Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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American Appointed

Chief Of Allied Forces

In Southern Europe
Twelve Powers Agree

WASHINGTON, June 18.

‘THE APPOINTMENT of Admiral Robert Bj...

Carney as Commander-in-Chief, Allied Forces

in Southern Europe,

said here to-day.

was unanimously agreed to b
all twelve North Atlantic Treaty wees. c

There was no indication here, whether or not

Britain for instance had

pressed a separate nomina-

tion and withdrawn it for any special reason.
Officials emphasised that Admiral Carney had
not been appointed Supreme Commander, Mediter-

ranean Command.

An official spokesman in London
Said to-day that the British Medit-
erranean fleet did not come under
Admiral Robert Carney’s new
command in southern Europe,

But he added. “We might of
course, be asked to contribute
forces and we might well do so,
The question of the Command of
the Mediterranean is still open.”

Not in his Command

Answering questions the spokes-
man said Gibraltar fell within
Admiral Carney’s area, but did
not come under his Command.

“Command of Gibraltar remains
British and the same applies to
Malta. Admiral Carney may how-
ever ask for facilities at both these
bases.” he said.

He would have the United
States Sixth Fleet under him and
this was “a very big contribution”
to the northern European area
the spokesman said,

He explained that this fleet
operated not only in the Mediter-
wanean but in the Atlantic. In
another reply he explained that
nce country had placed any terri-
tory under General Eisenhower.
They had only placed various
forces at his disposal and given
facilities. There was therefore no
question of actual territory being
under Admiral Carney’s command.

-—Reuter.

U.S. Scientist
Resigns Post

WASHINGTON, June 18

The U.S. Navy announced to-
day it had accepted the resigna-
tion of Dr. Stephen Brunauer
one of its highest civilian sci-
entists suspended on April 10
“as a security risk”. At the same
time the State Department sus-
pended his wife Mrs. Esther
3runauer who was Liaison Offi-
cer on the United Nations Rela-
tions Staff.

The Navy said that Hungarain
born Brunauer, who had been
chief chemist in the research and
development section of the Or-
dinance Bureau had replied to
Navy charges but had not re-
quested a hearings,

Both Brunauer and wife were
among targets last year of Sena-
tor Joseph McCarthy (Republi-
ean Wisconsin) in charges of
Communist infiltration in Govern-
ment. —Reuter.





No Special Forces
For U.N. “Police”
Says Dr. Stikker

THE HAGUE, June 18

Holland will not earmark spe-
cial forces for service with the
United Nations “police force”
as long as other countries do not
Foreign Minister Dr. Dirk Stik-
ker said today.

In the memorandum on for-
eign affairs to the first Chame
ber of States General, he said:
“increase in the defence effort
under the North Atlantic Treaty
is claiming nearly all our re-
sources so that extra effort in
another field is not possible.

—Reuter.



THIS is the man who got away
FUCHS and his four fellow traitors

series of articles

Advocate, an



THE SIXTH MAN

by Chapman Pincher,
absorbing revelation of the Russian Atom spy ring





UK—WI Talks
Postponed

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, June 18.
Discussions between members of
the West Indies Regional Economic

Air Battles

oMeiais) “Stepped Up

IN KOREA

TOKYO, June 18.

American Sabre Jets shot down
six Red jet planes and damaged
eight others in two swirling ai
battles over northwest Korea Sun-
day and Monday.

Red jets came out in force ag
United Nations ground forces ham-
mered at threatening Communisi
build ups near the 28th parallel
Fierce Communist resistance all
along the front coupled with heavy
Red traffic hinted at the possibility
of the third round of the Rea
$pring offensive.. The Russian
type MIG-15 Jets were reported
more aggressive than ever before.

Far East air force said all U.S.

Committee and British Govern-|planes returned safely, A total of

ment officials

here in London on}108 planes were involved in

the

the future of B.W.I. trade relations|two air battles. Monday's was the

with Canada are unlikely
before Thursday it

should have begun Monday. This
had to be abandoned when it was
discovered that the
delegation would not be complete
until that day,

The new date was provisionally
arranged for Wednesday. Now it
seems that it will have to be can-
celled as B.W.I. representatives
will be wanting a couple of days to
meet among themselves and talk
over their plans.

“We can hardly be ready by
Wednesday” said Mr. Albert
Gomes leader of the Trinidad del-
egation to-day, “I should think)
we need at least a couple of days
to talk over our plans with Jama-
ica’s representatives headed by
Mr. Bustamante.”

Mr, Gomes and Mr. A. E.

West India} je

to begin| bigger and took the heaviest toll of
hu is now learned, | Reds.
The original plan was that talks|two were ng pe

Five were destroyed and
To Fight
Thirty-three Sabre
ts battled with 40 M.I.G's
from 28,000 feet down to tree top
level. Sunday’s air fight was be-
tween 20 American jets and 25
Reds. One M.1.G, was_ reported
shot down and six damaged. Both
battles were fought near the Man-
churian border.

Ground war stirred up strong
Red resistance in unexpected spot:
in the centre. Five Allied patrols
were turned back by a strong Red

Only gains reported Sunday
were in the east where front line
dispatches said Allies captured key
heights on the push toward the
strategic assembly area. Tightened
censorship forbade more specific

Barton, West India Committee| location.

Secretary were. among those at
London airport to-night to meet
Mr. Bustamante and Mr. Grantley
Adams of Barbados and Mr. W. J.
Raatgever of British Guiana.
To-morrow it is probable that
delegates will be received by Mr.
James Griffiths, Secretary of State
for the Colonies and when talks
finally begin they will be under
the Chairmanship of Sir Hilton

Poynton, Deputy Under-Secretary hs

of State.

No official information is avail-}@94 Norway — on the
able here concerning the possibili-| Northern

—(CP)



Can Mobilize
500,000 Forces
By End Of 1952

COPENHAGEN, June 18.
A survey showed that two small
tlantic Pact powers — Denmark
exposed
North

sector of the

ties of the British Government] Atlantic defence line of Western

releasing additional
dollars to permit the West Indies
to step up trade with the Domin-
ion,

But among delegates themselves
it is possible that there is a feeling
that their efforts to secure these
dollars will not be in vain,



Petain’s Life
Term Commuted

ILE DYEU, June. 19

Marshal Philippe Petain, 95-
year-old prisoner on the fortress
island was to-day too weak to
sign a statement saying he had
heard and understood that his
life sentence had been com-
muted.

The Ministry of Justice an-
nounced yesterday his life sen-
tence had been commuted from
life imprisonment to detention
in a military hospital.

The man who ruled France
under the Germans, will be moved
from Ile Dyeu to a hospital on the
mainland as soon as he is well
enough.

Meanwhile the fortress Pierre
Levee here where/Petain is de-
tained will rank as a hospital.

—Reuter.



the agent who managed
THE SIXTH MAN, a
starts in to-morrow’s

Canadian} Europe will

be able to mobilize
about 500,000 combat troops be-
fore the end of 1952,

Norway’s border to the Soviet
Union and Denmark’s border to
Germany are obvious weak spots
in the northwestern defence line.
Between them lies Sweden with
the most powerful army of the
European continent to-day west of
the “iron curtain”. But Sweden
fis neutral and not a member of
the North Atlantic pact. Accord-
ing to best available estimates,
Sweden can mobilize well-equip-
ped field forces of 20 to 25 divis-
fons, plus an effective modern
navy and airforce ranking fourth
in the world. Total strength of
Swedish defence forces is approxi-
mately 700,000 officers and men.
Denmark at the end of the year
will have a total military strength
of 230,000 officers and men, and
Norway at that time will be able
to raise about 200,000.

Costly

The yrearmament drive is a
costly experience for the three
Scandinavian nations. But indi-
cations are that all classes of the
Scandinavian peoples are firmly
determined to defend _ their
national independence and cultural
democratic rights.

Defence budget figures do not

_J alone indicate the burdens which

rearmament has placed on the
Scandinavian peoples. Their for-
fign trade is suffering to such a
degree that Denmark and Norway
‘yave not yet been able to abandon
fully wartime ration

By the end of 1952 the three
nations with a total population of
fourteen millions (Denmark four.
Norway three, and Sweden seven)
will have more than one million
well-armed soldiers to meet possi-
ble aggression from the east. Even
if Sweden << at present is still
minded to maintain her traditional
neutrality, it might be considered
a fact that Swedish military forces
will never be used against the
West.

—B.U.P.

7 On Murder Charge

SUMMERVILLE, Georgia,
June 18.
Two men and five women havé
been charged with the murder of
45 years old Miss Nellie Tucker
who was killed when pickets over-
turned a car carrying six women
to work at a strikebound textile
mill,



—Reuter.

TRADE STOPPED
HAMBUKG, June 18
Hungary has stopped her trans-
it shipping trade through Ham-

j burg, according to the Harbour!
i ( dz



ee cia vienitiiedeaiian



ommissior
mmissio

—Reuter

THIRTEEN-YEAR-OLD Cynthia Ga¥e from Barbados presents a boug
Grocers’ Hall in the City.. The Pringess opened a Congress of Empire

The Next Move Is
Up to the Russians

PARIS, June 18.

THE UNITED STATES, Britain and France left the
next move in their long debate over another four-power
Foreign Ministers meeting up t@ the Russians: Western
powers carefully timed. the lategt manoeuvre to make it
impossible for the Russians to take theie reply before the
French people cast their ballots on Sunday in an election
aimed primarily at cutting down the French-Communist
strength in the French Parliament.

Western Powers are still try-
ing to arrange that if no Foreign
Ministers meeting is ever held
the Russians will be held to blame.





