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The Barbados advocate

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Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
PHavbados



ESTABLISHED 1895



Allies Agree To

| Proposal For

Approve Agenda
In Nine Minutes

UNITED NATIONS ADVANCE BASE,
Below Kaesong, Korea, July 26.

UNITED NATIONS and Communist cease-fire

negotiators agreed on an agenda and imme.

diately began formal talks to end the Korean
fighting.

Another meeting is scheduled for 10 a.m. to-
morrow in Racoong

An Advance U.N. Headquarters announce-
ment of an agreement on the armistice agenda
cautioned against undue optimism for an early end
to the war. It said it is much too early to predict
either success or the rate of progress to be obtained
in negotiations.

There were numerous basic| yesterday by removing the de-

——

im lteter

points within the framework of
the agenda on which agreement
must be reached and on which
there is at present wide division.

Negotiators approved the agenda
only nine minutes after gathering
around the conference table in
Kaesong at 2 p.m. to-day.

The agenda comprised:

Fixing of a military demarcation
line between both sides so as to
establish a demilitarised zone as
a basic condition for
tion of hostilities.

Concrete arrangements for 42

ceasefire and an armistice includ-| Conference on the terms of a mil-

ing composition of an authority,
and functions of the organisation
to supervise the carrying out of
measures,

Arrangements relating to pris-
oners of war.

Recommendations to Govern-
ments of countries concerned on
both sides,

Other Items

The U.N. announcement
that following approval of
agenda, negotiators began pre-
liminary discussions...of other
items “in order that the potential
for halting bloodshed in
may be realised as soon as possi
ble.”

This indicated that the delega-
tion talked on the question of a
demilitarised zone to be establish-
ed between opposing armies.

The Communists broke
week’s stalemate on the

said
the

last

agenda



To-day’s
Weather Chart

Sunrise: 5.48 a.m.

Sunset: 6.24 p.m,

Moon: Last Quarter.

Lighting Up: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 11.30 a.m., 10.47
p.in.

Low Tide: 5.10 a.m., 3.35 p.m.





the cessa-!

Korea | tives were formally admitted to

the
negotiations
;immediately began the discussion
of fixing the neutral zone along
the 135-mile Korean battle front
Meeting
Communist
and then

agenda or programme for formal
j armistice

that the
until an armistice has been signed.
| How long that will take, nobody
knows. The programme calls for
| fixing the demarcation line be-
tween U.N., and Communist armies
making arrangements for a cease-
fire

mand that the withdrawal of for-
eign troops from Korea be con-
sidered at armistice talks.

In its place they submitted a
compromise proposal which was
accepted to-day by the chief U.N.
tegotiator Admiral Joy. Its de-
tails were not exposed. Agreement
on the agenda came with dramatic
suddenness at the tenth session
and one of the shortest since Kae-
song meetings began July 10.

“Having agreed upon the agenda
the way is now clear for delega-
tions to enter really substantive

itary armistice. Major problems
remain to be solved in these dis-
cussions. It is much too early
to predict either success or fail-
ure. Jt is hoped that cessa-
tion of hostilities and the shed-

ding of blood will soon be over in
Korea.

There are numerous basic points
within the framework of the

agenda on which agreement must

be reached and on which there

are presently wide diversion of

views.
Neutral Zone

U.N. and Communist representa-

for cease-fire
Thursday and

programme
on

in Kaesong U.S., and
teams agreed upon,

adopted the five-point

negotiations and pro-
ceeded at once with the bargain-

| ing. }

But U.N, officials emphasized

shooting will not stop

and armistice including the
@ on page 5



Near East Is Area

Of Special Tensions

—ACHESON

WASHINGTON, July 26.

Secretary of State, Dean Acheson, said on Thursday as
he opened his testimony on the $8,500,000,000 Foreign Aid
Bill before Congress, “the Near East is an area of special

tension to-day.





Government Will

Reintroduce
Price Controls

In Britain






-orporation dividend payments in
an effort to check the inflation in
Britain.

Gaitskell said the Government
decided that “further steps must
now be taken” to check a rampant
increase in prices which
with the Korean War. The first

and kitchenware, carpet sweepers,
forks and spoons. Fish
controlled in autumn
price drops betore tnen.
The Minister of Food is consid-
ering the reintroduction of controls
on certain groceries like jam and
breakfast foods, but not on vege-
tables and fruits, Gaitskell said
Gaitskell said the Government
would introduce legislation this
autumn to control dividend pay

be
the

will
unless







LONDON, July 26. chet
Chancellor of the Exchequer "THE FIRST oOUTL OS oF a possipis Angio-
Hugh Gaitskell announced on Tranian oil partne:ship plan emerged here, as
Thursday that the Government = 7 r ’ “oe
would reintroduce some price} the Cabinet convened to eonsider sending a special
2ontrols to seek limitation on

Plan Outlined

started
price controls will be on =

FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1951





C

Cease-fire
Anglo—lranian Oil

mission to Teheran for discussions on the oil crisis.
A report from Britain’s Ambassador in Teheran,
Sir Francis Shepherd, was before the Cabinet.

It was understood that the Iranian Government had
dropped the demand for-unconditional acceptance by Bri
tain of the terms of its oil nationalization law. Britain is
still insisting that Premier Mohamed Mossadeq guarantec
the “rapid improvement of conditions for British personnel
in the oil areas.”

The Foreign Secretary, Herbert
Morrison, is expected to tell the
Commons later today of the further
course of events in Anglo-Iranian
peace moves.

Authoritative

Czechs Riot In

sources said that

een

ed |
|










FIVE CENTS

TEMPLE YARD VISTIORS



THE COMMISSIONERS OF
with Gol. R. T.

HEALTH OF
Michelin, Commissioner of

8ST. MIOHAEL along

Folice, Mr B. Skinne





7 ° eo
Director of HMithwavs and Trapsnort, M r&. WwW folon a wr ms
Engineer and Dr. J. P. O'Mahony, Director of Medical Services, visit
ed yesterday, Temple Yard, the te of the proposed new market

for hawkers to sell vegetables anti gree:

At Fasting

0 ee

Mine Worked

the reports from Shepherd had
“strengthened the implications
here that the situation is not dis-

Record

U.N. Forees Keep

By Russians






































arts. = ie PO. emnemeestion to eouragings. but there is'still a note m ; we ais ar po A a * 3
say that practically every morn-|of great caution over the ultima =: rac TATON 4a e S a alan Wan Malle. hae
ing there is news of a company |outcome of the orisis, nd ON, July 36. * £ F indian Yoga Fakir was sealed into
increasing its dividends in a Speedy acti os lore ’ Underground sources reported ; e/ rystal urn here on Wednesday
-etty bstantial fashi ; peedy action is considered af}sericus riot in the Russian operat TOUT.TH RMY FORWA } . nig d began the attempt to
pretty substantial fashion and on/the utmost importance if the situ: | cq uranium mine at Jachymov EIGHTH ARMY H.Q., KOREA, July 26 I orld fasting record, Th
a scale far greater than the] ation is » awe ine Gh ono ratek: : ears. United Nations { 3 beat two C nun bin bee ae peste reece 1e
‘ ft ation is to be saved, It was sala] Czechoslovakia largest behind tt nited Nations forces om two Communist probu ting x rd i t present claim-
general increase in incomes which he NN ntnttes § a, madd ; r es; 7 ¥e — : » 2 ; i 3 ty PEesene Claim
are currently taking place that oil stores in Abadan were] iron curtain. Qne Russian, anc attacks, and ambushed a R patrol on the central front French “Fakir” and an
This kind of thing inevitably filling up rapidly, and that the 14 natives were reportediy killec Ground activity continued to be on a minor scale however. | Italian Professor of Occult” who
acts as a continual irritant on the| finery would have to be closed «le gf ai gy Sg and an Kighth Army repo uid that U.N, casualties dur- | Chalked up 60 end 62 days respec-
at jority of i apilats down completely within séx dayg,} report came from the Nationa ps ee! ‘ . ; { ; tively, in a recent hunger booth
great majority of the population less a wis ; Committee for the liberati of ing the past 24 hours were the lightest in more than a wee! Rome
Who are not equity shareholders, | ¥Mess a way out is found before. | —™ Kia Wich ‘taima-%) Hay. = : the Ft Yich | fal ked tl
a . > Sa Beater < - . ele g "TE 8 tO have i; ‘ ~~ ‘ t ‘ } © Froich born takir asked 1¢e
Siete coutltas hernia to tale The eae poo Emami network of spies and saboteurs ir * . aE : a te page Italian court to disallow his Ttalian
down their di ds when divi- ‘anda it ima Fh ty | Czechoslovakia. Abdullah’s Heir ihaant ee oe ot: NOT colleague's Ca day axty-on the
n their demands when divi-|Independent, urged that legal] ~Tnformation reaching the grou; uthwest corner of the old Com! grounds that he ‘“victhted all
Aged payment vr soaring. steps be taken against Tudeh, |here said the Jachymov disturb W ill R “f “it H > unist “Iron Triang| but tail rules”, by no! resttag onm-broken
a e ap the control would Communist activities which helance developed after a Russiar 1 evuri ome jto dent the Allied line, At the! ojass, had no snakes in his coffin,
apply to every company, public) described as “becoming a threat engineer tried to step up produc- LONDON, July 26, |° me tine, U.N. units ambushed! and got out of the casket twice.
and private distributing more than eace sai ites i ai nrieate: JONDON, July 26 G ‘ L prec loom ,
£10,000 gross and would remain ; the peace and security of pen It said workers——mostly Emir Talar the 10-year-old | 1 Communist patret in pre-dawr The Italian said that he-was a
i { i an, saves Of Slovak and Czech] peir to the assassina Pian carkness west of Kumwa “scientist” not committed to Yoga
7 a Starts i E . » assassinat King Abe - as : 4 . :
Ubytod Sasi oe thee The U.S. Roving Ambassador, | descent—had to step up their out- tice iF ‘eapalind a oe fA UN, taak force on Wedhoaday | He lett-hia cofin tien but elaim-
7 vee Averill Harriman, President Tru+| put 40 percent if they expected tc Roma Ss cette Riche. o sanitorium | battled through a heavy mortar |ed he was escorted by two police-
= man’s personal mediator in the}c@ntinue getting normal food in Switzerland to succeed his|>att@se above Korangpo on t! jmen : ;
Fane site e are yes een reports that work father as King of Jordan, authori- oa ist fi } 1 bja highs ’ catechirntod’ tood a
ran'’s ailing Premier oha & ins P ’e sources se Thursday . , An ‘ ‘ IBY fey 7 ‘ p 6 ewe
Eleven More | Mossadeq Ag his bedside tet ers rebelled at the ultimatum and i ip coeneniad gy eta | Ae ound in an hou in 1 hal'| paration instead of water during
is icath an: {Billed the Engineer. Police rein-| 4) 1S ©XPE rei coe ; : {ght \ his fast. The Jtallan court is naw
Communists | sriter’ development ie. she “aaltoneepaiie susie vo, the” ccone| Palate piysical, condition outa AA intaracomnni capa in sonpaon sen,
, f ile pourers P wwe Na ° 7S Tb on a sarc iitven- | Suits brought by vac -.
stalemate. Authoritative quarters} $45 annie rie ea Switzerland, and his successfon]°@Alion at th®’same time attach . ons
; " i n 1 : ; i we f Kumwa behind heavy
Arrested In U.S.A. said that the next step would melee thai followed would be announced when rt ind artille b e, | . ye
; _ [probably come from London,} Vy, §, Krajcovic, Chairman of the Jordan Parliament re-assemblé ed artilery’ weatiouad the fee Berliners Ik ight
WASHINGTON, July 26. where the Cabinet is considering | Slovak Liberation Committee said|in September U.N al Communist patrols ©
_ The arrest of 11 more Commun- | Tran’s terms for talks to setile the | the incident occurred early in July One good source said: “I can i i ameied sail @ ‘Or BERLIN, July 26
ist Party leaders and functionaries!feud and put the oilfields back'together with other uprisings {sure you that Talar will return to | wednesday just east of the cea Three hundred West and East
by F.B.1. men in Los Angeles, San ) into operation. reflecting the resistance of Czech{succeed King Abdullah Be taon manenbanaes cite, Gl ates Berliners fought with fists end
eeel, ane eg ioe was $f: Harriman said that he would go{and Slovak peoples to Communist] brother Naif wants hin to returt oN. wai r leis eae 1 orti stones on the border between the
ance uursday, The roundup |, Tondon for talks with British |domination The people wants him to returt Oat ee aa man nist Ci ; Allied and Soviet sectors of the
was conducted simultaneously in geht abt en AS by eee ig the direct successor it the Ha 1 Wednesday again eee city on Thursday, ag a result of a
three Metropolitan centres. Hela ostesl Snr is one eltish Deportation semite line The Government |*UPP!y oe ate a rae a 4, | Communist propaganda meeting
l are charged with conspirin ? } ; vants o ret dso obv Re Riker er: tCwar ee: & : ‘ommun 1@ meeting
to teach and eaenbnis the forceful Ambassador, the Iranian; formuli} State Department officials could] ¥ Ap ay ; a ier a siot yrus\ pre Ons Tor @ BUNprisel at nda y any i ‘i me the Ge 1
overthrow of this Government. |for reopening the negotiations not confirm detailed underground #t @my change In —U.P ‘itack munist Youth rally to be held next
Forty four Communist leaders IT am hopeful these suggestisiis|reports although they fell within Ss aa -U.I month, A free for all fight brol
have now been indicted. Of these, | will form the basis for the reopen- Loe panier uf Anti-Soviet activity apafpninenonnem: ate :
eleven have been convicted. ing of talks between Iranian and |in Czechoslovakia Ali Kl A sk . N ° East Wi Berlin Police
; tee ; 1 ; Srairovic sat > ASKS enru va ind ser I ‘
Four of those convicted are now | British representatives in a friend-|. Krajcovic said on July 1, Red 1 1an ASKS | Oil Re placer an hs poing the fant
fugitive as are four of 21 rounded |ly atmosphere.”—.UP. bosses of Czechoslovakia circu- — ryy / ia se wool} .
up and indicted in New York, Slows lavized Iago! Epmmunists in the To Peace lalks NEW YORK. Julv 27. |
June 20. area of ratislavia. The letter rhe urnal Cominerce aid |
“Communist Party leaders ar- De Gas eri Names called for deportation of a large KARACHI, July 26 atti yer aaa oll niddiial ” ir The “ADVOCATE”
rested have long been active in j Pp e numbers of persons from the Prime Minister Liaquat Ali | Middle East, and the Western
Communist party work in Cali- N. 4 C bi Bratislavia region to war plants inj Khan, on Thursday asked the In- calaohal Ineo’? Maes HRA pays for NEWS
fornia and in various other parts ew abinet the Carpathian mountain towns of| dian Premier Nehru to visit Kara- ata? siathbaed ie. oT .
of the country on assignments is E Kremnica, Myjava, Prievidza and} chi for discussions on “restoration to the ‘orld (naticet Sollawini Dial 3113
pertaining to local county, state ROME, July 26 Banska Stiavnica, of a peaceful atmosphere” in the ' Hone tion of the oll indus . :
and national activities of the Com-| Premier Designate Alcide De] Krajcovic said this deportation] sub-continent. Liaquat however Be ie re ; sy U P. Day or Night.
munist Party,” F.B.I. Director, H.;Gasperi dropped_ ailing Countjalready is under way and has| stipulated as a pre-requigite to]! :
Edgar Hoover said.—U.P Carlo Sforza as Foreign Minister uprooted about 20,000 persons. ‘such a conference the withdrawal ———————— Se
when Fe formally announced hi He said each deported personjof Indian troop concentration
} ; 5
S a |new two party Cabinet for Italy.|was allowed to take “about 100] along the borders “to their normal
Oo i re De Gasperi himself retained the ; pounds of baggage but no food. peace time stations,” Liaquat’s
Achesow UPrVIVES Foreign Affairs post inthe new 17-|Food is scarce. in Slovakia proposal was made in a new mes-
WASHINGTON, July 26 ; member Government, his seventh | eastern part of Czechoslovakia gage to the Indian Premier 1
; ce by a ats in r0 |} consecutive pro-Western Cabinet owing to farmers resistance to|troop concentrations along the
The House by a standing vote | since 1945. e Red plan to merge little farms] countries’ border U.P.
f 171 to 81 Thursday defeated the R pl nerge little farm
of 171 to 81 on Pee | He gave 14 posts to members Of linto giant collectives
the Republican move to cut off the! ,is gwn Christian Democtati _UP. | . . e
salary of Secretary of State Dean) party, and three to Republicans in ' * ' .
Acheson, in nepts of aoe pe forming the new Government. and | Grain For India
out of office. Only two Democrats} onding Italy’s



were observed to stand up in
favour of the “get Acheson” |
move.

|
A score or more of Republicans



crisis

10-day-old Cabinet Pakistan, Turkey
Sign Treaty

U.P.



Unionists Protest |

Helps America

WASHINGTON, July 26

SUPERIOR 3-YEAR BRANDY



i ishi i ‘ ek ST. be: i Y 26 Wiilian: D. Pawley, former Am-
Time is of great importance in furnishing aid to our joined the Democratic majority to Bs ed prerelease EH, pee e cht a oF ay
friends in this area. ; itary defeat the long planned manoeuvre Jap Peace Treaty and Turkey was signed by the|Truman on Thursday, grain ai¢ In Quart and Concave
——-— . But he said yd AR after an acid debate, —U.P. ! aad Turkish Foreign Minister Faud| for India has helped the 4 nitec a B | ga]
: pecaian’ Suany Seana onust ‘We N s wie e July a ‘ Kopprulu and Pakistan Ambassa-|>tt« a gree vital materials i Pint ottles Seysh Atieas
a ni wae | because se Cc ries ) ew South Wales Trades Coun-\}"jor ian Besir Ahme Thurs. | SF6es trom sada. | ‘ a ae
War Danger made af Fine bed Be vi. inks 140 JAMAICANS cil representing more than | 3 jay A Storing to oe abated of He $ aid the Indian Governmen aed a mS
a ve ‘i at xe basic _needii- quarter of a Salient eke he Treaty there shall be mutual)" , i t Man patiens he kate
Still Reed Vos ss Re Bs, SEG] LEAVE FOR ENGLAND | inionists “on “rnursaday’ nigh tT oNd irlenaly “vetdtiona fa jwients. of manganese, ety}, ka BY THE
That is why he said “We must KINGSTON, J'ca., July 25. {Of Japan, af a threat to Australia,| Ween the two countries which| “sus back from his trip to India BOTTLED
ACHESON build up the economic strength in} One hundred and forty Jamai-|lives and security. One speaker] #8tee to start negotiations for the | pawley called at the

WASHINGTON, July 26.

U.S. Secretary of State Acheson,
said regardless of the course of
the Korean Armistice negotiations,
the danger from Communist
aggression is “no less real than it
was a month ago.”

There may be a period of com-
parative quiet if there is armistice
in Korea,” he told Senators. “If
so, we must not let ourselves be
pulled off balance by the shi
tactics. If armistice talks should
collapse, we should be ready for
a major Communist assault on
United Nations forces.

The enemy has been building up

his forces throughout this period.”

—U.P

Will Triple Oil
Payments To Iraq

BAGHDAD, July 27.
payments to



oil

years under the

sources s3id on Thursday





The Company operates under
joint British, Dutch, French, and
American ownership. The agree-
ment is understood to be based
roughly on a~50-50 spiit of the
profi similar to the agreement

t the Arabian Ameri

with King Tbr
bia. last De



; potential |
‘because it “lies within this region
| but
; programme
ift in|in other ways.”



Iraq are ex-
pected to be tripled in the next two
next agreement
reached with the British operated
Iraq Petroleum Company, reliable







the area, if it is not to be lost to
subversion or aggression.”
Acheson emphasized the impor-
tance of aid to Asia while the free
world must get many of its
strategic materials. “Of key
importance too is the industrial
of Japan,” he said

not included in this aid
since its needs are met

is

Red Pressure Great
He said “Communist pressures





cans, including male and female
artisans left by specially chartered
planes last night for New York
where they will take ship to
England.
Employment
worsening rapidly (CP).

conclusion of the agreement
The Treaty shall come into effect

15 days after the exchange of po)

struments of ratification. Lately

said the “signing of the Japanese
peace treaty would forsake the
principles of those men and
women who died in the last war

;to report to the ident on hi
servations i the ; ige
of grain aid legislation had a mir
aculou

ot

tralian soil.”—U.P.

million white crossés on Aus-



Suez Situation Is Danger Signal

FLUSHING MEADOW,















assertion. We believe it is urgent







If the treaty is signed then I see] @ €roup of these high Staff Officers) pre
rospects here are]ja

visited Pakistan.
—U.P.

have arisen on various occasion

jeord of the armistice

White House
Pres I
He



K. W.V.
eflect on the peoples anc

s of India and the Governmen
most friendly and helpful gy
—U-P. A bottle should in home K.W.V. is
PURE — WHOLESOME, Indispensable
|

be every

in Hospitals,

Nursing Homes and in private Sick Rooms.
At their respective prices, K.W.V. Brandies have

ystem there







in the Pacific area have been very New York, July 26. |that the Security Council should| within the context of the armistice ;is no other instance of aggressive : : |
great and internal pressures are Israeli Chief Delegate, Ambass-| pronounce its views on this decis-|system . land hostile practice being contin no superiors. They are made from pure and selected
continuous. Immediate need ofjador Eban, charged in a speech|ive question.” Eban argued forcefully that all!iied in the face of such urgent y . . s
military aid for this area is appat-|here before the U.N. Security) Ehan’s speech charged that the|U-N. acts since the signing of the !condemnation by authorized U.N white wines and the distillation and maturation pro-
ent. Arms we are sending tO} Council, that the Egyptian block- blockade in itself «was an illegal armistice in 1949—ineluding lift-' pepresentaiives | , 7 :
Indochina and the Philippines arej ade, violates the Suez Canal Con- and “piratical act” explicitly di-}ing of the embargo on arms shij Never yet has the Security cesses take place under the strictest Government Uxcise
urgently needed. vention of 1888 as well as Israeli-\ pocteg against “Tsvael” and chal-|ments were based on the assump-| Council failed to endorse and cot ;
With the concentration of Com-|Fgyptian Armistice agreements lenged the Eg tian assertion that| tien thot there was no state of war {firm a reasonable request of the Supervision.
munist effort in the last year in] and international law provisions] 4 jogal state ae exists between |in the Middle East and remarked!Chief of Staff in any case where
Korea some people may have for-| guaranteeing freedom of the seas. the Said dotntriss , : sarcastically. “A landmark is|the effective functioning of an |
xotten Communist pressures still] ~ Opening fhe first round of the P â„¢ ached in international history,| armistice is jeopardized t
are being kept up elsewhere in| Goncil debate on what may prove Eban recalled that Lieut. Gen. n a member of the United; He said “the Security Council 7 r T ] r ‘ Q.
this region.” ' s crucial U.N. intervention aa the] William E, Riley, Head of the|Nations asks the Security Coun-|obliged to act for suppression of A K, W. V. BRA NDY and Seda :
Acheson also emphasized Asia’s! Geteriorating Middle Eastern situ-! Palestine Truce Mission. stat djcil to honour, protect and sanction |acts of aggression no matter by |
need for economic help since,| ation, Eban told the Council] iast month that through the block-/its desire to exercise unilateral | what technique or instrumentality d. |
|“poverty, disease, illiteracy and) meeting in temporary quarters of|ade, “the effective functioning of | acts of war” jthey are committed a ay |
| resentments against former Colo- the General Assembly's hall. the Armistice agreement is jeo-| | Eban said the Egyptian blockade ii
io cian cha “My Government instructs me|pardized” and warned the Coun-| No Precedent as even more of hostile
acs Sle iene hate ia? to declare that Israeli is in no|cil that continuation of the situa- Eban also pointed out that the| because it “rest ire on a * 4 , ‘onoay ee ae have ix rate of war with Egypt and denies tion in eo ;a “serious dan- | missed ‘ ares: ~ ( aon | ave 7 a will keep all colds a nd f fis
‘ > . ‘ sat ratty that Egypt has the least right to! ger signa rulec na ie hink i as} le ne p n Royal
| elocing™ sibebetinity "to Taper. be at ean vith Israeli ‘ . ° Eban told the Council that the| the right te demand from the \déeoree of Ay 1950 3 ng that away !! 9> 1|
You are familiar with the~ very Every assertion of Egypt's in-| “aggressive and -hostile practice Egyptian Government o in- per ed to use . |
real progress we are making in| tention to maintain a state of war|of the Suez blockade is a “central tervene with the pa of gor c g en ne =| |
saration of the treaty of peace; is in itself an offence hardly le international questior a Israel th pt the Suez c I r i]
an as an essential firs | than the performance ofj complaint of limited n- nal te ‘ oe C i "
nif direction.” he ri } flow from that. ic ' milar t } Eb eclat in the ree ,





PAGE TWO



ING- COMMANDER L.













W Egd@lesfield, Director aia
al of Civ® Ayiation in the Carib-—
bean arep, left yesterday
n by* B.W.LA. for Trinidad

ere he will have a meeting
wi nourable J. Ajodhasingh,
Minister Of Works and Communi-
cations

He is expected to return tomor-
row

TwL.L. Engineer

NV rR AND MRS PASCAL

BOURNE are at present
aclidaying in Barbados, staying
with Mrs. Bourne’s parents, Mr.
and Mrs.. W. H. Corbin at “Wal-
bridge,” Skeete’s Hill, Worthing
Mrs. Bourne is the former Phyli
Corbin, With them are their two
children.

Mr. Bourne is an engineer with
Trinidad Leaseholds in Pointe a
Pierre. They expect to be here for
bout four or five weeks.

Off To England

t ASS JEANNE VAUGHAN,
ay daughte.of. Mr. and Mrs
Cyril Vaughan of Cheapside has







: Joh . and
left for Engtend where she will WALTER BRENNAN - MARIE wikoson Catherine McLEOD
attend Queen’ Mary's College, summon, A REPUBLIC PICTURE etme
London to take her*Arts degree
and also a diploma in teaching ‘ Inside her arms, he forgot he was outside the law,

A the me she is in England |
a i » ae y ith her THREE SHOWS SATURDAY 30 8.15 and 12 (Midnight).
er r Colin aug ghan.
Jeanne’s other brother Carl was WERSE ARGO eee
recently transferred to Cable and |
Wireless’ branch in Trinidad } -—— -———- --
| ACT OSe COMING oming Next Week
Olympia Dines i Where star money is made’ (Y [1] GREAT LOVER & UE RIDGETOWN SINNER OF
ly P Dee | ‘ pits oe tone eae rues i HAPPY GO LUCKY \PLAZ. a ial 2310 MAGDALA
ia ‘ ‘ ¥ ter a tar it 1 dte ) ciuaionsahdeauihaiiininiannai mesial aie
T 8.09 o'clock last night the 1 Freeing by t dance. (3) ,o i ae cae eee 8 ' & Continuing PHalipe iel
A z he ; : .. 5 Gntone . , 2.90 — & $30 pm. & Co
Oly mopia Club in celebration ; any a ay pee oe on ates aie) TO-DAY 2.0 445 & » 136 @ 8.89 p.m. (Te Tuesday)
of the &fth anniversary of the interest in tne cake ¥ (7) |
formatiorg of the Club dined at «> Anctent temple of Mexico with « a Da SILVA
Hote : ¢ iocar tle (8) ‘
oa 7 fH ’ + tis must be a merrow neck, (7) Also the Cartoon
Mrs. G =a Adainien sen ares FIRST TADY of the screen— —seen with lovely star “i Gibsons Sat tty files. (6) “HOW GREEN 18 MY ‘SPINISIN”
D H Le Ww: ra a he hi a Gear Shelley Winters, at a Beverley Hills cocktail party, on her recent 22 Take a step to make it. (5) (Popeye)
resp ctively the onatiieas Ten return to Hollywood from Europe L.B.B. 24 Britons are supposed to be, (4) ; To) p.m
spe a Big é i ale - He ee Down : . 2 as Charlie Ché Jimmy WAKELY in
Vice-Pregident of the Club from 1 Wedding age at sea’? (8) se TOLER as cis ae x___“sona of the RANGE”
its inceptton Rorbados Broxteaiien To Settle in Canada | 2 Music in the rose chart. (9) é =
Many «toasts were moved in- 7 R. NOEL EDWARDS, son ot : The ter tha tar '
cluding QGhe to the Founders and ISS DORIS JOHN, of Brook- Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Ed-|! » This shot ts close. (3) > OISTIN i eae A i Fi i ares
Officers who were at the helm of lyn. Ne Yorl rived “in eae) ce Fontat ail B iia " } 6 yery entry carries money. (3)_ ly TAZ ry Dial 8404 4 S }
the Chibttor the past five years yn, New zy K i wards o ontabelle expects oO; @ Wood every schooiLoy disiikes. (5 TO-DAY TO SUN. 5 & 8.20 p.m | THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
ubs past vea'> the colony on Wednesday by the jeave tomorrow for Canada. He ) One end of each foot. (8) ia cee ” il rO-DAY TO SUN. 8 30 p.m
Members attending the dinner ee 14 Does 2 Down do this to music FORGOTTEN WOMEN | : 5
: ; , Lady Nelson. Miss John who is a will be staying with his brother Sy supores? (4) lyse Knox — Edward Norris and | MAT. Sun. — 5.00 p.m.
Were. * school teacher is on her. return and sister-in-law Mr. and Mrs.| '6 Morning before empioyment (5: “THE GANGSTER" cre et eee
Miss Grace Bishop, Miss Dorothy Bish- . : . a z " | 18 That @ambling cube, (4) Barry Sullivan and Belita surt Virginia
op, Miss Joyce Bowen, Miss Phyllis Bowen trip home after having been on a Harry Edwards who live in Mon-| 49 o's apt for a chatee. (3) we SEaCIAL bP A. IE) | LANCASTER ARROW
Miss Daphne Clarke, Miss Merle Clarke, short cruise of the islands. ini ‘ oi ; , ne! | iauaiettOne Ot eno | FLAME and the ARRO
aris Daphne spans, Mist Merle Claes, short cruise of the i treal, Noel plans to settle in Can eisictige aa Vaseuenaés bieaielaeiey RET RN of the APE MAN | Pann ne eouhulasine
low, Miss Arftne Cummins, Miss Doreen She said that she thinks Bar- ada, 1. Ranch: 6 Dab: 9 Urchin; 10, Ape Bela LUGOSI anc a oat eens
; eet , : st inbtieekedas : Nacarat: 15, Bore: 14, Germ: 15 ‘WESTWARD BOUND’ Key rd SAT. «TH
Daniel Misg, Dorothy Donovan Mrs. bados very progressive, and q ‘ Get; 16, Window: 18, Astonisn: 20, | ——— porte anne Ones, nee te that every island she had visited Incidental Intelligence | Ominous: 21 ; ye Ba aa “TRAIL TO GUN SIGHT | “PHANTOM o% CHINA TOWN
Maxwel{ Miss Sylvia Maxwell, Miss hed its own particular charm and TENANT whose landlord was} % Cnarwoman ay Hire: 5. ones 4 —e area ‘ enti ts 5 . : : ppro; an : 12 Cotton? . : TAKELY
1 Maory aise Shells Pare diss colour. trying to evict him wrote a Weete 4p Sorb = . Jot a MACK-BROWN yee eee
Sheila Mamaags Miss Gloria’ Ramn- During her short stay here she letter cherished for its brevity De rn



ed

Carb Calling

PARTY FOR KETTE

jis the guest of Miss

Winnie

, Mis an Smith, Miss Muriel J Par- “Dear sir,
Tudor, Miss “Sheila Tudor, Miss Cicely ris of “Water Hall,” Eagle Hall —Bennett Cerf.
Vaughan, an@ Mrs. Margaret Malcott Road



THE





PLAZA

BTOWN| FROM
Â¥ Leal ic qb

2.30_4



‘SHORES OF !
THE





U.S,

also

PHILIP REED -

b Directed by WILL PRICE + wr
Produced by Wiliam

2 a

Also the Short —

Good Quality Diamond

PORT and SHERRY GLASSES
CLARET GLASSES
CHAMPAGNE GLASSES
WHISKEY GLASSES

WATER JUGS,
GOBLETS & PEACH MELBA



ADVENTURES

4 o
& 8.30 p.m.

GUTS-AND- GL
“” STORY OF THE

HOWARD da SILVA

A Paramount Picture

“HOW GREEN IS MY SPINACH”
SSeS RBSEHRREBERaERBRBHBEEHRE BeBe

Crystal Glass-Ware

$1.23 each -



OF PIPA

Copyright - P 85




MARINES!

. YAUREE OHARA JOHN ARNE 4
TRIPOLI ©

storing,

GRANT WITHERS

ten for the screen by Winston Miller
Pine and Witham € Thomas

(POPErt

HONEY JARS.

GLASSES,



I remain,

NOW
PLAYING

They storm
fortress capital *
of the Barbary
Pirates...
marched straight
into history!

ed the

and



$1.44 | ,,
$1.76 ,,
$1.23 ,,

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE

STORE

DIAL 4220



yours. truly.’

|
—LES.



Vez Dias Int’ Amster












BARBADOS ADVOCATE




























B. B.C i COPPERS FEAT
a io. BEI N Ove 00, O06 } The Hin yan
and 1 t one for ever Pri 23,382 feet, has been
Pro r , , ) amateur climb-
-rogramme : wel seeaee olin
ir l iglishman of the Na-
FRIDAY, JULY 1951 1¢ pgliceman a Academy. It is
| . the mt thie ic na he
11.45 a.m. Programme Parade; 11.25 | teason for the campai his is the highest
a.m Listeners’ Choice, 11.45 a.m |Children have reached by Indian
World Affairs, 12 noon The News, 12.10 of police that of » found sers. The expedition was ac-
pe. Mews AAares i themselves hindered nquiri« nied by Sherpa Tensin of
ae Ke ee jabégt Berlin children who have probably the _ best
4.15 pm Flint Of The Flying ‘Squad, disappeared climber in India to-day
| 4.45 p.m. Sporting Record, 5.00 p.m = al
| England Vs. South Africa, 5.05 p.m Read ee cB 2a ' Sebi ks
Composer of the Week: 5.30 p.m. Light ! i i |
| Music, 6.00 p.m Merchart Navy Py $ th
Programme. 615 p.m. Trans-Atlant.¢}} iy ap i Y RE g> i q TT iil E A T R E
} Quiz. 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade. € °4 : 4 a A *
p.m, Today's Sport %
oO—10 45 25 SSM a1 2M
740 p.m The News 7.10 p.m, News i i Z
Analysis. 7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary TO-DAY 4.20 and 8.15 and CONTINUING DAILY
7 35 p.m. Interlude 7.45 p.m. The
Hymns We Sing. 8.00 p.m. Radio News > , we ‘ . : 2
re 8.15 p.m. English Magazine. 8.45 REPUBLIC’S ALL ACTION DOUBLE
|} p.m. Interlude. 8.55 p.m. From the
| @ditorials. 9.60 p.m. The Glory Road ramen,
}9.45 p.m. World Affairs. 10.00 p.m
| The News. 10.10 p.m. Interlude. 10.15 Sworn TO 6
| p.m Asian Survey 10.30 p.m. Tor se
|} Jones Trio 10.45 p.m. The Debate KILL A MAN
Continues

HE'D HEVER




FABULOUS
< TEXAN”

Starring





































——_——=_

IPPING OPEN THE PAGES OF GLORIOUS HISTORY

|





ERROL FLYNN — PAUL LUKAS — DEAN STOCKWELL





: $ sd.
ri eo . ‘ay ’
| Plus Tonite: Caribbean Talent Contest
ST. VINCENT BARBADOS
Doris ROBINSON “My Heart’s Delight” Gerald DAISLEY “Song of Songs”
“For you Alone” Doug GRIFFITH “In the Gloaming”
Beresford COX “Begin the Beguine” Bruce MANN “Because”
“They didn’t Believe Me”

Pit 30c., House 48c., Bal. 72c., Box S4c. Tickets on Sale TO-DAY & TO-NITE
GUEST STAR TO-NITE

Joseph CLEMENDORE—Contortic nist

















GLOBE theatre Presents 10-DAY & Continuing

AOU ATIC CLUE C INEMA | (Members Only)

A



FRIDAY,





TEES

MAT TO-DAY &
TO-NIGHT Te tMONDS
Universal-International’s New Release

“THE GIRL

Mai ZETTERLING
Guy ROLFE

tarring

By Special Request

“JIGGS AND MAGGIE

with Joe YULE
Also the British Short
(The

T

Pe

Matinee Saturday

IMORROV

NIGHT

IN- THE PAINTING”

Robert BEATTY
HOLT

trick

IN

Renie

Morning

JULY 27, 1951







a

Herbert LOM

at 9.30 o'clock

COURT ”

RIANO

“INTO THE BLUE”

Story of B.O.A.C.)





ROYAL

CPENING TO-DAY 4.90 and

MUU OME
Ce







"ith
« “1 \\ Broderick CRAWFORD + Joan ORO) |
yh IRELAND «John DEREK
@ Sci reon and Olragted by ROBERT ROSSER

SPECIAL
Republic Smashing Double

‘** BRIMSTONE”
SERRE



TO-MORROW
Rod CAMERON

and
Starring William MARSHALL

THEATRE

8.15 and Continuing to Sunday 4.30 and 8.15

Colombia Smashing Deuble

A

THOUSAND

AND ONE

|
eB
a Y lov ss a
* NIGHTS f
Starring :
Evelyn Keyes
Phil Silvers and
Cornel Wilde
Morning at 9.30 a.m
Walter BRENNAN in

** BLACKMAIL ”

Adele

Sane

MARA



ROXY



OPENING
4.45

TO-MORROW
and 8.15

TO-DAY

It’s All About Airline Stewardesses!
vere “geri Fun Hit!




WYMAN JOHNSON"

who is Mike-crazy oy as Mike

HOWARD KEEL SULLIVAN

You'll DIE

STARTING





ommcnnnntaranane



Re ee nes

with

the Wolfmaii , Dracula

PLAYED BY

BELA LUGOSI GLENN STRANGE

t PLAYED BY

LON CHANEY

masters of MIRTH) .

Columbia

Warner

THEATRE

ONLY
430 & 8.15

Double
Attraction

Baxter
“DEVIL'S
HENCHMAN ”

AND

“CORONER CREEK ”

IN CINECOLOR

Ran

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“oe ree" OU

COSTELLO

LA UGHING af
TO-DAY

AND CONTINUING DAILY

EMPIRE .«

p
PK os
e

Starring

Scott
Tucker.

dolph
Forrest

X SURReS SREY

A AR og FORM I â„¢

“f





the Monster

PLAYED BY ‘

{ LENORE AUBERT - JANE RANDOLPH - drivina: Screenplay by ROBERT LEES+ FREDERIC t
[| RINALDG + SOHN GRANT + Directed by CHARLES T. BARTON + Produced by ROBERT ARTHUR



CHECK UP

The Hurricane and Rainy Season is

We can supply:—

Chimneys & Wicks
Lanterns

Bolts

Latches

Locks

Call at our
ment. Remember!
you shop with us.

e



NOW

Saws

approaching:

Hammers

Screw Drivers

Shovels

Whee

Hardware and Ironmongery

Ibarrows

Depart-

There is no parking problem when

THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

Hardware Department



Tel. No. 2039









SR ORE PER RAMEN gp AE ROEM ON TEE

;



FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1951



Not Guilty Of

Breaking

Into Shop

HIS HONOUR the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore
at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday discharged Denzil
Reece a motor mechanic of St. Thomas after an Assize jury
found him not guilty of breaking into the shop of Elliot

Reid at Bridgefield, St. Thomas

Egglesfield
Met Flying
Boats In J’ca

Wing Commander L. A. Eggles-
field, Director General of Civil
Aviation in the Caribbean area,
has just returned from a visit to
Jamaica.

He said that one of the reasons
for his visit was to meet the
R.A.F. Sunderland flying beats
which were making a goodwill
tour and training cruise .

They left their base at Pem-
broke Dock on July 12 and after
calling at Reykjavik in Iceland,
Argentia in Newfoundland and at
Bermuda, the three boats arrived
in Jamaica on July 17, alighting
in the harbour at Kingston.

“It was a matter of great regret
to everybody, and particularly the
personnel of the flight, that they
were unable to visit the other
British territories in the Carib-
bean. Unfortunately, problems of
engine maintenance did not permit
a longer period of flying, away
from their base’’, he said

With Amethyst

Although the Sunderland was
first laid down in 1936, following
closely on the -heels of its proto-
type, the “C” class flying boat
which became so welt known with
Imperial Airways, it is still very
valuable for long range overseas
reconnaissance and operations
against submarines. They have
been doing most useful work in
Korea and it played a prominent
part in the Amethyst incident in
the Yangtse Kiang River; in fact,
two of the members of this party,
were in the crew of the Sunder-
land which landed alongside the
Amethyst under heavy fire.

The flight was commanded by
Squadron Leader P. A. S. Rum-
bold and, from Argentia onwards,
was accompanied by Wing Com-
mander E. J. Brooks, D.F.C., who
is a member of the British Joint
Services Mission in Washington

Rain Fell
Every Day



Rain fell nearly all over the
island every day this week.
Planters who were waiting for

rain to soften the earth, have
begun planting provisions.

About the city area, one inch 11
parts fell on Tuesday and Tuesday
night and 20 parts from Wednes-
day to 6 o’clock yesterday morn-
ing. The only place rain fell
during the day on Wednesday
was about St. Michael, chiefly the
City area, but it fell during the
night over the whole island.

The highest fall was in St.
Andrew. The Belleplaine Station
there recorded 32 parts.

Following are the parts record-
ed at the various stations on
Wednesday night: Central .20,
District “A” .25, “B” .24-“C” .14,
“D” .13, “E” .4, “F” .10, Holetown
.16, Belleplaine .32, Crab Hill .5
and Four Roads .14,

FLEW OVER NORTH
POLE

FAIRBANKS, Alaska, July 25.

Ten crew members of an R.A.F.
bomber stretched their air legs to-
day after a casual hop over the
top of the world from Iceland to
Fairbanks.

It took a four-engined Aries
bomber 18 hours and 54 minutes
to go over the North Pole to Fair-
banks from Keflavik, Iceland, a
3.558 mile jaunt.—(CP),

fp

m the top of your head

< of vour Toes -

‘tural loveliness, the secret of which is
‘FAM — The Soap of the Beautiful.

Made from a_ special

eaury





be beantiful...
kin that is soft-smooth and radiant with

lather séeps deep down into th

Geta fe
skin beauty.

with intent on April 22, 1951.
Mr. E. W. Barrow appeared on
behalf of Reece while Mr. W. W
Reece K.C. Solicitor General pro-
secuted for the Crown, When the
case for the prosecution was
closed, Mr. E. W. Barrow address-
ed for 15 minutes before the
adjournment,

On resumption of hearing Mr.
W. W. Reece submitted that there
was no case to take to the jury.
Before advising them to return a
verdict of not guilty. His Honour
told the jury that he had con-
sidered the case during the inter-
val and owing to the discrepancies
the accused could not be found
fuilty of the offence,

Window Broken

First witness called for the pro-
secution was Sgt. C. Hutchinson
who is attached to the District “D’
Police Station. He said that on
April 23, he went to Bridgefield,
St. Thomas with other police-
constables and examined a shop
and noticed a window at the back
of the shop was. broken, The
window was secured by a latch,

To Mr, Barrow, Sgt. Hutchinson
said the window was about five
feet from the ground and was open
when he saw it. Lindsay Maynard
opened the shop for him and he
examined the window from inside
There was nothing under the
window inside the shop. The shop
was not untidy. He could not say
whether finger prints were taken
off the broken part of the window.

Next witness called was Cp!
Conliffe and he told the court that
on April 22, at about 11.05 p.m.
he was on duty at District “D” and
saw Denzil Reece at the station.
Island Constable Springer made
a report to him and he charged
Reece with shop breaking.

Reece made a statement which
was taken down in writing. On
April 23, he went to the shop of
Elliott Reid situated at Bridge-
field, St. Thomas. He examined
the shop and found that a window
was broken, The shop was opened
by Lindsay Maynard.

The window was unlatched,

Lindsay Maynard told the court
that he is a 19-year-old shop-
keeper of Bridgefield, St. Thomas.
He works with his brother Elliott
Reid—in his shop. Since Reece
was a schoolboy he knew him
On April 22, he closed his brother's
shop and went out. When he re-
turned to the shop he noticed that
Reece was jumping out of a win-
dow. He held him and sent for
Island Constable Springer who
came shortly after and arrested
the accused who was taken to
District “D” Police Station.

Seek Jobs
As Seamen

A large crowd of men and boys
gathered around the Harbour and
Shipping Departmdnt yesterday
seeking jobs as ratings on the
Harrison Liner Adviser which
was in Carlisle Bay discharging
camgo.

The Adviser
Harrison Liners
West Indians among her crew.
She has just come down from
U.K. and her next port of call
will be Trinidad.

Most of the crowd stood on the
wharf, looking anxiously at the
Shipping Office and hoping to hear



one of those
which employ

Is

their names called among the
picked. A quiet hum came from
them. Occasionally, light show-

ers of rain drove them to shelter.

In the office, the clerks were
kept busy signing up articles and
making the necessary arrange-
ments for the new crew to sail
with the Adviser. Quite a num-
ber of disappointed faces finally
left the wharf.



ne

to the
with

developed and

Pcleansi fy ae eit ae
» res, |, CLEANSINE, ung, re
e pores, , cleansing g Fhe nD

tropical , formula

pi ARF

oan?

; Sed cetyp a Fgh :
your skin to an unbelievable loveliness thatPwill’ bevihte enyyjofpyour, friends.
eer anes i 2 ghar arate 6 tame >:

w cakes of DREAM TOILET SOAP =P use it’ faithfully,

SOAP





A b
With

Unity Rests

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Iraq

By GEORGE PIPAIL.

Political observers said

BAGHDAD, July 26
that the assassination of King

Abdullah has shifted the centre of gravity of the move-
ment for Arab unity from Amman to Baghdad, and may
hasten the realization of the first objectives.

176,660 Feet Of
Lumber Come
By “Oak Hill”

Over 176,660 feet of pine lum-
ber arrived at Barbados yester-
day by the Saguenay Terminals’
freighter Oak Hill from Halifax
making a total of 621,170 feet to
have arrived this week

The new shipment found the
inner basin of the Careenage al-
ready congested with lumber. It
is almost three weeks now that
the waterfront of the inner basin
has not been freed from lumber.

Other cargo arriving by the
Oak Hill included 1,600 bags of
flour, 3,248 bags of soya bean
meal and a quantity of pickled
meat.

A stowaway has made the trip
aown with the Oak Hill from
Cuba. He will be taken by the
ship to Trinidad from where he
will be repatriated to Cuba.

Canada, U.S. Plan
To Keep Prices
Down

WASHINGTON, July 26,

Canada and the United States
will seek new ways today of
holding baek price climbs in
essential materials which threaten
the vast rearmament programme
of both countries,

High ranking officials will confer
on the possibility of creating
administrative machinery to bind
the two countries to a common
anti-inflation policy on defence
production.

This latest industrial mobiliza-
tion conference attended by C. D.
Howe, Canada’s Defence Produc-
tion Minister and four of his
advisers is understood to be a
direct outgrowth of United States

concern over recent price in-
ereases in Canadian essential
materials.—(CP)



War And Germany

WASHINGTON, July 26.

House Majority Leader John
McCormick announced on Thurs-
day night that the House will take
up at noon, Friday, a resolution to
declare the state of war with Ger-
many at end.

The resolution has already been
cleared by the Foreign Affairs
Committee and is expected to re-
eeive near unanimous approval by
a full House.

—U-P.







. . LONG, LASTING



otal 5 then
+» RICH BEAUTY, LATHER
», CPRAGRANTLY™ ae

On July 21 the Crown Prince
Abdullah said in London that the
“death of Abdullah” wil] not
change our course, or prevent my
iamily from carrying out our
duties, and fulfilling Arab objec-
tives.” This was interpreted here
to mean that Abdullah’s campaign
tor the unity of Syria, Lebanon,
Jordan and Arab Palestine, and a
cleser link with Iraq will not
diminish, but that important
alterations in strategy are almosi
certain.

Abdullah long Wad worked for
such a union. Now the titular
leadership falls on the 16 year
old King Feisei of Iraq as the
only Arab monarch claiming
direct descent from the Prophet
Mohammed, while the actual
leadership comes from his mater-
nal uncle,

Political observers here expect
Iraq first to seek unity with Syria
alone. The campaign wil, have
strong support from the Premier
of Iraq, Noury Pasha El. Pasha
El is said to have been a member
of the Arab Independence under-
ground under the Ottoman Em-
pire,

It was he, who originally
formulated proposals for the uni-
fication of Syria, Jordan, and
Iraq as the “fertile crescent.”
Abdullah personally expanded
this concept into his pro-
gramme for qa “greater Syria.”
Noury Pasha, in recent years, hus
been concentrating on the unity
of Syria and Iraq, a combination
which observers believe makes
most economic and political sense,
and has the best chance of suc-
ceeding.

Opposition Centres

There have been measures of
public support in both countries
since Abdullah’s younger brother
Feisel proclaimed a monarchy
in Syria in 1920. He wag ousted
by the French and an oligarehy
of wealthy merchants and land
owners which would be a decisive
factor in any political coup.

Principal centres of opposition
to the “Greater Syria pro-
gramme are: Egypt—which pre-
ters her own leadership within
the looser Aral league and sees
a threat in a strong Arab state.
Saudi Arabia whose ruler
King Ibn Saud igs the traditional
enemy of the Hassemite family o1
Abdullah ever since he ejected
Abdullah’s brother Ali from the
throne at Mecca. ;

Palestinian Arabs who provide
inereasingly active hut unpredic-
table political force. z

Syria — which at present is
under a republican form of Gov-
ernment.

The British and French have
remained outwardly aloof on
manoeuvres for Arab unity.






Fever? Cold? Headaches?




ASK



TemOles (Msigietuer lou) ot 1m

—U.P.

=| TRIUMPH OVER —

AIN

= XY Za <= \
a a = \

a Me ae te
fina

tor ee A ee it oly tae Pant |

ne eee een

ky

TEN TO SEVEN, GAVE
SU BERD

C t AM
sORRV im SOL
LATE. GEORGE )



Boat Owners

Repay $61,225

During the month an amount of
$1,747.83 was repaid by
ers On loans; this makes a total of
$61,225.02 repaid to date. Inter-
est collected for the same period
wi $21.07 making a total of
paid to date, writes C. C.
Skeete, Director of Agriculture in
his report for June this year

boat own-

“1



The amount loaned for the
month was $114.92, bringing the
total foaned from the inception of
fhe Loan Scheme to $105,741.86.

Experiments with the “Investi-
gator” were continued during the
month for the capture of flying
fish.

All of the gill netting imported
for introduction to the local fish-
ermen was sold, Efforts are being
directed towards persuading
local merchants to carry this net-
‘ting part of their regular
stock.

Catches of fish dropped during
the month as the close of the
flying fish season approaches.

Five fishing boats were lost ahd
two badly damaged during the
month. Four of the lost boats were
covered by insurance.

as



131 Confirmed

His Lordship the Bishop vested
in Cope and Mitre, administered
the Sacrament of Confirmation to

131 candidates at St. Michael's
Cathedral at 8 o'clock yesterday
morning.

Twenty-one of these candidate
were from St. Winifred’s and St.
Michael’s Girls’ Schools and the}
remainder from St. Cyprian’s, Alt}
Souls and the Cathedral

Fr. G. V. E. Hazlewood present- |
ed the candidates and Fr. H. St. j
Cc. Tudor the Bishop's '
Chaplain. }

There was a Sung Eucharist}
immediately following the Con-|
firmation at which the candidates |
made their first communion,

The Bishop spoke very impres-
sively to them on_ their future }
spiritual life and christian witness, |

acted as



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BATTLE DRESS Debroy Somers

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YEARS
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DUET MAC AND MAC
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Iver Novello |

Xylophone Soloists

Cpl, Best & Bandsman Lovelle
Film Musie—THE ROAD TO }
MOROCCO Hewsen
Dance Medley—-YOU WERE NEVER '
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KONG CHRISTIAN STOD VED
HOJEN MAST”
In_honour of the visit of the Yacht
“Marianne” Skipper Elmar Trastrup
and our Danish Visitors,
GOD SAVE THE





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PAGE FOUR







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Friday, July 27, 1951



DISQUIETING NEWS

A REPORT from the Advocate’s corre-
spondent in British Guiana of the pending
deportation of 17 West Indians focuses
public attention to what is a fundamental
problem.

There can be no doubt that there is grow-
ing necessity for population adjustment in
the West Indies and it is for the govern-
ments in the various islayds to face up to
the problem.

The first question to be settled, however,
is the status of West Indians and their
rights within the area. This subsidiary
point arises because of the attitude of the
Trinidad Government in this matter. The
Immigration. officer of British Guiana
pointed ‘out what. has been a disquieting
fact known throughout the West Indies.
The Trinidad Immigration Jaw prohibits
any outsider from taking up employment
if there are unemployed Trinidadians who
can do the job. This means that Trinidad
must be preserved for Trinidadians and
that they can only allow the entry of other
West Indians in situations in which they
cannot help themselves.

However excellent this theory might be
as a measure of self-preservation, it is at
variance with the much vaunted plea for
federation. If this same theory were car-
ried to its logical conclusion, it would be
impossible for the people of Essex to
secure employment in Manchester or
Birmingham although they are all English

The people born in this area are West
Indians whether they come from Jamaica
or Trinidad or one of the islands in the
Grenadines, It can only mean a perpetua-
tion of the old demon of insularity when
restrictions of this kind are raised in the
various territories.

The absurdity of the position is revealed
when the Government of British Guiana
is forced to retaliate by deporting a num-
ber of West Indians to their respective
homes. The vast lands of British Guiana
have always been regarded as supplying
the possible solution for the West Indian
population problem. An_ investigating
committee and a full fledged commission
have each reported that British Guiana is
suitable for the settlement of Assyrians or
West Indians from the more thickly popu-
lated areas,

The circumstances seem to reduce any
talk of West Indian federation to a mock-
ery and a sham. The present economic
difficulties of the West Indies had their
origin in the fostering of a policy of insu-
larity in these islands. Each island com-
peted against the other and even when the
time came for bartering for better prices
for the raw material produced in the area,
they were unable to speak with a concert-
ed voice. To-day they are still competing
against each other for the establishment
of industrial projects which would furnish
employment and’ raise the standard of
living. '

Let it be admitted that the West Indies
cannot settle satisfactorily the underlying
problem of population adjustment; but
they can, by common understanding be-
tween themselves, do much towards its
ultimate settlement. This is not to be
effected by hounding people of one colony
out of another or by forbidding them to
accept profitable employment in territories
other than their birthplace, This is a mat-
ter to which the legislatures of the various
colonies must address themselves immedi-
ately if federation is not to be undermined
before it has been properly launched.

OUR READERS SAY

|

|

Human beings, ever since their
fathers invented language, have
allowed themselves to be domin-
ated by tradition. This has been
e the main cause of progress
and the main obstacle to progres
Consider it first as a cause of pro-
gress. Where should we be if each
generation had to inyent reading,
writing, and arithmetic for itself?
How should we get on if arts and
crafts were not handed on? Even
in the most progressive age, much
the greater part of our activity
is, and must be, based upon tra-
dition. We may rebel against our
parents’ narrow-mindedness, but
we can only rise above them by
standing on their shoulders.

at onc





But although respect for tradi-
tion and obedience to custom are
necessary up to a point, most
societies have carried them much
too iar, and some have brought
themselves to destruction by this
sole defect. Human beings change
their ways much more quickly
than animals do; civilised men
change their ways more quickly
than uncivilised men, and modern
civilised men change their ways
more quickly than civilised men
of former ages. Civilised societies,
during the last 150 years, have
radically transformed their physi-
cal environment, the methods by
which they secure a_ livelihood,
and the apparatus of comfort
over and above the minimum fe-
cessary for survival. The priine
eause of these changes has been
a vast increase of knowledge and
skill. The new techniques in the
material realm demand, if they
are to bring their full benefit in
increase of human welfare, an
#vccompaniment of new mental
habits. 1t is in this respect, more
than in any other, that our world
falls short. In an age of machines
and skilled scientific production,
we retain the feelings, and many
of the beliefs, that were appropri-
ate to the ages of scarcity and
primitive agriculture.

