiator pre various provincés,” This action
BA ccciakes’ Gat’ cooaie ositions rmy Gaining, ae nee the chiet Cor m in st re des nef oo ae meeting of al}
tions in the oilfields for British 7 etic” mcaee asttnain ! ‘Minister, Lisquat Ali Khan,

jdetailed maps setting f oth his | Prime Minister, Liaquat Ali Khan,
Momentum jideas of the proper line to be |!@st Sunday, when they consider-

personnel would be improved] ®IGHTH ARMY H.Q., Korea
immediately. Failing such a prom- _ 7

1
|




























iq site’ : July 27, is : idrawn between the two armies | °4 the situation, brought about by
a ann ae ae The Korean war front quiet was rege wae Pee ae Currency Officers check the wooden | with a demilitarized zone separa! he movement of Indian armed
eatel seat e ROC en : Or; broken with sharpened Com- ad, _ “ — currency notes which arrived at Seawell j - a ‘ Mé RSHALL ing them ovee ilong Pakistan's border
settle it of the oil dispute. munist thrusts on the Eastern! yes yy. a eee ERE RS W / C wr _ ‘ | Nam II asked for a rece that Practice blackouts and ~ other
N A zone and increased Red activity ss p Poesy Oethred hg 2 ponding vy & Police van under ee U. rency WASHINGTON, July 27 his delegation could stud the ivil defence trials have been car-
Oo ssurances on the central sector. “ eee ee Bee ee eet eee e Defence Secretary, Geotge Mar- |™2ps and reply and agreed to mect | ‘ted out already in, some interior
: ‘ U.N., war planes used _ the { oy 18 hall, told Congress § 6 gain at 10 aa. Saturday. It is| ‘ities, Meanwhile, “Defence Day”
‘ ‘ a s yr shall, ’ gress that 1,600 :
eae eta ps clearing weather to blast Com-| + “ e + 4 rriv 28 shiploads of arms had already | Understood that Joy maps call} vas being observed in the eapital
ey harlabetiaa Bont bog ani |munist marshalling yards at) Bod been sent by the U.S, to the Allies |/0r fixing the ceasefire line rough lay. All shops were closed, and
officials stated on Friday night | bynsyang, rand made more 1 e e l e en n I ty-six sealed wooden cases al road, and that General Dwight | y along the presem battlefront sal prayers were — being -said
that Shepherd had not been able 800 sorties against the Red targets of the new West Indian Curr y| E:senhower’s Atlantic Pact army | hich is almost entirely nerth o Pakistan's safety. :
= aa ent : 1 as {aiming by radar through low} Hear arT from Trinidad by a Special} 'S gaining “real momentum.” the 38th parallel. A line along the —U.P
so far to obtain required assur- | ojouds | e e B.W.I.A. Charter flight’ yesterda Marshall urged the Senate For- rallel itself which Communist paneer
ances. A_ Foreign Office state- As the cease-fire talks moved’ afte ”n rhe aircraft nie ‘at| Cign Relations Committee to ap-! were expected to demand, woul ‘ .
ment on Friday night announced | oy in Kaesong, the Reds were stili/ : J Seawell at 2.47 p.m. R cool party - prove without delay a new $8,500,-|:ive them enormous advantage ( row Pp . a
that the recall of the ambassador $144 oa oa oe : { et pn a tot fae “ke L000 ai ata 5 a ah ; : . r A 4 i I nee
building up forces south of Kum- d . ing new currency were Mit 0,000 mutual aid programme in| because there is no good defense
ee ae toa, eee song, on the east central front, witn| WASHINGTON, July 27 | ed Brown and Mr, William| order to meet the “Communist| territory on the U.N. side Dp °
“ons ra ; inal decis- : ca. oe eek es ~ pee ‘ i 1 ‘ aig Clarke o 2 4 ¢ . in by ‘rballenge o ver Pr . ae Ke » t efire rneatin Co
: Soman ; 7 entire Communist companies mov Secretary. George arsh: |? .Glntas A f the Trinidad Currency | cP atlenge n every front i corean easefit negotiator I
ion so far had been taken. ing down to the Reds’ front-line oad Secr ta Y, George Mat hall told the we nate Department. aid that any delay would block | discussed the location of a buffer P ro essin
_ Harriman made it plain to both positions, Foreign Re ations Committee on Friday that the United At Seawell to meet the ’plane| Eisenhower's current mobilization | zcne across Korea at their elev
sides that a speedy decision we Major action was centred on States which “can’t do everything at once” would depend | were the two Currency Commis- | Schedules enth conference to-day and reac! GENEVA, July 27
required to avert a if comp ete |the eastern front again today, Two on Britain for aid in building up the defences of the Middle} worc's Mr W. D. Charlton, Mé shall said that funds asfed agreement “in principle ol British physician who accoa
breakdown in the Iranian oil in- Rea battalions counter attacked East ‘ Acopuntant General and Mr, J. A.| /arge as the present request will be” gaministrative matters to speed anied the Jordan Crown Prince
dustry. His visit to London was advanced Communist forces north os Reterts, Manager of the Govern-| required in the next two fiscal | up an armistice, The meeting at) “Mh Talal from Beirut, | lett

believed to have been intended to
emphasize this position on Brit-
ish government leaders. Exper
here estimated that the refinery
Abadan would have to be closed
completely before the end of next
week, because of storage space
filling up rapidly.



| Marshall said Europe’s share of the propos foreign ht. Savings Be , ; years 1952 and ‘53, for the overall eturn to his Beirut clinic’at 8
of Yanggu yesterday, after Allied E ; pes she the propo oreign { ment, Savings Bank. They watch-| Years 1994 and 93, for the overall) Kaesong lasted one hour and {if ae wee yet &
troops 1cok two hills. Heavy Red| aid funds was greater than the Near East's because it is of | 4 Vl shecked the unloading of a ae FO 000. the of morel icon minutes and adjourned unti) | 7 on Friday aboard a Prenc's
range pet anertar fire] — mcre.“‘eritieal importance.” ; SSB RS aircraft, inte al than. $25.000,000,000, He said that | io a.m. to-merrow , \emgab arrive In Beirut between
a "ior aa ., forces off the} —— — But he emphasized that the} jp, TE tie UN. said Allied. delegates de-
ills after a 10-hour battle. Middle East was vital to the , 0 ; izviled with words and maps their re ia ; er
e ; ae 7 F ‘ine@asrured é roxime ,|and oppression,” which aims tol... : ear eh is norning. Before leaving he said
West of Kunsong, U.N., patrols Reds Built [ defence of Europe and said plans} y x 9 x 18”, ; approximate'y | dominate the free world by “force| ews cn the =o mult rized zone | “His Royal Highness is. progress-
|for possibly inereasing its share of ” which will separate Communist

te"Van which had an| this is the price of meeting the



iWmed Police escort, The cases} “growing threat of Soviet tyranny i and 8& o'clock” on” Saturday



probed toward the Pyonggang The olane returned to Trinidad|0rby any other means ing under treatment, He is a will-



Reports from Teheran on Friday apex of the old Communist “iron| g~+ \a d are “under consideration pty about an hour after it ar- He claimed that any delay in the and U.N eee Com! 1unise ing and helpful patient as he i
night intimated that Harriman had triangle without meeting any 1orees Durin ;where we hope the British can] piyeq ; appropriation “will mean that asked an overnight re ( inxious to make a full reeovery
encountered difficulty from both | resistance. U.N. naval forces back- jdo a great deal for us.” a General Eisenhower will not have pare thei repls ;} Meantime, part of the curé Is. rest
sides of the conflict. Earlier this|¢d up ground forces and land Marshall said in a global de the trained and eauipped forces on| U-N. said both sides named jand quiet. Therefore he ig, not

week a formula evolved by Har-

e . |
based planes with a steady C f L II {fence programme it was neces ® 4 which he is basing his plans. It is | taff officer: to work out “admini eeing visitors for some time.’
ease- ire u f jsary to emphasise ig'l hree Plan t Ww . mavite trative and procedural matter rhe physician who asked th



















riman with Iranian Government |pounding of the eastern coast. | ome area essential that place 1
7 " ritish li -ruiser ¢ ri : more than others. I sutting this responsibility on him, provide} Cesigmed to expedite the fin il his name be not published fo:
‘ rs, £ sared to have es- A British light cruiser and three 1 here | In cutting MM iis responsibili I } :
teed ie basis tor}U.S. destroyers bombarded the US. ARMY CHARGE Burope s aid to increase the Near | ® } ‘ | him with the means of accom-| achievement of a military ' professional reasons said he woulc
the speedy resumption of negotia-|Red port of Wonsan for the 161 WASHINGTON, July 27 East’s he said he might trim the] | eeting hi ei e | Plishing his mission, It is the] uce and ceasefire ido his best to persuade-—-the
ee. -“a final settlement, Brit-|consecutive day yesterday. Thh Aimy sna eth UsY 4. = ntinental programme to the ) security of the U.S, as well as that] United Nations said that the; Amman Government, to ue
tions oF & spe Frid: : ht in- as —vU-P. i say and State Depart- |point of waste He recalled tha = St ‘ in of our Allies that is at stake.” ground covered in talh as {statement giving a picture-nt the
ish officials on. ] ri ay nig cote 5 Ate ere charged the Communists in|the United States had to pour it te WASHING T' IN, July 27 | He said that by the end of last purely military” but it appeared | whole case in the next 48”h6urs.
sisted that Br itain was So oe with having used the lull |main effort into Europe during th: The big three Western Powers | month the U.S. had shippedjthat the meeting had progressed |= deemed this necessary in view
to reach a séttlement, but she 1, . T' ik * during the ceasefire talks to build | last war, even though it had beer re considering a possible For-! abroad more than 1,600,000 meas- | more thar’ was expected Loca |, e the eitnation antl. DP,
does not want to ey nnolney roops, anks up theif forces for possible later |deeply and “tragically” invowec | °ign Ministers meeting here in| urement tons equal to 1,600 ship-|tion of the demilitarized zone
breakdown. “We mus nw” ae aggression. in the Pacific. id-September following the sign-| loads, in addition to aircraft and | the toughest item on the ceasefii t
edvance that there is some chance Ex:force Law coe enya that fresh Chin- The Secretary's testimony came’ 0 of a Japanese peace treaty in naval vessels delivered under tne ir | agenda | The “ADVOCATE”
of success,” one official said. aa ope rac moved in, and all |i: response to questions fror san Francisco it was disclosed on, own power It had been expected that this | f NEWS
—U.P. TEHERAN, July 27. ri dory ey ay ona 7 tremendous Democratic Senator Guy M iday Diplomati informant j —U.P point, number two on the pro pays for
Troops, armed police, and tanks ae Ss secretes open eae Gillette who wanted to know wh id that under tentative plans the | ramme would be argued out t Dial 3113
were massed in Central Teheran ne rents ce Of |the proposed aid for the Nea) Foreign Ministe ; ettlement before point number
: . . America broadcas at . \ . all ; gn Ministers would try pri x , ss ee y
COMEDIAN DIES - to enforce the law against a big saecaitas ee an eae E : t “ i 159 times les than th arily to reach a joint agreement N +h Lik 5| ay hree—-cetails of the actual cease i Day or Night.
ne. gone ra n Porikiunist Be a A pee tow foreign troops out of Koren wa ‘ aj esa yOG Ame nares n Westerr?® Germany's participa- INE ru IKely Oo, eo
Rmil Boreo, 66, died here o , $ > ited ates : > i Wess —U.P 7 ; eT an ¢ mn page 7 |
Brot) oT ‘The Polish born ore dcbsedes. “scheme” to put them in a position UE | on in North Atlantic treaty forces} R f ae I a . ;
ss tal al dia arnt dean Hil - Snes isan dea an eter -cops| @ Start later aggression. j oder General Dwight Eisenhower, | CLUSE nvitation
was a familiar figure ap | Two hundred helmeted Tomes American jofficials have. been GI bl P | Will The Allies are anxious to settle a"
Americon and European theatri- | with bayonetted rifles, police} “" . ol pee stare Noe vit > ashi i Pitvies.-'9 ar anxious to ' rat ni es
cal circles between the two world ]armed with carbines and swords,} ‘“arning for some time that the la German issue in advance of l'o Talk I eace

Reds are building un their forces, 1 e an ? 12 nation North Atlantic
but never before in such strong} Continue I oO Sery e suncil meeting expected to be NEW DELHI, July 27
terms as the Army spokesman id in Canada late September Political quarters and news-

said, They also said that the U.N. Abdullah’s Family, It was understood that forma’) Paper commentators, here said,
f s \

wars. He gave up the profession |and four tanks guarded Parlia-

atter he had suffered a heart attack ;ment Square and the vicinity.
two years ago.—U.P, —U.P.







forces were prepared to deal with its that the Prime Migister, Jawa-
2 ‘ 7 vitations to British Foreign Min .
vw Re ffensive E irely . Sarlal Ne ; 10t cely t
a each be “limehed it the tl uce AMMAN, July 27, ter Herbert Morrison and French Sent the Pakisten Timeeitinias
tate e u ees talks broke down. + Major General John Glubb | Foreign Minister Robert Schuman A, oP onditional invitation” fot
The Defence Department an- | ‘asha, the British Commander oi ve not been sent although the} him to visit Karachi for peace
nounced that Communist casual- |-he colourful st vowe roposal has been discussed by the | talks









© ‘ ties in Korea now total 1,221,434 [28 will faithtu famil tate Department and British and} Newspapers did not carry — the
fe, ension from the beginning of the war f the erase lah ench Embassies here. The final} full text of the Pakistan Prime
& au e through July 19th ue Seer § pas cision may be forthcoming next} Minister, Liaquat Ali Khan’s
American casualties are about |*+ ¥°o's ; . week, communication to Nehru detailing
ubb Pasha in an interview in

Morrison has already disclosed! the fiye-point peace plan which he
ans to attend the Japanese treaty wanted to discuss with Nehru,

WASHINGTON, July 27, 80,000.

* ime »side ‘ruman’s mall, but busy
President Truman said on Friday that one of the Meantime, President Truman

1dquarters office



Aftab Legion































: ; : ; increased hope for peace. express- said he has t ere foat ston of in sh-! after the withdrawal of troop:

princypal causes of tension in the Near East is the miserable] eq on Thursday afternoon, was tion of retiring “especiall a cee pee ee ah socentrations-an. thecinioeiales

tate of hundreds of thousands of Arab refugees from Pales- wae as uray iding important 3 ve Te a ae tad a aotare of Stele Dean Acheson., stan borders had been carried out.|
: ’ : : . ’ the ommunists of Y spi ( edouln iegion~ : aos . ' , ; 7.

tine.’ The President’s statement was contained in letters e peewee perenne ee ee ote de a een ur. | The Hindustan Times, which]

A Ss, a } ar= | > | reflects he Cs res arty
addressed to the Chairman She Senate and House Appro-} gaining at Kuesong.—U.P. |svith submachine gun sdescsieacgipeliniaceciainicin doihion Pie Liaguat'e letter al
priations Committees, in which he urgently requested Con- — |; Glubb : esha, sa saa ae \“propaganda stunt”, and eorn-|
eress to appropriate $2,000,000 for August and $3,000,000 Tits Goes U To had eer d andes i. otsche 1 ries I @ | plained against its being published
for September for Palestine refugee relief. a z p 13 . and he was a charming mz 4 i i Cone | mareen before its receipt ir
aceniide eanemncenstiine penn — Congress is currently consider- S e to work fc 4 ‘ ae ew 2th, .

; ing the administration's giant The Mountains | Praia ths {Bea ARES | Kind Cabine t Crisis | —UP.
x 5 : a 2 il rve |
; re $8,£ 000 rei Aid Pro- et LU ‘ Abdullah's far . ii!
Prey € nits Trade Eee Phin an item of MM BELGRADE, July 27, \ aueotion t : | F i PARIS ae Ma AID FOR Ol
- ¢ arshal Tito returned on Friday! ormer Finance Minister Maur-
. . $50,000,000 for Palestine refugees ars ; Abdullah fo | ee. eet Z 4
2 ysnian Mour: vh ‘ a e Pe he agreec to head a
With omen et xplained in a_ letter he “Ted “his tagged partisans. to sofda iriends { WASHINGTON, July 27, that the refuges feliet programme| Victory over the Germans in World! } . Pee | ap a net Pr ee American aid for Mexico’
Senator Herbert R. O'Conor,!) 54 been curried on during July War II, and told his people they| But ata uate 2 ee oeteche, | nationalized oil industry is “immi-
Panama has acted to prevent the through the use of existing stocks should be no more frightened of} P. aint id. infepe: jent Con-|nent” as a result of the Unites
ships of Panama’s huge merchant] snq funds from other sources, , Stalin today than they were off ———— | obbative netused to take over the | Sinee Interior Secretary Osea
fleet from carrying cargo 10] But the available resources were Hitler 10 years ago. y | STEEL FOR OIL i ae oe ‘ esignate at}Chapman's inspection of Mexica
Communist ports in Asia. now nearly exhausted, the Presi- Starting on Thursday afternoon) WASHINGTON. July 2 ve installations, Government official
He siid the Panamanian Em-! gent added the Marshal toured a series ott Secretary cf the Interior, Oscar Auriol decid to cull party}said on Friday Tney said bot}
bassy told him that Panama would| ‘Truman told legislators that a local celebrations commemot erie ‘hapman said on Friday that the|!caders into a special committee in| Senator Antonio Bermudez heac
-evOKe e registry of any of its ; e “iar ad been re-] the 1941 uprising. He gave brie \tnited State i ropa: new approach to hasten the end, cf the Petroleum Mexicano Officia |}
revoke th gi F major step forward hi A talks at each of the celebrations } il tt i k 1eW apy n n _ ch
ships destinea for Red China Or| cently made when the rab) taiks « acn ° avon illocate all the steel it can possi-| of the Cabinet crisis at a time {Oil Monopoly anc japman werce|} ‘“t
Noith Korea. League went on record in favou: He on sot on es join 1) bl pare for the build-up of! when important foreign faire} “pleased” with the results of their |f} Now / know why he always smokes
; why ates et _\similar celebrations in Crotia fexicai nroductio i Te ae ; Ball |
Panamanian Consulates — all| of a massive io pyle ie 5 ror OUP | Mexic oil produ ye. cisions are pending aks al a r ‘a h h h
over the world had been ordered | settlement of Palestinian 1 ; ; a ] RUM PETERS. T! ey ave suc a





to examine papers of ships head-} in Arab states. Grave damage to

ry? :

sd for Red ports and cancel their| this programme 1s likely to nesult | .
Panaraniat-rextity if shipown-|if the present aid programme D / aH. ‘side Fie = icbiibiea, ps
ers refuse to unload cargo. } collapsed because of the temporary } D ‘s ’

The Panamanian Embassy said | shortage of funds. au 2, smooth and FRESH y


























orders were only the first SCC DU) NEW YORK, July edal .« e i 4 Jniteq Natic ca t itever ena Z legislation the
preventing the use of the Pana- A bronze medal with blue ar * ef ‘ ¢ Red aggression ial Government
manian fiag to smuggle strategic! , white striped ribbon h Ce! Ta I eC nal ke.
materials behind the Iron Cur- To-day s devised for the award to Unitec ‘i non- N. membe be eli- The general expectation that °
tain, Weather Chart Nations soldiers, sailors and air- f t it ement adde like campaign ribbons of World “BY , ‘Rp ay “a .
He said a general decree gov- Sunrise: 5.49 a.m. men figh Communist 1 0 suth Korean ‘War II the medals will go t fle J af
ae x» ee would Sunset: 6.24 p.m Korea, it was ounce ossed laurel der General all people who have see \ a tive
i issuer ni anama Friday. United Na service n the United Nat ¢@nsj ¥ ¥ ’ ~~ -m 7m ~” My
O’Conor said the new Moon: Last Quarter The United Nations wil The United Nations ; nce tions cormman ich nation- Korean campaign é ga q, a a a: £ a #: %
anian crackdown aiready Lighting Up: 7.00 p.m. award its fighting men a rect - ment d_ regulatior n tt 1 ; Ttalliar erving in Italy The original General Assembly | F . a 4h.
prever ted x ships from sailing High Tide: 1.13 p.m ular ribbor th the same nur éligibilit r the 5 eld spit hen approved proposal that led to the estat 1~|
Two shit have been halted at Low Tid 6.42 m. 415 ber of vertical tripe under consideratior € ep ior © a t ment of the me yas p for-| @
at Karachi, any oe Ste 8m —? blue, eight white—for use v Ger { k we t : i thr } ze ’ ‘a's , . ~ ¥
4 I yhi 0 ike ward by the FE ine Us 1 7 yi +
Cee ae blue, eight G ry gv United way wit ig,make on ward by the Philippines trough | ORT AINABLE EVERYWHERE
| One side of the bronze } tr te t {3 woul ) Litic r eral Carlos Romulo,—U.P !

a ee en ne a tn ee RN ee a en nt a

S NEW TURNZetet

>

%

2
PAGE TWO









BARBADOS ADVOCATE
® 2 Why do so many well -dres { women wear such
| / 4 J
IS EXCELLENCY the Gov- . I - —4





























Ja maicam, Violinist




































































SATURDAY, JULY

































——

ee —_
AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)

TO-DAY at 5 p.m

ai
ry _ MATINEE
TO-NIGHT To MONDAY
Universal-International’s New Release





28, 195

1

“|
ae |







NIGHT at 8.30










































”
wanlpead eas wady Savuge acd 1 soc athering with an SOME k I Pari _ THE GIRL IN THE PAINTING OM
1ied by Major snnis ~~ Gir SOME lucky wor none Ry SLIS F p that aris i wring . TTERLING P — Herbert Li
Py rns ee ee ~ te eu flavour in Earls and TASTE Ot : by SUSAN DEACON 7 cad fashion g Mai ZE ao aes
ah e oe « s ss Doreen 4 ‘ 1 New al
tended the opening of the School Court last week, wa ; Mis = a money A ! i nts J usan Deacon writes about t say that New oS Se aa wen silks hcalatngninietesiaiiios
for Blind people t the Hurd Eon Naar "Ja rae i : She en- cer. t a ur. Perring, whose hobby is a ell ts By Special Request: MATINEE this Morning (Saturday) 9.50 o'clock
Memorial School, James Street “pean gee aie ate ye Spoiled | over-rimmed na | ki u a ea pear a sd
yoterday er terio'ned guests by playing Pieces ‘smageless. hat aking wou wat more | France tor restaurant clothes JIGGS AND MAGGIE IN COURT
a aan present were the Hon’ble from Bach and Beethoven on the MODEL HATS in Lond | comfortable, E i for tailor-made and with Joe YULE Renie RIANO
the C sles ial Secreta . a Mrs violin. Doreen says she is in Eng- anything from £12 to £50 € t rica for play clothes (defined Also the British Short: “INTO THE BLUE”
tod eee vgn Bena ipaerks land for a_ teachers’ training 4g, ; arse set the 4 CHERIE SAYS inything you wear without a (The Story of B.O.A.C.)
Turner, Sir AHan Collymore, the rarer but she.is, workiie in ai * this price 7 get 7 me E : » hat) 3
Rt. Rev. Bishop G. L. G. Man- urse, but a _ exclusive (you hope). But the eshrsitclg ——
deville, M "fle a Ibber. oh Social @flice until the a mic year COM~ women who wear them 1 de COMING emncw Coming Next Week
Bere ete ar poe cg 7 ces in October. srminéd to get good value | an EAT LOVER TOWN SINNER OF
Welfi.re Adviser to C.D. and ‘ ™ : termined, to £ v nd tor ae
Dr. I. P OM ihony Direcies r No Protests uiling on the trimming. — “J axalh agiccees Len PLAZA) Dial 2310 cee eerie
MI ii Services, Hon. Dr. C. H T the W.1S.U. dance and - P ' " 3 » the end. of TO-DAY — 445 & 830 pm. & Continuing Solty: tee Fee (To Tuesday)
a Mr. Cc. A. L A eatdret in honour of West The busine girl who spen hat I went Paramount's Techn color Dratna
y. J. Adams-Cooper, Rev Indivn visitors to the Festival of £6 a year on h its could ‘
val Mr. John Beckles, Britain lest week, was the Hon, many of the modei hat brigade cut fré A Howard Da SILVA.
sen Moore, Mr. and Mrs, V. W.-O. R. Kendall, a member of thing or:two on h ri 2 Also the Cartoon
im, Mrs. H. A. Vaughan the Legislature of British Guiana. hat—and how to wear .
A. K. Tucker, Mr. Ne- Askea about a report suggesting © WHERE DO society women bu, om the same eo ee nope)
nell, Miss 1, Pickering he and the Hon. T. Thompson their over-trimmed h “a | from museum SreciA v7 3p
* would register a protest with tne tour of the shops convinced m« idney TOLER as Charlie Chan in & Jimmy WAKELY in
Closed For Reconstruction LADY LOWSON Commonwealth Relations Office that they do not buy them, They | “Hey J—Who's been eating “THE TRAP" saree ia i SUING ot On RAM
5 lage British Council Centre «i Making Pilgrims’ history inst the British Governments “improve” then t hor | dog biscuits in bed?” “ _— ——
“Wakefield.” White Park,, ” a 8, nanishment of Tshekedi Khama, All I found were a few le anc L NORM fe wey E L L, wh 2 iF > OISTIN il G a I E
will be closed during the month of Seretse and Ruth from Bechuana- fruit-draped Henley hats, rac 1 as £141f are a et | “tl LAZA Dial 8404 Ri TY
August for reconstruction: the First Time For Women _iand, Mr. Kendall said, “This shaped cartwheel with velvé From Brussels “ene of sy best se ers as || | TO-PAY & TO-MORROW 5 & 8.20 p.m. THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
office will be manned by a skeletor OR the. first time since iheic news to me.” “We have made no ev gbcip err ue ST OnL alee 'HE Belgian Fashion Feder hig ‘ is | a Hives Tike it"| Elyse 2 nox. -~ Rw ord. Norris and ver ae ant nen ch
staff. FE + Ratan 3 he pj. protests about anything to any- and a garden party hat gui! Otte iclnecn ‘herr oaa ae Pa 1as nothing it.” | ene Canines | AT.—Sun. — pan.
Normal services will be résumed “.,. ee > vor the : iby. We have been kept ex- feather chiffon and fruit trimmings per gee “eg Ad ah Pi Sate er designers continue to go Barry Sullivan and Belita I wont or's Action See $i
at the beginning of September Freche a a aee pad vain i" tremely busy in this official Fes- (it tied under the chin for goo ier cneminattens the| to Paris — but it i wid fey Pk aPECIAY. THOW “TO-DAY v Se LANCASTER MAYO _ in
nied aa ll oe eae OMEN 1¢ or =the a5. aoe ebate eS -asure 7 aes. as a 1abit and make less and less of the APE MAN’ FLAME and the ARROW
and the Reading Room, Pocket sppis is in honour of Lady Lowsen, tval visit. ee ae St of the modelico! Oe ee WEOTTENE A! FT oe of Franti ideas aeleR Bela LUGOSI ‘and Color by Technicolor
Thez , Library and Gramophone nie SuAbe tacsan $ B To Secretary n fact, most of the model col- ysic art of dressing themselves | | MESTWARD BOUND’ Ken Maynard
. . ‘London's Lady Mavoress. ice oyv lec 4 ; }

