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The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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PHavbadros



ESTABLISHED 1895







FRIDAY,







Advocate



PRICT FIVE CENTS



JOURNALISTS “STOP” ARMISTICE TALKS

U.N. ISSUE ULTIMATUM,

TO COMMUNIST CHIEF

KAESONG, Korea, July 12.

NEGOTIATIONS for

a cease fire in the Korean FLOODS SWEEP ;

_ war were interrupted on Thursday, when Commu. sik ae
nists refused to permit the Allied free Press to) ENTIRE KANSAS
enter Kaesong, where the talks are being held. Vice TOPEKA, Kansas, July 12,

Admiral C. Turner Joy,
the following ultimatum

eral, Nam II Nam, chief of the Communist negotia- Topeka as sirens screamed, and
tors, by helicopter at about 11 a.m. on Thursday. 1,000 levee workers scrambled for
“There will be no further negotiations until, and| dike, built in 1908, starteq crun=
unless, Communists cease all interference with U.N, | !2*:

authorized personnel or

Fourteen hours later, no reply,
had been received, and Red radios |
failed even to mention the matter. |

As of this morning it appeared
that nothing further could happen
until the Reds replied to Joy. It}
was hoped that the breakdown
was only temporary. But negoti-
ations have already been suspend-
ed for one full day, while soldiers
died on the fighting line, and
quick Red action is necessary to
permit resumption today.

This was the first test of the
Red pledge of good faith and the
first direct opportunity to see if
the Communists really want a
cease fire — or if it is not a sham
conference which might cover a
gigantic double cross.

The Reds stopped a truck con-
voy containing 20 Press men
along with other U.N. personnel,
nine miles south of Kaesong. ‘The
truck was turned back. When it
became evident that the Reds did
not intend to admit the corres-
pondents, Joy sent the ultimatum.
It ig believed that Joy acted on
instructions from Matthew B.
Ridgway, the Supreme U.N.
Commander. It is assumed tinat
Ridgway may have had direct
orders from Washington and the
U.N. regarding the Allied attitude.

Indicating the importance he
attached to the free Press issue,
Ridgway raced alongside the road
when the Allied convoy started
for Kaesong, to wish the corres-
pondents good luck. Now he and
his command awaitéd the Red
reply which was the next step: }

So far as is known here, Com-
munists made no reply to Vice
Admiral C, Turner Joy’s demand
that all United Nations personnel
be admitted to Kaesong.

An official source cautiously
hoped that the Thursday dispute
over admitting Allied reporters to
the Korean truce talks will be
patched up. But they also recog-
nised it may be a danger signal that
Communists are not acting in good |
faith, }

A Defence Department source
speaking on the basis of informa-
tion received from General Mat-
thew Ridgway said it did believe;
the Red ban on United Nations
reporters “will be an ultimate
stumbling block.”

But authorities also believed the
cease fire talks, if they are resumed,
will continue for some time before
an armistice is reached,

Based on preliminary military
reports from Kaesong there h
been a cautious hope that an armis-
tice could be negotiated in one to
three weeks. The new Commu-
nist move may change that.

—U.P.

Dollar Crisis
Faces Britain

LONDON, July 12.

A new dollar crisis is brewing
in Britain and may force the Gov-
ernnient to seek a waiver on the
first repayment instalment of the
1946 American loan which is due
December 31. Li

The cause of the new crisis 1s
the rearmament programme in the
western world. It forced down
British exports drastically and
caused Britain to pay much higher
dollar prices for essential (raw
materials. The result is—a sha-
dow of the new dollar gap (excess
of dollar imports over dollar ex-
ports) Which Britain wiped out
early 1950. She was able to give
up Marshall Aid at the beginning
of 1951.—U.P.

Ban The King

BELIZE, BRITISH HONDURAS,
e July 12.

The City Council decided on
Thursday to ban the King’s photo-
‘raph from the city hall until
Britain grants British Honduras
self-government and until “‘de-
valuation of local dollars ended
and import controls are abol-
ished.”"—U.P.









chief UN. negotiator, sent s 4 - foot earthen levee broke,
é the North Korean Gen- and flood waters of the Kansas

River poured through into North
safety. The siren sounded as the

Tons of water flowed through
convoys.” the break and swamped the entire

section of North Topeka. Some
city streets were six feet below

| the surface. Most families fled}
oN, Advance their homes, leaving everything
they owned behind. Virtually all

Seven Miles of Kansas lay stricken today by the





UP A POLE

| US Announce) Morrison Regrets
|

oes

Jap Treaty | Anolo-U.S. Rift On





Un te today an-
1ounced tl ailed Allied plans! “ e . 4 ®
for tt dr Japanese peace! } i hese > 1O0n
treat Japan will get full free- A AW r \s ’
dom to rearm and build up its . oF ,
industries Japan loce some LOW iN, July 12,






island possessions but otherwise
goes almost unpunished for the
Pearl Harbgur = atiack 1d all
savagery that followed.”

The treaty is truly one of recon-
cihation,” said John Foster Dulle
Republiean leader, who negotiated
the treaty for the United States.

“Never in modern times have
the victors in a great and bitter
war applied this principle. They
have in the name of peace im-
posed ‘discriminations and humili-
ations which have bred new war

FOREIGN SECRETARY Herbert Morrison ex

pressed regrets on Thursday that United States
and Britain had’ been unable to reach “a tidy solu-
tion’’ on the Chinese situation before presenting
the Japanese perce treaty draft. _But he told Com-
mons that he thought the drafting powers have
done pretty well “in leaving it to the Japanese
themselves to decide which China to recognise.
Western Europe generally welcomed the draft





EIGHTH ARMY HEAD-

QUARTERS, Korea, July 13.

United Nations infantrynjen re-
ported that they were heavily
engaged in clese range fighting
against Communist troops on the
central front where the Reds are
building up a force of nearly

worst floods in the State’s history.
Almost every railroad and every
trans-continental line through the!
State was cut off by the water.}

U.S. engineers said the summer |
floods in the Kansas River basin}



had caused more than $75,000,000
damage to homes, crops and other}
property, They said that this}
week's flooding alone would cause |

The present treaty would avoic treaty as long overdue Mert Labour
that great error ney buverman i i were ol

“Dulles published the text of in the highest degree unfortunac
the Japanese peace treaty as the hat a settlement between Chiné

U.N. and Britain wrote it after
consulting their allies. Enough of
the other western powers have
ipproved the treaty to make sure
the Pact will be signed in Sar
Francisco during the first week in
September.

Dulles said the treaty will bc
followed quickly by two separate
arrangements for mutual defence



and Japa noud be held up :
by reason of the United States
refusal to recognise fccts about
the government of China

Morrison replied this doe
not pretend to be a complete and
comprehensive Far Eastern settle-
ment. I would naturally have been
happy if we could have had a tidy





500,000 men. The fight started | $10,000,000 more damage, to bring
late Thursday afternoon against | the total to $85,000,000, This esti-|
a Red foree of undetermiried | mate did not include millions upon }
strength in the Kumsong area. millions more damage along the,
f ' ; Missouri River and other tribu-!
Hard hitting United Nations |taries in Missouri and Wansae |
patrols advanced as much ‘as At least seven persons were
seven miles into Red territory. | drowned in the high waters along!
Powerful Red forces strung out the Kansas and Blue Rivers this/
in the west central sector, num- week , Tae , o
bered 400,000, and front reports :
said “more are coming in”
steadily. Heavy weapon supplies
and big self propelled guns moved
up to the Communist front area.
To the rear but not far, the Reds

eae |
Queuille Refuses
were rushing a fresh string of
|
|



U.P.







7 .
rere Preniiership
airstrips to completion to ac-

commodate jet fighters. | PARIS, July 12.
Former Premier, Henri Queuille
refused President Vincent Auriol’s
request to form a new French
dovernment. An official = an-
aia in issued shortly after
: a ; * Queuille left the Palace, where he
Communists were trying .to get} i i ; aa
all air combat expetibnha oiasiiie. conterred with Auriol, said that he
Front action was limited but oases the offer for “reasons of
Unite ions SW Sti i { i
Punching into Rea detenees every |. Auriol who has been interview-
where primarily to test the Com-,/88 party leaders for two days, in
munist strength and keep a tab on | the hope of finding a new Premier,
the Communist »iIldup. summoned the Finance Minister,
On the central front patrols got | Maurice Pethche to the Palace.
in two and a half miles of Pyorig-| The fifty-five-year-old financial
gang, the apex of the former iron | ¢xpert told the President he would
triangle now in Allied hands with- }consult with political leaders and



Continued appearance of Rus-
sian built MIG 15’s over North
Korea despite their steady losses
in combat with United States
sabre jets fostered the belief that

cut meeting opposition. bring Auriol an answer next
Near Kumhwa a Communist | Tuesday.
group was beaten back in a strike —UP.

at the United Nations outpost and
in another short fight Unitea

Nations patrols pulled ee 6 Killed : 1 Injured

- Bas In Plant Explosion
Vo Point INDIANAPOLIS, July 12.

An explosion and fire wrecked
TEHERAN, July 12. the closely guarded Allieson jet
The British Ambassador, Sir] engine experimental building at
Francis Shepherd, gave a cool} the General Motors Corporation
reception to the report of the} Defense plant, killing six persons
impending arrival of the U.S-] and injuring one. Major Harold
special Presidential adviser, W.] Wilber, an Air Force Command-
Averell Harriman, and reject- ing Officer, stationed at the plant,
ed any idea that Harriman would] caiq that ‘six civilian employees
mediate the Anglo-Iranian oil, were killed. a
crisis. han ‘ ened ei
He said predieely “there doesn’t a ties ee ake thas ae
seem very much point (to Har-| «jositively no sabotage involved.”
riman’s coming), in view of the He ree Stal cas wae

circumstances under which the :
nt . » as taesl destroyed. Jet engines were tested
acceptance was made to invite in the cells before shipped to the

aot te Wetcos aetnouiion arene airforce. The explosion was heard
man’s offer to send Harriman] @t least eight miles away. —U.P.
here, that any talks would have
to be “within the framework” of
uhe oil nationalisation law. f , ° ee se
Earlier, Mossadegh warned in a 50 Nations To Sign
speech to the Majlis that there J P T t
might be “serious consequences” > » * xe

for world peace as a result of the ay eace rea y
International Court of justice’s WASHINGTON, July 12.

ruling on the dispute. Abou+ 50 ¢ iex « i
: t 50 countries are being
A few hours later, his Gov-Jinvited to San Francisco to sign

ernment fired off another rejec-| the treaty. Russia apparently will
tion of the Hague ruling, in re-! not attend. On June 10, Russia
ply to the British note which ac-| demanded Dulles to abandon thé
cepted the Hague proposal to es-| neace treaty negotiations. Dulles
tablish a joint ~Anglo-Iranian | <4 iq that the U.S. now has an-
board of supervisors to run the} cwered this demand =
weer eelahid the belief that The reply obviously was a
the Court had no right “in tie blunt rejection of the Soviet pian.
frst pl to rul the di t Dulles said that the final decision
TEE Ret Re eee ee sat OF, © 1 was to let Japan decide whether
Ba Sty to sign the treaty with Nationalist
China or Communist China — or
neither.

FLOODS WRECK The treaty probably will be-

come effective early next year,

sry + after the necessary number of
JAP DIST RICTS countries ratify the pact. Then
the U.S. will select an ambassa-
OSAKA, Japan, July 12. dor to Japan. —U.P.

43 persons are dead and 108
ae in the Kyoto, Osaka, and

obe areas in the wake of floods . . r
which hit the district on Wednes- Britain Would

day. 56 other persons are report-











“a torrential thunder showers.

The heaviest damages are re- LONDON, July 12

ported in the Kyoto valley area.| Commonwealth Relations Min-
There have been no reports yetlister Patrick Gordon Walker said

of any casualties among foreign|on Thursday that Britain would

personnel. Unofficial estimates of | welcome closer defense ties with

the flood damage ranged up to|Pakistan even if India declined to

T iq} $100,000,000. epiter. timocaskone’ LC.F.T.U. REJECTS wp. |servative Lord “Winterton asked

RED PROPOSAL

MILAN, July 12.
The World’s Free Trade Union
Congress emphatically rejected a
surprise proposal by their Com-




munist dominated rivals to uMit€]in the & ttoyac River near here, | India?

in a common front to seek Pew ilast night. when a ferry boat Gordon Walker replied: “Yes,
ocial advantages” for workt | overturned on the flooding waters.;we will welcome closer military
The proposal, ae by thelafter striking a floating log lassociation with Pakistan.”

communist run federa-|'fhe accident scene is ‘only | Gordon Walker to another

t t i “35)a short distance from the spot |questioner that Premier Jawaharal |

tossed sion Of|where 55 persons perished on jNehru and Premier Liquat

th Congress of} Sund wher bus was swep Chan both sent messages to Ir

t} sf r ation E ¥ it at ted to ford the jurging a peaceful settlement d

‘ t thes +

edly injured in floods which fol- Welceonie Pakistan

Gordon Walker in the Commons
for an assurance “if the Pakistan

Government asked to enter into

FERRY BOAT CAPSIZES closer discussions in this matter

with Government, the Govern-

MEXICO CITY, July 12. ment will not give them a refusal
Twenty-seven persons are

feared to have been drowned









ing into similar discussions with













megsage e
U.P. ! helpful U.P.



GANGS OF REPAIR MEN employed by
Supply Corperation ave ot «rwkk
Holetown to Speightstown,
where necessary.
into position.

ot aidan aiid

They are replacing wires and poles
The picture shows a new pole being brought

AUSTRALIA GONCERNED

ABOUT REPARATIONS

CANBERRA, July 12,
External Affairs Minister Richard Casey told Parlia-
ment Thursday that the Japanese treaty draft does not meet
at all with the approval of Australia or other allies who con-
tributed to the formation of the treaty but hoped sufficient
countries would agree to the final draft to permit to the
signing, two months hence.

Benin HadA
Town Plan

Two bronze leopards, said
to be equal in quality to the

d reparations from Japan





in securing adequate com-
pensation for the hardships suffer-
ed by Australian prisoners

Regarding industrial reparations
“if the Japanese economy
\is te become self supporting in a

{make use of all plant machinery.

Exhibition of precise terms of Japan's

rraditional | obligations to the victorious pow-

Colonies, at the Imperial In-

from New York, lent by Mr international

Louis Carre,



economic ! *

nearly 2} feet in length.

West African city of Benin

is to permit
probably in the 16th century,

the Japanese to recover self



height of its power

those bronzes are thought to

tion on Japanese rearmament

town-planning
preoce upation



lon different points of view



. who first made
nin a great power, replanned
the city on lines strongly re-





built of hard red mud self-defence -
as the “City of Blood” dates

the time of the
Ovonramwe

Seize Ammunition
ASMARA, July 12.

from mainly

which hundreds



'ecame guards at the police post at}
| Neffasit, 15 miles off Asmara on

annually to the spirits of his i "

This was broken

he massacred

British party going to make

a treaty with him in 1897 and

and carried

only when ammunition



wires before the a
and gagged the guard
sacked the post but left the guards

Thic exhibitic
This exhibition rifles, 2 tommy guns, one r



West African sculpture dis-

played in a ammunition.—U.P.



lV - pair present- > 4e@ e the sh

ed to Queen Victoria after S Q) ia ls A British svok
the expedition which make uspen Wo e e ic e | xid that the nm
comparison

WASHINGTON ] f f 1
Department







Pope Receives Ambassador

two department
on the ground of their not enter- | VATICAN CITY. July investigations on
the former |
Brazilian Ambassador





al on behalf of t







solution to the Chinese situation
but it is impossible in the etr
cumstances”

Deputy Opposition Leader
Anthony Eden said “1 think the
procedure is unusual in pre-
senting the treaty in this form.
Would it not be more satisfac-
tory if the Commonwealth coun-
tries and we could agree before
presenting it in this form?”

Unusual

Morrison said “this is a draft
treaty and it does not represent the
views of the government. I agree
the procedure is altegether un-

ial"'

Unaer questioning Morrison said
there was a great deal of agree-

n the Pacifie
l A Japanese-United States
igreement that will allow the
United States to station land, sec
wid alr forces in Japan Thi
irrangement would be signed im-
mediately after the main Japanese
peace treaty 1s signed.
2 A mutual security agree-
nent among the United States
Australia, New Zealand Thi
pact patterned after the Atlantic
reaty is nearly ready. Dulles sai
he might have more details later
today
Dulles said, “the proposec

(peace) treaty does not put Japan
under any permanent restrictions
or disabilities which will make her
different or less sovereign thar



r nt among Commonwealth
any other free nation. : nations but it ts not “universal”
—U.P. He said “in any case Common-

wealth countries will have further

opportunity of discussing | the

B.G. Will Send
‘wice To india

(From Our Own Correspondent

GEORGETOWN, B.G. July 12

treaty at a later stave.”

oP RSs EVN PAROS
during the next Poreign Affairs
dabate two weeks hence

Morrison outlined the draft
treaty provisions in a statement to



British Guiana Legislature to- the House He said “six years
day decided in sympathy for after Japan’s acceptance of our
Bihar State in the Indian Republic urrender terms which she scrupu-
particularly to donate 500 bags of lously carried out we do not con-
rice costing $4,500 to a relief func sider we should continue to post-
Started recently, headed by the pone the treaty which would
West Indies Archbishop and the Mr. ANTHONY EDEN materially aid a settlement in the
Roman Catholic Bishop The —wunusual procedur Far East because a small minority
fund aims at sending India 10,000 ire not prepared to negotiate a
bags of rice for famine relief \treaty unle the veto is retained

Funds and rice are being col- | Anxiety
aa in a apheny whos re P li ‘ Morrison said certain economic
The ritish juliana population aga ( say’ j aspects o > treat o cause
comprise approximately 40 per OLLCE rUAr( Seats in Britain 7 with her

cent. East Indians and large rapidly increasing population Ja-

section have family ties with , 7 , 7 ‘ . . ‘ ‘
i ale pan is under strong economi
Bihar State U. K e Embassy compulsion to develop her ex-















~ ports
- CAIRO, July 12. on Pe a Fn rey
. % 3 ate s] a se 1e Boarc o rade arold
k rance Wants 3 sar nee re 7K ner Paes Winani sail the eeuse: that othe
ry \e ry... assy and Consulate here and British Government at present
l'o ‘ ign Treaty n Alexgndria and Port Said to- |¢Xtends a most favoured treat-
* ay A state of emergency wa nent to Japanese trade in goods
PARIS, July 12 leclared yesterday on the anni- but it is not prepared to entei
France will ask that the three] versary of the British bombard nto any formal undertaking.
autonomous Indo-Chinese States ent of Alexandria in 1882. All We feel we must for the pres-
Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos| %nti-British demonstratior ere nt retain our freedom to protec
be invited to sign the Japanese | banned ee - BeG HON if necessary SERINE
peace treaty, informed sources ibnormal and injurious compett-
said on Thursday. The sources The anniversary passed off We bel how a hat
aid that the request would b uietly except for a token strike ; € OLE vi 1 vel tha in
umong observations that France| yesterday But tode the mo penpee bi Pd me Ds
will send to Washington on the | “here is electi f Britain’ ¢ Hee ve = ; ‘abl a. Brat of
jcraft treaty France consider rotest ove the | r f +) lieve a o Asona le t ypc oF
, | that the three Indo-Chinese lip Empire Roach, ! t a " peheat it I ae cae eet
} States should sign the treaty, even lorrison’, tatement 1 it \ nes i A ! of’ 4 ; 8 cage ret
{though they were French colonies, || !ouse of Comme Cun wet ao tae li . enn D sath
until after the war because they | aie mounted tod on th Reyy PY + ree A ga 3
were occupied by Japanese force rx iroadca ting House She) Ad we belie. thote \cetaetival
Other French comments will}! key poin in tl mi h eutte he asdintael Meco.
concern the economic clauses of | ©" UF Gtattone’ between ineuseria’ th
the treaty and the wording of some terests i triat countrie P
political clauses, but informed ernec on the line f the Angk



sources pointed out that the draft
treaty already was a conciliatior

foradl Damitads: [Snes teapot ie soe

| ‘
Action In Suez Iran Rejects
24 Thank Dulles | ae eee eer Ruling Again
|



emanid
WASHINGTON, July 12 hat urgent S ty Counell
Twenty-four members of thel‘ion against #F pt’ lockade of TEHERAN, July 12
Japanese Diet called on Ambassa-|the Suez Canal which Tel-A-Viv Premier Mohammed Mossadeg)
dor John Foster Dulles on Thurs-; Ambassador called pit uct} warned Parliament on Thursday





day to thank him for his work on| ‘affecting the oil output and other | that world peace is threatened b:
the Japanese peace treaty. They | ®°onomi isi of th Midd the Hague Court decision on the
met Dulles in the State Depart-; ©" M1 S. Eban, Israel [ranian oil cris He also said that
ment diplomatic reception roor mt veto. 1 Unit i losses in revenue because of the










fadao Kuraishai, Chairman of the : ait a 4 to + Glad-] o L crisi bh Iran in a “criti

Lower House Labour Committee vebb of tain. Pre f f il state of inf " and demand-

eC Ee J pa wwe of three sil o meet

spoke for the group bast ra is l P I to meer

illes te he group that the ' a : , aXe ,

tect that the treaty wee a liberal| oringing cucstion before the] A few hours after Mossadegt

f la } ity ‘ a"! Security Cc ! hict F r nceke in Parliament he replied to

one caused some criticism by other | ° nay a : a dat tha. Werk © nat ieawenirig: kh

countries. He said the United) \riidie Kast “| Hague proposal with a secon
States feels however that a liberal) " + aiaoltom oF the court ‘oll

rejection of e court plan

of} treaty is the right type for Japan Egyptia or » of ul Trad held that the Court had no

a-| He added, it is now up to Japan) eccnomic Life of the ezion anc|right to act. Sir Francis Shep-

ehine gun and over 4,000 rounds of] to ore that this belief is ruc aii iu reninr CoDA-4t herd the British Ambassador said

yvrect.—U,P ty."— °

that Harriman’s visit might dela
vy evacuation of the oilfields by
Rritish








}pin-prick incident











ling British efforts
charges against ther They at forced P vithe ee | ner} ‘
the highest officials suspended ¢ United Stat 51 ‘ Dat y (
the State department during tm year mee ‘hen ate A rresponde!
P c + y y € ry) Rt Uer

current loyalty chech The State j ‘ . > h re

Davie 43 has been n the phasised that nei ' I 1a Colin Reid a Neges n
diplomatic corps. for 20 yea! et been fe Abadan sit Apri ae
His wife i former Patricia; thing. It | 1
Grady, daughter of United States; pended on t} ’ t

ac t Pp Henry of the I pert t secu - The “ADVOCATE”

Board penc

Clubb 50, has been ith the Su h su } pays for NEWS
Department for 28 vears and has | by law wi t Dial 3113
s the Day or Night.

China He was the t United
r U.P | seeeecsceemetcan nae een ee,







pe a TWO















































































































































P AY, JULY 13, 1951
BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRID
EE om Se |
How ae a. 1 . ) ;
fe e 1 P) 4 i
eh 7worr "46" _
, _ JSANETTA DRESS SHOP eo
| One OPENING TO-DAY, FRIDAY 13TH
" ‘ Lower Broad St. — Upstairs over Newsam’s
ISS FLORENCE INNISS_ who Success Story lve; {i aetna
flew down from Long Island | ARTIE'S HEADLINE TIE’S HEADLINE *ORDON KEITH, the Barbadian W mai { ‘
on Sunday to see her aunt Mrs. ¥B actor who became famou oO n ii}
A. G. Barnes of the’ “Rockery’ through his brilliant acting in the
Hastings is due to leave this morn- play “Deep are the Roots” | Mad 1}
ing for Puerto Rico on her return hes now achieved fame as a singer l , e \? ,
journey to the U.S. in Paris avery night in Pari Ah SVENING, COCKTAIL, AFTERNOON and BEACH
Leaving by the same plane is Gordon sings in a top class ni 700 000 ht ;
Wing Commander L. A. Eggles- club. The emcilgte of the Clul 9 14 Ready-Made and Made-to-Order ss f l
, ; \ } ru
field, Director er of Civil says “Gordon is the biggest at- — Also — I | $ so young aad beauti
Aviation in the aribbean area tract ye have had” NEW YORK, oo ton %
cies auatiiition to dusuuncn Ro eae ‘ How does a woman make BEAUTIFUL HANDBAGS from ...........- $7.89 to $10.61 | marries a man like this...
7 : ‘ 700,000? Fe , ice * 5 ; i ;
With Canadian Bank Sone at Wincheoter The Tees Rion LADIES PYIAMAR tele.) :., 5. cs. $5.30 per pr. fi] 4
Of Commerce NTHUSIASTIC parents attend-| Follies girls, did it by playing Floral $6.08 s : ANY y
R. ROBERT MACDONALD ing the annual cricket match a four-year-old brat on the 3 PS ab i ecogers oy he ta SAS a gee ? : H =
who is on the, staff of the between pupils of Winchester and radio ‘ wut PEETiCOne So eae $7.32 {
Canadian Bank of G€ommerce in Eton Colleges were Sir Charles She dressed like a baby She| ~ HA
i-Spain is at gpesent spend- Woolley, Governor of British|called herself Baby Snooks, She} —
ing his annual lea in Barbados Guiana who is on leave in Eng-| asked endless questions in a voice} —.. sai ae =, = e ] di
ptaying with relati§~s in Bellc- " Ste F i land, and Mr. Roland Robinson,|.ike a rusty saw. } .Inciu ing
7 7 Stop twisting h tail Di od a aes sha are nrihan ten r ®
uiite Nicherk. waned de a tne M.P., who is Chairman of the Brit-] A nd She became America’s | DIAL 2310 —= PLAZA — BRIDGETOWN
Mr. MacDonald was at one time Persian !" ish Guiana Consolidated Goldfields. / favourite nuisances one of radio's TODAY (3 Shows) ? 40 — 4 45 & 8 30 & Continuing Daily 4 45 & 8 30 p.m murder !
stationed at their branch in Bar- They both have sons attending} "ighest-paid stars. The Dive-for-Glory of the Submarine “THUNDERFISH” i § .
bades. Tradition Winchester College but neither She died last month, aged 59 2 er : | ;
Indefinite St RRANGEMENIS have been knew the other was going to be at] To-day it was revealed that she Warner Bros. present JOHN WAYNE in
NGEMENI'S hav ew the whe @ s two| left most of her £700,000 fortune Sig
sim aan : ae . leted in Britain to re- the match, For most of the two]: re i $ 00) os IFIC
AYINGStheir fir es Sia arate Pap oo Scouts days the game occupied jt looked| her son and daughter, {
to Barbados a oa Re gif ea a 8 tap cll sy gle ae though Sir Charles and Mr Fanny Brice was born on New with Patricla NEAL — Ward BOND — Philip CARBY
Smith, retired bus man and frem Jamaic prgle atl ar 5 Robinson were supporting the win-| Y°rk’s drab East Side, the daugh- a . , _ - ——
. to arrive in England later this 7 . ter of a -keepe, ame SPEC
Mrs. Smith of Londom, England. web ee on their way ra the Wor id ning team, But a fine second Pren a Ch ee names 7 = aor AT ane eae ~ CARIBBEAN PREMIERE !
© wl by bs Ea gronyre Jamboree in Austria, They will innings recovery enabled Eton’ tc \ In pam canis oe dae a fea ny See “. Grant Withers mere evis..Aties
on Wednesday morning for an in- * : : x De wt foe wes é wed ; : el ”
definite period aoe ee staying at Stay with members of the 15th Score an unex xpected victory. week chorus girl, The producer “SADDLE SERENADE | PAYMENT ON DEMAND |
St. Lawrence Hotel : Finchley (London) troop, thus sacked her because she could fot Starring; Jimmy Wakel DUE SOO! |
"They said that they first had a continuing a tradition begun in B.G. Law Student danee well enough. — == ——— SSS
Sea ae © ? : » s Je *2 . = 4 . rear ater “ar 4 ea came megs “gpa regen t Ty
ook at the is] when they stop- 1937 when the Jamaican contin " br aa? . Fifteen years later, the Same ~OISTIN:
oa for " oe in 1937 while on gent to the World Jamboree in co. FUNG-KEE-FUNG, / man hired her again for 100 times | PLAZA Dial 8404 G A I ETY
ae ribbes "ieee h A Holland, stayed with their friend Chinese law student who Was] as much. Today ~ Sunday 5 ’.29 pm THE GAKDEN — ST. JAMES
a inane 6 : f rok. in Finchley. The Jamaicans are born in British Guiana 21 ye 7 That was after Florenz Zieg-|}j ®* ae 4 oak Double to Sun, 8.0, p.m, Mat, Sun 5 p.m
2 ore . os which is now at the bot- expected to arrive in England on #89, and used to be a member 0!| feld gave her a small part in his pon Golds ann ae aes ROAD’
oe eee eee base M July 25th. Three days later, with the Chinese Sports Club back in) Follies, and she stopped the show. UP IN ARMS" | Joan Crawford, Zachary Scott &
* eave mens ae anes Ne Scouts from other parts of the B-G. is now a member of Barnes} Fanny's first husband was al|| Color by Technicolor & | BAN ANTONIO”
come back to Barbados for a holi- *' oe : vill be Cricket Club in England who plays barber. Said she: “I married him “THE AY PIGEON” Color_by Technicolor
ay, but the war intervened and Commonwealth, they will be re- } i ‘ Bill Williams, Barbara Hale Errol Flynn
Gay, bu 1e war | ened ¢ ceived by Princess Elizabeth at 2" -day matches on Saturday anc} because he smelled so nice.” The WIDNITESAT. ath | sacny — re
we could not get out. Two years Clarence House Sunday in various parts of London.) marriage lasted a year. RETURN OF THE APEMAN | | ]] Midnite Sat. 14th (By Special Reanest-
ago, we spent the winter in Ber- A *] . Barnes are one of the few unbeat- Her second was draper Nicky Bela Lugosi & John Carradine & George O’Brien in— cintvat- rox
muda end this is our first oppor- Nancy Likes Mexico en sides in London Club cricket Amstein, famous Broadway . WaaTw ABD BOL arp TAMER SE VALUBY | © : : 7 ee
tunity to come here. If we like it, MONG the many thousands For the preservation of that recora| gambler, Said Fanny: “I married|{| 2°°t Gibson, Ken May ie Steele | na tank wee LINDA CHARLES MICHAEL CONSTANCE
we hope to take up permanent , who attended the Lawn Ten- they are indebted to Owen who} nim for his sad smile. —— ——— ———$——— ‘ BOYER : ENN SMITH
residence here”, they said. nis Championships at Wimbledon last week-end was promoted from For six years she spent all her a hil el
In January this year, Mr. and last week was Miss Nancy Oakes. the 2nd XI. and scored 50 out Of/ money trying to clear him ot OPPO REDAO POPP PIED PS EP FPPP FPS GPP PPPS PPPS SPSS, wih FRANCOISE ROSAY Provuce ected by OTTO PREMINGER
Mrs. Smith spent two months on She igs hieress to a fifth of the a total of 193 all out, He hit 22 charges of being involved in o 8 x Screen Play by HOWARD KOCH + Based on # Story by Louis Chavence
the Italian Riviera while on a £3,671,724 fortune left by her fath- im one over and enabled Barnes 5,000,000-dollar robbery, % EMPIRE ROYAL 4 “ ~~ arene eel %
Mediterranean cruise from Lon- er, str et Cee who tent OS eal een aoe ote with} “But when Arnstein got out of 2 sai R PLUS TONITE a
don. The crossing then was very murdered in the Bahamas eight old rivals, Shepherds Bush jail he left her for a rich wido 1s : ad : Today to Sunday 5 & 815 pm. ¢ $ ¢
Syn cet Rin eke veh oe gee | ie ecg corse SSI WW ALLSTAR TALENT CONTEST |
Indies on the Colombie the weather are nee eiler ree ogg al Intransit Billy Rose, That marriage, t 10,1 by “tg - %| g %
was marvellous and the trip was Oakes, his wife and child. iss ended in divorce %§ M-G-M Presents | x & . “Tf I’m Lucky” x
ice Oakes mow spends a large part FYNTRANSIT through Barbados on London Express Service 1% q te he S | <é r SLAND % GERALD DAISLEY Singing . ssonsntens al F208
a eee of her time travelling. FMtexico i the Colombie were Mr. and} raed fi elie 13 “SOLDIERS THREE” | ROCK ISLA % : FITZ HAREWOOD Singing ..... ‘T Want To Be Loved" %
Learie Amongst The Stars is her favourite place. She spends Mrs. Phillip Comacho, who are on 1% : po ee TRAIL ” Bis ORVILLE GRANDERSON Singing . “be Ronisaiad x
Starring towa ive or | y Yr P
VERY interesting cricket auite a considerable amount of their way to B.G. after spending 1% ‘ Walter Pidgeon with — | x x Soi ae reer aeons “The Last Mile Home” &
. match took place in the time with fr iends in Mexico City. «heir long leave in England, Mr B. B.C. c ‘Radio is David Nive d Robert Newton | Starring: st g anes ea AAKE Bitahe 1 ee “Train No. 1” %
5 : ; Secutlal anise Her health has not been too good : =e : at Bank % ‘ i 218 a inging seagssee soos @ .
grounds of Arundel Castle, Sussex, and the dry climate of that. capi- c oma ho is with the eee B om ys — | Forrest Tucker Anele Mars with %|% CARL BEST Sin¥iny /...... “With A Song In My Hea a x
last Sunday. The Duke of Nor- $1" (06 CfY oF Catene. in. eareeew noe ; % fee gee renal see $|% DORIAN THOMSON Singing “May The Lord Bless You” %
folk captained a team including ““’ * T Meet Cost wife is the cen anno Jorge ogramme 1% ROXY x % e x
i stars Trevor yar i °o ee osts They spent their honeymoon in 1% | sy ‘ . ¥ ~ Bas be
fav oN. i a lg XL HE Annual General Meeting B ebadbas FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1951 $ | L M Cc x % A SHOW STUDDED WITH TALENT STARS %
av Niven ag s Ss ‘ S é al g Barba . F é JULY 13, 195 1o TODAY Only 1.50 & 8 15 oO 4 td * *
led by George Cox, whose benefit of the West Indian Club will ’ . gy Se perenne, eaen ane 251% oe | x % XTRA! EXTRA! >»
year this is. be held at the club premises, Incidental Intelligence am is an hee Tike sown te ik ne % Republic Big Double | Today to Sunday 430 & 8% 15 $ x EXTRA! : é Be x
Among the many other fine Whitehall Court, on July 18th. ysi > John Caroll and Adele Mnra in | Satur nthe: metaeaRtinge See x x “The Counterfeit, Cat” and eee Pageantry x
cricketers included in the Duke’s Among the items which I under- HEN IL. started to work, | 12 | pt 7 te.) Gate ee odie oiessipiaieadaeratlidatanalct ———
: ; 8 | | Ri % ; 7 x
team was Learie Constantine, the stand will be considered is a pro- used to dream about gettins man’s Creek, 445|06 «6s 4NGE, y?? | ‘Robert Rockwell and X1% 7 u LA: il x
i Sa x ANGEL CALL | Estelita Rodriguez in- 1] ¢ fn nS L %
famous West Indian Test all- posal to increase the annual in- the salary I’m starving on now.|» m_ Sporting ara 00 p a gh iS | ooare . R iain aS i x
rounder. come to meet increased costs, —Calgary Herald. poser of the W 515 pm _ Interlude, | 4 Oo] ¢ P eM
; 18 pm Compoli, 545 pm and | > Last Nite Globe’s QUIZ WINNER \ was s MISS DOREEN TATE
a ee Oe he tial Mu i 6 00 =e “BELLE OF OLD Sie of Roebuck Street X
, are ‘oe , Navy Programme, 6 15 p m . : ‘ BEY
THE ADVENTURES OF PIPA He Quize, 6.48. "p m Programm 8 * UNDERCOVER | MEXIC $1 THE JACK POT of $20.00 was not won x
355 pm Today's
5 Oe Ra mat ae im |X WOMAN” wre Qi X This was the Jack Pot Question : %
700 p.m The News, 7.10 pm. News 1% Tes = $ xt “Is the CITROEN CAR sold in Barbados of French or Italian %
Analysis, 715 p West Indian Diz WR i ae sats eis "ny yo 7 i a manufacture ?” The correct reply should have been : s
745 pm. Think ‘On These "Things, did |B Strrinw: Robert Hiviowaion ove, | “JUNGLE STAMPEDE” %)% — manufac sec. ame pls %
pm Radio Newsreel, 8 15 p m_ Engl ss : r ene l O NEITHE or it’s British. x
Bacazing. Ao pita anietdesp $8 p m. | SS SCCP OAD EPPSO LP ELPPPSLEP LEPC PP PLEIN’ VARIETY QUIZ every Wednesday at 8.30 p.m. %
: 915 pm nine of Musica Ms | Dap onp abhi ern iienenteacat pee ete ¥ NEXT WEEK’S JACK POT $40.00 %
World Affairs, 10 00 The
Bis: 10 10 p mh tntaclide. 10 5 pr Teeeui SEOSOS SSS OESSSSSSS CPOSOOSs GOS GES 6.60666 6OOOD
Asiz Survey 10 30 m Tor Jone
Trio, 1045 pm, The Debate Continue





Crmveiaht ."P 78. Ves Dis



BY THE WAY. ~ +e By Beachcomber

“2 question was: Is it fair to
call Pomerol a St. Emilion?
. One said, “Certainly. It is usually
classified thus.” A second said, “To
the devil with classification!
What does it taste like?”

Aha! There you have the root
of the matter, It tastes more like
a Medoe than a St. Emilion, and
it happens to be a wine of transi-
tion, or, if you will, evolution.
You can laste the Medoc turning






into St. Emilion. For the Pomerol
vineyards are just outside Li-
bourne, On the right bank of the

Dordogne, and next to them come
the St. Emilion vineyards. “Who
car ” cry a myriad voices. “I
co,” comes the firm reply, and if
you do not think that I should
write about what interests me,
you may retire into your corners
tc compose a peevish protest, of
which I shal] take as much notice
as I would of a gnat.

Wilk she go back with It?
J READ that a woman has ar-
rived in Los Angeles after



pushing a

wheelbarrow
miles. The

only comment I
think of is that of the Englishman
who was being shown Niagara
Falls. “Think of all that vast vol-
ume of water roaring down,” said
his companion. “I don’t see what

2,500
can



there is to stop it,” replied the
{Englishman. I don’t see what

there was to stop the
the wheelbarrow.

The higher

woman with

Leapfrog

AY who care for the advance-
ment of whatever it is will be
glad to hear that Dr. Strabismus
(Whom God Preserve) of Utrecht
is undaunted by the ludicrous
failure of his past attempts to
reach the moon. Convinced that
the idea of doing the journey in
one burst is impracticable, the
sege is working on a leapfrog
theory, by which a first rocket,
having projected a second, would
overleap the second, which, in its
turn, would have projected a



_ Rupert and

Simon—dl]



4 The two friends are excited at
their quest. ‘‘ Let's start at once,”’

says Simon. ‘* Where is Deepwood
Manor that your Professor told you

about ?’’ ‘I've no idea!" answers
Rupert. Then he thinks. ‘It's
ore not near my village of

Nutwood so it must be in the other
direction. That means through
forest.”" And off they go between
the trees But there seems to be
no footpath and, } as they rea










that they are lost ere com
sound of break Bs and
meet an aged wex



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third, While

the second overleaps
the third,

the third projects a
fourth, the first overleaps ,
third, the third overleaps
fourth, and so on, up into space,
until the winner, as it were,
reaches the moon,
of this



the
the

The advantage











-OSSWORD











method is that each active AcTOss {
rocket carries a passive rocket,} y eb ge Ua Teg" ey aut he
and each passive rocket an activa 8 i on ed 1uce tu produce
one. All that is called for Bea nidina aiee cota
technical efficiency, and only one i a Sul “0
rocket, the one destined to com-. |2
plete the journey, need be | ‘ig
manned, 18
| 40
Marginal Note as
FWHE funniest thing said so far} 5 ea en re Ny become one? (5)
by any member of the
Musicians’ Organisation for Peace | 1 mstrat (0)-4
is that there are Communist mem-|} 2
bers, but “We are determined to} 4
\eep politics out of the busines 6
The suggestion appears to be that | .
Communists only join this sort of | 4
organisation out of a pure love of| ¥
music; music, like everything else, ig
having been invented by Stalin,
as 8
Tail-piece '
)

PWHHEN, as

the sun sank in a
great j

“ed ball of fire behinc

the* mountains, Gwynneth (to
continued).

Prodnose: But—

Myself: To your hole, rat!

St





|
|
|
be |
|
|



> tia cui
Hour, Fy
yes ‘



2





AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEERS: TODA)

A TRULY GREAT MOTICG

* TOMORROW at
TO-NIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT
PICTURE

5 PLM
at ¥.50

Willi_m Wyter's

“THE HEIRESS”

OLIVIA De
RALPH

Starring

with



|

HAV LAND 10
MLARDSON

MIRIAM HOPKINS -—

A Paramount Picture





NTGOMERY CLIFT



INA FREEMAN



SUCH QUALITIES
APPRECIATED

S. & §. RUM

Are

and

only attained in long

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(1938) LTD.

rs for Best Run.



EMPIRE



M-G-M’S LAUGH AND THRILL HIT!

tse ata A ARAN ONAN A! “RONAN A OS ANE INR DO

STEWART GRANGER, is sen

in this new romantic adventure!






Si SACS LIN

sational



starring

STEWART

GRANGER

WALTER

PIDGEON

DAVID

NIVEN

NEWTON

Cia, St Pe

PHAR 029 eB. RH

with CYRIL CUSACK: c RETA GYNT + FRANK ALLENBY

Screen Ploy by MARGUERITE ROBERTS
Suggested by THE |

Directed by TAY GARNETT «

‘A METRO-GOL

SS

CALLING
ALL





FISHERMEN!

(
re for Fish | Pots

We can supply your R
Rylands Mesh Wi
Lacing Wire

TOM REED and MALCOLM STUART BO.L*

DYARD KIPLING STORIES

“roduced by PANDRO S$. BERMAN

JYN-MAYER PICTURE





'

quirenemts

Hounsells Fishing Lines 6 — 36 lbs. \
Fish Hooks

Stainless Steel Wire

Cotton and Seine Twines

e
THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

Hardware Department

Tel. No. 2039

OPERATION

PLAZA

2.30-4.45 & 8.30 p.m.







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TODAY









and CON TINUING DAILY at 4.45 and 8.30 pm









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as eh Duke Gifford
who could shoot a torpedo
~ through a needile—or sew
up a date with a laugh!



TH

WARD Bor be
PHILIP CAREY sansa

Steiner
Written and 1 Directed + by

NEAL GEORGE WAGGNER

| COMING FOR ONE WEEK
CARIBBEAN PREMIERE £

Bette DAVIS IN
PAYMENT ON DEMAND

ALSO STARRING

PATRICIA









FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1951



NEWS FROM BRITAIN

Hy DOUGLAS COBBAN

LONDON, July 6.
(Dominion Day).
Today, we

MONDAY, we saluted Canada
Wednesday, we saluted America (4th of July).

salute Holland.

Why Holland ? Listen to what happened there yester-
day. In Amsterdam nylons crashed in price from £1 to
8s. a pair, and every third pair was free, Men’s suits were
selling at £10 instead of £20, with three shirts, three ties

and a raincoat thrown in.

In Rotterdam, one could buy-—-

land; newly-weds found furnisn-
ing firms paying for their honey-

a free balloon with every packet
of sweets sold.

Holland gone crazy?
tourists, finding their

fores, NIEUWENENDIJK, the in
Oxford _ street
teemed like an

shopkeepers of Holland had got
tired of looking at

resulting from a

change of policy. in

The Housewife



to that wages had risen in

yesterday—a suite of furniture, ®#@Va&nce of the cost of living. “Try
with one’s return rail fare paid-— *® Set that over the public,” he
whereever you eame from in Hol- charged, “It is almost impossible,”
A Socialist
That member was a Socialist—
moon. Children’s icecream cones Joseph Slater, Durham M.P. To-
were half-priced—and there was Ties, naturally perhaps, piled on
the agony for the Government
with such dagger thrusts as that
In Enschede, one store was giving by Edinburgh’s ex-Lord Provost,
EVERYTHING FREE for one hour, Sir William Darling. Rounding on
British the Socialists, he declared “Your
florins Government six years ago took
turned to dollars, joined in the control of our lives and destinies,
mad rush for bargains, and didn’t from the Bank of England to the
stop to study the whys and where- babies’ bootees. ‘Dear Brutus’ is
And Sir William
of Amsterdam, accompanied the quotation by stab-
anthill in the bing a wicked finger at the Treas-
glorious hunt. Al] because the ury bench,
No body in the House was terri-
crammed fically impressed when the Parlia-
shelves and empty shops—sequel mentary Secretary to the Board of
to public boycott of high prices Trade, Hervey Rhodes, said that
government in a wide check on clothing prices
provincial cities last week, it ae . = ;
had been found ‘prices were ‘far the Administrative Council of the

below the permitted maximum, Empire Cotton Growing Corpora-

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“1 only said Come, fill the

Cup and mm the fire of Spring,

The Winter Garment oj

Repentance fling ’—but let it
pass.



W.1. Produced 5,635
Bales Of Cotton

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, July 11.
Empire countries last year pro-
duced 856,991 bales of cotton. Of
this amount 5,635 bales were pro-
duced in the West Indies by the
Sea Island Cotton Association.
These figures were revealed by

None can _be more enviovs ef The only hope he held out for the tion at the Annual General Meet-
this fantastic Dutch price-war suffering Britons was that if the ing held in Manchester yesterday.

revelry than Britain’s harassed prices of raw materials were to
housewife, barely keeping abreast fall, he would call a meeting of at not being able
cf the racing cost of living tide the clothing trade to discuss price
in hey own country. Mr. Michael reductions.

Foot may believe—as he wrote

In a letter expressing his regret
attend, Sir
Hartley Shawcross, President of
the Board of Trade, stressed the
great contribution made to the

this week--that prices are under benefit from a visit to Amster- welfare of the Commonwealth by

better control here than in al- dam's Nieuwenendijk for a check
most any other land. But, #8 on what happens when ieee.
Michael Fou: himself agrees, the wife's patience is exhausted.

Storm (Clouds
Newspaper Callup Polls reveal
have lost some
points in public favour during the
It may be due to the
fact that the stock of the new For-
fixing re Waeten nea - have curv-
; 1 w -
prices for plaster boards may not euler Mesan auteh tee, Bat he
Tories do not lack for power in
their fight for a general election
before Atlee wants it.
clouds still gather for the Socialist
There are those who
Tuesday with its warning that the hed ty Tag gl nore ae.
And public criti-
cism of the Government attitude
to atomic eer ae :
emer : Ma country is likely to develop as a
cerned, too, by the cost of living result of a debate on the subject
in the House of Lords last night,

Left in U.S.A.

It was accepted in wartime that
iy , : reduction of
ecutive were unanimous in pre- Should be left to the United States,
1948 the Minister of Defence
made it known that “all types of
medern weapons, including atomic
weapons,” were being developed in
As recently as February
of this year, when Mr, Winston
Churchill challenged the Govern-

i i ment about atomic progress
it for rather different reasons Britain, the Prime Minister, “Mr.

Attlee,

British housewife finds that diffi-
cult to swallow.
Prime Minister Atlee, and his

Cabinet colleagues, must be aS that the Tories

anxious about this home head-
ache as anything confronting them
on the Korean or Persian fronts,
The Government's defeat last
night on a question of

have been significant. It was a
snap division when more than 160
Socialists were missing frorn the
House. But the Government will
see the utmost significance in the
Socialist revolt in the House on

whole utility clothes scheme in this
country igs endangered by soaring
price levels.

The Government will be con-

debate at the conference yester-
day of the Nationa! Union of
Mineworkers. Communists and
others in the Union seem to be at
loggerheads as te how far the ex-

senting a new wage claim. But
it is clear that the miners now
want a minimum of £7. 10s. a
week—a claim based on the in-
crease in the cost of living.

This same miners’ conference ac-
cepted a resolution urging price
controls. The executive accepted

In

from those advanced by the com-
maunist element, who blamed ris-
ing prices on the rearmament

programme, the blame for which 9Pment.”
they laid at the door of Govern- Hillsborough,

ment. Voicing the majority op-
position to this attack on the
Government, Loyal delegates like
Wolsh Glyn Williams retorted;
“If rearmament is responsible for
the increased cost of living, then
that must apply in the sa‘ne way
in Russia. It has the biggest mil-
itary force in the world.”
Impossible !

ward surge of prices, affecting
practically every aspect of the citi-
zen's life at Ti moment, the public
Socialist, Tory or Liberal, is likely

to be satisfied only with action of
that will restore something of the time the Department of Atomic
pay packet's value, The inereas- Energy was divorced from civil
ing soreness of the public was service administration. It is now
pretty well summed up in the an
Commons debate on the Wednes- Supply.

day night when a Member dc-

clared the Government reply was the



IMPORTANT
NOTICE

We will

past month,

Government.

sian situation.

Britain,

emphatically
“There has been successful devel-
Viscount Alexander of
Chancellor of the
Duchy of Lancaster, defending the
Government’s position in the Lords,
reiterated the Premier’s statement.

The ehief feature of the debate,
however, was that with the an-
nouncement [
Controller of Atomic i
resigning next month and that his
chief
ready left, Lord Alexander could

not deny—no more than he would
Whatever the Government may confirm — that Lord Portal was

answer to the problem of the up- qiccatisfied with Britain’s present
atomic set-up.
Lord Cherwell,

spokesman expressed
we in and out

leading Oppo-
sition
view of many

Parliament, t

offshoot of the Ministry of

the Corporation’s encouragement
of scientific and agricultural pro-
gress in many countries. The
cotton crop of these countries in
1950—1951, which is expected
to be a record, showed the
inestimable value of the Corpora-
tion’s work in the year of shortage
in which an increase of supplies
when other sources had failed had
proved vital to the nation’s eco-
nomy.



ELEPHANT MEAT
1S TASTY DISH

LONDON, July 11.
A woman reporter in Britain
faid that Rajah, the London Zoo
elephant, killed on Monday for
attacking its keeper made a tasty
dish. Anne Cooper of the London
Daily Express said that she ob-
tained an unrationed cut of Rajah
and had it both as roast and stew.
She said that the raw meat cooked
like a “prime cut of beef only

slightly coarser”. —UP.



says that whatever the military
successes or failures of the De-
partment, “it is industrially vital
that the work, experimental as
well as productive, for peaceful
uses should not lag behind the
work done elsewhere.”

There is shrouded from the

ublic at the moment what really
5c being achieved in Britain,

either in the direction of atomic
production for war or in the scale
oi our resources for peaceful
atomic development. We know—
and it is about all we know—
that Britain has yet to produce
an atomic bomb, And the Brit-
ish organisation, of course, sup-
plies radio-active isotopes both
for scientific and industrial pur-
poses in Britain and on a limited
scale to other countries.

There is a growing feeling
throughout the country that some
vital re-organisation of our atom-
ic effort is necessary. The view
persists that under a civil service
regime atomic scientists and tech-
nicians are unable to achieve all
that Britain is certainly capable
of achieving in this highly im-
portant field. There will be
strong support for the solution
offered in The Times — the

creation of a separate Directorate
outside the Ministry of Supply—
a directorate responsible to Par-
Summing up the viewpoint of liament, like other official scienfi-
The Times to-day fic bodies.

improving our

Downstairs Premises beginning
from Monday 16th July, but will
continue business on the Second

Floor as usual.

We solicit the co-operation of
our Customers and the General

Public.

CORNER
STORE

MANNING & CO, LTD.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

U.K. Raises Retail

Sugar



Price

Is It Prelude Ta De-Rationing?

LONDON.

THE MINISTRY of Food has increased the retail price

of sugar in Britain from 5d.
July 15.

to 6d. per Ib., with effect from

The controlled price of wholesale sugar was

raised ten days earlier from 40s. 3d. to 49s. 3d. per ewt.

Prices paid to West Indies and
other Empire producers, which
ave fixed by agreement, wil! not
be affected by these changes. The
Ministry announces that the in-
creases have been made neces-
sary “because af rising costs
which cannot be met within the
food subsidy ceiling already an-
nounced.”

But experts in the sugar
trade in London believe that
the Ministry’s price increase
may be a prelude to the com-
plete de-rationing of sugar, in
spite of repeated Government
claims that Britain’s sugar sup-
plies are only just sufficient to
maintain the ration at the
present level.

The Food Ministry sells sugar
on a two-price system—5d. per
Ib. to the housewife and 7d to
the manufacturer of jam _ or
sweets. The extra price paid by
the manufacturer just about cov-
ers the cost of the subsidy on
thhousehold sugar.

A single-price - system, midway
between the two existing price
levels, is an obvious pre-requisite
to de-rationing; if unrationed
sugar remained at the 5d per Ib.
subsidised price, manufacturers
would turn to heusehold stocks
for their supplies and would
cease to buy any of the 7d per
ib. sugar at all.





Experts

The London experts believe
that the main reason why Mr.
Maurice Webb, the Food Minis-
ter, has not taken sugar off the
ration is that he has been re-
luctant to make any price change
which would show in the cost-
of-living index.

But housewives, whose major
food grievances since the war
have been on the subjects of meat
and sugar, have repeatedly rid
that they would rather pay a lit-
tle more for sugar and have all
they wanted, instead of getting
an insufficient allocation of sub-
sidised sugar. With prices of al-
most everything in Britain rising
steeply, the extra penny now to
be charged for sugar will hardly
be noticed.

