Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




ESTABLISHED 1895



MORE TRADE WIT

Busta Emphatie:
Adams Confident

MONTREAL, June 30.
HERE will definitely be improvement in trade
between Canada and the British West Indies,
Hon. William Alexancer Bustamante, Minister of
Communications and Leader of the House of Rep-
resentatives, Jamaica, assured members of the
Canadian Exporters Association last nicht.
Bustamante was cne of a delegation of eight from
the British West Indies and British Guiana hon
oured at a receytion and dinner tendered by the
Association.

Delegation has just
Trade Talks in Ottawa \

concluded
hich \






































lgwed discussions in London. ‘Che wre
delegation’s purpose in Lon \; I ii A . Ps
Mr. Miisteruante pany v : ug 1 i riny
a release of dollars for pu x ~
on the Canadian mm: H ( k = j
termed the talks a succe 50 orw arc |
not reveal the amount of mone |
to be released—he hinted tho 3 TOKYO, June 30,
would be quite a few million An Eighth Army Communique
Less Optimistic Friday evening said light conta:t |
Other members of the deleso- r reported along the Korean}
tion were less optimistic thon h Army patrols co =|
Bustamante. Hon. A, Go ggressive probing in
Minister of vite Ind = ry Patrols north and|
Commerce for Trinidad, rf Mans ncountered |
“We desire the re-estahl] zht ‘dente “ aurin yi oes 5 , ate |
of trade re‘ations Canad age se pee, «|
but it is not easy to contend wit! ~ rol Ae ; a ea we i ot ¥onche 4
the difficulties with which ae rent ee adic mortar |
faced: wexhave benefited « artiller tir ile ether _batrols |
erably from our talks in 1 in the north of onenon re- |
and Ottawa, and we will do « poled Hent Santack |
besf.” rit Nations patrols operat-|
G. H. Adams, Leader 0 ing in ereas north-northwest of
iSouse of Assembly, Bat 10. WoO? saged an u.adetermined |
said that he was confid number of Reds with an engage- |
restrictions would be 1 ment lasting three and a half hours}
Quinton J. Gwyn. President before fliendly patrols withdrew |
the Association, said that ceé
the substantial exports to the Atiack Repuised |
B.W.I. during the econd Worl |
War, and in the vears immeni An etimated Red company |
ly following, the impositior 'N® probed United Nations positions
United Kingdorn Governn ( in the area east northeast of
exchange and other restr 1} Kumiwa during the early morning |
exporters has meant . k The attack was repulsed. |
Canadian export trade ; he Artillery fire hit an estimated Red |

Islands has been limited i
and artificially restrained

batiali
chon with unknown results while |

on no-th-northwest of Hwa-



Import Quotas j patrols north of Hwachon en-|
s |
: aura) gaged a Red company.

It was reported from Ottawa) °°; : S i
on June 29, that import aaa Light contact was reported in
on Canadian goods may soon be} Sis aimee north of Yanggu as

riendly

relaxed in the British West Indies patrols engaged an un-
The eight-member West Indianj known number of Reds during the
Trade Mission said today that re-| ay. Light contact from platoon
laxation may develop out of the) company sized units were reported



\z he remainder of the
fact that the West Indies have ulong t

received more dollars from Br ritain | eastern front. —
for —U.P.

use in the dollar area, |
The Trade Mission asked re- \
porters at a Press Conference not
to seek further details, Members
of the delegation must report back



a

Siamese Army Take











































The










BARBADOS, J

t.W.T.



MISSION. In

THE BRITISH WEST INDIES TRADE DELEGATION stopped over briefly in Montresi on its way to

Hon.

W. A. Bustamante,
Canada Air Lines and Canadian National Steamships.

and Commerce, Trinidad;

Ww. J.
House

Jamaica; Hon.
Leader of the



Ras tz

of

Leader of the Jamaican House of Representatives the delegation wa nte ne

Seen here from le! *6 right Tio Aibs Gor

Captain J. Clarke, Canadian National Stoam sli) Hou. W Bustam s, Leat
Member of the Legislative and Exe cutive Council, Br h Gu 1
Assembly, Barbados; and G. R. McGregor, Pi ven TEESE OADM Canada Air Li

Missing Airliner

CHICAGO, June 30.

flight over the

airliner




















evel,

Planes Search For

A United Air Lines plane carry-
ing 44 passengers and a
five was missing on Saturday
mountains be-
tween Salt Lake City and Denver.
was a D.57 flying
from San Francisco

erew ol
on



iran Govl.
Con sec



Must Face
roneces If

British Are Harmed

















































to their Governments; an ¢ s to Chicago we PRAN Tne 2
announcement would then be} . with stops at Salt Lake City / TEHERAN, June 30
made. Delegates hinted that the} Rebel H Q Denver, Omaha and Chicago. Th Britain warned Iran Saturday it must face “consequence
relaxation—the first’ since last jy ee plane was three hours overdue at of any harm to British subjects in the disputed | field
January, will embrace a_ wide} WASHINGTON, June 30 Denver when a bre ss representa- The blunt note was delivered to Foreign Minister Bagher
range of Canadian products in- The Stz " a .,|tive Richard Fernauld reported i ei ; 1"... : Aes 5 Celt Nn a ci 1S
he State Department said aol ane : 4 Kazemi by British Ambassador Sir Francis 5S!
cluding ‘fish, wheat, textiles and | Siamese army forces on Saturday missing in an announcement at : It ade wiaik Ari
other goods. Sec hinad tive” Pyare ire nae Chicago. es ee ‘se t ion ol 31
Trinidad already has announced iaeGhe cates airing = Abid He said that the plane left Salt} | i a in : cateal ahr
.. | Siames s Z ‘ a 2 ver , ionaliz \
that it would create a free market | fight in which a number of stray |L@ke City at 1.45 am. and was HURRICANES ce a . en tg
for Canadian salt fish beginning) vijiery shells hit the United |@ue at Denver at 3.35 a.m. Mow- IS it true that Barbados ||” in Gor Genie M ss
January 1, next. t States Embassy at Bangkok. ever the plane was behind time!] has a hurricane every 50 fais ar ee Hn
B.W.I., import quotas created a 3 . and its pilot reported by radio at| years? Ate Wade far: a | p b ‘ i .
ticklish problem for Connaiin Sea Army and air force bombers had! 3.45 a.m. that he was over Silver j hurricane this year? Don't |; ye ~ Per
+ re r CO ¢ 7 " - e ‘ ; MS «
porters, since they ae a rapat| attacked a naval building | Crown, Wyoming. miss the first of an absorb- shai deo rn ion ih BARE
almost two years ABO. aria throughout the day at the same ‘ ing series of articles on ;
cases essential ewer ek a aa time demanding that rebels re- All radio operators of airpe art hurticanes .n Birbados | genct
ted to 50% of the 1946-4¢ BAO es lease the Premier. Rebels had}towers in the area were ordered which starts in temorrow’s |
on less essential goods quotas Were) -cized him and the Communica-|to listen for signals from the miss- “Evening Advocate.” | The Iranian
reduced to 30%. tions Minister at a ceremony in|ing airliner, and planes were put r \sponsible under n
Trade Balance which the United States was turn-| into operaition for the search. | law for the prot Bri
They were brought on by ing over to Thailand a barge to U.P. representative Riffard| ish subject n Pet
Britain's dollar shortage. However.) he used in deepening a river |Fernauld said at Chicago that the | | Broker Shoots Wife: they fail in this respect ti
with Britain’s er ee — channel. plane’s supply of gasoline would C. will be responsible for mn
steadily improving, and with the The Naval Headquarters build-|have been exhausted at 8 a. m. 1 | >» | quences.”
B.W.I. Colonies achieving a ing is about half a mile from the |—three hours after it was tas vommits Suicide The lengthy note reflected Brit
able trade balance, tain on : United States Embassy and on the|heard from.—vU.P. NEW YORK, June 30 ish impatience th i
have ara reroatient of dollar opposite side of the river.—U.P. Fifty-year-old insurance broke: | [t said bluntly : et ora
more liberal a } \ failing Pie are yittry : ternt At ' 1 th
\ g to reach a reconciliation | eapacity at Abagen I
for the western world trade Oe : ; Nik '
vith his wife shot her to -death{| means that the refiner )
cae eae me oo sat the Strike On St. Kitts | land critically wornded another vill have to clo (
name be not used saic he} Ty s iat 'on . a fi +}
< } | ma as ther dinec in a faghion-jthe existing ) e {
lies were more 1S | 4 ‘ “aa jman a y n } i
shane pe C: e vapaia than with any | A De al Of Harm Waterfront jeble restaurant on Friday night,} “efined product is full at
ree - ‘ “. the rar » and } , m- tide oil fror Iffelds wil
other country. The mission a 4 LONDON, June 30, (From o, a Correspondent) ips ae Han. Bae Sap en. oe 2 ey ‘ il Oe apt
statement issued at the vo f The Times said in an editorial KITTS,, June i ae" ‘dolde iv wir
said that it has been a nxi dh ~ to-day that a “deal of harm” was] A wate atuon strike was declared! The police said that John Wells . a Bera Y :
emphasize the great ay di being done to Colonial relations|by the Labour Union at 6 a.m.,'anqd his attractive 45-year-old crews x ;
attached in the West Indies and) by the problem of accommoda-|today. The efforts of the Labour wife Julia entered the restaurant} â„¢@ Abadan as, at
F ss *uiana to the mainte- |,; . itered the restaurant! duttne in it t
in British eo 1 de ie {tion and handling colonial peo-| Officer and others interested for’ at Madison Avenue accompanied a, nee } _ eo
ee ee e , Cota. improving | Pl¢ in Britain. over a week to dvert the, strike by J. W. Walsh, junior, 64-year- | quired’)
with ani t wnitual obeneltt The Times said the dispute now] were unsuccessful. lold friend of the family nina
oo . ae cd. rae going on between the British Work on the S.S. Alcoa Pennat) Jt was said that the meeting wa
20 rue mnil £ . he ts ‘agin i te . cure 7 ie Spee
a att aso appreciated in the Paoete a wee ne ee sa ee oz, re re a al’ arranged to try to bring about a
Adi é oxisting cir- | Gents in the unc Ss hostel at) stopped at 4 p.m., yesterday. reconciliation between Wells an Vas .
West, Indigs ee c 3 ees | Hang Crescent London called at-| Factory and sugar es were his wife ween “3 beet ae 4 Hungar ians
Sad bulk purch ases pres sent difi- | tention to the difficulties of sat-|not affected but the sugar storage po)\, 114 -that- Wells who- aia 4 “4 , “
a € ‘ atin , > I f at r appz ‘i
culties which require full ar id} AS ial, este : econ Colo- | capacity may fail by July 14 ently had been drinking heavily Ex-Communi ated
frank discussions to remove | nial students in Bri mee : when rea automatically stops. walked out, but returned whipped
(CP) “The immediate cause of this Approximately 10.000 tons of out a pisto) and fired five shots |
a LE E38 the need to move OUt!sugar are still to be harvested. “One shot struck Mr Wells
some of last year’s residents aa calieacatdiiticiainlaties Hing het Walsh. wan‘ simicke | cor
» jans "resc “entre i ‘ cu g als € r in|;
641 DESERTERS pine Han Crescent centre, at $714,381,000 For ‘the stomach He was reported in | ho :
= i ; aK order to make way for the flood sis * ja critical condition. Shortly aft ,and sentencit ae
BERLIN, June 30 of fresh men expected for the Military Construction eariy Walle wna SuGnA "4 A vai | otiseriment . of Py ;
Fifty-two East German People's coming academic year” the Times WASHINGTON, June 30. ais - aptiieini? CUP) ad In Ms | Jroes of
Police including two Commiss i eh The House of Representatives,’ y api it.—— ) The
deserted to West Berlin this week | is regarded with deep} Armed Services Committee today , | was cont
record for any week this oti suspicion by students and the story | authorised the army to start work; }deeree o
the West Berlin Police tomisnt) jis already being told indignantly } on $714,381,000 worth of military 2 e » vf I
stated and brought the total | and with embellishments by the]|construction in the United States ennaeed reg :
deserters for the first half of i West African press. It hag cut $275,309,000 from the TOC KHOL M, June 30 2 ¢
year up to 641.—Reuter. —Reuter. wriginal programme.—Reuter. Sovic 1tvia’s chief planner, 52- | a nee 2.
or ae a yeu rec Deglavs has beer | aaet oor vic® }
T U R K E Y = lismissed because the current lta overthrow "\ a
ie five-year plan i d schedule | ernawent
-ccording to information from Riga! Hungar
Diyarbekir bits OP § Reuter. ! U.P
ae
‘i i tol, wn | B.2 9's Usi
MEDITERRANEAN pl Sy nlA / bai - 1 ee, s roe
SEA “Se! Pip f Kirkuk TENERAN @- ~ r i
LEBANON : A a steel Nome, ; Persians [ >| WAatNCTON, 3 Ri
ain sets — ia BG | An ce kesm:
~ x 2 airt , JOT ‘
ISRAEL wa { I R A Qs oe a ot Noon § =| press Saturday fly ti t
suzz/ | AS HABBANITA@ tend E GLY ay Wlahag PERSIA Z B 29 Superfortresses are bon j
eS ele Gopi Git | Communist lines in Kor ;
\ La tie cana AgMashe-t >! deadl accuracy throu 000
i/o | British tases ia? i ppssemen v ; :
s a " nag Ff, Ratt Ket ANGLO. z, technique the
ess ‘ 5 & a AND ' he technique was develope ac t
NS £ BASRA® 5 Soy whois Sond iRAMIAH i World War II It alre ‘ il
—— - — OS KUWAIT “WY, has been 1eveiled that it is be Ur
ie x J that it is b
fc British Military 11.0 " — » 9 tehedsa sed in Korea, but the deta ne
ae \ 2-\ [bomber & fighter t bases} é ie DY, a tectiveness have be ptor
Hse Ve Tae UT ae Gy ys 5 led. Big 1
ih Oe \ rm b Af \ WG Ee
us | \ SAUD! ARABIA Miya nigk T
aaron ane erent nem f























Reds Give No iteply
To Gen. Ridgway’s
_ Peace Move Yet

LONDON, J une 30.
ALL EUROPE awaited tensely on Saturday the

outcome of the pro osal by the Unit ted Nations























Commander, General Matthew Ridgway, for an
armistice in Korea. British authorities said they
believed the Korean Communist Commander’s
reply might be made through Moscow.
They pointed out that the Moscow Radio had
reported armistice proposals in a Tass dispatch,
| including proposals that cease-fire talks should
take place aboard the Danish hospital ship “Jut
| landia’’ in Korean wators.
sea
| A broadcast from Peking moni
| - } .
|tored here mid-morning made nc| Sutlandia Is Ready
mention of irmistice proposals |
and it was believed that the Pe ln TE ‘ , '
| king Government would not asso oP | hie Conference
jciate itself with peace moves bk | :
leause of its insistence th > KOREA, June 30
Chinese fighting in Korea e? When the ceasefire negotiators
“volunteers” and not bellicerer et aboard the Danish hospital
forces ‘ hip Jutlandia, they will take theix
ces at the tables of the former
Research officials | ou.| *ansatlantic liner’s dining room
also that all North Ke n com according to the ships officers
muniques nd ter \t ; th is room for about 100 con
merged throust \ j ad rees in the dining room, Commo-
asts in the Russian langua we Kai Han nerich, commander
that the Red Korean Cx nander { @f the ship said on Saturday.
Kim UI Sung, last April announ For smaller meetings and in-
lho had taken command of Chinese | formal conversations the ship has
}“volunteer” armies a saloon He said “right now we
| | e awaiting specific orders before
| British ithoritie said ‘the | aking detailed plans, but we are
d the Red Korean repl 1 very happy to have the Jut-
uld be made throus Vio landia considered for this very
| the following reasons: Firstly ric mission
would give the Soviet Unitec If the Danish tiospital ship is
ions dplegate, Jacob Malik |‘heught fit fot the conference all
lit for’ having started peace | 2! Us aboard think it an excellent
Ottawa from London. Headed by moves. Secondly, it would enable !'%8 We are all working for
d at a luncheon given by Trans the Soviet Union to attach any aren't we?”
ie Minister of Labour,, Industry | strings to armistice conditions Che Jutlandia which returned
ier of House of Representatives, | ifom Japan just one week ago is
sbridge, Jamaica; G. H. Adams = | 3h. fully provisioned and has ample
(T.C.A, photo) Three Reasons upplies of pencils and paper met
PO er et ae oat i s : if whieh come from Denmark.
aeacs ee eae eis ae Hammoerich believes that the peace
‘Britain Seeks | conclude the Korean affair Fest. RacoHeteny, reearalies of BASene
vit has satin mation i " os tt will enjoy the comfort the 600
ach = can re-armament srogrammel on Sup olers—(U.E.)
DUNCHION | Winicn Enon yours tints ena ne
pace that of Weeden ge ed P
| pé ‘ rU.S.S.R, Sex
Ag yainst Ir: an ,endly, the Soviet Union cannot Red I apers
ge c yatord to permit the continued C (
wastage of Soviet equipment
By JOHN LAW | Thirdly, there are Pavenitake op domment Jn
THE HAGUE, June 30. | portunities at hand for increasing ¥ Pe
The three man Iranian delega-| pressure on the western Saeeie Cease-fire Offer
tion arrived here from Tehera)|in Europe and the Middle East : ‘ MOSCOW, June 30.
Saturday but failed to show up! Which are two areas which, with Every Soviet paper on Satur-
t World Court when Britain) their industry, skilled manpower|@#Y, Carried a dispatch that the
iewed its demand for an im-, and oil res ee, are more jmpor- United States Deputy Defence
liate temporary injunction} tant to Russia than the unexploit Se retary, Robert Lovett, had sent
in Ivan’ eizure of th “d resources of the Far Rast the U.N Commander, General
nglo-Iranian Oil Company | Matthew Ridgway instructions for
. Trani Minister, Hossein| A British Foreign Office poke neyotiating a cease fire in Korea
Nav entered the court roc man made the following state his was followed by another
d remained for two or three} â„¢ment to a midday press confer lispatech to the Communist Com-
musth but he left before the} ence. “The United Kingdom ha, !|™ender-in-Chief in Korea. The
ion began Ss Frank Soskice',}een in close consultatior vith | viel Press radio has not yet com-
Attorne General an ant | United States from the be} mented on the offer--(UP)
e fourteen-man Bri nning Not only do we re —
e here ed the Cour ‘| but we support it fully and
for njunetion against Iran : \j sh every success to General) THE “ADVOCATE”
te} of the “great t dgwi ay’s efforts Ever in
r Mall's” speech, His Majeas || pays for NEWS|
I ourt wa pected to give rovernment made every end AV | DIAL 3113
on the “B riti sh reque uur for a successful development.
thin a few days at the most | | Day or Night.
Soskice told the court that no —(U.P.) |
Bi noney from Mae eo mune
cormpensate for the lo | re
threatened Britain, and
that Lran conduct we . .
leading to the loss of skilled it The Law is always right.
fi mnel which in ur
ild lead to “serious accident mt
I damage to machinery an
plant Soskice referred to the}
! netion granted by the court)
1927 to protect the Belgi:
nts in China ; 1 precedent fc
n injunction inst Iran. When
hi denounce its treaty of
f it Belgium, the court
tere interim measure or pro
Ithough China ad no
mic ccepted the
the irt.—U.P.

Prake Will Consuli

With Directors

Drak general manager o
lo It 1 Oil Company i:
ed by air from Basra
yaturd for a consulta
the Board of Directors.
guardedly optimistic
ed to go into deep di

of the conflict because of
1 ery delicate situa
I i “I am not ir

ind 1

ht 1 |

ch r 48 hours!

|

: j

ot say whether Brit- |

mine i oon leave |

H uid that, “at the}
t tne morale of the taff

io

LONDON,







June



30



RALEIGH

THE ALL-STEEL BICVCLE

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

10, 11

Distributors

Sole







PAGE TWO



QO FF F999

STARBUDS of 1951 for JULY J2th

The Management of the Globe Theatre regrets that due

circumstances that were extremely difficult to control Madan
Ifill’s stage presentation “Starbuds of °51" carded for the

5th July is postponed

To Thursday July (2th 6.30 p.m.





Persons who have purchased Tickets for the 5th are re

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Continuing Daily st 445 and #90 ane a
M-G-M's Mighty Romantic
M-G-M’s Mighty Romantic Adventure—
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Starring: Deborah Kerr, Stewart
Granger with Richard Carlson

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Starring: Deborah Kerr, Stewart
Granger with Richard Carlson

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Robert The City of PARE
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~,
GC POOOOPOPROOOPOSSS

SUNDAY ADVOC
M* NORMAN FORBES who

fhe to ‘Teronte esteTdny
by T.C.A. expects to be there for
about two_months, after which
time Mrs. Forbes will join him in
Canada and they will visit France
and the Continent or he will re-

turn to Barbados.

With T.C.A.
i} ISS LORNA McKENZIE, sis-
aye A.

ter of Mr. Ross MeKenzie,
engineer stationed here
flew to Canada yesterday by T.C.A.

after spending a short holiday
with her brother and sister-in-
law at ‘Atlantic View’ Enterprise
Road.

Lorna aiso works with T-C.A,
She is in their Montreal Head
Office,

To Be Married Shortly

R. JOHN FOSTER, son of
Major and Mrs. A. R. Fos-
ter arrived from Canada yesterday
to § a month’s holiday in
Barbados, during which time he
is to be married to Miss Susan
Vickerman. John is at present
studying accountancy at MeGill
, University.
|. Other passengers arriving by

| T.C.A. yesterday were Dr. and
;Mrs. A. Greaves, Mr. and Mrs.
Ernest Kinch and two of their

daughters, Barbara and Fleurette

Short Holiday

M* & MRS. IAN ROBI N
and young son __ fie ack
from Grenada on. Fridayâ„¢ by
B.W.1.A. where they ‘had been on
a short holiday.

Attended Nephew’s

Wedding

RS. CLARICE STOUTE who

was in Barbados for the
wedding of her nephew, Mr. Hugh
Jordan to Miss Gloria Gilkes is
due to leave for the U.S. this
morning via Puerto Rico. She is
accompanied by her daughter Mrs.
Daphne DePass.



ve









ATE



Staying With Friends
ISS LESLIN ROBERTS of
Georgetown, British Guiana

arrived by the Gascogne yester-
day morning for a holiday. She
is staying with Mr. and Mrs. W.
W. Merritt at Friendly Hall, St

Michael
Miss Roberts is a sister of Mr
George Roberts, Vital Statistics

Officer, C.D. & W.

Also arriving by the Gaseogne
were Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Jar-
dine of Georgetown. They are
Staying at Indramer Guest House.
This is their first visit to Barbados
and also their first trip out of
British Guiana. They plan to
spend a month here.

Off to the U.S.
EAVING for New York during
the week by the Fort Amherst
‘vas Miss Gemmel Rollins who
was holidaying here for the past
six months with her sister Mrs.
Evelyn Straughn of Bank Hall.
Miss Rollins took with her three
nephews—Carl, Anthony and Mi-
chael Rollins who were at College
here. They are going to their par-
ents in New York where they will
complete their education.

Brother and Sister

N Barbados for two months’

holiday is Miss Ethel Watson
of Messrs, Booker Bros., British
Guiana. She is staying with Miss
M. L. Seale of Land’s End.

Miss Watson is a sister of Mr.
Edwin Watson of Messrs. William
Fogarty, Ltd. This is her second
visit to the island.

Appointed
R. BENTLEY CALLENDER
of the Public Library has
been appointed organist of St.
Mary’s Church. The appointment
comes into effect to-day.

a

WTCR

Old World Culture ;

and History

Travel to the U.K. and
Continent by “North
Star’ Skyliners via Can-
ada, Its quicker and
more convenient,

You can plan your holi-

duy to include at least
one way during the “Low
Fare” Seasons,

For complete information
See

(iardiner Austin & Co., Ltd

McGregor Street,
Bridgetown,
Phone 4518

_—~-







| AQUATIC CLUB CENEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT to TUESDAY, at 8.30

MARGARET

in







DRESSES

chintz

DISTEMPERS
ENAMELS

COTTON



JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Upstairs Over Newsam, Lower Broad St.

EVENING GOWNS
COCKTAIL GOWNS

Just arrived: Only a few superior quality Cotton
Dresses and Beach Dresses of permanent finish

$22.50 & $24.98

SAVE THE SURFACE AND SAVE
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We are Fully Stocked with . . .
HIGH CLASS PRODUCTS
PAINTS — Interior and Exterior

VARNISHES
WHITE LEAD & ZINC

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THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.

Hardware Department



LOCKWOOD

‘““MADNESS OF THE HEART”
with MAXWELL REED, KATHLEEN BYRON, PAUL DUPUIS
PRODUCED by RICHARD WAINWRIGHT

A TWO CITIES FILM



=







LINSEED OIL
BRUSHES



Tel. No. 2039







“Used to be an uneptre.”
London Ervress Service.
Attended Son’s Wedding

RS. T. E. WENT who was in
Trinidad for her son’s wed-
ding returned yesterdey morning
by B.W.1.A. Her daughter Nancy
who went down with her return-
ed by the same plane.
Other passengers arriving from
Trinidad yesterday were, Miss
Maggie Fields, Miss J. Howard,
Mrs. A. de K. Frampton who was
in Trinidad for ten days and Mrs.
M. Corbin who had been in Tri-

nidad for the past six months.



Wedding

R. RANDAL GRANT of Day-

rells Road was married to
Miss Muriel Odessa Alleyne also of
Dayrells Road on Sunday, June
24th, at Bethel’s Church.

The ceremony was

by the Rev. Crosby. The bride
was given in marriage by Mr
Beresford Cutting. The brides-
maids were Miss Barbara Evelyn
and Miss Norma Taitt. Miss
Brenda Alleyne was the maid of
honour.

Mr. Ivan Grant, brother of the
bridegroom was the bestman. The
ushers were Mr. Cecil Watkins
and Mr. Crispan Savoury.

After the ceremony a reception
was held at the home of the bride’s
sister.

performed

W.I. Holiday

PENDING part of his six
months’ holiday in Barbados
is Mr. B. M. Viapree, clerk to Mr.
Cc. R. Browne, Rent Assessor and
Magistrate of Georgetown, British
Guiana. He arrived yesterday
morning on the Gascogne accom-
panied by his wife and is staying
at “Maristow”, Maxwell Coast.
Mr, Viapree expects to spend a
week in Grenada and two weeks
in Trinidad to study their method
and practice of Rent Assessment
before returning home.

SUNDAY,
oceiencecilie tage LEAL

JULY 1, 1951

To be Married in U.K.
ISS EVELYN CHANDLER of
Johnson’s Stationery, is now

on her way to England to be mar-

ried to Mr. Albert Hall of Lan-
eashire. She left yesterday morn-
ing on the Gascogne.

Another passenger leaving on
the Gascogne for England yes-
terday to be married was Miss
Molly Barker, formerly of the
office staff of Messrs. ‘T. R. Evans.

She is the second daughter of Mr
and Mrs. E.A. Barker of “Rem-
ington”, Fontabelle. Her fiance :
Mr. Bill Dunean, son of Capt. and
Mrs. W. Duncan of Newcastle-
on-Tyne, Northumberland.

To Join Husband
EAVING to-day by B.W.LA.
for New York via Puerto Rico

to join her husband is Mrs. Inez
Green, For many years she has
been interested in social work in
Christ Church.

From B.G.
ISS MILDRED SIMPSON of
British Guiana arrived on
the Gascogne yesterday morning
to spend a holiday with her sister
Mrs. Robert King of Jackson.

Mr. King’s brother Alfred, a
druggist of Georgetown, has just
returned home after spending
three weeks’ holiday. His wife
who came over with him, is stay-
ing on for another three weeks.

Ten Days
FTER spending ten days’ holi-
day at Stafford House, Major
and Mrs. H, Grist returned to St.
Lucia yesterday morning by the
Gascogne.



A.G.L. Douglas Retires—After 42 Years Service

MR. A. G. L, DOUGLAS,
Divisional Manager of Cable and
Wireless (West Indies) Ltd,, since
1940 retired from the company
yesterday after forty-two years
telegraph service,

Last night at Boarded Hail
Transmitting Station, a cocktail
party was given in his honour.
Present were members of the local
and foreign service staff their
wives and friends .

_ The doorway of the station and
its surroundings were decorated
with the company's colours and
the courtyard in front of the
transmitting station was illumin-

ated for the occasion.

Mr. Douglas was presented with
Phillips radiogram from the
entire staff of his area and Mrs.
Douglas with a dressing table set.

Mr, Johnnie Bourne the Divi-
sional Manager's Secretary who
acted as master of ceremonies dur-
ing the presentation presented
Mr. Douglas with a volume of
autographs signed all mem-
bers of the staff of the area, local,
foreign service and supernu-
meraries. Even members who do
not work with the company, but
were in its employ during Mr.
Douglas’ tenure of office have also
signed.

The Cable and Wireless Sports
Club presented him with a set of
wedgewood vases and Mrs, March.
Penny wife of the Chief Electri-
cian of the Cable Ship “Electra”
presented Mrs. Douglas with a
bouquet of flowers.

peeches were made by Mr.

Robinson, Manager of the Barba-
dos Branch, Mr, Johnnie Bourne
and messages from His Excellency
the Governor, Branch Managers
throughout the West Indies and
from other parts of the world
were read.

Toasts to Mr. and Mrs, Douslas
were made and Mr, Douglas made
a speech after the presentation in
reply.

Mr. Douglas was born in Glouces-
ter on the 15fh April, 1893. He re-
ceived part of his education at the
Newport (Isle of Wight) Grammar
School and was privately tutored.

He began his career in the
telegraph service by joining the
Western Telegraph Company, en-
tering the London Training School
in 1909, ;

Graduating to the P.K. Station
in 1910 he was subsequently ap-
pointed overseas and was stationed
between 1911 and 1928 at Madeira,
Rio de Janeiro, St. Vincent (C.V.),
Santos, Pernambuco, Barbados,
Maranhao, Montevideo, Val-
paraiso and Santiago de Chile,
also serving on the Cable Ship
“Transmitter” in 1917. ;

In 1928 he was again appointed
to Barbados and served in vari-
cus capacities there also assuming
the management of the San Juan,

Are You Covered
Against
Loss of Money
In Transit ??

Friday's Theft from a Man-
ager whilst in the City
was covered by us as

— AGENTS OF —

THE LIVERPOOL &
LONDON & GLOBE
’ INSURANCE CO. LTD.

Suppose it had happened to
YOU !!

CONSULT

ALLEYNE ARTHUR
& CO. LTD.

MEN'S FELT
BOYS’

DIAL 4606

FELT HATS



Mr.
retires ofter 42 years’ service

A. G. L. DOUGLAS

Puerto Rico Branch in 1934 prior
i" - many h Ss
to his appointment as Manager of this ame. tren

the West Indies Division (com-
prising Cuba, Puerto Rico, Virgin
Islands, British West Indies and
British Guiana) ,

From the time of his appoint-
ment to Barbados Mr. Douglas has
participated in the modernisation
of the branch. He negotiated the
purchase of more than 80 acres of
land on which now stand the im-
portant relay stations at Boarded
Hal! and Carrington for the Lon-
don to Australia link, He was in-
strumental in arranging for and
opening the world-wide telephone
services now offered from Barba-
dos and the majority of the
B.W.1,

He assumed the management of
the Division soon after th: out-
break of World War 2 and was
manager until recent years of the
Barbados Branch as well,

The Cable Station at St. Law-
rence has been enlarged to three
times its original proportions; and
more recently six new bungalows
for the mobile staff have been
completed under his _ personal
supervision.

In the course of Mr. Douglas’
activities on the Company’s busi-
ness he travelled more than
100,000 miles by air alone and
accompanied Major General L, B
Nicholls on his tour of the Area
early in 1948.

He leaves the communication
services in Barbados and the West
Indies in general much improved
and it is hoped he will see the
completion of the programme of
extension and modernisation be-
gun under his direction.

Mr, Doug, or Doug as he was
known to many, was married in
1924.

Mrs. Douglas is the former
Dorothy Baily. She was at one-
time employee in the Superintend-
ent Engineer's office of the com-








pany in London. Her favourite
game is tennis
and she won

in

1931 to 1944 shel
was among those
selected to rep-
resent the Savan-
nah Club versus
the Tranquil-
ity Club
Trinidad.

ning the Savan-
nah Singles
Championship in
1986 and again H. L. N. ASCOUGH
in 1944, she also his successor
won in the ladies doubles and
mixed doubles in 1934 and 1936,
the mixed doubles (open) in 1937
and in both events during '39, °40
and ‘41.

They intend to retire in Barba-
dos. Their home is ‘Mayfield’ in
St. George.

Mr. Douglas’ successor is Mr.
H. L. N. Ascough who arrived in
Barbados a few weeks ago.







BY THE WAY «+.» by Beachcomber

F there is a heaven for good

shoes, then the aged pair with
whom I have just parted company
will come to their reward in the
end. They were gnarled and
bent and wizened, but no feet
ever had more loyal companions.

Their active life began in the
Norwegian mountains nearly 20
years ago, and a career full of
bonour closed on the crest of
Slievenamon, There, beside the
cairn, I would like to build a
memorial to them, recounting their
feats all over Europe, from the
Tatras to the Wigtownshire moors.
They were Harmodius and Astro-
giton. They were Damon and
Patroclus. They were Roland and
Oliver. May they recapture their
youth among the asphodel on
some upland of the Elysian Fields.

Nothing to do With Me

rFWHE most amusing Spring

fashion is said to be the new
polka dot veil, on which the dots
are arranged as a musical nota-
tion. Smart women will carry
about with them a small five-
barred gate. By focusing the veil
against the gate they will be able
to hum the melody,

Rustiguzzi Is Coming Here

USICAL London is agog at
the news of a_ forthcoming
visit by the great Emilia Rusti-
guzzi for a series of concerts and
perhaps a whack of opera. Hei
publicity agent has already ob-

jected to a description of her
voice as “piercingly sweet.”
“Well, piercingly something.”
riposted the critic. “Singing

mice,” said another critic, “we
have already had. We are now,
it seems, to have a singing hippo-
potamus.” A third wrote; “Apart

$5.16,

4.12
2.35

HATS $2.40,
$2.21,



YOUR SHOE STORE

from the French soprano Aden-
oide, I can think of nobody else

who could fill Covent Garden.”
The suggestion that Esperanto
should be used as the common

language in a polyglot production
of “Pelléas et Melisande” in mod-
ern dress is being considered

Still Remembered

PTCHE time oid Mrs. Wilberforce
and Miss Walker barged into
each other in High-streét, Wan-
tage, is still remembered to this
day. ‘
It was a calm afternoon in July.
Little did the sleepy old hamlet of
Wantage know that within the hour
it was to be the cynosure of all
eyes, Miss Walker (14st. 6lb.) left
the north pavement of the High-
street at precisely 9.37. Mrs. Wil-
berforce stepped off the pavement
at 9.37 point 8.
They met.

Mrs, Wilberforce’s corsets caught
Miss Walker’s roll-on a glancing
blow and they both (aggregate
poundage 310) became locked.

After the failure of the fite
brigade, the local Boy Scouts, and
the R.S.P.C.A., the Army was
called out. By this time the west-
bound traffic was held up for 17
miles; the east-bound for 16 miles
excluding a cycle club who turned
into the woods,

Using Churchill tanks the Arm-
oured Division attempted to draw
the two apart. This was unsuc-
cessful, but, using oxyacetylene
steel-cutting blow lamps, the con-
tact was broken, and Mrs. Wilber-
force was separated and her great
nose was turned into the wind as
‘she took off into the setting sun.

SEE R@OERESe BEB BRBRB Re ER
TROPICAL SUITING 54 ins
TROPICAL SUITING 56 ins
WOOLLEN SUITING 56 ins
WOOLLEN GABERDINE $11.24

$3.19

6.72, 6.78, 7.41

$9.38

WILSON 8.12

T.A. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL. 4220

es



SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951





FARM AND GARDEN “EY

By AGRICOLA

Merkets For Economy

WORLD conditions in regard to
food supplies appear to be worsen-
ing. In the prevailing circum-
stances, it is only reasonable that
we should ask ourselves whether
here, and in the West Indies as
a whole, we are doing everything
possible to alleviate increasing
hardship by harnessing our owr
considerable, regional resources
for an all out planned, integrated
attack, of a long range nature, on
the problems of food production
and distribution. Inseparable from
this is, as always, the need for
ensuring fair prices to the grower
or stock raiser in return for his
labour and imvestment and just
treatment of the consumer who
algo has got to live. Indeed, both
are mutually inter-dependent.

The facts reiuting w the over-
seas import trade have already
been the subject of recent inves-
tigation. It is when we come to
the distribution and marketing of
intercolonial and our own home
grown food supplies that we are
faced yrith a condition which cries
aloud for drastic overhaul. Deal-
ing first with the former, we sug-
gest that the time is ripe for 4
close investigation of the ramifi-
cations of the trade: sources of
supply; prices at source and sea-
sonal fluctuation; type of persons
engaged both at the export and
import ends—names, addresses
and methods of business; freight
rates; percentage of reasonable
spoliation of various classes of
produce; questions pertaining to
cospperation between the islands
caneerned; and so on. In this way,
an effort could be made to lift the
trade out of its present hugger-
mugger existence, which is no
credit to any one, and results most
of the time—to all appearances——
in the already hard hit consumer
being fleeced through the opera-
tions of a large number of middle
men (and women). The true posi-
tion can only be ascertained when
all the relevant factors are known
and especially the spread in price
between the producer and con-
sumer. In this connection, there
is no doubt that many vendors
prefer to maintain a price figure

which permits them to dump
spoiled stuff rather than m ake
greater sales ata lower price

which would work out equally, if

not more, advantageous in the
aggregate. Food wastage and
consumer economy are not their



vould, in our view, go far to cor-
rect or, at rate, minimize the
existing evils is the provision of
éstablished market facilities where
all the hole-in-the-corner and
pavement traders would be forced

any



to open up their tierces and
packages under sanitary condi-
tions, at the same time permitting



consumers to make théir pur-
chascs direct instead of through
a series of middle dealers. ©

So far as local produce is con-
cerned, the positien is equally
unsatisfactory te the consumer and
producer. The farmer has little
opportunity for direct contact with
the latter and both are, it may
be said, at the mercy of middle
traders. Here too, the time is ripe
for a study of prices in relation
to the cost of production and a
more accurate appraisal of -what
is a fair scale of remuneration to
the grower for the different classes
of produce, with the adoption of
more realistic prices to the con-
sumer. We are not aware of the
yardstick used in the calculation
wf ruling prices but, generally
speaking, the position needs re-
viewing. Established market fa-
cilities would go far to bring the
local producer and consumer to-
gether’ and provide means of
enforcing adequate measures ©
control which, currently, are more
often honoured in the breach than
in the observance, We support
the suggestion which has been
made for a large, up-to-date
market in the old railway. area
and which might also help to
stimulate bonification and devel-
opment in food gardens of the
unsightly, riparian lands of the
Constitution River. Meanwhile,
let ws be fully co-operative with
the welcome rains and get after
neglected or idle plots which are
all waiting ‘to be tickled with a
hoe and laugh a harvest.’
eee

———



Reply to Enquiry

For the information o2f
C.F., Agricola states he has
never heard of the idea that |
careful picking of lime fruit
by means of a ladder or fruit
picker is harmful to the trees
as @ppased to allowing the
fruit to ripen and drop. Such
crude methods as the not in-
frequent use of sticks or
stones to knock down the
fruit, stripping and, tearing
the branches to get at limes
out of reach are more likely |
to cause tree injury, apart |
from bringing down young |
limes and possible blossoms at |



THE GARDEN IN JULY

Fiowers for the rainy months.
Plant Chrysanthemum Suckers.

With the coming of July and
the rains garden owners must be-
gin to seriously plan their gar-
dens for the next few months.

How can gardens be kept going
in spité of the weather?

Well, there are many flowering

plants that like the rains, in fact +

there is almost as much choice in
our wet” weather plants as there
is among’ our dry “Weather an-
nuals. ”

Chief standby of course is the
lovely Zinnias, of which there are

several” Varieties. But so much
has been written already about
Zinnias and they are so widely
known, that it’ is hardly neces-
sary to describe their likes and
dislikes again.
Yellow Pea

Yellow Pea is another quick
growing useful wet weather
plant. It makes a lovely back-
ground to a bed, or it can be

planted as a garden (not a boun-
dary) hedge or in clumps. The
plants often grow to a height of
four_or five feet, the seeds can be
planted straight into the prepared
bed, and in five weeks time from
seed planting the plants should
begin to flower.
Balsam

Double balsam is another gay
little raimy weather plant. it can
be had in a number of lovely
colours both plain and variegated,
and although almost stemless the
flowers look charming when ar-
ranged in shallow vases, or float-
ing in bowls. Deuble Balsams
grow easily under any normal
garden conditions, and, like the
Yellow Pega the seeds can be
iplangjed straight jnto the bed,
which means such a saving in
labour. Six weeks from seed
planting double Balsam starts to
flower.

Single Balsams, also like the
rainy weather and are very
bright and lovely. Find a shady
spot for them however and plant
from seedlings which are gener-

ally found under an old plant, ;
or by cutting. They like very
moist conditions,

Tithonia

Although this plant is not a
great favourite, yet it will help
to fill your gardens in the coming
months, Tithonia is hardly, often
growing to a height of about four



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Sewing

‘ Preparing For First Fitting





Pressing equipment is nec
essary a sewing equipment for
a re uly professional looking job
of dressmaking Your iron and

Girele

cams





U e cloth
ai i stitching an even
istance from the cut edge on al

seams. I explained the use of to

attachment in the column = on

froning board sha be ¥ i 7

Neaiae®’ fon, a a a oo Marking on June 17.

Sweaty chiedaibic.. tt eid cnatlate Starting, with the bodice, }
of making style details on er in’ all darts and pleats and ma-
cloth your iron can’ olteh save chine baste them stitciuig from
ous ties: Zoe! Seat the wide end to the point of a
centre front, and centre back @47t- The pins should b2 placed
lines may often be pressed in as at right angles to the sewing line

an aid to
contrasting

Basting a
fied by
pressing.

running a basting of
colour thread.

dart can be simpli-
marking the centre by
Remember that press-



PENNY NOLAN.

ing and ironing are quite differ-

ent. In pressing you lower and
raise the iron from the same
place, never run the iron over

the material as you do in ironing,
Curved cut edges should be stay-
stitched to prevent stretching.

It will save you much time if you
will think of the stitching peosi-
tion before you pin. The bulk of
the cloth should be kept to the
left for easy stitching. If you
machine has a hinged pressure
foot it will stitch over pins placed
at right angles to the stitching
line but even if you ao not intenc
to stitch over them you will find
that pins placed in this manner
are much easier to remove as you
sew and also have the advantage
of puckering the cloth less.

Next pin and machine baste
the front and back shoulders to
gether. Note that the back should-
er seam usually has a bit of
fullness to be eased in to the fron;

\oulder seam. The shouldei
sums should be stitched from the
neg edge to the armhole edge.

Side seams are usually basted
next stitching from armhole to
waist. Don’t forget to leave an
opening on the left side for a «iy
it your frock needs one there.
The size of the opening in the
bodice may vary with the style.
Usually three or four inches if

the zip is put in the bodice but for

Stay-stitehing is machine stitch- ;

, ? very tight style , Hea
ing on the eam line, The pie” —_ styles be very tall pov"
houlders, the neckline, and the ofr . =o be allowed, When
armhole and the waistline of the ning the side seams for cap

sleeves cut in one with the bodice

skirt usually need this treatment. .,... ;

The correct order or routine S@tt from the waist ant pin up
for assembly for a garment natu- ° the back is usually longer than
rally varies somewhat with the the front. Sil
style, however some general rules Sleeve seams are generally
are helpful where basting is stitched from armhole to hem.
ealled for machine basting is Skirt seams are often best stitched
usually best, It gives a much from hem to waist. Don't forcet!
firmer construction than hand, tO leave an opening for a plac ke
pasting and makes fitting much #” the skirt also. "

and more accurate,





1ine basting is done with the
gest stitch on your machine
Test this on a scrap of material
as the tension may need adjusting



after you shave lengthened the
stitch. Too loose a tension will
sometimes loop very badly with
the basting stitch and foo tight



tend finally to top stiteh the skirt
to the bodice or to stich the
waistline from the wroug side you

will find it easier for fitting at this

Stage to fold under th»
vanee on the skirt
pin the skirt to tix
with the pins on the

seam al
‘eth waist Line
and Hodin

‘igh

sid



The pins are then easy to get at

Pin the skirt to the bodice on
the stitching line. Whether you in-

HATS

vi
DISTINCELON
AN)
CHAT



The Newest in Straws
and the

Latest in Styles



Sapte ua wrt ae and



PAGE THRE








a

ask for

“t1Ssons

LUXURY TOILET

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concern; the bird-in-the-hand the same time NO
is strong and persists. , . feet. The flowers are orange o >) maka Bet Feathered Hi that are ,
cone ater due ont which coloured although there is also CROSSWORD ; = panace DR ee ; i , Dats ns THERES A GLASS WONDER
a yellow variety. The plants KF he hang Of the skirt, ea NY ert row HALF OF 1” AN
a " or ———_—_—_——--——-——_ grow éasily from seed, and will “ ‘lin ready reference here is an S ae G oy “NT wes AND 4 YO ¢
flourish under any normal gar- F oe the steps to follow to Steel Grey avy MILK IN EVERY TASTE THE CREAM
den conditions, Seedlings are often Frepare for the first firing Br Fuchis
Da rtwords found under an old plant. It is " I ie fac machin? baste rown uchia HALF POUND
b ten to twelve weeks however be- all darts, tucks and ploats aa ‘i —
fore the plants start to flower. 2 soci r seams Black White .
" ‘ side seams 5
z Chrysanthemums ii 4. sleeve seam Green
Chrysanthemums are not wet 5. skirt sex
QU start olf weather plants, but, in order to Pin alki oan e
i this ‘week's have flowers for Christmas the Skirt to bodice.
~ Dartwords suckers must be planted during
with the word the months of June, July and ELECTRONIC ROBOT
FEOS.. ana Ate sath August. Chrysanthemums a r e NEW YORK. y.
BS PAR aOR aa very lovely but it does mean \ new electronic robot has just é
; been manufactured. It makes 20} i



ou alrange toe opher er
i ' order giving up a bed, or beds to them




, sich & ‘ ;
8-in sh ari classifications of a man (employ-|
















t°' the “relavionsh') for half year in order to have Across |
ats seine = the flowers at the end of the year. } 4 ioe mixture: | (Â¥) ed or unemployed, head of a fam-| he
a ap {S Prepare the bed thoroughly, en- Ee Goat, We, furnish inside ily, or a bachelor, etc) in one- a
six rules? When you | rich it with well rotted pen 10 Machine that almost produces sixth of a second, The Census &
come to PAUL, look manure, and plant the suckers ,, $203? 25d. Water miAttion 19) Bureau has bought the machine
TP iethsichore nee Bes about a foot or more apart. In 3 Sineat atint. () at a cost of £214,000 |

en Tet order to get suckers, an old plant ! at » put to the south-
RULES from last year must be pulled ) “extinet, it had double STOPPED TRIBAL WAR In fact all Shades to \

1. The word may be up, and the suckers which will ( (4) \ DARWIN. :

f, ed - 5 ing ff fr the ! {, may be a coral one. (4) A Fijiar igsionary ‘ .
an anagram of the be found shooting off from the jg sheas ight on evidence oy dian missionary. and his match your Easemble
word that precedes it. mother plant, separated by pull- » Tay white agricultural adviser stopped | y J f

out horse (4)

these } a tribal war in Arnhem Land by |














2-Tt may be a ing them off. Some of ie horse (8) as
§ De vhe word suckers will have roots attached, >} 1 without a ery. (4) standing amid flying spears be-
s they Be achieved but some will have more. Plant Deas tween two Australian Aboriginal | ®
by adding one letter to, subd- A typical succession of words the ones with roots straight into rat ‘ unt made here? (7) tribes. The fight was over the
tracting one letter from, or might be : Hard—Lines—Wines— the prepared bed, but for those , sot letting yourctree ? (7) illeged theft of the wife of one of
changing Sp. letter m the aera ae without roots it is best to start 3. ApY zraduate pvust nage “been the tribal chiefs. {
| dap be associated with Z = them in a box until they have 8 Wh ‘ed a pos AP ? | THE MODERN
the preceding word in wayne rooted. : It provides the newer edge. (5-4) AWAKENED BY RATS |
simile, metaphor, or association White, yellow and bronze are 9 Put « guide before the reverse of OTTAWA. |
of ideas. among the larger Chrysantlp- , 41,0608 sae sas A 17-year-old bride of two; DRESS
mum most commonly grown in 17 Orten to go ’ weeks was awakened by two rats



§. It mey form with the pre-
ceding word a name of u well-
ee person or place in fact or

ction.

enawing at her lips and chin. She
screamed and was rushed to hos-
pital, where she is now recelving
anti-tetanus treatment. The frame
row dwelling where she lived had
peen rat-infested for yea

this island, but there is a smaller
white variety with a yellow Solution of
centre, and a small yellow, both jj.) "M < :
with of which are very attractive and }* 4 t fur. 19

or v 211, Silo Mele 2, Acts
he would do well to edge a bed I : minate: 5. ‘Stilettos:

Chrysanthemums do not like « 5 Trough, 11
great deal of water.

Solution To-morrow

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FRANK KING SHINES FOR Marshall, Greenidge



SUNDAY



| COMBERMERE AS ‘PRO’













But This Causes Local Dispute
BY Q. S. COPPIN :

Tntercolonial

RANK “KING,

. Pace bowler, who represent-
ed Barbados against the 1948
M.C.C. touring team in the two

colony fixtures, and who has since
represented Barbados and Trini-
dad in the regular post-war Inter-
colonial series, created history
yesterday when he played with
the Combermere team in their
fixture with Lodge School.

King stole the bowling honours
by taking five of the Lodge wick-

ay

ets that fell for 55 runs in an j
innings of 209.
CREATED A_ STIR
ING’S inclusion in the Com- }

bermere team has created as
much stir in local sporting circles
as the ersatz bodyline controversy
of the 1930’s that involved Empire
and Spartan and the bowling
especially of E. A. “Manny” Mar-
lindale and to a lesser extent
another Bank Hall speedster
“Pamphy” Spooner.

The former controversy was not
ignored in view of its important
bearing on local cricket relations
and even progress itself. It was
aired, reduced to its proper per-
spective, ignored and finally for-
gotten.

Although I could not at this stage suggest that the “King affair
should be so dismissed yet I find that there is some analogy here
from the point of view of the King affair being a lively controversy
and as such should be well and properly aired.

NO PREDICTION YET

not it will receive similar treatment to the



FRANK KING

HETHER or local

bodyline controversy or whether it will precipitate a sort of
renaissarice in the seats of local crigket learning I am not prepared

to predict at this stage.
On the other hand, I am sure the readers of this column will

want me to give my views in th’s connection at once and I shall do so.

{ am in a very smal! minority I admit at once when I say that
I agree entirely with the principle of Frank King's turning out for
Combermere, a School team in the First Division of the Barbados
Cricket Association competition.

I consider school teams that compete in the Barbados Cricket
Association games as clubs for the purpose of competition.

B.C.A. RULES ALLOW IT
HE revised rules of the Barbados Cricket Association allow clubs
to field one professional in their fixtures and Combermere
as such is the first club to take advantage of this new regulation,
The only arguments against this action by Combermere must there-
fore be based purely on sentimental lines. The action is legitimate,
in keeping with the rules of the Association and, to my mind is miles
away from even a prima facie claim of immorality,

I have writfen in these columns about five years ago that the
question of school teams competing in the First Division Barbados
Cricket Association fixtures should be reviewed.

SELECTORS SHOULD KNOW

SUGGESTED that school teams should not be allowed to play

First Division cricket simply because the particular school teams
have been playing in this division for the past half century or even
Jonger.

I suggested that every year the Selection Committee of the Bar-
bados Cricket Association should liase with the games authorities of
every school competing in the Senior Division and find out whether
or not the teams that they could field in that particular season were
capable of giving other clubs a good game and were capable of looking
after themselves among the grown-ups of the other club teams.

WHY NOT RELEGATION ?
T WROTE that if the Selectors were not satisfied with the strength
of a particular school team that they shouid recommend that they
be relegated that season without prejudice to their being promoted
again—not if they won a cup in the lower division—but it tney satis-
fied the selectors that they could field a team of a strengtn that could
al least establish their bona fides as a senior team.

1 quoted instances where school teams, on good’ wickets had lost
their scheduled three day fixture in a single day. I quoted instances
where members of senior teams had scored undeserv ing aouble cen-
turies and even double centuries against demoratised scnuool teams.

ALSO drew attention to the fact that quickish bowlers ot the

other senior teams had had to cut down their pace and even
change the style of their bowling on impaired wickets to ensure
that members of school were not hurt.





When I wrote this I had not lost sight of the batting perform-
ances of schoolboys of Harrisonians like Clifford Inniss, the rroverbs
brothers, Dr, Lionel Stuart, Keith Walcott, Dr. Charlie Manning—
to mention only a few,

_t,, remember Old Combermerians jike J, E. D. Sealy “Dick
Smith” C. Lewis, “Paps Barrow, C. O'B, Crick, Harold Brewster,
Hopinson and the great Frankie Worrell.

; STRENGTHENS THE ARGUMENT
B" to recall people like these only Strengthened my argument that

a scnool team should be admitted only when they can show a
nucleus of players of the calibre generally conceded as being as-
sociated with such players as I have mentioned.

An alternative suggestion of mine was that the schools should
play in a Schools’ Division competition and indulge in one or twe
| oken fixtures arranged by the Fixture Committee of the Ba
| Cricket Association yearly,
| A third suggestion was that a Schools’ selection committee shoul
| select from among the members competing in the Schools’ Divisio
| a team which would play either in the Senior Division as a repre-
sentative team or play a series of fixtures against senior clubs or

two fixtures against the Barbados Cricket Association Colts on an
| Association basis,

Failing this I see no reason why school teams should not be regard-
ed as clubs if they take part in the Senior competition and as such
are entitled to recruit and pay for the aid of a pace bowler of King's

reputation,
A PUERILE SUGGESTION
- puerile suggestion that he would be robbing a boy out of a play
proves nothing. The fact that his presence in the team will make |
his coaching of the Combermere boys easier and so will no doubt raise !
the morale of the boys is sufficient rebuttal of this really weak claim,
Let King play by all means under present day conditions, If the

rbadog

| Schools are to play in a Schools’ Division competition then by all
| means debar King but if they are clubs to all intents and purpdses in

the Barbados Cricket Association competition then grant them all the
privileges afforded clubs and King is the most important one of which

they are now taking full advantage and with commendable results
even in its earliest stages.





‘| wickets for 71

ADVOCATE



Score Centuries

TWO CENTURIES were scored when the second series 6f

First Division games opened

yesterday. Norman Marshall,

playing for Wanderers against Empire, knocked up a force-

ful 137.

Winston Greenidge, who is turning out for Pick-

wick for the first time this year, scored an undefeated

125 against Sparatn.
WANDERERS vs. EMPIRE
330
A SOUND and aggressive knock

Wanderers (for 6 wkts.)

* for 137 runs by Norman Marsha.1
j of
| day’s play at the Bay yesterday

Wanderers, highlighted the
in the match between Wanderers

and Empire. The home team

| kept Empire in the field for the

entire day and scored 330 runs
for the loss of 6 wickets.

Marshall took part in two good
partnerships, The second wicket
partnership with G. Proverbs that
yielded 129 runs, and the third
wicket partnership with Denis
Atkinson that produced 96.

Fast bowler H. Barker was the
most successful bowler for the
Bank Hall team He took 3
runs in 22 overs
including 3 maidens. Slow
bowler O. Fields took 2 for 46 in
9 overs.

Wanderers started to bat on a
good wicket with Norman Mar-
shall and Eric Atkinson, but soon
Barker who opened the attack
with E. Grant, got the wicket of
Atkinson. The score was now
eight. runs and Proverbs joined

arshall, They kept together
until just before the luncheon
period when Proverbs was out
l.b.w. to Fields. He had _ scored
44 runs and the total was then
137 for 2 wickets

After lunch Denis Atkinson
joined Marshall and the aggressive
tactics were carried on. These
batsmen scored well in front of
the clock and the 200 mark’ was
reached in 158 minutes. Marshall
completed his century in five
minutes less, No less than eight
bowlers were pressed into service

but without any effect until At-
kinson returned a delivery to
Grant with his score at 45. The
total had reached 233. Marshall
and A. Skinner took it to 251 be-
fore the former mistimed a de-
livery from Barker and was bowl-
ed for 137 runs.

D. Lawless the next batsman
in was bowled by the same
bowler with the next ball and 5

wickets were now down with the
score unchanged. E. Manning and
Skinner added 31 and then Skin-
ner fell a victim to slow bowler
Fields. The batsman was caught
by Skipper Alleyne. E. Manning
‘and D. Davies played out time
taking the total to 330 runs.
Manning is 37 and Davies 22,

PICKWICK vs. SPARTAN
Pickwick (for 7 wkts.)

A chanceless century by Win-
stone Greenidge Pickwick bowler-
batsman was the highlight of yes-
terday’s game with Spartan at

ensington, This together with a
forceful knock of 54 by Gerald
Wood enabled Pickwick to score.
| Greenidge who batted extreme-
ly well during his undefeated in-
nings of 125, executed some fine
strokes all around the wicket, He
got no less than fourteen
boundaries during his stay at the
wicket.

Other useful contributions were
made by John Goddard (Jnr,) 29
H. King 23, T. S. Birkett 21 and
E. L. G. Hoad 23.

Bowling for Spartan L. F.
‘Harris got 2 for 38, B. K. Bowen
2 for 98, while F, D. Phillips and
'E. A. V. Williams each got 1 for
4i and 58 respectively,

In ideal conditions and on a
wwerfect wicket, Pickwick after
‘winning the toss, opened with

‘Eric Edwards and John Goddard
jnr. to the bowling of F, D.
Phillips and E, A, V. Williams
from the screen and Pavilion ends
respectively.

This pair started confidently
but with only 15 on the board,
Edwards who had been batting
very well, glanced one beautifully
to fine leg off fast bowler Phillips
and in attempting an overshy

;Was run out for 13 including two

boundaries.

Goddard who was 2, was joined
by Birkett. These batsmen then
defied the Spartan attack for a
considerable time and 50 went up
after 63 minutes play, Birkett
later returned a full toss to Bowen
and was out for 21.

Winstone Greenidge the in-
coming batsman got a boundary
through the slips off Bowen and
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the long on boundary hooked a
short one from Williams and
Atkins held a good catch at short
fine leg to dismiss him for 29.
Wood joined Greenidge and

these batsmen increased the
tempo of the ga by sending the
ball to the boundary frequently.

One hundred went up after 105
minutes play and when the
luncheon interval was taken, the
total was 129 with Wood 34 and
Greenidge 28.

After Lunch

On resumption both batsmen
attacked the bowling with Wood
doing the bulk of the scoring and
150 went up after 138 minutes’
play.

Later Wood singled with a
square cut off Cozier to get his 50
including seven boundaries in 54
minutes. Mis innings however
ended after he had added four
more to his score. He had a big
hit off one from slow bowler
Bowen and Chase took a well
judged catch in front of the sight
screen, The total was 164 and this
pair had put on 91 for the fourth
wicket,

Inniss the incoming batsman
had a brief stay as he was taken
behind the wicket off Harris be-
fore he had scored.

Clayton Greenidge joined his
brother and saw him late cut one
from Harris to the boundary to
get his 50 including six boundaries
in 98 minutes. Clayton was how-
ever |.b.w., to Harris after scoring
seven,

The

total was now 182. King
joined Greenidge and this pair
took the score to 200 in 183
minutes. Greenidge took two
boundaries in one over by Bowen
and later hooked one from Harris
to square leg for another to enter
the seventies.

King hooked one from Bowen
out of the grounds for six and
then turned one from Williams to
the square leg boundary, He was
later bowled by Phillips for 23
with the total at 230,

Hoad joined Greenidge and this
pair sent 250 on the board in 217
minutes. Spartan made a number
of bowling changes but without
result, Greenidge got a few more
boundaries and his score entered
the nineties. He eventually got
his century ineluding eleven
boundaries in 155 minutes with a
single off Bowen wide of square
leg.

The batsmen continued to attack
the bowling and the score went
up in spite of many bowling
changes. When stumps were
drawn these batsmen were still
together. The total was 302 with
Greenidge 125 and Hoad 23.

Harrison College v. Carlton

College Ist Innings............ 160
Carlton Ist Inns. (for 4 wkts.) 34

CARLTON dismissed Harrison
College for 160 runs on a perfect
wicket at College yesterday. In
reply, Carlton scored 39 runs,
losing four valuable wickets.

G. Edghill bowled well to take
3 College wickets for 50 runs,
James Williams too turned in a
good bowling performance, taking
3 Carlton wickets for 14 runs.

Cc. W. Smith of College top
scored with 61. College’s fielding
was better than Carlton’s. Carl-
ton missed a few catches.

College lost two early wickets
with only 22 runs scored. E. H.
Hope, who opened with C. W.
Smith, was caught by Warren at
fine leg off pacer Edghill and Mr.
Gittens was snapped up at short
leg by Harding off Edghill’s next
over. They scored 5 and 1 re-
spectively.

Smith and C. N. Blackman saw
50 go up after an hour’s play. The
pair kept a reasonable rate of
scoring. Smith, after being put
down in slips when 32, went on to
score 50 in 100 minutes. Ten
minutes later, 100 runs were on
the tins.

The fine partnership between
Smith and Blackman which
realized 75 runs ended with Smith
being caught at mid wicket on
the on-side by Harding off Edghill.
Smith tried to hook a short pitched
ball on the leg stump. He played
a fine innings for 61. Edghill had
then taken 3 for 37 in 11 overs.
The score was 102 for 3. Lunch
was taken three overs later with
the score at 109. Blackman was

@ On Page 5



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SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951

THE JESTER A CHAMP

Paris, Best Wishes And Cross Roads
Off Form
BY BOOKIE

WITHOUT waiting for the second day’s racing
of the T.T.C. June meeting and the reversal of
form that it may bring, on his running in the Trial
Stakes alone the Jester II deserves special men-
tion as one of the most outstanding three-year-olds
of 1952. By winning this classic, after taking the
two-year-old classic Breeders’ Stakes last Decem-
-. ber and the Easter Guineas at Union Park last

March, this Jamaican gelding has definitely estab-
lished strong claims to be considered the best of this age. It is quite
true to say that in both the Breeders’ and now the Trial Stakes The
Jester II did not meet his most important opponents at their best,
but those of us who have seen him racing could not fail to be
impressed with this upstanding chestnut by Merry Mark out of All
Gold.

From the moment I saw the Jester I! strike out in front of
the field in the Breeders’ Stakes last December and maintained his
three lengths lead from start to finish I marked him down as one
vt good class. Indeed of such class that I am prepared to state
that he may well be considered among the best Jamaican creoles
that we have seen racing in the South Caribbean. In my opinion
he is much better than, say, Brown Rocket, and in this respect I
think he is the best Jamaican creole we have ever seen racing in
Trinidad as a two-year-old and an early three. :

All this of course applies to the Jester II only as a sprinter,
for up to now he has not been tried at more than seven furlongs.
That is why it would have been far more interesting to see the
Trial Stakes decided over 74% furlongs or a mile rather than a simple
sprint of six furlongs, It is difficult to say exactly what stage of
the race The Jester II took the lead but it was evident that he
did so before a furlong and a half had been covered. After that
it was all over bar the shouting. He coasted home lite a cycle free-
wheeling down hill, or so it would seem from all accounts.

Now this is in striking similarity to the actual running of the
Breeders’ Stakes last December and but for the fact that Miss Flicka
and Buddha got between The Jester Il and Rock Diamond, who was
fourth, we might have seen a complete repetition of the two-year-
old classic. I am firmly convinced that if the rain had fallen we
would have seen the exact replica, since Rock Diamond prefers this
kind of going. Surely this is no kind of race to be called a classic?

One could understand if in Barbados there were three classic races
that there might be some difficulty in arranging for each one to be
run over a different distance because of the limited space on our
track, But in as much as the T.T.C. have a place like the Queen’s
Park Savannah, where, there are as many as three race tracks, the
largest measuring as much as 14 furlongs around, they have abso-
lutely no excuse at all. It shows a complete lack of imagination and
no appreciation for the finer points of racing.

To turn once more to The Jester II it now remains to be seen
whether he can keep up his mopping up of the Trinidad classics. He
has already won three and he now has two to go. The Derby Trial
at Arima next month and the Trinidad Derby in December in Port-
of-Spain. I think the chances are even money that he can.

It is not without passing interest that once again the old jinx
which seems to dog the footsteps of classic and championship events
played a large part in ruining this renewal of the Trial Stakes. Not
long ago a friend of mine said he could hardly credit the astonishing
facts I listed in an article of such spoilt occasions and now here is
another he can add to the ‘list.

_Entered in the Trial Stakes was not only The Jester, whose
praises have been sung above, but his fellow Jamaican Paris, one
of the best two-year-olds I have seen arrive on this side of the
Caribbean from that Colony and one who quickly substantiated his
reputation as champion of his age in his home country by winning
a D class six furlong at the Christmas meeting in very smart time.
Paris not only won his race in smart time but he defeated, at weight
for age, The Atom, a mare who later went up to C class and ran
Nan Tudor to a length at even weights over six furlongs. This
therefore set the standard for the type of three-year-old we could
reasonably expect Paris to be in 1951.

Next on the list in the Trial Stakes was Best Wishes a filly who
the Trinidad classifiers thought so well of that they had her pro-
moted to the imported classes before the 1951 racing season begun,
a distinction which could not be laid claim to even by the great
Gleneagle, who won four races (the last with 140 lbs.) as a two-
year-old at the Christmas meeting of 1941. Best Wishes won only
two. Of course what must have influenced the classifiers in large
measure to arrive at such an assessment of Best Wishes capabilities
was no doubt the spectacular times she returned when she won her
races, the last of which made all previous records for two-year-olds
over six furlongs on the Queen’s Park Savannah look slow indeed.
Best Wishes therefore was obviously far above the average.
re Next we ae Cross oro & gelding from, Barbados who won

ur races as a two-year-old and generally impressed the m
gritics with his all round ability ‘at three to run well over ansining
from five furlongs to a mile.

Then there was Rock Diamond, Miss Flicka and Buddha, who
if only considered to be second string, then at least a very strong one.

Came the race. Paris—ill. Best Wishes—ill. Cross Roads—not
well, Rock Diamond—off form. Miss Flicka—ran well but went
wide. Buddha—ran a good race. Final analysis: The Jester II first,
the rest nowhere. How can anyone feel anything else but disgusted
at a result like this,

Discussing the form of the A class bunch in the TTC Plate and
the Queen’s Park Stakes, the first a mile and distance, the second
a six, it is apparent that the winner of the first, Jamaica’s Mark
Twain, must be all that he was cracked up to be in his home coun-
try where he won all the classics as a three-year-old as well as a
few other races. Nevertheless from what I heard on the Radio the
commentator, Mr, Dick Murray, to whom we must be thankful, was
definitely of the opinion that Mark Twain was lucky to have won
from Rebate. This filly, as he described it, took over the lead some-
where between the four and the three, from the same Mark Twain
and had the field beaten in the stretch when her rider, in the heat
of the moment, drew his whip, and in striking caused her to come
away from the rails. Mark Twain was then rushed into this open-
ing by Yvonet and producing another burst won the race by a neck.

While beaten Rebate was therefore not disgraced and once again
she has lived up to expectations as one of the best distance horses
now in training in the B.W.I. However in the sprint event yes-
terday White Company, by his easy victory, bared the fact that
although the distance horses in A class are in form, the sprinters
are very definitely way off. Footmark, who was second, was but a
shadow of his former self. Ostara, the holder of the six furlong
track ord, was reported to be feeling the effects of a kick on the
knee which she sustained at the hands (or is it feet)) of Orly on
t@e first day, and this must have impeded her considerably. Lastly
Golden Quip, who has fairly good form in England, has clearly not
acclimatised while Blue Streak is too old. It therefore looks as if
some new sprinting talent is definitely needed in the top class.

WHAT IS THE SAND TRACK THERE FOR ?

Forgive me for changing the subject so radically but I would
like to know if there is someone in high authority in the Barbados
Turf Club who can answer the above question. I hope they will not
tell me that it was laid down to be used when the rainfall was so
heavy that it rendered the exercise track impossible, because I ab-
soluteiy refuse to accept this answer. I am sure I was not dream-
ing last Friday morning when I walked onâ„¢to the Savannah and
found it to be only slightly damp. Yet the exercise track was closed
and only the sand track was open. If this can be construed to mean
wet, then we had better make the entire track one of sand and let
us have our races on the beach.











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SUNDAY,

—

JULY 1, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE

—————_—_———————









JULY1 —





SCORE

WANDERERS V, EMPIRE

Wanderers— ist Innings

N. Marshall b Barker 137
E. Atkinson c Alleyne b Barker 7
G. Proverbs 1 b w. Fields 44
D. Atkinson ¢c &b Grant ” 45
A. Skinner c Alleyne b Fields 23
D. Lawless b Barker *
. Manning not out 37

22
+ 3 Lbs., 1 wd 18



Total

(for 6 wickets) 330

Fill” of wiekets: 1-8, 2—187, 9233
4—251, 5-251, 6-282

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o Mi R w
H Barke: 22 J 71 3
E. Grant il 4 aa i
S. Rudder 10 1 27 9
H King 15 0 64 0
A. Holder 7 9 39 0
C. Alleyne 5 0 2 0
QO. Fields 9 0 46 F
W. Cave i 10 0

©
SPARTAN vs. PICKWICK
Pick wick—ist Innings
RF Edwards run out 3
J idard jinr. ¢ Atkins b Williams 29
T S$ Birkett c& b Bowen 4
W. Greenidge not out
G Wood c Chase b Bowen
B. deL. Inniss c wk (Haynes) b
Harris 0
7





C. Greenidge 1 b w. Harris

H_ King b Phillips 2
E. L. G Hoad not out 23
Extras; b1, lb 2,nb. 2 5
Total (for 7 wkts) 302



BOARD

Brooks

2
I MeD. Alleyne b Glasgow 7
QO. H_ Wilkinsen not out 3
Extra 3
Total jfor 2 wkts) 40
CARLTON vs. HARRISON
COLLEGE
Harrison College’s—ist Innings
C. W. Smith e Harding b Edghill 61
E. H. Hope c Warren b Edghill 5
Mr. Gitténs c Harding b Edghil! 1
C N_. Blackman run out-.... 30
Mr. Headley c.F. Hutchinson b
K_ Hutehinson - ' . 9
N Harrison |b w. Greenidge. ....° 9
R Dash b Warren ¢ 10
J Williams run eut ‘ % 20.
K Griffith | bw Warren 0
G Foster run out 0
M Simmons not aut «..0.cee vest 2
Extras: b 7, wl 8
Total 160
Fall of wkts: 1—17, 2—27, 3-~102, 4—119
S121, 6—137, 7—137, 8-—137, 9—137,
10—160
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M R w
G Eadghiil 16 2 50 3
K. Greenidge 942 31 1
K. B. Warren 13 2 Be 2
K. Hutchinson 8 30 1

CARLTON’S Ist INNINGS

F. Hutehinson lbw Williams 6
NS. Lueas c Foster b Williams $
R. Hutchinson run out 3
K. Greenidge not out 13
C. McKenzie b Williams il
G. Harding not out 2
Extras 1

Total (for 4 wkts.) . 39

Pall of wickets: 1 for 6, 2 for 11, 3 forid







R w
F.-D~ Phillips 15 2 41 1 4 for &
E. AJ‘V. Williams 2-3 58 1 Y¥.M.P.C. V POLICE
*. Ey Cozier 8 6 16 0 ¥ M PC. Ist Innings
3... if,+ Bowen 22 1 98 62 G. Greenidge ¢ Bradshaw b Mullins (0
} E. Walcott 9 0 43 © | gpurke b Mullins 1”
.. F. Harris 9 1 38 2 :
he if made 1 ° 3 0 I. Greenidge b Bradshaw ’ Ww
r P ere Kk. Branker b Green 7
LODGE vs. COMBERMERE E Branker lbw b Brawshaw 42
Lodge—ist Innings EB. Porter b Mullins 28
LODGE 209 H. Ingram lbw b Mullins 1
COMBFERMERE (for 2 wkts) 40 J Hinds b Mullins 1
G. Stoute ¢ Licorish b E.G. Adems 65 G. Archer b Green a: om
Mr. Wilkes b F. King 11 R. Austin not put 18
G. Hutchinson 1bw. b F. King 18 §. Goddard b Green 0
Mr. Mc Comie 1 bw. b F. King 0 Extras 15
E W = Glasgow c wkpr. Alleyne
b: King 36 al 139
Cc. E Gill run out 18 1
c 9. Williams lbw. b LA Fall of wickets: 1 for 0,.2 for21, 8 for
eae 4 40, 4 for 40, 5 for 90, 6 for 100, 7 for
We a eet OE... “Hutris 4 102, 8 for 111, 9 for 111, 10 for 139
N- Whkie 0. King M1 BOWLING ANALYSIS
C,. Deane not out 14 Oo M P Ww
L Brooks stpd. wkpr. Alleyne C at. ewes Se
b Harris 233° 6 31.5 4 32 9
Extras ' 8 Gr i T; ae te
; ; kL Brewster 4 13
Fotal Bis. POLICE tst Innings
Fall of wkts : 1—10, 255, 3—55, 4138, C+ Blackman, not out ....... , 44
5—133, 6—136, 7—142, 8—163, 9—182 B. Kingh not out fe
BOWLING ANALYSIS ro
oO = R Ww Total (for no wicket) .., a8
L. R. Brathwaite 6 0 19 0 LT
FicH. King... 0) Oe Be TS BOWLING ANALYSIS
@. N°-B, Grant 9 0 4 Oo Oa oe ow
E. G. Adams 6 Oo 4 1 I. Burke 5 haps 3 am
L.A. Harris 1 0 39 3 R. Austin 4 1 5
Combermere—ist Innings G. Archer 6 1 16.
1. E Licorish not out 13. ~K, Branker 2 %
G Adams c wkpr Wilkes b E Branker 4 1 4
T XI CRICKET
I UK
@ From Page 4 Mullins and Bradshaw. Before

28 not out and Mr. Headley, who
replaced Smith, 2 not out.

Mr. Headley was quickly sent
back by K. Hutchinson who got
him caught at cover point by F.
Hutchinson for 9, A few balls later
Blackman got run out at 30. The
scoreboard read 121 for 5.

Collapse followed. Harrison was
adjudged l.b.w. to Greenidge for 7.
Warren rattled Dash’s stumps
when he was 10 and got K. Griffith
i.b.w. for duck. G. Foster who
went in at number nine faced one
ball before he was run out for
nought.

Four wickets fell at 137. J. Wil-
Hams and M. Simmons put on 2:
for the last wicket. They took the
seore to 160 when Williams was run
out.. Williams got 20 and Simmons
2 not out.

With an hour left for play, Carl-
ton fought hard to muster 39 runs.
They lost four wickets by time of
call.

The opening pair F., Hutchinson
and N. S. Lucas were both sent
back by pacer James Williams for
6 and 3 respectively. Hutchinson
was given out l.b.w. while Lucas
was taken by Foster in the slips.
R. Hutchinson was soon after
run out for 3. The score was 13
for 3.

Carlton was 34 when the fourth
wicket was taken. Williams com-
pletely beat and bowled C. Mc.
Kenzie for 11.

At close of play, Greenidge was
13 not out and G. Harding 3 not

out.

Y.M.P.C. vs. POLICE
Wee oie Rests peas «a 3Be
Police (for no wicket)....... 58

Police dismissed Y.M.P.C. for 139
runs in their first innings on the
first day’s play in their first divis-
ion cricket match at Queen’s Park
yesterday.

At the end of play Police had
replied with.58 runs for the loss of
no wicket. Carl Mullins, the Police
pace bowler took five of the
Y.M-P.C. wickets for the loss of 44
runs after sending 21 overs of
which six were maidens. He
bowled extremely well and moved
the ball both ways on a perfect
wicket: Medium pacer E. Green
took three wickets for 36 runs and
bowled 1) overs. The only bats-
man for Y.M.P.C. that put any

resistance was E. Branker who hit
a patient 4? which included three
fours.

C. Greenidge and I. Burke open-
ed for ¥.M.P.C. to the bowling of



Greenidge could get off the mark
Mullins had him for’ a duck. L.
Greenidge followed and when the
score had reached 21 Burke also
fell victim to Mullins. . Branker
joined L. Greenidge and they car-
ried the score to 40 when K.
Branker went. E, Branker fol-
lowed and opened his score with a
brace but Greenidge did not stay
long as he was bowled by Brad-
shaw. E. Branker carried his score

to 42. Y.M.P.C,, closed their
innings at 139.
After Lunch Blackman and

Kinch opened the first innings of
Police to the bowling of Burke and,
Austin. Blackman and -» Kinch
quickly settled. down, and_ scored
freely. When stumps were dvawn
‘they were still together with
Blackman 44 not out and Kineh 14
not out.

COMBERMERE vs. LODGE
BQO GO in. sissaieeses sivids oss ROD
Combermere (for 2 wkts) .... 40

Turning out for Combermere
for the first time yesterday, Frank
King captured five Lodge wickets
for 55 runs in the Lodge—Com-
bermere First Division cricket
match at Combermere. Lodge bat-
ted first and scored 209 runs.
Combermere is now 40-runs for
the loss of two wickets.

Frank King was not bowling at
his fastest but took things easy.
He bowled 16 overs. Slow left
arm bowler L. A, Harris com-
manded respect during his 10 overs
when he took three wickets for
39 runs

For Lodge, opening ‘batsman
Glyne Stoute played an enterpris-
ing innings to score 65, He sent
three balls to the six ‘boundary,
He was eventually out to E. G.
Adams’ bowling when L. E. Lic-
orish brought off a difficult catch
on the boundary,

Combermere’s L, E. Licorish is

not out with 13 while I, McD.
Alleyne scored 17. .
Mr. McComie, Lodge medium

pace bowler sent down five maid-
en overs.

Lodge'won the toss and’ elected
to bat on the perfect wicket.
Glyne Stoute and Mr. Wilkes op-
ened the innings for Lodge to the
bowling of Frank King and Leroy
Brathwaite. Each batsman began
his score with a four and went on
confidently.

Frank King, however, caught
his length early and bowled Mr.
Wilkes with the last ball of his
third over. The score was 19.

@ On Page 16

Spartan Proud Of
Goddard And Walcott

THE SPARTAN CRICKET and Football Club, at their |

Annual General meeting at

Queen’s Park on Friday, paid}

tribute to John Goddard for his fine handling of the vie- |
torious 1950 West Indies Cricket team to England, and

placed on record their appreciation of the fact that Clyde
Waleott, a member of the W.I, team and of the Spartan
Club, had distinguished himself by his performances with
the bat and behind the stumps.



JOHN GODDARD

Young Blood In Water

Polo

days practised
times a week in preparation for
the tournament,

By PAUL FOSTER

WATER POLO fans are disap-
pointed. They claim that too many
tall scores have been recorded so
far this season and they fear that
these big scores will continue
throughout the tournament.

The water pele association with
eight men’s teams taking part in
this year’s competition were faced
with a preblem shortly before the
1951 season opened. The six
teams who took part in last year’s
league could re-enter this year’s
competition, There were however
several youngsters who wantited to
learn the game. Had only these
six teams returned to play in this
year’s league then these young
players. would not have secured
places in the various teams,

The association decided to in-
vite the secondary schools and the
Carlton Club to enter teams
Harrison College accepted the in-
vitation, on one condition — that
some of their pupils then play-
ing for other clubs must play for
their school. When these boys lef.
school they could then re-join
their old clubs—an_ understand-
able request.

Reborn

Carlton were unable to enter a
team, but they told the associa-
tion of a group of men and boys
from the Black Rock and the
Paradise Beach Clyb area who
were interested in bringing @
team for the 1951 competition,
‘Thus was born or rather re-born
the Whipporays Water Polo Club,
Whipporays played league water
polo in the early forties and two
of their present members, captain
Albert Hunte and Clarence O'Neal
turned out for the original team.

With Harrison College entering
the competition, there was now
room in the other teams for the
new members of the association,
Snappers lost the Manning twins,
Bonitas lost Allan Taylor, Rolf
Feldman, Barracudas lost Charles
Evelyn and Flying Fish lost
Geoffrey Jordan. These boys
went over to Harrison College and
the newcomers filled the breach.

Snappers although they lost the
Mannings were perhaps the least
hard hit. They still had their ex-
perienced nucleus of George Mc-
Lean, C. McLean, Kenneth, Ince,
Delbert Bannister, A. Taylor, M.

browne and Glyne Rogers. The
other teams besides the players
they lost to Harrison College,

suffered with last minute casual-
ties—players leaving the island
or having changed their jobs and
beIng unable to play. This caused
an_ eleventh hour re-shuffle and
had. not the Headmaster of Har-
rison, College permitted some of
his younger players — those who
could not possibly gain selection
on the school team—to join the
hard pressed clubs for this year
only, several of the clubs might
well have had to cancel their en-
tries for the 1951 league,
Full Credit
Here is where the Snappers tean
must be given full éredit. With
two newcomers in their midst,
they got these players to turn up

regularly for practice and had
them in reasonable condition by
the start of the season. Harrison

College too during the Easter holi-

Officers elected for the year
were: — President — Mr, F. A, C,
Clairmonte, O.B.E,, Vice-Presi-
dents: — Mr, J. O. Tudor and Mr.
H. A. Tudor:— First XI Cricket
Captain:— Mr. Keith Walcott, |
Vice-Captain;— Mr, L. F. Harris, |
Intermediate Cricket Captain:— |
Mr. A. F. C. Matthews, Vice- |
Captain: — Mr. O. S. Coppin, First
XI Football Captain:— Mr, H. W.
Cadogan, Vic e-Captain, Mr.
Desmond Johnson, Seeond Divi-
sion Football Captain: Mr, A, D.
Gittens, Vice-Captain:—- Mr. Tom

Banfield

Mr. A, F. C. Matthews was Fe |
elected Honorary Secretary and
Mr. C. H. Skinner was elected |
Assistant Seeretary,.

The following were elected to|
serve with the ex-officio mem-
bers as a Committee of Manage-
ment:——Mr. D. H. L. Ward, Mr,
M. W. Clarke, Mr. E. D. Inni
Mr, O. S. Coppin and Captain
R. A. Sealy,





sometimes three

Swordfish, Barracudas, Flying
Fish and Bonitas with more new
men to train than cither Snappers
or Harrison College, found — this
task a great deal more diffigult.

Police also had newcomers and
Whipporays with the exception ol
Hunte and O'Neal had never play-
ed the game before.

Hence the 1951 season began
with Snappers and Harrison Col-
lege having a clear superiority
over the other six teams. The
first round of the tournament is
not even half way through and
already improvement can be
noticed in the weaker teams,

F.L.N.A.

There are several other im-
portant factors which have led to
these big scores. The Water Polo
Association is seeking affiliation
to the Federation Internationale
ie Natation Amateur an_ inter-
mational body which governs in-
ternational sport. Affiliation tc
this Federation is one of the major
steps towards international recog-
nition and on to what must be
every true sportsman’s desire—~
representation at the World Olym-
pic Games,

F.LN.A. sent the Barbados as-

sociation a copy of the rules of
water polo for 1951, These new
rules, quite different to the old

rules whieh were used last year,
have been strictly adhered to this
year, In 1950, playing by the old
rules, play lasted for two periods
of seven minutes actual play with
three minutes rest. This year the
new rules call for two periods of
ten minutes actual play with five
minutes rest. Six extra minutes
in which to shoot more goals.

The association found that the
distance between the uprights of
the goal posts used last year
were six inches short of inter-
national requirements, New goal
posts built to international scale
were constructed for the 1951
tournament, Six inches doesn’t
seem to be such a marked in-
crease. But ask any goal-keeper
what another six inches means,
when at the start of each jump
only hig head is out of the water.
This is not an attempt to exoner-
ate goalkeepers for the high
scores against them. It is merely
stating a few of the facts which
may be escaping water polo fans

Stop Watch

This year for the first time the
association is using a proper water
polo stop watch, Whenever play
is stopped for a goal or for any
other period over five seconds,
the watch is stopped and restarted
when the ball goes back into play.
Thus ensuring that there is ten
minutes of actual play each half.
Last year time keepers had to
average actual play by thelr wrist
watches, :

Bearing these points in mind,
spectators will have a better idea
of the 1951 set up and perhaps
reserve their criticism for a little
later in the season, Players will
get more accustomed to these new
conditions and with the weaker
teams improving in every match,
the standard of play will un-
doubtedly get better as the season
grows older,

NO. 178

The Topic
of

i

Last Week |



The first dgy in September
Away, in “forty-nine”
The floods in Constitution
Left suffering behing,

: .

For Betsy's pot and eld house

Her bed, her sheep, her goat

Leave her behind at mid-night
And to St. Lucia float

The people in this island
Start to show sympathy
And they collected money
To help her misery.
Whe Government as usual
Sterted at their snail's pace
Without a living interest
,In poor Betsy's disgrace
.

Well boys you know a slow death
Ts the most cruel way

And up te Menday last week
Betsy's in the same way,

At the St, Michael's Vestry
The. Government as before
Just tried to leave their trouble
Right at the Vestry’s door

. .

But “Bro. Motts’’ eried no bors
You all are out of luck
Now you are tn this trouble
You want to pass the buck”?
Leave out the Vestry, old boys
Share out you money t guess
You ought to knew the Vestry
Don't mix up in a mess! !
. . °

Fer trouble’s coming old boys
Much trouble as you see
Go! let the Welfare Office
Relieve your misery.
. .

Don't think you're fooling “yes mer
With your sweet “money fuss”
We got the Coppers old boys
Your Government miss the bus."*
For when the “‘share-out" starts up
We know you all il see
The present government “set-up
Adds to all miseries



Of course their inside headaches
Would set 4 pation mad
This is the revelation
Of their “adopted lad
‘ .
Is there no baim in Gilead?
Yes! there's a physician there
Do give them an injection
Can't you see death is near’

But Betsy can't keep quiet
She's living in slime and mire

She suffered by “flood waters
You'll burn up in hell fire

You parade about old times
You ‘buse the men of yore

But are you any different
In dealing with the poor”

Joe said, Lou get ;your black dress
Dress quickly girl come see

The funeraj of the comrades
At Westbury Cemetery

One thing, will Betsy welcome
Not silver, neither gold

But a J & B in this weather
While living in the cold

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PAGE SIX



portrait







SHAKESPEARE drew this
of himself

SAYS
EXPERT





pus bead, drawn upside down »rarians and collectors agree
on the margin of a book. t that the four-line inscription is
the head of William Shakespeare in writing ‘ike the known
drawn by Shakespeare—accord specimens of Shakespeare's

ing to Ronald Ashford, of Stour
bridge, Wores, expert wo
Clizahethan books,

it is be
to recor
say i.”

Vir. Ashford found the drawing on
an end-page of a 1605 edition o

tter to chuse a

er these

hand, They give this reading :—
present
estate with security than strive
olde idle doings

Vir. Ashford has sent copies of the

“The Annales of Cornelius sketch to experts in London
Tacitus.” bought from a Strat and to Oxford's Bodleian
ford-on-Avon collection. Library.

f.uatden xpress Service

Cricket Ambassador

for

His

THE name ‘Plum’ Warner lege will always be a matter
stimulates visions of the Mecca of speculation, but, at the age
Cricket and brings to mind his- 134, he left the West Indies and
toric cricket matches in every entered Rugby School—a_ school

art of the world where the Union that has never been particularly

ack waves in the breeze. That noted as a cricket nursery.
alone would popularise the life cricketing career as a schoolboy

story of Sir Pelham Warner and

all the more so to West Indians though he had the distinction, Of business to grasp the details /
when Plum Warner by Laurence shared by few, of becoming a 4nd resources of the concern.”
Meynell published by Phoenix member of the MCC while still a Back in London, Lewis made
House Ltd. dwells on the early schoolboy. At Oxford, ‘Plum’ was futurist furniture for the Omega
life of ‘Plum,’ a Trinidadian by dogged by bad luck. Ill-health Workshop: chairs that stuck to
birth. School for young ‘Plum’ curtailed his cricket He got his the seats of purchasers’ trousers,
was very largely synonymous Blue but his cricketing career at candlesticks that once picked up
with ‘increased opportunities for Oxford ended on a gloomy note could not be put down again ow-
playing cricket. His first intro- he was twice run out in the match ing to the umeconomic use af
duction to the game had been in against Cambridge in 1895. futurist glue. 1
a long verandah in the Attorney First playing for Middlesex It was not enough to quench
General's (his father’s) home in when he was stil at the ’Var ity, his creative ardour, which, in
Trinidad where a _ black boy, his long and distinguished active 1914, issued in the famous enor-
Humming Bird, was his coach and association with the county was to mous, pink-paper heavy-type,
mentor. continue until 1920 when he play- high explosive magazine Blast. A
At Harrison College it was ed his last innings in first class futurist manifesto. calculated to
diplomatic to do enough work to cricket. ‘To-day, at the age of 78 awaken, startle, affright, but
keep out of the ‘Black Book’, for he is still associated with Lord’s hardly to enlighten ,
an appearance in that ill-fated and the MCC. Few men have en- Before its echoes had died

volume automatically

entitled a gaged in

as many



crieket tours as

was not outstandingly brilliant al-

personal attendance in the Library ‘Plum’. When he first toured,
where headmaster Deighton's representative teams did not go
wrist-work with a bamboo cane abroad under the aegis of the
was distressingly accurate and MCC. It was only fitting that his
painful. In spite of having to first tour in 1897 should be to the
devote some grudged hours to his West Indies with Lord Hawke.
books, the future England captain When in 1903 he was asked to
managed to gain his First XI col- captain an English side, the first

ours at the tender age of 18, and
a
XI helped to

in

MCC side
Garrison
game for

against the
ave the

match



e to Australia

Warner
had already been on six tours to
various parts of the world inelud-

his school by staying in for over ing the U.S.A, Mr. Meynell tells
an hour for 7 runs, Evenin later the story of Plum’s thrilling
life, wnen’ he acquired glorious career in big cricket from his
scoring strokes, it was this grit and opening an innings with the Cham-
determination which he had first pion to the Inst thrilling match
shown at Harrison College that at Lord’s) when Middlesex beat
marked him out as a leader and Yorkshire by tive runs while the
a valuable asset to any team vast crowd held their breath anc
Whether ‘Plum’ would have the dropping of a pin would have
been an even greater cricketer sounded
had he remained at Harrison Col- explosion.

