Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


a a



ESTABLISHED 1895



Stage Set F or Cease-fire |

’

Discussions
White Flag Will |
Shelter U.N. Men

TOKYO, July €.
NITED NATIONS AND COMMUNIST leaders
completed long distance negotiations for a
cease fire meeting, and prepared to start Sunday
on face to face talks which could end the Korean
war or signal the start of World War III.
At 9 a.m, Sunday, protected by the white flag
of truce, representatives of General Matthew B
Ridgway will cross the Imjin river and move on
into wrecked Kaesong, ancient Korean capital,
two miles south of the 3%th parallel. |

——# Waiting to meet them will b>
Korea—4th In

Communist delegates of Kim II
Sung, Supreme Commander of the
Non-Korean army and Peng Teh
| Huai, Commander of Chinese Vol-





Men And Money | ‘2.

WASHINGTON, July 6
The Korea war which

fourth bloodiest and costliest con-

startle sod | simply
out as a police action so far is the’ jor top-level negotiators, who will

services.

First mecting at which none will
the rank of Colonel,
will be to clear the decks

be above





mee: Tuesday or shortly there-

flict in United States history in] after to arrange a cease tire.

casualties and treasure.
The year of fighting on the far-
away peninsula has cost the United



An Allied patrol reported Fri-
day that Communist scidiers were
cleaning out and repairing the city

States more dearly than the revo-j hall in Kaesong, the ceasefire city.
lutionary war of 1812 and tne! There was evidence that Com-
Mexican and Spanish~American| munists were also directing traffic

wars combined.

in the city but nething to indicate

Only World War II “the Civi'} that barricades or defending posi-

War and Word War I—in
order—have exacted heavier Uni-
ted States toll.

that} tions were being constructed there

; Allied patrols which have scouted

the area of the city daily since the
announcement of Malik’s ceasefire



5 Latest _ Defence Department) proposal, report there are no
figures show a total of 78,110 Am- booby 4rabe- there

; * i eA eis ) aps there.
erican battle casualties in Korea— Allied patrols reported that
13,000 dead, 52,975 wounded, 10.-| Communists have been keeping
649 missing, 159 prisoners 1,327] 4 token force in Kaesong since
once missing but since found.)the announcement of the ceasefire
These figures represent only} proposal Eighty Communist
casualties reported to nex* of Kin.) troops have dug in on the highest

Assistant Defence Secretary J-| hill in the suburbs of the city with
MeNeil told the Senate Finance;two machineguns, and_ several
Committee that the cost to date is} hundred more Communists are
anywhere between $2,000,000,000] quartered in schoo! buildings
and $10,000,000,000—depending on —U.P.

For
al-
the

how you want to figure it,
example, he explained that
though the cost of using
Seventh Fleet might be counted
in the Navy would have had te
maintain a fleet in the Far East
even if there had not been a war
—U.P.



Times Hopes For



TS



U.N. Planes Hit
Rail Yards

TOKYO, July 6.
Superforts attacked suc-
“railroad marshalling

Nine
cessfully
yards at Kowon on Friday drop-
ping 60 tons of 100-pound bombs





Barbados

CONDEMN |

LAMBETH
COUNCIL

(From Our Own Correspondent:

LONDON, July 6.
solution put forward
Council to ease
problem of the increasing col-
oured population in London has

|
|
|
i
The |
been condemned by the oe

the Lambeth

by
the

of Coloured Peoples as ‘“savour-
ing of Dr. Malan’s racial segre-
gation policy.”

The Lambeth Council, _ per-
turbed by the petition from Brix-
‘on residents complaining about a
‘coloured home in the district,
wants the Government to tighten
the methods of regulating the
flow of coloured people into Lon-
don.

The - flow,

should be confined to those with

says the Council,

prospects: of employment and















SATURDAY, JULY 7





NE PRINCESS ALICH PLAYING PIBLD was cpencd on March
40. t 7 ti overne 3 Alfy:d Savag adter
Prin ad visit B $ fer that month, had
t ane
j if Cs
. In the picture, Mr. H. A. Tudor, the then Churchwarden is seen
with the Gev x at the opening ceremony. %





PRICE: FIVE CENTS

N Ne ron e
Cox Gives Evidence
2 e
Before Princess
ye “ °
Alice Enquiry
FIVE more witnesses gave evidence yesterday,
the fifth day of the enquiry into the Princess
Alice Playing Field which is being conducted by
Sir Clement Malone in the Legislative Council

Chamber. These witnesses bring the number to
24 who have now given evidence.

he first witness yesterday, don’t remember
morning was Mr. Allan Greaves. worked?

The Attorney General; What is Mr. Greaves: I worked from th
your oecupation? time the building started until it

Mr. Greaves: A carpenter finished.

The Attorney General: Do you The Attorney General: Hov
know Charles Werrell much of the huts did you use in

Mr. Greaves: Yes. the construction of the building?



how long you









The Atterney General: Were} Mr. Greaves: Whatever we
you employed with him at the} wanted we took out.

Prineess Alice Playing Field in The Aitorney General: What
1949” type of wood was used in the

Mr. Greaves: Yes. boarding up of the building?

Yh. Attorney General: Was it Mr. Greaves: We used fir and
the first time you worked with}everything at the building was
j him? ; practically new.

Mr. Greaves: Yes. The Attorney General: How

were you being paid by Mr. Wor-
rell?

Mr. Greaves: I cannot remem
ber

| The Attorney General: Can you
| remember when vou first startea
,to work at the Playing Field?
Mr. Greaves: About October.





PEACE IN KOREA AND
THE SUGAR ISSUE

(From Our Own € orrespondent)

|

1

LONDON, July 6 :

The future of sugar, béth from the supply and price
point of view, is assuming additional importance as the
prospects of peace in Korea grow steadily closer Values in
the world market have already fallen since Malik’s cease
fire proposals were made knewn at the beginning cf last

month

But that cannot be taken as an indication of what









to expect if the Peace Pact ig signed.
During the current year the
et has been influenced in
Y it months by growing tight-

(ae ees of the
“Susie's Cure! fine: vy ine

i¢ tual

WISCONSIN, July u. }

Statistical position and
prospect of a possible

shortage which might

ee ehe tc had 4 os j result from a worsening of the
A 36-year-old hospit.! 7) jy ornational situation,
employee paid $1,358 to Me 5 a him Sa
leara that her health was j Me nik ws “— in their latest

improved by burning money, bulletin point out that in cireum

justification
































Attorney General: Who
used to receive the material?
Mr. Greaves: Mr. Maynard.
The Attorney General: Did you
see any pieces of pine 6 x 8 at the
Playing Field?
Mr. Greaves: I was lookin;
pieces} 4fter the men who were working
as well as I was working.

No Good

The Attorney General: Did you
see any card board among the

| The Attorney General: Did you
fo to Seawell to look at the huts?
+ Mr. Greaves: No.

The Attorney General: When you
went on to work at the Playing
Field, did you see what appeared
to be pieces of hut?

Mr. Greaves: I saw some
f hut which we used up.

The Attorney General; Had yo

started to work when the huts
| waete brought to the Reef by
lorries

Mr. Greaves: No.







Judges Under

i The Attorney General: When] huts?
K you were first employed at the Mr. Greaves: Yes, but it was not
U. e Influence Playing Field, how far had the }any good,

building got?

No. I Man

Mr. Greaves: | was there from
the time the foundation started

The Attorney General: Did you
see any black galvanise?

Mr. Greaves: Yes, but it had in
holes and was turned down,

The Attorney General: You said
that you were at the Playing Field



l¥an Charges

THE HAGUE, July 6.
Iranian officials charged Friday

that ten judges of the Internation-| The Attorney General; Couldfuntil the building was finished,
al Court who voted in favour of] you tell us something about th°fdo you know how many holes
Britain on Thursday in the Anglo] foundation? were there for the pillars?

Mr. Greaves: It was about 6 te
8 feet deep and about 4 feet wide

The Attorney General; About
how many carpenters were em-
ployed there?

Mr. Greaves: About 50 to 60.

The Attorney General; Were you
the chief carpenter?

Mr. Greaves: | cannot remem-
ber now, but there was a hole for
each, concrete pillar.

Mr. Walcott: Have you ever
made any statement to the Police
or any one else in connection with
this matter?

Mr. Greaves: No.

Iranian oil case were “perhaps
inder British influence”. Hussein
shayegan, member of the Iranian
Oil Commission and observer at
the hearing—Iran did not partici-
pate in the case—told a Press con-
ference “two of the neutral judges
of the Court had the same opinion

is we have but the majority may Mr. Greaves: Yes. I was Wor- Mr. Walcott: Have you ever
Se because of political considera-|rcll’s number one man. given any evidence before?

ions and perhaps under British| The Attorney General; Who] Mr. Greaves: No. This is the
influence voted for interim mea-|tised to mae out the Pay Sheets? evidence.

sures." ‘The Court by aal0—?eauete}- Arsh Mees evi
zranted the British request for an
‘injunction’ which would keep

the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company

Mr, Greaves: Mr.
self,

The Attorney General; Did you
get the names of the various work-

Worrey Wir het ver
worked at they Playing Field?
Mr. Greaves: Yes.

Mr. Mottley: Did you have






















|{ choking a chicken or break- |; stances there is little
: = on the east coast rail centre.”|“who are likely to become good ing an egg. | at present for hope that the world} jin operation until the two coun- | men? : i rk
°, Ae 7 ; s : ios 1 ‘ much rain during the time wor)
Better Relations Two other B 29s attacked the|sitizens”. The League opposes | She told police that a polwic ou } ill improve te] ‘ries reached a settlement.—U.P. Mv. Greaves: Sometimes I took] was going on? . :
Communist , front line positions}such controls because of the diffi- | character reader named c that any gener; the names and passed them on to Mr. Greaves: Yes
5° Friday night with 500 pound|culties of implementing them “Susie” swindicd her out of unlondi of stockpiles would be 7 ee A os = Se
/ .K., Argentina pil? yi fiolding’ teblal dikerin- ; oe aed ae Rich : ' Mr. Worrell Mr. Mottley: Suppose the men
Between U g bombs,—U.P. ews involving racial discrim i ae ate tad — a He oo ‘ bs a " Reds Will Reitvade The Attorney General: Howlhad started to work and rain fell,
LONDON, July 6. . ns : e betier ane .ao ees ae er eee : : ong were you employed at the} were they still paid?
The Times, commenting edi- ~ _ peta ny Mr, Sam Morris, the League’s} make oodles of money. es . Playing Field? Mr. Greaves: Yes.
: A ~ . * 5, é § a aa ae oa ate he say it remal o be 26 gis y : + . : f
torially er he oy ee ree U.S. Ask Russia ’ Oo Secretary, to-day commented: | ar a an rate on : Meir iy = alm as the Kore a Onily if Mr. Greaves: 1 cannot remem- Mr. Mottley: You saw some Old
agreement debate in the Commons : ¢ “If there are undesirables among Susie . ce “Susie Unit ace So Te 7 . I r her, lumber stored on the Reef grounds
said, it is to be hoped “now with Repay $672in. the coloured population, we feel told her to bring a chicken pean eae I a a Russia W ants W ar The Attorney Genera}: Did you}—how far was it from where you
better relations dearly bought new 7ASHINGTON it is up to the local authority to and “apparently choked haing realised. B ven so, tni TOKYO. July 6 see the Acting Governor there? were working?
and more supple methods of deal- WASHINGTON, July 6, deal with them and not penalise it Then “Susie led ing “ t ARO; Os as x , July 6. Mr, Geekveli On. ons, oodaaion ik, Cnsaiiek: tt, Grad Gut bie the
; ‘ bott . 4, S onanded ‘ could not ecome importan Governor Thoma Dewey now y
ing may be developed in both} The United States demanded |the majority for the sins of the her to a basement by : ; { aan Hisitin ; "| Phe Attorney General: Do you] Police Station and we were work-
countries so that trade between|for the third time that Russia 7 ec sillors Ld candlelight ¢ seemed tatistical factor for some con-| visiting Japan, i quoted = by Seney ' we w'
ill x l nger b > threatened | r rm sdiatel $672 000,000 fare. Th WIS COUTENAOrS, Ce a . ANE SOEs | ve siderable time and the worl nem of the Japanese Diet as| *"0™“ Mr. Tudor? ing down by the building. When
by will no po e threatene parr pens _ Y aed Stat beth would only look deeper into burn all the money she re- market position v nla ‘receive n aying, he ig convinced. Cox Mr. Greaves: Yes we wanted the stuff, we had t
wit periodic stoppages.’ . ‘ lenc lease aid. The wo e ates /the question, they would find that ceived. divert honnat munist forces will not reinvade The Attorney General: Howj,send labourers for it.
It added that the real test oflalso asked for the second time]the West Indians are forced to Lat “Susie” ‘ lir benefit ill 1 va :
the new agreement was its ability that Russia submit to arbitration Britain b oa aiia f the eter On. “Susie” wrapped South Korea after the ceasefire] ften did he visit the Playing Mr. Mottley: You told the Com-
Poel gery Be ftrictior i esaehi birch ited: | (ens, 0, Britain because of the an egg in cloth and broke and truce unless Russia herself| Field? missioner that the majority of the
to remove all sources of friction|the dispute with the United), lin onditiongs 4 the : in tussia hers ;
between Argentina and the United|States over cash payment tor! jppnas" r , n ie her heel. Then dy : . ready to start World War IL. Mr. Greaves: | saw him there onj stuff used was new. What did you
ere a eae an atmos- other. goods went 800,000,009 The League’s Chairman, Trini- a sate at aw ie I roops Goose-Step Der A i i ei to Kor a Sunday — eae eeaiih a mean by On aac |
phere of good will. zs whic he Sovie nion received |qad-born Dr. David Pitt, said: 4 . ce day cease fire talks 8 ? x $ ou 5
Supporting British » eee under wartime lend lease. The} «+ put it midly, we think the — at name revealed, Throu rh Abadan che sui to paein ae
John Edwards, the Times said th at State Department in announc-|]ambeth Council’s attitude | sale she had rec ov ered the | \ s Me “ en's of t e diet said De “ vy
the debaic was in effect a “critic-|ing the double barrelled action |rather unkind. No one seems to money from “Susie's” hus- || ABADAN, July 6 Sang Meee een eae
ism of Mr. Edwards’ own pre- |disclosed that Secretary Acheson |object to the presence of colonials|| band. The husband told Wer | rie tian SHO TA Nia ti. [for yy ath, Overall Japanese peace
decessor who tried to negotiate as Jon Monday sent a note to th@|in wartime, but in peace it is a Susie” had also taken $700 Jakes ation as - 0 ea tes i a i wy 1 - ‘ § pe ‘ a -
though all the Argentine s claims Soviet Charge D’Affaires in| different matter’. ' of his money when she left ye rice, ee re vena as hae? ' ner ae ey
Vee unreasonable. barf sa ony Washington, Boris Karavaev. The League’s executive has —U.P. ohne Finan ds ; va renta = fi Yr * ‘he Ur ted Beniae dW ass
The Times lists as follows, new —U.P. |sent a protest to the Lambeth a aa es th F re s ai aan ee nee Ween
Gatails that Edwards brought inte | Shi : A d Council and has drawn the Lon- ‘cin oni te a . Pe iF Te a eae
e debate in relaulo ili don County Council's attention to \ ince Le Ol). Crisis, began. vey é oat
agreement: . Seis inks dih lean di ' Ip Ruts sroun , |their point of view. Mayor Of Moscow 3 . a pe ce ‘ ve ‘ ibly , lsc Samtannt tp hee : 3 The Metropolité Borough's } a celebration to end a monthlong re- : ae) ee &
“ : acilitate payme 6. poiltan Bn ligt { t relatio arte ‘
vail shortly ; facilitate payment | The Cl et Joint Committee and the Colonial Refused The Girl ligious fast bu ome observers i l nship mi unde m tanding ‘and
again of pensions to former em- Offi ov A s ca c ¥ interpreted it Iran's answer | riendship would result between
ployees of once British-owned ! RIAS reported that an East Ger- iden are to ‘consider’ the que | , the Hague court decision Japan, the United States and
railways who now live in this man passenger steamer carrying a ie a PARIS, July 6 A crowd of 10,000 gave a tumul-] 0ther members of the free world’
country or wish to do so.” 400 persons, ran aground in Mag- | The Mayor of Moscow came), brsesliaeale to Hussein Makky| 2fter the Japanese Peace Treaty
, —(U.P.) deburg.—U.P. | out from behind the Iron Curtair i oe Tenet Te “y re on me oat igned
OE ab rt al eee eae to attend along with Mayor: > sranian t et UP.
Man Breaks Into | from other countries the 2,000th ae fe : ae nd Br oo hy
. = , ear, »- * 1 cCechnes lave ca € oncert
e e B ki h P l vgs | 20niversary of Paris’ establish- ; a. ; | 4 ‘
n mong British Embassy official
c kistan And India eres rene) Unirae & i, : ‘| Jamaicans Settled
a Mayor A. Yasnov was given U.P.
Buckingt oY July 6. |the freedom of the city and eee | From Our Own Correspondent
\ 7@ ® uckingham Palace, one of the| offered a limousine hotel room ve ry LONDON, July 6
Charge iolations noe heavy eran tenis ane a pretty society girl to show Sign Jap Treaty at core ‘fee omclals are
in e Was broken in y im around. 7 iewing with alarm e number
a man found crouched in a cor- ‘ 2 S 2ptem ber f recent arrivals of Jamaicans in
ridor one floor below the suite Yasnov accepted the freedon | Ir ef le v | paeees of work. Most of “09 party
e where Princess Margaret wasjcf the city but announced he ‘ ' : vhich arrived by air earlier this
Of Kashmir Truce asleep. would stay at the Soviet Embassy, | State D \ on hay € now been settled in
King George and Queen|and turned Mown the car, room| frmed on | obs in athe: ’ London, 3 sirming-
UNITED NATIONS, New York. gg were not . ihe palace i girl About 7 mars | mons for ae tae parece: ap Bigs rirt
; ‘ ce 2 ~ , ar residence a ym al} ove 1e world are her eace Tre a ‘ r S
India and Pakistan on Friday, exchanged a new Sexies Windsor SS and Peingnes Margaret : —(UP.) ace Fra icisco during the _ first | said a Colonial Office spokesman
of charges of Kashmir ceasefire violations. Pakistan said, wo. home only because, she was lipheke in Secteriher. (Oa) | onight
an Indian formation recently attacked a patrol of Punjab) contined to her room with a cold me lat iW S :
border police in Sialkot district of Pakistan and two con- The intruder was _ questioned ‘ . ae | y WUXLOCTC ar service
stables were killed. for hours at Cannon Street Police’ Call Rail Strike | Gold Increases |
But the main point of the Pakis- — {Station after Scotland Yard threw i WASHINGTON, July 6
tan complaint was its contention) “Me . il d into atin, Pes ee eens od " 2 NEW eee aioe: OTTAWA, July 6 President Truman issued an
that recent Indian charges had Millionaire Jai e bide which virtually | se: as r} A message from igpur} Fir Minister D. C. A order on Friday extending for on«
given a distorted picture and| square of the Empir ~ the}said the All-India nen’s| annour i Friday that Can-| year enlistments of all member
“onre aii ‘ined. outbursts” in “the NEW YORK, July 6. four residences of Royal family--|Federation Executive de onjada’s official holding of the Armed Forces who other-
Indian Pres and “bellicose| Federal Judge Sylvester Ryan | which has Buckingbam palace as}Friday to call a strike of all rail | Unite d States « ( 1ed vise would be refeased betwee:
seeuhés by sone Thaler leaders’| Sent millionaire Frederick Van-|jts keystone. iway wolkers effective August 27.{ grow in Jun and were well above | July 8, 1951 and July 1, 1952
8 Pa adev.»{derbilt Field to jail for refusing —(U.P.) —U.P. Ilest year.—(U.P.) UP

were meant to “queer the pitch’ |}
for new United Nations mediator,

Dr. Frank Graham,

Pakistan said that inciden

were charged by both sides andi
it was a “travesty ot facts to Sa¥|the custody of
tat all the blameday with Pakis-} State

tan

\'to reveal the names of the per-
} sons wiio put up the bail money
for four fugitive Communist





ts, leaders.

To-day



nitted Field to
Deputy United
yan sentenced

he cor



Marshal. _
pend 90 a:



| Field to

India sent the United Nations 2) contempt.

list of four new incidents in which!
violated the
ceasefire line. Complaints said in

Pakistan allegedly

these incidents one Indian border!

patrolman was killed, four wound-"
vil-
ornaments

ed, ma’e inhabitants of the

lage were flogged and

No Justification
WASHINGTON, July 6.



anid shaem, tear | Some Republican members of
The Indian complaint was sent the Senate MacArthur Investigat-
by Indiam delegate Sir Benegel ing Committee are circulating a
Rau to the July President of the report contending that there was
Securit Council, Sir Gladwyn no “military justification” for t
Jebb of Britair recall of General MacArthur it

U.P

: disclosed

Friday. —U.P.

in jail for}

(From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, July 8.
The dream of an Empire Par-

liament in Westminster is further





FIGHT FOR EMPIRE PARLIAMENT

SAYS DAILY EXPRESS





championed to-day. Lord Beaver-|cannot at this time march Express ; that the vast dis-
brook’s Daily Express takes up the out America and neither can tance eparate Empire
;cause of direct representation for United States march vithout 'éountric no handicap, They are
ithe peoples of the West Indies, It the Empire. The cause of peace bound thi onger than
says it is a consummation not just gepends on the comradeship of}law. They a ound t lood and
to be hoped for, but to be fought j,5¢,, by common citizenshi

lend worked for. 3ut at the same time | :

In a leading article the Express tinuing aim of British pol ite
defends its support of the Anglo- must be ti complete econor the case of f Empire
American alliance which it says and mi jiependenc citize r i I 1 Beave
many feel is making the Empire own Er bre ¢

e countries turn to Washington ada 1
rather than London for support. Det kir eor i t
| The Express says the Empire United Empire not px é lic lif
Sk tein. cae oti we Sa euiesn as a Shae



Some Americar it s find
difficult to realise that the resi- ,
dents of Dominior and colonie
can be membe of YO or ever
three sections of “the same Em-
pire — sections perhaps t:ousands|
of miles apart—and yet suffer nc

disability on that aecount |

“The French understand the}

imperial structure much better)
adds the Express. “They have on

of their own in their tem, The!

> people of Martinique send repre-

IT’S THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS

sentatives to sit and vote in the
French Parliament |

colonic ever

“Wi the British

Westminste





PAGE TWO



cect i â„¢

Carnub Calling



BARBADOS

B.B.C. Radio














|



ADVOCATE

——





GLOBE THEATRE








SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951







AQUATIC CLUB CEUNEMA (Members Only)







I Ps ;
7 s TO-DAY é 15 PM nd continuing DAILY i |
MATINEE: TO-DAY
d rog' amine TONIGHT TO MONDA\
JAMES STEWA
Ss. ». HEWITT MYRING, SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951

RS s nae “dpc dey 1115 a.m, Commentaries on the Da =| “BROKEN ARROW ”’

wife of C.D. and W Pu wt, 11.45 am. Program: Parade
lic Relations Adviser flew to noon) The News, 12.10 p.m. News G-M'G wre ants Se ee PAGET
Antigua yesterday on a_ short M-G-M's ayest with J {AN DEE sts
holiday. She is due to return to + Dm 19.18 M Technicolor Musical! SPECIAL MATINEE. THIS MORNING at 9.20 ocloci
Barbados on July 12th. Mr. p.m. The Glyndebourne Mozart FRED JANE ZANE GREYS
Hewitt Myring is at present in al. 4.45 p.m. Bertha Hagart, 5°p.m i Pe ‘
England attending a conference England | vs. South Africa, 5.05 pix “RED CANYON” in Technicolor
of Public Relations Officers from thes “AG, wan tlaeee el " 5 J on ‘

: . erlude, 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice : BLYTH—HOWARD DUFF—GEORGE BRENT
all br the British Common- 6 pm. Music for Dancing 645, pur Sratting: ANH
wealth. Programme Parade
4 ‘a 1O—11.00) pom 23.53 M. 31 32 M
- ‘ = = | 4g 6SS3930995 eos >

I EAVING half‘an hour later fot : in oie cele oe Pt AL iy LOCSSCSSET

Trinjdad on her way to the \nalysis, 7.15 p.m. Behind the News x
U.S. was Mrs. Helen Willie Leary 145 p.m, Sandy Mac?herson the LAWFORD - CHURCHILL \% E PIRE ROWA
Q ‘ i fheatre Organ, 8 p.m. Radio Newsree L
ae had 5 oer see - a 4.15 p.m, Report from Wimbledon, 8 ie
holiday in Barbados, staying with p.m. Interlude, 8.30 p.m. Minstrel Boy, xcenan WYNN To-day 4 45 & 8 30 and continuing To-day & To-morrow 430 & 8.15
Mrs. Hewitt Myring. if p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. Interlude, win

Mrs. Leary works in the New

York office of the Manila Times

















10.15 p.m, Just Fancy, 10.45 p.m. Yours
Faithfully








Daily 445 & 8 30
United Artist Presents - - -

Albert SHARPE







20th C-Fox Double
Robert TAYLOR, Brian DONLEVY

4,456
SCOPE FOEEESS



-
-
>
S
eins largest oy, papet in the Minti : CHARLIE CHAPLIN in “4
ilippines. She is also a repre- AN : ‘ . aa =
sentative of the Manila Broad- One Of Many wpe els, oR apalnan m7 $ «CITY LIGHTS’ BiLLy THE KID
casting Company. ‘ i “ She met Mrs. Hewitt Myting ARBADOS, although - may TOURING NORTHERN ENGLAN. an
during the war. They were both = have been ~ ao os ony _ BRITISH and AMERICAN Newsreels ee eet ‘ “~ MALAYA " x
with the British Information Ser- thelr at ‘tea fonaaee om LLL LPL LLLP LPP LPP PP LPPPL PPE en ee ~ SPECIAL mAsOCEE Saturday or. $
vice. 4 as p . : ; ; %
é Fi ” s * . ¢ %, ¥ 95 = my >
Double-Check ! puloay ip te Caritbege and He * TT 7 s OF 19 51 ee §=81R “CITY LIGHTS Spencer TRACY, John HODIAK NS
HILE Policemen on most of surroundings to be supplied with x -§ A RBUD: ° $ S so x : x
Y the main highways into one. | ar ss ° x ~ *
Bridgetown were checking car and MISS KAY AUSTIN speaking to her brother Victor who is in Bng- Trinidad, British Guiana, the) <} — ON! E13 ; OLYMPIC x
drivers’ licences yesterday, three land, over the Trans-Atlantic telephone, Bahamas and Venezuela have all % YY ROXY cae e in oe
children in Oistins were doing a Her brother who is a chiropractor in Manchester sends his best ive fie, with this type of 9 % ‘ oa ok sot crest ata ae
similar job. “Junior” the small- wishes on her recent engagement. . , et ¥, i ye To-day to Tuesday 145 & 8.15 y meter »
est of the three sat on his front Some of the other countries} * THURSDAY, JULY 2th 8.30 % % June Haver, William Lundisan >
= step, exercise book and pen- Engaged To Study Medicine png eee See aan — % $ sf Republic Picturés Presents - - - me %
cil in hand, his brother sat next ISS ANNIE SKEETE of Roe- 4 , 3 "1X R1y i S
i hi ata : - & ¢ Ne ee es 2 Hor Ong, Kenya, Cey) ; o1¢ a ; “ ” .
to him while their sister stood on A’ a family gather buck Street left Barbados for Marilyn anit bentthae Rhodesi * FEATURING +13 ROCK ISLAND Vil GET BY ¥
the edge of the road. As a car Thursday night, the Nev ‘or é t ; "hs > .,
4 , New York on Sunday to take up the Gold Coast, Tanganyika, Bur-| < 11g AND x
tes cee” see a = oY re ees - ¥ residence with relatives there. ma, Nyasaland, Abyssinia and 3 ’ TRAIL ” x
: br =Cwith_:=s=big- Austin, Secretary to the Ei Miss Skeete plans studying medi- < 1 others y ., “TWO FLAGS WEST” %
ger. brother checking, methodi- the Barbado Advocate, ind gine P several others, x : gehivine $
cally wrote y ° e 1ughte N and Mi e : ‘ } at ‘s
Paks “Ass eek er ters Co, eee gee Se To San Fernando |X BIB rece tuctor. ase atar serine S
doing the git] said ‘Mummy told stitution Road to Mr. Alwyn R. GEORGE CUMMING RS. A. G. ROCHEFORD of] ; Adrian Booth Bruce Gabot Joseph Cotton — Linda Darnell
us they were checking numbers Howell of the Audit Offic 1d » GE 7m C © son Black Rock was among the; \ , ,699$966665 re aa %
down the road, so we are doing oh ae Dr. Timothy Ho of * of oH ene Mrs, ‘ = ee passengers leaving me Trinidad | § ( SOSSESSE SESS FOSS OOOO IIE,
the same up here.’ castries, & ui und Mr . mins, 0 sothmare, an all, this afternoon to spend a month’s] ¥ ; 999399S$956956569065 303 565456 oie
* ‘ nese f Mart ndale who is studying medicine at the holiday in San Fernando staying % PPOOSOSSOSOS SOS OOS OOOO LOPE? %
With Shell Caribbean Hastings. University College of the West-with her friend, Miss Ifill. $ : : x
idies, Jamaics & $s ‘ }
RAR, and) MRS. THOMAS | By “a happy coincidence, nor Indien, Jamaica ts spending the “Talking Dolls”. |} : = BDOS = AGENCIES «LIMITED -
_ ANDERSON and son accom- wees ‘ee wee ts Scott parents, He arrived from Jamaica ROFESSOR MONTS, the Puer-| \ smi 4 8
Me Dunten Goh thie chases from, Manchester yesterday. and OM ‘Thursday afternoon by to Rican ventriloquist and | RESENTS 3
4 : ie ee etn Maeve him ‘he’ meee magician with his two “talking| % — PRESENTS -- 2
arrived from Trinidad yesterday wee ae Sere Meee: it * Five other Barbadian studentsydolls”, will be performing during | } x
morning en route f Vv la happy news pi %
g en route from Venezuela ; returned by the same ‘vlane, Mr. ance at t Aquatic Club to-|% : es
where both Mr. Anderson and the dance he Aq ‘ , , %
Mr. Dunean work with Sh 1 Car Wedding Vernon Smith, Miss Melenese| night. * %
ibbean Pete Company x ‘ ee rae a, Soar yh 9 x N
: , “sday e 2)lst Mr and , Keit s s r. |) —————— ——— ———______—_ | ¢ . ¢!
aay es i th xe OW nap ike. Verge of st. an Msg. B.D.” Ashby ofl SOR OSS WORD S (Every WEDNESDAY 8.30 P.M.) %
‘hey plan to spend three weeks , Ralph King, Verger of St. iW eiches Christ Church. They Xx x
+ at the’ ‘Paradise ‘Beach Pha 9 a Bone oF neti a have all completed their first year gS AT THE x
: Hill in Arts Mr. Clee Drakes, the % =
: = ’ student is doing Natural ~ %
M® Fn Fe VE an, The Bride who was given in Science. He has just finished his % $
° , marriage by her step-father wore second year. * g
who has been out of the a dress of brocaded silver georg Here Last Year x x
island for about one month came ette and her veil was held by a i ees 3 x « SHUAddALS TH 98L » ‘ : ‘ >
in yesterday by B-W.LA. from crown of orange blossoms. Hei M* ALEX BRATT, who was ‘ On WEDNESDAY JULY 1ith 8.30 p.m. %
Trinidad. Since he left Barbados bouquet was of Michaelmas in Barbados in April 1950 (Pye saan ta ile a : ' . ; x
he has visited the U.S. as well Daisies and Anthurium Lilies. flew in from Venezuela yesterday x GLOBE THEATRE presented by Madam Ifill, in aid of the WITH A FILM
as Trinidad, The Chief bridesmaid was Miss Morning via Trinidad by B.W.1.A, ‘ Christ Church Baby Welfare League Clinic.
Coming in by the same ‘plane Joan Phillips and the tnree other Alex is an accountant with the % Under the Patronage of the Hon. V. C. Gale & Mr. E. D. Mottley 66 se
was Mr. Gonzalo Senior a Car- bridesmaids were the Misses Smith Construction Co., in Car- et smAS 7
acas ecient who has flown over Lorna Browne, Jean Alleyne and “8s ee for ig ee & ORCH. BOX SEATS $1.00; HOUSE 72c.; BAL, 48c.
from enezucla on a four-day Velma Neblett. he is staving at the Hotel Royal. ‘ 5
holiday. He is staying at the Rev. F. C. Pemberton officiated He spent a week in Trinidad en y DANA ANDREWS & JANE WYATT

Aquatic Club.







3arlee.

assisted by Canon A H.







route.



Across





39 POSE OOOO: ie OOS SSF SOOO SS












































oe rs
leant bbc naaeattertilbie ee ~ -— — 1, Make pcrib coat tumbler-iike = (¥) PLAZ OISTIN G AIE | WY
7. Stop! te tones resemble the Dial 8404 Music For The Quizz b
THE ADVENTURES OF PIPA 19. Member “calica 's “'doyen.” (6) ||| TOBA TO sun: 5 4 sa at |] || THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES Maggie Goodridge and The Percy Gre
-—— 12. May be one or even a whole ||| Warner's Smashing Double : TO-DAY TO SUN. 8.20 p.m. Mat. - ggie Goodridge ani e Percy Green Orchestra
, regiment. (4) | “FLAMINGO ROAD” SUN. 5 P.M. a
me s 1g. Later may interest the angler. (3) | Joan CRAWF 5 Zachary SCOTT Screen Guild Acti Double ! ‘
4 14, Ties neatly into piace. (4) | JOnte cere a eae _— “DRAGNET (ancy WILCOXON) CONTESTANTS FOR THR QUIZZ TO BE SELECTED
15. Always represented at the Lord ||} miae “apenas FROM AUDIENCE
Mayor's banquet. (7) SAN ANTONIO cae
16. Here you may get a _ vroken | Color by Technicolor “BURNING CROSS"
im. (4) Errol FLYNN Hank Daniels, E otk 9s si . .
10, Where "you get proor or _ 16 | a READ TO-MORROW'S “ADVOCATE” FOR PARTICULARS
Across. (4) 1%, Scheme. (6) MIDNITE TONITE (By Request) MIDNITE TONITE R.K.O, Radio OF THE QUIZZ >
21, Would you look for a 24 Across Tim HOLT in (Both) i Tire HOLT in (Both) %
ta: BEoPy vib soe cna et SEES, hl “oyypaume tases «ii “sromst oven’ Wrommva” a $
St Bee a) Acrase, (hb , GUNS of HATE a WESTERN HERITAGE . x
_————————— ———-
Down > —= se x
Tr YOU SHOW CLASS & MOTORING SENS IN Y Ty &
1. One way to make Ted rave. (7) ‘ » E WHEN YOU BUY ‘
# eee, +h re Ludo tinted. (8) DIAL 2310 — PLA ZA -= BRIDGETOWN : %
Â¥ ae q . . % Y 7 7 Y %,
4 Doesn't tell us what Brato / ve oe : “s A CITRO NW A R. *
intended fur example. (8) TO-DAY 14 & 830 And Continuing Daily % ‘ } D ZL y/ io %
B Beta (0 « graven, sence, Hf olan — "WEL aw “The BREAKING POINT” ||| :
71. Var Dias Int. Amsterd. 8. Pound ta the ation ap re Seger jb NEAL in e , a te 6664 x
Seer e mice bhonaddboee 9. AS the yokel may describe what WARNER BROS. ROUSING ACTION - PACKED DRAMA! POLLS PSESES SEPP CPP PLL PPL
Annie witnessed. (7) (From the Story by Ernest Hemingway)
i} vent mary ot a rir sn nbed J 4 eee Kedeitiie ait aoe a sonst dtl lidar
: . r only part of the week-en SPECIAL TO-DAY 90am & 190 Pm it's That WAYNE Man
B HE WA ieee By Beachcomber it would be gloomy. (4) Big Action Double from Monogram Headed This Way in
“ 20. You do this down to blame. (4) “RETURN of the APEMAN” Bei His Biggest |
Y 1 | Y | | TL Base aetna "ae ion Pacific” AVE THE SURFACE AND SAVE
‘raded Sumjo7q uo ‘1o11tut with the neck wide open. The it means that by using my ape it 2, “@pruee: Of Cea are Pare cnerne: “WESTWARD BOUN Ken MAYNAF “Operation Pacific
B UT SpreMyoeq UsHTIM Oq [[IM ferret went into the sack, and Mr. chanism the ordinary man has as | 20. QOrdinaire; 12. Mile: 15 Reel; 14 Bob STEELE. ina SOON |
UWINTOI aTOYM 94} MOIIOWIOT, ‘dn Banton-Detmold ran forward and mueh chance of getting the gs | Rede: 19. Etch: 20. Irate. 21 Seat: 22 sinner hlioncoineinciarbiilsdihidtinaiiestitel aie : le
COM JUST 94} Bury, oy} urn} 07 St closed the neck. He then carried right as the trained scientist.” Gores. ewes Wiser k Poised, 6 —— $
C7essa90U ST yey} ITy ‘speey dJtoy} the ferret back to its shed. “It : Foroll: 8. Mane: 9. Yeomen: 11. Dtet
uo pueys you pesu AadyT, {410M all seems completely pointless,’ Mrs. Muthuish returns . 4
aL B Op 0} Slapwor AU OFeAn0d was the verdict of Mr. Arthur We are Fully Stocked with .. .
-ud 0} ‘uMOp optsdn sty, BSuyuud Owle. Sey tet as am arrow from its bow
&q uStedweo ey} Suruado jo ano > —nay, if anything, swifter—the ; HIGH CLASS PRODUCTS
-uoYy OY} aAeY | Aew ‘Aoyyne ayy Strabismus and the Lge rocket, with that homing instinct | ds 5
jyeour oF ABA-j[eY VwWOd YSN of hitherto confined to the lower ani- } To-ni Tat PAINTS — Interior and Exterior
Spear ay yeymM jo yno usuisofua R. STRABISMUS (Whom God mals, among whom I hope I may Gg DISTEMPERS
TINJ 2y} 42H 0} Jopso ut ‘yA0M 914311 Preserve) of Utrecht has per- include the humble eel—the rocket ENAME
B Op 04 pasedaid aq ysnui Japeed fected a very delicate instrument fell head-first into the great hole | Ls
ays “Way Jo} ASBd 004 apeul 9G. which will enable egg-observers to in the Waggling Parva sandpi' a * VARNISHES
ell at a moment's notice which Whence had set ou visit



0} SUTYJAIVAI D9 x9 sTaAOU Jo
Siapeai yey pres V

24 OLLINO
Filthistan Trio Not
Impressed

ASKED the Filthistan Trio

what they thought of the two
Americans who broke a record for
seesaw by seesawing for more than
72 hours. Ashura said, “This is
not hart no more nor hif we was
to be of boiling an hegg without a
stoppage for evermore.” Kazbu-
lah said: “Seesaw is not motter-
racing on around a track.” Riza-
mughan said: “Not ow long you
seesaw is not what is of counting,
but grasefull writhums now hup
now down like of dauncing and
phary. phlowting like lump of
thossel-down warftid hon the hair,
ho yes.” Ashura added: “By hour
hart we hare of hopping to paw
hoil hon trubbled hinteranasher-
naul watters.”

Ramsgate in Action

R. BANTON-DETMOLD yes-

terday gave a demonstration
of protting to representatives of
the Ministry of Bubbleblowing
The ferret Ramsgate was released
from a sack, and ran over a board
laid on the grass. This rang a
small bell attached to the board
by wire and hoisted a flag on a
miniature pole. The mopper
turned out to be a layer of wet
earth on which a sack was laid,



ay up an egg is. Asked of what
ypractical use this would be, the
Doctor jsaid that by sloping an es

from east to west between two tiny
joists it is possible to correct i

regularities of shape, but that this
had nothing to do with whether it



was the right way up or
Asked what he meant, the
said: “Shorn of technical language,
Se ,



Rupert ané



what his friend has said. *
to where your master lives?" he
asks, “*If the village is nearer |
think I ought to go and show this

to Constable Growler first. |
really don't know where | am."
For answer the dwarf takes hin

’ veritable
mechanic's
pa

triumph of th
art,” to quote é
The Doctor was on the
before you could say muttle-
hurst, with old-world cour
tesy he offered his arm to the tru
ant charwoman Mrs. Mutlhuis}
as calm as though she had just

y bus from King’s Knuckle-
Incredible, incredible,’

er-by
spot
pot

1
an

Simon—2Zeo

procore



“Look, there's
where my masrer hives, It's no dis-
tance at all through the wood. Do
come and show him the Jocket,"” he
coaxes, So they set off and meet
the Professor himeelt at the entrance
o his grounds. ‘* Well, well, what
brings my tle friend Rupert
here 2?’ smiles the old gentleman,

ip another slope



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SPECIAL MATINEE

THIS MORNING
at 9.30

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Charlie
CHAPLIN

ec fi ee meescaesiaaene oaths



in One of the Funniest
Comedies of Ali Time!

nGitY LIGHTS’

Written, Directed and Produced
by CHARLES CHAPLIN
Released thru United Artists

| SOCur erect e Ss

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SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951 BAERADOS ADVOCATI PAGE THREE
Co-op Talk Delayed

Leetureon Trade Unions

ee















BP. A. Enquiry -[ CARTGON

Watchmen, Caretaker wren

zyive kvi
i J ployed ?
Gi ve vidence Mr. Griffith: About 18
Mr, Mottley: How long afte:
you began to work there did

THE unfavourable weather on Wednesday night wa
erhaps responsible for the small attendance at the Barba
s Workers ‘Union Headquarters when Mrs. Gertrude

Williams, Reader in Social Economics at Bedford College

|
}
é
WHEN the Commission 4 Enguiry into the Princes. P a
- q to the Princess University of London, gave her lecture on “What A Trade 4 LUXUR si
}













































































Alice Pla‘ Fie ‘Sharadiary the ber ea ___. first set.of huts come? |
os ‘e oot 7 lursday, these iour witnesses Gave = Bar, Griffith: About two weeks, | | Union Can and Cannot Do.”
evidence oe ee the first | of Mrs Willi ms braved the weath- An senepherer is not any longer J oF ) iT ie) \ as
e’clock Miss Francis’ lorry? | Ss! . accom ~ end ym any on a | | | I | S
trucks : adie * j ~ € Z ompanied by lependent n any one inc ividuai y} ) ‘
Carpenter trucks. sist you..see. meying. the a Griffith: Yes. | ' \Ir A. Douglas-Smith and Mr. worker, The employer can get o
: Mr. Franeis: Duguig and Miss ,3 r. Mottley: The follow ing ey en ; Le Fanu. without the one worker but th: IMPERIAL LEATHER @ LINDEN BLOSSOM @ = BLUE HYACINTH
Adolphus Clarke, a carpenter Francis’. z aie two of Duguid’s came. About Mr. F. A. Walcott, Secretary of worker needs his wage to live |_
wo used to work "with Mr. c we whe oo a : the Union, introduced Mrs. Wil- The employer always has the bet-|
soni ee » called ’ > ri s ut 3 >
Worrell, w as then calle Meet : CGaretaker once: a cae va lian s. He apologised for the small ter of the bargaining. The worke | :
Attorney General: What was the " iltendance., is always more ready to come i
size of the building at Seaweill Lacusrd Weeds atismales kiddie ene ——" On the third Mr. J. M. Hewitt, who acted as terms and more ready than the ly
ic’ . : told 4 { f mest as a Cé - what came? ; . } . inm ret '
aa. told, you tO taker at Seawell in 1949 was call- Mr. Griffith: Francis’ lorry ; irman, delivered a lengthy ype arn iy iiffer nt if the ope
ake yn. ec c - 7. oe i tal ” the ec : 7 : re rer re or}
ea Wats) Yk wae a Sones he ed next be nhemat 7. Ginlonk: i alk® « th economic front which dig en: irely ¢ i € - i € oem | Dunlo illo is the most
f “y tnt. , Attorney Generah: Do you Mr. Mottley: On the h } is needed in the Barbados Workers’ €fs are joined together and speak- | P : §
Attorney General: What did you know how many huts Mr. Tudor you asked for, you 7 hen 2. Union. He spoke for many min- img with one voice Though the
do with it? bought from Seawell ? s coe % e gis ; utes on co-operatives before one employer can do without one e
M " - i on end the night work. j ; r e@
r. Clarke; I took it down an Mr. Forde: About five. Mr. Griffith: Yes li of the audience said: “I appreciate worker he cannot do without all
left it there 3 ; ; Attorney General: Did Mrs. Mr. Mottley: Seas ate , vameeres what you are saying but I came The main duty of the Trade Unior
Attorney General: After that Martineau buy any ? Pa a ae ts ~ 5 re here to hear Mrs. Gertrude Wil- is to join the workers together
Joe aia y ay P i ever seeing Murray omnions W ill ; The Trade U Pop ees &
where did you work : Mr, Forde: She took away two. Mr. Griffith: I do not rememb« A . s 1e Trade Union gives the work
Mr. Clarke: I worked about Attorney General: When the seeing Wurray ’ i ¥ Mr, Hewitt then had a heated #f more equal bargaining power
three months on the Reef? big building was cut up, how many Mr. ” Mottles Do yo eichnintsa i lebate ( in W ar. gument with Mr. Walcott after The Trade Union can so organise { a .
Attorney General; How many were they belonging to Mr. Tudor anybody calling you from dow! which Mr, Waleott asked him to itself as to keep a register wit fo rm o { cus h roning
carpenters did he have there? then ? ber sha baatee hat ecvatiiaarl ay For W hole Day be seated, To Mr. Walcott, Mz whatever vacancies there are
Mr. Clarke: I do not remember; Mr. Forde* Three. “Mr. Griffith: No J Hewitt said: “I have already Suit its members. It can also or
about ten, Attorney General: Do you know Mr. Mottley: Did you receive ( yondent raved your indulgence.” Mr, Wal samise itself to give its member i he W | j
Attorney General: Did you see whose lorries took them away? ‘any material during y cott replied: “There is a limit to Unemployment assistance in the oric¢
any other lumber arrive at the Mr. Ferde: Duguid, Miss Fran OOM ae en Pe July 4 indulgence.” She said that the Trade Unior
€ € v © ri y ’ ss = : ‘clock J Ut) * z 2 5 eevee Xs ~es . 1 *
Reef? eis and Murray. Mr. Griffith: About 1 o’cl ck. Par ‘ i. dip. Mr. Walcott, apologising to Mrs. Secretary must be a skilled indu
Mr. Clarke: Occasionally when Mr. Motiley: Who brought it t ‘ lee a Williams, said that if he hac trie) negotiator and a good judge It is the original latex foam cushioning, contaummg 1
. : cea One Ww Bs if : 1 . it uw se W\ s« " . o ¢ Ale . . a - — > > Ty : .
Mr. Worrell gave an order Attorney General. Do you know ote I think it was Miss | West I: thought Mr. Hewitt’s conduct wa ake can a eee of 5 ane tiny inter-connected cells through which air circuli
AE. Be : J ieee whose lorries t = ee s rry. I tt ‘onserva~ to be whé t ha } " j nion witheut having anythin, » . * ae atoesder pinata
pttorney General: The sides of; and joists ~ pre oe Mr. Mottley: Do you remember ia Gover not h ge Be teat hon oy bo moe to do with the political side of it result is that the mattress is completely hygienic ~~ i\
the building—were they new fir. See Badin Rach loitry tick Meee Murray’s lorry during thé “dis ie Sth th ; ine: tt dens’ ces a a. Political activities must be kept makes nor harbours dust and is resistant to moths and
Y Z c . san ean . : y ia it Lo discuss t 2. as # vy sad re- . " : .
Mr. Clarke: Some was from ine, day? sen » ‘ i British terri- flection on Mrs. Williams” he distinct from Trade Union actiy Not only is Dunlopillo hygienic;
Seawell and some was new Mr. Walcott: Mrs. Martineau M®- Griffith: No. 1 1 the Carovean : vil id 4 . ties and funds. No worker must throughout its long life it remains
Mr. Walcott: Did you have to ¢.iq she took away three huts. D. Mr. Mottley: Do you remembe! I ie ifternoo! VI Wil be compelled to subscribe to an) |
build many new windows? wats still cat Fy 4 k . ae ° if any truck brought material on]in the H 4 they have iss WENO, BYER ADA FOBAce rolitical rty The t k supremely comfortable and cannoteag
3 vou s say s oO away , . art gr I nt mou t y I to tart . nev > . ‘ ve Nitics ret 1@ main work o ;
Mr. Clarke: Yes. One whole 4, you really not "Nab a wo or | Saturday morning? a Ri as : aes, explained . Trade Senicn i tn aeaeiad sey , or gather into uncomfortable mounds;
side of the pavilion consists of Mr. Forde: I d ot k : Mr. Griilith: No. VY rmitted it will op, UO AEE ae problems of tiat the mai ' wh even in tropical climates it stays cool £
ioe Mr. Forde: do not know. Nv J : Ti . : Will Trade Union. She said she would ation; the main job for which | a da
wiews, : = Mr. Walcott: Were you there Mr. E. K. Walcott: Do you say |; day on the West bogin her talk by saying what the ©XiSts is to protect its members Chere are no springs or hard edges A
Mr. Walcott: Was all the wood when Mr. Murray took away some *O" Sot three from Francis and | +" irhament. Trade Union stood for and the She said to wear out the covering material
which came from Seawell worked material ? two from Duguid? Duguid said he te nt it mm pla ta tf : jern Replying to questions, Mrs. Wil. |
into the building ? Mr. Forde: Mr. Murray took he carried three unde rstood ill pursue the line y sey ave Be ay ‘ - ee ren — tome wae wean aa” Mac | -
Mr. Clarke: As far as I remem- away some of the big hut as well Mf. Griffith: That is so, in ane D ritish West os She ona Seat a ae Trade Union can be victimized fo. |
ber. ; 7 , as the small. p Mr. E. K, Walcott: Did Mr. Cox} fies to unit idderatiens So which the Trade Union movement *Yâ„¢Mpathising with another pol
The « Seen eeloe ee? When you Mr, Walcott: Did you see where ©¥e! come down there any time han: Covers ie expired wider spread and. more devel-. itic 1 part There is uo relatior
thes RG ae th : fl Sid ras the material came from which } eo Griffith: Yes, he came quick-] peliectar to do this, despite fre- oped than in any other community. ‘DiP_, between co-operatives ani | f
other huts wu are esides 1 2 4 . “| , after ss F “js? ro. . . _— : — ' on
on ¥ a 7 ms ve af Ps “i went on_ his lorry ? y ‘ after Miss Francis’ lorry. uct eC tic 1d sug- In England the economic struc- ‘¢ Trade Union. They aim at tw The REW WOU Cony oe
‘ae eke TN ACR ee ti Mr. Forde: I cannot directly MF. argue Did he return 1 vidual M.P’s ture that led to Trade Unions is “ferent things, The Trade Unioi |
'° arke : did no notice say agai when Mis Francis’ lorry i is that if West ; : “@ s t |
avi re ay. ; 2 f ew is th f st older than in any other place. The ‘cerns itself with what the ma
coy ere. 4 3 Mr. Walcott: Did you see Mr. Came? al to make Trade Union way ison pectinne gets for his work and in makit in mattresses and pane ning
The Commissioner: When this Cox up there ? Mr. Griffith: Yes ‘ i their wor+ jn England for about 150 years. Pargains with the employer, Th
one hut was ae the Reef, Mr. Forde: I never s*w him Mr. Walcott: Did he come f peak ho " ‘ ; rae rr co-operative concern tseif wit MADE IN ENGLAND BY DUNLOP CRAFTSMEN
were any more there? there in connection with the huts. Duguid’s lorry came? ! ‘ ’ E , } ; q
. : was Ss. ‘= zed I employ er Independent how the man spends hi wag
e 4 he: a ot see any a is: . - ar 7 . « t fe ition . ? ; , : £
Mr. Clarke: I did not se “The Commissioner: Mrs. Mar- Mr. Griffith: No. @he said that the Trade Union when he. gets it. J have neve. | ECKSTEIN BROS — Bay Street — Distributors
more tineau said she bought three, what sae Walcott: Do you now Over-populati inisation is the organ through 'eard of a Trade Union organisin
5 soy 2 ” o t} ee 1 ‘ ' ‘ ag > ® ’ 7 , : ; - — — - -
The Commissioner : How much wag Sy Ban. ee at a ne pee hans via Frar Cc serv 'e D4 to di ch the worker can bargain fur COrOperative nae , oe
of the pavilion was new wood? sat orde : daresay she was Ga but wi een nich was not check °F es baa eee Sec ee ee " his rights. It is not only in the Before the function elosed Mrs
“Se 1 oe rig € ch you are sure neither | ProPte! ‘ UPD= moder! vo . » has Williams went on to expl %
Mr. Clark . I =e not know. Sydney Walcott who was em- Murray nor Duguid brought uncas i r ! Antigua ie ain rid that people rs : ¥ oe Peele prem
The Commissioner : You say the : es 7 Mr. Grii : brougt They will seel ; hat law Worked. for others. As long as + bout co-operatives for those wh«
window to the huts were card Ployed on the Reef Grounds as Mr. Griiith: Yes a reece Lesa ey records show people have been Were interested
board, what about the frame ? watchman in October 1949 was i heckand re upnelg Barowgnes working for others for wage
, ‘ vallec 0 , 7 > é or Le * the terr as
Mr. Clarke : The frame was opand temive evidence after Leon pieiieiee te ta Hiss homed tliné cians
used in various places Att en .. “ will be time to nto the question b. 195
; : A rney General: Did you re- ; ‘
Attorney General: Who was e : : * | of West Indic econor elation ° r ANA
pa ee Fe ceive ries W hut Sea- “Cc » : - ‘ ; > son
Mr. Worrell’s foreman an ies with huts from Sea \ ACC idents | ith Can his is a problem No Action Is I aken me onepnee 60 1/10% 4
Mr. Clarke: Mr. Allan Greaves : hiel nder discussion Mei :
. : I Ss. £ ‘eceiv ries Demand
of Turner Hall, St. Lucy. me, Walcott T received 1OrS ies line ‘rease By 42 2 ! ¢ t continuing whenever a new major road is Draft 69.95% pr
with flooring on two different oc-~ in Ott I he wie of cer ted Pol C tabl : Sight Drafts 59 8/10°% pr
i easions from Francis. I was night Forty-two m , tain WET a ; z created @ lice onstapble 1° Gv, pr Cable
Watchman watchman : oceurred rm Penge a er : eer A LAP snd sua yl medy placed on point duty to direct g0 5/10% pr, Currenc py
. sla - or uK Ve Indie lie n recon- . 5 ‘ > » ne » of 0 )
‘ Attorney General: Whose else ing January to May this | | versior e pound ; affic, He might take the name ot ae en: .
es Renan 7 map lorries brought ? year than occurred over the | The it pport too for the feign’ a oe Me the —
watchman at Seawe rom 22, Mr. S. Wa : or a ? ati a : ad Meee ‘ : } ; ie cad studs No action is taken iy
then gave evidence. I know ere}. So cere es yarn ewe ae yeee. rae * ’ ye oe oo 5 FEBI- «vainst the person STOMACH oy eB a a
: E : . ary May s yea reformed pot ‘ sant
Attorney General: Were you Attorney General : Who was the 521 accidents took place. | if t " > iccessful in rhe $ C ommissioner of Polic | PN ee ir a eg
there rate bi ern auc- other watchman ? Most of the accidents | |t! is debate, it is be- os rhe eee ae oa Oe a)
tioneer sold the huts * s 7 ° © if. asd eal en the oe sa : } Mir. I 1 Samma if the person should commit 2! : .
aye. Francia * ne HF ene S. Walcott: Randolph Grif a an ee on Satur- | | Mr, aD ( ar . n ve Tense paeain he would not be! Alka-Seltzer is so easy to en’,
fe = ty . ays and the time during | opt _ tne position and iN eee a » ing P
Attorney General: Do you know Attorney General: Did you see the day is 5 and 6 p.m. | | Li a =o ble to say, “I did not know. | ze e nee Le can te soe
what Mr. Tudor bought Murray and Duguid’s lorry during One hundred and four hi Vea EF ne :
rs c i ae sae 5 : watch it fizz, then drink it, Not @
Mr. France I do not know ? .
. your time ? accidents occurred on Satur- | i i e uxury ° it
what he bought Mr. 8S, Walcott: No days during that period and | laxative, not habit-forming, you can .
Attorney Generai: Do you re- The last witness who gave evi- 89 on Wednesdays. The least | take it any time vet ane Seltzer 4
member telling the police that Mr. dence on Thursday was Randolph cecurred on Sundays, 45. relieve your acid indigestion. The economy of it..
er lee three huts? Griffith Between 5 and 6 p.m. 5 Have a supply handy. ex bh
r, Francis: x¢ Attorney General: What: time accidents took place and b * : 7
were you watchman ? tween 9 and 10 m, 42. The long-wearing beauty of it ee















eieraey a ener mB i Piss A y Mr. Griffith: During the day. The highest number o
member how jong atter they Attorney General: Were you accidents for one mont
‘ 4 } ) é nts fo NE non . > :
Oe es oa re - down detailed by Mr. Tudor to receive was in April when there | ee ahs cnt Wusth duet aioe
i eee Ce ate oe flooring were 115, : p 4
Attorney General: Was every- jr, Griffith: Yes. The first set | ori the suds. Rejoice in its long-lasting beauty.
thing moved : _ came about 5 p.m eoeerree oul find this exquisite Lingerie in ‘Celanese Crepe-de-
a y-aottg Yes. 1 donot know aitterney General: Did it have Chine. ‘Celanese’ Satin and ‘Celanese Celshung’.
where they went Duguid ? 3 i
Attorney General; Do you know & Another Big ; :
whose lorry took away the sleep- Mr. Griffith: Yes. It had 70 * es i Every lovely thing about it says.
ers? boards. / apts
Mr. Francis: I think it was Mr Attorney General: After these B.G. W ale rfal Dae AN Tee
Duguid’s lorry huts started coming, did you stay GEORGETOWN, B.¢ ; 1e aid om
Attorney General: Are you tell- on any nights? British Guiana has four of the f purity, and color
ing the Commissioner that all the Mr. Griffith: Three nights. world’s greatest waterfalls, witl . %
flooring was taken by Duguid ? Attorney General: Did you see the discovery, reported by a geo of our Diamonds,
Mr. Francis: What was taken Mr. Murray’s lorry come? logical expedition, of a great fall
during the night, but IT understand Mr. Griffith: No high up in a tributary of the Cu; X pivs ovr reputa-
some was tak during the day Attorney General: During the uni River ts ‘ Te of Hd
The Commissioner : Which time the pavilion was being built, —R.U.P s n. fo giving

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOGAT E

Ose eee fee)

Printed by the Advocate \o. 114., Broad St. Bridgetow.