U.K. Trade Union

, .

er On the other hand, however,

Worried Over Russians are using every instru-

}ment of propaganda to fix the

Rearmament jblame on the West, Deputies of

Sh “ the-four powers have been meéet-

ca BRIGHTON, ee jing here since Mareh 5—~almost

First indication that Crade| dcily—to work out ari agenda fot
Union leaders are getting wor-

their Foreign Ministers. At Fri-

ried about the extent and speed day’s seventy-first meeting, West«

of Britain’s



gramme came aia tae Sack |e" Deputies presented to Soviet
Tanner, President of the power- Deputy Andrei Gromyko _ three
ful 8,150,000 strong amalgamated |idemtical notes. ‘Latest Western
Engineering Union. notes in. effect askecl Russia. to

He told the annual conference | bd Deputies meeting here, accept |

4 partial agenda drafted here, and

of the Union here that criticism













et to Princess Elizabeth at the
Chambers of Commerce,

Kast Germany
Lifts Embargo

BERLIN, June 18.

West Berlin’s “little blockade,’
ended to-day when Bast Ger-
man authorities rescinded the
order imposing new restrictions
on exports from West Berlin to
West Germany, The order issued
on May 10 required west Berlin
exporters °¢o “lst on “loading
papers the origin of raw materials

used in the manufacture of ex-
port goods,
Western Allied Commandants

in Berlin started the self imposed
“little blockade,” by ordering
West Berlin authorities and‘ ex-
porters to disregard the request

After withdrawal of the order
Rast-West German trade negotia-
t.ons which West Germans broke
off soon after the order was is-
sued, were resumed at once

Goods had been piling up in
Berlin at the rate of $1,000,006
worth a day while the one way
blockade was in force,

Some West Berlin firms had
started to lay off workers.
—Reuter.

2 Guards Killed









about Britain rearmament could pamotelen ieee themselves eon
not be ignored. make e final decisions on the A 4 "

This was the first statement by | agenda At U.s. Embassy
a Trade Union leader on these Concessions Made HAVANA, Cuba, June 18
lines since Aneurin Bevan re- The latest Western note called Two guards were found shot tc
signed from the Government 6 a meeting in Washington July| death today in the United State:
month or so ago, 23, although that date might have| Embassy in Havana.

Bevah made it clear that re j}to be set back due to a lapse of First reports said one of the mer
armament was based on an un-/time, British delegate Ernest| was a United States marine anc
ittainable scale and would UN-) Davies admitted that the West|the other a Cuban civilian guard
dermine the social services {0F | had made ‘slight concessions to} A cordon was immediately throw:
ae = aga Party had/ihe Russians in. the last note.” around the building and officials
worked ‘for. years But Western delegate tood have declined to comment pending

He warned that an serious | , pri ; : Se ae
ieterioration of Britain's econo- |/itmly _ against listing either th investigation. d :

i. ate . . S Atlantic Pact or United State: Cuban police and Secret Service
nic stability would not weaken ? a, | aati annlaa clue
her influence throughout the} )S5°5 ape aa ste hao serie | Hien eae veer 4
vorld but it would enormously | ‘esa step that Russians would In Washington, police would no
strengthen forces of the comin-! certain to construe as calling | comment immediately, ;
form and increase the danger of | for Foreign Min decision One source said official reports
war. Although the ning of the] of the incident had not teen

—Retiter, | d¢livery of the Western note made,—Reuter,
obviously calculated to have the
we eee ee | best effect on French elections it .
Jeweller Arrested ite yonestea'ts fnve much] CHURCHILL LEAVES:
2 § otfe ie French people were
4 = 3 very apathetic about eae elec- THREE JETS CRASH
NEW YORK, June i8 |\tion ; eem uninclined to ge pet .

Two. New ¥ork city detectives texcited over oven ee ee BIGGIN HILL, Kent, June 18
arrested a former New» Yorkhtigm issue lot alone intern Honal Three jet meteor planes crashed
jeweller in Buenos Aires todaylynay ¢ rthermore the general ne re today, two an mid-air colliss
on a warrant charging him with | jablic ih ‘tther’ dountries as. well ions and the other on the aero-
the theft of $75,816 worth Of| se cegtrance has become rather| ome: Ali three pilots were
jewellery according to the Dis |, ynieal about ros ects ‘ { an | Riled. ‘
irict Attorney’s office oe + Big For } Se ae i Winston Churchill, Conservative

The accused man was identi- : 18 our meeting. ——B.U.F Party leader, had been visitin;
ied as Herman 8B. Sacks, 51, the aeradrome but left shortly,
who formerly had a_ jewellery before the jets crashed,-Reuter,
ousiness at 62 West 47 Street. BRIDGES DESTROYED

Disclosing. Sack’s. arrest As-| a
sistant District Attorney Skid JENEVA, June- 18.

Morgan, said that another count! Floods caused by violent rain- 50 BELIEVED DEAD

involving much larger jewellery |storms have destroyed bridges,
thefis was under investégation. | smashed . a hydro electric barri-
Sacks wag accused of stealiny|cade and swept away electricity
jewellery after it was sent to him|grids in the Val Dherens in
on consignment. | Switzerland
; —Reuter. | —Keuter

U.S. Seeks To Smooth
Out Persian Crisis

TEHERAN, June 18. |Grady has been urging both
American Ambassador Wenry| sides to keep”® cool. His inter-
F. Grady planned to meet ailing| cession with the Premier has

Iranian Premier Mahammed Mos-| broughy an extension until Tues-

sadez, Monday in a move aimed} day for British officials to reply
at lowering the temperature of|to an Iranian demand for immed
the boiling Anglo-Iranian oil| iate payment of 75 per cent of
crisis. Mossadez has just received! the Company’s profit
@ personal message from Foreig Finance Minister Mohammed
Secretary Herbert Morrison i Varasteh had threatened t
Britain expressing the hope that' break off negotiation unle
3ritis} Iranian negotiations « fund were handed over Sunday
the future of the Anglo-Irani Iranian Source said Britist
Comr a hok I gotiator f ”
. sed. would | x technical] * et th
C.P.)

IN TRAIN COLLISION

KARACHI, Pakistan, June 18
Workers Monday probed twistec

debris of a ‘wrecked passenger
train in which 50 people were
feared to have: perished.

The train, running between

Quetta and Lahore was in a col-
lision Sunday night with a wheat
train. Officials. said.thg list of
injured was very heavwe—CP)

BOMB KILLS THREE
NAPLES, June 18
Three children were killed by
a wartime bomb they found while
playing in a field at Acerra near
here.
—Reuter.

FOUR KILLED
NAMUR, Belgium, June 18.
Four workmeén were killed and

several injured following an ex-
h wrecked a gunpow-
i f t Jambes >

plo t hic

neal

Reuter

eS



PRICE: FIVE CENTS

Gaullists Sweep To

Top Place In Poll

PARIS, June 18

GENERAL CHARLES DE GAULLE’S PARTY

swept to top place in France’s General Elec-
tions today but could not break the overall majority
“third force’’ alliance which has governed since

1946.

Communists suffered heavily from the new
General Election voting law and with nearly all
returns in, had not many more than half the seats
which they held in the old Assembly, though poll-

ing the greatest number

Importation Of
Argentine Apples
Is No Real Risk

Webb Tells Commons
LONDON, June 18.

Conservative Ronald Russell
arked the Government in. Com-
mons to-day what ‘quantity \of
pples_ Britain was importing
under the Anglo-Argentine Agree-
nent of June 1949.

There was the danger that im-
ports of these apples in the early
months of the year will forestall
imports from Australia and New
‘ealand he said,

He asked whether these two
Dominions were consulted before
his item was included jin the
Anglo-Argentine Agreement,

Maurice Webb, Food Minister
teplied that the item covered ali
‘ruits.” There was no. specific
igure for apples. Australia anc
New Zealand were not consulted
‘bout it. But he did not think
(here was any real risk of !mporte;
apples from these countries being
affected.

This year, in fact, because of the
‘ateness of Australian and New
‘ealand crops and New Zealand
waterfront strike, Argentine apple;
had been welcomed and were in
very good demand, —Reuter,

Adenauer Ends
Visit To Italy

ROME, June 1?

German Chancellor Konrad
Adenauer ended his state visit te
Italy to-day with his second long
enversation with [talian Premier
Alcide De Gasperi.

De Gasperi accepted hig invita-
tion to visit Germany, and wil
probably go in the autumn
Adenauer later told the press con-
ference: “the Italian and German
Governments are at one in re-
cognising the absolute need for a
unified Europe,

He said the extreme rightist
who had “close relations” with the
Communists represented no peril
in Germany at present,

Germans also knew Communism
and the Soviets better than any
other people, and this was an
excellant deterrent”,

“T can state that 95 per cent of
the Germans living in the Soviet
Zone are anti-Communists” he
:dded, Reuter,

HOME FIRST
UNITED NATIONS, June 18.
India will not supply China
with any strategic war materials
because those goods are needed at
home, India told the United
Nations today,





—~Reuter.

of votes.

Observers here said voters wer
apparently not won over by the

Communists’ intensive ‘peace’ .
and “anti-American” election
campaign.

Semi-official figures up to noon
giving 565 results for 628 seats
showed: Gaullists 107 (23 fn the
old Assembly), Communists 96
(191), Socialists 96 (99), M.R.P. 77
(245), Radicals 85 (91) Moderates
100 (81), Others 4 (30).

Unofficial figures gave Gaullists
111 and Communists 99.

May Be Premier

Radical Premier Henri Queuille
whose coulition with the Social-
ists and Popular Republicans and
a backing of Moderates has a total
so far of 358 seats, may again be
Premier when the new Govern-
ment is formed after the new
Assembly meets on July 5.

The sixty-four year-old Premier
said today there were enough
Middle Party Deputies to form a
Government without a threat from

Gaullists or Communists.
“Government’s policy on the
international front has been ap-

proved by the people of France
and we shall be able to strengthen
our relations with other Demo-
cratic countries,” he added.

The electorates’ preference for
traditional methods was also re
flected im the re-election of al!
Cabinet Ministers and all but two
Secretaries of State.

Communist leader Maurice
Thorez, still absent in Moscow,
was re-elected with his second in
command, Jacques Duclos,

—Reuter.

*Quake Recorded

NEW YORK, June 18.

