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The Barbados advocate

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Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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fhavb



ESTABLISHED 1895



Korea Showdown

Begin At Kaesong

Armistice Expected

Wednesday July 11

TOKYO, July 10.

ALLIED and Communist negotiators began their

history making conference in Red encircled
Kaesong Tuesday to write an “honourable end’’ to
the Korean war. The five-man United Nations
truce team arrived in the ancient South Korean
border city by Helicopter and went into immediate
session with the five-man Communist group. Before
taking off from the United Nations advanced peace
camp Vice-Admiral C. Turner Joy, No. 1 Allied
negotiator, told reporters he would act in good
faith to bring about an honourable armistice.
A pencilled copy of the Admiral’s statement heavi-

ly underlined the word “honourable. ’’
It emphasised that conditions

of peace must be satisfactory tof .

the United Nations Command. N M . Arms
Joy earlier had stated he hoped! oO ore _—

an armistice could be achieved by 7 ° ee ,

Wednesday. But General Matthew Ik or Red ; hina

B. Ridgway said he had no idea ;

how long it would be before! : r
definite results were obtained, ATTLEE TELLS US. .
Dispatehes m the peace camp
its = ee ain BOSTON, July 9.
British Prime Minister Clen ent

said that Allied helicopters began
Attlee told the Massachusetts

taking off at 9.45 a.m. for a short
flight to the ancient Korean ; ’
capital of -Kaesong, 34 miles} Legislature in a letter made pub-
northwest of Seoul. lic to-day that Great Britain has
Dispatches indicated that the|t@ken “extensive measures” to
flight had taken place without aj emy potential war materials to
hitch, and said the meeting was|Red China and other Communist
underway. There was no indi-|D&tions. Attlee’s letter read by
cation of how long the showdown] Secretary W. W. Stratton Flint
talks would last. was prompted by a passage by
Joy took off with one other the rrp Aerie ne gg
American Admiral, two American) 0" cal ing on Great ritain to
stop exporting vital war goods to
Communist China.

Generals and one South Korean
Attlee’s reply addressed to the







General, for talks with the five-
man Communist team headed by
General Namil of the North












City

ENQUIRY ENDS AFTER

SEVEN-DAY HEARING

THE PRINCESS ALICE Playing Field Enquiry under4\ 9 ==

Commissioner Sir Clement
tive Council Chamber yest

Malone, ended in the Legisle-
erday after a seven-day sitting.

Over thirty witnesses were heard at this enquiry.
At the end of the evidence, the Acting Attorney Gen-

eral, Mr. E. K. Walcott,
addresses.
The Acting Attorney Gen

and Mr.

eral had directed the evidence, Mr.

Walcott had appeared on behalf of an interested party, and Mr.
Mottley was representing the Vestry as a member of a Committse
appointed by the Vestry for that purpose.

The Commissioner expressed thanks for the

had been given.

The first witness to give evi-
dence yesterday was Mr. M. E
Cox who was recalled.

He said that in 1946 he had a
resolution before the House to
get an enquiry into the adminis-
tration of the St. Michael’s Ves-
try because he thought it was
the most corrupt body in the is-
land. He was however unable to
get it through.

“Whatever the circumstances
would be, I am sure that when-
ever you are finished with. this
enquiry, the Vestries of the island
and more particularly the Vestry
of St. Michael would be a better
one.”

The Commissioner:
here to inquire into the conduct
of the St. Michael’s Vestry, I
am only conducting an enquiry
into the Princess Alice Playing
Field.

Mr. Cox said that, it was defi-
nitely untrue to say that he had
offered anyone a bribe of $240 to
withhold evidence in connection

I am not

Secretary of State said that Great}With the removal of huts from
Britain has “applied more restric- |

Seawell to the Reef Grounds,

~~ eee disclosed only] tons on trade with Communist He also refuted most strongly
T enue th Ne Reds had added China than any other country in the statement made by Mayers
uesday, that Reds had adc the world except the United|that he had paid him 2/- a trip
another member to their team, States.” for the removal of the stuff from
North Korean yeneral Chang “We have completely prohib-|Seawell to the Reef. The lowest

Pyong San. The advance guard for
the United Nations was made up
of seven trucks and three jeeps

ited the export of arms and arm-
aments and goods and commodities
of strategic importance to a num-

carrying food | and supplleS) her-—of destfhations which cover
through no-man’s land bristling the whole of the Soviet bloc and
with bayoneted Chinese rifles.

: - the whole of China.”

Personnel in the convoy includ-{ Attlee said the Hongkong Gov-
ed one army still photographer ernment has imposed total pro-
and one army movie photographer. .hibition on export to China of

Four helicopters landed at the| more than 200 items of industrial
advance peace base south of | equipment including machine
Kaesong at 8.35 The bad

: a tools, certain steel products, cop-
weather was clearing rapidly. A| per, brass, rubber tyres ond tubes
spokesman said that at the begin-|and electrical devices.

ning, that a limited number of This was done despite the “ob-
correspondents and photographers,| viously high degree to
probably sixteen, will be permit-) Hongkong’s economy depends on
ted to go to Kaesong.—U.P. trade with China.—U.P.

SIX MONTHS JAIL

NEW YORK, July 9.
W. Hunton, negro doctor of
philosophy was sentenced to six



;
|



TRUMAN ASKS...

WASHINGTON, July 9.
President Truman today asked

months’ imprisonment on Mon-| Congress to end the state of war
day night for contempt of court.|between fhe United States and
—U.-P. Germany. —U.-P.



England Should Win
Third Test To-Day

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 9.
RAIN throughout the greater part of the afternoon
prevented any prospect of an early finish to the Third
Test at Old Trafford, and England tomorrow need 103 runs
for victory on what will in any case be the final day.



So much has the weather affec-)and Ikin were concerned only
ted this game that even at this! with keeping their wickets intact.




stage — South Africa are not SOUTH AFRICA—Second Innings
rithout t the . str E Rowan c Ikin b Laker 57
wat shia 1 ch ance, ] for strong Waite b Statham ;
suMshine in the early morning|c Van Ryneveld b Lake 7
could make run-getting a tricky }A. Nourse c Evans b Tattersall 20
. J. G am b Bedser 46
roposition.
Bevos ; : " G. Fullerton c Tattersall b Laker 10
But with Hutton still there and|p’ werean c Ikin b Bedse. ‘9
all wickets intact the task should|A Rowan } b w. b Bedser 3
not be beyond the home country.| N. Mann b Bedser 4
This morning, England were £ abet ei 4
again indebted to the cheerful Extras 24
Surrey giant Bedser who com-
pletely demoralised South Africa Total 191
with a new ball spell when the BOWLING ANALYSIS
total stood at 155 for five. He ee? es ae
was almost unplayable during the pouser 4 2 : ee :
course of 5.2 overs in which he! statham 7” #3 #2 1
captured the remaining wickets] Tattersall 2. 8- At 1
for eleven runs to give himself u ENGLAND—Second Innings
inal analvsis of five for 54 L. Hutton not out 28
final analysis of five for 54. J. Ikin not-aut 8
Earlier, Cheetham and Rowan
had continued their stand of Total (for no wkt.) 7
Saturday and Rowan after scor-

; ; : BOWLING ANALYSIS
ing his individual 50 became the o> Bm. Rw
1

first tourist to complete 1,000 runs} McCarthy 11 4 2
for the tour, But with his depar-! Chubb ee eS

ture at 145 and that of Cheetham roe ¥ .
Three Will Sign

23 runs later, the South African

resistance crumbled and _ they

were all out before lunch giving WASHINGTON, July 9.

England an awkward five min-| Usually reliable sources said on

utes batting. Monday that Australia, New Zea-
During that time — Hutton} jand and the United States prob-

scered five and Ikin none. Re-| abiy plan to initial this week a

suming after the interval these! mutual defence pact which they

two took the score to 29 before] intend to sign with each other in

rain droye the players in again} connection with the Japanese
No further play was _ possible} peace treaty,



until just after six when M« Formal signing of the tri-party
Carthy and Chubb were too} pact is expected to take place at
handicapped by the wet ball to} San Francisco the first week in

trcuble the batsmen and Hutton] September. at about the same time
as the signing of the Japanese
{ treaty. —U.P,

RED CHAMPAGNE

LONDON, July 9.





The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS

|

¢ | Moseow radio reported on Mon-

Dial 3113 jday that champagne production

ight. in the Soviet Union increased by

Day oF N 8 more than 50 times 6ver the rate
wim. | in 1936 —U.P.



he had ever paid to anyone for
a trip was $1.02.

~ “I am sure I paid Mayers $5.00
a trip for the work he had done
in connection with the removal of
the huts from Seawell to the Reef.
I pay according to the mileage
and there is almost an agreement
to pay people time and a half at
night.”

Mr. Cox said he paid’ Mayers
$15 on the Saturday morning for
the first three trips he had made
and on the following week after
he had completed the job, he paid

whieh him $10.00 for the other two trips

Evidence Withheld

The Attorney General; Why.
reason would you have for trying
to withhold Mr. Mayers’ evidence
from this tribune?

Mr. Cox: None whatsoever.

The Attorney General: Yqu
were the person who telephoned
the Police about the missing joist?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Walcott: You said that Mr.
Mottley was present on the day
when a conspiracy took place at
Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfield’s
Office?

Mr. Cox: I said that I was in-
formed that Mr. Tudor, Mr. Mott-
ley, Mr. Tommy Miller and Tom
were there,

Mr. Walcott: You never saw
them there?

Mr. Cox: No

Mr. Walcott; You heard that

from Squires?
Mr. Cox: Yes.
Mr. Walcott: HE is a good friend

of yours?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Walcott: He works in the
office below Messrs. Hutchinson

& Banfield?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Walcott: Was he the same
Squires who drew the money for
the contract?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Walcott: As a member of
the Housing Board, did you think
it right for you to give an em-
Vloyee of the Housing Board
handbills to be given out for a
political meeting?

Mr. Cox: That has

@ On Page ?

Mossadegh

nothing to



‘| Disappointed

TEHERAN, July 10.

United States Ambassador
Henry Grady told a press confer-
ence that Premier Mossadegh
seemed disappointed over the
message he received from Presi-
dent Truman. Grady said: “I
told him you must understand the
President wrote the letter in a
spirit of greatest kindliness, like
a big brother trying to be help-
ful.” Grady emphasised to cor-
respondents that Mossadegh in-
formed him before reading Tru-
man's letter that Iran’s decision
was already made.

Informed Iranian quarters said
‘the Premier probably made a
special effort to get a cable to the
United Nations off before receiv-
ing Grady. They pointed out that
Grady this morning asked for an
appointment with the Premier at
noon and said Mossadegh dis-
patched the Iranian rejection
barely 15 minutes before Grady
arrived at his door-—U.P.








CRACKS like this one are appearing in various parts of the new runway at Seawell.



HOUSEWIFE MUST PAY |.
MORE FOR SUGAR IN U.K. |

Reds Push
Back Allies

EASTERN KOREAN FRONT,
July 9.
Strong Communist counter at-
tacks forced Allied troops back to
their own lines to-day after a two-
day battle in which United Na-
tions forces captured and then lost
mountain stronghold northeast of
Yanggu. Allied units jumped off
in a pincer attack at 10 a.m. Sun-
day and by nightfall had driven
close to their objective.

However elements of a Com-
munist regiment counter-attacked
at 10 p.m. Sunday and continued
their. attacks through the night
and throughout Monday.

Reds in well built bunkers, well
supported by mortar fire, opened
the attack but without success.

United Nations artillery pound-
jed Red positions Monday without
Stopping Sunday more than
28,000 rounds of artillery shells
were used in the attack. Also
north of Yanggu, two Red units
estimated at from 100 to 130 men
were brought under artillery fire.



* °
Two Buildings
(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, July 10.
Two buildings, one in which
chemicals ig stored, and the other
animals for experimental pur-
poses, were complately destroyed
by fire at the University College
of the West
morning.

Indies early this

The damage was estimated at
$15,000. The loss of
was complete but most of the
animals were saved. The origin
of the fire is unknown,

chemicals



Attempted Hold-up

There was an attempted hold-
up at the Ideal Store yesterday.

It was about | o’clock in the
afternoon when a man walked
upstairs and went to the cashier’s
cage. He pointed what looked
like a gun at the girl in the cage
and said: “I want some money!”
She screamed and the man ran
away.

The \Police were summoned and
were quickly on the scenhe but up
ito the time of going to Press no
arrest had been made, A thorough
investigation, however, was being
carried out by the Police,



A Rock For Truman

WASHINGTON, July 9.
It was announced to-day that
President Truman will recé@ive a
200 pound slab of historic Corregi-
dor rock in White House cere-
monies on Tuesday. A Filipino
end an American, both veterans of
valiant resistance which made the
rock a lasting chapter in Filipino-
\American military history will

pnake the formal presentation,

—U.P.

—U.P.
W.I. College Lose

E. D. Mottley mad

“Vrader” Drifted
For Four Days
KINGSTON, July 9.

The Haitian motor-vessel Vic-
toria Stephens of 125 tons, anc
{a regular trader between Por.-

assistance that bean







|
|

au-Prince, Curacao, and Miami,
was towed here yesterday for re-
pairs to a broken crankshaft,

The vessel drifted in the Carib-
from Monday morning to
Thursday night.—(CP)

CRACKS



PRICE FIVE &

Rei rer





TROUBLE AT SEAWELL





a

MEMBERS of the Executive Committee snont over an hour and a half at Seawell yesterday.
During theif visit they examined err whien had appeared recently on the new runway.
Immediate steps are being token to obtain advice as to further action which should he taken.

danger to aircraft

Seawell “Cracks”
;xamined by Ex. Co.

SHORTLY AFTER 9.30 o'clock yesterday morning

Meanwhile there is no immediate

meeting of the Executive Committee was held at Seawell
Airport Present were Mr. Ro N. Turner, Governor

Veputy, Sir John Saint, Hon, H. A. Cuke, M.L.C., Dr. H. G
Cummins, M,C.P., Mr. F. L. Walcott, M.C.P Squadron
Leader David Henderson, Government Airport Manager
Mr. B. Skinner, Director of Highways and Transport,
Wing Commander L, A. Egglesfield, Director General ot

Civil Aviation in the Caribbean
Bryan, Actine Financial Secretary.

Area, and Capt. @,. J

rhe

neeting last for just over and at present has a high mois-
i hour, after which the committee, ture content, When it dried there
ent on an inspection tour of tho} was bound te be sMrinkage
runway There, they were!

John Rahr, Acting! Meeting On The Spot
reneral BW T.A. and On the afternoon of Wednes-
apt “Bi” Cash, BW 1 A,'s} day July 4th,” Mr. Turner said,
enior pilot, who is at presem| “the Director of Highways ard
acting Operations Superintenden'| Transport reported to me several

the Company Mr. Rahr and! cracks on the surface of the run

Mr. Cash arrived fron Trinidad| way whieh were causing him

From Our Own Correspondent while the meetin roing Oo ome concern,” My Turner im
LONDON Tuly 9. _ They pent half am hou on) mediately visited Seawell, arc

: the jpunway before was dceided to watch them for

THE POSSIBILITY of sugar being derationed in Brit













returning taypit
the terminal building of ine aiv-\ a few days... The meeting yester














weain- ts one that is frequently being discussed here now. Thediart: Tho ootmi™ onded alfthiy was held on’ the spot so th
British Ministry of Food refuse to comment one way or]. 1.40. o’cloc! members might the ack:
another, But it is believed that the decision to increas: Mr peee tala’ the pavounte for themselves
the price of domestic sugar to sixpence a pound as from ai ath Ye oe, - seas ine, Cineererey Vine dei
e : 7 : \ ‘ 1e Supervise in charge ask , cto ieneral of
nexc Sunday is a first step in this direction the construction of the new! Civil Aviation Wing Gomel
ha as 5 unway at well ret wd to} Egglesfield, Mr. John Rahy Acting
anna For several months private} !DWay &@ ee ee Be ; '
| ineerests here have been assuring | O88 here a ae ee ! 4 Sanagee B w £.A., aril
CASH MISSING ithe Ministry that supplies are nov wee a i NM aka age hohe Ml R i oS ie ee
FROM TREASURY Dlentiful enough for them t = used aatls aot ee Shae os o are — Mr, Cash ; Y
© ic oe > it 1eVve ' 1y Li € a lar nec ere wa no lmmecdiate
vue i eee ae ned, because of the almost con-| danger to aireraft, Immedi
: bia Sat ‘ ‘ : . vs j ous wi conditions vs steps are ‘ing take 0 bt
The Police are investi- have been retailing at five pence “aie he Sas wh ie ies ' Be es: ba it : ee ra Wi +]
gating a deficiency of a pound, those to manufacturer fe He Ae 16d. tikat. - whanl wile “amenis : are ‘ ae
: 7 es r : ion | lé ni which should be taken by Vay
cash which hs been re- a been selling seven pence | ye runway did dry out. andl of re-sealing. In the meantime
ported missing from the | |"" Mia? SRE an Mey SAMMI Var ome shrinkage cracks} schedule services will operate
Government Treasury. ie ime SPORES Se » expected to appear, be} usual.
The Cominissioner of forerete 1 4 bine ree m ae i oe . ras the be ses oa appeare
Even though prices are being] '¢5 ‘ iby Pity slg tg ie. ce “ya week ago there has: been 1
Babocdic hate bane levelled out, the Food Ministry hat the stone is highly absorptive further deterioration
to make a_ statement ah eel Neer oe eat a OOO SSDP PLPL PLAY IV PLLA PL EPPA PPPOE,
a a é a . R
soon, ceive 2,226,000 tons of raw sugar %
»226, § sug
— This is an increase of 46,000 tons 9 4
over the pre-war consumption S
STORMS SWEEP |" ‘
A gure §
5 S 5 EE But Britain's population ha *
MID WEST : increased by four per cent, since %
® U.S. the war and her spending power § = x
has also risen. So it seems likels Gris DER .
Th ‘ caer AGO, Bie A rm t that the pre-war consumption fig > *
seRPe tornadoes. As violent | ure will be considerably exceeded ! a a a a &
‘hunderstorms lashed midwest ; as. a @ x
United States during heavy rains The first rush of buying might \s a s
that caused new flood crests in} jt is thought, put too grea Ff &
the Missouri river basin where | gtrain on supplies, but trade rep ~ | same Hi n §
high water has caused $5,000,000 ia C4 erinal . act 1 ‘ a °
: 2 ’ jresentatives believe that gradu ‘
damage. inerea of the ration to alloy Standard of %
} ‘ " ‘4
Storms battered Kansas, Mis-|housewives and manufacturers t . %
souri, Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois|do their own private “stock Quality as x
and Michigan throughout the} piling” would permit an early enc ; S
week-end, and wind, lightning, |to rationing ship ed to Xs
and ,rain played across the area t I e, ihe t S
early today. Six deaths wer t- ee ‘tat ated time vill 3 md . cf e %
tributed to the weather. Two|c#onial producers will Keep . .
tornadoes were reported last {Close waten tn Sen tte A } ‘West Indies *
night in Kansas; one near Park-|8Uâ„¢ption figures. For | : , " y
ville and the other near Olath,|figure that colonial eh res for the .
but neither caused any damage. |have had their allocation of >
The third hit Kokomo, Indiana, {guaranteed purchases based 3 %
to-day.—U.P. | the Food Ministry ¢
| The Food Ministry argued tha :
|Britain’s unrestricted requtire- y

$3m For Bauxite
In Jamaica

‘(From Our Own Correspondent

LONDON, July 9

the production of bauxite in Ja-









maica is announced to-day (Tue snag. For the Ministry of Food st i -
day) by the Economic Co-Opera-\has said that their unrestricted & insist om
tion Administration Headquarters requirements of sugar can only e
in London iccurately assessed by %
check of fitures he
The loan which is being made enerhs following deration % 8CN 7
to Reynolds Jamaica Mines Ltd., s ( iT BE y ty ‘
will be repaid with interest in| This means that unless sugar sf *
supplies of aluminium over a ‘comes off ration by the end of % ¢
period of eleven and a half ye ‘this year the Food Ministry will] .
Aceording to the agreement, Rey ct. know by the end of 1951 just x %
nolds will also spend approxi- | what their requirements are and|%& .
mately £450,000 on an expansion | colonial producers will not there-|% $
programme. fore receive immediate benef 1g :
It is anticipated that the pro-|Under the new agreement 1g .
duttion of Bauxite in Jamaica will a 1% ‘
be increased from 410,000 tons to t 1% and ¥
750,000 tons annually > * ¥ ‘ . xs © t .
Whe loan ‘brings the total of Atomic I rogress is %
FE.C.A. advances for Jamaican c 1% %
vauxite to $11,747,000 in dollars LONDON, July 9. 1% *
and £3,300,000 in counterpart Supply Minister George Strau % 7 ¢
funds, said in the Commons on Monday | % 4 y
that Britain made cc ide ts * ¢
progress in planning o c powe s .
plants for industrial H 1 % S :
MEXICAN "QUAKE there is reasonable prospect that } Y
the generation of electricity fr % y
MEXICO, July 9.jatomic power can be developed % ’ AUeT i Cn.. Lid. %
A sharp: earthquake of short|a large scale. He said, ultimately %& GARDINER AUSTIN & Co., Lt .
duration shook this city at 6 p.m./the cost will not diffe iv ¢ :
yesterday Mexican time. No dar -|from that of the power % Agents. ?
igé Was reported oe Iv *ntional source oP S ay EOE OLCOTT

}

| agreement

A loan of $3,284,000 to intrease, | 195¢

territories would be able to sel |y

more sugar to this Country at ¢
¢
.
s
%
>
Ks

ments would be 2,500,000 ton

If that figure is exceeded colonia



when tne new
into

guaranteed price

comes

Kor Finest WINES

force in



Eveh now, however, there is @



O66 6 6A 464 66 CEILS















Carib Calling





Other turftt







were Mr. Gilbe Mr
Eric Holdef.

Among ‘the turfites returning
from Trintiad’ on Sunday were
I E Dr. Tor Gale
r YT. N. Peirce nd Mr. Pat
Fle

Optics

M*. RALPH PRESCOTT a Bar-
i gn who hes been living
the U.S. for just over two years,
Parente i home vesterday via Tri-
I d by B.W.1.A. to spend a shor

I y with his relatives
iteen onths ago he gradu
the Brooklyn School of
nd he nother eighteen
n to before he qualifies
as opthalmic dispenser. He i:
t iz with his sister Mrs, Ram-

in Bav Street

Twelve Days
ERROL STEELE who owns
Ronnie Dundes” in St Law-
Gap flew to Veneznela ves-
terday morning bw B.W.1.A
he is leo nronrietor of Stecle’s

WAleotaene Cprartas We eve

viiete to be away for twelve days.

Grenada Engagement
a if engagement was announced

AAR

rene

where

in

in Grenada of Captain Ian
G. Boilesu) Goad, Officer Com-
manding First Company Welca

Fusiliers, which are still stationed

in Grenada as a result of the March
labour disturbances and Miss Jean
Adam only daughter of Hon.
G. H. Adams, C.B.E., Colonial
Treasurer, Grenada, and Mrs.
Adams. Capt. Goad is the only
son of Lt. Col. C. E. G. Boileau
Goad, M.c. and Mrs. Goad of Lee
on the Solent, England. The wed-

Anglican
this

place at the
Grenada later

ding takes
Church in
month,

With T.L.L.

M® PHILLIP SKINNER who
work§ with Trinidad Lease-
Ltd.,*in

holds Trinidad flew in on

Sunday by B.W.LA. to spend two
weeks’ holiday at Lowlands, St.
Lucy.

THE
4

BY THE

baby veterans, the
ay children, must have
when they read about
nine-month-old baby who,
he cannot stand yet, has to
dive from a sitting position at the
edge of the pool.” “The younger
generation is knocking at’ the
door,” commented .a voice from
the cradle, Those scientists who
say .that the world was once a
va a, and human beings fish,
point out that arms and legs are
merely the logical development,
by evolution, of fins, and — they
prophesy that if all babies.swim
from birth, arms: and legs will
slowly turn into fins again, and
we shall begin to bfeqihe ster-
torously through our gills, But
we must remember the experi-+
ment of Dr, Bell, who taught-a
whitmmg how to walk, After four
years on land, the fish fell off
the pier Brighton and was
drowned. had forgotten how
to swim be taught
to live the sea permanently,
if they to become good little
fish.



fot é
the





It
Babies must

in
are

Fi. done, Llangollen ! Perhaps someone has got the.
T the Eisteddfod ‘at Lle j measurements wrong, -\fter all,

A the Eisteddfod at Llangol- «4e Jearned Basgomoisle an-

len next month a French nounced that Mont Bienc was 26

song . to ~ ne. a ane a miles high.

wh his “shameless ontinental- ’ . 7

ism” (Councillor Jones) have on C. Suet, Esq. n

the dignity of the occasion? Sure- HARLIE SUT sat in his office

ly many a Druid nightshirt will “- at the Ministry of Bubble-

be worn in a jauntier way, and blowing. The forefinger of his

here and there a bard will per-,tight hand was laid along his

mit himself a rue Daunou wink|upper lip and he was breathing

at a lady in the audience, or’ even

sift his bardic crown to a

aucier angle. But the sugges-

tion that there should be a harp
ipanirnent to the nasal pea-
pushing of Evans the Hearse has
been ienounced licentious
frivolity.
How to report Tennis
Ww" ARING an off-white, one-
piece pique.gabardine with
ioulder-caps of pleated ballet-
ie satin trimmed with Greek
organdie, aceglamour tennis rac-
keteer Boobie Knockerbicker
Googoo Toffee, who was

accon



as

beat
wearing

a jacket of Welsh serge trimmed
with yellow ribbon, and green
shorts embroidered with silver
camels, edged with red chiffon,
and stratted with quilted pom-
por Se

tennis-playing
ut like manneqt




have}

they

MIAMI LINEN

WHITE DUCHES
SLUB LINEN
WHITE ELASTIC

4220

From the drawer the Professor

FLOWERED MOROCAINE CREPE 36”



ARTIE'S HEADLINE

OIL Co.

PERSIAN



Barbadian Student Awards

Baga June edition of the Can-
ada-West Indies magazine
publishes a list of students from
McGill University and Macdonald
College who graduated in the 1951
convocation

Among the list are several Bar-

badians. Hilary Bourne obtained
his diploma im _ obstetrics and
gynaecology. Harold Gardner

passed for the degree of Bachelor
of Arts. Geoffrey Skeete obtained
the degree of Bactielor of Sciente.
David W. Clarke of Pine Hill ob-
tained the degree of Bachelor of
Engineering, (Engineering Phys-
ies). Gerald Tryhane of St.
Thomas obtained the degree of
Bachelor of Engineering.) (Elec-
trical Engineering). They were
graduates from McGil!

Barbadians in the Macdonald
College pass list are, H. DeL. King,
Bachelor of Science in Agricul-
ture, third year Margaret E
Clarke, Maureen Johnson and
Dorothy Watson, Home Economics,
second year.

David Boyce «x
Harold C

Marine Gardens,
Gibbs of Worthing and
Vernon Sergeant of St. Michael,
were awarded the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
(McGill University) and Thelma
J. Clarke of St. Philip was award-
ed the degree of Bachelor of
Household Economics (McGill
University).



OF

ADVENTURES

lie
Mr.
the same firm
had

day in

spent a few days

Short Holidey
R. L. L. TOPPIN, Governing} a
Director of Messrs, J. B. Les-
& Co., Ltd., accompanied by
K. D. G. Frost, Director of
and Mrs, Frost who

1115 am

m

From
1210 p m
1i—6 45

415

om

been spending a short holi-
B.G, returned on Sunday
Trinidad where they also




















via

cine at the University College of

spend the summer holidays with
his relatives. It was a surprise
visit for they were not expecting
him until August.

Runner Beans?

ISS EILEEN KING, the slim
runner from Trinidad found

soon after she arrived in England
that British food upset her diges-
tion. She consulted McDonald
Bailey, the champion runner. He
prescribed for her meals of rice
and beans familiar in her own

land. Now Miss King is well|Mrs. Skelton said. “He said TO-DAY 66 @ 3
again, would take me another thirt WARNER BROS. ROUSING
oing Backwards years to become an actress.””
Going The second time they me Sau Patricia
NDICATIOz> of the tightening|Skelton apologised for his ruden GARFIELD — NEAL in

up of discipline at Oxford is
the insistence of the authorities
in regard to academic dress during
examinations,

Black nylons for women are
vetoed. A woman invigilator an-
nounced during one examination
“The flesh must not be allowed to
show through the stockings worn
by women candidates.”

Twenty-one
ISS JOAN LANGE celebrated
her twenty-first birthday on
Saturday night with a dinner party
at her home’ which afterwards
went to Club Morgan.

Besides this party, the Morgan
was crowded with its usual “Satur-
day-nighters” and guests from the
Cuke-Worme wedding.

Incidental Intelligence
N the eve of ner marriage to
a man of 75, Mrs. Leontine!
Schreyer, aged 72, of Springfield,
Massachusetts, remarked: “I’m no
Grable, but I can still get a man!”
—L.E.S.



PIPA





WAY

to keep on saying that it is not
the clothes that matter but the
tennis. But they know well that
iheir only hope of being raved
about and mobbed is to wear
something startling. For it is not
the few people capable of ap-
preciating good tennis who can
make these girls as well-known
as film stars; it is the vast herd
of worshippers, ready to die of
boredom without their daily at-
tack of hysterics.
St. Paul’s Moving
VERY now and then’ some
“spokesman” who wants to
scare the public to death an-
nounces that St. Paul's is moving
towards budgate-hill at the rate

of PA inches per 11,200 years, The
dre nervous among the shop-
keepers, who read only the fact,
and miss (he figures, make ar-
rangements to leave their homes.
Then the whole thing is forgot-
ven again. Today I read of an-
other fact, which need not cause
panic. The spire of Salisbury

Cathedral is growing taller,



Rupert and eee



takes out a powerful magnifying
glass and peeps through it at the
locket. ‘Hm,
thought," he murmurs fin some
excitement. ‘Here, little _ bear,

he hold this more steady while |
ook more closely.

ha, just as |

That tiny mark



By Beachcomber

down his nose—a sure sign of
perturbation, Before him lay 4
jetter. It read:—

Sir,

In accordance with instructions
received from your office I here-
by beg to apply for the necessary
forms enabling me to apply for
a licence to procure false teeth
eight in number, for my ferret
Ramsgate, which broke eight of
its. teeth on a bun,

Yours faithfully,
R. Banton-Detmold.

Suet wrote at the top of the
letter; ‘Passed to Mrs, Glapiron,
Animal Dental Welfare Division.”

Enter a dear little oa}

HAT vast and over-sensitive
public which not only blub-

bers shamelessly at the films, bui
has to find extra tears every day
for the intimate affairs of film
actresses, is now called upon tc
Spare the tribute of a sigh for a
film actor who has discovered
that fame and wealth do not en-

sure happiness, Fain would {[
cheer up a sorrowing public with
the beautiful story ot the tiny
golden-haired girl who, intend-
ing to bring about a_ beautiful
reconciliation for her beautifu!
parents, shut them both up in

a room with all their foryer hus-
bands and wives, The beautiful
little oaf had got it all wrong,
you see. Or was she being sa
tirical?

that we thought only a scratch is
really a wonderful piece of engrav-
ing. Through this glass I can see
the whole pattern, I’m not much |
of an artist, but I'll try to draw it |
for you." Fetching pencil and
peper, he works steadily while
Rupert looks on with growing
interest,

Interlude,
pm Music Magazine, 615 p m
Magazine, 6.45 p m
7.00—11 00 pm

the West Indies arrived from] },'>
Jamaica yesterday via Trinidad to] p m

Festival in Britain



BARBADOS

| Programme

TUESDAY, JULY 10.
Programme

1951
Parade, 11 30
Asian Survey, 11 45 a m. Report
Britain, 1200 noon The News
News Analysis

pm — 19 76 m

> pm Souvenirs of
England v

Music,
South Africa,
5.15 p m

5 00
5 06 p m
New Records, 6 00
Welsh
Programme Parade
— 253 m., 4132 m

+8 700 pm The News, 710 pm Ne
otudying Medicine ‘ Analysts, 715 p.m
“BERT” REECE of Society | Nieht. q 45 pm The Bright Dark, 8
> ~ .|p m adio Newsreel, 6815 pm Mee
Piantation, St. John, who has}5,. Commonwealth, 845. pm. tnter=
just finished his first year of medi-jiude, 855 pm From The Editorials, }

900 p_m. LBC Northern Orchestra, 9 45

Report From Britain,
News, 1010 pm _ Interlude,
Focus on Charities, 10 45

10 00 pm
10 15
pm

Mrs. ‘‘Red’’



ERSONALITY behind Holly-'

is
Georgia Maureen
Mrs. Skelton.

They married on March 9, 1945,
just a year from the day they met.
Now they are in London.

wood comedian Red Skelton,!
statuesque, Titian - haired |
Davis now



“The first time I met Red at a

friend’s house he

the

wa
bor

Island beauties for their
wreck Ball” at the Paradise Beach
Club on July 21st,

insulted me,” ql

and asked her views on marriag¢
Now they have two children,
Says Mrs.
like ten children;
valet, waiter and general assistant
to Red is a 24 hours a dav iob.”’

Skelton: “I should
but being wife,

South Sea Girls

J DON’T know whether the Poio

Club are importing South Sea
“Ship-

but I do know
it some will be there.

The Nina which will be moored
off-

shore is having a special gang-
y so that visitors can get on
ard and a platform is also being

-enstructed on the beach.



CROSSWORD



JePoo =

New
et—-cec

cx

oe fonr

Across

Provided little Leslie with a slug.
(B) Usefulness, (7)
Fish for the morning orgy ? (6)
R.N.| Army. R.A.F. (8)

Pen tne sapper for a trim up. (5)
What re-engagement hides this
plant? (4)
Outsize tooth. (4)

Wriggier in the electric clock. (3)
Knotted work for trimming. (7)
Doesnt suggest uprightness. (4)
In which Lols may paint. (4)
Some call it a tine. (5)

Down
Cause of the punt’s S.O.S.% (8)
There ale becomes heavent (a)
The jesser White Heron. (8)
Strong lovers produce the gaunt-
tet. (5)
Where you see my giri in Dorset.
(4, 5) 6. Speak to do this. (3)
You can st to the Inmocent, (9)
Sounds as though small nails
were used tor diplomacy. (4)
it’s evil in the ring. (7)
Becoming. (6)
Can be made end to end. (4)

Often much envied colour. (3)

Sojution of yesterday's puzzle,—Across:





, Acrobatic, 7

Vox humana, 10, Elder,
15, Roe; 14, Site: 15 ae

18. Meal 1S, Devise
Under, 25. Wide; 24 Study
1 Averted, 2 Coloured; 5.
“s, 4. Amusement; 5, Initiated; 4.
& Heat. Y Aniseed: LL), Derived:
vine Orv

Sore Mouth

Loose Bloody

Bleeding Gums, Sore as and Loose

Teeth mean that

ou have Pyorrhea,

‘Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism

mo

|





ee ee

SATIN 36”

2.53
3.00

ee tf He te

a ee ea SS ea

36"

YOUR SHOE STORE

1.37
7¢

ee a en ee ee

A. 5. G6.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

4606

ag?

Amosan

for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth

and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
bleeding the first day,
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
guarantee. Amosan must make your
mouth well and save

ends sore mouth

your teeth or
ney back on return of empty pack-
Get Amosan from your chemist
today. The guar-
antee protects
you.





EMBD. |

ANGLAISE |

THE DAINTIEST IN TOWN |

All the Elite are buying it |
out at...

THANIE’S

Pr. Wm. Hny. St. Dial 3466



ADVOCATE



Blitz sites could be searched
for loot

A plan to train dogs for use in
the bombed areas of the City is
being considered by the City of
London police, who believe that
such sites are ideal “dumping
grounds” for stolen property

At present the City Police know

they can “borrow” trained dogs
from the Metropolitan area in an
emergency.

"Most of them feel that the City

, wa iehould have their own police dogs,
West Indian “aggre: with the acres of bomb

es.
It is known that criminals from
South London raid shops . and















warehouses on the north side of
the Thames, and that men living
in the Islington, King’s Cross,
Edgware Road and Notting Hili
districts frequently go south of
he river to commit crimes.

City CID and Scotland Yd
men have suspected for some
time that stolen goods are tem-
porarily dumped in the bombed
wastes.

Trained police dogs, on continu-
ous night patrol could, they think,
prevent this, and be useful in
intercepting thieves who try to
use the basements of bombed
buildings as transit aan



——





AQUATIC CLUR CUNEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT TO THURSDAY NIGHT at 4.30
MATINEE: TOMORROW at 5 p.m

“THE BLACK

in Technicolor
TYRONE POWER — ORSON WELLES — CECILE AUBRY
JACK HAWKINS
A 2th Century-Fox Picture

ae

Starring





=





DIAL 2310 = PLAZA



(From the Story by Ernest Hemingway)

“The BREAKING POINT"

ROSE”



Se
= BRIDGETOWN

pm. And Continuing
ACTION - PACKED DRAMA!



SPECIAL THU RS. 140 P.M

Tim HCLT in (Both)

WESTERN HERITAGE &

STORM OVER WYOMING
~OISTIN

PLAZA pist si0

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.





“THIS WAS PARIS”
Ben LYON &
“GUNS of the PECOS"

Dick FORAN (Warner)



WED. & THURS. 5 & 8.30
(R.K.O, Double)
GRAY'S “SUNSET PAST"
AND
“STATION WEST" with
Dick POWELL

| Jane



| “SHIPWRECK BALL”

July

TABLES CAN BE RESERVED AT
JANETTA DRESS SHOP
$1.00 per person







Lower Broad St. —







| WARNER'S BOX - OFFICE

SMASHER !

OPERATION PACIFIC

Starring; John WAYNE j
SOON! =!





————

GAIETY |

THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
TO-DAY (only) 830 P.M.

ee
|
|
on (Final Inst. of Serial)

Frank BUCK in
“JUNGLE MENACE”



WED. & THURS. 8.30 P.M,

“THE HUNTED”
Preston FOSTER &
“NEWSHOUNDS”

GORCEY & Dead End





Leo





if
21st |
|









JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Upstairs over Newsam’s



DRE

EVENING, COCKTAIL, AFTERNOON and BEACH
Ready-Made and Made-to-Order

BEAUTIFUL HANDBAGS from

LADIES PYJAMAS—Plain

” ”

NYLON PETTICOATS....



CALLING
ALL

FISHERMEN!

We can supply your requirements —
Rylands Mesh Wire for Fish Pots

Lacing Wire

Hounsells Fishing Lines 6 — 36 lbs.

Fish Hooks

Stainless Steel Wire

Cotton and Seine

e
THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

Hardware Department








Floral

SSES

Also —
Eger iN i pae $7.89 to $10.61
Sorte eb Ww Lah oe $5.30 per pr.
Ses a abe Ne ys oa $6.08 ., »



Twines

Tel. No. 2039




















POROODOS



TUESDAY, JULY



10, 1951

———_—_—

|B.B.C. Radio| POLICE WANT ‘CELLAR? DOGS jgesowveseeeeeceseteecrerareerttttiineeey

CHARCOAL BOX IRONS DELUXE

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets



Coe

GLOBE

TO-DAY, LAST SHOWS, 5.00 & 8.15 P.M.

“ROYAL
FRED ASTAIRE

GLOBE

WEDDING”
JANE POWELL

’ PRESENTS :

so young ant

CanTVRT 10K

LINDA

wih FRANCOISE ROSAY

ty



eautiful

CHARLES

marries a man like this...

ANYTHING
CAN HAPPEN

...including
I

MICHAEL

DARNELL - BOYER - RENNIE « SMITH



THEATRE

Our Ist 20th Century Fox Release
Opening FRIDAY, July 13th, 5.00 & 8.15 p.m.

ne






CONSTANCE

Produced and Directed by OTTO PREMINGER

Screen Play by HOWARD KOCH + Based on a Story by Louis Chavance

PLUS :

THE ALL STAR TALENT CONTEST

GOS

%

PPPPPEPPP PPS PPEPS LSP PLP PSS

MADAM IFILL PRESENTS :

On Thursday, July 11th, %30 p.m.

GLOBE THEATRE

In Aid of

THE CH.

STARBUDS OF 1951 |
)

CH. BABY WELFARE LEAGUE CLINIC

Under the Patronage of

The Hon. V.

C. GALE, M.L.C. and Mr. E. D. MOTTLEY, M.C.P.
e

DON’T MISS THESE:

THE

WALTZ IN BLUE and THE SAMBA
e

Orchestra & Box Seats $1.00; House 72c; Balcony 48c.
Tickets and Reservation daily, Globe Theatre
and Madam Ifill’s Residence.

BDOS

Agents

AGENCIES

For The

Presents:

THE GRAND VARIETY
(Every Wednesday, 8.30 p.m.)

AT THE

GLOBE THEATRE

8.30 O'clock

Tomorrow

Night,

with the Film

“BOOMERANG”





LIMITED

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t Enjoyment : TO-DAY Last Two Shows 445 | Last Two Shows TODAY 4 20 %
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TTRCCERDRaRE CES eRe

:%
’

Liteid















TUESDAY, JULY

16,



@ From Page 1
with it.
Mr. Walcott: He

the car with you?

Given Handbills

Mr. Cox: No. I gave him some
of «ne handbills and I went
tnrough the various avenues.

Mr. A. B. Franklin, contractor

do

never sot

in

ana buiider Was 4180 recaiiea:

Mr. Walcott: In your esumate,
you only have $1,301 for cost oi
labour?

Mr. Franklin; That is what I
set it out to be.

Mr. Walcott: Do you find by

experience that there is 4 percent-

age that labour always pears to
the cost of materials?

Mr. Franklin: Not from practi-
cal experience.

Mr. Walcott: Would you say
that the percentage is 60?

Mr. Franklin; Sometimes you
would have to add 100% some-
times more,

Mr. Walcott: In dealing with
wood is the labour higher than
if you were dealing with stone?

Mr. Franklin: No.

Mr. Walcott: If yau have to

take down a building, would not
that increase the cost?

Mr. Franklin: Yes. All the ma-
terial taken down would have to
be assorted after it-has been sawn
up.

Mr. Walcott: You made your
calculations at four cents a cubic
foot for excavating — naturally if

more than you estimated was
done jit would be more
Mr. Franklin: Yes.
Y "ph ae °
Cost Of Pits
Mr. Walcott; What about the

water closet ‘pits?

Mr. Franklin: Well! allow $240.

Attorney General: Your esti-
mate is for a new building?

Mr. Franklin: Yes.

Attorney General: We have had
evidence in this case that a hut
had to be removed from Seawell.
Allowing for the labour to cut up
buch a hut how mucth....

Mr. Franklin: It would
more than a new building.

Attorney General: It is shown
that the mgterial. used was $5,000
odd and the labour $5,000, If
you were erecting a building of
this size under these conditions
how many people would normally
be employed?

cost

Mr. Franklin: I would use six
carpenters, two masons, two la-
bourers, and one mason tender,

that being nothing to do with the
painting.

Attorney General: _How
would you have taken to
struct such with these men?

Mr. Franklin: Eight weeks
would cover that.

Attorney General;
tell how much,
crease cost since
have cost then?

Mr. Franklin; At
cent. less.

Mr. E. K. Waleott: The price
paid for nails was 35 cents per
pound and you had put it at 27.

Mr. Franklin: All my estima-
tions are at today’s prices. I
bought some at 35 cents then
myself

A Conspiracy

Mr. Miller was recalled.

The Commissioner: Mr.
has given in evidence here
Mr. Mottley, Mr. Tudor, Mr.
Mayers and yourself went to
Hutchinson & Banfield’s office on
June 27 in pursuance of sOme con-
spiracy or plot. What about that
Mr. Miller?

Mr. Miller; I have nevet been
with any of them anywhere. Mr.
Banfield went to my place some-
time last week.

The Commissioner: Have you
ever been to Hutchinson ahd Ban-
field buildings anytine?

Mr. Miller: Only on
business.

The Commissioner: Any time in
the month of June?

Mr. Miller; No.

The Commissioner; And
visit by Mr. Banfield... .?

long
con-

Could
allowing for
1949, it

you
in-
would

least 10 per

Cox
that

my own

this

eee

1951

Mr. Miller: I told tf
know in whose inter he cam.
Anything I had said, { told him,
would be found in the minutes of
the Vestry. He said he had just
left the Vestry clerk and wanted
more information. I told him
there was nothing more I could
give him.

Mr. .Mottley: .Do you know
Squires?

Mr. Miller: | know the Squires
with whom Cox goes around.

Mr. Mottley: If Squires said
that he saw you, Tudor and my-
self go to Banfield’s office... .?

Mr. Miller: That would be a lie.
I have never been in the company
of Tudor, and Mottley together
walking the streets. The only
lime the three of us are together
is at the Vestry table.

1 I did not



Mr. Mottley: Have you ever
seen Mayers with me in your
whole life?

Mr. Miller: I have never seen

you with Mr. Mayers.
Mr. Cox was allowed to ques-
tion Mr. Miller,

Good Friends

Mr. Cox: I am putting it to you
Ahat you and Squires are good
friends — that you go around and
drink together?

Mr. Miller: That is so.

Mr. Cox; You said Mr. Banfield
went to you before the enquiry
started?

Mr. Miller: Yes.

Mr. Cox: You say you went
into Banfield’s office in June?

Mr. Miller: I did not go.

Mr. Cox: Have you any idea
where these huts are?

Mr. Miller: You are the best
person to know; You had the
job of moving them.

Mr.” Cox: You heard Mr.
Mottley speak of these huts at
the Vestry. Who spoke first?

Mr. Miller: I am not here to
remember who spoke first. I
would like to ask Mr. Cox some-
thing. :

The Commissioner; Tell’ xe
what it is. One

Mr. Miller:
bare-faced — I know he i8)‘a!
dirty, nasty and so on....

The Commissioner: This
not an abusing match.

Mr. Mayers, lorry driver, was
recalled.

The Commisioner: You made a
statement about Mr. Cox and he
has denied it. That is my reason
for having you recalled.

Mr. Cox: Where do you live?

Mr. Mayers: Station Hill.

Mr. Cox: How long were you
living there?

Mr. Mayers: Four years.



is

House Searched

Mr. Cox; The police searched
your place sometime ago, is that
not so?

Mr. Mayers: Yes.

Mr. Cox: Where were you liv-
ing then?

Mr. Mayers; King’s Gap.

Mr. Cox: How long was that?

Mr. Mayers: In 1949.

The Commissioner, And you
were living in *Station Hill for

four years?

Mr. Mayers. What really hap-
pened is that I was living in Sta=
tion Hill with my parents and I
was living with.. -.

Mr. Cox: Sometime between
September and October 1949 you
were the driver of 258. Do you
remember the sign on the board?

Mr. Mayers: P. M. Francis.
You told me the truck was yours.

Mr. Cox: What else was on the
sign board?

Mr. Mayers: Two Mile Hill.

Mr. Cox: Do you remember
where I was living at the time?
Mr. Mayers: Britton’s Hill,

Mr. Cox: Where did you house

this. lorry?

Mr. Mayers: At Mr. Tommie
Miller’s residence.

Mr. Cox: From the time you

were driving this lorry until you
left, it was being put up at Mr
Tommie Miller’s residence?

Mr. Mayers: Yes.

Mr. Cox: It would be therefore
untrue to say that during the
time you removed the building



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from Seawel] that the lorry was
housed anywhere else?

Mr. Mayers: Yes, it would be
untrue.

Mr. Cox: Do you remember
meeting Mr. Duguid and me in
a ear coming around+River Road
the first ¢vening you started to
move?

Mr. Mayers: I could not have

met you when that was not the
road I took. I took Government
Hill road.
Mr. Cox:
Tudor?
Mr. Mayers: Yes.

Any Meeting?

Mr. Cox: Did he at any time be-
fore this enquiry started, meet
you and discuss this?

Mr. Mayers: No.

Mr. Cox: Did you not hear that
he was trying to get in contact
with you?

Mr. Mayers: No.

Mr. Cox: Do you know a woman
who sells black pudding and souse
near Mr. Tudor’s garage?

Mr. Mayers: 1 know two women
who sell.

Mr. Cox: Did this lady not tell
you that Mr. Cox was trying to
get hold of you?

Mr. Mayers; No.

Mr. Cox: Did you see Mr. Tudor
at Hutchinson and Banfield when
you went there?

Mr. Mayers: Yes.

Mr. Cox: Did you see Mr. Mott-
ley or Mr. Miller there?

Dou you know Mr

Mr. Mayers: No.

Mr. Cox: Was the man who
you said came to you Rupert
Squires?

Mr. Mayers: [t was not him.

Mr. Cox: Could the men in the
joiner shop see?

Mr. Mayers: If they looked out.

Mr. Cex: Do you know why he
wanted to prevent you from giv-
ing evidence.

Mr. Mayers: No.

Mr. Cox: Did the man tell you
@ny reason?
r. Mayers: Not to say any-

, ot about” the removal of the
$.

Could he be .so-

‘ Mr. Cox: Are you absolutely
sure that 2361 was not there?

Mr. Mayers: Not in my pres-
ence.
Mr. Cox: What would be the

object then of preventing you from
coming before the Commissioner?

Misappropriation

The Commissioner: If you knew

nothing of the misappropriation
of this hut....what..
Mr. Cox: What were you paid

for a trip?

Mr. Mayers: Two shillings.

Mr. Cox: You went up to Sea-
well at all hours—at midnight for
two shillings?

Mr. Mayers: The latest time was
10 o'clock. What could I do?

Mr. Cox: Suppose the other
driver could have told you he was
paid $1.50 for a trip, what about
that?

Mr. Mayers: That would be
what you paid him.
Mr. Cox: During the time you

were driver did you eyer discuss
pay with this other driver?

Mr. Mayers: No.

Mr. Cox: Where did Mr. Ban-
field come to you?

Mr. Mayers: In Cheapside.

Mr. Cox: Just standing up in
the road?

Mr. Mayers: Just standing up
in the road.

Mr. Cox: Who told him that
someone had offered you this
money? “ie

Mr. Mayers: | told him.
Mr. Cox: Did you not think it
was proper to inform the police?

Mr. Mayers: Because I would
have liked .the money.
Mr. Allan Thompson, a chauf-

feur who worked with Mr. Duguid

when the huts were being re-
moved, was the next witness
called.

Attorney General:
trips did you make?

Mr. Thompson; Two, one that
evening and the other a Saturday.

Attorney General: How many
trucks were there?

Mr. Thompson: Duguid’s, Mur-
ray’s and 258

How many

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Princess Alice Enquiry Ends

Attorney General: Who left
first?

Mr. Thompson; Murray left
iirst.

Attorney General: When

got there where was Murray?

Mr. Thompson; On the Reef un-
loading

Attorney General: How long
dia you wait on the Reef after
you unloaded?

Mr. Thompson; About an hour.

Attorney General: 258 did not
come up to that time?

Mr. Thompson; No

Atterney General: Next time

you-made a trip who helped you
to unload it?

Mr. Thompson: Mr. Duguid |
four hands on the truck

Attorney General: Some of |
hut missing. Have }
where it has gone?

Mr. Thompson: No

Attorney General:
were you paid?

Mr. Thompson: | cannot remein-

Is you i

What a

trip

ber, I think I got two shillin
a trip

Mr. Coppin, Ex - Government
Analyst, was the next witnes
Besides his knowledge of che

istry, Mr. Coppin said that he w
a certified engineer and had
years’ experience in building cor
struction,

Mr. Walcott: At the request

of Counsel for Mr. Tudor
that is me—on July 8, you
surveyed the building at the
Princess Alice Playing Field
and you have an estimate on
findings together with a plan
showing the lay out and gen-
eral design

Mr. Coppin: Ye

Mr. Coppin submitted the
plan and copy of the survey

to the Commissioner,

Mr. Walcott: Have you had
any experience in the hand-
ling of the huts at Seawell on
behalf of Government?

Mr. Coppin: I removed two
huts on behalf of the Govern-
ment,

Mr. Walcott: Were you
Chairman of the Gommittee at

Lancaster Government Fac-
tory?

Mr. Coppin: Yes.

Mr. Walcott: From whom

did you get yours instructions

to remove the huts?

Mr. Coppin: | was instruct-
ed by the Acting Governor
Mr. Perowne to take the two
huts from Seawell.

Mr. Walcott; About what
time was this as compared
with the construction of the
Princess Alice Playing Field?

Mr. Coppin: It was around
1949.

Mr. Walcott: What did you
get out of these huts?

Mr. Coppin: 1 got about 30
per cent. of the material of
the huts. This was due to the
fact that the sides were mainly
cardboard, the roof was dete-
riorated galvanise and most of
the material had evidence of
wood ants.

Mr. Walcott: You have seen a
copy of the estimate by Mr.
Franklin of the cost of the build-
ing at the Princess Alice Playing
Field?

Mr. Coppin: Yes.

Mr, Walcott: What do you say
about that?

Labour Cost

Mr. Coppin:
tially

material,

I agree substan-
with Mr. Franklin’s bill of
but I differ on _ his
labour cost. I would say that it
is very improbable to construct
any building—I put it as low as

a chicken coop — labour cost
would not be less than 60 per
cent., or even more

Mr. Walcott: As regards a
wooden structure would this be
higher or lower?

Mr. Coppin: With that old
wooden construction it would be
higher.

Mr. Walcott: In ‘your estimate
have you allowed for green-
heart?

Mr. Coppin: I haye not allowed
for that which I uhderstand was
used for the foundation. @ could
not get at it to see it.

Attorney General: In. gon-
structing a building of the ‘size
and dimensions as that on the



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id



play
cons
I pie t
Mr Coppin
vie i
© ¢ t ether yoy are

tuil ¢
Attorney General W

a tin i’ on
at
Mr Coppin: rhree m h
wowd t reasonable time and
I woul 20 to 25 people should
be employed,

Attorney General: You did not

examine this building to ascer-
tain the type of wood?

Mr.*Coppin: Yes. I could see
neem per cent. of the floor was
ork fy old stuff, presumably
from the huts

Attorney General: What about
the ce ?

Mr, Coppin: I could not tell
very @ast t was painted

Attorney General: What about
he Ww ht

Mr. Coppin: | cannot speak on
the up *, the were painted
I coul determine that some
of the leepers were old

New Everything?






Attoriey General: In your esti-
miate 5 mated everything as
being ne

Mr. Coppin | e my cost, |
hint revailit prices ani
ihen e« end I allowed a re
duction for the old material

rhe, Commissioner; How long
have }Sou been a builder, Mr.
Coppin,

Mr, Coppin: I have been buiid-

ince 1937, but I ive been a
1 fully fora year now, the
time that I have retired.

The, Commissioner: You we
to Seauweil to inspect huts fo
Governmet

Mr. Coppin: 1 paid a visit ant
had look. | was told that I cou
have two, a large one and a sm
one I looked at them and i
tructed the factory manager
send for them.

The Commissioner: Were the:
more huts at Seawell then?

Mr. Coppin: About four or five





The Commissioner;
ittend the sale?

Mr. Coppin: No.

Mr. Mottley: You
weré@ approached by
to get this estimate
the enquiry?

Mr. Coppin: | wa
sked by the Financial
io make the survey, I said that I
did nét mind, but would prefer
to do so with somebody else.

I afterwards understood that
Franklin was do it. Then !
was asked by, Mr. Walcott to do

and I said T did not mind. As
result I have produced the fig-
ures and plan.

Mr, Redman, clerk
Vestry was recalled.

Did you

Said that you
Mr. Walcott
and plan for

actually
Secretary

to

of the

More Money Spent

Attorney General: 1 want t
know a it the Vestry’s decisio:
concerning the expenditure o
money over $1,000. Can you tel
us at hat meeting this took
piace?