The necessary price conditions
now exist in Britain to take sugar
off the ration altegether and ex-
perts in the City ure confident
‘that the price increase is only a
preliminary step to the announce-
ment of de-rationing

Man who has fought hardest in
the last few months for the aboli-
tion of sugar rationing is Lord
Lyle of Westbourne, president of
Messrs Tate & Lyle, Ltd., the
sugar refiners. He has returned
‘to the attack time and time again
in speeches, newspaper articies
and letters to the Press, produc-
ing figures to show that Britain's
UAE PURER ARS, TOW ample. to

Officials

Mr. Webb and officials of his
Ministry have produced other
figures and have stoutly main-
tained that there is still a gap to
be bridged between Britain’s ac-
tual sugar supplies and the po-
tential demand if and when it
comes off the ration. Concur-
rently with the announcement of
the price increase, Mr, Webb
stated in the House of Commons
that non-dollar supplies of sugar
are “still only sufficient to main-
tain the ordinary ration.”

Britain’s sugar supply position
was debated fully in the House
of Commons early in June, when
Mr. F. T. Willey, Parliamentary
Secretary to the Ministry = of
Food, declared that Britain needs
an assured sugar supply of
2,550,000 tons a year, as well as
a substantial stock on hand, be-
fore sugar can come off the ra-
tion.

This year, he said, Britain ex-
pects to receive only 2,226,000




ip

it QUININE

12,000

â„¢~





YS >
4) i TA rag
LD he =



tons of sugar, but to maintain
the ration at its present level will
take 2,174,000 tons of raw sugar.
Other Members of the House,
however, produced different sets
of figures and claimed that there
would be a substantial sugar sur-
plus in Britain this year, suffi-
cient to abolish rationing.
B.U,P.

B.G. Grants Mining
Coneessions

From Our Own Correspondent

GEORGETOWN, BG. July 11.

The Government has granted
the U.S. financed “Willems In-
dustries Incorporated” a five year
mining concession to explore 2,000
acres of Morabisci area in the
Mazaruni mining district for col-
umbite tantallite.

Willems have also been granted
temporary permission to occupy
and explore a further 10,000 acres
of the same district. A local
company headed by Eugene Cor-
relia and Maurice — Nascimento
also granted a temporary one year
permission to oecupy and explore
4,200 acres of the same district
also for columbite tantallite. The
Correia—Nascimento Exploration
party left Georgetown city today.

West Indies At Westminster

West Indies Regiment
LONDON.

In the House of Commons on
July 3, Mr. Bernard Braine (Con-
servative, Billericay) asked the
Secretary of State for War wheth-
er any stops have now been taken
‘Oo re-foin the West Indies Regi-
ment.

Mr. Woodrow Wyatt, Under-
secretary to the War Office replied.
“My right hon, Friend is in con-
sultation with my right hon. Friend
the Secretary of State for the
Colonies on this subject.”

Mr. Braine: “Will the hon, Gen-
tleman bear in mind that informed
opinion in the British West Indics
is in favour of re-forming th:
volunteer regiment whieh pe: -
formed great service in World
War 1? Will he also bear in mind
that its re-formation would duo
much to encourage regional con
sciousness and pride in the British
West Indies and form a valuable
addition to the strength of the
British Commonwealth?”

Mr. Wyatt: “I fully appreciate
what the hon, Member has said. I
am sure he also understands that
many interests have to be consid
ered in this matter, I can assure
bim that good progress is being
made.”

Only Just Enough Sugar

In the House of Commons on
July 4, Col Stoddart-Scott (Con-
servative, Ripon) asked the Minis-
ter of Food if, owing to the in-
creasing preduction of sugar in
the non-dollar area he is yet in a
position to make a statement with
regard to the termination of the
rationing of sweets,

The Food Minister, Mr. Maurice
Webb, replied: “Although suga:
production has increased in non-
dollar areas, non-dollar supplies
are still only sufficient to maintain ,
the ordinary ration, recently in-;
creased to 10 oz. the existing)
monthly bonuses and the present
allocation rates to manufacturers
In these circumstances I do noi,
think that I should be justified in}
inereasing ugar allocations to
sweet manufacturers sufficiently to

Sugar Cane Research in
Mauritius
in the House of Commons on
July 4, Mr. Thomas Reid (Labour

enable sweets to be perch.

Swindon) asked the Secretary of}

State for the Colonies what re-
sults have been achieved by the
State Research Station, Mauritius,
in respect of improvement ot
sugar cane;

Mr. John Dugdale, Minister of
Stiute for Colonia) Affairs, replied:
“IT would refer my hon, Friend to
the article entitled ‘Sugar Cane
Research in Mauritius’ which was
published in ‘Nature’ of 8rd Feb-
ruary, 1951, The most important
achievement of the Sugar Cane
Research Station has been breed-
ing and distributing an improved
variety of cane, M.184/32, which
is now grown over 90 per cent,
of the total eane area and thas
been largely responsible for the
record crops of recen, years. Good
work has also- been done on such
matters as the survey of the soil
of the cane belt, the investigation
of the nutritional status of vane



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and of the role of fertilisers and
pest and weed control.”
Sickness in Jamaica

In the House of Commons on
‘uly 4, Mr. Reginald Sorensen
Labour, Leyton) asked the Sec-
etary of State for the Colonies if
e is aware that an epidemic dis-
-ase described as vomiting sickness
‘ve to malnutrition has broken
vut in Jamaica and what steps are
ocing taken to déal with this and
ts cause,

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ickyess reported at present. Ja-
maica’s currency budget includes
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EXHIBIT OF RAZORS
COVERS 3,000 YEARS
LONDON, June.

Millionaire James Rand ean
take you back 8,000 years — w
vazors,

In a London strongroom, Rand
has a collection of razors dating
way back and remarks that you'd
be surprised at the mumber of
lifferent ways in which men have
ried to shave themselves.
Methods range from broken glass,
shark's teeth and singeing with
ved-hot plates to the practice of}
plucking followed by early Chin-
ese. —(C.P,)



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Facts about British West Indies
Trade Liberalization Plan

The number of Canadian dollars in Britain has
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new BOW.L. Trade Liberalization Plan, Under this,
Canadian suppliers with a history of export to the
tritieh West Indies during 1946-7-8, are now
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many items whieh you've not been able to offer

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Sch. Franklyn D. R., Sct 1
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M. Davidson, Sch. Gardenia W Sch
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SS. Sunayis, 4296 tons e,” «

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8.8, Willemstad, 2,855 ¢ Capt
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S.S. Alcoa Roamer, 4,625
Capt. Harum, from Mobile
SS. Canadian Constructor, 3,936 +
net, Capt. Wallace, from British Guiana
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Schoon¢r Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 tons
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Schooner BPyerdene, 68 tons net, Cant
Phillips. for British Guiana
§.S. Polycrest, 720 tons net. Capt. Pau!
from Trinidad



Rates of Exchange

JULY 12, 1951

a
iis nimctmtnoiniine cee taclgetnsigenrmereetonntiemed





PAGE THREE

Acid
Stomach?



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PAGE FOUR



ADVOGAT

=e eee maw

BARBADOS

toe



Printed by the Advocate Co. 114, Jroad Bt. Bridgetow.



Friday, July 13, 1951





THIRD PARTY

FOR some years public concern has
grown over thg absence of any adequate
insurance of motor vehicles in this island.
The condition has since been aggravated
by the continued increase of vehicles on
the roads.

Eighteen years ago the late Mr. L. T.
Yearwood introduced the matter in the
House of Assembly and asked the Govern-
ment to send down the necessary legislation
for Compulsory third Party Insurance, At
this period there had been a series of fatal
accidents and many others causing injury
to pedestrians and damage to vehicles.
These were settled in the Courts oecasional-
ly with serious loss and inconvenience to
people who had been injured. In the case
of many fatal accidents any reward to the
dependent family depended on the feeling
and charity of the owner of the vehicle.
Enlightened opinion felt that there should
be general provision for the dependents of
fatally injured people and recovery for
damage and injury to others. This could

be achieved by Compulsery third Party
Insurance.
The suggestion was rejected by the

House on the ground that there was not
sufficient justification, either by way of
the number of atcidents or the number of
vehicles on the roads, to warrant com-
pulsion, Many owners nevertheless took
the precaution to insure their vehicles
comprehensively or merely for Third Party
risks. In the years between there have
been some accidents, to which publication
has been given, in which bread-winners
have been killed outright without any pro-
vision for the dependents, And these
were unable to have recourse to the law.

It cannot be denied today that there is
need for Compulsory Third Party Insur-
ance. Figures compiled by the Police show
that there were 521 accidents in 5 months
with 115 occurring in the month of April.

And the number of vehicles are ever in-
Orvwemingg.: Reduwy Anere ere 2,825 vehicles

registered in St. Michael out of a total of
approximately 6,000 in the island. The
yovernment recognised the necessity for
Workmen’s Compensation after it was in-
troduced into the House of Assembly by
Mr. W. W. Reece and when the Bill was lost
at the end of the session sent down a new
bill which has now become law. If it can
be accepted that people working in shops,
stores, factories and on the water-front are
entitled to protection, it is clear that those
who must use the roads, in pursuit of their
daily occupation, also deserve protection.
It sometimes happens that innocent people
are injured or killed as a result of the care-
lessness or recklessness of drivers of motor
vehicles. The pedestrian or occupant of
the vehicle who took no part in causing the
accident might suffer permanent injury
and be without redress because owner or
driver was a man of straw.

It is unfair to have an abnormal number
of vehicles on the narrow roads of this
island with the possibility of an increasing
number of accidents without instituting the
necessary safeguards for public protection.
Only the Vovprnmant can do this.



OUR READERS SAY

only
make him a
of keeping her in a certain stand-
ard of material comfort.

Family Planning can

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—Despite the beautifully



BARB



ADOS ADVOCATE



But Can A Man

How can a man simply disap-
pear? how can he vanish into thin
air—or thick air for that matter
without leaving a trace?

“Elementary, my dear Watson,”
said Sherlock Wicksteed, filling
his pipe with shag. “Your ques-
tions are prompted, I take it, by

the case of the missing diplo-
mats?”

Well, how can you disappea:
without trace? Lots of people

would like to know, and I could
even name a few whom I'd be
willing to assist in their disappear-
ance if they’d promise not to
come back.

Disappearing is a relative term.
In January this year there were
19,588 deserters from the Armed
Forces. As far as the Services are
concerned they have vanished,
all 19,000 and odd of them.

I've vanished myself. I’ve done
it several times. If he’s still alive,
there’s a farmer in Queensland
to whom the disappearance of a
young cowhand called Wicksteea
is an unsolved mystery.

The farmer drank, and when he
was drunk he liked to let ail the
pigs loose and drive them into
the house. One morning at break-
fast when the place was full of
pigs I just walked out.

I said I was going to get some
eggs to go with all the bacon, and
I never went back.

Murderer?

In the records of the New York
police I may well be described as
a missing person.

They had me in for questioning
once because I looked like qa man
Who had murdered a _ taxidriver.

After letting me go they told
me to report back every day. But
I didn’t.

The old White Star
Homeric sailed at midnight

liner
and

; 1 sailed with her because I reck-

oned I'd had New York,
Did I do the murder?
Wouldn’t you like to know ?

Aha!



One of the neatest vanishing
acts of all time was performed in
1920 by Mr. Victor Grayson, form-
er Soc ialist M.P. for Colne Valley.

To the question which has
now get everybody arguing
BERNARD WICKSTEED adds

fuel . for argument

REESE
efter 5 ears...

GRAYSON
missing M.P.

He booked in at a Strand hotel,
ordered a whisky and soda at the
bar, drank half of it and then
vanished, just like that.

The barman didn’t actually see
him fade away. But one moment
he was drinking his whisky and
the next moment he wasn’t

He disappeared by simply going
down the Strand, possibly for a
banana. Nobody in the Strand
noticed him because they didn’c
know he was Victor Grayson or
that he had just disappeared.

The initial act of disappearing
is dead easy. You just dissolve
into the scenery as Victor Grayson
cid in the Strand and I did in the
Queensland bush.

Snap! It Goes

People sometimes disappear
without wanting to. They’d give
anything not to have disappeared.
You've read about them, They are
people with amnesia.

Something goes snap in their
minds and “they can't remember
who they are. It happened to a
girl in Nantwich, Cheshire, 12
days ago.

She was identified last night by
her mother, who saw her photo-
graph in the paper and phoned
the police to say the girl was her
daughter, Colleen Boosey, of
Palmers Green, N.

But sometimes no one does
recognise the photograph, and the
victims of amnesia may stay
vanished for years, even for ever





Just Vanish?

/
people can vanish without
we Fw to, how much easier, my
dear Watson, it is for people who

do want to.

1S masy

Supposing those two diplomats
were men who for some reason
did want to disappear. The first
part is easy because when the
actual act of vanishing took place
nobody knew what was going on
so nobody took any notice.

By the time people had begur
to look for them, they could have
completed their arrangements foi
hiding, if that was their plan.

But what about the police? The
police of half Europe are lookin;
for them. Their pictures and ful
descriptions have been studied by
tens of thousands of people.

True enough, but then so hav
the pictures of Freeman Reese
Who’s he? You've forgotter
already? That’s one of the reason
vanishing isn’t so hard... .

Wanted...

Freeman Reese was a colouré
G.I. deserter who is believed t
be the 1946 killer of Police Con-
stable James Booth at Burton-on-
Trent.

When a man has committed an;
murder he is_ hunted _ prett
remorselessly. When the victim i
a policeman you can be sure tha
nothing is left to chance. Ye



Freeman Reese is still missing
five years after the murder,
Posters with his photograp!

and the words “Wanted foi
Murder” were pasted up all ove
England. His fingerprint classifi
eation, which is
S M5 U 011 11
Bil Gite

has been radioed to the police of
33 nations.

No one can say that 6ft. Negroe:
with American accents are §
common in England that the,
pass unnoticed. But they are to
common to go running to th
police every time you see one.

And so are people who look lik
missing diplomats.

UE. Ss

Sterling —And Its.
Convertibility

LONDON, July 2.
In a few days’ time the Chan-
cellor of the Exchequer is due to
make his quarterly statement on
the gold and dollar reserves, This
will probably show that although
the reserves continued to grow in
the second quarter of this year, the
rate of increase has been slowed
down by recent recessions in
world commodity prices due to
the slackening of American
demand
is fact

‘bearing on

nas an
the current contro-
versy about sterling converti-
bility. There is a growing feei-
ing, particularly among Conserv-
ative M.P’s, that continued in-
convertibility has dangerous im-
plications for Commonwealth
trade. The recent visit of a West
Indian delegation to this country
to negotiate a larger allocation of
dollars to prevent a breakdown
in their trade with Canada has
underlined this problem

Although licences fer the impore
of dollar goods have been granted
more freely in the past fow
months, actual convertibility of
sterling into dollars—Canadian or
United States—seems to remain
as far away as ever

Apart from the recent slowing
cown in the rate of increase of
our gold and dollar reserves,
there are other signs suggesting
that sterling may lose a lot of its
strength in the months to come
Present moves in Persia do not
preclude the possibility that the
British oil company may be
forced to leave. This would in-
volve not only a loss of valuable
earnings from sterling oil but also
a weakening of our dollar position
if Persian oil has to be replaced
from American sources,

The second indication that
sterling may become a_ weaker
currency is provided by the
present trend of our overseas
trade. The terms of trade have



acquire a woman to
family on condition

Many of

Importapr,

(By CHAPMAN PINCHER)

By RONALD BOXALL

turned against us even more
drastically than was first expected,
and this together with the fact
that our import requirements have
greatly increased as a result of
the vearmament, resulted in an
adverse balance of trade for the
first five months of this year equal
to the trade “gap” for the whole



of last year There are now
svewing doulbtse that thie “gap?
can be filled by our earnings from

invisible trade, especially since a
large proportion of these earnings
come from overseas oil companies,
including Anglo-Iranian.

Put the greatest single threat
to our dollar position undoubt-
edly lies in the recent recession in
commodity prices from their post-
Korean peaks. This had in fact
been expected for some time,
since it was obvious that American
cemand could not continue in-
definitely at its recent high level.
Mr. Malik’s peace overtures have
now injected a new note of cau-
tion in world commodity markets.
If political tension is further
ased by a cease-fire in Korea
prices may fall almost as spec-
tacularly as they rose in the
immediate post-Korean months.
True, this might have a welcome
effect on our terms, of trade, but
it has obvious implications for
cur dollar-earning prospects.

Nor should
our dollar





it be assumed th

position is as sound
as the figures suggest. Despit
their recent encouraging grow!!
the real purchasing value of our
gold and dollar reserves, in terms
of 1939 prices, is only about one-
quarter of their pre-war value.
Moreover, at the end of this year
service on our post-war trans-
Atlantic doliar debts is due to
commence, and this will mean a
further deterioration in our re-
serves.

THAT SUDDEN HEART ATTACK Is

All this must inevitably result
yn a slowing down of progress
towards the relaxation of ex
change controls. It should not be
forgotten that the Treasur)
learned a bitter lesson from th«
disastrous experiment in converti
bility that followed the 194:
Ameriean loan, This showed tha
two essential conditions must be
present before such an experimeni
is undertaken again. The first i:

that some form of agreement mus
be reached witn nolders of ster-

ling balances for the ‘freezing’
of those funds, and the secon
1s that our overseas payments mus
be at least balanced,

It was largely because ther
was no agreement on the “freez
ing” of sterling balances that th:
first attempt at convertibility ha:
such dire consequences, But ever
assuming such an agreement coul:
be reached before convertibilit
were again attempted, the prob
lem of our balance of payment
would remain, If these payment
were not balanced, foreign holder:
of sterling would immediately cash
it in for dollars, and our reserve
would thus because a fund ou
cf which they could finance thei)
dollar requirements.

This would probably result ii
y rapid run-down of our gold anc
dollar reserves and we woulc
find ourselves back in the position
before Marshall Aid and devalua-
tion,

That is not to say, however
that convertibility, will neve
come, The British Governmen

still considers this their ultimat
aim; indeed, they are bound unde
the terms of the Bretton Wood:
and other financial agreements t
work towards this end. But unti
the political and economic horizon
become much clearer ‘than it is a
present, convertibility is still ai
unlikely prospect for the near
future

NOT SO SUDDEN...



builds up like pust inside

an iron

worded and terse dissertation on our men-folk dodge this condition A DOCTOR is flying to London pipe.
“Family Planning” in your “Our and many of our women-folk next month to ex n how he The gummy substance, which
Readers Say” of the 8th _ inst, dodge decent young men who are believes the word “sudden” can * is calledgcholesterol, narrows the
there are, I think a few practical willing to plight. their troth be taken out of the wor'd’s worst bore and evefitually causes a blood
points that the Theorist seemed to because the state of “wealth” of health hazard idden heart clot to form
have let slip. these young men does not afford attack.” Accurate
The writer expounded very well these young women the “necessi- Dr. Lester Morrison—leading a Dr. Morrison’s team has
the views of certain people on ties” of life, These men and ten-man research team—claims fo he . i ‘i j
Seer ig oe Ser iaet . : eee aie a fi , oa ere cund that by adding chemicals
Family Planning”, but it is women rather than make a family that a simple blood test can give 10 ‘@sdatsple obblobd:. th
indeed very difficult for us to life a suggestion of barter and early warning that en apparently measure ae o h of th ak can
have this type of planning until purchase, avoid it and love one jhealthy man is heading for heart fuer iain” a ae 3 © Camag-
we have a nation of families: We another in the way they love trouble. a a is circulating in the
can only have a nation of families mutton, as something to devour Until: now: there has been no t Te 3h “ lood-stream. z
when we can afford to maintain and destroy. At the moment Bar- reliable method of anticipating high a ip ount is abnormally
(in the true sense of the word) bados is being swept by a kind the most dangerous for™ of heart ugh—they conclude that the







































families; We can only afford to of immorality which, (if we do attack——what doctors call coronary patient is specially likely to suffer
maintain families when he have not find means of alleviating our thrombosis. f oo aeons of coronary thrombosis
a Family Allowance Scheme: We economic diMiculties) ill even- Doctors have had stand. bs i Morrison has tried out the blood
can only have a Family Allow- tually bring us the fate of Sodom helplessly while the death: rate est on scores of patients at the
ance Scheme when our industries and Gomorrah, This is because from this complaint has moré aa Angeles General — Hospital.
can finance it; We can only have many of the younger generation than doubled durin » last ten weiat pg subsequent medical his-
industriqgs capable of financing are claiming that they cannot years. vOKnee. goers proved that the test
such a Scheme when we plan afford a family. The men, in order Wie awtart aten 4 deviaes titer ely diagnosed — suscepti-
along regional lines and we can to satisfy their physical needs the reo test stan pe te have 1 eee heart trouble in three
only plan along regional lines without having to be induced inte — Gaveloped a promisinw diet treat. wee ene, eae rn
when we, in these parts, decide marriage and the women in order mart ee o a pre 4 attaties Hike stresses in his report pub-
to pool our resources and_ work to liquidate their financial obli- ana it ty hkon th nee : ers es ots a today that the test is still
for the good of a West Indian gations are not doing nice things. aii stible,. nm that a person is in ‘om on h_ stage one not vet
Community regardless of religion, Often and often marriage (in ° Brivty SR rg eh De ready for routine hospital use.
elass or creed, The writer is of Barbados) hardly differs from i nee aaa ee ee ee The treatment whioh Morrison
course unaware of the fact that prostitution except’ by being oe toa uacery blockage of the recommends for people likely to
with the exception of the few, harder to escape from. This is a ee blood . vessels called coron- develop heart trouble is simply a
economic causes make marriage state of affairs that will not exist ary arteries—which feed the heart diet low in cholesterol. |
(which is the only means of if we were to make a sincere itself. - : : Avoid—
achieving the recognised family- effort to get at the root of our : The blockage is caused by a He recommends’ that heart
life) in Barbados a matter of Population Problems and apply ood clot. But the formation of sufferers should avoid: Cream
bargain and contract. in . which remedies suitable to the sphere this clot is only the final stage of soups, liver, kidney, fat meat }
such ingredients as affection, cv- peculiar to us. * long blocking Be“ Plolse ‘ and fat fish. 7 : |
operation and the desire to limit The whole basis of these evils, Heart aRes lalists are sure the They should ration themselves
families are secondary, What kind inclusive of over-population, is Breese 23. PYOUGRE. On BY. ai an~ severely with rich cheese, butter
of family-planning can we have economic. It is no use being only herited dietary defe t is found margarine nd anything made |
if the man of the family does not philosophically theoretical. Let us an eee Who .cann ot cope prop- from egg yo . |
consider himself legally bound to view the thard facts as they are erly wit) a lot of fat in their food Salad dressings and vegetable
the woman who-is bringing his Let us therefore put the horse Like Rust oils are barred, ian
children into the world = and before the cart as Dr. Cato wants The result is th llions of Keep clear of these fatty foods,
devoting her life to rearing them it, and not the cart before the minute oil dr appear in thei Dr, Morrison tells his patients
to maturity? horse as the author of “Family blood = after t a 1 You will have more energy, feel

In Barbados, as in any part of Planing” desires it fatty mex se droplet e- fitt live longer. -

e world for that matter, a man EALIST t at —LES.

d {



and

| like them, and it is these who now see them

FRIDAY, JULY 15, 1951

i



With the present situation in Persial i)
occupying the attention of the whole world, |
the importance of oil is a topic affecting }
the remotest corners of the globe. In this
article, the reader catches a glimpse of the
way in which oil helps to keep the wheels
of civilisation turning.

Where’ The
Beluga Blows

LONDON

Just about now, a grand gathering of
Eskimos is assembling at one of the most
desolate stretches of Canada’s Arctic coast.
The name of the rendezvous is Whitefish. It
is here at a shallow bay opposite Richard’s
‘sland, that the Eskimos of the Mackenzie
River converge every July for their brief
summer ‘big game’ fishing season. Their
quarry is the formidable “Beluga” — the
eighteen-foot half-ton White Whale.

Between July and mid-September, these
whales come in their hundreds to feed at this
remote spot. For the Eskimos this means ar
invaluable opportunity of stocking a winter
larder which would otherwise be bare. At
this moment, countless watchers—men anc
women, young and old—cre lining the blufl
overlooking Whitefish Bay, their eyes strain-
ing for the first flash of silver betokening the
coming of their prey.

Once the alarm 1s shouted, the bay becomes
a scene of frenzied activity. Scores of small
out powerful motor schooners chug out to
battle stations’. Their decks are packed with
sarrels of gasoline fuel—obtained from a re-
inery on the Mackenzie River some 500 miles
away. Soon, the boom of harpoon-guns and
‘he crack of rifles echoes and re-echoes across
he water, mingling with the excited yells of
he hunters. The men tow each ‘kill’ to the
beach and then hand over the carcase to the
women, who do all the subsequent cutting-
ip and dressing. Especially prized as a
lelicacy is the ‘muk-tuk’, the fat which clings
o the whale’s skin and which is slashed into
liamond-shaped hunks and often eaten raw.
Chroughout the whole period, the chase goes
with unabated energy. The ‘midnight
sun’ is welcomed as a means of continuing
yperations almost ‘round the clock’: meals
and sleep are snatched as and when a lull in
che hunt permits. The women—working in
‘eams of four—race from catch to catch,
carving up an entire whale in less than half-
an-hour.

The coming of the oil-fuelled schooner has
nade a tremendous difference to the Mac-
‘xenzie Eskimos and taken a great deal of the
personal hazard out of their annual whale
hunt. The schooners bring not only the
aunters and their families but also their
log-teams, sleds, tents, food and other equip-
nent—all packed in sardine fashion into one
small communal cabin. It seems incredib!e
that these tiny craft—no larger than the
iverage river cabin cruiser—can transport
30 large a cargo. Yet mishaps are extremely
‘few. And although the hunt is a matter o!
‘heir very survival, and therefore something

CLOSED

FOR
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FURNISHING
FABRICS

A WONDERFUL RANGE AT THE
KEENEST PRICES!
*

to be undertaken in grim earnest, the Eskimo; Need we remind you that we are
make the most of its possibilities as a socia unexcelled for Furnishing Fabrics
occasion. The tented town that springs uy uo

along the shore hums perpetually with gossi, We ‘aré =~ showing a wonderful range
and laughter. Only toward the close o. by SANDERSON’S which includes

September, when the harsh, chill wind:
blowing from the polar ranges to the nortk
drive off the last of the whales to warme.
waters, do the tents vanish and the schooner:
disperse until another year......., 4

CRETONNES and TAPESTRIES

in LINEN and COTTON.

DACOSTIA & CO., LID.

DRY GOODS _ DEPT.

Colonial Students’
Probiems

LONDON, July 10.
Colonial relations are being harmed by the
policies which have caused Colonial student:
to protest vigorously against an order to leav:
their hostel at Hans Crescent, Knightsbridg:
in London’s West End, to make roon
for freshmen, says the London Times, in ;











oe







_s

SSEPSOES POS SP PEPPEPFSOOOS





OCTET

.
leading article commenting on the protests. %
“When it was rightly decided some year. 3

ago to provide large facilities for colonia
students to get their education and trainin;
in this country,” says the paper, “there wa:
far too little consideration of ways am
means; and the British Council, like the Colo.
nial Office welfare department before it, is
now feeling the effects of this improvidence

“At the bottom of the treuble is the attitud:
of some of the students to segregation. Whei
the British Council took over its new respon:
sibilities, it was widely taken for granted tha’
segregation was a bad thing for students whc
had come to England as much to learn Eng-
lish ways of life as to pursue academic
studies,

“So the numbers of students accommo-
dated in hostels were cut down, with the in-
tention of putting more of them into families
lodgings. Among the students them
selves, however, there is a strong core wh
prefer to be segregated in hostels, with other:

WITH TH E PROTEINS

YOU NEE!
HAM & FISH

Cold Storage HAMS
BRISKET OF BEEF
LUNCHEON BEEF
CALVES KIDNEYS
OX BRAIN

PORK SAUSAGES
Smoked HADDOCK
SOLE

“OD FILLETS
Large RED FISH

Orde

scU ITs

CARR’S CRACKERS
and

5 & KR BREAD

SANDWICH BREAD

To-day

ur. -

VSG SSSSORNIGGEGOSOS



4,65,



RUM & SODA

GOLD BRAID RUM
CLUB SODA
CANADA DRY



MIXED FRUIT

LLCLLPPPL ES PPPS







selves threatened again. for Cakes i etisias ee oer:
“Almost certainly, the advantages of dis- ; ae x
persing these coloured students among the nren Cuvee or %
. * . , 2
| population have been accepted too uncriti- GUEST SIZE TOIL 3
,cally and the difficulties have been treated 3
too lightly. Perhaps, for the African, the jump); % CODDARDS o g
s
(from his home life straight to an English) § PHONE WE DELIVER >
home is tox aN %
1ome is too big.—U.P. ¥3665690050000090006006 COCCSCBEGGCSSOGSE eeosesees



FRIDAY,

JULY 13, 1951

Rose Hill, St. Peter, was
Grand Sessions yesterday
33-year-old labourer who
June 3.

Cumberbatch stood eal

showing no trace of émotion as he listened to His Honour
the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Collymcre, pass the death

sentence.

Police Band To Give
Monthly Concert
At Club Willow

The Police Band will be leaving
their old quarters at Central Sta-



tion fer Club Willow, Passage
Roag on Wednesday Juty 38,
Colonel R. T. Michelin, Commis-

sioner of Police, told the Advocate
yesterday.

The new quarters at Club VWiil-
low is more spacious ard the
renovating of it has beer com-
pleted. 3

While in their new barracks,
the Police Band will give’ a
classical concert every last
Sunday night in the month to

which the public will be invited
to attend.

tc
It has not yet been decided
whether the Fire Brigade section
will share the Club Willow bar-
racks with the Police Band.
The programme of music played
by the Police Band under. Capt
Raison tonight Has 5s. Rocks
beginning at 8 o’clock is:













Quick March “Middy
Overture The Bohemia
Operatic ll Travatore”
Viennesse Waltz
Garland
Comic Opera Tol
By_ request
Tone Poem Finta Sibelius
Medley Old Irish Al
Selected
Film Music The New Moor
Romberg
Popular Song My Heart Cr
For You arr. Murreli
GOD SAVE THE KING





Bank Notes

Replaced By
Blank Notes

The Police Commissioner said
yesterday that the cash deficit
missing from the Public Treasury
s $14,000. Three sealed packages,
which should have contained five
dollar notes up to a value of $5,000
a package, contained notes of two
dollar denominations,



Another package which
should, have contained 1,500
dollar notes was found to be
made up of blank sheets of
paper neatly cut to bank note
size packed and sealed. The
Police are carrying out fur-
ther investigations.



Dogs Will Be Used
To Trace Criminals




The Police Alsatian dogs now
undergoing training at the Dis-
trict .” Police Station are get-
ting on well. The dogs—when
training is completed will be
used to trace culprits and will

be led to the scene of the crime
to assist detectives in their in-
vestigations.

One dog was used late’y in a
burglary case in the Hastings
area and was able to show the
Police where the thief had made

his escape.
Both dogs were brought
from the United K\Nigdom.

here



‘Constructor’ Loads
5,800 Tons of Sugar

The motor vessel
Censtructor (3,935 tons
chored at Speightstown yeste
to load 5,800 tons of sugar for .
John and Montreal. Loading t
gins today.

Canadian
net)










Plantations Ltd, and
Messrs. R. & G. Challenor & Co.,
Ltd., are shipping the sugar from
the two jetties at Speightstown
and one at Six Men’s.

The Canadian Constructor ar-
rived at during the
morning. From Speightstown she
will be returning to Bridgetoyya
to load molasses and rum for
Ca la,

The

barrels

Bridgetown



Constructor landed. +
of pickled.pork, 10 crates
matches





of oranges, rts and
among othe go which v,1s
loaded at British Guiana apd



Trinidad



More Lumber
Due Shortly

Two million feet of lumber are

expected to arrive at Barbados
from Canada within five days from
-day
Of this amount, 300,000 fect

re expected to arrive to-day by
the Seguenay Terminals’ ship Sun-
whit from Canada,, Lighter loads
of the new shipment will be dis-
charged around the Inner Basin of
the Careenage’ before the Poly-
crest’s 70,857 pieces of rough pine
from Kristiansand Norway, is en-
tirely removed. A large portion
of the Polycrest’s shipment was
still on the waterfront yesterday.



Schooner captains found it difi-
}

for their vessels













cult to get berth:
i ner basin with the lumber
t up mo of the landing
Harbour and _ Shipping
or itie ent hours on the
f yesterday try ig to solve
the problem of getting berths for
recent arrivals.
With \ lion feet of
mbher on to ’ d, the
difficulty of g berth the
i front t 5
I asin Wil ¢ oO €

rt



lived



a 32-vear-old butcher of
found guilty at the Court of
of murdering Cecil Jackman,
in the same district. on

mly in his dark suit, his face

“After an argument for two
shillings which Cumberbatch owed
Jackman,” Jackman’s: sister had
told the Jury, “Cumberbatch ran
home to return with his shirt tail
flying and a 14-inch-long knife in
his hand. He leaped in with an
animal sound and sent home the
knife in Jackman’s chest.” The
doctor said the fatal wound was
eight inches and had pierced the
lungs

The prosecution called 12 wit-
nesses on- Wednesday to prove their
ease. One was Cumberbatch’s
brother and one Jackman’s sister.
Yesterday Mr. G. B. Niles, coun
for Cumberbatch and Mr, W. W.
Reece. Solicitor General for the
prosecution addressed the jury
After the Chief Justice summed
up, the jury retired for'65 minutes
deliberating their verdict.

Argument

The case for the prosecution was
thet there was an argument be-
tween Cumberbatch and Jackman
tor two shillings which Cumber-
batch owed Jackman, During the
argument, Jackman cuffed Cum-
Derbatech who left and went home,

He returned shortly afterwards
and Jackman went for a stick and
struck him with it a few times.
Cumberbatch then stabbed him,
twice in his left arm which Dr,
Kirton said, suggested that Jack-
man was trying to defend him-
self. and once in the chest,

Evidence showed that the argu-
tuent started when Jackman was
indignant at the idea of Cumber-
batch going to the expense of go-
ing to a wedding and not paying
him 7

Jackman’s



r sister had said that
wnen Cumberbatch left on the
first occasion, he shouted back

that what he had for Jackman was
nome. When he returned and she
tried to pacify him he told her she
would see some sport.

The day after the murder was
committed, Cumberbatch surren-
dered himself to the police at
District “E” Station and swore
that it was he who had done the
stabbing.

_Mr. Niles for Cumberbatch based
Nts arguments to the jury on there
being provocation. He was asking
tne jury to return a verdict of
manslaughter and not murder,

Provocation

“I am submitting that there
was considerable provocation iw
tnis case,” he said. “And suilicient
provocation must necessarily re-
duce murder to manslaughter.”

Whetiier Jackman — struck
Cumberbatch once, twice, or
three times, he had given birth
to provocation,

Mr. Niles waived the first
attack by Jackman and told
the jury that there was a ter-
rific onslaught on Cumber-
batch with a stick by Jack-
man which caused Cumber-
batch to luse his balance and
coolness.

Mr, Niles cited a case to
show that if after reconcilia-
tion the one renewed the at-
cack and the other had a dead-
ly weapon on him and used it,
mere would have been evi-
dence which might reduce the
crime to manslaughter.

“One blow is regarded by
the law as being grave pro-
vocation,” he said. “The ques-
tion is,” he argued, “had he
time vo get possession of his
reison.” He did not, he said.
The attack was too swift.

They should attach little to
the evidence of Jackman’s sis-
ter, Mr. Niles told the jury.
She had given the suggestion
that Cumberbatch went home
for a knife, that he gave a
threat 2s he went and returned
running with the knife in his
hand. She, he said, could not
have been speaking the truth.
No other witness has. seen most

of the things she has seen or heard
the things she has heard,” he said.

She was the type of witness who
was guided by the old idea—an eve
for an eye and a tooth for a tooth
She had given the police a stick
which evidently wus not the stick
used es the other witnesses had
said that the stick which was used
broke twice. The stick she gave

the police was split and) worm
eaten and if it had been used it
would have broken. That stick

as they saw was.a*whole stick.

Manslaughter

“There notning in the evi-
dence, to sow,” he said, “that
Cumberbatch wanted to renew the
attack. If during your deliberation
there comes a doubt in your mind
that there was sufficient pfovocs-

1s

tion, then the verdict must be
manslaughte;z.”

Mr. Reece for the’ prosécution
said that it was quite true, that

one blow could amount to provocs-
tion

“But the case that was cited by
Cumberbatch’s counsel is not quite
the type of case with which we
are dealing.” he said. “Where two
men have a set-to — a fight — and
one is killed, it is not man-
slaughter.”

It was to be regretted, he said,
that Cumberbatch’s brother was
called to give evidence in a case
in which Cumberbatch was chars-
ed with murder. And it could
not be wondered at that he gave
the type of evidence he gave.

It was extremely marveliou
that the two men who were there
so little.
3ut it is to be noticed,” he
said, “that the only witness whose
















ence has been supported, b
I ical testimony was Czaren
Perh the men’s not
might be allowed for by
ss of the night t they

@ On Page 7



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



A

THIS IS NOT A DUCK.

‘CK ?




















It is a potato which a shopkeeper of
Bank Hall bought from a potato vender on Wednesday.

The

potato looks like a duck whose feathers are neatly arranged and

is squatting at rest. It has the

two balancing curves where the

sockets of a duck’'s wings would be and two indentations where

a duck’s eyes would be.

House

wives Will

Get

Natural Gas In Octobe:

t
_ BEGINNING from about October this year, house-
wives and others will be supplied with natural gas instead
of the present type of gas used and will therefore get more

value for their money.

Dowding Re-elected
President Of Stock
Hreeders’ Assoe’n

Mr H. A. Dowding was re-elect-
ed President of the Barbados
Dairy and Stock Breeders’ Asso-
ciation. This took place at the
Annual Meeting at the Chamber
of Commerce yesterday afternoon,

Other officers appointed were as
follows :

Mr. C. L, Sealy and Mr. C. L.
Davis (Vice Presidents); Sir John
Saint, Mr. C, W. Springer, Mr.
John Challenor, Mr. D. N. Weekes,
Mr. C. C. Skeete, Dr. M. B.
Proverbs, Mr. J. W. Smith, Mr.
H. J. Niblock and Mr. A. G. Seale
(Members of the Committee of
Management).



The other two members of the
Committee of Management will be
appointed after a meeting of the
Goat Society of the Association to
be held at some future date.

Mr. C. G. B, O'Neal (Secretary,
Treasurer and Registrar).

The statement of accounts and
the Report of the Committee of
Management for the year ended
December 31, 1950 were adopted.

The Association decided to raise
the annual subscription from $2.00
to $3.00.

The Chairman Mr. C. L. Sealy
on behalf of the Association ex-
pressed thanks to Mr, A. G. Seale
for the good work he had rend-
ered the Association during the
time he was Secretary.

Mr. Seale siitably replied.



Mangoes
Everywhere

Mangoes — all kinds of them—
are plentiful everywhere in Bridge-
town and in the country.

In the shops and alleys of the
City, hawkers’ trays are mostly
filled with mangoes which they
sell at prices ranging between
4 cents and 8 cents each.

Mangoes arrive by Schooners
and Motor Vessels almost every
day from other W.I. islands and
so mény spoilt ones are thrown
away from day to diy.

But in some of the trays, the
buyer will find oranges — mostly
engrafted — pines, bananas, plan-
tains, ackees, and limes.

Oranges are not really in season,
Sellers are king 6 cents each for










them. Pines are in scarce supply
end one is sold for 36 cents.
Banana limes and ackees are

in mocerate supply. Some hawke
are selling the bananas and limes
one for a penny, Others ask three
cents for two bananas.



CORNED BEEF
Local importers can order @
maximum supply of 3,000 cases of

corned beef from sterling and solt
currency sources for arrival .in
Barbados between the months of
August and December this year.

Licences will be issued at tye
Conivol Offices to importers who
apply for quotas. The ceiling price
will be $19.61 per case.

OILMEAL COMES

Over three thousand bags of
linseed oilmeal were landed here
from New Orleans yesterday by
the S.S. Aleoa Roamer, ‘The
Reamer also brought 4,800 bags
of corn and a box of sugar mill

machinery for Andrews Factory.
The Alcoa Roamer left port last
ht for British Guiana.

$24 FOR BODILY HARM

“A” Police Magis-
William Thomas 0
St. Michael, $24 for
on Gladys Maughn





A District
trate fined
Reed Street,
bodily harm
on Jur 11.
The fine is
y or tw



98

to be
months’

paid in
imprison-

>

Pile speakng

Countil on Tuesday
the salaries of Gov e

at Barbado in order tc
. i t

have > pay

ernment





Natural gas is supplied from a
well at Turner's Hall It: has a
very high heating quality which
only requires about half the
amount to do the same work as
the present gas

Mr. D. R. Young, Manager «Af
the Gas Company, said that now
the Gas Amendment Bill has
passed its various stages through
both Houses of the Legislature,
the public will be glad to hear
that pending the Governor's sig-
nature and assent of the Colonial
Office which will take a little time,
the Company is hoping to turn on

the natural gas supply to the
whole district about October.
“The basic price fixed by the

Bill is 40 cents to the publie and
34 cents to the Government but the
Management hopes to arrive at a
scale of rates to attract commer-
cial and industrial consumers.

Gas Pipeline
The natural gas pipeline runs
from the Belle Pumping Station
along the old Railway line via

Weiches Road, Pine Road, Beckles
Road to the Gas Works . with
branch line through Tweedside
Road, Roebuck Street, Country
Road via Peterkins Road (Strath-
clyde) to Black Rock at Carlton.

“Most of the residential districts
are already covered by the ordin-
ary gas mains which stretch fron

the Lazaretto at one end to
Graeme Hall Terrace at the other
end. They include all the princi-

pal streets in the city and suburbs,
These low pressure mains are con-
nected to the high pressure mains
through reducing pressure gov-
ernors.

“There is no doubt that with the
greater convenience which this
fuel wili offer, the whole commun-
ity will welcome it.”



RECORD CROP

The year’s crop has yielded
187,000 tons equivalent of sugar
and molasses, the Advocate
was told yesterday at the Depart-
ment of Agriculture.

The yield is a record and is
some 2,000 tons more than what
was estimated.

All factories have ceased
grinding operations, it was said.
—$_—_—
Clothing Lost In Fire
art of a board and shingle

house at Boarded Hall Tenantry,
the property of Lillian Davis, was
destroyed by fire about 3.15 p.m.
on Wednesday.

Clothing valued at $60 was also
destroyed. The loss is not insured.

Se BEsaSs B
@ jst ARRIVED

a
a STARTENA



PURINA CHICK



MUST PEOPLE



Dr.

Proverbs Poinis Out

Benefits Of Artificial
insemination Of Catile

DR. M. B. PROVERBS told members of the Stoc

Breeders’ Association at their Annual Meeting

at il

Chamber of Commerce yesterday afternoon that perhap:
the greatest advantage of Artificial Insemination of catt
is the prevention of the spread of venereal diseases suc
as Brucilla abortion, Trichomoniasis and C. pyogenes it

fection.

He said :

The Artificial Insemination of
Cattle has been practised for many
years and in many countries, fore-
most among which are Russia,
Ame.ica and Denmark. In Brit-

in, although research on insem-
ination had been going on for many
years, little was done in the large
cale use of the process. In 1942
however, the Ministry of Agricul-
ure set up an experimental Centre

Cambridge for the large scale
nsemination of cattle, and this
was soon followed by a second

station at Reading in 1943.

“It was soon evident that the
scheme was practicable and the
demand for this form of breeding
Was soon very great,

Several centres later sprung up,
and these were often organised on
co-operative lines run on a non-
profit making basis, the capital
being raised by members or inter-.
ested persons in the locality.

Control Measures

“The Milk Marketing Board now
idministering most ot the centres
and control measures to safeguard
the stcck owner is enforced by
the Ministry of Agriculture.

“The advantages of Artificial
‘usemination over natural service
are many and varied, Perhaps
greatest advantage is the pr
vention of spread of venereal dis
eases such as Brucilla abortion,
Trichomoniasis, C. pyogenes infe, -
tion, ete

Another great advantage is that
a single ejaculate from a bull can
be diluted up to 1 in 100 and this
could be used to inseminate as
many as 500 cows, It can thus
be seen that a great deal of good
work can be done to improve the
productive capacity of a dairy herd,
providing you are certain of the

capabilities of the bull which is
being used,
“It is for this reason that the

formation of an insemination cen-
tre is usually started on a small
seale and slowly built up, as the



Greater Rum Trade

With U.K.

genetic potentialities of the bul
heing used are reyealed in tl
offspring

“It is not yet known for certai:
vhat grade or breed of cattle wi!



be best suited for the climatic con
ditions of Barbados, From initi
cbservations and recordings at th<
Central Livestock Station, the in
dication appears to be that Fre

sians and Guernseys can be sat

factorily maintained, providir

the standard of
management is high

nutrition

Island's dairy herds
“in an effort to determin
whether this would apply equal
to other dairy herds in the islanc
a limited amount of artificial i:
semination is being done at t!
request of stock owners and th
first calves from artiicial inse

ee ee

UTCHER FOUND GUILTY OF MURDER
In Rose Hill Affray |

JOSEPH CUMBERBATCH

PAGE FIVE

Someone's,
4



WIN WITH

PALDING

OVER 70 YEARS OF SPORT











nation are just beginning to cor 5 2 ,
olony A Bs: 8 RA 8 1 @ & RR OS.” £7 DB)
“Twas fortunate to be associat ~ es a
with the development of an arti ‘
tial insemination centre in Hamp~ °%%%%G9999669969999999G9554599G9995S9GII9OOFOODIFOOR
shire, which was started ry M ‘ ‘ x
George Gould in Southampter \s ' X
with whom IT practised In 1943 % 4 >
small farmer’s herd became i % ‘ 5 : %
fected with Trichomoniasi H Ss i >
three sons were all in the service * ?
md his dairy herd meant, his e a. x
istence, We collected semen fro }s LA Ss
u neighbouring farmer's bull anc x " x
f scminated_ his cows for him. "To \ _ lay .
cov the centre from which thi & A REAL COOLING *
riicleus was developed has ov - i <
©; bulls of five different breed: % DELIGHT x
acl known as the Hampshir ws 3S
( at'le Breeders Society and is rvr ’ R
on a co-operative, non-pro! % x
making basis. YS %
“From initial experience i x y
in Barbados I would state th x %
Artificial Insemination has a ve a 3
definite future. Livestock owne %
qnus*, ‘however, be patien™ ar 3% %
Jend every assistance they can i: & x
such matters as milk recordine %
and their observations on the pro % } D i ’s x
geny of certain bulls, so that the %& 7 pu ZL i Xs
best possible and quickest estima st q7) ary xt
tion of the correct bulls to be us¢ % STi Ke¢ TA LX %
can be made | t Al :
+ ’ r r
* PHOENIN SODA *
» ram y
| FOUNTAIN *
x KNIGHT'S LTD.
» % LLLP ILE A ALE AALANL woe

NF,
SO SSO PO GOP OTOOO OE

Possible

—SAYS CAVE

THERE IS a potential trade for Barbados rum in eng
land but a great deal more advertising is needed, Mr, R. M
Cave of Messrs. Cave, Shepherd & Co., Ltd, told the

Advceate yesterday.
Mr. Cave has just retu

rned from England where hy

represented the Barbados Chamber of Commerce at th
Congress of the Federated Chambers of Commerce of thi

British Empire.

He said that at present Jamaica
um is quite well-known in Eng-
and and seems to be selling wel!
“Almost everywhere liquor is sold
you will see the Jamaica rum.

“When asked by people about
the products of Barbados,” said M:.
Cave, “I would naturally refer to
our sugar and rum in the firs:
place, I was surprised to hea:
from many of these people tha:
they knew Jamaica rum but not
Barbados’.

“That is why I think that if Bar
bados rum igs to take the marke!
in England as it undoubtedly can,
a more serious and determined
attempt should be made to adver
tise the product.”

Asked if the question of in-
creased steamship passenger fa-
cilities had been brought up ai
the Congress of the Chambers
of Commerce, Mr, Cave said
that the matter had been dis-
cussed, “A resolution is to be
forwarded to the Conference
Lines,” he said, “asking them to
take steps to make it attractive
to steamship lines to undertake

a
& GROWENAB
a
H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd gy

Obtainable from

BRANDY

AT IT’S

BEST

IS

MARTELL BRANDY

A Shipment of ..

This fine old, world re
arrived and is on sale
If you want the best
member to specify MART









ned French Brandy recently
ill Leading Grocers.
dy obtainable TO-DAY,

ELL when placing your order.

re-

}
|) STANSFELD, SCOTT & CC. LTD. |)

passenger traffic from the Unit-

ed Kingdom to the West Indies
Freight Value

“The cpinion was expressed b)
several delegates at the confer
ence that if the West Indies coul
put up figures as to the value o
freight offered as a whole, it woulc
be of great help to the Londor
Chamber of Commerce in puttin;
up a good case to the prope
uthorities,”

Mr. Cave’s 13-year-old daughte
Cynthia, presented a bouquet t
Princess Elizabeth when she open
ed the Congress of Chambers «
Commerce. The request for her t
make the pre@sentation, said M
Cave, came from the Secretary ol
the Chambers on the instructior
of the honorary members

Mr, Cave said that he had seen
a picture of the event in the
‘Advocate” and he and his famil)
were very pleased, “I look upor
this little service which my daugh
ter had been asked to perform a
1 compliment to Barbados.”

Sore Mouth |

Loose Bloody Teeth

Bleeding Guma, Sore Mouth and L
Teeth mean that you have Pyorr
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad dis 4
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may alao cause Kheumatiar
and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum |
bleeding the firat day, ends sore mouth
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad |
guarantee. Amosan must make your



mouth well and save your teeth or
money back on return of empty pack
ug’. Get Amosan from your chemist

today. The guar
antee snrotects
so

Armosan :''

for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth













OF

e

%

- *
POLLED PEO

MORE AND MORE MEN
ARNE CHANGING TO

es
x d / %
: DAILY $
\ >
‘ )
% Because they have become convinced ¥
x ' ‘ °
x of ‘KS’ Superiority.
x
s
: e N
%& aici at »
x HERE ARE THREE OF THE MANY VERY GOOD %
* REASONS FOR THAT SUPERIORITY : %
8 e §
% §
% (1) ‘K’ SHOES are made from the finest leathers %
st obtainable. Both soles and insoles are hand- %
% tested for flexibility and accurately graded
g by skilled craftsmen. 3
; %
s (2) THE UPPERS of ‘K’ SHOES are selected, %
% hand-cut and matched by experienced crafts
R men with a care that no machine could
2 imitate. g
$ %
,
x (3) ‘K’ SHOES are made over the famous ‘K’ -
x PLUS FITTING LASTS with the heel-parts Q
x 1444 awe jae a J . hic g
st one fitting narrower than the fore-parts. This g
% ensures a close fit at the heel and freedom %
. . x
% for the toes. %
‘ * :
~ ¥
% oe = Why not come in and be fitted with a pair x
x of these world famous shoes? We are sure °
% you'll say like all the other ‘K’ wearers : 3
%,
- i ; e
bs “PLL NEVER WEAR ANOTHER SHOE %
ss BUT ‘K’ ” %
% @ >
¥ »
st >
x ; :
® 4%
‘.
x %
% %,
: DIAL 2664 ‘
°
s . . .
% Sole Distributors for ‘K’ SHOES in Bavbados x
s x
he CPOE PCOS. POCO G56O9S5 od



WH MAVE AR. iSKET

_——_.











Kr

LVERY PURPOSK!
REASONABLY Paid “DD 100
LARGE SHOPPING BASKETS
$3.00, $2.50, $1.92, Ete.
WASTE PAPER BASKETS $§
LCAUNDRY BASKETS, $5.50 each
SEWING BASKETS $2.00 & $1.50 each
LARGE BREAKFAST BASKETS
$2.00 and $1.50 each
CHILPREN’S BASKETS & KEY BASKETS
1/- and 1/6 each
e
Call at Our Home Products Dept.



20 & 72c. each




=

©
CAVE SHEPHERD
& €O.. LTD.
HOME PRODUCTS DEPT.

10, 11, r







PAGE Six BARBADOS ADVOCATE

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON










MICKEY MOUSE










C\ refuse | |. 9's:
ere GIVE MY) 96"
‘” ( CONSENT! | |



MULD |
LOOR








=LN iS ;
\ENGAGED TO












6-23 .

ry : a. g
Cop 4991, King Pestones Spmineate, We World vite opverved I Wy

THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER ‘00K
fi SOMETHING MIGHTY Lp] [C- WiEN-THE MASKED MAN CROSSES THE |
=" * a FA 7 : Eee es \ \/ . 4 “LG




CLEARING, HE WILL TRIP-ON A STRING.
THAT STRING'LL FIRE A SHOTGUN










BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS | MW

ee | | the beaks of














mm

{ HELLO-MAGGIE-WiLL YOu hoe
| COME DOWN TO THE
EATANREGRET NIGHT

CLUB AN! MAKE YOUR

UNCLE COME HOME =''M i
ALL IN--
aol x whe ; |
Tyr

~ Vaselin













NOW-WHERE CAN MY
HUSBAND BE KEEPING
MY UNCLE ‘TIL THIS

HOUR ?POOR UNCLE!







SCHOOLS E NEW | f
LIBRARY-AND FINE
ARTS BUILDING --
YOU SEE-UNCLE IS
QUITE A STUDENT-



iM
TRADE MARK

" tM Ah
2.
VASELINE is the registered trade mark

of the Cheeebrough Mfg. Co., Cons'd

ny owl ceca

a BY FRANK ROBBINS |)



‘VER HEAR? A motor «eae
N OVER WITH A MISSING
STRIBUTOR CAP’ HO-HUM!
~.. PLEAGANT TRIP DEAR



GHT...WELL, LI'L
vik © HIM, ALL RIGHT
THE ROAR OF A FAGT



erie ae





SIERRA en

—

eats i
JEFF! OLEASE




BY ALEX RAYMOND {

MR KNOW WHAT th
my) THEY CALL IT?

Fine Quality PICNIC HAMS
6—9 Ibs.—-$1.02 per Ib.
STREAKY BACON —
Slabs: 6—8 lbs. at $1.07
per Ib.



BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

Sliced at $1.20 per lb
Bots, COLMAN’S PREPAR-
ED FRENCH MUSTARD 83c

| AS DIANA SWIMS FRANTICALLY
|_W_WHIRLPOOL CHANNEL~~~

Fine Quality LEG HAMS—
14-17 lbs, at $1.19 per Ib.
|
|

meer





JOHN

ss was
Wy N) (hs |
“/ Y aS oa |
G\ “i V trae 3 G
~S : Se ee

your BEST:

® GALY,. OIL CANS—1, 2 & 5 Gin. Sizes
HAIR fp. “Wie Established @ , | iy L, (| Incorporated |
C., iC i fi 1860 i. HERB IRV Utd. 1926
0 aka //Gee ee! \ 10 & 1) RORBUCK STREET, |

7h baa BY / EX-67 ra nae aici is

| eee eee ee =
>=>[Taanmaomaaaomaam=FE=E@=>>=Pamanm—@=P—FBFee x= TT EE
lia —

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE















HANDSOME DISHES

CALL FOR FINEST HAMS!!



= FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1951








On

children’s

cuts, scratches

and abrasions
use

‘DETTOL’

THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

| Safe. . . Non-poisonous
Doesn't Pain, . , Doesn't Stain =






Le good looks tell you they're just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price,





tag, that you can’t get finer value. [llustrated eee
OURO eg

is a Two-tone Brogue. ‘Tied to every pair is zu
7 eee ca

the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign
which means ‘ just right’! Look for it in

leading stores in Barbados.

HITE

means made just right

Magnificent Photo Cards
of Modern -British Cars!

Try







FLAKES “

Every 8-ounce packet contains 2
photo cards, (Full set, 40 cards)



The Only Pain Reliever
containing Vitamin B,

PLL LL LILI ISIS

2 For § When you take YEAST-VITE Tablets the
2 2. effect is wonderful! Pain vanishes, Cold and
Q HEADACHES 2 Chill symptoms disappear, and = regen lee
2 well! ‘There’s nothing else like YEAST- 3
2 NERVE PAINS 8 —it’s the ONLY pain reliever which ALSO
g COLDS 8 contains the tonic Vitamin B,. So make sure you
3 CHILLS 3 get YEAST-VITE to-day.

S RHEUMATIC 3 RELIEVES YOUR PAIN AND

3 PAINS $ MAKES YOU FEEL WELL

SALLI LDL LDL LD DDS “YEAST-VITE" is o registered Trade Mark

|
|

LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH
— Also —





aomuapnaaeraa

















Nn
uU
mr
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>
=
Oo
=
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=.
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=
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f.
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=
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=
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Cc
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7)
Qu
ow
<
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&
ee
=
Qo
ow
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Usually Now Usually NOW

Tins Silver Leaf Pineapple Juice 35 %0 Tins Koo Apricot Jam 63 34
Pkgs. Garden Cream Biscuits 53 1% Tins Batchelor Peas 38

Pkgs. Nelsons Gelatine (+) 60 54 Bottles Frontenac Beer 26 20










We Offer Tosday

} Bots. Sovora Prepared MUS- 1-Ilb Tins FINE DESSERT
| TARD .. ne B8C, PRUNES at 69¢
8-oz. tins PEARCE DUFFS PRUNES per lb. at 55c.

BLANC MANGE in 6 8-oz. tins ITALIAN OLIVE

flavours at 24c. each OIL at 69c
l-lb. pk. SELVA TABLE
SALT at 16c. each Pint bots. FRENCH OLIVE
Q2-lb. Bots. CROSSE & OIL ........ $1.80 bot
BLACKWELL'S TABLE 2 pint Cans FRENCH
SALT 39 OLIVE OIL ..... $2.03

1-lb Bots LEMON 10-0z. bots Escoffier Sweet
CHEESE 45c Pickles .... 47c. each



Ee Ss NaErLo

armmne cumax| ALLEYNE ARTHU

TO EVERY MEAL

ALLEYNE & Co. LTD.

ARTHUR'S “YOUR GROCERS”
SPECIAL Rive 5 ‘





FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1951



CLASSIFIED ADS.







Yinimum charge week 72 eents and

| FOR RENT





86 cents Sundays 24 words — ows
TELEPHONE 2508 words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a|
emnsnenen ————m } tere on Sundays.
—
The charge for announcements os : ‘-
Barts, “Mattage Tnguncemens (| PUBLIC SALES HOUSES
1g Mee 5s ees — nial hedipitentirnathil ii datas ven. teeta
$:.50 ay aioe dens rican progeny mene BEDROOMS Two (2) large cool bed-
for any number of words up to 50, and REAL ESTATE oe at ao Air (furnished or Uunfur-
3 cents per word on week-days and nished ial 3683 13.7.51—2

4 cents per word on Sundays for each,
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
additional wo-d. Terms cash. Phone 2508
wetween 8.30 und 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m,



DIED

KING — Lydia Eldica. Her funeral will
leave her late residence, Dash Valley,
St. George, for St George's Church,
at 430 pm today.
Dolphus King (Husband), Neville,
Gladstone, Curtis, Elson ,Mavis and Edna
King.





SMALL—On July 12, 1951,
Small late of Mapp Hill,
The funeral leaves her late resi-
dence at 4.30 p.m. to-day for St,
Barnabas Church, Friends are asked
to attend.

Mrs.
Mr



Mrs. Gertrude
St. Michael,

Astnath Ward
Harcourt Small

(daughter!,
(son),
5i—In
13th July, May
Louise, at her residence Olive Lodge,
Paynes Bay, St. James. Her funeral |
will leave her late residence at 4.30 p.m.
to-day for St. James Cemetery.
Friends are asked to attend,
Clayton Thorpe (brother), Olive
Hope and Elise Thorpe (sisters).
13.7, 51—1n.



THORPE—On Friday





ANNOUNCEMENTS

SE

HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—lIsle of
Spices. SANTA MARIA-—loveliest hotel
in Caribbean. Rates from $7.00 per head
per day, GRAND HOTEL—in best resi-

dential district under Government House | Hill,

hill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day. |
SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing}
Beach. Rates from $4.00 per head per
day. Enquiries to D. M. Slinger, Grenada,

26.6.51—78n.

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words —

over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word on Sundays.











AUTOMOTIVE

CAR: Dodge Car, 5 passengers.
class order, New tyres
Garage





First
Apply Fort Royal
1.7. $1—3n



$4,370 miles.
upholstery, all
seen at Cour-
12.7.51—3n

CAR: 1947 Ford Prefect,
Tyres, coachwork,
in good condition
tesy

engine,
To be

Garage.





CAR: 1937 Chevrolet in good order.
Apply to Springer, Rock Hall, St. Andrew.
11,7.51-—-1n





CARS-—Vauxhall
dition new tyres,
hall 12 (Wyvern)
Barbados Agencies.

14/6 in perfect con-
paint ete, Also Vaux-
in good shape, Apply
Ring 4908,

10.7,51-—6n







good working
almost new body. Apply
Stoute’s Drug Store or Marshall &
Edward's Garage, Roebuck Street,
where it can be seen. Phone 2549 or
3453, 22.6,51—t.f.n.

Pick-up Morris 8
order witn

in



ELECTRiCâ„¢.z,



One NORGE REFRIGERATOR, cubit
ft. open type unit, to be seen at ee
man & Taylor’s Garage 12.7.51—













PHILCO REFRIGERATOR: 9! cu
ft.
mew unit. Reconditioned

may be inspected at Leo Yard,
side. Apply H.

St. Philip.

Cheap-
Smith, Sandford,
7.7. 51—t.f.n,

L.



LIVESTUVCK

COW: One young Cow fresh in milk,
32 pints daily.





Apply Seawell Plantation.

12 7 51—6n



MISCELLANEOUS







A wind- blown look isn't. pretty
“Amami Wave Set" makes your hair so

easy to set so quick to dry. This



non-oily preparation keeps curls and
waves firm and wind-proof
KNIGHT'S LTD, 11.7.51—3n,
AMM-I-DENT TOOTHPASTE

Start saving your Amm-i-dent Tooth
peste Boxes. Within a short while you
may be the winner of one of the follow-
ing:— Ist Prize $50.00, 2nd Prize $15.00,
3rd Prize $5.00. 1,7,51—26n



TABLETS
Get

CHLOROPHYL

odour and bad breath
Knights Drug Stores.
12.7.51—2n

ENNDS
stops body
yours today



For cleaning your Suits, Frocks, Hats,
Coats etc., Dry
Cleaner."

Obtainable at

ete, try ‘“Scrubb’s

Price 1/9 bot
KINGHT’S LTD.
11,7, 51—3n





PLASTIC TABLE COVERS in beautiful
$1.29: 54 x 54 ins
and Plastic
13. i 51—1n

designs 36 x 236 ins
$2.30; 54 x 8&4 ins
Aprons $1.49 each

$3.57



RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing
.and we will order for you if we
haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,
Ltd. 6.7.51—t.f.n

“SARIDONE”





Tablets are recommend -
ed in such painful conditions as head-,;

ache, migraine, toothache, rheumatic
pain neuralgia ete, Obtainable at Knights
Ltd. 12.7.51—2n

——

SPECIAL OFFER: 6 Jars of Chivers
assorted Jams, one pound size, for onl
$2.88. W. A. Medford & Company, Rickett
Street. 11.7.51—3n

SPRING CUSHION UNITS FOR UP-
HOLSTERERS:—Ready packed in Burlap
(Bag), each contains 42 Springs (6 rows



of 7 each) Dimensions 18” % 21”. Limited
Quantity available. Apply immediately
to:— The Standard Agency (B'dos) Co.,
14 Sw Street, Phone 3620.
aa a 10.7.51—€n
“WELDING MATERIALS—_ Electrodes

in sizes of 6, 8 and 10's also bronze
steel and flux for Acetylene welding.

Enquire Auto Tyre Company, Trafal-
gar and Spry Streets. MRE E i



We have just received an assortment
of Flower and Vegetable Seeds from

HT’S LTD.
Australia, KNIG 11.7.51—3n

:

| COLLECTION OF REN






If you have trouble col-
lecting your rents from your
tenants why not allow
D'Arcy A. Scott to coilect
them for you? Only a com-
mission of 10% is charged
and your troubles go.

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,

Magazine Lane.










GGLDIES

< 10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

1 Only Set of 2 Volumes:—
KEMPES ENGINEERS’
YEAR BOOK 1950 to 1951

JOHNSON’ Ss STATIONERY
MIRRO}







RS



aS C U T TO ORDER
at

JOHNSON’'S HARDWARE %

Distt butt ttt trvtvttnte ttt
St GOO

the;

jand 4 p.m.

Full width freezing chamber. Brand
throughout

eooceed {
355



| ALLSYNis ViLLe, a cottuge







: ; St. John Possession on August Ist
goirits ok ae Au modern conve- 1951 Inspection on epiraset of the
on “MSPECHON DY actang-ment, Dial Tenant Apply to B. L. Barrow (next
es ee 44.7.91—3n | acor) 12, 7 Sn
If you are inte ied ink : rer ist. At
: ouying a VENTNOR” “Cornes ist Ave. “Pine
a Sena small or large, in the! Road, Belleville, Drawing room, dining
ones pf town; a piece of land, a,room 3 bedrooms, s€rvants room and
rte SS place or a plantation, why not Garage, immediate possession. Dial 4910
at_iny list which is too extensive | or 3601 after 4 p.m. 7.51—2n
to ae here? I have exactly what you eT en
wan
DD'arey A Scott, Magazin
. e Lane, WaA N i kb
Dial—3743 13.7.51—3n

You can purchase St.

more room you can exchange.

etc Dial—8400 and look it over. For

zine Lane, 13.7.51—3n

DWELLING 1 HOUSE called

SLIEW” with 3700 square feet of land
thereto situate at Chapman Street,
| Bridgetown, nearest Whitepark Read)
| The house contains Gallery, Drawing

end Dining Rooms, two bedrooms, Break-

fast room, usifal conveniences. Large

Basement. Electric Light and Govern-
| ment water installed.

The above premises will be set up for
sale by Public Competition at our Office
James Street on Friday 13th July 1951,
at 2 p.m. For inspection apply to Miss
Farmer the tenant between the hours of
{3 and 4.30 p.m. daily except Sundays.
| YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
| Solicitors.
| 1.7.51

The undersigned will offer for sals
) at their Office, No: 17, High Street,
| Bridgetown, on Friday the 20th day of
July, 1951 at 2 p.m,

A parcel of land containing 5,445
Square feet, situate on St. Stephen's
Black Rock, St. Michael, with the
Dweilinghouse thereon, called “The
Nest" containing 4 public rooms, 2
bedrooms, with usual offices,
Inspection any day between
on application
alton, on the premises.

For further particulars, and conditions
ot sale, apply to:—
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
7.7.51-—8n.













10
to

a.m

Ww. Miss



AUCTION









I have been instructed by the
Government in Executive Committee to
offer for sale by public auction at @he
yard of the Department of Highwuys
and Transport on Friday next the 13ih
ut 1 p.m, one 1949, 18 H.P. Vauxhall
Velox blue Saloon car. It has com-
paratively new tyres and the up-
holstery as good as new. Terms cash.

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
_ Government Auctioneer
7.7.5i-—in



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received, I wil! sell
on Friday July 13th at Messrs Redman
& Taylor's Garage, Church Village (1)

Light Hudson Car 1946 Model. Insured
and licensed until 1952, In perfect
condition, suitable for Taxi. Terms Cash,
Sale at 2 p.m.
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer.
11.7.51—8n





Under The Diamond Hammer

By instructions from Mrs,
will sell her entire lot of
furniture at her residence Bank Hail
X Road opposite the Roxy Theatre on
Thursday next the 19th July, 1951 at
1 Oehkwky The sale includes One
Piano, Mahog. sitting, arm and morris
chairs, Mahog, Couch, Rockers, hardwood,
bentwood and folding chairs, Mahog
Waggon and tables, larder, hatstands
vaido, iron bedstead, Mahogany
dressing’ table, night chair, washstand,
kitchen tables and presses, glass and

Worrell I
housthold

china ware, kitchen utensils and many
other items too numerous to Sention,
Terms Cash



D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer,
Sn

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER





On Thursday 19th by order of Mrs.
Florence All¢yne we will sell at “The
Rosary” St. George, her house appoint-

ments which are chiefly in old mahogany
and Cordea, and are both antique and
modern,
~~Which. include —

Old Colonial 2 Pedestal Dining Table
and Siddboard; Very nice Upright and
Arm Chairs; Book Cases; Round Tip Top
Table; Card, Ornament and Droplea/
Tables, Hatstand, Folding Chairs, all in
very old Mahogany; Rockers, Berbic»
and Easy Chairs; Ornament and Side
Tables all in Cordea; Pictures, Whatnot
Uphols. Arm Chairs, Antique Swords,
Flat Top Desk, Carpets and Rugs, Mir'd.
Cabinet; Glass and China, Cut Glass,
Decanters and Jugs, Very Handsome Old

China Lamps, Vases, Ornaments, Paper
Weight; Tea and Coffee Services; G. B,
Refrigerator in Working order; Mir’d.

Press, Chest of Drawers and Dressing
‘Tables, Escritoir, Mirrors, all in old
Mahog: Cedar Linen Press, Double Iron
Bedstead, Spring and Hair Bed. Cordea
eS Bedsteads, M.T. Washstand G.E.C.
Fadio, Plated Ware in Entre Dishes,
Waiters, Forks, Spoons, Fish Knives and
Forks Cutlery &c., Victrola and Records,
Ware Presses, Larders, Kitchen Utensils
and Tables, Golf Sticks, Coal Stove,
Fowl and Rabbit Pens, Terns, Books and

other items. Sale 11,30 o'clock, Terms
CASH.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers
13.7.51—2nm



PUmLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
mininum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. PETER

Applications for one or more vacant
Vestry Exhibitions at the Coleridge
School will be received by the under-
signed up to July 26th 1951

Candidates must be children of Parish-
joners in staitened circumstances and
must be between the ages of 7 and 13
years.

Applications must be forwarded with
4“ birth certificate, forms may be obtained
at the Parochial Treasurer's Office during
office hours, an Examination will be held
at the School on July LOth at 10 a.m

G. S. CORBIN,
Vestry Clerk





NOTICE

Re Estate of

BEATRICE FORDE, deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim
agairst the Estate of Beatrice Forde
late of King Edward Road, Bank Hall
in the parish of Saint Michael who
died in this Island on the 16th. day of
February 1951, are hereby required to
send particulars of their claims duly
attested to the undersigned Hilda Best
of Culloden Road, Saint Michael, the
qualified Executrix of the Will of tne
Deceased in care of Messrs. G. L. W
Clarke & Co. James, Street, Bridgetown;
Solicitors, on or before the 31st. day
of July 1951 after which date I shall
Proceed to distribute the assets of the
Deceased among the parties entit.ed
thereto having regard only to such
claims of which I shall then have had
notice, and that I will not be liable
for the assets or any part thereof so
distributed, to any person of whose
debt or claim I shall not then have
had notice,

And all persons indebted to tre said
Estate are requested to settle their in-
debtedness without delay

Dated this 31st day of May 1951

HILDA BEST,

qualified executrix of the Will of
Beatrice Forde, deceased

. 1.6.5.—41



in Hastings

een
Elmo at Max-
well Road for cash or on terms, or it
your house is too small and you want
It stands
on % acre of land and has 4 bedrooms,

particulars see D'Arcy A. Scott, Maga-

“ELLER-

Fa
He
‘ae
Pee Ee eee ve



E, Near Massiah St



ROSE-MONT HO





Minimum charge week 72 eents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words -- over 24

words 3 cents a word week—4 cents u

word on Sundays,

HELP

GENPRAL SERVANT: Apply aiter 1
p.m. Mrs, Laqy Hutson, “First Attempt
Brittons Hil 13.7.51—1n

Assistant











Architeet or Senior
tectural Assistant required in Port-of-
Spain Office of busy firm: must be
accurate and rapid draughtsman, capa-
ble of preparing working, drawings and
details for first class buildings, all types.
Interviews wil be arranged in Barbados;
write giving full particulars age, ex-
perience, salary required to W H
Watkins & Partners, FF. R.I.B.A
P.O.B. 251, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad

11.7.51—3n

Archi-



STENOGRAP?
ately by Messrs







Wanted tmmedi-
arrington and Sealy,
Lucas Street—Salary according to expe-
rience and ability. Apply in writing in
the first instance 12.7. 51—3n





STENOGRAPHER & TYPIST for
office. Apply by letter and in
Stating experience. Good salary
3. B. Leslie & Co., Ltd. Co
Building, Broad Street, Bridgetow

12.7, 51—6n
UES eeeeeeeeeee



our
person

offered

Ltd










TRINIDAD LEASEHOLDS LTD.

“A vacanqy exists for a Relief Mess
Manageress Previous exptrience in
eatering for restaurants or hotels or
similar experience is desirable. Appli-
cations should be submitted in writing
giving details of previous experience
and enclosing copies of testimonia!s and
a recent passport size photograph, and

Should be addr
& Co. Ltd.,

ssed to Messrs. Da Costa
P.O, Box 103, Bridgetown.”
13.7.51—6n

MISCELLANEOUS

One LIQUOR LICENSE. Hs
erbs & Co., Ltd, High Street,
12.7.51—3n
LIQUOR LICENSE ITICE | s
(TRANSFER AND REMOVAL)
The application of Harold Proverbs &

















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

GOVERNMENT NOTICE.



2) POST of ASSISTANT ENGINEER |

and ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR, |
Electricity & Telephone Depart-
ment, Grenada.



post of A



technical knowledge of Electricity
and will be required to perform |
any duties in connection with the |
running and maintenance of the

Electricity and Telephone Depart- |
ment which the Engineer-in- |
Charge, to whom he will be!

directly responsible, may require,
It will also be his duty to assist |
the Engineer-in-Charge in
work of supervision of the plant |
at the Power Station (including
the Refrigeration Plant).

figure above the minimum in the |
case of an exceptionally qualified
person,

Candidates should apply in
writing to the Administrator, Gov-
ernment Office, Grenada.
Government Office,

Grenada,

28th June, 1951.
_ tb. 7. ‘51—4n.

Stopper Heads
Give Man
New Career

Stalin Model Is
U.S. Favourite

When 28-year-old Paul Nathan-
son, of Wilkinson Street, Kenning-
ton, made three bottle stoppers and
sent them as a gift to a friend in
America, he was, without knowing |
it, founding a new business,



Co, cf City, St, Michael, the purchase .
of Liquor License No, 465 of 1951 grant-| , Phe bottle stoppers had mod-
ed to them in respect of a board and |@lled heads—one of Mr. Churchill,
Shingle shop at Four Roads, St. Philip, |one of Uncle Sam and the third of
to remove said License to a wall build- | Josef Stalin.
ing at Four Roads, St. Philip, and to usc one
it at such last described premises. f A few weeks later large orders
Dated this 9th day of July, 1951 or the stoppers came from sev-
DALLAS MARSHALL, eral ba firms whose representa-
for Applicant tives had seen the modelled heads
To a Ws tel cir ae displayed in a shop. And all of
Dist. eS. them wanted the Stalin model.
N.B.—-This application will be. consid- Nathanson left his job as a

red at a Licensing Court to be held on | fashion designer

23rd
Police

July, 1951, at
Courts Dist

iL
“er
he We
Magistrate

o'clock a.m. at
HARPER,

Police Dist

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Carmen Smith
bolder of Liquor License No
granted to her in respect of a
and shingle shop with shedroof





board



at Ste . St. Michael for permis-
Sioa cS cake take ae itenss a a |Charlie Chaplin, Mr. Attlee and
Seard and shingle shop with shedroof |dozens of others. Oxford under-
attached at Hingapury, Bend, Be iene" graduates wrote, sending details.)
ae x Mae Esq, 7 a of their professors’ faces, and
Police Magistrate, ‘Dist, “A” asked for bottle stopper carica-
JOHN BAILEY, | tures.
for Applicant A London club said all their
Bi thle BPE ee at ne enna members must have a pink ele-
Police Court, Dist) “A"’ on Monday the |Phant bottle stopper made by
2rd day of July 1951 at 11 o'clock |Nathanson. and radio and film
can : stars asked for their own carica-
E. A. MeLEOD, | tures.
Police May titrate, Dist. “A From what was a_ hobby
Se Bae built himself a |
y usiness, e is amused that the
“Ee ¢ ATIONAL only people who order the Joe
- Stalin heads are the Americans,
. ee EYNE SCHOOL but all the world orders Mr

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1951.

There will be an Entrance Examina-
tion on Monday 30th July at 9.30 a.m.
for New Pupils.

Applications must be made in writing
to the Headmaster and must be accom-
penied by a Birth or Baptismal Certifi-
cate and a Testimonial of Good Condyct
from the last School of attendance,

Closing date for receiving applications
wil! be 23rd July.

There is a vacant Foundation Scholar-
ship tenable at the Alleyne School.
Applications must be made in writing to









from
320 of 195: other world. capitals.

attached
ittache t

and worked for
16 hours a day to fill their orders.

Each model had to be hand- made
and then hand-painted.

Soon London stores asked him
o make some, then came orders
Paris, Brussels, Oslo and

Added to the first three carica-
ures came models of Danny Kaye,

Churchill. —L.E.S,

Sulphur? |



There’s Tons In |

Solomon’s Country

the Headmaster and must be aceom SHORTAGE of raw materials:
panied by Birth era a Nonsense, says $4-year-oid scien-
Selves tor emamination at the School on {@St and geologist Herbert Cross.
Monday July 30tn at 9.30 a.m it’s just a matter of knowing
Closing date for receiving applications | where to look,

will be Peery. = RUA OR, Back at his home in Lytham,
Headmaster. | Lancs, Mr. Cross, 5ft. ana a bit,
13.7,51—4n tossed a piece of rock sulphur in

his hand, ‘
q And he said: “It’s highgrade
LOST & FOUND ore. I can get thousands of tons ot
4t from a mine near Muscat in

LOST Arabia. And lead too.

aap tse ealt oat beatae atl dei athiapeanitone “The country is rich in minerals.
LOST SHARE CERTIFICATE King Solomon’s mines country,

Mt has been reported to the Trinidad
Building and Loan Association that Share




you know.”

Certificate No, A-3516 in respect of tw He made the 6,000-mile journey
shares numbered 2849 and 2850 “J" serie: lo prove that Government spokes-
ate '

in the name of the Estate of Edit!| nen are wrote about at least one
Warner has béen lost or imisiaid and . "

cannot now be found. of the raw materials which they

The public is hereby notified that un‘ess|sqy are so scarce these days.

the above Certific be received by the . o -eighter
Secretary of the Association on or before In the hold. of th . freig i e
Friday 20th July 1951, a new Certificate|Kohistan at Bristol is further

will be issued to the persons entitled to
the shares,
Dated this Third day of July 1951.
J.F. AGARD
Secre

SESSIONS

@ From Page 5.

could not hold that she did
pee,”

She had described it as her
brother throwing up his hand tc
defend himself and then when his
nand had become weak he was
stabbed in the chest, |

Mr. Reece also reminded the|
jury that Cumberbatch went to the
police on the following morning
and told them that he was the man
who had done the stabbing

Summing up, the Chief Justice
told the jury that they should not
be persuaded by the feelings of the
dead man’s relatives or sympathy
for Cumberbatch.

The Chief Justice went on t
direct the jury on the law and {9
review the case. After just over
an hour’s deliberation, the jury





no*

| buyers,

jean’t



proof—a five-ton sample of sul-|
phur brought back by Mr. Cross
He went one:—

“Politicians’ talk about shortage
of raw materials makes me mad
But it is no use sending bulk
They wouldn’t know the
difference between a diamond in
the rough and a pebble.”
Yesterday the Board of Trade |
jumped at the chance of investi-
gating Mr. Cros claim—for
sulphur is wanted for almost every
industry, for fertilisers, textiles
jdyes, rayon, steel paint, plastics
paper.

Said an official: We should like
to see Mr. Cross. We knew
deposits in Arabia but not parf.c-
ularly at Muscat.”

In the Kohistan,’ as
2,000 tons of oxide of iron
Mr. Cross found it on a rocky
island in the Persian Gulf. Ex-
perts had said the mines



test drills and found the
mineral each time.

Last word from Mr. Cross: “You
find raw materie! “from a
desk in Whitehall.



returned their verdict of guilty of
murder.









8 Killed In ‘Plane Crash
DAKAR, July 12. |
Fight were killed’ and nine |
seriously injured, when a Frery;
Dakota military plane cras
Although seriously burned,
nine survivors e immediately |
rushed to nearby Niame
hospital. 1e §=6hhad



taker ) airport





Today's (i. A. Song}

“Home Sweet Home”

“Mid pleasures and palaces

though we may roam”
“There is no place like
home”

If there

IS A GAS COOKER.



Applications are invited for the)
istf@mt Engineer and |

The applicant should have good |

the |

The initial salary,may be at a.

of |

well, i¢|

there |
|had been worked out, But he took |
| eight

If the Govern- |

ment really wants sulphur at the |
lowest price I will find it.”
—L.E.S.

!

Parental Neglect |
Main Factor
In Youth Problem |

LONDON, June.
homes and parental
neglect are the two main causes |

Broken



















PAGE SEVE





On A Bie cle EE TIM aL ET. OO

'MadeInBritain

British motor-cycles and bicycles
tremendous

are

experiencing a

| export boom.























ik

You have a HOUSE FOR SALE
Let US find a Buyer



Electrical Inspector, Electricity & | blamed for stea increase in| T' They are so ypular in the) TE
Telephone Department, Grenada. delinquency e a. adolescent, United States that local manu- | .
a eee of appointment | youth in Britain, ‘ facturers are getting worried |
are as follows :— The analysis i. ma in aj Last month Britain exported! y i Ty J
1. Salary in the grade of report by the joint ne on 10,049 motor-cycles, worl Fou wah Rey 4 oe
; $2,160 x 96 — $2,640 p.a. | PSyehiatry and the law, appointed £1,040,000, and 236,000 cycles, Let US find it for YOU
2 Temporary cost of living) by the Magistrates’ and British | worth £1,800,000, This $ al a E : ;
bonus at the rate of 10% on | Medical Associations. The number | increase in export sales of |
salary up to $2,400 and) os defaulting boys, convicted ot | £1,000,000 over May last year. |
81 7 on salary wr indictable offences, it says, rose| Biggest buyers of motor ~cycles | ~ - Lt
5 $2.4 ow : | from 19,387 in 1938 to 27.545 in were Australia (1,800), United |
Trave ling allowance not} 1948. States (1,074), and Switzerland |
a The png ged eee . its exhaustive study of the! (623), F.V.A.
I ; problem, the committee contends | 7 , ote . 83~
5 pds vanes 2 ginal that “shoddy” parents, lack of Popularity Hardwood Alley ‘ Phone 4683






























| Privacy at home, blind-alley jobs| Far-Eastern countries were the |
and lurid films, tell but half the major purchasers of bicycle ae
| story of delinquency. Too many} led by Malaya (28,700) and | (=== {
youngsters, it adds, don’t know India (22,000), Other big |
| the meaning of religion and get| buyers were Pakistan, West |
| through their early years without] Africa, and Mexico. , . 1 a
learning the difference between | THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPI Y
| right and wrong. { In the first five months of this | 4 Hd J K 4
Much of the trouble is attribu- year export figures were | 1 ’
| ted to adverse influences of the M™otcr-cycles £3,900,000, anc | CORPN LT)
| last war. More married women cycles £8,250,000, J . A .
with families had accepted war- Popularity of British motor- |
tir empleyment with the result ao and os les in the United |
| that children often ca home to ates is explained by the fact
jempty houses, There oe a jumb-; that American manufacturers NOTICE
ling up of human beings of all; have not treated this form of | :
ages sharing of everything from, locomotion seriously.
| beds to clothing. With parental Bik ¢
love and attention lacking the oe Were eo ave : -
inevitable harvest was delin-] 20@ are still listed as such i A J
ome’ Soniecsona stigma Yo. Toe eee
is Poor Example Set ' eine se Fe
|" “Many parents set such a poor| UNe motor-cycles. ALLE PERSONS having ACCOUNTS against
|} example in honesty, self-restraint Competing
| and perseverance,” says the report,| But now American youth has this Corporation are requested to be good
| “that the surprise is not that the! qiscovered the joys of the
| boys have such low standards} lighter British machines enough to send them in, made up to the
mcm run @5!So when so that some Americar
as § acturer: are 7 5 . > x .
| The report recommends that] Combate with “orotate t SO¢th OF JUNE as soon as possible
| mothers with children of school light-weight bikes.” canine
| age should accept employment r : |
| only Gusting school hours, If} Harley-Davidson, U.S motor 1 + 7 am ’
neces , local authorities should cycle manufacturers, hay a BARBADOS ELEC Ie
wdbeidine ‘sitting- in services thus applied to the Government t ‘mr , gy ’ r 7
enabling parents to go out to- increase the tariff on foreign | SUP LY CORPORATION LTD.
| gether more frequently. machines. |
| Among other remedies, the re- R. B. FRANCIS, M.LE.E., A.M.LC.E.
i! port suggests greater 7 ane aa aoe used ee it Pe suai et i
| ment in the adoption of orphans, te East because of poor public | ‘ting Manaver
}sex education, “eae schools, transport facilities, and weathe { Acting Manage Pr
| premarital advice for engaged conditions. They are uSed by yt 12.7.51 nN \
couples and free or assisted legal office and factory worke ). Papi a iar ee }
} aid to parents seeking divorce. students and peasants. SES SSS {
But special stress is laid on the,in Mexico they are hopulé ar |
| need for restoration of normal because they are the “best 13” Oe PPPOE POCO GOD VOCS VOPCDI IO
love and understanding between made and strongest’, according 3] . %
varents and children with the to the Mexican embassy. K 2
re-establishment of family life on JAMES MORAN. | DO you REALISE x
its proper pedestal. —(CP.) —L.E.S. | %
] %
x
s
SHIPPING NOTICES { How much you can Save {
, %
by making :
























MV.
and Passengers
Antigua,
St. Kitts
instant

“Cartbee" will accept cargo
Dominica,
Nev
Friday

for
Montserrat,
Sailing

and
13th





“Daerwood" will accept
and Passengers for St.
Lueja, Grenada and Aruba. Pas-
sengers only for St. Vincent.
Sailing Friday 13th instant

M.V
cargo

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION INO.

Telephone 4047.



| CCPC PAPAS OPP PPE |

NOTICE

' is hereby given

that SALEH MAHMAD AS-
WAT of Mahogany Lane,
Bridgetown is applying to
the Governor for naturaliza-
tion, and that any person
who knoWs any reason why
naturalization should not be
granted should send a writ-
ten and signed staternent of
the facts to the Colonial
Secretary.

11,7.51.—3n.

SOS eesti

.
:









THE

rooms, Kitchen, Pantry, etc.

A.F.S.,
Real Estate Agents,

"Phone 4640 -i-

and the Gardens are beautifully

ee

JOHN 4. BLADON & Co.





Canadian National Steamship:















Colo.
ca
G
ge

Accepting Passengers,

Cargo and Mail



R. M. JONES & €o., Lid.



AGENTS
3at4

Phone :::

SAILING TO ‘
E
S. “Colombie’’ 22nd, July 4
, via Martinique and
iadeloupe,
SOUTH BOUND. |
mbie, July 11th, 1951, ff}
ling at Trinidad, La
uaira, Curacao, Carta-
na and Jamaica





th ¢
PIP}
New

Plying to the Governor

is hereby given
at MOHMED SAYED
RAWALA of Ke nsington

Road, St. Michael is ap-

for



* naturalization, and-that any

pers
son

on who knows any rea-
w hy naturalization

should not be granted should

senc

Statement of the

1 a written and signed

facts to the

Colonial Secretary.

G9 DODSG PSII LOG EGOS OSGI IOE Libre r eee

(PO PSIGGS GIES G OGG GG OGG FGI OGE GFA, =

CHARCOAL BOX IRONS DmLUNE

®
CENTRAL

Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets

tra SALE “ CASABLANCA” “ MAXWELL'S COAST

This Excellent Modern Property set in walled gardens of about
2 acres contains a Large Verandah, 2 Reception, 5
There is a double entrance drive
laid out.

EMPORTUM

3n.

SOCOTOT COCO CCRE CE 1 GCOS
CPEOTPPT AGG IS PEFR CE LEE

11.7.51.










large Bed-

Well recommended.

F.V.A.

Auctioneers & Building Surveyors
THE FIRM WITH THE REPUTATION

Plantations Building

NOTICE












_ SOUT THBOUND
Sails Salls Salls Arrives Balls T + 2
Name of Ship Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados { Ol R OWN DRE |: $
LADY NELSON 30 June 3 July 5 July 14 July M4 July ‘$ 3
CAN, CRUISER os 10 July = 13, July _ 22 July 3 i§ :
CAN, CHALLENGEK 20 July = 23 July _ 1 Aug. 2 |
LADY RODNEY 320 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. M4 Aug 1%
CAN. CONSTRUCTOR ar Aug. 12 Aug. Z - 21 Aug. " ous .
LSON 0 Aug. 23 Aug 25 Aug 3 Sept. Sep i
eee _ \3 You have another opportunity
NORTHBOUND , :
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives | %
Name of Ship Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal | ‘ of learnin $
LADY NELSON 27 July 20 July 7 Aug. 9 Aug. 12 Aug | ‘ 8
LADY RODNEY 25 Aug. 28 Aug. 6 Sept. 8 Sept M1 Sept ‘ $
LADY NELSON 16 Sept, 18 Sept. 27 Sept. ae 2 Oct S
LADY RODNEY 16 Oct. 18 Oct. 27 Oct. 8 Oct 1 Novr, 3
>
| y 4! 1 %
d ‘ WOE - x
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents. Ig $
a F — g
nn | ‘AD :
| | i >
ROYAL NETHERLANDS | %
Pe
STEAMSHIP CO. 3
| R
SAILINGS FROM AMSTERDAM Cle G | z
le Gle Transatlantique | o>
MS MAAS-—12th July 1951 | STARTS ITS SUMMER COURSE ¥
MS BONAIRE—13th July 1951 | L %
MS HERA-—3ist July 1951 | 3
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND :
AMSTERDAM i i 4 i x
MS WILLEMSTAD—10th July 1951 ENGLAND & FRANC | Ea - @ a x
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAM- : | %
ARIBO AND GEORGETOWN Ss %
MS HECUBA—13th July aie 1951 | %
MS BONAIRE—2lst July 195 Gu 1% 7 ™/.T Oo - *
SAILING ‘TO TRINIDAD, LA_GUAIRA, } ENROLL NOW! %
CURACAO AND KINGSTON \% $
MS CONDOR—17th July 1951 1g 4
os i eerste see ea | Reooooooose OPPO OOOO ah
|
|
|

Wm. FOGARTY LUD.

New Arrivals Include ...

COTTON LACE ALLOVER (White)
Prices $3.26 to $4.24 per yd.

LACE EDGES—All widths and prices

HAND (Sewing) MACHINES

$69.59 each

BOY'S SUITS—Fitting from 2 to 6 yrs.
$3.00 each

A Beauty Mint...

HELENA RUBINSTEIN'S

WATER LILY CLEANSING CREAMS

Contains youth — renewing essences
of fresh Water Lilies











tpereo

ne
ae

a:
?

sebearcittii i



.

.
+
.



PAGE EIGHT



BARBADOS

SUGAR RAY ROBINSON

An Interesting Climb |

From Rags
GEORGE

Hy

To Riches

WHITING

SUGAR RAY ROBINSON, or American citizen, Walker

Smith, entered London on a

permit allowing him to “work

in the United Kingdom for two months.”

But it

amount he

took him onl)

got
to whom he lost hi



RAY ROBINSON



Play Baseball
After 3 Days

NEW YORK, July 12.
Major league baseball teams

resume action today after taking
three days out to play the annual
all-star game. Most interest was

centred on the four teams battling |

for leadership in the American

League.

The next two weeks should be !

very important toward settling the
pennant race between the Chicago
White Sox, the Boston Red Sox,
the New York Yankees, and the
Indians, Boston, one game behind
the first place White Sox, plays
Chicago in twilight and night
doubleheader at Chicago.

Other top American League
contest is the night game between
the Indians and Yankees at Cleve-
land. Meanwhile in the League,

SAP RA eee weal

Tea
the second place New York
Giants, meet the Chicago Cubs

play third place, St. Louis Car-

aL
over

dinals this afternoon in New
tonight in Brooklyn. The Giants
York,

—UP.

ARTIE’S HEADLINE

thite-

“My dear, you simply can’t

thar outfie

Wimbledon!"’

wear at



YACHT CLUB TENNIS
RESULTS

Following are the results of
yesterday’s Tennis at the Yacht
Club:—

Men's Doubles

J. D. Trimmingham and Dr.
C. G. Manning, beat C. Godfree
and A. M. Wilson 6—1, 6—1, 6—0.

TODAY'S FIXTURES

Men’s Singles, Semi-Finals
W.A. Crichlow vs, C. Godfree

Mixed Doubles Semi Finals

Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Bancroft vs.
Miss G. Pilgrim and G H
Manning.

an hour to

work for $144,000 the

for his fifteen round fight with Randolph Turpin

middleweight world title.
&

‘Sugar’ has been described as
the world’s richest fighter, and the
story tells of his “rags to riches”
limb, and hi rrival in England.

Looking like a younger duskier
Clark Gable, unscarred by his

trade, tailored soveriy but expen~-
sively and bowed into his chauf-
feur-driven flamingo pink Cadil-
lac convertible by one of his en-

tourage of nine, the immaculate
Sugar smiled and shook an exqul-
sitely barbered head when you in-
ferred he is the world’s richest
fighter

Maybe he is right for the high-

ly-polished and well-ordered
ruthlessne: he displays in the
ring have sent scores of possible
opponents running in all directions

but the right one for Ray



Still you could put his fortune
at £250,000. Nor, will be bother
to deny that he owns 75,000
worth of re estate on Sevenih
Avenue, New York: that he paid
£25,000 for a bar and grill-room
business; that 9 dry-cleaning out-
fit cost him £7,000; that he owns

ne of the most elaborate hair-

establishments in New
York; that he gave his wife a lin-
erie shop when their son ws
born 18 months ago, or ‘that |
taff pay roll outside of boxing
comes to about £1,500 a week

dressing

The Priest’s Idea
Detroit-born Robinson has come
1 long way since 1936 when as a
pindly little imp of less than 8st.,
he was taken by a priest to have
some of his street-arab devilry
turned into more orthodox boxing

hannels by _ instructor George
Gainford at the Salem Crescent
Athletic Club on 129th Street,
New York :

Gainford is now Robinson's

arge opulent and expansive man~
ager

“IT told Smitty he wa too
young,” says Gainford. “Beside
e said his ma would kill him if
he got mixed up with the fight
game. Sol chased him away from
the gym—back to delivering gro-
series and dancing for dimes on
the street corner

“But he turned un again with
my nephew, Warren Jones. I
took him into my home, taught
him a few tricks, and let him stay
around with me when I took my
team of amateur fighters round
‘he clubs.

“Mischievous little guy, he was.
Ine of his tricks was to have a

N iy liwate key of my car made and

ack the car f6r joy rides. 1

emacked him down mofe than

once,

“But Smitty deserves his breaks.
In those days he had nothing He
had come to New York with his
mother and two young. sisters
when his parents were divorced
in Detroit, His pa still works there
at the Ford plant.”

It’s ‘Baloney’

In later, lusher days Robinson
has encouraged a belief that he
began boxing as a worshipper of
and bag-earrier to Joe Louis in
Detroit. That is a fiction that can
be forgotten—on the authority of
his mother, Mrs. ueila Smith, who
has her own house, clar and

enow i
maid in New York Mrs. Smith
dismisses the Louis story as

“baloney.”

No, the Ray Robinson rags-to-
riches saga began with no roman-
tie nonsense about hero worship
He was just one of thousands of
coloured American kids who had
to fight for self-expression in a
tough, culf-or-be-culfed district

So Sweet
His first public fight—as distinct
from gutter scuffles—took place
at Kingston, New York, where,
despite being under age, he per-
suaded Gainford to let him give






two years and a beatin to an-
other young green-as-griss ama-
‘eur. To get round the age diffi-
ulty,. Gainford borrowed the

name of an older boxer called Ray
tobinson—and no more has been
heard of Walker Smith.

The nickname “Sugar” came a
year later when Gainford turned
to a ringside reporter at Water-
towm New York, and described
his by now promising fledgling as
“sweet as sugar.”

Having won all his 85 amateur
bouts, with several knock-out re-
cords on the way, Robinson turned
professional as a light-weight in
1940, beat up Joe Echeverria in
two rounds—and has been repeat-
ing the formula ever since, with
commensurate rise in the pay

packet
He Ate Them Up
To date his score-sheet tells of
128 wins two draws and only one






QUARTER-MILER’S SECRET



ENGLISH ATHLETICS STOCK rose still further last week when
2 combined Oxford and Cambridge team defeated Harvard and
Yale by nine events to four. Winner of the half mile event was Nick

Stacey (right)

English team captain,

He was followed home by

Ed Grutzner who had been timed at 48.2 seconds for the distance,

a time which was kept secret until the day of the meeting.

But

Grutzner was unable to reproduce that time against Stacey who

won comfortably in 49.2 seconds.

defeat—by Jake LaMotta from
whom he took the middle-weight
championship of the world last
February

Many of his opponents have
never been the same after being
taken apart py the polished

menace of the Robinson fist.

Robinson just ate them up one
by one all over the United States”
says Gainford

“But it was tough getting him
fights. Every guy ran away from
bim Even after he beat Tommy
Bell for the welter-weight title
he had to cut his purse-money
down ‘the middle to get pppo-
nents.”

“We had one hell of a time be-
fore we caught up with LaMotta.”

But now the hard times are
over. At 30, man-about-town
Robinson has put aside the incon-
venient memories of a divorce at
the age of 19 and the _ trouble

stirred up when, during his 15
months’ army service he refused
to box exhibitions unless Negro
soldiers were allowed to watch
them

Now He's Smooth

Robinson is now happily mar-
ried to ex-Cotton Club dancer
Edna Mae Holly, and has an 18-

month-old son Ray Il back in
Miami.
The rough-edged fighter with

a scowl and a chip on his shoulder
is gone. In his place. is the
smooth, smiling man of affairs, the
12-handicap golfer, the employer

labour, the owner of the “Sugar

fay’s basket ball team, the idol
of the Paris boulevards, and the
assiduous committee man with
£10,000 to distribute on behalf of

the Damon Runyon Cancer Fund
in England, Seotland and Ireland.

World Copyright Reserved
L.E.S.



WHAT’S ON TO-DAY

Court of Grand Sessions —
10.00 a.m.

Court of Appeai—10.00 a.m.

Police Courts — 10.00 arn.

CINEMAS °

Globe “The ith Letter” — 445
pm and $30 pm

Plaza (Bridgetown): “Operation
Pacific’ — 445 pm. and 8 WO
pm

Empire; “Soldiers Three’ — 2% 20
pm and & 80 pm

Aquatic “The Heiress” — 8 30
pm

Assize Diary

Kex vs. Israel Layne

Rex vs, Louise Walker







The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 5.45 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.25 p.m.
Moon (Full) July 18
Lighting : 7.00 p.m.
High Water: 11 a.m.,
p.m,

11.02

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) : nil
Total for month to yester-

day: 1,48 ins,
Temperature (Max.) 86.5°F.
Temperature (Min.) 72.5°F.
Wind Direction (9 am.) E.,
(3 p.m.) E.N.E
Wind Velocity; 8 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 am.) 29.992,

(3 pam.) 29.943,



%

ALWAYS GOOD TO
SEE YOU ON FRIDAYS»
HOW'S YOUR DOUBLE
GRIPPES I THOUGHT

IN AND SAIP you
WEREN'T ABLE TO
WALK +

| Srey |

They'll Do It Every Time

Via “1g v a eT _ WP
/4 HELLO, CRUMNEY~ Vy WELL*IM FEELING Y det Te ast WALKS,
“HE'S

(KOFF-KOFF-KOFF)~UHs] A COT RIGHT UNDER THE,
I GOT To TAKE IT EASY { $2 WINDOWsâ„¢THE ONLY
FOR A LONG TIME YET <7
YOUR MISSUS PHONEO ] vA IN BED MOST OF THE
TIMEsBUT THE Doc SAYS
IT'S GOOD FOR ME TO
TAKE A LITTLE WALK
y MEBBE ONCE A _Aa5y’ IS RIGHTAT LEAST
* 4-4 TWO BOOKIES HAVE ]
STRANGLE HOLDS _/ ~

A_ LITTLE BETTER, BUT

WEEK>+



==p DOUBLE GRIP

=)

es
= 6 54

ON HIM

DOC HE EVER SEES IS
A HORSE DOCTOR






WITH HIM sHES ONE
GUY WHO'S MADE A













WHEN HIS WIFE
GETS SICK OF HIM
HANGING ar








THE LEAST THEY COULD
DO |S MAIL OUT THE
POOR GUYS CHECKS =*+

THANX TO
PAUL E. PENROD,

3806 PRINCETON,
WAGAVILLE, TENN. +





* POOF *

4



i wie! Re ty
By M. Harrison-Gray



Dea! South i
Game alk ‘
N .
$ Aj1¢ $
AQ6S .
@3 10 $
@52 :
Ww.
aQwo8k ak
VK 942 vw
o6 @5
&I98G @ Q
3
a5
vs
@aAK 9725
eAKWIT4
South should wmave re
covered from is imitie
mistake Of opening On

Diamond on an idea! nanow?
tor a Two-bid| He torcea =
with Three Clubs. over
North's One Spade response
and North then bia Three
Hearts. Swill averse Lo show
ing the character ot his
hand, South made the vaa
rebid of Three No-Trumps

North visualised a slam
but from his angle the use
ol Blackwood could not clear
up the question of possible
losers 1n the ininor suits He
therefore. marked time with
Pour Diamonds

This left the way open tor
South to call Pour No
Trumps and to bid the grand
slam in Dramonds after
locating the missing Aces
South’s actua: bid of Six
Diamonds was a poor effort
and North could do no more,

ARNARERERAUR EROS Hee eE eee eee abateceenenene





SONNE TERES ORES ESE De SESE Dec Ses eee TEESE TC PONETE ESSE EEE TE ee sEetEtyegeseeess
SUnreseaseertueessanseeezer:
Foneeense essere ssocenccons

————

AGE AND
BEAUTY

LUEBECK: German giarls com-
peting for the title of “Baltic
Beauty Queen 1951” are in revolt
because the judges have set an
age-limit of 27. The girls have
written protesting that Helen of
Troy was 46 before she caused a
war, and that Cleopatra was over
40 before she bewitched Antony.
So the judges are meeting to re-
consider the decision.

TAKE ADVANTAGE Or THE
EXCURSION FARES
NOW IN EFFECT

@ Lowest Fares ever
0-Day Excursions
6 All Flights by “North Star"
Skyliners,
For Complete Information, s
. F » See
GARDINER AUSTIN & Co
Lta, %
McGregor St., Bridgetown
Phone — 4304
TRANS-CANADA
Alr Lines
International Trans-Atiantic
Transcontinental

MAKE SURE
THAT YOUR

NEXT SUIT
BEARS THIS

o

LA

SLOVO PLE PPP LLP GPP FF

Pre
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POPPIES POS - POOOSS S








ADVOCATE



COLLEGE, SWORDFISH |

WIN AT WATER POLO

HARRISON COLLEGE defeated Flying Fish four goals
to nil and Bonitas lost their game to Swordfish by two
goals to nil in the two water polo matches played at the
Aquatic Club yesterday afternoon.

Tne goals in both games were

\scored during the second half of
leach match. For Harrison Col-
lege Charles Evelyn scored two
| goals and was responsible for a
third which was deflected in by
one of the Flying Fish defenders.
| ‘Mortimer’ Weatherhead who
cpened the seoring for his team
scored the fourth, The two goals
in the Swordfish Bonitas match
|; were seored by Geoffrey Foster
j and Maurice Fitzgerald.

Flying Fish were still without the
services of their centre-back Tim
| Yearwood. Billy Malone, Clar-
|ence Hart and Vere Lawrence





was due to good marking on both
sides, Captain ‘Boo’ Patterson and
Trevor Yearwood kept Geoffrey
Foster and Mickey Jordan, tightly
marked, which was just what
Gerard Jordan and Maurice Fitz-
gerald did to Owen Johnson and
‘Brickie’ Lucas,

Swordfish kept up the attack as
the second haif opened and goal-
keeper Maurice Foster was kept
busy by shots from Geoffrey
Foster, Mickey Jordan and an oc-
easional swim-through by Gerard
Jordan, Swordfish got their first
goal after five minutes’ play in
the second half, Geoffrey Foster

| were also unavailable, Hazell, was the scorer,

Taylor and Whiting came into the
jteam to replace tnem. Harrison
| College were also without their
‘best seven. Allan Taylor stood
ijdown to give Stephen Grannum,
jone of their newcomers, an ‘out-
ing.’
| The first halt found both teams
| Still trying to open their account.
|Harold Weatherhead, “Termite”
| Taylor and Hazell in the back line
for Flying Fish worked hard, and
Peter Potter on the right wing was
his usual tireless self.

| Flying Fish went on an all out
offensive right after the interval.
Their attaek was broken up by the
College defence who cleared to the
forwards. During a melee about
five yards from the Flying Fish
goal, Mortimer Weatherhead got
his hand to the ball, and with his
usual quick flip shot had the ball
inside the nets.

Flying Fish went back on to the
defensive and for a time held the
Collegians at bay. Midway in the
cael half however, Charles Eve~-
lyn who had made several deter-
mined attempts to score during the
first half got his first goal and his
team’s second’, Flying Fish kept
attacking and their forwards miss-
ed some certainties, Potter on the
wing backed up his defence line
well and several times cut off the
Harrison College back Frankie
Manning who was attempting to
swim through and score,

On two occasions however Man-
ning got the ball to his forwards
who after some short passing od
the ball to Evelyn who shot the
third and fourth goals, one of these
shots was deflected into the nets
by one of the Flying Fish defend-

ers,



Second Game
The second game was perhaps
fas‘c~ than the first and once again
the first half was goalless. This

Bonitas rallied and this time it
was Albert Weatherhead the
Swordfish goal-keeper who was
called upon to do some saving.
Most of the Bonitas attacks how-
ever were broken up by Gerard
Jordan or Maurice Fitzgerald.
Jordan was marking the Bonitas
left hand sharp shooter Owen
Jdhnson, He kept Johnson well
under control throughout the
entire game,

Two minutes after Swordfish’s
first goal Maurice Fitzgerald swam
through to just inside the halt
way mark and sent in a well
placed shot which entered the goal
high into the top left hand corner,

Three minutes later the game
was over with Bonitas on the at-
tack and Swordfish maintaining
their undefeated record so far this
season,

The Mr.

Clarke,

The teams were:

Harrison College: J. Chabrol,
B. Manning (Capt.) C. Evelyn,
F. Manning, M. Weatherhead, R.
Feldman and S. Grannum.

Flying Fish:. P. Foster (Capt.),
L. Taylor, H. Weatherhead, P
Potter, M. Conliffe, W. Whiting
and Hazell.

Bonitas: M. Foster, T. Yearwood,
J. Paster, B. Patterson, O. John-
son, N. Lucas and M. Konisberg.

Swordfish: A. Weatherhead
(Capt), G. Foster, G. Jordan, M.
Jordan, M. FitzGerald, R. Weath-
erhead and H. Portillo.

This afternoon’s match between
Starfish and Sea Nymphs _ has
been postponed until Wednesday
July 18th,

The Harrison College Barracu-
das fixture scheduled for Tuesday
17th, has been postponed to July

referee was Archie

19th. The Snappers Swordfish
fixture will be played on July
17th.