A moderate earthquake record-
ed at 5.50 p.m, today on the Col-
umbioa University seismograph
here was estimated to have
occurred 2,200 miles south of New
York,

Observatory authorities said the
Jisturbanee was 60 miles beneath
the surface. It probably took place
in El Salvador or Guatemala, Cen-
tral American Republics, they
added,



—Reuter.



SPAIN GETS SEAT

MONTREAL, June 18.

Spain was elected to fill the
vacant seat on the 21 nation
Council of Internations!l Civil

Aviation Organisation at the clos-
ing meeting of its fifth annual
session here today.

—Keuter.



THE “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS

DIAL 3113
Day or Night.






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»

PAGE TWO

RS. HELEN LILLIE LEARY
flew in from New York
yesterday via Trinidad to spend
a short holiday in Barbados. She
is staying with Mrs, P, Hewitt
Myring. Mrs. Leary told Carib
that she worked with Mrs. Hew-
itt Myring during, the war with
the British Information Service.
Originally from Scotlandyshe
has been living in the» United
States. for 12 years. There, she
works in tie New York office of
the Manila Times—the largest
daily paper in the Philippines.
She writes articles for this and
other Philippine newspapers and
also assists with Public Rela-
tions werk. She is also a repre-
sentative of the Manila Broad-
casting Company.

On Honeymoon
R. & MRS, JOE PLIMMER
who were married in Tri-
nidad on Saturday are spending

their honeymoon in Barbados.
They flew in trom Trinidad on
Sunday and are guests at the

Hotel Royal.

Joe, who was manager of the
Trinidad Water Polo teams which
visited “Barbados in November,
1950, is the son of Mrs. A. P.
Plimmer and a Director of Plim-
mer & Co. Ltd. His wife is the
former Gwen House, daughter
of Mrs. May House.

LC.T.A. Students

R. HUGH PAYNE and Mr.
Edward Cumberbatch ar-
rived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. Mr. Mi-
chael Nurse arrived on Sunday.
They are all Imperial College of
. Tropical .Agriculture students
They are on vacation. Hugh
will not be returning to I.C.T.A.
He has just finished the exam-
ination for a diploma in Agricul-
ture.
Pat Haynes, another I.C.T.A,
student is due here tomorrow.
Other arrival on the Trinidad
flight was Mr. David Lucie-
Smith who had been to Trinidad
en a short visit.

B.G. Dentist
D* JAMES FUNG, Dental
Surgeon of British Guiana
who left here to spend. a short
holiday in St. Vincent returned
yesterday by B.G. Airways. He
still has two more weeks in
Barbados before he returns to
British Guiana.
He is staying at Crystal Wa-
ters Guest House.

Week-end Departure

ETURNING to Trinidad over

the week-end after a short
holiday in Barbados was Mr
Aurelio Gomes of Stephens Ltd.,
in Port-of-Spain. Mr. Gomes was
formerly with Messrs Wm. Fog-
arty Ltd, in Barbados and B.G.



THE ADVENTURES OF



BY THE WAY

HAVE never claimed to be of

a mechanical turn of mind, If
put to il, I can sometimes wind a
clock or lock a door. But in all
pastoral innocence I ask, what on
earth is the point of “a device for
deearbonising eggs,’ unless eggs
are being used as some mysterious
part of the internal economy of a
motorcar.

You might as well invent a
method of sifting sheep’s wool
through a lantern or uncorking a
bottle with a croquet-mallet, or
smoking haddock through a
holder,

Expert Evidence
IVING expert evidence before
the Rhubarb Puff Commis-
sion, Sir Hardleigh Wright re-
vealed that experiments made
over a period of years with hares
had proved that tolderol had no
effect, good or bad, on any hare,
“but,” he added, ““we have reason
to believe that if we had used
mice instead of hares we could have
proved that the effect of tolderol
on human beings when taken in
small quantities in sweetmeats,
pastries or fish-lollipops, is similar
to that of tri-glucol, a substance
which turned the brown whiskers
of an old badger white in four
calender months.” When Cockle-
carrot asked if a diet of rhubarb
puffs made with tolderol would
turn brown human whiskers
white, Sir Hardleigh paused be-
fore replying. He then said, weigh-
ing his word, “No.” Asked how
Mr. Corker, proprietor of the Oso-
kozi Snack Dainties Dive, could
have known of the presence of
tolderol in his rhubarb puffs, a
Ministry official said, “The law is
the law.”

I Don’t Care
YPRHEY say that the Laban
method of notating ballet

movements, so that a dancer can
learn from a chart or movement-

DIAL 4220

“1 enjoyed a visit to tne
South Bank, but the wife
was annoyed—I spent all
day up the shot tower.”



London Express Service

Intransit
R. AND MRS. I. F. A. CHILD
came in from St. Vincent
yesterday by B.G. Airways. Mr.
Child is a planter, Their home is
at Grand Sable, St. Vincent. Mrs.
Child is the former Yvonne
Richards. For her the visit is a
holiday. She returns to St. Vin-
cent June 25th. Mr. Child is
intransit to Canada. He leaves on
Saturday by T.C.A. Meanwhile
they are staying at the Ocean
View Hotel.
Mrs. Child spent part of her
schooldays in Barbados and has
many friends here.

“Cinema Manager

ACK to Caracas yesterday
after a short holiday in Bar-

bados went Mr. and Mrs. Stan-
ley Day who ned been staying
with Mr. and Mrs. B. M. Dray-

ton,

Mrs. Day and Mrs. Drayton are
sisters. Mr. Day manages a chain
of cinemas in Venezuela.

Jockey Salesman
R. CHARLES PEIRCE and
Jockey Pat Fletcher flew
to Trinidad yesterday afternoon
by B.W.L.A for the Mid-
Summer race meeting. Besides
being q jockey Pat is also #
salesman at one of the commis-
sion agents here. Besides riding,
our jockey salesman will do
some business in Trinidad.

Back Home

R. WINSTON MARSON is

back from his two month

trip to the U.S., Britain and the

continent. He flew in on Sunday
via Puerto Rico by B.W.I.A.

score, is about to revolutionise
English ballet, All that I ask is
some new movements, such as a
pirouette on the elbows or a
glissade on the heels. And, above
all, the brouette or wheel-barrow
trick, with one dancer advancing
on her hands while another holds
her by the legs. Away with all
the thistledown stuff! To the devil
with your toe-twiddling! Let us
have great roaring ballets that
combine the fury of all-in wrest-
ling with the fooleries of a coun-
try fair. '

ta

Erratum
For “hat-sandwich” rea d
“Homburger.”

French Poetry
N Paris poets are trying to se:l
their poems from stalls in the

street. The way to do it is to
print an advertisement for some-

Artist’s Eyes Failing
HEAR with regret that
Wyndham Lewis, | brill

ia
British artist, is losing his sig

is

His eyes have troubled him She Likes Children,

for some time. When he painted
his second portrait of T. S. Eliot
in 1949 he found he had to move
close to his sitter to see what he
wanted. This rtrait ig now at
Magdalene College, Cambridge.
His first portrait of Eliot caused
a Royal Academy sensation when
the RAs rejected it in 1938.
Now Mr. Lewis “can no longer
see a picture.” %
It ig fortunate that Mr. Lewis
is no less a writer than a painter.
And he finds that by using a
dictaphone he can continue to
write as before. At present he
is engaged om a novel and an
art book,
Mr. Lewis is 66.
Reason
ISS DORA IBBERSON, Ad-
viser on Social Welfare to |
C.D. and W., leaves for St.
Vincent on June 25th. Reason
for her visit is to advise on the
organisation of the Fairhall
Children’s Home.
She will return to Barbados
July 2nd.

Talking Point

“THE weaknesses of women

have been given them by
nature to exercise the virtues of
men, — Mme. Necker.

Brother And Sister

R. TONY ALLAMBY is pack

in Barbados, This time he
has brought along his sister Ma-
falda who has come over for a
holiday, They arrived on Sunday
by B.W.1A,

Mafalda who now lives in Trini-

dad went to school at the Ursu-
line Convent here.

With Barclay’s Bank i
ISS DAPHNE GILL flew over
from St. Vincent yesterday
by B.G. Airways to spend a couple
of weeks’ holiday in Barbados.
She is staying with Mrs. Bourne
in Fontabelle. Daphne is on the
staff of Barclays Bank in St.
Vincent.

Arriving by the same plane was
Miss M. I. Minors who is here for
two weeks staying at Paynes Bay,
St. James. p

Legal Draughtsman
R. CLYDE ARCHER, Legal
Draughtsman of Trinidad re-
turned to Trinidad on Sunday by
B.W.1LA. after spending a holiday
here.

Incidental Intelligence
AN_ BERNARDINO, California,
has a city regulation whith
requires every clock in public
view to have the correct time or

the owner of said clock will be
fined.

—L.E.S.

PIPA

Crovegm P

9 Var Oras Int Amsterda

By Beachcomber

thing at the foot of each poem,
Nobody will mind about the
verses, if they can read about a
new “diet” or what-pot. Balthazar
Desgueux had the right idea in his
Coeur Chavireé: \
Toujours endormeuse avec ta
belle main pale... '
Quel chagrin ! Quelle horreur! |
Quelle tristesse sublime !

Mary spoils the children.

when the Royal Family
gether touring some exhibition or
show, like the Festival, the chil-
dren are

een Mary.
aa, inspecting everything, and Queen Mary gravely thanks them.
asking all the questions that chil-
dren would ask, if they weren't Queen Mary buys all the presents
shy.

Elizabeth
her advice

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Wonderful Queen
Mary

nt She Dislikes Nylons, Dogs and Young People Smoking
Theatres and Sitting in the Park

FOR nearly every child in the
world, somewhere there is a refuge
from mothers who scold and nurses
who forbid. Somewhere there is
always something nice to eat

For all Britain’s royal youngsters

that haven is Marlborough House,
home of Queen Mary.