Been

Making

TARR, By Wyndham Lewis.
Methuen. 9s. 6d. 352 pages.
Perey Wyndham Lewis is a

painter and a writer. He had

been a painter and a writer in

London and Paris for 40 years.

He has also been a fire-eater for

40 years. His hobby has been

the collection of enemies. Now

his novel Tarr—the last explo-
sion of the 1914 war—is re-issued.

If it is no longer dynamite, it is

still dynamic.

First sign that there was some-
thing odd about Lewis (born 67
years ago in Maine) occurred
when a school mate at Rugby
found him painting the head
of a large dog and cried out in
horror. “You frightful artist’!
His house-master took appro-
priate action; Lewis was packed
off to the Slade School, where
he caught an inspiring glimpse
of the huge gold earrings of Au-
gustus John, at the dawn of his
career as artist and patriarch.
John did something more = in-
spiring; he bought one of Lewis's
first pictures.



By GEORGE MALCOLM
THOMSON

Followed Paris, where Lewis
studied philosophy under Berg-
son, and Munich, where he
studied painting in a studio run
by a Turk. He returned to Lon-
don, an arrogant young man in
an outsize sombrero and
Quartier Latin clothes made for
him by a horrified Brook Street
tailor.

The hero of Tarr, a novel deal-
ing with English and German
expatriates and their love affairs
in Paris, can be looked on as
partly a self-portrait of this pe-
riod:
: .dark skin and a steady,

unamiable expression. He was
clean-shaven with a _ shallow
square jaw and straight thick
mouth. His hands were square

”

and usually hot. . .

“He impressed the stranger as

having inherited himself last

week and as being in a great press

away, the Great War had carried
its founder off to other kinds of
high explosive. Returning in no
peaceable mood. he launched a
magazine called The Enemy.
When Arnold Bennett protested
against the title, he retorted, “If
you find a person distasteful to
you, be rude to him. Do not re-
fer to him as my friend so-and-
sO,’



Taking his own advice, Lewis
attacked Bloomsbury, “left-over
aesthetes of the greenery-yallery
period”; the idea of freedom: the
eult of the negro; the idolatry
of the little man: “What we wan:
is a tyranny—of the best intel-
lects.” “Indiseriminate education

SUNDAY

Busy
Enemies

fie

aioe

too much and dia
enough. The public
svarea at his pictures (you can
stare at one in the ‘ate now),
were puzzied by his violent, cha-
vac novels and were scared by
his opinions.

He was thought to be brutal
io be partial to despots, to lack
warmth of feeling for the poor
and lowly.

He declared that he preferrea
Fascism: to Communism, had a
pat on the back for Mussoiim,
wrote one book in favour of Hit-
ler (1931) and another against
him (1939). When the Ler be-
came warlike Lewis was against
a war “to make the world safe
for Communism.”

Simultaneously, then, he was
boycotted by a sect of the intel-
ligentsia and had his portrait of
T. S. Eliot rejected by the Royai
Academy, a singular double tri-
umph. Augustus Jahn resigned
from the Academy. Lewis com-
mented: “The Royal Academy
have lost their only artist.”

Ten years later in 1949, a deep
misfortune befell this old war-
rior of the studios. Painting his
second portrait of T. S. Eliot, he

wrote
paint



found that he had to move closer
to see his siiter, Now he faces
total blindness.

It is disaster which he ac-
cepts with some humour (“Tt
would solve a great many prob-
lems if English painters were born
blind”) and no self-pity:

‘Pushed into an _ unlighted

room, the door banged and _ bolt-
ed for ever, I shall then have to
light lamp of aggressive vol-
tage mind to keep at bay
the

From
}

a
in my
night.”
his obstreperous youth
he has retained the courage
which at one time might have
been mistaken for panache. He
still has his dictaphone. But, alas!
you cannot paint by dictaphone.

LOOK YOUNGER, LIVE LONG-
ER. By Gayelord Hauser. Faber

and Faber. 12s. 6d. 320 pages.

Who, asks Dr.
ence) Hauser, has been
aging your body? You
right. Do the Body

have
Slant

higher than your head).
Stomach lift. Bathe your
hot water, in cold water,
air, in something.

feet
in

in
hot

Take some spinach juice, pars-
Have

ley juice, watercress juice.
a liquid tomato, Have some Ex-
travagant Wild Rice Hamburgers,
a recipe dedicated by the Dr.
to Greta Garbo, Have some rhu-
barb and black treacle dedicated
(by me) to Mrs, Squeers.

Have a good neutral (not
kaline) shampoo, in the
Slant position naturally.
wear bright red, except
blood-stream,

Within 30 days you, too, can
have a flat stomach. So back to
Body Slant. Make every, day a
Vitamin D Day. Live longer, live
louder, live upside down.

World Copyright Reserved
—L.E.S.

SENATORS AGAINST
FORMAL REPORT
On MacArthur Inquiry

WASHINGTON, June 238.
Several members of the Senate
Committee inquiring into Gen.
MacArthur's case are against mak-
ing any formal report, Committee
Chairman Senator Richard Rus
sell (Democrat, Georgia) said to-
day
“The sentiment seems to be
strong that the Committee has put
the facts before the people. Under
the democratic process, the people
can approve or disapprove of
what has been done,” he added.
Russell said the Committee will
meet in ten days time to decide
whether to call more witnesses,

al-
30dy
Don"

in your



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SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951







You see, this city can snatch back so much that fame brings...

THE

By R. M. MacCOLL

HOLLYWOOD,

SO there’s this chap called Wil-
liam Clark Gable, jug-eared and
soupy-voiced, born in Cadiz,
Ohio, about 53 years ago.

I have never seen Cadiz, Ohio,
but I have seen 500 small towns
like it, the length and breadth of
America.

I cam hear the sound of its
Main Street, and t know I have
said good-morning to the cop on
the beat and had a chicken salad
sandwich in the corner drugstore.

Gable did not want to settle in
Cadiz, Ohio. He wanted some-
thing “different.” and he got it.

He tried working in an oilfield,
like his father. He tried being a
lumberjack. He got 15 dollars a
week in a rubber factory. But
all the time there was that con-
suming urge to be an actor.

BAD STAxT

THERE was no bright, quick
road to success for Gable.

Trying to be an actor entailed
dreary days of frustration and
nights of doubt and near despair.

He arrived in Hollywood — at
about the same time as the great
Depression of 1930, which was not
timing —-by way of an unofficial
journey on a goods train to the
Pacific Coast.

I was talking just now to an
Australian woman who used to
have the pre-success Gable as one
of her “roomers” here in Holly-
wood.

“He was néarly
gry,” she said.

always hun-
“Hadn't got the
price of a chocolate milkshake on.
him. But he had such appealing
eyes that I used to let him eat
part of my son’s breakfast in the
mornings.”

(That same appealing look was
soon going to get results from
millions of other women_ across
the world. And it was going to
pay off in rather more than haif
a breakfast.)

ON THE WAY

ALL the dreariness of cadgea
meals and shoes that needed
mending ended at last, and the
incandescent light of fame started
to warm up for the man with the
grey eyes and the urge to act:

Probably a lot of you remem-
ber “A Free Soul,” in. which
Jonnny-Come-Lately-Gable stole
the act from Norma Shearer and
Lionel Barrymore.

That flat voice proved irresis-

‘LONELY G



CLARK GABLE AND SYLVIA HAWKES

Ohio and Gable, wisely, has never
tried to monkey with it).

And then came the burgeoning
batch of successes culminating in
“Gone With The Wind.”

And how did success sit with
Gable? Well success in Holly-
wood is apt to be as congenial as
a case of bubonic plague on a
maiden voyage.

I was talking only yesterday to
one of the most. brilliant young
producers on the M.G.M. lot. He
is 34, and he is right up at the
top of the heap.

He said to me:

‘For years I
lived for success.

I was deter-
mined to get to where I wanted
to be. Suddenly Ll, was there—I
had it. And life Was not worth
fiving. I had nothing to fight for
any more.”

“What did you do?” I asked.

“Oh, I had to go to a psycho-
analyst; of course. it took 1h
months, and cost me afi awful lo
of money at 25 dollars a consul-
tation, but he finally straightened
me out.”

THEN CAROLE
SO Gable — and now it was
Golden Gable—bought his _ big
ranch in San Fernando Valley,

Or did he? There were already
two divorces. hanging sadly on
the record. Back in 1924 he had
mafried a girl called Josephine
Difloh. That ended in 1930. In
1931 he married Ria Langham,
The lawyers argued that one into
obscurity in 1938.

But in March 1939 Gable got
mafried to pretty, beguiling, and
amusing Carole Lombard, a tip-
top actress, anda resounding
suceess in hér own right.

They were happy for three
years. Then, in 1942, Carole was
killed in a plane crash. A few
months later Gable, now increas-
ingly taciturn and needing a daily
hair crop to conceal the greying
hair above his ears, enliste in
the American Air Force.

He had a good war record,
winning the Air Medal for “ex-
ceptibnally meritorious etrhieve-
ment” during five missions over
enémiy territory.

“MALAISE”

AFTER his demob the Boy
From Cadiz faced a world that
grew increasingly difficult. His
first post-war film, with Greer
Garson, was a flop. Then he
seemed to get back into the old
groove with “The Hucksters” and

SUNDAY

ABLE

But he was a fonely man. He
never cared to take any part in
the Hollywood razzle-dazzle. His
idea of a good time was to go out
hunting or fishing, or to down
some contemplative Scotches at
the ranch in the evenings.

Hollywood is not an awfully
gay place. People here are apt
to suffer from something for
which we have no exact word in
English, but which our French
friends call a “malaise.”

The Hollywood malaise is some-
thing that can be as troublesome
as lumbago. I have gay been
here a week, but already I begin
to see what ails the citizenry
around here.

Yes, there was Gable, awfully
lonely and with very few friends.
It is all right to have only a
handful of friends if you have
the spiritual and mental resources
to take care of the times when
vou know you are gging to be all
alone.

But if you haven't
going gets really rocky,

And then the lonely man met
the English woman Sylvia
Hawkes. There were some points
of resemblance. She was essen-
tially lonely too. She like Gable;
had been married three times
two divorces (Lord Ashley and
Lord Stanley of Alderley), and a
good marriage which ended when
Douglas Fairbanks Snr. died.

APARY.... ALONE

FOR a few months the marriage
went well. And then suddenly it
had stopped going at all, and
Sylvia Hawkes was off to Mexico
—alone.

She came back and went off in
the yacht of the millionaire Van-
derbilts for a Pacific cruise. She
has had a partial breakdown on
the trip

The ship’s doctor has forbidden
her to reply to radiograms.

So, while Sylvia sits sadly in
the yacht, Gable is back again
all alone at his great big ranch
house.

The

then the

ranch house with

. every~
thing—the

swimming pool, the
super TV set, the five bathrooms,
the giant refrigerator, the sports
room, the well-stocked bar, the
washing machines—all those gim-
micks and trimmings and fallals
that go to make up the rich, full
life.

Well, nearly all.
one thing missing

Happiness.

There is just

ADVOCATE





beings inmpacke t
department of C. F. Harri
Ca., Ltd. Miss Clare Cave showed

me the trickiest of models in a



two-piece, and also a one piece by
Ripley for $2.65. In ts collec-
tion I: saw the famous Jantzen
name, afd for mother—a very

new strapless design in Satin Las-
tex. In this beach display are
the raciest looking Beach Bags in
rainbow stripes and overall de-
sign, rubber lined and offered in
two sizes for $3.98. The whole
display is one of colour and in this
Kiddtes-Shop’, upstairs in Har-
rison’s, you'll find Miss Cave has
for children everything that will
answer the call for sun and sea,

The Paint Counter ai C

S. Pit-
cher & €

dazzles the eye. There’s
masses of it and for every purpose.
For the kitchen sink, now, all you
need is this Aluminum Paint that
Suarantees a long lasting silver
inish. And on those lime walls
you'd use Berger Matroil—a paint
that covers solidly two coats
and provides a really good wash-
able surtice. For that troublesome
Siower-bath, or for that matter
“ay congrete or metal work, the

in

excellent Perquite ‘White’ with it’s

anti-fungus
sultable
roof—with

And

qualities is ideally
Lastikon

if I've missed

Red Oxide.

anything,
Pitcher’s certainly haven’t in this
extremely well stocked depart-
ment

Books '— especially ‘Technical
Books abound in Roberts & Co.
on High Street. Electrical, Build-
ing, Automotive, Photographic, all
are here and many more besides.
Yes, many more — of which Mer-
cantile Law and Accountancy are
two, In passing I saw materials
for the Artist and Student includ-
ing Brushes, Oil and Water-Col-
Urs aNd an assortment of recent-
ly rec@ived Paint-Boxes. There
is also an excellent range of Paper
and Canvas and Roberts & Co.
will arrange to have this latter
cut and stretched to your re-
quirements. There is a splendid
choice of Artist’s Materials
whether for School use or to in-
dulge in that most excellent of
bobbies

i | Canada’s

Man About Town — LEER [ctor anon?

Finally, don’t forget the

PAGE SEVEN

TL aa eee

Mr. J. H. Buckland! ws

has View|

been owner

> on of he Sea Bring Prompt Relief from i:
2UCS ouse on istings since

March of this year. The managevr,! BACKACH ;

Mr, George Edwards, showed me HEADACHE

the extensive renovations, now| @ RHEUMATISM

almost completed. Large airy bed-| tee ane

rooms overlook coast and sea—| Jj ypurs e100 1 - é

emphasising the high location and | 4anes Garris _ .

cool comfort. Sea View Guest 40 3/-
House cater to Lunchéon and} BPs
Dinner Parties in the spacious





dining-room — serve and
cocktails in an attractive open air
patio-bar. Catering is the Ameri-
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service and in it’s central location,
convenient to beach, clubs and
town, the completely new Sea
View Guest House has everything
to offer the visitor.

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tible (it stemmed straight. from and he started to enjoy life.

Woman Of The Week

° ‘ ;
; Beautiful and novel Toilet Ac-
; 9 e Did you know that there’s an {cessories—every conceivable me-
] ren S ar a ac ve ae) extremely well stocked little De-|dicine, proprietary or dispensed,
a bh partment Store at 44 Swan Street?

y are leaders in their field—Pilot
Mik Aha Radios—and Barbados Agencies

have them.

You’re
Roberts &

to
Co. on High

L.E.S invited see



them at
Street.



a
saloon. Her husband to

his hospital in a Rolls.
Golf, Bridge, TV

angered

rives ; Fountain Pens from the States
aniyee the prides, Look, for instance, ;

these Irish Linen Table Sets and
the newly arrived American and/|
European Floral Spuns, Ahd over}

“tlvervy new indeed, a marvellous

candy counter, smokers’ sup-
plies, even Flower and Vegetable

’ vnusual Thermos Jugs and Ice
It’s the firm of J. B. Field & Co

ve Flasks, display of Waterman
The stock is excellent and so are

” E 7 I I She

Hy Evelyn Irons

is





by supposi-

tions that she a lot of seeds. A fresh and varied stock

spent







here isthe Millinery Department} ’,. ' . a ¥ .
Kann ar : ; ay . ; displayed in a_ spotless store. “ ty Bie.) ey
hildren’s lib ils that hi nha eee en, oe bebe it ee a pay 4 Witere? Sverythina’s there in P, KLIM is ideal for infant feeding—it’s always
every one in ther own hand c ren’s librarian wails that his Course. , She styles and colours. lis show- Meutedin ar Coe ife a aaa a 6 544 .
(“Children would not care for clients are too Blytonised to read it, she aoe __lcounter/is displaying a wide range |, ‘Bra hike Ga Pr ince Wil- Pyne an and unatfotmly nourishing, KLIM up
typewritten letters’). Her 23 Dickens. Both are keen golfers: play|of Costume Jewellery while fur- nat ret oo Ritant ithete Alte plies the important food essentials meeded for
publishers also get hand-written Enid Blyton weet serenely on. arr ® Je They ane ouleg ther back a A eparocen for Nore’s oe Matias’ thutehitan babies to grow strong and healthy. And KLIM is
letters—pages of them, on both “I am not a malicious person.’ so e ne ‘Ourt, | Ladies}and Men's Shoes, On this)‘*Ores et as? dass ait + ehtha one Lf ; si i
sides of the paper—detailing ail says she. ‘play bridge, watch TV. -work in| side jg the ‘comprehensive diets yard ot va oo moan cree readily digested another important featute, :
the preliminary business. She started to write as a school- the garden. 7 7 of Household Appliances andj#nd its former Pri a we ilia : Above all, KLIM is dependable, It’s aot surpris-
girl in Beckenham, where she was _ With all her colossal output, | Glassware and the whole selection! there how on tate SLLDAIES ing that so many Mothers prefer it!
e€ 1s a Company $ Enid Blytc ; lave. to h » Henry Street—the Cosmopolitan 8 y
Sometimes the business is born, treasures a ete ae at yton is no slave, to her i. omered to you at the corner of ee a some a, co er a
al intricacies rejection slips. Her first published 4tt. Swan Street and Bolton Lane. rug Store presentg its stock
sever abteat ite cab oinn Bas work wae. 2 love poem in Nash’s In a smart new black dress, a ee eee aT Te the modern manner,
r é is -wW a £ q a I ee 4 : . ‘ . é
factory: Sip pais in Ops lawyers maa wor = wee errr ee eu ‘Seon oe oot a 4 Car Vans Pick-ups—galore! Libe a Linens Jaeqmar 1. KLIM is pare, safe milk
' 1 ni ot one a. a} t ars, ans, -ups—gé Jiberty L : Ji ‘
eS ae _ ay eee i Sie wes a Sompetant pianist, husband and elder daughter} 1) Fort Royal Garage now, crowd-| Scarves—London Styled Dresses, ‘
herself extept in. special eireum- and her father disapproved of the ea ee aes as Maat “i the en eet eras ne ‘er ae aI 2. KLIM keeps without refrigeration
: ‘ , gee it writing; planned a musical career, ays | & avuent) their owners, Morris Minors, Oo} part o 1e «delightful stoc i
for te wees tue aalae wiles Instead, she broke away and took 12 4 Baptist Sunday-school at] and four-door saloons, the larger the Showroom of the Janetta
sentation) which. she im oses on the Froebel training, taught in a Beeckenham. Oxfords, Cowley Vans and Cowley! Dress Shop. The linens are styled | 3. KLIM quality is always uniform
ali heF publishers alike + ea kindergarten. (“I always. loved WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED Pick-ups, these last now with)in the most captivating, hand- *
On va lati m” sh , kes—no Children and was happiest in their LES. fully opening side-draft ventila-| embroidered skirts, You must
fhiggling baht ueibeks, The first company.”’) She burst into author- ee tors and in four colours—blue,|see them. The Jacsmar Scarves 4. KLIM is excellent for growing children
anes aces see a 000, or the aan ship when, as a student, a pub- STANLEY green grey, and ae Only &jare truly hog mete eer oT
* , * me ‘ 7] paived ar _z g ade hand-
i . have Lis her £72 down for a set small number are unsold, Coming} ceived are the English made hé
a et ede ce OF abt english Raters for schools. =the fearless soon is another mixed shipment | bags, perfectly finished and won- 5. KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes

NOW. f noelp you decorate the
scrapbook, this week's stamp
18 gbe showing Stanley :—

Here he ts—Staniey the feariess,
soldier sailor writer, and explorer
ot Atriea.

of twenty-one units, Have a look) derful value, From Scotland there
at the Cowley-Pick-Up designed, are knitted _ twin-sets in the
as a school bus with plastic cover-| finest of qualities — there is, in

ed side seats, overhead canopy andj fact, your complete wardrobe for

How much does she make? Far
more than the £10,000'a year
usually estimated; Probably nearer
the £50,000 which Edgar Wallace

ENID BLYTON
in a new black dress she takes time
off to go to Ascot.

Subconscious Cinema

She sits down at her typewriter
without plot or synopsis. Figures,

KLIM Is RECOMMENDED FOR INFANT FEEDING!

; He was born in Denbigh, Waies safety bar—the neatest thing you] day and evening wear, The whole

ENID BLYTON, the children’s 8S Said to get. tly.’ she She says appear before her eyes as eat Pe chidhood In @ | Evey saw. Incoming shipments of| selection, exclusive to the Janetta 7. KLIM is safe in the specially-packed tin
complete list of her books, Her _ “I don't’ Know exactly, ‘inh: 0D @ cinema, sereen. They move, ji "*0°8 i Morris Products are marked by| Dress Shop, is designed to pro-
fans have to. pay 6d. for it, It S@YS, looking her quizzer straight they talk, they sing their own joined the U.S a> riesae

in the eye. the speed in which they go out vide you with the widest range of



















shows that thits prodigious yarn~ i i ivi i original tunes. Other characters eal ad year cna ave you reserved yours.? apparel hallmarked quality. 8. KLIM is produced under strictest control
$ 7 Z Lik h dividue king vecame ~@ re “= hav 1 Cn
spinner, stfll in her forties, has ‘ ae ct Mtn, Enid Blyton Pies appear; the story unfolds: Al I power 13s hors pee SESS =
250 books in print, She estimates ys ie © have to do is to type it out as fast piggest a
that altagether she has written tumed herself into a limited com- ,2°y can says Enid Blyton, She W2,Was te, ind “An OLD Friend in a NEW Spot”
some 300, pany. That, shé says takes care Of yackons that she must have a w David Living- :
When Edgar Wallace died at the receiving end. (“You see, the singularly obliging sub-conscious stone, who was sust A FEW YARDS AWAY!! Take pure water,
nearly 57, his output had reached nas appreciation is my real hind, ae Fak Atricn, ;
170. reward. Some of her child, readers se hyve As the Ships Come in They Bring Us .
Wallace’s daily 12,000 words 21% Per Cent her out at Beaconsfield; she has 3). 4 dm°"*2S Fiera GO) r ial add KLIM, stir
were put on paper with the help Her book of children’s prayers. met thousands of others at meet- Condon. ana WATERMAN’S PENS, CUTRITE PAPER, SPECIAL fontk ot
of two lightning secretaries and a Before I Go to Sleep, brings in ings organised by book-sellers and 14 ana diamond snutl box oy LAUNDRY STARCH, SMALL THERMOS ICE, JARS, and you have pure, safe mi re -
dictaphone. Bnid Blyton uses no £300 to £500 a year, she says, That publishers. Queen Victoria, atin Sood his VEGETABLE and FLOWER SEEDS \ Sat OF Ny
such aids. is one cheque sh@ does not receive. at home she is Mrs. Kenneth 4.07 mie Suttie te discovered AEROSOL FLY SPRAY

She sits on a_ chintz-covered
swing couch in her garden at
Beaconsfield with a portable type-
writer on her knee, and the story

It goes to a children’s charity.
Add to her income from the 250

children’s books her 2} per cent.

royalties from all the commercial

Darrell Waters, wife of a surgeon,
mother of two daughters, one an
art student at St. Andrew’s Uni-
versity and the other at Boarding-

the course of the Congo Hiver and
this expedition iaid the foundation
tor what is now the Belgian Congo
one of the richest slices of Alrica.

ft honours Staniey in this stamp.



P.A. CLARKE—Cosmopolitan Pharmacy
PRINCE Wm. HENRY STREET.

pure
safe

Copr. 1950
Borden Co.

KLIM ©: MILK









as a sideline. Plus royalties on
over 200 school readers and. other

>

3 : ‘ ; ‘ s Price, unused 10d | aM Internat’! Copr
pours from the production line at produtts to which the Enid Blyton school, Her two-servant house is ioe Thierens F = aie 1 Hoserved
the rate of 10,000 words a day name is lent—diaries, writing well-ordered: so is her 3-acre London Rxpress Bervice = SSS SES SS | FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER me
(15,000 at full pressure). paper, jigsaws. Not to mention the garden, kept by the gardener fy LA PLOL LLLP PLE EPO LPC PPE PPLE PLL
card and board games she devises “gided by the chauffeur. “Onde 5 %

of my extravagances,” she said,
indicating a thousand bush roses

Keilag Keo ee

educational text-books. It’s. 4 jin beds laid out round a pool.
dizzy sum, She has a big Daimler, but
Sometimes a snooty critic lashes she prefers driving herself

over the world, and she answers at the Blyton books. Sometimes 4 around in her small fast, green _ Cashmere Bouquet Face Powder

%



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. She has six books at the proof
stage to correct. She has just
finished writing another, a nature
book begun six days ago (“I just
worked on it at odd times”’).

Letters arrive from children all

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PAGE FIGHT

& avvoerr

trace = SSS ese
Printed by the Advocate Co. Li4., umoespia “Is DFOIE

Sunday, July 1, 1951

OUR BEAM

IT IS unbelievable, yet it is said to be
true that during the last fortnight a boat
bringing meat for hard pressed Barbados
was not unloaded because of a technical
hitch between ship-workers and ship au-
thorities. The general public ought to be







under the Bridgetown, Speightstown and
Holetown Act of 1891, but this Act was
directed primarily at protecting the City
from the risk of fire.

What is needed in Barbados is a simple,
workable Town and Country Planning Act
which would cause the least possible hard-
ship. We could do no better than to follow
the Jamaican legislation on this subject.

The object of the Jamaican Town and
Country Planning Act is to “provide for
the control of development in both rural
and urban areas by securing the co-ordina-
tion of roads and public services, ensuring
proper conditions of health and sanitation,



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951

CLOSED

FOR
REPAIRS

Advocate Stationery

told (until they realise the truth) the
reasons for some of the increases in the
cost of living, and, it would appear too, for

Galvanized Wove Wire

4” MESH x 18” W.G. x 2 feet

preserving objects of architectural, histori-
cal, archaeological and artistic interest and
places of natural interest or beauty...”



“Let’s hope, Eden, those godless Socialists aren’t desecrating this Sabbath Day with
week-end speeches. .. .”

xX 2 »







some of the shortages of foodstuffs in the
island. The reasons show cumulatively

that the community is largely to blame.

Imagine a community as small as Barbados
allowing an incident of this nature to go
unprotested. At a time when there is a
real shortage of food which is but the pre-
lude of a greater shortage, a ship is allowed
to leave Barbados carrying with it a portion
of food intended to relieve that shortage.
Not only does this action accentuate an
existing food shortage but the meat when
it finally arrives will have to be sold at a
price which will compensate for its addi-
tional journey by sea.

This is but the quintessence of madness.
Yet it reflects a state of things too often
ignored and overlooked. It may be a source
of satisfaction to those who off-load ships
that they are paid high wages and that they
have it in their power seriously to affect
the cost of living in Barbados, This may be

‘The basis of the Act is the simple princi-
ple of zoning for development. The island
is divided into five principal zcnes—indus-
try, commerce, residential, agriculture and
open spaces. This does not mean that if
the Planning Board ordered that a certain
area should be a residential zone, and there
happened to be a factory in that area, the
{actory would have to close down: but
what it does mean is that the owner of the
factory would not be given permission to

extend it, and if ever it ceased operations

he could not redevelop the site by building
another factory.

In the same way, with regard to the wid-
ening of a street a line is established and
if an existing building is demolished the
new building cannot be built beyond that
line.

Exactly the same principle applies to
recreational open spaces. If, for instance,



‘Clubland’ And Bob Hope

Clubs for boys—and girls—are
jtaking quite a prominent place
nowadays in Social Welfare plans
and activities. And very worthily
so. For they are centres where the
young folk can get together in
healthy conditions, under suitable
superintendence, and give play
to their natural social instincts
and abounding energies. They
also possess a high ethical value
from both the negative and posit-
ive viewpoints: for they rescue the
boys and girls from idling in dan-
gerous places with nothing worth-
while to do, and so from the risk
of the “mischief” which the pro-
verb tells us “Satan finds for idle
hands”, and they furnish oppor-
tunity for beneficial activities—
perhaps the continuance of their
very limited education, or initia-
tion into some useful line of work,
along with reasonable provision
for recreation, Of this last there
should not be too much: that is the
dangerous tendency of the modern

By Rev. F. GODSON

(much more than a club) founded
nearly 30 years ago, in a very
small way, by a young Methodist
Minister named James Butter-
worth. But by the time of the
outbreak of the second World
War it had grown into the biggest
single institution of the kind,
probably, in the whole world,
with a membership of around
500, and is still growing.

While serving in the Lancashire
Fusiliers during the first War
Butterworth wa; deeply impress-
ed, and depressed, by the pro-
found ignorance of religion and
its inspiring and controlling influ-
ences displayed by the crowds of
young fellows around him, and
after demobilisation and his entry
into the Ministry he determined
to attempt something specially
for the boys, and later the girls,
in some slum area of a big city,
preferably London.

operations. This may be sur-
prising to superficial observers,
but it was, and is, most gratify-
ing to discover how the young
folk responded in due time to the
religious call, to the gracious,
heroic, Person of the Lord Christ
and His moral Kingship. A real
living Ecclesia was built up, a
genuine fellowship of faith and
reverence for goodness, which con-
trolled and inspired and ennobled
all the departments and activities
of the Scheme.

Three other important points
should be noted. The first is thai
the method of enlisting and train-
ing in dealing with new members
has been to appeal to the bit of
good in them, their better instincts,
which Butterworth holds are al-
ways there, though often deep
down and probably overlaid. The
second was to use what may be
called the Public School constitu-

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Successors to

PITCHER & CO.

BECKWITH STORES

A : . ; ; 7 sd i f Prefects, Captains, and -

as a sols o 3 Government decided to |increase in leisure time: “all play | Ba, ains,

Ralace to ship workers, & solace to relieve an enlightened Gove . t eer Goring \end ne work gives Jack & cen So he succee.ted in persuading other Officers, and give ‘every ENJOY A
hem from the drudgery and hardships of extend the Esplanade as far as the Swing Joi ies the “Fathers and Brethern” of the one the chance of position

their task. Bridge the process would be gradual. As Here in Barbados we are in- Annual Conference to give him a and honour in turn. Thus the

But it cannot be catzed public-spirited.

Sir Douglas Ritchie an impartial ob-
server wrote in his Deep Water Harbour
report about the efficiency of labour among
water front workers, in Barbados. He said
“since the war years the general output of
labour appears to have declined seriously”.
That was in 1949 and the recent action of
ship-owners in refusing any longer to pay
for exports until they arrive in Bridgetown
warehouses is guarantee enough that their
output has not improved but worsened
since 1949.

Figures quoted by Sir Douglas Ritchie
in his report on the Deep Water Harbour
in 1949 show that costs of ship discharge
per ton varied as follows—Trinidad 9s, 1d:
British Guiana 10s. 9d: and Barbados 18s.
9d. It is idle to blame widely others for

increases in the local cost of living and to development is essential to this island and naturally nicknamed “The Dug ae Coane the seen re OF
turn a blind eye to our own contributions See thik esl eaten i isas-. |and is certainly more than should Outs”. yet been no rnoney to rebuild. Bui
to that i a a if it is neglected the results will be disas-. ant is corn eee es stil it grew-(apd cieveh, and Sos Code See deneeteneins Want. 40

Ought we not by the
exercise of a healthy public opinion to
press for economies which will result from
greater efficiency of labour? Should we
biame world market conditions because
string beans which sold earlier this year

for 20 tb b bl WIMBLEDON is the Mecca Home, the School, and the Church money, plans to the cost of pon and led him forward to é
or 20 cents per Ib, are obtainable now only Shea : te 3 ecca of |to combine in an intensive cam- £28,000 were drafted, Two years Detter position. ey got inte
Tennis just as Lord’s is the Mecca paign. So far so good, but the plan gater, gifts and promises having conversation and the comediar

at 40 cents per Ib? Tomatoes did not jump
suddenly from 24 cents per Tb. to 40 cents
per lb. because of the Korean War nor be-
cause of any dollar shortage. Carrots have
not doubled in price because of trade
cycles nor trade tendencies, These deliber-
ate increases in the cost of living are due
to the fact that they have been ignored by
the community. Enough people are willing
to pay exorbitant prices and the price goes
up, with its attendant evils. Gambling
experts abound in the streets of Bridge-
town pouncing upon the holder of a large
pay packet. Money changes hands and
the cost of living goes up for one who loses
and the others who depend on him. Work-
ers who have made all they want for the
rest of the year on the sugar plantations
are not anxious to work much more this
year. Labour, writes the Director of Agri-
culture, is in short supply, and the 1951-52
planting programme is being retarded.
Housewives accustomed to ring up for
everything are too lazy to grow garden
produce. Servants who. spend half a day
hunting vegetables and fruit in alleys
object to healthy recreation cultivating the
garden, Pigs, goats, hens and livestock and

soon as a house was put up for sale the
Government would buy it and demolish it
and eventually the windows would join
together to give Bridgetown a lovely view
of the harbour,

Such a scheme is bound to cause a Cer-
tain amount of hardship, but everything is
done to try to prevent this. In the Jamai-
can Act, for instance, it is provided that in
any case where the Board have prepared
a scheme, before it becomes law it is open
to public inspection and any persons inter-
ested may make objections. The Board
then considers the objections and may
amend the scheme if they think it neces-
sary.

This is Election year, and any Party
that intends to work for the good of Bar-

hados must have a Town and Country Plan-
ning Act on its programme. Planned

trous.



WIMBLEDON

of Lawn

Cricket, and Wimbledon is even more im-
portant than Lord's for all the World plays
Lawn Tennis.

With the championship at Wimbledon in
full swing it is strange that the West
Indies, so prominent in the game of crick-
et, are not represented. In the long history
of Wimbledon we can only recall three in-
stances of players from the Caribbean
taking part in the championship, two of
these players hailed from Jamaica and one
from British Guiana — B. M. Clarke, Lea-
hong and A. C. Belgrave, It is true that
Madame Mathieu, at one time resident in
St. Lucia, came very near to winning the
Ladies’ Singles on more than one occasion,

but she, after all, was representing France.

What is the reason for the poor showing
by West Indians? We have the climate
suitable and the ability to play ball games.
We have shown that we can compete on
equal terms with the crack cricketing
countries. But our standard of Lawn Ten-
nis is not as high as that of a small provin-
cial town in England,

The absence of twilight restricts the
hours of play in the West Indies. Lawn Ten-

debted to our energetic and enter-
prising Commissioner of Police for
introducing the movement, and it
is very gratifying that it has
caught on so quickly and stron;
and gained the cordia] approval of
the community. The first Club,
at the Southern End of the Bay
Street Esplanade, was a prompt
suecess and it has been quickly
followed by others in St. Michael,
and in Speightstown and a couple
of the country parishes, and
Colonel Michelin is planning to
extend the movement to every
parish. He is finding also that a
special Welfare Officer is needed
to. run the scheme efficiently and
provide for development: so he is
sending a constable to England to
seek the necessary study and
training for the purpose.

Filling a Gap
In the effort that a few of us put

agreed that while every possible
effort should be made to |

the lawbreaker the main

would be to work through the
children, to teach and train them
in the ideas and ways of good be-
haviour, and to that end to get the

left the adolescent period, the
critical years between school days
and the entry into employment,
very insufficiently provided for.
That gap would now be filled
pretty suitably by the Club Move-
ment, supposing it could be ex-
tended to cover the whole area,
and efficiently equipped and ad-
ministered. And I am sure that
if the four branches of Social
Welfare service indicated would
really co-operate in a determined
and persevering effort very great
improvements in law and order
could be achieved,

But “Clubland”!
What is this?

This 1s the name for a very
comprehensive provision for the
boys and girls in the Walworth

section of South-East London,

“and reading

suitable appointment. This was
an almost derelict large old
Chapel in the Walworth area, left,
by death and migration, with only
a very small congregation, and yet
surrounded by a crowded popula-
tion, chiefly irreligious and un-
ethical, not to say immoral and
lawless, and. abounding in young
life of the cockney type.

Here he set about the very dif-
ficult task of making contacts and
a beginning. He used the few
doors open through the little com-
pany of church members and ad-
herents still remaining, also house
to house visiling and general
friendliness, and before long he
was able to make a start with just
half a dozen boys. The outlines
of his plans were still vague, but
taking shape as he went forward,

The old Chapel possessed base-
ment rooms—Sunday School and
Class and Committee accommoda-
tion, and these were used, and in
due course as the Club grew they
were adapted and equipped, and

“after six years of adventures,

failures, successes, and struggles,

new premises became a necessity”
—so Butterworth describes the
situation. And most fortunately a
near-by space was available, and
with great faith but very little

been secured, a builder’s contract
for that sum was signed, and the
young parson’s heart was im-
mensely cheered while his plans
and enthusiasms expanded,

But after a few more years
additions again became impera-
tive, and, most fortunately again,
the interest an@ powerful help of
the Duke and Duchess of York,
their present Majesties the King
and Queen, and of Queen Mary,
were enlisted, and buildings and
equipment valued at around
£100,000 were provided—work-
shops, gym, games rooms, library
room, parliament
chamber, ete., etc., and a branch
for the girls. And in the centre
«f all the “House of Worship”, the
Church, which Butterworth held
to be central and fundamental to
the whole organisation and its



boys and girls discipline ana
teach each other and develop
a strong public spirit. And the
third was the Employment as one
feature of the Parliamentary sys-
tem, imitative of the Nationa!
method of handling Public Affairs.
But Mr. Butterworth’s handbook,
“Clubland” — a volume packed
with information, life stories, and
wisdom gathered in running the
enterprise — must be read to fully
understand and appreciate the
subject.

Bob Hope

At last we come to this gentle-
man’s part in the Story. He is an
outstanding and immensely popu-
lar American comedian, and has
become a munificent patron of
“Clubland.”

It happened that the costly and
most precious buildings were
bombed and ruined during the
great blitz on London in 1940, and
while at the end of the war the
members, past and present, ralliea

U.S.A. on qa Lecture Tour, pre-
sumably about his special work
and ideals, and while there visitea
Hollywood. There, one day, with
a crowd, he was inspecting a “tilm
set” in which Hope was concerned,
and he approached the little par-

was immensely interested in Mr.
Butterworth’s story end said he
would like to give a “benefit per-
formance” for the rebuilding fund.
The winter passed and then a
couple of months ago Hope cabled
that he had booked a fortnight’s
engagement in London, and he
would give the whole of his share
in the proceeds to “Clubland”
This was estimated at £18,000.

That seems very big pay for 2
fortnight’s performances. Possibly
it may be a misprint in the report
I saw—for £1,800. Yet we know
what astonishing fees popular en-
tertainers receive. Anyway it is
a fine and substantial gift, and wil!
give a lively filip to the rebuilding
fund, and it is confidently to be
expected, will open the way to yet
greater achievements in the “Club-
land” that is yet to be.



Sitting On The Fence

R. ERNEST DAVIES, British

delegate to the Four Power
conference of Deputy Foreign
Ministers which has been argu-
ing with Comrade Gromyko for
longer than I can remember, is
reported as saying: “We don’t
want a breakdown, but we ean’t
sit here indefinitely and go craay,
We are all almost’ mental

out a time ago to devise ways and
means to control and reduce law-
lessness and crime in the island,
which seemed to be increasing,
J

already.”

By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

Do the mousy ones have blue
eyes or brown eyes?
Some blue, some brown.
How many brown?
I don’t know.
Have they all got mummies to
look after them?
Most of them.
And daddies?

vitamin deficiency check-up
and questioned about their
childhood by a_ psychiatrist.”
WORKER HITS OUT
Mg AD a bit of trouble, eh,
Schultzburger?”
“Yeah, I guess so, doc.”
“What happened?”
“Oh, I just busted the fore-
man on the nose, doc.”
“That all?”

; ; , . y , 2 * They have one daddy who “That's all, doc.’
poultry are getting less while people eat nis, unlike cricket, is not a game that can be | sian Pema pee, a fee ke looks after them all, . “Why did you siug the fore-
out of tins. played in the heat of the tropical midday | should take the advice of his ‘six- | Only one daddy? Who's that? man, Schultzburger?”
But saturation point has been reached : year-old daughter, Sally, The great Father Stalin. Why? Because he’s the low-
: bdr sun, Play usually starts at 4.30 p.m. and | tecently wrote to him: — ; Fancy being the father of more est, meanest, dirtiest son of
and unless these habits of sloth, indiffer- for the greater part of the year ends at 6 | Pear Daddy, ~# then 20,000,000 ee” a...
8 R y you are having a good FOOD NEWS “O.K., O.K. Schultzburger. Is

ence and a refusal to face unpleasant facts
are thrown away and a new constructive
effort made to face our problems, we are
all of us, despite what the politicians say,
going to be very much worse off than we
are today. Even tinned food is getting
short.



TOWN ANDCOUNTRY

p.m. In Northern climes devotees play the
whole day long in summer when the light
lasts until 9 p.m. or 9.30 p.m. And in the
winter months they play on hard courts
and on indoor wood courts. If the West
Indies are to overcome the absence of twi-
light and the inability to play in the heat
of the day then we must resort to evening
games on flood-lit courts.

Tennis in the West Indies — or at least

hope
time in Paris. If you can come

home, bring me Mr. Gromyke,
* we a m

_ After an hour of cross-question-
ing by a_ six-year-old, Comrade
G would be ready for the strait
jacket.

Are there millions and millions
of little girls in Russia?

Millions and millions.

How many millions?

Well, I don't know exactly.

My daddy says you know ail
the answers.

Shall we say 20,000,000?



UST the time of year for cold

salmon and cucumber, dear,

isn’t it?

Of course, dear. But who can
afford real salmon with the
present rate of taxation on un-
earned incomes?

Have you ever tried mock sal-
man, dear?

No, dear,

I read all about it in the papers.
You empty your tin of salmon
into a basin. Grade B is quite
“es dear.

yes, dear.





your poppa still alive?”
“Certainly is.”
“Fond of him, Schultzburger?”
“Sure I am. He’s the grand-
est poppa a guy ever had.”
“Did he ever beat you up wher
you were a kid, Schultzburger?’
“Yeah. Plenny.’
“Any hard feelings?”
“For beating me up?

Why
no. doc,

A saint would have
beaten me up when I was a
kid.”

“Didn't you slug the foreman
because your poppa slugged you?’

celles ceiiecentetainctactD yiamtintiaaets oeenirasatatie~ eth aga na et




DA COSTA & CO, LTD.



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CIGAR

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LONDRES BOXES of 25 ........
CORONAS BOXES of 25
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JAS. GARAWAY & CO.

Dial 4689



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SEE THAT YOU GET THEM STRUNG
WITH THE BEST GUT AT YOUR ....
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which is the Seal of Durability,

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Also BASKET BALLS and
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DACOSIA & CO., LID.

DRY GOODS _ DEPT.

a



2 i Sik Aece : 4 - ; What are their names? Then you boil some potatoes, “I'm telling you. T slugger
TODAY, with new buildings springing in Barbados oe suffers from another handi- Oh, they all have different mash them with half acup of the foreman pecause he’s the
up all over the island and the possibility cap of their own making. Lawn Tennis in names. milk, a dab of margarine, and the lowest, meanest, dirtiest son of $
, ya : : : . : $ f the Caribb Sento’ i Tae Twenty million different Chris- yolk of one egg. oe ..” : oo Sm
of new industries being established in the many of the Caribbean territories is still | tian names? Yes, dear, “Pipe” dbwn }- on. *thhty. shalt ah S
near future, the need for a Town and looked upon as a social game, This Victori- Well, no. Some have the same | Then you take half a_ stale Schultzburger. If you don’t hate | .
tye : . 3 names. Many thousands, for brown loaf, pull out the inside, your poppa you must hate your | % . 8
-Country Planning Act has become impera- an idea has prevented many a youngster instance, are called Olga. crumble it and add water till it’s: momma.” ’ y
tive. from gaining the opportunity to take part How many thousands? aogsy. 4 a “You leave my momma outa | ¥ i %
. = ) see, par. vs.
If building is not controlled now, ‘the in the game. And even some who might Don't rn LF wade Ada’ the potato mash and the “You identified this foremar § e x
; idge , 5 have made their mark have been excluded I haven't the figures with me wet breadcrumbs to the salmon, with your momma _ because she | §
charm of Bridgetown and the beauty of the . : : at the moment. and squeeze it all together in your was low and mean like him.” 2
country will be ruined within a few years. from improving their game because they Are little Russian girls dark or fingers. : i “Watch your step, doc,” $ WELL! ! Over to Bathshebo or some
Barbados must plan not only for herself were ineligible to play against other prom- rT aN ; ‘i ore wi feer? : Lest more, LS say re fore- x other lovely seaside resort Simply to RELAX §
. P : r / “4 hae ee ean Some are dark, some fair. ves, dear. en you shape it man has some physical resem- } ¥ ae
but for tourists: no tourist is going to ising players in other social spheres, How many are fair? into the form of a fish, add an- blance to your momma.” X on the silvery sands, BATHE in the briny and g
come to a country littered with jerry-built If. the West Indian is to take his rightful “ ave millions. other, dab of margarine, pop it “That gorilla like my % SIP now and again a Straight GOLD BRAID with ‘
" os F . ? : i . " : Xe ? i e yen and serve ¢ ‘ ? . - * *
houses and where industries thrive in resi- place in the Lawn Tennis World then no | any aha ecaks Metaeie aaah Sel aon Fie tn alee — % a little chipped ice. Of course it’s not a real %
dential areas. time should be lost in sweeping away the | And ten millions dark? The paper says if you stick in a for what the forgman got and $ vacation without %
7 ke me x : ie saat Ga haa ol oie q es caper where the eye should be here it comes.” <
At the moment there is no regulation to stupid barriers which prevent these islands | Aren't there any with mousy hubby will never know the differ- _ “I’m sorry you did that,)X GODDARD'S GOLD BRAID RUM
prevent an industrialist from starting a from competing on equal terms with the | coloured hair ° ence. Schultzburger. I shall have to] %& 2 S
4 : a hee a Ta tia dinned tase ‘est of the world | _Lots of them. Really, dear? report you as anti-social through | %
unning factory, with its accompanying rest of the word. Then altogether there must be “If workers in American excessive vitamin intake and! \ red i Lavi: fais
nell. in a residential or hotel area. The Let tis remember that Lawn Tennis is a | mere than 20,000,000 little Rus- factories reported lazy recommend smaller portions at, %& Serve ina avish Way.
. : | pica ar cies sian girl and difficult they are sent to the factory cafeteria.” s %
or control over building in this island is am | We the clinic for a —L.E.S. -¥ g
FESSSSSSSSS SSS SOSSSS o Oo



SUNDAY, JULY

i ccnaieitienetall

1, 1951



T



Rolling the cricket pitch.











SUNDAY - ADVOCATE NINi

PAGI





ee

MENTAL HOSPITAL

Pictures by CYPRIAN LaTOUCHE







Hy IAN GALE.

AE Lay

“SILVER
STAR”

CONGOLEUM.

a



as
FLOOR COVERING

For

em || ULASTING
BEAUTY

BeeEBEHRaas & &
JUST ARRIVED

Fr PURINA CHICK
a STARTENA & GROWENA
a a
= H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd. a
SBE EBRPeBBRBBAe

The Mental



Obtainable from

66S olo oO OOtet







































OOOO OPO DOOD DOE DP POPP OST DPSS MPP ot
% »
Tua ‘ogm . 96 ‘ ei
® rk COST OF ALL DOMESTIC HARDWARE ¢&
‘“ TE . . enn , 1" A GINIC d
1% ITEMS IS STEADILY INCREASING 2
Ly »
x >
IS THE TIME TO BUY! °
The new women’s ward * NOW i %
somes he m
The cows supply the kitchens with 2C0 pints of milk a day. $s The one are just a few of the many lines %
r , st ’ , \% Cea , leliVvA ’ » , ar r Per « ec re +
ERTVISE \ recently received which we are able to offer at advan- %
EVERY DAY six hundred Hospital was erected in 1891 ADVE i$ tageous prices %
pounds of sweet potatoes and six Before that mental patients were in the py OC i Vk % x
hundred pounds of rice are cooked housed in a forbidding building f - s COOK'S SIEVES %
in the kitchens of the Mental cpposite Glendairy Prison. Today LAL ELL PEPE | . 4
Hospital. Besides this the 7090 there are 35 dormitories, Oo oc- s Yio ‘ x
patients and 140 staff get fresh cupational therapy sheds, one * * % COTTON SOCKET MOPS %
meat, salt fish, pickled pork and each for the use of male and e z ‘ : vt ¥
milk and vegetables from the female patients, 1 WEATHERE | \pS * $s GLASS BUTTER CHURNS g
Hospital’s model farm. * Ee % 7 4 dt Vis x
One. of the finest in the Carib- 50% Discharged % 4 » % CHARCOAL BOX IRONS %
bean area, the Mental Hospital is The number of patients at the % lax : ‘aiv 1% : xs
built on an ideal site at Black Hospity has pepeoeed steadily * Ra ve just receive x x HURRICANE LANTERNS %
Rock. Its 35, acres extend trom since 1939, when there we 470 ‘. \ : c Sls $s
the road right down to the sea, patients. In the last few years * Four Femou x $ GALVANIZED OIL CANS x
and on Sundays the patients bathe it has been possible by moderi x % xs x
from the Hospital’s private beach. methods of treatment to keep the Xs 1% 7 " ; %
The grounds are well kept and number of patients stabilised at ss x ICE CREAM FREEZERS—3 Sizes x
planted with trees and flowering around 700. About 30° of tne ¢ xX mm i ; »
shrubs, the patients doing most cf newly admitted patients have been ss OC EDAR MOPS WI TH HANDLES ~
the gardening. Since his ap- cured and discharged. Dr. Lloyd S % | a" 6 s
pointment as Medical Superin- Still hopes that the new Act % * GALVANIZED GARBAGE CANS »
tendent Dr. Lloyd Still has had dealing with mentally deficieni st % = = : s
many unnecessary iron railings persons, which will come _ into x : is ENAMELLED NIGHT-CHAIR PANS :
pulled down, and the Mental effect soon, will, by putting x ais %
Hospital new tooks-more like a mission to the Hospital more on XM x ‘ GALVANIZED CLOTHES LI %
F lunt t 1 } *s ys .
park than.a prison. a voluntary asis anc making < v : »
certification a last resort, make it % ¥ ‘ KELLY NON-TURNOVER NIGHT %
Model Farm possible. for more cases to be & by J. L. CHATELAIN ° : ~
treated in the early stages. ~ Pharm. Chemi % ‘ LAMPS %
On the model firre attached to One of the methods of treating % San I NAME »
the hospital 83 pigs and 35 cattle the patients is to encourage them % Formerly Head Chemist to %]¢ P LLE . r x
are kept. The pigs are fed ou to learn -handicrafts and mak % the Paris Laboratories and % % . D (GREEN) BREAD BINS x
swill from the kitchen, and it is themselves useful in the garde: x Hospita s x : s
hoped to increase the number so and on the model farm Th % % * oo and — x
that in time at least one large pig women are taught needlework, | a |S ee F ney . : ae
can be killed every week. and I saw some men making These four little pigs have found a comfortable bed, ~ % Sd x x ar THERMOS i and 9 Pints & LASKS %
The cows are fed on elephant benches for one of the dining . s 3] % j x
grass grown on the farm, and rooms in the shade of a tree. The 8 Ae He es % x do 2 Pints Wide Mouth J AR! . %
supply the kitchens with 20U patients also cut the elephant @® CHATELAIN'S JUBOL—(1) $1% }
pints of milk a day, The Hospital grass on the farm and help in the Q For Constipation Re-Edu- ¥ s$ —————— %
now uses 400 pints of milk a day, kitchen garden, x cation of the Intestine % | % %
and it is planned to increase the For recreation the patients play x % ss WE CAN ALSO OFFER %
herd so as to make the Institution cricket and football, and there are & CHATELAIN'S URODONAL §&/& %
self-sufficient, occasional film shows. Also they s (2) For Arthritism, Rheu- $|% “4 SAM ' ” | s
There is also a small kitchen have concerts and dances, the % matism, Obesity Renal and & % %
garden which supplies the kitchens great day of the month being when @ Billary Lithsis Gout, Gravel $/%& Tua "An “ " ~
with lettuce and other vegetables. the Police Band pays them a visit. % Pains and Acidit % st — eon HEA I ROO! ADHE.- 3
If overhead irrigation were in- There are some excellent musician % 1% st Ke ° OF COLOSSAL y
stalled the model farm would among the patients, and Dr. Lloyd % CHATELAIN’S PAGEOI x) ss STRENGTH x
probably be able to supply all the Still is toying with the idea of % (3) For diseases of the Blad- &%]R %
greens that the Hospital required. starting a steel band for their } der, Prostrate and adjoining . es Only 27 Cents Per Tube. ~
The first building at the Mental amusement. 1% organ % 1% %
¥, ———-. >
i A Bi h W i * CHATELAI LOBEOI % % Piya — - >
i as | | B 5 { ( Is s ATELAIN'S GLOBEOL % * %
. 4) A Powerful Toni s 1X *
ve Isnop Was Held bY thard! eee | 1ClHardware Dept. &
PARIS of security at his Paris headquar- x Y a Be %
General Eisenhower, Atlantic ters. 1% For Anaen ( or % ¥% Tel. 2364 ~
Pact Commander-in-Chief, has A former Walt Disney cartoon pp CSN08, Over. un B | £22036 96965655.5665660556.006660060065 5006 OOOOOOOESO
ordered an immediate tightening artist has designed a new series x lon Scrofula ; by x —————S=_—= Spee “ settee e
of “Keep Your Mouth Shut’ i@ ane Nervous. Debill %
posters, which are being display- 1s Tonic tor the Heart M t
ed at headquarters, it ind Nerves %
New identity cards bearing a % %
large-size photograph have been x e %
ordered. 1% >
Even Bishop Fulton Sheen nar- \% ¥
rowly escaped interrogation when 1% %
he looked in this week to visit % al TCATUPDDUID ‘
General Eisenhower. He was x BRUCE W EATHERUEAD % % Qo
Ni Cie eeied rescued by Colonel Connolly, 1% % J =
s ¥ ¢ chief security officer, who was 1% LIMITED x 1% +i
SECURITY... 17$ UP 70 YOU! passing by while the newly cre- ss uh} y @ ‘ o °
ated American prelate, in his x : v
“ Horse sense” ... One of the episcopal dress, was being chal- One of the wards for male patients % ¥ ~
SHAPE “ Kee Your Mouth 9666666666666 OOO OOOO

Shut” posters in Paris.







TO ALL MOTHERS



—t.

SACROOL
RELIEVES
CHILDREN
SPRAINS

On Sale at .

KNIGHTS DRUG
STORES



lenged by the guards.

POP GIG A FIA AF





'







SS



For Delightful Din

AN PINEAPPLE
AFRICAN WHITE SWE
BAYS WHOLE TOMATOES, per
LIPTON’S FRENCH COF per %
SMEDLEY’S GARDEN BI ROOT, ;
SMEDLEY’S GARDEN PEAS, per tin

i ;
yer t )
CRAWFORD'S SWEET ASST. BISCUITS, per '2-Ib pkt. 49
CRAWFORD'S CUSTARD CREAM BISCUITS
( Ib. pk 4X '
CRAWFORD'S MARIE BI SCUITS, per % pkt $e
CRAWFORD'S CREAM CRACKERS, per 4 lb. pkt. .. 49
ARMOURS CHICKEN & HAM PASTE, per Jat
ARMOURS VEAL & HAM PASTE, per jar 28
ARMOURS BEEF & HAM PASTE, per jar..... 2

ing

SOU

TH
rH
THREE

AFRIC JAM, pe g

‘r CORN, per tit 48



Panu

AGS





5 ting)



ee





ANISH SALAMI SAUSA It



SLICED HAM, per



CAVE _







"ip anata et gy -esahes gh + Seelam SEVEN BRAND NEW STYLES to choose from in the AUSTRALIAN, SLICED BACON, pe
| helping doctors help you, mean a lot to u The rtair Ki CHEESE, per tin 57¢ ik r pk
\}} pride which comes from knowing that we are offering tt most gorgeous multicolours. Round, oblong and SHEPHERD GREEN LIMES, per 100 oe
ighes lalit igs at all time ny f PE LIME per 1 00
aes ne sa ht i I : [ i square, sling and short handles. Made of strong
careful and capable dispense Z p :
S
you eed. backed-up} : i Siecle Mtetesrecchatstie Usted & Co, Ltd. AS A SUPERB THRILLER. ..IT’S
your next prescrit tion t -- )))
} i0—i3 Broad Street | | COCKADE FINE RUM

Prices from $3.67

to

i KNIGHTS DRUG STORES i STANSFELD SCOTT & CO.. LTD.





PAGE TEN

Flowers For

End Of Crop

VV

i on

THE

Thursday,
ated

ried.

» dec



They begi
the iceld is loaded
gers
% drinks
then ppreciation of
ng the year,

ope ne

truck x mani
to
the





Pinfold Street



building will soon be erected.

he championships in silliards,
Dominoes, Draughts, Table Tennis
and other gamé€s will still be held
thi ar. Alr@atiy members are
o their names.





a, PRIZE at the Local

Talent Show at the Globe
Theot i Friday night went to
( uld ] who sang “Sep-
te e! Daisley, who is




addy Ail Star Winner, has
Vays pleased the crowd with
is well timed singing.

j Shoeshine”
“Boogie in the
i Fitz Harewood with
Can do r
second prizes.





were Adrian Howard and his
Q who played Latin Ameri-
A, RELIGIOUS service for mem-
4% bers of thé Y.M.C.A. afid
YÂ¥.W.C.A. will be held at the
¥ C.A. at 4,30 o’clock this
é 1 Thesé ‘services will be
hel nonthly.
night at 8 o’clock
L. Clarke, dietician at the

ffospital, will give a lec-
Nutrition” te members
Py w..C.A:.
qf. MARY’S BOYS’ School was
for the evening ses-
“nursday and Friday. The
» being repaired.

r. Dottin, Acting Headmaster,
s “T have made it clear to the
bo t school will be opened
@s usual on Monday morning.”

High Birth Rate

OVER ONE THOUSAND, five
1 ed and eight babies were

iis year in St. Miehael and
r Christ Church up to yes-
y. according to records of the







Ce al Station.
of the births were in
January when 305 were born.

The average number of births for
a month this year is 260,
In the same parishes 810 people

died during this period.
M deaths in a month were
159 in May
COPRA-ARRIVES
Schooner Freedom Fleary ar«
rived here yesterday with 279
ba f-copra from St. Lucta.



hs

v

PERROXIMDE

on oe } 58)
mC UCAS

e oi

aut b's

|

Telephone 2798

Our hollow

BLOCKS!!

conversant with

co 2¢

them and we fe

[Yel ve Wel el Yel Vel Ve Vel Ve ele Ve Pe Pe Ve Per

i

et
a

rt

‘w=
ak



crop season fin-
dgejpnd and Rill
cane
ch themselves with
flo plantation trucks and

too these

load of canes fron
on the
give the
show
work

NE NEW Y.M.C.A. Headquart-
are

being extended. There will be
more room for games, lectures
and services

he roof of the new part of

“You
» Wrong” were awarded
The Guest Artists

“AGLEANS

TEETH WHIT







SUNDAY ADVOCATE

NO THROUGH ROAD

Lee

en oe. all

1
n

Clarke who

Barnyard” THE HIGHWAY at the lower Wharf yesterday was completely blocked at times.



Reason — a schooner

was unloading charcoal and carts and all sorts of transportation were pressed into service.



B’dians Return l'rom Panama

Some Retired: Stranded

WITH sunken and unshaven iaces and’wearing crump-
led clothing, 14 Barbadians—one of them a woman—landed
at the Baggage Warehouse Pier yesterday after spersiing

most of their lives working for the Panama Government.

No relatives went to meet them. They sat around the
Baggage Warehouse like “strangers in a strange land.”
One by one they ambled out of the Baggage Warehouse in
search of a sister, daughter or some other relative whom

they did not think they would recognise.



yellow fever and accidents killed
out many of my fellow country-

men,” said.
Har too found house rent
high. He had to pay as much as

$16 per month for two small com-
partments with little accommoda-
Harris enjoyed cooking
for himself. “I ate soup, coucou
ind rice—the foods I was accus-
tomed to in Barbados,” he said.

tion

Those returning yesterday were; Oscar
Jone of St. Joseph, Gustavus Edey of
Massiah St, St. John, James Hunte of
Content Cot, St Philip, Charles Jackman
of St Lucy, Conrad Blackman of Byde
Mill, St George, Charles Greenidge of

Walton Village, Christ Church, Preston
Williams of Rock Hall Plantation, St

nin Stile sat . 3 Peter, Prince A Haynes of St John who

The Schooner Florence Emanuel for. , was accompanied by his wife, James
brought them up from Marti- “Wages were low,” said Jones, Griffith of St Luey, Samuel Harris of
nique. They were taken to “and the cost of living very Green Hill, St Michael, William Barker

Martinique from Panama by the high.” One good thing was that
They spent a the Government was educating his

S.S. Chang Chow.
day and a night in Martinique and children,
three days on sea in the Florence
Emantel,

The Panama Government paid
all their travelling expenses and
gave each of them $45 pocket

he got the
Barbados,
Bay by

opportunity

While Jones served in the Army,
see
He came into Carlisle
S.S. Oriana but he was,

to

of St George, Nathan Baird of St James
and Nicademus Alleyne of St John

Charles Greenidge is now intransit for
Trinidad where he lived for 26 years be-
fore go’ng to Panama

BLIND CORNERS

Best Kept
ity Garden

Where The Lizards Play

Nobody but the gardener goes
into t b lropt Cuty garden, the
one ar the end of Broad Street
near St. Mary’s Church. But

meny lizards are always running
between the thick plants through-
out the day.

The garden is enelosed with a
wire fenee and there are eight
palm trees on it. Its longest side
is about 24, yards long.

A thick hedge is planted around

the garden and since the rain last

the plants are green and

there are many flowers. There

ere lilies among them, but there
aré no roses or carnations.

Besides the hedge which grows
at the three sides, there are five
circular small beds of flowers and
the rest is turf.

The palm trees are too tall to
give much shade and the area is
not shady. A man who sells
potatoes nearby said. that some-
times he thinks it would be nice
to be able to eat his breakfast in
the garden.

“An evergreen tree should be
planted there and seats built
around it,” he said.

Trafalgar Garden

The garden in Trafalgar Square
only has water flowers. These
ere within the fountain and people
co not usually notice them. A
vardener has begun to plant a
hedge around this area.
The big tree which grows near

the fountain provides shade for
people who wait to catch a bus
there.

Grass is growing well on four
of the sections of the grass patch-
€s around the fountain, but too
niany people stand on the other
eection under the tree for grass to
grow well.

Small groups of men gather
daily near the fountain to discuss
the latast in polities.

Se nad tne eS



| Treat
your hair



ee
. a i a Se
New ij Ts |

in.time!

|
Dandruff, thinning hair and many other |
uthealthy hair conditions are a warning; |
your hair roots are undernourished, your
body is failing to supply adequate quan-
tities of cystine, tyrosine, tryptophane
and the other hair-forming substances.
You must act at once. Pure Silvikrincon-
tains all the fourteen organic substances
Which form the hair's natural food
Massageéd into the scaip Pure Silvikrin
will get your hair growing and thriving
again. Prove it for yourself— starting |
from roday.
Use Pure Silvikrin in cevere cases of dandruff }
and thinning hafr, As a daily tonic dressing ase |
Sitlvikrin Hair Tonte Lorton or, for dry heads, |
Sitvikrin Lorton with OW }
|
}



ne eho . ; }

Silvikrin

THE HAIR'S NATURAL FOOD



|
|

PPPOE OOF SSOSS

FOR SALE
e

ST. JOHN
A well built stone build-
ing standing on 1% acre
working land, House con-

R |
‘



b

SLOPES

tains 2 bed rooms, dining

Near the Central Road Board a and sitting rooms closed
wide spreading tree and two gallery and usual out 3
small palm trees provide shade for buildings,
bag mé@nders, drink _ sellers, ATTRACTIVELY PRICED
draughts players, a barber and e
cihers. Grass once used to grow
oa this triangular piece of land, BRIGHTON ON SEA

tut now it is built of conerete and
tor.



A modern Bungalow built
of Concrete blocks con-
taining 3 bedrooms water



ae os oy we ee eee f i | REMOVED In front of the library the lately in Reese es ag
oney to defray otel expenses. Jones said that he has a daugh- {vir rass 3 nex n anc ath, good sea bath-
Most of them are retired on a ier and a sister here, but he was| THE Barbados Automobile ; eration there Gat oasis oo ing.
ension. Some of the have not sure where he was g » to| Association will soon be affiliated ~). oy: et pie REASONABLY PRICED. |
p' m ure vy was going to} i ple waiting to catch the buses >
worked for 45 years with the live. "4@)| to the Automobile Association in | ping towards White Park usually e 3 |
Panama. Government. None of Samuel Harris, who was work-| England, Mr. Way of the Associa- ©. ( ears Ati ‘hihi etka ¥
them worked for shorter period ing as an attendant in a hospital | tion here said yesterday, “The f tg a suns See ar * yo pas — 4ed 2
than 25 years. in Canal Zone for about 45 years|Attomobile Association in Eng- | f th rt di soldi bi a 4 “het 2, “with

Oscar Jones, who is stooping a said: “I found it fairly good; man jland has replied to a letter we whe a ve a * oa Ps ar tres the iaadesn fenlek aacednine=
hit at 58, worked as a painter for 1 had nothing to complain about y|sent them and said they would a Pere woe WEE eye ? dati standing on %
over 30° years. He served in He has saved some of his earns | “low us TS ee tarted a oa atve of land sheet dee
France as a soldier for three years ings and is getting a pension. | this Peas ‘ew haa 220° menmbers tance from bus service.
during World War 1. He believed he had _ sisters in| mp ny ane ej ign i e

by worked hard and saved Hothersal Turning where yee hey ore DOW eer Beane *“Gascogne Ad Calls CHRIST CHURCH
nothing”, Oscar said. “It was a intended going. , a ead i 2

} ; i }of the corners already removed < stone

matter of being hand to mouth.” Harris said that there are} are rah at St. Harnabes and one © ee Seer an

Rent, food and the supporting of
five children in Panama took all
the money Jones was

working retire, Malaria,










TOOTH PASTE
1

LRRRRRRRREREREEET |

CONCRETE PRODUCTS CoO.,
LODGE HILL,
ST. MICHAEL.

‘co Those About To Build,

“. perfect building depends entirely on type of materials
used and the class of workmanship done.

concrete blocks are up to the standard of those

manuicctured in U.S.A. where they are so extensively used for
all types of buildings.

Tested regularly by hydraulic press, they withstand over 20
tons pressure per block without rupture. Certcin ¢ontractors
are not building with them correctly.

DO NOT BLAME OUR

We therefore suggest that any new builder who is not

the use of our blocks should consult us on his

ction problems, and we shall be only too pleased to
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Our blocks have an excellent name by all who have used

el assured that if you construct your building

vith them you will be fully satisfied.

CONCRETE PRODUCTS COMPANY
per. E. R. BOON
Manager.

oie af kk kn lk nk a



: 4
SOOO SPS OFSSS

Se ee a a a ek ad a

Ke

pox, |

4,

SCPE LOET OP PLEO SEE SPSS SE





many more Barbadians in Pana-| at Thornbury Hill near Oistin.
ma who are flow getting ready to!

small

“The owners of the land where
there are corners are co-operating
| willingly,” Mr. Way said. “We

draw it to their attention that
; the corners are dangerous and

should be removed and they are
removing them.”

Asthma, Bronchitis Coughing,
Choking Curbed in 3 Minutes

Do you have attacks of Asthma or Bron-
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No matter how long you have suffered or
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phlegm, promote free easy breathing and
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Mo Asthma in 2 Years

Mendaco not only brings almost immedt-
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up the system to ward off future attacks.

, For instance, J Richards, Hamilton, Ont.,

9590 06

a

POOCPSSSSFPSSSS

-

IN 1908 Prof, C V. Boys m

in his Presidential address

London :

which is at prese

something

knows what oiliness is’.

paper showing conclusively



POF LOOLEROLOCSE SELLER IVSE EPP SSPSFSOS 4,



“THE LUBRICATING PROPERTY of oil depends on

THIS BLISSFUL STATE of ignorance continued until
Mareh 1920 when Wells and

French steamship Gaseegne

brought 222 passengers to Bar- acres of land, 2 Bed

bados yesterday. Sixty four got rooms, Modern tiled bath,

off here. Spacious Gallery over-
The Gaseogne arrived from looking the = sea. Bus

Trinidad and, after a few hours service

stay here, was sailing for England

vie St. Lucia, Martinique and

Senso. CECIL JEMMOTT

PHONE — 4563

Can had lost 40 Ibs., suffered cough-

te choking aad piresigling over wi leat
n't sleep, expecte: e.

Seon, Asthma spasms first night and he

has had.none since in over two ¥
Back Guar:

Mon

Che very first dose of Mendaco
to work circulating through your blood and
helping nature rid you of the effects of
Asthma. Im no time at all Mendaco may
easily make you feel years younger’ an
stronaer. ‘Try Mendaco under an tron-cla
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If you den’t feel entirely well, like a new
person, and fully satisfied after taking
Mendaco just return the empty package
and the full, purchase price will be
refunded, Get Mendaco from your Chem-
int today and see how well you sleep to-
night and how much better you will feel

tomorrow. The
Mendac

guarantee pro-
Ends Asthma & Bronchitis K Hay Feves

3 right

tects you.

|

S$ $$$ a

Residence standing on 2



Over Pheonix Pharmacy
MORTGAGES ARRANGED

EDGE WATER
HOTEL

BATHSHEBA



SED SCS SSS SISOS SSS SOESESESSSS:

Reduced F-ates ist May to

3ist October for visits of
one week or over.

Telephone 95276



the following remarks
Physieal Society mn

in
aK

LO

to tne

ft unknown no-one

Southcombe published a
that the “oiliness” of a



x mineral oil could be substantially improved by addi-
% Oils made on the Wells Southcombe process .
g became marketed throughout the World as x }
2 } |
1x , : 4
iS GEKM OILS 3
%,
>
y
& THESE-OILS are available to you to-day in Barbados %
1 through the “Germ” Agent %
¢ $
x %
ls ?
1x * 3
x _
1% x
§
$ Central YFoundry Ltd. %
‘ § :
. ¥
%
%
%

43434 < 4¢
POSS ¢

PRIOR PSO S SSS

? PROS SSS

+4 < >
FSSOSSSOOS

<
SCOSSSSRe

*

wy PISOSSOS

Craftsmen.



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20 Broad Street,











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Take home , @ bottle today!

i

eucasany

BUCKEAST
TONIC WINE









PLYMOUTH — LE HAVRE



“COLOMBIE” ““GASCOGNE”

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CARIBBEAN CRUISE

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FR

Agents: R.
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RIDE A

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The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.
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Old silver cleaned without losing its patina.
Hand carved wedding rings a SPECIALTY,
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sturdy settings.

Jewellery valuations undertaken and gem
stones identified, by our expert staff, 33
years experience in Trinidad, Barbados,
British and Dutch Guianas. i

Repairs to Indian and Chinese jewellery,
and engraving expertly done.

Come in and let us advise you on the care
of your jewellery, FREE.

A faulty setting might be the cause of los-
ing thousands.

Charges ‘moderate. Venezuelan Orchid
Jewellery repaired and cleaned.

Phone 4644. |











SUNDAY, JULY 4, 1951



Soil Conservation Re

By Dr. H.

From The Scientific Monthly





for the first time in the his-
tory of the United S con-
servation of land, wa orest
grass, cultivated crops, an id-
life are being scientically co-
ordinated on basis of land



capability and need.
euucation, surveys, and
cessful application of erva-
tion measures have brought Am-
ericans to ‘a new concept of the
importance of land ana of the

Researst
Research,
the suc-

cons









need for keping it permanentiy
productive.

The programme of the U.S
Soil Conservation Service was
developed out of a balanced re-
lationship that exists in nature
among land, water, plants, ani-
mals, and climate. Productive
land, with the water that enable
it to produce, is the one basic
resource without which mankind
cannot live. A large share of sci-
entific endeavour is directed in
some way toward improving
man's welfare—his heaich, tus
comfort, his wealth, or other
needs or satisf: in life

entists, ther are con-
cerned about the
farmers’ fields and p:

Productive land is u other
natural resources such as min-

eral ores, coal, and oil. It i
characterized by the element of
life—fruitfulness—placed. by na-
ture in the thin cover of produc-
tive soil occurring over a limited



portion of the earth’s surface
This life-producing quality and
the water that makes it so, set
Jand off in a category by itself
Productive land is further differ-
entiated from other natural re-
sources, with few exceptions,
must be taken from the ear -
separated from it—in order to

be used by man. And their







ity, in large degree, calls for
complete transformation, as iron
ore into steel, and coal and pe-
troleum into warmth and power.
Limited

Productive land is much more
limited in extent than has com-
monly been supposed. It occurs
only on a part of the sur-
face of the earth. It is not per-
manent; it is not a renewable
natural resource. Once the fer-
tile topsoil is washed or blown
away, it cannot be restored or
replaced in any practical way for
generations. And what is left
subsoil—usually is far less pro-
ductive, less stable, and less ab-

sorptive of rainfall. There are no
substantial undiscovered reserves
of productive land anywhere. We



must keep what we have or do
without.

We occasionally hear discus-
sions of the possibilities of re-
making _ topsoil from erosion-
exposed subsoil. In my opinion it

cannot be done short of geologic
time. Subsoi] can improved,
of course, by growing gras wd
legumes, for example, and by
adding fertilizers Sometimes
following such treatment good
crop yields are obtained; but this
is a matter of improving the sub-
soil, not of making new topst
This brings the further prer
that we must treat and use our
remaining limited supply of pro-
ductive land in a way which will
protect it and increase its pro-
ductivity by conserving the soil
itself, its available elements of
fertility, and all that man and
nature have put into it. This con-

be











RENNETT

servation of land and water re-



sources is the most important
em contronting American
agriculture It also is a serious
problem in many other reas in
the world today It ig an urg





prcblem confronting Americ

efforts of the scientists and of al!
who farm the land. It is a job
that requires scientific knowl-
edge, technical skill, and under-

standing co-operation,

Simple
It is true that many soil-con-
serving measures, especially an-
nual farm practices, are sim-
ple that farmers need no direct
technical assistance in applying
them. But the principal soil con-

servation methods generally are
used in combination with one
another, and each must fit the
land in a properly co-ordinated
pattern to be effective and en-
during. Based on _ painstaking
scientific research and on wide

practical use, such measures must
conform in their application with
the principles of hydrology, en-
gineering, and agronomy The
over-all job of conservation in-
volves such complex problems
erosion control, drainage, im-
provement of soil fertility, wood-

land management, control of
running water, and wildlife con-
servation, Most farmers are not
specialists in these fields. Soil
and water conservation is a job
that demands the skill and

knowledge of experienced tech-
nicians who have special train-
ing. Experts trained in the spe-
cialized fields of agricultural sci-
ence make up the personnel of
the U.S. Soil Conservation Ser-
vice, which makes virtually al!
its assistance to American farm-
ers available through the farm-
ers’ own soil conservation dis-
tricts, and at their request.
Modern — soil conservation is
based on sound land use and
treatment of land with all the
proved measures that will keep
it permanently productive while
in use, .It means terracing land
that néeds terracing; contouring,



strip-cropping, and stubble-
mulching the land as required
along with supporting practices

of crop rotation, cover crops, and
similar practices. It means sta-
bilizing water outlets, building
farm ponds, locating farm roads



- and fences as nearly on the con-

tour as_ practicable, planting
steep, erodible land to grass or
trees, development of good pas-
tures, and devoting good man-
agement to them after they have
been developed.
Combinations

Modern soil conservation con-

sists of doing all these and still

other things. It includes, for
flood control and reservoir pro-
tection, treatment of whole wa-

tersheds with the right combina-
tions of practices, land. use, and
smaller watersheds where flood
waters start. Applied at the right
time and place, such watershed
treatment saves soil and reduce;
flood and sedimentation damage
puts water in the soil for plant
use and in ground-water reser-
voirs, and otherwise benefits gen-
eral farm, industrial, and muni-
cipal water users. There is only
one correct formula for the soil
and water conservation job—a
formula consisting of treating
each different kind of land on a





TECHNICIANS of the U.S. Soil

Conservation Service make stop-

watch measurements of the volume of water entering irrigation

furrows, .They are thus able to

determine accurately the rate of

water intake of different soils under varying conditions of slope

and soil composition,

This is part of the nation-wide plan to help ®

farmers preserve productive soil and conserve water supplies.





NI te D
se.

Here's a way to relief...

Do you know that a common
cause of backache lies in the
kidneys ? When they are healthy
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pe is very often the cause of

. De Witt’s Pills are
ey prepared to inyigorate
luggish kidneys. They act
directly on these vital organs, act
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speedily restoring them to their
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consequence, For over lia’ a
century De Witt’s Pills have
been bringing relicf to suf-
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we have received cuuntless
letters of gratitude from

all over the wrorld

Get a supply from
your chemist
today.







GUARANTEE , fg

De Witt’s Pills are -
manufactured under strictly hy.
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form to rigid star dards of purity.


























Help Your Children Avoid
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Insist that your children
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right after meals with Col-
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it’s easy to get them to use



Colgate’s correctly. The
Colgate way is the most

2 effective way yet known to



” COLGATE OFFERS SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE THAT °
BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING WITH

COLGATE DENTAL CREAM
HELPS STOP TOOTH DECAY!

Exhaustive Research By Eminent
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ALWAYS USE
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St

THIS AERIAL VIEW shows approved methods of contour plant-
ing and terracing to prevent soil erosion as being taught in the

United States.
land and water

Technical skill
conservation

necessary for planning a
survey is

complete

furnished the American

farmer by the Soil Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of

Agriculture
ised by such practices.

farm according to its individual
need or conditions, and using
each kind aceording to its capa-
bility for continued safe and
economical production.

There are three basic steps in
getting conservation. properly
applied to the land, First is the
making of a scientific land in-
ventory or a “land capability sur-
vey.” This inventory is made by
the U.S, Soil Conservation Service
in co-operation with farmers, and
it covers entire farms, It shows
the factors which, together with
climate, govern the whole safe use
and producing capacity of land.
Next, the technician and the far-
mer go out on the Jand together
and develop co-operatively a com-
plete soil conservattion plan for
the entire farm, This farm opera-
ting blueprint, although aimed first
at the maximum protection of the

‘and, takes into account such
economic needs of the farmer as
the income he must have to sup-

port bis family and to operate at
a profit, his market situation, and
so on, The plan specifies the best
use to be made of each part of the
farm, year by year
Finally

Finally, the planned soil and
water conservation measures are
applied to the land. Some of the





conservation measures are those
which the farmer can put into
practice himself, with little fur-

ther technical assistance, but gen-



erally the complete plan of co-
ordinated conservation practices
is of necessity complex as to
require expert technical help in
putting it to rk on the land at
the proper place and in proper
adjustmen The farmer provides
all the materials and labour and
maintains his structures and prac-
tices once they have en install-
ed on the land. If technical help

is needed on the maintenance job,

that, too, is provided for in the
arrangement between the — soil
conservation district and the U.S

Soil Conservation Service

Each conservation measure is
specifically designed to fit the land
on which it is used and is design-
ed to support or complement one
or more other measures. Conser-

vation work on one farm is plan-
ned with a view to the needs of
the neighbouring farms This

viewpoint is essential, for the pro-
cess of erosion has no respect for
boundary lines Neither do dust
storms nor floods



In the U.S. Soil Conservatior
Service, when asked for sugges-
tions on water conservation, spe-
cialists always look first at the
land within watersheds where
water shortage have occurred
They examine the condition — of

the land, and how it is being used
from the standpoint not only of
soil wastage but of water wastage
too. They look at all the land to
see if any of it is being seriously
affected by erosion, such as is
most commonly caused in humid
areas by cultivating excessively





Decay Before It Starts!


































Many millions of acres of farm land have been real-

steep land without adequate pro-
tection, over-grazing, and by
burning. All these abusive prac-
tices contribute to wastage of both
water and soil It is the exces-
sively rapid runoff of water that
produces erosion, And of great
importance in reservoir mainten-
ance is the prevention of fillins
up with the solid products of soil
erosion

More Farmers

More American farmers are
realizing that they need special
technical help in planning and

applying adequate soil and water
conservation programmes for their
farms. This growing national con-
sciousness of the essential place
that such conservation has in the
nation’s whole economy is evident
in the great progress the United
States has made in soil and water
conservation within a compara-
tively few years.

Soil conservation districts are
organized by the farmerg them-
selves under legislation enacted by
all 48 of the United States, the
Teiritories of Alaska and Hawaii,
and by Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Isiands, As of June 1, 1950, 2,247
of these farmer-managed districts

hed been formed, embracing more] ,;
than three-fourths of the nation’s} n

farms and a total of more than] postage etc., but send 6d in Brit fi Pr
23 ac Order for stationery, testimonials ete
1 ERT COR NO ares. You will be amazed at the remarkeble

The soil
represent, I am convinced, the
greatest land movement ini all
history They are essentially
group-action devices through





Pimples and Bad

Fought in
24 Hours

Since the discove
American physician it is no longer neces-
sary for anyone to suffer from ugly, dis-
gusting and disfiguring skin blemishes
such as Eczema, Pimples, Rash,
worm, Psoriasis, Acne, Blackheads, Scabies
and Red Blotghes. Don't let @ bad skin
make you feel inferior and cause you to
lose your friends. Clear your skin this new
scientific way, and don't letp a bad skin
make people think you are diseased.

A New Discovery

Nixoderm is an ointment, but different
from any obvsmens yet have ever seen or
felt. It is a new discovery, and is not
greasy but feels almost like a powder when
you apply it. It penetrates rapidly into the
pores and fights the cause of surface blem-
shes, Nixoderm contains 9 Ingredients
which fight skin troubles in these 3 ways.
1. It fights and kills the microbes or para-
sites often responsible for skin disorders,
2. It stops itching, burning and smarting
in 7 to 10 minutes, and cools and soothes
the skin. 3. It helps nature heal the s&ir
clear, soft and velvety smooth.

Works Fast

Because Nixoderm is scientifically com-
ounded to fight skin troubles, it works
aster than anything you have seen in
your life before. It stops the itching, burn-
ing and smarting in a few minutes, then
Starts to work immediately, clearing and











a ee



conservation districts] gecuracy of his statements about you a



of Nixoderm by an |

Ring- |



INDAY ADVOCATE



quires ‘Technical Skill |

which st: on. loca le
develops. They d
services and facilities of co-operat-
tng gover ental and private
interests alike, local, state, and
ational, And the soil conservation
districts are responsible for such
tangible results as the creation of
new markets for manufacturers of
equipment and tools, and for the
sfile of the products of nurseries
and seed producers.

Up to January 1, 1950, approxi-
mately 800,000 complete soil con-
servation plans had been prepared




aw, together









in these districts. These plans
covered some 220,000,000 acres
of which more than 112,000,000

had been treated with need-
ervation measures by that
time These figures do not in-
clude other millions of acres sur-
veyed, planned, and treated
hrough other programmes in
which the U.S. Soil Conservation
service has assisted.





The economy and efficiency of
soil conservation farming, and the

chain of economic and other bene-
fits it brings, have been proved
wherever it has been practiced

It enables the farmer to produce
needed crops or livestock at mini-
mum cost on his good land, and
to adjust his production to chang-
, market and other conditions
He therefore becomes a better and
more stable customer for business

and the professions in the city
and contributes to the nation’s
high standard of living nutri-
tionally and otherwise and to
such public benefits as reducing
flood and siltation damage. Any-

thing which helps any substantial
number of individuals of a nation
ilso helps the nation as a whole
This certainly can be said of the
kind of soil conservation farming
we have been discussing



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Russia To Repay |
Eleven Tons Of
Gold To Persia

TEHERAN, June 28

Russia has agreed to give back
to Persia 11 tons of gold now
being held in Moscow, a usually

well-informed Persian source here
said to-day

Repayment of the gold nov
would help to solve the Persian
financial crisis which would be

atensified by the complete closing
jiown of oil wells.

The gold was to have been
tiven to Persia in repayment for
ervices rendered by Persia «
Russian occupation troops during

he war. But payment was sus-
gended

No official confir.nation of the
Russian agreement to pay over

the money was available here this



morning. But an announcement!
Was expected to be made within
the next few days.

Eleven tons of gold is. worth
approximately £4,250,000

The gold was deposited in a
State Bank of the Soviet Union
under the Russo-Persian agree-
ment of May 1943

Under the agreement Russia

promised to pay in gold 60 percent

of all Persia’s advances to enable
her to maintain Soviet forces in
Persia

The remaining 40 percent wer

repayable in sterling and dollars

Persia has made repeated ce
mands for the gold Reuter.
MEAT DEBATE
LONDON, June 28
The House of Commons is to
have a debate, on Britain’s meat
agreement with the Argentin

next Thursday, it was announce

today.—Reuter.







PAGE ELEVEN

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PAGE TWELVE





MANCHURIA._,3%

Em «5 atin en tnsigniemnee a
S cuoncam

WYSANJIN p




N. KOREA

a, wy
re. SYONSAN

olel @ SEOUL 3 satel
"eS. KOREA

@TAEJON POHANG



YELLOW



THE 3eoTn

fo MILES scene HET ie ' ee “Sore re
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be echo at j reach frontier Fy 1 ae, Nov 21-12 Be poss

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cll aoe BR Koreags cross ee
[JUNE 25th 7 eee 5
| N. Korean Reds 3

| invade S. Korea



e
TAEGU

OUR READERS SAY:

Polities

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR.—I consider it my business
to endeavour to eliminate some
false impressions a regular contri-
butor to your “Our Readers
Say” tried to convey to our
pullible public on the 24th instant.

The writer does not seem io
understand what Socialists mean
by the “putting down of Capita
ism”. May I say, for his benet
that Socialists are those peop'e
who profess that they believe tht
the material instruments of
cuction should be
»ublic authority or voluntary
association and operated, not with
1 view to profit by sale to other
people, but for the direct service
of the community that the
Authority or Association repre-
sents. In other words they believe
that the freedom of the _ profit-
making individual must be cur-
tailed in the interest of the State

It is this particular phase ol!
Socialism that private interests
dislike

For the definition w7 what &

described as the Capitalist Sys-
tem, refer him to Mr. and Mrs,
Sidney Webb who say: “By the
term Capitalism, we mean the
particular stage in the develop-
ment of industry and legal
institutions in which the bulk of
workers find themselves diverced
from the ownership of the instru-
ments of production in such a
Way as to pass into the position of
wage earners whose subsistence,
security, and personal freedom
seem dependent on the will of a
relatively small proportion of the
nation; namely, those who own
and, through their legal owner-
ship, control the organisation of
the land, the machinery and the
labour force of the community,
and do so with the object of mak-
ing for themselves individual and
private gains,” This is the parti-
cular phase of Capitalism dis-
liked by the Socialists.

In passing let me just mention
that, on‘the other hand, Syndical-
fism is hostile both to the state and
Private Ownership. Sometimes
we feel that Syndicalism is more
nearly right than Socialism in
this respect, that both Private
Property and the State, which are
the two most powerful institu-
tions of the modern world, have
become harmful to life through
excess of power, and that both are
hastening the loss of vitality from
which the civilized world increas-
ingly suffers.

According to the writer of
“Politics”, our electorate finds
itself in a sad predicament, witn
ene party preaching “racial
harmony” and the other “taping
us behind the scenes,” and neither
with a party policy attractive
enough to drag us out of the mire.
“Technically” I do not agree witn
yA

dis-



GOOD FOR

um FOR YOU “Tom

NUTRICIA

POWDERED WHOLE MILK

QUALITY UNSURPASSED
Demand NUWTHRICEA jin the Blue Tin with the White Cow

1 lb Tins

ON SALE

prou-
owned by a ,

him. What Politician could truth-
fully deny the fact that the two
institutions, Socialism and Capi-
talism are closely connected! I
do not understand his point about
“Advisory Boards,” and probabl)

when next he gets a chance he
may like to elaborate or may be,
after reading your Editorial oi
the same date he may consider
this advice unwieldy.