Saturday, July 7, 1951

PARTIES

THE political parties in this island are
girding their loins for the general elections
later in the year. The present Legislative
Session began in December, 1948 and was
to have ended in 1950 but by an Act of
Legislation was extended for one year. The
end is nearly five months off and the parties
are courting the electorate at public meet-
ings. The lining up however is not definite
and the names of additional candidates: to
the ranks are merely known by rumour.
There has been no official declaration. The
Barbados Labour Party, the Government
party has never had a majority ever all
other parties in the House but has been
able to carry out its programme with the
assistance of opposition parties. The Labour
Party has been relying on attracting young
candidates to its ranks. The suspension of
one member, Mr. Allder, brought about the
unexpected withdrawals of Mr. Pilgrim
and Mr. Cumberbatch. Public criticism of
the Government by another young candi-
date, Mr. T. W. Miller, over the handling
of the compensation to flood victims
caused another unhappy division and party
loss. The only certainty is Mrs, Foster the
lady candidate for St. Andrew. It seems
now that other circumstances are likely to
cause further loss.





These defections in the ranks are occur-
ring at a time when the Party Leader, Mr,
G. H. Adams, is out of the island. It may
be that his dominating personality will be
all that is needed to bring a closing of the
ranks such as the genial Dr. Cummins has
not been able to achieve, The task is not
so easy, however, as there are rumours of
personal squabbles among party members
and the electorate who put them in power
in 1948 are voicing criticisms of the policies
and the lack of achievement of the Labour
Party. The Barbados Electors’ Association,
the Opposition Party, has not yet declared
its full list of candidates although public
meetings have been held in several par-
ishes campaigning for the old members of
the Party. This has been a welcome change
from the old method of (holding a few
meetings immediately before election time.

The party has not been without its trials.
Several members were ill for short periods
and propaganda by other parties brought
a few members into disfavour. But during
the session such work as was achieved by
the Government party was largely due to
the help of the Opposition. Now even with
the Party Leader, Mr, Wilkinson, out of
the island for health reasons, the Opposi-
tion holds the majority of seats over the
Government who will be without Mr.
Mapp and Mr. Adams for some weeks to
come.

The Electors’ Association, the Opposition
Party, now have nine votes as against the
Government with seven and the members
of the moribund Congress Party floating
somewhere in the constellation and one
independent, Mr. Alider. Mr. Garner has
been flirting with the Labour Party for
sometime but oceasionally records an inde-
pendent vote. Mr. Crawford and Mr.
Branker maintain their old association but
their efforts are regarded as individual
performances. Even the personality of that
outstanding West Indian, Mr, Bustamante,
the Jamaican Prime Minister, failed to re-
vive any public enthusiasm for the Con-
gress Party or any interest in its lack of
achievement.

In spite of the introduction of the Party
system in 1946, politics in Barbados is still
largely individual and there are signs now
that there will be many changes in the
personnel of the House despite party
allegiance.





A merica m Column :

In one American State convicts
living in outdoor camps have made a
contribution to society by building
better recreational facilities while
rehabilitating themselves,

(By HAROLD TITUS)

An experiment in using prison
labour for conservation work in
state parks and lake resorts in the
northern Great Lakes of Michigan
is being studied by penologists in
the United States as well as in
other lands.

Not only does this programme
set a precedent {or the number of
persons involved under lenient
custody, but it is also something
new because, for the first time, the
charges of a penal system are help-
ing to solve the problems of a
state conservation agency.

The first camp was opened in
1947. Another was functioning in
1948, and four more were added
in 1949. Each camp has 60 work-
ers. As a _ rehabilitation device
penologists are watching the ex-
periment critically but with
mounting enthusiasm. i...
being observed by public foresters,
park administrators, and fish and
game managers, because if the
promises it extends to date are
fulfilled, it means the return of
a large amount of labour such as
American conservation agencies
had available prior to World Wat
II. Most of these bureaus, both
state and federal, have been is
need of additional help since 1940.

The proposal to use prison in-
mates for the development of
Michigan Conservation projects
dates back to the 1930’s when
veteran Circuit Judge Parm C.
Gilbert, since retired, began agi-
tating for an experiment. “We
have a demonstration of the
social results of a conservation
corps right before us,” the judge
used to say. “All judges recognize
the value of Boy Scout and Four-
H training in citizenship. The
out-of-doors is a great healer of
ailing impulses, and I dislike
sending young men behind bars
when, in a State like ours, so much
work waits in our forests, parks,
and public hunting and fishing
grounds, Let these men pay their
penalty by working with their
hands — close to nature at her
best — and we will gain twice.
Character will be restored in the
offenders and more character will
be built in the public by the ad-
ditional facilities for healthy re-
laxation which are created.”



Everyone in the state capitol
agreed that the suggestion had
merit. But to try it out would
necessitate new interdepartmen-
tal arrangements, and then came
World War II and nothing was
done. Still, the idea stayed alive
to be picked up for further ex-
amination when the State began

its post-war consideration of
peacetime needs.
In Michigan the Conservation

Department is of unusual impor-
tance. It is responsible for aie
parks — 60 of them, ranging in

size from 20 to 45,000 acres, and
for state forests — 4,250,000 acres

of them, all of which, besides
yielding considerable values in
harvested forest products, are

open to hunting, fishing, and other
recreational uses, It is charged,
also, with the maintenance of
stocks of fish and game, The
State sold nearly 1,000,000 fishing
licenses in 1949 and more than
1,000,000 hunting licenses,

For years the Conservation De-
partment in Michigan has not been
able to keep up with the demand
for the services it gives, especially
in the public parks, In 1945 the
Michigan Legislature sought to
solve this problem by appropriat-
ing more than $4,500,000 for the
acquisition of additional sites,
among them an aggregate of
60,000 acres in five units. All the
land was within a 40-mile radius
of the industrial city of Detroit,
where lack of outdoor recreation-
al opportunities has been a major
civic problem, However, when
the Conservation Department
asked for funds to develop this
land and expand older parks, the
legislature appropriated only a
fraction of the amount requested.

Then P. J. Hoffmaster, Director
of Conservation, revived Judge
Gilbert's idea and began negotia-
tions with the Department of
Correction, which agreed to co-
operate by selecting prisoners to
work in the parks. The first group
soon set the pattern of work which
sueceeding groups followed,

Most visitors who saw that first
| crew at work never realized they
were prisoners. A work foreman,

| seldom with more than 10 men in

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Prison Labour Can

Be Helpful





“We might constitute ourselves as a Good Ogises
ae, Peace for Persia as well...”

his group, directed them. Few
who passed the remodeled farm-
house where the men were housed
suspected it sheltered anything’
other than another force of labour-
ers on some nearby job. There
were no walls, no wire fences; just
a few inconspicuous signs marked
“Yard Limits.”

And the prisoners themselves,
realizing that an idea which might
he priceless to them was on trial,
did their best to make it accept-
able. And they turned qut the
work! New drives were graded,
culverts built, hiking trails cleared,
picnic areas created, trees planted
for erosion control and for land-
seaping effects, and garages and
tool houses erected. Plants to
furnish food and shelter for wild
life were introduced.

Public apathy has changed to
warm approval of the programme
in less than four years, says J. N.

Frisbie, warden of the state
prison which furnishes all the
labour, When openings for work-
ers in the conservation camps

are announced, nearly all the in-
mates in the Michigan institutions
deluge the prison administration
with requests for consideration.
Three members of the staff are as
signed to screen possible workers.
In general, only those inmates
who have served half of their
sentences are selected, and tne
age range is from 25 to 45, with
some exceptions. Most of the
men in the camps have less than
a year more to serve on their
sentences.

The acceptance of tihe conser-
vation work programme by in-
mates of Michigan’s penal insti-
tutions was enthusiastic. . The
camp plan was something | new
and privileges were comparative-
ly abundant. Besides, the men
had a feeling that they were mak-
ing a genuine contribution, pro-
viding facilities which might be
enjoyed by their friends and
families and which they them-
selves might someday use.

The men work 40 to 50 hours
a week, with occasional chores
on Saturday. In a group of 60—
the standard size—10 are assign-
ed to kitchen and other camp dy-
ties. On Saturday forenoon all
hands join in to clean the camp.
Each bed has headphones con-
nected to a master radio for eve-
ning relaxation, All camps have
libraries and those within motor
ing distance of the big prison see
a motion picture once a week.
No dormitory door has a_ lock.
At first, work supervision was in
charge of guards. Now, park
rangers and other Conservation
Department employees have tak-
en aharge,

In three years, only five pris~
oners have walked away from
the camps. Two returned volun-
tarily, two were apprehended,
and one is still at large.

After giving proof of wanting
to abide by rules, a man's work
pattern is most important. If a
man does his best and keeps do-
ing it to the extent of his phy-



sical and mental ability, he
stays; if he shirks, back to the
prison he goes, Thus far, only

eight men have been withdrawn
from camps for not doing their
share of the work.

One 27-year-old prisoner, in
for manslaughter, had been in-
side the prison walls for three

» 2,045,000 WordsIn MacArthur. Case

London Express Service

years and’in a camp for nine
months. “Back at the prison
you do everything one way. It
is discouraging” he says earnest-
ly. “Out here work
every few days, but better than
that, every so often you will see
a new way to doit, You talk it
over with the boss tig ordinarily
he will let you try tell you,
when you see your res idea
tried out, it makes you feel you
are important.

Another, in for burglary and
due before the parole board
shortly, was enthusiastic about
camp life because of its prepara-
tion for a return to freedom.

“If a fellow made a mistake
and is paying for it and has made
up his mind never to let it hap-
pen again, a job like this is a
godsend, Under this kind of cus~-
tody you can try yourself out.”

One of the interesting side-
lights as the plan has been ac-
cepted has been the atitude of
prison guards. They are realists,
and many admit that they had
misgivings when the camp pro-
gramme was announced. “I have
been a guard for 23 years,” said
Sergeant John Hampton. “I was
there when silence among pris-
oners was almost a fixed rule.
In my time I have seen a lot done
in reforming men and a lot tried,
but when I heard about this
camp idea I did not give it a
chance of working out. But I
now believe that it is the great-
est thing ever tried. The state
is getting a lot of work done and
as a rehabilitation plan it is go-
ing to pay dividends you cannot
imagine.”

As yet, the rehabilitation factor
eannot be accurately measured.
A special study is being made of
men who have been paroled from
the camps, but it is not yet time
for drawing conclusions. How-
ever, it is established that Michi-
gan is getting big returns for the
money invested, although per
capita maintenance cost in camp
is higher than it is behind walls.

Group camping for Boy Scouts
and similar organizations is a
major activity im Michigan’s
state parks. Prisoners have pre-
pared cabins for winter use so
they will be habitable the year
around and more youths may
have a chance to learn to live
together in peace, health, and
productive activity.

“T think,” said one prisoner, as
he picked up his saw, “I should
get to work. We want to get this
place ready for the boys.” He
paused, “You know, if more of
them had places like this to go to,

there would not be so many of
us.”

There is the possibility that
some similar plan may be con-
sidered for American national
forests and parks and wild-life

refugees.

In many of the other 47 States
serious thought is being given io
similar plans. It is argued that
any plan which can make a more
beautiful land, make better citi-
zens, and at the same time save
money, is worth trying anywhere.
(Crime & Criminals).

This article appeared in Collier's

a widely circulated weekly magazine

published in the United States. The

writer was for 20 years a member of

the Michigan Conservation Commis-
sion, serving as chairman at the be-
ginning of the experiment he des-

cribes.

changes



1





}

|



|



NOBODY’S
DIARY |

around, There used to be a local proverb
which said “rain makes the young plants
grow” but nobody wants to grow. Every
time it rains the streets are deserted and}?
people cluster under shop-fronts.

But the "buses run. An enormous tar-
paulin is held up by a conductor and
when everybody has piled in down it
flaps and you’re shut in. s high time
"buses were designed differently.

Tuesday — The ‘bus position needs study.
Are there enough "buses to cope with the
8.30 to 9 a.m. travellers? The impression
is that they are nothing like enough.
Then the ’bus stops need revision. Many
of them are so arranged that they create
traffic blocks when one is coming up and
down, and they both pull up at ‘bus stops.
This happens often around corners and
near “Major Road ahead” signs. There
are far too many ’bus stops altogether.

Wednesday — Who is the wit who wrote
under the appeal “don’t throw your cig-
arettes into the lavatory basin.” “This
makes them soggy and hard to light ?”

Thursday — Down in Trinidad and in British
Guiana those who like good films have
formed a film society. The society rents
good films like “Vivere in Pace”, “Paisa”
and Citta Aperta”. Now that “City
Lights” has come to Barbados there is a
hope that the super-duper most breath-
taking, most spectacular, most lavish,
most ‘everything typical Hollywood
shockers will be crowded out a bit more.
In that case there might be no need for
a film society here. But if local cinemas
are not prepared to show an occasional
first rate film from Italy, France, Ger-
many or anywhere else where good films
are made, in addition to the rather rare
good ones from the Hollywood stable or
the British studios then let us start our
own film society.

friday — Talking of film societies, there
seems to be a hole in the pocket theatre. |
I wonder whether “Pygmalion” didn’t
kill it. Pygmalion was so good, so am-
bitious that maybe it has frightened the
pants off potential amateurs, The theatre
might have been no bigger than a pocket
but the talent was too much. Where has
the talent gone ? Now if they had taken
my advice (free) they would have begun
with one-act plays. Almost anybody can
put on a one-act play. I would have
expected to see one a month at the
Pocket Theatre.

Instead Pygmalion has frightened the
wits out of any little company and no-
body wants to risk being laughed at. If
there had been less: formality with Pyg-
malion, dinner jackets and black ties, the
average player might have been encour-
aged a bit more. If pocket theatres are
to flourish they need threadbare pants.

Saturday — What is a University? How about
this as a definition? “A University is a
cultural event: it is an institution in a
context: and it cannot be much better
than the culture in which it is set.” It
is Harman Grisewood’s.

And here as it’s Saturday, and I’m ina
quoting mood is what Wenceslas Ivanov,
a Russian, wrote to Pellegrini in 1934.
“My confidence in man is based precisely
on that faith which you consider the an-
tithesis of freedom: the faith which
places a free creature at the centre of
creation, condemns and saves him, finds
him fallen and raises him to heaven; the
faith which sees itself reflected in the
pure crystal of its teaching and is aston-
ished by the abysm of light contained in
itself; the Christian faith, which alone
teaches me what man is, and, by reveal-
ing his weakness and his value, purifies
and justifies my natural humanism, in
all that concerns the dignity of man.”



Stones Are Piling Up

By FREDERICK ELLIS
TWO of the world’s richest men,

“Our contract with the Diamond
Corporation terminates on Decem-

NEW YORK.
Remember ail the uproar over
General MacArthur? Remember
the Senate committee hearings on
his sacking began with all that
ianfare? sind

Well, the hearings have ended,
‘They lasted 42 days, during whicn
2,045,000 words were spilled into
the record by 13 witnesses,

Now the 26 Senators, belonging
to the Armed Services and the
Foreign Relations ‘Committees,
have got to start writing,

And they are ‘not going to
satisfy themselves with one re-
port. They propose to write three.

The first report will say Tru-
man was right in sacking Mac-
Arthur, It will come from the
President's orthodox © Democrat
supporters,

The second report will say the
President was wrong. This one
will be written by the Republi-
cans, the opposition party,



And the third will be ham-
mered out by liberal Republicans
and rebel Democrats. It will say
that Truman was partly wrong
ind partly right, :

E IS bad news for Britain
f another of Senators—tha



Committee on Export Controls,

It announced tonight that it is take action when friends told her

very displeased with the situation
revealed by an investigation into
ships flying the Panama flag and
dealing with Red China,

The committee says that between
February 1 and May 31, 37 cargo
ships flying the Panama flag visited
Red Chinese ports. And of these
24 were owned or operated by
companies “with head offices in
the United Kingdom or in British
territory.”

Of the rest, eight were Chiang
Kai-shek ships and five Greek.
Nearly all were U.S. wartime
Liberty ships, sold as surplus.

THERE WERE appreciative
whistles in a New York court-
room as Mae West, resplendent
in green, white, and gold, satn-
tered in. She was suing Sura
Allen, an actress, whom she ac-
cuses of impersonating her

Miss Allen’s counsel asked Miss

West how old she was when she
first appeared on the stage
Answer: “Five”
Question Was that about 35
years ago’
Miss West’s counsel, interrupt-
ng Don’t snswer.’
Miss. West said.ghe Jecided to

that Miss Allen’s night club im-
personations “ were cheapening
the character of her show, “Dia-
mond Lil.”

P.S.—A _ film
Miss West's age as

NEW YORKERS,
to many criticisms
people but generally
dynamic and restless, are annoyed
at the, strictures passed by Mrs.
Clarence Robinson, on paying “her
first visit to the city,

Sniffed Mrs. R: “People have
too much time to do nothing in
this place, How they hang around
and waste time!”

Mrs. R. is
Pennsylvania.

CARDBOARD CUPS and picnic

directory gives
58.

accustomed
from many
regarded as

from Hopbottom

containers are big business and
getting bigger all the time.

One firm has produced an aver-
age of 27,000,000 cups and con-

tainers a day this year
up new plants

It is rushing

THE GRAT

along

BOOM is
America’s
the

spreading
highways
and

out
di beache

reception ‘clerk



a tremendous holidays-at - home
splurge developed.

“A sensational season — and it
has begun a month early,” said
one travel agency man,

Other reasons for the joy: more
firms than ever are granting long
holidays with pay; with world
political uncertainty people like
“to stay in their own backyard.”
The one dark spot aiid the glitter
—luxury cottages are not being
rented as quickly as their owners
would like. They are only 1,800
dollars (£643) for the season.

CHARLES WILSON, America’s
defence mobilisation boss, warned
America’s business men to-day:

“If you are. tempted to join
voice with those who will clamour
for relaxation of effort in building
up our might if fighting ends in
Korea, just think of all the other
places where there is trouble and
which could set the world aflame.”

He gave as examples Indo-
China, Malaya and Persia

UNITED AIR LINES telegraphed



President Truman tonight a con-
jitional agreement to restore its
service cross America at mid-
ight. Fo ht days its pilots have
) ore-pay strike. Pan
an and other lines are.not

A

44-year-old Canadian
Dr. John T. Williamson
South Africa’s 71-year-old “Rand-
lord” Sir Ernest Oppenheimer,
have fallen out—over diamonds,

Mr. William Tayleur, spokes-
man for Dr. Williamson, who owns
a fabulously rich diamond mine
at Mwadui, four degrees below
the Equator in Tanganyika, said
in London last night: “There is
friction between ourselves and
the Diamond Corporation.’

The Corporation is the selling
end of Sir Ernest’s powerful De
Beevs diamond group, which pro-
duces most of the world’s dia-
monds.

Under a contract Williamson
agreed to sell all his stones to
the Corporation, which has
almost a monopoly over the sale
of diamonds, By regulating the
market it keeps diamonds rare
and dear.

War between the rival diamond
kings may cost millions if the
stones are thrown on to the market.

‘Over Prices’
‘Since last June the William-

son mine has delivered no
diamonds to the Corporation for

ule”, said Mr. Tayleur. “There
is a parce! of stones worth
ondon

£500, o00 deposi ted

in a L



ik,

white ¢



bachelor ber 31. I cannot say if it will ‘be
and renewed”.
Another spokesman of

Dr.
Williamson said: “The friction is
over prices”.

Until Williamson found his mine
in 1940 Sir Ernest had undisputed
domination over world diamonds.
After trying to buy out Williamson,
Sir Ernest came to terms. He gave
Williamson a 10 per cent. cut of
the market. That was worth
£4,000,000 last year. ,

Talks between the legal repre-
sentatives of both sides are being
held at the Colonial Office, who
come in on it because diamonds are
a big revenue producer for
Tanganyika

‘Eulldozed’ Out
Millions of pounds are involved %
in the dispute, The Diamond] *
Corporatiion alone has £11,800,000 | *
in the bank, and make a profit of
£5,483,000 last year.

“







SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951



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@ From Page
Mr. Greaves: The
building and the uprighi

Mr. Mottley: What a}
flooring? —

Mr. Greaves: We ussd the -ol
flooring from the hut



to put new boards as
old stuff was bad.
Mr. Mottley: Did vou leave bs
fore the building was painted?
Mr. Greaves: Yes
Mr. Moitley: Did you splice any
of the wood for use in the build-
ing? J
Mr. Greaves: No. The posts from
the huts were too smal! and they
had to get new ones,
Mr. Mottley: Were any
built?
Mr.
Mr.
terial

bench

Greaves: Yes.
Mottley: What sori of ma-
was used?

Mr. Greaves: New woo

Mr. Mottley: What bec:
the posts that were two

Mr. Gre.ves: They w
to make caps.

Mr. Mottley: While
out by the Police Station did you
see any trail by wood ¢
the labourers had removed

$2.40 A Day

Mr. Greaves:, I don’t remen
seeing any, but I know Mr.
rell bought atlas to avoid the
ants eating the wood.

The Commissioner:
getting $2.40 a day at the
Field?

Mr. Greaves: I thi
that.

The Commissioner: Was a man
by the name of Headley employed
there as a carpenter

Mr. Greaves: Yes.

The Com oner:
penters get $2.16 a day?

Mr. Greaves: I rea!ly
say because Mr. Worrell
ing those men.

The Commissioner:
pay you?

Mr. Greaves:

The Commissioner:
penters, there were
ployed there?

Mr. Greaves: Yes.

The Commissioner: You vic
that there were about 5) to 60
carpenters employed there?

Mr. Greaves: ‘That numbe1
cluded masons as well

The Commissioner: What
rial did you put on the roof of
building?

Mr. Greaves: Genesco.

The Commissioner: Was
any galvanise on the roof?



me
hort’
re used

he stuff

K
was



3 te

wood

Were you
Playing



k about



t

was








Did car-
eould no
pay-

was

Did Worrell
Ye .
Besides cai

masons em

in-

mate-
he

tnere

Mr. Greaves: I cannot remem-—
ber.

The Commissioner: How much
new wood was used on the shed-

court?
that was

roof facing the tennis

Mr. Greaves: All of
new wood.

The Commissioner: How
new wood was used on the
roof facing the sea?

Mr. Greaves: The uprights
old stuff while the siding wa
fir.

The Cepnmissioner:
the centre building?

Mr. Greaves: Ti
new wood,

The Commissioner:
tthe roofing part?

Mr. Greaves: A
stuff was used for

mucn
shed-

were
s new

What



it contained

What

about

of the
roofing.

lot old

the

The Commissioner: What about
the flooring?

Mr. Greaves: The old flooring
from the huts was put down, but
had to be repaired. A lot of new
boards had to be put in

Next Witness

Mr. Mencea E. Cox \ the next

jwitness,
The Attorney General:

You are



a member of the House of Assem-
bly and a member of the Execu-
tive?

Mr. Cox: Yes

The Attorney General: In 1949,
did you have any conversation
with Mr. Tudor, the then Churci-



warden to the removal of huts
from Seawell?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

The Attorney General: Did you

tell him you would tender for the
removal of the huts?

Mr. Cox: I remember telling
him I heard he wanted tenders
for the removal and asked him
whether or not the tenders were
closed, and he told me the tend-
ers were not closed.

The Atiorney General: Did you
do anything about it’

Mr. Cox: I told Miss Phyllis
Francis to tender.

The Aitorney General: Did you

know if she was interested in con-
tracting’

Mr. Cox: I knew
the number

she owned &

of which wa



The Attorney, General:
know if she tendered?

Mr. Cox: Yes she did
awarded the contract.

The Attorney General:

Do yor
and wa

she

Did

ask you to look after the contract
for her?
Mr. Cox: That is a fact.

The Attorney General: Did you
see after the removal of the hut?
If so what part did you take in it”

Mr. Cox: I am really not a
quainted with the freighting busi-
ness, but I know a Mr. Duguid
who goes in for this business, I
discussed. it with him and he
agreed to undertake the removal.
This was after I had anged



everything with Miss Francis and
she had agreed.

The Attorney General:
other steps did you

Mr. Cox: I met Wo
tractor in Broad Str
me he was ready
was the Thursday.

The Attorney
else took place?

What
take?
ell the
t and he
move



con-
tola
That



to



General: W





Mr. Cox: I got on to Mr. Duguid
by Plantations Ltd. and intimated
what Worrell had said. He told
me he would go to th 7 é
Police Station and get
mits. About 4.30 . y
took Duguid to Seawe ye
as he said he we suld have to
there and see the op in order t
lay out for it. While t e hi



dissecte: a

2ing



JULY 7, 1951

Playing Field Enquiry °°:





do not remember,
told
sent for

to the

money

missing piece





The Attorney General: Who re-
ceived the stuff hen you got to
he Reei

Mr. Cox: There was a man there
checking, but I did not know who
ne wa

The Attorney General :
go back teSeawell any time ?

Mr. Cox: No. I turned over
everything to Duguid.

The Attorney General: Do you
know Fitz Gerald Murray, a lorry
owner ? man it

Mr. Cox: Yes.

The Attorney General : Did vou
see him a eawell ?

Mr. Coz No

The Attorney General :

Did you





Was the

job finished’?

Mr. Cox: About the Wednes-
day morning in the next week,
Worrell told me that the job was
10t finished

Attorney General: What did



- Cox: I went in search of
guid who was working in My
Lord’s Hill at the time. I told
him what Worrell had said. He
told me he was sure both of his
lorries had removed the stuff on
he S rday night. He further
1id that he had even paid the
‘rivers for the two trips

sy Attorney General: What did
you do?

Mr, Cox: I took Duguid in my
ear and drove to town. I met Tom
the driver of M. 258 by Tudor’s
gasoline station I told him what
I had heard and he said that he
did not go up to Seawell on the
Saturday night. I suggested to him

t

c finish the job.
7 ve .
Work Finished

The Attorney General :
get a report that the
finished ?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

The Attorney General:
you ?

Mr. Cox: Tom

The Attorney General:
vas the amount collected

Did you
work was

Who told

When
for the

contract

Mr.
but I

ot

Cox. I do not
believe
so aftet

The

remember,
it about a week
the work was finished.
Attorney General: Who
went to get the money from the
Parochial Treasurer ?

Mr, Cox: Squires.

‘Phe Attorney General: Did you
report to Miss Francis that the job

finished and that she could
the ?

t was



rankly speaking, I
but I could have
that and she could have
it

The Attorney General: Who saw
paying of Duguid ?
Mr. Cox: I did.

The Attorney General:
paid to you ?

Mr. Cox: Yes

The Attorney General: Duguid
iid he was paid for three trips.

her

Was the

Is that true ?

Mr. Cox: Yes

The Attorney General: Did Mr.

Tudor tell you some pieces of joist
were missing ?

Mr, Cox: Yes. At a meeting

of the Housing Board.

The Attorney General: When





did Mr. Tudor make that report ?
r. Cox: About two or three
weeks afterwards

’ * o e
Missing Pieces
The Attorney General: Was that
the first time you heard about the

°



Mr. Cox: Yes, I suggested to
Mr. Tudor to report the matter to
the Police. He was not keen and
I did so.

The Attorney General: As far
as I remember, Mr. Tudor said
he went to your heuse very
early one morning and said:
“Man, look what you have done.
You are looking after the huts
and now a part is missing”,

Mr. Cox: That is not true.
Iie told me at my home that he
had reported the matter to the
Police and had taken out a
warrant to search Tom's house.

The Attorney General: Did
you (telephone the Police later?
Mr. Cox: No, but I said be-
fore that I had telephoned the
Police. On that occasion, I told

them I was speaking on behalf of

Mr. Tudor,

The Attorney General: As far
as you know, the missing pieces
of joist were never found ?

Mr. Cox: I knew nothing
more of the matter. The first
time I heard about the loss of
huis was when someone tele-
phoned me saying that it was
raised by Mr. Mottley at a Ves-
try meeting sometime last year.

The Attorney General: You
know how Miss Francis got this
lorry ?

Mr. Cox: I bought it for her
from Buttals Plantation,

The Attorney General: She
said that she subsequently gave
it back to you.. Is that true?

Mr. Cox: Yes. There was
an understanding between the
two of us.

The Attorney General: Did .she
get any part of the money for the
removal of the hut ?

Mr. Cox: Yes She got
$35 to $40

Same Business

The Attorney General: As far

the contract is concerned, is
Cox and Francis one and the same
business ?

Mr, Cox: That is not strictly
correct although there is some
closeness between the two.

Mr. Mottley: You said you
member of the Executive



about

a
ymmittee
Mr. Cox: Yes
Mr. Mottley : You said that the
t tin ou knew anything about
the m g of the huts was when
I raised the question at a meeting
of the Vestry ?
Mr. Cox: Yes
Mr. Mottley :

were

Ce







The hut question
was ked to _be investiga by
the Vestry of St. Michael in a let-
oming from the Financial Sec-
for and on behalf of the
itive Committee. Surely as
member of the Executive that
within your knowledge ?
Mr, Cox I am not prepared to
¢ : nict

ated











took







out of

since and the truck is

contract







wg the ite first time
nything about mi
s when some e { 1ed
you and said that I had raised the
question at a Vestry meeting?
Mr. Cox: Yes.
Mr. Mottley : When was it that





Mr. Tudor had discuss
}



d with you

of the’ building from

Mr, Cox: I have
hat was in 1949 ot
the Housing Board
building.

Hut’s Removal

Mr. Mottley : You said that you
got Duguid to look after the re-
moval of the building from Sea-
well?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Mottley: Did you have
lorry of your own at the time ?

Mr. Cox: Yes

Mr. Mottley: You were in the
“trucking” business at the time ?

Mr. Cox: Yes

Mr. Mottley: How long have
you been in the “trucking” busi-
ness ?

Mr. Cox: I do not

Mr. Mottley: Was
working condition ?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Mottley: Did your
take part in the removal
portion of the hut?

Mr. Cox: No. It never went
to Seawell and I am emphatic on
that.

Mr. Mottley : Do you know if a
permit was obtained from the Po-
lice Department for your lorry to
remove a portion of the hut from
Seawell ?

Mr. Cox: I have never seen it.

Mr. Mottley :
ber of your lorry ?

Mr. Cox: M. 2361.

Mr. Mottley: What is the num-
ber of Miss Francis’ lorry ?

Mr. Cox: M. 258.

Mr. Mottley: Were you Man-
ager of her “trucking” business or
were you both partners ?

Mr. Cox: I used to look after
certain arrangements for her

Mr. Mottley : Were you merely
looking after her business or do
you have a financie! interest in hei
“trucking” business ?

Mr. Cox: I have no
interest in the business

Mr. Mottley : You said that you
bought the truck for Miss Francis?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Personal Matter

Mr. Mottley :
the money

Mr. Cox:
matter

Seawell ?
already said

in this same

a

remember.
your lorry in



lorry

of any



financial

Did she give you
te buy it ?
That was a personal

The Commissioner: You must
answer that question.
Mr. Cox: I bought it for her

my own money.
Mr. Mottley: Did you register
it in her name ?
Mr. Cox: Yes. $
Mr, Mottley: Have you since
been given back the truck by Miss
Francis ? P
Mr. Cox:
ferent

There have been dif-
arrangements between us
mine
to you
yours?

now

Mr. Mottley: I put it
that the truck was always

Mr. Cox did not answer

Mr. Mottley: In supervising the
you said you gave some
of the work to Mr. Duguid ?

Mr. Cox: I said I turned over
the whole business to him

Mr. Mottley: How many trips
were made during the removal of
the building ?

Mr. Cox:. I understand eight
trips were made. I am not sure.
Mr. Mottley: Can you record

how many were done by Duguid’s
lorry ?

Mr. Cox: He told me his lorries
made three trips.

Mr. Mottley: Were the other
trips made by Miss Francis’ lorry ?

Mr. Cox: Yes

Mr. Mottley : Can you say how
much you paid Duguid ?

Mr. Cox: The money was di-
vided into the number of trips and
he was paid so much per trip.

Mr. Mottley: Was he paid for
looking after the whole business?

Mr. Cox: He never asked for
anything.

Mr. Mottley: Did you discuss
the removal of those huts with
Duguid before you did so with

Miss Francis ?
Mr. Cox: No

A 50-50 Basis

Mr. Mottley: You never dis-
cussed it with him and suggested
that the money should be divided

on a fifty-fifty basis?
Mr. Cox: No.
Mr. Mottley: When you gave

Duguid the work on behalf of Miss
Francis, was your lorry working ?

Mr. Cox: T believe so.

Mr. Mottley: Can you remem-
ber where it was working ?

Mr, Cox: I cannot remember
that.

Mr. Mottley:
arrangements that
should be removed
at night ?

Mr. Cox: Mr. Duguid.

Mr. Mottley : Was it done with
your knowledge or approval ?

Mr. Cox: He told me the width
of the building would be too wide
to pass in the day.

Mr. Mottley: Seeing that you
were managing Miss’ Francis’
lorry, can you say if it was work-
ing during the day ?

Mr. Cox: I could not say be-
sometimes I never

Who
the
from

made the
building
Seawell



cal saw the
driver for three days.
Mr. Mottley: The reason for

these huts being removed at night



was not because your lorry and
Miss Francis’ were working during
the day?

Mr. Cox: I know nothing about
that :

Mr. Mottley: If Duguid said
that your lorry did a portion of the
work, would that be true ?

Mr. Cox: It would be an un-
adulterated lie

Mr. Mottley: I put it to you
that both those lorries were work-
ing in the day removing houses
from the flood area to .the Bay
Estate.

Mr. Cox: I have no recollection
of that,

Mr. Mottley: Would you say
that these two lorries never re-
moved houses from the flood area
to the Bay Estate for the Housing
Bo ard ?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Mottley: I put it to you
that these tw lorries were re-

ving h c n tt ay and that

hy the hu ere removed
at night

Mr. Cox: N dD 1 told me
that the P ‘ ) not alle

f t e | { r } ia
eason f
Vi Me





question of the missing portion

a meeting of

What is the num- In

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

















lars Did you take rf the huts from Seawel!

Mr. Cox: I do net reme how Mr. Moitley did you get
much I gave her, bit I ad for the work a sing board
the gasoline, oil and who « i oO ve were
work¢ d the lorry M- and doing?
the remainder went to her. Mr. Cox: Ju S anybod

Mr. Mottley: Where did you jc The men on the trucks go
make your report about the hut? the job.

Mr. Cox; I may be mistaken, Mr. Mottley: Are you a member
but I think I telephoned the C.1.D. of fhe Housing Board?
and they communicated with. , Attorney General: The. Housing
Boarded Hall. Hoard is a body corporate

Mr. Mottley: it not true to say Mr. Mottley: Yes, but they are
that Mr. Tudor came _ to your now administering Government
home and reported the matter to funds at the Bay Estate. |] am
you? asking you Mr. Cox if you did

é not use your influence on _ that
Reluctant Action Board to get work for the truck.
falas , tam, Cox: As far as I could see” epgailing: How did) Miss
a e lume, Mr. Luger was reiuci- pp, a? bin
ant to tame ane suse. 1 eee Fr incis truck and yours get that
Se eer ° work at the Housing Board?

ps to report it because I had Mr. Cox: By ‘ fi ale ati
iéurtit What a mas erthe sume of . : By the forry drivers
Ss Walcott who went about setting the work themselves.



Mr. Mottley; I put it to you Mr

Lord



Lit campaigning agaist tne

Lebour Party, was tne watchman. @ On Page 8

I (merelore imagined that some-

thing would happen and I wanted Guilty Of Throwi ing

the air cleared immediately,






















Mr. Mottley; Did you still em- l
ploy the chauffeur who drove tne Corrosive F uid
ruck that removed the building A Jury at the Court of Grand
trom Seaw ell? Sessions yesterday found Winifred
Mr. Cox: I believed he left two Bryan guilty of throwing corro-
or three weeks alter sive fluid with intent to maim or
Mr. Mottley: I put it to you that disfigure St. Clair Bryan.
he also drove your personal truck. His Honour the Chief Justice
Mr. Cox: Never as far as I Sir Allan Collymore postponed
remember. seftence. Mr. E. W. Barrow
r. Moitley; Why did you dis- Be aaah me + ae of mon
charge him? wh r . W. Reece .K.C.,
Mr. Cox: As far 1 know, he Solicitor General, prosecuted for
was annoyed because Mr. Tudor the Crown.
earched his place and he felt I .,The offence was committed on
had agreed with Mr. Tudor to do March 5, 1951.
an injustice, He therefore His Honour the Chief Justice
2 Sir Atlan Collymore at the Court
Mottley: Have you had ©! Grand Sessions yesterday sen-
sion to discuss the removal or teed Lione] Best, a 23~ year-old
of portion of the hut from lab Se of Church Village, St.
Seawell, with any Government “+ °"8), to five years penal ser-
official? . te ate oe oe = ae
i : ‘ i articles, 1e property of Mr.
Mr. Cox: I um _ not going tO Waiter Boyce of Christ Church,
nswer this question I .
ont . a on January 18,
rhe Commissioner; Did .you Mr. W. W. Reece K.C., Solicitor
lave the opportunity of dist ussing General, prosecuted for the
v any Government official the Crown.
loss of the joist from the hut? Best was brought up on a twi
Mr. Cox: The opportunity is al- count indictment. On the firs:
ways there count on which he was found
Mr. Mottley: Did you avail guilty he was charged with
yourself of th opportunity Of burglary and larceny of articles
discussing it with any senior the property of Mr. Walter Boyce
Government official? nd valued at $33 on January 18
Mr. Cox: I do not remember, He was Charged with receiving
Mr. Mottley: Have you ever stolen property on January 18 in
been asked by any Government the second count
official whether you knew about
or had anything to do directly or

indirectly with the removal of the
building?

Couple Attacked

° . . Sixteen-year-old Myrtle Gar-
Denies Discussion yer ¢: vindsbury Road ana Colin
, Morris of Park Road, Bush Hall,
Mr. Oox: I have never had any \ore attacked in Perry Gap, Roe-
discussion with anyone like that buck Street, at about 9.40 o'clock
on that question. last night by an unknown man
Mr. Mottley: Have you evel The were both treated at the
discussed it with the Leader of General Hospital for injuries and
the House? discharged. Morris’ hand was in-
Mr. Cox: I have discussed it jyreq while Garner’s back, abdo-
with the Leader of the House, men and leg were wounded. The
Mr. Mottley: I put it to you that matter was immediately reported
you have emphatically denied to the Police. They are making
knowing anything at all about the jnyest ,

ations
transaction relative to the remov- —<

al of the building from Seawell.
Mr. Cox: I was not trained to MEMO STAMP FOR
‘tell lies and I hate a lie. BARBADOS
The Commissioner; Have you
ever said that? The Advocate learnt yesterday
Mr. Cox I have always said that consideration is being given
that I knew absolutely nothing, to the issue of a centenary com-
because Mr. Mottley .has been memorative stamp to mark the

hundredth anniversary of the first
adhesive stamp issued in Barba-
dos on April loth, 1852,

The Government has entered in-
correspondence with business
England with a view

trying for the longest time to im-
plicate me in this thing on public
platforms all over the island. I
knew absolutely nothing about it
in the sense that I did not admin-
ister anything.

to
concerns in

to having these stamps designed

Mr. Motiley: I put it to you that ang printed for circulation by |
you emphatically denied in the April 15th, 1952 i
presence of the Leader of the It is proposed that the stamps
House and other people that you will be of the following denomina-
knew nothing of the removal of tion 3c., 4c., 12c., and 24c,
the building directly or indirectly - aly

Mr. Cox: I never said that. MUSLIMS END

Mr. Mottley:
you bought the

You admitted that
truck and gave it

MONTH'S FAST





to Miss Francis. Is that correct? Muslims in Barbados yesterday
The, Commissioner: He said so. celebrated the end of their month~
Mr. Mottley; I put it to you that long fast of the Holy Month of
you bought it in her name with Ramadar All Muslim merchants
the object of being able to trade closed their stores the whole day,
with the Government of which sthers giving their employees a
ae a aoe 2st thi to do Mais the morning the small
‘ ~ See ee oo iat section of Muslims in the island
pales Prag " ¥ gathered at their church’ in
puree Mahogany Lane and held their
Mr. Mottley; I put it to you that festival service,
on more than one occasion that
truck traded with the Govern-

“LADY PATRICIA”
ON DRY DOCK

The motor vessel Lady Patricia

ment?
Mr. Cox:

Govt. Trading

It could have.



arrived here from St. Vincent
Mr. Mottley: And that it traded yesterday to undergo repairs.
with the Government as a result The Lady Patricia was dry
of you using your influence to get docked during the afternoon.
the work? She will be cleaned and painted,
Mr. Cox; That is not true, There
was no question of changing “ - ”
license to trade with the Govern FACT OR BRINGS
ment. There is no law laid down BISCUITS, COCOA
for not trading with the Govern- The Harrison liner S.S, Factor
ment. There is law so far as the arrived here yesterday with a
vestries are concerned, varied cargo including biscuits
Attorney General; All Mr. Cox and cocoa. The cargo was loaded

is concerned about is the removal at Liverpool

———

pier ae,






3 Sprinkle health on




















Fest a their food every day / /
; 5 Borat — 4
| ee —— as
; a a
ie | . Weas
4 222 SB git “4 Remax docs wonders fo
“3 4 hildren, It is the rich
a id va! et a > natural source of vitarnins
‘i . pt n and minerels, and
th ad ee wn ret re taken regularly, it ensures that
€ y iH hifdrea get enough of the nutrients
ee} lutely essential for proper growth
o.) Be €: Ske a ” sulids sound health for them, now and
he future. Easy to take —just sprinkle

it of their food.

From Chemists and Stores

BLT

@

BUADSBAW & CO. PALMETTO STREE T, BRIDGETOWN.

A CLT AN eet





Club Willow Will
House Police Band |
And Firemen

Police Band Cadets are clean-
ing up Club Willow. Later this
onth Club Willow will become

the new headquarters of the Police
Band,
The building, which is very airy,

is being redecorated and repaired.
Many’ casuarinas are planted
around the tennis court. Some

Cadets have little kitchen garden
plots where they can grow car-
vots, beets, lettuce, etc., Cpl, Ber-
nard Morris is in charge of the
work.

Colonel R, T. Michelin, Commis-
sioner of Police, said; “For years
now the Police Band has had no
proper place to practise, They were
in a small barrack room, At Club
Willow the Band will be comforta-

ble. In the outside gallery of the
building it is \hoped to have
monthly Sunday night concerts,

The public will be able to listen
to classical music in comfortable
surroundings.”

On another
Fire Station
racks for the
the second
building.

The Commissioner said
now thinking of a
the whole barracks.

part of the land a
will be built. Bar-
firemen will be on
storey of this new

; “We are
name to call
”



WATER SHORTAGE
AT TRIOPATH

There has been a water shortage
t Triopath, St. Andrew, for about |
two weeks now. No water can be} §)
got from the pipes during the day,
but the water comes on about mid
night for a short period. Many
people of the district have been
drinking spring water during the
1ortage, addi,

FLOATING TREE
IS A DANGER

A large tree was seen floating
in position 13.04 North 62.51
West, according to a report made
by the skipper of the S.S. Brazil
Thursday, ae
The tree is to nmaviga-
tion.

“ATHELBROOK" TO
LOAD MOLASSES

Molasses tanker Athelbrook is
expected to call here tomorrow
afternoon to load vacuum = pan
Trinidad
Athelbrook will take her
during the night and leave
on Sunday for Trinidad,

—————— ————



on
a danger



molasses for

The
load
port

:
x
x

?

Fresh Stock at

WEATHERHEAD'S

Zinnia (Giant Dahlia Mixed)
Snapdragon (3 kinds), Petu-
nia, Salvia (Red), Verbena,
Phlox, Coreopsis, Carnation,

PR SPPSS SSOP SPSS SPSS SSS

Larkspur, Balsam, Gillar-
dia, Marigold, Indian Pinks,
Calliopsis, Dahlia, Candy-
tuft, For-get-me-not, Portu-
laca, Mignonette, Aster,
Sweet Peas, Chrysanthe-
mum, Alyssum, Cosmos,
Ageratum, Cornflower, Can-
terbury Bells, Lupins, Nas-

turtium,
Take recent

raing and

advantage of



plant now.

\

Bruce
Weatherhead Ltd.

Head of Broad Street
seein at sual e

SOOO OSSO SSS

%



Hand Bags



oReeeee @ G&G
@ ywsr ARRIVED

g PURINA CHICK
@ STARTEN

—





2
. H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd. a
Jae BER Bee ee

Obtainable from

|
|
|
|

»
A & GROWENAB

Parasol Shape.

Prices from $3.63 to $24.00

40,11,





ACERS

Sot pte

PO



for all occasions

In Genuine Leather, Plastic and Imitation
Whip Snake. All styles including an unusual



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

12 & 13 Broad Street

PAGE FIVE



WHEN CONSTRUCTING

OR REPAIRING A

BUILDING

ALWAYS USE

*-EVERITE

ASBESTOS-CEMENT

CORRUGATED

SHEETS



y

REXALL

PRODUCTS OF REPUTE

“RENALL™
Cod Liver Oil E

An Easily Digested and Palatable preparation of
Vitamin Tested Cod Liver Oil. 2/9 and 5/- Bot.
Blood Purifier

The Ideal Remedy for Skin Eruptions, Ulcers, Pimples

ete,
3/- Bottle



alsion

e
KNIGHTS LTD.
PLL

POPPE LLLP LALLA LD

FROCKS
YOULL FANCY

COTTON
and

ART SILK ‘

I ASHION - RIGHT
STYLES
including
Plaids, Checks
Candy Stripes

4, oO



Floral Stripes
and

Solid Colours
e


them on display

at

HARRISON'S

Broad Strest Dial 2352



|
|

AAA LALLA APES PEED

66,66 66000

PAPEETE

Gott













PAGE SIX



BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



HENRY

BY CARL ANDERSON

pase
H







AREN'T YOU GETTING A LITTLE OLD
TO PLAY WITH DOLLS?





TN

HT

iii}



“in “TAT ANTI

ITT

WH



i}
Hit
fab
I HUNG MY PANTS OVER
THE CHAIR. MY SHIRT
ON THE DOORKNOB,





IT SAYS HERE,”
A WOMAN SHOT HER
HUSBAND MERELY
BECAUSE HE WOULONT

HANG UP HIS CLOTHES
> AT NIGHT
PS a
Ter



GOODNESS’ SAKES,
LISTEN TO THIS






Sem \_ MY TIE OVER THE MIRROR’
ow > AND MY LINDERWEAR
>

x



THE LONE RANGER

P

“4 ade
BY FRANK STRIKER

i ipoueT it! ) | fe
4 a

RANGER!
E -

EERE - <0. on won:
ELSE GOES AFTER JACKSON, MY 3
HUSBAND WILL BE KILLED/ ;

Rae nathan igpenioedsiaiey
WOULD YOU SHOOT ME ‘TO KEEP '
ME FROM RUNNING DOWN

3 THAT CROOK

Zai \F





! OKAY-MALLETHEAD --
| SHE'S GONE! YOU KIN
STOP - BUT I MAY
NEED vou! A :

|
|
y

}| | I CAN'T PRACTICE MY
SINGING WITH THAT
|
|





HELLO-PROFESSOR CHRIS

SENDO ? THIS iS MRS. JIGGS~
MAY I COME OVER TO YOUR
STUDIO ? I CAN'T
PRACTICE HERE /

RACKET OUTSIDE-AND






T MUST BE READY TO
| GING TOMORROW AT
| MRS. HERTRAIN'S —__
| PARTY -WHAT
| WILL I DO oe





| TOMORROW -IFSO \\|
"LL PHONE YOU- | |

la

THANKS -\VUZ IT |
NOISY ENOLIGH ? |

|
|
ca
4

















JOHNNY HAZARD

VE VILL GO TO
MY CAMP... AY
VILL PROVIGION

THANKS, T.N.T. / GAY.
THAT'S QUITE A RIG..

OUR PLANE GONKED OUT...

IT WAG TAKING GABLE TO...

AH... VIGIT HER SICK AUNT

IN TUNIS / HER AUNT

INGISTS GHE GPEND TiMt
WITH MER /

JUST LOVE
THAT GICK

e
A\rtee CRASHING IN THE AUNT #

LIBYAN DESERT, JOHNNY GAINS
CONTROL OF GABLE'S PICTOL
AND, BENT ON RETURNING HEZ
TO THE POLICE, HEADS FOR
CIVILIZATION... ONLY TO
BECOME LOST / AFTER TWO DAYS
THEY HIT WATER...SALT WATER /
SUDDENLY THEY ARE CON-
FRONTED WITH A FROG-MAN
ARISING FROM THE OCEAN... HE
INTRODUCES HIMGELF AG
THOR NILS THORSON / KE
TELLG THEM THE NEAREST
VILLAGE IG FIFTY MILES AWAY...



Ni iG i 3

BY ALEX RAYMOND
| We GREAT YOU'S” SECOND _
ARROW SPLITS THE FIRST ON!