The need of new political and
social ideas is due to our increase
of efficiency, both for good and
evil. In the old days many things
that are now possible could not
be achieved by any known means.
Extreme poverty for the great
majority was unavoidable. Popu-
lation perpetually pressed upon
the limits of subsistence, except
when it was catastrophically dim-
inished by famine or pestilence.
Wars created aristocracies of
conquerors, who lived without
compunction upon the labour of
the vanquished. It was not until
the French Revolution that this
system began to be superseded by
one involving less general misery.
Now, in certain important west-
ern countries, extreme poverty has
almost disappeared, famine is un-
known, large-scale _pestilences
have yielded to medical science,
and a low birth-rate has made it
possible to preserve a high level
of prosperity whe. it has been
reached. All this is new in human
history. Struggle, fight, starvation,
and premature death have been
the lot of the great majority of
human beings ever since there
were human beings, just as they
were the lot of the animals before
them.

The fundamental source of this
beneficent revolution is scientitic
production, and the scientific habit
of mind which has given rise to it.
Two other things besides scientific
methods of production have been
necessary, namely democracy and
a low birth-rate, bu: these by
themselves would not have been
sufficient, and would scarcely have
been possible without science, ex-
cept for brief periods in excep-
tional circumstances. Though not
sufficient to produce a happy
community they are necvssary,
and machine industry without
them may lead to a new form of
serfdom quite as dreadful us any-
thing in the gloomy annals of the
past.

We hear much about the west-
ern way of life, and the need of
defending it against the castern
menace. But few in the west are
clear as to the essentials of the
western way of life, or as to what
makes it worth defending. If we
were clear about this, our propa-
ganda would be more effective,
and we should have less need
than we have at present to devend
upon military might as our sole
protection. What the west has

discovered (though ag yet the
realisation is incomplete) is a
method by which _ practically

everybody can have as much of
material goods as is conducive to
happiness, without excessive
hours of labour, and with that de-
gree of mental culture that is
needed to make leisure delightful.
This is rendered possible by the

Obsolete Ideas

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By BERTRAND RUSSELL
; not blame Governments for our
fact that one man’s work can now troubles, nor can they be cured by
produce much more than is re- merely governmental action. What
quired for one man’s subsistence. jg needed is a change in the
> ae >! ie eve © : = ‘
jut as yet this system has only a ordinary outlook of ordinary peo-
precarious life. It is threatened ple. The change that is wanted is
from without by those whom envy sometimes thought to be a moral
venders destructive, _and it 13 change, but my own belief is that
threatened from within by those nothing is required beyond a just
who are still under the domination estimate of self-interest. I know
of beliefs and passions approvri- that it js difficult to rouse enthusi-
ate to a bygone age. asm for such a view. Suppose you

The kernel of these beliefs and *#id to a population: ‘If you pur-
passions is the struggle for life. “Uce. course A, — of you will
Where this struggle is now still sail it agony, ond & e other half
necessary, it is necessary because Wi ve in squalor; whereas if
men are misguided, not because YOU Pursue course B, you will all
nature is niggardly. In former FToSper. And suppose that on
times, if two men each wished'ta ‘his basis you conducted a great
live on the produce of a piece of political campaign. What so you
land which only yielded enough think would happen All the
for one, they must either both ©4rnest moralists would rise up

starve, or fight till one was killed, #04 Say: ‘Sir, your aims are base.
Ia practice, it was not single men There are more impurtant thing
who fought, but groups of men than material prosperity. Shoulc
called successively tribes, nations, ® great nation shrink from suffer-

coalitions, or United Nations. ing if it is imeurred in a noble
cause? Was it by such degraded

self-seeking that our ancestors
made our nation great? Perish the
thought ! Away with mone)
grubbers. Let us live like heroes
and if fate so wills it, die like
heroes.’ You will find that you
are completely powerless agains
the mass hysteria so generated
You will find men pcinting the
finger of scorn at you as a coward,
and you will be lucky if your
‘cowardice’ does not lead to your
being lynched, while the thou-
sands who are lynching you con-
trast their inflexible courage with
your base poltroonery.

pleasant fairy tale is that we “our|

These considerations apply to
the present east-west tension. The
Russians believe, whether sin—
cerely or not, that they can only
prosper by first ruining the west.
The west not unnaturally con-
cludes that it can only survive by
first ruining Russia. I will not for
a moment deny that while these
reciprocal sentiments exist, they
make themselves true. If A and
B each knows that the other is
after him with a pistol, they may
consider general maxims about
the desirability of co-operation
irrelevant. The question for each
reduces itself to the very simple
one: ‘Which of us will kill the
other first?’ But the difference
between their interests is caused
by their sentiments, not by any
external natural cause, and so it is
with the public enmities in the
modern world. They have no
justification in economic fact or
sober self-interest, but result
solely from the surviving pug-

The popular fear of intelligence
is one of the great dangers of our
times. If teachers and education-
al authorities had more under-
standing of the sort of person the
modern world needs, they coulc
within a generation produce ar
outlook that would transform thc
world. But their ideal of charac
ter is an old-fashioned one. The;
admire most the sort of characte:
which would give a man leader
ship in a gang of pirates, and i
jou say that commerce is a differ
ent thing from piracy, they thin!
you soft and hope you ar
mistaken. All this is due to the
persistence of old martial ideas
that have descended to us fron
earlier ages. These ideas, J repeat
were appropriate to an age of un-
avoidable scarcity, but are not
ppplicable to our own times, whe:
whatever scarcity still exists i
due to human stupidity and to
nothing else. Although this is the
case, most of us still prefer passio:
to intelligence, we like to have our
feelings roused, we like to chee
and boo, we like to admire anc
we like to hate, we like to set
things in black and white. Oui
whole mental apparatus is thai
which is appropriate to sending
us rushing into battle with hoarsc
war cries. ¥



BERTRAND RUSSELL

nacity of mankind, which
served a purpose, but now
merely antiquated,

If Russia and the west each
became convinced that the other
had no hostile intentions, each
would be spared all the expense of
armaments, each would derive
benefits from reciprocal com-
merce, each would escape from the

once
is

Consider the application of such
a mentality to international bank-
ing,.and you will not be surprisec
by the great depression which 1
produced whilst it reigned un



It’

dread of the atomic bomb and the
destruction of large parts of the
population, The motives of self-
interest which on each side pro-
mote hostile feeling are merely a
reflection of the exactly identical
motives of self-interest of the
other side, and are based on each
side upon the assumption that the
other side is irrationally inclined.
Of course, human nature being
what it is, this naked analysis will
seem shocking to both sides, for
wherever hostility exists, however
obsolete may be its sources, it
appears on both sides as a great
moral crusade, in which it is the
duty of every true man to uphold
high ethical ideals. But all this is
merely a part of the psychological
camouflage by which homo sapiens
conceals from himself his own
lack of wisdom, Suppose some
drug were discovered which re-
moved mental mists from the
mind, and suppose that the only
two people who had taken this
drug were Stalin and Mr. Truman,
what do you think would happen?
Presumably they would meet in a
neutral spot, they would shake
hands and share a drink, and each
would say to the other: ‘Well, old
boy, I suppose you are really not
much worse than me.’ They
would then in the course of half
an hour at most find an equitable
solution to all the problems in
which the interests of their re-
spective nations were popularly
supposed to be conflicting. They
would go home jubilant; but Stalin
would be assassinated by Molotov,
and Mr. Truman would be suc-
cessfully impeached by Senator
McCarthy. After this, each nation
would return to its former folly.

What I wish to illustrate by this

BOOK REVIEW

Watch The Suspense Mounting

Probe It is well known that Civil
at Servants in fear of dire conse-
To the Editor, The Advocate— quences, have to keep their finan- “IT WAS met at the Centrai
SIR,—We are accustomed in this cial affairs from reaching the Station by my employer's local
age of the Atom Bomb, to anxious courts: (and in doing so, often per- representative. His name was He wore them like
moments. Many an ancient right form . feats of financial jugglery Georghi Pashik. “I know a_ lot
has gone to the wall, and the very which would make the Chancellor “IT saw him standing on tie BOW. I know,

meaning of Democracy has be-
come exceedingly difficult to define,
Wars and rumours of wars persist, difficulties

of the











giving promise of more difficult for existence will be open to the with an array of f ai meat sandwich and a revolver, and calculating grey “jf ; ;
; xis I an array ountain pens : ’ B grey. brid
times ahead. Wildly soaring gloating examination of total ‘he handkerchief achat pens"! that the seersucker suit was given The foreground of the story and ar DuoERee ae tis -
prices mock stagnant and totally strangers, with all the various “Under his arm he carried to him when he was working in consists of the cunning and ruth- either side. Sane
inadequate salaric possibilities, is indeed discour- thin, black despatch Meta Hanten ‘a Displaced Persons camp, that less intrigues which, in this Balkan This book is meant for boys
In the midst of all this, there aging to say the least. tak a jalli ns cane wi » 2 one of the fountain pens came country, have taken the place of advise grown-ups t on ys.
arises a new menace on the horizon FIGARO, sinpek i - te Gee es mice from Passaic, New Jersey, and party politics. 5 ps to read it. |
directed against Civil Servants, miDper “ema © Stood Sy a pillar ihat those facts can be related Background nd foreground Brother] |
which threatens to expose their G.LU. Savs Thanks enone. about him with the im- girectly to his death.” combine to produce not merely : y Banter |
ee ne 3y cee b periouS anxiety of a wealthy fear that i , ’ FOR light relief from excit» |
private, intimate, and purely traveller who sees n ter and ear Mat is sharp but’ ‘abject ment 7. advi the MED :
domestic affairs to the scrutiny of To the Editor, The Adyocate— jinn that he goth alae ae ei terror that clings to the skin and PAPERS. na Ei . R aOgUGs
some Pooh-Bah, who presumably SIR,—The President, Commit- Edin bases im carry us This extract gives you the key S®@PS into the bones, Do not Dakers, 10s. 6d.) oss (Andrey
will in future direct their affairs oe and ; tee * tig ue , =" to Eric Ambler’s new thriller, read this book in the night “Hume Ross” is a Harley-stre>
with all the tender love and affec- nase a teat 2S yal —_————————. JUDGMENT ON_:~COéDSULT' CHIE specialist who has taken time of
i oc, sje ri + ate =) i iO wo 3 > = _ ~ > D |
tion associated with the Gestapo. Rabin pre A Neuababer this (Hodder and Stoughton, 10s. 6d.), South Pole Saga to make fun of his professiona |
An edict has gone forth from letter of “Thanks” ie thane oi local Agents and Producers of to its tautness of writing, to its brothers, He has, in fact, writte: |
somewhere in the regions of the De ccaeeiihe SiGe “thenk hice aie the following Products for their mounting suspense. IT says much for the writing of a light-hearted “Citadel,”
Secretariat, calling upon local oe hee Hn One é ae Gifsin Breda Tn: some “Wass this thriller 4s Admiral Lord Mountevans that The story begins when 1
hie : 1+ Gtitadine d Us 4 Ber, adbury nocolates coe veee . is 3 i te ini
firms to submit statements of Queen's Park on Empire Day Cow & Gate Milk (Prize (Award. Conventional, though brilliantly PAtts of his autobiography, elderly millionaire invites a
Civil Servants’ private accounts, . ed) Dispa Dreft>Flit . (Prize Tone. Some of the action scénes ene * DYENTURE R Journalist to eavesdrop on the de- |
While I am sure that few reput- They wish to thank Mrs. R. N. Deedes Pie ae ae : free produced in me so sharp.a fear (Lutterworth Press, 7s. 6d.) liberations of two consultants who |
able firms in Barbados would Turner for graciously opening yj) (Prize Awarded) Ratdomnan that when I hear the centuries- evoke ‘from his personal experi- have just examined him,
comply with this high handed, and the F ete, Mrs. e G Bryan, Tea, Kraft Products,’ McClean’s old cry of “Who goes home?” in ence Lead same de gree of excite- Because the consultants spenc |
dictatorial request, (except in the ec T ‘e wills s ae tt Tooth Paste (Prize Awarded), the House of Commons I found ment that Eric Ambler evokes their time discussing the patient's |
normal course of events where the Mrs. I. SON, ers, a»: Ox0, Oak Milk (Prize recom. myself longin for the bodyguz from his imagination. income instead of his symptoms |
as 4h eats : E. Raison for judging the Stalls eng bodyguard vans : ymptoms |
administration of justice requires =: ae nd ide. Lad. mended), Quaker Oats (Prize which in days gone by used to __L@'d Mountevans was leader of the millionaire founds a new |
an investigation), still it provides ae ie, eo = eae hes Awarded), Rowntree’s. Choco- protect members through the one of the two parties which ap- medical school to teach them a/|
an interesting revelation of the donations, Mrs. J s “Wilkin- lates (Prize Awarded), Red Rose shadows of Westminster. proached _ the South Pole with lesson, and imports Dr, Medi- |
trend of events. son for organizing the Costume Tea, Seven Seas Cod Liver Oil Captain Scott. Scott decided to cough’ as professor of comparative |
Whether Civil Servants exist on Parade. Mr. John Shannon for (Prize reeds Bico Ice . ° * “ make the final assault with one medicine. =I
salt fish, caviare, or just mainly supervising the aa Cream, Canada Dry Drinks, Four aie party only, and ordered Mount- The comparisons |
“grog”, will apparently in tivare Act . Divector tion Zn eet Been 7h & R. Rum & a Judgment on Delchey” evans with two others back to Medicough male wee onieu tr |
, Shh ae ctke 5 ; ; ; . ; Enrichec read (Prize Awarded) iS much more than a conventional base. b teal 4 : tale
form part of vital statistics in tt th Mot ¢ itertain- ne . : oe a * those medical tycoons iva!
cairo dossiers and. whisy athe iment : ’ and Mount ies abies ‘i oe The background is one After watching Scott’s party Scruple and Sir Spire Keate, tet!
MEE Nah oP hvb iota Ww f ANNE BENTLEY cf those political trials behind the leave—they were the las p 1 the slighte . 4
gallery records, of the city archives.* We have also to thank the President, (G.1.U.) von Curtain in which the roliné y ere the last men in they delighted the students, and |

Exchequer
envy), and now to know that their
and intimate struggles




green with

glasses and a tigh



platform as my train drew in: a
short, dark, flabby man in rimless

carried
contained

so
t seersucker suii





“I thing that it was the fountain
pens that identified him for me.

for instance, that

the black despatch case that he
importantly

anything but a

checked, nor by the belief of the
Nazis that the depression would be
curbed if only enough Jews wer:
exterminated, nor by the Russia:
belief that’ we should all be ric}
if all the rich men were liquidated
None of these mistakes would havi
been made my men in whom in-
telligencg was capable of con-
trolling passion, none of then
would have been made by me:
who understood that when differ-
ent groups have different interests
it is because of unwise passions
and not because of any physical
fact.

If we are to live happily with
“a modern technique—and it is
possible for modern technique tc
bring a far higher level of happi-
ness than was formerly possible—
we must banish certain ideas and
substitute certain others. For love
ot domination we must substitute
justice; for brutality we must sub-
stitute intelligence; for competition
we must substitute co-operation.
We must leafn to think of the
human race as one family, and
further our common interest by
the intelligent use of natural re-
sources, marching together toward
prosperity, not separately towards
death and destruction. The menta!
change required is difficult, anc
will not be achieved in a moment,
but if the need is recognised by
educators, and if the young are
brought up as citizens of this
world and not of a bygone world
of predatory warriors, the change
can be achieved within a genera-
tion, so that we may hope to save|
at least a portion of mankind from
the universal destruction with|
which we are threatened by the
pursuit of obsolete ideas,

a badge. him.
about Pashik
can feel the prop
on him until he
Deltchev, and to
is no black ox

rarely
Stale

People’s Party try to diseredit an
opponent, Deltchev, before hanging

As the trial unfolds the reader

white, only cold

the world to see that party alive

‘

Time We Shook Off
This ATOM DREAM

‘By CHAPMAN PINCHER

RED-CAPPED military police stood guard
outside the Kensington headquarters of |
Sritain’s Civil Defence, Inside, 250 Civil
Jefence chiefs were studying a huge model
showing what would happen if an atom
bomb exploded over Trafalgar Square.

No effort and no expense have been spared
to make the model accurate to the finest
fetail. For the atom defence plans of every
»ig town in Britain are to be based on the
essons learned from this master model.

I inspected it; it has been brilliantly de- :

igned. To make it, scientists have assessed
he blast and fire damage from stereoscopic
jictures taken by aircraft flying at 2,000ft.
‘hat is the likeliest height for an atom burst.

They have counted the number of people in
he London streets to calculate probable
asualties at different times, day and night.

By examining sample buildings in every
wea involved — from Regent-street’s shop-
ying centre in the north to Pimlico’s tene-
nents in the south — the scientists have even
vorked out the depth of road rubble.

All this information has. been cleverly
xrought together in the model so that the
\rmy generals, fire service, police, and rescue
eams can devise plans to minimise the disas-
ter,

By moving miniature fire engines, ambu-
ances and rescue equipment about the model
he experts are discovering exactly how their
jlans would work.

They can gauge the number of fire stations
ind hospitals which would be put out of
iction by the explosion. They can see which
itreets are likely to be impassable to rescue
vorkers.

Ingenious ? Yes, except for one overriding
‘act :—

The model is based entirely on what
would happen if a bomb as powerful as
the one dropped on Hiroshima were ex-
ploded. !

AND such a bomb is six years out of
date. }

DANGEROUS

At a Washington conference last month,
ollowing the secret bomb tests in the Pacific,
J.S. atom weapons chief Dr. Alvin Graves
iaid :—

“It does not make sense to give out data
m the basis of the old weapon, as it has
ready been released that weapons exist
several times larger.”

There is no certainty that any enemy
‘ountry will develop such powerful bombs.

3ut Britain’s Civil Defence precautions
ihould make that assumption.

This “master” model in Kensington is most
langerous in its present form,

The area of damage, the casualties, and
their effects on the rescue services would be
entirely different if a more powerful bomb
were dropped.

If enemy bombs were only twice as power-
ful as the Hiroshima type, the area of blast
damage would be two and a half times
greater.

WAKE UP!

Britain’s atom defence precautions should
be based on the existence of a bomb at leas!
five times as powerful as the Hiroshima
bomb, in my view.

This does not mean that all the scientists’
fine work is wasted.

The U.S, authorities have published formu-
las based on actual bomb explosions which
would enable the scientists to scale up their
calculations and bring the “master” model up
to date.

To carry on with detailed plans based on
the Hiroshima-type bomb would be as fool.
ish as reorganising our air defences to cope
with Messerschmitt 109’s.

The red-capped military police were guard-
ing a dream of atom days gone by. They

were awake; it is time the defence planners

woke up too.
1

—L.ES.

By J. P.

W. MALLALIEU, M.P.

—they began their return journey.
On the way they put themselvy>s
and their sledge over the 2,000fi.
Shackleton Falls, taking a drop of
700ft. in one go.

Later, all but out from tired-
ness, scurvy, and cold, they hai
to force their sledge over an ice-

aganda working
begins to doubt
feel that there

will delight readers.—L,E.S.

PL PPEC ODDES SOD SCP PC SS EEE EPEC CCL ECOG PCRESES SS OTSOF TES

FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1951

CE PIED OP IIS

CLOSED



FOR
REPAIRS



Advocate Stationery



NGOLEUM

in colours and designs to
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scheme






% 3 yds x 3 yds. and 3 yds x
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JAMS = CRYSTALS
PEAS

By Wm. P. HARTLEY Ltd.

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APRICOT... .. 45c. ,,
DAMSON ac.

} RED PLUM 42c. ,,

GREENGAGE Sle. »
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JAEGER ALL-WOOL
TRAVEL RUGS

and
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also
ALL-WOOL WORSTED

OVERCOAT MATERIAL
28 ozs. 58” wide in Black only

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STOCK ... :

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OX TONGUES CHEESE in Tins 8

LUNCHEON BEEF CARR’S CRACKERS %
MEAT PAsres CARR'S WATER BISCUITS
batons CARR’S SWEET BISCUITS

in Sealed Tins
SARDINES SWEETS in Bottles %
TABLE BUTTER SOUTH AFRICAN JAMS §



in Tins and Bottles %
GUAVAS in tins

COOKING BUTTER
LIPTON’S TEA

3
LIPTON’S COFFEE RAPES te Ts 3
Giienasa APRICOTS in Tins

GOLD BRAID RUM PEACHES in Tins

CANADA DRY SODAS

PHone—(()DDARDS—we pvetiver

‘





PO











FRIDAY, JULY 27,

__

Postpone Bill To |
Control Elections

1951



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
Welcome New |
Industries Bill |





Temple Yard Considered
For Temporary Market
THE ST. MICHAEL'S VESTRY will at some future |

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY at their meeting yesterday,

passed with amendments 33

sections of a Bill to make pro-|

vision for the direction and supervision of the election of
members to serve in the House: the procedure at such
elections and for other purposes connected therewith. The

House considered and postp

Section 28 of the Bill dealing
with the prchibition of selling in-
toxicating liquor by liquor licensed
places and clubs on polling day,
was the cause ‘of much discus-
sion. Tiaere were those who con-
sidered the section was an abso-
lute necessity for the orderly car-
rying on of the election, while
others thought if would be penal-
isiyg rum shopkeepers.

The section was finally passed
by an 8 to 5 division.

An amendment at the request
of Mr. G. H. Adams for the de-
letion of sub-section 4 was agreed
to

Voting for the section were Mr.
Miller, Mr. Cox, Dr. Cummins,
Mr. Adams, Mr. Brancker, Mr.
Garner, Mr. Lewis and Mr.
Haynes.

Against were: Mr. Bethell, Mr.
Allder, Mr. Mottley, Mr. Reece
end Mr. Goddard.

The section now reads:

“No intoxicating liquor shall bo
sold, offered for sale or given
away at any premises to which a
licence issued under the Liquor
Licences Act, 1908, applies at any
time between the opening and the
closing of the polls on polling day,
in any constituency for which an
election is being held,

“No intoxicating liquor shall be
supplied to any person on the
premises of any club at any time
between the opening and the clos-
ing of the polls Gn polling day in
any constituency for which an
election is being held.

“Any person who contravenes
any of the provisions of either
the last two preceding sections
shall, be liable on conviction by a
Court of Summary Jurisdiction to
a fine of five hundred dollars or
to inmyprisonment for six months.”

Clause 20 states that

1. “At the hour fixed for opening
the poll the presiding officer and
the poll clerk shall, in the pres-
ence of the candidates, their
agents, and such of the electors
as are present, open the ballot box
and ascertain that there are no
ballot papers or other papers there-
in, after which the box shall be
locked, and the presiding officer
shall keep the key thereof; the box
Shall be placed on a table in full
view of all present and shall be
maintained there until the close
of the poll.

2. Immediately after the ballot
box is so locked, «the presiding ,
officer shall call upon the electors +
to vote. :

3. The presiding officer shall
secure the admittance of every
elector into the polling station, and
shall see that they are not impeded
or molested at or about the polling
station.”

Mr. Lewis (L) felt that the
boxes should be sealed, He said
that he knew that in addition to
locking. boxes there was some
method of sealing them. He be-
lieved that the Presiding Officer
used to do this although it was not
specified, and he hoped it would
continue.

Merely locking it meant noth-
ing. “You can buy a dozen keys
in Bridgetown to unlock the same
lock,” he said. “You should seal
it so that one could tell whether
it had been tampered with,”

Mr. Miller (L) said he would ask
them to consider the amendment.
He thought it should be specifi-
cally stated that the boxes should
be sealed.

Mr. Adams (L) said that there
was provision in the Ballot Act for

sealing boxes and instructions
were issued to the| Presiding
Officer. There was no point in

writing in something which was
not needed.

In Clause 21, a motion by
Mr. J. E. T. Brancker (C) raised
much discussion.

Clause 21 stated:

1. “Notwithstanding
visions of Rule 13 of the

the pro-
Rules

for elections contained in
Schedule A of the Baliot Act,
1931, the presiding officer, at

the request of any blind elector:
who has taken the oath in the form
set out as Form No. 10 in the
Schedule to this Act and who is
accompanied by a friend who is an
elector in the polling division,
shall permit such friend to accom-
pany the blind elector -into the|

oned section 21 of the Bill.

the ability to read and write. They
would be opening a door to abso-
jute non-secret election. They
were not So ‘illiterate that they
needed any special symbols or
friends to vote for them,

As soon as they had that, he
said, one candidate took nold of
everybody and things would not
go the right way. .

“You would be upsetting the
secrecy of the ballot and opening
the door for abuse,” he said, Noth-
ing could be more dangerous than

to do that. He hoped the members | Sk

of the House who had been mem-
bers for long periods, would teil
of the dangers of the proposed
amendment,

Mr. Lewis said he was perfectly

willing to risk a bling man taking J

a friend, but so far as any person
who could not read or write was
concerned, he felt the sheriff
should look after that, The sheriff
would feel that there might be a
trick in it if a man came to him
saying that he could not réad and
write and not being sure whether
he could read and write, he would
be accurate,

“fam more willing to risk the
presiding officer to make a mistake
rather than having the whole num-
ber of electors being chaperoned
into the ballot booth.

Mr. Haynes (E) said that when
a man was illiterate he became
suspicious and would feel more
confident with a friend than with
a presiding officer. He seconded the
motion for the amendment.

Mr. W. A. Crawford (C) said
that in the 1931 Ballot- Act, the
Presiding Officer was permitted
to vote for anyone who was in-
capacitated by blindness or other
physical cause.

“We might, in this case, use the
same phraseology in permitting a
friend to vote,.for someone who
was either blind or incapacitated
by any other physical cause” he
said.

Mr. G. H. Adams (L) said that
he was not in the island when the
Attorney General drafted the Bill.
He had however talked with him
since his return and he (the At-
torney General) assured him that
he had drafted it with the most
up to date legislation on the mat-
ter before him.

He felt that if the Attorney
General had left out anything that
appeared in previous local legis-
lation on the matter, he had a
sound reason for doing so. .

He appealed to honourable
members to let the section remain
as it was,

Mr. W. W. Reece (E) said that
the section only affected blind



persons and persons who could
neither read nor write, He
wanted to know if previous

legislation affecting people who
were otherwise physically incapac-
itated would still stand:

If that legislation was going to
be repealed, he would not agree
with it berause he saw no reason
why a man who, for example, hyd
lost his hands, should not be able
to cast his vote.

Mr. L. E. R. Gill (E) said that
as far as he could see, the Gov-
ernment was differentiating be-
tween a blind person and a person
who was illiterate, He could see
no reason for such differentiation.

Mr. A. E. S. Lewis (L) drew
honourable members’ attention to
section 39 of the Bill which said:
“The provisions of this Act shall
be deemed to be supplementary
to the provisions of the Represent-
ation of the People Act, 1901, and
the Ballot Act, 1931, and the pro-
visions of these Acts shall apply
accordingly.

“Provided that in the case of
conflict or inconsistency, the pro-
visions of this Aet shall prevail
over the provisions of those Acts”.

After listening to the debate, he
said that it would be right if they
were to delete section 21 from
the Bill and let the Sheriff vote
for the blind as well as those
persons who could neither read
nor write as was done previously.

Mr. Adams (L) asked leave to
withdraw his motion that section
21 stand vert of the Bill.

Mr. Crawford (C) said that he
did not agrec with that. Since in
Great Britain, the Blind Persons

voting compartment and mark the| Act of 1933 permitted. blind per-
electors’ ballot paper for him, No’ sons to use their friend to vote for
person shall at any election be al- them. There was no reason why
lowed to act as the friend of more|18 years after, similar privilege
than one blind elector. should not be extended to blind |
2. Any friend who is permitted: people in Barbados,
to mark the ballot paper of a blind| The question that leave be
elector es aforesaid shall first be| granted the honourable member
required to take an oath in wae ites St. Jeseph was then put to
form set out as Form No. 11 in the! the vote and resolved in the nega-
Schedule to this Act that he will] tive by a 6—9 division.
keep secret the mame of the can- Mr. Adams (L) told the Com-
didate for whom the ballot of such| mittee that it had been drawn to
blind elector is marked by him, fhis attention that there was a way |
and that he has not already acted [in which they could compromise ,
as the friend of a blind elector for}by using the English methcd
the purpose of marking his ballds | whereby a friend could go along
paper at the pending election. with the elector to see that thc}
8. Whenever any elector has had| Presiding Officer did not make al
his ballot paper marked as pro-| mistake,

date
ment for their permission

ary wall to Drumm Street,
The Commissioners of

to the St. Michael's Vestry,
Yard be taken and covered t

report is gone into, The fir

Mr. Mottley M.C.P,
motion to the effect. «f:
that market would
the numerous hawkers at present
uSing the several streets, pave-
ments and alleys of the immediate
“ay area.

r. J. P, O'Mahony, Director of
Medical Services, Mr. Rit!
inner, Director of Highways and
Transport, Mr. T. E, Went, M.B.E..
Colonial Engineer, and Colonel

I. Michelin, Commissioner of
Police attended the meeting on
invitation to give their views,
Opening the discussion, Myr,
M. Kidney, Chairman, explained
that the meeting had been sum-
moned as a result of a motion
made by Mr. Mottley to discuss







the providing of a temporary
market at the site known as
Temple Yard.

Suitable Sites
Under the Act of 1948-36, he
said, the Vestries are empowered
to make recommendations of suit-
able sites and to provide estimates

decide whether or not they will
é and funds to make Temple Yard,
extending from Upper Cheapside opposite St. Mary’s bound-
; Health of the parish unanimously
decided at their meeting yesterday to send an interim report
negotiations relative to the site proposed in the first interim

a vegetable market at Tudor Street.

stating that! removing
accommodate Yard.

: J ; . }as its object the establishment and H.E. the Governor, Sir Alfri strain quickly end effectively. Remeny-
made a things that had to be conside ed ut | development of new industries in/Savage in the presence of ti ber, it is this strain on the system which
Se Suis, two, |e Island ; ; Executive Committee yesierd: constitutes the biggest danger from
the hawker and three, the ques- | 3 As far as the industries them-] presented the Imperial Servic Asthma! P
tion of health. seives are concerned, I think that]Medal to Mr, Evan Alphin § Ephazone contains several healing
Regarding the public, he sa everything possible should be done]/Aubyn McAlister, retired Po

approach Gove rh-] THREE City businessmen told the Advocate yesterday

that they welcome the introduction by Government of the
New Industries Bill. Not having yet read the Bill, how
ever, they were unable to make any specific comments as
to its provisions.
Mr. Trevor Bowring of Messrs. Da. Costa & Co., Ltd
said:
care think that everybody
interested in the social and econo-
mic development of Barbados will
welcome the Bil] recently intro-
}duced by the Government, having

a temporary vegetable market. |

&-

recommending that the Temple
emporarily until such time that



choking Asthma makes you

| WHEN
gasp for breath, one Ephazone

tablet slipped in the mouth cases the


























MCALISTER GETS
SERVICE MEDAL

st interim report recommended |







“to

agents which dissolve the strangling,
germ-laden accumulations

encourage them, provided

t the
1ature of the industry

is indigen-

jthe market would be at a i

1 man-Sorter, General Post Office ;
near a bus stand, near to a park- Mr. McAlister wos awarded ¢} m Me







[ Aug, SBot and near to the meat and | PU to the island, by which I mean|Imperial Service Medel on h bronchial tubes, and in this way promotes

jfish markets, The new marke

,would relieve the Town of the|{rniture making, oil production, tion of his twenty five year i i I hong

| ; ri g¢ Be year nothing to inhale. No matter how swiftly or ur
|hawkers—thereby easing con hipbuilding, canning and bottling faithful service in the Public Se : oe 72

ia} Of agricultural products growa
lof the insanitary conditions whic! | tocally, and of course the tourist
|now exist in the streets oceupied | “ade, which, after the sugar in-
by them | Gustry, is one of cur biggest assets
| Colonel Michelin recommended |®"®d which necessitates the provi-
that they first try out the project; Sion of modern hotels to cater for
and then if it

' tion—and at the same time g attack comes, there is always tim: to che



vice of this Island

Will Lecture On Cricket

Mr. ‘Jack Kidney wil] lectur







. sort is liable istur: rma}| Sunday, August 5
good suggestion, if the | is liable to disturb the norma!





c site was| ow “ t ¢ vf "Ge e team is J. Graham (Capt.)
of cost for the approval of the| $0ing to be permanently used as a | pereusione eat ee oes she E. on. reton. J. Lorde. W r — -
Governor-in-Executive Committee | Market. B * I sponsors. “Moreover. unless the| Grandison, S. Headley Elcock | & S9%9sees ‘ PLEO POPP OCS >
or district markets, Public Urinals | question is handled ‘on a regional]. White, L. Gibbs, C. Clarke |& ‘
This Board is fully aware of| He said that the buildings at! basis it is quite possible for|W- Stoute, and D, Agard
the very unsatisfactory conditions| the entrance of the street should | Barbados to find itself competing| Twelfth man will be St. c
existing of hucksters using the| be acquired and added “if we have lin a limited market with epi | Downes
highway, streets and alleys for} market, we should have lavat ory 1 eds ia ‘ } ‘ —

selling their Soods, thereby caus-|
Ing a condition that is not only

unsightly, but insanitary,” Mr,
Kidney said,
Mr. Mottley, after welcoming

the Heads of Departments present,
said he was quite aware that they
could not commit Government on
anything they said that day, but
he would welcome any assistance
from them by way of an expres-
sion of opinion.



recently established ir
Jamaica, Trinidad, or the othe
slands, the result of which would
9e ~6to)6hUrender§ «these — particula
industries uneconomic
Late Start
Mr. G, H. King of Messrs
Gardiner Austin & Co, Ltd, we!
comes the Bill, He thinks, however
that it is somewhat late for Bai
badés, as Jamaica, Trinidad and
other colonies have long had sucti

accommodation.” Th e alleys |
which were being used as market |‘
streets have become public |;
urinals and are in a very insani-|‘
tary condition. With proper toilet
facilities, he said, it would make
an excellent site for a market
“Even in London”, he said,
“there are certain streets where
traffic is not allowed to pass and
they are used for market stree :
if that is good enough for London,

GRAND SESSIONS

There will be no sitting of th
‘ourt of Grand Sessions today
"he next sitting will be on Monda
July 30 and the court will beg
1 10 o’cloek in the morning



BLIND SCHOOL

aa a



He reminded members that the
Board was acting in a dual
capacity as Commissioners of
Health and as a Committee ap-
pointed by the Vestry to make
recommendations relative to mar-
kets, as was empowered under the
amended Vestry Act 1911-5, As
Health Commissioners, he said,
they were fully conscious of the
insanitary and unsatisfactory con-
ditions under which hawkers]
offered their ware in and around!
the City,

The Commissioners, he said,
had already submitted an interim |
report to the Vestry which was
sent to Government, relative to
the acquisition of a site in the
Tudor Street area for the erection
of one of the City markets. “My!
motion, today, does not seek to
negative in anyway that recom-!
mendation, but is recommendiny|
a temporary arrangement.” }

This, he said, was brought about |
as a result of the police who, in'
trying to cope with the ever in-|
creasing problem of traffic, were!
always getting after the hawke
who invariably found him (Mr. |
Mottley) to make appeals on their}
behalf,

Exposed To Sun

He thought or this suggestion |
Lecause not only did the hawkers }
have nowhere to sell after pur-
chasing their licences, but when



|



they did sell in the alleys they |

were exposed to the sun and rain]
which he thought was something |
of which no one, conscious of his!
responsibility to the community, |
could be proud. '

The Temple Yard area was a
street 263 teet long and 34 feet
wide. There were only about four
places in the street that
had to use it as an entrance. |
He thought that that via swt
could be closed to vehicu-
lar traffic, with arrangements be-
ing made for those people who
occupied premises abutting there-}
on.

“IT feel that nothing should be
done to remove hawkers unless a
covering of some sort is erected
over this area to protect these
people from the weather,” he
said. He then invited members to
visit the Temple Yard.

Dr. J. P. O'Mahony said that he
was of the opinion that they
would have a very congested mar-
ket if they were going to accom-
modate about 390 people in it.
“That congestion will cause in~
san&ary conditions that you will
not be able to get over so easily,
he said.



Lesser Evil

Mr, Mottley asked if they would
not prefer that lesser evil to the
most unsatisfactory and insani-
tary conditions which now exist in
Busby Alley. “Over 100 hawkers
occupy that street,” he said. —

Dr. O'Mahony further pointed
out that the area Temple Yard
was approximately 8,942 sq. ft.,
and it was possible but not prob-
able that the whole area would be
available to them.

If however that they get the
whole area, he said, there would
be approximately 25 sq. ft. to a
hawker. They should remember
that people would have to go to
the market to purchase and they

s;the erecting of a central















it is good enough for Bridgetown.” | a Bill in operation, : His Excellency the Governo

Mr. A. R. Toppin said that he} “With such a late | start,’ he Sir Altred Savage will open ¥
was not altogether convinced: that | said, “it may now be difficult for|School for the Blind today at the %
it was the best place or the most new industries here to find, at any Hurd Memorial Ss hool which is a x
central spot for a market. If the rate for some time, a market for|James Street, The function wil 1$
Police felt that it. would drive | their products. begin at 12 noon,
eet ein hawkers es ri “On the other hand, however, if nitirnnching
thee thevey occupy in the City, |the Bill which I have not yet seen,
ae should try it out temporarily | p-ovides assistance to the Hotel STILL DETAINED
before they spent a lot of money adustry so that the tourist trade 7
on it. Then, if it should be suita-! 19° oe Si aa >] ing could} ,..Daisley Evelyn oi Maxweli %
ble, he said, they could spend (can be developed, nothing coulc Christ. Church ith Ward

’ 5 , . rl spenc > 2 sine > ‘ . es -
some money on it. He was not be ‘Gn dat aoe cist trade as Government Hill, st Michael an $ You ‘re alavays welcome at
recommending that they should J pagare ; eee ind try Seewell Layne of Christ Churet
spend a lot of money by putting/CUr Second aTipaveene ae jal Were still detained at the General Wo 1 7
up sheds over it at once. a ae Pt a i nt shoul Hospital yesterday after they were N (j

- Ui ‘hy: : > given to develop it, ‘ed when the bus M-361 in

Mr. Victor Chase said he felt Teaicel % : \ __ | injurec | AG e .
that it was going to frustrate an Assistance to the Hotel Indus which they were driving, struck AR e eae .
original scheme of getting a try would in the first instance be telephone poie on Strearn Poad. $LOCLOLLOLOD OE EEEP OGL OO POCO OS BOO”,
istrict tiaviest 4 ~ Street. |& means of finding employment i
He felt dank thay ilar haat with jfor a large number of our carpen- | (Ses power SS LLORES LE LOLOL LLL LPL LLLP LLLP LM
limited sunélieas” at ect Yard )ters, masons, engineers, labourers,

AT.

WEATHERHEAD'S

You SAVE $1.00 a tin on

KLIM
POWDERED MILK

Fresh Stock at...

REDUCED PRICE

because they had already had a/ ete. Secondly, the tourist business

market in the vicinity which was q Which would result would provide

failure. He felt that they should work for an equally large number
try out the project to see if it/of butlers, maids, cooks, and other
would be a success. “If it is going] essential helpers, '

to be an alternative for the sug- “IT sincerely hope the present
gestions that we have taken pains} Bill is the one we have long been
to form sometime ago relative to expecting.” Mr. King ended,

in Tuder Stroct. | : aa Employment

in udor street, am not going to ’ 2 " ao

Rive the motion my support”, he! ». wee OT udor of Me re J. o }

said ; aie & Co., also wacom. the

ral 7 ; : | Bill, “I consider that the establish-

ieee = bd if they built | ment of any new industries here
1S arxet and did not force the) would be an asset to the island.”

people to use it, they would never he said, “It would be a means of |
employment for a

yne “
ce



SPORT

Puncheons Repaired



make use of it. finding
jmany people who are at present

Mr. T. H. Wilkinson said that unemployed, YESTERDAY'S PRICE
for six months of the year, cooper “Who can tell, it might be the oi &% 98. a3 ti ye 1
repair puncheons in the temple | means of reducing the cost of yuo: Per tin &
Yard, and so the people oecupyin; some articles, It all depends upon

TO-DAY'S PRICE
$5.98 per tin

the market would have tu put up
with a terrific noise, “if tre
street is used as a market,” He
said, “the Government shoud
take over the cooperage.”” Without
covering the market, he said. jt
would be of no use.

Replying, Mr. Mottiey said he
very much appreciated tne candid
expression of opinion by the four

the kind of industries that would
be established.”

Like Mr. King, Mr, Tudor think:
that the Bill is somewhat late i:
view of the lead that Trinidad
Jamaica and some other colonic
have. “What people have got to
find out now is what new indus
tries are going to be advantageou



YOU’LL WANT
TO WEAR

also -

DELICIOUS SWEET
BISCUITS



EE
Soo
ot S



Yard without agreeing to recom-
mend that the area be
would not meet with his



ada saan ces get ate ad, here,” he said, “I honestly think
Sopclait the Com putanee that this question is going to bel! 10c. per pk. in cellophane e
Police who seemed atwavs so wil]-|one of the Aire hh wits 3 CUSTARD CREAMS {
ing to cooperate, those de sirous of establishing ney

But he said that any suggestion| industries will have to grapple. MILK AND HONEY { SHIRTS
to remove tihe people to Temple GINGER SNAPS ‘ he

OS

CURRENT PUFFS

NEILSON’S

covered,! shillings and pence. To cover this

in Cream,
approval.{urea would be a _ bagatalle witt



He would prefer to withdraw his} what was either recently carriec 7.
motion, away, strayed or arrested from veru, Brown,
“Mr. Chase hag suid that he dors Government.” Rose B “ae ai eae
reas ' se Buds 12¢. bar
not see the necessity of spending; The Board then unanimously Buds Yellow, Rust,

Nut Rolls 12¢. bar
Cherry Creme 12c. bax
Malted Milk 12¢, bar

MOIRS'

Pineapple 11e¢. bar
Buddies tle. bar

} Peppermint Patties
Ile. bar

so much money for covering the| decided to adopt Mr, Mottley’s
area,” said Mr. Mottley, “but {| motion and recommended that oa
want to remind him that he enn-| further interim report
not think of the comfort and
health of the people in pounds

Green,

Dark Brown

be sent to
‘4e Vestry to be transmitted to the
Government,

SS

$5.21 & $5.98

INSIST ON



POODSPS OS SOO F OSS FOSS SSS

"“ PURINA CHOWS

| JACOBS CREAM
. THEY ARE THE BEST |

\

|

Crackers $1.64

$2.91 to $5.58



|

8 ae
ba H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. - Agents
SERB ERB BRERA

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
iAMITED

44, PEPE OLS GOOLE

Ij





|
|

















vided in subsections (1) and (2)

At this stage the Committee re-| would have an extremely con-





HEETS

of this section, the presiding officer| ported progress









|) FINEST














PAGE

Noth

Is unsatisfactory | the increasing number of winter|members of the newly form fi —
from every point of view, wash i: | Visitors, Commonwealth Cricket Club o “ )
out. He felt that the public w ld | Careful Thought “Cricket” at their clib room o a PHAZS ,
Set accustomed to the new market; “When it comes ta the establish-] Monday, July 30, at 4.45 pom 1 e dees thd
after a time. ment of industries designed to The following will represe: Sold by all registered chemisis. If any diMiculty,

Mr. V. C. Gale, M.L.C., said that compete with those of the big]the Commonwealth Cricket Clu A. §. BAYDEN & SONS LTD.,
he thought the site could be used industrial countries of the world {iM 4 cricket match against Bell P.O, Box 403, Bridgetown,
as a market place. “It is wide and/T think careful consideration is re-]Plaine Club at Belleplaine, St Pe eT ye eRe
Mr. “Motley nae pine a very | duired, as competition of this] Andrew, on Sunday, July 29 an












*k Asthma with Ephazone.

~

write to:

FIVE

‘How to ease the strain in 3O seconds




ig tO inject,
ectediy the

For rapid relief from Asthma, I}ronchitis and Bronchial Catarch,
always keep a supply of Ephazone tablets handy!

FOR ASTHMA AND BRONCHITIS TAKE






ee

each
each
each
yard
yard

yard

each

|
and asked for) gested area. “It would be so con-| . , gy 7 vs " OTTON SUPpETC
shall énter,in the certified copy of}leave to sit again. The House gested, that quite a number of f MERE uw iD OrVE 4s? | (REXWEAR) COTTON ay ae
the register opposite the elector’s| then adjourned for dinner. people would not go shah ie Rie | 80 x 100 a $7.86
name in addition to any other} On resumption, sections 22 to! chase; and if the peste feet go - . (REXWEAR)
requisite entry, the reason why|34 were considered and passed ane than aned ‘ he said. I INE FOODS Ox 6G 91.07
ee ee ee Oe |. oar Maas acai. coats ME Te aca tek tik | (REXWEAR)
Mr. Brancker wanted an amend- Monda ] “s the idea was for the Board to 63 x 904 $5.99
ment made so that an illjterate| + yi choose of the two evils, as Direc-| AND
person could also eae tor of auerey oe he TICK
friend to accompany him into the would choose the Temple Yard. : :
aha compartment and mark the ALLIES AGREE TO Mr. T. E, Went said that if the FINE DRINKS DAMASK TICK : io
elector’s ballot paper for him. market could not properly accom- é 86 tis, Wide Gi $2.58
He moved that vesides “At the| REDS CEASE-FIRE | mocate 400 people, but could com. e \ In Our Linen Dept. Gun Cotes
‘ anv d ele 7 rta acc , Y 7 ley .
Seda Cad, Mint cane aloctie whe @ from page 1 it would be worthwhile erecting i ||| Mlartoll Brandy Cockade um | FANCY TICK :
oe ee et and write.” j Mr. A. B. Skinner asked/|/ DANISH SALAMI SAUSAGK-—-ver lb. .............. $1.41 56 ins. wide @ . $2.18
* Mr. Mottley (E) sald that that] SUPervision of tieir observaace| whether it would not be possible CAMEMBERT CHE®S1-—per tin $1.19 BLACK & WHITE TICK
eet Saree ae 4 very neces-|@Tangements as regards to warl| for other people to get tipences |) »_ GORGONZOLA CHEESE—per Ib $1.14 56 i me 7 $9.46
BIEREEAADS | SORNEd) vaherift* prisoners, and hawk ware in the places/!! CRAWFORD'S UFILLIT BISCUITS—per tin n $1.47 o% ins. wide 52.46
wey aebadlley notiulan in’ wen | AB Tuba, wineticig’ started. formerly occupied by the hawkers! || CRAWFORDS CLUB CHEFS “yTRAW.S per tin’. $1.12 Va
said, “actually refusing to id {Communists abandoned any insis-| that would be removed to Temple |!{ PLANTERS COCKTAIL PEANUTS—per tin 96e PILLOW CASES
for people who were not altogether! tance on the question of withdraw-| Yard. He got the answer red SUN PAT COCKTAIL PEANUTS—per tin 68¢ Seema ee
blind, but could not vote forling foreign troops from Korea to|the Police would look over that. SUN PAT SALTED CASHEW NUTS—per tin $1.06 COTTON PILLOW ¢€ ASES
themselves.” be made a programme or agenda Breach of Law SUN PAT SALTED ALMONI per tin $1.25 19x 30 @ $1.45
Mr. Adams said that that ques-| item. The North Korean General, | Colonel R. T. Michelin said that. | COCKTAIL ONIONS —4 Colou per Jar 80¢
tion had been considered very;Nam Il, opened the meeting by as Mr. Mottley had said, the||| DUTCH ASPARAGUS TIPS—per tin om ya
carefully by the Government. | asking the views of Vice-Admiral,| fs wyers wore committing a breach ||| BALLANTINES WHISKY old aa (: ! \] herd \ ( 0 | td
“We have come to the conclu-|C. Turner Joy, Chief U.N. of law when they occupied the| PERLSTEIN BEER — i8c. per bottle — $4.00 per Carton. ave | 1ep) : WN UO... i000,
sion,” he said, “that there could on’ the compromise!
be nothing more dangerous than
this smendment.”

What was illiteracy? What was

| negotiator

troduced on Wednesday.

Police did not remove them.

proposal of the Communists, Bat as it was their livelihood, the

—U.P.

He that

said

there were three



\|| STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.













10, 11, 12, 13 Broad Street





PRINTED DESIGNS including Africa Prints and
other Floral Patterns from

HARRISON'S —- eroan streer

‘





7 eee







~~ i








PAGE SIX

BY CARL ANDERSON



HENRY





















é “4 P NONSENSE! I've GOT DUST THE 5
THING FOR WOU! a â„¢
2% i ——— wv . \/ GAwRSH!









HOUSE Foz VER eS ies

RENT? .. z
5 tC ny Ene 9 NO,» Z
ae my ag
ALCATS <

2)
“6

TAT TTT
ey HAIN
aa NSO


















WELL, I MIGHT
AS WELL LIE DOWN

» AND TAKE A NAP

AN FOR TWO OR THREE
yO YEARS
S22

7 NO-YOu'RE
a TOO OLD FOR





7






THE LONE RANGER

Piss
a BATES HURT?
< . : | {



eee Q
WE'LL SEND THE BOYS OUT FOR THE
MASKED MAN WHO RODE AWAY WITH)
BATES

J] WE'VE LOST THE CHANCE
fa TO LEARN AGOUT ALL
Y THE CROOKS IN

BR PATESVILLE



- ; _—— gr

BRINGING UP FATHER



———— =~.





























rr ae Pp Core ‘
5 a

yr etherstaneennpita PS {

GUE ey NRE | AH! MR. JIGGS! ee ee ee tears o >

HERE COMES PROFESSOR AM I GLAD TO I'M GORRY- EXTRAORDINARY Y” || 60 AMI-YOoU BY GOLLY-THIS

MEL, O'OSE - IT HAVE A SEE YOu-1'D BUT IAM |] THIS WILL A SEE -I GOT ALLERGY 16 A

HUNCH HE'LL WANT ME LIKE YOU TO ALLERGIC i rf

GREAT HELP To



TO GO TO ONE OF HIS ATTEND MY TO S- M& -I MUST FINE
CONCERTS - I'VE GOT TO CONCERT- =I THEY AFFECT Out iy re as
THINK FAST TOG TOUT HAVE A FIFTy- THE DE@UMS MEANS /
OF IT? ——->) PIECE OF MY BARS! | Waitin iT . Poet seat \
ed ( \_ BAND! os wit |
7 ere s > —_, ¥
Ry / ve Wa, aad WR in

A











HAZARD

a nes) oe

{i
Pe Ac
'

| RECT HEE AWHILE...
fs ) {
’ N-NO, GAHIB...OMIe
NOT H-HURT / O-ONLY »)
LITTLE TiRED / J

JOHNNY








40! VAT

BY FRANK



TILL YOU GET YOUR
| BZEATH / CAN'T THANK
YOU ENOUGH... YOU
GAVED My LIFE # +

~ TF gs




SANE OMIR'S * L-HERE
COMES MASTER /

oni2! You
ALL RIGHT? NOT



IS NOTHING, GAHIB... ¥
ONLY M-MAYBE NOW YOU






















OH, HIM, HE'S A DRIP/

60 I DID... BUT THAT WAS
TLL NEVER GO OUT WITH .

ME SO! YOU JUST |] BECAUSE I MET “THE GREAT
You"/ OH, MOTHER, T WISH 4

THIS 16 THE 7 GOOD.
ADDRESS, (WAIT
YOU COULD MEET HIM!

| SiR...

A GOOD
TIME, BUT I DON'T LIKE
THAT BOy, JEFF KING/

BY LEE FALK & RAY







\ 1
i J
wat j y /
hey
“i ey, .

iA eer

ae Fs



|



YEON 8G OOO 4 SO ph gpl pK hie x ao
PPP APE OE EG SEECEE POOL PPA? PSP AF OPE LEE ELS EEE

LSPS SSP OSS FO POS SPS CSS SOO SSCS

PPS POD

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



A

FRIDAY,

27,

JULY

1951



BUY

PEEK

FREAN

BISCUITS
TO-DAY.

,

\RVINGS

YEAST-VITE

If you have a pain you don’t have to wonder
what to take. You must take YEAST-VITE
Tablets. YEAST-VITE is the ONLY pain
reliever which ALSO contains the tonic Vitamin
By. You will be overjoyed with the result. Your
pain will vanish quickly, and you'll feel ever so
much better.

For HEADACHES, NERVE PAINS,
COLDS, CHILLS, RHEUMATIC PAINS

“'YEAST-Vi

is a registered Trade Mork



The Only Pain Reliever
containing Vitamin B,

|

et

$ RELIEVES
3 YOUR PAIN
2 and

Ss

3

s

MAKES YOU
FEEL WELL

LISA L SA

SLL ILL LLL SS

3

LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH

— Also —
GALV. OIL CANS —1, 2

———

Established
1860



T. HERBERT Ltd.

1) & 1\ ROEBUCK STREET,

& 5 Glin, Sizes

Incorporated
1926

REMINDER



TRADE MARK

of the Chesebrough Mfg. Co., Cons’d







Bottles Grolsch Beer

oe






nye ee

RACON and HAM
DELICIOUS AUSTRALIAN
Streaky Bacon ...

Cold Sliced Danish Ham

BRANDY
Nips of South African Brandy

eis

Tins Kardomah Coffee

»....... $1.20 per Ib (Sliced)
$1.07 per Ib (by the Slab)97c. per Ib (per Case)

“ Basen’ VW 24Es> Megas &
Agee ¥ Ras Ue al

Usually

(4)

Pkgs. Custard Cream Biscuits

per Ib



Excellent For the Hot Weather

Bots. Roses Orange Squash

Lemon Squash

Lime Juice Bots. Keiller’s Lime Juice
Cordial Cordial
Robinson's Orange Bots. Keiller's Orange Squash
Barley Water Bots. Brooks Orange Squash |

“YOUR GROCERS”

Bots. Robinson's Lime
Barley Water



HIGH STREET

GOES SOSCOOOOOS>



S34, 6506"

Now

95 86 Pkgs. Jack Straws

51

24





JUICES

Bots. Brooks Lime Juice
Cordial
Bots. Appella Apple Juice
Tins Bahamas Orange Juice
» Trinidad Orange Juice
» Trinidad Grapefruit
Juice
Tins Trinidad Mixed Juice
» Pure Grape Juice—
(Purple or White)
Tins Tomato Cocktail Juice
Dessert Prunes
—(1t tins) also per Ib



PHONE US

o> RS ee

VASELINE is the registered trade mark



ss SSS

SO = : SS SSS

PPLE LE LL EEE LEE ELE SPE PPE PPD SLPS PEP PPE PEC EP PLE PEELE PAELLA ELPA OPP LP EPL OTES
*

|
ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO, LTD.