I, howeyer, agree with him
that we do “want brains” in

the House of Assembly, Probably,
ne has in view a resident of his
trict’ I do not. What I want
re representatives without ‘“me-
chanical brains”, i.e, brain; like
mine or the author of “Politics”;
‘or, admittedly, our views are no
original, consequently they are
slightly muddled. In other words
i want a Government whieh can
think for itself and not await 4
particular Minute from the Head

of a Government Department
before outling its policy with
respect t. certain phases of our
life,
DISINTERESTED
Australian four

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—All keen cricket enthusi-
asts in this island are looking for-
ward with great interest to the
nights when we may listen to the
achievements of our boys “Down
Under” over the Radio, I have
been in touch with an old friend
in Melbourne on the subject of the
Cricket Broadcasts we may expect

to hear. He is a member of the
‘Radio Australia’ Broadcasting
personnel,

He writes on date of May 21 as
follows: —Two of the broadcast-
“ing organizations in the West In-
“dies, the Trinidad Broadcasting
“Co, and the Broadcasting Co, of
“Jamaica, have written asking our
“plans for covering the West In-
“dies v, Australia tour. It appears
“that they are particularly inter-
“ested in re-broadcasting certain
‘portions of our commentary.
“We are getting details for them in
“the next few weeks, it being a
“little too early yet to formulate
“our final plans.”

To-day 1 received from
letter dated 2ist June, in
he says: —

“Already there is keen interest
“being displayed in the forth-
“coming visit of the West Indies

him a
which

“Cricket Team and I am certain
“that your fine cricketers are in
“for a stimulating series of

“matches with some hard fighting

“on both sides. The last hour of
“play will be transmitted by
“Radio Australia during the
“tests and I think this will be
“picked up and re-broadcast by

“vour local services (this at least
“is the position at the moment).”

He does not mention any appli-
cation from Barbados or from
British Guiana, although they
may have applied subsequently to
his first letter. But, the broad-
casting of only the last hour of

ME!

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each day's play in the Tests does
seem very inadequate, when one
considers that the England—Aus-
tralia Test Series was broadcast
ball-by-ball from start to finish.
Yours truly
CELT.
June 29 th, 1961.
Control

To the Editor the Advocate

SIR,—My religion teaches me
to love Mohammedans and birth
controllers. I would like to than’:
C. G. for his letter. It has con-
firmed my worst fears that im-
morality will increase not decrease
as a result of contraceptive
practices by young men and
women. Surely it is not a singu-
lar nor even a bigoted view to
suggest that a young man who
has plighted his troth
decent young girl should exercise

some restraint, and not indulge
freely in intercourse with other
young women who so far from
being victims, appear to be only

too co-operative?

If this is bigotry, I
vantent to be a bigot. Anyone
vho asks only a few questions
must realise how irresponsible is
the average man and woman in
Barbados with regard to parent-
hood, The only way to encourage
responsibility is to encourage
family life. As a Christain tax-
payer I object most strenuously
to subsidising anything which
likely to spread promiscuity an
immorality.

I repeat for C, G’s, benefit what
I made clear in my letter last
Sunday, that I am not here argu-
ing the case against birth control,

am well

I am exercising my right and
duty as a taxpayer to protest
against a policy which will not,

in my opinion, promote morality,
GEORGE HUNTE
Victoriana
To the Editor the Advocate

Sir,—A Loan Exhibition of Vic-
toriana is to be held at the Mus-
eum during the first three weeks

of August. The exhibition will
comprise furniture and furnish-
ings, paintings, prints, glass as
well as articles of personal use
and adornment and bibliots used
during Queen Victoria’s reign
1837—190f. I shall be. glad if

who have
any kind

those of your
Victorian objects of
which they would be willing to
lend for the exhibition would be
good enough to telephone me at
4201,

Since this climate is rather un-
kind to fabrics, I would be es-
pecially glad to hear from those
willing to lend table-cloths,
table-covers, anti-macassars, cush-
ions, curtains (lace or otherwise),
carpets, bead work and clothing
worn by men, women and chil-
dren during the reign.

The Exhibition will be in aid
of the Museum's Collection Fund

Yours truly,
NEVILLE CONNELL,
Director and Secretary.

readers










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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Progress In

T.B. Work

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GORGETOWN, B.G., June 26.
Dr. Harold Pacheco Fernandés,

‘fuberculosis Officer and Medical
Superintendent of the Best Sana-
torilum, Demerara, told a crowded
Town Hall on Friday night that
great strides have been made with-
in the last three years in the treat-
ment of Tuberculosis. Dr. Fernan-
des was speaking at the Annual
Meeting of the Society for the Pre-
vention and Treatment of Tuber-
culosis, presided over by His ex-
cellency the officer Administering
the Government, Hon. John
Gutch, O.B.E,

“Streptomycin,” he said, “is no
longer an experimental treatment
. it has come to stay and will
stay as a successful treatment of
Tuberculosis.” But he warned
that although great advances have
heen made with the use of this
drug, its curative qualities can be
nullified in a short time unless
treatment is carried to finality.

The Report of the Society for
1950 disclosed that “phenomenal
progress has been made at the
Best Sanatorium during the past
three years and this progress can
be seen not only through the in-
creased sums of expenditure but
in the modernisation of the hos-
pital. A new sterilisation plant
has been a great boon to the hos-
pital. The laundry has been ex-

* tended and a new ambulance and

a powerful electric lighting plant
have been acquired.

The Tuberculosis Officer during
last year embarked on a plan for
treating selected cases at the
Georgetown Clinie with Strepto-
mycin, and it is hoped in the rew
latively near future, to expand the
scope of this line of treatment
within fairly well defined
limits in order to reduee in some
measure the rate of increase of the
“Waiting List’ of cases seeking
admission to the Sanatorium

STOLEN FROM



DRUG STORE

Up to mid-day yesterday no one
had yet been arrested in connec-
tion with the larceny of over $4,000
from Mr. Teddy Hoad, but Major |
R. A. Stoute, Deputy Commission-
er of Police, said: “Intensive in-|
vestigations are being carried out |
by the Police with a view to solv-
ing the ease, It is an unusualiy
large amount of money to be}
stolen from a counter.”

The money was stolen from a
counter at the Phoenix Pharmacy, |
Broad Street. Mr. Hoad had
drawn it from the Canadian Bank
of Commerce to pay workers. He
is manager of Vauciuse.

“Rodney” Due On Tuesday |

The Lady Rodney is expected to
return to Barbados from British |
Guiana yia Trinidad, Grenada and |
St. Vincent on Tuesday morning, |

The Rodney will be loading |
sugar and molasses before sailing
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PAGE THIRTEEN






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: ms , er a. FOR SALE about 5,000 sq. ft., Going for Only £80
Bir Mar S, i 4 ae A | Nett. A Large Stonewall Business &|
Hee ee er ao on Sundays} Minimum charge week 12 eents andj Residence in Tudaoy St., Very Good Con- |
$:.50 Of Week dass and ee to BO, and | 9 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24|dition, Modern Convenie |
. ¢ i oe oa sd i eae Saye and | words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a| 4,000 sq. ft.. Going for Only
3 cents pe c 1 “k= a. f y £
4 cents per word on Sundays for each | “ord on Sundays. most New and Nearly 100% S



additional word 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type,





tion
















from the Garrison, Good Loc
i Modern Conveniences, Going for Onl
For Births, Marriage or Engagement TY N ‘ :

announcements in Carib Calling the; AUTOMOTIVE £1,600. A New 2 Bedroom Concrete |
e is $3.00 for any number of words eran at Lower Fontabelle odern |

5 oante . oe. : onveniences, Going Onl 050.

Se ae a gh Arend 4 ALMOST NEW i2 h.p, Bedford Van.| A 2 Bedroom ‘possible CGuitene am

onal word. ‘Terms catia for Death | Gvarantee if required. Extra Masonite | Barbarces Rd., Open Galleries, Electricit

ae niy aeend es m,. |F ooring. Upset Price $1,850. New one! Very Good Condition, Tenancy of Land

r Sate Ty COSt $2,125 presently. Apply: Sarees Assured, Going for about $2,40¢ A

ny on Gerage. -1.51—In | Chattel House off Upper Bank Hall Main
~~ Ts s preer Bank all air |

nme ———-—----—- | Pd. Electricity Good Condition, Goir

AANNOUNCEMEN CAR—Vauxhall 14/6 in perfect con-| for about. $1,400. A 2 Bedroom
eae dition, new tyres and paint-job.| property with Shop Attached, off Country |
HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—Isle of | easonably priced. Apply: B’dos Agencies} Ra, Good Condition, Going for about |
Spices. SANTA MARIA—loveliest hotel! Ltd, Ring 4908, 26.6.51—6n. | 41700. A New $ Bedroom Concrete
1 Caribbean. Rates from $7.00 per head 5 Bungalow Facing Sea, and an Almost
3 “GRAND HOTEL—in best _resi- PRs geind See erat? New 3 Bedroom 12 inch Stone Built
district under Government House Chote sae ardens, near 30651 an. Eungalow Near Ses, Both about 2 Miles

es from $5.00 per head per day. from City, Going for £2,500. and £2,400.


































































SBASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Rotbhitn ) ——__—_———————————,_ | respectively. Almost New Duplex 12
aac Rates from $4.00 per head per MOTOR CYCLE — New shipment of! inch Stone Built Bungalow Navy
day. Enquiries to D, M. Slinger, Grenada. | Velocette 200 ¢ c—Seeure yours before | Gardens, and an Almost New 3 Bedroom
26,6.51--76. | Prices advance. Courtesy Garage. Dial) 19 jnen Stone Built Bungalow Near Navy
aon mea 4616. 26.6°51—6n. | Gardens, Going for £3,000, and £2,800
- respectively C Me Unless Y Are
se oa i yoga teak Tooth| Pick-up Morris 8 in good working Sa or Wasitne Time | Re-Sale Values
t oes Within a short while you} order with almost new ly. APPIY | Assured Mortgages and Terms Ar-
pee be the winner of one of the follow- | Stoute’s Drug Store _or Marshall &| ringed. Dial 3111 D. F. de Abreu, “Olive
be the wines Cho, and Prize $18.00, | Edward's Garage, Roebuck Street, | Hough,” Hastings.
Sis a ae ~~ *4751—-26n | Where it can be seen, Phone 2549 or i er y eyes
Hengipasy | S488 22,.6.51—t{.n.| BUNGALOW — A comparatively ney
i n ————. ——— ui t , situate a the ; .
GOVERNMENT NOTICE |: TRUCK One Ford Truck 1946 model | son ana away from the. main ro. |
1 \ ih ua r ‘st-cla . . - gw , os
— Suit New hoon ght occur Mea) Deareume, with cunning, water tn, eae
in first class working | order. Owner! vontact W. Wells at T. Geddes Grarft Lid
leaving iss Sapase L. GriMith, | phone 2861 or Home 4025
CLOSING OF CHAMBERLAIN | Two Mile Hil. ong S Shaan. oe “AAS
» y LING call E
— WAGGON — 1981. (March) Hillman | . DO WEIING OGRE cal ed “ELLER:
The Chamberlain Bridge will be Station Waggon. | Milea is APPIY: | thereto situate at Chapmuin Street,
closed to all traffic from Monday, | ™'?P Bear mone ey 5.6.51-—3n,| Btidgetown, neurest Whitepark Road)

d » a é ’ 0 * The he » contains Gallery, Drawing
2nd July, to Thursday, 5th July,! and icine Homma, two baagooros, Sires
for the purpose of repairs. faut room, usual conveniences. Large

27.6.51.—2n. ELECTRICAL Basement. Electric Light and Govern
aneencmnnnrenieaa. as + | ment water installed
BATTERIES: 6 and 12 volt DURALIFE ped oes premises will be set up 4 yr
] , with Ebonite separators for Cars, Trucks} sale by Public Competition «4 ir Office
PUBLIC NOTICES and Motor cyclen, Courtesy Garage.| James Street on Fri 13th July 1951
5 : at neck« Dial 4391. 26.6.51—6n.| at 2 p.m. For inspection apply to Mi
hg eat me, hae tne On eee oa ae = Farmer the tenant between the hours of
ore hin charge $1.50 on week-days| COOLERATOR -- I good conditfon. | 3 and 4.30 p.m. daily except Sunday
and $1.80 on Sundays. Phone 3185. 20.6.51—2n. YEARWOOD & BOYC E
1 licttors
TENDER 7 RADIO—Tabie Modél—Ten tube Geret- 1.7.51—en
Tenders are hereby fhvited for the| l Blectric Radio $50.00Dial 8370. ——_—__-—__-—- ————
contract to erect an extension to an 1.7,51—1n ee as Cena ane ahhudied Bowes
, at the Company's) ———————— —_—_——_ ed, then, yut office
waantnes ie the drawink and REFRIGERATOR — One (1) Westing-} Near Pine Gap, Collymore Rock, Appl
specifications in respect of which may be] house, in ood working order. Apply: Herbert Grant, Upper Collymore Rock
nined at the Office of Messrs. D. M.| W. R. Tempro. Phone 5044 or 8224 1.7.61—1n |



28.6.51—t.f.n. | -





Marhill Street.

PROPERTY—That desirable

pson & Co.,



Wall and





























































SU AY ADVOCATE
FOR THE HAYNES MEMORIAL
WANTED SCHOOL
A Mistress (white) to teach the junior
Mir , arge week ent n
Ft eee eee ee om children. Salary $40.00 per month
rhe sy lifine neg = Ee. See 2 Duties to be assumed on 17th Septerr
ud on Mute ord week—4 cents Gye, 1951. Apply: by letter by 25th’ July
aunonys 3951 with testimonials of good character
and capabilities to
= Mrs. De Courcy BOYCE,
HELP Strathclyde.
27.6.51—3n
COOK GENERAL Must sleep i
.ppiy by letter to Box A.A. C/o Advocate
! ——— MAIL NOTICE
MISCELLANEOUS
a . contre Mails for the United Kingdom Ant-
PAYING GUEST—At Culpeper’s House, | werp, Amsterdam and Madeira by the
ot deal tuation. Overlooking ]§.S. Willemstad will be closed at the
« x « hing and inshine | Gereral Post Office as under:
jerate, be early for holiday Parcel Mail at 3 p.m. on the 6th
s a ppointment. Apply? | July 1951
re Culp House, Bathsheba, Registered and Ordinary Mails at 10,15
1.7.51—In, La.m.son the 7th July 1951,
By
Lieut.-Col J. Connell OBE,ED,
Commanding,
; « The Barbados Regiment
a io 29 June 51
, S—Training pe i En Pere, ee
All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700 hours on Thurs-

July

51



Band practice

Reeruits
Recruits will parade for training under their
Monday 2 and Wednesday 4 July 51







vill be held on Monday 2, Wednesday 4 and Thursday 5 July 51
respective squad instructors on

ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT for the week ending 9 July 5)

Orderly — OfF 2/Lt. A. H. Clarke,
Order Ser je 234 Sit. Williams, E.D
Next for duty
Order| Officer \ Lieut. T. A. Gittens
Orderly Serjeant 18 Sjt. Williams, §.D
M. I D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
8.01, FB. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment
PART Oi ORDERS
THE. BARBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 19.
2th JUNE, 195) SHEET NO 1
J STRENTH INCREASE—Attestations, c ey teates eee pS
or Dr r. Oxley re ' Attested and taken on. strength of
2 Pte. Peterkin, 1 ) Regiment w.e.f. 13 & 14 June 51, ;
respectively

PROMOTIONS,

Lt. H. B. Gooding Promotion
by H.EB.
240 Pte. Sobers, ¢
LEAVE—Privilage
Lt A. H. Clarke Granted
2% June
M. IL

the

Promoted to L/Cpl

3 months’

to

Lieutenant approved
Governor wef 1 June Si.
wef 15 June ‘51

P/Leave w.e.f

D. SKEWES-COX, Major,

S.OLF. & Adjutant,

The Barbados



Regiment |

POST OFFICE NOTICE i

CHANGES IN AIR MAILS.



mails will be closed at the General

Day

Wednesday
Saturday
Tuesday

Thursday
Monday to Thursday
Saturday

Tenders must be addressed to the s b Sffective - - on ea
undersigned at the registered Office S MECHANICAL Wace pveee cabed o mine at uae * ies ive i oe 1951, air
thes Company, McGregor St., ‘and we oad, . ‘onsis : Os fice as follows
6: re > nH is an p.m, on = Gallery to the front 2 Side Verandahs,
ary x a Ber es pee GE ee Po tee ids Drawing and Dining Rooms 4 Bedrooms Destination Ti
° THE 1S ¥ 0, LTD.,; 272 youths. Water Toilet and Bath, Modern Kitchen- ; n ine
THE BORRADOS ek prices. Dial 4391, Courtesy Garage. cette, Garage, Spacic ard enclosed »y | Grenada 11.45 adn
Secretary. 26.6.51—On- | wall and standing % of an acre of +s +20 Oe
23.6,51—3n,. land, with several bearing fruit trees 9.00 a.m,
-~ The Same will be set up for sale by |St, Lucia 8.830 am
public competition at our Office, James % 4 sé a.
Ore CHURCH MISCELLANEOUS Street, on Friday 6th July at 2 p.m 2.00 pum.
PARISH OF C SHURC ——e specti y day except Sundays, | 7)j z
Sealed Tenders, marked on the envel-} ANTIQUES — Of every description Pe De Leey op Oak Reon ee cd | Trinidad a ‘“ 11.45 a.m.
ope ‘Tender for the erection of a Pavil-| Glass, China, old Jewels, fang Sliver p.m. Hutchinson & Banfield, Solicitors. ; 9.00 a.m.
ion ot Sarjeant’s Village.” will be re-} Water-colours. Early books, wane 23.6.51—-7n
ceived at my office up to 3.00 p.m. on| Autographs etc. “dt Gorringes Antique; 0000 BAnarilda GHAUIA Red i
Monday 28rd July, 1951 for the erection| Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht wa “THE ROSARY” St. George (near St | schedules should be amended where necessary.
oi a pavilion at the Satjeant’s Village a 3. ce George's Rectory) — 5 miles from town—| General Post Office
Tlaving Field on a bus route 3 bedtooms, drawing 990 RF
Copies of the plan and specifications} ANTIQUE CHEVAL GLASS — Full icon dining room and breakfast roon 29.6.51,



length—Fiddle Pattern, Anyone interested
contact John Shannon, City Pharmaqy.
21.6.51—3n.

“FARM” POWDERED FULL
MiLK—Supreme quality and only $4.32
per 5-Ib tin and $1.00 per 1-Ib tin.

can be obtained from Mr, R, B. Moulder
al Messrs. C. F, Harrison & Co, Ltd.,
on deposit of the sum of five dollars
(95.001, which will be refunded on Te-
turning the plan to Mr. Moulder,

Each Tenderer should state the date
by which it is anticipated the work will



|
|
verandah South Side Company's }
water, Telephone and electric light
about % acres of grounds surrounded by
4 | Stone wall on 3 sides Solidly built of
stone with shingle roof. Garage for 4
cars, servant Tooms and usual offices
Inspection on application to the care

on

c tin to-day from your grocer
be completed and also submit the names Get a taken
of two persons willing to become bound] or Drug Store and try the best ROOT be put ‘up tor ee ibaa




milk obtainable. The 5-Ib family size is









































“ 1 p f 800,00 each iz e can . Eorat
fe One chee Ce aaiey of the contract | really economical es on “Farm so ae om Friday th July 1051 a
F uple ilding by} the sake of your health and your pocke “m. . as a eke
re Be ra of the building’ PY) Tr \our dealer cannot supply, Dhone = bac ela ocx
The successful tenaerer will be pS 27.6. 51—t.i.n.
lg i a bt or 7 t » 4 The undersigned will offer for sale b
\ y » erec " ding. GALVANIZED SHEETS: 24 gauge in uw ; , 0 for eae Dp
The ve on does obo oe tale 7 lengths of 6, 7; 8, 9 and 10 foot. Pypuire Pgh SEs Mie gt Soe oe + M an
accept the lowest or any tender a0t> Tyre Company, afal a, Eirert. Hah Mirah, Pade matty Baan
woo bi ga ae Be ——---- ~~ {dwellinghouse Va COTTAGE,
Clerk o e . eat AAO ality |‘'wo Mile Hill, standing In 2 acres of
re rete a an uaben i ee Inland | gardens and grounds, with 2 acres more
17.6.51—Sn. | HOW e504; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $0.72; 9 ft $7.98; | Of yood sour grass land. The house
— 10 ‘tt $8.40. Nett cash. Better hurry) | Contains all modern comforts ang ces
hon NE \ - enfénces and may be inspected on appli-
= ay Saree Seen qusiont to ‘Mr. Cc R. Tudor, Bovell &
—_—_———
LEATHER=Lizard, Crocodile Skins for | Skeete. i
MAPLE MANOR shoes, hand bags. Paster’s Leather Store yan Rogpeanlon will be given
1 é q - the rtictlars frorr
SORT ee Pee ye NOTE, CATFORD & CO.,
“STAINLESS STEEL — | 5 Solicitors,
OPPOSITE HASTINGS ROCKS | STAINLESS STEEL — Steak hives olicttors.
Tel, 3021. «. BOULLNE, $12.00 per dozen are be Aspe to men- Pia:
Manageress, tion. Broadway Dress CRBs 6,530. x SASH Prete ot
£100 each in Applewhaites Limited de
5 All sizes 8, 10 and |Shares of £1 each in Knights Limitec
i a” Gen css een G. ayhew toe be sold by public competition at the
‘ jal 2382 or 4334. i ! omice of the undersigned on Thursday
WrSs z " 27.6.51—4n. | t¥e 12th day July 1951 at 2 o'clock
NOTIC a. . COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
28.6,.51—8n.—e,0.d



FOR RENT

AUCTION

————

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

(
(
TO GAS CONSUMERS.

We have pleasure in notify-
ing our Customers that the

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
6 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a






























| ADVERTISE 1? PAYS





"
GRIENTAL
SOUVENTRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

|
|
_THANTS wa ||
|

wes











p.m ‘

'
: N
iN DON NACANO i rooms, built-in-garage and _ all
(F99G9%SSG9SS9GS AUCTION SALE % usual offices. Open to offers.
% r % > “LOCKERBIE HOUSE”, Brit-
% rete 1s : » Be
$ WANTE et SR | $ || tons Cone Sane, cueing eas
% MONDAY 2ND AND % FR] set well back in well mainta
% CLEAN OLD RAG % i ¥ and “secluded grounds, fe wat-
} ate ian T iy lens are’ we matured and
% Delivered to % TUESDAY 38RD JULY {st YOU WANT to economise on your % there is complete privacy from the
. ba tas tae ‘oadway ie
: Advocate Press Room — 3 vk nae ae % Ceilings and Partitions, use ....- + $/ff) There 1s a covered entrance porch
Lh aie y . for cars, wide airy verandahs,
14S OSF ASSO ESOS SBOOOS | R : DONNACANO WALL BOARD. g large lounge with a central stair-
CPL EEOC FOSS ; R 7 s way making an attractive feature,
ees ae near eT We are favoured with instruc- % ‘ Obtainable in the following Sizes : eens room, four good ms,
———F oo tions from Mrs. Don Johnson and \% = 4’ 8’ Yn!" ae eee BeCsys Onnits
, Here teat Besa Sa Sas ‘ / tO: rae offices. Our
James St. Methodist Church tdocive cuflaghhel ie piahine 50 IEE Seles, vig ne estas tae
e e) e collec’ 2 va J = a a -
Annual Missionary Meet- a Aktien.” ical: atk % N B H O W E L L 4 esting and desirable property.
ings Sunday, July Ist at 7 : chee $ 6 7 x eae Sugar Estate with
3.15 p.m, Juvenile Meeting and the entire caine ce ae st Lumber and Hardware % g Ouse up to £20,000,
— Special Programme MENHAM” Pine Hill. Viewing ¥ i % “HILL CREST”, Bathsheba. Sub-
Scholars of the School. Saturday 9 to 12 and morning prior Dial: 330 stantially built modern stone bun-
Monday, July 2nd at 7.30 to Sale aed galow on the brow of the cliffs







1.7.51—1n.






























SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951

_ eee REAL ESTATE |
ROYAL NETHERLANDS

STEAMSHIP CO. JOHN

SAILINGS FROM AMSTERDAM
v4.

M8 HECUBA—2ist June 1951.
M.S ORANJESTAD—Sth July 1951,
& €¢@.

M 8. BONAIRE—i3th July 1951.
A.E.S., E.V.A.





























The M.V will
accept Cargo and Passengers for !
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, }
Nevis and St. Kitts. Loading and i
Sailing Monday 2nd July.

CARIBBEE

The M.V. DAERWOOD will

M.S HERSILIA—26th July 1951.

SAILINGS TO PLYMOUTH AND
AMSTERDAM

M §. WILLEMSTAD—i0th July 1951.
SAHLANGS TO TRINIDAD, PARAM-
ARIBO AND GEORGETOWN

S 8. COTTICA—26th June 1951.
M8 HECUBA—Sth July 1951.

8S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO,, LTD.

aceept Cargo arid Passengers for

St. Lucia, Sate and Aruba.
Passengers only ¢ St. Vincent.
Date of departure to be notified,

B.W.l. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION INC.





























Agents, |
: eS = = , > =
Canadian National Steamships |}, ‘0? “|
the stb? nbings oF’ Barbadse
built By “craftsmén who to0dk a
pride in their work. Accommo-
SOUTHBOUND ¥ dation comprises of large recep-
Sails Sails Sails Arrives Salls tion rooms, .wide verandahs,
Name of Ship Montreal. Halifax Boston Barbados, Barbados study, 3 double bedrooms,’ 2
garages and customary offices and
CAN. CONSTRUCTOR 22 June 25 June - 4 July 4 July outbuildings, Picturesque gatdens
LADY NELSON ; 30 June 3 July 5 July 14 July 15 July with tennis court Total area of
CAN. CRUSSER as 10 July 13 July a= 22 July 23 July land about 4% acres
CAN. CHALLENGER 20 July 23 July — 1 Aug. 2 Aug. |
LADY RODNEY j 30 July 2 Aug. 4Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug. CASTRIES, ST. LUCIA. Valu-
CAN. CONSTRUCTOR 9 Aug. 12 Aug 7 21 Aug. 22 Aug. | able block of propefty in strategic
LADY NELSON pes 20 Aug 23 Aug. 25 Aug 3 Sept. 4 Sept. central — position Approx. ‘2
acre bounded by 3 main roads
abatiialiaads bee ee el s ipo ei ee and Castries River. Particulars on
application
ORTHBOUND
: ee Arrives Salls Arrives Arrives paren ‘ Bhs aon! paren BEATA inte
r os. Barbados Boston Halifax ontreal. o let and entire property for sale.
Name of Ship Rarbad de Godrington Hill, St. Michael. “A
LADY RODNEY 3 July 4 July 14 July 16 July 19 July fine old country mansion recently ;
LADY NELSON 27 July 29 July 7 Aug. 9 Aug. 12 Aug. converted into four spacious
LADY RODNEY 25 Aug. 28 Aug. 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 11 Sept. luxury flats fitted with all modern
LADY NELSON 16 Sept. 18 Sept. 27 Sept. 28 Sept. 2 Oct. conveniences, There are approx:
LADY RODNEY 16 Oct, 18 Oct. 27 Oct. 28 Oct. 1 Novr. 5 acres surrounding the house all

laid out with lawns, shrubberies
and gardens, the long driveway
approach is flanked by matured
mahogany trees. Good invest-
ment property espectalty suitable
for a resident owner. Only 3%
miles from town.



~~

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.











“SWEET FIELD”, St
PRESERVE YOUR BELTS house is af the Ratsle tee wit
2 storeys, solidly built

with

FLEXO HELT DRESSING

Obtainable from...

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

Pier Head Lane.

with parapeted roof,” ire We2§

Siding ae large gt wi
rench wi :
ered Perandane® ooh, a
is @ tinobstructed view of the

ort distance aWhy.~ The 3
bed airy, one







==



—~














IT IS A KNOWN FACT THAT

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM



v —_ in
constructed of stoné ‘with wa!
(With The Distinctive Flavour) shimuried sae ee a ocre
living toom, dining room, 4 bed:

rooms, ‘kitchen, servant's
and double garage. The pro
has a wide lawn at one side, a
small orchard and is fully en-
closed. Central residential area
near town and schools.

is outstanding in Quality and Flavour. ooo

SIP IT — TO ENJOY if.
' : e
BLENDERS :
JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

.

“SILVERTON"—Cheapside. Com-

modious 2 storey stone house
standing in ‘approx: 1% acres
on fruit Te 2 large re-
ception rooms, rooms, 2 gal-
leries, kitchen, 2 bathrooms Ge
Centrally located and suitable for
conversion into flats or boarding
house,














“IN CHANCERY”, Inch Marlow.
A_ modern, well designed and
soundly built bungalow on the
toast where there is always a
cooling breeze, There is a large
combined lounge dining room.
Kitchen with serving hatch, 2 bed-






























which affords fine views this
























































. 5 . able : 2 wild and rocky coastline re
Governor - in - Executive {| word on Sundays. The Hon. R. N. Turner, money Taegan Come Pree are 3 good bedrooms, living room,
Committee on the 14th June “ By instructions received 1 will sell on Acting Governor, will pre- boards, Set ¢ Dining Chairs. Set 2-sided gallery, kitchen, servant's
last approved in terms of HOUSES Friday 6th July at the General Motor side... 4 Dining Chairs, Set 6 Tub Chairs, aaah and garage. Electricity
Sec. 16 of The Natural Gas Bus Co Nelson &. ans Austin 4 in Speaker Rev. T, J. Furley Rockers, Easy Chafts, Morris Suite, Ly ven Nether a a a
i \ 2 accident) Sale at 2 Rr am -o! ot- . ‘
Corporation Act 1950 an FLAT--One Downstairs Flat at Bluc de aa ae (Deputation from St. Vin- Be ode Beck pat ates = about 60 coconut trees. 42 totes
interim selling price of Nat- Waters Terrace semi furnished, 3 Bed: | ° VINCENT GRIFFITH, cent). vélviigy Bookcase, Diant’ Stands, — proposition “at Ca
ural Gas to The Barbados racmes Bi modern conveniences. | AVERY asi te a All are cordially invited. Tip Top Tables (brass feet), Round ASSURANCE SOCIETY UES: GaSe
pee €o., Ltd, enabling them se wae | eh | ‘ Tip Top Table, Square Tables Nest || BUILDING LAND available in |
o remove the rece r FLAT—At Coral Sands, Worthing. rs ehh sind einlniabataaint petnbot- one dnde ail "Sables: es sabie- 5 ardens, Maxwells, Oistins,
charge of 10% on Gas... | moder furnished tat, kosd sea bathing | UNDER THE SILVER | pxseeiewenscsscscssssasaees 3g || tn Tables, Aidnes table, Ward | ELECTION OF A DIRECTOR Cnilat eae euleD, St James,
This new price being opera- For further particulars, Dial 6134, Alms HAMMER Tables, Gval Table, Screens, Writ ehah T ie loane 8S Other parts of
tive from the 16th May, }i| Lashley. Peay ; ENQUIRE AT... ing Desk. Two Pairs Single Betls
Of n . " i é 9 re Se eas adeeed 5) , Odd Single ed, having Stand “STR. ”
eget. Zhe Broporiesiats Bi FURNISHED — From August Ist} Gn WEDNESDAY 4th (and if not com- |} and Mirror, (all the above in Ma- e he Wale’ oe ose te Bons.
of surcharge for accounts the ‘Clifyyune” Garden Gap, Worthing. lated Thursday Sth tr order of Mrs. | ¢ * hokanyi.” Weatitene eri z ase — Handsome
- I wer as Y a - telephone etc. Fo-| Pleted) on Thursday § ‘ z i % ST ANWAY STORE nozany), estinghouse rig., “storey stone property with
Month of May will be de bedrooms, garage, i om 8 am. and| Robert M. Jones we will sell her | 2 Phillips Radio, Trays, Card Tables, s shingle roof and pine floors, Con-
ducted from and shown on. porticulars Dial 4304 be' ween $ § mid pn | House Appointments at Walmer Cottase, | ¥ iticha at Paititéd Gallery Furriture,, Painted Notice is hereby given that an Extraordinary tains 2 reception, dining room, 5
your June's Gas Accounts. { ea eens ea wee He, which, is eet Meee Bearoch Pamir, Oak China : + eae : Pectoains: 3 baths and toilets. Ex-
; ; - 7 in Mahogany and in perfect conditio a a al = Cabinet, Presses, Fretwork Book * * * 4 nsively —remod
rt HOMPSTBAD—Bastings. 3 | Bedtoor including ROP POR Otsiae, a yer orcs Genes OF Stand, | Walnut Dinfhg Table, Meeting of the qualified Policyholders of the above Feqnhtly. Grgunae or rab nko
; 3 -WiOy tuning: wate ee Aaeky on | Extension Dining sabe with patent at item you may need. Re- Indian Table, Two eis} Armour | ill b ehh ot the © iety’ Office. aa ft. Pleasant town house suit-
te. la . ' :| Screw to seat 12; Upright Chairs, i rardiess of size or quality, With- (stage), ' Single “Iron Beds and i a e society Ss ’ able as Doctor's residence
Chandler uae % iret Cabinet, Sideboard, Round bir Top | § ’ y biigation and fee of charge Soe, Seng Mattresses, Several named Society Ww le he y Guest House. F
. ¥ ps Table, Serving, Ornament anc ‘ock out obligation ar " wee Deep Sleep Mattresses, Shoe Racks, Pe ° .
FOR SALE MS—Gne Double Bedroom, one] Tail Tables; Bergere Arm) Chairs and ; Just Dial 4910 or 3601 and let mo Wicker Tables, Wicker | Chairs, Beckwith Place, Bridgetown, on Friday, 6th July, 1951, “WINDY WILLOWS", St. James
ee eae Nee AB single, "Excellent bea Bathing, Terms on | Rockers; Mortis” Chairs with Spelt 1# co the worrying Mosgilito “Nets” Blectrie’ Topsters, , , : — Delightful bungalow house with
application to Casuarina Residential Club, | Cushions, eases S ae * aA re ‘ . — rage Pare, ee ee can at 2 o'clock p.m. for the purpose of electing a Director west iter os oer ean ne ae
Maxwell Coast Road. Telephone 8378 Table, Carved Pedestal Pi a "sy Cc. PIERREPONTE % carpet, Dominican Rugs, Rush r a and stretches
a 1.7.81—1n. | in Mahogany! very nice China Cabins z 2 Carpets and Rtgs, Large Collec- ‘ B ho h ‘ d of beach. Large lounge, 3 bed-
3 = (Round Glass), Wicker Ax CHAS. | 0 p pa nnnmmnmnnnenne penitent pinebed tion Table Cloths, Tea and Tray in the place of Mr. Walter C. Boyce, who has resigne rooms, verandahs, kitchen, pantry
, “SNUG CORNER” — PALM BEACH, | Rockers and Tables: Paintings and Water | SR. eee | Cloths, Pillows, Cushions, ” Large and servants’ rooms. Storerooms
OF ae ene | HASTINGS, Ideally. situated on the SEA\| Colours; Chiming Clock, | “Veranda | Collection of “ikitehen, Ware’ ad his seat. = Senet COPE commenen-
5 fable, ord hs. | Chairs, Glass and China; Set of Table | Utensils, Ansome Mower, ‘ot ’ “ +”
ST. LUCIA hee Seay Pi fed ser 5,| Glass (61 pieces), Dinner Service (7 | K Ne ! S k i Plates, Kerdsetie Cookér,” Garden Cc. K. BROWNE, eine be an * fine im-
B.W.t with Running Water, all modern con- | pcs.) Tea and Coftee Serv ne ss Silvas ae 1 resh < toc Ss useinuy. acer Catenin ae Secretary. driveway is avanabie ath oe
veniences, Kitchen, Servants’ Room and | Plated ee ee eee ener Br . oer cendel te: Cae ys - 4 acres well laid out with lawns,
about miles from the aie ee % 18th July. Apply | Tureen &c, Forks, Cutlery Brass: | e — d Ornaments, Kitehen Furnitut?, r t is ‘ -
Capital, Castries) SE ee een cent, Dial OB31 Jardinieres, Finger Bowls &c, Cushions |{ ust Receiv e Table Lamps, 2 Portable Gramo- 21.6.51—6n. shrubberies,” livge taditk ae
Consisting of Twenty four (24) ana or 29.6.51—4n. | Folding Card Tables, — Westinghouse phones, Miscellaneous Records, closed by wall and feice. The
acres of land on which are sited: : Bassigerator yo parser, worse ome. PARK DAVIS SACCHARIN TABS Corigiat os ee order house contains very large lounges
ectric Fan; amps, ‘Toaster ec PARK DAVIS PALATOL COMP icture: and ‘rames, onerete 9
Two (2) Modern Buildings, suitable TWO BEDROOMS Fully furnishel | Handsome Prench Carpets and Rugs; PARK DAVIS PALATOL PLAIN Flowef Pots, Rose Trees, 1949 double bedroceas Weapons ‘hall,
for Country Club and Guest ‘with running water, St, Lawrence Gap. |New Carpet Sweeper: Single Pacstone PARK DAVIS LIVIBRON Model Morris 14 Car and very all Usual offices! Rates and Sak
House [ Fer particulars Dial 8489, 111 — Ons | ae Beings. eae + ih Te PARK DAVIS BEEF TRON & many other attractive items buildings. t fe
7 ——_—_———$ ‘ors, yent’s ess, Aine t WINE ; \
(1) A Wooden Building (36 x 38) 6 —O; ‘astings Main Road, | Vahity Tables all in Mahogenys Bedroom CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION } “ ” py ;
\ Containing 3 bedrooms, draw- Ty na house on the land | Sufte in Manchfheale Mird. Pr es, MT. | arsine re | \ Pe he le genet ee
i ing dining, dressing and side from St. Matthias Gap. Three bed | Washstand, ed and et oa tee | Cash on fall of the hamme ' gone age, is the ideal home for
( itting rooms rooms, all modern conveniences. Appl Table, Deep Sleep and Hair Mat-) DR as: a € hammer { someone who’ wants spacious
{ Veranda on two sides, Covered on premises. 1.7,51—1n | tresses, Child’s Bedstead, Canva oe DR rooms and quiet ‘surroundings
with Galvanized Iron Four Burner Perfection Oil Stove with | A CTIONEER ; ¢ St. James coast which offers
. built in oven, (periect condition, Larders, | YEASTVITE TABLETS . NS \ ood bathing is only ¥ mile away
} (2) A Large 3-Storey Concrete FOUND ae tienes ane SS eae By att Cit pare watas and distance from Bridgetown is
Building 42 x 42 Containing: Pal - ressure Cooker, Lawn Mower, ech. | ANALGES ALI J 6 miles. Offers” ‘
| | ® Bedrooms, Large Hall, Sit- Tobdls, Roller, New Hose; Garden Beneh ohn e ladon as ae er
, ti Room and Store Room, WRIST WATCH—At the “Princess | Chicken Coops and Runs, | lants In, mn - | “BAGATELLE OUSE,” st.
} Floors and other necessary wood- Alice” Playing Field, on Thursday night | ented Pots, Orchids, Books ing} id aint : | ‘ . | Thomas. '— A tive 2-storey |
work of Pitch Pine, Bullet wood 14th June, one (1) Ladies Wrist Watch | Schomburg’s History of Barb: C CARLTON BROWNE | A.F.S,, F.V.A. | cguntry house with approx. 5
? and Green-heart. Owner can have same by applying to the | other items. ns | required. There are 5 bedrooms,
: Veranda right around cn two Vestry Clerk, and paying cost of tht: Sale 12.30 o'clock. Terms cash, — | Wholesale & Retail Deuggist ia) Phone 4640 i acres plus additional 3% acres if
| storeys. All Modern Con- advertisement. BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. | oS : 2 lounges, dining room, 2 enclosed
veniences. 1.7.51—1n Auctioneers | 186 Roebuck St, Dial 2813 ) | PLA ATIONS BUILDING | oe a eaten’ eats
The Property his two rivers. of LOST cians inner capers Gna UReee Ri ce
ystal lee vater 26666666689 Pee. com-
} een by ars water running ooo SOOO OOSO OOOO OSS z - fs | mands ereqtiont view of the St.
For dc stic use the buildings ai —_—_—- — . s | j TH ' eee ee
‘ are served jointly frem concrete x s | SELECT E FOLLOWING BUILDING NEEDS rs } “GREY HOUSE” s itstown. —
| cisterns with a capaeity of 22,000 SWEEPSTAKE BOOKS — 2 Sweepstake % { % | o } Large 3-storey ‘house ' in ~ good
1 gallons Books II 7480 and IT 3430. Finder please . > / lp Cc x | | CEMENT (Drums & Bags) business section. Suitable for dry
a wise the ee Service is return to Prince Gregorie, Dpre: Bee ‘ eae %| | BAR IRON (tin all Sizes) goods, provision store, ete. In-
1 American Plant in perfect Street 51—2n . spy E. F.V.A - formation on application
be 1, with. a. capacity of 2 | A.M. INST, B. E A, | EXPANDED METAL (In all Sizes)
‘ Watts. | WALL BOARD wee
os mre Aiioe Goshabny { 3 | Auctioneer and Real Estate PAINTS & ENAMELS (In all Brands)
> oth | }
Graph Meta pebaah oe {0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH BEVER AGES | Arent { All ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIES WANTED
bearing) % ae
: ‘ — “ s | And Many Other Useful ITEMS Too Numerous to Mention SUGAR ESTATE with pleasant
is next to UNION, the EVERYMAN’S < at GRIFFITH'S R ‘kley » Offers You | t residence up to £20,000 or there-
ee eee Ae ENCYCLOPAEDIA % a VOE 1 ¢ Several interesting Properties in St. James, Christ Church, Pay US a Visit before making your Selection abouts for overseas buyer. '"
fovernment Exp C A : : : | : tins
ou eee % % Navy Gardens and Silver Sands. See: We shall be ‘pleastg to give de-
(2) Owner's reason for selling: Unable 3rd Edition revised to 1950 % Iced Cold or Supplied % tails of many other propefttiés for
i through impaired health to . $ s sale in Barbados, also in Jaqiaica,
(Xt devote personal attention to $36.00 for the Set $ Per Dozen e | eo e Bermuda and the Bahamas
{ business JOHNSON’S STATIONERY > %
{ *% s
cas § ©
ty further particulars, appl » we 2 B b d H d L d
rthe F: ‘5, ply ‘, 7 Nee ase ‘ ¥
g the next few dave” @ mEMIREORS g ce me} interwar arbados Hardware Co., Ltd. KEAL ESTATE AGENTS
i “i thing, Christ 22 ins. x 16 ins. B Book Your Order Now 9 THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS) (| 2
i ( 24 ins. x 18 ins. % S a % || PLANTATIONS BULL. DING
if PI > 8364 at 5 1% aDisel 1514 x No. 16 Swan Street one Phone 2109, 4406 or 3534 | = “Pho: a 4640
i 10ne JOHNSON’S HARDWARE {3 x i me {
M 4 Bea taht Sr ef
Feeennnaas FSFE FYSSOSSSSSOSSGGSSSSOG VSS Gs =
SSS So
























































































‘


















































































SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE dh See PAC c FIFTE! nN









HOUSING :

Aided Self Help Schemes :
Are Most Economical for WI

THE most economical method of providing adequate
housing for the lower income groups in the Caribbean area
is by aided self-help schemes.

FROPERSY

FOR SALE

B.B.C. Radio
was the conclusion reach-

yr : Thi
Notes ed by the Housing Conference
which met at Hastings House last
week. This conference concluded
its deliberations on Friday and

Again the coming we ae agreed om the terms of its report
of sports eioasibanien in ch oe to the British Caribbean Goverin-
Overseas Service. The Third Tesi ments.
beg on Thursday next, 5th. The Conference gave special at-
July, at Old Trafford, the famous tention to the application of the
Lancashire Cricket ground. Broad- principle of self-help in housing
casts om each day’s play will be schemes. An _ aided self-help
beamed to us in this area at 5.00 scheme is one in which the pub-
p.m. on each of the five days and lic authority assists house owners
in addition there will be com- to improve or build their dwellings
mentaries in beams to Africa at by providing, usually on a repay-
&.15 a.m. and 12.45 which you ment basis, land and materials,
may be able to pick up either the owner supplying the labour
in the 17 or 19 metre bands, 15.14 himself. The land is serviced by
and. 17.715 megacyeles, Lawn the authority with water supply
Tennis at Wimbledon is reported and essential roads.

duced, the need for which is
universally recognised, there
must be an adjustment ef
permitted standards in re-
gerd to both the size and the
amenities provided.

A sub-committee of the Con-

Sports, Broadcasts




ference reviewed the minimum
standards recommended in Devel-
opment and Welfare Bulletin No.
13, “Housing in the West Indies”,
and made suggestions involving,
in certain cases, the revision of
those standards. The same sub-
committee also made recommend-
ations on the subject of building
legislation and regulations



Another sub-committee report- FE ' > {
ed on housing finanee, 2dminis - or over 20 years people have
rents and used Alka-Seltzer for quick relief

“daily at 5.00 p.m. until the Test tration, management ne D
Match starts when it will be Schemes Successful The reports of both sub-commit- from acid indigestion and sour,

tees were accepted, with certain
modifications, by the Conference '

heard five minutes later and also The Conference noted that such upset stomach. Alka-Seltzer acts |

every day at 8.45 p.m. when Max
Robertson, Rex Alston and Ray-
mond Glendenning comment or
each day’s matches. The open
Golf Championship, being played
for the first time in Northern
Ireland at the Royal Portrush
Club, will be subject of an eye-
witness account at 5.10 and 9.00
p.m. on Friday, 6th July.

B.B.C. RADIO
-» PROGRAMMES

JULY 1,
2 Pt

951
rade, 11 30





1




aim +t .on The News

1210 pm. News A ;
iH i pm — 19 m

435 pm. Music Magazine, 430 pm
Sunday Half Hour, 5 00 pm. Composer
of the Week, 5 15 p m. Listeners’ Choice,
6 00 Nellie Lutcher, 615 pm



pot N
Ray A Laugh, 645 pm. Programme
Parade

7 W—11 00 — 25 58



m, 3132 m





710 pm News

00 pm ws,
. Caribbean Voices,

715 p



A

schemes have already been un-
dertaken with success in various
forms in several British West
Indian territories, notably Jamai-
ca, Trinidad and St. Vincent, and
recorded its opinion that these
schemes represent the most eco-
nomieal method of providing ade-
Guate housing for the lower income
groups.

It is hoped that aided self-help
schemes will be introduced in
those territories where they have
not yet been tried, and that in-
creased use will be made of them
in other territories, as they would
represent the most advantageous
use of the limited funds availab!..

The Conference was convened
with the main task of consider-
ing the position of the lower in-
come groups, the great majority of
whom live in unsatisfactory hous-
i.g conditions, In the debate in
the Trinidad Legislative Council
in June, 1950, where the sugges-

in plenary session.

Economy
The need for the utmost econo-
my in the use of funds is em-
phasised by the present high costs
of building, and by the inability

of governments to devote suffi- |
cient of their resources to hous- |
latter, the |

ing. As regards the
Conference drew attention to the
harmful effect of bad housing
conditions on productivity, and

hoped that increased funds could !
be made available for the im- |

provement of housing standards
in all territories. With regard to
costs, the Conference _ stressed
that the urgent need is for a re-
duction in the price of cement, o1
the provision of alternative ce-
menting material at a low cost,
and stated its belief that such

development could transform the |

situation in every territory.

The conference was arranged



gredients to neutralize excess gas-
tric acidity with an analgesic to
relieve the headache so often
caused by gastric distress.

Millions daily find Alka-Seltzer so
easy to take...so pleasant-tasting.
Try it—just drop one or two tab-
lets into a glass of water, watch
it fizz, then drink it,

Not a laxative, not habit-forming,
you can take it amy time, Keep a
supply handy — always!

_ Alka-Seltzer helps millions daily
“=~ let it help you too!

a = =m (i)
Alka-Seltzer




Tubes of
2& ablets



two ways, combining alkaline in- |



KNOWN AS

THE WHITEHALL

and Two adjoining Buildings
situated at Hastings opposite the Hastings Hotel















7 45°-p m cience and The Christian 4; % =i fone “Ps : ar eee at mem Ph
Man, @00 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 813 tion of a housing conference orig- by the Development and Welfare seen ncents AID, ¢ SURNAM Ud
pm Sunday Serviee, 845 pm iInter- inated, the hope was ee Organisation, and there were re- |" — . =
Inde, 855 pm From the Editorials, that by joint action following a presentativ arb:
eu E Ss 4 es from Barbados ° } _ VOTANt |

Pe Nawee 10:10 pio Pav ide ty ts conference, the governments oi Jamaica, Leeward Islands, Domin- (ng Or... AT PRESENT the house contains completely self contained well
pm Grand Prix D'Europe, 10 30 pm. the area would be able to effect " ica, Grenada, St. Lucia, St, Vin- 9 | appointed up-to-date FLATS, with conveniences
London Forun Seema Nag oh noon in the cent and Trinidad. | | 2% miles from Bridgetown in one of the most exclusive district

CBC PROGRAMME ousing oO) ne §=Jower = income Three of the delegates (Mr \ ndoag. “Sea Rathi asily available server first class “bus

SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951 groups by the mass proauction of els ; Mh eth | irbados, Sea Bathing easily available and served by first class ‘bu

at me aoe ae : E. N. Bird and Mr. D. W. Spreull | rvice
Sy ca bad at dbckeion ‘beet Mae: cheap houses, using methods of from Jamaica and Dr. H. B. { a
11.76 Mcs, 25.5% M prefabrication, Hetherington from Dominica)
pli hiliimnaselilbbidabinen : : have already retur ir : °
BOSTON Suggestion Considered Set ae Oe ned to thel: Sp Consult:
WRUT 0 Mc. WRUW 11% Me ves \ territories. The other members of , | |
WRUX fee ‘ast : I'he present Conference gave the Conference are due to leave
ay ” full consideration to this sugges- B ;
: . ae ; arbados within the next few 5

B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME. tion and reviewed the information days. Cables Phones: 5367

\omtae. JuLY.4, {oi available in regard to building
. Programmé Parade, 11.25 materials and house design and
am, Listeners’ Cholee, 11 45 a.m. Com- construction, including prefabri-
monweaith Commentar 12:00 noon The cation methods
News, 12 10 p r Fe
415-6 45 pm it appeared that the experience A Dance
: of governments and public hous-

5 oon Broek Brom Winthleten 8 od ing authorities to date, in the sponsored by —
pm England v. Australia, 510 pm, territories represented at the Con- Mr. GORDON YEARWOOD
interhide, 5 15 pm. The Storyteller, ference, was that in general, while (better known as Tourist)

, pr Interlude, 545 pm Halinka the use of prefabricated houses

be T nska, 600 pm Tom Jones 7 : F
‘Trio, 6 15 pm. From The Third Pro- has certain advantages, particu'ar-



A. M. QUERINO

P. O. Box 464
Trinidad

11.95





i) | This fine old whisky
| contains all the rieh-
| ness of many years
| maturing.
|

“Crino”’

Port of Spain )
Co Trinidad

B.W.I.



You are invited to-









At QUEER



‘'S PARK HOUSE

on — |

framme, 6-35 -p m=: Intertude, 649 p me Jy in emergency rélief measures, SATURDAY Night JULY 7, 1958 {
or Parade, 655 pm. Today's it does not result in any appreci- Arnie wy wes ates Aik
700-1100 pm — 2% 53 m, 3182 m_ able saving in cost by comparison ) 3 Eyer te

with traditional materials and Admission -;- 2/- ;



700 pm. The New 7.10 pm. News > . " " ;
Analysis, 715 pm. The Mayor of Cas. ™¢thods of construction.

" . |
terbri 745 p.m Living in an Atomic lhe use of prefabricated com- |
Age, 800 pm Radio Newsreel, 815 ponents, which is already exten- |

Commonwealth Commentary, 8 30) Giunly 5 _ mace ‘pam So
Practice Wakes: Perfect: 6 48° 15 sively practised in the area, ote rs —_ FH CO
From Wimbledon, 855 p.m. greater possibilities, and the Con-
: =—_—_
- ference considered that these Cg eee

r om The Edit 900 pm. Sera
1010 pm Interlude, 1013 pm Mar. POSSibilities should be further in- ] ae
VARIETY CONCERT

book for 19:12, 1060 pm. The News.
faret Loockwood, 10.45 p m, Science Re- Vestigated. In general it thought

REFRESHMENTS ON SALE
Extend this Invitation







4 oe
"DISTILLERS












FOR 2

























































view that there should be increased |
. yr Sag +R provision for building research in : }
Se meee individual territories, At the NURSES site - \
fans Tees, aR 2 a fnvan The Conferenee concluded, of the WE LD KS \
8) 20 pin Gallonese Golde® however, that if housing costs : i
B.m. — 10.30 p.m. Caribbean Corne persccagpske significantly sas Barbados General Hospital ld Ad Ko i
eee 74 |})) on PRIDAY, 6th July, 1951 iH
(q at 8.00 p.m. y i}
| In Aid of ARTHUR BELL € SONS LTD, aa’ it ih
N O' I : I S E m Beer casts cele i}
} he Barbados Nurses’ © AN /ND! NOENT HOUSE # Hi
Associat »
~ Rs “5 een PERKINS & CO., LTD. i}
| SSS Distributors y i
m i SSS SF | «
Our Customers are asked to note that our Broad i Sa ve these th
s * | 7 {i
treet Branch (Central Emporium) and the Sugar | Its Here at the B U Y N oO Ww ae Tren Cea i
Factory Supplies and Ship Chandlery Department | . ae pee ike ‘a y)
at Pier Head Lane will be closed for stock taking | Variet 3H hese pn ” ”
ae le wy tht Or] i}
on Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday, the 2nd, ard} | SAVE UP Cai ind 7 I Ne ce
and 4th July. Sandal Shoppe a Ria Fo) Le f a
’ , beh eae _ = (
} es : , pic
We solicit your co-operation and shall appreciate | TO 50 Tt] i om
Were f :
it if you will arrange your ordering to suit. | OUR ANNUAL REDUCTION SALE | at oe \
Ze j} 7 DAYS OF HEAL BARGAINS |}
BEGINNING MONDAY JULY 2nd. ——————————— }
Central F oundry Ltd | eee ee BRASSIERES 86c.u» | LADIES’ SANDALS |
e LADIES RAYON STOCKINGS in Long & Short Sleeves NIGHTIES $3.00 up hi > (K
Canadian Court Shoes in arious Shades 2 sf J $6. low $3.75 kc catl rere ss White & Brown ¢ i}
Seite wale i. eee various eile Pairs for Up to $6.00 Now $3.75 VESTS 2 for $1.00 up White & Red i
onnrennnnenerohehicninnehenehvensvottetcnttccstehsttehsehtstotiftojitt: Brown & White, formerly —_— - — Fine Quality Long Sleeve ory re for Sport or Work \}
FERGIE: 86 i ¥ COTTON ANKLETS. Plai : oye 1 pan) ; as \
| 37 oe ree ae eee oer an eee ee KH AKI SHIRTS wee ; = ira Now $3.60 2 }
Locally le HOES a! reduced t 0 Shilling at y $3.25 2 for $1. up or Pes Ps
You Should Check | inom dees G06 some fas pee oe raf es SINGLE BED COME IN
Up and Buy These now Cheap Cheap at $5.98 conven | DOUBLE BED MEN’S HOSE BEDSPRFADS i}
a LEATHER SANDALS all FELT HATS 1educed from BEDSPREADS 3 pairs for $1.00 Regular $5.14 Now $3.75
Now!!! Colours and Sizes going now $3.75 to $2.00 Regular $6.75 Now $4.95 ai etlihsaehltopnenns e ona
ee at bargain Prices $3.50 per —— ns — Mane eee a de 56 Pe a cls )
Pair CANVAS BOOTS with Rub- only LADIES’ SHOES cad ket Gl niken AND TAKE a
7) ber Soles all sizes in stock, Valises tb. te $61: NYLON HOSE M
LEATHER PUSHERS _ in selling now at $1.95 Now $4.50 |
t Green, Blue & Brown, going Now $4.5



All Shades & Sizes $1.36

i mow at $2.50 per Pair Black, Red, Grey, Browa conn a

7 REMNANTS

in Silks, Crepe & Spuns
at Unbelievable Low

CANVAS SHOES with Buc-
SOUP PLATES kles in Green & White.

Maroon. Regular Price $1.53.
DINNER PLATES Selling now at $1.20 A Real

RUBBER SHOFS—all ize«
Clearing at 2/- per Pair

Good Quality
TWEEDS
54” Now $4.75

ADVANTAGE













BOYS
PLASTIC BELTS at 1/-
each, } Socks in Grey and Pri
Bargain Brown, formerly $1.00 i rices
CUPS and SAUCERS — ———_—_— Selling now, 2 pairs for $1. ‘ENTS’ SNEAKEES ee ere tT eee eae ee ; {
BISCUIT BARRELS LADIES ae — - — GENTS’ SNEAKEK PRINTED LINEN §
TEA POTS Felt and Straw HATS also CHILDREN’S HAND-BAGS Now $1.95
Crinoline in all Colours. oo _ we ue ne to ) __._... | Regular $1.60 Now $1.29 if
i 2 oc, each, P are also ear- { ‘ domnctrnteieepniptntinmiiaiibenate —
MILK JUGS Real aiming, Goits now "ee ca pe ¥ Siar t Also a New Range of |——— pe | )
MEAT DISHES po ————— a Leather Shoes at $2.95 per })) 7! SPORTS SHOES STRIPED $ way Al j
Plain White and White | Jamaica Straw HATS, also Pair. ; i ae | snecial $2.95
with Gold Band. suitable for beach wear iN} At Low Prices | Special 82.95 tt
going now 2 for $1.00 these We are offering you a 10°; { Bi
} Prices are unbeatable discount on all other items } )
| 5 — - that are too numerous to be })) { y )
: |} Jamaica’ FANCY HAND- | mentioned during the 7 days {j E OUTS i
Pp antations Lt BAGS. Regular Price $3.85 SALE ti | / tH
. from $5.50 to $1.98 iad oaks H i
‘ome in a See for Your- {( |) 7 : te
mastic Hamp mace | "oie 30, Swan Street — §. ALTMAN, Proprietor | i
regular Price $3.85. Selling + . I
iy now at $2.90. Seeing Is Believing i 4 PHONE 2702 > i
eS } THE VARIETY SANDAL SHOPPE |) |) Hh
# <~ paeae oo i} Centre Broad St. Dial 2981 i My
4 Z ? / ae =o ~~ ~ = = = =
OO OOOO NOONE aa = = 5





|





> ten

wo

PAGE SIXTEEN

Another Tornado Series
Opens: Vamoose Wins

(By Our Yachting Correspondent)

A SECOND Tornado yachting series opened in Carlisle

Bay yesterday. Vamoose, skippered by her owner Teddy

Hoad, who sailed undefeated in the first series, was the

winner. This was the First Regatta of the new series.
5 Coslmenes —~-—- The wind was light and puffs

The Jester IL "0" ce

out. It
race





ween



oe \ »08e€ Ed: ’
2+ 2 kippered by Ivan Perkins an
Wins Again 2h xinercd ys ioc ue:

cock, The three sailed together

The secend day of the Trinidad 9nd from the start it was clea

Turf Club Summer Meeting saw that one of them would be the

another splendid victory by the winner
Jamaican bred Jester II wifen he

added the Woodbrook Stakes for Their helmsmen used good judg-
ass horses to his win in the ment throughout the race and












‘ 38 1 Stakes on the first nearly always the correct courses
i Coming out a warm favourite were taken to suit the wind. They
fé the race he made every pole were very rarely cought in calms
a winning one from start to finish and when the breeze got up they
in this mile and a distance event ploughed through the water a
but nevertheless had to contend though the had engine

with a strong bid from his stable

companion and full sister Rose- Six Started

mary who rat him to a_ short Six boats started. There wa

head

S. W. Branker and trained by
nry Hart and by winning this



for the remaining two Trinidad
Classies, the Arima Derby Trial
Stakes and the Trinidad Derby
already won all the other In
















oe beginning with the grouped together until they reach-
E ; ase a Lame December, ed the western mark. After they
nA ig male Guineas at Union younded this some took northern
F uses ictitisdtaa veiurece ties courses while others headed south.
for the were turned in by ene Baas Jae eae
Lt tthin’s big chesnut colt Tee! Mars
Wai Company, who won she Zephyr was first to get around
2b RECS NY ened fashion the Bay Street mark. She went
Se pe wiy. snporved ose iG ci to “complete the first round
fee M Fe at aiaglie a Ri hi fata with a driving finish. She was
the Arete Gtaiae rin dh Aa about 20 seconds ahead. of Vamoos
in the Maiden Stakes on the first which was. second. Baril which
day, The track was on the slow \ 9, sailing extremely well, wa

side due to rain on Friday but the
weather was otherwise on the fine
side.

Jockey Frank Quested who rode

in Trinidad for the first time last was far behind.

December was in fine form and

brought off the hat trick by riding On the run for the western mark
Lupinus, White Company and jn the second round Zepiaiyr kept
Brumine to victory in successive the lead but was challenged by
races At one time champion VYamoose. The race was most in-




jockey in Denmark, Quested has teresting between these marks
decided to make his home in the Zephyr got around first, about tw
West Indies for the time being and seconds ahead of Vamoose, St -
is under contract to Mr, Tass ly after clearing the mark Vamoose
Tawil owner of Blue Streak and overtook her. Edril, which comes
Paris around third, took the southern
Jockey J. “Mice” Lutechman was course while the others went
the next most successful with two north. Comet was dropping back
winners to his credit while badly all the time.
Abraham Joseph and_ Gilbert
Yvonet rode one each. Yvonet wa: Farther Ahead
particuiarly impressive when he Vamoose went farther into the
brought the Eagie to a short head lead. She was first around the
victory in the Belmont Stakes by Bay Street mark and completed
seizing the opportunity to bring this round about 25 seconds ahead
his mount through on the inside. of Zephyr which had a_ lead of
Previous to this the Eagle was over 40 seconds on Edril, Break-
noted for a complete lack of away was next, followed by Swan-
speed. sea. When Swansea was going
There were no very large fore- around the buoy Comet was stuck
casts like the $1,025.84 paid out up at the Bay Street mark. Co-
on the last race on Thursday but Met's skipper decided to drop out
throughout the day the Pari of the race before completing this
Mutuel paid good dividends, The round.
results were as follows




The final lap saw Vamoose
SAVANNAH STAKES (E class 6 furlongs keeping @ good lead all the time.
1. Baby Bird (A. Joseph) Zephyr and Edril chased after but

2. Sun Glee (Lattimer) oa . 7
3. Buddha (Quested) it was no use. She went on to
4. Flyaway ‘(M_ Gonzalez) win the race, finishing more than
Time Vs et 5. P iz * & $190. a minute ahead of Zephyr which
$3.48, $1 4: orecas 82 12 ik: atid 5 ts ss
het TIDIAN BTAKES CF clac 8 year WS Second, Eadril, third, was
olds 5 furlongs) about 12 seconds behind Zephyr.
1, My Babu (J. Lutchman) The other two boats were far be-
2. Hope's Cottaze (Mohommed) hind. Edril defeated Swansea,
; 5 ay Md de BBN cart fourth, by many minutes. Break-
‘ & $1 54, $318, away finished last after being
$i 78 recast: $1 overtaken by Swansea in the last












eerereet . round

MARAVAL STAKES (C class 6 furlongs) Win dy .
1. Lupinus (Quested) The Regattas of this new series
2 Careful Annie (C Lutehman) are expected to be held every
3. Notonite (P Fletcher) week-end.

4 Landscape (Singh)

Time: 118 2/5 Pori: $318 & $1.72
$3 36. 96 Forecast; $47 36
QUEEN'S PARK STAKES (A class
6 furlongs)

White Company (Quested)
2 Footmark (M_ Gonzalez)
3. Blue Streak (A. Joseph)

4 Rebate (J. Belle)

Pari: $436 & $1 72

recast: Si 6






‘Time oe
$2 90, $2
PORT OF 5

(B cla
Bru





1 ine (Quested)

2. Miss Vie (Lattimer)

3. Hot Bread (J Lutehman)

4 Fabulous ‘Hardwidge)

Time: 2 04. Pari; $6 34 & $206 $1 84,.,
$1 66 Pa
BELMONT STAKES (Ff class 4 year .

olds, 6 furlongs)

1 The Eagle (Yvonet

2. Kismet ‘A_ Joseph

3. Mardi Gr ‘Quested? and Assur-
ance (C. Lutchman)

Pari: $ 4& $190 $172, $118 &





$1.18 Forecast: $188 18 Besides the pupils of the school
WOODBROOK STAKES (D class and those of other Anglican
1 mile 180 yds.) schools, there were hundreds of

1 The Jester 11 (J| Lutchman)
2 Rosemary (A. Joseph)

3 Battle Song ‘Ali

4 Ali Baba (C. Lutchman)
Time; 1 54 2/5

citizens present, headed by Hi
Excellency the Governor Sir Rob-
ert Arundell and Lady Arundell
and also representatives of the
A Legislature, Municipality, Gov-
Students Complete ernment Departments and the

heads of the Methodist and Pre
Post-graduate Courses byterian Churches

FIFTEEN students from the Before Bishop Howe-Browne
Imperial College of Tropical verformed the act of blessing and
Agriculture in Trinidad passed laying the stone, he was intro-
through Barbados yesterday duced with a few short remarks
morning on the Gascogne on their by Archdeacon H, G. Piggott, who
way back home after completing said the duty devolving on the



their Post-graduate courses at Bishop was most appropriate since
the College. the S.P.G. had contributed rough
Fourteen of them are from the ly one-third of the building fund

United Kingdom and the other The Bishop’s prayers, as i
from Cevlor iddress later, were taken to the

They’ Hl Do It Ever

rg

t very Lime seen W 4 Pome Oe








BALSAMO MAGOO +SEE HOW NEATLY
HE SAWS HIS ASSISTANT IN TWO»





Ow!











©





someone to start the race but it
Both these horses are owned by finished unust ally, There was no
“gun” for the winner. The boats
, in the race were Vamoose, Edril,
distance event the Jester II has now Zephyr, Swansea, skippered by
made himself a definite favourite Noel Emtage, Breakaway. skipper-
ed by George Hoad and Comet
with George Allan at the helm

the first lap the boats kep*

only about three seconds behind
Vamoose. She was followed by
Breakaway which was over ten
seconds ahead of Swansea. Comet



Bishop Howe-Browne
aa Lays Corner Stone

(From Our Own Correspondent)

With impressive ceremony last Wednesday afternoon, the
Rt. Revd. A. H. Howe-Browne, the envoy to the West Indie:
of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. laid the
cornerstone of the new Anglican High School at Tanteer

crowd standing around by loud-
speakers hung on the scaffolding

Grenada and to lay the corn

stone of a new school as it wa
his firm conviction that a spirit
ual foundation was most essential

spoke about the work of the S.P.G., |
ind his present
West Indies

the building fund
song in the St. Ge
and was celebrant at the Holy

Eucharist next morning before
emplaning again on his tour



THE DOCTOR!! WHERE'S
THE IODINE #2 DON'T ‘
-\. JUST STAND THERE! 5
a et for Ay

> 1 i ~
| 14 Paes
4 GWay EX

~-

= gs
= kis

IST XI CRICKE?t

@ From Page 5
Hutel









Geoftre efu
icket own bat elped

Stoute to carry the score to 55 be-
fore he fell victim to F K Wit
He was adjudged lt

Without increasi the core
Mr. McComie was ven ou f
same way to King’s next

Earl Glasgow and St«
set about to put up the best
nership of the innin

ler d their r
ficulty exe

the bowling

The hundred went up ir 90
1inutes and Stoute and Glasgow
went on to 133 before Stouts

t on the boundary by I E
Licorish. He scored 65. He sent
three balls to the six boundary







and hit three fours and a five.
Frank King claimed his fourth
wicket before any ru were
added to the score. Glasgow who
was then 36 was caught behind
the stumps as he edged the first
ball of King’s tenth over behind







Three more wicket oon fell)
for an additional 2 before |
t fairly stubborn last wicket
tands were made [ne three
I men were Willem Welch |
ind Wilkie.

Cyril Gill and Collin’ Dean
associated gave life to the cricket.



Gill went to 18, hitting a six and
two fours before he was run out
when the score was 182

The last wicket partnership
yielded Collin Dean ending up









With 14 not out L Brooks
was stumped after a a brisk
23. The 209 runs were made in

1£5 minutes

Ternis Results
Y ESTERDA Y’S RESULTS














D FP. G beat Mr. S. P
Ec 6-1, 6
Men's Double
ir. ¥ 3. Nicholl Mr. G. L
i t Mr. V. Roac i Mr. W. W
{ er 2 23 10 5
Mixed Doubles
1 J. Wood a Mr. 3. Di 4
m i « 4
2, G—1
Mr B. Sisnett beat Mis
EB. Bowe i Mr. A. M. Wilson, 7—5
10.
MONDAY’S FIXTURES
Ladies’ Singles a
Mis G Pilarim ne
Men's Sir
c Vv v I ct
Doubies
Dr Cc. nd M



ladies’ Doubles

Miss A wutherland and IN
Miss D Austin and

Men's Doubles

M S. P. Bdghill and Mr. J, H. C

Mr, W. R. Allen and M BE. P




BOB HOPE refused recently, on
his return to New York, to pose
with the golf clubs he used in
losing his first-round match in the
British amateur championship at
Porthcawl, Said Hope I sent
the clubs to a clinic to have
muscles put into them.”

ry. r
The Weather

TO-DAY

+ 5.42 a.m,

+ 6.25 p.m.

Moon (New): July 4

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Water: 1.00 a.m., 2.52
Pm,

y ERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington); Nil
Total for Month to Yester-

day: 6.62 ins.
Temperature (Min.): 78.5° F
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) E.,
(11 a.m.) E.N.E.
Wind Velocity: 13 miles per
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.951,
(11 a.m.) 29.951










ST. GEORGE'S June 30

He said it was a delight to visit |



o a sound education, He also |

mission in the |

\ collection was taken in aid 0

His Lordship preached at Even





orge’s chureh

A small party in his honour

Was given at the Rectory on
Wednesday evening





By Jimmy Hatlo |

SS

THE BREAD »“HE MAY LOSE A FINGER

THE WORLDS GREATEST MAGICIAN, | Bur ANYTHING SIMPLE LIKE SLICING
| AS WELL AS HIS HEAD =>

OF ALL THE! ) =
ig THE KNIFE SLIPPED! WHY “27

CAN'T YOU GET BREAD _,/

s ALREADY CUT? CALL ~








% | )




SUNDAY



YARD

SPARES

SERVICE

We hold a large stock of
Standard
Triumph spare parts and our
trained service engineers are
ready to carry out any job
replacements
a complete overhaul.
not book an appointment with

Chelsea Garage 950) Ltd,
Pinfold St.



ORYPTOQUOTE No, 45

VSO XPN XFHH ONG ZTG

Answer to last



—-~ ——--—

A. LUKAS & BUNS

>

6659 ol oot,



beg to remind yc

which will be

JULY at CLUB



ADMISSION 2
Music supplied by Mr. Clevie

PEPE AEP OPEL EPP PPP PSS

6,6)4,66,6,66"
oo OPPOSE LE LOE

POI Io oto

’,

Slee



AND DANCE

MRS. DAPHNEY BUTLER

the Princess Alice Playing Field



3





4

ttt ttt tt IEE It Dla



Anniversary Service

TO-DAY (Sun.) at 3.30 P.M.

Anniversary Dance

CHILDREN'S GOODWILL







LETS BURY YO

With This Difference !!

in this Funeral
1 Establishment
Shares are offered the public
five Shares in this Company

eur business each year

SELF-HELP
ENTERPRISE LTD.

Funeral Furnishing Parlour,

Tweedside Rd

LLOYD &.

Managing Director



F446 64 , >
POOP PPPS OPIOID

1@
5
iss

++
POLST

ADVOCATE

YES, YOU CA

LUXOR CLEAR 6



IT AGAIN

088 VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH

— Also —
GALY. OIL CANS — 1,



& 5 Gin. Sizes

Incorporatea

puateved TP HERBERT Ltd. 1926



oe
a POD h tt tht tbeh-
COPED ETT
>

3
%

PROVIDE

Grey,



10 & 1! ROEBUCK STREET.



RLS SS

AND HIGH-CLASS



Wherever the Need

Rep Hanp Paints

RELIABLE PROTECTION FOR -
EXTERIORS

DECORATION FOR
INTERIORS

RED HAND HARD GLOSS
Tulip Green, ‘S’ Cream, ‘S’ While.
RED HAND TROPICAL WHITE
Retains its whiteness.
RED HAND SPECIAL PAINTS
For cxteriors and interiors.
Dark Grey,

With Grey undercoating.

Quality RED HAND MATINTO FLAT OIL PAINT
For interiors,

RED HAND CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS
Grey, Mid Green, Bright Red.

PHONE 4456

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.

Seth b tree ae
a a as a ala aaa

POPPE LPI SF o





Cream, White, Green.





EEO OOOO OOOO OOO LAA ALLA OOOO,







“Spun

B'dos Light & Dark
Stone Oak Brown.

3
i
‘
3
: The Sign of RED HAND PERMANENT GREEN
5
i
%
%



SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951

- Stampeta

SAAS
SD
ce

In an assortment
of shades and
beautiful patterns
36 inches wide.

per yard

¢ 1.20

Cave Shepherd & Co, Ltd.

| 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
|









JOPPA ES PEE FE PPPOE EEL PEE PLL ELA LP LPPE IIE OPPS P OSA D TOOT POP SROS SOSA PD PP OG CCCP PPPDOPOOT EE,
< eR ¥ a - je e a
* 5-9 + y
: +g snowRroom
* <2
| NE vg
* se
: THAT YOUR i 3 H.P:
x v -
x ty " w
: NGEAl sll 3 :
g BE
% RE
te + 6s
S BEARS THIS BS
ss = es
x Se MOTOR
LABEL y
& Se
> Sh
ts Xx a
x 1 BE
s
% OF DISTINCTION sf
$ HS
e xs
‘ NY .
me oN 3B
s. +
& Re
g x $
x BS
> Rs
é XY,
% SR
% xy x Truck’s Maximum Load | ton
x BX Trailer’s Maximum Load 1 ton
. Ry Gasoline consumption 2 pts. per hour with full load
. Se Maximum speed 12 m.p.h.
. VA PRICES pn
. 8B Truck 4 a $965.00
s 8B Trailer és ve $183.00
. y $ RS
x Re
* PCS MAFFEI& Co, Lid, $$ CHELSEA GARAGE «250 Ltd.
. . ’ ” .
i RR Pinfold Street‘ Phone 4264.
“ yi







IT PAYS YOU TO SHOP -MODEL”

EMB’D DRESS MATERIAL

FLOWERED SILKS

SATINS iss
SHOPPING BAGS
PLAIN CREPES

CHILDREN DESIGNS

DIAL 3131 FOR JULY SAVINGS

OTHER PLACES

MODEL STORE

$2.92 $2.78

$1.32 yd. : fal ae $1.28 yd.
82c. yd. oa aa: Bs Tic. yd.
$4.55 $4.48 ,,

$1.32

wen sxe fade $1.28 ,,
EDGES—New Shipment ott

6c. ‘yd.



Noted for the Best Prices in Town





‘i ]
45 ‘
CCC PPO OP OOOO OPO

SPORT SHIRTS

BY

CONSULATE

WITH

LONG SLEEVES
AT

Com RIG & CO.

BOLTON LANE.

£6.66 666666, CO CECO COEF O660066666656655

PSS CCE SL SELLE

EAE PPPOE

WAR!

loo OO

CLL SLIT

OSS SEL OD

te ee

PALL LL 668

“6
eo

ta a a oe

PCCELLLLLLL LLL LLLP

COL ALS SL E454
1,646.6 db. b6
LLL

Cr
oe

46,634, 66654

“¢

ae * PP ee el
PEOPLE CPE EL PPLE PLP LPL LLLP ALLL

WAR! WAR!

YES ! A RELENTLESS WAR IS BEING DECLARED ON PRICES

OF $100,000.00 MERCHANDISE

pee Come and Join in it by purchasing what you can

from the following Lines .. .

WHI, QNE WEE _ Siantint: MONDAY 2nd JULY



COTTON FUJI
45c.
CRETONES
78e.
JERSEY SILK
Plain and Striped
31.20 up
CHECK TAFETAS
$1.29









PLASTIC
UMBRELLAS
$1.50
GENTS’ VESTS”
2 for $1.20
CALICO
59e.







CURTAIN LACE
From 39c.

FLOWERED SPUN
98c.



<
a SSOP PFO Oe a ae ae as ae ae ee ee ee eee ,

FOR LADIES
FLOWERED CREPE | CRENOLINE HATS Lovely New Design





95e. All Shades BELTS
$1.98 82e.

Black & Gold
LADIES’ SHOES
$3.50 per pair

HANDKERCHIEFS





SOCKS LIMBRIC
3 pairs for $1.00 49e.



AOE COPS PODOSOSSSSS

































ao COTTON PRINTS LINENS
4 for $1.00 42e 75e.
2c.
DOMESTIC SATIN BROCADES
3be. a T5e.
T5ec.
TAFETTAS aes CREPE-DE-CHINE
* 59c. ROMAINE CREPE 8
From 59c $1.95 $1.15 per yd. up
3INGHAM §
se Silver & Gold ae
ea GEORGETTE and | ——_7 EP
BEDTICK CREPE BED SHEETS
a Yeddi High Class
$1.29 u for Weddings :
> Dp $2.40 up Single and Double
PLAIN SPUNS ——— $4.65
85e. Lovely
BED SPRE SUN GLASSES
ANGLAISE with Fringe American Type
$3.60 up $550 up Only $1.95 per pair



1.3.—NEXT WEEK THERE WILL BE WAR ON SO MANY OTHER LINES

THANI BROS. wan Pr, Wm. Henry St. & No. 6 Swan St.