Young Prince Michael of Kent,

her grandson, is a constant caller,
His
sure to be waiting for him.

favourite chocolate cake is

Just as Queen Mary insists on

knowing the likes and dislikes. of
her adult
gure that her young relatives will
have just what they want to eat

guests, so she makes

She ‘Spoils’ Them
There is no doubt that Queen
They,
n turn, find her far from dull and

old as they meet her in her sitting-
room surrounded by family photo-
graphs.

She is out and about seeing
so much that is new in the world,
and she always lodges in her
memory incidents and sights
which children like to hear
about. ty
You may have noticed ‘how,
are to-

rarely for away from
She moves along

Royal babies too have many

cpportunities for getting to know furry rabits, and rubber ducks will
Queen Mary. She is always calling bear new legends:—‘As purchased
to see how they are progressing, by H.M. Queen Mary.”

She takes a very loving interest
n Prince Charles and Princess
is also eager to have

A Favourite

As the young Prince grows,

Queen Mary may claim to have [If there is no sign of them, she
as great an influence on his edu- asks where they are.

cation and upbringing as she had of her ready gratitude for any -
en his mother’s.

Her strong opposition to any
form of relaxation from the old
dignified code of etiquette sur-
rounding the Court makes Queen
Mary take an exceptional ‘in-
terest in those highest in the line
of succession.

One of her favourite grand-

children is the Earl of Harewood
She was the first visitor to his
h

ome in London’s Orme-square

when his son was born recently.

BUT this frequent exchange of

visits between Queen Mary and
her young relatives is only part of
her life.

It is very unusual to find her at

Marlborough House in the morn- can still go on her Sunday after-

ings or afternoons and often, in

the evenings.

Misses Nothing

Round about the morning hour
when suburban housewives are
arriving in Oxford-street to do
their shopping the straight-backed
Daimler with the straight-backed
old lady inside is sweeping through
the gates of Marlborough House.

Queen Mary is on her way to
explore one of London's many ex-
hibitions.

Her taste is catholic, It doesn’t
matter whether it is a display of
agricultural implements, antiques,
or of exquisite needlework, she
goes from stand to stand missing
nothing.

The questions she ask are
legendary among exhibitors
.-,.and are often rather
dreaded. For they are not

mere polite inquiries; they are
sharp, shrewd, and searching.
It was out of such questions

that a disconserting rumour was Princess Elizabeth goes to tell her
born.

It began to be whispered
that Queen Mary is as acquisitive

as a squirrel; that what she likes, Sitting at home, still wearing her
she must have

Keen Curiosity
The truth is far from that. Sales-

men are perhaps too apt to mis- her children.

Dans ta voix j'entends le chant take her interest, and interpret it

matinal
De la chouette qui ronfle.

Visite St. Trophime.

Confort Moderne! Tennis
Réglementaire! Asile de Bon
Aloi! Chambres Ravissantes |
Ses Boues Adorables! Son Téleé- |
phone Exquis! Son Atmosphére
Tout Imprégnée D’une Aimable
Distinction! L’etape Des Gastro-,
nomes! Au Rendezvous Des Bons |
Viveurs ! {



~

Rupert and





Rupert
Horace.
friend
name's Simon,

kneels down to talk to
“You ask who my new
is?" he says. ‘* Well, his
As you say, he's a
simple of fellow, bur he's
rather nice and he's helping me to
find wild irises. D'you know where
there are any?" “I've no i‘2a.
4Ls RGUTS

sort

FIGURED WAFFLED PIQUE _
SRere JeSOAM Yeo
FLOWERED TAFFETA...
SILMIRA TAFFETA_

Assorted Colours including Black & White

YOUR SHOE STORE

fe
cdi
Cc ee
eae

i.
+
s

%



vi :

%,
%,
,
%,

Simon —H |
|

I've only just woken up, and | never
eat them anyway,"’ says Horace.
“*| don’t want them to eat,’ laughs

SLL POS

4

nie But his small pal has yy
walked back into the gorse bush,
so he runs on. For a long time he

searches. Suddenly he stops. ‘1 '
can hear a bell ringing. hat can |
it be ?"’ he whispers. = '
RESERVED }

$1.85
$2.02
$1.85
$1.40

EVANS & WHITFIELDS |

~ desire. Not so.



—_—_—_—_

OPPO PES FOE?

SOOO OPES ECCOEALLEL CELL CLL LLL:

The way she



AQUATIC CLUR CUNEMA< (Members Only)

TONIGHT TO THURSDAY NIGHT
WEDNESDAY, AT
SATURDAY MORNING, AT 9.30

MATINEES ;

BUD ABBOTT and

DICK POWELL

“IN THE NAVY”

with The ANDREWS SISTERS

in



———



DRES
READY-MADE, COCKTAIL,

MORNING and BEACH DRESSES

*

Made to Order—Dresses of any type

Excellent Cut and Fit—Satisfaction Guaranteed
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REESE,

SUCCESSFUL

USE ONLY THE

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We Can Supply - - -

STANLEY PLANES
Block, Rabbett,

RABONE TAPES
STEEL SQUARES
WOOD LEVELS

SANDERSON SAWS — 18” to 36”

i= Only a Limited Quantity Received

°
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COTTON FACTORY LTD.





35

——





PCOPOP OSS SS SOV SCO SST OPOF

JANETTA DRESS SHOP



ways with a holder. But she will
never smoke in public. And she
dislikes to see young people
smoking.

Smoking, indeed, ,is one of the
subjects on which she has strong
views. Just as she has on stock-
ings. She insists on silk stock-
ings; nylons she abhors,

LATE night trips from her home
are not encouraged by Queen
Mary’s doctors. But she horrified
them the other night when, long
after ten o’clock, she went to a
floor suite in the Savoy to see the
Festival illuminations. Doctors
= about the dangers of a
chill.

But Queen Mary just laughed.
Just as she did when she was first
confronted with her push-chair.

There were many confer-
ences about that chair, and
the gentlest way to introduce
it as a reminder of old age.

The royal wrath was feared.

Instead, Queen Mary studied it
from its pneumatic tyres to its
soft upholstery and then she sat
in it.

“It is quite comfortable,” she
{ said approvingly.

MARLBOROUGH HOUSE has
never looked more graceful or
pleasant than now. Queen Mary
has furnished it with wonderful
antiques, each with a little plate
attached, giving its history...

It is a charming home for the
upright old lady who. armed wiih
parasol and bag of peppermint
creams, insists on stepping out
and keeping a bright eye on the
world.—L.E.S.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

TUESDAY, JUNE 19, a
hey are 1115 am _ Programme Parade,
oe am Listeners’ Choice, 11.45
Report From Britain



QUEEN MARY
peers intensely into the inside of
the latest thing in saucepans; the
way she catches the hem of a
mannequin’s dress and, frowning,
feels the material, is just evidence
of the keenness of curiosity, which
has been whetted—not blunted—
by the years.

Nevertheless, flattered business
men will often insist on making
hasty presentations, for whicn

AF a
HM.

IT. is on these expeditions that

she loves to give through the year.
After she has gone, toy trains,

am

for the royal babies. The

12 00 noon

Gratitude News, 1210 pm News Analysis.
One of Queen Mary’s few in- 415% # Pm. — 19.76 m.
dications of great age centres 415 pm _ Souvenirs of Music, 5 00
round the gifts she makes. She P â„¢ Lancashire v South Africans, 5 05

pm _ England v. Australia, 510 pm
Interlude, 5 15 m. New Records, 6 00
pm Music Magazine, 6 15 pm. Welsh
Magazine, 6 45 p m. Programme Parade.

0—11 00 pm + 25 53 m, 31.52 m

700 pm The News, 7 10 pm. News
Analysis, 7.15 pm. West Indian Guest
Night, 745 pm. Generally Speaking,
800 pm. Radio Newsreel, 815 pm
Meet The Commonwealth, 8 45 p m_ In-
terlude, 855 pm From The Editorials,
900 pm Report From Britain, 9 15

wants to see her presents used.

A symbol



small favour done her are the
signed photographs of herself.
Queen Mary’s afternoons are
often spent in her favourite parks;
not the fashionable ones, but Bat-

tersea Park or Dulwich. She sits pm Music From Grand Hotel, 10 00
i pm. The News, 10 Pm nterlude,
for hours looking at the flowers. SAS: IR. An Sou Lake lic 1Oas out

“I think the flowers in Batter-
sea are the finest in London,” she
once said. Round her, children TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 1951
play and mothers sit knitting. 1000 pm. — 1015 pm. News, 10 15
Occasionally a small dog will yap A ies 10 29 ou Caribbean Corner.
and Quéen Mary will frown. She Kel
is not fond of dogs.

Afternoon Jaunt
Now the Festival Fun Fair is in
Battersea Park. But Queen Mary

Festival In Britain,

Cc BC. PROGRAMME





CROSSWORD

noon jaunt to Richmond Park,
where, as she is apt to say, she
often played as a little girl.

She has already made up her
mind about the Festival of
Britain. After she had been
pushed round in her shiny
plated chair she said: “It is all
very interesting, but I am
afraid it is too modern for me.
Perhaps I am too old-fashion-
ed.”

DESPITE her activities of the



day Queen Mary often visits a Across
theatre or a cinema in the evening. 1 many f poe is turned out o!
And her favourite places of enter-] 7 ius" fish, not the innkeeper’s
tainment are by no means all in ny Gpouse. 7) ; |
Joncerns the nose. (5)

the West End. She has a robust 12. Seems in retribution, (7)
sense of eee me ob us 18 Speak. Gr cined ? () nts te

The news of ndon’s nig ife ou wou e rapt in Ss. (4)

. ; , 1

always finds her listening intently. ° aN box has etriking possibilt
She likes to hear all the gossip} 18 Poain nina, oF & weed exter
about the fashionable restaurants} jy Shot cin (oh turt of

flowers. (3)
(4)

and the latest night clubs. She comes and goes.