Mr. Redman: At the meeting
of April 13, 1949 the Vestry were
discussing estimates or somethin
like that d on Mr, Leacock
suggestion it was decided to in-
vile tenders for work estimatec
to cost! $7,000 and over. (Clerk

referred to Minutes),













































PAGE THREE



}
Aitorney General Ww ‘SSeeueeEeeRe The name speaks for itself seseseeasess
























Mr Redman Yes, A ° 3 ° Aue "hele ° 8
1 a UX _ si
Attorney General: W that the] M
iecision of the Vestry |
Mr. Redman: Yes
Attorney General: In view of Helps to cleanse the system
what one wit stated, here from blood impurities
be Worrell to be ir
charge for a certain period, [ impurities in the blood may cause rheumatic

would like to ask Mr. Tudor ques- aches and pains, stiff and painful joints,

tions on that point, because thet boils, pimples and common skin disorders.

came asa bit of surprise to me. | Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
Mr..Tudor was recalled, e the blood, cleanses the system and assists °
Attorney General; Mr. Tudor. | in restoring good health.

a witness here last Friday or

Saturday said that Mr. Worret!

ceased to be employed om the job
ior some period. Is that so.

Mr. Tudor. Yes. That happened
on the labour question ?

Attorney General: Did it hap-
pen because of the fact that hi
house was searched ?

Mr. Tuder; No. His
earched before the
started to be erected.

Attorney General:
was he off the job?

Mr, Tudor: Two weeks

Attorney General: Who took his
place then ?

Mr, Tudor:
said that
work

Builder Recalled

Attorney General; And then
eventually Worrell was taken back
mm?

house was
building

How long

Mr.
he could

He
the

Maynard.
supervise

Mr. Tudor; Yes.
The Commissioner: Maynare
was not a carpenter or builder

was he ?

Mr. Tuder; He said that he had
fone one cr two jobs already. I
two weeks I found things were
oing bad and I had to call back
Worrell.

The Commissioner;
you pay Maynard at

Mr. Tudor: 1 paid
S18 per week,

Avtorney General; | notice he

{that during the two weeks | Mr

What dic
this time
the same

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Since the war, lack of dollars in the sterling area has meant many trade restrictions
and shortages. And these, in turn, have had a serious effect on British West Indian trade
—and so, on you.

Now there is a change for the better!

Because Canada is purchasing an increasingly large amount of British goods and
services, it is possible now, under the British West Indies Trade Liberalization Plan, to
import many items from Canada which you haven't seen in quantity for many a long day

Pleasant news for you ... and for us!

A return to more normal trade with Canada should be as natural jo you as breathing.
After all, we are traditional trading neighbours, Canadiar East Coast fishing craft were
4 fainiliar sight in your ports nearly 200 years ago. They
i brought in dried fish and took out cargoes of sugar, molasses
and rum, And, as sister nations in the british Commonwealth,
y 4 we have many mutual interests.

So, now that broader trade for better living is possible
again, we suggest that, Gs of yor, you make Canada your
first source of supply ... your first port of call.

B.W.1. Importers please note
Under the B.W.1, Trade Liberalization Plan, Canadian suppliers with a
history cf export to The British West indies during 1946-7-8, are now
eligibie toship quotas of opproved products for 50% or 33'1% (depend
ing ©
menticned above, We sage, therefore, thai you



categories) of their average shipments during the basic period











(a) get in touch with your established Canadian suppliers.

(b) ge! in touch with the Canudian Trade Commissioners regarding items
avuilable and possible suppliers.

TRINID /.D, BARBADOS, WINDWA2D & LEEWARD ISLANDS AND BRITISH GUIANA

Mr. T. G. Major, Canadian Government Trade Commissioner
43 St. Vincent St., Port-of-Spain, Trinidad

JAMAICA, BAHAMAS AND BRITISH HONDURAS
Mr. M. B, Palmer, Canadian Goverament Trade Comminioner
Canadian Bank of Commerce Chambers, Kingston, Jamaica

Bayt:
7 CY ERVICE

a







BARBADOS ADVOCATE





ADVOGATE

Ga SSS ssa ee

BARBADO:

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lt4., Broad St. Bridsetow.



Tuesday, July 10, 1951





ROAD SAFETY

THE Barbados Automobile Association
now has 238 members and its immediate
aim is to have a membership roll which in-
cludes as many as possible of the 8,000
motorists in this island. During the period
of checking licenses the Association made
a drive for membership. In conjunction
with the Police the Association checked on
motorists and handed out leaflets pointing
out that as soon as a driver had complied
with the law he or she should join the
Barbados Automobile Association.

The leafict itself was a reminder that the
Association was alive and functioning and
was courting the support of every motorist
for its future success, At present there is
a Committee working out details of a
scheme to accommodate drivers of various
types of vehicles as is done in the Automo-
bile Association in England,

There are many services which the Auto-
mobile Association can render to the pub-
lic. Already it has been able to influence
merchants to let their daily advertising
space be used for reminders to motorists
and pedestrians alike to observe the rules
of safety. The increasing number of motor
vehicles on the roads would seem to indi-
caté that there should be some means of
Compulsory Third Party Insurance. The
Association might throw its weight behind
the effort in order that if and when-acci-
dents do occur there should be some pro-
tection left for the bereaved.

This matter of Compulsory Insurance
was discussed in the House of Assembly
years ago and rejected. The need is more
insistent today and the objections raised
then cannot be sustained now. But the
Association hopes to do much more. The
observance of the rules of safety and the
imparting of knowledge which will make
for efficient control of motor vehicles are
among its aims. It deserves a greater meas-
ure of publie support.

UNSIGHTLINESS

WITHIN recent months advertising
signs became the subject of public com-
ment and the matter was taken up by the
Chamber 6f Commerce. .A committee was
appointed to interview people who used
these signs or allowed them to be set up
on their premises. The object was to ask
advertisers to avoid despoiling the beauty
of the districts by using signs which aid
not synchronise with the colour scheme.

Tn recent weeks, however, more and big-
ger signs have been erected. in the City:
which do violence to the surroundings, The
complaint has been made by visitors and
local people that in some districts the
natural beauty has been spoilt by these
advertising signs. It is true that owners
have the right to allow these signs to be
erected on their premises but the appeal
against unsightly hoardings should not be
lost on those who appreciate the natural
beauty of the countryside,

In the City there is room for advertising
but it is necessary to keep signs and build-
ings within the limit of what would be
allowed by a Town Planning Authority.
Bridgetown is already unsightly because
of its lack of uniformity. The indiscrimin-
ate erection of ugly advertising signs can
only add to it.



Garbo -Blossomed

(By EVE PERRICK)

HELMUTH EUGENE HAUSER,
best known under his assumed
but more romantic name of Gaye-
lord Hauser, who claims to know
the secret of everlasting energy

voice:

ond all-day vitality, arrived in
London—and went straight .to
bed.

Yes, the Elsa Maxwell of the

fancier food faddists, the modern
Medicine-man himself, was just
plain old-fashioned tired. So he



The Leper Is No Lenger
Doomed





courage of a handful. of. lepers—-ia PART. IL. disease or again by tissue absorp-
banishing forever the fear and hope tion which makes for a weird mask
“a thin. me aa mee seems to have affinity for some €ffect, as if the face had been vul-
ris once incurable disease races, which it loses in time, but ©@ized. Huge, lumpy ears, piled
By ROBERT ©. RUARK grants immunity to none. It some- USsues on the forehead which

From “Esquire” times seems to be easily trans- [md the “leonine” look (such re-

missible through families, but for sults of the disease are a thing of

In the autumn of 1948 two every positive check on family oe ees a waeine artes 2,
of news were susceptibility, the experts can nasal ailment aie other hall.

of vital significance to every vic- Jated cases in otherwise healthy ae see ida teenies
tim of leprosy and to all those families, One woman at Carville, known howe’ leprosy is con.
concerned with the fate of the wife of prosy is n-

a prominent physician, tracted or how long it takes tc
leper. married in the knowledge that she i : is that it
: . a 4 ‘a contract it. One theory is that it

In the United States a leper had Jleprosy. She bore her hus- is passed from pereon to person
had been given a medical _Gis- band 11 children, and neither he through the nasal passages afte:
charge (which calls for further nor the children were infected. long and intimate contact, such a-

treatment) from the national lep- f , ; : aoe
d rom nurse to child, and its period
rosarium at Carville, in the south- Most leprosy experts agree that of incubation may te eae noe

ern State of Louisiana. Instead of the disease is basically attracted to 10 years. The Carville doctors
going away and hiding in shame, to children and adolescents, and believg that. Mrs. Hornbostel. ir

Hornbostel, using her that it is generally acquired in whom'the disease did not manifes
own name, deliberately galled early years, even if it does not itself until her late middle years
attention to herself, and loudly become apparent until adulthood, contracted leprosy on Saipan oj
proclaimed exactly where she in- when some breakdown in body Guam, where she spent her child-
tended to live

Certrude

health or change of basa] metabol- hood, and very possibly from ar
ism weakens the victim. infected nurse.



nn salina enna Te

Soon afterwards, the Board of
Health of the
Hawaii,

Pacific Islands of

home of the celebrated deliberate attempts

Tnere have been 145

to

ccrtified
inoculate

leprosarium of Kalaupapa on the the disease on adult humans, and

island of Molokai, announced that no inoculation

no more admissions to
Damien’s famous settlement would
Henceforth

€
estonishing pieces
flashed around the world—news show countless instances of iso~

ever again be made,

all new cases, instead of being oped what the doctors then agreed Either
sent to the prison island, would ‘was an active case of leprosy. AS automatic

Father M

has taken effect.
any years ago a convict agreed
to a transplant of leprous tissue
in return for his life, and devel-

The theory of the nasal trans-
mission is used because one of the
final tests» for the leprous i
microscopic inspection of mucou
patches from the nostrils. How
ever, it has not yet been possibk
to eulture the bacilli artificial
or to inoculate animals with it
success would indicate a
end to centuries ©

be treated in an ordinary hospital. a scientific control, however, the horror, but the bacilli were no

Thus, at one stroke, thousands
of years of horror, misinforma-
tion, and misplaced dread—thou-
sands of years of near-criminal
persecution and savage mysticism
—officially came to a halt. Lep-
rosy, dire disease, incurable
scourge of the ages, suddenly had
assumed its true status of a di-
sease, extraordinary but no longer
incurable, rather than a_loath-
some mystery with implied over-
tones of filth and semi-criminality.

It is estimated ‘today that ‘lep-
rosy can be stamped out in two
generations, if handled as a medi-
cal entity on.a basis of intelligent
understanding of public - health
needs, The modern public-health
concept is emphasis on the diag-
nosis of the disease in its early
stages, swift treatment with the
marvel drugs, the sulfones, and
rigid protection of the children of
leprous parents, rather than the
largély needless protection of the
general public. This is the creed
of the Hawaii Board of Health

Down through the years there
has possibly been more widespread
misinformation about the micro-
bacillus leprae than any other sin-
gle scourge. Public conception of
the disease was founded on origi-
nal error, and has grown in inter-
national loathing through a hor-
rid fascination with its mystery
and long-term incurability, in
addition to its connotation of un-
cleanliness accompanied by ban-
ishment and made worse by the

awful physical ravages of the
active disease.
That is why, in recent years,

those afflicted with the disease and
those concerned in its treatment
have attempted to destroy the
word “leprosy” and substitute the
name Hansen's Disease, after the
Norwegian scientist who isolated
its unique bacillus, and to use
Hansenotic or Hensenian for
“leper’’, What the leper has ever
desired was to be regarded as a
sick person, instead of a monster
who must be pent up and shun-
ned for the misfortune of inno-
cently contracting a disease which
was incurable until very recently.
Leprosy is not only curable, but
it does not disfigure if promptly
and .properly treated,

The mystery that has always
cloaked the disease also has
clothed it with horror, It was
popularly supposed to be conta~
gious to such a point that any-
thing a leper touched was a source
of contagion, Today itis, actually,
thought. to be the most difficult of
all bacilli to, transmit, and leprosy
is almost impossible to contract
except at gn early age im loca-
tions where’ the disease is en-
demic—that is, where it thrives
and perpetuates itself, In the
United States, those sections are
the Gulf Coast areas of the south-
ern State of Florida, Texas, and
Louisiana, Mexico is regarded as
an endemie sectcy, with such close
juxtaposition to portions of the
Pacific Coast State of California
that it is difficult to say whether
parts of California are endemic
or not, The San Joaquin valley of
California now is regarded as an
endemic area, since eight cases
have developed there.

It is not known what makes a
section endemic, There have been
efforts to relate the transmission
of the disease to climate, nation-
ality, race, diet, and terrain, but
it has defied a correlation, It

Then to charm away my last
doubts about his sincerity he look-
ed into my eyes and intoned in a
pleasant,
“If only
with me, I would make you the
most wonderful juices,”

The mixer goes along with him
on ell lecture engagements. It will
make its first public appearance in
Britain on Monday night, when
Hauser will put over his formula
for health, iappiness and a long,



soft, German-a *cented

I had my mixer

ga to

for three years.
casions he cooked her

Hauser’s feat in getting Garbo to
parties
wagon in a big way,

man proved of little value, since
he showed a long, intimate family
history of leprosy, and might have
borne the disease all the time.

Some pretest, | think—
against the rising price
of clothes,”



The celebrated Belgian priest,
Father Damien, the patron saint of
Molokai, developed leprosy while
working intimately with the pa-
tients at Kalawao and Kalaupapa.
Most leprosy experts believe that
Damien de Vauster had leprosy
before going to Molekai, since his
Belgian region was highly endemic
at the time and that Father Dam-
ien knew he had the disease for
many years before he announced
it in his famous “We“lepers...”
speech to his people. It would
have been one way of accounting
for his complete carelessness of
approach to his charges and his
flaunting of the simplest sanitary
precautions. The only other at-
tendant on Molokai to contract
the @isease was Father Peter, a
man who had a habit of scratech-
ing his bald head constantly, A
leprous patch developed where he
scratched, The doctors removed
the patch and, with its usual
erratic behaviour, the disease
never sgain manifested itself.

fi the Carviile sanitarium, no
nurse, doctor, or visitor has ever
become infected. One attendant
did; he proved to have come from
an endemic region of Louisiana.
In regent times, the closest thing
to an infection control has been
the case of two American soldiers
of World War II. Coming from
widely divergent sections of the
United States, with no family pre-
disposition to the disease, they
both acquired leprosy in Austra-
lia. Both had been tattooed by a
needle artist who had leprosy.

One of the cammoner. miscon-
ceptions of Hansen's Disease - is
that it, causes fingers, tees, and
even limbs to drop off, and that
the disease iisslf automatically
kills people. The well-known
“leper claw,” the curled foot or
hand, is the result of cartilage
absorption and the contraction of
muscles and tendons until it is
aes for the patient to have
fingernails om his knuckles, and
his feet completely crumpled and
wasted. The visitor to «a lepro~
sarium js often struck. by the fact
that a great many patients have
snub noses. This also is due to
cartilage absorption, The distor-
tion of, the features caused
either by the great nodules which
mark the-cutaneous type of the

is

For

special oc-
his “cele-

joined the: band-

After His £3.500-a-Week Idea

nether
much of beauty; let.us keep what
3 we can and invent more,”

even isolated until late in the

nineteenth century

This impotency of researcn
then, put the burden of the ag
on remedies Until 1941 ther
was no definite remedy. The fa
mous chaulmoogra oi! seemed th:
best though some leprologists nov
admit that it was of ict
no value except for a 3
therapeutic effect on the patient
an indication that somebody wa
trying to do something for him
The new sulfunes. are effective
the patient who eannot tolera*
Promin, given intravenously, ca
usually take diasone or promece-
tin or sulfatrone in tablet form
The drugs are sensationally effec



tive. A pexgon who submits him
self to treatment in the earl
stages of the disease is~ almos

sure to see it stopped completel
in from one to two. years, A
least two of the writer's acquaint
ances from Carville, a young ma)
and Mrs. rnbostel, are fre
people in ‘a free world once more
Of all the patients discharged
there have been only eight re
lapses. Since 1941, over 150 sat
isfactorily arrested sufferers fron
Hansen’s Disease have passer
through the outer gates of Car
ville Leprosarium Many other
have been cured sufficiently to g
back to society, but a few, refus
because they are marked enoug)
to be recognizable as ex-lepers
and many are unwilling to try tr
cope with a society which stil
brands a former victim of lepros
as a dangerous and unpleasan
oddity.

It is here that the person wh«
wishes to evaluate the disease o
leprosy must take a short courst
in leper psychology. The bi:
battle in getting people to recog
nize that leprosy is a disease anc
not a crime has been led by suc!
rugged fighters as Father Damien
ex-Governor ‘Lawrence Judd of
Hawaii, Gertrude Hornbostel, ane
Stanley Stein, the blind editor of
Carville’s magazine, The Star
They have fought with great de-
termination and great selflessness
only to be partially defeated by
the people they fight for, who
have become hypersensitive by
reason of the attitude of the
“clean” world to an “unclean”
disease.

Living as a leper in a nonlep-
rous world is sometimes simply
too difficult for the individual.
It is regarded as a distinct tri-
umph by the Board of Health in
Hawail to-day that at least one
former occupant of the settlement
of Kalaupapa is out in the non-

leprous town of Honolulu, his
disease halted, and that he is
profitably ‘employed in a large



organization where his employer
and his fellow-workers know him
for what he is—a man who once
was afflicted with leprosy. His
tragic counterpart fs a young ance
handsome ‘* man, the disease
arrested, with no discernible signs
of his former ailment, who sti]
chooses to’ live and work in th>
-olony on Molokai because he
eannot bring-himself to face hos-
tile outsiders,

Many ptiful people, such as
this young man, are to-day pris-
oners of nothing but their own

fear, (MEDICINE—Practice)
End of Part I.
This is Part I of an article Which

oppeared im the April 1951 issue of
Esquire, a monthly magazine pub
lished in the United States and céi-
tainir tion and articles of general
interest, The writer is the author of

veral books and-a regular contrit
ulor to American periodicals,





writes:
“T even think Whose turn is it

brations only” speciality-——“Extra- to wash up’? would be a gayer
vagant Wild Rice Hamburgers.” question if a really pretty sink

In exchange, “Miss Garbo with pale-greengtiles, silvery fit-
taught me so much abeut women tings and cupboards below for
—why for example, they chatter china could be half-concealed in
so much. It's not maliciousness, a corner so that interesting after-
It's plain nervousness,” dinner talk need not be broken

Hollywood, impressed by by someone disappearing to the

regions, We. have lost so

did the plain, old-fashioned thing
—tock a nap (horizontally) and
demonstrated that he does not al-
ways practise what he preaches

For the Hauser way to relax,
according to his thousands of’
written and spoken words is the
Body Slant—at an angle of 45
degrees with the head lower than
the feet. :

Still up and about again a short
time after the world’s highest-
paid _ dietitian
(around £3,500



comes in every
week from books,
broadcasts lec- â„¢@
tures and selling 6 §)~* °
the ingredients ,5 — :
for his _ speci ~ 2
pecial as ;

menus) shrugged :
off this derelic- Sgr’ “s E
tion of duty. S

“Ah, yes, the

30dy Slant—but GAYELORD
that is particu- HAUSER

larly recommended for women.”

long life

. As well as the mixer he uses a
, bright line in patter, a seasoning
of sex appeal and a shiny smiled
personality to get the audience to
try out his “such delicious drinks”
of cabbage juice, skimmed milk,
yoghourt, black treacle and brew-
er’s yeast.

“Do you think we will go for
that stuff here?” I asked, Hauser
neglected his salad, ate a sausage
roll and smiled serenely: —

“I get so many letters from
England, I am thrilled, but I am
sad, too. They ask such primitive
questions like—Where can I buy
blackstrap molasses?”

In Paris soon he will be calling
on the Duchess of Windsor. The
duchess, one of his first disciples,
uses the Gayelord Hauser special
vegetable-juice extractor and has

written a foreword to the French
edition of his book
Greta Garbo was another de-

yotee, He was her close companion

Hauser’s own description of his
success story is about As extrava-
gant.as the wild rice rissoles, Now
56-years old (and a handsome 6ft.
Sins.) in a smooth blue suit and
white silk shirt, the smart set's
favourite diet doctor almost burst
with gratified pride as he de-
claimed: “Isn’t it wonderful. All
by myself I have changed the eat-
ing habits of the world.”

I prefer Jimmy Durante’s sum-
ming-up: “Dat molasses and
wheat germ and yoghourt don’t
really make ya live longer. It just
seenis longer.”

On Washing Up

* WHEN a lady of title takes
to her pen ten to one the
result will be a book on flower
arrangements. But Lady Gorell’'s
effort “That Looks Lovely” goes
a little beyond the take-one-
branch of pussy willow-and-a-
few-leafy-sprays routine.
Her ladyship has an interesting
idea or two on. the of
entertaining without She

subject
taff

Dry Those Eyes

* LITTLE LIZ TAYLOR — the
: latest contender for the poor
little rich girl titte—sighs so sadly
that nobody loves her any more.

Well dry thos@ violet eyes, lady,
and F'll put it in great big letters

EVE PERRICK LOVES ELIZA-
BETH ''AYLOR.

Why? Becatise she is the first
Hollywood filmestar to arrive here

wearing in place of the Tlooked- *

for mink a wrap made of that
homeliest of poer-relation furs—

moleskin.
Odd Shoes

* STREET SCENE: The puz-

zled lookers-in at the display
of photographed celebrities in the
shop window of a Regent-street
shipping company as they note
that that picture of Mrs. Harvey
S. Firestone, jnr., shows her
promenading the deck in one
black ‘court shoe and One white
peep-toe sandal



—L.E.S.

The Story Of Miss X
DRUG GIRL

| 'TEEN-AGE drug addicts are shocking
the United States with their disclosures
to the Senate’s Investigating Committee
in Washington.

}
|

THIS is the story of a pretty young] |

musician who sank from a respected place in
society to lead the life of a thief because of
her devouring need for narcotics. Her story
was recorded at the bleak Westfield State Re-
formatory for women in New York, where at
25 she is serving a prison sentence.

Born into an educated New England fam-
ily, Miss KX showed early talent for music,
which her parents sympathetically encour-
aged,

She studied at one of the best music schools
n the U.S.A.—Oberlin conservatory in Ohio
~and completed her education at Boston
Smmanuel College for women.

£380 A WEEK

She not only played bass violin, cello and
alto saxophone but was an accomplished
arranger and composer. At 20 she was earning
£80 a week. Then she was taken seriously ill.

Her doctor gave her demerol to relieve the
pain and soon she found she had become com-
sletely dependent on the drug.

When her doctor cut her off from demerol
she began to buy it illegally. But after a
while she found it too mild to satisfy her
ravings and turned to morphine.

About this time Miss X joined the Women’s
Army Corps, where she found it was easy to
»btain all the drugs she needed. “We were
jupplied with medical kits containing power-
ful drugs, and I got drugs that way. I simply
stole a kit whenever I needed more dope.”

After her discharge from the army she
ravelled' to New York, to Cleveland, Phila-
lelphia, Washington—any place where she
sould obtain narcotics.

THE CAPSULES

Despite the drug habit that was slowly de-
stroying her health she was still able to carry

yn with her work as arranger and errs
3ut though her income remained between!
£70 and £80 a week, she found it was not}
snough to keep her supplied with the tre-
nendous quantity of narcotics she now
desired.

She spent more than the £65 a week on the
30 drug capsules she used every day. Soon it
secame necessary to steal to get extra money.

Finally she turned to prostitution.

Miss X tells of a hotel in the New York
suburb of Bronx where clerks sold drugs.

“Tt was protected by the police. There was
ne particular patrolman we knew as Smitty
who went in there at seven or eight o’clock
at night until he went off duty early morning.

[hen he’d hang around until the girls paid
him off.”
HE BLUFFED

“If there was any complaint about men
brought in by girls then Policeman Smitty
bluffed his way and warned the men that if
they didn't give the girls their money he’d
send them off to prison. And then he would
take a man aside and say, ‘You know I could
have taken you to prison. Don’t you think I
deserve some consideration. So he made
money on all angles.”

Miss X tells how drugs were being openly
sold in some of Manhattan’s best known dru
stores, caféterias and night clubs.

“You go in the drug store and you ask the
man for needles, and if he thinks you look
all right he’ll just fish them from underneath
the counter and give them to you, no ques-
tions asked.”

Often when she had obtained enough drugs
for herself she joined other pedlars selling
narcotics to school children, She personaily
knew a “couple of hundred” child addicts.
and had “unfortunately sold drugs to them.”

Miss X was more sorry about this phase of
her activities than any other, and told the ir,-
vestigators: “It’s pitiful to see these ycung
kids buying the stuff. I don’t think they know
what they are doing. I know youngsters who
go to department stores doing what they c.ll
“boosting” (shoplifting), and who are turnin’,
into burglars, Sometimes they take thir
young girl friends with them—12 or 13 years
old.” .

In her travels from one area to another in
search of narcotics Miss X met many tragic
young people whose lives had been ruine<
by narcotics.

4

BABY, TOO

Her frieuds included a husbana and wif
who thought taking drugs was just as norm:
as eating and drinking. “They even ended uw
giving drugs to their baby only 11 mon‘h
old. Whenever the baby cried they woul:
give him a shot of heroin to shut him up.”

She knew children of 11 who were selliny
drugs and other eight- and nine-year-old
who acted as errand boys for dope pedlars.

At Coney Island amusement park ‘she ha:
watched pedlars who were so desperate t
sell their stuff to “hike someone out of som
money” that they would accost any man o
woman in the street—whether or not they
were known addicts—and say, “Want any-
thing? Do you use horse (heroin)? Would you
like to try cocaine?”

And her own future? Miss X hardly dared
to be hopeful. Her gréatest hope at thc
moment, she tearfully told the investiBators.
was that her tragic story could help-to save
other young lives ‘from being sold into the

slavery of the drug habit.’
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TUESDAY, JULY 1,



1951





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Princess Alice Enquiry Ends

From page 3
Maynard was in charge there
were only 20 odd workmen and
later on Mr. Worrell’s pay sheet
shows 40.

Mr. Tudor: When Worrell went
off, the majority of his workmen
went with him. When he came
back he brought back some of his
and knocked off some of May-
nard’s. The i

number was in-
creased.
Attorney General: Can you re-
member whether this was in

October, November or December?
Was it when there was the rainy
weather ?

Mr. Tudor: The rainy weather
was October and November, and
it was just around November
that Lord Listowel and the other
Governors visited the island.
Acting Governor Perowne told me
then that he weuld like Lord
Listowel to open the pavilion and

I should increase the labour to
push ahead the werk.
Mr. Mottley: Mr. Tudor, the

Attorney General has been ask-
ing you why you got rid of
Worrell and you said on account
ef the labour question. Please ex-
plain that more fully.

Labour Costs High

Mr, Tudvi; . yveit the labour
bill was too high. The men were
working one on top the other, as it
were; and I felt I was not getting
enough work for the money that
was being paid out.

Mr, Motuey; Was it as a result

of pressure brought on you by
the Acting Governor ?
Mr, Tudor: He asked me to

force the work as he would like
Lord Listowel to open the pavil-
ion. As a result | allowed Wor-
rell to carry on with the number
of workmen,

The Commissioner: Did
Listowel come in November?

Lord

Mr. Tudor: Yes.

Mr, Walcott: Mr. Ramsay es-
timated for certain work that
year. What work was it?

Mr. Tudor: Mr. Ramsay estim-
ated for work at the Almshcuse,
Queen’s Park, and St. Barnabas
and thé work was done for half
the estimated cost.

Attorney General: | have been
informed that Mr. Ramsay estim-

ated for an 18 inch wall and
eventually a 12 inch wall was

built. Is that so?
Mr, Tudor: No,
The Commissioner: With regard

to the Almshouse ‘did yc cut
Mr. Ramsay's estimate in half?
Mr, Tudor; Yes.
Bhe Commissioner: Did you

alter the size of the wal! ?

Mr, Tudor: The wall was built
to the same dimensions Mr. Ram-
pay had given.

The children’s rocf too at the
almshouse was built for half of
the estimated cost. The work at
St. Barnabas too was also for half
of the estimated cost.

Al Auction Sale

The Commissioner: Did you at-
tend the auction sale?

Mr, Tudor: Yes.

The Commissioner; You bought
five huts. With regard to ,the
other seven were they bought by
various people ?

Mr, Tuaor:
from all cover
sale,

The Commissioner: The Ves-
try had decided that all work over

Yes, people came
the istand to tne

$1,000 should be done by con-
tract?
Mr. Tudor: All work over

$1,000 was done by contract ex-
cept the building at the playing
field. That was done by day's
work. f

The Commissioner: Don't you
think that as an ordinary busi-
nessman it was better to do it
by contract?

Mr. Tudor: I felt it could not
be done by contract, and the Act~

ing Governor agreed with me and’

said that it would have to be
done by day labour.

Mr. Ashby Churchwarden’s
Clerk, was asked at this stage to
produce the Expenditure Book for
the year 1949-50.

The Vestry voted that year
$2,400, he said, to repair the roof
of the children’s ward at the alms-
house.

Mr. Walcott: Did you know
or did you not, whether that was
Mr; Ramsay’s estimate?



Mr. Ashby: I cannot say if it
wns?
Mr. Walcott: How much Mr.

Tudor did it for?



{MPERIAL LEATHER @



—





Mr. Ashby: I see that $2,275.80
was spent, but from it was spent
$800 on a,wall and $78 on the
yard,







Mr. Walcott: Therefore you
only spent the difference betwee
$2,275 and $2,400 less $878, on the
root?

Mr. Ashby; Yes

The Commissioner: What about
St. Barnabas’ Church?

Mr. Ashby: That. year the Ves-

try voted $720 for repairs to St
Barnabas chapel’s boundary wall
and the same amount was spent

Almshouse Wall

The Commissioner; What about
the wall at the almshouse?

Mr. Ashby: The Vestry did not
vote any money for the wall.

Mr. Walcott: Have you got the
estimate?

Mr. Ashby: If Mr. Ramsay gaye
an estimate it would probably be

in the possession of the Vestry
Clerk.
Mr. Walcott: Mr. Redman has

just informed me that the Vestry
only decided on it and he has not
got an estimate.

Mr. Tudor, do you or do you
not know who made that estimate
for the almshouse ?

Mr. Tudor: Mr. Ramsay made
tne estimate and he made that
for St. Barnabas which was cut
from $1,800 to $720.

The Commissioner: The
voted 2,400 for repairs
children’s roof.

Mr. Tudor; This was a decision
on Mr. Ramsay’s estimate. This
was for the roof alone and had
nothing to do with the wall. I
spent $1,400 on the roof. Every
vestryman knows that Mr. Ram-
say’s estimates had to be cut and

Vestry
to tne

were cut. They were always too
high.
Mr. Pile, the Vestry’s auditor,

was recalled.

Mr. Walcott: You made certain
Statements and you searched up
the records of Mr. D. G. Leacock
during his tenure of office?

Mr. Pile: I searched ove bundle
and found on@ fvouchers which
would confirm * tHe point I had
made, It was Mr. Leacock’s
voucher. It was a small amount
of course and may have -been a
special case. It was a voucher in
favour of Dr. Hunte for an ex-
traction under Poor Relief. The
certificate reads: “I hereby certify
the above to be correct by the
the instructions of the Church-
warden.” That was signed by Mr.
E. C. Thorpe, Inspector of Poor.

Minutes Read

Mr. Redman recalled, was asked
to read a portion of the Minutes
of April 13, 1949, referring to Mr.
Ramsay. This referred to com-
ments by members of the Vestry
on Mr. Ramsay’s supervision and
his estimates.

Mr. Redman then said; “The
Board of Poor’ Law Guardians
look after the almshouse and they
have a clerk. Their estimates are
‘sent to me en bloc and are read
out at the Vestry table} therefore
I wotild not have estimates’ from
Mr. Ramsay. I would have no
details or estimates.

The actual estimates
by Mr. Ramsay never
me.

Tailor’s Evidence

Mr Rupert Squires, a tailor of
School Gap, Hindsbury Road, was
the next witness,

The Attorney General: Where
is your tailoring establishment ?

Mr, Squires: In James Street.

The Attorney General: Is it in
the same building as Messrs.
Hutchinson and Banfield ?

Mr, Squires: It is on the ground
floor of that building.

The Attorney General: Do sou
know Mr. H. A. Tudor?

Mr, Squires: Yes.

The Attorney General: Do you
know Mr. Mottley, Mr. Tommie
Miller and Mr. Victor Mayers ?

Mr, Squires: Yes.

The Commissioner: {t was said
by Mr. Cox that you told him you
saw Mr. Tudor, Mr. Mottley, Mr.
Miller and Mr, Mayet’ go into
the office of Messrs. Hutchinson
and Banfield on or about June
Is that so?

prepared
come to





Mr, Squires: No. i! never cold
him I saw them go in there.
The Commissioner: What dil

you tell him?
Mr. Squires: I told him I saw





Mr
of

H. A. Tudor on the morning
June 27 in James Street.

The Attorney General: Did you
tell him what he was doing ?

MT. Squires: I told Mr. Cox 1
spoke to Mr- Tudor and we had
4 conversation,

The Attorney
happened ?

Mr. Squires:
Tudor said
Station Hill
night ?”

The Attorney General:
did you say to that ?

Mr. Squires; | replied ‘no’.

The Attorney General: What
else did Mr. Tudor say to you?

Mr. Squires: He he was
waiting there for a to fix
some business, ;

The Attorney General: Did he
tell you what the business was ?

Mr. Squires: No.

: General: What
else

I told him Mr
‘So you were up
with Mr. Cox last

What

aid
man



The Attorney General: What
did you do after that?

Mr. Squires: I went in ‘to my
work.

The Attorney General: What
happened to Mr. Tudor after-
wards ?

Mr. Squires: I do not know.

The Attorney General: Do you
know if he went into the Soliti-
tor’s Office ?

Mr. Squires: No.

The Attorney General: Did you
see Tom any time that day? —

Mr. Squires: No.

The Commissioner: Did you
see Mr. Mottley or Mr. Miller that
day ?

Mr. Squires: | do not remember
seeing them.

Mr, Mottley: You did not tell
Mr. Cox at any time that you saw
Mr. Tudor, Mr. Miller, Mr.
Mayers nor Mr. Mottley together
in James St. on or about June’27
at Messrs. Hutchinson and Ban-
fieid’s Office ?

Evidence Planned

No



Mr. Squires: I told him

mst night (Sunday) that I had
heard on Saturday afternooa
that Mr. Tudor, Mr. Vincent

Griffith and Mr. Tom Mayers had
planned the evidence that Tom
Mayers had given at the enquiry,

Mr. Mottley: Was that all you
told him?
Mr. Squires: Yes.

Mr. Mottley: You did not tell
him that you saw Mr. Mottley, Mr.

Tudor, Mr. Miller, and Mr.
Mayers at Hutchinson and Ban-
feild on June 27?

Mr. Squires: No.

Mr. Mottley: If he said tha>
you teld him you saw us there
would he be lying ?

Mr. Squires: I] never told him

60.

Mr. Mottley: You said you told
him last night that you heard
Griffith, Tudor and Mayers had
planned the evidence given by
Mayers ?

Mr. Squires: Yes.

Mr, Mottley; With whom were
you discussing this matter on the
Saturday ?

Mr. Squires: With a popular
fruit vendor by Harrison's Mr. Mottley: What is her name?
Mr. Squires: Nicey Belgrave.
Mr. Mottley: Did Nicev Bel-
grave tell you anything ~ abou,
Miller and Mottley being in this

conspiracy ?

Mr. Squires: No.

Mr. Mottley: Did you ever men-

tion the names of Mottley and
Miller to Cox.

Mr. Squires; No

Mr. Mottley: Are you and Mr.
Miller friendly ?

Mr, Squires: Yes.

Mr, Mottley: Are you and Mr.
Mottley friendly ?

Mr. Squires; Not politically.

Mr. Mottley: How long have
you been working in James
Street ?

Mr. Squires: From June 15.

mr, Mottley: Could you see
anyone go into Hutchinsén and
Banfield’s Office from your work-

shop ?
Mr. Squires: No.
Mr. Mottley: You are very

friendly with Mr. Cox and you
assist him in doing business
sometimes ?

Mr, Squires: Yes.

Mr, Mottley: Can you tell us
something about the hut business ?

Mr. Squires: I read something
about it in the papers and I also
heard Mr. Cox say Mr. Tudor hac
told him a part was missing.

Drawing Vouchers

Mr. Mottley: Could you go back
a little farther than that ?

drawing the money from the
voucher ?

Mr. Mottley: Yes

Mr. Squires: One/day 1
went to My. Ashby the
Churchwarden’s Clerk, for a
veucher and drew some
money from the Parochial
Treasurer.

Mr, Mottley: Who sent you
to the Churchwarden’s Clerk?

Mr. Squires: It might have
been Miss Francis or Mr. Cox,
I do not remember who.

Mr. Mottley: You drew the
Money ?

Mr. Squires: Yes.

Mr. Mottley: To whom did
you take it?

Mr. Squires: Either to Mr.
Cox or Miss Francis.

Mr. Mottley: Do you know
anything about the tender ?

Mr. Squires; I do not re-
member carrying the tender
to the Churchwarden,

Mr. Mottley: What did Mr.
Cox tell you about the huts ?

Mr, Squires; He told me
part of the hut was missing
and he told Mr. Tudor to get
the Police.

Mr, Tom _Mayers was recalled.
Mr. Edwin Branch was also
called.

Mr. Walcott then asked Mayers
if Branch was the man who was
in Mr. Cox's car on the evening
he was in Station Hill near the
Joiner’s shop: and he replied ‘no’

This closed the evidence.

Short Address

The Attorney General then
addressed the Commission. He
said that he did not propose tu

address at any great length, They
had heard a great deal of the
evidence. Some of it was useful,
some of it was useless and some
worthless. They

had heard a
great many aecusations and
allegations, some positive and

some influential, but those things,
he submitted, whilst they might
entertain the public and might
provide some useful knowledge,
did not really help them a great
deal in arriving at any substantial
findings of fact about which the
Commissioner was charged to
enquire into.

The Attorney General at this
stage reminded the Commissioner
of his terms of reference with re-
gard to enquiring into the
Princess Alice Playing Field,

“You have heard that the Ves-
try is a Statutory body elected
annually. It has as its Chairman,
the Rector of St. Michael, Although
he is Chairman, he is not what
is looked upon as the Executive
Officer of this body. His execu-
tive duties revolve upon the
Churchwarden and have been so
from the time of the Vestry sys-
tem. Of course, there are other
Officers of the Vestry like the
Vestry Clerk and the Churchwar-
den's Clerk,” he said.

He said that money was made
available to the Vestry by the
vovernor-in-Executive Committee
out of the Welfare funds. He
had put it to Mr, Tudor at one
stage of the enquiry that it was
being suggested that this establish-
ment of the Playing Field was
not strictly a Vestry matter, and
it was obvious to him that ut
some stage of the proceedings it
Was suggested that it was possibly
one reason why the departure
was made from what was even
the recognised practive of dealing
with regular Vestry matters,

Act Amended

He had put it to him that the
Vestries Act was amended in 1948
specifically for the purpose of
giving the Vestries authority to
maintain playing fields. Subse-
quently reculations were made
under the Sugar Rehabilitation
and Labour Welfare Act for’
carrying out the purpose of the
Act and it could not be argued or
suggested by anyone that these
funds for the Playing Field were
not properly Vestry matters.

The Vestry of St. Michael,
having a large number — seven
playing fields, appointed a Play-
ing Fields Committee which
comprised mostly of members of
the Vestry with powers to co-opt
This Playing Fields Commitive
selected sites and made recom-
mendations and one was the
Princess Alice Playing Field, This
happened during Mr. D, G.
Leacock’s term of office as Church-
warden,

From early 1949 until 1950 very



of the about what had
happenex with regard to the
Princess Alice Playing Field

The Committee first functioned
on September 29, 1949, but dic
not function again except possi-
bly until February 1950. That was
the material time during which
the Princess Alice Playing Field
was established.

Vestry

“We have it on record from
the Miéittutes of the Vestry of
September 19 that Mr. Tudor
himself had informed the Vestry
of the purchase of one or more
huts by the Government from
Seawell Airport fot the purpose
of erecting a Playing Field.”

No Report

From September 30 to Febru-
ary the next. year, there was no
reference in the Minutes of the
Vestry of any meeting or report
of the Playing Fields Committee
because there was nothing to re-
port.

“It is a matter of opinion how
these things are done, but nor-
mally, one would have expected
that some member of the Vestry
would have asked the Chairman
of the Playing Fields Committee
what progress was being made,

because documents, letters and
communications from the Gov-
ernment through the Welfare
Office were being sent to the
Vestry. These were put to the
Playing Fields Committee and

seemed to remain with them.”
The Vestry might rightly have

taken the view that they en-

trusted this matter into the hands

of the Committee and the Com-
mittee, comprising of its own
members, therefore thought that

it could assume as far as the en-
\ire Vestry was concerned, that
the matter was being and woula
be properly looked after.

The Committee for reasons best
known to themselves did. not con
sider whether they should await
the summons from the Chairman
as the Committee did not fune-
tion very effectively after the
selection of the first sites.

“Undoubtedly you have heard
the allegation that the then Aci-
ing Governor had taken a prom-

inent part in | establishment
of this Playing Field, though an

allegation like this would not up-
duly weigh with you in your
findings of fact. Whatever may
be suggested, we have it*from a
person like Mr. Maynard who
was there throughout the time
the Playing Field was being es-
tablished that the Governor came
there and made suggestions like
the removal of a wall and the
tutting down of a tree,

“The Acting Governor was in-
terested in this matter. It was
the first Playing Field to be es-
tablished under these funds and
he probably was anxious to see
it was constructed as soon as pos-
sible,

H.E’s Suggestions

aye
any

is difficult to believe that
Churchwarden would follow
blindly the suggestions of the
head of the Administration
whether he was there in an act-
ing capacity or not. The Vestries
in this island are a law. unto
‘themselves 1 do not deny that
Mr. Tudor might have been in-
fluenced by the Acting Governor,
but in spite of any suggestions
that might have been made to
him, I still see that there are a
lot of things that he could or
might have done which could not
have led the Government to be
dissatisfied with the expenditure
of money which have been voted.

“I do not for a moment sug-
gest, nor have, I suggested that
Mr. Tudor has accepted or re-
ceived any part of these funds,

nor is there anything in the evi-
dence given before this Commis-
sion to suggest that.

“What I do suggest is that the
way in which Mr. Tudor handled

this matter and was allowed tc
handle it certainly would cause
the public, when rumour start»

to be noised abroad, to have con-
cern over the administration ot
funds of this nature.”

“Whatever reasons
en, Mr. Tudor had no right t
disregard the Committee whic!
was appointed for the purpose o
tuking some of the responsibility

were giv-

Added to that, there was hi
failure to use the Clerk of thi
Playing Fields Committee, Mr

Redman, who would have prover
a useful person in the signing o
the vouchers and Mr. Ramsay
the Building Supervisor.

“What reasons had he for no
using these officers? In the case
of Mr. Ramsay he said that the

Mr. Squires: You mean about little was found in the Minutes two of them could not get on,”






em
MORNING

Bir ®

become all-day misery!



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stomach ruin your morning, you can
“save the day” with Alka-Seltzer.
Take it on arising, again—if needed
~later in the day. Keep a supply of

quick acting Alka - Seltzer
handy — always!





















Segue &
@ just ARRIVED
lg PURINA CHICK

ga STARTENA & GROWENAS

H. JASON

3

PPE PFE Fe



<
OOO EEL ML _M LM ALLL LL MAL OL TN

Obtainable from

s
JONES & Co, Ltd. gy
Se eee

5

St. Joseph Has |

No Assessor



. |
St. Joseph's parish is now}
without an assessor Mr. R. A
Lee drew this fact to the atten- |

tion of the St. Joseph Vestry
their meeting yesterday

The yacancy for thé post of
assessor occurred when the St
Joseph Vestry appointed their’
last assessor to the office of Par-
ochial “Treasurer. some months
ago. Mr, Lee urged the Vestry to
take steps in the matter

Mr. A. P. Cox said that the
assessor has to work at the begin-
“ing of the year and that the
assessor’s work in the parish had
Seen practically done this year.

“We cannot appoint a new
assessor because the assessor’
work has to be done within tw:
or three months”, he said,

Mr, H. A. Carter said that i
was their duty to know if they
were acting legally to appoint a:
assessor and he was of the opin
jon that the Vestry should get :
correct ruling from their solicito:

Mr. W. R. Coward said that, ii
the interest of the rate payer:
he did not think it wise to ap-
point a new assessor if they hac
to pay the former assessor for the
whole year
. The Vestry decided to consult
their solicitors before taking any
further steps in the matter

£300 Loan Wanted

The Vestry agreed to advertise
for a £300 loan for the purpose
of completing the enclosure ot
St. Ann's Chapel Burial Ground.

After reading a letter from the
Colonial Secretary, the Vestry
appointed Mr, Hutson to serve on

at

pe ee



the Scotland District Conserva-
tion Board,

Present at the meeting were Rev
Malialieu (Chairman), Mr W eR Cow

ard «(Churchwarden)
M.C P. Mr A P
ere. Se

Mr J A’ Haynes
Cox, Mr L L Giil
Lee and Mr H A Carte



Two Years For
Stealing Cloth

His Honour the Chief jist
Sir Allan Collymore at the Con's
vf Grand Sessions yesterday sen
(enced Albert Went to two year

: ee ee

SPELEELPP IPL ALLEL PPL LPT



tuprisonment with hard labs
ior larceny,
Albert Went on April 5, 1651

‘tole cloth valued at $58 from
counter of DaCosta & Co, Lic
He has four previous conviction
for larceny and 19 minor convi
tions.

Mr. W. W. Reece K.C., Solicito; |
General, prosecuted for the Crow:

The prosecution brought 6



witness who said that he si, ;
when Went took up the cloti:|
from DaCosta’s Counter on Apri. |
0

We |

Went called on two witnesse, |
One said that Went asked him t







:

4,

44,

-

oF

five evidence. The other witness | *
said that he knew Went trom |&
childhood but they were oi|&
“personal” friends, x
Before imposing the sentence: ix
His Honour said that on many oc- | %&
casions false evidence had been|¢@
given by defence witnesses as u|%
result of the Police Magistrat, %
giving bail as if bail were a mat-|%
ter of right in every case and not
a matter which is in the discre
tion of those administering the x
Jaw. . S%
He sajd that during the last ?
sessions man with a bad record s
had committed a similar offence |
after having been given bail. His x
Honour said that people with a 13
record should not be given the | 5
opportunity of bail, ts
— x
| | it
| In VARIOUS COLOURS 153
at $2.98 each |B! <
gis
Also gulty %
| ; igi.
| s
Plastic Umbrellas fs
| $1.58 each | |
THANECS E:
Py)
Pr. Wm. Hny. St. Dial 3466 § | “





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BY CARL ANDERSON



anronrdlBariniieapremmpinnaensio-

BY CHIC YOUNG

3LONDIE-
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(~~ MAMA, QUICK
THERES SOMETHING
BURNING ON THE
STOVE AND DADDy



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20 “OTN Le Be lyst
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AT THE END OF THAT TRAIL. | D
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. . == |
KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND



HE'S BEEN |
GONE NEARLY
AN HOUR. .





OKAY, T WAS
TRESPASSING. WHAT



ET TING
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ABO 1p : = ad A
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THE PHAN BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES
ect cad ath THE TWO GIANT MAN-EATERS WA [WHEE DIANA BATTLES THE
f ra HEAD FOR DEEP: INTO WM) Muet RE WAVES ANDEDOIESY

7 | ALN *+HALF WAY ACROSS ++OHs+

UGHER THAN | THOUGHT











BARBADOS ADVOCATE











eee EEO
|
|
|
|

TUESDAY, JULY 10, 1951



A
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WINCARNIS

ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT
BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY.



TONIC

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TUESDAY, JULY 10,



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.



The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths Ackrowl-
edgments, and In Memoriam notices is

$:.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.



DIED

LEWIS—On July 9th 1951, at her resi-
dence Sharon Land, St. Thomas, Mrs.
Mercy Forde Lewis. Her funeral ieaves
the above residence at 4.30 o'clock
to-day for Sharon Moravian Church
No cards, Friends are invited.

Ralph Bascome, Muriel
Wilma Forde.
(American Papers pliase copy)

Forde

107.51



fe

eaprenalicteennen
IN MEMORiAM



SMALL: In Loving Memory of a dear
wife and mother Mrs. Lilian Small
who fell asleep on July 10, 1948

Happy and smiling always content,
Loved and respected wherever she
went,




















TELEPHONE 2508







FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72
| 96 cents Sundays 24 words
words 3 cents a word weer
word on Sundays.

cents and
over 24
4 cents a





AUTOMOTIVE

CARS— Vauxhall
dition new tyres,
hall 12 (Wyvern:
Barbados Agencie









14/6 in perfect con-
Paint etc. A.wso Vaux-
in good shape. Apply

Ring 4908.



| 10.7.51-—6n

—$——

| CAR—One (1) Prefect Ford in good
condition. 4 new tyres. Apply to M. C
James, c/o Bata, Swan Street

6.7.51—6n

CARS—1950 Morris Minor 10,000 Miles.
1950 Morris Oxford 9,000 Miles. Like
New. 1949 Morris Six 18 H.P. Low
Mileage. 1948 Ford Prefect 14,000 Miles
in very good condition 1938 Chrysler
| Royal A bargain Fort Royal Garage
Ltd. Telephone 4504.











































6.7.51—6n
rake
PHILCO REFRIGERATOR: 92 cubic

PUBLIC SALES











[
| saa eee
.
| REAL ESTATE
_HOUSE: Board and shingled 20 x 11
|< bie a wd shed 11 x 9, enclosed itu-
|} ated ‘Whhn’ St. Peter. Apply to Sylvan
iD c Skecte Dist E Station st

| Peter No reasonable offer refused
10,7. 5i1—2n



HOUSES: One Board and “Shinglea
House, situated at Green Field, St. Mich-







nel, 4% x 12 in good condition, and
also one (1) Board and Shingled House
in Mahogany Lane, 24 x 12 with shop
attached. For further particulars, apply
to Mrs. Agnes Hinds, Mahogany Lane
10.7.51—1n

DWEI£ING HOUSE called “ELLER-

SLIEW” with 3700 square feet of land
thereto situate at Chapman = Street
Bridgetown, nearest Whitepark Road) !
The house contains Gallery, Drawing
and Dining Rooms, two bedrooms, Break-
fast room, usual conveniences. Large
Basement. Electric Light and Govern-
nee — installed.
above premises will be set
sale by Public Competition at our ‘Smee
James Street on Friday 13th July 1951
at 2 pan. For inspection apply to Miss
Farmer the tenant between the hours of
3 and 4.30 p.m. daily except Sundays.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE, —











To a beautiful life came a noble end Solicitors.
She died as she lived, everyoody's ELECTRIC: 1.7.51—8n.
friend Fee ese —_—
Ever to be remembered by— S. R. Small “THE ROSARY” St. George (near St.
Husband), Aileen, Doris, Enid, Olga and] ft. Full width freezing chamber. Brand sares Rectory) — 5 miles from town—
Muriel (Daughtes J. & K. Herbert} new unit. Reconditioned throughout, | ©" 4 DUS route — 3 bedrooms, drawing-
(Brother and E. Small (Brother-} may be inspected at Leo Yard, Cheap- | 700%, dining room and breakfast room
in-Law) 10.7.51—In| side, Apply H. L, Smith, Sandford, | YeT@ dah on South Side. Company's
on | St. Philip. 7.7.51—t.f.n, | “2ter, Telephone and electric light -
THANKS about % acres of grounds surrounded by
REFRIGERATOR — One (1) Westing- | StoP€ wall on 3 sides — Solidly built of
a i oe ge | house, in good working order. Apply: | Stone with shingle roof. Garage for 2
a We eine ae ik a Seat W. R. Tempro, Phone 5044 or 8224. ae) pao a usual offices.
Oo se reaths, ers and cards 8 _ ery good orchar
of sympathy in my recent bereavement, | —__ eat wher Inspection on application to the care-
Alice M, SMART, 10.7.51—In} REFRIGERATOR— One Superfex oil | ‘ker.
ae not . burning Refrigerator. In perfect work-| Will be put up for sale by auction at
aye tat co trees cen triske what ne, Gees Sper tee Pera, ee lee ee ey on ey ee
Nank a b e ie Ss 9 — ated 2
atest weenthh: with us in our recent bereavement 1,7.€ hal
caused by the death of our ne MECHANICAL ———___—__—_ fo ere *
Allene. —_—_—_—_——_o_ ———_—_—__- POULTRY FAR includi
Fredica Alleyne( Wife) Eva Eudora MOWER—One Ransome Motor Mower,| bungalow; over an acre of land with 2h
Alleyne, Mrs, Neomia Griffith (Daugh | ute used. Apply J Connell Phone} entrancing View of the sea. Hatchin,
ters), Bliot, Darnley, Osmon (Sons), | 2353 8 7.51—3n. | equipment and other Poultry "appliances
Elvita, Cynthia, Allwin, Neville _erand- as well as present stock of chicks etc
children). 10.7.91—1n MISCELLANEOUS Gace occupation for retired man
- - a meee 8 eason for sale owner leaving tne
eee TO AREY SENN Nts ete AMM-I-DENT TOOTHPASTE Island. Persons interested write O
tendered us on the cetasion of the | .5tart saving your Amm-i-dent Tooth | Kelly. c/o the Advocate. — 10.7.51—1n,
death of Taphnes Hill late of cur paste Boxes. Within a short while you SH. ak ee ee
Cottage a own may be the winner of one of the follow- ARES — 30 Preference Shares of
Fdward (husband), Bustace (son), Clara, ; {28> , 1st Prize 350,00, 2nd Prize $15.00,| £100 each in Applewhaites Limited. 150
Inez, Stella (sisters), Linda (niece). | *70_Prize 98.00, 1.7,51—26n | Shares of £1 each in Knights Limited
* s : 107 Sin to be sold by public competition at the
. BLUE JAY— Corn Piasters Fresh | Office of the undersigned on Thursday



ANNOUNCEMENTS

—

HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—Isle of
Spices. SANTA MARIA-—loveliest hotel
in Caribbean, Rates from $7.00 per head
per day. ‘GRAND HOTEL-—in best resi-
dential district under Government House
hill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day.
SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing
Beach. Rates from $4.00 per head per
day. Enquiries to D. M. Slinger, Grenada,

GOVERNMENT





NOTICES

RESTAURANT AND CANTEEN
AT SEAWELL AIRPORT
Applications are invited from
interested persons for the estab-
lishment of a Restaurant and a

Canteen at Seawell Airport.

2. The successful applicant
will be required to enter into a
Contract for the proper carrying
out of the service, etc.

3. Applications should be sub-
mitted in a sealed envelope and
addressed to the Colonial Secre-
tary (and not to any officer by!
name) to reach the Colonial Sec-
retary’s Office not later than 4
p.m. on Friday the 13th of July,
1951.

4. The envelope should be
clearly marked “Application for
establishment of a Restaurant and
a Canteen at Seawell Airport”.

5. The Government does not
bind itself to accept any applica-
tion.

6. Further particulars may be
obtained on application to the
Colonial Secretary's Office.

30.6.51.—2n.





(FACILITIES) AT
SEAWELL AIRPORT

Applications are invited from
interested persons for the estab-
lishment of Booth (Facilities) at
Seawell Airport for purpose of
(1) Bookstall and News Agent
(2) Local Handicraft
(3) Novelty Counter
(4) Toiletries. F

2, The successful applicant will
be required to enter into a Con-
tract for the proper carrying out
of the service, etc.