$3556%>
$366 6636566,



—————







CCE LLLP SD

VDSS SS SPSS OSES

LPSSGOS

; 4344 (26600004
SPOOL ALLA LLL OOOO ALLA LL E LPOPPSPD





6

POLO LES

a

SS OOOSOOSOS

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Full Text

PAGE 1

PACE TWO SUNDAY \I)VK \TI | STARBUDS of 19.;I for JULY 12th S The Management of the Gloh. "v X IhU's stage pre* Miranda a* '31" '.n'"" for the * 5th Julv i postponed I 5 '#' Thursday July I'Jlh lt..UI p.m. is who have purchased Ti ks for the I i tin12th JULY I.StHll IIIMII 1 I Mi ("nllnalne MM THAN 'MHISFIKIHO SMITH"! M Book Your Tickets now. .. %  ;-] M.i.:.. On Sale DAILY a I the Continent oi i • Staying With Friendt With T.C.A. \i ISS lj a UN ROBERTS of M ISS LORN A MeKENZlE. -•*1T Georgetown. British Guiana ter of Mr Ross Mea>n/i. W (.saragae yesterT.C A. engineer stationed here •*>' morning loi a holiday flW to Canada ye \. M staying *' ( h Mr after sp*ndir IK • Uv W. Men ith her brothi luw -i -Atlantic View" Enterprise Mi i; be %  a u-r -.f Mi Road, '.eorge Roberts. Vital SU1 .. erarfca .'-ri. %  r, C u & W. M is III their Montreal Head AIo arriving by the Gaarogue were Mr ami Mr*. Laurence Jaiime of Georgetown. They are Staying at Indramer Guest House This is their first visit to Barbados and also their flrst trip out of hstana. They plan to -pend a month hfre Off to (he U.S. L EAVING for New York during the week by the FortAmherst •A as Miss Gemrnel Rollins who kayttli here for the past %  IX months with her mater Mrs. Kvalyn Straughn of Bank Hall. Miss Rolllm took with her three Qcuub Catting JOMIS H.mr i jom, HMC^ •.- •e* J0M1. H^Ur ?*<*' Wedding M", rclls Road was married to Misa Muriel Odassa AHeyr.e also of Mm MUIW uowu Aiir;i.r*i""i ..- %  „f VI .cert Dayrelb BOM on Sunday. Jun, "' c ",*" f£"jdll si MIW. Jl'I.Y 1. IM. To be Married in U.K. Vgi:-ITI fsjimrsji'i •tataanary, 1S now on har v lr> England to ba ned to Mr. Albert Hall of LarteeaMn ing on the Gasraenr. Another passenger leaving on the Cascos-e far England > terdav to De married a Molly Barker, formeily of th.I Bvsa To Be Married Shortly M R. JOHN FOSTER, son of Major and Mrs. A. R. Fos tar arrived from Canada yeaterda. o spend a month'a holiday In tlarbado*. during which time lie a to be married to Miss Susan Wkerman. John is .it present -tudving aeeountuncy a* MeGili I'n.veralty. Other passenger* arriving bs T.C.A. yesterday were Dr. ard Mr. A Greav*-". Mr and Mrs Ernest Klnch and two of their -taughtera. Barbara and Flcnrette U led fo be an upfre." MaJaa aaaasj • %  .*•. Attended Son't Wedding T. E. WENT who was in Tnnidad for her son's wed• tfhavi i ICO*, witn ner inre* ,, ; j : 1. Anthony and M.*"• £"*?** y ** rr *2> m "" r,; r i were at College *>r B.WJ A^ Her daught, w, Rollins -... ra. Thev are going lo their parwho went down with her retumts in Now York whr. they will ed by Bhe aame plane morning u in* plata their education. Other po— n -r. ..rtvm f ren panied bv his wife and Brother and Sitter N Barbado* for two month Other pa* Trinidad yesterday were, Mi*a Maggie Fields, Miss J. Howard. Mrs. A. de K. Frampton who wn S2!*! y L'HL" Z'"V t'.fS.Z I" Trinidad for ten d. s .nd Mr I Hcun. Hooker Broi. Brilun M c ^^, „„ had ,^„ ln Tr ,_ d pr c „ ce 0 f R,„i Aiseument Lucia yealerda ,i an i imed > the Rev 0rwtW Th.' bride mm giv nd Mis F. A Bark., 01 R. %  ington". Fontaine Her fiance Mi i'. B W 1 ,-\ for Nev York via Pueito Hi. to join her husband is Mrs. In-. (mat) Fur nanj yaan he has been interested m MeLal work In Chn'i Church. From B.C. M ISS MILDRED SIMPSON i i British Guiana arrived on the Gascogne '.caterdav Bl g enln g to spend a holidav with her latter Mrs Robert King of Jackson. Mr. King's brother Alfred. %  druggist of Georgetown, has ju '. Brownc."Reni Assessor and "'turned home after spend.r W.I. Holiday PENDING part of his six 1 months' holiday in Barbados Mr. B. M. Viapree. clerk to Mr **"r HagtrtraM of Georget British raatsji la] %  crunill gfaU Log I -Manstow". Maxwell Coast. Mr. Viapree expects to spend a .-eek in Grenada and two weeks n Trinidad to study their method three weeks' holidav. Hli who came over with him. is stahag oa %  <>' another three Ten Dayg A FTER spending ten da day nd Mr StaiTord Rouse, Ma H. Grist returned to sbefore returning home. A.G.L. Douglas Retires — After 42 Years Service li> Station g| rence has been enlarged to three nginnl proportions, and %  i.ik all new bungalows for the mobile staff have been completed under his supervision. In the course of Mr. Dnuglaj ( uvitK". mi the Com] ness he travelled more rhr. i loo.ooo miles u> air al accompanied Major Gem OQ his lOUJ Of the Area aarb In IMS He leave InmunlcaUon • BaihadoN and the Wegl Indies In general much unproved and It is hoped he wil 1 completion "f Uti pmitrammo of e-enslon and modernisation be* xun under his direction. Mr. Doug, or Doug as he was %  %  T'L" 1 afn Ih>ugla> is the forrrpr Poratb) HallStM was at onetime employee in the Superintendent Engineer's oR.cc of the comuany in I^ndon Her favourite game is tennis. Puerto Rico Branch In 1M4 | nut ^ to his appointment a* Manager of M1S j,„ n r sf rom | the West Indies Division (com1931 l( 1^44 ng Cuba, Puerto Rico. Virgin was among those! West Indies and selected to ..if I L DOUGLAS <• veatss.reu. I'riaiiiK i IIIJK, l"U %  HI it. IT t L [ British Guiana 1 resent the SavanFiom the time uf nm app| land on which now stand the lm"* n Singlei ,1 I hninpionihip in von in the ladles doubles and xed doubles in 1994 and .936. .1.' nuuu-niiK n jurrir arid .*ervtceii now i ( ffere Australia link. He the Governor. Branch Managers ttnuneataJ In arTanglng for — throughout the West Indies and op£ll| ^J^^^^ST me nUti'dlSb es Vo'pen "m "Si from other parts of the world £"*" %  nn T ""^ r r ^arb*bo h ^^ ^ were read doa and the majority of the ... Toasts to Mi. and Mrs. IXm„las B.W.I. were made and Mr Douglas made a speech after the presentation in reply. Mr. Douglas was born in Gloucester on the IMh April. 1803. He received part of his education at the Newport (Isle of Wight) Gramirui School and was pnvately tutored. He began his career in the telegraph service by joining the Western Telegraph Company, entering the London Training School F there is a heaven for good from the French soprano Aden|H ltH)9. JL shoes, then the aged pair with oide. I can think of nobody else Graduating to the P.K. Station whom I have just parted company who could fill Covent Garden I 1910 he was subsequently apwill come to their reward in the The -suggestion that Ksperantn ..--inted overseas and wa s itationed end. They were gnarled and should be used as the common between 1911 and 1928 at Madeira, bent and wizened, but no feet language in a polyglot production if "Pelleas el Meli no,,r cluscd £? lhc t V. sl of In 1928 he was again appointe-l hllevenamon. There, beside the ., Barbados und served In varicalm. I would like to build a us eanacHlBBi there also assuming memorial to them, recounting their S „X^~ 3 San JU.H. gi -"^ =I ^,,^ Thaiwere Harmodius and Astroern dress Is being considered Slilt Rrnifmhrmt *"PHE time oid Mrs. Wilberforc and Miss Walker barged into each other in High-stree-t, Wantage, is still remt mbered to thU day. It was a calm afternoon in July. Iglton. They were Damon and IJlUe did the sleep\ >1e the cynosure o. au 1 %  U %  Walker ( 14st. 61b. 1 left the north pavement of the Highstreet at precisely il :i7 Mrs. Wilberforce stepped o(T the pavement %  •••*££ SI?' I h'u-li.-u;:i In minnHiTt lyVrfUSICAL Lond i is agog at forthcoming ,isit by the great Emilia Rustl[guzzi for a series of concerts and I perhaps a whack of opera. He; [publicity agent has already [jecled to a description of voice a piercingly sweet ("Well. piercingly something [riposted the critic. "Singing Mrs. Wllberforee's corset* c*UgM Miss Walker's roll-'.,, blow and they both poundage 310) became locked. After the failure of the firebrigade, the local Boy Scouts, and the R.S.P.C.A., the Army was called out. By this time the westbound traffic was held uu for IT miles: the east-bound for 16 miles excluding a cycle club who turned into the woods. Using Churchill tanks the Axni**" oured Division attempted to draw ;he two apart. This was cessful, but, using og] steel-cutting blow lamps, the conImlce," said another critic, "we" tact was broken, and Mrs. Willer%  already had. We are now. force was aepann ] it seems, to have a singing hipponose was turned into the wind as ipotamtis A third wrote: "Apart she took off into the setting sun. TROPICAL SUITING 54 ins $3.19 TROPICAL SUITING 56 ins $5.16. 672. 6.78. 7.41 WOOLLEN SUITING 56 ins S9.38 WOOLLEN GABERDINE $11.24 MEN'S FELT HATS $2.40. 4.12 WILSON 8.12 BOYS' FELT HATS $2.21. 2.35 T.H. EVANS & WHITFIEI.DS DIAL 4C06 YOUR SHOE STORE DIAL 4220


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SUNDAY, Jl'LY 1. 1SI MNDAV ADVOCATE PAGF SI \ I \ You sec, I his i ity can snatch backsomuch thai fume brings... THE LONELY GABLE H. K M MarCOLL HOLLYWOOD. SO there s thi< chap called William Clark Gable, jug-cared and soupy-voiced, burn ir\ Cadi/, Ohio, about S3 years ago. i have never seen Cadii. Ohio, but I have seen 500 small towns like it. the length and breadth of America. I can hear the sound of Its Main Street, and \ know 1 have said good-morning to the cop on the beat and had a chicken salad sandwich in the corner drugstore Gable did not want to settle m Cadii. Ohio. He wanted something "different and he got It. He tried working in an oilfield. like his father. He tried being a lumberjack. He got 15 dollars a week In a rubber factory. But all :he timethere was that consuming urge to be an actor. BAD tWaaaVI THEKE was no bright, quick road to success for Gable. Trying to be an actor entailed dreary days of frustration and nights of doubt and near despair. He arrived in Hollywood — at auout the same time as the great Depression of 1930. which was not l,. CLARK GABLE AND SYLVIA HAVVKES Hut ne Vat I lonH. man never cared to take an) the HolK-uod razzle-dazzle. His Idea of a good time wa to go out hunting or Mining, or to down \t,me contemplative Scotches at the ranch in the evenings. Hollywood is not an awfully nay place People here are apt to suffer from something for which we have no exact word in English, but which our French friends call a "malaise." The Hollywood malalM is something thai can be as troublesome as lumbago. I have only been here a week, but already I begin to see what ails the citiienry around here. Yes, there was Gable, awfully lonely and with very few friends It is all nglvt to have otiW u handful of friends if you have the spiritual and mental resources to take care of tin On vou know you are gojng to be all alone. But if you haven't then the going gels really rocky. And then th* loneh map im-l the English woman S %  [v I I %  •emblance Shewmu *i Ohio and Gable, wisely, hn.* tially lonely too She tiki Or did he'.' There were already had been marnad thro timing: — by way of an unofficial tried to monkey with it 1 two divorce* hanging sadlv on t Lord Ashley and journey on a goods train to the And then came the burgeoning Iho record. Back in 1924 he had Lord Stanley of Alrierlevi. and a Pacific Coast. batch of successes culminating in married a girl called Josephine good marriage which ended When 1 was talking just now to an "Gone With The Wind Hilton. That ended in 1M0. In Douglas Fairbanks Snr. died. Australian woman who used to And how did success sit with 1931 he married Ria Langham have the pre-success Gable as one Gable? Well success in HollyThB lawyers argued that one into APAKI ALONjc Man A6out%wn of her "roomers" here in Hollywood is apt to be as congenial wood. a case of bubonic plague on a "He was nearly always hunmaiden voyage, pry," she said. "Hadn't got the I was talking only yesterday to price of a chocolate milkshake on one of tho most brilliant voting him. But he had such appealing producer:: on the M.G.M lot He eyes that I used to let him eat is 34. and he is right up at the par' of my son's breakfast in the top of the heap, mornings.He said to me (That same appealing look was lived for success soon going to get results from mined to get to millions Of other women across to be. Suddenly I was IrK.. the world. And it was going t: had it. And life was not worth pay oft" in rather more than haif living. I had nothing to light for a breakfast, i onv more." ON THE WAY ALL the dreariness o! cadged What did you do" 1 .-.afced meali ami shoe? that needed '"9 n > h d to go in a psychomending ended at Inst. and andescent Ught of fame started 'bJrurity in I93~~8 FOR a few months the marriage But In March 1939 Gable got went well Ami then suddenly it married !o prettv. beguiling, anil hod stopped going at all, and amusing Carole Lombard, a tipSylvia Hawkes was off to Mexico top actress, and a resounding pone success in her own right She came back and wool off _. ihe yacht of the millionaire Vi They were happy ror three derbllU for a Pacific cruise. Sh %  Tor years I 5" 01 T(wn ', n ,M -> Carole w has had a Dartial hreakdnwi I was deter*'" in a plane crash. A few the trip here I wanted ">nths later Gable, now inrreasThe ship' ugly taciturn and needing a daily her to repl> doctor has forbidden lo radiograms to warm up for the man with the of money at 23 dollars a consul... .%  -_-• In h..< k> A—alls, >l...ikl.,^.l hair crop to conceal the groving So. while Sylvia sits sadly hair above his ears, enlistedin the yacht, Gable is back again the American An Force all alone at his great big ranch He had a good war record, house. winning the Air Medal for "exThe ranch house with aver] (-optionally meritorious rt-hlevething—the swimming pool tinirst, of cours.It took 10 ment" during five missionover • uper TV set. thi mth. and cost me an awful lot enenry territory the giant refrigerator, the sport. grey eyes and the urge to act. Probably a lot of you remembt. "A Free Soul,' in which Johnny-Come-Lately-Gable Hole the act from Normn Shearer and Lionel Barrymore. That flat voice proved irresislation. but he finally st me out." light* tlble fit stemmed straight from and he started to enjoy life. 'MALAISE" room, the well-.stocked bar. the AFTER his demob the Boy washing machines -all those gimFrom Cadii faced a world that mlcks and trimmings and fallals grew increasingly difficult His that go to make up the rich, full i ill N i Mini I tirst post-war film, with Greer life. SO Gable — and now it was Carson, was a flop. Then he Well, nearly all. There is just Golden Cable—bought his big seemed to get back into the old one thing mtaglrig ranch in San Fernando Valley, groove with "The Hucksters" and Happine*vhat not J | J Woman Of Hi. Week Children's Edgar Wallace Types 10,000 Words A Day If* i-r* -!> % %  Irons valoon. Her husband i his hospital In a Hull; Golf. Bridge. TV aiLjieien 1 %  > ttons that shespent a lot of money buytng s ourw. "My husbiind bought pU She ia Company Sometimes the business complex but mere legal intricacies never defeat this one-woman book ractory, Bho calls herself drafted the standard contrail (IS P-T cent. rov.iliies for herself except in special circumstances wlien she mav reduce it for |h0 sake .vmUUun) M fNIO ILYT0N rw block oVcn \ht fal-es time off lo go lo Ami. every one In her own hand children's librarian wail* tha* hi ("Children would no* care for clients are too Blrtonlarrl to rend it. sne says, typewritten letters"). Her 23 Dickens. '" kasan gJMOTi publishers also get hand-written Enid Blyton types serenely on. iwne a week. The) Latti POJjaa of them, on both "I am no* a malicious aajgaon. %  t oe m li on tnail own Mi sides of the paper—detailing a.l bays she. Pi** bridge, watch I\. work in the preliminary business. She started to write as a school• garden. girl in Ueekenham. where she wai Vi tth all her coloaaal output, born, treasures a collection of 500 Enid Blyton is no llga/e to liei rejection slips. Her first pubbsin work was %  love poem in Nash'i In a Lack (sKM hiwvcra Magazine, for which I6-yenr-o!d *>"* took lima oil to apeod Gold Enid got one nuineo. Cup Day at Ascot, with hef She was a eoniprtent pianist. £**• %  %  * %  •** %  £ £***£ nd her father disapproved of the Gillian, guile a step from :he cnting. pUmned a musical career 'd Om when ..he taught f iretiiiur'lietler oreInstead, she broke away and took <" %  "P Sunday-school irZ^in the Froebel training, taught in I Beeckenham. al l h.rpubuVhe^alil^e.' m, ^ kmdergurten. .'1 always love, woatt oeva.oHT nisaavro Cme stipulation the makes—im ohlldren and was.happiest in then niggling about numbers The first *" %  >' > Sh bur8t J ,nto a"* 0 'edition must be 25.000, or the deal 'hip when, as a student a. pubis off. Several of her books have lishtw PfJd her £72 down for a aet sold morrthan 1.000,000 copies. of 30c English readers fo, schools How much does she make? Far ... -,, more than the £10.000 a >...Snbconsciiiu* C inema usually estimated. Probably poorer ej* g| ls ^wn at her typewrite. Without plot or synopsis. Figures. she sayg appear before her eyes as on a cinema screen. They move. they talk, they sing thenown original tunes. Other character appear; tl story unfolds: AH I haveto do is to type it out as fa-'. MS 1 can says Enid Blyton. Sha reckons that she must have ., b-conscious %  %  nd also a omKtpley foi **5. In iffls cOUac1 jw the famous Jantien name, .ifd for mothei new atraaless design in Satui Lastt. In tMs beach display are the ncMft an king BaaeJi Bags in rainb. w tripes and ovarall de*bm. rob! %  lined in i offered in two s..,* lor W.IW. Thewhulv dteptay i| one >f colour ami in ihu, Kiddtes-Shrp. upsUirs In Harfor ehUdran everything that will sun and sea. I | Pitcher i ..... There's 1 purpose Ink, now, ,,u ou • Aluminum P IWnntees a long last;:. inish. \, you'd ire Bergei Igatroll .. pain) t!>al COM nlidl) in ind pr. v ,. iK i WM hi tsbaaaeaan ..n. Ol % %  i IhM m.illi'1 n te or metal work, the %  Perqutta White* wim it'i uiili-fungus qualities is ideally tuRabaa PlnaJly, dgnl rorget th. ioof—with l-istikon Fted Oxide And if I've missed anything %  afl In this well stocked department ii< oka un.i HI KotK-rt.s it Co. On High Strert. Klectm ai. HinJ.Ii.ig. Automotive lliolographic. all are here and many more besides. Yc Bflgaq mrt of which Mercaniiie Law and Accountancy an Nro, in psssstag %  saw gntarlali for tlie AfWn oid Stii<" I n MB, Oil and H n HI i an assortment of iccentrj i^eivcl raint-Rnve* There i^ also an excellent rang-fttg A Co. %  MII arrgfun Lo | '%  at ant) ilrciched lo your ni ipMndld ch • ier oi Artlat'i M itci wl thrr for School use Of lo in dnlge In that most excoltenl of i %  them at erl* A Co. i H Stie. I ltd ) know t %  %  %  ktreinel) well st.xked little Detoro at 44 Swan Street' M UM -.' .1 It Field a CO The atoct Is excellent and .,. in Iho ini!" Look) '"i noaance. at ansjal in Lloon Table s %  ind the newi. arrived Ame: i i' ii 01 Ban Kloral Spuns. Ahd over %  fl %  Millinery flepartmetit ..th itylca] %  counter i dl playing a %  I t'ostirie Jewellery while fur%  tn'on ,f th. J II II %  i l tin • Bgcn kvo almost completedI*rge airy bed% %  •k coast and ing the high lination and ei o| cnfon Bag \ citer ks lanulirou and f) : n"i'r 1'arties m the ling-room — serve drinks and ktaila in an attractive open air patio-bar Catering is the AmeuPlan with excellent food and service and in it's central location. in veil lent to beach, clubs and o*-n, the completely new Sea i*iew Guest House haevetrthing the \ i'iti'1 The only Serve-Yout in Storo In Barbexloi kj? Famed for this time sa\-ing and very modem shopping BKTke, ike tstrtedoi H Cnmpany is known to moat Inland residents on its corner site gt IS Swan Street. This spacious .-.tore with Its mu!ti-\ It Invites you to look around You'll %  tho recent an i\ ..I ( .:!. i f Sat | boMd, ION] f.a thai •1 *rlar gift. %  %  Hpg .. n-: ware howl ^ well ai leetricnl : m of %  aucers ami earthenfrom wimhlo chooaa a glittering A all of appliance*. im hiding Deetrta Kettles. V Barbados Hardware Co ltd time well spent. liefs rataJ and listen to a I'll'.l Radio. Yon can Barbados AsajncM Ud on Bag Street and do just that Take. (M instance, the ini|M>su)g 6-valve I*llo| Na\i ad to ..nerate off a six-volt bocatr] M the Mime—all electric rnOaatl at lesser coat. And tins tabta mod, tho 5-valv.LltUO Maestro, f.n ilv S40 500 Here's anobhei B]a| tho I v.iKo Pilot Jack In I handsotne, figured tntftUl "in. I i steal at JHH.5II A Botasrotttay feature %  i* \ „t ruwehold Aponaocaa and* %  ' lOlaaawin and th^nSot. "" "* .. Prt 5f! ^i'. 1 | K Offered lo you .1 the come, W Stnat the I-mopolHan RTMI and H-iion Una. ,lr "n su -"' i"' the ilinlem manner L.E.S. STANLEY —the (earless the £50.000 which Edgar Walla. ENID BLYTON. the children's •* •#**• SJ*f .., complotc list of her books. Her don l ,cnov esjaetly. he fans have to pav 6d for it. It ff** hK*ing her qiuzzer straight shows that this prodigious yam'n the eye %  tansr. still in her forties, has L4ke olheT lnd i v,d ui *i? niaking 250 books in print. She estimates >* of money, Eiud Blyton tu,^ thai altugother she has written '.unie.1 herself into a limited cornsome 300 P an *Thtt ,n *' **>"* UIl s l aro ul When Edgar Wallace died at " rsjcelving end. ("Yow see. the slliauhirly ob Ug,ng nearly 57, hip output had reached children s appreciation If my reel |nlnd 170 reward. > Some of her chad, rft.de: Wallace's daily 12.000 words 2y 2 Per tent her out at Beaeonafield: ah* ha %  were put on paper with the help Her book of children's prayers. mrt thousands of others at mee'of two lightning secretaries and a Before I Go to Sleep, brings In tngs organised by book-sellers and dictaphone. Enid Blyton uses DO 1300 to £500 a year, she says. That publishers. such aids. bt one cheque she does not receive--. At home she is Mrs Kenneth She sits on a chintz-covered It goo* to a children's charity. DarroU Waters, wife of %  surgeon, swing couch in her garden at Add lo her income from the 250 mother of two daughters, one an Bcaconslleld with a portable typechildren's booka her 2( per cent. ar t student at St. Andrew's Uniwriter on her knee, and the story royalties from all the comraerciil verslty and the other at Boardingpourg from the production lino at products to which the Enid Blyton school. Her two-servant house II the rate of 10.000 words a day name is lent—diaries, writing well-ordered so u. her 3-acre (15.000 at full pressure). paper, jigsaw*. Not to mention trie garden, kept by the gardener She has six books at the proof card and board games she devises a ,ded by the chauffeur. "One stage to correct. She has just as a sideline. Plus royalties on ,f my extravoganees." she said. finished writing another, a nature over 200 school readers and other indicating a thousand bush roses book begun six days ago ("I ju*t educational text-books. It's a m beds laid out round a pool, worked on it at odd times"). diy sum She lias a big Daimler, but Loiters arrive from children all Sometimes a snooty critic lashes .she prefers driving" herself over tho world, and ahe ims-ver* at the Blyton books. Sometime, i j round in her small fast, green lj)ajs>gaaajsas>os>gaas))a>oiaa^ %  II.. <:iii*tng si4ni* .— u* as is—eniT so >.n't,in ihi -•-amp. • Vi Cick-ups—galore* 'i %  K'.. .i Oarage no*a i rowd n.if the sh o ar ru o u i mtransit to their owner. M M nd ''.in tha Lai Bar Cowioy V lick-ii ns, Uiese last now with ng -ide n-ifi ventil.i%  .., .j q foui olours blue. ... %  I i. | i i .i, id Co min g mixed ahlpmenl %  %  -. -ai" in •Have i look at the Cowley-Pnk-Cp detained -ii I.ii. \itii pll %  oend i aiiopy and the nealrat thing you ever w. Incotn B PI pdiM-ts an in g in which the> uu iHit %  the Uberty UneM i |i Scarve*^—London Btyled indivniiial. exclusive .dl are Die detLghtftd in^ Bhowvoom id tin* Jenetl i The linens ire lyk* i ipiivating. Itaml. ,i %  km Y'i ggfl thoin The Jae*mai Scnve .in truly e\-iMii|>uli Ian Pharmacy %  ^.v uto t&£S*& TRY THESE FINE FOODS ((uality unvurpassed hy any other bnnds "TOWER" JELLY CRTSTALS "TOWER" FLAVOURING ESSENCES* "MOIR'S HONEYCOMB SPONGE BROOKES LEMOS CUT DRAINED PEEL in 8 oz. packages and in bulk "A PIE' PEANUT BUTTER in 1-lb. Glass Jars "KOO' 1 JAMS AND CANNED FRUITS Indispensable in a well-kept home "G O D D A R D S" POLISHES "G O D D A R D S" SILVER CLOTH Cashomt gouquvi Faca Pcwdir %  . ao veittt7 %  moot h ., esltcataly perfumed ... cling* softly for hours and hours, suing you thai aaiursl si*ld \ook. ICet.il Price I *. TVt %  J ;%:::*.;*.'.:%:;:*.:'.' ".','.'*',*,%',:',',',: BOOKERS (B'doa) DRUG STORES LTD. Broex recommended fitinfontfading Kl.IMmdc.il lor ml, pure, salt in.I nniloiinli reUing-it'silw.i,'. Una, KI.IM BOD. plus (IK ini|Mirtan( food c%scn;iils ratedcd lor hahic to n,mw Mrimg ind hulihy. And Kl IM is readU) dlsjettctl— arsDthrJ iin|>.m.ini Dratuie. Above .ill. Kl IM i\,l,pt>iiUbi,. h\ not mrprising that v> UMIIV Mothcn prefer it! l.KLIM is pure, safe milk 2. KLIM keeps without refrlejeratloa 3. KLIM quality Is always uniform 4. KLIM Is excellent for growinq children 5. KLIM adds nouriskment to eooked dishes £ KLIM is RICOMMINDID roe INFANT MIOINQI KLIM is safe in the specially-packed tin 8. KLIM is produced under strictest control '*-*.'. '.•.•.•.•. %  ,::-,*,•.;•. *,*, v*w, -. FUST IN MEfttlNCI THI WOULD OVII Cot/tutu. /)rufiit~ ACI fOWDEt rot THAT NATURAL VIVID LOOg % ^M^r MEWS* nut TUK inn sicmiK... •I)l{. \KI)I)S pt nare bsbti.. [id y INT! kei ram II On SSSSE .-.-. .•.•.-.•,-.-.•,-.-. ^S! nol kwp i""l wllfc / BW / I I.IMACOI. ? *V^ / / i, ii..,.ot yen who ^>X^ ntvr lo work in hot WMthCT, wlw nut ItWP > largt botil.nl I.IMACOL. plain or mentholated, in a handy spot, so that you can freshen up wflt' IBM? ..... arm* a loveTv COOllMal Keep frwh as a dais\ An'l wh.'ii v.iu pi away on ** \><*' k LIMAl you kn li laki unburn, prickly Imt, Ii tel •i hot day. LIMACOL Tl BrMM in a Bottle." .•,-.*.-.-y*.'.'-'#VST0Kti ft BfNOE ITD.-ACINTS.VX*'''-'''.'''-'-'-*'*-*-''*'''*'*-'•'''''-'-'•*''*' it's a



PAGE 1

SUNDAY Jll.Y 1. 1S1 SCN'DAY ADVOCATF. I'M.I I l\ I SCORK BOARD UANDEBBftg V. 1 KaBdarxal.i fai 34a-hall b Daih.r Atklnaon c AlWyn* b BMkt fsoverba 1 b w r>WAtaiaasaa c b OraM H I — AUrtM b l-Vi*. L*W b Barh., M.i..i n... a,,.. Davta* MI #ui Bilni It b. 1 lb*. I i i> TeUI •-aw. s-jsi. a-aw B.aa*r l"n b i-.-n ,a E L O Hoi Exua* b I. lb 1 S-IM. *-lH. 7-MO BOWLING ASAI Ysl-. CARLTON N*. HARRISON COLLEGE H.r.h.. I .11.., ._|„ |..|. ( Smith c llud.ri* b Edftiiu M Hf r Wcrrii b EJ(Mh r fl.Man* t lU-d-< b EdO N BUKkman run oM r Hradlr* r r Hal**."., r L "-HI : fllM<4 I Mil F>ua. b 1. W 1 T. • %  : . unwi.tNC. ANALYStt O M rdybiii i i r.iff-to*.' %  W*n*n II t %  %  — a r Mil TON |.| INNIMi* bv. William. %  WUUUM Hulrhinvfi mr oill UirvnuMr no! anM M.K.-fif l> WllluaW. H*r4ln| HOl OUt Spartan Proud Of J Goddard And Walcott JULY 1 NO. 178 K n rtiinip* is 1 41 1 A V William* It > a* r L CMlrr • i • M a 4) I H.m, f 1 M A-.X.n1 LODGE v.. (DMB1KM1KI In*..-I.I lai.li.1. : OCX. v. • 'MERE 'for 1 wkt %  b 1. C Ad. ma Mr Wiik n r KM KIM Mr He r.imir 1 b • b r K -. .: w UUMO. wi Alfcrynr b KIM Tall of wMkU limil 4 foe M Y.M.P.C. V POLK E i r MM I b Hi Durai l> MuLlilla i..b lr.4U..i. fVankrr b Own Branker Ibw b Brambaw i Mullina Infram Ibw b MIIHII.. Hind* b MUIIUM Aichcr b Ore*" ,."1 puX i (lrn THE SPARTAN CRICKET and Football Club, at thtttr Annual General meeting at Queen's Park on Friday, paid i tribute to John Goddard for his fine handling oi the vie torious 1950 West Indies Cricket team to England, and placed on record their appreciation of the fact that Clyd*. Walcott. a member of the W.I. team and of the Spartan Club, had 'listiniunsrifii himsolf by his performance* with j thf bat and behind the atufl OnVcrs elected for the Ml were — PreUdant — Mr. r. A, C CUlrmonl*. O BE. Vic--Pridents — Mr J. O. Tudor and Mr. H. A Tudor— First XI Crick*! Captain Mr Keith w.icou, •am — Mr. 1. F Harri* 1 ate Cricket Cfl Mr A. F c Matthews, VuaCaptaio Mi. O. s Coppm. pltaj XI Football CapUln-— Ur. H, W Cadogan. V i c e-Captain. Mr. Desmond Johnson. Seeond DlvlI %  .nball Captain: Mr. A. D Cittern, Vice-Captain — Mr Ten* Mr A F. C. Matthew* wa, p*. Honorary Secretary a*d Mr C H. Skumer was elected rt Saanstafl The following were eloeted to M'IV* with the esx.rr.eio ineav bers ft* a Commitlev of ManageN.nl Ui t> H L Ward. Mr. M w cSarka, Mr E. U. inm. Mr. O. S Oonm and CapUir. It A. SCfkf ZC i F ROM ANY ANGLE THEY FIT TO A HHIN fiOllhAKU r K GUI 'I Wllll.M„ J b W ll I. I A II... i. N WUkH b C Klrm 1". Di-anr mil mil I II --'l"l *k tl i b Harrit Bam 1 Young Blood In Water Polo Fall el Wtahl ILJU 3 lor > • i.* ) k>r an 4 IM l. T |.< Tola I rMuOfeM 21 • C Brad-h-w Jl i 4 E Orc-ii II I I -Irr 4 f'U M I 1.1 la—i. ( wkla I l-i". %  W > f. %  '• IM, HJ a %  •) • ia? tloWl INO ANALYSIS C. net i K'I.X -•• 4" MKHU ASALVa nork*I A.-I... I A CMI R 1ST XI CRICKET 9 From i' i:r 4 Mullln> ami Brudshaw Before 28 not out and Mr. lieadley, who Grecmdge could gi*t (iff the mark ed Smith, 2 nut out. Mullins had him tor'a duck. L Bv I'Ai I EOSTER daY,i pn/BVmA %  oRtattmaa n|e c WATEIt WIX I .1 i"""'' %  ""' W '" *" ff Pr :i " "* pointed Thay data, that too majv me tovunament. laU .core, have been recorded *• %  BwOPdflah. B-i.-iid... Bymj fr Ihli sea^.n and ti.e> tear that Fk* -'i"i IMtdtai wan man >** these bip Nc-orcs will continue n.en to tr.i.n than enher Sj.-pperi. lhroAiat*"'c j d4BJjn.l eight rnSH team. Eking p*n 1 '^ "'- ^ ***" "" this vc:.r. compelitK.n werg faced Whipn-raya with the exception ->l i gatarq akortl) iH-loro the Hunte and O'Neal dad nevei pla>1*51 season opened. The six the game before vho took part In laat yeWi Hence the ltftl1 season began league nmld re-enter this year'with Snappers and Harrison ColeantpatiUgn, Tnera wam bowavar kapa having a clear superu>iity several youngster who wantud to over thv other six. teams rhc learn the antna. Had ant) titf iir*-t round ot tire tournatnenl k six teams returned t<> i : '. even half way through ami year's league then Ibaaa VOUnp alreadj improvement cat plaran would not have secured noticed > %  > the weaker leama places HI the various teOBM F.I.N.A. Th ussciatiun u-(,dad If "v K H *• had reached II Burke al.o lUrrtmtn college accepted the InAaiociation U seeking afflUal him MUghl al l .v., poini ., I feU victim to Mullinv Branker „ WUon# 0 „ ,„. ( >n jhis Federation is one of the ma)oi their old clubs—an understandptapa towards lnla|HPUnnal raooa> utlon and on to what must be vary true sporuman's desire— at the World OlymE Branker folBranker Collapse followed I! I D I opened his score with .idjiKh.ci Lb. I,I M I 'i 1 brliea but Greenidge did no; %  A. ii. m rattled Dash's stumps long as he was bowled by Bradam ,V request when he was 10 and got K. C.i IfBtk ha E Branker I "I'M his score Kehorn lb.-, tor duck. G. F..UT who lo 42. V.M.P.C.. cloMKI Ihclr c ir|| „„ „„, ,„„„„, ,„ rn ,„ „ repr i„l.lion wen! in al numbor nlnr loged one innlnBs a! 138 „. 4 . team, but U..v U LU • asociapic G H.U befor. he wa .ui, out (or Adci Lunch Ulackman ind if ', mon und ^.^ r ,„ A c| „ hi ,, dos t „ noujhl. Kmch opened Ihe BrU nini.. B o , h( m ^ k Rock „ nd „,.. „, WhBl •tump, were dr.n BJ„ at ^^ u| ,,„„., „.,„,„ „,„ 1W1 ,„ inu Brthl .„, ,„ ,„„ out. Wlllmm ,wl 20 and S inm,.,,.. Ihey were Till loaetner prrW ||u u/hiupo, ,j. Water Polo Club, .ear, In 1950, playinK b> Ih. old 1 „"l '",1Black.nan 41 not ou( ana Kind, 14 Wnip p„ r y p |ayed league wale: rulv, plav lasted (or two period With an hour led for play. Carlnot out. pyk, In tnt ^^^ toiw Mkd r %  ot sown minuto. actual pl.y with Ion fought haul i„ ,„„„., :IK nn ,., !" B ,.|iyL|e ,. I IUUIK "I their prenenl members, captain Hire, mlnutea raat Thi, year the They lost lour arldaaa b) lime ol CI>MBhKMf.Kf. is. MMM.fc Alb-i| ||unu juJ t 1 ilol „,. lN ,.,, 5; rill „ ,.„„ f,„ ,„„ p/rlod. call. %  ..a.. 2V9 turned out for the oriKinal lean,. len minutes actual pla> with 11 Ladae The "peninB pair F. Ilutehlnsoi. ,.„ mb ,. t „„„ ,,„, „ k „, r<( riaj tii aoBIMnty. ** %  (wtwnln.Tt. rU-,^. in t-aiviiiutw.. i ..a.,, i bfhiM i BaMa-a paj and aid iwutr Hrr bN hn ihr4v. hr goal lsi Mr brbtnd M iMd-nTihi And la 4( Litafa AMI Th pruol* m u.i. lUind Blart la ahow yn>t>alh. And !*> %  > •ulUclHl niame> To Iv... M Wrll to.iv. VPII know a ab la ll>a iif-M mi I . Much Iioutolc -• >.^i . %  I... l.t Ilia W.li II. on, Hchr.t pavj nuaa-rv. With Harrison College enlerinu n mutes rest Six extra minuteand N. S. Lucas were both senl the competition, there was now In *hieh to akoot more inalo. back by pacet lamea WIU %  I ot Turning out foi Comlwr.nere Toom ,„ hr oUl(r icams for the The iiaocUUan fouiid that the fi and 3 respectively. Hutchinson Ioi n, e t rst U me yesterday. Frank TIC w members of the association, distance between tho uprights of ..veil out Lb.W, arhua Lueai Kuu captured live Lodge wickeiBnappata kntl the Munnnin twin Ihe goal posts used last year was taken by Foster in the slips, for 55 runs in the Lodtte—ComBonitas lost Allan Tayloi. Roll ware six Inches short of interR. Hutchinson was soon after bermere First Division cricket Feldman. Barracudas lost C h a rles national requirement>•. New &>ai run out for 3. The score was 13 match at Corabermere. Lodge batEvelyn and Flying. Fis:i Ion posts built lo inten itini.il .>U lor 3. ted first and scored 20 runs. Geoffrey Jordan The DO] I arere conrtnieted for the 1951 Carl ton was 34 when the fourth Combermere is now 40 runs for W ent over to HaiTlaOU Collega md lournament. Six '"' %  < ,Lu' wicket was taken Williams comthe loss of two wickets. • the newcomers tilled :he breach. seem to 1* such a marked U> neat and bowled C. Mc Frank King W not bowling, at Bnappara aUtough thtQ %  ••. But ask any goal-keeper tor U. FaataWl but took things i,..,^ what n not her six Inches means, At close of plav. Greenidge wa* He lyjwled 16 overs. Slow left hard hit. They still had tneir exwhen at the start of each jump 13 not out and (;.'Hard ins 3 not arm bowler L A. Horns comparlanced nucleus of Geoige Mconly hi B head la out of the water. out ii landed respect during his in fivers li(ii| r %It ., / ... (n> Keniietn luce. This inot an attempt to exonervupr n POI ICE when hc lo0k tt,rw "" k *" tv t Uclbert Bannister, A. Taylor. It "W aoalkeepers for the high i.M.i-x. \s. roiaH.r. M b iow?w R Jhe M M lh K lv Y.M.P.C 139 Foi Lodge, open'-'K *£*"" %  " other learns besidethe ,>l„vers %  t*UnI a few of tko ftagjg WfU. I'aliedfor no wicket) S8 ^USS^^^LV^SS^ ^y "*' '" -"^' Collage, ; o' W escaping water polo fa. •*Ba?i? ""In 9 ^St^^x^^ 3 J ^ "ft *ft ^ w IUTIS in tneir first innings on the He was eventually out to E. G. "* puyci. leaving me isiam -; ,„,tne. w tieHis, days pla, in their H.s, divisAdani. SSE&mJt*J& Z*Sii£SXL?1Uf!^St pS^W.lc^irflS*Tfi kt match .,1 QlWM'l Pu* onsh brouBht oft a dimcult catch lictnii una,,;. Thil m the boundary. leveiHli hour H At the'end of play Police had Cofnbarnwre'l U I lacoriah Is hod not the Headmaster He. replied wiUi 58 runs lor the los-. ot not mil with 13 While I MeD. naon CoUege permitted some of no wicket, c-irl .Mullins. the PoliUAlleync scored 17 his younger player.Ihoaa who oace bowler wok Bve < %  ' fir. McComie. ixxige medium could not pcailbiy gam %  ataeHon VVPr wKke Ho. the lo ol 44 PkM bowler sent down live m.,, anv-tO join the .f.^ .endml 1 overs of i' OVtR. hard pressed clubs lor ID ; Lodge-won the toss and eltyted on|v wvcrul o1 the duJ well ha no, migh.nice) then topped for B goal n f"t other iieriod over flv. the watch i* stopped and reatartc.l when the ball goes back into play Thus ensuring that there u ten minutes of Mttual play each half Last year time keepers had to average actual pla' by then wrist Paarlng these points bi mind. >peeUitors will have a better idea hull ( red.. o| the 1051 sel up and i>erhaps Hare at where the Snappen %  • aaorva than, irttlofam lor i litti. bowled ll ovara, The onlj fouTand want", %  -. to &f • aaaeoa. £•£ wiU nuin for YMI'C that put an) conAdenU] ,w, ' newcomers m thai : | accuatomod to ilieav ne rnuunre was K Brankei who hll Frank K.: aowar """ "' cnnditioitt and wiU. the weakn ree his length early and bowled Mr. regularly for had teams improving in ever' four Wilkcs with the lavt ball U hn ihem c creciiKlav >unc slou,e and r Mr T^ "!' %  the ball both ways on a l*"" cn , H 1


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MORE TRADE WITH CANADA CERTAIN Busta Emphatic: Adams Confident MONTREAL, June 30. "THERE will definitely be improvement in trade between Canada rnd the British West Indies. Hon. William Alexanc or Bustaraante, Minister of Communication.-, and i eader of the House of Rep resentatives, Jamaica, assured members of the Canadian Expo i.it'on last ni"ht. Bustamante wa'. r lW %  "f a delegation of i the British WP .! Indiea and British Sttiana lion oured at a reci linner tender";! by the Association. ir.w.i. >IIVSIO> I-. MOM III ll Delegation h:e Trade Talks in Oil i£we4 dlacuai Lot nl delegati'"; Mr Buetai l %  %% %  said that he wi reeti cl OulnlM J. Gwj %  iiu' Mbetantii i i xnot I B.W.] War. and in thr veara i 1> following. the impoaltl United K Go< exchange export ei %  Canadian expor, tra Islands has been Umltfr and artiftrlall'. ^igiilii Army Go Forward TOKYO. June 30 An t'Khth Army Ownmuniq. i ... %  i %  .. alow '•: KJ i \ %  Unue north and : | %  %  ..i Voncru ... %  %  i %  • %  %  •.-., N %  i norl Cho.i letermlned r I i n %  %  iij patroli withdraw %  ki|i:,i'n! An %  U I Rod im|ian> N •• %  po 111 %  !. luring I hou s. The attack was repulsed. i4 tlmated Red %  west ol HwaI .ills while patroli north of Hwaobon en%  i Rod co m pa n y. Light rontoct was repotted in the BfWI north of Yannt(u as patrotl engaged an unThe eight-member We* Indian ^'..u-, numlM-r ..f Reds during th. Trade £o.i said todaj that ra• U*S %  *•£ "' P 1 100 Keels Give No Reply To Gen. ftitigua^s Peace Move Yet LONDON, Jane 30. j\LL EUROPE await ad ten I irday the oulcome of the pro insal by the United Nations Commander. General Katthew RUiyway, lor an umistica in Korea. British autto Id they believed the Korean Communist Qonun&nder'l reply might be made tlirotijrh MoSOfl They pointed out that the Moscow Radio had reported armistice proposals in a Tass dispatch, including proposals tlat cease fire talks should take place aboard the Danish hospital ship "Jut landia*' in Korean watirs. Till: BKI rt.-. WKST INii H. ..],]. Import tfitolus It was reported frou on Juno 2i(. thai import quotas on Canadian foode may aoon be relaxed in Uie British Weal IndW taxation may develop out of UW fuel lhal thiWi received more dollars traan Britain for use in the dollar area. Tho Trade Mission asked reportai at a Pre** Confa lo seek further details. Members Of the delegation must ropoft bad: to Uieir Governmental an announcement made. Delegates hlntad relaxation—tini January, will %  range of Canadian producta Including llsh, wheat, t ex t 11 1 and other goods. Trinidad already has announced that It would create a fraa mark* for Canadian salt fish begi nnin g January 1. next. aw i Import quota ticklish pi •' i I 'iiadian exporters, since t; • % %  almost la reel In mye< case*, essential BOoda WO ted to 50' : on less c -%  reduced to 30"; Trade Balance Thaj were brought on DJ Britain's dollai shortage However, v,,ti, Brttain'a dollar po l %  %  taadlb lnl %  ll a\ %  ,:: w,,h lht B.W.I. Colonies achieving favouruble trade balal have been pre* i more liberal ..i for the western WO! Id One delegate who asked that his name b> not laed A'. trade with Canada than other country. Tho mi won in • %  %  %  said that it has been %  emphasize the gnat attached in the Waal indies ana in British Guiana In ihr maintecoinpanv sized units were reported along the ie:.. under Of the I'Nitein b —I'.P. Hou W A BaataauaU, Lf*dii lit > %  -1 K'-l'i%  CaiMda All Litic.uuli.i N..ti I seen Hare from. mid Cjnimci.r. Tilmdid: C.ipta n J. OIrk. Ciiaoi*n aTattOnl Jamaica: Hou W. J B. r-vn. M BtbOT ol the Lt;i-lauvr aM I Leader o( tnc Boa i M a n Wy. Baraaaai: and O R. iMOragar, >: at ii %  %  I ivni ity Tram BOOT, Induvlry oi KaajH "i BapfeeeataatTea, ilca*. Q li Ailmns l | | ol n.un with Canada and to I ahesc links to the mutual bencnt of bMta I "It is ilw ap| West Indb eunutanee i nnd bulk purch %  full and frank dh> ""_•> Siamese Armv Take Keb.1 H.Q. WASHINGTON. June 30 The State Di-portment said Siamese army forces on Saturday plured Ihe headquarters of the < eliels during a furious tluht |n which a number <•! stray BrtlUar) shells hit the United ^ %  Eral i .' Bangkok. Army and air force bombers had attacked a naval building throughout the day at the same .iiidintt that lease the Premier. Rebels had eized him and the Communica%  tatei .n %  ei %  A huh the United Stales was turning over to Thailand a barge to be used to daepamnj. a river channel. The Naval Headquarter! building is about hnif a mile from the United States Embassy and on the tide of the river. — I'.P. I Manes Srarvh Tor Missing Airliner CHICAGO, J""M. A united Air Limit, plane earn ing 4i pai %  angen an i i a i five was missing on Satuul.it a flight over the mounl tween Salt Lake City and Denver. The airliner was a D.57 flying from San Francisco lo Chlcal I at Sail 1. invar, Oma %  n mvei when %  pi tre Rlcfaam Farnauld roi n an annouti %  %  Ha s dd thai Uu i > %  b Ball Lake City at 1.45 a.m. and was due at Denver at 3.3a a.m How%  IMM t, a pi ina a i Mnd time and Iti pUM raportad I %  i %  %  Sllvw Crown Wyoming. All radio opai i the area were ordere to Uatan tot sign ila I titi airhntfOra pui Into "|-'i l search. U.P. ra Ki|iar.i| Farnauld aakl a1 Chicago thai the plane's lUpply Of have been exhausted rt K %  m Ihre** houn afti i an ha I %  aid rrorn, I'.P %  i 641 DESERTERS BEBIJ PUty-two Baal Police l0< deserted to Wes, cord fir any week 1 the west Berlin Police toni lal of | and with deirrten lot the • rat half year UptO 641 RruU-r. A "Deal Of Harm" Li iNX> i.\. Juno to The limes raid In an editorial ti da) that a 'deal of barm" was acini done t< Colonial relation* by the problem i nandlinK colonial peoBritaui. The Timrs said the dispute n letween tinI. ttlal Council and some Colonial reat, | . i %  %  Btlng Colordal students in Bi > of this ta Ithe need to I %  i %  : make way for the flOOd of man < Rpected ; ii ;1, .coming academtl year" the Time* %  %  I regarded with dot [ %  ...... M?ing lold it %  iimenu by the Iran Govl. Musi Face ,{ i ,ain Seeks _.. III jll IM IIOII Consent Ponces 11 \gainsl Iran ram Peking moni • n .i re -i. mid-mi ind It we i the P> . i kuai of Chinese %  n II North 1 i i i.it fo. R '. m II Sir i foluntaer i the Red Kon auk) t> f i tin i %  N %  i j would give i Malik 1 %  %  : '"' Bovl i %  Btl ll '. titio British Are Harmed TKI < .,;. Saturd iy it nf anv harm i< Brltith %  i I u ... HI cli'livcii 'I i> Koi. i Min Kazemi by Biltlsl \ idoi %  moii oi %  .... ei oval 111 It, % % %  !', | \l\ I I :. BO . but I % % %  % %  HURRICANES IS It true thai lltrbnJn-. h a hurricane every SO rearaf Are ire te > tm hiiiTKine tins raarT Don't liss Ihr I'rxt of ^n Ing atrfe %  hurrlcanra I which aawta "Breaker, ie> aiajelai on i Birtadae I i-.lri II l.iv, %  %  Strike On Si. Kilts Waterfrunt BrokerShooi$ Wife: i : itm m its Suicide NKW YORK, June 30 i I %  %  i .11 -ui,i insurance broki i laflli %  reach a reconeillatioi with intr to death and critkaUy amended anothei man as the:' dinad J^ %  laahloflable restaurant on Friday mght. il"d hi %  ill OI ;lared| The police said thai J< h live 4 wife Julia entered ih" V ST. KITi'S, .1 by the Labour Uiuon i Phi Officer ,i aak %  j %  were unaucjeaiBful %  f.mll Work on the Aleoa Fenu M \% loading mi*ar for Mont' %  .,.., %  .'. and augar aal %  not ah> i mat Wi capacitv heavily %  hen reaping automalicnlly stop*, wall %  %  %  he Irani %  %  uv) f-:l In rhl r. %  %  %  %  i ni..'.' H %  ill have the exiiin %  %  I I Hungarians Ex-Communacated Appmx ..I %  %  '. %  1 One shot $714,381,000 For Military Construction WASHINGTON. Juru SO. I %  \ I on $714,381,000 worth of military ictlon HI ihi /. .' %  i H-. r Re uter. jkillina hei Wal .,r %  | ..' ". Fella waa found rj dTi I Thnag Bamim %  %  %  %  that Ru '' %  "'' "'" 1 reaaona En ..iiiiii.il uu Korean ..n y i" ii..' ,.-i ,i, ,,.. %  %  • BowW Unto pornali the snvli II i M ire revoi raatorn powers I urope and Uv I two an jutlaisdia Is Read} or rhe Conference i A. June N %  %  i hucpilal hip Jutland,.!. Ihi %  .it Uu ibbea of tli %  %  about 100 onComrnool the whip H i on Saturday. i aid in. hip has .i % %  loon Ue %  ' right now ere %  i a king dct.., led plans, but JutUtndta eonalaered tm thli very %  % %  . aught ill I T Uh ird think It an i %  httbualla which %  .... r U i* I il .rnd paper most if whuh i i ienrnark. H I I re| n ih" %  %  "i n.it i.in.il%  i ion hip Mara it .r.i %  of ih pani %  ot roo* i or thn %  lefl before th % %  %  %  i ef 11 %  %  rl thai I % %  I %  i i I;, itain. ..i d %  ..... i in I %  %  , plan! i. d I., iiu the court .. .-. %  th, %  i %  %  han. when tiounoad II Sell : .... ... J". • Irr %  and oil n ei in i Milt t.' I I the Fai %  %  ' menl lo .i mldd IJ %  i mce -The unit* %  i i .tin' IH %  I • i ... . fforl | 4a Oovemment made evet %  — if .IM Hel Papers Comment On Ceaae-flre Offer Ml KSCOW, June 30. . Uial the I % %  i Defence % %  i || andai laneral I %  %  e Bra In Korea. %  i,..'.,.i i,v anothei i %  %  mui el "i Korea. The %  Ito # it'F) THE "ADVOCATE" payi for NEWS DIAL 3113 Day or Night. Dismixsi'ft %  i % %  %  • i : N KHOLM j • %  i been I^Vt %  Rente*. no v tea ..i Drake Will Consult With Directors %  %  %  %  '.. Board of D • I I think ii ll OOHK %  ; %  %  %  i p The Law is always right. v. Ii.29's Using Radar To Bomb Red Lines %  An air force ipi i i : %  %  V : The '.' %  I ; %  fullv BU 1 nigl.t for exainj.: %  I %  %  U I i I* JhsJbi JJCWVUAHC Qhnksi in CydoA Ok RALEIGH THE ALL-STEEL a\ aic vc L a CAVE SHEPHERD Be CO.. LTD. 10. It, 13 8 13 BROAD OIRtET Sole Distributors



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IIHRTI.KN rt CLASSIFIED ADS. ,1 HQAl IDVOI \ 11 SUNDAE, JULY 1, 1*51 I'l in ii SALES W.WTH) TILKPHONl 2901 REAL ESTATE i Baffi ;. gbj L and In Merpoiiam "re. d.i "dllMo on -rek-dao and per word < •.. i.'. i..< Men FOR SAU M ... .hard. H ,-*[ iimdan 3 -d 3 teals a u.' uirk l eOnta and I w*>rdf — over 24 • d u.k— £•* Mrk.(< '•! Engagem-nl ...ii. Cllml the lo. im number of •• I..I H..I* AUTOMOTIVE A.\.\OI .\SJMBNTS HEBOHTS-GMMdi Isle ol SH'-nit INN *>" Gum I Ratea ftn B4.0S per head pe tee lo D. M Sllnger. DKMM IM i" UOM-MWI H . .i.-nt Tooth %  ,,. Mtew I 7 II -.. GAVtlNMffl MIKI AIMO-.T NEW ii' h.p RediuKl V. ( i arantee if required Eatra Minn rnn| Upset litre (IBM. N'w onto* M.1M preaerdly. Apply: Cewrte.* 11/ rage I T ll i C'll V.I.IKH 14/B In parted cond.taon. rw* tyres ard paint-job Heasonably pilrti Apply. n do. Ai'mm I Id Hint mm MB 11 DODOS MR ca moot x Ml .. IBWH ireo. Apply lo Providence. 3SSSI Sn ucrtoa ,. MM price* ad wit. CYCIjr. — Now ahlpmrnl M MS c c Secure your* before anfa Coiifleav Garage. Dial 3t.SH D: Pick-up Morris > in food older with almost new body 1. Slot* or Ha Edward's Oarage. Horbuak where ll can be seen Phom 34M n Working Apply •hall A H A* %  and Ijxat.of Modm, about a.oao aq ft. Going lot Oniv caao %  •It A Utlr Stonewall Bn.li.rs. .v. Residence ii 4 000 aq ft. Coin, for Oily *I M. Ali .i \., '-.A ptaai. MM r. 1 Bedroom Bungalow Type. Not to fiom the Garrison. Good I • Modem C< rf I.: : for about It.sou i'n.per(> -.i" Shop Attached, off Count." Rd .. Good Condition II.TOP A New 1 Bedroom Concrete Bungalow Facing Sea ..ml an Aln.o.l New 3 Bedroom II Inch SI Euncalow Near *a. Both as %  r> "lie* Uval] I! .1 %  i %  Ml Clan*. I'nleaa Vou Aro .ting I. Aaaured Morldbce* and Term> ArIttal llll I' t il. Atieii. Ulive Imill II I Ml ( II.I.WI.Ol'S %  ... I '( %  ("il ret. Salary S0 'ai par liea lo be aaaumad on III-. IS0I. Apply by letter bv JH. .!h leatimoniaU u f flood rapabtlltlaa to Mrt. I>e tourcv BOYCK. StrathcKde T!tM 3n SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. MAIL NOTICE Mail ..i July IBM rtegi.i( CLOSING 01 I IHMaHlKLAIN HRIIHiF. imbi 11..ii'. Brhafj vUl IxII ixaffic from Monday. sth July. i.f irp-ITS 27.6.51.—2n. Tit UK (ynr *'.d Tmrk IS4S HH.Iel I 4nal geai in ilnKUu worklna mder He Ni lludaoi. tviht Hl> < ... fir -a .Uu wurkuig "tdar 0n. (.'onUct U L UrltFrh. rhone 1M1 Mlll-I" MWVlBJ Lland T*o Mile Hll WAGGON 1S5I 'Match. Ilium ir lation WaflflOn. Mileaac 1,000 Apply ialph BparrT Hardwood A1.#A I'l IH II NST1CES w>tfc Sspi SJISSSM IIS OK t TenderIS lunby invited lor . i an estenilon lo !...ildiii at the Comp-ny'a li^y lllreet. the drawing and speelflral.-.i h(ill inn. be %  niH-e ol Meairv O af \!aihlll Street addrr a WI lo th I | i.EIHi-led OSVa of I later than 4 p.m i IS6I. Till; BARBADOS X.I T Nt'rJ NOTICE PAKI.lt i'l t HSI-t W ' l>i.iler marked on the en of a Pa leant* Village" will bf re^00 p.m. < iTd July. 11*1 for the arocUt %  ri.anfi Vlllai ''• W ti. and apaclfleatlo. ) u. H M...i 1-ld Rvs doltar* iled oa ... to Hi Hoiddai .. .houtd Ule tur i led th (rots id .iloi iimmU Ihe willing ELECTRICAL HATTrTBIl .111, 1^I.IT. i i MM f, and II volt Dl'RAI III; %  p.H.ll'outha Special attractive rail pricea Dial 43SI. Courlaay Garage aS.Sal-n MlSCELLANkeOUS ANTIQUES — Of daacilptlon „, Jewell, flno Silver WatM-c-uiout* Sarrjf bookl, alapa. Ai.Wi.ipha etc at Clorrlnge* Antique Shop, adjoining Royal Yachl Club BUffOAl OH i . t; baMaUeU 1.,111*1 v* v. Phone -'aftl ..i II.,.,* *•> I TM T %  N DWUfJNG KOt'SF. % %  '; si n-v. a/iih Jios %  ) tleirlo -itui.tr i %  i Rrldgotnwn Th i->. %  I %  • I %  ajKHki ararbFi i.^talled %  • | i %  _t I p m Por ...-I..-I.. r, >| Pain.er me tenant baia'etn il a vSriyt p> daii VBAHWOOD .% i Til -., "DIM. I Boarded and ahl .ISKlUi ih.il. kilo-; Near Pi in. i; %  Herbert Gnu.' LfBca I leii.-K PffeOPBBTY--'n>al daalrable Wall and Woooa-n M %  Elmo al Maxrll Id. mi i %  %  ol Cloard t:tily Kail and alandlng ft) of an acre of kind, with several bearing I llll IrsaS The Saino will be aet tip publlr lompelllion al out Of) Sweet on Friday OUi Jnlv al 3 p.m IntpetUmi any dav encept Sundays. belteen the Main ot N JIII lliitihliianii A llaiifteld. Boll. I tor. 0M 'II %  >l in 'TARMpowniniiD rm.iCREAM US K s ,pietne quality and only ** per i-tb tin and fll 00 per 1-lt tin lo-day Irotii your f.iorri i4 l"y 'h' llir no-Am st Gei.rge ineai George i Ht"r> I on b route -lb. nlng room ad brosl i :. .|.hoi.v ..I.<1 ele< I %  .iiuled time -nil on • aHU %  tone a/lln Wb>fl*> Q i %  nAHHDtOTi.:. i PART ONE Bv Lieut -Col J OOBnell Oil CoaaSMndina, Tlie Itarban.-. H-airrvent i ... im on tha> Sth .aiy MAORDERS E D IWimantffl leadqiiartera al ITS* hour* Band practical a — rail. Monday 3. Wadnaadav 4 and Thuradaj > July ol %  %  %  >quad inalruetora OH osnssdi oi M si > ..i psrss tNo oBDsss.1 -i mi on rw UM •**• staftss -1.1 It A II CUrke. KM I I W.llian.' i I... Jut. ..•... T A <; a TS S|t WllUaiwa. S II %  i %  _> BaOmrM COS S U I A A i, The Hathan., ... PASV1 %  ..sin IT SSCKIAI. NO M 1 '• SHEET NO. I I MH INI Rf Ahl~llle.l.ll., l I %  I 'IIN-. Alteiled ai %  ; IS June nted 3 rnont*.<* P laave w D SKEWES-COX. Major. iOLT aV Adiutant. T' > i %  !• %  .-. i. %  III. VI VII I HL. Wl -\IIIM.TO in" AMI AMS1ERDAM a HlUJU'nn-luih July 1*11 -MUM.. in IklMOAII PASAatASIRO AMI ".! oi.i.l MI* S i tilTHA— Mth June 1MI. M %  SttlBA Mb July INI. S P MUSSON. SON A CO.. LTD. ApenU, The M V CARIBBEE wlL accept Cargo and Paaaangera foi DonlnKa. Anligu-. U.tnUerrat Nevla and St Km. leading ant Sailing Mondai' nd July The M V DAEBWOOD Srfl a-id Paaarngeri fol St lAicla. Grenada and Ariba %  ^aaengat' amB 1 fW •* Vincent %  %  Ii n 1 SCMOOSEB OVNKBS' i i.i"' WC. Itleabeae a*7 Canadian National Steamships •OITIIIIOI Nil NaMS af Skip CAN CONSTBUCTOH I.ADV NE1 CAN CltUkSEK CAN tllAI.Ii.NGEH LAUV RODNtV CAN ( < %  VSTBI/CTOK 1 M). \} l.si:iablr from riNTHAI. MM M.l.\ I.TI>. I':cr Head Lone. jcs *33sss ss ^sy .'y ^.''W ^W i ^^ Trinidad %  in %  0., L „ :: |Q ., i, J.on tun i.la s.i (..) til Dan YWd in %  >-,*.;,;. Saturdav Thursday MoodsYj in Tl Satuxds %  I 0 -ii. In %  l.nlilu iium..lil".i. .1 Iheli iilBli Stie>t ilia ltd oav .1 July ISO! ... roTTAt.i Two Mtle Hill *tan.ling In 1 dS, with 3 in of good land Tl .. i i % %  .... !•! i I. 1 id -i uoveu Skaeie %  ci.mj 'TI ii %  3S0SI—) %  tlltll VI \l SOl.VINIKS. ri'RIOS. JFWPI.S Nn w Sliiinnrni ope tied IHAMS \\. h..v. pleasun tn notitytonitn that the ,, HI Executive 'i %  Hth June ed In ten • IlnNatiu.il (.as : ..lion Act 1950 o itlUi B prtcs < %  ( Natural tla* f'* Ttftf Itarbadna I Co Id %  i'nal!iriy them r,. retnorn tn* KC*M iur. ->n Gas %  |i | bstttl operai om tiy 16th May. Liiilionnte part %  :i Month ol Mai "ill be deducted liniii and shown on i (las Accounts. FOII SALE KAI.ATA ST. LUCIA ...... %  %  I • %  "> lour (34i v.l i M-.ga. aultabla I Oil RENT .., charoa weak 71 eei Su-dapi 14 worda — SHARES — T i I ..111 ni.ll M KnmhtIn lu be aol.1 liv ir U Of the tie lh day July la*l al .HO ACO. 3SS.MIn HOUSES ir Dowittt Mce an ml in.ilein OOII 1 Bed Appb HJ 0 'i FLAT—Al Cbral Sand*. Wortblnj iliUflaSS fumlihed Sat. good *ea bathing rot lurther particulars. Dial IIJ4 Aim l.iuililcv 3T.0 l— t f II KI'HNISirrjy From Auguil %  CllS'un*Garden Gap. WotOslfal bidrnunia. garage. leleph... H Dul 4304 between S a.m. I HOMESTEAD -II -.lino J Badroon : with ninning water Breakfast rooi lc large yard, galas' Appl %  ,i.n. eoent Sunday oi lo Hi %  '.apaldr 1.741—1. -arrua COHNER" PALM BEACI: HASTINGS, ideally .Hinted %  Cool and Comlortabl.. Wide Vvrandahi Drawing;. Dining and Thiee nedic->rr. With Running Water, all PrlSJim *'" %  KitclK-n. Servanu* Room an.l OSrSSBI Avall-ible from IMh July Ap|" i I. baakg. 1 Swan Street Dial *.J1 0. 1U3S. 3SS.1I 4i ii llaaRfl iHi 1 ng 3 l.edroutna. dru A laige 3-Store* Concrete. ILilidlng 43 a 43 Containing: V Bedrooma. large Hall. Sll.1 s-. i. K....H Itsfll BOOagggef woodI Pilch J'ine. Bullet wood ajfltl .-I,. ,. >und -I bgag Modern Cor,wattr lunning .— the 1'i.lldlnga are sen. ..ricrato i a.osxi gallon* • % %  vice la perfect •i rapaiity of lo L'NION. the I -[.eilinental AgtlItatton. through SSI % %  lllllg DM uiiird health %  TWO in III BIBQKOOMS Fully 1 i,!!.a'ia*i"hVi MS9 "**V rnlshe S| 3n Hone lan. ree bed 7SI |i 1 BBJ TIOXA AWNT Oo Hastings Ma o'NV. third BOuie on *ti at Matthias Gap Th l-OI Ml AL'tnON WAMIII 3 i CLEAN OLD RAG ^ \ Dcllvrrrd l .* Advocate l'i.-Koom v WRIST WATCH -Ai tah* I All.e PlaviTig Field, on Tbursdav iii|hi 14th June one il' Ladlas Wn.t W.it.l. ijwne. can nave -..me by Bpfi I Ve.liv Cleik and paving Cost ..f till LOST v. Phone 8364 SWEEPSTAKE B-xiK-S Booki II ItBO and II 3430 ietuiu |o Prince Grrworle I Strett TO-DA TS NEWS FLASH lAKKVMANS ENCYCLOPAEDIA 12 v .liniii. A—Z 3rd Edition revised U Vib9 v36.(HI lor the Set JOHNSON b STATIONEKV BEVELL EDGE MIRBORS 22 Ins. x In Ins. 24 Ins. x IS IBS. ..i JOHNSON S IIAKim latl UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER H nii.ti. i, th J..i> %  ( %  %  -.. e.nvagea I lOent. BsH t 3 e.in.-grBM cam. v;KrKNT amrrrni. UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER ON WiayNESDAY 411. (and ll SaS '* ,.i. i.-i .nursdsi *Hi i. % %  Robert M Jone* we will sell net %  ,. Miu um. which %  -. i %  enalon Dining Tabgr wllP I: I iln1, Sideboard da vr. ins Orruunciil T,i|l Tnbln: Uril'"' Al i. : Biorri • ... i i i V I I %  is. Glass .ITIU (I Glass iSl piece-. Ds Si i. PUtrtl Ware ll. VaM-s B en *c. Eorka. CuOsrj S J„r(. -I urv.1 -I. i I.n, IV., i o I*. % %  I Kitchen I Hi Vrtasure Cooker. 1 1 'h'.-ken OWBS -I'.l R .,,i,o PMI orcbidi H %  Rale 11 IllvWMi: TROl MAN A l Aurlluneeni I BEVERAGES al (iKIHIlliS liorkliv James Si Methodii! Church VIIIH. : | Meci[ Ings Sunday, Juiv |sl il Meeting Spscl a I Progranune 1 Ihe School July 2ml at 7 :tn Ii Hun It. N At'lini; QcrvsiTJor, srlll prisule. RSI li( v T J i (Deputation (rooi St. VmII. viti-d ENQUIRE AT . STANWAY STORE ... • q ...in. Will i brso oi chsrs % %  ; %  %  AUCTION SALE MONIIW :M> AND TIESDAY 3RD JI'LY I1.3S A.M. DAILY Iced Cold or Supplied Per Dozen uk Volir Order NOW J Mal llll olher favoured with Inatrue% Mrs. Don Johnson Baal sell bv a net Im lunilvcollection ol f nltu.e. gUuware. silver, chins and the entire content* of "MEDKCNHAM Ssturdav 9 to 13 ..nu %  %  %  I 1 !. %  '. %  I %  mi Tasas*. Kasney Tabl-. WaidIT IS A KNOWN FACT THAT TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED KIM I With ll.. Dlallnrtlvr Flavour) is oni-. .'ui. II in Quality and Flavour. SIP IT — TO ENJOY IT. a BLENDERS: JOH.X It. TAYLOR A SO.XS LTU. D0NNACAN0 FOR SALE RESIDBNCB. Pins HiU On* o< u,e -laUly B0m> oi Barbados built Bv crafbrrKn Who took a w id> in their work AccontmoHati.ti .-.mpriaea ol large reception rooms. fiide verandahs. study, 3 double bedrooms. I garages and cuibymary oSscoa and! r.nthuiidinga Pictureaqua garde*ii with tan nia court Total area of land about 4', acre* acre bounded bv 3 main r< and Ca-trleR.vn H-rti.nlai. an application -wHiTEM.u.1 SLATS" ruu to let and ehlire propertv for Sale QosbSBgJsSst Hill Si Micnael A Hoe old eountrt mansion recently converted into lour apactou* liisurv flats fitted with all modern conveniences There are appro* I acres surrounding the house all laid out with Brims, shrubberies and gardens, the long driveway approach is flanked by matured 1 manogarv treev Good Investment property eipeCbUlv .iiltei.le for a reatdenl owner. Only SH milefrom town HWEfT HELDSI Petci Th* housa U of tod EstSle Tvpe with 3 norev.. tolldly built p| ,tone will! parapeted root. There Ia O.u-a roorti large kiUtlle With %  renih windows leaM.ig iMo POTcred verandah' irbm wV.wh Ihare H IB linobttrncted. vlaw %  '. the rs a hi.:diitanot awVy "" The 1 ssdrootni axo large abd airy, oast hi* ilgvrtl L.atH'. TI wtUt %  L bath and hot wafer The;. Is ample scope for ,mprov< man tj And moo>T"ia\ii>n to be ,rn*il b-.it wlthoii the iroi>crty 1-^iBf n. -Old tfdflu' atm.-pbeT* The ground* ss appiox 11 acres In e-in i. vI! planted w.th -reee ami Sowrring shrubol all varlel.r Thefb at two varriaswray and rigBI of a* over lbs* b*Wh with rxccUeni bathing £ lVsll.LIEll. Utfi 4V0SM, SMSsS — well nialnUmed biingaloa cnnstrucifd uf tton* with wallahs Ws. OvaiTbbfc.* r>e-.fc. Tv.< i V.I Sh.ivlng I Mm I the iib..v Mi .. otiss *-ng I llodro^n Fviiiillurc I 1 i IT %  %  %  |lg I "' Bed> -• %  •ol %  ii M.iti-vswi. Stve-.it .•i. SI. .% %  .in'. T.I.I \i V.isqiiltit Nrlv tin; 1 %  %  1 %  n Tai.lClhi. Tea Bi.d TrBV of Klf Btl Wat..lilt I K, .il-. Rar-ioine Mower. Ho". 1'l.itc. K. %  l L-llon Qla— I'l" ..lid i Fiimiii T %  i r %  i %  -I Model Morn, ll Cat and very %  %  ( M I I I ON ,111 |< VIIIIV Cujh on (all ol the hammer Al ( TIONLER J..I... Vl. Ill.a.l.... A r %  %  v A. I'hone 4fiia PLANTATIONS Bl'ILDING RALPH-A -BEARD %  \ II. IHST H K F V.A. XIII lli.nerr and Krai KoUte Churah, Rintf r WALL BOARD YOU WANT to economise on your Cellini's and Partitions, use DONNACANO WALL BOARD Obtainable in the following Sizes : 4 — 8' — W N. B. HOWELL Lumber and Hardware Dial: aautt %  Bay Strt. ^//////••/<^/>v/i^v/aW*v J v///fy//*v^ ntngled roof The I an en m. dininaj icloaed loriation Tte rvanl's room The property t one side a mom., kltch. and double ga has a wide Ii small orchard closed Central roaidantutl area near town and school* "SILVEBTON Chejpslda. Commodious 3 flora., stone houso %  landing in ..ppr<.lt before maklnc your Seleetlon Flsewhrrp. Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd. THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS) No M swan street rhone tIM. *• or S5S4 roadwav and adjoining property. There Is a covered entrance porch for rar. wide airy verandahs, large lounge with a central tlg|rwav making an attiaclive feature, dining room, four good bedrooou. kitchen, butler's pantry, alorsrooim and usual oRlcao. Out-ide there Is a large garage, servants' | quartan., etc. An extremely miarestinaand deairabi* property Produclive Sugar Eatate with good house up to K 90.040 "HILL CBEST". BaUshafea gubsuntlally built modern sbMi. btin•"JTT *i llw brow of ** ""> which uflord* Una views of this Wild and rocky comllfne There are 3 guod bedrooma. living room 3-lded gallery, kitchen, sarvanfa quarterand garage Electricity and walar are laid on The kind is over S acres and User* are %  '.ice. An ID tarestlng proposinnn st the hw figure asked Hi ILOINcl LAND available hi Navv Gardena. Manwetls. OI.UIH. P"""2d. Rockla*. 81 James, (hii.t Chimh and other parts of iho Island "STBATHHOBE". Culloden Road. K %  "• r Lea*e ~ Handsome 3-.li.rey .Ion. property with ulnngle r-l and pine floors. Contains t reception, dining room. 3 bedroom.. 3 baths and toiletExbrnalvary lemodalled rocently recently Grounds of about ISaoo sq fl Pleasant town house milt. able a. Doctor". residence or "WINDY WILLOWS". St lame. Delightful bungalow house with open verandah commanding maa i.iflc.it view of .ea and stretches or beach Large lounge. 3 bedrooms, verandah., kitchen, pantry and aervanU' rooms Storerooms In baseman! Offers considered %  TMH(1VU1A fine Imposing ID !" with double entrance driveway is available with appro. 4 ..-. well laid out with lawn., tennis court, ornamental i.rdens • hmbberles. large paddeb. all enclosed by sail and faKe Th* house cnnia.nvery targe dining ru..m. gallav.e. ihree double be.lriH.iiia, Imposmg hall. all ii-ual office., garage, and outbuilding* THORPES'. St Jame. Thi. massive property, typical of a bv%  one age. i. the Ideal hum. for •i-meone who want. -pacum. rooms and quiet atirroundingThe Bt Jaiif. coa-t which offar. B.-id bathing I. only t mile away and distance from Bridgetown Is .8 mile* Oflcrs Invited n v VTI l i i B 0 C s g," Bt ThoinaArwactive 3.*torey ewunlry housa with appro. 6 required There are 3 bed.ooms acre, plus additional 3'a acres If I lounges, dlntng room. 3 encloaad galleries. I hati.r. kllchan. pantry, aarvanta' room.. 3 garages and various out buildings Thla t :i e of the Bl j.rrws rna.inne "ORE* BOISE". Speight-town. large l-.torev house 1st good business **Uon Suilabel tor BaaT g-idpii.vi.Hm .lore, ate Informal Ion on apphcalion WANTED SI CAR IM lit wnn pleasant (•-•idence up to CSOflgB or thereabout* for overseas bMjer We .hall b* pleased to give de tails of many other propeeile. for -le in Barbados, al... in JaQUica. Bermuda and the BaJiamai KEAJ ESTATE AGENTS \t llTONEERS Ud SCRYEYORS PLANTATIONS BTJILDING Phone 4fl



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l-u.i SIXTEEN -.1 \nu IDVOI III M \|>\\ JULIf I i >"i %  i en a \nolhor Tornado Series lST v .' <* ,C KE1 <>l M'li.s: \amoosr \\ ins The Jester II \\ ins Again i ii\ (ur faehttei Correspondent) %  %  fenl • %  %  %  ; i %  i %  i from th* M Turf c .1. ; %  %  [| wflbn he Btakn for • %  rod courses %  %  ma I.H..I, the %  nd They I '" e.,l...t.tJ BaUtl Tmtr I |1 11 fan MM* II 1 u n u ; %  V..M !" .I WW v nil: I 1.1 -I'MV -TVhlThe ntiul tau M VamOO %  bad ill ihr time. I Kill il .ru-'l .iftci hui o i. i sin want on u AMI the race, BnJabbuj more than head of Zephyr which was second. EMnl. third, WM •bout 12 %  eooona behind I ICia other two boats were far IH-%  fourth, by many minutes. Broaknihed last after beinc • bg Bwanaea In the I u round. The Regati %  hold %  week-end. i 11 i i %  i •n > lull ( ili/ens ... .... i. ii and Ladj \ • nd •!•< %  %  iho u i foundal hfuniclpaUts i % %  %  .. II %  %  ... il He alao arnmenl DepartmenU and bout I vorkol the S.P.G lethodiit and 1 [on in the let %  i v. : . Before BUhop Howi Ira ii.bleaiiiui and the bu Idli I u Iture in TYinld Intn thn*ui;i. terday ''need with a rev • cs His I .4seoine on their G. 1 in the lut> devolvii ml ai the iu i> %  . %  ost appropriate %  i .... %  . %  Rectory . T. li. KI:U;I i.i.i. 10 I KOim.K STHIKI I r [...I. -II MM •• 7#e*ref#a" *#•** .\'ir*#e# RED HAND PAINTS I'ROVIDl Ktl.IVHI.l PROTECTION POI Ml RIORS AND mGet-CUMfl DwCORATfOM Hit INTERIORS i : B II AMI II MUD OLOSI Tulip Oraan f Q un >" vviii>. I;I i ii AMI iRorn \i. mo i, Keuin* tu nMtanaaa. U n HAND si'Kni. PAJNTfl hut i Mciinr.ind inlrtmrs. ffcrer, Hark <;rc%. IVdos I.icht \ Hail %  aana Onk Hnmp UDHANDrVJI \MM I.KI l\ With <.re> iiadittaallai ll' |I\MI MATINTO U.AT OIL I'AINI i --r tnttraan, Craaam, white Otean. Cll) HAND CONOBTI I MMM PADflS. Oral Mid Ore an, MtM Red. 5 WILKINSON i, IIAYNES CO., LTD. Tela Marina Stampeta Spun In an ;; %  i %  patterns pe> yaid %\M Cavfl Mii!11benl iS. CII.. I.hi. 10, Il 12 & 13 BROAD STREET WiMill I I l\M Rl H i %  • i %  I Ml.-U |i-.hi.. li rt,-.i %  %  M*B> i' J if ( r*uaiii v Mr. W R. II I MAKE SURE THAT YOUR NEXT SUIT BEARS THIS LABEL OF DISTINCTION MR' o.v insi'i.xv #.v inn % siionnooM 3 H.P: ROB BOM his return \ %  itch III the iiiship at : i clink I u have muscles put into The Weather TO-DAY sun lil>rs : 5.*i a.m. --(in atrtat b.tj p.m. Muun iNrwi: Jul> I l.illilmi: T.M p.m. Until W.ilel I 111! J III I MIKIIW i: i oot icediiailaa) Nil TwUl tr Munlh lu Ve*terd.i> 1.1, in-. Temp r-lur,. iMIi'i; 1%Jt I Wind lirrli..n (I %  in i I 4 11 am.) E.N.i: Wind Velocity: 13 BUaM pel hour Itaromrler: (0 s.m.l Z9.VM (11 a.m.) i.951 I MI. Maximum % %  nl I ton Trailer's Maximum Load 1 Ion (•mtollne (onnuinptlon I pU. per hour illi full load M iMiioiin in ii i m.p.h. PRICES Truck S965S0 Trailer 5183.60 P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co.. Ltd. [1 CHELSEA GARAGE <", L*d. ;:$ Pinfold Street' Phone 4264. o I'M <><, I -I IKI %  Id. >. llll.Mil a Run %  3 M ni Part 111 M A i • *i 1111 Kre.-i aiMfl II iwioniinoiiK ^i d> • I T*. .'. n i i %  I RoHnwrv
d. S2r. ill. S4.SS si.:i2 I DOES—NM Sliipinml MODEL STORK $2.78 SI.28 yd. 77c. yd. S4.4H .. S1.28 .. 6c. 'yd. Noted for the Beat Prices in Town MODEL STORE Crn. Broad ti Tudor St They'll Do lc i.scry lime XW WRL0S BREAIBST MA&OAH, BLS*O MAfloo—see HD.V MSATUV riS aWS HIS ASSISTANT N TWO— By Jimmy Hatlo -.'-'.'.%'.'.-.'.-*',',','.',-.'.-.-,*.'.-.'.-.• •: B^T AHYTHlMa SiPLE UKt SL i US THE 6KAO •• %  + MAY LOSE A FlNCeR AS WEi-L AS HIS HEA3 — SPORT SHIRTS BY CONSULATE! WAR! WAR! WAR! s • \ KI.I.I vn.Kss WAK is HI.INC. DECLARED ON PKIC OK sioo.iHlii.mi MERCHANDISE JV (um.' and Join in il by purchavini; what yon can In.in I Inloll.millUn . WITHIN OM W II It KOK LADIES MARIIMi MONUAI 2nd JIL1 WITH LONG SLEEVES AT C.B. RICE & CO. BOLTON LANE. COTTON 11 Ji Me, PLOWEBED CEEPE Me. CBBMOUNI BATS SI.98 Laval* N'cw np^ixii Bl LTS Cftl TONES Btseh .i lioiti I Milts* BBOCri s:i..">ll per pair K2c. 78c BOCKS I! (liiirs f< r M (HI IIMBRU JKRsp.V NlLK 49c. Plain and Bmped SI 2ll up HANDKEBCHIEI I 1 for ELM COTTOM PRINTS 42r. LINENS 75c. CHECK TAFF.TAS SI.2" DOMESTIC Me. SVT1N Tftc. BEOOADES T.'M PLnuTTIC i \l ETTAS From 39c. I MBKI i 1 \>1 :>o ROMAINI C RUM ^1 "I ( RI;IM:-I>E-CIIINI H.1S |>cr vd. up OBNTS* VEBTV 2 for Si.20 (ilNGHAM Me. Silver A Gold (.1 OBGI I IT: and CREPE for Wrddine* S2 Id up SHARKSKIN ILM up t \i ICO BIIHU h SI.29 up Bll> SHIMs Midi 4 la I : ; ouble CURTAIN LACI Pram He. PLAIN SPINS MM Leveli nun STREAM with Fnna* H.OW1 RED SIM N Etc. AX;LAISE S3.B0 up Onl> si.')." p,r pair N.&—NEXT WEEK THERE WUXBI IRON SOMAN1 OTHER LINES If TH.WI BROS. Pi \k'm Henry Si. & No. 6 Swan Si. J



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I'vei i K.HI SI SI. W U.SIM VII SUNDAY, M-'l-V 1. !M1 BARBADOS i£j ADV'tMMTE (. 7 T— -1 ennua b* tn Ad'ra i Ult, *• %  %  Sunday. July 1. 1951 Ol || III All IT IS unbelievable, jwl il is Mid to bo true thai durii :iuiht a boat ird prated Barbados • unJoaeVrl because of a technical hitch between %  hip-workeri and ship auThe general public mi. i told (until thev realbM the truth) the ; in the md, i' would appear loo, i"i I | ol fOOdatulh la tinisland. The reasons show cumulatively the community is largely to hlame. Imagine a community as small as Barbados allowing an incident of this nature to go unprotested. At a time when there is a I ol food which is but the prelude of a greater shortage, a ship is allowed to leave Barbados carrying with it a portion of food intended to relieve that shortage. Not only does this action accentuate an existing food shortage but the meat when it finally arrives will have to be sold at a price which will compensate for its additional urney by sea. This is but the quintessence of madn< Yet it reflects a state of things too often ignored and overlooked. It may be a source IttttfaotiOD to those who off-load ships that they are paid high wages and that they have it in their power seriously to affect the cost of living in Barbados This may be a solace to ship-workers. I Solace to U-ILVO them from the drudgery and hardships of their task. But it cannot be caned public-spirited. Sir Douglas Ritchie an impartial obM'I wr wrote in his Deep Water Harbour report about the efficiency of labour among water front workers, in Barbados. He said "since the war years the general output of labour appears to have declined seriously". That was in 1949 and the recent action of ship-owners In refusing any longer to pay for export! until they arrive in Bridgetown warehouses is guarantee enough that their output has not improved but worsened since 1949. Figures quoted by Sir Douglas Ritchie in his report on the Deep Water Harbour in 1949 show that costs of ship discharge per ton varied as follows—Trinidad 9s. Id: British GtinUU 10s. 9d: and Barbados 18s. 9d. It is idle to blame widely others for increase; in the local cost of living and t" turn a blind eye to our own conirihutmns in that Increaae, Ought we not by the exercise of a healthy public opinion to prasi for economief which will result from itei eflleienoy of Jatour? should we i me world market conditions be string beans which sold earlier tins \var for 20 cents per lb. are obtainable now only It 40 .('tits per lb? Tomatoes did not jump suddenly from 24 cents par lb. to 40 cents per lb. baoaUM Of the Korean War nor because of any dollar shortage. Carrots have not doubled m price because of trade cycles nor trade tendencies. These deliberate Increases In the coal "i living are due to the fact that they have been ignored by the community. Enough people are willing to pay exorbitant prices and the price goes up, with its attendant evils. Gambling experts abound in the streets of Bridgetown pouncing upon the holder of a large pay packet. Money changes hands and the cost of living goes up for one who loses and the others who depend on him. Workan who have made all they want for the rest of the year on the sugar plantations are not anxious to work much more this year. Labour, writes the Director of Agriculture, is in short supply, and the 1951-52 planting programme is being retarded. Housewives accustomed to ring up for everything are too lazy to grow garden produce Servants who spend half a day hunting vegetables and fruit in alleys object to healthy recreation cultivating the garden. Pigs, goats, hens and livestock and poultry are getting less while people eat out of tins. But saturation point has been reached and unless these habits of sloth, indifference and a refusal to face unpleasant factH are thrown away and a new constructive effort made to face our problems, we are all of us. despite what the politicians say. going to be very much worse off than we are today. Even tinned food is getting short. be Bridgetown. Spcightstown and n Act of 1891. but this Act was : primarily at protecting the City from tin What is needed in Barbados is a simple. workable Town and Country Planning Act rould cause the naMl possible hardship We could do no better than to follow the Jan itioo on 'hisubject. I the Jamaican Town and Country Planning Act is t.. "provide Bog i, i developmenl In both rural and urbai %  < uinv the co-ordtnaroadi and public services, ensuring condition* of health and sanitation, CU of architectural, historical, archaeological and artistic interest and tor beauty..." M> 11 the Art is the simple prir.ci!..r development. The island Iva p incipeJ zones—indus-^ try, commerce, residential, agriculture and Bcee. This does not mean that if the Planning Board ordered that a certain area should be a residential zone, and there ad i" be aJaciory in that area, the [actory would have to close down, but what it dins mean is that the owner of the factory would not be given permission to extend it. and il ever it ceased operations he could not redevelop the site by building .•mother factory. In the same way, with regard to the widening of a street a line is established and il an existing building is demolished the new building cannot be built beyond that line. Exactly the same principle applies to recreational open spaces. If, for instance. an enlightened Government decided to extend the Esplanade as Ur as the Swing Bridge the process would be gradual. As soon as a house was put up for sale the Government would buy it and demolish it and eventually the windows would join together to give Bridgetown a lovely view of the harbour. Such a scheme is bound to cause a certain amount of hardship, but everything is done to try to prevent this. In the Jamaican Act. for instance, it is provided that in anv case where the Board have prepared a scheme, before it becomes law it is open to public inspection and any persons interaated may mtka objections. The Board then considers the objections and may end the %  Cheme if they think it necessary. This is Election year, and any Party that intends to work for the good of BarbadOl must have a Town and Country Planning Act on its programme. Planned development is aaaentlal to this island and it u is liegleoted the results will be disas-. t n.us TOfl'X \.\< rXTHY TODAY, with new buildings springing up all over the island and the possibility Of new industries being established In the near future, the need for a Town and Country Planning Act has become imperative. If building i-s not controlled now, the charm of Bridgetown and the beauty of the country will be ruined within a few years. Barbados must plan not only for lu'is.lf. but for tourists: no tourist is going u> DOOM to %  country littered With lrirv-built houses and where industries thrive In residential I At the moment there is no regulation to prevent an industrialist from star Ding factory, with its accompanying in I residential or hotel area .. trol over building in this island II CLOSED Let's hope. Sden. those godless Socialists aren't desecrating this week-end spesc'iM. . ." Sabtxzth Day u-i.'/i Luaduti Esprws Ssevtcs "Clubland* And Hob IIO|MClubs for boys—and girls— L .UIKIIIK quite a prominent plutu nowadays in Social Welfare plan.* tnd activities. And very worthiU so. For they are centre* where the young (oik can get together In healthy conditions, under suitable superintendence, and give ploy to their natural social Instincts and abounding energies. They lso possess a high ethical value from both the negative and positHv Rev. F. CiODHON operations. This may be sur prising to superficial observer! (much more thi.ii a club) founded ,, u t it was. and is. most gratify nearly SO year* ago, In a very 1ng to discover how the young small way. b> a young Methodist foIk rtS pondcd In due time to th Minutci %  miwl James Butter„nious call, to the gracioui worth. But by the time of the hcroic ,, erson of the Lo rd Christ wnrTLVS ~,h d hSSg *" d H !" ral K,ng h,p A "" single instilutin of the kind probably, in the whole world with a memb'iship of around ive viewpoints: for they rescue the 5o\>. and is still growing. .. .-j„ njir !" n J ,„,i activities boys and g.rls from idling in danWhile serving in the Lancashire ! jff ""'hltoua an, | un method of handling Public Affal: at the Southern End of the Bay i-thiical. not to say immoral and But Mr. Butterworth's handbook. Street Esplanade, was a prompt lawless, and. abounding in young "Clubland" — a volume packed uccess and it has been quickly followed by others in St. Michael, .ixt in Speightstown and a couple if the country parishes, and Colonel Michelin extend the movement to every parish. He Is finding also that a special Welfare Officer is needed to run the scheme efficiently and provide for development: ^ he i 5aS=J co„ S U b ,;t„ Enj. !" !*. S.T.dM£ "TS. W S5lS; l Andean co^n .ni huj UI>IIII I lOV WIMBLEDON is the Mecca of Lawn Tannil |Uai as Lord's is the Mecca of Crickat, and Wlmbladon is even mure important than Lord'l for all the World plays Lawn Tannia. With the champlonahlp at Wimbledon in full awing it i^ itrange that the West Iti.iu-s. go prominant In tha wmo at crickat, are not represented. In the lone hiltory ol Wlmbladon we can only recall three In%  tancaa ol players from the Caribbean taking P" rl l ne championship, two of these players hailed from Jamaica and one from British Guiana — B. M. Clarke. Leahon and A. C. BelRrave. It is true that Madame Mathieu. at one time resident in St Lucia, came very near to winning the Ladies' Singles on more than one occasion, but she, after all, was representing France. What is the reason for the poor showing by West Indiana? We have the cUmnta .suitable and the ability to play ball game* Wa have shown that we can compete on equal terms with the crack cricketing countries. But our standard of Lawn Tenins is not as high as that of a small provincial town In England The absence of twilight restricts the hours 'f play in the West Indies. Lawn Tennla, unlike cricket, is not a game that can be played in the heat of the tropical midday sun. Play usually starts at 4.L10 p.m. and for the greater part of the year ends at fi p.m. In Northern climes devotees play the whole day long In summer when the light lasts until 9 p.m. or 9.30 p.m. And in the winter months they play on hard courts and on indoor wood courts. If the West Indies are to overcome the absence of twilight and the inability to play In the heat of the day than wa must resort to eveninii games on flood-lit courts. Tennis in the West Indies or at least in Barbados — suffers from another handicap ol their own making. Lawn Tennis in ii my ol the Caribbean territories is still looked upon as a social game. This Victorian idea has prevented many a youngster from gaining the opportunity lo take part In the game. And even some who might have made their mark have been excluded from improving their game because they arare Ineligible to play against other proinplayera in other lOCia] spheres. If the West Indian is to take Ins rightful place In tha Lawn Tennis World then no Um should be loat In sweeping away the stupid harriers which prevent the* finm competing on equal terms with the | the world Lei us rcmemhor that Lawn Tennis is %  game. tlon of Prefects Captains. So bfl Nuccee led in persuading other Officers, and give aWJ he "Fatners ar.'i Brethern" of the one the chance of positioi aference to give him a and honour in turn. Thus thi uitable appointment. This was boys and girls discipline ant in almost derelict large old leach c ich other and develop Chapel in the Wnlworth area, left, a strong public spirit. And the "has bv death and migrution, with only third was the Employmer life of the cockney type. with information, life storii %  and Here he set abOUt the very difwisdom gathered in runn rtcult task of n..king conuc'ts and enterprise must be read to fully a beginning lie used the few understand and appreoa'e the planning to d00ri 01)en thre.-.-h the little com*Ject • pany of church members and adheicnts still rei'iinning, also house to house vtahinf and general friend I mess, and before long he was -ible to make a start with Just Bob Hope At hist we come to this gcntlean'l part in the Story. He is an outstanding and immensely poputraining for the purpose Filling a < %  % % %  taking shape a^ he went forward The old Chapel possessed basement loonis-Sjndav School and most precious buildings Clubland It happened that the costly ana .inday School and rnosl precious Oui *,.mi nii. acrommoda. bombed and ruined during the In the effort that a few of us put ^'f\ 7^ !" £ used and m great blitz on Condon in 11MU. and out a t.me ago to devise ways and ..^^tt'^sTSwiew while at the end of the win the ss^srsLA'trJs, ^IF^^S-r i^jr&stesiiizz which seamed to be increaising natonUI, nicknamed -The Dug -nd^£ U^t. *J !" n. a J und i< cprtamly more than should 'ills „' i.„ii,.pi,„,h ^^I.I u %  complnconll, allowed, ,t wSUII It gre.' und Itrcw. .nd !> yer Mr. B"llroiii, w., i _>.d lh.. white ever, polt>l. alter .IX yc.r. of odvenlu.o.. UJA..0 B IjMBOT TWIT, Pf; eltorl .hoold be m.de ttMm Uhn. .uce-..i. .nd Mrua.le. .umably U ol •"•" Ihe lawbreaki Ihe m;„n plan new premMra beo.me a necemalty" "<, ld '^r^"?J £,tV Z< would be to work thruu.h ".he . Butterwoi .1. describe., the Hollywood. There, one da> win ,h,ld,en. 10 teach n,t M them Htu.Uon. And most fortunately a !" d -*? !"!" "'^''"'£ r %2 ... Ihe ideas and ways ot U-lween schnol days f,, r ihal sum was signed, and the Butterworth s story md said n. and the entry Into employment. vou nK parson's heart was imwould like lo give a "benefit pervaq ncumciently provid,e l,m „„i girls in Ihe Walworlh to be central and fundamental lo gre-.ter achievements In the Club"on. the whole organisation and .Is land iiiipn.vcnirnts ill law and souM be achieved. But "Clubl.inrl"! What Is this? SI'I'I loll South-East I.oml.in. 1 that Is yet to be. Sitting On The Fence M R ERNKST DAV1F.S. Dtitish delegate to the Four Power eoafarenee ol Dcput> Porelan MiMi'Kis w Inch has beui arguing with Comrade Grocnjko lor longer Uian 1 can ivmemUr, is reported as saying: "We don't want a breakdown, but we can't sit here Indefinitely %  ""' K cr 5We .ire all almost mental already." If he would rather see the Russian delegate go mad first, he should take the advice of Ids slxvear-old daughter. Sally, who recently wrote to him: Dear Dadd|/. I hope voti ore liaelnu a pO"il time In I'arlt. 1/ pou con coi'ie t, l>rlng >ne Mr. Gromi/ka. After an hour of cross-questioning by a six-year-old. Comrade G would be ready for the %  trail j.H'Kl'l Are there millions and millions of little girls in Russia Mim.injt and .illion.<. itnw many arfllionsT H'cN. i dfin't knew cxartli.. M 1 dedd. sayi you know il the ancwara, Shall uy *a\i 20.000.000': w ..' in '' %  • it Oh. fhry all have d.?rrvtf names. Twenty inillion dlfforent Christian names" Well. HO. Some have the H'"c name*, Manu ihomands. for instance, are called OUja. How many thousands? / tcnuld jay aoonf 100.000. Do*it you know exactly? / liui'i'ii'l Ihe /iifurri icilo MM Are little Rimsian girls dark or fair' Some are dark, some (air. How in.m %  ..itf.i.i ' I .'lii-IS. %  I And ten nlllkMH dark" Ves. rttt. mousy %  t must be 000 little Rus. yet. By NATHAMEIOt'BBINS Do the mom, ones have blue eyes or brown eyes? .Some blif. .-omc brmrn. How many brown? J don't krifiu Have they all got mummies to look ailer them? Most of then*. And daddies'.' Thru have otM dadd|, irho looks after Diem all. Only one daduy.' Who's that? The Great Father Stalin. Fancy being the father of more then 20.000,000 little girls. POOD NEWR J UST the time of year for cold salmon and cucumber, dear, isn'l it? Of course, dear, Bui trha can afford real salmon u-i.h fhe present rate of taxation on unearned incomes? Have you ever tried mock salman, dear? Vo. dear. I read all about u in the paper* You empty your lin of salmon into a basin. Grade B is quite cheap, dear Ye*, dear Tin II you boil some potatoes, mash them with half a cup of milk, a dab of margarine, and the olk of one egg. Ye, dear. Then you take half a stale brown loaf, pull (Hit the inside. ciuinMe II ,:.r till it's soggy. Met dear Add the potato mash and the wet breadcrumbs to the salmon, and squeerc il all together In your Bngan Sffneecf it. d'ttr? Yes. dear Then you shape it into the form of g fish, add another dali of margarine, pop it Uito the %  BOld Sounds delicious, dear. The paper says if you stick In a caper where the aye should be hubby will never know thi differ%  hVd.l|<, d.-o'' %  if workers, in American factories are reported laxy and dU not to the company 'a clinic for a vitamin deficiency check-up and questioned about their childhood by a psychiatrid.'" WORKER HITS OUT H AD a bit of trouble, eh Schultzburger?" "Yroh. I oners 10. doc." "What happened?" "Oh, / just busted ihe fore, man on the nose, dor." "That all?" "That's all. doe.' %  Why did you slug the fore BUUI, Schultzburger?" '•Why? Becautr he's Ihe loir el. meanest, dirtiest mn o O.K.. O.K. Schultzburger. b your poppa still alive?" "CrrtoJnlv H 'Fond of him, Schultzburger' 1 "Sure / am. He's the grandest poppa a t7uu erer had." "Did he ever beat you up wher you were a kid, Schultzburger?' "Yeah. Plenny." "Any hard feelings?" -For beating me up? Why no. doe. A taint would hatv beaten me up u'hen f vat c Md." "Didn't you slug the forem.ir because yo! and MTg if comes" "I'm sorr%' vou did that Schultzburger 1 shall have t> report you as anti-social through vitamin inlaki and recommend smaller port —L.E S. FOR REPAIRS Advocate Stationery Galvanized Wove Wire 4" MESH X 18" W.G. x 2 (eel 2" .. X 14.. X 2 „ 2" ., X 14' ,. X 3 „ Galvanized Soft lashing Wire 12 to 20 GAUGE Galvanized Mesh Wire FOR FISH POTS 1" MESH from 18" lo 72" Wide 1V4" ., „ 18" ., 72" „ WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD. Successor! to C. S. PITCHER &. CO. Phones : 4472 & 4687 BECKW1TU STORES ENJOY A DOMINICA CIGAR miSH STOCK AIIIIIVl LONDRES BOXES ol 25 *5.12 CORONAS BOXES of 25 M-31 SENORITAS PKGS. of 25 tt-00 Manufurlured by . JAS. GARAWAV & CO. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. Dial WHEN SELECTING YOUR . TENNIS RACQUETS MOI THAT YOU GET THEM STRUNG WITH THE BEST GUT AT YOUR .... REQUIRED TENSION .Vow in Slock . CUT by W. R. TRACY which is the Seal of Durability, Quality and Power. Also BASKET BALLS and Other SPORTS GOODS for your Selection DA COSTA hCO.. LTD. DRY GOODS DEPT. //,v//.w.V/V///////^///y.v/^///*v,v//j By the Way ... JULY Y 3rlhi Begins VAC A TIOIV WELL WELL I I Over lo Bathshebc or some other lovely seaside retort . Simply lo RELAX on the silvery aande. PATHE In the briny and SIP now and again a Straight GOLD BRAID with a little chipped Ice. Ol course it's not a real vacation without GODDARD'S GOLD BRAID RUM Serrcti in n Lavish Way.



