Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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ESTABLISHED 1895

ma

fharbados



Cease-fire Talks Still
Deadlocked Over The
Withdrawal Of Troops

UNITED NATIONS ADVANCE CAMP
BELOW KAESONG, KOREA. July 24.

ALLIED OPTIMISM
ceasefire increased
munist propaganda for

Nations forces from Korea.

over the chances for a
tonight despite new Com:
the withdrawal of United
U.N. quarters stil]

looked for Communists to back down on the demand
at the resumption of ceasefire negotiations in Kae.
song scheduled for 11 a.m. tomorrow. The 96 hour
Communist requested recess in negotiations expires

then.

U.N. representatives had hoped the Reds would
send word that they were ready to resume before

that hour, but there was
up to a late hour.

Negotiations came to a tem-
porary halt Saturday in the dead- |
Jock over the Red demand for the
withdrawal of U.N. forees as a
condition of Armistice.

Chief U.N. representative Vice-
Admiral C. Turner’ Joy made it
clear that the Allies would not
agree under any circumstances to
put the withdrawal question on
the Armistice agenda.

He said the question was a poli-
tical ene to be taken up at a peace
conference after the Armistice had
taken effect. It was at this point
that Communists asked and were
granted a four-day recess to con-
sider the Allied position.

Breakdown

If they stand firm on their with-
drawal demand, truce talks almost
certainly will be broken off.

Some Allied circles believed that
Communist negotiators after con-
sulting their superiors in Pyong-
yang, Peking. and possibly Mos-
cow will introduce some sort of
facesaving compromise proposal
tomorrow,

Early feeling that the Com-
munist requested postponement
was a ruse to cover offensive pre-
parations was almost gone. Most
sources felt that if the Reds were
planning some treachery, some-
thing would have happened before
this. Ground fighting along the
135-mile front continued on only
a minor scale.

U.N. units drove Communists
from high ground southwest of
Kufisong o the octt-rentral frent
and repulsed the Red attack south-
east of Canson.

Radio Pyongyang broadcast the
latest Communist demand for the
withdrawal of U.N, troops from
Korea during one of the regular
programmes on Tuesday morning.
“The Korean people firmly de-
mand the withdrawal of all for-
eign troops.”

It charged that the South Korean
forces started the Korean war by
invading North Korea at the in-
citement of the U.S.

It said, “Today, when the U.S.
Government is in the position of
having to carry on the ceasefire
talks, the representatives of Ridg-
way and the U.S. military men are
attempting to have us certify that
the U.S. must for an_ unlimited
period keep troops in Korea. The
U.N.. and undoubtedly the U.S.
imperialists, are trying to expand
their munitions production and to
gain huge monopolistic profits,”

U.N. circles regarded the broad-
cast more as propaganda than an
authoritative indication that the
Communists intend to stand firm
on their demand for an immediate
withdrawal of U.N. troops. It
said, however, that the Pyongyang
Radio significantly did not predict
the failure of the Kaesong meet-
ing.—U.P.

no word from Communists

‘Reds Have |
9,000,000 Men
Under Arms

PARIS, July 24.

The Secretary of State, Dean
Acheson, said on Tuesday night
that the Communists have 9,000,-
000 men under arms, backed by
20,000 firstline Soviet planes. He
warned, “we are in great danger,
greater perhaps than many Amer-
icans now appreciate.” Acheson’s
grim analysis of the Communist
military might was ineluded in a
major foreign policy speech at the
ceremonies marking the 250th
anniversary of ‘the founding of
Detroit—heart of the ex-
panding mobilization drive.

Acheson said that the defence
programme must be stepped up to
bolster the U.S, and its Allies
against the threat to world peace
posed by the massed Communist
forces. Acheson did not go into
detail about the possible increases
in the U.S. armed forces, but said
that even to meet the present
“minimum goals” will require
“greater effort from us and our
Allies.” 7

He gave this official estimate of
the present Communist military
power—“The Communist armed
forces at present total some
9,000,060 men. The Soviet Union
has more than 4,000,000 mep under
arms. The Chinese Communist
forces exceed 3,500,000 men.

European satellite regimes have
nearly 1,000,000 men. The Soviet
Union has more than 200 divisions
fully mobilized, In addition, the
Soviet Union has a trained reserve
of massive proportions. The Sov-
iet Air Force is the world’s larg-
est in peacetime, with more than
20,000 first line aircraft, a large
proportion of which are jets of ex-
cellent quality.” .

He said that faced with such an
array of Communist armed force
“it would be as dangerous to re-
lax our effort as it is to fall asleep
in a blizzard.” ;

De Gasperi
Forms Cabinet

ROME, July 24,
Premier Designate Alcide De
Gasveri called on President Luigi
Einaudi to present the Cabinet list
for his new two party Government



to Italy,
De Gasperi drove to the
President’s summer villa at

Caprarolo about 30 miles north of
Rome to report he had been suc-
cessful in putting together a
Cabinet to replace the one that
resigned July 16. —U.P.



Israel Goes To

Polls On

July 30

TEL-A-VIV, July 24,

More than half of Israel’s population will go to the
polls on July 30 to elect their Knisset (Parliament) for the
second time since the establishment of the young state.

Almost a score of the
candidates ranging

rivals for the 120 seats of the

Minister, Ben Gurion’s Labo

lead over all.

The first -Knisset, elected in
January 1949, was dissolved ear-
lier this year, when the coalition
government broke up due to
orthodox opposition to the gov-
ernment’s policy on religious edu-
cation.

Preliminary estimates predict
that the Mopai, the Labour party
of Ben Gurion will again emerge
as the strongest party, but not
strong enough to be able to rule
withou: a coalition.

The total number of vote.s en-
titled to take part in the poil ex-
ceeds 850.100 out of a total popula-
tion of more than 1,410,000, Very
few eligible voters are expected lwo
abstain.

New immigrants will vote along
with the old settlers. Many of them
have come lately from North Africa
or the Middle East countries.



The “ADVOCATE”

pays for NEWS
Dial 3113
Day er Night.



parties with more than 1,000

from extreme right to extreme left are

Knisset, where the Prime
Party has hitherto held the

ur

Big Question

The big question in the forth-
coming elections is how this great
flood of new immigrants will
vote in their first polls, Most of
them have little or no conception
of modern politieal systems. The
national election is being fough
on domestic issues rather than on
the question of East versus West
orientations.

Co-operation with the West is
for the great majority of Israelis
no longer a question of democratic
way of life but one of bread and
butter. The reason is apart from
political aspects—economic

Much of Israel’s initial economic
development is attributed to the
loan of the Export-Imports Bank
of $100,000,000 granted two years

}ago and to the more recent agri-

cultural. improyement loan of
$35,000,000.

Financial aid from United States
Jews has also contributed largely
to soften Israel’s economic plight
and its importance remaims un-
j; abated in the light of present
‘growing requirements.

{ Recent legislation has moreover

ltried to encourage United States|‘the British Union Oil Co., agreed| He

j and other foreign investment by
g the number of facilities
gn investors.—U.P.

te




150,000 Men
To Korea
REPORTS SAY

TAIPEH, July 24,
Nationalist Intelligence officers
lent support to private reports that
Chinese Reds have been moving
another five armies aggregating
150,000 men from northwestern
China to Korea,

These officers who refused to be
named, described the China Union
press report that Chinese Reds
ire stepping up troop movements
to Korea as “very likely.” The
China Union press which special-
izes in China mainland news cov-
erage, said one of five armies part
of Yao Chi’s_ suicide army
group left north Shansi for Man-
churia during the middle of July
and was expected to arrive ir
North Korea early in August.

Intelligence officers refused to
say whether troops movements
indicated Chinese Reds were bent
on starting a new offensive before
Kaesong peace talks end,—U.P.



Tanks And Police

Patrol Teheran

TEHERAN, July 24,

Tanks rumbled through the
streets of Teheran, and police an’
soldiers with fixed bayonets cor-
doned off the Majlis, when 606
Communists, “partisans of peace,”
defied the government ban ‘on
demonstrations. The ‘partisans’
assembled outside the Parliament
building just after the Lower
House went into morning session.

They demanded that they be
shown the secret graves of 15
“peace” sympathizers killed dur-
ing the rioting here on July 15,

The demonstration was orderly
— but 200 police and troops were
moved into the square to prevent
any attempted disturbances.

Tanks returned to the suburbs
after the demonstration. Six
army trucks with mounted ma-
chine guns, were posted § con-
spicuously and strategically
around the area.—U.P.



BUSTA IS SILENT

KINGSTON, Ja,, July 24.

Bustamante was silent to-day on
the question of giving full minis-
terial power to five elected mem-
bers of the Executive Council of
which he is one. It was announced
to-day that the Governor is send-
ig Mac Gillivray, the Colonial
Seeretary to Trinidad to study the
Constitution there, where the Min-
isters have the real power of their
Portfolios with a view to adoption
in Jamaica where Ministers are
not responsible.

Bustamante previously an-
noynced when the issue was put
in that his Ministers were ready
to accept full ministerial powers
provided this does not entail a
General Election before 1951.

Recent political events in the
colony indicate a strong swing
towards the Peoples National Par-
ty whose outright socialistic policy
{s based on self government.

The Party however wants a
General Election if Ministers are
to be given increased power—(CP)

Britain And U.S.
Discuss Spain

LONDON, July 24.

Minister of State, Kenneth
Younger told the Commons last
night that Britain and the United
States had exchanged views on
the question of Spain’s contribu-
tion to the Atlantic Pact.

He said the United States Gov-
ernment instructed their Am-
bassador Stanton Griffis to explore
ae question with Spanish author-
itles,



—UP.

WEDNESDAY, JULY



|

THIS CEREMONY took place in the Russian Orthodox Chursh, London, on the installation as a Bishop





25, 1951





La

ot Archimandrite Vitaly Ustinov. The picture shows the new Bishop (centre, wearing Orown) during the

ceremony.—Eypress,





U.N. Planes Blast\Jowit'Votead
Rail Junction

Troops Push On 3 Miles

EIGHTH ARMY H.Q., Korea, July 24,

Allied patrols push
munist territory on the B

more than three miles into Com-
je front testing the Communists

will to fight on the eve of resumed ceasefire talks in Kaesong.

Showdown In
Labour Camp
Shapes Up

LONDON, July 24.
showdown fight between
Minister Attlee’s Labour
Government and the dissident
forces of Aneurin Bevan shaped
up today as the Party's local
echelons voiced open concern over
Attlee’s policies.

Marked hostility by the rank
and file of the Labour members to
the rising costs of living and con-
cern at the size of Britain's re
armament programme highlighted
the publication of the prelim: v
resolutions “—_ submitt for the’
ruling of the Party’s annual con-
anes at Scarborough in October
—D.

The

The
Prime

resolutions indigated that
many of the Party’s local units fee!
that Attlee’s government follows
Washington's foreign policy line
too closely,

Several proposals support the
stand of Aneurin Bevan, the form-
er Labour Minister, who seeks to
wrest control of Party policy from
the cabinet.
other rebels on the Party’s 26
member executive claim that
the size of the. rearmament pro-
gramme threatens domestic Social-
ist goals.—€P),

Bevan and_ three



Brazil Army Chief
Visits Washington

NEW YORK, July 24,
The Chief of Staff of the
Brazilian Armed Forces, Pedr
Aurelio Goeg Monteiro will leave
for Washington today, for a series
of official calls before conferring
with U.N., officials on Brazil’s con-
tribution of troops to the Inter-
national Anti-Aggression Army
In Washington, Goes Monteir:
planned to call on the Seeretary
of State, Acheson, Defence Secre-
tary George Marshall, and Chiel
ef Staff General Omar Bradley, as
vell as members of the Inter-
American Defence Board.
He said yesterday, on arrival

from Rio, aboard the Uruguay,
that in addition to the U.N,,
mission, he would confer with
officials in Washington on the

execution of military co-operation
and resolutions adopted at the
fourth meeting of the American
Foreign Ministers,

Goes Monteiro, however, does
not have any definite plans for the
Washington visit. He said that he
would remain as long a8 necessary.

On his return from Washington
he will confer with the Chairman
of the U.N. Collective Measures
Committee, who, by a coincidence,
is Brazil’s representative to the
U.N. Ambassador Joa Carlos
Muniz. He also expected to confer
with the Secretary General and
top military adviser, Colonel
Alfred George Katzin.—U.P.



B'dos Oil Rights:

LONDON, July 19,

Complaints of a “broken
promise” by thr Government of
Barbados over oil prospecting
rights in the island have come from
two sources in London—one from
Lord Teviot, a Director of the
British Union Oi! Co., in a letter
to the London Times, and one from
Members of Parliament.

Lord Teviot, in his letter, out-
lined the situation briefly,
pointing out that before the pass~-
ing of the Barbados Petroleum
Act in January, 1950, the British
Union Oil Co., held leases over 78
per cent of the drillable area of
| the island

“When

nationalisation
| rights

suggested,”’

of oil

was he said,

to surrender its leases on the
understanding given by
Governor and his high official

the time that a prospecting licence

would be granted to the company |

over the whole of the isjand.

| “When tne Petroleum Bill was
|passed, the Barbados Government
|broke its promise to the British
Union Oil Co., and offered it a
licence over 55 per cent of the
island on such terms that the
icompany had no alternative but
to refuse. The American Gulf Oi!
i\Company accepted the terms,
| witch have since proved so un-
‘workable that they have been
| considerably amended.”

Lord Teviot pointed out that the
company ,had been established in
Barbados for more than 30 years
and had contributed materially to
tthe welfare of the island’s people
added: “The result of the
Barbados Government's actions ho

the! been to deprive the company of

it irilling rights and under the



The deepest penetration of U.N
trcops was made north of the
Hwachon reservoir on the eastern
front when a patrol thrust for-



| ward three and a half miles with-

lout making any contact. Twe
patrols meved out more than two
miles northeast of Kumswa, the
{south eastern corner of the old
‘iron triangle” also without mak-
ing effective contact with the
Communist front line. The Reds
sent out patrols in some sectors,
and there was a brisk five-minute
fight before one was thrown back
on the Western front.

Four waves of B29 Superfor-
tresses biasted the key west
Korean railway junction of Sari-
won with more than 70 tons of
bombs.

* Airforces took over the brunt of
the Allied offensive effort against

nists as ground fighting
sontinued on only a minor scale.

Superforts aimed their cargoes
f 500 and 100-pound bombs at
wo adjacent railway marshalling
yards at Sariwon, which lies al-
nost midway between Pyongyang,
North Korean Capital and the
‘easefire conference city of Kae-
song,

Bombers ran into some anti-
‘ircraft fire but all returned safe-
iy. It is at Sariwon that the main
Sommunist supply route in west-
rn Korea divides, one line run-
ning directly south toward Kie-
30ng, and the other east toward
the battle zone.—U.P.





Search For Missing
Plane Intensified

ALASKA, July 24,

The search for the Korean air-
aft DC 4, missing over the rugged
\laskah coast with 88 persons
iboard, was intensified with the
iddition of 14 more planes,

Officers of the 10th Rescue
Squadron at Elmendorf airforce
case said that they planned to
ake every advantage of the clear-
«ng skies for the first day since the
Canadian Pacifie Airliner van
ished on Saturday. Additional
planes will supplement the squad-
ron of 21 which has criss-crossed
she 31,000 square miles area with-
out finding any trace of the miss-
ing craft.

Until to-day, fog, clouds
‘uin have hampered the search
planes skimming over the snow-
capped peaks along the southeast
coast. Aboard the missing plane

and

were 26 U.S. servicemen, three
civilian government employees,
two Canadian navy men and
even crewmen,.—U.P.



U.S. PLANES INVADED

MANCHURIA—REDS SA‘
TOKYO, July 24.
Peking Radio early on Wednes-
day said eight United States jet
planes invaded Manchurian terri-
tory on July 21, out of which seven
were shot down by Red Chinese
air forces.—U.P.

Broken

terms of the Petroleum Act no
compensation is payable for the
(loss of its rights, the potential

value of which is obviously
considerable.”

The day after this letter was
| published in London, Col. Gomme-
Duncan, Conservative M.P., for

very

Perth, raised the same matter in|
'

the House of Commons, asking
Mr. James Griffiths, the Colonial
Secretary, about the Government’
attitude to the report submitted by
Mr, Lepper, the Colonial Office
expert, who recommended that a
ole prospecting licence should be

granted to the British Union
Oil Co.
No Monopoly
Mr. Griffiths declared that hi

predecessor Mr Creech-Jone
has agreed with the report,
that the Barbados Government had
decided: that it the t

not ir

E that the United Kingdon



Iran Mission

LONDON, July 24.

The British Cabinet named Lord
Jowitt to head the proposed mis-
sion to Lran to discuss with Pre-
mier Mohammed Mossadeq, the
Anglo-Iranian oil dispute,

Authoritative sources said that
Jowitt, who as Lord Chancellor is
a top legal expert would depart
as soon as the Cabinet decided
there was “reasonable hope’ for
agreement

A “special mission” is reported
to have been suggested by United
States Roving Ambassador, Aver-
ell Harriman.—vU,P.



PETAIN WILL BE

AT ILE D'YEU

ILE D'YEU, France, July 24,

The body of Henri Phillippe
Petain who lived a hero and died
a disgraced exile lay in a smail
black casket dressed in the uniform
of the Marshal of France, Petain
will be buried tomorrow on this
bleak Atlantic island in that uni-
form with the Medaille Militaire —
France's highest militar
on his breast, but his

BURIED TO-DAY |

y henour-—
family and

friends are convinced that one
day he will lie beside men who
led the French to victory at
Verdun.

During World War I, and even
before his death yesterday at 95
in a grim fortress where he was
sent by the High Court in 1945 for
collaboration with the Nazis, his
family had demanded that he be

buried at Douamont where his
French soldiers who fell during

the historic siege now lie

—U.P.



Britain To Buy
95.000,.000 Bushels
Of Canada Wheat

OTTAWA, July 24
‘Trade Minister, C, D, Howe an-

would buy 95,000,000 bushels of
Canadian Wheat in the new crop
year starting frceen August 1, under
the international Wheat agreement.

Britain also will buy 350,000 tons

an interest in buying 250,000 tons
more than the stipulated 95,000,-

000 bushels, if it is available pues)

side the international wheat
agreement A meeting will be
held on September 30 to discuss
the sale of additional wheat.

that the 95,000,000
suld under the I.W.A.
be at the price of $1.80
per bushel U.S., or
dian, plus six
carrying charge.

Howe said
bushels
would
$1.89 Cana-
per

cent bushel

—U.P



TOO MUCH SUGAR

NEW YORK, July 24

The Wall Street Journal Com-
modity Columnist expresses doubt
that che United States consumers
will be able to take the 8,250,000
tons of sugar allotted them this
year by Government;

He pointed out that the sugar
demand is one third of what it was

ja year ago and only half the rate

of two years ago—vU.P.

Promis







PRICE:



FIVE CEN



RED DEMAND IS

NOT A PROBLEM

Says General Marshall

WASHINGTON, July 24.
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE, George C. Mar-
Shall told a press conference on Tuesday that
the basic conditions to an armistice agreement in
Korea include a military line whjch will be defensi-
ble in the event of renewal of héstilities.
The text of Marshall’s prepared statement on

Korea:
ing truce negotiations

Ridgway is trying to

“I wish to make brief comment coneern

in Korea, What General
accomplish there is the

negotiation of a suitable military armistice.

This negotiation on battlefields
is entirely a different problem from
negotiation of political settlement.

It is essential that the two
natters be kept eytirely separate
and distinct. If it is acceptable
that the armistice can be obtained
he discussion of political ques-
‘ions can follow on Government
level.

The statement continued: “If
the talks are resumed and get to
the substance of the armistice
irvrangement, there must be
wreement upon the military line
which will be defensible in the
event of any renewal of hostili-
ties

There must be
iot to reinforce troops now in
Sorea, There must be provision
or adequate supervision and ac-
tual inspection by representative
of both sides to insure against any
preparations for a surprise attac
and as continuing evidence of goo
faith there must be © satisfactory
agreement regarding prisoners o
war

These are basic conditions to ai
armistice and the agreement wit!
respect to them must precede late
issues to reach a final settlemen

{ the Korean question

SIX agreements

—U.P.

Students Confer
With B.C. Chiefs

From Our Own Corpespondent

LONDON July 24

A West Indian Students Unio
delegation led by President Mi
Dudley Thompson conterred witi
british Council authorities fo
three hours to-day about the sit
uation at Hans Crescent

Commenting on the Director ot
Colonial Scholars letter Uresten:
ing action against five scholar:
among Hans Crescent strikers, Mr
H. Oxbury, Welfare Administrato:
of the British Council told the
delegation he was surprised at Mr
Keith's letter.

The W.1.S.U. delegation in
statement pointed out they could
not dissociate the Hans Crescent
situation from “the general unsat-
isfactory arrangements for accom-
modation for Colonial students’
and added “students have tried
are trying, and are still willing t
wy and cooperate with the Colon-
ial Office provided the latter treat
them as human beings and not
chattels,”



A report on to-day’s conference
will be submitted to the Union.

W.LS.U, has to-day petitioned
S.cretary
ics James Griffiths for
view

an inter-





of State for the Colon-|

Britain Awaits
The Invitation

From fran

LONDON, July 24

Britain is awaiting an invitation
from Iranian Premier Mossadeg to
resume discussions on the Angio-
sranian oil dispute but _ officials
made it clear they would not nego-
uiate if the acceptance of Iranians
oil nationalization law were made
1 prior condition

The Foreign Office received a
report fram the British Ambassa-
jor in Teheran, Sir Francis Shep-
ierd on a memorandum which
*ersia had handed last night to
V. Averell Harriman, President
Cfruman’s special envoy.

Terms of the Iranian Gov-
‘rnment for the resumption of
ulldress negotiations were qunder
le tudy but the British Gov-
rnment has so far not been able
o form an opinion on their
‘eptability.—U.P.

Burma Rejects
Jap Peace Pact

RANGOON, July 24,

It was learned on Tuesday, that
S8urma has informed the United
States Government, that she does
1ot approve the draft of the Peace
Creaty with Japan which enables
Japan to evade reparations which
3urma feels fully justified to
press.

Burma estimates that Japan
ronan AKMe country with 5; -
000 rupees in’ military cur-
ency, caused damage to property
‘stimated at 12,675,000,000 rupees
ind caused more deaths by occu-
yation and foreed labour on the
nainland of Burma than total
losses among allied prisoners

It was pointed out that Burma
has no vindictive feelings against
Japan; she has supported Japan's
asmission to certain organisation
in the United Nations and reestab-
lished trade.

The Burmese demand for repar-
ations were motivated by rehabil-

ace



itation needs At no time has
Burma received any substantial
contribution from any source for

this task

Burma considers unjustified, the
plea that Japan is unable to pay
reparations without injuring her
own economy-—hence she will not
sign any treaty which does not
}provide adequate reperations to
'Burma,—U.P.



Death Of B’dos Seaman:

cont oie") Doliceman Fined £10

It is said that Britain has shown |

March.

King was a seaman in the Brit-
ish cargo ship Strategist. He
was involved in an incident o1
March 3 in which the policeman,
Johannes Stephanus Koch Visser
was alleged to have struck him
blow which coused a haemorrhage
leading to his death two days later

Another policeman named
Groenewald, was with Visser at
ihe time of the incident and he
appeared as witness for the
Crown when the charge against
Visser was heard by Mr. J. T

Carnie in the Cape Town Magis-
trate’s Court The story told in

court was that the two policemen
unconscious, to

lad taken King,

A Cape Town police constable has been fined

an assault on a West Indian seaman, } t
led to King’s death while he was in Cape Town early in

CAPE TOWN, July 12.
£10 for

Milton King, whieh

MAYER ASKS
FOR SUPPORT’

PARIS, July 24
Rene Mayer, 56-year-old out
going Justice Minister asked th

National Assembly to approve him
as the Premier of France to open
the way for the formation of ¢
new middle of the road Coalitio:

Cabinet following last month’
general electior

When Mayer went before the
Assembly to ask for a confidence
vote his chances of getting tne

necessary 314 votes were still ur
certain, Mayer told the Assembly

: police station and reported that that his government would hay

they had arrested him on a charge

of drunkenness

Confessed Liar

‘These two men only know
whe hit King the blow in the
| street which caused his death,”

interests of the island to grant a:suid Mr, Carnie. How ear re
monepoly to the British Unionjarked to accept Groenewald’s
Oil Co. ft was then that Col.|statement that Visser struc!

Gomme-Dunean declared that the
|decisiens constituted a
lof a promise” on the part of the

Barbados Government and the
/Colonial Office.

“It is not a case of a broken
promise,” replied Mr. Griffiths
“This was the recommendation ¢

a committee appointed by th
Barbados Government and it is f
them to decide whether they wil
accept its recommendations.”
Col.Gomme-Duncan then ga
notice that in view of the
satisfactory reply, he would
the matter on the Adjournment at

the earliest opportunity Th
means that Col. Gomme-Duncat
will initiate a half-hour debate i
the House of Commons on tt
subject

—B.U.P

“breaking |

‘lof one or the other

“I do not know why the are
etupid and inhuman as to

cate this story and charge King
with drunkenness They could
still have allayed suspicion of the
| blow and given him medica!
ittention It ij on the me
conseiences. I am_ inclined

| believe that Groenewald is the mar
{who struck the blow but the

court cannot rely on the evidenc
constable

Your conduct is entirely */at of
It vo irresponsible young men an
lv most reprehensible, | arm
jsure, and have confidence, that you
jwill be brought to task and |!
with departmentally § fe
yur action.”




was









—B.U.P

thefed to “serious
lblow when he is a confessed liar ?} tions” which France

three main aims—to increase th
production, to reform the con
stitution and public services, and

to defend the natior

Mayer first outlined the domesti
measures his Government would
take to raise wages and to ly

1 be] to ease the plight of Roman Cath-

chools and then turn-
and urgent ques-
faces in the
He said,
has been

olic Church

present world situation
“on France's request it

Ties
fabri- recognised by our Atlantie Allies

that the defence of continent
Europe constit our fundamen-

tal obiective.”--0.P
|

ites

To-day’s
Weather Chart

“82s
5.48 a.m.
6.24 p.m.
Last Quarter
7.00 ‘p.m.
9.01 a.m.,

Sunrise :

Sunset:

Moon:

Lighting Pp:

High Tide:
p.m

Low Tide:
p.m

9.038

10.06 a.m., 9.48

cee EEO





PAGE TWO







— Cath Calling

Is G RACE RT. REV. ALAN
KNIGHT, Archbishop of the
West Indies and Bishop of British
Guiana who came to Barbados a
week ago for the consecration and
enthronement of Bishop Manide-
ville is due to return to B.G. this
afternoon by B.W.LA:

ne by the same plane are
Hon. W. Holder Attorney Gen-
eral of B.G. and Mrs. Holder,
Mr. Holder was also here for the
consecration. He is Chancellor of
the Diocese and Registrar of the
Provincial Synod.

Entertains Festival
Visitors
VER 500 people, West Indians

and their friends, were pre-
sent at St. Pancras (North Lon-

don) Town Hall on Friday last
week, when the West Indian Stu-
dents’ Union gave dance and
cabaret in honour of West In-
dian visitors to the Festival of
Britain,

In the charmingly informal at-
mosphere the West Indian visitors
met, talked and danced with their
fellow countrymen and women in
England.

Among those present were the
Hon. and Mrs. N. W. Tang, Hon.
and Mrs. W. Courtenay; Hon.
J. A. Smith, Hon. EH. Lake,
Hon. R. L. Bradshaw. Hon. L. L.
Simmons, Hon. T. T. Thompson,
Hon. W. O. Kendall, Mr. A. A.
Bannister, Mr. C. A. Robinson,
Mr. F. E. W.: Case, Mr Evon
Blake, Mr. W. M, Humphrey,
Mr. Ronald Crawford, Mr. Ronald
Mapp, Mr. G_ E. Willock, Mr.
and Mrs. Willy Richardson, Mr.
A. Chambers, Mr. and Mrs. Johan
Oliver and Mr. A. E. V. Barton

Music for_dancing was provided
by Reb Prescott (Grenada) and
his band.

Back To St. Lucia

RS. ANDRE du BOULAY, her

daughter Marguerite and
Mrs, Leo Bergasse who hud been
holidaying in Barbados since July
5th returned to St, Lucia yesterday
by B.W.1.A.' Mr. du Boulay who
accompanied them over for the
holiday returned over the week-
end.

Visiting Parents

RS. PETER BAYLEY who has

been im Barktados on a visit
to her parents Hon. and Mrs. H. A.
Cuke is due to return to B.G. this
afternoon by B.W.I.A. Her visit
coincided with her brother Henry’s
wedding. Hé was married a cou-
ple of weeks ago to the former
Alison Worme.

Optics

M:* AKTHUR ST. JOHN, son
of Mrs. Daisy St. John of
“Salters’, St. George and the late
Mr. St. John left on Sunday by
the Colombie for England. Arthur
has gone to study Optics and ex-
pects to be away for three or four
years.



THE ADVENTURES OF



"'I8S BETTY CRAIGCIE
Round the world on £220

Girl Globe-trotter
ROWN-EYED girl

from Syd-

ney, Australia, who set out
td see the world on £220 is Miss
Betty Craigie, a masseuse.

She is just setting off from
London for 4 tour of the south-
west of England on a cycle bought
for £7 in Paris. Next she plan
to hitch-hike through Spain
Portugal and North Africa.

Miss Craigie, who is small and
slim, knows how to travel a long
way on a little money. “Once on a
six-day trip with a girl friend, I
spent only 6s.; but in England I
expect to travel on about £3 a
week,” she says.

Here For A Month

R. and Mrs. Thomas McLeod

and two children arrived
from Trinidad over the week-end
by B.W.LA. to spend a month’s
holiday in Barbados staying with
the Armstrong’s in Fontabelle.
Mrs. McLeod is the former Mar-
jorie Armstrong.

Other arrivals over the week-
end were Mr. and Mrs. E. E.
Reece and son who are staying at
Baitery House, St. Lawrence, Mr.
Reece is a Civil Engineer’ in
Trinidad.

Three Air Hostesses

INNIE TURNER, Jane Ogden

and Valerie Stewart three
Chicago and Southern Airline
hostesses who had been on a two-
day visit to Barbados as guests ol
B.W.1.A. returned to Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by B.W.LA.
Accompanying them was Mr. Basil
Pantin of B.W.1.A’s Commercial
Department in Port-of-Spain.





Use Barbados Molasses
ISITORS to the governments
fishing lodge in New Bruns-

wick's famed Kestigouche Rivei
(favourite spot for catehing sal-
mon) can sample the famous

Trail Blazer Pancakes” turned

out by David Ogilvy, 74, the lodge’s
gaunt, Oracular man ger. Time's
July 9th edition gives the recipe
for Ogilvy’s paneakes, which for
more than a half a century he has
been making* “by feel.”

Take four mixing-spoonsful of

Barbados molasses; two hen's
eggs, or one loon’s egg; one pint

of creamy milk, or one pint of
new-fallen snow and one pint of
water. Beat this together.

“Then the dry mix. Flour: two
parts white, one part whole wheat
Add baking powder, two table-
spoons. Add salt to taste—if the
partv had a drink the night be-
fore, add a little bit more salt.
Put it through the sifter together.
Then stir until the batter is
smooth,

“Have your griddle greased with
a slab of bacon rind or some salt
pork skin. Heat to the proper tem-

perature to produce the deep
orange glow so essential to the
seductive pancake.

“Serve with butter and real
rock-maple syrup and a_ few

slivers of bacon thrown in on the
side.”

Try making some trail blazer'’s.
Note the Barbados molasses and
perhaps dispense with the pint of
new-fallen snow.

Polytechnic Diploma

N the historic surroundings of

the Stationers and Newspaper
Makers Hall, London, on July 13,
Novello Hamilton Richards of the
Leeward Islands student at Poly-
technic Course in Journalism was
presented with his Diploma by
Colonel The Honourable J. J
Astor, Chairman of the Times and
of the Commonwealth Press Union.
Six ether holders of Colonial Office
scholarships to the course—from
Gold Coast, Singapore, Nigeria
3ritish Guiana, Hong Kong and
Malaya also received Diplomas
together with 12 British student
The gathering included Mr. Eric
M. Clayson, Chairman, Newspaper
Society; Mr. John Gordon, past
President Institute of Journalists;
and Brigadier R. F. Johnson; al:
members of the Advisory Com-



mittee. Mr. R. T Rivington,
past Master of the Stationers and
Newspaper Makers Company,



described some of the treasures of
the Company displayed in the
hall, including famous pieces of
plate, a model of the Company’s
barge, and a priceless register in
which the first publication of
many of Shakespeare’s Plays i:
recorded.
Incidental Intelligence

I F a motorist stopped for ever

pedestrian he’d never ge’
anywhere. But if a pedestrian
didn’t stop for every motorist

he'd jolly
Overheard
crossing.

soon get somewhere.--
at Ludgate

—L.E.S.



PIPA



pentane +

P 87. Vee Dias Int. Amsterdam



BY - THE WAY... eee By Beachcomber

DREAM of the day when a

I

Prime Minister, hanging his
head in shame, resigns because
vie.cry has eluded his febrile

grasp in the matter of prayers to
annul orders relating to shredded
eg:-shells, dried ribbon, ash-sift-
er., buttons. made of decontrolled
goeis’ milk, stanchions, gravel,
dycd marramgrass, boiler-cases
wecden fruit, fingerless glove-
str 2tchers, dummy ~ binoculars,
slit cork, waterproof coverings
fo weathervanes, lampwick,
fossilised chalk, haddock-mallets,
shcrbet, tubular thongs, row-
lock-pins, birdlime, warehouse
tewel-rollers, grated sago, stilt-
straps, recking-horses’ snouts,
elbow-pads; froth, beard-glue,
gesworks ladders, tuning-forks,
biri-cage polish, zinc trestles,
m> h-balls, hat-blocks, shepherds’
breeches, soap-shapers, galvanis-
ed scooter-wheels, drum-stands,
ra‘vens’ nests, traction-engine
whistles, "bluebags, dredger-
buckets, penwiper-cases, storin -
cones, false noses, chimney-struts,
oiled cardboard, and Indian fiea-
trays in four colours.



Invisible: Exports

‘y ERE -size,” as the critic said

when he surveyed Mr.
Slaucha's 90-ton Dancing Fairy,
“is not everything.” Those who
are moved to tears by smallness
of any sort will probably sob
over the almost invisible ball-
bearings w@ are exporting, “Six
milion can be held in a_ tea-
spoon,” and the larger kinds of
bacilli are raging with jealousy,

“They look so helpless,”
a sensitive bystander. Each of
these bearings, I read, is so
small that if dropped, it could
not be found again Here, it
seems to me, is a _ chance for
some unscrupulous’ caterer to
boost them as invisible caviare,
How gross, how coarse seem the
old visible ball-bearings ‘or
roller-skates.

murmurs

Au rendezous des
Gommeux

Nan indignant speech yesier-
day Mrs. Wretch referred to

the Bun House in Sloane-square
as “the thin end of the Conti-
nental wedge.” She deplored the





Rupert and

coloured sunshades. “If” she
said, “there were a bun house
in the Place Blanche, fT would be
like this. Is there no other way
of attracting volatile foreigners t
England?” Couldn't we, for
instance, them interested i

cricket?

get

An Elephant Forgets
J T is said that when the Rajah
of Dhamdhurtipore beckon-

ed to his favourite elephant thc
other day, the beast turned its
back and walked away. The

elephant was flown to New Yors
where a_ psychiatrist examined
it, and reported that it was suffer-
ing from loss of memory,
(Beachcomber News Agency.)



Simon—39 _



When the little pals are supplied
wih buns and lemonade the lady
asks what reward they would like
Simon saye he wants to help his
Daddy vome supplies because
he keows it's early closing day.
Phew Rupert thinks carefully “We

Orererm





te

don’t really need anything,” he
says, “* but my Mummy ay that
wild iris you gave me. Could we
have another ?"’ ‘ You shall have
the best I've go, and not wild
either,”’ cries the lady as she takes

them to a bed of gorgeous blossoms.
evcvouven

——



(rood Quality Diamond Cut Crystal Glass-Ware 5

PORT and SHERRY GLASSES

~ CLARET GLASSES

ehisc

WATER JUGS,

q.

DIAL 4606

CHAMPAGNE GLASSES
WHISKEY GLASSES

HONEY
GOBLETS. & PEACH MELBA

JARS.

GLASSES



R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS *)

YOUR SHOE STORE

,

Sale a Waa ve $1.23 each K
“4 e144", B
ian y ynee Gh $1.76 ,,
$1.23 a

DIAL 4220

Circus
|

! liberations on

i

COMES LACK TO

BARBADOS

+>



\DVOCATE

f the Week
eth Bowen

a]
4
!

STUDY



A Matter of Life
By EVELYN IRONS mate |
mo .

This week, members of the bare parquet floor. }
Royal Commission on Capital Pun- In London she lives economi-|
ishment, under chairman Sir cally, keeps one Breton |
Ernest Geevers, resumed theiv nervant, and no car.
sessions in London. Secret ses- #1] keep Bowen's Court with my
sions, for at this stage the public Weriting’ , She says.

are not admitted. Soon they must

make up their minds whether:
raurderers should hang or not.
They have been at it for two
and a half years, and their repori
is due in December.

Two women are on the Com-
rnission—-Dame Florence Hancock
of the Transport and General
Workers’ Union, and Elizabeth

30wen novelist whose CBE (three
years ago) was awarded for
“services to literature”

Miss Bowen sits on the Com-
mission as Mrs, Alan Cameron
and this is the name inscribe?

on her impressive
box with the Royal cipher (gift
of the Government), which now
overfiows with official_ documents
on the death penal®®

She is still wondering why she

black despatcn

vas picked for the job. She is
no Dorothy Sayers, no Agatha
Christie has never attended a

murder trial.



“Rare sensitiveness and intro-
spection” are the kind of words
critics use for her finely spun
novels and short stories, into
which such debates as the fros
and cons of death by hanging
have never intruded.

“IT expect’, she says with a

“that I am just the man

street”.

smile,
in the

At Sing-Sing

Probauly the Commission’s work
has benefited from Miss Bowen's
intelligence. But even as Mrs.
Cameron she is highly uniypical
of the ordinary citizen.

She was the only woman mem-
ber of the Commissicn to go on it
recent three-weeks’ trip to the
United Siates and examine tne
vyorkings of the electric chair at
Sing-Sing.

There was no victim in the chair
at the time, but Miss Bowen found



it shocking enough. Although
she is a great reader of detective
stories and. a glutton for filiis,

she had no realistic mental nicture
of the execution scene. ,{f she
thought of the electric chair at all,

he saw it surgical, hygienic and
hromiu

“But in the room was an old
wooden chair homely chair

which might have come from High
W/7ycombe,” she said. “Somehow
that made it more horrible.”

Added horror was the range of
24 seats for spectaters, for in
Americ- ‘uations ere public. ‘It
eemed to her as if the condemned
man had to take his death before
a studio audience.

9.30 to 6

When she is not engaged on de-
the death penalty,
Miss Bowen works office hours
(9.30 until 6) on a novel she has
just started.

Husband Alan Cameron (they
married in 1923) works office
hours at the gramophone record
company where he is educational
dvise

His wife sits writing in her first-
floor study in their Regency house
overlooking Regent’s Park: the
room, like the rest of the house,
is alle light and air, with wide
curtainless sash windows down to



|
The Gentry
Court big, bare house |
1 County Cork built nearly 200 |
years ago by an ancestor is
an.iliar to her readers; sé: wrote
book about it. She is the first
woman to have inherited the
house and its 300 acres; she spends
cur months of the year there, |
i.as just returned from a three-|
reek ree, ("I try to be a good |
landlord.”

Bowen's



‘Fairly ordinary Anglo-Irish
ccuntry gentry,” she calls her |
family in that book, and herself |

when young she describes in the |
words of her mother (who did
when her only daughter was 13). |

he explained to me, with aj}

lyingly hopeful look, that I
would never be pretty, but that
she hoped I would grow up to
have a nice character.”

The prophecy

seems accurate

At 52 Miss Bowen is not pretty, |
but she has distinctive good
looks with her wide, serene face,
reddish hair smoothed to a low
knot and curiously penetrating

pale blue eyes.

She was educated at a boarding
school in Kent, regrets that she
never took a university degree.
(“I don’t suppose I could have
passed the exams”).

She thought of being an illus-
trator, studied briefly at a London
art school (“I imitated Beardsley
but found I was no draughts-
woman”), had embarked on a
course of journalism at London
University when she threw it up
at 24 to marry. Already she had
published two books of short
stories, hers was one of the rare
matriages that encour? aged the
wile’s career instead of Cutting it |
short.

She
pent
Sne

the war in neutral Eire. |
tayed at the Razgent’s Park}
jiouse, from 1940 was a raid war-|
den in Marylebone.

Out of that drab éxperience she |

wrote The Heat of the Day.
No Cook

At home, Miss Bowen is no}
cook, but enjoys polishing her
choice old furniture; takes a tilt
at those who sneer at women
who spend their time “doing the
flowers.” (“I would like to spend

a morning doing that and at
bowen’s Court I often do”.)

She relaxes by doing elaborate!) |

“montages” for screeus—a hign-
brow version of pasting up scraps.
Any minute now she will buy al
set of pastels following the trend
towards amateur art. (‘1 have to
cut masses of sheer description
from my writing, and I feel I
must record it in some way.)

But her dominating hobby is
meeting people, No ivory tower
ior Miss Bowen, who enjoys noth-

ing better than hearing others
talk. |
Which perhaps explains why

they were not so crazy when they
asked her to speak for the man

| 7.00-

| Analysis;

| 800 pm

| David Copperfield;
| Kunz; 9 45 p m

was not one of those who |

— ——

B.B.C. Radio Programme

1951
11 25)



Wednesday
Programme
Choice; 11 45 a m
12.00 noon The News
Analysis

July 25
1115 an Parade;
am Listeners
ment of Account;
1210 pm News
115—4 45 pom
415 pm Star Time; 4 30 | pm. Dance
Ther Around; 500 pm Composer of |
the Week; 515 pm At the Opera; 6.0¢
p m. Charlie Kunz; 6 15 pm Jack Salis-|
bury; 645 pm. Programme Parade;
655 pm To-day'’s Sport

10.45 p.m.



25 53M 31.32 M





1pm News

Calling the West}
Generally Speaking;
Radio Newsreel; 815 pm
Argument; 8 45 pm _ Interlude;

From the Editorials; 9 00 p m
930 pm. Charlie
Statement of Account;
10 00 pm The News; 10 10 pm _ Inter-

1015 pm. Crazy People; 10.45
Mid-Week Talk.

700 pm The News: 7
715 pm
Indies; 745 pm
Serious

8.55 p m

lude;
p.m



CROSSWORD







Across
Let the nairdresser do ity (6)
Su 4 runner may be tn_ the
garden put is not ere (3)
t n ook. (5)
' Vu corruption of a etpnet.
(3)
) Where fifty get the chopper. (6)
} Pick and choose. (6)
is Uda duck of sorts. (5)
14. Would-be man. (3)
15. This way it suggests. (3)
17. 22 Across is a this to the
debutante (5) 18. Away. (7)
41. What your friend consumed ? (6}
22 It may be lint. (8)
Down
1 Operation that lands the com-
manding officer in a squeeze, (7)
4. One Pimpernel was (7)
3. Carried on. (5)
4 Life blood of the usurer? (9)
5 Some one must before you can
14 down. (5)
6. This hand ts large in writing. (4)
8. Tear. (4)
i istastetul to Mrs, Spratt. (4)
14 See 5 Down. (5)
16. Such £ man might bulld a lean-
to. (4)
iy. Taken for a ride’ (3)
20 It’s rent would pour in, (3}

Relapse;
21, Pans;
. Anserine; 2, Roulette;
Vavasour: 5, Veer; 7,
14, Cost: 16,






s: 19 Sea:
; 18, Anne

Be Wise =

m Advertise

‘olfman played by LON CHANEY
Dracula played by BELA LUGOS!



in the street on that matter .of
life and death. ; |
WORLD COPYWRIGHT RESERVED

—I,E.S.





AQUATIC CLUR CUNEMA (Members Only) |)

Matince TO-

DAY 5 PM

TO-DAY & TO-MORKOW 8.50 PM

Sidney TOLER as Charlie Chan ir

“THE RED DRAGON”

much talked-about

IGG & eet IN COURT”

The

(From the ¢
YULE as J!

n Strip



a

&

by George Mec MANUS)
Renie RIAND as MAGGIE





—_—_—_—_

DAY
TRIPOLI
rechnicolor
John Payne \

—

TO-DAY
$45 & 8.29 pm,

ZOMBIES ON

with Bela LUGOST — Wally

RETURN OF THE BADMEN

With Randoiph SCOT
Special 1.30 Siow

WESTWARD BOUND & RETURN OF THE APEMAN







Ken MAYNARD — Bol STEELE
ae OISTIN ||!
p LAZA ost, ||

TO-DAY & Tomorrow 5 & 8.39 pm. |

“FORT APACHE” |
|

and

“ARIZONA RANGER”

with Tim Holt & Jack Holt
Opening FRIDAY 5 & 8.40 pm |
|
GANGSTER and {
FORGOTTEN WOMEN |





—S————— SSS

oacietnetnatmtieie=emmaen=e eee

CHECK UP
The Hurricane and

We can supply:—

Chimneys & Wicks
Lanterns

Bolts

Latches

Locks

Call at our Hardware
ment. Remember! There is
you shop with us,

e

THE BARBADOS

COTTON FACTORY LTD.

Hardware Department



TRIDGETOWN
PLAZA piai 2310

—— - +——








Rainy Season is approaching:





Due Soon—
SINNER of
MAGDALA



and TOMORROW

BROADWAY

BROWN — Alan CARNEY





rT — Robert RYAN

THURSDAY

With Bela LUGOSI ana







= 8
GAIETY
THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES

TO-DAY & Tomorrow
“GIRL RUSH"
Wally Brown Alan Carney &
“LAWLESS VALLEY"
George O'BRIEN
Friday to Sunday 8.30 p.m.
FLAME and the ARROW
Color by Technicolor

LANCASTER—Virginia

8.20 p.m.

Bart
















NOW

Saws
Hammers
Screw Drivers
Shovels

Wheelbarrows






and Ironmongery Depart-
no parking problem when

CO-OPERATIVE

Tel. No. 2039



Lenore Aubert + Jane Randolph s
STARTING

FRIDAY
EMPIRE

SPECIAL SHOW on
SATURDAY MORNING
at 9.30

















ENPLOSIVE
THRILLS!
THUNDEROUS
ACTIONS!
AT

PLAZA

BRIDGETOWN

SPECIAL SATURDAY 28th
9.30 & 1.30 P.M.

Sidney TOLER as
Charlie CHAN in

THE TRAP

With Mantan MORELAND
and
The Ever Popular
JIMMY WAKELY in

SONG OF THE
RANGE

PLAZA-o=m

SPECIAL SAT. 28th, 9.30 a.m.

RETURN OF
THE APEMAN

BELA LUGOSI — John
CARRADINE &

WESTWARD
BOUND

with
KEN MAYNARD — Hoot
GIBSON — BOB STEEL

BREATH-TAKING
THRILLS ££
ROUSING
EXCITEMENT ££









State- |

19 76 M|

|

'

|



the Monster played by GLENN STRANGE |









| RSS



ESTHER WILLIAMS—RED SKELTON—RICARDO MONTALBAN in

JAMES ELLISON — HEATHER ANGEL _ JOHN HOWARD _







- QUIZ





WEDNESDAY,

TONITE 8.30

PRESENTED BY

JOLY

QUIZ



95

1951







BARBADOS AGENCIES LTD.

— AT —

GLOBE THEATRE

WITH

“CAPTAIN CHINA”

N.B.—“CAPTAIN CHINA” will be shown 5 P.M. TO-DAY

JOHN PAYNE
JACK POT NOW $60.00



TO-MORROW 5 & 8.15 TO-MORROW 5 & 8.15 “CAPTAIN CHINA

And “S

Starts SAT.

“THREE GUYS
NAMED MIKE"

Columbia Double A

Eddy Arnold The Tennessee

FEUDIN' RHYTHM & BANDIT OF SHERWOOD FOREST

With Gloria Henry.



“DEVIL"
With Warner Baxter,

eins ege Re ees Mee aS AE sleet

ORROWFUL JONES”



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EAGLE HALL | ©

(Bob Hope)

eming Seen

“SWORD

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW
4.30 and 8.15 P.M.

ttraction

Starring Cornel Wilde —

Friday only at 4 30 and 8 15 pm
S HENCHMAN” &
With Randolph



Plowboy in:

OF MONTE

CRISTO”

George Macready

“CORONER CREEK"

Scott

EMPIRE

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SPECIAL-UNIVERSAL

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DOUBLE

REGIMENT~

With All The Suspense Your Heart Can Stand

Starring Dick Powell — Marta Toren

Starring

Vincent Price

AND

“«JASSY”

and

Basit Sydney and Damont Walsh

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY and TO-MORROW 4.30 & 8.15

20th Cen

tury Fox Double

MICKEY ROONEY — JUDY GARLAND in
“BABES ON BROADWAY”

AND

“DARK CORNER”
Starring

Mark Stevens — Lucille Ball — Clifton Webb

‘URE EERE

ROYAL



TO-DAY and TO-MORROW 4.30 & 8.15
20th Century Fox Double













“NEPTUNE’S DAUGHTER”

“UNDYING

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ROD CAMERON

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SPECIAL! SPECIAL! SATURDAY at 9.30

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WALTER BRENNAN in

MONSTER”

“BRIMSTONE”

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“BLACKMAIL”

Starring—WILLIAM MARSHALL — ADELE MARA

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\' FONESDAY,



JULY 25,

BRITAIN

1951

FACES



BIG TRADE GAP

By K. C.

THALER

LONDON, July 24

The British Labour Government, faced with one of the
rst trade gaps in its postwar experience, is contemplating
drastic action to halt the drift toward a new financial crisis.



No Copper For
India, Pakistan
If At War

WASHINGTON, July 23,

A Washington State Department
official said on Monday if India
and Pakistan went to war, the
United States would have “to take
another look” at its exports of
copper and other useful war
goods to India.

He said: “I am sure we would
not sit by shipping thern copper
if they were at war. This con-
firmed earlier United Press re-
ports quoting a High Commerce
Department official,

These officials of both Depart-
ments are instrumental in review-
ing the export policy and advising
the Secretary of Commerce who
formally sets the export quotas
on such controlled materials as
copper,

A Commerde
spokesman denied a
another news agency that the
original United Press story had
caused the Department embarrass-
ment, That United Press story
quoting a high official as saying
the copper exports to India would
be cut if an Indo-Pakistan war
started was correct, he said.

He added this was not meant as
any threat to India, but was in
with general United
States and United Nations’ policies
of preventing shipments of useful

Department
dispatch by



war goods to belligerents.
A an example, the State
Department official cited the pre-

cedent of the United States export
policy during the Arabian war in
1948-49 when the embargo was
clamped on all exports of muni-
tions and war materials—including
many fabricated copper items—to
Middle Eastern yore ens .

French, U.S. Goals
Are Identical

SAIGON,
General Jean De Lattre Dé
Tassigny, Comamnding General
ana French High Commissioner
in Indo China, said on Monday
the French and American goals
in the Far East are “identical,”
He said: “Spheres of influence in
the Far East are now impossible,
This is war, a war in which
America and France must work
hand in hand.”

De Tassigny, who spoke at the
opening ceremonies of the United
States Information Service Read-
ing room, said: “Our mission is
to stop the expansion of Commun-
fsm by intensifying our war ef-
fort and fortifying all means of
local resistance. There is only one
struggle in Asia, as there is only
one defense in Europe. All forces
of free peoples must contribute to
this struggle.”"—U.P

Czechs Refuse
To Free Oatis

WASHINGTON, July
It, is learned that
Czechoslovak Cabinet has
jected the United “States de-
mand for â„¢ the release of
Associated Press correspondent
William N. Oatis The United
States a week ago to-day sent
Czechoslovakia a stern note in-
sisting that Oatis be freed from
the Czech prison, where he has
started serving a 10-year term on
6py charges, The Czech Foreign
Minister referred the note to the
Cabinet. The Cabinet, however,
refused to free Oatis.—U.P







July 23



23.
the
re-

~ Canada’s Wonder Remedy Is

An inflated import bill has
caused a trade deficit, in six
months, of more than £550,000,000
—over $1,500,000,000 — and has

thrown gut of gear the British
Government's carefully prepared

estimates to balance Britain’s
carious economy

The Government admits that the
situation is alarming, and is under-
stood to have ordered its experts
to review its foreign trade policy
radically. But it is no secret that
means to remedy the situation are
limited and alternatives very few.

Chancellor of the Exchequer,,
Hugh Gaitskell faces further en-
quiries and reproaches in the Com-
mons, whenever Britain's economic
situation comes up for discussion.

Bevan Will Attack

The rebel Aneurin Bevan and
his associates are expected to at-
tack Government’s rearmament
policy for alleged adverse effects
on the overall picture of Britain's
economy, and to expand the offen-
sive started in their recent anti-
government pamphlets “One Way
Only”

Sore facts are that. Britain's
trade deficit has jumped two and
a half times over last year’s fig-
ures, and this adverse trend is still
rising. In the first six months of
1950, the trade deficit was £ 220,-
000,000.

If this trend continues
will be faced by the end of the
year with an enormous trade gap
according to best available calcu-
lations

The cause of this problem is out-
side the immediate control of the
British Government — it is the
steep rise in world commodity
prices and consequently of the bill
for Britain’s imports.

Rising Prices

Most of the increase this year is
in fact due to prices which are 43
per cent above 1950. The volume
of Britain’s imports has risen only
by one tenth over last ye ac-
cording to official records. At the
same time export prices have gone
up only 18 per cent. and sales
have not been able to make up for
the inerease in the import bill,

The problem is accentuated by
the fact that Britain’s rearmament
programme is largely tied up with
this issue. It is dependent on the
continued importation of raw ma-
terials. [f imports are cut rearm-
ament would have to be slowed
down. Rearmament orders to Brit-
ain’s industries at present are at
the rate of £100,000,000 per
month

pre-

Britain





Alternatives

Alternatives before the Gov-
ernment are: To eat into meagre
gold and dollar reserves or cut
non-essential dollar imports and
face further austerity at home

A revision of the import pro-
gramme is considered as imminent
although savings from it will not
be substantial. Hopes are mainly
pinned on the fall of international
price levels and consequently on
the reduction of prices which Brit-
ain would have to pay for her im-
ports. The Government insists that
the rearmament programme is not
to be interfered with, and is ex-
pected to meet Bevan’s challenge
with the argument that Britain's
and the Western security must
have priority.

The Iran oil dispute threatens
to aggravate still further the al-
ready tight situation. If Iranian oil
stops flowing altogether, recourse
will bave to be taken to alterna-
tive sources including dollar oil.
The financial picture then will be-
come uglier yet. Amounts of up
to $100,000.000 and more might be
involved.—U.P.

Owner Wants Land
Around Arthur's Hill

MANY residents who live above
Arthur’s Hill are removing their
houses. The owner of the land has
asked for it. “We are finding
difficulty in getting house spots,”
an old lady who has a house in
that district said yesterday.



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BARBADOS ADVOCATE

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Henriquez Has
Good Chance

IN MEXICAN ELECTIONS

From ROBERT PRESCOTT

MEXICO CITY, July 24.
Mexico’s Presidential elections
are still 12 months away but
already the name of “Henriquez”
is being scrawled above walls and
buildings in Mexico city. In many
places it blots out the name of
President Miguel Aleman on post-
ers remaining from the 1946 cam-

paign.

General Miguel Henriquez is the
first real candidate to toss his hat

rin the 1952 ring and the first
threat to 25 years of political
domination by the P.R.I. (Party

of Revolutionary Institutions),

With an outstanding record as a
soldier dating from the Mexican
revolution Henriquez stands the
best chance of any “independent”
candidate in this quarter century.

He will campaign on the plat-
form of “absolute honesty” and
the abolishment of special priv-
ileges

His fignt is expected to raise
the question of Government cor-
ruption and graft and _ possibly
touch off investigation nearly as
sensational as the recent United
States crime probes.

He may take many thousands
of votes away from P.R.I. and
threaten its stranglehold on Mexi-
ean politics,

fough Fight

But he faces a tough fight.
ed up against Henriquez is the
power of the Cardens dynasty
which has never lost an election.

He must battle either Miguel
Aleman who may seek to “extend”
his 6-year term of office despite
the constitutional ban on re-elec-
tion, or Aleman’s handpicked
successor,

He faces behind the scenes a
scramble for power a_ series of
still unconsummated political deals
hanging over from the last elec-
tion and a political machine that
seems to have the gituation at
voting booths well under control.

—U.P.

SUGGEST REFORMS
IN MEAT CONTROL

LONDON, July 24.
The National Federation of
Meat Traders Association suggest~
ed drastic reforms in the most
control schedule and proposed that
controls eventually be removed.

In a booklet pubiished “to serve
as guide to members of Parlia-
ment and other influential person-
ages”, N.F.M.T.A. said more money
should be spent on buying meat
from other countries “in order that
our people may be _ protected
against a fall in the standard of
nutrition.”

The booklet said that imported
meat supplies could be improved
and quoted statistics showing that
approximately 450,000 tons of
chilled beef had been shipped an-
nually before World War II and
that it was superior in quality to
the frozen beef at present being
shipped from Argentina.

The Meat Federation booklet
commented: “The Federation has
been advocating since 1946 the re-
vival of this important chilled beef
trade and we welcome the re-
sumption of shipments this year.

Nevertheless expected supplies



Lin-





stiff sore
rub it into
tired museles,



in LESS

relief





are infinitesimal.” the Royal Family. It also wants

The booklet condemned the| legislation to enable the Governor

present method of grading meat in| to remove councillors who sav

slaughterhouses, —UP. anything disloyal about the King.
1

U.S. Want 180
Group Air Force

WASHINGTON, July 24.

Defence Secretary George Mar-
shall said on Tuesday the Govern-
ment is aiming for enough airplane
factories to produce a 180 group
Air Force—nearly twice the pres-
ent air force goal—but he quickly
added he was talking about plane
production capacity, not actual
plans for a 180 group air armada

Marshall also told reporters the
Defence Department expects to de-
cide by some time in October
whether it will be necessary to in-
erease presently the planned size
of armed forces.

President Truman said on Mon-
day in his economic report to Con-
gress, it might be necessary to
raise the sights of a defense build-
up programme whether peace
comes in Korea or not

Strong support for any such
buildup came from Republican
Senator Henry Cabot Loage, Jr.,
of Massachusetts who said the
United States definitely must en-
large its defense programme

Lodge, just back from a Euro-
pean tour, said the United States
should have started a bigger de-
fense buildup last summer.

He added that his trip convinced
him he was right in calling for a
150 group air force instead of the
present 95 group goal.

The Air Force expects to reach
its goal of 95 groups some time in
the autumn of 1952. Air Force
leaders are said to be privately
pushing for expansion to 150
groups.



—U-P.

Ship Beached
After Collision

WASHINGTON, July 23,

The Economic Co-operation Ad-
ministration reported on Monday
that the Liberty ship John Chester
Kendall, carrying the first load of
wheat under the India famine aid
programme has been beached
after a collision, The ship is in the
Suez bay south of the entrance to
the Middle Eastern canal, It had
been scheduled to reach Bombay
on Wednesday. The collision, ap-
parently, occurred on Sunday. The
other ship involved, was the Dan-
ish S.S, Gerd Maersk. The John
Chester Kendali is carrying more
than 10,000 tons of grain. It had
sailed from Philadelphia on June
19.—U.P.

Petition Against
Belize Council





BELIZE:
Some retired civil servants in
British Honduras have begun

circulating a petition asking the
Governor, Sir Ronald Garvey, to
dissolve the Belize City Council
for “disloyalty to the Royal
Family.” The Council had voted
not to discuss the hanging of a
picture of the King in the Council
chamber until self-government is
granted to the Colony.

The petition asks the Governor
to abolish the present Council and
to pass laws requiring future
councillors to pledge allegiance to

—B.U.P.

Buy



{aaa eo eee ener tenes



AN ENGLISH ELECTRIC







“Britain Gives
To B.W.1.—Then
Takes Away”

LONDON:

What Britain gives to the West
Indies with its right hand, it takes
away with its left hand, said Mr,
Bernard Braine, M.P., secretary of
the West Indies Committee of the
Conservative Party, in an
on West Indian problems pub-
lished in the London Daily Mail.

“Truc, we pour. substantial
ums into the West Indies through
tha medium of the Colonia] De-
velopment and Welfare Fund in
an en@avour to improve living
standards and to encourage econ-
omic development,” he wrote
“What is the use of encouraging
welfare expenditure if the condi-
ticns under which West Indian
produce is marketed depress pro-

duction and cause unemploy-
ment?”
He described the British Gov-

ernment’s sugar policy as a “false
economy” and called for an
agreement that would allow the
West Indies to expand their
sugar production, since the sugar
industry cannot be broadened if

the base is insecure.
“Unless bold and imaginative
steps are taken soon,” he said,

“the situation is likely to get out
of hand.” —B.ULP.