3. Applications should be sub-
mitted in a sealed envelope and
addressed to the Colonial Secre-
tary (and not to any officer by
name) to reach the Colonial Sec-
retary’s Office not later than a
p.m. on Friday the 13th of July,
1951.

4. The envelope should be
clearly marked ‘Application for
establishment of Booth (Facili-
ties) at Seawell Airport.

5. The Government does not
bind itself to accept any applica-
tion.

6. Further particulars may be
obtained on application to the

lonial Secretary’s Office.
oe 30.6.51.—2n.

BOOTH

SE HABLA ESPANOL

ORIENTAL

| S, SOUVENIRS, AN-
co IVORY, JEWELS,

LKS Etc.

TIQUES,
SI

THANES

ear aeaaeaeeaaaananal
f0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

JOHNSON’'S STATIONERY
AND HARDWARE

will be closed
THURSDAY, JULY 12th

Stock-Taking |

SALE OE IIE
».
* x
S ASK... . >
* s,
3 YOUR GROCER x
e +
% FOR
s x
x <
% °
z »,
* JACOBS :
% y
% THE ORIGINAL $
> %,
$ AND STILL >
.
Â¥
% THE BEST %
%
. 1 1 wT ‘f &
© CREAM CRACKERS — §
*
% Supplies Always Available. %
2 x
% ® %
. x
»
& Stokes & Bynoe Ltd. %
’
x Agents %
% *
AAI IO OOOO OOOO OOOO




stock at Bruce Weatherhead Ltd
10.7.51—2n



COMBS & BRUSHES for Dogs. New
shipment at Bruce Weatherhead Ltd
10,7.51—2n



styles.
of good quality
KNIGHT'S DRUG

10.7.51—2n

CIGARETTE LIGHTERS—New
different shapes, all
and marked Cheap
STORES



ESTERBROOK PENS—We have them
—a'lso a few spare nibs. Call early
Knights (Pheonix), 10,7,51—2n



EMPTY TINS—A quantity of 10 lb. and

5 tins, suitable for holding plants.
Purity Bakeries Ltd. Dial 4529 or 3063.

5.7.51—5n.



FRERE PILGRIM SLING—You
get this from our Soda Fountain
(KNIGHT'S Pheonix) 10.7.51—2n

“FARM” POWDERED FULL CREAM
MÂ¥LK--Supreme quality and only $4.32
per 5-th tin and $1.00 per 1-lb tin.

et a tin to-day from your grocer
or Drug Store and try the best
milk obtainable. The 5-Ib family size is
really economical, Insist on “Farm” for
the sake of your health and your pocket.
If your dealer cannot supply, phone 2229,

27.6.51—t.f.n. |

can







GALVANISE SHEETS: heavy gauge 9

ft. $7.50, 8 ft. $7.00. Also Aluminium
Sheets 6 ft. 8 ft 10 ft At Ralph
Beard’s Hardwood Alley. 10.7.51—2n

LARDER—1 large Pine Larder in good
condition, suitable for Hotel or Guest
House. Reasonably priced. Phone 2169

8 7 51—2n

slater teiesiterrmnepretietenntinridin sane

NUT ROOL CHOCOLATE BARS—
These are in great demand. Call early
Knight's (Pheonix) 10.7,51—2n



RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing

...and we will order for you if we

haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,
Ltd. 6.7.51—t.f.n.
GENTS THREE PIECE GRAY TWEED

SUIT. Approximate size-38 Dial—8140.
10.7.51—t.f.n,







SPRING CUSHION UNITS FOR UP-
HOLSTERERS:—Ready packed in Burlap
(Bag!, each contains 42 Springs (6 rows
of 7 each) Dimensions 18” x 21”. Limited
Quantity available. Apply immediately
to: The Standard Agency (B'dos) Co.,
14 Swan Street, Phone 3620,



10.7.51—6n



TWIN PLEX SHARPENERS-—Sharpen
your Razor Blades with this well known
Sharpener—They get a Life time Edge
KNIGHT'S DRUG STORE 10.7. 51-—2n.

WELDING MATERIALS— Electrodes
in sizes of 6, 8 and 10's also bronze
steel and flux for Acetylene welding.
Enquire Auto Tyre Company, Trafal-
gar and Spry Streets. Phone—2696.

10.9.51—t.f.n.





~ GOVERNMENT NOTICE

APPLICATIONS FOR THE

ERECTION OF A WOODEN

CANTEEN AT GRAVES
END BEACH

Applications are invited from
persons who may be interested in
the erection, at their own expense,
and running of a Canteen at
Graves End Beach to be situated
to the South of the Government
Bathing Shed, for the purpose of
selling soft drinks, sweets, tea,
cakes, but not alcoholic drinks.

2. The building, the design and
construction of which will be sub-
ject to the approval of the Colo-
nial Engineer, should be of wood
approximately 18 feet by 20 feet
with a shed attached in front.
Rent for the land will be charged
at the rate of $2 per month,

3. The successful applicant will
be responsible for the water sup-
ply and for the disposal of waste
water and refuse.

4. The Canteen shall not oper-
ate when the Rifle Range is in use
and the successful applicant shall
conform to all military regulations
at such times.

5. No permanency of tenure is
guaranteed and the successful
applicant may be required to move
the canteen without compensation
at one month's notice.

6. Permission to erect a can-
teen will not be regarded as a
precedent for future applications
of the same type.

7. Applications should be for-
warded in sealed envelopes ad-
dressed to the Colonial Secretary
(and not to any officer by name)
so as to reach the ‘Colonial Secre-
tery’s Office not later than 4 p.m.
on Friday, the 33th of July, 1951.
The envelope should be clearly
marked “Application for the erec-



tion of a Canteen at Graves End
Beach”. \
8. The Government does not

bind itself to accept any particu-
lar application.

30.6.51.—2n.



To-day’s G. A. Song

“Home Sweet Home”

“Mid pleasures and palaces
though we may roam”
“There is no place like

If there
IS A GAS COOKER.



(Cash 10 7 51.

the 12th day July 1951 at 2 o'clock.
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
28.6.51-—8n,—
The undersigned will offer for
at their Office, No; 11,
Bridgetown, on Friday
July, 1951 at 2 p.m.
A parcel of land
square teet, situate
Hill, Black Rock, St
Dwellinghouse thereon, called “The
Nest” containing 2 public rooms, 2
bedrooms, with usual offices,
Inspection any day between
and 4 p.m on application
Walton, on the premises.
For further particulars, and conditions
ut sale, apply to:—
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
7.7.51-



salo
High Street,
the %th day of

containing 5,445
on St. Stephen's

Michael, with the

10
to

a.m,
Miss

8n.



AUCTION

Friday 13th at 2 p.m, at McEnearney
Garage—1935 Chevrolet Sedan Car, 1947
Piymouth Sedan Car. Both in working
order and suitable for taxi service. Terms
R ARCHER MCKENZIE,

8 7 S51—4n



Auctioneer

____ PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife ETTA EUDENE







SKEETE (nee Porte) as I do not nold
myself responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed
by me
SYLVAN D. C. SKEETE,
Dist. E. Station,
St. Peter.

10.7.51—2n
SS
The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife GERALDINE
HOLDER. (nee Blades) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone @¢lsé
contracting any debts or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed




me
FRANK HOLDER,
Delamere Land,
Stephenson Road,
St. Michael
19.7, 51—2n



WANTED

Minimum charge week 172 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word on Sundays.

HELP

CAPABLE HOUSEKEEPER-
vate home to live in. Apply to Box
No 00 c/o Advocate Advtg Dept |
Stating experience. 10,7.51—1n,





for pri-



POSITION OFFERED— Assistant re-



quired for our office Salary $40.00.
Applicant must have experience and
knowledge of cash and accounts.
Student with Schooi Certificate will
also be considered. Write stating quali-
fications and references '

Applications should be posted and not
brought in,
Johnson's Stationery

MISCELLANEOUS

10.7, 51-—-2n.





WANTED TO BUY
OLD SEWING MACHINE out of use
Good prices paid, Apply to Mrs. Vaughn,
Corner of Fairchild and Probyn Streets
10.7.51—3n

LOST & FOUND |

LOST

Two Plots bearing the names of Joseph
Mapp and Abel Emmanual Mapp. Find-









BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| FOR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
$6 cents Sundays 24 words — ovr 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word on Sundays



Seana teed

HOUSES

‘BAY VIEW”, St Lawrence Gap, fully
furnished, two bedrooms, modern
veniencés. Best sea-bathing. immediate

bossession. Apply next door to R. Lynch
















10.7.51

FLAT--At Coral Sands, Worthing. 1

modern furnished flat, good sea bathing

For turther particulars, Dial 8134. Alma

Lashley. 27.6.51—t.f.n.

.

FURNISHED — From August Ist.

*Clifigune” Garden Gap, Worthing. 3
bedrooms, garage, telephone
perticulars Dial 4304 between
10 a.m, 30.

ROOMS—Single and double, new



furniture —
Call

with breakfast
Telephone 4718

T.751—I3n

SMALL FLAT, partly furnished
further particulars Phone

For
8335, .
10.7. 51—2n







ck TO LET

TWO BEDROOMS Fully furnished
with running water, St, Lawrence Gap.
Fm particulars Dial 8459. 8.7.51— 2n







PUBLIC NOTICES |

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
~~ 12 vd by line on Sundays,
mintinum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays. *

PROFESSIONAL NOTICE
This is to inform my patients and the
public that my Dental Office will be
closed from July 9th and will be reopened
on July 28rd,

Dr, HM. HUNT.
8.7.51—4n
NOTICE '
APPLICATIONS for one vacant st}

Philip's Vestry Exhibition tenable at the
Lodge School will be received by the!
undersigned not later than Saturday}
14th July 1951, x

Candidates must be sons of Parishioners
in straitened circumstances, and must
be under the age of twelve years,

A birth certificate must be forwarded
along with an application form obtained
from the Parochial Treasurer’s Office.

Parents and/or Guardians will be
notified of the time and place.of the
eutrance examination,

P. 8. W. SCOTT,
Clerk to the Vestry,

St. Philip.
4.7.51-—n,
NOTICE
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT
OF APPEAL
Re: The Wesktapele Cembencntion, Act}
Notice is hereby given that Joseph’

Barnes, a labourer, formerly residing at

Morgans, St Peter, died as a result of )

an accident when employed at Vaucluse
Factory, Saint Thomas, and that com-
pensation has been paid into the Court,
All the dependants of the said Joseph
Barnes (deceased) are hereby required
to appear at the Assistant Court of
Appeal on Wednesday, the 25th day of
July, 1951, at 10 o'clock am
Dated this 2ist day of June, 1951
G TALMA,
Acting Clerk, AC A
23 6 51—3n



NOTICE

Applications for a vacant Bulkeley
Trust Fund exhibition tenable at any
first or second grade school of the Island
will be received by me up to the 14th
July 1951

Candidates must be sons of parents
in straitened circumstances having a
settlement in St. George or liable to
be rated there and must not be more
than 13 years of age.

A baptismal certificate and _ letter,
from the Headmaster of the schoo!
which applicant attends must accom-

pany application. Forms of application
must be obtained from me.
K. MASON,
Clerk, Vestry of St. George
10.7.51—3n



NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. JOHN

Applications for one (1) Vestry Exhibi-
tion at the Lodge School will be received
by the undersigned up to 3,00 p.m. on
Thursday the 12th July, 1951.

Candidates must be the sons of
Parishioners in straitened circumstances
and not less than 8 years nor more than
12 years old on the date of the examina-
tion which will be held at the School
at 10.30 a.m, on Friday the 13th July,
1961. Applications forms can be obtained
at my office during office days and hours
only. Baptismal certificates to accom-

pany applications.
R. S. FRASER,
Clerk to the Vestry,
St. John.
§.7.51—6n

ee
THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICULTU-
RAL BANK ACT, 194%

To the creditors holding specialty liens
against Roach’s Plantation, St, Lucy
TAKE NOTICE that I, the Owner of

the above Plantation am about to obtain

a loan of £300 under the provisions of

the above Act against the said Plantation,

in respect of the Agricultural year 1951 to

1952.

No money has béen borrowed under
the ‘Agricuitaral Aids Act, 1905, or the
above Act (as the case may be) in respect
of such \year

Dated this 10th day of July 1951.

Cc. ORMOND KNIGHT
Owner
10.7.51--3n



NOTICE

Re Estate of
ELLA LOUISE CRUMPTON.
NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or debt against
the estate of ELLA LOUISE CRUMPTON,
late of Hastings, Christ Church, who
died in this Island on the 28th, day of
November, 1950, are hereby required to
claims duly

er please return to Mrs, Mary Mapp fend particulars of their

Wavell Avenue, Black Rock. attested to the undersigned, c/o Messrs
10,7,.61—11 |cotte, Catford & Co. No. 17, High

— - Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors, on or be-





Lost in Bridgetown on Friday 6th.) fore the 15th. day of August 1951, after

which I shall proceed to distribute the

July, 3 keys attached by a small brass;
chain Finder will be rewarded on) assets of the deceased among the parties
returning same to the ADVOCATE| entitled thereto having regard only to
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT such claims of which I shall then have
10,.7.51—3n.| had notice, and that I will a0 ge table
4 ‘or the assets or any part ereof #0
POOL OOOODV ST PLOY Gistributed to any person of whose debt
or claim I shall not then have had
> nD wh notice
CHIROPRACTIC Dated this 6th. day of June, 1951
: T. T. HEADLEY,
é Public Trustee.
FECTIO! * Qualified Administrator of the
AFFECTIONS OF ANY OFTHE Estate of Ella Louise Crumpton.

NERVES IMPINGED AT THE SPIN
BY A SUBLUXATED VERTEBRA.

E

Drs. FERREIRA, “Chiroville”,
Upper Bay St. (near Esplanade)
Dial 2881. (Free Consultation)









7.6, 51—6n









FREE HOOK

which makes
*“*GOD’S WAY OF
SALVATION

con- |









) NOTICE
| TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC
| I the Undersigned do not hold vselé j
respec ble for a debt or debts
ed in my name except by written
Signed by me
ALVA WINSTON FORDE
Better known as
i WINSTON SMALL
! 8.7.51—2n
NOTICE

Re Estate of
| MARTIN LUTHER BUTCHER, deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that

!

























PAGE SEVEN
ee

OVERNMENT NOTICE

GOVERNMENT —NOTIC CHANCERY SALE

COMPENSATION TO FLOOD BARBADOS

VICTIMS The iderr a - J onpeets 1 be it the Regist

Se ee : as & ridgetown, between p.m. for the
oh R ape oy to _ is living cified below. If not ther set Bay an h
in the Parish of St. Michael whc ’ same pla during til sold. Full. particulars
suffered damage to their property PF t > me. ae
auring the floods on the night of eee eee yee oni ree

se \

August 3ist, 1949, will be paid at CHARLES SYDNEY EDWARDS Defendant
the Social Welfare Office, The] PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain plantation called Appleby in the parish of Suint
| Garrison. Payment will com- James and Islar foresaid containing by estimation twenty-three acres or
mence ‘at 9 a.m. on the following
days:
Monday, July 16—Persons whose

aly

persons having any debt or claim against
the estate of Martin Luther Butcher lite




























t

surnames commence with the
Letters A to H.





Forde



abut
deceased

hereabouts



lands of Eric

on

Carmichael on
White on lands of M.

Ro



James Main or however else the same may abut

lands of Dan Springer
lands of Edmund Brewster deceased on lands of Oxnards
of one Gaskin on lands of one
Gill deceased on lands of one Knight and on a public

und bounding on lands of E. Shorey on lands of Adrianna

on

Plantation on lands
Babb on lands of Joshua
road leading to Saint
and bound Together

with the messuage or dwelling house and all and singular other buildings ard













Tuesday, July 17—Persons whose erections on the said land erected and built standing and being with thi
of the parish of Saint Philip who died y sons whose eee thes Reditame ; . :
in this Island on the 22nd day of July surnames commence with the Ur ewe steak hereditaments and premises.

1950 afe hefeby required to send par- letter I to R. “Date of Sale; 13th July, 1951
ticulars of their claims duly attested to} Wednesday, Jul 18 Per. 7 7 ¢ H. WILLIAMS
the undersigned Louise Butcher the eo Se — £crsons Rexistiar ene
Administratrix of the Estate of the whose surnames commence ener Oe Chee
deceased in, care of mere Carrington with letters S to Z, and any- oe

¢ aly, as reet, ridgetown, " abe nity 7 = = . AES pe v7 oe i
Solicitors on or before the 15th day ot | one who has not yet been "

August 1961 after which date I shall pro paid.
ceed to distribute the assets of the Compensation will only be paid
deceased among the parties entitled there- ce ers ae . tie oe
of which { shall then have hag notice, |@lly submitted claims and whose a
and that T will not be liable for the 'claims have been approved by the ° °

ssets or any part thereof so distributed | Governor-in-Executive Commit- need tve ou
to any person of whose debt or claim aa Eac Pes
I shall net then have had notice tee. “ach person should bring . .

All persons indebted to the said estate| with him his birth or baptisma no anxtettes
ere pit. pp he to settle their indebtedness certificate and a_ certificate from Th *
without delay. ; i ere nig!

Dated thin 4908. dey Gf des 108 a Justice of the Peace or a Minis- need be no restless hts,

ter of a recognised Church stat- no tears, no baby disorders, if
_ LOUISE BUTCHER, ling the person's surname, chris- ou have Ashton & Parsons
Administratrix of the Estate of i z aot ‘ f ,
Martin Luther Butcher tian names, and the place where nfants’ Powders handy.
+ 18.6. 51-3n {he lived at the time of the floods Mothers all over the world have
‘ .
2 found them soothing and cool-
ing when baby is fretful through
are ABSOLUTELY SAFE, f Y/
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, = SSS
NEW ZEALAND LANE, LIMITED. Y
(MLA.N.Z.) :

S.S. “ARABIA” «@ scheduled to sai M.V. “Caribee” will accept cargo
from Melbourne 12th June, Brisbane 22nd and Passengers for enarte i ‘
June, Port Alma 28th June, Sydney Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and ER
July 4th, arriving Trinidad end July, St, Kitts. Sailing Friday 13th
and Barbados early August. instant ee

S.S. “FORT FAIRY" is scheduled to a 1
sail from Hobart late June, North Queens- _— ” i accept
land mid July, Brisbane end July, Sydney aa ST Phan a } = ae
early peer. See eae mid Seen Custh Grenada and Aruba, Pas-
arriving at Trinidad mid September, r a “ : 2 Vincent
| Cargo vaccepted on throusn mins ot 1H STNG priday 1th instant 0 FOR SALE
war rozen cargo,

In addition to general cargo these ; . we . House on Deacons Road,
vessels have ample space for chilled and B.W.I, SCHOONER OWNERS Stopped in 10 Minutes containing 2 Bedrooms,
Lading for transhipment a eee ASSOCIATION «INC, It ts no longer necessary to suffer Drawing and Dining Rooms,
to British Guiana, Leeward and Wind- pains, itching and torment from Piles open Gallery, standing on
ward Islands. Telephone 4047. since the discovery of Hytex (formerly 12,000 s ft t i land

For further particulars apply known as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to 2, sq. It. of good iand,

FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD. work fn +s retain and not only at with water well. Suitable

ss, -TD., = = the pain but takes out the swell- y kitchen garden.
TRINIDAD ADVERTIS ik ing: stops bleeding and combate nerve Sot = a yyy) 0. 0
B.W.1. ! tion thereby curbing other trou- rice; . Pe
= tiessint enix. are the be caused by Files such as Headechs. Mortgage can be arranged
D ; , ervousness, ache, Constipation ‘EC
BARBADOS ADVOCATE lone of energy, debility, and irritable eae
B.W.1. disposition. Get Hytex from your Phone 456: a
druggist today under the positive Over Knights, 33, Broad St.
guarantes Hytex must stop your pile 10.7.51—1n
pains and troubles or money back on Rs :
‘eturn of empty package. —

Alcoa, Steamship Ce

NEW YORK

8.S sails 8th June
A STEAMER 29th June





8S. ALCOA POLARIS ails 13th June
S. ALCOA ROAMEF ails 27th June
5.8. ALCOA PATRIOT” sails 11th July



8s
Ss







SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship
June

July
July

“ALCOA PEGASUS
“ALCOA PURITAN”
ALCOA PENNANT”

5.8.
8.8.
5.5,

NORTHBOUND

ss. "ALCOA PARTNER" due

i

accammodation,

* These vessels have limited



ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.

APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE
a











ait
26th
20th
LS

July

passen ger

SERVICE

Arrives Barbados 19th June,

A

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

Arrives Barbados 28th June,
Arrives
Arrives Barbados 27th July, 1951



CANADIAN SERVICE

Sails Montreal

h

13th





‘ ‘
‘
*

eo

1951

rrives Barbados 10th July, 1951.
—ineestapntans sien eee

6%,

4,

PPLE FOSS OOO

1951

Barbados 13th July, 1951

<9 9,

- eee CCE A

Sails Halifax Arrives B'dor

eer er

June 29th July 9th 6
July 9th July -19th i
July 23rd August 2nd »

‘

-

sails for St. Lawrence

River Ports.

LOOP EFT OES

*





OCS CSSSGSOS OOS





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June 28 June 15 July
July 18 July 6 August

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PAGE EIGHT



; G > ] { bE * clothes when he bumps ifito my . m i a a ee
é 1 ’ roth dekie volu me, and the sect, to say :
Regimen ( ain S Rando [ph urpin wy Ww Jackie's only a feather- ae ad ote ‘night ne . + '
| John White Shoes

In plain Brown, Black, Two-





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



weight—he doesn't weigh ten But he’s not a bebop fan.

you get

» : | stone in his winter overcoat. But Ligh i : i
| ‘a : } ; ight music and songs—particu-
I in Ss H O rs , this fellow is still groggy. He gog- larly those of the Negro singer
{ nN } j ’ a s ~wmnse gles at Jackie and he says: — Josh White.
i } I i [ don't know where

CABLE & WIRELESS who had scored 297 runs for the
loss of seven wickets on the first day of play, ended their




first innings at

"

N. Lawless hit 40 runs to top-

score for Cable and Wireless while



A. Cozier made the nex
score with 60.

For Spartan N. Harris.and E. G
McComie took three wickets each
for 57 and 79 runs respectively

In their turn at the wicket Spar-
tan have scored 158 runs for 9
wickets. N, Wood has so for top-
scored with 44, K. Sealy 37, and
E. G. MeComie 36. For Cable and
Wireless C. Lawless took four
wickets for 68 runs

At..the Garrison the Barbados
Regimént knocked up a total of
122 runs in reply to 87 runs made
by Empire in the first innings

When stumps were drawn Em-
pire had scored 97 runs for eighi
wickets in their second innings.

At Black Rock, Mental Hospital
gained a first innings lead on
Wanderers Wanderers were
dismissed for 156 runs in reply to
167 runs scored by the Mental Hos-
pital on the first day of play.

Mental Hospital in their second
innings ere now 110 runs for the
loss of six wickets. C. Williams
is not out with 45 runs and Skip-
per Carter not out one

The scores are: —





CABLE & WIRELESS vs. SPARTAN
AT BOARDED HALL

Cable & Wireless — First Innings

MeKenzie c aly b Gittens 4




8B. Matthew ec & b McCor 2
A. Cozler b Harris 60










R. Lawle ¢ Harris b Gitte Bt
Bs Or b Harri 2
Gilkes not out 4
Lawile b Harris {
D. I t ¢ Wood b McComie 10
) t run out >
Eg anker c Sealy b McComie 21
seale c (wkpr. Griffith) b Smith
‘xtra
Total 342
Fall of wicket 1 for 59
or 214, 4 for 251, 5 for 261, ¢
i tor 281, 8 for 318, 9 for 338

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Ww

Smith 12 1 4 1
Sealy 14 2 54 0
Harri 19 1 79 ;
MeComie 4 1 7 3
Gittens 13 3 37 2
Griffith It 0 38 0
Spartan -- First Innings
A. Gittens c & b Branker
S$ Griffith c Lewless b Branker 1
N Wood c ‘wk. Matthews) b C
Lawless a4
D. Morris b R. Lawless 2

QO. Coppin ec Sub b Lawless

N. Harris | b w b Branker 0

K. Sealy c Lawless b C

W. Jemmott c
c Lawless

E. McComie stpd. (w.k





C_ Lawless 36
E Smith not out 7
. Matthews not out 5

Extras 13
Total (for 9 wickets) 158
Fail of wickets: 1 for 5, 2 for 10

for 13, 4 for 17, 5 for 18, 6 for 64, 7 for
70, 8 for 135, 9 tor 148
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M RB. Ve

R. Lawles li 3 21 2
FE Branker 18 11 13 3
Cc. Lawle 21 4 68 4
R. McKenzie . 9 2 25 0
A. Cozier 4 1 6 0



EMPIRE vs. BARBADOS REGIMENT
AT GARRISON

Empire — First Innings 87
Barbados Regiment — First Innings
Phillips c wk. b Armstrong 19

342 runs on Saturday—the second day in
the second series of Intermediate Cricket matches — in
their match against Spartan at Boarded Hall-

Brathwa r y 26








Pinder Presco nstrong 1
Ishmael stpd b Amory 8
Watts |b w b Armstrong 0
E:iw b Spooner 14
Bispha ibw b Armstrong i4
Moe b Armstrong oh a
Marshall b Spooner 0
Parr not out 12
tichard b Pre 4 10
E 1 16
Total 122
Fall of wickets: 1 for 30, 2 for 34
or 34, 4 for i) for 64, 6 for 84 7 for
8 for 96, 9 for 9
Empire Second Innings
Taylor ¢ Bispham b Parris 12
B Bourne b Watt il

not out 0
ong b Watt 0
i rin out 3

B vw Fun out i
H c Watts b Pinder f
e Richards b Watt 12

run out I

4

Tota for 8 cket 9

i 1 for 25, 2 for 25, 3
5 for 41, 6 for 66, 7



BOWLING ANALYSIS

Oo 1 R Ww
Phillips 8 1 22 0
Richard 2 0 + 0
Par 0 ;



MENTAL HOSPITAL vy WANDERERS

AT BLACK f#OCK

Mental Hospital—ist Innings 107
Wanderers—tst Innings
WANDERERS FIRST INNINGS
©. Pierce c: Rock b. Knight 6





D. Alleyne Lb.w. b, Crichlow 12
I Mayers b, Carter 9
\. Lewis c, Carter b. Crichlow 47
B. Rolfe Lb.w, b Rock “6
Clarke Lb.w. b Rock 1

3 » not out 23

. r c, Chase b, Wiltshire 3
G. { ete b. Knight 13
L.. Greenidge c. Rock b. Chase » 30
Mi. Proverbs c. Wiltshire b, Chase )
Extras 5

Total ., ‘ -- 156

Fall of wickets: 1 ror #7, 2 for 18 3

for 24, 4 for 103, 5 for 1v3, 6 for 110,

/ for 113, 8 for 135, 9 for 153
BOWLING ANALYSIS
0 M R Ww







Carter ik 1 “4 1
Knight 10 1 29 2
c hlow 7 2 17 2
Roech 1 9
Wiltshire 5.4 4 20 2
Chase 5.4 4 20 2
ock 12 4 19 2
Mental Hospitat Second Innings
Vv foyee | bw., b Proverbs 0
“i Crichlow c Seale b Proverbs 23
Cc. Williams not out 45
Best ¢ Packer b Greenidge 3
J. Wiltshire b Greenidge 13
R Chase 1 bw, b Greenidge 8
R. Rock c Mayers b Greenidge 9
Carter not out i3
Extra 8
Total (for 6 wiekets) 110

Fall of wickets 1 for 14, 2 for 29, 3
for 4, 4 for 62, for 71, 6 tor 93

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M yo

lroverb 9 2 50 2 |
&keete 3 0 12 9
Packer | Re 10 «(OO |
Greenidge 7 1 19 4
Clarke 3 0 ll 0



Empire In The Lea
In School Game

EMPIRE are well on their way in obtaining an out-
right victory over Combermere at Combermere, as they
dismissed the schoolboys for 16 runs in their first innings
and replied with 75 runs for the loss of three wickets de-
clared on Saturday, the first day in the third series of

Second XI Cricket matches.

A good bowling spell by C
Beckles of Empire was perhaps
the main cause why Combermere
did not score more runs. Beckies
took five wickets for five runs
and G,. Downes three wickets
for three runs

Empire in their first turn at the
wicket had scored 75 runs for the
loss of three wickets declared,
thus giving them at least a first
innings lead.

When stumps were drawn
Combermere had scored 88 runs
in their second innings and had
lost eight wickets in doing so.



At Beckles Road, Y.M.P.C. bat-
ted the whole day against Wan-
derers to score 215 runs for the
loss of 9 wickets. B. Hoyos top-
seored with 60 for Y.M.P.C. and
C. Greenidge 34.

The most successful bowler for
Wanderers was R. Nicholls who
bagged 3 wickets for 39 runs.

Ps *

Police in their first innings
against Carlton at Carlton knock-
ed up a total of 165 runs with
S. Howard contributing a breezy
43 runs end B, Dodson 26 runs.
For Carlton H. Cox took five
wickets for 49 runs and G, Mat-
thew 2 wickets for 34 runs,

Carlton at the end of play had
replied with 54 runs for the loss
of four wickets. E. Denny, the
Police captain took two of the
wickets for nine runs.

* *

At Vaucluse Harrison Coliege

batting first scored 100 runs in
their first innings against Cen-
tral. T. Roach and Mr. Williams
were the best scorers for Col-
lege with 33 and 34 respectively.

When stumps were drawn Cen-
tral had replied with 84 runs for
the loss of nine wickets,

THE SCORES

Combermere vs. Empire at
Combermere

Combermere 16 (C. Beckles 5

for 5, G. Downes 3 for 3)
5

Empire 75 for 3 declared: (E.

Gill 19, M. Taitt 19, W. Maxwell

3 for 16),

Combermere Second Innings 88
for 8 wickets: (W. Maxwell 23,



S. Becki 2

2 for 19, V



Skeete 2 for 14.)



Harrison College vs. Central
Harrison College 100 (E. Ron-

ett 33, Mr. Williams 34)

Central 84 or 9 wickets: (Reid

4 for 23, Batson 4 for 20.)

Y.M.P.C, vs. Wanderers

Y.M.P.C, 215 for 9 wickets (B.

Heyos 60, C. Greenidge 34, R

Nicholls 8 wickets for 89 runs,

Ramsay 2 wickets for 29 runs,
Cheeseman 2 wickets for 47 runs,

Carlton vs. Police at Carlton

Police 165 (S. Howard 43, B.

Dodson 26,) H. Cox 5 wickets for

49 runs, G. Matthew 2 wickets

ior 34 runs

Carlton 54 runs for 4 wickets:
(BE. Denny 2 wickets for 9 runs.)

| They'll Do It Every Tinie _ Slenes 6 Cede





|/ COME AS FAST AS YOU CAN,
{ DOCTOR! NO FOOLIN’ SHE'S

REALLY SICK CAN'T HARDLY

IN MOVE JUST TOOK HER >
TEMPERATURE »IT'S UP 1

Te. TO 104 Bow

ech





"Wirra, wurra! wiFeys sick sn
SEND POR THE DOCTOR,
QUICK, QUICK, QUICK +++





ae
SSS



SE ae





2 for 23, G. Downes



Down THE ROAD COMES COC, CAREENING,
WHILE WIFEY DOES HER WHOLE
SPRING-CLEANING «+++

I CAN'T LET THE COCTOR SEE \/
ME AND MY HOUSE LIKE THIS»:
GET SOME CLEAN SHEETS
OUT OF THE CLOSET“GET MY
BEST SILK NIGHTGOWN:-
GET »---

Yhe strength from to hit me like

that T-just don't know!” He dees sometning to you says
atig sz ‘ cnow!

Turpin, fe gets his heart into his

TO PETER WILSON yersd "Tit stilt ‘Go Back so the GENE Fe rather, listen-to him



Champion Randolph Tur
pin fights Sugar Ray Robin
son to-night.

“Even if I make a world

champ,” he says, “I'll still go
back to the booths.”

My brother Dick w









WHAT'S ON TO-DAY

Police Courts — 10.00 a.m.

Court of Grand Sessions —
10.00 a.m,

Meeting of the Legislative

Council — 2.00 p.m.
Meeting of the House of
Assembly — 3.00 p.m,
CINEMAS

Empire: "City Lights"—4 45 p m
and $30 pm

Globe “Royal Wedding’ — 5 00
Pm and &§ 30 pm

Roxy “Rock Island Trail’ —
145 pm and 815 pm

Royal; “Laura — 450 pm. and
840 pm

Olympic: “Romeo and Juliet"
House on #2nd Street" — 4 20
Pm and 8% pm

Plaza’ (Bridgetown) “Breaking
Point’ — 445 pm and 9 30

pm

TO-DAY'S ASSIZE DIARY

No. 11. Rex vs. Edric Thomp-
son,

No. 12. Rex vs. Mervin
Lashley.

No. 14 Rex vs. Clotelle
Miller

The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 5.45 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.25 p.m.
se (First Quarter) July
Lighting : 7.00 p.m.
High Water: 7.41 a.m., 8.26
p.m,





YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington): 16
ins,
Total for month to yester-
day : 1.22 ins,
Temperature (Max,) 84.5°F.
Temperature (Min.) 74.5°F.
Wind Direction: (9.00 a.m.)
E,, (3.00 p.m ) E.N.E.
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour
Barometer (9.00 a.m,) 29.974,
(3.00 p.m.) 29.933.



By Jimmy Hatlo |





s 16 then
and beginning to do well in
booths and the smaller local
shows
He’d been an amateur—he won
seven fights and lost two—but
when he started making money
out of fighting we kids thought
we'd get in on it, too.
So they fitted us out with litfle
boxing gloves, dressing gowns,
embroidered knick
and everything like the proper
boxers had.
And we had proper fights, too.
That Jackie he used to thrash me
-—then I'd cry my eyes out

Just so as to ‘s
they used to bill us
and Mose”

3, boxing boots,

* the crowd
as “Alexander
| and the crowd would
| throw “nobbins’* into the ring
We used to sit up half the night
dividing them with George Mid-
| dleton, who finally managed
all, taking the threepenny bits out
to put in the bank for his daugh-
ter.

She’s never touched them and
she’s still got over £200 out o!



a RT Ce

MAGI HEALING OIL

An

than go out at night.
booths. And if anyone wants to I like to watch other people
take me on—well, I'll be there. dancing but I don't care for it
You know the old booth saying: much myself. I can’t really do it,
“Black, white or yellow—let 'em although I’m light enough on my
all come. feet in the ring.
erent wile : Randotph
fairpin is no showman in the
A phoney, glamorous sense of he | = MIOSe H Trust
word and his hobbies and pur- j
* suits are those of a kid who has . | like to fool around with the
always lived within walking boys. There's Jackie Worrall. He
distance of the countryside. used to carry me to school when
Heavyweight promoter Jack We Were nippers, and when it was
Solomons would have gone raining he’d put his coat over my
down to a fiyweight if he’d been head. He still does carry me
there the last time I saw Ran- around.
dolph. He’s got his own taxi now, and
he drives me to and from a lot of
He came im wearing a yellow ..¥ fights or when I’m giving ex-
sports shirt and a pair of riding hibitions.
breeches. He said: “I've just Then there’s Danny Hagan—we
been schooling a horse over call him “Dango.” I've known
jumps. The fellow with me—he him for years and now he’s more
used to be a National Hunt or less appointed himself as my
jockéy—he didn’t half come off “bodyguard.”
a wallop.” 7 c
idn’ 7» I like the folks I’ve grown up
- — ‘he woe bate pe with. You can trust them. They
the one to come the cropper. were friends before _you were
It's that lack of imagination famous and they'll still be your
or at least of brooding anxiety friends even when your name
which may well stand Randolph 8" t in the headlines. if I
in good stead as his big test on , That’s why I always knew i
July 10 approaches. turned professional there could be
only one manager for me—George
Another of his favourite hob- Middleton. He used to live in the
bies cost him dearly for, al- same street as us. We've all come
though it's not widely known, Up together.
he is more than slightly deaf as *Nobbins, the coppers and small
a result of an accident while he silver coins thrown into the ring
wds swimming. He says:— after a good serap.
I was only a kid at the time LES.
and I’d played truant to go swim-
ming in the river. I was always va
fond of swimming and diving and i
those threepenny bits. I toa I was showing off, diving Sports Window
I've never got the feel.of the in and seeing how far I could
booths out of my blood. We al- swim under water. WATER POLO



ways went to Hickman’s. It used Anyway there was an under- This “afternoon at the
to be run by Charlie Hickman. water stump and somehow - or Aquatic Club the two water

He was a heavy-weight with other it got caught in my swim- polo matches to be played
the heck of a punch before the ming trunks. are, Harrison College vs.
war. They say he was descended Pe. Police and Whipporays vs.
from “Gas” Hickman, one of the I struggled and struggled but I Barracudas. The referee is
most famous of the old bare-‘couldn’t get free. I thought I was Mr. A. Clarke.

knuckle fighters. going to drown. “In the end, with
( my lungs bursting, I got to the

surface,

A Secret “You' know how itis. 1'@ for- YACHT CLUB TENNIS

T’ll tell y something you don’t #otten about it the next day. ut

know. 7 Tred Leute: Stone ea) ager a time I peer ee I wer TOURNAMENT
last fight, against Jackie Keough hearing so well and when they
at the White City, Iwas lined up t00K me to a doctor he found out YESTERDAY’S RESULTS
with a lot of the booth fighters ®bout it and told me that the





accepting challenges from anyone Pressure ct the water had affected Ladies’ Doubles—Finals
in the crowd. i ? my e@ardrun’s. Miss G. Pilgrim, and Miss I).
Sure, they told the erowd who Wood beat Miss L, Branch and

mh 7 ao PETEK WILSON; Possibly Miss M. King 6—3, 6—0.
I was, but a lot of the fellows 1 sas ; :
didn’t believe I'd be there. There ‘hat aoe Turpin’s voice Men’s Singles
was one in particular. He kept on YY : cd a ously war one © Godfree beat C, B. Lawless
yelling out that it was a fake. hie pos sd eure soe Wun ge) 78,
That I was’nt really Randolph vis husky bronze frame. WEDNESDAY’S. FIXTURE

on . lve only heard one other
furpin. ' . ‘f ° ¢
In the etd when the barker fighter with a voice which Mixed Doubles

aaa ne bed tiik . : , eracks in a similar way. His Miss G. Pilgrim and G. H. Man-
or ~ ee ti heed aie name—Jack Dempsey. ning vs. Mrs. D. Worme and
tine (ah, Fee: A Randolph, as I've said is a W. A. Crichlow,
The , tell him I really am me youngster with simple tastes but
but he won’t wear it and in the when he likes something he



end we got in the ring together. ihe lot of it. Musie for in- WINS BY K.O.
Well, after about half a minute . :
somehow or other he gets his jaw In his house in Hanworth- BUENOS AIRES July 9

in the way of my fist and he goes road, Warwick — the Turpins Archie Moore, the veteran Uni-
straight through the ropes. moved from Leamington to ted States light heavyweight
“nh { Warwitk when Randolph was a Saturday night, knocked out Ar-

Let “Em All « ome toddler—he has two giant ra- gentina’s heavyweight champion
. : diograms in adjoining rooms. Alberto Lovell in the first round
They're helping him back to the Owing to his deafness he of a scheduled 12-round non-

, place where he’s left his street tunes them up to maximum. title fight.—(CP)



















‘ — ay

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MY HAND

I'm holding an excellent product.
A product. that I have no hesitation
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person Its got everything. In
the first place you can take it for
coughs, colds, colic or diarrhoea.
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thirdly you can give it to your
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What more could you ask of any
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MEALING

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 4TH

y kind permission of the Commissioner of Police

MUSIC by

THE POLICE DANCE ORCHESTRA

Fancy Dress Optional
including Light Refreshment



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Mr vy PHOEN!

: wee a
ANNUAL DANCE |

On WEDNESDAY NIGHT llth





Jul 1951, which was to be held
at the Childrer Cooc 1 League
but wi r t held at the
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Musie by Perey Gteen's Orchestra

ADMISSION %-

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See |



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TRAST Was



Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE Tl Isl) \\ j( I N II!. INI Regiment Gain 1st Innings Honours I v. ended their on Saturday—the second day in the of Intermediate Cricket matches — in then mail : n A %  *c.red with 44. K. S*-:i|y 37, > and foui i-iru hi ;he Garrison the Barbados RCfcnr" tal Of Its rui i" . %  made ; I . %  %  %  %  %  When sttrnp* were cirnwn Erri B If in Their second inning". At Back R< k, Meni il H I t Innings h I ; i ml) to loT nn pital on UM rtrit day of play Mental H Mond inning* ere now 110 run* fir the loss Ol it* Wicket*, C. Williams Randolph Turpin Talks Of Himself TO PETER WILSON Tot..I i l>>'" " &f •< I.I.IM, i. firr,. % %  Amorv not OUT %  I %  lor I for 1 % %  ; flOWl tWO AN LI Thf scores are — I'hllli*. 1 1 SS < • \tm a wiKiii" •• MWIX-. ia 4 n L Pain. • 1 \I HfMl'MI "Ml HK.I ISMNt.-, **aiy ii UcCottu* kpr OufBihi h Smith I 1 D K"lht %  %  'l 1.' i 1 Mow MM % %  as M Clarke Hi* t> Bofk 1 | (M IT. 5 ;,.. J14 4 fin -M fur JSI C lor .an. n( *i.it n < t'arlo-r %  Ch. b, WHt.hirr j (..' Ml, lor 111. 0 for IN %  %  13 %  %  Snniti 1* ? 1 H I %  final Bkjals M S *4 %  lit,.. IV 1 7B Total ., IN i i n 1 ( TOI tT. I for IB, >>nii~ -i "1 bMkati .... ; %  *. 4 m. • (< % %  in for IIS. %  i 1 " IM. INAI M N w..-i iwi KMOM %  (1 M If v> H 1 19 1 S O CWpjili. c tub b U<*lr 1 fiftftf 9 4* SO 1 1 ...M. %  i I nrk II IB 1 C Law-*..-. ID not out i Matthew t a i (' William 4: n 1 .-, 1. f.rernMUr ) wiltttmr i (ireenilae 13 Total tl-r % wtofcMaj in i| Chaae lb..h OramldM it Rock i• %  wx-krli1 far fr I) < for IT, %  Ml 1". n to. M : lai IN w na M* n<>wi.iNO ANALYSIS r.tat ifoi wifkei-i 111 w %  Lawk 11 3 21 Pall .-f ketI f.>r 14 S r B>, 3 r lii.i.k.i la II IS J tat Tl. f. l.-r t:i II 4 at it M. Kant a I 11 V | 1 4 1 . il M R W 1 HI'llll ill\*HAIIO>. 1 1 I'll KT U AT GAkaiaoN .-il1 li 11 I'arker S 0 10 0 1 mol.f — rtt.l Intilai. ; nait4 B.tin**at — rir.t InnlM.....UT 1 It Mh b Aimalmna i laiku i il a %  ' •N-iW Jackle'i only a (eatheiweight—hr rloeen'l wrtgh ten nil winter overcoat But •hi: fellow la sllll yrofgy He aogfackhl and he aaya: — l I know where you get gtn from to hit me like I ;ui don't know!'' tin thampton of the wrrld I'll still |o bark lo th IICJ itis And If anyone wants to ia> me on—well. Ml be there i< i know the old boot' .lute or yellow—let '*nt .1! tome." PS1KR WILSON Randolph farptn If no flioimtan in the pmn*v, glaniorou aens* of Ih.i.".fd und hu hobbies and pur' fiifa ire those of a Kid uho has always hved U'lfhin u'allclnrj dliffliire of the cOAintryiidr. irrohr promoter Jack is i.-., i, id hare gone .MMTI to a flmrright if he'd been rfietV f*ie last firnc / iflw Ra>irliiph. lie eamt In weartna a tiellote spons shrrf and a pair of ridtny //'• aaid: "Vvt imt been schoolina a horae orer jumpm. The felfotr ti*lth me— he used to be a National Hum %  "rki-v—he didn't half come off Champion Randolph T'ir pin flithti Sugar Ray Robin %  on lonighl. Even if I Btaka a world th.Tnp." he -.ay*. -1*11 -till go bsrk to the booth*." My brother Dirk araa m then nncl bt-KinniiiK to do *rtU in the. Hid the 5m;. i. dhim .,'. %  u i •rhari ha inj money 0U1 of Bl Mil i UlOUfhl %  % % %  iout with Uttle I llni boots, like IIM in .in b-iXillR Kl< Idj re-i-' !" The t.. R Nlcholla who bagged 3 wlcatetg for 3 U runs 100 (E. It' rit 33, Mr WUUarna 341 Central HI ..t n wicketg (Raid Police in Uvtil Aral innings 4 fl > %  "''"• %  ,0 f '" -" I Carlton al Carlton knockv .. ,, .. — %  —ed u|> runs with *' '..„.. ^' %  S Howard contributing a hreezy lt •' I Dodaon M runa. ,..,. %  M, R rlton il. Cox took %  i %  .. %  for 49 runs and O. Mat* thiuv 2 wickets for 34 runs. Carlton at the end of play had tarllon vs. I'lilif-e ut Carlton .. ;th 54 nins i"i tink>*. Police 105 (S. Howan IS, I of four wickets. E Dennv. thr Dedeon M,j H. Coi Police captaJn k %  the 40 runa, Q Matthew I wlckeU lor 3t • u, for 4 wickets At Van Hai on i oHeaje > %  -...n. 10.00 .in Met ling of |he I^gMallve Council — -'00 p.m. Meclini; of Hie HOIIM of rianaably -3.oo p.m. C1MM \-Ti.U' — I p >n | p aa Mi IIM's \ss|/| IHAKV No. 11. Rex va, Edrle Thump No. It. Laahlei Mrrvin ( lutelle i c ar got the feel of the Ixsoths out of my blood We al* It used to be run by Charlie fflckman. %  mht with the back of i punch b> I war They Ml he WaJ %  from <;.~'' Mickman, .me of the most famous of the old bareknuckle ItgJ \ Serret III tell you something you don't know, Throe woaki befon nu last light, iiguinttt Jackie Kcough at the White City, I was lined up with %  lot of the iKKith lighters eballengn from anyone in tlu crowd. Sure, they told the crowd who I was, but a lot of the fellows didn't believe I'd be then I hi > %  was one in particular. He kept on yelling out that it waa %  fake, That I was'nt realty Randolph Turpin. In the n.d when the barker asked for challengers this fellow comes up and says' III have him" pointini: at ne They tell him I really am nil, but he won't wear it and In the %  i | got in the ring together. Well, alter abOUl half •Olftehow or other he gets his Jaw In the wa %  I he goes straight through the ropes. I.rl Kn All Come They're tu-lplng him back lo xttm plaei where heleft icallop ft didn'f seem lo oeeur to Tur. jn r'taf he rtuohf have been the one to cotne Ihe cropper. It's Ihot lack 0/ irnavI'Mlfiori. or at Iea of broodlnp anxiety Men i'ia|f i.-eil stand Randolp'i In good sirad as his big test on idrg I" approaches. Another of his faeourKe hobbies cosf him dearly for, although Hi nol iridefu known. 1 a i" (-ire ihfln sllphrlb deaf as •i resulf of an acctdenf trhile he %  HI atrioiriiing. He says. I was only a kid at the time and I'd played truant to go swimming In the river. I was always *ond of swimming and diving and 1 suppose I was showing off. diving n and seeing how far I could wim under water. Anyway there was an underwater stump and somehow or other it got caught in my swimming trunks I struggled and struggled but I couldn't get free. I thought I was going to drown. In the end. with my lungs bursting, I got to the i face You know how it la. I'd forgotten aboul it the neset day. But ;Jtcr a time 1 noticed that I wasn't hearing so well and when they artok me to a doctor he found oul boul it and told me that the pressure cf the water had affected %  ) enrdrub s. PETER WILSON: Potnbl,, at explains Ttirpin's voice ufMcil is curloiislp soft and high-jtifefird in contrail triHi Ms hiist.i/ hrrm:e franit'. / Pe mill* heard one other fighter in.h a voice which crackf in a trmilar icag. Hi* name—Jack De-npaey. Randolph, as Tre said is a t'oungeter urifh simple tastes but iclten he likes something he likes a lot of If. Music for instance. '. to sail 'he leosf of it. is aasBOBl map as a Randolph i Bur he's not a bebop jar. LaeJM mbstc and mnai —particularly those nf the Negro ringer Josh U' He dc*- someimr.g to you aays Turpin. .te ^ets his heart Into his kinging. I'i rather listen to him than go out at night I like to waieh other people ilaneing but I don't tare for U il I cant realh do u. although I'm bgh 1 enough on mv feet In the ring. I Iss4 I Irnsl 1 like to fool around with the bovThere's Jackie Worrall He used to carry me to school when we were nippers, and when it was raining he'd put his coat over my herd He still does carry me around He's got his own taxi now. and h* drives me to and from a lot of .v fights, or when I'm giving t hibilions Then there's Danny Hagan— call him "Dango" I've known him for years and now he's more or less appointed himself as my "bodyguard." I like the folks I've grown up ,Mth You can trust them. They were friends before you were lamous and they'll still be > f i lends even when you isn't in the headlines. That's why I always knew If I turned professional there could he manager for me—George Middlcton He uned lo live in the same street as us. We've all come up together "WnbWns, the coppers and small silver coins ihrou-n into the ring offer a oood scrap. L.E.S John While Shoes In plain BMI-H. Black. TwoTone. Suedr. I ..it.-! Flc From M.33 to W.2J only \. \i %  •hipmeiii arriving 1* 5a. MORE. Be wt*e and BCY NOW al . I II t M \ fr. m. liny. St. Dial 3466 IIA It X DANCE Al THE CRANE HOTI I. stlthbAV tfJGtCT 4TH the Cumni" MUSIC by Till POLICE DANCE ORCHESTRA Fancy Dress Option-1 • Dre?;i Informal AdmkMinn : Sl.eo Including Light Itelre-hmert Sports Window WATER POLO Thla afterruBon at the Aqna-Ue Club the two water polo in itiii'to be plated are. Harrison College va. Pollre and Whlpporaya vs. BarraeedaH. The referee is Mr. A. Clarke. YACHT CLUB TENNIS TOURNAMENT YESTERDAY'S RESULTS t. "iir Double*.—Finals Miss G. Pilgrim, am: afj Wood beat Miss L. Branch and Miss M. King 0—3. 0—0. Men's Singles Ci Codfree beat C B. 1-awless t: 4. 7 5 WEDNESDAYS FIXTURE Mixed Doubles Miss G. Pilgrim and G. H Manning vs. Mrs. D. Worme and W. A. Crichlow. In his house In ffamroethroad, WaruHck — the Tiirpins iruwed (rotri Leaminglon 10 H'nriciclc u-hen Randolph waa a fuddler—he haa tir-o gianr radiograms in adjoining rooms. Qurf-tg to hit deafness he fhc up fo WINS BY K.O. HUENOS AIRES Ji.lv 9 Archie Moore, the veteran United States light heavyweight Saturday night, knocked out ArgenUna's ^heavyweight champion Alberto Lovell In the first round of a achedulcd 12-round nonlitle fight.—(CP> I IAHI'WH llvach Mil I S Very attractive shorts with Jitter Bug Shirts In bright colours sr,JH> $6.76 Cave Shepherd & Co., Lid. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street. — — The Weather TO-D.V BU l:..r. : 3.43 ..m. Sun Ml : MS .m. Mi.ou IIM llim.rr. ..... It. l.llhlhIK I : " p.m. Mil. JPalari Til am.. %.ZR P-m. IBBIIIIMI lijl.i.jll <( ,Ktrli.,l,.n> : .11 in.. ToUl Inr monlh lo \rsttrd> : 1.22 in.. Temprralur. IM.X., 81.3 I'. Trmprralurr I.Mln.. 74.3 P, Wind nailllllM 19.00 .. in I . | .... l INI Hind Vflorllv : 8 mili-s PIT hour K.rumi-W'r 10.00 A.m.) J'.i.i:!. 13.00 p.m.. 10.933. They'll Do It Every Tim e • ~— By Jimmy Hatlo fliRRA, MJRRA MFETS SC< SESC R3R Tl-i= DOCTOR, QUICK, QUICK, QJIC<—OU CAN / DOCTOR. I NO FOOLIN: SHE'S REALLY SICK-CANT HARDL V AOVE-JUST IOOK HER T[!*peRATLj^E--.rrs UP RIGHT IN THE PALM OF MY HAND I'm holding im excellent product. A pioduclthat I have no hesitation in i.i'.rnmcnding lo any practical person Us got everything. In the Ant place? you can take it lav coughs, colds, colic or diarrhoea. Secondly, you can use il for cuts, bniisw, strains and sprains, and thirdly you can give it to your stock an.l poultry What more could you ask of any product. It's ynur" first-aid kit in .boulo. U H Ma-gfi Ufuliitfi on MAGI HEALING OIL YOU SAW 3 WHY'S when you operate these fow-coit Alorrif-Commerc/af 25/30 cwt. trucks J & R BREAD & CAKES P0H. CONSUMPTION IS I.OWKR due to lugh-cfTi.icncy. earnmy engine which develops 42 b.h.p. MAINTENANCE COSTS LESS rugged construction el Ou -.*i-. gesrtios and engine withstand* harden working conditions, means fewer overhauls. REPLACEMENT COSTS ARE LOWER IH—I Mil ill (jtmrticrcul trucks are built iu stay 00 the job tonger 25/30 cwt. van Reduce delivery eons with this smaii,economical JS locwi.vjii. Ovcr-slzc capacity 245 cub. (6.9. cu.m. solidly built for hard work, sliding cab doors, lull-width rear doors, access to load from driver 'a MDRRIS-COHMERClAi FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributor. Phone 4504 HMTIX Trrailr-sriisi WAIIBOAKD IV thick. A' x 8'. 9'. 10*. 12'. lerailf-iiriMif STA.NDAIII) HAKIIHIIARD '„" thick. 4* x 6', 8'. 10'. 3'16" thick. 4' x 8* I.'i'i:iii.'-|ir.il TEMPERED HARHIEOAKI) I'lll I! FINE & DOIGLAS FIR JOISISk PLANKS i-, i i Viill \i,l BOILS & NUTS '. '.varlou, WmUw Phone 4456, 4267. Wilkinson & Haynes Co.. Ltd.