<
LFLS EPL FFF FFE SFOS OSSD

4®@ Tins Gloria Evap. Milk 29

18 Cakes Ivory Soap

-



4

Pe CL Se
Bec a

ith “

OE ESO

For SLIM figure

bright eyes
and radiant
complexion










The healthy way to keep
#im and youthful is to
take Bile Beans. They
cleanse your system of
the impurities that cause
“ putting on weight,”
i liverishness,

To look and feel at
your very best start tak-
ing Bile Beans, just a
couple at bedtime,

Take

BILE
BEANS

Nature’s Gentle Aid














Magnificent Photo Cards
of Modern British Cars!
Ty |



FLAKES “= <<

Every 8-ounce packet contains 2
photo cards. (Full set, 40 cards)

UR BEST

















Usually NOW

61 50

27





Se

Tins of NESTLES HOMO-
GENTSED BABY FOODS

in Custard, Liver Soup,
Prunes with Cereal, Bone
and Vegetable Broth. .
Meat and Vegetable Broth,
Tomato Soup, Carrots,
Srinach and Peas

WE DELIVER

LLLP EAL LLL LOLI

6544366 66

FLIGOSS SE LFF LES FD



x

FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN































































a.
- '
~ £54566 66,4, %5F,% FF tt, Cyt, 654} ’
i UBL re SALES OFFICIAL NOTICE | {SSS699999599999559999%
. Q ; i s —
Te cents per agate line m week-days'| BARBADOS . ie NOTICE 3
PnONs 2508 e 12 cents per te line on Sundays, IN CHANCE RY) i & N :
coe minimum charge $1.50 on week-days In pur ce of the Chancery Act, 1906, 1 do hereby give notic all persons | & > |
sagen) hy pater | affecting the property herematter property of the defendant) to bring 1X We bes to notify our custorsers B i
The charge for announcements a| FOR RENT | be r an account of their claims w witnesses scumer and vouchers | * that cur Parts. Depa teeee MES Be R $
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknowl- 4 | to be ed by me en any Tuesday or Fr between the hours of 12 noon and » oe — ae — x 3
edgments, and In Memoriam notices 1s mid . 13 the afternoon at the Regist: Office, Public Buildings, Bridgetown, eos we Ay a a
$:.50 on week-davs and 31.80 on Sundays| Minimum charoe week “> eonte and REAL ESTATE hater th day of September. 1951 in order that su amen tai tos cuneate ot our Repair and Service Depart. % 5
for any number of words up %6 and otis ie 4 ts = oor RR | and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof r tively, otherwise such | gs ments will be closed trom the =
° yord m week-days and ls 3 « : rd . 4 cents a mates a ‘ . *% swe date for two weeks annual .
3 cents per word on yersons be precluded from the benefits of any dec and be deprived of all ‘ ; 2
‘ 2 s ' ' S holiday, Ther ill be keleton &
4 cents per word on Sundays for each; © "re On Nun days ted at Maxwell | ciaims or acainst the said property. j * oe Oe . 7. a skeleto :
ariditional word, Price reason: | PLAINTIFF: JACQUES HUMPHREY | 1% sts duty for emergencies, ;
Peery inipereionee rer ore se oe a eT . Phone DEFENDANT: ANNA LORRA SPENCER ' % . ?
| HOUSF 40] PROPERTIES: FIRSTLY ALL THAT certain piece parcel of land situate at! \% COLE &@ CO., LEB., ;
SFS Greens in the parish of St. Gec Isiand of Barbados afor.- | BA 4 FR —
DIED | DWELLING HOUSE with 1,944 s said containing by admeasureme irty > perches Abutting Ms ¥ an OBYN OTe ha. §
| io ato d situate at Cypress ind bounding on two Sides or wis of Alphonsa Hoppin = re s 7
MAYNARD: On 27th July 1951, at 10.39 eames a pea el. The house contains Drawing of May Atkins and on a road or however else the same may abut and | PLL +
: AT « 1 : aur awit , f a ! } SAE PLL LOS
p.m. at his residence “Valentino | ey . — and Dini Rooms, two bedrooms and | bound and SECONDLY ALU THA® certain piece or parcel of land | t
Rock r gustine | _ ‘ eis Yn | CoRVeniences downstairs. Two bedrooms | situate at Greens in the parish of St rge and Island of Ba arbados | peers coe aes carmermunmies ee seenerwl i
) Mi 1 cial | =9.; 51--t.f£.n.| upstairs, Government water and electric aforesaid containing by admeasurement one acre two roods Abutting |
2 Assem- | eer ——-—~ | light installed and bounding on lands of Drax Hall Plantation on lands of F, F. he | $
above resi- | | Tr above property wiil be set up for | Gill on lands of G. T. Forde and on the public road or however else |
> for Sharon | FoR SALE sale by Public competition at our office | th, same may abwt and bound Together with the messuage or | z
James Street on Friday, 27th July 1951, | dy elling house nd alla ilar other the buildings and erec- c 4
Louise Maynard ‘Wife? ; r . | tions thereon erected and built standing and being with the appur i = |
J. W._B. Maynard (Brother) —— ction of application to Miss Cum- | ae tae ha AND OTHER THINGS AT
R. V. Pilgrim, Gloria Pilgrim ming at the premises on Thursdays | Bill Atecd Wth June, 1951 MONEY-SAVING PRE
9t.7.81 AUTOMOTIVE between 1 and 4 p.m. | Dated the 26th day of July, 1951 I s 2 ICES





YEARWOOD & BOYCE, Be ee ea NEW & Renewed Wardrobes $18

Solicitors —* mr up, Dresser-robes, Chests-of-
Drawers; Bedsteads $10 up, Cra- ~
dies, Beds, Couches, Settees; Van- -
ities and Space ying Dressing
Tables $16 up; Washstands, Night-
chairs

aiaetienieainnpeeingns 27.7 ol—4n
CAR-—One hall Car 14—6, in ex- 17.7.51—Tn 4

|

|

|

MASUOLL—In memor of our dear cellent condition For particulars Dial : - aie |
mother and grandmother Deleina | 3745. J. D. Evelyn, Audit Department. | LAND AT ST. LAWRENCE suitable | |



=MORIAM

























51—an | for building sites. For particulars apply

— who sore os the ed Eee) oon oo | to K. R. Hunte, telephone 8137 or 4611 | OFFICIAL NOTICE

A ‘gr Thine etcrnal rest. | | CAR One Vauxhall 18 done only | - 7.1.51—t-1.n. | BARBADOS
The Mascoil family, 10,000 miles, like new, Phone 2861. S. H.| ~R

| Kinch or 4569 Cyril Stoute, sasie Ges in achine win tee













C . N CHANCERY
K HALL PLN: St. Peter. Acreage | (it: “ORs )

China, Kitchen and Bedroom
| In pursuance of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all persons

Cabinets; Tables for Dining,


















24.7. 51—6n . : 2 5 having or claiming any estate, right or interest or any hen ncumbrance in or Kitchen, Radio, Cocktail and '
NTS, nee | CUVEE to July 28, 1951. Purchaser pays | sere the property hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defendant) to bring oe Bocoretion: Wee Seellave:
ANNOUNCE EME CARS—Hillman Saloons 1946, 1947 ana| —@™P__ Duties and Expenses. Vendor | petore me an account of their claims with their witnesses, documents and vouchers



| 1949, Singer




Sports Model, Wolseley 14 | (eserves the right not to accept th | to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of 12 noon and

Morris Furniture; Morris Spring
hone highest or any offer, Inspection on | 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings. Bridgetown,



“Tell me







cided eereanninipemnmoc ascites | Salton and Mania 19 Salou 3 and Springitke Cushionsis
HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—tsle of 6 Cole & Co. Ltd. tn | 8PPlication to Campbell Keliman before the 29th day of September, 1951 in order that such clatms may be reported on . Suites and separate piecess Spices. SANTA MARIA—ioveliest hotel | —_— fh Nadrssinhiepnibonilicaen Sigal 22.7.51--$n | and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof respectively, otherwise such | upright, arm and rocking chairs







in Caribbean. Rates from $7.00 per head oe TANT Thrge wheel pick-up in | persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be deprived of all
a i es esi- | 4 « st the said property

per day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi- | workir order. Apply: B'dos Agencies, | laims on or against t

dential district under Government House | Ring 1508 21.7.51—6n. | AUCTION PLAINTIF®: EDWIN N LEE B BELL

hill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day, | | DEFENIL v

@ for grown-ups and children $1 up.

» . . . ,

D OCTOLR. « whenthere’s an accident, is Pianos, Banjos at $18; ‘Blectric

Pick-up Bakelite Arms and Heads

it safe to put an antiseptic straight on the wound ?” Headies, Chain and regular stiven
and boot-making—BUY NOW



BELI



PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Stewart's Hill
in the parish of St. John and Island of Barbados aforesaid containing
by admeasurement one acre and twenty two perches Abutting and

bounding on the south on lands of Mount Pleasant Plantation, on the

Edwarc's Garage, Roebuck Street, | HAMMER north and on the west on lands of Mr, B, L. Barrow and on the, east

STU ae Kt where it can be seen. Phone 2549 or | I he . 2 structe: e > e Joh Weatherhead or however else the
URE HOSPIT Al.) 3453. hone 2549 oF | 1 jhave been instructed to sell bs on lands now or late of Mr. John We ‘

We ci killfull Br on on Friday next the 27th July at same may abut and bound Together with the messuage or dwelling
e can skillfully repair your Br
ares, remove Nicotine Stains.

SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing | Pick-up Morris 8 in good working |

Beach. Rates from $4.00 per head per! order wizta almost new body. Apply 7 ry * *

day. Enquiries to D, M, Slinger, Grenada, Stoute’s Drug Store or Marshall & UNDER THE DiA
26.6.51—78n. |







In an emergency you need an antiseptic that can be used

quickly, without hesitation, and without danger or undue L. S. WILSON



Sopnemmiemnedeee 2 o'clock at th



Barbados Taxi Cab house and all and singular other the buildings and erections thereon

































































































a lish th t } lik New EI T l Serv Bay Street, One Fiat Car with erected and built anding and being with the appurtenances a
snd Polish em, to look ee i. . new battery, good tres and engine in Biil filed 2ist December, 1} ° . > 2 ‘ . . ‘et
wpecials can be delivered within three SLECTRICAL perfect working order. One Prefect 10 Dated ‘the 20th day of July, 1951 cee discomfort, You need a retisble killer of germs, but it SPRY ST.
1ours; send your Broke a ates} Buf a Car with engine also good ‘king H ily Ss,
er call at ‘Square Deal Dental Lab., Se air hg a a tyres good and battery oman Registrar-in-Chancery aiid , 1 . : : eis le I : DIAL 4069
Magazine Lane "2 ¥4 ELECTRIC MOTORS — By Newman new. Also One Jan Tug or Me- oe Oe should be non-poisonous, non-staining, gentle on human
ba from % H.P, to 742 H.P. 200 Volts 30| sal Horse with two trailers. It is in
| relies. 8 ke al 2878. DaCosta ve | Perfect working order, It is jus . iss g valuable i lean and rapi i
PERSONAL [60°02 Be SicoP SL BITE | Eon eo ee hatha ae | nnn | tissue, and valuable in promoting clean and rapid healing
Te ——j| Vision store. Very economical to rua
Wr = 2@ OP: sg 10 t 2) 7.51—5n
Wie Thee WORKDLL)” on 1 do" not | Peewouers Som tyairect Bowie} 2] Bish & ’
one else contractin 1y debt or debts tee Se ERR CENNY Gn pices ete) ake UNDER THE ILVER WN COUNCIL
. ‘ > wane w . der | 2nd withou not water heaters. ial 3873 . ‘ 7
sidhed ea i BWritten /ORDSR: bay. Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical Depart- HAMMER NEW AMSTERDAM TO c E MODERN ANTISEPTIC
sig ee y 7 mai ment. 24.7.51.—-6n On Tuesday 3st by order Re * : :
WEAN WEIs. PR eas gl era a =. | Gahan Wee 2 Shomseitee wil ase ity THE MAYOR AND TOWN COUNCIL OF NEW AMSTERDAM
SOE ae rs One NORGE REFRIGERATOR, 6 cubit | Furniture at “Uisdale", Pine Road which | hereby invite applications to subscribe to a loan of $190,( o be ———_——_—__ -—-- + —-
26.7.51—2n | ft. Open type unit, to be seen at Red- | includes: Round Tip Top Dining Table; | raised by the Council by the issue (at par) of Municipal (Bearer)
= } man & Taylor’s Garage. 27.7.51—2n | Dining and Bergere Arm Chairs; Orna- Bonds of the denominations of $100.00; $500.00; $1,000.00; $2,000.00; -



M4.
BLADON

& co.
A.F.S., F.V.A.

ae ment and Serving Tables; Plant Stand; Ds dy
LosT & FOU ND PHILCO REFRIGERATOR: 6'4 cubic | Berbice Folding and other Chairs: Dou. | $5,000.00; $10,000.00 at a rate of 4% interest payable half-yearly. ;
ft. Full width freezing chamber. Brand | bie End Settee; Liquor Case ‘all in | The issue of these Bonds has been authorised by the Mayor anc
new unit, Reconditioned throughout, | Mahogany; China Cabinet, Book shel

LOST may be inspected at Leo Yard, Cheap-





Canadian Natioual Steamships





creen; Barrel Shad Flat Top Di Town Council, New Amsterdam, with the approval of the pores
arrel Shades, a op ‘ ~ > sto confer

}and Writing Tables; Congoleum: Glass | @Md Council acting in conformity, with the authority ——

and China; Singer’s Treadle Machine |red by the New Amsterdam Town Council Ordinance,

Simmons’ & Mahogany Single Bed- The Bonds will be repaid 20 years after the date of issue, but

steads, Vono Spring; M.T. Washstand,

and Star-Delta with Single Phasing Pre- | Chamber, Ware; Green Painted Single = . . > 2 e€ v

3n. | ventor, Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co.. Ltd. | Bedsteads, Springs; Mattresses; Dress. | Whole or in part, by drawing o> otherwise at any time after the expiry

Electrical Dept. 24.7.51—6n. | ing Table; Painted Presses, Divan Bed- | of ten years from the date of issue

stad; Larder, Kitchen Tables & Utensils The issue and transfer of Bonds under the Loan is restricted to

SOUTHBOUND



en a aeraeee ele Late vee ce side. Apply H. L. Smith, Sandford,
PLOTS & SALES—bearing the name of | St, Philip. 7.1.51—ti.n.

James Benjamin Cutting, near Howell's —_
Cross Road, Finder will be rewarded on MOTOR STARTERS. — Direct-on-l
returning same to the above addr
25.7

Salls Satls Salls Arrives Sails
Name of Ship Montreal Halifax Boston DBarbades Barbados





the Council reserve to themselves the right to redeem the Bonds, in] can, cHALLENGER 20 July




23 July = 1 Aug. 2 Aug.
LADY RODNEY » July Aug 4 Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug
CAN. CONSTRUCTOR 9 Aug Aug - 21 Aug 22 Aug
LADY NELSON : 20 Aug 23 Aug. 25 Aug. 3 Sept. 4 Sept.












SWEEPSTAK
1294. and 1895

TICKETS—Series BB.
returr





Finder please

2 Burner Rippingale oi! stove and oven































































































: me : = ELECTRIC FITTINGS.—A nice assort-| Terms Cash You need the modern antiseptic ‘Dettol’,
“The public are hereby warned against | ont including. 3 : C lr are = 3 ; : ;
. ‘ey? . n @ 2 & 3 light Chromium | rey A. Scott, Auctioneer !
aig, Pakage Nace aaa | ment using SR a Chron | ce GOVERNMENT N | "8 |
|













































































































































































































2 : “Scheduled Territories” as defined below, and to; ——— te mE ae Es ‘i ee
me to J, Griffith, Country Re Electric Hot Plate, Toaster and other | residents of the . ee,
<7 5 | = 2 able on o such NORTHBOUND
aise FURNITURE nese ie interest and redemption monies on bonds being payable ot A ibed Arrives Salls Arrives Arrives — Arrives FOR SALE camel
eee ee yt 3 ace " ROTMAN © Cash.| person or persons so resident at the time the Bond was subscer Name of Ship Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal on wee
: S Sere ag : | ANKEK, T . CO. i an
WANTED Fo oe WASREUR Rie ee, Bie er eee Me aes > LADY NELSON 27 July 29 July 7 Aug. 9 Aug. 12 Aug. RESIDENCE, Strathclyde —An fi SS.
Stock of Furniture in his New Show Auctioneers Scheduled Territories” means :-— ‘ ; “ 25 Aus ra . 6 Ss 8 Sept 1l Sept imposing home with double en+—- 5
R s, Lowe ay Street. The follow- | > f the British Com- | }ADY RODNEY : ug 28 Aug. Sept. pt. pt. . .
ooms, Lower Bay Street ne follo 91.7.81-3 (1) The fully self-governing countries of the LADY NELSON 16 Sept 14 Sept 27 Sept 28 Sept 2 Oct trance driveway is available with ~ a
Minimum charge week 72 cents and |ing Bargains are offered to you: Mag = mn . 1 < , ODS, a 28 0 1 approx; 4 acres well laid out ae
3 70 . Chairs i eas : |\—_ ~ monwealth except Canada. LADY RODNEY ca 16 Oct 1a Oct, 27 Oct, et, Novr.
86 cents Sundays 24 wOrds -- over 24 | Dining Chairs $22.00 a pr.; Birch Dining | . 1 f His Majesty. with lawns, tennis court,” orna- * ae
worded ig re See Sonn | CU Sh Sn ah eh | TLC: NOTICES (3) Any tertitory adminisicred. by the Goverament of any ag yh gee
word on Sundays a pr.; Rush Arm Chairs $10.00 a pr. Rush (3) Any territory administered b. 2 G é paddock all completely enclosed — So
Rockers $11.00 a pr., Steel Arm Chairs | yart of His Majesty’s Dominions under the trusteeship The house is 2 storey and has mo,
HELP 12,00 each; pad vif iy Chairs aiid | ——_-———- Sten of the United } Nations GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD.—Agents. large lounges, dining room, gal- an ae
“ air, Caned Morris Chairs $36.00 a Pair | : laries, 3 double bedrooms, hall, ——
“Col | Development Corporation? Not forgetting a large variety of New| | Eee cents per agate line on week-days (4) Any British Protectorate or British protected State. os Sal cada) ‘ofheae Gael outbufidings ro =
lonia evelopmer srporation ae de :
invites applic tens from qualified acd ane ee Hand Furniture. Phone 4693 | midbnsey Cheeta EL Oe Wen (5) South-West Africa, JULLCRE & —
s wiertanl cw ical engineers for the| °* 5010 - spublic “SHLLOREST", Bathshéeba — pawn
one sr rise ht saath pert pot wae 24.7.51--5n, | OMd $1.80 on Sundays. pt eon Irish Republic, ROYAL NETHERLANDS Substantially built modern stone a
« rin in D Sivaterss Senle | Sn er nee anee tan iN bungalow on the brow ‘of the® eet
Sear ake rere Satans|” Sects Dna NOTICE (8) Iceland STEAMSHIP CO. FRENCH LINE jh))) iieriiensine ti 28.9 ie Pe
ee ict ae ild and rocky coast line There
salary required to Mr. G, Roddan LLANE! i. eth (9) Burma. SAILINGS FRC BTERDAM wild .
Colonial Development Corporation, 134 PieRent given that all persons having (10) The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan as pans any pe AMSTER Cie Gle Transatluntique Stick bunts tien eee ed ;
Hope Road, Liguanea, P O Jamaica. s tee Seer ese Bt oF otal Dnt eae Ue ithe A Sinking Fund commencing from the year 1951 will be pro-] ms AGAMEMNON.2nd August 1951 a | Suartdietand’ earace, Mina 4
See Start saving your Amm-i-dent Tooth | of Reed Street in the City of Bridgetown,| vided annually out of the general revenue of the Council, towards | 8.8 gabe tos ek Toe Sear ied Lube and water are laid on, band ;
Ee r ree or 2 ns > vhil who died in this Is da the 15th day aa =o over 6 acres and there are about ~_
LUMbey experience GORbLeng Apo i eae be the winner of-one of the fotiow-| of April 1948 intestate, ane. hereby we-| Payment of me Boer JJESTAD ath August 1961 Senne Ree, ne cee
letter and in person. A, Barnes & Co., tng Ist Prize $50.00, 2nd Petes a muiee pid igs in particulars of thelr The Council do not bing themselves to accept any application; ‘0 TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBG ENGLAND & FRANCE | Proposition at low figure asked,
151— 8 .7.51—26n sims duly atteste oO mo e0- ag ; ; oa vA -
Ltd. 20.7.51—t.f.n. | 316 Prize $5 philus Headley, the Public Trustee of the | and reserve the right to apportion the Bonds as they may think fit. i A peas Ca aetna a “GASCOGNE” Lith “LOCKERBIE HOUSE”, Brit-
Applications are invited for the post| BINOCULARS (for the Races) | Island of Barbados, C/o Messrs. Hutchin- No application below par will be considered MS, AGAMEMNON loth August 195) wes it a St, Lucia i a gg apr ggae tb.
r Master of the St. Andrew’s| “Schutz Model Heliolith Prism. 8 fold | son & Banfield, at their office at James ee se sealed envelopes marked | *.°: 0%) a og ? August 1951, Via suc and well built 2 storey stone
of Tead 1 APPLICATIONS must be enclosed in I 2.8. COTTICA August 1951
Anglican Secondary School, Grenada MM with blue coating complete | Street, Bridgetown, on or before the 3rc ’ st be addressed to the ae Hate A Martinique, Guadaloupe and house set well back in secluded
: . ‘ ; 95 on the outside “Application for Bond” and mu € € SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND rounds, The garde vell
Further information from the Ai hde loat cas Ma in German | day of October 1951 after which date I G CURACAO Antigua. 8 a ne i we
coh of Grenada. St orge da v. Bruce Weatherhead Ltd | Shall proceed to distribute the ts oc | Town Clerk, New Amsterdam, Berbice, British Guiana. neh MMA REE A treca® Abbi matured and there is complete
~6n 26.7.51,—3n. | the said estate among the parties enti- & Pp. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD privacy from roadway and ad
—— | — i --| tle? thereto having regard to the debts D. DOW, § oe 9. arene ied a joining property, There is a c¢ov-
Sale for Cor s CHEESE inadian Ped Cheese, Kraft} and claims only of which I shall then Town Clerk. saci ae a se i aii ati SOUTH BOUND ered entrance porch for cars,
cae Onin peaptieterioe but will ; and Tins and Hams ave had notice and that I shall not be Town Hall Soe SO ! Ov ; vin ait earenenee large lounge
corsider applications fror t your Ww M. Ford, 35} li able for assets so distributed to any : ’ : dé Berbice. 30.6.51 3n. ' * “Gascogne” 2nd April a - nee wen ase mene
men, who would like to enter this kind 9 person of whose debt or claim 1 shall New Amsterdam, Berbice. 6.5 be ) 1081 Calling at Grenada, in arge bedrooms, chen,
of business. Applications from Sales: 26.7.51,—2n, | not have had notice at the time of such The M/V “CARIBBEE wilh }) ol, one py butler's pantry, storerooms and
wanting 0 pn Change will be preeee ey, } patna ‘i accept Cargo and pamsriners <) (I armas ge ic ee anc ygual oo See en ee
Idential ly in detail te j - —— -_—-———— —-——: —-— a persons indebted to the sa SSE, Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, ) rench G a, i ‘ "
conneroHA See | the sy care of Hair and Scalp | estate requested to settle their ac- Nevis and St. Kitts, Salling | itt ete. A very interesting and de-
try “Danderine” and note the soft lus- | counts without deias Vriaay 2tth inst. s sirable property, <
rous look i using. Price 1/3 and 2/-| DAYED this 24th day of July,
School | bor, Knight's Ltd. = SS:S~*dY SSsSIMOTHY T. HEADE Just in time for the Hurricane Season sno MAP MBean I Accepting Passengers, encknaibeis bundles: dane .
helda the Sonool: | i 26.7.51—2n. | ; : Public Trustee, accept Cargo and Passengers for )) Cargo and Mail An Estate House built of stone a
ing to apply himself diligently to beir Swoon npecen nna as ts + Qualified Administrator of the Estate at, Laie Grenada and “rubs. | yin vine Scoring Soe. shingled ro
tratried 86 a. edieaiar FLOOR POLISHERS -— Keep your | of Desdemona Foster-Turton, TABLE M D Missengers. only for St. Vincent. }}{ | Pr ; eception, rooms, =
Appiy in f instance> by Ictter in ow Floors in good condition with Johnson's | deceased. Date of Sailing to be notified (4 verandahs ete, also garage and om
handwiit.ng to Hull & Son, P.O. Box 192 | Wax pola Dial 3878, Da Coen Co ‘| 26.7.51—3n ' ba i { R. M. JONES & Co Ltd. abhtoer bts ae ‘en stands op
; 26.7 an, | Ltd., El Dept. 7.51—6n as 5 che 8 A of acres 0! me
GPO ( 1—8n, | Ltd ep E 1 | B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS i) ’ land (mahogany) approached-wia
ee eae At. SieiAr Seo eA . y 7 z Sa oed : . 7s ssoc : m9 a long driveway flank@d “with
WIDEAWAKE junior with knowlede GALVANIZED NAILS--Sizes to | PD UY ASSOCIATION (Ine,) y AGEN’ S y 1
of Customs work and import and export 2” at 31 cents per Ib. Limited Quantity LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE i cohulay EMI ee NS : ‘| ws gB14 closely planted mahogany trees
licences routine Apply in your ow only, G. W. Hutchinson & Co., Ltd (Transfer and Removal) Corner of Broad anc Tudor Streets { Consignee. Tele, 4047 iy | Phone %: Soe. gfe outstanding attractions
handwriting in the first instance to| Broad and Roebuck Streets Wk appieation wf -Clains “Hope “et * of Holder's is the very lovely and
HAROLD PROVERBS & C 26.7.51—2n. | Orange Hill, St. James holder of PFS FSM POTS Se SESS | 5! heavily wooded site which has the
_ LACTOMETERS For ascertaining "ene | Liquor.’ Idcense No. 10M of i961 in 55999000 Gaol WEN, Ale vlawee ror ae
eee - a ~ ar 1 s om 5 7 Rae PF OOOOOSS 7 Y -
ri sh hness of milk, To be obtained from | ‘spect ot a board and shingled Shop | 9656565656666 9G STOO IP PDOP OPP PPSPOIVPPOPODPPPIASS did me ¥* Pee ee sides, Coast and bathing under 1 =
MISC EL LAN :0US u with shedroof attached at Endeavour a a 2g
| ‘Bruce Weatherhead Ltd ; | St. James to remove said License to a| ¢ x mile, Town 6 miles <
— a 26.7 .51—3n. | } : : ; ‘ >
. shingi op ated at “ jen
a PLAY PEN 40 ins, x 40 ins Folding, | board and ingied shor situatec oe 1% TOBRUK", Cattlewash, Bath-
with logs and castors preferred. Write |"pippg——Power’s Positive Pills” best | Et wvour, St Janes and to use it at Once A ain as lk % | % wheba—a picturesque holiday
“Playpen”, P. O Box 92 state finish for all Liver and Stomach ills. rice | such la described a emis . be 1081 4 $ % e I home on the beach with about 3
a” peice Sl—t.f.t ; yht's Ltd 98.7.51-8n, | Dated this ath day of July, 190i. Rid of an acre of land, Timber o
price 1,- bot, Knight's Ltd. CLAINE HOPE % imber con
————eeeeeee “Atelicant struction raiséd on stone pillars,
PLASTIC RAINCOATS—Just in time}, if NURSE, Esq pplice % aninisd oanatlan throuatadt
for Rainy Season. Imported Raincoats| "Si. “Magistrate. BARGAIN % @ There are 3 bedrooms with. wash
ALE all sizes and colours $2.98, Plastic Pa | - oman x basins, lounge, wide gallery over-
~ na District “E.", Holetown. r
cls Pretty Designs $1.69. Kirpalani, 52 = - a aah looking the sea, kitceh servant's
Ss t. 27.7.51—-1n. | N.B.—This application will be consider % #o0me and-outside bathint bi
(The Provost Marshal's Act, 1904 eaeetl | Err ee bl} ed at a Licensing Court to be held on 1 - Gus rooms and outside bathing, cublls “
(1904-6) § 30 Reo lie the 7th August, 1951, at 11,00 o'clock a.m. =n 5
On Friday the 10th day of August. 1951 ‘RECORDS: Witisedae, ioe oan swing | at Police Court, District “E" Holetown. % “ nnouncing “COUNTRY HOUSE", St. Joh pnt
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon sn't got it in stock. A, Barnes & Co 8. H. NURSE, % A pleasant 9 storey prdhetts —e
will be sold at my office to the highest haven't got it in s oat Police Magistrate, R , ¥' iF eine mai A 2 _ property,
Ltd. 6.7.51--t.f.n. | ae Holet RE OP. ln stone built with shingled roof
bidder for any sum not under the apprais iiesbantiroarte PaaerIct Lie ais . Oo ers omet, n ew. 4 a 44 Completely re-decorated recentty
ed value at baat atts Pa Ss a; ne su LASSES. For Children, Ladi ies | po se ¢ Accommodation comprises 2 liv
centaining about 2 sq situate 1 ‘ ” ae e acsigns. r 7 r '@? in, oon, % re shel
1 Gentl All shapes, new “ar . 3 bed > , kit
Parish of St, Michael butting and bound- | 2nd Gentlemen All shapes, neo spruce, LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICI e AFTER STOCK-TAKING Day) wokathoms, satane: bere
ing on lands of Susan rere eee ahd ona} Weatherhead Ltd, 26.7.51—3n. | ant’s quarters ete. Wide dawt
Tose, apo ls of one a, oath ‘a teuzethé - 77: —— at The application of Doris MeCollin holder numerous fruit trees and fedd
Road cf Sufferance, at Goodland together | “Cee Tales: Shoes Samples. All| of Liquor License No. 457 of — 1951 vedetable garden. Well recor
“hattel-Dw ing 1 Suile SHOES--Ladie | 4 + ni
in as, be pa el then , re alze the. © e oe en | grar ted to Mar y man, in ‘seaport of $ Mt New I Ads Striking s mended at price quoted
The whole property, ‘chattel house ang | Barbados import @& Export hoard and shingle shop at Beckles MONDAY 80th Saat
pen erase to one thousand two hur | Room 308 Plantations Building. ¥ set Michael for ene ic ‘ to tise sai $ i ae R b L i. J | a 1 hk « } ath Av Bellevill
creda doliary and seventy-six | SO aia lane So ria, See. ee +e Cs Reasonable ag ok
cents ($1,200.76 ttac ched troy A in) . on aaa shed attached to reside: ats 4 Pa Ares om dna va
Berasford Stewart for and to epee, Maneia a. matters beck (POE BS PE ates $ | cama & srcation soomeF bed.
. Deposit to be paid on day of | Breakfast Rell Biase ane iene a A. McLEOD, Esq., 1. 42” SHEER DELIGHT—so utterly — 80 \ \ | “information on application: .
: Renna . ding Wholesale an etal Ea Police Magistrate, : s . ee ae ue, Corn j
eee T. T, HEADLEY, FORD, 35 Roebuck St. Dial M89, = |= istrict “A.” vere cool in these colors Nu : $1.89 \ 4 \ RESIDENCE, Maxwell's Coast—a
teas a erahatl 4 26.7. 51—2-"| DORIS McCOLLIN, Pink, Pearl Grey and Navy @ ........... $1.8 | beautiful property embodying the
Provost Marshal's Office = ED FRUIT aches, | ms teak ie eects ‘ ’ | aoe oe workmfinship, Well
oo Sestar 51. TANNEL : a N This application wi consid- ” ~ . . > 7 * designed for easy nm with
sual antahe sheet 25.7.51—3n. | s, Apricot. Gv Fruit Salad) cred at a Licensing Court to be held at 2. 42” TISSUE AND C TON FAILE—look glam , DEPART g fesaption 6 tye aicbede ceckns
1 Prunes, W. M, Ford, 3 Roebuck St.) police Court, District “A” on ‘Tuesday orous in a dress made from one of these | dah, kitehen, pantry, ‘
: 3A 5 '« the 7th day of August, 1951 at 11 o'clock lovely shades: Siam Royal, Black, Barbary Bowe) ee
| is aeadne renter | am. / é : @ € YM prox: 2 acres with flo and
WE ARE BUYERS SOT oie ee eee ea ee eai E. A. McLHOD, Taupe, Chinese Lacquer, Parma Violet, Wild 3) | vegetable gardéns, — prédiietive
| Je y anything connected with ee : 7 Police Magistrate, " . orchard and coconut grove.
We buy_an3 ES | ey A Be meg Pouce District "A." Huckleberry, Tange d Wild Orchid ae | One sere wall
Fe, ee eet ingle Stamps, || 0” drudgery. Dial 3878, Da Costa & Co. District "A uckleberry, Tangerine an i g One acre walled garden may: tye
Collections. ulations ape | Ete ‘ trical ep § 27.7.51—1n } @ $1.95 % | sold separately as buildfig Mite.
Covers, Good pr P he 21% sovtelewl *
CARIBBEAN STAM SOCIETY | rer i i® 3. 50” CROSS-DYED STRIPE SILK—here is 5 2 x | a 1 om
rd Floor, No. 10, Swan § | NE DAM s - | oo SS-DYED ST E SILK—here is some- 9 ] WANTED ~ :
j IONTREAL : A new seven mil- | thing every Miss and Mrs. has dreamed of: %
lion dollar river dam has just been | Cray, Aqua and Chartreuse, Lilac Sky and % TO START ON WEDNESDAY | _ ESTATE—Productive Sugar Ex- ‘
yened at Lethbridge. The struc-! E + . | tate with good House vu to mae
| ESPAN. PEROnAG BY EAE Ra moee ee ooo Bleeding |@ Honey Wheat, Pink Violence and Grenadure | | £20,000 Sens :
\ SE HABLA ESP-¢ ’ } ture, which is the world’s biggest Gums Bleed ©: have Le : @ $2.39 + | 4
qphgHk AF QL earth-fill dam, is another step in| , Mouth and ¥ @ $2.38 1% Ist tt T ST ;
“4k é |the fight to revive the parched | lose Teeth mean that you have Fyorrhea. | oe 4 re if —-
r I | Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease ad . a “Dp ys of a‘ :
CURIOS, SOUVENIRS, AN- ||range lands of south-eastern Al-| hat ctl coche or later cause your-death 4. 36” BORDERED SPUN in various patterns RENTALS
TIQUES, IVORY, JEWELS, berta It will take 15 years to|to fall out and may a no cause BBsuristisy @ $144 per yd. | .
| SILKS Etc. ||| complete the entire thirty million |}} caine the first day, ends sore mout) | Prices Cut Unspurin gly to make Daysttioka ran eee ?
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SENT TO ITALY

Weekes Heads W.I. First Class
Averages

(From Our Own Correspondent)

SOUTH AFRICA ended

LONDON, July 26.
the first day of the Fourth

Test at Headingly, Leeds, in a strong position, having
scored 282 for the loss of three wickets.
The batsmen mainly responsible for this commanding



THE BIG TWELVE
—And Makes His Oval Average 100
By Frank Restron



I PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1951
SOUTH AFRICA 282-3 IN FOURTH TES gh se Mg
Sport Report: eee kK. Ke Hits Fine Cent aR E |
ae aiaiind MUST BE As Buel a Fi old All Day. HUTTON ( ad ) J OINS By DESMOND ae ful

"THESE muscular misses who make

men’s professional golf circus are no myths. They
defeated the international amateur team here to-day by
3—0 in the foursomes, a game to which they are unaccus-
tomed, and they did it without even having to turn on any
of that old American power golf.

They found themselves with one a two holes win for the obvious

position were Eric Rowan and Clyde Van Ryneveld who « July iT,

By O. S. COPPIN created a new South African record for a second wicket YORKESHIRE’S Len Hutton, using that shortened and | the'golfite, cower’ gusts, Vicoureene Mtoe the vicomptome and Joan

TRINIDAD sporti s partnership of 198. This beat the previous record of 155 by deformed left arm* that has caused him to remould his/|de Saint Sauveur and Mrs. John Cowper was the consolation of

FB ey -iconge aperting a are happy and why R. H. Catterall and H. W, Taylor at Capetown during the style, guided a stylish cover drive to the boundary under | Corse ‘Pat. Bae ar Le ae ory — aa
she ney be happy as they have raised the necessary M.C.C. 1922—23 tour. the shadow of the Kennington Oval gasholder yesterday— | this}, \ g y re eee ee oe



$2,000 to send Compton Gonsalves their leading cyclist to
the World Cycling championships that take place in Italy

next month.



KEN FARNUM



Snappers And

Bonitas Wi

tw

BONITAS beat
Snappers defeated Barracudas in
the two water polo matches
played at the Aquatic Club yes-
terday afternoon,

Bonitas sent in 13 goals to one
by Police. The result of the other
Game was similar,

Spectators were kept waiting

over 15 minutes for the start by
players turning up late for the

Police and

games.
The first game was dull from
the spectators’ point of view.

Bonitas got nine goals in the first
half. Five of these were scored by
Qwen Johnson, two by Trevor
Yearwood, while G. Atwell and M.
Richardson scored one each.

In the second half, Richardson
and Johnson scored two more goals
each. M, Franklyn sent in the
lone goal for Police from glose
range late in the second half,

The second match although it
ended in a similar result as the
first, was a much faster game.
Barracudas were first off the mark
when Michael Lambert scored
after two minutes of play. A
minute and a half later Kenneth
Ince sent in the equaliser.

After this, Barracudas felt the
weight of an all-out attack by the
Snappers’ forwards, well backed
uj by their captain George

cLean, who turned in a fine
performance.

At half time the score was
Snappers seven, Barracudas one.
For Snappers, Ince scored five and
Bannister the other two.

After the interval the speed of
the game continued to be just as
fast as it was in the first half
with Snappers always on the
attack, Barracudas did once or
twice break through the Snappers’
defence but none bore fruit.

The end of the game found
Snappers with six more goals to
their credit. Ince, Bannister and
George McLean scored two each
in the second half.

The referee was Mr, J, Knight,

The teams were:—

Police: M, Richards (Capt.) L.
Dodson, M. Franklyn, R. Alleyne,
G. Porter, W. Phillips.

Bonitas: M. Foster, B. Patterson
(Capt.) T. Yearwood, G, Atwell,
J. Paster, M. Richardson, O.
Johnson.

Snappers: A. Taylor, G. McLean
(Capt.) C. McLean, D. Bannister,
K. Ince, G. Rogers and Barnes.

Barracudas: E. Perez, B. Brooks

(Capt.) HH. Rogers, M. Lambert,
K,. Armstrong, K, Taylor and
Skinner.

This afternoon’s games are

Starfish versus Goldfish. Referee.

Mr, K. Ince, and Mermaids
versus Sea Nymphs, Referee Mr.
B. Brooks.





No. Names Innings
1. Weekes 84
2. Worrell 127
3. Walcott 102

4. Rickard 34
5. Stollmeyer 139
6 Gomez 135
7. Rae 65
& — Christiani ’ 100
9. Marshall eeeee 35

10. Goddard ’ 87



ns
Ss

—

They'll Do Ir

When BELFRY MARRIED ROSIOLA»HE
ACTUALLY HAD TO FORCE HIS DOUGH
ON THE SHY LITTLE LIFE-PARTNER >

B-BUT, DEAR=-UH»
I FEEL SO STRANGE, }
TAKING MONEY FROM

news?
that
necessary that our own Ken Far-
num must be sent to these games
as well.

ous

Every Time

VA HAcHA-BUT WE'RE

MARRIED sIOW, OBAR»+
HA-HA-HA
YOU~IO MUCH RATHER \ TAKE SOME SPENDING

How has Barbados taken this
In the right way, that is

we consider that it is most

Genuine
This is no sudden impulse con-

tingent upon the news from Trini-
dad, nor is it a good example of
copy-cat.
some
Athletic

The
weeks

truth is that for
now the Amateur
Association of Barbados
have been trying to learn what
the average cost of the visit will
be so that they can come hefore
the public with a cut and dried
plan.

It is common knowiedge that the
local Association is making strenu-
efforts to form a National
Olympic Committee so that the
West Indies will be able to send
eyclists to the Olympic Garnes in
Helsinki in 1952

The cyclists who would at once
come to our minds as the most
likely to be selected are Compton
Gonsalves, Lindsay Gordon and
Farnum.

Farnum Should Go

If the West Indies are sending
a team as a whole to these games,
then Farnum should be sent to
Italy to gain much valuable ex-
perience.

The resounding success of the
West Indies team in England last
year should be taken as an ex-
ample, How could John Goddard
and his men have achieved such an
epoch-making triumph had not
cricketers of the leading West In-

dian colonies been given equal
opportunity.
It will be a challenge to the

sporting public of Barbados te
help subscribe the funds necessary
to send Farnum to Italy but it will
be the logical step before sending
him to Helsinki

A Long Way

The West Indies and Barbados
will have gone a long way towards
establishing a respectable identity
in world sporting cireles if they
can add to the excellent job they
have done by virtue of their
cricket triumphs by conquering
some other field of sport on_an
international level.

The Amateur Athletic Associa-
tion of Barbados will be coming
almost at once to the sporting pub-
lie of Barbados for funds to help
defray the cost of sending Far-

num, Let the public not let them
down. It is beyond their own fin-
ancial resources and

there is no
other way. '

Solid Reputation

The public af Barbados has
built up a solid reputation for their
generosity in assisting deserving

causes and also for their business
sense in refusing help where it is
not genuinely needed.

I say without fear of contradic-
tion, that this cause is worthy of
handsome public support and
should pay dividends in the years
to come.

First Class Cricket

Published in an earlier issue of
this paper this week was a table
showing the figures of batsmen
who had scored a century of cen-
turies in first-class cricket,

This has been so well received
by local sportsmen that I have
been besieged by telephone calls
and letters asking that some com-
pees figures be given for West
Indian batsmen, not centuries of
centuries, of.course, since they
would have been in the list under
reference if they had qualified,

“Statistician's” Figures

I am working on the number of
eenturies scored by West Indies
batsmen in First Class cricket and
should soon be able to supply these
to my readers.

Meanwhile my old and trusted
friend “Statistician” has sent me
the figures of the leading first class
batsmen in the West Indies, at
present still playing first class
cricket.

“Statistician” is well known for
his accuracy and I have no hesi-
tation in publishing these for the
benefit of other statisticians.

Runs Highest Not Average
Seore Out
5,288 ‘ 304* 12 73°45
7,430 308 22 70 76
5,293 314 i4 60 14
1,446 195 5 49 86
6,053 324 14 48 42
5,187 216" 19 44.71
179 a 44 57
181 12 43 88
191 0 41 80
218° 19 39 39



83 5 29.70





Registered U. 5. Fale Oftew



7 YY,
os HERE-+

YOU HANDLE |T=:70U pp MONEY:

COULD JUST GIVE ME
ALITTLE ALLOWANCE
OR SOMETHING »*++



Pur weyve BEEN MARRIED FOR °
ABOUT A YEAR NOWâ„¢AN
SHE AND HIS WALLET HAY

ALl. OF IT THIS TIME! tA
MAYBE YOU THINK I DON’T
KNOW YOU HELD OUT 2

Newport Say

‘No’ To £14

NEWPORT COUNTY are the
first club to say “No” to the £14
maximum-wage (old maximum
£12) sanctioned by the Football
League at their annual meeting
last month.

But they promise to review the
position about Christmas.

In the letter to the players, Mr.
Lionel Watkins, the Newport hon.
Secretary, ‘says:—

“You will be the first to appre-
ciate that a club’s ability to pay
depends entirely on the revenue
received through the turnstiles.

“The attendances at last sea-
son’s matches were a fair aver-
age of the past five seasons.

The income received was insuf-
ficient to carry us through to the
opening of next season and the
directors have had to advance
money for summer wages.

“In addition a good deal of
work has had to be done to the
ground and dressing room accom-
modation, This expenditure will

have to be guaranteed by the
Board.
Players’ reaction will not be

known until when the Union de-
cides whether players should re-
sign and accept the new May to
May contracts.

Last season Newport bought
houses for four players and gave
the £750 maximum benefit to two
men.

Cricket Results

July 26.

Scores in English County cricket
games today were as follows:

Royal Navy vs. Army at Lord's.
Royal Navy 249 for 6 declared,
164 for 6 declared; Army 293 for
2 declared, 100 for 5. Match
drawn,

Surrey vs, Leicestershire at the
Oval. Leicestershire 263, and 41
for one wicket; Surrey 377 for five
wickets declared.

Gloucestershire vs. Essex at
Bristol. Essex 243; Gloucester-

shire 297.

Hampshire vs. Middlesex at
Portsmouth. Middlesex 478 for
four wickets; Hampshire 256, and
80 for one wicket.

Kent vs. Derbyshire at Folke-
stone, Derbyshire 240, and 263 for
five wickets; Kent 191.

Lancashire vs. Northants at
Manchester. Northants 276; Lan-
cashire 358

Somerset vs. Warwickshire at
Wells, Warwickshire 397 for nine
wickets declared; Somerset 173,
and 89 for five wickets.

Sussex vs, Glamorgan at Hast-
ings. Sussex 207, and 138 for six
wickets; Glamorgan 303.

Worcestershire vs. Notts at Wor-
cester. Notts 300, and 47 for no
wicket; Worcestershire 450 for
nine wickets.

Yorkshire vs, Scotland at Scar-
horotgh. Yorkshire 372 for one



Max Faulkner, the British Open
champion, has been elected cap-
tain of the Professional Golfers’
Association. He holds the Ryle
Memorial Medal which goes to
the Open champion if a member
of the P.G.A.

WHAT’S ON TO-DAY

Court of Appeal—10,00 a.m.

Police Courts — 10,00 a.m.

Governor opens Schools for
Blind at Hurd Memorial
School, James Street —
12 noon,

Mobile Cinema gives show
at Dodd's Yard, St. Philip
—7.45 p.m.

Police Band gives Concert at
Hastings Rocks, Christ
Church—8.00 p.m.

CINEMAS

Glebe — “Kim"—8.30 p m

Empire “Meet
145 and $30 pm

Royal — “A FRon00g And One
Nights” & “All the King’s Men”
4.30 and 8.15 p.m,

(Bridgetown)

Frankenstein”

Plaza “Tripoli”

2.30; 445 and 8.30 pm
Olympic

and 81 pm

“The Showdown”

ing 5.00 and 8.30 p.m.





By Jimmy Hatlo

My! How :
CHANGED!

OKAY HAND IT OvER!!







wicket declared; Scotland 121, and fietdiny. 7 4.
6 . ata g, and went to hospital to
244 for six wickets. have it stitched.

In 310 minutes, 459 runs were
FAULKNER Is CAPTAIN scored, Notts piled up 251 before

4.30
Aquatic — ‘Phe Girl in the Paint- |

Winning the toss South Africa
batted first on an easy wicket.
The opening batsmen were quiet,
but not unduly troubled by Eng-

land’s attack and it was a_sur-
prise when Waite was _ i.b.w. to
Bedser.

The total was then 40.

So England gained an earl;
advantage, but with Rowan and

Van Ryneveld together they could

not press it home. These two

gradually mastered the bowling,

but could never force the

against England’s steady attack, so

the rate of scoring was not high.
Slow Scoring

Slow scoring was due to the
accurate bowling of Hilton and
Tattersall and England’s fielding
which was good all day.

England’s bowlers were re-
warded for their perseverance

when in the last hour Hilton had
Van Ryneveld caught and bowled
and Nourse was |.b.w. to Brown

Eric Rowan with 160 not out
played perhaps his best Test
innings to date.

Scores: —

SOUTH AFRICA—Ist Innings
FE. A. B, Rowan not aut 160
J. H. B. Waite |.b wb Bedser 13

C. B. Van Ryneveld c & b Hilton 83
A. D. Nourse |.b.w, b Brown 12
J. E. Cheetham not out 7
Extras 6
Total (for 3 wkts.) 282

To bat: R. A. McLean, P_N_F. Man-
sell, A. M. B. Rowan, NB F. Mann.

G. W. A. Chubb, CN. McCarthy

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o. M R w.
Bedser 30 4 63 1
Bailey 13 4 36 0
Brown 19 5 55 1
Tattersall 3% 11 59 0
Hilton 36 «(1158 1
Compton eu aaes 1 0 4 0



pace |

and 15,000 spectators rose to
famous throughout the Emp

Hutton, the master,
placed another imprint in
history books by scoring the 100th
first-class century of hi career,
and nis ‘ninth of the season,

had just
cricket's



ey



LEN HUTTON

Even the Tuscanic ranks of
Surrey clustered round to shake
the hand of Pudsey’s wizard of the
willow.

Surrey secretary Brian Castor
caused renewed cheering by blar-
ing on tne loudspeaker: “Congrat-
ulations to a fine cricketer.”

Housewives waved their dish-
cloths from the balconies of the
overlooking council houses, and
truant workmen tossed their caps

Graveney Leads _ x0 the air.

In 2,000 Race

By PAT MARSHALL.

July 14.
Look out, Denis Compton!
Young Tom Graveney, who took
your place so ably for the third

Test at Manchester, is determined
to stay there,

Twenty-four-year-old Tom hit
acentury in each innings—first
time in his career—for Gloucester-
shire against Northants at Bristol.

What is more, he scored his
second century of the match be-
fore lunch!

Now Graveney has scored eight
centuries this season-~five in his
last ten innings—and that puts

im one ahead of Compton in the

little matter of who scores most
hundreds.
Now he needs just 223 more

runs to be the first to reach 2,000

for the season. Nearest rival is
Jack Robertson, of Middlesex,
who wants 266.

No wonder they talk of Tom
down in Gloucestershire as a
second Walter Hammond.

Cook Hurt

It was not such a happy day
for sloy brother bowler Ken
He had to leave the field with a

recurrence of back trouble.
Then Cecil Cook, Sam” to his
team-mates, cut his left hand

lunch, declared at 309 for seven.
Hampshire. set to
just over 87 an hour, tried hard
but were beaten by 80 runs. It
was Notts’ first win this season.



Yesterday’s
Weather Report
FROM CODRINGTON

Rainfall; 1.12 ins,

Total Rainfall for Month to
date: 4.93 ins.

Highest Temperature: 81.0° F.

Lowest Temperature: 74.0° F.

Wind Velocity:
hour,

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.008,
(3 pam.) 29.929.

5 miles per



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It was a replica of the 1938
summer’s day when Hutton
broke the world Test record by
scoring 364 against the Aus-
tralians on the same ground
Jen went on to make 151 yester-

day and so take the life out of the

bowling. Vic Wilson profited to
collect a century enabling York-
shire to declare at 431 for three.

Surrey added 28 for one tc
first innings total of 156,

their

Hutton’s century was beautifully
earned. “Earned” is the word,
because there was no charity
offer.

on

‘Easy wicket’

Though the Surrey bowling later
disintegrated under punishmeni
it was especially good for the first
morning hour

Said Alec Bedser afterwards
“Tt was another great knock by



Kenyon And Co.
Deserve Break

HERE’S a _ suggestion
cricket rulers. Set aside a
each season between the current
iouring side and a Young
land team.

Many stars touring winter af-
ter winter are tired. They are re-
luctant to make the India trip thi
year,

for

Had a Young England side been
pitted against the present South
African tourists youngsters could
be found to replace the weary



for them.

| This team would give the pres-
{ent South African side something
| to think about:—
Kenyon, Lowson, May, Grave-
ney, Spooner, Close, Howard
|

(captain), Shackleton, Hilton, Ap- |

nleyard, and Statham.





— ae

|

|

|
Last Crypt The fea the
Lord is the beginning of wisdom

—Psalins.
ee
J. A. CORBIN & SONS.



Pe



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FSOSOO OGG FOOD GE SS SS SC OGG GGG OOO SOS GOGO SE FO POSD

our |
fixture |

Eng- |

stars. And what grand experience |

cheer a stroke that has become
ire.

Busting Patty Berg, a distinctly
\sturdy performer. was not accus-
| tomed to such frail players match-
Len, but the wicket was too easy.” |ing her own strong-arm drives

Too easy for Hutton and for his
shadow Frank Lowson, yes. But)
lesser batsmen could well have
faltered.

Alec Bedser did his best with |
the new ball and often made it
lift alarmingly. But a.punish-
ing rap on the hand. was all he
could produce to disturb Hut-

She was rattled by the laven-
der-cool calm of Joan Cowper
who, having seen her partner
drive out of bounds at the 142-
yard ninth, smoothly holed in
one to win the aole with a 2
Patty Berg, conscious that she

had recently beaten America’s first
ton’s serenity. |lady of golf, the fabulous Babe
Hutton now has an average of | Zaharias, became the foreman of

exactly 100 at the Oval. In his 20 | this match.

innings there (two not out) he has|_ She thumped partner Betty
cored 1,800 runs. | Bush heartily in encouragement,
Yesterday’s was his examined every putt with plumb

hundred at the Oval. line scrutiny, pursed her lips in an

seventh
The other |



were: 364, England y. Australia | agony of concentration.

1938; 206, England v. New Zealand ‘ -

1949; 202 not out, England v. West Consolation

Indies, 1950; 165 not out, England ‘ ‘

v. West Indies 1939; 121. Yorkshire This was cash register golf

{against the playsfor-pleasure abil-

v. Middlesex, 1937; 101, Yorkshire It ended with





The Babe and Betsy Rawls beat
Curtis Cup pair Irish champion
Philomena Garvey and Scottish
international Jean Dongld 11 and
9, all done to a smart running
commentary from the Babe,

She loosed a stream of wise-
cracks of Bob Hope calibre and
a string of shots far beyond the
hope of Hope.

Betty Jameson and Peggy Kirk
had another feather-cushion com-
fortable win against Bunty Ste-
phens and Joan Gee—a 4 and 3
success smoothly collected on the
greens.

These golden golfing girls just
have the game tied up from A to

Z—from American accuracy to
Zaharias. Results (U.S. names
first):—

Mrs. Zaharias and F. Rawls beat P
Garvey and J. Donald 11 and 9. P. Berg

and B, Bush beat Vicomtesse de St. Sau-
veur and Mrs. Cowper 2 up. P. Kirk and
S. Jameson beat F. Stephens and Hon
Mrs Gee 4 and 3



v. Surrey: 168 ity of the amateurs.
In March, 1941, while serv-| . —
ing as a P.T. instritctor in an
Army gymnasium, Hutton met}
with a serious accident to his}
arm. He was in hospital eight |
monthe and had three bone- |
rafting operations. .
—-L.ES.