RIP KIRBY



.. SR Q

/



|
ay
|



r

as. or ~ DEE

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES
HE WAG GOING TO RELEASE THEGE
MAN-EATING SHARKS. OUT IN
WHIRLPOOL CHANNEL WHERE
DIANA GWIMMING RIGHT Now! J








WHYZ{, DIANA+AND ME. HE SAYS WE


















Sensational New Make-up!

Foundation

and

in one!



New Not a cake make-up, not a greasy foundation!

is foundation and powder all in one
“Angel Face" goes on easily and smovthly
Gives you a soft, velvety complexion instantly.

“Angel Face”
no greasy fingertips

its own

Powder



white puff,

SATURDAY. JULY 7, 1951



New! Stays on longer than powder!

The special

ster on

“cling” ingredient fused into

much longer than ordinary powder

never greasy

New! can’t spill!

You'll sz

ay Pond’s “Angel Face”

“Angel Face’
And



is the most convenient

ver used it can’t spill over handbag or clothes
anytime, anywhere.

Choose
Angel, Tawny Angel, Bronze Angel

from five angelic shades: Bionde
At all

—

the

Angel, Ivory

best beauty



~~
— SS

| GIVE YouR |
CHILDREN

EXTRA PEP
BY USING

REMOGEN

MALT AND
COD LIVER OIL
the MALT with the

BUTTERSCOTCH
FLAVOUR






em neo

SSS SS

made by
Jeffreys Miller
and Co., Ltd.

look for their
TRADE MARK

REMOGEN

a

No wet spong
with

makes it

it's never drying



SS

It's perfect to

Obiainable at all
DRUG STORES

Angel
cour









IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE









SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only

Tins Spaghetti in Tom Sauce (small) 2 tins 40

Bots. Lea &





Perrins W. Sauce

Bottles Amstell Beer

Usually

el
28

NOW
ob
72
20

Usually NOW

Raisins (Per lb.) 45 40

Tins Grapes

Bacon (per. lb)













ML at

Business



DIAL 2620

ADVOCATE

PRINTING DEPT.









Co



COU

MEL has conguered tens o.

Liou nd; Gf coughs, For

ka n recommended

8, Nuzsces, Hospitals

tnataria every vhere. The

Simply this. It con-
soluble la tocreosote -

iscOvered in th

Famel labor-

--and this ingredient

your bloodstream and

the trouble at its roof.

why Feamel

is se effective

FAMEL

and why it acts so quickly andso
From the first dose
Famiel eases the inflamed bron-

thoroughly.

chial passages and builds up
your powers of resistance while
itis destroying the germs which
have caused the cough or cold.
The moment you suspect ’flu, or
catch a cough or cold, take
Famel Syrup and you will have
started on the road to recovery,
Always keep a bottle in the house.

SYRUP

rom all chemusts or stores.

CHS










®
ONLY ONE SOAP GIVES YOUR SKIN
THIS EXCITING FRAGRANCE

Your skin will be cooler, sweeter.,
desirably dainty from head-to-tce
if you bathe with fragrant
Cashmere Bouquet Beauty tome.

PERFUMED BEAUTY SOAP

EFFICIENT
Phew Yt Ate yp ER ESCIVE

ee

ond






LOW COST OPERATION
—— the engine is built for
the job.

ECONOMICAL MAINTENANCE
accessibility makes servicing and
maintenance easy.

BiG EARNING CAPACITY
Roominess, easy loading and
unloading save time and momey
on the road.

APPEARANCE

120 cubic feet'of carrying space, smartly
styled exterior, all-steel body mounted on
a robust chassis, powerful engine and all
the features of the modern private car.
Lockheed hydraulic brakes, 4-speed gear-
box, gear change on steering column.
Independent front wheel suspension. Rack

g ‘ 2 ay ior y the: 7 “

and pinion steering—and many other | The finest advertisement your
refinements. | . business can have.

Available also as chassis with cab.

FORT ROYAL
Phone 2385

GARAGE LTD.

Sole Distributors Phone 4504







ATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE
PUBLIC SALES FOR RENT —_— GOVERNMENT NOTICES |

CLASSIFIED ADS.

REAL ESTATE

PAGE SEVEN

SHIPPING NOTICES











WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and |
































5














































































































































' c ¢ |
mates — _______.__ | 6 cents Sundays 24 words — ov 24/ RD } spc vig ns ab ag eh Brggy eget
SHARES — 30 Preference Shares of oer et Seade A word week—4 cents a! WANTED | words 3 cents a word week—4 cents al MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, SS = eg
The charge for announcements of | F Bearectan ge Saas. 3B [ Approgtia’s office: accommuoda-| Sons on Comins a oe a Nz) oe
2 i nt ( NF
dette Marriages, | Deaths ae oR SALE be ont Ge oe n Knights Limited | on comprising about 800 square HELP | S.S. “ARABIA” a scheduled to sail at shina till
eugments, and In Memoriam notices is Office of the undersigned on aed set located within Bridgetown. | from Melbourne 12th June, Brisbane 22nd ad ssengers
£1.00 on weekdays su8 93.48 68 Santays | s' conte Diesen as wer 22 oe PY} the 12th day July 1951 at 2 ae .) HOUSES | Applications will be received | ~7, P aaa ——— | Jone, Port Alma 28th ‘June, Sydney { nis o "Menseaitat.. Me nd My
for any number of words up to 50, and | — GOTTLE, CATFORD & CO ~ woe ‘by the Dir : F TAILOPS ourney 1 Tailors for] July 4th, arriving Trinidad end July, St. Kitt Sailing Friday 12th 34
3 cents per word on week-days and! © 3 cents a word week—4 cents a Solicitors. FLAT-—-Al Coral Banas Wook , by the Director of Petroleum and | making jackets. Only those with ex-|and Barbados early August i ee re) Se . '
4 cents per word on Sundays for each | “Ord on Sundays. 28.6.5i-—Gn.—e.o.d, | Modern furnished flat, good sea bathing N°tUral Gas, Public Buildings up] perience peed anp\. Be Abreau Tailoring | §§. “PORT FAIRY” is scheduled tn [ *” (|
additional word. Sen aa [ Tee, foxther particulars. Dial #134. Alm, | ‘© and including 14th July, 1981. » farhill Sireet 1-7, d1--an sail trom Hokert late June. orth Queens- “Daerwood" will accept
1g.IN USE called “ELLER- | / shley 27.6514 | 4 ne) atdieehate. « r and mm ‘uiy, Brisbane end July, Sydney ‘s imei ; tr ©
picansetainis a tee Engagement AUTOMOTIVE _— with 3700 square feet of land | ae | Hittin ith coe Preto e porieece et haga | arly August, Melbourne mid ' August, rer Sor Atube wae
‘alli ry ~ > s . ~hs , * 7
charge is $3.00 for any number of woreda Sridbetown, wetrece Watebenn an ‘Gbayune’G de —— August Is.( DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE | wire lives. Good salary paid to right “Cares “tecepind on Matteeen bind ot riday 13t) ae
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each CAR—on house contains mame load) watene
additional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 e (1) Prefect Ford in good and Dining Rooms ery, Drawing | MS, Sarage, telephone etc. For & Co. P.O.B. 163 Bridgetown. In addition to general cargo these
between 8.30 und 4 p.m., 3113 for Death Se. ‘oew pres. Apply to M. C. | fast tom, usual ‘thie mavah- oc. inl Set Serween, 8 Ps i 2@* | MARKET FOR ARTICLES MAN- 47.5180. | vessels have ample space for chilled and B.W.A, SCHOONER OWNERS’
Notices only after 4 p.m. h eo a, Swan Street. ft. ieleeteic) Ribhe nen Large | ae 30.6.51—t2.n UFACTURED FROM TURTLE " Ferbr? uate ~ | Lading for transhipment a> Trinidad ASSOCIATION INC.
6.7.51—6n.| ment water installed, = abt ws “MARNET”, A dwelling ‘house and dand SHELL , MISCELLANEOUS a oe or
ms n use 4 "
oo CAR—Light Six Hudson in firat- | gine *b0Ve premises will be set up for|t The Ivy ‘Main Road, St. Michael ‘. me ———_— | ard Islands. = Telephone 4047.
THANKS class order, fully insured = Huethaas Dr Competition at our Office | House comprises Drawing. room. dining |, a@uiries have been received at Orders for AMERICAN MULES. We] For further particulars apply—
—————____________._] until 1952. Owner leaving island. Phone at 2 p.m Dec’! Friday 13th July 1981, | room, 3 bedrcoms, kitchen, water closet. | Ne Barbados Stand of the British have sold some of these. Contact, Har- FURNESS, WITRY & CO. LTD.
BISHOP—1 beg through this medium| M. L. Griffith, Two Mile Hill (2861) | Parmer the tense ee aePLY , 1 Mis: | bath. Electricity. Por further particubars {Industries Fair as to the supply| 4 Proverbs & Co. Ltd., ce rg TRINIDAD
friends ‘who sent wreaths ‘and’ cards | eee te |S aNd 4.90 Pim. dally except Sumiens.”' | Pond of Dey song CUMMINS, Belmont |and prices of articles manufac- ea BWI,
ys. ’ ; 7.7.81—2n
of sympathy in my recent bereave-| _CAR—Chevrolet, in good condition YEARWOOD & BOYCE, ——$ tured from Turtle-shell . FAN MILL-One (1) Secondhand. ot ine eienina tt ins tty
mént caused by the death of my| Owner driven, Apply R, M. Massiah, to Solicitors, ROOMS-—Single and double, new| 2. Persons desiring further in-| n¢w 16° or 18 Fan Mill complete with BARBADOS : r Ti
wee aoe Pitz Allan Bishop. be seen at Sion Hill, St, James. 1.7.51 —8n j sutniture with breakfast. Hastings } formation on this market are re tower — Apply D. M. Simpson é& Co B.W.L ADVOCA EE
inifres reenidge. 7.7.51—In 3.7.51—6n ee ee ee — |Call Telephone 4718. ? “2r "9 S a 3.7, 51—6n coo
Ss “HINDSBURY COT” standin, 5 ; quested to co t vith th
he tole F gon 1 $j iuested to communicate wi e) --
MAYLEY — We beg through this, _CARS—1950 Morris Minor 10,000 Miles. en, feet of land at the Corner’ o _RIPLEY—On Sea—Maxwell's Coast | Fishery Officer, Fishery Office, The WANTED TO BUY °
medium to thank ail those kind friends ; 1950 Morris Oxford 9,000 Miles. Like| polington and Bay Streets, Bridgetown | Milly furnished, two bedrooms, all eon-| Reef, St. Michael OLD SWING MACHINE out df usd
who sent wreaths, Cards and sympa-| New. 1949 Morris Six 18 H.P. Low nd inspection apply on the premises | veniences Telephone, Refrigerator. | = 1.75 Good prices paid. Apply to Mrs. Vaughn, L.
thised with us in our recent bereave-| Mileage. 1948 Ford Prefect 14,000 Miles | F°°, further particulars apply Hutchinso:, | AU&USt. September, November on Dial | 7.7,51.—I1n.| Corner of Fairchild and Probyn Streets
ment caused by the death of Undine| in very good condition. 1938 Chrysier |“ B#Mfield, Solicitors, James Street | 2380 6.7.5 1} 6th July, 1951. 30,6.51~-3n
ut, i ahs cane a é bargain. Fort Royal Garage 7.7,51—2n | erent ncionnceeih | . Gnc.
1e Whittington Family 751—1n| Lid. Telephone 4504 6.7.51— y } ro eS c
Ua laelit apse Stateline ae aaidlcaeeeacaate aeaeehadee eee (One) Boarded an | SRA GA?F NOTICE ls Gham | UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL OF THE WEST NEW YORK SERVICE
CAR -- One Austin A70 practically : jouse Situated at Rendez | pyy. ¢.,. et ee ae s
IN MEMORiAM Belmont Garage. Recle: atx Lone ae ow Hin, Upper Clapham. Size 16 x) — ee Telephone, Refrigeta | INDIES, JAMAICA, B.W.L. 8.8. “SFABREFZE” sails &th June Arrives Barbados 19h June, 1951
CRICHLOW—In ever loving Philip, ; 4.7.51—4n | Shed, Kitchen and galvanized patings | \priyite sagt’? Weeks July. Dial Mrs A STEAMER sails 29th June Arrives Barbados 10:h July, 1951.
« 1LO In ever loving memory of Price $600.00 or nearest Contact E elville 2660 7.7.5i—1n. | > okie sesilan snilebintiiceicaAetisians 5 dribahtncenacesictitiintante ensitepesinhiepaioadtinoni -
our dear father and grandfather William Marsh, Silver Hill, Ch. Ch e ; Applications are invited for 12 posts of House Officers in the new
Henry Crichlow who pass€d away on 5 7.1.51—2 | University College Hospital: NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
July 6th 1949, ELECTRIC*.z. 51—2n PUBLIC NOTICES Feline Shisatnn nated ea ae 3.8. ALCOA POLARIS” sails 18th June | Arrives Barbados 28th June, 1951
Rien ek deat tad ail Lathe serie aol ahaa a "She hae eee - ouse Surgeons: for general and surgical duties ..... 4 3.8. ALCOA ROAMER” sails 27th Juns Arrives Barbados 13th July, 1951
rest, AUTOMATIC RECORD CHANGERS—| at their Office No: 17 ° High an 2 | for casualty and outpatient duties . 4 5.$. ALCOA PATRIOT” sails llth July Arrives Barbados 27th July, 1961
Your loving hands will toil no more} With 78 — 45 — 33 R.P.M, will play.| Bridgetown, on Friday the 2th day of | .. 1&7”. cents per agate line on week-days | House Physicians sesrsaanevsneniacnyyursinssersnasenesneebivesterteseeenn 4 ve . sg
For those you loved you did your pga cae ease Sageerore. Dial} July, 1951 at 2 p.m. a SAO OAR a and 18 conte aay agate line on Sundays The appointments will be for one year commencing Ist January CANADIAN SERVICE
Dest jaCosta’s Electrical Dept. A parcel of iand containing 5,445] "ptmum. charge $1.50 on week-days | | gs. F "|| SoutHROUND
God grant you now eternal rest: 3.7.51—5n | stuare feet, sit ren’x | M4 $1.80 on Sundays. | pepe Syiit ; ; P
Eliza (wife), James (brother), Sydney] © ———-—W_______"""" "| Hit" Bisek ‘Rock, St. Michael. saynen’s | —_—___— silica } Each House Officer will serve 4 months in the surgical, medical Home: ot se Gatle Montreal . Sole, Baltes (Atrives Waa;
ton; Vince ent Fitinp (Ganghter). Glett: ‘i FL wide ee eu Swallinghanse thereon, called = “The oe Re B hen beet Casuarini / and casualty departments respectively, Salary £350 per annum lessfiss«. “ALCOA June 2th June 29th July Sth
stone (son-in-law) and = grand-c ren. E ng chamber, rand fest” containing 2 blic . i. rees fror me please call to correct a > rac . ar res enc ate : salary i & Ju 26 July & v thr
7.7.51—In, NeW unit. Reconditioned throughout,| bedrooms, with usual ie rooms, 2) mistake. F. Barker, Culloden Road ee i -Feepect. Of board, residence, etc. 3% of salary will be de rs MaoA” PENNANT Tuy Fa py ara foae tes
. may be inspected at Leo Yard, Cheap-| Inspection any day between 10 a.m 7.7.51—1n | ducted for superannuation contributions. Further information may : ae conAecscliecaaui
MET CEyT eo ee ea nen ace H. LL, i, PADS: apd 4 p.m. on application, to Miss |---| |1¢ obtained from the Hospital Manager and Secretary. NORTHBOUND
sister Lilian Inez Harewood who felly’ Le pate bap RhvceBbigel aging NOTICE | Applications should be sent to the Hospital Manager and Secre- | **. “ALCOA PARTNER due July lath salle ter Bt. Lawrence

felly
asleep on the 8th of July 1913
Asleep in God's benutiful garden,
Free from all sorrow and pain;
Some day when life's journey is ended
We hope to meet you again
Ever to be remembered by Millicent |
Harewood (Mother!, Fercy (brother). Mrs,
Germaine Crichlow, 7.7.51—I1n |

ANNOUNCEMENTS |

HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—lIsle of
Spices. SANTA MARIA-—loveliest hotel
in Caribbean, Rates from $7.00 per head
per day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi-
dential district under Government House
hill, Rates from $5.00 per head per day.
SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing
Beach, Rates from $4.00 per head per
day. Enquiries to D, M. Slinger, Grenada.

26.6.51—T8n.









.
OTICE
“FRIGIDAIRE”, refrigerators—the only
refrigerators with the famous “Meter-
Miser" unit. This well known and
proven product of General Motors Corp,
is at last available again, and we are |
pleased to announce that “FRIGIDAIRE”
may also be obtained now cash or on
terms through K. R, HUNTE & CO.
LTD,, who are assisting us in their
distribution, and have some of our
machines on show for demonstration at
their new SHOWROOM on Lower Broad
Street.
THE EMTAGE ELECTRICAL CO,
5.7.51—3n,

EDUCATIONAL
PARRY SCHOOL

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION
Pupils including Vestry candidates will
be examined on Friday, July 13 at
10 o'clock, Baptismal Certificates and
Testimonials from the Headmaster must
be presented,









J. 1 SMITH.
30.6.51—3n.
WANTED
QUEEN'S COLLEGE, BARBADOS,
B.W.L

Government Aided Secondary Day
School for Girls

Required for January, 1952—-Senior
History Mistress to organise the History
ot the School up to Open University
Scholarship standard, First or Second
Class History Honours essential; Teaching
Diploma and experience desirable.

Salary Seale for First or Second Class
Honours $(1,584 x 72-—-2,304 x 120— 2,784)
per annum. An additional salary of $216
per annum will be given to a Mistress
who has a Teaching Diploma

Super-seale salary for high qualifica-
tions and good experience $(2,880 x 120
3.840) plus $216 per anntim will be given
to a Mistress -who has a Teaching
Diploma. Position on this seale will start
at the bottom.

The passage will be paid out to Bar-
bados, but not the return passage. Tho
appointment is for three years, with the
option of joining the permanent staff
after that, when a term's leave on full
pay will be granted after five years’
service, but unfortunately leave passages
are not paid,

Applications, with copies of recent
testimonials, should be forwarded, not
later than 3lst July, 1951, to the Acting
Headmistress of Queen's College, Bar-
bados, B.W.I, 7.7. 51—2n

PERSONAL _

The public are hereby warned against





giving credit to my wife HILARIA
CRAIGG (nee LYNCH) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone

else contracting any debt or debts in my
rame unless by a written order signed

by me,
e LAMONT CRAIGG,
Dodson's Land,
Black Rock.
6.7.51--2n



The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, Ruby Aletha
Seott (mee Leacock) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my

name.
(Signed) GEORGE SCOTT,
Eckstein Village,
St. Michael.
6 7 51—2n.



7 public are hereby warned against
giving credit to any person or persons in
my name as I do not hold myself re-
sponsible for anyone contracting any
debt or debts in my name unless by a
written order signed by me,

CAMERON DA COSTA

COULTHRUST,
Sandy Ground,
Christ Church.
7.5.81-—2n







We Buy...
USED AND MINT POSTAGE
STAMPS
of the British West Indies, Good
Prices Paid at the CARIBBEAN
STAMP SOCIETY, 3rd Floor No.
10 Swan Street. 7.751—2n,

SE HABLA ESPANOL

ORIENTAL

CURIOS, SOUVENIRS, AN-
TIQUES, IVORY, JEWELS,
SILKS Ete.

THANTS

f0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Ten chances to win
thousands of dollars for 2/-
only, through our’ B’dos
Turf Club Race Syndicates
One Copy Left of Latest
Edition of Year Book of

West Indies $12.00

Rats and Mouse’ Traps.
at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and
HARDWARE.

%.

Of Re.
DOSES POSSESS



pane
SSSI





orotate lieRcmciine dl
REFRIGERATOR — One (1) Westing-
house, in good working order. Apply:
W. R. Tempro. _ Phone 5044 or 8224.
28.6.51—-t.f.n

MISCELLANEOUS

AMM-I-DENT TOOTHPASTE
Start saving your Amm-i-dent Tooth
paste Boxes, Within a short while you
may be the winner of one of the follow-
ing:— Ist Prize $50.00, 2nd Prize $15.00,
Src Prize $6.00, 1,9,51~--26n

ALUMINUM WARE—Highky Polished
Canadian Aluminum Saucepans, Kettles,
Rousters, Cake Pans, Percolators. Egg
Poachers, Deep Fryers etc. Exceptional
value, G, W. Hutchinson & Co. Ltd
Broad and Rotbuck Streets.



4.7.51—4n

AMERICAN MADE BABY BUTLER--
Bab, Feeding Table and Chair combina-
tion, converts to Play Table and Black-





board for later use. Reasonable. Dial
2378, Between 12 & 4 p.m. and 6 & 9
p.m. 6.7, 51—2n



CUTLERY -—- SWEDISH STAINLESS
STEEL Complete range includes Table
Knives 75¢. each Forks and Spoons 60c.
each, Dessert ‘Knives 70c. each, Forks
and Spoons 53c. each, G. W. Hutchinson
& Co,, Ltd. Broad and Roebuck Streets.

4.7.51—4n,

ee
EMPTY TINS—A quantity of 10 lb. and
25 Ib. tins, suitable for holding plants.

Purity Bakeries Ltd. Dial 4529 or 3063.
5.7.51—5n.









FISHING BOAT—21 ft. overall. “Isa-
belle" at Bathsheba. Communicate M
Sargeant Carters, St. John or A. Lesley,
Bathsheba. 7.7.51—1n

FISHING BOAT — Complete outit
14 ft. by 4 ft. Apply to Mr. Henry Price,
St. Lawrence Gap. 7.7 51—1n

“FARM” POWDERED FULL CREAM
MILK—Supreme quelity and only $4.32
per 5-Ib tin and $1.00 per 1-lb tin.
Get a tin to-day from your grocer
or Drug Store and try the best
milk obtainable. The 5-tb family size is
really economical, Insist on “Farm” for
the sake of your heaith and your pocket.
If your dealer cannot supply, phone 2229,

27,6, 51—t.f.n,
aap,

a nenerinneninaiimasinieresatnaniieaiaie
GALVANISE SHEETS heavy gauge %
ft. $7.50, 8ft. $7.00. Also Aluminum
Sheets 6 ft. $4.00, 8ft. $5.00, 10 ft
$6.50, At Ralph Beard's Hardwood
Alley 1.7.51—2n











GALVANIZED SHEETS: 24 gauge in
lengths of 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 foot. Enquire
Auto Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street,
Phone 2696. 26.6.51—4.f.n.

PALETHORPES — Finest quality Pork
Pies 9c, each, and Pork Sausages at 70c.
each, W. A. Medford & Co, Ltd., Rickett
St. 4.7.51—2n
SS URE REE EERE EEE

RAT BAITS—Locally preparéd by the
Agricultural Society. Obtainable for a
limited period at the Steel Shed, Queen's
Park, le. each 37 51.—3n

RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing
..and we will order for you if we

haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,
Ltd. 6.7.51—t.f.n.

LOST & FOUND















LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET — Series HH
1881. Finder rewarded on returning to
Joseph Brathwaite, Moncrieff, St. Philip.

7.7.51--1n

SWEEPSTAKE BOOKS--Two Sweep-
stake Books II-7480 and -3430, Finder
please return to Prince Gregorie, Upper
Roebuck Street. 1.7.$1-—2n

NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JOHN
Applications for one (1) Vestry Exhibi-
tion at the Lodge School will be received
by the undersigned up to 3.00 p.m, on
Thursday the 12th July, 1951.
Candidates must be the sons of
Parishioners in straitened circumstances
and not less than 8 yeafs nor more than
12 yeurs old on the date of the examina-
tion which will be held at the School
at 10.30 a.m. on Friday the 13th July,
1951. Applications forms can be obtairpd
al my office during office days and hours
cnly. Baptismal certificates to accom-
pany applications.
R. S. FRASER,
Clerk to the Vestry,
St. John.
5.7.51—6n.









NOTICE
The Estate of
GEOFFREY LLEWELLYN
HINDS-HOWELL
(deceased)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ail
persons having any debt or claim against
tne Estate of Geoffrey Liewellyn Hinds-
Howell who died in this Island on the
19th November 1948 are hereby
required to send particulars of their
claims duly attested to the undersigned
Fustace Maxwell Shilstone and Lindsay
Ercil Ryeburn Gill the duly constituted
attorneys in this bland of Lloyds Bank
Limited of England, the qualified execu-
tor of the will of the deceased, in care
of Messrs. Cottle Catford & Go., No. 17
High Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors on
or before the 22nd day of August, 1951,
after which date we shall proceed to
distribute the assets of the deceased
among the parties entitled thereto, hav-
ing regard only to such claims as we
shall then have had notice of, and
we will not be lable for the assets or
any part thereof so distributed io
any person of whose debt or claim we
shall not have had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are r ted to settle their
indebtedness without delay.

Dated this 22nd $x 9 June, 1951.

E. M. ILSTONE,
L. E, RB. GILL
Attorneys for Lioyds Bank
Limited, the executors of
the will of Geoffrey
Liéwellyn Hinds-Howell,
deceased

23.6.51-—4n.

9£990990590090070 999500;
WANTED

CLEAN OLD RAG |
Delivered to
y Advocate Press Room

PP SCCCSOSEESO SCOPE COOP CO







or further particulars, and conditions

ot sale, apply to
COTTLE,- CATFORD & CO

7.7.81-—6n

tt tt nee

AUCTION

__————

I have been instructed by The
Govt in Executive Committee to
sell by public Auction at Seawell, on
Wednesday the 11th at 2 o'clock. One
Dodge Ambulance Terms Cash

D’'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Government Auctioneer
TI—h







T am instructed to offer for sale that
very comfortable stone Bungalow called
“Marwin” at Maxwell Road, Christ
Church, It is nearly shaded with trees
and is off the main road with open
verandah, drawing and dining rooms,
2 bedrooms, toilet and bath, garage and
servants room together with the land
on which it stands. & is at present
vacant,

For particulars apply to

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Magazine Lane,
Dial 3743. 7.7.51—8n
innesinhpttcen ns ical etieninaiansinienatanaadiapattetsitatinin

T have been instructed by the
Government in Exécutive Committee to
offer for sale by public auction at the
yard of the Department of Highwuys
and Transport on Friday next the 13th
at 1 p.m. one 1940, 18 H.P! Vauxhall
Velox blue Saloon car, It has com-
paratively new tyres and the up-
holstery as good as new. Terms cash
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Government Auctioneer

7.7. 51—5n

Under The Diamond Hammer

By instructions received I will set up
for sale by public auction on Thursday
next the 12th July at 2 o'clock at Lower
Station Hill, St. Michael, one double
roofed house with shop attached, and
1,168 sq. ft. of land. Also the household
furniture. Terms cash. D'Arcy A. Scott,
Auctioneer. 6.7.51—5n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

By recommendations of Lloyd Agents
we will sell on TUESDAY 10th July at
our Mart, High Street. 222 Drums
One O One, 10 pes. Wallboard, 2 Came-
tas, 984 Tins Heinz Soups, 9 Ladies’
Hats. Sale 12.30 o'clock Terms Cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers









NOTICE

APPLICATIONS for one vacant St
Philip's Vestry Exhibition tenable at the
Lodge School will be received by the
undersigned not than Saturday
14th July 1951,

Candidates must be sons of Parishioners
in straitened circumstances, and must
be under the age of twelve years.

A birth certificate must be forwarded
along with an application form obtained
from the Parochial Treasurer's Office

Parents and/or Guardians will be
rotified of the time and place of the
entrance examination,

P. 8. W. SCOTT,
Clerk to the Vestry,

later







BARMADOS.

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT oF







i

River Ports.
er a en
accammodation.

tary, University College Hospital, Mona, St. Andrew,
efore 30th September, 1951.

Jamaica, B.W.1



* These vessels have limited passen ger







ve Warkaite ompensation Act. 4a | —_—_— ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
Ne > is hereby given that CANA|
ere re she Ors. St. Patrick, j Applications are invited for the following vacancies at the new APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD. IAN SERVICE
OF abebeAiid Saaceshict dies ak coe |! niversity College Hospital, duties to commence on the Ist. January =
mult of a broken neck which he su:-|/952;— ;
tained when he was thrown from 1 Medical Registrars ,................... Lope
ractor at Waldron Corner, Ch. Ch. an Surgical Registrars 3
that © a F 8 ’ at . Strars .... oie 98 ‘ ;
aie ee eet Dae ee The appointments will be for one year in the first instance
All dependants of the above-nameu|Salary in the scale of £700 to £1,000 per annum depending on ex
Clarence Weekes, deceased, and other {perience and qualifications. 5% of salary will be deducted for super OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

parties concerned are hereby required to
“appear at the Assistant Court of Appeal




on Wednesday, the Ist dé of August,
1951, at ten o'clock a.m
Dated this 4th day of 1951
s. ¥ GILKES.
Ag. Clerk, A.CLA
17 Sen
FORM I
THE LAND ACQUISITION
ACT, 1941
(Notice required by Section 3)

NOTICE is hereby given that it appear
to the Governor-in-Executive Committee
that the lands described in the Schedule
hereto and situate at the district of St.
Christopher in the parish of Christ Church
in the island of Barbados are likely to
be needed for purposes which in the
opinion of the Governor-in-Executive
Committee are public purposes, namely
for increasing school buildings snd fur-
nishing playgrounds for St. Christopher's
Girls’ School

THE SCHEDULE

ALL THAT certain parcel of land con-
taining one rood and seven perches,
more or less, adjoining the lands of St.
Christopher's Giris School and bounding
en lands of M. Hazlewood, of A. Clarke,
of Estwick Kirton and on the public
highway alleged to be in the ownership
or occupation of Mrs. Sarah Kirton of
Hopewell, Christ Church

Dated this 25th day of June, 1951, at
the Public Buildings in the City of
Bridgetown in the Island of Barbados,

By Command,
R. N. TURNER,
Colonial Secretary
3.7.51—-3n



NUTICE

Re Estate of
GEORGE NATHANIEL WILLIAMS

deceased.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claims

Nithaniel Williams deceased late of
Beckles Road, in the Parish of Saint
Michzel in this Island who died on the
30th. day of November, 1950 are reques
ted to send in particulars of their claims
duly attested to the
LEWIS, Qualified Executor of the Will
Nathaniel Williams
Spry Street,
age on

undersigned HUGH

of the said George
deceased, c/o K. Sandiford
Bridgetown,





over Springer








E or affecting the estate of George
t

or before the 15th day of September, 1951,
efter which date ¥ shall p d to dis
tribute the assets of the deceased, among
the parties entitled thereto having re
gard only to such claims of which I
Shall then have had notice and 1 shali
not be liable for the assets or any part
thereof so distributed to any person of
whose debt or claim I shall not then

have had notice
And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their in-
debtedness without delay
Dated this 6th. day of June,
HUGH LEWIS,

1951





St. Philip. ! Qualified Executor of the will of
4.7.51—On George Nathaniel Williams, decsd.
a ep poco | 9.6 51—4n.
NOTICE 0
Re Estate of | NOTICE
PRINCE ALBERT HOLDER. The Estate of
deceased ELSTON WATSON
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all - (deceased)

persons having any debt or claim against NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all

the Estate of Prince Albert Holder late
of the parish of Saint John who died
in this Island on the 2nd day of May
1950, are hereby required to send par-
ticulars of their claims duly
to the undersiened Mrs. Eileen Fred-)
erick the qualified Executrix of the
Estate of the deceased, in care of Messrs.
Carrington & Sealy of Lucas Street,
Bridgetown, Solicitors on or before the
11th day of August, 1951, after which date
} shall proceed to distribute the assets of
the deceased among the parties entitled!
thereto having regard only to such claims

attested |



persons having any débt or claim against
the Estate of Athelston Watson who diea
in England on the llth July, 1995

are hereby required to send particulars
of their claims duly attested to the un-
dctrsigned Eustace Maxwell Shilstone and
Lindsay Ereil Ryeburn Gill the qualified
administrators cum testamento annexo of
the Estate of the deceased, in care of
Messrs. Cottle Catford & Co, No. 17
High Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors on
er beforé the 22nd day of August, 1951,
after which date we shall proceed to
distribute” the assets of the déceased





of which I shall then have had notice | jinong the parties entitled thereto hav-

and that I will not be liable for the assets fing regard only

or any part thereof so distributed, to any
person of whose debt or claim I shall not
then have had notice
And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their indebt-
edness without delay.
Dated this 8th day of June, 1951.
EILEEN FREDERICK,
Qualified Executrix of the Estate of





Prince Albert Holder, deceased.
9 6.51—4n
NOTICE
Re Estate of
FRANCIS EDWARD CRAIG
Deceased .

NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim against
the estate of Francis Edward Craig iate
of the parish of Christ Church who died
in this Island on the 28th day of April
1951 are hereby required to send par-
ticulars of their claims duly attested to
the undersigned Mrs. Nita McLean Hur-
vey Read the qualified executrix of the
deceased in care of Messrs R. S. Nicholls
& Co., Roebuck Street, Bridgetown,
Solicitors on or before the fifteenth day
of September 195), after which date 1
shall proceed to distribute the nesets of
the deceased among the parties entitled
thereto having regard only to such claims
of which T shall then have had notice,
and that I will not be fiable for the
assets or any part thereof so distributed
te any person of whose debt or claim 1
shell hot then have had notice

All persons indebted to the said estate
are requested to settle their indebtedness
without delay ‘

Dated this 6th day of July, 1951

ITA Me LEAN HARVEY READ
Qualified Executrix of the Estate of
Francis Edward Craig ne

7.7.51—4n





To-day’s 6. A. Song

“Home Sweet Home”

“Mid pleasures and palaces
though we may roam”
“There is no place like

home”
.... If there
1S A GAS COOKER.



to such claims as we
shall them have had notice of, and we
will not be liable for the assets or an



part thereuf so distributed to any per-
son of whose debt or claim we shail
not have had notice,

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their indebt
edness without delay

this 22nd day of June, 1951

E. M. SHILSTONE,

L. E. R. GILL,

Qualified Administrators
cum testamento annexe of

the Estate of Athelston
Watson, deceased,
23.6.51— An



i, Aan, A, A, A, A, A, AP

Christian Science )
Reading Room

1ST FLOOR, BOWEN & oe

| Dated
i
|

(Broad Street)

Hours: 10 a.m.—2 p.m.
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridayn,
10 am. —12 o'clock Saturdays.
At this Room

the Bible and
the Christian Science text-book I
Seience and Health with key to

the Scriptures by MARY BAKER )

EDDY may be read, borrowed,
or purchased

VISITORS ARE hae: |
OE EO a

ao sl ie A a AE AD

=



WAR!

CONTINUES ON PRICES
OF $100,000 GOODS AT

THANTS

| Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466





annuation and £100 will be deducted in respect of board, residence
*. Further information may be obtained from the Hospital Manage















C
and Séeretaty. Vessel From Leaves peda :
Applications with full details and two recent testimonials shoul [3.g. «spa r" 9 . huly |
be sent to the Hospital Manager and Secretary, University Colleg , “AD sean 23rd June oath July
. tan o & ; : , : . ok rlasgow 6th July 20th July
fot the West Indies, Mona, St. Andrew, Jamaica, B.W.1., before 30th . “TRADER” Liverpool Tth July 2ist July
September, 1951, 30.6.51—2n . “STUDENT” London 10th July = 24th July
& : . “EXPLORER” . London 10th July 26th Jus
Make sure you ask for Sloan’s Liniment . “SPEAKER” : . Liverpool 20th July Ath Aus
dann elnd Yohei mange gertocts einai dil eens eyepiece
i] apply it to your rheumatism—then— HOMEWARD FOK {HE UNITED KINGDOM
i rm Closes in
pa ns and ~) es Vessel For Barbados
3S, “SCULPTOR” . Liverpool 18th July
3S, “TRIBESMAN” London 25th July
iS. “STRATEGIST . Greenock 26th July



Por further information apply tc - -

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents

RECETVED







You cannot get anything better
for your muscular pains than
Sloan's Liniment. Simply apply it
lightly — don’t rub — and relief is
quick and certain.

LOOK FOR THE PICTURE OF DR, SLOAN ON THE PACKET,

SLO



JUST

Large shipment of

WHITE LEAD & ZINC IN OLL AND FERGUSSON'S
DRY COLOURS




























THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM,

From ali chemists and stores. — Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets
hte ~~ nee onnoonmnnrhenenhnntnnhnnsr ti nnnnrrroeennnentintit tives.
' ( SON

Have YOU Visited...
Noid is APPLICATION FOR

THE EVANGELICAL dine eigen ALPH - A - BEARD

BOOK DEPOT NATURALIZATION
D ete A.M.- INST, DB. E. F.V.A,
(Adjoining gg jee a tmmehe Sy. Vi Auctioneer and Real Estate
(Chiropractor) Waiting Gills Road, Bridgetown is apply- Arent
rete eation, ad thst any person’ we




Offers You:
Seveval interesting Properties in St. James, @hrist Church,
Navy Gardens and Silver Sands

knows any reason why naturaliza~
lion should not be granted snowed
send a written and sign
ment of the facts to the
Secretary 7

THE DEPOT for Bibles and
Christian Literature,
Oven to 12






noon Daily
3.7.51—6n

9 om


















| JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(
{
| Lower Broad St. — Upstairs over Newsam’s
]





For Further Information
Please Ring
4683




Hardwood Alley P.O. Box 279



‘

DRESSES
%

x,

a,

EVENING, COCKTAIL, AFTERNOON and BEACH ;
Ready-Made and Made-to-Order :

Also — %.

BEAUTIFUL HANDBAGS from $7.89 to $10.61 \

4,

$5.30 per pr.
$6.08

LADIES PYJAMAS—Plain
{ Fr is Floral
NYLON PETTICOATS...... JN LER Ce i. $7.32
{

50%, SAVINGS

CHECK THIS LIST




APPL PP PEEL OTTO

GOOD NEWS:





LADIES’ SANDALS

44

BRASSIERES 86c. up

















; ane et

x , . . . % NIGHTIES $3.00 up 7 .

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PUP WY 4 44, $0 ve?



PAGE EIGHT



PLAYING FIELD ENQUIRY

Page 5
lorries doing tnis
removed more than
50 per cent of the houses from
the 1 the Bay Estate.

Mr. Cox:,] know nothing about
that, As far as I remember there
were over 20 lorries doing this
work and they came from various
parishes. I do not know wnat
percentage these lorries that you
are referring to did.

Job Given Away

@ From
Cox thar these

work actually

ood area to

Tne Commissioner; Mr. Cox,
Myr. Duguniit toid us that he
went to Mr ‘vudor 10) «—asK
lor the job ot. removing a
building from Seaweli to the
iieef, and that Mr, Tudor toia
tum the job had been given away
to you already; that Mr. luau

also said he could go and see you
und he did so.

jar. Cox: I
what I have
concoction.

fhe Commissioner: In the in-
terview with Mr. Tudor after the
loss Mr. Tudor said he had made
the statement to you: “What have
you gone and done? One of your
men has carried away some of the
material.”

am satisfied from
heard that



vhis is a

Mr. Cox: That is not true.

The Commissioner: Can you
suggest why Mr. Tudor should say
this thing which as you
untrue?

Mr. Cox: The statement 1s v"ry
clumsy. I am definitely sure taat
Mr. Tudor knows me so well he
would not attempt to besmirch my
character. I do not think people
would take that seriously

The Commissioner: After you
hed reported the loss of the
iterial, did you take any further
steps?

Mr. Cox: No.

Attorney General; Mr. Cox, Mr
Duguid told us that you got the
permits from the Police for trucks
to go to the airbase.

Mr. Cox: That is not so

Permits Granted

Attorney General: I have here
a book from the police in respect
of these trucks. Ido not know
who got the permits but I see here
that one truck is supposed to be
yours. Duguid two, Francis one
and one in your name. This is a
counterfile of the permits. Did
you apply for this permit?

Mr. Cox: No. Mr. Duguid tole
me that he would have to get the
permits. He knows the number of
my truck very well

Attorney General: Did the lorry
2381 go up at Seawell?

Mr. Cox: As far as I know it did
not go up there. It was not used.
T gave Mr.
after and as I can see from that



n

he did get permits for the trucks He bought it.

2861 and 258.
using four trucks,
not used.

Dangerous

He anticipated
but 2361 was

The other new witness to give Cox. — :
evening ners in business.
'T. W. Miller who
of the St,
a them to be good friends.

evidence during the
session was Mr.
has been a member
Michael Vestry for
half years.
Mr. Miller:
evidence, Mr.
thing I did not quite hear.
would like that cleared up.
The Commissioner: |
note which I believe you may
referring to, It was that Mottley

four and

Cox said

say, is

At the end of his
some-

have a
be

his own defence to try to bring
innocent people into a matter
like this.

I do not know how far I will go
with the Party to which I belong
and of which he is a member. I
will sever my conection with that
party! ;

I have done nothing to him! 1

have said nothing against him
about carrying away a hut! I have
not come here to give evidence. I
told Dr. Cummins night before I
was not prepared to give evidence
and he told me if 1 spoke to teil
whatever I knew of the matter.
! While I was here Cox in his
ending up remarks trieu to tarnish
the character of an innocent man.
1 have nothing more to say.

The Commissioner: | quite un-
derstand how sou feel






Mi, Milter: Ist feel ‘hurt!
Mr. Mettley: ‘cu said some-
thin hout Mr. Cox coming to
} é one morning aecom-
panied by Nelson and he remon-

strated with you for not defend-
ing him against the Vestry’s at-
tacks. You told him if he were
present he could not defend him-
self. | would like that explained.

Mr. Miller: Because as a mem-
ber of the House and Executive,
on every occasion he used his in~
fluence to get work for his lorries.
The Leader of the Government, the
President of the Party has spoken
to him in council over that very
matter.

Cox's féeelings—and he express-
ed them re, “the lorries are
mine. I pay taxes for them and
they must .yet work.”

And if he connived with Tudor
to remove this hut and he placed
you or another member of the
Vestry for criticism. how can I
defend him?

Wide Scope

Attorney General: I do not want
tc interrupt Mr. Mottley, but we
are not here to enquire into Mr.
Cox's method of doing business. I
think we are straying a little.

The Commissioner: The scope of
this enquiry is very wide. I do not
wish to... Mr. Mottley I take ¢
assumes that his questions bear. . .

Mr. Mottley: Anyhow, your ex-
planation is that he puts himself
in a position to be criticised anc
that was his lookout. In other
words you were not going to be a
party to stifling that criticism if
it were justifiable?

Mr. Miller: Quite.

Mr. Mottley: Throughout an-
other issue this morning, there
was a question of huts and lorrics.
You actually said that some of the
lorries were actually put into your
. .. What were the numbers?

Mr. Miller; M-258 and M-1301.

“Mr. Mott You are quite sure



Duguid the thing to see they are his lorries?

Mr. Miller; The lorry 258 is his.
He also intimated
to me that he would buy a lorry
in Miss Francis’ name.

Good Friends

Mr. Mottley: You know Mr.
You know them to be part-

Mr. Miller: I do not know about
partners in business. I know

Mr. Mottley; You made a strong
statement of Mr. Cox using his
influence in the Government vo
secure work for his lorries,

Mr. Miller: Everybody knows
that. What I am concerned about
Js bringing my name into the hut.

told him that he knew where the What work he got by Govern-

huts were and Miller knew. Is ment is nothing to do with the
that true? Princess Alice Playing Field.

7 ' Mr, Redman was recalled to put

Mr. Miller: There is not the jn evidence some records of min-

slightest
statement

atom of truth in

tries to bring me into it

tarnish my character.

I have heard many TUMOUTS, ceived a cable saying he cannot
said that he has

so now!
for
last
innocent

not
would I say
and dangerous
Cox to sit here and in his
words try to bring an
man into it!

but I have
them! Nor

It is nasty

As a result of the stand I took
when the Vestry made an inves-

that utes about

Nothing had been said yjsor’s duties and his appointment,
about me throughout all the evi-

dence, but in the last moment he
and

the Building Super-

Attorney General; | may state
now that I tried to get Mr.
Charles Worrell who is at present
employed in St. Lucia. We re-

come but he would
questionnaire,

In view of the absence of Miss
Arne, Social Welfare Officer, I
have some minutes to record.

The Commissioner: Have you
made any etfort to try and get
Mr. Dash the auctioneer’s sale

answer any

tigation, Cox came to my home
and said, “Tommie, I expected book. : 7
you, to defend me yesterday at Attorney General; I have tried

the Vestry against Mr. Mottley to get documents about the sale.

Mr. Mottley
told Cox in

when

me.” I my

was attacking
drawing 1
room that I could not defend him whether in

Chere is little available,
The Commissioner: The point is
fact 13 huts were

and if he were present he could there.

not defend himself.

Mr. E. K. Waclott; He sold 12.

He left my home at once and It is obviously a mistake, maybe

did not speak to me after that.

He went
Vestry election
against me.

and

Prior to the removal of the hut
he asked me to allow him to put possible explanation.

around during the last he might have found

in advertising or when he went up
that two

canvassed were really one—a kitchen and a

wash house say.
Attorney General; There is one
Originally

his lorries at me after he had there were 20 odd and four were

nowhere to put them, and the withdrawn, maybe another was

lorry M-258 that I hear belong subsequently withdrawn,

to Miss Francis but which I hap- 2

pen to know belongs to Cox, too. Mr. D. G. Leacock, Jnr., and
I want to make it clear that Mr. B. A. Weatherhead, past

when he was removing the huts Churchwardens, also gave evi-

with his lorries, they were
at my home.
It is a most sinister motive, |

not dence, reports of which will ap-

pear tomorrow
The enquiry continues today at

maintain, for anyone after giving 9 a.m.

They'll Do It Every Time seine By Jimmy Hatlo

How AciLe THE FINGERS

OF DOCTOR LA BOTTS~ — FoR THE BENEFIT
OF THE STUDENTS“
THIS IS KNOWN AS
THE GORGONZOLA KNOT»
FIRST A BOWLINE OVER
THE DOUVENUMâ„¢THEN A
HALF HITCH WITH A
Se HAWSER BEND BETWEEN

HIS FORTE IS THE
TYING OF SURGICAL
KNOTS +










< DON'T
Â¥ KNOW HOW
HE DoES IT! Z

orig

THE
















GASTRIC COTTER:

PIN AND SPLEENâ„¢



But wn wis TUXEDO
HIS TROUBLES BEGIN'+HE CAN'T
TIE THAT SHOELACE UNDER HIS CHIN’

~-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



choolboy Wins
U.K. Tennis Title

WIMBLEDON, July 6.

A powerful backhand proved too much for the cannon-
ball service, and American college boy Dick Savitt beat Aus-
tralia’s Ken McGregor in a 63 minute three set fifal for
the All-England lawn tennis championships.

The United States player won the sixtyfifth renewal of
the oldest and most prized tournament in the world by
decisively outpointing his rival 6—4, 6—4, 6—4.

Victories assured the Untied
States of triumphs in both men’s
und women's singles. Doris Har.
meets Shirley Fry in tomerrow's
All-American women’s finals.

After the first few nervous
games of set one, big 24-year-old
Savict displayed caampionship
form. His devastating backhand
cross the court was-too much for

curly haired McGregor who
fought a losing battle from the
start.

Tomorrow's women’s _ singles
finalists Hart and Fry made short
work of their American com-

patriots Miss Beverley Baker and
Miss Nancy Chaffee in Women’s
Doubles Semi-final. They won,
playing well within themselves
6—0,. 6—2 and qualify to
holders Louise Brough and Mar-
garet Osborne Dupont.

meet



Rain Washes Ou
Play At Old Trafford

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 6.

Heavy overnight rain foilowed
by another downfall at lunch time
prevented any play taking place
in the second day of the Third
Test at Old Trafford.

An inspection was made at 11.30
a.m. and again at 12.30. After-
wards it was announced that the
public would be adrnitted to the
ground but that no money would
be returned in any circumstance.

The wicket may prove too wet
tomorrow to assist the spin bowl-
ers but if a hot sun comes out
and turns it into a sticky one,

In the semi-final of the Men’s England may have a hard fight

Doubles,
Egypt and

Jaroslav

Erie Sturgess

Drobny of
South

Africa beat Gardner Mulloy and
Dick Savitt of the United States Test victims to 150 by claiming

4—6, 6—4, 6—3, and 6—4,
Doris Hart and Shirley

Fry

for first innings lead, and much
would appear to rest on Hutton

Bedser who brought his total of
wickets in the

seven first South

African innings is now fourth in

(U.S.A.), entered the final of the the list of bowlers who have taken

Women’s Doubles
erly Baker

beating

Bev-
and Nancy Chaffee (155), Sydney Barnes (189) and

(U.S.A.) 6—0, and 6—2, Jaroslav

Drobny, (Egypt) and Eric Sturgess taken more.

(South Africa) beat yardnar
Mulloy and Dick Savitt (U.S.A.)
4—-6, 6—4. 6.3, and 6—4

Frank Sedgman and Ken Mc-
Gregor, (Australia) beat Budge
Patty and Hamilton Richardson
(U.S.A.) 6—4, 6—2. and 6—3.
Mervyn Rose and Mrs, Nancy
Bolton (Australia) beat title-
holders Erie Sturgess (South
Africa) and Louise Brough
(U.S.A) 7—5, and 6—2.

—(U.P.



Sports Window

Today the Second Day of play
in the second seri¢s of the First
Division and Intermediate Cricket
matches takes place The Third
series of second Division games
will opt, Games begin at | 30
p.m, They are as follows:—

FIRST DIVISION

Wanderers v Empire at Bay

Pickwick v. Spartan at Oval

Police v. Y.M.P.C, at Park

College vy Carlton at College

Combermere vy. Lodge at Com-
bermere,

IN TERMEDUATE

Cable & Wireless v. Spartan at
Boarded Hall,

Mental Hospital vy. Wanderers at
Black Rock,

Regiment vy. Empire at Garrison
Windward v. Pickwick at Congo

Road,
SECOND DIVISION
Empire v. Combermere at Bank
Hall,
YMP.C. ¥ Wanderers at
Beckies Road,

Lodge v. Foundation at Lodge,
Carlton v. ¥ MPC, at Carlton
Central v. College at Vaucluse.
Leeward v, Pickwick at Foster's
SHOOTING
The Barbados Rifle Association
will hold « practice Shoot over
300, 500 and 600 yards at tha
Government Range at | pm.
NETBALL
There will be a Netball Prac-
tice at the ¥.W.C.A, at 5 p.m
Many girls are now taking a
keen interest in these practice
games.





WHAT’S ON TO-DAY

Princess Alice Playing Field
Enquiry 9.00 a.m,

Police Courts 10.00 a.m.

Police Band plays for Charity
Concert in aid of Boys’
Club at Speightstown 8.00

p.m.
CINEMAS
Empire—"Olty Lights” 445 and
4.30 pom,
Globe—"Royal Wedding” 5.00 and
8.15 pom,
Aquatic—'Broken Arrow’ 5.00 and
4.30 pom.

Plaza, Bridgetown ‘The Breaking
Point’ 445 and 8.50) p.m,

Olympic—"‘Tll Get By” and “Two
Flags West" 4.30 and 8.15 p.m.





The Weathe
TODAY
Sun Rises; 5.44 a.m,
Sun Sets: 6.25 p.m.
Moon (First Quarter)
July 12
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Water; 3.24 a.m.,
5.24 p.m.
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nil
Total for month to yester-
day: 1.06 ins.
Temperature (Max) 85.5° F
‘Temperature (Min,) 79.0° F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
-(3 p.m.) E.S.E.
Wind Velocity: 13 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.999
(3 p.m.) 29.929





Â¥ WHAT'S EATING
You, ANYHOW =
L THOUGHT you
WERE. HAVING







IT'S DRIVING
ME CRAZY!

eV





THANX To
DAVID J. CALICCHIO, MQ, |
9 KESWICK ST, |

BOSTON |5 MASS.

most Test wickets. Maurice Tate

Clarrie Grimmett (216) have
But Bedser’s record
is more remarkable since he has

appeared in only 30 Tests.



H. COLLEGE WINS

KNOCK OUT CUP!

Harrison College hag won the
Knock Out Cup in the Basket-
ball Competition. The school team
defeated Carlton 28—21, in the
finals last night at Y.M.P.C.

The game was thrilling from
beginning to end. At the end of
the first quarter the points ‘were
four all. Half time found the
score .10—9, in favour of College.
College increased their lead sand
by the end of the next quarter
they had Carlton 16—13. Carlton
fought hard but were eventually
beaten by seven points.

YACHT CLUB TENNIS
TOURNAMENT

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS

MIXED DOUBLES

Miss D. Wood and Dr. C. G.
Manning, beat Mr. and Mrs. C. B,
Sisnett 6—3, 6—1.