PAGE 1

fiajdralrtt ESTABLISHED 1895 TUESDAY, SI i in. IK Korea Showdown Talks Begin At Kaesong City Armistice Expectedr^r^y Ems AFTER Wednesday July ll| SEVEN DAY HEARING I HOI Ik I I VI SI AWIII TOKYO, July 10 \ hLIKD and Communist negotiators began their history making conference in Red encircled Kaesong Tuesday to write an "honourable end" to the Korean war The five man United Nations truce team arrived in the ancient South Korean border city by Helicopter and went into immediate session with the five man Communist group. Before taking oft from the United Nations advanced peace camp Vice Admiral C Turner Joy, No 1 Allied negotiator, told reporters he would act in good faith to bring about an honourable armistice A pencilled copy of the Admiral's statement heavily underlined the word "honourable II i mphastaed ihnt must be satisfactory, to mmand. truer had slated hehoped on armistice could be acl Wednesday. Bui General Matthew I; Ridgway said he had no idea how long it would t-' l>efori> FMUlM were obtained. B m the peace camp %  aid 'lut Allied helicopters began Liking off at f.45 a.m. for a short Might to the ancient Korean < a pita I of Kaesong, 34 miles vest of Seoul. Dispatcher Indicated that the Right had t:ik-ii place without %  < hltdl, and said the meeting was I I no indiI how long ihe showdown in hist. Joy took off with oneother American Admiral, two American and one South Korean k %  (oi talk.-, with ihe liveman Communist team hi Oaneral rfamll of the North Korean Army Peiping radio disclosed only T.u-N't;i\ "i.ilin n.id added .mother member to theh lOafl North Korean General Chans D tan. The advanea guard rat tha United Nations wag i trucks and Ihraa jaepg food and suppllM through no-man's land with bayoneted Chinas*) rifle* Personnel in |ht ronVO* Included one army still photographer and one army movie photographer. Four haUeoptai i w at dn advanea paa ca baai south at Kaeaong at fl 35 The bad \ ] gald that at the beginning, that a limited number of nut phoiographers. probably sixteen, will be permitted to go to KaesonK.—t' p. SIX MONTHS JAIL .1 .'. %  YORK. July 9. W Mnnlon. negro phlloaophy araa aentarieed to nix month-' imprisonment on Monday night for contempt of court. —I'.P. No MoTe Arms For Red China AftUB T£US U.S. HUSTON. July tf. Brilif.li Prime Minister I Ian -i Attle. told the Massachusetts Legislature In a letter made public to-day that Great Britain has taken "extensive mi.'ui. i r.erlals to Ked China and other Communist al A aaarl letter read by W. W. Stratton Flint was prompted by a passage by the Massachusetts House resolution calling on Great Britain to slop exporting vital w.n Communist China. Attlev's reply addressed lo the Secretary Of State said that Great Britain has "applied more leatl actions on trade with Communist China than an) othat eounto the worl.i except the United States." **Wa nava completely prohibited ihe export of arms and armaments and goods and commodities of sUral—ic Important.-* to a numbei of dr-Ktlhations which cover tin v.l,,.I, of the Soviet bloc and the wuN of China.'' Atllee said the Hongkong Government has imposed total prohibition on expori to r|. more than ?O0 items of Industrial equipment including machine tools, certain steel prod per. brass, rabbet 1 tyrea %  td tubaa and electrical davit Tin-, snu doni despite the -obVtOUBll high degree to .vhiiii Hongkong's economy depeniK on anftda vuth China.—U.P. THf : H FfCEfta ALICE Playing Held Enquiry ui Communuoney Sir Clement Malone, ended in the Le^isln-1 ( uncil Chninbdf ywUrday after a seven-day rifting.! Over thirty witnesses were heard at this enqutrj Al tht' end tn QuB iVldence, thr Acting Attnrnev Oen-i eral, Mr. E K Wulrott. and Mr. E. D. MottleV made* addresses. The Acting Attorney QeMtaJ had directed Ihe evident*; Mr VTaJaaM had appealed on behalf of an interested party, and Mr. Moltlcy was representinc Ihr Vestry an a mrmher of a CommillSr appclnted b> the Vritry for that purpose. The Commissioner expressed thanks for the ..*sistance that had been given. The ilrst witness to guv evf dence yesterday was Mr. M E Cox who was recalled %  Ud that III t4t> resolution before tha House n gel an enquiry into Uu tratlon of the St Michael's Vestry because he thought ti wa* the most corrupt body m iht |aand. He was however unable to let ii through %  i %  'nnl> the statement made In that he had paid him I lt brig for the removal of llie sltilT from Seawell to the Reef. The lowest he had ever paid lo anyone for trip was $1 02. "I am %  ore I paid Mayer.V0 trip for the work he had done connection with Ihe removal of Ihe huts from Seawell to ihe Reef I pav according to the mileage and there is almost nn agreement people lime and a half at night Mr. Cox said he paid' Mayers $15 on Ihe Saturday morning for the Ant three |rip* he h and on Ihe following week after he had completed tha job him $10.00 for the other two lrl|X< TRUMAN ASKS WASHINGTON, Ju • Pit Truman today Congress to end the state between *h United SUnaa an —u.p. England Should Win Third Test To-Day (Krtini Our Own Cur respondent) LONDON. July 9. RAIN throughout the greater pan of the afternoon prevtttitae) any prOsped Oi U) mariy finish to the Third Tatt M Old Tratford, and England tomorrow need 103 runs for victory on what will in any case be the final day. Bo T uoh h;is Ihe weather .iffeeted this game that even at thai stage — South Africa are not nee. for strong sunshuie in the eart> %  % %  i %  But with Hutton rtUl tad the task should not be beyond tha hon> This mornmc .igain ilKlebteti ti U< Surrey slant Bed-cr wno OOBB* em iliaul South Africa I all spell when tho IBS for five. He i Hiring 1 ihe course of 5.2 overs, in which ho captured the remaining wicked runs to give himself a ilnul analysis of live for 54 < etham and Rowan %  I'iniied their stand uf RoS mg hli IndlvUhsal so <"• sta 1.000 run* I ajr. But with hideparture at 148 ..'id anal of Cheewam i latar. the SouUi African %  MM ind lbs HrPN all OUt before lunch gniru England an awkward live minII %  During lh;it time — Hutton %  vc and Ikin i turning iiftei ihe interval triese | 29 before in agaio rther play was possible i until ItU d'%  I BHban Mi %  %  trouble the batsmen and Hutlon and Ikin were concerned with keeping their thickets I F.it|*n., iowaa .'1 b Laker i ikn, i, hr-w a v. a iu--, Mass %  % % % %  | IM. WM *l. O M M > S Lafc-r IS i SWriam 17 a KOMI l\i. S\H -I7/iree Will Sign WASHINGTON. July 9. Usually reliable sources said on Monday thai Amtralia. New ZeaIrnd and the United States probably plan to initial this week mutual defence pact which the intend to sign with each other 1 connection with the Japanese treaty. Formal signing of the tri-party pact expected lo take place at San Francisco the first week in September at about the same time as the signing of the Japanese The ADVOCATE pays for NEWS Dial 3113 Day or Nifht. RED CHAMPAGNE LONDON, : Moscow radio reported on Mon< hampagne production in Ihe Soviet t'nion In' more than SO timet ftvethe ra UI 1930 — l\p. 11 -aiivr" Drifted For Four Da\s KINGSTON. July S. iltian f.n.t1 %  1 t.r... Satvhen of 125 1 -u Priii. t. Curacao, and Miami. was towed hats jre rday for retan to a broken craukilufi. The veaael drifted In Oh Caribbeon from Monday morning to Hun 11.,\ night. MlVRIIls ,.f Ihr l\e>-|divr ( < -m t <. H llurins their vhit UM| .i.nu led Immediitr steps jre bvins t'keit ll Meanwhile tln-ir is HO lBUMfdtat 1 1 '1 % %  .M ii 1 u rdai %  ppearad rceearti are there, Mr. Vtalcoll: You never -n them then Mr. Cox: N Mr. Waleotl: You from BqulreaT Mr. Cox: V. Mr. Ualcolt: HE n ;i good friend f vours? Mr Cox: Yes. Mr. avaiaaah Hi srartu In the nfflce below Messrs. Ifutchlnson I B Held? Mr t ox: Yes. Mr. Wakath Wa? he the same Hquires who drew UM money for the contract? Mr fox. Y. Mr Waleotl: A he Housing Hoard, did you think I right for VOU to fjv* an emDl the Housing Board handbills 11 be rwlltical meeting? Mr K'ox: That has nothing la a> On Page 7 KASTRHN KOREAN FHONT. July 9 Strong CommuniM nuiiiti-i .ilunks torcad Aihei troopa back 10 then own linea to-day artcr a twoday battle in which United Napturad and then lost mountain stronghold northeast of Yanggu. Allied uint.s |iiinp''il off i: .1! iu ;i tn. Bunday and by nightfall had driven close 10 UW Hnwever elements of a Cominuiust regimeni countei-aitmked at 10 p m Sunday and continued thin attacks through the night and ihmiighr.m Monday Radl IB w,ll bufli bunkers, well lupportad by mortar fire, opened %  hut without success HaUons artillery |>oundI Red pOSltloni Monday without Hopping Sunday more than SH.OuO rounds of artillery ghelli were used in the attack. Also north of Yanggu, two Red unltl .it (ram I Oh to 130 men weie brought under artilleiv Bra —1 r W.I. College Lorn Tun} HuildingH (frani Om (>!' CofTMponOvuli KINGSTON, Jamaica. July 10. Two buildings, one in which %  ) stored, and Uic other animals for experimental purposes, were completely destroye I by fire Ht Ihe University College of Uic WH ,.il. (h^ morning. The 1 naa> aaUmatad M i 1.'. (1011 The loai chen u ..\ vas 101 nplele but OM %  r.Imals were -..•.en Tl IgU if the 1 1 unknown Mossadegh Disappointed TEHERAN. July 10 United Slates Ambassador Hri.!. <: %  ence thai Premier Mossadegh seemed disappointrd over the message he received from Prastdent Trumnn Qrady ld: "I i told him you must understand the President wrote thf 1. tier lo %  pb11 greatest kindliness, like l big urothci Irving lo IMhelpful l,i .... .. .! %  -.!, formed him before reading Trumgn' laftaf thai Iran's decision wa* already made. Informed Iranian quarters said the Premier probably made a special effort to |i United Nations off befori ng Grady They pointed out that ( %  rady thi morning ask. %  ppoutunent with the Premier ,d noon and said Mossadcsn >Ulatched the Iranian \ii iiijiinl Hold-up There was an attempted holdup al the Ideal Store yc-steiday It was about I o'clock in the ft when a man walked upstairs and went lo the canto cage He pointed what looked like „ Kun al the girl In the 0 and said; "I want some money' 11 She screamed and die man ran away :.i-e were summ %  I tha ie but ii)) to the lime of going to Press ft arrant had bean made. A thorougi investigation, however, wa brink %  ot by the Police 1 he formal presenlaUon. I }• VlWkForTrumun WASHINGTON. July 9 Weed to-day that Truman will receive 200 pound'si;di of bistort dor rock In Wl monies on Tuesday. A ItUpin j>nd an American, both veteran* 0 valiant resistance which made ih. rock a lasting chapter in Filipinomilitary historv will -K.P. aln H. one that isW,neMHs I-„\:drc Britlah Mlnlgtry <>f Pood rafUM to commwnl one 11 another. Bui it is believed th.it ll % %  d HiOn t (ha pi Ice tif tlomestic suj;ar to sixpence a pound a next Sunday is a flrsl step in this direction. CASH MISSING FROM TREASURY The Police are invesli:;;ilin: a Heliciencv of cash which has been reported maasani Irom llie to\ eriimenl Treasurx. The ('ommissiiiner ol Pollre >rsterda> told Ihe Advocate Ihnt lie hoped lo make u stnteineui MM. STORMS SWEEP MID-WEST U.S. CHICAOO, Jnb 9. Three lornadoa and violent hunderstorm* lushed midwest Initert .Stales durtnj he %  %  ..ii ofruaed new rtood crest I tiie Mitsouri nvei basin where mgh water has caused *5.non.iio damage Storms bat tore, i Kansas. MisKiuri. Iowa, WlstiHialn. Illinois 'id Mulligan Ihruughoui '.lie -eek-end. and wind, Ifghuilnf and ,raln played across ihe arc. 'ly today Si> liibulcd to tbc weather Twit irnadors were report ifhl In Kan.us; one near Parkdie and *e other M bul neither caused any The (hud hit RokOmn Indiana. vr. PM avaraJ nlerests hSTS hat I he MlrUSli \ that II' >lentiful 1 than ii ollah 1..!,.. %  %  1 • %  ., hiie tin iuiiiiiiclo dnuiiaU) %  %  lava bean retallli tl 1 1 < ive been •elun 1 %  11 I bat n can* be 1 1 1 1 %  1 %  |fy Bean Itmufh pdoai iiv.iie.i out, id. Pood Minfatn %  1 mi 1 Britain will ra calve 2.2,'t; 0 raw sugar This is an Uteraaao of v • iiv, 1tha 1 %  % %  Bui Britain's populat bj fo it pei 1 %  r.g powei ti >t the pi %  ra win s< U thou ipplka b I • %  1 %  do their own pfffvati piling" would pSI nut an %  to raUoi %  %  %  %  %  I fia*un P01 It' %  bad %  $3m For liuuxitv In Jttmtiirti 1 iii Britain unre-u 0 %  I %  ii 09 this Cot 1 %  %  LONDON. Julj . A loan of S:M84.OOO k> Increase, the production of bauxite in J;i I iea-|snag, Por The Mini f I 1 dey> by the aaXBtornio Co-Operahaa uid that theb ui tion AdminlitraUHeadquarters requ I %  The loan whu b 1Iwlng made Ids Jamaica Mlne-i Ltd., will be repaid with Iffltl supplies of aluminium over a period f.f eleven and rf ball >eir Aerordiiig to the notds will alvi rnajaf} i:4Mi.ooo on an programme r anticipated thai ihe prodJvrtlon of fiauxiie in J.-I from 410.ol 750,000 tons annuaUj %M MMB brings the total of RCA. advances for Jamaican lauxite to $11.747 000 In dollar-. ind tS.300.WO m 1 funds. MEXICAN 'QUAKE IOXICO, July I*. A sharp earthquake ruraskax ahoek thl elty at pjti vetierdav Mexican • • potted -IT. 1 % %  %  I This na it*s Migai %  urn .i lead] %  1 olonlal in ttueei %  %  • Seawell "Cracks'* Examined by Ex. Co. SHORI mi etii 1 was hi AVU i" 1 %  Pr ai ii ararc \'i 11 %  %  11 \ 1 1 Ui 1 1 Wall M I derson, •;.• % %  Dlracl win 1 \ |.. 'ivii .\\latlon in e Catrll Capi, O. J I ; I ai Ki tli .'"in 1 ial Si 1 rettiry. %  leni i %  %  .1 %  he ( M nil I in 1 %  %  %  %  a l A.'. Merluii; On The > (( ,| I %  v July 4th Mi rurni lie Din %  %  eporb v ,iy which won I %  Mr Tui r* Idvooal 1 %  1 in new %  %  mada 1 1 Him.us n %  %  %  %  1 1 bound I" :. iportunity v the Dlrerl 1 n 11 Aviatto EggH-sfleld. Mi Jol n W i A a (tl I .I gnd Mi I Hnnad than danger to Un aft %  lo ma furthi I 1 %  %  al. Since tsILBETal Afoinir ProgrenB %  dy %  %  aid in u' Conn He %  1 -.••er can >*• u> %  lb 1 %  1 %  %  %  %  1 r WINES in i:-i on GILBEY'S PORT SHERRY liuiniuii MMi\K.in, 1.11I.



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i: \KI: vims uivm Ml 11 I sii \y JULY in. IMI HFNRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY •rr^; BLONDIE"CY CHIC YOUNG \ k>^ MAMA OUOC euONit-*i O. THE 5I0VE AND QAGOv V*M5 M>J ON c CUTHE LONE RANGER •._T-U\r PLEK "OFCU.OW ;vx~y Sli (! .> BY FRANK STRIKER BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS -JFLLO-16 n* TV€ T1?VFU ,. .. ..... AOBWCV-* I WWT __ A GOCO D*/ ACJVEC f COMOLSTB -C\j&g CLffAMNS-vSSWELL-A* UAOOA MAS Mt?EP GOM PWETEH) I tM6l~FJ TO DO TUG kVCWK-. X<.: -•-•..' 1 ; Q-WTM6 -i-F IWEM AN£> P'PgM 6M_OW£NAoe-^v% % % %  -*x6PLEAOEC-''* oeoec-i U*JE A V WAN TO po i\\ TME wjax r %  • •-, .** %  -• (XO On,-' JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS •UT AY CAMNOT AllOV/ TUI VOBK Of AK TO I* iNTcreupiiP' Tun jeec K oui5r./A TOAST TO YOUR HEALTH!! LET WINCARNIS TONIC WIN E ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only Usually Now Usually NOW Hennessy *** Brandy. Heinz Bots. (Qrts.) 5.75 $.93 Tomato Ketchup. Bois. 80 70 72 Pineapple Jam. 2 lbs. Tins 66 -f S 1.35 I.OI Koo Pear. Tins 71 I Peanut Butter. Bots Ovaltine. Tins (Large D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street row in;m:ii .MILK II %  >i--ii •Mlrnilwl rrlo rl i"il liirniiil.i for >oung i lulilmi our Hut viiM'Mi'il Ihf i i !r nun [ilni>|iliiiii!s i n imnis ii.i di 4 In p+rferl h.i>>nrr for utrong hum-—hr would lind thai nalurr lusupplied thl% TCI*J formula in Milk. Th*>'% ttv Kjrm %  •owdtrrd .Milk I. %o vital io >uur hib In Ihr lr:irnlni-lo-\vAlli vfaici*. CiWf tilm plenty, II ha-. - %  •", liullrr tjl. v As fresh to the MM onl> S4M per 5 Ih. in. and SUM. pn 1 lb. I in J %  • • M day it wdVCf i.rtuiblcuiaincadin!'. CinctiM p. %  Ion viA DragStori J iheVann. If you cannot i-ot it phone 2229. H iberl Thorn Ltd K •• THOSE FIRST FEW STEPS OF BABY'S! I0r than ever, he needs plenty of milk. Thai's why .-> milk Guaranteed pure and free from all impurities and low hotoj LET IT BE . I A It M HEALTH • CONTAINS VITAMIN A & 0 IN A DELICIOUS FORM A INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS ENSURES STRONG LIMBS AND SOUND TEETH IN CHILDREN Haliborange The nieeit cary of taking HALIBUT LIVER OIL -, lldi b, mil 1 HlllSUItVI 110., I0D0 Gets the Dirt out of WORK CLOTHES faster and easier t!an ANY Soap! V, KAB --Bven In the hardest water — will get elaaiMr, whitiT. brighter — and 1 U I KLi loo. For your dainty things or heaviest wash—uae PAB...pat Iton yourgrocer*i li^t TO-DAY. Washing with FAB actually SAVES money — Use HALF as much Fab as soap! ^^_^-— 0vC ra „ • ,,1 •



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II I -II W Jll ', 111, 1 •• -. I BABRAD9I \UMM v ri PAGI IHREE Princess Alice Enquiry Ends % Fr„m Pape 1 %  Mr Wah-u: R< the c;>r with | Given Handbitts '•'•' OH %  I gave him t,>m* of use handbills and I MM '.IU*OU£rl IflC VBIIOUB av< Mi A. B. FrariKlin. contractor ana uuou.i w- .0*0 n Mr \tauuil: you only nave mi (or con ox Mr Iranklln: 'I h.ii • to be. Mr Wakatt: [>-. you tlnd by %  Mi FT —U li '. i il i-\r < Mr W l lfi lll l Would you say that the percentage is 60? Mr. Er-aklia: Sometimes you would haW u> add 100* IJIUOS : Mr. WMMMi In dialing with W labOMI InrhfT th.m 'i >"" rm -.iiifn: with itonaV Mr. EraaklUi: No. Mr. Kalratt: If nj| have to %  m i building, would not Hut mi %  . Mr Franklin: Ym All Ihfl material taken d'iwn would have to be assorted after it hxs t.. up. Mr. H'alretl: You modiyour ralculat i ons at four ifnu a cubic foot lr excavation — ant more man you estimated MM done ,t would b> Mr IraRklh. Vl Cost Of Pits Mr WaUBtti wnal tboul (he %  • pits? Mr. Franklin: Well' allow (240. Attorney General; Youi pallfor %  new building: Mr. Franklin: Yes Attorney General: We have had %  i thii i aM that a hut had to be removed irom Seawell. Allow nig lor thv labour lo cut up such .' hut how much Mr. FrankllB: ll would COSt %  n a new building. Ut*TH) General: it In shown that the material used odd und the labour $5,000. If yon ete erecting ii building of %  . ondlteoni .! noriiiully i pIoyeST Mr. Franklin: I would use six iwn millions, two la%  nd one rnaaon tender, that being nothing to do with the painting. Attorney General: How long would you have taken to coni^iruci such with these men? Mr. Franklin: Eight weeks would cover that. Attorney General: Could you tell how much, allowing for In•1 since lflS. it would • then** Mr. franklin: At least 10 per cent. less. Mr F. K. W illSll l The price pnid for nails wu 3!S oents per pound and you had pul It al 27. Mr. nanfelln: AH n I Ufa lions are at today'* prices. I bought some at 3" eenti !!"•:> myself A Conspiracy Mi Miller was recalled. The Commissioner: Mr. Cox has given in evidence here that Mr. Moltley, Mr. Tudor, Mr. Maytiand yourself went to Hutchinson Sr Danfleld's office on June tt in pursuance of some consplracy or plot. What about thai Mr. Miller? Mr. Miller; 1 haw rurVef been of idem anywtwre. Mr. BaiilU'lcl went lo mv place some1 me last .-.-k The CummlHionrr: Have you ever been to Hutchinson a Put Baniicld buildings an] Mr. Miller: Only M my own i ,: |nc v Tlir Commissioner: Any time ill me II utrlli <.f June? Mr Miller: No. The ( onimlvtionrr: And tin-; visit bv Mr. Banfield Mr Miller: 1 ;o!d him I did not %  enow tn whose uitere: he came. Anything I had said. 1 (old him. woubj be found in the %  He said %  left ihe Vestry ilerk and wanted more information | told him there was nothing more I could Mr. Motlley; Do you know Squires' Mr. MUler: I know the Squires with whom Cox goes around. Mr. .Mauley; if Squires said that he saw you. Tudor and myself go to Banfield'* ofll,.Mr Miller: That would be a lie. %  Motlley together weJUni 11M Mri %  %  is at the Veetry table. Mr. MaUlry: II..., m me tn vour whole life' 1 Mr Miller: I u^\v i < you with Mr. M t was allowed to out Hen \ii Miner. Good Friends Mr. Con: I aM putting it to you i end Squires are good 'bat ^au go around and drink together" Mr. MUler: That is so. Mr. Gei You tal I Mi Banfh I I went to you before th. %  fctarled? Mr. Miller: YeMr. Cox: You -n you went ml., rUnl.Hd s office In June? Mr, Miller I did not go. Mr. Co*: Have you any idea where the** hutare? Mr. Miller' You are lh> beat in-1 -HI i to know: You had the >nb of moving them Mr. Cox: You hrard Mr. Mettle] spok of these huts at the Veslry Who spoke first? Mr. Miller: 1 am not here U) remember who spoke first. 1 would like to ask Mr. Cox .i-methins The Commissioner; Tell whal It Is. Mr. Miller: Could be be SO hare-faced — I knou he l( a dirly. nistv and so on The CommrviioTirr: This I* not an abiudrut match. Mr. Mayers, lorry driver, was recalled. The I ommisioncr statement nbout Mr. Cox and he has denied t*. That i? my reaaoa for having you recalled Mr. fox: Where do you llvel Mr Mayers: Station Hill. Mr. ('•: How long were 0U living there? Mr Mayer*: Four years. House Searched Mr. Cox: The police seaicheu %  our place sometime ago. is that not so? Mr. Mayers: Yes. Mr. Cox; Where were you living then'' Mr. Hay en King's Gap. Mr. fox: How long was that? Mr. Mayers: In 194V. The t omaMlsslonrr. And you %  "..' Imnfl m Sntuori Hill for fOQT years? Mr. Mayers. What really happened ta that I ..living in StaUon Hill with my piil-r.' was living with. Mr Cox: Sometime between September und October 1949 you were IIW driver of 258 lit, yOU remember the sign on the board? Mr. Mayers: P. M Francis. You mid me the truck was yours. Mr. Cox: What BOM was on the%  Ujn board? Mr. Mayers: Two Mile Hill. Mr. Cox; Do you remember where I was living at the timeMr. Mayen: Button's Hill Mr. Cox: Whore did you house this lorry? Mr. Mayers: At Mr. Tommic Milbr's residence. Mr. Cox: From the time you were driving this lorry until yOU left, it was beingput up at Mr Tornii.ie Miller's residence" Mr. Mayer*: Y. Mr. Cox: it Would be therefore untrue to ray that during the tune you removed the InnUiinr from Seawell thai I anywhere else" ret. It would be untrue Mr. Oeat] p. freeting Mr. Duguid and me In a ear coming around R* the first cvemr Mr Mayers: I could not have met you when that was not the road I took 1 took Governmcn, Hill road. Mr. Cox: Dou you M Tudor" Mr Maver*: Yes Any Meeting'/ Mr. Cax: DM Bl ionmis anq i daseuei Ihle? Mr Marr. .N Mr. Cax: Did you not hear lhat he was trying to get a with you" Mr. Mayers: No. Mr. Cm*: Do you tone* ankO ^ ml H has gone" Mr. liicin|i...iNo Attorney OeaMlmfc W •rere you i Mr ThomnMii: IM-I. I Ihtnh I .i tup \i i i i Analyst i islry. Mi I i I ,i .II % %  *(%  ,. m %  in %  %  Mr H'ali ait i f Counee l fa that n mi %  %  Mr I on;.u. Mi | plan I Ui the Con Mr Hah-lt II you had ... ling of UM .M-II on of Gow Mr. Corpin i re iu oee d two hut> -HI behalf of the 0 ment, Mr. Walcatt W. 11 the -4 I Faeiantty Mr. Vx: Are you absolute!v sure that 3MI wu not Here Mr. Mayers: "Jot In my presence. Mr. Cox: What would he the object then of preventing vou from coining before the Comr Misappropriation The t ommissioner: If you knew nothing % %  ( Die of this hut. .. what.. Mr. oeati Whal were you paid foi a trip" Mr. Mayers: Two thill Mr. Vx: You wer.t up I well at all hours—at midnight for two shillings' Mr. Msyers: The latest time WU 10 o'clock. What could I do'' Mr. Cox; Suppose the other driver could have told you he was paid 51.50 for a trip, what about that? Mr. Mayer*: That would be what you paid htm. Mr. Cox. During the time you were driver did yon ever d^KUsi pay with thin other driver' Mr. Mayers: No. Mr Cox: Where did Mr. Banfleld come to you? Mr. Mayers: In Cheapslde. Mr. Cox: Just standing up in (he road? Mr. Mayers: Just standing up In the road. Mr. Cox: Who lotd him that someone hnd offered vou this ST Mr. Mayers: I told him. Mr. Cox: Did JOU not think it was proper to inform the police'' Mr. Mayers: Because 1 would have liked the money. Mr. Allan Thompson I feur who worked with Mr. Duguid when the hull were Mil moved, was the next arttneoj eanaxj Attorney OenanaJl How man. trips did you make? Mr. Thompfcon: Tw. i-veiung and the other Attorney Cirnrrai: How many truck* an re IhJ if Mr. Thompson: DugutoTe, Muru>'. and 25P Mr. Oeranea % %  Mr. Walrslt: I did yOU get youq mvlui. I .L Mr. coppm: i u i instructed • '> ihe Aeiiny Oovernoi Mr. Perowne lo take the two huts from Se.ioli Mr. Htoleoth A' time • %  iruetlon of the I Mr. I .ippln IM9 Mr Wslrott: W ti .,' got out ii %  I Mr. Coppln: I >:nt %  per cent, of the material of Ihe hutTnh wni due u> Ihe fad that the iklea were mainly cardboard, the i i ... ... the material had evidence of Mr ttalrolt' •inasiiajute bs M> rranklm ot %  Ihe building at Ihe Pi to* %  \ K.i i Mr. C'opoitn: Ye* Mi. Waleotl: W|if 00 r*0U M] %  l.at" Labour Cost %  M' t II,I i %  V Generil %  Mi i i.,.| monthi i lime and 1 MtnraW) t.^^eral Vou LiUhng to aseerMr. Cappin: Ys I could see per %  %  iff, pre*ut".ihlv %  Aeasr.icv O.irral What .um Mr. ( HPfaWl i .. Mr I I-I on %  %  .? &f ?**• Everything? Mia., metal In ) %  Mi (,,... %  %  ih. i iiannfcwkiair; How b i >lr. i amin: M>n but i; %  : illy foi i. | Ihe CommlssMiaer: VOU Wl Si ti i >(o \ i-if a i i %  have two and i iruenM the factoi %  them. Thr t loniiils-nunr Mr. I oppin: About I Ihe i ommisMoiii-r: l)i,l Mr. Coppm: No. Mr MottbM hj Mi Waleotl plan foi i %  Mr. Ceeeta Ml aid ih.it l prefei I l pfti : tood that %  ii wu %  ekad ind I %  mind. A~ %  %  ..I 'lie Veatry was recalled. More Money S/H'tit tttario t oenerali i arnnt I Vettr) ,-. %  ,. I NO m v.-., lei u at ii meeting this hwl %  Mr. Rrdman: A* the nieeluu %  Apr.i ireatry wen %  % %  %  to coptifT.tMlO ind aval fCMM referred to Mln Viaran (onrral Mr. Redea HI k*ei Otnaral %  I %  Mr. K.-diniii Aitarney O enarefc bl •vhnl 0oi A %  would lik.to ask Mr. Tud :n>ns on tin! point. bSCaUPO thil Mr Tudor was reeejled. \llornet Qg—|Bl; M. TUOOt A teased to %  at so. Mr. Tudor. Yi-. Thai happen. on the labour qu* \llrn.-< t;earr.l DM It hap%  i hod Mr ludor No I % %  larb lo be (rected M aa r ne i aeantal: How long %  job Mr. fudoe. TWO WOekl sitme> ficnrral: Who took his hen Mr. Tudar: V, %  I'm Hi 11-1 l\ti tilhif 7< ikenbeeh %  t ludar: V. The Ceanaansfanawi Maynen aai i" ot. i oi butldei waa he? Mr. Tudor: He paid that he hac i two |oee ah i Did I hail to to rrell Ihe c.minil—tonrr: Hii it .n, %  ixj pa] Maynard al ihh tune Mr. Tnoier I pud Ihe num Mri per week, xtioriirv General: i *. IUIUI, iwa afejeki Mi m tn l*sge 5 Halt's of Exchange II. I \tot .'.m I" Bl MM no IS pr i Cabw%  I *• 10 |o MI 10 |-r MAIL NOTICE Mm. I,.. UM US %  I Kit ad %  UM S a VIIIIM-.I.I 1 %  %  i' %  i and lUBi.taini uii .ns ii IM I't ill SII.K Ml I It IS POT LADIES aV < JENTS • With Hai harlot Views A Map I avpll fm Reach or thai Tata name •asssuVs/or ilaeff '&*'§****" f Helps to cleatw the nyttem from hiooil impurities impurities In ihr blood mav cause rheumatic %  ..he* aad palas. nlff and paiaful rlnia, b.iiU. pimiiltand common skin .io.or.lt-r.. l-.w. Blood Mi-lure hrlp, itt puHfy ihe blood, .lumo lh onoii and alss In i csiorlni |




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tlEsOAV JIXV 10. 1K1 %  ARBADlK ADVlK lit PAI.I IIM Princess Alice Enquiry Ends e> tnm pair J Maynard was in charge there were only 20 odd wa I later on Mr. Worrellslums 40. Mr Tstd-r When Worrell wem off, Ihi> majority of his woikmei. wem will back he i.rouglit -.nd kmnkeJ oA tom nard'.s. The walm M InAttarnr> (irneral: Can you remember whether this was in October. November ( .r Wan II I I Mr Tuilor wan Octol %  %  nber, and ii v.i> uis: around N that Lord Uatowet and Ihe otnet Oovernon Aciiiii; Qovtroor Ferowna told ma Um that hr wcuid i k< Lislowel to open thr pavilion a.td 1 should increase the labour "to push ahead the work Mr. %  U llll J i Mr. Tudor. Uu been asking you why you got A i f the labo II., %  %  pltln Thiit mine fullj. Labour Costs //I#/I Mr. TUC'J. mt the labour bill was too high Tba l working one on ti were; and 1 felt 1 vraa not get unit .noiiKli work for iii, mooe* lhat ws5 being paid out. Mr. M.IUrV; wai I'I [re-'ine brought OH ?.'*u by the Acting Qt Mr. Tudor: He asked me to force iba % % % % %  k u i %  would like Lord LtStOWej t0 Open IB* u.tvilton. As a result 1 allowed Wirrell lo carry on With the number of workmen. Thr Commissioner: %  | %  :... .1 H Mr. Tudor: Yes. Mi. Wal.ott; M, i; ,,;,..,, Mt muted for certain work that year. What w >. % % %  Mr. Tudor: Mi uled for work el %  %  and the* work lor hull the estimated Attorney General: I nVSj been informed that Mr Ran aled for an 18 Inch wall and eventually a 12 inch wall Wjsj built. Is that so? Mr. Tud-.r: No. I l.r C.niifill-si"ii>-l WH1 lo the Almshouse etui Hr. EUnuay's estimate in nail? Mr. Tudor: ',. Mir Cntnmrwioner: Did KOU Iter the BUM o( tin Mr Tudor: I lo the same dimensions Mr Ranv %  iven fhe chili built tor half jl ited co • 'i'i i Si Isarnabes. loo ws al 0J the estimated I At Auction Sate The CommisaiMipr: Did you attend the auction Mr. Tudor: y. Thr tommtasloiirr: You bought rive bum. Wiin roswd u> '"•' oUv; seven were they bougl I D] various people ? Mr TSUMT: \.people come brom all over the Uuana la ine : ale. The t'ommktiuner: The Verily had decided that all work over $1,000 should be trad %  Mr. Tudor Ail wink OVOT $1,000 was done by CCfltrnct axcept the building at tnw Held. That was done work. The CommisiMier: Don I fOU think that as an ordinary businessman It was belter to do it by contract? Mr. Tudor: 1 fell it could not be done by contrail, and the Acting Governor agreed with me and' -.aid that it would have to be done by day labour Mr. Ashby Churchwarden's Clerk, was asked al this stage to produce thr Expenditure Book for the year IM9-50. The Vestry $2,400. he Mild. '<> repair Ihe roof Of DM I hUdref/s ward ,it the almshouse. Mr. Waleotl: Did or di you not, whether thai *as Mr. Ram a) Mr. Ashby ; I eanm I whg? Kr Waleott: ROW much Mr. Tudor did il t"i Mr \xhby: 1 see UM1 | was spent, but from it $•00 on a,wall and IN yard. Mr WIsjiMj • Mr Aetna*; Y. The (•mmK.iitier What about St. Barrabas' Church" 1 Mr. Ashby: That yea' I • Barnabas chapel's boundary wall .m't Hie iame amount was spent. Almshouse Hat/ Thr rommiftluier : V. I l %  .11 at Ihe alnudv %  M. Assak) %  %  Mr. Waliud: Have >nu gut Ihe Mr. Amhby: If Mr. Itamsay gave it* it would pi in the possession of ti Mr. HairoU: Hi liedman has only decided on it and I got an estimate Mr. Tudor, do yot not know who n almahouas 1 Mr. Tudor: M too estimate and he made that for St. Barnabas which from $1,800 to $72ll Thr CommtMlonri: r #00 %  .... children's roof. Mr Tudor: [ok ,, a decision on Mr. Ramsay's estimate Tfcb was for the roof alone and had nothing to do with the wall. I spent $1,400 on the r.I %  knOWl that Mr Ft m' They were blah Mr Pile, the Vi I %  Mr \Valeolt: You nude certain statement! ol Mi D. 0 %  during his tenure of oflta Mr. Pllr: 1 sean i. and foun. her which WOUld eorulmi • Irt.point 1 had made. It was Mr. 1 voucher. It w BS I -mall amount %  and may have ,„-, n .. BpecssJ case [| was a voucher In favour of Dr. Munte for an e\mder Poor Belief. The rends: I hereby certify the above to be on the Instructions nf ihi warden." That was signed by Hr E. c. Tba 11 setor oi Poor, Minutes Read Hi Redman recalled, was asked to read a portion of t of April 13. 104!t. referring to Mi. Ramsay. This referred to com%  %  : %  meml i %  on Mi. Ramsay's suuen'ision and Mi Itedman then said. 'The Hoard of Poot Law G look after ihe almshouse and the) hhVl %  clerk. Thenrxtimstei. are sent to me en bloc and ;.n re I %  .' ..i idv. trj i.i -in i< ( I wniild not have estimates from Mr. Rsonaaj i would haw .. % %  The actual tlmatei \ Mr T %  Tailor's Evidence .Mr Uupj-rt Scaiires, a tailor ol School Cap. Hind.sburv Rood, wa. the next witness. The Acfontey Qssmali When is ypur tailoring establishment n Mr. Squires: In James Street Thr Attorney (ienrr.l: Is it >n the same building a 1 Hutehinaon and BanBeld %  Mr. Squires: It is on the ground floor of that building. Thr Attorney QeeMSVil Do *ou know Mr. H. A. Tudor? Mr. Sqntrrs: Ye Thr Attorney General: Do you know Mr. Hottley, Mr. Tommi-' id Hi VII t %  H .yeis Mr. Squires; V, Thr Commlslirr: It by Mr. Cox thai you tuW blm you sau Hi Tudor. Hr Moltiey. Hi Miller and Mr. Mayetjj |0 It to ; H< N lluuhins. ;itid Bantleld on OT about Jun i'7. Is !h It Mr Squlrr,: No I | him I sow them go In their. Tlir Commlionrr: What di I yOU lerll I Mr. Squire,; | told him I saw Mr H. A rhr merswj osnatBli D*I you %  %  .. h a t | M' S HU |rp. : ; %  .[.. M, ,, I we had Thr Altsmry OsSMI s J] What %  %  Mr. Squirrv i (old him Mr wrre up Cox last Thr Allornry fienrral: What did you say to thai %  Mr. Bsjsakes | no 1 II..IfteeSM) r.rnrral: What Ml TUdOl BS] : Mr Bsjalrea d be was the AMetaoj <>rnrral: Dsd he tell you what ti,, Mr Squirrv; '. rhr Attansaj O aas u nli What ki aftet ihat %  Mr. Squire*; 1 went in to mv work. Thr Allornry Onrral: Whal 10 Hi Tue> Mr. sgulrr*: i do not know. The AlU>rnry OeSBBtall Do wi know if he went ml., the Soliti%  %  Mr. squirro: No. The AlUrnry OeSNimll Did you siHTom any timr that day I Mr. Squlrr*: No. rhr <'omml*>iunrr: lii.' \ ec Mi Mi it* j oi Mi Uillei thai %  Mr, Squires: | not remember then) "r. MsMleyi You did not tell Mr. Cox at any time that you saw Mr. Tudor. Mi Miller. Mr n i Mi Mottky toiether in James St. on or about June 17 rlutehinson %  B Evidence Planned Mr. Squlrev \*., i told lorn %  asi night (Sundaj i that i had batunhu thai HI Tudoi Hi Orimth and Hi Tom Ha n %  ..idem,that Tom %  lyei %  id ven at the enquiry. Mr MatUa ; Wa lhat ail you • ild him" Mr. Squires: ', Mr. Mottle?; You did not tell him thai you saw Mi. Hottiey. Mi. M Miller, and Mr. %  lluHhinson and Banu June 27 ? Mr. Squirm: No. Mr. HeMleyi If he said tha" you if Id him you saw us there i uld he be lying ~ Mr squires | never told him Mr. Moltiey: You sgld you told I nlghi thai Cnmth, Tudi i and M lyei bad given by Mr. BsjtUrea: v. Hr. H et U ey: With whom were mattei on Ihe Mr. BHjaireai With a popular %  %  i b) Harrison .Mr. Metlley: What .s her name? Mr Squuex: Nice* Bl Mr. HatUeyi Did Nicer* Bel-"ii .in>thing"abou' Uillei and Uottli belni in this Mr. MBlraS] NI Mr. HetUey: Did you ever mention the i .!. Ml. .in.l MT. -squire.: No Mi. Mettle] Uillei (i i Mr, Bqalres: v. Mr. HatUeyi Are you and Mr i i dlj %  Hi Nakaa: Not pi I I Mr Mnttlr: How kmg have n working in James ST. %  | Mr. Sqalre-.: From June 15. %  jr. MotUr> : Could you see anyone |Q into Hutchlnson and Ilantleld's OfBcC from your workI %  ; %  Mr. Squires: No. Mr. Motth-y: Yo„ are very friendly with Mr Cox and you assist him In doinu business sometime!! ^Ir squires: V. Mr. HeMleyi Can you tell U* something about the hut business'.' Mr Snuitrs; about it tn the paper-, and I als^ Mi. Tudor had told him a part was missing. Drawing Vouchers Mr. Mottley: Could you gn bHfc thai than lhat Mr. squire*: You mean about Don't let MOHNING MISIHT all-doy I hrthOM snd uptst .tumii' Ii rum your mo'mna. you csn -save thr duv" srlth MkaiWtsw. Taks it oil atnini. againit needed -Iota* m thr dy. Krrp > mpply o* quirk SCtbH Alka-S.ltl • *.i handy mlwmyt! drawini the r. voucher" Mr MIMIIJI y M Mr. Squlrr, Onr di> 1 esH to Mr. Ashby thr t'hurrhHirdrn', Clrrk. u.r weSHhar *nd drrw % %  >'.monn rrcm thr r.r... m ,i Ireaturer. Mr. Mtllr>: Who em >*u lo the (hurrhwarden** Chrrfc? Mr SquU-rs: It nuehi pave hrrn MIM li.n.u or Mr. Cmx. I do ii..i rrmrmber who. Mr M (itIf *: Yov drew thr Maney? Mr. Hqubm: Yes, Mr M„uir To whom dit) I "ii take It ? Mr Squire*: Cllhrr to Mr Co* or MIM l I %  ,. IMr Moltiey: 1) 0 >u ko any thins about Ihr tendrr Mr. Squire-1 | do nut rrmrmber • arrylru thr tender to the < hurihwarden Mr. Mottlry Hhal did Mr (ox n-ll you about the huts '.* Mr Squires: He told mr part at Ihr hut HH mU.nq and hr told Mr Tudor U ut those thmgs. he submitted, whilst they might entertain the jmbiic and mlgni i' some useful knowlodge. did not ically help I hem a great deal m arriving, ut any ub bu U findings of tact about which the Commissioner was charged to enquire into. The Attorney (ipnerftl at this stage reminded the Commissioner of his terms of reference with re gard to enquiring into the Princess Alice PUying Field. "You have heard Unit the Vesbry i. ., Btatutory ixxly •leeted annually. It has as its Chairman, Ihe Hector of St. Michael. Although he is Chairman, he is not what is looked upon as the Executive Otttoai ,,r this biMly. HI i o live duties revtilve upon the sntOn and have been so fron t the lime ,.f ihe Veetr) tern. Of course, ther.ire other i the Vestry like the Vestry Clerk and the Cruirrhv. nden'a Clerk," he said. He s.ud that money was made available to the Vestry by the i ;.-\ t i noiin -Executive Committee out of the Welfare fund*. He Iuid put it to Mr. Tudor al one HUUBB of the enquiiy thai il wa.. tiring suggested thai |hll men! of the Playing Kiel.I wn% m : strictly a Vestry matter, and iwai obvious to him that at BOOM stage o£ th~ pro* < < i was suMnyaated that it was posslblv u why PM dVnarturo was n ade from ad >t ws am r msed practice of dealing iiar Vestry matters, Act Amended Mo had put it to him that the Venues Ail w.ts amended In IS4S spocillciilly for the purpOSS of giving the Vestries authority to man it a in olayuig llelds. SubseOjuently retulatlons were made under the Sugar R**li.< %  i n and Labour Welfare A.t fof carrying out the puiin.se of Ihe Act and it could not be argued or suggested by anyone that these funds for the Playing Tield wore not properly Vestry matters. The Vestry of St. Michael, having a large number — seven playing fields, appointed a Playing Fields Committee which comprised mostly of inembcis of the Veslry with powers la Co-op! This Playing Fields Commit le#> selected sites and made recommendations and one W BM fallce Playing Field This happened during Mr. I> U. LcacoCk's term of office as Churchv anleii. Prorri early 1049 until 1950 very lillle ma found Iii ttie Mm.itrs of the Vestry about what had lo tho %  : .n.tiotieil kaanber 29. i4>. but dl i aoapt pos*iPebrusr? "'•I' al time during which the piineew. Alice Playing PtrU was establishrd it on reeord fnin IhC Mmntrs ol the '. %  September 19 thai Mr TudsM himself h-a Inrhrnae d the Vestry ..t tho usssahaaa al onr os aaare huts by the Government frciii Senwell Airport fof the purpose Ol < n-cling a Playing Field No Ri'fwrt From September 30 to Febni,ii* tin next resu there vraa no %  In the Mii.uti-s of the lT| i any meeting or tepnrt (-1 the I'ta.ii..: F.elds Committee v ,i. was nothing to report "ll is a matter ol opinion how I bjoac ikingi an done, but normally. one would eiave expected that some member of Ihe vast?) v i uld have askixl the Chairman el the Playing Fieldi what |llflg*niB was brim made. iH'uinents. letleis and conununlcstions from the Oov* eminent through the Welfare Once were l>eing sent to the These wera put to the Playing Fields Committee and • eemed to remain with Uiem." The Veslry might rightly have taken dw view thai they entrusted this matter Into the hands or the Committee and Ihe Committee, comprising of its own therefore thought thai d COUM assume as far a' Uu H ..re Vestry was concerned. th;d the matter was being and arOU|Q Ixproperly looked after nmltteaj for ria a o n s beat known to themselves did not con skier whether they should await the summons from the Chalrtnun U the Comimtlee .lid not function very effectively aftet tin selection r>f the first sites. %  I'Tid...dito.il, >o,i have • ..I.i the allegation that ihe il mi Oovernoi had Utken %  prnraIneni pan m Che lablirnmeot of tinPlaying Field Ibougni an allegation like thai would n -t a$ duly weigh with VOU in yoUl rhidiugs of fact, whatever ma) l>e suggested, we have it "from a person like Mr. Maynard who was there throughout the time the Playing Field was Ireing e*UtbUahad that aha Oovernor came than and made suggestions like the removal of a wall and the tutting down of a tree. •The Acting Qovornoi aru in tl i HI this mailer It was : Playlnf Field to IKestabssfhOd under these funds and he prolmbly was anxious to seo it was constructed as soon us posatble, //•A"** Suggestions It is difficult lo believe that any Churchwarden would follow blindly the suggestions o( the head of the Administration whether he wai there In an itctIng capacity or not. The Veetrlet ii. tinisland ati' u law unto 1 do not deny that Mr To.lor might have I wen UBuenced by the Acting Oovernor, but In spite of any sugssarMoni that might have been made to him. I still are that there arc i lot of things that lie could oi might have done which could not have led the (mvernmeiil lo DO dissatisfied with the expenditure ... kjnh have been voted. %  I do not fBit Of these funds, noi i.s then anything "in ihe evidence given before this Commission to suggest that. %  What 1 do suggest is lhat tin way In which Mr. Tudor nandleu till* matter and was allowed U handle It certainly would CO UM the public, when rumour ttarb fa) bO noised abioad. to t arn Dm tlie adm mist ration oi funds of this nature." "Whatever reasons wengiv •St, Mi Tudor had no right t. disregard ihe Committee whir. was appointed for the purpose o baking some of the reaponsibilit) Added lo that, there U fsitlure to uaa ihe Clerk of th. Pl.t. i Fields Commit'! %  ||l Hedman. who would have prove. u useful person in the signing o the voueheiand Mi Ramsa. ih. Building Buporviaoi 'What reasons had he P.i no using *hese officers? In the CAM of Hr Hams.y be %  nd that thf two of Ihem could noi get mi" Si. Joseph Has No Assessor SI Jo* wttlotri m aaaaaeoi Hi it A lee drew this fact to I • then DSSJStkuj vfssb Th.' v;, assestor ocnirml when the Si Jo-rph Vi %  led then test assessor to thr ofl 1 ... i pn venial "^rreosurri^ s.m^. ago. Hr. Ltw urg.-d .. lake steps in the matte H A P Cox said that the as s e ss or has tn work at the beginning of the year and that the assessor's work in the parish had '•ecn practically dime this yssjl v.v BEnnat apssoeni a new the assessor work ha* to be done wtthln twi M "nee months", he said. Mr H A darker s.ud tfi %  was their duty to know if the\ i i %  HRJI kansllj to appotni %  asjwiisor and he was ol the opi • ion that the Vestry should net : correct ruling from their soucitoi Mr W K Coward said that, n the interest of the rate payei he did not think il .^ i->ud ., in'" is. ,--, to i>uy the formei i whole MM The Vestry decides! lo cOCUJUll their -..In itois liefi>ie tuking aov fUlUHH step* in She matter %  %  •< %  • Loan Wanted The Vestry asmioij to adVOjtl i lor s isoo loan for the purpee of completing the mi st Anns chapel Burial Ground Alter reading a leitet fiorn '! Colonial Secretory, the Veatr] appointed Mr jfuteoti I HieScotland District Conawrva lion Board l'r.nl al Ihr RSMSml %  -,< b. UaasMsu n„,„.,.„. Hi g I -n.lriii Mr J A H.o ". %  M C P Mr A IQ th R A I" aivd Ml |l CONSULT A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (Bd(.s) Ltd. iiiitiiii \\i; INSURANCE I AN #g // #*#*••#•# iu in II ill /'f/#.fg Yin$r HOUSE FURNITURE PERSONAL EFFECTS and your MOTOR CAR Fresh Canadian liar CHOCOLATE MllsON'SNut Rolls Koir Buds I'rpltermint Patlv Cherry Crram* Sultina Raisins Macaroon* Liquid Four Flavourjenay nutt Jrrw. Nut Toff re Milk Hurnl Almonds afjtlaaal Milk .i i barn I.i > r TIL | . 'Goodness knows Good." I'RKi: 1? (IVTs I \( || RRKF. WFAIIIUIIIFAII i mil in Sob* 9t witA tAac Jl ST ARRIVED I I'I %  %  > \ I III. K | MAIMIM.V (.IIOUIM Obtainable (fom | H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd 'menu Pno&em .H FOOD BUYS CHEESE JAM LUNCHEON BEEF STANSFELD, scon & Co. Lid. Kraft t hrrsf. | lb. pklv MM lt-0 Tin i.5T Knit thrrse A Maearonl— prr Tin 0.37 ll.nisli -.l.iin — per lb. 1.41 Danish tiorjonsola Cheese— prr lb. Ul i> % %  < amrmbrrt thrrse— pr Tin I 19 suerl Cn Cream Style— per Tin 0.41 leenk Afranui Pineapple Jam — prr Mb Tin 0.66 south African Otavn Jrlli— per 2-lb Tin 0.46 Soulh African Oranrr Marmaladr rf 3-lb. Tin UAt -an PaM -"ailed i *lim Sut— prr Tin 1.06 sun Pat -ialN-d Almonds— prr Iin I N j Rrg feather liin.lin.ii Brrf Hiih t rrr.l 0 4.1 THE WjjPJjjjJgW it i iAii PRODUCTS OF REPUTE -MUXALLt ml t.it-i-r Oil l.'iiiulsitm An Kailv Dinnlrd and Palaluhlr p i .ii ul Vilamin IVM.-.I Cod l.i.rr Oil. 2/9 and !/• Hot. /...// I'uritivr The Ideal Kemvdv for Pfcki Kruplions, L'lceis. Pimplf* etc. 3Boltle K.XI1.HTS LTD. Two V.uis F.ir Stealing Cloth H Hi noui the Cn f in Allan Collymorr ai ll. Grand Sei ilora n terdaj aw \ %  ...isl Albert w.nt |Q 'i i M luuneni with i> .1 HI larecnj AlU-it Went on April I lole doth valued al $r. rrott counlei or Danisia s< i\.. i He has four previous i, for larceny and is minoi 110ns. Mi w W Reeci K I Solid fienrral. preeecUtOd f"t the I The proaecution broughi • witness who said that ) %  *, when WeU look up the ,l,.| i Iron D'lCost.is C.unlu on A|>u Went called on two s/itnei . "nr Mid Hi.i' Went aske.1 him Ii live ( .1,1, i,,. Hi,. „lhel Willie %  aid that he knew Went hroin ilnldh.HNl Inil they ntri liol peis.n d fi lends Before nnpo*ini[ ihe lanlaiii Ills Honom aald Ibal on n mv easions false evident. I ben mvi-n by defence anllnscne. reauli of the Police Maglitrai. Hiving hail an if bail spare %  n % %  ler of right in every ease and not II iiutlei which is in the dis-i. lion of those administering; the Inw. He -.ii.l thai during Ihe I.i'' *i in.m with .i Bad re n h.id eon milled .1 swiul.n ..it. n,. after having Ifeen given ball IL Honour snd ibal peopla witb .. rei ord ihould not i>e given the oortunity of bull FROCKS YOU'LL FANCY RAIN COATS In VARIOI'S (OI.OI KS al %t.n rarh Plastic Umbrellas ll.SR earh I N A NI f I'r. Wm liny St. IIIBI 3460 in CO'l TON and ART SILK • FASHION-RIGHT STYLES including Plaids. Checks Candy Stripes Floral Stripes and Solid Colours • Se? (AMI on display at HARRISON'S Broad Street — Dial 2352 %  • .-.: '.'.'.'.::'.::::: .•.•.•.'.•.•. %  %  .: %  .::; %  %  ^ % %  //-. Cause for much delight EVER-REST Bridge Braced Arch Support s II o i<: s The perfect shoe for rk nnd ror in Blnck, Brown nund Ha Kl I. Court ilyld with Cuban kwobl nnd r .1 1 < | 1 | Pair SHMiS CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. 10— H Broa.! Street $ IMPORTANT TO PLANTERS!! Our Plantar frlendi Are requeatnd |0 let us know tthtil 1'HUircmrnts immediately to ensun< %  %  'deHvnTV Of the following equipment: — • Wheel and Trai k frmWtefl • firtts\ tutlers un ROJHM • Manure spreaders • Trailers, rtc. . COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM LTD. Whit!Park Road DIAL 4616