Record Library will again be open f B . ‘al AIT Be *¢ before ections showed ecleg simp A exciting black and white wy oe Z a. ~| MIDNITE TONITE IDNITE TONITE
to th bl Sir Denys Lowson and _ his WENTY-FOUR hours before shapes, which most sm lom« ; k { r | “TRAIL TO GUN SIGHT” “PHANTOM OF CHINA TOWN"
o the public. of fes i at + Tt . Mente ” a it a . a < . OS ae ISI. g \ triking and perma- Ex idie DEW &
‘wife will visit the United States the dinner given in his hon- : am Keye LUKE and - -
* ‘ would want to wear. ” r It r fil “THE OLD CHISHOL ”
To-night next September on their way our by the West Indian Club, > i efte mh mer t t Johnny MACK-B: M TRAIL “SADDLE SERENADE”
u : ae , jul Johnny MACK-BROWN ;
HE ANNUAL Dinner ofthe home from New Zealand. The Mr. George Dent, M.B.E., Secre- THE QUEEN’S milliner. Aag register on even ‘ auiles. sons aeasausnges Teas” Jimmy WAKELY |
} z : ; , : : Paiaod ; JEEN’S inet ag : id? oe pd ee
Old Harrisonian Society takes the Wal ater a tot rN oe a" ‘" nee cnowe what 2 Thearep (oversee prite for. 8 dim oe Sandman
place at the Marine Hotel tonight {the aldorf-Astora Hotel, New man, “I do no no : sixteen guineas) shows lots of vos ; $SSooseoeasasauune 54566664
at 8 o'clock. The Guests of honour York, on the night before they talk about” he confessed. Like his Vaivet in his new colladtion: : RALPH PERRI of tt “a en ee eee ORR POON O08S 900 SN IO OK
are, Mr. J. C. Hammond, M.A., sail for home. ‘victims’, however, 7 ee ara There is a tendeney in this oem pes CEE Sepa * a eee | * Gi OBE THEA 7 g
Headmaster of Harrison College. Invit itions have gone out to to the oceasion and deliverec e collection for higher crowns, long- Public Sandman. No Me ae ts od 4 RE %
Mr. T. E. Went, M.B.E., Major the 800 members of the Pilgrims. very interesting, amusing and } aired “bearskin’” felts, and sharp. “@Pby is beds. He spends hi $ xy
A. R. Foster, M.B.E., Mr. K. N. R. Members will pay £4. 10s, for sincere speech. vivid colours : es. trying to make your bed more » >
Husbands, Speaker of the House “heir meal, and an additional There was great amusement ee Ca for table. - & TODAY 5 & 8.15 and Continuing %
of Assembly, Mr. John Goddard, .£4 !0s. for each woman guest. when Mr. Dent recalled how his N-E-W-S r. Perrir ys: “Many peopk * %
O.B.E., Mr. M. O’N. Campbell, en guests will cost £5. 7s. apiece. connections with the West Indies World Round-Up For Womea in be Which; are: 199 * , $
eo gaeeiten Barbados inion New York’s Mayor, Mr. Vincent first commenced, through his du- From N oe York and too short Unless x ERROL FLYNN — DEAN STOCKWELL X
and lecturer at Achinot Impellitteri, and Mrs, Impellitteri ties at the West India Committee. Awae m New cere by is 8 inches wider 8 bee. x
: : ‘will be guests, Mr. John W. Davis, He was engaged by the Committe: ; , YORK milliner has de- girth and you have a 7-inch X %&
Butlin’s Promise former Ambassador to London, ag office boy, in the year 1904 aes ‘ a turban. of white fox in which to wriggle your “S $
‘who is president of the American after the previous boy had spent oo a er with a moonburst you are not sleeping com % M %
here is no likelihood of But- side of the Pilgrims, will be in the some of the petty cash on sweets ©! rhinestone s. This can also be ably, Across 1% %
lin’s camps being seen in any parts chair and had been sick in the office of ae as for each 4 “Everyone shifts between 20) 1. precursor of the harmonium. (9) | % s
of the Caribbean area for some PF Sir Algernon Aspinall, then Se pe fame for each mon'h 10 times a night, so vou must ped. tier or bird trainer ? (6) 1% - 2 %
time to come. This was stated by Summer Holidays retary of the Committee. of tHe aoe as sale in le ding ve room in bed to move around 1% Barbados Agencies Ouis Flash x
Mr. Butlin himiSelf"at the Annuale ISS DAPHNE PILG KIM, Town Clerk or s ‘ begins with Carnation When you are 1eV 1 . %
Meeting of His English Company daughter of Mr. and Mrs. §S, R. H. W. FARRELL, Town Ne eet iP y Aouad cide ves with mattress never poke it iY % $
in Yorkshire recently. He was O. Pilgrim of Bay Street, flew in Cle oie ae "Port ~ Spain gs arcissus rr wy et st. The only at you S ; (3) 1% MRS CAROL SKINNER won the Quiz on Wednesday last at %
"Or o pias ae outes Jamaice n rsday Te > ihe si 2 Abs mae om Paris vhat attire ike i y - romantic . | the . E .
replying to a share holder who ask- from Jamaica on Thursday Q after England for talks with Sir John eit Senee sen = ay samt dae it eee a ceenaro ee ty | $ aes slobe. She failed how ever to answer the Jack Pot Question 2
ed that in view of the writing off noon by B.W.A. to spend the 7 Gity Chamberlain of Edin- ,o~ Pe ep Se ete ate OR tT cat ea eae .,| 22. One hundred and fifty trees tor | at is the highest recorded mile ner hour on the Speedo- %
of the company’s £200,000 stake summer holidays with her parents, mrie, : AMDET LE “*y,,,, being sold in Paris. WHAT IS THE FASHION IN cover. (6) % «meter of the Citroen Car ?”—100 M.P.H. %
3utlin’ 2 > ring burgh, who leaves in September A Champs-Elysees dog shop EDS? The majority of married| 23. Adds reeds to envelope. (9) x %
Butlin’s (Bahamas) the Board Daphne is studying for her Arts Teac ‘ I 5 I ‘ s
in Butlin’s (Bahgmas)ithe Board degree at the University College for Trinidad to take up appoint- phathing white poodles in milk. uples over 40 buy single bec Down Dail ances tai %
should underté ikeeno~further for- of the West Indies in Jamaica and ment as Commissioner of Locai At a sale in Dior’s salon a well- h a wooden headboard 1. Let shy at a small pony. (6) LELPPPPLLLPPPLLPLPPPPP LPP LL ALLL SOOO,
Ai oy Government in Trinidad. Mr. yy, Kile: oh: aah? ia | 2. 8)
eign busi Ms. Butlin pointed has just finished her first year at 5 ; 4 cake. Ont suit afte eirhe Oe et eaee 3 (4) rane
out that although he had lost some the Valveteiey , Farrell has ay ee ee £180 to £25: he under 40’s prefer doubl 4 tate | (9). G00 8058 S20neneeee
- ¥ over > i » y “lerk’: ‘ ‘ hie ear. (6
$200,000 of his owiimeney in the Ns ey se own I From Johannesbure beds with a padded he ‘d= | 7 % (4) q> i Y Ni Pp | Cc T ll
venture, he had no regrets about Off To New York ICe avers AN ex-Paris dress designer hz rd and no foot, Re tenOG aaribs tos Caspar, i) 4 4 / E A TR E
; : : — ‘ ae uhie pean oe : "we ) : a foot short. (:
his part in it. The Board of But- i >. For Barbados Holiday started a shop where she cuts and Opposition Al AY 1 useless to sprinters. (4)
lin’s (Bahamas) was still trying R. OSWALD STREAT is on iSS CLAUDIE bBEUZELIN, tacks dresses to fit, ITH the Paris collections due} 16. money ? (4) ae eeeceeeeons
to save the public’s money al- his way to New York via M woul brother Andre was in customer does her own stitchi this month, news com 19. This Rt patted 44
fhough there was not a lot of this Trinidad. He left yesterday morn- ¥ ad Seki at home New York that American | 21. It is often snookered, (3)
money involved ing by B.W.LA. In New York, he Barbados a few weeks ago, arrived

sprint
successful debut at the White City
in the Women’s A.A.A. Champion-
has been
not to re-
Now, I under-
stand, she has decided to, do. juste’
this and McDonald Bailey says that weeks’
efforts are being made to obtain a turned to U.S.A. by B.W.1VA.
is enjoying Sunday.
herself very much and is proving
wherever
the past few days she has
stle,
am- staff of the Daily News New York.
During his stay here he was the
back (o guest

ships

ma

job

pop
Dut

been
Stoc

bitic
Trir

A

ant

ing
t



da



end
London

ivelled

Eileen Will Stay

ORE news of
King,
champion,

recenily,

in in England.

for her.

ular
ing
appearing
kton
on is

ridad

Trinidad’s
Since

Kileen
wondering whether or

Eileen

at
and Darlington.
to bring the
title at the 1952 Olympics

Miss

her

she



Newc
He!



P.R.O.

NEW
week

Publie

arr

is Llu

the Festival

will go

Wales. He

1s

of Bri
to Canterbury last we
later "0, Cambridge
m

val in London last
d Cywar,
Relations
ish Guiana. He is in Paes Visit= accompanied by their two daugh-
He ters April and Bobby. Here foy two
at Acvra

offlesr,



‘k

due back

in mid-October.

Eileen

un-

runs.

100 metres

Assist-
Brit-

will join his wife who is a nurse

Leaving by the same plane for
William Ban-
Heather.
young 'They had been in Barbados on six
Banfield’s
husband is with the Alcoa Steam-

Mrs
caughter,

Trinidad were
field and her
weeks’ holiday. Mrs.

ship Co., in, Port-of-Spain,

Back To The U.S.

R. SYDNEY A. THORNE who
two
re-
on

had been ~— spendin

holiday in Barbados

Mr. Thorne, who is
dian has been absent from
colony for the last
at present

is

employed on
Mrs,
St. Michael

Trinidad Solicitor
R. AND MRS:

of his sister
Ellis of Bibby’s Lane,

dad yesterday morning by B.W.1.A.

weeks they are

Guest House,
Mr. Power

Trinidad,

staying

is a solicitor









THE







ADVENTURES







a’ Barba-
the
24 years, and
the

Edith

FRANCIS
POWER arrived from Trini-

in

OF

from Martinique on Thursday by
B.W.LA. to spend a week’s holiday
in Barbados. She will then pe going
on to Trinidad for two weeks
before returning to Martinique on
August 16.

Miss Simone Rougery and het joccey
sister Maud who are from Mar- pm
tinique are also in Barbados on
holiday. They are here for two
months staying at Bagshot,
Stream.

Short Transfer

R. EDDIE LYDER of Barclays

Bank in Trinidad, just back
from England where he had beer
on four months’ long leave, ar-
rived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. He is on his
way to St. Lucia on a short trans-
fer. He leaves Barbados by the
Lady Nelson,

Arriving by the same plane were
Mr. and Mrs. D. H. L. Ward’
little davghter Heather. Othe:
arrivals from Trinidad were M.
and Mrs. Clark Elder and thei!
daughter Sybil. Here for abou
four days, they are staying at th
Ocean View Hotel. They aré
Americens living in Barcelona
Venezuela. Mr. Elder is a druggis
with one of the oil companies dow,
there,

PIPA

Saturday, fuly 2&8,
rlude; 1130 am = Pre
Parade; 1145 a Women
12 00 noon Tt Yew 12
Ww Analysi i

1958
1120 a
framme

m Int

>

Promenade
Fourth Test Match;
Cricket; 4 10 p mn



pm
men's

of bri
will

laughs.
get them ir
hers |"

lady “lust you wait

Ceavrinht

P 88 . Vaz Diss Int. Amstordam

CU B



















* Chole
Yancing: 6 45

re; 600 pm

pm Programme

-10.45 p.m 25.58
710 pm
Behind
vel; 8 15
30 pm
10.10





Yours





AL
Tae

ue



i

indoors
hear the
ne indoors
1 fine jar in
* This would suit those

flowers better than a cracked
he smiles.

appears





Lo=sighd

visit

MORGAN

Miami to Rio

ation for good food

¥ the young adventurers who ’ BY THE W A Y
tt repo. at OW hite | ¥. ©.% By Beachcomber T he A ost lub {rc m
‘ Ke 22 f Africa « 3 y - '
ee their lees os Ses ; aa 9 Pittsburg, squaw Giggling “What on earth do you mean
shi aie ison bers call he take i gle. Umpum umpum wa wa. asked the patient. The docto I : ° a
& scien! Ta ; oe SSS" Me Chinee dwarf, no likee flre- pointed to a correr of the room J Jusic, Dancing
. cep B jet water, no likee Aflican tlibes. “I see the saddle and bridle ove *
_‘shey may run across Big Cite Gentlemen, Governor Fullbath there,” he said complacently, 9 ° >
Stegnant Water Bogart. Him ‘he 1D Ysends an inyite to us all to a fivsta es Enter tainment
- \ a ah. Hin ree at his estancia. Saddle the camels! ‘a wo Epitaphs
it ter bust when squaw Bacall, We ride Horse Neck! -
off-white Queen uv the Kuppakaw- we _ pene ig 7 we ay Sant uh ae throughout the night
fee Injuns, puttum foot in croco- Uneircumstantial Victim of his bohemian tenden
ake nt eel 1 8 cies, : .
dile's mouth. Evidence yoyo an unwary missionary lie Dial 4000 for reservations
Say, don’t them tribal drums do See words in a correspon- The cannibals had sent a note t
omep'n to’a guy? Cap'n Corn- dence column, about jumping —_8@y



the
goa

pois



all f



Tretia
Water

VESTS 79¢

fluke,

ride. to. Fort
curned:

ned bullets
il? Waal,

Pigsnout
womett, and children.
Redskins
Red
Blackskins.
en I’m midy praoud o’ them-

met the fust wor he

vith
Them
is shoot’n
kins, mon
Tell



ov bultdin’ this lil ole Cana-
n-Pacifle railroad. Stagnant
riff



89¢ $1.00 113 115 118 134

c

t@ conclusions, prompt me to teli
this story A doctor ordered a
man to stSy in bed, and on no
account to eat meat. Next day he
led again, and said sternly:
ou've been eating meat!”
“No such thing,” said the patient,
“Well, horse is meat, isn’t it?
And you've been eating horse.”







SILK“ VESTS $137 147

PANTIES 89¢ 98¢ 99% $1.07 113 129 $1.41 152

SLIPS $220 252 488

BRAS. $181 164 195 240 2.70 3.40 440 4.43
NIGHTIES $410 416 429 426.452 495 4.97 5.33

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Yous

DIAL 4606

REeSQGReREREEREREURBHEUEREAES GB



YOUR SHOE STORE

“Drop in and take
us today.”

pot-luck with

* ® =F TOY
Shed, passer-by, a silent tear; SUS }
A champion glass-blower lies here c
Challenged one day to do hi
worst, y
He blew a greenhouse, and the? 48 728 €&
burst,

Canadian Har
and R

SECURE
®

BARBADOS
COTT@N FAC
Hardware Department

TUE

DIAL 4220

}

i
)
}



|



RECEIVED
Selling Vast
dwood Chairs
ockers

WOVRS NOW.

CO-OPERATIVE
TORY LID.
Tel. No. 2039

M 31.32

the N



Par



p.m

Music

M

Radio

Faith fil?





BB. CR Radio. Programme |

| To-day at












of yesterday's puzzle. —Acrosst
A Brey 9, p) Ate; 11











Bar Wi Toe: 14,
16, Amuse; 20, Pat.





ae ES, SWORK TO
— pera =| P/ MILL A MAN
EMPIRE THEATRE | eee:
|
To-day special 9.30 Show

4.45 and 8.30 and con-

4.45 and 8.30 p.m,

BUD & LOU

tangle with
TITANS of

., TERROR!

ONAL presents

tinuing

Daily

cain” ee ELLIOTT
WALTER BRENNAN MARIE WINDSOR

Rervess une A REPUBLIC PICTURE. csee =




UNIVERSAL INTERNAT!

ROYAL



the Wolfman





sla aalae TA
Dracula CCLUMBLA PICTURES presents
BELA LUGUSI POOUCTION at ENT

the Monster
GLENN STRANGE

ALL |



ENPLOSIVE
THRILLS!

THUNDEROUS
ACTIONS!

AT






Three Shows TO-DAY 4.30 — 8.15 and 12 (Midnight)

SUNDAY & MONDAY 4.30 & 8.15

“THE

FABULOUS
TEXAN” )

Starring-—-

William ELLIOTT
John CARROLL and
Catherine McLEOD

Inside her arms, he forgot he was outside the law,

“NEESER
ASERRERS SER
THEATRE

_—_—
TO-DAY and TO.“ORROW

4.30 and 8 15
Colombia Smashing Double

“A THOUSAND
AND ONE
NIGHTS”

Starring :



Evelyn Keyes
F ora Phil Silvers and
4 \ Broderick CRAMTORO Soins oe)
Sot] NS) “ite a Cornel Wilde
Welitan for the Screen and Directed by ROBERT ROSSER
BRIDGETOWN SapAee tees
SPECIAL SHOWS TO-DAY Republic Double” “Red ‘CAMERON —"t wait

All-Aetion Double

** BRIMSTONE”

1.30 P.M.
TOLER
ie CHAN in

“THE TRAP

With Mantan MORELAND

9.30 &

and



as



The Ever Wendie R Ox Y
“JIMMY WAKELY i
SONG OF THE|| TODAY TO TUESDAY

4.45 and 8.15pm.
It's All About Airline Stewardesses?
— Four-Stan, Fum Hit!

PLAZA-oisrn|| ge

SPECIAL TO-DAY 9.30 a.m,

RETURN OF |)
APEMAN

BELA LUGOSI — John
CARRADINE &

WESTWARD ||
BOUND . |.









JANE VAN
lL AN JOHNSON

who is Mike-cra: i
ies zy No, as M me



BARRY \
vow KEEL SULLIVAN

with
KEN MAYNARD — Hoot see, se See
GIBSON — BOB STEEL = z

or)





BREATH-TAKING |
THRILES £2

ROUSING ‘|

oX CITEMENT £ fy







Rod CAMERON -

* Walter BRENNAN

“ ener dg

in

Starring William MARSHALL — Adele MARA



WED. & THURS.

20th C-Fox Double

BURT LANCASTER

* MISTER
AND

BLACK HAND ”

STARTING SATURDAY
4th AUGUST

“SWORD OF
MONTE CRISTO”

880”

The First Sypercinecolor
Picture to Show in
Barbados.
a, IES AMS

SATURDAY, JULY. 28,





1951

Re-arming France
Is Critical Problem

(By EDWARD M. CORRY)

The problem of transfor
tary force is reaching the cr

PARIS, July 27,
ming France into a strong mili-
itical stage for U.S. planners.

Grave political problems have taken some of the lustre

off France’s pledge to supp

ly 10 divisions to the Atlantic

army by the end of the year—a promise which President
Vincent Auriol repeated only last Monday to General
Eisenhower, as he formally handed over the site of SHAPE

headquarters.

Ships Don’t Get
Enough Meat

From Argentina

LONDON, July 27.

The Lendon Times commenting
on the Argentine meat situation
said: “British shipping com-
panies, long accustomed to bring-
ing Argentine meat to this coun-
try in refrigerated space, are dis-
appointed with the limited quan-
tities made available for shipment
so far this year.

These have filled only a fraction
of the space which was fully con-
ducted on ordinary business lines.
From the resumption of ship-
ments at the beginning of May to
the end of this month, not more
than 55,000 tons of Argentine meat
will have been brought forward
for shipment.

Exports from Argentina to all
destinations are now restricted to
10,000 tons a month, and lines es-
timate that only 5,000 tons a month
will be available for shipment to
the U.K. during August, Septem-
ber. and October.

Out of the total authorized ship-
ments of 10,000 tons a month, ex-
ports are made to Brazil and other
countries. If the total expected
quantity of 15,000 tons for the U.K.
during the ensuing three months is
realized, this will make a total of
70,000 tons in the first six months
of the new trade agreement

The agreement stipulated for
exports of not less than 200,000
tens of carcass meat and offal,
during'the 12 months after its sig-
nature,

For this quantity to be supplied,
130,000 tons must be shipped dur-
ing six months from November to
April, a period when supplies are
normally at their largest. This
would provide an average monthly
export of over 20,000 tons.
Shipping, owned by British
lines, is capable of carrying 500,000
tons a year or more than 40,000
tons a month. Consequently, even
during the height of the shipping
season, refrigerated space will only
be half filled.

Ships carrying passengers
mails must be maintained in the
service, and they would be able
to carry all the limited shipments
likely to be offered.



and

—

TAKES OVER FROM
BRIGADIER PAGE

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 25.
Brigadier A. C. S§S. Jackson,
newly-appointed Commander of
the British Army in the Caribbean
area, arrived in Trinidad this
morning to pay his first. official
visit to Trinidad. He has taken
over from Brig. E. K. Page. He
will spend five days here, Before
coming to the Caribbean, he was
Officer Commanding, Northern
Area, East Africa.





Assistant Librarian
Accepted By Leeds

Mr. Carlyle A. Burton,
Assistant Librarian, Public Library
has been accepted by Leeds School
of Librarianship for a one-year
course beginning early in Septem-
ber and leading to the Library
Associations’ Registration
Examination,

Mr, Burton will be returning
from Trinidad at the end of this
month after having completed
three months training at the
Eastern Caribbean Regional

Library (British Council).





The truth of the military situa-
tion here, as it is being expressed
more and more openly by all poli-
tical parties as well as U.S, ex-
perts is, that as long as war in
Indo-China continues to bleed
France of equipment, and huge
sums of money, she will not be
able to play her traditional role of
defender of the continent.

As of today, France has barely
three and a half divisions ready
for Eisenhower. Its airforce is
past the blue print stage, its arma-
ments’ industry has been very
slow in increasing output.

While its morale has improved
considerably, the army still lacks
the support of France’s 41,000.000
citizens, not to mention whole-
hearted opposition of a large sec-
tion of the population which form
the leftwing.

In terms of money and raw ma-
terials the drain is tremendous on
this economically weak country.
With the threat of sabotage always
lurking behird a crisis such as
France is now again experiencing,
the cost of turning out divisions—
modern divisions with high priced
equipment—is something which
any French Government trembles
to ask of the country.

French officials note the cost of
raising and equipping a modern
armoured or airborne division 15
$285,000,000—about one seventh of
France’s record 1951 arms budget
of $1,115,000,000. Even an ordin-
ary infantry division costs about
$142,000,000.

High Price

The U.S. is paying a huge price
for rejuvenation of the French
army. In arms and equipment a
total of $2,200,000,000 is to be de-
livered this year. In addition an-
other $275,000,000 has been ear-
marked for Indo-China and finally
some $400,000,000 has been credit-
ed France for the purchase or
manufacture of arms.

The list of equipment delivered
to France in the first six months of
this year comprise 50 different
categories and range from aircraft
carriers to tractors and include
jets, artillery and tanks.

The 1939 army was mostly an
army of recruits armed _ with
equipment that was soon to be-
come obsolete. By the end of the
war, the French army had for all
practical purposes disappeared.
For four years nothing was done
about replacing it.

Now she has to start from the
beginning, equipping. and training
a medern striking force. To train
this foree she desperately needs
25,000 army officers and non-com-
missioned officers fighting among
155,000 troops in Indo-China —a
potential core for a new French
army.

She also needs an armaments
industry to equip recruits. In light
weapons, the French are once
again turning out equipment in in-
creasing numbers but in heavy
stuft it is going at a craw!l.—U-P.





ws

INQUEST WILL
CONTINUE TO-DAY

FURTHER hearing in the
inquiry into the death of Charles
McConney of Brereton, St, Philip

will be resumed today before
Coroner C, W. Rudder at the
District “B”’ Court, St. George

at 10 a.m.

McConney met his death when
he was involved in an accident on
Stepney Road, St. George with the
motor car M-669 owned and
driven by Carl Fields of Roebuck
Street, St, Michael about 7.45
p.m., on July 21,



T

means made just.right

HEIR good looks tell you they’re just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price
tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
is a Full Brogue Oxford. Tied to every pair is
the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign
which means ‘ just right’!
leading stores in Barbados.









Wild Confusion
On Stock Market

LONDON, July 27.

Scenes of wild confusion marked
the Stock Market confronted by
the new Gaitskell proposal for
three years control of dividends
and fortunes lost overnight. High
priced industrials tumbled right
and left at the opening.

Ford metors fell five shillings to
53 shillings nine pence, Dunlop
rubbers three shillings to 61 shill-
ings three pence, United Molasses
nearly four shillings to 83 shill-
ings six pence and Vickers six
shillings to 47 shillings.

Worst hit section‘as trading con-
tinued was rubber shares. They
‘were then without dividends for
years and have only just begun to
reward their patient holders when
this blow fell,

Dealers were completely at sea
and reluctant to buy at any price.

The Brooke family controlling
shareholders of Brooke Bond and
Company tea merchants, lost more
than £100,000 when £1 ordinary
shares fell from £11. 15 shillings
to £10. 10s.—a 25 shilling loss on
each share. At one time shares

fell to £10. —U-P.

Debate On Price
Rollbacks

WASHINGTON, July 27.

Exhausted Senate and House
conferees ended an all-night ses-
sion early today with only two
issues blocking agreement on the
compromise bill to extend econo-
mic controls for one year.

Conferees said they reached a
tentative agreement on the amend-
ment permitting price rollbacks to
pre-Korean levels provided in-
creased costs may be added to
ceiling prices.

The other issue still in doubt
was the controversial beef slaugh-
tering quota question.

Chairman Burnet R. Maybank
said conferees reserved the right
to reopen discussion of the roll-

back amendment. He said the
Committee also would continue de-



art slaughter quotas “to pre-
vent black market.”
Maybank scheduled another
meeting at 2 p.m. today.
—U-P.



$10,542 Collected
At Piarco Airport

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 25.
Revenue collected at Piarco Air-
port during the month of June was
$10,542.13 which was $428.74 less
than the previous month, stated a
release from the Director of Civil
Aviation. This amount further in-
dicates a continuous drop in rev-
enue at the Airport from April.
Of this amount aerodrome charges
realised $9,856.96 and $684.17
came from rentals.





Look for it in





IMN:

{MERICAN COLL

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE .

“To Mr. Bevan—the Order of Lenin, and to Mr. Harold Wilson we might give the same—er, 2nd class ..



Ghost Town Lives

TO THE STRAINS of grand opera, a ghost town comes

to life in the high Rockies.

mond jubilee they are putting on M
house at Central City—once the cen:

To celebrate Colorado's dia-
art in the old opera
e of a gold-mining

boom. Saloons have re-opened to serve drinks.





~ Call For
Islamic

Solidarity

From HAROLD GUARD

LONDON, July 27.

Leaders in Central Asia, Soviet
Asian republics, and in Iran, Pak-
istan and Egypt are reportedly
calling to the faithful for “Islamic
solidarity” in a combined “libera-
tion movement” against Western
imperialism.

A Chinese Communist broad-
cast from Hankow said a meeting
of Chinese Moslems had sent tele-
grams to “Moslems and workers
of Persia and Morocco expressing
support for their liberation move-
ments. ' ae

The message said: “Moslems in
China cannot sit idly by and see
Moslems oppressed elsewhere. We
must oppose imperialism in uni-
son with all Moslem countries and
all oppressed nationalities.”

In Sinkiang province, the chair-
man of the People’s Democratic
League broadcast a declaration on
behalf of Moslems of Asia in sup-
port of Moslems in Iran.

Sympathy

He said: “The sympathy of
people of Asia and the Moslem
masses lies with the Persian
people.”

Last week Moscow Radio
brought |to the microphone the
“Grand Mufti of Central Asia’,
who said the international situa-
tion was “favourable to the Per-
sian people in their fight for in-
jependence.”

In Iran, Ayatollah Kashani,
leader of Fidayan Islam last week
published correspondence between
himself and Altaf Hussein in his

counterpart in Pakistan. Hussein
wrote to Kashani, “Pakistani
people have complete sympathy

with your sacred struggle.”

Kashani said he had_ invited
“statesmen of Arabia and the Isl-
amic world” to a conference for
the purpose of establishing Isl-
amic solidarity. Pakistan news-
papers give |prominence to the
message sent by the Grand Mufti
of Palestine to the Prime Minister.
Liaquat Ali Khan which said, “All
Moslems believe it is their duty
to see that the defence of Pakistan
is not the burden for Pakistan
alone, but one to be shared by al)
Moslems who must by law and re-
ligion fight to the death in defend-
ing Pakistan and Kashmir.”

Soviet broadcasts in Turkish
and Arabic languages monitored
here recently, urged the establish-
ment of the Union of the whole
Islamie world.—wU.P.



New Piant Comes
Into Operation

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, July 24.

The first section of the Agricul-
ture Department's new processing
plant has come into operation,
while other sections continue to be
installed at the Kingston premises.

The section in operation is mix-
ing stock feed mechanically, hav-
ing taken over this job from the
Government Produce Depot, where
stock feed used to be made by
hang. The mechanically mixing
of stock feed ensures a better dis-
tribution of the ingredients within
the mixture.

When the plant is completed it’
will increase the Government's

‘drive to improve the Colony’s
peasant farming economy. It will
be having units for canning pine-
apples, grapefruit and oranges,
and for the conversion of corn
cassava or the like into flour.

It is hoped that the flour manu-
facturing unit will be ready in
time for the next corn crop, whick
is expected to be around 800,000
lbs. The new plant will also sup-
ply storage and drying facilities
which will render surplus produce
less liable to attacks by insects and
moulds,



CLUB PREMIERE TENNIS

Yesterday’s Results
MEN’S SINGLES
A. W. Symmonds beat
Blackett 6—0, 6—0.
F, Edwards beat J.
6—1, #—6.
LADIES’ SINGLES
A. Griffith beat Miss G
y Pe 6—1, 6—2.
Monday’s Fixtt\res
| MEN’S DOUBLES
| C. B. Forde and W, DeC. Forde

LeR.

Robinson

Miss

vs. J. E. Haynes and LeR. Black-
ett

MIXED DOUBLES
Grimes and C. B. Forde
E. Parris and F, Edwards

Miss G.

vs, Miss



DOPE ADDICTS in New York
may tot 90,000, reports the
Municip Committee on Drug
Addiction to Mayor Vincent Im
pelliteri. That would mean ont
out of every 90 New Yorkers. The
committee wants to spend millions

of dollars to prevent drug addic-
tion and cure victims.

CONSTABLE SAM SAPAN is
New York's busiest cop. He has
recovered 33 stolen cars, including
a mail truck. He has rescued *
drowning man He has fallen
downstairs chasing burglars.

He joined Sergeant William
Cotter in saving the life of actress
Joyce Matthews, found with her
wrists slashed in producer Billy
Rose’s apartment.

Just before Sam and the ser-
geant were to go off-duty one
night, a radio call summoned them
fifth-floor

to a bedroom = in
Broadway's Hotel Woodward.
There, cach grabbed one leg of
Mrs. Estelle Ryan and pulled her
pack into the room as she was

about to hurtle into the street
Carmen is ‘layzee’

ACTRESS Carmen Miranda,
highest paid woman in the
United States in 1946 ($201,458
£71,950) scorns this honour in
1951. Says the Brazilian dancer:
“In 1946 | work on stages and
make two films. I go on radio
and be |ike atomic bomb. Then

I go to hospital. That I don’t like.
My health is too important. Now
I be layzee. If I got 200,000 dol-
lars in nk I wouldn't know
what to do with them.” In other
words she wants to be poorer to
be healthier.

LONDPOS DOCTORS advised
12-year-old Henry Hooke’s par-
ents to take the delicate boy to
Canada if they wanted him to live
a few years more. They did, and
to-day in Lemnia New Jersey, he
celebrated hs 104th birthday. He
has outlived his wife and two
children.

Growing a record

BIGGEST cotton crop in_ his-
tory is now a possibility. Cotton
bales for future delivery are down

40 cents
York.
MISSING — one Atlantic Blue
Riband. It was actually a silver
gilt, onyx, and enamel trophy
given by the late Harold Keates

to three dollars in New

Hales, Tory M.P., for the ship
that crossed the Atlantic th
fastest

The Queen Mary holds the re-

cord (average speed 31.69 knots)
but never got the trophy because

it was presented earlier to the
French liner Normandie, When
the Normandie burned at New
York in 1942 the trophy was
probably burned, too.

Now Americans are taking an
interest in it again, Next year
the new liner United States may
have 1 crack at the Queen Mary’s
record

Turpin’s gloves
THE GLOVES whick Randoiph
Turpin wore in the big fight ap-
peared on a New York TV pro-
gramme “It’s News to Me.” The
B.O.A.C. flew them over and will

fiy them baek to-morrow.
New York is discussing an
official weleome for Sugar Ray

Robinson with a ticker-tape
shower down Broadway.

GENERAL MOTORS plan to
make 36 per cent. fewer cars in
the next three months than they
made in the same time last year.
The steel saved will go for de-
fence. Yet they will still be mak-
ing 513032 cars during those 90-
odd days.

The last fling

ROULETTE WHEELS, dice
tables, patrons and all could sink
into the basement by winch and
ceble machinery whenever the
police threatened to raid a
gembling-house at Cheboygan,
Michigan. But one night police
fooled the doorman and got in
before he could throw the lever
and. cause the place to vanish.



More Rice In B.G.
Means Less Cattle

(From Our Own Correspondent)

_ GEORGETOWN, July 24
Rice expansion being carried
eut on the coastal belt of British
Guiana has had an unfavourable
effect on cattle production. Fig-
ures for the past three years show
® progressive drop in the number
of animals slaughtered

In 1948 the number slaughtered
was 19,600; in-1949 it was 17,745;
and in 1950—16,043. The amount

of bee! consumed in Georgetown
in 1950 was 2140,000 lbs., com-
pared With 2,300,000 Ibs in 1949

Of thee quantities the Rupununi
supplied 520,000 lbs. in 1950, and

364,000 lbs. in 1949 Production
continues to drop and during the
past two months there have been
sever meatless days in George-
towr

t

PAGE THRLE

ne

Reduction



of

London Express

Series XX
On Sale

THE Barbados Turf Club are
now selling Series XX for the
Mid-Summer race meet, A record
number of 75 horses will be taking |
part in this four day meet and in|
groups about the city men daily |
Ciscuss the coming races, |

At the turf horses are regularly |
seen getting their workout. They |
are taken to the sea, too, on}
mornings





|
|
|
|
|
|

51b tin
NOW.....-

hopeal Judges 11b tin

rT * ¢ |
\ ary Decision NOW

Found guilty of stealing three < cm Se mem Se e e
breadfruit, one soursop, six paw-
paws and some _ tomatoes, all}
valued 96 cents, Sarah Johnson |
of Connell Town, St. Lucy was |
yesterday fined £1 by the Judges
of the Assistant Court of Appeal,
Mr. G. L. Taylor and Mr. J. W. B.
Chenery.

Sarah also has to pay 1/6 to
Mortimer Johnson from whom she
utole the fruit and vegetables. In
imposing the fine, the judges
varied the decision of Police |
Magistrate Mr. S. H. Nurse. Mr. |
Nurse had fined Sarah £2

The background of the case was}
a claim by Sarah Johnson that
she was in charge of the land on |
whieh the things were growing}
and it was not Mortimer Johnson's
land. She did not deny picking
the fruits.