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1 M.U II LI I. 1*51 M SIlAi UHI.I Wi I \,.i SIM II> l.\.\ 4. AII: THE MENTAL HOSPITAL Pictures by CYPRIAN LaTOUCHE Lay "SILVER STAR" CONGOLEUM. as a FLOOR COVERING For LASTING BEAUTY The row* tuppl) the kllehrn* with ZCO pint* uf milk A da>. EVERY DAY six hundred pounds of sweet poLitoes nd six hundred pound* of rice *re cooked in the kitchens uf the Mental Hospital. Besides this the 703 patients and 140 stuff Ret fruh meat, salt fish, pickled pork ..id milk and vegetable? from the Hospital's model farm. One of the finest In the Caribbean area, the Mental Hospital is built on mi ideal slta at Blacf. Rock. Its 33 acres extend from the road right down to the sen. and on Sunria>s the patients bathe from the Hospital's private beach. The grounds are wall kept and planted with trees ami flowering shrubs, the patients doing most of the gardening. Since his appointment as Medical Superintendent Dr. Lloyd Still has had many. unatcasaaff) Iran raOlnga pulled down, and the Mental HoepMgfl now looks more like a park than, a priscn. Mudol Farm On the model firm :.;tached to the hospital 83 pigs Wd 35 cattle me kept. The pigs are fed ui swill from the kitchen, and ll is hoped to increase the number Bo that in time at least one large pig CAB be killed every week. The cows nre fed on elephant grass grown on the farm, and supply the kitchens with 20u pints of milk a diy. The Hospital now uses 400 pints of milk a day. and n is planned to Increase the herd so as to make the Institution self-sufficient. There is also a small kitchen garden which supplies *ho kitchens with lettuce and other vegetables. If overhead irrigation were installed the model farm would probibly be able to supply all the greens that the Hospital required. The llrst building at the Munt.il Hospital was erected in ISbH. Before that mental patietiK sreri housed in a forbidding build.lie tpposito CilCTidairy I'n won in :i"i dormJI i %  eupitional therapy sin each for the UM i female pal :'A*% MgcSiargod The number of patient! • %  ItM rlogpll il smee 1939. when thi re WOM %  *'.' patients. In th. 1 IBM f" It has been possible I j methods of treatment (0 keep the number of patients stal around 7UU About 30'; M |A newly admitted paticits have beer Llov.l Still is toying with UM idea <.f starting a steel band fur ihen amusement %IH I.IIIISI in ll„ limH III I WEATHERHKADS j ;t Have just received K Four Famou* li MEDICINES | %  i Pham i y rnv rlj H • in' I'.u I %  oil Even A Was Held Ik Guards #*^*&gm PARIS of secunt> al hi I' General Eisenhower. Atlantic ters. Pact Commandcr-in •Chief, has A former W..ii ordered an Immediate tightening artist has designed a m of "Keep Your Mouth i>osiers, which are being ed at hattdo.ua rle New identity cards bearing •' l-rge-slze photograph have Beau ordered. Even Bishop Fulton Sheen narrowly esca|)Tii Interrogation when ha looked In this week to visit General Hsenho-wer, Ha ami rescued by Colonel Connolly, chief security officer, who arai passing by while the m ated American prelate, in his episcopal dress, was being challenged by the guard*. UOJHT MWIICM Hone sentr . One ol the SHAPE Kr-p Your Uoulh Shut poife'i in Pa'U. '.' OAROEN PI AS pel tin iMAWK.KO.s 8WEE1 kSSI BI8CI N I CRAWPORrrs CUSTARD CREAM BISCUITS !• %  rs. par '-.i" I A FORDS t REAM CKJ I MM KEN ARMOURS VEAL II \M PASTE pa Mr 2.SM.A.MI s II.


PAGE 1

PAGE BIX U MlW ADVOCATE si SIIW JULY I, 19.*.l SHAKESPEARE drew this portrait of himself EXPERT rf riy uisi IJIMJ*) {rduinl J.W K-oiuti jpiun> 3ppsn III cup UJ3FOS Ufiutlt] riunJip I3IOW ui S3U jniJJ \ luonrj [>jipuia ?!? %  * 1BSQ Mr. Lewis Has Been Busy Making Enemies I AKIl. B> Wt.tdh.im l.rwiv kBd be brutal Ihe > nllm-tion of enemies. Now to oe partial to despots, to lack lus novel Tarr—the last cxplo-inilh of feelinjr lor the pom *ion of the 1014 war—la re-lsaued. and lowly. If It Is 110 lunger dwiamlte, it la He declared that he preferred Mill dynamic. Faaciam to Communism, had a first sign that there was tomepat on the back for tauaaonni. thina; odd about Lewis (born fi7 wrote one book in favour of Riv years ago in Maine) occurred ler U93I) and another against when a school mate at Rugby nun (1M). When tne Lei. befound him painting the head came warlike Lewis was against of a large dog and cried out in •• war "to make the world sale horror. "You frightful artist'! for Communism." His house-master took approSimultaneously, then, he was Uon; Lewla was packed boyvoited by a aect of the Intel* orl to the Sladc School, where ligentaia and had his portrait t>r ha caught an inspiring gUmpae T. S. tin* rejected by the Royai of the huge gold earrings of AllAcademy, .1 singular double iri Kuslu* John, at the dawn of artist and patriarch. John did something more inspiring; he bought one of Lewis's first picture*. Ih (ir.OlK.r THOMSON 1 MIIS 1...i dr.mii upiidr doon Ihr martin or a l* H Ihr hrjd of Witli.n.i sii ihi pin hfurd I 'PMl 11.niJ i.ill'ilurs a(i :it >t tin four hit. m.. ripttea HI .--MI.: Ilkr Ihr k > %  % % %  %  i,. II-II. l -.hjkr-.prjrH hand Th. ginhi. rr.irtinr. : /' 11 artd (0 ehutt a ptest. mule Kith wunti, lAan IM fo rPii' I KoH.iwed Paris, ag philosophy 1 %  nd Munich, Mlulled painting in by The \iiii "t I'm ami .ir \-iiinf.i has -nit akt-lrh In riprrll 4 ltd t" i-|. -.1 Mhrarr. %  asm 1 Cricket Ambassador Tin -'in. of Tair, a n Ing with English and tea and their love dtTaiii in Paris, can be looked on Bl IMirily a self-portrait of this period: dark skin and a steady, THE name Plum' Warner lege will always ha %  matter for u 1 !" 7 ,,tt l b i e J* 9 ^** 1 5 u' %  ttmulalea vuai is of the Mecca of speculation, but, .it the ...:. of 25 !" E? w } lt L ,' h -:\ u '' x Cricket and brings to mind his13H. he I111 hi v., 1 !" %  I" and straight thick lone cricket matches in eve,, entered Ru School 1 Rl I '""'"hHI* hands were square S art of the world wher* tha Union that has never been particular!) ; '"" "" ll h r • %  %  ck waves in the hreeie. Thiit noted -1* i. ciiiket HUIMH Hn !" 1| "P'"' *<'rtr;it of T. S. Eliot. ie found that he hod to move closer la wi hi. sitter. Now he faces lotul blindness. It >s diaaatcr whluh he acI humour Cit would solve a great many probbUnd") and no •aU-ptty; 'Puahad into an unlightad door hangei! cl for ever. I shall then have to I.gin .1 ];.: %  '.]> of aggnMta fol1 i% mind to banp a bay '" the night." his obstreperous youth pi 1.tied the couragi in1 %  at one time might hav bnan mJatafcan for panncha, H II hai nil dictaphone. Hut. BbUl you cannot pjisnl i>\ nntaphone. I.OUK YOrNRER. LIVE LONCi IK. B> Gayrlord llaiurr. Faber and Falter. 17s. Gd. 320 parv Who, asks Dr. (of natural ••in,) rXauaor, has baar aging your bodv*' You have All right. Do the Body Slant (15 minutes a day with yom : higher than your head). Do the lift. Rathe your feel in hot water, 111 cold w.iti ->. air, in something. Take some spinach lu %  to Oretn Oarbo, Hava wma rhubarb and black treai!. (Iiv mel to Mrs. Squeers. Have a good neutral (not al. 1 In I SI T %  1 Itlon naturally ( „pn ,.i in. Ill I -llll'. II 1'...,11. ..1 here LaWfal miei Berg%  rhara studio run Turk. He returned to L*n arrogant young man in an outsize sombre. Latin eMhaa made for him by a horrified BrOOk Street tailor. el daalThe FINEST M/nesr/c* war uses hniuiW*. ih prf*ci st-ao*aoai cl*t u. b*iu*hins body oa*un. • %  "! jMK-uUrlv ipvisoraling Mi th balh *Un -vmia SrrubM An.munu tnManUy II Havaa intwi bi\r* und *iins and trt* "* %  .ctor out u. nrtd lt*i IrdjivMubl* lot -n hol' labrin. %  -m agC nMOl ClOU"'' k ii"ioBi B SCRUBBS ClOUDV AMMONIAuS%J 1 *'J B. ARMSTRONG LTD. Bridgetown. Harbailm. n.W.l. 9olg aoeafl /or Oarbadoi. Leeward and Vt'lnduiird fa Write Direct w Airmail lor Fatherly Advke Free THE STEPPING STONES TO SUCCESS Don't hesitate about your future '. Go forward, confident that The Bennett Cotlete will see you through to a sound position in any career you choose. The Bennett College method* are individual. There's a friendly, personal touch that encourages quick progress and makes Tor early efficiency. THE BENNETT COLLEGE LTD. SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND ._.. Thiit int.. alone would popiiinriv the hfe erlcketlni careei %  tory of Sir Pellmm Warner and all the more so to West Indians though he hud Hi man Plan Wmnm by Laurence iharad by i< M bacomlni a and reaourcce of the concern.' MiyniU puh Ui had bj riu.. m, mambai bile soil ;< Bach in i>mdon. Lewis ma*ie Houi,l.'.'l dwell* on the early Behoolbu) At Oxford. I'lum' w., futururt furniture for Ihl Ule of %  Plum.' a Tnnidadian hy dogged by bad luck !ll-lie.iltn Wi.rkfhop: chairs that stuck IJ birth. School for young 'Plum' curtailed his nickel He |0t his the Ptata of purchasers' trouacit.. was van laraatj iynonymous Bio. but hla cricket Ucka that once picked up with increased opportunities f.n Oxrord codad on a flam ill not uput down again —playing cricket His lirsl intr'ihe wai twice run Dul In taa match nit; to the unvcononic iv" duction to the aama bad been la agalnat Cambridge in IHM. futuriat glue. a lan K verandah W the Attorney KirM playuu for Mi.h.l.-.x 1| was not vnuUKh 10 qu\& Generals (Ml fathei %  ; i home m whe, i„ m ifll .,-. the V.,,,!,. nil creative ardour, which. I ir'.ni.i.'t v.neie a Mack boy. his IOIIK and distinguished active )9M. issued in the famous enoi HummiriR liircl. w.as his coach and association with the county was to mou*. pink-paper heavv-tviKmenloi COOUnUC Until I MO I ,M :. he play" At Harrison ColleRe it WH ad hl| hot Innlngi in diplomatic to do anougfa work to crfckei To-daj keep out ol tin 111.111. lionk'. for he 1-. >tiii .i1 la ted with Lord*) appeal • %  In that Ul-fatad and the MCC f I %  > Mf high explosive" magazine lllaM %  I futurist manifesto cakulati ,ie .,(,., >|1V((k( n ^inrtie, affright, hi I hardly to enugfitan. Before its echoes' had died wear bright red. except In your %  Within 3U days you. too. 1 u have I t'jt stomach. So back 10 Body Slant. Maki rvn^ il... live longer, live I nider. live iipsn'c d IWn, World Copi/nph! Hrs.-rvrt L r The Champion of Foods I Muscle-making, Body-building, tops for real Food energy. r A it M Milk rates POWIftl id 1 MILK the champion of all whole milk powders Tlirro is more downright day-by-day enjoyment for you when you feel fit. Drink a quart of Farm Powdered Milk mixed to directions every day and it will give you real health and energy. You will like that rich, smooth flavour, too! because Farm comes straight from Holland's best dairies, the water is removed and the health giving properties with 2H'. butter fat. sent on to ynu in its whole powdered form. Cheapcit on the market 5 1b. Tint $4.32—1 lb. Tin $1.00 On sale at all leading Oucerirv. Provision Stores and Drug Stores. If you cannot ofctS\1 it phone 2229, Robert Thorn Md.—Agents. volume automatically tntl ,. ,, ,,„. ,.' ... %  [ %  %  Hill %  llaitflani-a in Ihn t ihvmT 'IMum' IV *-..< h. I V %  "" 1'" **< personal attendance whan l* ''i wri**-u'ini. a ith i baml o was diitresslugl bad palnruL spite the Ubrary' i'lum'. When he Ural toured, '.'.. f Ulll( i,. r „!• i to HiS5nfte £g> "'"'' l* 0 0 10 n 0 he laun. bed abro:i> and afCC it tha >iily iltti SENATORS AGAINST FORMAL. REPORT Cfi MacArthur Inquiry m lhat his having to Hrst lour In 1897 should be to the megazlno called The WAIIINt;nN. June .X. ;ii memban of lha sit* Inquiring Into • England captain When In 1903 he wa ked ""f J* ""he retorted. "If MacArtnur's case are against makmanaged to gun his First XI colcaptain an English side, 1 ';' !!"". n P rs ? n distasteful to ing any formal report. Committee p.iiuini in spinui naving to nrsi tour in leaf MIOUIU be to tne ,.",". ,, ,, „ ... ,. ..7 I. devote somr grudged hours to hu W. %  I ll.iwke J l,n A '""' d „ ,U nm lt l"-"teste in a match agalnat the ;,irri*on hud already be< i %  • XI helpeii to save the game for vai %  lh* tvoild UirluHliis •chOOl by -laying in for over Ing the VS.A Ul Mi>nell telU an hour foi T rum Even In Liter the ltrj of I'ltunV thliUIng Ufa, whan hi aeoutrad ijoriou I n bi hli scoring atrokea. It i i t %  rilh the Chamthetea of the draehery-yalli determination which ha had drat plon to i .-: the Idea <.f freedom; the shown .' Ham %  I •:!' % %  Itai ai Lord ill of the negro: lha klolal %  % %  '..i. i ire b> hv* runs while Uu "1 lha llttla man: "What wa wai i ; t valuable aaael \~< any team vaal crowd hel I l I breatl tyrannj "t tha *>iM Intel Whether 'i'lum would have lha dropping of a put would have IOCU.H -ljdIaortmlnat education whethei i<> call more wltneaaaa, rarotM IM at the uppe, and If •• formal rtporl should be ^' l 1 %  •'" %  pre-ented. Reuler. 5 reChairman Senator Kichard Rus .-and-!l (Democrat, Georgia) sold today ihe sentiment seems to be Taking hia own advice, Lewli strong thai ihe Committee has put '......' RJo.rnshury-. h-ft-.v the factl before the people Under the democratic process, the people can appt ipprove of vvh.tt has been done," he added. nlttee wtU ieei i" tan dayi time to daetdg •all had ba ninalnad at Harrison Colaatplbaton. for better listening Dctigncd and huile for service under the most exacting conditions, these splendidly styled Ekxo receivers arc noteworthy for vnsmvirv, clarity, power and complete reliability. They give you better listening because they arc constructed by Britain's finest radio technicians after careful srudv of your local reception conditions; and bcause they are qua!it>--engineered throughout. For really worthwhile, trouble-free radio, rat* '•* Ehio! for STYLE COMFORT QUALITY ...-.-pi-.r.. ,.' iMf . /„< .iinuiim ifrtim immdgram pithup Lergl MIHif(wfiii MliiaMiii'ii 'l .-shins: t'-lls and Woodwark are .10 easy to etaaal win. Just I table Miocnful or Fab to a pail o[ water and a sn.'t <-ioth — no rubbinK I. V AutcmobllM j.iftt a |ulck rlnee-oll with 1 teaspoonrul r: Fb la a pail of water and let it dry 7ab removes din wit' out rtarminx the finish' NrJas* and Unena v-cshed In Fab rtanew-looking ever ac Fab ixretra'es 10 remove even perspira1 longer baeauv nrid*' NO SOAKING! NO W.EACHING! NO RrNSING! Xj wuklii %  • work? Fab\ lao-^:ts dirt fjler and TIPIIM m %  caki^c unnecessary. laaer*Wa*ateai ArUan r thoro.—hly! Make* No bloirhlnc svn n.t thit leaves l>lr.rl-l:u-. 11 k' Fab %  IJIIIi ur wash pure Ben* i'lci r>l. %  hi: without Sa\es \ior: \o voapv %  aeaaat Fab l*n't a soap. rlni.iclothes and di-he<. um In wasbrr or diihpsn "•o you needi : -.peed Ume u'anS?* !" 1 W ,hin i<>b in either HARD OR SOFT WATER' is all USEr-AB-^ SAVE MONEY! S'-V *^.^*--.-^.^VOOOO^',^^',%'.V'*'.V.'X.Vv%^^V^^r,^VVVVVV--.^ you neeu ior e, &n thing you wash! 1








ESTABLISHED 1895



MORE TRADE WIT

Busta Emphatie:
Adams Confident

MONTREAL, June 30.
HERE will definitely be improvement in trade
between Canada and the British West Indies,
Hon. William Alexancer Bustamante, Minister of
Communications and Leader of the House of Rep-
resentatives, Jamaica, assured members of the
Canadian Exporters Association last nicht.
Bustamante was cne of a delegation of eight from
the British West Indies and British Guiana hon
oured at a receytion and dinner tendered by the
Association.

Delegation has just
Trade Talks in Ottawa \

concluded
hich \






































lgwed discussions in London. ‘Che wre
delegation’s purpose in Lon \; I ii A . Ps
Mr. Miisteruante pany v : ug 1 i riny
a release of dollars for pu x ~
on the Canadian mm: H ( k = j
termed the talks a succe 50 orw arc |
not reveal the amount of mone |
to be released—he hinted tho 3 TOKYO, June 30,
would be quite a few million An Eighth Army Communique
Less Optimistic Friday evening said light conta:t |
Other members of the deleso- r reported along the Korean}
tion were less optimistic thon h Army patrols co =|
Bustamante. Hon. A, Go ggressive probing in
Minister of vite Ind = ry Patrols north and|
Commerce for Trinidad, rf Mans ncountered |
“We desire the re-estahl] zht ‘dente “ aurin yi oes 5 , ate |
of trade re‘ations Canad age se pee, «|
but it is not easy to contend wit! ~ rol Ae ; a ea we i ot ¥onche 4
the difficulties with which ae rent ee adic mortar |
faced: wexhave benefited « artiller tir ile ether _batrols |
erably from our talks in 1 in the north of onenon re- |
and Ottawa, and we will do « poled Hent Santack |
besf.” rit Nations patrols operat-|
G. H. Adams, Leader 0 ing in ereas north-northwest of
iSouse of Assembly, Bat 10. WoO? saged an u.adetermined |
said that he was confid number of Reds with an engage- |
restrictions would be 1 ment lasting three and a half hours}
Quinton J. Gwyn. President before fliendly patrols withdrew |
the Association, said that ceé
the substantial exports to the Atiack Repuised |
B.W.I. during the econd Worl |
War, and in the vears immeni An etimated Red company |
ly following, the impositior 'N® probed United Nations positions
United Kingdorn Governn ( in the area east northeast of
exchange and other restr 1} Kumiwa during the early morning |
exporters has meant . k The attack was repulsed. |
Canadian export trade ; he Artillery fire hit an estimated Red |

Islands has been limited i
and artificially restrained

batiali
chon with unknown results while |

on no-th-northwest of Hwa-



Import Quotas j patrols north of Hwachon en-|
s |
: aura) gaged a Red company.

It was reported from Ottawa) °°; : S i
on June 29, that import aaa Light contact was reported in
on Canadian goods may soon be} Sis aimee north of Yanggu as

riendly

relaxed in the British West Indies patrols engaged an un-
The eight-member West Indianj known number of Reds during the
Trade Mission said today that re-| ay. Light contact from platoon
laxation may develop out of the) company sized units were reported



\z he remainder of the
fact that the West Indies have ulong t

received more dollars from Br ritain | eastern front. —
for —U.P.

use in the dollar area, |
The Trade Mission asked re- \
porters at a Press Conference not
to seek further details, Members
of the delegation must report back



a

Siamese Army Take











































The










BARBADOS, J

t.W.T.



MISSION. In

THE BRITISH WEST INDIES TRADE DELEGATION stopped over briefly in Montresi on its way to

Hon.

W. A. Bustamante,
Canada Air Lines and Canadian National Steamships.

and Commerce, Trinidad;

Ww. J.
House

Jamaica; Hon.
Leader of the



Ras tz

of

Leader of the Jamaican House of Representatives the delegation wa nte ne

Seen here from le! *6 right Tio Aibs Gor

Captain J. Clarke, Canadian National Stoam sli) Hou. W Bustam s, Leat
Member of the Legislative and Exe cutive Council, Br h Gu 1
Assembly, Barbados; and G. R. McGregor, Pi ven TEESE OADM Canada Air Li

Missing Airliner

CHICAGO, June 30.

flight over the

airliner




















evel,

Planes Search For

A United Air Lines plane carry-
ing 44 passengers and a
five was missing on Saturday
mountains be-
tween Salt Lake City and Denver.
was a D.57 flying
from San Francisco

erew ol
on



iran Govl.
Con sec



Must Face
roneces If

British Are Harmed

















































to their Governments; an ¢ s to Chicago we PRAN Tne 2
announcement would then be} . with stops at Salt Lake City / TEHERAN, June 30
made. Delegates hinted that the} Rebel H Q Denver, Omaha and Chicago. Th Britain warned Iran Saturday it must face “consequence
relaxation—the first’ since last jy ee plane was three hours overdue at of any harm to British subjects in the disputed | field
January, will embrace a_ wide} WASHINGTON, June 30 Denver when a bre ss representa- The blunt note was delivered to Foreign Minister Bagher
range of Canadian products in- The Stz " a .,|tive Richard Fernauld reported i ei ; 1"... : Aes 5 Celt Nn a ci 1S
he State Department said aol ane : 4 Kazemi by British Ambassador Sir Francis 5S!
cluding ‘fish, wheat, textiles and | Siamese army forces on Saturday missing in an announcement at : It ade wiaik Ari
other goods. Sec hinad tive” Pyare ire nae Chicago. es ee ‘se t ion ol 31
Trinidad already has announced iaeGhe cates airing = Abid He said that the plane left Salt} | i a in : cateal ahr
.. | Siames s Z ‘ a 2 ver , ionaliz \
that it would create a free market | fight in which a number of stray |L@ke City at 1.45 am. and was HURRICANES ce a . en tg
for Canadian salt fish beginning) vijiery shells hit the United |@ue at Denver at 3.35 a.m. Mow- IS it true that Barbados ||” in Gor Genie M ss
January 1, next. t States Embassy at Bangkok. ever the plane was behind time!] has a hurricane every 50 fais ar ee Hn
B.W.I., import quotas created a 3 . and its pilot reported by radio at| years? Ate Wade far: a | p b ‘ i .
ticklish problem for Connaiin Sea Army and air force bombers had! 3.45 a.m. that he was over Silver j hurricane this year? Don't |; ye ~ Per
+ re r CO ¢ 7 " - e ‘ ; MS «
porters, since they ae a rapat| attacked a naval building | Crown, Wyoming. miss the first of an absorb- shai deo rn ion ih BARE
almost two years ABO. aria throughout the day at the same ‘ ing series of articles on ;
cases essential ewer ek a aa time demanding that rebels re- All radio operators of airpe art hurticanes .n Birbados | genct
ted to 50% of the 1946-4¢ BAO es lease the Premier. Rebels had}towers in the area were ordered which starts in temorrow’s |
on less essential goods quotas Were) -cized him and the Communica-|to listen for signals from the miss- “Evening Advocate.” | The Iranian
reduced to 30%. tions Minister at a ceremony in|ing airliner, and planes were put r \sponsible under n
Trade Balance which the United States was turn-| into operaition for the search. | law for the prot Bri
They were brought on by ing over to Thailand a barge to U.P. representative Riffard| ish subject n Pet
Britain's dollar shortage. However.) he used in deepening a river |Fernauld said at Chicago that the | | Broker Shoots Wife: they fail in this respect ti
with Britain’s er ee — channel. plane’s supply of gasoline would C. will be responsible for mn
steadily improving, and with the The Naval Headquarters build-|have been exhausted at 8 a. m. 1 | >» | quences.”
B.W.I. Colonies achieving a ing is about half a mile from the |—three hours after it was tas vommits Suicide The lengthy note reflected Brit
able trade balance, tain on : United States Embassy and on the|heard from.—vU.P. NEW YORK, June 30 ish impatience th i
have ara reroatient of dollar opposite side of the river.—U.P. Fifty-year-old insurance broke: | [t said bluntly : et ora
more liberal a } \ failing Pie are yittry : ternt At ' 1 th
\ g to reach a reconciliation | eapacity at Abagen I
for the western world trade Oe : ; Nik '
vith his wife shot her to -death{| means that the refiner )
cae eae me oo sat the Strike On St. Kitts | land critically wornded another vill have to clo (
name be not used saic he} Ty s iat 'on . a fi +}
< } | ma as ther dinec in a faghion-jthe existing ) e {
lies were more 1S | 4 ‘ “aa jman a y n } i
shane pe C: e vapaia than with any | A De al Of Harm Waterfront jeble restaurant on Friday night,} “efined product is full at
ree - ‘ “. the rar » and } , m- tide oil fror Iffelds wil
other country. The mission a 4 LONDON, June 30, (From o, a Correspondent) ips ae Han. Bae Sap en. oe 2 ey ‘ il Oe apt
statement issued at the vo f The Times said in an editorial KITTS,, June i ae" ‘dolde iv wir
said that it has been a nxi dh ~ to-day that a “deal of harm” was] A wate atuon strike was declared! The police said that John Wells . a Bera Y :
emphasize the great ay di being done to Colonial relations|by the Labour Union at 6 a.m.,'anqd his attractive 45-year-old crews x ;
attached in the West Indies and) by the problem of accommoda-|today. The efforts of the Labour wife Julia entered the restaurant} â„¢@ Abadan as, at
F ss *uiana to the mainte- |,; . itered the restaurant! duttne in it t
in British eo 1 de ie {tion and handling colonial peo-| Officer and others interested for’ at Madison Avenue accompanied a, nee } _ eo
ee ee e , Cota. improving | Pl¢ in Britain. over a week to dvert the, strike by J. W. Walsh, junior, 64-year- | quired’)
with ani t wnitual obeneltt The Times said the dispute now] were unsuccessful. lold friend of the family nina
oo . ae cd. rae going on between the British Work on the S.S. Alcoa Pennat) Jt was said that the meeting wa
20 rue mnil £ . he ts ‘agin i te . cure 7 ie Spee
a att aso appreciated in the Paoete a wee ne ee sa ee oz, re re a al’ arranged to try to bring about a
Adi é oxisting cir- | Gents in the unc Ss hostel at) stopped at 4 p.m., yesterday. reconciliation between Wells an Vas .
West, Indigs ee c 3 ees | Hang Crescent London called at-| Factory and sugar es were his wife ween “3 beet ae 4 Hungar ians
Sad bulk purch ases pres sent difi- | tention to the difficulties of sat-|not affected but the sugar storage po)\, 114 -that- Wells who- aia 4 “4 , “
a € ‘ atin , > I f at r appz ‘i
culties which require full ar id} AS ial, este : econ Colo- | capacity may fail by July 14 ently had been drinking heavily Ex-Communi ated
frank discussions to remove | nial students in Bri mee : when rea automatically stops. walked out, but returned whipped
(CP) “The immediate cause of this Approximately 10.000 tons of out a pisto) and fired five shots |
a LE E38 the need to move OUt!sugar are still to be harvested. “One shot struck Mr Wells
some of last year’s residents aa calieacatdiiticiainlaties Hing het Walsh. wan‘ simicke | cor
» jans "resc “entre i ‘ cu g als € r in|;
641 DESERTERS pine Han Crescent centre, at $714,381,000 For ‘the stomach He was reported in | ho :
= i ; aK order to make way for the flood sis * ja critical condition. Shortly aft ,and sentencit ae
BERLIN, June 30 of fresh men expected for the Military Construction eariy Walle wna SuGnA "4 A vai | otiseriment . of Py ;
Fifty-two East German People's coming academic year” the Times WASHINGTON, June 30. ais - aptiieini? CUP) ad In Ms | Jroes of
Police including two Commiss i eh The House of Representatives,’ y api it.—— ) The
deserted to West Berlin this week | is regarded with deep} Armed Services Committee today , | was cont
record for any week this oti suspicion by students and the story | authorised the army to start work; }deeree o
the West Berlin Police tomisnt) jis already being told indignantly } on $714,381,000 worth of military 2 e » vf I
stated and brought the total | and with embellishments by the]|construction in the United States ennaeed reg :
deserters for the first half of i West African press. It hag cut $275,309,000 from the TOC KHOL M, June 30 2 ¢
year up to 641.—Reuter. —Reuter. wriginal programme.—Reuter. Sovic 1tvia’s chief planner, 52- | a nee 2.
or ae a yeu rec Deglavs has beer | aaet oor vic® }
T U R K E Y = lismissed because the current lta overthrow "\ a
ie five-year plan i d schedule | ernawent
-ccording to information from Riga! Hungar
Diyarbekir bits OP § Reuter. ! U.P
ae
‘i i tol, wn | B.2 9's Usi
MEDITERRANEAN pl Sy nlA / bai - 1 ee, s roe
SEA “Se! Pip f Kirkuk TENERAN @- ~ r i
LEBANON : A a steel Nome, ; Persians [ >| WAatNCTON, 3 Ri
ain sets — ia BG | An ce kesm:
~ x 2 airt , JOT ‘
ISRAEL wa { I R A Qs oe a ot Noon § =| press Saturday fly ti t
suzz/ | AS HABBANITA@ tend E GLY ay Wlahag PERSIA Z B 29 Superfortresses are bon j
eS ele Gopi Git | Communist lines in Kor ;
\ La tie cana AgMashe-t >! deadl accuracy throu 000
i/o | British tases ia? i ppssemen v ; :
s a " nag Ff, Ratt Ket ANGLO. z, technique the
ess ‘ 5 & a AND ' he technique was develope ac t
NS £ BASRA® 5 Soy whois Sond iRAMIAH i World War II It alre ‘ il
—— - — OS KUWAIT “WY, has been 1eveiled that it is be Ur
ie x J that it is b
fc British Military 11.0 " — » 9 tehedsa sed in Korea, but the deta ne
ae \ 2-\ [bomber & fighter t bases} é ie DY, a tectiveness have be ptor
Hse Ve Tae UT ae Gy ys 5 led. Big 1
ih Oe \ rm b Af \ WG Ee
us | \ SAUD! ARABIA Miya nigk T
aaron ane erent nem f























Reds Give No iteply
To Gen. Ridgway’s
_ Peace Move Yet

LONDON, J une 30.
ALL EUROPE awaited tensely on Saturday the

outcome of the pro osal by the Unit ted Nations























Commander, General Matthew Ridgway, for an
armistice in Korea. British authorities said they
believed the Korean Communist Commander’s
reply might be made through Moscow.
They pointed out that the Moscow Radio had
reported armistice proposals in a Tass dispatch,
| including proposals that cease-fire talks should
take place aboard the Danish hospital ship “Jut
| landia’’ in Korean wators.
sea
| A broadcast from Peking moni
| - } .
|tored here mid-morning made nc| Sutlandia Is Ready
mention of irmistice proposals |
and it was believed that the Pe ln TE ‘ , '
| king Government would not asso oP | hie Conference
jciate itself with peace moves bk | :
leause of its insistence th > KOREA, June 30
Chinese fighting in Korea e? When the ceasefire negotiators
“volunteers” and not bellicerer et aboard the Danish hospital
forces ‘ hip Jutlandia, they will take theix
ces at the tables of the former
Research officials | ou.| *ansatlantic liner’s dining room
also that all North Ke n com according to the ships officers
muniques nd ter \t ; th is room for about 100 con
merged throust \ j ad rees in the dining room, Commo-
asts in the Russian langua we Kai Han nerich, commander
that the Red Korean Cx nander { @f the ship said on Saturday.
Kim UI Sung, last April announ For smaller meetings and in-
lho had taken command of Chinese | formal conversations the ship has
}“volunteer” armies a saloon He said “right now we
| | e awaiting specific orders before
| British ithoritie said ‘the | aking detailed plans, but we are
d the Red Korean repl 1 very happy to have the Jut-
uld be made throus Vio landia considered for this very
| the following reasons: Firstly ric mission
would give the Soviet Unitec If the Danish tiospital ship is
ions dplegate, Jacob Malik |‘heught fit fot the conference all
lit for’ having started peace | 2! Us aboard think it an excellent
Ottawa from London. Headed by moves. Secondly, it would enable !'%8 We are all working for
d at a luncheon given by Trans the Soviet Union to attach any aren't we?”
ie Minister of Labour,, Industry | strings to armistice conditions Che Jutlandia which returned
ier of House of Representatives, | ifom Japan just one week ago is
sbridge, Jamaica; G. H. Adams = | 3h. fully provisioned and has ample
(T.C.A, photo) Three Reasons upplies of pencils and paper met
PO er et ae oat i s : if whieh come from Denmark.
aeacs ee eae eis ae Hammoerich believes that the peace
‘Britain Seeks | conclude the Korean affair Fest. RacoHeteny, reearalies of BASene
vit has satin mation i " os tt will enjoy the comfort the 600
ach = can re-armament srogrammel on Sup olers—(U.E.)
DUNCHION | Winicn Enon yours tints ena ne
pace that of Weeden ge ed P
| pé ‘ rU.S.S.R, Sex
Ag yainst Ir: an ,endly, the Soviet Union cannot Red I apers
ge c yatord to permit the continued C (
wastage of Soviet equipment
By JOHN LAW | Thirdly, there are Pavenitake op domment Jn
THE HAGUE, June 30. | portunities at hand for increasing ¥ Pe
The three man Iranian delega-| pressure on the western Saeeie Cease-fire Offer
tion arrived here from Tehera)|in Europe and the Middle East : ‘ MOSCOW, June 30.
Saturday but failed to show up! Which are two areas which, with Every Soviet paper on Satur-
t World Court when Britain) their industry, skilled manpower|@#Y, Carried a dispatch that the
iewed its demand for an im-, and oil res ee, are more jmpor- United States Deputy Defence
liate temporary injunction} tant to Russia than the unexploit Se retary, Robert Lovett, had sent
in Ivan’ eizure of th “d resources of the Far Rast the U.N Commander, General
nglo-Iranian Oil Company | Matthew Ridgway instructions for
. Trani Minister, Hossein| A British Foreign Office poke neyotiating a cease fire in Korea
Nav entered the court roc man made the following state his was followed by another
d remained for two or three} â„¢ment to a midday press confer lispatech to the Communist Com-
musth but he left before the} ence. “The United Kingdom ha, !|™ender-in-Chief in Korea. The
ion began Ss Frank Soskice',}een in close consultatior vith | viel Press radio has not yet com-
Attorne General an ant | United States from the be} mented on the offer--(UP)
e fourteen-man Bri nning Not only do we re —
e here ed the Cour ‘| but we support it fully and
for njunetion against Iran : \j sh every success to General) THE “ADVOCATE”
te} of the “great t dgwi ay’s efforts Ever in
r Mall's” speech, His Majeas || pays for NEWS|
I ourt wa pected to give rovernment made every end AV | DIAL 3113
on the “B riti sh reque uur for a successful development.
thin a few days at the most | | Day or Night.
Soskice told the court that no —(U.P.) |
Bi noney from Mae eo mune
cormpensate for the lo | re
threatened Britain, and
that Lran conduct we . .
leading to the loss of skilled it The Law is always right.
fi mnel which in ur
ild lead to “serious accident mt
I damage to machinery an
plant Soskice referred to the}
! netion granted by the court)
1927 to protect the Belgi:
nts in China ; 1 precedent fc
n injunction inst Iran. When
hi denounce its treaty of
f it Belgium, the court
tere interim measure or pro
Ithough China ad no
mic ccepted the
the irt.—U.P.

Prake Will Consuli

With Directors

Drak general manager o
lo It 1 Oil Company i:
ed by air from Basra
yaturd for a consulta
the Board of Directors.
guardedly optimistic
ed to go into deep di

of the conflict because of
1 ery delicate situa
I i “I am not ir

ind 1

ht 1 |

ch r 48 hours!

|

: j

ot say whether Brit- |

mine i oon leave |

H uid that, “at the}
t tne morale of the taff

io

LONDON,







June



30



RALEIGH

THE ALL-STEEL BICVCLE

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

10, 11

Distributors

Sole




PAGE TWO



QO FF F999

STARBUDS of 1951 for JULY J2th

The Management of the Globe Theatre regrets that due

circumstances that were extremely difficult to control Madan
Ifill’s stage presentation “Starbuds of °51" carded for the

5th July is postponed

To Thursday July (2th 6.30 p.m.





Persons who have purchased Tickets for the 5th are re

that these Tickets are good for the 12th JULY



Book Your Tickets now. On Sale DAILY Globe Theatre
and Madam Ifill’s Residence.

SOOO LPC ELLVEEPELE PALES

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BRANDED

A Paramount Picture starring











x r ‘
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Continuing Daily st 445 and #90 ane a
M-G-M's Mighty Romantic
M-G-M’s Mighty Romantic Adventure—
Adventure— i
“KING SOLOMON'S MINES” |
“KING SOLOMON'S MINES Color by Technicolor SHORTS:

Color by Technicolor

Starring: Deborah Kerr, Stewart
Granger with Richard Carlson

ROYAL ©

Starring: Deborah Kerr, Stewart
Granger with Richard Carlson

OLYMPIC



Last Two Shows TO-DAY 4.20
TO-DAY ONLY 4.30 AND 8.15 —s
Find That, Coinmnbint werts Kathryn Grayson and Mario Lanza
. - ” jn
“THE SHADOW
Sterring: “ TOAST OF NEW ORLEANS”

Vietor Jory Along with the Picture

“TWO BLONDES AND A RED AND

“KIO GLOVE KILLER”





Starring:
Jean Porter Van Heflin and Masha Hunts
TO-MORROW AND TUESDAY
MONDAY Only 4.80 and 8.45 oe nae
Esther Williams end Van Johnson Greer Garson and Errol Flyn i
in
“THAT FORSYTH WOMAN"
“DUCHESS OF IDAHO” sit
AND
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MARK OF ZORRO fits tnc
Tyrone Power and Linda Darnell Pee oie mast



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Popeye The Sailor.

YALENT AUDITION TO-DAY,
9.30 a.m.



PLAZA Theatre

Bridgetown — Dial 2310

To-day to Tuesday 445 & 8.30 p.m.
R.K.O Radio presents

Charles Franchot Bergess

LAUGHTON TONE MEREDITH
Robert The City of PARE
| nutton & in
On
THE MAN tue EIFFEL TOWER
g Filmed in Ansco Color!
% Plus: Leon Errol in
AFFAIR
3 Wed. and Thurs, 5 and 8.30 p.m.
% |}R.K.0. Radio Double!
% “PANGEROUS PROFESSION”



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“SHIPWRECK BALL”

AT
PARADISE BEACH CLUB

JULY 2ist



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George Raft—Pat O'Brien
and
“THE OLAY PIGEQN”
Bill Wiltiams—Barbara Hale

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CHARLIE
CHAPLIN

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POESPP OPEL EOLA



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LD presents





“DRAGNET” Henry Wileoxon and
“BURNING CROSS"
Hank Daniels
| Mon. and Tues. 5 and 8.30 p.m.
Excelsior Pictures presents
| (First instal, of Serial!)
Frank Buck in
“JUNGLE MENACE”
with
Sasha Siemel (The Tigerman)
| Reginald Denny-—Clarence Muse
—

“ "
GAITETY
THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
Last 2 Shows To-day 5 and 8.30 p.m.

“THE PERFECT CRIME" and

“THE YOUNGER BROTHERS”









Color by Technicolor
= = e —
Mon, and Tues, 8.30 p.m
Bette Davis in
and
“THE TIME, THE PLACE AND
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Color nicolor
Jack Carson

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$22.10



waren ovr |
*

:
3
is coming to Barbados %
>
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~,
GC POOOOPOPROOOPOSSS

SUNDAY ADVOC
M* NORMAN FORBES who

fhe to ‘Teronte esteTdny
by T.C.A. expects to be there for
about two_months, after which
time Mrs. Forbes will join him in
Canada and they will visit France
and the Continent or he will re-

turn to Barbados.

With T.C.A.
i} ISS LORNA McKENZIE, sis-
aye A.

ter of Mr. Ross MeKenzie,
engineer stationed here
flew to Canada yesterday by T.C.A.

after spending a short holiday
with her brother and sister-in-
law at ‘Atlantic View’ Enterprise
Road.

Lorna aiso works with T-C.A,
She is in their Montreal Head
Office,

To Be Married Shortly

R. JOHN FOSTER, son of
Major and Mrs. A. R. Fos-
ter arrived from Canada yesterday
to § a month’s holiday in
Barbados, during which time he
is to be married to Miss Susan
Vickerman. John is at present
studying accountancy at MeGill
, University.
|. Other passengers arriving by

| T.C.A. yesterday were Dr. and
;Mrs. A. Greaves, Mr. and Mrs.
Ernest Kinch and two of their

daughters, Barbara and Fleurette

Short Holiday

M* & MRS. IAN ROBI N
and young son __ fie ack
from Grenada on. Fridayâ„¢ by
B.W.1.A. where they ‘had been on
a short holiday.

Attended Nephew’s

Wedding

RS. CLARICE STOUTE who

was in Barbados for the
wedding of her nephew, Mr. Hugh
Jordan to Miss Gloria Gilkes is
due to leave for the U.S. this
morning via Puerto Rico. She is
accompanied by her daughter Mrs.
Daphne DePass.



ve









ATE



Staying With Friends
ISS LESLIN ROBERTS of
Georgetown, British Guiana

arrived by the Gascogne yester-
day morning for a holiday. She
is staying with Mr. and Mrs. W.
W. Merritt at Friendly Hall, St

Michael
Miss Roberts is a sister of Mr
George Roberts, Vital Statistics

Officer, C.D. & W.

Also arriving by the Gaseogne
were Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Jar-
dine of Georgetown. They are
Staying at Indramer Guest House.
This is their first visit to Barbados
and also their first trip out of
British Guiana. They plan to
spend a month here.

Off to the U.S.
EAVING for New York during
the week by the Fort Amherst
‘vas Miss Gemmel Rollins who
was holidaying here for the past
six months with her sister Mrs.
Evelyn Straughn of Bank Hall.
Miss Rollins took with her three
nephews—Carl, Anthony and Mi-
chael Rollins who were at College
here. They are going to their par-
ents in New York where they will
complete their education.

Brother and Sister

N Barbados for two months’

holiday is Miss Ethel Watson
of Messrs, Booker Bros., British
Guiana. She is staying with Miss
M. L. Seale of Land’s End.

Miss Watson is a sister of Mr.
Edwin Watson of Messrs. William
Fogarty, Ltd. This is her second
visit to the island.

Appointed
R. BENTLEY CALLENDER
of the Public Library has
been appointed organist of St.
Mary’s Church. The appointment
comes into effect to-day.

a

WTCR

Old World Culture ;

and History

Travel to the U.K. and
Continent by “North
Star’ Skyliners via Can-
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more convenient,

You can plan your holi-

duy to include at least
one way during the “Low
Fare” Seasons,

For complete information
See

(iardiner Austin & Co., Ltd

McGregor Street,
Bridgetown,
Phone 4518

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Hardware Department



LOCKWOOD

‘““MADNESS OF THE HEART”
with MAXWELL REED, KATHLEEN BYRON, PAUL DUPUIS
PRODUCED by RICHARD WAINWRIGHT

A TWO CITIES FILM



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Tel. No. 2039







“Used to be an uneptre.”
London Ervress Service.
Attended Son’s Wedding

RS. T. E. WENT who was in
Trinidad for her son’s wed-
ding returned yesterdey morning
by B.W.1.A. Her daughter Nancy
who went down with her return-
ed by the same plane.
Other passengers arriving from
Trinidad yesterday were, Miss
Maggie Fields, Miss J. Howard,
Mrs. A. de K. Frampton who was
in Trinidad for ten days and Mrs.
M. Corbin who had been in Tri-

nidad for the past six months.



Wedding

R. RANDAL GRANT of Day-

rells Road was married to
Miss Muriel Odessa Alleyne also of
Dayrells Road on Sunday, June
24th, at Bethel’s Church.

The ceremony was

by the Rev. Crosby. The bride
was given in marriage by Mr
Beresford Cutting. The brides-
maids were Miss Barbara Evelyn
and Miss Norma Taitt. Miss
Brenda Alleyne was the maid of
honour.

Mr. Ivan Grant, brother of the
bridegroom was the bestman. The
ushers were Mr. Cecil Watkins
and Mr. Crispan Savoury.

After the ceremony a reception
was held at the home of the bride’s
sister.

performed

W.I. Holiday

PENDING part of his six
months’ holiday in Barbados
is Mr. B. M. Viapree, clerk to Mr.
Cc. R. Browne, Rent Assessor and
Magistrate of Georgetown, British
Guiana. He arrived yesterday
morning on the Gascogne accom-
panied by his wife and is staying
at “Maristow”, Maxwell Coast.
Mr, Viapree expects to spend a
week in Grenada and two weeks
in Trinidad to study their method
and practice of Rent Assessment
before returning home.

SUNDAY,
oceiencecilie tage LEAL

JULY 1, 1951

To be Married in U.K.
ISS EVELYN CHANDLER of
Johnson’s Stationery, is now

on her way to England to be mar-

ried to Mr. Albert Hall of Lan-
eashire. She left yesterday morn-
ing on the Gascogne.

Another passenger leaving on
the Gascogne for England yes-
terday to be married was Miss
Molly Barker, formerly of the
office staff of Messrs. ‘T. R. Evans.

She is the second daughter of Mr
and Mrs. E.A. Barker of “Rem-
ington”, Fontabelle. Her fiance :
Mr. Bill Dunean, son of Capt. and
Mrs. W. Duncan of Newcastle-
on-Tyne, Northumberland.

To Join Husband
EAVING to-day by B.W.LA.
for New York via Puerto Rico

to join her husband is Mrs. Inez
Green, For many years she has
been interested in social work in
Christ Church.

From B.G.
ISS MILDRED SIMPSON of
British Guiana arrived on
the Gascogne yesterday morning
to spend a holiday with her sister
Mrs. Robert King of Jackson.

Mr. King’s brother Alfred, a
druggist of Georgetown, has just
returned home after spending
three weeks’ holiday. His wife
who came over with him, is stay-
ing on for another three weeks.

Ten Days
FTER spending ten days’ holi-
day at Stafford House, Major
and Mrs. H, Grist returned to St.
Lucia yesterday morning by the
Gascogne.



A.G.L. Douglas Retires—After 42 Years Service

MR. A. G. L, DOUGLAS,
Divisional Manager of Cable and
Wireless (West Indies) Ltd,, since
1940 retired from the company
yesterday after forty-two years
telegraph service,

Last night at Boarded Hail
Transmitting Station, a cocktail
party was given in his honour.
Present were members of the local
and foreign service staff their
wives and friends .

_ The doorway of the station and
its surroundings were decorated
with the company's colours and
the courtyard in front of the
transmitting station was illumin-

ated for the occasion.

Mr. Douglas was presented with
Phillips radiogram from the
entire staff of his area and Mrs.
Douglas with a dressing table set.

Mr, Johnnie Bourne the Divi-
sional Manager's Secretary who
acted as master of ceremonies dur-
ing the presentation presented
Mr. Douglas with a volume of
autographs signed all mem-
bers of the staff of the area, local,
foreign service and supernu-
meraries. Even members who do
not work with the company, but
were in its employ during Mr.
Douglas’ tenure of office have also
signed.

The Cable and Wireless Sports
Club presented him with a set of
wedgewood vases and Mrs, March.
Penny wife of the Chief Electri-
cian of the Cable Ship “Electra”
presented Mrs. Douglas with a
bouquet of flowers.

peeches were made by Mr.

Robinson, Manager of the Barba-
dos Branch, Mr, Johnnie Bourne
and messages from His Excellency
the Governor, Branch Managers
throughout the West Indies and
from other parts of the world
were read.

Toasts to Mr. and Mrs, Douslas
were made and Mr, Douglas made
a speech after the presentation in
reply.

Mr. Douglas was born in Glouces-
ter on the 15fh April, 1893. He re-
ceived part of his education at the
Newport (Isle of Wight) Grammar
School and was privately tutored.

He began his career in the
telegraph service by joining the
Western Telegraph Company, en-
tering the London Training School
in 1909, ;

Graduating to the P.K. Station
in 1910 he was subsequently ap-
pointed overseas and was stationed
between 1911 and 1928 at Madeira,
Rio de Janeiro, St. Vincent (C.V.),
Santos, Pernambuco, Barbados,
Maranhao, Montevideo, Val-
paraiso and Santiago de Chile,
also serving on the Cable Ship
“Transmitter” in 1917. ;

In 1928 he was again appointed
to Barbados and served in vari-
cus capacities there also assuming
the management of the San Juan,

Are You Covered
Against
Loss of Money
In Transit ??

Friday's Theft from a Man-
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was covered by us as

— AGENTS OF —

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ALLEYNE ARTHUR
& CO. LTD.

MEN'S FELT
BOYS’

DIAL 4606

FELT HATS



Mr.
retires ofter 42 years’ service

A. G. L. DOUGLAS

Puerto Rico Branch in 1934 prior
i" - many h Ss
to his appointment as Manager of this ame. tren

the West Indies Division (com-
prising Cuba, Puerto Rico, Virgin
Islands, British West Indies and
British Guiana) ,

From the time of his appoint-
ment to Barbados Mr. Douglas has
participated in the modernisation
of the branch. He negotiated the
purchase of more than 80 acres of
land on which now stand the im-
portant relay stations at Boarded
Hal! and Carrington for the Lon-
don to Australia link, He was in-
strumental in arranging for and
opening the world-wide telephone
services now offered from Barba-
dos and the majority of the
B.W.1,

He assumed the management of
the Division soon after th: out-
break of World War 2 and was
manager until recent years of the
Barbados Branch as well,

The Cable Station at St. Law-
rence has been enlarged to three
times its original proportions; and
more recently six new bungalows
for the mobile staff have been
completed under his _ personal
supervision.

In the course of Mr. Douglas’
activities on the Company’s busi-
ness he travelled more than
100,000 miles by air alone and
accompanied Major General L, B
Nicholls on his tour of the Area
early in 1948.

He leaves the communication
services in Barbados and the West
Indies in general much improved
and it is hoped he will see the
completion of the programme of
extension and modernisation be-
gun under his direction.

Mr, Doug, or Doug as he was
known to many, was married in
1924.

Mrs. Douglas is the former
Dorothy Baily. She was at one-
time employee in the Superintend-
ent Engineer's office of the com-








pany in London. Her favourite
game is tennis
and she won

in

1931 to 1944 shel
was among those
selected to rep-
resent the Savan-
nah Club versus
the Tranquil-
ity Club
Trinidad.

ning the Savan-
nah Singles
Championship in
1986 and again H. L. N. ASCOUGH
in 1944, she also his successor
won in the ladies doubles and
mixed doubles in 1934 and 1936,
the mixed doubles (open) in 1937
and in both events during '39, °40
and ‘41.

They intend to retire in Barba-
dos. Their home is ‘Mayfield’ in
St. George.

Mr. Douglas’ successor is Mr.
H. L. N. Ascough who arrived in
Barbados a few weeks ago.







BY THE WAY «+.» by Beachcomber

F there is a heaven for good

shoes, then the aged pair with
whom I have just parted company
will come to their reward in the
end. They were gnarled and
bent and wizened, but no feet
ever had more loyal companions.

Their active life began in the
Norwegian mountains nearly 20
years ago, and a career full of
bonour closed on the crest of
Slievenamon, There, beside the
cairn, I would like to build a
memorial to them, recounting their
feats all over Europe, from the
Tatras to the Wigtownshire moors.
They were Harmodius and Astro-
giton. They were Damon and
Patroclus. They were Roland and
Oliver. May they recapture their
youth among the asphodel on
some upland of the Elysian Fields.

Nothing to do With Me

rFWHE most amusing Spring

fashion is said to be the new
polka dot veil, on which the dots
are arranged as a musical nota-
tion. Smart women will carry
about with them a small five-
barred gate. By focusing the veil
against the gate they will be able
to hum the melody,

Rustiguzzi Is Coming Here

USICAL London is agog at
the news of a_ forthcoming
visit by the great Emilia Rusti-
guzzi for a series of concerts and
perhaps a whack of opera. Hei
publicity agent has already ob-

jected to a description of her
voice as “piercingly sweet.”
“Well, piercingly something.”
riposted the critic. “Singing

mice,” said another critic, “we
have already had. We are now,
it seems, to have a singing hippo-
potamus.” A third wrote; “Apart

$5.16,

4.12
2.35

HATS $2.40,
$2.21,



YOUR SHOE STORE

from the French soprano Aden-
oide, I can think of nobody else

who could fill Covent Garden.”
The suggestion that Esperanto
should be used as the common

language in a polyglot production
of “Pelléas et Melisande” in mod-
ern dress is being considered

Still Remembered

PTCHE time oid Mrs. Wilberforce
and Miss Walker barged into
each other in High-streét, Wan-
tage, is still remembered to this
day. ‘
It was a calm afternoon in July.
Little did the sleepy old hamlet of
Wantage know that within the hour
it was to be the cynosure of all
eyes, Miss Walker (14st. 6lb.) left
the north pavement of the High-
street at precisely 9.37. Mrs. Wil-
berforce stepped off the pavement
at 9.37 point 8.
They met.

Mrs, Wilberforce’s corsets caught
Miss Walker’s roll-on a glancing
blow and they both (aggregate
poundage 310) became locked.

After the failure of the fite
brigade, the local Boy Scouts, and
the R.S.P.C.A., the Army was
called out. By this time the west-
bound traffic was held up for 17
miles; the east-bound for 16 miles
excluding a cycle club who turned
into the woods,

Using Churchill tanks the Arm-
oured Division attempted to draw
the two apart. This was unsuc-
cessful, but, using oxyacetylene
steel-cutting blow lamps, the con-
tact was broken, and Mrs. Wilber-
force was separated and her great
nose was turned into the wind as
‘she took off into the setting sun.

SEE R@OERESe BEB BRBRB Re ER
TROPICAL SUITING 54 ins
TROPICAL SUITING 56 ins
WOOLLEN SUITING 56 ins
WOOLLEN GABERDINE $11.24

$3.19

6.72, 6.78, 7.41

$9.38

WILSON 8.12

T.A. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL. 4220

es
SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951





FARM AND GARDEN “EY

By AGRICOLA

Merkets For Economy

WORLD conditions in regard to
food supplies appear to be worsen-
ing. In the prevailing circum-
stances, it is only reasonable that
we should ask ourselves whether
here, and in the West Indies as
a whole, we are doing everything
possible to alleviate increasing
hardship by harnessing our owr
considerable, regional resources
for an all out planned, integrated
attack, of a long range nature, on
the problems of food production
and distribution. Inseparable from
this is, as always, the need for
ensuring fair prices to the grower
or stock raiser in return for his
labour and imvestment and just
treatment of the consumer who
algo has got to live. Indeed, both
are mutually inter-dependent.

The facts reiuting w the over-
seas import trade have already
been the subject of recent inves-
tigation. It is when we come to
the distribution and marketing of
intercolonial and our own home
grown food supplies that we are
faced yrith a condition which cries
aloud for drastic overhaul. Deal-
ing first with the former, we sug-
gest that the time is ripe for 4
close investigation of the ramifi-
cations of the trade: sources of
supply; prices at source and sea-
sonal fluctuation; type of persons
engaged both at the export and
import ends—names, addresses
and methods of business; freight
rates; percentage of reasonable
spoliation of various classes of
produce; questions pertaining to
cospperation between the islands
caneerned; and so on. In this way,
an effort could be made to lift the
trade out of its present hugger-
mugger existence, which is no
credit to any one, and results most
of the time—to all appearances——
in the already hard hit consumer
being fleeced through the opera-
tions of a large number of middle
men (and women). The true posi-
tion can only be ascertained when
all the relevant factors are known
and especially the spread in price
between the producer and con-
sumer. In this connection, there
is no doubt that many vendors
prefer to maintain a price figure

which permits them to dump
spoiled stuff rather than m ake
greater sales ata lower price

which would work out equally, if

not more, advantageous in the
aggregate. Food wastage and
consumer economy are not their



vould, in our view, go far to cor-
rect or, at rate, minimize the
existing evils is the provision of
éstablished market facilities where
all the hole-in-the-corner and
pavement traders would be forced

any



to open up their tierces and
packages under sanitary condi-
tions, at the same time permitting



consumers to make théir pur-
chascs direct instead of through
a series of middle dealers. ©

So far as local produce is con-
cerned, the positien is equally
unsatisfactory te the consumer and
producer. The farmer has little
opportunity for direct contact with
the latter and both are, it may
be said, at the mercy of middle
traders. Here too, the time is ripe
for a study of prices in relation
to the cost of production and a
more accurate appraisal of -what
is a fair scale of remuneration to
the grower for the different classes
of produce, with the adoption of
more realistic prices to the con-
sumer. We are not aware of the
yardstick used in the calculation
wf ruling prices but, generally
speaking, the position needs re-
viewing. Established market fa-
cilities would go far to bring the
local producer and consumer to-
gether’ and provide means of
enforcing adequate measures ©
control which, currently, are more
often honoured in the breach than
in the observance, We support
the suggestion which has been
made for a large, up-to-date
market in the old railway. area
and which might also help to
stimulate bonification and devel-
opment in food gardens of the
unsightly, riparian lands of the
Constitution River. Meanwhile,
let ws be fully co-operative with
the welcome rains and get after
neglected or idle plots which are
all waiting ‘to be tickled with a
hoe and laugh a harvest.’
eee

———



Reply to Enquiry

For the information o2f
C.F., Agricola states he has
never heard of the idea that |
careful picking of lime fruit
by means of a ladder or fruit
picker is harmful to the trees
as @ppased to allowing the
fruit to ripen and drop. Such
crude methods as the not in-
frequent use of sticks or
stones to knock down the
fruit, stripping and, tearing
the branches to get at limes
out of reach are more likely |
to cause tree injury, apart |
from bringing down young |
limes and possible blossoms at |



THE GARDEN IN JULY

Fiowers for the rainy months.
Plant Chrysanthemum Suckers.

With the coming of July and
the rains garden owners must be-
gin to seriously plan their gar-
dens for the next few months.

How can gardens be kept going
in spité of the weather?

Well, there are many flowering

plants that like the rains, in fact +

there is almost as much choice in
our wet” weather plants as there
is among’ our dry “Weather an-
nuals. ”

Chief standby of course is the
lovely Zinnias, of which there are

several” Varieties. But so much
has been written already about
Zinnias and they are so widely
known, that it’ is hardly neces-
sary to describe their likes and
dislikes again.
Yellow Pea

Yellow Pea is another quick
growing useful wet weather
plant. It makes a lovely back-
ground to a bed, or it can be

planted as a garden (not a boun-
dary) hedge or in clumps. The
plants often grow to a height of
four_or five feet, the seeds can be
planted straight into the prepared
bed, and in five weeks time from
seed planting the plants should
begin to flower.
Balsam

Double balsam is another gay
little raimy weather plant. it can
be had in a number of lovely
colours both plain and variegated,
and although almost stemless the
flowers look charming when ar-
ranged in shallow vases, or float-
ing in bowls. Deuble Balsams
grow easily under any normal
garden conditions, and, like the
Yellow Pega the seeds can be
iplangjed straight jnto the bed,
which means such a saving in
labour. Six weeks from seed
planting double Balsam starts to
flower.

Single Balsams, also like the
rainy weather and are very
bright and lovely. Find a shady
spot for them however and plant
from seedlings which are gener-

ally found under an old plant, ;
or by cutting. They like very
moist conditions,

Tithonia

Although this plant is not a
great favourite, yet it will help
to fill your gardens in the coming
months, Tithonia is hardly, often
growing to a height of about four



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Sewing

‘ Preparing For First Fitting





Pressing equipment is nec
essary a sewing equipment for
a re uly professional looking job
of dressmaking Your iron and

Girele

cams





U e cloth
ai i stitching an even
istance from the cut edge on al

seams. I explained the use of to

attachment in the column = on

froning board sha be ¥ i 7

Neaiae®’ fon, a a a oo Marking on June 17.

Sweaty chiedaibic.. tt eid cnatlate Starting, with the bodice, }
of making style details on er in’ all darts and pleats and ma-
cloth your iron can’ olteh save chine baste them stitciuig from
ous ties: Zoe! Seat the wide end to the point of a
centre front, and centre back @47t- The pins should b2 placed
lines may often be pressed in as at right angles to the sewing line

an aid to
contrasting

Basting a
fied by
pressing.

running a basting of
colour thread.

dart can be simpli-
marking the centre by
Remember that press-



PENNY NOLAN.

ing and ironing are quite differ-

ent. In pressing you lower and
raise the iron from the same
place, never run the iron over

the material as you do in ironing,
Curved cut edges should be stay-
stitched to prevent stretching.

It will save you much time if you
will think of the stitching peosi-
tion before you pin. The bulk of
the cloth should be kept to the
left for easy stitching. If you
machine has a hinged pressure
foot it will stitch over pins placed
at right angles to the stitching
line but even if you ao not intenc
to stitch over them you will find
that pins placed in this manner
are much easier to remove as you
sew and also have the advantage
of puckering the cloth less.

Next pin and machine baste
the front and back shoulders to
gether. Note that the back should-
er seam usually has a bit of
fullness to be eased in to the fron;

\oulder seam. The shouldei
sums should be stitched from the
neg edge to the armhole edge.

Side seams are usually basted
next stitching from armhole to
waist. Don’t forget to leave an
opening on the left side for a «iy
it your frock needs one there.
The size of the opening in the
bodice may vary with the style.
Usually three or four inches if

the zip is put in the bodice but for

Stay-stitehing is machine stitch- ;

, ? very tight style , Hea
ing on the eam line, The pie” —_ styles be very tall pov"
houlders, the neckline, and the ofr . =o be allowed, When
armhole and the waistline of the ning the side seams for cap

sleeves cut in one with the bodice

skirt usually need this treatment. .,... ;

The correct order or routine S@tt from the waist ant pin up
for assembly for a garment natu- ° the back is usually longer than
rally varies somewhat with the the front. Sil
style, however some general rules Sleeve seams are generally
are helpful where basting is stitched from armhole to hem.
ealled for machine basting is Skirt seams are often best stitched
usually best, It gives a much from hem to waist. Don't forcet!
firmer construction than hand, tO leave an opening for a plac ke
pasting and makes fitting much #” the skirt also. "

and more accurate,





1ine basting is done with the
gest stitch on your machine
Test this on a scrap of material
as the tension may need adjusting



after you shave lengthened the
stitch. Too loose a tension will
sometimes loop very badly with
the basting stitch and foo tight



tend finally to top stiteh the skirt
to the bodice or to stich the
waistline from the wroug side you

will find it easier for fitting at this

Stage to fold under th»
vanee on the skirt
pin the skirt to tix
with the pins on the

seam al
‘eth waist Line
and Hodin

‘igh

sid



The pins are then easy to get at

Pin the skirt to the bodice on
the stitching line. Whether you in-

HATS

vi
DISTINCELON
AN)
CHAT



The Newest in Straws
and the

Latest in Styles



Sapte ua wrt ae and



PAGE THRE








a

ask for

“t1Ssons

LUXURY TOILET

eth

=
(MPERIAL LEATHE

Paci. esta, tise, bitter-sweer ».
avdewia" by Goya. a long-lasting
fragrance that brings you new charm,
new. coupbence Sov vomawtic meetings.
GARDENIA |

Re LINDEN BLOSSOM « BLUE HYACINTH






Gift Size and
Handbag Phial
\fatching Soap,
Perfumed Cologne,
Dusting Powder,
and Bath Essence.

@ MaDe IN ENOLAND BY GOYA © 161

Distributors; L.M.B. Meyers &

NEW BOND STREET *

P.O.

LONDON + Wt

Box 171, Bridgetews

Co. Led,








oan TN iM ee EEE EEE EE
























concern; the bird-in-the-hand the same time NO
is strong and persists. , . feet. The flowers are orange o >) maka Bet Feathered Hi that are ,
cone ater due ont which coloured although there is also CROSSWORD ; = panace DR ee ; i , Dats ns THERES A GLASS WONDER
a yellow variety. The plants KF he hang Of the skirt, ea NY ert row HALF OF 1” AN
a " or ———_—_—_——--——-——_ grow éasily from seed, and will “ ‘lin ready reference here is an S ae G oy “NT wes AND 4 YO ¢
flourish under any normal gar- F oe the steps to follow to Steel Grey avy MILK IN EVERY TASTE THE CREAM
den conditions, Seedlings are often Frepare for the first firing Br Fuchis
Da rtwords found under an old plant. It is " I ie fac machin? baste rown uchia HALF POUND
b ten to twelve weeks however be- all darts, tucks and ploats aa ‘i —
fore the plants start to flower. 2 soci r seams Black White .
" ‘ side seams 5
z Chrysanthemums ii 4. sleeve seam Green
Chrysanthemums are not wet 5. skirt sex
QU start olf weather plants, but, in order to Pin alki oan e
i this ‘week's have flowers for Christmas the Skirt to bodice.
~ Dartwords suckers must be planted during
with the word the months of June, July and ELECTRONIC ROBOT
FEOS.. ana Ate sath August. Chrysanthemums a r e NEW YORK. y.
BS PAR aOR aa very lovely but it does mean \ new electronic robot has just é
; been manufactured. It makes 20} i



ou alrange toe opher er
i ' order giving up a bed, or beds to them




, sich & ‘ ;
8-in sh ari classifications of a man (employ-|
















t°' the “relavionsh') for half year in order to have Across |
ats seine = the flowers at the end of the year. } 4 ioe mixture: | (Â¥) ed or unemployed, head of a fam-| he
a ap {S Prepare the bed thoroughly, en- Ee Goat, We, furnish inside ily, or a bachelor, etc) in one- a
six rules? When you | rich it with well rotted pen 10 Machine that almost produces sixth of a second, The Census &
come to PAUL, look manure, and plant the suckers ,, $203? 25d. Water miAttion 19) Bureau has bought the machine
TP iethsichore nee Bes about a foot or more apart. In 3 Sineat atint. () at a cost of £214,000 |

en Tet order to get suckers, an old plant ! at » put to the south-
RULES from last year must be pulled ) “extinet, it had double STOPPED TRIBAL WAR In fact all Shades to \

1. The word may be up, and the suckers which will ( (4) \ DARWIN. :

f, ed - 5 ing ff fr the ! {, may be a coral one. (4) A Fijiar igsionary ‘ .
an anagram of the be found shooting off from the jg sheas ight on evidence oy dian missionary. and his match your Easemble
word that precedes it. mother plant, separated by pull- » Tay white agricultural adviser stopped | y J f

out horse (4)

these } a tribal war in Arnhem Land by |














2-Tt may be a ing them off. Some of ie horse (8) as
§ De vhe word suckers will have roots attached, >} 1 without a ery. (4) standing amid flying spears be-
s they Be achieved but some will have more. Plant Deas tween two Australian Aboriginal | ®
by adding one letter to, subd- A typical succession of words the ones with roots straight into rat ‘ unt made here? (7) tribes. The fight was over the
tracting one letter from, or might be : Hard—Lines—Wines— the prepared bed, but for those , sot letting yourctree ? (7) illeged theft of the wife of one of
changing Sp. letter m the aera ae without roots it is best to start 3. ApY zraduate pvust nage “been the tribal chiefs. {
| dap be associated with Z = them in a box until they have 8 Wh ‘ed a pos AP ? | THE MODERN
the preceding word in wayne rooted. : It provides the newer edge. (5-4) AWAKENED BY RATS |
simile, metaphor, or association White, yellow and bronze are 9 Put « guide before the reverse of OTTAWA. |
of ideas. among the larger Chrysantlp- , 41,0608 sae sas A 17-year-old bride of two; DRESS
mum most commonly grown in 17 Orten to go ’ weeks was awakened by two rats



§. It mey form with the pre-
ceding word a name of u well-
ee person or place in fact or

ction.

enawing at her lips and chin. She
screamed and was rushed to hos-
pital, where she is now recelving
anti-tetanus treatment. The frame
row dwelling where she lived had
peen rat-infested for yea

this island, but there is a smaller
white variety with a yellow Solution of
centre, and a small yellow, both jj.) "M < :
with of which are very attractive and }* 4 t fur. 19

or v 211, Silo Mele 2, Acts
he would do well to edge a bed I : minate: 5. ‘Stilettos:

Chrysanthemums do not like « 5 Trough, 11
great deal of water.

Solution To-morrow

SHOPPE

BROAD STREET |




6. It may be associated 4
thé preceding word in '
action Of a book, pluy, oc!
eomposition.







;






Fly to Britain in Festival Year !
BY B.0.A.C, CONSTELLATION
IN CONJUNCTION WITH B.W.LA.

Get












errings

—V,

There Sooner! Stay There Longer!

FRESH orin |
“_» TOMATO SAUCE ie

‘ Flights a i Return Fare

ag wows | =Wemember
oan Phensic!

| From Vdad to, Flying Time

i 1 \ un



Bermuda 14.45 hour 2
Lisbon (99.00 ” | 2 1,396.80
\ | London |34.00 ” | 2 | 1,504.80 ¢

Wise is the sufferer from headache or nerve pain
who keeps a supply of Phensic! In a matter of
minutes the worst of pains give way to Phensic—
and as the pain lessens, you feel fit and cheerful,
ready again for work or play. It is good to know
oe gg seers rave ine carla relief of
*hensic. Be prepared for s—keep a su

of Phensic fg pa Sup

Phensic

for quick, safe relief



“com,

\





itish Overseas





, Bri ish O Airways Cor oration 2 &
iniovcr oom am rom = ||| PROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,
j‘ ¢ NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, FLU, COLDS & GHILLS
—_ : ——————————— { ee ee re i sed ae EGS AS SE sis Ee


PAGE FOUR







Fitting shoes for the
outdoor occasion

In England the SPIRE brogue is the vogue
This masculine style, combines a haadsome
appearance with a friendly fitting, giving
comfort from the first step. Like all
SPIRE shoes, these brogues are cut from
specially selected leathers by English

shoe craftsmen. Be fitted from
the newly arrived stocks at
your leading stores.







Agents for Barbados
General Agency Co. (Barbados) Ltd.
(P.O. Box 27), 14 High Street, Bridgetown



Nase cpap as
6 9.

GRAND PRIX’ is waterproof
This cartridge is now back to pre-war Eley-Kynoch standard,
and is completely waterproof. Supplied in 12 gauge 24"
lengths with 1; oz. standard, or 1} 0z. medium heavy load,
and in other gauges. It is the best general purpose cartridge
obtainable anywher
Your ammunition distributor will be pleased to give you
details of ‘Grand Prix’ and other cartridges in the Eley-
Kynoch range.

ELEY-KYNOCH

SHOTGUN CARTRIDGES
*GRAND PRIX’-‘ ALPHAMAX ’-' MAXIMUM’.‘GASTIGHT’

Factory Representatives: T. GEDDES GRANT, LTD.,
JAMAICA, TRINIDAD, B. GUIANA, BARBAROS

YMPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES LTD., LONDON

A.161(0/S)









For
Smart
Healthy
Hair

Play safe! Brylcreem your hair. Dandruff on your collar,
loose hair on your comb-—these are danger signals that
point the need for Brylcreem’s double benefit:
(1) Day-long smartness. (2) Lasting hair health.
Massage with Brylcreem stimulates the scalp,
encourages natural hair growth,
wards off Dandruff. Its pure
emulsified oils put life into Dry
Hair and impart a splendid
gloss. Don’t take any chances,
Brylcreem your hair — most
men do!












RATER ERT TT re

~
w @

ROLLING SHUTTERS

GNOME HOUSE, WALTHAMSTOW, LONDON, E.I7

Sole Agents in Barbados: THE DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING
URAC UL CM Rip

FRANK KING SHINES FOR Marshall, Greenidge



SUNDAY



| COMBERMERE AS ‘PRO’













But This Causes Local Dispute
BY Q. S. COPPIN :

Tntercolonial

RANK “KING,

. Pace bowler, who represent-
ed Barbados against the 1948
M.C.C. touring team in the two

colony fixtures, and who has since
represented Barbados and Trini-
dad in the regular post-war Inter-
colonial series, created history
yesterday when he played with
the Combermere team in their
fixture with Lodge School.

King stole the bowling honours
by taking five of the Lodge wick-

ay

ets that fell for 55 runs in an j
innings of 209.
CREATED A_ STIR
ING’S inclusion in the Com- }

bermere team has created as
much stir in local sporting circles
as the ersatz bodyline controversy
of the 1930’s that involved Empire
and Spartan and the bowling
especially of E. A. “Manny” Mar-
lindale and to a lesser extent
another Bank Hall speedster
“Pamphy” Spooner.

The former controversy was not
ignored in view of its important
bearing on local cricket relations
and even progress itself. It was
aired, reduced to its proper per-
spective, ignored and finally for-
gotten.

Although I could not at this stage suggest that the “King affair
should be so dismissed yet I find that there is some analogy here
from the point of view of the King affair being a lively controversy
and as such should be well and properly aired.

NO PREDICTION YET

not it will receive similar treatment to the



FRANK KING

HETHER or local

bodyline controversy or whether it will precipitate a sort of
renaissarice in the seats of local crigket learning I am not prepared

to predict at this stage.
On the other hand, I am sure the readers of this column will

want me to give my views in th’s connection at once and I shall do so.

{ am in a very smal! minority I admit at once when I say that
I agree entirely with the principle of Frank King's turning out for
Combermere, a School team in the First Division of the Barbados
Cricket Association competition.

I consider school teams that compete in the Barbados Cricket
Association games as clubs for the purpose of competition.

B.C.A. RULES ALLOW IT
HE revised rules of the Barbados Cricket Association allow clubs
to field one professional in their fixtures and Combermere
as such is the first club to take advantage of this new regulation,
The only arguments against this action by Combermere must there-
fore be based purely on sentimental lines. The action is legitimate,
in keeping with the rules of the Association and, to my mind is miles
away from even a prima facie claim of immorality,

I have writfen in these columns about five years ago that the
question of school teams competing in the First Division Barbados
Cricket Association fixtures should be reviewed.

SELECTORS SHOULD KNOW

SUGGESTED that school teams should not be allowed to play

First Division cricket simply because the particular school teams
have been playing in this division for the past half century or even
Jonger.

I suggested that every year the Selection Committee of the Bar-
bados Cricket Association should liase with the games authorities of
every school competing in the Senior Division and find out whether
or not the teams that they could field in that particular season were
capable of giving other clubs a good game and were capable of looking
after themselves among the grown-ups of the other club teams.

WHY NOT RELEGATION ?
T WROTE that if the Selectors were not satisfied with the strength
of a particular school team that they shouid recommend that they
be relegated that season without prejudice to their being promoted
again—not if they won a cup in the lower division—but it tney satis-
fied the selectors that they could field a team of a strengtn that could
al least establish their bona fides as a senior team.

1 quoted instances where school teams, on good’ wickets had lost
their scheduled three day fixture in a single day. I quoted instances
where members of senior teams had scored undeserv ing aouble cen-
turies and even double centuries against demoratised scnuool teams.

ALSO drew attention to the fact that quickish bowlers ot the

other senior teams had had to cut down their pace and even
change the style of their bowling on impaired wickets to ensure
that members of school were not hurt.





When I wrote this I had not lost sight of the batting perform-
ances of schoolboys of Harrisonians like Clifford Inniss, the rroverbs
brothers, Dr, Lionel Stuart, Keith Walcott, Dr. Charlie Manning—
to mention only a few,

_t,, remember Old Combermerians jike J, E. D. Sealy “Dick
Smith” C. Lewis, “Paps Barrow, C. O'B, Crick, Harold Brewster,
Hopinson and the great Frankie Worrell.

; STRENGTHENS THE ARGUMENT
B" to recall people like these only Strengthened my argument that

a scnool team should be admitted only when they can show a
nucleus of players of the calibre generally conceded as being as-
sociated with such players as I have mentioned.

An alternative suggestion of mine was that the schools should
play in a Schools’ Division competition and indulge in one or twe
| oken fixtures arranged by the Fixture Committee of the Ba
| Cricket Association yearly,
| A third suggestion was that a Schools’ selection committee shoul
| select from among the members competing in the Schools’ Divisio
| a team which would play either in the Senior Division as a repre-
sentative team or play a series of fixtures against senior clubs or

two fixtures against the Barbados Cricket Association Colts on an
| Association basis,

Failing this I see no reason why school teams should not be regard-
ed as clubs if they take part in the Senior competition and as such
are entitled to recruit and pay for the aid of a pace bowler of King's

reputation,
A PUERILE SUGGESTION
- puerile suggestion that he would be robbing a boy out of a play
proves nothing. The fact that his presence in the team will make |
his coaching of the Combermere boys easier and so will no doubt raise !
the morale of the boys is sufficient rebuttal of this really weak claim,
Let King play by all means under present day conditions, If the

rbadog

| Schools are to play in a Schools’ Division competition then by all
| means debar King but if they are clubs to all intents and purpdses in

the Barbados Cricket Association competition then grant them all the
privileges afforded clubs and King is the most important one of which

they are now taking full advantage and with commendable results
even in its earliest stages.





‘| wickets for 71

ADVOCATE



Score Centuries

TWO CENTURIES were scored when the second series 6f

First Division games opened

yesterday. Norman Marshall,

playing for Wanderers against Empire, knocked up a force-

ful 137.

Winston Greenidge, who is turning out for Pick-

wick for the first time this year, scored an undefeated

125 against Sparatn.
WANDERERS vs. EMPIRE
330
A SOUND and aggressive knock

Wanderers (for 6 wkts.)

* for 137 runs by Norman Marsha.1
j of
| day’s play at the Bay yesterday

Wanderers, highlighted the
in the match between Wanderers

and Empire. The home team

| kept Empire in the field for the

entire day and scored 330 runs
for the loss of 6 wickets.

Marshall took part in two good
partnerships, The second wicket
partnership with G. Proverbs that
yielded 129 runs, and the third
wicket partnership with Denis
Atkinson that produced 96.

Fast bowler H. Barker was the
most successful bowler for the
Bank Hall team He took 3
runs in 22 overs
including 3 maidens. Slow
bowler O. Fields took 2 for 46 in
9 overs.

Wanderers started to bat on a
good wicket with Norman Mar-
shall and Eric Atkinson, but soon
Barker who opened the attack
with E. Grant, got the wicket of
Atkinson. The score was now
eight. runs and Proverbs joined

arshall, They kept together
until just before the luncheon
period when Proverbs was out
l.b.w. to Fields. He had _ scored
44 runs and the total was then
137 for 2 wickets

After lunch Denis Atkinson
joined Marshall and the aggressive
tactics were carried on. These
batsmen scored well in front of
the clock and the 200 mark’ was
reached in 158 minutes. Marshall
completed his century in five
minutes less, No less than eight
bowlers were pressed into service

but without any effect until At-
kinson returned a delivery to
Grant with his score at 45. The
total had reached 233. Marshall
and A. Skinner took it to 251 be-
fore the former mistimed a de-
livery from Barker and was bowl-
ed for 137 runs.

D. Lawless the next batsman
in was bowled by the same
bowler with the next ball and 5

wickets were now down with the
score unchanged. E. Manning and
Skinner added 31 and then Skin-
ner fell a victim to slow bowler
Fields. The batsman was caught
by Skipper Alleyne. E. Manning
‘and D. Davies played out time
taking the total to 330 runs.
Manning is 37 and Davies 22,

PICKWICK vs. SPARTAN
Pickwick (for 7 wkts.)

A chanceless century by Win-
stone Greenidge Pickwick bowler-
batsman was the highlight of yes-
terday’s game with Spartan at

ensington, This together with a
forceful knock of 54 by Gerald
Wood enabled Pickwick to score.
| Greenidge who batted extreme-
ly well during his undefeated in-
nings of 125, executed some fine
strokes all around the wicket, He
got no less than fourteen
boundaries during his stay at the
wicket.

Other useful contributions were
made by John Goddard (Jnr,) 29
H. King 23, T. S. Birkett 21 and
E. L. G. Hoad 23.

Bowling for Spartan L. F.
‘Harris got 2 for 38, B. K. Bowen
2 for 98, while F, D. Phillips and
'E. A. V. Williams each got 1 for
4i and 58 respectively,

In ideal conditions and on a
wwerfect wicket, Pickwick after
‘winning the toss, opened with

‘Eric Edwards and John Goddard
jnr. to the bowling of F, D.
Phillips and E, A, V. Williams
from the screen and Pavilion ends
respectively.

This pair started confidently
but with only 15 on the board,
Edwards who had been batting
very well, glanced one beautifully
to fine leg off fast bowler Phillips
and in attempting an overshy

;Was run out for 13 including two

boundaries.

Goddard who was 2, was joined
by Birkett. These batsmen then
defied the Spartan attack for a
considerable time and 50 went up
after 63 minutes play, Birkett
later returned a full toss to Bowen
and was out for 21.

Winstone Greenidge the in-
coming batsman got a boundary
through the slips off Bowen and
Goddard after crashing Bowen to



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the long on boundary hooked a
short one from Williams and
Atkins held a good catch at short
fine leg to dismiss him for 29.
Wood joined Greenidge and

these batsmen increased the
tempo of the ga by sending the
ball to the boundary frequently.

One hundred went up after 105
minutes play and when the
luncheon interval was taken, the
total was 129 with Wood 34 and
Greenidge 28.

After Lunch

On resumption both batsmen
attacked the bowling with Wood
doing the bulk of the scoring and
150 went up after 138 minutes’
play.

Later Wood singled with a
square cut off Cozier to get his 50
including seven boundaries in 54
minutes. Mis innings however
ended after he had added four
more to his score. He had a big
hit off one from slow bowler
Bowen and Chase took a well
judged catch in front of the sight
screen, The total was 164 and this
pair had put on 91 for the fourth
wicket,

Inniss the incoming batsman
had a brief stay as he was taken
behind the wicket off Harris be-
fore he had scored.

Clayton Greenidge joined his
brother and saw him late cut one
from Harris to the boundary to
get his 50 including six boundaries
in 98 minutes. Clayton was how-
ever |.b.w., to Harris after scoring
seven,

The

total was now 182. King
joined Greenidge and this pair
took the score to 200 in 183
minutes. Greenidge took two
boundaries in one over by Bowen
and later hooked one from Harris
to square leg for another to enter
the seventies.

King hooked one from Bowen
out of the grounds for six and
then turned one from Williams to
the square leg boundary, He was
later bowled by Phillips for 23
with the total at 230,

Hoad joined Greenidge and this
pair sent 250 on the board in 217
minutes. Spartan made a number
of bowling changes but without
result, Greenidge got a few more
boundaries and his score entered
the nineties. He eventually got
his century ineluding eleven
boundaries in 155 minutes with a
single off Bowen wide of square
leg.

The batsmen continued to attack
the bowling and the score went
up in spite of many bowling
changes. When stumps were
drawn these batsmen were still
together. The total was 302 with
Greenidge 125 and Hoad 23.

Harrison College v. Carlton

College Ist Innings............ 160
Carlton Ist Inns. (for 4 wkts.) 34

CARLTON dismissed Harrison
College for 160 runs on a perfect
wicket at College yesterday. In
reply, Carlton scored 39 runs,
losing four valuable wickets.

G. Edghill bowled well to take
3 College wickets for 50 runs,
James Williams too turned in a
good bowling performance, taking
3 Carlton wickets for 14 runs.

Cc. W. Smith of College top
scored with 61. College’s fielding
was better than Carlton’s. Carl-
ton missed a few catches.

College lost two early wickets
with only 22 runs scored. E. H.
Hope, who opened with C. W.
Smith, was caught by Warren at
fine leg off pacer Edghill and Mr.
Gittens was snapped up at short
leg by Harding off Edghill’s next
over. They scored 5 and 1 re-
spectively.

Smith and C. N. Blackman saw
50 go up after an hour’s play. The
pair kept a reasonable rate of
scoring. Smith, after being put
down in slips when 32, went on to
score 50 in 100 minutes. Ten
minutes later, 100 runs were on
the tins.

The fine partnership between
Smith and Blackman which
realized 75 runs ended with Smith
being caught at mid wicket on
the on-side by Harding off Edghill.
Smith tried to hook a short pitched
ball on the leg stump. He played
a fine innings for 61. Edghill had
then taken 3 for 37 in 11 overs.
The score was 102 for 3. Lunch
was taken three overs later with
the score at 109. Blackman was

@ On Page 5



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SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951

THE JESTER A CHAMP

Paris, Best Wishes And Cross Roads
Off Form
BY BOOKIE

WITHOUT waiting for the second day’s racing
of the T.T.C. June meeting and the reversal of
form that it may bring, on his running in the Trial
Stakes alone the Jester II deserves special men-
tion as one of the most outstanding three-year-olds
of 1952. By winning this classic, after taking the
two-year-old classic Breeders’ Stakes last Decem-
-. ber and the Easter Guineas at Union Park last

March, this Jamaican gelding has definitely estab-
lished strong claims to be considered the best of this age. It is quite
true to say that in both the Breeders’ and now the Trial Stakes The
Jester II did not meet his most important opponents at their best,
but those of us who have seen him racing could not fail to be
impressed with this upstanding chestnut by Merry Mark out of All
Gold.

From the moment I saw the Jester I! strike out in front of
the field in the Breeders’ Stakes last December and maintained his
three lengths lead from start to finish I marked him down as one
vt good class. Indeed of such class that I am prepared to state
that he may well be considered among the best Jamaican creoles
that we have seen racing in the South Caribbean. In my opinion
he is much better than, say, Brown Rocket, and in this respect I
think he is the best Jamaican creole we have ever seen racing in
Trinidad as a two-year-old and an early three. :

All this of course applies to the Jester II only as a sprinter,
for up to now he has not been tried at more than seven furlongs.
That is why it would have been far more interesting to see the
Trial Stakes decided over 74% furlongs or a mile rather than a simple
sprint of six furlongs, It is difficult to say exactly what stage of
the race The Jester II took the lead but it was evident that he
did so before a furlong and a half had been covered. After that
it was all over bar the shouting. He coasted home lite a cycle free-
wheeling down hill, or so it would seem from all accounts.

Now this is in striking similarity to the actual running of the
Breeders’ Stakes last December and but for the fact that Miss Flicka
and Buddha got between The Jester Il and Rock Diamond, who was
fourth, we might have seen a complete repetition of the two-year-
old classic. I am firmly convinced that if the rain had fallen we
would have seen the exact replica, since Rock Diamond prefers this
kind of going. Surely this is no kind of race to be called a classic?

One could understand if in Barbados there were three classic races
that there might be some difficulty in arranging for each one to be
run over a different distance because of the limited space on our
track, But in as much as the T.T.C. have a place like the Queen’s
Park Savannah, where, there are as many as three race tracks, the
largest measuring as much as 14 furlongs around, they have abso-
lutely no excuse at all. It shows a complete lack of imagination and
no appreciation for the finer points of racing.

To turn once more to The Jester II it now remains to be seen
whether he can keep up his mopping up of the Trinidad classics. He
has already won three and he now has two to go. The Derby Trial
at Arima next month and the Trinidad Derby in December in Port-
of-Spain. I think the chances are even money that he can.

It is not without passing interest that once again the old jinx
which seems to dog the footsteps of classic and championship events
played a large part in ruining this renewal of the Trial Stakes. Not
long ago a friend of mine said he could hardly credit the astonishing
facts I listed in an article of such spoilt occasions and now here is
another he can add to the ‘list.