PAGE 1

I'M.i nvii BABBAMM ADVOCATE TUESDAY JILY lu, 1KI fouufi galling Advo%  ulay were : Optics M R HA1.PH PRFSCOTT a Bar%  in ih* t'fl • |HM sw %  .'. \ • i %  I %  %  Twelvr Day* R i L8T1 B I vhoowni -• l.ltt1 vr*rHV.l A hr%  1 II.. o. pert* to be a way-A* twelve days Lirrnt.dn Engagement T l %  Compsu %  %  %  labour d of Hon 1. a i : %  Colonial nd Mrs, Adaim oL C. B. G BofhMU Goad,' V The smiths Anglican Church In Grenada l.tltr this month. ARTIE'S HEADLINE With T.L.L. jyj'i; PtULUP SKINNER who %  I u .tt" I V to %  lands, si. i 3arbadian Student Awards T l ada-Wssi [adlti i publishes . lisi of *iii.i. I I M bl the 151 Among the list arc several Bar. H lar) Hourne obtained his rtipl. .'rlca and I passed for the degree of Bachelor if Arts. Q r Sclsncc M, %  %  I M.n-hclor of %  ring Physics). Gerald Tryhane of St. Thomas obtained UM I ictasariiuLj (Bee%  (roil McOil! the Macdonald DcL. King. Agrtcuiture. third ptai Mai Johnson and Wataon, Home Economlrs, wcond ) i David Boyc. MariM Qardsoa, Harold c Gihbv of Worthlnj ami of St Michael. %  Barhclur of Science in Agriculture (McCiii UniversHyi and Tbelnu %  -f S! Philip was awardid the dtgrst HouaahoU Bcoawmla i MeGiil Short Holiday M it L i. nii'i'iN. Oovrnla| Director of Messrs J. B I.cslie t Co. Ltd .Kd.mpanied b) Mr. K. D G. rru-t. I) '-m and Mr* rrost wh' ling .i short holiofl Sunday Us** alaa *^ent a few days Studying Medicine M R. -BERT' REECI of Society Hantation. St John, who has jrst finished hi* first year of medlthe University college of the West Indies arrived from >i-stcrday via Trinidad to %  pand the -uinmer holidays with his relatives. It was a surprise visit for they were not expecting him until August Hunner Beam? M ISS EILEEN KING, the >liv i unner from Trmldad found soon after nhe arrived in En£lan•- m in win nrii %  on the nor.' the Thames, and that n I : linyton. King's Cross, Edgwarc Road and Notting [lib Yid l-tiltlll / %  Mill rh'-J for fetal brain dogs for use m bombed areas of the city is ^ r "u frSOMSnUy go'aouth considered by the City of lf rlve lo comrnu crimes. police, who believe that tea are ideal "dumping City CID and Scotland for stolen property men have suspected for iorne At present the City Police know time that stolen goods are ternih< i an •borrow" trained dogs porarlly dumped in the bombed from the Metropolitan area in an wastes. emergency Tr.ine.l police dogs, on eontlnuOf them feel that the City ou* night patrol could, they think, •nould have their own police dogs, prevent this, and be useful in liar with the acres of bomb Intercepting thieves who try to s*r „ the basements of bombed ,„„,.; it a known that criminals from buildings as transit depots Fmm Th rdnmui.. igouth London raid shops and T SS m liBC Nrlnrn Orch*#U I U —— — %  %  — — — — —-— — %  — %  Raport From Britain. 10 on p m b llllVIII rillt CIIVEMA (M.mb.. S OnM lO-NIOHT lO THIK0A1 NMlHT al Going Backwards I NDICATIONOf the lighieninrf up of discipline at Oxford is the insistence of the BUthorltlt in regard to academic dress durinc %  xamlnetj i woman are vetoed. A woman invigilator announced during one examination "The Mesh must not be allowed t > %  how through the stocking* worn %  %  n eandMatai" Twenty-one M ISS JOAN LJ\N(;E celebrated her twenty-first birthday on Saturday night with a din at her home which altenrai i went to Club Morgan. Besides this party, the Morgan was crowded with its usual "Salurday-nightcrs" and guests from tin Ctike-Wormc wedding. Incidental Intelligence O N the eve of her marriage ia man of 75. Mrs. LeonUne Sehreyer. aged 72. of Springfield. Massachusetts, remarked: "I'm r Orabte. hut I can still get a man —1 ^ Mrs. "Red" P ERSONALITY behind Holl> wood comedian Red Skelton, is statuesque. Titian haired Georgia Maureen Davis — now Mrs Skelton. They married on March 9. 1943. Just a year from the day they me* how they are in London %  •The Aral Urna I mat Red ;.i i friend's house he Insulted me." Mrs BkStton Said "He said it would take me another thirty years to become an actress." The second time they metJ Skelton apologised for his mdeneagj and asked her vies s on marrlag^ Nw they have two children Says Mrs. Skelt.ni I houUi like ten children; but being wife. valet, waiter and genera to Red %  a 24 hours a dav ib." South Sea Girls J DON'T know whether the Poio Club arc Importing South Sea Island beauties for their "Shipwreck Ball" at the Paradise Bench Club on July 21st. but I do know that some will '.*• there The Nina Which Will he moored ofT-shore is havlna a special gangway so that visitors can net on board and a platform Is also being %  rnslructcd on the beach. *TlNf.l i> "THE BLACK ROSE" TvaONE POWER OHSOK WBJXS CECltF. AUBHY IAI-K HAWXTNH A Stb iatar,-ra> I-I. ... %  CHARCOAL BOX IKONS DELUXE TH§C (OIHII. I 11 foil 11 # Corner of BnMd and T-dni > *. i. 0 u #; TO-DAY. LAST SHOWS. 5 • t.15 r.M. ••ROYAL W LDDISC" FRED ASTAIRE — JANE POWELL I.LOiii; THEATRE PRESENTS: TIIIO U\ THE WAY By lleachcom bvr Tp %  nun, the %  haw %  nonth-old bs %  I %  i 1. ..-in position at the ie pool. "Th A'IM-Mll.l .1, !ll< %  r I % %  • :. 1 %  V ''i M %  %  %  IS .1 %  l im>. and Ihey %  . and Into ftni egtn to l ou Qu %  xpetlBsil vho v ..Ik Allcr fuui i %  ti fell <.:l Bl ghtoii and was -I I forgo %  !• taui'ht to I % % %  permanently, nrs to Ijcconie good little fish. t i thnc, Ltomgotlm .' A T the EJ laddfOd .'1 i %  ninth a French will th. | ontlnsntal• > have on i %  . %  q nl | oh] %  %  there a bard will permit himself a rue DostnOtl wink sndlonce, or a 1 bardsfl eron n t<< ingl% But the •.ugge.-' be a harp ant to *.hi' nasal pe >Evan the I Ilnv In nyitirt Ti'iinh W ; ... %  I BpS Of ptn ( J.. leer Booble Ki.ocfcerbicker belt %  %  %  ictth uellow rtbbon. and pre* lift siJi'e camelr, edoai vWi red chiffot %  ': . .!.. I I] % %  ton ol tin ; % %  %  • || Ii riot the clothe', tint matter hut the Inl Ihey know well Dial iheli only hi pe %  << being rnve. pers who reaa only the fact, make ariv their home*. %  whole thing u forg .en again. Today I read of another fact, which need not cause panic. Tinspire of Salisbury Ural is growing taller. Perhups Mimeone has got the %  Mints wrong. AfStl nil. %  mad Baigo rn oisla nnouncad I war 31 high. >in7. finj. C IIAIU.IK BUstT sal In hioffks at the Miiu-'i, ol Bubbss: ..f hli right hand was laid along his uppei lip and i^' wai down his nose—a sure -ign ol perturbation. Before him lay letter. It read: — Sir, in sccordanre setts tsdrractsoni riTHeed froB uostr oMes / lierehii hi'a to ni>i'l)' 'or the necessary forms (Ttnbdno ms (o applv lor a licence lo procure false teeth, stdnl in number, for nth J>rref Ilawiuaif, which broke eiyhr ol 1 OS bun. Your. faiihfuUu. //. /tuiiroN-DiT'Nola*. Suet wrote at the lop of the letlei "Passed to Mrs. Glapiron. Animal Dental Welfare Division tlntw II rfaOr* tilth' imf T :iAT vas; and ovcr-semittvi 1 ublk srhkh not only blubberb ihamelebsly at the films, but has to find extra tears every da> io. the intimate affairoil Bin actresses, is now called u|. MI ti spare the tribute of a Sigh f i I film actor who has discovi red that fame and wealth do not ensure happiness. Fain would I cheer up a sorrowing public will the beautiful story ol* the tin\ golden-hntretI girl who, intendIng to bring about a beautiful leennrillation for her lieaiititu parents, shut uhem both up in a room with all their Former h.ux bands and wives The iM*.*iutifui little oaf had got it all wronu. you ace. Or was she being s:i Rupert and Simon — 28 From iht drawer ihe Prolowr ukfi out a powerful magnifying gUti and nrrpi ihrough it at the Wkfi. "Hm, ha. just as I thought." he murmuri in some esdtemer.1. "Here, lii.le heir, you hold thii more steady while 1 look mote closely. That tiny mark it w* thought on!) ically a wonderful piece ol engrsviog. Through this glaaa I can see ihe whole pattern. I'm not muh of an arrin, but I'll try to draw n lor you." Fctchiag peiKil and paper. h wotki I'oJ'y :, r Kupers looki on with growing MIAMI LINEN 36". FLOWERED MOROCAINE CREPE 36 WHITE DUCHES SATIN 36". SLUB LINEN 36'.. WHITE ELASTIC J.l ..•'' %  • 1.37 I. S. . If T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS CROSSWORD i 2 3 A ,4 1 9 f %  A 1 l I ( .7 | I ProvldrO little L**lle With a (lug %  Si 8 Uaetuineaa. I'll IO rum for tli> morning orn ? (6) It H.N Army R AF 181 I* I'm ine mpper iur a trim up. S > riii nan .inifiii. M %  strinm loyera produce me % %  WIIPI. yi^u ee m gin in Duniet i* M Hpeat T do ini. Vou con i >i m tne iTinorrnt. im ixiltn Itp r*\l in Beeumiog. I.. Can • %  made mo t<> end. %  : I A> I .. .wm.ni X InioaWd ii. II ..-,t. ii I>I Sore Mouth loose Bloody Teeth 111*.dins Uni. Horr Mouth a Trrritli Moulh or p*rhBpa aonnha -,"4iT Thgaarfar r*rarrkea—Treat cat Nauih Ainoian EMBD. ANGLAISE THK DAINTIt:ST IN TOWN All the Elite are buying it out at . I HANI'S IT. Hm. lint. 81 IIUI 3I6B .-.-, ,',','.',-.*.-.'.--• -•. %  >-.'-'--.'.'-' 4220 YOUR SHOE STORE 4606 J (; %  these Tasty J Delights j For Your Enjoyment | 2 lb tin Danish Hams A .. Sliced ^acon 9 .. Swiflg Luncheon Beef S .. Vienna Sausage j "Black Buck" Sauce \ Tin. Lamb Tongues 5 .. Cocktail BUculta S .. Salted Peanut* ^ AND OI'R POPULAR S Fi Star Rum — I 13 Bol >: INCE & Co. Ltd. ^ MAL 2310 PisAZA UWOKOWN TO-IIAY • *ommmm WARNRR nm>i UOURISO ACTION PACKrD DRAMA !'. %  .Ia Blaer fcy Itraaa* Hali cAitriu.n — Bali WESTERN HERITAGE STORM OVER WYOMING PLAZA 5SV5J "THIS i Pan I.YON a ODNS < %  ."The BREAKING POINT VKsVlC '" "Mill M \-lil %  • OPERATION PACIFIC a Pat FAST CAIETV THK OARDEN — ST. JAMES TO-IIAY iali a SO Pit. tSBj HINTKDnJSTEH M H>IIUI MJ .. SHIPWRECK BALL" July 21st TABLES CAN BE RESERVED AT JANETTA DRESS SHOP $1.00 per penon Our 1st 20th Century Fox Opening FRIDAY, July I3t*, 5.00 & Release 8.15 p.m. and bcauti When a girl so young and beautiful marries a man like this... ANYTHING .CAN HAPPEN We can supply your requirements — Rylands Mesh Wire for Fish Pots Lacing Wire Hounsells Fishing Lines 6—36 lbs. Fish Hooks Stainless Steel Wire Cotton and Seine Twines THE ii Aim IBM o-oi"i:ii vi IVI t'OTTON FACTORY LTD. Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039 You Should CheckUp and Buy These NOW!! SOUP PLATES DINNER PLATES CUPS and SAUCERS BISCUIT BARRELS TEA POTS MILK IUGS MEAT DISHES Plain While and While with Gold Band. Plantations Ltd. LINDA CHARLES MICHAEL CONSTANCE DAKNKLL BOYKR RENNIE SMITH ... FKANCOISF. ROSAV f.-.~*iv.—... OTIO PHKMINGF.R PLUS: THE ALL STAR TALENT CONTEST .',:','sss.;','ssss.',',;',*> MADAM 1FIL.I. PRKSENTS: STilRBUDS OF 1951 On Thursday. July lllh. 8.30 p.m. iit. OBE THE A TH B In Aid of THE CH. CH. BABY WELFARE LEAGUE CLINIC Under Ihe Patronage of The Hon. V. C. GALE. M.L.C. and Mr. E. D MOTTI.EY. M.CP. • DON'T MISS THESE: THE WALTZ IN BLUE and THE SAMBA • Orrhii.tr* A Box Seals Sl.M; House 72e: Balron* 4r. Tlckels nnd Rcservalion daily, Clobc Theatre and Madam Kill's Itecidenre. II DOS AGENCIES LIMITED Agenta For The CITROEN CARS £ •; I*rcjients • ^ I THK GRAND VARIETY 4JDIC (Evrry Wednesday. 8.30 p.m.) AT THE S GLOBE THEATRE I Tomorrow Niiiht. 8.30 O'clock o with the Film "BOOMERANG" DANA ANDREWS 0; Come and have fun and vou BBS] in the *.l "" QaiSttM J PIT Ike; IIOl'SE 36e; BALCONY 48e; BOXES 60.-. ^ \ wvXrWvv i-vvr#v/v/iV/V*v/^^ EMPIRE I'nlird Arli.K Pinli • CHA-BlLr CIIAP1 IN D "CITY LIGHTS OLYMPIC ROGfR TOUHY CANCSTIKS aim POMfO AND JUUtT" V iMlir HOWARD and Norm. ROYAL la.l Io Sk... loDAV t H and %  H !Pi"i Cfit.iTA To\ tXi-bli0SM T.HRXCY MM Dana A.vnnr.ws m "LAUMA OfV/i'S DOOHWAY* tobnt TAYLOR and Mai THOMTSON HOW l.il Iwi BkMI TO-DAY I llrptil>l:r pTt*nla %  KOCK ISLAND TkAlf § Rlarrlnii 1 rutrru TUCKTO ASk. MAB-f; \ Adrian BOOTH and Bt.* CABOT % Mlf^lltcn I Aonimvuiii— n WAV>WA///V//.V///V>V///W.'//A''*'



PAGE 1

I'\..l I OIK K\KI.\I">IIIIIKAn Tl rsllAY. JII.V I" 1951 BARBADOS AuVOGTCE t. 1 *--— &f -—-i frtlitH BT lb* *W1 Lit Broad II. Brtaaaio*. The Leper Is \o Lou^-r Doomed Tu4n, July Hi. MR I ..III i: I < HI UU I mm FMiuirr" I'VIII I Mfm* b u %  %  •' %  on I rniily %  %  rl maik for son ; '-! b*to nil. I i l*nd Ihe %  ], are %  %  blindness, and IIOAII SATBTV THE Barbados Automobile AM now has 238 members and its bni aim is to have a membership roll which includes as many iis possible <•' %  the 8.000 motorists in tins Island Doftafl tbi period of checking licenses the Association made a drive for membersnip. In conjunction with the Police the Association checked on motorists and handed out leaflets pointing out that as soon as a driver had complied with the law he or she should join the Barbados Automobile Association The, leaflet itself was %  reminder that the uttiOfl was alive and functioning and was courting the support of every motorist i lor its future success. At present there is a Committee working out details of a Nl BJM to accommodate drivers of various types ot vehicles at is done In ihi> Automobile Association in England. There are many services Which the Automobile AsMtciation can render to the pubhe. Already it has been able to influence merchants to let their daily advertisine. ice be used for reminders to moton .t and i %  >!ike to observe UH of safety. The Increasing number of motor vehicles on the roads would Him to indicate 1 thai then should be some means of \ Third Party Insurance The m might throw its Wtighl behind the effort in order that if and when accidents do occur there should be some pro lecSbn left for the bereaved. Tins matter of Compulsory Insurance was discussed in the House of Assembly raari ago and rejected The need is more insistent today and the objections raised then cannot be sustained now. But the Association hopes to do much more. The observance of the rules of safety and the imparting of knowledge which will make lor efficient control of motor Vtttfcll among its aims. It deserves a greater measure of public support. %  %  its Oh Li t ,nt definite!; hawfinr leprosy Is eonI cvplibilitr, me mparts ean Uvu instance* of iso..( vit.ii sigruai %  i -. | v tan of l>. i vita IM Dm ot DM Al f v „f ,, pronm.i Ot ,,, h.**.' ling ., l "; tr .. *.. n un-Md to the toowlsdsa that si In tl i the bore her hu Is i ed froi pel had baan |ivsn .. medical jusband II children, and neither h thn.fth OH sn nfi". (wl.u-li calls tor ruril i 1(lM|{ .,,.,, ,.„ .•i.mal Iep. mifS€ tn cWW %  ' %  %  "••' ,,, • of Incubatfts ..-.%  Louisiana Instead of the dJsssai The CarvilU doctor, t hut) 114: in shame, uchildren SBd adnlewents, an-1 belleVf thai Mrs. llornboRlel, ir Gertrude Hornbostel, using her thai isnerallj acquired In who th Om 1 1 1 1 1 si i> v.,irv. even if It do 1 %  11 i idly hffome iipparri.t until adulthood il> where she inwhen some brsafcdown In bod) %  whan %  ipent her childbaalUi orcha • possibly from u e m weakens the victim. Soon sftsrwards, the Board of Baaltri of Uia Pacific Islands of Tnvv have hern 11 %  Hawaii, ham 4 the celebrated deliberate sttamp) I tutaupeps on uta tnc ... minced that no Inoculst taken effect no mnr< fj nsnt would \,. ., iranap] ml ol tepro iforth in ratura and & CSSSSi instead of being oped wh.it In* kstand, WWW was n i'-prosy. AS „„. „ centuries be treated in an ordinary hospital. a scientific control, ho%  v r ,. w n J.M proved Thus, nt one stroke, thousands h* showed %  long, Intonate fsinlb alneteeatfa century raai ol horroi mishtlormahistory of leprosy, and misl lion, and misplaced ireud—thouhot ( all ihe i.me. The Story Of Miss X Dili I. GIRL TESN-AGB drug addicts are shocking Ihe I'niled Slates with (heir disclosures lo the Senate's InvesiigalinK Committee in Washington. 1 the How %  I... not %  % %  %  ... 10 inoi %  aureed Either suflcssi would tn I \SI.IIII.IMSS WITHIN recent months advertising signs became the subject of public comment and the matter was taken up by the Chamber bf Commerce. A committee was appointed to interview people who used these signs or allowed them to be set up on their premises. The object was to ask advertisers to avoid despoiling the beauty of the districts by using signs which odd net synchronise with the colour scheme. In recent weeks, however, more and bigni have been erected, in the City which do violence to the surroundings. The complaint has been made by visitors and likcal people that in some districts the natural beauty has been spoilt by these advertising signs. It is true that owners have the right to allow these signs tit be erected on their premises but the appeal eejalnsl Unsightly hoardings should not be hist OH those who appreciate the natural beauty of the countryside. In the City there is room for advertising but it is necessary to keep signs and build. ithin the limit of what would be allowed by a Town Plnnmm: Authority. Bridgetown is already unsightly because of its lack of uniformity The Indiscriminate erection of ugly advertising signs can unlv add in it. nea came to %  > hall 1prnay, dire disease, InCUrabM sec ur e* ..1 the aaas, sudde nl y had • %  iana of .. dl.iy but no looser incurable, rather than a loathUtrj with impU tones of filth and in-*nnnnattty. It asUBMtad today that Icounaod out in *'o if handled a* a nedical entity on a basis ot Intelligent tins "f public health 1 1 modem puli. I BS| < it i.ti.iM* mi the diaRnosia of ihe disease tn Ih aarrj sUiReS. BWlil tre.ilment with the tr.iiv.l drusi IhS -nlfones, and tsetion of "• chlldran of leprowt iiarenls. rather than Ihe larsoly needless protection of the Krnorsl public This I* UU fSI of ihiHawaii Board ol llenlth Dawn throush ihe •has possibly been more wioaapraad misinformation about the microbrft-lllus tepr.ie than any other sinBla BCOUlSa Public conception of the disease was founded on nrle'n.,i not ind hai grown In Iniarnatlonal loathing through a hornatlon with its mystery S d long-term incurability, in t, ,, ; ot ^~ dwta si KsTswso^nd Kslsupa-pa li.mliiK I'.v U.nMij ., u %  nt and msds wwaa u nw namivn ((l Vauster had nwful physical ravages of the | wforc g^ng to Molokai, auKS his Belgian region was highly endemic those afflicted wilh the disease and n| ||(1 m ^ ,„. ini .„ lin ,., I 1 '" lls lr€ "" lme "' It In his fomou"We'lvp.i have atternptefi to destroy the 8p ,. w h tl his |>eople. It would word "leprosy" and substitute tho n|V4 \ ,., „ ,,,„. WB j „| .,,, 1 1 m'a Disease, after DM (,„ hi "Some prcicit, I (hli again 11 fhc ridng f of clothe*." The celebrated Belgian priest, Kather Oamien. Ihe 1 .illMolokai. developed leprosy whihworking ininnately with lbs 1 This Impotency of resesre. :hen. put the bw V I Until 1941 the vv.D. no d> : The la moul chsulmoogra oil 11 %  admit that il was of practicsll, no value except (or 1 % %  %  '' % %  %  %  trying to do something for hln %  saatnoi lolans' Pranuh, Kivin Int oar or promaee uUalrom In ubw torn %  tre semation |l nits hill telf to traatmeni in U 1 DUTHH to 1 least two of tha a 1IU 1 '1 si quain) aneai from CarvUle, a > M H 1 %  1 ire fre fi.plin .1 rpK WOI Id % %  Jt all the patients only eight re Blnce 194I. over ISO Ml knTactbrlly afreslad mffar 1 t have passer thtough II %  las -of Cai irltlc Laptassi ium Manj oUv 1 : lufflclently '.i> gi i^aik to society, but % %  I I'M n marked anougl to he recoKiu/.ii fiv ar-unwilling to try t< nl'. which stii brand* a for.. %  .1 (Lin,.' :. oddity. %  vh-tim of lepro i and unple It is hi : %  -.' rh.s to i'. ISUI J;i .. %  a short coum %  COOgy The b|i battle In : nize that leprosy is a di "SR'JSSTT? hu ">*!" .' U.WCW1M J..1.I nl jpjproach to his charges and his 1 flaunting of the .simplest sanitary • .... its unique bacillus, and HanaanoUC "i Hensenlan for prii-autions. The only other at' .. ( i.i W11.it the lep.-r has ever lendant on Molokai to contract Vl was to DS regarded as a the O l sea t S was Father Peter, a 1 k parson, instead of a monster mm who had a habit Of who mutt bo pent up and shunJng his bold head constantly. A ncd f>r the misfortune of innoleprous patch developed where he ccntly contracting a diSSSSC which M.atehod i was Incurable until very recently. >ne pau-h Leprosy is not only curable, hut erratic likun* if promptly never and propeily IraatSd, /. Ult CsrvUlfl BUtlt T,„. my ,,cr y ..,h., h., %  .„ ,,;:.;;-„:;: 'gj? did nl prOW tO N.ive COtlH from an andamlc region of LcnUsiang Hnw -„ ....H-V th ,,. M -8M£33 K •" : ft : The doctors l and, with iis usual behaviour, the disease sain manifested itself. naked the disease alM. has clothed it with horror It WSJ ; pularly supposed to be cont< rtrude Hornl Stsnls] Stein, tha blind odltor o maga/uu-. Ills Sfai The) have roughl Ith 1 %  larniln tUon gno gn ..; ett sted b; UM] light [OT, who na I persensllive I" Waon Ol the attitude of the clean" world to an "unclean* IJving iis a leper in a nonlep1 %  %  .11.1 is somatinv 1 too difficult for the individual It is regarded as a dislmet triumph b) the Hoard of Health in thai It ttlemeni upapa Is out in the nor 1 Honolulu, his snd that he 11 ployed in a largi 1 where his employer llow-workers know hln 1 man who once was nffhrivl with leprosy II ung an' hi .! Ie ilgni iU ,.. :-,.,,;,,. ,,.,; llmenl, WDO Iti .!. and that '", '" 'IV ';'"' "" if %  utomaUcany 0, ni "" M"h'hal i>rcause hr l .."..( two American soldleri. of contajuoir. roday u,ts. actually. Il( w.,ri.i w 11 Corning from ti.ought t> he the most difficult of widely divergent %  ecUona ol tha all lacifji ^o transmit, and leprosy United States, with no family prainSn Imposslbla I ntrocl lapoaltlon to the except -1 m early age in locuhr>th %  cqulred leprosi 11 lions where the dlseaie is enit.i ll,>th I demie—that Is. where it thrives geecUe artist '• %  had 1>; ,1 ui.ites it..elf In Ihe Ihoaa section, are <"" Pi II ' %  Ihe QuUCoast awai of the south"!""'' of 1 era Slate of Florida. Texas, and Louhuan The" 1 %  ,uxt.|H*ltlon to ponions 01 in.( _^, t||( pU|1#d ,,.„, li( Pacific Coaai BUfe ol < aiifon. ; .i I;I||() 1v . ,. that il is dimcult to cay wheiliei* Man) pi.iful pCOt endemk m u*:|o| and lendona unUI H I '"1 "10 '-^ ;i The San Jooquin valley of possible hn Ihe i aUent tO have l 1 "% %  nothing I California now la regarded as an fingernail* on his knuckle,, end H '" r endemic area, since eight rases bli i"i erumpiad and tvalopad there r/aiAcd Tbi vlsltoi U) %  1 Barllini I l 'die foct It U net known what makes ; „ i:i „,.,„, mam pii,. M i have section eodemli There have ban mub noaaa Thl Tso li due lo tori lo relate tha Iranandaaion cartilage lb tlon Thi i the djataaa to alimate, nationUllll ,,f n. %  ., caused iht>. race, diet, and terrain, but either by Uv Il has defied %  ecsTelateon 11 rk ,li '' %  ' b.-. (M0fCINC—Practice) ::nd ol Part I. %  Prt 1 ol %  •' ,.(. >, isai 1 ., %  >,. ....„ 1 %  %  1 %  %  ..,, .,..1 %  | 4M ot ii. ., %  fuM BiMl n r %  aaaru'w • 4.arbo IEIOSSOIIMII Aid I Ilia, I .s...00-a-U < k lle:a (lly EVE I'KKKU'K) HBDdin 11 BUOENB MAUSER, beat known under hu saaumed 1 ut more romantic name ot <;.,.-. lord Rauaar, e/ho clalma lo know ting encrgv nd alMiiy vitality, arrived In London—and went atralghi .to bed. V. the EUa Maxwell of Ihe iancier food faddists, the modern a-man himself, was lust 1 lain old red. So he did the plain, old-fashioned thine tot k 1 nap (borUontall} 1 demons! 1. iii : %  : • ., %  1 practla what 1 For the Mauser way to according to his thousands written and spoken word: Body Slant at an >i degrees with the head lowei than the fi-< l Still up and about again a short time after the world's highestp a 1 d dietitian (around £3.500 in every en books, broadcasts lectures and selllni the ingredients for his special menus) shrugged off thl lion of I particuTtaen t*> ehar 90UI Ins 0d into . WlCe' It ray last ha lookand muni 1 tierman-i. vented 1 had my ith in.-. I woul • to ... %  [erfaJ luleai" The mixer goes along with him on e'l lectme enaagementa It will tnaki iti Drat publli appi n Monday nubl a I .1 Hans,., will put over his formula for health. liSpplnaai and n long, long lite ana 1 •''" J As well as the mixer he %  I. htight line In patter, a aa lj"t aea appeal an 0* ""personality to gtt tin,md ( OAffl lottlt n u H i; 'commended fui I 1 < %  usai %  %  Jnjr smiled I) TO gat tha audience lo Iry out his "such delicious drinks" of cabbage juice, (dtimmed milk. voghourl. black '.< %  er'i yaaat "Do you think c will go for Bauan bis lalad, ate a saussge %  Had %  r. %  sty 1 get so many letu n hi n England, I am InrUlad. >>ul 1 am %  ad, lOO 'they ask such primitive questions hke Where raa I bus blackstrap atolg on tinDuche of Wind 1 % %  dlselpU >. 1 and has written a foreword t" tl of his book Bother dc%  for throe %  m 1' asioni he OOOkefl In C hi brations onlj 'Extravairanl Wild Rice N In eKchange. 'Ml Qarl 0 taushl mi % %  women why (or example thej chattel so much It's B" It' plain nervousness." Hollywood. I n* i> 1 aat I Qgrbo ti go to parties |0UM i wagon 1: 11...1 sr's %  %  .-Xti avagant as tbe wild rice 1 1 %  3imU In a smooth blue suit and uhil.' ^ 1 Ik shirt. Hi, favourite diet dOcto with gratified pride ai lie declaimed: "I-n't it %  %  %  1 x I i have chang %  .its of ihe world." 1 prefer Jimmy Duranti mlng-up: "Dal molaaaas and wheat germ and voghourl dOTrl reallj maki 11 Uvi 1 seems longer On Waaaing Up I evi tl w e 1 to wash up? ouln with her work as arranger and composer, lut though her income remained between L70 and £80 a week, she found it was not Enough to keep her supplied with the Irenendoui caiantity of narcotics she now desired. She spent more than the £65 a week on the il) drug capsules she used every day. Soon it iccame necessary to steal to get extra money. Finally she turned to prostitution. X tells of a hotel in the New York -uiiurh of Bronx where clerks sold drugs. "It was protected by the police. There was ine particular patrolman we knew as Smilty s/ho went in there at seven or eight o'clock it night until he went off duty early morning riun he'd hang ground until the girls paid HE BLUFFED 'Il there was any complaint about m ;n brought in by girls then Policeman Smitty bluffed his way and warned the men that il they didn't give the girls their money h**'d send them off to prison. And then he would Kike a man aside and say, 'You know I could have taken you to prison. Don't you think I deserve some consideration. So he made money on all angles." Miss X tells how drugs were being open I > sold in some of Manhattan's best known dl 1 %  tores, cafeterias and night clubs. "You go in the drug store and you ask the man for needles, and if he thinks you look ill right he'll just fish them from underneath the counter and give them to you, no cautions asked." Often when she had obtained enough drug) for herself she joined other pedlars gellin| narcotics to school children. She persona ly knew a "couple of hundred" child addii Is and had "unfortunately sold drugs to them Miss X was more sorry about this phase of her activities than any other, and told the 1' %  ,estimators: "It's pitiful to see these young kids buying the stuff. I don't think they know what they are doing. 1 know youngsters who go to department stores doing what they ell "boosting" (shoplifting), and who are turmn\ Into burglars, Sometimes they take th ,i [Irl friends with them—12 or 13 yean old." In her travels from one urea to another ir %  earofa ol nsacotics Miss X met many tra-m voting people whose lives had been ruiltet by narcotics. BABY, TOO Her friends included a husband and wif who thought taking drugs was just as norm: BS eating and drinking. "They even ended u living drugs to their baby only 11 mon'h ld Whenever the baby cried they wonT give him a shot of heroin to shut him up." She knew children of 11 who were sellm Il snd other eightand nine-year-o'.d who acted as errand boys for dope pedlar* At Coney Island amusement park she ha watched pedlars who were so desperate I sell their stuff to "hike someone out of gom money" thai they would accost any man a woman in ihe street—whether or not they were known addicts—and say. "Want anything? Do you use horse (heroin)? Would yo like to try cocaine?" And her own future? Miss X hardly dare to be hopeful. Her greatest hope at th moment, sne tearfully told the investrgator was that her tragic story could help.to sav ithei poung lives "from being sold into the if the drug habit.' World Copyright Reserved 1 —I..F..S CLOSED FOR REPAIRS Advocate Stationery U UllSIIM The ideal FILLER fur repairing damaged surfaces on Plaster, Walls, Birch, Wood etc: For livsidc and outside use. Can be washed or painted over. -BAWL PLASTIC" An Asbestos plugging compound, especially recommended for fastening Screws In Stone, Concrete, Brick and all types of BUSOBfS'i WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER &. CO. Phones : 4472 & 4687 BF.CKWITH STORES KEEP THE GRASS DOWN WITH RANSOMES LAWN MOWERS 14 inch MOTOR MOWERS WITH CRASS BOXES SUITABLE FOR USE ON LAWNS, Elc. 16 inch GAZELLES wilh Motors and does a really Good Job in Casting out Fields and Thick Crass. DA COSTA & CO., LTD. FURNISHING FABRICS A WONDERFUL RANGE AT THE KEENEST PRICES! Need we remind you that we are unexcelled for Furnishing Fabrics We are showing a wonderful range by SANDERSON'S which include. CRETONNES and TAPESTRIES in LINEN and COTTON. llvMIMV tV CO.. LTD. DRY GOODS DEPT. CHICK TMSE IXCCPTI0NAL V41U£S TEA l lb pk. ORANGE PEKOE .SO ITPHOO TIPS . CHOYCE TIPS ... M HORNIMAN'S 40 uy.it ROM to UPTON'S TENDERl.EAF 38 MYNAH W JAMS Bi-uk Currant— .40 per !UI. Bramble 40 per Dtt. Marmalade 32 pM tin. SI'MIAI.S CARR'S CRACKCR8 II 64 pc. IU CREAMS It Pk >• %  COOK'S PASTE r 6 cents per lln TEA TLMF. IWMK .15 |. COFFBK t lb pk. [ IPTON-S PUM 51.04 MAXWKI.I. IOUSR .85 CARDINAL 82 IIEIl WHITE lll.l.'K .90 : • MOUNTAIN' .77 CHOYCE .70 .44 FISH in tins MACKEREL 34 SARDINES .18 & .20 KIl'l'KH SNACKS ... .24 GRAB .58 SHRIMP 75 ANl'llc PVIE.S 4 COD ROES .36 FRESH RED SNAPPER PHONE GODDARD'S WC DELIVER A%*y^lVMV////AV////////V///////////////''' J



PAGE 1

11 I SDAV II I \ in 1*51 IIVKBAIMIS Unix Ml 'VI.I si M s CLASSIFIED ADS.J^J^-55.5"LTlLKPHOdl ISOfl The ci.T.. of Marriage. DeaUM A, Mn a. and In % %  ..* %  1 M o< weekd... IM . gajgOfa ..1 M % % %  3 MM Mi 4 nnti M MM fur |B %  MM -" BON I'll n il*lOn Ju, 1 %  anaa iWere* Forde Lew nl FOR SALE %  MHN eheru* t.ee*i 71 emle and %  .Ml -lvJ., M ..,J. !.. M UVftl* J . % %  j UH..J MB, ..,! %  fcord ••> .M...dtl*l AUTOMOTIVE la-He. I „.,. V M. VOUB1M above rrOw. at 430 oriurk *•>' I .'.no .h-pe Appl> to-day tor Sharon MoravUn Church I Earbedoa Acrndf Kmg *Um No card* Friend, are Invited I Ralph IhiaiTir, Muriel Fordc %  > Wllrna Forde I CAB One Hl^tM at U %  ei. > il in nod condition. and i Board and Shingled rJaaaae in Mahogany lame. 14 i IS %  %  • l *i In Mr. IN MKMOKiAM %  m i >.. .i '. She died 4> friend Ever lo be lemembeicl b8 P Small Huabaiidi. Aileen. Don*, f I Muriel %  Deuiil.t'iJ A, K M.rl.iV L ftnuili .lliolii.iIn-Lo. • Will THANKS AMafVNK—Wr beg through thli medium ..II iroac kind friend, who "in -realti* c.i-di and .MI*.!.,!*! -nn !. %  m out raaM wmvmmi nu-nl by inc death i>( our llorapio All. IM • -I CABS—1*50 Horn. Minor la.Oon Mile* 1M Morria On lord .00o Mi<<* Like NrlH Morrti Hi> l| HP Low tamtm is Pord Pieie.1 nm Mile* %  very rood condition 11B Chr>*ler Roval A bargain Fort Rov.il OanH I.id Telephone 4J04. • T M Sii ELfcXTTRlC .\AHne-n^c.EHATOR ~^^ cT.b^ ft. r U ll width freealng chamber Brand ROW unit Reconditioned throughout, may hr mapecird al Leo Yard. Cheep%  or Applv II I Smith. Sanoford, 5i Philip. ; T SI 1 mPSSHXS MOU> •"**' 1 :M SI .DEW w lid JT0O equate fact of land tr.rrcio 'iiuale at Chapman Street. %  — %  Ml "miepark Road. WtrtabM tidier). Uia,ii>f law. two ttMinmi. BreakTlie kow Baeement Electric Light and Governi.ient water metalled T* above premleee will be art up ( Pr r^H_I V , fwjiwtinon al our Offta* !" Wtool on Friday IJth Jjj, t MI I %  ;...: ,..; I Un.nl brtwrrn t-who..r. of P m dail> rirrpt HUIIQIM VMRWOOI) A noli > S. : ... Hi i. 1111 In I I %  HltrrtHJERATOK One 111 Wralinil hoiBM. In food oorking order. Applt U II T.inpro Phone 3044 or %  =:* IS6M I f 11 Hri'ltKirRATt)l— Oi\r Sui*tl.liuimna Relilaeralvr In p*i(l worku.if order. Apply Uraa Johnaon. Can. dUn Bank o( Commerce 10 1 M--U l.lli I in i-li riblPU • tendered ua 00 the oreai deain <•! Taphnea Hill U Collate 8t John. Edward ihnaband'. Bwatace 1 Inn. *i.iu niMerai. Linda 1 inu.lh< the ,t cur ANNOUNCEMENTS HOLIDAY rUBWJRTS—Orenada-I.le o( Spirr SANTA MARIA lovclleit hotel In Caribbean. Ratea Irotn fl W per head per dav ORAND HOTF1In beat residential dlftrlrt under Government Houac hill Katea Irom %  00 per head per day SEASIDE INNOn (iiand Anie Bathlnl Beach Rate. Irom M00 per head per day. Knqulrin M I) M Slinerr. Gienada MM-71n GOVEBN'MLNT NOIUIS RKHTAtRANT AMI CAKRBN AT KKAWKLL AIRI'ORT AppUcaUon .nitoTitad from 1: u n h i at r tom t Ibt nubIIKIIIIR'HI ul .1 Ki"l;uinint and 1 Canwtn .u BtwU Airport 2. Tne 8uccf>s(ui ipplkani will be required tu totac Into i %  Eor UM proper ctrryBfl ( >ui ui ihe Hrrice, etc 3. AppUcettonj %  nould be >ubmitlod in a iealfd rnvrloihr iin.i i^ UM Coloni lary (and nol to any offlccr by oaine) to reech the Co tou el Beej<'Uirv\ lHliir BOl later than [, m *ni Knday the 13th of July, 1951. 4. The envelope kTtOUld be tleurly mniKed "Application (or Mtebiubment <>f i Rerteureni MM] ; Canteen nt Stavvell Airport". 3. The Government does not hind ttsW to accept any applitaIlon. 6. Further particulars may bo obtained OH apphi'tion to the Colonial Secretary's Office. 30.6.51.—2n. MECHANICAL. MOWER. One Ranaome : A|i|itv .1 (' :...i aCSCIHXdfaNaWCS ANMIDINt TOOTBrASTB Start aavlni your Amm-I dent Tooil P.-ile Bn*ei Wilhln a abort while v.,i may be Ihe winner of one of the follow log IM Pru. MdOO. tnd Mae IIS (XI 1 m 00. 1.1.81— MR COMBS A BRUlOfjaji for Doll N. hlpntenl al Bn-ee Wealherhead LtJ 10 T II I CKiAHETTE L1UKTKKS New -Ivl.Oilprfiit aliape* all of good quality and maiked Cheap KNIQirTs DRC'i STORES 10 1 Jl-In F.STFRBROOK PENR-We have Ihem • 'a" a few ipare nlba Call eailv Knlghta iPheonlKi i 7 M 1.1 EMITY TLNS A quantity of V lb Una. auitable for hoMIni I wnly Dakerlra Ud Dial 4Yj < FRERE PH.OHIV SI.IN.; Y,iu r.i. %  M IdiIrnm our Soda Fountain KMi.lirs pheoiuii 10 T SI—Sn FARM" POWDERED Fl'LI. CHXAM MiLKSupreme quality and only H n •II. (in and II M per l-lfc tin Oet tin .. .t.. (1. George • Re.lorv. S milra from lown or a bua route — a bedroom.. giiRfcaai room, dining .00m and breaklaat room verandah on S.H.th Sid, Co.npan. *•'•' %  T '*ahone and .1-1:,. <, t ,. x about '. aerea ,4 grouiwl. %  urrouodrd bv atone wall on J id... v.lidu b.i|H t .r atOM -iih ahingle roof O-rugr l.t J t r.K.m. ,„K1 ueual I %  InapofUon on .ipplK-allon 10 the Ml*. laker Will br pi;( up f lq aakj „ auC (ion at our Offlcra on Friday aoth July IM| at NOTICE MtalnBiai riargr u-e* n rent* Ml reel! S-ndi,,! 3 i rj. — ....r 14 wortfa 1 reaia a e..rd ^ee* 4 inli a HOUSES re mi 'iMin %  1 VITW si t.,„ . o— aju, 1-0 bedr.^-n. n.,.i., aj. lenwneaa Boat aea-b-ithr^ poaaeaalon AgaX, nut door la B l.yract. NOTICE FLATAt Coral Sanda, Worthing 1 modern fumiahed gal. good eea bathi.j ror lurtr-rr partKulara Dial I1M Aim. 1 aaj |aj no JI tin "IIMSITO -From Augvart let Oardon Gap Worttueaf > badrooma. garage, telephone ate For p*rlieulare Daal 49M betw.n lam an.1 %  %  •! II n I .. MS HI T.-pl,..1. ..T..I ,1 break I... 4III ,-lCAHBINGTON A SEALY Kl.udlng latwl 1 POCI.TRV FARM aaaVaaMang View oi me in llau in ..-I other Poultry applian.*-, a wrll a. (•rvtit .lock o( %  Good oceupation for retired man Reaaon for sale owner leaving Ine %  •land iViauii* mtereiicd write O %  M Advocate i T.l-ln. TO III TWO HaU>RtH>US with running wa|i-r It. I^wrence Gap r..i |...rtx-ula Dial gM H 7 SI In Pl'aVLIL MIIMIS 1 I ,.k ....... Re EaUIr nt .RT1N l.l*THl BUTCHEa d. H HEXF.II1 Ql> >N ,., B ii. ila*.i or claim I Ma 1 UM aafaaa l the parL.h i.f S.mH I'Mllp w 11 Ihia laland on Ihe Und dav ItW aaa hereby required lo aei laculara of their rkalma duly att—ted to the imdereagned Loulaa Buleher thc-.dminiatralria of UM Balate of Ihe d-crmd in care of Meeara Camngta-i %  Seal*. Luraa 8tiei Bridgrtiwri. S.ilicitora on or before the llh da> o( 11 %  ( il after which date I ahall pro K.-0 1.. diainbote tiw -".•!. ..r UM daoi .,^1 -hu Dir garUai mtiiied thfran-aard only lo %  •1 ..liter. I U1.1II then have had notice. %  d that I wtll not be ILible *!." Ih* BreU or art. part Ih. prreon of a. hoar debt lllil-l'.-l -ird thla Uth da 1 itidebli dnt of June IMI LOUISE HI TCHW %  '... oi n.f r.i.i. Martin Lot her Butrhrr I II teala per apaie '"•" %  "< cno-oe II r* I II BO on Skiddvl BOVI KHESI MIKI < 0MP1 NTSATtOM in I LOOO VICTBU %  kuflcred .1 .iiinn ih. August 3l>t. IMP, w,ll bi %  '.e. Tho I'.ivn.ru .,111 eaaVj, Moidav July It. 1 %  rVlth tho Utl.i> A l. II Tur*e1a>. iul> 11 % umanie-s oommeaca with the ratter ] to R. t\.l in.-.ii. iiii. 11 whose surnames | with lattan s to / one who has nol 1 %  : Htion will ODJ pefarona who have otnclillied vlaims and vvhosi ii.iim.nave beet Conunltlf rlath prrs.111 ihould bring witli him his birth or 1 certificate laafl 1 %  % % %  ; %  ,.. re Mini tei ot .1 re co a Pua ed O iu inK Ihe person's pjnitJI lian naiii* Ibe Booea I'KIIHSSIOVAI NOIHI Thai la to Inform my patient, and Ihe f>ublK> that in> Denial OlTtce will be :toaed rroen Jly tth and i.l be reopened m J.ilv (3rd Dr li ill Iff • III—4n SHIPPING NOTICES SHAHES X 1-rrference Bharea of Eino each In Applewhalloa Limited Snare* of El each In Knlghla Umiled be aold bt public romprtition at the re of Ihe underaigned on TtiuradJy lllli da, July liai at J o'clock COTTLE. CATFORD A CO %  Jlll-fci rod. The iinderMgned will ofler for aalf 1 thou OfBie. No IT High Slre-t Ilintg.iov,! on Friday Ihe !*ik gay al Kljr. IMI at t p.m. parcel of land containing S.44J *r,uare teel. .nuate on HI Btephenl Hill. Black Ho-k si MtoldgL with lh thereon, called "Th. Neat" containing ) public room*, bedrooma, with uaual n> any d' between Hi <> m application to Mm ATFORD A CO AUCllOIt Drug Store and try the beat milk obtainable Tho 8-Ib family ilir la really economical Inalat on "Parm" for thaake of your health and your pocket I' lour dealer cannot tupply phone HI* 31 6 SIt fn. KliOTII (f-ACILITlFS) AT SFAWrXI. AIRI'ORT Applications are invited from interested persons for the establishment of Booth (Facilities) at Sea well Airport for purpose oi 11) Bookstall and News Auenl (2) Local Handicraft (3) Novelty Counter (4) Tuiii'i 2. The successful uppluam will t. required t<> enter Into -' t'""Ireel toe tue proper carrying out „f the terrice, etc. I. Applications should be submitted In a sealed envelope and uddrcssed to the Colonial Secretary (and not to any ollleer by name) to react] tha Colonial Secretary's Office nol later than 4 p.m. on Friday the 13th of July. 1951. ., 4 The envelope should t>e clearlv marked "Application for establishment of Booth (Facilities) at Sea well Airport 5. The Government does not bind talll to accept any application 6 Further particulars may ue obtained on application lo the Colonial Secretary's Office. 30.6 51.—2n GALVANISE SHEETS heavy gauge •1 30, • 11 Si 00 Aleo Aluminium -.win fl ft I It 10 ft At Ralph raid* ltardwood Alley. 10 T SIm DER-1 large Pine Larder in gotx on. Mutable for Hotel or One. Reaa.inably priced Phone 110S g 7 51—Jn ROOL CHOCOLATE BARS in gieat demand Call early ipheunio 10 7 11 3n Charlie Kui and wa will order haven't got II In Mock A 10 I f n. 1'SitION VNITS Ft)R t'P• KB — Ready packed In Burton I 13 Spring' %  row. % %  in 31Limited QuDhUly available Apply linm-dlat'l. to The Standard AgjanCI taTdaai Co 14 Swan Street. Phone MID TWIN PLEX SHAHI-RfEHS Sharpen pour Raaor Rlade. with thla well known Sharpei.er-They get a Life lime Edgr KNIOHT S DlU'fi STORE 10 7 SI2n. WFLD1NG MATERIALSElectrode. In alaoa Of I. I and ID* alto bronre ateel and flu for Acetylene -eldini i:;.|iiire Auto Tyre Company, Trafal gar and Spry SUeet* Phone 3*00 10 t Sl-I I n GOVERNMENT NOTICE Caah 10 7 91 al S p m M McEiiome.. Chevrolet Sedan Car. IH7 lii, Car Both In working able for tail aeivicr Term* R ARCHER MfKFN/lt %  T SI to PERSONAL The public are here!,, wail i'i erotfli I., mi iie ETTA HIIIM. %  1 .a I do not nold iiiaelf rr.pOT.ible for her 01 al ontractlng any debt or debta in mv 1.1 me unleu lo a written order .igned svl V vs P C sKFjrTT ..T, Illi, gUU-DOfl %  FRANK HOLDER, lie la me re l-n.l. %  H AMI1. u-eek 71 oenfa 4 inordi — over M >rd week A canta 111 1 r CAI'AUlJt HOUSEKEEPER vate home to live in Applv No 00 c o Advocate Advtg Statin* "irrienre 10 1 KiolUtl.. AI "UM %  \l Vy /I l \SU I IN. IIMIII.K IVAN Z.I S.S "ARABIA' m aclarduled lo aalt |i Bourne ll~.h June, Briabane Bnd Jurat, Port Alma Ittit June. Sydnn..„-.„, July h. -.riving Trindad end July. NOTICE 1 I .1e..rn Augu.t ,__,_,_ sH milT I'AlltY H acheduled -1 APPLICATIONS lor one vacant %  > %  I atf fASW BagMTl UOo JlrJMt. WgrMl QuoORI Ihillp. \eair> Exhibition tenable nt |hg (land mid Julv. Briabane end Jd ly Augual. Melbourne mid Auguat. Lodga School will be received \iha |"2f Bn *eaat tm ...ter tawa s,.. rasj from Ihe Par. ParenU and roll Red ol Ihe rhlal Treamre r Ouardiana time and plai T-.Mle.l 1 Office will bo .1 !•, SCOTT. > the Vealry. St Philip. 47 M ajn NOTICE VIII, Cargo r chilled and a' Trinidad I %  ;! WindABVEmnSE in llttABVOCATB i..alU> Act. I %  M Notice 1* hereby given that JoagBtl llarne*. a labourer, formerly reading gt Moiaaru. Si Peter, died aa a re.uH of an accident when employed al Vaueluae Factory. Saint Thomaa. and that com* pen*aton haa been paid into the Court. .li the dependant, of the aald Jmeph %  drcea.ed. are hereby i.u tired to appro Appeal on Jul>. IM. 1 Oalad tin Hi, •t -i day of June. Ittl F G TALMA. Acting Clerk, A C A S3 g M In NOTICE vacant Bulkcley Fund ruhlblllun tenable at any aecond grade achool of the laland 1 receivrd by me up in the I4lh Candidate* muat be aOTM In at 1 aliened clrcumatancea aetiiemem In Si George or Hat i^ 1 .ted there and mual not be ,. gojajj h-ptiwnal cerlimate and lelle I il.lnia*ler of the acho :h applicant alletvda must accon 1 applUallon Forma of appllrall-i %  %  •>ed Inrni me .. MASON. Clerk. Vri ad •* uraam 10 T 51 Si NOTICE PARISH OF ST JOBS Appllcnnnn. for one '!• Veitrv EahlbiIton al the lodge School will be received bv the underaigned up lo 100 p.m Ml Thursday Ihe 11th July. 1H1 < andid.ilci rouit be the aont of I'aOahlonera In atraltened elrcumitarvcn ami not le than %  yrara nor more than year* old on the date of the eamin.i111 which will l-y hald at the Schonl 10.30 am. on Friday the 13th July II. Apploationa forma can be obtained my oflUe during office day* and hourly Bapllamal certlBealea lo acrimi n.ifc 1 ,st: IMI1I.A aSPAWOL ORIENT Al S^I:i !" ? N ^^l SILKS Elf. TIIANI'S fO-DAY S NEWS FLASB JOHNSON S STATIONI KV ANII IIAHItWARI. will be rlo^rd TBDBIDAT. row u* Slock-Taking BOCFR FOR JACOBS ORIOINAU AND ST1U, THE BEST J APPLICATIONS FOR Till: HtlXTION OK A WOODEN CANTEEN AT GRAVES END BEACH Applications arc Invited from persons who may be interested Ute erection, at their own expense, %  Ad running of a Canteen at Graves End Beach lo be situated to Ihe South of Ihe Govei iiment Bathing Shed, for the purpose of gelling soft drinks, sweets, tea, takes, but not alcoholic drinks. TIM buildum. the desmn ami construction of which will be subji'ct lo the approval of the Colonial Engineer, should be of wood pproximately 18 feet by 20 feet tfilh a shed attached in uTonl Rent for the land will be charged be rate of $2 per month. The successful applicant will be responsible for the water supply and for the disposal of waste ler and refuse. I. The Canteen shall ndt operate when the Rifle Range is nnri the successful applicant shall .,11 milltaty regulatin t such times. 5. No permanency of tenure guaranteed and the successful applicant may be required to move the canteen without compensation one month's notice. 1 Permis*ion to creel | no* r will not l>e tegardi %  for future apfkiaeetaORI lltM tvof T. Applications should be forwarded In sealed envelope* adla Iha Colonial Secretirv (and not to any officer by name) so as to reach the Colonial Secretary's Office not later than 4 p.m. on Friday, the 13th of July. 1851. The envelope should be clearly marked "Application for the erection of a Canteen at Graves End Beach" fl. The Government does not bind itself to accept any particular application. 30 6 51.—2n o Bo* Depi I 51—In. l-osiTKiN OFFERHD ' %  I quired lor our office Salary 040 00 Applicant mual have eiperlence and knowledge of caah and account* Student with School Certificate will aleo be conalderaO Write .latin* quail ItcaUoni and referancea Aiplu-alloni ahould be po*ted and not brought in JOhnaon* Stationery 10 7 51-3" (Kl AM (RAlkERS Supplies Always Available MISCELLANEOUS WANTED TO err 1 gJCWINa MACHINE i1 of u*e price* paid Apply to Mr* Vaughi r I I Hi and 1-robvn Stre.-t. 10 7 SI 3i r Vestry, SI. John S7M en Ml SI CAR INOI'STBY AORII'IITI RAI BANK AIT. IMS la Ihe aridlMr* haldlai .pe.laii, Hag a|aln.l Raaeh* rianlallan. Ht. Lao TAKE NOTICE tha lo.r ..l-.ve I under the provaaloni of kgalnal Ihe aald Plantatioo, % %  Agricultural year 1*31 lo aoaarl ragMi the AgiKilfldral Aide Act. 1005. I.OVI A I OI Ml NOTICE LOST late and Abel aavtl %  Mag* raae return In M I Avenue. Dlack Rock. 10 7 II I...I In Bridgetown on Friday 0th Julv 1 ham attached by a amall brachain Finder will be reward-d %  returning aame to the ADVOCAT, ADNfUTISlNf; nr.PARTMFNT 10 7 31-Jn 'a*e'e'e*e*a'.'e'e*e'-'e*e'e'.'*e'''e'-'a-'-'CHIROPRACTIC 'FtCTio"ei or *m ••" 7M( ^ I s E A S E CKiropractic Ad itiil meal 1 Wdl Reitorr tke Cause fi Ua Stakas & lv TW.II.HI. A o arl i .','.-.'.-.'.-.-.--.-.-. A. To-dav G.A. SaH \gg "Home I %  iu->: BOOK whirl, make* GOD'S WAY OF SALVATION PLeVIN" rie-e WFllO ror ooo to Samuel Koberti Gospel Br-ok and Tract fiea-rlce, 30, Ontral Avenue, Baogar N. Ireland %  ^Mc oa* Steamship C 9nc. NEW YORK KF.rtVICa. %  J Mill %  NKW OR 14 COA J'"i AIM-aalM 13th Jm COA HOAMFJC Ulla ITlh Jui COA PATRIOT' ..ill* llth Ju SERVICE irnve. lUrbad II...I. 1.1— Kit CANADIAN SERVICE Sail. Mealraal '-ALCOA I'EiJAM's 'ALCOA IM'llrTAS .,i COA PBTHR IR 1 .alii for SI Lawn ROBERT TIIOM l-TD. — NEW YORK ANI> QOlaV SERVICE M'PI.Y:—DA CORTA CO. LTD -CANADIAN HERVICK SAGUENAY TERMINALS I .WUHAN SERVICE En.111 Halifax. N.S. & Monlreal -SVNWHIT OAK llll.l IUNDIAI L"AUINC! DATES 1 .p..i.a An i-.i.. n.i. Itarhad... I'.K SEKVK E Froin Swansea. LiveriHiol ami (ilaii"M I .,'ilid A.rl.al %  %  MHO ll.arpeal l.la.aow Hale. BatggOUOS -31WAVH" gJune JI Jun* il June U "BURAFMEAII'' t Julv 7 July n July VRNDOR' II Julv 17 Ju*. 13 July 4 Auguat l*.K. & CONTINENTAL SEKVICE ARenIs : PLANTATIONS LIMITI 11 — Phone 17!!:. ADVERTISE n rm: ADVOCATE HARO TIMES [ WITH BACKACHE OfW. d-a la a*u (f *af. aJdnay actiaai L I FH IS NOT ao good srberi roe are troubled with ba.k-.he, rtseamadc paint, mlf, "'"I Bbudea and i<.mi, tambagu o* comrmip vinnarr diaorderi dug tp alugzlab kadoey moo. 1 # Why put up with pain and dlta cornfort when rou might get hapop rehrf by takmaDooo'i Ba.ka.-bP Kidney I'llli They •timuUi'n*d cieante alugjpib kjoaeri and SB hrtp them to rid (be blood of • w agac god anal other impurities wtiKh rah'rwiar might cullect iffj the tyttem and cauar littreaa. Doan'a Puis have herpeJ rrutnT rhouaan li ; lot ih-m help TOO. NOTICE onlt the very beat , Swltgerland r a n \ %  III • Adji INI 1 HA VI 1 v ii rm r| Wa HI li 1 ^. 1 l %  \ istii M.I 1 II M Pa POOP: 1 1 "ii 1 1 CHANCERY SALE %  "1* place and %  PROPERTY -\ UM."! 1 UJ THAT laland ahan I bounding n Fotde decea*n on Unda of .-. gg 1 .->'.. %  i p eorabn %  Haaa R. aaoouagfa v dweiiua errclioiu on Ih.. raid land ei %  .aid plan tat LI'SET PRICE E l JgagOd. Pate ott Sale ink Julv. Mi. %  ,Ue.l Applebv 1.1 the pariah of Bab "f Adrianlande id Oti. .and* MOP ..I M BMhb c, la..(la of Joahiia Kmn and on a p,>bl I-H-I lending In Sai.it rtao ihe 11 Tia-tim, ected aivd built alartding tnH D* %  1.1 lUfWIH, BABY'S TEETHING need give you no anxieties There need be 00 realieoa nights, DO tears, ao baby disorder., d' \ou have Aahtuu & Parouna iDfantS* l',iv.,Ida liamlv Mothers all over the world have found them soothing and moling when baby ia fretful through teething, and. beat of all, ihey are &BSOI I II I Y SAFE. JS5& ASHTON & PARSONS INfANTS' POWDERS rrrrr PAINSof PILES Stopped in 10 Minutti .... r M,ia. .t ,ar.udl Hvlaa *ta h. die l-lea i Iha pain but aU takaa nut Iha %  ••ll lug. ati.pa bleodlng and rombnta nene iiinaii ..r, thereby curbing other trou I . ,..-. -I 1.. Pllea auch aa> Headache Nervouaneaa, IU. harhe. Conatl|*atl<^ laag of energy. deMIHy. and Irrllable druggla) today under tha i% %  11guaraalaa H,H. muat atop your pile nalHa and Iroubtee or money baath on • turn of amply pacoaga. FOR SALE I! u Dap) MM Hoed. eonuming i n, Dnwinf and DUIHH'. I rkaffi (; ,n,. w ( -i.itiihnu on 11,000 q c ol g'"i land, with amtei • %  BulUbie [ kiteOdB karden. ITIee : C 501. 0. •. Mortgage can be an I i it ii jiMMorr I'hone C&tS Over KnlghK 33. Brjd M in 7.51In. *'-*e*e'e'e V/,VrVrVeV "Iffffl II If fill" VICHV WATBR owea it*>i*i and high reputaaon la U %  i ii'iiuri'ii .I..,-( ,.f Liver I %  tics ition ioh.-g, dlabvU-s, ami chronic .ilTtvllons Of tinI'llnan orgBiU. Its cftleaey is reeo*fnlied In anectans of thdigestive organs: .. irii.rih.mil otlvci troubles ol il %  li nun h li b valuable lo tin Gouty, and lo II. Dyapeollc It yhutiid be uaad m nroderatc quanilUes, aamerall) %  Bonl> FOH YOIH iir.xrins SAKM < U "VIl'MMY WATKH" i;. • ifj p lea M i-i bettla fllil.llllllhlr It ; BOOKERS (B'dot) DRUG STORES LTD. Bn it sii.ii. .UM naatlitej IAI PIIA IMIAHFACYI * -.•--.-,*.*.*,---.'.*.•,•,',*-'•'.*-*.*-'-*-*-*-*'*-*•*•*'*-*-*-***-*''****-*-*-**'''****-" %  -e'-*,',',-,-,*a*a','a',',','-'e'e'e'e'a'a'*'a','e'e*'e'a'.*-*a ',','-'.**','.'-. '.*. '-'V/( WANTED. \ v %  ,th |bi N.iii..ti..i Caah I %  %  tsjanti (oi .in Appventlea Mfii-iin. tj Lnsited 'UTH IrMUvidUSdi batWaap ItM ages of IB and 22. who i < the fi ih.iiiii alUibutaa Uueetloa to atelMo) O pfJtude; InlUatlva px r--niuihy. The successful nppiiiiint will !"• re q u i red lo unOjorgo ;i "" rnonlhi i n bod lo .earbado i Ota ii a period In training in Trim.I.nl aaliaWJ dulini UM i probation afad Inlnlng win ba between Mo.00 and |70.(W per tnoiilh dapandlgkl OO Uh| BdJI ind cxi-ncn.%  ol UM individual. ApplleanU rnuat ic of ferropean Orialr Appl) In wi*tin| enlf giving roll parliriilais. ami luhmiltini iihotograph to The National Caah I i agytml t it Goddes Bo i l„ : ,VV*V 'a'a'e'e', '.Vr',V. BEACH HATS (OI.OCRFCL % GAY From 66>. upward* I II V S I s I'r. Wm. liny. St. Dial 3466 We .ton Walrhr*. Offer . ami a full assortim spare parts plus an expert II %  I plus ai si t ii ni uinis \PI'RM IATED N.cvN. I!l\l Anutilv attained In lng %  %  %  A rVholrwitir and Refreshing Drinks nl any lime STUART & SAMPSON (1938) LID. Ileailciuirters for Het Rum. FURNISH NOW und SAVE n .. ..|. latth. Morrta, n>r..e T and Mli upright Chain %  %  i-rde.. Wi gp iaa Horrti and Bprli %  II You have a BOUSE FOK SALS l.rl I'S lin.l I HUM i IF Ynu wish la BUY A ROUSS l.n l!S lirul il for SOU RALPH-A-BEARD ii....i.i i in.COOL Shoe for a HOT Day I AIHIYSO B. It IIMA 0 (II. v> OP!' GODDAItll s 1 \ 1 L. S. WILSON SPRY VI. DIAL IMS I '.•/•'',.' .*>* our llllf.1 Slf/lf'M NEW SHIPMENTS JUST OPENED also a wide selection ol Hosiery. Cleaners and Polishes. ncttt*


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ESTABLISHED 1895



Korea Showdown

Begin At Kaesong

Armistice Expected

Wednesday July 11

TOKYO, July 10.