“Bruno” Prepares
For 2md Trip to W.L

LONDON
The Norwegian cargo vessel
Bruno, on charter to Saguenay

Terminals, Ltd., of Montreal, for
service between Canada, London
and the British West Indies, has
returned to London from her
maiden voyage in this service to
the .West Indies. Normally, after
calling at ports in Barbados,
Trinidad and British Guiana, she
will sail for Canada with a cargo
of British Gtiana bauxite

On her first trip, however, she
sailed from Demerara in ballast
to Cubg to pick up a cargo otf
sugary for the Ministry of Food
to be delivered in London, Now,
in Tilbury, she is loading a
general cargo for the West Indies
and will carry a full comple-
ment of nine passengers on her
second voyage.

Cap}. Largs Fyliing, stocky, 51.
yenr-old master of the Bruno,
was pleased by his vessel’s per-

formance on her first trip to
West Indian waters. Only draw-
back to the pleasant trip, said a
member of the crew, wag the
great heat in the West Indies
especially since the Bruno was
not built for service in the
tropics
-B.ULP.



YOUNG WOMEN WILL
GET CERTIFICATES

CERTIFICATES
tributed to young

be dis-
of the

will
women





St. Augustine branch of the Bar-
bados Evening Institute, St.
George, on Monday evening. The
classes do hand work at the St.
Augustine Boys’ School. This is
two years now that the young
women have been attending the
classes.
———=—===.

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t In tablet form, di 1

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A: able Rein a ireles West In ' tia |: ind easy to take, but the newest and

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S$ S_ Richmond Ca SS. Audrey 1.) pure blood, and works so fast that you



Sheaf Mead. SS Apache Canyon in see and feel new boty power and


























SS Othon, SS Helicon, 8S Woens- vigour in 24 to 48 hours. Because of
| drecht, =S. Adviser, S S. Andrea Britt! ite? natural aetion on glands and
| $.S Esso Binghampton, S.S. Trans-Amer nerves, your brain power, memory and
S.S. Canadian Constructor, ss eyesight often improve amazingly
Prone vector, S.S. Rotula, S.S. Queenston, And this amazing new gland and
| Heights, $S. Skotaas, SS Adriatica. vigour restorer, called VI-TABS, is
|S 8 Tekla, $ S$. Mormac Guif, § § Lu- | guaranteed. It has been tested and
|culus, SS. Weildrecht, Fort Auck-| Proved by thousands and is now avall=
(land, SS Hidlefjord, Ganm 33 ft 82. 25.2 Sen ae a oe
% Monica, 8 S_ Brazil, S onian Pioneer : S from yout chereiat todas Pug
E ) 8.8. Canadian Cruiser, S'S. Battie Rock,| |{ tt, the test, See the big improvement
eLielhe oan |S'S Fort Fetterman, 'S'S | Fort Towns-| |yets Sate Geee “aa. tie Fs waite
- |hend. $$. Loide Honduras, S'S Loider| guarantee that it must make you fy uid
~ fru. S § osa, SS Jamaica, S § of rl energy and vitality and feel
For AMAICAN | oz 856 Leese, Mees oie ee eee calty nd fee
* $.S. Mona Lisa, SS Matina, SS. Sur om return of empty pack .
ray ss Hecuba, SS Doro ss -TARS costs little he guar-
B. it | Rovario, %.S, Mormaemar, S.S._ I dy | Vi T b protects
iss Orn 40 a s ss Dol J
auxite Yeon 28's SS, Atos Pie, Wes aDS
3S Charmouth Hill) SS. Trader, SS Restearas Manhood and Vitality
LONDON Lidverville
? , sipurnceeacisenatiitehs dehasameriatiiianncpatibtit sie sdcnctimiiti
A third Marshall Plan loan to
increase bauxite production in
Jamaica has been announced by| / iy
Nr. William Batt, Minister-in- /
Coarge of the Economic Co-|
coeration Administration Mission
to Britain, An agreement has
been signed under which the|

E.C.A,, will advance $3,284,000 to}
Reynolds Jamaica Mines, Ltd

According to the contract, the
company will also spend some
$450,000 on its expansion pro-|
gramme, which is expected nearly |
to double bauxite production from
its Jamaica mines, Repayment of
the E.C.A,, advanice, with interest,
will be made in supplies of
aluminium over a 11)-year period,

The new plans call for the
company’s present capacity of
bauxite mining and shipping to
be increased from 410,000 to
750,000 toms per year, New land
will be aequired in Jamaica for
bauxite development and mining
equipment will be increased by
70 per cent. The U.S. Government
will also have an option to buy
for dollars, in addition to the
aluminium to be delivered under
the contract, not less than $750,000
ror more than $1,500,000 , worth
of aluminium,

Under the original agreement
with Reynolds, the EC.A.,
edvanced $5,963,000 in dollars and
£1,800,000 in British counterpart

funds, This agreement also called
for repayment in aluminium, The |
E.Cc.A., has also fostered the)

cevelopment of Jamaican bauxite
through an advance of $2,500,000

in dollars and £1,500,000 in|
counterpart funds in 1950 to
Jamaica Bauxiies Ltd. for help

in constructing a bauxite process

ig plamt,

The latest loan brings the total
f E.C.A., advances for Jamaican
bauxite development to $11,747,000
n dollars and £3,300,000 in

counterpart funds, BUP.

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay





Sch Lady Noeleen, Sch, Rosaline M.,
MV. Sedgefield, Sch. Freedom

Sch. Marea Henrietta,
Seh. Pine Nose
Sely Rainbow M |
Cuidad Boli-

Seb. Sunshine R.,
Sch. Mary £. © aroline,
Mac, Sch. Franklyn D. R.,

Fleary \

Sch. Mildred Wallace, 8 8
var, British Yacht Marsaltese, Sch Cyril
E Smith, Sch Henry D. Wallace, 5 8
Strategist

ARRIVALS

Marianne 29 tons net, Capt
from Copenhagen

, Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 tons
Every, from British Guiana

Eunicia, 38 tons net,

Yacht



Capt
Schooner WL

Capt Joseph from Dominica



8. Mormacgulf, 4,521 tons net, Capt |
WeKinnon, from Los Angetes
MV Lady Joy, 46 tons net, Capt |
Parsons, from St, Lucia |
DEPARTURES |
M.V. Canadian Constructor, 3,035 tons
net, Capt Wallace, for St John |
MV. Canadian Cruiser 3,935 tons net, |
Capt. O'Hara, for St Vincent
SS Sundray, 4,307 tons net, Capt
Ga:dner, for Trinidad
July 24, 1961, |
CANADA |
626/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 60 8/10 pr
Demand Drafts 60 65% pr
Siaht Drafts 606/10 pr
20/10 pr Cable
613/10% pr. Currency 59 3/10% pr.
Coupons 58 6/10% pr







A FRESH SHIPMENT RECEIVED RECENTLY |
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@rinted by the Advocate Co., Lt4., Jroad St., Bridwetow.



Wednesday, July 25, 1951



IT has been announced that under a
Colonial. Development and Welfare scheme
a producer from the British Broadcasting
Corporation will be seconded to the Gov-
ernment of Trinidad. The duties of this
officer will be to provide a special pro-
gramme service for Trinidad, Barbados,
and British Guiana and to assist in getting
the maximum benefit from broadcasting
equipment already in existence.

There will be another B.B.C. producer
stationed in Jamaica to provide a similar
service for that island, British Honduras
and Bahamas.

|
BROADCASTING

In the past, people in the Caribbean have
accepted the broadcasts provided in the
Overseas Service of the B.B.C. and have
been glad to find that their affairs have
sometimes been given place in the Home
Service. But these were primarily intend-
ed to satisfy the tastes of people in Britain.

The West Indies as a unit of British Col-
onial territory has its own problems, its
own aims and ideals and its peculiar
growth and development. It is this growth
and the rate of progress by which they will
be judged by people in other parts of the
world including Great Britain,

Broadcasting has come as complemen-
tary to the Press and the services which it
provides are so extensive that it is a most
effective adjunct. It was during the dark
days of 1940 that the word of one man
moved the hearts and stirred the emotions
of millions of people in the free world, in-
spiring them with courage tomfight to the
death for an ideal. It was the voice of Mr.
Churchill which disheartened the Nazis.

By
specially for the West Indies in the West

these same services produced

|
|
Indies, West Indians will have the oppor-
tunity of knowing at the time, the events
dealing with problems which occur,

The programmes produced at the B.B.C.
for the benefit of the West Indies have the
disadvantage of severe limitations. They
tales of West Indian life produced on the
spot will have the advantage of natural
Indian people and those who live in this
area will learn more of their neighbours

|
|

in the area and the methods adopted of
have brought benefits nevertheless; but
background. There it is that the West
and their way of life.

But these are not the only advantages.
The question has been posed, not only in
Great Britain but in the United States of
America, as to whether there is a West
Indian culture. If there is a West Indian
culture, then broadcasting will give it life
and body and will present it to the world
as it really is. If there is no West Indian
culture but merely a hybrid of the British
way of life and African primitive methods,
then Broadcasting might be the means of
helping the people of the area to evolve
a culture of their own.

West Indian music, art, literature, and
life itself must benefit from a proper sys-
tem of broadcasting when the programmes
are produced in and are characteristic of
the West Indies.

FIRE FIGHTING

WITHIN the last two years efforts have
been made to bring Seawell Airport into
line with modern airports the world over.

With financial assistance from the Brit-
ish and Canadian governments a new run-
way has been built and the public are
awaiting the erection of a proper terminal
building.

A primary necessity at any airport is
adequate fire fighting equipment. The Gov-
ernment ordered fire fighting equipment
and it arrived and has been installed. It
will not be effective, however, until trained





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Presidency

In making anpther addition to THE amending of their Constitu- The U.S. Constitution originally

a eae er ee Setar in ee? tus ie Min livaiting provided that tHe — ole
e people of the United States the number of years an American vote for two persons. The Cun

in 1951 again demonstrated tha? President may serve, demonstrates date with the highest number of |
the fundamental Jaws of a nation again the enduring flexibility of yotes would be President, the)
can be charged peaceably and ef- â„¢e basic law of that nation which next highest would be Vice-|

enables the government to adapt it-

and President. To avoid tie votes and}

the necessity of choosing between |
rival candidates, the Twelf|
Amendment was adopted in 1804. |
of the Senate—thus pains the This directed the atten: ae

. » votes ” s “out” party ‘in wer without 4 their choices for reside and
ae Niataae wie male vote of the sania The 1886 law for Vice-President in separate
and the House of Representa- provided that members of the ballots. No further changes have
tives) and by three-fourths of
the States (36 out of 48).

The Twenty-Second Amend-
ment, prohibiting any person from
being elected U.S. President more
than twice or serving more than
10 years in that office, is now
part of the law of the United
States. The new Amendment
specificially does not affect Presi-
dent Harry S. Truman. It be-
comes effective with the person
who succeeds him as U.S, Presi-
dent.

fectively to meet changing con-
ditions and governmental needs
To change the basic laws of the
American nation, an amendment
must be approved by two-thirds

sef to conditions
needs

From SENIOR SCHOLASTIC

changing

order, would succeed to the Presi- lege through Constitutional |
dency after the Vice-President. amendment. Numerous Constitu-

pointed official (such as a Cabi- abolish the Electoral College have |
net Secretary) succeeding as been proposed and the United|
elected President or Vice-Presi- States eventually may act upon
dent, Congress in 1947 changed one or more such proposals in the |
the law again, placing the Speaker orderly manner prescribed by the |
of the House first after the Vice- Constitution, i
President, then the President pro ; shanged
tempore of the Senate, and then . The U.S. Presidency wee ae.
the Cabinet Secretaries. ‘Thig law Focnval atsertaieeis tn ‘the Constitu- |
is slit in effect. None of the ayes tion. For example, the U.S. Con-
cession laws ever has been in- "MX". amp ry ‘
Although this is the first time voked. eter a says that tg eee
that the Constitution of the Uni- President Truman, member of | rs Rete ee ee tae
ted: States has been changed the Democratic Party, enthusias- on ‘ girs — cuaaaad. ae ted
since 1938, it is only one of the tically supported the 1947 change, D8 hi a eth, 5 a ir Pert
many. continuing changes in the daspite the fact that, had he died two-thir o es pir ? ata ra:
cffice of the U.S. Presidency that in 1947 or 1948, he would have concur. hat i * sa’ till
began even as the American re- been succeeded by the Speaker sent” means in t oe Pee “es
public was being established, of the House, who at that time being workel our | pearl
The whole story of the chang- was a member of the Republi- The procedure used Y a
ing role, of the American Presi- can Party. Washington, the first US. - '
dency is a fascinating one. The The framers of the U.S. Con- dent, of working out treaties,
U.S. Constitution provides that stitution did not specify " ,
the Vice-President shall become amount of the Presidential salary tthe other parties and then sending
President, in the event that the in the Constitution which simply them. to the US. Senate for ap-
President dies, resigns, is unable says that the U.S, President shall proval or rejection, has been fol-
to serve, or is removed from “receive for his services a com- lowed ever since. Today. how- |
office by the U.S. Congress, The pensation.” No Ameriean Presi- ever, Congressional committees
President may be removed from dent ever got rich in the. White (or the Senate itself) often assum >
office by a process of Con- House (as the presidential resi- the right to give “advice” to ihe
gressional impeachment and con- dence is called), for he needs most U.S, Secretary of State on the con-
vietion for committing “treason, or-all of his salary to meet his duct of foreign relations.
bribery, or other high crimes and many’ personal and_ official ‘Through the years, the U.S
misdemeanors.” According to law expenses as the First Citizen of Constitution has proved to
the House of Representatives the nation, The U.S. Constitution flexible, and the fundamental
votes the impeachment, but the forbids changing the President’s gvctom of checks and balances
Senate must convict or acquit. ‘salary during his term of office. among the powers of the Execu-
Only one American President, The latest change in salary was tive, Legislative, and Judicial
Andrew Johnson (seventeenth approved by Congress just before ‘Branches for which it provides
holder ,of the office, 1865—1869, President Truman’s inauguration },y¥6 continued to operate effec-
who had succeeded to the Presi- for his new term on January 20, tively. |
dency upon the death of Abraham 1949, and the pay increase hecame
Lincoln) ever was impeached, effective on that date.

But the U.S, Senate found John- — Other changes have been made
son innocent of “high crimes and jn the U.S. Constitution to make
misdemeanors in office,” so he ‘yqministration of the government
was not removed, No President more effective, George Washing-
ever pes oe or annie ton, the first United States Presi-
prevented from servin . sath of office on ,
of illness. But seven U.S. Presi- April Sage Se earatties Yaaett doubtless will continue to je}
dents have died while in office, 4937 US Presidents were inaugu- made, 30th formal amendments |
three of them from assassins’ pated on March 4 of the year (to the Constitution and the less |
bullets. In each case the Vice-

that the Constitution of the United
States is the solid foundation of |
that government. As in the case
of the Presidency, changes in the}

ment can be, have been, and |



How the ex-generals have now disclosed
their plan at talks in Paris—with precise

proposals Wehrmacht

i

Americas C hanging ‘The Army That Germany

Wants

to’ make the

strong...

By CHARLES’ WIGHTON

: BONN.
THE German General Staff, that ruthlessly

ficient military machine which planned 100

years of European war, has made its come-

president’s Cabinet in a specified been made in the Electoral Col-| back.

It has a new plan for a new Wehrmacht
To avoid the possibility of an ap- tional amendments to revise or | vhich will give Germany the most formid-
tble single armed force in Western Europe

oday—if the Allies agree.

The Bonn Government, backed by the
\mericans, is urging this new German Gen-
ral Staff plan on the rest of the Atlantic

act nations.

Within a few months, believe high Allied
bservers in Bonn, the German, General
‘taff will almost certainly get the “go-ahead”

tynal for its new Wehrmacht.

Behind barred windows of a four-storey
‘ed brick building in a Bonn back street two
litler generals, with a skeleton staff of aris-
ocratic former colonels and majors, today
re planning the last details of that new
the making tentative agreements with Vehrmacht.

Hidden in other Bonn Ministries are at
east another dozen dark-suited Hitler gen-
rals—seven in the Ministry of the Interior
lone.

Key men are the elusive generals behind
he barred windows, former German High
‘ommand Operations Chief Adolf Heusinger

be| ind Rommel’s of Staff Hans

ex-Chief

Speidel.

Neither of them was a Nazi, for no German
yeneral Staff officer was permitted to join
the party. Both finished the war, however,
but nobody knows

is

Heusinger was the Fuehrer’s constant com-
anion for years at his Russian Front head-
methods and mechanics of govern-| »yarters, until he was arrested after the 1944
,omb plot, when defeat seemed inevitable.

Thin, spectacled Speidel planned the Ger-
aan offensive against the Second Front.

lieutenant-generals
Summing up, it may be seen | vyhat they really thought about Hitler.

President filled out the remainder
of the four-year term.

If both the President and the
Vice-President should die or could
not serve, the problem of succes-
sion is determined by Congres-
sional] action, In 1792 the U.S.
Congress enacted the first Suc-
cession Act, providing that, after
the President and Vice-President,
the President pro tempore of the
Senate would be next in line,
followed by the Speaker of the
House.
pro tempore is the Senator elect-
ed to preside over the chamber

in the absence of the Vice-Presi-
if there were more
five months of the Presi-

dent) And
than
dential term remaining, a special
national election would be held
to choose a new President to fill
out the term.

This law (which never had to
be used) lasted nearly a century.
It was changed in 1886 following
the death of Vice - President
Thomas A. Hendricks — shortly
after he had taken office. The U.S,

try suddenly realized that,

he would be succeeded by the chosen by popular vote in all the far-flung, sparsely-settled, agricul- |

Republican President pro tempore



KING Baudouin

As the Prince mounts the th .. th lei
; “Whom will he marry emo gians ask

BRUSSELS.

WHEN 20-year-old Prince Bau-
douin accedes to his father’s throne
in Brussels most Belgians
will be fervently hoping that his
coronation will mark the end of
the embittered dynastic dispute.
But they will also be keeping their
fingers crossed.

If, over one pf those gargantuan
Brussels dinners, you wish to
stertle your Belgian politician
guest into dropping his knife and
fork, say with innocent sweetness:
“How like Leopold Baudouin is
becoming—his walk, the way he
wears his military cap, Even his

hebbies, like mathematics and
engineering, remind one of his
father.”

This lean and studious-looking
youth has been under his father’s
influence throughout his life and
is conscious of the tragedy which
has forced his father into abdica-
tion, Baudouin is strongly attached
both to his father and to his step-
mother the beautiful Princess De
Rethy, whose war-time marriage

following that in which they
elected,

between electing a
ing office four months later
March 4, was shortened by adop-
tion of the Twentieth Amend-

ment in 1933, which advanced the
in-
augurations to January 20, Until

; then, too, a Congress elected in
Stee Danese Seemant November usually did not meet
until December of the following Russia
ear, and in nao case could it meet
Since the adqp-
tion of the Twentieth Amendment,

date of future Presidential

yefore March 4,

were formal operation of political party |
As railroad, automobile, Power have made many changes |
and air transportation knitted ge iD the office of the Presidency. |
nation together far more closely
than it was in Washington’s day, j V
the long and unnecessary delay by the men who met in Phil. |
President adelphia in 1787 to write the Con-
early in November and his tak- stitution for the then very new |
on

But they have been only modern-
izations of the pattern laid down

United States of America.

The peaceable procedures which
the Constitution of the United
States spells out, as to how the
basic law of the nation is to be
changed when needs arise, con-
trast sharply with communistic to-
talitarian methods which Soviet
labels as the democratic
way of living... The framers of the
U.S> Constitution
dignity of man and did their best

a new American Congress takes to assure citizens of the republic
office on January 3— two months freedom of speech, thought, and

after it is elected,

Although all American citizens ences in the convictions of indi-|

religion. They recognised differ-

elect the President, they do so vidual men and clashes of person-

the
who
College.

through “electors”

choose
toral

Each state

of basic laws

has Representatives and Senators a peaceful manner.

in the U.S. Congress.

if “in such manner as the legislature tion; it is meeti 3
oe ape s a s . i seting the needs of the
President Grover Cleveland, elect- thereof. may direct.” These elec- American ‘

ed by the Democratic Party, died, tors for many years have been quately, as it di seds “ee “
Eerie Ms quately, as it did the needs of the} Last week, at the Paris talks on a European

army, the Germans demanded that their plan
should be accepted—complete,
with memories of three German invasions in
70 years, were alarmed.
Other Allied observers thought the Ger-
man generals showed an overweening mili-
‘ary ambition in people who had suffered
catastrophic defeat only six years before.
This is the master plan — still an official
secret — to which Britain has not yet agreed
and to which

48 States,

(By SAM WHITE)

agreement between Baudouin and
his Ministers his father’s ene-
mies will be inclined to exclaim.
“See, he is just like Leopold,” while
his father’s followers will echo.
“Thank heaven he is.”

Yet a great part of this small,
prosperous country” retains an
almost Victorian adulation for
the monarchy. It was this, and
not political factors, which was
largely responsible for the wide-
spread feeling against -Leopoid’s
marriage to a commoner.

Blonde Princess
Now, however, Brussels buzzes
hopefully with rumours of an

early marriage for Baudouin and
a successor te the ever-adored late
Queen Astrid,

Whom will she be?

Gossip, indefatigably denied by
palace spokesmen, has fixed on
the 17-year-old blonde Princess
Isabelle, daughter of the French
Pretender, ‘the Count of’ Paris, as

Sans ie ‘oll i The U.S.
enate was then controlled by Constitution says that the electors numerous crises in the 1
the Republican Party. The coun- of each State shall be appointed that have clapsed. aince. 4



This set of laws has survived

ts adop-
citizens of 1951

ade-

tural United States of 1787.

the menus. It is advisable in
Brussels never to eat alone, if only
because the menus need four hands
to hold them,

recognised the |



|
|
|

|



SO SECRET...

he immediate post-war years of defeat he
ecame a professor of philosophy. ,
For more than a year the two generals,
vith their chief assistants, former Colonel
| ‘ount Kielmannsegg and former Major von
len Bussche, have planned in their half-
hidden Bonn War Ministry. The Germans
describe it officially as “The Service Office of
he Federal Prime Minister.”

So secret is their work that the main door
| of the new German Foreign Office is perma-
aently barred, and visitors are admitted only
after a strict “vetting” by a Prussian N.C.O.-
type porter.

MASTER PLAN

' is which would provide for the great. | The Allied Foreign Ministers’ conference
entitled to as many electors as it est good of the greatest number in|in Brussels at the end of last year which
agreed to the formation of a German Army.
64 years|let the generals come out into the open. But
the German General Staff master plan is still

| known to only a few Allied officials.

the French are

One fashionable Brussels restau- | 9PPosed :—



rant unable to obtain
height of ostentation, explains/
apologetically in its wine list: |
“We regret to inform our clients |
that the consignment of Russian
wines from Georgia ordered some
time ago has not yet arrived.”

further

Prices Soar

Another restaurant, not content |
with ordinary cauliflower, de-|
scribes its version as “Cauliflower |
ostgntation.” 4

fter the feasting the prosperous
citizens adjourn to night-clubs,
choosing boogieswoogie haunts or
staid brilliantly lit establishments |
where © middle-aged aristocrats |
dance to 1930 tunes played by a
gipsy string quartet or retire to
one of the innumerable lace-|
curtained bars,

Meanwhile priees soar to a
at which the most obvious

1.

6.

Allied diplomats taking part in the Paris
negotiations say that the French are adamant |
point! in opposition to No, 3 and No. 4.




A Wehrmacht of 250,000 German con-
scripts, serving two years each.

Six Army Corps, each of two divisions
12,000 men strong (despite French in-
sistence that no German unit should

be more than 5,000 to 6,000).

Revival of the German General Staff.
Creation of a German War Ministry

with a civilian War Minister,

Luftwaffe of 2,000 planes all Allied
manufactured, including 600 jet fight-

ers.

Naval Sauadrons for defence in North

Sea and Baltic.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 25,

1951







CLOSED
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‘ to Leopold sealed his st-wa e st li , " ¥ k econ- | y. r Cold Storage Bacon
personnel has been employed to operate it. | ffte 9"! Er eae Se noe eee prosscly thnniaths omy Spe the visitor is te restrict | OPPORTUNITY i ENJOY Oat Flakes by the Pound
: : ™ ; , : an aims himse! g a r= | : cnh ‘ 2
The services of the new Fire Officer should ‘The bitterness of the dispute its neon-lighted, luxurious self. nee ne Tie toi The French are too late. When with Britain |: £0 va -
be utilised by the Government in connec- | ar’ people garb a 0 bas- — Everything abounds and every- any non-Belgian mortal. |and America, they agreed last December to‘: OLING ee eee re ee
tion with this matter sions which will take years to thing is considerably larger than | WORLD COPYWRIGH? RESERVED negotiati G A h h ls
s . die out. At the first sign of dis- life size—especially the steaks and hi. .8 | § tons on a Werman rmy, t ey them- | Ny FRUIT FINE LiIguors
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OUR READERS SAY | wate thal ma » JUICES Martel Brandy
se ri ae oer e io . White Wines
Leo! a MH oe ° ; : ) Now America, disappointe ss Red Wines
Russian Brutality months in “the huge vaults of the ment, and I should like to men- yrolonged starvati suffer- : : PP hy Breast endl i
i : Butyrka prison” shi or off ‘ 2 I ged: starvation “and: suffer Benelux aid for Western defence plans, has | }< orate
To the Editor, The Advocate— ee a prison” shipped her off, tion them. ings described and come through | 7 E : P ’ Golden Tree Beer
SIR,—Kindly allow me to invite ee BAY charged offence | or First, that any human beings alive. Of course many do not | started a major boost for the immediate crea- | St Tuborg Beer
attention, if necessary, to the ae trial, to salve-labour in can, on a large general scale be so survive: the toll taken by death tion of the army. > Beer in Cans
Book Section in the June issue of Oreste and nee Te in Siberia, in so brutally and callously cruel to is exceedingly heavy,.and would bois eit High ale 1% Seether ne tiaartiee a Senet
the Reader’s Digest. It offers a Oe tet with a constant stream their fellow creatures, as these be swollen by suicide if it were eters 1g Commissioner John | ¥ oe r
en ne ton “ ~ almost unbe- vy et women equally with ee meer are here said to a sore paren ‘ RE } McCloy said in Bonn recentl y that). END-OF-DA ¥
ievable story of the sufferings of Maye be, from the high official down to nd thirdly, “I am astoundec | rH , : «“ s : is
a woman in a Soviet prison afd mites, OAR AMA 41 adere, cd the rank and file m@n s#d women that any person can still believe there will have to be compromises. “Great * ee SPECIALS
mipve-Labour Camps, the latter in incredible cafe tpt Years.of — who carry out the systematic in Conmntuntam, after maging a and fundamental strategic decisions,” said| Pineapple Juice ri . .
Siberia. ; a - z mn wickedness Miss Lipper describes. story of this nature. oxisting “ Z $43 : 13s
leased, ¢ é rie ane bper aescrid ; to | Mr. { > Pin le Crushe %g *
: : ; sg mi hse Cail cages ee J living conditions in many lands | Mr: McCloy, are awaiting the solution of the | ss Pineapple ie se d Carrs Crackers
Her name is Elinor Lipper. She SRC dee pate sco ca eaee ae We know of course that there. still entail much, very much hard- |German rearmament problem.” x . . Corrs Biscuits
was a medico living in Russia Bea ate en existence, Now she oceur occasionally brute beasts. in ship and suffering, but not to be | Only Britain is sil : i} pinennare Cueaks Canadian Red Cheese
and quite inoffensively and apari es ne wae in Switzerland human form, even in centres of compared with a Soviet Slave- nly Britain is silent. No official statement | 3: Grapefruit Hearts Danish Gouda Cheese
from politics. She went there ‘in er te ee” eet ee real civilisation, but here you Labour Camp in Siberia. of policy on the German Army has been x CANADA DRY Australian Cheese in Tins
1937, under the influence of an ones : son Camps, have an organisation embracing But what kind of “bee in the issued si f l se Sparkling Drinks Dutch Head Cheese
“emotional reaction” that led he which is described as one of the hundreds of them, even-thousands, bonnet” really possesses the Com - ee ane Orme announcement six ? _
fp eqiecge mot i lathe ioges. a hives wy id ane nn ne, ahaa ee ae together. And munists in France, Italy, ete. and months ago that Britain had agreed only in| %
the Secret Police, 1e N.K.V.D. av ee OF SISO Peavey 01 presumably Stalin and the Polit- -ven in Britai nd US.A.? rinciple » : : | 4s vB y sy
conceived that she w: ; earth. buro know and approve eyenon Ss. principle ,to the formation of a German| x PHONE— —We Deliver
“counter-revolutionary” and ar- There are three points that fill Secondly, it seems incredible ee ae F.G Army. iS
rested her, and then after 14 me with the profoundest astonish- that human beings can endure the July 20, 1951 ; : L.E.S. 3
my 20,296. : AEBS. €<66565$65SSSSSS5999SO9995 9 SS SOGS SSS GOSS GIO IOO

~



WEDNESDAY, JULY 25



Govt. Seeks Control

Of Elect

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMB
reading to a Bill having as
the General Election. The s

, 1951

ion Polls

LY yesterday gave the second
its purpose the conducting of
set-up is a new one necessitated

by the introduction of Adult Suffrage.

Among the proposals in the

Bill, provision is made for the

closing of liquor shops and clubs, the prohibition of the use

The offence was commitied on them that if they believed thar}
. : May 29, 1951. .His Hohour the the accused held a gun, pointed 1 ~ ~ —
of loud speakers, banners, flags and favours, bands of music Chiet Justice “Sir Allan Chi-lat Weakes end fred it with ant —— STS
and the assembling of crowds with 100 yards of pollin more postponed: sentence. Prov-jintention to maim or do bodily | ff, ws REE PLUMES
€ J poling : hae Ml...
stations. eros was represented by Mr. J,/ harm to Weekes, then it was the: | i een Te 4
The Objects and Reasons of the up their right of going into the Ss. B. Dear while. Mr. W. W., | duty to find him guilty. ia
Bill read: Bill section by section and elim- Reece, K.C. appeared on behalf ere was no evidence that the ,

The provisions of this Bill are
intended to be supplementary to
the provisions of the Representa-
tion of the People Act, 1901, and
the Ballot Act, 1931, in respect of
the hoiding of an election of mem-
bers of the General Assembly and

: aousy Ww 3 res ot side. The first wound was above
provides the necessary a ea ag any .necessary amend- the Sopa tes ‘aamilaaa iyitar Elisia Weekes and = Darniey
tive machinery in connection ee her rmght. breast necessitatin Prove the yore no}
therewith. He expressed agreement with medieai attention, , trieadiy’ ana the We tietec oa say
As a result of the introduction the provision of making it an that Proverbs went on a high- |
of adult suffrage some 96,000 offence for anyone who made or wiinesses to prove:their: case. Tne way with children playing on in|
persons have been registered as Published a false statement in defence called on two. and fired a revolver at her while |
electors under the provisions of COMnection with the personal The first witness called for. the she was sitting in her house |
the Special Registration of Voters character ae a candidate. : prosecution was. Sgt. Nathaniel It is for them to believe if thi: |
(General Assembly) Act, 1951. Some people got up on plat-! PLEASURE YACHT “Marianne” rides at anchor alongside the motor | (Skin who told the Court that en
That Act also provides for the forms, and not only said bad

division of the Island into 213
districts in which it is intended to
establish one or more polling
stations.

It is therefore obvious that the
administrative machinery neces-
sary for the efficient conduct of
an election must be substantially
increased.

It will be necessary to appoint,
some 450 election officers that is,
returning and presiding officers,
election clerks and poll clerks in|
the case of a General Election and
the general superintendence of
such matters will be carried out

4 ; Road, St. Philip when he inter- }
‘ ; ; Tslands in the Atlantic. rane bi :
by a Supervisor of Elections. was not ‘going to vote for that. Yesterda : b> _ |viewed Weekes again along wit S k R ] Ba
Time and Place | On this he believed he was ae o ag rh on, Tiaarup, his her son Monty Weekes. -Weekes pea er utes }
Actual voting on polling day ing alone in his own party. Any The House of Assembly trup and hi nyo = J hn § Tras-| pointed out a spot on Ere teat) ;

will be conducted in the same Closing of liquor shops would met at 3 p.m. yesterday. shar an the Masten sar ee: wom whith he measured to ap? Out Ar ument

manner as on previous elections, @Mtail the closing of provision Mr. Adams laid the fol- ack cee in uo but it is considered advisable to \SOPs because it was well known lowing : Mattenn ae ea be ke ee oF ater are ee a " :
depart from past practices in the |that 90 per cent. of liquor shops Message No, 21/1951 from | Rudbe Ms “ ta e her to John oe anes om a wenle ayy OF WHEN Mr. O. T, Allder, Senior
following respects: the time ana | Were also provision shops. His Excellency the Governor | sudbac of Los Angeles, her|He open e envelope ana + |Member for St. John, gave notice

place of holding the election will
be fixed in the writ and polling day

inating anything that might not
appear to be workable or in keep-}
ing with local conditions.

He took it that in due course
they would go into Committee!
on the Bill so that they would be!
able to go carefully into it and}

things about candidates, but their
family as well. This was a de-
plorable state of affairs and should
be stopped.

These were the kind of people
who felt they could not make an
appeal to the electorate unlesa
they indulged in such practices,
He hoped the provision in the
Bill would make these people

on in such a way.

Will Not Vote
Referring to the provision for
the closing of liquor shops and
clubs, Mr. Mottley said that he

“Why should we pass a sectian

that will not be workable,” said







RIDING
4 x

ship “Sedgefield” in the Careen

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

AT ANCHOR



age.

Sailed 5,000 Miles

———

In The House

to the Honourable the House
of Assembly informing the

Here From Sweden

talk politics and cease to carry |’ ~—~——-———-——————

A Danish crew of four—one a
woman—sailed the trim little
pleasure yacht Marianne into Car-
lisle Bay yesterday after a 2,700-
mile run across the Atlantic from
Madeira, a group of Portuguese

American owner.
| ‘The Marianne is a Swedish built



AFTER deliberating f

year-old labourer Darnley
Philip, guilty of shooti
disfigure or maim or to

of the Crown. mf
ine prosecution alleged that
on May 23, 1951 at Congo Road,
St. Philip, Darnley Proverbs who
was not a friend of Elisia Weekes
snot al her while she was sitting
cn the floor at*the entrance to her

The prosecution called on six

May 29 he went to Congo Road,
St. Philip and interviewed Elisia
Weexes Who handed him a. brown
dress and white petticoat. ‘There
Was 4 small hole in the dress and
another in the petticoat with spots

of blood. Later the same night he
eaw Proverbs on Congo Read and
toid him tnat ‘he was aceused. af

shooting at
arrested him,
Police Station, Proverbs was cau-
uoned and formally charged, He
made a statement which was read
over to him and signed.

Interviewed
On May 30 he went

Elisia Weekes and

to Conge

ontained a spent bullet.

He took away the envelope

On arriving at the|

or twenty minutes an Assiz

jury at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday found 28-
Proverbs of Congo Road, St.|
at Elisia Weekes with intent to|
o her some grievous bodily harm. |

house of the accused was searche:
for a gun.
that there

were two
‘which they

could make

Dr. Hutson said the wom 1
had three wounds on her righ.

was the action of » sane man!
and if there was a doubt arising |
im their minds then it was their |
duty to bring a verdict of noi |

guilty in the case.

no alibi,
{they had to decide was whethe:
the accusead was in that road

bullet from the gun.
His Honour, then
for the Jury,

summed up



of certain questions in the Hous
yesterday, the Speaker objected t

. ac at a and the spent bullet_and handed as weak oie abien j ‘

: ees vay) Mr. Mottley. Honourable House of pro- |; yacht. She was built 16 years ago ANC me eet | the last paragraph being read b\

bg ‘ier ehen 4 ep Sher Some people thought that the penis to: set up a Body Sn rs: Sweden, by Rertil poe Rnalree i ye him pointing out that he hac
ene ee aoe ow [Only way a certain type of indi- nown as the Scotland Dis- Bothin—a famous British ship de- "eaten ,| previously informed the Hon

nomination day, This is to allow | Vigor GOUIA seciitd
sufficient time for the printing of

by offering rum to the electorate.



under the Chairmanship of

| Signer—for a Swedish Director,

no street lamps on it. When

Member that that paragraph wa

; f Ghorpjorn Holm, ve av disallowed by him on the ground
the requisite number of ballvi|«this was absolutely incorrect. the Director of Agriculture. " si en ayer eeu he} that it contained argument
papers, There were hundreds of people Message No, 22/1951 from Ghorpjorn Holm sold her over to} Said nothing but made a state-}" rhe’ Hon Member had been

Nomination must be made in the |i, this country who at any time His Excellency the Govern- John Rudbach who has hired El-| ment at the Station. A spent! minded about the fact that
form to be provided and be signed | election or otherwise, would put|} OF, on the subject of assist- mar Trastrup to sail her over to] Dullet is one that is discharged

by two electors of the constituency
and must be handed, together
with the receipt for the deposit, to

7 c e 3 . soon as time for giving notice

the Returning Officer between the |;ym on Election Day, all it would|| with proper sanitary con- writes. “I thought it a fine oppor- Ne ary aay p eke 7 ye aes came, the Hon, Member insisted

hours of 9 a.m. and noon on|mean would be that the ordinary|| Veniences. || tunity to use my pen”,. Skipper arrested and cautioned and said] 4d read the paragraph. |

nomination day. shopkeeper would be unable to! Thirteenth Annual Report || Trastrup said, “and so I unhesitat-/ jhothing, Att District “C’ Station|. In making his report. to the
Candidates are also required to | sell it but every hotel and every of the Peasants Loan Bank— | ingly accepted the offer to sail the

make a statutory declaration on

a prescribed form as their

to



their hands into their pockets
and buy a drink for themselves.
“If you prohibit the selling of]}

club would be able to do so

“Imagine placing a policeman at

ance from the Labour Wel-
fare Fund to enable labour-
ers to equip their houses

Ist June, 1949 — 81st May,
1950.

Los Angeles. Skipper Trastrup is
an author and he makes his living
by travelling to places on which he

yacht to Los Angeles.”

Captain Trastrup started off



from the cartridge.
Police Consta 92 Shepherd
of District’“C” said‘he went to

Proverbs was charged and cau-
tioned and made a statement’to

















Paragraph 2, contained argument
before the meeting was con-
vened, the Speaker said, but as

House, the Speaker said that he
considered such













' Labourer Guilty Of |
Shooting With Intent |

He submitted to then. |
inferences

Mr. W. W. Reece in addressing '
the jury said that there wag really |
He told them that what

atl
that fime and whether he was in-|

Strumental in the discharge of the}

action calculated |

PAGE FIVE

ee







FOR THE BEST IN |

MATCHES

ASh FOR

|
|
|
|


















MATCHES

ON SALE
EVERYWHERE

|

—————————— ee
— —

|
'



NT2615











; 4k . ; Set. Gaskin who read the state~|to invoke the displeasure of th:
qualifications, the Marine Hotel, the Aquatic _ Quarterly Return of Trans- from Copenhagen on May 27 for! ment to him, He signed the] Chair and to infringe on the
Provision is also made for the|Club or any such place, to seo|| actions in Rum = to 30th Helsingborg, Sweden. From Hel-| statement. 5; Speaker's privilege. He then lef\|
adjournment of the election in |that this provision is carried out?” June, 1951. a | singhborg, he called at Falmouth— Elisia Weekes wife of Hughfit for the Honourable House to!
cases of emergency. said Mr. Mottley. scheme of Government | England—before going on to Weekes and mother of nine}make a decision, |
As regards the suggestion that for the Coleridge and Parry || Madeira. He took 21 days’ sailing|children told the court that. she : |
Expenses employers should give their em- wets ee. so gutieveas from Madeira here. knew Proverbs for three years.) Mr. Adams (L) said that no}
The expenses incurred in the|ployees an hour to vote, not only ean Colonial Estim- || “Fine Sailer” Her son and Proverbs had a case a, of the House of | If You Bid. yarcastt) Iyen “awakes
election which were previously |would his party support that, but a ce ‘eo; ~6=«||~. “Marianne is a fine. sailer,”|in the Court sometime ago. could attempt to question the| oo iy iad
P Reeth ae Ae 7 I The following notices | ale aoe “Wa Speaker’s ruling and so he did} at nights; are constantly “tired” ;
borne by the various local govern- they would go on every platform were given :— }, thought the skipper’s wife. “We Felt Burnin t feel it was necessary for the|
ment bodies will be borne by the |in the island and urge people to Mr. Adams: Resolution for met extremely fine weather} 6 May 29 eieegae and 8.30 Hoy ae ble “Ho Battie ae art easily upset and too often depressed,
Central Government and the duties | ajjow their em loyees to go and : 1 * = throughout the trip,” she said,|,. 0 “ay an atthiccanis idole go : ae wees pa it is @ sure sign that your cirength is
Seik a ely saga quew Pp 5 the sum of $1,000 to supple ie : ba.’ in the afternoon she was sitting at| views, If His Honour did not enter y
of Parochial Treasurer in relation | ast their votes on Election Day ment the Estimates 1951-52, but we were always on thel| her door.and het %on—Graham| tain that portion of the question Nagging and you're suffering from over-
to such an election are transferred Mr, J. A. Haynes (E) expressed Part I, Current, lookout for a hurricane, knowing Hunte—said something to her.Jhe said, then that was the end taxed nerves. The special ingredients of
to the Supervisor of Elections. disagreement with the suggestion Dr. Cummins: Resolution that these are the months for} While talking with her son Prov-}) of jt, : fi? ,
The opportunity has also been | of Mr, Mottley as regards the sell- to sanction the Regulations hurricanes,” erbs and his girl friend walked up Mr. E. K. Walcott (E) said that BUCKFAST TONIC WINE will
taken to insert provisions intend- | jng of liquor at rum shops on Elec- of the Immigration of Pau- The Marianne relies only on|i@ front_of her house. After they/he was in agreement with every- quickly restore lost energy; fortify you
- a ele a condict tion Day. He agreed with tthe pers (Prevention) Act, 1909. |! cuit. ana ‘somnatody nee sieriiya vt pana Poverty tgturned to her thine the Hon, Senior Member fo: Kealiot \favee abil the watinaitAa al
roughou e€ elections, by the ision in the Bill and*said tha ar bebip hie The skisper's| place and she ihed : : *) St. Joseph had said on the matter s
closing of liquor shops and clubs fear cauraeking aneR was done Mr. Adams: Resolution to || be” at “her heim, ons skippers | from a revolver and she felt alia saken the Speaker not to bear long-term fatigue.
(clause 28); by prohibiting the lin other countries sanction the Scheme of Gov- || Wife had to do her bit of steer-/ burning and shouted “Lord, Look as hard on some members as he Take h
use of loudspeakers, banners, flags,) "Mr, Fred Goddard (E) said that|] ernment for the Coleridge || ing when the three men were tired | Darnley Proverbs Shoot Me.” She] @S hard on some members as hi rece ,
favours (Clause 30) and bands of } did t see the necessity for and Parry Schools, under the or otherwise engaged. With good} held up her clothes and heard Tid: deal a litte sore. eiitly @ bottle today!
music (Clause 35): the assembling | ne 3 id no’ ‘ eaery provisions of section 32 of { wind, the Marianne does as much!|something fall on the floor, Her with, Mose Wino lenber labs, “than
oe O90} eras 5\closing rum shops on that day. nat . | as 12°knots. Her formance was|husband took her to Dr. Hutson . : i ?
of crowds within 100 yards of any |7 ld have been more to the the Education Act, 1890 || as 12 knots. Her perfor va " with those who knew more. |
polling station (Clause 32); any | point if there was the old system eee eee ats , wore eae pone eee an cous was in The Speaker in reply said tha G 6
attempt on polling day at in-} avi voli fre i r. ams: Resolution to e _ Bpproximarely 5,000-mile tena, ut aaa ie reet | he appreciated the advice from th eucnrast
Auaneiixc wale Shieh to vote for [eres eed ae pee tor authorise the lease in small sailing from Copenhagen here. pane 7 ae Weskes anid So teainens who spoke but hy MADE BY ; Vay RN Y
any particular candidate (Clause | iictaree thére were 27 polling plots to agricultural labour Rigged as a staysail schooner, iene ae as arkir Went square to the| wanted to make it clear that he THE MONKS OF |
33); preventing the interruption is cathe tn GhriseOhurch How could ers a parcel of land of an Marianne carries a square jib road and Proverbs was oblique to had disallowed, over and re aaenart 4
of any public meeting called for | ?°0''s ‘did te hope to keep these area of approximately five Specially for sailing with trade}, | “Proverbs was wearing a|Peatedly, questions or paragraph» aaeY Pe ke
the purpose of promoting the |80¥ C8” sa ; ee Pp acres forming part of Dodds winds. Her displacement is 29/¢a hat but no coat, There was|cf questions which the othe: ° .
election of a candidate (Clause 34) oe ee ae in other plantation situated in the tons. She carries an overall length] 4), oi) lamp in her house and when| Honourable Members had sub- q y Y
and requiring notice to be given cthlad,” BOE drear noe iste. it parish of St. Philip. £ of 57 feet, a beam of 14 ft. 10 ins.| proverbs first passed her house| mitted, > i y / aN Kk
to the police of si#h meeting | £4 ary in this island to-day Resolution to authorise and draws 8 ft. 4 ins. of water. |she kept her eyes on him all the a es Sar is a a
(Clause 36). atin thar ana ein the election sett see saree e the 7 ane She is scantly but comfortably} time.
It is an offence to make or pub- | With the change in a ae oh, eine a tne furnished. Cooking is done by oil] When the explosion occurred she Obituary:
lish any false statement in ielation |@: ad th: soot auicovaen- ade fag 7 id. — - stoves and lighting by oil. did not see Proverbs’ face but ys ss oe a ea
to the personal character of a| A Saran opportunity to aying “SILLS Captain Trastrup intends stay-| knew it was he. et eres {OR SODS IOSD OOOO VODPOD CSOD SOSEOS SAE FODP ES
candidate (Clause 31). |i aoe the Address of the Mr. Cox: A Bill intituled ing here until the hurricane season| Dr. Hutson said on May 29 he M W It * M q | ll % %
Provision is also made whereby iF oe rable junior member for St. aay Anti to. ehRolirage theese is over. From Barbados he is sail- | examined Flista ane ig Vir. aiter arsha % $
PTE, sae, SOW employees | . ‘shifting the expenses tablishment and develop- | ing for Los Angeles via Panama. )‘urgery at Sterling, | § ds aol & x
at least one hour to vote and no| en So v stries to Government.” ment of new industries and || He and his wife spent three| There were three wounds under! The death occurred on mondey: (Ve announce with pleasure *
deduction shall be made from |{70m the Vestries to ' : init fot months here five years ago. They|the right breast; one was one and| evening at his residence “Chan- | & %
; ; Day Off to make provision for the ‘ edna three quarter inches long. Blood] dos”, Aquatic Club Gardens of Mr |@ %
/ res 2 | Gave Day : 5 ; h t back to Barbados to 1 & , Aquatic Club Gar §
wages in respect of the time taken As ‘regards the provision for granting of certain relief jee eae was seen on the inner garment.! Walter Marshall, formerly Man- | % he cal $
accordingly (Clause 29), aki loyers give their em- from package tax on customs ee bed os thes The wounds he saw could have|ager of the Barbados ‘Aquatic | & the Sterna of x
The provisions of the bil! follow |e on ene cha nt to vote duty and income tax to per- been bullet wounds, They were] Ciub. 1% %
generally similar legislation in | Ployees ac a hia thet he could sons establishing factories in “MORMACGULF”’ not incised wounds and they could} Mr, Marshall was the son oi |% ~
other West Indian Colonies. Mr, Goddard sa lavas who connection with such indus- have been self inflicted, Mr. and Mrs, John Marshall of | % ~ x
Mr. Adams (L} moved the sec-|not imagine any employer wi tries and for purposes in- BRINGS LUMBER ; Bank Hall and after many years | $ a. d Gon nlete Range %
ond reading of the Bill and re-|to-day would not encourage eh cidental to or connected with Heard Explosion as a clerk at DaCosta & Co, Ltd % I ‘ .
ferred to the Objects and Reasons|#mployee, whether he was voting any of the foregoing pur- THE Moore Mac Cormack Albin McCollin, a witness for the} he was employed by the organ: | %
which he explained in detail. on his side or on the other, to go poses. freighter Mormacgulf brought|defence said on May 29, 1951 he] \sers of the Barbados Aquatic Club x %
He said that he regretted that|and exercise the right of,the vote. Mr. E. K. Walcott tabled a 444,570 feet of lumber from New|was home about 7 to 7.30 p.m. | He was concerned in the building / x
there was not a provision made| Speaking for himself, at the last question relating to the grant Westminister for Barbados yester-| While he was home Proverbs came | of the Club and becarne Manager % fy) %
in the Bill as to the total amount|'election he had people in his of funds for the repair of day. in his place with his wife and]jin 1928. He saw the club grov % *
. of money that could be spent by | employ who were = a tenantry roads in the various a ees ‘ cee oe and continued tis pattvities unti | % ¥
a candidate. He did not think it| Andrew, and he ha actually arishes. given dinner an je ate w im Jecember 1 when he retire * /. ¢ “ 4
fair for Mr. “A” with unlimited | given them the day off so that they P Mr. O. T. Allder tabled a LABOURER INJURED While they,were eating, he heard} ming to ill health ! ig Bhisc hoth Mrclen s i are yaralions $
meney to be able to spend £8,000 might vote. He knew many mer- question relating to the low " _|an explosion like that of a revol- Ife was a popular figure and re lo ~ « * - / g
when Mr. “B” would scarcely be chants in Bridgetown who made rate of pay given to dav Felix Bayne, a labourer o/|ver which had been discharged.| garded as part and parcel of the | $ x
able to spend 10,000 cents. lit éonvéhient for their employees labourers employed by the Combermere Street, St. Michael} When the Police came Proverbs “Aquatic by those who visiter | @ y
Mr. Lewis (L) said that he had | 4 and vote for any candidate Government. i : was involved in an accident with|was at his home, he Club, With naval personnel R %
much pleasure in seconding the ie The House passed the se- the motor bus M-1216 owned by He could not say where Proverbs especially Americans, he wae $ — X
; ay rere oO or two/they liked. e eb pete Vey | the Diamond Bus Co., and driven| was before ,he came to his home.| guide and confidant always will- | # ny
Bill, but there, were ‘one or twey id that he -ond reading of a Bill intitu- r ’ ‘ili ‘ : $ x
points that he wanted to make. Mr. L. E, Smith (L) sa * 4 Ds ee ake provision by Hughbert Forde of Clapham, To Mr. Reece: McCollin said hc | ny to offer information as to the % °
Now that a person had only to be | Welcomed a Bill of that sort, and for sae tasnection abe) super St. Michael on Probyn Street) heard the explosion while he wa | Barbadian way of life. % . ’ %
21 years old to become a voter, he Jas far as the closing of rum shops ice of the election of | about 4.30 p.m. yesterday. eating his dinner. Proverbs usec He was married to Miss Iris | CK . /, : ha / S
did not see it necessary for him{was concerned, © the — provision Tenthors ta save’ tn the Bayne was taken to the Gen-]to visit his house regularly. Ghent of Trinidad whom he nov |¥ ’ lg ls a, ~
to be called upon to swear to his}shoukd have been on the Statute General. Assembly of ‘this eral Hospital and detained. Mr. J. S. B. Dear then address-| leaves as a widow ; x , &
qualifications unless it was ques-|Book long ago. , imand, the mrovedure atislich ed the Jury on the casé. He told To these and other relatives % %
tioned by another voter. st He was sure =e — — siaoticns fre eeeciaas at } deepest sympathy will be ex-|¥ >
It was unfortunate that the Bi ut a stop to a lot of the robber, ve , ; So . tended. 3 Obit OA AA sD
was to be got through by the end vated by poor rum shop keeper: such elections — ee | SL LLLLLL LLL LLL LLL A OO AA eee
of the month because the House|o, giection Day. Sea tooith = Saree ' I
might find it necessary to insert| y+ was a fact that some of the , Furth "discussion was \ Ll XOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH
SO Earners See 21 years} Voters did not get as far as the postponed until toanprraw L a “s ti s s
the vote“ and Pallow people ‘with {Polling booth on that day because} Shen the House meets at | SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH LP arryc.
,oney to come around_and cor-|°f their drunken condition an 5.30 p.m. | on hte te ,
rupt them”. he said. He knew that |Sometimes they were taken to the 1}



police station instead. GALY, OTL CANS —1, 2 & 5 Gia. Sises

Hon. members had it in their
power to safeguard the poor ‘un-



in other places outside Barbados,
candidates had to make returns
of their elections expenses,



Patient Discharged

PYREX

Mr. Lewis said that the noticed|fortunate voter from drinking toc , 3 Established r BE JT Incorporatea
there was nothing in the Bill to]/much rum on Election Day and} MAUDE MURRELL of Barbarees 1860 ° L 4 le 1926
compel the election officers to|they should use it. Hill who was injured in an

conduct the counting of the votes The honourable junior member accident on Baxters Road on Mon-

10 & 1! ROEBUCK STREET,

in a particular way.

; : for the City had raised a poin'
The election officers

should be that candidates should be allowec

told of a method by which the - Fr ted. “I have
House intend to have the votes pe Se yorral cas parishe:
counted, giving the candidates | ?® nevi’ kee the - candidate
and their canvassers the chance|the sheri ps

to see them. very far off. I think they shoulc

day night about 7.30 o'clock was
treated at the General Hospital
and discharged the same night.
Two buses and three bicycles were
involved in the accident, One was
the National bus M-1287 which
was being driven by Cecil Bishop




Seeseuoena
Ki

INSIST ON

|
|
|
|
|

WARE

means OUICh DECISIONS





be allowed to be near enough tha!
fhey can see the marks on the
ballot paper.”
The Illiterates
He thought there was a_ pro-
vision in the Bill that a blind man
would be able to take someone

Perhaps it would be a good idea
to adopt one of the methods used
at Trinidad’s elections. That was,
that the police be allowed to vote
about two days before polling
dav

Mr, E. D. Mottley (E) said that

of Bush Halli and the other was
E-62 which was being driven by
Darnley Thomas of Western, St.
James. The buses were mot
damaged.

CASSEROLES CUSTARD DISHES in Shell
BREAKFAST, DINNER & SOUP PLATES
LARGE ROASTING DISHES

Shapes



_ PURINA cHows *












THEY ARE THE BEST | now available at

he thought he was speaking for| with him who would be sworn to
every member of the Opposition | secrecy, to cast his vote for him. FELL FROM LADDER Es Sos 2h mee * CAVE SH EPH E tad) A « @.. LTD.
when he said that they were in|He had not seen any ee ae Fitz Mapp of Sunbury Tenan iy fl 2a 1s oe 1 Street

entire agreement the prin-|however. for the person who, = DE it) ~ | ; 2 13 a

iple the Bi 3ecause they |tho , i see, could not}try, St. Philip was detained at the es

a ~ ms tk ee om _— — ee os fait ohio if this General Hospital after he fell from = H. JASON JONES & co. LTD. Agents 3

principle, however, did not neces-' particular privilege was to be given] 4 ladder yesterday about 3 p.m.





sarily mean that they had to give



@ On Page 7







i an

ae _ CARL ANDERSON















T'M GOING TO Ge
BATH...

MY OWN
LITTLE

T AHOT
AND CRAWL INTO

GOOD NIGHT! RGO"
MY HOUSE FOR SIK MONTH





BOv... 1S |T EVER GOING
TO FEEL GOOD TO GET
HOME AFTER ALL THOSE
WEEKS IN HOLLYWOOD!








HARARE
TM
ead aT Na gol
Ll. BET | GET

y MORE SHAVES |
UT OF A BLADE |
THAN ANY Guy |



"BY ~ FRANK ‘STRIKER













[KEEP BATES INT Tee SADDLE UNT iL
[WE REACH THE WOODS! yr>

————S——SS—SSS

tA f
(a VA

ae massa
































foe M







An THIS MOMENT OMI COMES ABREACT OF
THE SPOT ANC... %y













T CAN DISCOURAGE HIM A
LITTLE...1-1 HOPE /



f I WON'T HEAR A WORD
AGAINST “THE GREAT YOu"
HE'S A WONDERFUL MAN!
HE'S ‘THE ONLY ONE
WHO DOESN'T TREAT

DO you KNOW WHO
“THE GREAT yOu
REALLY IS ? HiS
RECORD SHOWS




ONLY ANXIOUS ABOUT
YOUR WELFA

_BY LEE _FALK_ & RAY Oe













_ IWHATON Y YOU GAVE ME THE | DEA PERFECT WHAT A” A) an! onan?

ee yee SARTHIS (. WHEN YOU KIDDED ABOUT] |PICTURE! YOU — SEDTODOS CO k™

HERE. GO INTO THE BUSHES ANDP [fia EOR, | MOVIN NIN WITH "HONEY 3" ait NOW THR,
ee }
THIS ON, AND TAKE’ {si Ces ys > RELATIVES. THE et - ' \ je
—> | OT ‘ + . ———| FC GIRLY A | F «ES WO / ters
| a6 || ES A eg |
| $ . : |

wae

}






; }

se . we )

YES ~MAGGIB-I'M. PAINTIN ' { NOW- UENNY- DON'T LET pl Ma Ly ee ae rr la

TH’ KITCHEN: BMS we \ | My. em ee Se | IN MY ROC “ 1}

c 24, r vo | iT GETS o S ‘4

SO Weis Nex) D ASLEEP 1 | ALLERGIC TO Dewy, sien ———~ Scinsaarre ft

ON TH! LAWN - = Wich | | GRASS -YOU KNOW ] eter | \}}
FINIGH - HELL. COME HOME! |



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



LIFEGUARD “ts

THE WONDERFUL BRITISH
DISCOVERY

A Supreme Germicide and Antiseptic

uw

GRAZES

Â¥, rv
AlN GT Ak A

Was

Pra
LN SS you can use,

FOR BABY’'S

“fy LIFEGUARD |



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* FOR PERSONAL HYGIENE

* TO STERILIZE CUTS

* TO DESTROY DISEASE GERMS

* SAFETY AND RELIEF FOR BITES
AND STINGS

This wonderful new “ Lifeguard” used in tens of
thousands of homes is the most powerful protection
At the
all to handle and pleasantly fragrant and non-staining.
No home with small children dare be without it.




a” 7s

Bl al

BATH





WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 1951

Pains in Back

one ind Tours



eee) Ae

If you suffer terrible, sharp
= wearing down aches in back or
u can t ge at rid of these with

ki nN the “germs in your kidneys. Other
: mpt oms of Kidney and Bladder
D rders are Scanty, Frequent ang
Painful Passages, Getting up Nights,
Leg Pains, Lumbago, ervousness,
Headaches, Dizziness, Circles under
Byes and Rheumatism, poor Appetite
and Energy, Swollen nkies, etc.—
Cystex ends these troubles by remov-
ing the cause—and starts benefits in
24 hours and completely stops trou-
bles in elg@ht days. Get Cystex from
any Chemiet on Guarantee to put
you right or money back. Act Now!
In 24 hours you will feel better and
be completely well in one week.
The Guar-

oo Cystex 2°";
protects

ne or

“or uae Rheumatism, Bladder you,

LOOK YOUR
£2

AND



came time it is quite safe for



SICKROOM

IN THE



| VASELINE isthe registred trade mark of

Chesebrough Manufacturing Co, Cons’d xa



IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE



——
—









Usually

Tins Four Cows Con. Milk
Pkgs. Jac. Cream Crackers

Pkgs. Shredded Wheat










Every spoonful gives you



more and more

eee and





@ Every spoonful of ‘Kepler’ gives you a rich
supply of vitamins A and D.

@ These vitamins are nature’s wonder workers,
assuring health and freedom from illness.

@ Men, women, children=ali should start
taking tasty * Kepler’ to-day.

‘KEPLER.

ROS ame) a ae






4 BURROUGHS WELLCOME & Co. PRODUCT ae
4 126



Sole Agents for Bartodos : Collins’ Led., 28 Broad Street

BWIA

1. Make Business Contacts
Faster in the Caribbean,

~
seo or vir transportation.

a}
epee) 3. Take all the Excess Baggage

you Need at New Reduced
Rates — 50% Saving

BWIA

| BRITISA. WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS









32
48

41

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street















SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only

Now Usually NOW
30 Cheese — per lb 115 1.00
40 Tins Nescafe 91 8&oO
36 Pkgs. Polar Icing Sugar 37 82









NOW! Dental Siience Reveals

PROOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING
IS THE SAFE, EFFECTIVE WAY TO

HELP STOP
TOOTH DECAY

Colgate Dental Cream

















Here’s a way to relief !

Do you know that one of the common
causes of backache lies in the Icidne:
When they are he althy they filter he
impurities out of the system —their n
function. When they grow slu +g: :
impurities accumulate and the n
congestion is often the cause of b ickache,



De Witt's Pills are specially pre-
pores to help wake up sluggish
idneys. They havea cleansing and
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to their natural Rees Relief from
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De Witt's Pills
are made specially for
BACKACHE
JOINT PAINS
RHEUMATIC PAINS
LUMBAGO
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It is far better to tackle the cause of
backache than to go on sutfering in a way
which is bound to affect your work and
happiness. Fo: over haif a century De
Witt’s Pills have been bringing relief to
sufferers from backache and we have
received countless letters of gratitude. Go
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OUR GUARANTEE
De Witt's Pills are
made under strictly
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and ingredients
contorm to most
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ot purity.



wen

4
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~



WEDNESDAY, JULY 25



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508



— —- nimi

The charge for announcemerits of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow!-
edgments, and In Memoriam notices

$:.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays}
for any number of words up to 50, and/|

$ cents per word on wectk-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
additional wo-d. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 und 4 p.m. 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

IN MEMORIAM

MAYERS—In loving memory
beloved mother
Mabel Mayers who departed this life
on July 25th, 1950

Days of sadness still are o'er







ef our

us.