She produced papers to try to
prove that the land previously
belonged to her grandfather and

Take pure water, add KLIM, stir

and you have pure, safe milk

ran

ala

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER











was handed over to William e
Johnson from whom she produced e paced
1 power of Attorney. We, 2





Fined 7/- More

WHEN he lost his appeal against
Police Magistrate Mr. E. A,
McLeod’s 5/- fine decision for
failing to produce his driving
licence to a policeman Hamilton
Bayley of Villa Road, Brittons Hill,
had to pay an additional 7/-
appeal costs, The Assistant Court
of Appeal Judges who heard the
appeal yesterday, were Mr, G, L.
Taylor and Mr, J. W. B, Chenery
The Court told Bayley he was
lucky in only being fined 5/-

The offence was committed on
May 22, when Bayley was driv-
ing the car M-1920 on the Pine}
road, |

P, C. 230 Gladston Bradshaw
who reported Bayley said that the
car came down the Pine Road
without a head light burning, “I
put out my hand to stop him, but
he only stopped after he got past
me and had turned on his lights.
He then asked me if I were blind.”

Pc. Bradshaw said, Bayley
was unable to produce his licence,

APPEAL WITHDRAWN

Winsion Walcott of Maxwell
Hill, Christ Church, yesterday
withdrew an appeal he had made
against Police Magistrate Mr. C
D. L. Walwyn’s decision of £1 in
14 days or 14 days imprisonment
when he found him guilty of em-
bezzlement.

Walcott used to work with Cecil
Edwards delivering milk for him
and he fraudulently embezzled
3/6 he received from W. Thomas
who took milk from Edwards,

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

fg see i ,
My,cough has‘quite gone...
f ~





I'can enjoy smoking now!

6 My cough bothered me for years until
finally | was forced to give up smoking.
But the cough didn't go and | missed my
smokes. Then | heard about Zubes Cough
Mixture. It was amazing! My ‘ chronic’
cough didn't last to the end of the bottle.

How | enjoyed my first pipel 9 REG?

Warming, comforting Zubes Cough
Mixture soothes the faw throat,
stops irritation and invigorates the
chest. It's excellent for coughs
arising from colds, bronchial inflam-
mation, throat dryness and over-

smoking. Zubes Cough Mixture gets

cata mae MEK TURE
The cough remedy for adl the family





Sch Lady Noeleen, Sch. Rosaline M, s
M V. Sedgefield, Sch Sunshine R_, Sch. So
Marea Henrietta, Sch. Franklyn D. R.,







Bch
Yacht Marsaitese

Rainbow M., Sch, Mildred Wallace,
Sch, Cyril E, Smith,

Sch. Henry D. Wallace, Yacht Marianne,
Sch Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. W. L
Eunicia, MV. Lady Joy, Sch. Molly N.
Jones, Yacht Keskidee, 8 8. Mormacgulf,
SS Barbara, MV. Antares, 3S. In-

ventor, 8 8. Adviser, 8.8. Oak Hill, 8.8.

Strategist, 55S Student, 5 5 Lady
Nelson
ARRIVAL
Motor Vessel Daerwood, 94 tons net,
Capt. Mulzac, from St. Lucia

DEPARTURES
& S Ganymedes, 1,532 tons net, Capt
Drijver, for Trinidad
Schooner Freedom Fleary, 23 tons net,
Capt DeRoche, for Grenada
S 8. Polycrest, 720 tons net, Capt, Nor-

CREAM
CRACKERS

CRISP
&
CREAMY

They're Simply Delicious
N. B.

sett, for Montreal
MV. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt
Gumbs, for Dominica



In Touch with Barbados
Coast Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd |
advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their |
Parbados Coast Station:—

S.S. Charmouth Hill, 8.8. Missionary
Ridge, S.S. Theodoxus, $8.9. Cillope, 8.8
Celilo, 8.9. Kelletia, $.S. Dingledale, 8.5
Critish Fortitude



SS. Trajanus, $58
rmocmoon, S.8. Guifpride, 8.S. Sam
. $8. Argentina, $.8. Carina, 8.5
diddiefjord, S.8 fonian Pioneer, $.S
Brazil, 8.8. Aleoa Ranger, 8.8. Chan
gellorsville, $.S, lonannis P. Goodlandria,
6&8. Skotaas, S.S, Dolores, 8.5. Epo
Cardiff 8.8 John Chandris, 38.8
jakonia, $5. Tista, 8.8. Esso Rotterdam,
8 S$ Valkyrien Marsk, 8.8. Nyholt, 8.5
F.nrmark, S.S. Ancap, SS. Stanvac,
Pretoria, 8.8. Colombie, $.5. Myrto, 8.8
6.8. Yvoming, S.S. Edith Berthen, 8.5
Imperial Charlottetown, 5.58 Lauela
Brideman, 8 S. Astrea, 8.8. Alcoa Point-
er, 8.8. John Chandris, 5S. S. Rosa,
S.8. Alcoa Pilgrim, 8.8. Pollycrest, $3.8
Lions Gate, 5.5. Cab 8.8. Ringvilde
8.8 Chemawa, &%5S aturalist, 8.58
Woensdrecht, 8S. Bonito, SS. Therma



Cream
ill effects.

Diabetics Crawford's

Crackers

can
without

enjoy

fear of any

ASK FOR:

CRAWFORD’S










| CRAWFORD'S



& S. Albaro, 8S.S. Seabreeze, 5.5. Jane

Stove, 8.8. Bonito, 8.8. Bosario, 3.5

Hallanger, S.S. Macoris, 5.8. Monteal- . ~

lure, 85, Del Sud, $8. Lolde Mexico CREAM CRACKERS
& 8. Adriatica, $ S. Frinton, 8.S. Britan- A 4 A A 4 Ls
ny. 9.8. Prospector, 8.8. Clare Park '

S.S Everett, 58.5 Ldbreville, $.S.]

Alpha, 3.8. Hatcreek SSS




PAGE FOUR

FAREADOS GB

_~ += —_—





Printed by the Advocaie Co., Ltd, Broad 8t., Bridgetown,



Saturday, July 28, 1951





TEMPLE YARD

THE need for a public market in the
City has been the subject of public discus-
sion for some time and the Sanitary Com-
missioners of St. Michael decided this week
to recommend to the Vestry “that Temple
Yard be taken over as a public highway,
that it be covered and converted into
temporary market for hawkers; and that
if possible the building at the western
corner be acquired to provide space for
sanitary conveniences.”

The Director of Medical Services, the
Director of Transport and Highways, the
Colonial Engineer and the Commissioner
of Police were invited to take part in the
discussion of Mr. Mottley’s motion. They
agreed that if this temporary arrangement
would relieve the congestion and insani-
tary conditions caused by the presence of
hawkers in the side streets and alleys of
the City it was worth while.

It will be remembered that the Commis-
sioners after investigating several spots in
the City decided that the area between
Tudor Street, Suttle Street, and Watkins
Alley would be a suitable area for a
market. They recommended that the land
and buildings should be acquired for this
purpose. Owing to the legal difficulty in
the titles of some of the properties, the
Commissioners in an interim report recom-
mended that the Government should
acquire such of the properties as were
available. The scheme was estimated to
cost a sum in the vicinity of £40,000.

a

It had not been found possible for the
Government to embark on the scheme
owing to the amount of capital expenditure
involved and in the meantime, Mr. Mottley
has suggested the temporary scheme for
the conversion of Temple Yard into a
vegetable and fruit market.

The new proposal has the merit of estab-
lishing a market in the immediate city
area and putting it in a spot where there
is a driveway all round, where there is a
*bus terminus for country lines, where
th@re is a parking area and where the
vegetable market will be adjacent to the
meat and fish markets.

It is now left to the Vestry to recom-
mend to the Central Government the
adoption of this scheme, the cost of which
has been estimated roughly between two
and three thousand pounds.

The Commissioners made it clear that
this was not to be an alternative scheme to
the one for the establishment of a market
in Tudor Street. It was merely an attempt
to remove the unsightly and insanitary
conditions now existing in Tudor Street,
Milkmarket, Busby and Luke’s Alley.

These conditions have been the cause of
much public criticism against the Sanitary
Authority and the Government.

The Police have desisted from driving
these hawkers from their improvised
markets on the streets because of the ab-
sence of proper market space.

This point was not overlooked by the
Commigsioners who made it clear that if
and when the temporary market is estab-
lished in Te:mple Yard it will be necessary
to compel hawkers to use it.

The public too will be asked to co-oper-
ate. It will then mean that the insanitary
conditions fn the alleys will be removed
and the fourteen side streets between
Broad Street.and the Wharf and Broad
Street and Swan Street would be available
for parking and pedestrian traffic.



Agricultare In Cuba

THE establishment of special govern-
mental agencies for the financing of econo-
mic development is being firmly written
into the economics of under-developed
areas. Under the Law for the Agricultural
and Industrial Development of Cuba of
December 20, 1950, Cuba has recently
established a Bank of Agricultural and
Industrial Development of Cuba,

This bank has an initial capital of 15
million pesos and a development fund
of 10 million pesos, divided equally be-
tween its Agricultural and Industrial
Divisions. Both capital and development
fund may be increased by further govern-
ment contribution and by earned profits.
The loans eccntemplated in the law may be
on long, medium, or short term.

The first major operation of the new
bank in the agricultural field is to be the
financing of coffee production. To secure
funds for loans for this purpose, the bank
will issue bonds which will be guaranteed
by the security offered for the loans, In
this manner the bank hopes to avoid using
its capital for loans.

The law also prescribes the establish-
ment of rural credit associations and
boards. These are to be local stock co-
operatives organised to extend credit facil-
ities to their members; to facilitate the
production, processing, conservation,
transportation, distribution, sale and con-
sumption of products; and to carry out
financial operations which may aid
agricultural production.

other

DVOGATE s >

ae ne ae

|

i





«
*z 6
q’ aa
nsport t

State T finished the
year wit! lo ef £14,100,000

So tt reat S i f
ours emobrac ter
tacles e railway nationalised
road ! lage, and t waterways,
records total lo f £39,600,000
in its first three years of nationali
sation.

Put thet besid hat is happen-
ing to coal, elec ity, gas, and
cables, the other niajor national-
ised businesses and what does it

all add up to?

SIMPLY THAT SOCIALISA-
TION HAS FAILED. WHY?
BECAUSE THE GENIUS WHO
MIGHT MAKE IT WORK
CAN'T BE FOUND.

Members of the Government no

longer trouble to conceal thei
anxiety. Trade-union leaders are
equally unhappy. Mr. Joe Scott,
of the engineers, say

“The British Electricity Authori-
ty is a democracy run stark, star-

ing mad....Let’s go back to the
good old days.”
Mi Arthur Deakin, biggest

trade-union boss of them all, gives
this frank warning
“Any considerable
nationalisation proposals
shall get the biggest
we've ever had,”

What has happened to call forth
such condemnation?

COAL

Dearer, Poorer, Scarcer
Coal now costs between two and
three times as much as it did be-
And it is poorer in

extension of
and we
whacking

fore the war.
quality.

Even with these so much higher
prices the Coal Board is still
£4,000,000 short of wiping out its
year’s loss of £23,500,000
‘ t is likely to lose money





first
This y
again.

Its failure so lamentable
that last winter we had to import
foreign coal at a loss of £4,500,000
to keep going. And already we
are warned that we shall have to
do the same next winter.

The nationalisers claimed that
when coal belonged to the State
the miners would work with a
zest they never displayed when
they served the private capitalist
employers.

But what in fact has happened?

The men like their new imperson-

al managers so little that they are

leaving the pits by the hundred,
The New Man

Put the responsibility for that
on Lord Hyndley. He was the first
He built

was

head of the Coal Board
the system.

It proved to be a system that
had no place in it for those human
relationships which must be the
foundation of every flourishing
industry.

Now Lord Hyndley goes. In his
place will sit Sir Hubert Houlds-
worth, a legai-Civil Service mind.

Can he restore what is missing?
Will he make nationalisation
work?

You can give the answer in one

guess.
RAILWAYS

Dearer, and Worse
According to Lord Hurecomb,
head_ of the State Transport:
“All the principal indices of efft-
ciency on the railways have im-
proved.” But no traders—- and



very few travellers—share that
view. ; en
Indeed the Federation of British



Industries declares that “despite
inereased charges the railways do
not serve traders as well as in
pre-war days.”

Traders say they can never be
sure when or where their goods
will arrive.

Three recent instances of the
odd things that happen on our
nationalised railways are:

Twelve pedigree heifers

consigned from Lanark to a

farm in Sussex were delivered

at a Sheffield slaughterhouse
Ten tons of potting sand was



Low Living Standards Hold Back —

BARBADOS

By
BERNARD HARRIS

or a month on the jour-
from St. Austell, Corn-
wall, to Croydon,

A truck of urgently wanted
steel took 37 days to reach
Bury St. Edmunds from Car-
diff.

lost

ney

Always Excuses
Even the coal workers are com-
plaining about the railways. and
congestion at railway junctions,
they vay, is making another coal
crisis more probable.
The Railway Executive replies

that the congestion is due to “a
shortage of trained locomotive
crews.”

One year the excuse is lack of
coal; the next lack of men, Always
excuses and always deterioration
of service.

it is not merely that the Trans-
port Commission already records
accumulated losses of £39,600,0uUu,
but this year there will certainly
be a further loss.

How are these losses to be met?
In the usual way — the customer
and the taxpayer will be milked
again.

Already a 10 per cent. increase
in freight rates has been pushed
through. It is proposed to make
yet another increase in mainline
and London Transport .« fares,
which will hit particularly heavily
those who must travel daily to
their work.

The minimum fare on London
buses, trams, and trains will be
2d. Monthly return rail fares will
cost another 2s. in the £ more.

jn the London area the cost of
travel will be 15s, in the £ more
than before the war; outside Lon-
don it will be nearly doubled.

‘Patching’

Would it be better policy to re-
duce fares and tempt more pas-
sengers? Lord Hurcomb, brus-
quely, says “No.” He forecasts
higher fares still,

AND WORSE STILL HE
DECLARES THAT THE RAIL-
WAYS HAVE SO LITTLE
MONEY TO SPEND ON RE-
NEWALS AND REPAIRS THAT
RE-EQUIPMENT IS VERY
DIFFICULT. “IN THE MAIN
ASSETS ARE BEING PATCH-
ED INSTEAD OF REPLACED.”
That is a very serious state of

affairs, A disquieting commen-
tary on the efficacy of nationalisa-
tion.

Why has Lord Hurcomb failed?
Because he is a great civil servant
and runs the railways the way
Whitehall runs its departments.
State Transport is top heavy with
administration, and its adminis-
trators not necessarily big enough
for so big a job,

It is one of the defects of social-
isation that you can’t always give
the important jobs to the men best
fitted by experience for them.

The waiting queue is always a
long one, and too often men have
to be selected for reasons other
than their competence.

ELECTRICITY
High Prices, Less Juice
Electricity made £4,391,000
profit in its first year of national-

isation, followed by £7,163,000 last
year.

But was that due to better ser-
vice? Far from it. The profits
came from higher charges.

In the three years’ before

nationalisation the price of elec-
tricity gradually fell, Within a
few weeks of the installation of
Lord Citrine as electricity chief
prices started going up.

IN SOME AREAS CONSUM-
ERS HAVE HAD THREE PRICE
INCREASES IN THREE
YEARS OF STATE OWNER-
SHIP.

DESPITE THAT, LORD
CITRINE FORECASTS STILL





ADVOCATE

HIGHER CHARGES — AND
POWER C(TS THAT WILL)
GO ON FOR YEARS.

Why has Lord Citrine, with a|
high reputation as a trade-union |
leader, failed” Partly because the
other nationa).sed industries like}
coal and transport make success |
impossible. Partly because quali-|
ties other than those developed -in
trade unionism are necessary for |
success. chiefly because only!
an excepti | genius could cope
with the job, Such a man hasn't
appeared, and if he did it would
be most unlikely that he would
get the job.

» GAS
Soak The Customer
Gas made « minute rrofit of |
£2,663 in its iirst year. Where}
caoes the Gas Board lay the blame? |
Like electricity on its near rela~-

tions the Coal Board and the
railways. -
The gas chicfs complain of 13)

per cent. ash in their coal, against
10 per cent, before the war. “Be-|
cause we have only one coal mer-
chant it.is a little difficult to get
what we want,” they say, like all
ordinary citizens

They complain of profiteering by
Lord Hureomb’s railways, and
threaten to meet it by sending)
more of their coal the cheap way
—by free-enterprise coastal ships.

Up 6s. IN &

Gas had been nationalised only
two days Whé@n the policy of soak- |
ing the consumer started. |

Some of the increases are more |
than even the supporters of social- |
isation can stomach. The Bristol |
Socialist Party has called for a}
probe into. the running of the
South-West Gas Board. |

Traders in that city have pro-!
tested about rate increases of up
to 6s. in the &£.

One small parish in Nottingham |
is so incensed at being charged 13s. |
in the £ more by the East Midland |
Gas Board that it has told the
board to take away the gas lamps.

AIRWAYS
£40,000,000 Losses |

Since 1946, when the airways |
were socialise’, the taxpayer has
had to meet losses of more than
£40,000,000. |f the costs of the,
Ministry of Civil Aviation are}
added, the privilege of owning the |
air lines has been costing the tax- |
payers about £2,000,000 a month. |

What prevents a profit being}

made? It is the old story, State
interference and administrative |
overloading. |

CABLES |
Now ‘Unreliable’

When a non-political board of |
experts took over the Cable and}
Wireless network in 1947 it con-|
tinued to be reasonably well run—
though profits of £1,722,000 were
little more than half those earned |
under free enterprise. |

Then, last year, the Post Office}
became responsible for the admin-|
istration. And the rot set in. One
firm wrote to Cable and
Wireless:— }

“Your cable service has be-
come completely unreliable
and is a menace to any firm
engaged in overseas business.

“The delays complained of |
are beyond anything which |
can be excused on the grounds
of temporarily heavy traffic)

ava . . They are due toa
complete indifference on the
part of your organisation as
it now evists.”

With second-rate service has |
gone the usual story of steadily
declining profits.

a *

x |
No wonder that even Aneurin
Bevan is re-discovering the vir-
tues of private enterprise and has
just declared publicly: “If the
State administrators can’t do a
job, then private firms should be
allowed to do it.”
—L.E.S.



Tropical Industries |

LONDON.

Is there a greater chance for
processing industries to be devel-
oped in self-governing countries
than in colonies?

Dr. Charlotte Leubuscher poses
this question in a new publication,
“The Processing of Colonial Raw
Materials—"“A Study in Location,”
Sometime Research Fellow of
Girton College, Cambridge and of
Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, the
author says that without more
thorough research, it hardly
ible to give a conclusive an-

Is

“But,” she says, “from the avail-
able evidence as well as from gen-
eral considerations, it would ap-
pear that governments able to de-
termine their own trade policy and
usually guided by the desire for
a high degree of self sufficiency,
will find it easier to adopt a
policy of protection than colonial
governments.

“The latter will feel seldom
driven to encouraging the setting
up of industries in the colonies
which might turn out competitors
to industries in the home country,
even if they refrain from positive-
ly counteracting such a develop-
ment, Against this, colonies may
find it easier—though not necess-
arily—to, obtain outside capital.
In times of instability of exchange
in particular, the absence of trans-
fer difficulties between the mother
country and the colonies may
prove advantage to the latter.”

Dr, Leubuscher points out earlier
in her exhaustive review of the
ituation that a great many of the
processing and other industries in
tropical countries are highly pro-

an



tected. There is little doubt, she
maintains, that their growth and
survival have depended on the

willingness
and

to make consumers,
sometimes the revenue, pay

the price of such a policy, The
manufacture of white sugar in
India and of coconut oil in Trini-

dad and Jamaica

examples
Processing industries established

in the tropies would without doubt,

ire mentioned as

according to Dr. Leubuscher, have
to eckon with protectionist
obstacles, should their products

threaten to enter into serious com-
petition with home produced goods
That this applied even to the posi-
tion in the metropolitan markets
of products from the colonies was
evident from the following

the penal duty imposed in this

country on high
sugar which has

Mauritius sugar industry to turn
out a sugar of lower polarisation
than it used to do;

the threatened prohibitive
duty on binder twine manufac-
tured in Tanganyika, should it
be exported to the U.K.,

the imposition in the U.S.A.,
of fairly narrow import quotas on
white sugar from the dependen-
cies.

Dr, Leubuscher gives in this
180-odd page volume a detailed
analysis of the prospects of pro-
cessing in five main categories of
colonial »roducts—cocoa; copra,
oil plant products and groundnuts;
sisal; sugar cane; and timber.

grade white

The idea that it is a simple
matter to secure a_ diversified
colonial economy by setting up

plant for processing locally pro-
duced raw materials is dispelled
by Dr, Leubuscher, Few of the
advocates of such a course, she
says, stop to enquire why so few of
these industries have so far been
established in the colonies, The
general background had to be faced
—tropical climatic conditions
which, if not barring manufactur-
ing activities altogether, tended to
inerease production costs; econo-
mie and technical backwardness
resulting in lack of trained and
reliable labour; inadequate trans-
port. and port facilities; and the
historical set-up. not only of the
manufacturing but also of, the
shipping and trading organisations

For centuries the temperate zone
had been regarded as the natural
locetion of all kinds of manufac-
turing industries. Exploration of
methods suited to the different
conditions of the tropics had been
neglected.

The slow advance made in
working out processes which en-
able cane sugar to be refined in
continuous process in the raw
sugar factories and the little
attention given to making saws
particularly adapted to converting
timbers in the tropics are cases in
point.

Various economic and technical
considerations which explain the
present predominant location of
processing industries in manufac-
turing centres are provided in the
book. In the case of some materials,
facilities are lacking in the pro-
duetivg tropical countries for the
utilisation of, the residue after
processing, such as the extraction
of theobroming from cocoa cake
or the recovery of glycerine from

soap stock, In many tropical |

forced the countries, too, the output of al

particular raw material is insuffic-
ient to feed a modern plant of an)
economic size. |

While her special studies have
shown Dr. Leubuscher that there |
are ample reasons to explain the |
present predominant situation in}
the manufacturing countries of}
industries processing raw mater-|
ials from the tropics, she notes
that the permanence of that situa- |
tion is being inereasingly ques- |
tion, That, she comments,
may be taken as proof-of gradually |
evolving changes in the division |
of labour between countries of the}
temperate zone and the tropics. |
“But it remains”, she Says, “to
look for more tangible signs of
such changes.” The organisation
of shipping, whether carried on}
under monopolistic or competitive
conditions, must have a deep effect
on the location of processing
industries, |

In view of reversion from belief |
in the superiority of large-scale
production in all circumstances, |
and a tendency towards decentral-|
isation in industrial organisation |
in making headway, Dr. Leubus-
cher regards the prospect of
technical progress to aid tropical |
industries as brighter than in the
past. “She sees possibilities in the



building up of local markets in
processed material in tropical

countries. Process for local market |
and for export could often inter-|
lock, |

Dr. Leubuscher discusses to-
wards the end of her reyiew what)
she calls “the root cause for the

absence of processing for such
materials as oilseeds or timber.”|
She blames “general economic



backwardness and a low standard)
of living in many tropical coun-|
tries especially in Africa.” Over-)
coming of the _ fundamental
economic deficiencies in the}
producing countries would on the|
broad view appear the most}
promising way to development of}
processing industries, she says.
She thinks that an individual
territory will often be too small
a basis for the development of an
efficient industry. “The market}
to be supplied would therefore |
have to be regional, comprising |
several territories, and a pre- |
requisite of such a development!
would be the removal of obstacles |
at present impeding the free flow |

of trade between the territories]
of an economie Tegion, such as
high customs duties and other)
import regulations, lack of trans-|

port, etc.



lisationHasFailed NOBODY'S |

DIARY |

SUNDAY — Alive with steamships, the harbour
was a pleasant sight to me it not to a boatman
friend of mine. He complained bitterly that
he couldn't get a fare for his rowboat, yet the
launches were crowded and most irregular in
their trips to and irom the French liner.

It seems strange that the row boat owners
have failed to see the writing on the wall
although it has been there so long that it should
almost be erased. Why haven't they ganged up
in twos and threes and purchased outboard
motor boats? It would be a paying investment.
When not employed in transporting passengers
in the shipping the owners could take visitors
on fishing trips along the coast.

The day of the row boat for harbour work
is over.

“ONDAY — Who is it that said the hands of the
clock cannot be put back. Today there was
an alarm of fire on the Pierhead and the hands
of the clock were put back for me. I became
a schoolboy on the roof of the three storey
building at Harrison College watching a fire
on the water front which lasted more than two
days. The fire sticks in my memory chiefly
because the school could do no lessons. Luckily
the fire this morning was quickly brought
under control.



UESDAY — Have the car agents heard the latest
regulations? I am afraid that it will affect
their pockets. No one who has to do business
in Bridgetown will find it profitable to purchase
a car if these new regulations remain in force.

This morning my car was blocked in by
another car in the car park opposite the
B.M.L.A. Building. I immediately looked for
the friendly “Peggy” to extricate my car, but
he had been removed to pastures new. Two
newly appointed car attendants informed me
that I would have to stay put. It was none of
their business to move cars. In fact they had
been given strict instructions that they were
not to touch a car, I suggested to them that if
they had indeed been given such an order
there must have been a preceding order: not
to allow any ear to park in front of another
ear, They emphatically denied that they had
been told that cars should be parked in such a
manner that drivers would have access to
leave when they wished.

I can hardly believe that anyone with the
slightest acquaintance with this particular car
park could have given the car park attendants
the instructions which they said they received.
Three lines of cars, one behind the other and
all facing in the same direction, are parked at
this car park.

After an extensive argument the attendants

were good enough to let me out, otherwise I;

would be still there. Instead of issuing such
regulations, the authority in charge would be
better employed in publishing a notice telling
all drivers that they must not lock the doors
of cars on car parks or alternatively if they
have valuables in the car and lock the doors
for safety they must leave the keys with the
car park attendants. Many a time the best
efforts of car park attendants are defeated be-
cause selfish motorists lock their car doors and
wander away on their own busineess.

| \ /EDNESDAY — Is there a shortage of paper for

printing sweepstake tickets, or has the Turf
Club decided that the sweepstake has reached
saturation point? I ask these questions be-
cause, to-day, no less than four sweepstake
ticket vendors asked me to buy a ticket from
them and on each occasion not only was it the
last ticket in the book but the very last that
the vendor had. Each one told me that I must
not miss the opportunity, his last ticket was a
certainty for the first prize, the combination
of 9s., 6s. and 3s. was just right. As I am a
kind hearted man I decided not to deprive the
| poor men of certain winners so I told them
to guard the ticket with their lives seeing that
| so little respect is shown for property today
that even the Government is being robbed.

Instead of thanking me for my forbearance
and good advice these men gave me such an
icy stare that I had to have a pick-me-up to
defrost my blood,

THURSDAY — I am heartily sick of the tale I
heard this morning. There was little variation
in the conversation between three men. Each
one was trying to impress on the others his
love of hard work. The first speaker worked
all day in the office, he worked all afternoon
in the garden, he put the baby to bed and then
he did carpentry for half the night. There's
nothing like work said the others it keeps the
doctor away, There might be some truth in
that, who knows? certainly the doctors don’t
recommend it, but why should they? I’ hear
these tales so often that I am almost beginning

to believe that there may be some people who!
After all, fifty thousand |

really relish work.
Barbadians can’t be all liars!

For myself I prefer an easy job—no heart
strain, no eye strain and the minimum of brain
strain are the doctor's recipe for longevity.
Today I saw what appeared, at first blush, to
be the ideal job, I almost decided to be a
farrier. Theré he was in the shade of a spread-
ing sandbox tree — not a chestnut tree—carry-
ing on a cheerful conversation with a groom.
His patient, the horse, as docile as an over-
grown turtle, was having his hoofs manicured
while listening to the conversation.
peace, when suddenly a bee stung the horse
and he lashed out with his hind legs narrowly

missing the farrier who was indolently trans- ! ’

ferring his attention from the port to the star- 1s

bord side of the horse. I had seen enough, The
profession is too fraught with danger. I am
looking for a safer job,

* *

FRIDAY — My dear old friend “F. G.” must be
happy today. The Government of Barbados
hopes to have a law on the Statute Book that
will give us a real sabbath even though it
doesn’t fall on the seventh day of the week and
only oecurs once in three years. Still it is a
beginning! This sabbath, made to measure for
“F. G.”, falls on Election Day. That day is to
be set apart: no brass bands, no steel bands,
no liquor shops, no loud speakers, no posters to
annoy the eyes of the tourists and no one shall
bear false witness against his neighbour: only
the soft tread of the voter, as he wends his
way to and fro between his castle or cottage
and the polling booth, shall be heard on that
day of days,

The Bill fails to ban rolling the bones on
that Red Letter Day, so it is just possible that |
there may be an amendment.

SPF FOF



SATURDAY, JULY 28, 1951








CLOSED
FOR

REPAIRS



Advocate Stationery

CONGOLEUM

in colours and designs to
match or tone with any colour

SQUARES

3 yds x 3 yds. and 3 yds x
4% yds

also

6 ft. wide, cut to your
Requirements

PLASTIC TABLE COVERIN

45 ins. wide, WHITE and ALL COLOURS





a
itin vooye

a

pe



& HAYNES CO. LTD.
Successors to

c.S. PITCHER & CO.
BECKWITH STORES

S

WILKINSON





YES MADAM!!
you'll be delightful with

JAMS = CRYSTALS
PEAS

By Wm. P. HARTLEY Ltd.

MARMALADE 4lc. bottle
STRAWBERRY .. 55c. »
APRICOT 2-40 oe, #
DAMSON iy ac.
RED PLUM .. 420. »,
GREENGAGE Sle. »
JELLY CRYSTALS

Assorted Flavours 20c. Pkg.
GARDEN PEAS 34e,



NO ADDATIVES — Only FRUIT and SUGAR
Obtainable at all Grocers

NORTH BOUND STUDE
AND OTHERS...

PLEASE NOTE



NTS

i

We are now Showing

JAEGER ALL-WOOL
TRAVEL RUGS

and

ALOMA. ‘ALL-WOOL

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SIF OOF FOF FD

All was |





FORP OOOO.









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also
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28 ozs. 58” wide in Black only

)
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DRY GOODS DEPT.

‘



VES
MADAM!

THESE ARE
SUGGESTIONS
FOR YOUR
HURRICANE
STOCK ...

OX TONGUES
LUNCHEON BEEF
MEAT PASTES
SALMON
SARDINES

TABLE BUTTER
COOKING BUTTER
sIPTON’S TEA
LIPTON’S COFFEE

CEREALS
PEACHES in Tins

GOLD BRAID RUM CANADA DRY SODAS

prone—(j()DDARDS—we petiver

?

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? CHEESE in Tins
CARR’S CRACKERS
CARR’S WATER BISCUITS

CARR’S SWEET BISCUITS
in Sealed Tins

SWEETS in Bottles

SOUTH AFRICAN JAMS
in Tins and Bottles

GUAVAS in tins
GRAPES in Tins
APRICOTS in Tins

“rr

FO?

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~

>
%

SCS 9SCESSOOOSSOOOSOS OS OOSOSOOOSE SECS

aS
SATURDAY, JULY

28,





Tribesman Sails
From Speightstown |

WO WEEKS of activity for Speightstown ended on!
Wednesday evening when the Harrison Liner

1951

Tribes-

man sailed from that port U.K. bound.
During the two weeks, Speightstown received two calls

from ships for sugar and over 7,900 tons of sugar were)
First to call of the two ships was the Canadian

shipped out.