ALLIED and Communist negotiators began their

history making conference in Red encircled
Kaesong Tuesday to write an “honourable end’’ to
the Korean war. The five-man United Nations
truce team arrived in the ancient South Korean
border city by Helicopter and went into immediate
session with the five-man Communist group. Before
taking off from the United Nations advanced peace
camp Vice-Admiral C. Turner Joy, No. 1 Allied
negotiator, told reporters he would act in good
faith to bring about an honourable armistice.
A pencilled copy of the Admiral’s statement heavi-

ly underlined the word “honourable. ’’
It emphasised that conditions

of peace must be satisfactory tof .

the United Nations Command. N M . Arms
Joy earlier had stated he hoped! oO ore _—

an armistice could be achieved by 7 ° ee ,

Wednesday. But General Matthew Ik or Red ; hina

B. Ridgway said he had no idea ;

how long it would be before! : r
definite results were obtained, ATTLEE TELLS US. .
Dispatehes m the peace camp
its = ee ain BOSTON, July 9.
British Prime Minister Clen ent

said that Allied helicopters began
Attlee told the Massachusetts

taking off at 9.45 a.m. for a short
flight to the ancient Korean ; ’
capital of -Kaesong, 34 miles} Legislature in a letter made pub-
northwest of Seoul. lic to-day that Great Britain has
Dispatches indicated that the|t@ken “extensive measures” to
flight had taken place without aj emy potential war materials to
hitch, and said the meeting was|Red China and other Communist
underway. There was no indi-|D&tions. Attlee’s letter read by
cation of how long the showdown] Secretary W. W. Stratton Flint
talks would last. was prompted by a passage by
Joy took off with one other the rrp Aerie ne gg
American Admiral, two American) 0" cal ing on Great ritain to
stop exporting vital war goods to
Communist China.

Generals and one South Korean
Attlee’s reply addressed to the







General, for talks with the five-
man Communist team headed by
General Namil of the North












City

ENQUIRY ENDS AFTER

SEVEN-DAY HEARING

THE PRINCESS ALICE Playing Field Enquiry under4\ 9 ==

Commissioner Sir Clement
tive Council Chamber yest

Malone, ended in the Legisle-
erday after a seven-day sitting.

Over thirty witnesses were heard at this enquiry.
At the end of the evidence, the Acting Attorney Gen-

eral, Mr. E. K. Walcott,
addresses.
The Acting Attorney Gen

and Mr.

eral had directed the evidence, Mr.

Walcott had appeared on behalf of an interested party, and Mr.
Mottley was representing the Vestry as a member of a Committse
appointed by the Vestry for that purpose.

The Commissioner expressed thanks for the

had been given.

The first witness to give evi-
dence yesterday was Mr. M. E
Cox who was recalled.

He said that in 1946 he had a
resolution before the House to
get an enquiry into the adminis-
tration of the St. Michael’s Ves-
try because he thought it was
the most corrupt body in the is-
land. He was however unable to
get it through.

“Whatever the circumstances
would be, I am sure that when-
ever you are finished with. this
enquiry, the Vestries of the island
and more particularly the Vestry
of St. Michael would be a better
one.”

The Commissioner:
here to inquire into the conduct
of the St. Michael’s Vestry, I
am only conducting an enquiry
into the Princess Alice Playing
Field.

Mr. Cox said that, it was defi-
nitely untrue to say that he had
offered anyone a bribe of $240 to
withhold evidence in connection

I am not

Secretary of State said that Great}With the removal of huts from
Britain has “applied more restric- |

Seawell to the Reef Grounds,

~~ eee disclosed only] tons on trade with Communist He also refuted most strongly
T enue th Ne Reds had added China than any other country in the statement made by Mayers
uesday, that Reds had adc the world except the United|that he had paid him 2/- a trip
another member to their team, States.” for the removal of the stuff from
North Korean yeneral Chang “We have completely prohib-|Seawell to the Reef. The lowest

Pyong San. The advance guard for
the United Nations was made up
of seven trucks and three jeeps

ited the export of arms and arm-
aments and goods and commodities
of strategic importance to a num-

carrying food | and supplleS) her-—of destfhations which cover
through no-man’s land bristling the whole of the Soviet bloc and
with bayoneted Chinese rifles.

: - the whole of China.”

Personnel in the convoy includ-{ Attlee said the Hongkong Gov-
ed one army still photographer ernment has imposed total pro-
and one army movie photographer. .hibition on export to China of

Four helicopters landed at the| more than 200 items of industrial
advance peace base south of | equipment including machine
Kaesong at 8.35 The bad

: a tools, certain steel products, cop-
weather was clearing rapidly. A| per, brass, rubber tyres ond tubes
spokesman said that at the begin-|and electrical devices.

ning, that a limited number of This was done despite the “ob-
correspondents and photographers,| viously high degree to
probably sixteen, will be permit-) Hongkong’s economy depends on
ted to go to Kaesong.—U.P. trade with China.—U.P.

SIX MONTHS JAIL

NEW YORK, July 9.
W. Hunton, negro doctor of
philosophy was sentenced to six



;
|



TRUMAN ASKS...

WASHINGTON, July 9.
President Truman today asked

months’ imprisonment on Mon-| Congress to end the state of war
day night for contempt of court.|between fhe United States and
—U.-P. Germany. —U.-P.



England Should Win
Third Test To-Day

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 9.
RAIN throughout the greater part of the afternoon
prevented any prospect of an early finish to the Third
Test at Old Trafford, and England tomorrow need 103 runs
for victory on what will in any case be the final day.



So much has the weather affec-)and Ikin were concerned only
ted this game that even at this! with keeping their wickets intact.




stage — South Africa are not SOUTH AFRICA—Second Innings
rithout t the . str E Rowan c Ikin b Laker 57
wat shia 1 ch ance, ] for strong Waite b Statham ;
suMshine in the early morning|c Van Ryneveld b Lake 7
could make run-getting a tricky }A. Nourse c Evans b Tattersall 20
. J. G am b Bedser 46
roposition.
Bevos ; : " G. Fullerton c Tattersall b Laker 10
But with Hutton still there and|p’ werean c Ikin b Bedse. ‘9
all wickets intact the task should|A Rowan } b w. b Bedser 3
not be beyond the home country.| N. Mann b Bedser 4
This morning, England were £ abet ei 4
again indebted to the cheerful Extras 24
Surrey giant Bedser who com-
pletely demoralised South Africa Total 191
with a new ball spell when the BOWLING ANALYSIS
total stood at 155 for five. He ee? es ae
was almost unplayable during the pouser 4 2 : ee :
course of 5.2 overs in which he! statham 7” #3 #2 1
captured the remaining wickets] Tattersall 2. 8- At 1
for eleven runs to give himself u ENGLAND—Second Innings
inal analvsis of five for 54 L. Hutton not out 28
final analysis of five for 54. J. Ikin not-aut 8
Earlier, Cheetham and Rowan
had continued their stand of Total (for no wkt.) 7
Saturday and Rowan after scor-

; ; : BOWLING ANALYSIS
ing his individual 50 became the o> Bm. Rw
1

first tourist to complete 1,000 runs} McCarthy 11 4 2
for the tour, But with his depar-! Chubb ee eS

ture at 145 and that of Cheetham roe ¥ .
Three Will Sign

23 runs later, the South African

resistance crumbled and _ they

were all out before lunch giving WASHINGTON, July 9.

England an awkward five min-| Usually reliable sources said on

utes batting. Monday that Australia, New Zea-
During that time — Hutton} jand and the United States prob-

scered five and Ikin none. Re-| abiy plan to initial this week a

suming after the interval these! mutual defence pact which they

two took the score to 29 before] intend to sign with each other in

rain droye the players in again} connection with the Japanese
No further play was _ possible} peace treaty,



until just after six when M« Formal signing of the tri-party
Carthy and Chubb were too} pact is expected to take place at
handicapped by the wet ball to} San Francisco the first week in

trcuble the batsmen and Hutton] September. at about the same time
as the signing of the Japanese
{ treaty. —U.P,

RED CHAMPAGNE

LONDON, July 9.





The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS

|

¢ | Moseow radio reported on Mon-

Dial 3113 jday that champagne production

ight. in the Soviet Union increased by

Day oF N 8 more than 50 times 6ver the rate
wim. | in 1936 —U.P.



he had ever paid to anyone for
a trip was $1.02.

~ “I am sure I paid Mayers $5.00
a trip for the work he had done
in connection with the removal of
the huts from Seawell to the Reef.
I pay according to the mileage
and there is almost an agreement
to pay people time and a half at
night.”

Mr. Cox said he paid’ Mayers
$15 on the Saturday morning for
the first three trips he had made
and on the following week after
he had completed the job, he paid

whieh him $10.00 for the other two trips

Evidence Withheld

The Attorney General; Why.
reason would you have for trying
to withhold Mr. Mayers’ evidence
from this tribune?

Mr. Cox: None whatsoever.

The Attorney General: Yqu
were the person who telephoned
the Police about the missing joist?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Walcott: You said that Mr.
Mottley was present on the day
when a conspiracy took place at
Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfield’s
Office?

Mr. Cox: I said that I was in-
formed that Mr. Tudor, Mr. Mott-
ley, Mr. Tommy Miller and Tom
were there,

Mr. Walcott: You never saw
them there?

Mr. Cox: No

Mr. Walcott; You heard that

from Squires?
Mr. Cox: Yes.
Mr. Walcott: HE is a good friend

of yours?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Walcott: He works in the
office below Messrs. Hutchinson

& Banfield?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Walcott: Was he the same
Squires who drew the money for
the contract?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Walcott: As a member of
the Housing Board, did you think
it right for you to give an em-
Vloyee of the Housing Board
handbills to be given out for a
political meeting?

Mr. Cox: That has

@ On Page ?

Mossadegh

nothing to



‘| Disappointed

TEHERAN, July 10.

United States Ambassador
Henry Grady told a press confer-
ence that Premier Mossadegh
seemed disappointed over the
message he received from Presi-
dent Truman. Grady said: “I
told him you must understand the
President wrote the letter in a
spirit of greatest kindliness, like
a big brother trying to be help-
ful.” Grady emphasised to cor-
respondents that Mossadegh in-
formed him before reading Tru-
man's letter that Iran’s decision
was already made.

Informed Iranian quarters said
‘the Premier probably made a
special effort to get a cable to the
United Nations off before receiv-
ing Grady. They pointed out that
Grady this morning asked for an
appointment with the Premier at
noon and said Mossadegh dis-
patched the Iranian rejection
barely 15 minutes before Grady
arrived at his door-—U.P.








CRACKS like this one are appearing in various parts of the new runway at Seawell.



HOUSEWIFE MUST PAY |.
MORE FOR SUGAR IN U.K. |

Reds Push
Back Allies

EASTERN KOREAN FRONT,
July 9.
Strong Communist counter at-
tacks forced Allied troops back to
their own lines to-day after a two-
day battle in which United Na-
tions forces captured and then lost
mountain stronghold northeast of
Yanggu. Allied units jumped off
in a pincer attack at 10 a.m. Sun-
day and by nightfall had driven
close to their objective.

However elements of a Com-
munist regiment counter-attacked
at 10 p.m. Sunday and continued
their. attacks through the night
and throughout Monday.

Reds in well built bunkers, well
supported by mortar fire, opened
the attack but without success.

United Nations artillery pound-
jed Red positions Monday without
Stopping Sunday more than
28,000 rounds of artillery shells
were used in the attack. Also
north of Yanggu, two Red units
estimated at from 100 to 130 men
were brought under artillery fire.



* °
Two Buildings
(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, July 10.
Two buildings, one in which
chemicals ig stored, and the other
animals for experimental pur-
poses, were complately destroyed
by fire at the University College
of the West
morning.

Indies early this

The damage was estimated at
$15,000. The loss of
was complete but most of the
animals were saved. The origin
of the fire is unknown,

chemicals



Attempted Hold-up

There was an attempted hold-
up at the Ideal Store yesterday.

It was about | o’clock in the
afternoon when a man walked
upstairs and went to the cashier’s
cage. He pointed what looked
like a gun at the girl in the cage
and said: “I want some money!”
She screamed and the man ran
away.

The \Police were summoned and
were quickly on the scenhe but up
ito the time of going to Press no
arrest had been made, A thorough
investigation, however, was being
carried out by the Police,



A Rock For Truman

WASHINGTON, July 9.
It was announced to-day that
President Truman will recé@ive a
200 pound slab of historic Corregi-
dor rock in White House cere-
monies on Tuesday. A Filipino
end an American, both veterans of
valiant resistance which made the
rock a lasting chapter in Filipino-
\American military history will

pnake the formal presentation,

—U.P.

—U.P.
W.I. College Lose

E. D. Mottley mad

“Vrader” Drifted
For Four Days
KINGSTON, July 9.

The Haitian motor-vessel Vic-
toria Stephens of 125 tons, anc
{a regular trader between Por.-

assistance that bean







|
|

au-Prince, Curacao, and Miami,
was towed here yesterday for re-
pairs to a broken crankshaft,

The vessel drifted in the Carib-
from Monday morning to
Thursday night.—(CP)

CRACKS



PRICE FIVE &

Rei rer





TROUBLE AT SEAWELL





a

MEMBERS of the Executive Committee snont over an hour and a half at Seawell yesterday.
During theif visit they examined err whien had appeared recently on the new runway.
Immediate steps are being token to obtain advice as to further action which should he taken.

danger to aircraft

Seawell “Cracks”
;xamined by Ex. Co.

SHORTLY AFTER 9.30 o'clock yesterday morning

Meanwhile there is no immediate

meeting of the Executive Committee was held at Seawell
Airport Present were Mr. Ro N. Turner, Governor

Veputy, Sir John Saint, Hon, H. A. Cuke, M.L.C., Dr. H. G
Cummins, M,C.P., Mr. F. L. Walcott, M.C.P Squadron
Leader David Henderson, Government Airport Manager
Mr. B. Skinner, Director of Highways and Transport,
Wing Commander L, A. Egglesfield, Director General ot

Civil Aviation in the Caribbean
Bryan, Actine Financial Secretary.

Area, and Capt. @,. J

rhe

neeting last for just over and at present has a high mois-
i hour, after which the committee, ture content, When it dried there
ent on an inspection tour of tho} was bound te be sMrinkage
runway There, they were!

John Rahr, Acting! Meeting On The Spot
reneral BW T.A. and On the afternoon of Wednes-
apt “Bi” Cash, BW 1 A,'s} day July 4th,” Mr. Turner said,
enior pilot, who is at presem| “the Director of Highways ard
acting Operations Superintenden'| Transport reported to me several

the Company Mr. Rahr and! cracks on the surface of the run

Mr. Cash arrived fron Trinidad| way whieh were causing him

From Our Own Correspondent while the meetin roing Oo ome concern,” My Turner im
LONDON Tuly 9. _ They pent half am hou on) mediately visited Seawell, arc

: the jpunway before was dceided to watch them for

THE POSSIBILITY of sugar being derationed in Brit













returning taypit
the terminal building of ine aiv-\ a few days... The meeting yester














weain- ts one that is frequently being discussed here now. Thediart: Tho ootmi™ onded alfthiy was held on’ the spot so th
British Ministry of Food refuse to comment one way or]. 1.40. o’cloc! members might the ack:
another, But it is believed that the decision to increas: Mr peee tala’ the pavounte for themselves
the price of domestic sugar to sixpence a pound as from ai ath Ye oe, - seas ine, Cineererey Vine dei
e : 7 : \ ‘ 1e Supervise in charge ask , cto ieneral of
nexc Sunday is a first step in this direction the construction of the new! Civil Aviation Wing Gomel
ha as 5 unway at well ret wd to} Egglesfield, Mr. John Rahy Acting
anna For several months private} !DWay &@ ee ee Be ; '
| ineerests here have been assuring | O88 here a ae ee ! 4 Sanagee B w £.A., aril
CASH MISSING ithe Ministry that supplies are nov wee a i NM aka age hohe Ml R i oS ie ee
FROM TREASURY Dlentiful enough for them t = used aatls aot ee Shae os o are — Mr, Cash ; Y
© ic oe > it 1eVve ' 1y Li € a lar nec ere wa no lmmecdiate
vue i eee ae ned, because of the almost con-| danger to aireraft, Immedi
: bia Sat ‘ ‘ : . vs j ous wi conditions vs steps are ‘ing take 0 bt
The Police are investi- have been retailing at five pence “aie he Sas wh ie ies ' Be es: ba it : ee ra Wi +]
gating a deficiency of a pound, those to manufacturer fe He Ae 16d. tikat. - whanl wile “amenis : are ‘ ae
: 7 es r : ion | lé ni which should be taken by Vay
cash which hs been re- a been selling seven pence | ye runway did dry out. andl of re-sealing. In the meantime
ported missing from the | |"" Mia? SRE an Mey SAMMI Var ome shrinkage cracks} schedule services will operate
Government Treasury. ie ime SPORES Se » expected to appear, be} usual.
The Cominissioner of forerete 1 4 bine ree m ae i oe . ras the be ses oa appeare
Even though prices are being] '¢5 ‘ iby Pity slg tg ie. ce “ya week ago there has: been 1
Babocdic hate bane levelled out, the Food Ministry hat the stone is highly absorptive further deterioration
to make a_ statement ah eel Neer oe eat a OOO SSDP PLPL PLAY IV PLLA PL EPPA PPPOE,
a a é a . R
soon, ceive 2,226,000 tons of raw sugar %
»226, § sug
— This is an increase of 46,000 tons 9 4
over the pre-war consumption S
STORMS SWEEP |" ‘
A gure §
5 S 5 EE But Britain's population ha *
MID WEST : increased by four per cent, since %
® U.S. the war and her spending power § = x
has also risen. So it seems likels Gris DER .
Th ‘ caer AGO, Bie A rm t that the pre-war consumption fig > *
seRPe tornadoes. As violent | ure will be considerably exceeded ! a a a a &
‘hunderstorms lashed midwest ; as. a @ x
United States during heavy rains The first rush of buying might \s a s
that caused new flood crests in} jt is thought, put too grea Ff &
the Missouri river basin where | gtrain on supplies, but trade rep ~ | same Hi n §
high water has caused $5,000,000 ia C4 erinal . act 1 ‘ a °
: 2 ’ jresentatives believe that gradu ‘
damage. inerea of the ration to alloy Standard of %
} ‘ " ‘4
Storms battered Kansas, Mis-|housewives and manufacturers t . %
souri, Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois|do their own private “stock Quality as x
and Michigan throughout the} piling” would permit an early enc ; S
week-end, and wind, lightning, |to rationing ship ed to Xs
and ,rain played across the area t I e, ihe t S
early today. Six deaths wer t- ee ‘tat ated time vill 3 md . cf e %
tributed to the weather. Two|c#onial producers will Keep . .
tornadoes were reported last {Close waten tn Sen tte A } ‘West Indies *
night in Kansas; one near Park-|8Uâ„¢ption figures. For | : , " y
ville and the other near Olath,|figure that colonial eh res for the .
but neither caused any damage. |have had their allocation of >
The third hit Kokomo, Indiana, {guaranteed purchases based 3 %
to-day.—U.P. | the Food Ministry ¢
| The Food Ministry argued tha :
|Britain’s unrestricted requtire- y

$3m For Bauxite
In Jamaica

‘(From Our Own Correspondent

LONDON, July 9

the production of bauxite in Ja-









maica is announced to-day (Tue snag. For the Ministry of Food st i -
day) by the Economic Co-Opera-\has said that their unrestricted & insist om
tion Administration Headquarters requirements of sugar can only e
in London iccurately assessed by %
check of fitures he
The loan which is being made enerhs following deration % 8CN 7
to Reynolds Jamaica Mines Ltd., s ( iT BE y ty ‘
will be repaid with interest in| This means that unless sugar sf *
supplies of aluminium over a ‘comes off ration by the end of % ¢
period of eleven and a half ye ‘this year the Food Ministry will] .
Aceording to the agreement, Rey ct. know by the end of 1951 just x %
nolds will also spend approxi- | what their requirements are and|%& .
mately £450,000 on an expansion | colonial producers will not there-|% $
programme. fore receive immediate benef 1g :
It is anticipated that the pro-|Under the new agreement 1g .
duttion of Bauxite in Jamaica will a 1% ‘
be increased from 410,000 tons to t 1% and ¥
750,000 tons annually > * ¥ ‘ . xs © t .
Whe loan ‘brings the total of Atomic I rogress is %
FE.C.A. advances for Jamaican c 1% %
vauxite to $11,747,000 in dollars LONDON, July 9. 1% *
and £3,300,000 in counterpart Supply Minister George Strau % 7 ¢
funds, said in the Commons on Monday | % 4 y
that Britain made cc ide ts * ¢
progress in planning o c powe s .
plants for industrial H 1 % S :
MEXICAN "QUAKE there is reasonable prospect that } Y
the generation of electricity fr % y
MEXICO, July 9.jatomic power can be developed % ’ AUeT i Cn.. Lid. %
A sharp: earthquake of short|a large scale. He said, ultimately %& GARDINER AUSTIN & Co., Lt .
duration shook this city at 6 p.m./the cost will not diffe iv ¢ :
yesterday Mexican time. No dar -|from that of the power % Agents. ?
igé Was reported oe Iv *ntional source oP S ay EOE OLCOTT

}

| agreement

A loan of $3,284,000 to intrease, | 195¢

territories would be able to sel |y

more sugar to this Country at ¢
¢
.
s
%
>
Ks

ments would be 2,500,000 ton

If that figure is exceeded colonia



when tne new
into

guaranteed price

comes

Kor Finest WINES

force in



Eveh now, however, there is @



O66 6 6A 464 66 CEILS












Carib Calling





Other turftt







were Mr. Gilbe Mr
Eric Holdef.

Among ‘the turfites returning
from Trintiad’ on Sunday were
I E Dr. Tor Gale
r YT. N. Peirce nd Mr. Pat
Fle

Optics

M*. RALPH PRESCOTT a Bar-
i gn who hes been living
the U.S. for just over two years,
Parente i home vesterday via Tri-
I d by B.W.1.A. to spend a shor

I y with his relatives
iteen onths ago he gradu
the Brooklyn School of
nd he nother eighteen
n to before he qualifies
as opthalmic dispenser. He i:
t iz with his sister Mrs, Ram-

in Bav Street

Twelve Days
ERROL STEELE who owns
Ronnie Dundes” in St Law-
Gap flew to Veneznela ves-
terday morning bw B.W.1.A
he is leo nronrietor of Stecle’s

WAleotaene Cprartas We eve

viiete to be away for twelve days.

Grenada Engagement
a if engagement was announced

AAR

rene

where

in

in Grenada of Captain Ian
G. Boilesu) Goad, Officer Com-
manding First Company Welca

Fusiliers, which are still stationed

in Grenada as a result of the March
labour disturbances and Miss Jean
Adam only daughter of Hon.
G. H. Adams, C.B.E., Colonial
Treasurer, Grenada, and Mrs.
Adams. Capt. Goad is the only
son of Lt. Col. C. E. G. Boileau
Goad, M.c. and Mrs. Goad of Lee
on the Solent, England. The wed-

Anglican
this

place at the
Grenada later

ding takes
Church in
month,

With T.L.L.

M® PHILLIP SKINNER who
work§ with Trinidad Lease-
Ltd.,*in

holds Trinidad flew in on

Sunday by B.W.LA. to spend two
weeks’ holiday at Lowlands, St.
Lucy.

THE
4

BY THE

baby veterans, the
ay children, must have
when they read about
nine-month-old baby who,
he cannot stand yet, has to
dive from a sitting position at the
edge of the pool.” “The younger
generation is knocking at’ the
door,” commented .a voice from
the cradle, Those scientists who
say .that the world was once a
va a, and human beings fish,
point out that arms and legs are
merely the logical development,
by evolution, of fins, and — they
prophesy that if all babies.swim
from birth, arms: and legs will
slowly turn into fins again, and
we shall begin to bfeqihe ster-
torously through our gills, But
we must remember the experi-+
ment of Dr, Bell, who taught-a
whitmmg how to walk, After four
years on land, the fish fell off
the pier Brighton and was
drowned. had forgotten how
to swim be taught
to live the sea permanently,
if they to become good little
fish.



fot é
the





It
Babies must

in
are

Fi. done, Llangollen ! Perhaps someone has got the.
T the Eisteddfod ‘at Lle j measurements wrong, -\fter all,

A the Eisteddfod at Llangol- «4e Jearned Basgomoisle an-

len next month a French nounced that Mont Bienc was 26

song . to ~ ne. a ane a miles high.

wh his “shameless ontinental- ’ . 7

ism” (Councillor Jones) have on C. Suet, Esq. n

the dignity of the occasion? Sure- HARLIE SUT sat in his office

ly many a Druid nightshirt will “- at the Ministry of Bubble-

be worn in a jauntier way, and blowing. The forefinger of his

here and there a bard will per-,tight hand was laid along his

mit himself a rue Daunou wink|upper lip and he was breathing

at a lady in the audience, or’ even

sift his bardic crown to a

aucier angle. But the sugges-

tion that there should be a harp
ipanirnent to the nasal pea-
pushing of Evans the Hearse has
been ienounced licentious
frivolity.
How to report Tennis
Ww" ARING an off-white, one-
piece pique.gabardine with
ioulder-caps of pleated ballet-
ie satin trimmed with Greek
organdie, aceglamour tennis rac-
keteer Boobie Knockerbicker
Googoo Toffee, who was

accon



as

beat
wearing

a jacket of Welsh serge trimmed
with yellow ribbon, and green
shorts embroidered with silver
camels, edged with red chiffon,
and stratted with quilted pom-
por Se

tennis-playing
ut like manneqt




have}

they

MIAMI LINEN

WHITE DUCHES
SLUB LINEN
WHITE ELASTIC

4220

From the drawer the Professor

FLOWERED MOROCAINE CREPE 36”



ARTIE'S HEADLINE

OIL Co.

PERSIAN



Barbadian Student Awards

Baga June edition of the Can-
ada-West Indies magazine
publishes a list of students from
McGill University and Macdonald
College who graduated in the 1951
convocation

Among the list are several Bar-

badians. Hilary Bourne obtained
his diploma im _ obstetrics and
gynaecology. Harold Gardner

passed for the degree of Bachelor
of Arts. Geoffrey Skeete obtained
the degree of Bactielor of Sciente.
David W. Clarke of Pine Hill ob-
tained the degree of Bachelor of
Engineering, (Engineering Phys-
ies). Gerald Tryhane of St.
Thomas obtained the degree of
Bachelor of Engineering.) (Elec-
trical Engineering). They were
graduates from McGil!

Barbadians in the Macdonald
College pass list are, H. DeL. King,
Bachelor of Science in Agricul-
ture, third year Margaret E
Clarke, Maureen Johnson and
Dorothy Watson, Home Economics,
second year.

David Boyce «x
Harold C

Marine Gardens,
Gibbs of Worthing and
Vernon Sergeant of St. Michael,
were awarded the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
(McGill University) and Thelma
J. Clarke of St. Philip was award-
ed the degree of Bachelor of
Household Economics (McGill
University).



OF

ADVENTURES

lie
Mr.
the same firm
had

day in

spent a few days

Short Holidey
R. L. L. TOPPIN, Governing} a
Director of Messrs, J. B. Les-
& Co., Ltd., accompanied by
K. D. G. Frost, Director of
and Mrs, Frost who

1115 am

m

From
1210 p m
1i—6 45

415

om

been spending a short holi-
B.G, returned on Sunday
Trinidad where they also




















via

cine at the University College of

spend the summer holidays with
his relatives. It was a surprise
visit for they were not expecting
him until August.

Runner Beans?

ISS EILEEN KING, the slim
runner from Trinidad found

soon after she arrived in England
that British food upset her diges-
tion. She consulted McDonald
Bailey, the champion runner. He
prescribed for her meals of rice
and beans familiar in her own

land. Now Miss King is well|Mrs. Skelton said. “He said TO-DAY 66 @ 3
again, would take me another thirt WARNER BROS. ROUSING
oing Backwards years to become an actress.””
Going The second time they me Sau Patricia
NDICATIOz> of the tightening|Skelton apologised for his ruden GARFIELD — NEAL in

up of discipline at Oxford is
the insistence of the authorities
in regard to academic dress during
examinations,

Black nylons for women are
vetoed. A woman invigilator an-
nounced during one examination
“The flesh must not be allowed to
show through the stockings worn
by women candidates.”

Twenty-one
ISS JOAN LANGE celebrated
her twenty-first birthday on
Saturday night with a dinner party
at her home’ which afterwards
went to Club Morgan.

Besides this party, the Morgan
was crowded with its usual “Satur-
day-nighters” and guests from the
Cuke-Worme wedding.

Incidental Intelligence
N the eve of ner marriage to
a man of 75, Mrs. Leontine!
Schreyer, aged 72, of Springfield,
Massachusetts, remarked: “I’m no
Grable, but I can still get a man!”
—L.E.S.



PIPA





WAY

to keep on saying that it is not
the clothes that matter but the
tennis. But they know well that
iheir only hope of being raved
about and mobbed is to wear
something startling. For it is not
the few people capable of ap-
preciating good tennis who can
make these girls as well-known
as film stars; it is the vast herd
of worshippers, ready to die of
boredom without their daily at-
tack of hysterics.
St. Paul’s Moving
VERY now and then’ some
“spokesman” who wants to
scare the public to death an-
nounces that St. Paul's is moving
towards budgate-hill at the rate

of PA inches per 11,200 years, The
dre nervous among the shop-
keepers, who read only the fact,
and miss (he figures, make ar-
rangements to leave their homes.
Then the whole thing is forgot-
ven again. Today I read of an-
other fact, which need not cause
panic. The spire of Salisbury

Cathedral is growing taller,



Rupert and eee



takes out a powerful magnifying
glass and peeps through it at the
locket. ‘Hm,
thought," he murmurs fin some
excitement. ‘Here, little _ bear,

he hold this more steady while |
ook more closely.

ha, just as |

That tiny mark



By Beachcomber

down his nose—a sure sign of
perturbation, Before him lay 4
jetter. It read:—

Sir,

In accordance with instructions
received from your office I here-
by beg to apply for the necessary
forms enabling me to apply for
a licence to procure false teeth
eight in number, for my ferret
Ramsgate, which broke eight of
its. teeth on a bun,

Yours faithfully,
R. Banton-Detmold.

Suet wrote at the top of the
letter; ‘Passed to Mrs, Glapiron,
Animal Dental Welfare Division.”

Enter a dear little oa}

HAT vast and over-sensitive
public which not only blub-

bers shamelessly at the films, bui
has to find extra tears every day
for the intimate affairs of film
actresses, is now called upon tc
Spare the tribute of a sigh for a
film actor who has discovered
that fame and wealth do not en-

sure happiness, Fain would {[
cheer up a sorrowing public with
the beautiful story ot the tiny
golden-haired girl who, intend-
ing to bring about a_ beautiful
reconciliation for her beautifu!
parents, shut them both up in

a room with all their foryer hus-
bands and wives, The beautiful
little oaf had got it all wrong,
you see. Or was she being sa
tirical?

that we thought only a scratch is
really a wonderful piece of engrav-
ing. Through this glass I can see
the whole pattern, I’m not much |
of an artist, but I'll try to draw it |
for you." Fetching pencil and
peper, he works steadily while
Rupert looks on with growing
interest,

Interlude,
pm Music Magazine, 615 p m
Magazine, 6.45 p m
7.00—11 00 pm

the West Indies arrived from] },'>
Jamaica yesterday via Trinidad to] p m

Festival in Britain



BARBADOS

| Programme

TUESDAY, JULY 10.
Programme

1951
Parade, 11 30
Asian Survey, 11 45 a m. Report
Britain, 1200 noon The News
News Analysis

pm — 19 76 m

> pm Souvenirs of
England v

Music,
South Africa,
5.15 p m

5 00
5 06 p m
New Records, 6 00
Welsh
Programme Parade
— 253 m., 4132 m

+8 700 pm The News, 710 pm Ne
otudying Medicine ‘ Analysts, 715 p.m
“BERT” REECE of Society | Nieht. q 45 pm The Bright Dark, 8
> ~ .|p m adio Newsreel, 6815 pm Mee
Piantation, St. John, who has}5,. Commonwealth, 845. pm. tnter=
just finished his first year of medi-jiude, 855 pm From The Editorials, }

900 p_m. LBC Northern Orchestra, 9 45

Report From Britain,
News, 1010 pm _ Interlude,
Focus on Charities, 10 45

10 00 pm
10 15
pm

Mrs. ‘‘Red’’



ERSONALITY behind Holly-'

is
Georgia Maureen
Mrs. Skelton.

They married on March 9, 1945,
just a year from the day they met.
Now they are in London.

wood comedian Red Skelton,!
statuesque, Titian - haired |
Davis now



“The first time I met Red at a

friend’s house he

the

wa
bor

Island beauties for their
wreck Ball” at the Paradise Beach
Club on July 21st,

insulted me,” ql

and asked her views on marriag¢
Now they have two children,
Says Mrs.
like ten children;
valet, waiter and general assistant
to Red is a 24 hours a dav iob.”’

Skelton: “I should
but being wife,

South Sea Girls

J DON’T know whether the Poio

Club are importing South Sea
“Ship-

but I do know
it some will be there.

The Nina which will be moored
off-

shore is having a special gang-
y so that visitors can get on
ard and a platform is also being

-enstructed on the beach.



CROSSWORD



JePoo =

New
et—-cec

cx

oe fonr

Across

Provided little Leslie with a slug.
(B) Usefulness, (7)
Fish for the morning orgy ? (6)
R.N.| Army. R.A.F. (8)

Pen tne sapper for a trim up. (5)
What re-engagement hides this
plant? (4)
Outsize tooth. (4)

Wriggier in the electric clock. (3)
Knotted work for trimming. (7)
Doesnt suggest uprightness. (4)
In which Lols may paint. (4)
Some call it a tine. (5)

Down
Cause of the punt’s S.O.S.% (8)
There ale becomes heavent (a)
The jesser White Heron. (8)
Strong lovers produce the gaunt-
tet. (5)
Where you see my giri in Dorset.
(4, 5) 6. Speak to do this. (3)
You can st to the Inmocent, (9)
Sounds as though small nails
were used tor diplomacy. (4)
it’s evil in the ring. (7)
Becoming. (6)
Can be made end to end. (4)

Often much envied colour. (3)

Sojution of yesterday's puzzle,—Across:





, Acrobatic, 7

Vox humana, 10, Elder,
15, Roe; 14, Site: 15 ae

18. Meal 1S, Devise
Under, 25. Wide; 24 Study
1 Averted, 2 Coloured; 5.
“s, 4. Amusement; 5, Initiated; 4.
& Heat. Y Aniseed: LL), Derived:
vine Orv

Sore Mouth

Loose Bloody

Bleeding Gums, Sore as and Loose

Teeth mean that

ou have Pyorrhea,

‘Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism

mo

|





ee ee

SATIN 36”

2.53
3.00

ee tf He te

a ee ea SS ea

36"

YOUR SHOE STORE

1.37
7¢

ee a en ee ee

A. 5. G6.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

4606

ag?

Amosan

for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth

and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
bleeding the first day,
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
guarantee. Amosan must make your
mouth well and save

ends sore mouth

your teeth or
ney back on return of empty pack-
Get Amosan from your chemist
today. The guar-
antee protects
you.





EMBD. |

ANGLAISE |

THE DAINTIEST IN TOWN |

All the Elite are buying it |
out at...

THANIE’S

Pr. Wm. Hny. St. Dial 3466



ADVOCATE



Blitz sites could be searched
for loot

A plan to train dogs for use in
the bombed areas of the City is
being considered by the City of
London police, who believe that
such sites are ideal “dumping
grounds” for stolen property

At present the City Police know

they can “borrow” trained dogs
from the Metropolitan area in an
emergency.

"Most of them feel that the City

, wa iehould have their own police dogs,
West Indian “aggre: with the acres of bomb

es.
It is known that criminals from
South London raid shops . and















warehouses on the north side of
the Thames, and that men living
in the Islington, King’s Cross,
Edgware Road and Notting Hili
districts frequently go south of
he river to commit crimes.

City CID and Scotland Yd
men have suspected for some
time that stolen goods are tem-
porarily dumped in the bombed
wastes.

Trained police dogs, on continu-
ous night patrol could, they think,
prevent this, and be useful in
intercepting thieves who try to
use the basements of bombed
buildings as transit aan



——





AQUATIC CLUR CUNEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT TO THURSDAY NIGHT at 4.30
MATINEE: TOMORROW at 5 p.m

“THE BLACK

in Technicolor
TYRONE POWER — ORSON WELLES — CECILE AUBRY
JACK HAWKINS
A 2th Century-Fox Picture

ae

Starring





=





DIAL 2310 = PLAZA



(From the Story by Ernest Hemingway)

“The BREAKING POINT"

ROSE”



Se
= BRIDGETOWN

pm. And Continuing
ACTION - PACKED DRAMA!



SPECIAL THU RS. 140 P.M

Tim HCLT in (Both)

WESTERN HERITAGE &

STORM OVER WYOMING
~OISTIN

PLAZA pist si0

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.





“THIS WAS PARIS”
Ben LYON &
“GUNS of the PECOS"

Dick FORAN (Warner)



WED. & THURS. 5 & 8.30
(R.K.O, Double)
GRAY'S “SUNSET PAST"
AND
“STATION WEST" with
Dick POWELL

| Jane



| “SHIPWRECK BALL”

July

TABLES CAN BE RESERVED AT
JANETTA DRESS SHOP
$1.00 per person







Lower Broad St. —







| WARNER'S BOX - OFFICE

SMASHER !

OPERATION PACIFIC

Starring; John WAYNE j
SOON! =!





————

GAIETY |

THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
TO-DAY (only) 830 P.M.

ee
|
|
on (Final Inst. of Serial)

Frank BUCK in
“JUNGLE MENACE”



WED. & THURS. 8.30 P.M,

“THE HUNTED”
Preston FOSTER &
“NEWSHOUNDS”

GORCEY & Dead End





Leo





if
21st |
|









JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Upstairs over Newsam’s



DRE

EVENING, COCKTAIL, AFTERNOON and BEACH
Ready-Made and Made-to-Order

BEAUTIFUL HANDBAGS from

LADIES PYJAMAS—Plain

” ”

NYLON PETTICOATS....



CALLING
ALL

FISHERMEN!

We can supply your requirements —
Rylands Mesh Wire for Fish Pots

Lacing Wire

Hounsells Fishing Lines 6 — 36 lbs.

Fish Hooks

Stainless Steel Wire

Cotton and Seine

e
THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

Hardware Department








Floral

SSES

Also —
Eger iN i pae $7.89 to $10.61
Sorte eb Ww Lah oe $5.30 per pr.
Ses a abe Ne ys oa $6.08 ., »



Twines

Tel. No. 2039




















POROODOS



TUESDAY, JULY



10, 1951

———_—_—

|B.B.C. Radio| POLICE WANT ‘CELLAR? DOGS jgesowveseeeeeceseteecrerareerttttiineeey

CHARCOAL BOX IRONS DELUXE

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets



Coe

GLOBE

TO-DAY, LAST SHOWS, 5.00 & 8.15 P.M.

“ROYAL
FRED ASTAIRE

GLOBE

WEDDING”
JANE POWELL

’ PRESENTS :

so young ant

CanTVRT 10K

LINDA

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THEATRE

Our Ist 20th Century Fox Release
Opening FRIDAY, July 13th, 5.00 & 8.15 p.m.

ne






CONSTANCE

Produced and Directed by OTTO PREMINGER

Screen Play by HOWARD KOCH + Based on a Story by Louis Chavance

PLUS :

THE ALL STAR TALENT CONTEST

GOS

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MADAM IFILL PRESENTS :

On Thursday, July 11th, %30 p.m.

GLOBE THEATRE

In Aid of

THE CH.

STARBUDS OF 1951 |
)

CH. BABY WELFARE LEAGUE CLINIC

Under the Patronage of

The Hon. V.

C. GALE, M.L.C. and Mr. E. D. MOTTLEY, M.C.P.
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THE

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AT THE

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TTRCCERDRaRE CES eRe

:%
’

Liteid












TUESDAY, JULY

16,



@ From Page 1
with it.
Mr. Walcott: He

the car with you?

Given Handbills

Mr. Cox: No. I gave him some
of «ne handbills and I went
tnrough the various avenues.

Mr. A. B. Franklin, contractor

do

never sot

in

ana buiider Was 4180 recaiiea:

Mr. Walcott: In your esumate,
you only have $1,301 for cost oi
labour?

Mr. Franklin; That is what I
set it out to be.

Mr. Walcott: Do you find by

experience that there is 4 percent-

age that labour always pears to
the cost of materials?

Mr. Franklin: Not from practi-
cal experience.

Mr. Walcott: Would you say
that the percentage is 60?

Mr. Franklin; Sometimes you
would have to add 100% some-
times more,

Mr. Walcott: In dealing with
wood is the labour higher than
if you were dealing with stone?

Mr. Franklin: No.

Mr. Walcott: If yau have to

take down a building, would not
that increase the cost?

Mr. Franklin: Yes. All the ma-
terial taken down would have to
be assorted after it-has been sawn
up.

Mr. Walcott: You made your
calculations at four cents a cubic
foot for excavating — naturally if

more than you estimated was
done jit would be more
Mr. Franklin: Yes.
Y "ph ae °
Cost Of Pits
Mr. Walcott; What about the

water closet ‘pits?

Mr. Franklin: Well! allow $240.

Attorney General: Your esti-
mate is for a new building?

Mr. Franklin: Yes.

Attorney General: We have had
evidence in this case that a hut
had to be removed from Seawell.
Allowing for the labour to cut up
buch a hut how mucth....

Mr. Franklin: It would
more than a new building.

Attorney General: It is shown
that the mgterial. used was $5,000
odd and the labour $5,000, If
you were erecting a building of
this size under these conditions
how many people would normally
be employed?

cost

Mr. Franklin: I would use six
carpenters, two masons, two la-
bourers, and one mason tender,

that being nothing to do with the
painting.

Attorney General: _How
would you have taken to
struct such with these men?

Mr. Franklin: Eight weeks
would cover that.

Attorney General;
tell how much,
crease cost since
have cost then?

Mr. Franklin; At
cent. less.

Mr. E. K. Waleott: The price
paid for nails was 35 cents per
pound and you had put it at 27.

Mr. Franklin: All my estima-
tions are at today’s prices. I
bought some at 35 cents then
myself

A Conspiracy

Mr. Miller was recalled.

The Commissioner: Mr.
has given in evidence here
Mr. Mottley, Mr. Tudor, Mr.
Mayers and yourself went to
Hutchinson & Banfield’s office on
June 27 in pursuance of sOme con-
spiracy or plot. What about that
Mr. Miller?

Mr. Miller; I have nevet been
with any of them anywhere. Mr.
Banfield went to my place some-
time last week.

The Commissioner: Have you
ever been to Hutchinson ahd Ban-
field buildings anytine?

Mr. Miller: Only on
business.

The Commissioner: Any time in
the month of June?

Mr. Miller; No.

The Commissioner; And
visit by Mr. Banfield... .?

long
con-

Could
allowing for
1949, it

you
in-
would

least 10 per

Cox
that

my own

this

eee

1951

Mr. Miller: I told tf
know in whose inter he cam.
Anything I had said, { told him,
would be found in the minutes of
the Vestry. He said he had just
left the Vestry clerk and wanted
more information. I told him
there was nothing more I could
give him.

Mr. .Mottley: .Do you know
Squires?

Mr. Miller: | know the Squires
with whom Cox goes around.

Mr. Mottley: If Squires said
that he saw you, Tudor and my-
self go to Banfield’s office... .?

Mr. Miller: That would be a lie.
I have never been in the company
of Tudor, and Mottley together
walking the streets. The only
lime the three of us are together
is at the Vestry table.

1 I did not



Mr. Mottley: Have you ever
seen Mayers with me in your
whole life?

Mr. Miller: I have never seen

you with Mr. Mayers.
Mr. Cox was allowed to ques-
tion Mr. Miller,

Good Friends

Mr. Cox: I am putting it to you
Ahat you and Squires are good
friends — that you go around and
drink together?

Mr. Miller: That is so.

Mr. Cox; You said Mr. Banfield
went to you before the enquiry
started?

Mr. Miller: Yes.

Mr. Cox: You say you went
into Banfield’s office in June?

Mr. Miller: I did not go.

Mr. Cox: Have you any idea
where these huts are?

Mr. Miller: You are the best
person to know; You had the
job of moving them.

Mr.” Cox: You heard Mr.
Mottley speak of these huts at
the Vestry. Who spoke first?

Mr. Miller: I am not here to
remember who spoke first. I
would like to ask Mr. Cox some-
thing. :

The Commissioner; Tell’ xe
what it is. One

Mr. Miller:
bare-faced — I know he i8)‘a!
dirty, nasty and so on....

The Commissioner: This
not an abusing match.

Mr. Mayers, lorry driver, was
recalled.

The Commisioner: You made a
statement about Mr. Cox and he
has denied it. That is my reason
for having you recalled.

Mr. Cox: Where do you live?

Mr. Mayers: Station Hill.

Mr. Cox: How long were you
living there?

Mr. Mayers: Four years.



is

House Searched

Mr. Cox; The police searched
your place sometime ago, is that
not so?

Mr. Mayers: Yes.

Mr. Cox: Where were you liv-
ing then?

Mr. Mayers; King’s Gap.

Mr. Cox: How long was that?

Mr. Mayers: In 1949.

The Commissioner, And you
were living in *Station Hill for

four years?

Mr. Mayers. What really hap-
pened is that I was living in Sta=
tion Hill with my parents and I
was living with.. -.

Mr. Cox: Sometime between
September and October 1949 you
were the driver of 258. Do you
remember the sign on the board?

Mr. Mayers: P. M. Francis.
You told me the truck was yours.

Mr. Cox: What else was on the
sign board?

Mr. Mayers: Two Mile Hill.

Mr. Cox: Do you remember
where I was living at the time?
Mr. Mayers: Britton’s Hill,

Mr. Cox: Where did you house

this. lorry?

Mr. Mayers: At Mr. Tommie
Miller’s residence.

Mr. Cox: From the time you

were driving this lorry until you
left, it was being put up at Mr
Tommie Miller’s residence?

Mr. Mayers: Yes.

Mr. Cox: It would be therefore
untrue to say that during the
time you removed the building



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from Seawel] that the lorry was
housed anywhere else?

Mr. Mayers: Yes, it would be
untrue.

Mr. Cox: Do you remember
meeting Mr. Duguid and me in
a ear coming around+River Road
the first ¢vening you started to
move?

Mr. Mayers: I could not have

met you when that was not the
road I took. I took Government
Hill road.
Mr. Cox:
Tudor?
Mr. Mayers: Yes.

Any Meeting?

Mr. Cox: Did he at any time be-
fore this enquiry started, meet
you and discuss this?

Mr. Mayers: No.

Mr. Cox: Did you not hear that
he was trying to get in contact
with you?

Mr. Mayers: No.

Mr. Cox: Do you know a woman
who sells black pudding and souse
near Mr. Tudor’s garage?

Mr. Mayers: 1 know two women
who sell.

Mr. Cox: Did this lady not tell
you that Mr. Cox was trying to
get hold of you?

Mr. Mayers; No.

Mr. Cox: Did you see Mr. Tudor
at Hutchinson and Banfield when
you went there?

Mr. Mayers: Yes.

Mr. Cox: Did you see Mr. Mott-
ley or Mr. Miller there?

Dou you know Mr

Mr. Mayers: No.

Mr. Cox: Was the man who
you said came to you Rupert
Squires?

Mr. Mayers: [t was not him.

Mr. Cox: Could the men in the
joiner shop see?

Mr. Mayers: If they looked out.

Mr. Cex: Do you know why he
wanted to prevent you from giv-
ing evidence.

Mr. Mayers: No.

Mr. Cox: Did the man tell you
@ny reason?
r. Mayers: Not to say any-

, ot about” the removal of the
$.

Could he be .so-

‘ Mr. Cox: Are you absolutely
sure that 2361 was not there?

Mr. Mayers: Not in my pres-
ence.
Mr. Cox: What would be the

object then of preventing you from
coming before the Commissioner?

Misappropriation

The Commissioner: If you knew

nothing of the misappropriation
of this hut....what..
Mr. Cox: What were you paid

for a trip?

Mr. Mayers: Two shillings.

Mr. Cox: You went up to Sea-
well at all hours—at midnight for
two shillings?

Mr. Mayers: The latest time was
10 o'clock. What could I do?

Mr. Cox: Suppose the other
driver could have told you he was
paid $1.50 for a trip, what about
that?

Mr. Mayers: That would be
what you paid him.
Mr. Cox: During the time you

were driver did you eyer discuss
pay with this other driver?

Mr. Mayers: No.

Mr. Cox: Where did Mr. Ban-
field come to you?

Mr. Mayers: In Cheapside.

Mr. Cox: Just standing up in
the road?

Mr. Mayers: Just standing up
in the road.

Mr. Cox: Who told him that
someone had offered you this
money? “ie

Mr. Mayers: | told him.
Mr. Cox: Did you not think it
was proper to inform the police?

Mr. Mayers: Because I would
have liked .the money.
Mr. Allan Thompson, a chauf-

feur who worked with Mr. Duguid

when the huts were being re-
moved, was the next witness
called.

Attorney General:
trips did you make?

Mr. Thompson; Two, one that
evening and the other a Saturday.

Attorney General: How many
trucks were there?

Mr. Thompson: Duguid’s, Mur-
ray’s and 258

How many

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Princess Alice Enquiry Ends

Attorney General: Who left
first?