Secret tears we o/fen flow,
For to-day has brought before u
Memories of one year ago
Ever to be remembered by her dear
children, Elliot, Majorie, Edna; Grand-j
children Shiela, Lloyd, (3) Great
grands, (Nephew) Winston
25.7 .51—1n
WHITE—In fondest and ver fading
memory of Isaac White who passed
into the Great Beyond on July 25,
1949.
He loved and was loved to the end
A tribute from
DAISY.
25.7.51—1n

ANNOUNCEMENTS



—$<$<—< —$—$ $$ |
HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—lIsle of | invites applications from

is}

and grandmother |

1
|

FOR RENT









Winimwm charce week 72 eerte and
*@ cents Sundays 24 ~Orde ovr 2
werds 3 cents o word imeek-.4 cents a

| vere on Sundays. |

aieiai gee

HOUSES

}
| CLIFTON TERRACE Furnished |
| House Upp Eay Street. Opposite Yacht}

{ and Aq Clubs All Modern j

| conveniences. Apply on premises. To an)
approved tenant |

2 7:51—2n |
FLAT on Blue Waters Terracs, newly!
} built with spacious cupboards, Phone |

| 8280 25.7.51—t.f.n.|

—————
LAURATON; ROCKLEY TERRACE, 3|
Bedrooms with running water. Picase
Phone 8280. 21.7.51--41.f£.n, |
THE CAMP—On the Sea, St. Lawrence. |
Fully furnished Dial 8357. |
147 51.—t fn.!







- y
Minimum charge week 72 cents and)
98 cents Sundays 24 words -- over 24/
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word on Sundays. |

HELP







“Colonial Development Corporation

qualified and |

Spices. SANTA MARIA—.oveliest hotel! «> perienced electrical engineers for the |

in Caribbean.
per day.

dential district under Government House giving details

hill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day.

SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing Colonial

Beach. Rates from
day. Enquiries to D, M, Slinger, Grenada.
26.6.51—78n.

$4.00 per head per



NEW DENTAL HOSPITAL

skillfully repair your Broke.
remove Nicotine Stains, clean,
them, to look like New.



THE

We can
Dentures,
and Polish
specials can be delivered
hours; send your Broken
or call at Deal
Magazine

within three
Dental Pilates
Square Dental Lab.,
Lane "2

51—3n
Slack Pilates
with
Dentures, this 1s
“ky paste,
al thing.
Deal

can
our

and falling Dental

now be refitted permanently
new system, for slack
foolproof; no more gum or s
or powdered stuff this is the
Try it and be
Dental Lab.,





convinced, Square
Magazine Lae *'2.
24.7.81—3n



LOST &

OUND





ween Sandy









Lane and St. James’ Vicarage on Mon-
day last. Finder rewarded on returning
to A. L. Mayers, Advocate Advertising
Dept
25.7.51—I1n
Lost in Canadian Bank of Commerce
and Broad Street a small Black Note
Book with Index and a Pocket to hold
small paper or cards—Reward—Phone
8121, 25.7.51—2n



PLOTS & SALES—bearing the name o
James Benjamin Cutting, near Howell's
Cross Road. Finder will be rewarded or
returning same to the above address



. 25.7. 51—3n

WATCH — Ladies Gold Watch witr
strap; on Yonkers Bus, between Bus
Stand to Spooners Hill. Finder revarn t

T. Frankiyn, Inspector of Police. Rewarc
offered,

20th July,





On Friday evening Aquat
Club Pier or vicinity. Pair of Spectacles
heavy Biack Plastic Rims, in Fawr
eather case marked Polaroid Ro Re-



ward offered
4669,

Finder ploase Ring





LOST CERTIFICATE

THE WEST INDIA RUM REFINERY

Notice is herebyegiven that application
has been made to the Board of Directors
of the abovenamed Company for the issue
of a Duplicate Share Certificate for twen-
ty (20) shares, Nos. 7133 to 7152 inclusive,
ia the name of W. R. St. C. Redman,
the original of which has been lost or
misplaced, and Notice is hereby given
that within fourte¢n days from this date
hereof, if no claim of representation is
made in respect of such original Certifi-
cate, a new Certificate will be issued

By order of the Board of Directors,










25th July, 1951



GOVERNMENT NOTICE

NOTICE TO IMPORTERS

Notice is hereby given that
owing to the congested state of
Steamer’s Warehouses it has be-
come necessary to enforce Subsec-
tion 4 Section 48 of the Trade
Act, 1910.

2. Importers and Merchants are
requested in their own interest:
to ciear tneir goods from the
Warehouses as quickly as possible.

3. All goods not cleared anc
removed from Steamer’s Ware-
houses at the expiration of 10 days
from landing will be subject to e
penalty of 2/6 per ton weight o:
measurement for each day they
remain in Warehouse in excess Oi
the 10 days.

(Sgd.) R. W. B. BELT)
Comptroller of Customs,
21st July, 1951.

24.7.51—2n.





WE ARE BUYERS |

We buy anything connected with |

STAMPS. Sheets, Single Stamps,

Collections, Accumulations and

Covers, Good prices Paid at the

CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY
3rd Floor, Na. 10, Swan St.















SE HABLA ESPANOL

ORIENTAL

CURIOS, SOUVENIRS, AN-
TIQUES, IVORY, JEWELS,
SILKS Etc,

THANTS














EA for
wo

“Can't you see how

(. To-day's @ A. Song

happy we would be

. With GAS installed





_
POPS PEOSOE SDSS IPS POPE,
« ¥

x ¥
% NOTICE 3
g x
ss We beg to notify our customers \&
S that our Parts Department will be \

X +
X closed for stock taking from Mon- s |
\ day, 20th July, for a week. Also Ps
\ our Repair and Service Depart-
% ments will be closed from the ¢
% same date for two weeks annual @&
% holiday. There will be a skeleton
q staff om duty for emergencies, %
. ¥

‘

& COLE & CO., LTD., %
rod »

. BAY and FROBYN STREETS %
5, +
* q 7 %,

s' 22.7.5

“ ¥

oft ‘ .
LkPPSSSSOSOC OO FOS OOOODSDE



GRAND HOTEL—in best resi- | St. Vincent Hydroelectric Systems. Reply |





















| ings



PUBLIC. SALES



REAL ESTATE

AT THE GARRISON
clusive Lecation)—A 3
oo Presses and
tone Built Bungalow about 10 yes
all Modern Convenienc cawn. Shee
To Suit a Keen and Genuine Buyer.

A Large Stonewall Business &
Residence in Tudor St., Very Good Con-
dition, Modern Conveniences, about
4,000 sq. ft.. Going for Only £2'500. Al-
most New and Nearly 100% Stone Built
3 Bedroom Bungalow Type, Not Far
from the Garrison, Good Location, all
Modern Conveniences, Going for Only
£1,800 A New 2 Bedroom Concrete
Bungalow at Lower Fontabelle, Modern
Conveniences, Going for Only £1,050
A 2 Bedryom Sruperty with Shop attaes-
ed, off Country Rd, Good Condition
Going for about $1,700. A New 3 Ped-

‘Superb and Se-
Bedroom swith
Basins) 12 inch



100m Concrtte Bungalow Facing Sea
about 2 Miles from City, Going for
£2,500 Almost New Duplex 12. ineh



tone Built Bungalow

in Navy Gardens,
nd an Almost New

3 Bedroom 12 inch

Stone Built Bungalow Near Navy Gar-
eens, Going for £3,000. and £2,800
respectively. Re-Sale Values Assured



Mortgages and Ter

ms Arranged Dial 3111
D. F. de Abreu,

“Olive Bough", Hast-

25.7.51—1n
ee
“HOLLANTHIE”-—Standing on 8,000 sq
of land at Two Mile Hill. Just 1%



ft.

| miles from town, and on the 15 minutes

Bus Service. Large Drawing Room, 2 Bed
Rooms, Dining and Breakfast Rooms, W.C
end Path. Company's Water, Light and
Telephone Services installed Garage
Servants Toilet and Bath, spacious yard
with several fruit trees outside palings.
The above has been recently remodelled
and is in A-1 condition. For further
particulars apply next door or Dial 9§292
or 2021

25.7.51-—3n









One Fiat Car with
res and engine in
order, One Prefect 10









a fee-paying vacancy,

“33. Long, Colvin Cleophas









3 ,
BARBADOS ADVOCATE
{ y
- ‘a " + } He t t the I m1) witht shales oe i
EDt q A TIONAL o mH y alll ho 1. me eit tunity without unc ue re trictions,
¥ agreed that some prope’ to express their feclings
sansa ctiett —___—. | *eeulation of the conduct of the “For one to be fined’ $1,000 or
* an kiuect was absolutely necessary, to be imprisoned for one year
COMBERMERE \( HOOL but did appear to him that in merely because he might get up at
many respects the proposals in & mecung and say ‘I do not want
“ge! seliowing ts the erd’r of merit/the Bill were unsatisfactory, so and so to talk here tonight’,
list of ca ates for St. Michael's Ves- T = ; . aii s y mi abs , antas~
try “Scholarships and Open Fateanes to|,, 1° begin with, they were told is to my en fantas
Combermere School for the School Year|'"@t fourteen days_lor not more lc,” said r. Crawford.
Raeniee Tuesday, Sept. 18, 1951. Boys}than twenty-one days should Mr. Sse also objected to
marked with an asterisk ary condidates|clapse between’ Nominat Day Section 35 which reads:
for St. Michael’s Vestry Scholarshi . magpins dpe ay “ . .
Candidates for the St. Michael's. Wouter and Election Day. The only rea- 1. No person shall, for the

purpose of promoting or pro-
curing the rg: of any candi-
didate, hire any band of music.
of ballot 2. No person shall play

on given for that was to allow
sufficient time for the printing of
the requisite number

pepers.

“That is not good enough, there
is no fundamental principle
underlying the suggestion,” said
Mr. Crawford. “I personally see candidate.
no reason why twenty-one days 3. Every person who contra-
should elapse between Nomina- yenes the provisions of this sec-
tion Day and Election Day. This tion shall, on conviction by a

Scholarship who do not secure an @ward
from the Vestry are invited to take una |
provided they
netify the Headmaster in person or in
writing not later than the 3ist July of
their intention to do so

“1. Brathwaite, Harold McDonald

2. Bayley, Winstone Hudson

3. Vaughn, Louis McLeod

4. Bart, Joseph George

5. Garnes, Cuthbert Austin
: Seale, Keith Livingstone
8



Joe or in

Browne, Franklyn Orville
Walrond, Anthony Myrville



a oa Seas, ee is too long.” Court of Summary Jurisdiction
‘11. Innise, Winston ae There were a few sections, he be liable to a fine of one hun-
12. Maynard, Winstone Anthony Said, with which he found it diffi- dred dollars or to imprisonment
"1s Brome, Albert Timothy cult to agree. For instance, there for three months.”
14 Rowling Paco was section 33, the first part of Fantastic
16. Carter, Bertram Alexander Waich reads: “Duriyg the hours “The time was not stated,” said
17, Belgrave, Robert Oliver that the poll is open upon Elee- Mr, Crawford, “but if this pro-
a —— Vievor Stirling tion Day, no person shall upon posal meant that during the cam-
*20. Boyce, ‘Allan Archibald any public road or in any public paign you cannot hire any band
21. Campbell, Lionel Fudolph place within 100 yards of any of music, it is absolute nonsense.
= King, Walter Beresford building in which a polling sta- If you want to say nobody should
om sponta, Seen ‘a ticn is situate, seek to influence be allowed to have music to in-
25. Newton, Reynold DeLisle any elector to vote for any candi- terrupt a rival candidate’s meet-
"3 Bannister, Arley Melvor Harcourt, | date or to ascertain for what can- ing, I Seg none nk ue
orris, Anthon; Chesterfield didate any elector inte ; , certainly to lay 1 own at no
26. Walker, McDonald ci has ae ee Soe person should hire any band or
29. Cox, Simeon StClair ua V a. he any music even. say, six
30, Graham, Briggs Roger ‘One hundred yards are too Mave an) ot he electiot is
31. Wiltshire, Erick Adolph many,” said Mr. Crawford, “Un- Months before the election, is
32. Pollard, Eustace Trevor absolutely fantastic

less you have got a lot of money Mr. E. K. Walcott (E)

pointea



. } ea 5 1 e YY Cd yvassers * ;
Rates from $7.00 per head | post of Engineer/Manager Dominica and) LAND AT ST. LAWRENCE suitable °34, King, Geoffrey Bruce : employ c aera es you have out it might be necessary to make
for building sites. For particulars apply | “29: Waterman, Klensil Montclair got to do a lot of canvassing up M » Bill, but
of Career and stating|/to K, R, Hunte, te dohaes 8137 or recy 36. Norris, Erskine Anton to Blection Day. Some of us have some amendments to the Bill, bu
. at | «Rk r, tele e@ ohe : . ; oe Oo “ry scessary
salary required to Mr. G. Roddam, | 17.7.51—t4.n_| 2% Sandiford, Alwyn Anthony had to go near to the polling sta- it was certainly a very necessary
Development Corporation, 134) 0 538. Walrond, Allan Francis pak s ee . one and he was prepared to sup-
Hope Road, Liguanea, P O Jamaica.” | LAND—A most desirable building site] 3% Seale, Peter Laurie tion and ask a beleehadl alee: decent port it.
9.7.51 —6n_| on Rendezvous Terrace, Christ hurch, oat bg iirbee Carlisle way to vote for us. I am con- “ fr, Adams (L) agreed that there
EFFICIENT CLERK, Hardware. and| (Pee 700, feet frontage over-looking| 44° Brathwaite, Neville Clairmonte vinced that this section penalises might be the necessity to make
Lumb the St. Lawrence, Worthings, Hastings - airm the average candidate at Election.”
— er experience desirable. Apply bY| ana the Golf Course, next to “Cloud| 43. Young, John Anson ‘ € _ . ' * some amendments. He too did not
ae ee a te $0" | Walk” with a 20 ft. roadway,’ apply.| 44: Bellamy, Manesseh Mr. Crawford then referred to have any opportunity to read the
.7.51—t.£.n \f E. Clarke, 7 Swan Street, Phone 2631 2 psp eo eb ae aan, "RS section 34 which reads: Bill until about nine or ten o'clock
ee ee ae et bd . Bayley, ic) elstan Casares nye, 7 . ; ;
NURSE—Experienced Child’s Nurse to | °° 902% ANDY 40 | ae. Wark Meare, ntneny Every person who between the night before and it did appear
sleep in. Apply Herbert, Dunford, Fonta- AUCTION "48. Yarde, Keith Alfred the date of notification by the to him that it might take amend-
belle, 24.7.51—2n | Br pebeew, saan Carlisle Colonial Secretary of the issue ing here and there. The Bill was
noone | eid, ictor Cameron > Cove ni 7 ‘ rary -accary i
Applications are invited for the post A hie ’ we oil by the Governor-in-Executive a very necessary one but it could
of Head Master of the St. Andtfew's UNDER THE DiAMOND SF: SURG, PATCL FAT: 9 Committee of a writ for pur- hardly be expected that all per-
oe. ? a | 25.7.51—2n I ;
Raaiican Secondary jnohesl, Grenada | HAMMER ns poses of an election, afd the day sons could agree with every pro-
ae Oe Grkaae arty ean Soc | I have been instructed to sell by} The following are the 51 successful after polling at such election posal
eee ee eee ““ ? bie a Auction on Friday next the 27th July at} candidates in the Entrance Examination (whether in a general election {It was the first time, he said,
vi—On | 2 o'clock at the Barbados Taxi Cab] io the Preparatory Department of Com- 2 = see that he had heard the hon. senior
——_—_———-——— | Service, Bay Street, bermere School for the School Year be-| Or bye-election), incites, com- ‘at he had heard the hon. 7
new battery, good t ginning Tuesday, September 18, 1951. bines or conspires with another Member for Christ Church—possi-
FOR SALE perfect working Parents are invited to call at the Head-| to act in a disorderly manner bly for party purposes—make the
Car with engine also in good working | master’s office during the week beginning ith intent ¢ revent the mistake of thinking that the Gov-
| order, tyres good and battery compara-]| Monday, September 10th, for information with = inte o p ernment was waiting for the hon

transaction of the business of



tively new. Also One Jan Tug or Me-]| relative to Book and Stationery Lists, ‘
chanical Horse with two trailers. It is in] School Uniforms and Fees a public meeting called for the )UM0T member for St. Andrew to
AUTOMOTIVE Dertact Working Order. It is just Mer 1. owe, Timothy urpose of promoting the elec- give a lead on anything, When
: | thing for a Sewn hardware or pro- : Sodrinatan ure Leroy ro of ‘ Cen oe . Sree this hon. member had suggested
vision store ery economical to rua 3 shby, William Roderick € a ca é as i 4% 5 i
— | rerms Cash 4. Whittaker, Tony Lamara her to serve in. the General 2 the House = a Sate =
a | D'Arcy A. Scott, Auctioneer 5. Pile, Colvin DaCosta ssembly, shall b ilty é te government should under
CAR—1947 Ford Prefect, Reasonably 21.7.51—5n. | 6. Young, Elsworth Ethelbert Assembly, shall be guilty of an the expenses and not the Vestries
Bie Cen wae, an 7. Hall, George Ethelbert illegal practice and shall on he had tried to stop him and had
CAR—One Vauxhall 18 done only | UNDER THE SILVER : Smith, Arthur Winston conviction by a
10,000 miles, like new. Phone 2861, S. H.| HAMMER 10. Worrell, Keith Junior mary Jurisdiction be liable to @ already decided on that. It was
Kinch or 4569 Cyril Stoute. | On Thursday 26th by order of Mrs. | 11. Wilkinson, Samuel Algernon fine of one thousand dollars or no good however telling him sc
47-51-60 |p B. Sutherland we will sell her | i2. Grifith, Ezra Edward to imprisonment for one year. for he still kept on. to make the
prateiclaith ae | Furniture at “Sauderdale’’ Chelsea[ 13. Mapp, C, Llewellyn and be incapable during a period int acide
CAR—Austin Station Waggon hardly | 5“! ‘ ee a _ , y cS ape § 4 pi point, \ 4
used. Bargain $700.00 under current, new | Waar demir Minctene init a Coaee ia Boreioes rare Soapnny of five years from the date of | Mr. Adams finally hinted that if
list price, Telephone 91—60. i ths | Blont” Bteols, CT. Tables, Upright 16. Ishmael,’ Allan Cariton conviction of being registered might be necessary to put a few
7-51—2n.| Chairs in Mahogany; Dining and Side | 17 Drake . Desmond Anthony as an elector or voting at an more sections in the Bill.
S * | Tables, Cabinet (Glass Doors), Carpet, [18 Ider, Wavell C slection.” ‘ J < ae
sah aia een ore ig eet Sectional Bookcase; Corner Chairs; | 19. Goodridge, Trevor Lamonte a e rawf 1 aid that after The Bil was ered be i
Saloon, aa korea 10 Ee . Teleph . | Rush Rockers, Phillips Radio, Metal Elec. | 20. Outram, Clyde Celso Vernal r. Crawford sale na er ond reading and further discussion
1316 Cole & CO Lid. a a siya | Floor Lamp;' very good Norge Refrig- | 21. Pobinson, Seibert Rudolph all they were supposed to be con- wag adjourned until tomorrow,
oe | erator (7 Cubic Feet) Mahog, Mir'd Press | 22. Thompson, Paul Anderson ducting the election under demo-

——
1951 HILMAN CAR—Condition as new.

Always self-driven, Mileage 3,600. Owner

leaving island, Telephone 2459 or 2342.



























and Bureau;
| Painted Pr
stead with
Bedstead Spring

Single lron Bedsteads, Blue
. Dressing Tables and Bed-
ono Spring; Single Mahog:
and Bed; Medicine |<

















Gittens, Wesley St.Clair
Lorde, Frank Wyatt

. Norris, Robin Cranmore
6, Maynard, Frank Alvin

.

6 Hurt In Storm



cratic conditions, and as long as
one did not indulge in violence,
throw bombs, stones, use abusive







ae #8.7.81—48n | Cabinet, Canvas Cots, Iron Chave Be 27. Small, Lyall Winston language or do anything of the
“RELIANT'—Three w cup in| Glaga s , Dinner and Tea Sets; ]| ‘8. Arthur, Kervyn Allan t. there was no reason why he 2A. PERU, July 24
RELIANT'—Three wheel pick-up in| Glass and China P . ; ; sort, there was h AREQUIPA, PERU, July 24,
rde : B'dos jeg, | Larder, Kitchen Uterisils, 3 Burner] 2%. Mottley, Winston DaCosta cn & thi = . koe Nahe
Rie age ach Apply: B'dos Agencies.| Fiovence Oil Stove and Oven, Enamel] 30, Taitt, Anthony Lawrence could not say peggndee o § - a pub Winds of hurricane force whic!
a 21-7918") and Alum. Top Cupboards,’ Kitchen] 31. Hall, Clive Othniel no mpeeing Mp ae et a buffeted this mountain city for 12
“ur Tables, Dominion Washing Machine, }] 32. Gaskin, Morvan Andrew e was not suggestin na rs. left six persons injured
ne Bra aint eee mone wReaiy Scales and Weights, Good Lawn Mower, | 33. Gill, Hugh Oliver Andrew should be done in a blood-thirsty oe Pavers a ain ind enie:
Stoute's eae Store or Marshall & Garden Tools, Hose, Good Garden Bench, ] 34. Morris, Lisle Atway manner, but after all, one of the iree 0 1 7 Sly, a .
Edwarc's Gara Roebuck St t,| Books, Winter Coat and other items. | 35. Sealy, Carney Rance feat sae { lactic ~ampatgnin ed extensive property damage.
where it can be seen. Phone? 2540 of | Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms CASH. 135 Smith, Richard Eakins Be a cia ec amnnnies of cael The combination hurricane anc
‘ ‘ ae ANKEK, TROTMAN & CO. | 37. Taylor, Joseph DaCosta vas a certé a aoe raed. eee i
= een OT hvenenes mt, tr ice He, eee eee a
cahcee i. < uctioneers 39. Bradshaw, Anderson Leroy “ electing bishops, [ous § i
_VAN—A Twelve Horse Power Bedford 4 tian 140, Eepary Wetdals SGoKanels 16 You are not lecting shop: , the city and blocked many streets
Ven, in first class condition. Priced to 22 n you are electing politicians anc Cr
. ae oOo rns 41. Hutson, Hewley Lyte : : vith fall trees —U.P.
Sell. Apply: Courtesy Garage or Dial a Tae, Lashley, Karl Marx the public should have full oppor- With fallen ees. P.
bac ‘ j *
eee cube a PUBLIC NOTICE 43. Yearwood, AUP Anthony
a 44. Forde, Hayden rnott
f Sic wena Be NMENT NOTICE
ELECTRICAL Ten cents per agate line on week-days} 4°) Cioute, Winston Lero/ GOVER
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, 47. Clarke, Garnet Sylvester 5
deen | minimum charge § $1.50 on week-days 48. McCollin, Evan ‘Ainsley
i El TRIG Org ry a aR and $1.80 on Sundays. 49. Seale, Michael Tyrone — ; : caer”
c 4 HL8. oT AE. 200 Volts © 50. Harrison, Carol Rudolph ications are invited for the Post of Stenographer-Typist in
Cycles, 3 Phase, Dial 3878, DaCosta & NOTICE 51. Lynton, James William Applicat sev bande ° eae grap E
Co,, Ltd, Electrical Dept, 24.7.51—4n PARISH OF SAINT THOMAS a 25.7.51—2n, | the Administration ae Po ea - ar anes
aLE mtn ——~| SEALED TENDERS will be receive The post is pensionable and carries a salary o plus @
ELECTRIC FITTINGS.—A nice assort-|}y the undersigned up to the 4th of ———_- - -- } PEAmeos . Fae ee ce aeg Th int
ment including 2 & 3 light Chromium | August 1951, for the removal of the temporary cost of living bonus at the approved rate. e appoin
Fiectroliers, Semi-Indirect Bowls, 1 & 2| (iq and tha etection af & new one h So 1 , egulations and local Orders in force
Light Brackets, Table Lamps in Chrom- | ¢y ‘Baca Se ‘Thomas. fenders thust { ;overnment ment is subject to Colonial Regul: S é é
jum & Mahogany, Saving Mirrors wit)| haye marked on envelope “Tenders for | from time to time
Rina iy Tae: sie tnaaaans Roof at Glendale.” : The candidate selected will be appointed on a probationary
a osta o., a c i? j ‘
aeons MISA lao Caer ee Seek Control period of one year in the first instance and will be’ required to take
i W. F. GOODING. z verbatim reports of meetings of the Legislative Council and perform
PHILCO REFRIGERATOR: 9% cubic Strong Hope Plantation, 4 ; F s a ae
ft. Full width freezing chamber. Brand . Chureh Warden, from page 5 such other reportorial or clerical duties as may be assigned to him
new unit, Reconditioned throughout, 15.7.51—4n. a) = it should | from time to time
may be inspected at Leo Yard, Cheap- ute ae to a blind man to vote, it shoul« e i

H. L. Smith, Sandford,
7.7, 51—t.f.n,

side. Apply
. Philip.
MULLARD BULBS-—40 Watts Bayonet
24c., Lashleys Limited, Pr, Wm. Hy. St
24.7.51,—2n.







“Tender for the Erection
at Bathsheba,"
at the Parochial Treasurer's Office up to





NOTICE
PARISH OF SALNT JOSEPH
Sealed tenders, marked on the envelope,
of a Pavilion
will be received by me

MOTOR_ STARTERS. Diréct-on-line | Saturday 11th August, 1951 for the erec-
and Star-Deita with Single Phasing Pre- | tion of # “avilion at the Bathiheba Flay-
ventor. Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co,. Lid. | ing Field
Electrical Dept 2A.7.51—6n Copies of the plan and specifications by



1 MULLARD BATTERY RADzO 1951
Model. Lashiey’s Limited, Swan Street.
23.7.51—2n.



LIVESTOCK

|





HORSE—One half-bred chestnut geld-
ing by Bandit, rising seven years, fifteen
hands. Played one season's polo; good
ride for anyone. Apply: Major Skewes-
Cox. Phone 4095,

22.7.51—2n |





FURNITURE



OFFICE CHAIRS—Just received a|
shipment of Office Posture Chairs with |
three point adjustment. See them to-day
at T. Geddes Grant Ltd., or Dial 4442.

20.7.51—6n.



Ralph Beard invites you to inspect his
Stock of Furniture in his New Show
Rooms, Lower Bay Street. The follow-
ing Bargains are offered to you: Mag
Dining Chairs $22.00 a pr.; Birch Dinina
Chrirs $18.00 a pr.; Rush Upright $8.00
a pr.; Rush Arm Chairs $10.00 a pr. Rush
Rockers $11.00 a pr.. Steel Arm Chairs
#12.00 each; Rush Morris Chairs $30,00
each; Caned Morris Chairs $36.00 Cech
Not forgetting a large variety of New
and Second Hand Furniture. Phone 4683
or 5010



* 24.7.51—5n



MISCELLANEOUS





ANTIQUES — Of every description |
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver |
Water-colours, Early books, Maps, |
Autographs etc., at Gorringes Antique |
Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht Club.
3.9,50—t.f.n. |





AMM-I-DENT TOOTHPASTE |

Start saving your Amm-i-dent Tooth
peste Boxes, Within a short while you
may be the winner of one of the follow- |
ing:— Ist Prize $50.00, 2nd Prize $15, 00,
31d Prize $5.00, 1.7.51—26n

FLOWERED OIL SKIN—fn Beautiful |
Flower and Check Designs 45 ins wide |
$1.24 yard. Remember New price will be |
20% high. Kirpalani, 52 Swan Street. |

23.7 .51—1n







+. teemmtctininastqnasitadinhatuaiatiedian

FLOOR POLISHERS — Keep your
Floors in good condition with Johnson's
Wax Polishers, Dial 3678. Da Costa & Co., |
{ Ltd., Elec. Dept. 24.7.51—6n. |
een

PIANO—Lipp; Apply to Mrs. Hutson |
Inniss, Acrshford, St. Thomas. |
24.7.51—Bn. |





; RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing}
and we will order for you if we!

haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,

6.7.41--t.f.n

"UUM CLEANERS, Hand and Flec-
operated. Takes the drudge out
gery. Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co.,
Electrical Dept 24.7.51—6n







*htd.,

Mr. R, B. Moulder can be seen at Messrs
A. Barnes & Co, Ltd. or at the Parochial
Treasurer's Office, Bathsheba.

Each tendtr must submit two sureties
in the sum of £450 each for the due
performance of the contract.

The Social Committee does not bind
itself to accept the lowest or any tender.

J, MERTON McCARTY,
Secretary, Social Committee,
St. Joseph.







PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE

(The Provost Marshal's Act, 1904
(1904-6) § 30
On Friday the 10th day of August, 1951
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon

will be sold at my office to the high =|



bidder for any sum not under the apprais-
ed value All that certain piece of Land
centaining about 2,640 sq. ft. situate ir
Parish of St. Michael butting and bound-
ing on lands of Susan Yearwood, a private
road, on lands of one E. Holmes and on a
Koad of Sufferance, at Goodland together
with the Chattel-Dwelling House, Build-
ings, &e., appraised as follows:—

‘The whole property, chattel house ane
land, appraised to one thousand two hun-
dred and ninety dollars and seventy-six
cents ($1,299.76; attached from Martin
Beresford Stewart for and towards satis-
faction, &¢

N.B.—25%
purchase.

Deposit to be paid on day of

T. T. HEADLEY,
Provost Marshall
Provost Marshal's Office,
24th day of July, 1951.
25.7,51—3n



| 70 Parts Rain

In St. John

The heaviest rainfall for yester-
day was recorded in the parish of
St. John where 70 parts of rain
fell. The Sub-Station at Four
Roads reported that much of the
work was held up in the fields by
the intermittent showers.

Reports from other districts
were District “A” 30 parts, Dis-
trict “C’’ 41 parts, District “B” 22)
parts, District “D” 14 parts, and
District “E” 10 parts.

» Contact with the Sub-Station in
St. George was poor and in some
cases it was difficult for the opera-
tor of the switchboard at Central |
Station to hear from this branch
audibly.

All stations reported Jate last |

1
|



night that there were still heavy
falls of rain but no damages were
teported. Only one traffic acci-
dent occurred in District “B” when |
a motor car ran into the rear/
of a moving truck due to a wet!
road.

also be given to
could not read or write.

it appeared there would be some
discrimination as
closing of clubs
He felt that if small traders were} medical fitness, which should reach the Administrator, St. Lucia, not
to refrain from doing business in
liquor on Election Day, it should
be done in su@h a way that no one|)=
could say, “You have forced the {
small trader to close his business
but yOu have said or done nothing
as regards the big hotels.

tioned and liquor businesses are
also mentioned, but we all know
that hotels
different from rum shops or the

is sold.”

of allowing
illiterates to the booths to
their votes for them, “I was hop-
ing to see provision for the use of

and Trinida@
go a far way to assist those who

the candidates.

an amendment will be accepted to|
include the use of symbols.”

was not decided as to whether or
not there should
tion of
Election Day.

ment would find it necessary to
be happy to have reached a stage

on any country





Cost of passages,of appointee and family (up to a maximum of
5) will be paid in the first instance and is refundable if the appointee
resigns his appointment within one year.

Applicants should furnish full details of qualifications and expe-
rience accompanied by at least two testimonials and a certificate of

the man wo

Mr. O. T. Allder: (L) said that

regards the
and rum shops

later than 31st July, 1951. 21.7.51—3r







ITEMS TO CHOOSE FROM.

Peanut Spread; Cheese per Ib.; Peaches; Fruit Salad: Tins
Whole Tomatoes; Jelly Crystals; Breakfast Rolls; Salad Cream;
Olive Oil in tins; Horlicks Malted Milk; Hams in tins; Klim
5-lb, tins: Gouda Cheese 4} Ib. blocks; Nescafe Cocktail Onions;
Olives, Stuffed & Plain Tins Toffee and Peppermints.

TAYLOR'S, FAMOUS FALERNUM LIQUEUR.
JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

“IT notice that clubs are men-

consider themselves

iverage social club where liquor
Another point was the question
people to go with
cast

symbols as was done in Jamaica
I think that would



ould not distinguish the names of





“I hope that at the proper time



REAL ESTATE

Mr. F. Miller (L) said that he

be the prohibi-
the selling of rum on

He did not think the Govern-

use symbols at the election. |
He thought Barbados ought to|

where this
sary.

fas not really neces-|
It was not a good reflection |
Which had to do}
this. |

He considered that some minor |
amendments to the Bill were nec- |
essary and he hoped he would be
given an opportunity to make the
necessary suj@¢gestions,



Mr. W. A. Crawford (C) said)
that he would have liked a little |
{more time to read the Bill fully |
and compare it with similar Bri-|
tish and Colonial legislation.





|
NOTICE |

Dr. Prescod B. O'Neale

begs to inform his Clients
that his Office will be closed







“This one in John M, Bladon’s listing looks as though it might
Suit us. We had better call and have a chat with him as I know
from his reputation he will give us all the help he can and in any
case he usually has for sale everything worth having.”

JOUN M. BLADON A co.

AF.S., F.V.A.
Phone 4640 Plantations Building
ba ahs

from Saturday 28th July,
and will be re-opened
Monday 20th August.

on











in
any band of inusic at any meet-
any procession held
tor the purpose of promoting or
procuring the election of any



















PAGE SEVEN

. Ft

‘SHIPPING NOTICES .
HARRISON LINE |

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM =

































Vessel From Leaves Due

- i Barbados
Ss. aeepee i .. Liverpool 7th July 22nd July
os PLORER ae .. London 7th July 23rd July -
cs “STUDENT” af -. London llth July 26th July
cs “ADVISER eae .. Glasgow 12th July 25th July
Ss “NOVELIST wt .. Lendon 23rd July 6th Aug.
5S. . “HERDSMAN .. Liverpool 26th July 7th Aug.





HOMEWARD FOE TAs“ UNITED KINGDOM ~—-





Vessel Fi Rorbedse
or is
S.S. “SCULPTOR” . . . Liverpool 18th July
S.S. “TRIBESMAN” ‘London 19th July
S.S. “STRATEGIST” . Greenock 21st July x
For further information apply te - - - SAF

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents oe

Canadian National Steamships

















SOUTHBOUND . :
Sails Sal Sails Arrives LA
Name of Ship Montreal. Halifax Boston Barbados. “4
et
LADY NELSON is MJune 3 July SJuly 14 July CAN. CRUISER es 10 July 13 July — 22 July
CAN. CHALLENGER 20 July = -23 July ot 1 Aug.
LADY RODNEY . = July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. y x
. CONSTRUCTO! ug. 12 Aug. - 21 Aug. Aug. >
LADY NELSON -» 0 Aug: 23 Aug. 25 Aug. 3Sept. 4 Sept, "
cent Mien ada
NORTHBOUND
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives pose
Name of Ship Barbados Barbados. Boston Halifax Montreal,
LADY NELSON 27 July 29 July 7 Aug, 9 Aug. 12 Aug.” 19
LADY RODNEY 25 Aug. 28 Aug. 6 a: 8 Sept. 11 Sept. %
LADY NELSON 16 Sept. 18 Sept. 27 Sept: 28 Sept. 2 Oct.
LADY RODNEY 18 Oct. 18 Oct, 27 Oct, 28 Oct, 1 Novr.
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents. MT
.



x = . + a

FRENCH LINE

Cie Gle Transatluntique
SAILING TO
ENGLAND & FRANCE

S.S. “Colombie” 22nd. July
1951, via Martinique and
Guadeloupe,



STEAMSHIP CO.




SAILINGS FROM AMSTERDAM
M.S. HERA—3ist July 1951.
M.S AGAMEMNON- 2nd August 1951.

5.8. COTDICA—10th August 1951.
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND






















AMSTERDAM
M.S. ORANJESTAD— 8th August 1951.
SMILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBYU
AND GEORGETOWN
eo BONAIRE.3ist July 1961,
8.8


















AGAMEMNON- 16th August 1951.
COTTICA—27th August 1951
SAILANG TO TRINIDAD AND

CURACAO
HERA—16th August 1951

MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.,

4 Agents.






us
8. P















































33 :
= é +
SOUTH BOUND. '
The M/V “CARIBBEE" will : ;
saneht Cargo and Passengers for a8 24
minica, Antigua, Montserrat, x
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Accepting Passengers, â„¢
Priaay 27th inst. Cargo and Mail an
=










The M/V_ “Daerwooa" will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba,
Passengers only for St. Vincent,
Date of Salling to be notified.













BiH

R. M. JONES & Co., Ltd.




BW. SCHOONDPR

ASSOCIATION

OWNERS'
(Ine.














Consignee. Tele, 4047












SEA VIEW GUEST
HOUSE

HASTINGS BARBADOS

Under new management.

Daily and longterm rates
quoted on request

PAE. Labi biccicsl

i TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

" TS

.S



LIQUID GUMARABIC bottles
with Rubber Spreaders 1/- per
bottle, POCKET CHESS SETS $5.50
POKER DICE, POKER CHIPS
SPOT DICE, PLASTIC SHEETING

in




























Brown, White and Clear, UN Permanent guests
BREAKABLE SHEET GLASS f
Windows. = welcome.

Dinner and Cocktail
parties arranged,
J, H, BUCKLAND,
Proprietor,

JOHNSON'S STATIONERY

and —

JOHNSON’S HARDWARE







Have you a noisy Gear Box or Differential ?

We recommend GERMTRAC

Product of Germ Lubricants Ltd.

CENTRAL ren DRY LTD.




Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets





* + eg

Wm. FOGARTY LID.
NOTICE

We beg to notify our Customers







and the general public that we
will be closed to business from
Thursday 26th to Saturday 28th
July, for the purpose of....

STOCK-TAKING.

Our Office will be opened however,
for payment of accounts.






' NEW ARRIVALS
STYLE PATTERNS




-BRODERIE ANGLAISE, :
ORGANDIE ANGLAISE.







5 “WEDNESDAY,

JULY 325,

EIGHT 1951

36 Asked To Trials
For Trinidad ‘Tour
NO PLAY YESTERDAY

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Denis Compton Hits
His 97th Hundred

Marlar Makes Fine Start

By FRANK ROSTRON

rs

So Fred Gets
514 Not Out —

July
FREDDIE JAKEMAN
Taants

















UNFIT

See our fine line of



THIRTY-SIX players have been invited to practise for
the forthcoming water polo tour to Trinidad which is to take
place either in September or October
be announced at the end of this nionth.

The following players have been invited:—

M.C.C, Team

Paul Foster, Albert Weatherhead, peramental knee permitting, RAI
Maurice Foster, Charles Evelyn, should be ngf more than two or yi eg 1, 18-year-old
i our « nada Harold Weatherhead, Kenneth three weeks behind his old rival oP SES aaeae ie Cc ~
. Ca « c Delbert Banniste Billy ; . ; . Colin Smith, of Lancashire. Colin
Ince, ber et r, Len Hutton in becoming the four- left his Stockport school just a

; F Manning, Nesta ortillo, Owen teenth player to achieve the “triple eek z a) $

LONDON July 24 Johnson, Michae, ‘Mortimer’ triple” et teadtianh. . wi ited ee ey Seiiaeee — ea.

A team of First Class amateur Weatherhead, Frank Manning and So well was Compton's timing mvs o try out his fast medium





cricketers captained by L. W. V. Basil Brooks, ad ee E r
Robins, former Middlesex and Sasiehs Ann Eckstein, Barbara JACK IKIN ee i have I seen Colin took one for 32, Not
England skipper left London to- Hunte, Frieda Carmichael, Doro- Such mort now end ppanien © pve gaa telly tha a use:
day for the first Marylebone thy Warre as Wevitaat a r ny po ° won't tell you that repeated- PLANT
Cricket Club tour of Canada since Oy ee ae ee eee JACK IKIN UNFIT seemed a cameo of his golden ly he beat the bat.
1937. - dap : i 7 On: mae is rae Y IN TEST season of 1947. * * *
penn eee Chaat eats TO PLA Then in his record season's ag- Now No. 2, another Lancastrian,
Alastair McCorquodale Olympic “innon, Ehy is © anor, vance gregate of 3,816 he scored 18 20-year-old Tom Greenhough, and,
sprinter who gave up athletics for Chandler, Gill Gale, Ann Suther- (From Our Own Correspondent fant vies like Smith akin. tai dapat
sricket, is travelling separately by land, Phyllis Fitzpatrick, Toni LONDON, July 24, Centuries. er) mm tere e mae Kin ins
air. He is one of two players Browne, June Hill (St. Winifred’s) It was announced to-day that Len demoted shi for 45 in 4 overs—and he calmly $10. Al
without a University Blue in the and Diana Johnson. Jack Ikin, the Lancashire opening It was all the sunshine of 0 7 E : ea.
: t bowled experienced Neville Rogers
party of 14, The first of a series of practice bat will be unfit to play in the 1947 yesterday and aunt of the tS -
The tour will continue two matches begins on Sunday July fourth Test, beginning at Leeds on sorrow as unsuccessful vice~ oogly. Brain 0-
months. About 30 matches have 29th. Thursda His place is to be captain last winter in Austra- DENIS COMPTON oan pa Ii an sg no] eee

been lined up.









The exact date will

Men: George McLean, Geoffrey ; “ rod %
Foster, Gerard Jordan, _ ge class century of his career, pom A vehate” ot caicat
Boo’ Patterson, Tim Yearwood, On this form Compton, tem- prop’

No water polo was played at











taken by F. Lowson of Yorkshire.







July 19,

HARD on the trail of his hundredth hundred is Denis

Compton.

Scoring a characteristically gay 150 in three and

a half hours for Players against some ‘Gentlemanly bowling
yesterday in his favourite setting, Lord’s, he made his
eighth three-figure score of the season and the 97th first-

lia. Instead, it was Hutton, Star





Surrey at the Oval

1% |

. of Nor-|

Th s, who hit the season’s top |
individual score — 258 not out)
against Essex on Monday, ham-
mered another 176 not out against
That little collection, plus the}
eestershire bowling last Friday,
gives him 514 runs in three
Stop that head-shaking, you

80 not out he took off the Glou-
innings—and not once was he out,

gloom. Hail, this

bowling on Hampshire.

_———————— making only his second appear-

LADIES’
PLASTIC

morning, the







CAVE SHEPHERD







the Aquatic Clut sterday after- f that tour, who played an 2x

The team R, W. V Robin oa n ies F the deith oa Mi Wal- " leunealanain baneltina vie. ping by Robin Marlar, Cambridge caer etd Vee tt a
(Middlesex) J. J Wart (C l= ter Marshall, former Manager of y orkshire (30 for 6) Suffering from a bruised back— U iiversity’s slow bowler, who on 47. , & (0 LD.
bridge University and re S€X), the Barbados Aquatic Club, Yes- injured the day before in a suicide flighted the ball well in his. first He was at it again yesterday 9
aa Keighley (Oxford “niver- torday’s games were postponed U . Vill re fielding position at The Oval— big representative game. nie of bowriit. he
fett (su —. W a : ee | This afternoon’s match is Mer- Be Mage skipper Len demoted himself to Experience war tie ‘ar ae, “tie. down 10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET

; Susse> McCorquodale sae, f ;

(Middiesex), Dr. E. K. Seott T@ids vs, Starfish. Referee Gree ‘Tactics number five in the batting order. Nigel Howard took over the wowcestershire. His figures; \
Cetucestes), A. H. Broadhurst Atchie Clarke reett actuics Stiff and subdued, Hutton fer captaincy of the Gentlemen from 4913-794,

Sarriakt maa we “ nce ced av Old Master. H re —
Uaiversitg and Somerset). MM, ay July 18. fad a brief innings of 1% which wish, to give him experience be- CLUB PREMIERE i
Walford (Oxtord “Daicaneta “and Grenada Girls The giant squeof ae ended when Divecha bowled him fore his forthcoming leadership of ¢
§ merset), J — aiken ee rs oot ae Ewes ae “Anal Pete oh 7 = ordinary ae teens ‘. the M.C.C. on “9 = Se TENNIS LOURNAMEMT
wicksnhire). A. ‘ ale xe * ; " - WT tte Z : r nother, once again to sulifer by He handled the limite ow ling no pla)

: z A y 4 e +t at the Oval ,
3 rd Co: an a. My Arrive Today at i 7 igilahate rhireatheistiate comparison with the sparkle of the gj his disposal well, except for afternoon. =
2owell (Cambridge University and 4 — Glamour Boy, was Jack Robertson, cat t tting Marlar on at
Pol ic) amivel efor _ biden St i : in It was largely because of a stub amour 3 . starting by putting rlar on
ee. t Petre A ee The Revers Netbali Stub priv es 7 a vot in 88 minutes by the season's heaviest scorer, who the wrong end follows:—
coien canteen’ ticateie “kad oon, Pan See to play @ Secdser that Yorkshire were set to made a most impressive 80 before
Weptsstorshire) CP). Pen rae of, Netball ee mes aga) . get 43 in 20 minutes. being out l.b.w. to Yardley. Players’ closing total of 343 for !
orces 1 ° Island Teams chosen from the But then Robertson, by long eight—modest considéring that Grimes = wo ten coe ot te eee bs es a2
Barbados Netball League. And it was Bedser who caused | 446 is accustomed to being a Compton and Robertson scored 230 an oo
There” will also be matches such a panic that Yorkshire lost martyr to his Middlesex team- between them—was a reward for
7 . against Olympia Club and Queen’s six men in scoring 30 and had to
ans Barrac Gallege. be content with first innings matey gy ics the
The fixtures are as follows: oints. eons VEE tt gs aa | OAS | ERS 15
Gibb *s I38 Saturday, 28th July—Rovers Club vs P That 43 was exactly the number Graveney with a stylish innings —— ee eee ye
Island at Gueen's College at $00.» ™. o¢ runs added for the ninth wicket of 37. z
July 18. Olympia ‘Club at Olympia’s ground by Bedser and Lock (23) in a Eventually he was caught hop-

Paul Gibb bespectacled, 38- (Highness penn as 5.00 P m ie valuable stand that expeperated
Keeper, hit 188—his highest score “%nisuay'’ gua""Aununt Ravers” Club Slogger Hutton SHERMAN’S BODY TAKEN TO USA .-. 912.5

, p y - ven's College ueen’s College . zge )
ae are eh Nostham gion eo ae M 5 as tn Pe cee ogeer NAPLES, July 24. without fanfare to a waiting plane
— +h - eeeed ey eee Saturday, 4th August—Rovers Club v Two runs a minute seemed far A spevial plane left for Wash- at the nearby airport. An honour Cause m led in 3 Days
“<3, sap male aaa iene Musee Sree Sacer from impossible for any side with ington with the body of Admiral guard of U.S. seamen, and Italian np 6 *9

Unbeaten Essex wiped off their Lady Savage has kindly con- jrutton in it. But maestro Hutton Forrest R. Sherman, the late U.S. vice, Sherman's coffin was remeved | germ be aso © Paar away “pl Pains R EI JKC | RIC t
149 arrears befor lunch...and Sented to make the first pass. tried to become slogger Hutton— Chief of Naval Operations. Earlier, soldiers, sailors, and airmen stoo: magic. Use Nixederm ta ht
stolidly went on batting They ind found big hitting was imposs- Sherman was honoured in a at attention while the body was ae you will soon see your skin
t 1 . af " ii s tcehin 2 placed aboard, The flight to} coming soft, smooth and clear, Nixo-
made the game safe and still C * k R l ible against the short- pitching, simple ceremony. _ Places ted to take | derm aw @incov that kills
went on batting. ricket esults high-rearing deliveries of Bedser. Sherman's flag-draped coffin Washington is expected to ta ps Fy RR py A

They batted all day, Result:
357 for seven and a tame draw.

LONDON, July 23.

Bowling just short of a length,
with a spread-eagled field and no-

was loaded aboard a four-engined
navy aircraft at Naples. The plane

about 29 hours.
———

coe Pimples, Bolls, Red Blotches,
zema, Ringworm, and Hruptions.
You can't get rid of your skin troubles

COOKER ... with oven—

Yes, Essex kept their unbeaten English first class cricket results behind-the- yiekes Reldemery Alse, is emer’ to arrive in Wash- path ¥ou Famove the ee that mice
record but they lost a lot of Of games played Monday: invited the Yorkshire men to com- ington tomorrow. ’ n the tiny pores of your skin. So
admirers. a, roa Leicestershire 267, South Afri- mit suicide. Led by Hutton'’s ex- The final plans of Sherman’s WHAT’S ON TO-DAY fay under te From yore Shemist to:
cans 227 for eight. ample, they did. burial in the Arlington National Court of Grand Sessions Nixederm will banish pimples and GRILL d HOTPLA
Hampshire beat the clock by Middlesex 271, Surrey 284 for Ni fr the first over; four Cemetery await the wishes os his —10.00 a.m clear ar skin soft and smooth or an PE a *
nine minutes and Worcestershire three, ine came 0 e first over; wife, in whose arms he died on Court of Original Jurisdic- Seat on
by five wickets at Southampton. Sussex 294 and 32 for one, Kent of the second. Then, with the Sunday from heart attack. A 12- tion—10,00 pany Nixoderm © return of

It looked oh, so easy at lunch,
when Worcester were only one
run on and had lost eight wickets.



169

Warwickshire 184, and 25 for

two, Lancashire 333 for nine de-



total 19, Hutton tried a huge drive
off one of those tantalisingly short
pitched balls and miscued for

minute religious service was held
aboard the U.S.S. Mount Olympus,
the flagship of Admiral Robert

Police Courts—10.00 a.m,
Police Band gives a concert

this
i i Thursday’s matches will be as
‘ Ladies Singles
Miss A. Griffith vs Miss G.
P Men’s Doubles
C, B. Forde and W. De C, Forde
Gentlemen’s sustained Feen- vs. J. E. Haynes and Le R, Black-
ness and a tendency to light- ot,
heartedness by the later batsmen. Men's Singles
Compton, it seemed, went tO VP, E, Edwards vs. J. Robinson.
their heads. Pim

empty

For Skin Troubles package. e



















, ag a

But bowlers Reg Perks and Dick clared. Constable to take a simple catch in Gayney, the Commander-in-Chiet ay wom Pasture at "\ GEARS )

i - Glamorgan 437 for seve . the covers. of the Mediterranean fleet. : . i i ‘ Q
Howorth blossomed, aut BS ninth fate a on or seven de- Lowson unsuccessfully tried to P . 7 Mobile Cinema gives concert Lucky Lindberg 4s on the air
wicket batsmen with a partnershiy lared, erbyshit 251 and 92 Il the next ball and a catch was The longest prayer, by the t M i's P St. once more
of 77. om, Glamorgan. won by innings and Po tably taken by Lock at long Ships chaplain, Et, Commander Philp ese. A GRAND DANCE ADING Co., Ltd.
94 runs. , = 7 G, R. Eckard, reminde 1at Sher- , =o *
So in Hampshire went again, Somerset 260, Hampshire 392 ©, 19 for 2 man’s fact nission—the integra- Globe, “Cai SE 6.00 p.m. | .
needing 80 in 48 minutes, They for nine. Two balls later skipper Norman tic) or Western Europe defences— Plaza (Bridgetown) “Payment On Will be given by
did it in 39 minutes. ; Gloucestershire 299, and 66 for Yardley (partly responsible for his aimed at peace through strength Demand"—4.45 p.m. and 8.30 pe ee Sone RIA STREET—DIAL 4671
f two; Northamptonshire 300 side's plight through dropping "The ar of the US Mediter- san. At ST. CATHERINE 'S SOCIAL

Tom Goddard, Gloucestershire’s Nottinghamshire 122 and 190 for Fishlock at a critical juncture in .anean fleet, who were command- Olympic, “Babes on Broadway" & |) Wiltshires, St. Philip
50-year-old 6ff-spin bowler, has b Sinnleala fee is, Pink «els Surrey’s innings), lofted a drive off “"""\* ’ ; “Dark Corner’—4.30 p.m, and i
50-year-old Off-spin bowler, has four, Yorkshire 377 for five de- Surrey’s Innings), ‘ ed by Sherman before becoming 8.15 p.m. ie \(Mindly lent by the Measesment)
retired from first-class cricket. He clared Wait to be taken—of all flelders— jy, \veeaemme Ge nave amen Royal, “Neptune’s Daughter” and | {{\} 2 FRIDAY NIGHT, 27th July, 1951 sperceneoneoncsreneneconeessuesennssneneccecnesaensasnensnoscenednecet
+o a , 4 99 : : “ : + Wichlock. 20 for 3 Mae mye oth, a : 2s
jot aan poe 4e sue and ha Worcestershire 248 for six de- by Fishlock. 20 for 3 stood silently through the service ala ‘4.30 p.m. i ADMISSION :0: 2/- FOREIGNER ONIN ONO F
taken 2, wickets for an aver- clared, Devon 162 for eight rn ' on the ship's deck. R mandie Forest” Mr. Perey Green's Orchestra in
age a ‘ 9 I voy od Out 4 oxy “Bandit of Sherwood Fores a
age of less than 20. Match drawn,—CP). Two Run Four U.S. destroyers, recently —4.15 p.m, and 8.30 p.m, cenene ee o

Newcomer Willie Watson scored returned from the Korean war Savoie, ree Bet Dragon” --5.90 in regen one itnds
only a single before being run out hovered in the background. oars vm :
in attempting a risky short one. Upon the completion of the ser- rrr | SCS OSS SPS OVO SODOOOS,

































Four wickets in seven balls. 22 % (
for 4
‘ ? "Similarly, Keighley got a singze RECITAL OF MUSIC &
Similarly, ghley got a singie e % :
Thi ts ‘foolproof weapon ‘and was run out (by Bedser R in aid of the y PROVIDE RELIABLE PROTECTION FOR
when Wilson did not back up. 27 wi : NEW HAVEN DAY NURSERY % EXTERIORS
for 6 by x AND HIGH-CLASS DECORATION FOR |
can be dangerous Sixteen still needed, with only ff MALT VINEGAR . Mrs. CO. Eee x INTERIORS oO )
five minutes left. ‘* at the Organ ¥
rywo important slogans tor First and foremosp, Is there any Big -hitter Johnny Wardle, York- fi Its P ure — g ; Assisted by % RED HAND HARD GLOSS
the sensible Bridge player canes a DOE ee — ot shire’s last hope, snatched a ae ‘ ¥ Miss NELL aa (Vocalist) % Tulip Green, ‘S’ Cream, ‘8S’ White
are “Blackwood in modera- 8&tng too high through the two. Then, with the score 30 for Mi , % reas | See ri |
tun” and "Handle. with 362 of the convention ? hy osrandighed his bat like a base-| Ye Ts Brewed from Malted Barley SMe. W.D. HARRIS (Vion) § RED HAND TROPICAL WHITE |
care.” s Npth chgane she following ball hitter and Wait’s full toss Cy s % «ST. - BARNABAS CHURCH $ etains its whiteness.
+ ee lettee . and ? ne Spade and was preadeagle 2s s. at mati ) “
pahe unusual simplicity ot this well pleased with South's jump readeagled the stump se . Wadswais) Sea July, 908 sia: gl Beamer eeu
slam Parone eet or 18 praise to Three Spades: . eae a one oh Sai argue cane . at 730 pm ; x ors an me FlOrs.
Michanics seem anol Te ef ak Ve SR! Fk A Ae age oop BP og SEE THAT YOU GET Teo Magaiay ext rom the Vicar B Ne a ee
chanics s orks . Jillage green tactics ~ ; londay Pour No-Trump. bid 1s followed » OK 10. Rib e pwh ‘with ments hot expected FiOS MGUY DEE TR ee or er Stone Oak Brown.

ov a schedule of Ace-showin

responses that can be memorise























Here, it seemed, was _ the idea!

hand for Blackwood. With any







from first-class batsmen.















ROSSE &
















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With Grey undercoating.