Constructer which loaded about 5,800 tons for Canada and
then the Tribesman came for over 2,000 tons.

Temple Yard
Unpopular —
With Hawkers

THE idea of making Temple’
Yard a temporary district vege-!
table market is not popular with}
quite a number of hawkers of City
streets,

Over a dozen hawkers of Busby
Alley gave their reasons for object-
ing tu a vegetable market at that!
site yesterday while others gather-|
ed around them uttering phrases}
of agreement with their views,

“Give us a proper market and
we will be glad to make use of ji;!
but not in Temple Yard or any-|
where near Drumm Street.” This
was a sort of slogan of the Busby
Alley hawkers,

Daisy Hall, who has been selling}:

vegetables in Busby Alley for 27
years now, said that she is all
comfortable at the spot where she
sells and does not want to be
moved from there to be carried to
“raw Temple Yard.”

“How do they expect us to
stomach the rawness coming from!
the fish market?” she asked. “And|
then there will be the coopers
keeping a lot of noise all day with
the puncheons.” ‘

Daisy said that -she noticed ‘in!
the paper, a suggestion that it was
not necessary to spend money ia
covering. the spot, “It would be
useless moving us from Busby
Alley to carry us to an uncovered
spot in Temple Yard”, she said
“There will be no place to shelter
when the rain falls—we can find
shelter now that we are in Busby
Alley—and we would be exposed
to much more sun”,

Mildred Jordan, another hawker
of long standing in Busby Alley,
said that the idea of making
temporary district vegetable mar
ket is a good one but the site was
badly chosen,



on the seaside”, she said. “I will
be willing at anytime to move my
tray from Busby Alley to a market,
but not in Temple Yard.

Bad Site

Mildred said that she _ his
travelled among 11 West Indian
islands and in every place, except
Barbados, a vegetable market was
one of the first things that she
saw as she stepped ashore, She got
the others to agree with her when
she said “i would not mind if they
put up a market at Tudor Street
because wit would be a good area
for trade,”

A hawker joined in “Do you
think that a clerk of any of these
stores that wants something would
go all the way down to Temple
Yard for it?” “It would be much
easier for her to just come into
the alley and get what she wants.”

Nicey Belgrave, who sells at the



corner of Messrs. C. F. Harrison| there to pass.

said that she has been Senne
vegetable for over 25 years and! +
has never known Barbados to

have a proper vegetable market.

She said that she has always|Mr. Lambert Archer is now in
\ charge of the library.

associated Temple Yard with fish
and pigs and not a place for a

vegetable market. She knew of
about 300 other hawkers who
would be glad to get a proper



market where they would be well]
protected from the rain and sun,

These hawkers would, however,;
“prefer to get wet by rain and then
dried out by the sun at their
spots in the alleys than to be well}
covered at Temple Yard anc
getting few sales when the days |
came.”

Nicey felt that ,with the number
of people that might be going
down to Temple Y
would be always
uncomfortable.



congested

}any stir in the port.

a, with small catches of flying fish

, | fishing boats on the beaches, but
“Why don't they make a market) they still go out daily in ‘moses’

The: port was quiet yesterday.

{Only fishing boats returning. with
‘moses’ |
going to bring the fishermen and |

their catches of fish and

their fish to the market caused |
|
Hand earts, which during the |
two busy weeks were laden with |
sugar time and again and rushed
through the streets to the jetties
by groups of men, were motion- |
less at their parking spot in
Messrs. R. & G. Challenor’s yard.
Trollies were not running the
lines of the jetties as frequently.

Sugar workers of Speightstown,
most of whom are now idle again,
are anxiously awaiting the arrival |
of another sugar ship at that port. |
A shipping clerk said that he did}
not know when another ship was
going to call at Speightstown, but
he did not think the Tribesman
would have been the last to call.

AIN FELL every day this
week up to Thursday in St.
Peter, the greatest fall being on}
Tuesday when an inch of rain}
was recorded at »District “E”’ |
Police Station. |
The rainfall’ returns at that
police station were | inch, 78 parts
up to Thursday evening. Forty-
five parts were recorded | for
Thursday. 3
Planters of the parish said that
the. showers ..were timely and
most welcome! They fiad just got
through the crop and were wait-
ing for~showers to plant food.

The early part of the month
was dry and in some parts of the
parish, ratoons had begun to look
withered. The showers of rain
have given those flelds a “greener
look.” .

PEIGHTSTONIANS have been
getting little fish during this

month, Fishing boats have been
going to the banks but returning



and bigger fish.
Fishermen are hauling up their

nots and
catches

in seavch of their fish
they bring back large
some days.

Some fishermen are using ineir
nets for catching fry, pilchards {|
and other stnall fish. Fry are be-

{
!

coming plentiful.
HE HIGHWAY COMMIS-

SIONERS, of St..James are
still widening and levelling their
road along Highway 1.



Most of their activities yester-
day » were \concerttated on the}
strip of road covered by Sandy}

Lane trees. One half of the road
was blocked by colas' drums,
heaps ‘of* fine stones and the road
workers’ tools, while a _fock
crusher was levelling ‘the other
half,

Vehicles could not move along
thet road freely. At sometimes, a
vehicle had to stop before enter-
ing the strip of road under repairs
so as to allow another already

ISS ELAINE JORDAN, Litea.|
rian of the Speightstown
Free Library, is on a week’s leave. ;

GET COMMENDATION
CERTIFICATES

THE Commissioner of Police
Colonel R. T. Michelin presented
Harbour Police Constables Gill
and Philips of the Bridge Post,
Bay Street, with commendation
certificates on Thursday morning,
at a parade at Central Station.

They received these certificates





ard, the market |for detective work and zeal which
and!they showed when they success-
lfully investigated a ase of lar-

A man who was selling fruit injceny of a bicycle from the Empire
a push cart was not very interested | Theatre.

because

he could “go around
selling.”

Two hundred and five officers
and men attended the. parade.



RAINS HOLD UP FOOD
CROP PLANTING

SGME MANAGERS of plantations in country districts,
told the Advocate vesterday that they are now planting
food crops and that ratoon canes are coming on very well

indeed,

in some cases.

Mr. J. N. Wilkie of Cottage
Plantation, St. George, said that

they had started to plant 11 acres
of yams. They had also planted
4 acres of corn. ‘We should have
done mere planting,” he said, “but
on account of the late reaping of
the crop and the recent rainfall,
ploughing was held ‘up. These
conditions have the same effect on
adjoining plantations and also on
small landowners, the ploughing
of whose land done by the es-

totes’ tractors
Good Outlook
Mr. Wilkie said that the ratoon
canes were doing well. When

asked about the prospect of next
year’s crop, he said: “If the rains
continue satisfactorily, I feel sure
that the crop next year will be as
good as it was this year. |

Mr. G. A. Corbin of Sturgess
and Bloomsbury plantations
Thomas, said that they had s
to plant yams; potatoes and other
food crops. At Sturgess they had
fortunately got through with their




Recent rains, however, have held up ploughing

were coming on very well indeed.
Plougnhing

Mr. C. Clarke of the Rock Plan-
tation, St. Peter said that many of
the agricultural labourers are now
engaged in ploughing the field and
setting manure to the young canes.

Good progress is being made in
regards to this work on the plan-
tation so that a good crop can be
had, such as the last one. Not
all the labourers are working on
the setting of manure, and perhaps
the majority are working on the
trash, clearing it away and then
storing it

About three and a half acres of
the field are taken up with the
growing of yams, The_ receht
heavy rainfall has impeded the
progress of work on the plantation
as the majority of workers stay at
home on a very rainy day.

The rain has also held up the
ploughing of the field and there is
still much work to be done in re-
gards to this branch of work.

No complaints have been com-

ploughing before the recent rains. | ing from _ the labourers and no
The contrary was the case at) fights in the fields have occurred
Bloomsbury. lately. 7
The ratoon canes were respond- Another planter of Christ
ing nicely to the weather Church said that they are also

“I think that the weather in the
months of August and September
will have a decided effect on next

year’s crop,” said Mr. Corbin,
“Certainly if we get a dry August
there will be a set back.”

Mr. Hunte of Ball’



Christ Church, saic
now

ing fo

and and plant-
> ratoon canes



a

preparing for the next crop. The
field at present is undergoing a
“major overhaul” and labourers
are working well clearing away
excess trash

There is still some ploughing to

| be done but the young ratoons are

springing up well. If the weather
permits, a good crop like t

is expected.

he last | kindly



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



FOR

|
|
}
|
|

}
}
|

THE

KLIND

THE GOVERNOR, Sir Alfred Savage, declares the first school for the
School, James Street, yesterday.

H.E. Opens School For Blind



_————




lind open at the Hurd Memorial

At Hurd Memorial School

THE FIRST SCHOOL for blind people in Barbados was )

cpened yesterday at the Hurd Memorial Schoo] in James |

Street by the Governor Sir

Alfred Savage.

This has been done mainly through the efforts of Miss

Betty Arne, Secretary of the
the Deaf and the Dumb.
Sir Allan Collymore,

welcomed the Governor and Lady Savage after which Mrs.
H. A. Vaughan, Acting Honorary Secretary, gave a short

history of the Association.

After the Governor’s Address,
the Rt. Rev. Bishop G. L. G
Mandeville blessed the building

This was followed by the Report
of the Honorary Treasurer Mr. V.
E. Cobham and a vote of thanks
by Mr. C. A. L. Gale, Vice Presi-
dent of the Association.

Sir Allan Collymore said: “It is
my pleasant privilege to welcome
Sir Alfred and Lady Savage here
to-day. My Committee and I are
grateful to you for your presence
and to the Governor for having
consented to open this centre.

From small beginnings, it
hoped to expand, enlarge and to
give greater service to a small, but
very deserving section of the com-
munity

The aim of the centre is to
instil greater self confidence in
the pupils to provide them with
occupational interests, and in-
deed to endeavour to make their
lives happier and more pleasant.

Thanks

The establishment of this centre
is largely due to the initiative and
enthusiasm of Miss Arne who is
away on leave, and unfortunately,
cannot be present to-day. She has
been ably assisted by Mrs.
Vaughan who now | takes
place as Secretary of our Com-
mittee and has made all

is

mony.

The efforts of these good ladies
would have proved in vain, had it
not been for the ready co-opera-
tion and kindness of the Building
and Property Board of the James
Street Methodist Churc/. We are
deeply grateful to them for having
granted us the use of this build-
ing for the nurpose of housing the
centre.

There are several others to
whom debts of gratitude are due,
but I shall not detain you at
length. I would However mention
this: The Treasurer gives willing
service and his only regret which
is shared by all members of the
Committee is, that
sufficient funds to handle.
heing the case, we hope efforts will

her |

the !
| arrangements for this simple cere-

Association in aid of the Blind,

President of the Association

more can be sent at present as the
School has reached the limit of
its capacity. The School however
is expecting anew and larger
building in the near future when it
will continue its policy of accept-
ing other handicapped children
from the neighbouring islands for
training there.

Teaching the Deaf is a long and
arduous task, and Miss Yuille the
Principal of the School in Trini-
dad has worked wonders with our
youngsters who have all improved
since their stay there.

Training for the Blind—In 1948
a Blind Barbadian, George Scott
was sent by the Association to
Trinidad for training. Our thanks
go to the Trinidad & Tobago Blind
Welfare Association who were re-
sponsible for Mr. Scott's training.
George Scott, aged 38 resides at
Eckstein’s Village, St. Michael, 10.
In his early years he assisted in
teaching at St. Stephen’s Boys’
School, Later he worked at Ovid's
Mechanical Shop. In 1932 he join-
ed the C.N.S. on the S.S.
Prince Henry. While at sea he lost
his sight.

On his return to Barbados by his

own efforts he taught rfnself to
;read braille in the short space to

jat a centre in Trinidad.



He has now returned
small training centre for blind
adult persons was started at the
Hurd Memorial School, Jame
Street.

The centre opened with 6
dents but since work has started
we have had applications fron

by

Cro

t!
S

Garrison.

The

ipport

the last war.





| Fined $14.40

| For Woundittg

His W
Police Ma
yesterday



imposed of $1

at



to.be paid ,by instaiments
default two months’ imprisonn
; With hard labour or Alberthe
Grant of Flint Hall, St Mict
{tor wounding Evans Husband
| July 7
{ Mr. D. H. L. Ward appeared «
j behalf of Grant In |

to the court Husbands said tiiat
}July 7 he and Grant ha o
|thing” and Grant struck him
| the head with a hoe

As a result of the blow w
‘forced to go to the General He
' pital Maud Pinder, a ne
jfor the defence said that
{not,see when Husbands 1¢
;the wound on his h

not say that Grant had
‘with a hoe

Grant admitted. in her ev ice
j that she hit Husband with he
hx but said that he attack el
vith a piece of slick

Mr. Ward—for defendant Grant
|} —said that it was clear that~the
}two people had a_ fight in ‘
norning of July 7 and as a result

| of this Husbands was wounded on

case she was entitled to defend
:

Obi :
Mr. E. A. Maynard



ary







re =Financial Treasurer, The death oceurred at his resi-
ocial Welfare Office, the} dence, Black Rock, on ‘Thursday
night of Mr. Eugene Agustus May-
Happy nard, Official Reporter of the

G = - “ -,| House of Assembly. He was 57

iovernor said My wife ’

a Tate vers hanpy to wide Mr. Maynard who will best be
in: 7 AREY “he our) remembered as Reporter of the
: yee at work, more! Barbados Advocate was born i
rticularly, because we have haa this island in the parish of St
ersonal contact with a very dear] ‘~numas and was taken in his ear-
iend of ours who lost his signt} ), years by his parents to Brit-
J | ish Guiana where his early educa-
What surprised both of us so| tion was fostered by the iate Rev

age,

that

in
to

Mrs.



{

ne

possible

ver
iKe




the

life.
learn

may

n and

1? an

by

d

energy

ma

be used

and
ny

been

t

so pleased
similarly,
George Scott, by his energy and
by his drive, has put himself in
a leading position in this islan:
in relation to his fellow men and
women who are similarly handi-
capped and I hope that his ex-
ample will be to all others, such
that will enable them with that
same courage and energy to take! of this island
their normal places in the life of
the community
Vaughan
ecessity for us all to help these
eople to cross the road.
peal that these words ‘cross the
i in more than
sense. That we help by our
ntributions, that we help where
articles

buying the

g this school open.”

| Lady
and a!today and you, Sir, for having con-
sented to open the centre and also

for th

1 believe
tu-) operation

S

e

avage

for

continued }
have taken in the Association.

of

the

he

referred

coming

much, was the tremendous cour-

drive
others

came in contact with, had m
to get as it were that fresh

have
that

May I



interest

we

t

Mr

the

hich are made, but we can help
iinly by taking a real interest in
group of citizens and when-
we have an opportunity, we
that opportunity to sp
find out

ik to
how they are
gresssing in their new life
I have great pleasure in declar-

Sir, that with the co-
1 community,
jthis centre will help to give eyes
4)to the blind and will at the same

other blind persons. It is proposed |time, add a number of useful citi-
in the first instance to teach the'zens to Barbados.”

blind how to re-seat chairs in Rush

he has notj to cane chairs, and later basketr) |
That| Arrangements are being made to}

teach braille to those who arc}

be made to secure more contribu-| capable. |

tions and donations to our fund.

All the students are provid

We have with us this morning| with white walking sticks, so\jhat

apart from the Committee, Miss|they can perambulate independ

Pickering. She has shown tre-
mendous interest in the centre
from the time of its inception and
attends almost daily to assist in
this good work. I think that is all
I need say. In a short while and
in gratitude to you, Sir, for com-
ing and taking an interest in the
work, I shall ask you to formally
declare the centre open.”
Mrs. Vaughan in giving a
history of the centre said:

hort

Voluntary

‘The proposal to form the Bar-
bados Association in aid of the
Blind, the Deaf and the Dumb
was accepted at a public meeting
after the need for such an asso-
ciation was shown by the Rev. F.
W. G. Gilby, M.A. during his
visit to this colony in the latter
part of 1944 and a
Committee was appointed.

The Barbados Association in
aid of the Blind, Deaf and Dumb
is a voluntary Association working
however in close cooperation with
government. Constitutionally the
Committee is still in a formative
stage with the Social Welfare
Officer as Hon, Secretary, The
Association has a Committee of 12
members: —

Sir Allan Collymore—President;



Mr. Louis Gale—Vice-Presdient;
Mr. John Beckles, Dr. J. P.
O'Mahony, Mr. Kenneth Tucker,
Cr. H. G. Cummins, Dr. C. H
St. John, Mrs. Ben Moore, Mr. C

G. Reed, Miss B. L. Arne—Hon
Secretary, Mr. V. E. Cobham
Hon. Treasurer, Miss [. Pickering

—Co-opted,

The Association started by -com-
piling a register of all the Blind,
Deaf and Dumb in the island. In
this effort teachers, ministers o!
religion, doctors and other public-
ninded citizens helped. In 1946
the register showed a total of 502
blind and deaf people.

Training

Deaf and Dumb—The Associa-
tion agreed that it would concen-
trate in the first instance on the
training of the juvenile Deaf.
There are now five children at-
tending the School for the Deaf
and Dumb in Trinidad, This was
agreed to as it was found much
| too expensive for the society with



‘limited funds to launch out into | %
having a school of its own when,
facilities existed in a nearby |
island. The Association for the]
Deaf and Dumb in Trinidad has | %
consented to accept our) 9
deaf children. Unfortunately ‘no 9596999660064906090000000™"



Formative}

|
ently of human guide. The Com-
mittee asks the public therefore |
to assist in every possible way any |

person it sees carrying a white)
walking stick, helping them t
cross the road. hoard buses, et
Finance
The Association is a volu
tary Society which is partly |

financed by government, but the
Committee must also depend o
the goodwill of the public an
any subscriptions will be grat

,‘NELSON’’
ON SUNDAY

The S.S
port taking

Canada

Barbados

ern

by
wood,

aay

about 164 packages of fresh fruit.



LEAVES

Aiso arriving by the Daerwood

were

350

fully received and acknowledged cocoanuts





ZOFLORA
fragrant with
oils, especially made for purifying the

i

SABC SR HAT eee
POSSESSES SSS SSPSES SES SPP PSS POPE PAP AA. LAA



atmosphere by

!

} houses and in tt

Available
Bouquet,
Lavender and Pir

J





in the
Jasmine

powerful

666 oto



germicide,

mngly antiseptic floral

Spraying
Rooms, Offices, shops, Factories, Ware-

Home.

a SOC

Lilac,

in

Lof lora
(Despumed D\S\NFECTANT

Public

following perfumes:
Carnation,

1%



feet of mahogany,
| bags of copra and a quantity of

mH. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. - Agents
BEBHEBSBea&Baas &B

POLES LSELPEOOOP PEPE LLL LLL ALLL APD

PA APSA

270

BaeoeseeekteaSGQage ase & B
a INSIST ON

= PURINA CHOWS

THEY ARE THE BEST

ty

“8



OS SOS SC POO PODS OSES GDI EPEAT



Dingwall of the Moravian Chureh

He returned to Barback in 1915
and became a pupil teacher at
the Buxton Boys’ School, Later
¢ went to Carriacou as an over-
seer and after a_ short period
returned to Barbados

he entered the fleld of journal-
ism when he joined the staff of the

now defunct Agricultural Report
er. Then he came to the Adyocate

where he remained as Senior Re-
porter for 26 years. He was a pro-
| ficient shorthander and it was his
| life’s ambition to become an Offi-

of the Legislature
The cup of his am-
bition was filled in 1946 when he

cial Reporter

| succeeded Mr. E. J. Taylor

»| Within recent months he. was
struck down by a malignant dis-
ease and after weeks of painful

illness the end came on Thursday
His funeral took place at Sharon
Moravian Church yesterday
presence of a large gathering
He leaves a widow and a brother



Mr. John Maynard, to whom
deepest sympathy will be = ex-
tended

=

AT .

WEA





|
|

THERIEAD'S

|about three weeks, and later on Pleased You SAVE $1.00 a tin on
also taught himself to write. Not}. Moving the vote of thanks

allowing his blindness to be alyr, Cc. A. L. Gale said: “I am KLIM
handicap, he helped himself inppjeased to see that I have very J

various ways, by teaching and}pleasurable and brief duty of )

peddling, Scott spent ten months thanking Your Excellency and POWD Vi ED M I

Fresh Stock at...

REDUCED PRICE

YESTERDAY'S PRICE
$6.98 per tin

TO-DAY'S PRICE
$5.98 per tin

also

DELICIOUS SWEET



Lady Nelson, now in i

a load of sugar for]) BISCUITS i}

, is expected to leave }) 4 tt

on . Sandy » night 10c. per pk. in cellophane i

|for Canada via the British North- } CUSTARD CREAMS )
Islands and Bermuda i} mee i
peiealiah, i MILK AND HONEY ;

)) UNG) . Cc }

FRUIT COMES i GINGER SNAPS tH
CURRENT PUFFS Ni}

A good supply of mangoes ar- ' (i
rived here from St. Lucia yester- i\
the motor vessel Daer- NEILSON S ))

The Daerwood brought ut {

Rose Buds 12c. bar
Nut Rolls 12¢. bar
Cherry Creme 12¢
Malted Milk 12c.

MOIRS'

Pineapple Ile. bar

Buddies Ile. bax

Peppermint Patties
Ile. bar

JACOBS CREAM

Crackers $1.64





BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LAMUTED

FINEST
BEDROOM





in the |

his head. His client was. first
attacked by this man who was
rmed with a stick and in. that}

|

|

i





DRINK

Tn

TTT LP PY Ce”

‘WE

PAGI



COOLING &

DTS

‘n Cream,

REFRESHING

ZAc. TIN







FIVE

& ENJOY







PEEPS GSE SSIS IDPSD9OSTSVSD GODS SODGTPGOTO TOY
. s
* « ° . / %
» Reduction of BBU36% x
M , n= = x
s After Stock Taking %
*
s e
s $
. . ;
: for 2 3 & Ff people x
> y
sy ta aaah ‘ se bd
s BASKETS Original Price $36.24 8
. now 25.00 &
. Price 18.68 &
% now $118.00 &
“ Price 24.00 2
oar a now 16.00 &
* VALISES Price 18.69 &
f now | 13.00 $
S Price 29.52 &
% ae now 20.00 &
ss ATTACHMENT CASES Price 26.00 %
a: now 18.00 &
ZIPP CASES Price 18.68
;
“ now 13.00 %
:
‘. %,
ss Y ‘ reve 5
x KNIGH SE LY. %
s,
%) ,
PALO. 39 OSCOOCOONSB995OO666665°4 set
PPS SS90s9696%" PROC EOOIOOOF, ADONIS OOM»
: :
= %
x net ws ine al g
s e ti >
\ wWret «Bar pe ” 3
a“ aces %
* ne x
ot %
%
‘ :
§ >
&
% we have the ¥
3 3
ss
’ SPORT
» i
%
‘
% ‘1g ren
ge i
x
x
% YOU'LL WANT
>
% fO WEAR
8
>
%
x
ss
% @
ys
%
X SHIRTS ‘ de.
) ¢
; err
”

SOS

FURNISHINGS

In Our Linen Dept.

fC mo ae
M4
} et 55,
Lah’
| ra Z 1
fi 4
i" r A
; |
%
ed
e | <
ook Se

ueru, Brown,
cellow, Rust, be

ireen,

Vark Brown

ttt GOCE

*










t

$5.21 & $5.98

other Floral Patterns from

$2.91 to $5.58

1 OOOO OE Ot

PCE ALL LPL APLAA”D

SHEETS
(REXWEAR)







COTTON SHEETS

80 x 100 $7.86 each
(REXWEAR)

70x 90 @ $7.77 each
(REXWEAR)

63x 90 @ $5.99 each
TICK
DAMASK TICK

56 ins. wide @ $2.58 yard

Blue, Green

FANCY TICK

56 ins, wide @ $2.18 yard
BLACK & WHITE TICK

56 ins, wide @ $2.46 yard

PELLOW CASES
COTTON PILLOW CASES

19 x 30 G $1.45 each
Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd,

1G; it,



12, 13 Broad Street

neers eae seers sen



PRINTED DESIGNS including Africa Prints and

HARRISON'S — sroan strcex

6965 OE SOA

«
PPLAPS SLOPES ©


PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, JULY 28, 1951
Se ee Si asians

ee 1 Rheumatism
Dreadful, Choking, Spasms Of and Backache

BRONCHIAL Gonein i Week

Feel Fine
Cystex—the prescription of a famous
ad t

y } r—endas all troubles due to faulty
EASED IN | kidney action in double quick time, so,

if you suffer from Rheumatism, Sciati-

. ca, Neuritis, Lumbago, Backache, Ner-

A FLASH |B | vousness, Leg Pains, Dizziness, Circles

| under Eyes, frequent Headaches and
Colds, Poor Energy and Appetite, Puffy

| Ankies, Burning, Smarting Passages,
| or have frequently to Get up Nights,

go to your chemist today for Cystex
| and be fit and well next week.

Cystex Helps Nature 3 Ways

The Cystex treatment is highly scien-

tific, being specially compounded to

| soothe, soe sae clean rem, sore, sick

z ‘ A ‘ Ws j kidneys and bladder and to remove

ease that choking, smothering spasm in seconds! Buckley’s | acids and polsons from your system
safely, quickly and surely, yet contains
no harsh, harmfvl or dangerous drugs,

Cystex works in these 3 ways to end

your troubles:—

(1) Starts killing the germs which are
attacking your Kidneys, Bladder
and urinary system in two hours,
yet is absolutely harmless to human
tissue.

(2) Gets rid of health destroying,
deadly poisonous acids with which











HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON
ese | | eee teen









NIGHTS When one dose of the amazing Mixture will

BY WALT DISNEY
7.1 FIGGEZ TO SCARE THUH GHOSTS)
WITH MUH RELATIVES... BEFORE THEY
P SCARE 8! |

Mixture is no ordinary medicine—its different from any
Cough Remedy you have ever tasted—Triple Strength—No

Syrup—All Medication.

your system has become saturated.

(9) Strengthens and reinvigorates the
kidneys, protects you from the rav-
ages of disease-attack on the deli-
cate filter organism, and stimulates
entire system.

9 Weeks in Hospital—
Now Well

“T have suffered for five years with Kidney
| and Bladder trouble, also Rheumatic pains

end Stiff Joints. I was not able to raise my
arms and spent nine weeks in a hospital.
They said I would not be able to work, but
after Cystex I feel years younger, well and
strong.” (Sgd.) J. A. PF.

Health Improved in 2 Days
| «7 pad not felt really well for ages and suf-
fered continually from backaches and head-
aches. I had tried almost everything but I
could not get lasting relief. Finally I decided
| to give Cystex a trial, and wish I had tried
| it long ago and saved myself much pain and
expense. It has improved my health more in
2 or 3 days than other things have done for
months.”’—Mrs. B.
Gueranteed to Put You Right

or Money Back r
Get Cystex from your chemist today,
Give it a thorough test. Cystex is
guaranteed to make
you feel younger,
stronger, better in
every way, in 24 hours
and to be completely
well in 1 week or your
money back if you re-
turn the empty pack-
age. Act now! for

KIDNEYS
Cystexrinroore
The CUARANTEEL Remedy RHEUMATISM





ne One Dose Stops The Cough

= \ tg

; sy] ag 7 Mees a if When you feel a cough or choking bron-

ONS MLE IG SEL Fi ¢ re 2 ~ \° j chial spasm coming on, just take a dose of
Fh) (| ve 2 * ee - + | es 7 . . Buckley’s Mixture and swallow slowly.
You'll feel the powerful healing warmth
| spread down through your throat and bron-
chial tubes, soothing inflamed parts, easing
hard breathing and loosening tough phlegm,
making it easy to expel, Buckley’s Mixture is
made from rare Canadian Pine Balsam, and
other proven ingredients. There’s not another
cough medicine like it. Get a bottle TODAY,
and relief right away.

BUCKLEY’S

MIXTURE





! A SINGLE SIP TELLS WHY WE SELL A MILLION
i BOTTLES A YEAR IN ICE-COLD CANADA ALONE.













THE LONE RANGER




















ei meet AMASKED MAN ANDA ) (WE SHOT BATES, BY
REDSKIN FOUND BATES WHERE WE ( DON'T KNOW THA |

STAKEDHIM QUT TO DIE. THEY RODE on
AWAY WITH RIM. appre caave=

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only











Usually Now Usually NOW
Tins Kardomah Coffee (+) 95 86 Pkgs. Jack Straws 61 50

Pkgs. Custard Cream Biscuits 51 40 Tins Gloria Evap. Milk 29 26

Bottles Grolsch Beer 24 4&8 Cakes Ivory Soap 27 24
BRINGING UP FATHER



ma ian ae a “1 v , NOW IF I CAN ONLY {

'M GOING TO THERE'S OUR NEIGHBOR C “ | FIND GOME NOISE
REQUEST NOW - ILE TELL THAT S nN TH ET G | to DROWN our

HIM TO MIND GUY A THING OR TWO - WIFE ss) ; YOUR WIFE'S VOICE-
Lis CAA j












ADVERTISE

IN THE

|
4 EVENING ADVOCATE

| j GROWING CIRCULATION EVERY MONDAY
<
Â¥
Â¥

ask for

“Ciassons







JOHNNY HAZARD
eaten
THAT WAS FOOLISH TO
90, OMI! AY AM ANGRY /
YOU KNOW EQUIPMENT IS

VALUABLE! LETTING
AMATEUR USE IT 15







For Rates Apply Advocate Advertising Dept.

IF YOU'RE SHORT- : }
HANDER MAYBE YOU'LL EH 2/ HMMM... MAYBE |
LET ME MAKE UP MY AY CAN TRUST YOu / |

ROOM ANP BOARD/ my MAYBE... ‘ | £0
I CAN SWIM... Fis,
Sa | echt e

ofAre”

NBER pant?










ABOUT YOU, MR. HAZARD, AY
AM NOT CONCERNED’ BOT OMIR
JEOPARDIZES HIS LIFE TO GAVE

YOU FROM SHARK... ANP HE I¢
VALUABLE TOME / HIG INJURY
KEEPS HIM FROM HELPING ME
NOW WHEN AY NEED HIM












LOOK, TNT, (7
WAGN'T OMIR'S FAULT /
1 PUSHED HIM INTO
Usa

















WHY, MOTHER! YOU
HAVE IT UPSIDE DOWN!
THAT'S AU/! IT
MUST BE “THE
GREAT you”!





“It feels as if there's always some- ‘‘His sight is fine!” says Doctor. The

thing in my eyes,” cries John. Mother trouble is i
: in my eyes,” cr } inflammation cau b
worries: “Oh! Is his sight alright?’ v ol x





WHAT \ HE SAVS HE GAWA GIRL AND
3 BP ATIGER CROSS THE ROAD

TOGETHER? AGIRLIN >

TIGER SKIN?

So, every day Jonn bathes h ;
with Optrex, washing away all dirt




: = ae NV ISON, | 4 ‘ ta
FOOTPRINTS OF A m OS SS ee For swift deliveries and easy maneuvering in city and
FEMALE+« : | uburban areas, this van is unexcelled for the carrying of

many types of merchandise. It has an all-steel body with PROTECT YOUR EVES wth



d about Opirex—
-eyes’ now John!"






and germs, soothing tiny eye veins.