MEN’S DOUBLES

J. H. Manning and F, D. Barnes,
beat V. Hutson and G. Watson,
6—1, 6—2, 6—4,

TO-DAY’S FIXTURES ..
MEN’S SINGLES

J. B. Trimingham vs. Dr. F. G.
Reader.
MEN’S DOUBLES
F. P. Edgehill and J. H. C
Edgehill vs. G. H. Manning and
F, D. Barnes,


















,oldfish B :
« }
Goldfish Beat |;
~ + %
ea Nymphs |
j &
Two goals peored by Pitcher, | $
ene in the first half and the other | $
in the second half, gave Goldfish a | 8
narrow. victory over Sea Nymphs ! %

in their water polo match at the} >
Aquatic Club yesterday ¢fternoon. | %

+
In the other match Mermaids | %&

easily defeated the Ursuline Con-| ¢
vent 14 goals to love. Ann Suth-| %
rland scored five goals and Jean‘ &
Chandler four, June Hill three and | 9

Jean McKinnor: two for Mer-| \
maids ss
Charmaine Goddard in goal for |



the Ursuline Convent was kept] %&







busy and de: pite the high _ Score Music by Mr. C. Curwen’s
she saved many other certainties. aon
The referee was Mr. Basil x a ak Orchestra »
Brocks x 7 7.51—In. x
eb hese > ienk: | SCCCSS SOGOU ODOVESBE?
See 4 Nom nh : : A Eckstein } CLEP LEE EEE EP CPIPIOE
i we . - - * <
(Capt), J. Eckstein, T. Browne, | % +
M. Knight, B. Mahon, N. Jones, B. | * ASK ©
Williams. 1% YOUR GROCER %
Goldfish: B, Hunte, D. Johnson, | & eS
P. Fitz Patrick, M. Lopez, M. Tay- | % ‘
lor, P, Pitcher (capt), R. Clarke. | ¥ %
Mermaids: J. Croney, J. Chand-| * JA B »
ler (Capt.), J. McKinnon, H. Mc- | 3 ~
Kinnon, T. Ince, J. Hill, A. Suth-| \ q ‘
erland, % THE ORIGINAL &
; mn x %
Ursuline Convent: M. Fung'y
(Capt.), L. Netto, S. Walton, B.]% AND STILL %
Henzell, J. Lashley, E. Parsons} & > -
and C. Goddard. % THE BEST %
y ‘ 1 a7 ¥ .
f -— & CREAM CRACKERS —
‘ 4
Faulkner Wins z Supplies Always Available. x
% .
IRELAND, July 6. % e 3
Max Faulkner, British Ryder Cup] . x
player, won the British open golf} X Stokes & Bynoe Ltd. %
Championship with 72 hole score] % <
of 285. But his victory was not $ Agents ¥

Antonio | »®
70 score

assured until Argentine
Cerda returned with a
for an aggregate of 287.

—U.P.

ET OE
CRYPTOQUOTE No. 43 |
‘ |
ve AO QWHRVWI RE
| HOXRFRVB Re YV AO
| RHHOXRFRVWIXG HOXRFRVWI |
| NOBB \
Last Crypt Whispering tongues
can poison truth; and constancy
lives in realms above.—Coleridge
| nee |
)
(





] J. A. CORBIN & SONS. |
LESTE ETN
TO-NITE TO-NITE

SATURDAY Night JULY 7, 195)

A Dance

sponsored by —~

Mr. GORDON YEARWOOD
(better known as Tourist)
At QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE

ADMISSION 2/-











SSS)

Remember you are invited

to
1 a
A GRAND DANCE
AT THE PRINCESS ALICE
PLAY FIELD
On Monday Night, July 9th,
1951
By the Misses Gwendaline
and Louise Greenidge, bet-
ter known as Gwen and Siss
Admission:
|

Musie by Mr. Hoppy Jordan's Ork
BAR SOLID
SSS

Gents 2/- Ladies 1/6

Refreshments on Sale — Bar Solid



Preity

Per Yard

Beige, Tu
wide. Per

———









IMPORTANT
TO PLANTERS !!










Manure spreaders

Trailers, ete... .

of the following equipment:—

Wheel and Track Tractors

| Our Planter friends are requested
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ROBERT
White Park Road y

SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951



Pniertainment & Dance

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB
(Members Only)
TO-NIGHT
7th, 9 p.m

Saturday, July

Introducing Professor
LUCAS MONTES, Puerto
Rico’s famous MAGICIAN

and VENTRILOQUIST with
his two fantastic “Talking”
Dolls; and LADY ORLANDO

Don’t Miss this Performance! %

Admission to Ballroom $1.00
Dancing until 2 a.m.

MEA AOL AAO OAM A

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ALLA OS

We now have a good selection of Building Materials to
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UNTFEN Termite-proof WALLBOARD

4” thick, 4’ x 8’, 9’, 10’, 12’.

Termite-proof STANDARD HARDBOARD

\%” thick, 4’ x°6’, 8’, 10’.
3/16” thick, 4 x 8’.

“Termite-prool TEMPERED HARDBOARD

PHICHT PINE & DOUGLAS FIR JOISTS & PLANKS
EXPANDED METAL SHEETS

GE BOLTS

ari

CARRIA

6 x 8

& NUTS

Phone 4456, 4267.

SSSSSSSSSSS SOOO SOE.





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. . Cc 73 4 %
Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd. 3
ROSS HeSHeHSNNSe TIS HNN MOTTON ONTO ON SNCS SO LSSSeTN









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r\.i I IGHT HARHAIMIS Hill* \ 11 -Ml l:n\\ II I V 7. IMl PLA > TNG FIELD EISQUIR > ITMI rag* 5 hta own del %  matter %  know how far I will go lb the Party to which 1 belong Mi Cn:,l %  i ich he U a member, i that, A '• ir *' v : —"** m > l " nwtlon wlth tnal %  1 have done nothing to him' I iva said nothing against hln bout carrying n %  not i / . I)[ Cummin* in.;.!' l-efore I fib tp.H'ft AU'UY erwjenei and he loid mr il 1 %|.oke lo toil •" "">" hutever f knew of the | While 1 M her.CM In his %  nding up rem-rl Schoolboy Wins U.K. Tennis Title %  building %  Ji to ihe .... %  %  %  to you gj .id so. I loll. mg I MMilMlinrf: hi UM u> th a the statement to you: "What have KM of join State* of triumph* m both men's I thing men ; %  > say. At-*--, 'he flrtl few nervous Tor (•inin^iM'i; I kultO onW mrs of pal otM big 24 I how MI feel. San ifl >i. !..' %  m 11 form His devastating backhand Hi GoMIUi Beol Sea Nymphs Two goals evored b] .... narrov\_ Sea Nymphs { i water i* match at th* I lub yesterday Afternoon -.-.',•,',,',-. *.::::;: *.',','.--'.*.-.' In the other match Mermaids • f'jted the Ursuline Conh, l't,: ,.ki\ot vnn the sixtyftfth renewal of vent 14 goals to love Ann SutI £ K oldeel and most prlied tournament"... th; li.iin Washes *'"• i'lavAtOlfl Trufford him • try's atI could not defend him* -plained. Hi Mnler: Because %  • %  way some of the DM I th. II. i. he used his inlorries. i "\' Th.,'. \i not emit ant, .h.'the (nuMla-l*Mirr: | • %  atagteg finalists Hart and Fry made short work of then American comB) v-i 1v Baker and MUs Nanev ('halfe.in Wi :>. s, -I.I-J, nal The] won, 6-returned playing well within themselves Thr wl( kl t 6—0. 6—2 and qualify to meet lomill lKllnl'1 1. LONDON, July 6. Heavy ovenughl rain fouowed b) anotfsgt downfall at !umh time prtvontad any play taking place in Ihe second day of the Third Tesl at Old Trafford. An inspection was made at 11.30 am and again at 12.3*1. Afterwards it was announced th:it the public WouM i>< admitted to the ground but that no money would '"y (i rUfinon,' T "l g pin bowlUrsa-Hsu for Mer;,. Chai rd in goal for '*> U %  I i the high score The Mi Beau I i.lrrlainsrfiil \ Itaiirr THE UARKADOS A(. CLUB (Members < > NIGHT %  awavaar, jui> :th. •* p.m Introducing Professor LUCAS MOM Rleo's famOUl MAGICIAN : with : %  <• Talking" Dollsi and LADY ORLANI N I man* Adrak-lw to rlallr.>*tn fl.Mi Dancini until I MM. %  Orchestra INNl'AI l\MI %  t <--l-ill !**."i WAR! nrnnm n not nr sion.Don liiiiiiri M THANI'S era* — \ Rckrrtetn (Cap-1. J PxksleiM. T. Browne. U R Mai %  %  %  M fioldlsh: B. Hunte. D. Johnson, P Fit/ Patrick. M U>i*/ M Ta>lor, P 1'iuhei (eapt), R Bids J C'ronev. J ChandI M.Kinnon. H. MrJ liill. A Sulhv/,V,V/A :'.•. ----Kidney Trouble Causes iackache, Getting Up Nights No Bcncfi^ \*r/ (In -No Pay if. tinlot i n M i si.... uup i i"i tin-in and %  work." And if ha connived %  m of :'!< %  itum. how can I Faulkner VT ins Wide Scope Permits Granted \tieriie> QgeggaJi I i police in respect Miotii't (irneral: I do not u.ii inlenupt Mr. Mottley, but we •',"' %  Boll-wi %  %  r. Cog ni is v rv %  %  %  attempt to i" I ha t %  •mmivlener; After vou u Take any further Mr. lax; No. Attorney Oneral: Mr, Cog, Ml that you got the are not here to enquire Into If •olli of doli think we .inNtr.iy.nK .i Httle. Mr i n n tl not go The ('oaunlaatoner: TI i this enquiry is very wide. I do not wish to . Mr Mottley I take ,• %  Mr. Mulllev; AII.IHVC your : viii of the United States jasi victims t.. i5o bv claimini %  i i. ii i •< :i .in i 'i ., ., „ i, ki i.(. in. ni < South M.ii Han and Snlrhn Fry African innings li BOH fourth III M's.A.i. entered the final of the th.-list ,.i bowler* who have taken lh Tudoi women'i Double* beating n.-v„„,... r ,.., a/kketi Maurice Tat, player, won Ihe liritish open K"i' "••rl&lii U C,(tll Will .tl-.fv %  %  ,-..k jem to try H %  *** 'l*t*lllAOOIII *i-...--), RMIUMATISM (South Afrien) beat airdn ,in. I. s.viti (U.S.A. 4—ft, 6—4. 6 3, and Frank Sodjpnan and Ki %  lion Richard t; i : .< ;,i ,. >. .'. n.l Mi Nun %  beol Eric SUi tnd Loune BrausH (U.S.AI 7 5. and o—2. HI*. II. COLLEGE WINS KNOCK OUT CUP Sportt Window .i.-i. h-. I.I.-. n. i. third l*Ui> |*m*. I.--In .1 I U. they .ire his lorries? Mr Miller: The lorry 258 is his. He bought it. He also Intimated to me that he would buy a lurry in Miss Francis" name, Dangerous Gooil friends Mr Mollle>; You COX You know thei businesd. Mr. Miller: I do not kn know Mr. .. %  1 W Miller who *>r. Milter: 1 do not know about UM ; irtneri In business. I know i,r and a Ihem to l>e good trtandi %  a* x. th. and of hie Mr y/lolUrj: Y,m mautf a 8,ro,, £;, ,• italement of Mr. Cox usliuj i %  said om?ilung I did not quite hear. I 1 111' iiir t •asaateaaseer %  i may IM* hu %  .n the liovernment secure work for his Ionic. Ml llllrr: Everybody knows What I ant concerned about ... me into the but i the What work ho fat bi knev is rneni u nothmi b) do with Ihe ,, „ tllll %  Princen Alice Pleylni field Mr. !tednma was recalled to |mt Mr Millar rhe i Ii not the HI %  record a of mm* hat uta< aboul the BuDdlna Buner' Nothing bad t s Uuliea and his appointment. evl.\tuirnry Qeaaaali l may slate ll ,n "" '"' now thai 1 tried to get Mr. tne into It ai I , li( Worrell who Is at preeeni saanlamtl In 81 Ultaa, We re'' rV??"^ Wived a cable saymg he c.uuiot Came but be would answer any %  nnalro College has won the Knock 'Jut Cup In the Bf geeball Compi tltlO I he sohOO] teurr. defeated Carlton 28—21. in tho finals last night at Y M P C The game wa*. ihrllllng from beginning t<> attacking liure is lltlle available, me." I told C<>\ Ul my drawing The Commwaloaer: Tinpoinl H room thai I could not defend him wnetner m fact 13 huh) were . mid there. MI 1 K. Waeaaak He sold 12. He hsfl %  ihe, maylx* did nd ak uTOT thai when he weni up during the lust he might have found thai two canvassed were really one—a kitchen and a 1 rne h house say. Prior U> Of thl bul Attorney (;rnrral : There is one allow him to put lUon, Originally h % %  tn. re were 20 odd and four were to pul them, and the withdrawn, maybe another was %  i haai belong rubiequently withdrawn. i.ul which I hupknow belongs to Cox, too •" <-• i-eacock Jm and I wan) to make it clear that Mr I* *_ Wcathcrhead. past when he was removing the huts Churchwardens, also gave viwere not d. nee. reports of which will np,,.„ umwrrou ntfrj Bonunue I ;i a.m. They'll Do It Every Time HcW .AG.LE "me FiNGERS c^ DOCTOR LA 6orrs-> R* THE BENEFIT HIS FCeTTE IS THE TYING OF SJRQ CAu KNOTS "•' BLTT IM HIS TUXEDOHIS TROUBLES BEGlN—HE CANT TIE THAT SHOELACE UN'OEK MS CUM'%2%£82? TsHUT'UPi' I TH3U3HT yai K 'A COME OUT HERE' OWM BOW Tl \\"'( IT'S DRIVINS v The Wcatlu r TODAY Sun Rbw*: *. a.m. Sun SeU: iii p.m. Moon (First quarter) July 11 l.irhtlni: 7.00 p m. High Water: 3.24 a.m.. a.24 p.m YESTERDAY Rainfall (t'ndrlniton) nil Total for month to jesterday: 1.06 in* Trmiirralure iMaxi 114* F Temperature (Mini 79.0" F Wlinl IMrertion (9 a.m > E. • (S gun.) ES.E. Wind Velocity: II mileper hour rUrnmctrr <9 a.m ) 'J9.999 (3 p.m I ?.9t9 By Jinimy Hatlo



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I -MI mm ii i.v :, IISI IMKIIUHIMIMX Ml CLASSIFIED APS. v,nLH **"* FOM REVr smuiwF NMKB I'AI.I -I VI Tiumoni IOt I OH SALE t la'on weeti^arav* M"ti •>"•>•"9urMU>" *"• % %  • %  "• rberee IMA 71 • %  •-bee o( %  ortfi up to SO. atvl ** '* %  %  *"Mlir* M *-*. — e fur am. ounce menu of Birth*. Marriage*. Dratha. Achnowl1 aaigiai nt. and In HnMfiMi notkai *JPO-le 1 ."III i *TO> we**!—4 (ami I Par Bb'ha. Marnag* or fnifrmi •fMM>unra*tnu In Carib Calling the J charge i> UN for any number * word* I WWH and %  eenia per word for each %  ddiUonal >ot Term* ctlA Phone 1MB WWm • 3fl -id p re 111) for Uealb \ettr** only after 4 u %  AUTOMOTIVE THANKS "I beg inro.ie.ri Ihi* medlu *to all thoae Hi >d* who lent w-<*th< and raf ivmpatnt i>. ... NHM bare., I cauaed b' the death of r Ri*hoi> %  tag* -In i iiitt %  mm thiaed With Ml mani riuHd i %  % %  Ihrojgh I hi* i ""id ir.ena* ana *>mpa %  %  1 -l-.wH: Ol l'.,dl a >li Prefect ford "•* >'" **** i Ba-a. Swan Btreer EEAL ESTATE •"* **"i in Appl< ?w" i.f' ~ ,h ,r Kr " nw Liu*' H> be .aid b, public eompe,,,,,,,, ,, ,„ ce of the un*.*,,.,,*, on ThuraJa COTTtR. CATf-ORI* aCO. Mil ,(.; T HOUSES SI Or**' II 1 111 i ri AT-At Coral Sand". 1 I modern fumLhed flat rN-J I in pii.1 %  -• —— *Min JTO* .qua,.. („, a, 1--J Biidaelowr, pe, !" ., Whiiepar. B-d %  T 11—n CAR -Light Sin Hudaon Cai in nr.l '~T. SfS*' ully '•* %  •* d llcenaed rail IBta Owner ljMn| laland ptiur %  I. Onfllth. To Mil* Hilt Mai 7 1 li_jf CAR Chfviol.1. p good condition Own*, driven Apply R. H. MaaMab, ui be area at Sion Hill. SI Jama. STB ?: M IN MEMOK.AM i Kit Ml ON In ever our dear .blow hi Julv Bin 1MB. rl I BH | %  .idfaiher Williai pawed away oFor U.-i loving hand* Mill toil i be.t Wvad you did your CM rt.uit .... now eternal real I %  -III-UWI and i-..t'rt-rnili1r 7.1.51>AHnoon [ CABS-IPSO Mom. Minor IP.ooo Mil*. % %  M Kami Oxford t.OBn MiUa utr N>'1MB Mo.ru Six IB HP 1-. %  paMflH lt* Pord Pfad HMO Mi> in ir> food condition IBM Chryurr Byyal A Uium port Ho}al GJI I.W Talapn*.n# BOH %  T SI I:AH t>t I oRimoua. •ion comprising aboui tOO squate MM •riUlta HririfftoHTi. Applications wtU b riWrtHl %  fetor of Prtrolfum anl ; P Iblfc BinUling* up iudin 141h Julv. l5l 30.6.51 --4n. J.tn fltrm on P^da, U,n J,.^ ,, "•patlion apply w> Mi. r.1 l*tr.n iht hmi^ o; > flail" BEMfM * % %  %  *— VTARWOOD IBOTc^*" flOlltllof 1*11 M 1 I .... Partnar on lha pram I Ma ,l !" >f "•twulai. •ppit Hutr1in> for BanH-IO ollrltoi WALL MOl'SB ... •t.ifiB.ral llonw RiluBtr.t | I'M BBHriB. IHill I. Pnrr Moo Hil. Ch fh : ll :• M-CO MBB'RIOBrlAToH '.ill mum Irrailr.f III %  flail Brj-i, unil. RrconditiBiird lb IiiKpwiad .i La* Yard. rh|. Appl< H L, Smith. Kandford Up : || -I t r, vrd n.iiiKh'.oi ,ir>1 %  *• Hi %  UMaa InM KttBwoBd a-k rsnj —_— ualp nn the Bin •' J. It IBB REFRIGERATOR — Or a %  in ood aiorhlnB a W II Tampro %  horn MM4 ... %  : BVBT it b.i. 1-iTib.iL.i I Mother-, rrnj ibt Oermslne Crlrhlr.-. TTM In WaattriB %  Appl. n:2t MISCELLANEOUS A.WOI \M;>II MS Start AMM-I lrNT IOOTHPASTI KM Within a ahorl ba tha winner ol ena of th. lat Brila |BI B>. Tod yju, line' BB 00 id*—Is) UfTA KAJIU~ravUsBl hntei in Caribbaan Hmlri Ironi IT 40 par naad per day GRAND HOTEL—In bait Nflil'tili.,1 diiti.it under flovrrtmirnl Houaa i u I l"im U00 par head per di SEASIDE INN On Giand A"* Bathm* Beam Rale* fn>m M 00 par hrad pai da) KnBjuiraM lo D M. tl • XISAlton Mil Mi NOTICE : %  %  i %  trierainr. ,tli the (MHM BH Ttuwall knoon and irovcn product of Genual Molora C pla I.M.M H BH • thai "PRIOIDAIRK m> aiao oe obtained now caih or on term. IhrouBh K R HUNTE %  rVI LTD. who arc ainKluiH ui i dlHribiillon. and havr aoma niM-hiivaa on show for demnnairntipn i their new SHOWROOM on lower Broad Street Tlir EMTAGE El.FXTRICAL CO S I.il-3n. I III I \illl\ VI AIAMIKUM WAR*.Huhl Palt-iied CJiRBdian Aluminum Sauaapani. Kaiilai H-....irri. Cake Pan.. Peirolaloi. EU roatnarB. Deep Fry art ar E>repti tahie G. W. Huichlnaoti t, Co. Ilro-d and Rorbvrk Straati. AM rHlC AN %  lArji nAiiv Mn 11 %  r' E. ••Hin| T.bl. %  id Chair r, ,„i M "' Is 1".. Tahla .i Bia ., %  %  p NOTICE iHTAHTMINT OF ftCIENCE UfB \i.HU IXTlltE MARKU FOB ATI< LrS MAN I VAi-n Ell) FROM TIRTLkMIHJ Enquiries huve ben recriYcxI at ,Itaih-.tlcStand ,! the Brilish li.iHi'tnc rait a> t<> the -uppl? %  t>d pure* of art Mr ls manufat'ur*d from Turtie-jnell X. Persons tteiiiini further inr.'rmation on thi market are reluesied to communicate with the rfflcai l^aherj omce. The Mit-hael 7.7.51.—IB. dth July. 1951. WAMI II M.ii-ium i-baeoa wuk 73 irnf m U canta S*ada.t 14 u>*d* — oae> aoed %  cn(i a u-ard laaak—4 Hail SHIPPING NOTICES iii\ur %  BB1 %  I MOB aAl.rSMANPrelei.hlv •. %  lnw* c—i aalaa Aai>i> in wrtun* i.. A.. •' POB IBS ririoaatown MM if MlSt EL1..\NE(M'S for AMERICAN MULES I nome of theie Conla. t : erb. Co ltd 11.ah tand> U I MM Par part II-K Ian applr tn D'ARCY A SC-OTT. Magatiiie Lana 3T43 fit] | han-a bran inair Government in B*eri.m orTar for c ,i(, ,r, i,.i, *a-oe |l '* .,<> i Sundae* %  sal .i —Bgii H ii-(*' nbousl't Caauarii %¡ laaar rail la %  7 7 II—In NOTICE si oi IRAADOB Is IMI --! .1 \, i *rr >i • '-. %  •' % %  ( ami., .,.,i„n .I*| i iIhe i. eh he i.i I %  %  i. ,.. a %  %  M i Wedneadav the 41. at ten o'clock a Dated tli.. Btll ,l.o I An Clark A C A. 7 1 M- FORM I IMF I.AN11 ACQ1 ISFUON A.n<(. rRflkltncR, ( %  %  rtll indti %  (to* nipeniifluattaii oontrtbutu I .-i from tinHoeplUI Managtr .-id Iractvtarjr. Applirnticnt should he BBfll 10 UM HOBprl BtOTt i c.iiii'Uf Ho5pitui. MORIL si Andrew Janwifi %  %  • ptefnbrT, 1851. _^ ___ 30 5 2n Apj nvitetl for the fiJlow n %  the new II) I'Mllefp llo-ipit.,:. duties lo mmmni.r on the let. Janunrv %  M.slin.1 Reittstrars . 3 The .ip|K>intmcnU will Infor ore \eur in th, eala of C7O0 to El.ooo IK-I Rnnuni tu-pnuiing on en -I'V rt iii DA deductajd I liTintiatlwii and tlOO will be deductiwl In re-|act of boaiil. MM.II.U'I ''hor information mi] %  il ManaE.Si .i-tary. AjaplU itlori wllk i %  %  ... rJiouli %  ant !. %  UM Hospital Manager ;ind BiWU ry, UnlverHtj Colic ol the YOBI tndlea, Mona, st Andraw, Jnmnica, B.W i bel r, 1051. .me }| |TI S fl 'ARABIA fiem Melbourne llh Jj J. na. Part Alma ill luly *.th. anoiruj r and Barbad... ran. FOH n HflSM PAtBY i late J %  .e BIBISHI J.-.J June. Irtna. %  Mr*] It.ien i*'BO. In addioiui io flertaral curao leaaaat have .mpla .pace fur .Mil. Laainf for iranablpmem a" Tt I • Britlah Uuiann Laaward ntd d laland. r..r further partWulata applenn i IIIISI ADHMXTE T 9r.c. NEW MM -in Jin A Tl Mint *BIB JBth June RK -F.HVKr i NEW ORUIANI SERVICE ALCOA JMLAIUS aall* l-'lh Juna Arrive, llarnadm Uth Jim'. If4t AUX1A BOAMER" -ail. Illh Jun* Anoe. BJBrhadBal Pin July, IMI ALCOA PATRIOT" aaila Iltn Jvily Arrive. Reib*aaa rth July. 1W1 CANADIAN ftEKViCr. Balea Maaaraal Balk I Arrive* R'da*. VI i .< \ Ala'i'A PURITAN \\ i HA il N IN i WANTED t,l I |.\ .Ol.I |.t,|;. HAMBAHOX II *t I i.eommrnt Aided *ca-dar r Day -rhael lar QMS Hlln„ The paaaaaa will be pild nut to Bar* baataB, ball net the irlin. paauBe Tli j.ppolntme-1 11 for Uir> r vcar with Hie option of JoinlnH iwv y* ill ue nanled nder tva eaaa* service, bui iinlorHi'.iii lr paid. (*t Apphcali. -oh copie* of receni CM. ii he forwarded, noi Hit July. IBM. to ihe AeUn| * of queen'* Collefe fUt 'I T 7 al In I'lllSIIWI c RAIGfl (BM I i my*ell reaponiible lot h elaa contrariini any debt i I A MONT CBAeQC. Dndioira Land. BLerk Rent S.7.IIThe public are hereby warned aaralnit niving err*!ii to my wife. Buby Alema Sc.it inaa l^acocki aa 1 do not held ii .niible for her or anyone elaa lontractina any debt or debt* In my iSined' GEORGfc SCOTT. Eck*1ein VilUB*. St Michael. ... FBbl ^.>rn living credit to any parion u* m| iame a1 do not hold I .• i..i .iiynur ficbi or debt. In .nv name unlaaa by written order .ignert bv ma. CAMERON DA COSTA COULTHRUBT. Sandy Ground. ChrtM Church T7B1 | li lFll AVH MINT PO-TACli • T4MPH Ihr nnli'h Writ lndl". Good Ice. Paid al the CARIBItr'AN rAMP SOCOCTV .SF HABIarl F.SPANOL OIIIIMAI CURIOS. SOUVENIRS. ANTIQUES. IVORY. JEWELS. SII.KS Etc. HUMS ss rp-DAY S NEWS FIASB Ten rhanrn to win thousands of dollars for 2 • only, through our B'doo TWrf < i!> Race Syndicates One Copy Left of Latest Edition of Year Book of West Indies $12 00 Rats and Mouse Traps. at JOHNSONS STATIONERY and HARDWARE. PISHING BOAT Complete ouln 1 14 B. by 4 fl Appl to Mr Henry PrkSt Lawranca Oap. enry Price. T.t SI-in %  FARM %  POWDERED PULL CREAM mILK— Buprarna quality and only S4 11 per -Ib tin and II 00 per 1-lb tin Ort a tin to-day from your grocer or Drue Store and try the beal Ik obtalnal.te The - fai *Bi i m leal Indit i 1 for h,. f >ou dealer r baailh and your pocket. = % % %  %  -.., .. %  ,. %  M -• BM 17 S II—l.f.n. 0AI ft 17 S' .... M H Alley VAN ISP •c in ft At H Sll B ^PS he.. fv gauge S Aluminum ..i y i 8ft |S Beard'* P0 lo ft H. %  .! %  .. %  7 1 || J. Auto Tyre Company. Tralalaar Street I'AI.PPIIOIIe-EB FineRAT BAITSl^c i\ %  'iii i-.i **.ii-ii limited period at the Sleel Shed QueenPark, le each S t 11 Jn RECORDS Charlie Kunr, Bir.f. Sw in and we will order for you If v> laven'l fot it In atork A Barnea 4 C Ad t 7 H-t I r MIST A I OIMI LOST -WPfPtTAItr TK*KFT BBTtBd lilt 'Al Finder rewarded on returning Hi •aapli Brail . g s. phn.i. SWF.ri'*tTAKL BOOXa Two gwWBR. •t.ik. Bouk. II-74B0 -i,d IIMil rnulei ple.-e return to Prince Orraohe lfpi.il NOTICE i'v] I-M OF 4T JOHN Applicotioni for one Hi Ve.t.y Eshibion at the Lodfe School win be r> reived by lha iir.deralgiied up to J00 prr „ n Thureday tha Illh July. 1SSI indldatr. muet be Ihr ont of thloner* In atnltmrd circumtancea not leas than S year, nor more than • or. old on tha date of the examlmwhich will ba bald at Ihe School C3U am on Friday Ihe IJth Jul>. ApplK-ation* form, can or obtali|d ly office during office day. and hour* Daptiamal certlrleatr* to acenmipln-.-i FHASFR. NOTICE The ci m i UP i iimimv NIMI* IIOAIM ide*a*ed) NOTICE IB IUWE&Y GIVEN that all peraoni hivn.| any debt or claim aaaimt trie Eatate of OrorTiey Llewellyn Hind. II rll who died In Ihi* l*land on ESS iMh November 19U Bra hereby required lo aand particular* ol ihelr claim* duly -tte*te in Ihe .n itei >ii.e.l F-iatace Ma.aril SluUtonr end Linda*v Ercil Ryeburn Gill the dul eonatitutM attomeya in thi. laland of Lloyds B-• Li-Hied of fkiflind, Ihe qualified BStOTi tor of tha will nf ihe daceaard. In mre ol Me*ar* Collie Calford ar CV. No 17 Huh Btreet. Brtdgelown Solicitor, on EJider Thn lliamand HaniBirr By Inttructionj received 1 will aet up for .air by public auction on Thiirxi.iv next the Ifflh July at I o'clock at Lews* autlon Hill. St MHhael cue doulilr roofed houae wllh (hop attached, and I.IM aq ft of land Aleo Ihe houchold furniture Term. ca*h D'Arrv A Seolt. Auctioneer. UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER By recninmendalioiu of Lloyd Agent are will .HI no TUESDAY lOlh Julv %  u. atari. HlBh Street tn Dium )i .i) One. lo pc. Wallbnard. I Cama •M, BB* Tin. Hem. BotlpB. S tjdlei HalS..le II M o'clock %  I I BRANKFR, TROTMAN CO. /tuctlonrers 1 7 siIn NOTICE APPLICATIONS for one vacant Si Philip* VeMrv FVIL i Lodge Sch.h.1 will BS leeeiVOCl %  '1 undeiiiKiieci n..t ..• %  Mlh J.ily lBSL Candidalei rnviM be ann* nf Parrthlnnert be undei Ihe B |e ..' I M Pater rotlSrd ..ui-i ba forwnr.ki i an appliealion form obtained Parochial Treaaurer* Ofllra and or Guardian* will Ur SCOTT. St Philip. NOTICE I'ttl'.TF. of 'l HFftT HDIJ>PJt .„.. r ,. I NOTICE IS HEREBY tllVPN th.it i pern-"* having any debt or claim ag.nn-t the Eaute of Prine. Albert Hoide, late of the parith of Saint John who died in thi* I-land on ihe }nd day of May IBM. are hereby required tn aand partkular* of their claim* duly atte.tr.l j (A the underala—e) Mra PH-en Pre-•Slca; ii.iautllSedBcicuini ol Iho „ 1(1 peraont indebted lo the ..,,..-.. .-... then In1 >! %  tlh day of June. ISSI HUOH LF.W1S. i I Ihe will at Mgr Nathaniel Willume, dr-ad • I M 4.i silir rfOTI I I -io\ iTBON HlBBoaaBfli \v ,. h,lv. I .1. rularr Ir.gton ol rutg.lown. Bollclt Illh ri.y of Augtiat. IMI. after which dMe I ahall proered lo diitrlhutr the a.a-Sa of the deccaeed among th* partie* entitled thereto having regard onlv to ueh clalim of which f ahall then have had notice %  .nd that I will not be liable for the aaeeti or any part thereof *o distributed, to any panon of whoae debt or claim I ahall not .4 notice And all peraon. indebted to the aald aatate are reqi.eBt-dl lo aetlle U.rlr uidetoled* e.* withoul delay Rh day of June. IBS! F.II.BEN FRF.IhTJ'H K Qunllflrd FWrcutrix of the Eatate of Prtncr Albert lloldey. deceaaed t fl II—4n tall %  reed to deceau-d long lha partie* rh III led Ihrreto. hav I regard only lo auch Claim* ae we ill then have had nol.ee af. anil i will Mot be liable far the a-art. or y part thereef ao giumkmUMI o %  paraon of whoae debt or claim w I %  II not havr had notice And all paraon* indebted to the UI4 lite are requeued to *eitle Iheir lrbt.dt>e*a without dels. Ill I '.II iltorneyn for IJoyda III..L.ir.iied the eierutor. ol Ihe will of CeofTirv l.lewetlvn Hmd'-Hoc. dei-eated XI B % %  ] %  *-. wwrrii CLEAN OLD RAG Drllvereg u. Advocate Press Roou NOTICE Re Eita'e of FRANCIS FDWAHU CRAlG paasBBsg NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a-l iern having any debt or rlulm agaln-t the ettate of Pranrl* Edward Ci.i. .at* of Ihe p. rl*h of Oirlat Church who die 111 ihit.land orHie IBlh flay of Apr>. mil *re hereby required to wnd par ticuUr* of their cUumduly -tlaet'd U tha undesigned Mr. Nlta M-Iraii H...in Bead the q.i.iliSed everutrHt of lha rterea*ed in care of Meter* R S Nirhnll. 1 Co.. Roebuck Street. Bridgetown SolWitor* on or before Ihe fifteenth rt.vv Sei.irmber IMI SI M %  Bail proceed to BJStftatltO tna aaaet* nt He .!ereD*ed iirnni.r Ihf P-'t." "t'l" .r ,-.t,. having retard or ly to .uch claim ii ~l irh I ahall then have had notice -..-I that I will not he liablfor th* .-,.•*!• ar any part thereof an dlatribut*.) t>e.*<.n of ahr.ie rtrbl 8* < lainI Iheri have had notice All o*r*en* lnde*n*d tn the aald eaiM* ire requaatad to aettlthen .. .rw,' riela/ Dated ihi. Oth day nf July 1S9I VITA Mc I.FAN KAR\TV READ Oual.r.ed E.eculr.v of the Eatate ot PrAhCi* Edward Crnig idaeaa.ed Bnglbiid in. ... i I .. i mn iralaaariita aaaeie •! the Eatiile of the dWveaaeu. I Sleaar* (Vile Calford Iligli Street. Bridgetown. Soil..ton on or before the land day uf Auguat. IMI. BAM Which dale r ahall proceed lo feUM lha aa*et* of Ihe d*ceaaad ng tha partie* %  |.nf rearard only lo aucb claim* a. we %  .hall the* hav* had notice of. and we %  III not be liable for the aaaeU or an i no attributed U> any paioti of whoae debt or claim • •*... lot have h. I And all leraona indehlcl lo Um •l.iur me ri c-'.'i -dne* W'lUiD-ted 0UB ESad day of June, im C M SM It-STORK, L. E H OBJ QualllWd Adn ...m Ir.lanif nl. a {Christian Science I Heading Koom I i a VISITORS ARE WEIXOMF | .Broad RrtM Hojr*. 1* S p m Tuaadav. Wrdi. -la. 10 am -11 n At thi* Room %  Brie urarid llei 11. 1 MAIIV HAKI' EDDY may ba rsaa '.-: "' A. Tn-days . A. Sonji ) %  "Home Sweet Home" "Mid pleasures and palaces though we may roam" "There is no place like home" ... II lhere I A OAS COOKER X\ \H mum ES n\ PBJOS ur -.inn nun I.IIIIII 1 |f THAIfl'S Make sure you ask for Sloan's Liniment ~apply it to your rheumatism—thenpains and ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK NI> CI'l.F -i ml. I APrLTs—DA COSTA CO. LTD.—CANADIAN SERVK I HAIIKISON LINE 00TWABD rBOM THZ UNITED KrNODPJI VMI^I } |, „P I i i \nvisFir • %  TRADER" STUDENT EXPI.OMHI • %  SPEAKril" IAI.I.II.II I I.. N Ion London Llvfrpaol 23ld June 71.1 Jill. lOlh Julv imii Jul. tOlh Jul. 20th JllK •M-i H0*li'.WAD FOB THIS UNITED KIHbDUM DRESSES EVENING, COCKTAIL. AFTERNOON n.l IIEAill %  %  %  — Alu) — 11 MI in i II %  %  %  r Flor.l NYLON PETTICOATS l %  lo l.0 S5.3. BM I'. Hal .. 17.3: UOOIf NEWS i nut nn MOUSBWtTB... \ Fresh Supplit". of J "DR. NEDD'S ANT TAPE" arc jgoin once nwii'.iv iilnhk... n Tablag and Saleol ANTP K'i-ii vour houaflBold free from these annoying FaWTfl With DR. NEDD'S ANT TAPE || ir.. Reuu MM i/. rttt. Obtainable at:— Hll.l.ltt /fl#ff.l#\S #* U.I.I'. m% SAVIlfGS CHECK THIS LIST BOOKERS (B'det) -:•.•.•.•.•.::•,:::::'.'.:•.:• DRUG STORES LTD. HA IMIARMA' Y RMSII %  LOCKERBIE HOUSE BRITTONS CROSS ROAD Md ^tone house set in i %  i r in C -'V n'd ffilraiire ( tars, wide side gallery ovcrlookin/Tawn. large lounge, dining Idy, 4 tjedroom-,. kitchen, butler's pantry, nil usual III ,. Klflhl} rerotnmended. • IOIIV \i. Ill 1IIOS 4V i *.. AKS. IV..V Baal Batata Aaaaia, Am llaaaiii a Buildi.i 1 ; Stuv*y*tt Till: FIRM WITH Till: KKITTATION I'l .' "'Ii. Hlanliiliont Rulldlni: III! \SSII HI S Mc. up NIGHTHtS S::KI up Vt.STSZfnr $1.1111 up rCITTON T.WTIKS 2 lor SI.IHI u|i MEN'S HUSK :i puirs lor SI00 LADIES' SIKIKS Value, up to SB.tn Now Sl.r.11 Rloi It. Red. (.rev. Brown l I ((ualilv TWEEDS M" Now SI.7-. CUNTS' KNr.AKI.BK Now si.ar. \lvii .i N.'W I. i HI: .t SPORTS ajtom Al Low Pricm sen SPORT SHIRTS I. I. Ill; a Short Slri ra* Up i |BM Naw s:..7.-. Fine Quallly Lon8le*v KHAKI SHIRTS •I only S.1.25 LADIES' SANDALS IVI.il,St llr.ni n Wl.il.ARed in. Bporl at Bark Now IMI SINGLE BED BEDSmiADB %  Mlllli S.-..II Vow B.TI old] NYUIN liosl: All Sh.nVi A Si, r. si M REMNANTS in Silk.,. Cri'hc A; Sji-m nl I'tibrlirvablp I..... Prlr... PUNTED LINEN H.Ki.lnr Sl.li.l' New $1.29 STIIIPFII SHIR rs •racial S29.1 DOUBLE BED IIIDSPUI.MIS ttPGiilnr S0.7r. Mm MJ only IIAIM* \l\ HOI si: JO, Swan Slrccl — PHONE i. AI.T.MAN. Pr,i|.rii-I,ir 2702 .-.•.•-* -.-.*.'.-.-.•,'.*--,'.*.*.-.*.^*.'.*.--'---*-*-*•'•*•"-' '-' •


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a a



ESTABLISHED 1895



Stage Set F or Cease-fire |

’

Discussions
White Flag Will |
Shelter U.N. Men

TOKYO, July €.
NITED NATIONS AND COMMUNIST leaders
completed long distance negotiations for a
cease fire meeting, and prepared to start Sunday
on face to face talks which could end the Korean
war or signal the start of World War III.
At 9 a.m, Sunday, protected by the white flag
of truce, representatives of General Matthew B
Ridgway will cross the Imjin river and move on
into wrecked Kaesong, ancient Korean capital,
two miles south of the 3%th parallel. |

——# Waiting to meet them will b>
Korea—4th In

Communist delegates of Kim II
Sung, Supreme Commander of the
Non-Korean army and Peng Teh
| Huai, Commander of Chinese Vol-





Men And Money | ‘2.

WASHINGTON, July 6
The Korea war which

fourth bloodiest and costliest con-

startle sod | simply
out as a police action so far is the’ jor top-level negotiators, who will

services.

First mecting at which none will
the rank of Colonel,
will be to clear the decks

be above





mee: Tuesday or shortly there-

flict in United States history in] after to arrange a cease tire.

casualties and treasure.
The year of fighting on the far-
away peninsula has cost the United



An Allied patrol reported Fri-
day that Communist scidiers were
cleaning out and repairing the city

States more dearly than the revo-j hall in Kaesong, the ceasefire city.
lutionary war of 1812 and tne! There was evidence that Com-
Mexican and Spanish~American| munists were also directing traffic

wars combined.

in the city but nething to indicate

Only World War II “the Civi'} that barricades or defending posi-

War and Word War I—in
order—have exacted heavier Uni-
ted States toll.

that} tions were being constructed there

; Allied patrols which have scouted

the area of the city daily since the
announcement of Malik’s ceasefire



5 Latest _ Defence Department) proposal, report there are no
figures show a total of 78,110 Am- booby 4rabe- there

; * i eA eis ) aps there.
erican battle casualties in Korea— Allied patrols reported that
13,000 dead, 52,975 wounded, 10.-| Communists have been keeping
649 missing, 159 prisoners 1,327] 4 token force in Kaesong since
once missing but since found.)the announcement of the ceasefire
These figures represent only} proposal Eighty Communist
casualties reported to nex* of Kin.) troops have dug in on the highest

Assistant Defence Secretary J-| hill in the suburbs of the city with
MeNeil told the Senate Finance;two machineguns, and_ several
Committee that the cost to date is} hundred more Communists are
anywhere between $2,000,000,000] quartered in schoo! buildings
and $10,000,000,000—depending on —U.P.

For
al-
the

how you want to figure it,
example, he explained that
though the cost of using
Seventh Fleet might be counted
in the Navy would have had te
maintain a fleet in the Far East
even if there had not been a war
—U.P.



Times Hopes For



TS



U.N. Planes Hit
Rail Yards

TOKYO, July 6.
Superforts attacked suc-
“railroad marshalling

Nine
cessfully
yards at Kowon on Friday drop-
ping 60 tons of 100-pound bombs





Barbados

CONDEMN |

LAMBETH
COUNCIL

(From Our Own Correspondent:

LONDON, July 6.
solution put forward
Council to ease
problem of the increasing col-
oured population in London has

|
|
|
i
The |
been condemned by the oe

the Lambeth

by
the

of Coloured Peoples as ‘“savour-
ing of Dr. Malan’s racial segre-
gation policy.”

The Lambeth Council, _ per-
turbed by the petition from Brix-
‘on residents complaining about a
‘coloured home in the district,
wants the Government to tighten
the methods of regulating the
flow of coloured people into Lon-
don.

The - flow,

should be confined to those with

says the Council,

prospects: of employment and















SATURDAY, JULY 7





NE PRINCESS ALICH PLAYING PIBLD was cpencd on March
40. t 7 ti overne 3 Alfy:d Savag adter
Prin ad visit B $ fer that month, had
t ane
j if Cs
. In the picture, Mr. H. A. Tudor, the then Churchwarden is seen
with the Gev x at the opening ceremony. %





PRICE: FIVE CENTS

N Ne ron e
Cox Gives Evidence
2 e
Before Princess
ye “ °
Alice Enquiry
FIVE more witnesses gave evidence yesterday,
the fifth day of the enquiry into the Princess
Alice Playing Field which is being conducted by
Sir Clement Malone in the Legislative Council

Chamber. These witnesses bring the number to
24 who have now given evidence.

he first witness yesterday, don’t remember
morning was Mr. Allan Greaves. worked?

The Attorney General; What is Mr. Greaves: I worked from th
your oecupation? time the building started until it

Mr. Greaves: A carpenter finished.

The Attorney General: Do you The Attorney General: Hov
know Charles Werrell much of the huts did you use in

Mr. Greaves: Yes. the construction of the building?



how long you









The Atterney General: Were} Mr. Greaves: Whatever we
you employed with him at the} wanted we took out.

Prineess Alice Playing Field in The Aitorney General: What
1949” type of wood was used in the

Mr. Greaves: Yes. boarding up of the building?

Yh. Attorney General: Was it Mr. Greaves: We used fir and
the first time you worked with}everything at the building was
j him? ; practically new.

Mr. Greaves: Yes. The Attorney General: How

were you being paid by Mr. Wor-
rell?

Mr. Greaves: I cannot remem
ber

| The Attorney General: Can you
| remember when vou first startea
,to work at the Playing Field?
Mr. Greaves: About October.





PEACE IN KOREA AND
THE SUGAR ISSUE

(From Our Own € orrespondent)

|

1

LONDON, July 6 :

The future of sugar, béth from the supply and price
point of view, is assuming additional importance as the
prospects of peace in Korea grow steadily closer Values in
the world market have already fallen since Malik’s cease
fire proposals were made knewn at the beginning cf last

month

But that cannot be taken as an indication of what









to expect if the Peace Pact ig signed.
During the current year the
et has been influenced in
Y it months by growing tight-

(ae ees of the
“Susie's Cure! fine: vy ine

i¢ tual

WISCONSIN, July u. }

Statistical position and
prospect of a possible

shortage which might

ee ehe tc had 4 os j result from a worsening of the
A 36-year-old hospit.! 7) jy ornational situation,
employee paid $1,358 to Me 5 a him Sa
leara that her health was j Me nik ws “— in their latest

improved by burning money, bulletin point out that in cireum

justification
































Attorney General: Who
used to receive the material?
Mr. Greaves: Mr. Maynard.
The Attorney General: Did you
see any pieces of pine 6 x 8 at the
Playing Field?
Mr. Greaves: I was lookin;
pieces} 4fter the men who were working
as well as I was working.

No Good

The Attorney General: Did you
see any card board among the

| The Attorney General: Did you
fo to Seawell to look at the huts?
+ Mr. Greaves: No.

The Attorney General: When you
went on to work at the Playing
Field, did you see what appeared
to be pieces of hut?

Mr. Greaves: I saw some
f hut which we used up.

The Attorney General; Had yo

started to work when the huts
| waete brought to the Reef by
lorries

Mr. Greaves: No.







Judges Under

i The Attorney General: When] huts?
K you were first employed at the Mr. Greaves: Yes, but it was not
U. e Influence Playing Field, how far had the }any good,

building got?

No. I Man

Mr. Greaves: | was there from
the time the foundation started

The Attorney General: Did you
see any black galvanise?

Mr. Greaves: Yes, but it had in
holes and was turned down,

The Attorney General: You said
that you were at the Playing Field



l¥an Charges

THE HAGUE, July 6.
Iranian officials charged Friday

that ten judges of the Internation-| The Attorney General; Couldfuntil the building was finished,
al Court who voted in favour of] you tell us something about th°fdo you know how many holes
Britain on Thursday in the Anglo] foundation? were there for the pillars?

Mr. Greaves: It was about 6 te
8 feet deep and about 4 feet wide

The Attorney General; About
how many carpenters were em-
ployed there?

Mr. Greaves: About 50 to 60.

The Attorney General; Were you
the chief carpenter?

Mr. Greaves: | cannot remem-
ber now, but there was a hole for
each, concrete pillar.

Mr. Walcott: Have you ever
made any statement to the Police
or any one else in connection with
this matter?

Mr. Greaves: No.

Iranian oil case were “perhaps
inder British influence”. Hussein
shayegan, member of the Iranian
Oil Commission and observer at
the hearing—Iran did not partici-
pate in the case—told a Press con-
ference “two of the neutral judges
of the Court had the same opinion

is we have but the majority may Mr. Greaves: Yes. I was Wor- Mr. Walcott: Have you ever
Se because of political considera-|rcll’s number one man. given any evidence before?

ions and perhaps under British| The Attorney General; Who] Mr. Greaves: No. This is the
influence voted for interim mea-|tised to mae out the Pay Sheets? evidence.

sures." ‘The Court by aal0—?eauete}- Arsh Mees evi
zranted the British request for an
‘injunction’ which would keep

the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company

Mr, Greaves: Mr.
self,

The Attorney General; Did you
get the names of the various work-

Worrey Wir het ver
worked at they Playing Field?
Mr. Greaves: Yes.

Mr. Mottley: Did you have






















|{ choking a chicken or break- |; stances there is little
: = on the east coast rail centre.”|“who are likely to become good ing an egg. | at present for hope that the world} jin operation until the two coun- | men? : i rk
°, Ae 7 ; s : ios 1 ‘ much rain during the time wor)
Better Relations Two other B 29s attacked the|sitizens”. The League opposes | She told police that a polwic ou } ill improve te] ‘ries reached a settlement.—U.P. Mv. Greaves: Sometimes I took] was going on? . :
Communist , front line positions}such controls because of the diffi- | character reader named c that any gener; the names and passed them on to Mr. Greaves: Yes
5° Friday night with 500 pound|culties of implementing them “Susie” swindicd her out of unlondi of stockpiles would be 7 ee A os = Se
/ .K., Argentina pil? yi fiolding’ teblal dikerin- ; oe aed ae Rich : ' Mr. Worrell Mr. Mottley: Suppose the men
Between U g bombs,—U.P. ews involving racial discrim i ae ate tad — a He oo ‘ bs a " Reds Will Reitvade The Attorney General: Howlhad started to work and rain fell,
LONDON, July 6. . ns : e betier ane .ao ees ae er eee : : ong were you employed at the} were they still paid?
The Times, commenting edi- ~ _ peta ny Mr, Sam Morris, the League’s} make oodles of money. es . Playing Field? Mr. Greaves: Yes.
: A ~ . * 5, é § a aa ae oa ate he say it remal o be 26 gis y : + . : f
torially er he oy ee ree U.S. Ask Russia ’ Oo Secretary, to-day commented: | ar a an rate on : Meir iy = alm as the Kore a Onily if Mr. Greaves: 1 cannot remem- Mr. Mottley: You saw some Old
agreement debate in the Commons : ¢ “If there are undesirables among Susie . ce “Susie Unit ace So Te 7 . I r her, lumber stored on the Reef grounds
said, it is to be hoped “now with Repay $672in. the coloured population, we feel told her to bring a chicken pean eae I a a Russia W ants W ar The Attorney Genera}: Did you}—how far was it from where you
better relations dearly bought new 7ASHINGTON it is up to the local authority to and “apparently choked haing realised. B ven so, tni TOKYO. July 6 see the Acting Governor there? were working?
and more supple methods of deal- WASHINGTON, July 6, deal with them and not penalise it Then “Susie led ing “ t ARO; Os as x , July 6. Mr, Geekveli On. ons, oodaaion ik, Cnsaiiek: tt, Grad Gut bie the
; ‘ bott . 4, S onanded ‘ could not ecome importan Governor Thoma Dewey now y
ing may be developed in both} The United States demanded |the majority for the sins of the her to a basement by : ; { aan Hisitin ; "| Phe Attorney General: Do you] Police Station and we were work-
countries so that trade between|for the third time that Russia 7 ec sillors Ld candlelight ¢ seemed tatistical factor for some con-| visiting Japan, i quoted = by Seney ' we w'
ill x l nger b > threatened | r rm sdiatel $672 000,000 fare. Th WIS COUTENAOrS, Ce a . ANE SOEs | ve siderable time and the worl nem of the Japanese Diet as| *"0™“ Mr. Tudor? ing down by the building. When
by will no po e threatene parr pens _ Y aed Stat beth would only look deeper into burn all the money she re- market position v nla ‘receive n aying, he ig convinced. Cox Mr. Greaves: Yes we wanted the stuff, we had t
wit periodic stoppages.’ . ‘ lenc lease aid. The wo e ates /the question, they would find that ceived. divert honnat munist forces will not reinvade The Attorney General: Howj,send labourers for it.
It added that the real test oflalso asked for the second time]the West Indians are forced to Lat “Susie” ‘ lir benefit ill 1 va :
the new agreement was its ability that Russia submit to arbitration Britain b oa aiia f the eter On. “Susie” wrapped South Korea after the ceasefire] ften did he visit the Playing Mr. Mottley: You told the Com-
Poel gery Be ftrictior i esaehi birch ited: | (ens, 0, Britain because of the an egg in cloth and broke and truce unless Russia herself| Field? missioner that the majority of the
to remove all sources of friction|the dispute with the United), lin onditiongs 4 the : in tussia hers ;
between Argentina and the United|States over cash payment tor! jppnas" r , n ie her heel. Then dy : . ready to start World War IL. Mr. Greaves: | saw him there onj stuff used was new. What did you
ere a eae an atmos- other. goods went 800,000,009 The League’s Chairman, Trini- a sate at aw ie I roops Goose-Step Der A i i ei to Kor a Sunday — eae eeaiih a mean by On aac |
phere of good will. zs whic he Sovie nion received |qad-born Dr. David Pitt, said: 4 . ce day cease fire talks 8 ? x $ ou 5
Supporting British » eee under wartime lend lease. The} «+ put it midly, we think the — at name revealed, Throu rh Abadan che sui to paein ae
John Edwards, the Times said th at State Department in announc-|]ambeth Council’s attitude | sale she had rec ov ered the | \ s Me “ en's of t e diet said De “ vy
the debaic was in effect a “critic-|ing the double barrelled action |rather unkind. No one seems to money from “Susie's” hus- || ABADAN, July 6 Sang Meee een eae
ism of Mr. Edwards’ own pre- |disclosed that Secretary Acheson |object to the presence of colonials|| band. The husband told Wer | rie tian SHO TA Nia ti. [for yy ath, Overall Japanese peace
decessor who tried to negotiate as Jon Monday sent a note to th@|in wartime, but in peace it is a Susie” had also taken $700 Jakes ation as - 0 ea tes i a i wy 1 - ‘ § pe ‘ a -
though all the Argentine s claims Soviet Charge D’Affaires in| different matter’. ' of his money when she left ye rice, ee re vena as hae? ' ner ae ey
Vee unreasonable. barf sa ony Washington, Boris Karavaev. The League’s executive has —U.P. ohne Finan ds ; va renta = fi Yr * ‘he Ur ted Beniae dW ass
The Times lists as follows, new —U.P. |sent a protest to the Lambeth a aa es th F re s ai aan ee nee Ween
Gatails that Edwards brought inte | Shi : A d Council and has drawn the Lon- ‘cin oni te a . Pe iF Te a eae
e debate in relaulo ili don County Council's attention to \ ince Le Ol). Crisis, began. vey é oat
agreement: . Seis inks dih lean di ' Ip Ruts sroun , |their point of view. Mayor Of Moscow 3 . a pe ce ‘ ve ‘ ibly , lsc Samtannt tp hee : 3 The Metropolité Borough's } a celebration to end a monthlong re- : ae) ee &
“ : acilitate payme 6. poiltan Bn ligt { t relatio arte ‘
vail shortly ; facilitate payment | The Cl et Joint Committee and the Colonial Refused The Girl ligious fast bu ome observers i l nship mi unde m tanding ‘and
again of pensions to former em- Offi ov A s ca c ¥ interpreted it Iran's answer | riendship would result between
ployees of once British-owned ! RIAS reported that an East Ger- iden are to ‘consider’ the que | , the Hague court decision Japan, the United States and
railways who now live in this man passenger steamer carrying a ie a PARIS, July 6 A crowd of 10,000 gave a tumul-] 0ther members of the free world’
country or wish to do so.” 400 persons, ran aground in Mag- | The Mayor of Moscow came), brsesliaeale to Hussein Makky| 2fter the Japanese Peace Treaty
, —(U.P.) deburg.—U.P. | out from behind the Iron Curtair i oe Tenet Te “y re on me oat igned
OE ab rt al eee eae to attend along with Mayor: > sranian t et UP.
Man Breaks Into | from other countries the 2,000th ae fe : ae nd Br oo hy
. = , ear, »- * 1 cCechnes lave ca € oncert
e e B ki h P l vgs | 20niversary of Paris’ establish- ; a. ; | 4 ‘
n mong British Embassy official
c kistan And India eres rene) Unirae & i, : ‘| Jamaicans Settled
a Mayor A. Yasnov was given U.P.
Buckingt oY July 6. |the freedom of the city and eee | From Our Own Correspondent
\ 7@ ® uckingham Palace, one of the| offered a limousine hotel room ve ry LONDON, July 6
Charge iolations noe heavy eran tenis ane a pretty society girl to show Sign Jap Treaty at core ‘fee omclals are
in e Was broken in y im around. 7 iewing with alarm e number
a man found crouched in a cor- ‘ 2 S 2ptem ber f recent arrivals of Jamaicans in
ridor one floor below the suite Yasnov accepted the freedon | Ir ef le v | paeees of work. Most of “09 party
e where Princess Margaret wasjcf the city but announced he ‘ ' : vhich arrived by air earlier this
Of Kashmir Truce asleep. would stay at the Soviet Embassy, | State D \ on hay € now been settled in
King George and Queen|and turned Mown the car, room| frmed on | obs in athe: ’ London, 3 sirming-
UNITED NATIONS, New York. gg were not . ihe palace i girl About 7 mars | mons for ae tae parece: ap Bigs rirt
; ‘ ce 2 ~ , ar residence a ym al} ove 1e world are her eace Tre a ‘ r S
India and Pakistan on Friday, exchanged a new Sexies Windsor SS and Peingnes Margaret : —(UP.) ace Fra icisco during the _ first | said a Colonial Office spokesman
of charges of Kashmir ceasefire violations. Pakistan said, wo. home only because, she was lipheke in Secteriher. (Oa) | onight
an Indian formation recently attacked a patrol of Punjab) contined to her room with a cold me lat iW S :
border police in Sialkot district of Pakistan and two con- The intruder was _ questioned ‘ . ae | y WUXLOCTC ar service
stables were killed. for hours at Cannon Street Police’ Call Rail Strike | Gold Increases |
But the main point of the Pakis- — {Station after Scotland Yard threw i WASHINGTON, July 6
tan complaint was its contention) “Me . il d into atin, Pes ee eens od " 2 NEW eee aioe: OTTAWA, July 6 President Truman issued an
that recent Indian charges had Millionaire Jai e bide which virtually | se: as r} A message from igpur} Fir Minister D. C. A order on Friday extending for on«
given a distorted picture and| square of the Empir ~ the}said the All-India nen’s| annour i Friday that Can-| year enlistments of all member
“onre aii ‘ined. outbursts” in “the NEW YORK, July 6. four residences of Royal family--|Federation Executive de onjada’s official holding of the Armed Forces who other-
Indian Pres and “bellicose| Federal Judge Sylvester Ryan | which has Buckingbam palace as}Friday to call a strike of all rail | Unite d States « ( 1ed vise would be refeased betwee:
seeuhés by sone Thaler leaders’| Sent millionaire Frederick Van-|jts keystone. iway wolkers effective August 27.{ grow in Jun and were well above | July 8, 1951 and July 1, 1952
8 Pa adev.»{derbilt Field to jail for refusing —(U.P.) —U.P. Ilest year.—(U.P.) UP

were meant to “queer the pitch’ |}
for new United Nations mediator,

Dr. Frank Graham,

Pakistan said that inciden

were charged by both sides andi
it was a “travesty ot facts to Sa¥|the custody of
tat all the blameday with Pakis-} State

tan

\'to reveal the names of the per-
} sons wiio put up the bail money
for four fugitive Communist





ts, leaders.