34




SUALBCe

“Frankly, 1 thought it
noe, to o % “We te
70) ov my

Malo,



BEL

OF DISTINCTION

PCS. MAFFEI & Co, Ltd.

é

oS SSSOOO SS SSS SPSS OO SSS

CRYPTOQUOTE No. 50
| GNJ WASYZ WTI QITXDE

Kingston Gets
New Mayor

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, July 11.
Ken Hill, P.N.P. second Vice-
President and member of the
House of Representatives to-day
was elected Mayor of the City of
Kingston, St. Andrew, with Wil-
liam Seivright, ex-Mayor as De-
puty.

Hill is leader of the left-wing
group of the Socialist Party and
President of the Trades Union
Congress. The Party elected him
for the post of Mayor when Seiv-
right who was recently termed
the island’s most respected and
honoured citizen by Governor
»Foot, declined to accept re-elec-
, tion.



MB GT WTIDJG GNJA
—-EZISE
Last Crypt: Forty is the old
age of youth; fifty is the youth of
old age,
—Proverb

SE HABLA ESPANOL

ORIENTAL

CURIOS, SOUVENIRS, AN-

TIQUES, IVORY, JEWELS,
SILKS Etc.

THANTS

A GRAND DANCE

by #4
MISS BERYL TAITT

at
St. Joseph’s Girls’ School
TO-NIGHT
Percy Green’s Orchestra
Admission 2/6

‘ODPODSSIOSSSSSPSSSIOO

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For Your

Enjoyment

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FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1951



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and first class private roads completed.

Sites from 10,000 sq. ft. upwards



For further information ‘phone 4230

FOR SALE
at HIGHGATE St. Michael
Cool and Attractive Situation in well laid-out area.
Water mains and electric mains have been installed
Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.
Head Office, Prince Alfred Street



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—— a



Full Text

PAGE 1

I HIDAV. HIV 13. |(5I BARIIADOS ADVOCATF I'Af.I Tlllll I NEWS FROM BRITAIN IU IIOI .l AS MMIHW LONDON. July 6. MONDAY. \w saluted Canada (Dominion Day). Wednesday, we saluted America (4th of July), Todav, we %  M Holland Why Holland ? Listen to what happened there yesterday. In Amsterdam nylons crashed in price from £ 1 to Hs. a pair, and every third pair was free. Men's suits were wiling at £10 instead of £20. with three shirts, three ties thiown in. %  Mild l>u>.— vertrrday—a suite of Furniture, unii oneri return rail I i n you ramc frum in Holland; newly-weds found furiusning firms paying for then* honeymcon. Children's icecream cones uiKali-priced—and there w* ,i free balloon with (.very packet of sweets sold. WHS giving EVERYTHING FREE for one hour. H Hand gone crazy 1 British lour! I finding their florin.* turnrd t<> dollara, JoaoOd kn Ike mod lush fur bargains, and didn't Mdj the whyi and wherefore*. NIEUWENENDUK. Irkfl Oxf.nl street of Amsterdam. teemed like an anthill in the glorious hunt. All because the nhopkeapers of Holland had go* tiicd of looking a*, crammed shelves and empty shopi—sequel to public boycott of high prices resulting from a %  UVMMMBI change of p 'In | The llmrsrv. ifr None can be more ci. thin fantastic Dutch price-war revelrv then Brtl < barely keeping uureast ynl delegates like Wolsh Glyn Williams retorted; "If rearmament is responsible for the increased cost of IIVMI,;. flam thai must apply In the ta'-ia way ;r. f'.ms'n. H has the be %  ilaiy |. rca in the worM." Impossible! Whatever the Government may 10 the problem of the upward surge of prica*, POM ticalljr every aspect of the citizen's life at TTnmoment, the public %  I is likelv to be ntlgfled only witii action that will restart something of tenpay packet's value. Tin nig s..reness of the public was pretty well summed up in the .in u dcb.it.' on the Wednesday niptit when a Member declared the Government reply wa I i rtaen ui advatiee of the cost of living. 'Tito get that over the public," he cbargM. 'It u. almost impossible A .SlH-|.ll,.I That member was a Socialist— Joseph Slater. Durham M.P. Torte naturally perhaps, piled o-i v for the Govenuneit with such dagger thrusts aa that by Edinburgh's ex-Lord Provost. Sir William Darling Rounding on %  declared "You.' Govenunanl six years control of our lives and dethUea, from he Bank of %  ngdand to the babies' bootees. Deai Brutus' i> in ourselves" And Si: v, aw. %  nnd '.he quotation fc> -t.ilb*ng a wicked ilm POCKET CARTOON by OSBERI LANCASTER I oaJfe said Come. f.U the Cup and ia fie fire o/ Sprinu Th' Winter Garment of R"ncm-ace nine-—but let i* B<1J* U.K. Raises Retail Sugar Priee Is It Prelude To tk-Rat toning? B.G. GrantJ Mining t'nii')'Hsii>ns HAJIBOlit LOG ia C.rli.U B.i I'.EOfiOETOWN. B.G July U Tile llovcruaeeM twa panlee. UM U.S. iliu.ncv.1 "WlUems Induelnp, lncnri>onited" %  five ;t*i LONDON muimg CWNMOI U> .xplan t.000 THE MINISTRY ol Pood has increased the retail price j !" ^^^^ "uT & Slat sugr in Britain from Sd to 6d. per )h with effect from urnW te untaiutc. July 16. The controlled price of wholesale su^ar was l ten l.ivs earlier Crotn Wl { I lo 4!*s 9d ptl cwl prua patri uWIM [odti oa of MgW, but uajiei Empire puKiim-.-. whMtl the IHI-II at Ul preer nl level will ore haeo bv agawemen*. irUI nUik>2 l .t.UOn tegu ol raw sugar 0U> %  nbei-s of the House. I announces that the inhen creases have been made nece*of flgii W.l.l > roclu-d5.63."> Bales Of Cotton lion I -rifyaa4.nl LONDON. July 11. "ifohodv in the House wu, torn. Empire countrle* last year pro. Secreta Trade. Hervv Hh In a wide eh* k on HI pruvineml cttieid been found priees were UHTVMM •SJ 1 "*"! %  ""!"}" ."r P:"Id tint d" 1 1 in ,h w>st indies by'the lothing pcteM ^JL l ta,ltl t ' llw A-*.-.. i the Administrative O U-lo the permitted maaJmum, Empire Cotton Growing CorporaThe only hope he held out for UV' ,l "" at the Annual (i-'iiei.il Meetsuffeiuu Billons wu lh-.t ,f the '"g held In Manchester yesterday. prices of raw materials wet.:., X" a letter espreaaUig his regret fall, he would tall a meeting of at not being able t' aU • % %  siig trade to discuss price Har'iey Buwcroam, President of the BtKud of Trade, itraaaad HH Mr. Rhodes, perhaps, would great contribution made to the beneiii from a VHH M Amstrrwelfare of the Commonwealth by dam'i Nteuwcwrndlik Cor a check Ute Corporation's arieeuraaaMMKri on what happens when the houvof seientiiic and %  gjnettltunl arowi(e'< u.itieiii.i-. exhausted. ftreoi In Bttinj countliM. Tlu cotton crop of these rOBMtrlrJ m Mnrm t lotids HJO1951, which is expected newspaper Callup Polls repeal t ., be a record, showed the that rhe Torie~ have lost Bprna irH-e cost ol p i hooaeoold sufjar A single-pvi,. ^ batayegei tfai two exliitini prtc* lev< to rte-iationini:if unraUopi sugar innaiiKsJ a! the suosldlaed price, mm would tm.) Tu hauaeJ Cat their SUppU %  lb. sugar at ail. wTB— %  Bern also been granUU i'tnpurary permission to occupt 1 rrnisaton to occupy and explore C nJH. btl ^ ,ial 5Ufar "*" J 2 mam "* Uie ame durtnet Britain thu year, suflialso for egeuaabite taneaaht* The t-.iish rauonbg. Corrasa—Wa*cimento Exploration B.l'.f. p;irtjr left Ge orgetown city today. ^V esl Indies Al WeslmhiBler Acid Stomach t WIM Indies Kcviinrnt IxiNDON 1 Mouso .f Commons on itaa (Con .... %  le lor War whethMM been taken I gleg Beg*. %  M. fJoadnn Wyatt, Undc % %  Wai OltleereplHi•^t^* i..nt hon. Kneiid is HI cot" itatwarj !,lll! %  "" l* ny i >ghi ham. man • ;i* Secretarj ..f st.n, (,„ n. < olonk ..thli MIIMVI %  W tKHLOagf tieman beai n mind thai Uaforrnej opinion in the Hntish West badki Blttl in ilunteei regunent wbai. p.-. ELEPHANT MEAT IS TASTY DISH LONDON. July || woman reporter %  Eptfej The L M oelleve tlmt the main MgOOn why M' Maurice Webb.-fh.K g tei. h.iv ran lakag) UgW olf the ration is Hint he ha> been nluctant to make any prtci IO|l whieh Mould show in the COg*ajf'lrrind index But houwwives. w hose major food grievances since the war have been r M-mitini i •< .I a bucuel inftudM 1'lU.OOO for detailed lab-.ratory osUfaUoO of the cimdltlnn with Won i lha co-operation >t the staff of thj in ii.n i UnHrarstt) College of the West i cUee,' -B.H.P ( \HIBIT Ol ICA/OKS tOVlKS :1.INW YrARS LONDON. JMO. Mlllkioolre Jam.-. Hand can >"ii nack 3.IHKI years — m Rsagfj .: % %  .. be roiuid inaors erool In this mnttar. I can assure In a l U* la,, ni*,, V^—fif*****, L-eft in U.S.A. SI"' s 'd that the raw meat cooked It was accepted in wartime that like a 'prime cut o! beef OOlj production of atomic weapons slightly coarser should be reft to the United States. In 194H die Minister of Defenc. that •fhalever the mlUtar) madV'it known that "' %  ail types of %  H^*'*" "' '"'''"I* PLX? J£~. modem weapon, including: aU 1-rtnijnt. ... %  wene being developed b.^! prod^ve.^,. peaceful Britain. As recently as Februaiy ^ ^ ^ linii IU Churchill chiillenged the Governxiieie is shrouded from the nicnt .ibni-t aUimic progress in DUU i lc al tuw muiaaul what. rawlLy rlnlntn h Primagnts4r, M. f fc u ]n) Hchieved in Britain. Attloe, i-mphaticallv declared. #rt her in the direcUon of atomic "There has been successful develproduction for war or in Wic asftle opment Viscount Alexander of ol our rraou rces for peaceful Hills-borough. Chancellor of the gtttrnic development. We know — Duchy of Lancaster, defending the Bna ,i y about all we know— Govcntmcnfs position in the Lord*, that Britain has yet to produce reiterated the Premier's statement. B0 atomic lmb. And the lintTlte cnief feature <•! the debate, j^ri organisation, or course, suphowever, was that with the anph>s radio-active Isotopes both iiouncemeirt that Ix>rd Portal, f„ r jdrntific and Indus'.'. %  i Controller of Atomic Energy, is po M .. i: i'.u:.m: and on a limited next month and that his arsile to other countries, ientlfk adviser had alThere is a growim: ready left. Lord Alexander could ttBOUghOUt the countrj that some -no more than he would v n a | re-orgimiflotlon t our ntomconflrm — that Lord Portal vrat i. i \u nonpreliminary step to the announcedollai aroi DOO-dotlar suppuement of do-ratlonlni are tui or, nalritaln Man who h> fought hardest In the ordlna raei ally Ii the last few month* for the .ilxdiceased to 10 or,, the tlon of sugar rationing Is Lord ui,|% Iu.s and the present Lyle ol WesibourM prestdent of ,., ., i„ manufacturer* Messrs Tale 4 Lylr. Lbi UM ,,, lhPh( ,, llIlutIanct s „„ ll(>1 sugar n-ftnerN. He ha. returned think |nj) jhoui,, be |i PLY y*f/f ito tho muck lime and time i li:; „ mi.^.tl,i in speeches ".V !" ^1" • %  nMnaht £?££ "'"'^ sugar (.uppHes ara now ami>Uto Siijor Caae Keaearrh In (-•t I'll' '• .T 'il* I n i i %  in %  Officials the lb use of Common* 01 Mi Webb tu 4 hi* July 4, M. Thomas Iteid i Ubou nave arodvoad arhei s%  i -„• secretary oi figures and have stoutly mainsi.de ha tne Colonies bat retained lha) there fc stIU %  gap I ad by lha be brldgad i*tw.*i Brltali s Itauon, Mauritius lual sug.i the POin reapect "f improvement ol tentlal demand If an r caw romes off the rsjUon COHOOrM, ,!„hii l>ugdule. Minister of renth v ith the BDi t ol Si te u I i ,e|>lied the pi ice increase. Mr. Wol • hon Friend to stated in the Houo of entlUed Suga. Cans ab lu ataoh was 111 only suflh.ee %  „ „.' of 3rd Feb'..! % % %  the % % %  w i i -M D Hut.mi's sugar BUppt) i illy in the Hot nt Comm'in* earn' i" ; .T ,". Mr. F. T. Will. M UVT "wh. • ry to the Mini irj of VJ Food deelarod than ., in %  2.5an,0O0 Inns., ) I %  a suli^tantial riorl 0B hand, bi fore sugar can eoroa no the %  i This p. it', t roar, he said, Brataln an* ic-ive only 2 220.rif|fl i| The most important %  %  i 'it of the Sugar Cane I Stfition has been breeded which nra n ovei IHI per aacd .,f the a arts and ba been larfejy roapoaaBaai for Uio . i i>.,( rocani yaan. Good work has alao l"eii done on such lha Mi-vejof the soil m the eane bolt, the UivaataaoUon Of the i.iitntional dot IMPORTANT NOTICE We will be improving our Downstairs Premises beginning from Monday 16th July, but will continue business on the Second Floor as usual. We solicit the co-operation of our Customers and the General Public. CORNER STORE MANNING & CO.. LTD. CONQUER PAIN %  bv En|oy the hospitality, comfort and thoughtful servIca which hava mada PAA tun Hi mm ot vasaroo travelart the world ovsr. NEW YORK Nonitup BBrrHM I* tl Kl I.. .1.1-1,1, or vis Sau Jti uopjjfii, luooey-asviiig "Kl TurW*" EUROPE FteguUi BSrrlaa by glanl flVubUdrok^d "Slmto" Qlpparr* -world's IsgSjal nirlmors—lo Hans, liome... *ionomi in FngLuid, li IJIHI Venezuela BvruH, dally BSS*VfoS to all mam 11 %  i asailsji b^'.ito W •' la il"-v, Colombia. Central Ainrrlca. Meucu ... and to East Cot ol Maxh Anwik4. la ho t. you OM D0 "Hy 1'AA" to R'l couiitnci Bod cokiales. For 22 years the leading international airline— f AA was first to link the Americas by air, first to fly to all six continants. and first to fly around tha world. WITH '."• • ''<'•" %  "fed SajradleilC, iriHdl f*.nforees the loothmi icilo* DO YOU SUFfeH FHOM TMESt P Thcia irv ihe pa-'" M rias-rai hesd(has. foldi, tooth(h. .h*i.iTut-it.. sa a x uh r sals*, saaralgai, msnurual pa>n*. And. as lo^.nh mifrditn:. Quinin*. bnn|i down fetentn imp'ilurei '*' men MUIEVE MM ... MT oitcet h easts you *ry artta to buy 2-ibi*t s*slopeof 'ANACIN'— nou|h to krm; you ItM •'<<** lioen or* bowl ot [HWn Also m handy boas* :< K tat *tt to' i f BhSC. an4 botiMn of M Ubiei (or household KM. 1 Dot ion and tfeninti u ")#f P"" *f thr 0*'d 'o.e t*elca*neT *w*£i-* fr ih* tt<*f of f-Mi fa Cirol ftrili •*' 12000 OXIOM BBf >it reeammwrf 0>ii %  -n their asraaiW (9WAMERfCAIV lt-j/t//i I/.--H it % ifCMM S Ca lid BtBMl il—.1 %  '.**>•••• Mic*. 1W (*l..r b.i Mil ho.... IJOJl 77//. MOST IMPORTANT OCCASIONS URSI nn II i ui: I ill si IX LOVELY HANDBAGS LADIES DRESSES DRESSY HATS a Till: MtHH.lt \ DttESS si/oi'i*/ BROAD AWAWMWA'/AW/// NO MORE GREY HAIR AFRICAN MIXTURE Colours r4 fcr t. FlOUOf RITO.. limmo-., t AIM try FLEUROIL BRIUIANTINE Make* (he hair left and gJouy .tn| ti.d.ias* NOW WHIi URKAM II"' ^S / I ( \ .Suap ' " BtRUllful V W I I V\ •re aiird ..I ni Ma VJ / I f\\ 11. :.uly >ti-^ \\ IIKIAM is pio.lu.i-U Ii m t--" X\ %  I %  n.ilii.l f..rn...ln lrl."l HI _> SKIN BLi. .•' '.|..l I.I II"' J TO H.. It I. .%  I...I... .1 .2 I'll. 11. are ; *"• :., -I..,, .(....i j..1 ,| M -.....I i.i.-l.i.lI..• 1.. 1 1.1neii ..1 il" %  • s*2 / %  "*' "'"i "' '' I "' '%  i' i'-"" 1 • /,MtMUlk— IUM" -•". i" bnn ". ; f SikmSBkwkm^ ,.,, ,1.,,,. ,.l„.l, ...... ben Hi •• J •' I j-^^^T -' ii ni.. 1 G able aiid H • ..r|. ,n i' U P ' •naacnr ..st*.s-n sraas. •--* -I... 1.1111. IHIK ff.,ir It.tl'J. Trail* lm i *.n.r* ran i^'ii'JiL I" "" l'l" n a Cel in tonrli iinm''diatrl with 71 M aVBaiesd I aasdasa ppaers, I. t,ri in nu< li v. 11 ii lbs Caaadiaa lr. FOREIGN TRADE SERVICE I ;••



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r u;r TWO IIMiRAFlOS \IIVOCATF. FRIDAY. II I-Y II. 1951 Qmhib CaUinq \i i down frean Long Island i A i. pinni or thf'"Rsckary' %  this morninir for Purto Riro or t journ. .: by the NTTM \ Oenere] • %  ( CM I i imatra With Canadian Bank Of Commerce M R ROBERT HkcDOIffALD whi> il of the Bank of ram 1' %  .: % %  .-*;. ... a) |*i-'ont spend* 1. .ivi .ii Barbados with riMi> Mr. Mar Don a Id was at OM IWW • i tinned al thi*ir branch IB BarIndefinite Sti HE'S HEAr : i Richard. inli r Nra, P AYlNi_thelr to Barbado. Smith, Mr*. Smith of They arrived by the Tradition RRANUEMfc ul!l|,h Success Story G m KEITH, the B %  ling in the Hoots" — has now achieved fame as a singer i Ever] night In Pan %  4 tin Clu %  I %  Sons at Winchester E NTmmiAn n lug the annual cricket mutch pupils ot Winchester and Eton COUl Mr Charle* Qoverno. ol Guiana who u on le:ivc in tutland, i nil ?.ir. Roland I I leldflelds They both have sons %  Iterating Mr i knot, %  ted in Britain lo re"'* match For most of the two titan .. U looked %  ajgh Blr Chart to arrive In England lato. Robinaon were wppo Ing team, But %  \ i Thev wW ,l "' I Eton W the i Wry. B.G. Law Student |WEH nmO-XIB-FUMO, i %  4m, Holland, stayed with thi ( '' ktw etadent who era i.now.t uu SoT %  %  %  %  "'",522* C UI -" 1 a i J? 1 ^ .. of thoaea wtportad to an re in 1 • l iva ilwav arantari In Jury l0l TM-, ' Sports Club back II ^JZx.JltL ? JI ""' ," Beuut, i ta av the B.O. o %  RMBBDet ->1 Hfimet. forahoilg* !" V !" :m '' SvVThr^neett^Jkabett %  %  " %  '%  |, %  .i London u ., w Barm i ire one of U %  nd this is our first oopornancy Likes Mexico tjda ,„ London Club i rk kef %  unitytocomenan. tfwalla*II a MONO tha manj thousand Forth pa to taka up paraaaent X\ who attended tha Lawn Ten.i.lo Owi residence here", the. TliS championships at WlnabtodO %  I week-end WM promoted from In January thki year, Mr. and tost week was Mi's Nancy Onke*. tha 2nd XI i I two months on She is hiere&s to %  fifth of :i A 1U3 all out Ha hit 2. ilian Riviera while on a t3.G71.724 fortune laft by he. tathIn OM < %  :• % % %  BBd enabled Barne from inar, Bti Harr) Oekaa, who ana to force an honourable draw wlUi Qg thru m v,-,< murdered la u< Bahamas eight old nvaui Bhaphei rouch. but coming out to the West years ago With her m London Indies on the Colombie thiw< Intrnnsit ll and ihe trip was Oakts. his wife and child. Miss % %  H>oth. part TNTRANSIT ih i ._. T-. 0 ol her tune travelling, Mexico 1 ih.-foiombk-w.ie Mr and L-jatte Amongst Ihe Stars is her I comarhn who an cu A VKItY interesting erickcl **• %  match t.-.k raaea H. Ihi.^Mexr...' ; md Mf Me, healtt has not bem too ih the 1 and ttw dry dlrnau ol 01 cai Lil oeorgel %  ^ . wfa Is the former Etaln lo Meet Costs They spenl Iheli hi An mi,11 General Meeting Barbados. f West will i • held ;it the CHlb Court, on July 18lh. Among tha i I under,i\ v II F. W. man ami gaglai d OasaaalNa mini lor an inand arc staying at %  •> with membt i Motel. Itachlej Lot %  I they Mr-*t had a eontmuiiitf top1937 when ihe J i rtped here for a day in J37 while on "" %  " toror in g^jw One Woman Made £700.000 NF.W YOltK, %  f70o.ooo Fannj Brio the moat famouH Follies gtrks, did it by playing i id bnu %  > Ihs :*d like a bal %  i quasi ike a rusty saw. \ i. l %  %  %  lied that she Bg foitune to her son ;n.UIrs aver Kai DRESSES CVCNIMO COCKTAJt, AITEHNOON anj HF.ACII • lOrdtr — AIo — BSAUTIIUL HANDBAGS fioni S7.lt to llfjl LADIES PYJAMAS I'lnn H.M per pr. rioral MM .. 4,1 AHU THEATRE (ill NINO TO-DAY. FRIDAY i:iTH When a girl so young and beautiful marries a man like this... ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN ti-k place in the Of Arundcl Castle, Sussex. lay. The Duke of NorIncrudlni Treva Howard i i d wt a 8u • .... i other a the ihik< T n of 1 team was Learlr Conslantine, the Mand will be considered is a pro%  Indian Test ,11posal U %  I rounder. Incidental Intelligence W HEM 1 Mailed •-. WOrk, I • i to drean aboui THI: ADVK.vn III:S %  • % %  .% T HE q It fair to pushing B \. hi. II,in . 2 &0(l third While tk, : """""• '"> onlye rourlli A Mcond Mid, "To i ., ,„.. l, h „A?" l,,Uon r "" s "" KMIIktt" .i,,.-, I • „,„| '"'"' vl,u h ,v '* '*"• tf i ipar on II IMMl more like 11.,. s, EmUkm, '%  '••''"' }" '• '!"'' "' V '"-'' Ihw wheel! Rupert and Simon—31 > The (*o tritndi trt tsdiad n 'heir qucit. "Let's Han one*." dirfiikon. Thai mtitii ihrough ih.fjyi Simon. '" \Mwtr is Drrpwood And efl thej % ihe treti no lootpjih ind, | ISII ihey are lost. M.nor |bM your Pro*tor told you %  bout?" "rnaoaisi l"aaswsn Kuprn. Ihn h* tlunki. "It's sound o! brrjknii: iwigi trt*inly not r.fjt my v ..jgr ot BJtM j LADIES SHOES ARC OLA > BJ.ACK SUEDE. TAN SUEDE. & WHITE NUB'JCK 1Q.39 1R-24 SMART STYLUS Black Laced OXFORDS For NURSES & SCHOOL GIRLS 760 T. R. EVANS^WHITFIELDS 4220 YOUR SHOE STORE 4606 3IDIBBBISBSBISB9I BY THE WAY .. By Beachcomber IsM hi^hrr l.vupfrnp evolution 1n „ I the Modoe turning %  rnllton. For the %  bank of the Dordogne and next to them come A IJ wh0 '•'"' '"' "Id the St. BmlU i, %  who * "•i 1 1 of whatever it is will be %  i\ a myriad voices -i a*ao lo hear thai Dr Bti 'o." comes the lirm reply, and If (Whom God Praaarve) of Utrecht you do thai i should 1 un lmm,,


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FRIDAY, .11 i.v i:, IMI HAKHADOs M)\(K Ml I IVI BUTCHER FOUND GUILTY OF MURDER In Rose Hill Affray V III A K ? PH CUMBERBATCH -.„%  >[ I Ml 51 Petal %  • *dai <->i Iccil Jackman, iiv.il In the now district on June %  '. Cumberbatch stood calmly m hut dark guit, trace of emotion as ha IIST ned to Ru Honour the Ctuei Ju Allan Collyrot n the deatn sentence. "After an argument lor two sdiich Cumberbafa deter bad lold the Jury. "Cumberbatch r^n shirt till • ich-long kiuf.in hU hand. He leaped in-twit h an und and sent I knife in Jacknun 1 • ik'ht Inchn and I lulls. 1 12 v.%  ilice Band To Give •'• • %  iiii Concert M Chili \\ illou Uca Band -n I ntral Si'aClub Willow '. July ,'H. \i\.'.a| '.'.'cdjiesd. One WM Cumberbat The :, # : 4 ber and M Jackm Mr. (i it Nil. tor rumberhj.i.ii and lfr 4 w w BoUeltCN nantrai n r iba ''i genetic potent! U i't.ictmed for m.n.Itttl )etoreOffl %  hkh lire Russia "H is not vet kno Wunark In Brit'balgredeoi breed of cattle wi! . .. ,. i ted for UM touui on for man : i". %  I ,i | %  • ni 1^ high %  ifiii.k B&raa 1 '""""' • < |.rr.lt. %  .(•II. %  1 amir n>* ' %  1 s. clod 1 %  %  • %  %  i COD IA1 Hank Notes Replaced By IIla nl. \ olrs i,. >. j ctawo WM n iit %  %  r cumu,I'owuiiis; lic-clectcd n pwruu fresidenl Of stock Jaekmuft lister h.ni h k'fl told her the elation. This too* place at the Id tha THIS IS NOT A ntTK It l i poUto whlrh .. nhupkeeprr ol ll ml. Hall buuthl Irom poutu vrndur on adBtasiBJ The IMtUlu looks like 4 durk whose n-iili.?--. arr nr-.tlj rr4iurd ...nl K Miuattina at rr*t. It hathe two baUntlm rurvWJ whore thf %  aekeM ol A duck* ndBKH Mould be and two Indentaiioiis where duck's r\rs Would be. Housewives Will Get Natural Gas In Oelobe BEGINNING from about October this year, houacand others will be supplied with natural gaa instead Ol tha present type of g Uied and \v\\\ then foTe Ret RlOTe Value for then money. %  uppued from i wall it Turm H ver> hitch beaUni quaUtj which onl) require* aboul hall the %  i %  it ns M q it your* Ui %  '"" %  :! %  <' '.: %  ..: .ILI :| %  t .,.. ihe Can Amendment BUI has passed its various stages UUVUStl Ixitii Houses of tlie I.< the public will he film! In 1 tlnj the Qovei n li natura nd eaaant 'if the ('U1OMI.II Oftlce which .Mil t,ik free) Drum uPi i. co-operative Imei run mukii Island's dair\ herd* iii l! whether this %  0* ...... II limited miounl ol ili s uiiri.it T %  t: IQUae) of 't.-k i •' %  .; %  : bomeone's goin to WIM WITH SPAIQ1NG OVER 70 YEARS OF SPORT baeta, the capiui tir>t ce • H |UJ • i I i i i" memben or lnhw> at one In the i. ealltj (inirol Mi-.'siircs Hoard now i IIK mosi ,,i the centrw safeguard the -i ck ownai b tnforcad b) ih %  Mn.c i %  n ijitun ihc advantaai of Artitlcii.i ttlon over natural serview nan plaaa. 1 \.Uh the %  i.il lni*nilnniii w en re i'i Hami %  .;..,! %  r |d : hi iin. .II r %  imc I %  i %  %  Ol t I S P A I 0 I N C R 0 S. LTD ^reetiVrV AKSOI-'H Peittani litenee Wr olli rtad nelghbouriiii farm* i • n Mm To v tho centre from which th developed I \h f flv dlffei nyt Ihe Man 1 i co-operaU vi I "rrom Initial expa i woul Annual McetmR at Ihe Chamber \ sattf-^araSR'nsK.sws JM.' Ihe tried to pacify hi would see unii The day after the murder ... , commitle antaje ,s 'he p* vi nii.ui ,.i %  pre Ml il H 1 real dl 1 %  .1". B "I'll. .llH.lll. i T: lehomonloaui I • .> 1 : %  Another freal edvantai %  ilnjjle ejaculate from a hull %  diluted ip to I In 100 end Ihti could be used to insnsnlnata ..^ It can thu'J ue seen that :. neat deal of goini ArUflctal [nsemlnaU u-oik can be dene t. improve Uudahrdta future preduettv* cap brol a dairy herd. nus". howevw heir l )t Vll luK you aro certain of tht* lend HIT. ibUlUai ol the bull which is such matters u mllh > %  being used. 00 Ihe pro "It in lor this reason lli.il the geny of ceil nil I PINEAPPLE 1 CREAMS *v/ i# < tun i\<. Aezjvjnr is $14.tMin. Three which should haw dollar noti ad rive ralue ..f ss.oon other officers nppointc,! srara %  1 L Bealj and Mr 11); Sir John Mill saint. Ml w Bpringer, Mr. 34 c. U the natural gas lUpply tobei The basli price Axed 03 the 11 cants to the publi ills to ti %  1 bul the (nation huill up. I I %  I it > %  small Uon of th. he 1 ,111 I"' made tne %  *'i 1 oi-ki.r %\blrh •haulsk have eeetaiaesl MM dollar iiot-s u..s tumid to he lil.ldr Up o( blank shrcls ol pjprr in %  n' tut to hank note sl/r parked and srjlrd. Thr Police *rr earrviiut out fiirIber investliallon-. aughler and not murder. ProiHMxilion (Members of the Oofnmtttes ol l the 1 ',,..".,./ ..'..-wiVu ***** ssaar* ne-aasd. rrcna gpaicleni omn noewtj or lire Association to branch line ihroti 'ion must nece ssa rily rabe j 1 dak | Roebuck duee n.urder tO manslaughter." Wlirl.icr l.rkio.n struck Greater Rum Track With U.K. Possible SPECIAL AT i>mn xi \ sun 1 101 MM. v KNIGHTS LTD. Hops W ill Be Used To Trace Criminals The Police AJ %  the l)is%  tuii: ''onstruetor" Loads 5,800Toiu of Sugar The motor vessel OeJtsffkui Constructor (8,93 is net) i-n%  %  Ltd) and a Co,, Ltd.. nre ihipplnc the sugar 1 tho tw, Bra brtown or snd one Cumberbatcli once. twi... Ihree limes, he had given birth lo provocation Mr. \ilis waived Ihe lirsi attack by Jaeknun and lold ihe Jurj that there WM a lernlic onslaushl on cumberbatch with a stick by Jjcki.i.n which caused Cumberbatch in lo-,t iibalance and coolness. atT. MUM ciled a case to snow that if after reconciliation Uie one renewed Ihe atNkCk *nd Ihe othrr hid a deadly weapon un him and used it. mere would have been evidence which mtghl reducr the crime lo manslaughter. *()np blow Is resarded b* the law aa belns grava pros ....ti.,1.." he said "The question fa." he arrucd. "had he time 10 set possession of his reison." He did not. he s*id. The Attack was too swift. They should attach little |o the evidence ol Jarkman's sisirr. Mr Mies told Ih. |urShe had given the suisei|ioii lhal Cumberbatch wenl home for a knife, that he save a • hreat s. be went and returned running wllli the knife in hU *iaaff She. he said, could not have been speaking the truth. No other witness has seen n> Mi. c. <:. II O'Neal (Set ratal 1 %  and Registrar). The statamant m %  ecounti and "Most <.r the residential the Iteport of the Committee of are alieiuH covered l UW OIIIM Management for Ihe year ended arv gas malnl Which strel December 31. 1000 srare nttopted. the La tan ltd at one end to The Asaociatlon decided tori % %  %  '* ir Hall Terrace %  tha othei 1 subscription from $2.00 end. They Include all tht to J3.00. pal streets In the cltj end suburbs The Chairman Mr. C. L. Scaly These low oressure mains arc on Iwhnlf of the Association exnrled t< gh In Mi A I'. Se for the good work he hud rendPrno OCdaUon during the time he was Secretary. Mr. Beale suitably replied. the high presaure —SAYS CAVE THKREISa potential trade for Barbadoi rum in Ens land bul a Kraal deal more advei IIMIH' ii needed, Ml R Cave ol Mesera c^\--. Shepherd e.Co., Ltd, told Uu Adveeata yagtardaj Mr. Cavi has just returned from England repreaented the Isarbadoa Chamber ol Commerce . vi ..r. crop hoi 187,000 tons equivalent of sugar I n d molasses. Ihe Advocate was told yesterday at the Department ol Agriculture. laid hi > record and is some 2X00 tons more than what 'mated. All factories have coa*?d hmgs fhc has seen 01 } the thing She w. the tvpeof witness who Bel* 1 . Pln< tOOth : I I I Mangoes — all kind* od | are plentiful everywhere m Bridgetown nd in the country. In the shops and alleys of tne City, hawkers' trays are mostly idled with mangoes which they sell at prices ranging Ung operations, it was a Mangoes arrive bv Schooners %  . day from other WL islands and pott! awaj irom daj I Hut In some of the trays, the buyer will find ui.nines — mostly ti t — pines, bananas, plan1 11 Britlah Empire He said that um 1. quite well-known in Englllng well iivwliciv luguor is sold ou will see the Jamaica rum 'When asked by penile .,!-„, the products >t Berbadeav 1 said M; ( ave 1 would uturau) 1. % %  :-: t .in.l ium in the flrv place 1 was siupilsed to has I I ....pie th;. J .1 1 urn bul ni 1 Barbados' That is why I think that If Bar 1 .ados rum is to take the marki C Dthta, presented %  bouquet passenger traffic from the UnitKfngd West Indies rial|sH Value "Th" 1 pinion da 1 nates .,1 ih.l-mfel %  %  || uu w*i %  Ii put up Bgures %  • %  to the value freight i rfered as a whole, it WOUk be of great help to Ute Londoi Chamber of Comme ci in 1 iittl Up .1 uiM case t-i the PTOpe uthorit 11 Mr. Cave's 13-year-old daiigh'e ..( Clothing Lost In Ftie 1 D i in < .nistrii. let %  1 ,: k 1 .iven will Lhjeh avldenUv is not the stick In the other will.. | BSlUng tl Cefutnsctor id that the stick which w 9 used %  and limes. \ in season. .s-kin* 6 cents each for 1 % %  %  and limes The stick she gavo iH)llce was split and worm eofen and if it had b* have broker Th II Othf I tl r. oadt t CORNED BEEI they : Whole stick. M irnporter can order %  I OOO 1 % %  % %  m .a Page 7 Licences will be issued at fy C01 rol OfBces to Impot npply for quotas. The 1 e him pi It will be 01961 per 1 OIL-MEAL COMES % %  ree thousand %  1 -. %  % %  : Akiia gosmer. 1 be "-."er ahw urouuht 4800 000 ix of sugar nal machinery for Andrews Factory Uaaa Haanirr lafl %  $24 FOi< BODILY HARM i rt of l i. end shinr> ... t Bo lad n ill Tenantry, the pro pe rty of Lilian D I b] inebOUt 3.IS pro i Wednesday. Clothing valued at 60 was also %  in up I %  %  i ., ,i a... i ''. ;-. a more lertaui end attempt should !-• made to n'lvci % %  ,,, Askeo be forwarded to the l'""'' 1 '"" ha wild, -'asking then, to UM M ^tractive to steamship Itnea lo ursBertake i. % %  1 i ommcrce The requ e st CH bt i make the present I Cave, came rron Ihi B> ; ibera on the In .t the honorai %  nv mhet Mr Cave said thai be had sec .i picture of the %  vent In tru "Advooast %  i trj pleased i i<>"k up n this little sei vice which niv daugh ti bed beet i compUnuml I • Bat bade %  %  Jl ST AKKIVKO IM in \\ cam STAIITIi.XA s% t.ltOWKSA Obtainable from H. JASON JONES & Co.. Ltd. a -Sore Mouth Loos* Bloody Tcclli Amman i.i II • i ii..*. Am os.in Tor Pyorrhi* —irmrd Mania \ P. And K COUld 'rale lined William I h i. $2* rot Sflauglu I 1. The tine is to l>e pc clays or two month*' mi orison %  %  as in i %  %  n tadmt l • In II. %  M.ST PEOPLE KNOW BRANDY AT IT'S BEST MARTELL BRANDY %  '" This fine old. world i< l I %  %  < DAV. i M \ 11 i i STAXSFELB. sum A II. I.I It. MORE AND MORE MEN ran CHANGINO TO ... K SHOES DAILY Becauso Ihey have become convinced of KV Superiority. HI Id Mil. THREE OF l ill M \\V VERY GOOD REASONS FOR THAT SI riltliiKin \ 11) 'K' SHOI S in made troi nlitaiiuiljle Hot I lUgndlaated for flexibility and accurately graded by skilled ei;iltsmcn. uu. I I'l'i its : K sinus an hand-out gnd matched ! %  man wiih o care thai no mat ne could Imital c.i -K' MIOLS ..,. made over tl PHIS FTTTING i A3TS with one fitting nai rower than Ihe foi i gngun it the het lii tin %  \Vh\ not come III and !•• %  lined srlfh %  pair of these world famous shoes > \\ ,. %  ,,,. mi rOU'll s;i> like all Ihe oilier K Wl ,.. iI'l.l. NEVER vvi \i( win mi; -.11111 111 T K HARRISONS I DIAL 2664 5 Sola D! tribnlora f,„ K' SHOES In Ii..,'-„'.,. s % %  ••• %  •SS.-.W.:::::VM:WSSSSSSV.V^SSSS M : WIV S£ WE A BASKET FOR E I iJtt 1 ## HPOSE! IV\ !/. I'ltUI II l \WI.V. SHOPPING BASKI i^ I -.IHI. >.'.1(1 N| ;; | ,, WASTE PAPI i: BASKETS WJI -v He. rich MM)I(V BASKETS UMmth II Ul\f. BASKETS S3 no A si :,n ,... i, Mti;i IIICI IKFAS1 BASKI TS H I I ami SI.. H ,,,, I, IIII ITU \s BASKETS t KE1 BASKETS I/and I/O • 3W Call .,i Hi.. II, MI,. Product* n.-i"(\\i siii:iiii:n A CO. LTD. HOME PRODUCTS DEPT. 10. II. It, I I %  BKO UI ITUI I



PAGE 1

I W.I IOI II BARBADOS kDVOt ITC i UD .1 il LI IJ, 1931 BARBADOS ABROGATE t. ^ t --.— .1 MM br th* Aa*nm ^. I.M JMI v. artdi*... I rMaj, M] 19 i"-.i Mil 1111) PARTI 7 FOR KMM yma public conoara has grown >vcr the absence '* i • h icier, in Ulli llland. The condition I by the conlinuod increase n| v<>hicli-s OH the roads. Elghti i introduced tinnuiitt-r In 111 House %  '.. i iiment to tend down 1 legislation for coi At •rfcaol fatal tnd many others causing injury itrlans and damage to "lucles. n the Courts occasionally with letioui toai and Inconvai lance t" people who had bix-n mjure>f v injured people ind recover} %  i i to others. This could d by Compula ry third p The suggestion was rejected by the ||mr i i OUnd that there was riot sufUctonl justification, either by way "i the number nf accidents or tinnumber <*f vehicles on the reads, to warrant i pulaioi o w ners nevertheless took the precaution to insure their vehicles >i merely tor Third Party I there have :i ntS, t<> which publication been given, in which b ras td-wfa have been killed outright without any pp>. n for the dependents. And thaae were unable to have recourse to the law. HOI IKdenied today that then foi Oampulaon Third Party Insurance. Figures compiled by the Police show that there were 521 accidents in r > months with 115 occurring in the month of April. A d the number of vehicles are ever m11,,..., K --*-;, mmmm — 9w vmwiM ered ssibihly of an inere.i n number of accidents without Instituting the ra eeaaary safeguards for public protection Only the (lovernment can do this. Bui Can A Jiittt Vani %  .• %  vanifth uilo UUn %  t matter %  r Watson." i. flUing 1 t. I !..k,. il. BJ %  • %  i yi>u diiappei'i without trace? I^HS of peopla arould iik;<'i i Uuddriver. AfUT latunaj m, day. But i didn't The Oil Star Uncr llumerk .... d .1 midnight and [rack ooad I'd bad Noa Did i do Iho murder? Aha : Wouldn't .vm uka to know One nf the neatest vanishing .it ,.r all Urna was performed In tr. Victor Grayson. joiiii. \1 I'. tor Coin* Valley. To the nu*MIn wln.li hiM.H Ml .vcrb€(dy jrcutric HI I:N \KI \\H KVIII H ..Mfurl lor /rtumml h without much easier, mj %  for people who %  iia*v-<*4 aiminu V P. 1 HI 1 -' Ulttr I us wjtay liplomatn who for nme realtor. ippaar The onf %  JSV bee iue when th< ill hlng took plac nutxxty knew what was K"n OH • took any nal By the lime people had begin u thetn, they could hav <<>n>pleted their arrjnHemenl* fOi ,' i their plan. But whnt nbout tha poUcal Th I il i>e are looking !Sui^l J." t l 5 U ""'!' 1 ""T 1 f r ,hl m Thtlr Picture* and Ml and nod* at tho deirnption* have been atudlH l | %  f it and Ibaa i.i,-. -,f ihmisands of people. anough, hut then w> hav dn't aiiu.diy tea the ptetui n Reeat You've forprttet okini in. arhlsky and aln na "f ihe reason %  .. %  -Hi ranuSuni laal ao hard. He dJ limply .., down fur a Wanied . nd %  now ha wai Victor Qntjrson w (; %  u i i did HI Hi. ii. i busk Snap! it Goea Paople sometimei disappear afUhoul They'd aive Bv % %  t II ; In have dinappaared. bput lh.ni. They i people with ami i thi r mindi .. %  bar suoa, ID t % %  12 • I v iij;'i. 1941 Ike Con B oth at Burton-on %  When .nutted an. tiiiirdei he is hunted pretl %  .'. %  en the < % % %  • um I u pollceaian you can be aura %  nutliinK i '.< n 'u **.i> ooa. o look Ilk %  .i >" %  :.' — L-K.S. Sterling -And Its Convertibility LONDON, Jurj 1 h. i, A i tin*the Chaniill.n Of 1 maka inquai %  %  I) tatement on the gold and detUl i serves. Thl^ UI.I prota ibly ahow that nlthoiiKh %  quartet ol tin rate of In i I an ilowe down bj receni world ooounodlty prices duo to ickenlng <>f """ %  W.V' 1 i • t taring on the current i i bull) Tot. %  %  %  i. big partli ul irlj ..i ve M i 1 % %  %  l auad In %  aroui IrnplleaUoni foi < nonwaalth Wi to Ihii country %  . %  ; %  %  n their trade with Canada r>as Althuugn leences I i %  i • . Ublllty ol lerllng Into dollan ( inaduin or i %  Li remain I I .i' .. i vti down la the rati 4 our old ind dollai n ervaa, %  %  %  P r aa anl movi I i i that the British ">*y De velvs not only %  lo i i' valusble i'.i!inm;~ It I bul IBM .. we tkcrnii): of our d< Uar poslUon rep] ice t %  i" The second Indication that .... bj the p raa an l trend ol out ovei aai trade, Tl %  By ROKAMl BOXAM. draaUeaU) than %  and this together with the lad .nts baye H, incn result ot llti I in an ade I i Hi I month %  ol thai real equal to the tradi %  .. ii There i from u mce i i .. nil )\. %  i "iir dot] undouol commodity pricea from thi | %  ma lime. i Ince it wai obvlouj thai DOt continue inBl its reel i.t bJgfa level overtures batn %  %  lion in WO) I %  tnarkeis If poUtlegl tension Ii further ea %  % %  %  Korean month* Y Lght have a walcoma %  I %  iur dollar-earniig proapacl %  Id It in' aarui : be i jioli! and d In larmi .! |S38 in .bout onequarter l | II value. ii Tit. end ol this year i i el wai n.'i.-AUantlc i hi due i" comment %  i III mean %  In our i 1 'Ail thimust Inevitably result 'it a flowing down of progress toward i taxation of ex .truls It should not b> Hint the Treasure from tin . Kperlmcal In converl blUty thai followed the 194 Amerfcrm loan This showed th M %  %  tlal condlUona must be 1Kb an expeiimen. an igaln The first >. form "f agreomenl mui DC .t,.i..-.i wrm irnon n tn u av if for the "freotlng* i i fundSi and the iseont thai % %  %  i %  %  ''ids mui t balsnoad n A., largahj ii.Tau.sc then teul mi the "fraaa i lei ting balances that In* i it i onverttblUty hw %  i %  queneaa, Bui evei .iKsuming such an agreement couli ii. lened before ooni %  ttempted, 'he proh U-m of our balance oj | would rcninin. if theac payment %  bra hoitiit of steilmie would In medtateu i asl %  I in lor dollars, and our res.iv. would th i lund ou i i v.i i >i they could rlnanee the! %  .quiremtnts. Phi would probably result Ii i rapid run-down of our gold an< %  n %  !'% %  and hnd ourselves back in the positloi %  !"i' Mai hall Aid and devaluation. Thai is not to say, howevet r.viiiibdity. wdl neve rome The British Govcrnmcn •nleps this their ultimat in., in i.i'i. they are hound undo %  i B vtton Wood and other llnancial agreements t' R iids tins end But unti I .it and economic horizon . ai man M is %  i onverubllHy is >tiii ai unlikely prospect f.r the naai future With tlu iiresent >iluartion in Persia ; oceaipjrlasj ihe attention ol the hole v/orld. ihe mwiorlanir of nil is a topic alln tin : I lie remotest corners ol ihe -lnhe In this article, the reader catches a glimpse of the way in which oil helps to keep the wheels %  of civilisation turning. Where The Beluga Blows LONDON Just about now. a grand gathering of Eskimos i.s assembling at one of the most lesolato stretches of Canada's Arctic coast. The name of the rendezvous is Whitefish. It s here at a shallow bay opposite Richard's 'slar.d, that the Eskimos of the Mackenzie River converge every July for their brief ;ummer 'big game' fishing season. Their quarry is the formidable "Beluga" — the eighteen-foot half-tun White Whale. Between July and mid-September, these whales come in their hundreds to feed at thi* remote spot. Fur the Eskimos this means at invaluable opportunity of stocking a wintelarder which would otherwise be bare. At Ins moment, countless watchers—men art women, young and old—ere lining the blufl overlooking Whitefish Bay, their eyes strainng for the first flash of silver betokening thi coming of their prey. Once the alarm is shouted, the bay becomes a scene of frenzied activity. Scores of small jut powerful motor schooners chug out t battle stations*. Their decks arc packed with Mirrels of gasoline fuel—obtained from a reinery on the Mackenzie River some 500 mile: iway. Soon, the boom of harpoon-guns and he crack of rifles echoes and re-echoes acrost he water, mingling with the excited yells he hunters. The men tow each 'kill' to the beach and then hand over the carcase to the women, who do all the subsequent cuttingip and dressing. Especially prized as a lelicacy is the 'muk-tuk'. the fat which clings 0 the whale's skin and which is slashed Into liamond-shoped hunks and often eaten raw fhroughout the whole period, the chase goe;. m with unabated energy. The 'midnight sun' is welcomed as a means of continuing iperatinns almost 'round the clock': meals ind sleep are snatched as and when a lull in he hunt permits. The women—working In earns of four—race from catch to catch. ;arving up an entire whole in less than hnlfin-hour. The coming of the oil-fuelled schooner has nade a tremendous difference to the Maeearaaaa t^Uim-^ >nd tnkon u nr*.wt <| OB l f th*oersonal hazard out of their annual whale nunt. The schooners bring not only the lUnters and their families but also then log-teams, sleds, tents, food and other equfpnent—all packed in sardine fashion into one imall communal cabin. It seems incredib'c hiit these tiny craft—no larger than the iiver cabin cruiser—can transport Yet mishaps are cxtremeK lew. And although the hunt is a matter OJ heir very survival, and therefore something lo bo undertaken in grim earnest, the Eskimo. make the most of its possibilities as a socia ICCeston, The tented town that springs u[ ilong the shore hums perpetually with gossij und laughter. Only toward the close o September, when the harsh, chill wind.* blowing from the polar ranges to the nortr drive off the last of the whales to warmc. waters, do the tents vanish and the schooner -iisperse until another year CLOSED FOR REPAIRS Advocate Stationery Ol ll in: \m us SAY h iimily I'/aniiiiiM I ,,.• Advocate-lUfUU) citation on iung*' in >our "Our Fa i %  %  i i ; l'.H.. n lew pre I i Mind* d vn \ v.i ii the vie* • %  i M lain people on but rt u initeed veiy dinVult lor U DD jrpe of plrmninK un'il ation ol faaulU Wi %  : %  ., % %  .i %  :. % %  %  %  maintain famlllet when hi have v, %  y \. 3ehi en Lndu ti le ao ) have ipable <>( ti.-: %  aioiiK regional lines and we can only plan along region l lino* when we, m the-e parts, dedde cea find work for the sood nf a West Indian • as of religion, claas or ereed. Trie writer I ' ... | u ..f the fw. %  lv means ot achlavlng the recognUed familyUfa) bargain and conti fumiUc* ure secondary What kind %  .the family DVM I who Is brim: D %  to rearing them %  . ., an] ncquln %  a m in t.i make lam i il1 11 of kaeplng her In a certain trd "t material comfort, tn*an> ol our raan-folk dodge II .ui.i maro -folk are la plight 'hen troth of "w< ith" i< %  > iruj men >i—not tin-1I Uea" i n women ratliei lhan maka %  i life purcbaaa, avoid it and love one •he way they love inuttc i in %  mui di Bar%  of imi i %  i n. i if we do %  i lc dlfncultlei %  Itially %  .'i. PI I !' ration lalmlni that Uu II) The men ii wltho red Into %  to Uq .. Obllihlnea. (In THAT SLIH)i:\ IIE-VHT ATTACK IS NOT SO SIDDKN .. bj I: %  !>; %  If u I ,ir %  apply %  %  pop %  : LOt ) are %  res it. Il> ( II M'M \\ I'.M III R) A DOCTOR i'""%  %  i to ex how he believes U ha lain n .'..T.I l).*. Lester Moi %  earb warning tl %  toi heart trouble. Until now thei itlctpatlng Q .... rhromli %  %  %  %  %  the new lo have menl fi>, prcvanl %  %  %  I %  I N %  .i irv artrrlr* —wfa TiuUaenaga I But 1 %  S i %  %  I Ihe RMVI %  %  %  The Mood builds up like rutf inside an iron The gununy sabstanee, which h collitlehuk- circulating in the itream. If the Bmount UH ahnormauy the) nmclude that the rlafly likeiv to St i coronary thrombosis •i .. | out %  ai patients at Ihe I .< Ana) 1.1 n TBI Hospital. io nibai genl tnedloa) htathdl the teat ignoa laaceptilo h. t trouble In three oul nf evei i oui He s:re(., i ni Mi rep m pabhm tha Mat U tni 'i sreo* sad *.ir piat read 1 ; i -i wj ei kal at which Morrison for people llkel> t.> op heart Iroubli i in eholestcrol Avoid— ii-.' %  %  heart suffer. i Cream Ki." %  meat, l %  ; %  %  %  Milter. margarine and anything made %  You a oere energ> feel longer. -t. r %  Colonial Students' Problems LONDON, July 10 Colonial relations are being harmed by il>< J>UIKHS which have caused Colonial Studenti tn protest vigorously %  gjainal an order to leave their hostel at Hans Crescent, Knightsbridg* in Ltmdon's West End. lo make roon tor freshmen, says the London Times, in leading article commenting on the protests. "When it was rightly decided some year JIKO to provide large facilities for colonia students to (jet their education and tramin in this country," says the paper, "there ayaj far too little consideration of ways ar< means; and the British Council, like the Colo nial Office welfare department before it. h now feelini; the effects of this improvidence "At the bottom of the trouble is the ultitud. of some of the students to segregation. Wht the British Council took over its new respon itbUities, it was widely taken for granted tha segregation was a bad thing for students trtu had come to England as much to learn Enc Ugh w.ivs of life as to pursue aWSKaan %  < studies. "So the numbers of students aQCOmSM dated in hostels were cut down, with the In lention of putting more of them into families and lodgings Among the students them selves, hr'wever. there is a strong core win prefer | ( h %  segregated in hostels, with other) like them, and it is these who now see them %  elves threatened again. "Almost certainly, the advantages of disthese coloured students among th( population have been accepted too uncritically and the difficulties have been treated too lightly. Perhaps, for the African, the jump From his home life straight to an English home is toe big.—U.P. II 1II4MISI The ideal FILLER for repairing damaged surfaces on Plaster, Walls, Birch. Wood etc: For inside and outside use, Can be washed or painted over. -BAWL PLASTIC" An Asbestos plunging compound, especially recommended for fastening Screws lo Stone, Concrete, Urick and all types of masonry. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C.S. PITCHER & CO. 'Phones : 4472 & IMI BECKWITII STORES Annnunriny ... MH XOEIil H.M.V. RADIO RECEIVERS 6-TUBK MODEL .1114 ... I 9X.3II B-Tl HE MODEL 5112 125.00 6-TUBK HANDSPltEAD 180.00 • New Model RAlHOfiRAMS rxprrled shortly Please call il our Sales Department and hear the ne t>pe 7-inch Record. Revolving at 45 r.p.ni. with Microttrove. OF QUALITY DA COSTA & CO., LTD. FURNISHING FABRICS A WONDERFUL RANGE AT THE KEENEST PRICES! Need we remind you that we are unexcelled for Furnishing Fabrics We are showing a wonderful range by SANDKRSON-S which includes CRETONNES and TAPESTRIES in LINEN and COTTON. IIMOM 1 If CO., LID. DRY GOODS DEPT. i V.v.v.v,v.v,v,v.v.v.w,'/,v.-.'.v.v.v.v.v.-,v.v.-.-.-A WITH THE PROTEINS YOU NEED!'. HAH A I IMI Cold Storage HAMS BRISKET OF BEEF LUNCHEON BEEF CALVES KIDNEYS OX IlItAIN FORK SAUSAGES Snu.k.-O IIA!>IK>CK SOLE "OD Fll.l.r TS Large RED FISH BISCUITS .1 A II Hill Ml SANDWICH BREAD %  II M A SOIIA (.'! Ii LSI Mil RIM >ll\l l 1 III 11 1 < Ll H >