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From October, 1950 to
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/% and these higher priced
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Full Text



PAGE 1

PAGE rrtl'B BARBADOS ADVOCATE MRRADOS^AmtXWTE &.._-. _TM 1 i %  l..v. .Inl ^'T DISQI II TIM. NEWS spondrnr m Brii sh Guiana < %  ( the ptodfang deportafio'i of 17 West Indians ftsCUBSS pubJn. %  i funaaunaataJ problem. There cm i>> no doubl that there is grow1 adjustment In tinWe i I.'ulu .ii i ;• ii : rnents ii ad to face up to the pn The Aral question i<> lsettled, h %  rights v.. M Thia lees because <>t the attttude of tinTrinidad Gov. .; m this matter. The Immigration officer ol British Guiana pointed out what has been a disquietim; fact known thn>u((hout the West Indies. The Trinidad Trr-Trm-ration law %  .ikin up eini .employed Tnnidadians who ran do the job. This means that Trinidad must, be preserved for Trinidadians and that they can only allow the entry ol Other .ti situations in which they I howevei excellenl this theory n as a measure of eeU it is at %  with the much vaunted plea for federal wore OSj> n. it would be impossible fur the people ol Rsseai to rmanl in Manchester or Birminfh.ini although they are all English Tinpeople born in this area are Wee) whether they come from Jamaica or Trinidad or on.of tho islands in the Grenadines. It can only mean n I %  tinn ol the old demon of insularity when restrictions of thia kind are raised in the various ten [| Tinabsurdity of the position is revealed when the (iuvernment of British Guiana ii forced to retaliate by deporting a number ol West Indians to their respective anda of British Guiana %  ways been regarded as supplying the possible solution for the West Indian population problem. An Irtve committee and a full fledged commission ii reported that British Gulai i la suitable for the settlement of Ass^ | West Indians from the more thickly popuI '• 'I'lie circumstances seem to reduce any talk of West Indian Federation to a mockiiv .on! a sham. The present economic dil.ic-.ill.i-.. Of the West Indus had their origin in the fostering of a policy of insularity in these islands. Bach island competed against the other and even when the time came for bartering for better prices for the raw material produced in the area. %  %  unable to speak with a < eil voice. To-day thi 11 tnpetlng against each other tor the establishment of industrial projects which would furnish employment and raise the standard of living. Let it be admitted that the West Indies cannot settle .atisfactonlv the underlying problem of population adjustment; but in, by common understanding between themselves, \Y, Jl l-V 27. 1931 n> ni i: i i: v i> III ^v| i i in BOD It ia iron pleasant fiiry tale Ul that i.ot blame Govoir.incntj (or our IB needed is o change in the %  | i .mted Is net .. haaee, but my own i %  %  %  %  i %  %  life DUt by those wham live and iron, w.thhi by thOM noUuM uTreaulr^d'bi belief, and passion, appro,,,gfS£ jgSS tSSL mSZ --by.oneaae. in.The kernel of the** belief, .nd ea "* to Pf^'V riition *• %  may rrbtl BK ilil our passion, b II... Itrugato for IK*. IV !" '" „. !. ,\" ? .! iniaibl i now -HI! Vai IiJl 8 ^** *",''' SKZ "" I tern air, l U necessary because W|U i,v "* %  "". whereai if standing on their shoulder*. mhMuldoA net because ^u pursue course B. you will u nature I. niggardly, in former t ros P er ; *"<* suppose that oi. %  f. %  tradl, each wlaheartn !" ba ? ls ,:| %  ''"< ''' hvc on the produce of a piece of m ft land which only yielded enough %  tern much f„ r one, they Inusl ,-ither both iv.. or flat.! i.ii one was killed. Djk DMB eel. Human being, change wn „ ro UK ht, but grnups of men. weir wa nulioni., oi United Natl %  i a ei %¡ The i < n >PPh/ to t-Wtat tension. The '" %  i. Russians believe, whether sin-thought! A. %  think would happen'' All the earnest moralist ': ban are Bton hartal i Bhouli .> great nation slaink fro DI inii if it i II. a w. H eklos iely or not. th.it they can only gnil L*M during the last 150 years, have prosper by first i.iinmg the west, and if fate so will.-. It, die liki II not unnaturally conheroes.' You will And I iod by cluaaa thai it can only survive by are eornplately ] %  • wbkb !' %  a ire I ItvaUboi i. ^' ruining Russia. I will not for the mass bytterui DWCneal deny thut while these You will llnd men pclnting tht an ii' Btl exist, they linger of scorn at you as .. i :' %  prUne make Ihamaalvea true, if A anrl and you win be lucky if row I . i %  knows that the other is 'cowardice' dOOJ not lead to youi .i \.I.-I Increaee "f BO fter hho With l partol. they may being lynched while the thouakilL The aaa the conalaar aeneral maxims about aanid chutg you condemand. It tl hrabUlty of co-operation hvat their Inflexible ouras* with %  iinn their full benefit in irrelevant. The o,uestion for each your base poltroonery, ill reduces itself to the very simple ental one: 'Which of us will kill the The popular Ajar of Into %  ther rirst" Bui the dillcrence \ one nf the grral danajBI it our world between their Interests is caused times. If teacher-, and education' %  rt. In an age of machines by their sentiments, not by any Bl authorities id more underbid -killed KaanUBC production, exlern.l natural cause, and M It is standing of ti..' we retain the feelings, and many with the public enmities in tht* modern world needs, ;, i'.v coult il were iipprop r lmodern world. Thry have no within a gar* luce ai ate lO the Bfl ttoa in economic fact or outlook that WOUtd transform tin sober self-interest, but result world. Hut then Ideal of chnrnc solely from the surviving pugter is an old-fa h.oned one The; admire most the sort of rharacte %  %  of efflcteni evil. In the old days many IhinR: %  low pcesfblc i ny poverty EM %  M, |.l vv hen i' %  t imlno 11 i Wars crea) i without i n the labour of Ihe \.(in|iiisin!< %  %  %  % % %  ,. aarved and a low hnlh-rate has mode il nieieh possible to per I %  T %  >' [K^rity which would glVC a man leadei rap, Hi i )0U say that commerca is a differ ent thing iroin piracy, they thlnl you soft and hobo you ar mistaken. All this i> due to UM persistence of old martial idea; %  hat have descended to us Iron earlier ages. These idea were appropriate to an .,-iidatiu? scarcity, but are no' ,.pplicable to oar own limes, whca whatever acardty mil axuda b due to human stupidity and to nothing else. Although this U the to intelligence, WO like to have oui feelings roused, we like to chec and boo, we like to admire ain we hke to hate, wo Ul ihlngs In black and white. Ou. -hole mental now i J "inch Is spproprlata b us rushini; UttO high laval It Ruaala* and the west each war .Ties. became convinced that the other tcHKAHD MBJBJU mankind, purpose, liquated which once but n< ihei The fundamental %  : %  %  I %  u i revolution Ii DtlAc h ibil . %  ; % %  ., ,iti> i i aw In human had no hostile intentions, each Consider 1 % % %  !..-. fight, starvation, would be Spared all the expense of n mentality to international bankiment i h would derive ing, and you win .%  i 11 1( lot ol llM a o! Denefiti from reciprocal comby the great depression which btlni evil .'in'trim ni'"' i .ieh would escape dom tho produced whiht it remne.1 un wenhuman being*, just a. M %  IhS at. mi. bomh and the checked, nor by the belicl of Ii" the lot of the animals before daetrucUoo of large parts of the Nazis that the depression would u population. The mOUVOi Ol self"urbed if only enough Jew. wei* bstareat which on each side proexterminated, nor by th I atla re merely %  oeUee" that we should all be rict reflection of Ihe exactly identical if all the rich men wore liquidate)* %  alt-Interest of Ihe None of theaa mistakes would havi other tide, and are based on seen ix'cn mada my men in whom m pon UM assumption that the laUlsjanoq was capable of con i I,.,, olhei tide i Irrationally Inclined, trolling passion, none of then I i i: urea, human nature l>eing would have been made %  n,. by what It is. thia naked analysis will who understood ii.. %  ..ii-i i.tr. ibsmsolvi SSm abOCklni lO both sldaa, for ent groups have different interests however it is btause of UI.WIM i„i-t may be Its sources, it and not because of any pi ,,,,, fo, i p appears on both sk* i %  real fact. „. t moral crusade. In which ii is tho rue man to uphold if ws sre to Uve aapplh wll , 1V high ethical ideals. Hut all this is a modern technupie and It u .' %  f <^' psycholugi. i m is a ipecUve nation were i>opiiiarly brought up a. citizen, of th II s Time We Shook Off This ATOM DREAM By CHAPMAN PINCMrK RED-CAPPED military police stood guard utalds the Kensington headquarters of Jntain's Civil Defence. Inside. 250 Civil kffenea chiefs were studying a huge model ihowing what would happen if an atom homo exploded over Trafalgar Square. \ N' effort and no expense have been spared jj to make the model accurate to the linest S HrtaU For the atom defence plans of every S %  i In Britain arc to be bas^d on the S i mad from this master model. ^ i acted it; it has been brilliantly deS i^ncd. To make it. scientists have assessed 5 1 Bra damage from stereoscopic iclures taken by aircraft flying at 2.000ft tie likeliest height for an atom burst They have counted Ihe number of people in he London streets to calculate probable asualties at different times, day and night mining sample buildings in every irea involved — from Regent-street's shopbra in ihv north to Pimlico's tenenenls in the south — the scientists have even v-orked out the depth of road rubble. All this information has been cleverly ^ irought together in the model so that the < \rmy generals, tire service, police, and rescue *J !ii devise plans to minimise the disas** ter. By moving miniature tire engines, ambu .ind rescue equipment about the model he experts are discovering exactly how their ilans would work. They can gauge the number of tire stations ind hospitals which would be put out of iCtion by the explosion. They can see which '.nets are likely to be impassable to rescue vorkers. Ingenious ? Yes. except for one overriding act :— The model is based entirely on what would happen if u bomb as powerful as ihr one dropped on Hiroshima were exploded. A\l> such a bomb is six years out of dale. DANGEROUS At a Washington conference last month, ollowing the secret bomb tests in the Pacific. IS. atom weapons chief Dr. Alvin Graves aid :"It does not make sense to give out data m the basis of the old weapon, as it has ilready been released that weapons exist aver*] Umas larger." Phara is DO certainly that any enemy onnliy will develop such powerful bombs. iut Britain's Civil Defence precautions hould make thai assumption. This "master" model in Kensington is mosi langerous In its present form. The area of damage, the casualties, and heir effects on the rescue services would be mOrely different if a more powerful bomb were dropped. If enemy bombs were only twice as powerful as the Hiroshima type, the area of bias! laraag* would be two and a half times penter. WAKE UP! Britain's atom defence precautions should be based on the existence of a bomb at leasl five times as powerful as Ihe Hiroshima 'Jomb. in my view. This does not mean that all the scientists' nne work Is wasted. The U.S. authorities have published formulas based on actual bomb explosions which would enable the scientists to scale up the!, calculations and bring ihe "master" model u date. To carry on with detailed plans based < Ifte Huroihima-type bomb would be as foe in ag reorganising our air defences CLOSED FOR REPAIRS Advocate Stationery ', ,*0'^^ r r '^^^^^^ t ^tf^^^^y' t '^'^t* r *^^^^'^^' r '^^^t*f t***^^^ r '.' C0NG0LEUM In 101..ur<. and design, to match or tone with any colour %  easass SQUARES : 3 yds. and 3 yd* 4V 4 yds C ft. wide, rut U> ya Rrquirrmriit* PLASTIC TABLE COVERING 45 In*. Id.WHITE and ALL COLOURS WILKINSON HAYNES CO. LTD. Succeuon to C. S. PITCHER & CO. r 'Phones : 4472 & 4687 BECKWITH STOBES YES MAMAMtt you'II bv ,14'Ii,,hifnI •• ill, 1.1 >IS (IIVM AIS PEAS By Km P HARTLEY Lid. MARMALADE .. 41c. boll STRAWBERRY .. .. 5Sc. ., APRICOT 45C. ., OAMSON 4JC. ., RED PLUM . 4Jr. „ GREENGAGE .. Sic. „ JELLY CRYSTALS Auortrd Flavour* . 21c. Pki GARDEN PEAS .. .. 34c. UJi b) which prsctlesUy suppo 1 nfllcUnf. They world and not of a byuorw* worldi W| th Messerschmitt 109's, to cope rum %  > %  much ot wouMmhonie jubilant; but Stalin *>f predatory warriors. th, th.mr. material vood a* in cond ictvs to would be assassinated by Moioiov. can he nehicved within ^ penerer rrlUlOtll OXceSStre and Mr. Truman would be sueHon. so that we may hope to saw srltl lhat deeeesrulh* bstpesched bj Bei iter et least a portten of mankind fron 1 mental culturs lhat M McCarthy. After ihis, each nation ihe universal destruction wlthi w t to make leisure delightruli would return Ii itforrnai tolly, which we are tnreetened by ""•' Tin* isn Bible by the what I wish to Ulustrate by this pursuit of obsolete Ideas, th The red-capped military police were guard"K a dream of atom days gone bv. Tnay were awake; it is time the defence planners I %  — up too. —UE.S. NO ADDATIVES — Only FRl'IT and BCGAS Obtainable at all Grocers NORTH BOUND STUDENTS AND OTHERS... fl.K.i.SK NOTE !•'• anrniir Shun ini, ^= JAEGER ALL-WOOL R TRAVEL RUGS and ALOMA ALL-WOOL BLANKETS also ALL-WOOL WORSTED OVERCOAT MATERIAL 28 ozs. 58" wide in Black only ia Cewta A. In.. Mil. DRy GOODS D'EPT. BOOK REVIEW I;„IH 11 11 well known :M.it civil Barvnnl In ( %  u of 1 From toi.hmu the •1 WAS moi 01 Ihe n employer* itlve. HiMli. W< Peahlk I -a him .I „!,„ %  .,„ • mcnmii or .• %  1 .., .„ llj „„ |m J" m %  '•'"'"• Mnrt '..T,,k f l .bi.;,,,.,,, ,,,„;, wjr. per.isl. dlfflculUen nncl Intimate 'il pen %  the with an array or fountain i^nt i %  %  il "~ oil Iho ByJ. P.W. MAUAUIU. M.P Watch The KuKpeHwc Momiliiig ... '^W^W^ww^^^w^. ii "I thintf that il was the fouiiUm Peoplal Partj 1 1 pens thai Identined him for nst> opponent, Deltph Hi won them hw-.1 1 him. %  | know a lot about Pashik As the trial unfoldi the n > I know, for baatanee, that sen fed I irs r glvUii pn prices mock slajrnant and totally ..-, ,, %  1.. %  j ,,, %  %  %  %  %  FH 'Jte lundkerchltf packtt his iron he 1 srrled %  patch .!" %  with silver med Mi••tood b fron f/./.f. Sstes TkamH %  PBSM c, N> >' %  '< %  .1 I %  weall %  ".*" %  %  ConunltKl 1 \' ''"" "• cannot cirry his will in nature direel theli id rlii < ;i11 -' wn "''ssaee. with all the tender love and alTec' lion associuted with the "" An %  „ Producer of e in the regions 01 Olrti -B.cu v ^r„ ll 1LT"L ^!_— l \Vl |B §••/ %  Cadbury Chocoiat aspaa h ease ih 1 He on him unni carried so hnportantiy inciy Deltchev, and 1 contninert aaythlag bui .1 stals Is DO black 01 indwteh and a n-vnlvir. unit rnlcubiini 1 Ivcn The ton crou d ol th* 1 foi I 0* the u ilni ud rathaTthW"ataa one oi thr fount .un pan came countrj i % %  %  politics B round nd foresrouml combine to produce DO| merelv lear thai 1* %  harp hut iibiect terror thai to the skin and seeps Into (he bones. r> read this book In the night todMredti an they began ssalr mum kxirn. ; C tjsforebajunna o.. the war they put thenawlvi J and their sledge over the 2,tH)0f C eShaeklctnn Falls, taking a drop of R WOrtllns 7lKift. |„ one 8 „. doubt Lflter. all but out from U, fri thai ther,„.„., soorvsr, and coldihev h ^•"•''""> %  COM to force their sledge over an 1, bridge (list wide enough to like with blue-black depths ; columni i .i,>ci Wi: %  wh This extract stvei you the key Iri Ambler's new tnrillcr, JIDGMFNT ON OH. Kill V (Hoeoer and Srouohton. 10s. Sd ), 10 its lautnen <>f wrrtloa, to LSB niounliim suspense. In some ways this thriller is though brilliantly -K-ft ~ Kin (I'M/.done. Some of the .iction %  eenrs 1 BAY Beei Kl iwodueed In ma so sharp a fear Brotherly Banter FOR light relief from exel'. in.'i:I advise the MFOK'Olf.l „ fAFEta. b) Hume Ross (4 SOI DofcSTS, 10s. 6d). • Hume Ross'* is a Harley-slre speeslrw who has taken tii to make fun of hla profession.! , bnithii-. He has, in fart writt< tor thr writing ol .. llaht-hearted ^iteoaL" usna stountevans that The story begum when IIAFFI AnvrsTiRER journausi • 1 nvesdrepoa the do' iwo consonants S.uiih I'olr Saaa IT %  Adm11.1l J 11 Wilkln%  %  %  %  gallery record.'.. A wa 1 r |.. • • • : sml on c Irian .1 convi: I %  1 l and Mount Oay Jur ihrlUer The rwekgrou,.. After watchln %  LEY Cf those polnu, Ihe ruling the world to see thst party alnv teach them .. id imports Dr. Mrdl! irofessor of comi proeched th< • 1 %  • make the %  tth I tycoons Bu •scruple and Sir Spiro KeaU. But lltej d e lig h ted the students, and ...IU readers.—L.E.S. VES MADAMt wmsam ARE SI 1,1.1 s 110 \ -, EOH vwm mmtucANB ST9CK. . OX TONGUES LUNCHEON BEEF MEAT PASTES SALMON SAItDINES TABLE BUTTER COOKING BUTTER UPTON'S TEA UPTON'S COFFEE CEREALS GOLD iiCllli R(M c HFPSE 111 Tim CARRS CRACKERS CARR'S WATER BISCUITS CARR'S SWEET BISCUITS in Scaled Tins SWEETS In Bottles SOUTH AFRICAN JAMS in Tins and Bottles GUAVAS in tins GRAPES 111 Tins APRICOTS 111 Tins PEACHES in Tins CANADA DRY SODAS ij I-IIO.M: GODDARDS —Welle-litrr j <,:::;:;::::;:


PHavbados



ESTABLISHED 1895



Allies Agree To

| Proposal For

Approve Agenda
In Nine Minutes

UNITED NATIONS ADVANCE BASE,
Below Kaesong, Korea, July 26.

UNITED NATIONS and Communist cease-fire

negotiators agreed on an agenda and imme.

diately began formal talks to end the Korean
fighting.

Another meeting is scheduled for 10 a.m. to-
morrow in Racoong

An Advance U.N. Headquarters announce-
ment of an agreement on the armistice agenda
cautioned against undue optimism for an early end
to the war. It said it is much too early to predict
either success or the rate of progress to be obtained
in negotiations.

There were numerous basic| yesterday by removing the de-

——

im lteter

points within the framework of
the agenda on which agreement
must be reached and on which
there is at present wide division.

Negotiators approved the agenda
only nine minutes after gathering
around the conference table in
Kaesong at 2 p.m. to-day.

The agenda comprised:

Fixing of a military demarcation
line between both sides so as to
establish a demilitarised zone as
a basic condition for
tion of hostilities.

Concrete arrangements for 42

ceasefire and an armistice includ-| Conference on the terms of a mil-

ing composition of an authority,
and functions of the organisation
to supervise the carrying out of
measures,

Arrangements relating to pris-
oners of war.

Recommendations to Govern-
ments of countries concerned on
both sides,

Other Items

The U.N. announcement
that following approval of
agenda, negotiators began pre-
liminary discussions...of other
items “in order that the potential
for halting bloodshed in
may be realised as soon as possi
ble.”

This indicated that the delega-
tion talked on the question of a
demilitarised zone to be establish-
ed between opposing armies.

The Communists broke
week’s stalemate on the

said
the

last

agenda



To-day’s
Weather Chart

Sunrise: 5.48 a.m.

Sunset: 6.24 p.m,

Moon: Last Quarter.

Lighting Up: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 11.30 a.m., 10.47
p.in.

Low Tide: 5.10 a.m., 3.35 p.m.





the cessa-!

Korea | tives were formally admitted to

the
negotiations
;immediately began the discussion
of fixing the neutral zone along
the 135-mile Korean battle front
Meeting
Communist
and then

agenda or programme for formal
j armistice

that the
until an armistice has been signed.
| How long that will take, nobody
knows. The programme calls for
| fixing the demarcation line be-
tween U.N., and Communist armies
making arrangements for a cease-
fire

mand that the withdrawal of for-
eign troops from Korea be con-
sidered at armistice talks.

In its place they submitted a
compromise proposal which was
accepted to-day by the chief U.N.
tegotiator Admiral Joy. Its de-
tails were not exposed. Agreement
on the agenda came with dramatic
suddenness at the tenth session
and one of the shortest since Kae-
song meetings began July 10.

“Having agreed upon the agenda
the way is now clear for delega-
tions to enter really substantive

itary armistice. Major problems
remain to be solved in these dis-
cussions. It is much too early
to predict either success or fail-
ure. Jt is hoped that cessa-
tion of hostilities and the shed-

ding of blood will soon be over in
Korea.

There are numerous basic points
within the framework of the

agenda on which agreement must

be reached and on which there

are presently wide diversion of

views.
Neutral Zone

U.N. and Communist representa-

for cease-fire
Thursday and

programme
on

in Kaesong U.S., and
teams agreed upon,

adopted the five-point

negotiations and pro-
ceeded at once with the bargain-

| ing. }

But U.N, officials emphasized

shooting will not stop

and armistice including the
@ on page 5



Near East Is Area

Of Special Tensions

—ACHESON

WASHINGTON, July 26.

Secretary of State, Dean Acheson, said on Thursday as
he opened his testimony on the $8,500,000,000 Foreign Aid
Bill before Congress, “the Near East is an area of special

tension to-day.





Government Will

Reintroduce
Price Controls

In Britain






-orporation dividend payments in
an effort to check the inflation in
Britain.

Gaitskell said the Government
decided that “further steps must
now be taken” to check a rampant
increase in prices which
with the Korean War. The first

and kitchenware, carpet sweepers,
forks and spoons. Fish
controlled in autumn
price drops betore tnen.
The Minister of Food is consid-
ering the reintroduction of controls
on certain groceries like jam and
breakfast foods, but not on vege-
tables and fruits, Gaitskell said
Gaitskell said the Government
would introduce legislation this
autumn to control dividend pay

be
the

will
unless







LONDON, July 26. chet
Chancellor of the Exchequer "THE FIRST oOUTL OS oF a possipis Angio-
Hugh Gaitskell announced on Tranian oil partne:ship plan emerged here, as
Thursday that the Government = 7 r ’ “oe
would reintroduce some price} the Cabinet convened to eonsider sending a special
2ontrols to seek limitation on

Plan Outlined

started
price controls will be on =

FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1951





C

Cease-fire
Anglo—lranian Oil

mission to Teheran for discussions on the oil crisis.
A report from Britain’s Ambassador in Teheran,
Sir Francis Shepherd, was before the Cabinet.

It was understood that the Iranian Government had
dropped the demand for-unconditional acceptance by Bri
tain of the terms of its oil nationalization law. Britain is
still insisting that Premier Mohamed Mossadeq guarantec
the “rapid improvement of conditions for British personnel
in the oil areas.”

The Foreign Secretary, Herbert
Morrison, is expected to tell the
Commons later today of the further
course of events in Anglo-Iranian
peace moves.

Authoritative

Czechs Riot In

sources said that

een

ed |
|










FIVE CENTS

TEMPLE YARD VISTIORS



THE COMMISSIONERS OF
with Gol. R. T.

HEALTH OF
Michelin, Commissioner of

8ST. MIOHAEL along

Folice, Mr B. Skinne





7 ° eo
Director of HMithwavs and Trapsnort, M r&. WwW folon a wr ms
Engineer and Dr. J. P. O'Mahony, Director of Medical Services, visit
ed yesterday, Temple Yard, the te of the proposed new market

for hawkers to sell vegetables anti gree:

At Fasting

0 ee

Mine Worked

the reports from Shepherd had
“strengthened the implications
here that the situation is not dis-

Record

U.N. Forees Keep

By Russians






































arts. = ie PO. emnemeestion to eouragings. but there is'still a note m ; we ais ar po A a * 3
say that practically every morn-|of great caution over the ultima =: rac TATON 4a e S a alan Wan Malle. hae
ing there is news of a company |outcome of the orisis, nd ON, July 36. * £ F indian Yoga Fakir was sealed into
increasing its dividends in a Speedy acti os lore ’ Underground sources reported ; e/ rystal urn here on Wednesday
-etty bstantial fashi ; peedy action is considered af}sericus riot in the Russian operat TOUT.TH RMY FORWA } . nig d began the attempt to
pretty substantial fashion and on/the utmost importance if the situ: | cq uranium mine at Jachymov EIGHTH ARMY H.Q., KOREA, July 26 I orld fasting record, Th
a scale far greater than the] ation is » awe ine Gh ono ratek: : ears. United Nations { 3 beat two C nun bin bee ae peste reece 1e
‘ ft ation is to be saved, It was sala] Czechoslovakia largest behind tt nited Nations forces om two Communist probu ting x rd i t present claim-
general increase in incomes which he NN ntnttes § a, madd ; r es; 7 ¥e — : » 2 ; i 3 ty PEesene Claim
are currently taking place that oil stores in Abadan were] iron curtain. Qne Russian, anc attacks, and ambushed a R patrol on the central front French “Fakir” and an
This kind of thing inevitably filling up rapidly, and that the 14 natives were reportediy killec Ground activity continued to be on a minor scale however. | Italian Professor of Occult” who
acts as a continual irritant on the| finery would have to be closed «le gf ai gy Sg and an Kighth Army repo uid that U.N, casualties dur- | Chalked up 60 end 62 days respec-
at jority of i apilats down completely within séx dayg,} report came from the Nationa ps ee! ‘ . ; { ; tively, in a recent hunger booth
great majority of the population less a wis ; Committee for the liberati of ing the past 24 hours were the lightest in more than a wee! Rome
Who are not equity shareholders, | ¥Mess a way out is found before. | —™ Kia Wich ‘taima-%) Hay. = : the Ft Yich | fal ked tl
a . > Sa Beater < - . ele g "TE 8 tO have i; ‘ ~~ ‘ t ‘ } © Froich born takir asked 1¢e
Siete coutltas hernia to tale The eae poo Emami network of spies and saboteurs ir * . aE : a te page Italian court to disallow his Ttalian
down their di ds when divi- ‘anda it ima Fh ty | Czechoslovakia. Abdullah’s Heir ihaant ee oe ot: NOT colleague's Ca day axty-on the
n their demands when divi-|Independent, urged that legal] ~Tnformation reaching the grou; uthwest corner of the old Com! grounds that he ‘“victhted all
Aged payment vr soaring. steps be taken against Tudeh, |here said the Jachymov disturb W ill R “f “it H > unist “Iron Triang| but tail rules”, by no! resttag onm-broken
a e ap the control would Communist activities which helance developed after a Russiar 1 evuri ome jto dent the Allied line, At the! ojass, had no snakes in his coffin,
apply to every company, public) described as “becoming a threat engineer tried to step up produc- LONDON, July 26, |° me tine, U.N. units ambushed! and got out of the casket twice.
and private distributing more than eace sai ites i ai nrieate: JONDON, July 26 G ‘ L prec loom ,
£10,000 gross and would remain ; the peace and security of pen It said workers——mostly Emir Talar the 10-year-old | 1 Communist patret in pre-dawr The Italian said that he-was a
i { i an, saves Of Slovak and Czech] peir to the assassina Pian carkness west of Kumwa “scientist” not committed to Yoga
7 a Starts i E . » assassinat King Abe - as : 4 . :
Ubytod Sasi oe thee The U.S. Roving Ambassador, | descent—had to step up their out- tice iF ‘eapalind a oe fA UN, taak force on Wedhoaday | He lett-hia cofin tien but elaim-
7 vee Averill Harriman, President Tru+| put 40 percent if they expected tc Roma Ss cette Riche. o sanitorium | battled through a heavy mortar |ed he was escorted by two police-
= man’s personal mediator in the}c@ntinue getting normal food in Switzerland to succeed his|>att@se above Korangpo on t! jmen : ;
Fane site e are yes een reports that work father as King of Jordan, authori- oa ist fi } 1 bja highs ’ catechirntod’ tood a
ran'’s ailing Premier oha & ins P ’e sources se Thursday . , An ‘ ‘ IBY fey 7 ‘ p 6 ewe
Eleven More | Mossadeq Ag his bedside tet ers rebelled at the ultimatum and i ip coeneniad gy eta | Ae ound in an hou in 1 hal'| paration instead of water during
is icath an: {Billed the Engineer. Police rein-| 4) 1S ©XPE rei coe ; : {ght \ his fast. The Jtallan court is naw
Communists | sriter’ development ie. she “aaltoneepaiie susie vo, the” ccone| Palate piysical, condition outa AA intaracomnni capa in sonpaon sen,
, f ile pourers P wwe Na ° 7S Tb on a sarc iitven- | Suits brought by vac -.
stalemate. Authoritative quarters} $45 annie rie ea Switzerland, and his successfon]°@Alion at th®’same time attach . ons
; " i n 1 : ; i we f Kumwa behind heavy
Arrested In U.S.A. said that the next step would melee thai followed would be announced when rt ind artille b e, | . ye
; _ [probably come from London,} Vy, §, Krajcovic, Chairman of the Jordan Parliament re-assemblé ed artilery’ weatiouad the fee Berliners Ik ight
WASHINGTON, July 26. where the Cabinet is considering | Slovak Liberation Committee said|in September U.N al Communist patrols ©
_ The arrest of 11 more Commun- | Tran’s terms for talks to setile the | the incident occurred early in July One good source said: “I can i i ameied sail @ ‘Or BERLIN, July 26
ist Party leaders and functionaries!feud and put the oilfields back'together with other uprisings {sure you that Talar will return to | wednesday just east of the cea Three hundred West and East
by F.B.1. men in Los Angeles, San ) into operation. reflecting the resistance of Czech{succeed King Abdullah Be taon manenbanaes cite, Gl ates Berliners fought with fists end
eeel, ane eg ioe was $f: Harriman said that he would go{and Slovak peoples to Communist] brother Naif wants hin to returt oN. wai r leis eae 1 orti stones on the border between the
ance uursday, The roundup |, Tondon for talks with British |domination The people wants him to returt Oat ee aa man nist Ci ; Allied and Soviet sectors of the
was conducted simultaneously in geht abt en AS by eee ig the direct successor it the Ha 1 Wednesday again eee city on Thursday, ag a result of a
three Metropolitan centres. Hela ostesl Snr is one eltish Deportation semite line The Government |*UPP!y oe ate a rae a 4, | Communist propaganda meeting
l are charged with conspirin ? } ; vants o ret dso obv Re Riker er: tCwar ee: & : ‘ommun 1@ meeting
to teach and eaenbnis the forceful Ambassador, the Iranian; formuli} State Department officials could] ¥ Ap ay ; a ier a siot yrus\ pre Ons Tor @ BUNprisel at nda y any i ‘i me the Ge 1
overthrow of this Government. |for reopening the negotiations not confirm detailed underground #t @my change In —U.P ‘itack munist Youth rally to be held next
Forty four Communist leaders IT am hopeful these suggestisiis|reports although they fell within Ss aa -U.I month, A free for all fight brol
have now been indicted. Of these, | will form the basis for the reopen- Loe panier uf Anti-Soviet activity apafpninenonnem: ate :
eleven have been convicted. ing of talks between Iranian and |in Czechoslovakia Ali Kl A sk . N ° East Wi Berlin Police
; tee ; 1 ; Srairovic sat > ASKS enru va ind ser I ‘
Four of those convicted are now | British representatives in a friend-|. Krajcovic said on July 1, Red 1 1an ASKS | Oil Re placer an hs poing the fant
fugitive as are four of 21 rounded |ly atmosphere.”—.UP. bosses of Czechoslovakia circu- — ryy / ia se wool} .
up and indicted in New York, Slows lavized Iago! Epmmunists in the To Peace lalks NEW YORK. Julv 27. |
June 20. area of ratislavia. The letter rhe urnal Cominerce aid |
“Communist Party leaders ar- De Gas eri Names called for deportation of a large KARACHI, July 26 atti yer aaa oll niddiial ” ir The “ADVOCATE”
rested have long been active in j Pp e numbers of persons from the Prime Minister Liaquat Ali | Middle East, and the Western
Communist party work in Cali- N. 4 C bi Bratislavia region to war plants inj Khan, on Thursday asked the In- calaohal Ineo’? Maes HRA pays for NEWS
fornia and in various other parts ew abinet the Carpathian mountain towns of| dian Premier Nehru to visit Kara- ata? siathbaed ie. oT .
of the country on assignments is E Kremnica, Myjava, Prievidza and} chi for discussions on “restoration to the ‘orld (naticet Sollawini Dial 3113
pertaining to local county, state ROME, July 26 Banska Stiavnica, of a peaceful atmosphere” in the ' Hone tion of the oll indus . :
and national activities of the Com-| Premier Designate Alcide De] Krajcovic said this deportation] sub-continent. Liaquat however Be ie re ; sy U P. Day or Night.
munist Party,” F.B.I. Director, H.;Gasperi dropped_ ailing Countjalready is under way and has| stipulated as a pre-requigite to]! :
Edgar Hoover said.—U.P Carlo Sforza as Foreign Minister uprooted about 20,000 persons. ‘such a conference the withdrawal ———————— Se
when Fe formally announced hi He said each deported personjof Indian troop concentration
} ; 5
S a |new two party Cabinet for Italy.|was allowed to take “about 100] along the borders “to their normal
Oo i re De Gasperi himself retained the ; pounds of baggage but no food. peace time stations,” Liaquat’s
Achesow UPrVIVES Foreign Affairs post inthe new 17-|Food is scarce. in Slovakia proposal was made in a new mes-
WASHINGTON, July 26 ; member Government, his seventh | eastern part of Czechoslovakia gage to the Indian Premier 1
; ce by a ats in r0 |} consecutive pro-Western Cabinet owing to farmers resistance to|troop concentrations along the
The House by a standing vote | since 1945. e Red plan to merge little farms] countries’ border U.P.
f 171 to 81 Thursday defeated the R pl nerge little farm
of 171 to 81 on Pee | He gave 14 posts to members Of linto giant collectives
the Republican move to cut off the! ,is gwn Christian Democtati _UP. | . . e
salary of Secretary of State Dean) party, and three to Republicans in ' * ' .
Acheson, in nepts of aoe pe forming the new Government. and | Grain For India
out of office. Only two Democrats} onding Italy’s



were observed to stand up in
favour of the “get Acheson” |
move.

|
A score or more of Republicans



crisis

10-day-old Cabinet Pakistan, Turkey
Sign Treaty

U.P.



Unionists Protest |

Helps America

WASHINGTON, July 26

SUPERIOR 3-YEAR BRANDY



i ishi i ‘ ek ST. be: i Y 26 Wiilian: D. Pawley, former Am-
Time is of great importance in furnishing aid to our joined the Democratic majority to Bs ed prerelease EH, pee e cht a oF ay
friends in this area. ; itary defeat the long planned manoeuvre Jap Peace Treaty and Turkey was signed by the|Truman on Thursday, grain ai¢ In Quart and Concave
——-— . But he said yd AR after an acid debate, —U.P. ! aad Turkish Foreign Minister Faud| for India has helped the 4 nitec a B | ga]
: pecaian’ Suany Seana onust ‘We N s wie e July a ‘ Kopprulu and Pakistan Ambassa-|>tt« a gree vital materials i Pint ottles Seysh Atieas
a ni wae | because se Cc ries ) ew South Wales Trades Coun-\}"jor ian Besir Ahme Thurs. | SF6es trom sada. | ‘ a ae
War Danger made af Fine bed Be vi. inks 140 JAMAICANS cil representing more than | 3 jay A Storing to oe abated of He $ aid the Indian Governmen aed a mS
a ve ‘i at xe basic _needii- quarter of a Salient eke he Treaty there shall be mutual)" , i t Man patiens he kate
Still Reed Vos ss Re Bs, SEG] LEAVE FOR ENGLAND | inionists “on “rnursaday’ nigh tT oNd irlenaly “vetdtiona fa jwients. of manganese, ety}, ka BY THE
That is why he said “We must KINGSTON, J'ca., July 25. {Of Japan, af a threat to Australia,| Ween the two countries which| “sus back from his trip to India BOTTLED
ACHESON build up the economic strength in} One hundred and forty Jamai-|lives and security. One speaker] #8tee to start negotiations for the | pawley called at the

WASHINGTON, July 26.

U.S. Secretary of State Acheson,
said regardless of the course of
the Korean Armistice negotiations,
the danger from Communist
aggression is “no less real than it
was a month ago.”

There may be a period of com-
parative quiet if there is armistice
in Korea,” he told Senators. “If
so, we must not let ourselves be
pulled off balance by the shi
tactics. If armistice talks should
collapse, we should be ready for
a major Communist assault on
United Nations forces.

The enemy has been building up

his forces throughout this period.”

—U.P

Will Triple Oil
Payments To Iraq

BAGHDAD, July 27.
payments to



oil

years under the

sources s3id on Thursday





The Company operates under
joint British, Dutch, French, and
American ownership. The agree-
ment is understood to be based
roughly on a~50-50 spiit of the
profi similar to the agreement

t the Arabian Ameri

with King Tbr
bia. last De



; potential |
‘because it “lies within this region
| but
; programme
ift in|in other ways.”



Iraq are ex-
pected to be tripled in the next two
next agreement
reached with the British operated
Iraq Petroleum Company, reliable







the area, if it is not to be lost to
subversion or aggression.”
Acheson emphasized the impor-
tance of aid to Asia while the free
world must get many of its
strategic materials. “Of key
importance too is the industrial
of Japan,” he said

not included in this aid
since its needs are met

is

Red Pressure Great
He said “Communist pressures





cans, including male and female
artisans left by specially chartered
planes last night for New York
where they will take ship to
England.
Employment
worsening rapidly (CP).

conclusion of the agreement
The Treaty shall come into effect

15 days after the exchange of po)

struments of ratification. Lately

said the “signing of the Japanese
peace treaty would forsake the
principles of those men and
women who died in the last war

;to report to the ident on hi
servations i the ; ige
of grain aid legislation had a mir
aculou

ot

tralian soil.”—U.P.

million white crossés on Aus-



Suez Situation Is Danger Signal

FLUSHING MEADOW,















assertion. We believe it is urgent







If the treaty is signed then I see] @ €roup of these high Staff Officers) pre
rospects here are]ja

visited Pakistan.
—U.P.

have arisen on various occasion

jeord of the armistice

White House
Pres I
He



K. W.V.
eflect on the peoples anc

s of India and the Governmen
most friendly and helpful gy
—U-P. A bottle should in home K.W.V. is
PURE — WHOLESOME, Indispensable
|

be every

in Hospitals,

Nursing Homes and in private Sick Rooms.
At their respective prices, K.W.V. Brandies have

ystem there







in the Pacific area have been very New York, July 26. |that the Security Council should| within the context of the armistice ;is no other instance of aggressive : : |
great and internal pressures are Israeli Chief Delegate, Ambass-| pronounce its views on this decis-|system . land hostile practice being contin no superiors. They are made from pure and selected
continuous. Immediate need ofjador Eban, charged in a speech|ive question.” Eban argued forcefully that all!iied in the face of such urgent y . . s
military aid for this area is appat-|here before the U.N. Security) Ehan’s speech charged that the|U-N. acts since the signing of the !condemnation by authorized U.N white wines and the distillation and maturation pro-
ent. Arms we are sending tO} Council, that the Egyptian block- blockade in itself «was an illegal armistice in 1949—ineluding lift-' pepresentaiives | , 7 :
Indochina and the Philippines arej ade, violates the Suez Canal Con- and “piratical act” explicitly di-}ing of the embargo on arms shij Never yet has the Security cesses take place under the strictest Government Uxcise
urgently needed. vention of 1888 as well as Israeli-\ pocteg against “Tsvael” and chal-|ments were based on the assump-| Council failed to endorse and cot ;
With the concentration of Com-|Fgyptian Armistice agreements lenged the Eg tian assertion that| tien thot there was no state of war {firm a reasonable request of the Supervision.
munist effort in the last year in] and international law provisions] 4 jogal state ae exists between |in the Middle East and remarked!Chief of Staff in any case where
Korea some people may have for-| guaranteeing freedom of the seas. the Said dotntriss , : sarcastically. “A landmark is|the effective functioning of an |
xotten Communist pressures still] ~ Opening fhe first round of the P â„¢ ached in international history,| armistice is jeopardized t
are being kept up elsewhere in| Goncil debate on what may prove Eban recalled that Lieut. Gen. n a member of the United; He said “the Security Council 7 r T ] r ‘ Q.
this region.” ' s crucial U.N. intervention aa the] William E, Riley, Head of the|Nations asks the Security Coun-|obliged to act for suppression of A K, W. V. BRA NDY and Seda :
Acheson also emphasized Asia’s! Geteriorating Middle Eastern situ-! Palestine Truce Mission. stat djcil to honour, protect and sanction |acts of aggression no matter by |
need for economic help since,| ation, Eban told the Council] iast month that through the block-/its desire to exercise unilateral | what technique or instrumentality d. |
|“poverty, disease, illiteracy and) meeting in temporary quarters of|ade, “the effective functioning of | acts of war” jthey are committed a ay |
| resentments against former Colo- the General Assembly's hall. the Armistice agreement is jeo-| | Eban said the Egyptian blockade ii
io cian cha “My Government instructs me|pardized” and warned the Coun-| No Precedent as even more of hostile
acs Sle iene hate ia? to declare that Israeli is in no|cil that continuation of the situa- Eban also pointed out that the| because it “rest ire on a * 4 , ‘onoay ee ae have ix rate of war with Egypt and denies tion in eo ;a “serious dan- | missed ‘ ares: ~ ( aon | ave 7 a will keep all colds a nd f fis
‘ > . ‘ sat ratty that Egypt has the least right to! ger signa rulec na ie hink i as} le ne p n Royal
| elocing™ sibebetinity "to Taper. be at ean vith Israeli ‘ . ° Eban told the Council that the| the right te demand from the \déeoree of Ay 1950 3 ng that away !! 9> 1|
You are familiar with the~ very Every assertion of Egypt's in-| “aggressive and -hostile practice Egyptian Government o in- per ed to use . |
real progress we are making in| tention to maintain a state of war|of the Suez blockade is a “central tervene with the pa of gor c g en ne =| |
saration of the treaty of peace; is in itself an offence hardly le international questior a Israel th pt the Suez c I r i]
an as an essential firs | than the performance ofj complaint of limited n- nal te ‘ oe C i "
nif direction.” he ri } flow from that. ic ' milar t } Eb eclat in the ree ,


PAGE TWO



ING- COMMANDER L.













W Egd@lesfield, Director aia
al of Civ® Ayiation in the Carib-—
bean arep, left yesterday
n by* B.W.LA. for Trinidad

ere he will have a meeting
wi nourable J. Ajodhasingh,
Minister Of Works and Communi-
cations

He is expected to return tomor-
row

TwL.L. Engineer

NV rR AND MRS PASCAL

BOURNE are at present
aclidaying in Barbados, staying
with Mrs. Bourne’s parents, Mr.
and Mrs.. W. H. Corbin at “Wal-
bridge,” Skeete’s Hill, Worthing
Mrs. Bourne is the former Phyli
Corbin, With them are their two
children.

Mr. Bourne is an engineer with
Trinidad Leaseholds in Pointe a
Pierre. They expect to be here for
bout four or five weeks.

Off To England

t ASS JEANNE VAUGHAN,
ay daughte.of. Mr. and Mrs
Cyril Vaughan of Cheapside has







: Joh . and
left for Engtend where she will WALTER BRENNAN - MARIE wikoson Catherine McLEOD
attend Queen’ Mary's College, summon, A REPUBLIC PICTURE etme
London to take her*Arts degree
and also a diploma in teaching ‘ Inside her arms, he forgot he was outside the law,

A the me she is in England |
a i » ae y ith her THREE SHOWS SATURDAY 30 8.15 and 12 (Midnight).
er r Colin aug ghan.
Jeanne’s other brother Carl was WERSE ARGO eee
recently transferred to Cable and |
Wireless’ branch in Trinidad } -—— -———- --
| ACT OSe COMING oming Next Week
Olympia Dines i Where star money is made’ (Y [1] GREAT LOVER & UE RIDGETOWN SINNER OF
ly P Dee | ‘ pits oe tone eae rues i HAPPY GO LUCKY \PLAZ. a ial 2310 MAGDALA
ia ‘ ‘ ¥ ter a tar it 1 dte ) ciuaionsahdeauihaiiininiannai mesial aie
T 8.09 o'clock last night the 1 Freeing by t dance. (3) ,o i ae cae eee 8 ' & Continuing PHalipe iel
A z he ; : .. 5 Gntone . , 2.90 — & $30 pm. & Co
Oly mopia Club in celebration ; any a ay pee oe on ates aie) TO-DAY 2.0 445 & » 136 @ 8.89 p.m. (Te Tuesday)
of the &fth anniversary of the interest in tne cake ¥ (7) |
formatiorg of the Club dined at «> Anctent temple of Mexico with « a Da SILVA
Hote : ¢ iocar tle (8) ‘
oa 7 fH ’ + tis must be a merrow neck, (7) Also the Cartoon
Mrs. G =a Adainien sen ares FIRST TADY of the screen— —seen with lovely star “i Gibsons Sat tty files. (6) “HOW GREEN 18 MY ‘SPINISIN”
D H Le Ww: ra a he hi a Gear Shelley Winters, at a Beverley Hills cocktail party, on her recent 22 Take a step to make it. (5) (Popeye)
resp ctively the onatiieas Ten return to Hollywood from Europe L.B.B. 24 Britons are supposed to be, (4) ; To) p.m
spe a Big é i ale - He ee Down : . 2 as Charlie Ché Jimmy WAKELY in
Vice-Pregident of the Club from 1 Wedding age at sea’? (8) se TOLER as cis ae x___“sona of the RANGE”
its inceptton Rorbados Broxteaiien To Settle in Canada | 2 Music in the rose chart. (9) é =
Many «toasts were moved in- 7 R. NOEL EDWARDS, son ot : The ter tha tar '
cluding QGhe to the Founders and ISS DORIS JOHN, of Brook- Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Ed-|! » This shot ts close. (3) > OISTIN i eae A i Fi i ares
Officers who were at the helm of lyn. Ne Yorl rived “in eae) ce Fontat ail B iia " } 6 yery entry carries money. (3)_ ly TAZ ry Dial 8404 4 S }
the Chibttor the past five years yn, New zy K i wards o ontabelle expects oO; @ Wood every schooiLoy disiikes. (5 TO-DAY TO SUN. 5 & 8.20 p.m | THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
ubs past vea'> the colony on Wednesday by the jeave tomorrow for Canada. He ) One end of each foot. (8) ia cee ” il rO-DAY TO SUN. 8 30 p.m
Members attending the dinner ee 14 Does 2 Down do this to music FORGOTTEN WOMEN | : 5
: ; , Lady Nelson. Miss John who is a will be staying with his brother Sy supores? (4) lyse Knox — Edward Norris and | MAT. Sun. — 5.00 p.m.
Were. * school teacher is on her. return and sister-in-law Mr. and Mrs.| '6 Morning before empioyment (5: “THE GANGSTER" cre et eee
Miss Grace Bishop, Miss Dorothy Bish- . : . a z " | 18 That @ambling cube, (4) Barry Sullivan and Belita surt Virginia
op, Miss Joyce Bowen, Miss Phyllis Bowen trip home after having been on a Harry Edwards who live in Mon-| 49 o's apt for a chatee. (3) we SEaCIAL bP A. IE) | LANCASTER ARROW
Miss Daphne Clarke, Miss Merle Clarke, short cruise of the islands. ini ‘ oi ; , ne! | iauaiettOne Ot eno | FLAME and the ARRO
aris Daphne spans, Mist Merle Claes, short cruise of the i treal, Noel plans to settle in Can eisictige aa Vaseuenaés bieaielaeiey RET RN of the APE MAN | Pann ne eouhulasine
low, Miss Arftne Cummins, Miss Doreen She said that she thinks Bar- ada, 1. Ranch: 6 Dab: 9 Urchin; 10, Ape Bela LUGOSI anc a oat eens
; eet , : st inbtieekedas : Nacarat: 15, Bore: 14, Germ: 15 ‘WESTWARD BOUND’ Key rd SAT. «TH
Daniel Misg, Dorothy Donovan Mrs. bados very progressive, and q ‘ Get; 16, Window: 18, Astonisn: 20, | ——— porte anne Ones, nee te that every island she had visited Incidental Intelligence | Ominous: 21 ; ye Ba aa “TRAIL TO GUN SIGHT | “PHANTOM o% CHINA TOWN
Maxwel{ Miss Sylvia Maxwell, Miss hed its own particular charm and TENANT whose landlord was} % Cnarwoman ay Hire: 5. ones 4 —e area ‘ enti ts 5 . : : ppro; an : 12 Cotton? . : TAKELY
1 Maory aise Shells Pare diss colour. trying to evict him wrote a Weete 4p Sorb = . Jot a MACK-BROWN yee eee
Sheila Mamaags Miss Gloria’ Ramn- During her short stay here she letter cherished for its brevity De rn



ed

Carb Calling

PARTY FOR KETTE

jis the guest of Miss

Winnie

, Mis an Smith, Miss Muriel J Par- “Dear sir,
Tudor, Miss “Sheila Tudor, Miss Cicely ris of “Water Hall,” Eagle Hall —Bennett Cerf.
Vaughan, an@ Mrs. Margaret Malcott Road



THE





PLAZA

BTOWN| FROM
Â¥ Leal ic qb

2.30_4



‘SHORES OF !
THE





U.S,

also

PHILIP REED -

b Directed by WILL PRICE + wr
Produced by Wiliam

2 a

Also the Short —

Good Quality Diamond

PORT and SHERRY GLASSES
CLARET GLASSES
CHAMPAGNE GLASSES
WHISKEY GLASSES

WATER JUGS,
GOBLETS & PEACH MELBA



ADVENTURES

4 o
& 8.30 p.m.

GUTS-AND- GL
“” STORY OF THE

HOWARD da SILVA

A Paramount Picture

“HOW GREEN IS MY SPINACH”
SSeS RBSEHRREBERaERBRBHBEEHRE BeBe

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$1.23 each -



OF PIPA

Copyright - P 85




MARINES!

. YAUREE OHARA JOHN ARNE 4
TRIPOLI ©

storing,

GRANT WITHERS

ten for the screen by Winston Miller
Pine and Witham € Thomas

(POPErt

HONEY JARS.

GLASSES,



I remain,

NOW
PLAYING

They storm
fortress capital *
of the Barbary
Pirates...
marched straight
into history!

ed the

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T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE

STORE

DIAL 4220



yours. truly.’

|
—LES.



Vez Dias Int’ Amster












BARBADOS ADVOCATE




























B. B.C i COPPERS FEAT
a io. BEI N Ove 00, O06 } The Hin yan
and 1 t one for ever Pri 23,382 feet, has been
Pro r , , ) amateur climb-
-rogramme : wel seeaee olin
ir l iglishman of the Na-
FRIDAY, JULY 1951 1¢ pgliceman a Academy. It is
| . the mt thie ic na he
11.45 a.m. Programme Parade; 11.25 | teason for the campai his is the highest
a.m Listeners’ Choice, 11.45 a.m |Children have reached by Indian
World Affairs, 12 noon The News, 12.10 of police that of » found sers. The expedition was ac-
pe. Mews AAares i themselves hindered nquiri« nied by Sherpa Tensin of
ae Ke ee jabégt Berlin children who have probably the _ best
4.15 pm Flint Of The Flying ‘Squad, disappeared climber in India to-day
| 4.45 p.m. Sporting Record, 5.00 p.m = al
| England Vs. South Africa, 5.05 p.m Read ee cB 2a ' Sebi ks
Composer of the Week: 5.30 p.m. Light ! i i |
| Music, 6.00 p.m Merchart Navy Py $ th
Programme. 615 p.m. Trans-Atlant.¢}} iy ap i Y RE g> i q TT iil E A T R E
} Quiz. 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade. € °4 : 4 a A *
p.m, Today's Sport %
oO—10 45 25 SSM a1 2M
740 p.m The News 7.10 p.m, News i i Z
Analysis. 7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary TO-DAY 4.20 and 8.15 and CONTINUING DAILY
7 35 p.m. Interlude 7.45 p.m. The
Hymns We Sing. 8.00 p.m. Radio News > , we ‘ . : 2
re 8.15 p.m. English Magazine. 8.45 REPUBLIC’S ALL ACTION DOUBLE
|} p.m. Interlude. 8.55 p.m. From the
| @ditorials. 9.60 p.m. The Glory Road ramen,
}9.45 p.m. World Affairs. 10.00 p.m
| The News. 10.10 p.m. Interlude. 10.15 Sworn TO 6
| p.m Asian Survey 10.30 p.m. Tor se
|} Jones Trio 10.45 p.m. The Debate KILL A MAN
Continues

HE'D HEVER




FABULOUS
< TEXAN”

Starring





































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IPPING OPEN THE PAGES OF GLORIOUS HISTORY

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JULY 27, 1951







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FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1951



Not Guilty Of

Breaking

Into Shop

HIS HONOUR the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore
at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday discharged Denzil
Reece a motor mechanic of St. Thomas after an Assize jury
found him not guilty of breaking into the shop of Elliot

Reid at Bridgefield, St. Thomas

Egglesfield
Met Flying
Boats In J’ca

Wing Commander L. A. Eggles-
field, Director General of Civil
Aviation in the Caribbean area,
has just returned from a visit to
Jamaica.

He said that one of the reasons
for his visit was to meet the
R.A.F. Sunderland flying beats
which were making a goodwill
tour and training cruise .

They left their base at Pem-
broke Dock on July 12 and after
calling at Reykjavik in Iceland,
Argentia in Newfoundland and at
Bermuda, the three boats arrived
in Jamaica on July 17, alighting
in the harbour at Kingston.

“It was a matter of great regret
to everybody, and particularly the
personnel of the flight, that they
were unable to visit the other
British territories in the Carib-
bean. Unfortunately, problems of
engine maintenance did not permit
a longer period of flying, away
from their base’’, he said

With Amethyst

Although the Sunderland was
first laid down in 1936, following
closely on the -heels of its proto-
type, the “C” class flying boat
which became so welt known with
Imperial Airways, it is still very
valuable for long range overseas
reconnaissance and operations
against submarines. They have
been doing most useful work in
Korea and it played a prominent
part in the Amethyst incident in
the Yangtse Kiang River; in fact,
two of the members of this party,
were in the crew of the Sunder-
land which landed alongside the
Amethyst under heavy fire.

The flight was commanded by
Squadron Leader P. A. S. Rum-
bold and, from Argentia onwards,
was accompanied by Wing Com-
mander E. J. Brooks, D.F.C., who
is a member of the British Joint
Services Mission in Washington

Rain Fell
Every Day



Rain fell nearly all over the
island every day this week.
Planters who were waiting for

rain to soften the earth, have
begun planting provisions.

About the city area, one inch 11
parts fell on Tuesday and Tuesday
night and 20 parts from Wednes-
day to 6 o’clock yesterday morn-
ing. The only place rain fell
during the day on Wednesday
was about St. Michael, chiefly the
City area, but it fell during the
night over the whole island.

The highest fall was in St.
Andrew. The Belleplaine Station
there recorded 32 parts.

Following are the parts record-
ed at the various stations on
Wednesday night: Central .20,
District “A” .25, “B” .24-“C” .14,
“D” .13, “E” .4, “F” .10, Holetown
.16, Belleplaine .32, Crab Hill .5
and Four Roads .14,

FLEW OVER NORTH
POLE

FAIRBANKS, Alaska, July 25.

Ten crew members of an R.A.F.
bomber stretched their air legs to-
day after a casual hop over the
top of the world from Iceland to
Fairbanks.

It took a four-engined Aries
bomber 18 hours and 54 minutes
to go over the North Pole to Fair-
banks from Keflavik, Iceland, a
3.558 mile jaunt.—(CP),

fp

m the top of your head

< of vour Toes -

‘tural loveliness, the secret of which is
‘FAM — The Soap of the Beautiful.

Made from a_ special

eaury





be beantiful...
kin that is soft-smooth and radiant with

lather séeps deep down into th

Geta fe
skin beauty.

with intent on April 22, 1951.
Mr. E. W. Barrow appeared on
behalf of Reece while Mr. W. W
Reece K.C. Solicitor General pro-
secuted for the Crown, When the
case for the prosecution was
closed, Mr. E. W. Barrow address-
ed for 15 minutes before the
adjournment,

On resumption of hearing Mr.
W. W. Reece submitted that there
was no case to take to the jury.
Before advising them to return a
verdict of not guilty. His Honour
told the jury that he had con-
sidered the case during the inter-
val and owing to the discrepancies
the accused could not be found
fuilty of the offence,

Window Broken

First witness called for the pro-
secution was Sgt. C. Hutchinson
who is attached to the District “D’
Police Station. He said that on
April 23, he went to Bridgefield,
St. Thomas with other police-
constables and examined a shop
and noticed a window at the back
of the shop was. broken, The
window was secured by a latch,

To Mr, Barrow, Sgt. Hutchinson
said the window was about five
feet from the ground and was open
when he saw it. Lindsay Maynard
opened the shop for him and he
examined the window from inside
There was nothing under the
window inside the shop. The shop
was not untidy. He could not say
whether finger prints were taken
off the broken part of the window.