,

safety sliding doors, and provides excellent visibility for the
driver. Loading space is exceptional, no less than 150 cubic

feet! The low fuel consumpticn and negligible maintenance

costs ensure really economical operation. ‘sp

” we

bs s
J ae



LOTiON

mMORRIS-COMMERCIAL

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504




SATURDAY, JULY 28. 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.











TELEPHONE 2508
}

The charge for annoyncements of | RENT
Births, Marriages, Deatns, Acknowl- FOR
edgments, and In Memoriam notices is |

50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays / vimum charge week 72 ts and
for any number of words up to 50, and} °5 nts) Sut™deays 24 words mer 24
3 cents per word on week-days and| “ords 3 cents @ word week—4 cents a

4 cents per word on Sundays for eacn

additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement

announcements in Carib Calling
charge is $3.00 for amy number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each



the,

additional wo-d. Terms cash. Phone 2508

between 8.30 und 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 o.m.







DIED
CRAWFORD—On July 27th, 1951 At
her residence Saitters antry, St
George, Amelia Rose J Crawford
Age 82. The funeral | s the above



address for St. George

4 o'clock this evening
Clarence and Hillary
sons}; Mrs. Elsie
daughter); Loy and
grands).

Parish Church

Jones
Brown
Aldon

‘Grand-
(grand-
(Great-

28.7.51—1n
ee



THANKS







WILL"AMS—We the undersigned desire
to return thanks through this mediurn
to those who attended the funeral!
sent wreaths or letters or expressed
sympathy in any way during our recent
bereavement due to the death of Mary
A. Wiliams

Harold EB, Williams and Family
28.7.51-—1n



IN MEMORL

—,
CLARKE--We
through this



the undersigned
medium to extend

beg
a our
sincere appreciation to all those kind

friends who attended, sent wres ' “ l4-h.p. car in
cards and in any war sensed Wace [cee ondition. Engine has just been
pathy in our sad bereavement caused pasa ag Priced to sell. See or
by the death of Thomas Albert ‘Clarke. | 6 ay bake Applewhaite, Lakes Folly
The Clarkes’ Family, Capt. Grant and Pls
famil 28.7.51—1n 28.7.51.—2n
Seteent einen



ANNOUNCEMENTS

Seen

HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—Isle of
Spices. SANTA MARIA—ioveliest hotel
in Caribbean.
ber day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi-
dential district under Government House
hill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day.
SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing
Beach. Rates from $4.00 per head per













day. Enquiries to D. M. Slinger, Grenada,
+6.6.51—78n.
es
LOST & FOUND
LOST
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET — Series AA.
1885. Finder please return same to
Charles King. Ashby Alley, Nelson
Street. 28.7.51—1n

Lost in Canadian Bank of Commerce
and Broad Street a small black note book
with Index and a pocket to hold smal!
peper or cards.—Reward. Phone 8121

25.7.51—2r



WALLET—Black, with map on outside,





containing money and race tickets be- j Chelsea Garage (1950) Ltd., Pinfold St

tween Rockley & City
return to Herbert
and Bynoe

Finder please
Rogers, C/o Stokes
28.7.51--2n





GOVERNMENT NOTICES
APPOINTMENT OF DENTAL

SURGEON, GENERAL
HOSPITAL

‘:pplications are invited for the
part - time non - pensionable ap-
pointment of Dental Surgeon,

General Hospital, which will be-| â„¢&"

come vacant on Ist September,
1951. ®
The = salary....attached.. to..the

appointment is $960 per annum.

The duties’ of this officer will] ¢t.
consist of the treatment of in-| ma

patients referred to him and a

limited number of dental extrac-|

tions for out-patients.

Arrangements may be made
with this officer for additional
extractions for out-patients at a
fixed rate of payment.

Full particulars of the appoint-
ment may be obtained from the
Medical Superintendent, to whom
applications should be forwarded
by 31st July, 1951.



9.6.51.—3n.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOS-
PITAL OF THE WEST INDIES,
JAMAICA, B.W.1.

Applications are invited from |
Consultant Specialists for hon-
orery posts as part-time special-|
ists at the University
Hospital, in the departments of
Ophthalmology, Ear, Nose and
Throat Surgery and Dermatology.

Appointments will be for one}
year in the first instance.

The Specialists appointed may,
by special arrangement witn the
University College of the West
Indies, be required to lecture to
medical students in their particu-
lar specialty, remunerction for,
these teaching duties to be by)
honorarium payable by the Uni-|
versity College of the West Indies.



j

Further information may be
ebtained from the Registrar of
“he. University College of the

West Indies or from the Hospital

Manager and Secretary.
Applications should be sent to
the Hospital Manager and Secre-
tary, University College Hospital, |
Mona, Jemaica, B.W.1., before the

30th of September, 1951.
21.7,.51—2n. |





NO SHOOTING



Due to the Cadet Camp there | milk obtainable. The 5-tb family size is

will be no shooting practice at
the Small Bore Rifle Club today
or Wednesday.



WE ARE BUYERS
We buy anything connected with
| STAMPS. Sheets, Single Stamps,
Collections, Accumulations and
Covers, Good prices Paid at the

CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY
3rd Floor, No. 10, Swan St.







SE HABLA ESPANOL

ORIENTAL

CURIOS, SOUVENIRS, AN-
TIQUES, IVORY, JEWELS,
SILKS Etc.

THANTS

|

OSES

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

—_———-
Outstanding books on our Islands





“en

L

5

CARIBBEAN CIRCUIT — Full of
information about the Caribbean
Islands iy-

ISLANDS IN THE SUN — Similar
to the above. Book full of rich
information . 13/6

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

—_[———————



Rates from $7.00 per head | Kinch or 4569 Cyril Stoute,

j and Star-Delta with Single Phasing Pre-
| ventor. Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co., Ltd

ollege | or

| Tirst

Clear Glass n Plastic Heavy
guage for ear windshields
Unbreakable.

JOHNSON’S HARDWARE |

RONSON.

i



word on Sundays

ee

HOUSES



LIFTON TERRACE—To an approved
j tenant. Furnished House Upper
| Street ©pposte Yacht and Aquatic

Clubs. All modern conveniences. Apply
| on premises. 27.7.51—2n

































FLAT on Blue Waters Terrace, newly
j built with spacious cupboards. Phone
8282 25.7.51—t-f.n.
HOUSE in Bedford Avenue, Upper
B Street. Inspection by Appointment.
I 2347 28.7.51—3n
HOUSE called “Marnet” at the Ivy
Road It consists of drawing and
dining rooms, 3 bedrooms, kitchen, water
tcllet & bath. Vacant now. $35.00 per
month, Apply to D'Arcy A. Scott, Mag-
ezine Lane
28.7. 51—3n
ONE (1) large airy room at Bel Airy

‘Furnished or unfurnished),
28.7.51—2n
—_—_——— SS
THE CAMP—On the Sea, St. Lawrence.
Fully furnished Dial 8357.
147 51.—t fin,

FOR SALE











AUTOMOTIVE




Vauxhall



CAR—One Vauxhall Car 14—6, in ex- |
celient condition, For particulars Dial
3745. J. D. Evelyn, Audit Department. |

26.7.51—4n. |

CAR—One Vauxhall
10,000 miles, like new. P’





18 done only}
hone 2861. S. H, |

24.7.51—6n

ee

CARS—Hillman Saloons 1946, 1947 and
1949, Singer Sports Model, Wolseley 14|
Saloon and Morris 10 Saloon, Telephone |
4316 Cole & Co. Ltd. 21.7.51—7n,

——————————_—

CARS—Renault ‘760" formerly M—682,
tyres and condition excellent. 38—4)
M.P.G. Only 7,000 miles Reason fo}
sclling—owner bought a Mayflower. To |
be seen at Chelsea Garage (1950) Ltd., |
Pinfold Street |



28.7 .51—3n

CARS—Just arrived!—Mayflowers &
Vanguards in Grey, Maroon, Blue, Black.



















rr i a
Bay |

| BARBADOS

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
} Minimum charge $1.50 week-days
and $1.86 on Sundays.

on



REAL ESTATE

See
| BUILDING sITE—Situ

ated at Maxwell

|Ch. Ch. 70 tt. frontage Price reason
| able Apply to B. A. Brooks Phone
| 8335 or 8162, 26.7.51—4n

LAND AT ST. LAWRENCE suitable
| for building sites. For Particulars apply
to K. R. Hunte, telephone 9137 or 4611
| 17.7.51—t.4.n,
—___—

“HOLLANTHTE"—Standing on 8,000 sq
ft. of Jand at Two Mile Hill, Just ly
miles from town, and on ths i5 minutes
| Bus Service Large Drawing Koom, 2 Bed
| Rooms, Dining and Breakfast Rooms, W.C
| and Bath. Company's Water, Light and
| Telephone Services installed Garage
Servants’ Toilet and Bath, Spacious yard
With several fruit trees outside palings.
| The above has been recently remodelled
and is in A-1 condition. For further
particulars apply next door or Dial 95292
| or 2021



25.7.51—3n

rte,
HINDSBURY COT—standing on 1,756
Scuare feet of land at the corner of
Wellington and Bay Streets, For inspec-
tion apply on premises. For further
particulars apply HUTCHINSON & BAN-
| FIELD, Solicitors, James Street.
28.7.51—2n
— ages
House called St. ELMO at Maxwell
Road. It is a four bedroom house and
Stands on % of an acre of land, with
fruit trees. Only five minutes walk to sea,
Inspection any day except Sunday. Vacant
possession in a month's time Apply to
| Darcy A, Scott, Magazine Lane. Dial 3743,
28.7.51—3n.

PUBLIC NOTICES

a ees

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
Gnd 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.















GIRLS INDUSTRIAL UNION
There will be a General Meeting of

the G.I.U at the Union Rooms; on
Monday 30th Juby at 5 p.m
G. WILLIAMS,
General Secretary,
28.7.51.—1n
—_————
NOTICE

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF APPEAL
Re Workmen's Compensation Act, 1943

Notice is hereby given that Alonza
Gooding, an Engineer, former.y residing
at Fairview, Christ Church, died as a
result of injuries sustained when he fell

from a ladder during his employ at
Roberts’ Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Bay
Street, St. Michael and that compensa-

tion has been paid into Court

All dependants of the above-named
Alonza Gooding (deceased) are hereby
requested to appear at the Assistant

Court of Appeal on Wednesday the 22nd
day of August, 1951, at 10 o'clock a.m









Cash prices $2,300.00, $2,800.00 respec- | Dated this 26th. day of July 1951.
tively. Just advised of further increase A. W. HARPER,
in prices on future shipments Chelsea | Clerk, Assistant Court of Appeal
Garage (1950) Ltd., Pinfold Street joo -
28.7.51—3n
PICK-UPS—Two new Vanguard Pick-| NOTICE
Ups. Cas rice $2, , s ent | :
sai he enon Mh een ye Sp | 1S HEREBY ¢ ven that all persons having
sh . ; - ‘ any debt or ;
hould seize this opportunity now. | state of Desdemona Foster-Turton.. lat
28.7.51.—8n. | Cf Reed Street in the City of Bridgetown,
a who died in this Island on the 15th day
of April 1948 intestate, are hereby re-
ELECTRICAL quired to send in particulars of | their

ELECTRIC MOTORS — By Newman
from % H.P. to 7% H.P. 200 Volts 50

4
Cycles, 3 Phase, Dial 3878, DaCosta &
Dept, 24.7.51—4n



Co., Ltd. Electrical
-—

ELECTRIC FITTINGS.—A nice assort- |
ment including 2 & 3 light Chromium
Niectroliers, Semi-Indirect Bowis, 1 & 2
Light Brackets, Table Lamps in Chrom-
jum & Mahogany, Saving Mirrors with
and without het water heaters. Dial 3873
Da Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical Depart-
24.7.51.—6n







One G. EB. Refrigerator in good work-
ing condition. Ring Reid 2483.

claims duly attested to Timothy Theo-
philus Headley, the Public Trusteé of the
Island of Barbados, C/o Messrs. Hutchin-
son & Banfield, at their office at James
Street, Bridgetown, on or before the 3re
day of October 1951 after which date 1
shall proceed to distribute the assets o*
the said estate among the parties enti-
tle! thereto having regard to the debts
and claims only of which I shall then
have had notice and that I shall not be
liable for assets so distributed to any
person of whose debt or claim I shall
net have had notice at the time of such
distribution, .

And all persons indebted to the said
estete are requested to settle their ac-



E 28.7.51—2n,

x ‘ -

One NORGE REFRIGERATOR, 6 cubit
open type unit, to be seen at Red-
n & Taylor's Garage, 27.9,.51—3n
—_—
HILCO REFRIGERATOR: 914 cubic
Full width freegng chamber. Brand

new unit, Reconationed throughout,

may be inspected at Leo Yard, Cheap- |
L.

side. Apply
. Philip.

Hu. Sreith, Sandford,

7.7.51—t.f.n. |

Dircet-on-line









MOTOR STARTE

Electrical Dept.

FURNITURE

Ralph Beard invites you to inspect his
Stock of Furniture in his New Show
Rooms, Lower Bay Street. The follow-
ing Bargains are offered to you: Mag
Dining Chairs $22.00 a pr.; Birch Dining
Cheirs $18.00 a pr.; Rush Upright $8.00
a pr.; Rush Arm Chairs $10.00 a pr. Rush
Rockers $11.00 a pr., Steel Arm Chairs
$12.00 each; Rush Morris Chairs $30.00
4 Pair, Caned Morris Chairs $36.00 a Pair
Not forgetting a large variety of New
and Second Hand Furniture, Phone 4683
5010,

24.7.51—6n,



24.7.51--5n,

LIVESTOCK

GOAT—One Alpine Goat fresh in milk.
litter. Apply St. Clair Rayside,
White Hall, St. Michael, 28.7.51—2n

MECHANICAr

Seth sailplanes hina vet
BICYCLES—(2) Bicycles, one Gentle-

man’s and One Boy's. Phone 2886.
26.7 .51—2r

MISCELLANEOUS __

AMM-I-DENT TOOTHPASTE
Start saving your Amm-i-dent Tooth
frste Boxes. Within a short while you
may be the winner of one of the follow-
ing:— Ist Prize $50.00, 2nd Prize $15.00,
8rd Prize $5.00. 1.7.51—26n

BINOCULARS (for the Races)
“Schutz Model Heliolith Prism. 8 fold
x 22 MM with blue coating complete
with leather case, Made in Germany
New. Eruce Weatherhead Ltd.

26.7.51.—3n.

“FARM” POWDERED FULL CREAM
M*#LK—Supreme quality and only $4.32
per 5-t tin and $1.00 per 1-Ib tin.
Get a tin to-day from your grocer
or Drug Store and try the best













really economical. Insist on “Farm” for
the sake of your health and your pocket.
If your dealer cannot supply, phone 2229,
27.6.51—t.f.n, |

es
FLOOR POLISHERS Keep your
Floors in good condition with Johnson's
Wax Polishers. Dial 2878. Da Costa & Co.,



attached

counts. without delay.
DATED this 24th day of July, 1951.
TIMOTHY T. HEADLEY,
Public Trustee,
Qualified Administrator of the Estate
of Desdemona Foster-Turton,
deceased,
26.7.51—3n



NOTICE _

BARBADOS,
IN THE AS



TANT COURT OF
APPEAL

Re Workmen's Compensation Act, 1943.
Notice is hereby given that Clarence
Weekes of Packers, St. Patrick, in the
parish of Christ Church, an employee
at Hopefield Plantation, died as the





sult of a broken neck which he sus-
tained when he was thrown from a
tractor at Waldron Corr Ch. Ch. and
that Compensation has been paid into
Court.

All dependants of the above-named
Clarence Weekes, deceased, and other



parties Concerned are he by required to
appear at the Assistant Court of Appeal
on Wednesday, the Ist day of August,
1951, at ten o'clock a.m.
Dated this 4th day of July, 1951.
i, V. GILKES,
Ag. Clerk, A.C.A
7.7.51—2n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Victor Leon Hinds
of Durhams, St. Lucy. the holder of
Liquor Licens. No. 667 of 1951 granted
in respect of a beard and shingle shop



inttached to a house at Spring Hall, St

Lucey to remove said License to a
bovrd and shingle shop with shedroof
at Durhams, opposite Spring
Hall, St. Lucy and to use it at such
last described premises
Dated this 25th day of Juby, 1951
VICTOR HINDS,
Applicant
To: SYDNEY H, NURSE, Esq.,
Police Magistarte,
District “E." .
N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held on
Wednesday 8th August, 1951, at 11
o'clock a.m. at Police Court, District “E.’
SYDNEY H. NURSE,
Police Magistrate,
District ‘

Vigour Restored,
jlands Made Young
{n 24 Hours

It fa no longer necesrare to evffer
from loss of vigour and manhnod
memory and body,, nerve
pure sickly skin,
und pour sleep, because an American
i tor has discovered a quick, easy
y to ond these troubles,

This discovery ts in pleasant, easy-

















Ltd., Elec. Dept. %4.7.51—6n

KHAKI DRILL — Famous Stockport
Khaki Wigan quality $1.25 and Heavy |
thick quality $1.47 per yard special |
discount to wholesalers Kirpalani, 52
Swe Strect a



28.7.51—1n
“LACTOMETERS—For ascertaining the |
richness of milk, To be obtained from
Bruce Weatherhead Ltd.
26.7.51—3n.

—— ,

RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing
....and we will order for you we
haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,
Ltd. 6.7.51--t.f.n.

SUN GLASSES—For Children, Ladies
and Gentlemen—All shapes, new designs,
Prices from 2/- to $10.00, Bruce
Weatherhead Ltd. 26.7.51—3n.







QUAKER OATS—Large Packages 27
Pkg. All Bran 18. Pkg, Stanway Store, |
Lucas Street, Dial 4910





28.7.51.—In

a

VACUUM CLEANERS. Hand and Filec-
trically operated: Takes the drudge ‘out |
of drudgery. Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co.,

Lt¢., Electrical Dept. 24.7.51—6n





FOR SALE

FURNITURE
Drawers, 3 Rush Chz
Table, Ofte small K
Book Case, Electric Stove,
Baby’s Pram. Phone 8335.

One Press, Chest of
s, One Dining
itchen Table

ard One









‘Vi-Tabs

to-take tablet fori, is absolutely
harroless, does away with gland op-
erations and is bringing new you
and vigour to thousands, It works @
rectly on the glanc vl nerves, and
puts new, rich bicod and energy
your Veins, In 24 hours sou can se
and feel y ’ getting younge
Your eyes sp , You feel all an
full of youthful vigour and po ss
And this amazing. nev und and
vigour restorer, called Vi-Tabs, is
guaranteed, It has been proved by
thousands in America and Is now dis-
tributed by chemists here under a
uarantee of satisfaction or money
ack. Vi-Tabs must make you feel
full of vigour and energy and from
10 to 20 years younger, or you mere-
ly return the empty package and get
your money back. A special, double-
strength bottic of 48 Vi-Tabs costs
little, and the
Suarantee pro-
tects you.

Restores Manhood and Vitality
















To-day’s @. A. Song}

“I want to be happy ”

“but I can’t be happy
.» till I have a Gas
too!
- .. Hubby take note!
ee

Cooker



ent










BARBADOS ADVOCATE

WANTED
















| More Light Through |

Chemistry



| Minimum charge week cent an
96 cents Sunday 4 words — we a4
words 3 cents | word week4 € sa
| word on Stenduys; "
}
HELP
An Experienced Maid-Butler. Apply to ‘vahisitie cones
ae Solin aoddard Marine, ) Mange, ide fforts * tpeinee rti-
Marine Gardens 60a ahting, but the riddle of how
ae. Tee t efly and certain other creatures
Applications are invited for the post Wp St remains -unageyed,
of Head Master of the St. Andrew's 7
Anglican Secondary School, Grenada By JOHN A. ANGUS
Further information from the Archdea ‘
ton of Grenada, St, Ceorge’s, Grenada wrem Science Digest
24.7. 51—tn :
: Man, it would uppear, never has
“Colonial Development Corporation 2 willing to accept daylight’s

invites applications from qualified and
*sperienced electrical engineers for the
vost of Engineer/Manager Déminica and
St. Vincent Hydroelectric Systems. Reply
giving details of Career and stating
salary required to Mr. G. Roddam,
Colonial Development Corporation, 134
Hope Road, Ligvanea, PO Jamaica.”
25.7.51.—én

EFFICIENT CLERK, Hardware
Lumber experience desirable
ietter and in person.
Ltd

and
Apply by
A. Barnes & Co.,

20.7.51—t.f.n,

—_—_——
SALESMAN for Commission Business—
ene with experience preferred, but will
consider applications from bright young
men, who would like to enter this kind
* business. Applications from Salesmen
wanting to make a change will be kept

confidential. EBeply in detail to “Sales-
man", C/o Advocate
SALESMAN—A Junior Salesman or a

young Lad who has recenthy left School
bolds the School Certificate and is will-
ing to apply himself diligently to being
trained as a salesman

Apply in first instance by letter in own
handwriting to Hull & Son, P.O, Box 192
G.P.O 26.7.51—3n,

ee
WIDEAWAKE junior with knowledge
of Customs work and import and export
licences routine. Apply in your own
handwriting in the first instance to

HAROLD PROVERBS & CO., LTD
27.7. 51—3n

MISCELLANEOUS

WANTED TO RENT
BUNGALOW by married couple, ne
children. One completely furnished bun-
galow, on the sea, with garage, for iong
period. Address particulars to: M.B.,
P.O. Box 124. 24,.7.51.—5n,











WANTED TO BUY
OLD SEWING MACHINE out of use.
Good prices paid. Apply to Mrs, Vaughn,
Corner of Fairchild and Probyn Streets,
21.7.51—9n
TRAILOR—Second Hand Trailor suit-
able to be drawn by tractor. Phone
$5273.









28.7, 51—3n

Colonial Art
Debate

LONDON, July.

Traditional arts and crafts from
the Colonies now on show at the
Imperial Institute have led not
only to unstinted admiration but
some controversy in artistic circles
in London.

The view has been expressed,
for instance, that the Ife heads
from Benin (Nigeria) are the
works of Europeans and not Afri-



cans. In this school of thought is
Henry Moore, the well-known
sculptor.

Well now, who did make the
Ife heads? Were they made by
several artists or by one artist ?

A panel of art experts argued
the pros and cons at the Imperial
Institute this week. After con-
siderable academic jugglery, they
came to the conclusion that the
cea ae from Benin are the
work of African sculptors. |.

Mr. G.- Braunlotz, wee. of the
British Museum, raised another
controversial point when he stated
that in the Colonies, works of art
are not produced primarily for
aesthetic reasons. The fundamen-
tal prineiple of African art, he
claimed, is functional.

He was strongly opposed by Mr,
Kenneth Murray, Head of the
Department of Antiquities in
Nigeria; Mr. William Fagg, Assist-
ant Keeper, British Museum, also
took sides against his British
Museum Chief. “There is,” Fagg
said, “always some element of
aesthetics in all tribal art”. He
pointed out that there is no single
tradition in African art there
is a variety of tradition and he
claimed that the artistic excellence
of African art is comparable to
Western art.

During the debate questions dis-
cussed included the differences
between the emotional and intel-
lectual approach to art and’ the
aesthetic standards of European
and Colonial peoples.

The growing appreciation of
Colonial arts and crafts by people
in Britain was commented upon
by art critic chairman, Mr, F,
Wendy. He hoped that more en-
couragement would be given to
Colonial artists.

CABLE THIEVES
HONGKONG: Telegraph cable
thieves are at work in the South
China Sea. Last week they lifted
che Hongkong-Amoy undersea
sable to the surface and cut off a
jection three miles long. In 1946



he Navy had to be called out tu
guard repair work on the Hong-
song-Singapore line .after thieves
pinched a total oi over four miles
of cable.





|
KILLS PAIN |
oS |
RACES - RACE

JOCKEY WHIP!

Best Quality Whalebone
Lined









TODAY.

Dog Chokers? Collars,
Leads, Chains, etc.

NEWSAM & CO.

nn ee

Secure Yours

Also



encroaching darkness, as
‘ning more than a challenge.
kens go home to roost at
most of natute is willing to

t a day when the sun goes
but from earliest times, man

to have wanted a longer
This meant more light, not
sarily to rival the sun's light



}

slow is called phosphorescence. If
the glow ceases “instantly when
the activating agent is removed the
Jight is called fluorescence. |

Looking back, it almost seems
that the fluorescent lamp emerged
complete after sufficient timse was
allowed for growth; more careful
examination, however, reveals}

that chemists were persistently att

work, steadily progressing toward)
The first step in the lone
was the brilliant flash of}
genius which visualised the possi-/
bility of dispensing with the metal
‘lament in the light bulb. Georg:

Claude, a French chemist who had
heen pioneering with a littl









bu t least enough to permit] !nown rare gas called neon, found
ex ing the day's work or play.] that a small amount of this gas
: ' substituted for the filament in the
A ‘s, from the time that the] conventional light bulb, could be
ca it domesticated fire to dis-] made to transport the electrical!
pe the fearsome shadows of his current, and, more important, emit
rc Shelter, the flame of fire 1 light of its own.
served as the only source of arti-
fieval illumination until well into} Further laboratory work with
the nineteenth century. Then the} other rare gases led to experiments
development of electric power] With materials which are not gen-
m possible for the first time} erally considered gases at all. Thus.
th complete change of ideas|S0dium, cassium, and, most im-}
Which has resulted in modern] portant, mercury were irtroduced |
acvances in lighting; the name] into the vacuum tube where their |
most closely associated with the|low vapour pressures readily pro-
beginning of this advancement is,] duced sufficient. material in the
of course, that of Thomas Edison,| gaseous state to serve as “wire-|
renowned American inventor. less filaments” with remarkable |
Z r ranges of colour, brilliancy, and
Late in December 1879, Edison inten dirrmartine srourw. |
gave his famous demonstration ot physical properties. The ea

@ complete incandescent lighting
System at Menlo Park, New Jersey,
not far from New York City
However, as early as 1838, Pro-
fessor Jobard of Brussels had sug-
gested that a lamp might be made
by heating a small piece of carbon
by electricity in a vacuum.

In the United States, three
other men are prominently asso-
ciated with early attempts to pro-
duce the _ incandescent lamp
William E. Sawyer developed
s€veral lamps consisting of a piece
of graphite in a glass globe fillea
with nitrogen. A feature of these
lamps was that the globe was
cemented to a metal base which



id be removed when the
@raphite evaporated, Professor
Moses G. Farmer also developed



a lamp consisting of a graphite
rod heated in nitrogen, and Hiram



S. Maxim, another noted inventor,
later produced two lamps, one
consisting of a piece of sheet

platinum operating in air, and the
other of a graphite rod heated in



a hydrocarbon vapour.

One of Edison's principal con-
tributions toward improved arti-
ficial illumination was the result
of his realization that electrie
lamps would need to be operated
4S separate units if they were ta
be widely accepted, The carbon-
ized thread which was used in
Edison's lamps had the necessary
high resistance to make them
Suitable for use where needed.
Edison called this thread a fila-

men', and the name was generally
adopted. This first lamp gave
seyeral times the number of light
tits that could be obtained from
the candle
lamp.

The second great step in the
development of ihe electric light

bulb came in 1911 with the dis-
covery of a method for making
drawn or ductile tungsten wire,
The tungsten filament was much

more efficient, Yielding additional
ght units per watt. Two years
inter came the development of
the gas-filled lamp, a contribution
perfected by Dr. Irving Langmuir,
‘tinguished American chemist
iy introducing inert gas into the
mp, in place of a vacuum as in
rlier lamps, the evaporation of
e filament was retarded and the
life of the bulb extended.





Since the advent of the incan-
scent lamp, the greatest advance

in lighting undoubtedly has been
“fluorescent” lamp. Fluores-

ce, the giving off of radiation
bsorbed from some other source,
not a rare phenomenon in
nature, but until chemical re-
serch revealed the nature of the
roaterials involyed, and methods
cre developed for producing the
orescent substance synthetically,
was impossible to harness this
iree of illumination. It has long
reen known that fluorescence
ald be used for general illumin-
on by combining two essential
sredients — a material which
uld give suitable illumination

hen activated by an appropriate
activating agent, and this agent.

In general, there are two basic
ources of light. The first, and
most common, is that produced by
emission of heat energy from a
iot surface such as the sun, a
tungsten filament, a campfire, or
: candle. The second is lumines-
eence, by which, under certain
conditions, thousands of known
substances will glow in the dark
*ithout any apparent emission of

“"y

luminescence is caused by
some activating agent and the
glow may persist for minutes.
bouts, or days after the agent has



} beeh withdrawn, in which case the







NOTICE
Dr. Preseod B. O'Neale

begs to inform his Clients
that his Office will be closed
from Saturday 28th July,
and will be re-opened on



Monday 20th August.
25.7.51.—4n.



SRLS

»,

a

>
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4 that our Parts Department will be R
% Gesed for stock taking from Mon-

» day, 30th July, for a week. Also %
|% our Repair and Service Depart- 4
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% ame date for two weeks annual ¢

@ ‘oliday. There will be a skeleton


. %,

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Sd ¥

$} BAY and FROBYN STREETS. %

. 7517 ?

‘ 22.7.51—7n %

tg z
GSO ty SSA FOS OCOOOD.

vapour lamp provides a good |
source of light in the ultraviolet |
irea of the spectrum. The first |
fluorescent lamps produced in the |
laboratory utilized ground natur a |
willemite, a zine orthosilicate |
which fluoresces green,

However, none of the thousands
of natural minerals are of suffi-
cient brilliance to be‘of commer-
cial use and the production ot
synthetic materials is complicated
by a curious situation: inorganic
substances in a pure state, gener-
ally, do not fluoresce,

Research has revealed that a
trace of some impurity, usually a
metal, is a requirement of fluores-
cence, When it is found in natural
fluorescent materials, this
activator is generally manganese
and this is the element frequently
used in the synthetics, although
silver, copper, and bismuth also
have their places. The synthetic
materials are coated directly on
the inner surface of the fluorescent
tube, and their development,
manufacture, and standards con-
trol are the result of outstanding
accomplishments in the field of
inorganic shemistry,

The public
chemical achievements are
cated by the efficiency of the
present day product, The light
output from standard ‘commercial
fluorescent tubes is better than 65
light units per watt, in contrast
to 12 light units per watt from
corresponding tungsten filament
lamps.

benefits of these

indi-

Somewhere in the story of fluor-
escence the name of Vincenzio

or from the kerosene] Casciarola, a cobbler in the city

of Bologna, Italy, about the year
1600, should be included, His
hobby was alchemy. Searching
for the philosopher’s stone, Casci-
arola one day climbed a mountain
near his city and gathered some
stones which looked promising ‘to
him. That night he powdered
them and roasted the powder. It
reemed to him that the powder
never would cool off. Hour after
hour the heated powder continued
to give off a reddish glow, and

finally Casciarola realized that. ti
was not a glow of heat. He haa
produced the first phosphor, by
transmuting barium sulfate tc

barium sulfide in the presence of
a few impurities of manganese or



bismuth Although Casciarole
undoubtedly was disappointed to
discover that his powder was not
the philosopher’s stone, his fame
spread far and wide, and it is
recorded that he did a profitable
business thereafter with alchem-
ists, sorcerers, and similar enter-
prising men of his time.