To-day



nitted Field to
Deputy United
yan sentenced

he cor



Marshal. _
pend 90 a:



| Field to

India sent the United Nations 2) contempt.

list of four new incidents in which!
violated the
ceasefire line. Complaints said in

Pakistan allegedly

these incidents one Indian border!

patrolman was killed, four wound-"
vil-
ornaments

ed, ma’e inhabitants of the

lage were flogged and

No Justification
WASHINGTON, July 6.



anid shaem, tear | Some Republican members of
The Indian complaint was sent the Senate MacArthur Investigat-
by Indiam delegate Sir Benegel ing Committee are circulating a
Rau to the July President of the report contending that there was
Securit Council, Sir Gladwyn no “military justification” for t
Jebb of Britair recall of General MacArthur it

U.P

: disclosed

Friday. —U.P.

in jail for}

(From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, July 8.
The dream of an Empire Par-

liament in Westminster is further





FIGHT FOR EMPIRE PARLIAMENT

SAYS DAILY EXPRESS





championed to-day. Lord Beaver-|cannot at this time march Express ; that the vast dis-
brook’s Daily Express takes up the out America and neither can tance eparate Empire
;cause of direct representation for United States march vithout 'éountric no handicap, They are
ithe peoples of the West Indies, It the Empire. The cause of peace bound thi onger than
says it is a consummation not just gepends on the comradeship of}law. They a ound t lood and
to be hoped for, but to be fought j,5¢,, by common citizenshi

lend worked for. 3ut at the same time | :

In a leading article the Express tinuing aim of British pol ite
defends its support of the Anglo- must be ti complete econor the case of f Empire
American alliance which it says and mi jiependenc citize r i I 1 Beave
many feel is making the Empire own Er bre ¢

e countries turn to Washington ada 1
rather than London for support. Det kir eor i t
| The Express says the Empire United Empire not px é lic lif
Sk tein. cae oti we Sa euiesn as a Shae



Some Americar it s find
difficult to realise that the resi- ,
dents of Dominior and colonie
can be membe of YO or ever
three sections of “the same Em-
pire — sections perhaps t:ousands|
of miles apart—and yet suffer nc

disability on that aecount |

“The French understand the}

imperial structure much better)
adds the Express. “They have on

of their own in their tem, The!

> people of Martinique send repre-

IT’S THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS

sentatives to sit and vote in the
French Parliament |

colonic ever

“Wi the British

Westminste


PAGE TWO



cect i â„¢

Carnub Calling



BARBADOS

B.B.C. Radio














|



ADVOCATE

——





GLOBE THEATRE








SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951







AQUATIC CLUB CEUNEMA (Members Only)







I Ps ;
7 s TO-DAY é 15 PM nd continuing DAILY i |
MATINEE: TO-DAY
d rog' amine TONIGHT TO MONDA\
JAMES STEWA
Ss. ». HEWITT MYRING, SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951

RS s nae “dpc dey 1115 a.m, Commentaries on the Da =| “BROKEN ARROW ”’

wife of C.D. and W Pu wt, 11.45 am. Program: Parade
lic Relations Adviser flew to noon) The News, 12.10 p.m. News G-M'G wre ants Se ee PAGET
Antigua yesterday on a_ short M-G-M's ayest with J {AN DEE sts
holiday. She is due to return to + Dm 19.18 M Technicolor Musical! SPECIAL MATINEE. THIS MORNING at 9.20 ocloci
Barbados on July 12th. Mr. p.m. The Glyndebourne Mozart FRED JANE ZANE GREYS
Hewitt Myring is at present in al. 4.45 p.m. Bertha Hagart, 5°p.m i Pe ‘
England attending a conference England | vs. South Africa, 5.05 pix “RED CANYON” in Technicolor
of Public Relations Officers from thes “AG, wan tlaeee el " 5 J on ‘

: . erlude, 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice : BLYTH—HOWARD DUFF—GEORGE BRENT
all br the British Common- 6 pm. Music for Dancing 645, pur Sratting: ANH
wealth. Programme Parade
4 ‘a 1O—11.00) pom 23.53 M. 31 32 M
- ‘ = = | 4g 6SS3930995 eos >

I EAVING half‘an hour later fot : in oie cele oe Pt AL iy LOCSSCSSET

Trinjdad on her way to the \nalysis, 7.15 p.m. Behind the News x
U.S. was Mrs. Helen Willie Leary 145 p.m, Sandy Mac?herson the LAWFORD - CHURCHILL \% E PIRE ROWA
Q ‘ i fheatre Organ, 8 p.m. Radio Newsree L
ae had 5 oer see - a 4.15 p.m, Report from Wimbledon, 8 ie
holiday in Barbados, staying with p.m. Interlude, 8.30 p.m. Minstrel Boy, xcenan WYNN To-day 4 45 & 8 30 and continuing To-day & To-morrow 430 & 8.15
Mrs. Hewitt Myring. if p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. Interlude, win

Mrs. Leary works in the New

York office of the Manila Times

















10.15 p.m, Just Fancy, 10.45 p.m. Yours
Faithfully








Daily 445 & 8 30
United Artist Presents - - -

Albert SHARPE







20th C-Fox Double
Robert TAYLOR, Brian DONLEVY

4,456
SCOPE FOEEESS



-
-
>
S
eins largest oy, papet in the Minti : CHARLIE CHAPLIN in “4
ilippines. She is also a repre- AN : ‘ . aa =
sentative of the Manila Broad- One Of Many wpe els, oR apalnan m7 $ «CITY LIGHTS’ BiLLy THE KID
casting Company. ‘ i “ She met Mrs. Hewitt Myting ARBADOS, although - may TOURING NORTHERN ENGLAN. an
during the war. They were both = have been ~ ao os ony _ BRITISH and AMERICAN Newsreels ee eet ‘ “~ MALAYA " x
with the British Information Ser- thelr at ‘tea fonaaee om LLL LPL LLLP LPP LPP PP LPPPL PPE en ee ~ SPECIAL mAsOCEE Saturday or. $
vice. 4 as p . : ; ; %
é Fi ” s * . ¢ %, ¥ 95 = my >
Double-Check ! puloay ip te Caritbege and He * TT 7 s OF 19 51 ee §=81R “CITY LIGHTS Spencer TRACY, John HODIAK NS
HILE Policemen on most of surroundings to be supplied with x -§ A RBUD: ° $ S so x : x
Y the main highways into one. | ar ss ° x ~ *
Bridgetown were checking car and MISS KAY AUSTIN speaking to her brother Victor who is in Bng- Trinidad, British Guiana, the) <} — ON! E13 ; OLYMPIC x
drivers’ licences yesterday, three land, over the Trans-Atlantic telephone, Bahamas and Venezuela have all % YY ROXY cae e in oe
children in Oistins were doing a Her brother who is a chiropractor in Manchester sends his best ive fie, with this type of 9 % ‘ oa ok sot crest ata ae
similar job. “Junior” the small- wishes on her recent engagement. . , et ¥, i ye To-day to Tuesday 145 & 8.15 y meter »
est of the three sat on his front Some of the other countries} * THURSDAY, JULY 2th 8.30 % % June Haver, William Lundisan >
= step, exercise book and pen- Engaged To Study Medicine png eee See aan — % $ sf Republic Picturés Presents - - - me %
cil in hand, his brother sat next ISS ANNIE SKEETE of Roe- 4 , 3 "1X R1y i S
i hi ata : - & ¢ Ne ee es 2 Hor Ong, Kenya, Cey) ; o1¢ a ; “ ” .
to him while their sister stood on A’ a family gather buck Street left Barbados for Marilyn anit bentthae Rhodesi * FEATURING +13 ROCK ISLAND Vil GET BY ¥
the edge of the road. As a car Thursday night, the Nev ‘or é t ; "hs > .,
4 , New York on Sunday to take up the Gold Coast, Tanganyika, Bur-| < 11g AND x
tes cee” see a = oY re ees - ¥ residence with relatives there. ma, Nyasaland, Abyssinia and 3 ’ TRAIL ” x
: br =Cwith_:=s=big- Austin, Secretary to the Ei Miss Skeete plans studying medi- < 1 others y ., “TWO FLAGS WEST” %
ger. brother checking, methodi- the Barbado Advocate, ind gine P several others, x : gehivine $
cally wrote y ° e 1ughte N and Mi e : ‘ } at ‘s
Paks “Ass eek er ters Co, eee gee Se To San Fernando |X BIB rece tuctor. ase atar serine S
doing the git] said ‘Mummy told stitution Road to Mr. Alwyn R. GEORGE CUMMING RS. A. G. ROCHEFORD of] ; Adrian Booth Bruce Gabot Joseph Cotton — Linda Darnell
us they were checking numbers Howell of the Audit Offic 1d » GE 7m C © son Black Rock was among the; \ , ,699$966665 re aa %
down the road, so we are doing oh ae Dr. Timothy Ho of * of oH ene Mrs, ‘ = ee passengers leaving me Trinidad | § ( SOSSESSE SESS FOSS OOOO IIE,
the same up here.’ castries, & ui und Mr . mins, 0 sothmare, an all, this afternoon to spend a month’s] ¥ ; 999399S$956956569065 303 565456 oie
* ‘ nese f Mart ndale who is studying medicine at the holiday in San Fernando staying % PPOOSOSSOSOS SOS OOS OOOO LOPE? %
With Shell Caribbean Hastings. University College of the West-with her friend, Miss Ifill. $ : : x
idies, Jamaics & $s ‘ }
RAR, and) MRS. THOMAS | By “a happy coincidence, nor Indien, Jamaica ts spending the “Talking Dolls”. |} : = BDOS = AGENCIES «LIMITED -
_ ANDERSON and son accom- wees ‘ee wee ts Scott parents, He arrived from Jamaica ROFESSOR MONTS, the Puer-| \ smi 4 8
Me Dunten Goh thie chases from, Manchester yesterday. and OM ‘Thursday afternoon by to Rican ventriloquist and | RESENTS 3
4 : ie ee etn Maeve him ‘he’ meee magician with his two “talking| % — PRESENTS -- 2
arrived from Trinidad yesterday wee ae Sere Meee: it * Five other Barbadian studentsydolls”, will be performing during | } x
morning en route f Vv la happy news pi %
g en route from Venezuela ; returned by the same ‘vlane, Mr. ance at t Aquatic Club to-|% : es
where both Mr. Anderson and the dance he Aq ‘ , , %
Mr. Dunean work with Sh 1 Car Wedding Vernon Smith, Miss Melenese| night. * %
ibbean Pete Company x ‘ ee rae a, Soar yh 9 x N
: , “sday e 2)lst Mr and , Keit s s r. |) —————— ——— ———______—_ | ¢ . ¢!
aay es i th xe OW nap ike. Verge of st. an Msg. B.D.” Ashby ofl SOR OSS WORD S (Every WEDNESDAY 8.30 P.M.) %
‘hey plan to spend three weeks , Ralph King, Verger of St. iW eiches Christ Church. They Xx x
+ at the’ ‘Paradise ‘Beach Pha 9 a Bone oF neti a have all completed their first year gS AT THE x
: Hill in Arts Mr. Clee Drakes, the % =
: = ’ student is doing Natural ~ %
M® Fn Fe VE an, The Bride who was given in Science. He has just finished his % $
° , marriage by her step-father wore second year. * g
who has been out of the a dress of brocaded silver georg Here Last Year x x
island for about one month came ette and her veil was held by a i ees 3 x « SHUAddALS TH 98L » ‘ : ‘ >
in yesterday by B-W.LA. from crown of orange blossoms. Hei M* ALEX BRATT, who was ‘ On WEDNESDAY JULY 1ith 8.30 p.m. %
Trinidad. Since he left Barbados bouquet was of Michaelmas in Barbados in April 1950 (Pye saan ta ile a : ' . ; x
he has visited the U.S. as well Daisies and Anthurium Lilies. flew in from Venezuela yesterday x GLOBE THEATRE presented by Madam Ifill, in aid of the WITH A FILM
as Trinidad, The Chief bridesmaid was Miss Morning via Trinidad by B.W.1.A, ‘ Christ Church Baby Welfare League Clinic.
Coming in by the same ‘plane Joan Phillips and the tnree other Alex is an accountant with the % Under the Patronage of the Hon. V. C. Gale & Mr. E. D. Mottley 66 se
was Mr. Gonzalo Senior a Car- bridesmaids were the Misses Smith Construction Co., in Car- et smAS 7
acas ecient who has flown over Lorna Browne, Jean Alleyne and “8s ee for ig ee & ORCH. BOX SEATS $1.00; HOUSE 72c.; BAL, 48c.
from enezucla on a four-day Velma Neblett. he is staving at the Hotel Royal. ‘ 5
holiday. He is staying at the Rev. F. C. Pemberton officiated He spent a week in Trinidad en y DANA ANDREWS & JANE WYATT

Aquatic Club.







3arlee.

assisted by Canon A H.







route.



Across





39 POSE OOOO: ie OOS SSF SOOO SS












































oe rs
leant bbc naaeattertilbie ee ~ -— — 1, Make pcrib coat tumbler-iike = (¥) PLAZ OISTIN G AIE | WY
7. Stop! te tones resemble the Dial 8404 Music For The Quizz b
THE ADVENTURES OF PIPA 19. Member “calica 's “'doyen.” (6) ||| TOBA TO sun: 5 4 sa at |] || THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES Maggie Goodridge and The Percy Gre
-—— 12. May be one or even a whole ||| Warner's Smashing Double : TO-DAY TO SUN. 8.20 p.m. Mat. - ggie Goodridge ani e Percy Green Orchestra
, regiment. (4) | “FLAMINGO ROAD” SUN. 5 P.M. a
me s 1g. Later may interest the angler. (3) | Joan CRAWF 5 Zachary SCOTT Screen Guild Acti Double ! ‘
4 14, Ties neatly into piace. (4) | JOnte cere a eae _— “DRAGNET (ancy WILCOXON) CONTESTANTS FOR THR QUIZZ TO BE SELECTED
15. Always represented at the Lord ||} miae “apenas FROM AUDIENCE
Mayor's banquet. (7) SAN ANTONIO cae
16. Here you may get a _ vroken | Color by Technicolor “BURNING CROSS"
im. (4) Errol FLYNN Hank Daniels, E otk 9s si . .
10, Where "you get proor or _ 16 | a READ TO-MORROW'S “ADVOCATE” FOR PARTICULARS
Across. (4) 1%, Scheme. (6) MIDNITE TONITE (By Request) MIDNITE TONITE R.K.O, Radio OF THE QUIZZ >
21, Would you look for a 24 Across Tim HOLT in (Both) i Tire HOLT in (Both) %
ta: BEoPy vib soe cna et SEES, hl “oyypaume tases «ii “sromst oven’ Wrommva” a $
St Bee a) Acrase, (hb , GUNS of HATE a WESTERN HERITAGE . x
_————————— ———-
Down > —= se x
Tr YOU SHOW CLASS & MOTORING SENS IN Y Ty &
1. One way to make Ted rave. (7) ‘ » E WHEN YOU BUY ‘
# eee, +h re Ludo tinted. (8) DIAL 2310 — PLA ZA -= BRIDGETOWN : %
Â¥ ae q . . % Y 7 7 Y %,
4 Doesn't tell us what Brato / ve oe : “s A CITRO NW A R. *
intended fur example. (8) TO-DAY 14 & 830 And Continuing Daily % ‘ } D ZL y/ io %
B Beta (0 « graven, sence, Hf olan — "WEL aw “The BREAKING POINT” ||| :
71. Var Dias Int. Amsterd. 8. Pound ta the ation ap re Seger jb NEAL in e , a te 6664 x
Seer e mice bhonaddboee 9. AS the yokel may describe what WARNER BROS. ROUSING ACTION - PACKED DRAMA! POLLS PSESES SEPP CPP PLL PPL
Annie witnessed. (7) (From the Story by Ernest Hemingway)
i} vent mary ot a rir sn nbed J 4 eee Kedeitiie ait aoe a sonst dtl lidar
: . r only part of the week-en SPECIAL TO-DAY 90am & 190 Pm it's That WAYNE Man
B HE WA ieee By Beachcomber it would be gloomy. (4) Big Action Double from Monogram Headed This Way in
“ 20. You do this down to blame. (4) “RETURN of the APEMAN” Bei His Biggest |
Y 1 | Y | | TL Base aetna "ae ion Pacific” AVE THE SURFACE AND SAVE
‘raded Sumjo7q uo ‘1o11tut with the neck wide open. The it means that by using my ape it 2, “@pruee: Of Cea are Pare cnerne: “WESTWARD BOUN Ken MAYNAF “Operation Pacific
B UT SpreMyoeq UsHTIM Oq [[IM ferret went into the sack, and Mr. chanism the ordinary man has as | 20. QOrdinaire; 12. Mile: 15 Reel; 14 Bob STEELE. ina SOON |
UWINTOI aTOYM 94} MOIIOWIOT, ‘dn Banton-Detmold ran forward and mueh chance of getting the gs | Rede: 19. Etch: 20. Irate. 21 Seat: 22 sinner hlioncoineinciarbiilsdihidtinaiiestitel aie : le
COM JUST 94} Bury, oy} urn} 07 St closed the neck. He then carried right as the trained scientist.” Gores. ewes Wiser k Poised, 6 —— $
C7essa90U ST yey} ITy ‘speey dJtoy} the ferret back to its shed. “It : Foroll: 8. Mane: 9. Yeomen: 11. Dtet
uo pueys you pesu AadyT, {410M all seems completely pointless,’ Mrs. Muthuish returns . 4
aL B Op 0} Slapwor AU OFeAn0d was the verdict of Mr. Arthur We are Fully Stocked with .. .
-ud 0} ‘uMOp optsdn sty, BSuyuud Owle. Sey tet as am arrow from its bow
&q uStedweo ey} Suruado jo ano > —nay, if anything, swifter—the ; HIGH CLASS PRODUCTS
-uoYy OY} aAeY | Aew ‘Aoyyne ayy Strabismus and the Lge rocket, with that homing instinct | ds 5
jyeour oF ABA-j[eY VwWOd YSN of hitherto confined to the lower ani- } To-ni Tat PAINTS — Interior and Exterior
Spear ay yeymM jo yno usuisofua R. STRABISMUS (Whom God mals, among whom I hope I may Gg DISTEMPERS
TINJ 2y} 42H 0} Jopso ut ‘yA0M 914311 Preserve) of Utrecht has per- include the humble eel—the rocket ENAME
B Op 04 pasedaid aq ysnui Japeed fected a very delicate instrument fell head-first into the great hole | Ls
ays “Way Jo} ASBd 004 apeul 9G. which will enable egg-observers to in the Waggling Parva sandpi' a * VARNISHES
ell at a moment's notice which Whence had set ou visit



0} SUTYJAIVAI D9 x9 sTaAOU Jo
Siapeai yey pres V

24 OLLINO
Filthistan Trio Not
Impressed

ASKED the Filthistan Trio

what they thought of the two
Americans who broke a record for
seesaw by seesawing for more than
72 hours. Ashura said, “This is
not hart no more nor hif we was
to be of boiling an hegg without a
stoppage for evermore.” Kazbu-
lah said: “Seesaw is not motter-
racing on around a track.” Riza-
mughan said: “Not ow long you
seesaw is not what is of counting,
but grasefull writhums now hup
now down like of dauncing and
phary. phlowting like lump of
thossel-down warftid hon the hair,
ho yes.” Ashura added: “By hour
hart we hare of hopping to paw
hoil hon trubbled hinteranasher-
naul watters.”

Ramsgate in Action

R. BANTON-DETMOLD yes-

terday gave a demonstration
of protting to representatives of
the Ministry of Bubbleblowing
The ferret Ramsgate was released
from a sack, and ran over a board
laid on the grass. This rang a
small bell attached to the board
by wire and hoisted a flag on a
miniature pole. The mopper
turned out to be a layer of wet
earth on which a sack was laid,



ay up an egg is. Asked of what
ypractical use this would be, the
Doctor jsaid that by sloping an es

from east to west between two tiny
joists it is possible to correct i

regularities of shape, but that this
had nothing to do with whether it



was the right way up or
Asked what he meant, the
said: “Shorn of technical language,
Se ,



Rupert ané



what his friend has said. *
to where your master lives?" he
asks, “*If the village is nearer |
think I ought to go and show this

to Constable Growler first. |
really don't know where | am."
For answer the dwarf takes hin

’ veritable
mechanic's
pa

triumph of th
art,” to quote é
The Doctor was on the
before you could say muttle-
hurst, with old-world cour
tesy he offered his arm to the tru
ant charwoman Mrs. Mutlhuis}
as calm as though she had just

y bus from King’s Knuckle-
Incredible, incredible,’

er-by
spot
pot

1
an

Simon—2Zeo

procore



“Look, there's
where my masrer hives, It's no dis-
tance at all through the wood. Do
come and show him the Jocket,"” he
coaxes, So they set off and meet
the Professor himeelt at the entrance
o his grounds. ‘* Well, well, what
brings my tle friend Rupert
here 2?’ smiles the old gentleman,

ip another slope



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THIS MORNING
at 9.30

OOO0000000000

Charlie
CHAPLIN

ec fi ee meescaesiaaene oaths



in One of the Funniest
Comedies of Ali Time!

nGitY LIGHTS’

Written, Directed and Produced
by CHARLES CHAPLIN
Released thru United Artists

| SOCur erect e Ss

CODCDDDDDNOONONNNONOOOO00C0O
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SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951 BAERADOS ADVOCATI PAGE THREE
Co-op Talk Delayed

Leetureon Trade Unions

ee















BP. A. Enquiry -[ CARTGON

Watchmen, Caretaker wren

zyive kvi
i J ployed ?
Gi ve vidence Mr. Griffith: About 18
Mr, Mottley: How long afte:
you began to work there did

THE unfavourable weather on Wednesday night wa
erhaps responsible for the small attendance at the Barba
s Workers ‘Union Headquarters when Mrs. Gertrude

Williams, Reader in Social Economics at Bedford College

|
}
é
WHEN the Commission 4 Enguiry into the Princes. P a
- q to the Princess University of London, gave her lecture on “What A Trade 4 LUXUR si
}













































































Alice Pla‘ Fie ‘Sharadiary the ber ea ___. first set.of huts come? |
os ‘e oot 7 lursday, these iour witnesses Gave = Bar, Griffith: About two weeks, | | Union Can and Cannot Do.”
evidence oe ee the first | of Mrs Willi ms braved the weath- An senepherer is not any longer J oF ) iT ie) \ as
e’clock Miss Francis’ lorry? | Ss! . accom ~ end ym any on a | | | I | S
trucks : adie * j ~ € Z ompanied by lependent n any one inc ividuai y} ) ‘
Carpenter trucks. sist you..see. meying. the a Griffith: Yes. | ' \Ir A. Douglas-Smith and Mr. worker, The employer can get o
: Mr. Franeis: Duguig and Miss ,3 r. Mottley: The follow ing ey en ; Le Fanu. without the one worker but th: IMPERIAL LEATHER @ LINDEN BLOSSOM @ = BLUE HYACINTH
Adolphus Clarke, a carpenter Francis’. z aie two of Duguid’s came. About Mr. F. A. Walcott, Secretary of worker needs his wage to live |_
wo used to work "with Mr. c we whe oo a : the Union, introduced Mrs. Wil- The employer always has the bet-|
soni ee » called ’ > ri s ut 3 >
Worrell, w as then calle Meet : CGaretaker once: a cae va lian s. He apologised for the small ter of the bargaining. The worke | :
Attorney General: What was the " iltendance., is always more ready to come i
size of the building at Seaweill Lacusrd Weeds atismales kiddie ene ——" On the third Mr. J. M. Hewitt, who acted as terms and more ready than the ly
ic’ . : told 4 { f mest as a Cé - what came? ; . } . inm ret '
aa. told, you tO taker at Seawell in 1949 was call- Mr. Griffith: Francis’ lorry ; irman, delivered a lengthy ype arn iy iiffer nt if the ope
ake yn. ec c - 7. oe i tal ” the ec : 7 : re rer re or}
ea Wats) Yk wae a Sones he ed next be nhemat 7. Ginlonk: i alk® « th economic front which dig en: irely ¢ i € - i € oem | Dunlo illo is the most
f “y tnt. , Attorney Generah: Do you Mr. Mottley: On the h } is needed in the Barbados Workers’ €fs are joined together and speak- | P : §
Attorney General: What did you know how many huts Mr. Tudor you asked for, you 7 hen 2. Union. He spoke for many min- img with one voice Though the
do with it? bought from Seawell ? s coe % e gis ; utes on co-operatives before one employer can do without one e
M " - i on end the night work. j ; r e@
r. Clarke; I took it down an Mr. Forde: About five. Mr. Griffith: Yes li of the audience said: “I appreciate worker he cannot do without all
left it there 3 ; ; Attorney General: Did Mrs. Mr. Mottley: Seas ate , vameeres what you are saying but I came The main duty of the Trade Unior
Attorney General: After that Martineau buy any ? Pa a ae ts ~ 5 re here to hear Mrs. Gertrude Wil- is to join the workers together
Joe aia y ay P i ever seeing Murray omnions W ill ; The Trade U Pop ees &
where did you work : Mr, Forde: She took away two. Mr. Griffith: I do not rememb« A . s 1e Trade Union gives the work
Mr. Clarke: I worked about Attorney General: When the seeing Wurray ’ i ¥ Mr, Hewitt then had a heated #f more equal bargaining power
three months on the Reef? big building was cut up, how many Mr. ” Mottles Do yo eichnintsa i lebate ( in W ar. gument with Mr. Walcott after The Trade Union can so organise { a .
Attorney General; How many were they belonging to Mr. Tudor anybody calling you from dow! which Mr, Waleott asked him to itself as to keep a register wit fo rm o { cus h roning
carpenters did he have there? then ? ber sha baatee hat ecvatiiaarl ay For W hole Day be seated, To Mr. Walcott, Mz whatever vacancies there are
Mr. Clarke: I do not remember; Mr. Forde* Three. “Mr. Griffith: No J Hewitt said: “I have already Suit its members. It can also or
about ten, Attorney General: Do you know Mr. Mottley: Did you receive ( yondent raved your indulgence.” Mr, Wal samise itself to give its member i he W | j
Attorney General: Did you see whose lorries took them away? ‘any material during y cott replied: “There is a limit to Unemployment assistance in the oric¢
any other lumber arrive at the Mr. Ferde: Duguid, Miss Fran OOM ae en Pe July 4 indulgence.” She said that the Trade Unior
€ € v © ri y ’ ss = : ‘clock J Ut) * z 2 5 eevee Xs ~es . 1 *
Reef? eis and Murray. Mr. Griffith: About 1 o’cl ck. Par ‘ i. dip. Mr. Walcott, apologising to Mrs. Secretary must be a skilled indu
Mr. Clarke: Occasionally when Mr. Motiley: Who brought it t ‘ lee a Williams, said that if he hac trie) negotiator and a good judge It is the original latex foam cushioning, contaummg 1
. : cea One Ww Bs if : 1 . it uw se W\ s« " . o ¢ Ale . . a - — > > Ty : .
Mr. Worrell gave an order Attorney General. Do you know ote I think it was Miss | West I: thought Mr. Hewitt’s conduct wa ake can a eee of 5 ane tiny inter-connected cells through which air circuli
AE. Be : J ieee whose lorries t = ee s rry. I tt ‘onserva~ to be whé t ha } " j nion witheut having anythin, » . * ae atoesder pinata
pttorney General: The sides of; and joists ~ pre oe Mr. Mottley: Do you remember ia Gover not h ge Be teat hon oy bo moe to do with the political side of it result is that the mattress is completely hygienic ~~ i\
the building—were they new fir. See Badin Rach loitry tick Meee Murray’s lorry during thé “dis ie Sth th ; ine: tt dens’ ces a a. Political activities must be kept makes nor harbours dust and is resistant to moths and
Y Z c . san ean . : y ia it Lo discuss t 2. as # vy sad re- . " : .
Mr. Clarke: Some was from ine, day? sen » ‘ i British terri- flection on Mrs. Williams” he distinct from Trade Union actiy Not only is Dunlopillo hygienic;
Seawell and some was new Mr. Walcott: Mrs. Martineau M®- Griffith: No. 1 1 the Carovean : vil id 4 . ties and funds. No worker must throughout its long life it remains
Mr. Walcott: Did you have to ¢.iq she took away three huts. D. Mr. Mottley: Do you remembe! I ie ifternoo! VI Wil be compelled to subscribe to an) |
build many new windows? wats still cat Fy 4 k . ae ° if any truck brought material on]in the H 4 they have iss WENO, BYER ADA FOBAce rolitical rty The t k supremely comfortable and cannoteag
3 vou s say s oO away , . art gr I nt mou t y I to tart . nev > . ‘ ve Nitics ret 1@ main work o ;
Mr. Clarke: Yes. One whole 4, you really not "Nab a wo or | Saturday morning? a Ri as : aes, explained . Trade Senicn i tn aeaeiad sey , or gather into uncomfortable mounds;
side of the pavilion consists of Mr. Forde: I d ot k : Mr. Griilith: No. VY rmitted it will op, UO AEE ae problems of tiat the mai ' wh even in tropical climates it stays cool £
ioe Mr. Forde: do not know. Nv J : Ti . : Will Trade Union. She said she would ation; the main job for which | a da
wiews, : = Mr. Walcott: Were you there Mr. E. K. Walcott: Do you say |; day on the West bogin her talk by saying what the ©XiSts is to protect its members Chere are no springs or hard edges A
Mr. Walcott: Was all the wood when Mr. Murray took away some *O" Sot three from Francis and | +" irhament. Trade Union stood for and the She said to wear out the covering material
which came from Seawell worked material ? two from Duguid? Duguid said he te nt it mm pla ta tf : jern Replying to questions, Mrs. Wil. |
into the building ? Mr. Forde: Mr. Murray took he carried three unde rstood ill pursue the line y sey ave Be ay ‘ - ee ren — tome wae wean aa” Mac | -
Mr. Clarke: As far as I remem- away some of the big hut as well Mf. Griffith: That is so, in ane D ritish West os She ona Seat a ae Trade Union can be victimized fo. |
ber. ; 7 , as the small. p Mr. E. K, Walcott: Did Mr. Cox} fies to unit idderatiens So which the Trade Union movement *Yâ„¢Mpathising with another pol
The « Seen eeloe ee? When you Mr, Walcott: Did you see where ©¥e! come down there any time han: Covers ie expired wider spread and. more devel-. itic 1 part There is uo relatior
thes RG ae th : fl Sid ras the material came from which } eo Griffith: Yes, he came quick-] peliectar to do this, despite fre- oped than in any other community. ‘DiP_, between co-operatives ani | f
other huts wu are esides 1 2 4 . “| , after ss F “js? ro. . . _— : — ' on
on ¥ a 7 ms ve af Ps “i went on_ his lorry ? y ‘ after Miss Francis’ lorry. uct eC tic 1d sug- In England the economic struc- ‘¢ Trade Union. They aim at tw The REW WOU Cony oe
‘ae eke TN ACR ee ti Mr. Forde: I cannot directly MF. argue Did he return 1 vidual M.P’s ture that led to Trade Unions is “ferent things, The Trade Unioi |
'° arke : did no notice say agai when Mis Francis’ lorry i is that if West ; : “@ s t |
avi re ay. ; 2 f ew is th f st older than in any other place. The ‘cerns itself with what the ma
coy ere. 4 3 Mr. Walcott: Did you see Mr. Came? al to make Trade Union way ison pectinne gets for his work and in makit in mattresses and pane ning
The Commissioner: When this Cox up there ? Mr. Griffith: Yes ‘ i their wor+ jn England for about 150 years. Pargains with the employer, Th
one hut was ae the Reef, Mr. Forde: I never s*w him Mr. Walcott: Did he come f peak ho " ‘ ; rae rr co-operative concern tseif wit MADE IN ENGLAND BY DUNLOP CRAFTSMEN
were any more there? there in connection with the huts. Duguid’s lorry came? ! ‘ ’ E , } ; q
. : was Ss. ‘= zed I employ er Independent how the man spends hi wag
e 4 he: a ot see any a is: . - ar 7 . « t fe ition . ? ; , : £
Mr. Clarke: I did not se “The Commissioner: Mrs. Mar- Mr. Griffith: No. @he said that the Trade Union when he. gets it. J have neve. | ECKSTEIN BROS — Bay Street — Distributors
more tineau said she bought three, what sae Walcott: Do you now Over-populati inisation is the organ through 'eard of a Trade Union organisin
5 soy 2 ” o t} ee 1 ‘ ' ‘ ag > ® ’ 7 , : ; - — — - -
The Commissioner : How much wag Sy Ban. ee at a ne pee hans via Frar Cc serv 'e D4 to di ch the worker can bargain fur COrOperative nae , oe
of the pavilion was new wood? sat orde : daresay she was Ga but wi een nich was not check °F es baa eee Sec ee ee " his rights. It is not only in the Before the function elosed Mrs
“Se 1 oe rig € ch you are sure neither | ProPte! ‘ UPD= moder! vo . » has Williams went on to expl %
Mr. Clark . I =e not know. Sydney Walcott who was em- Murray nor Duguid brought uncas i r ! Antigua ie ain rid that people rs : ¥ oe Peele prem
The Commissioner : You say the : es 7 Mr. Grii : brougt They will seel ; hat law Worked. for others. As long as + bout co-operatives for those wh«
window to the huts were card Ployed on the Reef Grounds as Mr. Griiith: Yes a reece Lesa ey records show people have been Were interested
board, what about the frame ? watchman in October 1949 was i heckand re upnelg Barowgnes working for others for wage
, ‘ vallec 0 , 7 > é or Le * the terr as
Mr. Clarke : The frame was opand temive evidence after Leon pieiieiee te ta Hiss homed tliné cians
used in various places Att en .. “ will be time to nto the question b. 195
; : A rney General: Did you re- ; ‘
Attorney General: Who was e : : * | of West Indic econor elation ° r ANA
pa ee Fe ceive ries W hut Sea- “Cc » : - ‘ ; > son
Mr. Worrell’s foreman an ies with huts from Sea \ ACC idents | ith Can his is a problem No Action Is I aken me onepnee 60 1/10% 4
Mr. Clarke: Mr. Allan Greaves : hiel nder discussion Mei :
. : I Ss. £ ‘eceiv ries Demand
of Turner Hall, St. Lucy. me, Walcott T received 1OrS ies line ‘rease By 42 2 ! ¢ t continuing whenever a new major road is Draft 69.95% pr
with flooring on two different oc-~ in Ott I he wie of cer ted Pol C tabl : Sight Drafts 59 8/10°% pr
i easions from Francis. I was night Forty-two m , tain WET a ; z created @ lice onstapble 1° Gv, pr Cable
Watchman watchman : oceurred rm Penge a er : eer A LAP snd sua yl medy placed on point duty to direct g0 5/10% pr, Currenc py
. sla - or uK Ve Indie lie n recon- . 5 ‘ > » ne » of 0 )
‘ Attorney General: Whose else ing January to May this | | versior e pound ; affic, He might take the name ot ae en: .
es Renan 7 map lorries brought ? year than occurred over the | The it pport too for the feign’ a oe Me the —
watchman at Seawe rom 22, Mr. S. Wa : or a ? ati a : ad Meee ‘ : } ; ie cad studs No action is taken iy
then gave evidence. I know ere}. So cere es yarn ewe ae yeee. rae * ’ ye oe oo 5 FEBI- «vainst the person STOMACH oy eB a a
: E : . ary May s yea reformed pot ‘ sant
Attorney General: Were you Attorney General : Who was the 521 accidents took place. | if t " > iccessful in rhe $ C ommissioner of Polic | PN ee ir a eg
there rate bi ern auc- other watchman ? Most of the accidents | |t! is debate, it is be- os rhe eee ae oa Oe a)
tioneer sold the huts * s 7 ° © if. asd eal en the oe sa : } Mir. I 1 Samma if the person should commit 2! : .
aye. Francia * ne HF ene S. Walcott: Randolph Grif a an ee on Satur- | | Mr, aD ( ar . n ve Tense paeain he would not be! Alka-Seltzer is so easy to en’,
fe = ty . ays and the time during | opt _ tne position and iN eee a » ing P
Attorney General: Do you know Attorney General: Did you see the day is 5 and 6 p.m. | | Li a =o ble to say, “I did not know. | ze e nee Le can te soe
what Mr. Tudor bought Murray and Duguid’s lorry during One hundred and four hi Vea EF ne :
rs c i ae sae 5 : watch it fizz, then drink it, Not @
Mr. France I do not know ? .
. your time ? accidents occurred on Satur- | i i e uxury ° it
what he bought Mr. 8S, Walcott: No days during that period and | laxative, not habit-forming, you can .
Attorney Generai: Do you re- The last witness who gave evi- 89 on Wednesdays. The least | take it any time vet ane Seltzer 4
member telling the police that Mr. dence on Thursday was Randolph cecurred on Sundays, 45. relieve your acid indigestion. The economy of it..
er lee three huts? Griffith Between 5 and 6 p.m. 5 Have a supply handy. ex bh
r, Francis: x¢ Attorney General: What: time accidents took place and b * : 7
were you watchman ? tween 9 and 10 m, 42. The long-wearing beauty of it ee















eieraey a ener mB i Piss A y Mr. Griffith: During the day. The highest number o
member how jong atter they Attorney General: Were you accidents for one mont
‘ 4 } ) é nts fo NE non . > :
Oe es oa re - down detailed by Mr. Tudor to receive was in April when there | ee ahs cnt Wusth duet aioe
i eee Ce ate oe flooring were 115, : p 4
Attorney General: Was every- jr, Griffith: Yes. The first set | ori the suds. Rejoice in its long-lasting beauty.
thing moved : _ came about 5 p.m eoeerree oul find this exquisite Lingerie in ‘Celanese Crepe-de-
a y-aottg Yes. 1 donot know aitterney General: Did it have Chine. ‘Celanese’ Satin and ‘Celanese Celshung’.
where they went Duguid ? 3 i
Attorney General; Do you know & Another Big ; :
whose lorry took away the sleep- Mr. Griffith: Yes. It had 70 * es i Every lovely thing about it says.
ers? boards. / apts
Mr. Francis: I think it was Mr Attorney General: After these B.G. W ale rfal Dae AN Tee
Duguid’s lorry huts started coming, did you stay GEORGETOWN, B.¢ ; 1e aid om
Attorney General: Are you tell- on any nights? British Guiana has four of the f purity, and color
ing the Commissioner that all the Mr. Griffith: Three nights. world’s greatest waterfalls, witl . %
flooring was taken by Duguid ? Attorney General: Did you see the discovery, reported by a geo of our Diamonds,
Mr. Francis: What was taken Mr. Murray’s lorry come? logical expedition, of a great fall
during the night, but IT understand Mr. Griffith: No high up in a tributary of the Cu; X pivs ovr reputa-
some was tak during the day Attorney General: During the uni River ts ‘ Te of Hd
The Commissioner : Which time the pavilion was being built, —R.U.P s n. fo giving

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOGAT E

Ose eee fee)

Printed by the Advocate \o. 114., Broad St. Bridgetow.







Saturday, July 7, 1951

PARTIES

THE political parties in this island are
girding their loins for the general elections
later in the year. The present Legislative
Session began in December, 1948 and was
to have ended in 1950 but by an Act of
Legislation was extended for one year. The
end is nearly five months off and the parties
are courting the electorate at public meet-
ings. The lining up however is not definite
and the names of additional candidates: to
the ranks are merely known by rumour.
There has been no official declaration. The
Barbados Labour Party, the Government
party has never had a majority ever all
other parties in the House but has been
able to carry out its programme with the
assistance of opposition parties. The Labour
Party has been relying on attracting young
candidates to its ranks. The suspension of
one member, Mr. Allder, brought about the
unexpected withdrawals of Mr. Pilgrim
and Mr. Cumberbatch. Public criticism of
the Government by another young candi-
date, Mr. T. W. Miller, over the handling
of the compensation to flood victims
caused another unhappy division and party
loss. The only certainty is Mrs, Foster the
lady candidate for St. Andrew. It seems
now that other circumstances are likely to
cause further loss.





These defections in the ranks are occur-
ring at a time when the Party Leader, Mr,
G. H. Adams, is out of the island. It may
be that his dominating personality will be
all that is needed to bring a closing of the
ranks such as the genial Dr. Cummins has
not been able to achieve, The task is not
so easy, however, as there are rumours of
personal squabbles among party members
and the electorate who put them in power
in 1948 are voicing criticisms of the policies
and the lack of achievement of the Labour
Party. The Barbados Electors’ Association,
the Opposition Party, has not yet declared
its full list of candidates although public
meetings have been held in several par-
ishes campaigning for the old members of
the Party. This has been a welcome change
from the old method of (holding a few
meetings immediately before election time.

The party has not been without its trials.
Several members were ill for short periods
and propaganda by other parties brought
a few members into disfavour. But during
the session such work as was achieved by
the Government party was largely due to
the help of the Opposition. Now even with
the Party Leader, Mr, Wilkinson, out of
the island for health reasons, the Opposi-
tion holds the majority of seats over the
Government who will be without Mr.
Mapp and Mr. Adams for some weeks to
come.

The Electors’ Association, the Opposition
Party, now have nine votes as against the
Government with seven and the members
of the moribund Congress Party floating
somewhere in the constellation and one
independent, Mr. Alider. Mr. Garner has
been flirting with the Labour Party for
sometime but oceasionally records an inde-
pendent vote. Mr. Crawford and Mr.
Branker maintain their old association but
their efforts are regarded as individual
performances. Even the personality of that
outstanding West Indian, Mr, Bustamante,
the Jamaican Prime Minister, failed to re-
vive any public enthusiasm for the Con-
gress Party or any interest in its lack of
achievement.

In spite of the introduction of the Party
system in 1946, politics in Barbados is still
largely individual and there are signs now
that there will be many changes in the
personnel of the House despite party
allegiance.





A merica m Column :

In one American State convicts
living in outdoor camps have made a
contribution to society by building
better recreational facilities while
rehabilitating themselves,

(By HAROLD TITUS)

An experiment in using prison
labour for conservation work in
state parks and lake resorts in the
northern Great Lakes of Michigan
is being studied by penologists in
the United States as well as in
other lands.

Not only does this programme
set a precedent {or the number of
persons involved under lenient
custody, but it is also something
new because, for the first time, the
charges of a penal system are help-
ing to solve the problems of a
state conservation agency.

The first camp was opened in
1947. Another was functioning in
1948, and four more were added
in 1949. Each camp has 60 work-
ers. As a _ rehabilitation device
penologists are watching the ex-
periment critically but with
mounting enthusiasm. i...
being observed by public foresters,
park administrators, and fish and
game managers, because if the
promises it extends to date are
fulfilled, it means the return of
a large amount of labour such as
American conservation agencies
had available prior to World Wat
II. Most of these bureaus, both
state and federal, have been is
need of additional help since 1940.

The proposal to use prison in-
mates for the development of
Michigan Conservation projects
dates back to the 1930’s when
veteran Circuit Judge Parm C.
Gilbert, since retired, began agi-
tating for an experiment. “We
have a demonstration of the
social results of a conservation
corps right before us,” the judge
used to say. “All judges recognize
the value of Boy Scout and Four-
H training in citizenship. The
out-of-doors is a great healer of
ailing impulses, and I dislike
sending young men behind bars
when, in a State like ours, so much
work waits in our forests, parks,
and public hunting and fishing
grounds, Let these men pay their
penalty by working with their
hands — close to nature at her
best — and we will gain twice.
Character will be restored in the
offenders and more character will
be built in the public by the ad-
ditional facilities for healthy re-
laxation which are created.”



Everyone in the state capitol
agreed that the suggestion had
merit. But to try it out would
necessitate new interdepartmen-
tal arrangements, and then came
World War II and nothing was
done. Still, the idea stayed alive
to be picked up for further ex-
amination when the State began

its post-war consideration of
peacetime needs.
In Michigan the Conservation

Department is of unusual impor-
tance. It is responsible for aie
parks — 60 of them, ranging in

size from 20 to 45,000 acres, and
for state forests — 4,250,000 acres

of them, all of which, besides
yielding considerable values in
harvested forest products, are

open to hunting, fishing, and other
recreational uses, It is charged,
also, with the maintenance of
stocks of fish and game, The
State sold nearly 1,000,000 fishing
licenses in 1949 and more than
1,000,000 hunting licenses,

For years the Conservation De-
partment in Michigan has not been
able to keep up with the demand
for the services it gives, especially
in the public parks, In 1945 the
Michigan Legislature sought to
solve this problem by appropriat-
ing more than $4,500,000 for the
acquisition of additional sites,
among them an aggregate of
60,000 acres in five units. All the
land was within a 40-mile radius
of the industrial city of Detroit,
where lack of outdoor recreation-
al opportunities has been a major
civic problem, However, when
the Conservation Department
asked for funds to develop this
land and expand older parks, the
legislature appropriated only a
fraction of the amount requested.

Then P. J. Hoffmaster, Director
of Conservation, revived Judge
Gilbert's idea and began negotia-
tions with the Department of
Correction, which agreed to co-
operate by selecting prisoners to
work in the parks. The first group
soon set the pattern of work which
sueceeding groups followed,

Most visitors who saw that first
| crew at work never realized they
were prisoners. A work foreman,

| seldom with more than 10 men in

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Prison Labour Can

Be Helpful





“We might constitute ourselves as a Good Ogises
ae, Peace for Persia as well...”

his group, directed them. Few
who passed the remodeled farm-
house where the men were housed
suspected it sheltered anything’
other than another force of labour-
ers on some nearby job. There
were no walls, no wire fences; just
a few inconspicuous signs marked
“Yard Limits.”

And the prisoners themselves,
realizing that an idea which might
he priceless to them was on trial,
did their best to make it accept-
able. And they turned qut the
work! New drives were graded,
culverts built, hiking trails cleared,
picnic areas created, trees planted
for erosion control and for land-
seaping effects, and garages and
tool houses erected. Plants to
furnish food and shelter for wild
life were introduced.

Public apathy has changed to
warm approval of the programme
in less than four years, says J. N.

Frisbie, warden of the state
prison which furnishes all the
labour, When openings for work-
ers in the conservation camps

are announced, nearly all the in-
mates in the Michigan institutions
deluge the prison administration
with requests for consideration.
Three members of the staff are as
signed to screen possible workers.
In general, only those inmates
who have served half of their
sentences are selected, and tne
age range is from 25 to 45, with
some exceptions. Most of the
men in the camps have less than
a year more to serve on their
sentences.

The acceptance of tihe conser-
vation work programme by in-
mates of Michigan’s penal insti-
tutions was enthusiastic. . The
camp plan was something | new
and privileges were comparative-
ly abundant. Besides, the men
had a feeling that they were mak-
ing a genuine contribution, pro-
viding facilities which might be
enjoyed by their friends and
families and which they them-
selves might someday use.

The men work 40 to 50 hours
a week, with occasional chores
on Saturday. In a group of 60—
the standard size—10 are assign-
ed to kitchen and other camp dy-
ties. On Saturday forenoon all
hands join in to clean the camp.
Each bed has headphones con-
nected to a master radio for eve-
ning relaxation, All camps have
libraries and those within motor
ing distance of the big prison see
a motion picture once a week.
No dormitory door has a_ lock.
At first, work supervision was in
charge of guards. Now, park
rangers and other Conservation
Department employees have tak-
en aharge,

In three years, only five pris~
oners have walked away from
the camps. Two returned volun-
tarily, two were apprehended,
and one is still at large.

After giving proof of wanting
to abide by rules, a man's work
pattern is most important. If a
man does his best and keeps do-
ing it to the extent of his phy-



sical and mental ability, he
stays; if he shirks, back to the
prison he goes, Thus far, only

eight men have been withdrawn
from camps for not doing their
share of the work.

One 27-year-old prisoner, in
for manslaughter, had been in-
side the prison walls for three

» 2,045,000 WordsIn MacArthur. Case

London Express Service

years and’in a camp for nine
months. “Back at the prison
you do everything one way. It
is discouraging” he says earnest-
ly. “Out here work
every few days, but better than
that, every so often you will see
a new way to doit, You talk it
over with the boss tig ordinarily
he will let you try tell you,
when you see your res idea
tried out, it makes you feel you
are important.

Another, in for burglary and
due before the parole board
shortly, was enthusiastic about
camp life because of its prepara-
tion for a return to freedom.

“If a fellow made a mistake
and is paying for it and has made
up his mind never to let it hap-
pen again, a job like this is a
godsend, Under this kind of cus~-
tody you can try yourself out.”

One of the interesting side-
lights as the plan has been ac-
cepted has been the atitude of
prison guards. They are realists,
and many admit that they had
misgivings when the camp pro-
gramme was announced. “I have
been a guard for 23 years,” said
Sergeant John Hampton. “I was
there when silence among pris-
oners was almost a fixed rule.
In my time I have seen a lot done
in reforming men and a lot tried,
but when I heard about this
camp idea I did not give it a
chance of working out. But I
now believe that it is the great-
est thing ever tried. The state
is getting a lot of work done and
as a rehabilitation plan it is go-
ing to pay dividends you cannot
imagine.”

As yet, the rehabilitation factor
eannot be accurately measured.
A special study is being made of
men who have been paroled from
the camps, but it is not yet time
for drawing conclusions. How-
ever, it is established that Michi-
gan is getting big returns for the
money invested, although per
capita maintenance cost in camp
is higher than it is behind walls.