Next witness called was Cp!
Conliffe and he told the court that
on April 22, at about 11.05 p.m.
he was on duty at District “D” and
saw Denzil Reece at the station.
Island Constable Springer made
a report to him and he charged
Reece with shop breaking.

Reece made a statement which
was taken down in writing. On
April 23, he went to the shop of
Elliott Reid situated at Bridge-
field, St. Thomas. He examined
the shop and found that a window
was broken, The shop was opened
by Lindsay Maynard.

The window was unlatched,

Lindsay Maynard told the court
that he is a 19-year-old shop-
keeper of Bridgefield, St. Thomas.
He works with his brother Elliott
Reid—in his shop. Since Reece
was a schoolboy he knew him
On April 22, he closed his brother's
shop and went out. When he re-
turned to the shop he noticed that
Reece was jumping out of a win-
dow. He held him and sent for
Island Constable Springer who
came shortly after and arrested
the accused who was taken to
District “D” Police Station.

Seek Jobs
As Seamen

A large crowd of men and boys
gathered around the Harbour and
Shipping Departmdnt yesterday
seeking jobs as ratings on the
Harrison Liner Adviser which
was in Carlisle Bay discharging
camgo.

The Adviser
Harrison Liners
West Indians among her crew.
She has just come down from
U.K. and her next port of call
will be Trinidad.

Most of the crowd stood on the
wharf, looking anxiously at the
Shipping Office and hoping to hear



one of those
which employ

Is

their names called among the
picked. A quiet hum came from
them. Occasionally, light show-

ers of rain drove them to shelter.

In the office, the clerks were
kept busy signing up articles and
making the necessary arrange-
ments for the new crew to sail
with the Adviser. Quite a num-
ber of disappointed faces finally
left the wharf.



ne

to the
with

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your skin to an unbelievable loveliness thatPwill’ bevihte enyyjofpyour, friends.
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w cakes of DREAM TOILET SOAP =P use it’ faithfully,

SOAP





A b
With

Unity Rests

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Iraq

By GEORGE PIPAIL.

Political observers said

BAGHDAD, July 26
that the assassination of King

Abdullah has shifted the centre of gravity of the move-
ment for Arab unity from Amman to Baghdad, and may
hasten the realization of the first objectives.

176,660 Feet Of
Lumber Come
By “Oak Hill”

Over 176,660 feet of pine lum-
ber arrived at Barbados yester-
day by the Saguenay Terminals’
freighter Oak Hill from Halifax
making a total of 621,170 feet to
have arrived this week

The new shipment found the
inner basin of the Careenage al-
ready congested with lumber. It
is almost three weeks now that
the waterfront of the inner basin
has not been freed from lumber.

Other cargo arriving by the
Oak Hill included 1,600 bags of
flour, 3,248 bags of soya bean
meal and a quantity of pickled
meat.

A stowaway has made the trip
aown with the Oak Hill from
Cuba. He will be taken by the
ship to Trinidad from where he
will be repatriated to Cuba.

Canada, U.S. Plan
To Keep Prices
Down

WASHINGTON, July 26,

Canada and the United States
will seek new ways today of
holding baek price climbs in
essential materials which threaten
the vast rearmament programme
of both countries,

High ranking officials will confer
on the possibility of creating
administrative machinery to bind
the two countries to a common
anti-inflation policy on defence
production.

This latest industrial mobiliza-
tion conference attended by C. D.
Howe, Canada’s Defence Produc-
tion Minister and four of his
advisers is understood to be a
direct outgrowth of United States

concern over recent price in-
ereases in Canadian essential
materials.—(CP)



War And Germany

WASHINGTON, July 26.

House Majority Leader John
McCormick announced on Thurs-
day night that the House will take
up at noon, Friday, a resolution to
declare the state of war with Ger-
many at end.

The resolution has already been
cleared by the Foreign Affairs
Committee and is expected to re-
eeive near unanimous approval by
a full House.

—U-P.







. . LONG, LASTING



otal 5 then
+» RICH BEAUTY, LATHER
», CPRAGRANTLY™ ae

On July 21 the Crown Prince
Abdullah said in London that the
“death of Abdullah” wil] not
change our course, or prevent my
iamily from carrying out our
duties, and fulfilling Arab objec-
tives.” This was interpreted here
to mean that Abdullah’s campaign
tor the unity of Syria, Lebanon,
Jordan and Arab Palestine, and a
cleser link with Iraq will not
diminish, but that important
alterations in strategy are almosi
certain.

Abdullah long Wad worked for
such a union. Now the titular
leadership falls on the 16 year
old King Feisei of Iraq as the
only Arab monarch claiming
direct descent from the Prophet
Mohammed, while the actual
leadership comes from his mater-
nal uncle,

Political observers here expect
Iraq first to seek unity with Syria
alone. The campaign wil, have
strong support from the Premier
of Iraq, Noury Pasha El. Pasha
El is said to have been a member
of the Arab Independence under-
ground under the Ottoman Em-
pire,

It was he, who originally
formulated proposals for the uni-
fication of Syria, Jordan, and
Iraq as the “fertile crescent.”
Abdullah personally expanded
this concept into his pro-
gramme for qa “greater Syria.”
Noury Pasha, in recent years, hus
been concentrating on the unity
of Syria and Iraq, a combination
which observers believe makes
most economic and political sense,
and has the best chance of suc-
ceeding.

Opposition Centres

There have been measures of
public support in both countries
since Abdullah’s younger brother
Feisel proclaimed a monarchy
in Syria in 1920. He wag ousted
by the French and an oligarehy
of wealthy merchants and land
owners which would be a decisive
factor in any political coup.

Principal centres of opposition
to the “Greater Syria pro-
gramme are: Egypt—which pre-
ters her own leadership within
the looser Aral league and sees
a threat in a strong Arab state.
Saudi Arabia whose ruler
King Ibn Saud igs the traditional
enemy of the Hassemite family o1
Abdullah ever since he ejected
Abdullah’s brother Ali from the
throne at Mecca. ;

Palestinian Arabs who provide
inereasingly active hut unpredic-
table political force. z

Syria — which at present is
under a republican form of Gov-
ernment.

The British and French have
remained outwardly aloof on
manoeuvres for Arab unity.






Fever? Cold? Headaches?




ASK



TemOles (Msigietuer lou) ot 1m

—U.P.

=| TRIUMPH OVER —

AIN

= XY Za <= \
a a = \

a Me ae te
fina

tor ee A ee it oly tae Pant |

ne eee een

ky

TEN TO SEVEN, GAVE
SU BERD

C t AM
sORRV im SOL
LATE. GEORGE )



Boat Owners

Repay $61,225

During the month an amount of
$1,747.83 was repaid by
ers On loans; this makes a total of
$61,225.02 repaid to date. Inter-
est collected for the same period
wi $21.07 making a total of
paid to date, writes C. C.
Skeete, Director of Agriculture in
his report for June this year

boat own-

“1



The amount loaned for the
month was $114.92, bringing the
total foaned from the inception of
fhe Loan Scheme to $105,741.86.

Experiments with the “Investi-
gator” were continued during the
month for the capture of flying
fish.

All of the gill netting imported
for introduction to the local fish-
ermen was sold, Efforts are being
directed towards persuading
local merchants to carry this net-
‘ting part of their regular
stock.

Catches of fish dropped during
the month as the close of the
flying fish season approaches.

Five fishing boats were lost ahd
two badly damaged during the
month. Four of the lost boats were
covered by insurance.

as



131 Confirmed

His Lordship the Bishop vested
in Cope and Mitre, administered
the Sacrament of Confirmation to

131 candidates at St. Michael's
Cathedral at 8 o'clock yesterday
morning.

Twenty-one of these candidate
were from St. Winifred’s and St.
Michael’s Girls’ Schools and the}
remainder from St. Cyprian’s, Alt}
Souls and the Cathedral

Fr. G. V. E. Hazlewood present- |
ed the candidates and Fr. H. St. j
Cc. Tudor the Bishop's '
Chaplain. }

There was a Sung Eucharist}
immediately following the Con-|
firmation at which the candidates |
made their first communion,

The Bishop spoke very impres-
sively to them on_ their future }
spiritual life and christian witness, |

acted as



POLICE BAND AT
‘ROCKS’ TONIGHT

THE Police Band will render the
following programme at Hastings
Rocks to-night beginning at 8. p.m.
Famous Regimental Marches

BATTLE DRESS Debroy Somers

Overture ORPHEOUS IN THE
UNDERWORLD Offenbach
Operatic—LA TRAVIATA Verdi
Spanish Valse--ESTUDIANTINA |
;







Waldteufel
Musical Play —THE DANCING
YEARS
Instrumental Solos
TATTENHAM CORNER GALOP
DUET MAC AND MAC
Kenneth Alford

Iver Novello |

Xylophone Soloists

Cpl, Best & Bandsman Lovelle
Film Musie—THE ROAD TO }
MOROCCO Hewsen
Dance Medley—-YOU WERE NEVER '
LOVLIER Jerome Kern
Finale—Nationa Anthem of Denmark

KONG CHRISTIAN STOD VED
HOJEN MAST”
In_honour of the visit of the Yacht
“Marianne” Skipper Elmar Trastrup
and our Danish Visitors,
GOD SAVE THE





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| COULON'T REMEMBER WALTHER

YOU GAID MEET YOU AT Six

OTLOCK OR SIX FIFTEEN
anaes

Sch, Lady Noeleen, Sch. Rosaline M ,
M_ V. Sedgefield, Sch. Freedom Fieary,
Sch. Sunshine R,, Sch. Marea Henrietta,

Gumbs, from Dominica

Woatlis, for Antigua

PAGE THREE














Good
News!

Big

Price

Reductions
of

KLIM

5lb tin

Now....$0.98

llb tin

now......$1,39



Entire Cabinet
Offered To Resign

LIMA, July 26,
President Manuel Odria accepted
the resignations of two Ministers
bat rejected those of others when
tle entire Cabinet offered to step
vide to give the President scope
to reorganize the government.
lhose whose resignation he accep-
ted were Lt. Colonel Jose Del
Cabrejo, Minister of Development
ul Public Works who left for
“personal reasons,” and General
Jose C. Fillander who said he

“needed a rest.” —U.-P.

Harbour’ Log

In Carlisle Bay












sch Mary E Caroline, Seh, Franklyn
D R, Sch. Rainbow M., Sch, Mildred
Wallace, S.S. Cuidad Bolivar, Yacht ite oe ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ~
tavsaitese, Sch Cyril E Smith, Sch Ps agag hy Take pure water, add KLIM,
tenry D Wallace, Yacht Marianne, Sch aad 7 '
Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch W. L Eunicia, = , | stir and you have

iV Lady Joy, Seh Molly N. Jones, F | 3 1
Yacht Keskidee, S.S. Lady Nelson, S.S | pure, safe milk
Mormacgulf, 8 S. Inventor, 8S. Bar- K i . | ¢
bara ee BR —— eo oo oo on

ARRIVALS Math Aa

S 8. Oak Hill, 4,229 tons net, Capt, Sul- WHOLE MILK

tie, from Halifax | pure
SS Student, 4443 tons net, Capt. fe

Pemberton, from London $a

M V. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER

DEPARTURES
Schooner Blue Nose Mac, 80 tons net,
capt. McFarlane, for British Guiana
SS Cuidad Bolivar, 540 tons net, Capt

Valesquez, for Trinidad

} 8. Tribesman, 4,860 tons net, Capt



MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Montser-
rat, Nevis, St. Kitts by the MV. Carib-
bee will be closed at the General Post
Office as under

Parcel Mail at 12 noon; Registered Mail
at 2pm. and Ordinary Mail at 2 30
pm all on the 27th July 104

tiow to get rid of
STOMACH

Over 100 flights daily, 800,000 passen
Wers flown a year on 47 Skyliners
along 18,000 miles of “Maple Leaf”
routes. The th largest airline in
the world—TCA has bulit its great
record of reliability on years of smooth
comfortable, scheduled fying

Por complete information, see

GARDINER AUSTIN & co.,, LTD
McGregor Street, Bridgetown
Phone 4518

TRANS-CANADA Air Lines





FOR YOUR LEATHER NOVELTIES
SHOP AT....

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PAGE FOUR







a

Printed by the

DVOGATE



Ltd.,

Advocate Co Bread St., Bridgetown,





Friday, July 27, 1951



DISQUIETING NEWS

A REPORT from the Advocate’s corre-
spondent in British Guiana of the pending
deportation of 17 West Indians focuses
public attention to what is a fundamental
problem.

There can be no doubt that there is grow-
ing necessity for population adjustment in
the West Indies and it is for the govern-
ments in the various islayds to face up to
the problem.

The first question to be settled, however,
is the status of West Indians and their
rights within the area. This subsidiary
point arises because of the attitude of the
Trinidad Government in this matter. The
Immigration. officer of British Guiana
pointed ‘out what. has been a disquieting
fact known throughout the West Indies.
The Trinidad Immigration Jaw prohibits
any outsider from taking up employment
if there are unemployed Trinidadians who
can do the job. This means that Trinidad
must be preserved for Trinidadians and
that they can only allow the entry of other
West Indians in situations in which they
cannot help themselves.

However excellent this theory might be
as a measure of self-preservation, it is at
variance with the much vaunted plea for
federation. If this same theory were car-
ried to its logical conclusion, it would be
impossible for the people of Essex to
secure employment in Manchester or
Birmingham although they are all English

The people born in this area are West
Indians whether they come from Jamaica
or Trinidad or one of the islands in the
Grenadines, It can only mean a perpetua-
tion of the old demon of insularity when
restrictions of this kind are raised in the
various territories.

The absurdity of the position is revealed
when the Government of British Guiana
is forced to retaliate by deporting a num-
ber of West Indians to their respective
homes. The vast lands of British Guiana
have always been regarded as supplying
the possible solution for the West Indian
population problem. An_ investigating
committee and a full fledged commission
have each reported that British Guiana is
suitable for the settlement of Assyrians or
West Indians from the more thickly popu-
lated areas,

The circumstances seem to reduce any
talk of West Indian federation to a mock-
ery and a sham. The present economic
difficulties of the West Indies had their
origin in the fostering of a policy of insu-
larity in these islands. Each island com-
peted against the other and even when the
time came for bartering for better prices
for the raw material produced in the area,
they were unable to speak with a concert-
ed voice. To-day they are still competing
against each other for the establishment
of industrial projects which would furnish
employment and’ raise the standard of
living. '

Let it be admitted that the West Indies
cannot settle satisfactorily the underlying
problem of population adjustment; but
they can, by common understanding be-
tween themselves, do much towards its
ultimate settlement. This is not to be
effected by hounding people of one colony
out of another or by forbidding them to
accept profitable employment in territories
other than their birthplace, This is a mat-
ter to which the legislatures of the various
colonies must address themselves immedi-
ately if federation is not to be undermined
before it has been properly launched.

OUR READERS SAY

|

|

Human beings, ever since their
fathers invented language, have
allowed themselves to be domin-
ated by tradition. This has been
e the main cause of progress
and the main obstacle to progres
Consider it first as a cause of pro-
gress. Where should we be if each
generation had to inyent reading,
writing, and arithmetic for itself?
How should we get on if arts and
crafts were not handed on? Even
in the most progressive age, much
the greater part of our activity
is, and must be, based upon tra-
dition. We may rebel against our
parents’ narrow-mindedness, but
we can only rise above them by
standing on their shoulders.

at onc





But although respect for tradi-
tion and obedience to custom are
necessary up to a point, most
societies have carried them much
too iar, and some have brought
themselves to destruction by this
sole defect. Human beings change
their ways much more quickly
than animals do; civilised men
change their ways more quickly
than uncivilised men, and modern
civilised men change their ways
more quickly than civilised men
of former ages. Civilised societies,
during the last 150 years, have
radically transformed their physi-
cal environment, the methods by
which they secure a_ livelihood,
and the apparatus of comfort
over and above the minimum fe-
cessary for survival. The priine
eause of these changes has been
a vast increase of knowledge and
skill. The new techniques in the
material realm demand, if they
are to bring their full benefit in
increase of human welfare, an
#vccompaniment of new mental
habits. 1t is in this respect, more
than in any other, that our world
falls short. In an age of machines
and skilled scientific production,
we retain the feelings, and many
of the beliefs, that were appropri-
ate to the ages of scarcity and
primitive agriculture.

The need of new political and
social ideas is due to our increase
of efficiency, both for good and
evil. In the old days many things
that are now possible could not
be achieved by any known means.
Extreme poverty for the great
majority was unavoidable. Popu-
lation perpetually pressed upon
the limits of subsistence, except
when it was catastrophically dim-
inished by famine or pestilence.
Wars created aristocracies of
conquerors, who lived without
compunction upon the labour of
the vanquished. It was not until
the French Revolution that this
system began to be superseded by
one involving less general misery.
Now, in certain important west-
ern countries, extreme poverty has
almost disappeared, famine is un-
known, large-scale _pestilences
have yielded to medical science,
and a low birth-rate has made it
possible to preserve a high level
of prosperity whe. it has been
reached. All this is new in human
history. Struggle, fight, starvation,
and premature death have been
the lot of the great majority of
human beings ever since there
were human beings, just as they
were the lot of the animals before
them.

The fundamental source of this
beneficent revolution is scientitic
production, and the scientific habit
of mind which has given rise to it.
Two other things besides scientific
methods of production have been
necessary, namely democracy and
a low birth-rate, bu: these by
themselves would not have been
sufficient, and would scarcely have
been possible without science, ex-
cept for brief periods in excep-
tional circumstances. Though not
sufficient to produce a happy
community they are necvssary,
and machine industry without
them may lead to a new form of
serfdom quite as dreadful us any-
thing in the gloomy annals of the
past.

We hear much about the west-
ern way of life, and the need of
defending it against the castern
menace. But few in the west are
clear as to the essentials of the
western way of life, or as to what
makes it worth defending. If we
were clear about this, our propa-
ganda would be more effective,
and we should have less need
than we have at present to devend
upon military might as our sole
protection. What the west has

discovered (though ag yet the
realisation is incomplete) is a
method by which _ practically

everybody can have as much of
material goods as is conducive to
happiness, without excessive
hours of labour, and with that de-
gree of mental culture that is
needed to make leisure delightful.
This is rendered possible by the

Obsolete Ideas

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By BERTRAND RUSSELL
; not blame Governments for our
fact that one man’s work can now troubles, nor can they be cured by
produce much more than is re- merely governmental action. What
quired for one man’s subsistence. jg needed is a change in the
> ae >! ie eve © : = ‘
jut as yet this system has only a ordinary outlook of ordinary peo-
precarious life. It is threatened ple. The change that is wanted is
from without by those whom envy sometimes thought to be a moral
venders destructive, _and it 13 change, but my own belief is that
threatened from within by those nothing is required beyond a just
who are still under the domination estimate of self-interest. I know
of beliefs and passions approvri- that it js difficult to rouse enthusi-
ate to a bygone age. asm for such a view. Suppose you

The kernel of these beliefs and *#id to a population: ‘If you pur-
passions is the struggle for life. “Uce. course A, — of you will
Where this struggle is now still sail it agony, ond & e other half
necessary, it is necessary because Wi ve in squalor; whereas if
men are misguided, not because YOU Pursue course B, you will all
nature is niggardly. In former FToSper. And suppose that on
times, if two men each wished'ta ‘his basis you conducted a great
live on the produce of a piece of political campaign. What so you
land which only yielded enough think would happen All the
for one, they must either both ©4rnest moralists would rise up

starve, or fight till one was killed, #04 Say: ‘Sir, your aims are base.
Ia practice, it was not single men There are more impurtant thing
who fought, but groups of men than material prosperity. Shoulc
called successively tribes, nations, ® great nation shrink from suffer-

coalitions, or United Nations. ing if it is imeurred in a noble
cause? Was it by such degraded

self-seeking that our ancestors
made our nation great? Perish the
thought ! Away with mone)
grubbers. Let us live like heroes
and if fate so wills it, die like
heroes.’ You will find that you
are completely powerless agains
the mass hysteria so generated
You will find men pcinting the
finger of scorn at you as a coward,
and you will be lucky if your
‘cowardice’ does not lead to your
being lynched, while the thou-
sands who are lynching you con-
trast their inflexible courage with
your base poltroonery.

pleasant fairy tale is that we “our|

These considerations apply to
the present east-west tension. The
Russians believe, whether sin—
cerely or not, that they can only
prosper by first ruining the west.
The west not unnaturally con-
cludes that it can only survive by
first ruining Russia. I will not for
a moment deny that while these
reciprocal sentiments exist, they
make themselves true. If A and
B each knows that the other is
after him with a pistol, they may
consider general maxims about
the desirability of co-operation
irrelevant. The question for each
reduces itself to the very simple
one: ‘Which of us will kill the
other first?’ But the difference
between their interests is caused
by their sentiments, not by any
external natural cause, and so it is
with the public enmities in the
modern world. They have no
justification in economic fact or
sober self-interest, but result
solely from the surviving pug-

The popular fear of intelligence
is one of the great dangers of our
times. If teachers and education-
al authorities had more under-
standing of the sort of person the
modern world needs, they coulc
within a generation produce ar
outlook that would transform thc
world. But their ideal of charac
ter is an old-fashioned one. The;
admire most the sort of characte:
which would give a man leader
ship in a gang of pirates, and i
jou say that commerce is a differ
ent thing from piracy, they thin!
you soft and hope you ar
mistaken. All this is due to the
persistence of old martial ideas
that have descended to us fron
earlier ages. These ideas, J repeat
were appropriate to an age of un-
avoidable scarcity, but are not
ppplicable to our own times, whe:
whatever scarcity still exists i
due to human stupidity and to
nothing else. Although this is the
case, most of us still prefer passio:
to intelligence, we like to have our
feelings roused, we like to chee
and boo, we like to admire anc
we like to hate, we like to set
things in black and white. Oui
whole mental apparatus is thai
which is appropriate to sending
us rushing into battle with hoarsc
war cries. ¥



BERTRAND RUSSELL

nacity of mankind, which
served a purpose, but now
merely antiquated,

If Russia and the west each
became convinced that the other
had no hostile intentions, each
would be spared all the expense of
armaments, each would derive
benefits from reciprocal com-
merce, each would escape from the

once
is

Consider the application of such
a mentality to international bank-
ing,.and you will not be surprisec
by the great depression which 1
produced whilst it reigned un



It’

dread of the atomic bomb and the
destruction of large parts of the
population, The motives of self-
interest which on each side pro-
mote hostile feeling are merely a
reflection of the exactly identical
motives of self-interest of the
other side, and are based on each
side upon the assumption that the
other side is irrationally inclined.
Of course, human nature being
what it is, this naked analysis will
seem shocking to both sides, for
wherever hostility exists, however
obsolete may be its sources, it
appears on both sides as a great
moral crusade, in which it is the
duty of every true man to uphold
high ethical ideals. But all this is
merely a part of the psychological
camouflage by which homo sapiens
conceals from himself his own
lack of wisdom, Suppose some
drug were discovered which re-
moved mental mists from the
mind, and suppose that the only
two people who had taken this
drug were Stalin and Mr. Truman,
what do you think would happen?
Presumably they would meet in a
neutral spot, they would shake
hands and share a drink, and each
would say to the other: ‘Well, old
boy, I suppose you are really not
much worse than me.’ They
would then in the course of half
an hour at most find an equitable
solution to all the problems in
which the interests of their re-
spective nations were popularly
supposed to be conflicting. They
would go home jubilant; but Stalin
would be assassinated by Molotov,
and Mr. Truman would be suc-
cessfully impeached by Senator
McCarthy. After this, each nation
would return to its former folly.

What I wish to illustrate by this

BOOK REVIEW

Watch The Suspense Mounting

Probe It is well known that Civil
at Servants in fear of dire conse-
To the Editor, The Advocate— quences, have to keep their finan- “IT WAS met at the Centrai
SIR,—We are accustomed in this cial affairs from reaching the Station by my employer's local
age of the Atom Bomb, to anxious courts: (and in doing so, often per- representative. His name was He wore them like
moments. Many an ancient right form . feats of financial jugglery Georghi Pashik. “I know a_ lot
has gone to the wall, and the very which would make the Chancellor “IT saw him standing on tie BOW. I know,

meaning of Democracy has be-
come exceedingly difficult to define,
Wars and rumours of wars persist, difficulties

of the











giving promise of more difficult for existence will be open to the with an array of f ai meat sandwich and a revolver, and calculating grey “jf ; ;
; xis I an array ountain pens : ’ B grey. brid
times ahead. Wildly soaring gloating examination of total ‘he handkerchief achat pens"! that the seersucker suit was given The foreground of the story and ar DuoERee ae tis -
prices mock stagnant and totally strangers, with all the various “Under his arm he carried to him when he was working in consists of the cunning and ruth- either side. Sane
inadequate salaric possibilities, is indeed discour- thin, black despatch Meta Hanten ‘a Displaced Persons camp, that less intrigues which, in this Balkan This book is meant for boys
In the midst of all this, there aging to say the least. tak a jalli ns cane wi » 2 one of the fountain pens came country, have taken the place of advise grown-ups t on ys.
arises a new menace on the horizon FIGARO, sinpek i - te Gee es mice from Passaic, New Jersey, and party politics. 5 ps to read it. |
directed against Civil Servants, miDper “ema © Stood Sy a pillar ihat those facts can be related Background nd foreground Brother] |
which threatens to expose their G.LU. Savs Thanks enone. about him with the im- girectly to his death.” combine to produce not merely : y Banter |
ee ne 3y cee b periouS anxiety of a wealthy fear that i , ’ FOR light relief from excit» |
private, intimate, and purely traveller who sees n ter and ear Mat is sharp but’ ‘abject ment 7. advi the MED :
domestic affairs to the scrutiny of To the Editor, The Adyocate— jinn that he goth alae ae ei terror that clings to the skin and PAPERS. na Ei . R aOgUGs
some Pooh-Bah, who presumably SIR,—The President, Commit- Edin bases im carry us This extract gives you the key S®@PS into the bones, Do not Dakers, 10s. 6d.) oss (Andrey
will in future direct their affairs oe and ; tee * tig ue , =" to Eric Ambler’s new thriller, read this book in the night “Hume Ross” is a Harley-stre>
with all the tender love and affec- nase a teat 2S yal —_————————. JUDGMENT ON_:~COéDSULT' CHIE specialist who has taken time of
i oc, sje ri + ate =) i iO wo 3 > = _ ~ > D |
tion associated with the Gestapo. Rabin pre A Neuababer this (Hodder and Stoughton, 10s. 6d.), South Pole Saga to make fun of his professiona |
An edict has gone forth from letter of “Thanks” ie thane oi local Agents and Producers of to its tautness of writing, to its brothers, He has, in fact, writte: |
somewhere in the regions of the De ccaeeiihe SiGe “thenk hice aie the following Products for their mounting suspense. IT says much for the writing of a light-hearted “Citadel,”
Secretariat, calling upon local oe hee Hn One é ae Gifsin Breda Tn: some “Wass this thriller 4s Admiral Lord Mountevans that The story begins when 1
hie : 1+ Gtitadine d Us 4 Ber, adbury nocolates coe veee . is 3 i te ini
firms to submit statements of Queen's Park on Empire Day Cow & Gate Milk (Prize (Award. Conventional, though brilliantly PAtts of his autobiography, elderly millionaire invites a
Civil Servants’ private accounts, . ed) Dispa Dreft>Flit . (Prize Tone. Some of the action scénes ene * DYENTURE R Journalist to eavesdrop on the de- |
While I am sure that few reput- They wish to thank Mrs. R. N. Deedes Pie ae ae : free produced in me so sharp.a fear (Lutterworth Press, 7s. 6d.) liberations of two consultants who |
able firms in Barbados would Turner for graciously opening yj) (Prize Awarded) Ratdomnan that when I hear the centuries- evoke ‘from his personal experi- have just examined him,
comply with this high handed, and the F ete, Mrs. e G Bryan, Tea, Kraft Products,’ McClean’s old cry of “Who goes home?” in ence Lead same de gree of excite- Because the consultants spenc |
dictatorial request, (except in the ec T ‘e wills s ae tt Tooth Paste (Prize Awarded), the House of Commons I found ment that Eric Ambler evokes their time discussing the patient's |
normal course of events where the Mrs. I. SON, ers, a»: Ox0, Oak Milk (Prize recom. myself longin for the bodyguz from his imagination. income instead of his symptoms |
as 4h eats : E. Raison for judging the Stalls eng bodyguard vans : ymptoms |
administration of justice requires =: ae nd ide. Lad. mended), Quaker Oats (Prize which in days gone by used to __L@'d Mountevans was leader of the millionaire founds a new |
an investigation), still it provides ae ie, eo = eae hes Awarded), Rowntree’s. Choco- protect members through the one of the two parties which ap- medical school to teach them a/|
an interesting revelation of the donations, Mrs. J s “Wilkin- lates (Prize Awarded), Red Rose shadows of Westminster. proached _ the South Pole with lesson, and imports Dr, Medi- |
trend of events. son for organizing the Costume Tea, Seven Seas Cod Liver Oil Captain Scott. Scott decided to cough’ as professor of comparative |
Whether Civil Servants exist on Parade. Mr. John Shannon for (Prize reeds Bico Ice . ° * “ make the final assault with one medicine. =I
salt fish, caviare, or just mainly supervising the aa Cream, Canada Dry Drinks, Four aie party only, and ordered Mount- The comparisons |
“grog”, will apparently in tivare Act . Divector tion Zn eet Been 7h & R. Rum & a Judgment on Delchey” evans with two others back to Medicough male wee onieu tr |
, Shh ae ctke 5 ; ; ; . ; Enrichec read (Prize Awarded) iS much more than a conventional base. b teal 4 : tale
form part of vital statistics in tt th Mot ¢ itertain- ne . : oe a * those medical tycoons iva!
cairo dossiers and. whisy athe iment : ’ and Mount ies abies ‘i oe The background is one After watching Scott’s party Scruple and Sir Spire Keate, tet!
MEE Nah oP hvb iota Ww f ANNE BENTLEY cf those political trials behind the leave—they were the las p 1 the slighte . 4
gallery records, of the city archives.* We have also to thank the President, (G.1.U.) von Curtain in which the roliné y ere the last men in they delighted the students, and |

Exchequer
envy), and now to know that their
and intimate struggles




green with

glasses and a tigh



platform as my train drew in: a
short, dark, flabby man in rimless

carried
contained

so
t seersucker suii





“I thing that it was the fountain
pens that identified him for me.

for instance, that

the black despatch case that he
importantly

anything but a

checked, nor by the belief of the
Nazis that the depression would be
curbed if only enough Jews wer:
exterminated, nor by the Russia:
belief that’ we should all be ric}
if all the rich men were liquidated
None of these mistakes would havi
been made my men in whom in-
telligencg was capable of con-
trolling passion, none of then
would have been made by me:
who understood that when differ-
ent groups have different interests
it is because of unwise passions
and not because of any physical
fact.

If we are to live happily with
“a modern technique—and it is
possible for modern technique tc
bring a far higher level of happi-
ness than was formerly possible—
we must banish certain ideas and
substitute certain others. For love
ot domination we must substitute
justice; for brutality we must sub-
stitute intelligence; for competition
we must substitute co-operation.
We must leafn to think of the
human race as one family, and
further our common interest by
the intelligent use of natural re-
sources, marching together toward
prosperity, not separately towards
death and destruction. The menta!
change required is difficult, anc
will not be achieved in a moment,
but if the need is recognised by
educators, and if the young are
brought up as citizens of this
world and not of a bygone world
of predatory warriors, the change
can be achieved within a genera-
tion, so that we may hope to save|
at least a portion of mankind from
the universal destruction with|
which we are threatened by the
pursuit of obsolete ideas,

a badge. him.
about Pashik
can feel the prop
on him until he
Deltchev, and to
is no black ox

rarely
Stale

People’s Party try to diseredit an
opponent, Deltchev, before hanging

As the trial unfolds the reader

white, only cold

the world to see that party alive

‘

Time We Shook Off
This ATOM DREAM

‘By CHAPMAN PINCHER

RED-CAPPED military police stood guard
outside the Kensington headquarters of |
Sritain’s Civil Defence, Inside, 250 Civil
Jefence chiefs were studying a huge model
showing what would happen if an atom
bomb exploded over Trafalgar Square.

No effort and no expense have been spared
to make the model accurate to the finest
fetail. For the atom defence plans of every
»ig town in Britain are to be based on the
essons learned from this master model.

I inspected it; it has been brilliantly de- :

igned. To make it, scientists have assessed
he blast and fire damage from stereoscopic
jictures taken by aircraft flying at 2,000ft.
‘hat is the likeliest height for an atom burst.

They have counted the number of people in
he London streets to calculate probable
asualties at different times, day and night.

By examining sample buildings in every
wea involved — from Regent-street’s shop-
ying centre in the north to Pimlico’s tene-
nents in the south — the scientists have even
vorked out the depth of road rubble.

All this information has. been cleverly
xrought together in the model so that the
\rmy generals, fire service, police, and rescue
eams can devise plans to minimise the disas-
ter,

By moving miniature fire engines, ambu-
ances and rescue equipment about the model
he experts are discovering exactly how their
jlans would work.

They can gauge the number of fire stations
ind hospitals which would be put out of
iction by the explosion. They can see which
itreets are likely to be impassable to rescue
vorkers.

Ingenious ? Yes, except for one overriding
‘act :—

The model is based entirely on what
would happen if a bomb as powerful as
the one dropped on Hiroshima were ex-
ploded. !

AND such a bomb is six years out of
date. }

DANGEROUS

At a Washington conference last month,
ollowing the secret bomb tests in the Pacific,
J.S. atom weapons chief Dr. Alvin Graves
iaid :—

“It does not make sense to give out data
m the basis of the old weapon, as it has
ready been released that weapons exist
several times larger.”

There is no certainty that any enemy
‘ountry will develop such powerful bombs.

3ut Britain’s Civil Defence precautions
ihould make that assumption.

This “master” model in Kensington is most
langerous in its present form,

The area of damage, the casualties, and
their effects on the rescue services would be
entirely different if a more powerful bomb
were dropped.

If enemy bombs were only twice as power-
ful as the Hiroshima type, the area of blast
damage would be two and a half times
greater.

WAKE UP!

Britain’s atom defence precautions should
be based on the existence of a bomb at leas!
five times as powerful as the Hiroshima
bomb, in my view.

This does not mean that all the scientists’
fine work is wasted.

The U.S, authorities have published formu-
las based on actual bomb explosions which
would enable the scientists to scale up their
calculations and bring the “master” model up
to date.

To carry on with detailed plans based on
the Hiroshima-type bomb would be as fool.
ish as reorganising our air defences to cope
with Messerschmitt 109’s.

The red-capped military police were guard-
ing a dream of atom days gone by. They

were awake; it is time the defence planners

woke up too.
1

—L.ES.

By J. P.

W. MALLALIEU, M.P.

—they began their return journey.
On the way they put themselvy>s
and their sledge over the 2,000fi.
Shackleton Falls, taking a drop of
700ft. in one go.

Later, all but out from tired-
ness, scurvy, and cold, they hai
to force their sledge over an ice-

aganda working
begins to doubt
feel that there

will delight readers.—L,E.S.

PL PPEC ODDES SOD SCP PC SS EEE EPEC CCL ECOG PCRESES SS OTSOF TES

FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1951

CE PIED OP IIS

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OX TONGUES CHEESE in Tins 8

LUNCHEON BEEF CARR’S CRACKERS %
MEAT PAsres CARR'S WATER BISCUITS
batons CARR’S SWEET BISCUITS

in Sealed Tins
SARDINES SWEETS in Bottles %
TABLE BUTTER SOUTH AFRICAN JAMS §



in Tins and Bottles %
GUAVAS in tins

COOKING BUTTER
LIPTON’S TEA

3
LIPTON’S COFFEE RAPES te Ts 3
Giienasa APRICOTS in Tins

GOLD BRAID RUM PEACHES in Tins

CANADA DRY SODAS

PHone—(()DDARDS—we pvetiver

‘





PO








FRIDAY, JULY 27,

__

Postpone Bill To |
Control Elections

1951



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
Welcome New |
Industries Bill |





Temple Yard Considered
For Temporary Market
THE ST. MICHAEL'S VESTRY will at some future |

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY at their meeting yesterday,

passed with amendments 33

sections of a Bill to make pro-|

vision for the direction and supervision of the election of
members to serve in the House: the procedure at such
elections and for other purposes connected therewith. The

House considered and postp

Section 28 of the Bill dealing
with the prchibition of selling in-
toxicating liquor by liquor licensed
places and clubs on polling day,
was the cause ‘of much discus-
sion. Tiaere were those who con-
sidered the section was an abso-
lute necessity for the orderly car-
rying on of the election, while
others thought if would be penal-
isiyg rum shopkeepers.

The section was finally passed
by an 8 to 5 division.

An amendment at the request
of Mr. G. H. Adams for the de-
letion of sub-section 4 was agreed
to

Voting for the section were Mr.
Miller, Mr. Cox, Dr. Cummins,
Mr. Adams, Mr. Brancker, Mr.
Garner, Mr. Lewis and Mr.
Haynes.

Against were: Mr. Bethell, Mr.
Allder, Mr. Mottley, Mr. Reece
end Mr. Goddard.

The section now reads:

“No intoxicating liquor shall bo
sold, offered for sale or given
away at any premises to which a
licence issued under the Liquor
Licences Act, 1908, applies at any
time between the opening and the
closing of the polls on polling day,
in any constituency for which an
election is being held,

“No intoxicating liquor shall be
supplied to any person on the
premises of any club at any time
between the opening and the clos-
ing of the polls Gn polling day in
any constituency for which an
election is being held.

“Any person who contravenes
any of the provisions of either
the last two preceding sections
shall, be liable on conviction by a
Court of Summary Jurisdiction to
a fine of five hundred dollars or
to inmyprisonment for six months.”

Clause 20 states that

1. “At the hour fixed for opening
the poll the presiding officer and
the poll clerk shall, in the pres-
ence of the candidates, their
agents, and such of the electors
as are present, open the ballot box
and ascertain that there are no
ballot papers or other papers there-
in, after which the box shall be
locked, and the presiding officer
shall keep the key thereof; the box
Shall be placed on a table in full
view of all present and shall be
maintained there until the close
of the poll.

2. Immediately after the ballot
box is so locked, «the presiding ,
officer shall call upon the electors +
to vote. :

3. The presiding officer shall
secure the admittance of every
elector into the polling station, and
shall see that they are not impeded
or molested at or about the polling
station.”

Mr. Lewis (L) felt that the
boxes should be sealed, He said
that he knew that in addition to
locking. boxes there was some
method of sealing them. He be-
lieved that the Presiding Officer
used to do this although it was not
specified, and he hoped it would
continue.

Merely locking it meant noth-
ing. “You can buy a dozen keys
in Bridgetown to unlock the same
lock,” he said. “You should seal
it so that one could tell whether
it had been tampered with,”

Mr. Miller (L) said he would ask
them to consider the amendment.
He thought it should be specifi-
cally stated that the boxes should
be sealed.

Mr. Adams (L) said that there
was provision in the Ballot Act for

sealing boxes and instructions
were issued to the| Presiding
Officer. There was no point in

writing in something which was
not needed.

In Clause 21, a motion by
Mr. J. E. T. Brancker (C) raised
much discussion.

Clause 21 stated:

1. “Notwithstanding
visions of Rule 13 of the

the pro-
Rules

for elections contained in
Schedule A of the Baliot Act,
1931, the presiding officer, at

the request of any blind elector:
who has taken the oath in the form
set out as Form No. 10 in the
Schedule to this Act and who is
accompanied by a friend who is an
elector in the polling division,
shall permit such friend to accom-
pany the blind elector -into the|

oned section 21 of the Bill.

the ability to read and write. They
would be opening a door to abso-
jute non-secret election. They
were not So ‘illiterate that they
needed any special symbols or
friends to vote for them,

As soon as they had that, he
said, one candidate took nold of
everybody and things would not
go the right way. .

“You would be upsetting the
secrecy of the ballot and opening
the door for abuse,” he said, Noth-
ing could be more dangerous than

to do that. He hoped the members | Sk

of the House who had been mem-
bers for long periods, would teil
of the dangers of the proposed
amendment,

Mr. Lewis said he was perfectly

willing to risk a bling man taking J

a friend, but so far as any person
who could not read or write was
concerned, he felt the sheriff
should look after that, The sheriff
would feel that there might be a
trick in it if a man came to him
saying that he could not réad and
write and not being sure whether
he could read and write, he would
be accurate,

“fam more willing to risk the
presiding officer to make a mistake
rather than having the whole num-
ber of electors being chaperoned
into the ballot booth.

Mr. Haynes (E) said that when
a man was illiterate he became
suspicious and would feel more
confident with a friend than with
a presiding officer. He seconded the
motion for the amendment.

Mr. W. A. Crawford (C) said
that in the 1931 Ballot- Act, the
Presiding Officer was permitted
to vote for anyone who was in-
capacitated by blindness or other
physical cause.

“We might, in this case, use the
same phraseology in permitting a
friend to vote,.for someone who
was either blind or incapacitated
by any other physical cause” he
said.

Mr. G. H. Adams (L) said that
he was not in the island when the
Attorney General drafted the Bill.
He had however talked with him
since his return and he (the At-
torney General) assured him that
he had drafted it with the most
up to date legislation on the mat-
ter before him.

He felt that if the Attorney
General had left out anything that
appeared in previous local legis-
lation on the matter, he had a
sound reason for doing so. .

He appealed to honourable
members to let the section remain
as it was,

Mr. W. W. Reece (E) said that
the section only affected blind



persons and persons who could
neither read nor write, He
wanted to know if previous

legislation affecting people who
were otherwise physically incapac-
itated would still stand:

If that legislation was going to
be repealed, he would not agree
with it berause he saw no reason
why a man who, for example, hyd
lost his hands, should not be able
to cast his vote.

Mr. L. E. R. Gill (E) said that
as far as he could see, the Gov-
ernment was differentiating be-
tween a blind person and a person
who was illiterate, He could see
no reason for such differentiation.

Mr. A. E. S. Lewis (L) drew
honourable members’ attention to
section 39 of the Bill which said:
“The provisions of this Act shall
be deemed to be supplementary
to the provisions of the Represent-
ation of the People Act, 1901, and
the Ballot Act, 1931, and the pro-
visions of these Acts shall apply
accordingly.

“Provided that in the case of
conflict or inconsistency, the pro-
visions of this Aet shall prevail
over the provisions of those Acts”.

After listening to the debate, he
said that it would be right if they
were to delete section 21 from
the Bill and let the Sheriff vote
for the blind as well as those
persons who could neither read
nor write as was done previously.

Mr. Adams (L) asked leave to
withdraw his motion that section
21 stand vert of the Bill.

Mr. Crawford (C) said that he
did not agrec with that. Since in
Great Britain, the Blind Persons

voting compartment and mark the| Act of 1933 permitted. blind per-
electors’ ballot paper for him, No’ sons to use their friend to vote for
person shall at any election be al- them. There was no reason why
lowed to act as the friend of more|18 years after, similar privilege
than one blind elector. should not be extended to blind |
2. Any friend who is permitted: people in Barbados,
to mark the ballot paper of a blind| The question that leave be
elector es aforesaid shall first be| granted the honourable member
required to take an oath in wae ites St. Jeseph was then put to
form set out as Form No. 11 in the! the vote and resolved in the nega-
Schedule to this Act that he will] tive by a 6—9 division.
keep secret the mame of the can- Mr. Adams (L) told the Com-
didate for whom the ballot of such| mittee that it had been drawn to
blind elector is marked by him, fhis attention that there was a way |
and that he has not already acted [in which they could compromise ,
as the friend of a blind elector for}by using the English methcd
the purpose of marking his ballds | whereby a friend could go along
paper at the pending election. with the elector to see that thc}
8. Whenever any elector has had| Presiding Officer did not make al
his ballot paper marked as pro-| mistake,

date
ment for their permission

ary wall to Drumm Street,
The Commissioners of

to the St. Michael's Vestry,
Yard be taken and covered t

report is gone into, The fir

Mr. Mottley M.C.P,
motion to the effect. «f:
that market would
the numerous hawkers at present
uSing the several streets, pave-
ments and alleys of the immediate
“ay area.

r. J. P, O'Mahony, Director of
Medical Services, Mr. Rit!
inner, Director of Highways and
Transport, Mr. T. E, Went, M.B.E..
Colonial Engineer, and Colonel

I. Michelin, Commissioner of
Police attended the meeting on
invitation to give their views,
Opening the discussion, Myr,
M. Kidney, Chairman, explained
that the meeting had been sum-
moned as a result of a motion
made by Mr. Mottley to discuss







the providing of a temporary
market at the site known as
Temple Yard.

Suitable Sites
Under the Act of 1948-36, he
said, the Vestries are empowered
to make recommendations of suit-
able sites and to provide estimates

decide whether or not they will
é and funds to make Temple Yard,
extending from Upper Cheapside opposite St. Mary’s bound-
; Health of the parish unanimously
decided at their meeting yesterday to send an interim report
negotiations relative to the site proposed in the first interim

a vegetable market at Tudor Street.

stating that! removing
accommodate Yard.

: J ; . }as its object the establishment and H.E. the Governor, Sir Alfri strain quickly end effectively. Remeny-
made a things that had to be conside ed ut | development of new industries in/Savage in the presence of ti ber, it is this strain on the system which
Se Suis, two, |e Island ; ; Executive Committee yesierd: constitutes the biggest danger from
the hawker and three, the ques- | 3 As far as the industries them-] presented the Imperial Servic Asthma! P
tion of health. seives are concerned, I think that]Medal to Mr, Evan Alphin § Ephazone contains several healing
Regarding the public, he sa everything possible should be done]/Aubyn McAlister, retired Po

approach Gove rh-] THREE City businessmen told the Advocate yesterday

that they welcome the introduction by Government of the
New Industries Bill. Not having yet read the Bill, how
ever, they were unable to make any specific comments as
to its provisions.
Mr. Trevor Bowring of Messrs. Da. Costa & Co., Ltd
said:
care think that everybody
interested in the social and econo-
mic development of Barbados will
welcome the Bil] recently intro-
}duced by the Government, having

a temporary vegetable market. |

&-

recommending that the Temple
emporarily until such time that



choking Asthma makes you

| WHEN
gasp for breath, one Ephazone

tablet slipped in the mouth cases the


























MCALISTER GETS
SERVICE MEDAL

st interim report recommended |







“to

agents which dissolve the strangling,
germ-laden accumulations

encourage them, provided

t the
1ature of the industry

is indigen-

jthe market would be at a i

1 man-Sorter, General Post Office ;
near a bus stand, near to a park- Mr. McAlister wos awarded ¢} m Me







[ Aug, SBot and near to the meat and | PU to the island, by which I mean|Imperial Service Medel on h bronchial tubes, and in this way promotes

jfish markets, The new marke

,would relieve the Town of the|{rniture making, oil production, tion of his twenty five year i i I hong

| ; ri g¢ Be year nothing to inhale. No matter how swiftly or ur
|hawkers—thereby easing con hipbuilding, canning and bottling faithful service in the Public Se : oe 72

ia} Of agricultural products growa
lof the insanitary conditions whic! | tocally, and of course the tourist
|now exist in the streets oceupied | “ade, which, after the sugar in-
by them | Gustry, is one of cur biggest assets
| Colonel Michelin recommended |®"®d which necessitates the provi-
that they first try out the project; Sion of modern hotels to cater for
and then if it

' tion—and at the same time g attack comes, there is always tim: to che



vice of this Island

Will Lecture On Cricket

Mr. ‘Jack Kidney wil] lectur







. sort is liable istur: rma}| Sunday, August 5
good suggestion, if the | is liable to disturb the norma!





c site was| ow “ t ¢ vf "Ge e team is J. Graham (Capt.)
of cost for the approval of the| $0ing to be permanently used as a | pereusione eat ee oes she E. on. reton. J. Lorde. W r — -
Governor-in-Executive Committee | Market. B * I sponsors. “Moreover. unless the| Grandison, S. Headley Elcock | & S9%9sees ‘ PLEO POPP OCS >
or district markets, Public Urinals | question is handled ‘on a regional]. White, L. Gibbs, C. Clarke |& ‘
This Board is fully aware of| He said that the buildings at! basis it is quite possible for|W- Stoute, and D, Agard
the very unsatisfactory conditions| the entrance of the street should | Barbados to find itself competing| Twelfth man will be St. c
existing of hucksters using the| be acquired and added “if we have lin a limited market with epi | Downes
highway, streets and alleys for} market, we should have lavat ory 1 eds ia ‘ } ‘ —

selling their Soods, thereby caus-|
Ing a condition that is not only

unsightly, but insanitary,” Mr,
Kidney said,
Mr. Mottley, after welcoming

the Heads of Departments present,
said he was quite aware that they
could not commit Government on
anything they said that day, but
he would welcome any assistance
from them by way of an expres-
sion of opinion.



recently established ir
Jamaica, Trinidad, or the othe
slands, the result of which would
9e ~6to)6hUrender§ «these — particula
industries uneconomic
Late Start
Mr. G, H. King of Messrs
Gardiner Austin & Co, Ltd, we!
comes the Bill, He thinks, however
that it is somewhat late for Bai
badés, as Jamaica, Trinidad and
other colonies have long had sucti

accommodation.” Th e alleys |
which were being used as market |‘
streets have become public |;
urinals and are in a very insani-|‘
tary condition. With proper toilet
facilities, he said, it would make
an excellent site for a market
“Even in London”, he said,
“there are certain streets where
traffic is not allowed to pass and
they are used for market stree :
if that is good enough for London,

GRAND SESSIONS

There will be no sitting of th
‘ourt of Grand Sessions today
"he next sitting will be on Monda
July 30 and the court will beg
1 10 o’cloek in the morning



BLIND SCHOOL

aa a



He reminded members that the
Board was acting in a dual
capacity as Commissioners of
Health and as a Committee ap-
pointed by the Vestry to make
recommendations relative to mar-
kets, as was empowered under the
amended Vestry Act 1911-5, As
Health Commissioners, he said,
they were fully conscious of the
insanitary and unsatisfactory con-
ditions under which hawkers]
offered their ware in and around!
the City,

The Commissioners, he said,
had already submitted an interim |
report to the Vestry which was
sent to Government, relative to
the acquisition of a site in the
Tudor Street area for the erection
of one of the City markets. “My!
motion, today, does not seek to
negative in anyway that recom-!
mendation, but is recommendiny|
a temporary arrangement.” }

This, he said, was brought about |
as a result of the police who, in'
trying to cope with the ever in-|
creasing problem of traffic, were!
always getting after the hawke
who invariably found him (Mr. |
Mottley) to make appeals on their}
behalf,

Exposed To Sun

He thought or this suggestion |
Lecause not only did the hawkers }
have nowhere to sell after pur-
chasing their licences, but when



|



they did sell in the alleys they |

were exposed to the sun and rain]
which he thought was something |
of which no one, conscious of his!
responsibility to the community, |
could be proud. '

The Temple Yard area was a
street 263 teet long and 34 feet
wide. There were only about four
places in the street that
had to use it as an entrance. |
He thought that that via swt
could be closed to vehicu-
lar traffic, with arrangements be-
ing made for those people who
occupied premises abutting there-}
on.

“IT feel that nothing should be
done to remove hawkers unless a
covering of some sort is erected
over this area to protect these
people from the weather,” he
said. He then invited members to
visit the Temple Yard.

Dr. J. P. O'Mahony said that he
was of the opinion that they
would have a very congested mar-
ket if they were going to accom-
modate about 390 people in it.
“That congestion will cause in~
san&ary conditions that you will
not be able to get over so easily,
he said.



Lesser Evil

Mr, Mottley asked if they would
not prefer that lesser evil to the
most unsatisfactory and insani-
tary conditions which now exist in
Busby Alley. “Over 100 hawkers
occupy that street,” he said. —

Dr. O'Mahony further pointed
out that the area Temple Yard
was approximately 8,942 sq. ft.,
and it was possible but not prob-
able that the whole area would be
available to them.

If however that they get the
whole area, he said, there would
be approximately 25 sq. ft. to a
hawker. They should remember
that people would have to go to
the market to purchase and they

s;the erecting of a central















it is good enough for Bridgetown.” | a Bill in operation, : His Excellency the Governo

Mr. A. R. Toppin said that he} “With such a late | start,’ he Sir Altred Savage will open ¥
was not altogether convinced: that | said, “it may now be difficult for|School for the Blind today at the %
it was the best place or the most new industries here to find, at any Hurd Memorial Ss hool which is a x
central spot for a market. If the rate for some time, a market for|James Street, The function wil 1$
Police felt that it. would drive | their products. begin at 12 noon,
eet ein hawkers es ri “On the other hand, however, if nitirnnching
thee thevey occupy in the City, |the Bill which I have not yet seen,
ae should try it out temporarily | p-ovides assistance to the Hotel STILL DETAINED
before they spent a lot of money adustry so that the tourist trade 7
on it. Then, if it should be suita-! 19° oe Si aa >] ing could} ,..Daisley Evelyn oi Maxweli %
ble, he said, they could spend (can be developed, nothing coulc Christ. Church ith Ward

’ 5 , . rl spenc > 2 sine > ‘ . es -
some money on it. He was not be ‘Gn dat aoe cist trade as Government Hill, st Michael an $ You ‘re alavays welcome at
recommending that they should J pagare ; eee ind try Seewell Layne of Christ Churet
spend a lot of money by putting/CUr Second aTipaveene ae jal Were still detained at the General Wo 1 7
up sheds over it at once. a ae Pt a i nt shoul Hospital yesterday after they were N (j

- Ui ‘hy: : > given to develop it, ‘ed when the bus M-361 in

Mr. Victor Chase said he felt Teaicel % : \ __ | injurec | AG e .
that it was going to frustrate an Assistance to the Hotel Indus which they were driving, struck AR e eae .
original scheme of getting a try would in the first instance be telephone poie on Strearn Poad. $LOCLOLLOLOD OE EEEP OGL OO POCO OS BOO”,
istrict tiaviest 4 ~ Street. |& means of finding employment i
He felt dank thay ilar haat with jfor a large number of our carpen- | (Ses power SS LLORES LE LOLOL LLL LPL LLLP LLLP LM
limited sunélieas” at ect Yard )ters, masons, engineers, labourers,

AT.

WEATHERHEAD'S

You SAVE $1.00 a tin on

KLIM
POWDERED MILK

Fresh Stock at...

REDUCED PRICE

because they had already had a/ ete. Secondly, the tourist business

market in the vicinity which was q Which would result would provide

failure. He felt that they should work for an equally large number
try out the project to see if it/of butlers, maids, cooks, and other
would be a success. “If it is going] essential helpers, '

to be an alternative for the sug- “IT sincerely hope the present
gestions that we have taken pains} Bill is the one we have long been
to form sometime ago relative to expecting.” Mr. King ended,

in Tuder Stroct. | : aa Employment

in udor street, am not going to ’ 2 " ao

Rive the motion my support”, he! ». wee OT udor of Me re J. o }

said ; aie & Co., also wacom. the

ral 7 ; : | Bill, “I consider that the establish-

ieee = bd if they built | ment of any new industries here
1S arxet and did not force the) would be an asset to the island.”

people to use it, they would never he said, “It would be a means of |
employment for a

yne “
ce



SPORT

Puncheons Repaired



make use of it. finding
jmany people who are at present

Mr. T. H. Wilkinson said that unemployed, YESTERDAY'S PRICE
for six months of the year, cooper “Who can tell, it might be the oi &% 98. a3 ti ye 1
repair puncheons in the temple | means of reducing the cost of yuo: Per tin &
Yard, and so the people oecupyin; some articles, It all depends upon

TO-DAY'S PRICE
$5.98 per tin

the market would have tu put up
with a terrific noise, “if tre
street is used as a market,” He
said, “the Government shoud
take over the cooperage.”” Without
covering the market, he said. jt
would be of no use.