The biochemist just possibly
may be the individual who will
announce the next great step in
the scientific development of
lighting. In numerous laboratories,
studies are being made of th«

more than 40 orders of animals; |
ind of the two groups in the plant |
world which have the ability tc
luminesce. It is interesting t
note that all 40 orders of animal
ife which luminesce are either
earthworms, fireflies, or other
and creatures, or else they are
inhabitants of «the sea, such as
ellyfish, squid, and the like. For
ep as yet unknown reason, no
fresh-water luminous species have
found,

s



een



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PAGE SEVEN
ere ee Se Rsteeaner

Reds Take Time Off



meeting proceeded

Preliminary handling of smaller
F details took only 18 minutes and
e rom Page 1




Joy then read a statement which
fire—was reached gut a U N. ee ee, _ oF Fe
spokesman said that both points Te eee oar



were taken up t ay.

The meeting started at 10 am
with General Nam II top Commun-
ist negotiator reading a statement
on administrative and procedural
introduced yesterday by
delegate Vice-Admiral

Turner Joy
Nam lI said he “agreed in prin-
cipte” with Joy's points. Both
Teams promptly named staff assist-
ants to get to work on these de-
uils while the big business of the



TOURIST RECEIPTS

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 25.

The Tourists Board receipts in
U.S. currency amounted to $76,170
for the half year ending June 30.
Sales at the Tourist Bureau for the
first six months amounted $30,095
B.W.I. compared with $29,993 in
1950 and $15,270 in 1949

Cc







SHIPPING





MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA,
NEW ZEALAND LAINE, LIMITED.
(M_AN.Z.)
S.S. “ARABIA” 4 scheduled to sail
from Melbourne 12th June, Brisbane 22nd







M/V “CARIBBEE” wil





wa 4 . Syd The BEI
julee oe tt Pease ee Soe accept Cargo and Passengers tor
ind Barbados early August , Dominiga, Antigua, Montser

“$8. “FORT FAIRY" is scheduled to Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing




Friaay 27th inst.



sail from Hobart late June, North Queens-
lond mid July, Brisbane end July, Sydney
early August, Melbourne mid August,



The M/V ” “Daerwooa" will






\rriving at Trinidad mid September. \ accept Cargo and Famensess Oe
Cargo accepted on througm mas of St. Lueia, Grenada gett xt -
ard frozen cargo, sengers only for St eee .
In addition to general cargo these of Sriling to be notified,
vessels have ample space for chilled and =e
lading for transhipment a Trinidad BWI SCHOONER OWNERS
be ag ta apr | Leeward and Wind- ASSOCIATION (iInc,)

For further particulars apply— :

FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD. Consignee. Tele, 4047







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SS. TRYA sails 20th July Arrives Barbados 3ist July, 196}
A STEAMER. sails 10th August Arrives Barbados 2ist August, 1951









NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
S.S. GENERAL ARTIGAS sails 18th July Arrives Barbados 3ist
A STEAMER sails Ist August
A STEAMER sails 15th August

195}.

July,
/rrives Barbados I4th August
Arrives Barbados 29th August, 1951









CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND

Name of Ship ves B'dos

Sails Montreal Sails Halifax bah Arrt

















aa Reet
corm
. D $ h
a CO. *ENNANT” July 20) July 24th August 4t
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“ALCOA PILGRIM" Aug. 24ih Aug. 27th Septr, 6th
J
8 RALCOh, PILGRIM" due Barbados July 380th for St, Lawrence River
—— ane
* These vessels have limited passen ger accammodation,

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APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., UTD—CANADIAN SERVICE







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?
PAGE EIGHT

SOUTH AFRI

Opener Eric Rowan

Scores 236: New Record

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, July 27,

Starting the second day’s play with 282 for three
wickets to their credit, South Africa carefully amassed the
formidable total of 538 to-day, This beats their previous
highest Test score against England of 533 made at Man-
chester in 1947.

It was 2 personal triumph for Eric Rowan who took
his overnight score of 160 to 236 before being briljantly
caught in the gully by Bedser off Brown. He thus became
South Africa’s highest test scorer.



His innings was a model of one . —
patience and concentration and 7 7
he was at the wicket for over CO! | EGE

nine hours.

Twenty-one-year-old Me Clean







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

CA HIT 583 IN 4TH TEST



ENTRIES:

A RECORD 75

By BOOKIE

ENTRIES for the Barbados Turf Club August meeting
revealed that a new record high of 75 horses will be due to
take part at the meeting. Of these only three horses are
due to arrive from Trinidad but there are others already in
the island under Trinidad ownership while St. Vincent) St.
Lucia and B.G, will also be represented by horses owned
or bred in these colonies.

The three from Trinidad are The



Eagle, a winner of one race at ©#'ania 123

ToT oO > Demure 124
the recent T.T.C. June fixture, Topsy 109
Betsam, a well known half-bred Land Mark 132
and winner of a few races in

Trinidad, and Monsoon, a frequent SECOND DAY—Monday Aug. 6th

visitor to Barbados, who will also



































































Starfish Win Water
Polo ‘Trophy (1951

GOLDFISH revenged their first-round defeat by con-
vincingly beating Starfish four goals to nil in their water
polo match yesterday afternoon. For Goldfish, Marion Tay-|
lor and Phyllis Pitzpatrick scored two goals each. This was|
Starfish’s first defeat for the season. Goldfish still have one
more match to play, but Starfish with fourteen points to|
their eredit are the winners of the 1951 league and will be|
presented with the Y. de Lima Challenge Cup at the end
of the season. adjudged ofi-side and the goal was

In the other game of the after- dis-allowed. Joyce made up for
noon, Mermaids lost to Sea her mistake shortly after this)
Nymphs four goals to one. when she scored the fourth goal)

Play began at 5.20, with Starfish for her team. This proved to be
ccfending the shore goal, Goldfish the last goal of the match,




























R ! t f DEF ‘A 7 ’ be racing in class G rere ous Furs, 1h ORR ae ae “ae ee ee referee was Mir, Basi

was owan’'s partner for most of aio tan : \ Sun Queen ce ‘ . fever defended stub- 20KS j
the morning and he produced some The Barbados Derby, the feature aie Ween it bornly and for the majority of the The teams were:— _
delightful strokes in his innings ’ event of fhe meeting, attracted jrign ana Low 10g fiist half the ball went from one Starftsh: J. Ghent, F. Carmichael
of 67 before he was unfortunately LODGE oe get arrorienges Sg vg - — Gua ane 111 side of the field to the other with (Capt.) D. Warren, J. Chandler,

‘ sub- Gun Site : ; . ets , |
run out. He batted less than two list of those who had paid = Burrs . io neither side able to make a really C. McKinnon, P, Chandler and J.
cul ee Kit nn ate and. elavab scriptions. Favourite for this race Catania 115 ngerous opening. When the Hill.

Pubes ’ ? ren Harrison College defeated will be Best Wishes the Burning Nan Tudor 16 vome was five minutes and fifteen Goldfish: B. Hunte, P. Pitcher

Me Clean's dismissal brought in Lodge School by 103 runs yester= Bow—Felicitas filly from St, Vin- renun e econds old, however, Phyllis (Capt.) J, Gale, D, Johnson, P. |

a a : Lf - 1 a Us Pent day, the last day in their first cent, but due to her recent illness Topas too itzpatrick opened the score for Fitzpatrick, M. Lopez and M

rerey Manse making his c division cricket match which in Trinidad she is not the out- ranamark 120 qJoldfish with a shot from five Taylor.

Senee. Fe. ee last out for a fine was played at the Lodge School standing .choice she was a few Drake's Drum , 133 yards. outside the Starfish goal Mermaids: J Croney, J. Chandler

innings of 90 and in his stay of two grounds. months ago. Her chief rival was ¥— ERC Rae one (F870) ea F (Capt.) J. McKinnon, J. Hill, 37|

and a half hours hit 15 fours. — On the first day of play— Cross Roads, the big gelding by vanguara =e * 124 This brought the Starfish for- Ingram, A. Sutherland and. C

England bowling remained Wednesday July 25—Lodge win- Dunusk out of April Showers M7’ ward line down in a threatening Knight

rteady. Tattersall especially being ning the toss sent in Harrison owned by Mr. Alexander Chin of Sitncie Ts move and Phyllis Chandler se +) Sew Nymphs: A. Eckstein (Capt.)

difficult to score off. The England College on a wicket that was well B.G., but he too was ill in Trini- Glomorntinn rt HaL ecerind Like we certain soni? Beowhect teknac- at Vidoes]

attack was weakened when Bailey soaked and College ended their gad, Therefore others in the race River Mist dic tne Gan, g ae ier "Sak reece
had to leave the field after an first innings at 75 runs. Opening who were hardly considered some Water Belle 12) Goldfish sent the ball upfield; Williams

hour’s play with a strained back. batsman C, Smith topscored for \eeKs ago now appear to have yjccroy 124 m “ 2 ott

pray ; College by scoring 18 runs while iceroy nz fiom the resulting goal-throy
Grennan was steady behind the Mr % Headley — i R. Dash Detter chances, These include atin Marion Taylor in the Goldfish | i
wicket and only allowed one bye . . as a es nen ‘} . 4S. Soprano, Water Bell and Usher, W—VICTORIA arene OP AIR Orward dine got the ball and she | WHAT'S ON TO-DAY
In the hour remaining afte: “"0¢Kec Up té runs each. The Stewards’ Stakes for A class acai ‘ sn gdal # :
nthe 8 Best bowler for Lodge was J 2 it in the second goal for her bik i “om
uth Africa had been dismissec arte vey anes . attracted a larger entry than usual The Fagie 133 m with a well placed shot. At Inquiry at District “B” into
ngl ind scored 37 without a loss cae 4 ae eat ae A teleéts for ong there are 8 on the card for sam Flight 125 stage Starfi he basa "tee } Death of Charles Mc
ao 7 7 ; - mn, £4 runs after bowling five overs. ( > Lg ee, pollo 126 | Stage stars gan tk re, ap
et which Lowson making his Test Lodge in their turn at the wicket this event. Five of these are in April Flowers 125 but they were able to keep off any ; Conney 10 a.m.
~9O7 seul as = rT ; ; the top class, one in A2, one in B Duteibelia 130 iiaiad 2. ¢ fa | Police Courts and Juvenile
1 p
debut made 27. scored 35 runs. Their collapse ma A Vixen se iursher attacks until half time. | : 10
Scores follow:— as due mainly to some good and another from C2. The five Batts 198 The Second Half 1} Courts — 10 a.m.
bowling by M. Simmons who Class giants are Atomic a me — Pharos II 121 Soon afte othe ws cond half got || Meeting ae = Housing
SOUTH AFRICA—Ist Innit.es ’ r "S Burns, Elizabethan an rake’s Epieur ri ee a meee Board — 10.30 a.m.
; 2 bagged four of the Lodge Schoo) urns, B 8 mapigure — as 18. vitebaren. Cedi > McKinno: . S ae s

I Wane ie yb aeine 713 wickete for seven runs, Tie bowl- Drum, the last named staging a H-—st VENILE STAK 2 yo. colts | Rack - eo ae ee n, 04) | Old Boys’ Dinner at Marine

©. Van Ryneveld ¢ & b Hilton . 83 od six overs. comeback after nearly two years Gang * “tins” ie es eeliteh od ae, oH | Hotel

A. Nourse 1.b.w, b Brown 7 When played ended on the first off the track. | Rebate who did March Winds ES sunita: weed _ “top form Shal{ First Intermediate and Se-

z iesaen eam ‘ @7 day, Harrison College had scored well in Trinidad without winning Aptpnusk us ! wate . mae See e een cond Divisions Cricket at

P. Mansell ¢ Tattersall b Hilton 90 64 runs for the loss of two wickets. is the one from A2, the old gelding aoe y a0 » is & corner, Dut noting} the various grounds —

A. Rowan b Brown ® Due to heavy rains, play on the Slainte from B, and the French j»sparroRD HANDICAP —' ‘(Bolass) Goldfie ate at's. data | 1 p.m

Ni Mann b Tatteraall ; second day—Thursday July 26— bred mere Flieuxce from C2. To Furs, ioldfish were now showing First Division :

GP Snub 6: Lowsen } Biltan ) was washed out 7 Following are the entries for Sun Queen perfect understanding as several Wandeters i, Boaktan at
§ metres. ie 1, 6. 7 Resuming their second innings each race with the approximate Deanne’ Wiebe: ses their players interchanged Bay ‘ » peel
ons ja, At 64 for the loss of two wickets weights for the weight-for-age Harroween ae “a play es Empire ve. Y.M.P.C.. at
ota os sterday, College carried their socee Slainte ‘ oal came from Marion aylor 5 * 5 |
es y, é races. : . " Bank Hall

Fall of wickets: 1 for 40; 2 for 238; core to 148 runs for the loss of FIRST DAY oon, ‘Fikes who once again beat the Starfish ‘ riton ee! Tinling at Casas

for 267; 4 for 286; 5 for 392; 6 for 480; 7 seven wickets and declared, N. . a Lunways custodian Joan Ghent, | ton A
for 498; 8 for 500; 9 for 538 Harrison going in at number three !—MAIDEN STAKES (C & C2) 51% furs, Oatcake With the ball back into play ' i ; Caliegs at odve

BOWLING ANALYSIS tia: sy atts ns state 2 Miss Panic 128 Land Mark Starfish first on it. They ad-| | .odge vs College at Lodge

0.) M. R. w. inthe batting order scored 33 (Ming Princess 119 . oT rae Cones (ae tye aled a j Pickwick vs. Combermere
Bedser $s’ 14 113° 2 runs before he was caught and sweet Rocket 119 13--TRAFALGAR HANDICAP—(D class) V20C¢ed into the Goldfish goal aree| ! abiival
Bailey 17, 4 48 © bowled by Wilkie. Fuss Budget i 716 Furs. in a determined effort to score. | sudeedudinke >
Brown a a yt . Wilkie and Farmer both took oe 119 Three well placed shots from the 1, | Cele ae Wisdlese we, Jin:
mn. 60318 176 3 two wickets for 39 and 20 runs (apoure 119 Se on. Starfish forwards, however, were] | ate : senayvaet Hall
Compton . 1 Ae 4 0 respectively. Lunsway 119 DHulcibella well stopped by the Goldfish goal-]| ; Merital Hosvite) vs, Pidke |
Lodge was dismissed for 85 Topsy ; 124 Colleton kee Barbara Hunte. The bali] | Mental Hospital vs. Pic

Hutt pe AND it PEReY 9 runs in their second innings and#®?—-PLANTERS' fore cee eee ar pence 9 as once again transferred int ria ick at —s ee .

utton not ou > ee as ss le, a . oe iow Bells .. a . tegiment vs, Spartan a

Lowson not out 27 the only batsman who gave any rhe Eaule 126 Will O° the Wisp tt the Starfish goal area and after : aot |
Extras 1 resistance to the steady bowling offffirst Flight 118 Gross Bows melee in front of the Starfish goal sarrison ; |
: “3, Mr. Headley were Mr. V.{yApolio 7 Phyllis -Fitepatrick sent in the Windward vs. Pickwick at ||
Total 8 McComie 21, C. Grane 15 and Rane sewers 198 14—OISTIN STAKES—(G class) 516 Furs, fourth and fal goal of the match Congo Road. }
mh He : "Mr. Hes Pe bow), Duleibella oo Jewel ; 139 POUT é al Zoe * Se Seshin $
BOWLING ANALYSIS Reefer 14, Mr. Headley’s bowl-b coneton 128 Gavotte : iso | The referee was Mr. K. Ince. Se cond Div ision : : |
‘ 6, M. Fe W. ing analysis was ten overs, twoffpharos 11 at Miss Friendship 130 Second Game ait & ma i Lodge at
McCarthy maidens, 18 runs, five wickets “Betsam May Time 119 jeckles oac |
8. ae arene , Peas 3 11 The. sae ome was . “ . salle
aaron S pe eo Skipper Willams and C. Smith7P ie sansAbOS DERBY—0 Furlones hl Ba a The is bree ca ae ee, Foundation vs. Wanderers | |
' both took two wickets each, Vanguard , 120 Joan's Star ioe °° exciting as the first, but it we at Foundation |
Scores are as follows: — Hi-Lo iW Betsam 133 pcan th -_ sing e Central vs. Carlton at j
HARRISON COLLEGE—1st Innings Soprano ymphs_ with 1eir stronge Vaucluse
7 ’ 117 : aucluse
: : : 1 Bell 15—SU N 3 Vv r , ; “y 1 |
Crickei Results $ ce. sven bh Fatiner iC ao ICross Roads 120 PuMMee a ; C Blackman ec (wkpr. Mr. Wilkes) YaUsher 120 have been able to accomplish ha College vs. Pickwick at |
July 27. b Reefer uN ioe Wishes | 17 Thfusion . they been able to put in their Collage |
cores in English County Crick- Mr. Headley b Wilkie 12 ‘ ‘ ia ‘, Miss Panic strongest team in the water for 7 are
; ay were N Harrison b Farmer 2 §I—-STEWARDS' STAKES — (A) 9 Furs. pair Sally : jee en Combermere vs. Leeward
et games which ended to-day were R Dash c Williams b Farmer 12 #Atomnic 11 . 126 Dashing Princess every game, Mary Knig' nt anc at Combermere. |
as follows ° K Griffith ¢ Gill b Farmer cose 6 gSlainte iy Sweet Rocket Betty Williams in the Sea Nymphs CINEMAS

Gloucestershire vs -bevex at seristal, M nons b Mr. MeComie 7 (Gua Site 138 No-to-Nite back line played a fighting gam Aquatic: “The Girl in The Paint- !
Essex 243 and 183 tloucestershire 297 G er not out ® "sBurns runda . i s chi ir hare -—$b and 8.40 p.m.
“Witcriarstie Nanak ere ket Spa ane orien 108 APehe a that The Wbcatas tors nd Empire: ‘Abbolt, ‘Costello Meet |

I tershire won by nine wickets J. Williarns absent 7 eee Flieuxce erford ‘ a é § “ * As ine ,

Hampshire vs. prictiecse at eae! Extras see *sfiDrake's Drum 4 Fileuxce were kept at a safe distance, Dismete athe Fabulous Texan”— |
Middlesex 478 for 4 wickets; Hampshire ~—— [|*Elizabethan . : ota Doldrum me orm ; rhe net 30 a 8.15 j
256 and 287 for 8 wickets, Match drawn Total 75 [}0—SUMMER STAKES—(C class) 77 Furs. Vinways It was Mermaids who opene Placa (Bridvetowns: | ‘Teipot— |

Kent vs. Derbyshire at Folkstone —=— } {infusion | : 7 Oatcake the scoring early an the first hal! Sek nok 4a ca
Derbyshire 240 and 263 for 5 wicketS ~~ Fall of wickets: 1 for 11; 2 for 31; 3))Miss Panic ig Tiberian Lady Jean Chandler tried with a lon {|
ee gent 38 orarenr renee aa ek Debian Peinabes 101 shet from just inside the half-way |{__
won by 177 runs 68; for 75; 9 for 75 i The nd “7 666696,66666666 6666 COO OOO

e . G ‘ y ; 108 ark, The ball struck the cross- | (999GO9G99SCODGS9SSROO9OTS

Sussex vs. Glamorgan at Hastings BOWLING ANALY High and Low mark, Xe
Glamorgan 203 and 80 for 1 wicket; Sus- aM. R. W his tbe is bar and rebounded into play it & Messrs. CARDON TUDOR (well %|
sex 207 and 174, Match drawn Brookes 5 0 21 0 gjCatania # » direc f Jean McKinnon | & own shopkeeper of Baxters Road ¢{

Sear 101 the direction of Jea I know pe axte s

Yorkshire vs. Scotland at Scarborough. Reefer 4 6 14 1 MArunda renada Netball . . se range, Twc|%$ and ADOLPHUS (Cain! SEALY

2 272; Yorkshire 37% 116 ho scored from close range. Tw] ¥ and ADOL. ‘ ‘ s x
Scotland 121 and 272; Yorkshire 372 and wWiikie 4 1 4 1 BAberford Ww § “ ; . +
22 for 2 wickets : Farmer 5 0 20 4 _Flieuxce a Ti , minutes later Roberta Vidmer it x request the pleasure of your com- s
mareanite: won. by t-wiekets, Pu earners mais L ae coe i, £our Opens 7 oday a determined swim-through, sw op > pany to their Xx
Mr. Wilkes b Mr, Headle 5 Wiberian Lady ia : ball and goalkeeper into the] ANNES 74) %
AYES G Stoute b Simmons 0 Oateake nae team which has been goal to score the equaliser % ANNUAL NOR 2 |
RH C Grant b Simmons 0 ri class) Chosen to represent Barbados in At half time, the score was Ses] s ~)
: : sell PALG STAKES — (D class) é a j x : ee iy
Su Y’ FIXTURE oe es Bone é er eit Furs. the Netball Match against Gren- Nymphs 3, Mermaids 1. Joyes * At QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE %|
TO-DAY’S C Git ated: wkpr. Harrisohy 6 Suntone tae 4 today at 5.00 p.m. at Queen’s Pekstein and Pat Mahon sent in Se On Monday Night, goth July,1951 9
< . sines. _ Foster 19 Mary Ann us College is as follows: — the second and third goals for Ses] % ADMISSION 0:0 2/-

Rain prevented play on Wednes- 4 "Reefer pb Simmons 1 First Flight us Shooter: Thelma Barker, jg »mphs in that order. x Siunic be wee cos eens 3

. Yhursday this week in the ce Witiar t Duleibella 7 ympns ; 5,
day and Thursc ay h Ss wee nny ¢ Rudeins we ed 6 Vikert 115 Attack: Sylvia Maxwell, Attack- After the interval Mermaids] ss Orchestra $
Men's ae ae Nee Takin nade Uaioe Hainan) Clementing | 06 ing Centre: Jean Chandler, Cen- tried to increase their score. Jean x BAR SOLID Xs)
de Lima ‘Trophy aft aia deste Sep b_ Foster a: eet tees jay tre: Margaret Ramsey, Defending Chandler worked hard throughout] — pjoase extend this Invitation S|
hayes Lawn Tennis Tournament at J. Farmer not out 0 pee Re 130 Centre: Kathleen Connor, De- th me and she and Jean} S

» Te : 9 y ellis ‘ roy ’ é > - © aaa j
Belleville. meee: 72 WH othe Wasp il 115 fence: Patricia Best (Captain), °,.88 lade severdl attempts | 2699GGG9GG009999S9SS999F"
This fixture will take place Total 33 i=-STAFFORD STAKES — (B class) (Goalkeeper: Beverley Batson eee a were unfortunate
4 , Sly Furs. a . score y u 1 C
today at 4.30 p.m : ie 9. «= GRENADA ROVERS CLUB —&® SCOxe Dus ey we lefence would
The couples are. D, W. Wiles and | Fall of wiekets; 1 for 2; 2 for a, 3 pe Oks 119 TEAM The Sea ae as aeten . ;
ples D, Ww. \ sel pe Bi 6 tor if: : Ree : i 4 | ing through.
J. S. B. Dear vs C. R. BE. Warne fos toe fr Fit ist 10; 6 for 1h; 7 for ae ka Low 309 Shooter: Joyce Blache, Attack let nothing Rett as LADIES |
and L, A, Hutchinson, BOWLING ANALYSIS BP ng Harroween ~ Bileen La Hee, Attacking Centre i = Der aati in the
’ . M, Dy é ils ontre: ‘an s ste oe sae .
Yesterday's Results A oe eeriee i Elma Wilson, Centre: — Doreen — At this s i dicaraba: sine ean Another Addition to our
MEN’S SINGLES &immons.\... 6 eat: 4 Gittens, Defending Centre: Pearl Sea Nymphs forwar “arin Fast Selling Stock of ...
a S. Cato beat BE. R. At- Air. Headley C.eee Ae LODGE~2nd Innings Mendes, Defence: Angela Andrew, down and scored from near 1 ast selling + uh
we “ak 6. ae go wu Foster , 5 4 2 2 G Stoute b Williams oi aies 13 Goalkeeper: Dorothea Sylvester.’ However Joyce Eckstein. ws
us —6, 6—4, 6-2, ; ; 2 q : jams r. Headle f ; C A p , 4 , $5656060O,
ga : ehhidin coLi za E ond hits ? S etthinssn ° MS Headley b . SOP OP OSS GSES SOS IOS POP DOPE PPI FOOD POPPI PRD “<
ieeeelipcnnimeiernincaaneemencccmmcncecamcemsigll je 5 OUL - ; a <
©. Smith e wkpr. Mr, Wilkes) b Williams q =
Farmar we : 30 Mr, MeComie b Mr, Headley 21 * FOR YOUR LEATHER NOVELTIES st | f
Y t d ’s E Hope b Farmer 9 Me Wilkes c & b Mr. Headley . 0 . J ahs +
esteraay N. Harrison c & b Wilkie 33 6c: Gill e peck iae b aha 8 iy %
C Blackman run out 31° K Brookes c Blackman b SHOP AT.... a ‘ ; Y
Weather Report Karimi wot out Ts a a oe 4d % EMBROIDERED
; Mr. t tle & b Wilkie 7 © Williams ec Griffith b Smi ai aun .
FROM CODRINGTON Mr. Headley ¢ & b Wilkie LS FS wundies 0 1% BOOKER’: x 36” f $2.35 up
: 01 in. J Williams c Williams b Mr B Reefer run out ‘ 14 1 30° TrOM dé.ve
Total ht ‘ 2 N. Wilkie not out 2/8 %
Total Rainfall for month to McComie . ie : 111 We have just received:— ¥ ? :
, Retens 4 Extras ; s e have just received: ey ee ; js
date ; 4.94 ins. ate is ie — 1% Leather Book Markers x We have now oe
—" Temperature: 85.5 Total (for 7 wits, decid) 148 Total 8 * f Stocking Mending Sets x eotiorns and shades to
i ; ei call 3 5 c se from...
. , : Fall of witkets; 1 for 40; 2 for 41; Fall of wickets : 1 for 7; 2 for 21; 3 for} sf ” Ladies Shopping Purses eo choose
= Keppeeatare k “000 for 91: 4 Tor 117; 6 for 126; 6 for 129; 36; 4 ee rll Ha Bah. S08 BEd ” Tobacco Pouches .. . ete., etc. . x
7 for 148 8 for 55; 9 for . . — also — i .
Jelocity : iles BOWLING ANALYSIS BOWLING ANALYSIS ‘ _ "i Yours for Service
Wind Velocity : 9 miles we. ae OM ROW o,M. RW.) Ladies Compacts, & Cigarette Cases % "
hour. aberee E., Sesee Brookes $0 14 GC J Wiliams Rook at ie (ee with $
‘ : : : \
Barometer : ( cam) " HpeEe 3 hee an. ph en io akc ea | g COLOURED VIEWS OF BARBADOS $
(3 pam.) 29.89 yr. MeCo oS 3 oe Eee 4 9 Bw Ole These make Weal Gifts .. . x pros.
. Wilkie 14.5 330 2c. Smith . Sra ee ie % REMEMBER IT’S ALWAYS BEST TO SHOP 3
. . a . % ,
B Jimm Hatlo % me % Pr. Wm. Hny. St.
. ’ ’ y et onne
= 8 BOOKER’S (B’dos) DRUG STORES LTD. x Dial 3466
‘
BROAD STREET & HASTINGS (Alpha Pharmacy) y
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PAGE 1