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as che eaceaee magne pod Mik small slam could be bid with for Bpdeeie Dart, Task good cricket. LESLIE VEESEEE cee RED HAND MATINTO FLAT OIL PAINT
ames the pertect contract, ¢very confidence. If South had naval base. For interiors, Cream, White, Green.
Coniparec with the complex nea aA ie a gonleags of Five LACKWE LL RED HAND CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS.
ua, of asking bids, for Would eu sale. Sara ne naan Grey, Mid Green, Bright Red
‘astunce Blac K wei is a godsend But South's hand turned out ’ GENUINE MALT VINEGAR A ENTION PHONE 4456 ; . me
cae eedien en Yewterday’s n WILKINSON & HAYNES C0, LID
n fact, tt is the ter tatio oO “ De *
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every conceivable opportunity North had to play tn Five Fr Codri : Geddes Grant Ltd., Bridgetown,
juces an ever-lengthen- Spades and watch the opponents Heinfell: Wil, rington ” eT Te 55%
{ card table ho colle , ee Aces i : . ¥ $6599 4, 2999S SOCSO OOS = Mp tptp oto oe
tne sins ophimitiod ma This 1s an obvious case where Total Rainfall for month to | eo PRON R NTN OTH e -— g GUESTS : ores
mig a at - oi vent are Black wood must be re cted a date; 3.00 ins. 1s . ‘%
n ‘rabie Simple thoug it too dangerous a weapon orth Highest Temperature: 84.0 1‘ FOOD FOR THOUGHT
uu sppoar here are pitfalls should k s sla try wil 7. x é
> ait Side for tn unwary user z cue bid ar Bout Mitnonee L va r . H y MAKE SURE | BUNDLE PAR x
at Blackwood allowing south to sign off at the pee st Temperature: 75.0 o i %
re making the call with a S@fe level of Four Spades es } ys From October, 1950 to
fecling of mastery over Should South happen to hold Wind Velocity: 6 fs : i
Hae or tie moment, "Wo. Aces. he can’ show. them Se ee THAT YOUR SPION KOP June, 1951 the price of
re slave bound Soke phe Anavering. ote ase Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29,980 3 D z
Oa of shouia ane without the slightest ris ~ 7" (3 p.m.) 29.941 % fe Chang W ll ;
a series ol questior mion Kapress Service — ~
ee ar il Dol E Th $$ § NEXT SUIT 20 HOURS Colt
ey'll Do It Every Time satond 6 Yate Om _By Jimmy Hatlo | |§ urtings
Q
a es |} FRIDAY JULY 27
has advanced over 100%,
ERE'S ONE FOR THE BOOK~ Page| |e fe Bur THE WORK DOGS HE PLOUGHS % BEARS THIS i i 2
and these higher price
PENDS BIG DOUGH FOR THE SHOES AROUND IN I6 HOURS EVERY DAY>>> - materials are now begin- :
HE WBARS ONE DAY A WEEK»: 3 BUCKS HE PAYS FOR “EM: t A B E :. TO ALL MOTHERS ning to arrive in Barba-
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Full Text

PAGE 1

X III. Ill II Mill MHIS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. Jll.Y 25. IJJl 36 Asked To Trials For Trinidad Tour NOPLA) YESTERDAY i.\ni THIKTV-S1X player* nave oeen mvitcd to prat itn [or< i a*' tTrinidad w! place either in September or Oclojber Th-> exact date will Imtl I ei i haw been lavited Men: < %  Geoffrey C. A %  %  Ev%  %  > Inert HanmsiI Johnson, Michael Mortimer' %  | ii %  roana. I...at in. : Ai >, i %  %  %  •. | %  thy Warren. M.nj Knight. i'egx* *"""* pui fnUaiMt M.HI.'. Taylor. .'< Jean Mc M.C.C. Team Tour Camula tied by L. W. V. Kobms. forme i %  the first n Knight, Itv William*. 137 Denis Compton Hits s ^ r f^ l8 t „. ^K ^ i 514I\atOut His 97 th Hundred Ihtriar Makes Fine Start July la. FHEDDIE JAKEMAN. of Nor~u>nt*. who hit the Mason's top individual score — 258 not mi*.. nrainsi Essex on Monday, hamBv FRANK ROSTRON mcred another ITS not out against July 19. Surrey at the Ova) HARD ,.n the trail of h,. r-ndredth hundred1 ,, Den* M !" ^•**?&,£%£! Compton. icorinfi a charscterislically gay ISO in three ina c^m^e. bowUnj last rrWay. a halt hours lor Players against some Gentlemanly bowling f)v him 514 rum in three lay in hi* favourite antting. Lord's, he made his Inninis—nd not once wu he oui ,h„, tnree-figure .core ol *. se.son and the 7th firstJJft • h^hjM.* jgj nowaday*"" prophets of cricket ) M K IKIN I II'. • r. Janice JACK /K/N UHFIT TO PLAY IN TEST i %  .:, Sutberin •" ••" n*ea E H I I I IH IIM lXNDON,Ju.y24 l n.ju-hes have The lean) H W ridi i> Uni W G Kefuh lv I N Barl %  I H rset >, M. H jt B ...... i ,., -. rel. A W. 1 il i i Kenl). A 'i I i Cai %  : %  i II Cheioxford University and %  (,n>nada Girls Arrive Today Yorluhirf (SO for 6) IW Villaige Green Taeties July 18. and vi.. .n K dual hour ol %  1 the Oval lass century of his career. On tin* form Compton. lemparnUttana, %  feould be u> more than two or I aha ix hind his old rival 1. ii Hutlou in b< •.tenth player to achieve the "triple Bo <-ll was Complon's timing functioning—never have 1 seen %  an thwackatrg his oeeer drives with mote power and pace—that II seemed a cameo of his golden 1M". Then In his record season's aggregate of 3.816 he Leu dt'iimlrd It .tall Ihe sunshine of 1947 yesterday and OOtM of tin* sorrow a unsuccessful viteruptaln last winter in Australia. Instead, it was Hut ton. Star , Saaaaiacuoul SS^J^WWSS^Si tSTu^&, when" he took Suffering from .. beutaed back l ''"'>*/ o* Jr. L', .. for 41 Injured lluday before in a suicide flighu-d the ball well in his llrst "j^ ^ al ( n£o|n yw Uird IVi pOatUOa %  < Tin(> %  ..! Bag ii|.M-M-ntative game. whan, in long spells of bowling, he U-n demote*! kj m aj lf u> Kxperlence wa u,,. only nuin to He down (I" ttlag '>nir. Nigel Howard took over the •^ropc.Btershire His tigurc-.; .s-ift and subdui-d. Hution for rapUmcy of the Gentlemen from 42—13—78^—4. i i t-.iv Old Master. He Yat.tley M Yardley's exprvss — l i | UUtlnp "f 1. which wlsn< to give him experience beCLUB PREMIERE %  ban Dsvnaaa baanad him f oru m8 forthcoming leadership of XCMMIC TOIIPNAMITMT ordinary off-break. thc M C .C. teem in India. T 95 v ? TOURNAMtM I Another, once again lo suffer by |[. handled the limited bowling THERE will be no play this .n with the sparkle of ihe al his disposal well, except for afternoon. mvis ( OMITON glojm. Hail, this moining. Parade of Youth. Step forward No. 1. 18-year-old Colin Smith, of Lancashire. Colin left his Stoekp-irt chool just a week ago. Yesterday he was invited to try out his fast medium bowling on Hampshire. Colin look one for 32. Not startling. ma>be Bui Ihe recori book won't tell you that repeatedly ha beat the bat. Now No. 2, another Lancastrian 20-year-old Tom Greenhough. nd like Smith, making his debut. Tom's spinners gave him three lor 45 m 14 overs—and M OtlmU bowled experienced Neville Itogers with a googly. Here's No. 3—Gloucester's 20year-old off-splnner Brian Weil*. making only his second appearance His first was against So See our fine line of LADIES' PLASTIC RAINCOATS s-2.au •;,. and PLANTERS" UMBRELLAS si. II eg. CAVE SHEPHERD & (0.. LTD. 10.11.12 & 13. BROAD STREET i. „. luh. 01 otirBi ....-j.ki mea Martina b) putOm Harlai en al ,u, by the sea-m-. heavlo,! KOrer. who hc wron „„,. Thursday's match 'III be thai Ytvkablre i • %  I set to mad.n most impressive SO bflorc being out II... to Yarrtloy. Players cloamg tolsl ot S43 for Miss Bui then Robertson, by long eight—modest comiderin ml Gilnics. Ladles Sinslr, A Griffith VI Fans Barrack Gibb's 138 July 18. Paul Ol wtefcet%  %  %  for g*scx— ill Northam^--day. Ar. .. %  . %  ears befor lunch and stolidly went on batting They made the game lafe I till went on batting ril.-v K:I 381 ( %  even and a lame draw Yes, Essex kept i/icit record hut tbtj loal l lot of gdsabn I --day froip Onanada to pl*y Island Team* chosen ban UU ItarbadoNet ball League. will also be matches sut h u panic lhat Yorkshire lost _. to m9 Middlesex learnbetween ihem—was a reward for c. B. Forde and W. DeC. For %  Olympls cinb gad Qua* x n in In woring 30 and had to t j_ J %  The II xt And it ri caused .,,„,,. , ar custome-l to being a Compton and Robertson scored 210 .. .... il.i Vi.-liiriirsi liis.1 "' %  . ... ,,_ . . -. IWA-; ,fits> a ipiEarrl tot Men's Double* ,,iv .^ follows : ., %  .. Club CAkmr -t %  >' 1' < JI M> a—w OlyrniMa%  %  . 1 IN p n %  i id >t Qua* Aumi-t Hi>\ •I Qui i i. %  %  beconlenl %  %  ol runs eddad toi the ninth wicket Lock (23) in a valuable stand that exasperated ihi Gentlemen's sustained keenV s. J ,„„,„„, mate^d.^*^ c!mf T |m m .. f , „ „ u,h, ^ Cr.v.n,, w„h -,>U.h I I-— tt-lH ^ K-unttMlly he was caught hoptheir head-.. ind Ix R. Black%  Hea's Silltles Eiiwatds vs J. Robi ,>r.' *tn Am I Savage has kindly i i ;i Maggat iiuiton > seemed fa SHERMAN'S BODY TAKEN TO USA NAPLES. July 24 >l plane left for Wash^ Cricket Results ,-itl it faul.irile a wailing plat a minute ssemed tar A spe.ii.l plane let! lor waoat Ihj nearby airport *'> '">"; ..,.. /. ,, .. ., oi^walrelTed | H m Chl< N ival OporaUoni Earl.er. .oldiers. sailors,.and .nd found big hitting was impossible against the short-pitching, high-rciini; deliveries of Bedsn LONI-DN Julj SA Knaliah first ci |ust short of a length, eld and noil rmen stood Sh-im-n was "honoured in a at ,''enlinn while ihe bod>w simple ceremony BtoMJ aboard. The niht to Shermans fiag-diaped coffin Washington H expected lo lake was loaded aboard a foui-englned about 29 hour^ : gaa i plu td Ma 287, South AftiU It. I' eight. Hampshire beat the clock by Mlddltsix 271. Surrey 284 for nine minutes nnd W I ree. by five wicketM Soiunamploti. Sussex 294 and 32 (or %  It looked oh, so easy at lunch, li>9 when Woi War\M.-l)ite 1H4, and 25 for run on and had lost eight wickets, 'wo. LanaaaMra 333 foi nine <(< But U.wlert Re ivuEMel .red. Quunorgan *•! Tin wvn. dei %  n — cnckal raaultfl liahlnd-wa-Wl84 Ws>n, Alec, invitetl loeom. %  Lad b) Butti ..inph. they did. navy aircraft at Naples. The plane arrive in WashHOWUIU, l>ttM>MHl K *••• wlckel %  of 77. iimi..%  So In H I 8li in 48 mu. lb did it in 39 minules. %  Tom Qoddard, Oloueei Id 4fl leln.d fro i ticket, lie county in 193] %  %  !'4 ruii-. i I 2-iU II imp %  1 two. Not 300. ire 1 four. Yorkshire :,:: foi %  %  Devon isz for eight. -CPheduled lo uiglon tomorrow. The rlnal plans of Sherman's burial in the Arlington National Cemeter> awail the wishes of his Nina off lift over; four wlf0i ,„ wr ,ose arms he died on ,,l! the aaeond Then, wilh the g uni j 8 y (rom heart atlack. A 11%  ,1 10 II itb Wad hUM drive m i nutc religious service was held i .11 one "f Ihose tantolislngly short a bo lirt i the U.S.S. Mount OIv'pua, pitched balls and mlscueo for ne neganip of Admiral Robert Constable tn lake u stmple catch in Carney, the Commander-in-Chlef fors, „ . ot lha Mediterranean fll |w ? oo ..iwueMMiuUv UrM.to Th| r n „ Bl prayer, by Ihe pull the next ball and a catch was w chaplain, LI. Commander n in lAKk at long Q ( L : kiiril| reminded that -Sheron, 19 f—10 uu a.mPolice Band gives a concert at St. George's Pasture si 1.45 p.m. MubUe i lueiiu ilvea concert at Marshaira Paahsre, St. I'hillp at 8.45 p.m. CINSHAS lilab* i .Ham Chin. -• p -. i %  ... iB.ISirUl i'...-... i II,. l..".-, .1 I i. P "i % %  • "J* I Kim Oni .HARHISOK-GHAY This 'foolproof weapon can be dangerous %  'WO important Mo| ihi %  le Bi lgi iyei itiurkwaod in moderaind "Handle with care 1 lie u.iu.'.Uii! tlttpUcitt ol thH . . iiiun. ant, Ai grsi stgtii IU* iiieetian: > seem looJoroof Trie . \ i np b d M it'.nv.i*d ot Are-siiowina an t' ineriiorlsea nil data goes nachioe and out !* %  me | ( 0P u.l u i i.iaf.-i.l In !.. • i % % %  %  i %  %  if l"rn %  %  ... rd i'.. n<: KTI B-acUtf "it .u-i wiiti a %  %  %  ., i) iT I, 1 %'Q I %  %  ..41. el %  %  I ...; %  .' % %  %  seL-.i* too high inroua UM Of Uis eonveuiion I North opoDOd UM T hand will: One Spade ami was -II pleased with Souths lump Spadai I tl. • i. %  Han li at m J. was the ideal hand !r Uia plmiil" Hk> maslr \in> Nlxod*tm tonlaM %  nd you "IU af-iii ••• yo.ir ikln t.-romlnfvolt, wiiooin and ncsr. Nino *wm %  "iw dlacovery thai kmH-tnisi snil P411FIM on tho akin Uutl %  us* Plii.pl. Holla, Rd HloM!--Uitiu Hingwutm. ami Crinnn: Vuii • %  mi t s" rid if your akin trotil unlll you rcmovB Ihn %  •rrmtlul hi' In in* tlnj pores of your skin. So M<-l NixoSsrm from your chemist in day under ihe i->ltlv guatiintos thai Nlnadarm will banish rlmplra nn l iar jour akin soft and smooth or Nlxoderm E|V; Tor akl-a Tranblas -,a.i>.g MAC IRONS .2 TOASTERS $1J.7 HOT PLATES .SI2..sO "JUNIOR" ELECTRIC COOKER ... WITH OVENGRILL and HOTPLATE $72.00 CITY GARAGE TRADING Co., Ltd. VICTORIA STREET-DIAL 4671 They'll Do It Every Time — ~ lERES OME FDR. THE BOS<~JEStiLt.y SPENDS Biffl COUGH FOR. THE SHOES HE WEARS ONE QAY A WEEK.-





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rAOETWO Cahib Q a ^ ru } BARBADOS \n\i>< \li ni i. .1 siiw a i v :;. is;,. H FrT REV AI.AN HT. Archbishop of the West Incite* and Bishop of B Guinna who came to Barbados a %  •ecration and inlhrnnemaiil <>f Bishop Mai.devillc b dU4 '•• rcnirn to BG Ihi* ff| A %  ol B 0 sad ttn. noid.i Mr Holder WM also here for tfc* eoiwcration. H is Chancellor ol ..ltd Registrar of the I wd nit I tains Festival Visitor* O %  %  Waal IndiansPI if pra (North LonH III on Fri...y last %  Indian stu. and in BUOOW <> West lath i • uval of In ttie charmingly informal at%  West lndlftn %  i % % %  %  listed and dnni-ed with thru fellow count! nun and amain ta England. Among those present were the MUM and Mrs N W Tmn. Hen and Mr?. W Courtenay. Hon. J A Smith. Hon E H l...t H. -i K I. Brndahaw, Hon. L. L. Simmon*, Hon. T. T Thompson Hon. W O Kendall. Mr. A A Mi C. A Robinson. Mr F K W CaSC, Mr Evo:. BUka, Hr, W M Humphrev. Mr. Ronald Craw f.nil. Mi Ronald 1: Q E WiUc*-k. Mr and Mr* Willy Richardson. Mr. A Chai %  Ml *nd Mrs. John Oliver and Mr. A. E V Marlon Music for dancing was provldad by Reb Prescoit (Grenada) an*' hi* bnnd. Back To St. Lucia M M As'I.i.K da BOTJLAY, her daughter Marguerite and Mrs. Leo Bergassc who had beei. holidaying in Barbados since July irnadj to St. Lucia yesterday b) It W I A Ml du BOUIBV who accompanied them over for the holiday returned over the week* iV BITTY CRAXIl Hound Ihe world on I 10 Girl Globe-trotter B ROWN-F.YE1* mil t ll tcf pee t!>e arorld on CSM is Ml** i maaaeuaa luat atttUuj oil Croat London fo: i tour ol U weei of England on %  cycle bongo,! for C7 in Paris. Next she plan.to hitch-hike Ihl ->, Porlui&il and Mi Mm Craigie. who is H slim, know* how to tfSV" WJ\ on .i little mom S?fi£rt, expeit in mvei on .IOOUI i. .I r .., b i.L-.^/<.i u i.ina week," she sys. Use Barbados Molasses V ISITORS to the government* fishing lodge in New BrunsKaatigoucb* Miv. Ichlng sala|f the famou< Trail Blazer Pancakeou' by Da\ %  i Tuna's i edition gives the recipe %  Inch fi>i %  been making"by tea. i ike four mlxing-npoonsful of Itarbadoa molasses; two h*n'.. a*MB loons eg*. v milk, or one pint • > : snow and one pint ol j igattMH Then the dry mix Flour two !, one part whoii Orhe t Add baking powder, tv Add salt to taste—if tlM party hod a drink the night before, add %  little bit mote salt. Pul it through tin until the batter 1* •month. %  rind or some s ill pork >kn. uia iu-.'i. ornnge glow so essential to the seductive puneake. With build and real rock-maple syrup and %  |M slivers of baron thrown in on UM Try making some trail blazer'-. Note ihe It .rUnIo* molasset and i %  %  i % %  pun D snow. Polytechnic Oiploma I N Ihe histnrie '.urmundings ol the Btatloners and N< Job 13 Novello Hamilton Richards o* the i | .i nudanl 'i iiism was presented with hi.; Diploma b> Cotonal The Honou*abla J. 1 ili-raan > HitH,. k / / t\Jbeth Bv wen COMES LACK TO STUDY A Matter of Life And Death Bv t.VM.i V II.I 1 end. Visiting Parents M RS. I'l.TKH HAY1.KY who has Qt B P BdOS on a visit ciii' Hon. and Mis 11. A. n:e to return to |l •', thi.. r.% B w I A Her vMl wilh her brother Henry*! wadding. He was married o couii * antpapcr Makers Compi Optics M'v, AicTHUIt ST JOHN, son %  Ognen i throa Airline "Baiters", St. George and the late Mr Bt John If ft on Sunday by the Colamble for England. Arthur his gone to study Optics and expects to be away for throe or fuui W INNIE TURNER, ". nd Velaria Blew Chicago and hostesses who i day VLSH tu It.H I B.W.I.A. returned In yesterday afternoon by Accompanying them wan. Mr. Haul o Panttn of B.W.I.A'S Commercial l). [.ailment in Port-Ot-Spaln staying g| daacriDsd aotne of the tree .:, the Company displayed in the ineiudtng famous pi %  s model mm %  fill tWO .Mid i hall idue in December. 'i i are i %  %  %  i',< wen novelist w h oaa CB1 (three ..op was awat I iture*' %  %  box with the Rojal ci| I of the Oovernmant), which now wl h otw etaj docuroonta MI the death ptnal^^ ondarlni why she t>aa pick.r tl • She • 00 Dorothy Savers, no Agatha %  murder tri.il md Introkind of words %  novels and loi leg, into which such debates us the rro* %  nd cons ..( daaa I i hanging ever intruded. "1 ex; with a smile, il.it I am fuat the man %  I \i Sum-Siim i tad from Mi' %  Cameron ID rpujal lUzvn. the only woman member of the recent thr . irorkuup %  %  There % %  the at the tune %  she la a grant nd a glutton l i . 01 the execu .,'' s htIhi "-ht ol the alt i i the room w.i oodci i i chali ivhleh might have come from High Ible." Added ha range of pactatora, tor In Amerii: i ublic'M %  man had to take his death before %  . %  : 9.:io lo 6 Wlifii In i %  I.I %  in..i—'l • on ii %  death penalty, kiln Bowen works oAVe hours %  I she has • %  triad. Husband Alan Canu ran (they married In I0kt) WOT* the gramophoni %  His wit. n her firstlioor sidd) overlooklni Eh | %  it I room, iik* ths house, light and air, with Wide down t .i:.(. Kadiu I'rirjiiwiiu' IS a I" Pi x.nd. a ao p m cnminnr <* I b m A< thr Opera. %  o> %  K ,ni. IS p in Jr aSkU• p m PmramK* Parade. > ni T<>da| i Sparl RMS SUB IS SIM SIM M BY THE WAY ... By Beaekcomber I hREAM of Ihe day when a ter, hanging his hi. in shame, resigns because has Bluded bis febrile gi ii in ihe matter of prayei t annul orders relating to shredded tgj •.shells, dried ribtion, nsh-sift(i button! made of decontrolled Bk milk, slanehioiis. gravel. .iiramgrnss. boiler-cases an i len fruit. Ilngerless glovebinoculurs, tlii cork. waterproof coverings fo we.ilhervancs. lampwlck. I chalk, haddock-mallets. sh : bet. tubular thongs. rowi birdlime. warehouse towcl-rollerj, gratad tago, %  tilt* %  i re* ldn| tv es' snouts. idg, froth, beard glue, ladders, tuning-forks, polish. Sine trestles. m rj-ball-. hsnVhlocks, shepherds' soap-shaperr, galvanised rrooter-wheels rta, tiK-tion-engine •bluebags, dl sdgai pen wiper-cases, stormfalaa noses, ehlmney-atruts, oiled cardboard, and Indian fleatra'.s in four colours. murmurs Bnattlvi i" itai tai 4 these bearings. I I g> small that if drop]>eii. it could not be found again Here, it seems to me. is a chance for some unscrupulous caterer to boosi them as invisible eavlare. How gross, how coarse see.n th,. old visible ball I" i roller-skates. tu ivmlvzmi* ilff (inmnirux I N an bidignan .lay Mrs. Wretch referred to Ihe Bun House in SII.H as -the thin end of the Continental wedge" She daplerad Uv sunshades. .... In the Plaea Blanche, iT would IKis toare no other waj tln| volatile fot Couldn't we. int ntarested | %  i %  \n t.'ti-phunl t'orftrtu I ..id that wi rv. MM Rajah ni DiwndhurUpora ed to ins favourlta elephant th* other day, the beast IIUIHHI it.% back and walk.il ..way. Tin iliphaut was flown U) New Vm where a psychiatri-t eX.unmtd ii and reported that it wassuffeiing from lo~s of mem.us iHen.-hei"lur VeWS Aoen.'|i. g*parejuet floor ;nn she lives i rally, keeps one Breton man%  and no tar Bowen'l Court with my she says. The r.rnlrv < nil' t>ig, bare bouse l an ancestor is %  n. I liar to her readers: s'af* wrote book about it. She is the first .(in.in to have inherited the j %  %  our months of the year there :: %  tarei It ( I try to be a good! landlord. "> 1 %  gantry,'' she calls her D that book, and herself when young she desci lot I who d-^d onl) denigkter *•• %  i*l. JBhe explainci to me. with a hopeful look, that I ... but that i I would grow up to nice i ham ter The propheey sccim . not pretty, live good Ii % % %  .' %  *& with her wide, serene face, ir snuothed to a low. knot •md curiously ; i pale blue eyes. ... sch.io) in Kent, regrets k I university degree, ci don't suppose i couk) have passed the exams"). thought of being an illustudled briefly at : | inn' but found 1 was no draught?woman"), had amborked % %  I : louinalism at Windon iew it up ., %  %  h ; | two books Of sh.rt hers was one of the rare nuarlfcgas ih^.i cneoura tend of cutting it • She was not one ol i jient the war in neutral Eire. the il'j:enfs Park uouse. from 1940 was a raid warden in M.iiylelsjne. Out of that drab experience she %  Meal f the l>;>s No Cook At home, Miss Bowen is no ll enjoys polishing her ruraiture; takes %  tilt • women : I their time "doing the bnwai i "I would like to spend a morning doing thai and at Bowei Court i often do".) She relaxes by doing elaboratef 1 —a hignlon of pasting up scraps. Anv unii'e now she will buy a :et o| pastels following the trenn lewaPds amateur art. ("1 have U bum my writing, and I feel 1 ";>y") But hei dominating hobby i iinctiiig people. No ivory tower for Miss Bowen, who enjoys nothing bettci than hearing others talk. Which perhaps explains why a hen ihe) .rid her k> -i w, ''k fur the man .ii uia street on that matter "I Ufa and % % %  COf'VWBJOKT nraaBVED —I..E.S. i m Thr H*w,. 1 IS p P m CalliM lh* W-.l -t***lns. ^ p m ol. is p m Interlude UnEdiuulah. OS p m I Capp'tatal. S M p 11. ; • ** p m Slalemenl ol Aiti-inx. p m The New*. It 11 p m Inter19 IS p m Cruy People. 10 4.' Mid.Week Talk IHOSSWO HII Tie T S f PT L II QUIZ TOXITE 8.30 QUIZ PRESENTED BY BARBADOS AGENCIES LTD. GLOBE THEATRE WITH "CAPTAIN" CHINA" JOHN PAYNE JACK POT NOW see to N.B.—-CAPTAIN CHINA" wUI be shewn 5 P.M. TO-DAY TO-MORROW 5 8.15 "CAPTAIN CHINA And "SORROWFt L JONES" (Bob Hope) „ it |rvn rSI 'in . 11 1<1 • dues at aorU. • S.I I 'as man i3l 15 rni. wt it ww. 'J' T ii AcroM i%  tnu to we MU 'S l. Am. (Tf (. Whal v..viiiinid ".iiaumwl T (•! O II may b> lint. i8> gaara l Oprr-jtiwn mat lands tne cominauding uttlcvi in a aoura nperoel * i~ J.I. I5> 4 Lit* bluod of the uaurer • ( a ISumtJ >jr>a nu*t beiore you M down. ISI i.jua II larga In writing. I,I.-IM< UealtU Allrarllea Bddy Arnold Th* Tenne**ee PU.wboy In FEUDIN' RHYTHM ft BANDIT OF SHERWOOD FOREST VII.'S in s, M W. I'l •i MSB II' |J:m'miui to Mrs. Sprstt. LK.WH. (Ol i 'nun mlJi-il oulid %  i* HI HI Itupert and Simon—39 /mi-ilit,K\[iort> M ERE alaa-M m 'he critic said hwi he sum red Ml %  i'-. teo-ton Dancing Fairy. .s not evjryMilng." Those who are moved to tears by smallneis .f any .on will probably rob the almost invisible ball,>rt.ng. "Six million can be held in a teaand the larger k*nds of bacilli are raging with jealousy. w %  ins i %  i pi IN tjpphrd monads the h.i> .,t. ~ ui rswai : f would % % %  d M .1 e.rly in. AQUATIC < B.I IS IIMHA (Mwnbm Only) ro-oAi i swaaois s r THE RED DRAGON" & •JIGGS & MAGGIE IN COURT" 1,1 IV. I.KI1MIKT(I\ I'M..**,. I Dial mo ZOMBIES ON,„BR0ADWAY RETURN 0F"TH£ BADMEN WESTWARD BOUND ft RETURN OF THE APEMAN l*I,.m/..\ in.I 8104 FORT APACHE" ARIZONA RANGER . All I'V MR '. XIHI \ — ST. JAMFI n?usi I %  ..%  l-lda. | itri.i .. p ,„ II un sa. Ihe ARHOH GatSf hi teehalraler tail 1 tVI,-lt M—Vlritflta MAIO Good Qualify Diaiiiond Cut Crystal Glass-Wore 41114 K II* \4I\V i li ilny S ftu o n is apui PORT uml SIIKKKY tll.ASSKS CLARET GLASSES CHAMPAQNI (il.ASSLs WIIISKKV (ll.ASSES WATER JUGS. HONEY JAKS. C.OBLETS PEACH MKI.BA I.I ANSIs •LB oath Sill .. S1.7G $1.23 .. Wo 03i Mippl\:— Cliimnois . Whta liMlaihi Bald 1. ili v-.. Lurks Bam Hanuaan Sorew Drivors Shovols WhiM-llinrrous T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORE DIAL 4220 %  I I'.ill g| our Hardwgn and Ironmongery DeparlRt nMmberl Hiere is n paikim; problem when p with us. THE HAKHAIIOS 4 4-OIl It A I IVI TOTTOX I AMOIIi LTD. Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039 %  %  .-,, %  > d SO, Be. I p r '%  0 % %  J RMltUci ii t v uv Ve-r: T. e-t i. i %  EMPIRE To-day and To-morrow 4.30 and 8.30 SPECIAL-UNIVERSAL DOUBLE HIM.I IS IKISal All \l Wild All The Smp.n Your Htai: Can Stand Starring Dick Powell — Maria Toren and Vincent Price AND •• J A S Starring Basil Sydney and Damont ^'alsh tit' II IS*' aa? aaw Ylll I'llist' AiorKpSuo Ik Wollman „.h ION CHANEY Dracula ,iim -, Bill LUGOSI IM Monster ..,..., r.lCNH IIUBK IMO'. UtiH 111. RlH.t f SIAIITING FRIDAY BAIIMIII: B PBC1 A1 SHOW on SiVHRIMY MORNING 41 9.3(1 O L Y MPIC a TO-DAY and TO-MORROW Ut & 8.15 20th Century Fox Double MICKEY ROONEY — JUDY GARLAND in •ll\lll> OS %  H04D4V" AND lltllk MIIISIII Starring Mark Slovens — Lucille Ball — Cliflnn Webb K II i A L i:\ft.osiii: THHH.LS! THl win-;HOI s urio.xll PLAZA immr.ETOWN SI'H |\|. s VI I ROW 2Rth 930 & 1.3S P.M. Sidney TOLER as I ("HAN in THE TRAP With Mitntun MORELAND and The Ever Populnr JIMMY WAKELY in SONG OF THE RANGE -OISTIN PLAZA SPFOAL SAT. -JSIh. tUll m RETURN OF THE APEMAN HELA LUGOSI — John CARRADINE & WESTWARD BOUND A ilh KEN MAYNARD — Hoot GIBSON HOH STEEL BREATH-TAKING THRILLS 11 ROUSING EXCITEMENT!! TO-DAY and TO-MORROW ,.J0 g.l| 201h Century Fox Double ESTHER WILLIAMS-RED SKELTON-R1CARDO MONTALBAN -KEPT! "SE'S DAI I.Ill I H AND "I'XDYIXI. MONSTER M SUrrinj JA MES ELIJSON — HEATHER ANGEL — JOHN HOWARD "" sfECIAI. I SPIX'IAL SATL'RDAV Jl 9.30 Republic Smashing Double ROD CAMERON — WALTER URENNAN in . "HIII>IMOM AND "BLACKMAIL" Starring—WIIXIAM MARSHALL — ADE1-E MARA OPENING GLOBE FRIDAY ERROL FLYNN and DEAN STOCKWELL RUDYARD KIPLING'S KIM PLUS CARIBBEAN TALENT CONTEST ST. VINCENT vs. BARBADOS* Pit 30c. — House 48c. — Balcony 72c. — Box 84c. TICKETS ON SALE DAILY GLOBE THEATRE



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HI DNESI1AY. JII.V 2.-,, I9.-.1 HUillVIM.s VliMH Ml PAGI THREE BRITAIN FACES BIG TRADE GAP It* K 4 I MM IK ON. July M, Tl m Brltlah Labour Government, laced with one of the %  •A .ii Wltpm it -niv. iom'emplaluu'. til the drift toward a new tlnaiici.i. —^^—— An M1 rt altl tamon bin has caused ii trade w than JL 550.000.000 %  -fiver 11.500.000.000 — and has thrown (.in of gear the British %  %  c.irious IT The Covernmtut adn WASHINGTON. Julv 23 .1 arming, and is underA Washington Slate I > %  official -aid on Motidav If In und Pak i.ca.ry. But it is no secret that United State* would h..y.to UkC I !" • ulion are %  look" al it. export* of u He ae.d "lam sure we wou.d K 5lS£S: T U'tr GAM \o Copper lor India. Pakistan If At War • -'.-*.. .S", BOL? /? the end of the lie cut it an 1 '"If gap started was correct. I.ivail.ibio alcitHe added thiwas um mtwil as •"^P !" BID, threat to India, but WU in The cause of this problem is outtonfornuiv w ( Ui general United ** lh "' Inimedlate control of 'he British Oovertsn. i .,,, Aeep rise m world COfnanodJty warp crents. '" l ntly of the UH | he Stat. ' %  "'-Depai*nent orBctal died the preHMtm$ Pn.cs codanl of (he United state-, export Most ..f tin incrr asc this rear in policy er cent, and lalaa ^__^_^____ have not heen able to make up foi the increase in the Import lull The problem is aeeenluated by the fact thnt Britain's rt.-irmamenl II ( !• tied up with lent on the continued Importation of raw matin.iN. if anporti anetri reannanu-nt would have to be slowed down Rearmament order* to Britaln'i Induftri* I 100 IHHI.fllM) pet Alteninlivc. Alternative brft n tho Oovernmenl aie To cat into mcagrt aolfl und tlollai receiveor cut non-eesenttal delln Imporb and :.uitin tl i \ retrutlon ill the import progranune l km although mylng from it will not trench, U.S. Goals Are Identical BAIOOfV, Jul a lv l-itire DO i %  ..-i .. %  nc Fn-n. )\ High Con %  .ri ind.. China, %  aid on Mi. ILL... the Wei in lha K.II Bait are He said: "Spheral ol Influence In th* i .'i I.I • am now impossible i i war in which An .,II.I nid Pranca must won I and HI band %  Oke at the i.penmg ceiemonie> of itk I | IIeni*iquez Has Good Chance IN MEXICAM ELECTIONS rrom ROBERT PRESCOTT Ml XICO fITY. Julv 24. Mexico 1 PteaMenttal ewettom are still 12 months |U but already the name of "Henniue/" b being aarawiea above walls and buildings b In many places it blotft out the name of President Miguel Airman on posters remaining from the iW6 campaign. Qenerai Miguel Hemiqu** is the first real candidate to If** hi> hat in the 1052 ring and the llrst threat to 25 years of p..litu-aJ domination bg the PJRX (Party of Revolutionary inatWuttena) With an outslandiuij n< M< Henriimer si liest chance of any "indi pendent candidate in tin q lb arul -ampaign f>u MH poittan of "abeolute homey and the abolishment of >pc i; i ;|IU) throeXen Hi itransletiuld on Mexi lilies I'lnigk Fitflil Hut he I ght IJncd up against Henriquer kg the power of Oie Cardeni which ha never lost an election He tum battle either Miguel AJesnan who may seek to "eartend inB-yeaj term % %  thi conttttutlonal ban nn re-e l eetlon, or AJeman's bandpicketl suceeaaoi. He faces hehind the seiamble fOI DOWei a a | .! % %  | ||U iianginij over from the Inst rlerU00 and a pobtical ma. i seems to .have the Situation at voting lo.ith well under control, —U.P. U.S. Want ISO Group Air force What Bnbu WASHINGTON. Jul> 24. Defence Seerrtar> George Mai shall said on Tuesday the Oov n men! || aiming tor enough airplane rlM to produce a 180 group Air Force neorb twice iha pn I ent air force goal.but he quick!. .. ilklng aiiout pi production capacity, not actu the rt> %  %  %  also told report* ra tt. Defagwa Depertinenl enpi I cide by some time in Octottei whether It will be n a c aaaa r y to Inft hand, aaid Mi lu-rnaid Bi m M P ecrofjarj of Mae of oia i ,:. i. Wi shod i Lon Ion i**iv Ma4i Trii. we pour suhaUnllal W< i lea thivupi r the CotonJej Developn ii.: and Wlfam* Fund Hi SiSAs EarSt?eSrSie^^'^ ** ** *^ n ~ $4.%0.000 on iU expansloii V arnaune whleh i" ex|Hitod nearly loublo biiuxite production fiom Jamaica mines. Ret>aymeiit ol \ i.e. with mteiest. II Inmadi> In Mipplies M minium oVM all The new plans call for UM Ho daacMbad the Itriiisli Ctovcornpnnj uioaOM caMdhj >f i^ie*;us; ;;,;k ,,, ;;'::m a' r:uroJ-S&II.-MI ;,-,-;;; *ggp g an tour said the United States economy" %  %  • • <' f" > •jJjy | S ili-cement that wmltl allow the 'OU," LONDON. A thud Marshall Plan loun tfl production in bi %  aSaaOungjad to WUIiam li.dt. Mimstcr-uignas of the Economic ColeraUon AdiiimisliNtiun Mission %  %  Britain, An ugieemenl hat IK'HHI under which Uu .ii advance *3.?84.ooo t. lUynold* Jam.i iceording io ih .onu...t. th> VEHICLES COLLIDE %  Pi A'lth the %  Hall of I toad al" fU :h vet In Touch with Barbados Coast Station ma uw <"ii.-*.. I I'. !-•*< '<-t-I %  %  S Sfr.1 M-M. ft ApM %  I .ICM-l.l ** Advaf, N S %  %  i %  Mnm w, si S ^ Ii..i.i>J Uean>i. rt. I Hfiahu g S Ik.ilaaa. S H Adrlaii.-a, S s Trtd*. s S U.irnuM(J %  ruhw B S S'-lilm hi H port Auck 'Mad. S B Ibdlrli M H O.k-.ll 1 M ... s v „, J s a !,,.,, Plonker a s riMd. ii ... ~ ^ a.t'ir RM|> •w*d % i„„i M.HHH.1.. ft S LMOrr t RM a m J. 'a lfc>na um, s -* M*I : %  B a livcuta I Uaonacntar. %  %  u 1'iKn. ih Hill * T i Glands Made Young -Vigour Renewed Without Operation %  %  • f.-i "* % %  --n p'! %  '"ii Ami Ihla •rrn-inf rif* rim %  he I "lent.** the USe Of enrouragim; M>endmirc if the condb which Went Indian grcss. It might be necessary raJM the sights nf a rlefc. i up programme whether iiea.-e Korea w not StiT>ng Mipport fur any such buildup came Horn ReB % %  I" ' Senatoi it. i rj Cal i Lodge, Jii dw cause ui of Massa. huselts who isld UW • \\ must cndefense programme om a E iiitcci S J amaic e '..ildup last summer Wise Indusj to expand the* Wjfl J ?*gS?l^. He aoVM that Ma trip nervine. luet Una nan %  % %  %  • '7T"' "J 'V t him he WM right in calling (tt *• .....anent wii !%  .... n 150 noun air force instead of tin Ih. t rCUTe, • %  "*t-nnnent present B5 K r.mp .•. ITnli bold md linelMUvf will also have >nopUoi to buy The An Force exped ion a) i taken oon.he asM '> %  dollars, m nddliionto tin its goal of 95 groups some time m ih* gltu .tlon Is likely to gel mil aim .ui.i.im to be del.erecl ..mie. the autumn ol nftt. Air FOTCC .(,.., B.V*. lead en aw i aid to bi lejj pushing for expansion to IN groups -I IV H %  •[sriino" RrepaVei Pov 2nd Trip to W .1. Intorii ntlal Hopes nig ronin. said: "Our mission Is pinncxl on the fall of international to stop the expansion of Commuuprice levels and consequently on rim by Intensifyimg our war efthe reduction of prices which Britfort and fortifying all means of aln would have Io pay for her imlocal resistance There is only one ports The Government insists that .struggle In AsiI only "* rearmament progrnn one defense m Europe All forces lo be inter* and Ll 0X-f free DtOplea must contribute to peetrd to meet Bevan'^ rballenp thU struggle "—f V Cztths R*fiist' To Five Oatis WASHINGTON. Julv 23. It is 1 e a r n ed thai tl C/c< ihoslovak Cabinet has jeeted the United 31 mand fof "" the release ited Press correspondent Wilham N. Ostis The Lnited week rtgo to-day sent Chechoslovakia a start) note InIstmg that OatiS be freed fron ..)th the argument that Britain's HM the Western security must lority. The Iran oil dispute threatens ite still further the aleUtiaUon If Iranian oil ag sltog' ther, recourse will hvr to be taken in alternative sources including dollar oil. The financial picture then will hereconn %  i Amounts of up deto $100,000,000 and more might be Of involve;].—I'.P. Owner Wants Land Aiound Arthur's Hill MANY residents who 1 hoi %  %  I tech prison, where he has Arthur's Hill are removing their started SM Ml term on houses-. The owner of the land has apy charnes The Czech Foreign asked '<" 't 'We are finding Minister referred the note to the difficulty In getting house spots. Cabinet The Cabinet, however, an >ld lady who has a bouse in le'used to free Oatis —I' P. that district said yesteni. > SUGGEST REFORMS IN MEAT CONTROL LONDON, July 24 The N-itional POOWatiUII of n suggested diasti. reforms in lha m -t control schedule and proposed that -ontrols eventually i>e removed. In a booklet published "to serva ai, guide to members of Parliament and other influential personaaea". N.F.M.T A. said more monej should be sperd on buying meal from other countries 'in order thai our people may be protected against a fall in the standard of nutrition The booklet said that Imported meat supplies could lie improved and quoted StaUsttcS showing that hte|) 450 000 tons of chilled beef had been shipped annually brfun World War II and thai it was superior in quallts to the froien beef at present being shipped from Argentina The Meat Federation booklet commented: 'The Federation has Beating suice 1946 the vival of this important chilled beef trade and we welcome the resumption of shipmenls this year Nevertheless expected supplies are infinitesimal." The booklet condemned the present method of grading meal in datiPhterhmises. —U.P Ship lieachctl After Collision WASHINGTON. July 23. The Economic Co-. iDSmtton Admmtstratton reported on Mond\ thai ihe Liberty ship John Chester Kendall, carrying the first Ii Wheat undei ttx India famine aid programme has licen benched after a collision. The slut Sue* bay south of the entrance b the Middle Kastern canaL It had been scheduled in reach Bombaj iV ; %  ' % % %  %  I %  ,„ ,.,., u Pick up a cargo ol parently ,K-eur,ed on Sundui Tni .. Ul l ,', lh ,. H u | | other ship involved, wathe Ds ,, ,„ ,,„ „ Nov. (.erd .Maerxk. The John m sstujy, '..adlng i.. Wei i indii contract, not !•*< %  ihan IfMJNO i i more than $1.5110.000 wont, i alumlniuan 1'i.dei the orlfdVkBJ agreeinem with Reynolds. the EC A l dvancad 15.M3.000 hi dollais and •'.HOO.OOO .11 Itiltisb eou.lterpiii; hinds This ngrewtnnit also called 1 repaytnant In aluminium The toatervd the bat: LjOMOOri The Nerwegpan enfti veaaaj I.TA.. Bruno, on charter to Bagjue snt el J-. sdvanea of u auu.000 l ia. Lond oottars and CI.SOO.WMI ... and the Brltlah West Indie* hoi 1 unaxxoart f"" m ioao t rrturmd to London from bee Jamaica Bauxites Ltd, to fwtp .... njhii arrtci 0 I onat %  %  % % %  %  *" i"'"'-' the W. inally. after ig plum porti m Barbadoi TrlnM ai and British Ou K-IU mil for Cai rith %  oarg 1 ol British OWano bausdta ArM trip, howavoi he lleil f IV.Uei.iia in ballast "the latest i.am brings Bw total 1 r< A advances ror Jamoiean %  uxtte ONwelopmant to OOtBkri und illltHMKHI 1" ouutei-psrt funds. i haetar KendJh 11 cai 1 than 10.000 hXU of grain. It had sailed from Philadelphia on June IB—I'.P. will cany a full complement of nine passenger* on her %  econd t %  nj Vylung, BSeaxXyj it,, 1 old inaaxsa ol the awavw, .,1. >.\ t.% his vessel's perloiinauce on her first trip to Wst inttian waters. Only drawback to the pleasant trip I I %  I the 1 lew. '. a.. Ihe Ul Ihe We.' Indies since the Bruno was not bu it for service in the —B.l'.P. Petition V"..II'M -,i Belise Council HELIZE Borne rexired civil servants In Dntiah Honduras have cireulatinK I petition asking the Sic Ronald fl.uvev. t, the Bells. Cttj Council for "disloyalty t n i(„. Royal Family." The Council had voted not to discuss the hanging of a Picture of th c King in the Council chamber until BBtf-fOVernmanl I tranted to the Colon> CKHTIFICATES w.il TIKpetition |eJni Ti,. QovernOI l '"' 1 1*> young women of Ihe to abolish the pp % %  mi S1 AugU line branch ol ihe Karto pass laws requirinj future M Bvening institute. BI tjou ncuior g to pledge allegiance to ( '' %  : %  " %  The the Boyal Family, it u \s<, wanti c,i hand work al the St IcgUlaUon to enable the G.>vemor Augustine Boys' BshsaJ phi 1 to rcmovp councillors wh u sav two ypn now that the young anything disloyal about the Km*. wOAUM have been attending the —B.i'.p. rJaaeas YOUNG WOMEN WILL GET CERTIFICATES Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay s.i. Lea* N.*lrn HH> BB.sl.ne U.| 1 V (WlBrWM. t*rt\ I"—"-" Fta.iv <*.% H.,.*I.I... 11. .i. *Ury JUm rl flU* „, Kn 1 %  • % %  %  %  "•" % Sfl. ri.i.*lml) 11 w-i. •" %  •"• M •i, 1 Miiiii*.i w.ii s H o aiep a <-!' vai llniflt Vadl< Mir>alir. s„.,.i,. SO .I—. l WS BS M * IHgVMJ %  1-..1' I. Bunir... M i..n n-l. 1 1 1. M v I-.I J.. 44 haaa aat cam nirAKTiaia \! V fanadlan Cun.lr.nl. *,S lm .-• CtS4 Walla*r. f..r Ht J.liiM V Canartlan Cral-r BJSS ..a 11 Mara l..r Ht V.niml a s s.. as*, fapi ... a,. bM TrtaaSad RATES OF EXCHANGE Banhsei aiehi Draftit %  1" *i %  • si ae is-, p* Canada's Wonder liciiicdv Is Here Again-To Slay! ENGLISH ELECTRIC For CHEST COLDS, RHEUMATISM. .NEURALGIA, ARTHRITIS NEURITIS ECZEMA, BURNS, SORES, PIMPLES There's nothing like Bndtley** While Rub for biwakfg*j nn g tlghl ebeal cold over niffht, or banitau9| the gtaaUring, lorturini: pan. '. It itimnlgttl circulation, breaks up eOaU*tttie*i ami relieves pain. H"alami M.ntli.s sores, pimples and tired bnrnins, aealji FKKT. We u'mraiitee MORE relief I i LESS time or your money buck. Ill Mil IaYS STAINLKSS WHITE lll'IS REFRIGERATOR a HanaattaaB] Si>aird irnii a llriiuliful in lli'sicn a AlMHaal rillail • Kcniiomiriil Io Operule • B-Tan OuarBnlr**. HI y AX i:\4.1.isn 11 n //in 111111101 it 1 nut ro-inv I FHISH suil'ili \J tUXEMVBB HMh.XTl.t M.WM.X. A IO.. I.TI.-..\K.nl IM.on,V2tl Vi-Tabs i Maakaaal md VilmlH* IS excellent {of growing childrer; Mien %  umbers nf paren h • %  drtn ct • ..M. .11^ .....I 1 .1 j \ axini dellciXH Kll It ihildrm lb. an D rUOd rrarnwih Kl I \i 1 il Oxaendabli 1 lit it 1 IS NO HMit MIUK IHAN KIIM 1. KLIM is pure tofc milk 2. KLIM keept without refric,rration 3. KLIM quality is always in fo, M JB KLIM IS EXCELLENT FOk GROWING CHILDREN 5. KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes b. KLIM Is recommended tor tmVjnt f ;eolnq 7. KLIM is safe in the specially pack?d tin 8. KLIM is produced under strictest control hove pi>e. tofe KLIM M ILK Bill IH MfMMNCI IMI WOlia OVl? Quality has mailc OValtinv the World's "Best Seller" T HE world.wi (lull,,,%  following facial— • • ..:' %  '. J I .,.„..., „f ht.Alh Kl.ir %  xmrid.mriii of lh /ugh ifuuiir. ui id. lassssi /•" ..Mr (-,,., • All ih laaajax / < % % %  d... ...... itn .1 1 ...1 >../hai I .... 1 %  .1 • ., ... (he SjtHK In lh* ; .M.II low. (.ri. r • ConiidmnR MX r.,,/.( %  ...., %  j %  %  %  11 r %  in %  ., I* iha men rn.nomi.ul foo

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IWIINF.SDAY. JULY . 1M1 Govt. Seeks Control Of Election Polls THE HOUSE OK ASSEMBLY yofrday gave the second ng to a Bill having us its purpose the conducting ol • .;> i| nt OIM in.. by the introduction of Adult Sufl Amun.Li the prnpt—ll in Iht Bill, provision is made for the of liquor shops and clubs, the prohibition of the use of loud speakers, banners, flags and favours, bands of musir and the assembling of crowds with 100 yards of polling stations. Th? Objects and Reason* of the up their right of going into the BAftRADOS ADVOCATE PAC.I MM HIIHM. AT VMHOIt Bill The provisions of this Rill are Intended to be supplementary to the provisions of the Itlor. of the People Act. 1M0I. and Act. iii, in reaped the holding of an election of me the General A-^< I provides the neceuary administrative machinery in connection therewith. As i result of the introduction iM rarAraa* some 96.0UO persons haw been registered as uadar the pew KbftnUoa of Voters (Getter*! fljeiinlilij Act. 1951. That Act alea dhrkdoa of the wand into 111 In winch it IN intended to establish one or more polling Stations. It |g therefore obvious that the administrative ina;hmei> Bill section by section and eliminating anything that might not appear to be workable jt in keeping with local conditions. He took It that in due course would go into Committee OB the Bill so that they would be (I able to go carefully into it and put in any necessary amend ments. He expressed agreement witl the provgion of making it an offence for anyone who made or publis h ed .1 faftat %  tatetnant twth the personal '• i M .i i.in.li.late. Mple got up on platforms, and not only Mud had thing* about candidates, but their family as well. This was a deplonbta state of affairs and should be stopped. These were the kind of people who felt they could not make an appeal to the electorate unless FSASSrS returnmg nnd presiding Officers, on in ,,ch a way ejection clerfca and poll clerks m| Will Not Vote %  >f a General Election and Referring to the provision for the tssnoni superintendence of the closing of liquor shops and -such matters will be carried ou*. clubs. Mr. Mottley said that he by a Supervisor of Elections. was not going to vote for that. Time and Plnre Actual voting on polling day will 1*conducted in the lama iM.ihiici M on prevkiu %  but it is cun.-m.T.M ..ivlsjblc > %  > depart from past pracin following respects: the time and place of holding the ale be fixed in the writ mid polling day win not be earlier than 14 days or later than 21 rt..v afto nomination day. This i iu attost sufficient time fur the printing of the requisite number of hallo. papai Nomiualion must be made In the form to be provided and be signed by two electors of the constituency and must be handed, together with the receipt for the deposit, to the Returning Officer bet hours of 9 a.m. and noon on nomination day. ( indidataa are also required to make .* statutory declaration on praeerlbad form af to their quauDeaUona, Provision is i.iso made for the adjournment of the eleeUon In casea ' emergancy, On this he believed he was standing alone in his own party. Any closing of liquor shops would entail the closing of provision shops because it was well known that 90 per cent, of liquor shops aren BUM provision shops "Why should we pass a section that will not be workable." said Mr. Mottley. Some people thought that the only way a certain type of individual could secure election wa by offering rum to the electoral?. This was absolutely Incorrect. There were hundreds of peopl* in this country who at any time. election or otherwise, would put their hands into their pockets and buy a drink for themselves "If you prohibit the selling of rum on Election Day, all it would moan would be that the ordinary shopkeeper would be unable to %  all it but every hotel and every club would be able to do so "Imagine placing a policeman at the Marine lintel, the Aquatic Club or anj such place, to seo that this provision Is carried out' %  aid Mi Mottley. nm I'cgards the suggestion thai r.xuensvs employers should give their emHie expenses incurred in the p i oy ees an hour to vote, not only election which were previously wou i d hIs party supp ort that, but borne by the various local governlh ,. v wU uld go on everv platform menl bodies will be borne by the n lnc w i and and urge people to Central Government and the duties a i low he i r employees to go and of Parochial Treasurer in relation VMX lnelr voles on Election Day to such an election arctransferred Mr j. ABaylies (t) Ml P ad to the Supervisor of Elections. disagreement with the suggestion The opportunity has also been of Mri Mottley as regards the selltaken to inter) provWotu intend|M of Itounrftnim aliopa on Beee; by prohibiting ., lolintrles use ..f loudspeakers, banner*, flag*.. Mr Krrd iimi 4mr4 (El said that --urs (Clause 30) and bands of ) ne dIn nol sfp n( nwctt i, y for •^>;^M*embhns[ closing rum snops OI1 tna day ^^Wyardiofaro „ wouId nave heen m0re lo lhc y point if there was the old system I Of having one polling centre in when, for 27 polling music (Cl polling station (Clause 32) attempt on polling day at ..tun.pt on polling day at inj £" h "'* Z,, n „ fltarncmg sue,, person to vote tor lI r jl" I l B r^^iCda ?r \-. **"u. m| L SJ*5S*te booths in Christ Church. of any public meeting called for the purpose of promoting the election of n candidate (Clause 34) and requiring notice to be given to the police of si/'h meeting (Clause 36). It is an offence to make or publish any false st itement in i elation to the personal character of a candidate (Clause 31). Provision is also made whereby s-mplovers must allow employee* at least one hour to vote and no deduction shall be made fi how could any candidate hope to keep these 27 rum. shops going. "1 know it is done In other countries, but 1 do not think i( is necessary in this island to-day with the change in the election set up. "1 am glad to see that Government has taken opportunity to implement the Address of the honourable junior member for St. Andrew in shifting the expenses [from the Vestries to Government.' wages in respect of the time t iken | accordingly (Clause 2 i. The provisions of th* I generally similar legislation in other West Indian Colonies Mr. AaVima (L' moved the second reading of the Bill and referred to the Ob)ects and Reasons which he explained in detail He said thai he regretted that there was not I provision made in the Bill as to the total amount ol money UuM could be spent by n candidate. He did not think it Gave Day Off As regards the provision for making employers give their employees an hour at least to vote, Mr. Goddard said that he coula not Imagine any employer who to-day would not encourage employee, whether he was voting on his side or on the other, to go and exercise the right of.the vote. Speaking for himself, at the last election he had people In his employ who were living in St. Andrew, and he had actually %  '"' '"' f* "A" with unlimited „i V ,. n ,|,' t ., n the day off so that they la to rpond M.OOO mi hl vote H e knew many merr;T.n Mr ;-J/. lonftft 1 El?* ly %  chants in Bridgetown who made i. ,.>„, r or their employees %  :t convent! spend M-. Lewi* CL1 Mid thai he had. much pleasure in seconding the l • , Bill, but there were one or twof 1 "*? ". S aint* that Ate wanted to make. B perron had only to lie 2i yaw oiii to become .. did not iry for him to Itr called upon to swear to his o.iialil'HMtionL i.,i was questioned by another voter. ii -:^ unfortunate that the Bill was lo he got through by the end Of the month because the House flight find it necessary t lnaa.il the expenditure clause. %  'You glee people of 3! the vote and allow people with money to coir< around and rori u;.! them", he said. He knew that ,:i o:hei candidate* had to make returns of iheir elections expenses. Mr. Lewll said that I'le noticed there was nothing in the Bill to compel the election officers to conduct the counting of the votes In a particular way. The election ofAcari should be %  eld of a method bv which the House Intend to have fchc votes counted, giving the candidates and their canvassers the chance to tee them. Perhaps It would be a good Idea to adopt one of the methods uied %  1 Trial That lh.it the police be allowed to vote altout two days bef->rc polling dav Mr. K. D. Mottley (El said that he thought he was speaking for every member of the Opposition when he sjid that thole for any candid'itc PLEASURE YACHT •Marianne ride* at .inchor alongside HIP inota> BBBB Bed|cfield' in the Careenage. Sailed 5,000 Miles Here From Sweden Mr. U E. Smith (L) said that he welcomed a Bill of that sort, anc is far as the closing of rum shop: rag concerned. the pfovlsiot houW have been on the Statue Book long ago. He was sure that this would put a stop to a lot of the robbery suffered by poor rum shop keeper: on Election Day. It was a fact that some of thi voters did not get as far as the polling booth on that day because of their drunken condition and sometimes they were taken to th< police station instead. Hon. members had it in their power to safeguard the poor "unfortunate voter from drinking to" much rum on Election Day anc they should use it. The honourable junior membei for the City had raised a poin' that candidates should be allowe. to sec the vote* counted. "I hav been told that In some parishe the sheriff keeps the candidate very far off. 1 think they shoulc be allowed to be near enough tbat Ihey cin see the murks on thr ballot paper." The Hl.tei.it. He thought there was a provision in the Bill thdt a blind man would be able to take someone with *im who would be sworn to secreev. to cast his vote for him He had not seen any provision • ntire : ( greemer-,t with the prin-1however, for the persm who. I the Bill. Because they [though he rrnild see. could not agreement with thei IP jd or write. He felt that if this principle, however, did not necesparticular privilege was to be given aarily mean that they had to give On Page 7 In The House Yesterday The House of A. met at 3 p.m. yeetamlay. Mr. Adi'ms laid the following ,, M **age No. 21 1951 from His Excellency the Govenioi to the Honoui able the House Of Assembly informing the Honourable House of propoanls to set up n Body known as the Scotland District Conservation Board under the Chairmanship of the Director of Agriculture. Message No. 22/1951 from His Excellency th.' Governor, on the subject of assistance from the Labour Welfare Fund to enable labourers to equip their houses with proper sanitary conveniences Thirteenth Annual Report of the Peasants Loan Bank 1st June. 1949 — 31st ftfiy, 1950. Quarterly Return of Transaction, in Rum to 30th June 1951. Scheme or Qovenunenl for the Colei id|;e and Pain School. 1951 Barbados Colonial Estimates 1951-52 The following notices were given :— Mr. Adams: Resolution for the sum of $1,000 to supplement the Estimates 1951-52. Part I. Current l>r. (Umnilni: ReBOlUtfOB to sanction the Regulations Of the Immigration of Paupers (Prevention) Act. 1909. Mr. Adams: Resolution to %  Bra Uon the Scheme of Government lor the Coleridge and Parry Schools, under the provisions of section 32 of the Education Act. 1890 (1890-121. Mr. Adams: Resolution to authorise the lease in small plots to agricultural labourers a panel of land of an are;, of approximately live acres forming part of 'Dodds plantation situated in the parish of St. Philip. Resolution to authorise the lease to the Vestry of St. Michael of a parcel of land known as The Princess Alice Playing Field. BILLS Mr. Cox : A Bill intituled an Act to encourage the establishment and development of new industries and to make provision for the granting of certain relief from package tax on customs duly and income tax to persons establishing factories in connection with such industries and for purposes incidental to or connected with any of the foregoing purP< I"— Mr. E. K. WaJeotl tabled a question relating to the grant of funds for the repair of tenantry road* in the variottl parishes. Mr. O. T. Adder tabled %  question relating to the low rate of pay given to dav labourers employed by the Government, The House t atSOd tlic •• oond reading of Bill intituled an Act it make provision for the direction and supervision of the election of members to serve m the General Assembly of this Island, the procedure elections, the expenses al such elections and for other purposes in connection therewith. Further discussion was postponed until M-morn. c when the HOUN n > 5 30 p.m. Patient Discharged MAL'DE MURREl.I.of Barbarees Hill who was injured in an accident on Baxters Rood on Morday night about 7 30 p/cloth r/U treated at the General Hospital and discharged the same night. Two buses and three bicycles were involved In the accident. One wna the National but M-12B7 which was being driven by Cecil Bishop of Bush Hall and the other wot E-62 which was being driven by Darnley Thomas of Western. St James. The buses were nol II.UT aged A Danish crew of four—one i woman—sailed the trim htlli pJoaaure jmcht Marianne into Carlisle Bay yesterday after a 2.700mile run across the Atlantic from Madeira, a group of Portuguese Islands in the Atlantic Skipper Elmar Trastrup. his wife Carina. Junior Elmar Trastrup end handy-majq John Staven%  OD are the Marianne's crew. Thev are making this trip with the Martaane to take her to John Rudbach of Los Angaata, hea American owner. The Marianne is ,i Swedish built yacht. She was built III at Gothenburg. Sweden, by Bertil Bothin—a famous British ship designer—for u Swedish Director, (Jnorpjorn Holm. Ghorpjorn Holm Mid h.r n i John Rudbach who has hind Hmar Trastrup to sail her over lo Los Angele*. Skipper Trastrup is •Hid he makes his living by (ravelling lo places on which he writes. "I thought it a line opportunity to use my pen". Skipper Trastrup said, "and so I unhesitatuigl> accepted the offer to sail the yacht to Los Angeles." Captain Trastrup started off from Co|>enhagen on Ma) !"l fOl lieisingboig. Sweden prom Hol. ingbborg, he called at Falmouth--' England—before K"iiu; on to M..,I.,I i H,. look Jl d vssailing from Madeira bera "Fine Sailer" "Marianne is a Hue sailer." thought the skipper's wife. "We met extremely line weather throughout the trip," she said. "but we were ulw.iv on the lookout i<" %  hurricane, Mnnwbui that these are the i hurricanes Labourer Guilty Of Shooting With Intent AFTER li^likiuri' or maini or to ilu lu-i some >riewoui bodily harm. The bfTancr w committed on ihem th*'. (f the) beUavad Ihm May 20. 1951 Hi* Holiour the the uccuiad held a gun pom) Chiat Justice Sir Allan Colly{at Wvekes and llrvd it with •". i.ioie postponed acntcnc-c. llovIntenti n to malm 01 try* v.as repreeentco oy Mr. J. jharm to Weekes. ; %  for The Marianne i.-lies only sails and somebody has glwayi be .it her helm. The ikippe] wife had ti do her bit of steerjj ing when the three men wore Uresj or otlu-rwiMenguged. With good wind, the Marianne does as much | as \2 knots. Her perform completely satisfactory durtBJj the .iiproximately 5.000-mlle %  ailUni from Corssnnagen hen ltuCK<*ia Weekes I ai ner wvule she was sitting D the t!j.a at -,'ie entrance to her touh Weekes as a rasul, • Lull was wpunde.i UBOJH let iigni oicd-t nc• %  ivdicai attantion The proeecultou railed on -ix < %  pun.the,i | .. lerence caileo on m Phe ArM wltnavs called fur the at 'ion anal Rgt. S'aiiuuiiei sakln who told the Court that w n %  aj !• he went to Congo Ro.ut Si Philip HIHI mteivicw,ed Eilsia Weejce*. who handed him a brown and white petticoat There -.nail nee in the uress ami anottur in th* petticoat with sputu of blood LAUT the ame night hv m* Prowips on Congo Huad ano tolo him that he was aecuanri •*. shooting at Eliua Week.-, aajd arrested hun. On arriving al th* Police station, Proverbs was ceo.unied and formally charged He made ( statement which was read over to him and signed. Interviewed On May 30 he went to Cong-i Itoad. St. Philip wihen he imei %  viewed Weekes again along wlti btff -on Monty Weekes. -Weekes pointed out a spot on the ioa-i trom which he measured to her house. Uiter the same evenln.i he went lo r>i. Huftaoo't Uftir} fend huncied him a sealed envelopHe opened the envelope eho ml..Hied .. sp.-llt hollel He ti"k away the envelop) and the spent imllet and hind them >ii M.> :u n. in. iji \ .in ment Analvst. T Mr. Dear: Congo (toad hano street lamps on It. When the accused wan arrested he saut nothing bul made a stale menl al the Station A spent bullet % %  one that is discharged from the cartridge. rollee Constable tl Shepherd of District "C" said he went to Congo Road on May 29 and there he saw Proverbs. He was .1 ii' .ted .mil .iiitioncil ,n,l -..i.. nothing. At Dfattlict "C" Station Proverbs was charged and cautioned and made a statement lo Sat. Gaskln who read the stateiriefll to him He signed the %  tetemertL Mhdi Weekes wife of Hugh Weekes ind inothci of nine children told the court that she knew I'rov.-rbi for three years. Her son and Proverbs had a case in the Court sometime ago Kelt Burning On May 29 between 8 and 8 30 in the afternoon she was Kitting at her door utid her ami—i,i..ii m> llunte—said something to her. Whde talking with her son Pruverbl and his girl friend walked up In front of her house. After they passed Proverbs returned to hei place and she satand a notea a .mil she felt | ing and shouted "Lord. 1-ook duty to find him guilty There was no evidence that thi j house of the accused was searchev for a gun. He submitted lo then that there afore two which they coul.i Dr. iiuii. said the warn i % %  ad three wounds on her righ lde. The first wound was jboe t IIM. Weekes and n %  Prvverbs the ....,-. i re DO friendly and she Is in Ins lo u) %  hat F*roverb-< uenl on a high' * wlUt children BMysslJ on v and iirr^g K revolver al her hll< he MILS •UtiiiK in her IIOUM* It U for them to bellrcr if ilu was the action of a -wne mar and if ihrrr was a .iArKim IN their minds i It w s theli duty i.. !• %  .. a verdict f no. Kuili. in the ease. Mr. W W Baoaa la %  the jury said Uutl then* I no alibi. He told the i lhal what they had to dorlcle .<-. whether! the aecuseu was in thai i I that fTmc and arbethei he .*., II %  trumentol in the dlaehi i buUet rrom the gun. His Honour then summed US for the Jury. iOH riiiJ BEST IX >l All HIS ASM EtUt THREE PLUME MATCHES AAY SAM*E BVEm\ \\ Hlltl. "MORMACGULF" BRINGS LUMBER THE Mm Mar Corm.ck freiKhlcr MormM*rulr lr'H.aht 441.570 fp^t of lumber Irom KW t. i tin MjulMidoH j'PMerduy. LABOURER INJURED Felix Ituyne, a iJbourer o.' Combermere aHreol st. Michael %  Involved In an aceldent with thi motor bus M-1216 owned DJ I the Diamond Bus Co.. and driven bv Hughbert Forde of Claphnn.. i St Mie#iael on ProliMi S-teet [ about 4 30 i> m reate r oay, Bayne was taken to the c. era! Hoacdtal and detained Darnley Proverbs Shn<* Me." Shhelii up her clotheand heard | fall on the floor HIM husband took her to Dr. Hutson and he attended to her ( To Mr. Itesr: The rOJkJ was in darknaW H there are no street lampe m that area. Weekes said her bodv was not square to the road ami Proverbs was oblique to her. "Proverbs was wearing .. felt hat but no coat. There was an oil lamo in her house and when Proverbs first passed her houseshe kept her eyes on him all the time When the explosion occurred she did not see Proverbs' face but knew it was he Dr. Ilui".., said on Mav 29 he examined F.lioia Weekes at his %  mgerv ,,i Sterling. St. Philip. nere were three wound* under the tight breast, one was one and three % %  be c.iine to bis borne To Mr. Magai McCollin said b' heard the explosion while he wi eating his dinner. Proverb* uan to visit his house regularly Mr J S. B. Dear then addressed the Jury on the | .- %  Il< told FELL FROM LADDER [aOp of Sunbury Tenantry. St Philip was detained at the Qajnanl Hospital after he fell from a ladder yesterday about 3 p.m. Ll'XOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH SUPREME IN QUALITY — Al— — ALV. On. CANS — 1 t AND FINISH 1 !Oli ftlira biUblUhrd KM T. nF.RKF.RT Lid. Hi a LI miU'.t < K STREET. InroraorateO iez Speaker Rules Out Argument WHEN M. 0 IV Alldei. S..„ M ml.-i loi Si John, gave notlci oi certain oueaUons in the Hun-, vi .ie..|i,. in.Speakei objeeted t th • IUM paragraph Ix-inj bun iK.mting out that he ),.„ un-viously informed the lion Member th.it thai paragraph wa disallowed by him on U i th.it it con tamed argumanl rba ii"ii Member bad ban leminded about the fact that Paragjaph 2. before the meeting vened. the S| t Honourable Hous>< to y,\.ih.-ii vtewa, K Hi Honoui did tenb I...Ii 'l,.,l IHUl.oti of Uv* i,ui iu> aid, then fi.it wai of H Mr. t, i. w.-.\. %  ,-: (B) tald that he was in agre.ii,rni with v\ entiling the lion Senior Meuilx-. fo st Joatph had said i n the mattai He lakad the gpoaltei not to beau as hard on eoma members as hi would mi othen ib* feii thai hi sho„id deal %  htiie M ktndb wild rhoea who knew les thai with those who knew more The Speakei In replj raid tha< hi' .ip| %  in %  i.iti-d ilu.iiiviie frorn th o memln-rwho -poke but h ntod to mafca it cleaj thai hi had disallowiil, ovei and re paatedly, questions Ol of question* which Honouruhle Member itted Oliiliiur?; Mr.Walter Marshall The death oeruired evening at he reside doe", Aquatic Club Oai Wulter Marshall, lorn agcr of the Barbad. C ub. Mr Mar> hull Mr and Mis John M li.mk Hail ..mi .,!(.. n ins vean .i ,i u-ik .it DaCoata I i a Ltd he was employed b> Uv i %  of tin I%  He was cone-Tiied in thi ot the club and becaim Managei ill 1B28. He -.a>-. tin club giov Bbd conUnietd h DeeemlMT HUB wtstn hi n ing to iii health .1 tig i-ii' ind parcel I %  %  he Club. With naval |--i American*, he was i guide ami %  „> %  wiling to offei Information Barbadian of life i! married Ohent ol Trinidad whom he leaves as a widow. To Ihaaa end other relative* deopeel sympathy will be extended H %  %  INSIST ON %  •i III.VA mows THEY ARE THE BEST H. JASON JONES & CO. LTD. Agents 5 #> &f # *m tin rrt§ IS PYREX WARE CASSEROLES CUSTARD BREAKFAST. DINNER LARGE BEVI&mXS DISHES in Shell Shapes & SOUP PLATES ROASTING DISHES now available at CAVE SIN I'll 1 Hit A tOiD. II. 12 & It Broad llll.