Replying, Mr. Mottiey said he
very much appreciated tne candid
expression of opinion by the four

the kind of industries that would
be established.”

Like Mr. King, Mr, Tudor think:
that the Bill is somewhat late i:
view of the lead that Trinidad
Jamaica and some other colonic
have. “What people have got to
find out now is what new indus
tries are going to be advantageou



YOU’LL WANT
TO WEAR

also -

DELICIOUS SWEET
BISCUITS



EE
Soo
ot S



Yard without agreeing to recom-
mend that the area be
would not meet with his



ada saan ces get ate ad, here,” he said, “I honestly think
Sopclait the Com putanee that this question is going to bel! 10c. per pk. in cellophane e
Police who seemed atwavs so wil]-|one of the Aire hh wits 3 CUSTARD CREAMS {
ing to cooperate, those de sirous of establishing ney

But he said that any suggestion| industries will have to grapple. MILK AND HONEY { SHIRTS
to remove tihe people to Temple GINGER SNAPS ‘ he

OS

CURRENT PUFFS

NEILSON’S

covered,! shillings and pence. To cover this

in Cream,
approval.{urea would be a _ bagatalle witt



He would prefer to withdraw his} what was either recently carriec 7.
motion, away, strayed or arrested from veru, Brown,
“Mr. Chase hag suid that he dors Government.” Rose B “ae ai eae
reas ' se Buds 12¢. bar
not see the necessity of spending; The Board then unanimously Buds Yellow, Rust,

Nut Rolls 12¢. bar
Cherry Creme 12c. bax
Malted Milk 12¢, bar

MOIRS'

Pineapple 11e¢. bar
Buddies tle. bar

} Peppermint Patties
Ile. bar

so much money for covering the| decided to adopt Mr, Mottley’s
area,” said Mr. Mottley, “but {| motion and recommended that oa
want to remind him that he enn-| further interim report
not think of the comfort and
health of the people in pounds

Green,

Dark Brown

be sent to
‘4e Vestry to be transmitted to the
Government,

SS

$5.21 & $5.98

INSIST ON



POODSPS OS SOO F OSS FOSS SSS

"“ PURINA CHOWS

| JACOBS CREAM
. THEY ARE THE BEST |

\

|

Crackers $1.64

$2.91 to $5.58



|

8 ae
ba H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. - Agents
SERB ERB BRERA

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
iAMITED

44, PEPE OLS GOOLE

Ij





|
|

















vided in subsections (1) and (2)

At this stage the Committee re-| would have an extremely con-





HEETS

of this section, the presiding officer| ported progress









|) FINEST














PAGE

Noth

Is unsatisfactory | the increasing number of winter|members of the newly form fi —
from every point of view, wash i: | Visitors, Commonwealth Cricket Club o “ )
out. He felt that the public w ld | Careful Thought “Cricket” at their clib room o a PHAZS ,
Set accustomed to the new market; “When it comes ta the establish-] Monday, July 30, at 4.45 pom 1 e dees thd
after a time. ment of industries designed to The following will represe: Sold by all registered chemisis. If any diMiculty,

Mr. V. C. Gale, M.L.C., said that compete with those of the big]the Commonwealth Cricket Clu A. §. BAYDEN & SONS LTD.,
he thought the site could be used industrial countries of the world {iM 4 cricket match against Bell P.O, Box 403, Bridgetown,
as a market place. “It is wide and/T think careful consideration is re-]Plaine Club at Belleplaine, St Pe eT ye eRe
Mr. “Motley nae pine a very | duired, as competition of this] Andrew, on Sunday, July 29 an












*k Asthma with Ephazone.

~

write to:

FIVE

‘How to ease the strain in 3O seconds




ig tO inject,
ectediy the

For rapid relief from Asthma, I}ronchitis and Bronchial Catarch,
always keep a supply of Ephazone tablets handy!

FOR ASTHMA AND BRONCHITIS TAKE






ee

each
each
each
yard
yard

yard

each

|
and asked for) gested area. “It would be so con-| . , gy 7 vs " OTTON SUPpETC
shall énter,in the certified copy of}leave to sit again. The House gested, that quite a number of f MERE uw iD OrVE 4s? | (REXWEAR) COTTON ay ae
the register opposite the elector’s| then adjourned for dinner. people would not go shah ie Rie | 80 x 100 a $7.86
name in addition to any other} On resumption, sections 22 to! chase; and if the peste feet go - . (REXWEAR)
requisite entry, the reason why|34 were considered and passed ane than aned ‘ he said. I INE FOODS Ox 6G 91.07
ee ee ee Oe |. oar Maas acai. coats ME Te aca tek tik | (REXWEAR)
Mr. Brancker wanted an amend- Monda ] “s the idea was for the Board to 63 x 904 $5.99
ment made so that an illjterate| + yi choose of the two evils, as Direc-| AND
person could also eae tor of auerey oe he TICK
friend to accompany him into the would choose the Temple Yard. : :
aha compartment and mark the ALLIES AGREE TO Mr. T. E, Went said that if the FINE DRINKS DAMASK TICK : io
elector’s ballot paper for him. market could not properly accom- é 86 tis, Wide Gi $2.58
He moved that vesides “At the| REDS CEASE-FIRE | mocate 400 people, but could com. e \ In Our Linen Dept. Gun Cotes
‘ anv d ele 7 rta acc , Y 7 ley .
Seda Cad, Mint cane aloctie whe @ from page 1 it would be worthwhile erecting i ||| Mlartoll Brandy Cockade um | FANCY TICK :
oe ee et and write.” j Mr. A. B. Skinner asked/|/ DANISH SALAMI SAUSAGK-—-ver lb. .............. $1.41 56 ins. wide @ . $2.18
* Mr. Mottley (E) sald that that] SUPervision of tieir observaace| whether it would not be possible CAMEMBERT CHE®S1-—per tin $1.19 BLACK & WHITE TICK
eet Saree ae 4 very neces-|@Tangements as regards to warl| for other people to get tipences |) »_ GORGONZOLA CHEESE—per Ib $1.14 56 i me 7 $9.46
BIEREEAADS | SORNEd) vaherift* prisoners, and hawk ware in the places/!! CRAWFORD'S UFILLIT BISCUITS—per tin n $1.47 o% ins. wide 52.46
wey aebadlley notiulan in’ wen | AB Tuba, wineticig’ started. formerly occupied by the hawkers! || CRAWFORDS CLUB CHEFS “yTRAW.S per tin’. $1.12 Va
said, “actually refusing to id {Communists abandoned any insis-| that would be removed to Temple |!{ PLANTERS COCKTAIL PEANUTS—per tin 96e PILLOW CASES
for people who were not altogether! tance on the question of withdraw-| Yard. He got the answer red SUN PAT COCKTAIL PEANUTS—per tin 68¢ Seema ee
blind, but could not vote forling foreign troops from Korea to|the Police would look over that. SUN PAT SALTED CASHEW NUTS—per tin $1.06 COTTON PILLOW ¢€ ASES
themselves.” be made a programme or agenda Breach of Law SUN PAT SALTED ALMONI per tin $1.25 19x 30 @ $1.45
Mr. Adams said that that ques-| item. The North Korean General, | Colonel R. T. Michelin said that. | COCKTAIL ONIONS —4 Colou per Jar 80¢
tion had been considered very;Nam Il, opened the meeting by as Mr. Mottley had said, the||| DUTCH ASPARAGUS TIPS—per tin om ya
carefully by the Government. | asking the views of Vice-Admiral,| fs wyers wore committing a breach ||| BALLANTINES WHISKY old aa (: ! \] herd \ ( 0 | td
“We have come to the conclu-|C. Turner Joy, Chief U.N. of law when they occupied the| PERLSTEIN BEER — i8c. per bottle — $4.00 per Carton. ave | 1ep) : WN UO... i000,
sion,” he said, “that there could on’ the compromise!
be nothing more dangerous than
this smendment.”

What was illiteracy? What was

| negotiator

troduced on Wednesday.

Police did not remove them.

proposal of the Communists, Bat as it was their livelihood, the

—U.P.

He that

said

there were three



\|| STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.













10, 11, 12, 13 Broad Street





PRINTED DESIGNS including Africa Prints and
other Floral Patterns from

HARRISON'S —- eroan streer

‘





7 eee







~~ i





PAGE SIX

BY CARL ANDERSON



HENRY





















é “4 P NONSENSE! I've GOT DUST THE 5
THING FOR WOU! a â„¢
2% i ——— wv . \/ GAwRSH!









HOUSE Foz VER eS ies

RENT? .. z
5 tC ny Ene 9 NO,» Z
ae my ag
ALCATS <

2)
“6

TAT TTT
ey HAIN
aa NSO


















WELL, I MIGHT
AS WELL LIE DOWN

» AND TAKE A NAP

AN FOR TWO OR THREE
yO YEARS
S22

7 NO-YOu'RE
a TOO OLD FOR





7






THE LONE RANGER

Piss
a BATES HURT?
< . : | {



eee Q
WE'LL SEND THE BOYS OUT FOR THE
MASKED MAN WHO RODE AWAY WITH)
BATES

J] WE'VE LOST THE CHANCE
fa TO LEARN AGOUT ALL
Y THE CROOKS IN

BR PATESVILLE



- ; _—— gr

BRINGING UP FATHER



———— =~.





























rr ae Pp Core ‘
5 a

yr etherstaneennpita PS {

GUE ey NRE | AH! MR. JIGGS! ee ee ee tears o >

HERE COMES PROFESSOR AM I GLAD TO I'M GORRY- EXTRAORDINARY Y” || 60 AMI-YOoU BY GOLLY-THIS

MEL, O'OSE - IT HAVE A SEE YOu-1'D BUT IAM |] THIS WILL A SEE -I GOT ALLERGY 16 A

HUNCH HE'LL WANT ME LIKE YOU TO ALLERGIC i rf

GREAT HELP To



TO GO TO ONE OF HIS ATTEND MY TO S- M& -I MUST FINE
CONCERTS - I'VE GOT TO CONCERT- =I THEY AFFECT Out iy re as
THINK FAST TOG TOUT HAVE A FIFTy- THE DE@UMS MEANS /
OF IT? ——->) PIECE OF MY BARS! | Waitin iT . Poet seat \
ed ( \_ BAND! os wit |
7 ere s > —_, ¥
Ry / ve Wa, aad WR in

A











HAZARD

a nes) oe

{i
Pe Ac
'

| RECT HEE AWHILE...
fs ) {
’ N-NO, GAHIB...OMIe
NOT H-HURT / O-ONLY »)
LITTLE TiRED / J

JOHNNY








40! VAT

BY FRANK



TILL YOU GET YOUR
| BZEATH / CAN'T THANK
YOU ENOUGH... YOU
GAVED My LIFE # +

~ TF gs




SANE OMIR'S * L-HERE
COMES MASTER /

oni2! You
ALL RIGHT? NOT



IS NOTHING, GAHIB... ¥
ONLY M-MAYBE NOW YOU






















OH, HIM, HE'S A DRIP/

60 I DID... BUT THAT WAS
TLL NEVER GO OUT WITH .

ME SO! YOU JUST |] BECAUSE I MET “THE GREAT
You"/ OH, MOTHER, T WISH 4

THIS 16 THE 7 GOOD.
ADDRESS, (WAIT
YOU COULD MEET HIM!

| SiR...

A GOOD
TIME, BUT I DON'T LIKE
THAT BOy, JEFF KING/

BY LEE FALK & RAY







\ 1
i J
wat j y /
hey
“i ey, .

iA eer

ae Fs



|



YEON 8G OOO 4 SO ph gpl pK hie x ao
PPP APE OE EG SEECEE POOL PPA? PSP AF OPE LEE ELS EEE

LSPS SSP OSS FO POS SPS CSS SOO SSCS

PPS POD

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



A

FRIDAY,

27,

JULY

1951



BUY

PEEK

FREAN

BISCUITS
TO-DAY.

,

\RVINGS

YEAST-VITE

If you have a pain you don’t have to wonder
what to take. You must take YEAST-VITE
Tablets. YEAST-VITE is the ONLY pain
reliever which ALSO contains the tonic Vitamin
By. You will be overjoyed with the result. Your
pain will vanish quickly, and you'll feel ever so
much better.

For HEADACHES, NERVE PAINS,
COLDS, CHILLS, RHEUMATIC PAINS

“'YEAST-Vi

is a registered Trade Mork



The Only Pain Reliever
containing Vitamin B,

|

et

$ RELIEVES
3 YOUR PAIN
2 and

Ss

3

s

MAKES YOU
FEEL WELL

LISA L SA

SLL ILL LLL SS

3

LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH

— Also —
GALV. OIL CANS —1, 2

———

Established
1860



T. HERBERT Ltd.

1) & 1\ ROEBUCK STREET,

& 5 Glin, Sizes

Incorporated
1926

REMINDER



TRADE MARK

of the Chesebrough Mfg. Co., Cons’d







Bottles Grolsch Beer

oe






nye ee

RACON and HAM
DELICIOUS AUSTRALIAN
Streaky Bacon ...

Cold Sliced Danish Ham

BRANDY
Nips of South African Brandy

eis

Tins Kardomah Coffee

»....... $1.20 per Ib (Sliced)
$1.07 per Ib (by the Slab)97c. per Ib (per Case)

“ Basen’ VW 24Es> Megas &
Agee ¥ Ras Ue al

Usually

(4)

Pkgs. Custard Cream Biscuits

per Ib



Excellent For the Hot Weather

Bots. Roses Orange Squash

Lemon Squash

Lime Juice Bots. Keiller’s Lime Juice
Cordial Cordial
Robinson's Orange Bots. Keiller's Orange Squash
Barley Water Bots. Brooks Orange Squash |

“YOUR GROCERS”

Bots. Robinson's Lime
Barley Water



HIGH STREET

GOES SOSCOOOOOS>



S34, 6506"

Now

95 86 Pkgs. Jack Straws

51

24





JUICES

Bots. Brooks Lime Juice
Cordial
Bots. Appella Apple Juice
Tins Bahamas Orange Juice
» Trinidad Orange Juice
» Trinidad Grapefruit
Juice
Tins Trinidad Mixed Juice
» Pure Grape Juice—
(Purple or White)
Tins Tomato Cocktail Juice
Dessert Prunes
—(1t tins) also per Ib



PHONE US

o> RS ee

VASELINE is the registered trade mark



ss SSS

SO = : SS SSS

PPLE LE LL EEE LEE ELE SPE PPE PPD SLPS PEP PPE PEC EP PLE PEELE PAELLA ELPA OPP LP EPL OTES
*

|
ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO, LTD.

<
LFLS EPL FFF FFE SFOS OSSD

4®@ Tins Gloria Evap. Milk 29

18 Cakes Ivory Soap

-



4

Pe CL Se
Bec a

ith “

OE ESO

For SLIM figure

bright eyes
and radiant
complexion










The healthy way to keep
#im and youthful is to
take Bile Beans. They
cleanse your system of
the impurities that cause
“ putting on weight,”
i liverishness,

To look and feel at
your very best start tak-
ing Bile Beans, just a
couple at bedtime,

Take

BILE
BEANS

Nature’s Gentle Aid














Magnificent Photo Cards
of Modern British Cars!
Ty |



FLAKES “= <<

Every 8-ounce packet contains 2
photo cards. (Full set, 40 cards)

UR BEST

















Usually NOW

61 50

27





Se

Tins of NESTLES HOMO-
GENTSED BABY FOODS

in Custard, Liver Soup,
Prunes with Cereal, Bone
and Vegetable Broth. .
Meat and Vegetable Broth,
Tomato Soup, Carrots,
Srinach and Peas

WE DELIVER

LLLP EAL LLL LOLI

6544366 66

FLIGOSS SE LFF LES FD
x

FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN































































a.
- '
~ £54566 66,4, %5F,% FF tt, Cyt, 654} ’
i UBL re SALES OFFICIAL NOTICE | {SSS699999599999559999%
. Q ; i s —
Te cents per agate line m week-days'| BARBADOS . ie NOTICE 3
PnONs 2508 e 12 cents per te line on Sundays, IN CHANCE RY) i & N :
coe minimum charge $1.50 on week-days In pur ce of the Chancery Act, 1906, 1 do hereby give notic all persons | & > |
sagen) hy pater | affecting the property herematter property of the defendant) to bring 1X We bes to notify our custorsers B i
The charge for announcements a| FOR RENT | be r an account of their claims w witnesses scumer and vouchers | * that cur Parts. Depa teeee MES Be R $
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknowl- 4 | to be ed by me en any Tuesday or Fr between the hours of 12 noon and » oe — ae — x 3
edgments, and In Memoriam notices 1s mid . 13 the afternoon at the Regist: Office, Public Buildings, Bridgetown, eos we Ay a a
$:.50 on week-davs and 31.80 on Sundays| Minimum charoe week “> eonte and REAL ESTATE hater th day of September. 1951 in order that su amen tai tos cuneate ot our Repair and Service Depart. % 5
for any number of words up %6 and otis ie 4 ts = oor RR | and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof r tively, otherwise such | gs ments will be closed trom the =
° yord m week-days and ls 3 « : rd . 4 cents a mates a ‘ . *% swe date for two weeks annual .
3 cents per word on yersons be precluded from the benefits of any dec and be deprived of all ‘ ; 2
‘ 2 s ' ' S holiday, Ther ill be keleton &
4 cents per word on Sundays for each; © "re On Nun days ted at Maxwell | ciaims or acainst the said property. j * oe Oe . 7. a skeleto :
ariditional word, Price reason: | PLAINTIFF: JACQUES HUMPHREY | 1% sts duty for emergencies, ;
Peery inipereionee rer ore se oe a eT . Phone DEFENDANT: ANNA LORRA SPENCER ' % . ?
| HOUSF 40] PROPERTIES: FIRSTLY ALL THAT certain piece parcel of land situate at! \% COLE &@ CO., LEB., ;
SFS Greens in the parish of St. Gec Isiand of Barbados afor.- | BA 4 FR —
DIED | DWELLING HOUSE with 1,944 s said containing by admeasureme irty > perches Abutting Ms ¥ an OBYN OTe ha. §
| io ato d situate at Cypress ind bounding on two Sides or wis of Alphonsa Hoppin = re s 7
MAYNARD: On 27th July 1951, at 10.39 eames a pea el. The house contains Drawing of May Atkins and on a road or however else the same may abut and | PLL +
: AT « 1 : aur awit , f a ! } SAE PLL LOS
p.m. at his residence “Valentino | ey . — and Dini Rooms, two bedrooms and | bound and SECONDLY ALU THA® certain piece or parcel of land | t
Rock r gustine | _ ‘ eis Yn | CoRVeniences downstairs. Two bedrooms | situate at Greens in the parish of St rge and Island of Ba arbados | peers coe aes carmermunmies ee seenerwl i
) Mi 1 cial | =9.; 51--t.f£.n.| upstairs, Government water and electric aforesaid containing by admeasurement one acre two roods Abutting |
2 Assem- | eer ——-—~ | light installed and bounding on lands of Drax Hall Plantation on lands of F, F. he | $
above resi- | | Tr above property wiil be set up for | Gill on lands of G. T. Forde and on the public road or however else |
> for Sharon | FoR SALE sale by Public competition at our office | th, same may abwt and bound Together with the messuage or | z
James Street on Friday, 27th July 1951, | dy elling house nd alla ilar other the buildings and erec- c 4
Louise Maynard ‘Wife? ; r . | tions thereon erected and built standing and being with the appur i = |
J. W._B. Maynard (Brother) —— ction of application to Miss Cum- | ae tae ha AND OTHER THINGS AT
R. V. Pilgrim, Gloria Pilgrim ming at the premises on Thursdays | Bill Atecd Wth June, 1951 MONEY-SAVING PRE
9t.7.81 AUTOMOTIVE between 1 and 4 p.m. | Dated the 26th day of July, 1951 I s 2 ICES





YEARWOOD & BOYCE, Be ee ea NEW & Renewed Wardrobes $18

Solicitors —* mr up, Dresser-robes, Chests-of-
Drawers; Bedsteads $10 up, Cra- ~
dies, Beds, Couches, Settees; Van- -
ities and Space ying Dressing
Tables $16 up; Washstands, Night-
chairs

aiaetienieainnpeeingns 27.7 ol—4n
CAR-—One hall Car 14—6, in ex- 17.7.51—Tn 4

|

|

|

MASUOLL—In memor of our dear cellent condition For particulars Dial : - aie |
mother and grandmother Deleina | 3745. J. D. Evelyn, Audit Department. | LAND AT ST. LAWRENCE suitable | |



=MORIAM

























51—an | for building sites. For particulars apply

— who sore os the ed Eee) oon oo | to K. R. Hunte, telephone 8137 or 4611 | OFFICIAL NOTICE

A ‘gr Thine etcrnal rest. | | CAR One Vauxhall 18 done only | - 7.1.51—t-1.n. | BARBADOS
The Mascoil family, 10,000 miles, like new, Phone 2861. S. H.| ~R

| Kinch or 4569 Cyril Stoute, sasie Ges in achine win tee













C . N CHANCERY
K HALL PLN: St. Peter. Acreage | (it: “ORs )

China, Kitchen and Bedroom
| In pursuance of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all persons

Cabinets; Tables for Dining,


















24.7. 51—6n . : 2 5 having or claiming any estate, right or interest or any hen ncumbrance in or Kitchen, Radio, Cocktail and '
NTS, nee | CUVEE to July 28, 1951. Purchaser pays | sere the property hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defendant) to bring oe Bocoretion: Wee Seellave:
ANNOUNCE EME CARS—Hillman Saloons 1946, 1947 ana| —@™P__ Duties and Expenses. Vendor | petore me an account of their claims with their witnesses, documents and vouchers



| 1949, Singer




Sports Model, Wolseley 14 | (eserves the right not to accept th | to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of 12 noon and

Morris Furniture; Morris Spring
hone highest or any offer, Inspection on | 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings. Bridgetown,



“Tell me







cided eereanninipemnmoc ascites | Salton and Mania 19 Salou 3 and Springitke Cushionsis
HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—tsle of 6 Cole & Co. Ltd. tn | 8PPlication to Campbell Keliman before the 29th day of September, 1951 in order that such clatms may be reported on . Suites and separate piecess Spices. SANTA MARIA—ioveliest hotel | —_— fh Nadrssinhiepnibonilicaen Sigal 22.7.51--$n | and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof respectively, otherwise such | upright, arm and rocking chairs







in Caribbean. Rates from $7.00 per head oe TANT Thrge wheel pick-up in | persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be deprived of all
a i es esi- | 4 « st the said property

per day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi- | workir order. Apply: B'dos Agencies, | laims on or against t

dential district under Government House | Ring 1508 21.7.51—6n. | AUCTION PLAINTIF®: EDWIN N LEE B BELL

hill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day, | | DEFENIL v

@ for grown-ups and children $1 up.

» . . . ,

D OCTOLR. « whenthere’s an accident, is Pianos, Banjos at $18; ‘Blectric

Pick-up Bakelite Arms and Heads

it safe to put an antiseptic straight on the wound ?” Headies, Chain and regular stiven
and boot-making—BUY NOW



BELI



PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Stewart's Hill
in the parish of St. John and Island of Barbados aforesaid containing
by admeasurement one acre and twenty two perches Abutting and

bounding on the south on lands of Mount Pleasant Plantation, on the

Edwarc's Garage, Roebuck Street, | HAMMER north and on the west on lands of Mr, B, L. Barrow and on the, east

STU ae Kt where it can be seen. Phone 2549 or | I he . 2 structe: e > e Joh Weatherhead or however else the
URE HOSPIT Al.) 3453. hone 2549 oF | 1 jhave been instructed to sell bs on lands now or late of Mr. John We ‘

We ci killfull Br on on Friday next the 27th July at same may abut and bound Together with the messuage or dwelling
e can skillfully repair your Br
ares, remove Nicotine Stains.

SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing | Pick-up Morris 8 in good working |

Beach. Rates from $4.00 per head per! order wizta almost new body. Apply 7 ry * *

day. Enquiries to D, M, Slinger, Grenada, Stoute’s Drug Store or Marshall & UNDER THE DiA
26.6.51—78n. |







In an emergency you need an antiseptic that can be used

quickly, without hesitation, and without danger or undue L. S. WILSON



Sopnemmiemnedeee 2 o'clock at th



Barbados Taxi Cab house and all and singular other the buildings and erections thereon

































































































a lish th t } lik New EI T l Serv Bay Street, One Fiat Car with erected and built anding and being with the appurtenances a
snd Polish em, to look ee i. . new battery, good tres and engine in Biil filed 2ist December, 1} ° . > 2 ‘ . . ‘et
wpecials can be delivered within three SLECTRICAL perfect working order. One Prefect 10 Dated ‘the 20th day of July, 1951 cee discomfort, You need a retisble killer of germs, but it SPRY ST.
1ours; send your Broke a ates} Buf a Car with engine also good ‘king H ily Ss,
er call at ‘Square Deal Dental Lab., Se air hg a a tyres good and battery oman Registrar-in-Chancery aiid , 1 . : : eis le I : DIAL 4069
Magazine Lane "2 ¥4 ELECTRIC MOTORS — By Newman new. Also One Jan Tug or Me- oe Oe should be non-poisonous, non-staining, gentle on human
ba from % H.P, to 742 H.P. 200 Volts 30| sal Horse with two trailers. It is in
| relies. 8 ke al 2878. DaCosta ve | Perfect working order, It is jus . iss g valuable i lean and rapi i
PERSONAL [60°02 Be SicoP SL BITE | Eon eo ee hatha ae | nnn | tissue, and valuable in promoting clean and rapid healing
Te ——j| Vision store. Very economical to rua
Wr = 2@ OP: sg 10 t 2) 7.51—5n
Wie Thee WORKDLL)” on 1 do" not | Peewouers Som tyairect Bowie} 2] Bish & ’
one else contractin 1y debt or debts tee Se ERR CENNY Gn pices ete) ake UNDER THE ILVER WN COUNCIL
. ‘ > wane w . der | 2nd withou not water heaters. ial 3873 . ‘ 7
sidhed ea i BWritten /ORDSR: bay. Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical Depart- HAMMER NEW AMSTERDAM TO c E MODERN ANTISEPTIC
sig ee y 7 mai ment. 24.7.51.—-6n On Tuesday 3st by order Re * : :
WEAN WEIs. PR eas gl era a =. | Gahan Wee 2 Shomseitee wil ase ity THE MAYOR AND TOWN COUNCIL OF NEW AMSTERDAM
SOE ae rs One NORGE REFRIGERATOR, 6 cubit | Furniture at “Uisdale", Pine Road which | hereby invite applications to subscribe to a loan of $190,( o be ———_——_—__ -—-- + —-
26.7.51—2n | ft. Open type unit, to be seen at Red- | includes: Round Tip Top Dining Table; | raised by the Council by the issue (at par) of Municipal (Bearer)
= } man & Taylor’s Garage. 27.7.51—2n | Dining and Bergere Arm Chairs; Orna- Bonds of the denominations of $100.00; $500.00; $1,000.00; $2,000.00; -



M4.
BLADON

& co.
A.F.S., F.V.A.

ae ment and Serving Tables; Plant Stand; Ds dy
LosT & FOU ND PHILCO REFRIGERATOR: 6'4 cubic | Berbice Folding and other Chairs: Dou. | $5,000.00; $10,000.00 at a rate of 4% interest payable half-yearly. ;
ft. Full width freezing chamber. Brand | bie End Settee; Liquor Case ‘all in | The issue of these Bonds has been authorised by the Mayor anc
new unit, Reconditioned throughout, | Mahogany; China Cabinet, Book shel

LOST may be inspected at Leo Yard, Cheap-





Canadian Natioual Steamships





creen; Barrel Shad Flat Top Di Town Council, New Amsterdam, with the approval of the pores
arrel Shades, a op ‘ ~ > sto confer

}and Writing Tables; Congoleum: Glass | @Md Council acting in conformity, with the authority ——

and China; Singer’s Treadle Machine |red by the New Amsterdam Town Council Ordinance,

Simmons’ & Mahogany Single Bed- The Bonds will be repaid 20 years after the date of issue, but

steads, Vono Spring; M.T. Washstand,

and Star-Delta with Single Phasing Pre- | Chamber, Ware; Green Painted Single = . . > 2 e€ v

3n. | ventor, Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co.. Ltd. | Bedsteads, Springs; Mattresses; Dress. | Whole or in part, by drawing o> otherwise at any time after the expiry

Electrical Dept. 24.7.51—6n. | ing Table; Painted Presses, Divan Bed- | of ten years from the date of issue

stad; Larder, Kitchen Tables & Utensils The issue and transfer of Bonds under the Loan is restricted to

SOUTHBOUND



en a aeraeee ele Late vee ce side. Apply H. L. Smith, Sandford,
PLOTS & SALES—bearing the name of | St, Philip. 7.1.51—ti.n.

James Benjamin Cutting, near Howell's —_
Cross Road, Finder will be rewarded on MOTOR STARTERS. — Direct-on-l
returning same to the above addr
25.7

Salls Satls Salls Arrives Sails
Name of Ship Montreal Halifax Boston DBarbades Barbados





the Council reserve to themselves the right to redeem the Bonds, in] can, cHALLENGER 20 July




23 July = 1 Aug. 2 Aug.
LADY RODNEY » July Aug 4 Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug
CAN. CONSTRUCTOR 9 Aug Aug - 21 Aug 22 Aug
LADY NELSON : 20 Aug 23 Aug. 25 Aug. 3 Sept. 4 Sept.












SWEEPSTAK
1294. and 1895

TICKETS—Series BB.
returr





Finder please

2 Burner Rippingale oi! stove and oven































































































: me : = ELECTRIC FITTINGS.—A nice assort-| Terms Cash You need the modern antiseptic ‘Dettol’,
“The public are hereby warned against | ont including. 3 : C lr are = 3 ; : ;
. ‘ey? . n @ 2 & 3 light Chromium | rey A. Scott, Auctioneer !
aig, Pakage Nace aaa | ment using SR a Chron | ce GOVERNMENT N | "8 |
|













































































































































































































2 : “Scheduled Territories” as defined below, and to; ——— te mE ae Es ‘i ee
me to J, Griffith, Country Re Electric Hot Plate, Toaster and other | residents of the . ee,
<7 5 | = 2 able on o such NORTHBOUND
aise FURNITURE nese ie interest and redemption monies on bonds being payable ot A ibed Arrives Salls Arrives Arrives — Arrives FOR SALE camel
eee ee yt 3 ace " ROTMAN © Cash.| person or persons so resident at the time the Bond was subscer Name of Ship Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal on wee
: S Sere ag : | ANKEK, T . CO. i an
WANTED Fo oe WASREUR Rie ee, Bie er eee Me aes > LADY NELSON 27 July 29 July 7 Aug. 9 Aug. 12 Aug. RESIDENCE, Strathclyde —An fi SS.
Stock of Furniture in his New Show Auctioneers Scheduled Territories” means :-— ‘ ; “ 25 Aus ra . 6 Ss 8 Sept 1l Sept imposing home with double en+—- 5
R s, Lowe ay Street. The follow- | > f the British Com- | }ADY RODNEY : ug 28 Aug. Sept. pt. pt. . .
ooms, Lower Bay Street ne follo 91.7.81-3 (1) The fully self-governing countries of the LADY NELSON 16 Sept 14 Sept 27 Sept 28 Sept 2 Oct trance driveway is available with ~ a
Minimum charge week 72 cents and |ing Bargains are offered to you: Mag = mn . 1 < , ODS, a 28 0 1 approx; 4 acres well laid out ae
3 70 . Chairs i eas : |\—_ ~ monwealth except Canada. LADY RODNEY ca 16 Oct 1a Oct, 27 Oct, et, Novr.
86 cents Sundays 24 wOrds -- over 24 | Dining Chairs $22.00 a pr.; Birch Dining | . 1 f His Majesty. with lawns, tennis court,” orna- * ae
worded ig re See Sonn | CU Sh Sn ah eh | TLC: NOTICES (3) Any tertitory adminisicred. by the Goverament of any ag yh gee
word on Sundays a pr.; Rush Arm Chairs $10.00 a pr. Rush (3) Any territory administered b. 2 G é paddock all completely enclosed — So
Rockers $11.00 a pr., Steel Arm Chairs | yart of His Majesty’s Dominions under the trusteeship The house is 2 storey and has mo,
HELP 12,00 each; pad vif iy Chairs aiid | ——_-———- Sten of the United } Nations GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD.—Agents. large lounges, dining room, gal- an ae
“ air, Caned Morris Chairs $36.00 a Pair | : laries, 3 double bedrooms, hall, ——
“Col | Development Corporation? Not forgetting a large variety of New| | Eee cents per agate line on week-days (4) Any British Protectorate or British protected State. os Sal cada) ‘ofheae Gael outbufidings ro =
lonia evelopmer srporation ae de :
invites applic tens from qualified acd ane ee Hand Furniture. Phone 4693 | midbnsey Cheeta EL Oe Wen (5) South-West Africa, JULLCRE & —
s wiertanl cw ical engineers for the| °* 5010 - spublic “SHLLOREST", Bathshéeba — pawn
one sr rise ht saath pert pot wae 24.7.51--5n, | OMd $1.80 on Sundays. pt eon Irish Republic, ROYAL NETHERLANDS Substantially built modern stone a
« rin in D Sivaterss Senle | Sn er nee anee tan iN bungalow on the brow ‘of the® eet
Sear ake rere Satans|” Sects Dna NOTICE (8) Iceland STEAMSHIP CO. FRENCH LINE jh))) iieriiensine ti 28.9 ie Pe
ee ict ae ild and rocky coast line There
salary required to Mr. G, Roddan LLANE! i. eth (9) Burma. SAILINGS FRC BTERDAM wild .
Colonial Development Corporation, 134 PieRent given that all persons having (10) The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan as pans any pe AMSTER Cie Gle Transatluntique Stick bunts tien eee ed ;
Hope Road, Liguanea, P O Jamaica. s tee Seer ese Bt oF otal Dnt eae Ue ithe A Sinking Fund commencing from the year 1951 will be pro-] ms AGAMEMNON.2nd August 1951 a | Suartdietand’ earace, Mina 4
See Start saving your Amm-i-dent Tooth | of Reed Street in the City of Bridgetown,| vided annually out of the general revenue of the Council, towards | 8.8 gabe tos ek Toe Sear ied Lube and water are laid on, band ;
Ee r ree or 2 ns > vhil who died in this Is da the 15th day aa =o over 6 acres and there are about ~_
LUMbey experience GORbLeng Apo i eae be the winner of-one of the fotiow-| of April 1948 intestate, ane. hereby we-| Payment of me Boer JJESTAD ath August 1961 Senne Ree, ne cee
letter and in person. A, Barnes & Co., tng Ist Prize $50.00, 2nd Petes a muiee pid igs in particulars of thelr The Council do not bing themselves to accept any application; ‘0 TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBG ENGLAND & FRANCE | Proposition at low figure asked,
151— 8 .7.51—26n sims duly atteste oO mo e0- ag ; ; oa vA -
Ltd. 20.7.51—t.f.n. | 316 Prize $5 philus Headley, the Public Trustee of the | and reserve the right to apportion the Bonds as they may think fit. i A peas Ca aetna a “GASCOGNE” Lith “LOCKERBIE HOUSE”, Brit-
Applications are invited for the post| BINOCULARS (for the Races) | Island of Barbados, C/o Messrs. Hutchin- No application below par will be considered MS, AGAMEMNON loth August 195) wes it a St, Lucia i a gg apr ggae tb.
r Master of the St. Andrew’s| “Schutz Model Heliolith Prism. 8 fold | son & Banfield, at their office at James ee se sealed envelopes marked | *.°: 0%) a og ? August 1951, Via suc and well built 2 storey stone
of Tead 1 APPLICATIONS must be enclosed in I 2.8. COTTICA August 1951
Anglican Secondary School, Grenada MM with blue coating complete | Street, Bridgetown, on or before the 3rc ’ st be addressed to the ae Hate A Martinique, Guadaloupe and house set well back in secluded
: . ‘ ; 95 on the outside “Application for Bond” and mu € € SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND rounds, The garde vell
Further information from the Ai hde loat cas Ma in German | day of October 1951 after which date I G CURACAO Antigua. 8 a ne i we
coh of Grenada. St orge da v. Bruce Weatherhead Ltd | Shall proceed to distribute the ts oc | Town Clerk, New Amsterdam, Berbice, British Guiana. neh MMA REE A treca® Abbi matured and there is complete
~6n 26.7.51,—3n. | the said estate among the parties enti- & Pp. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD privacy from roadway and ad
—— | — i --| tle? thereto having regard to the debts D. DOW, § oe 9. arene ied a joining property, There is a c¢ov-
Sale for Cor s CHEESE inadian Ped Cheese, Kraft} and claims only of which I shall then Town Clerk. saci ae a se i aii ati SOUTH BOUND ered entrance porch for cars,
cae Onin peaptieterioe but will ; and Tins and Hams ave had notice and that I shall not be Town Hall Soe SO ! Ov ; vin ait earenenee large lounge
corsider applications fror t your Ww M. Ford, 35} li able for assets so distributed to any : ’ : dé Berbice. 30.6.51 3n. ' * “Gascogne” 2nd April a - nee wen ase mene
men, who would like to enter this kind 9 person of whose debt or claim 1 shall New Amsterdam, Berbice. 6.5 be ) 1081 Calling at Grenada, in arge bedrooms, chen,
of business. Applications from Sales: 26.7.51,—2n, | not have had notice at the time of such The M/V “CARIBBEE wilh }) ol, one py butler's pantry, storerooms and
wanting 0 pn Change will be preeee ey, } patna ‘i accept Cargo and pamsriners <) (I armas ge ic ee anc ygual oo See en ee
Idential ly in detail te j - —— -_—-———— —-——: —-— a persons indebted to the sa SSE, Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, ) rench G a, i ‘ "
conneroHA See | the sy care of Hair and Scalp | estate requested to settle their ac- Nevis and St. Kitts, Salling | itt ete. A very interesting and de-
try “Danderine” and note the soft lus- | counts without deias Vriaay 2tth inst. s sirable property, <
rous look i using. Price 1/3 and 2/-| DAYED this 24th day of July,
School | bor, Knight's Ltd. = SS:S~*dY SSsSIMOTHY T. HEADE Just in time for the Hurricane Season sno MAP MBean I Accepting Passengers, encknaibeis bundles: dane .
helda the Sonool: | i 26.7.51—2n. | ; : Public Trustee, accept Cargo and Passengers for )) Cargo and Mail An Estate House built of stone a
ing to apply himself diligently to beir Swoon npecen nna as ts + Qualified Administrator of the Estate at, Laie Grenada and “rubs. | yin vine Scoring Soe. shingled ro
tratried 86 a. edieaiar FLOOR POLISHERS -— Keep your | of Desdemona Foster-Turton, TABLE M D Missengers. only for St. Vincent. }}{ | Pr ; eception, rooms, =
Appiy in f instance> by Ictter in ow Floors in good condition with Johnson's | deceased. Date of Sailing to be notified (4 verandahs ete, also garage and om
handwiit.ng to Hull & Son, P.O. Box 192 | Wax pola Dial 3878, Da Coen Co ‘| 26.7.51—3n ' ba i { R. M. JONES & Co Ltd. abhtoer bts ae ‘en stands op
; 26.7 an, | Ltd., El Dept. 7.51—6n as 5 che 8 A of acres 0! me
GPO ( 1—8n, | Ltd ep E 1 | B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS i) ’ land (mahogany) approached-wia
ee eae At. SieiAr Seo eA . y 7 z Sa oed : . 7s ssoc : m9 a long driveway flank@d “with
WIDEAWAKE junior with knowlede GALVANIZED NAILS--Sizes to | PD UY ASSOCIATION (Ine,) y AGEN’ S y 1
of Customs work and import and export 2” at 31 cents per Ib. Limited Quantity LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE THE i cohulay EMI ee NS : ‘| ws gB14 closely planted mahogany trees
licences routine Apply in your ow only, G. W. Hutchinson & Co., Ltd (Transfer and Removal) Corner of Broad anc Tudor Streets { Consignee. Tele, 4047 iy | Phone %: Soe. gfe outstanding attractions
handwriting in the first instance to| Broad and Roebuck Streets Wk appieation wf -Clains “Hope “et * of Holder's is the very lovely and
HAROLD PROVERBS & C 26.7.51—2n. | Orange Hill, St. James holder of PFS FSM POTS Se SESS | 5! heavily wooded site which has the
_ LACTOMETERS For ascertaining "ene | Liquor.’ Idcense No. 10M of i961 in 55999000 Gaol WEN, Ale vlawee ror ae
eee - a ~ ar 1 s om 5 7 Rae PF OOOOOSS 7 Y -
ri sh hness of milk, To be obtained from | ‘spect ot a board and shingled Shop | 9656565656666 9G STOO IP PDOP OPP PPSPOIVPPOPODPPPIASS did me ¥* Pee ee sides, Coast and bathing under 1 =
MISC EL LAN :0US u with shedroof attached at Endeavour a a 2g
| ‘Bruce Weatherhead Ltd ; | St. James to remove said License to a| ¢ x mile, Town 6 miles <
— a 26.7 .51—3n. | } : : ; ‘ >
. shingi op ated at “ jen
a PLAY PEN 40 ins, x 40 ins Folding, | board and ingied shor situatec oe 1% TOBRUK", Cattlewash, Bath-
with logs and castors preferred. Write |"pippg——Power’s Positive Pills” best | Et wvour, St Janes and to use it at Once A ain as lk % | % wheba—a picturesque holiday
“Playpen”, P. O Box 92 state finish for all Liver and Stomach ills. rice | such la described a emis . be 1081 4 $ % e I home on the beach with about 3
a” peice Sl—t.f.t ; yht's Ltd 98.7.51-8n, | Dated this ath day of July, 190i. Rid of an acre of land, Timber o
price 1,- bot, Knight's Ltd. CLAINE HOPE % imber con
————eeeeeee “Atelicant struction raiséd on stone pillars,
PLASTIC RAINCOATS—Just in time}, if NURSE, Esq pplice % aninisd oanatlan throuatadt
for Rainy Season. Imported Raincoats| "Si. “Magistrate. BARGAIN % @ There are 3 bedrooms with. wash
ALE all sizes and colours $2.98, Plastic Pa | - oman x basins, lounge, wide gallery over-
~ na District “E.", Holetown. r
cls Pretty Designs $1.69. Kirpalani, 52 = - a aah looking the sea, kitceh servant's
Ss t. 27.7.51—-1n. | N.B.—This application will be consider % #o0me and-outside bathint bi
(The Provost Marshal's Act, 1904 eaeetl | Err ee bl} ed at a Licensing Court to be held on 1 - Gus rooms and outside bathing, cublls “
(1904-6) § 30 Reo lie the 7th August, 1951, at 11,00 o'clock a.m. =n 5
On Friday the 10th day of August. 1951 ‘RECORDS: Witisedae, ioe oan swing | at Police Court, District “E" Holetown. % “ nnouncing “COUNTRY HOUSE", St. Joh pnt
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon sn't got it in stock. A, Barnes & Co 8. H. NURSE, % A pleasant 9 storey prdhetts —e
will be sold at my office to the highest haven't got it in s oat Police Magistrate, R , ¥' iF eine mai A 2 _ property,
Ltd. 6.7.51--t.f.n. | ae Holet RE OP. ln stone built with shingled roof
bidder for any sum not under the apprais iiesbantiroarte PaaerIct Lie ais . Oo ers omet, n ew. 4 a 44 Completely re-decorated recentty
ed value at baat atts Pa Ss a; ne su LASSES. For Children, Ladi ies | po se ¢ Accommodation comprises 2 liv
centaining about 2 sq situate 1 ‘ ” ae e acsigns. r 7 r '@? in, oon, % re shel
1 Gentl All shapes, new “ar . 3 bed > , kit
Parish of St, Michael butting and bound- | 2nd Gentlemen All shapes, neo spruce, LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICI e AFTER STOCK-TAKING Day) wokathoms, satane: bere
ing on lands of Susan rere eee ahd ona} Weatherhead Ltd, 26.7.51—3n. | ant’s quarters ete. Wide dawt
Tose, apo ls of one a, oath ‘a teuzethé - 77: —— at The application of Doris MeCollin holder numerous fruit trees and fedd
Road cf Sufferance, at Goodland together | “Cee Tales: Shoes Samples. All| of Liquor License No. 457 of — 1951 vedetable garden. Well recor
“hattel-Dw ing 1 Suile SHOES--Ladie | 4 + ni
in as, be pa el then , re alze the. © e oe en | grar ted to Mar y man, in ‘seaport of $ Mt New I Ads Striking s mended at price quoted
The whole property, ‘chattel house ang | Barbados import @& Export hoard and shingle shop at Beckles MONDAY 80th Saat
pen erase to one thousand two hur | Room 308 Plantations Building. ¥ set Michael for ene ic ‘ to tise sai $ i ae R b L i. J | a 1 hk « } ath Av Bellevill
creda doliary and seventy-six | SO aia lane So ria, See. ee +e Cs Reasonable ag ok
cents ($1,200.76 ttac ched troy A in) . on aaa shed attached to reside: ats 4 Pa Ares om dna va
Berasford Stewart for and to epee, Maneia a. matters beck (POE BS PE ates $ | cama & srcation soomeF bed.
. Deposit to be paid on day of | Breakfast Rell Biase ane iene a A. McLEOD, Esq., 1. 42” SHEER DELIGHT—so utterly — 80 \ \ | “information on application: .
: Renna . ding Wholesale an etal Ea Police Magistrate, : s . ee ae ue, Corn j
eee T. T, HEADLEY, FORD, 35 Roebuck St. Dial M89, = |= istrict “A.” vere cool in these colors Nu : $1.89 \ 4 \ RESIDENCE, Maxwell's Coast—a
teas a erahatl 4 26.7. 51—2-"| DORIS McCOLLIN, Pink, Pearl Grey and Navy @ ........... $1.8 | beautiful property embodying the
Provost Marshal's Office = ED FRUIT aches, | ms teak ie eects ‘ ’ | aoe oe workmfinship, Well
oo Sestar 51. TANNEL : a N This application wi consid- ” ~ . . > 7 * designed for easy nm with
sual antahe sheet 25.7.51—3n. | s, Apricot. Gv Fruit Salad) cred at a Licensing Court to be held at 2. 42” TISSUE AND C TON FAILE—look glam , DEPART g fesaption 6 tye aicbede ceckns
1 Prunes, W. M, Ford, 3 Roebuck St.) police Court, District “A” on ‘Tuesday orous in a dress made from one of these | dah, kitehen, pantry, ‘
: 3A 5 '« the 7th day of August, 1951 at 11 o'clock lovely shades: Siam Royal, Black, Barbary Bowe) ee
| is aeadne renter | am. / é : @ € YM prox: 2 acres with flo and
WE ARE BUYERS SOT oie ee eee ea ee eai E. A. McLHOD, Taupe, Chinese Lacquer, Parma Violet, Wild 3) | vegetable gardéns, — prédiietive
| Je y anything connected with ee : 7 Police Magistrate, " . orchard and coconut grove.
We buy_an3 ES | ey A Be meg Pouce District "A." Huckleberry, Tange d Wild Orchid ae | One sere wall
Fe, ee eet ingle Stamps, || 0” drudgery. Dial 3878, Da Costa & Co. District "A uckleberry, Tangerine an i g One acre walled garden may: tye
Collections. ulations ape | Ete ‘ trical ep § 27.7.51—1n } @ $1.95 % | sold separately as buildfig Mite.
Covers, Good pr P he 21% sovtelewl *
CARIBBEAN STAM SOCIETY | rer i i® 3. 50” CROSS-DYED STRIPE SILK—here is 5 2 x | a 1 om
rd Floor, No. 10, Swan § | NE DAM s - | oo SS-DYED ST E SILK—here is some- 9 ] WANTED ~ :
j IONTREAL : A new seven mil- | thing every Miss and Mrs. has dreamed of: %
lion dollar river dam has just been | Cray, Aqua and Chartreuse, Lilac Sky and % TO START ON WEDNESDAY | _ ESTATE—Productive Sugar Ex- ‘
yened at Lethbridge. The struc-! E + . | tate with good House vu to mae
| ESPAN. PEROnAG BY EAE Ra moee ee ooo Bleeding |@ Honey Wheat, Pink Violence and Grenadure | | £20,000 Sens :
\ SE HABLA ESP-¢ ’ } ture, which is the world’s biggest Gums Bleed ©: have Le : @ $2.39 + | 4
qphgHk AF QL earth-fill dam, is another step in| , Mouth and ¥ @ $2.38 1% Ist tt T ST ;
“4k é |the fight to revive the parched | lose Teeth mean that you have Fyorrhea. | oe 4 re if —-
r I | Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease ad . a “Dp ys of a‘ :
CURIOS, SOUVENIRS, AN- ||range lands of south-eastern Al-| hat ctl coche or later cause your-death 4. 36” BORDERED SPUN in various patterns RENTALS
TIQUES, IVORY, JEWELS, berta It will take 15 years to|to fall out and may a no cause BBsuristisy @ $144 per yd. | .
| SILKS Etc. ||| complete the entire thirty million |}} caine the first day, ends sore mout) | Prices Cut Unspurin gly to make Daysttioka ran eee ?
| THANIS | dollar irrigation scheme, designed |and quickly tightens the teeth. Tren cla ; Te ai i ae a Rouen He Soe ta oeDpeares
| 400,000 f dry land |E¥arantee. Amosan must make you 5. OPENING TO-DAY—Various Styles in Shoes a r 1 A 7 ror S
j to turn acres Of Ory 1aNd | inouth well and save your teeth o . bs | Room for New Goods ugust 15th to Nov, 30th.
| into one of Canada’s richest farm-|money back en return of empty pack. | different prices. 4 pi iy
a age. Get Amosan from your chemis HITEHALL FLATS”, Cod-
ce ire iowa Gold ing areas, eo day, The guar % | rington Hill, St. Michael — Modern
V2 antee protect ~o * _— af , } apartment ith use t
™o NDW } Amosan you. ¢ | $ 6. ACCESSORIES: Ladies Hosiery, Bras, Panties, 3 e apartraents with use of beautiful
T, : ase +78 ’ | j
10 DAY'S NEWS PLAS AD VER TSE For Pyorrhea—Trench Mont~ |} Nightgowns, Slips, Children’s Socks, Vests, %| ,
' 3 . . So “STRATHMORE”, Culloden Rd.,
pmsenareasnine | 3 $ Panties and Kerchiefs. Zio ° Town house furnished or un-
Outstanding books on our Islands | IN THE g % 3 You will be glad you saved for finished on long lowe
CARIBBEAN CIRCUIT Full of 1? : :
tMopmation Sbeut te Cartsbess | ADVOCATE Today's G. A. Seng] |§ Unsurpassed is the word for Our New Goods = 31
Islands 14/- | * Poy AT
; 1% ‘ ‘ | KEAL ESTATE AGENT:
ISLANDS IN THE SUN — Similar = EA for 1% § % 1 .
to the above. Book full of rich - . a wo e ~~ rm ' | | AUCTIONEERS and inns
OHNSON? TATIONE Ry” oa FOR SALE x BA , Al WN HOUSE % % 7 2
3 N’S ST: % snes ; § a» > | J ty
- + + + “Can't you see how 4
et Gi : rr § FURNITURE: One Press, Chest 0 P x 3 SURVEYORS
ear Glass in Plastic leavy § 2 Ru =} 1airs, One Dinir i 7 < | 1
3 r ining happy we wou a » K LANT.
fuase for ear windshields 3 Kitchen Table appy would be % 30, Swan Street — S. ALTMAN, Proprietor $ % ; P ATIONS BUILDING ©
B Stove, and One . 4 % |
JOHNSON’S HARDWARE % 1e 8335 ; With GAS installed 1% PHONE 2702 R i¥ | Phone 4640
yi 4 2 | iA »,
erento pivtnort. ne nnnoe ’ 5 319 ‘
é OY EEE eee | LTTTTNTTTNs—E8 OO OCO 000 OOOO OPPOOPOOOD AOS SCSROBG BBD 9 S099 O 999999 SOF 00090 OOOO OFO9 OOOO OOF












SENT TO ITALY

Weekes Heads W.I. First Class
Averages

(From Our Own Correspondent)

SOUTH AFRICA ended

LONDON, July 26.
the first day of the Fourth

Test at Headingly, Leeds, in a strong position, having
scored 282 for the loss of three wickets.
The batsmen mainly responsible for this commanding



THE BIG TWELVE
—And Makes His Oval Average 100
By Frank Restron



I PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1951
SOUTH AFRICA 282-3 IN FOURTH TES gh se Mg
Sport Report: eee kK. Ke Hits Fine Cent aR E |
ae aiaiind MUST BE As Buel a Fi old All Day. HUTTON ( ad ) J OINS By DESMOND ae ful

"THESE muscular misses who make

men’s professional golf circus are no myths. They
defeated the international amateur team here to-day by
3—0 in the foursomes, a game to which they are unaccus-
tomed, and they did it without even having to turn on any
of that old American power golf.

They found themselves with one a two holes win for the obvious

position were Eric Rowan and Clyde Van Ryneveld who « July iT,

By O. S. COPPIN created a new South African record for a second wicket YORKESHIRE’S Len Hutton, using that shortened and | the'golfite, cower’ gusts, Vicoureene Mtoe the vicomptome and Joan

TRINIDAD sporti s partnership of 198. This beat the previous record of 155 by deformed left arm* that has caused him to remould his/|de Saint Sauveur and Mrs. John Cowper was the consolation of

FB ey -iconge aperting a are happy and why R. H. Catterall and H. W, Taylor at Capetown during the style, guided a stylish cover drive to the boundary under | Corse ‘Pat. Bae ar Le ae ory — aa
she ney be happy as they have raised the necessary M.C.C. 1922—23 tour. the shadow of the Kennington Oval gasholder yesterday— | this}, \ g y re eee ee oe



$2,000 to send Compton Gonsalves their leading cyclist to
the World Cycling championships that take place in Italy

next month.



KEN FARNUM



Snappers And

Bonitas Wi

tw

BONITAS beat
Snappers defeated Barracudas in
the two water polo matches
played at the Aquatic Club yes-
terday afternoon,

Bonitas sent in 13 goals to one
by Police. The result of the other
Game was similar,

Spectators were kept waiting

over 15 minutes for the start by
players turning up late for the

Police and

games.
The first game was dull from
the spectators’ point of view.

Bonitas got nine goals in the first
half. Five of these were scored by
Qwen Johnson, two by Trevor
Yearwood, while G. Atwell and M.
Richardson scored one each.

In the second half, Richardson
and Johnson scored two more goals
each. M, Franklyn sent in the
lone goal for Police from glose
range late in the second half,

The second match although it
ended in a similar result as the
first, was a much faster game.
Barracudas were first off the mark
when Michael Lambert scored
after two minutes of play. A
minute and a half later Kenneth
Ince sent in the equaliser.

After this, Barracudas felt the
weight of an all-out attack by the
Snappers’ forwards, well backed
uj by their captain George

cLean, who turned in a fine
performance.

At half time the score was
Snappers seven, Barracudas one.
For Snappers, Ince scored five and
Bannister the other two.

After the interval the speed of
the game continued to be just as
fast as it was in the first half
with Snappers always on the
attack, Barracudas did once or
twice break through the Snappers’
defence but none bore fruit.