s\TI RDAY. JULY U. 1S1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAf.l. rilREE Re-arming France Is Critical Problem (Bv EDWARD M. L'ORHY) PARIS. July H Trie problem of transforming France Into a strom; mihiiirv i ing the critical itin for U.S. planners. Grave polities] prublems have loon some oj tha haftrc i-lcdce to supply 1" divisions to the Atlantic army by tinuud uf the year—a promise which Pn Vincent Auriol repeated only laU Monday to General Eisenhower, as he formally handed over the site of SHAPE headq uarteis. The truth of the military situs_ tlon here, as It lit being expressed **llilv 11*111 I fl>4*t more and more openly by all poll^111 |S WOn I U<1 Uca| yiifllM „ OTll as US expert* i< that M long as war In Imlo-Chitia continues lo bleed France of equipment, and huge turns of mone>. she will not be able to play her traditional role of deri aider of the continent As of today, France has barely .md a half dhrtaJOHl read. for Eisenhower It* allfOI | past the blue print stage, its armament-.* industry has been *ef) slnv<, tn increasing output. While its morale has Improved %  Don't f>t Enough Meat From Argentina LOhTDON. July 27. The London Times commenting un the Argentine meat situation said: ""British shipping companies, long accustomed to bringing Argentine meat to this country in refrigerated space, are dis.ipp-nr.ieu ith the limited quan* %  * .,dui.. ££ STSSSifiUEKi "JWTooo 'tizen.1, not to mention wholeso far this year. # of the the 1 flV-niK Of Iha spine which was fully cmducted on ordinary business lines From the resumption of shipmenu at the beginning of May to the end of this month, not more than 55.000 tons of Argentine natal will have been brought forward for shipment. Exports fiom Argentina lo .ill destinations are now restricted to the 10.000 tons a month, and lines esmodtTl / W ild Confusion On Stock Market LONDON, July 27. on marked the Stock Market confronted by the new QaJtakiafl nmpoMl for %  .. I of dit LdejMi and fortunes toat overnight. High asm again aapartorKini. prices! industrials tumbled ris-hof turning out divisions and left at the opening. isions with high prlred Ford motor* f.-ll live ahillings to Ghosl Town Lives In teams of money and t.n.iK tha dram is tremendous at namleBlb waak country With the threat of sabotage alwayi lurking behr d a crisis such Fra TO Till-: STRAINS of grand opet %  i ghat* town COmtM to life In the high Rockies To Ctfrbnto Coionkdo nond iubtlM lho w putting aa M iri In the o* houit at Central City%  one* the ce e ol %  gold-mlnlnfi boom. Saloons have re-opened to I •.. %  drlnka _.. that only 5.000 tons a month equipment—is something which 53 shillings nine pence. Dunlop will be available for shipment to any French Covernment trembles rubbers three' shillings 1.. BI lAllfthe U.K. during August, Septemto ask of the country. ings three pence. United M n l n ill bar, and Octobar. French offleUli iwU Iha coal <>f naarly fom shillingto 33 ahillOut of the total authorized shipraising ,md equipping u modern ings six pence and Vickers six ments or 10.000 tons a month, exarmoured or airborne division ji shillings to 4. shillings. ports are to Bl gil and Other S285.000.000 about one seventh of Worrt hit section .is trading conCOUntrtaa If tin to*.a exptctad France's record lM arms budget uiiuett was rubber shares. f 15.000 tons foi MLr K of $1.115 000.000 Even an ordlnwere ther are infantry division costs about $142 000.000. during the ensuing three months realized, Ulll will make a total ot 70 0011 tons in the first six months Of tha new trade agre. i The agreement stipulated for exporta of not less than 200.000 of carcass meat and offal. Iliyh Price r S is paying a huge price foi rajuvanation of the French ithout dividends for and have only iu-t begun ta reward their patient holders when this blow fell. Dealers were completely at sea iiid reluctant to buy at any price The Brooke family controlling shareholders of Brooke Bond and Call For Islamic Solidarity From HAROLD fit'AMI DOFF tlillliTK m New Y iiv tot 90.000 Corn"./ Mayor V Municip. Addict lot pellltarL out of ev oomnittfe f s> Dai lion and 1.. adei i LONDON. July 27. i Central Asia. Soviet during, the IS months after its rig"""x'" '"'* '^' ''^'.^'Vi/ fL orap SLKSJ n 2f£f B lt\^S* !" Asla repubuc*. and in Iran. PaK ,, a ur .. total of 12.200 000,000 is to rxI dt th.ni i: 100.000 when £ 1 ordinary lslan am j Egypt are reportedly Joyce hat would N New \ | 'III IllllllOl, %  %  %  ire \, CONS! \Hl.r. SAM SATAN i New V" ast i Ha ha recovcree t: stolen can, InalHdfni '•^^'' % %  -.^ : ,i mini t %  k He has raacisad i drowntni nan He has fallen downsUli chasing burglars. He lonved Sergeant Willi n THE Barbndoa Turl flub ure ram celling Scrica XX for the Mid-Summer race meet A record number of 75 horses will be taking pan In Ihtl four day meet and in IDS about the eft) men duilv fining races. rfc At the turf horses are regular It a gHthiK their workout. The> Drug Sic taken to the saa, loo, on lit lit) i' V|i|H-al Jadfei Vary DtfohdlMI %  natura, For this quantity to be supplied. 130,000 tons must be shipped during six months from NovemlH-r to April, a period when supplies are normally at their largest. This would provide an average monthly export of over 20.000 tons. ,i this \car In addition other 1275.000.000 has been ear1O £io 10s a 25 shilling toss on .narked for Indo-China and Hnjll> %  Oma I400.000.OOH \, is hun i re lit ed France for the purchase ar manufacture of arms The list of equipment delivered to France in the first six months of ,0oo when £1 ordinary s t an and Egypt are reportedly tiara* fell from Kll IB shillings calling to the faithful for "Islamic ilidarlly" in a combined UUi each share At one time shares aon movement againsi W<-lcn. fell to £10. — \ *P H tons n year or more thai, 40000 "X^ to fraetoS Jm? torn i month. Consequent! '.^leW mdtanks during the height of ,hr shipping ^^A^gggk "" """'*" : ""' %  "'" rm v ,;, tSShM armed ,1 rerafl lude Debaie On Price Rollbacks .mpeiialism. ,\ cblnwt mi cast from Hankow : of Chines.Mo grams to "Moslem* of Persia and Morn umist broad.uii .i iimiini had sent telcand worki i-xpresslng liberation move n. refrigerated space will only bv ball Mled Ships carrying Masai I mails must be malntali i servlca, and U to carry all the Qmltad shipments likelv to be ofh TAKES OVER FROM BRIGADIER PAGE i|>om Our Own Cot-Mpotid*ii1 > PO(T-OF-SPAlN. July IS. Brigadier A. C. S. Jackson. newly-appointed Comn I the British Army in the Caribbean area, arrived in Trinidad this morning to pay visU to Trinidad.. I Hi taken equipment that was soon to hecome obsolete. By the end of the war the French army had for all HH—NII— I purposes disappeared !' | %  | ,u i Dthll | about replacing it. Now she has to start from the beginning, equipping and training %  inking fofce. To train this force she des|*mtely needs 25 000 BTftTy officers and non-com•* %  ., .-.„.,.. missioned officer-. flBhtlng among tering quota question 155 000 troops in Indo-China —a Chairman liurnel I potential core for a new French said co pport for ttv ments. •* The message said' '"Moslems in China cannot sit idly by and see Moslems oppressed elsewhere We must oppose imperialism in uiuhlgjBssst on with all Moslem countries and United S .ill oppressed nationalities." £71.950) In Sinkiang province, the chair|asj. Sail of the Paopla i DssBoarafii ..j n 1 .,4t SIs^i'K %  %  % %  i-r-^-'-.r.rKsr, will spend live days here. coming to the Caribbean, he was Officer Commanding. Northern Area, East Afnm WASHINGTON. Julv 27 Kxhausted Senate and lieu eunferees ended an all-night si slon early today with only u issues blocking agreement on t compromise bill to extend econ ton controls for one year Conferees said they reached tentative ugi.cixcnt on tinaOMD mem permitting prl.t rollbaiks to League broadcast a riecUruli"ti OH prv-Korean levels provided inbehalf of Moslems of Asia in supcreased costs may be uddnl tu port of Moslems in Iran ceiling prices. The other issue still in doubt hymputhy — the controversial beef slaughHe aUd: "The sympathy of Is Mavbank people ot Asia and the Moslem reserved the' right nasse* lies with the Persian ,.pcn discussion of the rollpeople i tha lift of actress Matthews, found wilh he: ,. i in produeai Bilhj Hose's apt.rtnnnt just psi Baa %  iha M to fo off-dytj % %  H night. S i WliO call siimiiioiiil tfftl M to a fth-fsooi badfi i BivadwuHotel Woodward. Then-. %  %  one leg of Mri. Fst. %  Ryan and pulled hi I the loom as she was about to %  urtla Into tha Mreel Ceimeii is 'lay/re' AC1M1 -I %  sroman In tha l 1040 (HO uu tin honottf in u.i n ct: Mlk uf stealing IhTM %  ouraop, i\ paw pawn and some tomatoes, all v.i!ued !*rt cents, Sarah Johnson ,.i Coniifil Town, St. I.u.y was .-terda.v fined £1 by the Judges of the Assistant Court of Appeal. tfl Q I. f^vlor and Mr. J W. B. Chenery SHI ah also haa lo pay I S lo Moituiiei Johnson fmm whom she i lole the fruit an.l vegetables. In .mi*oatng t*nAna Iha ludjgei varied tha daclaion of Police Magistrate Mr. S H Nuiw. Mr had Hoed Sarah £2 1 inbM kciound of the case was i.. Barah fohnaon that 'he wii in eharsja of the land on Which the tilings wengrowing and it wai not Mortimer Johnson's land, sinihd not oanj picking ha fiuits She pnKlme.1 paiiei-. t > try to prove thai the land previously balonsMd to her grandfather and handed over to William K L I M 51b tin A __ NOW—45.98 lib tin NOW-—$1.35 ;.ke tv and be I go to ll My heal" 1 Inlay i In Ad Johnson fiu I go Ol. I oil. %  tORltC bomb. Then (at That I don't Ilk. • rnportanl Hoas If I got Jiia.nuo dolk I wouldn't know l: othei ants *o be p KSrai lo whom she produced e pure wotc, add KUM. shr | e pure, sofa mils I KLIM aere sefe MILK Take and you have | Kim •urni *tn" pSfja IN atlFIVINCE TMI WOSID OVS.S %  f Attnrnev I•in.Tr^Mor.My/eough has quite gone tinFrench are Jgaln tvirnniK out equipment In Increasing numbers hut In heavy sttif U is K-illlB at 9 criiwl.— VV. „„,,. hating slaughter quotas "to pre~0 vent black market.'" May bank scheduled meeting at 2 p m. today Assistant librarian Accepted Bj Leeds INQUEST WILL CONTINUE TO-DAY ufti of Central Aslsrf*. ,l tini'ii. %  %  riother lion was "favourable to the Persian people in their light for Inl\P. lepcndence" In Iran, Ayatullah KashanJ, leader of Fidayan Islam but areeft the $10,543 Oollectetl At Piarco Airport lublished eorresp-mdence lietwi-en cn,,a W1IF-N be lost hi IBpaal aMlnal is.li.o Magistrate Mr. G. A. 1 whnl to In With them In oihei Mc i XH)d ., 5/ nne de r|tion for %  l """ 1 w ratUnsj t.. produea bla ditvtaal be hesuth r. U ca nsa < %  %  pijiieaassiii MjmiUon LONfNM IMMTORN idVUd t .> lev of Villa (toad, flrlttans Hill. 12-yenr-ort Henry Hookes parnj( Io |U V MI1 uddllional 7 Uka tha delicate boj i .,,.,! costs. The Aaaisum court 1 '" Uve ;f Appeal Jucbjas who heani the a few yean more. Tl %  %  > did and appaal yesterday, were Mr (J. I, k>->] in Led hi Taylor and Mr J. W 11 Ch-nerv ad hi iu4th birUiday. nfee Cosart load Bsrytoy he was has outlive! his Wlft and two |,. C kv in i* knots) % %  trophy Ds ca uae %  i !|iAPPEAL WITHDRAWN Winston Wal.olt of Maswell Hill. Christ Church, yesterday % %  an appeal he had naoe UwandreFran.-l, liner Normandie Whan S!dMlP^T*iB&***C igion tight to the death in defendthe Noimandlr burned it Ne 1 ing Pakistan and Kashmir Soviet broadcasts in Twueh and Arabic languages monitored here recently, urged the establishment of the Union of the whole Islamic world.—I'.P. fpiIEIR goorl looks teTl you they're;usl right. You know, too, when you look at the price tap, that you can't get finer valor. Illustrated is a Full Brogue Oxford. Tied io ever; pair is the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign which means • ;ul right '/ Look for it in leading stores in Darbadoe. made by JOHN WHITE means made just right J New Plant Comes Into Operation Fli.n On. Ova • i %  •poiMlnH GEORGETOWN, July 24. The first section of the Agriculture Department's new processing plant has come Into operation, while oth.i sections continue to reinstalled at the Kingston premises. The section in operation is mixing stock feed mechanically, having taken over thilob from the Government Produce Depot, where stock twii used to I* made by ham;. The mechanical]. of atock feed ensures a better oisIribuOon of the Ingredient* within the mixture. When the plant is completed it will increase the Government s drive to Improve the Colony's pcasint farming economy. It will be having units for canning pineapples, grapefruit and oranges. and for the conversion of corn cassava or the like Into flour It Is hoped that the flour manufacturing unit will lx* ready in lime 'or the next torn crop, whlcfr Is expected :o be around 800,000 lbs The new plant ill also supply storage and rirving facilities which wlfl render surplus produce less liable to attacks by Insects and moulds. Ii'42 the tropl .Ml luiined. too No\< An.in "i> an r.k.ng aO kt it I|;.OTI. Nastl y*a' %  %  -* lave rack id the (Jnien Mary's and 8 8 h Turpfn's l.w Till C.LOVFS wine' : : nn in tha bin nnhi apD a New York TV (noil's News U> Me." The H.O.AC flew them over and will psssh to-rnoiiow. New York is discussing an official feleotne for Sugar Ray Robli 'i with a tld %  hower down Rroadwaj. (.1 M RAL MOTORS plan to make 38 pee cent fewer ears in I months thin th.-/ ma lima I*.--I %.'..r The steel Bared will go for lefence Vat thev will still he making S1' I I32 cars during thos<> Wodd daitf The la\f fling I"" Lrm WHEEL*, dice f'~ 1. u/alwyn's decision of t\ In 14 days or 14 days Imprlsonmenl when he found him tmilty of eml>e//lement Walrdt used to work with Cecil Awards delivering milk f<-i him fraudulently embezzled received fr.tm W Thotiiaa who took milk from Edi Harbour Log In C*rliile Bay km i-.< N'-II-TI •••(• M V AnU't. II A h %  Hill. Lad? •..I %  into tatrnns and all could sink %  havement b* winch :mil %  whenever :h-.< threatened to rod a f -house at Cheboygan. n. Rut one night police the donini.m .md got m he could thiow the lavai •a* the place to vanish. la ass AaaivAL .. %  al DtM*r*BTi a iM. I.HI I" lor Trlr.ld-1 ,nr Freedom rtSSfly. tons net ,i,( DaBoeha. f Oreaeda I %  r.l ? rre-l 1S8 IWI hat. Cap* War o DT Munliral -• V I'aiibl-*. ISO l.rt> n" Capl I can enjoy smoking nowl |H, oifh bMh<'*4 mt fv re*l -"Hi fttafiy I i-ol fouad lo fiea up Wio*in| Suf iha tar" d.dK'1 t >"• ">'"' "SJ %  KWkai. rhe"llaO'dotl7 U tMtoi.|i sskextfa ii •••"*•*."§'M %  •"•*'" ta-fh d-dn'f feii m • %  • '"J '' iz* &•!•. Ho* J injarN re ffU P>p*l Warming, tomforuni 7obei Couah Hiatwra aoothes the tiw throat, nops irrlunon and lo.iiorjtet the chsi. iti •acallani for couth* %  rltlng from told*, bronthial inflammatloe, (hroit dryndn and ovrimoklng. Zubai Cough W.oitr|cu i o" your i lifti — qwlcktf COUGH MIXTURE i nal. Capl More Kk3 In B.G. V< ans LiM Caillf CLUB PREMIERE TENNIS Yesterday's Results MKN-8 8INCLES A. W. Symmonds 'teat LeRHlackett —0, 6 0. F. Edward* beat J Robtnaon 0—1. 8—. LADIES* siNfil.t.i Miaa s. Orsflth bash Misi G Crimes *-l. 6—2. Moml.i\ rixttVe* MKN'S DO I'RLE S C. B. Torde and W D" \-s J. E. H %  B BlackOMI nut a MIXED DOl BI,X Miss E. Parru and F. Edwards urea f e pror.' of arm In IV and In ol bee %  pared Of tb WDpl l MM D eontii. past t towi .F/JRCET(iW.V July 24 expansion being carried • na* had an unfavourable >n rattle production Flg' the past three years show eaahra drop in the number all tlj-ughlerfd .. %  400. in 1049 It was 17.745; ItSO—ir,.043 The amount consum' d in Georget'>wn I was 2 140.000 lbs. eom-Hh 2 300.000 lb in liMB • ovantltles tin* Itupununi I 520,000 lbs in 1950. and lbs. in 1949 Pi %  s lo drop and d > months there ban baaa maallos dayin Q eorsjS' In Touch with Barbados Coaat Station C.bia and Wlr*le>* iWaal Indian LU *lww lhat thcr tan r.w eommunirnw viUi Ihr lullewlng tftlpa Ihraugh man Itatladoa Cnm* Walton •* 1 namwlh Mill S 1 MiaiiMmefl |'if!r S a Theodoam. S B CllctH S frlllo. S B KaUMla. S S Dl-igled-l'. S S i -. Tra)anut. %  S %  t n 'I .ifpnQf. B S Samana, a %  Araanlin". S < % %  itmcliafjotd. 8 S fcsnlen Plo'iaei H tSraaU, • S AK n H toiiannlt F Cio^Undila • aketaai. OS Potoeaa. M Skaa %  .,i,ii a J'-t-n tn-i.d-i. as (-<,.* TiaU. S F*. Il.ill.i.l.n •> I V-llyrien Mink fl S Nyholt, B.a I a Aiicap S.B. atanvK ITetoria. S S Ceoaiht. S S Mrrto. a S .,i.i... niideman. a S Artraa. B H Alna F.nM. rr. S B Jonn Chandrit H S S SlaM 1 %  Alraa ,Pllri'. • PWUcra*. a %  n a Cabia. a a Kinaviid*-. p H ivmaaa. HS Hamralw. S a • %  i H Pioditn %  Thrrma. • 'A i..". a a hrafcrae... s a Jana M..va S B Bonllo. a S HuMtw. S H S S Maco>. 1 •* M'ml-alt !• 1 Iwl *.-!. B l.'i-laBMOM • <* Adnallra >IM> S S BnUm l-roaaerter. B B Clan Farfc Si Bvaralt. B S Ubravin*, a 3 Alpha. S Kalcrert CRAWFORD'S CREAM CRACKERS a CRISP & CREAMY Thvy'rf Simply #Se/#V/o* N.B. Hhlialil I .mn enjoy Crawloid's Cream Cra. kcri williout fear ol any ill elfetta. ASH run: CRAWFORD'S C R EA M C R A C A E R S



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PAC.I sl\ R.VRRADOS ADV'"-ATE SATl RDAY, JULY M, JS1 HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON Bottles Grolsch Beer Dreadful, Choking, Spasms Of BRONCHIAL ASTHMA r:" !" WHY SUFFER TORTURES OF SLEEPLESS NIGHTS When one doso of the amazing Mixture will ease that choking, smothering spasm in seconds' Buckley's Mixture is no ordinary medicine— its different from any Cough Remedy you have ever tasted—Triple BtNngtl Syrup—All Medication. One Oose Stops The Cough Whn n>u feel a cough or choking bionChtaJ -.ii-sm turning on. just lac a dose of Buckley's Mixture and •wallow slowlv. You'll leal the powerful healing warmth -preart down through your tnruil t) • hcil tubes, soothing inllarnt hard breathing and loosening tough pfe making It easy to expel. Buckley's Mixture i%  nade from rare Canadian Pine Balaam, and other proven ingredients. There'not aoot hw cuch medicine like it. Get a bollle TODAY. and relief right away. BUCKLEY'S MIXTURE \ SINGLE SIP TELLS WHY WE SELL A MILLION BOTTLES A YEAR IN ICE-COLD CANADA ALONE. Rheumatism and Backache GoneinlWeek Filth K.dncvt With C.tfo. u*a You'll Rial MM C,I—Hi* pn-'.-rlptton of tamoua % %  i all iroubioo flue to raun k time. ... %  from Rnf U i>itiioi, aciati. J. Niur.tii. Lumbago. Backacfta. Ner• t.i~m. L*f Punt. Olllii.ii. Clrcloo u-'T E)FI. fr-a Oat up Nlgnta. rto I-OWP 'hamUl todar for €•• and ba m and wall next waalt Cyttm Helps Nature 3 Ways Th. Cyita* traatmatLt li blMy ocl-nIMa, beingapwlnlly compound** *o aooth-. ton" and • %  • raw. %  <•. lick UK?n*v and Madder and to rwmov* %  rid" mitA polaMMJ ffom your ayateT-i : .contain* : %  ah, harmful -a. pfotf-ta you fri>m tha wvuiC'B of m^aw-altack on m* n>ii< at" r.ltrr onranlatn. and HlmulalrTwsiTla Ho-ir-Jr— Now Well "<• hat !£"* *>' f" "*'• "* ***** r*4 a'add" iroaM*. aI*o ftftra-iatic %  €< %  > rd *(!# JoMlt. / 0i aof iM (o •>< %  Mi %  raw and **•?*( alw Matawl totpltaf. :. rafi I wo*f4 ""' •* •*** to wort. OBI %  fttrr Cytla. "*' f—* %  >•"#*'. *" "d I'-.-ir,. f iSgd I J. A.P. Health Improved in 2 Days t "f ftat a*t f*If rralt' w*n for agM aad raS..—I roaffano'iy fcna bar*ar# Old ad; ,.!. ( Aod irfrd oftaoil awrrtUtwf tai / „,r,a ff -lie'. Flaallr / dfdrf to on' o.d laMfOMi v fcMltlt *of la I .r dapt fJMia oUwr Mla-v aan d^aa ft.' Mri D to Pat You Right (M Cr*t*>t irPOwJ >"tir -L-nil*! today ;ira II a thof-uih tast, Cyataa I_ njront-d to make .1 youti.ar. f r. b.ttar IT. Y. in 14 houra and to b comploialy .11 In I w..*k or your may back It vou torn tli* amply parkCystexili"o& I Tv.fi 4ivrutbiMd r RHIUMATISM IT PAYS YOU TO PEAL HERE I SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit cuslomers for Thursday to Saturday only Usaally Now Usually NOW ^.i, Tins Kcudomah Coffee (i) 95 Hti Pkgr;. Jack Straws 61 ..O Pkgs. Custard Cream Biscuits 51 10 Tins Gloria Evap. Milk 29 M 24 18 Cakes Ivory Soap 27 24 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street tnVERTISE #.V 7-JVaV EVENING ADVOCATE GROWIXG URCil.XTIOS KYF.RY .HO.V0.4I For Rates Apply Advocate Advertising Dept. K^" ask for GilssoiS LUXURY TOILET. SOAPS -,,. IMPtRUttEATHEK • lli>D£N BLOSSOM • BUTE HYACINTH -~^xwm 7 1'or swift uchveno and tttj nunoruvcring in city and jburban areas, this vm is unexcelled for the carrying: of uny tvpes of meri.hjndisc. It has an all-steel body with safety sliding doors, and pntMal excellent visibility for the river. Loading space is exceptional, no less than 150 cubic 'eetl The low fuel comumptir.n and ncgligihlc maintenance .oats ensure really economical opcratton. MORRIS-QIMNERCUL FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 foiwdijloutaioN ... \-r it iMMbutaMwdmtaiar, %  V 0 aiog i^** J dm •ndgcirr.. nr* fiaar PROTECT YOUR EYES witk Optr w I E Y E re EYE LO r -^_. \ MAXI '< r c s r | „h. 4



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TAOF. KH'rl BARBADOS \HVOCAT,: SATIRDAY, Jll.Y -S. IftSI BARBADOS AtVOGttE i 1—-—...—— f __—, Saturday, Jul) Hi IISI TEMPLE YAIIII THE need for a public market Clly has been I slon for some lime and tbfi B Michael decided tl : mend t" the VeMry "thai Yard be taken over as a public highway, tad Into ;< ken; and thai %  cocnav be acquired to provide space (or The Director <>f Medical Servie Hlgl Colonial Kniiineor and the CCfJUl I Invited to take part in the discussion ol III Mct'l. \'s mOtiOB. They thai if tins tcmpoiaiA arrai tary condition! cause,! by th> hawkers in U I fa and alleys %  >( the City it was wmth while. it will ! %  remembered thai the Ommiisiuners alter loi aetl Btin avcrtJ spots in the City decided thai the area Tudor Street. Suttic Street, and Watklna Alley would be ., I for .L market. They recommended that the land and buildings should be acquired (or this purpose, Owing to the le^al dillieulty in the titles o( some of the properties, the Comniim Interim report recommended that the (.overnment should acquire such of the properties as were available. The scheme wai estimated to eoai a sum In the vicinity of i: 40,000. It had not been found possible fur the ;menl to embark on Ihe ICheflM owing to the amcunt of capital expenditure involved and in the meantime, Mr. Mottley has suggested the temporal > ihcmc for the conversion of Temple Yard into a vegetable and fruit market The new proposal has the merit a market in the Immediate city area and putting it m a spot where there is a driveway all round, where there is a 'bus terminus for country lines, wh-ie there is a perking area and where the vegetable market will be adjacent to the meat and tish markets It is now left to the Vestry to recommend to the Central Covemment the adoption of this scheme, the cost of which has been estimated roughly between two and three thousand pounds. The Commit nonet nude it clear that this was not to be an alternative scheme tc the one for the establishment of a market in Tudor Street. It was merely an attempt to remove the unsightly and insanitary conditions now existing in Tudor Street, Milkmarket, Busby and Luke's Alley. conditions have been the cause of much public criticism against the Sanitary Authority and the Government. The Police have deM.sted tnun drivini: these hawkers from their improvised markets on the streets because of the ab%  encal ol proper market space This point was not overlooked by the Com mission or s who made it clear that if and when tne temporary market is estal lished in Teoiple Yard it will be necessary to compel iikwkeis to use it. The t-ublic too will be asked to co-operate. It will then mean that the Insanitary conditions In the alleys will be removed and the fourteen side streets between Broad Street and the Wharf and Broad Street and Swan Street would be available for parking and %  ifflc. Socialisation lias I ailed MBODY'S DIARY A-^1 M uhiiB In i iih.i THE establishment of apodal mental agencies for the nnaneing i mir developme beini firmly written into the economics ol under-developed areas. Under the Law for the Agricultural and Industrial Development of Cuba of I 20, 1950. Cuba has rcentU established a Hank of Agricultural and Industrial Development ol Cuba. This hank has an Initial capital of 15 milbon pesos and a developmcnl fund of 10 million peaoa, divided equally be> tween its Agricultural and Industrial Divisions, Both capital and development fund may be Increased by further government contri earned proiits The loans contemplated in the lav on loin;, medium, 01 short term. The tist major operation ol the new bank in the agricultural field is to he the financing of coffee production. To secure funds for Hans for this purpose, the bank will issue bonds which will be guaranteed by the security offered for the loa this manner the bank hopes to avoid using its capital l"! The i preacril ment ol rura oil arid These are t operatives "i ganiscd to extend cred ities to their members; to (aciltt production. transportation, diatril sumption of products; and to ci may aid agricultuial production. %  %  f £39flO0.0O0 %  %  MMPLl Til \ I SOX l M W v TION %  *• WHY? Bl \i -i: in i .i M> R "iio MIGHT MAKE II WllRK CANT IU FOUNll %  al ihcii %  I %  iliteracy rim nark, slor%  %  i ilayi." Ill UN \KI1 IIAKKIS %  ,%  -, a %  i i isjdaa I n Cardiff. Always Excuse* the < (Ml workers ore com. %  .i,' | i.nlway junctions, they :ay, i making anothrr coal rlsis morn probable. The Hallway Executive replies that the congestion 11 due to "t flOftoe* i't trained IIK.HIK niMKiES — AND POWBR (ilTHAT WTI.I <;o ON ma l KAKs Why has i i Citrine, with a %  leader, failed P other nati'in;, d Industries like coal and tren-pr make success if. p rtly because quail1 ni„: 'use developed.ini %  %  %  BJ %  MaM only %. mus could cope with Ihe jch. Such a man hadn't i A would L* IT.I'S' uiih 'I. thai he would jet lhjob. f.AS Soak i i %  r T CLOSED FOR (... nflde of £2.663 In H excuses and alw;>s ileti rioutiot: It Is not manly that in. Ti,i %  iMlab : MM %  of pa,8 M Where rd la* |ha larae %  i.d the o! 13 then will certainly %  %  'Any '" nd the taxpayer will l>e %  > < 1 %  %  COAL Deaset) Peeeer, Scarcer and London Tran.-port fare which will hit particularK ; %  %  w\ M travi I ci.il)> i" ., wur k. war. And it is poorer in Tfu minimum fare on London train* will be Bven %  .]. ., • ... (.ui ram will %  %  BOSl anoU %  I more. Ill tl • ,,.•! will UIB*, in tlM l more 1 Hi io befora |ba war; outside Lon% %  n il will he nearly doubled. p ;,. .... uui • ntabic mpori %  %  KI wiatar, %  i thai ... d to t u„. mUtM rt with a I %  I Man %  B %  %  In fact 1 i Th. in.-ii like theli m %  > %  w i ttic lhal they ira by ihe hunciretl. The New Man put tha rasponatblUiy for that on Lord Hyndlaj H %  i I %  head "( Patchinis' Would it I* battar policy to re. i. U mpt more passengers'' I>ord Murcomb. brus•N" He narei teta lull AMI WORSi: STILL HE MM 1 \RI.S THAT THE RAILV\ \^ -. II AVI SO LITTLE HONEY TO SI'IMi ON RENEWALS AND Ki:i'MRS THAT RE-EQUIPMENT IS VERY DIFFICULT. "IN THE MAIN Ministry of VS'I.TS AK HEIN with administration, and its adminlsllh in Nottingham Mlns ch ar s sd 13s. the East Midland it has told the i Ihe gas lamps. AIRWAYS t40,were socialise the taxpayer has bad to meet %  '• %  • ol mora than l4ri(HHi.i on the costs of the ivll Aviation are lege of owning the b IN i-n costing the taxpayagg gbout £2.IKK).OU .I month. What presents a profit being ]. It is the old story. Stale \'i niicnce ii.d admlnLitratlve overloading. C MILES Now TnrellabV When a no -i" .litical board ot experts took over the Cable and Wireless netw ik in 1947 it coni job. vi ii 1-n-.^ jiri>' rtly big enough ljnued to ^ „ 1M nablv wcU run though profitof £1.722.000 were Now Lord II. plaea will Sir Hu isrt How %  • %  frdnd it igoMo/tiMdafaotaof aodal, m ,m A_ „ %  „ ,, ,| you can*! always give fVtU %  ..Lun.mt jobs to the men best m lilted by experience for then 1 '"' The waiting |iieue is always a gUSSi long one, and too often men have tn lie selected for rcM^onj other ih.ni then eomrarMaea RAILWAYS Dearer, and Worse %  .,i DM Btala 1 %  "All the i i tinrotlwam haw* lm, |. u.ue IIL..* Vta> KLECTRICITY High I'riccs. I-es Juice i ity nude £4.391.01)0 proftt in its first vr t n iMitmn, lullowcd by £7.103.000 last Indeed llw Fedi I' %  i. %  ,that due to belter serPBr from it. The profits ,.( rharocti lh* railways do eama from higher charges. -u.r ii'riY (rosters oi U*M <" In In the ttnW -...is before prs*tl i"" ilffljys." IHlllSHlsastlflll thl price of alSC" Traders say they can never be irktt> gredualb nu, Within a ,, %  rhen Of When Uw .. weaka of Ihe instnllntion of declining pi.illts ,!l arrive. lord Citrine U elcrtncitv chief prices started going up, IN SOME AREAS CONSCMERS HAVE IMP THKEL PRICK INCREASES IN HIKE! VE.ARS or STATE OWNERSHIP HESPin: THAT. LORH CITRINE lOITECASTS STILL Then, last year, ihe Post Office became respoi inle for the administration. Anil the rot set m. One i.i'n wrote to Cable and Wireless:— "Your ra 1 .ntet has become comi'U-lvly i n re I la hie utd Is a neaacff lo any firm .nyaycd In Kivrsca* busixcss "The delays cuiiiplotiird of are hcyond anything which can be errun-d on the (/rounds o) t<'i"TrartJi/ hcoi*v irnflir . Thvy are du>Io a complele I'dffrV'cnre on Che port of i .r oryin i.ofion al U now irti'ls." Wilh MCOOd-rata service has gone the uniBI story of 8leadily %  odd thinu II TtucN %  %  i farm h) Sl i ,,i Sheffield ila %  u Ten t'Mis ol potm g n"d was N wonder that even Aneurin F.evnn i* i-discovering the \ n% %  enterprise and hM pUbUl i' | II '>'• State adi'iidstrotoTS can't do a lob, [hen ; ~.ralc ftrmj should be ta io If." -LE.S. Lou IJving Slainl.irils llolil Hark I i n|ii4*al IIKIIISII i s i ta i ereatj In : Induat to h. .III^: con oountr; vhlte soap stc the IOUI.'.MI P i ri :r!l-i!i"i than in colonies? Dr. civ rlotte %  %  %  lal Raw ROM reh Pelloai .i Glrton Collese, i irnbi Idge and ol H I It i hardly Maurillus sugar induslrjto turn parllcul mil .. Mii.r el lnwer pol.nl; than It used t.. do: the tine, tim-.l duly ol) bind* lined in Taosanylka, ihould it > 1 "' umple i Di npH 'lit, Ihfl 1' K iiresent pn Ihe bnpo ill n in the H.S.A tlH .i i.iii i> IL. tin.-. Import quota* on Induatrlei i white ausar trom the depanden* lali I ,„.. that *iol: Di Leubu %  %  %  iu" 'i In lap, Ihe output of n raw material Is Insufficient to feed a modern plant ol U hibitive Wlille her peanufai Ihown I-' l.eubuscher that iher •asons to explain u onlnanl inuaUon In cturtns counlrlea ol ocessing ram nvatariropns. ana notai .nieiu'i uf thai M1.IIiiu iea-itirtly *piesshe conunenU, a conclusive aniao-odd paae rahune a dttaued maybeuki aa p roof-of sraduaU) analyslj of the prc ep eeta ot ii"evolvl %  in the division 1 ihe avalL caaaJnl In five main catagortaa ol >\ <-i iiment.s. by Dr Leubuaohet Few ci th HVOOBtCa <'f such a COUI ri.e latter *ili teal my9t atop to enquire why ao few oi the %  nth %  re an far bear. up ..'111 1 tabllahed In lha colonloa Th wineh mi. 1 pel intral baos^rround had to be faced m m! klni .,,,,,. r to toiduiuiei In Uie home country. ti al cUi IUC condil st have a deep effect Hie lot .ion of prow trie In view %  averaton from bellel the siipe'ionty of largn-acali pradUCtlon In all circumstance-, and a tendency towards deeentrallaaUon In Ul luslrlal organisati %  Lna manufactur| (H mi r;i i the prospect of local marketj, in tterlal In tropical ,, %  -1.1 local market t could often utterbram from poaltivewnion, u not Darnna manuracturjeehnical ~pru reaa to "aid "tropica ly counteracUna rucb % %  develo) In] h ether, tended to ,„,i lls i r ,,. s ., t i K hter than in th> production c.-ts. econo,„,,, Sh( M a po>ihilitics m the bad it easier Ihough no* necanmlc and technical baclcwanSnaa Rjiidini ui ..,i teaulttna In lac* of trained ai OfeXChanSe lehahle lalx.m made-iini-.e lranmintries. 1 1 %  and in • and I nlsUM only of ihi lock Dr. Leui turla. the temp i %  evi. a I :1 mft* lv I 1 "* '' %  "V 1 ** 1 %  •'"' %  %  %  %  ", %  n| Industrie blame< ffi rent barkwardne* had been at hving m oI irane ,., worklni out u r ucte aag whkh anaeon %  milpaj %  hla cane sugar to be refined In productt K CO nUnuoui p r ocaai ba uraw brea nd the litue promoting wi ttenl to making aav iiiBostrlea, she aays. rUcularly aeaipted to convarttna she ihmk> that -" IneavMual In the tropics are caaaa m larritory wll often be too small Inl devetopmenl of an ti .mi doubt various economli an i bschnlcal emcient ln< rtry. "The market . %  i irhlch explain the %  !• CupplipfJ would therefore kon piedftntinant locution egional. eomprlstaf 1 i aa, and a pre„.. ,! lala. would be the '•rnoval of obstacles adli x me ti countiiea f'.r the of trade hei aen the lei region, such an g, Mich as the of the %  lack of trans| taai tool her rai ,• root rau.e for the roceaalng for luch lUaaadi or limber." economic, +. and a low standard m lanv tropical eounPaVfOAf — M / in Africa." OverI h e fundamenlal ha the itrles would on Ihe appeei lha moat lo devehipment of • • i l asMl Have lha ear agents heard the latest | iegiil.itii.ns'.' I am afraid that it will affect j then po ch et a No one who has lo do business ri Hi lilasjluwn will tnid it profitable to purchase %  car if these new regulations remain in force, i This morning my car was blocked in by another car in the car park opposite the Il MI. A Building 1 immediately looked for the friendly "Peggy" to extricate my car, but he had been removed to pastures new. Two DSWhj appointed car attendants informed me that 1 would have to stay put. It was none of iheir business lo move cars. In fact they had been given slrici instructions that they were not to touch a ear. I suggested to them that if they had indeed been given such an order there must have leen a preceding order: not to allow any car to park in front of another car. They emphatically denied that they had been told that cars should be parked in such a manner that drivers would have access to leave when they wished. I can hardly believe that anyone with the slightest acquaintance with this particular car park could have given the car park attendants the instructions which they said they received. Three lines of cars, one behind the other and all facing in the same direction, are parked at this car park. After an extensive argument the attendants were good enough to let me out, otherwise I would be still there. Instead of issuing such regulations, the authority in charge would be belter employed in publishing a notice telling all drivers that they must nol lock the doors of cars on car parks or alternatively if they have valuables in the car and lock the doors for safety they must leave the keys with the car park attendants. Many n time the best efforts of car park attendants arc defeated because selfish motorists lock their car doors and wander away on their own busineeas. • • • '.. EUNESUAY — Is there a shortage of paper for printing sweepstake tickets, or has the Turf Club decided that the sweepstake has reached saturation point? I ask these questions because, to-day, no less than four sweepstake ticket vendors asked me to buy a ticket from them and on each occasion not only was it the last ticket in the book but the very last that the vendor had. Each one told mc that I must not miss the opportunity, his last ticket was a certainty for the first prize, the combination of 9s., 6s. and 3s. was just right. As I am a kind hearted man I decided not to deprive the poor men of certain winners so I told them to guard the ticket with their lives seeing thai so little respect Is shown for property today that even the Government is being robbed. I lead of thanking me for my forbearance and good advice these men gave me such an icy stare that I had to have a pick-me-up to defrost my blood. • • • IIUIlSliAY I am heartily sick of the tale 1 heard thin morning. There was little variation in the conversation between three men. Each one was nying to impress on the others his love of hard work. The first speaker worked all day in the office, he worked all afternoon in the g.irdcn, he put the baby to bed and then i u he did carpentry for half Ihe night. There'*! nothing like work said the others it keeps the doctor away. There might be some truth in that, who knows? certainly the doctors don't recommend it, but why should they? I hear these tales so often that I am almost beginning to believe that there may be some people who really reUnfc work. After all. Ilfty thousand Barbadians can't be all liars? For myself I prefer an easy job—no heart strain, no eye strain and the minimum of brain .strain are the doctor's recipe for longevity. Today I saw what appeared, at first blush, to >>c the ideal job. I almost decided to be a farrier. Therehe was in the shade of a spreading sandbox tree — not a chestnut tree—carrying on a cheerful conversation with a groom. Mis patient, the horse, as docile as an overgrown turtle, was having his hoofs manicured while listening to the conversation. All was peace when suddenly a bee stung the horse and he lashed out with his hind legs narrowly missing the farrier who was indolently transferring his attention from the port to the starle Of the horse. I had seen enough. The Ion is too fraught with danger. I am ksDldBI fjr a safer )ob. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. Sticceaaora to LTD. 5 C. S. PITCHER & CO. J Phone* : 4472 & 4687 BECKWITH STORES KB0 MAMAMO you'll iaj dviifihtful teith JAMS CRYSTALS PEAS Br Mm. P. HARTLEY Ltd. MARMALADE %  %  %  ..