5 od ‘ 22 Regret of all true penitents, (3)
And when there is a big party,| 93. Hes on the move. 49) ret
especially at Buckingham Palace, ha
1, What tree does the animal go to ¥
all about it. 2 Tree man appointed by the cit:
y the city’s
Often she finds Queen Mary rulers. (8) 3. Steerage. (4)
4. A very smal! hooter. (5)
out-of-doors hat—a foible of hers., 5 miner igre” SbF eneinger.0a1n
Grandmother is usually wens 8 Nothing rude here, (6)
a lot of jewellery, too—as well as . {t's sure nice but unsafe, (8)
To tas 9. Loyal. (8 5 |
lockets containing miniatures of] 18° [C3 Yerreshing ogy Pe (7)
a Sweet means of punishment ? (4) |
When she is alone, Queen Mary eae aoe ,
sometimes smokes a cigarette, al-] 1, “Mediocre: YUniverses 8 Stay TO.
Vault; 11. Granary; 13. Arrange: 16.
Tag; 17, Peck, 19, Amorpha; 21, Dilute:
22, Ghat; 25, Onser. wail, Mustard
2%. Borercaigs & Dia rach, 4, iy 2B 1
. tT; 8. Range; an; 12, Ra
14 Echo: 15, Skate; 18, Loot: 20. Pen

—



NOW SHOWING
4.45 & 8.30 DAILY

A

-
EMPIRE THEATRE

A new experience in music!

AT 8.30
PM

LOU COSTELLO

SES
EVENING, AFTERNOON

LLLP LLLP CLO



$64

WORKMEN

BEST TOOLS

Bench, Fore, Jointer



THE
PHILHARMONIC-
SYMPHONY *
ORCHESTRA aaa
OF NEW YORK Alama

A World Artists Production }

CO-OPERATIVE







PLAZA Siu GAIET

TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 1951

ee
- $666"
GLEE LLLP PLP PLL LLL LL

IMPORTANT NOTICE

“The undermentioned film companies wish to inform
the general public that the information contained in the
public announcement, purporting to be from ourselves and

signed by Keith WEATHERHEAD, appearing in the Sunday
/ Advocate of June 10th, was not correct in any respect; and
. that no authorization was given by us for such an announce-
ment to be made.

ee
%,

We wish to apologize for the embarrassment which this
erroneous public notice may have caused any exhibitor in
Barbados.

TWENTIETH CENTURY-FOX TRINID AD, Lrp.
L. E. Mittan—Manager.
PARAMOUNT FILMS OF TRINIDAD, Inc,
H. Donatp HunTER—Manager.

BOOP PPS SS

R.K.O. RADIO PICTURES (TRINIDAD) Inc. %

E. C, TeLrFer—Manager. S

UNIVERSAL PICTURES OF TRINIDAD, Inc. ¥

M. R. FerBeEr—Manager. a

MONOGRAM PICTURES OF TRINIDAD Inc. %

R. A. pe Sitva—Manager. ;

6550550000990 CS OOO OOOO OEE ALIN










(OAL 2310) P L A L A THEATRE -— \

BRIDGETOWN
Last 2 Shows TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p m.
Warner Bros, present - - -

THE GLASS MENAGERIE

by Tennessee Williams
with

Jane Wyman — Kirk Douglas
Gertrude Lawrence





















WED. & THURS
445 & 4.30 p.m.
arner’s Action
uble !
“BARRICADE”
Color by Technicolor
Dane Clarke, Ruth Roman,
Raymond Massey &
“PRAIRIE THUNDER”

SPECIAL |!
THURS. 2ist)
1.30 p.m
“SUNSET |
PASS" |
(James. Warren)

Arthur
Kennedy

and
“RIDERS of the RANGE”

reine (Tim Holt)
Trl. “MAD WEDNESDAY —Harold & “VARIETY TIME"'—Leon

Lloyd Errol

Dick Foran Sy Se” Tae















THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
Last Show TONITE — 8.30
“THE FOUNTAINHEAD”
Gary Cooper, Patricia Neal &

“LAND BEYOND THE LAW”
Dick Foran .

Last 2 Shows TODAY 5 & 8.30 P.M
“THE WINDOW"

Bobby ‘Driscoli” = Arthup. Kennedy rs

“TARZAN'S DESERT MYSTERY”
Johnny Weissmuller

WED. & THURS 5 & 8.30 P M
“STEP By STEP” (Lawrence Tierney)
“FALLEN SPARROW"

John Garfield & Maureen O'Hara





WED. & THURS. — 830 P M
“DICK TRACY'S DILEMMA”
with Ralph BYRD &
“CORNERED”
Dick POWELL & Walter SLEZAK









$995

POO

PPPPPPP OPP POO.
>

POPPPPE POPP POPP POOP SD

PPPPPPS SLL LS LIE

‘ > ’ x 7 x
GLOBE THEATRE %
TO-MORROW NITE — 11.00 O’CLOCK %
FAREWELL REPEAT SHOW y

9 ’ . . S

% T’dads Carnival Review %
A Ringside Seat at the world’s “BIGGEST FETE” 3

See CARNIVAL as it is played in Trinidod $

Pageants, Gorgeous Costumes, Calypsoes x

Pit 20c; House 36c; Balcony 48; Box 60c. x

%,

Tickets on Sale TO-DAY and TO-MORROW %
PPPOE EEE POPOL A AMMA A A A x



$|





: SOLSEELOELP ELLA PEAK AS Mo 08
: :
. \ x
’$ GLOBE THEATER
% TO-DAY, 5.00 & 815 P.M—LAST SHOWS >
“MYSTERY SUBMARINE” %

+

Marta TOREN ae MacDonald C\\REY %

s

TO-MORROW & THURSDAY, 4.45 & 815 PM. %
ABBOT & COSTELLO >

In x

“IT AIN'T HAY” %

And %

“HOUSE OF FRANKENSTEIN” ¥

% Boris KARLOFF & Lon CHANEY +
PSOOVOCCOS GOSS OSS SESS S999 SOOO
CDPD SPOOSODED SOOO SP OVESE OPEL D

PRESENTING A NEW STAR
Opening GLOBE June 22nd 3 & 8.15
This is Pier Angeli... Her first big M-G-M

picture ‘‘Teresa’’ is wonderful

M-6-M Ties

Presents
THE STORY OF A BRIDE

PIER ANGEL! + JOHN ERICSON

SPECIAL:
Free photographs of Miss Pier Angeli to the First 800 Patrons
on Friday Nite!
PSS

SOOO SSS SS POSS CESSES

ee





8



BY SPECIAL REQUEST

MADAM IFILL presents
STARBUDS OF 19351

at the GLohe Theatre Thursday July 5th 8.30 p.m.

Under the Patronage of
HON. V. C. GALE, M.L.C. and MR. E. D. MOTTLEY, M.C.P.

In Aid of the Christ Church Baby Welfare League Clinic
Orchestra and Box Seats; $1.00 — House 72c. i Sateen 48c.

Tickets on sale Globe Theatre and Madame Ifill’s Residence,
Hastings







EMPIRE |

To-day 4.45 and 8.30 and
Continuing

SEE .. MEET. . & HEAR
The World’s “—_ Masters

ROYAL

Last Two Shows Today
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

20th Century Fox Double—

of musit. Edward G. ROBINSON in
Twentieth Century Fox >
presents— “OUR VINES HAVE TENDER
“OF MEN AND MUSIC” ne
Featuring in order of their AND

appearance — Arthur RU- [|
BINSTEIN and Dimitri

MITROPOULOS conducting ‘THE OTHER LOVE”
the PHILHARMONIC-SYM- '
PHONY ORCHESTRA of Starring

NEW YORK AND OTFPERS Barbara STANWYCK





Today & Tomorrow
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Universal Big Double—

Michael REDGRAVE and
Joan BENNETT in. . .

“SECRET BEYOND THE

OLYMPIC

| Today Only 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Republic Whole Serial



“HAUNTED HARBOR ”

DOOR”
Starring
AND
, Kane RICHMOND and
‘ MASKED — RIDER” Kay ALDRIDGE



i a teen reienmnemel,

eal

—_

Be



'
i



TUESDAY,

Pei
tgs)

JUNE 19,

ee

To the first jockey who gets lost
in the dark from Manchester's

erperimental evenin
racing at the Castle
course.



horse-

1951



To the first American w
not tell me that.they p
trailers my size at the
Irwell

States.

Emigrants Crowd
Queen’s Park

EMIGRATION to the US. is keeping Queen’s Park as busy

as a bee.
in the Park vesterday.
Some of the men have

About 300 men and women spent hours

been selected for work in the

States and they brought their wives, sweethearts and
mothers to sign for the part of their earnings that will be
coming back to Barbados. They themselves were signing
contracts. They had six clerks attending to them.

Some others waiting around the
Park-had been selected but had
not been called to sign up. They
bunched at the Park House door
waiting to hear their names called.

Most of the people left their
homes without breakfast and so the
refreshment sellers did a roaring
trade. Water cocoanuts and bread
were the choice. The Summer
House encouraged two sleepers, as
usual, but two lads preparing the
cricket pitch could not relax that
much,

LOW PITCHED VOICE

called “Pass your’ book
please!” and immediately a man
leaning against the Government
Savings Bank’s counter was giving
an encaged clerk his bank book
through a cubby hole.

He headed a line of about 10
people who went to the Bank to
withdraw money. Each person
patiently awaited his turn. Those
coming in took their places in the
line wifhout any fuss.

The necessary subtractions and
entries were made at that booth
while the clerk sent them one by
one to another booth for pay-
ment. Not far from the paying
booth was a longer line of people,
some carrying hand bags and
others a bulge in their pockets.
They were depositing money.
Strangely enough, more /people
were depositing than were with-
drawing.

In the department, typewriters

were giving off a rhythmic
sound, silver was jingling as it
fell from the counter into the

educated palms of the clerks, who
all the while were keeping a
steady eye on rolls of notes. The
floor was strewn with torn up
forms which were badly signed,
Clerks peered into ledgers.