_Entered in the Trial Stakes was not only The Jester, whose
praises have been sung above, but his fellow Jamaican Paris, one
of the best two-year-olds I have seen arrive on this side of the
Caribbean from that Colony and one who quickly substantiated his
reputation as champion of his age in his home country by winning
a D class six furlong at the Christmas meeting in very smart time.
Paris not only won his race in smart time but he defeated, at weight
for age, The Atom, a mare who later went up to C class and ran
Nan Tudor to a length at even weights over six furlongs. This
therefore set the standard for the type of three-year-old we could
reasonably expect Paris to be in 1951.

Next on the list in the Trial Stakes was Best Wishes a filly who
the Trinidad classifiers thought so well of that they had her pro-
moted to the imported classes before the 1951 racing season begun,
a distinction which could not be laid claim to even by the great
Gleneagle, who won four races (the last with 140 lbs.) as a two-
year-old at the Christmas meeting of 1941. Best Wishes won only
two. Of course what must have influenced the classifiers in large
measure to arrive at such an assessment of Best Wishes capabilities
was no doubt the spectacular times she returned when she won her
races, the last of which made all previous records for two-year-olds
over six furlongs on the Queen’s Park Savannah look slow indeed.
Best Wishes therefore was obviously far above the average.
re Next we ae Cross oro & gelding from, Barbados who won

ur races as a two-year-old and generally impressed the m
gritics with his all round ability ‘at three to run well over ansining
from five furlongs to a mile.

Then there was Rock Diamond, Miss Flicka and Buddha, who
if only considered to be second string, then at least a very strong one.

Came the race. Paris—ill. Best Wishes—ill. Cross Roads—not
well, Rock Diamond—off form. Miss Flicka—ran well but went
wide. Buddha—ran a good race. Final analysis: The Jester II first,
the rest nowhere. How can anyone feel anything else but disgusted
at a result like this,

Discussing the form of the A class bunch in the TTC Plate and
the Queen’s Park Stakes, the first a mile and distance, the second
a six, it is apparent that the winner of the first, Jamaica’s Mark
Twain, must be all that he was cracked up to be in his home coun-
try where he won all the classics as a three-year-old as well as a
few other races. Nevertheless from what I heard on the Radio the
commentator, Mr, Dick Murray, to whom we must be thankful, was
definitely of the opinion that Mark Twain was lucky to have won
from Rebate. This filly, as he described it, took over the lead some-
where between the four and the three, from the same Mark Twain
and had the field beaten in the stretch when her rider, in the heat
of the moment, drew his whip, and in striking caused her to come
away from the rails. Mark Twain was then rushed into this open-
ing by Yvonet and producing another burst won the race by a neck.

While beaten Rebate was therefore not disgraced and once again
she has lived up to expectations as one of the best distance horses
now in training in the B.W.I. However in the sprint event yes-
terday White Company, by his easy victory, bared the fact that
although the distance horses in A class are in form, the sprinters
are very definitely way off. Footmark, who was second, was but a
shadow of his former self. Ostara, the holder of the six furlong
track ord, was reported to be feeling the effects of a kick on the
knee which she sustained at the hands (or is it feet)) of Orly on
t@e first day, and this must have impeded her considerably. Lastly
Golden Quip, who has fairly good form in England, has clearly not
acclimatised while Blue Streak is too old. It therefore looks as if
some new sprinting talent is definitely needed in the top class.

WHAT IS THE SAND TRACK THERE FOR ?

Forgive me for changing the subject so radically but I would
like to know if there is someone in high authority in the Barbados
Turf Club who can answer the above question. I hope they will not
tell me that it was laid down to be used when the rainfall was so
heavy that it rendered the exercise track impossible, because I ab-
soluteiy refuse to accept this answer. I am sure I was not dream-
ing last Friday morning when I walked onâ„¢to the Savannah and
found it to be only slightly damp. Yet the exercise track was closed
and only the sand track was open. If this can be construed to mean
wet, then we had better make the entire track one of sand and let
us have our races on the beach.











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JULY 1, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE

—————_—_———————









JULY1 —





SCORE

WANDERERS V, EMPIRE

Wanderers— ist Innings

N. Marshall b Barker 137
E. Atkinson c Alleyne b Barker 7
G. Proverbs 1 b w. Fields 44
D. Atkinson ¢c &b Grant ” 45
A. Skinner c Alleyne b Fields 23
D. Lawless b Barker *
. Manning not out 37

22
+ 3 Lbs., 1 wd 18



Total

(for 6 wickets) 330

Fill” of wiekets: 1-8, 2—187, 9233
4—251, 5-251, 6-282

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o Mi R w
H Barke: 22 J 71 3
E. Grant il 4 aa i
S. Rudder 10 1 27 9
H King 15 0 64 0
A. Holder 7 9 39 0
C. Alleyne 5 0 2 0
QO. Fields 9 0 46 F
W. Cave i 10 0

©
SPARTAN vs. PICKWICK
Pick wick—ist Innings
RF Edwards run out 3
J idard jinr. ¢ Atkins b Williams 29
T S$ Birkett c& b Bowen 4
W. Greenidge not out
G Wood c Chase b Bowen
B. deL. Inniss c wk (Haynes) b
Harris 0
7





C. Greenidge 1 b w. Harris

H_ King b Phillips 2
E. L. G Hoad not out 23
Extras; b1, lb 2,nb. 2 5
Total (for 7 wkts) 302



BOARD

Brooks

2
I MeD. Alleyne b Glasgow 7
QO. H_ Wilkinsen not out 3
Extra 3
Total jfor 2 wkts) 40
CARLTON vs. HARRISON
COLLEGE
Harrison College’s—ist Innings
C. W. Smith e Harding b Edghill 61
E. H. Hope c Warren b Edghill 5
Mr. Gitténs c Harding b Edghil! 1
C N_. Blackman run out-.... 30
Mr. Headley c.F. Hutchinson b
K_ Hutehinson - ' . 9
N Harrison |b w. Greenidge. ....° 9
R Dash b Warren ¢ 10
J Williams run eut ‘ % 20.
K Griffith | bw Warren 0
G Foster run out 0
M Simmons not aut «..0.cee vest 2
Extras: b 7, wl 8
Total 160
Fall of wkts: 1—17, 2—27, 3-~102, 4—119
S121, 6—137, 7—137, 8-—137, 9—137,
10—160
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M R w
G Eadghiil 16 2 50 3
K. Greenidge 942 31 1
K. B. Warren 13 2 Be 2
K. Hutchinson 8 30 1

CARLTON’S Ist INNINGS

F. Hutehinson lbw Williams 6
NS. Lueas c Foster b Williams $
R. Hutchinson run out 3
K. Greenidge not out 13
C. McKenzie b Williams il
G. Harding not out 2
Extras 1

Total (for 4 wkts.) . 39

Pall of wickets: 1 for 6, 2 for 11, 3 forid







R w
F.-D~ Phillips 15 2 41 1 4 for &
E. AJ‘V. Williams 2-3 58 1 Y¥.M.P.C. V POLICE
*. Ey Cozier 8 6 16 0 ¥ M PC. Ist Innings
3... if,+ Bowen 22 1 98 62 G. Greenidge ¢ Bradshaw b Mullins (0
} E. Walcott 9 0 43 © | gpurke b Mullins 1”
.. F. Harris 9 1 38 2 :
he if made 1 ° 3 0 I. Greenidge b Bradshaw ’ Ww
r P ere Kk. Branker b Green 7
LODGE vs. COMBERMERE E Branker lbw b Brawshaw 42
Lodge—ist Innings EB. Porter b Mullins 28
LODGE 209 H. Ingram lbw b Mullins 1
COMBFERMERE (for 2 wkts) 40 J Hinds b Mullins 1
G. Stoute ¢ Licorish b E.G. Adems 65 G. Archer b Green a: om
Mr. Wilkes b F. King 11 R. Austin not put 18
G. Hutchinson 1bw. b F. King 18 §. Goddard b Green 0
Mr. Mc Comie 1 bw. b F. King 0 Extras 15
E W = Glasgow c wkpr. Alleyne
b: King 36 al 139
Cc. E Gill run out 18 1
c 9. Williams lbw. b LA Fall of wickets: 1 for 0,.2 for21, 8 for
eae 4 40, 4 for 40, 5 for 90, 6 for 100, 7 for
We a eet OE... “Hutris 4 102, 8 for 111, 9 for 111, 10 for 139
N- Whkie 0. King M1 BOWLING ANALYSIS
C,. Deane not out 14 Oo M P Ww
L Brooks stpd. wkpr. Alleyne C at. ewes Se
b Harris 233° 6 31.5 4 32 9
Extras ' 8 Gr i T; ae te
; ; kL Brewster 4 13
Fotal Bis. POLICE tst Innings
Fall of wkts : 1—10, 255, 3—55, 4138, C+ Blackman, not out ....... , 44
5—133, 6—136, 7—142, 8—163, 9—182 B. Kingh not out fe
BOWLING ANALYSIS ro
oO = R Ww Total (for no wicket) .., a8
L. R. Brathwaite 6 0 19 0 LT
FicH. King... 0) Oe Be TS BOWLING ANALYSIS
@. N°-B, Grant 9 0 4 Oo Oa oe ow
E. G. Adams 6 Oo 4 1 I. Burke 5 haps 3 am
L.A. Harris 1 0 39 3 R. Austin 4 1 5
Combermere—ist Innings G. Archer 6 1 16.
1. E Licorish not out 13. ~K, Branker 2 %
G Adams c wkpr Wilkes b E Branker 4 1 4
T XI CRICKET
I UK
@ From Page 4 Mullins and Bradshaw. Before

28 not out and Mr. Headley, who
replaced Smith, 2 not out.

Mr. Headley was quickly sent
back by K. Hutchinson who got
him caught at cover point by F.
Hutchinson for 9, A few balls later
Blackman got run out at 30. The
scoreboard read 121 for 5.

Collapse followed. Harrison was
adjudged l.b.w. to Greenidge for 7.
Warren rattled Dash’s stumps
when he was 10 and got K. Griffith
i.b.w. for duck. G. Foster who
went in at number nine faced one
ball before he was run out for
nought.

Four wickets fell at 137. J. Wil-
Hams and M. Simmons put on 2:
for the last wicket. They took the
seore to 160 when Williams was run
out.. Williams got 20 and Simmons
2 not out.

With an hour left for play, Carl-
ton fought hard to muster 39 runs.
They lost four wickets by time of
call.

The opening pair F., Hutchinson
and N. S. Lucas were both sent
back by pacer James Williams for
6 and 3 respectively. Hutchinson
was given out l.b.w. while Lucas
was taken by Foster in the slips.
R. Hutchinson was soon after
run out for 3. The score was 13
for 3.

Carlton was 34 when the fourth
wicket was taken. Williams com-
pletely beat and bowled C. Mc.
Kenzie for 11.

At close of play, Greenidge was
13 not out and G. Harding 3 not

out.

Y.M.P.C. vs. POLICE
Wee oie Rests peas «a 3Be
Police (for no wicket)....... 58

Police dismissed Y.M.P.C. for 139
runs in their first innings on the
first day’s play in their first divis-
ion cricket match at Queen’s Park
yesterday.

At the end of play Police had
replied with.58 runs for the loss of
no wicket. Carl Mullins, the Police
pace bowler took five of the
Y.M-P.C. wickets for the loss of 44
runs after sending 21 overs of
which six were maidens. He
bowled extremely well and moved
the ball both ways on a perfect
wicket: Medium pacer E. Green
took three wickets for 36 runs and
bowled 1) overs. The only bats-
man for Y.M.P.C. that put any

resistance was E. Branker who hit
a patient 4? which included three
fours.

C. Greenidge and I. Burke open-
ed for ¥.M.P.C. to the bowling of



Greenidge could get off the mark
Mullins had him for’ a duck. L.
Greenidge followed and when the
score had reached 21 Burke also
fell victim to Mullins. . Branker
joined L. Greenidge and they car-
ried the score to 40 when K.
Branker went. E, Branker fol-
lowed and opened his score with a
brace but Greenidge did not stay
long as he was bowled by Brad-
shaw. E. Branker carried his score

to 42. Y.M.P.C,, closed their
innings at 139.
After Lunch Blackman and

Kinch opened the first innings of
Police to the bowling of Burke and,
Austin. Blackman and -» Kinch
quickly settled. down, and_ scored
freely. When stumps were dvawn
‘they were still together with
Blackman 44 not out and Kineh 14
not out.

COMBERMERE vs. LODGE
BQO GO in. sissaieeses sivids oss ROD
Combermere (for 2 wkts) .... 40

Turning out for Combermere
for the first time yesterday, Frank
King captured five Lodge wickets
for 55 runs in the Lodge—Com-
bermere First Division cricket
match at Combermere. Lodge bat-
ted first and scored 209 runs.
Combermere is now 40-runs for
the loss of two wickets.

Frank King was not bowling at
his fastest but took things easy.
He bowled 16 overs. Slow left
arm bowler L. A, Harris com-
manded respect during his 10 overs
when he took three wickets for
39 runs

For Lodge, opening ‘batsman
Glyne Stoute played an enterpris-
ing innings to score 65, He sent
three balls to the six ‘boundary,
He was eventually out to E. G.
Adams’ bowling when L. E. Lic-
orish brought off a difficult catch
on the boundary,

Combermere’s L, E. Licorish is

not out with 13 while I, McD.
Alleyne scored 17. .
Mr. McComie, Lodge medium

pace bowler sent down five maid-
en overs.

Lodge'won the toss and’ elected
to bat on the perfect wicket.
Glyne Stoute and Mr. Wilkes op-
ened the innings for Lodge to the
bowling of Frank King and Leroy
Brathwaite. Each batsman began
his score with a four and went on
confidently.

Frank King, however, caught
his length early and bowled Mr.
Wilkes with the last ball of his
third over. The score was 19.

@ On Page 16

Spartan Proud Of
Goddard And Walcott

THE SPARTAN CRICKET and Football Club, at their |

Annual General meeting at

Queen’s Park on Friday, paid}

tribute to John Goddard for his fine handling of the vie- |
torious 1950 West Indies Cricket team to England, and

placed on record their appreciation of the fact that Clyde
Waleott, a member of the W.I, team and of the Spartan
Club, had distinguished himself by his performances with
the bat and behind the stumps.



JOHN GODDARD

Young Blood In Water

Polo

days practised
times a week in preparation for
the tournament,

By PAUL FOSTER

WATER POLO fans are disap-
pointed. They claim that too many
tall scores have been recorded so
far this season and they fear that
these big scores will continue
throughout the tournament.

The water pele association with
eight men’s teams taking part in
this year’s competition were faced
with a preblem shortly before the
1951 season opened. The six
teams who took part in last year’s
league could re-enter this year’s
competition, There were however
several youngsters who wantited to
learn the game. Had only these
six teams returned to play in this
year’s league then these young
players. would not have secured
places in the various teams,

The association decided to in-
vite the secondary schools and the
Carlton Club to enter teams
Harrison College accepted the in-
vitation, on one condition — that
some of their pupils then play-
ing for other clubs must play for
their school. When these boys lef.
school they could then re-join
their old clubs—an_ understand-
able request.

Reborn

Carlton were unable to enter a
team, but they told the associa-
tion of a group of men and boys
from the Black Rock and the
Paradise Beach Clyb area who
were interested in bringing @
team for the 1951 competition,
‘Thus was born or rather re-born
the Whipporays Water Polo Club,
Whipporays played league water
polo in the early forties and two
of their present members, captain
Albert Hunte and Clarence O'Neal
turned out for the original team.

With Harrison College entering
the competition, there was now
room in the other teams for the
new members of the association,
Snappers lost the Manning twins,
Bonitas lost Allan Taylor, Rolf
Feldman, Barracudas lost Charles
Evelyn and Flying Fish lost
Geoffrey Jordan. These boys
went over to Harrison College and
the newcomers filled the breach.

Snappers although they lost the
Mannings were perhaps the least
hard hit. They still had their ex-
perienced nucleus of George Mc-
Lean, C. McLean, Kenneth, Ince,
Delbert Bannister, A. Taylor, M.

browne and Glyne Rogers. The
other teams besides the players
they lost to Harrison College,

suffered with last minute casual-
ties—players leaving the island
or having changed their jobs and
beIng unable to play. This caused
an_ eleventh hour re-shuffle and
had. not the Headmaster of Har-
rison, College permitted some of
his younger players — those who
could not possibly gain selection
on the school team—to join the
hard pressed clubs for this year
only, several of the clubs might
well have had to cancel their en-
tries for the 1951 league,
Full Credit
Here is where the Snappers tean
must be given full éredit. With
two newcomers in their midst,
they got these players to turn up

regularly for practice and had
them in reasonable condition by
the start of the season. Harrison

College too during the Easter holi-

Officers elected for the year
were: — President — Mr, F. A, C,
Clairmonte, O.B.E,, Vice-Presi-
dents: — Mr, J. O. Tudor and Mr.
H. A. Tudor:— First XI Cricket
Captain:— Mr. Keith Walcott, |
Vice-Captain;— Mr, L. F. Harris, |
Intermediate Cricket Captain:— |
Mr. A. F. C. Matthews, Vice- |
Captain: — Mr. O. S. Coppin, First
XI Football Captain:— Mr, H. W.
Cadogan, Vic e-Captain, Mr.
Desmond Johnson, Seeond Divi-
sion Football Captain: Mr, A, D.
Gittens, Vice-Captain:—- Mr. Tom

Banfield

Mr. A, F. C. Matthews was Fe |
elected Honorary Secretary and
Mr. C. H. Skinner was elected |
Assistant Seeretary,.

The following were elected to|
serve with the ex-officio mem-
bers as a Committee of Manage-
ment:——Mr. D. H. L. Ward, Mr,
M. W. Clarke, Mr. E. D. Inni
Mr, O. S. Coppin and Captain
R. A. Sealy,





sometimes three

Swordfish, Barracudas, Flying
Fish and Bonitas with more new
men to train than cither Snappers
or Harrison College, found — this
task a great deal more diffigult.

Police also had newcomers and
Whipporays with the exception ol
Hunte and O'Neal had never play-
ed the game before.

Hence the 1951 season began
with Snappers and Harrison Col-
lege having a clear superiority
over the other six teams. The
first round of the tournament is
not even half way through and
already improvement can be
noticed in the weaker teams,

F.L.N.A.

There are several other im-
portant factors which have led to
these big scores. The Water Polo
Association is seeking affiliation
to the Federation Internationale
ie Natation Amateur an_ inter-
mational body which governs in-
ternational sport. Affiliation tc
this Federation is one of the major
steps towards international recog-
nition and on to what must be
every true sportsman’s desire—~
representation at the World Olym-
pic Games,

F.LN.A. sent the Barbados as-

sociation a copy of the rules of
water polo for 1951, These new
rules, quite different to the old

rules whieh were used last year,
have been strictly adhered to this
year, In 1950, playing by the old
rules, play lasted for two periods
of seven minutes actual play with
three minutes rest. This year the
new rules call for two periods of
ten minutes actual play with five
minutes rest. Six extra minutes
in which to shoot more goals.

The association found that the
distance between the uprights of
the goal posts used last year
were six inches short of inter-
national requirements, New goal
posts built to international scale
were constructed for the 1951
tournament, Six inches doesn’t
seem to be such a marked in-
crease. But ask any goal-keeper
what another six inches means,
when at the start of each jump
only hig head is out of the water.
This is not an attempt to exoner-
ate goalkeepers for the high
scores against them. It is merely
stating a few of the facts which
may be escaping water polo fans

Stop Watch

This year for the first time the
association is using a proper water
polo stop watch, Whenever play
is stopped for a goal or for any
other period over five seconds,
the watch is stopped and restarted
when the ball goes back into play.
Thus ensuring that there is ten
minutes of actual play each half.
Last year time keepers had to
average actual play by thelr wrist
watches, :

Bearing these points in mind,
spectators will have a better idea
of the 1951 set up and perhaps
reserve their criticism for a little
later in the season, Players will
get more accustomed to these new
conditions and with the weaker
teams improving in every match,
the standard of play will un-
doubtedly get better as the season
grows older,

NO. 178

The Topic
of

i

Last Week |



The first dgy in September
Away, in “forty-nine”
The floods in Constitution
Left suffering behing,

: .

For Betsy's pot and eld house

Her bed, her sheep, her goat

Leave her behind at mid-night
And to St. Lucia float

The people in this island
Start to show sympathy
And they collected money
To help her misery.
Whe Government as usual
Sterted at their snail's pace
Without a living interest
,In poor Betsy's disgrace
.

Well boys you know a slow death
Ts the most cruel way

And up te Menday last week
Betsy's in the same way,

At the St, Michael's Vestry
The. Government as before
Just tried to leave their trouble
Right at the Vestry’s door

. .

But “Bro. Motts’’ eried no bors
You all are out of luck
Now you are tn this trouble
You want to pass the buck”?
Leave out the Vestry, old boys
Share out you money t guess
You ought to knew the Vestry
Don't mix up in a mess! !
. . °

Fer trouble’s coming old boys
Much trouble as you see
Go! let the Welfare Office
Relieve your misery.
. .

Don't think you're fooling “yes mer
With your sweet “money fuss”
We got the Coppers old boys
Your Government miss the bus."*
For when the “‘share-out" starts up
We know you all il see
The present government “set-up
Adds to all miseries



Of course their inside headaches
Would set 4 pation mad
This is the revelation
Of their “adopted lad
‘ .
Is there no baim in Gilead?
Yes! there's a physician there
Do give them an injection
Can't you see death is near’

But Betsy can't keep quiet
She's living in slime and mire

She suffered by “flood waters
You'll burn up in hell fire

You parade about old times
You ‘buse the men of yore

But are you any different
In dealing with the poor”

Joe said, Lou get ;your black dress
Dress quickly girl come see

The funeraj of the comrades
At Westbury Cemetery

One thing, will Betsy welcome
Not silver, neither gold

But a J & B in this weather
While living in the cold

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J&R BAKERIES
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PAGE SIX



portrait







SHAKESPEARE drew this
of himself

SAYS
EXPERT





pus bead, drawn upside down »rarians and collectors agree
on the margin of a book. t that the four-line inscription is
the head of William Shakespeare in writing ‘ike the known
drawn by Shakespeare—accord specimens of Shakespeare's

ing to Ronald Ashford, of Stour
bridge, Wores, expert wo
Clizahethan books,

it is be
to recor
say i.”

Vir. Ashford found the drawing on
an end-page of a 1605 edition o

tter to chuse a

er these

hand, They give this reading :—
present
estate with security than strive
olde idle doings

Vir. Ashford has sent copies of the

“The Annales of Cornelius sketch to experts in London
Tacitus.” bought from a Strat and to Oxford's Bodleian
ford-on-Avon collection. Library.

f.uatden xpress Service

Cricket Ambassador

for

His

THE name ‘Plum’ Warner lege will always be a matter
stimulates visions of the Mecca of speculation, but, at the age
Cricket and brings to mind his- 134, he left the West Indies and
toric cricket matches in every entered Rugby School—a_ school

art of the world where the Union that has never been particularly

ack waves in the breeze. That noted as a cricket nursery.
alone would popularise the life cricketing career as a schoolboy

story of Sir Pelham Warner and

all the more so to West Indians though he had the distinction, Of business to grasp the details /
when Plum Warner by Laurence shared by few, of becoming a 4nd resources of the concern.”
Meynell published by Phoenix member of the MCC while still a Back in London, Lewis made
House Ltd. dwells on the early schoolboy. At Oxford, ‘Plum’ was futurist furniture for the Omega
life of ‘Plum,’ a Trinidadian by dogged by bad luck. Ill-health Workshop: chairs that stuck to
birth. School for young ‘Plum’ curtailed his cricket He got his the seats of purchasers’ trousers,
was very largely synonymous Blue but his cricketing career at candlesticks that once picked up
with ‘increased opportunities for Oxford ended on a gloomy note could not be put down again ow-
playing cricket. His first intro- he was twice run out in the match ing to the umeconomic use af
duction to the game had been in against Cambridge in 1895. futurist glue. 1
a long verandah in the Attorney First playing for Middlesex It was not enough to quench
General's (his father’s) home in when he was stil at the ’Var ity, his creative ardour, which, in
Trinidad where a _ black boy, his long and distinguished active 1914, issued in the famous enor-
Humming Bird, was his coach and association with the county was to mous, pink-paper heavy-type,
mentor. continue until 1920 when he play- high explosive magazine Blast. A
At Harrison College it was ed his last innings in first class futurist manifesto. calculated to
diplomatic to do enough work to cricket. ‘To-day, at the age of 78 awaken, startle, affright, but
keep out of the ‘Black Book’, for he is still associated with Lord’s hardly to enlighten ,
an appearance in that ill-fated and the MCC. Few men have en- Before its echoes had died

volume automatically

entitled a gaged in

as many



crieket tours as

was not outstandingly brilliant al-

personal attendance in the Library ‘Plum’. When he first toured,
where headmaster Deighton's representative teams did not go
wrist-work with a bamboo cane abroad under the aegis of the
was distressingly accurate and MCC. It was only fitting that his
painful. In spite of having to first tour in 1897 should be to the
devote some grudged hours to his West Indies with Lord Hawke.
books, the future England captain When in 1903 he was asked to
managed to gain his First XI col- captain an English side, the first

ours at the tender age of 18, and
a
XI helped to

in

MCC side
Garrison
game for

against the
ave the

match



e to Australia

Warner
had already been on six tours to
various parts of the world inelud-

his school by staying in for over ing the U.S.A, Mr. Meynell tells
an hour for 7 runs, Evenin later the story of Plum’s thrilling
life, wnen’ he acquired glorious career in big cricket from his
scoring strokes, it was this grit and opening an innings with the Cham-
determination which he had first pion to the Inst thrilling match
shown at Harrison College that at Lord’s) when Middlesex beat
marked him out as a leader and Yorkshire by tive runs while the
a valuable asset to any team vast crowd held their breath anc
Whether ‘Plum’ would have the dropping of a pin would have
been an even greater cricketer sounded
had he remained at Harrison Col- explosion.

Been

Making

TARR, By Wyndham Lewis.
Methuen. 9s. 6d. 352 pages.
Perey Wyndham Lewis is a

painter and a writer. He had

been a painter and a writer in

London and Paris for 40 years.

He has also been a fire-eater for

40 years. His hobby has been

the collection of enemies. Now

his novel Tarr—the last explo-
sion of the 1914 war—is re-issued.

If it is no longer dynamite, it is

still dynamic.

First sign that there was some-
thing odd about Lewis (born 67
years ago in Maine) occurred
when a school mate at Rugby
found him painting the head
of a large dog and cried out in
horror. “You frightful artist’!
His house-master took appro-
priate action; Lewis was packed
off to the Slade School, where
he caught an inspiring glimpse
of the huge gold earrings of Au-
gustus John, at the dawn of his
career as artist and patriarch.
John did something more = in-
spiring; he bought one of Lewis's
first pictures.



By GEORGE MALCOLM
THOMSON

Followed Paris, where Lewis
studied philosophy under Berg-
son, and Munich, where he
studied painting in a studio run
by a Turk. He returned to Lon-
don, an arrogant young man in
an outsize sombrero and
Quartier Latin clothes made for
him by a horrified Brook Street
tailor.

The hero of Tarr, a novel deal-
ing with English and German
expatriates and their love affairs
in Paris, can be looked on as
partly a self-portrait of this pe-
riod:
: .dark skin and a steady,

unamiable expression. He was
clean-shaven with a _ shallow
square jaw and straight thick
mouth. His hands were square

”

and usually hot. . .

“He impressed the stranger as

having inherited himself last

week and as being in a great press

away, the Great War had carried
its founder off to other kinds of
high explosive. Returning in no
peaceable mood. he launched a
magazine called The Enemy.
When Arnold Bennett protested
against the title, he retorted, “If
you find a person distasteful to
you, be rude to him. Do not re-
fer to him as my friend so-and-
sO,’



Taking his own advice, Lewis
attacked Bloomsbury, “left-over
aesthetes of the greenery-yallery
period”; the idea of freedom: the
eult of the negro; the idolatry
of the little man: “What we wan:
is a tyranny—of the best intel-
lects.” “Indiseriminate education

SUNDAY

Busy
Enemies

fie

aioe

too much and dia
enough. The public
svarea at his pictures (you can
stare at one in the ‘ate now),
were puzzied by his violent, cha-
vac novels and were scared by
his opinions.

He was thought to be brutal
io be partial to despots, to lack
warmth of feeling for the poor
and lowly.

He declared that he preferrea
Fascism: to Communism, had a
pat on the back for Mussoiim,
wrote one book in favour of Hit-
ler (1931) and another against
him (1939). When the Ler be-
came warlike Lewis was against
a war “to make the world safe
for Communism.”

Simultaneously, then, he was
boycotted by a sect of the intel-
ligentsia and had his portrait of
T. S. Eliot rejected by the Royai
Academy, a singular double tri-
umph. Augustus Jahn resigned
from the Academy. Lewis com-
mented: “The Royal Academy
have lost their only artist.”

Ten years later in 1949, a deep
misfortune befell this old war-
rior of the studios. Painting his
second portrait of T. S. Eliot, he

wrote
paint



found that he had to move closer
to see his siiter, Now he faces
total blindness.

It is disaster which he ac-
cepts with some humour (“Tt
would solve a great many prob-
lems if English painters were born
blind”) and no self-pity:

‘Pushed into an _ unlighted

room, the door banged and _ bolt-
ed for ever, I shall then have to
light lamp of aggressive vol-
tage mind to keep at bay
the

From
}

a
in my
night.”
his obstreperous youth
he has retained the courage
which at one time might have
been mistaken for panache. He
still has his dictaphone. But, alas!
you cannot paint by dictaphone.

LOOK YOUNGER, LIVE LONG-
ER. By Gayelord Hauser. Faber

and Faber. 12s. 6d. 320 pages.

Who, asks Dr.
ence) Hauser, has been
aging your body? You
right. Do the Body

have
Slant

higher than your head).
Stomach lift. Bathe your
hot water, in cold water,
air, in something.

feet
in

in
hot

Take some spinach juice, pars-
Have

ley juice, watercress juice.
a liquid tomato, Have some Ex-
travagant Wild Rice Hamburgers,
a recipe dedicated by the Dr.
to Greta Garbo, Have some rhu-
barb and black treacle dedicated
(by me) to Mrs, Squeers.

Have a good neutral (not
kaline) shampoo, in the
Slant position naturally.
wear bright red, except
blood-stream,

Within 30 days you, too, can
have a flat stomach. So back to
Body Slant. Make every, day a
Vitamin D Day. Live longer, live
louder, live upside down.

World Copyright Reserved
—L.E.S.

SENATORS AGAINST
FORMAL REPORT
On MacArthur Inquiry

WASHINGTON, June 238.
Several members of the Senate
Committee inquiring into Gen.
MacArthur's case are against mak-
ing any formal report, Committee
Chairman Senator Richard Rus
sell (Democrat, Georgia) said to-
day
“The sentiment seems to be
strong that the Committee has put
the facts before the people. Under
the democratic process, the people
can approve or disapprove of
what has been done,” he added.
Russell said the Committee will
meet in ten days time to decide
whether to call more witnesses,

al-
30dy
Don"

in your



like an atomic bomb is dangerous. Look at the upper and if a formal report should be



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ADVOCATE

Mr. Lewis Has













(of natural sci-
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All
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JULY 1951

SUNDAY. 1,







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if your requirements are not listed above, write us for free advice

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SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951







You see, this city can snatch back so much that fame brings...

THE

By R. M. MacCOLL

HOLLYWOOD,

SO there’s this chap called Wil-
liam Clark Gable, jug-eared and
soupy-voiced, born in Cadiz,
Ohio, about 53 years ago.

I have never seen Cadiz, Ohio,
but I have seen 500 small towns
like it, the length and breadth of
America.

I cam hear the sound of its
Main Street, and t know I have
said good-morning to the cop on
the beat and had a chicken salad
sandwich in the corner drugstore.

Gable did not want to settle in
Cadiz, Ohio. He wanted some-
thing “different.” and he got it.

He tried working in an oilfield,
like his father. He tried being a
lumberjack. He got 15 dollars a
week in a rubber factory. But
all the time there was that con-
suming urge to be an actor.

BAD STAxT

THERE was no bright, quick
road to success for Gable.

Trying to be an actor entailed
dreary days of frustration and
nights of doubt and near despair.

He arrived in Hollywood — at
about the same time as the great
Depression of 1930, which was not
timing —-by way of an unofficial
journey on a goods train to the
Pacific Coast.

I was talking just now to an
Australian woman who used to
have the pre-success Gable as one
of her “roomers” here in Holly-
wood.

“He was néarly
gry,” she said.

always hun-
“Hadn't got the
price of a chocolate milkshake on.
him. But he had such appealing
eyes that I used to let him eat
part of my son’s breakfast in the
mornings.”

(That same appealing look was
soon going to get results from
millions of other women_ across
the world. And it was going to
pay off in rather more than haif
a breakfast.)

ON THE WAY

ALL the dreariness of cadgea
meals and shoes that needed
mending ended at last, and the
incandescent light of fame started
to warm up for the man with the
grey eyes and the urge to act:

Probably a lot of you remem-
ber “A Free Soul,” in. which
Jonnny-Come-Lately-Gable stole
the act from Norma Shearer and
Lionel Barrymore.

That flat voice proved irresis-

‘LONELY G



CLARK GABLE AND SYLVIA HAWKES

Ohio and Gable, wisely, has never
tried to monkey with it).

And then came the burgeoning
batch of successes culminating in
“Gone With The Wind.”

And how did success sit with
Gable? Well success in Holly-
wood is apt to be as congenial as
a case of bubonic plague on a
maiden voyage.

I was talking only yesterday to
one of the most. brilliant young
producers on the M.G.M. lot. He
is 34, and he is right up at the
top of the heap.

He said to me:

‘For years I
lived for success.

I was deter-
mined to get to where I wanted
to be. Suddenly Ll, was there—I
had it. And life Was not worth
fiving. I had nothing to fight for
any more.”

“What did you do?” I asked.

“Oh, I had to go to a psycho-
analyst; of course. it took 1h
months, and cost me afi awful lo
of money at 25 dollars a consul-
tation, but he finally straightened
me out.”

THEN CAROLE
SO Gable — and now it was
Golden Gable—bought his _ big
ranch in San Fernando Valley,

Or did he? There were already
two divorces. hanging sadly on
the record. Back in 1924 he had
mafried a girl called Josephine
Difloh. That ended in 1930. In
1931 he married Ria Langham,
The lawyers argued that one into
obscurity in 1938.

But in March 1939 Gable got
mafried to pretty, beguiling, and
amusing Carole Lombard, a tip-
top actress, anda resounding
suceess in hér own right.

They were happy for three
years. Then, in 1942, Carole was
killed in a plane crash. A few
months later Gable, now increas-
ingly taciturn and needing a daily
hair crop to conceal the greying
hair above his ears, enliste in
the American Air Force.

He had a good war record,
winning the Air Medal for “ex-
ceptibnally meritorious etrhieve-
ment” during five missions over
enémiy territory.

“MALAISE”

AFTER his demob the Boy
From Cadiz faced a world that
grew increasingly difficult. His
first post-war film, with Greer
Garson, was a flop. Then he
seemed to get back into the old
groove with “The Hucksters” and

SUNDAY

ABLE

But he was a fonely man. He
never cared to take any part in
the Hollywood razzle-dazzle. His
idea of a good time was to go out
hunting or fishing, or to down
some contemplative Scotches at
the ranch in the evenings.

Hollywood is not an awfully
gay place. People here are apt
to suffer from something for
which we have no exact word in
English, but which our French
friends call a “malaise.”

The Hollywood malaise is some-
thing that can be as troublesome
as lumbago. I have gay been
here a week, but already I begin
to see what ails the citizenry
around here.

Yes, there was Gable, awfully
lonely and with very few friends.
It is all right to have only a
handful of friends if you have
the spiritual and mental resources
to take care of the times when
vou know you are gging to be all
alone.

But if you haven't
going gets really rocky,

And then the lonely man met
the English woman Sylvia
Hawkes. There were some points
of resemblance. She was essen-
tially lonely too. She like Gable;
had been married three times
two divorces (Lord Ashley and
Lord Stanley of Alderley), and a
good marriage which ended when
Douglas Fairbanks Snr. died.

APARY.... ALONE

FOR a few months the marriage
went well. And then suddenly it
had stopped going at all, and
Sylvia Hawkes was off to Mexico
—alone.

She came back and went off in
the yacht of the millionaire Van-
derbilts for a Pacific cruise. She
has had a partial breakdown on
the trip

The ship’s doctor has forbidden
her to reply to radiograms.

So, while Sylvia sits sadly in
the yacht, Gable is back again
all alone at his great big ranch
house.

The

then the

ranch house with

. every~
thing—the

swimming pool, the
super TV set, the five bathrooms,
the giant refrigerator, the sports
room, the well-stocked bar, the
washing machines—all those gim-
micks and trimmings and fallals
that go to make up the rich, full
life.

Well, nearly all.
one thing missing

Happiness.

There is just

ADVOCATE





beings inmpacke t
department of C. F. Harri
Ca., Ltd. Miss Clare Cave showed

me the trickiest of models in a



two-piece, and also a one piece by
Ripley for $2.65. In ts collec-
tion I: saw the famous Jantzen
name, afd for mother—a very

new strapless design in Satin Las-
tex. In this beach display are
the raciest looking Beach Bags in
rainbow stripes and overall de-
sign, rubber lined and offered in
two sizes for $3.98. The whole
display is one of colour and in this
Kiddtes-Shop’, upstairs in Har-
rison’s, you'll find Miss Cave has
for children everything that will
answer the call for sun and sea,

The Paint Counter ai C

S. Pit-
cher & €

dazzles the eye. There’s
masses of it and for every purpose.
For the kitchen sink, now, all you
need is this Aluminum Paint that
Suarantees a long lasting silver
inish. And on those lime walls
you'd use Berger Matroil—a paint
that covers solidly two coats
and provides a really good wash-
able surtice. For that troublesome
Siower-bath, or for that matter
“ay congrete or metal work, the

in

excellent Perquite ‘White’ with it’s

anti-fungus
sultable
roof—with

And

qualities is ideally
Lastikon

if I've missed

Red Oxide.

anything,
Pitcher’s certainly haven’t in this
extremely well stocked depart-
ment

Books '— especially ‘Technical
Books abound in Roberts & Co.
on High Street. Electrical, Build-
ing, Automotive, Photographic, all
are here and many more besides.
Yes, many more — of which Mer-
cantile Law and Accountancy are
two, In passing I saw materials
for the Artist and Student includ-
ing Brushes, Oil and Water-Col-
Urs aNd an assortment of recent-
ly rec@ived Paint-Boxes. There
is also an excellent range of Paper
and Canvas and Roberts & Co.
will arrange to have this latter
cut and stretched to your re-
quirements. There is a splendid
choice of Artist’s Materials
whether for School use or to in-
dulge in that most excellent of
bobbies

i | Canada’s

Man About Town — LEER [ctor anon?

Finally, don’t forget the

PAGE SEVEN

TL aa eee

Mr. J. H. Buckland! ws

has View|

been owner

> on of he Sea Bring Prompt Relief from i:
2UCS ouse on istings since

March of this year. The managevr,! BACKACH ;

Mr, George Edwards, showed me HEADACHE

the extensive renovations, now| @ RHEUMATISM

almost completed. Large airy bed-| tee ane

rooms overlook coast and sea—| Jj ypurs e100 1 - é

emphasising the high location and | 4anes Garris _ .

cool comfort. Sea View Guest 40 3/-
House cater to Lunchéon and} BPs
Dinner Parties in the spacious





dining-room — serve and
cocktails in an attractive open air
patio-bar. Catering is the Ameri-
can Plan with excellent food and
service and in it’s central location,
convenient to beach, clubs and
town, the completely new Sea
View Guest House has everything
to offer the visitor.

drinks















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The only Serve-Yourself Hard-
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where it is? Famed for this time
saving and very modern shopping
service, the Barbados Hardware
Company known to most
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is Is-
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at 16 Swan Street. This spacious
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Cutlery Sets—attractively boxed,
ideal for that ‘special’ gift.



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There’s
cups

an
and

extensive selection of
saucers and earthen-
ware bowls from whic hto choose,
well as a glittering wall of
electrical appliances, including
Electric Kettles. Shopping at
Barbados Hardware Co, Ltd
‘time well spent.

}

as

Is



Let's
Pilot

relax and
Radio. You

Barbados Agencies

listen to
ean drop
Ltd. on
Street and do just that. Take, for
instance, the imposing 6-valve
Pilot Navigator designed to op-
erate off a six-volt battery, or
the same—all electric model—at
lesser cost. And this table-mod-
el, the 5-valve Little Maestro, for
only $49.500 Here's another
model—the 6-valve Pilot Jack in
it's handsome, figured walnut
cabinet—a _ steal at $88.50. A
noteworthy feature of all these
models is the exceptionally wide
tuning ban dto ensure ease of re-
ception. The larger models have
record pick-up adaptions. These

a
into
Bay

tible (it stemmed straight. from and he started to enjoy life.

Woman Of The Week

° ‘ ;
; Beautiful and novel Toilet Ac-
; 9 e Did you know that there’s an {cessories—every conceivable me-
] ren S ar a ac ve ae) extremely well stocked little De-|dicine, proprietary or dispensed,
a bh partment Store at 44 Swan Street?

y are leaders in their field—Pilot
Mik Aha Radios—and Barbados Agencies

have them.

You’re
Roberts &

to
Co. on High

L.E.S invited see



them at
Street.



a
saloon. Her husband to

his hospital in a Rolls.
Golf, Bridge, TV

angered

rives ; Fountain Pens from the States
aniyee the prides, Look, for instance, ;

these Irish Linen Table Sets and
the newly arrived American and/|
European Floral Spuns, Ahd over}

“tlvervy new indeed, a marvellous

candy counter, smokers’ sup-
plies, even Flower and Vegetable

’ vnusual Thermos Jugs and Ice
It’s the firm of J. B. Field & Co

ve Flasks, display of Waterman
The stock is excellent and so are

” E 7 I I She

Hy Evelyn Irons

is





by supposi-

tions that she a lot of seeds. A fresh and varied stock

spent







here isthe Millinery Department} ’,. ' . a ¥ .
Kann ar : ; ay . ; displayed in a_ spotless store. “ ty Bie.) ey
hildren’s lib ils that hi nha eee en, oe bebe it ee a pay 4 Witere? Sverythina’s there in P, KLIM is ideal for infant feeding—it’s always
every one in ther own hand c ren’s librarian wails that his Course. , She styles and colours. lis show- Meutedin ar Coe ife a aaa a 6 544 .
(“Children would not care for clients are too Blytonised to read it, she aoe __lcounter/is displaying a wide range |, ‘Bra hike Ga Pr ince Wil- Pyne an and unatfotmly nourishing, KLIM up
typewritten letters’). Her 23 Dickens. Both are keen golfers: play|of Costume Jewellery while fur- nat ret oo Ritant ithete Alte plies the important food essentials meeded for
publishers also get hand-written Enid Blyton weet serenely on. arr ® Je They ane ouleg ther back a A eparocen for Nore’s oe Matias’ thutehitan babies to grow strong and healthy. And KLIM is
letters—pages of them, on both “I am not a malicious person.’ so e ne ‘Ourt, | Ladies}and Men's Shoes, On this)‘*Ores et as? dass ait + ehtha one Lf ; si i
sides of the paper—detailing ail says she. ‘play bridge, watch TV. -work in| side jg the ‘comprehensive diets yard ot va oo moan cree readily digested another important featute, :
the preliminary business. She started to write as a school- the garden. 7 7 of Household Appliances andj#nd its former Pri a we ilia : Above all, KLIM is dependable, It’s aot surpris-
girl in Beckenham, where she was _ With all her colossal output, | Glassware and the whole selection! there how on tate SLLDAIES ing that so many Mothers prefer it!
e€ 1s a Company $ Enid Blytc ; lave. to h » Henry Street—the Cosmopolitan 8 y
Sometimes the business is born, treasures a ete ae at yton is no slave, to her i. omered to you at the corner of ee a some a, co er a
al intricacies rejection slips. Her first published 4tt. Swan Street and Bolton Lane. rug Store presentg its stock
sever abteat ite cab oinn Bas work wae. 2 love poem in Nash’s In a smart new black dress, a ee eee aT Te the modern manner,
r é is -wW a £ q a I ee 4 : . ‘ . é
factory: Sip pais in Ops lawyers maa wor = wee errr ee eu ‘Seon oe oot a 4 Car Vans Pick-ups—galore! Libe a Linens Jaeqmar 1. KLIM is pare, safe milk
' 1 ni ot one a. a} t ars, ans, -ups—gé Jiberty L : Ji ‘
eS ae _ ay eee i Sie wes a Sompetant pianist, husband and elder daughter} 1) Fort Royal Garage now, crowd-| Scarves—London Styled Dresses, ‘
herself extept in. special eireum- and her father disapproved of the ea ee aes as Maat “i the en eet eras ne ‘er ae aI 2. KLIM keeps without refrigeration
: ‘ , gee it writing; planned a musical career, ays | & avuent) their owners, Morris Minors, Oo} part o 1e «delightful stoc i
for te wees tue aalae wiles Instead, she broke away and took 12 4 Baptist Sunday-school at] and four-door saloons, the larger the Showroom of the Janetta
sentation) which. she im oses on the Froebel training, taught in a Beeckenham. Oxfords, Cowley Vans and Cowley! Dress Shop. The linens are styled | 3. KLIM quality is always uniform
ali heF publishers alike + ea kindergarten. (“I always. loved WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED Pick-ups, these last now with)in the most captivating, hand- *
On va lati m” sh , kes—no Children and was happiest in their LES. fully opening side-draft ventila-| embroidered skirts, You must
fhiggling baht ueibeks, The first company.”’) She burst into author- ee tors and in four colours—blue,|see them. The Jacsmar Scarves 4. KLIM is excellent for growing children
anes aces see a 000, or the aan ship when, as a student, a pub- STANLEY green grey, and ae Only &jare truly hog mete eer oT
* , * me ‘ 7] paived ar _z g ade hand-
i . have Lis her £72 down for a set small number are unsold, Coming} ceived are the English made hé
a et ede ce OF abt english Raters for schools. =the fearless soon is another mixed shipment | bags, perfectly finished and won- 5. KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes

NOW. f noelp you decorate the
scrapbook, this week's stamp
18 gbe showing Stanley :—

Here he ts—Staniey the feariess,
soldier sailor writer, and explorer
ot Atriea.

of twenty-one units, Have a look) derful value, From Scotland there
at the Cowley-Pick-Up designed, are knitted _ twin-sets in the
as a school bus with plastic cover-| finest of qualities — there is, in

ed side seats, overhead canopy andj fact, your complete wardrobe for

How much does she make? Far
more than the £10,000'a year
usually estimated; Probably nearer
the £50,000 which Edgar Wallace

ENID BLYTON
in a new black dress she takes time
off to go to Ascot.

Subconscious Cinema

She sits down at her typewriter
without plot or synopsis. Figures,

KLIM Is RECOMMENDED FOR INFANT FEEDING!

; He was born in Denbigh, Waies safety bar—the neatest thing you] day and evening wear, The whole

ENID BLYTON, the children’s 8S Said to get. tly.’ she She says appear before her eyes as eat Pe chidhood In @ | Evey saw. Incoming shipments of| selection, exclusive to the Janetta 7. KLIM is safe in the specially-packed tin
complete list of her books, Her _ “I don't’ Know exactly, ‘inh: 0D @ cinema, sereen. They move, ji "*0°8 i Morris Products are marked by| Dress Shop, is designed to pro-
fans have to. pay 6d. for it, It S@YS, looking her quizzer straight they talk, they sing their own joined the U.S a> riesae

in the eye. the speed in which they go out vide you with the widest range of



















shows that thits prodigious yarn~ i i ivi i original tunes. Other characters eal ad year cna ave you reserved yours.? apparel hallmarked quality. 8. KLIM is produced under strictest control
$ 7 Z Lik h dividue king vecame ~@ re “= hav 1 Cn
spinner, stfll in her forties, has ‘ ae ct Mtn, Enid Blyton Pies appear; the story unfolds: Al I power 13s hors pee SESS =
250 books in print, She estimates ys ie © have to do is to type it out as fast piggest a
that altagether she has written tumed herself into a limited com- ,2°y can says Enid Blyton, She W2,Was te, ind “An OLD Friend in a NEW Spot”
some 300, pany. That, shé says takes care Of yackons that she must have a w David Living- :
When Edgar Wallace died at the receiving end. (“You see, the singularly obliging sub-conscious stone, who was sust A FEW YARDS AWAY!! Take pure water,
nearly 57, his output had reached nas appreciation is my real hind, ae Fak Atricn, ;
170. reward. Some of her child, readers se hyve As the Ships Come in They Bring Us .
Wallace’s daily 12,000 words 21% Per Cent her out at Beaconsfield; she has 3). 4 dm°"*2S Fiera GO) r ial add KLIM, stir
were put on paper with the help Her book of children’s prayers. met thousands of others at meet- Condon. ana WATERMAN’S PENS, CUTRITE PAPER, SPECIAL fontk ot
of two lightning secretaries and a Before I Go to Sleep, brings in ings organised by book-sellers and 14 ana diamond snutl box oy LAUNDRY STARCH, SMALL THERMOS ICE, JARS, and you have pure, safe mi re -
dictaphone. Bnid Blyton uses no £300 to £500 a year, she says, That publishers. Queen Victoria, atin Sood his VEGETABLE and FLOWER SEEDS \ Sat OF Ny
such aids. is one cheque sh@ does not receive. at home she is Mrs. Kenneth 4.07 mie Suttie te discovered AEROSOL FLY SPRAY

She sits on a_ chintz-covered
swing couch in her garden at
Beaconsfield with a portable type-
writer on her knee, and the story

It goes to a children’s charity.
Add to her income from the 250

children’s books her 2} per cent.

royalties from all the commercial

Darrell Waters, wife of a surgeon,
mother of two daughters, one an
art student at St. Andrew’s Uni-
versity and the other at Boarding-

the course of the Congo Hiver and
this expedition iaid the foundation
tor what is now the Belgian Congo
one of the richest slices of Alrica.

ft honours Staniey in this stamp.



P.A. CLARKE—Cosmopolitan Pharmacy
PRINCE Wm. HENRY STREET.

pure
safe

Copr. 1950
Borden Co.

KLIM ©: MILK









as a sideline. Plus royalties on
over 200 school readers and. other

>

3 : ‘ ; ‘ s Price, unused 10d | aM Internat’! Copr
pours from the production line at produtts to which the Enid Blyton school, Her two-servant house is ioe Thierens F = aie 1 Hoserved
the rate of 10,000 words a day name is lent—diaries, writing well-ordered: so is her 3-acre London Rxpress Bervice = SSS SES SS | FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER me
(15,000 at full pressure). paper, jigsaws. Not to mention the garden, kept by the gardener fy LA PLOL LLLP PLE EPO LPC PPE PPLE PLL
card and board games she devises “gided by the chauffeur. “Onde 5 %

of my extravagances,” she said,
indicating a thousand bush roses

Keilag Keo ee

educational text-books. It’s. 4 jin beds laid out round a pool.
dizzy sum, She has a big Daimler, but
Sometimes a snooty critic lashes she prefers driving herself

over the world, and she answers at the Blyton books. Sometimes 4 around in her small fast, green _ Cashmere Bouquet Face Powder

%



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Printed by the Advocate Co. Li4., umoespia “Is DFOIE

Sunday, July 1, 1951

OUR BEAM

IT IS unbelievable, yet it is said to be
true that during the last fortnight a boat
bringing meat for hard pressed Barbados
was not unloaded because of a technical
hitch between ship-workers and ship au-
thorities. The general public ought to be







under the Bridgetown, Speightstown and
Holetown Act of 1891, but this Act was
directed primarily at protecting the City
from the risk of fire.

What is needed in Barbados is a simple,
workable Town and Country Planning Act
which would cause the least possible hard-
ship. We could do no better than to follow
the Jamaican legislation on this subject.

The object of the Jamaican Town and
Country Planning Act is to “provide for
the control of development in both rural
and urban areas by securing the co-ordina-
tion of roads and public services, ensuring
proper conditions of health and sanitation,



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951

CLOSED

FOR
REPAIRS

Advocate Stationery

told (until they realise the truth) the
reasons for some of the increases in the
cost of living, and, it would appear too, for

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preserving objects of architectural, histori-
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“Let’s hope, Eden, those godless Socialists aren’t desecrating this Sabbath Day with
week-end speeches. .. .”

xX 2 »







some of the shortages of foodstuffs in the
island. The reasons show cumulatively

that the community is largely to blame.

Imagine a community as small as Barbados
allowing an incident of this nature to go
unprotested. At a time when there is a
real shortage of food which is but the pre-
lude of a greater shortage, a ship is allowed
to leave Barbados carrying with it a portion
of food intended to relieve that shortage.
Not only does this action accentuate an
existing food shortage but the meat when
it finally arrives will have to be sold at a
price which will compensate for its addi-
tional journey by sea.

This is but the quintessence of madness.
Yet it reflects a state of things too often
ignored and overlooked. It may be a source
of satisfaction to those who off-load ships
that they are paid high wages and that they
have it in their power seriously to affect
the cost of living in Barbados, This may be

‘The basis of the Act is the simple princi-
ple of zoning for development. The island
is divided into five principal zcnes—indus-
try, commerce, residential, agriculture and
open spaces. This does not mean that if
the Planning Board ordered that a certain
area should be a residential zone, and there
happened to be a factory in that area, the
{actory would have to close down: but
what it does mean is that the owner of the
factory would not be given permission to

extend it, and if ever it ceased operations

he could not redevelop the site by building
another factory.

In the same way, with regard to the wid-
ening of a street a line is established and
if an existing building is demolished the
new building cannot be built beyond that
line.

Exactly the same principle applies to
recreational open spaces. If, for instance,



‘Clubland’ And Bob Hope

Clubs for boys—and girls—are
jtaking quite a prominent place
nowadays in Social Welfare plans
and activities. And very worthily
so. For they are centres where the
young folk can get together in
healthy conditions, under suitable
superintendence, and give play
to their natural social instincts
and abounding energies. They
also possess a high ethical value
from both the negative and posit-
ive viewpoints: for they rescue the
boys and girls from idling in dan-
gerous places with nothing worth-
while to do, and so from the risk
of the “mischief” which the pro-
verb tells us “Satan finds for idle
hands”, and they furnish oppor-
tunity for beneficial activities—
perhaps the continuance of their
very limited education, or initia-
tion into some useful line of work,
along with reasonable provision
for recreation, Of this last there
should not be too much: that is the
dangerous tendency of the modern

By Rev. F. GODSON

(much more than a club) founded
nearly 30 years ago, in a very
small way, by a young Methodist
Minister named James Butter-
worth. But by the time of the
outbreak of the second World
War it had grown into the biggest
single institution of the kind,
probably, in the whole world,
with a membership of around
500, and is still growing.

While serving in the Lancashire
Fusiliers during the first War
Butterworth wa; deeply impress-
ed, and depressed, by the pro-
found ignorance of religion and
its inspiring and controlling influ-
ences displayed by the crowds of
young fellows around him, and
after demobilisation and his entry
into the Ministry he determined
to attempt something specially
for the boys, and later the girls,
in some slum area of a big city,
preferably London.

operations. This may be sur-
prising to superficial observers,
but it was, and is, most gratify-
ing to discover how the young
folk responded in due time to the
religious call, to the gracious,
heroic, Person of the Lord Christ
and His moral Kingship. A real
living Ecclesia was built up, a
genuine fellowship of faith and
reverence for goodness, which con-
trolled and inspired and ennobled
all the departments and activities
of the Scheme.

Three other important points
should be noted. The first is thai
the method of enlisting and train-
ing in dealing with new members
has been to appeal to the bit of
good in them, their better instincts,
which Butterworth holds are al-
ways there, though often deep
down and probably overlaid. The
second was to use what may be
called the Public School constitu-

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BECKWITH STORES

A : . ; ; 7 sd i f Prefects, Captains, and -

as a sols o 3 Government decided to |increase in leisure time: “all play | Ba, ains,

Ralace to ship workers, & solace to relieve an enlightened Gove . t eer Goring \end ne work gives Jack & cen So he succee.ted in persuading other Officers, and give ‘every ENJOY A
hem from the drudgery and hardships of extend the Esplanade as far as the Swing Joi ies the “Fathers and Brethern” of the one the chance of position

their task. Bridge the process would be gradual. As Here in Barbados we are in- Annual Conference to give him a and honour in turn. Thus the

But it cannot be catzed public-spirited.

Sir Douglas Ritchie an impartial ob-
server wrote in his Deep Water Harbour
report about the efficiency of labour among
water front workers, in Barbados. He said
“since the war years the general output of
labour appears to have declined seriously”.
That was in 1949 and the recent action of
ship-owners in refusing any longer to pay
for exports until they arrive in Bridgetown
warehouses is guarantee enough that their
output has not improved but worsened
since 1949.

Figures quoted by Sir Douglas Ritchie
in his report on the Deep Water Harbour
in 1949 show that costs of ship discharge
per ton varied as follows—Trinidad 9s, 1d:
British Guiana 10s. 9d: and Barbados 18s.
9d. It is idle to blame widely others for

increases in the local cost of living and to development is essential to this island and naturally nicknamed “The Dug ae Coane the seen re OF
turn a blind eye to our own contributions See thik esl eaten i isas-. |and is certainly more than should Outs”. yet been no rnoney to rebuild. Bui
to that i a a if it is neglected the results will be disas-. ant is corn eee es stil it grew-(apd cieveh, and Sos Code See deneeteneins Want. 40

Ought we not by the
exercise of a healthy public opinion to
press for economies which will result from
greater efficiency of labour? Should we
biame world market conditions because
string beans which sold earlier this year

for 20 tb b bl WIMBLEDON is the Mecca Home, the School, and the Church money, plans to the cost of pon and led him forward to é
or 20 cents per Ib, are obtainable now only Shea : te 3 ecca of |to combine in an intensive cam- £28,000 were drafted, Two years Detter position. ey got inte
Tennis just as Lord’s is the Mecca paign. So far so good, but the plan gater, gifts and promises having conversation and the comediar

at 40 cents per Ib? Tomatoes did not jump
suddenly from 24 cents per Tb. to 40 cents
per lb. because of the Korean War nor be-
cause of any dollar shortage. Carrots have
not doubled in price because of trade
cycles nor trade tendencies, These deliber-
ate increases in the cost of living are due
to the fact that they have been ignored by
the community. Enough people are willing
to pay exorbitant prices and the price goes
up, with its attendant evils. Gambling
experts abound in the streets of Bridge-
town pouncing upon the holder of a large
pay packet. Money changes hands and
the cost of living goes up for one who loses
and the others who depend on him. Work-
ers who have made all they want for the
rest of the year on the sugar plantations
are not anxious to work much more this
year. Labour, writes the Director of Agri-
culture, is in short supply, and the 1951-52
planting programme is being retarded.
Housewives accustomed to ring up for
everything are too lazy to grow garden
produce. Servants who. spend half a day
hunting vegetables and fruit in alleys
object to healthy recreation cultivating the
garden, Pigs, goats, hens and livestock and

soon as a house was put up for sale the
Government would buy it and demolish it
and eventually the windows would join
together to give Bridgetown a lovely view
of the harbour,

Such a scheme is bound to cause a Cer-
tain amount of hardship, but everything is
done to try to prevent this. In the Jamai-
can Act, for instance, it is provided that in
any case where the Board have prepared
a scheme, before it becomes law it is open
to public inspection and any persons inter-
ested may make objections. The Board
then considers the objections and may
amend the scheme if they think it neces-
sary.

This is Election year, and any Party
that intends to work for the good of Bar-

hados must have a Town and Country Plan-
ning Act on its programme. Planned

trous.



WIMBLEDON

of Lawn

Cricket, and Wimbledon is even more im-
portant than Lord's for all the World plays
Lawn Tennis.

With the championship at Wimbledon in
full swing it is strange that the West
Indies, so prominent in the game of crick-
et, are not represented. In the long history
of Wimbledon we can only recall three in-
stances of players from the Caribbean
taking part in the championship, two of
these players hailed from Jamaica and one
from British Guiana — B. M. Clarke, Lea-
hong and A. C. Belgrave, It is true that
Madame Mathieu, at one time resident in
St. Lucia, came very near to winning the
Ladies’ Singles on more than one occasion,

but she, after all, was representing France.

What is the reason for the poor showing
by West Indians? We have the climate
suitable and the ability to play ball games.
We have shown that we can compete on
equal terms with the crack cricketing
countries. But our standard of Lawn Ten-
nis is not as high as that of a small provin-
cial town in England,

The absence of twilight restricts the
hours of play in the West Indies. Lawn Ten-

debted to our energetic and enter-
prising Commissioner of Police for
introducing the movement, and it
is very gratifying that it has
caught on so quickly and stron;
and gained the cordia] approval of
the community. The first Club,
at the Southern End of the Bay
Street Esplanade, was a prompt
suecess and it has been quickly
followed by others in St. Michael,
and in Speightstown and a couple
of the country parishes, and
Colonel Michelin is planning to
extend the movement to every
parish. He is finding also that a
special Welfare Officer is needed
to. run the scheme efficiently and
provide for development: so he is
sending a constable to England to
seek the necessary study and
training for the purpose.

Filling a Gap
In the effort that a few of us put

agreed that while every possible
effort should be made to |

the lawbreaker the main

would be to work through the
children, to teach and train them
in the ideas and ways of good be-
haviour, and to that end to get the

left the adolescent period, the
critical years between school days
and the entry into employment,
very insufficiently provided for.
That gap would now be filled
pretty suitably by the Club Move-
ment, supposing it could be ex-
tended to cover the whole area,
and efficiently equipped and ad-
ministered. And I am sure that
if the four branches of Social
Welfare service indicated would
really co-operate in a determined
and persevering effort very great
improvements in law and order
could be achieved,

But “Clubland”!
What is this?

This 1s the name for a very
comprehensive provision for the
boys and girls in the Walworth

section of South-East London,

“and reading

suitable appointment. This was
an almost derelict large old
Chapel in the Walworth area, left,
by death and migration, with only
a very small congregation, and yet
surrounded by a crowded popula-
tion, chiefly irreligious and un-
ethical, not to say immoral and
lawless, and. abounding in young
life of the cockney type.

Here he set about the very dif-
ficult task of making contacts and
a beginning. He used the few
doors open through the little com-
pany of church members and ad-
herents still remaining, also house
to house visiling and general
friendliness, and before long he
was able to make a start with just
half a dozen boys. The outlines
of his plans were still vague, but
taking shape as he went forward,

The old Chapel possessed base-
ment rooms—Sunday School and
Class and Committee accommoda-
tion, and these were used, and in
due course as the Club grew they
were adapted and equipped, and

“after six years of adventures,

failures, successes, and struggles,

new premises became a necessity”
—so Butterworth describes the
situation. And most fortunately a
near-by space was available, and
with great faith but very little

been secured, a builder’s contract
for that sum was signed, and the
young parson’s heart was im-
mensely cheered while his plans
and enthusiasms expanded,

But after a few more years
additions again became impera-
tive, and, most fortunately again,
the interest an@ powerful help of
the Duke and Duchess of York,
their present Majesties the King
and Queen, and of Queen Mary,
were enlisted, and buildings and
equipment valued at around
£100,000 were provided—work-
shops, gym, games rooms, library
room, parliament
chamber, ete., etc., and a branch
for the girls. And in the centre
«f all the “House of Worship”, the
Church, which Butterworth held
to be central and fundamental to
the whole organisation and its



boys and girls discipline ana
teach each other and develop
a strong public spirit. And the
third was the Employment as one
feature of the Parliamentary sys-
tem, imitative of the Nationa!
method of handling Public Affairs.
But Mr. Butterworth’s handbook,
“Clubland” — a volume packed
with information, life stories, and
wisdom gathered in running the
enterprise — must be read to fully
understand and appreciate the
subject.

Bob Hope

At last we come to this gentle-
man’s part in the Story. He is an
outstanding and immensely popu-
lar American comedian, and has
become a munificent patron of
“Clubland.”

It happened that the costly and
most precious buildings were
bombed and ruined during the
great blitz on London in 1940, and
while at the end of the war the
members, past and present, ralliea

U.S.A. on qa Lecture Tour, pre-
sumably about his special work
and ideals, and while there visitea
Hollywood. There, one day, with
a crowd, he was inspecting a “tilm
set” in which Hope was concerned,
and he approached the little par-

was immensely interested in Mr.
Butterworth’s story end said he
would like to give a “benefit per-
formance” for the rebuilding fund.
The winter passed and then a
couple of months ago Hope cabled
that he had booked a fortnight’s
engagement in London, and he
would give the whole of his share
in the proceeds to “Clubland”
This was estimated at £18,000.

That seems very big pay for 2
fortnight’s performances. Possibly
it may be a misprint in the report
I saw—for £1,800. Yet we know
what astonishing fees popular en-
tertainers receive. Anyway it is
a fine and substantial gift, and wil!
give a lively filip to the rebuilding
fund, and it is confidently to be
expected, will open the way to yet
greater achievements in the “Club-
land” that is yet to be.



Sitting On The Fence

R. ERNEST DAVIES, British

delegate to the Four Power
conference of Deputy Foreign
Ministers which has been argu-
ing with Comrade Gromyko for
longer than I can remember, is
reported as saying: “We don’t
want a breakdown, but we ean’t
sit here indefinitely and go craay,
We are all almost’ mental

out a time ago to devise ways and
means to control and reduce law-
lessness and crime in the island,
which seemed to be increasing,
J

already.”

By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

Do the mousy ones have blue
eyes or brown eyes?
Some blue, some brown.
How many brown?
I don’t know.
Have they all got mummies to
look after them?
Most of them.
And daddies?

vitamin deficiency check-up
and questioned about their
childhood by a_ psychiatrist.”
WORKER HITS OUT
Mg AD a bit of trouble, eh,
Schultzburger?”
“Yeah, I guess so, doc.”
“What happened?”
“Oh, I just busted the fore-
man on the nose, doc.”
“That all?”

; ; , . y , 2 * They have one daddy who “That's all, doc.’
poultry are getting less while people eat nis, unlike cricket, is not a game that can be | sian Pema pee, a fee ke looks after them all, . “Why did you siug the fore-
out of tins. played in the heat of the tropical midday | should take the advice of his ‘six- | Only one daddy? Who's that? man, Schultzburger?”
But saturation point has been reached : year-old daughter, Sally, The great Father Stalin. Why? Because he’s the low-
: bdr sun, Play usually starts at 4.30 p.m. and | tecently wrote to him: — ; Fancy being the father of more est, meanest, dirtiest son of
and unless these habits of sloth, indiffer- for the greater part of the year ends at 6 | Pear Daddy, ~# then 20,000,000 ee” a...
8 R y you are having a good FOOD NEWS “O.K., O.K. Schultzburger. Is

ence and a refusal to face unpleasant facts
are thrown away and a new constructive
effort made to face our problems, we are
all of us, despite what the politicians say,
going to be very much worse off than we
are today. Even tinned food is getting
short.



TOWN ANDCOUNTRY

p.m. In Northern climes devotees play the
whole day long in summer when the light
lasts until 9 p.m. or 9.30 p.m. And in the
winter months they play on hard courts
and on indoor wood courts. If the West
Indies are to overcome the absence of twi-
light and the inability to play in the heat
of the day then we must resort to evening
games on flood-lit courts.

Tennis in the West Indies — or at least

hope
time in Paris. If you can come

home, bring me Mr. Gromyke,
* we a m

_ After an hour of cross-question-
ing by a_ six-year-old, Comrade
G would be ready for the strait
jacket.

Are there millions and millions
of little girls in Russia?

Millions and millions.

How many millions?

Well, I don't know exactly.

My daddy says you know ail
the answers.

Shall we say 20,000,000?



UST the time of year for cold

salmon and cucumber, dear,

isn’t it?

Of course, dear. But who can
afford real salmon with the
present rate of taxation on un-
earned incomes?

Have you ever tried mock sal-
man, dear?

No, dear,

I read all about it in the papers.
You empty your tin of salmon
into a basin. Grade B is quite
“es dear.

yes, dear.





your poppa still alive?”
“Certainly is.”
“Fond of him, Schultzburger?”
“Sure I am. He’s the grand-
est poppa a guy ever had.”
“Did he ever beat you up wher
you were a kid, Schultzburger?’
“Yeah. Plenny.’
“Any hard feelings?”
“For beating me up?

Why
no. doc,

A saint would have
beaten me up when I was a
kid.”

“Didn't you slug the foreman
because your poppa slugged you?’

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2 i Sik Aece : 4 - ; What are their names? Then you boil some potatoes, “I'm telling you. T slugger
TODAY, with new buildings springing in Barbados oe suffers from another handi- Oh, they all have different mash them with half acup of the foreman pecause he’s the
up all over the island and the possibility cap of their own making. Lawn Tennis in names. milk, a dab of margarine, and the lowest, meanest, dirtiest son of $
, ya : : : . : $ f the Caribb Sento’ i Tae Twenty million different Chris- yolk of one egg. oe ..” : oo Sm
of new industries being established in the many of the Caribbean territories is still | tian names? Yes, dear, “Pipe” dbwn }- on. *thhty. shalt ah S
near future, the need for a Town and looked upon as a social game, This Victori- Well, no. Some have the same | Then you take half a_ stale Schultzburger. If you don’t hate | .
tye : . 3 names. Many thousands, for brown loaf, pull out the inside, your poppa you must hate your | % . 8
-Country Planning Act has become impera- an idea has prevented many a youngster instance, are called Olga. crumble it and add water till it’s: momma.” ’ y
tive. from gaining the opportunity to take part How many thousands? aogsy. 4 a “You leave my momma outa | ¥ i %
. = ) see, par. vs.
If building is not controlled now, ‘the in the game. And even some who might Don't rn LF wade Ada’ the potato mash and the “You identified this foremar § e x
; idge , 5 have made their mark have been excluded I haven't the figures with me wet breadcrumbs to the salmon, with your momma _ because she | §
charm of Bridgetown and the beauty of the . : : at the moment. and squeeze it all together in your was low and mean like him.” 2
country will be ruined within a few years. from improving their game because they Are little Russian girls dark or fingers. : i “Watch your step, doc,” $ WELL! ! Over to Bathshebo or some
Barbados must plan not only for herself were ineligible to play against other prom- rT aN ; ‘i ore wi feer? : Lest more, LS say re fore- x other lovely seaside resort Simply to RELAX §
. P : r / “4 hae ee ean Some are dark, some fair. ves, dear. en you shape it man has some physical resem- } ¥ ae
but for tourists: no tourist is going to ising players in other social spheres, How many are fair? into the form of a fish, add an- blance to your momma.” X on the silvery sands, BATHE in the briny and g
come to a country littered with jerry-built If. the West Indian is to take his rightful “ ave millions. other, dab of margarine, pop it “That gorilla like my % SIP now and again a Straight GOLD BRAID with ‘
" os F . ? : i . " : Xe ? i e yen and serve ¢ ‘ ? . - * *
houses and where industries thrive in resi- place in the Lawn Tennis World then no | any aha ecaks Metaeie aaah Sel aon Fie tn alee — % a little chipped ice. Of course it’s not a real %
dential areas. time should be lost in sweeping away the | And ten millions dark? The paper says if you stick in a for what the forgman got and $ vacation without %
7 ke me x : ie saat Ga haa ol oie q es caper where the eye should be here it comes.” <
At the moment there is no regulation to stupid barriers which prevent these islands | Aren't there any with mousy hubby will never know the differ- _ “I’m sorry you did that,)X GODDARD'S GOLD BRAID RUM
prevent an industrialist from starting a from competing on equal terms with the | coloured hair ° ence. Schultzburger. I shall have to] %& 2 S
4 : a hee a Ta tia dinned tase ‘est of the world | _Lots of them. Really, dear? report you as anti-social through | %
unning factory, with its accompanying rest of the word. Then altogether there must be “If workers in American excessive vitamin intake and! \ red i Lavi: fais
nell. in a residential or hotel area. The Let tis remember that Lawn Tennis is a | mere than 20,000,000 little Rus- factories reported lazy recommend smaller portions at, %& Serve ina avish Way.
. : | pica ar cies sian girl and difficult they are sent to the factory cafeteria.” s %
or control over building in this island is am | We the clinic for a —L.E.S. -¥ g
FESSSSSSSSS SSS SOSSSS o Oo
SUNDAY, JULY

i ccnaieitienetall

1, 1951



T



Rolling the cricket pitch.











SUNDAY - ADVOCATE NINi

PAGI





ee

MENTAL HOSPITAL

Pictures by CYPRIAN LaTOUCHE







Hy IAN GALE.

AE Lay

“SILVER
STAR”

CONGOLEUM.

a



as
FLOOR COVERING

For

em || ULASTING
BEAUTY

BeeEBEHRaas & &
JUST ARRIVED

Fr PURINA CHICK
a STARTENA & GROWENA
a a
= H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd. a
SBE EBRPeBBRBBAe

The Mental



Obtainable from

66S olo oO OOtet







































OOOO OPO DOOD DOE DP POPP OST DPSS MPP ot
% »
Tua ‘ogm . 96 ‘ ei
® rk COST OF ALL DOMESTIC HARDWARE ¢&
‘“ TE . . enn , 1" A GINIC d
1% ITEMS IS STEADILY INCREASING 2
Ly »
x >
IS THE TIME TO BUY! °
The new women’s ward * NOW i %
somes he m
The cows supply the kitchens with 2C0 pints of milk a day. $s The one are just a few of the many lines %
r , st ’ , \% Cea , leliVvA ’ » , ar r Per « ec re +
ERTVISE \ recently received which we are able to offer at advan- %
EVERY DAY six hundred Hospital was erected in 1891 ADVE i$ tageous prices %
pounds of sweet potatoes and six Before that mental patients were in the py OC i Vk % x
hundred pounds of rice are cooked housed in a forbidding building f - s COOK'S SIEVES %
in the kitchens of the Mental cpposite Glendairy Prison. Today LAL ELL PEPE | . 4
Hospital. Besides this the 7090 there are 35 dormitories, Oo oc- s Yio ‘ x
patients and 140 staff get fresh cupational therapy sheds, one * * % COTTON SOCKET MOPS %
meat, salt fish, pickled pork and each for the use of male and e z ‘ : vt ¥
milk and vegetables from the female patients, 1 WEATHERE | \pS * $s GLASS BUTTER CHURNS g
Hospital’s model farm. * Ee % 7 4 dt Vis x
One. of the finest in the Carib- 50% Discharged % 4 » % CHARCOAL BOX IRONS %
bean area, the Mental Hospital is The number of patients at the % lax : ‘aiv 1% : xs
built on an ideal site at Black Hospity has pepeoeed steadily * Ra ve just receive x x HURRICANE LANTERNS %
Rock. Its 35, acres extend trom since 1939, when there we 470 ‘. \ : c Sls $s
the road right down to the sea, patients. In the last few years * Four Femou x $ GALVANIZED OIL CANS x
and on Sundays the patients bathe it has been possible by moderi x % xs x
from the Hospital’s private beach. methods of treatment to keep the Xs 1% 7 " ; %
The grounds are well kept and number of patients stabilised at ss x ICE CREAM FREEZERS—3 Sizes x
planted with trees and flowering around 700. About 30° of tne ¢ xX mm i ; »
shrubs, the patients doing most cf newly admitted patients have been ss OC EDAR MOPS WI TH HANDLES ~
the gardening. Since his ap- cured and discharged. Dr. Lloyd S % | a" 6 s
pointment as Medical Superin- Still hopes that the new Act % * GALVANIZED GARBAGE CANS »
tendent Dr. Lloyd Still has had dealing with mentally deficieni st % = = : s
many unnecessary iron railings persons, which will come _ into x : is ENAMELLED NIGHT-CHAIR PANS :
pulled down, and the Mental effect soon, will, by putting x ais %
Hospital new tooks-more like a mission to the Hospital more on XM x ‘ GALVANIZED CLOTHES LI %
F lunt t 1 } *s ys .
park than.a prison. a voluntary asis anc making < v : »
certification a last resort, make it % ¥ ‘ KELLY NON-TURNOVER NIGHT %
Model Farm possible. for more cases to be & by J. L. CHATELAIN ° : ~
treated in the early stages. ~ Pharm. Chemi % ‘ LAMPS %
On the model firre attached to One of the methods of treating % San I NAME »
the hospital 83 pigs and 35 cattle the patients is to encourage them % Formerly Head Chemist to %]¢ P LLE . r x
are kept. The pigs are fed ou to learn -handicrafts and mak % the Paris Laboratories and % % . D (GREEN) BREAD BINS x
swill from the kitchen, and it is themselves useful in the garde: x Hospita s x : s
hoped to increase the number so and on the model farm Th % % * oo and — x
that in time at least one large pig women are taught needlework, | a |S ee F ney . : ae
can be killed every week. and I saw some men making These four little pigs have found a comfortable bed, ~ % Sd x x ar THERMOS i and 9 Pints & LASKS %
The cows are fed on elephant benches for one of the dining . s 3] % j x
grass grown on the farm, and rooms in the shade of a tree. The 8 Ae He es % x do 2 Pints Wide Mouth J AR! . %
supply the kitchens with 20U patients also cut the elephant @® CHATELAIN'S JUBOL—(1) $1% }
pints of milk a day, The Hospital grass on the farm and help in the Q For Constipation Re-Edu- ¥ s$ —————— %
now uses 400 pints of milk a day, kitchen garden, x cation of the Intestine % | % %
and it is planned to increase the For recreation the patients play x % ss WE CAN ALSO OFFER %
herd so as to make the Institution cricket and football, and there are & CHATELAIN'S URODONAL §&/& %
self-sufficient, occasional film shows. Also they s (2) For Arthritism, Rheu- $|% “4 SAM ' ” | s
There is also a small kitchen have concerts and dances, the % matism, Obesity Renal and & % %
garden which supplies the kitchens great day of the month being when @ Billary Lithsis Gout, Gravel $/%& Tua "An “ " ~
with lettuce and other vegetables. the Police Band pays them a visit. % Pains and Acidit % st — eon HEA I ROO! ADHE.- 3
If overhead irrigation were in- There are some excellent musician % 1% st Ke ° OF COLOSSAL y
stalled the model farm would among the patients, and Dr. Lloyd % CHATELAIN’S PAGEOI x) ss STRENGTH x
probably be able to supply all the Still is toying with the idea of % (3) For diseases of the Blad- &%]R %
greens that the Hospital required. starting a steel band for their } der, Prostrate and adjoining . es Only 27 Cents Per Tube. ~
The first building at the Mental amusement. 1% organ % 1% %
¥, ———-. >
i A Bi h W i * CHATELAI LOBEOI % % Piya — - >
i as | | B 5 { ( Is s ATELAIN'S GLOBEOL % * %
. 4) A Powerful Toni s 1X *
ve Isnop Was Held bY thard! eee | 1ClHardware Dept. &
PARIS of security at his Paris headquar- x Y a Be %
General Eisenhower, Atlantic ters. 1% For Anaen ( or % ¥% Tel. 2364 ~
Pact Commander-in-Chief, has A former Walt Disney cartoon pp CSN08, Over. un B | £22036 96965655.5665660556.006660060065 5006 OOOOOOOESO
ordered an immediate tightening artist has designed a new series x lon Scrofula ; by x —————S=_—= Spee “ settee e
of “Keep Your Mouth Shut’ i@ ane Nervous. Debill %
posters, which are being display- 1s Tonic tor the Heart M t
ed at headquarters, it ind Nerves %
New identity cards bearing a % %
large-size photograph have been x e %
ordered. 1% >
Even Bishop Fulton Sheen nar- \% ¥
rowly escaped interrogation when 1% %
he looked in this week to visit % al TCATUPDDUID ‘
General Eisenhower. He was x BRUCE W EATHERUEAD % % Qo
Ni Cie eeied rescued by Colonel Connolly, 1% % J =
s ¥ ¢ chief security officer, who was 1% LIMITED x 1% +i
SECURITY... 17$ UP 70 YOU! passing by while the newly cre- ss uh} y @ ‘ o °
ated American prelate, in his x : v
“ Horse sense” ... One of the episcopal dress, was being chal- One of the wards for male patients % ¥ ~
SHAPE “ Kee Your Mouth 9666666666666 OOO OOOO

Shut” posters in Paris.







TO ALL MOTHERS



—t.

SACROOL
RELIEVES
CHILDREN
SPRAINS

On Sale at .

KNIGHTS DRUG
STORES



lenged by the guards.

POP GIG A FIA AF





'







SS



For Delightful Din

AN PINEAPPLE
AFRICAN WHITE SWE
BAYS WHOLE TOMATOES, per
LIPTON’S FRENCH COF per %
SMEDLEY’S GARDEN BI ROOT, ;
SMEDLEY’S GARDEN PEAS, per tin

i ;
yer t )
CRAWFORD'S SWEET ASST. BISCUITS, per '2-Ib pkt. 49
CRAWFORD'S CUSTARD CREAM BISCUITS
( Ib. pk 4X '
CRAWFORD'S MARIE BI SCUITS, per % pkt $e
CRAWFORD'S CREAM CRACKERS, per 4 lb. pkt. .. 49
ARMOURS CHICKEN & HAM PASTE, per Jat
ARMOURS VEAL & HAM PASTE, per jar 28
ARMOURS BEEF & HAM PASTE, per jar..... 2

ing

SOU

TH
rH
THREE

AFRIC JAM, pe g

‘r CORN, per tit 48



Panu

AGS





5 ting)



ee





ANISH SALAMI SAUSA It



SLICED HAM, per



CAVE _







"ip anata et gy -esahes gh + Seelam SEVEN BRAND NEW STYLES to choose from in the AUSTRALIAN, SLICED BACON, pe
| helping doctors help you, mean a lot to u The rtair Ki CHEESE, per tin 57¢ ik r pk
\}} pride which comes from knowing that we are offering tt most gorgeous multicolours. Round, oblong and SHEPHERD GREEN LIMES, per 100 oe
ighes lalit igs at all time ny f PE LIME per 1 00
aes ne sa ht i I : [ i square, sling and short handles. Made of strong
careful and capable dispense Z p :
S
you eed. backed-up} : i Siecle Mtetesrecchatstie Usted & Co, Ltd. AS A SUPERB THRILLER. ..IT’S
your next prescrit tion t -- )))
} i0—i3 Broad Street | | COCKADE FINE RUM

Prices from $3.67

to

i KNIGHTS DRUG STORES i STANSFELD SCOTT & CO.. LTD.


PAGE TEN

Flowers For

End Of Crop

VV

i on

THE

Thursday,
ated

ried.

» dec



They begi
the iceld is loaded
gers
% drinks
then ppreciation of
ng the year,

ope ne

truck x mani
to
the





Pinfold Street



building will soon be erected.

he championships in silliards,
Dominoes, Draughts, Table Tennis
and other gamé€s will still be held
thi ar. Alr@atiy members are
o their names.





a, PRIZE at the Local

Talent Show at the Globe
Theot i Friday night went to
( uld ] who sang “Sep-
te e! Daisley, who is




addy Ail Star Winner, has
Vays pleased the crowd with
is well timed singing.

j Shoeshine”
“Boogie in the
i Fitz Harewood with
Can do r
second prizes.





were Adrian Howard and his
Q who played Latin Ameri-
A, RELIGIOUS service for mem-
4% bers of thé Y.M.C.A. afid
YÂ¥.W.C.A. will be held at the
¥ C.A. at 4,30 o’clock this
é 1 Thesé ‘services will be
hel nonthly.
night at 8 o’clock
L. Clarke, dietician at the

ffospital, will give a lec-
Nutrition” te members
Py w..C.A:.
qf. MARY’S BOYS’ School was
for the evening ses-
“nursday and Friday. The
» being repaired.

r. Dottin, Acting Headmaster,
s “T have made it clear to the
bo t school will be opened
@s usual on Monday morning.”

High Birth Rate

OVER ONE THOUSAND, five
1 ed and eight babies were

iis year in St. Miehael and
r Christ Church up to yes-
y. according to records of the







Ce al Station.
of the births were in
January when 305 were born.

The average number of births for
a month this year is 260,
In the same parishes 810 people

died during this period.
M deaths in a month were
159 in May
COPRA-ARRIVES
Schooner Freedom Fleary ar«
rived here yesterday with 279
ba f-copra from St. Lucta.



hs

v

PERROXIMDE

on oe } 58)
mC UCAS

e oi

aut b's

|

Telephone 2798

Our hollow

BLOCKS!!

conversant with

co 2¢

them and we fe

[Yel ve Wel el Yel Vel Ve Vel Ve ele Ve Pe Pe Ve Per

i

et
a

rt

‘w=
ak



crop season fin-
dgejpnd and Rill
cane
ch themselves with
flo plantation trucks and

too these

load of canes fron
on the
give the
show
work

NE NEW Y.M.C.A. Headquart-
are

being extended. There will be
more room for games, lectures
and services

he roof of the new part of

“You
» Wrong” were awarded
The Guest Artists

“AGLEANS

TEETH WHIT







SUNDAY ADVOCATE

NO THROUGH ROAD

Lee

en oe. all

1
n

Clarke who

Barnyard” THE HIGHWAY at the lower Wharf yesterday was completely blocked at times.



Reason — a schooner

was unloading charcoal and carts and all sorts of transportation were pressed into service.



B’dians Return l'rom Panama

Some Retired: Stranded

WITH sunken and unshaven iaces and’wearing crump-
led clothing, 14 Barbadians—one of them a woman—landed
at the Baggage Warehouse Pier yesterday after spersiing

most of their lives working for the Panama Government.

No relatives went to meet them. They sat around the
Baggage Warehouse like “strangers in a strange land.”
One by one they ambled out of the Baggage Warehouse in
search of a sister, daughter or some other relative whom

they did not think they would recognise.



yellow fever and accidents killed
out many of my fellow country-

men,” said.
Har too found house rent
high. He had to pay as much as

$16 per month for two small com-
partments with little accommoda-
Harris enjoyed cooking
for himself. “I ate soup, coucou
ind rice—the foods I was accus-
tomed to in Barbados,” he said.

tion

Those returning yesterday were; Oscar
Jone of St. Joseph, Gustavus Edey of
Massiah St, St. John, James Hunte of
Content Cot, St Philip, Charles Jackman
of St Lucy, Conrad Blackman of Byde
Mill, St George, Charles Greenidge of

Walton Village, Christ Church, Preston
Williams of Rock Hall Plantation, St

nin Stile sat . 3 Peter, Prince A Haynes of St John who

The Schooner Florence Emanuel for. , was accompanied by his wife, James
brought them up from Marti- “Wages were low,” said Jones, Griffith of St Luey, Samuel Harris of
nique. They were taken to “and the cost of living very Green Hill, St Michael, William Barker

Martinique from Panama by the high.” One good thing was that
They spent a the Government was educating his

S.S. Chang Chow.
day and a night in Martinique and children,
three days on sea in the Florence
Emantel,

The Panama Government paid
all their travelling expenses and
gave each of them $45 pocket

he got the
Barbados,
Bay by

opportunity

While Jones served in the Army,
see
He came into Carlisle
S.S. Oriana but he was,

to

of St George, Nathan Baird of St James
and Nicademus Alleyne of St John

Charles Greenidge is now intransit for
Trinidad where he lived for 26 years be-
fore go’ng to Panama

BLIND CORNERS

Best Kept
ity Garden

Where The Lizards Play

Nobody but the gardener goes
into t b lropt Cuty garden, the
one ar the end of Broad Street
near St. Mary’s Church. But

meny lizards are always running
between the thick plants through-
out the day.

The garden is enelosed with a
wire fenee and there are eight
palm trees on it. Its longest side
is about 24, yards long.

A thick hedge is planted around

the garden and since the rain last

the plants are green and

there are many flowers. There

ere lilies among them, but there
aré no roses or carnations.

Besides the hedge which grows
at the three sides, there are five
circular small beds of flowers and
the rest is turf.

The palm trees are too tall to
give much shade and the area is
not shady. A man who sells
potatoes nearby said. that some-
times he thinks it would be nice
to be able to eat his breakfast in
the garden.

“An evergreen tree should be
planted there and seats built
around it,” he said.

Trafalgar Garden

The garden in Trafalgar Square
only has water flowers. These
ere within the fountain and people
co not usually notice them. A
vardener has begun to plant a
hedge around this area.
The big tree which grows near

the fountain provides shade for
people who wait to catch a bus
there.

Grass is growing well on four
of the sections of the grass patch-
€s around the fountain, but too
niany people stand on the other
eection under the tree for grass to
grow well.

Small groups of men gather
daily near the fountain to discuss
the latast in polities.

Se nad tne eS



| Treat
your hair



ee
. a i a Se
New ij Ts |

in.time!

|
Dandruff, thinning hair and many other |
uthealthy hair conditions are a warning; |
your hair roots are undernourished, your
body is failing to supply adequate quan-
tities of cystine, tyrosine, tryptophane
and the other hair-forming substances.
You must act at once. Pure Silvikrincon-
tains all the fourteen organic substances
Which form the hair's natural food
Massageéd into the scaip Pure Silvikrin
will get your hair growing and thriving
again. Prove it for yourself— starting |
from roday.
Use Pure Silvikrin in cevere cases of dandruff }
and thinning hafr, As a daily tonic dressing ase |
Sitlvikrin Hair Tonte Lorton or, for dry heads, |
Sitvikrin Lorton with OW }
|
}



ne eho . ; }

Silvikrin

THE HAIR'S NATURAL FOOD



|
|

PPPOE OOF SSOSS

FOR SALE
e

ST. JOHN
A well built stone build-
ing standing on 1% acre
working land, House con-

R |
‘



b

SLOPES

tains 2 bed rooms, dining

Near the Central Road Board a and sitting rooms closed
wide spreading tree and two gallery and usual out 3
small palm trees provide shade for buildings,
bag mé@nders, drink _ sellers, ATTRACTIVELY PRICED
draughts players, a barber and e
cihers. Grass once used to grow
oa this triangular piece of land, BRIGHTON ON SEA

tut now it is built of conerete and
tor.