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JOURNALISTS "STOP" ARMISTICE TALKS U.N. ISSUE ULTIMATUM TO COMMUNIST CHIEF KAESONG, Korea, July 12. NEGOTIATIONS for a cease fire in the Korean war were interrupted on Thursday, when Commu nists refused to permit the Allied free Press to enter Kaesong, where the talks are being held. Vice Admiral C. Turner Joy, chief U.N. negotiator, sent the following ultimatum to the North Korean Gen eral, Nam U Nam, chief of the Communist negotia tors, by helicopter at about 11 a.m. on Thursday "There will be no further negotiations until, and unless, Communists cease all interference with U.N. authorized personnel or convoys." Fourteen hours later, no reply i had been received, tod Red radios) fatted even to men t i on II • lhli morning it appeai-exii that nothing further eould happen | %  "itil the |teds replied to Joy. It was hoped that th c breakdown temporary. But neROtiatlons have already been suspend* d for one full day. while soldiery the lighting line, and quick Bed action is necessary to permit resumption today. Thi 8 was the Ilrsi past of the Bed plcdjie of good faith and the tirst diif, men .ilonii with other UN. personnel. nine mile* south %  | truck u.i. turned beck when ii became evident (hat the Beds did lot intend to admit '.< %  coneepondents, Joy sent thc ultimatum, %  cted on instructions from Matthew 11. Kidgway. the Supreme Li N Commander. It i-> assumed thai EUdgway may hav,. had direet order, from Washington and the I N. regarding the Allied attitude. Indicating the importance he MM'I. Press issue. raced alongside the road • %  hen tiie Allied convoy started for Kaesong. to wish the correspondents good luck. Now lie and his command awaited the Bed ..ply which was the next stcr So far as is known here. Communists made no reply to Vice Admiral C. Turner Joy's demand that all United Nations personnel '.. Kiiewmg. An oBdal sourer cautiously hoped thai Ihe Thursda. dlapUM OVtr Emitting Allied reporters to the Korean iru-e talk* will bo U.N. Advance Seven Miles EKUITI! AHMY HEADQUARTERS. Korea. July 13 f luiu-d Hi..! they wen l y d In cli M i..nofhrhtmg 1 ommunlst troop rentr.,1 from where th.| buildinc up a lorce of ncarl. sno.ooo men. The tight started 1 ile Thuisdi.y .iftemi.oii against -t Red force of und* 'i T i the Kumsong area. : IttlBUJ United Nalinle patrols advanced a* much as %  hung i .A ii the mart central doctor mini• %  %  re coming tn' :. supplies •md big self propelled guru move* 1 Up to the Oommunlat front area. %  thj Red;, lung a fresh strjng of to accommodate :et tighter*. Continued appearance of HUNsinn bull) MIG ll's over North teady losses in combat with United State (oslcred Ihe belief that Communists were trying lu get M possible. Front ;n!ii n STM limited hut L'mled Nation*, uulrols %  i.unchmg Into Reu defences avai p marlly to tetl (be Com01 DgUl and keep a tab or the Communlsl ^"'ldup. On the central lroni patrols Rot in two ami a half miles of Pyoilggsng. the ,.pex of the former iron now HI Allied hands without meeting opp Near Kumhwa a Communist group was beaten back in a strlk* FLOODS SWEEP ENTIRE KANSAS idl'KKA. K., July W A 3a loot aarthi nd flood waters of the Knns,,-* ired through into North lOPeke as -Irrns screamed, and 1.000 levee workers scramble,, u„ Safety. The siren sound, .like, bmli in 1908, started Crumbling. Tons of water flowed through the break and swamped the entire section of North Topeka %  MX feet belm lace. Must fan iiieir homes, leaving everything d behind. Virtually all of Kansas lay stricken to ll in the Stnte's historv. : %  Mental hue "hrough the State was cut off by the water. UJ3 engineers said the summer floods in the Kansas hv 11 I more thei ^TS.OOO.OOO ttamege to homes, crops u property. They said that this week's flooding alone would cause the %  i to ws.ooti.uoo This satimate dli not incli.de mill nuoni more damage Mtseourl it vei n tanes in Missouri and Kansas. A1e;>-t seven persons i*eie drowned in the high wati the Ret Blue 1 %  IP. patched up. But they also recof-l g| the United Nations outpost and nisrd it may hen danger signal that 1,, another short light JJ (Jm'uillf Refuses INtiiiitrsln'ii i'ABIS. Jnl> II Former Premier. Menri QuWtlllk 1 Dl Aunol's reejut t to tarn %  nee Frew n ent An oflUiai nnouncemeni issued shortly after where he onferred with Aurlol, said that he rejected, the offer (CM "P health." Aurlol who his been interviewing party leaders for two d IJ the hope of finding a new Pft ml* summoned the Finance Minuter. M • Pethebe to the Pal i The flfty-flve-yeer-old financial expert told the !*roefore an armistice is reached. Based on preliminary Military leports from K.e HOW hope thai an ai mis,i pa MgOtlated in one to three weeks. Tlie new CommuI may change that. Dollar Crisis Faces Britain LONDON. Jul> 12 A new dollar rrisis ll brewing and may force the Government I Ivai on thr first repa>-ment instalment of the 19-16 American loan which is due December 31. Thc cause of the ne thc rearmament programme in the western world It forced down Brtish exports drastically and caused Britain to pay much higher dollar prices for essential raw ; | i .--a shathe new dollar gap -d nnd import controls are abolished."—l'.F. I.C.F.T.L. REJECTS RED PROPOSAL MILAN. Julv 12 The World.Fre. Trade Unlo Congress emphn:. •'irir CmS a inunist iIn a common from to seek nee i worker.loposal, made by t.'e %  %  %  Free Trad' t.P ols pulled back. -.1* I' JXo Point TEHBRAN, Jul; The British Ambassador, Sir Francis Shepherd, gevt racepUon to the report of the impending arrival of the U.S. sueelal Presidential :nin • %  W ll-rriinnn. .md rejevtnv idea that Harriiunn would mediate the Anglo-Irnni.,i mi lie ;uil precisely "then %  eem very much point (to Reromlng), in view of the taneee under which the acceptance was made t-i mviie Tlie premier pointed out in Iran's acceptance i>f Truman's offer to send Harrlmaii here, that uny ttlks would have to bo "within the framework" ot bhe oil nationalisation law. Earlier, Mossadegh warned in a spcec>i in Ihe Majlis that there ight be "serious consequences' for world peace as a result of the International Court of justli uling on the dispute. A few hours later, his Government fired off another rejection of the Hague ruling, In reply to the British note which accepted the Hague proposal to establish a Joint Anglo-Iranian board of supervisors to run the oil industry. 'ran reiterated the belief that the Court had no right, in the flr>t place, to rule on the dispute. —U.P. 6 Killed: I Injured In Plant Explosion INDIANAPOLIS. July 12. plosion and Bi> Ihe cloaely guarded All i ngin,. experimental building ut !!., General seeeon Corporation Defense plant, kill. pat and Injuring one. Major Rarold Wilber. an Air Force Cnmmand. stationed ut the plant, said that six civilian employem were killed Wilber blamed iras vapour for %  eying that there wei poeltlvel) no %  abotaga InvelTed Ha "1 that 2U test cells were destroyed. Jet engines were basted u before nipped to the The explosion wax heard ft least eight miles ewe] D !' FLOODS WRECK JAP DISTRICTS OSAKA, Japan. Jttl dead end ioa missing in the Kyoto, Osaka, and K'il>c ureas in the wake of floods which hit the district on Wednesday. .'.6 other persons are reportedly injured in floods which folio.'en torrential thunder showers. The heaviest damages are reported in the Kyoto valley area. There have been no reports yet of any casualties among foreign personnel. Unofficial estimate-: of the flood damage ranged up to SI oo.ooo. two. IP FERRY BOAT CAPSIZES MEXICO CITV. J>r> 12. persoru. are feared to have been drowned U| the A" last night, when a fcribo-' on ttw flooding waters .king t floating log I fct i only from the spot "here M persons perished on Sunday. When a bus was swept I I 1 .">() Nations To Sign Jap Peace Treaty WASHINGTON. July 12. About 50 countries are being I '.II MI'I the treaty Imata tpparentlr will not attend On June 10. Russia lemanded Dulles to abandon th ty negotiation^ DuUaf .-lid thai Use u 8. now has an %  wared this rh mend. The n;il blunt rejection ut th*> Sovtet phm ild thai the Una) was p. let japan decide wiuthe %  -'I % %  %  %  ' • China or Communist China — or The tre i will become eltective early next yenr. > i i gary number •>', rntify th(. pa^t Then the V S will select an ambassalapan. —u.p. Britain Would Wrlcoiiir Pakistun LONDON. Julv 12. Commonwealth Relations Minister Putnrk flordnn Wall on Thurvlay mat Britain would welcome closer defend. | %  en if India dl enter similar dlsciissif wlnterton asked Cordon Walker in th< I for an assurance "if the <"iter Into cloatr dleciualoftt in thl the <* %  <'-• %  ment will not give then on the ground of their not erter* %  Gordon Walker rrplied Ye. we will Uon '<. itn Pakistan." Gordon Walker tol %  Nehru end Pre %  i sent messai; 1 urging a peaceful settlement "and i lelpful I 9 BalUniW l Spelhtstouii. Thn where neee>.sjr The pirturr '.ho s into position Ins wire* and pule* pule Itrlur hrnuilil AUSTRALIA CONCERNED ABOUT REPARATIONS External Affalrg Min rnenl Thureday that thej at nil with thoappi %  tributed to the formation i tountriet would agree i< siKnint;. two month CANBERRA. Juh IS t'li'i Pi tiepanege treety drefl %  nol meet let vi ho con%  bul hoped nifflclenl the final i nil ti the UcninlladA Town Plan Two bronze 1< %  I aeet Chlneea I %  %  %  the EJ atlon of Traditional Art from the H Imperial institute from New York, lent >\ Mr nch art I nearly 2\ feat u length %  m the %  probably in the 1 fit It DBtttUry. when the city wai wer h .' a einturv ight to have bat l %  %  which t allel in .-> % % %  who Bret mi I Paris win • f> %  %  I mud i • U| %  mad King Ovunramwe loI ol the mth %  gan .. rt Ign l i i.i people were tacrlAced 'if his ancestor*. This wae bi inn he raaas) I %  ty ft %  with I im 1> 188 was himself defeated and pedlUon. Thi' bit h ln%  %  %  %  %  in a temporal) j %  ... ., n Inti %  Ii %  %  •:t by An %  : 'i. i %  .'. %  reasonable tiro) %  %  I gnd ceonomk rluuws .of the treat) eerefullj %  %  %  pfs and ;il imc noi mal Ineiwnatlonal relatk utUnn a %  • workable .' %  : %  %  pei mil •he jgpen %  %  i • I rue %  %  %  '.f Australia We ear./i' %  '.' J pan .' | iSeise Viniiiiinitioii ASMARA. July 12. ,.V'I lice post % %  IWI highwav early on il a large I | %  ,' left the guards unerased, Bl chine gin i p US Announce Jap Treaty w fcSWNG n N \ %  %  1 %  % %  tollo' radar, wl ty for I I i pel i thn pi Ira i nave in the name of | %  I The pre Kit great %  fd the text ol %  H. and I %  %  onsuhing then g] i ittW the Paet will i>.' dgned In Baa frent I co %  Septemlier DUHM said Ihe traati will h. followed %  i "iv im mutual defenei n the Paetfle I A Janeneai that will glloe tb< b ignad iinI A mil %  %  Zealand Thl ft< i the All.Hill. re it* i neai I) rearij Dulla be mighl have more del t .11..V thlllei said. "the pi*0U0—I %  %  i it .-1 .in. [| nl,..I er Cent, fc-i-t Ii ii.in%  %  Blhai State. France \\ utta A To Si^n Troalv PAAI8 %  %  %  it id "• %  Invited to ign HH Jspanese %  %  hid 00 Thursday. Th* aid 'h-t ti.e requegi wouli among observation* thai I %  n ft treel %  I '< <> % %  Indo-Chin %  %  though tin until ..'ler th %  .. %  %  . i ;>M rj b) Jape %  OUH I'rerH ii i omn concern it"' economic %  .;.,,,. but Informed ... differ) i r 24 thank DtfffrM WASIIINCnON. Jul'. \i • ol Ihr Japanese Diet railed on dot .John Pootei Duller on Thur^dey 10 thank (urn fm hll work on %  aeeci Ui n .•> '< tile In tin 1 matf m eptk Rural i l use l.aboui gjp Untie* told tin liberal er I treaty is th< %  i that Ihis belief is I i Morrison Regrets Anglo-l .8. liifl On Chinese (X%e lirorrdurr i unusual In pre*r n it in ilialrt*i, hi tht form Unalil H nut '.-niorr salwiUelur if thr ( uiiimoiiMeallh rounttle* and r n.iilil jisrre before praeenllria it in tht. farm?" I IIIIMUll ild thl* I treat] BI tin %  -1 ii,l'n-i. • i ignei i' i %  %  %  i %  nwealth rentj' 1 %  it.. jm.< .it %  %  BU ". %  Hi w nioNi i MI \ i Police Guard U.K. Embaae-j il %  il %  % %  I) A *tal" of %  I lions w I %  la %  %  loui ion' H m lh< lot 1 turn Bro %  %  i farael Demand* Action hi Suvz %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  i i %  %  i. %  %  Suspend Two U.S. Officials Pop? Receives Ambassador | %  %  %  i Pelaee llefaaarh pre•*nte*l lh iii.f of thn %  oi the i i P %  %  %  %  %  artment's %  cbarga the huhe-d offlclabi suspct %  i urrenl U chi I i .. % % % %  %  I^partrn%  %  %  %  I I ; I %  %  ' M ei %  • to postni in the %  I \n\iel> %  :,ipi' i:. "f the treat; %  nxietj ir> Britain with hei : spldU im i eai Ing populal pan ht ui %  .. lop hei v In Man ii. Ihe then I (th i ran %  %  %  U4d %  %  Ho %  %  %  %  rietit to .1 I ,n gOOdS bul it is not DP iimleihikhiK. %  %  th.it it i no %  %  %  i without 1 ers in ui. rd bl "OI' Iran Rejects Killing Again ll] !3. %  %  %  tt on th. %  d .temanrii t. i %  %  inc thi i Ir.ni hiiii thai ths Court bad n r | %  tt-e nililrldN hj \ %  aid


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PAGE Kir.HT RARRADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. JCLY 13, 1S5I SUGAR RAY ROBINSON Aii Interesting Climb From ttags To Riches H> 4.IOIH.I Will 11M. SUGAR RAY ROBINSON, CM American cm/en. Walker %  %  <%  d London on i permit allowing him to %  ,ii how to "" IM Tin pin. %  ... the %  Lookint IBM .lark <: -i by his %  %  Uw immaculate irbered head wl i %  I IT is right *'>T %  MiiR have sent %  still you eouli ..,11 M. iKilhrr worth, of real < %  I '"' liihr-i %  .. Iln%  in 18 %  ' ..t boxing C 1.500 l week QUARTER-MILEKS SECRET fVf.lJMI MlllKIKs *vlO(K row -dill .rim r last week wlwi %  MM! Oxford .mi < MTO.II.I-. ti-.m rlrfi tied lUrvaril ana* i lie In In-event* to four. Winner of the half mil* event ui. Nick rtgUI I nJiOi 'cm n.ptain. ll< wa* followed hontf bv r' roni touch netting him l 'i Bin BVI i' Tommy li.-n Mr th weltar-walgfit title ho had to (u| hi. purse-money down tha mldJdfa 1 4 pppi ii' -it Wo had ana doll lUght up rMi Lallotta %  i %  i over. At in maa-about-towD i: Ida tha locoi veniont m Itvorca si the .igc of iH and Uw %  Urraa up whan, dibit irmj an lo ht rafun d ml* lowad to watch White Sox. the Boston Hed Sox. tha (Yew Indiana. place White Sox. pluys Chkauja In twilight and night dBublahaaater t Chicago. ng gmfor din \iirt" He's Smooth RoUmon in now huppily martu \ Cotton ClUD ried "But hi] %  i, ^ HoU> and ha* an IH QOM him into m> horn*, i lupn ,, lm ., raw trick—* %  "-•" %  him M) .round with i! a whfn I toe* mj laaon ol anutaui n|nu I he clubs. %  %  -ii" Other top American LOaJXM the night Barn at Cleveland. MtMmUnio Ui the Laaguc, dfht ann a ntnTTfrflo Wfn O""PT T! -V rte.*.. „.( piaco Now Yorl na lied him down mofa tna %  tl. tuoaiaa Cubi oncat play U 5 B it Bi • % %  i aaervai bia break Ho had nothing. 1 %  %  %  MI Brooklyn, Th, v ,„, mother and tWO —i-r. whn h Pffntt in Detroit, Hipa dor with a scowl and a chip ofl his xhouldci is none In hi* pUca is the nlllni mnn ol affairs, the 12-handlcap uolfer. the ampjoyai • latoMir. vh ownar of the "liuar n %  Kiski I 1, ,11 lr;mi, Itio Vclol 11 boulevarcU, and the r Ittoc man with i: Ki.ooo to distribute on behalf of ft o ia 'i a • Kin Din s. a> i •> I • i J l •' a A I* '. I II a til COLLEGE, SWORDFISH WHS AT WATER POLO HARRISON COLLEGE defeated Flying Fish four oaU to nil and Bonitas lost their game to Rwnrdflsh by two ffoals to nil in the two water polo matches nlayed at the Aquatic Club yesterday afternoon. Tno goals In both games were wai due to sood marking on both i red during the .second half of ildea. Captain 'Boo' Patteri>on and fuch match. For Hamaon ColTrev..r Yearwood kept Geoffrey lean Charlea Evelyn acorad two Foatcr and Mickey Jordan, tightly goals and waa l aanp n e r b l a 1 for a marked, which ma just what tl.ir.i which waa deSactad in by Gerard Jordan and Maurice FiUOCM of the FIVIHK Kish defenders, terald dtd to Owen Johnson Mortimer' Wealherhead who Brickie* Lucas. < pened the scoring for his team Swordflsh kept up the ,.it;n • cored the fourth. The two goals the second hail opened and goalui the Swordnsh Bonitaa match keeper Maurice Foster was kept were scored by Geoffrey Foster busy by ahota from Geoffrey ,.nd Maurice Fitigerakl Foster. Mickey Jordan and an ocFlylng Fish were still without the casional swim-through by Gerard services of their centre-back Tun Jordan. Swordflsh got their first Yearwood. Billy Malone, Clargoal after nve minutes' play it ence Hart and Vere Lawrence the second half. Geoffrey Fostc were also unavailable. HaxeU, was the scorer Taylor and Whiting came into the Bonitas rallied and this time i team to replace tnem. Harrison was Albert Weatherhead tl* College were also without their Swordflsh goal-keeper who wa beat aeven. Allan Taylor stood called upon to do some saving. down to give Stephen Ormnnum, Most of the Bonitas attacks howi.ne of their newcomers, an 'outever were broken up by Gerard mg Jordan or Maurice Fitzgerald. The first half found both teams Jordan was marking the Bonitas Mill trying to open their account, left hand sharp shooter Owen Harold Weatherhead. "Termite" Johnson. He kept Johnson well Taylor and Hazell in the back line under control throughout the lor Flying Fish worked hard, and entire game. Peter pvjtter oil the right wing we* Two minutes after Swordfish's his usual tireless self lirst goal Maurice Fitzgerald swam Flying Fish went on an all out through to just inside the hall (.ffensive right after the interval, way mark and sent in a well Their attaok was broken up by the placed shot which entered the goal College defence who cleared to the high into the top left hand corner. forwards. During a melee about Three minutes later the game Jive vards from the Flying Fish was over with Bonitas on the ot%  oaL Mortimer Weatherhead got tack and Swordnsn maintaining his hand to the ball, and with his their undefeated record so far thiusual quick flip shot had the ball season, inside the nets. The referee was Mr. Archie Mving Fish went back on to the Clarke, defensive and for a time held the The teams were: Collegians at bay. Midway In the II urisen College: J. Chabrol, second half however, Charles EveB Manning (Capt.) C. Evelyn, lyu who had made several deterp Manning. M. Weatherhead, rimmed attempts to score during the Keldman and S Grannum litst half got his Am goal and MS Flying Fish: P. Foster (Capt..). team's second' Flying Fish kepi, Taylor, ii, Weatherhead. P ..Hacking and their forwards miss,vtirr. If, Conliffe. W. Whiting ti i an !" j Soot 11 covered %  uptake ot op oianiuna on an idea i tor a two btd n., with Tnrcc Clui* North oinBpad I %  Ml lluei ing the cnarat fl ut inhand. Sir. rrbid ol Three No-Ttumpi. North visual sro iain nut from n angle *iie us* ol BlacKaood could up the quest on o: noviib> uwraforc marked Hit Tlul'(t ti c *av open tor South to call Pour No Turnip and to na the giam: suet locating 'he musing :•> Souih* SCtua bid ot and Nortl i na mare .... certainties. Potter on th wing backed up his defence line well and several times cut off the Itairison College back Frank ir Manning who was attempting to %  wtn through and score. On two occasions however Manning got the ball to his forwards who after some short passing got the ball to Evelyn who shot the third and fourth goals, one of theso .hols was deflected into the DOU i,y one of the Flying Fish defendSecond flame The second game was perhaps !.,. than the tlrst and once again the rtrst half waa goalless. and Haiell KoMltasL M. Foster. T. Yearwood. J P ister. H. Patterson. O. Johnson. N. Lucas and M. Konisberg Swordflsh: A. Weatherhead i Capt l, G. Foster. G Jordan, M. Jordan, M FitzGerald. R, Weatherhead and H. Portillo. This afternoon's match between Starfish and Sea Nymphs h.as been postponed until Wednesday July 18th. The Harrison College Barracudas fixture scheduled for Tuesday ITth. has been postponed to Jijy lth. The Snappers Swordflsh rtxture will be played on July This 17th H'urid ( I J.v ARUM'S HEAOl.tNr. von lancer Fun. <;,.,. ta had | l I liters %  ill! works the tt the Fnrd plant Ii\ lUoawy" in lab i. lual %  has aacouragad hlppei of „i bag rrler l Jo Louia In Action thai can t„, rorgotten on tl Smith, who | I l| I %  I L 1 bailongn rags-tol %  %  %  u kl %  %  lough. cuff-or-lM i AGE AND BEAUTY %  M, .,.,.,. M.i, timpfj ,.,.,'f "' wiMi'!,.v,iiI.! .• %  •' YACHT CLUB TENNIS RESULTS Following are the results of yesterday's Tennig at ihe Yacht Club:— Men's Doubles J U Tin Inghar and Dr So Svv.-ei His nrat i ubllc Bght aa distinct rrom gutti i scuffles took place ot Kingston, New York, where, be pet %  I to k' him give tl n ; green-aa-gr • In To t %  round Uw iii\ Galnfora borrowod Uw older boxer i • %  I WalkeT Smith. The nickname Sugar" l year lah ford turned to a ringside reporter at Walerlown* Mew York and deacrlbad Ui bj paw pto rnu d n g fledgling as %  i WHAT'S ON TO-DAY Court of tlrand Sections — Hl.Ofl i in Court ot Appeal —1 •> a ni rnllee Courts — l.0ti a.m. t INKMAS OpriallBI, Airizr Diary Rl \ .v Israel lat>nr lies s-.. Ionise Walker t; M< %  %  beat '"K '"> •'" hl ; 8ft amateur ,md A. M. Wilson 0-1. 6—1.6—0. boulg. with aeveral h n c KINGSTON. Julv 11 Kan Hill, P.N.P. aacond VlcePresident and member of the House of Representatives to-day was elected Mayor ol the City ol Kingston, St. Andrew, with William Seivright, ex-Mayor as Deputy. Hill Is leader of the left-w group of the Socialist Party President of the Trades Union Congress The Parly elected him for Ihe post of Mayor when Seivrigh; who was recently lei med the island's most respected and honoured citizen by Governor fFont, declined to accept rv-elecLviJ-i Sisrsw aSTH M svi rcA pOV t& TAKf. 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PHavbadros



ESTABLISHED 1895







FRIDAY,







Advocate



PRICT FIVE CENTS



JOURNALISTS “STOP” ARMISTICE TALKS

U.N. ISSUE ULTIMATUM,

TO COMMUNIST CHIEF

KAESONG, Korea, July 12.

NEGOTIATIONS for

a cease fire in the Korean FLOODS SWEEP ;

_ war were interrupted on Thursday, when Commu. sik ae
nists refused to permit the Allied free Press to) ENTIRE KANSAS
enter Kaesong, where the talks are being held. Vice TOPEKA, Kansas, July 12,

Admiral C. Turner Joy,
the following ultimatum

eral, Nam II Nam, chief of the Communist negotia- Topeka as sirens screamed, and
tors, by helicopter at about 11 a.m. on Thursday. 1,000 levee workers scrambled for
“There will be no further negotiations until, and| dike, built in 1908, starteq crun=
unless, Communists cease all interference with U.N, | !2*:

authorized personnel or

Fourteen hours later, no reply,
had been received, and Red radios |
failed even to mention the matter. |

As of this morning it appeared
that nothing further could happen
until the Reds replied to Joy. It}
was hoped that the breakdown
was only temporary. But negoti-
ations have already been suspend-
ed for one full day, while soldiers
died on the fighting line, and
quick Red action is necessary to
permit resumption today.

This was the first test of the
Red pledge of good faith and the
first direct opportunity to see if
the Communists really want a
cease fire — or if it is not a sham
conference which might cover a
gigantic double cross.

The Reds stopped a truck con-
voy containing 20 Press men
along with other U.N. personnel,
nine miles south of Kaesong. ‘The
truck was turned back. When it
became evident that the Reds did
not intend to admit the corres-
pondents, Joy sent the ultimatum.
It ig believed that Joy acted on
instructions from Matthew B.
Ridgway, the Supreme U.N.
Commander. It is assumed tinat
Ridgway may have had direct
orders from Washington and the
U.N. regarding the Allied attitude.

Indicating the importance he
attached to the free Press issue,
Ridgway raced alongside the road
when the Allied convoy started
for Kaesong, to wish the corres-
pondents good luck. Now he and
his command awaitéd the Red
reply which was the next step: }

So far as is known here, Com-
munists made no reply to Vice
Admiral C, Turner Joy’s demand
that all United Nations personnel
be admitted to Kaesong.

An official source cautiously
hoped that the Thursday dispute
over admitting Allied reporters to
the Korean truce talks will be
patched up. But they also recog-
nised it may be a danger signal that
Communists are not acting in good |
faith, }

A Defence Department source
speaking on the basis of informa-
tion received from General Mat-
thew Ridgway said it did believe;
the Red ban on United Nations
reporters “will be an ultimate
stumbling block.”

But authorities also believed the
cease fire talks, if they are resumed,
will continue for some time before
an armistice is reached,

Based on preliminary military
reports from Kaesong there h
been a cautious hope that an armis-
tice could be negotiated in one to
three weeks. The new Commu-
nist move may change that.

—U.P.

Dollar Crisis
Faces Britain

LONDON, July 12.

A new dollar crisis is brewing
in Britain and may force the Gov-
ernnient to seek a waiver on the
first repayment instalment of the
1946 American loan which is due
December 31. Li

The cause of the new crisis 1s
the rearmament programme in the
western world. It forced down
British exports drastically and
caused Britain to pay much higher
dollar prices for essential (raw
materials. The result is—a sha-
dow of the new dollar gap (excess
of dollar imports over dollar ex-
ports) Which Britain wiped out
early 1950. She was able to give
up Marshall Aid at the beginning
of 1951.—U.P.

Ban The King

BELIZE, BRITISH HONDURAS,
e July 12.

The City Council decided on
Thursday to ban the King’s photo-
‘raph from the city hall until
Britain grants British Honduras
self-government and until “‘de-
valuation of local dollars ended
and import controls are abol-
ished.”"—U.P.









chief UN. negotiator, sent s 4 - foot earthen levee broke,
é the North Korean Gen- and flood waters of the Kansas

River poured through into North
safety. The siren sounded as the

Tons of water flowed through
convoys.” the break and swamped the entire

section of North Topeka. Some
city streets were six feet below

| the surface. Most families fled}
oN, Advance their homes, leaving everything
they owned behind. Virtually all

Seven Miles of Kansas lay stricken today by the





UP A POLE

| US Announce) Morrison Regrets
|

oes

Jap Treaty | Anolo-U.S. Rift On





Un te today an-
1ounced tl ailed Allied plans! “ e . 4 ®
for tt dr Japanese peace! } i hese > 1O0n
treat Japan will get full free- A AW r \s ’
dom to rearm and build up its . oF ,
industries Japan loce some LOW iN, July 12,






island possessions but otherwise
goes almost unpunished for the
Pearl Harbgur = atiack 1d all
savagery that followed.”

The treaty is truly one of recon-
cihation,” said John Foster Dulle
Republiean leader, who negotiated
the treaty for the United States.

“Never in modern times have
the victors in a great and bitter
war applied this principle. They
have in the name of peace im-
posed ‘discriminations and humili-
ations which have bred new war

FOREIGN SECRETARY Herbert Morrison ex

pressed regrets on Thursday that United States
and Britain had’ been unable to reach “a tidy solu-
tion’’ on the Chinese situation before presenting
the Japanese perce treaty draft. _But he told Com-
mons that he thought the drafting powers have
done pretty well “in leaving it to the Japanese
themselves to decide which China to recognise.
Western Europe generally welcomed the draft





EIGHTH ARMY HEAD-

QUARTERS, Korea, July 13.

United Nations infantrynjen re-
ported that they were heavily
engaged in clese range fighting
against Communist troops on the
central front where the Reds are
building up a force of nearly

worst floods in the State’s history.
Almost every railroad and every
trans-continental line through the!
State was cut off by the water.}

U.S. engineers said the summer |
floods in the Kansas River basin}



had caused more than $75,000,000
damage to homes, crops and other}
property, They said that this}
week's flooding alone would cause |

The present treaty would avoic treaty as long overdue Mert Labour
that great error ney buverman i i were ol

“Dulles published the text of in the highest degree unfortunac
the Japanese peace treaty as the hat a settlement between Chiné

U.N. and Britain wrote it after
consulting their allies. Enough of
the other western powers have
ipproved the treaty to make sure
the Pact will be signed in Sar
Francisco during the first week in
September.

Dulles said the treaty will bc
followed quickly by two separate
arrangements for mutual defence



and Japa noud be held up :
by reason of the United States
refusal to recognise fccts about
the government of China

Morrison replied this doe
not pretend to be a complete and
comprehensive Far Eastern settle-
ment. I would naturally have been
happy if we could have had a tidy





500,000 men. The fight started | $10,000,000 more damage, to bring
late Thursday afternoon against | the total to $85,000,000, This esti-|
a Red foree of undetermiried | mate did not include millions upon }
strength in the Kumsong area. millions more damage along the,
f ' ; Missouri River and other tribu-!
Hard hitting United Nations |taries in Missouri and Wansae |
patrols advanced as much ‘as At least seven persons were
seven miles into Red territory. | drowned in the high waters along!
Powerful Red forces strung out the Kansas and Blue Rivers this/
in the west central sector, num- week , Tae , o
bered 400,000, and front reports :
said “more are coming in”
steadily. Heavy weapon supplies
and big self propelled guns moved
up to the Communist front area.
To the rear but not far, the Reds

eae |
Queuille Refuses
were rushing a fresh string of
|
|



U.P.







7 .
rere Preniiership
airstrips to completion to ac-

commodate jet fighters. | PARIS, July 12.
Former Premier, Henri Queuille
refused President Vincent Auriol’s
request to form a new French
dovernment. An official = an-
aia in issued shortly after
: a ; * Queuille left the Palace, where he
Communists were trying .to get} i i ; aa
all air combat expetibnha oiasiiie. conterred with Auriol, said that he
Front action was limited but oases the offer for “reasons of
Unite ions SW Sti i { i
Punching into Rea detenees every |. Auriol who has been interview-
where primarily to test the Com-,/88 party leaders for two days, in
munist strength and keep a tab on | the hope of finding a new Premier,
the Communist »iIldup. summoned the Finance Minister,
On the central front patrols got | Maurice Pethche to the Palace.
in two and a half miles of Pyorig-| The fifty-five-year-old financial
gang, the apex of the former iron | ¢xpert told the President he would
triangle now in Allied hands with- }consult with political leaders and



Continued appearance of Rus-
sian built MIG 15’s over North
Korea despite their steady losses
in combat with United States
sabre jets fostered the belief that

cut meeting opposition. bring Auriol an answer next
Near Kumhwa a Communist | Tuesday.
group was beaten back in a strike —UP.

at the United Nations outpost and
in another short fight Unitea

Nations patrols pulled ee 6 Killed : 1 Injured

- Bas In Plant Explosion
Vo Point INDIANAPOLIS, July 12.

An explosion and fire wrecked
TEHERAN, July 12. the closely guarded Allieson jet
The British Ambassador, Sir] engine experimental building at
Francis Shepherd, gave a cool} the General Motors Corporation
reception to the report of the} Defense plant, killing six persons
impending arrival of the U.S-] and injuring one. Major Harold
special Presidential adviser, W.] Wilber, an Air Force Command-
Averell Harriman, and reject- ing Officer, stationed at the plant,
ed any idea that Harriman would] caiq that ‘six civilian employees
mediate the Anglo-Iranian oil, were killed. a
crisis. han ‘ ened ei
He said predieely “there doesn’t a ties ee ake thas ae
seem very much point (to Har-| «jositively no sabotage involved.”
riman’s coming), in view of the He ree Stal cas wae

circumstances under which the :
nt . » as taesl destroyed. Jet engines were tested
acceptance was made to invite in the cells before shipped to the

aot te Wetcos aetnouiion arene airforce. The explosion was heard
man’s offer to send Harriman] @t least eight miles away. —U.P.
here, that any talks would have
to be “within the framework” of
uhe oil nationalisation law. f , ° ee se
Earlier, Mossadegh warned in a 50 Nations To Sign
speech to the Majlis that there J P T t
might be “serious consequences” > » * xe

for world peace as a result of the ay eace rea y
International Court of justice’s WASHINGTON, July 12.

ruling on the dispute. Abou+ 50 ¢ iex « i
: t 50 countries are being
A few hours later, his Gov-Jinvited to San Francisco to sign

ernment fired off another rejec-| the treaty. Russia apparently will
tion of the Hague ruling, in re-! not attend. On June 10, Russia
ply to the British note which ac-| demanded Dulles to abandon thé
cepted the Hague proposal to es-| neace treaty negotiations. Dulles
tablish a joint ~Anglo-Iranian | <4 iq that the U.S. now has an-
board of supervisors to run the} cwered this demand =
weer eelahid the belief that The reply obviously was a
the Court had no right “in tie blunt rejection of the Soviet pian.
frst pl to rul the di t Dulles said that the final decision
TEE Ret Re eee ee sat OF, © 1 was to let Japan decide whether
Ba Sty to sign the treaty with Nationalist
China or Communist China — or
neither.

FLOODS WRECK The treaty probably will be-

come effective early next year,

sry + after the necessary number of
JAP DIST RICTS countries ratify the pact. Then
the U.S. will select an ambassa-
OSAKA, Japan, July 12. dor to Japan. —U.P.

43 persons are dead and 108
ae in the Kyoto, Osaka, and

obe areas in the wake of floods . . r
which hit the district on Wednes- Britain Would

day. 56 other persons are report-











“a torrential thunder showers.

The heaviest damages are re- LONDON, July 12

ported in the Kyoto valley area.| Commonwealth Relations Min-
There have been no reports yetlister Patrick Gordon Walker said

of any casualties among foreign|on Thursday that Britain would

personnel. Unofficial estimates of | welcome closer defense ties with

the flood damage ranged up to|Pakistan even if India declined to

T iq} $100,000,000. epiter. timocaskone’ LC.F.T.U. REJECTS wp. |servative Lord “Winterton asked

RED PROPOSAL

MILAN, July 12.
The World’s Free Trade Union
Congress emphatically rejected a
surprise proposal by their Com-




munist dominated rivals to uMit€]in the & ttoyac River near here, | India?

in a common front to seek Pew ilast night. when a ferry boat Gordon Walker replied: “Yes,
ocial advantages” for workt | overturned on the flooding waters.;we will welcome closer military
The proposal, ae by thelafter striking a floating log lassociation with Pakistan.”

communist run federa-|'fhe accident scene is ‘only | Gordon Walker to another

t t i “35)a short distance from the spot |questioner that Premier Jawaharal |

tossed sion Of|where 55 persons perished on jNehru and Premier Liquat

th Congress of} Sund wher bus was swep Chan both sent messages to Ir

t} sf r ation E ¥ it at ted to ford the jurging a peaceful settlement d

‘ t thes +

edly injured in floods which fol- Welceonie Pakistan

Gordon Walker in the Commons
for an assurance “if the Pakistan

Government asked to enter into

FERRY BOAT CAPSIZES closer discussions in this matter

with Government, the Govern-

MEXICO CITY, July 12. ment will not give them a refusal
Twenty-seven persons are

feared to have been drowned









ing into similar discussions with













megsage e
U.P. ! helpful U.P.



GANGS OF REPAIR MEN employed by
Supply Corperation ave ot «rwkk
Holetown to Speightstown,
where necessary.
into position.

ot aidan aiid

They are replacing wires and poles
The picture shows a new pole being brought

AUSTRALIA GONCERNED

ABOUT REPARATIONS

CANBERRA, July 12,
External Affairs Minister Richard Casey told Parlia-
ment Thursday that the Japanese treaty draft does not meet
at all with the approval of Australia or other allies who con-
tributed to the formation of the treaty but hoped sufficient
countries would agree to the final draft to permit to the
signing, two months hence.

Benin HadA
Town Plan

Two bronze leopards, said
to be equal in quality to the

d reparations from Japan





in securing adequate com-
pensation for the hardships suffer-
ed by Australian prisoners

Regarding industrial reparations
“if the Japanese economy
\is te become self supporting in a

{make use of all plant machinery.

Exhibition of precise terms of Japan's

rraditional | obligations to the victorious pow-

Colonies, at the Imperial In-

from New York, lent by Mr international

Louis Carre,



economic ! *

nearly 2} feet in length.

West African city of Benin

is to permit
probably in the 16th century,

the Japanese to recover self



height of its power

those bronzes are thought to

tion on Japanese rearmament

town-planning
preoce upation



lon different points of view



. who first made
nin a great power, replanned
the city on lines strongly re-





built of hard red mud self-defence -
as the “City of Blood” dates

the time of the
Ovonramwe

Seize Ammunition
ASMARA, July 12.

from mainly

which hundreds



'ecame guards at the police post at}
| Neffasit, 15 miles off Asmara on

annually to the spirits of his i "

This was broken

he massacred

British party going to make

a treaty with him in 1897 and

and carried

only when ammunition



wires before the a
and gagged the guard
sacked the post but left the guards

Thic exhibitic
This exhibition rifles, 2 tommy guns, one r



West African sculpture dis-

played in a ammunition.—U.P.



lV - pair present- > 4e@ e the sh

ed to Queen Victoria after S Q) ia ls A British svok
the expedition which make uspen Wo e e ic e | xid that the nm
comparison

WASHINGTON ] f f 1
Department







Pope Receives Ambassador

two department
on the ground of their not enter- | VATICAN CITY. July investigations on
the former |
Brazilian Ambassador





al on behalf of t







solution to the Chinese situation
but it is impossible in the etr
cumstances”

Deputy Opposition Leader
Anthony Eden said “1 think the
procedure is unusual in pre-
senting the treaty in this form.
Would it not be more satisfac-
tory if the Commonwealth coun-
tries and we could agree before
presenting it in this form?”

Unusual

Morrison said “this is a draft
treaty and it does not represent the
views of the government. I agree
the procedure is altegether un-

ial"'

Unaer questioning Morrison said
there was a great deal of agree-

n the Pacifie
l A Japanese-United States
igreement that will allow the
United States to station land, sec
wid alr forces in Japan Thi
irrangement would be signed im-
mediately after the main Japanese
peace treaty 1s signed.
2 A mutual security agree-
nent among the United States
Australia, New Zealand Thi
pact patterned after the Atlantic
reaty is nearly ready. Dulles sai
he might have more details later
today
Dulles said, “the proposec

(peace) treaty does not put Japan
under any permanent restrictions
or disabilities which will make her
different or less sovereign thar



r nt among Commonwealth
any other free nation. : nations but it ts not “universal”
—U.P. He said “in any case Common-

wealth countries will have further

opportunity of discussing | the

B.G. Will Send
‘wice To india

(From Our Own Correspondent

GEORGETOWN, B.G. July 12

treaty at a later stave.”

oP RSs EVN PAROS
during the next Poreign Affairs
dabate two weeks hence

Morrison outlined the draft
treaty provisions in a statement to



British Guiana Legislature to- the House He said “six years
day decided in sympathy for after Japan’s acceptance of our
Bihar State in the Indian Republic urrender terms which she scrupu-
particularly to donate 500 bags of lously carried out we do not con-
rice costing $4,500 to a relief func sider we should continue to post-
Started recently, headed by the pone the treaty which would
West Indies Archbishop and the Mr. ANTHONY EDEN materially aid a settlement in the
Roman Catholic Bishop The —wunusual procedur Far East because a small minority
fund aims at sending India 10,000 ire not prepared to negotiate a
bags of rice for famine relief \treaty unle the veto is retained

Funds and rice are being col- | Anxiety
aa in a apheny whos re P li ‘ Morrison said certain economic
The ritish juliana population aga ( say’ j aspects o > treat o cause
comprise approximately 40 per OLLCE rUAr( Seats in Britain 7 with her

cent. East Indians and large rapidly increasing population Ja-

section have family ties with , 7 , 7 ‘ . . ‘ ‘
i ale pan is under strong economi
Bihar State U. K e Embassy compulsion to develop her ex-















~ ports
- CAIRO, July 12. on Pe a Fn rey
. % 3 ate s] a se 1e Boarc o rade arold
k rance Wants 3 sar nee re 7K ner Paes Winani sail the eeuse: that othe
ry \e ry... assy and Consulate here and British Government at present
l'o ‘ ign Treaty n Alexgndria and Port Said to- |¢Xtends a most favoured treat-
* ay A state of emergency wa nent to Japanese trade in goods
PARIS, July 12 leclared yesterday on the anni- but it is not prepared to entei
France will ask that the three] versary of the British bombard nto any formal undertaking.
autonomous Indo-Chinese States ent of Alexandria in 1882. All We feel we must for the pres-
Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos| %nti-British demonstratior ere nt retain our freedom to protec
be invited to sign the Japanese | banned ee - BeG HON if necessary SERINE
peace treaty, informed sources ibnormal and injurious compett-
said on Thursday. The sources The anniversary passed off We bel how a hat
aid that the request would b uietly except for a token strike ; € OLE vi 1 vel tha in
umong observations that France| yesterday But tode the mo penpee bi Pd me Ds
will send to Washington on the | “here is electi f Britain’ ¢ Hee ve = ; ‘abl a. Brat of
jcraft treaty France consider rotest ove the | r f +) lieve a o Asona le t ypc oF
, | that the three Indo-Chinese lip Empire Roach, ! t a " peheat it I ae cae eet
} States should sign the treaty, even lorrison’, tatement 1 it \ nes i A ! of’ 4 ; 8 cage ret
{though they were French colonies, || !ouse of Comme Cun wet ao tae li . enn D sath
until after the war because they | aie mounted tod on th Reyy PY + ree A ga 3
were occupied by Japanese force rx iroadca ting House She) Ad we belie. thote \cetaetival
Other French comments will}! key poin in tl mi h eutte he asdintael Meco.
concern the economic clauses of | ©" UF Gtattone’ between ineuseria’ th
the treaty and the wording of some terests i triat countrie P
political clauses, but informed ernec on the line f the Angk



sources pointed out that the draft
treaty already was a conciliatior

foradl Damitads: [Snes teapot ie soe

| ‘
Action In Suez Iran Rejects
24 Thank Dulles | ae eee eer Ruling Again
|



emanid
WASHINGTON, July 12 hat urgent S ty Counell
Twenty-four members of thel‘ion against #F pt’ lockade of TEHERAN, July 12
Japanese Diet called on Ambassa-|the Suez Canal which Tel-A-Viv Premier Mohammed Mossadeg)
dor John Foster Dulles on Thurs-; Ambassador called pit uct} warned Parliament on Thursday





day to thank him for his work on| ‘affecting the oil output and other | that world peace is threatened b:
the Japanese peace treaty. They | ®°onomi isi of th Midd the Hague Court decision on the
met Dulles in the State Depart-; ©" M1 S. Eban, Israel [ranian oil cris He also said that
ment diplomatic reception roor mt veto. 1 Unit i losses in revenue because of the










fadao Kuraishai, Chairman of the : ait a 4 to + Glad-] o L crisi bh Iran in a “criti

Lower House Labour Committee vebb of tain. Pre f f il state of inf " and demand-

eC Ee J pa wwe of three sil o meet

spoke for the group bast ra is l P I to meer

illes te he group that the ' a : , aXe ,

tect that the treaty wee a liberal| oringing cucstion before the] A few hours after Mossadegt

f la } ity ‘ a"! Security Cc ! hict F r nceke in Parliament he replied to

one caused some criticism by other | ° nay a : a dat tha. Werk © nat ieawenirig: kh

countries. He said the United) \riidie Kast “| Hague proposal with a secon
States feels however that a liberal) " + aiaoltom oF the court ‘oll

rejection of e court plan

of} treaty is the right type for Japan Egyptia or » of ul Trad held that the Court had no

a-| He added, it is now up to Japan) eccnomic Life of the ezion anc|right to act. Sir Francis Shep-

ehine gun and over 4,000 rounds of] to ore that this belief is ruc aii iu reninr CoDA-4t herd the British Ambassador said

yvrect.—U,P ty."— °

that Harriman’s visit might dela
vy evacuation of the oilfields by
Rritish








}pin-prick incident











ling British efforts
charges against ther They at forced P vithe ee | ner} ‘
the highest officials suspended ¢ United Stat 51 ‘ Dat y (
the State department during tm year mee ‘hen ate A rresponde!
P c + y y € ry) Rt Uer

current loyalty chech The State j ‘ . > h re

Davie 43 has been n the phasised that nei ' I 1a Colin Reid a Neges n
diplomatic corps. for 20 yea! et been fe Abadan sit Apri ae
His wife i former Patricia; thing. It | 1
Grady, daughter of United States; pended on t} ’ t

ac t Pp Henry of the I pert t secu - The “ADVOCATE”

Board penc

Clubb 50, has been ith the Su h su } pays for NEWS
Department for 28 vears and has | by law wi t Dial 3113
s the Day or Night.