Group camping for Boy Scouts
and similar organizations is a
major activity im Michigan’s
state parks. Prisoners have pre-
pared cabins for winter use so
they will be habitable the year
around and more youths may
have a chance to learn to live
together in peace, health, and
productive activity.

“T think,” said one prisoner, as
he picked up his saw, “I should
get to work. We want to get this
place ready for the boys.” He
paused, “You know, if more of
them had places like this to go to,

there would not be so many of
us.”

There is the possibility that
some similar plan may be con-
sidered for American national
forests and parks and wild-life

refugees.

In many of the other 47 States
serious thought is being given io
similar plans. It is argued that
any plan which can make a more
beautiful land, make better citi-
zens, and at the same time save
money, is worth trying anywhere.
(Crime & Criminals).

This article appeared in Collier's

a widely circulated weekly magazine

published in the United States. The

writer was for 20 years a member of

the Michigan Conservation Commis-
sion, serving as chairman at the be-
ginning of the experiment he des-

cribes.

changes



1





}

|



|



NOBODY’S
DIARY |

around, There used to be a local proverb
which said “rain makes the young plants
grow” but nobody wants to grow. Every
time it rains the streets are deserted and}?
people cluster under shop-fronts.

But the "buses run. An enormous tar-
paulin is held up by a conductor and
when everybody has piled in down it
flaps and you’re shut in. s high time
"buses were designed differently.

Tuesday — The ‘bus position needs study.
Are there enough "buses to cope with the
8.30 to 9 a.m. travellers? The impression
is that they are nothing like enough.
Then the ’bus stops need revision. Many
of them are so arranged that they create
traffic blocks when one is coming up and
down, and they both pull up at ‘bus stops.
This happens often around corners and
near “Major Road ahead” signs. There
are far too many ’bus stops altogether.

Wednesday — Who is the wit who wrote
under the appeal “don’t throw your cig-
arettes into the lavatory basin.” “This
makes them soggy and hard to light ?”

Thursday — Down in Trinidad and in British
Guiana those who like good films have
formed a film society. The society rents
good films like “Vivere in Pace”, “Paisa”
and Citta Aperta”. Now that “City
Lights” has come to Barbados there is a
hope that the super-duper most breath-
taking, most spectacular, most lavish,
most ‘everything typical Hollywood
shockers will be crowded out a bit more.
In that case there might be no need for
a film society here. But if local cinemas
are not prepared to show an occasional
first rate film from Italy, France, Ger-
many or anywhere else where good films
are made, in addition to the rather rare
good ones from the Hollywood stable or
the British studios then let us start our
own film society.

friday — Talking of film societies, there
seems to be a hole in the pocket theatre. |
I wonder whether “Pygmalion” didn’t
kill it. Pygmalion was so good, so am-
bitious that maybe it has frightened the
pants off potential amateurs, The theatre
might have been no bigger than a pocket
but the talent was too much. Where has
the talent gone ? Now if they had taken
my advice (free) they would have begun
with one-act plays. Almost anybody can
put on a one-act play. I would have
expected to see one a month at the
Pocket Theatre.

Instead Pygmalion has frightened the
wits out of any little company and no-
body wants to risk being laughed at. If
there had been less: formality with Pyg-
malion, dinner jackets and black ties, the
average player might have been encour-
aged a bit more. If pocket theatres are
to flourish they need threadbare pants.

Saturday — What is a University? How about
this as a definition? “A University is a
cultural event: it is an institution in a
context: and it cannot be much better
than the culture in which it is set.” It
is Harman Grisewood’s.

And here as it’s Saturday, and I’m ina
quoting mood is what Wenceslas Ivanov,
a Russian, wrote to Pellegrini in 1934.
“My confidence in man is based precisely
on that faith which you consider the an-
tithesis of freedom: the faith which
places a free creature at the centre of
creation, condemns and saves him, finds
him fallen and raises him to heaven; the
faith which sees itself reflected in the
pure crystal of its teaching and is aston-
ished by the abysm of light contained in
itself; the Christian faith, which alone
teaches me what man is, and, by reveal-
ing his weakness and his value, purifies
and justifies my natural humanism, in
all that concerns the dignity of man.”



Stones Are Piling Up

By FREDERICK ELLIS
TWO of the world’s richest men,

“Our contract with the Diamond
Corporation terminates on Decem-

NEW YORK.
Remember ail the uproar over
General MacArthur? Remember
the Senate committee hearings on
his sacking began with all that
ianfare? sind

Well, the hearings have ended,
‘They lasted 42 days, during whicn
2,045,000 words were spilled into
the record by 13 witnesses,

Now the 26 Senators, belonging
to the Armed Services and the
Foreign Relations ‘Committees,
have got to start writing,

And they are ‘not going to
satisfy themselves with one re-
port. They propose to write three.

The first report will say Tru-
man was right in sacking Mac-
Arthur, It will come from the
President's orthodox © Democrat
supporters,

The second report will say the
President was wrong. This one
will be written by the Republi-
cans, the opposition party,



And the third will be ham-
mered out by liberal Republicans
and rebel Democrats. It will say
that Truman was partly wrong
ind partly right, :

E IS bad news for Britain
f another of Senators—tha



Committee on Export Controls,

It announced tonight that it is take action when friends told her

very displeased with the situation
revealed by an investigation into
ships flying the Panama flag and
dealing with Red China,

The committee says that between
February 1 and May 31, 37 cargo
ships flying the Panama flag visited
Red Chinese ports. And of these
24 were owned or operated by
companies “with head offices in
the United Kingdom or in British
territory.”

Of the rest, eight were Chiang
Kai-shek ships and five Greek.
Nearly all were U.S. wartime
Liberty ships, sold as surplus.

THERE WERE appreciative
whistles in a New York court-
room as Mae West, resplendent
in green, white, and gold, satn-
tered in. She was suing Sura
Allen, an actress, whom she ac-
cuses of impersonating her

Miss Allen’s counsel asked Miss

West how old she was when she
first appeared on the stage
Answer: “Five”
Question Was that about 35
years ago’
Miss West’s counsel, interrupt-
ng Don’t snswer.’
Miss. West said.ghe Jecided to

that Miss Allen’s night club im-
personations “ were cheapening
the character of her show, “Dia-
mond Lil.”

P.S.—A _ film
Miss West's age as

NEW YORKERS,
to many criticisms
people but generally
dynamic and restless, are annoyed
at the, strictures passed by Mrs.
Clarence Robinson, on paying “her
first visit to the city,

Sniffed Mrs. R: “People have
too much time to do nothing in
this place, How they hang around
and waste time!”

Mrs. R. is
Pennsylvania.

CARDBOARD CUPS and picnic

directory gives
58.

accustomed
from many
regarded as

from Hopbottom

containers are big business and
getting bigger all the time.

One firm has produced an aver-
age of 27,000,000 cups and con-

tainers a day this year
up new plants

It is rushing

THE GRAT

along

BOOM is
America’s
the

spreading
highways
and

out
di beache

reception ‘clerk



a tremendous holidays-at - home
splurge developed.

“A sensational season — and it
has begun a month early,” said
one travel agency man,

Other reasons for the joy: more
firms than ever are granting long
holidays with pay; with world
political uncertainty people like
“to stay in their own backyard.”
The one dark spot aiid the glitter
—luxury cottages are not being
rented as quickly as their owners
would like. They are only 1,800
dollars (£643) for the season.

CHARLES WILSON, America’s
defence mobilisation boss, warned
America’s business men to-day:

“If you are. tempted to join
voice with those who will clamour
for relaxation of effort in building
up our might if fighting ends in
Korea, just think of all the other
places where there is trouble and
which could set the world aflame.”

He gave as examples Indo-
China, Malaya and Persia

UNITED AIR LINES telegraphed



President Truman tonight a con-
jitional agreement to restore its
service cross America at mid-
ight. Fo ht days its pilots have
) ore-pay strike. Pan
an and other lines are.not

A

44-year-old Canadian
Dr. John T. Williamson
South Africa’s 71-year-old “Rand-
lord” Sir Ernest Oppenheimer,
have fallen out—over diamonds,

Mr. William Tayleur, spokes-
man for Dr. Williamson, who owns
a fabulously rich diamond mine
at Mwadui, four degrees below
the Equator in Tanganyika, said
in London last night: “There is
friction between ourselves and
the Diamond Corporation.’

The Corporation is the selling
end of Sir Ernest’s powerful De
Beevs diamond group, which pro-
duces most of the world’s dia-
monds.

Under a contract Williamson
agreed to sell all his stones to
the Corporation, which has
almost a monopoly over the sale
of diamonds, By regulating the
market it keeps diamonds rare
and dear.

War between the rival diamond
kings may cost millions if the
stones are thrown on to the market.

‘Over Prices’
‘Since last June the William-

son mine has delivered no
diamonds to the Corporation for

ule”, said Mr. Tayleur. “There
is a parce! of stones worth
ondon

£500, o00 deposi ted

in a L



ik,

white ¢



bachelor ber 31. I cannot say if it will ‘be
and renewed”.
Another spokesman of

Dr.
Williamson said: “The friction is
over prices”.

Until Williamson found his mine
in 1940 Sir Ernest had undisputed
domination over world diamonds.
After trying to buy out Williamson,
Sir Ernest came to terms. He gave
Williamson a 10 per cent. cut of
the market. That was worth
£4,000,000 last year. ,

Talks between the legal repre-
sentatives of both sides are being
held at the Colonial Office, who
come in on it because diamonds are
a big revenue producer for
Tanganyika

‘Eulldozed’ Out
Millions of pounds are involved %
in the dispute, The Diamond] *
Corporatiion alone has £11,800,000 | *
in the bank, and make a profit of
£5,483,000 last year.

“







SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951



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Williamson just sits on a “pipe” Canada Dry Drinks Grapes $
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@ From Page
Mr. Greaves: The
building and the uprighi

Mr. Mottley: What a}
flooring? —

Mr. Greaves: We ussd the -ol
flooring from the hut



to put new boards as
old stuff was bad.
Mr. Mottley: Did vou leave bs
fore the building was painted?
Mr. Greaves: Yes
Mr. Moitley: Did you splice any
of the wood for use in the build-
ing? J
Mr. Greaves: No. The posts from
the huts were too smal! and they
had to get new ones,
Mr. Mottley: Were any
built?
Mr.
Mr.
terial

bench

Greaves: Yes.
Mottley: What sori of ma-
was used?

Mr. Greaves: New woo

Mr. Mottley: What bec:
the posts that were two

Mr. Gre.ves: They w
to make caps.

Mr. Mottley: While
out by the Police Station did you
see any trail by wood ¢
the labourers had removed

$2.40 A Day

Mr. Greaves:, I don’t remen
seeing any, but I know Mr.
rell bought atlas to avoid the
ants eating the wood.

The Commissioner:
getting $2.40 a day at the
Field?

Mr. Greaves: I thi
that.

The Commissioner: Was a man
by the name of Headley employed
there as a carpenter

Mr. Greaves: Yes.

The Com oner:
penters get $2.16 a day?

Mr. Greaves: I rea!ly
say because Mr. Worrell
ing those men.

The Commissioner:
pay you?

Mr. Greaves:

The Commissioner:
penters, there were
ployed there?

Mr. Greaves: Yes.

The Commissioner: You vic
that there were about 5) to 60
carpenters employed there?

Mr. Greaves: ‘That numbe1
cluded masons as well

The Commissioner: What
rial did you put on the roof of
building?

Mr. Greaves: Genesco.

The Commissioner: Was
any galvanise on the roof?



me
hort’
re used

he stuff

K
was



3 te

wood

Were you
Playing



k about



t

was








Did car-
eould no
pay-

was

Did Worrell
Ye .
Besides cai

masons em

in-

mate-
he

tnere

Mr. Greaves: I cannot remem-—
ber.

The Commissioner: How much
new wood was used on the shed-

court?
that was

roof facing the tennis

Mr. Greaves: All of
new wood.

The Commissioner: How
new wood was used on the
roof facing the sea?

Mr. Greaves: The uprights
old stuff while the siding wa
fir.

The Cepnmissioner:
the centre building?

Mr. Greaves: Ti
new wood,

The Commissioner:
tthe roofing part?

Mr. Greaves: A
stuff was used for

mucn
shed-

were
s new

What



it contained

What

about

of the
roofing.

lot old

the

The Commissioner: What about
the flooring?

Mr. Greaves: The old flooring
from the huts was put down, but
had to be repaired. A lot of new
boards had to be put in

Next Witness

Mr. Mencea E. Cox \ the next

jwitness,
The Attorney General:

You are



a member of the House of Assem-
bly and a member of the Execu-
tive?

Mr. Cox: Yes

The Attorney General: In 1949,
did you have any conversation
with Mr. Tudor, the then Churci-



warden to the removal of huts
from Seawell?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

The Attorney General: Did you

tell him you would tender for the
removal of the huts?

Mr. Cox: I remember telling
him I heard he wanted tenders
for the removal and asked him
whether or not the tenders were
closed, and he told me the tend-
ers were not closed.

The Atiorney General: Did you
do anything about it’

Mr. Cox: I told Miss Phyllis
Francis to tender.

The Aitorney General: Did you

know if she was interested in con-
tracting’

Mr. Cox: I knew
the number

she owned &

of which wa



The Attorney, General:
know if she tendered?

Mr. Cox: Yes she did
awarded the contract.

The Attorney General:

Do yor
and wa

she

Did

ask you to look after the contract
for her?
Mr. Cox: That is a fact.

The Attorney General: Did you
see after the removal of the hut?
If so what part did you take in it”

Mr. Cox: I am really not a
quainted with the freighting busi-
ness, but I know a Mr. Duguid
who goes in for this business, I
discussed. it with him and he
agreed to undertake the removal.
This was after I had anged



everything with Miss Francis and
she had agreed.

The Attorney General:
other steps did you

Mr. Cox: I met Wo
tractor in Broad Str
me he was ready
was the Thursday.

The Attorney
else took place?

What
take?
ell the
t and he
move



con-
tola
That



to



General: W





Mr. Cox: I got on to Mr. Duguid
by Plantations Ltd. and intimated
what Worrell had said. He told
me he would go to th 7 é
Police Station and get
mits. About 4.30 . y
took Duguid to Seawe ye
as he said he we suld have to
there and see the op in order t
lay out for it. While t e hi



dissecte: a

2ing



JULY 7, 1951

Playing Field Enquiry °°:





do not remember,
told
sent for

to the

money

missing piece





The Attorney General: Who re-
ceived the stuff hen you got to
he Reei

Mr. Cox: There was a man there
checking, but I did not know who
ne wa

The Attorney General :
go back teSeawell any time ?

Mr. Cox: No. I turned over
everything to Duguid.

The Attorney General: Do you
know Fitz Gerald Murray, a lorry
owner ? man it

Mr. Cox: Yes.

The Attorney General : Did vou
see him a eawell ?

Mr. Coz No

The Attorney General :

Did you





Was the

job finished’?

Mr. Cox: About the Wednes-
day morning in the next week,
Worrell told me that the job was
10t finished

Attorney General: What did



- Cox: I went in search of
guid who was working in My
Lord’s Hill at the time. I told
him what Worrell had said. He
told me he was sure both of his
lorries had removed the stuff on
he S rday night. He further
1id that he had even paid the
‘rivers for the two trips

sy Attorney General: What did
you do?

Mr, Cox: I took Duguid in my
ear and drove to town. I met Tom
the driver of M. 258 by Tudor’s
gasoline station I told him what
I had heard and he said that he
did not go up to Seawell on the
Saturday night. I suggested to him

t

c finish the job.
7 ve .
Work Finished

The Attorney General :
get a report that the
finished ?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

The Attorney General:
you ?

Mr. Cox: Tom

The Attorney General:
vas the amount collected

Did you
work was

Who told

When
for the

contract

Mr.
but I

ot

Cox. I do not
believe
so aftet

The

remember,
it about a week
the work was finished.
Attorney General: Who
went to get the money from the
Parochial Treasurer ?

Mr, Cox: Squires.

‘Phe Attorney General: Did you
report to Miss Francis that the job

finished and that she could
the ?

t was



rankly speaking, I
but I could have
that and she could have
it

The Attorney General: Who saw
paying of Duguid ?
Mr. Cox: I did.

The Attorney General:
paid to you ?

Mr. Cox: Yes

The Attorney General: Duguid
iid he was paid for three trips.

her

Was the

Is that true ?

Mr. Cox: Yes

The Attorney General: Did Mr.

Tudor tell you some pieces of joist
were missing ?

Mr, Cox: Yes. At a meeting

of the Housing Board.

The Attorney General: When





did Mr. Tudor make that report ?
r. Cox: About two or three
weeks afterwards

’ * o e
Missing Pieces
The Attorney General: Was that
the first time you heard about the

°



Mr. Cox: Yes, I suggested to
Mr. Tudor to report the matter to
the Police. He was not keen and
I did so.

The Attorney General: As far
as I remember, Mr. Tudor said
he went to your heuse very
early one morning and said:
“Man, look what you have done.
You are looking after the huts
and now a part is missing”,

Mr. Cox: That is not true.
Iie told me at my home that he
had reported the matter to the
Police and had taken out a
warrant to search Tom's house.

The Attorney General: Did
you (telephone the Police later?
Mr. Cox: No, but I said be-
fore that I had telephoned the
Police. On that occasion, I told

them I was speaking on behalf of

Mr. Tudor,

The Attorney General: As far
as you know, the missing pieces
of joist were never found ?

Mr. Cox: I knew nothing
more of the matter. The first
time I heard about the loss of
huis was when someone tele-
phoned me saying that it was
raised by Mr. Mottley at a Ves-
try meeting sometime last year.

The Attorney General: You
know how Miss Francis got this
lorry ?

Mr. Cox: I bought it for her
from Buttals Plantation,

The Attorney General: She
said that she subsequently gave
it back to you.. Is that true?

Mr. Cox: Yes. There was
an understanding between the
two of us.

The Attorney General: Did .she
get any part of the money for the
removal of the hut ?

Mr. Cox: Yes She got
$35 to $40

Same Business

The Attorney General: As far

the contract is concerned, is
Cox and Francis one and the same
business ?

Mr, Cox: That is not strictly
correct although there is some
closeness between the two.

Mr. Mottley: You said you
member of the Executive



about

a
ymmittee
Mr. Cox: Yes
Mr. Mottley : You said that the
t tin ou knew anything about
the m g of the huts was when
I raised the question at a meeting
of the Vestry ?
Mr. Cox: Yes
Mr. Mottley :

were

Ce







The hut question
was ked to _be investiga by
the Vestry of St. Michael in a let-
oming from the Financial Sec-
for and on behalf of the
itive Committee. Surely as
member of the Executive that
within your knowledge ?
Mr, Cox I am not prepared to
¢ : nict

ated











took







out of

since and the truck is

contract







wg the ite first time
nything about mi
s when some e { 1ed
you and said that I had raised the
question at a Vestry meeting?
Mr. Cox: Yes.
Mr. Mottley : When was it that





Mr. Tudor had discuss
}



d with you

of the’ building from

Mr, Cox: I have
hat was in 1949 ot
the Housing Board
building.

Hut’s Removal

Mr. Mottley : You said that you
got Duguid to look after the re-
moval of the building from Sea-
well?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Mottley: Did you have
lorry of your own at the time ?

Mr. Cox: Yes

Mr. Mottley: You were in the
“trucking” business at the time ?

Mr. Cox: Yes

Mr. Mottley: How long have
you been in the “trucking” busi-
ness ?

Mr. Cox: I do not

Mr. Mottley: Was
working condition ?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Mottley: Did your
take part in the removal
portion of the hut?

Mr. Cox: No. It never went
to Seawell and I am emphatic on
that.

Mr. Mottley : Do you know if a
permit was obtained from the Po-
lice Department for your lorry to
remove a portion of the hut from
Seawell ?

Mr. Cox: I have never seen it.

Mr. Mottley :
ber of your lorry ?

Mr. Cox: M. 2361.

Mr. Mottley: What is the num-
ber of Miss Francis’ lorry ?

Mr. Cox: M. 258.

Mr. Mottley: Were you Man-
ager of her “trucking” business or
were you both partners ?

Mr. Cox: I used to look after
certain arrangements for her

Mr. Mottley : Were you merely
looking after her business or do
you have a financie! interest in hei
“trucking” business ?

Mr. Cox: I have no
interest in the business

Mr. Mottley : You said that you
bought the truck for Miss Francis?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Personal Matter

Mr. Mottley :
the money

Mr. Cox:
matter

Seawell ?
already said

in this same

a

remember.
your lorry in



lorry

of any



financial

Did she give you
te buy it ?
That was a personal

The Commissioner: You must
answer that question.
Mr. Cox: I bought it for her

my own money.
Mr. Mottley: Did you register
it in her name ?
Mr. Cox: Yes. $
Mr, Mottley: Have you since
been given back the truck by Miss
Francis ? P
Mr. Cox:
ferent

There have been dif-
arrangements between us
mine
to you
yours?

now

Mr. Mottley: I put it
that the truck was always

Mr. Cox did not answer

Mr. Mottley: In supervising the
you said you gave some
of the work to Mr. Duguid ?

Mr. Cox: I said I turned over
the whole business to him

Mr. Mottley: How many trips
were made during the removal of
the building ?

Mr. Cox:. I understand eight
trips were made. I am not sure.
Mr. Mottley: Can you record

how many were done by Duguid’s
lorry ?

Mr. Cox: He told me his lorries
made three trips.

Mr. Mottley: Were the other
trips made by Miss Francis’ lorry ?

Mr. Cox: Yes

Mr. Mottley : Can you say how
much you paid Duguid ?

Mr. Cox: The money was di-
vided into the number of trips and
he was paid so much per trip.

Mr. Mottley: Was he paid for
looking after the whole business?

Mr. Cox: He never asked for
anything.

Mr. Mottley: Did you discuss
the removal of those huts with
Duguid before you did so with

Miss Francis ?
Mr. Cox: No

A 50-50 Basis

Mr. Mottley: You never dis-
cussed it with him and suggested
that the money should be divided

on a fifty-fifty basis?
Mr. Cox: No.
Mr. Mottley: When you gave

Duguid the work on behalf of Miss
Francis, was your lorry working ?

Mr. Cox: T believe so.

Mr. Mottley: Can you remem-
ber where it was working ?

Mr, Cox: I cannot remember
that.

Mr. Mottley:
arrangements that
should be removed
at night ?

Mr. Cox: Mr. Duguid.

Mr. Mottley : Was it done with
your knowledge or approval ?

Mr. Cox: He told me the width
of the building would be too wide
to pass in the day.

Mr. Mottley: Seeing that you
were managing Miss’ Francis’
lorry, can you say if it was work-
ing during the day ?

Mr. Cox: I could not say be-
sometimes I never

Who
the
from

made the
building
Seawell



cal saw the
driver for three days.
Mr. Mottley: The reason for

these huts being removed at night



was not because your lorry and
Miss Francis’ were working during
the day?

Mr. Cox: I know nothing about
that :

Mr. Mottley: If Duguid said
that your lorry did a portion of the
work, would that be true ?

Mr. Cox: It would be an un-
adulterated lie

Mr. Mottley: I put it to you
that both those lorries were work-
ing in the day removing houses
from the flood area to .the Bay
Estate.

Mr. Cox: I have no recollection
of that,

Mr. Mottley: Would you say
that these two lorries never re-
moved houses from the flood area
to the Bay Estate for the Housing
Bo ard ?

Mr. Cox: Yes.

Mr. Mottley: I put it to you
that these tw lorries were re-

ving h c n tt ay and that

hy the hu ere removed
at night

Mr. Cox: N dD 1 told me
that the P ‘ ) not alle

f t e | { r } ia
eason f
Vi Me





question of the missing portion

a meeting of

What is the num- In

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

















lars Did you take rf the huts from Seawel!

Mr. Cox: I do net reme how Mr. Moitley did you get
much I gave her, bit I ad for the work a sing board
the gasoline, oil and who « i oO ve were
work¢ d the lorry M- and doing?
the remainder went to her. Mr. Cox: Ju S anybod

Mr. Mottley: Where did you jc The men on the trucks go
make your report about the hut? the job.

Mr. Cox; I may be mistaken, Mr. Mottley: Are you a member
but I think I telephoned the C.1.D. of fhe Housing Board?
and they communicated with. , Attorney General: The. Housing
Boarded Hall. Hoard is a body corporate

Mr. Mottley: it not true to say Mr. Mottley: Yes, but they are
that Mr. Tudor came _ to your now administering Government
home and reported the matter to funds at the Bay Estate. |] am
you? asking you Mr. Cox if you did

é not use your influence on _ that
Reluctant Action Board to get work for the truck.
falas , tam, Cox: As far as I could see” epgailing: How did) Miss
a e lume, Mr. Luger was reiuci- pp, a? bin
ant to tame ane suse. 1 eee Fr incis truck and yours get that
Se eer ° work at the Housing Board?

ps to report it because I had Mr. Cox: By ‘ fi ale ati
iéurtit What a mas erthe sume of . : By the forry drivers
Ss Walcott who went about setting the work themselves.



Mr. Mottley; I put it to you Mr

Lord



Lit campaigning agaist tne

Lebour Party, was tne watchman. @ On Page 8

I (merelore imagined that some-

thing would happen and I wanted Guilty Of Throwi ing

the air cleared immediately,






















Mr. Mottley; Did you still em- l
ploy the chauffeur who drove tne Corrosive F uid
ruck that removed the building A Jury at the Court of Grand
trom Seaw ell? Sessions yesterday found Winifred
Mr. Cox: I believed he left two Bryan guilty of throwing corro-
or three weeks alter sive fluid with intent to maim or
Mr. Mottley: I put it to you that disfigure St. Clair Bryan.
he also drove your personal truck. His Honour the Chief Justice
Mr. Cox: Never as far as I Sir Allan Collymore postponed
remember. seftence. Mr. E. W. Barrow
r. Moitley; Why did you dis- Be aaah me + ae of mon
charge him? wh r . W. Reece .K.C.,
Mr. Cox: As far 1 know, he Solicitor General, prosecuted for
was annoyed because Mr. Tudor the Crown.
earched his place and he felt I .,The offence was committed on
had agreed with Mr. Tudor to do March 5, 1951.
an injustice, He therefore His Honour the Chief Justice
2 Sir Atlan Collymore at the Court
Mottley: Have you had ©! Grand Sessions yesterday sen-
sion to discuss the removal or teed Lione] Best, a 23~ year-old
of portion of the hut from lab Se of Church Village, St.
Seawell, with any Government “+ °"8), to five years penal ser-
official? . te ate oe oe = ae
i : ‘ i articles, 1e property of Mr.
Mr. Cox: I um _ not going tO Waiter Boyce of Christ Church,
nswer this question I .
ont . a on January 18,
rhe Commissioner; Did .you Mr. W. W. Reece K.C., Solicitor
lave the opportunity of dist ussing General, prosecuted for the
v any Government official the Crown.
loss of the joist from the hut? Best was brought up on a twi
Mr. Cox: The opportunity is al- count indictment. On the firs:
ways there count on which he was found
Mr. Mottley: Did you avail guilty he was charged with
yourself of th opportunity Of burglary and larceny of articles
discussing it with any senior the property of Mr. Walter Boyce
Government official? nd valued at $33 on January 18
Mr. Cox: I do not remember, He was Charged with receiving
Mr. Mottley: Have you ever stolen property on January 18 in
been asked by any Government the second count
official whether you knew about
or had anything to do directly or

indirectly with the removal of the
building?

Couple Attacked

° . . Sixteen-year-old Myrtle Gar-
Denies Discussion yer ¢: vindsbury Road ana Colin
, Morris of Park Road, Bush Hall,
Mr. Oox: I have never had any \ore attacked in Perry Gap, Roe-
discussion with anyone like that buck Street, at about 9.40 o'clock
on that question. last night by an unknown man
Mr. Mottley: Have you evel The were both treated at the
discussed it with the Leader of General Hospital for injuries and
the House? discharged. Morris’ hand was in-
Mr. Cox: I have discussed it jyreq while Garner’s back, abdo-
with the Leader of the House, men and leg were wounded. The
Mr. Mottley: I put it to you that matter was immediately reported
you have emphatically denied to the Police. They are making
knowing anything at all about the jnyest ,

ations
transaction relative to the remov- —<

al of the building from Seawell.
Mr. Cox: I was not trained to MEMO STAMP FOR
‘tell lies and I hate a lie. BARBADOS
The Commissioner; Have you
ever said that? The Advocate learnt yesterday
Mr. Cox I have always said that consideration is being given
that I knew absolutely nothing, to the issue of a centenary com-
because Mr. Mottley .has been memorative stamp to mark the

hundredth anniversary of the first
adhesive stamp issued in Barba-
dos on April loth, 1852,

The Government has entered in-
correspondence with business
England with a view

trying for the longest time to im-
plicate me in this thing on public
platforms all over the island. I
knew absolutely nothing about it
in the sense that I did not admin-
ister anything.

to
concerns in

to having these stamps designed

Mr. Motiley: I put it to you that ang printed for circulation by |
you emphatically denied in the April 15th, 1952 i
presence of the Leader of the It is proposed that the stamps
House and other people that you will be of the following denomina-
knew nothing of the removal of tion 3c., 4c., 12c., and 24c,
the building directly or indirectly - aly

Mr. Cox: I never said that. MUSLIMS END

Mr. Mottley:
you bought the

You admitted that
truck and gave it

MONTH'S FAST





to Miss Francis. Is that correct? Muslims in Barbados yesterday
The, Commissioner: He said so. celebrated the end of their month~
Mr. Mottley; I put it to you that long fast of the Holy Month of
you bought it in her name with Ramadar All Muslim merchants
the object of being able to trade closed their stores the whole day,
with the Government of which sthers giving their employees a
ae a aoe 2st thi to do Mais the morning the small
‘ ~ See ee oo iat section of Muslims in the island
pales Prag " ¥ gathered at their church’ in
puree Mahogany Lane and held their
Mr. Mottley; I put it to you that festival service,
on more than one occasion that
truck traded with the Govern-

“LADY PATRICIA”
ON DRY DOCK

The motor vessel Lady Patricia

ment?
Mr. Cox:

Govt. Trading

It could have.



arrived here from St. Vincent
Mr. Mottley: And that it traded yesterday to undergo repairs.
with the Government as a result The Lady Patricia was dry
of you using your influence to get docked during the afternoon.
the work? She will be cleaned and painted,
Mr. Cox; That is not true, There
was no question of changing “ - ”
license to trade with the Govern FACT OR BRINGS
ment. There is no law laid down BISCUITS, COCOA
for not trading with the Govern- The Harrison liner S.S, Factor
ment. There is law so far as the arrived here yesterday with a
vestries are concerned, varied cargo including biscuits
Attorney General; All Mr. Cox and cocoa. The cargo was loaded

is concerned about is the removal at Liverpool

———

pier ae,






3 Sprinkle health on




















Fest a their food every day / /
; 5 Borat — 4
| ee —— as
; a a
ie | . Weas
4 222 SB git “4 Remax docs wonders fo
“3 4 hildren, It is the rich
a id va! et a > natural source of vitarnins
‘i . pt n and minerels, and
th ad ee wn ret re taken regularly, it ensures that
€ y iH hifdrea get enough of the nutrients
ee} lutely essential for proper growth
o.) Be €: Ske a ” sulids sound health for them, now and
he future. Easy to take —just sprinkle

it of their food.

From Chemists and Stores

BLT

@

BUADSBAW & CO. PALMETTO STREE T, BRIDGETOWN.

A CLT AN eet





Club Willow Will
House Police Band |
And Firemen

Police Band Cadets are clean-
ing up Club Willow. Later this
onth Club Willow will become

the new headquarters of the Police
Band,
The building, which is very airy,

is being redecorated and repaired.
Many’ casuarinas are planted
around the tennis court. Some

Cadets have little kitchen garden
plots where they can grow car-
vots, beets, lettuce, etc., Cpl, Ber-
nard Morris is in charge of the
work.

Colonel R, T. Michelin, Commis-
sioner of Police, said; “For years
now the Police Band has had no
proper place to practise, They were
in a small barrack room, At Club
Willow the Band will be comforta-

ble. In the outside gallery of the
building it is \hoped to have
monthly Sunday night concerts,

The public will be able to listen
to classical music in comfortable
surroundings.”

On another
Fire Station
racks for the
the second
building.

The Commissioner said
now thinking of a
the whole barracks.

part of the land a
will be built. Bar-
firemen will be on
storey of this new

; “We are
name to call
”



WATER SHORTAGE
AT TRIOPATH

There has been a water shortage
t Triopath, St. Andrew, for about |
two weeks now. No water can be} §)
got from the pipes during the day,
but the water comes on about mid
night for a short period. Many
people of the district have been
drinking spring water during the
1ortage, addi,

FLOATING TREE
IS A DANGER

A large tree was seen floating
in position 13.04 North 62.51
West, according to a report made
by the skipper of the S.S. Brazil
Thursday, ae
The tree is to nmaviga-
tion.

“ATHELBROOK" TO
LOAD MOLASSES

Molasses tanker Athelbrook is
expected to call here tomorrow
afternoon to load vacuum = pan
Trinidad
Athelbrook will take her
during the night and leave
on Sunday for Trinidad,

—————— ————



on
a danger



molasses for

The
load
port

:
x
x

?

Fresh Stock at

WEATHERHEAD'S

Zinnia (Giant Dahlia Mixed)
Snapdragon (3 kinds), Petu-
nia, Salvia (Red), Verbena,
Phlox, Coreopsis, Carnation,

PR SPPSS SSOP SPSS SPSS SSS

Larkspur, Balsam, Gillar-
dia, Marigold, Indian Pinks,
Calliopsis, Dahlia, Candy-
tuft, For-get-me-not, Portu-
laca, Mignonette, Aster,
Sweet Peas, Chrysanthe-
mum, Alyssum, Cosmos,
Ageratum, Cornflower, Can-
terbury Bells, Lupins, Nas-

turtium,
Take recent

raing and

advantage of



plant now.

\

Bruce
Weatherhead Ltd.

Head of Broad Street
seein at sual e

SOOO OSSO SSS

%



Hand Bags



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@ ywsr ARRIVED

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PAGE FIVE



WHEN CONSTRUCTING

OR REPAIRING A

BUILDING

ALWAYS USE

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ASBESTOS-CEMENT

CORRUGATED

SHEETS



y

REXALL

PRODUCTS OF REPUTE

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Cod Liver Oil E

An Easily Digested and Palatable preparation of
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PAGE SIX



BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



HENRY

BY CARL ANDERSON

pase
H







AREN'T YOU GETTING A LITTLE OLD
TO PLAY WITH DOLLS?





TN

HT

iii}



“in “TAT ANTI

ITT

WH



i}
Hit
fab
I HUNG MY PANTS OVER
THE CHAIR. MY SHIRT
ON THE DOORKNOB,





IT SAYS HERE,”
A WOMAN SHOT HER
HUSBAND MERELY
BECAUSE HE WOULONT

HANG UP HIS CLOTHES
> AT NIGHT
PS a
Ter



GOODNESS’ SAKES,
LISTEN TO THIS






Sem \_ MY TIE OVER THE MIRROR’
ow > AND MY LINDERWEAR
>

x



THE LONE RANGER

P

“4 ade
BY FRANK STRIKER

i ipoueT it! ) | fe
4 a

RANGER!
E -

EERE - <0. on won:
ELSE GOES AFTER JACKSON, MY 3
HUSBAND WILL BE KILLED/ ;

Rae nathan igpenioedsiaiey
WOULD YOU SHOOT ME ‘TO KEEP '
ME FROM RUNNING DOWN

3 THAT CROOK

Zai \F





! OKAY-MALLETHEAD --
| SHE'S GONE! YOU KIN
STOP - BUT I MAY
NEED vou! A :

|
|
y

}| | I CAN'T PRACTICE MY
SINGING WITH THAT
|
|





HELLO-PROFESSOR CHRIS

SENDO ? THIS iS MRS. JIGGS~
MAY I COME OVER TO YOUR
STUDIO ? I CAN'T
PRACTICE HERE /

RACKET OUTSIDE-AND






T MUST BE READY TO
| GING TOMORROW AT
| MRS. HERTRAIN'S —__
| PARTY -WHAT
| WILL I DO oe





| TOMORROW -IFSO \\|
"LL PHONE YOU- | |

la

THANKS -\VUZ IT |
NOISY ENOLIGH ? |

|
|
ca
4

















JOHNNY HAZARD

VE VILL GO TO
MY CAMP... AY
VILL PROVIGION

THANKS, T.N.T. / GAY.
THAT'S QUITE A RIG..

OUR PLANE GONKED OUT...

IT WAG TAKING GABLE TO...

AH... VIGIT HER SICK AUNT

IN TUNIS / HER AUNT

INGISTS GHE GPEND TiMt
WITH MER /

JUST LOVE
THAT GICK

e
A\rtee CRASHING IN THE AUNT #

LIBYAN DESERT, JOHNNY GAINS
CONTROL OF GABLE'S PICTOL
AND, BENT ON RETURNING HEZ
TO THE POLICE, HEADS FOR
CIVILIZATION... ONLY TO
BECOME LOST / AFTER TWO DAYS
THEY HIT WATER...SALT WATER /
SUDDENLY THEY ARE CON-
FRONTED WITH A FROG-MAN
ARISING FROM THE OCEAN... HE
INTRODUCES HIMGELF AG
THOR NILS THORSON / KE
TELLG THEM THE NEAREST
VILLAGE IG FIFTY MILES AWAY...



Ni iG i 3

BY ALEX RAYMOND
| We GREAT YOU'S” SECOND _
ARROW SPLITS THE FIRST ON!

RIP KIRBY



.. SR Q

/



|
ay
|



r

as. or ~ DEE

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES
HE WAG GOING TO RELEASE THEGE
MAN-EATING SHARKS. OUT IN
WHIRLPOOL CHANNEL WHERE
DIANA GWIMMING RIGHT Now! J








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Always keep a bottle in the house.

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ATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE
PUBLIC SALES FOR RENT —_— GOVERNMENT NOTICES |

CLASSIFIED ADS.

REAL ESTATE

PAGE SEVEN

SHIPPING NOTICES











WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and |
































5














































































































































' c ¢ |
mates — _______.__ | 6 cents Sundays 24 words — ov 24/ RD } spc vig ns ab ag eh Brggy eget
SHARES — 30 Preference Shares of oer et Seade A word week—4 cents a! WANTED | words 3 cents a word week—4 cents al MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, SS = eg
The charge for announcements of | F Bearectan ge Saas. 3B [ Approgtia’s office: accommuoda-| Sons on Comins a oe a Nz) oe
2 i nt ( NF
dette Marriages, | Deaths ae oR SALE be ont Ge oe n Knights Limited | on comprising about 800 square HELP | S.S. “ARABIA” a scheduled to sail at shina till
eugments, and In Memoriam notices is Office of the undersigned on aed set located within Bridgetown. | from Melbourne 12th June, Brisbane 22nd ad ssengers
£1.00 on weekdays su8 93.48 68 Santays | s' conte Diesen as wer 22 oe PY} the 12th day July 1951 at 2 ae .) HOUSES | Applications will be received | ~7, P aaa ——— | Jone, Port Alma 28th ‘June, Sydney { nis o "Menseaitat.. Me nd My
for any number of words up to 50, and | — GOTTLE, CATFORD & CO ~ woe ‘by the Dir : F TAILOPS ourney 1 Tailors for] July 4th, arriving Trinidad end July, St. Kitt Sailing Friday 12th 34
3 cents per word on week-days and! © 3 cents a word week—4 cents a Solicitors. FLAT-—-Al Coral Banas Wook , by the Director of Petroleum and | making jackets. Only those with ex-|and Barbados early August i ee re) Se . '
4 cents per word on Sundays for each | “Ord on Sundays. 28.6.5i-—Gn.—e.o.d, | Modern furnished flat, good sea bathing N°tUral Gas, Public Buildings up] perience peed anp\. Be Abreau Tailoring | §§. “PORT FAIRY” is scheduled tn [ *” (|
additional word. Sen aa [ Tee, foxther particulars. Dial #134. Alm, | ‘© and including 14th July, 1981. » farhill Sireet 1-7, d1--an sail trom Hokert late June. orth Queens- “Daerwood" will accept
1g.IN USE called “ELLER- | / shley 27.6514 | 4 ne) atdieehate. « r and mm ‘uiy, Brisbane end July, Sydney ‘s imei ; tr ©
picansetainis a tee Engagement AUTOMOTIVE _— with 3700 square feet of land | ae | Hittin ith coe Preto e porieece et haga | arly August, Melbourne mid ' August, rer Sor Atube wae
‘alli ry ~ > s . ~hs , * 7
charge is $3.00 for any number of woreda Sridbetown, wetrece Watebenn an ‘Gbayune’G de —— August Is.( DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE | wire lives. Good salary paid to right “Cares “tecepind on Matteeen bind ot riday 13t) ae
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each CAR—on house contains mame load) watene
additional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 e (1) Prefect Ford in good and Dining Rooms ery, Drawing | MS, Sarage, telephone etc. For & Co. P.O.B. 163 Bridgetown. In addition to general cargo these
between 8.30 und 4 p.m., 3113 for Death Se. ‘oew pres. Apply to M. C. | fast tom, usual ‘thie mavah- oc. inl Set Serween, 8 Ps i 2@* | MARKET FOR ARTICLES MAN- 47.5180. | vessels have ample space for chilled and B.W.A, SCHOONER OWNERS’
Notices only after 4 p.m. h eo a, Swan Street. ft. ieleeteic) Ribhe nen Large | ae 30.6.51—t2.n UFACTURED FROM TURTLE " Ferbr? uate ~ | Lading for transhipment a> Trinidad ASSOCIATION INC.
6.7.51—6n.| ment water installed, = abt ws “MARNET”, A dwelling ‘house and dand SHELL , MISCELLANEOUS a oe or
ms n use 4 "
oo CAR—Light Six Hudson in firat- | gine *b0Ve premises will be set up for|t The Ivy ‘Main Road, St. Michael ‘. me ———_— | ard Islands. = Telephone 4047.
THANKS class order, fully insured = Huethaas Dr Competition at our Office | House comprises Drawing. room. dining |, a@uiries have been received at Orders for AMERICAN MULES. We] For further particulars apply—
—————____________._] until 1952. Owner leaving island. Phone at 2 p.m Dec’! Friday 13th July 1981, | room, 3 bedrcoms, kitchen, water closet. | Ne Barbados Stand of the British have sold some of these. Contact, Har- FURNESS, WITRY & CO. LTD.
BISHOP—1 beg through this medium| M. L. Griffith, Two Mile Hill (2861) | Parmer the tense ee aePLY , 1 Mis: | bath. Electricity. Por further particubars {Industries Fair as to the supply| 4 Proverbs & Co. Ltd., ce rg TRINIDAD
friends ‘who sent wreaths ‘and’ cards | eee te |S aNd 4.90 Pim. dally except Sumiens.”' | Pond of Dey song CUMMINS, Belmont |and prices of articles manufac- ea BWI,
ys. ’ ; 7.7.81—2n
of sympathy in my recent bereave-| _CAR—Chevrolet, in good condition YEARWOOD & BOYCE, ——$ tured from Turtle-shell . FAN MILL-One (1) Secondhand. ot ine eienina tt ins tty
mént caused by the death of my| Owner driven, Apply R, M. Massiah, to Solicitors, ROOMS-—Single and double, new| 2. Persons desiring further in-| n¢w 16° or 18 Fan Mill complete with BARBADOS : r Ti
wee aoe Pitz Allan Bishop. be seen at Sion Hill, St, James. 1.7.51 —8n j sutniture with breakfast. Hastings } formation on this market are re tower — Apply D. M. Simpson é& Co B.W.L ADVOCA EE
inifres reenidge. 7.7.51—In 3.7.51—6n ee ee ee — |Call Telephone 4718. ? “2r "9 S a 3.7, 51—6n coo
Ss “HINDSBURY COT” standin, 5 ; quested to co t vith th
he tole F gon 1 $j iuested to communicate wi e) --
MAYLEY — We beg through this, _CARS—1950 Morris Minor 10,000 Miles. en, feet of land at the Corner’ o _RIPLEY—On Sea—Maxwell's Coast | Fishery Officer, Fishery Office, The WANTED TO BUY °
medium to thank ail those kind friends ; 1950 Morris Oxford 9,000 Miles. Like| polington and Bay Streets, Bridgetown | Milly furnished, two bedrooms, all eon-| Reef, St. Michael OLD SWING MACHINE out df usd
who sent wreaths, Cards and sympa-| New. 1949 Morris Six 18 H.P. Low nd inspection apply on the premises | veniences Telephone, Refrigerator. | = 1.75 Good prices paid. Apply to Mrs. Vaughn, L.
thised with us in our recent bereave-| Mileage. 1948 Ford Prefect 14,000 Miles | F°°, further particulars apply Hutchinso:, | AU&USt. September, November on Dial | 7.7,51.—I1n.| Corner of Fairchild and Probyn Streets
ment caused by the death of Undine| in very good condition. 1938 Chrysier |“ B#Mfield, Solicitors, James Street | 2380 6.7.5 1} 6th July, 1951. 30,6.51~-3n
ut, i ahs cane a é bargain. Fort Royal Garage 7.7,51—2n | erent ncionnceeih | . Gnc.
1e Whittington Family 751—1n| Lid. Telephone 4504 6.7.51— y } ro eS c
Ua laelit apse Stateline ae aaidlcaeeeacaate aeaeehadee eee (One) Boarded an | SRA GA?F NOTICE ls Gham | UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL OF THE WEST NEW YORK SERVICE
CAR -- One Austin A70 practically : jouse Situated at Rendez | pyy. ¢.,. et ee ae s
IN MEMORiAM Belmont Garage. Recle: atx Lone ae ow Hin, Upper Clapham. Size 16 x) — ee Telephone, Refrigeta | INDIES, JAMAICA, B.W.L. 8.8. “SFABREFZE” sails &th June Arrives Barbados 19h June, 1951
CRICHLOW—In ever loving Philip, ; 4.7.51—4n | Shed, Kitchen and galvanized patings | \priyite sagt’? Weeks July. Dial Mrs A STEAMER sails 29th June Arrives Barbados 10:h July, 1951.
« 1LO In ever loving memory of Price $600.00 or nearest Contact E elville 2660 7.7.5i—1n. | > okie sesilan snilebintiiceicaAetisians 5 dribahtncenacesictitiintante ensitepesinhiepaioadtinoni -
our dear father and grandfather William Marsh, Silver Hill, Ch. Ch e ; Applications are invited for 12 posts of House Officers in the new
Henry Crichlow who pass€d away on 5 7.1.51—2 | University College Hospital: NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
July 6th 1949, ELECTRIC*.z. 51—2n PUBLIC NOTICES Feline Shisatnn nated ea ae 3.8. ALCOA POLARIS” sails 18th June | Arrives Barbados 28th June, 1951
Rien ek deat tad ail Lathe serie aol ahaa a "She hae eee - ouse Surgeons: for general and surgical duties ..... 4 3.8. ALCOA ROAMER” sails 27th Juns Arrives Barbados 13th July, 1951
rest, AUTOMATIC RECORD CHANGERS—| at their Office No: 17 ° High an 2 | for casualty and outpatient duties . 4 5.$. ALCOA PATRIOT” sails llth July Arrives Barbados 27th July, 1961
Your loving hands will toil no more} With 78 — 45 — 33 R.P.M, will play.| Bridgetown, on Friday the 2th day of | .. 1&7”. cents per agate line on week-days | House Physicians sesrsaanevsneniacnyyursinssersnasenesneebivesterteseeenn 4 ve . sg
For those you loved you did your pga cae ease Sageerore. Dial} July, 1951 at 2 p.m. a SAO OAR a and 18 conte aay agate line on Sundays The appointments will be for one year commencing Ist January CANADIAN SERVICE
Dest jaCosta’s Electrical Dept. A parcel of iand containing 5,445] "ptmum. charge $1.50 on week-days | | gs. F "|| SoutHROUND
God grant you now eternal rest: 3.7.51—5n | stuare feet, sit ren’x | M4 $1.80 on Sundays. | pepe Syiit ; ; P
Eliza (wife), James (brother), Sydney] © ———-—W_______"""" "| Hit" Bisek ‘Rock, St. Michael. saynen’s | —_—___— silica } Each House Officer will serve 4 months in the surgical, medical Home: ot se Gatle Montreal . Sole, Baltes (Atrives Waa;
ton; Vince ent Fitinp (Ganghter). Glett: ‘i FL wide ee eu Swallinghanse thereon, called = “The oe Re B hen beet Casuarini / and casualty departments respectively, Salary £350 per annum lessfiss«. “ALCOA June 2th June 29th July Sth
stone (son-in-law) and = grand-c ren. E ng chamber, rand fest” containing 2 blic . i. rees fror me please call to correct a > rac . ar res enc ate : salary i & Ju 26 July & v thr
7.7.51—In, NeW unit. Reconditioned throughout,| bedrooms, with usual ie rooms, 2) mistake. F. Barker, Culloden Road ee i -Feepect. Of board, residence, etc. 3% of salary will be de rs MaoA” PENNANT Tuy Fa py ara foae tes
. may be inspected at Leo Yard, Cheap-| Inspection any day between 10 a.m 7.7.51—1n | ducted for superannuation contributions. Further information may : ae conAecscliecaaui
MET CEyT eo ee ea nen ace H. LL, i, PADS: apd 4 p.m. on application, to Miss |---| |1¢ obtained from the Hospital Manager and Secretary. NORTHBOUND
sister Lilian Inez Harewood who felly’ Le pate bap RhvceBbigel aging NOTICE | Applications should be sent to the Hospital Manager and Secre- | **. “ALCOA PARTNER due July lath salle ter Bt. Lawrence

felly
asleep on the 8th of July 1913
Asleep in God's benutiful garden,
Free from all sorrow and pain;
Some day when life's journey is ended
We hope to meet you again
Ever to be remembered by Millicent |
Harewood (Mother!, Fercy (brother). Mrs,
Germaine Crichlow, 7.7.51—I1n |

ANNOUNCEMENTS |

HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—lIsle of
Spices. SANTA MARIA-—loveliest hotel
in Caribbean, Rates from $7.00 per head
per day. GRAND HOTEL—in best resi-
dential district under Government House
hill, Rates from $5.00 per head per day.
SEASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Bathing
Beach, Rates from $4.00 per head per
day. Enquiries to D, M. Slinger, Grenada.

26.6.51—T8n.









.
OTICE
“FRIGIDAIRE”, refrigerators—the only
refrigerators with the famous “Meter-
Miser" unit. This well known and
proven product of General Motors Corp,
is at last available again, and we are |
pleased to announce that “FRIGIDAIRE”
may also be obtained now cash or on
terms through K. R, HUNTE & CO.
LTD,, who are assisting us in their
distribution, and have some of our
machines on show for demonstration at
their new SHOWROOM on Lower Broad
Street.
THE EMTAGE ELECTRICAL CO,
5.7.51—3n,

EDUCATIONAL
PARRY SCHOOL

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION
Pupils including Vestry candidates will
be examined on Friday, July 13 at
10 o'clock, Baptismal Certificates and
Testimonials from the Headmaster must
be presented,









J. 1 SMITH.
30.6.51—3n.
WANTED
QUEEN'S COLLEGE, BARBADOS,
B.W.L

Government Aided Secondary Day
School for Girls

Required for January, 1952—-Senior
History Mistress to organise the History
ot the School up to Open University
Scholarship standard, First or Second
Class History Honours essential; Teaching
Diploma and experience desirable.

Salary Seale for First or Second Class
Honours $(1,584 x 72-—-2,304 x 120— 2,784)
per annum. An additional salary of $216
per annum will be given to a Mistress
who has a Teaching Diploma

Super-seale salary for high qualifica-
tions and good experience $(2,880 x 120
3.840) plus $216 per anntim will be given
to a Mistress -who has a Teaching
Diploma. Position on this seale will start
at the bottom.

The passage will be paid out to Bar-
bados, but not the return passage. Tho
appointment is for three years, with the
option of joining the permanent staff
after that, when a term's leave on full
pay will be granted after five years’
service, but unfortunately leave passages
are not paid,

Applications, with copies of recent
testimonials, should be forwarded, not
later than 3lst July, 1951, to the Acting
Headmistress of Queen's College, Bar-
bados, B.W.I, 7.7. 51—2n

PERSONAL _

The public are hereby warned against





giving credit to my wife HILARIA
CRAIGG (nee LYNCH) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone

else contracting any debt or debts in my
rame unless by a written order signed

by me,
e LAMONT CRAIGG,
Dodson's Land,
Black Rock.
6.7.51--2n



The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, Ruby Aletha
Seott (mee Leacock) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my

name.
(Signed) GEORGE SCOTT,
Eckstein Village,
St. Michael.
6 7 51—2n.



7 public are hereby warned against
giving credit to any person or persons in
my name as I do not hold myself re-
sponsible for anyone contracting any
debt or debts in my name unless by a
written order signed by me,

CAMERON DA COSTA

COULTHRUST,
Sandy Ground,
Christ Church.
7.5.81-—2n







We Buy...
USED AND MINT POSTAGE
STAMPS
of the British West Indies, Good
Prices Paid at the CARIBBEAN
STAMP SOCIETY, 3rd Floor No.
10 Swan Street. 7.751—2n,

SE HABLA ESPANOL

ORIENTAL

CURIOS, SOUVENIRS, AN-
TIQUES, IVORY, JEWELS,
SILKS Ete.

THANTS

f0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Ten chances to win
thousands of dollars for 2/-
only, through our’ B’dos
Turf Club Race Syndicates
One Copy Left of Latest
Edition of Year Book of

West Indies $12.00

Rats and Mouse’ Traps.
at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and
HARDWARE.

%.