Mr. Thompson; Murray left
iirst.

Attorney General: When

got there where was Murray?

Mr. Thompson; On the Reef un-
loading

Attorney General: How long
dia you wait on the Reef after
you unloaded?

Mr. Thompson; About an hour.

Attorney General: 258 did not
come up to that time?

Mr. Thompson; No

Atterney General: Next time

you-made a trip who helped you
to unload it?

Mr. Thompson: Mr. Duguid |
four hands on the truck

Attorney General: Some of |
hut missing. Have }
where it has gone?

Mr. Thompson: No

Attorney General:
were you paid?

Mr. Thompson: | cannot remein-

Is you i

What a

trip

ber, I think I got two shillin
a trip

Mr. Coppin, Ex - Government
Analyst, was the next witnes
Besides his knowledge of che

istry, Mr. Coppin said that he w
a certified engineer and had
years’ experience in building cor
struction,

Mr. Walcott: At the request

of Counsel for Mr. Tudor
that is me—on July 8, you
surveyed the building at the
Princess Alice Playing Field
and you have an estimate on
findings together with a plan
showing the lay out and gen-
eral design

Mr. Coppin: Ye

Mr. Coppin submitted the
plan and copy of the survey

to the Commissioner,

Mr. Walcott: Have you had
any experience in the hand-
ling of the huts at Seawell on
behalf of Government?

Mr. Coppin: I removed two
huts on behalf of the Govern-
ment,

Mr. Walcott: Were you
Chairman of the Gommittee at

Lancaster Government Fac-
tory?

Mr. Coppin: Yes.

Mr. Walcott: From whom

did you get yours instructions

to remove the huts?

Mr. Coppin: | was instruct-
ed by the Acting Governor
Mr. Perowne to take the two
huts from Seawell.

Mr. Walcott; About what
time was this as compared
with the construction of the
Princess Alice Playing Field?

Mr. Coppin: It was around
1949.

Mr. Walcott: What did you
get out of these huts?

Mr. Coppin: 1 got about 30
per cent. of the material of
the huts. This was due to the
fact that the sides were mainly
cardboard, the roof was dete-
riorated galvanise and most of
the material had evidence of
wood ants.

Mr. Walcott: You have seen a
copy of the estimate by Mr.
Franklin of the cost of the build-
ing at the Princess Alice Playing
Field?

Mr. Coppin: Yes.

Mr, Walcott: What do you say
about that?

Labour Cost

Mr. Coppin:
tially

material,

I agree substan-
with Mr. Franklin’s bill of
but I differ on _ his
labour cost. I would say that it
is very improbable to construct
any building—I put it as low as

a chicken coop — labour cost
would not be less than 60 per
cent., or even more

Mr. Walcott: As regards a
wooden structure would this be
higher or lower?

Mr. Coppin: With that old
wooden construction it would be
higher.

Mr. Walcott: In ‘your estimate
have you allowed for green-
heart?

Mr. Coppin: I haye not allowed
for that which I uhderstand was
used for the foundation. @ could
not get at it to see it.

Attorney General: In. gon-
structing a building of the ‘size
and dimensions as that on the



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id



play
cons
I pie t
Mr Coppin
vie i
© ¢ t ether yoy are

tuil ¢
Attorney General W

a tin i’ on
at
Mr Coppin: rhree m h
wowd t reasonable time and
I woul 20 to 25 people should
be employed,

Attorney General: You did not

examine this building to ascer-
tain the type of wood?

Mr.*Coppin: Yes. I could see
neem per cent. of the floor was
ork fy old stuff, presumably
from the huts

Attorney General: What about
the ce ?

Mr, Coppin: I could not tell
very @ast t was painted

Attorney General: What about
he Ww ht

Mr. Coppin: | cannot speak on
the up *, the were painted
I coul determine that some
of the leepers were old

New Everything?






Attoriey General: In your esti-
miate 5 mated everything as
being ne

Mr. Coppin | e my cost, |
hint revailit prices ani
ihen e« end I allowed a re
duction for the old material

rhe, Commissioner; How long
have }Sou been a builder, Mr.
Coppin,

Mr, Coppin: I have been buiid-

ince 1937, but I ive been a
1 fully fora year now, the
time that I have retired.

The, Commissioner: You we
to Seauweil to inspect huts fo
Governmet

Mr. Coppin: 1 paid a visit ant
had look. | was told that I cou
have two, a large one and a sm
one I looked at them and i
tructed the factory manager
send for them.

The Commissioner: Were the:
more huts at Seawell then?

Mr. Coppin: About four or five





The Commissioner;
ittend the sale?

Mr. Coppin: No.

Mr. Mottley: You
weré@ approached by
to get this estimate
the enquiry?

Mr. Coppin: | wa
sked by the Financial
io make the survey, I said that I
did nét mind, but would prefer
to do so with somebody else.

I afterwards understood that
Franklin was do it. Then !
was asked by, Mr. Walcott to do

and I said T did not mind. As
result I have produced the fig-
ures and plan.

Mr, Redman, clerk
Vestry was recalled.

Did you

Said that you
Mr. Walcott
and plan for

actually
Secretary

to

of the

More Money Spent

Attorney General: 1 want t
know a it the Vestry’s decisio:
concerning the expenditure o
money over $1,000. Can you tel
us at hat meeting this took
piace?

Mr. Redman: At the meeting
of April 13, 1949 the Vestry were
discussing estimates or somethin
like that d on Mr, Leacock
suggestion it was decided to in-
vile tenders for work estimatec
to cost! $7,000 and over. (Clerk

referred to Minutes),













































PAGE THREE



}
Aitorney General Ww ‘SSeeueeEeeRe The name speaks for itself seseseeasess
























Mr Redman Yes, A ° 3 ° Aue "hele ° 8
1 a UX _ si
Attorney General: W that the] M
iecision of the Vestry |
Mr. Redman: Yes
Attorney General: In view of Helps to cleanse the system
what one wit stated, here from blood impurities
be Worrell to be ir
charge for a certain period, [ impurities in the blood may cause rheumatic

would like to ask Mr. Tudor ques- aches and pains, stiff and painful joints,

tions on that point, because thet boils, pimples and common skin disorders.

came asa bit of surprise to me. | Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
Mr..Tudor was recalled, e the blood, cleanses the system and assists °
Attorney General; Mr. Tudor. | in restoring good health.

a witness here last Friday or

Saturday said that Mr. Worret!

ceased to be employed om the job
ior some period. Is that so.

Mr. Tudor. Yes. That happened
on the labour question ?

Attorney General: Did it hap-
pen because of the fact that hi
house was searched ?

Mr. Tuder; No. His
earched before the
started to be erected.

Attorney General:
was he off the job?

Mr, Tudor: Two weeks

Attorney General: Who took his
place then ?

Mr, Tudor:
said that
work

Builder Recalled

Attorney General; And then
eventually Worrell was taken back
mm?

house was
building

How long

Mr.
he could

He
the

Maynard.
supervise

Mr. Tudor; Yes.
The Commissioner: Maynare
was not a carpenter or builder

was he ?

Mr. Tuder; He said that he had
fone one cr two jobs already. I
two weeks I found things were
oing bad and I had to call back
Worrell.

The Commissioner;
you pay Maynard at

Mr. Tudor: 1 paid
S18 per week,

Avtorney General; | notice he

{that during the two weeks | Mr

What dic
this time
the same

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menticned above, We sage, therefore, thai you



categories) of their average shipments during the basic period











(a) get in touch with your established Canadian suppliers.

(b) ge! in touch with the Canudian Trade Commissioners regarding items
avuilable and possible suppliers.

TRINID /.D, BARBADOS, WINDWA2D & LEEWARD ISLANDS AND BRITISH GUIANA

Mr. T. G. Major, Canadian Government Trade Commissioner
43 St. Vincent St., Port-of-Spain, Trinidad

JAMAICA, BAHAMAS AND BRITISH HONDURAS
Mr. M. B, Palmer, Canadian Goverament Trade Comminioner
Canadian Bank of Commerce Chambers, Kingston, Jamaica

Bayt:
7 CY ERVICE

a




BARBADOS ADVOCATE





ADVOGATE

Ga SSS ssa ee

BARBADO:

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lt4., Broad St. Bridsetow.



Tuesday, July 10, 1951





ROAD SAFETY

THE Barbados Automobile Association
now has 238 members and its immediate
aim is to have a membership roll which in-
cludes as many as possible of the 8,000
motorists in this island. During the period
of checking licenses the Association made
a drive for membership. In conjunction
with the Police the Association checked on
motorists and handed out leaflets pointing
out that as soon as a driver had complied
with the law he or she should join the
Barbados Automobile Association.

The leafict itself was a reminder that the
Association was alive and functioning and
was courting the support of every motorist
for its future success, At present there is
a Committee working out details of a
scheme to accommodate drivers of various
types of vehicles as is done in the Automo-
bile Association in England,

There are many services which the Auto-
mobile Association can render to the pub-
lic. Already it has been able to influence
merchants to let their daily advertising
space be used for reminders to motorists
and pedestrians alike to observe the rules
of safety. The increasing number of motor
vehicles on the roads would seem to indi-
caté that there should be some means of
Compulsory Third Party Insurance. The
Association might throw its weight behind
the effort in order that if and when-acci-
dents do occur there should be some pro-
tection left for the bereaved.

This matter of Compulsory Insurance
was discussed in the House of Assembly
years ago and rejected. The need is more
insistent today and the objections raised
then cannot be sustained now. But the
Association hopes to do much more. The
observance of the rules of safety and the
imparting of knowledge which will make
for efficient control of motor vehicles are
among its aims. It deserves a greater meas-
ure of publie support.

UNSIGHTLINESS

WITHIN recent months advertising
signs became the subject of public com-
ment and the matter was taken up by the
Chamber 6f Commerce. .A committee was
appointed to interview people who used
these signs or allowed them to be set up
on their premises. The object was to ask
advertisers to avoid despoiling the beauty
of the districts by using signs which aid
not synchronise with the colour scheme.

Tn recent weeks, however, more and big-
ger signs have been erected. in the City:
which do violence to the surroundings, The
complaint has been made by visitors and
local people that in some districts the
natural beauty has been spoilt by these
advertising signs. It is true that owners
have the right to allow these signs to be
erected on their premises but the appeal
against unsightly hoardings should not be
lost on those who appreciate the natural
beauty of the countryside,

In the City there is room for advertising
but it is necessary to keep signs and build-
ings within the limit of what would be
allowed by a Town Planning Authority.
Bridgetown is already unsightly because
of its lack of uniformity. The indiscrimin-
ate erection of ugly advertising signs can
only add to it.



Garbo -Blossomed

(By EVE PERRICK)

HELMUTH EUGENE HAUSER,
best known under his assumed
but more romantic name of Gaye-
lord Hauser, who claims to know
the secret of everlasting energy

voice:

ond all-day vitality, arrived in
London—and went straight .to
bed.

Yes, the Elsa Maxwell of the

fancier food faddists, the modern
Medicine-man himself, was just
plain old-fashioned tired. So he



The Leper Is No Lenger
Doomed





courage of a handful. of. lepers—-ia PART. IL. disease or again by tissue absorp-
banishing forever the fear and hope tion which makes for a weird mask
“a thin. me aa mee seems to have affinity for some €ffect, as if the face had been vul-
ris once incurable disease races, which it loses in time, but ©@ized. Huge, lumpy ears, piled
By ROBERT ©. RUARK grants immunity to none. It some- USsues on the forehead which

From “Esquire” times seems to be easily trans- [md the “leonine” look (such re-

missible through families, but for sults of the disease are a thing of

In the autumn of 1948 two every positive check on family oe ees a waeine artes 2,
of news were susceptibility, the experts can nasal ailment aie other hall.

of vital significance to every vic- Jated cases in otherwise healthy ae see ida teenies
tim of leprosy and to all those families, One woman at Carville, known howe’ leprosy is con.
concerned with the fate of the wife of prosy is n-

a prominent physician, tracted or how long it takes tc
leper. married in the knowledge that she i : is that it
: . a 4 ‘a contract it. One theory is that it

In the United States a leper had Jleprosy. She bore her hus- is passed from pereon to person
had been given a medical _Gis- band 11 children, and neither he through the nasal passages afte:
charge (which calls for further nor the children were infected. long and intimate contact, such a-

treatment) from the national lep- f , ; : aoe
d rom nurse to child, and its period
rosarium at Carville, in the south- Most leprosy experts agree that of incubation may te eae noe

ern State of Louisiana. Instead of the disease is basically attracted to 10 years. The Carville doctors
going away and hiding in shame, to children and adolescents, and believg that. Mrs. Hornbostel. ir

Hornbostel, using her that it is generally acquired in whom'the disease did not manifes
own name, deliberately galled early years, even if it does not itself until her late middle years
attention to herself, and loudly become apparent until adulthood, contracted leprosy on Saipan oj
proclaimed exactly where she in- when some breakdown in body Guam, where she spent her child-
tended to live

Certrude

health or change of basa] metabol- hood, and very possibly from ar
ism weakens the victim. infected nurse.



nn salina enna Te

Soon afterwards, the Board of
Health of the
Hawaii,

Pacific Islands of

home of the celebrated deliberate attempts

Tnere have been 145

to

ccrtified
inoculate

leprosarium of Kalaupapa on the the disease on adult humans, and

island of Molokai, announced that no inoculation

no more admissions to
Damien’s famous settlement would
Henceforth

€
estonishing pieces
flashed around the world—news show countless instances of iso~

ever again be made,

all new cases, instead of being oped what the doctors then agreed Either
sent to the prison island, would ‘was an active case of leprosy. AS automatic

Father M

has taken effect.
any years ago a convict agreed
to a transplant of leprous tissue
in return for his life, and devel-

The theory of the nasal trans-
mission is used because one of the
final tests» for the leprous i
microscopic inspection of mucou
patches from the nostrils. How
ever, it has not yet been possibk
to eulture the bacilli artificial
or to inoculate animals with it
success would indicate a
end to centuries ©

be treated in an ordinary hospital. a scientific control, however, the horror, but the bacilli were no

Thus, at one stroke, thousands
of years of horror, misinforma-
tion, and misplaced dread—thou-
sands of years of near-criminal
persecution and savage mysticism
—officially came to a halt. Lep-
rosy, dire disease, incurable
scourge of the ages, suddenly had
assumed its true status of a di-
sease, extraordinary but no longer
incurable, rather than a_loath-
some mystery with implied over-
tones of filth and semi-criminality.

It is estimated ‘today that ‘lep-
rosy can be stamped out in two
generations, if handled as a medi-
cal entity on.a basis of intelligent
understanding of public - health
needs, The modern public-health
concept is emphasis on the diag-
nosis of the disease in its early
stages, swift treatment with the
marvel drugs, the sulfones, and
rigid protection of the children of
leprous parents, rather than the
largély needless protection of the
general public. This is the creed
of the Hawaii Board of Health

Down through the years there
has possibly been more widespread
misinformation about the micro-
bacillus leprae than any other sin-
gle scourge. Public conception of
the disease was founded on origi-
nal error, and has grown in inter-
national loathing through a hor-
rid fascination with its mystery
and long-term incurability, in
addition to its connotation of un-
cleanliness accompanied by ban-
ishment and made worse by the

awful physical ravages of the
active disease.
That is why, in recent years,

those afflicted with the disease and
those concerned in its treatment
have attempted to destroy the
word “leprosy” and substitute the
name Hansen's Disease, after the
Norwegian scientist who isolated
its unique bacillus, and to use
Hansenotic or Hensenian for
“leper’’, What the leper has ever
desired was to be regarded as a
sick person, instead of a monster
who must be pent up and shun-
ned for the misfortune of inno-
cently contracting a disease which
was incurable until very recently.
Leprosy is not only curable, but
it does not disfigure if promptly
and .properly treated,

The mystery that has always
cloaked the disease also has
clothed it with horror, It was
popularly supposed to be conta~
gious to such a point that any-
thing a leper touched was a source
of contagion, Today itis, actually,
thought. to be the most difficult of
all bacilli to, transmit, and leprosy
is almost impossible to contract
except at gn early age im loca-
tions where’ the disease is en-
demic—that is, where it thrives
and perpetuates itself, In the
United States, those sections are
the Gulf Coast areas of the south-
ern State of Florida, Texas, and
Louisiana, Mexico is regarded as
an endemie sectcy, with such close
juxtaposition to portions of the
Pacific Coast State of California
that it is difficult to say whether
parts of California are endemic
or not, The San Joaquin valley of
California now is regarded as an
endemic area, since eight cases
have developed there.

It is not known what makes a
section endemic, There have been
efforts to relate the transmission
of the disease to climate, nation-
ality, race, diet, and terrain, but
it has defied a correlation, It

Then to charm away my last
doubts about his sincerity he look-
ed into my eyes and intoned in a
pleasant,
“If only
with me, I would make you the
most wonderful juices,”

The mixer goes along with him
on ell lecture engagements. It will
make its first public appearance in
Britain on Monday night, when
Hauser will put over his formula
for health, iappiness and a long,



soft, German-a *cented

I had my mixer

ga to

for three years.
casions he cooked her

Hauser’s feat in getting Garbo to
parties
wagon in a big way,

man proved of little value, since
he showed a long, intimate family
history of leprosy, and might have
borne the disease all the time.

Some pretest, | think—
against the rising price
of clothes,”



The celebrated Belgian priest,
Father Damien, the patron saint of
Molokai, developed leprosy while
working intimately with the pa-
tients at Kalawao and Kalaupapa.
Most leprosy experts believe that
Damien de Vauster had leprosy
before going to Molekai, since his
Belgian region was highly endemic
at the time and that Father Dam-
ien knew he had the disease for
many years before he announced
it in his famous “We“lepers...”
speech to his people. It would
have been one way of accounting
for his complete carelessness of
approach to his charges and his
flaunting of the simplest sanitary
precautions. The only other at-
tendant on Molokai to contract
the @isease was Father Peter, a
man who had a habit of scratech-
ing his bald head constantly, A
leprous patch developed where he
scratched, The doctors removed
the patch and, with its usual
erratic behaviour, the disease
never sgain manifested itself.

fi the Carviile sanitarium, no
nurse, doctor, or visitor has ever
become infected. One attendant
did; he proved to have come from
an endemic region of Louisiana.
In regent times, the closest thing
to an infection control has been
the case of two American soldiers
of World War II. Coming from
widely divergent sections of the
United States, with no family pre-
disposition to the disease, they
both acquired leprosy in Austra-
lia. Both had been tattooed by a
needle artist who had leprosy.

One of the cammoner. miscon-
ceptions of Hansen's Disease - is
that it, causes fingers, tees, and
even limbs to drop off, and that
the disease iisslf automatically
kills people. The well-known
“leper claw,” the curled foot or
hand, is the result of cartilage
absorption and the contraction of
muscles and tendons until it is
aes for the patient to have
fingernails om his knuckles, and
his feet completely crumpled and
wasted. The visitor to «a lepro~
sarium js often struck. by the fact
that a great many patients have
snub noses. This also is due to
cartilage absorption, The distor-
tion of, the features caused
either by the great nodules which
mark the-cutaneous type of the

is

For

special oc-
his “cele-

joined the: band-

After His £3.500-a-Week Idea

nether
much of beauty; let.us keep what
3 we can and invent more,”

even isolated until late in the

nineteenth century

This impotency of researcn
then, put the burden of the ag
on remedies Until 1941 ther
was no definite remedy. The fa
mous chaulmoogra oi! seemed th:
best though some leprologists nov
admit that it was of ict
no value except for a 3
therapeutic effect on the patient
an indication that somebody wa
trying to do something for him
The new sulfunes. are effective
the patient who eannot tolera*
Promin, given intravenously, ca
usually take diasone or promece-
tin or sulfatrone in tablet form
The drugs are sensationally effec



tive. A pexgon who submits him
self to treatment in the earl
stages of the disease is~ almos

sure to see it stopped completel
in from one to two. years, A
least two of the writer's acquaint
ances from Carville, a young ma)
and Mrs. rnbostel, are fre
people in ‘a free world once more
Of all the patients discharged
there have been only eight re
lapses. Since 1941, over 150 sat
isfactorily arrested sufferers fron
Hansen’s Disease have passer
through the outer gates of Car
ville Leprosarium Many other
have been cured sufficiently to g
back to society, but a few, refus
because they are marked enoug)
to be recognizable as ex-lepers
and many are unwilling to try tr
cope with a society which stil
brands a former victim of lepros
as a dangerous and unpleasan
oddity.

It is here that the person wh«
wishes to evaluate the disease o
leprosy must take a short courst
in leper psychology. The bi:
battle in getting people to recog
nize that leprosy is a disease anc
not a crime has been led by suc!
rugged fighters as Father Damien
ex-Governor ‘Lawrence Judd of
Hawaii, Gertrude Hornbostel, ane
Stanley Stein, the blind editor of
Carville’s magazine, The Star
They have fought with great de-
termination and great selflessness
only to be partially defeated by
the people they fight for, who
have become hypersensitive by
reason of the attitude of the
“clean” world to an “unclean”
disease.

Living as a leper in a nonlep-
rous world is sometimes simply
too difficult for the individual.
It is regarded as a distinct tri-
umph by the Board of Health in
Hawail to-day that at least one
former occupant of the settlement
of Kalaupapa is out in the non-

leprous town of Honolulu, his
disease halted, and that he is
profitably ‘employed in a large



organization where his employer
and his fellow-workers know him
for what he is—a man who once
was afflicted with leprosy. His
tragic counterpart fs a young ance
handsome ‘* man, the disease
arrested, with no discernible signs
of his former ailment, who sti]
chooses to’ live and work in th>
-olony on Molokai because he
eannot bring-himself to face hos-
tile outsiders,

Many ptiful people, such as
this young man, are to-day pris-
oners of nothing but their own

fear, (MEDICINE—Practice)
End of Part I.
This is Part I of an article Which

oppeared im the April 1951 issue of
Esquire, a monthly magazine pub
lished in the United States and céi-
tainir tion and articles of general
interest, The writer is the author of

veral books and-a regular contrit
ulor to American periodicals,





writes:
“T even think Whose turn is it

brations only” speciality-——“Extra- to wash up’? would be a gayer
vagant Wild Rice Hamburgers.” question if a really pretty sink

In exchange, “Miss Garbo with pale-greengtiles, silvery fit-
taught me so much abeut women tings and cupboards below for
—why for example, they chatter china could be half-concealed in
so much. It's not maliciousness, a corner so that interesting after-
It's plain nervousness,” dinner talk need not be broken

Hollywood, impressed by by someone disappearing to the

regions, We. have lost so

did the plain, old-fashioned thing
—tock a nap (horizontally) and
demonstrated that he does not al-
ways practise what he preaches

For the Hauser way to relax,
according to his thousands of’
written and spoken words is the
Body Slant—at an angle of 45
degrees with the head lower than
the feet. :

Still up and about again a short
time after the world’s highest-
paid _ dietitian
(around £3,500



comes in every
week from books,
broadcasts lec- â„¢@
tures and selling 6 §)~* °
the ingredients ,5 — :
for his _ speci ~ 2
pecial as ;

menus) shrugged :
off this derelic- Sgr’ “s E
tion of duty. S

“Ah, yes, the

30dy Slant—but GAYELORD
that is particu- HAUSER

larly recommended for women.”

long life

. As well as the mixer he uses a
, bright line in patter, a seasoning
of sex appeal and a shiny smiled
personality to get the audience to
try out his “such delicious drinks”
of cabbage juice, skimmed milk,
yoghourt, black treacle and brew-
er’s yeast.

“Do you think we will go for
that stuff here?” I asked, Hauser
neglected his salad, ate a sausage
roll and smiled serenely: —

“I get so many letters from
England, I am thrilled, but I am
sad, too. They ask such primitive
questions like—Where can I buy
blackstrap molasses?”

In Paris soon he will be calling
on the Duchess of Windsor. The
duchess, one of his first disciples,
uses the Gayelord Hauser special
vegetable-juice extractor and has

written a foreword to the French
edition of his book
Greta Garbo was another de-

yotee, He was her close companion

Hauser’s own description of his
success story is about As extrava-
gant.as the wild rice rissoles, Now
56-years old (and a handsome 6ft.
Sins.) in a smooth blue suit and
white silk shirt, the smart set's
favourite diet doctor almost burst
with gratified pride as he de-
claimed: “Isn’t it wonderful. All
by myself I have changed the eat-
ing habits of the world.”

I prefer Jimmy Durante’s sum-
ming-up: “Dat molasses and
wheat germ and yoghourt don’t
really make ya live longer. It just
seenis longer.”

On Washing Up

* WHEN a lady of title takes
to her pen ten to one the
result will be a book on flower
arrangements. But Lady Gorell’'s
effort “That Looks Lovely” goes
a little beyond the take-one-
branch of pussy willow-and-a-
few-leafy-sprays routine.
Her ladyship has an interesting
idea or two on. the of
entertaining without She

subject
taff

Dry Those Eyes

* LITTLE LIZ TAYLOR — the
: latest contender for the poor
little rich girl titte—sighs so sadly
that nobody loves her any more.

Well dry thos@ violet eyes, lady,
and F'll put it in great big letters

EVE PERRICK LOVES ELIZA-
BETH ''AYLOR.

Why? Becatise she is the first
Hollywood filmestar to arrive here

wearing in place of the Tlooked- *

for mink a wrap made of that
homeliest of poer-relation furs—

moleskin.
Odd Shoes

* STREET SCENE: The puz-

zled lookers-in at the display
of photographed celebrities in the
shop window of a Regent-street
shipping company as they note
that that picture of Mrs. Harvey
S. Firestone, jnr., shows her
promenading the deck in one
black ‘court shoe and One white
peep-toe sandal



—L.E.S.

The Story Of Miss X
DRUG GIRL

| 'TEEN-AGE drug addicts are shocking
the United States with their disclosures
to the Senate’s Investigating Committee
in Washington.

}
|

THIS is the story of a pretty young] |

musician who sank from a respected place in
society to lead the life of a thief because of
her devouring need for narcotics. Her story
was recorded at the bleak Westfield State Re-
formatory for women in New York, where at
25 she is serving a prison sentence.

Born into an educated New England fam-
ily, Miss KX showed early talent for music,
which her parents sympathetically encour-
aged,

She studied at one of the best music schools
n the U.S.A.—Oberlin conservatory in Ohio
~and completed her education at Boston
Smmanuel College for women.

£380 A WEEK

She not only played bass violin, cello and
alto saxophone but was an accomplished
arranger and composer. At 20 she was earning
£80 a week. Then she was taken seriously ill.

Her doctor gave her demerol to relieve the
pain and soon she found she had become com-
sletely dependent on the drug.

When her doctor cut her off from demerol
she began to buy it illegally. But after a
while she found it too mild to satisfy her
ravings and turned to morphine.

About this time Miss X joined the Women’s
Army Corps, where she found it was easy to
»btain all the drugs she needed. “We were
jupplied with medical kits containing power-
ful drugs, and I got drugs that way. I simply
stole a kit whenever I needed more dope.”

After her discharge from the army she
ravelled' to New York, to Cleveland, Phila-
lelphia, Washington—any place where she
sould obtain narcotics.

THE CAPSULES

Despite the drug habit that was slowly de-
stroying her health she was still able to carry

yn with her work as arranger and errs
3ut though her income remained between!
£70 and £80 a week, she found it was not}
snough to keep her supplied with the tre-
nendous quantity of narcotics she now
desired.

She spent more than the £65 a week on the
30 drug capsules she used every day. Soon it
secame necessary to steal to get extra money.

Finally she turned to prostitution.

Miss X tells of a hotel in the New York
suburb of Bronx where clerks sold drugs.

“Tt was protected by the police. There was
ne particular patrolman we knew as Smitty
who went in there at seven or eight o’clock
at night until he went off duty early morning.

[hen he’d hang around until the girls paid
him off.”
HE BLUFFED

“If there was any complaint about men
brought in by girls then Policeman Smitty
bluffed his way and warned the men that if
they didn't give the girls their money he’d
send them off to prison. And then he would
take a man aside and say, ‘You know I could
have taken you to prison. Don’t you think I
deserve some consideration. So he made
money on all angles.”

Miss X tells how drugs were being openly
sold in some of Manhattan’s best known dru
stores, caféterias and night clubs.

“You go in the drug store and you ask the
man for needles, and if he thinks you look
all right he’ll just fish them from underneath
the counter and give them to you, no ques-
tions asked.”

Often when she had obtained enough drugs
for herself she joined other pedlars selling
narcotics to school children, She personaily
knew a “couple of hundred” child addicts.
and had “unfortunately sold drugs to them.”

Miss X was more sorry about this phase of
her activities than any other, and told the ir,-
vestigators: “It’s pitiful to see these ycung
kids buying the stuff. I don’t think they know
what they are doing. I know youngsters who
go to department stores doing what they c.ll
“boosting” (shoplifting), and who are turnin’,
into burglars, Sometimes they take thir
young girl friends with them—12 or 13 years
old.” .

In her travels from one area to another in
search of narcotics Miss X met many tragic
young people whose lives had been ruine<
by narcotics.

4

BABY, TOO

Her frieuds included a husbana and wif
who thought taking drugs was just as norm:
as eating and drinking. “They even ended uw
giving drugs to their baby only 11 mon‘h
old. Whenever the baby cried they woul:
give him a shot of heroin to shut him up.”

She knew children of 11 who were selliny
drugs and other eight- and nine-year-old
who acted as errand boys for dope pedlars.

At Coney Island amusement park ‘she ha:
watched pedlars who were so desperate t
sell their stuff to “hike someone out of som
money” that they would accost any man o
woman in the street—whether or not they
were known addicts—and say, “Want any-
thing? Do you use horse (heroin)? Would you
like to try cocaine?”

And her own future? Miss X hardly dared
to be hopeful. Her gréatest hope at thc
moment, she tearfully told the investiBators.
was that her tragic story could help-to save
other young lives ‘from being sold into the

slavery of the drug habit.’
' World Copyright Reserved

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, 2 LIPTON’S PURE .. $1.04

% ORANGE PEKOE . .50 MAXWELL HOUSE 95

2 TYPHOO TIPS 46 CARDINAL aye 92

, ‘ D, WHITE & BLUE _.90

S . PaOxCe ies ‘44 | BLUE MOUNTAIN 77

> HORNIMAN'S ....... 40 CHOYCE = “70

; . RED ROGM' uy. ss)... 40 EMPIRE a 54

ee EREPPCONS e os cs uh .40 ee epee te, a

® TENDERLEAF ...... .36 ae

BT OMYNABRE ok. 135 FISH in tins

% Fh Ge aiapr eben itor ce MAGKEREL:/ 04... 00 34

; SARDINES .... .16 & .26

s KIPPER SNACKS ... .24

MEP ON Ly hw 58
SESAME reco os ax (es 75

Black Currant— .40 per Btl. ANCHOVIES ....... 48
Bramble........ 40 per Btl. COD ROES........... 36
Marmalade ...... 32 per tin
TUESDAY, JULY 1,



1951





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Princess Alice Enquiry Ends

From page 3
Maynard was in charge there
were only 20 odd workmen and
later on Mr. Worrell’s pay sheet
shows 40.

Mr. Tudor: When Worrell went
off, the majority of his workmen
went with him. When he came
back he brought back some of his
and knocked off some of May-
nard’s. The i

number was in-
creased.
Attorney General: Can you re-
member whether this was in

October, November or December?
Was it when there was the rainy
weather ?

Mr. Tudor: The rainy weather
was October and November, and
it was just around November
that Lord Listowel and the other
Governors visited the island.
Acting Governor Perowne told me
then that he weuld like Lord
Listowel to open the pavilion and

I should increase the labour to
push ahead the werk.
Mr. Mottley: Mr. Tudor, the

Attorney General has been ask-
ing you why you got rid of
Worrell and you said on account
ef the labour question. Please ex-
plain that more fully.

Labour Costs High

Mr, Tudvi; . yveit the labour
bill was too high. The men were
working one on top the other, as it
were; and I felt I was not getting
enough work for the money that
was being paid out.

Mr, Motuey; Was it as a result

of pressure brought on you by
the Acting Governor ?
Mr, Tudor: He asked me to

force the work as he would like
Lord Listowel to open the pavil-
ion. As a result | allowed Wor-
rell to carry on with the number
of workmen,

The Commissioner: Did
Listowel come in November?

Lord

Mr. Tudor: Yes.

Mr, Walcott: Mr. Ramsay es-
timated for certain work that
year. What work was it?

Mr. Tudor: Mr. Ramsay estim-
ated for work at the Almshcuse,
Queen’s Park, and St. Barnabas
and thé work was done for half
the estimated cost.

Attorney General: | have been
informed that Mr. Ramsay estim-

ated for an 18 inch wall and
eventually a 12 inch wall was

built. Is that so?
Mr, Tudor: No,
The Commissioner: With regard

to the Almshouse ‘did yc cut
Mr. Ramsay's estimate in half?
Mr, Tudor; Yes.
Bhe Commissioner: Did you

alter the size of the wal! ?

Mr, Tudor: The wall was built
to the same dimensions Mr. Ram-
pay had given.

The children’s rocf too at the
almshouse was built for half of
the estimated cost. The work at
St. Barnabas too was also for half
of the estimated cost.

Al Auction Sale

The Commissioner: Did you at-
tend the auction sale?

Mr, Tudor: Yes.

The Commissioner; You bought
five huts. With regard to ,the
other seven were they bought by
various people ?

Mr, Tuaor:
from all cover
sale,

The Commissioner: The Ves-
try had decided that all work over

Yes, people came
the istand to tne

$1,000 should be done by con-
tract?
Mr. Tudor: All work over

$1,000 was done by contract ex-
cept the building at the playing
field. That was done by day's
work. f

The Commissioner: Don't you
think that as an ordinary busi-
nessman it was better to do it
by contract?

Mr. Tudor: I felt it could not
be done by contract, and the Act~

ing Governor agreed with me and’

said that it would have to be
done by day labour.

Mr. Ashby Churchwarden’s
Clerk, was asked at this stage to
produce the Expenditure Book for
the year 1949-50.

The Vestry voted that year
$2,400, he said, to repair the roof
of the children’s ward at the alms-
house.

Mr. Walcott: Did you know
or did you not, whether that was
Mr; Ramsay’s estimate?



Mr. Ashby: I cannot say if it
wns?
Mr. Walcott: How much Mr.

Tudor did it for?



{MPERIAL LEATHER @



—





Mr. Ashby: I see that $2,275.80
was spent, but from it was spent
$800 on a,wall and $78 on the
yard,







Mr. Walcott: Therefore you
only spent the difference betwee
$2,275 and $2,400 less $878, on the
root?

Mr. Ashby; Yes

The Commissioner: What about
St. Barnabas’ Church?

Mr. Ashby: That. year the Ves-

try voted $720 for repairs to St
Barnabas chapel’s boundary wall
and the same amount was spent

Almshouse Wall

The Commissioner; What about
the wall at the almshouse?

Mr. Ashby: The Vestry did not
vote any money for the wall.

Mr. Walcott: Have you got the
estimate?

Mr. Ashby: If Mr. Ramsay gaye
an estimate it would probably be

in the possession of the Vestry
Clerk.
Mr. Walcott: Mr. Redman has

just informed me that the Vestry
only decided on it and he has not
got an estimate.

Mr. Tudor, do you or do you
not know who made that estimate
for the almshouse ?

Mr. Tudor: Mr. Ramsay made
tne estimate and he made that
for St. Barnabas which was cut
from $1,800 to $720.

The Commissioner: The
voted 2,400 for repairs
children’s roof.

Mr. Tudor; This was a decision
on Mr. Ramsay’s estimate. This
was for the roof alone and had
nothing to do with the wall. I
spent $1,400 on the roof. Every
vestryman knows that Mr. Ram-
say’s estimates had to be cut and

Vestry
to tne

were cut. They were always too
high.
Mr. Pile, the Vestry’s auditor,

was recalled.

Mr. Walcott: You made certain
Statements and you searched up
the records of Mr. D. G. Leacock
during his tenure of office?

Mr. Pile: I searched ove bundle
and found on@ fvouchers which
would confirm * tHe point I had
made, It was Mr. Leacock’s
voucher. It was a small amount
of course and may have -been a
special case. It was a voucher in
favour of Dr. Hunte for an ex-
traction under Poor Relief. The
certificate reads: “I hereby certify
the above to be correct by the
the instructions of the Church-
warden.” That was signed by Mr.
E. C. Thorpe, Inspector of Poor.

Minutes Read

Mr. Redman recalled, was asked
to read a portion of the Minutes
of April 13, 1949, referring to Mr.
Ramsay. This referred to com-
ments by members of the Vestry
on Mr. Ramsay’s supervision and
his estimates.

Mr. Redman then said; “The
Board of Poor’ Law Guardians
look after the almshouse and they
have a clerk. Their estimates are
‘sent to me en bloc and are read
out at the Vestry table} therefore
I wotild not have estimates’ from
Mr. Ramsay. I would have no
details or estimates.

The actual estimates
by Mr. Ramsay never
me.

Tailor’s Evidence

Mr Rupert Squires, a tailor of
School Gap, Hindsbury Road, was
the next witness,

The Attorney General: Where
is your tailoring establishment ?

Mr, Squires: In James Street.

The Attorney General: Is it in
the same building as Messrs.
Hutchinson and Banfield ?

Mr, Squires: It is on the ground
floor of that building.

The Attorney General: Do sou
know Mr. H. A. Tudor?

Mr, Squires: Yes.

The Attorney General: Do you
know Mr. Mottley, Mr. Tommie
Miller and Mr. Victor Mayers ?

Mr, Squires: Yes.

The Commissioner: {t was said
by Mr. Cox that you told him you
saw Mr. Tudor, Mr. Mottley, Mr.
Miller and Mr, Mayet’ go into
the office of Messrs. Hutchinson
and Banfield on or about June
Is that so?

prepared
come to





Mr, Squires: No. i! never cold
him I saw them go in there.
The Commissioner: What dil

you tell him?
Mr. Squires: I told him I saw





Mr
of

H. A. Tudor on the morning
June 27 in James Street.

The Attorney General: Did you
tell him what he was doing ?

MT. Squires: I told Mr. Cox 1
spoke to Mr- Tudor and we had
4 conversation,

The Attorney
happened ?

Mr. Squires:
Tudor said
Station Hill
night ?”

The Attorney General:
did you say to that ?

Mr. Squires; | replied ‘no’.

The Attorney General: What
else did Mr. Tudor say to you?

Mr. Squires: He he was
waiting there for a to fix
some business, ;

The Attorney General: Did he
tell you what the business was ?

Mr. Squires: No.

: General: What
else

I told him Mr
‘So you were up
with Mr. Cox last

What

aid
man



The Attorney General: What
did you do after that?

Mr. Squires: I went in ‘to my
work.

The Attorney General: What
happened to Mr. Tudor after-
wards ?

Mr. Squires: I do not know.

The Attorney General: Do you
know if he went into the Soliti-
tor’s Office ?

Mr. Squires: No.

The Attorney General: Did you
see Tom any time that day? —

Mr. Squires: No.

The Commissioner: Did you
see Mr. Mottley or Mr. Miller that
day ?

Mr. Squires: | do not remember
seeing them.

Mr, Mottley: You did not tell
Mr. Cox at any time that you saw
Mr. Tudor, Mr. Miller, Mr.
Mayers nor Mr. Mottley together
in James St. on or about June’27
at Messrs. Hutchinson and Ban-
fieid’s Office ?

Evidence Planned

No



Mr. Squires: I told him

mst night (Sunday) that I had
heard on Saturday afternooa
that Mr. Tudor, Mr. Vincent

Griffith and Mr. Tom Mayers had
planned the evidence that Tom
Mayers had given at the enquiry,

Mr. Mottley: Was that all you
told him?
Mr. Squires: Yes.

Mr. Mottley: You did not tell
him that you saw Mr. Mottley, Mr.

Tudor, Mr. Miller, and Mr.
Mayers at Hutchinson and Ban-
feild on June 27?

Mr. Squires: No.

Mr. Mottley: If he said tha>
you teld him you saw us there
would he be lying ?

Mr. Squires: I] never told him

60.

Mr. Mottley: You said you told
him last night that you heard
Griffith, Tudor and Mayers had
planned the evidence given by
Mayers ?

Mr. Squires: Yes.

Mr, Mottley; With whom were
you discussing this matter on the
Saturday ?

Mr. Squires: With a popular
fruit vendor by Harrison's Mr. Mottley: What is her name?
Mr. Squires: Nicey Belgrave.
Mr. Mottley: Did Nicev Bel-
grave tell you anything ~ abou,
Miller and Mottley being in this

conspiracy ?

Mr. Squires: No.

Mr. Mottley: Did you ever men-

tion the names of Mottley and
Miller to Cox.

Mr. Squires; No

Mr. Mottley: Are you and Mr.
Miller friendly ?

Mr, Squires: Yes.

Mr, Mottley: Are you and Mr.
Mottley friendly ?

Mr. Squires; Not politically.

Mr. Mottley: How long have
you been working in James
Street ?

Mr. Squires: From June 15.

mr, Mottley: Could you see
anyone go into Hutchinsén and
Banfield’s Office from your work-

shop ?
Mr. Squires: No.
Mr. Mottley: You are very

friendly with Mr. Cox and you
assist him in doing business
sometimes ?

Mr, Squires: Yes.

Mr, Mottley: Can you tell us
something about the hut business ?

Mr. Squires: I read something
about it in the papers and I also
heard Mr. Cox say Mr. Tudor hac
told him a part was missing.

Drawing Vouchers

Mr. Mottley: Could you go back
a little farther than that ?

drawing the money from the
voucher ?

Mr. Mottley: Yes

Mr. Squires: One/day 1
went to My. Ashby the
Churchwarden’s Clerk, for a
veucher and drew some
money from the Parochial
Treasurer.

Mr, Mottley: Who sent you
to the Churchwarden’s Clerk?

Mr. Squires: It might have
been Miss Francis or Mr. Cox,
I do not remember who.

Mr. Mottley: You drew the
Money ?

Mr. Squires: Yes.

Mr. Mottley: To whom did
you take it?

Mr. Squires: Either to Mr.
Cox or Miss Francis.

Mr. Mottley: Do you know
anything about the tender ?

Mr. Squires; I do not re-
member carrying the tender
to the Churchwarden,

Mr. Mottley: What did Mr.
Cox tell you about the huts ?

Mr, Squires; He told me
part of the hut was missing
and he told Mr. Tudor to get
the Police.

Mr, Tom _Mayers was recalled.
Mr. Edwin Branch was also
called.

Mr. Walcott then asked Mayers
if Branch was the man who was
in Mr. Cox's car on the evening
he was in Station Hill near the
Joiner’s shop: and he replied ‘no’

This closed the evidence.

Short Address

The Attorney General then
addressed the Commission. He
said that he did not propose tu

address at any great length, They
had heard a great deal of the
evidence. Some of it was useful,
some of it was useless and some
worthless. They

had heard a
great many aecusations and
allegations, some positive and

some influential, but those things,
he submitted, whilst they might
entertain the public and might
provide some useful knowledge,
did not really help them a great
deal in arriving at any substantial
findings of fact about which the
Commissioner was charged to
enquire into.

The Attorney General at this
stage reminded the Commissioner
of his terms of reference with re-
gard to enquiring into the
Princess Alice Playing Field,

“You have heard that the Ves-
try is a Statutory body elected
annually. It has as its Chairman,
the Rector of St. Michael, Although
he is Chairman, he is not what
is looked upon as the Executive
Officer of this body. His execu-
tive duties revolve upon the
Churchwarden and have been so
from the time of the Vestry sys-
tem. Of course, there are other
Officers of the Vestry like the
Vestry Clerk and the Churchwar-
den's Clerk,” he said.

He said that money was made
available to the Vestry by the
vovernor-in-Executive Committee
out of the Welfare funds. He
had put it to Mr, Tudor at one
stage of the enquiry that it was
being suggested that this establish-
ment of the Playing Field was
not strictly a Vestry matter, and
it was obvious to him that ut
some stage of the proceedings it
Was suggested that it was possibly
one reason why the departure
was made from what was even
the recognised practive of dealing
with regular Vestry matters,

Act Amended

He had put it to him that the
Vestries Act was amended in 1948
specifically for the purpose of
giving the Vestries authority to
maintain playing fields. Subse-
quently reculations were made
under the Sugar Rehabilitation
and Labour Welfare Act for’
carrying out the purpose of the
Act and it could not be argued or
suggested by anyone that these
funds for the Playing Field were
not properly Vestry matters.

The Vestry of St. Michael,
having a large number — seven
playing fields, appointed a Play-
ing Fields Committee which
comprised mostly of members of
the Vestry with powers to co-opt
This Playing Fields Commitive
selected sites and made recom-
mendations and one was the
Princess Alice Playing Field, This
happened during Mr. D, G.
Leacock’s term of office as Church-
warden,

From early 1949 until 1950 very



of the about what had
happenex with regard to the
Princess Alice Playing Field

The Committee first functioned
on September 29, 1949, but dic
not function again except possi-
bly until February 1950. That was
the material time during which
the Princess Alice Playing Field
was established.

Vestry

“We have it on record from
the Miéittutes of the Vestry of
September 19 that Mr. Tudor
himself had informed the Vestry
of the purchase of one or more
huts by the Government from
Seawell Airport fot the purpose
of erecting a Playing Field.”

No Report

From September 30 to Febru-
ary the next. year, there was no
reference in the Minutes of the
Vestry of any meeting or report
of the Playing Fields Committee
because there was nothing to re-
port.

“It is a matter of opinion how
these things are done, but nor-
mally, one would have expected
that some member of the Vestry
would have asked the Chairman
of the Playing Fields Committee
what progress was being made,

because documents, letters and
communications from the Gov-
ernment through the Welfare
Office were being sent to the
Vestry. These were put to the
Playing Fields Committee and

seemed to remain with them.”
The Vestry might rightly have

taken the view that they en-

trusted this matter into the hands

of the Committee and the Com-
mittee, comprising of its own
members, therefore thought that

it could assume as far as the en-
\ire Vestry was concerned, that
the matter was being and woula
be properly looked after.

The Committee for reasons best
known to themselves did. not con
sider whether they should await
the summons from the Chairman
as the Committee did not fune-
tion very effectively after the
selection of the first sites.

“Undoubtedly you have heard
the allegation that the then Aci-
ing Governor had taken a prom-

inent part in | establishment
of this Playing Field, though an

allegation like this would not up-
duly weigh with you in your
findings of fact. Whatever may
be suggested, we have it*from a
person like Mr. Maynard who
was there throughout the time
the Playing Field was being es-
tablished that the Governor came
there and made suggestions like
the removal of a wall and the
tutting down of a tree,

“The Acting Governor was in-
terested in this matter. It was
the first Playing Field to be es-
tablished under these funds and
he probably was anxious to see
it was constructed as soon as pos-
sible,

H.E’s Suggestions

aye
any

is difficult to believe that
Churchwarden would follow
blindly the suggestions of the
head of the Administration
whether he was there in an act-
ing capacity or not. The Vestries
in this island are a law. unto
‘themselves 1 do not deny that
Mr. Tudor might have been in-
fluenced by the Acting Governor,
but in spite of any suggestions
that might have been made to
him, I still see that there are a
lot of things that he could or
might have done which could not
have led the Government to be
dissatisfied with the expenditure
of money which have been voted.

“I do not for a moment sug-
gest, nor have, I suggested that
Mr. Tudor has accepted or re-
ceived any part of these funds,

nor is there anything in the evi-
dence given before this Commis-
sion to suggest that.

“What I do suggest is that the
way in which Mr. Tudor handled

this matter and was allowed tc
handle it certainly would cause
the public, when rumour start»

to be noised abroad, to have con-
cern over the administration ot
funds of this nature.”

“Whatever reasons
en, Mr. Tudor had no right t
disregard the Committee whic!
was appointed for the purpose o
tuking some of the responsibility

were giv-

Added to that, there was hi
failure to use the Clerk of thi
Playing Fields Committee, Mr

Redman, who would have prover
a useful person in the signing o
the vouchers and Mr. Ramsay
the Building Supervisor.

“What reasons had he for no
using these officers? In the case
of Mr. Ramsay he said that the

Mr. Squires: You mean about little was found in the Minutes two of them could not get on,”






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St. Joseph Has |

No Assessor



. |
St. Joseph's parish is now}
without an assessor Mr. R. A
Lee drew this fact to the atten- |

tion of the St. Joseph Vestry
their meeting yesterday

The yacancy for thé post of
assessor occurred when the St
Joseph Vestry appointed their’
last assessor to the office of Par-
ochial “Treasurer. some months
ago. Mr, Lee urged the Vestry to
take steps in the matter

Mr. A. P. Cox said that the
assessor has to work at the begin-
“ing of the year and that the
assessor’s work in the parish had
Seen practically done this year.

“We cannot appoint a new
assessor because the assessor’
work has to be done within tw:
or three months”, he said,

Mr, H. A. Carter said that i
was their duty to know if they
were acting legally to appoint a:
assessor and he was of the opin
jon that the Vestry should get :
correct ruling from their solicito:

Mr. W. R. Coward said that, ii
the interest of the rate payer:
he did not think it wise to ap-
point a new assessor if they hac
to pay the former assessor for the
whole year
. The Vestry decided to consult
their solicitors before taking any
further steps in the matter

£300 Loan Wanted

The Vestry agreed to advertise
for a £300 loan for the purpose
of completing the enclosure ot
St. Ann's Chapel Burial Ground.

After reading a letter from the
Colonial Secretary, the Vestry
appointed Mr, Hutson to serve on

at

pe ee



the Scotland District Conserva-
tion Board,

Present at the meeting were Rev
Malialieu (Chairman), Mr W eR Cow

ard «(Churchwarden)
M.C P. Mr A P
ere. Se

Mr J A’ Haynes
Cox, Mr L L Giil
Lee and Mr H A Carte



Two Years For
Stealing Cloth

His Honour the Chief jist
Sir Allan Collymore at the Con's
vf Grand Sessions yesterday sen
(enced Albert Went to two year

: ee ee

SPELEELPP IPL ALLEL PPL LPT



tuprisonment with hard labs
ior larceny,
Albert Went on April 5, 1651

‘tole cloth valued at $58 from
counter of DaCosta & Co, Lic
He has four previous conviction
for larceny and 19 minor convi
tions.

Mr. W. W. Reece K.C., Solicito; |
General, prosecuted for the Crow:

The prosecution brought 6



witness who said that he si, ;
when Went took up the cloti:|
from DaCosta’s Counter on Apri. |
0

We |

Went called on two witnesse, |
One said that Went asked him t







:

4,

44,

-

oF

five evidence. The other witness | *
said that he knew Went trom |&
childhood but they were oi|&
“personal” friends, x
Before imposing the sentence: ix
His Honour said that on many oc- | %&
casions false evidence had been|¢@
given by defence witnesses as u|%
result of the Police Magistrat, %
giving bail as if bail were a mat-|%
ter of right in every case and not
a matter which is in the discre
tion of those administering the x
Jaw. . S%
He sajd that during the last ?
sessions man with a bad record s
had committed a similar offence |
after having been given bail. His x
Honour said that people with a 13
record should not be given the | 5
opportunity of bail, ts
— x
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ig Cherry R South African Guava Jelly— ~ — ie 7? — x @ Dump and side-delivery Rakes i
Lig Caramel f per 2-Ib. Tin 0.46 The Ideal Remedy for ©kin Eruptions, Ulcers, Pimples i
“Goodness knows they're South African Orange Mar- 1X ete, > @ Manure spreaders ‘i ROBERT THOM LTD. \)
Good.” malade—rer 2-lb, Tin 0.49 % %
PRICE: 12 CENTS EACH Sun Pat Salted Cashew ss 3/- Bottle White Park Road ;
a STANSFELD Nuts — per Tin 1.06 })}! % : S| @ Trailers, ete....
BRUCE WEATHERHEAD ) . nan nee Senree egy 1.25 1% e % { DIAL 4616
4 ui 4 ti } per Tin oe | % K NIGHTS I TD. # tt
" ) | Red Feather Luncheon Beef i% 4 im ‘ ld le %
LIMITED | SCOTT & Co. Ltd. | "iter ods TE cic caceskesgiebtnsAliieusclegscabildeal
§§ ei taceatic FLO EEL EEL LE ELC ELLA DA DI IE,










oe

DYDD ILA Ae

-
LESS SESE LEE

.
PLEO





SEE PEPE PPAP PPP O OE,

|





BY CARL ANDERSON



anronrdlBariniieapremmpinnaensio-

BY CHIC YOUNG

3LONDIE-
Minit.














(~~ MAMA, QUICK
THERES SOMETHING
BURNING ON THE
STOVE AND DADDy



WANTS YOU ON SY eX
THE PHONE / seq ay /
[PB
a
F {





20 “OTN Le Be lyst
THE LO BY FRANK STRIKER




{FELLER NAME JACKSON

eesti
TRAIL THAT PLENTY EASY ’

AT THE END OF THAT TRAIL. | D
THINK WE'LL FIND CARTER, THE Ba t

PUBLISHER, HELD CAPTIVE!

‘BY
foe ey

| nst
|| HELLO-I6 THIS THE














HELLO-I6 THIS THE TRYEM















JOHNNY HAZARD

| WELL- AS MAGGIE HAS WELL-CAN | 7 AND FIREM |
| AND FIREM EMPLOYMENT HIRED SOMEONE -!LL I BELIEVE I THOUGHT ''D | & YMENT AGENCY? | |
| AGENCY~-? I WANT PRETEND I WANTED MY EYES? BETTER GET } 7 S -
> g , | A GOOD DAY WORKER TO DO THE WORK-- BUSY AN’ DO | PL
wre TO DO A COMPLETE "LL MAKE A BIG HIT | SOME WORK=-
| HOUSE CLEANNG-Yes-| || | WITH HER = a vom eat
5 ey - he] 1 : | Md oat
£ ) a4 || /\ © 6B
= irony - iR
| & wz ~ +; | aa} | \ we “ A
oy BG . } J SE Se 7
aX fh. D- adi We hn
pie’ A Bay ake
| he
hae a

BY FRANK ROBBINS









HAR, THERE I¢
CAMP! NOW YOU CAN
REST AND AY VILL
HELP YOU FOR YOUR

y

...BUT AY CANNOT ALLOW
THE VORK OF YEARS TO BE
INTERRUPTED! THis JEEP
16 MY ONLY MEANS OF
CONTINUING MY SEARCH...
Au,..PFOR MOST RARE GAME
FIGH/ NOTHING MUST STOP

HMM... METHINKS
FRIEND THOR IS
AFTER BIGGER CATCH

? THAN,..FIGH /

ed
MORE THAN YOU ~&
THINK, FRIEND THOR,, |
I MUST HAVE THIS
JEEP /



FORGIVE ME, PAL,. DIDN'T
; MEAN"TO TAKE AW@ANTAGE
THE GOOP SAMARITAN /
T..FIFTY MILES’ WALK
7 FOR A GiRi = y

YOU DO STRAIN
MY HOSPITALITY,
MR. HAZARD...






. . == |
KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND



HE'S BEEN |
GONE NEARLY
AN HOUR. .





OKAY, T WAS
TRESPASSING. WHAT



ET TING
@ WORRIED

BRIE a ay. ARE YOU GO}
ABO 1p : = ad A
DESMOND! ee") ey —

ge ¥

oe

=
ee

“|

a




b,
|
f





|











THE PHAN BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES
ect cad ath THE TWO GIANT MAN-EATERS WA [WHEE DIANA BATTLES THE
f ra HEAD FOR DEEP: INTO WM) Muet RE WAVES ANDEDOIESY

7 | ALN *+HALF WAY ACROSS ++OHs+

UGHER THAN | THOUGHT











BARBADOS ADVOCATE











eee EEO
|
|
|
|

TUESDAY, JULY 10, 1951



A
TOAST TO

YOUR
HEALTH!!