China He was the t United
r U.P | seeeecsceemetcan nae een ee,




pe a TWO















































































































































P AY, JULY 13, 1951
BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRID
EE om Se |
How ae a. 1 . ) ;
fe e 1 P) 4 i
eh 7worr "46" _
, _ JSANETTA DRESS SHOP eo
| One OPENING TO-DAY, FRIDAY 13TH
" ‘ Lower Broad St. — Upstairs over Newsam’s
ISS FLORENCE INNISS_ who Success Story lve; {i aetna
flew down from Long Island | ARTIE'S HEADLINE TIE’S HEADLINE *ORDON KEITH, the Barbadian W mai { ‘
on Sunday to see her aunt Mrs. ¥B actor who became famou oO n ii}
A. G. Barnes of the’ “Rockery’ through his brilliant acting in the
Hastings is due to leave this morn- play “Deep are the Roots” | Mad 1}
ing for Puerto Rico on her return hes now achieved fame as a singer l , e \? ,
journey to the U.S. in Paris avery night in Pari Ah SVENING, COCKTAIL, AFTERNOON and BEACH
Leaving by the same plane is Gordon sings in a top class ni 700 000 ht ;
Wing Commander L. A. Eggles- club. The emcilgte of the Clul 9 14 Ready-Made and Made-to-Order ss f l
, ; \ } ru
field, Director er of Civil says “Gordon is the biggest at- — Also — I | $ so young aad beauti
Aviation in the aribbean area tract ye have had” NEW YORK, oo ton %
cies auatiiition to dusuuncn Ro eae ‘ How does a woman make BEAUTIFUL HANDBAGS from ...........- $7.89 to $10.61 | marries a man like this...
7 : ‘ 700,000? Fe , ice * 5 ; i ;
With Canadian Bank Sone at Wincheoter The Tees Rion LADIES PYIAMAR tele.) :., 5. cs. $5.30 per pr. fi] 4
Of Commerce NTHUSIASTIC parents attend-| Follies girls, did it by playing Floral $6.08 s : ANY y
R. ROBERT MACDONALD ing the annual cricket match a four-year-old brat on the 3 PS ab i ecogers oy he ta SAS a gee ? : H =
who is on the, staff of the between pupils of Winchester and radio ‘ wut PEETiCOne So eae $7.32 {
Canadian Bank of G€ommerce in Eton Colleges were Sir Charles She dressed like a baby She| ~ HA
i-Spain is at gpesent spend- Woolley, Governor of British|called herself Baby Snooks, She} —
ing his annual lea in Barbados Guiana who is on leave in Eng-| asked endless questions in a voice} —.. sai ae =, = e ] di
ptaying with relati§~s in Bellc- " Ste F i land, and Mr. Roland Robinson,|.ike a rusty saw. } .Inciu ing
7 7 Stop twisting h tail Di od a aes sha are nrihan ten r ®
uiite Nicherk. waned de a tne M.P., who is Chairman of the Brit-] A nd She became America’s | DIAL 2310 —= PLAZA — BRIDGETOWN
Mr. MacDonald was at one time Persian !" ish Guiana Consolidated Goldfields. / favourite nuisances one of radio's TODAY (3 Shows) ? 40 — 4 45 & 8 30 & Continuing Daily 4 45 & 8 30 p.m murder !
stationed at their branch in Bar- They both have sons attending} "ighest-paid stars. The Dive-for-Glory of the Submarine “THUNDERFISH” i § .
bades. Tradition Winchester College but neither She died last month, aged 59 2 er : | ;
Indefinite St RRANGEMENIS have been knew the other was going to be at] To-day it was revealed that she Warner Bros. present JOHN WAYNE in
NGEMENI'S hav ew the whe @ s two| left most of her £700,000 fortune Sig
sim aan : ae . leted in Britain to re- the match, For most of the two]: re i $ 00) os IFIC
AYINGStheir fir es Sia arate Pap oo Scouts days the game occupied jt looked| her son and daughter, {
to Barbados a oa Re gif ea a 8 tap cll sy gle ae though Sir Charles and Mr Fanny Brice was born on New with Patricla NEAL — Ward BOND — Philip CARBY
Smith, retired bus man and frem Jamaic prgle atl ar 5 Robinson were supporting the win-| Y°rk’s drab East Side, the daugh- a . , _ - ——
. to arrive in England later this 7 . ter of a -keepe, ame SPEC
Mrs. Smith of Londom, England. web ee on their way ra the Wor id ning team, But a fine second Pren a Ch ee names 7 = aor AT ane eae ~ CARIBBEAN PREMIERE !
© wl by bs Ea gronyre Jamboree in Austria, They will innings recovery enabled Eton’ tc \ In pam canis oe dae a fea ny See “. Grant Withers mere evis..Aties
on Wednesday morning for an in- * : : x De wt foe wes é wed ; : el ”
definite period aoe ee staying at Stay with members of the 15th Score an unex xpected victory. week chorus girl, The producer “SADDLE SERENADE | PAYMENT ON DEMAND |
St. Lawrence Hotel : Finchley (London) troop, thus sacked her because she could fot Starring; Jimmy Wakel DUE SOO! |
"They said that they first had a continuing a tradition begun in B.G. Law Student danee well enough. — == ——— SSS
Sea ae © ? : » s Je *2 . = 4 . rear ater “ar 4 ea came megs “gpa regen t Ty
ook at the is] when they stop- 1937 when the Jamaican contin " br aa? . Fifteen years later, the Same ~OISTIN:
oa for " oe in 1937 while on gent to the World Jamboree in co. FUNG-KEE-FUNG, / man hired her again for 100 times | PLAZA Dial 8404 G A I ETY
ae ribbes "ieee h A Holland, stayed with their friend Chinese law student who Was] as much. Today ~ Sunday 5 ’.29 pm THE GAKDEN — ST. JAMES
a inane 6 : f rok. in Finchley. The Jamaicans are born in British Guiana 21 ye 7 That was after Florenz Zieg-|}j ®* ae 4 oak Double to Sun, 8.0, p.m, Mat, Sun 5 p.m
2 ore . os which is now at the bot- expected to arrive in England on #89, and used to be a member 0!| feld gave her a small part in his pon Golds ann ae aes ROAD’
oe eee eee base M July 25th. Three days later, with the Chinese Sports Club back in) Follies, and she stopped the show. UP IN ARMS" | Joan Crawford, Zachary Scott &
* eave mens ae anes Ne Scouts from other parts of the B-G. is now a member of Barnes} Fanny's first husband was al|| Color by Technicolor & | BAN ANTONIO”
come back to Barbados for a holi- *' oe : vill be Cricket Club in England who plays barber. Said she: “I married him “THE AY PIGEON” Color_by Technicolor
ay, but the war intervened and Commonwealth, they will be re- } i ‘ Bill Williams, Barbara Hale Errol Flynn
Gay, bu 1e war | ened ¢ ceived by Princess Elizabeth at 2" -day matches on Saturday anc} because he smelled so nice.” The WIDNITESAT. ath | sacny — re
we could not get out. Two years Clarence House Sunday in various parts of London.) marriage lasted a year. RETURN OF THE APEMAN | | ]] Midnite Sat. 14th (By Special Reanest-
ago, we spent the winter in Ber- A *] . Barnes are one of the few unbeat- Her second was draper Nicky Bela Lugosi & John Carradine & George O’Brien in— cintvat- rox
muda end this is our first oppor- Nancy Likes Mexico en sides in London Club cricket Amstein, famous Broadway . WaaTw ABD BOL arp TAMER SE VALUBY | © : : 7 ee
tunity to come here. If we like it, MONG the many thousands For the preservation of that recora| gambler, Said Fanny: “I married|{| 2°°t Gibson, Ken May ie Steele | na tank wee LINDA CHARLES MICHAEL CONSTANCE
we hope to take up permanent , who attended the Lawn Ten- they are indebted to Owen who} nim for his sad smile. —— ——— ———$——— ‘ BOYER : ENN SMITH
residence here”, they said. nis Championships at Wimbledon last week-end was promoted from For six years she spent all her a hil el
In January this year, Mr. and last week was Miss Nancy Oakes. the 2nd XI. and scored 50 out Of/ money trying to clear him ot OPPO REDAO POPP PIED PS EP FPPP FPS GPP PPPS PPPS SPSS, wih FRANCOISE ROSAY Provuce ected by OTTO PREMINGER
Mrs. Smith spent two months on She igs hieress to a fifth of the a total of 193 all out, He hit 22 charges of being involved in o 8 x Screen Play by HOWARD KOCH + Based on # Story by Louis Chavence
the Italian Riviera while on a £3,671,724 fortune left by her fath- im one over and enabled Barnes 5,000,000-dollar robbery, % EMPIRE ROYAL 4 “ ~~ arene eel %
Mediterranean cruise from Lon- er, str et Cee who tent OS eal een aoe ote with} “But when Arnstein got out of 2 sai R PLUS TONITE a
don. The crossing then was very murdered in the Bahamas eight old rivals, Shepherds Bush jail he left her for a rich wido 1s : ad : Today to Sunday 5 & 815 pm. ¢ $ ¢
Syn cet Rin eke veh oe gee | ie ecg corse SSI WW ALLSTAR TALENT CONTEST |
Indies on the Colombie the weather are nee eiler ree ogg al Intransit Billy Rose, That marriage, t 10,1 by “tg - %| g %
was marvellous and the trip was Oakes, his wife and child. iss ended in divorce %§ M-G-M Presents | x & . “Tf I’m Lucky” x
ice Oakes mow spends a large part FYNTRANSIT through Barbados on London Express Service 1% q te he S | <é r SLAND % GERALD DAISLEY Singing . ssonsntens al F208
a eee of her time travelling. FMtexico i the Colombie were Mr. and} raed fi elie 13 “SOLDIERS THREE” | ROCK ISLA % : FITZ HAREWOOD Singing ..... ‘T Want To Be Loved" %
Learie Amongst The Stars is her favourite place. She spends Mrs. Phillip Comacho, who are on 1% : po ee TRAIL ” Bis ORVILLE GRANDERSON Singing . “be Ronisaiad x
Starring towa ive or | y Yr P
VERY interesting cricket auite a considerable amount of their way to B.G. after spending 1% ‘ Walter Pidgeon with — | x x Soi ae reer aeons “The Last Mile Home” &
. match took place in the time with fr iends in Mexico City. «heir long leave in England, Mr B. B.C. c ‘Radio is David Nive d Robert Newton | Starring: st g anes ea AAKE Bitahe 1 ee “Train No. 1” %
5 : ; Secutlal anise Her health has not been too good : =e : at Bank % ‘ i 218 a inging seagssee soos @ .
grounds of Arundel Castle, Sussex, and the dry climate of that. capi- c oma ho is with the eee B om ys — | Forrest Tucker Anele Mars with %|% CARL BEST Sin¥iny /...... “With A Song In My Hea a x
last Sunday. The Duke of Nor- $1" (06 CfY oF Catene. in. eareeew noe ; % fee gee renal see $|% DORIAN THOMSON Singing “May The Lord Bless You” %
folk captained a team including ““’ * T Meet Cost wife is the cen anno Jorge ogramme 1% ROXY x % e x
i stars Trevor yar i °o ee osts They spent their honeymoon in 1% | sy ‘ . ¥ ~ Bas be
fav oN. i a lg XL HE Annual General Meeting B ebadbas FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1951 $ | L M Cc x % A SHOW STUDDED WITH TALENT STARS %
av Niven ag s Ss ‘ S é al g Barba . F é JULY 13, 195 1o TODAY Only 1.50 & 8 15 oO 4 td * *
led by George Cox, whose benefit of the West Indian Club will ’ . gy Se perenne, eaen ane 251% oe | x % XTRA! EXTRA! >»
year this is. be held at the club premises, Incidental Intelligence am is an hee Tike sown te ik ne % Republic Big Double | Today to Sunday 430 & 8% 15 $ x EXTRA! : é Be x
Among the many other fine Whitehall Court, on July 18th. ysi > John Caroll and Adele Mnra in | Satur nthe: metaeaRtinge See x x “The Counterfeit, Cat” and eee Pageantry x
cricketers included in the Duke’s Among the items which I under- HEN IL. started to work, | 12 | pt 7 te.) Gate ee odie oiessipiaieadaeratlidatanalct ———
: ; 8 | | Ri % ; 7 x
team was Learie Constantine, the stand will be considered is a pro- used to dream about gettins man’s Creek, 445|06 «6s 4NGE, y?? | ‘Robert Rockwell and X1% 7 u LA: il x
i Sa x ANGEL CALL | Estelita Rodriguez in- 1] ¢ fn nS L %
famous West Indian Test all- posal to increase the annual in- the salary I’m starving on now.|» m_ Sporting ara 00 p a gh iS | ooare . R iain aS i x
rounder. come to meet increased costs, —Calgary Herald. poser of the W 515 pm _ Interlude, | 4 Oo] ¢ P eM
; 18 pm Compoli, 545 pm and | > Last Nite Globe’s QUIZ WINNER \ was s MISS DOREEN TATE
a ee Oe he tial Mu i 6 00 =e “BELLE OF OLD Sie of Roebuck Street X
, are ‘oe , Navy Programme, 6 15 p m . : ‘ BEY
THE ADVENTURES OF PIPA He Quize, 6.48. "p m Programm 8 * UNDERCOVER | MEXIC $1 THE JACK POT of $20.00 was not won x
355 pm Today's
5 Oe Ra mat ae im |X WOMAN” wre Qi X This was the Jack Pot Question : %
700 p.m The News, 7.10 pm. News 1% Tes = $ xt “Is the CITROEN CAR sold in Barbados of French or Italian %
Analysis, 715 p West Indian Diz WR i ae sats eis "ny yo 7 i a manufacture ?” The correct reply should have been : s
745 pm. Think ‘On These "Things, did |B Strrinw: Robert Hiviowaion ove, | “JUNGLE STAMPEDE” %)% — manufac sec. ame pls %
pm Radio Newsreel, 8 15 p m_ Engl ss : r ene l O NEITHE or it’s British. x
Bacazing. Ao pita anietdesp $8 p m. | SS SCCP OAD EPPSO LP ELPPPSLEP LEPC PP PLEIN’ VARIETY QUIZ every Wednesday at 8.30 p.m. %
: 915 pm nine of Musica Ms | Dap onp abhi ern iienenteacat pee ete ¥ NEXT WEEK’S JACK POT $40.00 %
World Affairs, 10 00 The
Bis: 10 10 p mh tntaclide. 10 5 pr Teeeui SEOSOS SSS OESSSSSSS CPOSOOSs GOS GES 6.60666 6OOOD
Asiz Survey 10 30 m Tor Jone
Trio, 1045 pm, The Debate Continue





Crmveiaht ."P 78. Ves Dis



BY THE WAY. ~ +e By Beachcomber

“2 question was: Is it fair to
call Pomerol a St. Emilion?
. One said, “Certainly. It is usually
classified thus.” A second said, “To
the devil with classification!
What does it taste like?”

Aha! There you have the root
of the matter, It tastes more like
a Medoe than a St. Emilion, and
it happens to be a wine of transi-
tion, or, if you will, evolution.
You can laste the Medoc turning






into St. Emilion. For the Pomerol
vineyards are just outside Li-
bourne, On the right bank of the

Dordogne, and next to them come
the St. Emilion vineyards. “Who
car ” cry a myriad voices. “I
co,” comes the firm reply, and if
you do not think that I should
write about what interests me,
you may retire into your corners
tc compose a peevish protest, of
which I shal] take as much notice
as I would of a gnat.

Wilk she go back with It?
J READ that a woman has ar-
rived in Los Angeles after



pushing a

wheelbarrow
miles. The

only comment I
think of is that of the Englishman
who was being shown Niagara
Falls. “Think of all that vast vol-
ume of water roaring down,” said
his companion. “I don’t see what

2,500
can



there is to stop it,” replied the
{Englishman. I don’t see what

there was to stop the
the wheelbarrow.

The higher

woman with

Leapfrog

AY who care for the advance-
ment of whatever it is will be
glad to hear that Dr. Strabismus
(Whom God Preserve) of Utrecht
is undaunted by the ludicrous
failure of his past attempts to
reach the moon. Convinced that
the idea of doing the journey in
one burst is impracticable, the
sege is working on a leapfrog
theory, by which a first rocket,
having projected a second, would
overleap the second, which, in its
turn, would have projected a



_ Rupert and

Simon—dl]



4 The two friends are excited at
their quest. ‘‘ Let's start at once,”’

says Simon. ‘* Where is Deepwood
Manor that your Professor told you

about ?’’ ‘I've no idea!" answers
Rupert. Then he thinks. ‘It's
ore not near my village of

Nutwood so it must be in the other
direction. That means through
forest.”" And off they go between
the trees But there seems to be
no footpath and, } as they rea










that they are lost ere com
sound of break Bs and
meet an aged wex



LADIES SHOES

ARCOLA in Brack sUEDE, TAN SUEDE,

& WHITE NUBUCK 1389 15:24
SMART STYLES
Black Laced OXFORDS

For NURSES & SCHOOL GIRLS 7.90 & 7.63

T..R. EVANS & WHETFIELDS

4220





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third, While

the second overleaps
the third,

the third projects a
fourth, the first overleaps ,
third, the third overleaps
fourth, and so on, up into space,
until the winner, as it were,
reaches the moon,
of this



the
the

The advantage











-OSSWORD











method is that each active AcTOss {
rocket carries a passive rocket,} y eb ge Ua Teg" ey aut he
and each passive rocket an activa 8 i on ed 1uce tu produce
one. All that is called for Bea nidina aiee cota
technical efficiency, and only one i a Sul “0
rocket, the one destined to com-. |2
plete the journey, need be | ‘ig
manned, 18
| 40
Marginal Note as
FWHE funniest thing said so far} 5 ea en re Ny become one? (5)
by any member of the
Musicians’ Organisation for Peace | 1 mstrat (0)-4
is that there are Communist mem-|} 2
bers, but “We are determined to} 4
\eep politics out of the busines 6
The suggestion appears to be that | .
Communists only join this sort of | 4
organisation out of a pure love of| ¥
music; music, like everything else, ig
having been invented by Stalin,
as 8
Tail-piece '
)

PWHHEN, as

the sun sank in a
great j

“ed ball of fire behinc

the* mountains, Gwynneth (to
continued).

Prodnose: But—

Myself: To your hole, rat!

St





|
|
|
be |
|
|



> tia cui
Hour, Fy
yes ‘



2





AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEERS: TODA)

A TRULY GREAT MOTICG

* TOMORROW at
TO-NIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT
PICTURE

5 PLM
at ¥.50

Willi_m Wyter's

“THE HEIRESS”

OLIVIA De
RALPH

Starring

with



|

HAV LAND 10
MLARDSON

MIRIAM HOPKINS -—

A Paramount Picture





NTGOMERY CLIFT



INA FREEMAN



SUCH QUALITIES
APPRECIATED

S. & §. RUM

Are

and

only attained in long

careful Maturing

A Wholesome and Refreshing
Drinks at any time

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

rs for Best Run.



EMPIRE



M-G-M’S LAUGH AND THRILL HIT!

tse ata A ARAN ONAN A! “RONAN A OS ANE INR DO

STEWART GRANGER, is sen

in this new romantic adventure!






Si SACS LIN

sational



starring

STEWART

GRANGER

WALTER

PIDGEON

DAVID

NIVEN

NEWTON

Cia, St Pe

PHAR 029 eB. RH

with CYRIL CUSACK: c RETA GYNT + FRANK ALLENBY

Screen Ploy by MARGUERITE ROBERTS
Suggested by THE |

Directed by TAY GARNETT «

‘A METRO-GOL

SS

CALLING
ALL





FISHERMEN!

(
re for Fish | Pots

We can supply your R
Rylands Mesh Wi
Lacing Wire

TOM REED and MALCOLM STUART BO.L*

DYARD KIPLING STORIES

“roduced by PANDRO S$. BERMAN

JYN-MAYER PICTURE





'

quirenemts

Hounsells Fishing Lines 6 — 36 lbs. \
Fish Hooks

Stainless Steel Wire

Cotton and Seine Twines

e
THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

Hardware Department

Tel. No. 2039

OPERATION

PLAZA

2.30-4.45 & 8.30 p.m.







HRIDGETOWN

TODAY









and CON TINUING DAILY at 4.45 and 8.30 pm









WAYNE

as eh Duke Gifford
who could shoot a torpedo
~ through a needile—or sew
up a date with a laugh!



TH

WARD Bor be
PHILIP CAREY sansa

Steiner
Written and 1 Directed + by

NEAL GEORGE WAGGNER

| COMING FOR ONE WEEK
CARIBBEAN PREMIERE £

Bette DAVIS IN
PAYMENT ON DEMAND

ALSO STARRING

PATRICIA






FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1951



NEWS FROM BRITAIN

Hy DOUGLAS COBBAN

LONDON, July 6.
(Dominion Day).
Today, we

MONDAY, we saluted Canada
Wednesday, we saluted America (4th of July).

salute Holland.

Why Holland ? Listen to what happened there yester-
day. In Amsterdam nylons crashed in price from £1 to
8s. a pair, and every third pair was free, Men’s suits were
selling at £10 instead of £20, with three shirts, three ties

and a raincoat thrown in.

In Rotterdam, one could buy-—-

land; newly-weds found furnisn-
ing firms paying for their honey-

a free balloon with every packet
of sweets sold.

Holland gone crazy?
tourists, finding their

fores, NIEUWENENDIJK, the in
Oxford _ street
teemed like an

shopkeepers of Holland had got
tired of looking at

resulting from a

change of policy. in

The Housewife



to that wages had risen in

yesterday—a suite of furniture, ®#@Va&nce of the cost of living. “Try
with one’s return rail fare paid-— *® Set that over the public,” he
whereever you eame from in Hol- charged, “It is almost impossible,”
A Socialist
That member was a Socialist—
moon. Children’s icecream cones Joseph Slater, Durham M.P. To-
were half-priced—and there was Ties, naturally perhaps, piled on
the agony for the Government
with such dagger thrusts as that
In Enschede, one store was giving by Edinburgh’s ex-Lord Provost,
EVERYTHING FREE for one hour, Sir William Darling. Rounding on
British the Socialists, he declared “Your
florins Government six years ago took
turned to dollars, joined in the control of our lives and destinies,
mad rush for bargains, and didn’t from the Bank of England to the
stop to study the whys and where- babies’ bootees. ‘Dear Brutus’ is
And Sir William
of Amsterdam, accompanied the quotation by stab-
anthill in the bing a wicked finger at the Treas-
glorious hunt. Al] because the ury bench,
No body in the House was terri-
crammed fically impressed when the Parlia-
shelves and empty shops—sequel mentary Secretary to the Board of
to public boycott of high prices Trade, Hervey Rhodes, said that
government in a wide check on clothing prices
provincial cities last week, it ae . = ;
had been found ‘prices were ‘far the Administrative Council of the

below the permitted maximum, Empire Cotton Growing Corpora-

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“1 only said Come, fill the

Cup and mm the fire of Spring,

The Winter Garment oj

Repentance fling ’—but let it
pass.



W.1. Produced 5,635
Bales Of Cotton

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, July 11.
Empire countries last year pro-
duced 856,991 bales of cotton. Of
this amount 5,635 bales were pro-
duced in the West Indies by the
Sea Island Cotton Association.
These figures were revealed by

None can _be more enviovs ef The only hope he held out for the tion at the Annual General Meet-
this fantastic Dutch price-war suffering Britons was that if the ing held in Manchester yesterday.

revelry than Britain’s harassed prices of raw materials were to
housewife, barely keeping abreast fall, he would call a meeting of at not being able
cf the racing cost of living tide the clothing trade to discuss price
in hey own country. Mr. Michael reductions.

Foot may believe—as he wrote

In a letter expressing his regret
attend, Sir
Hartley Shawcross, President of
the Board of Trade, stressed the
great contribution made to the

this week--that prices are under benefit from a visit to Amster- welfare of the Commonwealth by

better control here than in al- dam's Nieuwenendijk for a check
most any other land. But, #8 on what happens when ieee.
Michael Fou: himself agrees, the wife's patience is exhausted.

Storm (Clouds
Newspaper Callup Polls reveal
have lost some
points in public favour during the
It may be due to the
fact that the stock of the new For-
fixing re Waeten nea - have curv-
; 1 w -
prices for plaster boards may not euler Mesan auteh tee, Bat he
Tories do not lack for power in
their fight for a general election
before Atlee wants it.
clouds still gather for the Socialist
There are those who
Tuesday with its warning that the hed ty Tag gl nore ae.
And public criti-
cism of the Government attitude
to atomic eer ae :
emer : Ma country is likely to develop as a
cerned, too, by the cost of living result of a debate on the subject
in the House of Lords last night,

Left in U.S.A.

It was accepted in wartime that
iy , : reduction of
ecutive were unanimous in pre- Should be left to the United States,
1948 the Minister of Defence
made it known that “all types of
medern weapons, including atomic
weapons,” were being developed in
As recently as February
of this year, when Mr, Winston
Churchill challenged the Govern-

i i ment about atomic progress
it for rather different reasons Britain, the Prime Minister, “Mr.

Attlee,

British housewife finds that diffi-
cult to swallow.
Prime Minister Atlee, and his

Cabinet colleagues, must be aS that the Tories

anxious about this home head-
ache as anything confronting them
on the Korean or Persian fronts,
The Government's defeat last
night on a question of

have been significant. It was a
snap division when more than 160
Socialists were missing frorn the
House. But the Government will
see the utmost significance in the
Socialist revolt in the House on

whole utility clothes scheme in this
country igs endangered by soaring
price levels.

The Government will be con-

debate at the conference yester-
day of the Nationa! Union of
Mineworkers. Communists and
others in the Union seem to be at
loggerheads as te how far the ex-

senting a new wage claim. But
it is clear that the miners now
want a minimum of £7. 10s. a
week—a claim based on the in-
crease in the cost of living.

This same miners’ conference ac-
cepted a resolution urging price
controls. The executive accepted

In

from those advanced by the com-
maunist element, who blamed ris-
ing prices on the rearmament

programme, the blame for which 9Pment.”
they laid at the door of Govern- Hillsborough,

ment. Voicing the majority op-
position to this attack on the
Government, Loyal delegates like
Wolsh Glyn Williams retorted;
“If rearmament is responsible for
the increased cost of living, then
that must apply in the sa‘ne way
in Russia. It has the biggest mil-
itary force in the world.”
Impossible !

ward surge of prices, affecting
practically every aspect of the citi-
zen's life at Ti moment, the public
Socialist, Tory or Liberal, is likely

to be satisfied only with action of
that will restore something of the time the Department of Atomic
pay packet's value, The inereas- Energy was divorced from civil
ing soreness of the public was service administration. It is now
pretty well summed up in the an
Commons debate on the Wednes- Supply.

day night when a Member dc-

clared the Government reply was the



IMPORTANT
NOTICE

We will

past month,

Government.

sian situation.

Britain,

emphatically
“There has been successful devel-
Viscount Alexander of
Chancellor of the
Duchy of Lancaster, defending the
Government’s position in the Lords,
reiterated the Premier’s statement.

The ehief feature of the debate,
however, was that with the an-
nouncement [
Controller of Atomic i
resigning next month and that his
chief
ready left, Lord Alexander could

not deny—no more than he would
Whatever the Government may confirm — that Lord Portal was

answer to the problem of the up- qiccatisfied with Britain’s present
atomic set-up.
Lord Cherwell,

spokesman expressed
we in and out

leading Oppo-
sition
view of many

Parliament, t

offshoot of the Ministry of

the Corporation’s encouragement
of scientific and agricultural pro-
gress in many countries. The
cotton crop of these countries in
1950—1951, which is expected
to be a record, showed the
inestimable value of the Corpora-
tion’s work in the year of shortage
in which an increase of supplies
when other sources had failed had
proved vital to the nation’s eco-
nomy.



ELEPHANT MEAT
1S TASTY DISH

LONDON, July 11.
A woman reporter in Britain
faid that Rajah, the London Zoo
elephant, killed on Monday for
attacking its keeper made a tasty
dish. Anne Cooper of the London
Daily Express said that she ob-
tained an unrationed cut of Rajah
and had it both as roast and stew.
She said that the raw meat cooked
like a “prime cut of beef only

slightly coarser”. —UP.



says that whatever the military
successes or failures of the De-
partment, “it is industrially vital
that the work, experimental as
well as productive, for peaceful
uses should not lag behind the
work done elsewhere.”

There is shrouded from the

ublic at the moment what really
5c being achieved in Britain,

either in the direction of atomic
production for war or in the scale
oi our resources for peaceful
atomic development. We know—
and it is about all we know—
that Britain has yet to produce
an atomic bomb, And the Brit-
ish organisation, of course, sup-
plies radio-active isotopes both
for scientific and industrial pur-
poses in Britain and on a limited
scale to other countries.

There is a growing feeling
throughout the country that some
vital re-organisation of our atom-
ic effort is necessary. The view
persists that under a civil service
regime atomic scientists and tech-
nicians are unable to achieve all
that Britain is certainly capable
of achieving in this highly im-
portant field. There will be
strong support for the solution
offered in The Times — the

creation of a separate Directorate
outside the Ministry of Supply—
a directorate responsible to Par-
Summing up the viewpoint of liament, like other official scienfi-
The Times to-day fic bodies.

improving our

Downstairs Premises beginning
from Monday 16th July, but will
continue business on the Second

Floor as usual.

We solicit the co-operation of
our Customers and the General

Public.

CORNER
STORE

MANNING & CO, LTD.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

U.K. Raises Retail

Sugar



Price

Is It Prelude Ta De-Rationing?

LONDON.

THE MINISTRY of Food has increased the retail price

of sugar in Britain from 5d.
July 15.

to 6d. per Ib., with effect from

The controlled price of wholesale sugar was

raised ten days earlier from 40s. 3d. to 49s. 3d. per ewt.

Prices paid to West Indies and
other Empire producers, which
ave fixed by agreement, wil! not
be affected by these changes. The
Ministry announces that the in-
creases have been made neces-
sary “because af rising costs
which cannot be met within the
food subsidy ceiling already an-
nounced.”

But experts in the sugar
trade in London believe that
the Ministry’s price increase
may be a prelude to the com-
plete de-rationing of sugar, in
spite of repeated Government
claims that Britain’s sugar sup-
plies are only just sufficient to
maintain the ration at the
present level.

The Food Ministry sells sugar
on a two-price system—5d. per
Ib. to the housewife and 7d to
the manufacturer of jam _ or
sweets. The extra price paid by
the manufacturer just about cov-
ers the cost of the subsidy on
thhousehold sugar.

A single-price - system, midway
between the two existing price
levels, is an obvious pre-requisite
to de-rationing; if unrationed
sugar remained at the 5d per Ib.
subsidised price, manufacturers
would turn to heusehold stocks
for their supplies and would
cease to buy any of the 7d per
ib. sugar at all.





Experts

The London experts believe
that the main reason why Mr.
Maurice Webb, the Food Minis-
ter, has not taken sugar off the
ration is that he has been re-
luctant to make any price change
which would show in the cost-
of-living index.

But housewives, whose major
food grievances since the war
have been on the subjects of meat
and sugar, have repeatedly rid
that they would rather pay a lit-
tle more for sugar and have all
they wanted, instead of getting
an insufficient allocation of sub-
sidised sugar. With prices of al-
most everything in Britain rising
steeply, the extra penny now to
be charged for sugar will hardly
be noticed.

The necessary price conditions
now exist in Britain to take sugar
off the ration altegether and ex-
perts in the City ure confident
‘that the price increase is only a
preliminary step to the announce-
ment of de-rationing

Man who has fought hardest in
the last few months for the aboli-
tion of sugar rationing is Lord
Lyle of Westbourne, president of
Messrs Tate & Lyle, Ltd., the
sugar refiners. He has returned
‘to the attack time and time again
in speeches, newspaper articies
and letters to the Press, produc-
ing figures to show that Britain's
UAE PURER ARS, TOW ample. to

Officials

Mr. Webb and officials of his
Ministry have produced other
figures and have stoutly main-
tained that there is still a gap to
be bridged between Britain’s ac-
tual sugar supplies and the po-
tential demand if and when it
comes off the ration. Concur-
rently with the announcement of
the price increase, Mr, Webb
stated in the House of Commons
that non-dollar supplies of sugar
are “still only sufficient to main-
tain the ordinary ration.”

Britain’s sugar supply position
was debated fully in the House
of Commons early in June, when
Mr. F. T. Willey, Parliamentary
Secretary to the Ministry = of
Food, declared that Britain needs
an assured sugar supply of
2,550,000 tons a year, as well as
a substantial stock on hand, be-
fore sugar can come off the ra-
tion.

This year, he said, Britain ex-
pects to receive only 2,226,000




ip

it QUININE

12,000

â„¢~





YS >
4) i TA rag
LD he =



tons of sugar, but to maintain
the ration at its present level will
take 2,174,000 tons of raw sugar.
Other Members of the House,
however, produced different sets
of figures and claimed that there
would be a substantial sugar sur-
plus in Britain this year, suffi-
cient to abolish rationing.
B.U,P.

B.G. Grants Mining
Coneessions

From Our Own Correspondent

GEORGETOWN, BG. July 11.

The Government has granted
the U.S. financed “Willems In-
dustries Incorporated” a five year
mining concession to explore 2,000
acres of Morabisci area in the
Mazaruni mining district for col-
umbite tantallite.

Willems have also been granted
temporary permission to occupy
and explore a further 10,000 acres
of the same district. A local
company headed by Eugene Cor-
relia and Maurice — Nascimento
also granted a temporary one year
permission to oecupy and explore
4,200 acres of the same district
also for columbite tantallite. The
Correia—Nascimento Exploration
party left Georgetown city today.

West Indies At Westminster

West Indies Regiment
LONDON.

In the House of Commons on
July 3, Mr. Bernard Braine (Con-
servative, Billericay) asked the
Secretary of State for War wheth-
er any stops have now been taken
‘Oo re-foin the West Indies Regi-
ment.

Mr. Woodrow Wyatt, Under-
secretary to the War Office replied.
“My right hon, Friend is in con-
sultation with my right hon. Friend
the Secretary of State for the
Colonies on this subject.”

Mr. Braine: “Will the hon, Gen-
tleman bear in mind that informed
opinion in the British West Indics
is in favour of re-forming th:
volunteer regiment whieh pe: -
formed great service in World
War 1? Will he also bear in mind
that its re-formation would duo
much to encourage regional con
sciousness and pride in the British
West Indies and form a valuable
addition to the strength of the
British Commonwealth?”

Mr. Wyatt: “I fully appreciate
what the hon, Member has said. I
am sure he also understands that
many interests have to be consid
ered in this matter, I can assure
bim that good progress is being
made.”

Only Just Enough Sugar

In the House of Commons on
July 4, Col Stoddart-Scott (Con-
servative, Ripon) asked the Minis-
ter of Food if, owing to the in-
creasing preduction of sugar in
the non-dollar area he is yet in a
position to make a statement with
regard to the termination of the
rationing of sweets,

The Food Minister, Mr. Maurice
Webb, replied: “Although suga:
production has increased in non-
dollar areas, non-dollar supplies
are still only sufficient to maintain ,
the ordinary ration, recently in-;
creased to 10 oz. the existing)
monthly bonuses and the present
allocation rates to manufacturers
In these circumstances I do noi,
think that I should be justified in}
inereasing ugar allocations to
sweet manufacturers sufficiently to

Sugar Cane Research in
Mauritius
in the House of Commons on
July 4, Mr. Thomas Reid (Labour

enable sweets to be perch.

Swindon) asked the Secretary of}

State for the Colonies what re-
sults have been achieved by the
State Research Station, Mauritius,
in respect of improvement ot
sugar cane;

Mr. John Dugdale, Minister of
Stiute for Colonia) Affairs, replied:
“IT would refer my hon, Friend to
the article entitled ‘Sugar Cane
Research in Mauritius’ which was
published in ‘Nature’ of 8rd Feb-
ruary, 1951, The most important
achievement of the Sugar Cane
Research Station has been breed-
ing and distributing an improved
variety of cane, M.184/32, which
is now grown over 90 per cent,
of the total eane area and thas
been largely responsible for the
record crops of recen, years. Good
work has also- been done on such
matters as the survey of the soil
of the cane belt, the investigation
of the nutritional status of vane



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and of the role of fertilisers and
pest and weed control.”
Sickness in Jamaica

In the House of Commons on
‘uly 4, Mr. Reginald Sorensen
Labour, Leyton) asked the Sec-
etary of State for the Colonies if
e is aware that an epidemic dis-
-ase described as vomiting sickness
‘ve to malnutrition has broken
vut in Jamaica and what steps are
ocing taken to déal with this and
ts cause,

Mr. John Dugdale, Minister of
state for Colonial Affairs, replied:
“There are no cases of vomiting
ickyess reported at present. Ja-
maica’s currency budget includes
£10,000 for detailed laboratory in-
vestigation of the condition with
the co-operation of the staff of the
University College of the West
Indies.” —B.U.P.



EXHIBIT OF RAZORS
COVERS 3,000 YEARS
LONDON, June.

Millionaire James Rand ean
take you back 8,000 years — w
vazors,

In a London strongroom, Rand
has a collection of razors dating
way back and remarks that you'd
be surprised at the mumber of
lifferent ways in which men have
ried to shave themselves.
Methods range from broken glass,
shark's teeth and singeing with
ved-hot plates to the practice of}
plucking followed by early Chin-
ese. —(C.P,)



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Facts about British West Indies
Trade Liberalization Plan

The number of Canadian dollars in Britain has
itcreased sufliciently to belp make possible the
new BOW.L. Trade Liberalization Plan, Under this,
Canadian suppliers with a history of export to the
tritieh West Indies during 1946-7-8, are now
cligible to ship quotas of approved products for
(depending on categories) of their

average shipments during the basie period

many items whieh you've not been able to offer

HARBOUR LOG
In Carlisle Bay



Sch. Mary M. Lewis, MV. Sedge
Sch. Frances W_ Smith. M.V
Sch. Franklyn D. R., Sct 1
Sch, Emeline, Sc Anita H., Sch, f liz
M. Davidson, Sch. Gardenia W Sch
Mary E. Caroline, M.V. Caribbee, M.V
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ARRIVALS
SS. Sunayis, 4296 tons e,” «

Macleod, from Glasgow
8.8, Willemstad, 2,855 ¢ Capt
Burgt, from: Port-au-Prince via Tri
S.S. Alcoa Roamer, 4,625
Capt. Harum, from Mobile
SS. Canadian Constructor, 3,936 +
net, Capt. Wallace, from British Guiana
via Trinidad







DEPARTURES

Schoon¢r Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 tons
net, Capt. Every, for British Guiana
Schooner BPyerdene, 68 tons net, Cant
Phillips. for British Guiana
§.S. Polycrest, 720 tons net. Capt. Pau!
from Trinidad



Rates of Exchange

JULY 12, 1951

a
iis nimctmtnoiniine cee taclgetnsigenrmereetonntiemed





PAGE THREE

Acid
Stomach?



It can be very unpleasant when excess
stomach acid does not permit you to
enjoy a meal without suffering dis
comfort——but luckily there is a safe
remedy that brings quick relief

BISMAG ° (Bisurated Magnesia). It





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616 pe Currency 59 ¢ t
Coupons seo pr
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ergo eee
MAIL NOTICE 7am

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Cais yore See" | «BISURATED” MAGNESIA

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered Mai)
at 2 pan., Ordinany Math at 2.90 pe on
the 18th July, 1951



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Canadian Goverament Canadian Government
‘Trad, munissioner Vrade Commissioner
Canadian Bank of Com- 45 Suint Vincent Street
merce Chambers P.O). Bos 125

P.O. Box 2 Port-ofSpain, Trinidad
Kingston, Jamaica (Teertios ie ng Wishes ain
(Territory includes the Windward and Leeward telands
Kahamasand Brivah Hondoras) und Britieh Guiwe















PAGE FOUR



ADVOGAT

=e eee maw

BARBADOS

toe



Printed by the Advocate Co. 114, Jroad Bt. Bridgetow.



Friday, July 13, 1951





THIRD PARTY

FOR some years public concern has
grown over thg absence of any adequate
insurance of motor vehicles in this island.
The condition has since been aggravated
by the continued increase of vehicles on
the roads.

Eighteen years ago the late Mr. L. T.
Yearwood introduced the matter in the
House of Assembly and asked the Govern-
ment to send down the necessary legislation
for Compulsory third Party Insurance, At
this period there had been a series of fatal
accidents and many others causing injury
to pedestrians and damage to vehicles.
These were settled in the Courts oecasional-
ly with serious loss and inconvenience to
people who had been injured. In the case
of many fatal accidents any reward to the
dependent family depended on the feeling
and charity of the owner of the vehicle.
Enlightened opinion felt that there should
be general provision for the dependents of
fatally injured people and recovery for
damage and injury to others. This could

be achieved by Compulsery third Party
Insurance.
The suggestion was rejected by the

House on the ground that there was not
sufficient justification, either by way of
the number of atcidents or the number of
vehicles on the roads, to warrant com-
pulsion, Many owners nevertheless took
the precaution to insure their vehicles
comprehensively or merely for Third Party
risks. In the years between there have
been some accidents, to which publication
has been given, in which bread-winners
have been killed outright without any pro-
vision for the dependents, And these
were unable to have recourse to the law.

It cannot be denied today that there is
need for Compulsory Third Party Insur-
ance. Figures compiled by the Police show
that there were 521 accidents in 5 months
with 115 occurring in the month of April.

And the number of vehicles are ever in-
Orvwemingg.: Reduwy Anere ere 2,825 vehicles

registered in St. Michael out of a total of
approximately 6,000 in the island. The
yovernment recognised the necessity for
Workmen’s Compensation after it was in-
troduced into the House of Assembly by
Mr. W. W. Reece and when the Bill was lost
at the end of the session sent down a new
bill which has now become law. If it can
be accepted that people working in shops,
stores, factories and on the water-front are
entitled to protection, it is clear that those
who must use the roads, in pursuit of their
daily occupation, also deserve protection.
It sometimes happens that innocent people
are injured or killed as a result of the care-
lessness or recklessness of drivers of motor
vehicles. The pedestrian or occupant of
the vehicle who took no part in causing the
accident might suffer permanent injury
and be without redress because owner or
driver was a man of straw.

It is unfair to have an abnormal number
of vehicles on the narrow roads of this
island with the possibility of an increasing
number of accidents without instituting the
necessary safeguards for public protection.
Only the Vovprnmant can do this.



OUR READERS SAY

only
make him a
of keeping her in a certain stand-
ard of material comfort.

Family Planning can

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—Despite the beautifully



BARB



ADOS ADVOCATE



But Can A Man

How can a man simply disap-
pear? how can he vanish into thin
air—or thick air for that matter
without leaving a trace?

“Elementary, my dear Watson,”
said Sherlock Wicksteed, filling
his pipe with shag. “Your ques-
tions are prompted, I take it, by

the case of the missing diplo-
mats?”

Well, how can you disappea:
without trace? Lots of people

would like to know, and I could
even name a few whom I'd be
willing to assist in their disappear-
ance if they’d promise not to
come back.

Disappearing is a relative term.
In January this year there were
19,588 deserters from the Armed
Forces. As far as the Services are
concerned they have vanished,
all 19,000 and odd of them.

I've vanished myself. I’ve done
it several times. If he’s still alive,
there’s a farmer in Queensland
to whom the disappearance of a
young cowhand called Wicksteea
is an unsolved mystery.

The farmer drank, and when he
was drunk he liked to let ail the
pigs loose and drive them into
the house. One morning at break-
fast when the place was full of
pigs I just walked out.

I said I was going to get some
eggs to go with all the bacon, and
I never went back.

Murderer?

In the records of the New York
police I may well be described as
a missing person.

They had me in for questioning
once because I looked like qa man
Who had murdered a _ taxidriver.

After letting me go they told
me to report back every day. But
I didn’t.

The old White Star
Homeric sailed at midnight

liner
and

; 1 sailed with her because I reck-

oned I'd had New York,
Did I do the murder?
Wouldn’t you like to know ?

Aha!



One of the neatest vanishing
acts of all time was performed in
1920 by Mr. Victor Grayson, form-
er Soc ialist M.P. for Colne Valley.

To the question which has
now get everybody arguing
BERNARD WICKSTEED adds

fuel . for argument

REESE
efter 5 ears...

GRAYSON
missing M.P.

He booked in at a Strand hotel,
ordered a whisky and soda at the
bar, drank half of it and then
vanished, just like that.

The barman didn’t actually see
him fade away. But one moment
he was drinking his whisky and
the next moment he wasn’t

He disappeared by simply going
down the Strand, possibly for a
banana. Nobody in the Strand
noticed him because they didn’c
know he was Victor Grayson or
that he had just disappeared.

The initial act of disappearing
is dead easy. You just dissolve
into the scenery as Victor Grayson
cid in the Strand and I did in the
Queensland bush.

Snap! It Goes

People sometimes disappear
without wanting to. They’d give
anything not to have disappeared.
You've read about them, They are
people with amnesia.

Something goes snap in their
minds and “they can't remember
who they are. It happened to a
girl in Nantwich, Cheshire, 12
days ago.

She was identified last night by
her mother, who saw her photo-
graph in the paper and phoned
the police to say the girl was her
daughter, Colleen Boosey, of
Palmers Green, N.

But sometimes no one does
recognise the photograph, and the
victims of amnesia may stay
vanished for years, even for ever





Just Vanish?

/
people can vanish without
we Fw to, how much easier, my
dear Watson, it is for people who

do want to.

1S masy

Supposing those two diplomats
were men who for some reason
did want to disappear. The first
part is easy because when the
actual act of vanishing took place
nobody knew what was going on
so nobody took any notice.

By the time people had begur
to look for them, they could have
completed their arrangements foi
hiding, if that was their plan.

But what about the police? The
police of half Europe are lookin;
for them. Their pictures and ful
descriptions have been studied by
tens of thousands of people.

True enough, but then so hav
the pictures of Freeman Reese
Who’s he? You've forgotter
already? That’s one of the reason
vanishing isn’t so hard... .

Wanted...

Freeman Reese was a colouré
G.I. deserter who is believed t
be the 1946 killer of Police Con-
stable James Booth at Burton-on-
Trent.

When a man has committed an;
murder he is_ hunted _ prett
remorselessly. When the victim i
a policeman you can be sure tha
nothing is left to chance. Ye



Freeman Reese is still missing
five years after the murder,
Posters with his photograp!

and the words “Wanted foi
Murder” were pasted up all ove
England. His fingerprint classifi
eation, which is
S M5 U 011 11
Bil Gite

has been radioed to the police of
33 nations.

No one can say that 6ft. Negroe:
with American accents are §
common in England that the,
pass unnoticed. But they are to
common to go running to th
police every time you see one.

And so are people who look lik
missing diplomats.

UE. Ss

Sterling —And Its.
Convertibility

LONDON, July 2.
In a few days’ time the Chan-
cellor of the Exchequer is due to
make his quarterly statement on
the gold and dollar reserves, This
will probably show that although
the reserves continued to grow in
the second quarter of this year, the
rate of increase has been slowed
down by recent recessions in
world commodity prices due to
the slackening of American
demand
is fact

‘bearing on

nas an
the current contro-
versy about sterling converti-
bility. There is a growing feei-
ing, particularly among Conserv-
ative M.P’s, that continued in-
convertibility has dangerous im-
plications for Commonwealth
trade. The recent visit of a West
Indian delegation to this country
to negotiate a larger allocation of
dollars to prevent a breakdown
in their trade with Canada has
underlined this problem

Although licences fer the impore
of dollar goods have been granted
more freely in the past fow
months, actual convertibility of
sterling into dollars—Canadian or
United States—seems to remain
as far away as ever

Apart from the recent slowing
cown in the rate of increase of
our gold and dollar reserves,
there are other signs suggesting
that sterling may lose a lot of its
strength in the months to come
Present moves in Persia do not
preclude the possibility that the
British oil company may be
forced to leave. This would in-
volve not only a loss of valuable
earnings from sterling oil but also
a weakening of our dollar position
if Persian oil has to be replaced
from American sources,

The second indication that
sterling may become a_ weaker
currency is provided by the
present trend of our overseas
trade. The terms of trade have



acquire a woman to
family on condition

Many of

Importapr,

(By CHAPMAN PINCHER)

By RONALD BOXALL

turned against us even more
drastically than was first expected,
and this together with the fact
that our import requirements have
greatly increased as a result of
the vearmament, resulted in an
adverse balance of trade for the
first five months of this year equal
to the trade “gap” for the whole



of last year There are now
svewing doulbtse that thie “gap?
can be filled by our earnings from

invisible trade, especially since a
large proportion of these earnings
come from overseas oil companies,
including Anglo-Iranian.

Put the greatest single threat
to our dollar position undoubt-
edly lies in the recent recession in
commodity prices from their post-
Korean peaks. This had in fact
been expected for some time,
since it was obvious that American
cemand could not continue in-
definitely at its recent high level.
Mr. Malik’s peace overtures have
now injected a new note of cau-
tion in world commodity markets.
If political tension is further
ased by a cease-fire in Korea
prices may fall almost as spec-
tacularly as they rose in the
immediate post-Korean months.
True, this might have a welcome
effect on our terms, of trade, but
it has obvious implications for
cur dollar-earning prospects.

Nor should
our dollar





it be assumed th

position is as sound
as the figures suggest. Despit
their recent encouraging grow!!
the real purchasing value of our
gold and dollar reserves, in terms
of 1939 prices, is only about one-
quarter of their pre-war value.
Moreover, at the end of this year
service on our post-war trans-
Atlantic doliar debts is due to
commence, and this will mean a
further deterioration in our re-
serves.

THAT SUDDEN HEART ATTACK Is

All this must inevitably result
yn a slowing down of progress
towards the relaxation of ex
change controls. It should not be
forgotten that the Treasur)
learned a bitter lesson from th«
disastrous experiment in converti
bility that followed the 194:
Ameriean loan, This showed tha
two essential conditions must be
present before such an experimeni
is undertaken again. The first i:

that some form of agreement mus
be reached witn nolders of ster-

ling balances for the ‘freezing’
of those funds, and the secon
1s that our overseas payments mus
be at least balanced,

It was largely because ther
was no agreement on the “freez
ing” of sterling balances that th:
first attempt at convertibility ha:
such dire consequences, But ever
assuming such an agreement coul:
be reached before convertibilit
were again attempted, the prob
lem of our balance of payment
would remain, If these payment
were not balanced, foreign holder:
of sterling would immediately cash
it in for dollars, and our reserve
would thus because a fund ou
cf which they could finance thei)
dollar requirements.

This would probably result ii
y rapid run-down of our gold anc
dollar reserves and we woulc
find ourselves back in the position
before Marshall Aid and devalua-
tion,

That is not to say, however
that convertibility, will neve
come, The British Governmen

still considers this their ultimat
aim; indeed, they are bound unde
the terms of the Bretton Wood:
and other financial agreements t
work towards this end. But unti
the political and economic horizon
become much clearer ‘than it is a
present, convertibility is still ai
unlikely prospect for the near
future

NOT SO SUDDEN...



builds up like pust inside

an iron

worded and terse dissertation on our men-folk dodge this condition A DOCTOR is flying to London pipe.
“Family Planning” in your “Our and many of our women-folk next month to ex n how he The gummy substance, which
Readers Say” of the 8th _ inst, dodge decent young men who are believes the word “sudden” can * is calledgcholesterol, narrows the
there are, I think a few practical willing to plight. their troth be taken out of the wor'd’s worst bore and evefitually causes a blood
points that the Theorist seemed to because the state of “wealth” of health hazard idden heart clot to form
have let slip. these young men does not afford attack.” Accurate
The writer expounded very well these young women the “necessi- Dr. Lester Morrison—leading a Dr. Morrison’s team has
the views of certain people on ties” of life, These men and ten-man research team—claims fo he . i ‘i j
Seer ig oe Ser iaet . : eee aie a fi , oa ere cund that by adding chemicals
Family Planning”, but it is women rather than make a family that a simple blood test can give 10 ‘@sdatsple obblobd:. th
indeed very difficult for us to life a suggestion of barter and early warning that en apparently measure ae o h of th ak can
have this type of planning until purchase, avoid it and love one jhealthy man is heading for heart fuer iain” a ae 3 © Camag-
we have a nation of families: We another in the way they love trouble. a a is circulating in the
can only have a nation of families mutton, as something to devour Until: now: there has been no t Te 3h “ lood-stream. z
when we can afford to maintain and destroy. At the moment Bar- reliable method of anticipating high a ip ount is abnormally
(in the true sense of the word) bados is being swept by a kind the most dangerous for™ of heart ugh—they conclude that the







































families; We can only afford to of immorality which, (if we do attack——what doctors call coronary patient is specially likely to suffer
maintain families when he have not find means of alleviating our thrombosis. f oo aeons of coronary thrombosis
a Family Allowance Scheme: We economic diMiculties) ill even- Doctors have had stand. bs i Morrison has tried out the blood
can only have a Family Allow- tually bring us the fate of Sodom helplessly while the death: rate est on scores of patients at the
ance Scheme when our industries and Gomorrah, This is because from this complaint has moré aa Angeles General — Hospital.
can finance it; We can only have many of the younger generation than doubled durin » last ten weiat pg subsequent medical his-
industriqgs capable of financing are claiming that they cannot years. vOKnee. goers proved that the test
such a Scheme when we plan afford a family. The men, in order Wie awtart aten 4 deviaes titer ely diagnosed — suscepti-
along regional lines and we can to satisfy their physical needs the reo test stan pe te have 1 eee heart trouble in three
only plan along regional lines without having to be induced inte — Gaveloped a promisinw diet treat. wee ene, eae rn
when we, in these parts, decide marriage and the women in order mart ee o a pre 4 attaties Hike stresses in his report pub-
to pool our resources and_ work to liquidate their financial obli- ana it ty hkon th nee : ers es ots a today that the test is still
for the good of a West Indian gations are not doing nice things. aii stible,. nm that a person is in ‘om on h_ stage one not vet
Community regardless of religion, Often and often marriage (in ° Brivty SR rg eh De ready for routine hospital use.
elass or creed, The writer is of Barbados) hardly differs from i nee aaa ee ee ee The treatment whioh Morrison
course unaware of the fact that prostitution except’ by being oe toa uacery blockage of the recommends for people likely to
with the exception of the few, harder to escape from. This is a ee blood . vessels called coron- develop heart trouble is simply a
economic causes make marriage state of affairs that will not exist ary arteries—which feed the heart diet low in cholesterol. |
(which is the only means of if we were to make a sincere itself. - : : Avoid—
achieving the recognised family- effort to get at the root of our : The blockage is caused by a He recommends’ that heart
life) in Barbados a matter of Population Problems and apply ood clot. But the formation of sufferers should avoid: Cream
bargain and contract. in . which remedies suitable to the sphere this clot is only the final stage of soups, liver, kidney, fat meat }
such ingredients as affection, cv- peculiar to us. * long blocking Be“ Plolse ‘ and fat fish. 7 : |
operation and the desire to limit The whole basis of these evils, Heart aRes lalists are sure the They should ration themselves
families are secondary, What kind inclusive of over-population, is Breese 23. PYOUGRE. On BY. ai an~ severely with rich cheese, butter
of family-planning can we have economic. It is no use being only herited dietary defe t is found margarine nd anything made |
if the man of the family does not philosophically theoretical. Let us an eee Who .cann ot cope prop- from egg yo . |
consider himself legally bound to view the thard facts as they are erly wit) a lot of fat in their food Salad dressings and vegetable
the woman who-is bringing his Let us therefore put the horse Like Rust oils are barred, ian
children into the world = and before the cart as Dr. Cato wants The result is th llions of Keep clear of these fatty foods,
devoting her life to rearing them it, and not the cart before the minute oil dr appear in thei Dr, Morrison tells his patients
to maturity? horse as the author of “Family blood = after t a 1 You will have more energy, feel

In Barbados, as in any part of Planing” desires it fatty mex se droplet e- fitt live longer. -

e world for that matter, a man EALIST t at —LES.

d {



and

| like them, and it is these who now see them

FRIDAY, JULY 15, 1951

i



With the present situation in Persial i)
occupying the attention of the whole world, |
the importance of oil is a topic affecting }
the remotest corners of the globe. In this
article, the reader catches a glimpse of the
way in which oil helps to keep the wheels
of civilisation turning.

Where’ The
Beluga Blows

LONDON

Just about now, a grand gathering of
Eskimos is assembling at one of the most
desolate stretches of Canada’s Arctic coast.
The name of the rendezvous is Whitefish. It
is here at a shallow bay opposite Richard’s
‘sland, that the Eskimos of the Mackenzie
River converge every July for their brief
summer ‘big game’ fishing season. Their
quarry is the formidable “Beluga” — the
eighteen-foot half-ton White Whale.

Between July and mid-September, these
whales come in their hundreds to feed at this
remote spot. For the Eskimos this means ar
invaluable opportunity of stocking a winter
larder which would otherwise be bare. At
this moment, countless watchers—men anc
women, young and old—cre lining the blufl
overlooking Whitefish Bay, their eyes strain-
ing for the first flash of silver betokening the
coming of their prey.

Once the alarm 1s shouted, the bay becomes
a scene of frenzied activity. Scores of small
out powerful motor schooners chug out to
battle stations’. Their decks are packed with
sarrels of gasoline fuel—obtained from a re-
inery on the Mackenzie River some 500 miles
away. Soon, the boom of harpoon-guns and
‘he crack of rifles echoes and re-echoes across
he water, mingling with the excited yells of
he hunters. The men tow each ‘kill’ to the
beach and then hand over the carcase to the
women, who do all the subsequent cutting-
ip and dressing. Especially prized as a
lelicacy is the ‘muk-tuk’, the fat which clings
o the whale’s skin and which is slashed into
liamond-shaped hunks and often eaten raw.
Chroughout the whole period, the chase goes
with unabated energy. The ‘midnight
sun’ is welcomed as a means of continuing
yperations almost ‘round the clock’: meals
and sleep are snatched as and when a lull in
che hunt permits. The women—working in
‘eams of four—race from catch to catch,
carving up an entire whale in less than half-
an-hour.

The coming of the oil-fuelled schooner has
nade a tremendous difference to the Mac-
‘xenzie Eskimos and taken a great deal of the
personal hazard out of their annual whale
hunt. The schooners bring not only the
aunters and their families but also their
log-teams, sleds, tents, food and other equip-
nent—all packed in sardine fashion into one
small communal cabin. It seems incredib!e
that these tiny craft—no larger than the
iverage river cabin cruiser—can transport
30 large a cargo. Yet mishaps are extremely
‘few. And although the hunt is a matter o!
‘heir very survival, and therefore something

CLOSED

FOR
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FABRICS

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to be undertaken in grim earnest, the Eskimo; Need we remind you that we are
make the most of its possibilities as a socia unexcelled for Furnishing Fabrics
occasion. The tented town that springs uy uo

along the shore hums perpetually with gossi, We ‘aré =~ showing a wonderful range
and laughter. Only toward the close o. by SANDERSON’S which includes

September, when the harsh, chill wind:
blowing from the polar ranges to the nortk
drive off the last of the whales to warme.
waters, do the tents vanish and the schooner:
disperse until another year......., 4

CRETONNES and TAPESTRIES

in LINEN and COTTON.

DACOSTIA & CO., LID.

DRY GOODS _ DEPT.