PAGE 1

I\Y ,nn HXKIIADOS ADVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS. -""" " !" IILKPHONI 1MI Tha .'urge far Births. MMIIUM Death* Arano-i •JUDinU and In al-iint... • M on --!•• 1*4 II for any number of om* up to W. an. 4 (MM per %  MM i %  V..T.I I Sunday* for #—n Fof Blr'ha, Slarruee or I-naagern-il H nounccmrnu In Canli charge k Sioo for eat) nun i up to SO and fl rrnli p*r rord lor eatrt •MMMml won Tcruu Ca>t tMf*e.i. JJO -mi pm. Ill] (of IMalfe (..He-, urilj after 4 0 m. IN MKMOKI AM FOK BKNT REAL ESTATE %  %  it i r ,. all Modern C To Sun a K A Lars;. iiovsrs I a %  IAll %  MM MB %  aiow T^ r MM > .i-n. Goa-i i. %  i.ii .i night beo.r 1 Ever In IK %  %  .-hildrr. crar.il> %  AIRATON. nCK-HlXV TTPrt \CT 1 Pfea *-*i ii i M i t.m I'm | i Ham UM a BloOerii £1*0*. ; %  eg. Ml Coasting for about .n A N C „ a r loom Co-rrn, r-rig.lo fating 1 %  Stone ,i. "" 3 Bedi 1 Fonts ball. I lor Only *U I A IKIWI. CWOIIMU! MHIMII %  %  %  %  Mn-hself, Vestry WHIT.. In fo4nt and ... mimwv of laaac While into In*Citol I' pa Mr l..>f-l and Was lover! to In* end I DAISY a* T *l-ln A.\.\Ol*IS'E.MK.\rS Ttir CAMP on the s. If Uarror Fully furnished Dial B35T i : H | i WA.vn MlKi-num cKarc* ween 71 n uM'dt 3 erm* a word inn word on Sunday* I -,.., H .. .a: • -. W ,, ranged nial 1111 | %  LMTHH Mjiiduif on SOU •*) M TS-.,. Mlla Hill Jul l, %  Lsrga iii.-.tia Moon. I Bad i -..fa.t Room.. W.C .".1 I'alli Comunnt Wate. I hfj i Telephone SerMce. in.lallM Osr.fe 1 B-Ili HELP The aim. NTA In Caribbr.. lui. > iro-n i; oo per h*-t per day GRAVID H IT %  %  hill Hat** from to UO per Wad per day WASIDE INN-On Grand Ana* Balhini Beach Rate-, from M'" :< %  day Knq.urles it D M Sin | | 3oSl -Tn III! M W III M U HU-I-' I 'I W, %  •rd JHiiish their, to kaaal DM M" Slack and luilo., I nw OP rafllttd prntuiiiriii.' %  foolproof or powdered Hull thai 1* I %  Dental Lab. Maga-intI... • HI Mivr A Forivn LOST DODCM WMI-FI c W %  '. %  %  %  | l*rw> and fit. Jan>v. %  %  ad i' i %  i 2i 7 SI -1" Pl-OTS , SAUES--bennri II Jama* Rrnjamin Ciitllnn. n*ar Howrll'i Cow Road Plnd'r will tn %  %  15 1 II ii. HATCH Yonkpr. SUind In %  ) f l'l I I l>H(K*-tr the Tracli A.ct. 1910. 2. Importers and Mc.lT,^lr,(ric Si I'rnti Hrpli -.-rv rcQuind lo Mr O Roddam nionui Dvviopmnt Corporatioti. m (up*R.iod. Imniifi. P O Jamaica. •> 1 S| %  %  I-'.. %  .iKIdr | %  afejan %  nil -l.pl > r —II I i i.i %  LAND-A I d nble biiitdKK atW TIXRK Hare irIUi and In parson. A. Ban Apply bv #|-I VVltrtC Cparlend Child %  Nur.a lo Ai'ply llvrbrrf. Dunlord. Fo,,!.. 14 T SI—lii i Walk %  •! MfJ X0 leet (r l->-irr.,e. rthlnn. Hn-llin %  %  Ittone K..II 11 t SI Appltcaliom aic Invited for the poa. oi Haad Muter of Iho St Andre• %  -I %  . S| ... ruiihA inf.irmali'in Irani \l\r Arvhrtra ton ol Granada. HI corgr < G M.I ^1-Sn I'NDER THE l>. \A.OM> HAMMER FOR SALE naw hoi li D< rdI v ll.t i Hie 2tUl Jl idea T-i IM! I'.' i..| AUTOMOTIVE QAS I**; rul PralactRaa.nn.bl> **** A %  "' priced Call 4AM 14 7 M fa ^^__^^^^_ %  % %  %  in..Jan TUB ot Moraa -im iwo ti %  iparfrrt Morning order Itilr.K li.r %  hm.b. i ...idv.-ir or viaMu atore V.. Ht.M. C i.ll 11 7 51 IB done i.n l v S17 Slii Station WaaVon hardly %  -*d. Hargaln tMOOa under currant, new %  t %  %  Ii-lr-phoue 91 an M 1 SI-In UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER nSSS* th Of nrd-r Of MM 11 n Snlhrrl-nd wa mill aall ha* Furnilura .n "Saudanliila" Cial-a.i Road, which InclUdMI Vmili Arm Chain nh %  prlii|C cinhiia Timothv %  %  iT.n-m A>.,paatr 17 IVIgiivr. Hobe. Hi Walk,. •IS low-, Allan Archibald II Can i lolph -. p/aJb iU Raid. Ceonfe Uncoln •:i Mi.rg.n .van I lndaa i'. ",dd DrlJale %  m BaiuiiMer. Arkfy alt-Ivor rUrrourl •.A -tr'IWM .-. Walker. McDonald .* .,Simeon SSCIair Graham. Bllnga Bogr ;il Wiltaidrr. Erirk Adolpr, B PolUrd. Fu.lacr Tnrroi '3d lamg. Col. in Cleopha. "S* KM K lirnrliri I •o Waterman. Klon.lt M.mt.l-i. M. Naarla. ttaklna Anton Tt Sandiford. Alwvn AnUtaay J> W.lrond Allan PranrH JMaial. I"eter l.nin. %  I Kelt! Andrew t'arlul..1 I.--IHu David .; BYathWalto, NeMlle Clalrmonte 43 Young. John Anaon 44 Heli-m. Uaneaaah 41 tlr.uglut Brat IJewell.it i | llugti Tatrlch AlhellUn 47 \v .r.l tl, tin Anthony •4* Yarde. Keith Alfred 4" Dartow. Rudolph Caill.le >M lt.t'1 V %  loi ( .„.„., SI AlUml. IS 7 SI—Si %  Sports Model. Woiwirv it :1 .1 I11S Colo a. Co. Ltd. II 7 ni 7n %  . .... %  .'.river, Mileage 3MB UJVINK l.lni.d. Telephone J4JB 01 25 7 Three wheel pir -i i A|.|.H I. 0M %  b .. mm :i i %  Ml %  Stoto> %  here I 34U Mai m %  Jraorl Drug Uarae Mon M.i %  Ut ll< !" e. Good (laidini Bench looks, Winter Coal snd other item. Bale II 10 o'clock Term. CASH iriirirtiMTT. IKOIMAN & to. Aur Monet r* Fl i: Title •at including I a J ... Llthl Brackit*. Table IJ lum A Han i %  I i-o. Ltd C % % %  !< In Chi.in. I Mlrrari -ti -.ten DUI jan.i e. trlc.l Dep.rlH-t.kl I'HHIi) KFIa-KIGrUtATOR: *<, eubhc ft. Full width liee/mg chamber Bran* new unit. Ilerondltioncd Ihroughmi! may be Inipccted at Lac Yaid. Chaap... App| H. L Srrllh. Sandford. H Philip 7 I M-t.f.n. MIXI AIU> BULBS -an w.tin....n.i ."i Wm llv J4 7 51 In \l'i P. HI VTARTawtl Dinct-on-lirte •nil Star.Drit-i will. Single Phasing Pre%  ISM [), ,-..*>.. Co. IJd Drpt 34 7 SI -l" I1ATTEJIY KADeO 1SSI %  Limited, Swan SHe' n -] ?.. NOTICE I Hi i" Or KU.N1 TIIOMt SEALED TENDFJtS will be rer by Ihe M the 4i August 1*51 lor the removal nl the < I Oast .i. la x%  iKed on II.-.1 ut Glenflale Tot in.pocHon aSSJll %  Strong Hops Plantallon. Chunrh Warden 1 j T 11 4n | i %  %  i.artlrulara i.i iII %  %  Te.d.l LIVESTCK K IIORSF. One : !'• by Bandit, r laid. Played %  Cox Phone 44* nil-bred chestnut geldilng seven year., nftecn lie season'! polo; |ood Apply. Major SkeweiNOTICE it *At.\T JO.IPS marked nil Ihe envelope, for the Erection ol a Pavilion iheuj will be if-ii-d By mn .il Iha P.rnchUI Treasure' fhSlce up lo •.itunrlnv llth Algu.l. 1SSI ICV Iha rr*Cilion at the Bat Ing Fl'td Mi H H M i %  ,.r at o.e Parochial Treasurer • OfRe*. UathUiob. Each icnd-r pasjss •tlaaSUT two .uretie. nf C4SS each for Ihe due u( Ihe .millact The Social Committee doe* not bind M the lowest M any lemlei J MEMTilN M.e.M:rv Secrrl.r-. Social Cocrunlttae. laM '-Unwind, are the SI Ian* SI %  %  % %  l Year benmng Tuaaak IS ISM. d to MU at tht Hsjad master s oAVe ainmr the % %  %  I i %  .1 FeeHow ell. Timothy %  Raalartck Wlutli... I a i .. • II..II Ueoiae Eihelb'it So,HI.. A.tlmr Wiii.ii! 11.11. IMmtiii.l \Ui wortwu, Kent Wilkinson. Samuet Alsicm tJilmlh. Eri i I i .i Mapp. C Llewrl! i, i pa, Duval Anthony 15 !*pr.iigei H.mm.oid A IS I .hn i.i.-l. Allan I I AnlhOnv II llder. Wavell C 19 Gixnlrldge Tr-vnr Inmoiil. %  %  • RuflV P* 33 Thompaon, Paul Aii-in .n OtHana, We.le. Mtci.ni I'rank WWall %  %  ict of ih si,000 or %  might ft up at : . % %  ... :..i If!., 1"II I. (antas %  ( ( .:.l than : D> 5"t*tton 35 which r. %  %  %  i %  tatini of i.mber ol IMIIO'. "That is not good enouati'On!,u> no fundamental the lUUMtal Mr. Craw find l i^raonally see no reason why twenty-one days hould elapse between NomiinMMl aWrtaOB l'i> Issll Tlui, mn' .1 few >ritioti. InI .. h..M in found u dltt.tha .i-t part of DurlaM] the houra tint tin' |-,u it, open up.ni BM M -t.n shall, for the uurpoae of promoting or procuring Ihe election of any candiv hand of im N.i ixMwn shall play any baixt ,H HUM. .it .n> n liat or In any procession bold [car itM purpose of promoting or procuring the election of any 3 Every person who eontrsLfM provisions of this m tion shall, on conviction by i url ut Sninmary Jurisdiction IMh.ible to a line of one huni onmeitl for three months'' I antavlic Thai iniic was not Msted. %  %  r.ill up.ni pajaj meant that during the cami i> pubttc I'.nkn .mi uiuiot hire any band I ..:..a] ., It is aJosolutC I inldiiK HI whuli .i [KIUIIII! >i.tH vim want to say nobody should ItUSU pMfe ti nillnrru.i tM aJlOWSd t" h.ive nisaaC to In* •I U) total (Ot Hi Liiulitcrrupt a rival candidate's meetfar to U BTtSU lOI what canll>B %  would agrr. .. i:..ii.l> I.i I.IV it .lown lh,ii no "i sssal yOtOtL" person should hire any band or Ul (,..i h..M.tin music even_ ssy ; Ml Croprford -UnI U haVO fjo| a \,.\ ,,f num.. employ c.inviiwers. jrou bum canvassiiig up i Da) Some of us have 1 ..'i to nesr tn ths polling station aim A, iv to voto fur us | am conmonths beton tht .! %  absolutciv fsnU Mr. E. K. Wal. nil (E) P-mtcc. out It might be raaSaOffJWr) to toak* %  onM ."'"'"ii tnti t' UM B-UL inn i i tainly a very necessary one .mil b* Wl pat ind to slip* rl H Mr. Warn* t ,,,,Kjrtunlt tn ic.ul the M whlrn "'ads: Mill until ul-iut nine i hi. o'eloeh EtrOT) pOrtOD who iH-tween the nisht before and it did appear the data <•! notiih.iti.m by UM t„ him that it miiiht tiikc I %  The Hill was by ihe Oovrrnor-iii-Kxeniiuo MCtjOaary mic but it could CriiTiJtuttoa of .i urn lot pmbardli I %  %  xpactas. that -.i %  parl iv )!• ,-nil.l gftM wilh every proaftct poiUnfl it iiich etoetioa peal (whethor In a tenoral .iciion it was the iii-t time, he said. i | .,!!..., m""' ha had Mai I ll> hon senior i % % %  '! .p.iw with another 'n.mlw r tor Christ Church posaito ,,t ,,. .. diwnterl) msonoi ,lU 'V i'-'-'y iH'r,-is,-.-.„,.. With provaol the '" -i***'t thinking that the Govn Of Ihe hu.in.ss ,.f ^^''L^*.?^"^ • ..-..nil" i .'i miiimiin" m _, j , p U bik -MUX..Ned ic, us. :r r ,z^,:;, ling tht lacJv ( tion of a candidate as a mem,,, ln#? -j i for the hon St Andn mi ber to UM) (li-nii.il thai ki'Vcimi amllniig Whir. ii i had suggested in his Address, that it should undertake IS MiO'iuird. Frank Alvi,, 17 Small. Ijall Winston h Arthur, Knv-ii Allan IB MnUley. Hi %  DoCosli 30 Taltt. Anthonlowim,. u iioii. Clrra oihinet ..; Gajafeln, Morvan Andre'j (o.i rtwajti "I3* MornUakf At-... Ilimce a loioai.i bkm. H TSflOr. Joseph DaCn-ta ?B Walton. Robert Michael Ofkl Loro/ %  4J Yrorwood. Aul II."!. n 4> Garretl. *>ars.. %  Government Seek Control .1 be ruDly of an „„. ,. X pens.-s and" not the V. tn,%  *" he bad ti ie.i to stop bun and hao IfcaD i ,i l asjri if Sum,, P1 hlm lh;it lm K IV( ., nm ,. ll( hl( %  i %  Mdj oaddad on that it wsi line of one thousand dollars or „„ K ,,.„i howOVl tilling him s. m be sun kept mi to nn.ki thi .•no be Incapable dui big a period point. 4 Of Hvr tindale i,f Mr Adams liiu.ll> hinted thai i • rtrod might be neeesssry lo put I few n elettiH 0) tfOUtlf at t'h-tlnH." Mi Crawford said that after | | nict.Bg the t'U'ition inuler demon.it i. innditions. and as long as one tlui inn Indulge in violi'tici• in. thing nl the ...ii (hen no roaaon why he uld nut '.i. "inn thing at J publli n • ting it he wanted to ii, %  iiggestlnjj that it thouhl be done in a blood-thlrgt) %  i ill. .me of the i ,• %  of i lection can tin .iiniiuiit ol oppoMt V ,i. iml ihititig tHshopn, ..ut ire elf. tlui; politicians nnd the public should have full OppOl ., ti, The Hill ill it r colon: rag idjoui i in the Bill rai then given iU see.n.l fintliir discussion d until inmorrow 6 Hurl In Storm ARBQUIPA, 1'Kltll, Julv 24, VVIII.K ..I bun II %  ne loti %  whli I ii.ireied tii' rnounWa >ny toi l> hours lefl six persons injured i, e ,1 theni Ml nn.sU II ed extensive propert) damage. i he i"" biii.iii.Hi hurricane %  dust storm blew the rtMaal oil i... i ea m the porjulsi aoeUon oi the rjaky aSad BMaaaaad arVaanai atroeti a/tth rallen brtea —it t;oVKIINMK\T NOTICK aj from pane 5 dind man t UM It should i-rite. (I.) said that Hid Bards the FURNITURE OFPICE CrlAIrUt—Just received I ipmenl of Office Posture Chairs i hre* point adlustment HeItaBMI loll T Geddea Grant Ltd or Di.i **In hi* Ne. Hntot Ttir%  hi %  I'ililH nl HUM. SALE On l-rMx. Ihe au.> IIBI ot tha hou. %  'he hlBhe-tt l.iuder lor an. Sum HOI under the apptiis. ec! value All lhat .-rtaiii ptOOl "I Las t iboul 1440 | (i butting and bound. . ..i, %  road, on und. of Or, | M % %  ranre. at Goc-dl. -.H. Ihe Cl stlol '.' A. otfir.-d to you: Mag HO a p. : lurch Dinlr.il Rmh L'pnght H h^ir. 110 m a or. Bus', pr rtleel An M7I %  ml i i. and from Marti and 1w.: tie Boxes. Within a short while nay be Ihe winner of one pi the followr til Pure SM ot, Ind **r.re MS W. lid Pine M 00. I 7 Sl-Mn Tht heat tor yesterday -. idant Tootnist. John where TO parts •"'fall. The 9 ll Four Roads reported that much of the rdei dical llti FLOWERED OIL HKIN In lleautl't.l : i i i 1 -* >ard l %  .-r will I* K.rpalam. S3 Swan Si —I B 7 SI 1We be, t i notify our ruMomrrt lhat our Parts Department will be V ciu-axi i rroaa MonV day. ar-h July, for a week. Alw | 't.alr and Kerv . \ nierils will be rk-ird aafel annual \ holidav There will be a skeleton A ataO on duty for cmrrgancie*. POLMMasM K-ep your 'lonr In good tondition with Johnaor.'%  Dial Sana Da Coata ft Co .td. Ekrc. Dept S T SI In to a l also be given could not read or Mr. O. T. Allder It appeared there discrimination eg fi closing of cluhs im He felt lhat if small tr to refrain from doing b liquor on Election Dey, it shoul i be done in suPh a v/ay :t | could say, "You have fa i small trader to elOH Ins bUaBUM hut you have said or done nolhln as regards the big httels. •T notice that clubare HUH tioned and liquor buslns i ,i. mamUonea, but -t* all fcrno* IhM hotels considei th> lilTeunt from rum shop %  n %  octal (lull win %  b -old Another point was the 'f allowing j>eople In gn w|tj 'lliteratex to the bOOthl to eaf" their vntes for them. "I wag hoping to see provision for the use of %  boll ;i % %  done in Jamah ind Trinidad. I think that would my to aaasii t U Would not di'tlnttinsii the names of lidates. "I hope that .it the pTOp> an amendment wll include the use of symbols." Mr. F. Miller i|.) geld was n't •' % %  •u,: there ihould !• thi tion of the selling of rum on Deetlon i^ ) He did not think tin n.ent would find it necessarv to uso symbols It the .-lection. He thought Itarhad-r. ought to be barjea v*ere thi-. wai l %  *ary. It wa. not a goo i on any country whicj Ul H %  aasmry nd he u,,-. ., given an opportunity to n akc Iho 4 Mr. H A. Orawterd n i that he would have liked wo.k wai held up in the lleldl bv I mor m0 <> read the Bill full, the IntcrmilUnt shower. "^ wrnpam it with sim.l other districts ( llsn '"" Colonial legislation I'lstncl A" 30 parts, Dis-1 tlict "C" 41 parti. District B parts. District "D" 14 parts, and n • • Cuntact with thi 0OT and In some cases it was dlftlcult for U %  tor of the Station to Ms branch %  %  APsaUcattooa iraj Invited for the I'.ist .if Stenographer-Typist ir. the Adimnistratii II Ixpm tinrut (Legislative) SI. LAicia. The po-! |,eriMi,ii.ii le ..rid i.iriies a salary of 11-200 plus i M hviiig bonus ,it the iijmv.d rate Thi appointi % %  '. %  '!: % %  I I Orders in fni, fi.im tUM to time The candidate nleetod iVUl be appoaaited on a probationar> i one real In tne and lna**uica and will be required to taki %  Of meeting* tif Ihe 1 %  rn il and perforrr. such oth'i Tn-s a* may be assigned to him %  . Coat of passages of appointee and taUnll] (Up to a maximum ol t) will be paid in the first Instance and is refundable If the appointee I potourient within one year. Applicants should furnish full details of qualifications and expei oinpanted by at Uaat two tes'.imonials and a certificate ol fthieh should reach tin later than :ilst July. 1931 Administrator. Si Luci 31.7.61—• not I O 11:. --.'.'-'.-e',-,.',-.',',', ,',',-.',-,',-.-.'. RECORDS: Charlie Kunf. Bin,. tw-m night tl Ltd if aT-lfa '-(-ported. Only one trafnc acci— d ent occurred In D motor car ran ;nto the f^:l^!^r^Cll, B d a;c:; a moving truck du. to a wet I El-ctrlca! Dept M 7 SI n road. NOTICE Dr. Prfsrsd B. OVak begs to inform hi. I that h. < a closed from Saturday 38th July, a nd will bre'Opt %  • onday ZOIh August. ITEM'S TO CHOOSE ER0M. r.-11111! Spread: (hrrv per lb I'earlim: trull Salad Tin* Whole To malax*; I.Ms CryaUN: Hmakfast Kulla; Salad ONUM OUva till In tins: HorlkUs Malted Milk: Hams In tins: Klim 5-lb. Iln. t.ouda Cheese It lb. blocks; Nescafe Cocktail Onions Olive-, -niiied A I'liiin TIM Toffee and Peppermint*. lAVIIIIIs IAMBUS 111 HIM M I.IQIHK. SHIPPING NOTICES HAIiKLSON LINE OUTWARD rROH THZ UNITED KJH0D0M ran-] 8.S. "TRADER" SS EXI'l.otlKH SS "STI'IIENT" AOV1SER" NOVELIST SS "HEHI1SMAN" SS -•s From Leorrs Due 7th July 22nd Julj e* I^H.dnii 7th July 2lrd July I^rndon llth July 26th July Glauow 12th July 25th July — London UrtJ J1U3 6th Aug %  Ijwerpool 36th July 7th Aug %  OfcuewARD roa raa DNITBD -JWODOM Closo U ss "SCUI^R. ..uv-ra5. SSnZX!. IIHFSMAN" ..Londmt lh Juh S STRATEGIST" Gr-.no,K 2IM Jul. ror funh.r information tpplr tc DA COSTA A CO^ LTD.—AaaaaS Canadian National Steamships BO irnsoIwo Naaas .f Ship I ADV MEIJKtN i AN CHttlJULK i*AN i. M i i -;,: %  H 1ADY IHlllNKY CAN coNarTTUaTTOR t AtV NKlJJON S) June la July SO July > July 13 J ily 33 J ily — I Aug. 4 Aul 13 Aug. — II Aug. IS Aug 3 Sept u J 31 Julv a Aug 14 Aug II Aug NOBTSSOINS All Naaas af aaip Baras Aril.** Armas I ADV NELSON LADY ROPNgY IADY NELSON I.ADY HODNEY 7 July l July 3S Aug Aug. !• Oept II Sa^f. 1 Orl IS Oct. 7 Aug. • Sept II ,p| a. -nrsn %  Sapt 3 Oci 37 Oet Oet | NOVT GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agenta. ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. I BSSA Jim Jui^ „M AtlAUBMNOX and AiifUO U i turn ],,, A.igu.i itni stiiisi. i II i n -,*,, AatnrsaUAM OBANIBSTAP Sth Aug.i.1 ISt II INt. lo II I'M. in i ..in. i AND USMROkTOWN BOXAIHt Jl.i J,,|v (Nl *£*ffP*$* '•'" Auglirt I • orm A -j;ih Augusi itai -Mils,!, in iHIMOtli IM, CI'RAt 4 0 %  BRA lath Aug.,.i 1*91 — S..N A i ti LTD A....I FRENCH LINE Cte Ole Trsnsstlantique "(AIIJNO TO ENGLAND A FRANCE S.S. "Colombie" 22nJ. July i I'M. via Martinique and Guadeloupe. Have you a noisy Gear Hox or Differential ? We recommend 4.IIIM I I I A* 1'roduM of Germ l.ubrlcanta Lid. i IMH vi loiunn I.TII. Corner of Br< Wm. FOtiARTY LTD. ./## i n. i MI on A SONS I.I it. Ill VI. ISIATI. "Thion* In John M. Bladon a UnUng look* sa though It might ami us. Wa had bettor call and bar* a chat with him as I know from In, reputation b will give, uall tha balp he can and in any ra.a tin usually baa for aala everything worth having I Oil A Hf. Ill %!IO\ AMI AF S .* V A. Phone 4640 Plantations Building NOTICE We beg to notify our Customers and the general public that we will be closed to business from Thursday 26th to Saturday 28th July, for the purpose of. . STOCK-TAKING. Our Office will be opened however, for payment of accounts. NEW ARRIVALS STYLE PATTERNS BRODERIE ANGLAISE, ORGANDIE ANGLAISE. Wm. FOGARli LTD.








ESTABLISHED 1895

ma

fharbados



Cease-fire Talks Still
Deadlocked Over The
Withdrawal Of Troops

UNITED NATIONS ADVANCE CAMP
BELOW KAESONG, KOREA. July 24.

ALLIED OPTIMISM
ceasefire increased
munist propaganda for

Nations forces from Korea.

over the chances for a
tonight despite new Com:
the withdrawal of United
U.N. quarters stil]

looked for Communists to back down on the demand
at the resumption of ceasefire negotiations in Kae.
song scheduled for 11 a.m. tomorrow. The 96 hour
Communist requested recess in negotiations expires

then.

U.N. representatives had hoped the Reds would
send word that they were ready to resume before

that hour, but there was
up to a late hour.

Negotiations came to a tem-
porary halt Saturday in the dead- |
Jock over the Red demand for the
withdrawal of U.N. forees as a
condition of Armistice.

Chief U.N. representative Vice-
Admiral C. Turner’ Joy made it
clear that the Allies would not
agree under any circumstances to
put the withdrawal question on
the Armistice agenda.

He said the question was a poli-
tical ene to be taken up at a peace
conference after the Armistice had
taken effect. It was at this point
that Communists asked and were
granted a four-day recess to con-
sider the Allied position.

Breakdown

If they stand firm on their with-
drawal demand, truce talks almost
certainly will be broken off.

Some Allied circles believed that
Communist negotiators after con-
sulting their superiors in Pyong-
yang, Peking. and possibly Mos-
cow will introduce some sort of
facesaving compromise proposal
tomorrow,

Early feeling that the Com-
munist requested postponement
was a ruse to cover offensive pre-
parations was almost gone. Most
sources felt that if the Reds were
planning some treachery, some-
thing would have happened before
this. Ground fighting along the
135-mile front continued on only
a minor scale.

U.N. units drove Communists
from high ground southwest of
Kufisong o the octt-rentral frent
and repulsed the Red attack south-
east of Canson.

Radio Pyongyang broadcast the
latest Communist demand for the
withdrawal of U.N, troops from
Korea during one of the regular
programmes on Tuesday morning.
“The Korean people firmly de-
mand the withdrawal of all for-
eign troops.”

It charged that the South Korean
forces started the Korean war by
invading North Korea at the in-
citement of the U.S.

It said, “Today, when the U.S.
Government is in the position of
having to carry on the ceasefire
talks, the representatives of Ridg-
way and the U.S. military men are
attempting to have us certify that
the U.S. must for an_ unlimited
period keep troops in Korea. The
U.N.. and undoubtedly the U.S.
imperialists, are trying to expand
their munitions production and to
gain huge monopolistic profits,”

U.N. circles regarded the broad-
cast more as propaganda than an
authoritative indication that the
Communists intend to stand firm
on their demand for an immediate
withdrawal of U.N. troops. It
said, however, that the Pyongyang
Radio significantly did not predict
the failure of the Kaesong meet-
ing.—U.P.

no word from Communists

‘Reds Have |
9,000,000 Men
Under Arms

PARIS, July 24.

The Secretary of State, Dean
Acheson, said on Tuesday night
that the Communists have 9,000,-
000 men under arms, backed by
20,000 firstline Soviet planes. He
warned, “we are in great danger,
greater perhaps than many Amer-
icans now appreciate.” Acheson’s
grim analysis of the Communist
military might was ineluded in a
major foreign policy speech at the
ceremonies marking the 250th
anniversary of ‘the founding of
Detroit—heart of the ex-
panding mobilization drive.

Acheson said that the defence
programme must be stepped up to
bolster the U.S, and its Allies
against the threat to world peace
posed by the massed Communist
forces. Acheson did not go into
detail about the possible increases
in the U.S. armed forces, but said
that even to meet the present
“minimum goals” will require
“greater effort from us and our
Allies.” 7

He gave this official estimate of
the present Communist military
power—“The Communist armed
forces at present total some
9,000,060 men. The Soviet Union
has more than 4,000,000 mep under
arms. The Chinese Communist
forces exceed 3,500,000 men.

European satellite regimes have
nearly 1,000,000 men. The Soviet
Union has more than 200 divisions
fully mobilized, In addition, the
Soviet Union has a trained reserve
of massive proportions. The Sov-
iet Air Force is the world’s larg-
est in peacetime, with more than
20,000 first line aircraft, a large
proportion of which are jets of ex-
cellent quality.” .

He said that faced with such an
array of Communist armed force
“it would be as dangerous to re-
lax our effort as it is to fall asleep
in a blizzard.” ;

De Gasperi
Forms Cabinet

ROME, July 24,
Premier Designate Alcide De
Gasveri called on President Luigi
Einaudi to present the Cabinet list
for his new two party Government



to Italy,
De Gasperi drove to the
President’s summer villa at

Caprarolo about 30 miles north of
Rome to report he had been suc-
cessful in putting together a
Cabinet to replace the one that
resigned July 16. —U.P.



Israel Goes To

Polls On

July 30

TEL-A-VIV, July 24,

More than half of Israel’s population will go to the
polls on July 30 to elect their Knisset (Parliament) for the
second time since the establishment of the young state.

Almost a score of the
candidates ranging

rivals for the 120 seats of the

Minister, Ben Gurion’s Labo

lead over all.

The first -Knisset, elected in
January 1949, was dissolved ear-
lier this year, when the coalition
government broke up due to
orthodox opposition to the gov-
ernment’s policy on religious edu-
cation.

Preliminary estimates predict
that the Mopai, the Labour party
of Ben Gurion will again emerge
as the strongest party, but not
strong enough to be able to rule
withou: a coalition.

The total number of vote.s en-
titled to take part in the poil ex-
ceeds 850.100 out of a total popula-
tion of more than 1,410,000, Very
few eligible voters are expected lwo
abstain.

New immigrants will vote along
with the old settlers. Many of them
have come lately from North Africa
or the Middle East countries.



The “ADVOCATE”

pays for NEWS
Dial 3113
Day er Night.



parties with more than 1,000

from extreme right to extreme left are

Knisset, where the Prime
Party has hitherto held the

ur

Big Question

The big question in the forth-
coming elections is how this great
flood of new immigrants will
vote in their first polls, Most of
them have little or no conception
of modern politieal systems. The
national election is being fough
on domestic issues rather than on
the question of East versus West
orientations.

Co-operation with the West is
for the great majority of Israelis
no longer a question of democratic
way of life but one of bread and
butter. The reason is apart from
political aspects—economic

Much of Israel’s initial economic
development is attributed to the
loan of the Export-Imports Bank
of $100,000,000 granted two years

}ago and to the more recent agri-

cultural. improyement loan of
$35,000,000.

Financial aid from United States
Jews has also contributed largely
to soften Israel’s economic plight
and its importance remaims un-
j; abated in the light of present
‘growing requirements.

{ Recent legislation has moreover

ltried to encourage United States|‘the British Union Oil Co., agreed| He

j and other foreign investment by
g the number of facilities
gn investors.—U.P.

te




150,000 Men
To Korea
REPORTS SAY

TAIPEH, July 24,
Nationalist Intelligence officers
lent support to private reports that
Chinese Reds have been moving
another five armies aggregating
150,000 men from northwestern
China to Korea,

These officers who refused to be
named, described the China Union
press report that Chinese Reds
ire stepping up troop movements
to Korea as “very likely.” The
China Union press which special-
izes in China mainland news cov-
erage, said one of five armies part
of Yao Chi’s_ suicide army
group left north Shansi for Man-
churia during the middle of July
and was expected to arrive ir
North Korea early in August.

Intelligence officers refused to
say whether troops movements
indicated Chinese Reds were bent
on starting a new offensive before
Kaesong peace talks end,—U.P.



Tanks And Police

Patrol Teheran

TEHERAN, July 24,

Tanks rumbled through the
streets of Teheran, and police an’
soldiers with fixed bayonets cor-
doned off the Majlis, when 606
Communists, “partisans of peace,”
defied the government ban ‘on
demonstrations. The ‘partisans’
assembled outside the Parliament
building just after the Lower
House went into morning session.

They demanded that they be
shown the secret graves of 15
“peace” sympathizers killed dur-
ing the rioting here on July 15,

The demonstration was orderly
— but 200 police and troops were
moved into the square to prevent
any attempted disturbances.

Tanks returned to the suburbs
after the demonstration. Six
army trucks with mounted ma-
chine guns, were posted § con-
spicuously and strategically
around the area.—U.P.



BUSTA IS SILENT

KINGSTON, Ja,, July 24.

Bustamante was silent to-day on
the question of giving full minis-
terial power to five elected mem-
bers of the Executive Council of
which he is one. It was announced
to-day that the Governor is send-
ig Mac Gillivray, the Colonial
Seeretary to Trinidad to study the
Constitution there, where the Min-
isters have the real power of their
Portfolios with a view to adoption
in Jamaica where Ministers are
not responsible.

Bustamante previously an-
noynced when the issue was put
in that his Ministers were ready
to accept full ministerial powers
provided this does not entail a
General Election before 1951.

Recent political events in the
colony indicate a strong swing
towards the Peoples National Par-
ty whose outright socialistic policy
{s based on self government.

The Party however wants a
General Election if Ministers are
to be given increased power—(CP)

Britain And U.S.
Discuss Spain

LONDON, July 24.

Minister of State, Kenneth
Younger told the Commons last
night that Britain and the United
States had exchanged views on
the question of Spain’s contribu-
tion to the Atlantic Pact.

He said the United States Gov-
ernment instructed their Am-
bassador Stanton Griffis to explore
ae question with Spanish author-
itles,



—UP.

WEDNESDAY, JULY



|

THIS CEREMONY took place in the Russian Orthodox Chursh, London, on the installation as a Bishop





25, 1951





La

ot Archimandrite Vitaly Ustinov. The picture shows the new Bishop (centre, wearing Orown) during the

ceremony.—Eypress,





U.N. Planes Blast\Jowit'Votead
Rail Junction

Troops Push On 3 Miles

EIGHTH ARMY H.Q., Korea, July 24,

Allied patrols push
munist territory on the B

more than three miles into Com-
je front testing the Communists

will to fight on the eve of resumed ceasefire talks in Kaesong.

Showdown In
Labour Camp
Shapes Up

LONDON, July 24.
showdown fight between
Minister Attlee’s Labour
Government and the dissident
forces of Aneurin Bevan shaped
up today as the Party's local
echelons voiced open concern over
Attlee’s policies.

Marked hostility by the rank
and file of the Labour members to
the rising costs of living and con-
cern at the size of Britain's re
armament programme highlighted
the publication of the prelim: v
resolutions “—_ submitt for the’
ruling of the Party’s annual con-
anes at Scarborough in October
—D.

The

The
Prime

resolutions indigated that
many of the Party’s local units fee!
that Attlee’s government follows
Washington's foreign policy line
too closely,

Several proposals support the
stand of Aneurin Bevan, the form-
er Labour Minister, who seeks to
wrest control of Party policy from
the cabinet.
other rebels on the Party’s 26
member executive claim that
the size of the. rearmament pro-
gramme threatens domestic Social-
ist goals.—€P),

Bevan and_ three



Brazil Army Chief
Visits Washington

NEW YORK, July 24,
The Chief of Staff of the
Brazilian Armed Forces, Pedr
Aurelio Goeg Monteiro will leave
for Washington today, for a series
of official calls before conferring
with U.N., officials on Brazil’s con-
tribution of troops to the Inter-
national Anti-Aggression Army
In Washington, Goes Monteir:
planned to call on the Seeretary
of State, Acheson, Defence Secre-
tary George Marshall, and Chiel
ef Staff General Omar Bradley, as
vell as members of the Inter-
American Defence Board.
He said yesterday, on arrival

from Rio, aboard the Uruguay,
that in addition to the U.N,,
mission, he would confer with
officials in Washington on the

execution of military co-operation
and resolutions adopted at the
fourth meeting of the American
Foreign Ministers,

Goes Monteiro, however, does
not have any definite plans for the
Washington visit. He said that he
would remain as long a8 necessary.

On his return from Washington
he will confer with the Chairman
of the U.N. Collective Measures
Committee, who, by a coincidence,
is Brazil’s representative to the
U.N. Ambassador Joa Carlos
Muniz. He also expected to confer
with the Secretary General and
top military adviser, Colonel
Alfred George Katzin.—U.P.



B'dos Oil Rights:

LONDON, July 19,

Complaints of a “broken
promise” by thr Government of
Barbados over oil prospecting
rights in the island have come from
two sources in London—one from
Lord Teviot, a Director of the
British Union Oi! Co., in a letter
to the London Times, and one from
Members of Parliament.

Lord Teviot, in his letter, out-
lined the situation briefly,
pointing out that before the pass~-
ing of the Barbados Petroleum
Act in January, 1950, the British
Union Oil Co., held leases over 78
per cent of the drillable area of
| the island

“When

nationalisation
| rights

suggested,”’

of oil

was he said,

to surrender its leases on the
understanding given by
Governor and his high official

the time that a prospecting licence

would be granted to the company |

over the whole of the isjand.

| “When tne Petroleum Bill was
|passed, the Barbados Government
|broke its promise to the British
Union Oil Co., and offered it a
licence over 55 per cent of the
island on such terms that the
icompany had no alternative but
to refuse. The American Gulf Oi!
i\Company accepted the terms,
| witch have since proved so un-
‘workable that they have been
| considerably amended.”

Lord Teviot pointed out that the
company ,had been established in
Barbados for more than 30 years
and had contributed materially to
tthe welfare of the island’s people
added: “The result of the
Barbados Government's actions ho

the! been to deprive the company of

it irilling rights and under the



The deepest penetration of U.N
trcops was made north of the
Hwachon reservoir on the eastern
front when a patrol thrust for-



| ward three and a half miles with-

lout making any contact. Twe
patrols meved out more than two
miles northeast of Kumswa, the
{south eastern corner of the old
‘iron triangle” also without mak-
ing effective contact with the
Communist front line. The Reds
sent out patrols in some sectors,
and there was a brisk five-minute
fight before one was thrown back
on the Western front.

Four waves of B29 Superfor-
tresses biasted the key west
Korean railway junction of Sari-
won with more than 70 tons of
bombs.

* Airforces took over the brunt of
the Allied offensive effort against

nists as ground fighting
sontinued on only a minor scale.

Superforts aimed their cargoes
f 500 and 100-pound bombs at
wo adjacent railway marshalling
yards at Sariwon, which lies al-
nost midway between Pyongyang,
North Korean Capital and the
‘easefire conference city of Kae-
song,

Bombers ran into some anti-
‘ircraft fire but all returned safe-
iy. It is at Sariwon that the main
Sommunist supply route in west-
rn Korea divides, one line run-
ning directly south toward Kie-
30ng, and the other east toward
the battle zone.—U.P.





Search For Missing
Plane Intensified

ALASKA, July 24,

The search for the Korean air-
aft DC 4, missing over the rugged
\laskah coast with 88 persons
iboard, was intensified with the
iddition of 14 more planes,

Officers of the 10th Rescue
Squadron at Elmendorf airforce
case said that they planned to
ake every advantage of the clear-
«ng skies for the first day since the
Canadian Pacifie Airliner van
ished on Saturday. Additional
planes will supplement the squad-
ron of 21 which has criss-crossed
she 31,000 square miles area with-
out finding any trace of the miss-
ing craft.

Until to-day, fog, clouds
‘uin have hampered the search
planes skimming over the snow-
capped peaks along the southeast
coast. Aboard the missing plane

and

were 26 U.S. servicemen, three
civilian government employees,
two Canadian navy men and
even crewmen,.—U.P.



U.S. PLANES INVADED

MANCHURIA—REDS SA‘
TOKYO, July 24.
Peking Radio early on Wednes-
day said eight United States jet
planes invaded Manchurian terri-
tory on July 21, out of which seven
were shot down by Red Chinese
air forces.—U.P.

Broken

terms of the Petroleum Act no
compensation is payable for the
(loss of its rights, the potential

value of which is obviously
considerable.”

The day after this letter was
| published in London, Col. Gomme-
Duncan, Conservative M.P., for

very

Perth, raised the same matter in|
'

the House of Commons, asking
Mr. James Griffiths, the Colonial
Secretary, about the Government’
attitude to the report submitted by
Mr, Lepper, the Colonial Office
expert, who recommended that a
ole prospecting licence should be

granted to the British Union
Oil Co.
No Monopoly
Mr. Griffiths declared that hi

predecessor Mr Creech-Jone
has agreed with the report,
that the Barbados Government had
decided: that it the t

not ir

E that the United Kingdon



Iran Mission

LONDON, July 24.

The British Cabinet named Lord
Jowitt to head the proposed mis-
sion to Lran to discuss with Pre-
mier Mohammed Mossadeq, the
Anglo-Iranian oil dispute,

Authoritative sources said that
Jowitt, who as Lord Chancellor is
a top legal expert would depart
as soon as the Cabinet decided
there was “reasonable hope’ for
agreement

A “special mission” is reported
to have been suggested by United
States Roving Ambassador, Aver-
ell Harriman.—vU,P.



PETAIN WILL BE

AT ILE D'YEU

ILE D'YEU, France, July 24,

The body of Henri Phillippe
Petain who lived a hero and died
a disgraced exile lay in a smail
black casket dressed in the uniform
of the Marshal of France, Petain
will be buried tomorrow on this
bleak Atlantic island in that uni-
form with the Medaille Militaire —
France's highest militar
on his breast, but his

BURIED TO-DAY |

y henour-—
family and

friends are convinced that one
day he will lie beside men who
led the French to victory at
Verdun.

During World War I, and even
before his death yesterday at 95
in a grim fortress where he was
sent by the High Court in 1945 for
collaboration with the Nazis, his
family had demanded that he be

buried at Douamont where his
French soldiers who fell during

the historic siege now lie

—U.P.



Britain To Buy
95.000,.000 Bushels
Of Canada Wheat

OTTAWA, July 24
‘Trade Minister, C, D, Howe an-

would buy 95,000,000 bushels of
Canadian Wheat in the new crop
year starting frceen August 1, under
the international Wheat agreement.

Britain also will buy 350,000 tons

an interest in buying 250,000 tons
more than the stipulated 95,000,-

000 bushels, if it is available pues)

side the international wheat
agreement A meeting will be
held on September 30 to discuss
the sale of additional wheat.

that the 95,000,000
suld under the I.W.A.
be at the price of $1.80
per bushel U.S., or
dian, plus six
carrying charge.

Howe said
bushels
would
$1.89 Cana-
per

cent bushel

—U.P



TOO MUCH SUGAR

NEW YORK, July 24

The Wall Street Journal Com-
modity Columnist expresses doubt
that che United States consumers
will be able to take the 8,250,000
tons of sugar allotted them this
year by Government;

He pointed out that the sugar
demand is one third of what it was

ja year ago and only half the rate

of two years ago—vU.P.

Promis







PRICE:



FIVE CEN



RED DEMAND IS

NOT A PROBLEM

Says General Marshall

WASHINGTON, July 24.
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE, George C. Mar-
Shall told a press conference on Tuesday that
the basic conditions to an armistice agreement in
Korea include a military line whjch will be defensi-
ble in the event of renewal of héstilities.
The text of Marshall’s prepared statement on

Korea:
ing truce negotiations

Ridgway is trying to

“I wish to make brief comment coneern

in Korea, What General
accomplish there is the

negotiation of a suitable military armistice.

This negotiation on battlefields
is entirely a different problem from
negotiation of political settlement.

It is essential that the two
natters be kept eytirely separate
and distinct. If it is acceptable
that the armistice can be obtained
he discussion of political ques-
‘ions can follow on Government
level.

The statement continued: “If
the talks are resumed and get to
the substance of the armistice
irvrangement, there must be
wreement upon the military line
which will be defensible in the
event of any renewal of hostili-
ties

There must be
iot to reinforce troops now in
Sorea, There must be provision
or adequate supervision and ac-
tual inspection by representative
of both sides to insure against any
preparations for a surprise attac
and as continuing evidence of goo
faith there must be © satisfactory
agreement regarding prisoners o
war

These are basic conditions to ai
armistice and the agreement wit!
respect to them must precede late
issues to reach a final settlemen

{ the Korean question

SIX agreements

—U.P.

Students Confer
With B.C. Chiefs

From Our Own Corpespondent

LONDON July 24

A West Indian Students Unio
delegation led by President Mi
Dudley Thompson conterred witi
british Council authorities fo
three hours to-day about the sit
uation at Hans Crescent

Commenting on the Director ot
Colonial Scholars letter Uresten:
ing action against five scholar:
among Hans Crescent strikers, Mr
H. Oxbury, Welfare Administrato:
of the British Council told the
delegation he was surprised at Mr
Keith's letter.

The W.1.S.U. delegation in
statement pointed out they could
not dissociate the Hans Crescent
situation from “the general unsat-
isfactory arrangements for accom-
modation for Colonial students’
and added “students have tried
are trying, and are still willing t
wy and cooperate with the Colon-
ial Office provided the latter treat
them as human beings and not
chattels,”



A report on to-day’s conference
will be submitted to the Union.

W.LS.U, has to-day petitioned
S.cretary
ics James Griffiths for
view

an inter-





of State for the Colon-|

Britain Awaits
The Invitation

From fran

LONDON, July 24

Britain is awaiting an invitation
from Iranian Premier Mossadeg to
resume discussions on the Angio-
sranian oil dispute but _ officials
made it clear they would not nego-
uiate if the acceptance of Iranians
oil nationalization law were made
1 prior condition

The Foreign Office received a
report fram the British Ambassa-
jor in Teheran, Sir Francis Shep-
ierd on a memorandum which
*ersia had handed last night to
V. Averell Harriman, President
Cfruman’s special envoy.

Terms of the Iranian Gov-
‘rnment for the resumption of
ulldress negotiations were qunder
le tudy but the British Gov-
rnment has so far not been able
o form an opinion on their
‘eptability.—U.P.

Burma Rejects
Jap Peace Pact

RANGOON, July 24,

It was learned on Tuesday, that
S8urma has informed the United
States Government, that she does
1ot approve the draft of the Peace
Creaty with Japan which enables
Japan to evade reparations which
3urma feels fully justified to
press.

Burma estimates that Japan
ronan AKMe country with 5; -
000 rupees in’ military cur-
ency, caused damage to property
‘stimated at 12,675,000,000 rupees
ind caused more deaths by occu-
yation and foreed labour on the
nainland of Burma than total
losses among allied prisoners

It was pointed out that Burma
has no vindictive feelings against
Japan; she has supported Japan's
asmission to certain organisation
in the United Nations and reestab-
lished trade.

The Burmese demand for repar-
ations were motivated by rehabil-

ace



itation needs At no time has
Burma received any substantial
contribution from any source for

this task

Burma considers unjustified, the
plea that Japan is unable to pay
reparations without injuring her
own economy-—hence she will not
sign any treaty which does not
}provide adequate reperations to
'Burma,—U.P.



Death Of B’dos Seaman:

cont oie") Doliceman Fined £10

It is said that Britain has shown |

March.

King was a seaman in the Brit-
ish cargo ship Strategist. He
was involved in an incident o1
March 3 in which the policeman,
Johannes Stephanus Koch Visser
was alleged to have struck him
blow which coused a haemorrhage
leading to his death two days later

Another policeman named
Groenewald, was with Visser at
ihe time of the incident and he
appeared as witness for the
Crown when the charge against
Visser was heard by Mr. J. T

Carnie in the Cape Town Magis-
trate’s Court The story told in

court was that the two policemen
unconscious, to

lad taken King,

A Cape Town police constable has been fined

an assault on a West Indian seaman, } t
led to King’s death while he was in Cape Town early in

CAPE TOWN, July 12.
£10 for

Milton King, whieh

MAYER ASKS
FOR SUPPORT’

PARIS, July 24
Rene Mayer, 56-year-old out
going Justice Minister asked th

National Assembly to approve him
as the Premier of France to open
the way for the formation of ¢
new middle of the road Coalitio:

Cabinet following last month’
general electior

When Mayer went before the
Assembly to ask for a confidence
vote his chances of getting tne

necessary 314 votes were still ur
certain, Mayer told the Assembly

: police station and reported that that his government would hay

they had arrested him on a charge

of drunkenness

Confessed Liar

‘These two men only know
whe hit King the blow in the
| street which caused his death,”

interests of the island to grant a:suid Mr, Carnie. How ear re
monepoly to the British Unionjarked to accept Groenewald’s
Oil Co. ft was then that Col.|statement that Visser struc!

Gomme-Dunean declared that the
|decisiens constituted a
lof a promise” on the part of the

Barbados Government and the
/Colonial Office.

“It is not a case of a broken
promise,” replied Mr. Griffiths
“This was the recommendation ¢

a committee appointed by th
Barbados Government and it is f
them to decide whether they wil
accept its recommendations.”
Col.Gomme-Duncan then ga
notice that in view of the
satisfactory reply, he would
the matter on the Adjournment at

the earliest opportunity Th
means that Col. Gomme-Duncat
will initiate a half-hour debate i
the House of Commons on tt
subject

—B.U.P

“breaking |

‘lof one or the other

“I do not know why the are
etupid and inhuman as to

cate this story and charge King
with drunkenness They could
still have allayed suspicion of the
| blow and given him medica!
ittention It ij on the me
conseiences. I am_ inclined

| believe that Groenewald is the mar
{who struck the blow but the

court cannot rely on the evidenc
constable

Your conduct is entirely */at of
It vo irresponsible young men an
lv most reprehensible, | arm
jsure, and have confidence, that you
jwill be brought to task and |!
with departmentally § fe
yur action.”




was









—B.U.P

thefed to “serious
lblow when he is a confessed liar ?} tions” which France

three main aims—to increase th
production, to reform the con
stitution and public services, and

to defend the natior

Mayer first outlined the domesti
measures his Government would
take to raise wages and to ly

1 be] to ease the plight of Roman Cath-

chools and then turn-
and urgent ques-
faces in the
He said,
has been

olic Church

present world situation
“on France's request it

Ties
fabri- recognised by our Atlantie Allies

that the defence of continent
Europe constit our fundamen-

tal obiective.”--0.P
|

ites

To-day’s
Weather Chart

“82s
5.48 a.m.
6.24 p.m.
Last Quarter
7.00 ‘p.m.
9.01 a.m.,

Sunrise :

Sunset:

Moon:

Lighting Pp:

High Tide:
p.m

Low Tide:
p.m

9.038

10.06 a.m., 9.48

cee EEO


PAGE TWO







— Cath Calling

Is G RACE RT. REV. ALAN
KNIGHT, Archbishop of the
West Indies and Bishop of British
Guiana who came to Barbados a
week ago for the consecration and
enthronement of Bishop Manide-
ville is due to return to B.G. this
afternoon by B.W.LA:

ne by the same plane are
Hon. W. Holder Attorney Gen-
eral of B.G. and Mrs. Holder,
Mr. Holder was also here for the
consecration. He is Chancellor of
the Diocese and Registrar of the
Provincial Synod.

Entertains Festival
Visitors
VER 500 people, West Indians

and their friends, were pre-
sent at St. Pancras (North Lon-

don) Town Hall on Friday last
week, when the West Indian Stu-
dents’ Union gave dance and
cabaret in honour of West In-
dian visitors to the Festival of
Britain,

In the charmingly informal at-
mosphere the West Indian visitors
met, talked and danced with their
fellow countrymen and women in
England.

Among those present were the
Hon. and Mrs. N. W. Tang, Hon.
and Mrs. W. Courtenay; Hon.
J. A. Smith, Hon. EH. Lake,
Hon. R. L. Bradshaw. Hon. L. L.
Simmons, Hon. T. T. Thompson,
Hon. W. O. Kendall, Mr. A. A.
Bannister, Mr. C. A. Robinson,
Mr. F. E. W.: Case, Mr Evon
Blake, Mr. W. M, Humphrey,
Mr. Ronald Crawford, Mr. Ronald
Mapp, Mr. G_ E. Willock, Mr.
and Mrs. Willy Richardson, Mr.
A. Chambers, Mr. and Mrs. Johan
Oliver and Mr. A. E. V. Barton

Music for_dancing was provided
by Reb Prescott (Grenada) and
his band.

Back To St. Lucia

RS. ANDRE du BOULAY, her

daughter Marguerite and
Mrs, Leo Bergasse who hud been
holidaying in Barbados since July
5th returned to St, Lucia yesterday
by B.W.1.A.' Mr. du Boulay who
accompanied them over for the
holiday returned over the week-
end.

Visiting Parents

RS. PETER BAYLEY who has

been im Barktados on a visit
to her parents Hon. and Mrs. H. A.
Cuke is due to return to B.G. this
afternoon by B.W.I.A. Her visit
coincided with her brother Henry’s
wedding. Hé was married a cou-
ple of weeks ago to the former
Alison Worme.

Optics

M:* AKTHUR ST. JOHN, son
of Mrs. Daisy St. John of
“Salters’, St. George and the late
Mr. St. John left on Sunday by
the Colombie for England. Arthur
has gone to study Optics and ex-
pects to be away for three or four
years.



THE ADVENTURES OF



"'I8S BETTY CRAIGCIE
Round the world on £220

Girl Globe-trotter
ROWN-EYED girl

from Syd-

ney, Australia, who set out
td see the world on £220 is Miss
Betty Craigie, a masseuse.

She is just setting off from
London for 4 tour of the south-
west of England on a cycle bought
for £7 in Paris. Next she plan
to hitch-hike through Spain
Portugal and North Africa.

Miss Craigie, who is small and
slim, knows how to travel a long
way on a little money. “Once on a
six-day trip with a girl friend, I
spent only 6s.; but in England I
expect to travel on about £3 a
week,” she says.

Here For A Month

R. and Mrs. Thomas McLeod

and two children arrived
from Trinidad over the week-end
by B.W.LA. to spend a month’s
holiday in Barbados staying with
the Armstrong’s in Fontabelle.
Mrs. McLeod is the former Mar-
jorie Armstrong.

Other arrivals over the week-
end were Mr. and Mrs. E. E.
Reece and son who are staying at
Baitery House, St. Lawrence, Mr.
Reece is a Civil Engineer’ in
Trinidad.

Three Air Hostesses

INNIE TURNER, Jane Ogden

and Valerie Stewart three
Chicago and Southern Airline
hostesses who had been on a two-
day visit to Barbados as guests ol
B.W.1.A. returned to Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by B.W.LA.
Accompanying them was Mr. Basil
Pantin of B.W.1.A’s Commercial
Department in Port-of-Spain.





Use Barbados Molasses
ISITORS to the governments
fishing lodge in New Bruns-

wick's famed Kestigouche Rivei
(favourite spot for catehing sal-
mon) can sample the famous

Trail Blazer Pancakes” turned

out by David Ogilvy, 74, the lodge’s
gaunt, Oracular man ger. Time's
July 9th edition gives the recipe
for Ogilvy’s paneakes, which for
more than a half a century he has
been making* “by feel.”

Take four mixing-spoonsful of

Barbados molasses; two hen's
eggs, or one loon’s egg; one pint

of creamy milk, or one pint of
new-fallen snow and one pint of
water. Beat this together.

“Then the dry mix. Flour: two
parts white, one part whole wheat
Add baking powder, two table-
spoons. Add salt to taste—if the
partv had a drink the night be-
fore, add a little bit more salt.
Put it through the sifter together.
Then stir until the batter is
smooth,

“Have your griddle greased with
a slab of bacon rind or some salt
pork skin. Heat to the proper tem-

perature to produce the deep
orange glow so essential to the
seductive pancake.

“Serve with butter and real
rock-maple syrup and a_ few

slivers of bacon thrown in on the
side.”