ITH BREAKFAST period

just a few minutes off, fire-
men were hustling to get through
with their morning routine when
the Advocate visited yesterday.

The fire engines were clean; the
brass sparkling and the water hose
as though scrubbed with lime. In
the case of a sudden alarm, the
crew just had to hop aboard and
“kick” Ue engines over.

A fireman, standing well at ease
and dangling a switch in his hands,
kept watch at the entrance to the
barracks. On his immediate left
was a table with a_ telephone.
The fireman who is doing duty at
the door receives all calls that are
put through to the station.

The clock pointed to 11.30 and
all the firemen—except the stand-
by man and the foreman—were
laying off the job to take their
lunch.

ERHAPS the most busy Gov-

ernment oflice from day to
Gay is the Customs. Clerks passing
warrants, receiving the reports of
whatever come into and goes out
of the island, typists—some mani-
pulating adding machines— and
other clerks searching into docu-
ments and ledgers all make the
Customs a hive of activity.

At any hour between 9 a.m. and
4 p.m., on office days the Customs
could be found as it was shortly
after mid-day yesterday. The
office is along the waterfront.
Shipping clerks were moving in
and out of the office.

But the Baggage Warehouse was
the complete contrast yesterday.
No passenger boats were in har-
bour, no baggage was coming in
or going out of the island. A single
clerk held the fort while porters
relaxed on benches.

‘WO STAMPS for six cents
please! Only seven people
were waiting for stamps at about
11.30 yesterday, and so the clerk
in the stamp booth was in no
hurry to attend to this call. The
seven people were however
quickly dispatched.

On a table in the Stamp Office,
are receptacles for water where
people posting letters wet their
stamps. So here comes the drill.

They bought their stamps, went



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over to the table to stick on the
stamps to the letters and then
went over to the letter box. One
or two of them certified whether
they were posting the letter in the
overseas or local slot,

The clerk dropped the money
in the box and elosed the books
with the many different issues of
stamps.

The Parcel Post on the water-
front was even more quiet 20
minutes before. About four peo-
ple were going through the rou-
tine of posting parcels.

In the spacious department,
bags of mail ready for shipment to
England and parcels for many
other destinations were stacked
up. Some clerks were doing book
work and typewriters rattled far
in the back. Everyone was en-
joying the sea breezes,

NLY an occasional thud—the

sound of a lédger opened
back upon a desk—and soft foot-
steps broke the monotony at the
Agricultural Bank, Barbados Mu-
tual Life Assurance Building, yes-
terday.

On entering the office, the staff
eould be seen bent over books
with pens in their hands. The
Agricultural Bank makes ad-
vancements to planters of the
island. Friday is their busy day.
The Bank is now coming to the
end of its financial year and at
this time it is not frequented by
planters.

HE PEASANTS LOAN BANK
was at full swing at about
10.30 yesterday. Peasants from
various parts of the island queued
up at the office in Pinfold Street
for loans.- The number of the
crowd yesterday was not surpris-
ing because peasants will be busy
this month planting crops with
the coming of the rains.

Each peasant had to sign a cer-
tificate of loan. They next got
cheques which they eashed at the
bank. Only one clerk attended
them and so many anxious faces
kept quiet in the line. The bank
is like this every Monday, Tues-
day and Friday. After mid-day
yesterday, the peasants were al!
gone,

QUIET HUM went through
é the Old Age Pensions Office
at White Park around mid-day
yesterday. People, both young and
old, were seeing if .their money
tallied with the cards and passing
remarks to each other of some of
the current topics of the days.

The office was not hard pressed

their trailers ’way home in the

vho does |
ull little |
back of | 201
| As

hours

far as I'm



Tory Wants

LONDON, June 18.

Food Minister Mayrice Webb
was asked in the House of Com-
mons to-day why Britain paid
£10 more for foreign suger than
that from the British colonies in-
cluding Jamaice.

Webb stressed that Britain gave
a long term guarantee to Com-
monwealth countries which gave
security against a fall in price.

This year’s price was agreed as
giving a reasonable return to pro-
ducers. But Commonwealth sup-
plies were not enough to cover all
the British commitments.. Britain
therefore had to buy foreign
sugar at the open market price
which at present was above the
Commonwealth price.

Antigua Troubles

Peter Smithers, Conservative,
asked Secretary of State for the
Colonies James Griffiths if he had
any statement to make about An-
tigua. Griffiths said that feeling
on the island was running high
but there had been no serious in-

cidents since the troops arrived
there.
Smithers: “Is the Minister

aware that quite apart from trade
disputes the vast majority of West
Indians are loyal and law-abiding
people and wish to live their lives
in peace. Will he assure the
House that the West Indian Gov-
ernments will have his fullest sup-
port in taking any measures ne-
cessary to maintain the rule of
law?"

Griffiths: “Yes, Sir. I am equally
anxious to remorve the root of
the cause of these continuous in-
dustrial disputes and improve in-
dustrial relations.”

Lennox |Boyd (Conservative):
“Is the Minister aware that there
is a growing feeling that there is
not enough concentration on the
simple problem of maintaining
law and order, and will he tecon-
sider once more reorganisation of
the West Indian Regiment?”

Griffiths: “That is another mat-
ter.”

David Gammans (Conserva-
tive). “Can the Minister assure
the House that troops will not be
removed from the island so long
as there is any danger of a break-
down of law and order?

Griffiths: “That is a matter I
shall leave to the discretion of the
Governor.”

Lennox Boyd: “But this is the
second lamentable statement the
Minister has been forced to make,
and in view of the widespread
loyalty of the mass of people in
the West Indies will he not look
again into the question of reform-
ation of some of the loyal elements
in the West Indies who can play
their part in maintaining law and
order?”

Griffiths: “I think I am entitled
to ask for notice on that question,
It would be very dangerous to
assume because the people strike
they are disloyal.”

—Reuter.



Festival Of Britain

as most of the pensionersfor that~,

day had got their money already
and had gone on to their homes.,
Few pensioners were lurking

around in a shed built to keep the

sun off them when they assemble, ~
7THE LABOUR COMMISSION-~

ER’S Department was almost
deserted when the Adv0cate
dropped in yésterday. Most of the
clerks were out to breakfast. The
crowd of people who gather at the
department’s door almost daily
were in Queen’s Park hoping to
“get on the side” for America. The
furniture around the office showed
that there were quite a number
of clerks to return from lunch,

72 YEARS YOUNG
CHRISTCHURCH, N.Z,

“ He is too young to ride a
motor-cycle,” said a magistrate
here in fining a man for a traffic
violation. The 72 - year - old
defendant said he had been riding
a motor-cyele for 50 years and
this was his first offence.





—«CP)
HE CHOSE FREEDOM
LONDON.

A bridegroom at a marriage

ceremony replied “No” when the
opposite answer was expected.
He walked away from the altar
after commenting: “T choose
freedom.” Now the girl’s parents
are looking for him.

—(CP)

———





The New Model L.E. 200 C.C. is different from
Motor Cycle — in fact it’s the nearest approach to a motor car.

Water-cooled. Hand-Started,

and Noiseless.

‘Interesting—Marson

“After spending 2} months’ holi-
ay in Europe and the US.A.,
r. Winston Marson, Managing
Director of J. Ken Johnson &
Co., Ltd., is now back in Barba-
dos. He returned on Sunday
evening by B.W.LA. from the
U.S.A. via Puerto Rico.

He said that from the point of
view of the tourist, conditions n
England have somewhat im-
proved but everything there was
still expensive.

He saw the Festival of Britain
and found it extremely inter-
esting from every point of view
although it was felt by many that
it would only interest the scien-
tific minded.

He was particularly impressed
by the Dome of Discovery which
shows all the scientific advance-
ment in Great Britain throughout
the ages.

He spent ten days in Italy, and
was in Rome for the Beatification
of Pope Pius 10th. The cere-
mony at St. Peter’s was very in-
teresting and there was a crowd
of about § million people out-
side the square.

Mr. Marson also had a two-
week stay in France when the
weather was good, and an en-
joyable week in Switzerland be-
fore going on to, the U.S.A. for
a few days. Bs



the conventional type

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To “Syncopating Sandy” Strickland
of Boiten, attempting a record ot
non-stop piano playing
concerned
| place the award in his musical ear.

’ Caribbean Housing
W.I. Regiment Conference Opens June 25

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

To the lady
erpected

he can “What!

HOUSING EXPERTS from Barbados, Jamaica, the
Leeward Islands, Dominica, Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vin-
cent and Trinidad will assemble in Barbados for a Con- Washington)
ference on housing to be opened at Hastings House on the

25th of June.

The Conference has been ar-
ranged by the Development and
Welfare Organisation and is ex-
pected to last a week, The Chair-
man will be Mr. C. A. Grossmith,
O.B.E., Administrative Secretary
to the Development and Welfare
Organisation, Mr. W. M. Wood-
house, A.R.I.B.A., Building De-
velopment Adviser, will assist
him and act as Vice-Chairman.

The list of delegates is: —

BARBADOS :
Mr. T. E. Went, MBE, — Colonial
Engineer
Mr. T. Lashley - Secretary of the

Housing Board; and three observers—

Mr. M. E Cox, M.C P

Hon F.C. Hutson, ML C.,, and

Mr C A. Coppin, formerly of the
Department of Science and Agricul-
ture

JAMAICA:

Mr. Roy D. Lindo,—Chairman of Ja-
maica’s Central Housing Authority
Mr. Lindo was formerly a member
of the House of Representatives and
is well-known in business and the
public service in Jamaica

Mr E. N. Bird, M B E --Manager of
Jamaica Central Housing Authority

Mr D W. Spreull, A M P.T I —Town
Planning Adviser to the Government
of Jamaica and a member of the Cen-
tral Housing Authority

LEEWARD ISLANDS:

Mr. J. Knox, A M I C E —Federal En-
gineer and Chairman of the Central
Housing Authority of Antigua

Mr, Knox will also represent Montser-
rat and St. Kitts
DOMINICA :—

Mr H B Hetherington, O B E —Chair-
man of Dominica Central Housing
Authority and Senior Medical Officer
of Dominica.