Colonial Students’
Probiems

LONDON, July 10.
Colonial relations are being harmed by the
policies which have caused Colonial student:
to protest vigorously against an order to leav:
their hostel at Hans Crescent, Knightsbridg:
in London’s West End, to make roon
for freshmen, says the London Times, in ;











oe







_s

SSEPSOES POS SP PEPPEPFSOOOS





OCTET

.
leading article commenting on the protests. %
“When it was rightly decided some year. 3

ago to provide large facilities for colonia
students to get their education and trainin;
in this country,” says the paper, “there wa:
far too little consideration of ways am
means; and the British Council, like the Colo.
nial Office welfare department before it, is
now feeling the effects of this improvidence

“At the bottom of the treuble is the attitud:
of some of the students to segregation. Whei
the British Council took over its new respon:
sibilities, it was widely taken for granted tha’
segregation was a bad thing for students whc
had come to England as much to learn Eng-
lish ways of life as to pursue academic
studies,

“So the numbers of students accommo-
dated in hostels were cut down, with the in-
tention of putting more of them into families
lodgings. Among the students them
selves, however, there is a strong core wh
prefer to be segregated in hostels, with other:

WITH TH E PROTEINS

YOU NEE!
HAM & FISH

Cold Storage HAMS
BRISKET OF BEEF
LUNCHEON BEEF
CALVES KIDNEYS
OX BRAIN

PORK SAUSAGES
Smoked HADDOCK
SOLE

“OD FILLETS
Large RED FISH

Orde

scU ITs

CARR’S CRACKERS
and

5 & KR BREAD

SANDWICH BREAD

To-day

ur. -

VSG SSSSORNIGGEGOSOS



4,65,



RUM & SODA

GOLD BRAID RUM
CLUB SODA
CANADA DRY



MIXED FRUIT

LLCLLPPPL ES PPPS







selves threatened again. for Cakes i etisias ee oer:
“Almost certainly, the advantages of dis- ; ae x
persing these coloured students among the nren Cuvee or %
. * . , 2
| population have been accepted too uncriti- GUEST SIZE TOIL 3
,cally and the difficulties have been treated 3
too lightly. Perhaps, for the African, the jump); % CODDARDS o g
s
(from his home life straight to an English) § PHONE WE DELIVER >
home is tox aN %
1ome is too big.—U.P. ¥3665690050000090006006 COCCSCBEGGCSSOGSE eeosesees
FRIDAY,

JULY 13, 1951

Rose Hill, St. Peter, was
Grand Sessions yesterday
33-year-old labourer who
June 3.

Cumberbatch stood eal

showing no trace of émotion as he listened to His Honour
the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Collymcre, pass the death

sentence.

Police Band To Give
Monthly Concert
At Club Willow

The Police Band will be leaving
their old quarters at Central Sta-



tion fer Club Willow, Passage
Roag on Wednesday Juty 38,
Colonel R. T. Michelin, Commis-

sioner of Police, told the Advocate
yesterday.

The new quarters at Club VWiil-
low is more spacious ard the
renovating of it has beer com-
pleted. 3

While in their new barracks,
the Police Band will give’ a
classical concert every last
Sunday night in the month to

which the public will be invited
to attend.

tc
It has not yet been decided
whether the Fire Brigade section
will share the Club Willow bar-
racks with the Police Band.
The programme of music played
by the Police Band under. Capt
Raison tonight Has 5s. Rocks
beginning at 8 o’clock is:













Quick March “Middy
Overture The Bohemia
Operatic ll Travatore”
Viennesse Waltz
Garland
Comic Opera Tol
By_ request
Tone Poem Finta Sibelius
Medley Old Irish Al
Selected
Film Music The New Moor
Romberg
Popular Song My Heart Cr
For You arr. Murreli
GOD SAVE THE KING





Bank Notes

Replaced By
Blank Notes

The Police Commissioner said
yesterday that the cash deficit
missing from the Public Treasury
s $14,000. Three sealed packages,
which should have contained five
dollar notes up to a value of $5,000
a package, contained notes of two
dollar denominations,



Another package which
should, have contained 1,500
dollar notes was found to be
made up of blank sheets of
paper neatly cut to bank note
size packed and sealed. The
Police are carrying out fur-
ther investigations.



Dogs Will Be Used
To Trace Criminals




The Police Alsatian dogs now
undergoing training at the Dis-
trict .” Police Station are get-
ting on well. The dogs—when
training is completed will be
used to trace culprits and will

be led to the scene of the crime
to assist detectives in their in-
vestigations.

One dog was used late’y in a
burglary case in the Hastings
area and was able to show the
Police where the thief had made

his escape.
Both dogs were brought
from the United K\Nigdom.

here



‘Constructor’ Loads
5,800 Tons of Sugar

The motor vessel
Censtructor (3,935 tons
chored at Speightstown yeste
to load 5,800 tons of sugar for .
John and Montreal. Loading t
gins today.

Canadian
net)










Plantations Ltd, and
Messrs. R. & G. Challenor & Co.,
Ltd., are shipping the sugar from
the two jetties at Speightstown
and one at Six Men’s.

The Canadian Constructor ar-
rived at during the
morning. From Speightstown she
will be returning to Bridgetoyya
to load molasses and rum for
Ca la,

The

barrels

Bridgetown



Constructor landed. +
of pickled.pork, 10 crates
matches





of oranges, rts and
among othe go which v,1s
loaded at British Guiana apd



Trinidad



More Lumber
Due Shortly

Two million feet of lumber are

expected to arrive at Barbados
from Canada within five days from
-day
Of this amount, 300,000 fect

re expected to arrive to-day by
the Seguenay Terminals’ ship Sun-
whit from Canada,, Lighter loads
of the new shipment will be dis-
charged around the Inner Basin of
the Careenage’ before the Poly-
crest’s 70,857 pieces of rough pine
from Kristiansand Norway, is en-
tirely removed. A large portion
of the Polycrest’s shipment was
still on the waterfront yesterday.



Schooner captains found it difi-
}

for their vessels













cult to get berth:
i ner basin with the lumber
t up mo of the landing
Harbour and _ Shipping
or itie ent hours on the
f yesterday try ig to solve
the problem of getting berths for
recent arrivals.
With \ lion feet of
mbher on to ’ d, the
difficulty of g berth the
i front t 5
I asin Wil ¢ oO €

rt



lived



a 32-vear-old butcher of
found guilty at the Court of
of murdering Cecil Jackman,
in the same district. on

mly in his dark suit, his face

“After an argument for two
shillings which Cumberbatch owed
Jackman,” Jackman’s: sister had
told the Jury, “Cumberbatch ran
home to return with his shirt tail
flying and a 14-inch-long knife in
his hand. He leaped in with an
animal sound and sent home the
knife in Jackman’s chest.” The
doctor said the fatal wound was
eight inches and had pierced the
lungs

The prosecution called 12 wit-
nesses on- Wednesday to prove their
ease. One was Cumberbatch’s
brother and one Jackman’s sister.
Yesterday Mr. G. B. Niles, coun
for Cumberbatch and Mr, W. W.
Reece. Solicitor General for the
prosecution addressed the jury
After the Chief Justice summed
up, the jury retired for'65 minutes
deliberating their verdict.

Argument

The case for the prosecution was
thet there was an argument be-
tween Cumberbatch and Jackman
tor two shillings which Cumber-
batch owed Jackman, During the
argument, Jackman cuffed Cum-
Derbatech who left and went home,

He returned shortly afterwards
and Jackman went for a stick and
struck him with it a few times.
Cumberbatch then stabbed him,
twice in his left arm which Dr,
Kirton said, suggested that Jack-
man was trying to defend him-
self. and once in the chest,

Evidence showed that the argu-
tuent started when Jackman was
indignant at the idea of Cumber-
batch going to the expense of go-
ing to a wedding and not paying
him 7

Jackman’s



r sister had said that
wnen Cumberbatch left on the
first occasion, he shouted back

that what he had for Jackman was
nome. When he returned and she
tried to pacify him he told her she
would see some sport.

The day after the murder was
committed, Cumberbatch surren-
dered himself to the police at
District “E” Station and swore
that it was he who had done the
stabbing.

_Mr. Niles for Cumberbatch based
Nts arguments to the jury on there
being provocation. He was asking
tne jury to return a verdict of
manslaughter and not murder,

Provocation

“I am submitting that there
was considerable provocation iw
tnis case,” he said. “And suilicient
provocation must necessarily re-
duce murder to manslaughter.”

Whetiier Jackman — struck
Cumberbatch once, twice, or
three times, he had given birth
to provocation,

Mr. Niles waived the first
attack by Jackman and told
the jury that there was a ter-
rific onslaught on Cumber-
batch with a stick by Jack-
man which caused Cumber-
batch to luse his balance and
coolness.

Mr, Niles cited a case to
show that if after reconcilia-
tion the one renewed the at-
cack and the other had a dead-
ly weapon on him and used it,
mere would have been evi-
dence which might reduce the
crime to manslaughter.

“One blow is regarded by
the law as being grave pro-
vocation,” he said. “The ques-
tion is,” he argued, “had he
time vo get possession of his
reison.” He did not, he said.
The attack was too swift.

They should attach little to
the evidence of Jackman’s sis-
ter, Mr. Niles told the jury.
She had given the suggestion
that Cumberbatch went home
for a knife, that he gave a
threat 2s he went and returned
running with the knife in his
hand. She, he said, could not
have been speaking the truth.
No other witness has. seen most

of the things she has seen or heard
the things she has heard,” he said.

She was the type of witness who
was guided by the old idea—an eve
for an eye and a tooth for a tooth
She had given the police a stick
which evidently wus not the stick
used es the other witnesses had
said that the stick which was used
broke twice. The stick she gave

the police was split and) worm
eaten and if it had been used it
would have broken. That stick

as they saw was.a*whole stick.

Manslaughter

“There notning in the evi-
dence, to sow,” he said, “that
Cumberbatch wanted to renew the
attack. If during your deliberation
there comes a doubt in your mind
that there was sufficient pfovocs-

1s

tion, then the verdict must be
manslaughte;z.”

Mr. Reece for the’ prosécution
said that it was quite true, that

one blow could amount to provocs-
tion

“But the case that was cited by
Cumberbatch’s counsel is not quite
the type of case with which we
are dealing.” he said. “Where two
men have a set-to — a fight — and
one is killed, it is not man-
slaughter.”

It was to be regretted, he said,
that Cumberbatch’s brother was
called to give evidence in a case
in which Cumberbatch was chars-
ed with murder. And it could
not be wondered at that he gave
the type of evidence he gave.

It was extremely marveliou
that the two men who were there
so little.
3ut it is to be noticed,” he
said, “that the only witness whose
















ence has been supported, b
I ical testimony was Czaren
Perh the men’s not
might be allowed for by
ss of the night t they

@ On Page 7



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



A

THIS IS NOT A DUCK.

‘CK ?




















It is a potato which a shopkeeper of
Bank Hall bought from a potato vender on Wednesday.

The

potato looks like a duck whose feathers are neatly arranged and

is squatting at rest. It has the

two balancing curves where the

sockets of a duck’'s wings would be and two indentations where

a duck’s eyes would be.

House

wives Will

Get

Natural Gas In Octobe:

t
_ BEGINNING from about October this year, house-
wives and others will be supplied with natural gas instead
of the present type of gas used and will therefore get more

value for their money.

Dowding Re-elected
President Of Stock
Hreeders’ Assoe’n

Mr H. A. Dowding was re-elect-
ed President of the Barbados
Dairy and Stock Breeders’ Asso-
ciation. This took place at the
Annual Meeting at the Chamber
of Commerce yesterday afternoon,

Other officers appointed were as
follows :

Mr. C. L, Sealy and Mr. C. L.
Davis (Vice Presidents); Sir John
Saint, Mr. C, W. Springer, Mr.
John Challenor, Mr. D. N. Weekes,
Mr. C. C. Skeete, Dr. M. B.
Proverbs, Mr. J. W. Smith, Mr.
H. J. Niblock and Mr. A. G. Seale
(Members of the Committee of
Management).



The other two members of the
Committee of Management will be
appointed after a meeting of the
Goat Society of the Association to
be held at some future date.

Mr. C. G. B, O'Neal (Secretary,
Treasurer and Registrar).

The statement of accounts and
the Report of the Committee of
Management for the year ended
December 31, 1950 were adopted.

The Association decided to raise
the annual subscription from $2.00
to $3.00.

The Chairman Mr. C. L. Sealy
on behalf of the Association ex-
pressed thanks to Mr, A. G. Seale
for the good work he had rend-
ered the Association during the
time he was Secretary.

Mr. Seale siitably replied.



Mangoes
Everywhere

Mangoes — all kinds of them—
are plentiful everywhere in Bridge-
town and in the country.

In the shops and alleys of the
City, hawkers’ trays are mostly
filled with mangoes which they
sell at prices ranging between
4 cents and 8 cents each.

Mangoes arrive by Schooners
and Motor Vessels almost every
day from other W.I. islands and
so mény spoilt ones are thrown
away from day to diy.

But in some of the trays, the
buyer will find oranges — mostly
engrafted — pines, bananas, plan-
tains, ackees, and limes.

Oranges are not really in season,
Sellers are king 6 cents each for










them. Pines are in scarce supply
end one is sold for 36 cents.
Banana limes and ackees are

in mocerate supply. Some hawke
are selling the bananas and limes
one for a penny, Others ask three
cents for two bananas.



CORNED BEEF
Local importers can order @
maximum supply of 3,000 cases of

corned beef from sterling and solt
currency sources for arrival .in
Barbados between the months of
August and December this year.

Licences will be issued at tye
Conivol Offices to importers who
apply for quotas. The ceiling price
will be $19.61 per case.

OILMEAL COMES

Over three thousand bags of
linseed oilmeal were landed here
from New Orleans yesterday by
the S.S. Aleoa Roamer, ‘The
Reamer also brought 4,800 bags
of corn and a box of sugar mill

machinery for Andrews Factory.
The Alcoa Roamer left port last
ht for British Guiana.

$24 FOR BODILY HARM

“A” Police Magis-
William Thomas 0
St. Michael, $24 for
on Gladys Maughn





A District
trate fined
Reed Street,
bodily harm
on Jur 11.
The fine is
y or tw



98

to be
months’

paid in
imprison-

>

Pile speakng

Countil on Tuesday
the salaries of Gov e

at Barbado in order tc
. i t

have > pay

ernment





Natural gas is supplied from a
well at Turner's Hall It: has a
very high heating quality which
only requires about half the
amount to do the same work as
the present gas

Mr. D. R. Young, Manager «Af
the Gas Company, said that now
the Gas Amendment Bill has
passed its various stages through
both Houses of the Legislature,
the public will be glad to hear
that pending the Governor's sig-
nature and assent of the Colonial
Office which will take a little time,
the Company is hoping to turn on

the natural gas supply to the
whole district about October.
“The basic price fixed by the

Bill is 40 cents to the publie and
34 cents to the Government but the
Management hopes to arrive at a
scale of rates to attract commer-
cial and industrial consumers.

Gas Pipeline
The natural gas pipeline runs
from the Belle Pumping Station
along the old Railway line via

Weiches Road, Pine Road, Beckles
Road to the Gas Works . with
branch line through Tweedside
Road, Roebuck Street, Country
Road via Peterkins Road (Strath-
clyde) to Black Rock at Carlton.

“Most of the residential districts
are already covered by the ordin-
ary gas mains which stretch fron

the Lazaretto at one end to
Graeme Hall Terrace at the other
end. They include all the princi-

pal streets in the city and suburbs,
These low pressure mains are con-
nected to the high pressure mains
through reducing pressure gov-
ernors.

“There is no doubt that with the
greater convenience which this
fuel wili offer, the whole commun-
ity will welcome it.”



RECORD CROP

The year’s crop has yielded
187,000 tons equivalent of sugar
and molasses, the Advocate
was told yesterday at the Depart-
ment of Agriculture.

The yield is a record and is
some 2,000 tons more than what
was estimated.

All factories have ceased
grinding operations, it was said.
—$_—_—
Clothing Lost In Fire
art of a board and shingle

house at Boarded Hall Tenantry,
the property of Lillian Davis, was
destroyed by fire about 3.15 p.m.
on Wednesday.

Clothing valued at $60 was also
destroyed. The loss is not insured.

Se BEsaSs B
@ jst ARRIVED

a
a STARTENA



PURINA CHICK



MUST PEOPLE



Dr.

Proverbs Poinis Out

Benefits Of Artificial
insemination Of Catile

DR. M. B. PROVERBS told members of the Stoc

Breeders’ Association at their Annual Meeting

at il

Chamber of Commerce yesterday afternoon that perhap:
the greatest advantage of Artificial Insemination of catt
is the prevention of the spread of venereal diseases suc
as Brucilla abortion, Trichomoniasis and C. pyogenes it

fection.

He said :

The Artificial Insemination of
Cattle has been practised for many
years and in many countries, fore-
most among which are Russia,
Ame.ica and Denmark. In Brit-

in, although research on insem-
ination had been going on for many
years, little was done in the large
cale use of the process. In 1942
however, the Ministry of Agricul-
ure set up an experimental Centre

Cambridge for the large scale
nsemination of cattle, and this
was soon followed by a second

station at Reading in 1943.

“It was soon evident that the
scheme was practicable and the
demand for this form of breeding
Was soon very great,

Several centres later sprung up,
and these were often organised on
co-operative lines run on a non-
profit making basis, the capital
being raised by members or inter-.
ested persons in the locality.

Control Measures

“The Milk Marketing Board now
idministering most ot the centres
and control measures to safeguard
the stcck owner is enforced by
the Ministry of Agriculture.

“The advantages of Artificial
‘usemination over natural service
are many and varied, Perhaps
greatest advantage is the pr
vention of spread of venereal dis
eases such as Brucilla abortion,
Trichomoniasis, C. pyogenes infe, -
tion, ete

Another great advantage is that
a single ejaculate from a bull can
be diluted up to 1 in 100 and this
could be used to inseminate as
many as 500 cows, It can thus
be seen that a great deal of good
work can be done to improve the
productive capacity of a dairy herd,
providing you are certain of the

capabilities of the bull which is
being used,
“It is for this reason that the

formation of an insemination cen-
tre is usually started on a small
seale and slowly built up, as the



Greater Rum Trade

With U.K.

genetic potentialities of the bul
heing used are reyealed in tl
offspring

“It is not yet known for certai:
vhat grade or breed of cattle wi!



be best suited for the climatic con
ditions of Barbados, From initi
cbservations and recordings at th<
Central Livestock Station, the in
dication appears to be that Fre

sians and Guernseys can be sat

factorily maintained, providir

the standard of
management is high

nutrition

Island's dairy herds
“in an effort to determin
whether this would apply equal
to other dairy herds in the islanc
a limited amount of artificial i:
semination is being done at t!
request of stock owners and th
first calves from artiicial inse

ee ee

UTCHER FOUND GUILTY OF MURDER
In Rose Hill Affray |

JOSEPH CUMBERBATCH

PAGE FIVE

Someone's,
4



WIN WITH

PALDING

OVER 70 YEARS OF SPORT











nation are just beginning to cor 5 2 ,
olony A Bs: 8 RA 8 1 @ & RR OS.” £7 DB)
“Twas fortunate to be associat ~ es a
with the development of an arti ‘
tial insemination centre in Hamp~ °%%%%G9999669969999999G9554599G9995S9GII9OOFOODIFOOR
shire, which was started ry M ‘ ‘ x
George Gould in Southampter \s ' X
with whom IT practised In 1943 % 4 >
small farmer’s herd became i % ‘ 5 : %
fected with Trichomoniasi H Ss i >
three sons were all in the service * ?
md his dairy herd meant, his e a. x
istence, We collected semen fro }s LA Ss
u neighbouring farmer's bull anc x " x
f scminated_ his cows for him. "To \ _ lay .
cov the centre from which thi & A REAL COOLING *
riicleus was developed has ov - i <
©; bulls of five different breed: % DELIGHT x
acl known as the Hampshir ws 3S
( at'le Breeders Society and is rvr ’ R
on a co-operative, non-pro! % x
making basis. YS %
“From initial experience i x y
in Barbados I would state th x %
Artificial Insemination has a ve a 3
definite future. Livestock owne %
qnus*, ‘however, be patien™ ar 3% %
Jend every assistance they can i: & x
such matters as milk recordine %
and their observations on the pro % } D i ’s x
geny of certain bulls, so that the %& 7 pu ZL i Xs
best possible and quickest estima st q7) ary xt
tion of the correct bulls to be us¢ % STi Ke¢ TA LX %
can be made | t Al :
+ ’ r r
* PHOENIN SODA *
» ram y
| FOUNTAIN *
x KNIGHT'S LTD.
» % LLLP ILE A ALE AALANL woe

NF,
SO SSO PO GOP OTOOO OE

Possible

—SAYS CAVE

THERE IS a potential trade for Barbados rum in eng
land but a great deal more advertising is needed, Mr, R. M
Cave of Messrs. Cave, Shepherd & Co., Ltd, told the

Advceate yesterday.
Mr. Cave has just retu

rned from England where hy

represented the Barbados Chamber of Commerce at th
Congress of the Federated Chambers of Commerce of thi

British Empire.

He said that at present Jamaica
um is quite well-known in Eng-
and and seems to be selling wel!
“Almost everywhere liquor is sold
you will see the Jamaica rum.

“When asked by people about
the products of Barbados,” said M:.
Cave, “I would naturally refer to
our sugar and rum in the firs:
place, I was surprised to hea:
from many of these people tha:
they knew Jamaica rum but not
Barbados’.

“That is why I think that if Bar
bados rum igs to take the marke!
in England as it undoubtedly can,
a more serious and determined
attempt should be made to adver
tise the product.”

Asked if the question of in-
creased steamship passenger fa-
cilities had been brought up ai
the Congress of the Chambers
of Commerce, Mr, Cave said
that the matter had been dis-
cussed, “A resolution is to be
forwarded to the Conference
Lines,” he said, “asking them to
take steps to make it attractive
to steamship lines to undertake

a
& GROWENAB
a
H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd gy

Obtainable from

BRANDY

AT IT’S

BEST

IS

MARTELL BRANDY

A Shipment of ..

This fine old, world re
arrived and is on sale
If you want the best
member to specify MART









ned French Brandy recently
ill Leading Grocers.
dy obtainable TO-DAY,

ELL when placing your order.

re-

}
|) STANSFELD, SCOTT & CC. LTD. |)

passenger traffic from the Unit-

ed Kingdom to the West Indies
Freight Value

“The cpinion was expressed b)
several delegates at the confer
ence that if the West Indies coul
put up figures as to the value o
freight offered as a whole, it woulc
be of great help to the Londor
Chamber of Commerce in puttin;
up a good case to the prope
uthorities,”

Mr. Cave’s 13-year-old daughte
Cynthia, presented a bouquet t
Princess Elizabeth when she open
ed the Congress of Chambers «
Commerce. The request for her t
make the pre@sentation, said M
Cave, came from the Secretary ol
the Chambers on the instructior
of the honorary members

Mr, Cave said that he had seen
a picture of the event in the
‘Advocate” and he and his famil)
were very pleased, “I look upor
this little service which my daugh
ter had been asked to perform a
1 compliment to Barbados.”

Sore Mouth |

Loose Bloody Teeth

Bleeding Guma, Sore Mouth and L
Teeth mean that you have Pyorr
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad dis 4
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may alao cause Kheumatiar
and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum |
bleeding the firat day, ends sore mouth
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad |
guarantee. Amosan must make your



mouth well and save your teeth or
money back on return of empty pack
ug’. Get Amosan from your chemist

today. The guar
antee snrotects
so

Armosan :''

for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth













OF

e

%

- *
POLLED PEO

MORE AND MORE MEN
ARNE CHANGING TO

es
x d / %
: DAILY $
\ >
‘ )
% Because they have become convinced ¥
x ' ‘ °
x of ‘KS’ Superiority.
x
s
: e N
%& aici at »
x HERE ARE THREE OF THE MANY VERY GOOD %
* REASONS FOR THAT SUPERIORITY : %
8 e §
% §
% (1) ‘K’ SHOES are made from the finest leathers %
st obtainable. Both soles and insoles are hand- %
% tested for flexibility and accurately graded
g by skilled craftsmen. 3
; %
s (2) THE UPPERS of ‘K’ SHOES are selected, %
% hand-cut and matched by experienced crafts
R men with a care that no machine could
2 imitate. g
$ %
,
x (3) ‘K’ SHOES are made over the famous ‘K’ -
x PLUS FITTING LASTS with the heel-parts Q
x 1444 awe jae a J . hic g
st one fitting narrower than the fore-parts. This g
% ensures a close fit at the heel and freedom %
. . x
% for the toes. %
‘ * :
~ ¥
% oe = Why not come in and be fitted with a pair x
x of these world famous shoes? We are sure °
% you'll say like all the other ‘K’ wearers : 3
%,
- i ; e
bs “PLL NEVER WEAR ANOTHER SHOE %
ss BUT ‘K’ ” %
% @ >
¥ »
st >
x ; :
® 4%
‘.
x %
% %,
: DIAL 2664 ‘
°
s . . .
% Sole Distributors for ‘K’ SHOES in Bavbados x
s x
he CPOE PCOS. POCO G56O9S5 od



WH MAVE AR. iSKET

_——_.











Kr

LVERY PURPOSK!
REASONABLY Paid “DD 100
LARGE SHOPPING BASKETS
$3.00, $2.50, $1.92, Ete.
WASTE PAPER BASKETS $§
LCAUNDRY BASKETS, $5.50 each
SEWING BASKETS $2.00 & $1.50 each
LARGE BREAKFAST BASKETS
$2.00 and $1.50 each
CHILPREN’S BASKETS & KEY BASKETS
1/- and 1/6 each
e
Call at Our Home Products Dept.



20 & 72c. each




=

©
CAVE SHEPHERD
& €O.. LTD.
HOME PRODUCTS DEPT.

10, 11, r




PAGE Six BARBADOS ADVOCATE

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON










MICKEY MOUSE










C\ refuse | |. 9's:
ere GIVE MY) 96"
‘” ( CONSENT! | |



MULD |
LOOR








=LN iS ;
\ENGAGED TO












6-23 .

ry : a. g
Cop 4991, King Pestones Spmineate, We World vite opverved I Wy

THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER ‘00K
fi SOMETHING MIGHTY Lp] [C- WiEN-THE MASKED MAN CROSSES THE |
=" * a FA 7 : Eee es \ \/ . 4 “LG




CLEARING, HE WILL TRIP-ON A STRING.
THAT STRING'LL FIRE A SHOTGUN










BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS | MW

ee | | the beaks of














mm

{ HELLO-MAGGIE-WiLL YOu hoe
| COME DOWN TO THE
EATANREGRET NIGHT

CLUB AN! MAKE YOUR

UNCLE COME HOME =''M i
ALL IN--
aol x whe ; |
Tyr

~ Vaselin













NOW-WHERE CAN MY
HUSBAND BE KEEPING
MY UNCLE ‘TIL THIS

HOUR ?POOR UNCLE!







SCHOOLS E NEW | f
LIBRARY-AND FINE
ARTS BUILDING --
YOU SEE-UNCLE IS
QUITE A STUDENT-



iM
TRADE MARK

" tM Ah
2.
VASELINE is the registered trade mark

of the Cheeebrough Mfg. Co., Cons'd

ny owl ceca

a BY FRANK ROBBINS |)



‘VER HEAR? A motor «eae
N OVER WITH A MISSING
STRIBUTOR CAP’ HO-HUM!
~.. PLEAGANT TRIP DEAR



GHT...WELL, LI'L
vik © HIM, ALL RIGHT
THE ROAR OF A FAGT



erie ae





SIERRA en

—

eats i
JEFF! OLEASE




BY ALEX RAYMOND {

MR KNOW WHAT th
my) THEY CALL IT?

Fine Quality PICNIC HAMS
6—9 Ibs.—-$1.02 per Ib.
STREAKY BACON —
Slabs: 6—8 lbs. at $1.07
per Ib.



BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

Sliced at $1.20 per lb
Bots, COLMAN’S PREPAR-
ED FRENCH MUSTARD 83c

| AS DIANA SWIMS FRANTICALLY
|_W_WHIRLPOOL CHANNEL~~~

Fine Quality LEG HAMS—
14-17 lbs, at $1.19 per Ib.
|
|

meer





JOHN

ss was
Wy N) (hs |
“/ Y aS oa |
G\ “i V trae 3 G
~S : Se ee

your BEST:

® GALY,. OIL CANS—1, 2 & 5 Gin. Sizes
HAIR fp. “Wie Established @ , | iy L, (| Incorporated |
C., iC i fi 1860 i. HERB IRV Utd. 1926
0 aka //Gee ee! \ 10 & 1) RORBUCK STREET, |

7h baa BY / EX-67 ra nae aici is

| eee eee ee =
>=>[Taanmaomaaaomaam=FE=E@=>>=Pamanm—@=P—FBFee x= TT EE
lia —

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE















HANDSOME DISHES

CALL FOR FINEST HAMS!!



= FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1951








On

children’s

cuts, scratches

and abrasions
use

‘DETTOL’

THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

| Safe. . . Non-poisonous
Doesn't Pain, . , Doesn't Stain =






Le good looks tell you they're just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price,





tag, that you can’t get finer value. [llustrated eee
OURO eg

is a Two-tone Brogue. ‘Tied to every pair is zu
7 eee ca

the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign
which means ‘ just right’! Look for it in

leading stores in Barbados.

HITE

means made just right

Magnificent Photo Cards
of Modern -British Cars!

Try







FLAKES “

Every 8-ounce packet contains 2
photo cards, (Full set, 40 cards)



The Only Pain Reliever
containing Vitamin B,

PLL LL LILI ISIS

2 For § When you take YEAST-VITE Tablets the
2 2. effect is wonderful! Pain vanishes, Cold and
Q HEADACHES 2 Chill symptoms disappear, and = regen lee
2 well! ‘There’s nothing else like YEAST- 3
2 NERVE PAINS 8 —it’s the ONLY pain reliever which ALSO
g COLDS 8 contains the tonic Vitamin B,. So make sure you
3 CHILLS 3 get YEAST-VITE to-day.

S RHEUMATIC 3 RELIEVES YOUR PAIN AND

3 PAINS $ MAKES YOU FEEL WELL

SALLI LDL LDL LD DDS “YEAST-VITE" is o registered Trade Mark

|
|

LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH
— Also —





aomuapnaaeraa

















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mr
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Usually Now Usually NOW

Tins Silver Leaf Pineapple Juice 35 %0 Tins Koo Apricot Jam 63 34
Pkgs. Garden Cream Biscuits 53 1% Tins Batchelor Peas 38

Pkgs. Nelsons Gelatine (+) 60 54 Bottles Frontenac Beer 26 20










We Offer Tosday

} Bots. Sovora Prepared MUS- 1-Ilb Tins FINE DESSERT
| TARD .. ne B8C, PRUNES at 69¢
8-oz. tins PEARCE DUFFS PRUNES per lb. at 55c.

BLANC MANGE in 6 8-oz. tins ITALIAN OLIVE

flavours at 24c. each OIL at 69c
l-lb. pk. SELVA TABLE
SALT at 16c. each Pint bots. FRENCH OLIVE
Q2-lb. Bots. CROSSE & OIL ........ $1.80 bot
BLACKWELL'S TABLE 2 pint Cans FRENCH
SALT 39 OLIVE OIL ..... $2.03

1-lb Bots LEMON 10-0z. bots Escoffier Sweet
CHEESE 45c Pickles .... 47c. each



Ee Ss NaErLo

armmne cumax| ALLEYNE ARTHU

TO EVERY MEAL

ALLEYNE & Co. LTD.

ARTHUR'S “YOUR GROCERS”
SPECIAL Rive 5 ‘


FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1951



CLASSIFIED ADS.







Yinimum charge week 72 eents and

| FOR RENT





86 cents Sundays 24 words — ows
TELEPHONE 2508 words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a|
emnsnenen ————m } tere on Sundays.
—
The charge for announcements os : ‘-
Barts, “Mattage Tnguncemens (| PUBLIC SALES HOUSES
1g Mee 5s ees — nial hedipitentirnathil ii datas ven. teeta
$:.50 ay aioe dens rican progeny mene BEDROOMS Two (2) large cool bed-
for any number of words up to 50, and REAL ESTATE oe at ao Air (furnished or Uunfur-
3 cents per word on week-days and nished ial 3683 13.7.51—2

4 cents per word on Sundays for each,
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
additional wo-d. Terms cash. Phone 2508
wetween 8.30 und 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m,



DIED

KING — Lydia Eldica. Her funeral will
leave her late residence, Dash Valley,
St. George, for St George's Church,
at 430 pm today.
Dolphus King (Husband), Neville,
Gladstone, Curtis, Elson ,Mavis and Edna
King.





SMALL—On July 12, 1951,
Small late of Mapp Hill,
The funeral leaves her late resi-
dence at 4.30 p.m. to-day for St,
Barnabas Church, Friends are asked
to attend.

Mrs.
Mr



Mrs. Gertrude
St. Michael,

Astnath Ward
Harcourt Small

(daughter!,
(son),
5i—In
13th July, May
Louise, at her residence Olive Lodge,
Paynes Bay, St. James. Her funeral |
will leave her late residence at 4.30 p.m.
to-day for St. James Cemetery.
Friends are asked to attend,
Clayton Thorpe (brother), Olive
Hope and Elise Thorpe (sisters).
13.7, 51—1n.



THORPE—On Friday





ANNOUNCEMENTS

SE

HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—lIsle of
Spices. SANTA MARIA-—loveliest hotel
in Caribbean. Rates from $7.00 per head
per day, GRAND HOTEL—in best resi-

dential district under Government House | Hill,

hill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day. |
SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing}
Beach. Rates from $4.00 per head per
day. Enquiries to D. M. Slinger, Grenada,

26.6.51—78n.

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words —

over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word on Sundays.











AUTOMOTIVE

CAR: Dodge Car, 5 passengers.
class order, New tyres
Garage





First
Apply Fort Royal
1.7. $1—3n



$4,370 miles.
upholstery, all
seen at Cour-
12.7.51—3n

CAR: 1947 Ford Prefect,
Tyres, coachwork,
in good condition
tesy

engine,
To be

Garage.





CAR: 1937 Chevrolet in good order.
Apply to Springer, Rock Hall, St. Andrew.
11,7.51-—-1n





CARS-—Vauxhall
dition new tyres,
hall 12 (Wyvern)
Barbados Agencies.

14/6 in perfect con-
paint ete, Also Vaux-
in good shape, Apply
Ring 4908,

10.7,51-—6n







good working
almost new body. Apply
Stoute’s Drug Store or Marshall &
Edward's Garage, Roebuck Street,
where it can be seen. Phone 2549 or
3453, 22.6,51—t.f.n.

Pick-up Morris 8
order witn

in



ELECTRiCâ„¢.z,



One NORGE REFRIGERATOR, cubit
ft. open type unit, to be seen at ee
man & Taylor’s Garage 12.7.51—













PHILCO REFRIGERATOR: 9! cu
ft.
mew unit. Reconditioned

may be inspected at Leo Yard,
side. Apply H.

St. Philip.

Cheap-
Smith, Sandford,
7.7. 51—t.f.n,

L.



LIVESTUVCK

COW: One young Cow fresh in milk,
32 pints daily.





Apply Seawell Plantation.

12 7 51—6n



MISCELLANEOUS







A wind- blown look isn't. pretty
“Amami Wave Set" makes your hair so

easy to set so quick to dry. This



non-oily preparation keeps curls and
waves firm and wind-proof
KNIGHT'S LTD, 11.7.51—3n,
AMM-I-DENT TOOTHPASTE

Start saving your Amm-i-dent Tooth
peste Boxes. Within a short while you
may be the winner of one of the follow-
ing:— Ist Prize $50.00, 2nd Prize $15.00,
3rd Prize $5.00. 1,7,51—26n



TABLETS
Get

CHLOROPHYL

odour and bad breath
Knights Drug Stores.
12.7.51—2n

ENNDS
stops body
yours today



For cleaning your Suits, Frocks, Hats,
Coats etc., Dry
Cleaner."

Obtainable at

ete, try ‘“Scrubb’s

Price 1/9 bot
KINGHT’S LTD.
11,7, 51—3n





PLASTIC TABLE COVERS in beautiful
$1.29: 54 x 54 ins
and Plastic
13. i 51—1n

designs 36 x 236 ins
$2.30; 54 x 8&4 ins
Aprons $1.49 each

$3.57



RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing
.and we will order for you if we
haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,
Ltd. 6.7.51—t.f.n

“SARIDONE”





Tablets are recommend -
ed in such painful conditions as head-,;

ache, migraine, toothache, rheumatic
pain neuralgia ete, Obtainable at Knights
Ltd. 12.7.51—2n

——

SPECIAL OFFER: 6 Jars of Chivers
assorted Jams, one pound size, for onl
$2.88. W. A. Medford & Company, Rickett
Street. 11.7.51—3n

SPRING CUSHION UNITS FOR UP-
HOLSTERERS:—Ready packed in Burlap
(Bag), each contains 42 Springs (6 rows



of 7 each) Dimensions 18” % 21”. Limited
Quantity available. Apply immediately
to:— The Standard Agency (B'dos) Co.,
14 Sw Street, Phone 3620.
aa a 10.7.51—€n
“WELDING MATERIALS—_ Electrodes

in sizes of 6, 8 and 10's also bronze
steel and flux for Acetylene welding.

Enquire Auto Tyre Company, Trafal-
gar and Spry Streets. MRE E i



We have just received an assortment
of Flower and Vegetable Seeds from

HT’S LTD.
Australia, KNIG 11.7.51—3n

:

| COLLECTION OF REN






If you have trouble col-
lecting your rents from your
tenants why not allow
D'Arcy A. Scott to coilect
them for you? Only a com-
mission of 10% is charged
and your troubles go.

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,

Magazine Lane.










GGLDIES

< 10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

1 Only Set of 2 Volumes:—
KEMPES ENGINEERS’
YEAR BOOK 1950 to 1951

JOHNSON’ Ss STATIONERY
MIRRO}







RS



aS C U T TO ORDER
at

JOHNSON’'S HARDWARE %

Distt butt ttt trvtvttnte ttt
St GOO

the;

jand 4 p.m.

Full width freezing chamber. Brand
throughout

eooceed {
355



| ALLSYNis ViLLe, a cottuge







: ; St. John Possession on August Ist
goirits ok ae Au modern conve- 1951 Inspection on epiraset of the
on “MSPECHON DY actang-ment, Dial Tenant Apply to B. L. Barrow (next
es ee 44.7.91—3n | acor) 12, 7 Sn
If you are inte ied ink : rer ist. At
: ouying a VENTNOR” “Cornes ist Ave. “Pine
a Sena small or large, in the! Road, Belleville, Drawing room, dining
ones pf town; a piece of land, a,room 3 bedrooms, s€rvants room and
rte SS place or a plantation, why not Garage, immediate possession. Dial 4910
at_iny list which is too extensive | or 3601 after 4 p.m. 7.51—2n
to ae here? I have exactly what you eT en
wan
DD'arey A Scott, Magazin
. e Lane, WaA N i kb
Dial—3743 13.7.51—3n

You can purchase St.

more room you can exchange.

etc Dial—8400 and look it over. For

zine Lane, 13.7.51—3n

DWELLING 1 HOUSE called

SLIEW” with 3700 square feet of land
thereto situate at Chapman Street,
| Bridgetown, nearest Whitepark Read)
| The house contains Gallery, Drawing

end Dining Rooms, two bedrooms, Break-

fast room, usifal conveniences. Large

Basement. Electric Light and Govern-
| ment water installed.

The above premises will be set up for
sale by Public Competition at our Office
James Street on Friday 13th July 1951,
at 2 p.m. For inspection apply to Miss
Farmer the tenant between the hours of
{3 and 4.30 p.m. daily except Sundays.
| YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
| Solicitors.
| 1.7.51

The undersigned will offer for sals
) at their Office, No: 17, High Street,
| Bridgetown, on Friday the 20th day of
July, 1951 at 2 p.m,

A parcel of land containing 5,445
Square feet, situate on St. Stephen's
Black Rock, St. Michael, with the
Dweilinghouse thereon, called “The
Nest" containing 4 public rooms, 2
bedrooms, with usual offices,
Inspection any day between
on application
alton, on the premises.

For further particulars, and conditions
ot sale, apply to:—
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
7.7.51-—8n.













10
to

a.m

Ww. Miss



AUCTION









I have been instructed by the
Government in Executive Committee to
offer for sale by public auction at @he
yard of the Department of Highwuys
and Transport on Friday next the 13ih
ut 1 p.m, one 1949, 18 H.P. Vauxhall
Velox blue Saloon car. It has com-
paratively new tyres and the up-
holstery as good as new. Terms cash.

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
_ Government Auctioneer
7.7.5i-—in



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received, I wil! sell
on Friday July 13th at Messrs Redman
& Taylor's Garage, Church Village (1)

Light Hudson Car 1946 Model. Insured
and licensed until 1952, In perfect
condition, suitable for Taxi. Terms Cash,
Sale at 2 p.m.
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer.
11.7.51—8n





Under The Diamond Hammer

By instructions from Mrs,
will sell her entire lot of
furniture at her residence Bank Hail
X Road opposite the Roxy Theatre on
Thursday next the 19th July, 1951 at
1 Oehkwky The sale includes One
Piano, Mahog. sitting, arm and morris
chairs, Mahog, Couch, Rockers, hardwood,
bentwood and folding chairs, Mahog
Waggon and tables, larder, hatstands
vaido, iron bedstead, Mahogany
dressing’ table, night chair, washstand,
kitchen tables and presses, glass and

Worrell I
housthold

china ware, kitchen utensils and many
other items too numerous to Sention,
Terms Cash



D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer,
Sn

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER





On Thursday 19th by order of Mrs.
Florence All¢yne we will sell at “The
Rosary” St. George, her house appoint-

ments which are chiefly in old mahogany
and Cordea, and are both antique and
modern,
~~Which. include —

Old Colonial 2 Pedestal Dining Table
and Siddboard; Very nice Upright and
Arm Chairs; Book Cases; Round Tip Top
Table; Card, Ornament and Droplea/
Tables, Hatstand, Folding Chairs, all in
very old Mahogany; Rockers, Berbic»
and Easy Chairs; Ornament and Side
Tables all in Cordea; Pictures, Whatnot
Uphols. Arm Chairs, Antique Swords,
Flat Top Desk, Carpets and Rugs, Mir'd.
Cabinet; Glass and China, Cut Glass,
Decanters and Jugs, Very Handsome Old

China Lamps, Vases, Ornaments, Paper
Weight; Tea and Coffee Services; G. B,
Refrigerator in Working order; Mir’d.

Press, Chest of Drawers and Dressing
‘Tables, Escritoir, Mirrors, all in old
Mahog: Cedar Linen Press, Double Iron
Bedstead, Spring and Hair Bed. Cordea
eS Bedsteads, M.T. Washstand G.E.C.
Fadio, Plated Ware in Entre Dishes,
Waiters, Forks, Spoons, Fish Knives and
Forks Cutlery &c., Victrola and Records,
Ware Presses, Larders, Kitchen Utensils
and Tables, Golf Sticks, Coal Stove,
Fowl and Rabbit Pens, Terns, Books and

other items. Sale 11,30 o'clock, Terms
CASH.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers
13.7.51—2nm



PUmLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
mininum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. PETER

Applications for one or more vacant
Vestry Exhibitions at the Coleridge
School will be received by the under-
signed up to July 26th 1951

Candidates must be children of Parish-
joners in staitened circumstances and
must be between the ages of 7 and 13
years.

Applications must be forwarded with
4“ birth certificate, forms may be obtained
at the Parochial Treasurer's Office during
office hours, an Examination will be held
at the School on July LOth at 10 a.m

G. S. CORBIN,
Vestry Clerk





NOTICE

Re Estate of

BEATRICE FORDE, deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim
agairst the Estate of Beatrice Forde
late of King Edward Road, Bank Hall
in the parish of Saint Michael who
died in this Island on the 16th. day of
February 1951, are hereby required to
send particulars of their claims duly
attested to the undersigned Hilda Best
of Culloden Road, Saint Michael, the
qualified Executrix of the Will of tne
Deceased in care of Messrs. G. L. W
Clarke & Co. James, Street, Bridgetown;
Solicitors, on or before the 31st. day
of July 1951 after which date I shall
Proceed to distribute the assets of the
Deceased among the parties entit.ed
thereto having regard only to such
claims of which I shall then have had
notice, and that I will not be liable
for the assets or any part thereof so
distributed, to any person of whose
debt or claim I shall not then have
had notice,

And all persons indebted to tre said
Estate are requested to settle their in-
debtedness without delay

Dated this 31st day of May 1951

HILDA BEST,

qualified executrix of the Will of
Beatrice Forde, deceased

. 1.6.5.—41



in Hastings

een
Elmo at Max-
well Road for cash or on terms, or it
your house is too small and you want
It stands
on % acre of land and has 4 bedrooms,

particulars see D'Arcy A. Scott, Maga-

“ELLER-

Fa
He
‘ae
Pee Ee eee ve



E, Near Massiah St



ROSE-MONT HO





Minimum charge week 72 eents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words -- over 24

words 3 cents a word week—4 cents u

word on Sundays,

HELP

GENPRAL SERVANT: Apply aiter 1
p.m. Mrs, Laqy Hutson, “First Attempt
Brittons Hil 13.7.51—1n

Assistant











Architeet or Senior
tectural Assistant required in Port-of-
Spain Office of busy firm: must be
accurate and rapid draughtsman, capa-
ble of preparing working, drawings and
details for first class buildings, all types.
Interviews wil be arranged in Barbados;
write giving full particulars age, ex-
perience, salary required to W H
Watkins & Partners, FF. R.I.B.A
P.O.B. 251, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad

11.7.51—3n

Archi-



STENOGRAP?
ately by Messrs







Wanted tmmedi-
arrington and Sealy,
Lucas Street—Salary according to expe-
rience and ability. Apply in writing in
the first instance 12.7. 51—3n





STENOGRAPHER & TYPIST for
office. Apply by letter and in
Stating experience. Good salary
3. B. Leslie & Co., Ltd. Co
Building, Broad Street, Bridgetow

12.7, 51—6n
UES eeeeeeeeeee



our
person

offered

Ltd










TRINIDAD LEASEHOLDS LTD.

“A vacanqy exists for a Relief Mess
Manageress Previous exptrience in
eatering for restaurants or hotels or
similar experience is desirable. Appli-
cations should be submitted in writing
giving details of previous experience
and enclosing copies of testimonia!s and
a recent passport size photograph, and

Should be addr
& Co. Ltd.,

ssed to Messrs. Da Costa
P.O, Box 103, Bridgetown.”
13.7.51—6n

MISCELLANEOUS

One LIQUOR LICENSE. Hs
erbs & Co., Ltd, High Street,
12.7.51—3n
LIQUOR LICENSE ITICE | s
(TRANSFER AND REMOVAL)
The application of Harold Proverbs &

















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

GOVERNMENT NOTICE.



2) POST of ASSISTANT ENGINEER |

and ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR, |
Electricity & Telephone Depart-
ment, Grenada.



post of A



technical knowledge of Electricity
and will be required to perform |
any duties in connection with the |
running and maintenance of the

Electricity and Telephone Depart- |
ment which the Engineer-in- |
Charge, to whom he will be!

directly responsible, may require,
It will also be his duty to assist |
the Engineer-in-Charge in
work of supervision of the plant |
at the Power Station (including
the Refrigeration Plant).

figure above the minimum in the |
case of an exceptionally qualified
person,

Candidates should apply in
writing to the Administrator, Gov-
ernment Office, Grenada.
Government Office,

Grenada,

28th June, 1951.
_ tb. 7. ‘51—4n.

Stopper Heads
Give Man
New Career

Stalin Model Is
U.S. Favourite

When 28-year-old Paul Nathan-
son, of Wilkinson Street, Kenning-
ton, made three bottle stoppers and
sent them as a gift to a friend in
America, he was, without knowing |
it, founding a new business,



Co, cf City, St, Michael, the purchase .
of Liquor License No, 465 of 1951 grant-| , Phe bottle stoppers had mod-
ed to them in respect of a board and |@lled heads—one of Mr. Churchill,
Shingle shop at Four Roads, St. Philip, |one of Uncle Sam and the third of
to remove said License to a wall build- | Josef Stalin.
ing at Four Roads, St. Philip, and to usc one
it at such last described premises. f A few weeks later large orders
Dated this 9th day of July, 1951 or the stoppers came from sev-
DALLAS MARSHALL, eral ba firms whose representa-
for Applicant tives had seen the modelled heads
To a Ws tel cir ae displayed in a shop. And all of
Dist. eS. them wanted the Stalin model.
N.B.—-This application will be. consid- Nathanson left his job as a

red at a Licensing Court to be held on | fashion designer

23rd
Police

July, 1951, at
Courts Dist

iL
“er
he We
Magistrate

o'clock a.m. at
HARPER,

Police Dist

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Carmen Smith
bolder of Liquor License No
granted to her in respect of a
and shingle shop with shedroof





board



at Ste . St. Michael for permis-
Sioa cS cake take ae itenss a a |Charlie Chaplin, Mr. Attlee and
Seard and shingle shop with shedroof |dozens of others. Oxford under-
attached at Hingapury, Bend, Be iene" graduates wrote, sending details.)
ae x Mae Esq, 7 a of their professors’ faces, and
Police Magistrate, ‘Dist, “A” asked for bottle stopper carica-
JOHN BAILEY, | tures.
for Applicant A London club said all their
Bi thle BPE ee at ne enna members must have a pink ele-
Police Court, Dist) “A"’ on Monday the |Phant bottle stopper made by
2rd day of July 1951 at 11 o'clock |Nathanson. and radio and film
can : stars asked for their own carica-
E. A. MeLEOD, | tures.
Police May titrate, Dist. “A From what was a_ hobby
Se Bae built himself a |
y usiness, e is amused that the
“Ee ¢ ATIONAL only people who order the Joe
- Stalin heads are the Americans,
. ee EYNE SCHOOL but all the world orders Mr

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1951.

There will be an Entrance Examina-
tion on Monday 30th July at 9.30 a.m.
for New Pupils.

Applications must be made in writing
to the Headmaster and must be accom-
penied by a Birth or Baptismal Certifi-
cate and a Testimonial of Good Condyct
from the last School of attendance,

Closing date for receiving applications
wil! be 23rd July.

There is a vacant Foundation Scholar-
ship tenable at the Alleyne School.
Applications must be made in writing to









from
320 of 195: other world. capitals.

attached
ittache t

and worked for
16 hours a day to fill their orders.

Each model had to be hand- made
and then hand-painted.

Soon London stores asked him
o make some, then came orders
Paris, Brussels, Oslo and

Added to the first three carica-
ures came models of Danny Kaye,

Churchill. —L.E.S,

Sulphur? |



There’s Tons In |

Solomon’s Country

the Headmaster and must be aceom SHORTAGE of raw materials:
panied by Birth era a Nonsense, says $4-year-oid scien-
Selves tor emamination at the School on {@St and geologist Herbert Cross.
Monday July 30tn at 9.30 a.m it’s just a matter of knowing
Closing date for receiving applications | where to look,

will be Peery. = RUA OR, Back at his home in Lytham,
Headmaster. | Lancs, Mr. Cross, 5ft. ana a bit,
13.7,51—4n tossed a piece of rock sulphur in

his hand, ‘
q And he said: “It’s highgrade
LOST & FOUND ore. I can get thousands of tons ot
4t from a mine near Muscat in

LOST Arabia. And lead too.

aap tse ealt oat beatae atl dei athiapeanitone “The country is rich in minerals.
LOST SHARE CERTIFICATE King Solomon’s mines country,

Mt has been reported to the Trinidad
Building and Loan Association that Share




you know.”

Certificate No, A-3516 in respect of tw He made the 6,000-mile journey
shares numbered 2849 and 2850 “J" serie: lo prove that Government spokes-
ate '

in the name of the Estate of Edit!| nen are wrote about at least one
Warner has béen lost or imisiaid and . "

cannot now be found. of the raw materials which they

The public is hereby notified that un‘ess|sqy are so scarce these days.

the above Certific be received by the . o -eighter
Secretary of the Association on or before In the hold. of th . freig i e
Friday 20th July 1951, a new Certificate|Kohistan at Bristol is further

will be issued to the persons entitled to
the shares,
Dated this Third day of July 1951.
J.F. AGARD
Secre

SESSIONS

@ From Page 5.

could not hold that she did
pee,”

She had described it as her
brother throwing up his hand tc
defend himself and then when his
nand had become weak he was
stabbed in the chest, |

Mr. Reece also reminded the|
jury that Cumberbatch went to the
police on the following morning
and told them that he was the man
who had done the stabbing

Summing up, the Chief Justice
told the jury that they should not
be persuaded by the feelings of the
dead man’s relatives or sympathy
for Cumberbatch.

The Chief Justice went on t
direct the jury on the law and {9
review the case. After just over
an hour’s deliberation, the jury





no*

| buyers,

jean’t



proof—a five-ton sample of sul-|
phur brought back by Mr. Cross
He went one:—

“Politicians’ talk about shortage
of raw materials makes me mad
But it is no use sending bulk
They wouldn’t know the
difference between a diamond in
the rough and a pebble.”
Yesterday the Board of Trade |
jumped at the chance of investi-
gating Mr. Cros claim—for
sulphur is wanted for almost every
industry, for fertilisers, textiles
jdyes, rayon, steel paint, plastics
paper.

Said an official: We should like
to see Mr. Cross. We knew
deposits in Arabia but not parf.c-
ularly at Muscat.”

In the Kohistan,’ as
2,000 tons of oxide of iron
Mr. Cross found it on a rocky
island in the Persian Gulf. Ex-
perts had said the mines



test drills and found the
mineral each time.

Last word from Mr. Cross: “You
find raw materie! “from a
desk in Whitehall.



returned their verdict of guilty of
murder.









8 Killed In ‘Plane Crash
DAKAR, July 12. |
Fight were killed’ and nine |
seriously injured, when a Frery;
Dakota military plane cras
Although seriously burned,
nine survivors e immediately |
rushed to nearby Niame
hospital. 1e §=6hhad



taker ) airport





Today's (i. A. Song}

“Home Sweet Home”

“Mid pleasures and palaces

though we may roam”
“There is no place like
home”

If there

IS A GAS COOKER.