Try making some trail blazer'’s.
Note the Barbados molasses and
perhaps dispense with the pint of
new-fallen snow.

Polytechnic Diploma

N the historic surroundings of

the Stationers and Newspaper
Makers Hall, London, on July 13,
Novello Hamilton Richards of the
Leeward Islands student at Poly-
technic Course in Journalism was
presented with his Diploma by
Colonel The Honourable J. J
Astor, Chairman of the Times and
of the Commonwealth Press Union.
Six ether holders of Colonial Office
scholarships to the course—from
Gold Coast, Singapore, Nigeria
3ritish Guiana, Hong Kong and
Malaya also received Diplomas
together with 12 British student
The gathering included Mr. Eric
M. Clayson, Chairman, Newspaper
Society; Mr. John Gordon, past
President Institute of Journalists;
and Brigadier R. F. Johnson; al:
members of the Advisory Com-



mittee. Mr. R. T Rivington,
past Master of the Stationers and
Newspaper Makers Company,



described some of the treasures of
the Company displayed in the
hall, including famous pieces of
plate, a model of the Company’s
barge, and a priceless register in
which the first publication of
many of Shakespeare’s Plays i:
recorded.
Incidental Intelligence

I F a motorist stopped for ever

pedestrian he’d never ge’
anywhere. But if a pedestrian
didn’t stop for every motorist

he'd jolly
Overheard
crossing.

soon get somewhere.--
at Ludgate

—L.E.S.



PIPA



pentane +

P 87. Vee Dias Int. Amsterdam



BY - THE WAY... eee By Beachcomber

DREAM of the day when a

I

Prime Minister, hanging his
head in shame, resigns because
vie.cry has eluded his febrile

grasp in the matter of prayers to
annul orders relating to shredded
eg:-shells, dried ribbon, ash-sift-
er., buttons. made of decontrolled
goeis’ milk, stanchions, gravel,
dycd marramgrass, boiler-cases
wecden fruit, fingerless glove-
str 2tchers, dummy ~ binoculars,
slit cork, waterproof coverings
fo weathervanes, lampwick,
fossilised chalk, haddock-mallets,
shcrbet, tubular thongs, row-
lock-pins, birdlime, warehouse
tewel-rollers, grated sago, stilt-
straps, recking-horses’ snouts,
elbow-pads; froth, beard-glue,
gesworks ladders, tuning-forks,
biri-cage polish, zinc trestles,
m> h-balls, hat-blocks, shepherds’
breeches, soap-shapers, galvanis-
ed scooter-wheels, drum-stands,
ra‘vens’ nests, traction-engine
whistles, "bluebags, dredger-
buckets, penwiper-cases, storin -
cones, false noses, chimney-struts,
oiled cardboard, and Indian fiea-
trays in four colours.



Invisible: Exports

‘y ERE -size,” as the critic said

when he surveyed Mr.
Slaucha's 90-ton Dancing Fairy,
“is not everything.” Those who
are moved to tears by smallness
of any sort will probably sob
over the almost invisible ball-
bearings w@ are exporting, “Six
milion can be held in a_ tea-
spoon,” and the larger kinds of
bacilli are raging with jealousy,

“They look so helpless,”
a sensitive bystander. Each of
these bearings, I read, is so
small that if dropped, it could
not be found again Here, it
seems to me, is a _ chance for
some unscrupulous’ caterer to
boost them as invisible caviare,
How gross, how coarse seem the
old visible ball-bearings ‘or
roller-skates.

murmurs

Au rendezous des
Gommeux

Nan indignant speech yesier-
day Mrs. Wretch referred to

the Bun House in Sloane-square
as “the thin end of the Conti-
nental wedge.” She deplored the





Rupert and

coloured sunshades. “If” she
said, “there were a bun house
in the Place Blanche, fT would be
like this. Is there no other way
of attracting volatile foreigners t
England?” Couldn't we, for
instance, them interested i

cricket?

get

An Elephant Forgets
J T is said that when the Rajah
of Dhamdhurtipore beckon-

ed to his favourite elephant thc
other day, the beast turned its
back and walked away. The

elephant was flown to New Yors
where a_ psychiatrist examined
it, and reported that it was suffer-
ing from loss of memory,
(Beachcomber News Agency.)



Simon—39 _



When the little pals are supplied
wih buns and lemonade the lady
asks what reward they would like
Simon saye he wants to help his
Daddy vome supplies because
he keows it's early closing day.
Phew Rupert thinks carefully “We

Orererm





te

don’t really need anything,” he
says, “* but my Mummy ay that
wild iris you gave me. Could we
have another ?"’ ‘ You shall have
the best I've go, and not wild
either,”’ cries the lady as she takes

them to a bed of gorgeous blossoms.
evcvouven

——



(rood Quality Diamond Cut Crystal Glass-Ware 5

PORT and SHERRY GLASSES

~ CLARET GLASSES

ehisc

WATER JUGS,

q.

DIAL 4606

CHAMPAGNE GLASSES
WHISKEY GLASSES

HONEY
GOBLETS. & PEACH MELBA

JARS.

GLASSES



R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS *)

YOUR SHOE STORE

,

Sale a Waa ve $1.23 each K
“4 e144", B
ian y ynee Gh $1.76 ,,
$1.23 a

DIAL 4220

Circus
|

! liberations on

i

COMES LACK TO

BARBADOS

+>



\DVOCATE

f the Week
eth Bowen

a]
4
!

STUDY



A Matter of Life
By EVELYN IRONS mate |
mo .

This week, members of the bare parquet floor. }
Royal Commission on Capital Pun- In London she lives economi-|
ishment, under chairman Sir cally, keeps one Breton |
Ernest Geevers, resumed theiv nervant, and no car.
sessions in London. Secret ses- #1] keep Bowen's Court with my
sions, for at this stage the public Weriting’ , She says.

are not admitted. Soon they must

make up their minds whether:
raurderers should hang or not.
They have been at it for two
and a half years, and their repori
is due in December.

Two women are on the Com-
rnission—-Dame Florence Hancock
of the Transport and General
Workers’ Union, and Elizabeth

30wen novelist whose CBE (three
years ago) was awarded for
“services to literature”

Miss Bowen sits on the Com-
mission as Mrs, Alan Cameron
and this is the name inscribe?

on her impressive
box with the Royal cipher (gift
of the Government), which now
overfiows with official_ documents
on the death penal®®

She is still wondering why she

black despatcn

vas picked for the job. She is
no Dorothy Sayers, no Agatha
Christie has never attended a

murder trial.



“Rare sensitiveness and intro-
spection” are the kind of words
critics use for her finely spun
novels and short stories, into
which such debates as the fros
and cons of death by hanging
have never intruded.

“IT expect’, she says with a

“that I am just the man

street”.

smile,
in the

At Sing-Sing

Probauly the Commission’s work
has benefited from Miss Bowen's
intelligence. But even as Mrs.
Cameron she is highly uniypical
of the ordinary citizen.

She was the only woman mem-
ber of the Commissicn to go on it
recent three-weeks’ trip to the
United Siates and examine tne
vyorkings of the electric chair at
Sing-Sing.

There was no victim in the chair
at the time, but Miss Bowen found



it shocking enough. Although
she is a great reader of detective
stories and. a glutton for filiis,

she had no realistic mental nicture
of the execution scene. ,{f she
thought of the electric chair at all,

he saw it surgical, hygienic and
hromiu

“But in the room was an old
wooden chair homely chair

which might have come from High
W/7ycombe,” she said. “Somehow
that made it more horrible.”

Added horror was the range of
24 seats for spectaters, for in
Americ- ‘uations ere public. ‘It
eemed to her as if the condemned
man had to take his death before
a studio audience.

9.30 to 6

When she is not engaged on de-
the death penalty,
Miss Bowen works office hours
(9.30 until 6) on a novel she has
just started.

Husband Alan Cameron (they
married in 1923) works office
hours at the gramophone record
company where he is educational
dvise

His wife sits writing in her first-
floor study in their Regency house
overlooking Regent’s Park: the
room, like the rest of the house,
is alle light and air, with wide
curtainless sash windows down to



|
The Gentry
Court big, bare house |
1 County Cork built nearly 200 |
years ago by an ancestor is
an.iliar to her readers; sé: wrote
book about it. She is the first
woman to have inherited the
house and its 300 acres; she spends
cur months of the year there, |
i.as just returned from a three-|
reek ree, ("I try to be a good |
landlord.”

Bowen's



‘Fairly ordinary Anglo-Irish
ccuntry gentry,” she calls her |
family in that book, and herself |

when young she describes in the |
words of her mother (who did
when her only daughter was 13). |

he explained to me, with aj}

lyingly hopeful look, that I
would never be pretty, but that
she hoped I would grow up to
have a nice character.”

The prophecy

seems accurate

At 52 Miss Bowen is not pretty, |
but she has distinctive good
looks with her wide, serene face,
reddish hair smoothed to a low
knot and curiously penetrating

pale blue eyes.

She was educated at a boarding
school in Kent, regrets that she
never took a university degree.
(“I don’t suppose I could have
passed the exams”).

She thought of being an illus-
trator, studied briefly at a London
art school (“I imitated Beardsley
but found I was no draughts-
woman”), had embarked on a
course of journalism at London
University when she threw it up
at 24 to marry. Already she had
published two books of short
stories, hers was one of the rare
matriages that encour? aged the
wile’s career instead of Cutting it |
short.

She
pent
Sne

the war in neutral Eire. |
tayed at the Razgent’s Park}
jiouse, from 1940 was a raid war-|
den in Marylebone.

Out of that drab éxperience she |

wrote The Heat of the Day.
No Cook

At home, Miss Bowen is no}
cook, but enjoys polishing her
choice old furniture; takes a tilt
at those who sneer at women
who spend their time “doing the
flowers.” (“I would like to spend

a morning doing that and at
bowen’s Court I often do”.)

She relaxes by doing elaborate!) |

“montages” for screeus—a hign-
brow version of pasting up scraps.
Any minute now she will buy al
set of pastels following the trend
towards amateur art. (‘1 have to
cut masses of sheer description
from my writing, and I feel I
must record it in some way.)

But her dominating hobby is
meeting people, No ivory tower
ior Miss Bowen, who enjoys noth-

ing better than hearing others
talk. |
Which perhaps explains why

they were not so crazy when they
asked her to speak for the man

| 7.00-

| Analysis;

| 800 pm

| David Copperfield;
| Kunz; 9 45 p m

was not one of those who |

— ——

B.B.C. Radio Programme

1951
11 25)



Wednesday
Programme
Choice; 11 45 a m
12.00 noon The News
Analysis

July 25
1115 an Parade;
am Listeners
ment of Account;
1210 pm News
115—4 45 pom
415 pm Star Time; 4 30 | pm. Dance
Ther Around; 500 pm Composer of |
the Week; 515 pm At the Opera; 6.0¢
p m. Charlie Kunz; 6 15 pm Jack Salis-|
bury; 645 pm. Programme Parade;
655 pm To-day'’s Sport

10.45 p.m.



25 53M 31.32 M





1pm News

Calling the West}
Generally Speaking;
Radio Newsreel; 815 pm
Argument; 8 45 pm _ Interlude;

From the Editorials; 9 00 p m
930 pm. Charlie
Statement of Account;
10 00 pm The News; 10 10 pm _ Inter-

1015 pm. Crazy People; 10.45
Mid-Week Talk.

700 pm The News: 7
715 pm
Indies; 745 pm
Serious

8.55 p m

lude;
p.m



CROSSWORD







Across
Let the nairdresser do ity (6)
Su 4 runner may be tn_ the
garden put is not ere (3)
t n ook. (5)
' Vu corruption of a etpnet.
(3)
) Where fifty get the chopper. (6)
} Pick and choose. (6)
is Uda duck of sorts. (5)
14. Would-be man. (3)
15. This way it suggests. (3)
17. 22 Across is a this to the
debutante (5) 18. Away. (7)
41. What your friend consumed ? (6}
22 It may be lint. (8)
Down
1 Operation that lands the com-
manding officer in a squeeze, (7)
4. One Pimpernel was (7)
3. Carried on. (5)
4 Life blood of the usurer? (9)
5 Some one must before you can
14 down. (5)
6. This hand ts large in writing. (4)
8. Tear. (4)
i istastetul to Mrs, Spratt. (4)
14 See 5 Down. (5)
16. Such £ man might bulld a lean-
to. (4)
iy. Taken for a ride’ (3)
20 It’s rent would pour in, (3}

Relapse;
21, Pans;
. Anserine; 2, Roulette;
Vavasour: 5, Veer; 7,
14, Cost: 16,






s: 19 Sea:
; 18, Anne

Be Wise =

m Advertise

‘olfman played by LON CHANEY
Dracula played by BELA LUGOS!



in the street on that matter .of
life and death. ; |
WORLD COPYWRIGHT RESERVED

—I,E.S.





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Matince TO-

DAY 5 PM

TO-DAY & TO-MORKOW 8.50 PM

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IGG & eet IN COURT”

The

(From the ¢
YULE as J!

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by George Mec MANUS)
Renie RIAND as MAGGIE





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TRIPOLI
rechnicolor
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$45 & 8.29 pm,

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with Bela LUGOST — Wally

RETURN OF THE BADMEN

With Randoiph SCOT
Special 1.30 Siow

WESTWARD BOUND & RETURN OF THE APEMAN







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p LAZA ost, ||

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Rainy Season is approaching:





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SINNER of
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BROWN — Alan CARNEY





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With Bela LUGOSI ana







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1951







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S HENCHMAN” &
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\' FONESDAY,



JULY 25,

BRITAIN

1951

FACES



BIG TRADE GAP

By K. C.

THALER

LONDON, July 24

The British Labour Government, faced with one of the
rst trade gaps in its postwar experience, is contemplating
drastic action to halt the drift toward a new financial crisis.



No Copper For
India, Pakistan
If At War

WASHINGTON, July 23,

A Washington State Department
official said on Monday if India
and Pakistan went to war, the
United States would have “to take
another look” at its exports of
copper and other useful war
goods to India.

He said: “I am sure we would
not sit by shipping thern copper
if they were at war. This con-
firmed earlier United Press re-
ports quoting a High Commerce
Department official,

These officials of both Depart-
ments are instrumental in review-
ing the export policy and advising
the Secretary of Commerce who
formally sets the export quotas
on such controlled materials as
copper,

A Commerde
spokesman denied a
another news agency that the
original United Press story had
caused the Department embarrass-
ment, That United Press story
quoting a high official as saying
the copper exports to India would
be cut if an Indo-Pakistan war
started was correct, he said.

He added this was not meant as
any threat to India, but was in
with general United
States and United Nations’ policies
of preventing shipments of useful

Department
dispatch by



war goods to belligerents.
A an example, the State
Department official cited the pre-

cedent of the United States export
policy during the Arabian war in
1948-49 when the embargo was
clamped on all exports of muni-
tions and war materials—including
many fabricated copper items—to
Middle Eastern yore ens .

French, U.S. Goals
Are Identical

SAIGON,
General Jean De Lattre Dé
Tassigny, Comamnding General
ana French High Commissioner
in Indo China, said on Monday
the French and American goals
in the Far East are “identical,”
He said: “Spheres of influence in
the Far East are now impossible,
This is war, a war in which
America and France must work
hand in hand.”

De Tassigny, who spoke at the
opening ceremonies of the United
States Information Service Read-
ing room, said: “Our mission is
to stop the expansion of Commun-
fsm by intensifying our war ef-
fort and fortifying all means of
local resistance. There is only one
struggle in Asia, as there is only
one defense in Europe. All forces
of free peoples must contribute to
this struggle.”"—U.P

Czechs Refuse
To Free Oatis

WASHINGTON, July
It, is learned that
Czechoslovak Cabinet has
jected the United “States de-
mand for â„¢ the release of
Associated Press correspondent
William N. Oatis The United
States a week ago to-day sent
Czechoslovakia a stern note in-
sisting that Oatis be freed from
the Czech prison, where he has
started serving a 10-year term on
6py charges, The Czech Foreign
Minister referred the note to the
Cabinet. The Cabinet, however,
refused to free Oatis.—U.P







July 23



23.
the
re-

~ Canada’s Wonder Remedy Is

An inflated import bill has
caused a trade deficit, in six
months, of more than £550,000,000
—over $1,500,000,000 — and has

thrown gut of gear the British
Government's carefully prepared

estimates to balance Britain’s
carious economy

The Government admits that the
situation is alarming, and is under-
stood to have ordered its experts
to review its foreign trade policy
radically. But it is no secret that
means to remedy the situation are
limited and alternatives very few.

Chancellor of the Exchequer,,
Hugh Gaitskell faces further en-
quiries and reproaches in the Com-
mons, whenever Britain's economic
situation comes up for discussion.

Bevan Will Attack

The rebel Aneurin Bevan and
his associates are expected to at-
tack Government’s rearmament
policy for alleged adverse effects
on the overall picture of Britain's
economy, and to expand the offen-
sive started in their recent anti-
government pamphlets “One Way
Only”

Sore facts are that. Britain's
trade deficit has jumped two and
a half times over last year’s fig-
ures, and this adverse trend is still
rising. In the first six months of
1950, the trade deficit was £ 220,-
000,000.

If this trend continues
will be faced by the end of the
year with an enormous trade gap
according to best available calcu-
lations

The cause of this problem is out-
side the immediate control of the
British Government — it is the
steep rise in world commodity
prices and consequently of the bill
for Britain’s imports.

Rising Prices

Most of the increase this year is
in fact due to prices which are 43
per cent above 1950. The volume
of Britain’s imports has risen only
by one tenth over last ye ac-
cording to official records. At the
same time export prices have gone
up only 18 per cent. and sales
have not been able to make up for
the inerease in the import bill,

The problem is accentuated by
the fact that Britain’s rearmament
programme is largely tied up with
this issue. It is dependent on the
continued importation of raw ma-
terials. [f imports are cut rearm-
ament would have to be slowed
down. Rearmament orders to Brit-
ain’s industries at present are at
the rate of £100,000,000 per
month

pre-

Britain





Alternatives

Alternatives before the Gov-
ernment are: To eat into meagre
gold and dollar reserves or cut
non-essential dollar imports and
face further austerity at home

A revision of the import pro-
gramme is considered as imminent
although savings from it will not
be substantial. Hopes are mainly
pinned on the fall of international
price levels and consequently on
the reduction of prices which Brit-
ain would have to pay for her im-
ports. The Government insists that
the rearmament programme is not
to be interfered with, and is ex-
pected to meet Bevan’s challenge
with the argument that Britain's
and the Western security must
have priority.

The Iran oil dispute threatens
to aggravate still further the al-
ready tight situation. If Iranian oil
stops flowing altogether, recourse
will bave to be taken to alterna-
tive sources including dollar oil.
The financial picture then will be-
come uglier yet. Amounts of up
to $100,000.000 and more might be
involved.—U.P.

Owner Wants Land
Around Arthur's Hill

MANY residents who live above
Arthur’s Hill are removing their
houses. The owner of the land has
asked for it. “We are finding
difficulty in getting house spots,”
an old lady who has a house in
that district said yesterday.



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Henriquez Has
Good Chance

IN MEXICAN ELECTIONS

From ROBERT PRESCOTT

MEXICO CITY, July 24.
Mexico’s Presidential elections
are still 12 months away but
already the name of “Henriquez”
is being scrawled above walls and
buildings in Mexico city. In many
places it blots out the name of
President Miguel Aleman on post-
ers remaining from the 1946 cam-

paign.

General Miguel Henriquez is the
first real candidate to toss his hat

rin the 1952 ring and the first
threat to 25 years of political
domination by the P.R.I. (Party

of Revolutionary Institutions),

With an outstanding record as a
soldier dating from the Mexican
revolution Henriquez stands the
best chance of any “independent”
candidate in this quarter century.

He will campaign on the plat-
form of “absolute honesty” and
the abolishment of special priv-
ileges

His fignt is expected to raise
the question of Government cor-
ruption and graft and _ possibly
touch off investigation nearly as
sensational as the recent United
States crime probes.

He may take many thousands
of votes away from P.R.I. and
threaten its stranglehold on Mexi-
ean politics,

fough Fight

But he faces a tough fight.
ed up against Henriquez is the
power of the Cardens dynasty
which has never lost an election.

He must battle either Miguel
Aleman who may seek to “extend”
his 6-year term of office despite
the constitutional ban on re-elec-
tion, or Aleman’s handpicked
successor,

He faces behind the scenes a
scramble for power a_ series of
still unconsummated political deals
hanging over from the last elec-
tion and a political machine that
seems to have the gituation at
voting booths well under control.

—U.P.

SUGGEST REFORMS
IN MEAT CONTROL

LONDON, July 24.
The National Federation of
Meat Traders Association suggest~
ed drastic reforms in the most
control schedule and proposed that
controls eventually be removed.

In a booklet pubiished “to serve
as guide to members of Parlia-
ment and other influential person-
ages”, N.F.M.T.A. said more money
should be spent on buying meat
from other countries “in order that
our people may be _ protected
against a fall in the standard of
nutrition.”

The booklet said that imported
meat supplies could be improved
and quoted statistics showing that
approximately 450,000 tons of
chilled beef had been shipped an-
nually before World War II and
that it was superior in quality to
the frozen beef at present being
shipped from Argentina.

The Meat Federation booklet
commented: “The Federation has
been advocating since 1946 the re-
vival of this important chilled beef
trade and we welcome the re-
sumption of shipments this year.

Nevertheless expected supplies



Lin-





stiff sore
rub it into
tired museles,



in LESS

relief





are infinitesimal.” the Royal Family. It also wants

The booklet condemned the| legislation to enable the Governor

present method of grading meat in| to remove councillors who sav

slaughterhouses, —UP. anything disloyal about the King.
1

U.S. Want 180
Group Air Force

WASHINGTON, July 24.

Defence Secretary George Mar-
shall said on Tuesday the Govern-
ment is aiming for enough airplane
factories to produce a 180 group
Air Force—nearly twice the pres-
ent air force goal—but he quickly
added he was talking about plane
production capacity, not actual
plans for a 180 group air armada

Marshall also told reporters the
Defence Department expects to de-
cide by some time in October
whether it will be necessary to in-
erease presently the planned size
of armed forces.

President Truman said on Mon-
day in his economic report to Con-
gress, it might be necessary to
raise the sights of a defense build-
up programme whether peace
comes in Korea or not

Strong support for any such
buildup came from Republican
Senator Henry Cabot Loage, Jr.,
of Massachusetts who said the
United States definitely must en-
large its defense programme

Lodge, just back from a Euro-
pean tour, said the United States
should have started a bigger de-
fense buildup last summer.

He added that his trip convinced
him he was right in calling for a
150 group air force instead of the
present 95 group goal.

The Air Force expects to reach
its goal of 95 groups some time in
the autumn of 1952. Air Force
leaders are said to be privately
pushing for expansion to 150
groups.



—U-P.

Ship Beached
After Collision

WASHINGTON, July 23,

The Economic Co-operation Ad-
ministration reported on Monday
that the Liberty ship John Chester
Kendall, carrying the first load of
wheat under the India famine aid
programme has been beached
after a collision, The ship is in the
Suez bay south of the entrance to
the Middle Eastern canal, It had
been scheduled to reach Bombay
on Wednesday. The collision, ap-
parently, occurred on Sunday. The
other ship involved, was the Dan-
ish S.S, Gerd Maersk. The John
Chester Kendali is carrying more
than 10,000 tons of grain. It had
sailed from Philadelphia on June
19.—U.P.

Petition Against
Belize Council





BELIZE:
Some retired civil servants in
British Honduras have begun

circulating a petition asking the
Governor, Sir Ronald Garvey, to
dissolve the Belize City Council
for “disloyalty to the Royal
Family.” The Council had voted
not to discuss the hanging of a
picture of the King in the Council
chamber until self-government is
granted to the Colony.

The petition asks the Governor
to abolish the present Council and
to pass laws requiring future
councillors to pledge allegiance to

—B.U.P.

Buy



{aaa eo eee ener tenes



AN ENGLISH ELECTRIC







“Britain Gives
To B.W.1.—Then
Takes Away”

LONDON:

What Britain gives to the West
Indies with its right hand, it takes
away with its left hand, said Mr,
Bernard Braine, M.P., secretary of
the West Indies Committee of the
Conservative Party, in an
on West Indian problems pub-
lished in the London Daily Mail.

“Truc, we pour. substantial
ums into the West Indies through
tha medium of the Colonia] De-
velopment and Welfare Fund in
an en@avour to improve living
standards and to encourage econ-
omic development,” he wrote
“What is the use of encouraging
welfare expenditure if the condi-
ticns under which West Indian
produce is marketed depress pro-

duction and cause unemploy-
ment?”
He described the British Gov-

ernment’s sugar policy as a “false
economy” and called for an
agreement that would allow the
West Indies to expand their
sugar production, since the sugar
industry cannot be broadened if

the base is insecure.
“Unless bold and imaginative
steps are taken soon,” he said,

“the situation is likely to get out
of hand.” —B.ULP.



“Bruno” Prepares
For 2md Trip to W.L

LONDON
The Norwegian cargo vessel
Bruno, on charter to Saguenay

Terminals, Ltd., of Montreal, for
service between Canada, London
and the British West Indies, has
returned to London from her
maiden voyage in this service to
the .West Indies. Normally, after
calling at ports in Barbados,
Trinidad and British Guiana, she
will sail for Canada with a cargo
of British Gtiana bauxite

On her first trip, however, she
sailed from Demerara in ballast
to Cubg to pick up a cargo otf
sugary for the Ministry of Food
to be delivered in London, Now,
in Tilbury, she is loading a
general cargo for the West Indies
and will carry a full comple-
ment of nine passengers on her
second voyage.

Cap}. Largs Fyliing, stocky, 51.
yenr-old master of the Bruno,
was pleased by his vessel’s per-

formance on her first trip to
West Indian waters. Only draw-
back to the pleasant trip, said a
member of the crew, wag the
great heat in the West Indies
especially since the Bruno was
not built for service in the
tropics
-B.ULP.



YOUNG WOMEN WILL
GET CERTIFICATES

CERTIFICATES
tributed to young

be dis-
of the

will
women





St. Augustine branch of the Bar-
bados Evening Institute, St.
George, on Monday evening. The
classes do hand work at the St.
Augustine Boys’ School. This is
two years now that the young
women have been attending the
classes.
———=—===.

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? , sipurnceeacisenatiitehs dehasameriatiiianncpatibtit sie sdcnctimiiti
A third Marshall Plan loan to
increase bauxite production in
Jamaica has been announced by| / iy
Nr. William Batt, Minister-in- /
Coarge of the Economic Co-|
coeration Administration Mission
to Britain, An agreement has
been signed under which the|

E.C.A,, will advance $3,284,000 to}
Reynolds Jamaica Mines, Ltd

According to the contract, the
company will also spend some
$450,000 on its expansion pro-|
gramme, which is expected nearly |
to double bauxite production from
its Jamaica mines, Repayment of
the E.C.A,, advanice, with interest,
will be made in supplies of
aluminium over a 11)-year period,

The new plans call for the
company’s present capacity of
bauxite mining and shipping to
be increased from 410,000 to
750,000 toms per year, New land
will be aequired in Jamaica for
bauxite development and mining
equipment will be increased by
70 per cent. The U.S. Government
will also have an option to buy
for dollars, in addition to the
aluminium to be delivered under
the contract, not less than $750,000
ror more than $1,500,000 , worth
of aluminium,

Under the original agreement
with Reynolds, the EC.A.,
edvanced $5,963,000 in dollars and
£1,800,000 in British counterpart

funds, This agreement also called
for repayment in aluminium, The |
E.Cc.A., has also fostered the)

cevelopment of Jamaican bauxite
through an advance of $2,500,000

in dollars and £1,500,000 in|
counterpart funds in 1950 to
Jamaica Bauxiies Ltd. for help

in constructing a bauxite process

ig plamt,

The latest loan brings the total
f E.C.A., advances for Jamaican
bauxite development to $11,747,000
n dollars and £3,300,000 in

counterpart funds, BUP.

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay





Sch Lady Noeleen, Sch, Rosaline M.,
MV. Sedgefield, Sch. Freedom

Sch. Marea Henrietta,
Seh. Pine Nose
Sely Rainbow M |
Cuidad Boli-

Seb. Sunshine R.,
Sch. Mary £. © aroline,
Mac, Sch. Franklyn D. R.,

Fleary \

Sch. Mildred Wallace, 8 8
var, British Yacht Marsaltese, Sch Cyril
E Smith, Sch Henry D. Wallace, 5 8
Strategist

ARRIVALS

Marianne 29 tons net, Capt
from Copenhagen

, Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 tons
Every, from British Guiana

Eunicia, 38 tons net,

Yacht



Capt
Schooner WL

Capt Joseph from Dominica



8. Mormacgulf, 4,521 tons net, Capt |
WeKinnon, from Los Angetes
MV Lady Joy, 46 tons net, Capt |
Parsons, from St, Lucia |
DEPARTURES |
M.V. Canadian Constructor, 3,035 tons
net, Capt Wallace, for St John |
MV. Canadian Cruiser 3,935 tons net, |
Capt. O'Hara, for St Vincent
SS Sundray, 4,307 tons net, Capt
Ga:dner, for Trinidad
July 24, 1961, |
CANADA |
626/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 60 8/10 pr
Demand Drafts 60 65% pr
Siaht Drafts 606/10 pr
20/10 pr Cable
613/10% pr. Currency 59 3/10% pr.
Coupons 58 6/10% pr







A FRESH SHIPMENT RECEIVED RECENTLY |
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BARBADOS

eae)



@rinted by the Advocate Co., Lt4., Jroad St., Bridwetow.



Wednesday, July 25, 1951



IT has been announced that under a
Colonial. Development and Welfare scheme
a producer from the British Broadcasting
Corporation will be seconded to the Gov-
ernment of Trinidad. The duties of this
officer will be to provide a special pro-
gramme service for Trinidad, Barbados,
and British Guiana and to assist in getting
the maximum benefit from broadcasting
equipment already in existence.

There will be another B.B.C. producer
stationed in Jamaica to provide a similar
service for that island, British Honduras
and Bahamas.

|
BROADCASTING

In the past, people in the Caribbean have
accepted the broadcasts provided in the
Overseas Service of the B.B.C. and have
been glad to find that their affairs have
sometimes been given place in the Home
Service. But these were primarily intend-
ed to satisfy the tastes of people in Britain.

The West Indies as a unit of British Col-
onial territory has its own problems, its
own aims and ideals and its peculiar
growth and development. It is this growth
and the rate of progress by which they will
be judged by people in other parts of the
world including Great Britain,

Broadcasting has come as complemen-
tary to the Press and the services which it
provides are so extensive that it is a most
effective adjunct. It was during the dark
days of 1940 that the word of one man
moved the hearts and stirred the emotions
of millions of people in the free world, in-
spiring them with courage tomfight to the
death for an ideal. It was the voice of Mr.
Churchill which disheartened the Nazis.

By
specially for the West Indies in the West

these same services produced

|
|
Indies, West Indians will have the oppor-
tunity of knowing at the time, the events
dealing with problems which occur,

The programmes produced at the B.B.C.
for the benefit of the West Indies have the
disadvantage of severe limitations. They
tales of West Indian life produced on the
spot will have the advantage of natural
Indian people and those who live in this
area will learn more of their neighbours

|
|

in the area and the methods adopted of
have brought benefits nevertheless; but
background. There it is that the West
and their way of life.

But these are not the only advantages.
The question has been posed, not only in
Great Britain but in the United States of
America, as to whether there is a West
Indian culture. If there is a West Indian
culture, then broadcasting will give it life
and body and will present it to the world
as it really is. If there is no West Indian
culture but merely a hybrid of the British
way of life and African primitive methods,
then Broadcasting might be the means of
helping the people of the area to evolve
a culture of their own.

West Indian music, art, literature, and
life itself must benefit from a proper sys-
tem of broadcasting when the programmes
are produced in and are characteristic of
the West Indies.

FIRE FIGHTING

WITHIN the last two years efforts have
been made to bring Seawell Airport into
line with modern airports the world over.

With financial assistance from the Brit-
ish and Canadian governments a new run-
way has been built and the public are
awaiting the erection of a proper terminal
building.

A primary necessity at any airport is
adequate fire fighting equipment. The Gov-
ernment ordered fire fighting equipment
and it arrived and has been installed. It
will not be effective, however, until trained





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Presidency

In making anpther addition to THE amending of their Constitu- The U.S. Constitution originally

a eae er ee Setar in ee? tus ie Min livaiting provided that tHe — ole
e people of the United States the number of years an American vote for two persons. The Cun

in 1951 again demonstrated tha? President may serve, demonstrates date with the highest number of |
the fundamental Jaws of a nation again the enduring flexibility of yotes would be President, the)
can be charged peaceably and ef- â„¢e basic law of that nation which next highest would be Vice-|

enables the government to adapt it-

and President. To avoid tie votes and}

the necessity of choosing between |
rival candidates, the Twelf|
Amendment was adopted in 1804. |
of the Senate—thus pains the This directed the atten: ae

. » votes ” s “out” party ‘in wer without 4 their choices for reside and
ae Niataae wie male vote of the sania The 1886 law for Vice-President in separate
and the House of Representa- provided that members of the ballots. No further changes have
tives) and by three-fourths of
the States (36 out of 48).

The Twenty-Second Amend-
ment, prohibiting any person from
being elected U.S. President more
than twice or serving more than
10 years in that office, is now
part of the law of the United
States. The new Amendment
specificially does not affect Presi-
dent Harry S. Truman. It be-
comes effective with the person
who succeeds him as U.S, Presi-
dent.

fectively to meet changing con-
ditions and governmental needs
To change the basic laws of the
American nation, an amendment
must be approved by two-thirds

sef to conditions
needs

From SENIOR SCHOLASTIC

changing

order, would succeed to the Presi- lege through Constitutional |
dency after the Vice-President. amendment. Numerous Constitu-

pointed official (such as a Cabi- abolish the Electoral College have |
net Secretary) succeeding as been proposed and the United|
elected President or Vice-Presi- States eventually may act upon
dent, Congress in 1947 changed one or more such proposals in the |
the law again, placing the Speaker orderly manner prescribed by the |
of the House first after the Vice- Constitution, i
President, then the President pro ; shanged
tempore of the Senate, and then . The U.S. Presidency wee ae.
the Cabinet Secretaries. ‘Thig law Focnval atsertaieeis tn ‘the Constitu- |
is slit in effect. None of the ayes tion. For example, the U.S. Con-
cession laws ever has been in- "MX". amp ry ‘
Although this is the first time voked. eter a says that tg eee
that the Constitution of the Uni- President Truman, member of | rs Rete ee ee tae
ted: States has been changed the Democratic Party, enthusias- on ‘ girs — cuaaaad. ae ted
since 1938, it is only one of the tically supported the 1947 change, D8 hi a eth, 5 a ir Pert
many. continuing changes in the daspite the fact that, had he died two-thir o es pir ? ata ra:
cffice of the U.S. Presidency that in 1947 or 1948, he would have concur. hat i * sa’ till
began even as the American re- been succeeded by the Speaker sent” means in t oe Pee “es
public was being established, of the House, who at that time being workel our | pearl
The whole story of the chang- was a member of the Republi- The procedure used Y a
ing role, of the American Presi- can Party. Washington, the first US. - '
dency is a fascinating one. The The framers of the U.S. Con- dent, of working out treaties,
U.S. Constitution provides that stitution did not specify " ,
the Vice-President shall become amount of the Presidential salary tthe other parties and then sending
President, in the event that the in the Constitution which simply them. to the US. Senate for ap-
President dies, resigns, is unable says that the U.S, President shall proval or rejection, has been fol-
to serve, or is removed from “receive for his services a com- lowed ever since. Today. how- |
office by the U.S. Congress, The pensation.” No Ameriean Presi- ever, Congressional committees
President may be removed from dent ever got rich in the. White (or the Senate itself) often assum >
office by a process of Con- House (as the presidential resi- the right to give “advice” to ihe
gressional impeachment and con- dence is called), for he needs most U.S, Secretary of State on the con-
vietion for committing “treason, or-all of his salary to meet his duct of foreign relations.
bribery, or other high crimes and many’ personal and_ official ‘Through the years, the U.S
misdemeanors.” According to law expenses as the First Citizen of Constitution has proved to
the House of Representatives the nation, The U.S. Constitution flexible, and the fundamental
votes the impeachment, but the forbids changing the President’s gvctom of checks and balances
Senate must convict or acquit. ‘salary during his term of office. among the powers of the Execu-
Only one American President, The latest change in salary was tive, Legislative, and Judicial
Andrew Johnson (seventeenth approved by Congress just before ‘Branches for which it provides
holder ,of the office, 1865—1869, President Truman’s inauguration },y¥6 continued to operate effec-
who had succeeded to the Presi- for his new term on January 20, tively. |
dency upon the death of Abraham 1949, and the pay increase hecame
Lincoln) ever was impeached, effective on that date.

But the U.S, Senate found John- — Other changes have been made
son innocent of “high crimes and jn the U.S. Constitution to make
misdemeanors in office,” so he ‘yqministration of the government
was not removed, No President more effective, George Washing-
ever pes oe or annie ton, the first United States Presi-
prevented from servin . sath of office on ,
of illness. But seven U.S. Presi- April Sage Se earatties Yaaett doubtless will continue to je}
dents have died while in office, 4937 US Presidents were inaugu- made, 30th formal amendments |
three of them from assassins’ pated on March 4 of the year (to the Constitution and the less |
bullets. In each case the Vice-

that the Constitution of the United
States is the solid foundation of |
that government. As in the case
of the Presidency, changes in the}

ment can be, have been, and |



How the ex-generals have now disclosed
their plan at talks in Paris—with precise

proposals Wehrmacht

i

Americas C hanging ‘The Army That Germany

Wants

to’ make the

strong...

By CHARLES’ WIGHTON

: BONN.
THE German General Staff, that ruthlessly

ficient military machine which planned 100

years of European war, has made its come-

president’s Cabinet in a specified been made in the Electoral Col-| back.

It has a new plan for a new Wehrmacht
To avoid the possibility of an ap- tional amendments to revise or | vhich will give Germany the most formid-
tble single armed force in Western Europe

oday—if the Allies agree.

The Bonn Government, backed by the
\mericans, is urging this new German Gen-
ral Staff plan on the rest of the Atlantic

act nations.

Within a few months, believe high Allied
bservers in Bonn, the German, General
‘taff will almost certainly get the “go-ahead”

tynal for its new Wehrmacht.

Behind barred windows of a four-storey
‘ed brick building in a Bonn back street two
litler generals, with a skeleton staff of aris-
ocratic former colonels and majors, today
re planning the last details of that new
the making tentative agreements with Vehrmacht.

Hidden in other Bonn Ministries are at
east another dozen dark-suited Hitler gen-
rals—seven in the Ministry of the Interior
lone.

Key men are the elusive generals behind
he barred windows, former German High
‘ommand Operations Chief Adolf Heusinger

be| ind Rommel’s of Staff Hans

ex-Chief

Speidel.

Neither of them was a Nazi, for no German
yeneral Staff officer was permitted to join
the party. Both finished the war, however,
but nobody knows

is

Heusinger was the Fuehrer’s constant com-
anion for years at his Russian Front head-
methods and mechanics of govern-| »yarters, until he was arrested after the 1944
,omb plot, when defeat seemed inevitable.

Thin, spectacled Speidel planned the Ger-
aan offensive against the Second Front.

lieutenant-generals
Summing up, it may be seen | vyhat they really thought about Hitler.

President filled out the remainder
of the four-year term.

If both the President and the
Vice-President should die or could
not serve, the problem of succes-
sion is determined by Congres-
sional] action, In 1792 the U.S.
Congress enacted the first Suc-
cession Act, providing that, after
the President and Vice-President,
the President pro tempore of the
Senate would be next in line,
followed by the Speaker of the
House.
pro tempore is the Senator elect-
ed to preside over the chamber

in the absence of the Vice-Presi-
if there were more
five months of the Presi-

dent) And
than
dential term remaining, a special
national election would be held
to choose a new President to fill
out the term.

This law (which never had to
be used) lasted nearly a century.
It was changed in 1886 following
the death of Vice - President
Thomas A. Hendricks — shortly
after he had taken office. The U.S,

try suddenly realized that,

he would be succeeded by the chosen by popular vote in all the far-flung, sparsely-settled, agricul- |

Republican President pro tempore



KING Baudouin

As the Prince mounts the th .. th lei
; “Whom will he marry emo gians ask

BRUSSELS.

WHEN 20-year-old Prince Bau-
douin accedes to his father’s throne
in Brussels most Belgians
will be fervently hoping that his
coronation will mark the end of
the embittered dynastic dispute.
But they will also be keeping their
fingers crossed.

If, over one pf those gargantuan
Brussels dinners, you wish to
stertle your Belgian politician
guest into dropping his knife and
fork, say with innocent sweetness:
“How like Leopold Baudouin is
becoming—his walk, the way he
wears his military cap, Even his

hebbies, like mathematics and
engineering, remind one of his
father.”

This lean and studious-looking
youth has been under his father’s
influence throughout his life and
is conscious of the tragedy which
has forced his father into abdica-
tion, Baudouin is strongly attached
both to his father and to his step-
mother the beautiful Princess De
Rethy, whose war-time marriage

following that in which they
elected,

between electing a
ing office four months later
March 4, was shortened by adop-
tion of the Twentieth Amend-

ment in 1933, which advanced the
in-
augurations to January 20, Until

; then, too, a Congress elected in
Stee Danese Seemant November usually did not meet
until December of the following Russia
ear, and in nao case could it meet
Since the adqp-
tion of the Twentieth Amendment,

date of future Presidential

yefore March 4,

were formal operation of political party |
As railroad, automobile, Power have made many changes |
and air transportation knitted ge iD the office of the Presidency. |
nation together far more closely
than it was in Washington’s day, j V
the long and unnecessary delay by the men who met in Phil. |
President adelphia in 1787 to write the Con-
early in November and his tak- stitution for the then very new |
on

But they have been only modern-
izations of the pattern laid down

United States of America.

The peaceable procedures which
the Constitution of the United
States spells out, as to how the
basic law of the nation is to be
changed when needs arise, con-
trast sharply with communistic to-
talitarian methods which Soviet
labels as the democratic
way of living... The framers of the
U.S> Constitution
dignity of man and did their best

a new American Congress takes to assure citizens of the republic
office on January 3— two months freedom of speech, thought, and

after it is elected,

Although all American citizens ences in the convictions of indi-|

religion. They recognised differ-

elect the President, they do so vidual men and clashes of person-

the
who
College.

through “electors”

choose
toral

Each state

of basic laws

has Representatives and Senators a peaceful manner.

in the U.S. Congress.

if “in such manner as the legislature tion; it is meeti 3
oe ape s a s . i seting the needs of the
President Grover Cleveland, elect- thereof. may direct.” These elec- American ‘

ed by the Democratic Party, died, tors for many years have been quately, as it di seds “ee “
Eerie Ms quately, as it did the needs of the} Last week, at the Paris talks on a European

army, the Germans demanded that their plan
should be accepted—complete,
with memories of three German invasions in
70 years, were alarmed.
Other Allied observers thought the Ger-
man generals showed an overweening mili-
‘ary ambition in people who had suffered
catastrophic defeat only six years before.
This is the master plan — still an official
secret — to which Britain has not yet agreed
and to which

48 States,

(By SAM WHITE)

agreement between Baudouin and
his Ministers his father’s ene-
mies will be inclined to exclaim.
“See, he is just like Leopold,” while
his father’s followers will echo.
“Thank heaven he is.”

Yet a great part of this small,
prosperous country” retains an
almost Victorian adulation for
the monarchy. It was this, and
not political factors, which was
largely responsible for the wide-
spread feeling against -Leopoid’s
marriage to a commoner.

Blonde Princess
Now, however, Brussels buzzes
hopefully with rumours of an

early marriage for Baudouin and
a successor te the ever-adored late
Queen Astrid,

Whom will she be?

Gossip, indefatigably denied by
palace spokesmen, has fixed on
the 17-year-old blonde Princess
Isabelle, daughter of the French
Pretender, ‘the Count of’ Paris, as

Sans ie ‘oll i The U.S.
enate was then controlled by Constitution says that the electors numerous crises in the 1
the Republican Party. The coun- of each State shall be appointed that have clapsed. aince. 4



This set of laws has survived

ts adop-
citizens of 1951

ade-

tural United States of 1787.

the menus. It is advisable in
Brussels never to eat alone, if only
because the menus need four hands
to hold them,

recognised the |



|
|
|

|



SO SECRET...

he immediate post-war years of defeat he
ecame a professor of philosophy. ,
For more than a year the two generals,
vith their chief assistants, former Colonel
| ‘ount Kielmannsegg and former Major von
len Bussche, have planned in their half-
hidden Bonn War Ministry. The Germans
describe it officially as “The Service Office of
he Federal Prime Minister.”

So secret is their work that the main door
| of the new German Foreign Office is perma-
aently barred, and visitors are admitted only
after a strict “vetting” by a Prussian N.C.O.-
type porter.

MASTER PLAN

' is which would provide for the great. | The Allied Foreign Ministers’ conference
entitled to as many electors as it est good of the greatest number in|in Brussels at the end of last year which
agreed to the formation of a German Army.
64 years|let the generals come out into the open. But
the German General Staff master plan is still

| known to only a few Allied officials.

the French are

One fashionable Brussels restau- | 9PPosed :—



rant unable to obtain
height of ostentation, explains/
apologetically in its wine list: |
“We regret to inform our clients |
that the consignment of Russian
wines from Georgia ordered some
time ago has not yet arrived.”

further

Prices Soar

Another restaurant, not content |
with ordinary cauliflower, de-|
scribes its version as “Cauliflower |
ostgntation.” 4

fter the feasting the prosperous
citizens adjourn to night-clubs,
choosing boogieswoogie haunts or
staid brilliantly lit establishments |
where © middle-aged aristocrats |
dance to 1930 tunes played by a
gipsy string quartet or retire to
one of the innumerable lace-|
curtained bars,

Meanwhile priees soar to a
at which the most obvious

1.

6.

Allied diplomats taking part in the Paris
negotiations say that the French are adamant |
point! in opposition to No, 3 and No. 4.




A Wehrmacht of 250,000 German con-
scripts, serving two years each.

Six Army Corps, each of two divisions
12,000 men strong (despite French in-
sistence that no German unit should

be more than 5,000 to 6,000).

Revival of the German General Staff.
Creation of a German War Ministry

with a civilian War Minister,

Luftwaffe of 2,000 planes all Allied
manufactured, including 600 jet fight-

ers.

Naval Sauadrons for defence in North

Sea and Baltic.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 25,

1951







CLOSED
: FOR

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Bit by bit the German generals have
revealed their plans to Allied diplomats and

they al interest and so they laboured! officers in Bonn.
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—



NERGY

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Weet-a-bix

Grape Nuts

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Cold Storage Hams

7 FOODS















‘ to Leopold sealed his st-wa e st li , " ¥ k econ- | y. r Cold Storage Bacon
personnel has been employed to operate it. | ffte 9"! Er eae Se noe eee prosscly thnniaths omy Spe the visitor is te restrict | OPPORTUNITY i ENJOY Oat Flakes by the Pound
: : ™ ; , : an aims himse! g a r= | : cnh ‘ 2
The services of the new Fire Officer should ‘The bitterness of the dispute its neon-lighted, luxurious self. nee ne Tie toi The French are too late. When with Britain |: £0 va -
be utilised by the Government in connec- | ar’ people garb a 0 bas- — Everything abounds and every- any non-Belgian mortal. |and America, they agreed last December to‘: OLING ee eee re ee
tion with this matter sions which will take years to thing is considerably larger than | WORLD COPYWRIGH? RESERVED negotiati G A h h ls
s . die out. At the first sign of dis- life size—especially the steaks and hi. .8 | § tons on a Werman rmy, t ey them- | Ny FRUIT FINE LiIguors
| selves created the new German General Staff | >
| | :
7 " | and the German generals were not slow to |% Prunier Brandy
OUR READERS SAY | wate thal ma » JUICES Martel Brandy
se ri ae oer e io . White Wines
Leo! a MH oe ° ; : ) Now America, disappointe ss Red Wines
Russian Brutality months in “the huge vaults of the ment, and I should like to men- yrolonged starvati suffer- : : PP hy Breast endl i
i : Butyrka prison” shi or off ‘ 2 I ged: starvation “and: suffer Benelux aid for Western defence plans, has | }< orate
To the Editor, The Advocate— ee a prison” shipped her off, tion them. ings described and come through | 7 E : P ’ Golden Tree Beer
SIR,—Kindly allow me to invite ee BAY charged offence | or First, that any human beings alive. Of course many do not | started a major boost for the immediate crea- | St Tuborg Beer
attention, if necessary, to the ae trial, to salve-labour in can, on a large general scale be so survive: the toll taken by death tion of the army. > Beer in Cans
Book Section in the June issue of Oreste and nee Te in Siberia, in so brutally and callously cruel to is exceedingly heavy,.and would bois eit High ale 1% Seether ne tiaartiee a Senet
the Reader’s Digest. It offers a Oe tet with a constant stream their fellow creatures, as these be swollen by suicide if it were eters 1g Commissioner John | ¥ oe r
en ne ton “ ~ almost unbe- vy et women equally with ee meer are here said to a sore paren ‘ RE } McCloy said in Bonn recentl y that). END-OF-DA ¥
ievable story of the sufferings of Maye be, from the high official down to nd thirdly, “I am astoundec | rH , : «“ s : is
a woman in a Soviet prison afd mites, OAR AMA 41 adere, cd the rank and file m@n s#d women that any person can still believe there will have to be compromises. “Great * ee SPECIALS
mipve-Labour Camps, the latter in incredible cafe tpt Years.of — who carry out the systematic in Conmntuntam, after maging a and fundamental strategic decisions,” said| Pineapple Juice ri . .
Siberia. ; a - z mn wickedness Miss Lipper describes. story of this nature. oxisting “ Z $43 : 13s
leased, ¢ é rie ane bper aescrid ; to | Mr. { > Pin le Crushe %g *
: : ; sg mi hse Cail cages ee J living conditions in many lands | Mr: McCloy, are awaiting the solution of the | ss Pineapple ie se d Carrs Crackers
Her name is Elinor Lipper. She SRC dee pate sco ca eaee ae We know of course that there. still entail much, very much hard- |German rearmament problem.” x . . Corrs Biscuits
was a medico living in Russia Bea ate en existence, Now she oceur occasionally brute beasts. in ship and suffering, but not to be | Only Britain is sil : i} pinennare Cueaks Canadian Red Cheese
and quite inoffensively and apari es ne wae in Switzerland human form, even in centres of compared with a Soviet Slave- nly Britain is silent. No official statement | 3: Grapefruit Hearts Danish Gouda Cheese
from politics. She went there ‘in er te ee” eet ee real civilisation, but here you Labour Camp in Siberia. of policy on the German Army has been x CANADA DRY Australian Cheese in Tins
1937, under the influence of an ones : son Camps, have an organisation embracing But what kind of “bee in the issued si f l se Sparkling Drinks Dutch Head Cheese
“emotional reaction” that led he which is described as one of the hundreds of them, even-thousands, bonnet” really possesses the Com - ee ane Orme announcement six ? _
fp eqiecge mot i lathe ioges. a hives wy id ane nn ne, ahaa ee ae together. And munists in France, Italy, ete. and months ago that Britain had agreed only in| %
the Secret Police, 1e N.K.V.D. av ee OF SISO Peavey 01 presumably Stalin and the Polit- -ven in Britai nd US.A.? rinciple » : : | 4s vB y sy
conceived that she w: ; earth. buro know and approve eyenon Ss. principle ,to the formation of a German| x PHONE— —We Deliver
“counter-revolutionary” and ar- There are three points that fill Secondly, it seems incredible ee ae F.G Army. iS
rested her, and then after 14 me with the profoundest astonish- that human beings can endure the July 20, 1951 ; : L.E.S. 3
my 20,296. : AEBS. €<66565$65SSSSSS5999SO9995 9 SS SOGS SSS GOSS GIO IOO

~
WEDNESDAY, JULY 25



Govt. Seeks Control

Of Elect

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMB
reading to a Bill having as
the General Election. The s

, 1951

ion Polls

LY yesterday gave the second
its purpose the conducting of
set-up is a new one necessitated

by the introduction of Adult Suffrage.

Among the proposals in the

Bill, provision is made for the

closing of liquor shops and clubs, the prohibition of the use

The offence was commitied on them that if they believed thar}
. : May 29, 1951. .His Hohour the the accused held a gun, pointed 1 ~ ~ —
of loud speakers, banners, flags and favours, bands of music Chiet Justice “Sir Allan Chi-lat Weakes end fred it with ant —— STS
and the assembling of crowds with 100 yards of pollin more postponed: sentence. Prov-jintention to maim or do bodily | ff, ws REE PLUMES
€ J poling : hae Ml...
stations. eros was represented by Mr. J,/ harm to Weekes, then it was the: | i een Te 4
The Objects and Reasons of the up their right of going into the Ss. B. Dear while. Mr. W. W., | duty to find him guilty. ia
Bill read: Bill section by section and elim- Reece, K.C. appeared on behalf ere was no evidence that the ,

The provisions of this Bill are
intended to be supplementary to
the provisions of the Representa-
tion of the People Act, 1901, and
the Ballot Act, 1931, in respect of
the hoiding of an election of mem-
bers of the General Assembly and

: aousy Ww 3 res ot side. The first wound was above
provides the necessary a ea ag any .necessary amend- the Sopa tes ‘aamilaaa iyitar Elisia Weekes and = Darniey
tive machinery in connection ee her rmght. breast necessitatin Prove the yore no}
therewith. He expressed agreement with medieai attention, , trieadiy’ ana the We tietec oa say
As a result of the introduction the provision of making it an that Proverbs went on a high- |
of adult suffrage some 96,000 offence for anyone who made or wiinesses to prove:their: case. Tne way with children playing on in|
persons have been registered as Published a false statement in defence called on two. and fired a revolver at her while |
electors under the provisions of COMnection with the personal The first witness called for. the she was sitting in her house |
the Special Registration of Voters character ae a candidate. : prosecution was. Sgt. Nathaniel It is for them to believe if thi: |
(General Assembly) Act, 1951. Some people got up on plat-! PLEASURE YACHT “Marianne” rides at anchor alongside the motor | (Skin who told the Court that en
That Act also provides for the forms, and not only said bad

division of the Island into 213
districts in which it is intended to
establish one or more polling
stations.

It is therefore obvious that the
administrative machinery neces-
sary for the efficient conduct of
an election must be substantially
increased.

It will be necessary to appoint,
some 450 election officers that is,
returning and presiding officers,
election clerks and poll clerks in|
the case of a General Election and
the general superintendence of
such matters will be carried out

4 ; Road, St. Philip when he inter- }
‘ ; ; Tslands in the Atlantic. rane bi :
by a Supervisor of Elections. was not ‘going to vote for that. Yesterda : b> _ |viewed Weekes again along wit S k R ] Ba
Time and Place | On this he believed he was ae o ag rh on, Tiaarup, his her son Monty Weekes. -Weekes pea er utes }
Actual voting on polling day ing alone in his own party. Any The House of Assembly trup and hi nyo = J hn § Tras-| pointed out a spot on Ere teat) ;

will be conducted in the same Closing of liquor shops would met at 3 p.m. yesterday. shar an the Masten sar ee: wom whith he measured to ap? Out Ar ument

manner as on previous elections, @Mtail the closing of provision Mr. Adams laid the fol- ack cee in uo but it is considered advisable to \SOPs because it was well known lowing : Mattenn ae ea be ke ee oF ater are ee a " :
depart from past practices in the |that 90 per cent. of liquor shops Message No, 21/1951 from | Rudbe Ms “ ta e her to John oe anes om a wenle ayy OF WHEN Mr. O. T, Allder, Senior
following respects: the time ana | Were also provision shops. His Excellency the Governor | sudbac of Los Angeles, her|He open e envelope ana + |Member for St. John, gave notice

place of holding the election will
be fixed in the writ and polling day

inating anything that might not
appear to be workable or in keep-}
ing with local conditions.

He took it that in due course
they would go into Committee!
on the Bill so that they would be!
able to go carefully into it and}

things about candidates, but their
family as well. This was a de-
plorable state of affairs and should
be stopped.

These were the kind of people
who felt they could not make an
appeal to the electorate unlesa
they indulged in such practices,
He hoped the provision in the
Bill would make these people

on in such a way.

Will Not Vote
Referring to the provision for
the closing of liquor shops and
clubs, Mr. Mottley said that he

“Why should we pass a sectian

that will not be workable,” said







RIDING
4 x

ship “Sedgefield” in the Careen

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

AT ANCHOR



age.

Sailed 5,000 Miles

———

In The House

to the Honourable the House
of Assembly informing the

Here From Sweden

talk politics and cease to carry |’ ~—~——-———-——————

A Danish crew of four—one a
woman—sailed the trim little
pleasure yacht Marianne into Car-
lisle Bay yesterday after a 2,700-
mile run across the Atlantic from
Madeira, a group of Portuguese

American owner.
| ‘The Marianne is a Swedish built



AFTER deliberating f

year-old labourer Darnley
Philip, guilty of shooti
disfigure or maim or to

of the Crown. mf
ine prosecution alleged that
on May 23, 1951 at Congo Road,
St. Philip, Darnley Proverbs who
was not a friend of Elisia Weekes
snot al her while she was sitting
cn the floor at*the entrance to her

The prosecution called on six

May 29 he went to Congo Road,
St. Philip and interviewed Elisia
Weexes Who handed him a. brown
dress and white petticoat. ‘There
Was 4 small hole in the dress and
another in the petticoat with spots

of blood. Later the same night he
eaw Proverbs on Congo Read and
toid him tnat ‘he was aceused. af

shooting at
arrested him,
Police Station, Proverbs was cau-
uoned and formally charged, He
made a statement which was read
over to him and signed.

Interviewed
On May 30 he went

Elisia Weekes and

to Conge

ontained a spent bullet.

He took away the envelope

On arriving at the|

or twenty minutes an Assiz

jury at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday found 28-
Proverbs of Congo Road, St.|
at Elisia Weekes with intent to|
o her some grievous bodily harm. |

house of the accused was searche:
for a gun.
that there

were two
‘which they

could make

Dr. Hutson said the wom 1
had three wounds on her righ.

was the action of » sane man!
and if there was a doubt arising |
im their minds then it was their |
duty to bring a verdict of noi |

guilty in the case.

no alibi,
{they had to decide was whethe:
the accusead was in that road

bullet from the gun.
His Honour, then
for the Jury,

summed up



of certain questions in the Hous
yesterday, the Speaker objected t

. ac at a and the spent bullet_and handed as weak oie abien j ‘

: ees vay) Mr. Mottley. Honourable House of pro- |; yacht. She was built 16 years ago ANC me eet | the last paragraph being read b\

bg ‘ier ehen 4 ep Sher Some people thought that the penis to: set up a Body Sn rs: Sweden, by Rertil poe Rnalree i ye him pointing out that he hac
ene ee aoe ow [Only way a certain type of indi- nown as the Scotland Dis- Bothin—a famous British ship de- "eaten ,| previously informed the Hon

nomination day, This is to allow | Vigor GOUIA seciitd
sufficient time for the printing of

by offering rum to the electorate.



under the Chairmanship of

| Signer—for a Swedish Director,

no street lamps on it. When

Member that that paragraph wa

; f Ghorpjorn Holm, ve av disallowed by him on the ground
the requisite number of ballvi|«this was absolutely incorrect. the Director of Agriculture. " si en ayer eeu he} that it contained argument
papers, There were hundreds of people Message No, 22/1951 from Ghorpjorn Holm sold her over to} Said nothing but made a state-}" rhe’ Hon Member had been

Nomination must be made in the |i, this country who at any time His Excellency the Govern- John Rudbach who has hired El-| ment at the Station. A spent! minded about the fact that
form to be provided and be signed | election or otherwise, would put|} OF, on the subject of assist- mar Trastrup to sail her over to] Dullet is one that is discharged

by two electors of the constituency
and must be handed, together
with the receipt for the deposit, to

7 c e 3 . soon as time for giving notice

the Returning Officer between the |;ym on Election Day, all it would|| with proper sanitary con- writes. “I thought it a fine oppor- Ne ary aay p eke 7 ye aes came, the Hon, Member insisted

hours of 9 a.m. and noon on|mean would be that the ordinary|| Veniences. || tunity to use my pen”,. Skipper arrested and cautioned and said] 4d read the paragraph. |

nomination day. shopkeeper would be unable to! Thirteenth Annual Report || Trastrup said, “and so I unhesitat-/ jhothing, Att District “C’ Station|. In making his report. to the
Candidates are also required to | sell it but every hotel and every of the Peasants Loan Bank— | ingly accepted the offer to sail the

make a statutory declaration on

a prescribed form as their

to



their hands into their pockets
and buy a drink for themselves.
“If you prohibit the selling of]}

club would be able to do so

“Imagine placing a policeman at

ance from the Labour Wel-
fare Fund to enable labour-
ers to equip their houses

Ist June, 1949 — 81st May,
1950.

Los Angeles. Skipper Trastrup is
an author and he makes his living
by travelling to places on which he

yacht to Los Angeles.”