The end of the game found
Snappers with six more goals to
their credit. Ince, Bannister and
George McLean scored two each
in the second half.

The referee was Mr, J, Knight,

The teams were:—

Police: M, Richards (Capt.) L.
Dodson, M. Franklyn, R. Alleyne,
G. Porter, W. Phillips.

Bonitas: M. Foster, B. Patterson
(Capt.) T. Yearwood, G, Atwell,
J. Paster, M. Richardson, O.
Johnson.

Snappers: A. Taylor, G. McLean
(Capt.) C. McLean, D. Bannister,
K. Ince, G. Rogers and Barnes.

Barracudas: E. Perez, B. Brooks

(Capt.) HH. Rogers, M. Lambert,
K,. Armstrong, K, Taylor and
Skinner.

This afternoon’s games are

Starfish versus Goldfish. Referee.

Mr, K. Ince, and Mermaids
versus Sea Nymphs, Referee Mr.
B. Brooks.





No. Names Innings
1. Weekes 84
2. Worrell 127
3. Walcott 102

4. Rickard 34
5. Stollmeyer 139
6 Gomez 135
7. Rae 65
& — Christiani ’ 100
9. Marshall eeeee 35

10. Goddard ’ 87



ns
Ss

—

They'll Do Ir

When BELFRY MARRIED ROSIOLA»HE
ACTUALLY HAD TO FORCE HIS DOUGH
ON THE SHY LITTLE LIFE-PARTNER >

B-BUT, DEAR=-UH»
I FEEL SO STRANGE, }
TAKING MONEY FROM

news?
that
necessary that our own Ken Far-
num must be sent to these games
as well.

ous

Every Time

VA HAcHA-BUT WE'RE

MARRIED sIOW, OBAR»+
HA-HA-HA
YOU~IO MUCH RATHER \ TAKE SOME SPENDING

How has Barbados taken this
In the right way, that is

we consider that it is most

Genuine
This is no sudden impulse con-

tingent upon the news from Trini-
dad, nor is it a good example of
copy-cat.
some
Athletic

The
weeks

truth is that for
now the Amateur
Association of Barbados
have been trying to learn what
the average cost of the visit will
be so that they can come hefore
the public with a cut and dried
plan.

It is common knowiedge that the
local Association is making strenu-
efforts to form a National
Olympic Committee so that the
West Indies will be able to send
eyclists to the Olympic Garnes in
Helsinki in 1952

The cyclists who would at once
come to our minds as the most
likely to be selected are Compton
Gonsalves, Lindsay Gordon and
Farnum.

Farnum Should Go

If the West Indies are sending
a team as a whole to these games,
then Farnum should be sent to
Italy to gain much valuable ex-
perience.

The resounding success of the
West Indies team in England last
year should be taken as an ex-
ample, How could John Goddard
and his men have achieved such an
epoch-making triumph had not
cricketers of the leading West In-

dian colonies been given equal
opportunity.
It will be a challenge to the

sporting public of Barbados te
help subscribe the funds necessary
to send Farnum to Italy but it will
be the logical step before sending
him to Helsinki

A Long Way

The West Indies and Barbados
will have gone a long way towards
establishing a respectable identity
in world sporting cireles if they
can add to the excellent job they
have done by virtue of their
cricket triumphs by conquering
some other field of sport on_an
international level.

The Amateur Athletic Associa-
tion of Barbados will be coming
almost at once to the sporting pub-
lie of Barbados for funds to help
defray the cost of sending Far-

num, Let the public not let them
down. It is beyond their own fin-
ancial resources and

there is no
other way. '

Solid Reputation

The public af Barbados has
built up a solid reputation for their
generosity in assisting deserving

causes and also for their business
sense in refusing help where it is
not genuinely needed.

I say without fear of contradic-
tion, that this cause is worthy of
handsome public support and
should pay dividends in the years
to come.

First Class Cricket

Published in an earlier issue of
this paper this week was a table
showing the figures of batsmen
who had scored a century of cen-
turies in first-class cricket,

This has been so well received
by local sportsmen that I have
been besieged by telephone calls
and letters asking that some com-
pees figures be given for West
Indian batsmen, not centuries of
centuries, of.course, since they
would have been in the list under
reference if they had qualified,

“Statistician's” Figures

I am working on the number of
eenturies scored by West Indies
batsmen in First Class cricket and
should soon be able to supply these
to my readers.

Meanwhile my old and trusted
friend “Statistician” has sent me
the figures of the leading first class
batsmen in the West Indies, at
present still playing first class
cricket.

“Statistician” is well known for
his accuracy and I have no hesi-
tation in publishing these for the
benefit of other statisticians.

Runs Highest Not Average
Seore Out
5,288 ‘ 304* 12 73°45
7,430 308 22 70 76
5,293 314 i4 60 14
1,446 195 5 49 86
6,053 324 14 48 42
5,187 216" 19 44.71
179 a 44 57
181 12 43 88
191 0 41 80
218° 19 39 39



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Newport Say

‘No’ To £14

NEWPORT COUNTY are the
first club to say “No” to the £14
maximum-wage (old maximum
£12) sanctioned by the Football
League at their annual meeting
last month.

But they promise to review the
position about Christmas.

In the letter to the players, Mr.
Lionel Watkins, the Newport hon.
Secretary, ‘says:—

“You will be the first to appre-
ciate that a club’s ability to pay
depends entirely on the revenue
received through the turnstiles.

“The attendances at last sea-
son’s matches were a fair aver-
age of the past five seasons.

The income received was insuf-
ficient to carry us through to the
opening of next season and the
directors have had to advance
money for summer wages.

“In addition a good deal of
work has had to be done to the
ground and dressing room accom-
modation, This expenditure will

have to be guaranteed by the
Board.
Players’ reaction will not be

known until when the Union de-
cides whether players should re-
sign and accept the new May to
May contracts.

Last season Newport bought
houses for four players and gave
the £750 maximum benefit to two
men.

Cricket Results

July 26.

Scores in English County cricket
games today were as follows:

Royal Navy vs. Army at Lord's.
Royal Navy 249 for 6 declared,
164 for 6 declared; Army 293 for
2 declared, 100 for 5. Match
drawn,

Surrey vs, Leicestershire at the
Oval. Leicestershire 263, and 41
for one wicket; Surrey 377 for five
wickets declared.

Gloucestershire vs. Essex at
Bristol. Essex 243; Gloucester-

shire 297.

Hampshire vs. Middlesex at
Portsmouth. Middlesex 478 for
four wickets; Hampshire 256, and
80 for one wicket.

Kent vs. Derbyshire at Folke-
stone, Derbyshire 240, and 263 for
five wickets; Kent 191.

Lancashire vs. Northants at
Manchester. Northants 276; Lan-
cashire 358

Somerset vs. Warwickshire at
Wells, Warwickshire 397 for nine
wickets declared; Somerset 173,
and 89 for five wickets.

Sussex vs, Glamorgan at Hast-
ings. Sussex 207, and 138 for six
wickets; Glamorgan 303.

Worcestershire vs. Notts at Wor-
cester. Notts 300, and 47 for no
wicket; Worcestershire 450 for
nine wickets.

Yorkshire vs, Scotland at Scar-
horotgh. Yorkshire 372 for one



Max Faulkner, the British Open
champion, has been elected cap-
tain of the Professional Golfers’
Association. He holds the Ryle
Memorial Medal which goes to
the Open champion if a member
of the P.G.A.

WHAT’S ON TO-DAY

Court of Appeal—10,00 a.m.

Police Courts — 10,00 a.m.

Governor opens Schools for
Blind at Hurd Memorial
School, James Street —
12 noon,

Mobile Cinema gives show
at Dodd's Yard, St. Philip
—7.45 p.m.

Police Band gives Concert at
Hastings Rocks, Christ
Church—8.00 p.m.

CINEMAS

Glebe — “Kim"—8.30 p m

Empire “Meet
145 and $30 pm

Royal — “A FRon00g And One
Nights” & “All the King’s Men”
4.30 and 8.15 p.m,

(Bridgetown)

Frankenstein”

Plaza “Tripoli”

2.30; 445 and 8.30 pm
Olympic

and 81 pm

“The Showdown”

ing 5.00 and 8.30 p.m.





By Jimmy Hatlo

My! How :
CHANGED!

OKAY HAND IT OvER!!







wicket declared; Scotland 121, and fietdiny. 7 4.
6 . ata g, and went to hospital to
244 for six wickets. have it stitched.

In 310 minutes, 459 runs were
FAULKNER Is CAPTAIN scored, Notts piled up 251 before

4.30
Aquatic — ‘Phe Girl in the Paint- |

Winning the toss South Africa
batted first on an easy wicket.
The opening batsmen were quiet,
but not unduly troubled by Eng-

land’s attack and it was a_sur-
prise when Waite was _ i.b.w. to
Bedser.

The total was then 40.

So England gained an earl;
advantage, but with Rowan and

Van Ryneveld together they could

not press it home. These two

gradually mastered the bowling,

but could never force the

against England’s steady attack, so

the rate of scoring was not high.
Slow Scoring

Slow scoring was due to the
accurate bowling of Hilton and
Tattersall and England’s fielding
which was good all day.

England’s bowlers were re-
warded for their perseverance

when in the last hour Hilton had
Van Ryneveld caught and bowled
and Nourse was |.b.w. to Brown

Eric Rowan with 160 not out
played perhaps his best Test
innings to date.

Scores: —

SOUTH AFRICA—Ist Innings
FE. A. B, Rowan not aut 160
J. H. B. Waite |.b wb Bedser 13

C. B. Van Ryneveld c & b Hilton 83
A. D. Nourse |.b.w, b Brown 12
J. E. Cheetham not out 7
Extras 6
Total (for 3 wkts.) 282

To bat: R. A. McLean, P_N_F. Man-
sell, A. M. B. Rowan, NB F. Mann.

G. W. A. Chubb, CN. McCarthy

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o. M R w.
Bedser 30 4 63 1
Bailey 13 4 36 0
Brown 19 5 55 1
Tattersall 3% 11 59 0
Hilton 36 «(1158 1
Compton eu aaes 1 0 4 0



pace |

and 15,000 spectators rose to
famous throughout the Emp

Hutton, the master,
placed another imprint in
history books by scoring the 100th
first-class century of hi career,
and nis ‘ninth of the season,

had just
cricket's



ey



LEN HUTTON

Even the Tuscanic ranks of
Surrey clustered round to shake
the hand of Pudsey’s wizard of the
willow.

Surrey secretary Brian Castor
caused renewed cheering by blar-
ing on tne loudspeaker: “Congrat-
ulations to a fine cricketer.”

Housewives waved their dish-
cloths from the balconies of the
overlooking council houses, and
truant workmen tossed their caps

Graveney Leads _ x0 the air.

In 2,000 Race

By PAT MARSHALL.

July 14.
Look out, Denis Compton!
Young Tom Graveney, who took
your place so ably for the third

Test at Manchester, is determined
to stay there,

Twenty-four-year-old Tom hit
acentury in each innings—first
time in his career—for Gloucester-
shire against Northants at Bristol.

What is more, he scored his
second century of the match be-
fore lunch!

Now Graveney has scored eight
centuries this season-~five in his
last ten innings—and that puts

im one ahead of Compton in the

little matter of who scores most
hundreds.
Now he needs just 223 more

runs to be the first to reach 2,000

for the season. Nearest rival is
Jack Robertson, of Middlesex,
who wants 266.

No wonder they talk of Tom
down in Gloucestershire as a
second Walter Hammond.

Cook Hurt

It was not such a happy day
for sloy brother bowler Ken
He had to leave the field with a

recurrence of back trouble.
Then Cecil Cook, Sam” to his
team-mates, cut his left hand

lunch, declared at 309 for seven.
Hampshire. set to
just over 87 an hour, tried hard
but were beaten by 80 runs. It
was Notts’ first win this season.



Yesterday’s
Weather Report
FROM CODRINGTON

Rainfall; 1.12 ins,

Total Rainfall for Month to
date: 4.93 ins.

Highest Temperature: 81.0° F.

Lowest Temperature: 74.0° F.

Wind Velocity:
hour,

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.008,
(3 pam.) 29.929.

5 miles per



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It was a replica of the 1938
summer’s day when Hutton
broke the world Test record by
scoring 364 against the Aus-
tralians on the same ground
Jen went on to make 151 yester-

day and so take the life out of the

bowling. Vic Wilson profited to
collect a century enabling York-
shire to declare at 431 for three.

Surrey added 28 for one tc
first innings total of 156,

their

Hutton’s century was beautifully
earned. “Earned” is the word,
because there was no charity
offer.

on

‘Easy wicket’

Though the Surrey bowling later
disintegrated under punishmeni
it was especially good for the first
morning hour

Said Alec Bedser afterwards
“Tt was another great knock by



Kenyon And Co.
Deserve Break

HERE’S a _ suggestion
cricket rulers. Set aside a
each season between the current
iouring side and a Young
land team.

Many stars touring winter af-
ter winter are tired. They are re-
luctant to make the India trip thi
year,

for

Had a Young England side been
pitted against the present South
African tourists youngsters could
be found to replace the weary



for them.

| This team would give the pres-
{ent South African side something
| to think about:—
Kenyon, Lowson, May, Grave-
ney, Spooner, Close, Howard
|

(captain), Shackleton, Hilton, Ap- |

nleyard, and Statham.





— ae

|

|

|
Last Crypt The fea the
Lord is the beginning of wisdom

—Psalins.
ee
J. A. CORBIN & SONS.



Pe



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FSOSOO OGG FOOD GE SS SS SC OGG GGG OOO SOS GOGO SE FO POSD

our |
fixture |

Eng- |

stars. And what grand experience |

cheer a stroke that has become
ire.

Busting Patty Berg, a distinctly
\sturdy performer. was not accus-
| tomed to such frail players match-
Len, but the wicket was too easy.” |ing her own strong-arm drives

Too easy for Hutton and for his
shadow Frank Lowson, yes. But)
lesser batsmen could well have
faltered.

Alec Bedser did his best with |
the new ball and often made it
lift alarmingly. But a.punish-
ing rap on the hand. was all he
could produce to disturb Hut-

She was rattled by the laven-
der-cool calm of Joan Cowper
who, having seen her partner
drive out of bounds at the 142-
yard ninth, smoothly holed in
one to win the aole with a 2
Patty Berg, conscious that she

had recently beaten America’s first
ton’s serenity. |lady of golf, the fabulous Babe
Hutton now has an average of | Zaharias, became the foreman of

exactly 100 at the Oval. In his 20 | this match.

innings there (two not out) he has|_ She thumped partner Betty
cored 1,800 runs. | Bush heartily in encouragement,
Yesterday’s was his examined every putt with plumb

hundred at the Oval. line scrutiny, pursed her lips in an

seventh
The other |



were: 364, England y. Australia | agony of concentration.

1938; 206, England v. New Zealand ‘ -

1949; 202 not out, England v. West Consolation

Indies, 1950; 165 not out, England ‘ ‘

v. West Indies 1939; 121. Yorkshire This was cash register golf

{against the playsfor-pleasure abil-

v. Middlesex, 1937; 101, Yorkshire It ended with





The Babe and Betsy Rawls beat
Curtis Cup pair Irish champion
Philomena Garvey and Scottish
international Jean Dongld 11 and
9, all done to a smart running
commentary from the Babe,

She loosed a stream of wise-
cracks of Bob Hope calibre and
a string of shots far beyond the
hope of Hope.

Betty Jameson and Peggy Kirk
had another feather-cushion com-
fortable win against Bunty Ste-
phens and Joan Gee—a 4 and 3
success smoothly collected on the
greens.

These golden golfing girls just
have the game tied up from A to

Z—from American accuracy to
Zaharias. Results (U.S. names
first):—

Mrs. Zaharias and F. Rawls beat P
Garvey and J. Donald 11 and 9. P. Berg

and B, Bush beat Vicomtesse de St. Sau-
veur and Mrs. Cowper 2 up. P. Kirk and
S. Jameson beat F. Stephens and Hon
Mrs Gee 4 and 3



v. Surrey: 168 ity of the amateurs.
In March, 1941, while serv-| . —
ing as a P.T. instritctor in an
Army gymnasium, Hutton met}
with a serious accident to his}
arm. He was in hospital eight |
monthe and had three bone- |
rafting operations. .
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PAGE 1

Allies Agree To Red Proposal For Cease-fire i %  :> % %  • %  %  : v\m VIMKMIS Approve Agenda In Nine Minutes UNITED NATIONS ADVANCE BASE, Below Kaesong, Korea, July 26 (JNITED NATIONS and Communist cease-fire negotiators agreed on an agenda and imme diately began formal talks to end the Korean fighting. Another meeting is scheduled for 10 a.m. to morrow in Kaesong An Advance UN Headquarters announce ment of an agreement on the armistice agenda cautioned against undue optimism for an early end to the war It said it is much too early to predict either success or the rate of progress to be obtained in negotiations There were numerous bail' points Hithin the framework of she agenda OB winch agreement must be icached ,th ildee so as to itabh-! ed EOtM "S condition for the relation of hostOfti < la arrangements for -i m tka including composition of an BUthorlfljr. .'.nd functions of Hie organisation to supervise the carrying out of Arrangements relating, to prisoners of war. Recommendations to Oovernf countriei concerned on bojOi %  Other Hems The UJf. announcement said that following approval of the tffjton began preliminary di£cus*iou*_ uf other iiem* "in order that the potential ln| bloodshed in Korea 'as soon as uosslThis indicated that the delegation talked on the question of a %  %  i I'd between opposing at The Conununlra broke last week's stalemate on the agenda To-day' Weather Chart Bui %  i8un*et: 8 Jl p.m. Moon. Last Quarter. Lighting Up: 7 00 p.m. High Tide: 11 : .m.. 10 47 p.m. Low Tide: 5.10 a.m., 3.35 p.m. yesterday by removing the demand that the withdrawal of foreign troopfrom Korea be eon* HI, red at armistice talkIn its place they submitted a compromise proposal which • accepted to-d.,y by the chief U.N i cgotlulor Admiral Joy Its dci Mot exposed. Agreement on the agenda came with dramatic .suddenness at the tenth session ;md one of the shortest since Kac%  'nigs began July 10. "Having agreed upon the agenda the way is now clear for delegations to enter really substantive conference on the terms of a milItarj .iinii-stuv. Major problems remain to be solved in tMN discussions It is much too earlv to predict either success or failure. It is hoped that cessation of hostilities and the shedding of blood will soon be over in Kore.. There are numerous basic points ithin the framework uf the agenda on which agreement murl be reached and on which there are presently wide d le ar al on of views. Neutral Zone UN. and Communist representative* were formally admitted to the programme for cease-lire negotiations on Thursday and immediately began the discussion of fixing the neutral zone along the 135-miaKorean battle front In Kaesong U.S.. and Communist teams agreed upon, id then adopted the live-point agenda or programme for formal niftlce negotiations and pro%  ded at once with the bargain: ii'K But C.N., oltlcials emphasi-.cd that the shooting will not stop until an annlstlee has been signed. How long that will take, nobody knows The programme rails fot fixing the demarcation line between I' N., and Communist armle: i making arrangements for a ceaselire and armistice including the m. on page a Government Will Reintroiluve Price Con trots In Britain l.( HIDON July M %  lot of UH I Hugh Gaitskeii annoum Thursday that vould reintrcHtiic %  ootrola to seek limitation on -urporation divid, iin effort to check the Inflation in Britain Gaitskeii uld the Government decided that "fui %  ncn" to chock %  Increase In prices which with the Korean War Iroli wU] ba on and kttchciiware i forks and spooiiB. nan win ba I In autumn unless the orlce drops before men The Minister of Food is considering the reintroduclion on certain groceries like jam and breakfast foods, but not on vegetables and fruits, Gaitskeii n i Gaitskeii said the <.%  > %  would introduce legislation thl autumn to control ri i -. :> tniiit'It is no cxagc< aav that pi... He illj avM %  ng there is news of a company increasing Its dividends in a pretty iithstantial fashion and on a scale far greater than Uic genera] increase In into are currently taking | la a This kind of thing |i gets as a continual irritant on the great majority of the population not equity shar.l olden They are asked in effect t* earners could be requested to hold down their demands when dividend payments are soaring. Gaitskeii said the control would apply to every company, public and private distributing more than £lo.ooo gros and would remain In effect during the "rearmament period "defined as three year* r.r. Czechs Hiol In Min< Worked BY Russians Near East Is Area Of Special Tensions —ACHESON WASHINGTON. July 26. Secretary of Stale. Dean Achesun, said on Thursday as he opened his testimony on the $8,500,000,000 Foreign Aid Bill before Congress, "the Near East is an area of special tension to-day. Time is of great importance in furnishing aid to our friends in this area _,.„,., But he said that ntUtarj .I'M'.iini was not because these countries must be feel that •'their lot h with the free world, and the fre world haa their basic needsmoral and material—at That is why he Mid "We must build up the economic strength In the area, if it is not to be lost t> ion or aggression Acheson emphasized the importance of aid to Asia while the free world must gft mana of Iti strategic materials. "Of key importance too is the industrial r compotential of Japan." he said EFffWlSSBS ff'oJKS ill Korea hiti.lil Scnaturn "If! 1 "" ' nM Inclucfcd In '" %  %  „, ,-..., I.l ,„.r*lw,:pw !" ine_iu*.|l.id..r.m pulled off balance bv the shift in tactic*. If armistice talks should Eleven More Coiiiniuiiigta Arrested In U.S.A. WASHINGTON. July 26. The arrest of 11 more Commun%  I Pans h adei and functionaries "> F B.I mi ii In Lo Angeles, San Francisco and New Ycik nounced Thursday The roundup was conducted simultaneously in three Metropolitan centre*. All are charged with conspiring to teach and advocate the forceful overthrow of this Government Forty four Communist leaden %  been Indicted. Of these. given have been eonvii Four of those co fugitive as arc four of 21 rounded up and indicted in Neu York June 20. "Communist Party leader* arrested have long bcei activi In Communist part> work In C-Iiforma and in various other para of the country on assignments pertaining to local eoui •pal activities of thl Cqoimunlst Party." F.B.I. Director. 1! |d| it H ov. laid r i* War Danger Still Real ACHtSON WAfAlfNGTON. July 26 i S .> Mi Achcson. said regardless of the course of I vitiations. Kcr from Communist i< I tluni it i month %  oilapse. we should be ready fi a major Communist assault on United Nations forces. The encmv has been building up his forces throughout this period -I P Will Triple Oil Payments To Ira<| BAGHDAD. July 27 Oil payments to Iraq are e pected to IKtripled in the next tWO years under the next agreement with the British operated j "poverty. i other ways." Kcd Pressure Great Anglo—Iranian Oil Plan Outlined LONDON, Juiy 2C THE FIRST OUTL tbie Anglo Iranian oil partae.Bhip plan emerged here, as the Cabinet convened to eonsitfer sending a specia mission to Teheran for discussions on the oil crisis A report from Britain's Ambassador 11 Teheran Sir Francis Shepherd, was before the Cabinet !: ...is understood that the Irai U imenl ha dropped the demand for unco: >' | j 1 of the %  w lUonalizution law. Britain ia %  Prenthv Hoi the "rapid improvement of conditions foi Brltisl ill llU' Oil .11I Tha roralaii BecrtUry, n.M-oert M Commoni -.,.. furuM ( '"nr v < > %  \ In-li.iniari %  Author i • ". %  .treiiuth-iici the II. iicre lh.it tin-if,.i cmiM.gmg." but iheit1. awe* tit* uluma outcome ol the orlalS. %  tho utmost importance if the *imthat oil stores in Ah i i filling up rapidly, and tli..t the ba cluart down completely within stx day*, unlesa a way out is foi.i l-eMl Steps The Deputy Jam .1 Emami [Ddepandant, urged that legal steps be Tudfti, I I omiiiK a threat to the i | Iran L.iv.ng AmbajaadBH Avenii Harrlman, Preal \< %  in |hs Bril Iran oil dispute, visited Iran* ailing Pn i lioasadeq ,it hi i i edsidv '."-.i y [ There U no U> lurthei dovetoDmapi lo lha i tulemste Authoritdllve quurlers .soul that the nel ih probably come from London, where the Cablni Iran's terms for talks to attUe the feud and put the oilfield l. icl into operation. a uld that 11 i to Ukpdon fin talks will ifHcial .r neci HI %  He "I have pased along to the grltlsl A^nbaaaador, tha I lor reop en i n g the negotial l um hopeful Ihese suggesnon; will form the basis fot ibi lot; of talks between Iranian and British reprcsenlir !\ Btmotpn) re "— Ii* \U' (satifH*ri Namts Ni'H Cahim-I ROafX .i, i.. ;.isi>-ii droppM ailinii Count Miru-t. %  i announoad hli at ,iew two pan. c. 1 Arht'SOn Mir\ IV*'S • "P ri himself retained th. ^ %  •* Poratcn Affairs pool WASHINGTON. July 26. !'"ember Covernme The House by a standing vote '' J^' l '' 'y of 171 to 81 on Thuradaj iJJJ ., . m ,. mlw ri H.hcan move to cut off the; ij?gg l ££^ salary of SecreUry of State Dean, ,, ;(rt U|U , ,,. t Acheson, in hopes of forcing him form | nf ,, I I >•! Illlllli lit li Democrat ,..,.. u : stand up In I r %  get Arheson" out of office. Only were observed favour of th> move. A score or more of Republicans joined the Democratic majority t^ defeat the long planned m aftei an „ud debate. — V.f. 0 1 i 3i %  %  Ilia RuaaUn. am and i>4 .,.. %  kt'ikin which rtalms to jrk of vakith< %  devaloj ed aft I Up priMluclion a MM worken | Bl nd Ciecl %  p ..I. (IH .' nut%  gcttin-t normal food rations '' .it wi.rkI n bl II%  I the iiltiniutoin >tnd killed tloKinio.. i to Ut •••• %  %  ,,i tlv meter III .I. i V ft KralcOVle, Chairman l the n lite. h in .lul tOOOthei Mill lll'l isll.l" In i %  domination Deportation %  i.ut lonlinn di tailed u id llthoug] %  on .Inly I. I!ci l>osteii ol Cli larixed \a la via. The letU-i called fur ( from the in %  %  I %  Dai i Stu %  %  and hi ibotll -M'l 1 about 100 f l ood is scarce m Slovakia iftern part "f I owing t" fai mera %  Into giKiit colk —i-.r. THE GOHMIHaiONEKM OF HI-ALTH Or af MICl | . lor ol . %  aadnaer and Di ] p. Oa C a k aai tor of Madleal BarVtcat rd >e-tridy lesapsi \ HI ti ;i M II for hawkari to •all ^ u Mi U.N. Forces Keep Reds if Bay i attacks, and pat ml on the 1 %  %  ing I he past i Usdullaha Heir W ill Return lioin. Lom> i .'II tO till tullah, b I %  ;. i. Swlteei .: d IClng ol i. %  ; eftpech l lara paysii al be mnd<%  . %  %  Fiber Abdullah Id %  i return ai %  %  t c Fakir Aims Vt Paaljpg Record 1 %  i %  • Italian "I %  %  1 i A: Ih. I %  I AUN leak %  on v. batttod thi i %  %  %  hungi al r* • %  %  Wednesd.. \ infe.i % %  | I %  %  1 ,/UiKhonAskeNehru To Peace Talks KARA! HI, J %  KJ Chl iol Ml %  %  I. II-. ut Indian iro %  %  r.p. 140 JAMAICANS LEAVE FOR ENGLAND Ki.viSTON. J'ea.. Jub la One hundred and foil, jamal cans, including male and female artisans left by specially planes last night for Ni where they will take ship to Ealfdjffld Employment prsspects ben arc worsening rapidly O* UnioiiiaLs ProU'sl Jap Pfad-f 'iVfuly bVUNEY. Jalj 2fi • % %  B lib W A> %  • i ii repra i Dting n ore than . %  p.jiler of .i II illlon fa '' iinioul .t mi Yi Ugalliat '.Inn inn,.' i r, '.ukiiah.il. j.ml the "signing of tl.e JapanC I l of (hoae mi %  (I lot treaty Is signed n B million white nouei on An trahan soil." -1'.p. I*ukistan. Turkey Sign Treaty ISTANIiUL. July 26 The Tri ai.d Tuifci rurfciah Foreign Mini %  ^opprulu and 1 Urn A lor Mian Beau Ahmed on Thui irtlclea ol %  • %  .n'nt %  %  [ these high -if Grain for India fletps America • i .i : %  %  I 1 %  I %  aculou efli % %  ' %  r He said "Communiil presaurei in the Pacific area have been ven %  lirWrnal prewures an continuous Immediate need of military aid for this area Is apparent. Arms we arc H Indochina and the Philippine* are urgently ii the concentration of C the last yeai Korea aome people may have for% oltcn Communist pressures still %  re beaOi kept up elwwhere la this region Acheson uli emphasized Asia') need for economic help since disease, illiteracy and Iraq Petroleum Cum pan v. reliable •ooreea said on Thursdav The Company overall • under loint British. Dutch. Fi. American ownership Ti oH t., be based rotwhb on %  S0-94 profits, %  .iereem<-nt negotiated by the Arabian Amen..„ i Oi. Company with King Ibn preparation of the treaty of peace tnat former Colo. tat ions are our enemies tOO. we nuaM understand these forces at work In Asia %  have in mind the great Importance of % %  ffnty to Japan You are familiar with the verj real progress we are making in Saud of Saudi Arabia ( %  ember —I' F in essential first step 11 nld—V F. Suez Situation is Danger Signal Oil Raphteed Jul) 2 ial Vt %  A i I,. %  %  balked %  %  ..n the grounoa %  %  The Kal %  %  %  I ui llfll '*H'-' ''nil I'"" l i .,rlif i Berlineri li*;lil BB81 %  l I .llv nil Tht %  dll o| i %  uni-d held th> mi Un %  %  ut %  The "ADVOCATE" pays for NEWS Dial 3113 Day or Night. FLUSHING MEADOW. New York, July 2B. Israeli Chief Delegate. Ambassador Eban, chaigcd In here before the U.N Security CauncfL thai the Egyptian blockade, violates the Suez Cat vent son of 1888 as well as UraaUEgyptian Armistice agreements and International law provisions guaranteeing freedom of the seas Opening the first round of the Council debate on what n crucial U.N. intervention i n the ting Middle Esi ation. Eban Told the Council meeting in temporary quarters of the General Assembly'* hall. "\!v Owrnment instruct* to declare that Israeli is in state of war with K. pt that Egypt has the least nght I-J l-raeli. tention to maintain a *tafc -. irdly les< grave than the performance of hostile arts which flow from that assertion, We balk thai the 6V rlty Council should pro no u nc e its vlawi on this decisive question." Eban's speech charged that tl.e •ii Itself A'ai an iUeg.il nd %  piral %  ,,:.. itij .i rected again I I r | Nan asxertion that a legal state of war cxitls betwetn i i,: mfi II Eban ra William E Blley. Head of the nn, tat<-d %  effective functioning of tne Armi*' — %  %  Cil that continuation of tl turn m the Buet gc alcp Eban tok i that l^ic "aggiessive and %  of the Bia I quest %  ical scopvarious occaalori ilhin the conUnt of the armlai •yftcm proctai being conttnEban argued forcefullj thai u N acta ainca tisigning ol tl c in 1946 including uf' ing of the i .motion that there was no state of w. t i UI the Middle Eail and lb "A landmark %  %  %  1 I %  No Precedent 1 that the F I ii haa to intervene with 'hipaaaing i %  Eban declared t'.F %  Chief ..I .%  ; %  |n fund Obliged IgraeaioQ no it %  they an %  %  i i %  Is alwa ig ti i K. W. V. M I'lllllil! UU& BRANPi In Quart and Concave Pint Bottles BOTTLED BY THE K.W.V. f| bollU ihoald be in i . %  in ma iH V. I I'l Ki: ITHOLBSOMI IctdltprtuabU In UoaplUla, S'ursinu Home* mill in private Sii k ItoonM. Al llieir respective juices K.\v \ Bnudlafl hitvc "" npatian. Tbaj an made fnun pure and .-l

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i IUI. w n i %  n m Postpone Bill To Control Elections BARBADOS ADVOCATE Temple Yard Considered For Temporary Market THE HOUSE OF A.sSKMHI.V al their meet.n K veelerdav 552? %  'V'"" 1 1 !" '''* " BUo "I a Bill to make pro\iuon tor the direction and supervision of the el UM Kouae; the procedure : ir other purposes connected therewi I. red and postponed .section 21 of the Bill THE ST MICHAEL'S VESTRY i ;,".;'. < e whelher r m " M '. v "" %  j ir ^ !" ri?.. lr f, rmissi !" ""d fundi to mail exiencliru from I'm-—. rh..K..i.u ... .. .-.* . \ ,f rVe l 1 ,hc lUmsc <** procedure a, web *" 2ffJ Dr, i !~. !? n S nd lor . ,he r Purposes connected therewith. Th. %  ling lnbj lu.uor licensed places and club* un polling day, lUKfa U1SCUS%  stdered the section was an absolute %  while would be penali i-opkecpers. la passed by ..it H to S dlvlHon An amendment k': %  VOi Cummins. % % %  earn Has w .: AIM. i 4 .i %  .] The i "No i,,t *<>''' %  ,i B iv'n %  *•) • %  In which a l "'* : ler the Liquor 1 %  %  i IMA, i| i ltd al uu Um between the opt nine %  in any corn I U* election ii being held. %  i| liquor shall be .'•Upplicd to nn> ; % %  '"K Of I polling dnv i: which a %  %  %  %  any %  i •oclions %  I rUon tu n line pi nve hundred do I lO i i .until Clause 1. "At the hour lixed the pull the pragttlng the |*11 clerk shall, m UM prOan ui ihe electon pen the ballot box •re an DO ballot papers or i in. otter which the box %  hall Lie locked, and the -shall keep Khali be placed on i table in full .ill present and shall be maintained there until the close of the poll. 2. Immediately alter the ballot box Is o locked, the -ill call upon thf |0 Vole. near shall secure the admittance of every elector Into the pollinc il shall see that th, %  thr polling %  tataon." Mr. Lewis |L> felt that the boxes should bi that he knew that in addition to looking boxes there was some method ol eaallng them. He beI'.i.l' the Presiding Officer. There was no point in arriving in %  omethlng which was not ne e ded. In Clause II, i motion by Mr. J. i-:. T. Braoea.ec I much discussion. clause 21 stated: i. "No' %  the provtoloni of Kuit 13 ol for elet' n B d If] Bohedule A of the Bi A i3i. th officer, u*. the reqi.< I kind elector who has taken the oath In the form .set out as Form No. 10 in the Act and who is who is an ID the polling division. it such friend to accompany the blind elector into the the ability to read and write. Thev I would be opening a door to aatatute n o n sa cral election Tasrj were not so illiterate that they I needed any special symbols ~ >ote ro r them. As soon as ihey had that, said, one candidate took nold c | evarybady and things would not go ina right way You would be upsetting the DJ the ballot and opening the door for abuse.he said Nothing could be more dangerous than to do that. He hoped the members %  I in.House who had been members for long periods, would tell %  %  the dbugari of the proposed amendment. Mr. I'.k. said he was perfectly willing to risk a blind man taking J friend, but I -. — %  —eaaaja-ee a MJ • i !'' .,!.-.• ?" d c vorpd lemporanlv until such time that "ej/Mwtion. relative to UM ill, proposed In th. I vegetable irarket M Tudor Street M Welcome New Industries Bill TURK! \,| v ,,.. "if Intxoductl trie, BUI. Not htvli thej wen unable to m;.k. provl Mi TirM.i Bowrlnfl • %  Mai Da. C "aid I I i\ I fAr ds any person .h o could BM road or write WJJ ul !" meeting had been i-oncemed. he fell the sherifl """e", al a ratull .1 %  Hoiud look after tiut. The Hwia fS" ''•'' S" v -"'" %  .....id reel ,h,„ lhor e mulhl „, S ""'?' .1 II ^ man !" ,o hlai Z"£V "*• ""• kaowo .,M) taa II,... he ,„ula ,„>. read ^nu TCTnp, Y ^; ., _, I : nol being mi. whether SUIIable Sites M c.uld re) jn d write, he wuuld .„,'!" d ,? r 'h * of IW8-36. ha be accurate. *a.a. me vestries are enp 1 am more willing lo r.s llie, .'J.,"'"'!'.'' '"""""endal...... „l „,|.. offleer lo nuke a mistake fj ,,. "'"' '" Provide esilmal. or the approval of the notion ""the'enw,"' ''. """" lh. ^, ,tln , i ,>... uinV. i h "" v : %  near lo sSnt~' 11 S m "•* A I SKE"-, rown pv.nL : h, lin %  ".".. ?2S "'tended the r,. % %  Nilnry ondm imitation lo give ihei, ,„.„. now exist In the % %  -. M b] them J. M kidney. Ch.nrnun. ,.„l..„„.„ „' Hun Hi... %  ,„ Irj out lb. and then if il I. ,„. from every p.,im ..r V i. "1 Hunk thai of cos! Governor-iii-t„[i' '... diMn lh ." B ard ," '"><> aware .. '<"• verj ..ii.%ati.fact..|-v ....nditlou "ttfUba ..i i,.„k S t..r, ...nig" 1 ,;: •citing their goods. Ihereb] causig a condition that is ,, u but laaannary," M %  ther than having the whole nurn ber of electors being chaperoned into tile nallot booth. Mr. Haynea IE) said Unit when a man was illiterate he became and would feel more with %  friend than with a presiding officer. He seconded the motion for the amendment Mr. W. A. Crawford said that In the 1931 nallot Act. the Prealdln, out. l.r anyone who was inIsald he was ".nine Vw'iVe th",'.'^,'.'.' %  I by Hmdncss or other could no, .s.l'nn, L' ,^, me,,!" SSTi lk i"'" 1 "" '"-> %  "" tha d,y bnt We might, in this case, use the he would welcome lc Phi rmtUUll a .from them by way friend lo vole for someone wh> slon of opinion. cither blind or incapacitated I "' reminded member, that the my other physical cease" ho Beard was Ktlga la %  dual H ,. „ Icapaeity as Commissioners of Mr. ... II. Adams (LI said that I Health and as a Committee he was nol in the island when the Pointed by the Vestry to make General drafted the Bill, recommendations relative to marHe had however talked with him kels; as was empowered unde; unsightly Kidney ,.,i,i ed JI%£?S&J2SL2 I inoe his return and he (the AtGanaral] assured him that he had drifted it with the most up to dale legislation on tba matter before him. He felt that it the Alto.',,* I had left out anything thai amended Vestry Act 1911-5. A: He.iitn OorntrJiriooars, Be said !hey ware fully conscious of the insanitary and unsatisfactory conditions undo, which hawkers i offered then ware In and around :he City. Tha CoriunJ lonart, ha said oui. lie rail that the public te the new m. ,k.'l artvr a time Mr. V. c .;..],, Mi.r.. ^,d th.it %  not used i p | good hugite-tion. If the ___ omg to IKpermanently n-ed an %  Committee Beorkai Public Urinata %  :i.;it thc I. il %  %  added •ve should have I %  ... •Web %  .. 1 pur.) Utin.iN ; „,d are m .. H %  an exeeueni site I'M B tr..-irkrt 1 %  he aid !" % %  %  eartalit rtre. %  M>! ilhiwed to pass and they ore used for mark.f thai K n.-^i anough tot I is good enough for Rrii Mr. A. a. To..pln s.ii.1 thii he ahogathei eonvli %  I •entral spot for %  Police fell that it would drive some of the hawkeri tratti ih.-v occupy in tha t' ty they should try it out t. batore they snanl .-i lot i I It. Then if ii ibould bie. he sdd. shay rauld i m mooej on U Ha %  recommend in a that th•pend -ii of money by putting %  • %  '".' JISt.llli i%  • .run* tliai ever.-lw-i, > • h.„,nc 1 think that %  Indigcn. hut, |,„,..., .1 bottllru allow I ,rd h the provl number ..( i in previous ftx-al leg.s. ""' < "' % % %  :" %  %  on the matter, he had .. !" ? l !" ,d >', s,,, >!"' lu -'' ; "' hiterunl M. Victor Chase 'rapott tolha Vasgry which waa'that ir waf gSni ible rema id reason for doing so. Ha appuilcd to honoui n to let the section I It a Mr. H. If. Reeee (|) said that %  'i only affected blind and persons who could neither read nor write |J. Wanted to know if previous affecting people wno were otherwise physically taggacitated would still stand If that legislation was going to dad, ha tVOUld not agre. with it ber.-iu.se he saw no reasoi hj ;i man Who, for example, h'.'d loat hh handa, should not be able to cast his vote. Mr. L E. R. GUI (I) said that tar U he could see. the Gov • run,: wasdifTerentiating be %  ii ;. htind parson and a person who was illiterate. He cnld sec > reason for such differentiation. Mr. A. K. S. Lewis drew honourable members' attention to %  action 3!' of tha M,II which said: The provisions of this Act shall he d-emed to be supplementary to the provisions of the Representation of the People Act. 1V01. and the Ballot Act. 1931. and the provisions of these Acts shall apply reordfngly. 1 J'T nfed that in the ease of let 01 inconsistency. Uie proislons of this Aet shall prevail over the provisions of those Actj". After listening to the debate, hisaid that it would be right if they were to delete section 21 from the Bill and let the Sheriff vote Ina blind as well as those /.ho could neither read nor write as was done previously. Mr. Adam* (L> asked lejve to ..thdraw his motion that section 1 stand p.irt ol the Bill. Mr. Crawford (C) said that he id not agree with that. Since in t Britain, the Blind Pi %  Id voting compartment and mark the I Act n f 1 of i|te \;L the world I think careful i u compeUUon of th '^.t is liable ... distuib the normal %  %  %  I inless* th .handled on i is quite i Barbados to And ItaaU competim in -i limited market with %  bnlla : . Jamaica, IMnldad, or the othe dt ol %  . Mulllll I.Jile St... I H Kin Gardiner Austin I I a i romes the Bill He think | i enewhal lati Jam.ile*., Trinidad n othei coli nles iwi. long had u I .i Bill In operation, I late start." he nld ii in.., new be difflcuit f. new induatrtee here to Baa rate fur lana time, a markat f. Iheti producta, • % %  %  i hand, howevei. the Bill which i have nol yei %  ean, %  % %  > Idea law a to the Hotel %  the tourlsl n.uie can be davelopad, nothJ IHmore desir.ihle. '1 regard the lunr.i | %  I i pOa l.illl llldlistt nnd evei be 0ven to develop it. %  lano %  use Hotel badualiy would in the Hi I II tai i a menus of finding emi'l.iym'i.l r 4 i larga numl er of our i < %  I.'IIII. i l.dmure MCALISTER GETS SERVICE MEDAI. ASTHMA How to ease the strain in JO seconds il E. uu %  %  h* I I faithful m I Will Lecture On Cricket igi dt II Common* jnet' %  The I ... %  nday, Au| Tlie loan w rand .son. 8 H E Elc %  Whiti i ail c Clirki \ Twelfth man -\ ill t, Si | Downca \V/'HHN ch,*ing Aithmi nutn vou gasp for brcarh. gBJ tablrt ilipped in the m.iuth m.i ihc •iram quickly and rffectmlv Rcmrmber. it u this sssaffl on the .vncm *hi.h conitiiutei the ^lggct dsngrr fnn Aithiiu Ephazooc OBBSSjsg seven I ageni* whtji dissolve th,germ Udra -i.-iimuLiii.xi, m die bron.hu! iuh*-. sa I The Kphai.ti.nr treMnicnt noUiing to inhal %  %  snack cornea., there n nh>B] Por rspul relief from .A-tlunj, always keep a aSBf %  ihandyl FOR AST HMA A!.D BROMCHITIS TAKE SJQ3CIIOZB i St i it iree to of one of the ( I notion, loday, Secondly, the tourist buiine~in anyway that racom-(market bi th which would raault would provide llura !• k I n oqually largi project l ind other i*Ssei".iid li>-i( %  %  Fame Street i. function wl %  noon, Chu Kiiih 1 well i -i> in-I i %  Hosplti I % %  < %  terdas %  11%  Injured wrben tha bu which thej wera drlvl i %  gatlv mendation. but Is reeommetxlin u bunpon %  % %  -, ut." try out th Thiv. in. wild, was brought about, would be . :%  nlri < i.u of the polka who. in to I trying to cope with the over ln-[geetlons thai we have Ink. creasin proohmi of trafllc, wera lo form sometln e ago relative to always getting alter the ^.• %  %  .k'Ira] market who invariably found him (Mi. %  •" Tudor Street, I am no* Mottley) to make .OIHMI behalf. Exposed To Sun He thought <..this '.ecausc not only did th> have nowhere to tall aftei pui chasing their licences, but when they did sell in tl-e alleys thev sad to tha sun which he thought of which no one, conscious responsibility to the ci-ininunit could be proud. The Temple Yard area was a street 263 teet long ami 34 feet wide. There were only about four places in the street thai had to use It as an entrance. He thought that that street could be closed to vehicular trafllc. with arrang.i ing made for those people who occupied premises abutting there. ve the motion i Mr Gale mid Vial if ti the market and did ii"! people to us., it u of It. Puncheons Repair. etw7g !££ %  ?' '""" L '"" 1 W "" lf clous of I %  %  :..i at out M Porm No 11 It Schadule %  ,i the hallo; of such blind eli i had by him. and thai elector for the purpose of marking I . lor has had marked as provided In Mbeecti i .-'iall enter In Ih* the reglstci the elector's lo any other entry, the r furh ballot paper was so marked Mr. Brancker a i men! made so that an Illiterate person could also be permitted a friend lo accompany him into Unvoting compartment and mark the ballot paper for him Ha moved that beak. request Of •hould ;> % %  • %  aloctor who is unable to read and write." Mr. %  goa il S j (B) id that that amendment eaeri i iry, %  i i n herlff,*' he i. in.in | to rota for people who ware not altogether Mmd. but could not vote for them" Mr. Adams said thai tlon had been %  the roneluKion," he said, "that there could Be nothing more dan?* I What %  I feel that nothing should be done to remove hawkers unless a covering of some sort is erected over this area to protect these people from the weather." aid. He then invited members isit the Temple Yard. Dr. J. P. O'Mshony said thnt he Las of the opinion Ut iould have %  VT ket if Ihey were going t oommodati about 3*HI ; %  That congestion will cause InanV IV eondlllons that you will not Be able to get over he said. U-er Evil Mr. Mottley asked if thev woul i not prefer that leaaK evil to tin [most unsatisfactory and Insanib>> Itnry conditions which now exist in ber Busby Alley. "Over 10U hawker. hen put to [occupy _thtt street." he said. the marital arould bavi j rifle notse. "II %  iket," ru> '-i.o. "tha G take over the cooperage" Without COVerlng the market, (.. would be of no use. Replying. Mr. Motllcv very much appro, .... %  . Head* of Depai especially the I • Police whoseenifii ing to cooperate. But he IBM that any n %  % % %  Yard without agreeing to I om—cN'i that th, rineeraly hoi %  ieaatil IIIII is tha one we hi.vr lot DCOI -\i',linn." Mi-. Ring 'ii...i I nipin. uient Mr. j n rude .1 '.; % %  I.O jTudor A Co alao an Ii %  Bin I conaldei that Uu mini of any new indu n aaaat to U in ..i ii wo. i rment for a ood it proa ..•I .'. : %  %  %  1 %  ., %  the kind ..I industries thai woul I %  King Mr TudOl think hat late I viaw of %  %  TOnidad .'. i .it people i .. %  i %  %  I here," he saw. i horti I thnt this quartan i| 4i %  in' of the prableme with which .( eetabll lung i I have to %  that the an i I not meet with hi. apt n %  ., VQ uld \# He wuuld piefer to withdraw hi. 'notion "Mr Chaaa has ild that he da *o much mono, f areu." said Mi. Mottli u| i want to remind htm Of UM comfort umi health 'it tha people III po mil the the vote and raaolsed In the nega'* r O'Mahonv further pointed ill live bv n 6—9 division i *>ut that the ana Tempi Mr. ^dam. IL laid the Cool^3 i !"!" '£"X!u.. It had been dr. !" u, >'Z Z' h ^Zl a^vvouUI ; ':'"," ,hi "W w< """'' available to them. 111 which Ihey could compronus.' by using the English methed K '14.' If however that they gel th. %  vhole area, h' aid. thertwould OfTlcer did not make a lha p^pio tHIK-lt.dk> will ... recant] r ean i away, strayed or era i %  ment. The Hoard then m decided i" adopt Mi ad recommend* Ii in Ned lo f" roventosotT.. INSIST tf ON %  %  %  PURINA mows %  THEY ARE THE BEST H. JASOM JONES & CO. LTD. Agents W.AIIII-IIIIJAIIS kini POWDERED MILK Ir.-h Block ill REDUCED PRICE VI Ml IUI \\ %  .•i.l. |; s.i.'iH |, i i| n Mi nil's PBICE K.M p, | .. | DELICIOUS SWEET BISCUITS Hi... per pk. in eelloi u ( USTARD i III IMS MII.K AMI HUM i OINORI -\ vi's ( I 1(1(1 SI I'l I I NEILSONS 11.^..Hulls 12, Inn N.H Bold IS tai I In in ( r.-nie lie. l.-n Mailed Mill. I2r. bat MOIRS Plnaappla lie. b n Buddie* i h. bu I'l pperiniiil I'iiltn-. III. I..M JACOBS CREAM Cnwken st M MUCE WIATIEISIAI ilMIIM) TO-P^ V S PRUNE CREAMS niiimi-. <'/.-,„,. ( ,i I KNIGHTS PHOBNE. SODA FOUNTAIN '.•.•.•.•.v//,v.v/.v, ::: V .. JV ^M^^J.., J ................ ^^Ibe Abet 01 ** Vhe Oaoce poce'i we have the spom Ml HIT | YOU'LL WANT I TO WEAR SHIRTS in Crruin, Ecra, Drown, Villnw. Knsl. Green, lliirk llrovvn $5.21 & $598 PRINTED DESIGNS bDeludtoi rUrftea Pi other I lorui Patiami in. III S2.91 to S5.58 nusti.ke. At this sloge thc Comminee reported peog r aai ond asked (or leave to sit again. The House then adiourned for dinner. On resumption, sections 22 to 34 were considered and passed with some amendments The House adjourned until I ond iv ALMF.S AGREE TO REDS CEASE-FIRE a> from pige 1 I n ,.f t'.ielr observance '-nts as regards to war prisoners. As Thursday's meeting started. CnmmunMs abandoned any insistence on the question of withdraw Ing foreign troops from Korea lo be made a programme or agend. item. The North Korean General. N m 11. opened the meeting ha asking the views of Vice-Admiral, C. Turner Joy. Chief UN.. negotiator on the would have to go le lha market to purchase and tha) would have an extrcmch congealed area. "It would I"' gested, that quite : %  number < f people would no*, tin IhCri chase; and If the peopldon I go there to purchn-e tin will be disappointed." ha Mr. A. II. Sku %  %  i the idea was for the Board to ehooso of the two evils, as Director of Highway and Transport he would choose the Temple Yard. Mr. T. E. Went -aid "uld not properly ace mimodnte 400 people but eo forlably accommodate 200 people, it would be worthwhile erecting it. Mr. A. B Skinner aeked whether It would not be for other people to get and hawk ware In the places formerly occupied by the hawkers that would be removed lo Temple Yard He cot the answer that the Police would Putk over that. Breach of Law n T Miohclin said that, ns Mr. Mottley had said, the hawkers were committing a breach law when they occupied the HARRISON'S ''''**'•'•'•'•••;'.'.•.•,',%;;*, — BROAD STREET '•'-'-'-•-'-'-'---•.'.•-'.--•.-.---.•.•.' negotiator on tlw compromise 'Greets to offer ihV.lr wsr. • proposal of the Communist.. In-I B u fa, H WM ihcir Uvelr 1 on Wednesday. g^' 2>i'£,"£Z£V'S££; "" —t.P. Hi said that therin itr il i: OFFER I IiNE FOODS I.YeV FINE DRINKS Inrkmlf It ..... .Murlfll II, -mil I, DANISH 8A1 Uld SAI CAMKMHF.KT (ir. GORG. '" Il, CRAWFOIIDS nil. 1.11 I.UB citrrs. I RS rOCKTAll SUN P X BUN PA1 SAI ITO I % %  :%  v. UTS Jai IUTI H ASPAR v;rs BALLANTINPH WHIHKY PERLSTEIN BRKR 18. p-r botll. ,1 rio p.r Csrton l II 91 IB ill, SI 47 II 12 c SI Z.I I 85c STAKSFEMM. SUM A ro. I in. FINEST BEDROOM FURNISHINGS In Our Linen Depf. ns ] sinus si \i \iti t III ins sin i r~ N \ in.. (BEXWI Mti 7.1 V "Ml ,, IT.TI ...... lltlWM \l(i n x ao ti UM •... i. IKK DAMASK IKK "ill IBJB, nidia MM yard nine. Green 1 INC1 TICK II ins a/Ida 'i H Iftxt BLACK & WHITKTICK N in*, wide .i s;.i.i jranl I'll.l.OH 1 %SIS 1 1.1 II.S I'll 1 IIV. ( \-.| s i'l v :in .. CavcS & Co., Lid. in. II It, II Itr.u.l Street