Dr. Hetherington was formerly Director
of Medical Services in British Guiana.
GRENADA:

Mr C. Renwick,—Superintendent of
Public Works and a member of the
Grenada Central Housing Authority.

ST. LUCIA:

Mr. J C_ Rose, A RIB A.,—Execu-
tive Architect (Windward Islands).

St. Lucia will also be represented by a
Member of its Central Housing Authority
ST. VINCENT:

Mr J L Chapman--Secretary of the

St. Vincent Central Housmg Author-

ity
TRINIDAD :

Mr W L Osborne, M B E.—Director
of Works and Hydraulics; formerly
Director of Public Works in Aden

Mr H A _Littlepage—Chief Technical
Officer, Planning and Housing Com-
mission, Trinidad
A Medical Officer may also at-

tend as an observer on behalf of
the Trinidad Government,
Mr. M. S. Staveley of the Devel-
opment and Welfare Organisation,
will acl as Secretary of the Con-
ference,
Subjects for discussion will in-
clude; — a
(1) Survey of recent develop-
ments in housing in British
West Indies.

(2) Building standards and regu-
lations.

(3) Design, construction and costs,

(4) Building materials.

(5) “Self-help housing”.

(6) Housing finance, rents, man-
agement, etc.

The idea of the Conference
emerged from a proposal by the
Honourable Victor Bryan in the
Trinidad Legislature that there
should be a representative con-
ference of all British West Indian
Governments to study means of
relieving the working classes
housing shortage. In welcoming
Mr. Bryan's suggestion, the Gov-
ernment of Trinidad made the
proposal that in view of the pres~
ence of an expert adviser at Hast-
ings House, arrangements for the
Conference should be left in the













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who, like most people, To the jirst publican who doesn’t utifying effect!
an old, bearded remind me that nearly all Br as + 4

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| thought you were



hands
Velfare

Following
appointed to report on the opera-
tien of the present Cost of Living
Index and, if necessary, to makc
recommendations for the adoption
of a new Index;

PAGE THREE








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ARTHRITIS!

Their terrible pain is often needless.

DOLCIN, a new type of treatment, brings prompt relief from pains
due to symptoms of these dread diseases, But more! DOLCIN
also has physiological action, particularly on metabolic procesers
which are a very important factor in the rheumatic state, ‘Tha is
due to the coordinated action of a new combination of acientitic,
atich octing ingredients,

DOLCIN has been tested thoroughly in hospitals and clinics. It is
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your condition may be improved,

Yet DOLCIN costs very little.



i\,orea War Is Run By
State Department
—HARRY CAIN

WASHIN:+TON, June 18
Senator Harry P. Cain (Rep.
said Monday that
the United States State Depart-
isent instead of military leaders is
!.anaging the war in Korea,

Cain is a member of the com-
ined Senate Armed Services and
boreign Relations Committee call-
ed into session Monday to decide
how many more witnesses to call
in the investigation of Genera)
Douglas MacArthur's ouster as
Picific Commander.

In advance of this session Cain
tola reporters nine who have tes-
tified thus far have convinced him

of the Development and

Organisation .



WILL REPORT ON
C.O.L. INDEX

is the Committec

Get it today—100 precious tablew

The Honourable’ Sir John that State Secretary Dean Achesyn| cost only 5 a

Saint, Kt., C.M.G., O.B.E., Chair- has more to say about vital SOLD BY:

man, “orean decisions than military BOOKERS (BARBADOS) DRUG STORES LTD.
K. H. Straw, Esquire, B.A., leaders. Broad Street and Alpha Pharmacy, Hastings.

B.A., (Hons. Econ.)
(Hons. Eeon.) — Economist, Uni-
versity College of the West Indies.

Acting Financial

King “Smiler”
Babies for THE BARBADOS

The Contest is n
GATE Milk Food, th
—Entries close

For entry forms and furth
n er particulars se
nouncements in the “Barbados Advocate” a write

THEY WILL BE WWAT YOU WANT
THEM TO BE- ON COW & GATE

The management of the Korean
wor remains in the State Depart-
ment hands with decisions made
on a political rather than military
basis, he said.—(€P)

Economist idle ingnidainsasinionicnsttintjennnialiiitenen





Captain G. J. Bryan, M.C

Secretary.

NEW
AMERICAN
AND
CANADIAN
LADIES’
DRESSES










Mm-m! 4:
nothing y
smells
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as a
good cup
of coffee!











They are the pick
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waffle cloth, shan-
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smart cottons and
art silk dresses.

“$15.00

nd

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@

—

THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE

BROAD STREET

Especially if the cup holds Chase & |
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Ask for Chase & Sanborn today!





ence tte tatiana tinae titel tiene ttt

Your money buys more

im a MORRIS eee
nese

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invites all mothers to enter their
BONNIEST BABY
1951
all Babies fed on COW &
“The Food of Royal tabies,’’
on 30th September, 1951-—

CONTEST OF

an-

to agents as at foot:

FORT ROYAL

Phone 2385

CAR AT

GARAGE LTD.

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Sole Distributors

i



TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 195] |





PAGE FOUR oe i ie ili cas
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown The Sahara Desert Can MOEN IN DEFENCE

Tuesday, June'19$, 1951 4 ea
werming words must surely be “peace” and

“home”. It is, therefore, not pleasant, in con-
templating the state of the world today, to} {
realise that many many thousands of gentle: f

nan int glee wpe hearted people must again turn from their
In the Sahara Desert plants deliberately erode the soil cover- | quiet domestic pursuits and build up national
a i. : a - ing the and 4urn them | ee ae ae would then Siva water tess i the bitter, but unequivocally accepted
carry on their work of @is- WOU [htt hills where they had |. tk 7 in ed of
covering and revitalizing the 3 eee ene aa tcum In a region |Prospect which the women.of Britain and o
ancient system of wells and with a mean rainfall of six inches,|the free democracies as a whole are facing.
canals which made the region one acre of water shed by such tnt t new Defence Pro-
a rich granary more than devices can provide irrigation for In Britain, whose great ne
2,000 years ago.



Be Reclaimed

One-third of the surface of the
earth is arid zone, barren soil
which almost invariably is dis-
counted, and disregarded in any
discussion of how the multiplying
millions of the world car be fed.
“The deserts are on the march,”
is a prophecy uttered with fata'-
istic certainty that this is a judg-
ment on men’s follies—a juda-
ment from which there is no re-
prieve. But a third of the earth's



CANE FIRES REPAIRS

IN an island so dependent upon agricul-
ture and where that agriculture is based
so largely on the sugar industry, it is
criminal folly to allow so much of that
crop to be destroyed by fire every year.

The figures for the last three years are
evidence of this fact. In 1948 there were
89 fires destroying 659 3/8 acres of canes;
in 1949 there were 195 fires destroying





Advocate Stationery

(ialvanized Wove Wire

eight acres. In Tripolitania more | gramme will cost £4,700 millions in the next 4” MESH x 18” W.G. 2 feet





1,051 1/5 acres; 172 fires in 1950 destroyed murbsoat ty © than 200 of these ancient wells la ‘ i i
¥ oo much to discard, three years, women are once again, as In - # “2

i aan 2 ‘ have been .disgovered, out of the : : or 2 = x 14 oe ”
838% acres and up to the end of May this and if the deserts are on the march thousentetinineed t. More | World War II, facing up to their responsibil- ” S Cae Oo ee

nae a ne ee ee By RITCHIE CALDER than 100 have already been clean- |jties. There is no compulsion on women, as
a6 td ctioning @*| there ‘was during the war, for them to serve

thousands of square miles of @Mficiently as they did 2,000 years "
; - with the Armed Forces or the factories, yet

year 159 fires had destroyed 1,114 acres of
canes. Quite apart from the physical loss
of sucrose in the cane, quantities of cane

Galvanized Soft Lashing Wire

This world-scale problem lies into desert 280:

fires must result in rises in the premiums
paid to fire insurance societies, and the
heavy expenditure devolving on fire socie-
ties restricts capital available for invest-
ment and consequently lessens production.
It is a vicious circle, too little appreciated

the enemies of society who set cane fires.

or is the loss restricted to loss of sugar
Heat from
cane fires is sufficient to damage or kill
young canes especially when there is no

and loss of insurance funds.

immediate rain to follow fires.

But there is a further loss.

is produced in years of drought.

So serious is the condition to which this
wilful burning of canes gives rise that it
merits the closest investigation and a sub-
sequent publication of all the relevant facts
in order that every member of the com-
munity should realise the harm which is

done.

At present there is a belief that at times
labourers set fire to fields of canes for sev-
eral reasons. In the first place the canes
are easier to cut and the cutters can cut a
greater tonnage daily; secondly the tired-
ness of workers particularly women work-
ers, is blamed for the setting of fires which
seek to hasten the crop; thirdly labourers
are anxious to get back to their small plots
of land as soon as possible after the crop.

Cane fires also do damage which is not
intended. Fires cannot be controlled and
they often jump roads and consume acres
of young canes. This is probably the worst
effect of cane fires in Barbados. But there
needs to be a complete change of attitude.

There were occasions in the past when
cane fires expressed the spite of labourers
against owners. Today there are no such
feelings. A field of canes burning excites
labourers
already earn much money by reaping canes
and who seem to care not at all if the fires
Even when fields are burnt
by accident, little effort is made to prevent
In conse- °
quence of this attitude, hundreds of acres
of canes which might have been saved are

little interest among

are put out.

spreading to adjoining fields.

lost every year.

There is great need for educating the
sugar worker today. The worker must +
realise that the quantity of canes depends
on good rains and that no legislation exists
which can produce rain, It is up to work-
ers to avoid burning canes during years of
heavy crops and to save the land for years

of drought.

Everything in this island revolves around

a prosperous sugar industry.