A modern Bungalow built
of Concrete blocks con-
taining 3 bedrooms water



ae os oy we ee eee f i | REMOVED In front of the library the lately in Reese es ag
oney to defray otel expenses. Jones said that he has a daugh- {vir rass 3 nex n anc ath, good sea bath-
Most of them are retired on a ier and a sister here, but he was| THE Barbados Automobile ; eration there Gat oasis oo ing.
ension. Some of the have not sure where he was g » to| Association will soon be affiliated ~). oy: et pie REASONABLY PRICED. |
p' m ure vy was going to} i ple waiting to catch the buses >
worked for 45 years with the live. "4@)| to the Automobile Association in | ping towards White Park usually e 3 |
Panama. Government. None of Samuel Harris, who was work-| England, Mr. Way of the Associa- ©. ( ears Ati ‘hihi etka ¥
them worked for shorter period ing as an attendant in a hospital | tion here said yesterday, “The f tg a suns See ar * yo pas — 4ed 2
than 25 years. in Canal Zone for about 45 years|Attomobile Association in Eng- | f th rt di soldi bi a 4 “het 2, “with

Oscar Jones, who is stooping a said: “I found it fairly good; man jland has replied to a letter we whe a ve a * oa Ps ar tres the iaadesn fenlek aacednine=
hit at 58, worked as a painter for 1 had nothing to complain about y|sent them and said they would a Pere woe WEE eye ? dati standing on %
over 30° years. He served in He has saved some of his earns | “low us TS ee tarted a oa atve of land sheet dee
France as a soldier for three years ings and is getting a pension. | this Peas ‘ew haa 220° menmbers tance from bus service.
during World War 1. He believed he had _ sisters in| mp ny ane ej ign i e

by worked hard and saved Hothersal Turning where yee hey ore DOW eer Beane *“Gascogne Ad Calls CHRIST CHURCH
nothing”, Oscar said. “It was a intended going. , a ead i 2

} ; i }of the corners already removed < stone

matter of being hand to mouth.” Harris said that there are} are rah at St. Harnabes and one © ee Seer an

Rent, food and the supporting of
five children in Panama took all
the money Jones was

working retire, Malaria,










TOOTH PASTE
1

LRRRRRRRREREREEET |

CONCRETE PRODUCTS CoO.,
LODGE HILL,
ST. MICHAEL.

‘co Those About To Build,

“. perfect building depends entirely on type of materials
used and the class of workmanship done.

concrete blocks are up to the standard of those

manuicctured in U.S.A. where they are so extensively used for
all types of buildings.

Tested regularly by hydraulic press, they withstand over 20
tons pressure per block without rupture. Certcin ¢ontractors
are not building with them correctly.

DO NOT BLAME OUR

We therefore suggest that any new builder who is not

the use of our blocks should consult us on his

ction problems, and we shall be only too pleased to
give him the benefit of our advice.

Our blocks have an excellent name by all who have used

el assured that if you construct your building

vith them you will be fully satisfied.

CONCRETE PRODUCTS COMPANY
per. E. R. BOON
Manager.

oie af kk kn lk nk a



: 4
SOOO SPS OFSSS

Se ee a a a ek ad a

Ke

pox, |

4,

SCPE LOET OP PLEO SEE SPSS SE





many more Barbadians in Pana-| at Thornbury Hill near Oistin.
ma who are flow getting ready to!

small

“The owners of the land where
there are corners are co-operating
| willingly,” Mr. Way said. “We

draw it to their attention that
; the corners are dangerous and

should be removed and they are
removing them.”

Asthma, Bronchitis Coughing,
Choking Curbed in 3 Minutes

Do you have attacks of Asthma or Bron-
chitis so bad that you choke and gasp for
breath and can't sleep? Do you cough so
hard you feel likg you were being rup-
tured? Do you feel weak, unable to wor!
and have to be careful not to take cold an
can't éat certain foods? ;

No matter how long you have suffered or
what you have tried, there is new hope for
you ina Doctor's prescription called Men-
daco. No dopes, no smokes, no injections,
no atomizer All you do is take two taste-
less tablets at meals and your attacks seem
to vanish like magic. In 3 minutes Mendaco
starts working through your blood, aiding
nature to dissolve and remove strangling

phlegm, promote free easy breathing and
ring sound sleep the first night so that
you soon feel years younger and stronger.

Mo Asthma in 2 Years

Mendaco not only brings almost immedt-
ate comfort and free breathing but builds
up the system to ward off future attacks.

, For instance, J Richards, Hamilton, Ont.,

9590 06

a

POOCPSSSSFPSSSS

-

IN 1908 Prof, C V. Boys m

in his Presidential address

London :

which is at prese

something

knows what oiliness is’.

paper showing conclusively



POF LOOLEROLOCSE SELLER IVSE EPP SSPSFSOS 4,



“THE LUBRICATING PROPERTY of oil depends on

THIS BLISSFUL STATE of ignorance continued until
Mareh 1920 when Wells and

French steamship Gaseegne

brought 222 passengers to Bar- acres of land, 2 Bed

bados yesterday. Sixty four got rooms, Modern tiled bath,

off here. Spacious Gallery over-
The Gaseogne arrived from looking the = sea. Bus

Trinidad and, after a few hours service

stay here, was sailing for England

vie St. Lucia, Martinique and

Senso. CECIL JEMMOTT

PHONE — 4563

Can had lost 40 Ibs., suffered cough-

te choking aad piresigling over wi leat
n't sleep, expecte: e.

Seon, Asthma spasms first night and he

has had.none since in over two ¥
Back Guar:

Mon

Che very first dose of Mendaco
to work circulating through your blood and
helping nature rid you of the effects of
Asthma. Im no time at all Mendaco may
easily make you feel years younger’ an
stronaer. ‘Try Mendaco under an tron-cla
money back guarantee. You be the judge.
If you den’t feel entirely well, like a new
person, and fully satisfied after taking
Mendaco just return the empty package
and the full, purchase price will be
refunded, Get Mendaco from your Chem-
int today and see how well you sleep to-
night and how much better you will feel

tomorrow. The
Mendac

guarantee pro-
Ends Asthma & Bronchitis K Hay Feves

3 right

tects you.

|

S$ $$$ a

Residence standing on 2



Over Pheonix Pharmacy
MORTGAGES ARRANGED

EDGE WATER
HOTEL

BATHSHEBA



SED SCS SSS SISOS SSS SOESESESSSS:

Reduced F-ates ist May to

3ist October for visits of
one week or over.

Telephone 95276



the following remarks
Physieal Society mn

in
aK

LO

to tne

ft unknown no-one

Southcombe published a
that the “oiliness” of a



x mineral oil could be substantially improved by addi-
% Oils made on the Wells Southcombe process .
g became marketed throughout the World as x }
2 } |
1x , : 4
iS GEKM OILS 3
%,
>
y
& THESE-OILS are available to you to-day in Barbados %
1 through the “Germ” Agent %
¢ $
x %
ls ?
1x * 3
x _
1% x
§
$ Central YFoundry Ltd. %
‘ § :
. ¥
%
%
%

43434 < 4¢
POSS ¢

PRIOR PSO S SSS

? PROS SSS

+4 < >
FSSOSSSOOS

<
SCOSSSSRe

*

wy PISOSSOS

Craftsmen.



Your Jewellers

Y. De Lima & Co.. Ltd.

20 Broad Street,











The special ingredients of BUCKFAST
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SUNDAY, JULY 4, 1951



Soil Conservation Re

By Dr. H.

From The Scientific Monthly





for the first time in the his-
tory of the United S con-
servation of land, wa orest
grass, cultivated crops, an id-
life are being scientically co-
ordinated on basis of land



capability and need.
euucation, surveys, and
cessful application of erva-
tion measures have brought Am-
ericans to ‘a new concept of the
importance of land ana of the

Researst
Research,
the suc-

cons









need for keping it permanentiy
productive.

The programme of the U.S
Soil Conservation Service was
developed out of a balanced re-
lationship that exists in nature
among land, water, plants, ani-
mals, and climate. Productive
land, with the water that enable
it to produce, is the one basic
resource without which mankind
cannot live. A large share of sci-
entific endeavour is directed in
some way toward improving
man's welfare—his heaich, tus
comfort, his wealth, or other
needs or satisf: in life

entists, ther are con-
cerned about the
farmers’ fields and p:

Productive land is u other
natural resources such as min-

eral ores, coal, and oil. It i
characterized by the element of
life—fruitfulness—placed. by na-
ture in the thin cover of produc-
tive soil occurring over a limited



portion of the earth’s surface
This life-producing quality and
the water that makes it so, set
Jand off in a category by itself
Productive land is further differ-
entiated from other natural re-
sources, with few exceptions,
must be taken from the ear -
separated from it—in order to

be used by man. And their







ity, in large degree, calls for
complete transformation, as iron
ore into steel, and coal and pe-
troleum into warmth and power.
Limited

Productive land is much more
limited in extent than has com-
monly been supposed. It occurs
only on a part of the sur-
face of the earth. It is not per-
manent; it is not a renewable
natural resource. Once the fer-
tile topsoil is washed or blown
away, it cannot be restored or
replaced in any practical way for
generations. And what is left
subsoil—usually is far less pro-
ductive, less stable, and less ab-

sorptive of rainfall. There are no
substantial undiscovered reserves
of productive land anywhere. We



must keep what we have or do
without.

We occasionally hear discus-
sions of the possibilities of re-
making _ topsoil from erosion-
exposed subsoil. In my opinion it

cannot be done short of geologic
time. Subsoi] can improved,
of course, by growing gras wd
legumes, for example, and by
adding fertilizers Sometimes
following such treatment good
crop yields are obtained; but this
is a matter of improving the sub-
soil, not of making new topst
This brings the further prer
that we must treat and use our
remaining limited supply of pro-
ductive land in a way which will
protect it and increase its pro-
ductivity by conserving the soil
itself, its available elements of
fertility, and all that man and
nature have put into it. This con-

be











RENNETT

servation of land and water re-



sources is the most important
em contronting American
agriculture It also is a serious
problem in many other reas in
the world today It ig an urg





prcblem confronting Americ

efforts of the scientists and of al!
who farm the land. It is a job
that requires scientific knowl-
edge, technical skill, and under-

standing co-operation,

Simple
It is true that many soil-con-
serving measures, especially an-
nual farm practices, are sim-
ple that farmers need no direct
technical assistance in applying
them. But the principal soil con-

servation methods generally are
used in combination with one
another, and each must fit the
land in a properly co-ordinated
pattern to be effective and en-
during. Based on _ painstaking
scientific research and on wide

practical use, such measures must
conform in their application with
the principles of hydrology, en-
gineering, and agronomy The
over-all job of conservation in-
volves such complex problems
erosion control, drainage, im-
provement of soil fertility, wood-

land management, control of
running water, and wildlife con-
servation, Most farmers are not
specialists in these fields. Soil
and water conservation is a job
that demands the skill and

knowledge of experienced tech-
nicians who have special train-
ing. Experts trained in the spe-
cialized fields of agricultural sci-
ence make up the personnel of
the U.S. Soil Conservation Ser-
vice, which makes virtually al!
its assistance to American farm-
ers available through the farm-
ers’ own soil conservation dis-
tricts, and at their request.
Modern — soil conservation is
based on sound land use and
treatment of land with all the
proved measures that will keep
it permanently productive while
in use, .It means terracing land
that néeds terracing; contouring,



strip-cropping, and stubble-
mulching the land as required
along with supporting practices

of crop rotation, cover crops, and
similar practices. It means sta-
bilizing water outlets, building
farm ponds, locating farm roads



- and fences as nearly on the con-

tour as_ practicable, planting
steep, erodible land to grass or
trees, development of good pas-
tures, and devoting good man-
agement to them after they have
been developed.
Combinations

Modern soil conservation con-

sists of doing all these and still

other things. It includes, for
flood control and reservoir pro-
tection, treatment of whole wa-

tersheds with the right combina-
tions of practices, land. use, and
smaller watersheds where flood
waters start. Applied at the right
time and place, such watershed
treatment saves soil and reduce;
flood and sedimentation damage
puts water in the soil for plant
use and in ground-water reser-
voirs, and otherwise benefits gen-
eral farm, industrial, and muni-
cipal water users. There is only
one correct formula for the soil
and water conservation job—a
formula consisting of treating
each different kind of land on a





TECHNICIANS of the U.S. Soil

Conservation Service make stop-

watch measurements of the volume of water entering irrigation

furrows, .They are thus able to

determine accurately the rate of

water intake of different soils under varying conditions of slope

and soil composition,

This is part of the nation-wide plan to help ®

farmers preserve productive soil and conserve water supplies.





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St

THIS AERIAL VIEW shows approved methods of contour plant-
ing and terracing to prevent soil erosion as being taught in the

United States.
land and water

Technical skill
conservation

necessary for planning a
survey is

complete

furnished the American

farmer by the Soil Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of

Agriculture
ised by such practices.

farm according to its individual
need or conditions, and using
each kind aceording to its capa-
bility for continued safe and
economical production.

There are three basic steps in
getting conservation. properly
applied to the land, First is the
making of a scientific land in-
ventory or a “land capability sur-
vey.” This inventory is made by
the U.S, Soil Conservation Service
in co-operation with farmers, and
it covers entire farms, It shows
the factors which, together with
climate, govern the whole safe use
and producing capacity of land.
Next, the technician and the far-
mer go out on the Jand together
and develop co-operatively a com-
plete soil conservattion plan for
the entire farm, This farm opera-
ting blueprint, although aimed first
at the maximum protection of the

‘and, takes into account such
economic needs of the farmer as
the income he must have to sup-

port bis family and to operate at
a profit, his market situation, and
so on, The plan specifies the best
use to be made of each part of the
farm, year by year
Finally

Finally, the planned soil and
water conservation measures are
applied to the land. Some of the





conservation measures are those
which the farmer can put into
practice himself, with little fur-

ther technical assistance, but gen-



erally the complete plan of co-
ordinated conservation practices
is of necessity complex as to
require expert technical help in
putting it to rk on the land at
the proper place and in proper
adjustmen The farmer provides
all the materials and labour and
maintains his structures and prac-
tices once they have en install-
ed on the land. If technical help

is needed on the maintenance job,

that, too, is provided for in the
arrangement between the — soil
conservation district and the U.S

Soil Conservation Service

Each conservation measure is
specifically designed to fit the land
on which it is used and is design-
ed to support or complement one
or more other measures. Conser-

vation work on one farm is plan-
ned with a view to the needs of
the neighbouring farms This

viewpoint is essential, for the pro-
cess of erosion has no respect for
boundary lines Neither do dust
storms nor floods



In the U.S. Soil Conservatior
Service, when asked for sugges-
tions on water conservation, spe-
cialists always look first at the
land within watersheds where
water shortage have occurred
They examine the condition — of

the land, and how it is being used
from the standpoint not only of
soil wastage but of water wastage
too. They look at all the land to
see if any of it is being seriously
affected by erosion, such as is
most commonly caused in humid
areas by cultivating excessively





Decay Before It Starts!


































Many millions of acres of farm land have been real-

steep land without adequate pro-
tection, over-grazing, and by
burning. All these abusive prac-
tices contribute to wastage of both
water and soil It is the exces-
sively rapid runoff of water that
produces erosion, And of great
importance in reservoir mainten-
ance is the prevention of fillins
up with the solid products of soil
erosion

More Farmers

More American farmers are
realizing that they need special
technical help in planning and

applying adequate soil and water
conservation programmes for their
farms. This growing national con-
sciousness of the essential place
that such conservation has in the
nation’s whole economy is evident
in the great progress the United
States has made in soil and water
conservation within a compara-
tively few years.

Soil conservation districts are
organized by the farmerg them-
selves under legislation enacted by
all 48 of the United States, the
Teiritories of Alaska and Hawaii,
and by Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Isiands, As of June 1, 1950, 2,247
of these farmer-managed districts

hed been formed, embracing more] ,;
than three-fourths of the nation’s} n

farms and a total of more than] postage etc., but send 6d in Brit fi Pr
23 ac Order for stationery, testimonials ete
1 ERT COR NO ares. You will be amazed at the remarkeble

The soil
represent, I am convinced, the
greatest land movement ini all
history They are essentially
group-action devices through





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sary for anyone to suffer from ugly, dis-
gusting and disfiguring skin blemishes
such as Eczema, Pimples, Rash,
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A New Discovery

Nixoderm is an ointment, but different
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1. It fights and kills the microbes or para-
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a ee



conservation districts] gecuracy of his statements about you a



of Nixoderm by an |

Ring- |



INDAY ADVOCATE



quires ‘Technical Skill |

which st: on. loca le
develops. They d
services and facilities of co-operat-
tng gover ental and private
interests alike, local, state, and
ational, And the soil conservation
districts are responsible for such
tangible results as the creation of
new markets for manufacturers of
equipment and tools, and for the
sfile of the products of nurseries
and seed producers.

Up to January 1, 1950, approxi-
mately 800,000 complete soil con-
servation plans had been prepared




aw, together









in these districts. These plans
covered some 220,000,000 acres
of which more than 112,000,000

had been treated with need-
ervation measures by that
time These figures do not in-
clude other millions of acres sur-
veyed, planned, and treated
hrough other programmes in
which the U.S. Soil Conservation
service has assisted.





The economy and efficiency of
soil conservation farming, and the

chain of economic and other bene-
fits it brings, have been proved
wherever it has been practiced

It enables the farmer to produce
needed crops or livestock at mini-
mum cost on his good land, and
to adjust his production to chang-
, market and other conditions
He therefore becomes a better and
more stable customer for business

and the professions in the city
and contributes to the nation’s
high standard of living nutri-
tionally and otherwise and to
such public benefits as reducing
flood and siltation damage. Any-

thing which helps any substantial
number of individuals of a nation
ilso helps the nation as a whole
This certainly can be said of the
kind of soil conservation farming
we have been discussing



Startling Predictions
In Your Horoscope
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any



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practical advice



contained in his
Horoscopes on
Business, Specula
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Love - afiairs
Friends, Enemies
Lotteries, Travels
Changes, Ligitiga
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Sickness etc. have
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Russia To Repay |
Eleven Tons Of
Gold To Persia

TEHERAN, June 28

Russia has agreed to give back
to Persia 11 tons of gold now
being held in Moscow, a usually

well-informed Persian source here
said to-day

Repayment of the gold nov
would help to solve the Persian
financial crisis which would be

atensified by the complete closing
jiown of oil wells.

The gold was to have been
tiven to Persia in repayment for
ervices rendered by Persia «
Russian occupation troops during

he war. But payment was sus-
gended

No official confir.nation of the
Russian agreement to pay over

the money was available here this



morning. But an announcement!
Was expected to be made within
the next few days.

Eleven tons of gold is. worth
approximately £4,250,000

The gold was deposited in a
State Bank of the Soviet Union
under the Russo-Persian agree-
ment of May 1943

Under the agreement Russia

promised to pay in gold 60 percent

of all Persia’s advances to enable
her to maintain Soviet forces in
Persia

The remaining 40 percent wer

repayable in sterling and dollars

Persia has made repeated ce
mands for the gold Reuter.
MEAT DEBATE
LONDON, June 28
The House of Commons is to
have a debate, on Britain’s meat
agreement with the Argentin

next Thursday, it was announce

today.—Reuter.







PAGE ELEVEN

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MANCHURIA._,3%

Em «5 atin en tnsigniemnee a
S cuoncam

WYSANJIN p




N. KOREA

a, wy
re. SYONSAN

olel @ SEOUL 3 satel
"eS. KOREA

@TAEJON POHANG



YELLOW



THE 3eoTn

fo MILES scene HET ie ' ee “Sore re
7o 150] i Americans The black 16 days i i
be echo at j reach frontier Fy 1 ae, Nov 21-12 Be poss

| ' SY Ra Bc te
cll aoe BR Koreags cross ee
[JUNE 25th 7 eee 5
| N. Korean Reds 3

| invade S. Korea



e
TAEGU

OUR READERS SAY:

Polities

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR.—I consider it my business
to endeavour to eliminate some
false impressions a regular contri-
butor to your “Our Readers
Say” tried to convey to our
pullible public on the 24th instant.

The writer does not seem io
understand what Socialists mean
by the “putting down of Capita
ism”. May I say, for his benet
that Socialists are those peop'e
who profess that they believe tht
the material instruments of
cuction should be
»ublic authority or voluntary
association and operated, not with
1 view to profit by sale to other
people, but for the direct service
of the community that the
Authority or Association repre-
sents. In other words they believe
that the freedom of the _ profit-
making individual must be cur-
tailed in the interest of the State

It is this particular phase ol!
Socialism that private interests
dislike

For the definition w7 what &

described as the Capitalist Sys-
tem, refer him to Mr. and Mrs,
Sidney Webb who say: “By the
term Capitalism, we mean the
particular stage in the develop-
ment of industry and legal
institutions in which the bulk of
workers find themselves diverced
from the ownership of the instru-
ments of production in such a
Way as to pass into the position of
wage earners whose subsistence,
security, and personal freedom
seem dependent on the will of a
relatively small proportion of the
nation; namely, those who own
and, through their legal owner-
ship, control the organisation of
the land, the machinery and the
labour force of the community,
and do so with the object of mak-
ing for themselves individual and
private gains,” This is the parti-
cular phase of Capitalism dis-
liked by the Socialists.

In passing let me just mention
that, on‘the other hand, Syndical-
fism is hostile both to the state and
Private Ownership. Sometimes
we feel that Syndicalism is more
nearly right than Socialism in
this respect, that both Private
Property and the State, which are
the two most powerful institu-
tions of the modern world, have
become harmful to life through
excess of power, and that both are
hastening the loss of vitality from
which the civilized world increas-
ingly suffers.

According to the writer of
“Politics”, our electorate finds
itself in a sad predicament, witn
ene party preaching “racial
harmony” and the other “taping
us behind the scenes,” and neither
with a party policy attractive
enough to drag us out of the mire.
“Technically” I do not agree witn
yA

dis-



GOOD FOR

um FOR YOU “Tom

NUTRICIA

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prou-
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him. What Politician could truth-
fully deny the fact that the two
institutions, Socialism and Capi-
talism are closely connected! I
do not understand his point about
“Advisory Boards,” and probabl)

when next he gets a chance he
may like to elaborate or may be,
after reading your Editorial oi
the same date he may consider
this advice unwieldy.

I, howeyer, agree with him
that we do “want brains” in

the House of Assembly, Probably,
ne has in view a resident of his
trict’ I do not. What I want
re representatives without ‘“me-
chanical brains”, i.e, brain; like
mine or the author of “Politics”;
‘or, admittedly, our views are no
original, consequently they are
slightly muddled. In other words
i want a Government whieh can
think for itself and not await 4
particular Minute from the Head

of a Government Department
before outling its policy with
respect t. certain phases of our
life,
DISINTERESTED
Australian four

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—All keen cricket enthusi-
asts in this island are looking for-
ward with great interest to the
nights when we may listen to the
achievements of our boys “Down
Under” over the Radio, I have
been in touch with an old friend
in Melbourne on the subject of the
Cricket Broadcasts we may expect

to hear. He is a member of the
‘Radio Australia’ Broadcasting
personnel,

He writes on date of May 21 as
follows: —Two of the broadcast-
“ing organizations in the West In-
“dies, the Trinidad Broadcasting
“Co, and the Broadcasting Co, of
“Jamaica, have written asking our
“plans for covering the West In-
“dies v, Australia tour. It appears
“that they are particularly inter-
“ested in re-broadcasting certain
‘portions of our commentary.
“We are getting details for them in
“the next few weeks, it being a
“little too early yet to formulate
“our final plans.”

To-day 1 received from
letter dated 2ist June, in
he says: —

“Already there is keen interest
“being displayed in the forth-
“coming visit of the West Indies

him a
which

“Cricket Team and I am certain
“that your fine cricketers are in
“for a stimulating series of

“matches with some hard fighting

“on both sides. The last hour of
“play will be transmitted by
“Radio Australia during the
“tests and I think this will be
“picked up and re-broadcast by

“vour local services (this at least
“is the position at the moment).”

He does not mention any appli-
cation from Barbados or from
British Guiana, although they
may have applied subsequently to
his first letter. But, the broad-
casting of only the last hour of

ME!

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each day's play in the Tests does
seem very inadequate, when one
considers that the England—Aus-
tralia Test Series was broadcast
ball-by-ball from start to finish.
Yours truly
CELT.
June 29 th, 1961.
Control

To the Editor the Advocate

SIR,—My religion teaches me
to love Mohammedans and birth
controllers. I would like to than’:
C. G. for his letter. It has con-
firmed my worst fears that im-
morality will increase not decrease
as a result of contraceptive
practices by young men and
women. Surely it is not a singu-
lar nor even a bigoted view to
suggest that a young man who
has plighted his troth
decent young girl should exercise

some restraint, and not indulge
freely in intercourse with other
young women who so far from
being victims, appear to be only

too co-operative?

If this is bigotry, I
vantent to be a bigot. Anyone
vho asks only a few questions
must realise how irresponsible is
the average man and woman in
Barbados with regard to parent-
hood, The only way to encourage
responsibility is to encourage
family life. As a Christain tax-
payer I object most strenuously
to subsidising anything which
likely to spread promiscuity an
immorality.

I repeat for C, G’s, benefit what
I made clear in my letter last
Sunday, that I am not here argu-
ing the case against birth control,

am well

I am exercising my right and
duty as a taxpayer to protest
against a policy which will not,

in my opinion, promote morality,
GEORGE HUNTE
Victoriana
To the Editor the Advocate

Sir,—A Loan Exhibition of Vic-
toriana is to be held at the Mus-
eum during the first three weeks

of August. The exhibition will
comprise furniture and furnish-
ings, paintings, prints, glass as
well as articles of personal use
and adornment and bibliots used
during Queen Victoria’s reign
1837—190f. I shall be. glad if

who have
any kind

those of your
Victorian objects of
which they would be willing to
lend for the exhibition would be
good enough to telephone me at
4201,

Since this climate is rather un-
kind to fabrics, I would be es-
pecially glad to hear from those
willing to lend table-cloths,
table-covers, anti-macassars, cush-
ions, curtains (lace or otherwise),
carpets, bead work and clothing
worn by men, women and chil-
dren during the reign.

The Exhibition will be in aid
of the Museum's Collection Fund

Yours truly,
NEVILLE CONNELL,
Director and Secretary.

readers










FINE BONE CHINA

to Qa.

the British Northern Islands,
ey



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Progress In

T.B. Work

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GORGETOWN, B.G., June 26.
Dr. Harold Pacheco Fernandés,

‘fuberculosis Officer and Medical
Superintendent of the Best Sana-
torilum, Demerara, told a crowded
Town Hall on Friday night that
great strides have been made with-
in the last three years in the treat-
ment of Tuberculosis. Dr. Fernan-
des was speaking at the Annual
Meeting of the Society for the Pre-
vention and Treatment of Tuber-
culosis, presided over by His ex-
cellency the officer Administering
the Government, Hon. John
Gutch, O.B.E,

“Streptomycin,” he said, “is no
longer an experimental treatment
. it has come to stay and will
stay as a successful treatment of
Tuberculosis.” But he warned
that although great advances have
heen made with the use of this
drug, its curative qualities can be
nullified in a short time unless
treatment is carried to finality.

The Report of the Society for
1950 disclosed that “phenomenal
progress has been made at the
Best Sanatorium during the past
three years and this progress can
be seen not only through the in-
creased sums of expenditure but
in the modernisation of the hos-
pital. A new sterilisation plant
has been a great boon to the hos-
pital. The laundry has been ex-

* tended and a new ambulance and

a powerful electric lighting plant
have been acquired.

The Tuberculosis Officer during
last year embarked on a plan for
treating selected cases at the
Georgetown Clinie with Strepto-
mycin, and it is hoped in the rew
latively near future, to expand the
scope of this line of treatment
within fairly well defined
limits in order to reduee in some
measure the rate of increase of the
“Waiting List’ of cases seeking
admission to the Sanatorium

STOLEN FROM



DRUG STORE

Up to mid-day yesterday no one
had yet been arrested in connec-
tion with the larceny of over $4,000
from Mr. Teddy Hoad, but Major |
R. A. Stoute, Deputy Commission-
er of Police, said: “Intensive in-|
vestigations are being carried out |
by the Police with a view to solv-
ing the ease, It is an unusualiy
large amount of money to be}
stolen from a counter.”

The money was stolen from a
counter at the Phoenix Pharmacy, |
Broad Street. Mr. Hoad had
drawn it from the Canadian Bank
of Commerce to pay workers. He
is manager of Vauciuse.

“Rodney” Due On Tuesday |

The Lady Rodney is expected to
return to Barbados from British |
Guiana yia Trinidad, Grenada and |
St. Vincent on Tuesday morning, |

The Rodney will be loading |
sugar and molasses before sailing
on Wednesday night for Bermuda,
Boston, Halifax and Montreal via







Dene ter.
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BAYLEY

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Worthily upholding . . .
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§



SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951

HENRY





o——

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PAGE THIRTEEN






By Appointmons
Gin Distillers
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PAGE FOURTEEN -

CLASSIFIED ADS|"2isa"

























EPHONE 2508 —
= nie soucnchetteailaspeininistiakihiindiindeatabieesieilishiiinnassjumiduitiiis At Ch. Ch. Main Rd.,—A
ee 2 pig Pee | Bungalow Type, Very Good

y si adelaalaamas t and Location, Modern Conv |
: ms , er a. FOR SALE about 5,000 sq. ft., Going for Only £80
Bir Mar S, i 4 ae A | Nett. A Large Stonewall Business &|
Hee ee er ao on Sundays} Minimum charge week 12 eents andj Residence in Tudaoy St., Very Good Con- |
$:.50 Of Week dass and ee to BO, and | 9 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24|dition, Modern Convenie |
. ¢ i oe oa sd i eae Saye and | words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a| 4,000 sq. ft.. Going for Only
3 cents pe c 1 “k= a. f y £
4 cents per word on Sundays for each | “ord on Sundays. most New and Nearly 100% S



additional word 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type,





tion
















from the Garrison, Good Loc
i Modern Conveniences, Going for Onl
For Births, Marriage or Engagement TY N ‘ :

announcements in Carib Calling the; AUTOMOTIVE £1,600. A New 2 Bedroom Concrete |
e is $3.00 for any number of words eran at Lower Fontabelle odern |

5 oante . oe. : onveniences, Going Onl 050.

Se ae a gh Arend 4 ALMOST NEW i2 h.p, Bedford Van.| A 2 Bedroom ‘possible CGuitene am

onal word. ‘Terms catia for Death | Gvarantee if required. Extra Masonite | Barbarces Rd., Open Galleries, Electricit

ae niy aeend es m,. |F ooring. Upset Price $1,850. New one! Very Good Condition, Tenancy of Land

r Sate Ty COSt $2,125 presently. Apply: Sarees Assured, Going for about $2,40¢ A

ny on Gerage. -1.51—In | Chattel House off Upper Bank Hall Main
~~ Ts s preer Bank all air |

nme ———-—----—- | Pd. Electricity Good Condition, Goir

AANNOUNCEMEN CAR—Vauxhall 14/6 in perfect con-| for about. $1,400. A 2 Bedroom
eae dition, new tyres and paint-job.| property with Shop Attached, off Country |
HOLIDAY RESORTS—Grenada—Isle of | easonably priced. Apply: B’dos Agencies} Ra, Good Condition, Going for about |
Spices. SANTA MARIA—loveliest hotel! Ltd, Ring 4908, 26.6.51—6n. | 41700. A New $ Bedroom Concrete
1 Caribbean. Rates from $7.00 per head 5 Bungalow Facing Sea, and an Almost
3 “GRAND HOTEL—in best _resi- PRs geind See erat? New 3 Bedroom 12 inch Stone Built
district under Government House Chote sae ardens, near 30651 an. Eungalow Near Ses, Both about 2 Miles

es from $5.00 per head per day. from City, Going for £2,500. and £2,400.


































































SBASIDE INN—On Grand Anse Rotbhitn ) ——__—_———————————,_ | respectively. Almost New Duplex 12
aac Rates from $4.00 per head per MOTOR CYCLE — New shipment of! inch Stone Built Bungalow Navy
day. Enquiries to D, M. Slinger, Grenada. | Velocette 200 ¢ c—Seeure yours before | Gardens, and an Almost New 3 Bedroom
26,6.51--76. | Prices advance. Courtesy Garage. Dial) 19 jnen Stone Built Bungalow Near Navy
aon mea 4616. 26.6°51—6n. | Gardens, Going for £3,000, and £2,800
- respectively C Me Unless Y Are
se oa i yoga teak Tooth| Pick-up Morris 8 in good working Sa or Wasitne Time | Re-Sale Values
t oes Within a short while you} order with almost new ly. APPIY | Assured Mortgages and Terms Ar-
pee be the winner of one of the follow- | Stoute’s Drug Store _or Marshall &| ringed. Dial 3111 D. F. de Abreu, “Olive
be the wines Cho, and Prize $18.00, | Edward's Garage, Roebuck Street, | Hough,” Hastings.
Sis a ae ~~ *4751—-26n | Where it can be seen, Phone 2549 or i er y eyes
Hengipasy | S488 22,.6.51—t{.n.| BUNGALOW — A comparatively ney
i n ————. ——— ui t , situate a the ; .
GOVERNMENT NOTICE |: TRUCK One Ford Truck 1946 model | son ana away from the. main ro. |
1 \ ih ua r ‘st-cla . . - gw , os
— Suit New hoon ght occur Mea) Deareume, with cunning, water tn, eae
in first class working | order. Owner! vontact W. Wells at T. Geddes Grarft Lid
leaving iss Sapase L. GriMith, | phone 2861 or Home 4025
CLOSING OF CHAMBERLAIN | Two Mile Hil. ong S Shaan. oe “AAS
» y LING call E
— WAGGON — 1981. (March) Hillman | . DO WEIING OGRE cal ed “ELLER:
The Chamberlain Bridge will be Station Waggon. | Milea is APPIY: | thereto situate at Chapmuin Street,
closed to all traffic from Monday, | ™'?P Bear mone ey 5.6.51-—3n,| Btidgetown, neurest Whitepark Road)

d » a é ’ 0 * The he » contains Gallery, Drawing
2nd July, to Thursday, 5th July,! and icine Homma, two baagooros, Sires
for the purpose of repairs. faut room, usual conveniences. Large

27.6.51.—2n. ELECTRICAL Basement. Electric Light and Govern
aneencmnnnrenieaa. as + | ment water installed
BATTERIES: 6 and 12 volt DURALIFE ped oes premises will be set up 4 yr
] , with Ebonite separators for Cars, Trucks} sale by Public Competition «4 ir Office
PUBLIC NOTICES and Motor cyclen, Courtesy Garage.| James Street on Fri 13th July 1951
5 : at neck« Dial 4391. 26.6.51—6n.| at 2 p.m. For inspection apply to Mi
hg eat me, hae tne On eee oa ae = Farmer the tenant between the hours of
ore hin charge $1.50 on week-days| COOLERATOR -- I good conditfon. | 3 and 4.30 p.m. daily except Sunday
and $1.80 on Sundays. Phone 3185. 20.6.51—2n. YEARWOOD & BOYC E
1 licttors
TENDER 7 RADIO—Tabie Modél—Ten tube Geret- 1.7.51—en
Tenders are hereby fhvited for the| l Blectric Radio $50.00Dial 8370. ——_—__-—__-—- ————
contract to erect an extension to an 1.7,51—1n ee as Cena ane ahhudied Bowes
, at the Company's) ———————— —_—_——_ ed, then, yut office
waantnes ie the drawink and REFRIGERATOR — One (1) Westing-} Near Pine Gap, Collymore Rock, Appl
specifications in respect of which may be] house, in ood working order. Apply: Herbert Grant, Upper Collymore Rock
nined at the Office of Messrs. D. M.| W. R. Tempro. Phone 5044 or 8224 1.7.61—1n |



28.6.51—t.f.n. | -





Marhill Street.

PROPERTY—That desirable

pson & Co.,



Wall and





























































SU AY ADVOCATE
FOR THE HAYNES MEMORIAL
WANTED SCHOOL
A Mistress (white) to teach the junior
Mir , arge week ent n
Ft eee eee ee om children. Salary $40.00 per month
rhe sy lifine neg = Ee. See 2 Duties to be assumed on 17th Septerr
ud on Mute ord week—4 cents Gye, 1951. Apply: by letter by 25th’ July
aunonys 3951 with testimonials of good character
and capabilities to
= Mrs. De Courcy BOYCE,
HELP Strathclyde.
27.6.51—3n
COOK GENERAL Must sleep i
.ppiy by letter to Box A.A. C/o Advocate
! ——— MAIL NOTICE
MISCELLANEOUS
a . contre Mails for the United Kingdom Ant-
PAYING GUEST—At Culpeper’s House, | werp, Amsterdam and Madeira by the
ot deal tuation. Overlooking ]§.S. Willemstad will be closed at the
« x « hing and inshine | Gereral Post Office as under:
jerate, be early for holiday Parcel Mail at 3 p.m. on the 6th
s a ppointment. Apply? | July 1951
re Culp House, Bathsheba, Registered and Ordinary Mails at 10,15
1.7.51—In, La.m.son the 7th July 1951,
By
Lieut.-Col J. Connell OBE,ED,
Commanding,
; « The Barbados Regiment
a io 29 June 51
, S—Training pe i En Pere, ee
All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700 hours on Thurs-

July

51



Band practice

Reeruits
Recruits will parade for training under their
Monday 2 and Wednesday 4 July 51







vill be held on Monday 2, Wednesday 4 and Thursday 5 July 51
respective squad instructors on

ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT for the week ending 9 July 5)

Orderly — OfF 2/Lt. A. H. Clarke,
Order Ser je 234 Sit. Williams, E.D
Next for duty
Order| Officer \ Lieut. T. A. Gittens
Orderly Serjeant 18 Sjt. Williams, §.D
M. I D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
8.01, FB. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment
PART Oi ORDERS
THE. BARBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 19.
2th JUNE, 195) SHEET NO 1
J STRENTH INCREASE—Attestations, c ey teates eee pS
or Dr r. Oxley re ' Attested and taken on. strength of
2 Pte. Peterkin, 1 ) Regiment w.e.f. 13 & 14 June 51, ;
respectively

PROMOTIONS,

Lt. H. B. Gooding Promotion
by H.EB.
240 Pte. Sobers, ¢
LEAVE—Privilage
Lt A. H. Clarke Granted
2% June
M. IL

the

Promoted to L/Cpl

3 months’

to

Lieutenant approved
Governor wef 1 June Si.
wef 15 June ‘51

P/Leave w.e.f

D. SKEWES-COX, Major,

S.OLF. & Adjutant,

The Barbados



Regiment |

POST OFFICE NOTICE i

CHANGES IN AIR MAILS.



mails will be closed at the General

Day

Wednesday
Saturday
Tuesday

Thursday
Monday to Thursday
Saturday

Tenders must be addressed to the s b Sffective - - on ea
undersigned at the registered Office S MECHANICAL Wace pveee cabed o mine at uae * ies ive i oe 1951, air
thes Company, McGregor St., ‘and we oad, . ‘onsis : Os fice as follows
6: re > nH is an p.m, on = Gallery to the front 2 Side Verandahs,
ary x a Ber es pee GE ee Po tee ids Drawing and Dining Rooms 4 Bedrooms Destination Ti
° THE 1S ¥ 0, LTD.,; 272 youths. Water Toilet and Bath, Modern Kitchen- ; n ine
THE BORRADOS ek prices. Dial 4391, Courtesy Garage. cette, Garage, Spacic ard enclosed »y | Grenada 11.45 adn
Secretary. 26.6.51—On- | wall and standing % of an acre of +s +20 Oe
23.6,51—3n,. land, with several bearing fruit trees 9.00 a.m,
-~ The Same will be set up for sale by |St, Lucia 8.830 am
public competition at our Office, James % 4 sé a.
Ore CHURCH MISCELLANEOUS Street, on Friday 6th July at 2 p.m 2.00 pum.
PARISH OF C SHURC ——e specti y day except Sundays, | 7)j z
Sealed Tenders, marked on the envel-} ANTIQUES — Of every description Pe De Leey op Oak Reon ee cd | Trinidad a ‘“ 11.45 a.m.
ope ‘Tender for the erection of a Pavil-| Glass, China, old Jewels, fang Sliver p.m. Hutchinson & Banfield, Solicitors. ; 9.00 a.m.
ion ot Sarjeant’s Village.” will be re-} Water-colours. Early books, wane 23.6.51—-7n
ceived at my office up to 3.00 p.m. on| Autographs etc. “dt Gorringes Antique; 0000 BAnarilda GHAUIA Red i
Monday 28rd July, 1951 for the erection| Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht wa “THE ROSARY” St. George (near St | schedules should be amended where necessary.
oi a pavilion at the Satjeant’s Village a 3. ce George's Rectory) — 5 miles from town—| General Post Office
Tlaving Field on a bus route 3 bedtooms, drawing 990 RF
Copies of the plan and specifications} ANTIQUE CHEVAL GLASS — Full icon dining room and breakfast roon 29.6.51,



length—Fiddle Pattern, Anyone interested
contact John Shannon, City Pharmaqy.
21.6.51—3n.

“FARM” POWDERED FULL
MiLK—Supreme quality and only $4.32
per 5-Ib tin and $1.00 per 1-Ib tin.

can be obtained from Mr, R, B. Moulder
al Messrs. C. F, Harrison & Co, Ltd.,
on deposit of the sum of five dollars
(95.001, which will be refunded on Te-
turning the plan to Mr. Moulder,

Each Tenderer should state the date
by which it is anticipated the work will



|
|
verandah South Side Company's }
water, Telephone and electric light
about % acres of grounds surrounded by
4 | Stone wall on 3 sides Solidly built of
stone with shingle roof. Garage for 4
cars, servant Tooms and usual offices
Inspection on application to the care

on

c tin to-day from your grocer
be completed and also submit the names Get a taken
of two persons willing to become bound] or Drug Store and try the best ROOT be put ‘up tor ee ibaa




milk obtainable. The 5-Ib family size is









































“ 1 p f 800,00 each iz e can . Eorat
fe One chee Ce aaiey of the contract | really economical es on “Farm so ae om Friday th July 1051 a
F uple ilding by} the sake of your health and your pocke “m. . as a eke
re Be ra of the building’ PY) Tr \our dealer cannot supply, Dhone = bac ela ocx
The successful tenaerer will be pS 27.6. 51—t.i.n.
lg i a bt or 7 t » 4 The undersigned will offer for sale b
\ y » erec " ding. GALVANIZED SHEETS: 24 gauge in uw ; , 0 for eae Dp
The ve on does obo oe tale 7 lengths of 6, 7; 8, 9 and 10 foot. Pypuire Pgh SEs Mie gt Soe oe + M an
accept the lowest or any tender a0t> Tyre Company, afal a, Eirert. Hah Mirah, Pade matty Baan
woo bi ga ae Be ——---- ~~ {dwellinghouse Va COTTAGE,
Clerk o e . eat AAO ality |‘'wo Mile Hill, standing In 2 acres of
re rete a an uaben i ee Inland | gardens and grounds, with 2 acres more
17.6.51—Sn. | HOW e504; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $0.72; 9 ft $7.98; | Of yood sour grass land. The house
— 10 ‘tt $8.40. Nett cash. Better hurry) | Contains all modern comforts ang ces
hon NE \ - enfénces and may be inspected on appli-
= ay Saree Seen qusiont to ‘Mr. Cc R. Tudor, Bovell &
—_—_———
LEATHER=Lizard, Crocodile Skins for | Skeete. i
MAPLE MANOR shoes, hand bags. Paster’s Leather Store yan Rogpeanlon will be given
1 é q - the rtictlars frorr
SORT ee Pee ye NOTE, CATFORD & CO.,
“STAINLESS STEEL — | 5 Solicitors,
OPPOSITE HASTINGS ROCKS | STAINLESS STEEL — Steak hives olicttors.
Tel, 3021. «. BOULLNE, $12.00 per dozen are be Aspe to men- Pia:
Manageress, tion. Broadway Dress CRBs 6,530. x SASH Prete ot
£100 each in Applewhaites Limited de
5 All sizes 8, 10 and |Shares of £1 each in Knights Limitec
i a” Gen css een G. ayhew toe be sold by public competition at the
‘ jal 2382 or 4334. i ! omice of the undersigned on Thursday
WrSs z " 27.6.51—4n. | t¥e 12th day July 1951 at 2 o'clock
NOTIC a. . COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
28.6,.51—8n.—e,0.d



FOR RENT

AUCTION

————

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

(
(
TO GAS CONSUMERS.

We have pleasure in notify-
ing our Customers that the

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
6 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a






























| ADVERTISE 1? PAYS





"
GRIENTAL
SOUVENTRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

|
|
_THANTS wa ||
|

wes











p.m ‘

'
: N
iN DON NACANO i rooms, built-in-garage and _ all
(F99G9%SSG9SS9GS AUCTION SALE % usual offices. Open to offers.
% r % > “LOCKERBIE HOUSE”, Brit-
% rete 1s : » Be
$ WANTE et SR | $ || tons Cone Sane, cueing eas
% MONDAY 2ND AND % FR] set well back in well mainta
% CLEAN OLD RAG % i ¥ and “secluded grounds, fe wat-
} ate ian T iy lens are’ we matured and
% Delivered to % TUESDAY 38RD JULY {st YOU WANT to economise on your % there is complete privacy from the
. ba tas tae ‘oadway ie
: Advocate Press Room — 3 vk nae ae % Ceilings and Partitions, use ....- + $/ff) There 1s a covered entrance porch
Lh aie y . for cars, wide airy verandahs,
14S OSF ASSO ESOS SBOOOS | R : DONNACANO WALL BOARD. g large lounge with a central stair-
CPL EEOC FOSS ; R 7 s way making an attractive feature,
ees ae near eT We are favoured with instruc- % ‘ Obtainable in the following Sizes : eens room, four good ms,
———F oo tions from Mrs. Don Johnson and \% = 4’ 8’ Yn!" ae eee BeCsys Onnits
, Here teat Besa Sa Sas ‘ / tO: rae offices. Our
James St. Methodist Church tdocive cuflaghhel ie piahine 50 IEE Seles, vig ne estas tae
e e) e collec’ 2 va J = a a -
Annual Missionary Meet- a Aktien.” ical: atk % N B H O W E L L 4 esting and desirable property.
ings Sunday, July Ist at 7 : chee $ 6 7 x eae Sugar Estate with
3.15 p.m, Juvenile Meeting and the entire caine ce ae st Lumber and Hardware % g Ouse up to £20,000,
— Special Programme MENHAM” Pine Hill. Viewing ¥ i % “HILL CREST”, Bathsheba. Sub-
Scholars of the School. Saturday 9 to 12 and morning prior Dial: 330 stantially built modern stone bun-
Monday, July 2nd at 7.30 to Sale aed galow on the brow of the cliffs







1.7.51—1n.






























SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951

_ eee REAL ESTATE |
ROYAL NETHERLANDS

STEAMSHIP CO. JOHN

SAILINGS FROM AMSTERDAM
v4.

M8 HECUBA—2ist June 1951.
M.S ORANJESTAD—Sth July 1951,
& €¢@.

M 8. BONAIRE—i3th July 1951.
A.E.S., E.V.A.





























The M.V will
accept Cargo and Passengers for !
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, }
Nevis and St. Kitts. Loading and i
Sailing Monday 2nd July.

CARIBBEE

The M.V. DAERWOOD will

M.S HERSILIA—26th July 1951.

SAILINGS TO PLYMOUTH AND
AMSTERDAM

M §. WILLEMSTAD—i0th July 1951.
SAHLANGS TO TRINIDAD, PARAM-
ARIBO AND GEORGETOWN

S 8. COTTICA—26th June 1951.
M8 HECUBA—Sth July 1951.

8S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO,, LTD.

aceept Cargo arid Passengers for

St. Lucia, Sate and Aruba.
Passengers only ¢ St. Vincent.
Date of departure to be notified,

B.W.l. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION INC.





























Agents, |
: eS = = , > =
Canadian National Steamships |}, ‘0? “|
the stb? nbings oF’ Barbadse
built By “craftsmén who to0dk a
pride in their work. Accommo-
SOUTHBOUND ¥ dation comprises of large recep-
Sails Sails Sails Arrives Salls tion rooms, .wide verandahs,
Name of Ship Montreal. Halifax Boston Barbados, Barbados study, 3 double bedrooms,’ 2
garages and customary offices and
CAN. CONSTRUCTOR 22 June 25 June - 4 July 4 July outbuildings, Picturesque gatdens
LADY NELSON ; 30 June 3 July 5 July 14 July 15 July with tennis court Total area of
CAN. CRUSSER as 10 July 13 July a= 22 July 23 July land about 4% acres
CAN. CHALLENGER 20 July 23 July — 1 Aug. 2 Aug. |
LADY RODNEY j 30 July 2 Aug. 4Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug. CASTRIES, ST. LUCIA. Valu-
CAN. CONSTRUCTOR 9 Aug. 12 Aug 7 21 Aug. 22 Aug. | able block of propefty in strategic
LADY NELSON pes 20 Aug 23 Aug. 25 Aug 3 Sept. 4 Sept. central — position Approx. ‘2
acre bounded by 3 main roads
abatiialiaads bee ee el s ipo ei ee and Castries River. Particulars on
application
ORTHBOUND
: ee Arrives Salls Arrives Arrives paren ‘ Bhs aon! paren BEATA inte
r os. Barbados Boston Halifax ontreal. o let and entire property for sale.
Name of Ship Rarbad de Godrington Hill, St. Michael. “A
LADY RODNEY 3 July 4 July 14 July 16 July 19 July fine old country mansion recently ;
LADY NELSON 27 July 29 July 7 Aug. 9 Aug. 12 Aug. converted into four spacious
LADY RODNEY 25 Aug. 28 Aug. 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 11 Sept. luxury flats fitted with all modern
LADY NELSON 16 Sept. 18 Sept. 27 Sept. 28 Sept. 2 Oct. conveniences, There are approx:
LADY RODNEY 16 Oct, 18 Oct. 27 Oct. 28 Oct. 1 Novr. 5 acres surrounding the house all

laid out with lawns, shrubberies
and gardens, the long driveway
approach is flanked by matured
mahogany trees. Good invest-
ment property espectalty suitable
for a resident owner. Only 3%
miles from town.



~~

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.











“SWEET FIELD”, St
PRESERVE YOUR BELTS house is af the Ratsle tee wit
2 storeys, solidly built

with

FLEXO HELT DRESSING

Obtainable from...

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

Pier Head Lane.

with parapeted roof,” ire We2§

Siding ae large gt wi
rench wi :
ered Perandane® ooh, a
is @ tinobstructed view of the

ort distance aWhy.~ The 3
bed airy, one







==



—~














IT IS A KNOWN FACT THAT

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM



v —_ in
constructed of stoné ‘with wa!
(With The Distinctive Flavour) shimuried sae ee a ocre
living toom, dining room, 4 bed:

rooms, ‘kitchen, servant's
and double garage. The pro
has a wide lawn at one side, a
small orchard and is fully en-
closed. Central residential area
near town and schools.

is outstanding in Quality and Flavour. ooo

SIP IT — TO ENJOY if.
' : e
BLENDERS :
JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

.

“SILVERTON"—Cheapside. Com-

modious 2 storey stone house
standing in ‘approx: 1% acres
on fruit Te 2 large re-
ception rooms, rooms, 2 gal-
leries, kitchen, 2 bathrooms Ge
Centrally located and suitable for
conversion into flats or boarding
house,














“IN CHANCERY”, Inch Marlow.
A_ modern, well designed and
soundly built bungalow on the
toast where there is always a
cooling breeze, There is a large
combined lounge dining room.
Kitchen with serving hatch, 2 bed-






























which affords fine views this
























































. 5 . able : 2 wild and rocky coastline re
Governor - in - Executive {| word on Sundays. The Hon. R. N. Turner, money Taegan Come Pree are 3 good bedrooms, living room,
Committee on the 14th June “ By instructions received 1 will sell on Acting Governor, will pre- boards, Set ¢ Dining Chairs. Set 2-sided gallery, kitchen, servant's
last approved in terms of HOUSES Friday 6th July at the General Motor side... 4 Dining Chairs, Set 6 Tub Chairs, aaah and garage. Electricity
Sec. 16 of The Natural Gas Bus Co Nelson &. ans Austin 4 in Speaker Rev. T, J. Furley Rockers, Easy Chafts, Morris Suite, Ly ven Nether a a a
i \ 2 accident) Sale at 2 Rr am -o! ot- . ‘
Corporation Act 1950 an FLAT--One Downstairs Flat at Bluc de aa ae (Deputation from St. Vin- Be ode Beck pat ates = about 60 coconut trees. 42 totes
interim selling price of Nat- Waters Terrace semi furnished, 3 Bed: | ° VINCENT GRIFFITH, cent). vélviigy Bookcase, Diant’ Stands, — proposition “at Ca
ural Gas to The Barbados racmes Bi modern conveniences. | AVERY asi te a All are cordially invited. Tip Top Tables (brass feet), Round ASSURANCE SOCIETY UES: GaSe
pee €o., Ltd, enabling them se wae | eh | ‘ Tip Top Table, Square Tables Nest || BUILDING LAND available in |
o remove the rece r FLAT—At Coral Sands, Worthing. rs ehh sind einlniabataaint petnbot- one dnde ail "Sables: es sabie- 5 ardens, Maxwells, Oistins,
charge of 10% on Gas... | moder furnished tat, kosd sea bathing | UNDER THE SILVER | pxseeiewenscsscscssssasaees 3g || tn Tables, Aidnes table, Ward | ELECTION OF A DIRECTOR Cnilat eae euleD, St James,
This new price being opera- For further particulars, Dial 6134, Alms HAMMER Tables, Gval Table, Screens, Writ ehah T ie loane 8S Other parts of
tive from the 16th May, }i| Lashley. Peay ; ENQUIRE AT... ing Desk. Two Pairs Single Betls
Of n . " i é 9 re Se eas adeeed 5) , Odd Single ed, having Stand “STR. ”
eget. Zhe Broporiesiats Bi FURNISHED — From August Ist} Gn WEDNESDAY 4th (and if not com- |} and Mirror, (all the above in Ma- e he Wale’ oe ose te Bons.
of surcharge for accounts the ‘Clifyyune” Garden Gap, Worthing. lated Thursday Sth tr order of Mrs. | ¢ * hokanyi.” Weatitene eri z ase — Handsome
- I wer as Y a - telephone etc. Fo-| Pleted) on Thursday § ‘ z i % ST ANWAY STORE nozany), estinghouse rig., “storey stone property with
Month of May will be de bedrooms, garage, i om 8 am. and| Robert M. Jones we will sell her | 2 Phillips Radio, Trays, Card Tables, s shingle roof and pine floors, Con-
ducted from and shown on. porticulars Dial 4304 be' ween $ § mid pn | House Appointments at Walmer Cottase, | ¥ iticha at Paititéd Gallery Furriture,, Painted Notice is hereby given that an Extraordinary tains 2 reception, dining room, 5
your June's Gas Accounts. { ea eens ea wee He, which, is eet Meee Bearoch Pamir, Oak China : + eae : Pectoains: 3 baths and toilets. Ex-
; ; - 7 in Mahogany and in perfect conditio a a al = Cabinet, Presses, Fretwork Book * * * 4 nsively —remod
rt HOMPSTBAD—Bastings. 3 | Bedtoor including ROP POR Otsiae, a yer orcs Genes OF Stand, | Walnut Dinfhg Table, Meeting of the qualified Policyholders of the above Feqnhtly. Grgunae or rab nko
; 3 -WiOy tuning: wate ee Aaeky on | Extension Dining sabe with patent at item you may need. Re- Indian Table, Two eis} Armour | ill b ehh ot the © iety’ Office. aa ft. Pleasant town house suit-
te. la . ' :| Screw to seat 12; Upright Chairs, i rardiess of size or quality, With- (stage), ' Single “Iron Beds and i a e society Ss ’ able as Doctor's residence
Chandler uae % iret Cabinet, Sideboard, Round bir Top | § ’ y biigation and fee of charge Soe, Seng Mattresses, Several named Society Ww le he y Guest House. F
. ¥ ps Table, Serving, Ornament anc ‘ock out obligation ar " wee Deep Sleep Mattresses, Shoe Racks, Pe ° .
FOR SALE MS—Gne Double Bedroom, one] Tail Tables; Bergere Arm) Chairs and ; Just Dial 4910 or 3601 and let mo Wicker Tables, Wicker | Chairs, Beckwith Place, Bridgetown, on Friday, 6th July, 1951, “WINDY WILLOWS", St. James
ee eae Nee AB single, "Excellent bea Bathing, Terms on | Rockers; Mortis” Chairs with Spelt 1# co the worrying Mosgilito “Nets” Blectrie’ Topsters, , , : — Delightful bungalow house with
application to Casuarina Residential Club, | Cushions, eases S ae * aA re ‘ . — rage Pare, ee ee can at 2 o'clock p.m. for the purpose of electing a Director west iter os oer ean ne ae
Maxwell Coast Road. Telephone 8378 Table, Carved Pedestal Pi a "sy Cc. PIERREPONTE % carpet, Dominican Rugs, Rush r a and stretches
a 1.7.81—1n. | in Mahogany! very nice China Cabins z 2 Carpets and Rtgs, Large Collec- ‘ B ho h ‘ d of beach. Large lounge, 3 bed-
3 = (Round Glass), Wicker Ax CHAS. | 0 p pa nnnmmnmnnnenne penitent pinebed tion Table Cloths, Tea and Tray in the place of Mr. Walter C. Boyce, who has resigne rooms, verandahs, kitchen, pantry
, “SNUG CORNER” — PALM BEACH, | Rockers and Tables: Paintings and Water | SR. eee | Cloths, Pillows, Cushions, ” Large and servants’ rooms. Storerooms
OF ae ene | HASTINGS, Ideally. situated on the SEA\| Colours; Chiming Clock, | “Veranda | Collection of “ikitehen, Ware’ ad his seat. = Senet COPE commenen-
5 fable, ord hs. | Chairs, Glass and China; Set of Table | Utensils, Ansome Mower, ‘ot ’ “ +”
ST. LUCIA hee Seay Pi fed ser 5,| Glass (61 pieces), Dinner Service (7 | K Ne ! S k i Plates, Kerdsetie Cookér,” Garden Cc. K. BROWNE, eine be an * fine im-
B.W.t with Running Water, all modern con- | pcs.) Tea and Coftee Serv ne ss Silvas ae 1 resh < toc Ss useinuy. acer Catenin ae Secretary. driveway is avanabie ath oe
veniences, Kitchen, Servants’ Room and | Plated ee ee eee ener Br . oer cendel te: Cae ys - 4 acres well laid out with lawns,
about miles from the aie ee % 18th July. Apply | Tureen &c, Forks, Cutlery Brass: | e — d Ornaments, Kitehen Furnitut?, r t is ‘ -
Capital, Castries) SE ee een cent, Dial OB31 Jardinieres, Finger Bowls &c, Cushions |{ ust Receiv e Table Lamps, 2 Portable Gramo- 21.6.51—6n. shrubberies,” livge taditk ae
Consisting of Twenty four (24) ana or 29.6.51—4n. | Folding Card Tables, — Westinghouse phones, Miscellaneous Records, closed by wall and feice. The
acres of land on which are sited: : Bassigerator yo parser, worse ome. PARK DAVIS SACCHARIN TABS Corigiat os ee order house contains very large lounges
ectric Fan; amps, ‘Toaster ec PARK DAVIS PALATOL COMP icture: and ‘rames, onerete 9
Two (2) Modern Buildings, suitable TWO BEDROOMS Fully furnishel | Handsome Prench Carpets and Rugs; PARK DAVIS PALATOL PLAIN Flowef Pots, Rose Trees, 1949 double bedroceas Weapons ‘hall,
for Country Club and Guest ‘with running water, St, Lawrence Gap. |New Carpet Sweeper: Single Pacstone PARK DAVIS LIVIBRON Model Morris 14 Car and very all Usual offices! Rates and Sak
House [ Fer particulars Dial 8489, 111 — Ons | ae Beings. eae + ih Te PARK DAVIS BEEF TRON & many other attractive items buildings. t fe
7 ——_—_———$ ‘ors, yent’s ess, Aine t WINE ; \
(1) A Wooden Building (36 x 38) 6 —O; ‘astings Main Road, | Vahity Tables all in Mahogenys Bedroom CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION } “ ” py ;
\ Containing 3 bedrooms, draw- Ty na house on the land | Sufte in Manchfheale Mird. Pr es, MT. | arsine re | \ Pe he le genet ee
i ing dining, dressing and side from St. Matthias Gap. Three bed | Washstand, ed and et oa tee | Cash on fall of the hamme ' gone age, is the ideal home for
( itting rooms rooms, all modern conveniences. Appl Table, Deep Sleep and Hair Mat-) DR as: a € hammer { someone who’ wants spacious
{ Veranda on two sides, Covered on premises. 1.7,51—1n | tresses, Child’s Bedstead, Canva oe DR rooms and quiet ‘surroundings
with Galvanized Iron Four Burner Perfection Oil Stove with | A CTIONEER ; ¢ St. James coast which offers
. built in oven, (periect condition, Larders, | YEASTVITE TABLETS . NS \ ood bathing is only ¥ mile away
} (2) A Large 3-Storey Concrete FOUND ae tienes ane SS eae By att Cit pare watas and distance from Bridgetown is
Building 42 x 42 Containing: Pal - ressure Cooker, Lawn Mower, ech. | ANALGES ALI J 6 miles. Offers” ‘
| | ® Bedrooms, Large Hall, Sit- Tobdls, Roller, New Hose; Garden Beneh ohn e ladon as ae er
, ti Room and Store Room, WRIST WATCH—At the “Princess | Chicken Coops and Runs, | lants In, mn - | “BAGATELLE OUSE,” st.
} Floors and other necessary wood- Alice” Playing Field, on Thursday night | ented Pots, Orchids, Books ing} id aint : | ‘ . | Thomas. '— A tive 2-storey |
work of Pitch Pine, Bullet wood 14th June, one (1) Ladies Wrist Watch | Schomburg’s History of Barb: C CARLTON BROWNE | A.F.S,, F.V.A. | cguntry house with approx. 5
? and Green-heart. Owner can have same by applying to the | other items. ns | required. There are 5 bedrooms,
: Veranda right around cn two Vestry Clerk, and paying cost of tht: Sale 12.30 o'clock. Terms cash, — | Wholesale & Retail Deuggist ia) Phone 4640 i acres plus additional 3% acres if
| storeys. All Modern Con- advertisement. BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. | oS : 2 lounges, dining room, 2 enclosed
veniences. 1.7.51—1n Auctioneers | 186 Roebuck St, Dial 2813 ) | PLA ATIONS BUILDING | oe a eaten’ eats
The Property his two rivers. of LOST cians inner capers Gna UReee Ri ce
ystal lee vater 26666666689 Pee. com-
} een by ars water running ooo SOOO OOSO OOOO OSS z - fs | mands ereqtiont view of the St.
For dc stic use the buildings ai —_—_—- — . s | j TH ' eee ee
‘ are served jointly frem concrete x s | SELECT E FOLLOWING BUILDING NEEDS rs } “GREY HOUSE” s itstown. —
| cisterns with a capaeity of 22,000 SWEEPSTAKE BOOKS — 2 Sweepstake % { % | o } Large 3-storey ‘house ' in ~ good
1 gallons Books II 7480 and IT 3430. Finder please . > / lp Cc x | | CEMENT (Drums & Bags) business section. Suitable for dry
a wise the ee Service is return to Prince Gregorie, Dpre: Bee ‘ eae %| | BAR IRON (tin all Sizes) goods, provision store, ete. In-
1 American Plant in perfect Street 51—2n . spy E. F.V.A - formation on application
be 1, with. a. capacity of 2 | A.M. INST, B. E A, | EXPANDED METAL (In all Sizes)
‘ Watts. | WALL BOARD wee
os mre Aiioe Goshabny { 3 | Auctioneer and Real Estate PAINTS & ENAMELS (In all Brands)
> oth | }
Graph Meta pebaah oe {0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH BEVER AGES | Arent { All ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIES WANTED
bearing) % ae
: ‘ — “ s | And Many Other Useful ITEMS Too Numerous to Mention SUGAR ESTATE with pleasant
is next to UNION, the EVERYMAN’S < at GRIFFITH'S R ‘kley » Offers You | t residence up to £20,000 or there-
ee eee Ae ENCYCLOPAEDIA % a VOE 1 ¢ Several interesting Properties in St. James, Christ Church, Pay US a Visit before making your Selection abouts for overseas buyer. '"
fovernment Exp C A : : : | : tins
ou eee % % Navy Gardens and Silver Sands. See: We shall be ‘pleastg to give de-
(2) Owner's reason for selling: Unable 3rd Edition revised to 1950 % Iced Cold or Supplied % tails of many other propefttiés for
i through impaired health to . $ s sale in Barbados, also in Jaqiaica,
(Xt devote personal attention to $36.00 for the Set $ Per Dozen e | eo e Bermuda and the Bahamas
{ business JOHNSON’S STATIONERY > %
{ *% s
cas § ©
ty further particulars, appl » we 2 B b d H d L d
rthe F: ‘5, ply ‘, 7 Nee ase ‘ ¥
g the next few dave” @ mEMIREORS g ce me} interwar arbados Hardware Co., Ltd. KEAL ESTATE AGENTS
i “i thing, Christ 22 ins. x 16 ins. B Book Your Order Now 9 THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS) (| 2
i ( 24 ins. x 18 ins. % S a % || PLANTATIONS BULL. DING
if PI > 8364 at 5 1% aDisel 1514 x No. 16 Swan Street one Phone 2109, 4406 or 3534 | = “Pho: a 4640
i 10ne JOHNSON’S HARDWARE {3 x i me {
M 4 Bea taht Sr ef
Feeennnaas FSFE FYSSOSSSSSOSSGGSSSSOG VSS Gs =
SSS So
























































































‘















































































SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE dh See PAC c FIFTE! nN









HOUSING :

Aided Self Help Schemes :
Are Most Economical for WI

THE most economical method of providing adequate
housing for the lower income groups in the Caribbean area
is by aided self-help schemes.

FROPERSY

FOR SALE

B.B.C. Radio
was the conclusion reach-

yr : Thi
Notes ed by the Housing Conference
which met at Hastings House last
week. This conference concluded
its deliberations on Friday and

Again the coming we ae agreed om the terms of its report
of sports eioasibanien in ch oe to the British Caribbean Goverin-
Overseas Service. The Third Tesi ments.
beg on Thursday next, 5th. The Conference gave special at-
July, at Old Trafford, the famous tention to the application of the
Lancashire Cricket ground. Broad- principle of self-help in housing
casts om each day’s play will be schemes. An _ aided self-help
beamed to us in this area at 5.00 scheme is one in which the pub-
p.m. on each of the five days and lic authority assists house owners
in addition there will be com- to improve or build their dwellings
mentaries in beams to Africa at by providing, usually on a repay-
&.15 a.m. and 12.45 which you ment basis, land and materials,
may be able to pick up either the owner supplying the labour
in the 17 or 19 metre bands, 15.14 himself. The land is serviced by
and. 17.715 megacyeles, Lawn the authority with water supply
Tennis at Wimbledon is reported and essential roads.

duced, the need for which is
universally recognised, there
must be an adjustment ef
permitted standards in re-
gerd to both the size and the
amenities provided.

A sub-committee of the Con-

Sports, Broadcasts




ference reviewed the minimum
standards recommended in Devel-
opment and Welfare Bulletin No.
13, “Housing in the West Indies”,
and made suggestions involving,
in certain cases, the revision of
those standards. The same sub-
committee also made recommend-
ations on the subject of building
legislation and regulations



Another sub-committee report- FE ' > {
ed on housing finanee, 2dminis - or over 20 years people have
rents and used Alka-Seltzer for quick relief

“daily at 5.00 p.m. until the Test tration, management ne D
Match starts when it will be Schemes Successful The reports of both sub-commit- from acid indigestion and sour,

tees were accepted, with certain
modifications, by the Conference '

heard five minutes later and also The Conference noted that such upset stomach. Alka-Seltzer acts |

every day at 8.45 p.m. when Max
Robertson, Rex Alston and Ray-
mond Glendenning comment or
each day’s matches. The open
Golf Championship, being played
for the first time in Northern
Ireland at the Royal Portrush
Club, will be subject of an eye-
witness account at 5.10 and 9.00
p.m. on Friday, 6th July.

B.B.C. RADIO
-» PROGRAMMES

JULY 1,
2 Pt

951
rade, 11 30





1




aim +t .on The News

1210 pm. News A ;
iH i pm — 19 m

435 pm. Music Magazine, 430 pm
Sunday Half Hour, 5 00 pm. Composer
of the Week, 5 15 p m. Listeners’ Choice,
6 00 Nellie Lutcher, 615 pm



pot N
Ray A Laugh, 645 pm. Programme
Parade

7 W—11 00 — 25 58



m, 3132 m





710 pm News

00 pm ws,
. Caribbean Voices,

715 p



A

schemes have already been un-
dertaken with success in various
forms in several British West
Indian territories, notably Jamai-
ca, Trinidad and St. Vincent, and
recorded its opinion that these
schemes represent the most eco-
nomieal method of providing ade-
Guate housing for the lower income
groups.

It is hoped that aided self-help
schemes will be introduced in
those territories where they have
not yet been tried, and that in-
creased use will be made of them
in other territories, as they would
represent the most advantageous
use of the limited funds availab!..

The Conference was convened
with the main task of consider-
ing the position of the lower in-
come groups, the great majority of
whom live in unsatisfactory hous-
i.g conditions, In the debate in
the Trinidad Legislative Council
in June, 1950, where the sugges-

in plenary session.

Economy
The need for the utmost econo-
my in the use of funds is em-
phasised by the present high costs
of building, and by the inability

of governments to devote suffi- |
cient of their resources to hous- |
latter, the |

ing. As regards the
Conference drew attention to the
harmful effect of bad housing
conditions on productivity, and

hoped that increased funds could !
be made available for the im- |

provement of housing standards
in all territories. With regard to
costs, the Conference _ stressed
that the urgent need is for a re-
duction in the price of cement, o1
the provision of alternative ce-
menting material at a low cost,
and stated its belief that such

development could transform the |

situation in every territory.

The conference was arranged



gredients to neutralize excess gas-
tric acidity with an analgesic to
relieve the headache so often
caused by gastric distress.

Millions daily find Alka-Seltzer so
easy to take...so pleasant-tasting.
Try it—just drop one or two tab-
lets into a glass of water, watch
it fizz, then drink it,

Not a laxative, not habit-forming,
you can take it amy time, Keep a
supply handy — always!

_ Alka-Seltzer helps millions daily
“=~ let it help you too!

a = =m (i)
Alka-Seltzer




Tubes of
2& ablets



two ways, combining alkaline in- |



KNOWN AS

THE WHITEHALL

and Two adjoining Buildings
situated at Hastings opposite the Hastings Hotel















7 45°-p m cience and The Christian 4; % =i fone “Ps : ar eee at mem Ph
Man, @00 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 813 tion of a housing conference orig- by the Development and Welfare seen ncents AID, ¢ SURNAM Ud
pm Sunday Serviee, 845 pm iInter- inated, the hope was ee Organisation, and there were re- |" — . =
Inde, 855 pm From the Editorials, that by joint action following a presentativ arb:
eu E Ss 4 es from Barbados ° } _ VOTANt |

Pe Nawee 10:10 pio Pav ide ty ts conference, the governments oi Jamaica, Leeward Islands, Domin- (ng Or... AT PRESENT the house contains completely self contained well
pm Grand Prix D'Europe, 10 30 pm. the area would be able to effect " ica, Grenada, St. Lucia, St, Vin- 9 | appointed up-to-date FLATS, with conveniences
London Forun Seema Nag oh noon in the cent and Trinidad. | | 2% miles from Bridgetown in one of the most exclusive district

CBC PROGRAMME ousing oO) ne §=Jower = income Three of the delegates (Mr \ ndoag. “Sea Rathi asily available server first class “bus

SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951 groups by the mass proauction of els ; Mh eth | irbados, Sea Bathing easily available and served by first class ‘bu

at me aoe ae : E. N. Bird and Mr. D. W. Spreull | rvice
Sy ca bad at dbckeion ‘beet Mae: cheap houses, using methods of from Jamaica and Dr. H. B. { a
11.76 Mcs, 25.5% M prefabrication, Hetherington from Dominica)
pli hiliimnaselilbbidabinen : : have already retur ir : °
BOSTON Suggestion Considered Set ae Oe ned to thel: Sp Consult:
WRUT 0 Mc. WRUW 11% Me ves \ territories. The other members of , | |
WRUX fee ‘ast : I'he present Conference gave the Conference are due to leave
ay ” full consideration to this sugges- B ;
: . ae ; arbados within the next few 5

B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME. tion and reviewed the information days. Cables Phones: 5367

\omtae. JuLY.4, {oi available in regard to building
. Programmé Parade, 11.25 materials and house design and
am, Listeners’ Cholee, 11 45 a.m. Com- construction, including prefabri-
monweaith Commentar 12:00 noon The cation methods
News, 12 10 p r Fe
415-6 45 pm it appeared that the experience A Dance
: of governments and public hous-

5 oon Broek Brom Winthleten 8 od ing authorities to date, in the sponsored by —
pm England v. Australia, 510 pm, territories represented at the Con- Mr. GORDON YEARWOOD
interhide, 5 15 pm. The Storyteller, ference, was that in general, while (better known as Tourist)

, pr Interlude, 545 pm Halinka the use of prefabricated houses

be T nska, 600 pm Tom Jones 7 : F
‘Trio, 6 15 pm. From The Third Pro- has certain advantages, particu'ar-



A. M. QUERINO

P. O. Box 464
Trinidad

11.95





i) | This fine old whisky
| contains all the rieh-
| ness of many years
| maturing.
|

“Crino”’

Port of Spain )
Co Trinidad

B.W.I.



You are invited to-









At QUEER



‘'S PARK HOUSE

on — |

framme, 6-35 -p m=: Intertude, 649 p me Jy in emergency rélief measures, SATURDAY Night JULY 7, 1958 {
or Parade, 655 pm. Today's it does not result in any appreci- Arnie wy wes ates Aik
700-1100 pm — 2% 53 m, 3182 m_ able saving in cost by comparison ) 3 Eyer te

with traditional materials and Admission -;- 2/- ;



700 pm. The New 7.10 pm. News > . " " ;
Analysis, 715 pm. The Mayor of Cas. ™¢thods of construction.

" . |
terbri 745 p.m Living in an Atomic lhe use of prefabricated com- |
Age, 800 pm Radio Newsreel, 815 ponents, which is already exten- |

Commonwealth Commentary, 8 30) Giunly 5 _ mace ‘pam So
Practice Wakes: Perfect: 6 48° 15 sively practised in the area, ote rs —_ FH CO
From Wimbledon, 855 p.m. greater possibilities, and the Con-
: =—_—_
- ference considered that these Cg eee

r om The Edit 900 pm. Sera
1010 pm Interlude, 1013 pm Mar. POSSibilities should be further in- ] ae
VARIETY CONCERT

book for 19:12, 1060 pm. The News.
faret Loockwood, 10.45 p m, Science Re- Vestigated. In general it thought

REFRESHMENTS ON SALE
Extend this Invitation







4 oe
"DISTILLERS












FOR 2

























































view that there should be increased |
. yr Sag +R provision for building research in : }
Se meee individual territories, At the NURSES site - \
fans Tees, aR 2 a fnvan The Conferenee concluded, of the WE LD KS \
8) 20 pin Gallonese Golde® however, that if housing costs : i
B.m. — 10.30 p.m. Caribbean Corne persccagpske significantly sas Barbados General Hospital ld Ad Ko i
eee 74 |})) on PRIDAY, 6th July, 1951 iH
(q at 8.00 p.m. y i}
| In Aid of ARTHUR BELL € SONS LTD, aa’ it ih
N O' I : I S E m Beer casts cele i}
} he Barbados Nurses’ © AN /ND! NOENT HOUSE # Hi
Associat »
~ Rs “5 een PERKINS & CO., LTD. i}
| SSS Distributors y i
m i SSS SF | «
Our Customers are asked to note that our Broad i Sa ve these th
s * | 7 {i
treet Branch (Central Emporium) and the Sugar | Its Here at the B U Y N oO Ww ae Tren Cea i
Factory Supplies and Ship Chandlery Department | . ae pee ike ‘a y)
at Pier Head Lane will be closed for stock taking | Variet 3H hese pn ” ”
ae le wy tht Or] i}
on Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday, the 2nd, ard} | SAVE UP Cai ind 7 I Ne ce
and 4th July. Sandal Shoppe a Ria Fo) Le f a
’ , beh eae _ = (
} es : , pic
We solicit your co-operation and shall appreciate | TO 50 Tt] i om
Were f :
it if you will arrange your ordering to suit. | OUR ANNUAL REDUCTION SALE | at oe \
Ze j} 7 DAYS OF HEAL BARGAINS |}
BEGINNING MONDAY JULY 2nd. ——————————— }
Central F oundry Ltd | eee ee BRASSIERES 86c.u» | LADIES’ SANDALS |
e LADIES RAYON STOCKINGS in Long & Short Sleeves NIGHTIES $3.00 up hi > (K
Canadian Court Shoes in arious Shades 2 sf J $6. low $3.75 kc catl rere ss White & Brown ¢ i}
Seite wale i. eee various eile Pairs for Up to $6.00 Now $3.75 VESTS 2 for $1.00 up White & Red i
onnrennnnenerohehicninnehenehvensvottetcnttccstehsttehsehtstotiftojitt: Brown & White, formerly —_— - — Fine Quality Long Sleeve ory re for Sport or Work \}
FERGIE: 86 i ¥ COTTON ANKLETS. Plai : oye 1 pan) ; as \
| 37 oe ree ae eee oer an eee ee KH AKI SHIRTS wee ; = ira Now $3.60 2 }
Locally le HOES a! reduced t 0 Shilling at y $3.25 2 for $1. up or Pes Ps
You Should Check | inom dees G06 some fas pee oe raf es SINGLE BED COME IN
Up and Buy These now Cheap Cheap at $5.98 conven | DOUBLE BED MEN’S HOSE BEDSPRFADS i}
a LEATHER SANDALS all FELT HATS 1educed from BEDSPREADS 3 pairs for $1.00 Regular $5.14 Now $3.75
Now!!! Colours and Sizes going now $3.75 to $2.00 Regular $6.75 Now $4.95 ai etlihsaehltopnenns e ona
ee at bargain Prices $3.50 per —— ns — Mane eee a de 56 Pe a cls )
Pair CANVAS BOOTS with Rub- only LADIES’ SHOES cad ket Gl niken AND TAKE a
7) ber Soles all sizes in stock, Valises tb. te $61: NYLON HOSE M
LEATHER PUSHERS _ in selling now at $1.95 Now $4.50 |
t Green, Blue & Brown, going Now $4.5



All Shades & Sizes $1.36

i mow at $2.50 per Pair Black, Red, Grey, Browa conn a

7 REMNANTS

in Silks, Crepe & Spuns
at Unbelievable Low

CANVAS SHOES with Buc-
SOUP PLATES kles in Green & White.

Maroon. Regular Price $1.53.
DINNER PLATES Selling now at $1.20 A Real

RUBBER SHOFS—all ize«
Clearing at 2/- per Pair

Good Quality
TWEEDS
54” Now $4.75

ADVANTAGE













BOYS
PLASTIC BELTS at 1/-
each, } Socks in Grey and Pri
Bargain Brown, formerly $1.00 i rices
CUPS and SAUCERS — ———_—_— Selling now, 2 pairs for $1. ‘ENTS’ SNEAKEES ee ere tT eee eae ee ; {
BISCUIT BARRELS LADIES ae — - — GENTS’ SNEAKEK PRINTED LINEN §
TEA POTS Felt and Straw HATS also CHILDREN’S HAND-BAGS Now $1.95
Crinoline in all Colours. oo _ we ue ne to ) __._... | Regular $1.60 Now $1.29 if
i 2 oc, each, P are also ear- { ‘ domnctrnteieepniptntinmiiaiibenate —
MILK JUGS Real aiming, Goits now "ee ca pe ¥ Siar t Also a New Range of |——— pe | )
MEAT DISHES po ————— a Leather Shoes at $2.95 per })) 7! SPORTS SHOES STRIPED $ way Al j
Plain White and White | Jamaica Straw HATS, also Pair. ; i ae | snecial $2.95
with Gold Band. suitable for beach wear iN} At Low Prices | Special 82.95 tt
going now 2 for $1.00 these We are offering you a 10°; { Bi
} Prices are unbeatable discount on all other items } )
| 5 — - that are too numerous to be })) { y )
: |} Jamaica’ FANCY HAND- | mentioned during the 7 days {j E OUTS i
Pp antations Lt BAGS. Regular Price $3.85 SALE ti | / tH
. from $5.50 to $1.98 iad oaks H i
‘ome in a See for Your- {( |) 7 : te
mastic Hamp mace | "oie 30, Swan Street — §. ALTMAN, Proprietor | i
regular Price $3.85. Selling + . I
iy now at $2.90. Seeing Is Believing i 4 PHONE 2702 > i
eS } THE VARIETY SANDAL SHOPPE |) |) Hh
# <~ paeae oo i} Centre Broad St. Dial 2981 i My
4 Z ? / ae =o ~~ ~ = = = =
OO OOOO NOONE aa = = 5





|


> ten

wo

PAGE SIXTEEN

Another Tornado Series
Opens: Vamoose Wins

(By Our Yachting Correspondent)

A SECOND Tornado yachting series opened in Carlisle

Bay yesterday. Vamoose, skippered by her owner Teddy

Hoad, who sailed undefeated in the first series, was the

winner. This was the First Regatta of the new series.
5 Coslmenes —~-—- The wind was light and puffs

The Jester IL "0" ce

out. It
race





ween



oe \ »08e€ Ed: ’
2+ 2 kippered by Ivan Perkins an
Wins Again 2h xinercd ys ioc ue:

cock, The three sailed together

The secend day of the Trinidad 9nd from the start it was clea

Turf Club Summer Meeting saw that one of them would be the

another splendid victory by the winner
Jamaican bred Jester II wifen he

added the Woodbrook Stakes for Their helmsmen used good judg-
ass horses to his win in the ment throughout the race and












‘ 38 1 Stakes on the first nearly always the correct courses
i Coming out a warm favourite were taken to suit the wind. They
fé the race he made every pole were very rarely cought in calms
a winning one from start to finish and when the breeze got up they
in this mile and a distance event ploughed through the water a
but nevertheless had to contend though the had engine

with a strong bid from his stable

companion and full sister Rose- Six Started

mary who rat him to a_ short Six boats started. There wa

head

S. W. Branker and trained by
nry Hart and by winning this



for the remaining two Trinidad
Classies, the Arima Derby Trial
Stakes and the Trinidad Derby
already won all the other In
















oe beginning with the grouped together until they reach-
E ; ase a Lame December, ed the western mark. After they
nA ig male Guineas at Union younded this some took northern
F uses ictitisdtaa veiurece ties courses while others headed south.
for the were turned in by ene Baas Jae eae
Lt tthin’s big chesnut colt Tee! Mars
Wai Company, who won she Zephyr was first to get around
2b RECS NY ened fashion the Bay Street mark. She went
Se pe wiy. snporved ose iG ci to “complete the first round
fee M Fe at aiaglie a Ri hi fata with a driving finish. She was
the Arete Gtaiae rin dh Aa about 20 seconds ahead. of Vamoos
in the Maiden Stakes on the first which was. second. Baril which
day, The track was on the slow \ 9, sailing extremely well, wa

side due to rain on Friday but the
weather was otherwise on the fine
side.

Jockey Frank Quested who rode

in Trinidad for the first time last was far behind.

December was in fine form and

brought off the hat trick by riding On the run for the western mark
Lupinus, White Company and jn the second round Zepiaiyr kept
Brumine to victory in successive the lead but was challenged by
races At one time champion VYamoose. The race was most in-




jockey in Denmark, Quested has teresting between these marks
decided to make his home in the Zephyr got around first, about tw
West Indies for the time being and seconds ahead of Vamoose, St -
is under contract to Mr, Tass ly after clearing the mark Vamoose
Tawil owner of Blue Streak and overtook her. Edril, which comes
Paris around third, took the southern
Jockey J. “Mice” Lutechman was course while the others went
the next most successful with two north. Comet was dropping back
winners to his credit while badly all the time.
Abraham Joseph and_ Gilbert
Yvonet rode one each. Yvonet wa: Farther Ahead
particuiarly impressive when he Vamoose went farther into the
brought the Eagie to a short head lead. She was first around the
victory in the Belmont Stakes by Bay Street mark and completed
seizing the opportunity to bring this round about 25 seconds ahead
his mount through on the inside. of Zephyr which had a_ lead of
Previous to this the Eagle was over 40 seconds on Edril, Break-
noted for a complete lack of away was next, followed by Swan-
speed. sea. When Swansea was going
There were no very large fore- around the buoy Comet was stuck
casts like the $1,025.84 paid out up at the Bay Street mark. Co-
on the last race on Thursday but Met's skipper decided to drop out
throughout the day the Pari of the race before completing this
Mutuel paid good dividends, The round.
results were as follows




The final lap saw Vamoose
SAVANNAH STAKES (E class 6 furlongs keeping @ good lead all the time.
1. Baby Bird (A. Joseph) Zephyr and Edril chased after but

2. Sun Glee (Lattimer) oa . 7
3. Buddha (Quested) it was no use. She went on to
4. Flyaway ‘(M_ Gonzalez) win the race, finishing more than
Time Vs et 5. P iz * & $190. a minute ahead of Zephyr which
$3.48, $1 4: orecas 82 12 ik: atid 5 ts ss
het TIDIAN BTAKES CF clac 8 year WS Second, Eadril, third, was
olds 5 furlongs) about 12 seconds behind Zephyr.
1, My Babu (J. Lutchman) The other two boats were far be-
2. Hope's Cottaze (Mohommed) hind. Edril defeated Swansea,
; 5 ay Md de BBN cart fourth, by many minutes. Break-
‘ & $1 54, $318, away finished last after being
$i 78 recast: $1 overtaken by Swansea in the last












eerereet . round

MARAVAL STAKES (C class 6 furlongs) Win dy .
1. Lupinus (Quested) The Regattas of this new series
2 Careful Annie (C Lutehman) are expected to be held every
3. Notonite (P Fletcher) week-end.

4 Landscape (Singh)

Time: 118 2/5 Pori: $318 & $1.72
$3 36. 96 Forecast; $47 36
QUEEN'S PARK STAKES (A class
6 furlongs)

White Company (Quested)
2 Footmark (M_ Gonzalez)
3. Blue Streak (A. Joseph)

4 Rebate (J. Belle)

Pari: $436 & $1 72

recast: Si 6






‘Time oe
$2 90, $2
PORT OF 5

(B cla
Bru





1 ine (Quested)

2. Miss Vie (Lattimer)

3. Hot Bread (J Lutehman)

4 Fabulous ‘Hardwidge)

Time: 2 04. Pari; $6 34 & $206 $1 84,.,
$1 66 Pa
BELMONT STAKES (Ff class 4 year .

olds, 6 furlongs)

1 The Eagle (Yvonet

2. Kismet ‘A_ Joseph

3. Mardi Gr ‘Quested? and Assur-
ance (C. Lutchman)

Pari: $ 4& $190 $172, $118 &





$1.18 Forecast: $188 18 Besides the pupils of the school
WOODBROOK STAKES (D class and those of other Anglican
1 mile 180 yds.) schools, there were hundreds of

1 The Jester 11 (J| Lutchman)
2 Rosemary (A. Joseph)

3 Battle Song ‘Ali

4 Ali Baba (C. Lutchman)
Time; 1 54 2/5

citizens present, headed by Hi
Excellency the Governor Sir Rob-
ert Arundell and Lady Arundell
and also representatives of the
A Legislature, Municipality, Gov-
Students Complete ernment Departments and the

heads of the Methodist and Pre
Post-graduate Courses byterian Churches

FIFTEEN students from the Before Bishop Howe-Browne
Imperial College of Tropical verformed the act of blessing and
Agriculture in Trinidad passed laying the stone, he was intro-
through Barbados yesterday duced with a few short remarks
morning on the Gascogne on their by Archdeacon H, G. Piggott, who
way back home after completing said the duty devolving on the



their Post-graduate courses at Bishop was most appropriate since
the College. the S.P.G. had contributed rough
Fourteen of them are from the ly one-third of the building fund

United Kingdom and the other The Bishop’s prayers, as i
from Cevlor iddress later, were taken to the

They’ Hl Do It Ever

rg

t very Lime seen W 4 Pome Oe








BALSAMO MAGOO +SEE HOW NEATLY
HE SAWS HIS ASSISTANT IN TWO»





Ow!