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FRIDAY. JILT 17. 1M1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE TI1RKE Not Guilty Of Breaking Into Shop TMfGAMBOL? Kgglesfield Mel Flying BoaLs In J'ca HIS HONOUR iho Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymort%  Court of Grand Sessions yesterday discharged DtnzL Reece a motor mechanic of St. Thomas after an Assize jury found him not guilty of breaking into the shop of Elliot Reid at Bridgefield. St. Thomas with intent on April 22 1MI Mr E L*rull of Riisv wmlo Mr. W W n>*fT K.C. S..liclnr General pn>. aacutfd (car UM I case for the proarcutaio wa. closed. Mr E W llarruw addrv.• %  d f.iil." minutebefore th? %  djoum mtw On resumption ol hearing M' W. W Reece submitted Unit ther., was no case to take to the mn V. ku c ummander I. A. EgslrsBaton advising Ulvm u, leturu .. held. Uireelor aeneral ol Civil V erd,ct of not gulltj. Hi* Honour f;'"he't','Surged ^", n i,rTi '"'' l " '>" ,h "• h " !" returned from ;. VISIT I „„ |nu r ltoSIi,i IUI „,. ..I .1,. „„_.,. IJ| •" ul >" to the dl.ii.iMn.-i. R.A.r Sunderlon,! ,„., boal* ""> "'. '!"."""SJ v.h..h mm making a goodwill ,. MmdiiM Broken tour and trainhiK ( -ui ' mtnal ... %  %  the pro. They left their base at IVniaaentlon wa. SKI. ( H broke Ifc*k on July I] in Ireland. l'"He Slati ,n He ankl Arnenlia in Newfoajnonssd and at April 73. he -rnt lo BlMlMMd, Hiimucla. the three boul an vm It, iln.,,..,...:n ollHT polieein Jamaica on July 17. allghtfl mil examined a shop in the haibour ai Kingston. and ooltntj] .. tvuidoii at the back "It Ha a mattl 'el of the shop was broken The %  I i..-l>. and pan,,lularl) the affJKaM was secured by a latch 1 of tho (Unlit. Ihat tl\v To Mr. Burrow. S fc t llutebimon nabla lo visit the other atid the -tadm muj about tliv British territories ,„ Carlo(ad tram the aruuiui and waa oven '•ean. Ul ll p rnM S nu of when Se aaw Undsa) Mayuaid angina rnalnumanea ;'"• Jn cclan Oylni boat Next wlUier* ailed *„. c',,: which Occam so well Known wilh C'onlilfc and he told the court that Imparlal Airways, it i.1,11 very ,„ April 21, at about II.OS p.m. valuable toi i !" ,it ranaa oversees he was i.n dutv ai Diitrict "D" and leaanca and „ U.,,^,1 UH ,„. .,, ,„ „,„, against submarines. They have „,.„,, constable Springer made fefi*•' < ** I" a report to hin, and he charged Korea anil it played a proirinonl i, rtH ,. Luh. „.„„ i-—,k,.w pan in the Ainethy.t Incident In „?' JLxV* KEii^L, -M the Yang,.,. Klani River; In fact. v ...^a,, D ^," *.TfTS""',,„ two of tlie metni.. •., 4, V h T, .K K f were in Ihe crew of tha SMO.II Ai "' 1 2i no **"' to ln e shop ol Amothvsl under heav> (Ire. L \. S ",""-, S* • J 2fi2!S The niitht wu commanded bv the "^P nd found lhi*l a window Sutiadrun UMtor P. A. S, Run %  ' %  •" %  <'".. • -.hop wa> opned bold and, from A-WilLl onwilda, bv 1-indnov Maynnrd. was accompaniwl hv WI-IK ComTl* window wu urUaiched. mander E. J. Brooke. D F C\. who Lindsay Maynard luld the oil I i., tnenibar nf th<> British Joint 'o 0 n %  is-year-old *hnpServf. H lion In washtneton keeper of Bridgelleld. S*. Thomas He workr. with his brother Elliot*. Reid—in bis sh..p. Since Rety-.\*as l schoolboy he knew him On April 22. he dosed his brother ahop and went out. When he returned to the *>hop he noticed tli.t. 11 jumping out 1 dow. He held him and sent for Ixland Constable Sprlnper who Rain fell nearly .nil over the c mf .hortiy .#,and Jv and every da> this week. |hc ac ,. uscd who was l..k. %  „ to 1'lat.ten who were waltinit for Dlitric -. D" PpUce Station rain 10 soften the earth, have --,,,, besun plntblg provisions. About the city area, one inch 11 parti (ill un Tuesday and Tuesdnv night nr,d 20 parta from Wednr-day to 6 o'clock yesterday morning. The only place ram fell during the day on '\ %  d was about St. Michael, chiefly the ,,_-„ ^..^A n mpn nnf t .,„. J!fell during the W 3JS3 aiiund tL "SirKiIr -^ >6aAA# A^^V^ Arab Unity Rests With Iraq By OrtMl P1PAI. BAGHDAi>. July ;-i' Political nbsrrvtTs fiiiid Ihnt Ihe iSSUtinatloi Abdullah has shiftrd the centre of gravity ol DM Bl lor Arab unity from Amman lo Batjh'i.id. md r-i ( \ hasten the realization of the first ubjectn. & On Julj 21 in,. Crown Pi lneftb dUllMI vaitl in 1—ndon thai the "death of Abdullah" will nor tbanm nut count, or prevent my lamil) from cajryfeid| out nur .: 1 day by the 8*fU< kgar link limmlsh. ZT', "2 **•> %  TermmalV dimtnllh. but that he.gh.er Oak HUl frwn Halifax UM in strategy a making a total of 831.170 feet lo „. ** Irai| will that Imporl.i re almc i ed Ihl* week |r i %  round tho nner basin of the Careenage alAbduUab loofl l*.d worked for *ueh a union Now the titular leadership baUl on th,. 16 >-ear rftjJCS *^t '" mh, r • W K "" F ""i "' 'rq a. the "jo* that „nly Arab „„,narrh clahninr. w..l...l,„i„ „l Ul. inwr basin ,| Cror d^.,,, fr „„, lhl ,^.„^„, r\.h2. ,""" '?""" Mhamrrml. wl„l,. ihiorlual ...a nu r r ^H„T'^.. & '": leartemhip cane, frorn bt, ,„: %  !., lak Mill included 1.600 bagi of „„i unc [ e •d a niLiniiiy ol pkkaM Iraq ,„i to aaak unHy wiUi Syn.. nl.ine. Thi tnnipiugn will hav* .... '...;.".' : "' %  i, :,., prams lrnq. Nuui-y Paahii E3. Paahn Boa! Owners Repay $61,225 fXn .i^,' Ihe month an M.T47.83 %  i ;.. dale. Inter1 i waa $31 rites C. i : is tepon i for the I H i tocUlf th> total nined from tinincept Ihe I.an Sohorno to $1 i-.i'oi DHNt HMll IUM %  duj m; the Of (IVIOK Bah. AH I UM till netting imported %  %  %  I %  art U'liK! directed ti'W.u i ptTaniadttll %  ling is jwirt of their regular slock ..I Bah dropped dunih: the moot] ., %  of the Hying nab season approaches. Kiv. mtini/ boala v.. i. la .. %  %  two badly damaged during the month Four ol the loM l> I eoven*H by insurance Entire Ctibiiit-t Offered To Resign LIMA. PraaMeni Manuel <>i ti e reattrwrtlona or two i ul n'li't tcit UtOafl of others u hen %  l %  i'. .i ti Pn %  Idtnl TO..,' .in/.tha (tovntiment %  he Mcop. .i iron U • MlnltttO of Development .: ui Pub'I Mil t I I reasons," and QafllOfM i. .C KMLunlii who tald — v.r Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay S,n Lady Nftelres*. Ml HUMIIIHM I \ S,-lMft-fl.l *-li •Gh rliiiialilnr H Hch Htm II. *' %  .. %  •, Uaft at CaroatU Ba rtawHIvn • R ai'ti Rainbow M Hch i.-ll-. • S CuafUd llohv. meat. A sto nown with (ho Oak Hill CulM He will he tak<-n li ship to Trinidad from wh will be repatriate! to Cubii 131 Confirmed ,v the Kain Fell Every Day Canada, U.S. Plan To Keep Pvioea Dou n El Li •aid to have been a member of the Arab Independence underground under the Ottoman Empire. It was he. who originally formulated proposal* for the umllcution of Syria. Jordon, and Iraq aa the 'fertile creacent." Abdullah personally expanded thih concept Into 111 fininime fnr t "greater Syria N'mry Paah.i, HI reee-nt %  >een concentrating on the unity Hli Seek Jobs As Seamen WASHINGTON. Julv Jt, Canada and the United Statei f SvT ' %  ""! '""aq. a combinatii will seek mw wavs todflv ef which obMrvw-4 believe mnkc* holding back price climbs in mo '" economic and poUUi %  Mtnttal n.iiiM.ds which threaten i,mi has the best chance of sucthe vast rearmamc-nt pmgrnmme reeding Of boCn i-iLinlric* .., (Ollt.l creotlnil y to bind dcfciui it on The hiRhest fhnle Island fall was in St. The Bclleplame Station S~ AnovoWi there recorded 32 piiftt. Follow irta recorded at lihe various stations on WedneMlay night: Central 2". District V 25. "B" M "C" .14. %  f' ,11, F." .4. 'T" in. Holetown .!. Belleplnine .32. Crab Hill 5 and Four Road* .14. StuppiiiK Departmakit siH'kini; j. her of disappointed faces finally wharf War Ami Germany WASHINGTON, July 26. House Majority Load a a. John McCnrmlck announced on Thursdaj night that UM House will take up at noon. Friday, a resolution to declare ihe %  tata <>f *rat wHh c.rr.1 md. The resolution hai already been cleared by the Foreign Affairs Committee and Is expected to "OOtva near unanimous approval by ^ full House. —t'.P. •ri IMT own lesiderahip within the looser Arab league and sees a threat in a strong Arab state. Saudi Arabia whi-*m! ronaindei from st Cyprian's, AM Souls and the Caahedi.d Fr. G V i: Ha/lrucd .-1 Of 1 %  ) %  • % %  ind n M st C Tu-to, tod 1 %  • B IM, Chnplain %  Sung Fuehurist immedintelv following the Connrmotion .if which the i-o.ini.iit made thelt llrsl communion The Riahop spoke vt-i dvob to thorn on UMH tulura spuitual life and rhn.tian iTHnoas POUCE BAND AT ROCKS* TONIGHT THF Polk-e Band will r-nd.-r tin! proframino %  ) H 1 Unga I;.1. ks tO-nUflll l-eginninn at R p m raiMtua ItfSin s-nlnl MutriitHAITI K DSJS8 Drbtus -nm-FOKPUBOU 1 IN mi %  \t)l i\\< I i:> on.nia.h nprrjllr I A TIIAVIATA w .1. tpuiHll V*l-. ESTIIDIANTISA HildO-al'l U .11 Plai rug DAI VI Ml-I.or •.-•'II%  S..I.1. TATtr.SHAM roftNEH OALOP I1UET MAI' AM* MAC K--.,Mh Ml.,,.1 X< i..|h.* P 0*1 IK.I Bandoaaa iu>.nmm \l.i-,. Till IIOAU Tit MORI)"" H,m.*„ Dvrr Maxllis VOtl WKhE NrVRIl LOVI.1FM ItNW h.f-i %  (x. IM. IIHIMTIAN HT'ltl VFI) IICUFN M*ST' In Hurvour ( !•>• vlsll l tha>., %  %  aiMSM Rima, I Sfh D •anae*. VM MIUKII.. s*h • (. IWIIas Wulfp H.11 W 1. Kunussi. 1 \ Laily J<>>. Mg-H \tll> N Jona.. VarUl Kxhiilrr B S La>dv MisSA, S MoraisOlMat, S %  lnvnlin. h S Itai il-lil.o I R JiliKla-Ml. 4U ton. iwt. CapL IHMtMM, torn. Ultltlul. M V C>ribb*100 Inn. nrl. Opt BmM. ftvii 1>II" .'uij 01 i* MM ( •4.h<-,rv.( atlua) N-,-> SI a. H (isna 1.1. Mpi Mcr-aiUna. lur li.mu. Ouiana H-.ll.ai. %*0 Ion. n..| Cap* Trinalail < I Ml. Capl MAIL NOTICE Ul M %  How to get rid of STOMACH PAINS Good News! KLIM NOW $5.98 Hb Un #1.r. NOW--,>|..)i) Take put* water, add KLIM. shr and you have pure, tale milk KLIM MILK FIRST IN MIMR1NCI THI WOILD OVIR ." IIW Hi, %  %  aoian a s.au n B0U.KMI 1 ss %  • %  (in. „,,,„ ••. Tha tlh .1 %  Mapls. "1 Jifl auin ti. tiforlablf -I...I % %  %  i11.. (.Aai.iM.a AI ns fl o MrOrrlor BIISaM, tltfillOl P"I>"SI via TRANS-CANAUA Air l.uua 1 a Ik IStfiP 1 Motl d*n|t •ray t iiomsch psi"* •U* ! *Cld fet rid ol th. %  ^11 ara due to Tha quitha.t Hit K by I*II>( a doa o* BISMAG t.hort tor Bnuritad l'ii['ii*i Thi. -ondartul ramad/ v>.ll bring "" 'MUMII ralstf. G( %  RISMAG today and alwayi ba lura ot citint • (Omlort. •H i> 1 VI..Iri'in IAVF nil KIM. YOU NEED BISMAG iHiKiMDHtcaitia $kt*&**6f ,| loll 1. 1 be 1. ..HI iiiii... i II I iftan ll lo, .,,.... |h .iK r n-l_nl w\ Tag s..:i]i .I las Bijitllal from ; special tropical %  %  i T. .n^.. i '"'ai '1'''''--" 1 '' IjIn^thf^TrojijfjjDre.m'g In mi in'itiwii-'":,..:"M,n^lii^-^tl l TitVlli;i.;^ti".^i,rr'..rrYi'i" : U-w\. ,.„,,. [,,„„ special iropiral l..rmnl.i 'j'.'^ff'^--'"^';' 1 '"'i'"j,'"-'V'i'1 ; 1 ',"."^',r e m i ile,.,, ilown_iiiiojW|m*di<.n -dki. acii ininediaial)f 10 ratieva pain The four fvmotn in/iKlir' arl h 11 contaim—Phrnacatm. CaHelnc. A'ciyltlliC^lK Add and Quinine— %  ra balanced oacdr thejr wo>b t'-jjeihaf wiiti a \ynar|itiK act-on (o relax your narOut .xtiem. anC itnora your lama at aM-beirij t DO TOO SUFFER FROM ANY OF THtSE? Fe*tr' Cold' Headache*' ToOtbatAOf Roaumji,i-n' NSMrasjBal Periodic pami' Tnan • ANACIN 1 b'ing you immedisic lei.et' MIT OFF RAIN-NOW! li COW* to littta to inara In lha benefiO ol thu jreai ne* rnadKin* ANACIN it available In 3-iablet en.alopet. hanOr 20-iablei boei. and m boidei of SO tablet, ((or hoe u\t) ARM YOURSELF ACAIHST PAW GET'ANACIN' TOD An ENGLISH ELECTRIC %  IS \ REFRIGERATOR • llermrlieally Seiiled L'nil • Heuiiliful in l)esi|{ii • AMSleel Cabinet • l-imnnniinil to Operate • 5-Year Guarnnlee. Ill V ...V i:\UI.ISII 11.11 I Hli HF.FHNIKH.XTOH Ill-Ill A FHFSII sill I'Ml \# HI 4 1 li I It HEFF\Ti.V .M.\V\I.V. A tO.. I.TI.-.\griil* I'hon. l-MI!



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FACE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE IR1DAY, JtLV tl, 1S1 SOUTH AFRICA 282-3 IN FOURTH TEST — KEN EARN!M Snappers A nil Bonitas Win Sport lt |MM l: KEN FARNUM MUST BE SENT TO ITALY Weekes Heads W.L First Class Averages iha s. com\ TRINIDAD s|M)iiini, circle* are happy and why shouldn't thev be happy as they have | BMMT) (2.000 !o send Comptou Gootalv** their leading cyclist to '• vJd Cycling ch*roplenhip* that take place in Italy next month. How has Barbados taken this %  Ibe light way, thai U 11 thai ii u most th.it our own Ken Fai ouni must be *nt to the** nine* a, wreJl Genuine %  HngtM II, : rom Tnm%  %  tl Tinirutlis foal foi weeks now the Amalcur Athletic AatoctaUoo been tryuig to lean (h* I %  iht visit will onmi oefor* i* i ( iit la "), %  i HI tod dried plan. if that thi ... ous effort tiat the to s*nd %  • kl ii ifl*2 %  . .. ml Ukelj Lindsay (inrdon and I I .ii'iiiiu Should (in if UM W. %  (J -.%  sendta* it. than xamis. I i| tum should i < ii..K to %  * much valuabM The resounding success of the BONITAS but PC '• Snappers defeated Barracudas In >' %  "" should ^ '"ken an an o*> *rajl*r polo m-i.1%  ampla How could John Goddam] rj surh an Ittrdu afternoon, apo^maWiw triumph had not Bonltiw aant in 13 gpals to oni **•* %  f ,h '' 'fading West InbyIWl(,-.-|V,,M,h,.lu ll ...n.;:1 "' rolnmr, h P en given equal £!I" .. be the logical step l>riore sending 1|t Th0 | 1.. ll.-lsink. the spectators point of QorUtas got nine foals in the first A Lfagf Way half Five of iheso were scored l>v The Waal Indus and Barbados Owen Johrmon. two by Trevor will have gone a long wav ii.u.ud; I, while C, Atwell and M establishing ;i r*spcctablr IdefttlT} on scored one each In world iportini circle* if theg in ihiaacond h.iir. Rlcnardaon can add to the eteellenl lob tin v andJotonvsa scoredtvomoraanahi berv* •u>nr by virtue of than* each M Fnnkljn aant In UM crick*! triumph* b> conquering .1 for Police from i ai n without rcai of .oimadicBonnistcr the other two. iio,,, tliat this cause is worthy of After the interval the speed of handsome public support and the game continued to be just as should pay dividends In the years fast as it was in the first half coin*. with Snappers always on the First Class Cricket attack. Barracudas did once or Published in an earlier issue of :wic. toe* Ihey E. Kowan Hits Fine Century Ab England Field All Day (From Our Own Correspondent| LONDON. Julv 26. SOUTH AFhlCA ended the first day ol the Fourth Tut not unduly UTOUblad l I it was a auTl.b.w. to Bedstr The ttal was inen 40. NfcWPOilT COUNTY ire the So England gained an earl;. first club lo say No' to the r|4 BdVWlta**, but with ROWU and -wage (old inaxiii. ( i' Van Hynevelri tOf*th*i t Newport Say No' To KU HUTTON ( %  ) JOINS THE BIG TWELVE —And \lakt> His Oval fcvonqp \W ll I l-.Mlk H.'SllOII .. Julv 11 YORKSHIRE'S Lei Hi lortened and 'ieformed left arm" tha; I ^uld his stvle 'hp boundac> *do nnington Oval yusholder yesterday—i nd t!t,000*pi i rok* that haj become famoug ihrouajKHit thai En Buttot.. h:id just Lao, bul the ancket gnu too easy. !" rfutton and foi bli Oth "hadow Frank Uwson. n %  cr, lesser batsmen could well have ninth ol PATTY TURNS ON THE CASH GOLF By DESMOND HACKETT July 14 "T*HESE muscular misses who make up the American women's professional ^tilf circus are no myths. They defeated the international amateur team here to-day by '.I —0 In the foursomes, a game to which they are unaccustomed, and they did it without even having to turn on any nt that old American power golf. They found themselves with one a two holes win for the obvious tough fight on their hands when professionals. the golnng cover girls, Vicomtesse For the vicomtesse and Joaji de Saint Sauvcur and Mrs. John Cewper was the consolation of Cowper were MX up after 21 holes matching the Babe and BeUy S ;\itt> Brg and Betty Bawls dh the best score of the ish. day—59 for the tn I Busting Patty Berg, a distinctly The llaix >turd> performer was not acCUSCurtis Cup pair Irish i tomed to such frail players matchPhllomena Clarvcy and tfOU*d by the t in., tin %  : %  ikm > % %  • POlittOn about Christmas. In the letMr t* the players. Mr. Lion*! Watkins. the MWpOfl lu-n. f \*OU *>U] \,v the lu-t lo approI'll'' UM! .1 atufee* aOihty lo p> reottvod through tinturnatuei*. The attendani • it Last notion's inalfhag an %  press it ho gradually nastered the but eoulrl iii-v. i attack .f sroring was Slow Seorint: lo lb date. 0|M'llin.. of have had to advance for I .irniner wages. In ddJttOn a gDOd deal o' woik has had to be done to the ground mul dressing room accomThis expenditoie „ ill bavg to b* guaranlaed by the Hoard. Players* reaction will not Inknown until when the Union decide whether players should reSign and accept Ihe new May to %  lay contracts. Last season Newport hough? fttHst houses for four players and g-" fiES lh.£750 niaxnrnim benefit to two men. II A McLean. P N f. t U B Soon N D r M \ Chubb. C N % %  %  HOHI INO ANALYSIS Alee Badger did bii ball and ofl< %  hand was all he lurb llut%  MOW has an average of %  at th, II. ,i i rung* there itwo not otii he ha' *%  runs. %  '* was hi. .mi v. Australia I Zealand England v. West 0 %  '. 121, Yorkshire ex. 1037. 101. V .1.. •In March. ; I .. P.T. flu I %  i.ni ttgM I had i %  %  i s ing her own strong-arm driv She was rattled by the lavender-cool calm of Joan Cowper who. having ard ninth, smoothly holed in gin the hola with a 2 llerg. conscious that she iten America's first had anotli. | I lady of golf, the fabiduus Babe rortabl* win afainst Bunty Ste7-aharlas. beenme the foreman of phins and Joan Oc* a 4 and :i this match success smoothly o She thumped partner Uetty greens. irtJll i" • ii.uiiragcmtnt. These golden golilng girls just rXJmined evirv putt wllh plumb have the game tM rutlny purad h*r up* In an Z from Ai agony of concentration Zaharlas international Je*n Donajd 11 -:id 1, all done to a smart running ommenury from the Babe. She loosen a strearr. i cracks of Bob HUIMT calll a string of shots far beyond the I Hope. Bett> Jameaon and i' Consolation This was cash register golf %  play.for-ple,^ iiy of the amateur*, it m i first): — Si !" Z*h I. Yoarwood. C. Atwell. J l"aster, M. Richardson. O. Johnson. Snapper*: A. Taylor, 0 McLean tCapi > C. atc L**n, n Bannartei K. Ince, (i Kosers and Biirnes. M ,.,,, t(1(1 )||ls|| .„ k. Peie/, B. Brook* fr end %  Slj!l .„ ..,„n „ wnl mc (Capt.) M Hr and batsmen In Ihe Weel Indies, at Ba wMMI plient still playing Ursl class This ailernoon %  games are cr i,kel SUrnah versus Goldfish. Referee. "St.,tiMician i.. well known for Mr. K. luce, and Mermaids i,, fc ; ,ecutacj and I have no he Ivei-si.* Sea Nymphs. Refeix'e M:. t.,tmn In pnbBgnlni uSes* lor the 11. Brooks. benefit of othei ttaustlclani PAULKNER IS CAPTAIN Ma* KuilKiu'r. the British Open champion, has bean elected eap•ain t>( the Professional MC holds the Byte Uomorlal ICeoal which goes to hj iipii I'hampion il a incnibe f Ihe PC.A. i..i...... > % %  < ii,.1..., s>. ( N-l ajsaanl I S.Stt %  MS* S.IH1 314* I.4U Ml 6.BSJ at 9 id" JIUts %  WHAT'S ON TO-DAY Court of Appeal—10.00 a.m. P**!** ourls — lo.eo a.m. tiovrrnnr oprn* Schools for Blind at llurri Memorial School. James Street — 12 noon. Mot.HiCim-ma lives ahou at Dodd's Yard. SI. Philip —7.4* p.m. 1-olice Band fives Concert at %  gaifJjafg Korki. Christ t'hurrb—1.00 p.m. ClNRMAS QlalM — "Ktm' %  —..* p m I iiL|nir Mrtl I (iiack trouble. Then Cecil Cook, "Sam" to his teom-inates. cul big left hand (Mding, and wcu to hospital to have Ii -:itcj>d. In 310 minutes. 450 runs were aoored. Notts piled us 261 before lunch, declared at 308* f >r gert en Hampshire. -iel to make 28il p.1 Hist over 87 „n hour, tiii.l hard D .t beaten by fin runs, it was Noils' Qrsl win thm season. t\t ii to* 1 luster**) round I Pu willow. ii r*t*i r Brta caused renewed cheering by blarUig on the loudspeaker: "Congratkeusr." HOUM-U j'ieir dumi keth* from tho balcoi... Ml council DOU %  truant workmen toseed I Into to* It wa I r*l day when Mutton %  I.. • scoring 364 against trallan, on ground. l en wen' on to make I %  bowling. Vic Wilson pp lollect c 'ig York%  % %  to 'i" Ian I : I Brst innings total Ifulton'.. .lu'ifullv t*m*dL 'Kanied" i 'I : are n u no charity on offer. 'Kasy wickei' Though the Sui 11 disintegrated UT. |i It WB* especially good foi | hour Dec Bedst-r i r %  "It was another gix-at i. Yesterday's Weather Report FROM nin:i\<, N.\ K.uiif.iil. i u ma. Toui Rainfall for sflOnU) i,. dale: 4 03 Ins. Highent Temperature: 81 0* F. Lowe-t Tempei-tiiro: Tl 0F. Wind Velocity: f mileper boar Barometer. (9 a.m > 30 00g, (3 p m ) 2U 920. k'n\on Add Co. Deserve Hn-uk HERTS .... rricket rulers, s.-t aside %  Axtun 1 %  % %  Many si ler winter are tired Tl • lucMnt to mak* H e Ii t rip thi %  %  : Had %  V pl'led against If* B 1 \fraan Murlatg i %  % tars. And what grand as %  If li.em. This team would pve the pre*u %  •> think al I ney, Spooner. Close I el HI Hillon, Acie> .i %  %  %  • LADIES! !• %  I ha* AdeUtson t*j acu p I-I E Hum atejek of • • ANGLAISE MMKOIIIIKKD :ih from t?JI up We hav* mm J beautiful palterns and -hades to cliei g* from . Ynura Inr Service THANI Bros Pr, Wm. iinv. si. Dial MM V ,W, -• %  *',',*,',*,*,*,* FOOD FOR THOUGHT BATTERY BEARS THIS LABEL OF DISTINCTION From October, 1950 to Juna, 1!I51 tha price ol Woollen c Suitings : ^KAf YOU GIT PEAK PERFORMANCE sfis-bcy pOWff |0 handle che I -inking jobs and extra %  •• turd, long; ecoD ill cUaMIH... :hai's wo*| ..,, ^.,, | lt:n you 1 li.u.ii Wbenh's %  D' Start! TuPENOABLE BATTERIES E0R Gl YEARS! Oiri|f Trad i oil C has advanced over liHK>i. and these higher priced materials are now beginninK to arrive in Barbados. We still have a n*Mid selection ol TROPICALS AMD ALL WOOL SUITINGS at last years prices. so NOW IS THE TIME to select yours at C.B. RICES. Co. Iliji Class Tailors. BOI.TON LANE. ',',',**-,-*'.'.-,-, ',->.'



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PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. Jll.Y 27. 1K1 Cahib CaU&nq W IMHANDOt L. A. rector (.or.cral of i bean %  Wurks nd Communim return tomorZ TiL.L. Engineer M B kjiD m I \E arr at present %  parents, Mr. H. Corbm t "Wal-. rthlng. V. ttiem are ibeir two Ml %  ngtawr with i Pierre. The\ rxpoct to be here tor i :i> wc-k Off To England 11*188 11 V.N.. \ \ U 0 H A N. 1VI lor 1 '-.. %  %  • % % % %  hi will Coltast, London to take her'Art. de-jrev %  he is in England 1 in Vaughau, %  %  %  %  %  h in Trinidad OJvmpia Dines A T 8 Op o'clock last night the m k Club in cdebratlon I formation; of the Club dined M Hotel R The C&iests "1 HOUOW wenMrs. O.. H Adams and Mr. i) JI Li Warn, who hava bM iha Pn %  dent of UM Club from I (lurtinR d)ir to UM PMM %  the helm f %  in* dfniwf i %  i m ii. M-.-.i ... Clark*. Ml.. M Mix Norm. dart lint. Mlaa Ai-tne Cummini. Mia. Doraan %  -I DenlUty IXmovan. Mti Or*u lUrnf* Ki* • M ri'oru Jordan. Ml.. EW M !" .-..(T Mn. S)l.u >H.**II. MiAIT 1 MC Mr. nargawl Matron MC. Radio Programme I Klll\l It I IMI II 4* %  m Procrsmm* farad*. || ft) %  m UtMnats' OnU* II.U am -.11 !" >r, Tha N*< II 1J p m Naw. Analynt |—n u — i 4 IS p nu Flint irt Tha Flying Squad. • S p.m Spurtu* lti of tha) H .- KUata, II* p m Marchart NavfM.mai.iPv l\ pm 1. V.la a U i> i>. l-n.gia.-nnHPar-W *' SHn ( OPPI RS bftinf shown in Wait Berlin u< %  iWact. for the i %  %  .'UMjri Berlin children who have i-M-ppe,.red Mi %  Ian !H p m Tna NawJ 1 I analvaia t II p II WM Indl p m li.lwluda T *B •lyrr,"i We Win* • * p m KadIO IW-a-.. -. B IS p m Fngli.n Mag"""* %  • .df la pi i pn The atorv Road j U p m World AITatrt 10 oa p m Hal in || p in Anan HIIIV*V I0H pm Ton Trio 10 41 p m Tha IMaU %  CRosswoun cz.'f as 6 i F r& IT *—3" *. U I EAT i has been ; %  ur climb— h yol malEruflithman i I Academy. It is that this i> the highest Indian I %  xpedition was ac• tie best i imibt, in Indii' to-d-i> •JC DAILY UPCBUCI MI Miiosnoilii "Tilt FABULOUS TEXAN" AVI .VI M H'H I I.\|;MA M,mb..s Only) rfJB TOVDAV a TOMORROW H .:-.HT Ti MONP/V MCIIT -t 1110 THE GIRL IN THE PAINTING" atanim V" zirmmuNa itt>rn BRATT^' — H>rari LOM -. i By Sprrlal Ilaqueal: Maunaa SalurOay Homini at 9 30 oclocal JIGGS AND MAGGIE IN COURT" %  BBS Jo. YU1X Hr.nr K1ANO Alao lh Brillah ahort INTO TMC I William ELLIOTT — . %  : : %  I WAITER mt>HM • MARIE WIM0S03 fc .I*, %  . A ItPUH.C aiCTUII — 1 THRU %  •I' 1 '"*"" IIOYAL Til I AIIII ALL THE THl SIORt 01 J BIG SHO! 'A THOUSAND AND m S^L jfcy NIGHTS" tvelyn Keyea Pliil Silvers and Cornel NX ilde FIRST EAI>Y or th -eracn Bait* fttii'll-v Wintort at a Baverlay Hitln cocktail party. ifliini to Hollywood troni Knrope. LE8 Pnrbadoa Prog-resaive ,\! I HUB JOHN, of Hi"k. by the I .arty NVKnn. \I M'hoot teacher b mi in, trip horrta aftai I i hoti cruiat tM UM I %  She said that she thinks Barbados very progressive, und U .Mil she had visited h: d lit own particular rharm and Dunlin hrr ihoi h the lUfsl ,,' H VI i i r Wata. Hall aatfla Ball To Settle in Canada M it KOBL RDWAJU38, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Edv. .in!' if Fontnballa txpacta to •sow foi Canada. He will iRtayLBg with his brother Md i-tiM-in-law Mr. and Mrs Harry Edwards who live in Montraa] Noel pliini t. THE >^a. PLAZA \9M in B'TOWN' FROM I & -• P.m., THE HALLS* OH 7 I&j mwivjAma. TO THIS SlIOKttS OF TRIPOLI. THE (HIS \M> fJLORV STORY 01 THE IJ. S. MARIIUilS! tllllMrOIOR TRIPOLI %  RE€D-GRAHI WITHERS .... i a jiWr > i A ii.'Sno.! "HOW GREEN IS MY SPINACH" PO Good Quality Diamond Crystal Glass-Ware POUT and SHERKV QLA8SES CLABEt GLASSES CHAMTAONI i.n Alone" ii.mated < ox "H.-uin the BagnuM* "Tluv ill.In I ll.li.MM< :i"r.. Hi.iiv iv, Bal. Iti Ban McTtckeni oa Bale To-nw \TO-NTR dtlEST STAB Ii' NITE Joph I II Ml NIHIIIl: — Ci.nli.rlii nisi Th. Wolf man DracuTa~*Th. Monster *"l" .Dr na.ioar i ION CHANEY BELA IUGOSI GlENN STRANGE ICMOU! •IIBERT %  UNI •IIIIOtPH-i,i,,„s„„„„ B ii 1 ,i,,[,s. l |, l „i e i I %  NIUI • ilia Mill • UKM II HUIU r llllln • MM llllll mill | III IA K IF .\OW Trte Hurricane and Rainy Season 13 approaching: We ran up ply:— Cliimncy*. & Wicks Su\\s I.nnterns Hammers Bolts Screw Drivers 1 :il( lies Shovels laiirks Wheelbarrows Cull at our Hardware and Ironmongery Department. Remember! There is no parking problem when y m shop with us. THE II tllll VIMIS 4 O-OIMVVI IVi: 40TTOX FA1TOIIV B.TII. Htrdware Department Tel. No. 2039 4



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1 1 UDAi II Vt tl, IM1 n\i:it.\i>ns AIIVOCATK PAfil MAI S CLASSIFIED ADS. Im, * %  %  TrLfPHONi 2S0B %  f*f li Ue.ihi rtrci U of A-, m w iBirtha. %  I V on ..e.-d %  and II So on Si.nda*. fur any rmmbrr of word* u|> M. and 9 renla per word OM grMl 4 cent* prt word on IJI-:. %  DIED M\. \ Miu MM. el IB 3 %  I Im rci*"f. i. I %  %  FOB ill M REAL ESTATE DA Bi I FIAT • %  M Si il BE : %  Piignn I IOIK ••All; AL'TOMOTIVl IN M: HOBIAM MftlUM mother JIVO %  d nth July. iw i .-%  i %  ,vv\oi \ I;MI:STS HOLIDAY ftl Bpkrel SANTA MAIUA i i : ltw. t~'*0 yrr need ,,, Jjy Ql i, bc.t rMdrntlal 4Mb hill Halt* from 15 03 per head per day. I | | :r. Iron MQ i %  •. l"i0,..lrlra UiU M aMlDdf lAlt L %  < > : %  M .' It l:\-l,.. Audit lvi<*ilinent tl *l M.chael The hone ion!.. %  lain To bedao-.-n. % %  %  an up fua .*ut.ii at our one. Immm mw ga ma .•.. % %  < %  iub INI Ir.ape.lion .1 application lo Uiae dimming ai the pramlM a*, th-nu.,, Ir*ii. I and • pm. YEA It WOOD J, BOYCaT. IT 1 Jl Tn | haatUOOl p.. •* %  i A.Ml %  OFFICIAL NOTICE IV (\MII CAM One Vaushall IB done ."• mile*, like ue Phone SMI. an O-TII sioi.tr. IASO AT to K. R II. 8T rlgg H LAWKB1CI For par lieu la tarPla—l B1S1 ITT arpl or Mil m IM1 an1 %  Saloon and Uonn 10 Salmon Telephone 4JI.J COM a. Co. Ltd. i uheel pick-up in Mf Auuli |l .lo. Ageneiei, Ming 4MW HOCK HAM. Pl.N M Peter Ac rang. '413 1a U""i IT. wrfUM %  ceued lo Jul\ . IBM. Purenaier pay I >• right not to accept th iHBlteai or any oflri luapeciuHi on 1 AIT T ION %  MI \i i>r\nm HOBPfTAl, •.pair vour Bro*?i l .; %  : % % %  .mm mre* o>ir Biokcn th Dad D PEHSOXAl. The public are hereby v. .Clvlng credit I" m> ifr CAROLINA HII (• WOP.KKU.' a* t da not %  On* el*e contract.nj an) del in nit name unleaa by a me. •All MAM WII1TK Hock D\.i,do. LOST c returning MUM to the M> % %  IPII im TICKETS*-acrte* III' %  H.i.1. Road > T i WVMM I. ..-, Sunday u.i-d O" .'ii'ijdpi rk Tl "ti and iii-i.r i.il Uevclop'nt "t Corporatlo Engtni %  r (olortal IK -.ration. IK Hope RaM, Uguanea, P O Jamaica %  H Hi ...... i Ij.niber e*perlener IBMHI letter and In peraon A. M ltd 7 IIU.n Anglic-n S | %  ccn ..i Qret %  %  %  i red, but will %  who i • %  %  H 1 SI 3n BAUMH U %  >nd u il tl %  %  %  o.ro WtDKAU.w.. %  kiwwh-dg" i in'iK-' rauUtw. Apinv i handwrttM bi H* •' i"*"" HAIUIII) PNOVnOM |l D j-: i it-= MISOI i. a\i-:ous PMMI3 Morrta • in good a/orklng •moil new bod) Apply MotileUrn Store or atarohall a, P^-JII Oarage. Huebuck Slreet. • I.cic it can be aecn pt.on SMS or MM na.il If ii IMHI: i MI it, UKOND HAMMER %  %  %  naumi to bin ni. and MM o* II noon and i Iw M M IaW W • %  K... :U-d in *ell ELECTRIC AX ELBCTRaC MOTUK" li I' % %  %  HP to 3', HI 1 Ml VolU J Cvclca. S Phase Dial ."UTIB DaCnata J| Co. Ltd Electrical Dcpt 34 7 11 4n IC flTTINOS—A nice . iimg I a J light CbronUu n Eiectroliera. Sanu-lndtrect Bouli. I & ; L.ght Crackiti. Table Ui"|>< lum Mahogany. Bavlnf Mini%  rrUt and without hot water heaten. Dl-I *TJ Da Co.U at Co. I.ld. Electrical Drp^i'nv-nl 14 7 11 i i nfincn at the Daibadu* T.m I'.I %  i Car With l engine in i %  Pi.f^l W i ..• -in, i i t.id or Meii.T.iwith two trailers It l> In nttr. Ii u j ur | ihe naHaMV, h.nil.mr or provmon itoie Very economical to ru.< .. % %  t_ .. I, ft | 31 7 SI 5n %  -. rUV.r'HKiKHATOH llc.ilil 'umilirr %  U> IM aeen at Be.1ii im A Taylor'a Gaiag.v BTJI-.-n may bo inapetted at In Yaid. Mtte. Apply II. L MrH*. K> St. Philip. 1.7.61-U.r nd SUrlielta wrth Single Pliatlng PrevrTitot Dial Mil Da Coata Co lad llrpt. M 7 SI ,,. FL'RMTl Ri: i: I > >ou M H'li'cl hiSt.ick t.f t\iniiluie in hl New Show Rooma. I>iwer Bay Strael The followIng Bargaim are offered to you: Mag Dining Chain *00 a pr li fluir. II* t" a pr.; Hu.h Upright tn %  * a pr.; Ruth Arm Chain fio.M a pr. n i ll..kn HI 00 a pr Steel Arm C'UUK II Kuah Hurra Cham SW.on Ml Morn* Chain H8.e0 a Pair %  %  and Second Hand Furniture PfeMMM 4S*1 M:M HI INDKR TIIK S1IAKR IIAMMKK On TueMay 31.| by order of lUv -ion P W p H ,ll aell hi. i i %  ii... .i ... iM Tip Top Dining TableDining and Bern-re Aim Chain; Ornament and Senlng Tublr.. plant Stand. l-erbwe K,id.ng ind China. Sliiger i Tie.iU:. -1 %  ateada. VoiM Spring. MT Ci.mubei IParoj (;nen Paint B M MM fla Bpr ln gji; MalUeaaea. DrraaDivan Bed%  id. l-.rdcr. Kitchen Tabl... .\ ng ,.i. %  I Sale 1130 o'clock TWBM CM* bH.t.NMK. TROTMAN ft CO. Auctioneers PI III H MITIIES treeb-d4.< I a-Hadavi. % % %  > *ggl MISCELLANEOUS AVH-IDIM TOOIHrASTB Stan aavlng our Amm-1-dent Toolh Within a ih.nt while vou i-v be tha winner of on* ol the tollow..ig:— lat Prira IM 00. Ind "Ma 4IS M. ?iPure SS 00. liM-l"" U MM with blue ci %  Ihe Rare*Ptwm. %  (old %  ting lomplete i r-d Chti Kt B %  W M Ford. %  i 01 Hair %  l 3 and 1 %  LEKfl Keep yoot It Johnaon'i T [>.,.! 1B7B Da Coala It Co34 til -li I.T.I MM % %  -.., •; ui^... I i" r' ( at 31 cenla per lb l.imit-d Quantity llut.-hluaon 4. Co Ud Broad and Beobuck *'i-et M 7 BI In NOTICE l \ IM UOaotaU. are I^TeOy required to aend in particular, nl thru • ..tleited to Timothy TheoI IlutrhtnI suert Bridgwiown, on M k> ft %  •... ..T INI .,!ter whH-h dale 1 i lie assela oi ihe uid oat parUag enii%  the deblI whleh I thall then : dull not be te-.l lo an. peraon of I i I I UBB I Bball 0 BI tne lune o( nnh And nil pcTsom iiuubu-l to the Mid eatate are rrqueiled in ettle their ac.i ily, mil TIMOTHY T HIAIHt.V. I I %  ol Di'tdemona Pnatrr-Turton %  1 II In i MM HI, LICENSE NOTICE iki %  riglafll and rl'movi of P1\Y PTN 4n in. %  *ml ca %  Playpen t 0 %  Box at. 1.1. i| u PUBLIC OFFICIAL SAFE (The Provoat Marhal> Act. IW ilPM-Oi I 30 On Fru.iy the I0U wiU be ild at my office to the hlghct hinder ("i %  > l *PP" % %  %  %  ..ntaii'.ns about >40 aq <' l-art.il of ft -l.apnvat" road, on land moo and on ;i B %  %  ingja, IThe oho %  %  cenla -ll.aie.Wi attached Horn Martin lUwarl lo. and towardi Wa> ale. %  T T i rrovoat Manh.it34th d' of July. IM1_.„ 39 7 51 gd] WE ARE BUYERS S7AVI I ,. IBBI .N RlAMP %  < li it SE BABL i I Ollll VI w CL'IIIO... SOUVBMIRS. ANTIUI'ES. IVORV. JEWELS, SILKS I I IIAM S l^CTOMETZR!*— For aaeeitalntng the milk. To lie obtained Iron. i Ltd. X 1 51 -an p il. ill* mco I hi 7 51 *n PI UTI BAD RI.COltDS Charlie Kuni. Blng. Swing ...and wo WIU order lor jou K we haven't got It In otock A. Barnoi • Co.. % %  l.H-tl n. m OUrVaaBMl f I • lie** 1 '"• % %  %  •' % %  '" ,: .. Dr V r %  il Ud. Jg 7 51 %  On I %  r. CuniO and Ml I'^ibadoa ...f-trt & Export Co. Ltd tanl MEATS annMnMM VMM" i Nautane* and Pork : HJhD. 38 Boeb-ck M Dial • St Jame* holder MOM No l*M l 1MI in IIOBIBI Bi Hied li"P with ahedrool attached BI I bnard a ltd ihoigi %  Dald Ihl. JMth dav ol Jul/. IHI. c LADfl nori: ApplHanl ,1 NURSE. Eaq %  Dmliut 1 I %  S II Trni^ .inpiicalion will be conalderrd at a L^eimng Court to be held on %  t n I.I a-gaM* •• %  : Police Cou'l. Duuict "E" Holeto-n S. H NL'BAC. ppuca M..gi>tri>lc. Il,.lrlel C II %  UM %  ftomoon at %  the BMJ rrnbor. 1*91 in nked gMM*l %  will be pttviude.l fiom the I .'la.mi on <>r MUmt the MH.< propel 1 I %  DEPENDANT jor. U BSLBH HU ,!,. HTIltV ALL THAT ceitain p.%  tn the iwiiUl ol SI J.iby admea-u.r ,„„,.,, %  . „ %  -nuth M LI....I" mtot*. ll H north ami .-. Ihg we-t on lai gi ol ft. B. I. Bai on land, now ,.i late M clae UM .. akjul anil Imuiul T..*ttlier i". i ilwellma I i hrad of ail Bill ,.i Hiding GOVERNMENT NOTICE mill NIU VM-IIKDAM N>WM t Ol \* II. TIIK UATOn AND TOWN COUNCIL I I ,..„IH LnvlU ifpiiCBtloni to tubtc.ibe to .. loan oi SIWI.IMW.UO to Nraised by the Cmim-il by UM IftWO {mi DM) "' Muini'ip-ili '">*' BondB of UM deownlnntioni ..f *10O 00; $5Utl.OO; $1,000 W; $2.000.UO; SS.OllO.OU; J10.0OO.00 al u liiltpOMbto half-yt-ui l.v The lailM 'it (MM Hi-mis has i Ben lU'.h.u isiM bj Ihe Mayt Town Council. New Aiiist.-uL.ni. v ill* lh approval of the Go' %  rid Council acUita In %  inartno contei ... Anwlrnlam Tnwrt CmiftCU Oidiuunce, IMt* Tha irODdi will uraptrtt] 2<< raan afti tl [ sue. but the Council i^gprvi %  %  i HM Boaoa, in whole or in part, by drawing orsti> • UBal %  flM UM .-xpu.v uf U?n yearn from the diil

    ol DM '^h.-iui.i itaonod balow, and i ntacaai and radamcitaon rnoniai person or persons so resident at tha III %  I nbscrtbed for ui purchased. "Scheduled Territories" means .— (1) The fully self-five mi .,: countrMM of the Brilish Com%  .ol.. (2) An< Colony under tne dominion of Ilia Majesty. <3> Aiiv terril n ered by the Government or any pa,! in, iiLHHUT DM trusteeship of the United <4t Any Hnli h I'rolci Im %  • (5) Bouth-Weal Africa. <6t The Irish Hrpuhlic. (7> Iraq. (81 Iceland im Burma. (10) MHashemlte Klnadoen ol Jordan A SinkiriK Fund cmimencini; (ntin ihe year 19M will be provided annually oui of the a) ol ihe CMBMU, lowacoa repayment of UM Bond! The Council fin nni hii.i Din lv %  > application: and reservt tha iihi to Bpportion the %  may iltink Bt, No Bppllcatfon be-low par will be n Idered APPLICATIONS must b marked on UM outside "Application foi %  |1, eo to ihe Town Clerk, Now ArnaMi Im I h Gu 'Tell me I ( CUir, • ^lirullirrrVaii accident, U ilmifc In |M it an aUataBMtk nlrai^iil n llic \oiind?* In an rniiT^i in \ yon '"' d -in %  Dtlaapilli llial ran In' u->--l IJIIIlLK. Mllll.Mll li'-ltattn'i. BUd willlt.llt laaUaJBf lr lllllllll' iloiiiinl.il t. ^.lu mi.I a rrU ll<* L ille-r Of Bf.-nii-. hut it -liuiilil be IIIIII-|">I-IIII.'II-, n ;(.lining. |Qntk mi Iiiim.ui ti--m'. ud evhubli III prom luaj clean and rapid healiuu. Ymi nrrd tininotl-'rii unti Detto :DETTOL rM£ HODEHN N HSf PIIC Canadian Nalioaal Steamship*; %  Ot'TtlBOI'ND Nanaa of Skip CAN < HAIJJ-NOFIt i ,\ni u< HIM v IAN lilNSTIHI'IUK IAIIV N El AON I July I Aug I Aug I Aug. 4 Aug. IS Aug I Aug II Aug 71 Aug MMBTIIBIII Ml Naaoo af Ship I.AI1Y NEUftON IJMIY HilIlNKY I.AIIY Ml IAUV Hut M T Aug. fl Sept. -. BSM 11 Aug II He|.| 3 Oet I Novr GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agent.. ROYAL NETHERLANDf STEAMSHIP CO. Table* la li Kadlo, CocHlall i. titan. UUCP* MagTM aVtmi ., ,i Baeiagiuj. i i\. Suite* and aepaialr i Planoa. Banjoa .t BIB. f,., MiB X T SI~Jn lie-in. ut .1 board SI A %  • St Michael Dated IMi iln ... I v Pnlire Magistrate. Iti.1.it A li. %  \\ %  -III'. Applicant %  %  iird at a LUeni.ng Court to to* held at . %  : . VACUUM C1J-\.NER-S Hand ratod T.ihe. the drudge on. lual 38J8. Da Coal I .1 n. pi >4 T il-n E. A. iMJIOO %  JT 1 SI —li ,-,'y.:,\^Y.' l -^ TO-DAY'S NEWS Fl AMI XEV. DAM . in has )u*t been opened at Lelhbridgo. The strw %  v... i iris btfiaat I'niih-lill dam, is imotln liie light to revive the parchad ranire lands of south -eastern AlII will take IS 'no entire thirty million dollar irrigation scheme, designed to turn 400.000 acres of dry bud inio one of Canada's rich* ADVERTISE Teeth Loose Gums Bleed ., I. gan ".. teetfe lr..n Amojan* Tmr frtrrhfa—Tranch Mont** ti\ itii***uii*l<' I SHI lit I.IXK.HT—M utterly leminine. so VM-J MOl in tlnvc colors—Nu Blue, * g |LH TISSI'i; AMI CANTON IAII.I-—I'Mik lumorofjf in ;" ilri--. inndi* from one of these lovely slindes: Slum KOMII. Black, Barharv Taupe. ('him-Ml.att|iier Purina Violet. Wild llmklrhet r\. I n-erimanil \Vilil Orrhid £j SI.95 ( BOSS-DYED STRIPE sil.K—bar* iaomalluii:' every Mi :tnd Mrs. hus drcained of: < rjv. Aquu and ( luirlrcn-e. LUlC Sk> and ILniei Wlic.tt. Pink Violi'iirc and (irenadiire 9 S2.::9 3f." BORDER! l> SIM \ :it various piil'erns 'a SI.1I per yd. OPENING TO-IIAV-Vari.Mi differenl pemaafJ M\ |(Mj in SluH-1 it < %  .Rinni \\ i n THE ADVOCATE -1 \ MUM HI i ... L, PI %  Wmn Mil' f-> OH -.n4.h..l4. lakieaaaalr aaawaoH IUI ion SALE rVRNlTL-RX one Preaa. Cheat o< Dnieora J Ruih i Table. Ot bon Table Book Caae. Electric Stove, and One Baby' %  Pram. Phone BUS A To-days G.A. Sng •^EA fo 1 WO "Can't you sec how happy we would be With GAS installed ACCESSORIES! L$4kt$ HoiUrjr, Bras. Panties Sii-.htL'uvMi-. *->lip^ CMMmi'l Socks. Vestv Panlies and Ki-rcliicls. I'liMirpiissnl i (In\ ril for Our New Coods BARGAIN 30. Swan Btrctt IIOIM-; — -*.1--l.**'-'.V*',V*'^V — S. ALTMAN, Propriclor PHONE 2702 %  .; %  %  %  %  %  .: %  %  %  %  .: %  ,: -,-. vw. v.w>*v>v.' Win. FOGARH Ltd. .XniHHiiirinfl Our — III -Ol'l \> \ 1i 1 1 II It SlOt k-T I KaWC MONDAY 30th JULY SPFAIAL VAI.l'FS IN EVFRY DEPAIMMENT BIG CLEARANCE SALE TO START ON WEDNESDAY l*rirt'H I ui I IIS/' liiif/li/ In BfMMM Itmim fur Xi'ir limiils Yon will be glad you saved for I Fou,\i.rrs CLEARANCE SALE. V'a'e'e'e'e-'eVa*,'! rW//V^MW/'.V *W*'.W/''V. FOR SALE %  I MM si i II%  .1,An impnini home traneo dn..*.> u avaiut.li> altn aoprua 4 acre* well bud out with l.nan. i.nr i it. IH. paee • i MM -i--ii The hnuae la 2 ilorev andhai >.•' %  lounge., .li Mttaa, 1 dimblr bedieanna. hall. all iia.ial onVea and oulbiilld.ng* Millt aim-. BanaMamSa hitbalanllallv built modci l.iiig.iln. %  T II.. I .. I.HHV EOOal ISM, arelgooltiedii-.fillvlggfj ill! I J aided gallei> kite, ha It al i and gaiage Elauli.aU> |KIIIIIU at li— figure aaked. I in HI HUM Hill -I II, it <"' % %  .II -. and aril imilt I Mow %  alone I M "• -Oil l,-k i„ %  eeliHMd B i Tha KIII.II> aie *nl liialiired and thrle %  %  4-hrai f.uiu loadvvav and ad %  it'. ...tii.I lUlROM dinltlg ... lintlr p.nit l i •l..iii.a)iiul and laige ... %  i|.iartera %  I. A rag) ml.t.-.ting ...id de~ K An Ealata -ill, Bin if-, st j.ine* lie H.P.V.. mull f Horn%  ni. ,g and ihlngled reception, i baxlroomi. *M I |BU ill I lon-l. and •avlly wooded ule grtM .1. •nl.ge of |MBM a|g> on! *llh l II IBM IWB iiillaa TOIIl H I .Hi.-Lh BaM) •"• I"' t.lPt|ile holiday iim on the lieaili ttitli alaiut ', .„ nd Il t bad %  %  UI. galnwy III ,; tl kit, %  nf. %  %  w on inn U BT %  .• i. It •allh -t ^ted ret ... %  Il> IM '"• %  let %  .'. a IBnir? %  %  %  ,nd l-.i.li %  aalDINt.. Maiwell'a Cnaat—a -.. in. nneet |>reai oikn.lrul,. deaiflned fur r-.y i .... , HMJMM, pantrv. garage. .t..r,r,.„„. atg. Th* lan d II apgM"Wn p %  WANTED RENTALS III I.IM il II I ..itl t(,l DarrelU H.l Thai m. -Iv NluaK.l heaiae M avallald* f-itiilehad from A'lgiiil Iftth lo Nov Wlh. HMIIHIM I ringl,,,, Mill SI Ml IS". Cod Model n beauUlul HKAL ESTATE AGENTS ACCTI0NEEKS and SIRVEYOR8 TLANTATIONS Kl IMUNl. 1-h.ne 44t



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    HAKBAOOS ADVOC ATI I KIIUV. Jll.Y 2T. 1M1 HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON w MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY IOV3EN9E! rvi aor __s— -E > 'N.3 ^JS VOs*~~~ ~-e-y~ BLONDIF BY CHIC YOUNG : I B* THE LONE RANGER V.EIX. 1 MIGHT ...... L %  •*• AxD T* TO GO TO ONJ6 pa BAND 1 JI 60 AM :-v*j GGC r OOT *VA6 A A IIAJJQPWM' %  A, I.BOQV . A CLP ID MQ I VUST Fr OUT W-IAT IT 5 JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS OKT 4i7f WMI„ TILL 1CU 6il >CUW W;*Tu CN1 1MANK iy *: %  ? vt pitH eonUi"* t .. lo ttx-iijtr whi co u. You mual ukc YEAST-VITB T.Met. YEAST-VITF. is llw ONLY puin B,. YouiUI. m*mi "ill. Ih.r.-.iill. Your 5 TUUK rAIM £ p.muilKani.hquKkly.anu' you'll feel ever w > r •> MM s MAKES YOU 5 For HEADACHES, NFRVf PAINS, { FE£ W£ II s COLOS, CHILLS, RHEUMA1IC PAIMS j^^JjJ^^J Ll'XOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH — Alto — GALV. OIL CANS — 1, 4 5 Gin. Nile. L.iUMbhrct UM T. HERBERT Ltd. : %  1.' ROEBUCK STREET. Inrorpormtro 1M LOOK YOUR BEST •it Hooks of, U TRY IT! acftlmA HAIR IT PAYS YOU TO PEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit cuslomers for Thursday to Saturday only Usially Now Usually M)W Tins Kardomah Coffee (,) 95 Pkgs. Jack Straws 61 M Pkgs. Custard Cream Biscuits 51 l Tins Gloria Evap. Milk 29 26 Bottles Grolsch Beer 24 l Cakes Ivory Soap 27 21 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street ,'/,V,'.V,W.W >ivv.V/V ( v///V.v.y.v/v.Wi'/ f -.-','.. ,-, '. %  ,.'.::: -----.-----.v,--. IUHIN ami HAM DFXK-IOrs AISTKAL1AN Slrrftky IV .. s| ; prr lb (Sliced) %\.V\ p*r lb lb> ihr Kimb)V:c IMT lb (per C*we) (Aid Sllrrd iKtmoh lUm prr lb BKANDV \)pl>r .SOUlh \Ui. % %  \\\ niilv J1.IHI I \i llciii lor llir lll Wcullirr rBol K,...•-. Ilriiur N ( |li4-n „ I cm", -mi i1 Llm* Jutor Titrdijl Roblniton'm Oraitcr tUtlr. VYatrr II.-1I:U).IIIM.II I Itnr K.rl.-, W -\, Hnl*. Krillrr* Umr Jutre OlffdJll tlolv Knll.r | Orange SqUHtah Boli. KfiH.k% (Inner Suuahh Hii;s Hot-.. Hrooki. Lime .luic* Cordial H \|i|:Hi Apple Jnirr Tin* r. id..in. "in %  MM Trinidad Oranrf IMN Trinidid Graprrrull Tin* Trinidad \li\rd Juir-f Pure i.i. iJuice— (Purplr r WMAU Tin* Tomato CoekUll JMICO IVwrrt Prunr* (lib tin*.) JIM> per lb Tin* of NEsTLFS HOMO (.1 NM I* H\BV VOOM in (UnUnl I.ivrr MMII. Prunes witli Orrjl. Bone and Vegetable Broth Meat and Vegetable Broth. Tomato Soup, Carrot*. Sr.narh n a Pw. ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO. YOUR GROCERS" — HIGH STREET PHONE US — LTD. WE DELIVER l*W*Vi****t******Vt**rf*W.W^^^