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V ESTABLISHED 1S:> SATURDAY, ..Y 1951 run K n\i OIL CRISIS TAKES NEW TURNERS Quick Decision Can Avert Complete Breakdown\For War Britain Wants Pledge From Mossadegh Bv J. C. THALER LONDON, July 27. THE ANGLO IRANIAN OIL CRISIS took a turn for the worse on Friday night, and Britain was considering the re-calling of Sir Francis Shop herd, the Ambassador in Teheran, to London for on the spot consultations. The scheduled trip to London of Averell Har riman, Truman's special envoy to Iran, was also viewed in diplomatic quarters as an indication of a hitch in the current efforts to bring about talks in Teheran on the oil dispute. • ui ihal — 1 tbeen 'peciflcally .isked in coma iu l-endon. and thai %  his own. Harrip M wai I''%  i arrival here on nJng. The hitch urose over Britain'* insistence on ; pledge from Premier fctaea*eegh's Onvernment III lions in Mi. oilAeldl for British jersonnel would or improved iling surh a prnm%  .in was not prepared to Enter Into the proposed talk* for gt ttleinent of the .ill dispute. No Assurances Morrison announced earlier this week that Britain had asked for t. clarification from Iran and f.fflrlals stated on Friday night thai Shepherd had not been able to far to obtain required assurance-A Foreign Office slaieirenl on Friday night announced recall of the ambassador ficm Teheran had been under b ,i no Anal decie(..! had baan taken. 1 Hamman made il pla sides that a speedy decision was required to avert a complete breakdown in the Iranl-m oir indUatfJ His Visit to London WAS believed to have been intended to emphailze this posl U.N. Planes Blast Red Positions BtOHTH ARMY H.Q K July 27. TinKorean war front quiet wabroken with sharpened Communist thnisti oa the Eastern *one and Increased Hed activity •n the central sector. U.N., war plane* used tV tearing weather lo blast Con munart marshalling yards Pyongyang, ;nnd made more thar 800 sortlaa against the Red target aiming by radar through low' UftKfe As the cease-fire talks moved' on in ffgaanfig the Reds were still' building up forces south of KumMMitf. on the east central front, wit-i aununlat companies moving down t<> the Reds' front-line }>. -itni-iMajor action was centred the eastern front again today. T Red battalions counter attacked advanced Communist forces north of Yanggu yesterday, after Allied „ is^w i..d.r "K.Z;'U r '" "l.'••""!" „X v r £! uiit%  vould have to he closed M.mploicly before the end of next v eek. I>ecause of storage space tilling up rapidly. Reports from Teheran on Friday night intimated that Harriman had encountered difficulty from both tldM of the conflict. Earlier this mck %  formula, evolved by Har,Hh Iranian Government appeared to have esUbUahad a promising basis .or :v resumption of negotiations for a final settlement. Br.ti h officials on Friday night injnal Britain was BBUOUI i.,,1 | %  Atlamtnt but she ooes not want to risk another lirnkdown We must know in .-ne chance v." one official said. COMEDIAN DIES NK.W YORK. July 2' i Boreo, 6*. died here Thuraday. The Polish Son II HfcUU and %  uropaaai theatribetween the two world gjVO up the profession iltat M had lufff n ago.—I'.F, Reds Take Time Off To Study UN 'Biif f er Zone* Proposal U N ADVANCE BASK Below Kaesong, Korea, Ju JWO SPECIFIC DEVELOPMENTS which may speed the hour when troops along the 13 i Bib Korean war front will be told to halt shooting. emerged from the meeting of United Nation, an. Communist cease Are negotiators in Kaesong An agreement was reached in principle on "administrative and procedural matters deaicrnet' to expedite the final achievement %  i' . %  ; %  I ,:! pn • . I allvRfO %  IX. %  hall ha i from July Jii. 1931." I riii 'i obi 11 cat ion quick!) ih< %  %  %  %  %  %  i Mint The ordinam II. %  Eisenhower's Army Gaining Mnim-iiliiiii TRINIDAD AND BARBADOS CII.I.I cssss of new WP-I ludi.ii: get 'Iuch jresUrday from Ti'inut-ul The caseware tian.poitvd to tli* Treatury by a Police irnod eacort and followed by the Currency Oon.i U.S.Will Depend On Britain For Help WAS I 1 ,'v V Defence Sen Foreign Relations CotnmlttM "ii Friday thi States which "can't do everythii at once ul< on Britain for aid in building up I DI the Middle East. Marshall saul Europe/i share of the propoi aid funds was greater than the Near E mere "< • ..uu. hills after • 10-hour battle. Wet of Kunsong. U.N. patrols probed toward the Pyongyang apex of the old Communist "Iron triangle" without meeting .my resistance. U.N. naval forces backd up ground forces and land used planes with ; %  stead> IKiunding of the eastern coast. %  \ Brtttth light cruiser and three Ixxnbarded the Red port of Wonaan for the 161 consecutive day yesterday. Troops. Tanks Enforce Lu* TtHVtAN July 27. Troops, armed police. nd tanks ere massed In Central Teheran enforce the law against a big Communist rally. Extra guards were posted at the United States M.I iiutLsli embassies. TWO hundred helmeted troops with bavonetted rifles, police tinned with carbinrs and swords, and four lank* guarded Parliament Square and ihe vldnUy. State Oi Refugees Is Cause Of Tension %  Ti WASHINGTON. July 27. id on Friday Ihat one of th .,1 I, moil la the Near East b >he misorable I hundndi ol Ihousands ot Arab refugees from PalcsTbi Pmidant'l statement was contained in letters the Chairman cVihe Senate and House Appro%  s CommilteM, in which he urgently ret|UMted ( .• iropriat. $2,000,000 for August and $.1,000,000 for September for Palestine refugee relief. Congrca. If currently i pnic the administrations Preveittfl Trade \V itti Crtiniminiata WASHINGTON. July 27. r Herbert R O'Conor. tad !o prevent thePanama*! huge marchant Actl from cerrynai etrfo to • AM. nanlan ffP tama would uv of inv of its I Red China or Ncith Korta. Pannmaninn Consulates all v.orld hud bean onVred oc pap •I ports ind < Panamanian registry if -hipown^ Unkatd cargo. if the u*c o' : .. io smuggle vrining Panama. %  oe Issued soon In Panama. O'Cor.. %  %  iVfl been hatted at India, two j.nd two at Hamburg Germany —UP. Reds Built Up Forces During Cease-fire Lull US. ARMY CHARGE WASHINGTON. Jub IT, Tha Arm) and Btata uepsriments churged the Communlsls in Korea with having used the lull during the cessettre talks to build up iintr foreaf for poastbla latav iiggresslon The Army said lh;d fragh Chinese troops hnd moved in, and all evidence pmnito .1 In buildup of North K. 1 Th.Stata Department'' You > 1 ( America broadcast that tinCoinrdutoU' demand for nulling all foreign troops out of Korea AUS 11 %  %  o itart lati 1 %  %  A awning for aoma Unw that the Hnd^ iic building iiu their fOTCOt. %  %  i.'rmgj the Army ip also paid thai tha n N forces were prepan-H lo the new Ren olfen would be launched \'. t;ilkbroke down Th.Defonce Dei nounced that Communl-t cabU il ties in K. 1 1 1.221.434 from the beginning of the war through July IBlh American casualties rc nbout 60.000. Meantimi. Pn %  ed on Thureia) rternooi evidence ao 'hi I L*S. gooS Up To Thv Mountains etnp*'* •*•*' I** lal in Ihe '.ud pt:i for possibly inei • Marshall said In %  | fence pMCranurH %  euruni Burope'i %  I %  trim tin % %  it of %  .[led thn 1 %  %  r, even tha 1 I 1 1 : %  %  %  1 % %  % %  I Gillette 1 %  1 1 P W ./.(.urrency irrivm ..,1 Bden ing ne W 1 A. %  %  rompany* currenc) an Mr. William 1 %  %  %  %  gflrt the two Cui Mr m i) 1 %  li % %  Govern I tha unlondins. ot W ^*c fron-.Uif .if'-(' into •> 'r"hfng rntireViiH "m.ii had I-" 1 I',,I n t I Mi V XV < Th>i.i! ,.ptv |U returned to Trinidad .. . $8,500,000,000 Foreign Aid Proimme which includes an Hem o( $50,000,000 for Palestine refugee relief Truman explained in ; %  letter that the refugee relief programnv had been carried on during Jul> through the uae nf existing stock. und funds from other sources. But the available resource* were now nearly exhausted, the President added Trumar. told leglslatoi-s that a major atep foi-ward hnd been recently made when the Aral. League went on record U mvou of a massive programme of resettlement of Palestinian refugeein Arab gtatesi Crave damage* t thl< programme is likely to resu. aid programme collapsed beeauae of the tempera shortage of fundiu 1 GRADE July 27. I to 'be It %  \ he led hta regBed iwrtlsans to victory ova War II, and mid his people Ihey should be no more friiI Stalin today than the;. 10 years ago. Starting on Thursday %  %  %  the 1M1 uprising. H Iks at einf. "1 |he Cl< He then llai celebi n on — If Gtabb Padia Will C rtriinur To Serve \l>dijllah's I umil\; M fastis, tin Bi iti 1 1 %  %  %  %  in 1 els %  .mall, hut I hcadquarii 1 %  %  %  I %  I %  |i ... %  1 Abdullah for 2\ years I think I hi In %  much." -I V -VP. To-day* Weather Chart Nunrise : 3.4* a m Sunel ti 34 p m Moon : I-ast Quarter Lighting t>: ".08 p.m. Illch TMe I 1.13 p.m Low TMe: C.43 a.m. Ul a.m STEEL FOR OIL %  %  :alloeate I 1, .Id-uj) 1 Big Three Plan Meeting In I .S. WASHINGTON, Julj I %  ign Mr the sign* K 'I ii %  %  %  %  eemenl Wenterrt' Oerm %  'ii In North AM . Phe An,. North Ati.tini' inci • %  • led t.> t< . %  ...ii' • .reign M ive nor 'hough the beet % %  en n 1 einion n ng next 'eek. Morrison hai already dlacU MARSHALL WASHINGTON Julj .', .. • 1. %  !; %  v Cenrge M .1 il .11 told emigre** that I.flOO HI aim* had already U-8 to Hie Allies %  ral Uwight F. senhower's Atlantlr Pact mm> S ming "real mojl ,ihnii %  note roi 11 RelaUoni Commlttoi •ove wtthoul deli 000.000 mutual aid programme In met l the "Oommunlal i iiienge on avei 1 frani He did btoch ii amhowi' Man hall aid ihal 1 indg large ae tha prwenl roqueu win tx required In the next \ 1 Mar* 1052 and W. for 11 dt fence am progiionim II, leettng "growing finest of Bovlet lyre and oppiesfcioii." whirh Ul dominate the free weetd 1 hi ,mv other meant" ..if thai an> i" 1 itlon will 1 %  I enhowei will not have • %  -.,, M reeantlal thai m N ulblllty on him provide l |a with fhe means ul plishtng hi mlagion M ithe %  eeurlty ol % %  n as that ,i oui A lies I itf month the US. had shipped abroad more than 1.000,000 meanuremont ton*eo,ual to 1 I naval veceeli delivered under tneir own powi'i t r Nehru Likelj To, Refuse Imitation To Talk Pemfl drawn getwei with a dei in; them Uon 0 HI %  %  'i. 1 .lath 1 arallel A HI %  %  1 %  %  %  %  %  K 1 %  1 ."> H III IU-1IMHIOW I >)*. Iholi %  1 iid UN %  %  %  %  %  %  l ground covered in 1 mi i\ ii .1.1. %  more than* %  It had 1 • %  %  nl nuinhe %  ee and 1I1 I.IPI pn 1 government oH %  Simultaneously, the geiiN powegf uod 1 itgWeVrs In the rhi eeultod from Ua Dvlnelal I attth Ihe Pi Lme alh %  bout by I %  1 ii ded no am Intel i"i %  led, and %  I P Crow i! Prinee Progi'esHing i.i'M v \ July n %  Cro 1 .1,1 from 1 % %  e urn 1-. tionrd %  fraru 1 %  ii* wUl .'v.In Basmi %  -ii ifng. Ilefoi.. leaving !• aid mass ir>mm-ei'ing under treatment, Hi I ; I 1 . illme part of th< 1 pilot. %  %  i slclan ho .. • %  %  %  1.. %  " nexl 41 Kours. %  r r The "ADVOCATE'' payg for NEWS Dial 3113 Day or Night. NKW DCLHI, i"iv a .1 qtiaraM ntatot %  1 %  Mloi ler, Jaw .-: %  nd the Japai %  %  l %  iDu w. nil 1 r p. i %  %  I that th. him t" 1 1 lid not ci full leal at aha l'Kl-taii Primi UaqUBt All Khun' 01 r %  'in.Itlon 10 Nehiii .in.,.lit. 'polnl pearc plan which lifcel. Paktetan Prime Mm. litional invitation'* lot .it Karachi f i Vtbche Triea To IM>I Cabinet Oriria %  %  %  resent %  1 the led to dlseuss with Nehru, affer the withdrawal of trOOpt 'I.. l:ido-l'..ki%  The Hindu tan Tin %  . .iii.-i Uaquat'i lettet Lunt*. and '"lopl,.llie




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PAGE TWO I'.MiHAIMI\ll\t>' Ml SATL'RDAV. JVXY 2*. H'SI CaAib falling ii Major Dennis %  %  • lay. I | llon'Mr %  % %  '. : I more, the I G Miin%  v. Di r. II %  i B Mi John Hcckl'i, %  %  Ml P A K T %  < r Mi N''. .: : Closed For Reconstruction i BrllW) Council Ontu..^ I irlng the month oil August u linn On I %  %  %  % %  fcr*. tt[ im n • mber, %  Record Ubrar> will ajwln be open Jp.TPtlcin Violinist lathering with W •A i* OJ SO ma'iy welt-dres.-. women >vear suc/i FRIGHTFUL HATS i. %  01 .en on the -i-'ii-.i f_ - imiihai %  trail rar mis pn for '.raining % Husivc %  inKn I tt*M \ By SUSAN DEACON m ueacm wnui about— it. pertlng, whom hobtnt U aking your bfd more com/orfabfe. CHERIE SAYS LAD* l.o\'-i>\ Making Pfl-TtaM hl.i.ir> —1,.K %  First Time For Women IM3. thol An, rlca No Protest* A I w i s u dano an i i i I I %  Hon v. II %  I. ol British Gut n MlltlCfKtlllJC Will bi Hon i ; lour of tl :.%  % %  ' lintish Oovi di <,f TshdMdl Kli..nn. AH I tOU -,H l'uth Iron' i %  Unit iinylhiiin to IB] and %  I iioily. We rum Ijffii kept 'rimni %  •lit New. %  %  %  %  %  hath v. %  .'-J-OW I %  I I %  %  %  .... ,. i • a. be United Si lo-nigtii next T H fUAL DUUMi of the h . Id II U,r Marine Rote] tonlghl he Waldorf-A*l '"" i s.. n %  of the Hub a not know What 1< • lied undi urn. %  I %  % %  %  %  %  would %  Friuii Hi BMMI %  %  Know the NO KM fcH NOII LI*!>' EMI ilk* It ... IKS I.,'. loch The GUsBts of hon'm are \ii J. C. H Raj O !lcge. Mr T I Wei I H B I Uajoi '" %  :i'i Mr. K N hi store tin %  talit about" <" %  eon* %  ,.,...•' bo wea r Mi D i lMlllll|. amii' %  ii pat] ii. 10s, fa Ofial Tnrrc was |P l '"' oach ., Mr. Dt-nt rec or, !\ Mi M o-N. Campbell. cotujectioni with Mi*West] SI,.IM N '' "" %  .Vincent Am conunCOCed, through his du\...... % % %  ImpeUltterl ties ,t thw.-bt Imii.. Commit'*-. Hi Joaa n D.v, |r. %  .. %  r v thCommlttf ttutlin'x Promise lbrmei to London, as offlca boy. In the year lBiH •who i* president t the American aftei tin, had *pctn "'*M iv J* a '111 I111 the Summer Holidays IS DAPHNI I'I M. n r M, %  i rid Mr*. S. m f Bay Sin.,, iw .-. M ci.3 uf thf tba Qiounlttca. Town Clerk PABRBLI* Town ik M! r..r'-i.f-Spaln Iv, •! id for Uilk. with Sir John City Chamberlain of Bdin• Hhellhood ..f Hut.• Bed ill any puits '' ot the <' iribJ ".in area the Ann | re recently, Hi kiioni Jamaica on Thin %  '. vsyw 1.1 the writuuj oil noon by H.W i A. to BBOBCI the I 200.000 stake with her parents. ux roc hW An, Jjfc. "ft. Tr. ...nu the lUi.trct dexree -i the University ColleKo „„„, %  in. further forol the Weal Indies In Jamaica .mwn moncj In lh ho hud no iwitrets about Off To New York • Board of Butstill tPYlnH TV/!'!OSWALD STHEAT U on jlJ*' his w.iv to New York via Ihotujh HUMwas not n lot of Ihla TrinidadHe left yesterday morning by B.W.I A. In Now York, ht Mill jiiii his Mite who i i aine pla Trinidad wore MeWiili.nn Bi money Eileen Will Stay •uTORK |sa Kilccn 'or Barbados Holiday M ISS CLAUDOE i.Kuz.L^IN. whose brother Audi. Barbados a lew weeks ago, arrived from Martinique on ThUI u.w.i. A. to MH-mi .. Meek hoildaj n ". in Barbadoa, She Mill th> i Eileen fjeid and i at iir' rli In"L*o Trinidad '"' /" "'••' L King. Iiii.idads youruj Tltev had bee Ititrbudos on six beforo ivluining to Ma rti nique on on. Since her unweeks'holiday Mis lt.miieids August io. ful debut at the White City husband hi .iti. the Alcoa SteamMUM Bunone Ftougery • u I'.. \\ % %  %  A A A i iTipiorship Co is. I'..n Spain. aistcr Maud who ate bODl Mari ,. imupie .no iiKo m Barbados on or not to reBack To The U.S. hoBday, They u% ben indaVIV/f'*SYDNEY A. THOKNK Mho months staying at Bagahut, i I., uu mi 1V1 \,„,\ been xpf-ndutg twn Slrvam. I M<'i>>mihi ijaiiej holida> m Ban.. Short Transfer re beinf made] to •>btam a lurosd to U.S.A by B.W I A on IIK KIIDIK LYDRR "i Barclay. job for her. Eileen enjoj i Sunday M Bmk u ,,,. indfcpi Mr. Thoroe, who hi %  Bar) ,. England where he h wiierevvi at i,,, . .,, from lh, (1| (,„„ months long |i lony roi the las: 2\ % %  ... si .. terds rlaweastlt mptoyi d on lh> %  n.w i,\ n, is on hi lart of the Datti News New Voi* „ ; „ to St. Lucia a I'lintig bis stay bora in it ,. , by the l nast ol his %  Isjttl Mrs. Edith Lad> NKwut. I Bh "' '" 81 Michael AITIVUUJ by the anv plane wan a u r\ -r • -J J e f •< Ml )L ,I Mls D L r.K.U. irimdad bohcitor httle dai^bter n \MU. AND uus. FRANCIS arrivals from Trinidad i \ %  i>l POWKR arrived from Trlnl and Mrs Clark Bidet and theii i Hoidad yesterday momlns; by B-W.I.A, daughter ByblL Hen rot accompanied b\ li-.-n two daugli Foui Uu layinj • B %  %  H %  % %  Api ind Bobby Here for two Ocean View Hotel. Tboj Amerlr ns living in Barcelon • : %  .. itttT-ta Cambrkbjt Oueat Venesuela. Mr. Elder i* > TDK Ql RRN'S ml sixteen in %  There is n tendenc%  Vivid colours. N-I: u-s IVorU K'niiuFlp | or Woim-i I iHI New York A NEW YORK milliner has de%  j;htter-t imined srltti %  inoonburst i muff. I of tho y.., tori i %  %  Frtim Piffftl BILVI i . A 'dr.d 10 1 A %  %  %  %  %  K ISO to C2S. From IcHMUUW I bw %  %  i i uu aitu lacks drtM ment as Contmbarionar of Loca %  .1 m Trinid-d. Mi. nrn n b u been stud) Ii ml in the Town dark's ofticr in Newcastle Semdman I : i f PUbU I. Hu %  ads, !(< %  spends his %  %  | .:.. %  . %  %  %  vha i % %  bed I %  %  %  %  %  i %  %  %  t .i fi-.it. Opposition ttifts moo h n %  CROSSWORD i r r p P i ryi i l r r~" ££ ti ir-\--\AOI.VIK — "THE GIRL IN THE PAINTING" sumna MM zarrsaiuKG n>*~Ti BEATTY n*ftwrt LOM '.-HJX Faun. i.,...( sMiwau iau MHIK* isasseeari •*• •''i** "JIGGS AND MAGGIE IN COURT" i Jo* Vila Km.r RIANU nriiuh gheri INTO nir BLUE iThr Story ol II B.B.C. Radio Programme SolarSai I .. P m aereea ,-JT of ib* harmonium. <*i i.iu •raiuer ? eW %  ... I-M Oil ... II IS In %  i>fc M. Boupo to •litc.'Pd. 1 11 ft. One hundred and nfly irew toi coTer. fli 2\ Addreedi to enrtiopa. (V) Uenra I, \*\ *t\i at s Hoiau poor. 16) .-.-•IDOWS. IB) fi ..-. in . rivet run. till %  ia ocar. iei .:.. 141 I .•! to m aw*rd. IB) out a loot snort, ui Haaleas to sprluiais. i*) l ? (41 r.. Thin tin can ny. IS) Jl. IL U olten unooKereOis) pad* .— Ar* hon. li • %  .-oes; . K-m: I. % %  rlllm-. ntra; 3, N. Veil, a II Ol.llii: THEATM ... Week; S 30 | ... A N .! ; i w H Id-O tol i r. Mr. Power Trinidad, is solicitor in Hh I there %  of the ml COmpi I TIIK \IVI:MIIIKS OI rn.\ \i.3\ Rup ert and Simon—40 2? %  Kuren %  Kh She'll I,..-... ( TO- % % %  i i ponI'O tO'a Si \ . on, about lurnpuu I .ell O • % % %  .in and children r*am tali a %  \ do toi er %  *'n man to I and on no account to eat meal Neatl du ba Shed, wuser-liy. %  U %  .died again, and said ternly A cha paow fflass-blouwr Ik beei < itlng it* < 'ha .i No such thing' i at, u-ort. ^ i W II. horse I |tf He blew a oreenJunise, %  hoi s bbrst. i LIB MOK'aAX 10 Rio Music, Dnttctng Entertainment throughout the night Dial 4000 lor '.'iervations VESTS 79 89? S1.00 1.13 1.15 1.18 1.34 SILK VESTS S1.37 1.47 PANTIES 89? 98s 99c S1.07 1.13 1.29 $1.41 1.52 SLIPS S2.20 2.52 4.88 BRAS. $181 1.64 1.95 2.40 2.70 3.40 4.40 4.43 NIGHTIES $4.10 4.16 4.29 4.26 4.52 4.95 4.97 5.33 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS D DIAL 4606 s %  %  YOUR SHOE STORE DIAL 4220 JUST REGEWED uinl 'n'llitifi Fust Canadian Hardwood (hairs anil Backers SEt I *: > or its von • THE BARBADOS O-OI'IIIATIVK • OTTOX FACTORY l.TII. Hardwaro Department Tel. No. 2039 i:\fi.tf.siii; IIIIIII.I.S! Till XIHCHOIS ACTMOJVtt PLAZA nitlDCJETOWN I I l IHOWI TO-DAY v . in I'M. %  MAN in THE TRAP MORF.LAND I %  I V in SONG OF THE RANGE PLAZA— BH (I \l lil-IHV .30 a.m. RETURN OF THI: APEMAN n isi — John CARRADINE At Vv/ESTWARD BOUND UtD Hoot BREATH-TAKING THRILLS!! ROUSING EXCITEMENT!! "'^ |f*fe.loC.l „(a| 23lt %  -. m Jf^. IM.I g404 tin I.\M,.TI gun s uiiuan -Ild ,. •>' '" %  \~\iTu\\-.V -Marn N .,. UM Art WAN II.. %  "'[ SUP SOIXD' K.. MIOMII li.MII—— Mill TO Ul \ |..|| I on .v llll Ol l> ( MI>IIOI.M TSAII." MACK-BHOWN GAIETY THE i. M.IM s ST. JAMES Tu-lar a T-M*rrw ass p n ft .00 PMI LANCASTEIt MAI FL4MK and I.. \K %  '' ay reriiuim GLOBE TMEATHE MASS 5 HIS .I,„I Conllnulnn ERROI. FLYNN — DEAN STOCKWELI. — in — K I M I Hurbnilns 4 fwri| | On is 3 l„sl. •: % ^oiS^'u BSEPH vv n "" %  Q u """ w " % % % %  It O Y A I. TII E A T III IBHBBBBSr WBBBBBBk. ALL_ THE THE STORY OF A BIG SHOT M4M. KlNG'S j "Z i XLtfiffsM i!,7lt '-'-• CMS5oat.aw.ias'' 'l"*wF/V MsSSl>AB