Applications are invited for the)
istf@mt Engineer and |

The applicant should have good |

the |

The initial salary,may be at a.

of |

well, i¢|

there |
|had been worked out, But he took |
| eight

If the Govern- |

ment really wants sulphur at the |
lowest price I will find it.”
—L.E.S.

!

Parental Neglect |
Main Factor
In Youth Problem |

LONDON, June.
homes and parental
neglect are the two main causes |

Broken



















PAGE SEVE





On A Bie cle EE TIM aL ET. OO

'MadeInBritain

British motor-cycles and bicycles
tremendous

are

experiencing a

| export boom.























ik

You have a HOUSE FOR SALE
Let US find a Buyer



Electrical Inspector, Electricity & | blamed for stea increase in| T' They are so ypular in the) TE
Telephone Department, Grenada. delinquency e a. adolescent, United States that local manu- | .
a eee of appointment | youth in Britain, ‘ facturers are getting worried |
are as follows :— The analysis i. ma in aj Last month Britain exported! y i Ty J
1. Salary in the grade of report by the joint ne on 10,049 motor-cycles, worl Fou wah Rey 4 oe
; $2,160 x 96 — $2,640 p.a. | PSyehiatry and the law, appointed £1,040,000, and 236,000 cycles, Let US find it for YOU
2 Temporary cost of living) by the Magistrates’ and British | worth £1,800,000, This $ al a E : ;
bonus at the rate of 10% on | Medical Associations. The number | increase in export sales of |
salary up to $2,400 and) os defaulting boys, convicted ot | £1,000,000 over May last year. |
81 7 on salary wr indictable offences, it says, rose| Biggest buyers of motor ~cycles | ~ - Lt
5 $2.4 ow : | from 19,387 in 1938 to 27.545 in were Australia (1,800), United |
Trave ling allowance not} 1948. States (1,074), and Switzerland |
a The png ged eee . its exhaustive study of the! (623), F.V.A.
I ; problem, the committee contends | 7 , ote . 83~
5 pds vanes 2 ginal that “shoddy” parents, lack of Popularity Hardwood Alley ‘ Phone 4683






























| Privacy at home, blind-alley jobs| Far-Eastern countries were the |
and lurid films, tell but half the major purchasers of bicycle ae
| story of delinquency. Too many} led by Malaya (28,700) and | (=== {
youngsters, it adds, don’t know India (22,000), Other big |
| the meaning of religion and get| buyers were Pakistan, West |
| through their early years without] Africa, and Mexico. , . 1 a
learning the difference between | THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPI Y
| right and wrong. { In the first five months of this | 4 Hd J K 4
Much of the trouble is attribu- year export figures were | 1 ’
| ted to adverse influences of the M™otcr-cycles £3,900,000, anc | CORPN LT)
| last war. More married women cycles £8,250,000, J . A .
with families had accepted war- Popularity of British motor- |
tir empleyment with the result ao and os les in the United |
| that children often ca home to ates is explained by the fact
jempty houses, There oe a jumb-; that American manufacturers NOTICE
ling up of human beings of all; have not treated this form of | :
ages sharing of everything from, locomotion seriously.
| beds to clothing. With parental Bik ¢
love and attention lacking the oe Were eo ave : -
inevitable harvest was delin-] 20@ are still listed as such i A J
ome’ Soniecsona stigma Yo. Toe eee
is Poor Example Set ' eine se Fe
|" “Many parents set such a poor| UNe motor-cycles. ALLE PERSONS having ACCOUNTS against
|} example in honesty, self-restraint Competing
| and perseverance,” says the report,| But now American youth has this Corporation are requested to be good
| “that the surprise is not that the! qiscovered the joys of the
| boys have such low standards} lighter British machines enough to send them in, made up to the
mcm run @5!So when so that some Americar
as § acturer: are 7 5 . > x .
| The report recommends that] Combate with “orotate t SO¢th OF JUNE as soon as possible
| mothers with children of school light-weight bikes.” canine
| age should accept employment r : |
| only Gusting school hours, If} Harley-Davidson, U.S motor 1 + 7 am ’
neces , local authorities should cycle manufacturers, hay a BARBADOS ELEC Ie
wdbeidine ‘sitting- in services thus applied to the Government t ‘mr , gy ’ r 7
enabling parents to go out to- increase the tariff on foreign | SUP LY CORPORATION LTD.
| gether more frequently. machines. |
| Among other remedies, the re- R. B. FRANCIS, M.LE.E., A.M.LC.E.
i! port suggests greater 7 ane aa aoe used ee it Pe suai et i
| ment in the adoption of orphans, te East because of poor public | ‘ting Manaver
}sex education, “eae schools, transport facilities, and weathe { Acting Manage Pr
| premarital advice for engaged conditions. They are uSed by yt 12.7.51 nN \
couples and free or assisted legal office and factory worke ). Papi a iar ee }
} aid to parents seeking divorce. students and peasants. SES SSS {
But special stress is laid on the,in Mexico they are hopulé ar |
| need for restoration of normal because they are the “best 13” Oe PPPOE POCO GOD VOCS VOPCDI IO
love and understanding between made and strongest’, according 3] . %
varents and children with the to the Mexican embassy. K 2
re-establishment of family life on JAMES MORAN. | DO you REALISE x
its proper pedestal. —(CP.) —L.E.S. | %
] %
x
s
SHIPPING NOTICES { How much you can Save {
, %
by making :
























MV.
and Passengers
Antigua,
St. Kitts
instant

“Cartbee" will accept cargo
Dominica,
Nev
Friday

for
Montserrat,
Sailing

and
13th





“Daerwood" will accept
and Passengers for St.
Lueja, Grenada and Aruba. Pas-
sengers only for St. Vincent.
Sailing Friday 13th instant

M.V
cargo

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION INO.

Telephone 4047.



| CCPC PAPAS OPP PPE |

NOTICE

' is hereby given

that SALEH MAHMAD AS-
WAT of Mahogany Lane,
Bridgetown is applying to
the Governor for naturaliza-
tion, and that any person
who knoWs any reason why
naturalization should not be
granted should send a writ-
ten and signed staternent of
the facts to the Colonial
Secretary.

11,7.51.—3n.

SOS eesti

.
:









THE

rooms, Kitchen, Pantry, etc.

A.F.S.,
Real Estate Agents,

"Phone 4640 -i-

and the Gardens are beautifully

ee

JOHN 4. BLADON & Co.





Canadian National Steamship:















Colo.
ca
G
ge

Accepting Passengers,

Cargo and Mail



R. M. JONES & €o., Lid.



AGENTS
3at4

Phone :::

SAILING TO ‘
E
S. “Colombie’’ 22nd, July 4
, via Martinique and
iadeloupe,
SOUTH BOUND. |
mbie, July 11th, 1951, ff}
ling at Trinidad, La
uaira, Curacao, Carta-
na and Jamaica





th ¢
PIP}
New

Plying to the Governor

is hereby given
at MOHMED SAYED
RAWALA of Ke nsington

Road, St. Michael is ap-

for



* naturalization, and-that any

pers
son

on who knows any rea-
w hy naturalization

should not be granted should

senc

Statement of the

1 a written and signed

facts to the

Colonial Secretary.

G9 DODSG PSII LOG EGOS OSGI IOE Libre r eee

(PO PSIGGS GIES G OGG GG OGG FGI OGE GFA, =

CHARCOAL BOX IRONS DmLUNE

®
CENTRAL

Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets

tra SALE “ CASABLANCA” “ MAXWELL'S COAST

This Excellent Modern Property set in walled gardens of about
2 acres contains a Large Verandah, 2 Reception, 5
There is a double entrance drive
laid out.

EMPORTUM

3n.

SOCOTOT COCO CCRE CE 1 GCOS
CPEOTPPT AGG IS PEFR CE LEE

11.7.51.










large Bed-

Well recommended.

F.V.A.

Auctioneers & Building Surveyors
THE FIRM WITH THE REPUTATION

Plantations Building

NOTICE












_ SOUT THBOUND
Sails Salls Salls Arrives Balls T + 2
Name of Ship Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados { Ol R OWN DRE |: $
LADY NELSON 30 June 3 July 5 July 14 July M4 July ‘$ 3
CAN, CRUISER os 10 July = 13, July _ 22 July 3 i§ :
CAN, CHALLENGEK 20 July = 23 July _ 1 Aug. 2 |
LADY RODNEY 320 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug. 13 Aug. M4 Aug 1%
CAN. CONSTRUCTOR ar Aug. 12 Aug. Z - 21 Aug. " ous .
LSON 0 Aug. 23 Aug 25 Aug 3 Sept. Sep i
eee _ \3 You have another opportunity
NORTHBOUND , :
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives | %
Name of Ship Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal | ‘ of learnin $
LADY NELSON 27 July 20 July 7 Aug. 9 Aug. 12 Aug | ‘ 8
LADY RODNEY 25 Aug. 28 Aug. 6 Sept. 8 Sept M1 Sept ‘ $
LADY NELSON 16 Sept, 18 Sept. 27 Sept. ae 2 Oct S
LADY RODNEY 16 Oct. 18 Oct. 27 Oct. 8 Oct 1 Novr, 3
>
| y 4! 1 %
d ‘ WOE - x
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents. Ig $
a F — g
nn | ‘AD :
| | i >
ROYAL NETHERLANDS | %
Pe
STEAMSHIP CO. 3
| R
SAILINGS FROM AMSTERDAM Cle G | z
le Gle Transatlantique | o>
MS MAAS-—12th July 1951 | STARTS ITS SUMMER COURSE ¥
MS BONAIRE—13th July 1951 | L %
MS HERA-—3ist July 1951 | 3
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND :
AMSTERDAM i i 4 i x
MS WILLEMSTAD—10th July 1951 ENGLAND & FRANC | Ea - @ a x
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAM- : | %
ARIBO AND GEORGETOWN Ss %
MS HECUBA—13th July aie 1951 | %
MS BONAIRE—2lst July 195 Gu 1% 7 ™/.T Oo - *
SAILING ‘TO TRINIDAD, LA_GUAIRA, } ENROLL NOW! %
CURACAO AND KINGSTON \% $
MS CONDOR—17th July 1951 1g 4
os i eerste see ea | Reooooooose OPPO OOOO ah
|
|
|

Wm. FOGARTY LUD.

New Arrivals Include ...

COTTON LACE ALLOVER (White)
Prices $3.26 to $4.24 per yd.

LACE EDGES—All widths and prices

HAND (Sewing) MACHINES

$69.59 each

BOY'S SUITS—Fitting from 2 to 6 yrs.
$3.00 each

A Beauty Mint...

HELENA RUBINSTEIN'S

WATER LILY CLEANSING CREAMS

Contains youth — renewing essences
of fresh Water Lilies











tpereo

ne
ae

a:
?

sebearcittii i



.

.
+
.
PAGE EIGHT



BARBADOS

SUGAR RAY ROBINSON

An Interesting Climb |

From Rags
GEORGE

Hy

To Riches

WHITING

SUGAR RAY ROBINSON, or American citizen, Walker

Smith, entered London on a

permit allowing him to “work

in the United Kingdom for two months.”

But it

amount he

took him onl)

got
to whom he lost hi



RAY ROBINSON



Play Baseball
After 3 Days

NEW YORK, July 12.
Major league baseball teams

resume action today after taking
three days out to play the annual
all-star game. Most interest was

centred on the four teams battling |

for leadership in the American

League.

The next two weeks should be !

very important toward settling the
pennant race between the Chicago
White Sox, the Boston Red Sox,
the New York Yankees, and the
Indians, Boston, one game behind
the first place White Sox, plays
Chicago in twilight and night
doubleheader at Chicago.

Other top American League
contest is the night game between
the Indians and Yankees at Cleve-
land. Meanwhile in the League,

SAP RA eee weal

Tea
the second place New York
Giants, meet the Chicago Cubs

play third place, St. Louis Car-

aL
over

dinals this afternoon in New
tonight in Brooklyn. The Giants
York,

—UP.

ARTIE’S HEADLINE

thite-

“My dear, you simply can’t

thar outfie

Wimbledon!"’

wear at



YACHT CLUB TENNIS
RESULTS

Following are the results of
yesterday’s Tennis at the Yacht
Club:—

Men's Doubles

J. D. Trimmingham and Dr.
C. G. Manning, beat C. Godfree
and A. M. Wilson 6—1, 6—1, 6—0.

TODAY'S FIXTURES

Men’s Singles, Semi-Finals
W.A. Crichlow vs, C. Godfree

Mixed Doubles Semi Finals

Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Bancroft vs.
Miss G. Pilgrim and G H
Manning.

an hour to

work for $144,000 the

for his fifteen round fight with Randolph Turpin

middleweight world title.
&

‘Sugar’ has been described as
the world’s richest fighter, and the
story tells of his “rags to riches”
limb, and hi rrival in England.

Looking like a younger duskier
Clark Gable, unscarred by his

trade, tailored soveriy but expen~-
sively and bowed into his chauf-
feur-driven flamingo pink Cadil-
lac convertible by one of his en-

tourage of nine, the immaculate
Sugar smiled and shook an exqul-
sitely barbered head when you in-
ferred he is the world’s richest
fighter

Maybe he is right for the high-

ly-polished and well-ordered
ruthlessne: he displays in the
ring have sent scores of possible
opponents running in all directions

but the right one for Ray



Still you could put his fortune
at £250,000. Nor, will be bother
to deny that he owns 75,000
worth of re estate on Sevenih
Avenue, New York: that he paid
£25,000 for a bar and grill-room
business; that 9 dry-cleaning out-
fit cost him £7,000; that he owns

ne of the most elaborate hair-

establishments in New
York; that he gave his wife a lin-
erie shop when their son ws
born 18 months ago, or ‘that |
taff pay roll outside of boxing
comes to about £1,500 a week

dressing

The Priest’s Idea
Detroit-born Robinson has come
1 long way since 1936 when as a
pindly little imp of less than 8st.,
he was taken by a priest to have
some of his street-arab devilry
turned into more orthodox boxing

hannels by _ instructor George
Gainford at the Salem Crescent
Athletic Club on 129th Street,
New York :

Gainford is now Robinson's

arge opulent and expansive man~
ager

“IT told Smitty he wa too
young,” says Gainford. “Beside
e said his ma would kill him if
he got mixed up with the fight
game. Sol chased him away from
the gym—back to delivering gro-
series and dancing for dimes on
the street corner

“But he turned un again with
my nephew, Warren Jones. I
took him into my home, taught
him a few tricks, and let him stay
around with me when I took my
team of amateur fighters round
‘he clubs.

“Mischievous little guy, he was.
Ine of his tricks was to have a

N iy liwate key of my car made and

ack the car f6r joy rides. 1

emacked him down mofe than

once,

“But Smitty deserves his breaks.
In those days he had nothing He
had come to New York with his
mother and two young. sisters
when his parents were divorced
in Detroit, His pa still works there
at the Ford plant.”

It’s ‘Baloney’

In later, lusher days Robinson
has encouraged a belief that he
began boxing as a worshipper of
and bag-earrier to Joe Louis in
Detroit. That is a fiction that can
be forgotten—on the authority of
his mother, Mrs. ueila Smith, who
has her own house, clar and

enow i
maid in New York Mrs. Smith
dismisses the Louis story as

“baloney.”

No, the Ray Robinson rags-to-
riches saga began with no roman-
tie nonsense about hero worship
He was just one of thousands of
coloured American kids who had
to fight for self-expression in a
tough, culf-or-be-culfed district

So Sweet
His first public fight—as distinct
from gutter scuffles—took place
at Kingston, New York, where,
despite being under age, he per-
suaded Gainford to let him give






two years and a beatin to an-
other young green-as-griss ama-
‘eur. To get round the age diffi-
ulty,. Gainford borrowed the

name of an older boxer called Ray
tobinson—and no more has been
heard of Walker Smith.

The nickname “Sugar” came a
year later when Gainford turned
to a ringside reporter at Water-
towm New York, and described
his by now promising fledgling as
“sweet as sugar.”

Having won all his 85 amateur
bouts, with several knock-out re-
cords on the way, Robinson turned
professional as a light-weight in
1940, beat up Joe Echeverria in
two rounds—and has been repeat-
ing the formula ever since, with
commensurate rise in the pay

packet
He Ate Them Up
To date his score-sheet tells of
128 wins two draws and only one






QUARTER-MILER’S SECRET



ENGLISH ATHLETICS STOCK rose still further last week when
2 combined Oxford and Cambridge team defeated Harvard and
Yale by nine events to four. Winner of the half mile event was Nick

Stacey (right)

English team captain,

He was followed home by

Ed Grutzner who had been timed at 48.2 seconds for the distance,

a time which was kept secret until the day of the meeting.

But

Grutzner was unable to reproduce that time against Stacey who

won comfortably in 49.2 seconds.

defeat—by Jake LaMotta from
whom he took the middle-weight
championship of the world last
February

Many of his opponents have
never been the same after being
taken apart py the polished

menace of the Robinson fist.

Robinson just ate them up one
by one all over the United States”
says Gainford

“But it was tough getting him
fights. Every guy ran away from
bim Even after he beat Tommy
Bell for the welter-weight title
he had to cut his purse-money
down ‘the middle to get pppo-
nents.”

“We had one hell of a time be-
fore we caught up with LaMotta.”

But now the hard times are
over. At 30, man-about-town
Robinson has put aside the incon-
venient memories of a divorce at
the age of 19 and the _ trouble

stirred up when, during his 15
months’ army service he refused
to box exhibitions unless Negro
soldiers were allowed to watch
them

Now He's Smooth

Robinson is now happily mar-
ried to ex-Cotton Club dancer
Edna Mae Holly, and has an 18-

month-old son Ray Il back in
Miami.
The rough-edged fighter with

a scowl and a chip on his shoulder
is gone. In his place. is the
smooth, smiling man of affairs, the
12-handicap golfer, the employer

labour, the owner of the “Sugar

fay’s basket ball team, the idol
of the Paris boulevards, and the
assiduous committee man with
£10,000 to distribute on behalf of

the Damon Runyon Cancer Fund
in England, Seotland and Ireland.

World Copyright Reserved
L.E.S.



WHAT’S ON TO-DAY

Court of Grand Sessions —
10.00 a.m.

Court of Appeai—10.00 a.m.

Police Courts — 10.00 arn.

CINEMAS °

Globe “The ith Letter” — 445
pm and $30 pm

Plaza (Bridgetown): “Operation
Pacific’ — 445 pm. and 8 WO
pm

Empire; “Soldiers Three’ — 2% 20
pm and & 80 pm

Aquatic “The Heiress” — 8 30
pm

Assize Diary

Kex vs. Israel Layne

Rex vs, Louise Walker







The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 5.45 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.25 p.m.
Moon (Full) July 18
Lighting : 7.00 p.m.
High Water: 11 a.m.,
p.m,

11.02

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) : nil
Total for month to yester-

day: 1,48 ins,
Temperature (Max.) 86.5°F.
Temperature (Min.) 72.5°F.
Wind Direction (9 am.) E.,
(3 p.m.) E.N.E
Wind Velocity; 8 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 am.) 29.992,

(3 pam.) 29.943,



%

ALWAYS GOOD TO
SEE YOU ON FRIDAYS»
HOW'S YOUR DOUBLE
GRIPPES I THOUGHT

IN AND SAIP you
WEREN'T ABLE TO
WALK +

| Srey |

They'll Do It Every Time

Via “1g v a eT _ WP
/4 HELLO, CRUMNEY~ Vy WELL*IM FEELING Y det Te ast WALKS,
“HE'S

(KOFF-KOFF-KOFF)~UHs] A COT RIGHT UNDER THE,
I GOT To TAKE IT EASY { $2 WINDOWsâ„¢THE ONLY
FOR A LONG TIME YET <7
YOUR MISSUS PHONEO ] vA IN BED MOST OF THE
TIMEsBUT THE Doc SAYS
IT'S GOOD FOR ME TO
TAKE A LITTLE WALK
y MEBBE ONCE A _Aa5y’ IS RIGHTAT LEAST
* 4-4 TWO BOOKIES HAVE ]
STRANGLE HOLDS _/ ~

A_ LITTLE BETTER, BUT

WEEK>+



==p DOUBLE GRIP

=)

es
= 6 54

ON HIM

DOC HE EVER SEES IS
A HORSE DOCTOR






WITH HIM sHES ONE
GUY WHO'S MADE A













WHEN HIS WIFE
GETS SICK OF HIM
HANGING ar








THE LEAST THEY COULD
DO |S MAIL OUT THE
POOR GUYS CHECKS =*+

THANX TO
PAUL E. PENROD,

3806 PRINCETON,
WAGAVILLE, TENN. +





* POOF *

4



i wie! Re ty
By M. Harrison-Gray



Dea! South i
Game alk ‘
N .
$ Aj1¢ $
AQ6S .
@3 10 $
@52 :
Ww.
aQwo8k ak
VK 942 vw
o6 @5
&I98G @ Q
3
a5
vs
@aAK 9725
eAKWIT4
South should wmave re
covered from is imitie
mistake Of opening On

Diamond on an idea! nanow?
tor a Two-bid| He torcea =
with Three Clubs. over
North's One Spade response
and North then bia Three
Hearts. Swill averse Lo show
ing the character ot his
hand, South made the vaa
rebid of Three No-Trumps

North visualised a slam
but from his angle the use
ol Blackwood could not clear
up the question of possible
losers 1n the ininor suits He
therefore. marked time with
Pour Diamonds

This left the way open tor
South to call Pour No
Trumps and to bid the grand
slam in Dramonds after
locating the missing Aces
South’s actua: bid of Six
Diamonds was a poor effort
and North could do no more,

ARNARERERAUR EROS Hee eE eee eee abateceenenene





SONNE TERES ORES ESE De SESE Dec Ses eee TEESE TC PONETE ESSE EEE TE ee sEetEtyegeseeess
SUnreseaseertueessanseeezer:
Foneeense essere ssocenccons

————

AGE AND
BEAUTY

LUEBECK: German giarls com-
peting for the title of “Baltic
Beauty Queen 1951” are in revolt
because the judges have set an
age-limit of 27. The girls have
written protesting that Helen of
Troy was 46 before she caused a
war, and that Cleopatra was over
40 before she bewitched Antony.
So the judges are meeting to re-
consider the decision.

TAKE ADVANTAGE Or THE
EXCURSION FARES
NOW IN EFFECT

@ Lowest Fares ever
0-Day Excursions
6 All Flights by “North Star"
Skyliners,
For Complete Information, s
. F » See
GARDINER AUSTIN & Co
Lta, %
McGregor St., Bridgetown
Phone — 4304
TRANS-CANADA
Alr Lines
International Trans-Atiantic
Transcontinental

MAKE SURE
THAT YOUR

NEXT SUIT
BEARS THIS

o

LA

SLOVO PLE PPP LLP GPP FF

Pre
OF OU

“ 44
POPPIES POS - POOOSS S








ADVOCATE



COLLEGE, SWORDFISH |

WIN AT WATER POLO

HARRISON COLLEGE defeated Flying Fish four goals
to nil and Bonitas lost their game to Swordfish by two
goals to nil in the two water polo matches played at the
Aquatic Club yesterday afternoon.

Tne goals in both games were

\scored during the second half of
leach match. For Harrison Col-
lege Charles Evelyn scored two
| goals and was responsible for a
third which was deflected in by
one of the Flying Fish defenders.
| ‘Mortimer’ Weatherhead who
cpened the seoring for his team
scored the fourth, The two goals
in the Swordfish Bonitas match
|; were seored by Geoffrey Foster
j and Maurice Fitzgerald.

Flying Fish were still without the
services of their centre-back Tim
| Yearwood. Billy Malone, Clar-
|ence Hart and Vere Lawrence





was due to good marking on both
sides, Captain ‘Boo’ Patterson and
Trevor Yearwood kept Geoffrey
Foster and Mickey Jordan, tightly
marked, which was just what
Gerard Jordan and Maurice Fitz-
gerald did to Owen Johnson and
‘Brickie’ Lucas,

Swordfish kept up the attack as
the second haif opened and goal-
keeper Maurice Foster was kept
busy by shots from Geoffrey
Foster, Mickey Jordan and an oc-
easional swim-through by Gerard
Jordan, Swordfish got their first
goal after five minutes’ play in
the second half, Geoffrey Foster

| were also unavailable, Hazell, was the scorer,

Taylor and Whiting came into the
jteam to replace tnem. Harrison
| College were also without their
‘best seven. Allan Taylor stood
ijdown to give Stephen Grannum,
jone of their newcomers, an ‘out-
ing.’
| The first halt found both teams
| Still trying to open their account.
|Harold Weatherhead, “Termite”
| Taylor and Hazell in the back line
for Flying Fish worked hard, and
Peter Potter on the right wing was
his usual tireless self.

| Flying Fish went on an all out
offensive right after the interval.
Their attaek was broken up by the
College defence who cleared to the
forwards. During a melee about
five yards from the Flying Fish
goal, Mortimer Weatherhead got
his hand to the ball, and with his
usual quick flip shot had the ball
inside the nets.

Flying Fish went back on to the
defensive and for a time held the
Collegians at bay. Midway in the
cael half however, Charles Eve~-
lyn who had made several deter-
mined attempts to score during the
first half got his first goal and his
team’s second’, Flying Fish kept
attacking and their forwards miss-
ed some certainties, Potter on the
wing backed up his defence line
well and several times cut off the
Harrison College back Frankie
Manning who was attempting to
swim through and score,

On two occasions however Man-
ning got the ball to his forwards
who after some short passing od
the ball to Evelyn who shot the
third and fourth goals, one of these
shots was deflected into the nets
by one of the Flying Fish defend-

ers,



Second Game
The second game was perhaps
fas‘c~ than the first and once again
the first half was goalless. This

Bonitas rallied and this time it
was Albert Weatherhead the
Swordfish goal-keeper who was
called upon to do some saving.
Most of the Bonitas attacks how-
ever were broken up by Gerard
Jordan or Maurice Fitzgerald.
Jordan was marking the Bonitas
left hand sharp shooter Owen
Jdhnson, He kept Johnson well
under control throughout the
entire game,

Two minutes after Swordfish’s
first goal Maurice Fitzgerald swam
through to just inside the halt
way mark and sent in a well
placed shot which entered the goal
high into the top left hand corner,

Three minutes later the game
was over with Bonitas on the at-
tack and Swordfish maintaining
their undefeated record so far this
season,

The Mr.

Clarke,

The teams were:

Harrison College: J. Chabrol,
B. Manning (Capt.) C. Evelyn,
F. Manning, M. Weatherhead, R.
Feldman and S. Grannum.

Flying Fish:. P. Foster (Capt.),
L. Taylor, H. Weatherhead, P
Potter, M. Conliffe, W. Whiting
and Hazell.

Bonitas: M. Foster, T. Yearwood,
J. Paster, B. Patterson, O. John-
son, N. Lucas and M. Konisberg.

Swordfish: A. Weatherhead
(Capt), G. Foster, G. Jordan, M.
Jordan, M. FitzGerald, R. Weath-
erhead and H. Portillo.

This afternoon’s match between
Starfish and Sea Nymphs _ has
been postponed until Wednesday
July 18th,

The Harrison College Barracu-
das fixture scheduled for Tuesday
17th, has been postponed to July

referee was Archie

19th. The Snappers Swordfish
fixture will be played on July
17th.



34




SUALBCe

“Frankly, 1 thought it
noe, to o % “We te
70) ov my

Malo,



BEL

OF DISTINCTION

PCS. MAFFEI & Co, Ltd.

é

oS SSSOOO SS SSS SPSS OO SSS

CRYPTOQUOTE No. 50
| GNJ WASYZ WTI QITXDE

Kingston Gets
New Mayor

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, July 11.
Ken Hill, P.N.P. second Vice-
President and member of the
House of Representatives to-day
was elected Mayor of the City of
Kingston, St. Andrew, with Wil-
liam Seivright, ex-Mayor as De-
puty.

Hill is leader of the left-wing
group of the Socialist Party and
President of the Trades Union
Congress. The Party elected him
for the post of Mayor when Seiv-
right who was recently termed
the island’s most respected and
honoured citizen by Governor
»Foot, declined to accept re-elec-
, tion.



MB GT WTIDJG GNJA
—-EZISE
Last Crypt: Forty is the old
age of youth; fifty is the youth of
old age,
—Proverb

SE HABLA ESPANOL

ORIENTAL

CURIOS, SOUVENIRS, AN-

TIQUES, IVORY, JEWELS,
SILKS Etc.

THANTS

A GRAND DANCE

by #4
MISS BERYL TAITT

at
St. Joseph’s Girls’ School
TO-NIGHT
Percy Green’s Orchestra
Admission 2/6

‘ODPODSSIOSSSSSPSSSIOO

; Get These Tasty
Delights
For Your

Enjoyment

"j
o

LLLP PP®PPPL PLL LLL LL LDL PLO

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» Sliced Bacon
» Swifts Luncheon Beef
» Vienna Sausage
“Black Buck” Sauce
Tins Lamb Tongues
» Cocktail Biscuits
, Salted Peanuts
AND OUR POPULAR
Five Star Rum — 1.15 Bot

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SOOCSS ES OSS SSO SE SGSSS

LVPBPPLPPVPP PPL PLL LLLP PPPDPIL VAP

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FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1951



Ory Yeast for
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NEEDS NO REFRIGERATION—AS EASY TO USE
AS OLD-FASHIONED PERISHABLE YEAST

@ There's no yeast like Fleisch- solved, one package equals onecom-
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fresh on your pantry shelf for Get Fleischmann’s Dry Yeast!
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ready anytime for fast action, de- Fleischmann’'s Dry Yeast dissolved
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Keen 2 syyoly on hand - bake at a moments notice



YOUR
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NEEDS

ARE AGAIN AVAILABLE



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2/- per oz.

@ STITCH HOLDERS
e@ WOOL HOLDERS

@ KNITTING NEEDLES

@ KNITTING REGISTERS

BRAN ie |
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and first class private roads completed.

Sites from 10,000 sq. ft. upwards



For further information ‘phone 4230

FOR SALE
at HIGHGATE St. Michael
Cool and Attractive Situation in well laid-out area.
Water mains and electric mains have been installed
Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.
Head Office, Prince Alfred Street



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—— a




PAGE 1

FRIDAV. Jll.V II I:.I BARBADOS XDVOCATI' CLASSIFIED ADS. TBLKPMOMl 2900 The charge, for Hindi Mvruin. DwiM tdMUl and In Mrmoria. • M 011 —1.-.U1. .nd It an (or any number o( wudi ui S eeale per word I-I IM.M KAUtt HEAL E&IATfc up to 30 and • cm, p. additional mud Trrn,. ftbrr ii word* KIM, I-dvB EldK-a M-r lunrial oil) leave her laic raeldenre DMh Vglaty. Si George, fur St Gn %  %  I I p m teat] DeJptiu. King .Hu.ban.i M. %  ... Oladalone Curii. glaon IUM< and Edna -Oil Julv II. It* ( Mi. 04.1i Jr II lair of Uapp Mill f,iiwr.il leave* net late re.ir al *30 p i-i 1<>-day lor Si. > are a*! %  vd .da .igl.'.-1 mm Viui. j IM ni.h i. |1H . I -Sat you n i siVou can purrhoae Si ginu> a) Mi.. we.l Road lor c>an or on term, or u your houae la loo mull and you wan) mor P room you ran enhangc u ,und. and loon „ oTeVr !" %  a iw D'Arcy A Broil. Maa. 11 1 31— in nor l_.n r I MOUI-I <>u Friday ->. > lair ic-day for St. Jimri Cemrtrrt ni.no. air BfSN II.w .iiid IVu1 ii; i A\MHMI>1IMS mJ£S* JHa "" <"ed "ILLU252^ *"" r > "*"•" '•! Ol land S^.. i u 1" tn -w-*h aireai. The I'M,* conU.na Uallri I Boom, ,*,„ bedroom.. H...I.I*I room, "iital convenient*!, laige I?..aemeM ITlreinc UgM ->d Cove,,,mem avatar Inaiallad. The auovr prrmiae* will bact iip law a*r oy Public Competition a( our OH .r Jame. Siro-I on Iriday Uih July ,,. v".V ""p^'^" *i i %  BIBIU Inc Irnant Wl.irn iho hour* of -nd m ii da FOII iii:vr '•"II XaaU-v* 14 '."-J. — o.-* CONU r w.i M \ i \ <.OY.I,\\IF\T NOTHI PanmM Vegkci Main I'aeior HOI SIS I'OSI .SM1STAN? 1 M.IM U aiirt till IKK M. INSPICTOB, Mr.,,,..,, a. Irlfph,-, DrNrt. I / } Oiltft /Vo/#/(*#/! mrnl. (.irn idi. On A Bicycle MadelnBrilaiii %  MS T < ll Jili' root bod 11 1 SI-J KOSC-MOK^ HOUSE. Naai Uaaaiah SI I'coaMalon on A %  approval -• •-roaaaM Aj.. WA.MI1I H %  : raiim uark 11 arnli a N c-il. iwaoai,. 14 Mora w awnfa j tmn a vord k D M. Slin(r. Gr-nada %  Ma Ma n >i>. on t-nday Ui MOUDAY nrsoiir*. <-.i Spirr. SANTA MARIA ll < -':. I •.-. aaaSM f-. >'.' % %  I. r I ... 1 p-r da> (SRANH H dr-ntlal dulrlct under aovrrimirnt H..u.r i ,.., hill I'-ie. from *on pr. : Mirh.rl -,ih II IV StASlDt INNOn Gf....d AnBofJUnj Crt" eooll^i i^l.-ia?"tl H. pr, hd prr| ^'.7^, %£}£. ~ Inapot i .. ., ,i., i.rt.,i ^'and p.m on appU tut pi %  ion Situ .,,..CO %  ppll AUTOMOTIVI, CAR Dodaa Car. I poaa-nerra rir Claaa ordrr N<-(>..Apfri) lort H",. Oaragw il '. tl .. j, CAR: IS4T Ford Prrfca.1 Tynt. roarhwork i II loud rondlllon To bwm al Cour> 1r. .!..i..r II T SIl>i CARfV-Vaiixbiill %  tyrao, ,, baa II %  Parbadua ASSflGafli rl In good order -1 An.Ii. ii : si i r, in p.ifrrl cor INd. 1 : ,. -V,,,. Plrk--;> Momi II urdrr — i;n aUnoat i Sloulr* DruK Slot* Edward* Garaac. In good working !" body Apply or M..I.I..1I Hi-1'...i Slrr. I. l-Mn-r 3M 6 SIIf. ELKCTRiCM. n^y ba Inaprcl-d -l I-.. Vaid. Chrap%  Id* Apply HI PI. Philip. 1 7 51 —I.f n LlVKSTOlii HISCELLANtOlS %  %  on-oily prrparalioi -v firm and win KNIGHT'S LTD ii r it In AMM i nrsi roorNM'ii Rlarl aavlnn rnullf> rtrwan. Mum lr. II ! %  M i S in: II 30. 14 4 In* 3 it Apron* 11 ao rarh RECORDS Charlia Kuiw I and wr will nrdn IM fOH K *s havrnl gol ll In lork A. nI"a o Co lid TSl-tfr and riiiuliiu. i> iTTLE. CATTORD CO. ^^^ 7 7 51-1.1 AUCTIOIf I have ban navarillMDl in Erutivc __. adtn )"i -air by public aurlion al aid of iho Drpaitrnanl of Htali* feM T r .i,,,,_,rt on Irldav nrl Ihr I %  II 1 I tPHBt .v TVI'IST (..i ..... I II l-T'l %  IKIMI'Mi 1.1 \-t Hill 1I rO ... blC AppliCallon* ahould Ui lubmlllrd ir w riling and cnrlo'lng ...pi,. ; %  %  o Lid <' > u;si HI '-ill $590 p.M. 4 The post i T. peruxi of DM %  I HM lh-t :nsi ; uico. ;>lic^nf afeoUld ntivr BjOOfJ trchnw. : I %  i ,'n.l mamlenancr of the > "Ii the Enj;iner-inCbarg, to whom he will he %  %  require IT will „i^„ u>ns ,luty to assist Ibf. EiiKirifi.-ir-Chariie In the worm of supervision of thf plum -it the Pow.-r Station (including HM llefrmrration Plnnl>. Tha PUttaJ s.il;iiv.rii. %  ll 'h In Britain. \ factor* Hi.. %  nsOysti | a made In 1 %  '' I %  lh I i %  iw, apoointed II Mi 14H t> tit. iaTJ4lfftntc< and Bill ri WOHti ClJOfMNM It ^ ...'.ions. Tli-. nun o' defaulting boys. WPTtcas tl ol (1.000000 ov.i U %  ralsstofM, it says. ros. Biggest %  HI IH387 i„ IH38 to 27.545 n ft-ance not j m t MIS( ll.l.ANKOl'S M II |aj ll ha. ..... %  nd the UB IWnag i >-i. A SCOTT UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER i —II on Friday July |](h at Mciara Redl A Taylor. Oa.aar. Chuith VllUgr 111 LlBht Hud win Car IS** M.nl< i I arf • il until 19SI U. pcrfr.: auiublr for Tnl Term* Cash, -i | i IOI up; UCKNSE NOTICI nurmi wp aj not \> i cits si M.. i.... %  a %  .II i. ,,i,i g al Poui Ha l' .nd lo no %  If %  DAU U lor A i \ H I .'.111' h DM '. | IIAIM'/.II I mli't Thp lliiimiiiirl lliniiiiirr .lion, from IBS, Worrrll I win wii hrr rnllraKM of boii.. n„i.i -Idr-iH-. Bank H.H X Hoad oppoatlr OnII,.,. I*.*! Ihr 11-1, July, Ifol „i I %  I i.l.-. Ofaa Piano. Mahog anting, mm and rraNffi %  i brnlwood and folding .halra. Mahog Waggon .ind lablr. lard.. ialo. iron badalKad. Mahogany drcaalng'tablr. mghl chair. waahMand. nrn lablra and prriara. gla
\ I i.l Thrir win be an I. lion on Monday jmh July al JU a.m .. Nr* PUp Appllrnlioni imine School Ui gfrtung l.i .. . 1 ( ..d TliiniialAppli.aiiU in.nl praaanl them %  .. %  i I MIIHIItAT. II I 7 51 4n SPECIAL OFTTR P Van '"' • %  aaaorlrd Jniii* fHM BoUIMl '•'<• tot ""I •S M W A. Medlord a Company. Rlckett Street HttWtO Cl '-HI..', I '.'iT" I" 'I! '' I RS llr*dv peeked in Burlap %  Flag., each eonttMM 41 Spring. '8 >owi of i fh. Pwiatialaag i* %  tl Q.iantnv available Apply to — The Standaid Agrnrv Hdoo Co. 14 Swan Stieet. Pnorie MXO u.TJi—a CASH. BltANK.R. TROTMAN ft C< /turllnnrrrs 13 7.51 nail $1*0 on a,adorn WtLDOKi 'i\ti UAU Heclrr-I.-, in ea of f. %  and 10'a alto bron/i-leal and Mux f.r Acrtylenr welding P.nqulre Aulo Tyre Company. T'a la.. gar and Spry Slreeli Phone *• lfi 7 51—^ I We have Juat received an a*ao" of Flower and Vegetable Seeda Auatralla KNIGHT'S LTD IIIIIKIIIIV ui' I:I\IN .ii have iroublr col* [ lecting your rents from > our tenants win D'Arcy A Siot: to i . mission of and your troubles go. D'ARCY A. SCOTT, i ne Lane fO-DAVS NEWS FLASH act — K V. M P I S DfOINI VKAK BOOK 1950 to 1951 I JOHNSONS STATIONEItV T TO ORDER al JOHNSONS HARDWARE :i. • II oclork. Trri PI ifi.it; \oi II i s u re--da.il NOTICE i ii i in M ri us -' %  for one or more vacant • %  %  r %  ...'. Sciiooi win be race* ..gnrd up lo July Mlh IHl Candidal. loner* In italtencd elrewtatt inu*1 br brlwwn the age* ,.E Appllra'ioni mu.l be forwarded i ai thr paroshiai traaauntr'i Orl offir. hour., an E. annual Ion H %  O S NOTICE B' F-tate of BEATPICI KOIIIH.. NO-nCt: IS HEREIIV OtVKM peiaona having any deb| or ela.ir, agalial Ihe E.Ialr of RealfLe Turd, laie of King Edaara Road Bank Hal In Ihe iwri.h of Saint Wich.el wlm dlrd In Ihit ui.-knd Pn ,he Igth da Februaiv j|. ,-. r*rby rt-ju.rn •end parnculara of then claim, dill) •itnted to Ihe undri.igned Hiloa |i. of Culloden Road. Saint Michael, tl q.iallrled Eaeeutriv of Ihe WIH of n Deeeaaed In ear*e of Meaar. I, i \i tlarke a Co Jimr. St.rrl. nndgr.,,Sohriton. ..n or before the 31*1 d. nl July IBSi after which dale | aro proceed to dirlrlbi.te Ihe a.wi. ol ll — uong Ihe pa" %  hereto having regard only to au. r'alma of whirh I ihiil inn, nonce, and thai 1 will not be liable for Ihe a.*n* or any part thereof .o to any perann of whoee drot or claim 1 .hall nol then hav had rat Ice. And all peraona indebted lo it* .-. Eatale are requeated lo ae" debtedneea wnhoul delay. Dated HI. 11*1 day of Ma. 1S5| HILDA qualified eaarulrnt of the Will of Bretilre Fordr drcraard IJOCdk I.H KNSi: NOTIt 1 I .id.. M l..., :ta of ltd) vi-' '"I 10 Ml Ul reepecl of a board %  %  Mich -aid liquor %  T I \ ,i. I I. .I> I .,, i A" JiHIN II.'IIV l. A| N B. Till* a pc I II p.. h. i 1 ,i 1 ..-i M II %  K A r.' I.OSI A MM .Ml No A-JS1B III reaper .i-. am* of Hi1 Secretary of lift .. %  liidav am. Julj IffSftl %  • %  m ihnrea. Dated IhW Third day ol July ISM. JF Af.Al'.n Stopper Heads Give Man New Career Stalin Motlel Is U.S. Favourite '• %  • %  >' %  . at, Ki %  .i.n ton, mark %  sent them as .i ^ifi [„ ., wlthoul knowing i %  : %  oni of Mi. Churchill, one pi Uncle Sam and ihe third ol Joatfl Stalin, A few ..k, tatsg larM onlen %  u& %  i. . %  %  Uaplayed In l tboa And || of IheiB wanted the Stalin modi I i fashion das ig a e i ud worked lor to All thi Eneh model had to be he and then h;ind-p..int.>d Soon Lot %  "" %  Pal ,. other wot Added In P, I D i. Charlie Chaplin, Mr Attlee and otKeri Oxford undcr%  raduataa wrote. K..IMIH U darsana of their proressors' fact asked lor bottle -toppi i %  A London club said all their ive .. pink tie. B iant bottle rto] i" i made ;.-. %  and ni theii own i u K inii.i From W h ;i t was | I %  has built hlmsell Ha i^ arauaad thai "i< %  the Jot Stalin heads an the Ai %  but all the world m. Churchill I. I s Lttsj gtudy of tin the iMinniUtCe contends %  lf n*li*;ion and get without ha dlrratance between %  i HH> trouble is utlnbutei io adveng, miiutnces of the Us', war. More .named wiimeii 1 I .. %  %  n %  wnii the result '!• %  i angj home |o I a was a jumb-j ling up of hum.in iii'-gs* ul JH i.fc.ig almrliig of ev.-ivthm* rrOBI rlothmg. With parental lovg and atssaTJaon Lukm,; the %  %  qufancnr, Poor i:\ainple Sri %  Dei sat BUCxt ;i POM i Xample bo lumi-sty, self-ri'strim and % %  '"'VITJIUV," say 8 the report. %  "-ti.it the) Mirpris,la not thai the ch tow standards but thai their slandaids run % %  | d.." i i i. %  commends UIIIT %  :"i hil.tli':i I -.-h.i.'l %  i apt sjnptVgynanl •nl> duntiff si-hool hours. If i.'.horilieg should 1 "iitinit-in %  farvioaa id i t-nabiinu i go out toj;ellu r nion(iet|in nllv AiTiong other rvtasokss, tiie reii i renter enrournci rnant in the aWdoptloD of orphans. %  %  Moo, special KMO I n.li.rc for engaged nd ft* or ;I-M-II'.I li-.;.,! trenti se^'king DaVorce Bui apeeiti itnoa hi laid on the %  I -:.tion of nonnal urutentandinj bet. ten %  i'h the %  i ....-.\f Ufa on %  11 !M (823) %  II You >.., i HOI ~i FOB BALI I.. %  • is | nd %  B II Y,,u \.i! lo m v \ mil ~i l.ii Dg Ind ,i i : WM RALPH-A-BEARD ropularitv Far-Easiern COia %  led by Malaya (taXTOO) al India ithai i I n, Wi • Afri< ( '' %  %  year sa motCT-i %  Popularity of Brit and cyi lea in I the that Amen II.IMnot treated tlii. fonri ol %  .'ii .filoualj %  and are siill n %  tumbei-. Iik.in,.lot -.v. (oiupeiiiiu Bui mi-.. i of tio lighten lines So whan ro thai some t i Ught-wi fj cycle l %  nvM bin* %  %  %  %  the Baal I %  %  %  | tranapoi II I nd v eatli ii'.d i.. .ml DMton %  in atexlco thaj an Dopulai thaj in ihe "beat 'i ti the Mexii in JAMES MOHAN MS illl i:\l!l!\lnis UKlltll SUPPLY (OKPiN. LTD. MIIICI: \\\l Al nun A I.l. PBBS0NS h this C-..r|Hit,iliiiii IBOafk I" Mini them mt ACCOUN rS M ilni I tr ri-l|lli>sli' lo lh. 'mill aw .II'.\K us s.M.n us |i,,..,i>i, #### .i mi. if MJS I:IJ:I inn si i>ni.% nmi'OHMio.x II n. H ll ntAMCIS U I K K A M I C E Aril' U 1 In DO YOU REALISE SHIPPING NOTICES Canadian National Steamship;Namr al Shlfi I.AIIV '.FLSON ;srii l LKNflFI LAD\ K.-liNFY iBTIIUCTOn .11. 10 June 10 July 3S July M Jui %  a Ai.g 10 Au| %  .1 Jut) 1 Aug 1? Aug U Aug I Ai.g 13 Aug. II Aug i •-! i II Aug %  \ i How much you can by making Save UI1V NEl/i'iN 1J.DV HODNI %  l-MIV Nl I.ATiV Hi •' \ rr July 35 Aug IC Sepi %  July m Aug %  %  M .i Aug. Aug %  Sepi GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agcnti. SESSIONS g) Iram I'ace 5. eould not hold that she did no" %  m deseribed it brother throwing up his hand tc .vhen hi* hand hd become week ha wai %  %  In dad the %  i %  who had thing %  I Juatlc %  lould noi be persiiade>l hy the feelings of lh"" dead mai for Cumberbatch. %  V| I ..; j Alter )ust ovf an hour's deUbOl %  %  %  i:iii lei 8 Killed In 'Plane Crash OAK'. Eighl were killed •eriouslv %  Attri"ii(li J n %  i port en I I' Sulphur? There's Tontt In Solomon *s Country SHuKTAcik of raw irntertau Noofanue, sa> M-yaai %  lisl ana geologist HertMrrl i i It'a )US| | mutter .if Knowing here tfl -ook. 'his home ui Lanes, Mr. CiXafj, Bfl (ossed a piece of rock sulphur in fits hand. And ha sajid "It'.., Or*. I i ui get thousands II Iron .i mine Mar M Arabia. And Id The country la nrli in minerals. a.en i.' II country, yOU know." He in de the G.OOO-niile JoUTtet) nl spokesi .. ,. ... %  torlal* tiich they days. lieinMei ,.i Bristol it. furthei hve-ton samplf H M \t. Illh Jut) 1*01 I ..-. Mil 11)11, let Jill) ItSI -Ml IS.. Ml III""! Ml Mi IM'IIHO. I llli-T\li loth July IBSI Ml is.. TO IKIMIHIi l'\SAM \lllll.l AMI 1.1.IHl.I l" N Illl 1 ll*-l!1li July IBS I I i\<^ tiac mi July ll 111*1. I.l IIIIMIIAI) I.' (I "Al *0 AMI KIM. u oin 71H Jul I -I \l> isai HI. j.. M V %  Daerwondill accept ergo and J>aaaen|era for bt %  Sa i.i.d Aruba Piv : OWM.K I INC. FRENCH LINE t lr file TrailSAIIJM. Ill tNfil.AM) g, I HAM I ss t ol,,mine" Und. July HIM. via M.ir'ii iota ; sjna HOl'TH BOUND >•'. July Illh. 1 I; i. i., 11 i I'm 11 ., i. i I Airrpllnr. I***>.riigrrv (iirgb and Mill it. M. J0.NES& *o..ltd. AGENTS I'hane ;;: 3oll \Ol\i OWN DRESSES? %  >!< /"lie fl IK./ /M-I..f.|..l. i.l ,i, I v of learning — mi mm i)iiiNN-\i\Ki,M, ACADEMY STARTS ITS SUMMER COURSE •sa VfONUAa. Rill lln 2. I \HOI. I. NOW I 3 %  J *'eWe-e'V-W*#Ve'e**'e*e*e'e'*r*r;, | > NOTICE I... %  thai SAI.CII MAMMA!) ASV WAT of Mahogany Ul. 8 1 'ii is applying to J I'w GoveTrtoe fur natur.ili'.i9 UfJII, and that any persoii 2; who knows any reason why J I ition should ' I i:i.iiit. .1 should end a writJJ i tatement of v the faeU lo the Colonial X ;; II .1 :ii. NOTICE is hen I h a I MfiJIMr.O SAYED PlPRAn %1 % % %  I %  v. Roa plyinit to Hi. I l I n w ii > ruaturajixatlofi %  hould nol be granted I i i signed atatenii'iit of '•> i I St at BkSSCJM | CHARCOAL BOX IRONS DELUXE '#'/##•; I IC.XTtt. 1 1. I Ml-) HI It If I I!f....| .:..,l\. Wm. FOGAIM'V LTD. \-nI•/•/ %  /* lilt III %  !< %  COTTON LACE Prices $3.26 to ALLOVER (White) $4.24 per yd. %  '.'.•.tt:-//.^;:'.-/,. ^ lo-da\'s (I. £ Staf "Home Sweet Home' i leasures and palaces may roam" "There is i: If there. I\ f.\s fOOKF.lt 11111 'Ms. "CASABLANCA" UHWMI.S IIMM A'allcd gDrden2 acres contains a Large) room". Kitchen. I'antr;. and the Oarrt ions M. BI tiios y C . A.I.S.. F.V.A. R^l — ai l. Al.nlM. AwHMMM. A HMiMiiu Ban I i Till: FIRM Mill! Mil KI Tl I \IIOS Yhmt .... ri.ni-ii.n,. Bu.iiiin. LACE EDGES—All widths and prices HAND (Sewing) MACHINES $69.59 each BOYS SUITS—Fitting from 2 to 6 yrs. S3.00 each I Il4-n II I// IIill I ... HELENA RUBINSTEIN'S WATER LILY CLEANSING CREAMS Contains youth — renewing essences of fresh Water Lilies



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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. Ili.Y O, MM HENRV CARL ANDERSON LLU On children's cuts, scratches and abrasions use *DETTOL' IHl MODIIN ANlltirTIC *.'.. . Xm-pmsn—i Paiim'i PM" . />*" %  *' %  **" ., .1 — _: — 'PHKIH goodlook* leU N* t lirv'rr hfl right. You know, too* whru y..ii look il tinpre e tag, thai you ..in'i pal Ban r ol l. niMtrated il I Two-lnnr Itroffii--. Tied I" I'MTY jinn ir t— ^v^ i %  a n thr Joliu Wttta GnanotoB ShMd—-tinrip ^-"Y'\?/| ^-^^wbitli MW >/• ntlu'! Look for it in ft \ leading MttNl in li.iiI..I.U... made by JOHN WHITE means made just right Magntlicant Photo Carda •I Modem British Cats! FLAKES ('.%  t-OJcr ptebflt ecnUim 1 pyato cat*. tf" *. *) tooicvouR BEST .tf I TRY IT! vaseline^ •^ v XVXVlNG's "^ YEASfVITE The Only Pain Reliever containing Vitamin Bi When yon take vi:\si-vni; Tablets the effect i wcmdetlul' I'ain vimih**. Cold and %  ins .liviprx-.ir. and vim tvfin to/.*.' tr//.' ThCfc'a n.ihmg el* like YEA&T-VITE —' du ONLY pain reliever which ALSO QtMafni that Book \ V.imii II, So make tun you (fi YRAS1 VITE to-day. REl/EVES YOUR PA/N AND AMK'_S YOU FEEL WELL IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday Only Isually Tins Silver Leal Pineapple Juice 35 Pkgs. Garden Cream Biscuits 53 Pkgs. Nelsons Gelatine (j) 60 KM, Usually NOW :i Tins Koo Apricot Jam 63 .** I Tins Batchelor Peas 38 •" .VI Bottles Frontenac Beer 26 2o D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street il \ \ ii s o n i: II i s il i: s f/Ui mm ffltiEST HlMSH • Wuiilil> PICNIC HAMS •—9 ibi ii n pti id r vw, BACON — 8 H Um ;.I SI 07 pet lb .' SI *0 per Hi I M \\ S PBKPARED FRENCH MUSTARD 33.i:. %  s TOTS Prep ir*d IfUSrARD til :) %  !. NOE In i> %  l.lh pk SKI A A TAB1 E II IS E & SWELLS TABLE SALT Bft l-lh Boi 45c %  SSERT PRUNES I'HINKS ( HT H>nl Mc. iN Ol IVF Oil i FRENCH oil VI-: I ML Can FKFNCH OIL S2U3 -17c enrh A FITTING CLIMAX TO EVERY MEAL AIM Y\l All I III H'S SIMM VI HI It S4.08 a Gallon ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO.. LTD. "YIH 'II I.HIMIIIS PHONE US — WE DELIVER