Captain Trastrup started off



from the cartridge.
Police Consta 92 Shepherd
of District’“C” said‘he went to

Proverbs was charged and cau-
tioned and made a statement’to

















Paragraph 2, contained argument
before the meeting was con-
vened, the Speaker said, but as

House, the Speaker said that he
considered such













' Labourer Guilty Of |
Shooting With Intent |

He submitted to then. |
inferences

Mr. W. W. Reece in addressing '
the jury said that there wag really |
He told them that what

atl
that fime and whether he was in-|

Strumental in the discharge of the}

action calculated |

PAGE FIVE

ee







FOR THE BEST IN |

MATCHES

ASh FOR

|
|
|
|


















MATCHES

ON SALE
EVERYWHERE

|

—————————— ee
— —

|
'



NT2615











; 4k . ; Set. Gaskin who read the state~|to invoke the displeasure of th:
qualifications, the Marine Hotel, the Aquatic _ Quarterly Return of Trans- from Copenhagen on May 27 for! ment to him, He signed the] Chair and to infringe on the
Provision is also made for the|Club or any such place, to seo|| actions in Rum = to 30th Helsingborg, Sweden. From Hel-| statement. 5; Speaker's privilege. He then lef\|
adjournment of the election in |that this provision is carried out?” June, 1951. a | singhborg, he called at Falmouth— Elisia Weekes wife of Hughfit for the Honourable House to!
cases of emergency. said Mr. Mottley. scheme of Government | England—before going on to Weekes and mother of nine}make a decision, |
As regards the suggestion that for the Coleridge and Parry || Madeira. He took 21 days’ sailing|children told the court that. she : |
Expenses employers should give their em- wets ee. so gutieveas from Madeira here. knew Proverbs for three years.) Mr. Adams (L) said that no}
The expenses incurred in the|ployees an hour to vote, not only ean Colonial Estim- || “Fine Sailer” Her son and Proverbs had a case a, of the House of | If You Bid. yarcastt) Iyen “awakes
election which were previously |would his party support that, but a ce ‘eo; ~6=«||~. “Marianne is a fine. sailer,”|in the Court sometime ago. could attempt to question the| oo iy iad
P Reeth ae Ae 7 I The following notices | ale aoe “Wa Speaker’s ruling and so he did} at nights; are constantly “tired” ;
borne by the various local govern- they would go on every platform were given :— }, thought the skipper’s wife. “We Felt Burnin t feel it was necessary for the|
ment bodies will be borne by the |in the island and urge people to Mr. Adams: Resolution for met extremely fine weather} 6 May 29 eieegae and 8.30 Hoy ae ble “Ho Battie ae art easily upset and too often depressed,
Central Government and the duties | ajjow their em loyees to go and : 1 * = throughout the trip,” she said,|,. 0 “ay an atthiccanis idole go : ae wees pa it is @ sure sign that your cirength is
Seik a ely saga quew Pp 5 the sum of $1,000 to supple ie : ba.’ in the afternoon she was sitting at| views, If His Honour did not enter y
of Parochial Treasurer in relation | ast their votes on Election Day ment the Estimates 1951-52, but we were always on thel| her door.and het %on—Graham| tain that portion of the question Nagging and you're suffering from over-
to such an election are transferred Mr, J. A. Haynes (E) expressed Part I, Current, lookout for a hurricane, knowing Hunte—said something to her.Jhe said, then that was the end taxed nerves. The special ingredients of
to the Supervisor of Elections. disagreement with the suggestion Dr. Cummins: Resolution that these are the months for} While talking with her son Prov-}) of jt, : fi? ,
The opportunity has also been | of Mr, Mottley as regards the sell- to sanction the Regulations hurricanes,” erbs and his girl friend walked up Mr. E. K. Walcott (E) said that BUCKFAST TONIC WINE will
taken to insert provisions intend- | jng of liquor at rum shops on Elec- of the Immigration of Pau- The Marianne relies only on|i@ front_of her house. After they/he was in agreement with every- quickly restore lost energy; fortify you
- a ele a condict tion Day. He agreed with tthe pers (Prevention) Act, 1909. |! cuit. ana ‘somnatody nee sieriiya vt pana Poverty tgturned to her thine the Hon, Senior Member fo: Kealiot \favee abil the watinaitAa al
roughou e€ elections, by the ision in the Bill and*said tha ar bebip hie The skisper's| place and she ihed : : *) St. Joseph had said on the matter s
closing of liquor shops and clubs fear cauraeking aneR was done Mr. Adams: Resolution to || be” at “her heim, ons skippers | from a revolver and she felt alia saken the Speaker not to bear long-term fatigue.
(clause 28); by prohibiting the lin other countries sanction the Scheme of Gov- || Wife had to do her bit of steer-/ burning and shouted “Lord, Look as hard on some members as he Take h
use of loudspeakers, banners, flags,) "Mr, Fred Goddard (E) said that|] ernment for the Coleridge || ing when the three men were tired | Darnley Proverbs Shoot Me.” She] @S hard on some members as hi rece ,
favours (Clause 30) and bands of } did t see the necessity for and Parry Schools, under the or otherwise engaged. With good} held up her clothes and heard Tid: deal a litte sore. eiitly @ bottle today!
music (Clause 35): the assembling | ne 3 id no’ ‘ eaery provisions of section 32 of { wind, the Marianne does as much!|something fall on the floor, Her with, Mose Wino lenber labs, “than
oe O90} eras 5\closing rum shops on that day. nat . | as 12°knots. Her formance was|husband took her to Dr. Hutson . : i ?
of crowds within 100 yards of any |7 ld have been more to the the Education Act, 1890 || as 12 knots. Her perfor va " with those who knew more. |
polling station (Clause 32); any | point if there was the old system eee eee ats , wore eae pone eee an cous was in The Speaker in reply said tha G 6
attempt on polling day at in-} avi voli fre i r. ams: Resolution to e _ Bpproximarely 5,000-mile tena, ut aaa ie reet | he appreciated the advice from th eucnrast
Auaneiixc wale Shieh to vote for [eres eed ae pee tor authorise the lease in small sailing from Copenhagen here. pane 7 ae Weskes anid So teainens who spoke but hy MADE BY ; Vay RN Y
any particular candidate (Clause | iictaree thére were 27 polling plots to agricultural labour Rigged as a staysail schooner, iene ae as arkir Went square to the| wanted to make it clear that he THE MONKS OF |
33); preventing the interruption is cathe tn GhriseOhurch How could ers a parcel of land of an Marianne carries a square jib road and Proverbs was oblique to had disallowed, over and re aaenart 4
of any public meeting called for | ?°0''s ‘did te hope to keep these area of approximately five Specially for sailing with trade}, | “Proverbs was wearing a|Peatedly, questions or paragraph» aaeY Pe ke
the purpose of promoting the |80¥ C8” sa ; ee Pp acres forming part of Dodds winds. Her displacement is 29/¢a hat but no coat, There was|cf questions which the othe: ° .
election of a candidate (Clause 34) oe ee ae in other plantation situated in the tons. She carries an overall length] 4), oi) lamp in her house and when| Honourable Members had sub- q y Y
and requiring notice to be given cthlad,” BOE drear noe iste. it parish of St. Philip. £ of 57 feet, a beam of 14 ft. 10 ins.| proverbs first passed her house| mitted, > i y / aN Kk
to the police of si#h meeting | £4 ary in this island to-day Resolution to authorise and draws 8 ft. 4 ins. of water. |she kept her eyes on him all the a es Sar is a a
(Clause 36). atin thar ana ein the election sett see saree e the 7 ane She is scantly but comfortably} time.
It is an offence to make or pub- | With the change in a ae oh, eine a tne furnished. Cooking is done by oil] When the explosion occurred she Obituary:
lish any false statement in ielation |@: ad th: soot auicovaen- ade fag 7 id. — - stoves and lighting by oil. did not see Proverbs’ face but ys ss oe a ea
to the personal character of a| A Saran opportunity to aying “SILLS Captain Trastrup intends stay-| knew it was he. et eres {OR SODS IOSD OOOO VODPOD CSOD SOSEOS SAE FODP ES
candidate (Clause 31). |i aoe the Address of the Mr. Cox: A Bill intituled ing here until the hurricane season| Dr. Hutson said on May 29 he M W It * M q | ll % %
Provision is also made whereby iF oe rable junior member for St. aay Anti to. ehRolirage theese is over. From Barbados he is sail- | examined Flista ane ig Vir. aiter arsha % $
PTE, sae, SOW employees | . ‘shifting the expenses tablishment and develop- | ing for Los Angeles via Panama. )‘urgery at Sterling, | § ds aol & x
at least one hour to vote and no| en So v stries to Government.” ment of new industries and || He and his wife spent three| There were three wounds under! The death occurred on mondey: (Ve announce with pleasure *
deduction shall be made from |{70m the Vestries to ' : init fot months here five years ago. They|the right breast; one was one and| evening at his residence “Chan- | & %
; ; Day Off to make provision for the ‘ edna three quarter inches long. Blood] dos”, Aquatic Club Gardens of Mr |@ %
/ res 2 | Gave Day : 5 ; h t back to Barbados to 1 & , Aquatic Club Gar §
wages in respect of the time taken As ‘regards the provision for granting of certain relief jee eae was seen on the inner garment.! Walter Marshall, formerly Man- | % he cal $
accordingly (Clause 29), aki loyers give their em- from package tax on customs ee bed os thes The wounds he saw could have|ager of the Barbados ‘Aquatic | & the Sterna of x
The provisions of the bil! follow |e on ene cha nt to vote duty and income tax to per- been bullet wounds, They were] Ciub. 1% %
generally similar legislation in | Ployees ac a hia thet he could sons establishing factories in “MORMACGULF”’ not incised wounds and they could} Mr, Marshall was the son oi |% ~
other West Indian Colonies. Mr, Goddard sa lavas who connection with such indus- have been self inflicted, Mr. and Mrs, John Marshall of | % ~ x
Mr. Adams (L} moved the sec-|not imagine any employer wi tries and for purposes in- BRINGS LUMBER ; Bank Hall and after many years | $ a. d Gon nlete Range %
ond reading of the Bill and re-|to-day would not encourage eh cidental to or connected with Heard Explosion as a clerk at DaCosta & Co, Ltd % I ‘ .
ferred to the Objects and Reasons|#mployee, whether he was voting any of the foregoing pur- THE Moore Mac Cormack Albin McCollin, a witness for the} he was employed by the organ: | %
which he explained in detail. on his side or on the other, to go poses. freighter Mormacgulf brought|defence said on May 29, 1951 he] \sers of the Barbados Aquatic Club x %
He said that he regretted that|and exercise the right of,the vote. Mr. E. K. Walcott tabled a 444,570 feet of lumber from New|was home about 7 to 7.30 p.m. | He was concerned in the building / x
there was not a provision made| Speaking for himself, at the last question relating to the grant Westminister for Barbados yester-| While he was home Proverbs came | of the Club and becarne Manager % fy) %
in the Bill as to the total amount|'election he had people in his of funds for the repair of day. in his place with his wife and]jin 1928. He saw the club grov % *
. of money that could be spent by | employ who were = a tenantry roads in the various a ees ‘ cee oe and continued tis pattvities unti | % ¥
a candidate. He did not think it| Andrew, and he ha actually arishes. given dinner an je ate w im Jecember 1 when he retire * /. ¢ “ 4
fair for Mr. “A” with unlimited | given them the day off so that they P Mr. O. T. Allder tabled a LABOURER INJURED While they,were eating, he heard} ming to ill health ! ig Bhisc hoth Mrclen s i are yaralions $
meney to be able to spend £8,000 might vote. He knew many mer- question relating to the low " _|an explosion like that of a revol- Ife was a popular figure and re lo ~ « * - / g
when Mr. “B” would scarcely be chants in Bridgetown who made rate of pay given to dav Felix Bayne, a labourer o/|ver which had been discharged.| garded as part and parcel of the | $ x
able to spend 10,000 cents. lit éonvéhient for their employees labourers employed by the Combermere Street, St. Michael} When the Police came Proverbs “Aquatic by those who visiter | @ y
Mr. Lewis (L) said that he had | 4 and vote for any candidate Government. i : was involved in an accident with|was at his home, he Club, With naval personnel R %
much pleasure in seconding the ie The House passed the se- the motor bus M-1216 owned by He could not say where Proverbs especially Americans, he wae $ — X
; ay rere oO or two/they liked. e eb pete Vey | the Diamond Bus Co., and driven| was before ,he came to his home.| guide and confidant always will- | # ny
Bill, but there, were ‘one or twey id that he -ond reading of a Bill intitu- r ’ ‘ili ‘ : $ x
points that he wanted to make. Mr. L. E, Smith (L) sa * 4 Ds ee ake provision by Hughbert Forde of Clapham, To Mr. Reece: McCollin said hc | ny to offer information as to the % °
Now that a person had only to be | Welcomed a Bill of that sort, and for sae tasnection abe) super St. Michael on Probyn Street) heard the explosion while he wa | Barbadian way of life. % . ’ %
21 years old to become a voter, he Jas far as the closing of rum shops ice of the election of | about 4.30 p.m. yesterday. eating his dinner. Proverbs usec He was married to Miss Iris | CK . /, : ha / S
did not see it necessary for him{was concerned, © the — provision Tenthors ta save’ tn the Bayne was taken to the Gen-]to visit his house regularly. Ghent of Trinidad whom he nov |¥ ’ lg ls a, ~
to be called upon to swear to his}shoukd have been on the Statute General. Assembly of ‘this eral Hospital and detained. Mr. J. S. B. Dear then address-| leaves as a widow ; x , &
qualifications unless it was ques-|Book long ago. , imand, the mrovedure atislich ed the Jury on the casé. He told To these and other relatives % %
tioned by another voter. st He was sure =e — — siaoticns fre eeeciaas at } deepest sympathy will be ex-|¥ >
It was unfortunate that the Bi ut a stop to a lot of the robber, ve , ; So . tended. 3 Obit OA AA sD
was to be got through by the end vated by poor rum shop keeper: such elections — ee | SL LLLLLL LLL LLL LLL A OO AA eee
of the month because the House|o, giection Day. Sea tooith = Saree ' I
might find it necessary to insert| y+ was a fact that some of the , Furth "discussion was \ Ll XOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH
SO Earners See 21 years} Voters did not get as far as the postponed until toanprraw L a “s ti s s
the vote“ and Pallow people ‘with {Polling booth on that day because} Shen the House meets at | SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH LP arryc.
,oney to come around_and cor-|°f their drunken condition an 5.30 p.m. | on hte te ,
rupt them”. he said. He knew that |Sometimes they were taken to the 1}



police station instead. GALY, OTL CANS —1, 2 & 5 Gia. Sises

Hon. members had it in their
power to safeguard the poor ‘un-



in other places outside Barbados,
candidates had to make returns
of their elections expenses,



Patient Discharged

PYREX

Mr. Lewis said that the noticed|fortunate voter from drinking toc , 3 Established r BE JT Incorporatea
there was nothing in the Bill to]/much rum on Election Day and} MAUDE MURRELL of Barbarees 1860 ° L 4 le 1926
compel the election officers to|they should use it. Hill who was injured in an

conduct the counting of the votes The honourable junior member accident on Baxters Road on Mon-

10 & 1! ROEBUCK STREET,

in a particular way.

; : for the City had raised a poin'
The election officers

should be that candidates should be allowec

told of a method by which the - Fr ted. “I have
House intend to have the votes pe Se yorral cas parishe:
counted, giving the candidates | ?® nevi’ kee the - candidate
and their canvassers the chance|the sheri ps

to see them. very far off. I think they shoulc

day night about 7.30 o'clock was
treated at the General Hospital
and discharged the same night.
Two buses and three bicycles were
involved in the accident, One was
the National bus M-1287 which
was being driven by Cecil Bishop




Seeseuoena
Ki

INSIST ON

|
|
|
|
|

WARE

means OUICh DECISIONS





be allowed to be near enough tha!
fhey can see the marks on the
ballot paper.”
The Illiterates
He thought there was a_ pro-
vision in the Bill that a blind man
would be able to take someone

Perhaps it would be a good idea
to adopt one of the methods used
at Trinidad’s elections. That was,
that the police be allowed to vote
about two days before polling
dav

Mr, E. D. Mottley (E) said that

of Bush Halli and the other was
E-62 which was being driven by
Darnley Thomas of Western, St.
James. The buses were mot
damaged.

CASSEROLES CUSTARD DISHES in Shell
BREAKFAST, DINNER & SOUP PLATES
LARGE ROASTING DISHES

Shapes



_ PURINA cHows *












THEY ARE THE BEST | now available at

he thought he was speaking for| with him who would be sworn to
every member of the Opposition | secrecy, to cast his vote for him. FELL FROM LADDER Es Sos 2h mee * CAVE SH EPH E tad) A « @.. LTD.
when he said that they were in|He had not seen any ee ae Fitz Mapp of Sunbury Tenan iy fl 2a 1s oe 1 Street

entire agreement the prin-|however. for the person who, = DE it) ~ | ; 2 13 a

iple the Bi 3ecause they |tho , i see, could not}try, St. Philip was detained at the es

a ~ ms tk ee om _— — ee os fait ohio if this General Hospital after he fell from = H. JASON JONES & co. LTD. Agents 3

principle, however, did not neces-' particular privilege was to be given] 4 ladder yesterday about 3 p.m.





sarily mean that they had to give



@ On Page 7




i an

ae _ CARL ANDERSON















T'M GOING TO Ge
BATH...

MY OWN
LITTLE

T AHOT
AND CRAWL INTO

GOOD NIGHT! RGO"
MY HOUSE FOR SIK MONTH





BOv... 1S |T EVER GOING
TO FEEL GOOD TO GET
HOME AFTER ALL THOSE
WEEKS IN HOLLYWOOD!








HARARE
TM
ead aT Na gol
Ll. BET | GET

y MORE SHAVES |
UT OF A BLADE |
THAN ANY Guy |



"BY ~ FRANK ‘STRIKER













[KEEP BATES INT Tee SADDLE UNT iL
[WE REACH THE WOODS! yr>

————S——SS—SSS

tA f
(a VA

ae massa
































foe M







An THIS MOMENT OMI COMES ABREACT OF
THE SPOT ANC... %y













T CAN DISCOURAGE HIM A
LITTLE...1-1 HOPE /



f I WON'T HEAR A WORD
AGAINST “THE GREAT YOu"
HE'S A WONDERFUL MAN!
HE'S ‘THE ONLY ONE
WHO DOESN'T TREAT

DO you KNOW WHO
“THE GREAT yOu
REALLY IS ? HiS
RECORD SHOWS




ONLY ANXIOUS ABOUT
YOUR WELFA

_BY LEE _FALK_ & RAY Oe













_ IWHATON Y YOU GAVE ME THE | DEA PERFECT WHAT A” A) an! onan?

ee yee SARTHIS (. WHEN YOU KIDDED ABOUT] |PICTURE! YOU — SEDTODOS CO k™

HERE. GO INTO THE BUSHES ANDP [fia EOR, | MOVIN NIN WITH "HONEY 3" ait NOW THR,
ee }
THIS ON, AND TAKE’ {si Ces ys > RELATIVES. THE et - ' \ je
—> | OT ‘ + . ———| FC GIRLY A | F «ES WO / ters
| a6 || ES A eg |
| $ . : |

wae

}






; }

se . we )

YES ~MAGGIB-I'M. PAINTIN ' { NOW- UENNY- DON'T LET pl Ma Ly ee ae rr la

TH’ KITCHEN: BMS we \ | My. em ee Se | IN MY ROC “ 1}

c 24, r vo | iT GETS o S ‘4

SO Weis Nex) D ASLEEP 1 | ALLERGIC TO Dewy, sien ———~ Scinsaarre ft

ON TH! LAWN - = Wich | | GRASS -YOU KNOW ] eter | \}}
FINIGH - HELL. COME HOME! |



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



LIFEGUARD “ts

THE WONDERFUL BRITISH
DISCOVERY

A Supreme Germicide and Antiseptic

uw

GRAZES

Â¥, rv
AlN GT Ak A

Was

Pra
LN SS you can use,

FOR BABY’'S

“fy LIFEGUARD |



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* FOR PERSONAL HYGIENE

* TO STERILIZE CUTS

* TO DESTROY DISEASE GERMS

* SAFETY AND RELIEF FOR BITES
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This wonderful new “ Lifeguard” used in tens of
thousands of homes is the most powerful protection
At the
all to handle and pleasantly fragrant and non-staining.
No home with small children dare be without it.




a” 7s

Bl al

BATH





WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 1951

Pains in Back

one ind Tours



eee) Ae

If you suffer terrible, sharp
= wearing down aches in back or
u can t ge at rid of these with

ki nN the “germs in your kidneys. Other
: mpt oms of Kidney and Bladder
D rders are Scanty, Frequent ang
Painful Passages, Getting up Nights,
Leg Pains, Lumbago, ervousness,
Headaches, Dizziness, Circles under
Byes and Rheumatism, poor Appetite
and Energy, Swollen nkies, etc.—
Cystex ends these troubles by remov-
ing the cause—and starts benefits in
24 hours and completely stops trou-
bles in elg@ht days. Get Cystex from
any Chemiet on Guarantee to put
you right or money back. Act Now!
In 24 hours you will feel better and
be completely well in one week.
The Guar-

oo Cystex 2°";
protects

ne or

“or uae Rheumatism, Bladder you,

LOOK YOUR
£2

AND



came time it is quite safe for



SICKROOM

IN THE



| VASELINE isthe registred trade mark of

Chesebrough Manufacturing Co, Cons’d xa



IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE



——
—









Usually

Tins Four Cows Con. Milk
Pkgs. Jac. Cream Crackers

Pkgs. Shredded Wheat










Every spoonful gives you



more and more

eee and





@ Every spoonful of ‘Kepler’ gives you a rich
supply of vitamins A and D.

@ These vitamins are nature’s wonder workers,
assuring health and freedom from illness.

@ Men, women, children=ali should start
taking tasty * Kepler’ to-day.

‘KEPLER.

ROS ame) a ae






4 BURROUGHS WELLCOME & Co. PRODUCT ae
4 126



Sole Agents for Bartodos : Collins’ Led., 28 Broad Street

BWIA

1. Make Business Contacts
Faster in the Caribbean,

~
seo or vir transportation.

a}
epee) 3. Take all the Excess Baggage

you Need at New Reduced
Rates — 50% Saving

BWIA

| BRITISA. WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS









32
48

41

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street















SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only

Now Usually NOW
30 Cheese — per lb 115 1.00
40 Tins Nescafe 91 8&oO
36 Pkgs. Polar Icing Sugar 37 82









NOW! Dental Siience Reveals

PROOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING
IS THE SAFE, EFFECTIVE WAY TO

HELP STOP
TOOTH DECAY

Colgate Dental Cream

















Here’s a way to relief !

Do you know that one of the common
causes of backache lies in the Icidne:
When they are he althy they filter he
impurities out of the system —their n
function. When they grow slu +g: :
impurities accumulate and the n
congestion is often the cause of b ickache,



De Witt's Pills are specially pre-
pores to help wake up sluggish
idneys. They havea cleansing and
antiseptic action oa these vital -
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to their natural Rees Relief from
backache follows as a natural consequence.




De Witt's Pills
are made specially for
BACKACHE
JOINT PAINS
RHEUMATIC PAINS
LUMBAGO
SCIATICA





It is far better to tackle the cause of
backache than to go on sutfering in a way
which is bound to affect your work and
happiness. Fo: over haif a century De
Witt’s Pills have been bringing relief to
sufferers from backache and we have
received countless letters of gratitude. Go
to your chemist and obtain a supply to-day.










OUR GUARANTEE
De Witt's Pills are
made under strictly
hygienic conditions
and ingredients
contorm to most
rigid standards
ot purity.
wen

4
”



~



WEDNESDAY, JULY 25



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508



— —- nimi

The charge for announcemerits of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow!-
edgments, and In Memoriam notices

$:.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays}
for any number of words up to 50, and/|

$ cents per word on wectk-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
additional wo-d. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 und 4 p.m. 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

IN MEMORIAM

MAYERS—In loving memory
beloved mother
Mabel Mayers who departed this life
on July 25th, 1950

Days of sadness still are o'er







ef our

us.








Secret tears we o/fen flow,
For to-day has brought before u
Memories of one year ago
Ever to be remembered by her dear
children, Elliot, Majorie, Edna; Grand-j
children Shiela, Lloyd, (3) Great
grands, (Nephew) Winston
25.7 .51—1n
WHITE—In fondest and ver fading
memory of Isaac White who passed
into the Great Beyond on July 25,
1949.
He loved and was loved to the end
A tribute from
DAISY.
25.7.51—1n

ANNOUNCEMENTS



—$<$<—< —$—$ $$ |
HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—lIsle of | invites applications from

is}

and grandmother |

1
|

FOR RENT









Winimwm charce week 72 eerte and
*@ cents Sundays 24 ~Orde ovr 2
werds 3 cents o word imeek-.4 cents a

| vere on Sundays. |

aieiai gee

HOUSES

}
| CLIFTON TERRACE Furnished |
| House Upp Eay Street. Opposite Yacht}

{ and Aq Clubs All Modern j

| conveniences. Apply on premises. To an)
approved tenant |

2 7:51—2n |
FLAT on Blue Waters Terracs, newly!
} built with spacious cupboards, Phone |

| 8280 25.7.51—t.f.n.|

—————
LAURATON; ROCKLEY TERRACE, 3|
Bedrooms with running water. Picase
Phone 8280. 21.7.51--41.f£.n, |
THE CAMP—On the Sea, St. Lawrence. |
Fully furnished Dial 8357. |
147 51.—t fn.!







- y
Minimum charge week 72 cents and)
98 cents Sundays 24 words -- over 24/
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word on Sundays. |

HELP







“Colonial Development Corporation

qualified and |

Spices. SANTA MARIA—.oveliest hotel! «> perienced electrical engineers for the |

in Caribbean.
per day.

dential district under Government House giving details

hill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day.

SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing Colonial

Beach. Rates from
day. Enquiries to D, M, Slinger, Grenada.
26.6.51—78n.

$4.00 per head per



NEW DENTAL HOSPITAL

skillfully repair your Broke.
remove Nicotine Stains, clean,
them, to look like New.



THE

We can
Dentures,
and Polish
specials can be delivered
hours; send your Broken
or call at Deal
Magazine

within three
Dental Pilates
Square Dental Lab.,
Lane "2

51—3n
Slack Pilates
with
Dentures, this 1s
“ky paste,
al thing.
Deal

can
our

and falling Dental

now be refitted permanently
new system, for slack
foolproof; no more gum or s
or powdered stuff this is the
Try it and be
Dental Lab.,





convinced, Square
Magazine Lae *'2.
24.7.81—3n



LOST &

OUND





ween Sandy









Lane and St. James’ Vicarage on Mon-
day last. Finder rewarded on returning
to A. L. Mayers, Advocate Advertising
Dept
25.7.51—I1n
Lost in Canadian Bank of Commerce
and Broad Street a small Black Note
Book with Index and a Pocket to hold
small paper or cards—Reward—Phone
8121, 25.7.51—2n



PLOTS & SALES—bearing the name o
James Benjamin Cutting, near Howell's
Cross Road. Finder will be rewarded or
returning same to the above address



. 25.7. 51—3n

WATCH — Ladies Gold Watch witr
strap; on Yonkers Bus, between Bus
Stand to Spooners Hill. Finder revarn t

T. Frankiyn, Inspector of Police. Rewarc
offered,

20th July,





On Friday evening Aquat
Club Pier or vicinity. Pair of Spectacles
heavy Biack Plastic Rims, in Fawr
eather case marked Polaroid Ro Re-



ward offered
4669,

Finder ploase Ring





LOST CERTIFICATE

THE WEST INDIA RUM REFINERY

Notice is herebyegiven that application
has been made to the Board of Directors
of the abovenamed Company for the issue
of a Duplicate Share Certificate for twen-
ty (20) shares, Nos. 7133 to 7152 inclusive,
ia the name of W. R. St. C. Redman,
the original of which has been lost or
misplaced, and Notice is hereby given
that within fourte¢n days from this date
hereof, if no claim of representation is
made in respect of such original Certifi-
cate, a new Certificate will be issued

By order of the Board of Directors,










25th July, 1951



GOVERNMENT NOTICE

NOTICE TO IMPORTERS

Notice is hereby given that
owing to the congested state of
Steamer’s Warehouses it has be-
come necessary to enforce Subsec-
tion 4 Section 48 of the Trade
Act, 1910.

2. Importers and Merchants are
requested in their own interest:
to ciear tneir goods from the
Warehouses as quickly as possible.

3. All goods not cleared anc
removed from Steamer’s Ware-
houses at the expiration of 10 days
from landing will be subject to e
penalty of 2/6 per ton weight o:
measurement for each day they
remain in Warehouse in excess Oi
the 10 days.

(Sgd.) R. W. B. BELT)
Comptroller of Customs,
21st July, 1951.

24.7.51—2n.





WE ARE BUYERS |

We buy anything connected with |

STAMPS. Sheets, Single Stamps,

Collections, Accumulations and

Covers, Good prices Paid at the

CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY
3rd Floor, Na. 10, Swan St.















SE HABLA ESPANOL

ORIENTAL

CURIOS, SOUVENIRS, AN-
TIQUES, IVORY, JEWELS,
SILKS Etc,

THANTS














EA for
wo

“Can't you see how

(. To-day's @ A. Song

happy we would be

. With GAS installed





_
POPS PEOSOE SDSS IPS POPE,
« ¥

x ¥
% NOTICE 3
g x
ss We beg to notify our customers \&
S that our Parts Department will be \

X +
X closed for stock taking from Mon- s |
\ day, 20th July, for a week. Also Ps
\ our Repair and Service Depart-
% ments will be closed from the ¢
% same date for two weeks annual @&
% holiday. There will be a skeleton
q staff om duty for emergencies, %
. ¥

‘

& COLE & CO., LTD., %
rod »

. BAY and FROBYN STREETS %
5, +
* q 7 %,

s' 22.7.5

“ ¥

oft ‘ .
LkPPSSSSOSOC OO FOS OOOODSDE



GRAND HOTEL—in best resi- | St. Vincent Hydroelectric Systems. Reply |





















| ings



PUBLIC. SALES



REAL ESTATE

AT THE GARRISON
clusive Lecation)—A 3
oo Presses and
tone Built Bungalow about 10 yes
all Modern Convenienc cawn. Shee
To Suit a Keen and Genuine Buyer.

A Large Stonewall Business &
Residence in Tudor St., Very Good Con-
dition, Modern Conveniences, about
4,000 sq. ft.. Going for Only £2'500. Al-
most New and Nearly 100% Stone Built
3 Bedroom Bungalow Type, Not Far
from the Garrison, Good Location, all
Modern Conveniences, Going for Only
£1,800 A New 2 Bedroom Concrete
Bungalow at Lower Fontabelle, Modern
Conveniences, Going for Only £1,050
A 2 Bedryom Sruperty with Shop attaes-
ed, off Country Rd, Good Condition
Going for about $1,700. A New 3 Ped-

‘Superb and Se-
Bedroom swith
Basins) 12 inch



100m Concrtte Bungalow Facing Sea
about 2 Miles from City, Going for
£2,500 Almost New Duplex 12. ineh



tone Built Bungalow

in Navy Gardens,
nd an Almost New

3 Bedroom 12 inch

Stone Built Bungalow Near Navy Gar-
eens, Going for £3,000. and £2,800
respectively. Re-Sale Values Assured



Mortgages and Ter

ms Arranged Dial 3111
D. F. de Abreu,

“Olive Bough", Hast-

25.7.51—1n
ee
“HOLLANTHIE”-—Standing on 8,000 sq
of land at Two Mile Hill. Just 1%



ft.

| miles from town, and on the 15 minutes

Bus Service. Large Drawing Room, 2 Bed
Rooms, Dining and Breakfast Rooms, W.C
end Path. Company's Water, Light and
Telephone Services installed Garage
Servants Toilet and Bath, spacious yard
with several fruit trees outside palings.
The above has been recently remodelled
and is in A-1 condition. For further
particulars apply next door or Dial 9§292
or 2021

25.7.51-—3n









One Fiat Car with
res and engine in
order, One Prefect 10









a fee-paying vacancy,

“33. Long, Colvin Cleophas









3 ,
BARBADOS ADVOCATE
{ y
- ‘a " + } He t t the I m1) witht shales oe i
EDt q A TIONAL o mH y alll ho 1. me eit tunity without unc ue re trictions,
¥ agreed that some prope’ to express their feclings
sansa ctiett —___—. | *eeulation of the conduct of the “For one to be fined’ $1,000 or
* an kiuect was absolutely necessary, to be imprisoned for one year
COMBERMERE \( HOOL but did appear to him that in merely because he might get up at
many respects the proposals in & mecung and say ‘I do not want
“ge! seliowing ts the erd’r of merit/the Bill were unsatisfactory, so and so to talk here tonight’,
list of ca ates for St. Michael's Ves- T = ; . aii s y mi abs , antas~
try “Scholarships and Open Fateanes to|,, 1° begin with, they were told is to my en fantas
Combermere School for the School Year|'"@t fourteen days_lor not more lc,” said r. Crawford.
Raeniee Tuesday, Sept. 18, 1951. Boys}than twenty-one days should Mr. Sse also objected to
marked with an asterisk ary condidates|clapse between’ Nominat Day Section 35 which reads:
for St. Michael’s Vestry Scholarshi . magpins dpe ay “ . .
Candidates for the St. Michael's. Wouter and Election Day. The only rea- 1. No person shall, for the

purpose of promoting or pro-
curing the rg: of any candi-
didate, hire any band of music.
of ballot 2. No person shall play

on given for that was to allow
sufficient time for the printing of
the requisite number

pepers.

“That is not good enough, there
is no fundamental principle
underlying the suggestion,” said
Mr. Crawford. “I personally see candidate.
no reason why twenty-one days 3. Every person who contra-
should elapse between Nomina- yenes the provisions of this sec-
tion Day and Election Day. This tion shall, on conviction by a

Scholarship who do not secure an @ward
from the Vestry are invited to take una |
provided they
netify the Headmaster in person or in
writing not later than the 3ist July of
their intention to do so

“1. Brathwaite, Harold McDonald

2. Bayley, Winstone Hudson

3. Vaughn, Louis McLeod

4. Bart, Joseph George

5. Garnes, Cuthbert Austin
: Seale, Keith Livingstone
8



Joe or in

Browne, Franklyn Orville
Walrond, Anthony Myrville



a oa Seas, ee is too long.” Court of Summary Jurisdiction
‘11. Innise, Winston ae There were a few sections, he be liable to a fine of one hun-
12. Maynard, Winstone Anthony Said, with which he found it diffi- dred dollars or to imprisonment
"1s Brome, Albert Timothy cult to agree. For instance, there for three months.”
14 Rowling Paco was section 33, the first part of Fantastic
16. Carter, Bertram Alexander Waich reads: “Duriyg the hours “The time was not stated,” said
17, Belgrave, Robert Oliver that the poll is open upon Elee- Mr, Crawford, “but if this pro-
a —— Vievor Stirling tion Day, no person shall upon posal meant that during the cam-
*20. Boyce, ‘Allan Archibald any public road or in any public paign you cannot hire any band
21. Campbell, Lionel Fudolph place within 100 yards of any of music, it is absolute nonsense.
= King, Walter Beresford building in which a polling sta- If you want to say nobody should
om sponta, Seen ‘a ticn is situate, seek to influence be allowed to have music to in-
25. Newton, Reynold DeLisle any elector to vote for any candi- terrupt a rival candidate’s meet-
"3 Bannister, Arley Melvor Harcourt, | date or to ascertain for what can- ing, I Seg none nk ue
orris, Anthon; Chesterfield didate any elector inte ; , certainly to lay 1 own at no
26. Walker, McDonald ci has ae ee Soe person should hire any band or
29. Cox, Simeon StClair ua V a. he any music even. say, six
30, Graham, Briggs Roger ‘One hundred yards are too Mave an) ot he electiot is
31. Wiltshire, Erick Adolph many,” said Mr. Crawford, “Un- Months before the election, is
32. Pollard, Eustace Trevor absolutely fantastic

less you have got a lot of money Mr. E. K. Walcott (E)

pointea



. } ea 5 1 e YY Cd yvassers * ;
Rates from $7.00 per head | post of Engineer/Manager Dominica and) LAND AT ST. LAWRENCE suitable °34, King, Geoffrey Bruce : employ c aera es you have out it might be necessary to make
for building sites. For particulars apply | “29: Waterman, Klensil Montclair got to do a lot of canvassing up M » Bill, but
of Career and stating|/to K, R, Hunte, te dohaes 8137 or recy 36. Norris, Erskine Anton to Blection Day. Some of us have some amendments to the Bill, bu
. at | «Rk r, tele e@ ohe : . ; oe Oo “ry scessary
salary required to Mr. G. Roddam, | 17.7.51—t4.n_| 2% Sandiford, Alwyn Anthony had to go near to the polling sta- it was certainly a very necessary
Development Corporation, 134) 0 538. Walrond, Allan Francis pak s ee . one and he was prepared to sup-
Hope Road, Liguanea, P O Jamaica.” | LAND—A most desirable building site] 3% Seale, Peter Laurie tion and ask a beleehadl alee: decent port it.
9.7.51 —6n_| on Rendezvous Terrace, Christ hurch, oat bg iirbee Carlisle way to vote for us. I am con- “ fr, Adams (L) agreed that there
EFFICIENT CLERK, Hardware. and| (Pee 700, feet frontage over-looking| 44° Brathwaite, Neville Clairmonte vinced that this section penalises might be the necessity to make
Lumb the St. Lawrence, Worthings, Hastings - airm the average candidate at Election.”
— er experience desirable. Apply bY| ana the Golf Course, next to “Cloud| 43. Young, John Anson ‘ € _ . ' * some amendments. He too did not
ae ee a te $0" | Walk” with a 20 ft. roadway,’ apply.| 44: Bellamy, Manesseh Mr. Crawford then referred to have any opportunity to read the
.7.51—t.£.n \f E. Clarke, 7 Swan Street, Phone 2631 2 psp eo eb ae aan, "RS section 34 which reads: Bill until about nine or ten o'clock
ee ee ae et bd . Bayley, ic) elstan Casares nye, 7 . ; ;
NURSE—Experienced Child’s Nurse to | °° 902% ANDY 40 | ae. Wark Meare, ntneny Every person who between the night before and it did appear
sleep in. Apply Herbert, Dunford, Fonta- AUCTION "48. Yarde, Keith Alfred the date of notification by the to him that it might take amend-
belle, 24.7.51—2n | Br pebeew, saan Carlisle Colonial Secretary of the issue ing here and there. The Bill was
noone | eid, ictor Cameron > Cove ni 7 ‘ rary -accary i
Applications are invited for the post A hie ’ we oil by the Governor-in-Executive a very necessary one but it could
of Head Master of the St. Andtfew's UNDER THE DiAMOND SF: SURG, PATCL FAT: 9 Committee of a writ for pur- hardly be expected that all per-
oe. ? a | 25.7.51—2n I ;
Raaiican Secondary jnohesl, Grenada | HAMMER ns poses of an election, afd the day sons could agree with every pro-
ae Oe Grkaae arty ean Soc | I have been instructed to sell by} The following are the 51 successful after polling at such election posal
eee ee eee ““ ? bie a Auction on Friday next the 27th July at} candidates in the Entrance Examination (whether in a general election {It was the first time, he said,
vi—On | 2 o'clock at the Barbados Taxi Cab] io the Preparatory Department of Com- 2 = see that he had heard the hon. senior
——_—_———-——— | Service, Bay Street, bermere School for the School Year be-| Or bye-election), incites, com- ‘at he had heard the hon. 7
new battery, good t ginning Tuesday, September 18, 1951. bines or conspires with another Member for Christ Church—possi-
FOR SALE perfect working Parents are invited to call at the Head-| to act in a disorderly manner bly for party purposes—make the
Car with engine also in good working | master’s office during the week beginning ith intent ¢ revent the mistake of thinking that the Gov-
| order, tyres good and battery compara-]| Monday, September 10th, for information with = inte o p ernment was waiting for the hon

transaction of the business of



tively new. Also One Jan Tug or Me-]| relative to Book and Stationery Lists, ‘
chanical Horse with two trailers. It is in] School Uniforms and Fees a public meeting called for the )UM0T member for St. Andrew to
AUTOMOTIVE Dertact Working Order. It is just Mer 1. owe, Timothy urpose of promoting the elec- give a lead on anything, When
: | thing for a Sewn hardware or pro- : Sodrinatan ure Leroy ro of ‘ Cen oe . Sree this hon. member had suggested
vision store ery economical to rua 3 shby, William Roderick € a ca é as i 4% 5 i
— | rerms Cash 4. Whittaker, Tony Lamara her to serve in. the General 2 the House = a Sate =
a | D'Arcy A. Scott, Auctioneer 5. Pile, Colvin DaCosta ssembly, shall b ilty é te government should under
CAR—1947 Ford Prefect, Reasonably 21.7.51—5n. | 6. Young, Elsworth Ethelbert Assembly, shall be guilty of an the expenses and not the Vestries
Bie Cen wae, an 7. Hall, George Ethelbert illegal practice and shall on he had tried to stop him and had
CAR—One Vauxhall 18 done only | UNDER THE SILVER : Smith, Arthur Winston conviction by a
10,000 miles, like new. Phone 2861, S. H.| HAMMER 10. Worrell, Keith Junior mary Jurisdiction be liable to @ already decided on that. It was
Kinch or 4569 Cyril Stoute. | On Thursday 26th by order of Mrs. | 11. Wilkinson, Samuel Algernon fine of one thousand dollars or no good however telling him sc
47-51-60 |p B. Sutherland we will sell her | i2. Grifith, Ezra Edward to imprisonment for one year. for he still kept on. to make the
prateiclaith ae | Furniture at “Sauderdale’’ Chelsea[ 13. Mapp, C, Llewellyn and be incapable during a period int acide
CAR—Austin Station Waggon hardly | 5“! ‘ ee a _ , y cS ape § 4 pi point, \ 4
used. Bargain $700.00 under current, new | Waar demir Minctene init a Coaee ia Boreioes rare Soapnny of five years from the date of | Mr. Adams finally hinted that if
list price, Telephone 91—60. i ths | Blont” Bteols, CT. Tables, Upright 16. Ishmael,’ Allan Cariton conviction of being registered might be necessary to put a few
7-51—2n.| Chairs in Mahogany; Dining and Side | 17 Drake . Desmond Anthony as an elector or voting at an more sections in the Bill.
S * | Tables, Cabinet (Glass Doors), Carpet, [18 Ider, Wavell C slection.” ‘ J < ae
sah aia een ore ig eet Sectional Bookcase; Corner Chairs; | 19. Goodridge, Trevor Lamonte a e rawf 1 aid that after The Bil was ered be i
Saloon, aa korea 10 Ee . Teleph . | Rush Rockers, Phillips Radio, Metal Elec. | 20. Outram, Clyde Celso Vernal r. Crawford sale na er ond reading and further discussion
1316 Cole & CO Lid. a a siya | Floor Lamp;' very good Norge Refrig- | 21. Pobinson, Seibert Rudolph all they were supposed to be con- wag adjourned until tomorrow,
oe | erator (7 Cubic Feet) Mahog, Mir'd Press | 22. Thompson, Paul Anderson ducting the election under demo-

——
1951 HILMAN CAR—Condition as new.

Always self-driven, Mileage 3,600. Owner

leaving island, Telephone 2459 or 2342.



























and Bureau;
| Painted Pr
stead with
Bedstead Spring

Single lron Bedsteads, Blue
. Dressing Tables and Bed-
ono Spring; Single Mahog:
and Bed; Medicine |<

















Gittens, Wesley St.Clair
Lorde, Frank Wyatt

. Norris, Robin Cranmore
6, Maynard, Frank Alvin

.

6 Hurt In Storm



cratic conditions, and as long as
one did not indulge in violence,
throw bombs, stones, use abusive







ae #8.7.81—48n | Cabinet, Canvas Cots, Iron Chave Be 27. Small, Lyall Winston language or do anything of the
“RELIANT'—Three w cup in| Glaga s , Dinner and Tea Sets; ]| ‘8. Arthur, Kervyn Allan t. there was no reason why he 2A. PERU, July 24
RELIANT'—Three wheel pick-up in| Glass and China P . ; ; sort, there was h AREQUIPA, PERU, July 24,
rde : B'dos jeg, | Larder, Kitchen Uterisils, 3 Burner] 2%. Mottley, Winston DaCosta cn & thi = . koe Nahe
Rie age ach Apply: B'dos Agencies.| Fiovence Oil Stove and Oven, Enamel] 30, Taitt, Anthony Lawrence could not say peggndee o § - a pub Winds of hurricane force whic!
a 21-7918") and Alum. Top Cupboards,’ Kitchen] 31. Hall, Clive Othniel no mpeeing Mp ae et a buffeted this mountain city for 12
“ur Tables, Dominion Washing Machine, }] 32. Gaskin, Morvan Andrew e was not suggestin na rs. left six persons injured
ne Bra aint eee mone wReaiy Scales and Weights, Good Lawn Mower, | 33. Gill, Hugh Oliver Andrew should be done in a blood-thirsty oe Pavers a ain ind enie:
Stoute's eae Store or Marshall & Garden Tools, Hose, Good Garden Bench, ] 34. Morris, Lisle Atway manner, but after all, one of the iree 0 1 7 Sly, a .
Edwarc's Gara Roebuck St t,| Books, Winter Coat and other items. | 35. Sealy, Carney Rance feat sae { lactic ~ampatgnin ed extensive property damage.
where it can be seen. Phone? 2540 of | Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms CASH. 135 Smith, Richard Eakins Be a cia ec amnnnies of cael The combination hurricane anc
‘ ‘ ae ANKEK, TROTMAN & CO. | 37. Taylor, Joseph DaCosta vas a certé a aoe raed. eee i
= een OT hvenenes mt, tr ice He, eee eee a
cahcee i. < uctioneers 39. Bradshaw, Anderson Leroy “ electing bishops, [ous § i
_VAN—A Twelve Horse Power Bedford 4 tian 140, Eepary Wetdals SGoKanels 16 You are not lecting shop: , the city and blocked many streets
Ven, in first class condition. Priced to 22 n you are electing politicians anc Cr
. ae oOo rns 41. Hutson, Hewley Lyte : : vith fall trees —U.P.
Sell. Apply: Courtesy Garage or Dial a Tae, Lashley, Karl Marx the public should have full oppor- With fallen ees. P.
bac ‘ j *
eee cube a PUBLIC NOTICE 43. Yearwood, AUP Anthony
a 44. Forde, Hayden rnott
f Sic wena Be NMENT NOTICE
ELECTRICAL Ten cents per agate line on week-days} 4°) Cioute, Winston Lero/ GOVER
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, 47. Clarke, Garnet Sylvester 5
deen | minimum charge § $1.50 on week-days 48. McCollin, Evan ‘Ainsley
i El TRIG Org ry a aR and $1.80 on Sundays. 49. Seale, Michael Tyrone — ; : caer”
c 4 HL8. oT AE. 200 Volts © 50. Harrison, Carol Rudolph ications are invited for the Post of Stenographer-Typist in
Cycles, 3 Phase, Dial 3878, DaCosta & NOTICE 51. Lynton, James William Applicat sev bande ° eae grap E
Co,, Ltd, Electrical Dept, 24.7.51—4n PARISH OF SAINT THOMAS a 25.7.51—2n, | the Administration ae Po ea - ar anes
aLE mtn ——~| SEALED TENDERS will be receive The post is pensionable and carries a salary o plus @
ELECTRIC FITTINGS.—A nice assort-|}y the undersigned up to the 4th of ———_- - -- } PEAmeos . Fae ee ce aeg Th int
ment including 2 & 3 light Chromium | August 1951, for the removal of the temporary cost of living bonus at the approved rate. e appoin
Fiectroliers, Semi-Indirect Bowls, 1 & 2| (iq and tha etection af & new one h So 1 , egulations and local Orders in force
Light Brackets, Table Lamps in Chrom- | ¢y ‘Baca Se ‘Thomas. fenders thust { ;overnment ment is subject to Colonial Regul: S é é
jum & Mahogany, Saving Mirrors wit)| haye marked on envelope “Tenders for | from time to time
Rina iy Tae: sie tnaaaans Roof at Glendale.” : The candidate selected will be appointed on a probationary
a osta o., a c i? j ‘
aeons MISA lao Caer ee Seek Control period of one year in the first instance and will be’ required to take
i W. F. GOODING. z verbatim reports of meetings of the Legislative Council and perform
PHILCO REFRIGERATOR: 9% cubic Strong Hope Plantation, 4 ; F s a ae
ft. Full width freezing chamber. Brand . Chureh Warden, from page 5 such other reportorial or clerical duties as may be assigned to him
new unit, Reconditioned throughout, 15.7.51—4n. a) = it should | from time to time
may be inspected at Leo Yard, Cheap- ute ae to a blind man to vote, it shoul« e i

H. L. Smith, Sandford,
7.7, 51—t.f.n,

side. Apply
. Philip.
MULLARD BULBS-—40 Watts Bayonet
24c., Lashleys Limited, Pr, Wm. Hy. St
24.7.51,—2n.







“Tender for the Erection
at Bathsheba,"
at the Parochial Treasurer's Office up to





NOTICE
PARISH OF SALNT JOSEPH
Sealed tenders, marked on the envelope,
of a Pavilion
will be received by me

MOTOR_ STARTERS. Diréct-on-line | Saturday 11th August, 1951 for the erec-
and Star-Deita with Single Phasing Pre- | tion of # “avilion at the Bathiheba Flay-
ventor. Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co,. Lid. | ing Field
Electrical Dept 2A.7.51—6n Copies of the plan and specifications by



1 MULLARD BATTERY RADzO 1951
Model. Lashiey’s Limited, Swan Street.
23.7.51—2n.



LIVESTOCK

|





HORSE—One half-bred chestnut geld-
ing by Bandit, rising seven years, fifteen
hands. Played one season's polo; good
ride for anyone. Apply: Major Skewes-
Cox. Phone 4095,

22.7.51—2n |





FURNITURE



OFFICE CHAIRS—Just received a|
shipment of Office Posture Chairs with |
three point adjustment. See them to-day
at T. Geddes Grant Ltd., or Dial 4442.

20.7.51—6n.



Ralph Beard invites you to inspect his
Stock of Furniture in his New Show
Rooms, Lower Bay Street. The follow-
ing Bargains are offered to you: Mag
Dining Chairs $22.00 a pr.; Birch Dinina
Chrirs $18.00 a pr.; Rush Upright $8.00
a pr.; Rush Arm Chairs $10.00 a pr. Rush
Rockers $11.00 a pr.. Steel Arm Chairs
#12.00 each; Rush Morris Chairs $30,00
each; Caned Morris Chairs $36.00 Cech
Not forgetting a large variety of New
and Second Hand Furniture. Phone 4683
or 5010



* 24.7.51—5n



MISCELLANEOUS





ANTIQUES — Of every description |
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver |
Water-colours, Early books, Maps, |
Autographs etc., at Gorringes Antique |
Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht Club.
3.9,50—t.f.n. |





AMM-I-DENT TOOTHPASTE |

Start saving your Amm-i-dent Tooth
peste Boxes, Within a short while you
may be the winner of one of the follow- |
ing:— Ist Prize $50.00, 2nd Prize $15, 00,
31d Prize $5.00, 1.7.51—26n

FLOWERED OIL SKIN—fn Beautiful |
Flower and Check Designs 45 ins wide |
$1.24 yard. Remember New price will be |
20% high. Kirpalani, 52 Swan Street. |

23.7 .51—1n







+. teemmtctininastqnasitadinhatuaiatiedian

FLOOR POLISHERS — Keep your
Floors in good condition with Johnson's
Wax Polishers, Dial 3678. Da Costa & Co., |
{ Ltd., Elec. Dept. 24.7.51—6n. |
een

PIANO—Lipp; Apply to Mrs. Hutson |
Inniss, Acrshford, St. Thomas. |
24.7.51—Bn. |





; RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing}
and we will order for you if we!

haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,

6.7.41--t.f.n

"UUM CLEANERS, Hand and Flec-
operated. Takes the drudge out
gery. Dial 3878. Da Costa & Co.,
Electrical Dept 24.7.51—6n







*htd.,

Mr. R, B. Moulder can be seen at Messrs
A. Barnes & Co, Ltd. or at the Parochial
Treasurer's Office, Bathsheba.

Each tendtr must submit two sureties
in the sum of £450 each for the due
performance of the contract.

The Social Committee does not bind
itself to accept the lowest or any tender.

J, MERTON McCARTY,
Secretary, Social Committee,
St. Joseph.







PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE

(The Provost Marshal's Act, 1904
(1904-6) § 30
On Friday the 10th day of August, 1951
at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon

will be sold at my office to the high =|



bidder for any sum not under the apprais-
ed value All that certain piece of Land
centaining about 2,640 sq. ft. situate ir
Parish of St. Michael butting and bound-
ing on lands of Susan Yearwood, a private
road, on lands of one E. Holmes and on a
Koad of Sufferance, at Goodland together
with the Chattel-Dwelling House, Build-
ings, &e., appraised as follows:—

‘The whole property, chattel house ane
land, appraised to one thousand two hun-
dred and ninety dollars and seventy-six
cents ($1,299.76; attached from Martin
Beresford Stewart for and towards satis-
faction, &¢

N.B.—25%
purchase.

Deposit to be paid on day of

T. T. HEADLEY,
Provost Marshall
Provost Marshal's Office,
24th day of July, 1951.
25.7,51—3n



| 70 Parts Rain

In St. John

The heaviest rainfall for yester-
day was recorded in the parish of
St. John where 70 parts of rain
fell. The Sub-Station at Four
Roads reported that much of the
work was held up in the fields by
the intermittent showers.

Reports from other districts
were District “A” 30 parts, Dis-
trict “C’’ 41 parts, District “B” 22)
parts, District “D” 14 parts, and
District “E” 10 parts.

» Contact with the Sub-Station in
St. George was poor and in some
cases it was difficult for the opera-
tor of the switchboard at Central |
Station to hear from this branch
audibly.

All stations reported Jate last |

1
|



night that there were still heavy
falls of rain but no damages were
teported. Only one traffic acci-
dent occurred in District “B” when |
a motor car ran into the rear/
of a moving truck due to a wet!
road.

also be given to
could not read or write.

it appeared there would be some
discrimination as
closing of clubs
He felt that if small traders were} medical fitness, which should reach the Administrator, St. Lucia, not
to refrain from doing business in
liquor on Election Day, it should
be done in su@h a way that no one|)=
could say, “You have forced the {
small trader to close his business
but yOu have said or done nothing
as regards the big hotels.

tioned and liquor businesses are
also mentioned, but we all know
that hotels
different from rum shops or the

is sold.”

of allowing
illiterates to the booths to
their votes for them, “I was hop-
ing to see provision for the use of

and Trinida@
go a far way to assist those who

the candidates.

an amendment will be accepted to|
include the use of symbols.”

was not decided as to whether or
not there should
tion of
Election Day.

ment would find it necessary to
be happy to have reached a stage

on any country





Cost of passages,of appointee and family (up to a maximum of
5) will be paid in the first instance and is refundable if the appointee
resigns his appointment within one year.

Applicants should furnish full details of qualifications and expe-
rience accompanied by at least two testimonials and a certificate of

the man wo

Mr. O. T. Allder: (L) said that

regards the
and rum shops

later than 31st July, 1951. 21.7.51—3r







ITEMS TO CHOOSE FROM.

Peanut Spread; Cheese per Ib.; Peaches; Fruit Salad: Tins
Whole Tomatoes; Jelly Crystals; Breakfast Rolls; Salad Cream;
Olive Oil in tins; Horlicks Malted Milk; Hams in tins; Klim
5-lb, tins: Gouda Cheese 4} Ib. blocks; Nescafe Cocktail Onions;
Olives, Stuffed & Plain Tins Toffee and Peppermints.

TAYLOR'S, FAMOUS FALERNUM LIQUEUR.
JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

“IT notice that clubs are men-

consider themselves

iverage social club where liquor
Another point was the question
people to go with
cast

symbols as was done in Jamaica
I think that would



ould not distinguish the names of





“I hope that at the proper time



REAL ESTATE

Mr. F. Miller (L) said that he

be the prohibi-
the selling of rum on

He did not think the Govern-

use symbols at the election. |
He thought Barbados ought to|

where this
sary.

fas not really neces-|
It was not a good reflection |
Which had to do}
this. |

He considered that some minor |
amendments to the Bill were nec- |
essary and he hoped he would be
given an opportunity to make the
necessary suj@¢gestions,



Mr. W. A. Crawford (C) said)
that he would have liked a little |
{more time to read the Bill fully |
and compare it with similar Bri-|
tish and Colonial legislation.





|
NOTICE |

Dr. Prescod B. O'Neale

begs to inform his Clients
that his Office will be closed







“This one in John M, Bladon’s listing looks as though it might
Suit us. We had better call and have a chat with him as I know
from his reputation he will give us all the help he can and in any
case he usually has for sale everything worth having.”

JOUN M. BLADON A co.

AF.S., F.V.A.
Phone 4640 Plantations Building
ba ahs

from Saturday 28th July,
and will be re-opened
Monday 20th August.

on











in
any band of inusic at any meet-
any procession held
tor the purpose of promoting or
procuring the election of any



















PAGE SEVEN

. Ft

‘SHIPPING NOTICES .
HARRISON LINE |

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM =

































Vessel From Leaves Due

- i Barbados
Ss. aeepee i .. Liverpool 7th July 22nd July
os PLORER ae .. London 7th July 23rd July -
cs “STUDENT” af -. London llth July 26th July
cs “ADVISER eae .. Glasgow 12th July 25th July
Ss “NOVELIST wt .. Lendon 23rd July 6th Aug.
5S. . “HERDSMAN .. Liverpool 26th July 7th Aug.





HOMEWARD FOE TAs“ UNITED KINGDOM ~—-





Vessel Fi Rorbedse
or is
S.S. “SCULPTOR” . . . Liverpool 18th July
S.S. “TRIBESMAN” ‘London 19th July
S.S. “STRATEGIST” . Greenock 21st July x
For further information apply te - - - SAF

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents oe

Canadian National Steamships

















SOUTHBOUND . :
Sails Sal Sails Arrives LA
Name of Ship Montreal. Halifax Boston Barbados. “4
et
LADY NELSON is MJune 3 July SJuly 14 July CAN. CRUISER es 10 July 13 July — 22 July
CAN. CHALLENGER 20 July = -23 July ot 1 Aug.
LADY RODNEY . = July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. y x
. CONSTRUCTO! ug. 12 Aug. - 21 Aug. Aug. >
LADY NELSON -» 0 Aug: 23 Aug. 25 Aug. 3Sept. 4 Sept, "
cent Mien ada
NORTHBOUND
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives pose
Name of Ship Barbados Barbados. Boston Halifax Montreal,
LADY NELSON 27 July 29 July 7 Aug, 9 Aug. 12 Aug.” 19
LADY RODNEY 25 Aug. 28 Aug. 6 a: 8 Sept. 11 Sept. %
LADY NELSON 16 Sept. 18 Sept. 27 Sept: 28 Sept. 2 Oct.
LADY RODNEY 18 Oct. 18 Oct, 27 Oct, 28 Oct, 1 Novr.
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents. MT
.



x = . + a

FRENCH LINE

Cie Gle Transatluntique
SAILING TO
ENGLAND & FRANCE

S.S. “Colombie” 22nd. July
1951, via Martinique and
Guadeloupe,



STEAMSHIP CO.




SAILINGS FROM AMSTERDAM
M.S. HERA—3ist July 1951.
M.S AGAMEMNON- 2nd August 1951.

5.8. COTDICA—10th August 1951.
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND






















AMSTERDAM
M.S. ORANJESTAD— 8th August 1951.
SMILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBYU
AND GEORGETOWN
eo BONAIRE.3ist July 1961,
8.8


















AGAMEMNON- 16th August 1951.
COTTICA—27th August 1951
SAILANG TO TRINIDAD AND

CURACAO
HERA—16th August 1951

MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.,

4 Agents.






us
8. P















































33 :
= é +
SOUTH BOUND. '
The M/V “CARIBBEE" will : ;
saneht Cargo and Passengers for a8 24
minica, Antigua, Montserrat, x
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Accepting Passengers, â„¢
Priaay 27th inst. Cargo and Mail an
=










The M/V_ “Daerwooa" will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba,
Passengers only for St. Vincent,
Date of Salling to be notified.













BiH

R. M. JONES & Co., Ltd.




BW. SCHOONDPR

ASSOCIATION

OWNERS'
(Ine.














Consignee. Tele, 4047












SEA VIEW GUEST
HOUSE

HASTINGS BARBADOS

Under new management.

Daily and longterm rates
quoted on request

PAE. Labi biccicsl

i TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

" TS

.S



LIQUID GUMARABIC bottles
with Rubber Spreaders 1/- per
bottle, POCKET CHESS SETS $5.50
POKER DICE, POKER CHIPS
SPOT DICE, PLASTIC SHEETING

in




























Brown, White and Clear, UN Permanent guests
BREAKABLE SHEET GLASS f
Windows. = welcome.

Dinner and Cocktail
parties arranged,
J, H, BUCKLAND,
Proprietor,

JOHNSON'S STATIONERY

and —

JOHNSON’S HARDWARE







Have you a noisy Gear Box or Differential ?

We recommend GERMTRAC

Product of Germ Lubricants Ltd.