Of Re.
DOSES POSSESS



pane
SSSI





orotate lieRcmciine dl
REFRIGERATOR — One (1) Westing-
house, in good working order. Apply:
W. R. Tempro. _ Phone 5044 or 8224.
28.6.51—-t.f.n

MISCELLANEOUS

AMM-I-DENT TOOTHPASTE
Start saving your Amm-i-dent Tooth
paste Boxes, Within a short while you
may be the winner of one of the follow-
ing:— Ist Prize $50.00, 2nd Prize $15.00,
Src Prize $6.00, 1,9,51~--26n

ALUMINUM WARE—Highky Polished
Canadian Aluminum Saucepans, Kettles,
Rousters, Cake Pans, Percolators. Egg
Poachers, Deep Fryers etc. Exceptional
value, G, W. Hutchinson & Co. Ltd
Broad and Rotbuck Streets.



4.7.51—4n

AMERICAN MADE BABY BUTLER--
Bab, Feeding Table and Chair combina-
tion, converts to Play Table and Black-





board for later use. Reasonable. Dial
2378, Between 12 & 4 p.m. and 6 & 9
p.m. 6.7, 51—2n



CUTLERY -—- SWEDISH STAINLESS
STEEL Complete range includes Table
Knives 75¢. each Forks and Spoons 60c.
each, Dessert ‘Knives 70c. each, Forks
and Spoons 53c. each, G. W. Hutchinson
& Co,, Ltd. Broad and Roebuck Streets.

4.7.51—4n,

ee
EMPTY TINS—A quantity of 10 lb. and
25 Ib. tins, suitable for holding plants.

Purity Bakeries Ltd. Dial 4529 or 3063.
5.7.51—5n.









FISHING BOAT—21 ft. overall. “Isa-
belle" at Bathsheba. Communicate M
Sargeant Carters, St. John or A. Lesley,
Bathsheba. 7.7.51—1n

FISHING BOAT — Complete outit
14 ft. by 4 ft. Apply to Mr. Henry Price,
St. Lawrence Gap. 7.7 51—1n

“FARM” POWDERED FULL CREAM
MILK—Supreme quelity and only $4.32
per 5-Ib tin and $1.00 per 1-lb tin.
Get a tin to-day from your grocer
or Drug Store and try the best
milk obtainable. The 5-tb family size is
really economical, Insist on “Farm” for
the sake of your heaith and your pocket.
If your dealer cannot supply, phone 2229,

27,6, 51—t.f.n,
aap,

a nenerinneninaiimasinieresatnaniieaiaie
GALVANISE SHEETS heavy gauge %
ft. $7.50, 8ft. $7.00. Also Aluminum
Sheets 6 ft. $4.00, 8ft. $5.00, 10 ft
$6.50, At Ralph Beard's Hardwood
Alley 1.7.51—2n











GALVANIZED SHEETS: 24 gauge in
lengths of 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 foot. Enquire
Auto Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street,
Phone 2696. 26.6.51—4.f.n.

PALETHORPES — Finest quality Pork
Pies 9c, each, and Pork Sausages at 70c.
each, W. A. Medford & Co, Ltd., Rickett
St. 4.7.51—2n
SS URE REE EERE EEE

RAT BAITS—Locally preparéd by the
Agricultural Society. Obtainable for a
limited period at the Steel Shed, Queen's
Park, le. each 37 51.—3n

RECORDS: Charlie Kunz, Bing, Swing
..and we will order for you if we

haven't got it in stock. A. Barnes & Co.,
Ltd. 6.7.51—t.f.n.

LOST & FOUND















LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET — Series HH
1881. Finder rewarded on returning to
Joseph Brathwaite, Moncrieff, St. Philip.

7.7.51--1n

SWEEPSTAKE BOOKS--Two Sweep-
stake Books II-7480 and -3430, Finder
please return to Prince Gregorie, Upper
Roebuck Street. 1.7.$1-—2n

NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JOHN
Applications for one (1) Vestry Exhibi-
tion at the Lodge School will be received
by the undersigned up to 3.00 p.m, on
Thursday the 12th July, 1951.
Candidates must be the sons of
Parishioners in straitened circumstances
and not less than 8 yeafs nor more than
12 yeurs old on the date of the examina-
tion which will be held at the School
at 10.30 a.m. on Friday the 13th July,
1951. Applications forms can be obtairpd
al my office during office days and hours
cnly. Baptismal certificates to accom-
pany applications.
R. S. FRASER,
Clerk to the Vestry,
St. John.
5.7.51—6n.









NOTICE
The Estate of
GEOFFREY LLEWELLYN
HINDS-HOWELL
(deceased)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ail
persons having any debt or claim against
tne Estate of Geoffrey Liewellyn Hinds-
Howell who died in this Island on the
19th November 1948 are hereby
required to send particulars of their
claims duly attested to the undersigned
Fustace Maxwell Shilstone and Lindsay
Ercil Ryeburn Gill the duly constituted
attorneys in this bland of Lloyds Bank
Limited of England, the qualified execu-
tor of the will of the deceased, in care
of Messrs. Cottle Catford & Go., No. 17
High Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors on
or before the 22nd day of August, 1951,
after which date we shall proceed to
distribute the assets of the deceased
among the parties entitled thereto, hav-
ing regard only to such claims as we
shall then have had notice of, and
we will not be lable for the assets or
any part thereof so distributed io
any person of whose debt or claim we
shall not have had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are r ted to settle their
indebtedness without delay.

Dated this 22nd $x 9 June, 1951.

E. M. ILSTONE,
L. E, RB. GILL
Attorneys for Lioyds Bank
Limited, the executors of
the will of Geoffrey
Liéwellyn Hinds-Howell,
deceased

23.6.51-—4n.

9£990990590090070 999500;
WANTED

CLEAN OLD RAG |
Delivered to
y Advocate Press Room

PP SCCCSOSEESO SCOPE COOP CO







or further particulars, and conditions

ot sale, apply to
COTTLE,- CATFORD & CO

7.7.81-—6n

tt tt nee

AUCTION

__————

I have been instructed by The
Govt in Executive Committee to
sell by public Auction at Seawell, on
Wednesday the 11th at 2 o'clock. One
Dodge Ambulance Terms Cash

D’'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Government Auctioneer
TI—h







T am instructed to offer for sale that
very comfortable stone Bungalow called
“Marwin” at Maxwell Road, Christ
Church, It is nearly shaded with trees
and is off the main road with open
verandah, drawing and dining rooms,
2 bedrooms, toilet and bath, garage and
servants room together with the land
on which it stands. & is at present
vacant,

For particulars apply to

D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Magazine Lane,
Dial 3743. 7.7.51—8n
innesinhpttcen ns ical etieninaiansinienatanaadiapattetsitatinin

T have been instructed by the
Government in Exécutive Committee to
offer for sale by public auction at the
yard of the Department of Highwuys
and Transport on Friday next the 13th
at 1 p.m. one 1940, 18 H.P! Vauxhall
Velox blue Saloon car, It has com-
paratively new tyres and the up-
holstery as good as new. Terms cash
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Government Auctioneer

7.7. 51—5n

Under The Diamond Hammer

By instructions received I will set up
for sale by public auction on Thursday
next the 12th July at 2 o'clock at Lower
Station Hill, St. Michael, one double
roofed house with shop attached, and
1,168 sq. ft. of land. Also the household
furniture. Terms cash. D'Arcy A. Scott,
Auctioneer. 6.7.51—5n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

By recommendations of Lloyd Agents
we will sell on TUESDAY 10th July at
our Mart, High Street. 222 Drums
One O One, 10 pes. Wallboard, 2 Came-
tas, 984 Tins Heinz Soups, 9 Ladies’
Hats. Sale 12.30 o'clock Terms Cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers









NOTICE

APPLICATIONS for one vacant St
Philip's Vestry Exhibition tenable at the
Lodge School will be received by the
undersigned not than Saturday
14th July 1951,

Candidates must be sons of Parishioners
in straitened circumstances, and must
be under the age of twelve years.

A birth certificate must be forwarded
along with an application form obtained
from the Parochial Treasurer's Office

Parents and/or Guardians will be
rotified of the time and place of the
entrance examination,

P. 8. W. SCOTT,
Clerk to the Vestry,

later







BARMADOS.

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT oF







i

River Ports.
er a en
accammodation.

tary, University College Hospital, Mona, St. Andrew,
efore 30th September, 1951.

Jamaica, B.W.1



* These vessels have limited passen ger







ve Warkaite ompensation Act. 4a | —_—_— ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
Ne > is hereby given that CANA|
ere re she Ors. St. Patrick, j Applications are invited for the following vacancies at the new APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD. IAN SERVICE
OF abebeAiid Saaceshict dies ak coe |! niversity College Hospital, duties to commence on the Ist. January =
mult of a broken neck which he su:-|/952;— ;
tained when he was thrown from 1 Medical Registrars ,................... Lope
ractor at Waldron Corner, Ch. Ch. an Surgical Registrars 3
that © a F 8 ’ at . Strars .... oie 98 ‘ ;
aie ee eet Dae ee The appointments will be for one year in the first instance
All dependants of the above-nameu|Salary in the scale of £700 to £1,000 per annum depending on ex
Clarence Weekes, deceased, and other {perience and qualifications. 5% of salary will be deducted for super OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

parties concerned are hereby required to
“appear at the Assistant Court of Appeal




on Wednesday, the Ist dé of August,
1951, at ten o'clock a.m
Dated this 4th day of 1951
s. ¥ GILKES.
Ag. Clerk, A.CLA
17 Sen
FORM I
THE LAND ACQUISITION
ACT, 1941
(Notice required by Section 3)

NOTICE is hereby given that it appear
to the Governor-in-Executive Committee
that the lands described in the Schedule
hereto and situate at the district of St.
Christopher in the parish of Christ Church
in the island of Barbados are likely to
be needed for purposes which in the
opinion of the Governor-in-Executive
Committee are public purposes, namely
for increasing school buildings snd fur-
nishing playgrounds for St. Christopher's
Girls’ School

THE SCHEDULE

ALL THAT certain parcel of land con-
taining one rood and seven perches,
more or less, adjoining the lands of St.
Christopher's Giris School and bounding
en lands of M. Hazlewood, of A. Clarke,
of Estwick Kirton and on the public
highway alleged to be in the ownership
or occupation of Mrs. Sarah Kirton of
Hopewell, Christ Church

Dated this 25th day of June, 1951, at
the Public Buildings in the City of
Bridgetown in the Island of Barbados,

By Command,
R. N. TURNER,
Colonial Secretary
3.7.51—-3n



NUTICE

Re Estate of
GEORGE NATHANIEL WILLIAMS

deceased.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claims

Nithaniel Williams deceased late of
Beckles Road, in the Parish of Saint
Michzel in this Island who died on the
30th. day of November, 1950 are reques
ted to send in particulars of their claims
duly attested to the
LEWIS, Qualified Executor of the Will
Nathaniel Williams
Spry Street,
age on

undersigned HUGH

of the said George
deceased, c/o K. Sandiford
Bridgetown,





over Springer








E or affecting the estate of George
t

or before the 15th day of September, 1951,
efter which date ¥ shall p d to dis
tribute the assets of the deceased, among
the parties entitled thereto having re
gard only to such claims of which I
Shall then have had notice and 1 shali
not be liable for the assets or any part
thereof so distributed to any person of
whose debt or claim I shall not then

have had notice
And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their in-
debtedness without delay
Dated this 6th. day of June,
HUGH LEWIS,

1951





St. Philip. ! Qualified Executor of the will of
4.7.51—On George Nathaniel Williams, decsd.
a ep poco | 9.6 51—4n.
NOTICE 0
Re Estate of | NOTICE
PRINCE ALBERT HOLDER. The Estate of
deceased ELSTON WATSON
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all - (deceased)

persons having any debt or claim against NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all

the Estate of Prince Albert Holder late
of the parish of Saint John who died
in this Island on the 2nd day of May
1950, are hereby required to send par-
ticulars of their claims duly
to the undersiened Mrs. Eileen Fred-)
erick the qualified Executrix of the
Estate of the deceased, in care of Messrs.
Carrington & Sealy of Lucas Street,
Bridgetown, Solicitors on or before the
11th day of August, 1951, after which date
} shall proceed to distribute the assets of
the deceased among the parties entitled!
thereto having regard only to such claims

attested |



persons having any débt or claim against
the Estate of Athelston Watson who diea
in England on the llth July, 1995

are hereby required to send particulars
of their claims duly attested to the un-
dctrsigned Eustace Maxwell Shilstone and
Lindsay Ereil Ryeburn Gill the qualified
administrators cum testamento annexo of
the Estate of the deceased, in care of
Messrs. Cottle Catford & Co, No. 17
High Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors on
er beforé the 22nd day of August, 1951,
after which date we shall proceed to
distribute” the assets of the déceased





of which I shall then have had notice | jinong the parties entitled thereto hav-

and that I will not be liable for the assets fing regard only

or any part thereof so distributed, to any
person of whose debt or claim I shall not
then have had notice
And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their indebt-
edness without delay.
Dated this 8th day of June, 1951.
EILEEN FREDERICK,
Qualified Executrix of the Estate of





Prince Albert Holder, deceased.
9 6.51—4n
NOTICE
Re Estate of
FRANCIS EDWARD CRAIG
Deceased .

NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim against
the estate of Francis Edward Craig iate
of the parish of Christ Church who died
in this Island on the 28th day of April
1951 are hereby required to send par-
ticulars of their claims duly attested to
the undersigned Mrs. Nita McLean Hur-
vey Read the qualified executrix of the
deceased in care of Messrs R. S. Nicholls
& Co., Roebuck Street, Bridgetown,
Solicitors on or before the fifteenth day
of September 195), after which date 1
shall proceed to distribute the nesets of
the deceased among the parties entitled
thereto having regard only to such claims
of which T shall then have had notice,
and that I will not be fiable for the
assets or any part thereof so distributed
te any person of whose debt or claim 1
shell hot then have had notice

All persons indebted to the said estate
are requested to settle their indebtedness
without delay ‘

Dated this 6th day of July, 1951

ITA Me LEAN HARVEY READ
Qualified Executrix of the Estate of
Francis Edward Craig ne

7.7.51—4n





To-day’s 6. A. Song

“Home Sweet Home”

“Mid pleasures and palaces
though we may roam”
“There is no place like

home”
.... If there
1S A GAS COOKER.



to such claims as we
shall them have had notice of, and we
will not be liable for the assets or an



part thereuf so distributed to any per-
son of whose debt or claim we shail
not have had notice,

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their indebt
edness without delay

this 22nd day of June, 1951

E. M. SHILSTONE,

L. E. R. GILL,

Qualified Administrators
cum testamento annexe of

the Estate of Athelston
Watson, deceased,
23.6.51— An



i, Aan, A, A, A, A, A, AP

Christian Science )
Reading Room

1ST FLOOR, BOWEN & oe

| Dated
i
|

(Broad Street)

Hours: 10 a.m.—2 p.m.
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridayn,
10 am. —12 o'clock Saturdays.
At this Room

the Bible and
the Christian Science text-book I
Seience and Health with key to

the Scriptures by MARY BAKER )

EDDY may be read, borrowed,
or purchased

VISITORS ARE hae: |
OE EO a

ao sl ie A a AE AD

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WAR!

CONTINUES ON PRICES
OF $100,000 GOODS AT

THANTS

| Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466





annuation and £100 will be deducted in respect of board, residence
*. Further information may be obtained from the Hospital Manage















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and Séeretaty. Vessel From Leaves peda :
Applications with full details and two recent testimonials shoul [3.g. «spa r" 9 . huly |
be sent to the Hospital Manager and Secretary, University Colleg , “AD sean 23rd June oath July
. tan o & ; : , : . ok rlasgow 6th July 20th July
fot the West Indies, Mona, St. Andrew, Jamaica, B.W.1., before 30th . “TRADER” Liverpool Tth July 2ist July
September, 1951, 30.6.51—2n . “STUDENT” London 10th July = 24th July
& : . “EXPLORER” . London 10th July 26th Jus
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i] apply it to your rheumatism—then— HOMEWARD FOK {HE UNITED KINGDOM
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pa ns and ~) es Vessel For Barbados
3S, “SCULPTOR” . Liverpool 18th July
3S, “TRIBESMAN” London 25th July
iS. “STRATEGIST . Greenock 26th July



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RECETVED







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Large shipment of

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THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM,

From ali chemists and stores. — Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets
hte ~~ nee onnoonmnnrhenenhnntnnhnnsr ti nnnnrrroeennnentintit tives.
' ( SON

Have YOU Visited...
Noid is APPLICATION FOR

THE EVANGELICAL dine eigen ALPH - A - BEARD

BOOK DEPOT NATURALIZATION
D ete A.M.- INST, DB. E. F.V.A,
(Adjoining gg jee a tmmehe Sy. Vi Auctioneer and Real Estate
(Chiropractor) Waiting Gills Road, Bridgetown is apply- Arent
rete eation, ad thst any person’ we




Offers You:
Seveval interesting Properties in St. James, @hrist Church,
Navy Gardens and Silver Sands

knows any reason why naturaliza~
lion should not be granted snowed
send a written and sign
ment of the facts to the
Secretary 7

THE DEPOT for Bibles and
Christian Literature,
Oven to 12






noon Daily
3.7.51—6n

9 om


















| JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(
{
| Lower Broad St. — Upstairs over Newsam’s
]





For Further Information
Please Ring
4683




Hardwood Alley P.O. Box 279



‘

DRESSES
%

x,

a,

EVENING, COCKTAIL, AFTERNOON and BEACH ;
Ready-Made and Made-to-Order :

Also — %.

BEAUTIFUL HANDBAGS from $7.89 to $10.61 \

4,

$5.30 per pr.
$6.08

LADIES PYJAMAS—Plain
{ Fr is Floral
NYLON PETTICOATS...... JN LER Ce i. $7.32
{

50%, SAVINGS

CHECK THIS LIST




APPL PP PEEL OTTO

GOOD NEWS:





LADIES’ SANDALS

44

BRASSIERES 86c. up

















; ane et

x , . . . % NIGHTIES $3.00 up 7 .

% FOR THE HMOUSEWIVE... % VESTS 2 for $1.00 up ae

De x ; ¢ Pe:

3s Fresh Supplies Of... % COTTON PANTIES for ee ao

% ; ’ a 2 for $1.00 u

“DR. NEDD’S ANT TAPE Seoslortacene Shc dan

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x Rid Your Tables and Safes of ANTS 3 pairs for $1.00 Regular $5.14 Now $3.75
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$ DR, NEDD'S ANT TAPE Values up to $6.1! oe

$ Just Tie It On nae soe om . NYLON HOSE

‘ Retail Price 1/6, Pkt. ac ed, Grey, Brown 7 ac
% Obtainable at:— 3 _ . county All Shades & Sizes $1.36
%, 0 :

% BOOKER’S (B’dos) DRUG STORES LTD. TWeeDe REMNANTS.

* Broad Street, and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings. x 54” Now $4.75 in Silks, Crepe & Spuns
ee SAA AA AAAI OAL ANE N AAAI A Ae * ores at Unbelievable Low

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Now $1.95

Prices

PRINTED LINEN
Regular $1.60 Now $1.29

STRIPED SHIRTS
Special $2.95

LOCKERBIE HOUSE
BRITTONS CROSS ROAD

An attractive and mellowed stone house set-in secluded
grounds of about half an acre. Covered entrance porch for
cars, wide side gallery overlooking Sawn, large lounge, dining





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At Low Prices

500 SPORT SHIRTS
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oftiess Gad oeanaines: Highly recommended. Up to $6.00 Now $3.75 Sean ree

e Fine Quality Long Sleeve ~ seeds me

| KHAKI SHIRTS Regular $6.75 Now $4.95 >

' { | at only $3.25 only >

(JOHN <4. BLADON & Co. eee

| . . 7 Te" x
AES EVA BARGAIN HOUSE |

Real Estate Agents, Auctioneers & Building Surveyors | s

S. ALTMAN, Proprietor
PHONE 2702

oO
EFF OCC OOS TIO

THE FIRM WITH THE REPUTATION
Phone 4640 Plantations Building

30, Swan Street



re Af.
PUP WY 4 44, $0 ve?
PAGE EIGHT



PLAYING FIELD ENQUIRY

Page 5
lorries doing tnis
removed more than
50 per cent of the houses from
the 1 the Bay Estate.

Mr. Cox:,] know nothing about
that, As far as I remember there
were over 20 lorries doing this
work and they came from various
parishes. I do not know wnat
percentage these lorries that you
are referring to did.

Job Given Away

@ From
Cox thar these

work actually

ood area to

Tne Commissioner; Mr. Cox,
Myr. Duguniit toid us that he
went to Mr ‘vudor 10) «—asK
lor the job ot. removing a
building from Seaweli to the
iieef, and that Mr, Tudor toia
tum the job had been given away
to you already; that Mr. luau

also said he could go and see you
und he did so.

jar. Cox: I
what I have
concoction.

fhe Commissioner: In the in-
terview with Mr. Tudor after the
loss Mr. Tudor said he had made
the statement to you: “What have
you gone and done? One of your
men has carried away some of the
material.”

am satisfied from
heard that



vhis is a

Mr. Cox: That is not true.

The Commissioner: Can you
suggest why Mr. Tudor should say
this thing which as you
untrue?

Mr. Cox: The statement 1s v"ry
clumsy. I am definitely sure taat
Mr. Tudor knows me so well he
would not attempt to besmirch my
character. I do not think people
would take that seriously

The Commissioner: After you
hed reported the loss of the
iterial, did you take any further
steps?

Mr. Cox: No.

Attorney General; Mr. Cox, Mr
Duguid told us that you got the
permits from the Police for trucks
to go to the airbase.

Mr. Cox: That is not so

Permits Granted

Attorney General: I have here
a book from the police in respect
of these trucks. Ido not know
who got the permits but I see here
that one truck is supposed to be
yours. Duguid two, Francis one
and one in your name. This is a
counterfile of the permits. Did
you apply for this permit?

Mr. Cox: No. Mr. Duguid tole
me that he would have to get the
permits. He knows the number of
my truck very well

Attorney General: Did the lorry
2381 go up at Seawell?

Mr. Cox: As far as I know it did
not go up there. It was not used.
T gave Mr.
after and as I can see from that



n

he did get permits for the trucks He bought it.

2861 and 258.
using four trucks,
not used.

Dangerous

He anticipated
but 2361 was

The other new witness to give Cox. — :
evening ners in business.
'T. W. Miller who
of the St,
a them to be good friends.

evidence during the
session was Mr.
has been a member
Michael Vestry for
half years.
Mr. Miller:
evidence, Mr.
thing I did not quite hear.
would like that cleared up.
The Commissioner: |
note which I believe you may
referring to, It was that Mottley

four and

Cox said

say, is

At the end of his
some-

have a
be

his own defence to try to bring
innocent people into a matter
like this.

I do not know how far I will go
with the Party to which I belong
and of which he is a member. I
will sever my conection with that
party! ;

I have done nothing to him! 1

have said nothing against him
about carrying away a hut! I have
not come here to give evidence. I
told Dr. Cummins night before I
was not prepared to give evidence
and he told me if 1 spoke to teil
whatever I knew of the matter.
! While I was here Cox in his
ending up remarks trieu to tarnish
the character of an innocent man.
1 have nothing more to say.

The Commissioner: | quite un-
derstand how sou feel






Mi, Milter: Ist feel ‘hurt!
Mr. Mettley: ‘cu said some-
thin hout Mr. Cox coming to
} é one morning aecom-
panied by Nelson and he remon-

strated with you for not defend-
ing him against the Vestry’s at-
tacks. You told him if he were
present he could not defend him-
self. | would like that explained.

Mr. Miller: Because as a mem-
ber of the House and Executive,
on every occasion he used his in~
fluence to get work for his lorries.
The Leader of the Government, the
President of the Party has spoken
to him in council over that very
matter.

Cox's féeelings—and he express-
ed them re, “the lorries are
mine. I pay taxes for them and
they must .yet work.”

And if he connived with Tudor
to remove this hut and he placed
you or another member of the
Vestry for criticism. how can I
defend him?

Wide Scope

Attorney General: I do not want
tc interrupt Mr. Mottley, but we
are not here to enquire into Mr.
Cox's method of doing business. I
think we are straying a little.

The Commissioner: The scope of
this enquiry is very wide. I do not
wish to... Mr. Mottley I take ¢
assumes that his questions bear. . .

Mr. Mottley: Anyhow, your ex-
planation is that he puts himself
in a position to be criticised anc
that was his lookout. In other
words you were not going to be a
party to stifling that criticism if
it were justifiable?

Mr. Miller: Quite.

Mr. Mottley: Throughout an-
other issue this morning, there
was a question of huts and lorrics.
You actually said that some of the
lorries were actually put into your
. .. What were the numbers?

Mr. Miller; M-258 and M-1301.

“Mr. Mott You are quite sure



Duguid the thing to see they are his lorries?

Mr. Miller; The lorry 258 is his.
He also intimated
to me that he would buy a lorry
in Miss Francis’ name.

Good Friends

Mr. Mottley: You know Mr.
You know them to be part-

Mr. Miller: I do not know about
partners in business. I know

Mr. Mottley; You made a strong
statement of Mr. Cox using his
influence in the Government vo
secure work for his lorries,

Mr. Miller: Everybody knows
that. What I am concerned about
Js bringing my name into the hut.

told him that he knew where the What work he got by Govern-

huts were and Miller knew. Is ment is nothing to do with the
that true? Princess Alice Playing Field.

7 ' Mr, Redman was recalled to put

Mr. Miller: There is not the jn evidence some records of min-

slightest
statement

atom of truth in

tries to bring me into it

tarnish my character.

I have heard many TUMOUTS, ceived a cable saying he cannot
said that he has

so now!
for
last
innocent

not
would I say
and dangerous
Cox to sit here and in his
words try to bring an
man into it!

but I have
them! Nor

It is nasty

As a result of the stand I took
when the Vestry made an inves-

that utes about

Nothing had been said yjsor’s duties and his appointment,
about me throughout all the evi-

dence, but in the last moment he
and

the Building Super-

Attorney General; | may state
now that I tried to get Mr.
Charles Worrell who is at present
employed in St. Lucia. We re-

come but he would
questionnaire,

In view of the absence of Miss
Arne, Social Welfare Officer, I
have some minutes to record.

The Commissioner: Have you
made any etfort to try and get
Mr. Dash the auctioneer’s sale

answer any

tigation, Cox came to my home
and said, “Tommie, I expected book. : 7
you, to defend me yesterday at Attorney General; I have tried

the Vestry against Mr. Mottley to get documents about the sale.

Mr. Mottley
told Cox in

when

me.” I my

was attacking
drawing 1
room that I could not defend him whether in

Chere is little available,
The Commissioner: The point is
fact 13 huts were

and if he were present he could there.

not defend himself.

Mr. E. K. Waclott; He sold 12.

He left my home at once and It is obviously a mistake, maybe

did not speak to me after that.

He went
Vestry election
against me.

and

Prior to the removal of the hut
he asked me to allow him to put possible explanation.

around during the last he might have found

in advertising or when he went up
that two

canvassed were really one—a kitchen and a

wash house say.
Attorney General; There is one
Originally

his lorries at me after he had there were 20 odd and four were

nowhere to put them, and the withdrawn, maybe another was

lorry M-258 that I hear belong subsequently withdrawn,

to Miss Francis but which I hap- 2

pen to know belongs to Cox, too. Mr. D. G. Leacock, Jnr., and
I want to make it clear that Mr. B. A. Weatherhead, past

when he was removing the huts Churchwardens, also gave evi-

with his lorries, they were
at my home.
It is a most sinister motive, |

not dence, reports of which will ap-

pear tomorrow
The enquiry continues today at

maintain, for anyone after giving 9 a.m.

They'll Do It Every Time seine By Jimmy Hatlo

How AciLe THE FINGERS

OF DOCTOR LA BOTTS~ — FoR THE BENEFIT
OF THE STUDENTS“
THIS IS KNOWN AS
THE GORGONZOLA KNOT»
FIRST A BOWLINE OVER
THE DOUVENUMâ„¢THEN A
HALF HITCH WITH A
Se HAWSER BEND BETWEEN

HIS FORTE IS THE
TYING OF SURGICAL
KNOTS +










< DON'T
Â¥ KNOW HOW
HE DoES IT! Z

orig

THE
















GASTRIC COTTER:

PIN AND SPLEENâ„¢



But wn wis TUXEDO
HIS TROUBLES BEGIN'+HE CAN'T
TIE THAT SHOELACE UNDER HIS CHIN’

~-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



choolboy Wins
U.K. Tennis Title

WIMBLEDON, July 6.

A powerful backhand proved too much for the cannon-
ball service, and American college boy Dick Savitt beat Aus-
tralia’s Ken McGregor in a 63 minute three set fifal for
the All-England lawn tennis championships.

The United States player won the sixtyfifth renewal of
the oldest and most prized tournament in the world by
decisively outpointing his rival 6—4, 6—4, 6—4.

Victories assured the Untied
States of triumphs in both men’s
und women's singles. Doris Har.
meets Shirley Fry in tomerrow's
All-American women’s finals.

After the first few nervous
games of set one, big 24-year-old
Savict displayed caampionship
form. His devastating backhand
cross the court was-too much for

curly haired McGregor who
fought a losing battle from the
start.

Tomorrow's women’s _ singles
finalists Hart and Fry made short
work of their American com-

patriots Miss Beverley Baker and
Miss Nancy Chaffee in Women’s
Doubles Semi-final. They won,
playing well within themselves
6—0,. 6—2 and qualify to
holders Louise Brough and Mar-
garet Osborne Dupont.

meet



Rain Washes Ou
Play At Old Trafford

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 6.

Heavy overnight rain foilowed
by another downfall at lunch time
prevented any play taking place
in the second day of the Third
Test at Old Trafford.

An inspection was made at 11.30
a.m. and again at 12.30. After-
wards it was announced that the
public would be adrnitted to the
ground but that no money would
be returned in any circumstance.

The wicket may prove too wet
tomorrow to assist the spin bowl-
ers but if a hot sun comes out
and turns it into a sticky one,

In the semi-final of the Men’s England may have a hard fight

Doubles,
Egypt and

Jaroslav

Erie Sturgess

Drobny of
South

Africa beat Gardner Mulloy and
Dick Savitt of the United States Test victims to 150 by claiming

4—6, 6—4, 6—3, and 6—4,
Doris Hart and Shirley

Fry

for first innings lead, and much
would appear to rest on Hutton

Bedser who brought his total of
wickets in the

seven first South

African innings is now fourth in

(U.S.A.), entered the final of the the list of bowlers who have taken

Women’s Doubles
erly Baker

beating

Bev-
and Nancy Chaffee (155), Sydney Barnes (189) and

(U.S.A.) 6—0, and 6—2, Jaroslav

Drobny, (Egypt) and Eric Sturgess taken more.

(South Africa) beat yardnar
Mulloy and Dick Savitt (U.S.A.)
4—-6, 6—4. 6.3, and 6—4

Frank Sedgman and Ken Mc-
Gregor, (Australia) beat Budge
Patty and Hamilton Richardson
(U.S.A.) 6—4, 6—2. and 6—3.
Mervyn Rose and Mrs, Nancy
Bolton (Australia) beat title-
holders Erie Sturgess (South
Africa) and Louise Brough
(U.S.A) 7—5, and 6—2.

—(U.P.



Sports Window

Today the Second Day of play
in the second seri¢s of the First
Division and Intermediate Cricket
matches takes place The Third
series of second Division games
will opt, Games begin at | 30
p.m, They are as follows:—

FIRST DIVISION

Wanderers v Empire at Bay

Pickwick v. Spartan at Oval

Police v. Y.M.P.C, at Park

College vy Carlton at College

Combermere vy. Lodge at Com-
bermere,

IN TERMEDUATE

Cable & Wireless v. Spartan at
Boarded Hall,

Mental Hospital vy. Wanderers at
Black Rock,

Regiment vy. Empire at Garrison
Windward v. Pickwick at Congo

Road,
SECOND DIVISION
Empire v. Combermere at Bank
Hall,
YMP.C. ¥ Wanderers at
Beckies Road,

Lodge v. Foundation at Lodge,
Carlton v. ¥ MPC, at Carlton
Central v. College at Vaucluse.
Leeward v, Pickwick at Foster's
SHOOTING
The Barbados Rifle Association
will hold « practice Shoot over
300, 500 and 600 yards at tha
Government Range at | pm.
NETBALL
There will be a Netball Prac-
tice at the ¥.W.C.A, at 5 p.m
Many girls are now taking a
keen interest in these practice
games.





WHAT’S ON TO-DAY

Princess Alice Playing Field
Enquiry 9.00 a.m,

Police Courts 10.00 a.m.

Police Band plays for Charity
Concert in aid of Boys’
Club at Speightstown 8.00

p.m.
CINEMAS
Empire—"Olty Lights” 445 and
4.30 pom,
Globe—"Royal Wedding” 5.00 and
8.15 pom,
Aquatic—'Broken Arrow’ 5.00 and
4.30 pom.

Plaza, Bridgetown ‘The Breaking
Point’ 445 and 8.50) p.m,

Olympic—"‘Tll Get By” and “Two
Flags West" 4.30 and 8.15 p.m.





The Weathe
TODAY
Sun Rises; 5.44 a.m,
Sun Sets: 6.25 p.m.
Moon (First Quarter)
July 12
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Water; 3.24 a.m.,
5.24 p.m.
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nil
Total for month to yester-
day: 1.06 ins.
Temperature (Max) 85.5° F
‘Temperature (Min,) 79.0° F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.
-(3 p.m.) E.S.E.
Wind Velocity: 13 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.999
(3 p.m.) 29.929





Â¥ WHAT'S EATING
You, ANYHOW =
L THOUGHT you
WERE. HAVING







IT'S DRIVING
ME CRAZY!

eV





THANX To
DAVID J. CALICCHIO, MQ, |
9 KESWICK ST, |

BOSTON |5 MASS.

most Test wickets. Maurice Tate

Clarrie Grimmett (216) have
But Bedser’s record
is more remarkable since he has

appeared in only 30 Tests.



H. COLLEGE WINS

KNOCK OUT CUP!

Harrison College hag won the
Knock Out Cup in the Basket-
ball Competition. The school team
defeated Carlton 28—21, in the
finals last night at Y.M.P.C.

The game was thrilling from
beginning to end. At the end of
the first quarter the points ‘were
four all. Half time found the
score .10—9, in favour of College.
College increased their lead sand
by the end of the next quarter
they had Carlton 16—13. Carlton
fought hard but were eventually
beaten by seven points.

YACHT CLUB TENNIS
TOURNAMENT

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS

MIXED DOUBLES

Miss D. Wood and Dr. C. G.
Manning, beat Mr. and Mrs. C. B,
Sisnett 6—3, 6—1.

MEN’S DOUBLES

J. H. Manning and F, D. Barnes,
beat V. Hutson and G. Watson,
6—1, 6—2, 6—4,

TO-DAY’S FIXTURES ..
MEN’S SINGLES

J. B. Trimingham vs. Dr. F. G.
Reader.
MEN’S DOUBLES
F. P. Edgehill and J. H. C
Edgehill vs. G. H. Manning and
F, D. Barnes,


















,oldfish B :
« }
Goldfish Beat |;
~ + %
ea Nymphs |
j &
Two goals peored by Pitcher, | $
ene in the first half and the other | $
in the second half, gave Goldfish a | 8
narrow. victory over Sea Nymphs ! %

in their water polo match at the} >
Aquatic Club yesterday ¢fternoon. | %

+
In the other match Mermaids | %&

easily defeated the Ursuline Con-| ¢
vent 14 goals to love. Ann Suth-| %
rland scored five goals and Jean‘ &
Chandler four, June Hill three and | 9

Jean McKinnor: two for Mer-| \
maids ss
Charmaine Goddard in goal for |



the Ursuline Convent was kept] %&







busy and de: pite the high _ Score Music by Mr. C. Curwen’s
she saved many other certainties. aon
The referee was Mr. Basil x a ak Orchestra »
Brocks x 7 7.51—In. x
eb hese > ienk: | SCCCSS SOGOU ODOVESBE?
See 4 Nom nh : : A Eckstein } CLEP LEE EEE EP CPIPIOE
i we . - - * <
(Capt), J. Eckstein, T. Browne, | % +
M. Knight, B. Mahon, N. Jones, B. | * ASK ©
Williams. 1% YOUR GROCER %
Goldfish: B, Hunte, D. Johnson, | & eS
P. Fitz Patrick, M. Lopez, M. Tay- | % ‘
lor, P, Pitcher (capt), R. Clarke. | ¥ %
Mermaids: J. Croney, J. Chand-| * JA B »
ler (Capt.), J. McKinnon, H. Mc- | 3 ~
Kinnon, T. Ince, J. Hill, A. Suth-| \ q ‘
erland, % THE ORIGINAL &
; mn x %
Ursuline Convent: M. Fung'y
(Capt.), L. Netto, S. Walton, B.]% AND STILL %
Henzell, J. Lashley, E. Parsons} & > -
and C. Goddard. % THE BEST %
y ‘ 1 a7 ¥ .
f -— & CREAM CRACKERS —
‘ 4
Faulkner Wins z Supplies Always Available. x
% .
IRELAND, July 6. % e 3
Max Faulkner, British Ryder Cup] . x
player, won the British open golf} X Stokes & Bynoe Ltd. %
Championship with 72 hole score] % <
of 285. But his victory was not $ Agents ¥

Antonio | »®
70 score

assured until Argentine
Cerda returned with a
for an aggregate of 287.

—U.P.

ET OE
CRYPTOQUOTE No. 43 |
‘ |
ve AO QWHRVWI RE
| HOXRFRVB Re YV AO
| RHHOXRFRVWIXG HOXRFRVWI |
| NOBB \
Last Crypt Whispering tongues
can poison truth; and constancy
lives in realms above.—Coleridge
| nee |
)
(





] J. A. CORBIN & SONS. |
LESTE ETN
TO-NITE TO-NITE

SATURDAY Night JULY 7, 195)

A Dance

sponsored by —~

Mr. GORDON YEARWOOD
(better known as Tourist)
At QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE

ADMISSION 2/-











SSS)

Remember you are invited

to
1 a
A GRAND DANCE
AT THE PRINCESS ALICE
PLAY FIELD
On Monday Night, July 9th,
1951
By the Misses Gwendaline
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Admission:
|

Musie by Mr. Hoppy Jordan's Ork
BAR SOLID
SSS

Gents 2/- Ladies 1/6

Refreshments on Sale — Bar Solid



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SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951



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Saturday, July

Introducing Professor
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Dancing until 2 a.m.

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PAGE 1

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PAGE 1

Stage Set F or Cease-fire Discussions %  %  ... lii tha sestore, Mr H. A. Tudor, tkt then Churchwarden %  Men White Flag Will Shelter L.N. Men TOKYO, July €. UNITED NATIONS AND COMMUNIST leaders completed long distance negotiations for a cease fire meeting, and prepared to start Sunday on face to face tulks which could end the Korean war or signal the start of World War III. At 9 a.m. Sunday, protected by the white Hag of truce, representatives of General Matthew B Ridgway will cross the Imjin river and move on into wrecked Kaejcng, ancient Korean capital,! two miles south of the Sftth parallel. f Waiting lo meet them will b" Communist delegates of Kim n Sunn. Supronu Conunander %  >> UM u I Ptni i it Huai. Comm itidM of Cfa i i /In*. ,. i none will • .ink of r. lonel %  Korea —///# In Men Ami Money WASHINGTON. Jut II.,. Kres wai which naru ; ... „..„ tho decks out as a : w ho will Diet In United States history m t(i . mo casualties and trt An Allied patrol reported FrlThe year of fighting on the fai day ii.it i ,, i tiers were away peninsulu has cost the United suites more dearly than th so luUonjV) war " n Charles Worrell Atleeiiry mplo Greaves: • AltariU'.i On Playing Field yea General: W.. vou worked with U.N. Planes Hit Kail Yards TOKYO. July 6. Nine Superforta a tt ached u<-cessfuliy "railroad mai&hulling yards at Kowon on Friday dropping 60 tons of 100-pound bombs on the enst coast rail centre." Two other B 26s attacked the Communist f.ont line positions i Ighl with SOU pound t i. l.i I'.P. LONDON. Jul] 0 1 lie Thataa, i ntuii editorially on tha Aniilo-Argentlnc %  debate in thi I %  aid, n Is to be bopad "now with iictt.i relation doarlj bought ncw and more supple methods of dcald In both eountrloi to thai trade bat them will in. longer bo threatened with periodic stoppages." It added that tht rt .igreement was Its ability lo remove all sources of friction between Argentina and the United Kingdom and to create an atmosphere oi good will. Support in): British Minuter John Edwards, the Times said thai li • was i:; effect a "criticisan of Mr Edwards' • itei i ami who tried to negotiate as .—gt. jji the Argentine's claims i %  %  i [i The Times oiiRht into relation %  Bh the agreement: t. The Aravntiue Government•vtn shortly facilitate payment i, ? ?'„ tormar amThf American run radio station ,,;,,.., of once brittab-OWnod' WA8 leported that an East Oer%  who now live in this man passenger steamer carrying countrv or wish to do so." *Q0 persons, ran aground in Mag—;2.ooo.ooo lend lease aid. The United States also asked for the second time that Husia submit lo arbitration the dispute with the Umted StatOi over cash payment for other goods wortA $HOO.0O0.0OO which the Soviet Unio under wartime lend I Stale Department in announcing the double barrelled -clior dun laaed thai Sot n uu % %  At M on ,i note to ihp Soviet Charge D*A8aJri| m %  K iraraei —U.P. Ship Ruiis Aground CONDEMN LAMBETH COUNCIL %  LOMUON Ji.1% i. The solution put forward b) tha l..imU'th I'oun.il to problem of the increasing colpopulation in Ixndiin had been condemned by tAe League of Coloured Peoples .is "savourT D?. Malan'i. racial segregation policy." The Umibclh Council, perturbed bv the petition fi-m linBU cuiiipl nnii: %  Olourod home in the d^lotriot, wanth the Goverunient to tlghton the method!! of regulating the Bow "i i loured people Into Lon* ton. The flow, says the roun.il. should be conllned to those with prospects of enujdoymeni and "who are likely to become good -Itizens". The ixague oppose* >i ihc 'fittiiilHes of implementing thent without hwolrlruj in.it i on. Mi Sam Morris, tinLOOgUO'l Sei rotary, bHdaj eonunontod: li thoro art im dea lrablaa ammg the coloured population, wo foal a is up to the local authoritj to doal with them ami not ponaUaa the majority for the few. If the councillorof l..imbeta would only look dot the question, they would And that the West Indian.an forced lo ionic to Hnudn becau %  appalling conditions in the islands". The leagues Chairman, Tiini^! dad-born I). I... i 10 to put it roJdly, we think the Lambeth Council's attitude lather unkind. No one seems to object to the praoanea of colonials in wartime, but in pooi different mallei" Mie Laajrue's ojtocullve has sent a pi • t t l-nnl>eth Council and has drawn the London County Council's attention to their i>oint of rlflW TfeO Metropolitan BOTOUgh'i; Joint Committee and the I null Office are to consider 'I i tlon. Pakistan And India Charge Violations Of Kashmir Truce UNITED NATIONS, New Yurk. India and Pakistan on Friday, exchanjipd a new series of charges ol Kashmir ceaselire violation* Pakistan said an Indian formation recently attacked o patrol of Punjab bordei police In SlaUcol dlatrict of Pakistan and two canstables were kille.'. But t 10 main point Of the Pakistan complaint *rai i"* contentioni *• % %  • „_ %  „•„ f •! ,1 that recent IndUn charges MlllinilUIIV Juilfll and iitcil outbursts" tod Pri and H bouaeooa by acme India i mt to "queer tne ptteh" PEACE US KOREA \\/) THE SUGAR ISSl E (Prom Our Own < irreapondoat) i ho. The future of stifiar, botfrom ifi'supply point of \new. is assumn Ihe w rld market have alrea< i i opoaals were %  i f lust month Mid ih.it cannol be to expeel if the Peat c Pad l) ring the i Influence i li ..-. IIUIIT. 'by lh' iniKht "SufdeV 1 Cnrr! mw ONaiN, juij A 26-yrar-ull ln.-im rU(|.liM-. |III M.l.J, l I-.11.i that her : %  ,. ..i. tft Improved l> burniim mono. etaafewf a oUakoa or arooa on: 4ii OM, she iniu paUaa that j The worn.n paid II lo "Su^ile". tnee 'Susie' told nor to i.n... a chid and %  apparently rhokrtl it Then "suvr' ini her to a baaemrnt b> Lindlrlleht and -.remed to burn all the monn *hirroalvaal lain mi "Susie r.inprd an eaa HI rloUi anil limkc it agaiiut her heel "Sunlo" ii. .UM" i m'. The wimaii. h,. did not want her name rfTTOlSd ald ahe had rOeOT Of Od tlimeney from "Suoie' bu< hand. The husband laid % tOI SiiHle" had .ho l.ik.-n of his mon.v wbr.i h I %  %  %  i %  %  It %  : %  %  %  %  %  : %  sing i %  K July fl. t". %  | sent mil:. derbih Held to fall t<| sons o uu: up the boil Bnontj for Dour funitivCo.nmiinist Paidttan said that incidenU lenders. sides and r ta %  roots to say -.., : Deputy United % %  I... %  nil for mediator. Ur Fran'< OlOfaam. Man Breaks Into Buckingham Pa-wr I-ONDON. July 6. Buckingham Palace. 0M M l>U moat heavily guarded bulkttoas in the world wag broken into by a man found crouched in a cot ridor one floor below \>. !: %  %  I': M.u,: lift i ., %  HMp King George and Quo Elizabeth were not t the pal — they Ale in residence Bt Windsor — and Prtncoss Margaret was home only becnuMI conllned to her room with a cold The intruder was quesl r hours at Cannon Street PoM< %  'land Yard threw into actioi %  ,, x alsnn s%-stem which virtually seals oil "square of I r" — tha ftur reaidonoM i; Roys ., Iluckingham |>alace n —tt'.P.l Mavor Of Ifogcov Hrfused The <-irl PARIS, July B Tho Mayor of 1 OUt frr.ni ibind the Hand from other countriestl %  :vcrsary of I ment > | A. Yasnov a dom of the i jflorod u Hmoufclne hob and .i pretl jnd. Yasrov %  'i would pti] iinri turned Wlowii (he COJ „T, i r Sign Jap Treaty In September i %  i %  %  moii} foi %  I IM Cull Ituil Strike %  f i Friday 1 way wol kei -If (laid Increase* OTTAH %  %  I P.) Judges Under li.K. Influence Iran Chargee THI HAGUE, July fl 1 that bm judgm of the Infc >i c '.HI a/ho votod in favour oi Thuraday In the Anglo %  inlan %  .. %  "perhaps tiah Inlluont •-" lluasein oi iho Iranian and observer ut he hoarlni [ran did not partlel'•' tn ib.rose told a Press eonrwo of the noun IIIIIIOI iwo have but the ma] I <>f imbtiCAl coruddorai sn i ihaai under Britub In mtvrlm mea, iW „ .__ British request for an h uoniii kaop i [ranlan OU i n until tha two cotnv m tllement —I'.P. Redfl Will K.hivadr Ktma Ottl) If Russia Wants War Pi (KYI July . Japan, iQUN I BBS I'" 1 ,. i it roinvaoV %  i War III Sunda; %  n the So ... i;. lapant %  %  %  ej %  lien thai a "solid ding and II Japan, Ihe Unit* %  o f the I t'.p Jamaicans Settled LONDON. J 1 '" i B omcialfi arc %  iriho numboi anivahi ol Jam %  %  irllei M,i.... BirmingManc h ost ai : > %  workers Bxfend War Service 1 WASHINGTON. Jul I ... i urii an •:li (Ol Ol' membei > I the Arnv I %  %  July 8. I9fl 1952 — t I' Ml t;r 1 -^\rs Y. tnr Aitomr> Qosawal; Can foo remember when VOU i*n-l tlarteii i tba i'i •> Ini Kiebt %  Ml I.IMVI I hr Vliiirnc. 4ieneral DM yOO it ihe haw? Mr Greaves: No. The Attnntry Genrral • rk AI the PI lyttuj ippoari to w piscaa <'f hut? >ir. Qsnavasi i son BOOM pMoai if hut which we used up. Ihc \ttornr> OoStBtall Mad itartod to work when tho hub i, bn II dii to Ihs Roof by %  %  Mr. Greavea: No. TBO AtUirney General: When mi wors first araploytd at ttu PlayUuj Pleld, how nil had th MI idlna i'"'f No. I Man don't remembei workod? Mr. GreavM; I worked from th N., tl i bUsMUlf started until II .. The AUMSW) Qan s r s t: Hov much ol ih^ hoSl General: Wl. tvpe of wood .is UOSd in :"'• boarding up of the building.'.' Mr. Greavra: We used Hi* and everything at the building was practically new. The AUorne> General Hoe ere vou being pam* bj Mr W.., roll.' Mr. Greaveu: I cannot remein ber. The Allornr. tienerjl \M used to receive the BMterlal' Mr. Greavr*Mr Ma) The Attorney General: l> | I'I. I K n Mr. Gnnvr*: I after the men who I . ,. u \>.irkn Mr. Oroavosi i was tii-r.Iron the time the foundat* The xiii.iii.s General: Cottld MHI tell us BOmOtl uitt UOUl lb Mr Qroavea H ".> sboui 6 ti I i.. I daan and sboui t tot) wlda UM UI.-MH > Qoaarali Ab.iu' how many carpenters wenen* ployed there? Mr. Greevra: Alxiut Ml to Ho The Attornev Genrral: w*0n fOt >hc < hwf eaipoDsarf Mr. OroaVOat Yes I roil'a number one man. The Attarney General: Wh" %  Bwd %  > aafho out the Pas Shoal* M>. l---rr. Trti Wniien mm' BSlf, The Altarnry fiener^il: Did voi, SO| Ihc II. i !, %  MrOrS Oreavoi mea I tooh .11.0 l-l'.-Cll lll'Mi nO Tl. %  eroll The Attorney General: HOW long wors you amployod si ihc 1 Mi Greavea: I ft M rOBOOm* DM Ml.on. General: Did fOV •so the Acting; fjinrernoi there? Mr Grease*. On mi, thaMorasi Oenarali I> rou Mi Mi The Y." \llomrv tienrral: How did ha vi it tha Ploj Ing Mr. Greaves: I BS him there on /Vo Good The Mlorn I..-I .1 v.. Ihe \Htirii-. tleneral: DM SOS any can! board among the huts? Mr. area-sosi v<. bui n was not any good Ihe Allornry Grnrral Did fOtl asa u i btach sal %  Mr Or eOvO SI Yes. but it hid in holes snd waa turned down. The Attorney General: Yon s.uo that you wnv it the l'I.i>ing Field ..K'II iii.' building was finished. do vou know bow manv hOSSM wars thoro u Uu piiinrs? Mr. Qsaavosa I cannot romombcr now, but there wa* a holo for i 'iii lainerete pillar. Mr. Walcirtl: BaV0 >"ii SVOI made any statement to the Polh-v i sag ono alia la oonstaetMn wttn this mattci Mr. Greavea: No. Mr. Wall all II... ni'ii unv BVldanos boforol Mr. Greavea: No. Tins u the l\n\ lyji" I am aiving avus-itr mr MMIIII I worked at the Playing FieldMr. Greare*. V< Mr. Mollify: DM you have mi.id FOfn during the Mine work Mr. Greaves: Yes. Mr. Maltley BjUB,.,.,, %  |}u| mOfl %  i lo work snd roin Ml were they slill paid Mr. Grravev Vr Mr. Mtrtllry: You BOW BOmO bid lumbar stored on Ihs Roof pounds bow far WSS it f] %  I wars working.' Mr. Grravr*: II Smi I ut b> UM Polios st.iii. III snd wo aaari down bj Iho building, win'ii wantad die atuff. am hid t • "•II-I InbourerB for it. Mr Mottle* V n f Id U hist tho maforlty of the ,\ mean by lh.it; (In Page I a Dnho i Nattosu i new inniin t-i m which 1 POJcista-i BllofOCtty violated toe oeoaeflre line ComplaiiU said in thes • u... ttan border • ir wound%  • flogged and i ted I iOar Own Cnrr(M"">di ill LONDON. July &. I rlream :xprea Uko* up the ,.. ...use Of direct repreaentation tor t to be hoped for. but to ix: tougriT itrt% ^ WASHINGTON, July 6. |.-,,d worked for. Some Republican members of In ;i leiidnik I UBfOSB tjriiorin aim of British ThIndian complaint wan son'HacArlhur InvesUtat-1defends iu support of the Anglomual ,*. thr sjnlttee an circulating a Arnarlcan alliance wtdch it says uid milll tending that there u.. Ung the Empire owo Empire Gladwyn no "military justification" trtas turn to Washinaton than London IP uv-l'P. I The Express says the El FIGHT FOR EMPIRE PARLIAMENT SAYS DAILY EXPRESS %  No Joslifiiutioil %  %  %  i can %  I v.. pin %  ousand i f miles apart—and yet %  %  ,,.. an d "The Fren.1i underst imperial structure mue i bettei! adds %  %  i rjsrasa %  ... I %  I IT'S THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS



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PAGE TWO II.VKII.MMIS ADMii \ II s viridiw. .11 I \ 1 PLI CaJub CaU** 1 *} M RSP. HEWITT M I AnUgu.i I sho't iuc in return i Barbados on July 12th. Mr Hewitt Vyrlng l* ai prwrm in EngUm'l .itu-iului*. .i of Puulinil over Ihe r.i L EAVIlfo hslf'nn hour" l*t*r tot Trlnidsrl on hn way in 'h* U.S. WMr>. ItVl.n Willie I af %  holidny in ltarl>Ad<>•Uying u.ih Mr* Hewlts Mvdnfl III Laai M -. in th<* No York office of tho Manila Time* the lorgcm flatly p.iprr In ih<; < %  *. She'in also a representative of the Manila Broadcasting Company. She met Mrs. Hewitt Mvrin-; during ihe war, Th<\v weft boHl with ttie Britiih Information 8eivire. Double-Check! WHII.K PDUCMnw on most (CM main highways into Bridgetown win. Inn-king car and driven' licences yesterday, three children m Oirtins were doing %  similar job. 'Junior' the smallest of the three sat on tits front djOOT step, exercise book and pencil in hand, his brother sat next to him while the the ed fc e of the road As a ear passed she would shout out the number and "junior" v.-ith bigIfer brother uheckinn rally wrote down tinWhen asJted what the. teen doing the (ill UMQ %  >hocking numbers down the read, BQ wo are doing the tame up here.' With Shell Caribbean TaJR and MRS THOMAS ANDERSON and son accomuanied by Mr. und Mrs. George M. Duncan and three rhildien arrived from Trinidad vesterday morning en route from Venemel.i where both Mr. Anderson and Mr. Duncan work with iheU <'. ibbean Pe'.roleum Companv in Maracaibo. They plan t 0 spend three weeks' holiday at the ParaH. Club. Also the U.S. M R. WOODLEY ANTHONY who has been out of the island for about one month came in yesterday by B.W.I.A. from Trinidad. Since he left Barbados he has visited the U.S. as well ns Trinidad. Coming in by the same 'plane was Mr. Qonralo Senior a Caracas merchant who ha* flown over from Venetuela on a four-day holiday. He Is staying at the Aquatic Club, B.B.C. Radio Programme 4 IS p m TH# OHnd-lFeillval. 4 41 9 m Daitha ILa-irt p m tnt-Und IH tir Report !>.. -ii ,, ,„ t n terh.de. Sit pm Lnunr. B p in Huilr lor Denctn*,. a S %  > -• Programme PII.IIT M,~ -.1 M .1 %  %  .ioni. mi vi iti I The N* i ? II p r in Sana, OrgM MISS KAY AUSTIN -i>ekinti to her brother Victor who Is In England, over the Trai i>tions. Her brother who Is %  .hitopraitor m Manchester %  end* his bast wishes on tiei recent iiifsgt raonr. Engaged \ T a family Thursd inm i the Barbados Advoc-iu. only dauj I %  i atftuUon Road Unwell of the Aiulil < > son u( Dr. 1 Castrta B i monB-Hnwell i I Hastings. II v :i tiapp] brother V, prartor in EogLai* from Mai in .i... 1 happy %  %  M To Study Medicine ISA ANNIE BKflETI of RacKrI, Slie.l left Barbados for Yon on Sunday tO tags Up derm with relatives there. Skoete plnns studying medlWeddinc O N Thursd\ June Ralph King, Vergci %  fnin h Krai married l< Miss Anita B: i '-oding the ,\itli his in Jamaica I't-'ii *\i.* aflernonn by B.W.I.A. iier Barbadian students •ctu'ned by K MRM 'ulane. Mi \ernon Smith, Miss Metencat itndgeman. Mr Charles lllgrim Keith Ashby son of Mr. %  d Mrs. ED. Aeiib r I'M %  !lrt yeai in Arts. Mi c ••.Drafci II % %  idanl is doing Natural rle h.s jast finished his • ear. Here Lait Year M il ALm BRATT, who wn in Barbados in Aprlj I9M) 1',-w, ,n %  .esterdiiy 1 %  nldad by B w I A. m aecountani with the in Carf.i two weeks* holiday he Is staving at the H" punis pm pj.ni <.|.i i1|JO all ten %  •sill o op oi sj.ipooj Xiu onejiio.> was the verdict "f Mi -ua oj 'u/Kop apisdn siu.i rtunui.u Owle. . J fed "H-.~rT_~'_*y ^ l p %  Wwhleh wUl enable i Uw Waggling Parva ^lapBOJ lain pip; 'M .IIIIM.I I..) up in egg I \ %  '' %  I Of Hi Ltprai Ucal use thl Qu.i.-tii said that bv sli | liiii>re**eil Snail i could *S) i-Jin-,it Is possible to c< k Ii h %  l-world coui ASKED the Filthistan Trio rtgularities ol loth' %  ..ioui Ol vi'.v.-Jirii juin.i \speai ,-n itqM jo pio ggBUI ll n M1 •>> -MOJO ui •% UMd Filthinliin Trio Xat 1 what they thought of the two Americans who broke a record for %  ersaw by seesawing for more than 72 hours Ashura said. "This is not hart no more nor hif we was to be of boiling an hegg Without %  stoppage for evermore" Kazbulah said: "Seesaw is not motterraclng on around a track Ritamughan said "Not ow long vou seesaw is nut what is of counting, but grasefull wrlthums now hup now down like of daunclng and phary phlowting like lump of thosscl-doun warftid hon the nait. ho yes." Ashura added' "By hour hart we hare of hopping to paw holl hon trubblcd hinteranashernaul watters Ramagatv in ,-ti'fiofi M R. BANTON-DETMOI.D yesterday gave a demonstration i if protting to representatives of the MlniMrv of Bubblcblowing. The ferret RamBgate was released from a sack, and ran ovei .i boai I laid on the grass This rang s small bell attached to the board by wire and hoisted a flag on a miniature pole. The mopper turned out to be a layer of wet earth on which a sack wns laid. h.-.d nothing to B* m M was tna rlghl Asked what I"m< .mi I said: "Shorn of Rupert and man—26 m i Hupsn look* 4 hi s-ht hit friend hji 10 whan your rru SSks. "If Ihe vil rasnk l ought io to ConiubkGl IMIIJ don'i know Per imwer iht d*nf ul*ei le doubilul wid. I. m i hi %  i*r Ira all through |lM ood. Uo lomc jnd *how hm t^e lotker," h le lh(V Ml oil ind BWffl '. mtrsaei . hn issusdi % %  Wi stag, hji rings my littll f-iend Rupert %  ra M genilseuii. MIAMI LINEN 36" _l.l FLOWERED MOROCAINE CREPE 36'._ 9M WHITE DUCHES SATIN 36" gJM SLUB LINEN 36" 1.37 WHITE ELASTIC I. S. . 7 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS i cgoiawoai m Radio N".r-L 4 IS p m Kvport Irorn WimMnWn. • H p m l..(rri, l > IS(" Mlnrl B*> ir p... Th '>.. If I" [ IS IS p m Ji.t ranry. HUpm Vo-r PaHhl ill] One Of Many B ARBADOS, although it may have been Ihe first colony in Ihm area to receive delivery of %  :| ....(, | Baawoll Airport, li not tha colon* in the Caribbean anil Hgw**aT* % MM aaaraT *aTA*W surroundings to be supplied wiUt \ "* .^ #. 1 arfJaravfT %  #.* r i imdnd. British Guiana, the Bahamas and Venezuela have al> been supplied with this type of lire flihter. Some of the othei countries which have or will soon havo them snv Belgium, Chile, lr.ni. Hong *ng. Kei ( %  l- Northern and Southern Bhooaal| the Oold Coast. Tanganyika. Bur ma, Nyasaland. Abyssinia and %  evet il others li |Bh OsltSB I "I" Darnell \ 1. Hur ii 7. 3top 1 lie union ir*ciim v U %  liuuisn *oic*. |S. 8< ill Member ollcQ %  Uuyeti.' Iti 13. May Or one Of tint a whole irguneii!. IS) 13. Lai&r may iiitrreet tne anglst CJ. 14. rm neii.y iota D ••• i*l is. Alwafi rtoraaented ai the Lorn Ueynr %  Dnnqu-t. Ill is. Hvre you may eel a oroSrri 15. WhrVs you gel prool ol l^ Acme*. IS) IW. Hciiemr Itti •Jl. Would you look lur a 34 M-nlitrii I*I ti nvfrm 'Si %  J3 Kill* Bi-Ml Iiti .in ai crirK.l Ha H See SI AoroM. ISI gasya 1. One way u> mas* led rave, <:. X Pruvide* ih* ore l.ndn tmUl, ISI 1. Trouble* 7| 4. Oovant lei; ut win*. Bra %  %  uienUou luf example. iWi i started, mi n Provide lor %  Oioren lisce Hi B Found in Ms sitic. .ti A ihe yoKel may aeacriDe win' Annie wiuiaurd. <7| 11. Be-ii p^.l ol a ilirr indeed I '• i7. After rniiy nan I It would Da •i.—m u W. Vou do thin CI.OBK THEATHF presented by Madam llill. in akl of the Welfare league Clinic ;v •he PaU-OtUga of the Hon. V. C. Oak & Mr. E D. Motlley V J OBCH BOX SEATS $1 00; HOUSE 72c: BAL. 48c 0 r blame. SgntUea ( aaiiaraiy i oeiiw *Aer—1 Sprue: i lOfi frr> Yr-liuv... 10^ Ordlntrf^ 13 Pil* 1\ ll#cl i % %  llailMr.* I'l. Saddle II Dale n Hede 19 rvn, SO Traie 21 Seat S3 Annea 0*-~ I ti.wnafl.. | e-ilora.., Utitiw rip.-en. ^ I-H< Aral): B Uior wi.n IT. (Nrr •Ha Saw < -m.-hiit, Oaeblr • -TLAMINUO ROAD' i CRAWFORD Zarhary SCOTT AND iiiii-.ni romra %  %  "• %  I I IV,|I t.>viiii r". *. 1,1 N. II^TS-' (.AHTV THE OARDEN — ST. JAM1 M'^ll R • IU.U 2310 /'/ 1/ I BRIDGETOWN IO-IIA1 .. %  •• %  UHIMII.M, /The BREAKING POINT i utmn i %  ii..sura '"(Ml IODAV >ia a ll'i" %  MM [e MAVNARD "Operation Parilir" B'DftS AGENCIES LIMITED pmuMTa — THE VARIETY QUIZZ CONTEST (Every WEDNESDAY 8 10 PM.) AT THE GLOBE THEATRE H'ED.VESD.M WL\ llth H.:m,>.m. WITH A FILM DANA ANDREWS JANE WYATT Moilc For The QuIit by Maggie Goodrldge and The Perry (irern Drehestrs CONTESTANTS FOR THE QUIZZ TO RE SELECTED FROM AUDIENCE READ TO-MORROW'r3 "ADVOCATF" FOR PARTICULAR i OF THE QUIZZ YOU SHOW CLASS A MOTORING SENSE WKFN YOU BUY A 11 THO I YY i.\n. WINDOLENE NOW SHOWING AT EWIliE THEATRE 4.45 & 830 DAILY to -II it/til vis il CM II ^lOIM.W Tht mmi Beautiful Sight Club fro* trith a worVI-icidr re;ulaflon foi Miami to Rio good food Music, Dancing Entertainment throughout the night Dial 4000 fcr reservations SAVE THE SURFACE AND SAVE ** 9 9 l*> are Fully Stocked wilh . HIGH CLASS PRODUCTS PAINTS — Interior and Exterior DISTEMPERS ENAMELS VARNISHES WHITE LEAD & ZINC LINSEED OIL BRUSHES • IW SEND US YOUR ORDERS e THE II lllllAIIOS CO-OPERATIVE (OIIO.\ FACTORY I i 'Si. Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039 \IH I IIIISI in tht ll( If/ SPECIAL MATINEE THIS MORNING at 9.30 oooooooooooooo 4220 YOUR SHOE STORE 4606 cny LIGHTS* o o IT CHMIIS CHAPIW Q MMVA IIMU Ur-'M Aitim Q OOOOOOOOOOOOOO New Shipment of MARVIN WATCHES 100% SWISS EVERY WATCH GUARANTEED FOR 2 YEARS 15 Jewels $37.50 and up ALFONSO B. DeLIMA & CO. The Jewel Box of Barbados Opposite Goddards i





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I' \(.l 1111 li BARBADOS ADVOCATK SATIRDW Jl'LY 7. ItSl BARBADOS^I ADVOGHT gW1 f-r--1 r mw d by u>* A. Jul> 7. I9.'il l> AIM IIS THE political parties In this island are uirdinc. their loins lor t> %  %  gl I era] elections latBV in 'he y.'.ir The | -i L 'tiw Session began In Da c a tn bai MMa and was to tun I "SO bui by iin A> i latkin mi extended for one year. The off and the pai Matinns. The lining np hewevaj I net dtHstrkt and the n imes of. additional c mdidab the rank;nc Merely known by rumour. There has been no official declaration. The Barbados La Inii r Party, the Government party lias never I ty I ver all other parties In %  %  %  been U programme with the l'ne Labour Party t m attracting young ..dates U) its ranks The suspension ot one member. Mi Midi r brought about the unexpected withdrawals ol Mr PI and Mr. Cumoerbatch. Public criticism ol the Oovenimenl by another young candi* dale Mi T W Miller, over the handOn of the compensation \ ..<-d viet caused another unhappy division and parly The only certainty is Mrs. Poster the candidate for St Andrew. It seems now that other olrcurnstancei are likely to Further l<>ss i the ranks are occurring at a time when Ihe Partj I anflgr, Mr. Q H A lama, Is OUl Of the island. It may be that his dominating personality will be all that is ne e ded to brlpg %  closing ol the ranks such I i 1 Or. Cummin 1 mit i • kchieve. The task is not ivii, ..-there are rumours of n.ibhles among parly members and ib< electorate who put them In power in IMS are voicing criticisms ol the poll and the lack "f achievement of the Labour Party. The Barbados Electors' Association, the Opposition Party, has not yet declared its full list of candidates although public meetings have been held In several par* I | lor the old members of the Party Tins has been a welcome change (from the old method of folding a few meetings immediately before election time. The party has not been without Its trials. Several members were %  I %  for short periods and propaganda by other parties brought ;i lew members Intq disfavour, But during the session such work as was achieved by the Government partv was largely due to the help of Ua D New even with the Party Leader, Mr. Wilkinson, out of the island for health reasons, the Opposition holds the majority ot seats OVSBf the Government who will be without Mr, Mapp and Mr. Adams for some weeks to come. The Electors' Association, the Opposition Party, now have nine votes as against the Government with seven and the members of the moribund Congress Party floating somewhere In the constellation and one independent. Mr. Allder. Mr. Garner has l>een flirt inn with the Labour Party for sometime but occasionally records an independent vote. Mr. Crawford and Mr. ill anker maintain their old association but their efforts arc regarded as individual performances, Even the personality of that outstanding West Indian, Mr. Bustamante, the Jamaican Prime Minister, failed to revive any public enthusiasm for the ConrON Party or any interest In its lack of achievement In spite nf the introduction of the Party system in 1946, politics in Barbados is still largely individual and there are signs now that there will be many changes in the personnel of the House despite party allegiance. Prison Labour Be Helpful UvfekS III o.ildMH 01141a •> % %  • (onblbuUMi U> ..*,*•* b> building brttrr fit.ii..; latUltln hilr rvhabilliaiini itH-i.M-iv**. (By IIAKOI l> TITOS) An experiment in us in if prison labour for conservation WOTfe i and lake r#: %  I northern Greet Lakes of %  is being studied bj pem>1 Un %  United State* aS well .v In nds. •N'ui m 1> doei tall pi set A precedent lor the numUi nf penona n\ cModjr, but it ts also somcthine lew because, lor the first lime, ihe %  vc the pfOblsnM "t %  sacs'. The first romp was* Opened In 1947. Another WSS fOBCUOnlng In are adden in 1949. I til) workers. As .-i rehabilitation dsvtas itching the es> perlment critically but with mounting: enthualaaan. It is being observed by public foresters. park administr.it^rs. and fish and use if ihe promises it extend* to date are ralnDed, M n 11 the return at a Urge snwunl < %  labour such a* %  ible prioi M World Wai vaaua, both i federal, have been i •...-I of addition >i help i. i.it. i"i '.in dovslopi project* %  ince retired, begun agitating for an experiment. "W • i of thi> ooascrvstlon .otps right before in the judge All judges recognize S> "Hi -nd Fouri rig In '/.li' alp The out-of-doors h %  great I ailing Impulse) and I dislike sending youne men behind bar* when, m .i State like ours, so muefa work walto in our forest*, parks, and public hunting and i. d In Michigan the Conservation Department u ol unusual importance. It is responsible for stale. park* — till .it them, raiigtns *n si/e froni 20 to 45,000 B) for stale forests — 4,250,000 acres of them, all ol which yicMinit considerable vah* harvested forest products, are open to hunting, Ashing, and other 11 is i barged also, with the maintenance ot i> en "f fish and gnme The State sold nearly 1,000.000 llshing licenses in IMS and more than 1.000,000 hunt inn licensee. For years the Conscrvat u n Department in Michigan has not been eble tn keep \ it with ib i maad (or Ihe services it gives, i in the public parks. In 1945 the Mlchlican Lesulstun sought to solve this problem by appropriating more than s~l.M)n.tioo fir the acquisition ol iddlUeaal among them an atcgivgate of ftO.000 acres hi live unu*. All the within a 40-mile radhl %  if iiie Industrisl ii'y ol Detroit, sfhete lack of nuuioor recu %  I opporl fill Sn a mujor \\ i, problern However, when lbs Oonservstion Di | sskad lor tundi 'i* danwop bale land and expand older parks. Ihe leglslal ire sppi pi Istad onlj s rractlon of th< smounl i > Then P. J. Hoffn IStST, I I< i if Q o nS SrVS Uon, revived .liidK • QUbert'i ni'.i "i"i began negotiattone with the Department ol Correction, which agreed to cooperate by selecting p0sonen .fork In (he parka, The llrst Kroup !•,'•.. in ,.| srorh which in -leediiiu groups followed Most visitors who saw that rlrsl ... % %  illsad thai .me arisonan A work lataman, reldocn with mon than i" men In Wc t.iii;iit constitute "UIMI'IM as a Good Offices Osasafssaaal W Pcucc for Persia as •< ,-ll .." Loodon Express Servt led IhSSB Few who parsed (he remodeled farm%  %  man were housed tn Itered anything other than snothei fun % %  t.t lahourIrMre were no walls, no wire ;* i a few inconspicuous signs marked Yard lamlts" And tiM realutlns that sn idee which might be priceless to them wns on trial, did their best b s M sccsptable. And they turned nut Ihe work New dl %  < ulverts built, hlkll .-. %  . erosion control and for landBcaplng effects, and garages and i,„.| iin.i % %  %  furnish food and SQSIMT for wild lite weie tatroduced. Public apathy has chanuwi tO proval of the programmo in less than four years, says J. N. 1 ivarden of the stats i. ishea all the labour. When openings for workVg in i' %  Uon camps are annoumed. nearly all the inmates in (he Michigan Institutions deluge the prison .nlmmistration with requesn foi eon Three members of the stall are a:-.MIIIIIII to sera wot kei in generel, onlj thasc Inmates who have served heir of (heir are selected, and the age range is from 25 to 45. with Ome exceptions Mot.t of th" men in the camps have less than a year more to serve on their %  The acceptance "f Hie conserVattCSI work programnie by m mates of Mli %  higmiN p> tutions waa enthusiastic. .The camp plan "as something new and privileges v. i • Jv abundant BWsalSS, the men liad a feeling (hat they were meking a genuine contribution, protfJaUUj facilities which might be enjoyed by their friends and families and which they ihcmmlght Mwneday use. The man work w (< so hours a week, with occasional chores on Saturday. In a group Of 60 the standard size—10 are assigned to kiU hen and other camp duties. On Saturday forenoon all hands join in to clean the camp. Bach i--d bus i^eadpttones connected to a master radio f'.r seeAll camps have uDrarlas i>n<\ those within motoi ing distance of Ihe big prison see a motion picture mice .. week No dormitory door has a lock. At flrat. wink supervision was In Charge Of guards Now. park rangers and other CODServaUon Department em|>l en charge. In three years, only live prlsoners have walked the camps. Two returned volun(aniy, two were spprehended, and OOS is Still ll large. After glvlns proof of wanting to abide by rules, i mans work pattern is most important, if a man does his be I i nd keeps doing it to the extent of nil I'hveJcsJ and neatal ability. he stays; if ha ihtrkfc back to the rhui tai onlj eight men have been 9 r pe for not doing their share of the work. One 27-year-old prisoner. In for manslaughter, had been inside ihe prison walls for three years and'in a camp fur nine months. "Back at the prison you do everything one way. Ii is discouraging" he says earnestly "Out here work changes even hrn> days, but better than %  i. so often you will see a new way (o do it. You talk II over with Uie boss and ordlnsrtlj be will let you try I t. II jrou fOU see yon? o I .. • ... f-'<') 41 %  re important. Another, in for burglary and due before the psrols board was enthusiastic about %  because of iu Dcapsration for a return to freedom. If .. fellow made I mistake and is paying for it and has made up his mind never to let II happen again, a job like this is %  godsend. Under this kind of nU tody you can try yourself oui." One of the Interesting MdelighUt as the plan has been accepted has been the BtitUdS Of prison guardsThey are realists, and many admit that they had misgivings when the j amp pro"I have been a guard for 2:i yaars," said Sergeant .John Hampton, "l WSJ there whin silence smOUg pfffsOBSfS WSJ almost a llxed rule. In my time I have Mn .. lot done in reforming men and a lot tried, ben 1 heard about this eamp Idas I did ool give it %  chance of working out. But 1 now believe that it is the greatest thing ever tried. The state is getting a lot of work done and as a rehabilitation plan it Is going to pay divider. Is you cannot imagine." As yet, the ICllshMHattOn (SCtM cannot l>e accurately measured A special study .. being made of men who have been paroled from tho camps, but It Is not yet time for drawing conclusions. However, it is established that Michigan Is getting big returns for the money uisfaau, aitnough per capita maintenance cost in camp is higher (han ll is behind walls. (iroup camping for Boy Scouts %  iiui similar organizations is a major activity in Michigan's state parks. Prisoners have prepared cabins for winter use so they will be habitable the ycai around and more youths may have a chance to lenrn to live tosjsthsf in peace, health, and productive acdvity. "i ahbuV 1 ssaf one prisoner, .1 he picked up his saw, "I shoulo get to work. We want to get this place ready for ihe boys." He paused. "You know, if more of them had places like this to go to. there would not be so many of Than is the possibility that %  : Liar plan may be considered for American national forests and parks and tfild-lif. rafugaaa In many of the other 47 Stales serious thought Is oeing gi similar plans. It is argued that any plan which can mnke beautiful land, make btttoi citizens, and at the same time save moony, 1worth trving anywhere (Crime a CriminuJs). T* %  Mk'l* appr.i-Hl in t'alllar'B %  -.-rkU magBStM % %  ubiioii'it Hi ihr UnllMl Blalm. Thp ••niber 11I I i.rrvatlon Commit1 at if.beNOBODY'S DIARY Monday When it rains nobnd'. 1 There used to be a local pr.iverb Whloh said "rain makes the youno plants but nobody wants to (jrow Evssr*. time it rains the streets are deserted and people cluster under shop-fronts. But the 'buses run. An enorm tarpaulin is held up by a conductor and when everybody has piled in down it fljps and you're shut in. It's high tune 'buses were .1 signed differently. Iiiesday — The 'bus position needs study. Are there enough 'buses to cope with the 8.30 to 9 a.m. travellers? The impression is that they are nothing like enough. Then the 'bus stops need revision. Many of them anso arranged that they create traffic blocks when one is coming up and down, and Ihey both pull up al 'bus slops. Tins happarjs nl ten around corners and near "Major Road ahead" signs. There are far ten. many 'bus stops altogether. iVetliiesday — Who is the wit who wrote under the appeal "don't throw your cigarettes into the lavatory basin." "This makes them soggy and hard to light'.'" Thursday — Down in Trinidad and in British Guiana those who like good lilms have Eormad ;t Mm society. The society rents good films like "Vivere in Face". "Paisa and Citla Aperta". Now that "Cit Lights" has come to Barbados there is a hope that the supcrduper most breath. most spectacular, most lavish, most everything typical Hollywood shockers will be crowded out a bit more In that case there might be no need for a lilm society here. But if local cinemas are not prepared to show an occasional Brtl rate lilm from Italy. France. Germany or anywhere else where good lilms are made, in addition to the rather rare good ones from the Hollywood stable or the British studios then let us start our own lilm society. Friday — Talking of tiim socieiies than seems to be a hole in the pocket theatre, j I wonder whether "Pygmalion" didn't kill it. Pygmalion was so good, so ambitious that maybe it has frightened the pants off potential amateurs. The theatre might have been no bigger than a pocket but the talent was too much. Where has the talent gone ? Now if they had taken my advice (free) they would have begun with one-act plays. Almost anybody can put on a one-act play. I would have expected to see one a month at the Pocket Theatre. Instead Pygmalion has frightened the wits out of any little company and nobody wants to risk being laughed at. If there had been less formality with Pygmalion, dinner jackets and black Uag, Un average player might have been encouraged a bit more If pocket theatres are to flourish they need threadbare pants. Saturday — What is a University? How about this as a definition ? "A University is a cultural event: it is an institution in a context: and it cannot be much better than the culture in which it is set." It is Harman Griscwood's. And here as it's Saturday, and I'm in a quoting mood is what Wenceslas Ivanov. a Russian, wrote to Pellegrini in 19:14 "My conlidence in man is based precisely on that faith which you consider the antithesis of freedom: the faith which placaa a free creature al the centre of creation, condemns and saves him. finds him fallen and raises him to heaven; the faith which sees itself reflected in the pure crystal of its teaching and is astonished by the abysm of light contained in itself; the Christian faith, which alone teaches me what man is. and. by revealing his weakness and his value, purities and justilies my natural humanism. all that concerns the dignity of man." CLOSED I OK REPAIRS Advocate Stationery 11 lit IS IIM The Ideal FILLER foe repairing damaged surfaces on Plaster, Walls. Birch. Wood etc: POT inside nnd outside use. Cen be washed or painted over, "gaAWL PLASTIC" An Asbestos plugging compound, especially recommended for fattening Screws in Stone. Concrete, Brick -nd all types of masonry. WILKINSON St HAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER & CO. 'Phones : 4472 & H..-7 BKCKWITII STORKS Ami I ,lull,II 2,045,000 Wordsln MacArthur Case Diamond king ltow: £500,000 Stones Are Piling Up NKW YORK. it ennounced t.ouaht that it li Resnesflber ill ihe uproar over vei %  iin Remember revealed i>v Hi, investigat i %  %  se.-.utc committee hearings on ships flying the I'nnama H.TR end lag bcuan with ul| that dealing with Red China. ' %  : mt The committee* MI-S that between i i ml May 3i. SI cargo MI ships rlying the Panama flag visited L'.(145.000 words ware Rod Chinese p..:' I % %  record by II witni I %  .'.MUM or operated by Wo* ll belonging companies "with heed offices in Ihe the Unlb I Kh gdom 01 In Brittea % % %  : ltO!> %  ling. _, iL Of the rest, eight wen 1 nlam And UW) not guing to Kai-shek snips and five Greek reNearly ell were i,\s. wartime ft T %  write three. Liberty ehlps, sold .IN Hi | Theli II say TruTHERE WERE nppieclatitL' ', ,g %  ,, Mckln Ma c whistle* m a New Vorfc court. i come from the ,,„„„ u Ml „, w tg orthodox Dcm- gold, esiinXvrt Ll cuing Sera Allan. in sctre whom %  • %  RapubU.: W 1 how old ... flnl appeared on the stage. third will be hemArgtwer; I %  .i'lieans rate, it will say Question %  Wi that Trua rttj wrong .,„— -,,•. f right. ^ l news for Brit Interruptlot of Senators •ttKS.tng: "D %  • lake action when friends t>i'i bar %  tremendous holidays-el boow that Misj; Allen's night club lmVturg* devoioned. personations were daaapa nln g "A sensatk nal season — and it the character of her show. "Dinhas begun a month early." said in md l.il." aaa bnv nan. ejtta P.S —A film dueclory Miss West's Bg as .• NEW YORKERS, .iccustonie.i tn meaty %  rrom many people but eerier.ill> t. dyqamlc ei ire annoyed .it tho strictures passed by Mr ? %  on paying "her % %  to the i K] SnilTe.1 Mrs R l'"rl'' haw too much time to do imhlng la How they hang arouni 'iii'" Mis H IN (Tom Ilopbollom Panne) h i \ni)itoARD CUPS and psau I nnlelneii are biE business — ani ll] the time one Bw ega "f VlfiOOMO cups and con1: is rushmK I %  dancing on tin in the li Perha*. i has such I H reesons for tbe joy: nuiri* Anns than eve era irmntlng long Ith pa] with world poUtlcal .iiu'-i t.nnt. people Uk< i. thou own i Ihe one dark spit amid toe ulilto. -llIMilA cutl.ije.ive lint IH'I'.: icnted a* quickly as their owner* would like. They are only l,8l>0 dollars (£643> for the season. CHARLES WILSON, A aw ri oa'i %  %  '•If you are tempted '..> jom voloa with Uwea wh > win cJarnouf OaUon of effort In building up our might if (igtitinj: ends :i [ all tlie othei 1 are there is trouble and %  He gave as examples Indov ... %  >' %  UNITED AIR LINKS telegraphed rrutnan tonight a eon•graement to re re-pay strike. Pan %  BY irilltKKK EM.1S TWO of the world's richest men. It .e.ii-dd Canadian bachelor Dr. John T. Williamson and South Africa's 71-year-old "Rand\" Sn Ernest Oppenheimer, %  % %  fallen out—over diamonds. Mr. William Tayleur. spokesman for Dr. Williamson, who owns .-i fabulously rich diamond mine %  I Mwadui. four degrees below trie Equatur in Tanganyika, said in London last night; "There kj friction between ourselves and imood Corporation.' T'le Corporation is the selling end of Sir Ernest's powerful l>e Keen diamond group, which produces rnOSl of the world's di.inonaa Under a contract Williamson %  *igreed to ^ell all his stones to the Corporation, which has itsnosi i monopoly over the sale of diamonds. By regulating the market it keeps diamonds rare and dear. War between the rival diamond millions if the siones are thrown on to the market. 'Oxer Prices' %  9 mint has deli.I* to the Corporation for .r "There is a paro^ of itona faoO.000 deposited in a London .Tirluding a utl white gem stone of 175 carats.' "Our contract with the Diamond Corporation terminates on December 31 I cannot say if it will be lenewed" Another spokesman of Dr. Williamson said: "The friction if i ver prices" Until Williamson found his mine in 1040 Sir Ernest had undisputed domination over world diamond.; After trying to buy out Wil Sir Ernest came to terms. He gave Williamson a 10 per cent, cut of the market That was eforth M W in l ast year, tween the legal repre%  entatlvei of both sides are being held at the Colonial Office, who come in on it because diamonds are a big revenue producer for Tanganyika 'L*ulldozed' Out Millions of pounds are involved In the dispute The Diamond n alone has EU.800.OOO m the bank, and make a profit of MM ul ye n rtuon just sits on a "pipe of diamonds beyond calculation it face that he bulldozes them out. One of the stones from the mine said to be worth £16,000 wedding present to Princess H Williamson. • A carat teas itriainall\i dm seed of u %  rr. T'oy ict'tpht. a • %  —L 1 j PHONE GODDARDS WE DELIVER



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VII l.'ll \\ /ll\. HAimADOS \li\n. in I'M! Illlill I*. .%. I.ii(|iiirv Watchmen, Caretaker Give Evidence % %  WHEN the Commission of Enquiry into the Princess Field sat Thu i trucks did you see moying the material ? Mr. Fraatrtn I Duguid and Mils Carpenter Caretaker who roj Ml AUolph.ii Clarke, a i who used to WOT* Woi rell. was than called. Attorney GIB I r a i l What wus the size of the buttdl erfgich Mr. Worrell told you to BWB Mr. Clarke: ll WOg i. loiiK one. Attorney OlI I W ll Wl do with it? Mr. lUrkr : I left it there. Attorney General where did you I Mr CaMW) I Wtt %  AKorne* General; II %  Mr. Clark*: %  do no* I i nboir Attorney General: any other lumber nrriv at the Hecf Mr. ClarkeI artMaO Mr. Wot Attorney General: the bulldlnj owe Mr. Clarke: Some M from Sea well and Mai I %  Mr. Waleott: EHd • build many new windows'.' Mr. Clarke: Y im. whole side of the pavilion consist* of %  tadowi Mr Wilrotl : \V. all the wood ime from Seawell worked „. intn the building Mr. I orde | Mr Murray Mr. Clarke: At far a' 1 rememawav gome of the big hut a* %  %  The otnmi' tionei \1 r \\ alrntt : Did von see %  %  aaeurial ew %  other hull up till lorry callAttorney General: Do you many huts Mr. Tudor in Seawrll Mr. FaraV: Ab.ni: : Attorney General: Did Mrs. %  Air. J ..rde : She took away two. Attorney General : hiK building WM rut up. how many %  tare they belonging t*> Mr. Tudor then Mr. FerdeThree. Attorney General: Do you know 'K tliem away ? Mr. Fordr : Duguid, Mis* Kran:ir d Murray. Attorney General. Do you Know Ion ies took away the floorMr. Forde : Each lorry took how ni ployed Mr. Griffith: About 18 Mr. MotUry : Ho %  Aral art of huts come? Mi Gviftxh Mr MeMleyi %  O'clock Mm Fi Mr Griffith: Yes. Mr. Motile: T1 %  I what timeMr Griffith: A1IT 0.30 IO I oYlo, K. Mr. Mettle* I imef Mi Griffith: F m about 1 o'clock. M. Matttai On the Fourth d %  help tot the nigh" Mr OrMMh: > %  Mr. Motile*: 11 aanrUj Murray" Mr <.rit.i'i | %  %  J r ( i ;. Mr M.iUc-. D %  %  Mr. Griffith Mr. M1(li>: Mr. Griffith About I i Mr. Mottle): Who b Mr. Griffith: I Ihlnk It Francis' lorry. Mr Meaaatfi Do you CARTOON Mr. Ytalcotl: lira. Martincou took away three huta. Do YOU still say she took away two or do you really not know t Mr. Fwrde : I do noi know Mr. Waleott: Were VCHI there Murray look away some took Mr GrtfM Mr. Motilry : Do you if any truck brought mi I Mr. Gn.lith Mr. i;. K. Waleattj :>. ;hree from Fr ;*o frera Dujul three Mr. CrltiithTl • Mr. K. h. Waleott: n. %  -hieh Co-op Talk Delayed Led u re on Trade Unions . .....-. %  ce1 UM aUrba i WiUug D SodaJ h-conumit: it Bedford Colkaajf I | l.i'Uiir nil % %  W'l.i ATradr and Cannol 1>> ittoA" emuloMMinot any loneri wHhout the Mr P A. WaJcOtt, Secretory of work, i W ; '' Uw WilTheempi..vc. always has the betII. .. 'In \askfor o@i SP Comnioiis \\ ill Debate On W.I. For \\ hole l)a\ July 4. %  % %  %  %  %  %  l( h terri: %  nice. I C h ain— lengthy %  %  .. %  %  i A Ha s^hi UM n %  i ryhai but I .. Oavtrude Wii %  %  %  Dtl | ki >i turn to Hi w-u-ott. Mi i hav. HI uutul|tei M ." Mr. Wal• d than % %  iinin la iiMulttenor." Mr. WaU<*t. ,.1-oloBiWrm U, Mri .. paid tl .' if he hai'. thoin-ht Mr Hewitt's conduct always man ... PO II to mium are loi and peik i.-uj wttii employer can do 0 worker ha cannot do %  i %  ar tnoro fiuai haranjnUuj paraaari : 1 i'; adj i %  %  %  %  %  Baa rafcai f %  IA M HV rOILET SOAPS i\U'iai\i i.i im a UM" %  • KIVM> It II. IIIMI. Why Dunlopillo illiP noil ..i n had be*-he wool.: 8dOB itha,.i haWrut anythin i \nn\ Io aSaaj MM very sa.l re on HitWill %  %  Mr. Clurke i [did HOl notice any mot The CommKstoner : When this one hut waa brought to the Roof, %  Mr. t larke : I did IMf more directly The Commit*inner : How much of the pi Mr. Clarke: I do not kXaOW. The Coinmbwloner VOU 807 'he window Io Ihe huts wore board, what about the Mr. Clarke: The frame WfO used ui vartot Attorney QoaafaJ I Who was Mr WorreU'l foreman" Mr. Clarkr: u n.iii. si i Watchman Archie tTBOOhl odsO wos a watchman a! SoawoU I then gave evidence. Attorney General there when RM government nuctioneei lOld the I Mr. Francl* : Yes. Attorney General: Do you know what Mr. Tudor bought .' Mr. Francl*: 1 do not know what he i Attorney General: Do pou remember toUhuj iho police thai Mi. ,|, Tud". Mr I i iAt8o.uoj ueneraa : u member how l" %  bought thi %  down Mr. I ran h Attorn, i Oiaoral i thintt m Mr. Francis : Yea, 1 do not know whruthi Aaaornej Oanimli Du vou know whose lorry took away the sleepera'' Mr. Francis: 1 thi Duguid's I M. lorde: say. Mr. Walceil: Did TO I Cox up more Mr. Forde : I nevti Uon with the huts. The CaaaanLvOoaer I M she bought three, what ..about that f Mr. Forde : I daresay she was right Sydney Waleott who i on UM Roof Orounde os hman In October i*i* arm cellod t give aaldegtOe iftr-r Leonard Fordo. Attorney General : Did you rcoarvo V riles with huts from SeaMi. I WateoU : i moBlYed lorrtaj %  ins on two different oecaaiOM from Irani ll 1 was night watchman. Attorney General : Wr : %  i |C (nought ? Mr. S. Waleott: No other that Attorney General: Who was the other watchman ? Mr. S. Wslrett: Randolph Griffith. Attorney General : Did you see 'ui Duguid's lorry during you Mr S. Walratt: No. witness who gave eviThursdav ami Randolph Griffith, Attorney General: What time i watchman ? Mr OfhaUtt! During the day. Attorney General : Wen rtl ft I %  I Mr ..r.ll.th: Yes. The llr B t set ibout i> p.m. AlUu-oev General: Did it have Duguid ? Griffith YOfcl l\ ittU-l Mi Ci <;,; IMI i Mr %  Waanfltti again WnM Mr. I %  Mr. Griffith: V, Mr W.I...II Did 1 Mr. Griffith: No. Mr 8 V nh H 8 ti 1 : and one loud which w> %  ed but whl Mni .i. n. i Dui '. Mr. t.n.tilh Accidonta iiurea&e \i\ \1 occurred in UM anand ^IU 1 Inj to >eor •' same perioti laat yen I%  lonta took place. Moat ot ii usually takv \--^ days and the time it* day IK a and u p.m. One hundred tnd four ... i i. i . days during thnt period and "on Wednesdays. Tl. Bet wee: i S and fl p n tddenj iween M The I %  : was In A; were 115. i the line %  I ii. i %  it Weal %  %  %  Oval %  i %  It Is furl 'liit there %  1 i .1* Thsa M %  %  1 %  i %  H %  I D do Political activities moot be kepi dlaUnct from Trade %  ker nu I I.compi artj The main i ,. % %  M %  en I hhaure, i tplaine i %  i %  port it can play m thai haodaVTi %  %  i aj | i) %  II onuaUfl kvorli linn, .i eounbrj In l uioo inovemen' %  laead mid more davot* thai •eoagntinlt) ind the aoonoroai i u m %  i %  %  In any Ahei | I i .. %  r'.mpinver I %  m!..n organ through gl r can brKaui foi not ont| in UM I. that pi apti I %  I.. Veoords nhow D00| %  v^orklng fin Ota r N %  i rode i i rmpathlalnj po die i pai • i %  m -t tw •trdreni I i %  %  irl(oi I %  I W*| : have in \. L'nio IU [ore " rut '.<< M plain rnon ihooa wsv %  %  ( %  mi. i No Aeiion Is Taken ,\ ood It All 01 I M II trlOl INAUA p i laawsi an p an i it Deaaai > !-!' %  saw. %  %  lit.*, t., iii' > %  %  roe t the majot ". ; %  %  r po&< in. i he aame la kepi .. otnmli %  • WOUU not t, n'l out know CaB %  I for in of <• IIIi i o II i II j: in I he 1 orll ll is the original Ule (oin n hn aVaMng COaU tinv iiitri-.unnciicd Ohaa ifttfOUnh wgach .. < rr>ult is lhai the iiiurc * nunpl.i.lv tsyonaVW anajkaa nor hailmuio sJWd ainl rOahngaU %  Not only i* DunrOpatJo hysMkvBl gWMMM**'^' ihtuutihoiit K* IOJIC lib* ii rrnuin* ^P" .upr.iii.l) .oinloiijl.l.'andcarHotsag Ifii' or gather tnlo uncornforiabk' m KJIKI. j even in tnOaOal liiiial* n SUVJ > iwwl Tticre an no spitiiir-. r hand %  Ifga 1.. out \M-M 7hi new wind foxCvmijtnt in iiKillri'imrH mi.I .'iiHlii.itiiii^ MADE IN I HUM Y DUNLOP c H Al' ISMCN ECKSTEIN BROS — By Slrt — Distributor. STOMACH DISTRESS' iltMt la aaaay to Uka !U < laattni |ui' drop i u ^ ,'m ..i sfata ,.-. i. it d-/. IIMH drink U Not I laaabva. not iii>ii aaairdngf you can Lot Alki. S.'.l/n Mr. Grllllth: Yes. It had Uoard*. ttternei General : Alter these od roming. did Attorney General: Alt you loll00 any night) n g -in all the Mr. Grtltilh : Three nights. flooring Attorney General I Did Mr. Franri-: v. Ml MurraV* lorry eorne ? durlnj Ihe I Mr. Griftlth : afC AI In r no General: During thi The ( omml*.sloner : Th luxury of ii.. The economy of it. The long-wearing beauty of H. • ro. (hat beauty tan ba pnutloril Waar it with pride. Wash it wMa Ka|Oic in its lotif-lasting b na Lingarla In 'Calanaia' Crapa da 1 CalanawCalshong made by JOHN WHITE means made just right ^J



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S 111 UIIW PI i | BARBADOS ADVOCATE I'M. I I I VI Playing Field Enquiry Mr. On .. kg and th Mr Mettley: noosing %  Mr. I.... Hoot ing. la put MI old slulT I %  Mr. Mi.nl. i Son the i Mr. OrWTW Mr nonUM %  ing? Mr. fi reave*: No. Th; %  i i. Mr. Miilllo I uill Mr. Omw V Mr. M..HI.. H %  i Mr. Gmn Mr. M o Wlej I the poi ii short* Mr. I.i. MM %  COM. Mr. M..IU.-' M HI.\Uo.t-r. . Mr. t ..v ma,, t „,.,-. M %  %  he in Mora*) flwiril Mr .x I t, Hi. UUirur. (,rrl I Do wu Mi < u The Altoriii* General Hi „ %  No The Al'ornev (.rneral j Was the Mr. COX | A next week. thai ihe job was '••I' | %  : Hffttj Cox: Yes Mr M-llle. V. t tun. Mr. fat 1 do not n I pi.ri %  %  %  Mum f Mr. f.x ti 194tt : •:g Board %  Mr. Main. | %  Mr I .\ %  Mr. o\ The Hut's I'rmuftl Mr V|,.ltlr 1 %  the |J.I> %  I %  him whal I r out by the I I %  i thi i b> %  $2.10 A Day %  I I IWMHJI What <):d %  Mr. Cm I took Du 'net Tom I told htm what H ark Finished A Horn r: Gcwral i > told Mr. (.r< MX %  %  Ung the wood. **• '""" ...id he said • i II on UM ' ..._, L s Mr. Greaves: the job that. Tinfnmmioslnnrr: Was o mun by the Ml there m Mr. Graavea in. ri—lihllii r penh i Mr fitMIVMi %  %  mm* Thr rmnmissunirr pa* you*/ lb Oreaeea i The (kaauattl i ; ployed U Mr. flmra! Yi The f oninii--ionrr a %  i orpenb I i then Mr. flreavee] Thai eluded ii i The Coinmisslom-r %  binldiiiR Mr (ir.ivi".: I In< ommlealener: Mr. Qwu m i cannot bar. The fommlaU>ner: How much pew wood roof racing the Mr. Greaves: All n( th.it mi new wood. Mr. Moltlo : i got Dugu %  om Scam i ov Mr M l WI I lorry of your ox It Mr ..s Mr. hanhnea i You were in th. "tiuckinj.if Coa Mr MlM.11 R long have you been in DM "trucking*' buslMr t Wx : I do not %  MI Metttei v ktion ? Mr I ..*. Mr MocMai t Like part in UK hull Mr. fox : No. It i < I %  thai. Mr. MM I try !' p-rinlT Wl remove %  ; '" 'tut from Sea well ? Mr. fox if vim hutt Action %  ii o %  | .• R ..-e I h.til %  Mr Mautev: DM yOU gUll ern%  I %  Mr. Caw: i behaved he left t %  %  Mr. MaaUayi | put I Mr. I M v %  %  B :All., \.r Ml Mlt | -r. ('•*: As far 1 know, he Solicitor t %  Mi Meattei A Hoard? \u..nir. OaaMtal rate Mr Mettberi Yae, but Estate i tan 'f yot on that tot the bruck. Mr. Cv N Hr. M.tlle>: Ho did Mi*s ." '; % %  trw k and r. uri i Mousing Board? Mr. i.\ %  drtvon k Ihemaeive* ^:r MaWa a ; I put It to j l Mi On P.itr K Mr Muttlejr : What ouz lorry Mr. Co*: M tMl. the numt i bed his plao Ciiiilh Of Tlirouiii*: Coi'TOfltve l Inn) i %  Winifred H ly of a.v. KuM I rran. t JUfttlCO LI Ian Colly mora poatponact Mr. F. W Harrow %  Mr W. W U K. 1 I tMd on CU.h Willow Will tiOIlM' I'olirr K.I Nil VIHI Firt'iiH'ii %  I ..t> Willow. Later um ib Willow wUi become %  dquttrterv of Uut Police K..I..I i> betng lede...rated und repoire>l planted ': a Tennis COUIt, M• %  i>e in the outekic galk > %  ( Bag i ulldbu) it is hopa-d to have .. lUghl .mieert*. %  to listen i J much in i "ir.tortabli .nigs "' %  Fire Statkm 'H be ouitt, Bar%  in i-%  i building no* thinking ^i .. i i the whok w, left Mr. M U lllr> ; injuatke H In. Mr. oaa Vei The Alliirnrv (ir-nrral: \M >lr I \ lere*) i.. an ii i Wh n %  %  %  % %  %  Ml i ai i %  ih. m ace e i General %  money from Mr. fox : Sqtl i he tMaraay tirnerai i DM %  i %  thai Mr. CM : rS mk!. I •-ember, but I i %  'i it i: M te me] Qeaeral: Who aaw n.g of Duguid ? Mr. Oaa s i did, The Attorney 0 %  aural; W U i vOU Mr. f \ Have you had Mr. Molttei : Wh.it |fl Ulfl nUa i 'ion of thrhul Mr. fax : M *J'.8 iuan in Mr. W, W Raan KI BoUclbH lor th 19.11 i HonoU] the Chk I i %  the Court a %  I %  ii ha h VI %  .H |ienal aerMr Cox; [ uaod to : i ,,i-, : i |M CM %  ipportumiy Mr. Hettltj %  %  Mr. Cox i i Mr Mettle) he boMr. ( ..v Personal Waiter %  %  %  >ugbt ii|i mi .1 '". '" Cox: i ctment. On UM BI on which ho raa found Mi M ittleyi II gjgjn i n tried nitri .iiin I.. %  IBoyca I II >.n January i Mr. cox ... n\ ing Mr. Ma w l aj Hat lanuary |S in WATER SHORTAGE AT TRIOPATH baan •• ratei ahortali H t %  % %  >! about now No w.itci oaa ba C.i ; .ii.ni the |ipes durbuj tin* day, aa .HI %  bout ana I parted. Many the dietrtet have baea drinking H'nug water during Ihg FLOATING TREE IS A DANGER \ large urea wei loan floating In poanion 13 04 North tMl rdlruj to i ie Hppar 01 UM S.S. llrarU n Thunklay. I • notree || langei %  uon, ii Mattlei : Did buy it ? Mr. fox : That mi i ( ommbaloner: \ %  %  Mr i ox; 1 bought it for hei OUt Of ii:I Mr. MeUlej DM you register %  official whethei you knen iboul %  i. Uy Qg ,.l of III.' Couple Aiianshed Denie$ Discussion Mr. f o\ : Y< Mr. Moltlry : The fommi-.sii.ner: ThAttorney f.ener.t i bock the truck paid for three new amod roof faciin; th. Mr. O re a rai old stuiT while the The f .mmission, r tre I Mr. OroaTaai nan The QManmlailonei I Mr Qreavei %  . The fominKsiimcr: W the floorini'" Mr. OraaTe a i from the had to be \ boards har* to be put in Next Witness Mr. Cox ; V, I The Atternei Qeneral i KM1M pieec 'ing? Mr Cos : Yea At a Thr AWernej Qeaeral Myrtle *;.nI el 11 Ihndsliui I Rood i lall .1. Hacked It ui.known man ited al ih. Genei.d Hi' .: %  %  .1. ick, ibdoin I Police The] ire nmkina %  ATHSLBROCK' TO LOAD MOLASSES I %  \lh, II., ...... I v|.. etad la call ban lo load vacuum pan tor Trinidad Ih,. Alhelbraok will take her load during the night gnd leave p •' ..n Sun.iav (..i Trinidad MI. i axi i hi ve novel bad anj arlth anyone like thai %  Mr. Mottle?; Have I it with the 1.' Housei .Mr. fox: i bare dieeuoaod H Mr. Cea du*"dUi Uia Laadai I Mr Miillley: 1 put II ... Did Mi. Mr. Mnttley : I put it to you knowing anything ol all about the %  . | Mr I newer. meeting Mr. Mollley : In ItipervlBlng the *tr. I'ox: I Nft ooi brained to rou said you gai I I ab %  lie, %  .f the WOTk l The r.imniiwiiHirr: II. i\s. 'ix II i: v A i i PRODUCTS OF REPUTE •-#;% it. i. #'! /ii... Off f'.'ffffffxtoft i Easily DigMIrd mitl l*nluliihlf |irrpiirutii>n "I /llambi T.'si,-.l Co* Um "il %  !/• %  ami:.'Boi. Ill ••ml I'm ilii-r I....I Ki-ini.il> t.n skin iiriipiiuiis. Ulean, riinplr^ h\ II. II IS I.I II. MEMO STAMP FOR BARBADOS FROCKS YOU'LL FANCY Tudor to Hi | I %  He told r Mr. Haneea I I ax willing AUiwney Onrr-i a member of the \ Ural Mr. Cox Th,Attera*! General did you with Mr. TH. i warden M to the ran from SV i Mr. fox: Yl The Attorney General: tell him you would tender lar the remo va l ..f UM Mr. fax: i reuv ml I him I baai %  for the ran whether or ool ... be | Ih' Miorn. \ (.. % %  .. %  I Mr. fox: I told M I'r.ine.s to tender. The Attorney General know it i • ted In eon•* %  Mr i .i\ lorry, the nun.. • M—258. The AttarTH' I know if .. Mr. fx Yi owarded ti'. i The Atieraey General: : Mr. foxThai The Attarnr* Qenetall D i : Mr. f os qualnted jiow, but I kno %  discussed it with him and no %  %  s and sne had l The Attorney Q—m I %  ..-I Mr. cox: 1 in. %  v %  %  me he a nove. That lb) 'liursday, The Aitnrnev Geaajrall else took place? Mr (..s %  whal Worrell had me he 1 Poh. %  %  %  The Attorney G eneral I A far i remember. Mr. Tudor said he waaa to raw hcu*e very early one morning and said : "Matt, look what you have done. Van are I Hiring after ttU huts 1 no ,i part Is missing". Mr C ox : That I* noi true. II. told me al m> home that he had reported thr matter to the Poltee and had taken out a warrant to searrh Tom's house. The Attorney (.rneral : Hid you telephone the I'ollee later '.' Mr. fox : No, hul I said brfore thai I had leleplnnie.l th' p i %  Ox mat leeaalan i MM them I was speaking on I..hall ol Ml I odor i in Attorn*] Gei ami \M far ... v.. II kiuiu. the missing BMCOa >. "re never found ? Mr (ox: I knew nothing I ihe mailer, l be hrvl lime I In ird ahoul the less of u.. mi "ion aranaane t*le. : il m. saying that II was ndBed l>v Mr. Moltley at a Veii. miHtlBI ^omrllme last year. The Attorney M motoi v.ss.i Lady Pan .rrom st Vin %  IM Lady ralrkla B I i i ai %  uhl I .ill nf Ihi Ihe I-. j'.' m ihi Duguid. Ml Molllr. our knowledge or approval 7 Mr. CM EM b Id iw %  Mr. Cox: Hurl There .. %  %  1 lllainin OaMval FACTOR BRINCiS BISCUITS, COCOA ,. il i I B, I.. : %  pool .! %  Cei Sii m v tin siness | i.eneral Thr Allor %  | A i .wio and the same the Mr. Moid.* thai you ., if .; as workin; the day ? .ti t ..v I ...: %  .. %  !" %  i .i saw the . : Mettto] i •our lorry und Mr. fox i That la not strictly I I ng during there M some th. ,,:i the two. Mr. fax: I know nothing, about Mr. Mottley I Von said VOU that Mr Mattb > p of Ihe Mr. I .is i that be "rue ? Mr. Mattley: You Mr. CjX! 1' %  ing of the hula was wh. n Mr. M-tUrr ; I .; a meeting that l>lh IhOM lorries were work| house* Mr. fax : Yes. %  tb* ftood ;ir< Mr. MotUey: Tie Bttate. i. Mt fox: I have no recoUeetk I ng from UM Fin Mr. M-rnie* Would >•••" sa %  Spriflldf h ajnx> tallu-rlieail Mil. H-ad of Bioad Strttt HARRISON'S Broad Street — Dial 2352 %  ,,,' % %  i. <::;'..::;:;'A. .*,-, :•.;;•,: •.•.•*:*.'.•. .::; ,'.'/.'/,'.'//. I piAicin ind irii' I : %  • .pniUu* irhni I