©





someone to start the race but it
Both these horses are owned by finished unust ally, There was no
“gun” for the winner. The boats
, in the race were Vamoose, Edril,
distance event the Jester II has now Zephyr, Swansea, skippered by
made himself a definite favourite Noel Emtage, Breakaway. skipper-
ed by George Hoad and Comet
with George Allan at the helm

the first lap the boats kep*

only about three seconds behind
Vamoose. She was followed by
Breakaway which was over ten
seconds ahead of Swansea. Comet



Bishop Howe-Browne
aa Lays Corner Stone

(From Our Own Correspondent)

With impressive ceremony last Wednesday afternoon, the
Rt. Revd. A. H. Howe-Browne, the envoy to the West Indie:
of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. laid the
cornerstone of the new Anglican High School at Tanteer

crowd standing around by loud-
speakers hung on the scaffolding

Grenada and to lay the corn

stone of a new school as it wa
his firm conviction that a spirit
ual foundation was most essential

spoke about the work of the S.P.G., |
ind his present
West Indies

the building fund
song in the St. Ge
and was celebrant at the Holy

Eucharist next morning before
emplaning again on his tour



THE DOCTOR!! WHERE'S
THE IODINE #2 DON'T ‘
-\. JUST STAND THERE! 5
a et for Ay

> 1 i ~
| 14 Paes
4 GWay EX

~-

= gs
= kis

IST XI CRICKE?t

@ From Page 5
Hutel









Geoftre efu
icket own bat elped

Stoute to carry the score to 55 be-
fore he fell victim to F K Wit
He was adjudged lt

Without increasi the core
Mr. McComie was ven ou f
same way to King’s next

Earl Glasgow and St«
set about to put up the best
nership of the innin

ler d their r
ficulty exe

the bowling

The hundred went up ir 90
1inutes and Stoute and Glasgow
went on to 133 before Stouts

t on the boundary by I E
Licorish. He scored 65. He sent
three balls to the six boundary







and hit three fours and a five.
Frank King claimed his fourth
wicket before any ru were
added to the score. Glasgow who
was then 36 was caught behind
the stumps as he edged the first
ball of King’s tenth over behind







Three more wicket oon fell)
for an additional 2 before |
t fairly stubborn last wicket
tands were made [ne three
I men were Willem Welch |
ind Wilkie.

Cyril Gill and Collin’ Dean
associated gave life to the cricket.



Gill went to 18, hitting a six and
two fours before he was run out
when the score was 182

The last wicket partnership
yielded Collin Dean ending up









With 14 not out L Brooks
was stumped after a a brisk
23. The 209 runs were made in

1£5 minutes

Ternis Results
Y ESTERDA Y’S RESULTS














D FP. G beat Mr. S. P
Ec 6-1, 6
Men's Double
ir. ¥ 3. Nicholl Mr. G. L
i t Mr. V. Roac i Mr. W. W
{ er 2 23 10 5
Mixed Doubles
1 J. Wood a Mr. 3. Di 4
m i « 4
2, G—1
Mr B. Sisnett beat Mis
EB. Bowe i Mr. A. M. Wilson, 7—5
10.
MONDAY’S FIXTURES
Ladies’ Singles a
Mis G Pilarim ne
Men's Sir
c Vv v I ct
Doubies
Dr Cc. nd M



ladies’ Doubles

Miss A wutherland and IN
Miss D Austin and

Men's Doubles

M S. P. Bdghill and Mr. J, H. C

Mr, W. R. Allen and M BE. P




BOB HOPE refused recently, on
his return to New York, to pose
with the golf clubs he used in
losing his first-round match in the
British amateur championship at
Porthcawl, Said Hope I sent
the clubs to a clinic to have
muscles put into them.”

ry. r
The Weather

TO-DAY

+ 5.42 a.m,

+ 6.25 p.m.

Moon (New): July 4

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Water: 1.00 a.m., 2.52
Pm,

y ERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington); Nil
Total for Month to Yester-

day: 6.62 ins.
Temperature (Min.): 78.5° F
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) E.,
(11 a.m.) E.N.E.
Wind Velocity: 13 miles per
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.951,
(11 a.m.) 29.951










ST. GEORGE'S June 30

He said it was a delight to visit |



o a sound education, He also |

mission in the |

\ collection was taken in aid 0

His Lordship preached at Even





orge’s chureh

A small party in his honour

Was given at the Rectory on
Wednesday evening





By Jimmy Hatlo |

SS

THE BREAD »“HE MAY LOSE A FINGER

THE WORLDS GREATEST MAGICIAN, | Bur ANYTHING SIMPLE LIKE SLICING
| AS WELL AS HIS HEAD =>

OF ALL THE! ) =
ig THE KNIFE SLIPPED! WHY “27

CAN'T YOU GET BREAD _,/

s ALREADY CUT? CALL ~








% | )




SUNDAY



YARD

SPARES

SERVICE

We hold a large stock of
Standard
Triumph spare parts and our
trained service engineers are
ready to carry out any job
replacements
a complete overhaul.
not book an appointment with

Chelsea Garage 950) Ltd,
Pinfold St.



ORYPTOQUOTE No, 45

VSO XPN XFHH ONG ZTG

Answer to last



—-~ ——--—

A. LUKAS & BUNS

>

6659 ol oot,



beg to remind yc

which will be

JULY at CLUB



ADMISSION 2
Music supplied by Mr. Clevie

PEPE AEP OPEL EPP PPP PSS

6,6)4,66,6,66"
oo OPPOSE LE LOE

POI Io oto

’,

Slee



AND DANCE

MRS. DAPHNEY BUTLER

the Princess Alice Playing Field



3





4

ttt ttt tt IEE It Dla



Anniversary Service

TO-DAY (Sun.) at 3.30 P.M.

Anniversary Dance

CHILDREN'S GOODWILL







LETS BURY YO

With This Difference !!

in this Funeral
1 Establishment
Shares are offered the public
five Shares in this Company

eur business each year

SELF-HELP
ENTERPRISE LTD.

Funeral Furnishing Parlour,

Tweedside Rd

LLOYD &.

Managing Director



F446 64 , >
POOP PPPS OPIOID

1@
5
iss

++
POLST

ADVOCATE

YES, YOU CA

LUXOR CLEAR 6



IT AGAIN

088 VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH

— Also —
GALY. OIL CANS — 1,



& 5 Gin. Sizes

Incorporatea

puateved TP HERBERT Ltd. 1926



oe
a POD h tt tht tbeh-
COPED ETT
>

3
%

PROVIDE

Grey,



10 & 1! ROEBUCK STREET.



RLS SS

AND HIGH-CLASS



Wherever the Need

Rep Hanp Paints

RELIABLE PROTECTION FOR -
EXTERIORS

DECORATION FOR
INTERIORS

RED HAND HARD GLOSS
Tulip Green, ‘S’ Cream, ‘S’ While.
RED HAND TROPICAL WHITE
Retains its whiteness.
RED HAND SPECIAL PAINTS
For cxteriors and interiors.
Dark Grey,

With Grey undercoating.

Quality RED HAND MATINTO FLAT OIL PAINT
For interiors,

RED HAND CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS
Grey, Mid Green, Bright Red.

PHONE 4456

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.

Seth b tree ae
a a as a ala aaa

POPPE LPI SF o





Cream, White, Green.





EEO OOOO OOOO OOO LAA ALLA OOOO,







“Spun

B'dos Light & Dark
Stone Oak Brown.

3
i
‘
3
: The Sign of RED HAND PERMANENT GREEN
5
i
%
%



SUNDAY, JULY 1, 1951

- Stampeta

SAAS
SD
ce

In an assortment
of shades and
beautiful patterns
36 inches wide.

per yard

¢ 1.20

Cave Shepherd & Co, Ltd.

| 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
|









JOPPA ES PEE FE PPPOE EEL PEE PLL ELA LP LPPE IIE OPPS P OSA D TOOT POP SROS SOSA PD PP OG CCCP PPPDOPOOT EE,
< eR ¥ a - je e a
* 5-9 + y
: +g snowRroom
* <2
| NE vg
* se
: THAT YOUR i 3 H.P:
x v -
x ty " w
: NGEAl sll 3 :
g BE
% RE
te + 6s
S BEARS THIS BS
ss = es
x Se MOTOR
LABEL y
& Se
> Sh
ts Xx a
x 1 BE
s
% OF DISTINCTION sf
$ HS
e xs
‘ NY .
me oN 3B
s. +
& Re
g x $
x BS
> Rs
é XY,
% SR
% xy x Truck’s Maximum Load | ton
x BX Trailer’s Maximum Load 1 ton
. Ry Gasoline consumption 2 pts. per hour with full load
. Se Maximum speed 12 m.p.h.
. VA PRICES pn
. 8B Truck 4 a $965.00
s 8B Trailer és ve $183.00
. y $ RS
x Re
* PCS MAFFEI& Co, Lid, $$ CHELSEA GARAGE «250 Ltd.
. . ’ ” .
i RR Pinfold Street‘ Phone 4264.
“ yi







IT PAYS YOU TO SHOP -MODEL”

EMB’D DRESS MATERIAL

FLOWERED SILKS

SATINS iss
SHOPPING BAGS
PLAIN CREPES

CHILDREN DESIGNS

DIAL 3131 FOR JULY SAVINGS

OTHER PLACES

MODEL STORE

$2.92 $2.78

$1.32 yd. : fal ae $1.28 yd.
82c. yd. oa aa: Bs Tic. yd.
$4.55 $4.48 ,,

$1.32

wen sxe fade $1.28 ,,
EDGES—New Shipment ott

6c. ‘yd.



Noted for the Best Prices in Town





‘i ]
45 ‘
CCC PPO OP OOOO OPO

SPORT SHIRTS

BY

CONSULATE

WITH

LONG SLEEVES
AT

Com RIG & CO.

BOLTON LANE.

£6.66 666666, CO CECO COEF O660066666656655

PSS CCE SL SELLE

EAE PPPOE

WAR!

loo OO

CLL SLIT

OSS SEL OD

te ee

PALL LL 668

“6
eo

ta a a oe

PCCELLLLLLL LLL LLLP

COL ALS SL E454
1,646.6 db. b6
LLL

Cr
oe

46,634, 66654

“¢

ae * PP ee el
PEOPLE CPE EL PPLE PLP LPL LLLP ALLL

WAR! WAR!

YES ! A RELENTLESS WAR IS BEING DECLARED ON PRICES

OF $100,000.00 MERCHANDISE

pee Come and Join in it by purchasing what you can

from the following Lines .. .

WHI, QNE WEE _ Siantint: MONDAY 2nd JULY



COTTON FUJI
45c.
CRETONES
78e.
JERSEY SILK
Plain and Striped
31.20 up
CHECK TAFETAS
$1.29









PLASTIC
UMBRELLAS
$1.50
GENTS’ VESTS”
2 for $1.20
CALICO
59e.







CURTAIN LACE
From 39c.

FLOWERED SPUN
98c.



<
a SSOP PFO Oe a ae ae as ae ae ee ee ee eee ,

FOR LADIES
FLOWERED CREPE | CRENOLINE HATS Lovely New Design





95e. All Shades BELTS
$1.98 82e.

Black & Gold
LADIES’ SHOES
$3.50 per pair

HANDKERCHIEFS





SOCKS LIMBRIC
3 pairs for $1.00 49e.



AOE COPS PODOSOSSSSS

































ao COTTON PRINTS LINENS
4 for $1.00 42e 75e.
2c.
DOMESTIC SATIN BROCADES
3be. a T5e.
T5ec.
TAFETTAS aes CREPE-DE-CHINE
* 59c. ROMAINE CREPE 8
From 59c $1.95 $1.15 per yd. up
3INGHAM §
se Silver & Gold ae
ea GEORGETTE and | ——_7 EP
BEDTICK CREPE BED SHEETS
a Yeddi High Class
$1.29 u for Weddings :
> Dp $2.40 up Single and Double
PLAIN SPUNS ——— $4.65
85e. Lovely
BED SPRE SUN GLASSES
ANGLAISE with Fringe American Type
$3.60 up $550 up Only $1.95 per pair



1.3.—NEXT WEEK THERE WILL BE WAR ON SO MANY OTHER LINES

THANI BROS. wan Pr, Wm. Henry St. & No. 6 Swan St.

$3556%>
$366 6636566,



—————







CCE LLLP SD

VDSS SS SPSS OSES

LPSSGOS

; 4344 (26600004
SPOOL ALLA LLL OOOO ALLA LL E LPOPPSPD





6

POLO LES

a

SS OOOSOOSOS

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PAGE 1

P.\t;r TEN SIJNDAS ADVOCATE AY, JULY I, 198! Flowers For Km I Of Crop W n i %  tki m %  %  give the drink* to show U lation of the worn i 'l " -i ,\ 1 \|(.AHeadquari* Pinfold Street ace Ktended. There will !>o I names, lectures part of he erected. Billiard*. %  % %  !. %  > will -nil be held %  .irridy members lire •net. I MUST PRIZE at the Local On Globe ll. niRht wen! to who sang "September Song." Dniilcy. who is All Stir Winner, hat (ho crowd with •imed singing. ShOMttfm" Clarke who II the Barnyard" Harewood with "You i g" were awarded The Guest Artists VMM Adrian Howard and his played Latin AmeriXO TIIIIOI4.il IIO.\l Best Kept City Garden Where The Lizards Play Nobocfv out the gar," | ,| nai ^i Bn>ad Street Mary*, Church. Bui %  v llzai'ls are always running between Ir.e thick plants throughan* baa day The garden h enclosed with a wfera Cent,and there are eight i.ilm Wees on It. Its longest side u about 24 yards long A thick hedge is planted around the garden and "ince the rain last week, the plants are green and there are many flowers. There re lilies among them, but there are no roves or carnations. Besides the hedge which grows Rt the three aides, there are lire circular small beds of flowers and the rest Is turf. The pnlm trees are too tall to Rive much shade and the area is not shady A man who sells potatoes nearby said that sometimes he thinks It would H nice to be able to eat his breakfast In 'he garden. "An evergreen tree should r>e limned there and seats built id a." he lid THE HIGHWAY at the low was unloading charcoal mid Reason a Mibootv pressed into •ervtce. A Hi l KilOlS service for mem%  Tk of the Y.M.C.A. and aril] he held at the 4 30 o'clock this M vices will be night at 8 O'CIOCK • dietician at the Ho la! will Rive a lec'. itritlan" to members '. ( \ S I4IW BOTr School was H the evening sesand r*r.dnv. The elng i. pmed. Acting Mend mailer, haw to the I • ehooi win \M> opened ft* usual on Monday morning.'* High Birth Rate ; HOU8AND, aWa 1 eight babies, wen i IM St. Michael and l Christ i "!iui eh up to yesUng to records of thl i Most .if the birihs were in January whan 305 arara born [e number nf birtha for Bgj i260. arUltea BIO people • %  riod. %  month were __ OPRA ARRIVES 1 TtM.im Fleary gga with 279 from St. Icicle. BTiians Ilelurn IVom Panama Som e Retired; Stru nded WITH sunken and unshaven .aces and wearing crumpled clolhinR. 14 Barbadians—one ol lltem %  woman— landed at the Baggage Warehouse Hier yesterday alter .speigiing mosl of their lives working for Ihe Panama Government. No relatives went io meel "mm. '1 hey sat around the Baggage Waiehuuse like "strangers in a strange land" One by one ihey ambled oui of the Baggage Warehouse in search of a sister, daughter or some other relative whom they did not think they would recognise. The Schooner Florence trtunnel (or. urougnt them up From Haiti"Wages were low," said Jones, iiKjue. They were taken t.i 'sj|d ine cost of living very Martinique from Panama by the high." One good thing was th..i S.S. Chans Chow. They spent n the ('overnmeni was educating hi' day and a night in Martinique and Ct) three dnys on sea in the Florence While Jones served in the Army. I m mm l he nut the opportunity to see The Panama Government p.ml Barbados, He came into Carlisle all their travelling expenses and Bay by S.S. OrlaJU but he was, gave each of them $45 pock**) not allowed ashore, money to defray hotel expenses. .lone-, s.-rid that he has a dnughMoet of them ;ire retired on a ter gad sister here, but he was pension. Some of then have not sure where he mi goinn to worked for *S years with the Panama Government. None .t &f hem worked for shorter period than 25 years. Oscar Jones, who i* Itoopbu ; %  bit at 58, worked as a painter for Samuel Harris, who W9 ng is .in attendarri m a hospital n Canal / | I mid: "1 lound it fairly good; man, had nothing to CM He served in 11. %  tins sived some of his earnFt.iitce as a soldier for three years itigs and Is netting g pension, during World War 1 I i leved he bad "I've worked hard and saved RoflMTHl Turning wliei % %  M nothing". Oscar said. "It was a intended going. matter of being hand to mouth. 1 Harris thai Ihwlsj art Rent, food and the supporting ot many more Barbadlani %  He children in Panama took all m;i who arc now gsjttlni Jones WfSJ working retire. Mahiu.i, small pox. MACLEANS : DwSIEDI TOOTH PASTE s vino WUVIL and healthy telephone 2798 CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO., LODGE HILL. ST. MICHAEL. %  Those About To Build, ?. perfect building depends entirely on lYPa ol ma'erials used and the class ol wockmanahlp done. Our hollow concrete blocks are up to the standard ol those manulcclurod in U.S.A. where Ihey are so extensively used lot all typos ol buildings Tested regularly by hydraulic press, they withstand over 20 ton* pressure per block without rupture. Certain contractors OM not building with them correctly. DO NOT BLAME OUR BLOCKS!! Wo therefore suggest that any new builder who is nol conversant with the us* ol our blocks should consult us on his tion problems, and we shall bst only too pleased to .% %  %  him ihe benefit of our advice. Our blocka have an excellent name by all who have used '.horn and we feel assured that II you construct your building with them you will be fully satisfied. CONCRETE PRODUCTS COMPANY P-r. E. R. BOON Manager. >ellow fever and accidents killed of my fellow country %  I nd house rent Mgh. He had to pay as much as onth for two small comwlttl little accommodation Harris enjoyed kim. for himself. "I ate som and rice—tinfoods l was accustomed to In Barbados," he said. Thoa* ratu'riins n-tarrtav wn* Onrar v Con Tin Cot. Si Philip, cnarm Jarhmaii ot SI l~ur>, tVmrad niaikmsn i>f fcrSa Mill, St GMTS*, ChiiM* Gwnxlar oi llaSS. L'hrlit Churrh, Pnnlon Willii... ..f Hor Ilatl Plsnlatlon. St i %  A psaraei it si jonn ho w x*roinp*nil by hit wife Jim** OrinSlh or SI Luc*. SUtiin.fi Maul* ..I rc-n If.II. SI Mlrna*! William Uulci • Sainati Bali.l of Sf AIM and NKidfimw Allayiw of SI Jonn I %  iran.it 1m Trinidad wh.rr hnM far M wan befor Bons to Pansms BLIND CORNERS REMOVED T1IK SHUlMUaO \ .iir.iuit.-i to the Aiitoini.h. • l tion here -aid yexterdii' DM %  k AMoeiallon In Fr* land h;is replied ( %  ) n lel'er we Mill them and said it" allow us to be affiliated The Association which started this vi.iinow has 220 member* i now making a campaign to remove blind corners. Somol tinouners already removed are m\o nt St. Barnabas and one at Thornbury Hill near Otstln. Tinowners of the land where • %  corners are ro-tiperatlnn wllUngly, H Mr. Way said. "W* draw it 'o their attention thai en are dangerous and should be icmoved and they are removing them." Trafalgar The Harden in Trafalgar Square i olv has water flowers. Theseare within the fountain end people do not usually notice them. A ,irdener has begun to plant i I "ige around this area. The lux tree which grows nea t oor ha "Km arw andetnourHhcd. hody is failrAfl e sas>aS> Sdiqalt' " %  **nuts ef cvf>MM. tfroskw. irypiee*ianc and Uw nihf' kaii-rorminf saSMlsacet V mow act at ' nitural fnnd Missascd into ihescalp rVf 1M*" It t e\ Mgfl hair ereint %  > t*io<"S %  ram rrn >t Tor m.irwlf— tiartinf from mln. *• a Mi MBS urHbti W r—ftjmm -. *> *> -', <-t.tr(. | rl -r* >1 Silvikrin rH£ :— NATURAL fOOD i on fAIJI I • s|. JOHN § A well built stone buildi ing standing on l*i acre w..rking land llou^e con] 1. lied rooms, dining and sitting rooi* gallery and usual out buildings ATTRACTIVELY PRICED r.iK.itniN ON SEA %  rn Hung.iloubuilt nf Concrete blocks containing 3 bedrooms water In < H li. Modern kitchen and bath, good sea bathing REASONABLY PI • } %  \ \ M BAV A solidly constructed 2 Md ravm house, with modern toilet icenmmodatlons standing on > acre of land short distance from bus service. • i lli:il i Mi 1:1 il A substantial rcarg) fit ng Resilience standing on 2 nrre* of land, 2 Bed rooms. Modern tiled bath. Spacious Caller v overUiokiiii the tea. B service PHONE 4S83 S Over Pheonix Pharmae". S 5 MORTOACIE* ARRANOED J COLOMBIE' "GASCOGNE REUl'LAR LrXli10i;8 ECONOMY VOYAGES BY TWO D1STING1 ISIIH) SHIPS FROM TRINIDAD TO EIROPE CARIBBEAN CRUISE TRINIDAD — EA Gl'AIBA — Cl RACAO CARTAGENA — JAMAICA 10 DAYS' VACATION ON BOARD OF THE LI'XRY I.INER S.S. "COLOMBIF" FORTNIUIITLY SAH.IN0S NEW YORK-EUROPE "ILE-DfFRANCE" •nd "LIBERTE" 19 5 2 THE NEW LCXl'RY SHIPS or THE WEST INDIES ANTILLES AND FLANDRE 20.000 Groaa Twrnagr—23 Knl. FRENCH LINE AitenU: R. M. JONES CO LTD Pr Wm. Henry Street — Phone 38H I Hha 1.-7 %  (..-t. th-ri> nt |-fcllDIK.I m, i. i m aSaa. i • ill B*"P 'or i-rna .up""•" "r ,.. i,. t" < %  .11-1 M.n. No AsUuM-a ist 2 Tears Manflaio i"' "'* St*aaS lm.*( imiTH r^ I*? & r? & IE rl .... Buffrnd cushH rhrViiiK nd -iT.n.lnK VIT nlptit. "I in t -lwn aiSMfif W dlManaaca rni-lWl .*hi • .l^.iT.(n.i nlhl and B* Henty Back Guarantea fha Vfr |tt-(dna>f M-na*o rwi rlshf i work •in-u'.tln (Hr">h ronrlloo.1 an.l .l|-m B natar* fH -> of Uw iffacla of %  :. %  ). in il ttm. at all Mandaao mav ..llv nwka *0il '-*! *•*'• rngn|.fRna trona'r Try Mandaaa und>r an iron-rlad ...n.., I...h *'!' % % %  %  • V% %  !%  -b)UdSi wm u II ) (.•*! I'uiiroiy •••11. Iik* a na> mfwm, add faW aallanad alter lakltui "' "lllnn" o ,, %  ,11, „„|,...,vcl hy •d.... :„ soiini.-oml" BWhoul tl" Worid a< l.KKM OILS OILS uro avail.blc to you :o-diy in Fwvbatl'-. 'hniuBh ih.' I Central foundry £td. .V.:VSSA*,VS.:;:'.:-.:::-,:::;V > 0 0


PAGE 1

1 SUNDAY. JVI.Y 1. 1951 SUNDAY U'V.M Mi: I' Ml THIRTEEN HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE (JBS... 5CCC> S <30~5N ~**' TUIN*IN^ MS WA9 A S 3 3-J~ %  -O-' BY WALT DISNEY v.. %  ..... •JJV.N -\J P.'NNEK ... OZ WAT 9 gCA NS N... T "— \ BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG WCXJ_DN.T SAV -4ES>8 WCCCLE* VW*S MANMCVE n_W F W COLE •-•<-/ NOP OOCXEV %  I • •&MS THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER SET TVPC IN WiAISE O' I MAKES ME BOIL.] i--. nwi WHXI v.. n DON / i PtFAPt-GO AVAV i-1 CANT TALK TO YOU ~7/ BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS Bv COu.v. i v"\ HATT(GAN LOO MAPPV-WKMl *JHFiTT=C> A r/ GOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS OF HOISTS COMPRESSORS CAR WASHERS LUBRICATION BATTERIES AND A WIDE RANGE OF LUBRICATING HAND GUNS a NIPPLES AGIN! 111.1 I It 14 SALES AMI si; II i HI: I/I II. TWEEDSIDF. ROAD ST. MICHAEL PHONES 4629 & 4371 THE PHANTOM LEE FALK & RAY MOORES DIANA S7AATS M£D LOVS. HABC\ SWIMACBOSS WHIBLPCOL | MANHeL" k>A* -AS5rrv !.: .'.. ~ • %  '.•-•, ; %  ••...' kWAir.NOtroaci>os£is \ —, % %  •%  PRELL THE MOST OUTSTANDING CREAM SHAMPOO KEEPS HAIR "VITALLY ALIVE' 1 ... SPARKLING ... RADIANT OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING STORES. ? -f:tt^ K* 3 toBOX^^OC(WW/ %::'.'.'.•.•,;'.'.'.::•.:::•.:'.:::• % %  00* ','.*-w ,;;%;;;'.;:'.



PAGE 1

SIMUY. Jl l-V I mt si \an .\i>\< ui FARM AND GARDEN (.ARbLNl.M. Kill WIAIMKN Sewing Circle By K.UU in \ THE GABBBN IN IUL1 I Per PM KM* rtoWWl for thr rains Mttl :&ed market facilities where rbnl Cimsanthemum Meters .. -in-the-eorner and With the coating nf July and phv. nvtll traders would be forced .. :i I>WIICI muit be' %  . : ,„ itw i.-lumi. on %  pen uu their tierces and gin to seriously plan their garIroning board should bo right Vrl|ln( D n June 17. hether packages under sanitary condidens for I ii Mnr s^p,,^. WORLD KttdltlOM in regard to food supplias appear to be worsen' ing. In the prevail.n stances, it is onl. w should ask oursel |th '.in all dm .nd ma%  :nRi'hme i How ean gaulrn* be kept going I :Fpirrn" i -^*tuns.der.ible. regn n '^ I" lor aa 3l out planned, integrated g?j*^umTs \ ** tanU £ ""! lf *> attack, of a long rangnature, on S' tf ller to ..( our drt wwiher < „ lllICJli w. thuik I the problems ol food production ^ als ^ ^ Basting '•"• '•'" I"" "" b.il\ by uie .loth should be kept to the me prooicnit wi iuu ^umimuii Jnivirnmiii for dlr**-! n intact with and autnbution. Iamtf.bl.hja &?•£'.3 *bSSar."iiI m ^SHC attw IHl. %  *. U th. „„'; ensuring Iir pints to the grower £ d cr< „ c ,,. too th U m Is ripe acveral car..or stock rjisttm return fcr Mj ^f^' 0 j urlcM ,„ „ U tm ha. labour and iavc.tm.iit nd nial J",J,."^l ol produrtion and a Zinnia, and they are treatment of th{ con.umcr who „, wha k „ nw! , h „t II la hardly ncce*alao haa got to live. Indeed, both f • are mutuallv inlcr-iUT' i that pn likes and v in deseritie the I .•n the adoption ol VelU.w IV. v. .-. u..clul ol W Yellow The fads re. iajn seas import trade ha\ %  len the aubjcl ol recent ii tigaUon. It H the distribution and intercolonial and out I .own fooil supplies lead with a condition which ci Bccr nft l ,.,. lll r (r height alouu I mC-iM ..I ,.,.. log in.t lth the lormei i p,,p..i.n Best that the JIM %  %  "pe oi .. ... clow loveauaaucw o .he;'•;"", n thi HaKhthan .,,, i;,,,,,,,,, „,. cations of the trade, source, ol |n |hf ^m^ W; sopport D B1I1 ,o dowir. BalMni We support supply, prices i.l source ana se-, u ggej|lon which has been sonal flucluation: t. ix Ol ParaoD. a (t_ larM up-to-date engaged both ... •.!• export and .,..,_ „ M Q is luiolhci ga> %  LDI placed %  : N Mil %  • not int I • stitch ovei than you iii And .n this manni %  %  i puck. lew Efexi i .. %  i t f scam usually has j bit of (i.lines* to be eastd la to the Iron Thithoulde. i aas should W stitched from the u •Nuns lire usu il TUXstitching from artnbole t (l ronhuj ira qu Donl Ibfgtl :. I. and opening on Hi,left .i,j,. i your frock needs one lluic. P| \N, SOI \\ I ''! the slyle. ol th.i Hma to all sppi in the .lriMd> hard hit consumer being fleeced through tin,.pei.itions of a large numbvi i men (atid women) The true position can only be •scertalnea when %  11 thf relevant factors are known and especlallj the spread m pure between the producer and consumer. In this connection, thenis no doubt that mans prefer to maintain a pnre figure which permits them t.. (lump spoiled stuff rather than make greater sales at a lower price which would work out not more, advantageous In the aggregate. Food wastage and consumer economy are not their concern, the bird-, i i-utnplex Is strong and I step long over-due and which Reply §o Enquiry For the lnfonnsUon >t CT„ Agrloola "Utas as lins never heard of t> tdea that careful pit king of lime fruit by means of a Udder or fruit picker 1* harmful to the trees n qppQsed to allowing the fruit to ripen and drop. BCB crude msthodx aa the not Infrequent use of itck or stones to knock down the fruit, stripping and. tearing the branches to get at limes out of reach are more likely to cause tree injury, apart from brluglng down young limes and possible blo**omi at the same tune. I... 1. Skirt seania arc olten hes: hitched lplanje.1 stia.ghl |nlo uhlch Dltanl such 1..I.. ptantiuit double Baia.m Bow* ^.„ ralleil^lo'i" machine basimg ,amy weather ..... are rm d '• '• %  I Ung foi ., ,.| .. kbright and lovely. Find a*. ,, spot lor them boweser and |, hl |i( |ic Irom t^edUngs which are MI .. %  ,. ,.,,,„ ally round under an IU to 101 Mlb or by cuttle* Tile:, like in ..,,.. Ul ., :i h 'V alettine from tinin .. I iiliiu.i.t ..^then. i OssWi II nnd i Igh this plant is .. 1 llaga '.. fi.l.i „ Alth> CROSSWORD %  Dartwords Y OU surt on this weeks D a r i w o r ds with the word ntuo and PAN ; • %  lOll. Call you arrarige i a m ti-h % %  (SSSl I hi befr.n auy M •"• %  %  that pn gsjremea W ou •' rules? Wh tic to PAU1 tor. RULES 1. The an anagiAiv oi *hiword that prccc^^j it. 2. tl lynonyin %  HIP word that pre 1. It :uiv Qe by adding ooi •-ractinz DM lettei :;-ni ot Bmj ..; i.'tier m m* precedinv. word. 4> It mv bi' associs %  UH precedlni; I ilH, aVtapbor. (,; u>sar:e::.in S. 1:r,, torn *Mth Uie pre•edaig wiird .* nani" % %  • u eutnuvvii ptl I 'c oi (L It BW] Dt the prec<" action %  esa.Dos.liyb. pin* .. %  % %  ihe nau t>i U i here i-. an %  UsM til the ah p u %  %  . .'ii, and machl I all houldi .1 aide 4. sleeve •-• in 5 skirt sea i kin I a '' %  % % %  • *or&* mifh pe : Hard-Lim^k Slue* Nerrs — Nevei —Scvet — Cut—Price. Soltiiiuii To-iiu.rrou r — 1 loose greet favourite, ywt it will :K.H B il I to th months. Tithonia is hardly. Krowing to .1 height of abOUl to-t The Bowers are 0 coloured ulthiiugh •> ., yellow vartefc grow esjaUy from 1 under any normal garBeeditn. • %  (" 1 round under an old plant. It is ton if iwelv.weeks herevi fore the plants stort to flower. 1'hry.anlhemuiiu. Chijsanthemums are ' %  i, ( %  weatbei plants, but in ordei % %  have QoWerj (01 a ten must be plantetl 1 the months or June. Jul /tuffiist. Chrysanthemums .t 1 l MB lovely but U giving up • bwd, or bed to th< 1. ),.,If >.-ai m ocdes to the IkWlri t the end ot UM I'repare the ben lliorouglil.'. enrich it with well rotted P*>' manure, and pUnl U about a foot or DM .an old plan', from last | • up. and the suck-1 be found shooting oB from the ..•.h.-i i-l.'.-i' ing them off. Some of ma win have roots attached but some will IWnfl the ones with roots straight Into tin. prvparcd bed. but for those without roots it Is best to start them In a box until n < rooted. White, yellow and b among the larger C'hiysanttjmiim most common 1. Uiis Island, imt there is a %  mailer while variety w 1U1 • <.f which are would dp well i" %  not like n groat deal of watn • 1SI imtsb lusute %  %  111 mure, il %  %  mil it> tut touin %  %  I (J.iUO-t 1*1 . HI .• %  nee oi KLECTRONIC ROBOT NEW VOKK \ new 1 1 baa )ul iiutactured h 1' 1 %  ui HI. in teotplo) %  : iployad boad .1 etc) ui one. %  -. and 11 1 1 %  ma, bine ..t u roll ot C2H.0OO. 1 %  • (4) no I HI en. ui If Itrmll li.it.n i 1 ret <7t %  .ever* ot STOPPED TRIBAL WAR DABWm. A Fiji i Liltural advkM .,: ui aixnhesn Land by standing amid flying ; %  .-,. %  light srsM %  131 AWAKENED BY RATS OTTAWA A 17-1 awakened by iwo rats il -let s ircali .ent. %  %  •SflHS^rWM o^rON lemngs ^"l ~~fy FRESH on IN TOMATO SAUCE Fl/ to Britain in Festival Year! BY B.O.A.C. CONSTfclLATION IN 1 V. IB '.'.' 1 A. li.l IT" 1 • Soniier! May There latnger rl 1 1 pas K.tai.. I.l* 11 ll.il kwa> 11 -i.eo i M .Ti.aa B. 1. S *4'j.na 1 '! %  .', so 1/.111 no .1 %  ling ser\i 1 lo Ihe Whole World. A. S. Byyden & Sons (BirMos) Ltd.-Ag.-nN. H-H-C k 11A T S insn.\(iiu\ AMI mm I'M.I IIIKI I ^r ask for Cussoiii LUXL'RY TOILET SOAPS • IMELUll tHILl • ITM I S BIOSilOM • HUT m tCINTH &A$vmu tfwfc Inityi"you itfw cluww,, GARDENIA I lie \e.-M ill Sink untl Ihe L.itesi in ^i\ lee %  r...lheiel Hals llial are n .ilK arwlt) Steel t.rei ^.|V^ Brawn Fmhia Black WhH Green c 4 J> In (oil nil SI. iclcs I.. iii.il> Ii 51.111 I ...inil'l.' THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE BROAD STREET 1 I'hml %  | I I AllogHt, and Batti fiuaapa. 0) H.l.r IN . >.. -, tm irSSM li"aN> %  %  thkantaoMBM 1 "ii M,..,, A ... 1..1. l-.o. 11.. i?l. THAT'S WHY I SAY. $ want CaSur^s! When strike remember Phensic! Wise is Ibc sufferer from headache or nerve pain who keeps supply of Phensic I In a nulttr of minutes the worsi of pains give way 10 Phensic mil as ihe pain lessens, you feel fit and cheerful, ready again for work or play. Il is good lo know thai you can always have the certain relief ol Phensic. Be prepared for h e ada ch es keep a supply o! Phensic handy. Just take* 2 .Tablets, Phensic for quick, safe relief FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, FLU, COLDS & CHILLS



PAGE 1

PAC.l FOl R SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JULY 1. 1951 Fitting shoea for the OtUdoOi OCCOaUm I i and th* SP1RJ b'ogue •• ihr socuc. i^iilint style, combines J haJMiomc %  iricndly lining, giving %  r-.-m I he tint %'ef I ice .ill sPIRI ihoes, iin.se (rogues arc oil from >C*MJII^ V&tod leather* hy (ngli* He lilted from ttn ncwK .,. ILIS .a >i*ir lea.: FRANK KING SHINES I OH COMBERMERE AS 'PRO' Hill Thili CflUIMfl Local Dis/tutr Marshall. Greenidge THE JESTER A CHAMP Score CeiltlirieS Paris, Best Wishes And Cross Roads Agtnli /or Barbadot General Agency '.<. (Barbados) Lid. |P(> ... 1 •. 11 High Street. Bi>dgtlov.n fining for men BY Q. S. COPPIN F HA 'GRAND PRIX' is waterproof This cartridge is now back to pre-war Hlcy-Kynoch standard. and is completely waterproof. Supplied in 12 gauge *| lengths with 1 A "' standard, or It oz. medium heavy load, and in other gau| It ll ihe best general purpose cartridge obtainable an) Your ammuniiior, .iMiibulor will be pleased to give you details of 'Grand Pri*' and other cartridges in the f.lcyKynoch range. ELEY-KYNOCH SHOTGUN CARTRIDGES •GRAND fHix % %  AI PHAMAX %  -' MAXIMUM *-• GASTICHT' DM OIANT. LTD.. ^_^^ AN*. %  % %  *..<>/KIN IMF! UAL ill MM A*. IMILMKIKS l H>.. LONDON ^^ ANK KIN'; '_ pact bow let whn % %  M.C C. touring team in the> two colony fixture*. and who tod Barbados and Trinidad 111 the regular post-war Inti-i^er^c^. created hi toi. yesterday when he played with the Combermcrc team In their fixture with Lodge School King Mole the bowling honours by taking rtvc of the Ixxlgc wiek%  t* that Ml for 55 runs in an linings of 209. CBEATED A STIK K ING S Inclusion in the Combrnin r ii'Jteo an much -stir in local sporting circles the ergat: bodylim* comrov tf l j of thelB30"s that involved Empiu and Spartan and tin Of I A "M..' Linda'e and to a lesser extent another Bank Hall M< "Pomptur" Sponner. The former oontl ignoree. In view of it* bearing on local erichi I and even progrc** Itself, ll was ktrod. reduced '" ignored ami Anally forgntten Although I OOUld BOl %  <' this %  *.'.: %  -oil afla: ihould bi from the point of view of the King ;d!.m being i livi I %  aired. TWO CENTURIES wonscored when the second series of mantes opened yesterday. Norman Marshall. >rs anainst Empire, knocked up a forceful 1-17. Wtnston Greenidge. who is turning out for Pickwick lor the first time thin year, scored an undefeated 125 against Sparatn. U WIH-RLKKS vv I MPIKE *"* ' on boundary hooked a short one from Williams and aasfaMfl (for 6 wkU.) 310 Atkin. held a good catch at short fine leg to dismiss him for 29. A SOUND ami .•,:.. w.—l joined Greenidge and i's hy Norman Marsha.I ih CKl batsmen increased the Ushed strong Wanderers, highlighted the tempo of the game by sending the 'rue 4L& Off Form BY BOOKIE malting for the ond day's racing WITHOUT ... of the T.T.C. June meeting and the reversal of form th3t it may bring, on his running in the Trial Stakes alone the Jester II deserves special menone of the most outstanding lhrec-year-o.d of 1952. By winning tail .lassie, after taking the —year-old classic Breeders' Stakes last December and the Easter Guineas at Union Park lasl March, this Jamaican gelding has definitely eslablaims to be considered the best of this age. It is quite .it In both the Breeders' and now the Trial Stakes The play at the Bay yesterday ball to lhc bounSry'frequently. Jester II did not meet his most important opponents at their best, •he match between Wanderers One hundred went up after 10* but thos ** " wh nave een nim racln ? could no1 ,ail * b d Bmpars. The home team ,,.mutes play and when the impressed with this upstanding chestnut by Merry Mark out of All i %  ggngan in 'he DCM for the luncheon Interval was taken, the Go 'd. .. — .. , tire day and scored 33o runs total was 129 with Wood 34 and From V moment I saw the Jester II the loss of 0 wickets. deenidge 28. M ushafl took pan in two good \f ter Lunch hips. The second wicket on resumpUon both batsmen partnership with G. Proverb* thai the field in" the Breeders* Stakes last December and maintained his three lengths lead from start to finish I marked him down as one jf good class. Indeed of such class that I am prepared to stats that he may well be considered among the best Jamaican creoles attacked the bowling with Wood thal wc haV 8cen raclnf ln i he south Caribbean. In my opinion uv runs, and the third uo(ng „<. bulk of the scoring and he is much better than. say. Brown Rocket, and in this respect I ..rinership with DenlJ 150 went up after 138 minutes lhink he ls the b€lt Jamaican creole wc have i %  hat produced Fast lwler H. Barker m i earful bowler for Hw Bank Hall tean. Re took I wickati for 71 mm in 22 overs Including Slow for 4C n PBANB KiNf. NO PREDICTION I I W lItTHEit or not il will rccei* locaJ Msrshall. bodyUtaa i atrovw -hafcei It wdl pi eipttato a sort of unl !' Jus | u f re *• renaissaric. | %  %  of I am not prepared PJfSTi %  £ in prsdiCl Ml tins stage r bh'a %  .... 13" for I wickat After lunch !" %  %  | .. i.'.umn will *.] ani 'inlo give my n do so. I am in a Vtl onet SfhCCI I My that irnlng out for re, s< hool laani In uM t Cricket Aasocurttoo comp i I'jiiM-iei tebool UMma thai ofn \ [i n games as clubs to the pur|>o c <•! com patlUon. B.C.A. RULES ALLOW IT T tU %  .-.•,. tn Bald one piofc-'.'i ii in il"'" nsituraa and CcanbarnM as Mich i'he Hist dub |0 lafc %  I I rVglllSttlOD. Tini-ni\ argumi i re must thenklnso be b:. %  ital llna rhe action is legltlmaflr. Grant with hif ever seen racing in 'play. Trinidad as a two-year-old and an early three. Later Wood singled with a All this of course applies to the Jester II only as a sprinter, square cut off Cozier to get his 50 for up to now he has not been tried at more than seven furlongs including seven boundaries in M That is why it would have bn fr mm interesting to see the irlnutes ininninaa hnwuvf Trial Slakes decided over 7Uj furlongs or a mile rather than a simple ended after he had added four sprint of six furlongs. H is difficult to sav exactly what stage of more to his score. He had a big the race The Jester tl took the lead but it was evident that he hit off one from slow bowler did so before a furlong and a half had been covered. After that Bowen and Chase took a well it was all over bar the shouting. He coasted home like a cycle freewand, to bal on a judged catch in front of the sight wheeling down hill, or so it would seem from all accounts. good wicket with Norman Maiscreen The total was 184 and this Now this is in striking similarity to the actual running of the ahaU and Brie Atkinson, but soon M | r had put on 91 for the fourth Breeders' Stakes last December and but for the fact that Miss Flicka Barks* who opened the attack wlckst, : lf Bu ddha got between The Jester II and Hock Diamond, who was with E. Grant, got the wicket of Inniss the incoming batsman ''"""th. we might have seen a complete repetition of the two-yearAOilnsoo Th. score waa now had ibrls* stay as he wag taken old classic. I am flrml> convinced that if the rain had fallen we ..vht runs and Proverb* jomed behind the wicket off Harris be*,^ !d M ha J p n ^V i "£? rCp r t'. s nr *; rk Diamond prefers this They kept together fore he had scored. ktnd of 0 ng S" 1 1 ,nis l !" k,,ld of race l >"' < a" 1 classic? luncheon Clavton Greenidge joined his c could understand if in Barbados there were three classic races brathST and saw him late cut one lhal lh ere might be some difficulty in arranging for each one to be. tired ftum Harris to the boundary to run over a different distance because of the limited space on our • h,s 50 including six boundarle, ££ But in as much as the T.T.C. have a place like the Queen'> ln 93 minutes. Clayton was howP'k Savannah, where, there are as many as three race tracks, the ever l h.w.. to Harris after scoring l : l^ K ^ s, !" *Muring as much as 14 furlongs around, they have abso* lutely no excuse at all. It shows a complete lack of imagination and nour m? Kina " appreciation for the liner points of racing. * ...— one m0rc to The Jes er ,| „ .. to firids. Ha ba mu and II remains to be seen t Division of the Bar*i> Th ' ,oUl1 w " 1 mark was minutes, ed in 158 minutes. gnpleted hU r^2t? ';n m r^.. t-is! siSSR£M K iVS^'s^^^ I S^ £ 0 srs f" live and later hooked one from Harris keeping with the rules of the Association nd, lo mj mind la miles t"'at had reached 2SS. %  waj f'l-ii. %  vi i arinM fselc claim W A Skmner took It 1 i havfl wrlttan In thsse columns about five yaara ago thai UM f "' "' fl %  ..i n oool teai Barbs %  '"" ,1 nnrltet and a i ( %  ticket Atsoctatlon flxturai ihould ied lor 137 runs. Srl.lt TOKS SIIOI LI> KNOW D I SUGGESTED thai chool Hawed to play ln Fust Division crickel ; 11 achool teams pir.ymg In this division for the past halt centui. I augui %  Hi %  %  the Select CommltU I ll 1.adoCricket Asso itlori Lid with tl gtn ;; ^ legfor mUmWSm whjjS ISsS ttr&SttSii ^^^£Z UTSS! one from Bowen fdng^ i^fleniT^'m^^d r^^rt^^^^ • 'leltve, • ,he grounds fbr six and facia1 I listed in an arUele of tucb s, 1 n.,w he,r Q -1 45. The then turned one from Williams to another ho can add to the list. i but eith.i. 1 mh 1 lbs square leg boundary. He was Entered in the Trial Stakes was not only The Jester whose later bowled by Phillips for 23 praises have been sung above, hut his fellow Jamaican Paris, one with UM total It 230 or the .best two-year-old* I have seen arrive on this' rids of the Hoad joined Greenidge and thiCaribbean from that Colony and one who ijuicklv substantiated litant 250 011 the board In 217 reputation as champion of his age in his home country b* wlnniiu; minutes. Spartan made a number a D class six furlong at the Christmas meeting in verv smart time" by th.-.011,1 "f bowling changes but without Haris not only won his race In smart time but he defeated, at weigh: ith the next hull nnd 5 reult. Greenidge got a Tew more Jr age. The Atom a mare who later went up to C class and ran ith the houndailes and his score entered J,^^ or „, K n ,en ^ h ,"', CVPn < ".h 1 ovci six furlongs. This were 1 down I I" M Hilling an.! 'I"' ninetn-.H Skinner added 31 and then Skin,1IS century inel fell a victim to slow bowler boundaries in 155 the Senior Divl mg caught amgla off Bowen or not Ihe teams that they could Held in thai partict I f gKing othei ciuii1 good game and 1 t>f looking after themselves among Ihe grownupi Ol Skipper Alleyne. K. Manning '""f WHV NOT I WKOTfc that if UKj ol RELEGATION .' %  in t 1 loaned with 1 1 1 • and I). Davt taking the Manning at Tudor to .. ,-entualIy got therefore set the standard for the type of three-vear'-oYd "we could Kling eleven reasonably expect Paris to be in 1951 ninute* with a .. New on the l.-t In the Trial StSJOM wsj BCM Wishes a (illy who /Ide of &quar.> lh *" Tnrodad classitlers thought so well of that they had her promoted to the imported classes before the 1951 racing season begun I distinction which could not be laid claim to even by the greai %  pl-iw-d' 01 w The batsmen conUnued to ittack V.." !" 01 lon wnil h cwiiu not be laid claim to even by the greai %  t .l t. t?n HI? Ibe bowling and the score went ^ len *f 1 5 le -, w ^ 0 *"". ( our races, (the last with 140 lbs., as a two37 a-id >-.vle? ?9 "P *" ll !" 3 many bowling y !" r "S "IJ* ^E !" tma -•*"* g 1MI. Best Wishes won only " -. 1 in.it gain not it thaj won %  cup In tha lost ltd in.aelscton gut the %  Bald %  warn ol a tn tujin ihat could f ' %  Greenidge Pickwick~bowl %  ... then IWII* naea ... 1 NCUOI bum 1 ..man I .,11,.led instances where Mhool teams, on pOOd -%  had loal WTanyi When -rtumns were *""• w !" "'" ""i "ui nave innuenced lh*classifiers in large Iilgnffliii The total was 302 with Harrison College v. Carlton the hirfhiiMht of yescoHagt UI innings tb 1 Humra iincea wnerv M.IWOI u-ains. vs game ivith Snarl m at i.SZ .-. %  Ta .ko i '""" w !" f "" %  "ui an their scheduled th.ee day nx.uicM., tingla da,. | qUOiad wsuncet Ke,i-,ngton Th,, together wdh a "" n Ia '""^ '"""xhi! !h2?5.!? Aelff 1 n two. Of course what must have influenced' the "" • to arrive at auch an assessment of Best .... doubt tha spectacular times she returned when slie won her -, ihe last of which made all previous records for two-year-olds V. v, r , x l ur,on s on the Queen's Park Savannah look slow indeed. Best Wishes therefore was obviously far above Uie average Next wo had Cross Hoads, a geldm* tvom Barbados who won four races as a iwo->e.,i-old and gcociaiiy imprcued the moat aevern mu s wiui hia all round abiuiy at three to run well over anyiniriK wmre members of sejiiddartl (Jnr.) 29 uniih C. Lewis, i-ap.s Bsrrow, oil. Cnck, Harold B.vv t.i K "--'' %  T S. Itirk.-U 21 nnd College for 160 runs on a perfect %  'ge who baited extremewicket at College yesterday. In we n„ ly well during bis undefeated Inreply. Carlton scored 39 runs, WK j e ntngs of 125, executed some fine i !" ii D /„., 1 around the wnket. II' it"oniM.n d nd the great Erankio Worrell. STKLNGTHLNS THE AKtiLMKNT %  JUT to recall people like HUMonly strength. *J a acnooi warn snouid be admitted onij when 1 K. :*; Hoad U, Bowling for Spartan L. F. H.rris got 2 for 38. D. K. Bo lated with such players as 1 have mentioned. An alternative suggestion of mine was that the schools J play in u Schools' Division competition mid indulge in one '2 for ( E A %  i tod U rai psetivaly. ,^,1;;^, j'Lv ..' '/"'-'^ie.-l.^^S^i!: ihould two ", arltta Play safe! Brylcrecm your hair. Pandruff on your collar, loose hair on your comb—these arc danger signals that point the need for BrylcrccnA double benefit: (II Day-long imartnou. (;) Lading hair health. Massage with Brylcrecm stimulates the scalp, encourages natural hair growth, wards off Dandruff. Its pure emulsified oils put life into Dry Hair and impart gloss. Don't take any Brylcrecm your hair %  men do I In ideal condltloni and rfect wicket. Pickwick stures airaiigcd by The Fixture Committee"" Of'the BaVosdog i''! 11 ']^ *? "" s P* ne • rtckat Assoviution yearly. '" Edwards and A third suggestion was that a SchooU' solccUon committee ihould "' j w n *t elect from among the members competing m tha Schools' DiyiSiol l biiup* •nd E A. \. .1 team which would play either in Hio %  anlor Dlvlaton as a repietrom lhc %  cr en and Pavilion sentalivo leain or play u series of llxtun-. %  %  % %  :i\-..ue,. acalng) UM ButMDg CrtckM A lociatlon Colta 01 %  > ,:1 % %  : '•''" %  • I confldanl John doddard ** y Ha.d.ng off Ldghill's ; A third suggcatuHi waa that a SchooU' aolectlon eonmittee ahouki '^J 1 "" %  bowling, of F. D. oVCr ;. rhey scored a and l among the members competing ,„ the Schools' DrvVsiol PWUips and E A. V. Williams M>tctiyely. Smith and C. N. Blackm 10 1 at ion basis. Failing this I sec n reason ask) M ho.ii loan ed as clubs If they take part in the Senior .. are eniiUed lo recruit and pay for thi reputation. A PUERILL SKH.LSIION 'HE puerile Miggestion that he would be robbing %  boy out of a play proves nothing hi*, coaching of the Then there was Rock Diamond, Miss Kin k. and Buddha, who if only considered to be second string, then at least a very strong one Came the race. Paris—Ul. Best Wishes—111. Cross Roads—not Rock Diamond—off form Miss Flicka—ran well but went Buddha—ran a good race. Final analysis: The Jester II first. losing four valuable wickets. ihe rest nowhere. How can anyone feel anything else but disguste-i G. Edghill bowled well to take at a result like this. 3 College wickets for SO runs. Discussing: the form of the A class bunch In the TTC Plate and James Williams too turned in a the Queen's Park Stakes, the first a mile and distance, the second good bowling performance, taking a six, it is apparent that the winner ol the first, Jamaica's Mark 3 Carlton wickets for 14 runs. Twain, must be all that he was cracked up to be in his home eounC W. Smith of College top try where he won all the classics as a throe-y car-old as well as a scored wilh 81. College's llelding few c^ber races. Nevertheless from what 1 heard on the Radio the A ..M.i inan Cirlton's. Carlcommentator, Mr. Dick Muriay. po pshoga an Quasi inthankful, ara definitely of the opinion that Mark Twain was lucky to have won om Rebate. This Ally, as he described it, took over the lead somchere between the four and the three, from the samu Mark Twain and had the field beaten in the stretch when her rider. In the heat of the moment, drew his whip, and in striking caused her to come away from the rails. Mark Twain was then rushed Into this opening uy Yvonet and producing another burst won the race by a neck. While beaten Rebate was therefore not disgraced and once again she has lived up to expectations as one of the best distance horses now In training In the B.W.I. However in the sprint event yesterday White Company, by his easy victory, bared the fact that although the distance horses In A class are in form, the sprinter50 go up after an hour's play. The are very definitely way off. Footmark, who was second, was but a kept_ a reasonable rate ol shadow of his former self. Ostara, ihe holder of the six furlong ton missed a few catches. College lost two early wickets Hope, who opened Smith, was caught by Warren at ^ "I,',' (haleg off pacer Edghill and Mi .lilt l „..,.„„J ...V -t .S.-1 Gittei apped up at short but with only 15 on the board, -coring. Smith, after being put truck record, was reported to bo fooling the effecta. of a kick on the 1 should not be regardEdwards who had been batting down in slips when 32, went on to knee which she sustained at the hands (or Is it feet)) of Orly on npetltlon 1 %  id vorv "*'"• glanced one beautifully score 10 in 100 minutes. Ten an* first day, and this must have Impeded her considerably. Lastly o„i, hnwlM A( vinrt to fine lea off fast bowler Phillips minutes later, 100 runs were 01. Golden Quip, who has fairly good form ln England, has clearly not and in attempting an orsrsh) mg tins. acclimatised while Blue Streak is too old. 11 therefore looks as if was run out for 13 including two The line partnership between ome new sprinting talent is definitely needed in the top class. 831 V^^T ,^ cub I" d K "" 1 '" %  "B b"lmon not ;. I, !" n.l.,iy wns t.ikon thro* overs later wilh mul only Ihe „nd track Waa open. II Ulia can be construed to meLi ,,,.1, ', ., .1 1 .'"? mmm Md Willl canna m ihroush the aUpa off tea and the score at 109. Blackman -s wet. then we had better make the entire track one of aand and let %  ' Goddard after cashing Bowen to # On Pafe S I" have our races on the beach. WHAT IS THE SAND TRACK I III Kl FOR ? Forgive me for changing tho subject so radically but 1 would ....e to know if bherc ia someonein high UMon~Ud by Harding^off Edghill. Turt c ub wno cnn an!wpr lh „ llovr !" N. E. WILSON & Co. SllVf In ail lh-< i iinii.'itm. I.mill's: — "Km' -> % %  tr d feast tu the appradati 1 a < %  %  *M w | .11.-.;. of "Fashion Right* 1 matt i lala H I eh are being opened • % %  aniun-; \-. hich i WfJte i 1 itto %  Eml I A ti in two width*. Also an assoismer I %  . name It \KBADOS enchantingly In -. %  : ted I'S Shop Only mfeftK for youthful vigoui LK> of \i: '. %  r *>inpt. %  •"• %  %  .' %  i 1 %  It I %  normal bap .it. Th.if i kesr i vaeishc.l. Th i tool i i ilJna PHOS1 i WNI for a day N. E. WILSON eSc Co. The Ultra Modern Store 31 Swan St. — Dial 3676. PHOSFF.RINE begins its good work by reviving ihe appetite. This, in rum. starts %  whole sequence of benefits. A good digestion wans on appetite. Good digestion enriches lhc blikHlstream, feeds caa nerve*, builds up tcrengrh and energy. Tf PHOSFER1NB today— for buoyancy, resilience. confidence. 10 drops si PHOSFHRINB eossal a Tablets. The makers of Mobiloil protect world's costliest engines • Get thli tame uniurpaurd prolrcnon lor vow car-* wilh MOBILOIL MOBILOIL giv VOJT eoDinr lull protrciion with xprcial built in pfoperil** that ouafd again": d*posil and corrouon For a I* cents more you arc auured ol peak economy be cause of fewer repair.. I ..%  engine injintenantr costs THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS THE QUEEN ELIZABETH anJ the flagships of all ma^or maritime n.itiont are lubrl-caled by ihe makers of • %  .1111 ( HI 1 for DsOeession. Oeftifity. fndfgetti oft*r InfTtweii in. SJ—pl M isaa, sad Ask for and demand Mobiloi! GARDINER AUSTIN ft CO., LTD.^AetnU



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1 si MMi ii i \ i, mi SUNDAY Uiwil \ i i P .( I i HOUSING : Aided Self Help Schemes A re Most Economical for WI B.Ii.C. Radio /Xo/op THE most economical method of providing adequate housing for the lower income "ruups in the Car 1 .bean area is by :iHifi\ s.'If-help scheme*. "ip'.ilv Bro:< in. when Max Alston and Rayng comment ot: Tbi Boca h p. been, playad %  Northern loyal Portmsh 1 lay, nth July. B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMMES •V .111 V I, 1*31 feraas, n so .,.:• %  I H %  %  — W M m 1 19 i Begat as tNpi %  %  %  11 p in at M i i> M< i .-—II %  *. %  >. M*. i' %  i. Rawi •.. ,. i i i %  i Das in an i> m %  .imw. IO sn p m %  i r < HOI.IUHMI io an n n to ia p m Ham, i %  %  % %  .' ,> m Aud i afRux B n I KAOIO PROGRAMME %  v JULY I. 1M1 P*l# P %  a m. Lt.i. ... in Cominnfmvalm -i IMKIII The III |> .11 Srt,, A: 4 II—8 4S %  m V :l %  > ( | THRpnr I 'Hrllor. I II o m HalinR* at Th* Til ; on i> m The aH*, for IV : II. |0 UO p m i.. I" It iim Mar.t n i PKOOa MMI MONO V I to no t < m — l II v m Ne. io i.i p.m io M p m f..iah>Fin %  M conclusion reachr I b\ lb.Housing Conference i House laat week. Thi.conference concluded I i ithMM OH r'i n Uia terms of iLs report to ihe British Ceribbem Covernn sat* Tin" conference gave special blithe application of fie principle of =elMieip in housing An aided self-liclp scheme bj ooa ba which the public authority assist* hou-i TO improve or build their dwelling* ling, usually on a repayment basis, land and materials, el •upplving the labour himself. The I .no is etrvlced bf the authority with water supply and essential roads. Schemes Successful The Conference noted that such :uvp already been undertaken with success in wirmus forms in several Iiriti.h Wes: Ionian territories. notr.bl> .'.ima.i.i Trinidad ind St. Vincent, and recorded it* opinion that these i.-present the most economies I method of providing adei uate housiim for the low groups. It is hoped thai akMd self-help will be introduced .* rhoae territories where they haw *• %  i>eii tried, and that ir.t reaped use will be made of them In other tanitorli repreaen* the most advantageous I %  .. v ni-,,,1 ii'e Confarancc i nn •vith the main task of considerInj the peiMt.on ni (ba Icarar income groups, the great n wrom live in UD1 i: | a nditions. In '!. debate .n the Trinidad LagMlativa Council in June. llf5U. where '.': %  housina confen tlM hope am that hy joint action followinu i conferanca), tha prranunenpi ot %  .i.i.i bo abaa I : 'ih^lantinl imnroveinent in tha %  >f tha lower income •(.. j ].. i%  tthod '•( prefabriration. Sn-mstion Con side red araaaM Confari no full consideration to tlu tioi and reviewed the i avallabla bi regard in bulMlnj matarlaJi ami house rtailgn aM construction, including prafiabn* cation rnetbodi It appeared that the eX| M i Of governments and public bouaknj .uithorities to date. In the tarrltorlaa represented at the Cc-nPtrenca, was that in general, while tha use of prefabricated hous '"i .in artv.iiitugch. p.'irticu'arly in emeracnc\ relief measure*, % %  n ill in an) appract* able savuig In cost by OOtl %  iiii.iiuii iiiaataalali end methods of ronstructmn Tha use of prefabi.cii:i pi nanfar, which bi alraad i u n%  %  %  i greater possibilities, and the Cnn%  b i "'ii thai than I should be further investigate.! in Kencral it though' should be Inwaaaarl prOVtakM) l. were to he significantly reduced. Ihe nerd far uhlch Iunlvmall* muiniord. ther-* nniM hr *n adlon'meni .< %  permtlied otansUrd* in reT-rd to both Ihe sl/e jnd ihe amrahW-s pravldrd. A sub-committee el the Con• i the minimum standard' reconm I opment and Welfare ButV is. "HmaHiBi in 'he w%  and made lunaaffana haaatatnj n case*, the revision of .those stnndards. The same subconunltfaa i I attoni on UM .VUIIIM .. legislation and regulations Another suh-commut.-, ad "ii hoiiMii*: ftnanaa, .iimnus tration, routs end maiiagaanepi The report" of both aub> .1... plad, ^^ modIflcations, by the Conference in plenary session. Kcimim* %  ii for the utmost economy in the uee of funds is emphasiaed by the present high costs of huiloing, end by Hie inability of go\ ernnieiiLi to daTO ta ntfl) cient of tneir resources to hou W Spr.ul. from .'amaica and Dr. ftB. Metherington from Dom have already returned to their territories. The other members of the Conference are due to leave Barbados wlthjfl the next fro" dan stornach mm Alka-Seltz^r PROPERTY FOR SALE For over .'0 sjgaj people h-.e ii ...1 AJka Xll/.r lor qunL tell. I from acid indigctbon and wmr. upMf \toouuh. Alks-Srli/.-r | is two wav combining alkaline la gredtcm* to neuiralm cs.rw ga trK acid.is add* an BBatlgaall B> relieve die laMandaa m afiaa caused b> eaaVfc daaaam Million, daily hod AlkaSdtnr so aai>' to take...so plcsiani-nning Try II — iii*i drop one or iwo tablet* mm a glau ol waeab watch %  I ti//, then drink H. No* a lasaii.e. not habil-lormir.g. you can take n mf ume. Keep a *uppl> hand> -abvaiv! AHia-Seltzei helps millions daily %  <,:. let it help you too! KNOWN AS THE WHITEHALL and Two adjoining Buildings situated al Hastings opposite the Hastings Hotel AT PRESENT Ihi houi nl Ii i | Ii %  <• %  !-. Mil oonl lie FLATS with m dti i %  llci from Brldtfctown In one %  %  dan 3— BlhinB MSIIV avml.ii. OUR ANNUAL REDUCTION SALE 7 HAYS OF III \l HAKI.AIW BEGINNING MONDAY JULY 2nd. LA II IKS ( iii-iliui Court shoes In White. BUrk & White. Brown 47 White, former! v S7.8b' gum* now al M..' Locally nude SHOKS J!I klndt form.ru ss no ,,,,,,bow Cheap (heap at S5.9H LEATHER SANIIAL.M all Colour* and Khtea galng now At bargain Price* S3.SB per Pair LEATHER PtSIIIRs Green. Blue a. Brown, goln now at tZAO per V* in CANVAS SHOES with Ku< kle* In Green A Whii. Maroon. Regular Price BLU. Selling now al SIM A Real Bargain LADIES Telt and Straw BAM al | Crinoline in all Colour-. Real Bargain* Going now al I1.M Jamaica Straw HATS, also meltable for beach wear galng now ? for fl.00 the.Prices are unbeatable Jamaica FANCY HANDHAGS. Regular Priee S3.B5 from I5.se Io SI.H PLABTII HAND n\'.~ reiular Price *3.g5 Srllmr now at 2.B. RAYON STO'KINGS In various Shades Pair, for SI.UB. • Onus \NKLI IS Plain and with border*, all .brs reduced to One Sliillin. M/-) per Pair QENTfl FELT HATS irdu.ro from S3.75 to 12.00 CANVAS BOOTS with Rubber Soles all lie. in Mark. — rl.j._ now at i %  I'.CBBI R BHOI >it lei Oaaaraag at I/per Pair BOVfl PLAffTM HILTS at l/eaah, | sock* in Grey and Brown. former!. -1 no Selling now. 1 pair* for l. rillLDRlA-. IIWII-RM. With long SUan-. reduced Io MB. ea.h. We are al-o ( le.iring ABB pair'.I I il.-I^alher Shoe. .1 *.'•'•: .., Pair. We are oflerlnit tou i 10'. in-1.mm on all other Heaifl that are i.... uumeroum to he mentioned during the 7 day* %  All (ome in and See for Vaur%  eJff! Seeing I* It. BUY NOW SAVE UP TO 50% $AVER$ -.11(1 SPOKT SIIIIITS l...ni( & %  wrl BIM*I Up i.. ssciii \„„ |3. I'ilK' ()u.ilit\ 1 in.: fUeva KHAKI SHIRTS nl only S^.2.-> DOUBLI BED I1UISI-I1 :\ns K^Kulur SH.lr, No S4.(i:> >inl\ llll X^sll Id R I NIGHTIES i"" VESTS 1 l.irSI.IKIiili I iirnis PANTIE 2 lor SI.IHl up Ml vs HOSS I pairs (ir Ml nil I.AIHKS Slllll VahMi up la Nni -i W lllli.k. Hnl. >.„%  II I III VAHIKTl SWIIAI SHOIM'I Cenlie Broad Si. Dial 2981 I." :l 'III.ilil'. TWEED? H N..^ 14.71 I.I vi ^ SSI.\KI:I:' Sou -I '.-. LADIES' SANDALS While & Bra WMIa • -'-I fur Spnrl .it Work Nan B.M SINI LI in n III ii-rm Mi-. It. • i.l.r -", I I ..III' NYLON HOSE All Bfcadi REMNANT* in SilkCnpa Spun ..I llllx'ln I'M n Alsu a V'w Iliiii^f BP0BTB BHOI Al l..m MM PRINTED LINI I Hritlilar HOI s..u I 'i STWPED sum r Spr.i.il -"' BARGAIN HOUSE 3. Swan IIIMl — S. ALTMAN*. Proprltlor PHONE 27112 COME IN AND TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR SPECIAL CLOSE OUTS



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BUNDAl II I \ I, 14.-.I SI MHI \ll\OI Hi: I'M. I ELEVEN Soii Conservation Requires Technical Skill H> Mr. II. II. Ill VM I I Fram Th* Mattfgta Monlhl> | i rfn d -n(1 umc m ;: M Is the most %  grass, cuU Hie ate UCTIIK ordlnatcd on It* capabilitycuucaiion %  lion mcajsurt-s h., enrans lo a new flaw ldlng rid today !; is %  I A In* term the land. Il knoulnd undcrtater rai need lur kt-tnnx it i* >llll|HC produ. "' : "'" The proir^mmv of tlur s %  f ineasiiren, eap< Soil Conservation Setvic* was, ""•' !" %  %  SmfaN i UHonjfc .-lance in appl among lam !" *. %  principal foil mala. 1-nd. With thi %  resource without wnkrl 1 endeavour is i com/a .ti Iffe f the 1 %  naiural ores. methods g.-neralh used in combination with one land In a property co-ordinated, pattern to be aflMtlva and enduring. Baaed i and o -I their anpUt .. I and agrono over-all job of ronservatiori Inueh complex control %  i I • %  %  • %  .. woodi, i, land management, control o| laed by the • .'ter, and wildlife aarvation. MOM formei • life—fruitfuliii'>" ,.. tin,, m Uu thin 'uUsU in these fields. Soil live sod occ ur r i ng over •> limit.-.! und a,w consorv.ition portion of lh.i %  i'and* the skill and This Uf*-producJ no k 'r crs own so cormerv.i!. complete Iransformation. as II '' Jl ,hl '"' "^l 1 ore into steel, and coal mid pc, Modern soil conservation |. . lancl W | t hout adequate protroleum into warmth and power. ha * 1 *>nd land use and """ %  Jirordlnf to its individual u-cUon. over-gra/in. ind lLlmited ireutment of Und with all the ";' eondJttone, and using burning. All these abusive in.., Productive butd i much more 1 ,ov, d '" %  ""* that will k< g ofboili lim^ in extent than has cmnll permanently productive while l 1 '-' f,,r "*"* aafe and water and -oil II b & execsiotuv l^riunnmed It oc l "^ mean % %  UOn •* 55 %  JET rtrlp-croppinf, and rtu -.-vation properly Importance in reservoii ,-,.,1,1,mulching the land as rtMuirni •PI' 1 "*' u. the land. First K the and prevention ol flltto, long with supporting practice: m**"*ol tie mine land in -mirtth the • ,.hd I'KHIIK • ..i H..I f crop rotation, cover crops, ami Memory or ;i land capubllll> in Pfi don THIS AERIAL VIEW -.Jioirs jpptovfd msthods of contour plant nig and MmeiBg to prevent noil eronion an tie inn taught in the Unitl 8Ui,. Technical skill necassary for planning > compMUud and water connsibl> for such la gible rcsuitu as the creation of lew markets for i"anufnetuiers of quipment and tools, and for the rile of the products ol nurseries ad producers. i uiuary 1. 1950, approxl%  arrvation plans had been prrparrc 1 in these districts Th cohered some 220.000.000 acres than 112.000.00f .v ith need%  I time Tli. not iniludi other millions of acres purveyed, treated %  iirough iranunssj In which the is B L*an lea hai aaasahMI .•ni eflli-ieliev ol I.inning. MIUI the chain ol economic and outer bene%  .i>. bava in-. %  | ; %  %  %  I hn production l> knd Othai e.mditlon* %  re becomes a better and nere .i I'litesMons In the Cats % %  Lbutei U> lha nationi . mitutlonallv an \i \ thing which helps any sulistatttinl number ol indivlduall "' a nation I it be said of the kind nf M>II conaarvstlon farming we have %  %  i face of the : %  antntj ll %  tile topsail Is washed vable W.I v. not be i.nutnc. It meabj j '> 'made b More Kuriners ., bili/mg water outlet, building '" s s ' CoruwrvatlOn SarViC* M A,m-n....i ranner* ie^ahons 'A .-n ponds, locating farm r... . lJl/1IW ^ ^. ^ *'^ ^ %  ii less prof nd fencca "f'-'y '•" '"'' •"' TLshL^Sh "**>nical help In plgnnlntf and "" '-" ^' '.?„ f_ut;, aC V C ^ le ; PiJ '"' ,: %  >' b ' adequate soil and watr: %  orpUvo of rainfall I c "frodlble land to gr. or J" ;^ • >'>• % %  >*** "*• ( „nservuon p.ograinmes to Uici, substantial und vlopmeiU of good pa \H > ' '" '^J-V ?' '* nri farms ThL, pwn| n,.n na] co„o' P-iuctive £ S&L** g^JEj SUSL !" <* !" <* <* * •place must keep wrial sre have or do w't to them afte. the, havo without '"''•" ''"'Hopfd^ We Combination* sions of thai Modern poll conaarvaUon conmaking topaoil from !*• *f doing all these and things. It includes, f. cannot be domtologic Hood control and rwarvoti time. Subsoil ran be ant of whole wa% %  rabedg with the right combinnlegumes, for exan pit an prncUc" id use. and rertlUgei BomeUmaa smaller watersheds where flood' .it. Applied at the right crop yMd '" and place, such a tter >f Improving the HIDtreatment saves soil and reduce;. soil, not of making m Hood and sedimentation This brings tinhiruY ttr in the soil for pi ml that we must treat and UM i I In ground-wati kg limited lupplj of i i otherwise beneilts genductlve land In .1 wa> Which I %  industrial, and munir-otert u and | :. .• IU pro rlpel water Uaera. There is onlj ductivltv in con* ne corred (omtula for the If, its aval water conservation Job—;i lerahtv. and all thai m ttng of treating n.iture :.. Bl h d.lTerent kind of land on a iiy of .... n^nNext, the i the far '.nd. Ilka. ,nu. £gZSk sich !" 'v "w ""•.[ I >,.,.,. t„ -up'•' %  ""'••* bJ! %  yaw Kinally 1 • %  : %  .-foirti'i, ..1 lh.n"alici-. '•<• lo.nu uid i. lolal ..I mere than I :ti. land. Boma <>t lha i 2:17 ooo.nuo acraa. Ttta !^.lc conaamtioo ciisirici 1 , .. d ill pin Ml to 1n.nnl.1U1 I I I Tin remaining 40 percent srei ling and doHai Id Ri'uter. MF.A1 OEBATt LONDON. J"i W .,. on Britain's meal with the Argent m next Thin das innount i IIKIII> -Rruter. BRINGS QUICK RELIEF FROM STOMACH PAINS DUE TO INDIGESTION II you iu-r Ihan STOMAOl PAINS. I I ,\ 1 I I 1 Ni I III \K I BURN NM MA.i \i 11 > I 1 'i .t., |„ lr.digcti-'n. 1> \IA(.LBAN BRAND s loM.M ll POWDRV nn ckmifti IU bahwiced ftnwnila gives vou rmllv qukel nritofl ll b ana ...... I..I-K m IABI.TU tn. MACLEAN BRAND Stomach Powder mra: i ii j 11. MaTt? I |U)U|| lr Imt tend %  %  > I 'Irdcr tm UmonlaU fl' -Ym mill ii^ ..ii.ji.-4l .I "• • %  I. Wti i thtr technical %  i ; Ian of IIV.I! Ill C • t* Ir TECHNICIANS of tae ITS. Soil Conservation Servic mike stopwatch iiMaVsiirenients of tin* volume of water entering irrigation furrows. Thvy aro thus able to determine accurately the rate of water intake of different HOIIN under varying conditions of slope and soil composition This is part of the nation-wide plan to help farmer, preserve productive SJII and conserve water supplies. %  I %  t] %  In propel I ell the motet 1 i tta n i I nn i i n Inatalled on the land, if technleal help oca Job. for in thi UM soil i the UJ Boll I j ipeclfleaUy dealgned t.. %  %  O" which it IH used ami ipport or compk %  %  %  m %  wit] I theneed if farms This i the propi nf erosion hai no rc*pect for line N< ith< %  storms n> n In the U.S St IV e lions on %  land wltl hedl where water Bhortages have occurred %  H from the standpoint not soil waatai i t'. They Im.k at .'ill the land t. see if any of it Ii being seriouslv alTecied by areeaon. such as it most corrurx ed In humie areas hy cultlt PAINS I THE BAC Here J a way to relief. Do yon Know that a common ante of backache lies in the kidneys? When they are healthy they help to filvr latWrBBS* ft Oi the ivunn. When th-y ,;.,;%-• %  loggisn. these inipufities accumulate and the resulting congestion is very often the lo. K.dn,., I cotcsTi amis SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE THAT irusHiM TEETH RISHT arna UTINS WITH COLGATE DENTAL CREAM HELPS STOP TOOTH DECAY! Halt Year Children Aveid Tooth Decay! Insist that your children always brush Ibgll % %  (', right after meals a gate Dental Cream. They'll love Colgate's delicious Houhle-minty flavour, so it'• easy to get them to use Colgate's correctly The Colgate way i* I help reduce decay. Eihoastiva Research By Eminnnl Dental Authorities Proves Hew Using Celaerle's Helps Step Teeth Decoy Belere ll Starts I 2 years' research at 5 great universities—case histories of hundreds of people who used Colgate Dental Cream right after eating —shows the Colgate way help* prevent new cavities, greatly reduce tooth decay! ALWAYS USE r C0LGAiE S TO CUAN TOUR IREATH WHIIE YOU CLEAN YOUR THTH — AND HELP v ST0P TOOTH DECAYW Pimples and Bad Skin Fought in 24 Hours W %  BH the .n i-ii ^ phT.imn >r lor anvoiw lo luBtr nim uil). rti%  uesr-> U an ointment, but differ-!' (ion any ointment vou haia e'er *eii ni treaiv but r*l almoit like a'powd'i %  "!• )u apply It. It peuriral'< iap>dl| Inlo 11 "N..n"a.,m ronUttM 0 h*Md i i • hkh Asht akin iroubtoa In tl*at ) -n1 Ii flihla and Hilllha mtrrobeiir j.aiaa.l*. oftn ieponlbU tec akin ataordrra. 1 II •totia liiu.. burnina andfaBatiint in 1 lo ft mlnulet. and tool, and WoUiM in* akin I li miw ntn i.aal o *.n dear, aolt and .tftalj aovoSUa. Works Fast IUr, ... NU**SI Mundrd lo Ilflil fail*! Ihan antthinf >uu nava arm in juuf die bvlorr 11 I'.opa Ilia Itclilofl, OurnIna ar.a imaillivi In a lew minutia. II.'%  % % %  "-> atari* lo ooik unnwdiauir. IIHIH.I •,. I U-aar. n* maklns ,rt*i. -hiur .. day or two Ml tierat laal airosr Ud"K r Et'titt isGas ja i toi at at j a i oadlna4orlrar your akin Ilia trei aha you lo..k motatltatll.a. I -in frin.da. Nil**'" tiaa bi •f. a#al"i"r aku.i to ilioutandi. j. r. R K ho rlUa: "I agBered Iron, r.rrlbly Itfhinf. burnln and .martini ftnaraia ter 11 *ar Tiled a**iythin At .ail I heard of NHaaVaeaa. II atopped Itoa it. Iiini in 10 mlnutea. 1 could a-e m aBla .|..ll..( UP AH '! %  "> dtaOtfU'lnt blot.l.e 4 and aialy akin dlaap,e,->l tn 10 data My Irleiada wala amaaad at Ut Unpioxoicnl la Bit appaaisnc*.' Sotlsfactlon Ouarantood Nimatr-a eo-la abacluflr nothlnf un!• % %  it < -' %  your >* n lo youi ei.mpieia %  %  llila'ii'h f.-l Niioataem rr'.m your %  hemi-i lad.v lui in lh. miirvr ID IM r< ,. am a* imi:i


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PACK tWI l.\ I SUNDAY ADVO( ATI: SUNDAY. JITV 1. 1MI mi: :IIIIII I*\II\I D i i Map-story of ups-and-downs in a year of war &NCHURIA J Mj N K0KI J* ^SmS% m< \HVINCs YEAST-VITE BWIA aTlil,ias v *iiMiaf t^imh ca& Li %  UM touttttu down ol Cai 'roots dot* teen verj uada ,uate, when one rmuMltTa lhai the England—Australia rest s.i ii .., '111.111,..-', .11 from start to Iim.h Youra truly t$ Hi. 1951. Progress In T.it. Work Contn.t MfMr '> %  Advocate % %  < :,*' ,1,s adv '" controllers I would like fa C. t; foi hi fartb r It fiaa ranliinnvi in. want (<\ns ni.it mibutter UM direel atrvke ': .1';"" ^ t "v,, *** *J" Anthontv or \ .On^"-* J* SS scnts In olhcr word* IIM I" %  •• Jl ,;, 1MK ,,„ ltjdl .... .„, ....„ %  ,, ^ hr onlv that the f f eado m of UM profit,.„„„.„].,, Minute from UM Head (M( ,"„ making individual must be %  %  (j .. taAt what from the ownership of the iiiklrubeen m UMatb wlUl tn old fiu-ml ] nUKM dear an mv letlei but menu of prwiuetmn In niefa %  in UelboUrraF OTI Uti siinit.v, that 1 am not here arguway as to pass into ihe paiiUon of Crlfkel DroadcBita we may ex|iect |nR thl c-$0 agll ,, 1|lt |,, n h eontrol wage cajriien. wnuoe %  ubaMence, toheai J' '.' ".' 1 ,', n l :,m ta"TCielm my right an duty date of May 21 ns of Ihe i % % %  ffly, and persoiiBl freedom Hadm A h seem dependent on the will vl %  • personnel. relatively smaU proportion of Uv JJ nation; namely, those who BWO ','.'",\. ,.,„ i Vh West InUd. -hwugh thcu togal ownerIg^fPfSSH ship, control the organisation ol r „ JMI |hBroadcaaUlu Co ol the land, the maeluneiy and UM .inmaica, have writu-n alkirig our labour lorce of the ci.mn.u!.. 1 .unit the West InBid do no with the object ol nwk". v. Australia ioUl H appear* tng for themselves individual and "u,at thev are particularly InterlQTl1 private gairu." Thil is the pn"-"'ested in re-broadcastliiK oertain ^. !" l !" B ?L!H£ cular phase of Capitalism disliked by the Sot % %  •* iorna hard iip.i.ing kllM Ui 1 !l "' Muanum'i CouocUon I-i with u parly policy atliactiv. ma ^yp applied subsequently to Y..m. truly, enough to drag u> out of the milhis Oral IsjOer. But, the hroadNEVILLE CONNE1-1.. 'Teehnically" I do nol agive will casting of only the last hour of Director and OtCratai , ., i ,. .ii ii.iiiL'-nn'i\ iiiiii-miiiiMiifi i"~'"" 0( "meLr I... . n-,i %  ' %  ; "' 1 "'."" 1 '." |M %  ., the position at the moment).w !" by i men women and chilOOnOrCTOWN, BO June 26. !)i Harold Pacheco FernandeS. 1 'i > I and Medical Slupenntendeni i>i Ihe Best SanaoiHioi. pemerara, mid crowaed f'own Hall on Friday night (hat MM have been made within the last three yean In ihe tiestna ni of TUbereulosni. Dr. Fernandes was speaking at the Annual Messing "i the Boasato lor the Prev. iitum and Tn-aunenl of Tubersulosjs, ptesided over by His exi %  ufflcei Administering, the Government, ii'>n. John Gutch. O P I. Sta-aptaenyefoV' he MIIL "ib no %  •xperlmental treatment . it has come to *tay ami will slay as a successful iiuatna-nl M PuMrculoau.* 1 But he warned Ifiatt although great advances have !, with Ihe use of this drug, its curative qualities can be nullified in %  short lime unless treatment is carried to Uriah!' The He port of the Society for 11)50 disclosed thai phenomenal progress has been made at the tOfium during llic past threat yean and this progress can I*asen noi onlv through the ini-reased sums of expenditure but in the mudvrnisaUon of the hospiiai. A new sterilisation plant has beer, a great boon to Ihe hospital. The laundry has bean ea> lended and a new ambulance and powerful elecinc lighting plant have been acquired. The Tuberculosis Ofllcer during last real embarked on a plan for treating selected cases at ihe Georgetown Clinic with Streptomycin, and il is honed in the relatively near future, lu expand the seem of Bus line of treatment within fairly well defined hums in niuti lo reduce ill some UM rale of increase of the "Waiting list" of cases seeking admission to Ihe Sai-alpri um STOLEN FROM DRUG STORE Up to mid-day yesterday no one had %  ' been arrested in connection wltb the larceny of over $4,000 from Mr. Teddy Hoad. but Major it A. sioute. Deputy Commissioner of Police, said. "Intensi. c mvesUgaUoni ire Deiad a tried out by the 1'oliie wiln ., view to solving IM IMf It II an UBUSlMiiy large amount of money to instolen from a counter." The money was stolen jmm a counter al the Phoenix Phannacy. Broad Shu' Mi Hoad had drawn il from the Canadian Bank ol • Mamerea to gay workers He is manager of Vsuciuse. "Rodnay" Due On Tuesday The Lidy Bodnrv l| expected to return i Barbadoi 'mm British Guiana via Trinidad. Grenada and St VIM. id on Tuesday morning The Redney will be loading sugar and molaiaer lief ore satlinif m Wednesdiiy night lor Bermuda Boston, Halifax and Montreal vis ihe British Northern Islands. GOOD FOR ME! GOOD FOR YOU TOO NUTRICIA POWDERED WHOLE MILK • ijlAMTY rssiwwssKi) • T\STK UNEXCBLLED Demand \l"I'lIM 1% In ihe Blus Tin wild (he While Cow • 1 lb Tins $1.10 — 2 lb Tins $2.58 —5 lb Tins $4.95 o> SAI.I i \ iwire) in in SIMION HUNIE & CO LlD-AgH %  .'.::: %  .'.'.:'..: %  %  fiofuilaA (PJOJOJ (pott&Alj. WAl.l. PI.ACKS Flying Uurk-.. per Ml ol 3 J6.SS Sou Hulls. prrsrlo(2 S5.X! Slur Birds, por sel of 3 MiJ S'AI.I. VASES fnmi 52.3(j per pair up AT VOUR JBwauass Y. DeLIMA & CO.. LTD. 20 Broad Slrrrt. FOR FINE BONE CHINA AND BAVARIAN PORCELAIN LOUIS L. BAYLEY BOLTON LANE The Only Pain Reliever containing Vitamin B\ If you wut iu|ti QL'ICK RELIEF froaa FAIN, and also to enjoy the bcocfiu of Vitamin B. you muit take YEAST VITE TabUts Thcrr'i nothing rise like YEA VI VITE. It ii the ONLY pain reliever which ALSO contains the leoic Vusnun H. Don'l wait— go and gel soax YEAST-VIIr: Tsblcu now. HEADACHES NERVE PAINS I COLDS, CHILIS, RHEUMATIC PAINS RELIEVES TOUR PAIN IM MJJtti la '*'. CoribbfO" 2 Id Ckaooo loo. tKaa ohttO Of tlir Ironiporta.ion, 3. Toko oil Ihr Eicon 600.9090 you Neod 01 New Reduced Rolot — 50 -c So->n 9 YEAST-VITE I'm all for Eno's 0hVf4 BBITISH WEST MIAN AIRWAYS CONQUER PAIN WITH Feeling liverish? Take a glass of ENO'S Fruit Salt". The wonderful tffirvttcente of ENO'S freshens a dry, stale mouth banishing all trace of hangover. HMO'S n a gentle laxative and a mii-.i anucid. Ii contains no (ilauberN Salt, no Epsom Sale.. Keep vour Fruit Salt by you—and lake it regularly. That's ihe way ro keep lit, day by day, all the year round. Eno's Fruit Salt' PcKvtc iPFTHLLY Ht:ntMMHMtt:n 1*1 lllKlil Itl ACTION. Ml k lUAUAdll I IVIJtlHHNtSS. HII nil s\l ss ill 4RIBIRN. .1. ••Waaaaaafatja* 1 fading litthnrii. ITS FOURTH INGREDIENT IS QUININE' 'ANAON* is ths scientific ns rslievar of pain, lu wcrtt li is the MWI blefidinj of thrs# wsll-provsn madicines (Phnttin. Cse*aa snd Actiyisshcvlic Acid) with s (OUSTH ingrsdiant. And this fourth mgrtd'tnt. which rtinforcei the OOlhin| Action o' the Other chrea, n QlUNiNt DO TQU SUFFER FH0M THESE ? These sre (hi puiu -ANAON" ralisve* hiadschai, toldi. toochacha. rhaumitiim. muKulsr punt, neurilfia. memtruil paint. And. lu fourth ingredient. Quinine, bring* down feverish lem para tor Of last THEN RELIEVE PUN ...AT 0SCE I It cosu ton very little totuya 1-tablei en.eldaaof %  ANACSN'— dMagii to bring you fast relief from one bout of pun Alto in handy Beaut of 20 tablet* for the pocket, and botilei of SO tabteti for household ute rcion ond denturi in ciany purts o. r %  worfd fiort weicomtd •***&* ff relief of po<" In Greot B'lioln over 12^00 docWM ond dentiiu racommend ih-t o/iolgenc and me > M l"*ir lurfene* I m rr ji "."^^j^y CANADIAN B-H PAINTS ...It's good to know tht wo en supply you with "HADE IN CANADA" Brandraa-Handerson paints again, tha reliable nd genuine B-H !!! A. BARNES ft CO.. LTD. GET SOME •AMACIH' TODAY AMD AHH YOURSELF ACAWST PAIH ANiCIN K HI. m area) BrtUia snS So.ih Srr*M utkSer IM IraSe -n-i A-tDlh NOTICE a WUI ihe friandi and Ciulanors ol Ihe . S.P.C.K. Book Department 1st Floor C. F. HARRISON & CO. LTD. Broad Street ^ Kindly not* thai our DEPARTMENT will be . Closed for Stock Taking J MONDAY 2nd. and TUESDAY 3rd of July, 1951 It l\ and will reopen again lor Business On WEDNESDAY 4th. July, 1951 \ r- itwn* AND t.l s, 11 I sal NT WILLIAM FOURTY LIMITED Worthily upholding .... TUP TKAnlTlONS OF UM: TAII.ORINl; KXPKRT CT'TTINC I'RKCISION OP STITdllS AND FINE STYI.INti OF BUNM COST1ME TO WIN OS Nl I I STOM GENTS' IIIOH-r.RADF. CLOTHING puts u> .ll I" lh.Ian in lh