WINCARNIS

ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT
BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY.



TONIC

LET WINE

SSS

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

RR



SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only









Usually Now Usually NOW

Hennessy *** Brandy, Heinz

Bots. (Qrts) 5.75 4.23 Tomato Ketchup, Bots 80 70
Peanut Butter, Bots. 72 66 Pineapple Jam, 2 bs. Tins 66 38
Ovaltine, Tins (Large) 135 1.08 Koo Pear, Tins 71 4



THOSE FIRST FEW
STEPS OF BABY'S!

Now, more than ever, he needs plenty of milk. That’s why
a milk guaranteed pure and free from all impurities and

disease is the obvious choice.

LETITBE ...

FARM

POWDERED
MILE

} As ffeshas the

lf a great scientist were to search for a perfect
feod formula for young children—one that supplied
the calcium, phosphorus, vitamins needed in per-

fect balance for strong bones—he would find that
nature has supplied this very formuia in Milk.
That's why Farm Powdered Milk is so vital to your
baby in the learning-to-walk stage. Give him
plenty, it has 28% butter fat.




¢

Price only $4.32 per 5 Ib. tin and $1.00 per 1 Tb. tin



# day it Teaves
Obtainable at all leading Groceries, Provision and Drug Stores 4 ‘he hiner.

ot
If you cannot get it phone 2229, Robert Thom Ltd.,--Agents. ¥

SSE SSS oe ce

L pis | peek Get the
SEG

Dirt out

of WORK CLOTHES

HEALTH BENEFIT faster and easier than ANY Soap!
* CONTAINS VITAMIN A & D aun insiiee aisatel Amano ration Gedaecs den
INA DELICIOUS FORM QUICKLY too, For your dainty things or heaviest

*% INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS

wash—use FAB,..put it on your grocer’s list TO-DAY,
Washing with FAB actually

* ENSURES STRONG LIMBS

AND SOUND TEETH IN CHILDREN!









SAVES money — -
Use HALF as

much Fab as



Haliborange

The nicest way of taking
HALIBUT LIVER OIL



>



oo

ee emernmermemamal

oO Oe OO Oo




SS —easo_”™-—~— rr



TUESDAY, JULY 10,



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.



The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths Ackrowl-
edgments, and In Memoriam notices is

$:.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.



DIED

LEWIS—On July 9th 1951, at her resi-
dence Sharon Land, St. Thomas, Mrs.
Mercy Forde Lewis. Her funeral ieaves
the above residence at 4.30 o'clock
to-day for Sharon Moravian Church
No cards, Friends are invited.

Ralph Bascome, Muriel
Wilma Forde.
(American Papers pliase copy)

Forde

107.51



fe

eaprenalicteennen
IN MEMORiAM



SMALL: In Loving Memory of a dear
wife and mother Mrs. Lilian Small
who fell asleep on July 10, 1948

Happy and smiling always content,
Loved and respected wherever she
went,




















TELEPHONE 2508







FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72
| 96 cents Sundays 24 words
words 3 cents a word weer
word on Sundays.

cents and
over 24
4 cents a





AUTOMOTIVE

CARS— Vauxhall
dition new tyres,
hall 12 (Wyvern:
Barbados Agencie









14/6 in perfect con-
Paint etc. A.wso Vaux-
in good shape. Apply

Ring 4908.



| 10.7.51-—6n

—$——

| CAR—One (1) Prefect Ford in good
condition. 4 new tyres. Apply to M. C
James, c/o Bata, Swan Street

6.7.51—6n

CARS—1950 Morris Minor 10,000 Miles.
1950 Morris Oxford 9,000 Miles. Like
New. 1949 Morris Six 18 H.P. Low
Mileage. 1948 Ford Prefect 14,000 Miles
in very good condition 1938 Chrysler
| Royal A bargain Fort Royal Garage
Ltd. Telephone 4504.











































6.7.51—6n
rake
PHILCO REFRIGERATOR: 92 cubic

PUBLIC SALES











[
| saa eee
.
| REAL ESTATE
_HOUSE: Board and shingled 20 x 11
|< bie a wd shed 11 x 9, enclosed itu-
|} ated ‘Whhn’ St. Peter. Apply to Sylvan
iD c Skecte Dist E Station st

| Peter No reasonable offer refused
10,7. 5i1—2n



HOUSES: One Board and “Shinglea
House, situated at Green Field, St. Mich-







nel, 4% x 12 in good condition, and
also one (1) Board and Shingled House
in Mahogany Lane, 24 x 12 with shop
attached. For further particulars, apply
to Mrs. Agnes Hinds, Mahogany Lane
10.7.51—1n

DWEI£ING HOUSE called “ELLER-

SLIEW” with 3700 square feet of land
thereto situate at Chapman = Street
Bridgetown, nearest Whitepark Road) !
The house contains Gallery, Drawing
and Dining Rooms, two bedrooms, Break-
fast room, usual conveniences. Large
Basement. Electric Light and Govern-
nee — installed.
above premises will be set
sale by Public Competition at our ‘Smee
James Street on Friday 13th July 1951
at 2 pan. For inspection apply to Miss
Farmer the tenant between the hours of
3 and 4.30 p.m. daily except Sundays.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE, —











To a beautiful life came a noble end Solicitors.
She died as she lived, everyoody's ELECTRIC: 1.7.51—8n.
friend Fee ese —_—
Ever to be remembered by— S. R. Small “THE ROSARY” St. George (near St.
Husband), Aileen, Doris, Enid, Olga and] ft. Full width freezing chamber. Brand sares Rectory) — 5 miles from town—
Muriel (Daughtes J. & K. Herbert} new unit. Reconditioned throughout, | ©" 4 DUS route — 3 bedrooms, drawing-
(Brother and E. Small (Brother-} may be inspected at Leo Yard, Cheap- | 700%, dining room and breakfast room
in-Law) 10.7.51—In| side, Apply H. L, Smith, Sandford, | YeT@ dah on South Side. Company's
on | St. Philip. 7.7.51—t.f.n, | “2ter, Telephone and electric light -
THANKS about % acres of grounds surrounded by
REFRIGERATOR — One (1) Westing- | StoP€ wall on 3 sides — Solidly built of
a i oe ge | house, in good working order. Apply: | Stone with shingle roof. Garage for 2
a We eine ae ik a Seat W. R. Tempro, Phone 5044 or 8224. ae) pao a usual offices.
Oo se reaths, ers and cards 8 _ ery good orchar
of sympathy in my recent bereavement, | —__ eat wher Inspection on application to the care-
Alice M, SMART, 10.7.51—In} REFRIGERATOR— One Superfex oil | ‘ker.
ae not . burning Refrigerator. In perfect work-| Will be put up for sale by auction at
aye tat co trees cen triske what ne, Gees Sper tee Pera, ee lee ee ey on ey ee
Nank a b e ie Ss 9 — ated 2
atest weenthh: with us in our recent bereavement 1,7.€ hal
caused by the death of our ne MECHANICAL ———___—__—_ fo ere *
Allene. —_—_—_—_——_o_ ———_—_—__- POULTRY FAR includi
Fredica Alleyne( Wife) Eva Eudora MOWER—One Ransome Motor Mower,| bungalow; over an acre of land with 2h
Alleyne, Mrs, Neomia Griffith (Daugh | ute used. Apply J Connell Phone} entrancing View of the sea. Hatchin,
ters), Bliot, Darnley, Osmon (Sons), | 2353 8 7.51—3n. | equipment and other Poultry "appliances
Elvita, Cynthia, Allwin, Neville _erand- as well as present stock of chicks etc
children). 10.7.91—1n MISCELLANEOUS Gace occupation for retired man
- - a meee 8 eason for sale owner leaving tne
eee TO AREY SENN Nts ete AMM-I-DENT TOOTHPASTE Island. Persons interested write O
tendered us on the cetasion of the | .5tart saving your Amm-i-dent Tooth | Kelly. c/o the Advocate. — 10.7.51—1n,
death of Taphnes Hill late of cur paste Boxes. Within a short while you SH. ak ee ee
Cottage a own may be the winner of one of the follow- ARES — 30 Preference Shares of
Fdward (husband), Bustace (son), Clara, ; {28> , 1st Prize 350,00, 2nd Prize $15.00,| £100 each in Applewhaites Limited. 150
Inez, Stella (sisters), Linda (niece). | *70_Prize 98.00, 1.7,51—26n | Shares of £1 each in Knights Limited
* s : 107 Sin to be sold by public competition at the
. BLUE JAY— Corn Piasters Fresh | Office of the undersigned on Thursday



ANNOUNCEMENTS

—

HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—Isle of
Spices. SANTA MARIA-—loveliest hotel
in Caribbean, Rates from $7.00 per head
per day. ‘GRAND HOTEL-—in best resi-
dential district under Government House
hill. Rates from $5.00 per head per day.
SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing
Beach. Rates from $4.00 per head per
day. Enquiries to D. M. Slinger, Grenada,

GOVERNMENT





NOTICES

RESTAURANT AND CANTEEN
AT SEAWELL AIRPORT
Applications are invited from
interested persons for the estab-
lishment of a Restaurant and a

Canteen at Seawell Airport.

2. The successful applicant
will be required to enter into a
Contract for the proper carrying
out of the service, etc.

3. Applications should be sub-
mitted in a sealed envelope and
addressed to the Colonial Secre-
tary (and not to any officer by!
name) to reach the Colonial Sec-
retary’s Office not later than 4
p.m. on Friday the 13th of July,
1951.

4. The envelope should be
clearly marked “Application for
establishment of a Restaurant and
a Canteen at Seawell Airport”.

5. The Government does not
bind itself to accept any applica-
tion.

6. Further particulars may be
obtained on application to the
Colonial Secretary's Office.

30.6.51.—2n.





(FACILITIES) AT
SEAWELL AIRPORT

Applications are invited from
interested persons for the estab-
lishment of Booth (Facilities) at
Seawell Airport for purpose of
(1) Bookstall and News Agent
(2) Local Handicraft
(3) Novelty Counter
(4) Toiletries. F

2, The successful applicant will
be required to enter into a Con-
tract for the proper carrying out
of the service, etc.

3. Applications should be sub-
mitted in a sealed envelope and
addressed to the Colonial Secre-
tary (and not to any officer by
name) to reach the Colonial Sec-
retary’s Office not later than a
p.m. on Friday the 13th of July,
1951.

4. The envelope should be
clearly marked ‘Application for
establishment of Booth (Facili-
ties) at Seawell Airport.

5. The Government does not
bind itself to accept any applica-
tion.

6. Further particulars may be
obtained on application to the

lonial Secretary’s Office.
oe 30.6.51.—2n.

BOOTH

SE HABLA ESPANOL

ORIENTAL

| S, SOUVENIRS, AN-
co IVORY, JEWELS,

LKS Etc.

TIQUES,
SI

THANES

ear aeaaeaeeaaaananal
f0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

JOHNSON’'S STATIONERY
AND HARDWARE

will be closed
THURSDAY, JULY 12th

Stock-Taking |

SALE OE IIE
».
* x
S ASK... . >
* s,
3 YOUR GROCER x
e +
% FOR
s x
x <
% °
z »,
* JACOBS :
% y
% THE ORIGINAL $
> %,
$ AND STILL >
.
Â¥
% THE BEST %
%
. 1 1 wT ‘f &
© CREAM CRACKERS — §
*
% Supplies Always Available. %
2 x
% ® %
. x
»
& Stokes & Bynoe Ltd. %
’
x Agents %
% *
AAI IO OOOO OOOO OOOO




stock at Bruce Weatherhead Ltd
10.7.51—2n



COMBS & BRUSHES for Dogs. New
shipment at Bruce Weatherhead Ltd
10,7.51—2n



styles.
of good quality
KNIGHT'S DRUG

10.7.51—2n

CIGARETTE LIGHTERS—New
different shapes, all
and marked Cheap
STORES



ESTERBROOK PENS—We have them
—a'lso a few spare nibs. Call early
Knights (Pheonix), 10,7,51—2n



EMPTY TINS—A quantity of 10 lb. and

5 tins, suitable for holding plants.
Purity Bakeries Ltd. Dial 4529 or 3063.

5.7.51—5n.



FRERE PILGRIM SLING—You
get this from our Soda Fountain
(KNIGHT'S Pheonix) 10.7.51—2n

“FARM” POWDERED FULL CREAM
MÂ¥LK--Supreme quality and only $4.32
per 5-th tin and $1.00 per 1-lb tin.

et a tin to-day from your grocer
or Drug Store and try the best
milk obtainable. The 5-Ib family size is
really economical, Insist on “Farm” for
the sake of your health and your pocket.
If your dealer cannot supply, phone 2229,

27.6.51—t.f.n. |

can







GALVANISE SHEETS: heavy gauge 9

ft. $7.50, 8 ft. $7.00. Also Aluminium
Sheets 6 ft. 8 ft 10 ft At Ralph
Beard’s Hardwood Alley. 10.7.51—2n

LARDER—1 large Pine Larder in good
condition, suitable for Hotel or Guest
House. Reasonably priced. Phone 2169

8 7 51—2n

slater teiesiterrmnepretietenntinridin sane

NUT ROOL CHOCOLATE BARS—
These are in great demand. Call early
Knight's (Pheonix) 10.7,51—2n



RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing

...and we will order for you if we

haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,
Ltd. 6.7.51—t.f.n.
GENTS THREE PIECE GRAY TWEED

SUIT. Approximate size-38 Dial—8140.
10.7.51—t.f.n,







SPRING CUSHION UNITS FOR UP-
HOLSTERERS:—Ready packed in Burlap
(Bag!, each contains 42 Springs (6 rows
of 7 each) Dimensions 18” x 21”. Limited
Quantity available. Apply immediately
to: The Standard Agency (B'dos) Co.,
14 Swan Street, Phone 3620,



10.7.51—6n



TWIN PLEX SHARPENERS-—Sharpen
your Razor Blades with this well known
Sharpener—They get a Life time Edge
KNIGHT'S DRUG STORE 10.7. 51-—2n.

WELDING MATERIALS— Electrodes
in sizes of 6, 8 and 10's also bronze
steel and flux for Acetylene welding.
Enquire Auto Tyre Company, Trafal-
gar and Spry Streets. Phone—2696.

10.9.51—t.f.n.





~ GOVERNMENT NOTICE

APPLICATIONS FOR THE

ERECTION OF A WOODEN

CANTEEN AT GRAVES
END BEACH

Applications are invited from
persons who may be interested in
the erection, at their own expense,
and running of a Canteen at
Graves End Beach to be situated
to the South of the Government
Bathing Shed, for the purpose of
selling soft drinks, sweets, tea,
cakes, but not alcoholic drinks.

2. The building, the design and
construction of which will be sub-
ject to the approval of the Colo-
nial Engineer, should be of wood
approximately 18 feet by 20 feet
with a shed attached in front.
Rent for the land will be charged
at the rate of $2 per month,

3. The successful applicant will
be responsible for the water sup-
ply and for the disposal of waste
water and refuse.

4. The Canteen shall not oper-
ate when the Rifle Range is in use
and the successful applicant shall
conform to all military regulations
at such times.

5. No permanency of tenure is
guaranteed and the successful
applicant may be required to move
the canteen without compensation
at one month's notice.

6. Permission to erect a can-
teen will not be regarded as a
precedent for future applications
of the same type.

7. Applications should be for-
warded in sealed envelopes ad-
dressed to the Colonial Secretary
(and not to any officer by name)
so as to reach the ‘Colonial Secre-
tery’s Office not later than 4 p.m.
on Friday, the 33th of July, 1951.
The envelope should be clearly
marked “Application for the erec-



tion of a Canteen at Graves End
Beach”. \
8. The Government does not

bind itself to accept any particu-
lar application.

30.6.51.—2n.



To-day’s G. A. Song

“Home Sweet Home”

“Mid pleasures and palaces
though we may roam”
“There is no place like

If there
IS A GAS COOKER.



(Cash 10 7 51.

the 12th day July 1951 at 2 o'clock.
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
28.6.51-—8n,—
The undersigned will offer for
at their Office, No; 11,
Bridgetown, on Friday
July, 1951 at 2 p.m.
A parcel of land
square teet, situate
Hill, Black Rock, St
Dwellinghouse thereon, called “The
Nest” containing 2 public rooms, 2
bedrooms, with usual offices,
Inspection any day between
and 4 p.m on application
Walton, on the premises.
For further particulars, and conditions
ut sale, apply to:—
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
7.7.51-



salo
High Street,
the %th day of

containing 5,445
on St. Stephen's

Michael, with the

10
to

a.m,
Miss

8n.



AUCTION

Friday 13th at 2 p.m, at McEnearney
Garage—1935 Chevrolet Sedan Car, 1947
Piymouth Sedan Car. Both in working
order and suitable for taxi service. Terms
R ARCHER MCKENZIE,

8 7 S51—4n



Auctioneer

____ PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife ETTA EUDENE







SKEETE (nee Porte) as I do not nold
myself responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed
by me
SYLVAN D. C. SKEETE,
Dist. E. Station,
St. Peter.

10.7.51—2n
SS
The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife GERALDINE
HOLDER. (nee Blades) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone @¢lsé
contracting any debts or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed




me
FRANK HOLDER,
Delamere Land,
Stephenson Road,
St. Michael
19.7, 51—2n



WANTED

Minimum charge week 172 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word on Sundays.

HELP

CAPABLE HOUSEKEEPER-
vate home to live in. Apply to Box
No 00 c/o Advocate Advtg Dept |
Stating experience. 10,7.51—1n,





for pri-



POSITION OFFERED— Assistant re-



quired for our office Salary $40.00.
Applicant must have experience and
knowledge of cash and accounts.
Student with Schooi Certificate will
also be considered. Write stating quali-
fications and references '

Applications should be posted and not
brought in,
Johnson's Stationery

MISCELLANEOUS

10.7, 51-—-2n.





WANTED TO BUY
OLD SEWING MACHINE out of use
Good prices paid, Apply to Mrs. Vaughn,
Corner of Fairchild and Probyn Streets
10.7.51—3n

LOST & FOUND |

LOST

Two Plots bearing the names of Joseph
Mapp and Abel Emmanual Mapp. Find-









BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| FOR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
$6 cents Sundays 24 words — ovr 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a
word on Sundays



Seana teed

HOUSES

‘BAY VIEW”, St Lawrence Gap, fully
furnished, two bedrooms, modern
veniencés. Best sea-bathing. immediate

bossession. Apply next door to R. Lynch
















10.7.51

FLAT--At Coral Sands, Worthing. 1

modern furnished flat, good sea bathing

For turther particulars, Dial 8134. Alma

Lashley. 27.6.51—t.f.n.

.

FURNISHED — From August Ist.

*Clifigune” Garden Gap, Worthing. 3
bedrooms, garage, telephone
perticulars Dial 4304 between
10 a.m, 30.

ROOMS—Single and double, new



furniture —
Call

with breakfast
Telephone 4718

T.751—I3n

SMALL FLAT, partly furnished
further particulars Phone

For
8335, .
10.7. 51—2n







ck TO LET

TWO BEDROOMS Fully furnished
with running water, St, Lawrence Gap.
Fm particulars Dial 8459. 8.7.51— 2n







PUBLIC NOTICES |

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
~~ 12 vd by line on Sundays,
mintinum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays. *

PROFESSIONAL NOTICE
This is to inform my patients and the
public that my Dental Office will be
closed from July 9th and will be reopened
on July 28rd,

Dr, HM. HUNT.
8.7.51—4n
NOTICE '
APPLICATIONS for one vacant st}

Philip's Vestry Exhibition tenable at the
Lodge School will be received by the!
undersigned not later than Saturday}
14th July 1951, x

Candidates must be sons of Parishioners
in straitened circumstances, and must
be under the age of twelve years,

A birth certificate must be forwarded
along with an application form obtained
from the Parochial Treasurer’s Office.

Parents and/or Guardians will be
notified of the time and place.of the
eutrance examination,

P. 8. W. SCOTT,
Clerk to the Vestry,

St. Philip.
4.7.51-—n,
NOTICE
IN THE ASSISTANT COURT
OF APPEAL
Re: The Wesktapele Cembencntion, Act}
Notice is hereby given that Joseph’

Barnes, a labourer, formerly residing at

Morgans, St Peter, died as a result of )

an accident when employed at Vaucluse
Factory, Saint Thomas, and that com-
pensation has been paid into the Court,
All the dependants of the said Joseph
Barnes (deceased) are hereby required
to appear at the Assistant Court of
Appeal on Wednesday, the 25th day of
July, 1951, at 10 o'clock am
Dated this 2ist day of June, 1951
G TALMA,
Acting Clerk, AC A
23 6 51—3n



NOTICE

Applications for a vacant Bulkeley
Trust Fund exhibition tenable at any
first or second grade school of the Island
will be received by me up to the 14th
July 1951

Candidates must be sons of parents
in straitened circumstances having a
settlement in St. George or liable to
be rated there and must not be more
than 13 years of age.

A baptismal certificate and _ letter,
from the Headmaster of the schoo!
which applicant attends must accom-

pany application. Forms of application
must be obtained from me.
K. MASON,
Clerk, Vestry of St. George
10.7.51—3n



NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. JOHN

Applications for one (1) Vestry Exhibi-
tion at the Lodge School will be received
by the undersigned up to 3,00 p.m. on
Thursday the 12th July, 1951.

Candidates must be the sons of
Parishioners in straitened circumstances
and not less than 8 years nor more than
12 years old on the date of the examina-
tion which will be held at the School
at 10.30 a.m, on Friday the 13th July,
1961. Applications forms can be obtained
at my office during office days and hours
only. Baptismal certificates to accom-

pany applications.
R. S. FRASER,
Clerk to the Vestry,
St. John.
§.7.51—6n

ee
THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICULTU-
RAL BANK ACT, 194%

To the creditors holding specialty liens
against Roach’s Plantation, St, Lucy
TAKE NOTICE that I, the Owner of

the above Plantation am about to obtain

a loan of £300 under the provisions of

the above Act against the said Plantation,

in respect of the Agricultural year 1951 to

1952.

No money has béen borrowed under
the ‘Agricuitaral Aids Act, 1905, or the
above Act (as the case may be) in respect
of such \year

Dated this 10th day of July 1951.

Cc. ORMOND KNIGHT
Owner
10.7.51--3n



NOTICE

Re Estate of
ELLA LOUISE CRUMPTON.
NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or debt against
the estate of ELLA LOUISE CRUMPTON,
late of Hastings, Christ Church, who
died in this Island on the 28th, day of
November, 1950, are hereby required to
claims duly

er please return to Mrs, Mary Mapp fend particulars of their

Wavell Avenue, Black Rock. attested to the undersigned, c/o Messrs
10,7,.61—11 |cotte, Catford & Co. No. 17, High

— - Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors, on or be-





Lost in Bridgetown on Friday 6th.) fore the 15th. day of August 1951, after

which I shall proceed to distribute the

July, 3 keys attached by a small brass;
chain Finder will be rewarded on) assets of the deceased among the parties
returning same to the ADVOCATE| entitled thereto having regard only to
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT such claims of which I shall then have
10,.7.51—3n.| had notice, and that I will a0 ge table
4 ‘or the assets or any part ereof #0
POOL OOOODV ST PLOY Gistributed to any person of whose debt
or claim I shall not then have had
> nD wh notice
CHIROPRACTIC Dated this 6th. day of June, 1951
: T. T. HEADLEY,
é Public Trustee.
FECTIO! * Qualified Administrator of the
AFFECTIONS OF ANY OFTHE Estate of Ella Louise Crumpton.

NERVES IMPINGED AT THE SPIN
BY A SUBLUXATED VERTEBRA.

E

Drs. FERREIRA, “Chiroville”,
Upper Bay St. (near Esplanade)
Dial 2881. (Free Consultation)









7.6, 51—6n









FREE HOOK

which makes
*“*GOD’S WAY OF
SALVATION

con- |









) NOTICE
| TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC
| I the Undersigned do not hold vselé j
respec ble for a debt or debts
ed in my name except by written
Signed by me
ALVA WINSTON FORDE
Better known as
i WINSTON SMALL
! 8.7.51—2n
NOTICE

Re Estate of
| MARTIN LUTHER BUTCHER, deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that

!

























PAGE SEVEN
ee

OVERNMENT NOTICE

GOVERNMENT —NOTIC CHANCERY SALE

COMPENSATION TO FLOOD BARBADOS

VICTIMS The iderr a - J onpeets 1 be it the Regist

Se ee : as & ridgetown, between p.m. for the
oh R ape oy to _ is living cified below. If not ther set Bay an h
in the Parish of St. Michael whc ’ same pla during til sold. Full. particulars
suffered damage to their property PF t > me. ae
auring the floods on the night of eee eee yee oni ree

se \

August 3ist, 1949, will be paid at CHARLES SYDNEY EDWARDS Defendant
the Social Welfare Office, The] PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain plantation called Appleby in the parish of Suint
| Garrison. Payment will com- James and Islar foresaid containing by estimation twenty-three acres or
mence ‘at 9 a.m. on the following
days:
Monday, July 16—Persons whose

aly

persons having any debt or claim against
the estate of Martin Luther Butcher lite




























t

surnames commence with the
Letters A to H.





Forde



abut
deceased

hereabouts



lands of Eric

on

Carmichael on
White on lands of M.

Ro



James Main or however else the same may abut

lands of Dan Springer
lands of Edmund Brewster deceased on lands of Oxnards
of one Gaskin on lands of one
Gill deceased on lands of one Knight and on a public

und bounding on lands of E. Shorey on lands of Adrianna

on

Plantation on lands
Babb on lands of Joshua
road leading to Saint
and bound Together

with the messuage or dwelling house and all and singular other buildings ard













Tuesday, July 17—Persons whose erections on the said land erected and built standing and being with thi
of the parish of Saint Philip who died y sons whose eee thes Reditame ; . :
in this Island on the 22nd day of July surnames commence with the Ur ewe steak hereditaments and premises.

1950 afe hefeby required to send par- letter I to R. “Date of Sale; 13th July, 1951
ticulars of their claims duly attested to} Wednesday, Jul 18 Per. 7 7 ¢ H. WILLIAMS
the undersigned Louise Butcher the eo Se — £crsons Rexistiar ene
Administratrix of the Estate of the whose surnames commence ener Oe Chee
deceased in, care of mere Carrington with letters S to Z, and any- oe

¢ aly, as reet, ridgetown, " abe nity 7 = = . AES pe v7 oe i
Solicitors on or before the 15th day ot | one who has not yet been "

August 1961 after which date I shall pro paid.
ceed to distribute the assets of the Compensation will only be paid
deceased among the parties entitled there- ce ers ae . tie oe
of which { shall then have hag notice, |@lly submitted claims and whose a
and that T will not be liable for the 'claims have been approved by the ° °

ssets or any part thereof so distributed | Governor-in-Executive Commit- need tve ou
to any person of whose debt or claim aa Eac Pes
I shall net then have had notice tee. “ach person should bring . .

All persons indebted to the said estate| with him his birth or baptisma no anxtettes
ere pit. pp he to settle their indebtedness certificate and a_ certificate from Th *
without delay. ; i ere nig!

Dated thin 4908. dey Gf des 108 a Justice of the Peace or a Minis- need be no restless hts,

ter of a recognised Church stat- no tears, no baby disorders, if
_ LOUISE BUTCHER, ling the person's surname, chris- ou have Ashton & Parsons
Administratrix of the Estate of i z aot ‘ f ,
Martin Luther Butcher tian names, and the place where nfants’ Powders handy.
+ 18.6. 51-3n {he lived at the time of the floods Mothers all over the world have
‘ .
2 found them soothing and cool-
ing when baby is fretful through
are ABSOLUTELY SAFE, f Y/
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, = SSS
NEW ZEALAND LANE, LIMITED. Y
(MLA.N.Z.) :

S.S. “ARABIA” «@ scheduled to sai M.V. “Caribee” will accept cargo
from Melbourne 12th June, Brisbane 22nd and Passengers for enarte i ‘
June, Port Alma 28th June, Sydney Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and ER
July 4th, arriving Trinidad end July, St, Kitts. Sailing Friday 13th
and Barbados early August. instant ee

S.S. “FORT FAIRY" is scheduled to a 1
sail from Hobart late June, North Queens- _— ” i accept
land mid July, Brisbane end July, Sydney aa ST Phan a } = ae
early peer. See eae mid Seen Custh Grenada and Aruba, Pas-
arriving at Trinidad mid September, r a “ : 2 Vincent
| Cargo vaccepted on throusn mins ot 1H STNG priday 1th instant 0 FOR SALE
war rozen cargo,

In addition to general cargo these ; . we . House on Deacons Road,
vessels have ample space for chilled and B.W.I, SCHOONER OWNERS Stopped in 10 Minutes containing 2 Bedrooms,
Lading for transhipment a eee ASSOCIATION «INC, It ts no longer necessary to suffer Drawing and Dining Rooms,
to British Guiana, Leeward and Wind- pains, itching and torment from Piles open Gallery, standing on
ward Islands. Telephone 4047. since the discovery of Hytex (formerly 12,000 s ft t i land

For further particulars apply known as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to 2, sq. It. of good iand,

FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD. work fn +s retain and not only at with water well. Suitable

ss, -TD., = = the pain but takes out the swell- y kitchen garden.
TRINIDAD ADVERTIS ik ing: stops bleeding and combate nerve Sot = a yyy) 0. 0
B.W.1. ! tion thereby curbing other trou- rice; . Pe
= tiessint enix. are the be caused by Files such as Headechs. Mortgage can be arranged
D ; , ervousness, ache, Constipation ‘EC
BARBADOS ADVOCATE lone of energy, debility, and irritable eae
B.W.1. disposition. Get Hytex from your Phone 456: a
druggist today under the positive Over Knights, 33, Broad St.
guarantes Hytex must stop your pile 10.7.51—1n
pains and troubles or money back on Rs :
‘eturn of empty package. —

Alcoa, Steamship Ce

NEW YORK

8.S sails 8th June
A STEAMER 29th June





8S. ALCOA POLARIS ails 13th June
S. ALCOA ROAMEF ails 27th June
5.8. ALCOA PATRIOT” sails 11th July



8s
Ss







SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship
June

July
July

“ALCOA PEGASUS
“ALCOA PURITAN”
ALCOA PENNANT”

5.8.
8.8.
5.5,

NORTHBOUND

ss. "ALCOA PARTNER" due

i

accammodation,

* These vessels have limited



ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.

APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE
a











ait
26th
20th
LS

July

passen ger

SERVICE

Arrives Barbados 19th June,

A

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

Arrives Barbados 28th June,
Arrives
Arrives Barbados 27th July, 1951



CANADIAN SERVICE

Sails Montreal

h

13th





‘ ‘
‘
*

eo

1951

rrives Barbados 10th July, 1951.
—ineestapntans sien eee

6%,

4,

PPLE FOSS OOO

1951

Barbados 13th July, 1951

<9 9,

- eee CCE A

Sails Halifax Arrives B'dor

eer er

June 29th July 9th 6
July 9th July -19th i
July 23rd August 2nd »

‘

-

sails for St. Lawrence

River Ports.

LOOP EFT OES

*





OCS CSSSGSOS OOS





POORGGFOF

Once again available:

VICHY “ATE

VICHY WATER owes its old and high reputation to the results
Hepatic-
eolics, diabetes, and chronic affections of the Urinary elaetin: “
Its efficacy is recognized in affections of the digestive organs; y
Gastralia, Gastritis, Gastric Enteritis and other troubles of the
It is valuable to the Gouty, and to the Dyspeptic
should be used in moderate quantities, generally a Bottle a

produeed by its use in cases of Liver Congestion,
stomach,
day

FOR YOUR HEALTH’S SAKE USE

VICHY WATER”

Retail Price 84c. per bottle.

Obtainable at

BOOKER’S (B’dos) DRUG STORES LTD.-

Broad Street, and Hastings (ALPHA PHARFACY).







PPPOE EEE.



It

ALAA LALLA LALA AAA AEA ALA ALLA AAA

us, :
OOP LOOCSSOOOPSOSOSSSSO EL OPE PPLE PPPP PPPOE,

+
$ %
WANTED
CANADIAN SERVICE % " x
From Halifax, N.S. & Montreal X %
paler einemetiel _lenccolpinilagtaaingnsi ti ih aie casiciarigptideacaeinatebal x A Vacaney exists with the National Cash Register Com- $
LOADING DATES % pany’s Agents for an Apprentice Mechanic. Applications are x
| Expected Arrival x invited from individuals between the ages of 19 and 22, who %
men erees =| malitas bidet a % possess the following attributes; Education to School Certificate —
4.8, “SUNWHIT” va June | 27 June I July % Standard; mechanical aptitude; initiative personality, The suc- %
iS. SSUNDIAL ie July | 93 Jay * Anqust % cessful applicant will be required to undergo a three to six &
Spi ih- VECO os pes Sed Rr Aa ee ee x months probationary period in Barbados, followed by a similar %
U.K SERVICE g period in training in Trinidad, Salary during the periods of 4
$ probation and training will be between $45.00 and $70.00 per x
From Swansea, Liverpool and Glasgow month depending on the age and experience of the individual. %
Swansea Liverpool Glastow Daten nudeniowt Applicants must be of European Origin. Apply in writing only x
9 June a Sune *, rons a qe giving full particulars, and submitting a passport photograph 8
48. “LONDON VENDOR” MW July 17 July 23: July 4 August to The National Cash Register Co’s., Agents, c/o T, Geddes <
sg Ra ee ese eed ne ee eee ee . = R Grant, Ltd., Bolton Lane, 1,2.51.8n. %
U.K. & CONTINENTAL SERVICE > »

Antwerp Rotterdam



21
27

as, “SUNRAY” 17 June
M.V. “BRUNO” 23 July
Agents



ADVERTISE
IN THE

ADVOCATE

Hard TIMES —
With BACKACHE

Often due to sluggish kidney action



IFE IS NOT 80 good when
L are troubled Cockaches
stiff, aching

LPS EE
NOTICE

We stock only the very best



4,6
LALLY

Expected Arrival

London Dates, Bridgetown,
Barbados
June 28 June 15 July
July 18 July 6 August

PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703







HAVE YOU VISITED









THE EVANGELICAL BOOK
DEPOT in B Street 7
(Adjoining Dr owe's (Chiro

practor) Waiting Room)

T EPOT for Bibles and
Christian Literature

Open 9 a.m, to 1? noon DAILY



Watches Switzerland can
8.7.51.—2n. | S offer...
LLL LOL LAL } S LONGINES
; x
" ' : MOVADO $
APPLICATION FOR ‘
, + fi .

NATURALIZATION MARVIN %
' and a full assortment of -
See | spare parts plus an expert %
; Notice is hereby given that a Horologist always.at your x
SMAIL YOUSUPJI PATEL of , services. %
Gills Road, Bridgetown is apply- | COLOURFUL & GAY 8 %

ing to the Governor for natura- | ! *. 1
lization, d that any person who From 66c. upwards | x ALFONSO B. De LIMA ¥
knows any reason why naturaliza- . .
: 8 5
tion should not be granted should }})! | ° mis an .
send a written and signed state- j t i A ~ é $s % & Co. %
ment of the cts to the Colonial - ~
Secretar 2.7.51—3n (@| Pr. Wm. Hny. St. Dial 3466 |§} > OPP. GODDARD'S >
| art, ee oe ae ged - %4
Se en mm Seees.ees, LPO EO o>














SUCH QUALITIES
APPRECIATED

S. & S. RUM

Are only attained in long

and careful Maturing

A Wholesome and Refreshing
Drinks at any time

STUART & SAMPSON |
(1938) ITD.

Headquarters for Best Rum.



NOW and SAVE

NEW and Renewed Streamlined
and simpler Vanities, Stools, Ward
robes, Bedsteads, Beds, Springs
Laths—Morris, Bergere, Tub, Rush
and other Rockers, Armehairs,
Settees and upright Chairs

TABLES-—-China,
Kitchen Cabinets

Bedroor and
Sideboards

Larders, Waggons—Morris Spring
and Springlike Cushions 4.50
Desks, Bookrack Bookcases

L.S. WILSON |
SPRY ST.

DIAL 4069





IF

You have a HOUSE FOR SALE
Let US find a Buyer

ik
You wish to BUY A HOUSE
Let US find it for YOU

RALPH - A - BEARD

F.V.A.

Hardwood Alley “ie

PSF ISSN.

A COOL Shoe
for a HOT Day



Ladies! See our

latest Styles

NEW SHIPMENTS
JUST OPENED

also a wide selection
of Hosiery, Cleaners

and Polishes.

ts
LAL LLL LLL LEELA OREN

’Phone 4683













a

i
PAGE EIGHT



; G > ] { bE * clothes when he bumps ifito my . m i a a ee
é 1 ’ roth dekie volu me, and the sect, to say :
Regimen ( ain S Rando [ph urpin wy Ww Jackie's only a feather- ae ad ote ‘night ne . + '
| John White Shoes

In plain Brown, Black, Two-





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



weight—he doesn't weigh ten But he’s not a bebop fan.

you get

» : | stone in his winter overcoat. But Ligh i : i
| ‘a : } ; ight music and songs—particu-
I in Ss H O rs , this fellow is still groggy. He gog- larly those of the Negro singer
{ nN } j ’ a s ~wmnse gles at Jackie and he says: — Josh White.
i } I i [ don't know where

CABLE & WIRELESS who had scored 297 runs for the
loss of seven wickets on the first day of play, ended their




first innings at

"

N. Lawless hit 40 runs to top-

score for Cable and Wireless while



A. Cozier made the nex
score with 60.

For Spartan N. Harris.and E. G
McComie took three wickets each
for 57 and 79 runs respectively

In their turn at the wicket Spar-
tan have scored 158 runs for 9
wickets. N, Wood has so for top-
scored with 44, K. Sealy 37, and
E. G. MeComie 36. For Cable and
Wireless C. Lawless took four
wickets for 68 runs

At..the Garrison the Barbados
Regimént knocked up a total of
122 runs in reply to 87 runs made
by Empire in the first innings

When stumps were drawn Em-
pire had scored 97 runs for eighi
wickets in their second innings.

At Black Rock, Mental Hospital
gained a first innings lead on
Wanderers Wanderers were
dismissed for 156 runs in reply to
167 runs scored by the Mental Hos-
pital on the first day of play.

Mental Hospital in their second
innings ere now 110 runs for the
loss of six wickets. C. Williams
is not out with 45 runs and Skip-
per Carter not out one

The scores are: —





CABLE & WIRELESS vs. SPARTAN
AT BOARDED HALL

Cable & Wireless — First Innings

MeKenzie c aly b Gittens 4




8B. Matthew ec & b McCor 2
A. Cozler b Harris 60










R. Lawle ¢ Harris b Gitte Bt
Bs Or b Harri 2
Gilkes not out 4
Lawile b Harris {
D. I t ¢ Wood b McComie 10
) t run out >
Eg anker c Sealy b McComie 21
seale c (wkpr. Griffith) b Smith
‘xtra
Total 342
Fall of wicket 1 for 59
or 214, 4 for 251, 5 for 261, ¢
i tor 281, 8 for 318, 9 for 338

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Ww

Smith 12 1 4 1
Sealy 14 2 54 0
Harri 19 1 79 ;
MeComie 4 1 7 3
Gittens 13 3 37 2
Griffith It 0 38 0
Spartan -- First Innings
A. Gittens c & b Branker
S$ Griffith c Lewless b Branker 1
N Wood c ‘wk. Matthews) b C
Lawless a4
D. Morris b R. Lawless 2

QO. Coppin ec Sub b Lawless

N. Harris | b w b Branker 0

K. Sealy c Lawless b C

W. Jemmott c
c Lawless

E. McComie stpd. (w.k





C_ Lawless 36
E Smith not out 7
. Matthews not out 5

Extras 13
Total (for 9 wickets) 158
Fail of wickets: 1 for 5, 2 for 10

for 13, 4 for 17, 5 for 18, 6 for 64, 7 for
70, 8 for 135, 9 tor 148
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M RB. Ve

R. Lawles li 3 21 2
FE Branker 18 11 13 3
Cc. Lawle 21 4 68 4
R. McKenzie . 9 2 25 0
A. Cozier 4 1 6 0



EMPIRE vs. BARBADOS REGIMENT
AT GARRISON

Empire — First Innings 87
Barbados Regiment — First Innings
Phillips c wk. b Armstrong 19

342 runs on Saturday—the second day in
the second series of Intermediate Cricket matches — in
their match against Spartan at Boarded Hall-

Brathwa r y 26








Pinder Presco nstrong 1
Ishmael stpd b Amory 8
Watts |b w b Armstrong 0
E:iw b Spooner 14
Bispha ibw b Armstrong i4
Moe b Armstrong oh a
Marshall b Spooner 0
Parr not out 12
tichard b Pre 4 10
E 1 16
Total 122
Fall of wickets: 1 for 30, 2 for 34
or 34, 4 for i) for 64, 6 for 84 7 for
8 for 96, 9 for 9
Empire Second Innings
Taylor ¢ Bispham b Parris 12
B Bourne b Watt il

not out 0
ong b Watt 0
i rin out 3

B vw Fun out i
H c Watts b Pinder f
e Richards b Watt 12

run out I

4

Tota for 8 cket 9

i 1 for 25, 2 for 25, 3
5 for 41, 6 for 66, 7



BOWLING ANALYSIS

Oo 1 R Ww
Phillips 8 1 22 0
Richard 2 0 + 0
Par 0 ;



MENTAL HOSPITAL vy WANDERERS

AT BLACK f#OCK

Mental Hospital—ist Innings 107
Wanderers—tst Innings
WANDERERS FIRST INNINGS
©. Pierce c: Rock b. Knight 6





D. Alleyne Lb.w. b, Crichlow 12
I Mayers b, Carter 9
\. Lewis c, Carter b. Crichlow 47
B. Rolfe Lb.w, b Rock “6
Clarke Lb.w. b Rock 1

3 » not out 23

. r c, Chase b, Wiltshire 3
G. { ete b. Knight 13
L.. Greenidge c. Rock b. Chase » 30
Mi. Proverbs c. Wiltshire b, Chase )
Extras 5

Total ., ‘ -- 156

Fall of wickets: 1 ror #7, 2 for 18 3

for 24, 4 for 103, 5 for 1v3, 6 for 110,

/ for 113, 8 for 135, 9 for 153
BOWLING ANALYSIS
0 M R Ww







Carter ik 1 “4 1
Knight 10 1 29 2
c hlow 7 2 17 2
Roech 1 9
Wiltshire 5.4 4 20 2
Chase 5.4 4 20 2
ock 12 4 19 2
Mental Hospitat Second Innings
Vv foyee | bw., b Proverbs 0
“i Crichlow c Seale b Proverbs 23
Cc. Williams not out 45
Best ¢ Packer b Greenidge 3
J. Wiltshire b Greenidge 13
R Chase 1 bw, b Greenidge 8
R. Rock c Mayers b Greenidge 9
Carter not out i3
Extra 8
Total (for 6 wiekets) 110

Fall of wickets 1 for 14, 2 for 29, 3
for 4, 4 for 62, for 71, 6 tor 93

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M yo

lroverb 9 2 50 2 |
&keete 3 0 12 9
Packer | Re 10 «(OO |
Greenidge 7 1 19 4
Clarke 3 0 ll 0



Empire In The Lea
In School Game

EMPIRE are well on their way in obtaining an out-
right victory over Combermere at Combermere, as they
dismissed the schoolboys for 16 runs in their first innings
and replied with 75 runs for the loss of three wickets de-
clared on Saturday, the first day in the third series of

Second XI Cricket matches.

A good bowling spell by C
Beckles of Empire was perhaps
the main cause why Combermere
did not score more runs. Beckies
took five wickets for five runs
and G,. Downes three wickets
for three runs

Empire in their first turn at the
wicket had scored 75 runs for the
loss of three wickets declared,
thus giving them at least a first
innings lead.

When stumps were drawn
Combermere had scored 88 runs
in their second innings and had
lost eight wickets in doing so.



At Beckles Road, Y.M.P.C. bat-
ted the whole day against Wan-
derers to score 215 runs for the
loss of 9 wickets. B. Hoyos top-
seored with 60 for Y.M.P.C. and
C. Greenidge 34.

The most successful bowler for
Wanderers was R. Nicholls who
bagged 3 wickets for 39 runs.

Ps *

Police in their first innings
against Carlton at Carlton knock-
ed up a total of 165 runs with
S. Howard contributing a breezy
43 runs end B, Dodson 26 runs.
For Carlton H. Cox took five
wickets for 49 runs and G, Mat-
thew 2 wickets for 34 runs,

Carlton at the end of play had
replied with 54 runs for the loss
of four wickets. E. Denny, the
Police captain took two of the
wickets for nine runs.

* *

At Vaucluse Harrison Coliege

batting first scored 100 runs in
their first innings against Cen-
tral. T. Roach and Mr. Williams
were the best scorers for Col-
lege with 33 and 34 respectively.

When stumps were drawn Cen-
tral had replied with 84 runs for
the loss of nine wickets,

THE SCORES

Combermere vs. Empire at
Combermere

Combermere 16 (C. Beckles 5

for 5, G. Downes 3 for 3)
5

Empire 75 for 3 declared: (E.

Gill 19, M. Taitt 19, W. Maxwell

3 for 16),

Combermere Second Innings 88
for 8 wickets: (W. Maxwell 23,



S. Becki 2

2 for 19, V



Skeete 2 for 14.)



Harrison College vs. Central
Harrison College 100 (E. Ron-

ett 33, Mr. Williams 34)

Central 84 or 9 wickets: (Reid

4 for 23, Batson 4 for 20.)

Y.M.P.C, vs. Wanderers

Y.M.P.C, 215 for 9 wickets (B.

Heyos 60, C. Greenidge 34, R

Nicholls 8 wickets for 89 runs,

Ramsay 2 wickets for 29 runs,
Cheeseman 2 wickets for 47 runs,

Carlton vs. Police at Carlton

Police 165 (S. Howard 43, B.

Dodson 26,) H. Cox 5 wickets for

49 runs, G. Matthew 2 wickets

ior 34 runs

Carlton 54 runs for 4 wickets:
(BE. Denny 2 wickets for 9 runs.)

| They'll Do It Every Tinie _ Slenes 6 Cede





|/ COME AS FAST AS YOU CAN,
{ DOCTOR! NO FOOLIN’ SHE'S

REALLY SICK CAN'T HARDLY

IN MOVE JUST TOOK HER >
TEMPERATURE »IT'S UP 1

Te. TO 104 Bow

ech





"Wirra, wurra! wiFeys sick sn
SEND POR THE DOCTOR,
QUICK, QUICK, QUICK +++





ae
SSS



SE ae





2 for 23, G. Downes



Down THE ROAD COMES COC, CAREENING,
WHILE WIFEY DOES HER WHOLE
SPRING-CLEANING «+++

I CAN'T LET THE COCTOR SEE \/
ME AND MY HOUSE LIKE THIS»:
GET SOME CLEAN SHEETS
OUT OF THE CLOSET“GET MY
BEST SILK NIGHTGOWN:-
GET »---

Yhe strength from to hit me like

that T-just don't know!” He dees sometning to you says
atig sz ‘ cnow!

Turpin, fe gets his heart into his

TO PETER WILSON yersd "Tit stilt ‘Go Back so the GENE Fe rather, listen-to him



Champion Randolph Tur
pin fights Sugar Ray Robin
son to-night.

“Even if I make a world

champ,” he says, “I'll still go
back to the booths.”

My brother Dick w









WHAT'S ON TO-DAY

Police Courts — 10.00 a.m.

Court of Grand Sessions —
10.00 a.m,

Meeting of the Legislative

Council — 2.00 p.m.
Meeting of the House of
Assembly — 3.00 p.m,
CINEMAS

Empire: "City Lights"—4 45 p m
and $30 pm

Globe “Royal Wedding’ — 5 00
Pm and &§ 30 pm

Roxy “Rock Island Trail’ —
145 pm and 815 pm

Royal; “Laura — 450 pm. and
840 pm

Olympic: “Romeo and Juliet"
House on #2nd Street" — 4 20
Pm and 8% pm

Plaza’ (Bridgetown) “Breaking
Point’ — 445 pm and 9 30

pm

TO-DAY'S ASSIZE DIARY

No. 11. Rex vs. Edric Thomp-
son,

No. 12. Rex vs. Mervin
Lashley.

No. 14 Rex vs. Clotelle
Miller

The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 5.45 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.25 p.m.
se (First Quarter) July
Lighting : 7.00 p.m.
High Water: 7.41 a.m., 8.26
p.m,





YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington): 16
ins,
Total for month to yester-
day : 1.22 ins,
Temperature (Max,) 84.5°F.
Temperature (Min.) 74.5°F.
Wind Direction: (9.00 a.m.)
E,, (3.00 p.m ) E.N.E.
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour
Barometer (9.00 a.m,) 29.974,
(3.00 p.m.) 29.933.



By Jimmy Hatlo |





s 16 then
and beginning to do well in
booths and the smaller local
shows
He’d been an amateur—he won
seven fights and lost two—but
when he started making money
out of fighting we kids thought
we'd get in on it, too.
So they fitted us out with litfle
boxing gloves, dressing gowns,
embroidered knick
and everything like the proper
boxers had.
And we had proper fights, too.
That Jackie he used to thrash me
-—then I'd cry my eyes out

Just so as to ‘s
they used to bill us
and Mose”

3, boxing boots,

* the crowd
as “Alexander
| and the crowd would
| throw “nobbins’* into the ring
We used to sit up half the night
dividing them with George Mid-
| dleton, who finally managed
all, taking the threepenny bits out
to put in the bank for his daugh-
ter.

She’s never touched them and
she’s still got over £200 out o!



a RT Ce

MAGI HEALING OIL

An

than go out at night.
booths. And if anyone wants to I like to watch other people
take me on—well, I'll be there. dancing but I don't care for it
You know the old booth saying: much myself. I can’t really do it,
“Black, white or yellow—let 'em although I’m light enough on my
all come. feet in the ring.
erent wile : Randotph
fairpin is no showman in the
A phoney, glamorous sense of he | = MIOSe H Trust
word and his hobbies and pur- j
* suits are those of a kid who has . | like to fool around with the
always lived within walking boys. There's Jackie Worrall. He
distance of the countryside. used to carry me to school when
Heavyweight promoter Jack We Were nippers, and when it was
Solomons would have gone raining he’d put his coat over my
down to a fiyweight if he’d been head. He still does carry me
there the last time I saw Ran- around.
dolph. He’s got his own taxi now, and
he drives me to and from a lot of
He came im wearing a yellow ..¥ fights or when I’m giving ex-
sports shirt and a pair of riding hibitions.
breeches. He said: “I've just Then there’s Danny Hagan—we
been schooling a horse over call him “Dango.” I've known
jumps. The fellow with me—he him for years and now he’s more
used to be a National Hunt or less appointed himself as my
jockéy—he didn’t half come off “bodyguard.”
a wallop.” 7 c
idn’ 7» I like the folks I’ve grown up
- — ‘he woe bate pe with. You can trust them. They
the one to come the cropper. were friends before _you were
It's that lack of imagination famous and they'll still be your
or at least of brooding anxiety friends even when your name
which may well stand Randolph 8" t in the headlines. if I
in good stead as his big test on , That’s why I always knew i
July 10 approaches. turned professional there could be
only one manager for me—George
Another of his favourite hob- Middleton. He used to live in the
bies cost him dearly for, al- same street as us. We've all come
though it's not widely known, Up together.
he is more than slightly deaf as *Nobbins, the coppers and small
a result of an accident while he silver coins thrown into the ring
wds swimming. He says:— after a good serap.
I was only a kid at the time LES.
and I’d played truant to go swim-
ming in the river. I was always va
fond of swimming and diving and i
those threepenny bits. I toa I was showing off, diving Sports Window
I've never got the feel.of the in and seeing how far I could
booths out of my blood. We al- swim under water. WATER POLO



ways went to Hickman’s. It used Anyway there was an under- This “afternoon at the
to be run by Charlie Hickman. water stump and somehow - or Aquatic Club the two water

He was a heavy-weight with other it got caught in my swim- polo matches to be played
the heck of a punch before the ming trunks. are, Harrison College vs.
war. They say he was descended Pe. Police and Whipporays vs.
from “Gas” Hickman, one of the I struggled and struggled but I Barracudas. The referee is
most famous of the old bare-‘couldn’t get free. I thought I was Mr. A. Clarke.

knuckle fighters. going to drown. “In the end, with
( my lungs bursting, I got to the

surface,

A Secret “You' know how itis. 1'@ for- YACHT CLUB TENNIS

T’ll tell y something you don’t #otten about it the next day. ut

know. 7 Tred Leute: Stone ea) ager a time I peer ee I wer TOURNAMENT
last fight, against Jackie Keough hearing so well and when they
at the White City, Iwas lined up t00K me to a doctor he found out YESTERDAY’S RESULTS
with a lot of the booth fighters ®bout it and told me that the





accepting challenges from anyone Pressure ct the water had affected Ladies’ Doubles—Finals
in the crowd. i ? my e@ardrun’s. Miss G. Pilgrim, and Miss I).
Sure, they told the erowd who Wood beat Miss L, Branch and

mh 7 ao PETEK WILSON; Possibly Miss M. King 6—3, 6—0.
I was, but a lot of the fellows 1 sas ; :
didn’t believe I'd be there. There ‘hat aoe Turpin’s voice Men’s Singles
was one in particular. He kept on YY : cd a ously war one © Godfree beat C, B. Lawless
yelling out that it was a fake. hie pos sd eure soe Wun ge) 78,
That I was’nt really Randolph vis husky bronze frame. WEDNESDAY’S. FIXTURE

on . lve only heard one other
furpin. ' . ‘f ° ¢
In the etd when the barker fighter with a voice which Mixed Doubles

aaa ne bed tiik . : , eracks in a similar way. His Miss G. Pilgrim and G. H. Man-
or ~ ee ti heed aie name—Jack Dempsey. ning vs. Mrs. D. Worme and
tine (ah, Fee: A Randolph, as I've said is a W. A. Crichlow,
The , tell him I really am me youngster with simple tastes but
but he won’t wear it and in the when he likes something he



end we got in the ring together. ihe lot of it. Musie for in- WINS BY K.O.
Well, after about half a minute . :
somehow or other he gets his jaw In his house in Hanworth- BUENOS AIRES July 9

in the way of my fist and he goes road, Warwick — the Turpins Archie Moore, the veteran Uni-
straight through the ropes. moved from Leamington to ted States light heavyweight
“nh { Warwitk when Randolph was a Saturday night, knocked out Ar-

Let “Em All « ome toddler—he has two giant ra- gentina’s heavyweight champion
. : diograms in adjoining rooms. Alberto Lovell in the first round
They're helping him back to the Owing to his deafness he of a scheduled 12-round non-

, place where he’s left his street tunes them up to maximum. title fight.—(CP)



















‘ — ay

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MY HAND

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BARN DANCE |

THE CRANE HOTEL
SATURDAY, AUGUST 4TH

y kind permission of the Commissioner of Police

MUSIC by

THE POLICE DANCE ORCHESTRA

Fancy Dress Optional
including Light Refreshment



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terre ILL OD IL IPO lh
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TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1951







Mr vy PHOEN!

: wee a
ANNUAL DANCE |

On WEDNESDAY NIGHT llth





Jul 1951, which was to be held
at the Childrer Cooc 1 League
but wi r t held at the
PRINCESS ALICE PLAYING
Pirlo

Musie by Perey Gteen's Orchestra

ADMISSION %-

(Transportation available through-

out the night: 7.7. 51—2n

<< Dress Informal







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-
TRAST Was