CENTRAL ren DRY LTD.




Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets





* + eg

Wm. FOGARTY LID.
NOTICE

We beg to notify our Customers







and the general public that we
will be closed to business from
Thursday 26th to Saturday 28th
July, for the purpose of....

STOCK-TAKING.

Our Office will be opened however,
for payment of accounts.






' NEW ARRIVALS
STYLE PATTERNS




-BRODERIE ANGLAISE, :
ORGANDIE ANGLAISE.




5 “WEDNESDAY,

JULY 325,

EIGHT 1951

36 Asked To Trials
For Trinidad ‘Tour
NO PLAY YESTERDAY

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Denis Compton Hits
His 97th Hundred

Marlar Makes Fine Start

By FRANK ROSTRON

rs

So Fred Gets
514 Not Out —

July
FREDDIE JAKEMAN
Taants

















UNFIT

See our fine line of



THIRTY-SIX players have been invited to practise for
the forthcoming water polo tour to Trinidad which is to take
place either in September or October
be announced at the end of this nionth.

The following players have been invited:—

M.C.C, Team

Paul Foster, Albert Weatherhead, peramental knee permitting, RAI
Maurice Foster, Charles Evelyn, should be ngf more than two or yi eg 1, 18-year-old
i our « nada Harold Weatherhead, Kenneth three weeks behind his old rival oP SES aaeae ie Cc ~
. Ca « c Delbert Banniste Billy ; . ; . Colin Smith, of Lancashire. Colin
Ince, ber et r, Len Hutton in becoming the four- left his Stockport school just a

; F Manning, Nesta ortillo, Owen teenth player to achieve the “triple eek z a) $

LONDON July 24 Johnson, Michae, ‘Mortimer’ triple” et teadtianh. . wi ited ee ey Seiiaeee — ea.

A team of First Class amateur Weatherhead, Frank Manning and So well was Compton's timing mvs o try out his fast medium





cricketers captained by L. W. V. Basil Brooks, ad ee E r
Robins, former Middlesex and Sasiehs Ann Eckstein, Barbara JACK IKIN ee i have I seen Colin took one for 32, Not
England skipper left London to- Hunte, Frieda Carmichael, Doro- Such mort now end ppanien © pve gaa telly tha a use:
day for the first Marylebone thy Warre as Wevitaat a r ny po ° won't tell you that repeated- PLANT
Cricket Club tour of Canada since Oy ee ae ee eee JACK IKIN UNFIT seemed a cameo of his golden ly he beat the bat.
1937. - dap : i 7 On: mae is rae Y IN TEST season of 1947. * * *
penn eee Chaat eats TO PLA Then in his record season's ag- Now No. 2, another Lancastrian,
Alastair McCorquodale Olympic “innon, Ehy is © anor, vance gregate of 3,816 he scored 18 20-year-old Tom Greenhough, and,
sprinter who gave up athletics for Chandler, Gill Gale, Ann Suther- (From Our Own Correspondent fant vies like Smith akin. tai dapat
sricket, is travelling separately by land, Phyllis Fitzpatrick, Toni LONDON, July 24, Centuries. er) mm tere e mae Kin ins
air. He is one of two players Browne, June Hill (St. Winifred’s) It was announced to-day that Len demoted shi for 45 in 4 overs—and he calmly $10. Al
without a University Blue in the and Diana Johnson. Jack Ikin, the Lancashire opening It was all the sunshine of 0 7 E : ea.
: t bowled experienced Neville Rogers
party of 14, The first of a series of practice bat will be unfit to play in the 1947 yesterday and aunt of the tS -
The tour will continue two matches begins on Sunday July fourth Test, beginning at Leeds on sorrow as unsuccessful vice~ oogly. Brain 0-
months. About 30 matches have 29th. Thursda His place is to be captain last winter in Austra- DENIS COMPTON oan pa Ii an sg no] eee

been lined up.









The exact date will

Men: George McLean, Geoffrey ; “ rod %
Foster, Gerard Jordan, _ ge class century of his career, pom A vehate” ot caicat
Boo’ Patterson, Tim Yearwood, On this form Compton, tem- prop’

No water polo was played at











taken by F. Lowson of Yorkshire.







July 19,

HARD on the trail of his hundredth hundred is Denis

Compton.

Scoring a characteristically gay 150 in three and

a half hours for Players against some ‘Gentlemanly bowling
yesterday in his favourite setting, Lord’s, he made his
eighth three-figure score of the season and the 97th first-

lia. Instead, it was Hutton, Star





Surrey at the Oval

1% |

. of Nor-|

Th s, who hit the season’s top |
individual score — 258 not out)
against Essex on Monday, ham-
mered another 176 not out against
That little collection, plus the}
eestershire bowling last Friday,
gives him 514 runs in three
Stop that head-shaking, you

80 not out he took off the Glou-
innings—and not once was he out,

gloom. Hail, this

bowling on Hampshire.

_———————— making only his second appear-

LADIES’
PLASTIC

morning, the







CAVE SHEPHERD







the Aquatic Clut sterday after- f that tour, who played an 2x

The team R, W. V Robin oa n ies F the deith oa Mi Wal- " leunealanain baneltina vie. ping by Robin Marlar, Cambridge caer etd Vee tt a
(Middlesex) J. J Wart (C l= ter Marshall, former Manager of y orkshire (30 for 6) Suffering from a bruised back— U iiversity’s slow bowler, who on 47. , & (0 LD.
bridge University and re S€X), the Barbados Aquatic Club, Yes- injured the day before in a suicide flighted the ball well in his. first He was at it again yesterday 9
aa Keighley (Oxford “niver- torday’s games were postponed U . Vill re fielding position at The Oval— big representative game. nie of bowriit. he
fett (su —. W a : ee | This afternoon’s match is Mer- Be Mage skipper Len demoted himself to Experience war tie ‘ar ae, “tie. down 10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET

; Susse> McCorquodale sae, f ;

(Middiesex), Dr. E. K. Seott T@ids vs, Starfish. Referee Gree ‘Tactics number five in the batting order. Nigel Howard took over the wowcestershire. His figures; \
Cetucestes), A. H. Broadhurst Atchie Clarke reett actuics Stiff and subdued, Hutton fer captaincy of the Gentlemen from 4913-794,

Sarriakt maa we “ nce ced av Old Master. H re —
Uaiversitg and Somerset). MM, ay July 18. fad a brief innings of 1% which wish, to give him experience be- CLUB PREMIERE i
Walford (Oxtord “Daicaneta “and Grenada Girls The giant squeof ae ended when Divecha bowled him fore his forthcoming leadership of ¢
§ merset), J — aiken ee rs oot ae Ewes ae “Anal Pete oh 7 = ordinary ae teens ‘. the M.C.C. on “9 = Se TENNIS LOURNAMEMT
wicksnhire). A. ‘ ale xe * ; " - WT tte Z : r nother, once again to sulifer by He handled the limite ow ling no pla)

: z A y 4 e +t at the Oval ,
3 rd Co: an a. My Arrive Today at i 7 igilahate rhireatheistiate comparison with the sparkle of the gj his disposal well, except for afternoon. =
2owell (Cambridge University and 4 — Glamour Boy, was Jack Robertson, cat t tting Marlar on at
Pol ic) amivel efor _ biden St i : in It was largely because of a stub amour 3 . starting by putting rlar on
ee. t Petre A ee The Revers Netbali Stub priv es 7 a vot in 88 minutes by the season's heaviest scorer, who the wrong end follows:—
coien canteen’ ticateie “kad oon, Pan See to play @ Secdser that Yorkshire were set to made a most impressive 80 before
Weptsstorshire) CP). Pen rae of, Netball ee mes aga) . get 43 in 20 minutes. being out l.b.w. to Yardley. Players’ closing total of 343 for !
orces 1 ° Island Teams chosen from the But then Robertson, by long eight—modest considéring that Grimes = wo ten coe ot te eee bs es a2
Barbados Netball League. And it was Bedser who caused | 446 is accustomed to being a Compton and Robertson scored 230 an oo
There” will also be matches such a panic that Yorkshire lost martyr to his Middlesex team- between them—was a reward for
7 . against Olympia Club and Queen’s six men in scoring 30 and had to
ans Barrac Gallege. be content with first innings matey gy ics the
The fixtures are as follows: oints. eons VEE tt gs aa | OAS | ERS 15
Gibb *s I38 Saturday, 28th July—Rovers Club vs P That 43 was exactly the number Graveney with a stylish innings —— ee eee ye
Island at Gueen's College at $00.» ™. o¢ runs added for the ninth wicket of 37. z
July 18. Olympia ‘Club at Olympia’s ground by Bedser and Lock (23) in a Eventually he was caught hop-

Paul Gibb bespectacled, 38- (Highness penn as 5.00 P m ie valuable stand that expeperated
Keeper, hit 188—his highest score “%nisuay'’ gua""Aununt Ravers” Club Slogger Hutton SHERMAN’S BODY TAKEN TO USA .-. 912.5

, p y - ven's College ueen’s College . zge )
ae are eh Nostham gion eo ae M 5 as tn Pe cee ogeer NAPLES, July 24. without fanfare to a waiting plane
— +h - eeeed ey eee Saturday, 4th August—Rovers Club v Two runs a minute seemed far A spevial plane left for Wash- at the nearby airport. An honour Cause m led in 3 Days
“<3, sap male aaa iene Musee Sree Sacer from impossible for any side with ington with the body of Admiral guard of U.S. seamen, and Italian np 6 *9

Unbeaten Essex wiped off their Lady Savage has kindly con- jrutton in it. But maestro Hutton Forrest R. Sherman, the late U.S. vice, Sherman's coffin was remeved | germ be aso © Paar away “pl Pains R EI JKC | RIC t
149 arrears befor lunch...and Sented to make the first pass. tried to become slogger Hutton— Chief of Naval Operations. Earlier, soldiers, sailors, and airmen stoo: magic. Use Nixederm ta ht
stolidly went on batting They ind found big hitting was imposs- Sherman was honoured in a at attention while the body was ae you will soon see your skin
t 1 . af " ii s tcehin 2 placed aboard, The flight to} coming soft, smooth and clear, Nixo-
made the game safe and still C * k R l ible against the short- pitching, simple ceremony. _ Places ted to take | derm aw @incov that kills
went on batting. ricket esults high-rearing deliveries of Bedser. Sherman's flag-draped coffin Washington is expected to ta ps Fy RR py A

They batted all day, Result:
357 for seven and a tame draw.

LONDON, July 23.

Bowling just short of a length,
with a spread-eagled field and no-

was loaded aboard a four-engined
navy aircraft at Naples. The plane

about 29 hours.
———

coe Pimples, Bolls, Red Blotches,
zema, Ringworm, and Hruptions.
You can't get rid of your skin troubles

COOKER ... with oven—

Yes, Essex kept their unbeaten English first class cricket results behind-the- yiekes Reldemery Alse, is emer’ to arrive in Wash- path ¥ou Famove the ee that mice
record but they lost a lot of Of games played Monday: invited the Yorkshire men to com- ington tomorrow. ’ n the tiny pores of your skin. So
admirers. a, roa Leicestershire 267, South Afri- mit suicide. Led by Hutton'’s ex- The final plans of Sherman’s WHAT’S ON TO-DAY fay under te From yore Shemist to:
cans 227 for eight. ample, they did. burial in the Arlington National Court of Grand Sessions Nixederm will banish pimples and GRILL d HOTPLA
Hampshire beat the clock by Middlesex 271, Surrey 284 for Ni fr the first over; four Cemetery await the wishes os his —10.00 a.m clear ar skin soft and smooth or an PE a *
nine minutes and Worcestershire three, ine came 0 e first over; wife, in whose arms he died on Court of Original Jurisdic- Seat on
by five wickets at Southampton. Sussex 294 and 32 for one, Kent of the second. Then, with the Sunday from heart attack. A 12- tion—10,00 pany Nixoderm © return of

It looked oh, so easy at lunch,
when Worcester were only one
run on and had lost eight wickets.



169

Warwickshire 184, and 25 for

two, Lancashire 333 for nine de-



total 19, Hutton tried a huge drive
off one of those tantalisingly short
pitched balls and miscued for

minute religious service was held
aboard the U.S.S. Mount Olympus,
the flagship of Admiral Robert

Police Courts—10.00 a.m,
Police Band gives a concert

this
i i Thursday’s matches will be as
‘ Ladies Singles
Miss A. Griffith vs Miss G.
P Men’s Doubles
C, B. Forde and W. De C, Forde
Gentlemen’s sustained Feen- vs. J. E. Haynes and Le R, Black-
ness and a tendency to light- ot,
heartedness by the later batsmen. Men's Singles
Compton, it seemed, went tO VP, E, Edwards vs. J. Robinson.
their heads. Pim

empty

For Skin Troubles package. e



















, ag a

But bowlers Reg Perks and Dick clared. Constable to take a simple catch in Gayney, the Commander-in-Chiet ay wom Pasture at "\ GEARS )

i - Glamorgan 437 for seve . the covers. of the Mediterranean fleet. : . i i ‘ Q
Howorth blossomed, aut BS ninth fate a on or seven de- Lowson unsuccessfully tried to P . 7 Mobile Cinema gives concert Lucky Lindberg 4s on the air
wicket batsmen with a partnershiy lared, erbyshit 251 and 92 Il the next ball and a catch was The longest prayer, by the t M i's P St. once more
of 77. om, Glamorgan. won by innings and Po tably taken by Lock at long Ships chaplain, Et, Commander Philp ese. A GRAND DANCE ADING Co., Ltd.
94 runs. , = 7 G, R. Eckard, reminde 1at Sher- , =o *
So in Hampshire went again, Somerset 260, Hampshire 392 ©, 19 for 2 man’s fact nission—the integra- Globe, “Cai SE 6.00 p.m. | .
needing 80 in 48 minutes, They for nine. Two balls later skipper Norman tic) or Western Europe defences— Plaza (Bridgetown) “Payment On Will be given by
did it in 39 minutes. ; Gloucestershire 299, and 66 for Yardley (partly responsible for his aimed at peace through strength Demand"—4.45 p.m. and 8.30 pe ee Sone RIA STREET—DIAL 4671
f two; Northamptonshire 300 side's plight through dropping "The ar of the US Mediter- san. At ST. CATHERINE 'S SOCIAL

Tom Goddard, Gloucestershire’s Nottinghamshire 122 and 190 for Fishlock at a critical juncture in .anean fleet, who were command- Olympic, “Babes on Broadway" & |) Wiltshires, St. Philip
50-year-old 6ff-spin bowler, has b Sinnleala fee is, Pink «els Surrey’s innings), lofted a drive off “"""\* ’ ; “Dark Corner’—4.30 p.m, and i
50-year-old Off-spin bowler, has four, Yorkshire 377 for five de- Surrey’s Innings), ‘ ed by Sherman before becoming 8.15 p.m. ie \(Mindly lent by the Measesment)
retired from first-class cricket. He clared Wait to be taken—of all flelders— jy, \veeaemme Ge nave amen Royal, “Neptune’s Daughter” and | {{\} 2 FRIDAY NIGHT, 27th July, 1951 sperceneoneoncsreneneconeessuesennssneneccecnesaensasnensnoscenednecet
+o a , 4 99 : : “ : + Wichlock. 20 for 3 Mae mye oth, a : 2s
jot aan poe 4e sue and ha Worcestershire 248 for six de- by Fishlock. 20 for 3 stood silently through the service ala ‘4.30 p.m. i ADMISSION :0: 2/- FOREIGNER ONIN ONO F
taken 2, wickets for an aver- clared, Devon 162 for eight rn ' on the ship's deck. R mandie Forest” Mr. Perey Green's Orchestra in
age a ‘ 9 I voy od Out 4 oxy “Bandit of Sherwood Fores a
age of less than 20. Match drawn,—CP). Two Run Four U.S. destroyers, recently —4.15 p.m, and 8.30 p.m, cenene ee o

Newcomer Willie Watson scored returned from the Korean war Savoie, ree Bet Dragon” --5.90 in regen one itnds
only a single before being run out hovered in the background. oars vm :
in attempting a risky short one. Upon the completion of the ser- rrr | SCS OSS SPS OVO SODOOOS,

































Four wickets in seven balls. 22 % (
for 4
‘ ? "Similarly, Keighley got a singze RECITAL OF MUSIC &
Similarly, ghley got a singie e % :
Thi ts ‘foolproof weapon ‘and was run out (by Bedser R in aid of the y PROVIDE RELIABLE PROTECTION FOR
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the sensible Bridge player canes a DOE ee — ot shire’s last hope, snatched a ae ‘ ¥ Miss NELL aa (Vocalist) % Tulip Green, ‘S’ Cream, ‘8S’ White
are “Blackwood in modera- 8&tng too high through the two. Then, with the score 30 for Mi , % reas | See ri |
tun” and "Handle. with 362 of the convention ? hy osrandighed his bat like a base-| Ye Ts Brewed from Malted Barley SMe. W.D. HARRIS (Vion) § RED HAND TROPICAL WHITE |
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ov a schedule of Ace-showin

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Here, it seemed, was _ the idea!

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PAGE 1

. ESTABLISHED 1395 PRH E FI\ I Cease-fire Talks Still Deadlocked Over The Withdrawal Of Troops UNITED NATIONS ADVANCE CAMP BELOW KAESONG, KOREA. July 24. %  \LLIED OPTIMISM over the chances for a ceasefire increased tonight despite new Com munist propaganda for the withdrawal of United Nations forces from Korea. U N quarters still looked for Communists to back down on the demand at the resumption of ceasefire negotiations in Kae song scheduled for 11 a.m. tomorrow. The 96 houi Communist requested recess in negotiations expires then. U N representatives had hoped the Reds would send word that they were ready to resume before that hour, but there was no word from Communists up to a late hour itlons came u> u lemix>rarv halt Saturday In Ihe deadi,k ovei the Red darnand for the withdrawal of U N force* as i condition of Armistice. Chu-f U N ropreiaentattvo ViceAdmiral C. Turner Joy mode It i Uiir thai would not i.:iK under any el rcu instances to put the withdrawal question on the Armlittcc agenda. He said the question wan a poli.,1 MM Ul be taken up at a peace :hc Armistice had taken effect I' was al this point that Communists Bflkad and were granted a four-day recess to consider the Allied position. Breakdown l! they stand firm DO their wilh< maud, truce talks almost icrtainlv will be broken off Some Allied circles believed that Communist negotiators after consulting U* Ill Pyong\ .ing. Peking, and possibly Moscow will introduce some sort of iaceenving compromise proposal' I l" Kariy feeling thai the ComtminM requested postponement was a rUM 'o cover offensive preparation*; was almost none. Host source* felt that if the Reds were planning some treachery, aomethlns would have happened before Ground lighting along the 13!S.inile front continued on only ;i minor scale. U.N. units drove Communists from high ground southwest of -utrel Irwii i.nd repulsed the Bed attack imith an of Oi Radio Pyongyang broadcast the Utesl Communist demand for the withdrawal of '*N troopa from Korea during one of the regular programmes ..n Tuesday morning. %  n. % %  Koraan people firmly dci withdrawal of all formOpS." II i barged that the South Korean forces started the Korean War by Invading North Korea nt the ineltcment of the US. It said. -Today, when the US Govanunant is in the position or bavin* to carry on the ceasefire UlhS, the representatives of Hidgway and the U.S. military men are attempting to have us certify that the US must for an unlimited period keep troop* in Kara* Pna [) N and undoubtedly the U.S. iRlDCriaUste, are trying to expand their munitionproduction and t.i ; inonopoUstle proflta. U.N. circles regarded the broadi-ast more as propaganda than an authoritative indication that the Communist'. Inland i" stand firm on their demand for an immediate U.N. troops. It said, however, that the Ppmioiiiip[nlftcantly did not [ redid ihe failure of the Kaesong meeltoa>—O*. tCeds Have 9,000,000 Men Undei 4 Arms PARIS, July 24 The SetreUir) of Stale. Deal Acheson, said on Tuesday night ihat the Communists have 9,000,000 men under arms, backed by 20.000 m.-tline Soviet planes. He warned "wc are in great danger, greater perhaps than many Americans now appreciate Acheron's •;rim analysis of the Communist military might was Included in a major foreign policy speech at the ceremonies marking: the 250th anniversary of ihe founding of Detroit—heart of Ihe US expanding mobilization drive. Ann son said that the defence programme must be stepped up to bolster the U.S and its Allies BgalDJt the threat to world peace posed by the massed Communist EorcSJ Acheson did not go into detail about the possible Inere; In the U.S. armed forces, but said that even to meet the present "minimum goals" will requ 'greater effort from us and e Onsoeri rnlled on President Ling. Euiaudi to present the Cabinet list for his new two party Government to Italy. DP Gaspeii drove to the President's summer vlll Caprarolo about 30 miles north of Rome to report he had bean sue cessful m putting togethr Cabinet to replace the out resigned Julv 16—l Reds Move 150,000 Men To Kama R£PORTS SAY TAII'EII. Jub 24, N a t io nal ist litiatllganca officers lent support to private reports that .'hlnesc lli.l: have I cell iiu>\ ill. mother live armies aggregating 150,000 men from northwestern China to Korea These osBoan who rcfus.,! to be named, described the China Union press report that Chinese Keels irg slipping up troop movements to Koreu as "very likely." Tin China Union press which special>zas in China m.inland nsnvi erage, said one of live armies pan of Yao Chl's suicide army group left north Shansi for Manchuria during the middle of Julv nid aSJ expected to art.v. i North Korea early in Augus' Intelligence officers refused to say whether troops u Indicated Chinese Reds were bent on starting J new offensive before Kacsong peace talks end I .P. goal Israel Goes To Polls On July 30 TEL-A-VI V.July 24, n than half of Israel's population will o to the %  n |. oi July 3Q to elect their Knisset (Parliament) for the ; UtO the establishment of the youne state. Almost a score of the parties with more than 1.000 candidates ranging from extreme right to extreme left arc lor Ihe 120 scats of the Kniaset, where the Prim. | Ban OuriotVa Labour Party has hitherto held the load over all. _. „ Btf Question Tnt biK gusstion in ihe forth The Hi-1 Knraatt, elected i.i January l*We\ was dissolved eartmr, when the coalition IB due to orthexlox opposition to the government's poMry on religious edu%  I/relln I at" predict •he labour party of Ben Gurton will again enter % %  trorujoof; paity. but not strong enough to he able to rule ,i coalition. ,1 number of l I tied U) ^ake part in the po.l ex>00 out of a total population of more than 1,410.000. Very toga are expected u. %  New immigrants will I Old settlers. Many of Ul have come laieiv (mm North Afi or the Middle East countries Tank* And Police Patrol Teheran TEHERAN. July 24. Tank* rumbled through ihe streets >i Teheran, and police and soldiers with fixed bayonets cordoned off the Majlis when 0O< Communist*, "partisans of peace," defied the government ben on demonstrations. The "partisans assembled outside the I'.rliamen; building |ust after the Lower Mouse went into morning session. They demanded that they be hown the secret graves of 15 "peace" sympathizers killed during the rioting here on July 15. Tlw dsunoostralton was orderly -but 300 police and troops were moved into the square to prevent n> attempted aisturbances. Tanks returned to the suburbs after the demonstration Si* army trucks with mounted innchine guns, were posted eonspicuously and strategically round the area.—ITJ?. 71(18 CEREMONY took place in il of Archimandrite Viuly Ustinov The "ADVOCATE" payt for NEWS Dial 3113 Day or Night. coming elections is how this greal flood of new immigrants will vote in their first polls. Mest of them have little or no conceptioi of modern political syftems. Th< national election is botng fough on dome-stic iues rather than on the auaatton of East versus West orientation*. Co-oper-ilion with the West is for the great majority of Israelis no longer a question of democratic anjt sj life but one of bread and butter The reason is apart from i aspoeta—economic Much of Israel's initial etonomi development Is attributed to the. loan of tbe Export-Imports Bank of S100.oo.ooo grinted two years ago and t<> the more recent agriimprovement loan of fas.wonoo. F i .n.< i.il aid from United States Jews has also contribute largely to soften Israel's economic plight and its importance remains un.ii Uie light of preseht j grow mg requirements, j Recent leglilition has moreover ] tried to encourage United States | and ether foreign Investment by 'si te n d in g the number of fsi-illtle" %  —I'.F. Britain And U.S. I )i-ru.— >|ain IXtSDON. July 24 Minuter eif Stale, Kenneth Youiii'i told the Commons last night Uut ilrit.iii and the United States had exchanged vltWi on the question of Spam's tontribulion to the Atlantic Pad i the United Slates Government instructed their Ambassador Stanton On His to explore the quertior. with Spanish authorities —I .P. Kl(.;HTH AKMY H.Q., Korea. July 24, Allied putrols pUbhaaLamire than Lhroe miles Into Comnmnist territory on tho bihk* front teatn will to fitfhl on the eve oi l-eaumt'd ceaatliie t.i!k^ m K The deep--st paMtratHM "f U N '" *'i• vv-s made north of the %  i i IB eaati rrorst when a patrol tlnuot torvard three and a half n .. OUt making any contact. Two I iti 4l iraOTod out more than two snllea noilhcast of Kumswa. the south eastern corner <>f the old iron trinngle" also without makinK ettectivc eOQUlCl Wlttl UtC Communlai front line. Ttu Red aem cut patrol* it .,,., tctoi iimi 'here was a brisk five-minute tight before one wai ihi on the West.rn front. Four wnvi' of 1121* Bttporfortresses biaitad Ua ki Korean railway )UBCtJOB "i S.H. vmn with more than 70 tons of bombs. Alrforccs Imik ova* the brunt i>i ihe Allied ottcmlvr effoi f^niUSHinUlm % %  ntueind nnhlli.B pnlinued on only a minor scale a. A Bishop I dm ins the Jou ill I o III-Mi I Iran IMission LONDON, July 24 rha uiitish CabiasM aa JOWltl to head UM preiposed mishion to Iran to discuss with Premier Mohammad Mossade<|. the hi Irani i dtaputs AuthoriUllve sources said (hat lOWtH who us I-ord ChuMflloi is %  .1 ex|tcrt would ,n p irl i v*\ i.iiin ivMaiked hostility bv the rank and hie of the Labour members to the rising costs or living and con* n at the sue of Britain, rearmament programme InghliKh the publicauun of Ihi preUml %  publ "Uit.resolutlono >ubfniited for ;hVrulinn of the partvS annual coviferencc at Scarbe>rough in October I B %  olutlona in <,rated that man) Of the Portv's local iimi ttt I thai Atllee'K Kovernment toUoWl Washington': tonrian pnlle) hue ie.o closely. Several preipc*U support the stand of AasffUrut lievan, Ihe former Labour Minister, wbwrest control of Party poh.\ frorri ..i .'n i Hi >. ..ii %  ihf-i other rebel, on the Part/a 2C i bat aaacutlva claitrn that the size of ihe rearmament programme threatens domestic Socialist R;;i|s. — < oi 1,1 M-.i-Jijll .,i.it Chn I of Stan* General Omar Bradley. ... ..oil aa marn ba r a of the InterUefenec Hoard. Ma ild %  %  '< %  taj. on arrival (mm Kio, aboard the Uruguay 'hat in additieMs to Uie UN. mission, he would confer with officials m Ifaahliigton on th.xecuUon of inilltury < o-o|>-'r,itioii •nd raaolptiarui %  doptad .it tbf fourth meeting of the American Foreign Ministers. Ci'M'Hitciro. bow* -nit have any definiteplans 101 the Washington visit. Ms wild that he 1 ould %  inaui as lorut as necessary. II W.oihingU>' he win cooler wiUi DM Qhalrtnan of the U.N Collective Meatuies Ojmnultev. who. by a ciuncidenre. is Brazil's representative to the IN Ambassador Jo Carlos Muni/ He arao expected to confer with the rstcrataey Oesiaral ami top military advlaar, Ceaonal Alfred Georite K-tnn.-L'.P. Sunerforts aime.) their cargoes %  f )00 and 100-pound Imnibs a> wo adjacent railway marshalling -ards at BariWQfl, which ||gi :iibatwaai i' nun/ang, [forth Korean Capital and the eaieflrc conference city ol Kaewng, Bomban ran into BOOM MtU< n but .ill r.-tiuned sfcls it is at Bvran n thai the mala "ommunint suppi> rauta ill m rn Korea divides, one Una running dlreetlv south toward KieJong, ami the other east toward the baitle /one —I'.P. Search For Missing Plane Intensified ALASKA July 24. The search for Ihe K. %  aft DC 4. ml r ain g ovai ina rtifned ...;.-' . itli .'(K iboard, u u Intensified with .he iddmon i.i 14 more planes. Officers ol UM I0U M.uadrmi .n Urmndotf .urfonc i tb.it thav planned I i .keewo advantgag oi the eleai •ng skies for the nut day line* Ihe Can idian 1'acillc Aiilnm i isheo on Saturday. Additional planes will supplement the squadron of 21 which has rrlra oroaead he 31.000 auuaie m'les area wllh.iil nnding any Iran.,f the missing craft. Until to-day, log. .lauds anu aln have Mrnpi ed i UM nay/ 1 c.ippeet p.Mks along the coast. Aboard the nil*. i, three vilian BOvernmern employees. so Canudi.n |..,-. vi 'i er ew w ran. t'.iv rh i*nt i rely HfgoU.itloi I nailers UleAeldi different probli m frorn of political aetta wntial that the two r;t eutnely sepa dbuoi: if ii i> rceptahle %  obtained ion of political queaH M i M fi llov I i,.,,l The rt atswnenl eaeagnued "if I | imed and get to nee of the muet be %  upon th* mllltarv Una whtth aill be defei riba vein Of Bl f hostllir,,There n t I i paernentt > %  •! tO niiifuice 11ik>[i IHMI 111 i'hi re must bi 11 idi quale lupi >\ isaon and aci %  n' iMiih redea t" insure laainal anj %  and as continuing i f.uth there J %  %  %  ugKi at I the agn o tham must pro %  I the Korea i v LONDON, July U from Ii .i i .1 I'M inn i \1.. ..jJ. ., '., resume discussions on the Angio,i.iiii.m i>ii dHpute bu made It clear Kiev MhOUld I .late if thi ml ntin law oiu made BjdfUon TinForeitn 0(Rce n-eeived %  report from the ItiiiiBti AmlMMa(oi in TBrtcran, Bh Prastaai Shepi OB I ineiiior.iniliiiti syhlch Handed last night to Averell Hai i la an r^eatdefti nvo] mment I illdn I) i.,.i the Hi Utah Govbeen abli o form an opinion on their ac—\ p. PETYIN WILL HK BURIED TO DAI AT HE D'YtU II.I Ii VKI1 Kiaiii.v July 24. I Tho iMKly of Henn PhUllupe! I'.tain who lived a hero aiul died disgraced exile lay tn a smad liliiek casket dressed In the uniform %  f thu Mardhal of Kt..n.IVtain /III be hut led lOeBjMTOa on ihU i MlanUi laland that um form wiUi the Me-etiUlle Mlllliinc Franct-'a tata>M. mil Students Confer With B.C. Chiefs n.m ei -rAsjBfes>se*ai LOMDi 'N It A West Indian Btudenti Unioi delegaUan led by Prt Dudley TBornoei t %  %  iniuii Counell BUUUH three houi to d i* about ihe in ii.i i i his bnH t bui hi family an-j friemiN ire coov bred that on< day he will lie borjrde men who led the Freneli to victory .it Verdun, During World w.tr i. end oven brfine his death re eta rda) it 11 grlrn foetrt i tt> >< %  he wa sent by the High Court in IS4S for ll.ilioiiition with the Na/is his ,t datawnded ihaf he bt Doiiiiinont whir, | e/ho fail during the hlatorfc ri*M i DOW lie —U.P. U.8. PLAM& IMWIM M.\\t;HLRL\—KII>* >w TOKYO, July 24. Peking Radio early on A'< day Kald elitht Unm planes invaded Ifanehui lory on July 21, out of which arvg snare shot , %  :, n-. Ri air forces.—I'.P. itriiiiin To Buy 95.000a0p0 Ituslhls Of CuiiuduWIii'at OTTAWA. July 24 Ti .ide Minmti i < \> l\v,v ,m/IOUIMKI thai mi United Kmgiion would buy ii:..(MMiOiNi biiahe] ol cm.nil.m B/hael Ira the i %  .i .II %  niiiit ii %  AUKU 1 I. under the Internauoi Bi i alao win buy SSO.OOOioiu .,f floui. the eouivali nt ol g.OuO.000 I .vheat. It r smd mat Britain has shown | | in buying '!''•> b ne more than the stipulated Dft.000,IH* buahels, if it la avail :.ide the internatiiMial wheat •' A meeting will be held on Beptarnbei ati to discuss (he sale of aelditional wheat Howe said that the 00.000,000 bushel* sold under the I W A a/ould be al the price or $i 80 I VA, Of •l.Bg Canasix cent per biWhel earryini charge, —r.F sntlng ii the Diretoi o\ raeassalal --^M WMSW IM*>II Ing action againai nv .* mong Han Cn %  ani iti iki i '-i H. Ombury, Welfare Adn told the dalogatlon in>• Keith's letii-i The wist dilasjallnn in : iii'iiiiiit polntad out u • Kan •'< %  -ii iluatioii from "the ueneral inisatisfaclory %  rrangemeiitj lo, eccorn* i nodal ion fi %  i il. nth have tncl ire trying, and are etui edlllna i> 11 and i acgkirale a llti Ha Cot ial Office provided the Islter treat them as human hcinxx and not chattels.'' Burma Rejects JajF PeaceFacI BANOOON, July 24. it was leai iday, that mini nun the United IUUM < tovernrnent, that n>! approve the draft of the Peace rreaty wltl Bfl enables i \ .,n to evade %  apai aUona • hlch tuim.i feeai fully II Ufied lo %  Hurn i.i 'it i til nni %  ,(.. tm %  Munli rggssei n rnttrfsu I eui : i % %  ;...ooo.oon rupeee ind i .inMil Him e deal iUon i' i fori 'ii laboui on Ihe i i i "i Mil mar I It was poll %  Burma hoe no VIM i %  i | tiaa supported lapen n lo certain org in the United Nat ind rcestobliehed tiade. iii Bum e doe 11 %  I %  %  %  ItMrM 'leedv At no timr ha* Burma received any ubstannal nntribution Iron iny OVRO for i t .k Burma conatders u f Ut a s ttn ed, tha Japan IS unabla to pa> A rvporl "n lo-dgj i ..i fereni v .dl he submitted lo the Inioii i.paratio^ witboul imuring hei WIST hag to-day petitioned !.,*„ •eonoms |. ca he will noi ,1 su : ihs I i ny treal iti Jamen (inffiih* toi an inter' II' TOO MUCH SUGAR NEW YORK, Jul> 24 %  .'. trawl in.i cun mndir. COsUntnlgf exprexsea doubt United %  %  >' %  oneun %  .-in in %  ble to take the H.ZM.OWJ ggBJr allotlsd ibem tho %  %  lunetri H i ou sd Ul that Ihe kuga id of what It wa* BO end only half the rale of two year 1 aK"—I'.P. Death Of B'dos Seaman: Policeman Fined £10 CAP! A ClM T'.'tn polk I i: In In. an UHUI on %  ''''"" K '""' *'" c III ('. ;.i Pi '. I Bl IV Iti B 9 dos Oil Rights: Broken Promise loci to Km ['I dagtil while I March. King wa. j raamao in Ihe Bnti carao Ship hlrstrtlM Hi lived in an In ,i iroft :i Ii % %  '' %  h ,,i ' P %  K i. utd %  havi til ) %  whir r .1 ., haemorrhage h %  ng to hi aV I Anotm | i named i with \ w f il %  ttmg of tiincident and he i iv. wi v.i.. %  ea %  f** n *' Vlsser was heaid by M' J T Camia In Ihi [p. Town stalsV court was that the two i K -ii clous P police station ind reported th.it ( %  JjfggfTti LiBf IXJNDON. July 19. Complaint* of a 'broken would be itraincel to the ci*mpany promise" bv Uu Covi-rrunent of over the whole .,f the Isjand BarbaduH over oil proapeeting t.ghts in the island have come from two sources in London—one from Lord Teviot. a Director of the British L'nlon Oil Co, in a letter to the London Times, md one from Members of 1'arh l i %  ,., !. the time that a prospecting licence' terms of the Petroleum Act <• %  < Interests of ah Kranf ipensatioti is pay.iblifOl lo the British Udi' of Its Hghts. tbe poiantial Oil O ft was then that | Lord Teviot. in his letter, outlined the situation briefly, pou.tins; out that before the poising of the Barbados Petroleum Act in January. 1960. the Bi iwTJnion Oil Co.. held leases over T per cent of the drlllable tne Island When UM Petroleum Bill was passed, the Barbados OovarJarnafM promise to tlie Britfso t'ruon oil (o and of f ered U I Uearaoa over 5!\ per cent of tli of which i i'liini.i-Duiiean declared Hie) ti" considerable.'' Ideefale luted %  > "breaking The day .i'tr r tin-: letter ilar/ 1 on aae pnrl % %  / ti %  published In London, Col OoanmeBnrtsados Oovernrrasnt .md the Dnnean, Cejnservative M.p. fo r Colonial Offii-e. hit K street whi.-h mused t\ Cai irapl %  I.-.IM ni th ii vusset when he i" a < land on such "terms "that the I erth. raided the name matter in I 'It \not %  rase of ., brokn >rapariy had no alternative but the House of ('"minors, asking'promise." replied Mr r.ntnth refu e The American Gulf Oil Mr. James Qriittthl ffcll S hi uvnpany accepted the term ,. Secretary, about tbe %  DOOM leg ippotnti I hich have since proved v< unattrtudr to the report fc-diinitted by I -old It Is fo orkabie thai they have been Mr. Lepper, the Colonial Oflle-e them to decide whethl -.ded" '""part, who reeornmended ". ",' Col Qon ma-D Lord Tevtot pouited out Uut Uut, granted to the British Uni'm notlee Mi:it m V* of .companv,had been established In Oil Co. U fgfli Ili.rlssdo* for mm than 30 yeai* Ihe When nritionalisotion of oil, ..nd had contributed mateii No Monei|Mil\ the %  rights ws suggested," he sald f 'the welfare of tba island's people Mr. Griffiths dec! a reel that his "loan' Ihat Col. OerruTlg'Dunca 'the British Union Oil Co, agrees He added "The result of the predeceeaor, Mr. %  • sill Initiate a half-h' render its leases on Uie Barbados Government's actions h;>' hag agre-e^l with the report, Ihe House of Commons to — — •• %  understanding given by the been to deprive the rompany of that Uie Barbad' Government ha I subtect Governor and his high officials at its drilling rights and under the decided that it was not in the best -Bl P i do II, .i kn % %  • %  ;.ie this irton. J 1 > %  •• %  ,i till have allay blow and ltl\i tentinn It ., •Have th..' C Uo struck the blow but the %  i f one or the nthe m High Thlr ')l .. as.. ' Lew TfdWi !•• a.m.,



PAGE 1

PACE iim BARBADOS AllW't \TI \\l l>M Mi \\ .11 IV M, 195| BARR\DOS t 1 ADVtMATE M.rlii.-il.,>. .Iitl. n IWI HIIOAIM \STI.\4. IT has been announced that under a Colonial and WeSai i a producer from the Corporation will be seconded to the Government of Trinidad The duties of this officer Will be to provide a special programme Trinidad. Barbados. %  nd lintish liuiana and to assist in getting Bt from broadcasting equipn :n existence There will be another B.B.C. producer iteUOMd In Jamaica tO provide a similar %  ervice lor thai litand, British Honduras and Bal< In the past, people in the Caribbean have i i the broadc ad in the ice of the BBC and have .d to tiii'l that their affairs have sometimes been given place in tha Home Si-rvn-e. But these were primarily Intend' ..-.sty the tastes of people in Britain. 11M Weal Indies as a unit of British Col onial territory has its own problems, its own aims and ideals and its peculiar growth end development. It is tins growth and the rate of progress by which they will be judged by people in other parts of the world including Great Britain. ; %  Bating has come as complrinon to the Preee and the aervicea which it proi ft thai H li ;i most ljunci it was during the dark" days of 1940 that the word of one man move*! the hearts and itirred the emotions of millions of people In the free world, inspiring them with courage to tight death for an ideal. It was the voice of Mr. Churchill which disheartened the NaiU By these same services produced : reially for the West Indies in the West Indies, West Indians will have the opportunity of knowing at the time, the events m the area and the methods adopt I'd of dealing with problems which occur. The programmes produced al the BBC. for the benefit of the Weal Indies have the disadvantage of severe limitations. They have brought benefits nevertheless; but tales of West Indian life produced on the spot will have the advantage of natural baekground. Thnre it la *>*ui the West Indian people and those who Hve In tins area will learn more of their neighbours and then* way of life. But these are not th only sch The question has been posed, no) only In Great Britain but in the United States of America, as to whether there is a West Indian culture. If there is a West Indian culture, then bra 111 give it life and body and will present it to the world as it really is. If then Is no West Indian culture but merely a hybrid of the British way of life and African primitive methods, then Broadcasting might be the means of helping the people of the area to evolve a culture of their own. West Indian music, art, literature, and life itself must benefit from a proper system of broadcasting when the programmes are produced in and arc characteristic of the West Indies. AiiM'i-i' %  '* Changing Presidency Ml ol V.. *aW in 1MI. lhl. lim* lunlllna ttia nuitkbvr of yaare an A %  n Btr*t< dm" !" u(n %  Cain tha mdunu SWOB Ai* batic law *f that nat < %  M> ( li thanguia condition, and I ni.it . i %  '.III ion to %  %  in 1851 . ueably and efaflLng conrnnfntal nerds imendmem %  .1 by twi.-thirds I hullHI lit rov led that Ihrea-fourttu -l Ml)* II..I \IImiginalij "" ho ld rbe c.uididsftS with the highest number of. viie". would be prettaent, lb* natxt highest would be Vieei • re .Amendm. % %  ' in X *T > This directed UK electors to nam their cholcws lor Presidi 4 the Senate—thus putting th la |-,wi-i without The IBM I-* for Vice-Preaidrnl iibers of the ballotNo furth. President's Cabinet In a speclned been made In the Electoral Colorder, would succeed to the Presilege thriush Constltul Th! Amendden.y after the V.ce-Pre,ident. amendment. To avoid U.e PO">bdity of an apttenel I canted official tiuch a, a Cabt>b^sh_uwBwtoi ., MI Secretary) succeeding as Bee, La eloctrd President or Vli nendmenl College h*\* been proposed and Vie United e-~PreslState* eventually may aft upoi 1947 changed one c %  ViceConstitution President pro ;h prop*"*-' in th< v the I igress .. Amendment the Uiw ag^n p)aciru| me Soeaker ^c ipedfletaU) i •• ifleet Pni "'a HSMM fits* a fter tb rniBiM) It beIV^.dent men th P President pro The US Presidency h.M '"SSL ***!?$* I'S w n other way., too eve. , %  s ,.,, ._ ti-.r (.bine _SecrcUi.cs Tjuj law alu-ratlonh to gtffl to afreetNone of tee sueUon r u ,,,, ,. s ,,„._ f 4 *** 0 low cver "*" bCCn m itltution says thil th. S lheflm 8 ^SLteot Truman, member of ^ £. lh Untrrwiaent iruman. mcinuvr %  ,.|,. 4r ,. „,,,, ,onnt o! Btetj, has been craaiaBd J Oa^noer^cJ nly on. of the tlcally supported the 1847 change. B*M; W SSSSfetm l advice and conince 1933. it o, .miy oot of the ticnllv supported urn i--.* —" % % % %  ,^_ tl ,, ri t „. h> c,. i-iUthe fart that, had he died ^^'^-V^ !" .2 ency thit in 1947 or 1948, he would have~'JJ n „V MO succeeded by the Speaker aant means Sj *1 public %  i ot the House, who at that time )-emg w '"£ ''''. *"* The whol. rtorV of the chengw^, member 3 the RepubUThe P !" *f u u ^ ^ ,, Preslcan Party. W • %  > "# n ;.' tf n \^ .''.^ ..mating on.-. The The framers "f the U.S. Condent, of * rVn g cut -nMties itlon provides U.at gtitution did DM upecify the makliui teniatl/e -greementt with letu -hall become ..mount of the Presidential salary the other parties and then . %  [.,.,' II in the (' %  ">titution which simply them to ttu i 'or apis unablo says that the US. President shall provnl or rejection, lias been folranwvad from receive for his servlew a comlowed ever since Today, how. i the US. CongreH. The pensatlon." No American Preslever. Congressional committee* "' ma) be removed from dent ever got rich in the White (or the Senate itself) ott.n | process of ConHouse las the presidential realthe right to give "advice to .he nt and condence is called), for he needs most US. Secretary of State on : n. gg all of his salary to meet his duct of foreign relations. I or other inch crimes and many personal and official Through the years, the US icanors" According to law expenses as the First Citizen of constitution h..s proved to be House of Hi presenUUves the nation. The U.S. Constitution n^hl*, and the rundanvntil .'. but the forbids changing the Preatdenrl aystcm of chei ki and balances Senate must convict or acquit, salary during his term Of office u nnnK ihl %  Exco Amen.an Prrsident, The Wait Change in salary v/as twi fjtffatm nn d Judicial .,..,... ,^.vi. n t.nih npproved by ( ongrcss >ust before ,,.,.,-w tttr Inauguration for hLi new term on January 20, 1949, and the pay Iraereg I effective on that date. Andrew Johnson (seventeenth approved liy Congress Just : ' ••• '''"."^L.T^I^'V to the Presi%  |i ittl ol Abraham Lincoln) ever wag impeached. But th,. rs. Senate round Johnn n Innocent of -high crimes and inasUeiinjunIn <'th('*'," so he rod, No President %  if because %  | Preatdentg have died while ta ofBee, three of them from assassi Other changes have been in the U.S. Constitution to make administration of the government more ifltcttve, c.eorge Waaainstea, the Hrst United States President, took the oath of office on April 30. 1789. Thereafter, until 1937. U.S. Presidents were Inaugui.tted on Much 4 of the yc In eech case the Vleerolhjwliuj that m which tbey were Ailed out ttwreneuraer dected. As railroad, automobile, und air transportation knitted fc e ition together MI more < ( ttuImir-year tei it both the Pnetdeot and the ii,. or could kHlg and unnecessary ,1 . liilii'iuni j> 1'ilOiU I I'll' %  Washing*' nlned by Consreaiu'wi'i ii eloetttuj i %  %  nid hU takatltutlen for tin•.hen rorj nev dl-ll-I lllllli-l ill < nil l-.-v "'""• '" '"• %  * %  •;;:;:',z. N ":Tz,^ :„., i !" *i M. II ill i. was shortcnwl by iidop1)00 "I Uie Twentieth ment in tc or . to J.muury 20. Until i enacted the Hrst Suo that, ifl • i Vlca-Fnetdent, th. I'M Ideal pro tempera ot uic Senate would be next In line, i b> the Speaker of the "K"rat Hou (The Senate President u | ,rn :_ to : pr<> temporo is the Senator electrt • ii i pn .uie over the chamber u (lie I-WCIitletn Aincnu.^ %  ;;„-Vii. 193J. which advanced ihe ' ""ffij 1 ,bawc ..I ttM Vic-l'r-l. > dentl And U theff were nioie i l,, ;" L than live month, of the Prcsi CHAssLES WKiHTON BONN. i'tIK German General Staff, that ruthlessly tfflcienl military machine which planned 100, iif Kurnpean war, has made its come-' Les have | %  It has a new plan Cor a new Wehrmacht vhich will Ktve Germany the most formid•ble single armed force in Western Europe iday—11 the Allies agree. The Bonn Government, backed by the imencans. Is urging this new German Cental Staff plan on the rest of the Atlantic 'act nations. Within a few months, believe high Allied bservers in Bonn, the German General taff will almost certainly get the "go-ahead" Ignal (or Its new Wehrmacht. Behind barred windowa of a four-storey %  ed brick building m a Honn back street two tiller generals, with a skeleton staff of erisiCratic former colonels and majors t today' re planning the last details of that new Velirmacht. Hidden in other Bonn Ministries are at ;ast another dozen dark-suited Hitler genrals—seven in the Ministry of the Interior one Key men are the elusive generals behind he barred windows, former German High 'ommand Operations Chief Adolf Heusinger ind Rommel's ex-Chief of Staff Hans leases*! Neither of them was a Nazi, for no German hmaral Staff Officer was permitted to join l!-,,^,,-I:":;,;: put? Both tot** th. wr, however. .s lieutenant-generals but nobody knows ;hut they really thought about Hitler. SO SrXRKT ... Heusinger was the Fuehrer's constant comanion for years at his Russian Front headquarters, until he was arrested after the 1944 umb plot, when defeat seemed inevitable. Thin, spectacled Speidel planned the Gerlan offensive against the Second Front. In lie immediate post-war years of defeat he ecame a professor of philosophy.. For more than a year the two generals. ith their chief assistants, former Colonel ount Kielmannsegg and former Major von len Bussche, have planned in their halfidden Bonn War Ministry. The Germans lescrtbe it officially us "The Service Office of he Federal Prime Minister." So secret is their work that the main door if the new German Foreign Office is permalently barrd, and visitors are admitted only Stter %  strict "vcttim;" by a Prussian N.C.O.CLOSED FOR REPAIRS Advocate Stationery II IK IS IISI The ideal FILLER for repairinn damaged lurfaces on Plaster, Walls, Birch. Wood etc; For inside and outside use. Can be washed or painted over. •• %  AWL PLASTIC" An Asbestos pluaaina: compound, especially recommended for fastening Screws In Stone, Concrete, Brick and ail types or masonrj. %  tranches for hi lively. Summing up, ii may be seen . that the C.institution of the United States is the nlld foundation of that government. As in the i.iw 0< the Presidency, changi methods and mtohanm nt fnvei niniiit caa be, l.ave been, and doubtless will continue to le made. 1-ilh fori .il .i' tn (he Constitution and the les.. formal operation of politic il party power have made mans in the office of the Presidt n ;. Hut they have l>ren OiU) %  tutlona of the pattern laid down by the men ndw met In I'hii delpliiiain 1787 I.vrit th. ConThe [" -II < %  tha CocistUutton of the United out, as tu how the the changed when needs RflM, i".iWILK1NSON & HAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C.S. PITCHER ck CO. •Phones: 4472 & 4687 BECKWITH STOBES YES MABAMtt you'II /#• tlvliuhlSul uilh .t\Ms cpnririaLS %  i: \ s By Win. P II ARTI.I 1 1 HI HABMAUIII: 41c. STRAWBERRV 55c. APRICOT 48c. DAMKOM 42c. GREENGAGE 51c. .. JELLY CRYSTALS Aosortrtl Flavours roc. pk*. GARDEN PEAS 34c. .. NO ADDATIVES — Onl> Fill 11 ami 9VOAB Obluillihhlc i it 11 GnNVn ^TJF*?. . irasl sharply wilh rommunlttic toetnber usually did iiol urn ,„,i,, irl;in mH had. w hich Sovlcl December ol Ihc Ii.ll,,,,;..u K lhl ,,..„„,.,,„ e M.ucli 4 SJncotht IdqpIIS CrmMHuHBri ,„.. B ,„.,.,i ihe Han „l Ihe TWciillem Aniendincnl. dlnnlly of man and did rli.-.r l-i l vile porter. u new Ainerlcui C.HIKress lakes to assure rili/eiu of Ihe republic | .l.muory 3 — two months freedom of ,p,„h. itiounhl. and! %  ftw It li .-leilc L reunion. T^.-y recoumsed dlfTerBit by bit Althouilh all Aineii.aii dUWU ence. m Ih nvictlon. of null,,„.„.,|,„| ,i,„i. ..is,-,,. AIIUvl rlir.le.mitc nnrl elerl lhl I'reMdent. ihey dn so vidual men and clanhe,i of p.< % %  .'>''JIKI ttioir plans In Allied diplomats anil Ihe.nth Ihe "ataetanr* they ul inleresl and so they laboured 'Ulcers in Bonn. %  or., <"i:r, i^rov!d.for"hr C ^: The Allied Foreisn Ministers' conference entitled to as many electors as it est good of the greatest number m n Brussels at the end of last year which hns Representatives and Senators a peaceful n ..,. .„„ j ,„ .u. *--_.-.,-~i „ f„ !" „„ A^R,., ... the U.S. Congress. The t s. ThS set .f ... '^ lo thl 'orrnation of a German Arm\. tutton say. that the electors numerous crises i" tha IM reen let the nencrals come out into the open. But """uS. leSSriJ. !& lr;.: %  ... * <; ""-"> Gl SI.S master plan ,s still MASTER PLAN tha Corman jrenerals have Just Received In Our Pi lent Orbver Ctevi d i letsthereof may dlrsct. H Tfe. ed by the Democratic Purtv. dutl. i,, )v fol men p ft avri he WOtlld be succeeded by the chosen by popular vote in ..II the f:.i-fhmi:, sparsely-settled, agrieuli President pro temporo 48 Suites! 'leeAnn. of IBS) adeknown to onlv a few Allied officials. Last week, at the Paris talks on a European turn! United States of 1787. Iil\<. Baudouin As ili, I'rinrr mi.nnis ih: iliioii, ih, II,', 1-i.iiK ak: -•\\ lioin nill Iniiiiu-i-* ?" BRUSSELS iBy SAM WHITE) the menus. It u advisable In! mia ia me master plan — sun an omciai old Prince Ban.„„„„, .„, w „„ „„„.„„„ „„ H Brunah never to eat alone. II only secret — to which Britain has not vet agreed ;-..'.:'! S.1SS, iTMuSiliS'hT tt£2S"££ !FSSS%£r m '~ i mtS *\** ' which th, French are Mrmly i llll I II.Ill'l.-M. WITHIN the last two years efforts have been made to bring Seawell Airport into lino with modern airports the world over. With financial assistance from the British and Canadian governments %  new runtvay has been built and the public are swatting the erection of a proper terminal building. A primary necessity si any airport is adequate Are righting equipment. The GOT ernment ordered Bre fighttng equipment and it arrived nnd has been installed. It will not be effective, however, until trained personnel has been employed to operate it The services of the new Fire Offic < be Utilised by the Government in connection with this matter. out III:.\II:II SAY BRUSSELS WHEN L'0-ye.ir-oM I'm |; %  dM lo li. %  %  %  ill be tervenUj hoplns that hu ttMt Wl11 tyr inclined to exclaim 1 V "' ' "' ^^JrJ.^i'n^^^'m'^K 0 ra "' unable to obtain further .,„. .mbittarad put* "i ?>J J" 0 *"-?, wtn ,h Ue.uht of ostcnution. explains :.„ l.nnk l.e.vei, heis apoloxetically in its wine list: , Yet a K ret part i thosr ..nm.muHn |.ro,|H-rous country ret..ins an |haf (h ronngnmem „, Kll „ 1(l Brussels dinners, you wish to almost Victorun adulation for ,,.„„.„ fro „, Oeorpia order, ;rmy. the Germans demanded that their plan j should be accepted—complete. Frenchmen. : with memories of three German invasions in 70 years, were alarmed. Other Allied observers thought the Ger man generals showed an overweening miliI tary ambition in people who had suffered LMtastrophic defeat only six years before. This is the master plan — still an officia WOOLLEN DEPT. CHAMOIS LEATHERS In Super and Medium Qualities nt rtta l Batatat. politician uw rnonarehj n was this, ami „„„. „, MI hu mofvit rri apping hu knife and ,ot political ractors, which was I.IIK. -,i\ vvih Ini "How like Leopold Baudouin II walk, the ami he %  military c\ip. Even hi' 'ike methenutta end Ulg, remind one ol bu %  This lean und studion--l<>oktn^ yOUtb has been under hw faUlsVl largely responsible for the wide-pread feeUni ataiasl Leopold's .': in ; t ., comn ontc HI..ml, Prince*.* Prices Soar Another reilajrant, not content vilh iircimary cauliflower, de, rlbei ii-^ verssM %  i *Oaelijloiee< nflutnee ihroughoul hki itfti d Queen Atrid. Now, htiveevi' BruSsSlt buzzes Aftt-r the feastinx the piospemu h4>pefully with njniours of an citizens adjourn to night-club:, early nUurlass tot Baudouin and choosing boogie-woogie haunts < %  a successor t the evor-adored late sUUd brtUhmily !. %  i i his father audoul n isstn _. dl father and to h mtddlr-aired aristocrat dance to 19.1tl uiie Lived liv .. •ly attached palace spokesmen, lu.s Used on one of the nnumcrable licestepihe n-year-oM blonde Princess curtained bars mother the beautiful Princess De Isabelle. dauglitei of the Kiencii Kelby. wbosa ni.ige pretender, the Count of Par!: P0 t-war the inust hkelv new Queen KeanwhUl Brussel omy for the visitor is to l e atrk l FuxurteTlelS runSfe' | 2£j£ i • %  -H,]^,,, mortal %  %  *YOHU) c 'VYwmr.li. HEsmVED tie out. At Ihe Hrst sign i-f .u lift stw tsped 1..F s Kii**iiiti Hrutulily To the r-Mlur. Th.Advocate— BID Kindly BUOV, %  attention, If nee Book Section in the Ji the Resder'. DIgVsS. If %  %  ngi of %  th,latter in %  %  i i %  She went then in %  %  the NKV.n. %  %  ..| ar"the IIUKC vault* ol the %  sapped hei off. without im charged offence 'i %  h romnkoa with i Iter 11 yen's of mi ra%  %  %  I %  .. home in B< snd %  rritten this bo h i M na r .in Bevtet rrhae tamps. ; %  %  me with %  ment. and | should lilce to mention them. Fust, i can, on i large issseral lo i u.i.ilh and cellously cruel to iheir fellow creatures. .,> tbsee Russian Mvagei aie Iven said to be, from the high ntln;.il down 10 the rank i men as ini Ihe w Ickedne Hist Lippsi i We kr lhal th.v,01, ui oeeai It i .n> brut* in-asts in human form, even mi' real ctvUlsatti n, bul I %  %  mbrai kng hundredol lhl m, CV< n i 1 Ihci And %  he Politburo km .v Seeonoly. It seen '.hat human beings can eiidu.e ".Into hold them. One fashionable Brussels reslatiPposed : — 1 A Wehrmacht of 250.000 tierman conscripts, serving two years each. 2 Six Army Corps, each of two divisium 12.000 men strong (despite French insistence that no Corman unit should be more than 5,000 to 6.000). 1. Revival of the German General Staff. I Creation of a German War Ministry \ with a civilian War Minister. 5 Luftwaffe of 2,000 planes all Allied manufactured, including 600 jet lighters. 6. Naval Squadrons for defence in North Sea and Baltic. Allied diplomats taking part in the Paris negotiations say that the French are adamant Meanwhile pries* soar to o point i i n opposition to No. 3 and No. 4. which ihe most obvious econi OPPORTUNITY The French are too late. When with Britain '; and America, they agreed last December to %  negotiations on a German Army, they them; • >\ M created the new German General Staff J j —and the German generals were not slow to <£ teiie their opportunity. Now America, disappointed by French and j;. Benelux aid for Western defence plans, has ;C started a major boost for the immediate crea^ tion of the army. J American High Commissioner John J* McCloy said in Bonn recently that I;'. there will have to be compromises. "Great £ and fundamental strategic decisions," said £ Mr. McCloy. "are awaiting the solution of the j| Oerinan rearmament problem." ** Only Britain is silent. No official statement,\ I of policy on the German Army has been \ Issued since a formal announcement six I months ago that Britain had agreed only in GET YOURS FROM DA COSTA t> CO.. LTD. DRY GOODS DEPT. ========= .^VV'*'**',O0**V^.^.V>VVV***-%O',^^%',*,V-,',-,%','*V>%',*-'*'--'**^' F.1VEHGY IIIII1IS E.XJUY .f?? rear nrr FllliT %  II HES prolonged itarvauen nnd raffer.ngs described and .come tluoush alive. Of course many do nul %  0 survive: Hie U>ll I ital by sVsSUl Is exceedingly htuny, and woul-i be swollen by suli ide if ii were nut forcibly prevenhad And thirdly, l :im astounded thai an* person end still believe HI Communl-Tii. fitter n story of tins nature. Existing living conditions In many lands slill entail much, very much hardship and suffering, but not to be compared with %  Soviet Sl.ive1-rbour Camp in Siberia. Hut whal kuod i f "bee In th.laaesssM the Com even in Hrllaln and I'.S.A 8 'i uly. F. G. 1951. I'ineapplr Juice I'HII _.. %  i %  li .i *i.1 Pineapple Rinis I'lneapplp (hanks .r II>. I; inllrarls CANADA DRY SparklliiK Drinks Ml liraii shrrridi'ri H'hrat WteC-a-bsX Qtspt Nuts i'rull tVbeat I'uffrd Wheat CoM ateraga Hams Cold Storacc II iron Oat llakc-In Ihr 1'ound 24c. WWXB /-#<## aits rrunlcr Brandv Martrl Brand> \\ hl|p Whirs Krd Wines I.lqupurs '. M.II Tree u>rr Tuhre Beer Berr In Cans Cam Oisssken ( arrs Biscuits < .uiicli.i. K.d ( hsssM I>anLsh (iouda t heese Auslralian ( In— In Tins Dutch ll-*ad Cheew %  ,t0 the formation of a German fi l*IIO\l' L -GODDARDS-w <• lli,r .-------.-.-. V,V.W/.M*MC..'



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