The bigger the crop the greater is the

It is an es-
tablished fact that in fields where the canes
have been burnt the loss of trash for mulch-
ing-reduces the moisture content of the
fields and only half of the average tonnage

within the province of two United
Nations agencies—the Food and
Agricultural Organization and
UNESCO (United Nations Educa-
tional, Scientific and Cultural Or-
ganization). The first is concern-
ed with applying modern know-
ledge to soil conservation and
restoration to production of food
for the peoples of the world.
UNESCO is concerned with re-
search and was_ instructedâ„¢ by
member states to consider setting
up an international body to co-or-
dinate and promote research inte
the problems of the arid zone, Such
an undertaking would involve in-
vestigations going on, or required,
in five of the six inhabited conti-

nents. To get some idea of what
kind of research stations already
exist, what manner of men and
women carry science’ into the
desert, what they do or hope to
do, and what they need in the
way of international backing,
UNESCO asked the writer to make
a sample survey of a sector of the
arid zone. The sector chosen was
the classical deserts of North
Africa afd the Middle East—
“classical” because in this area
some 15 civilizations, cultures, or
empires foundered in the dust of
their own creation, and there an
opportunity was provided to study
what is, what was, and what might
â„¢

The assignment involved me in
a journey of 15,500 miles over and
across the deserts in Algeria.
Tunisia, Tripolitania, Cyrenaica,
Egypt the Biblical wildernesses of
Sinai and the Negeb, the lost lands
of Babylon, and the salt deserts of
Iran. It took a journey of a thou-
sand miles, or, in nomad meas-
urement, 40 camel days, from
Algiers to find the Center of Saha-
ran Research in the sand dunes of
the Great Erg. The Center lies at
the end of a trail which leads to
the great, white fortress of Beni
Abbes. Once this housed a regi-
ment of the French Foreign Legion
and a squadron of the Camel
Corps. To-day its “garrison” is a
group of scientists, field workers
whose “field” is thousands of
square miles of emptiness.

On the battlements of the for-
tress avFrench scientist enumer-
ated for me the following prior-
ities to consider in the problem of
reclaiming the deserts: (1) men
and their habits; (2) water; (3)
wind; (4) fuel, or energy.

“But what about the soil?” I
asked him. Above us reared “the
smoking dunes,” great mountains
of sand with plumes which looked
like volcanic smoke but were
streams of fine dust. Below us,
on the edge of the “Scorpion
Oasis” of the Zouara, a palmery
was so engulfed by sand that date
trees which ordinarily stood as
tall as houses now looked like
stunted shrubs. “The good earth
will not. fail you even in the
Sahara,” the Frenchman assured
me. He pointed over the parapet
to a garden and added, “That,
two years ago, was a dune.”

The garden into which I looked
is now an extensive experimental
nursery of the Center of Saharan
Research where desert plants and
trees are studied, and where food-
giving plants from other parts of

ancient agriculture
wastes. Of course climate is an
operative factor—low rainfall, ex-
tremes of heat or cold, violent
winds, and violent rains can, ol
themselves, fashion deserts. But
more than this, they can acceler-
ate the processes which men them-
selves begin.

On my first night in the desert
I saw something of the beginnings
of that process whereby Men can
turn agricultural land into desert
waste. Ahead of my jeep ap-
peared a succession of , shaped
in a semicircle. When we reached
the fiery ambush we scared a
shepheru and his boy—tne only
people for miles—who had merely
been following their normal prac-
tice of keeping warm in the
freezing night cold of the High
Plateau by setting fire to a grow-
ing bush and then moving on and
lighting the next and the next.
Whenever they find a large juju-
bier, or Christ’s thorn, they can
have a bonfire.

It is easy to take the desert for
granted and assume that it was al-
ways as it is to-day. But ancient
legend and history picture the
Sahara as once a forest area over-
run with elephants, lions, and
other wild animals. In addition,
soil surveys have confirmed the
historic fertility of the region.
And the French are already re-
claiming it as a large develop-
ment scheme which, by modern
machinery ang modern methods,
will grow enough grain to feed
al the nomads of the French
Sahara,

One of the most debatable points
about this region is whether the
climate has changed in historical
times. We have evidence from
Carthaginian, Grecian, Roman,
and Byzantine history that North
Africa was once a great granary.
We also have evidence that the
‘emporia,” the trading posts on
the Gulf of Sirte, established by
the Phoenicians and developed by
the Greeks and the Romans into
majestic cities, maintained a pros-
perous trade across the Sahara
into Equatorial Africa. If we ac-
cept all this as true then we must
also accept the fact that once
there was water in North Africa
sufficient for the production of
grain, and adequate oases through
the desert to feed and water the
pack animals of trading caravans.
some desert scientists claim that
the oases disappeared because the
water table dropped when the
climate changed. Experts working
in the field, however, insist that
the water tables dropped because
of the ancient predecessors of to-
day’s Bedouins who “killed” the
lost oases when they destroyed
the forests of North Africa. Per-
sonally, I challenge the view that
the climate has materially chang-
ed and support the latter opinion
because of the evidence of the
ancient water systems recently
found. All over North Africa and
in the Negeb wells, underground
cisterns, diversion dams, water-
holding terraces, and irrigation
channels built by the ancient
Romans to hoard the same limited
rainfall which the region has
today.



POCKE: CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

Curiously enough, deserts can
be crea by too much water
as well as too little. Mesopotamia
is, according to the rainfall charts,

an arid zone, Yet the desert of-

today was once an area so rica
and fertile that it has become
legendary as the site of the Gar-
den of Eden.

All the ancient water systems
exploited.
Euphrates, and exploited also the
fact that in the north the Euphra- |
tes is higher than the Tigris, and
in the south the gradient is re-
versed, so that the fertile soil
between the areas was irrigated
by a crisscross of gravitational

canals. The canals had to be:

hand-cleared of silt and, when the

bunds—the banks alongside—rose ;

to more than ten feet, human
muscle could not throw higher
and it was easier to dig new
canals. This shifting of the trri-
gation systems, and sometimes
the deliberate diversion of the
two rivers, not only left grea:
cities high and dry, but upset the |
rivers and led to the creation o!
marshes,

We cannot change the deser'| aim of Britain of manufacturing for defence

rainfall but afforestation can dis-
cipline it. In any event, the field

scientists in the Sahara insist that) er will be the last to be considered, Thus

they are walking on water. By
this they mean that beneath the
desert and sand at perhaps 10,000
feet is the “Albienne Nappe,” the
great water-bearing layer which
cutcrops in the Atlas and stretches
for hundreds of miles under the

Sahara—an underground fresh
water sea which has been proved
by a sinking at Zelfana near
Ghardaia and another near Gabes
in Tunisia. Evidence reveals
another underground lake stretch-
ing under the Lybian Desert of
Egypt and supplying the wideiy
separated oases.

To bore for water and to pump
water requires energy. To pre-
vent the nomads from burning
what is left of the trees and plants,
and hastening the progress cf the
desert, requires fuel. Fuel and
energy are scarce in the desert.
Paradoxically, energy is also
abundant in the desert, solar
energy. But the physicists have
not yet found a way to harness
this solar energy to man’s use
Another of the immediate prob-
lems in the desert is not finding
water so much as saving—that is,
from salting—water which al-
ready exists. Springs which are
palatable may contain a fraction
of salt. By a prccess of evapora-
tion and aggregation, this fraction
poisons the soil of the oases and
and salts the water that passes
through it. Cheap methods of de-
salting would be a godsend, in the
desert.

There are fundamental problems
cof research to be tackled in the
desert but most of the immediate
answers are self-evident. I be-
lieve that hundreds of thousands
of acres of desert could quickly
be made fruitful if the ancient
wells and cisterns were located,
cleaned out, and again put into
use. There is plenty of scope for
undeveloped countries, and many
projects which need money and
men and material. Babylonia
could become again a great gran-
ary. ran, in spite of its intract-
able salt deserts, tould raise not
cnly the standards of its own
people but probably help to feed

Tigris. and the} women, many of whom are taking their

| defence equipment, the call upon the woman- eee




































tens of thousands of them are serving as full-
time members of the Army, the Royal Navy
and the Royal Air Force. Hundreds of
thousands are working in the factories which
are turning over to production of equipment
j for defence. A large proportion of members
of the newly revived Civil Defence Corps, me
which are more than 73,000 strong, are also

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training courses in their spare time after
work. Additionally there has recently been
an increase in recruits for-voluntary, unpaid
service as part-time ovclicewomen in the
Special Constabulary, and in the auxiliary
| fire and nursing serv‘ces,

As more and more contracts are placed for



power of Britain grows more urgent. Al-
ready 700,000 married women are working
part-time in industry, and a very much
larger number full-time. The women in the
home will feel many repercussions of this
great new industrial activity, for the twin

PAINTS

COVER THE WORLD!

and export means that the domestic consum-

Britain’s homemakers are faced with further
, Shortages of things needed in the home, the
luxuries first, then house furnishings and
utensils, and even a greatly limited choice in
slothes.
SHORT SERVICE COMMISSIONS

Since the outbreak of the war in Korea
ind the announcement six months ago by the
Jnited Kingdom Government of its Defence
Programme, recruiting of women for service
vith the Armed Forces has risen steadily.
(he Women’s Royal Air Force, for example,
s receiving 50 per cent. more volunteers
every week than six months ago. In this ser-
vice, which like the Women’s Royal Army
-orps and the Women’s Royal Naval Service,
was integrated in 1949 as a permanent peace-
cime branch of the Armed Forces, a very
wide variety of trades, some of them highly
skilled, is open to women. Recently the scope

: F {
of their service was enlarged by the provi-
sion of short service commissions in the





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‘ighter Control Branch of the Royal Air
Force. This branch is the medium through
vhich all the active and passive defences of
Britain are alerted, set in motion and co-or-
dinated. Members of the Women’s Royal Air
Foree are serving as radio and radar
mechanics and as operators, as_ flight
mechanics, instrument repairers, fitters, elec- |
tricians, radiographers, photographers, air-|
eraft finishers and in dozens of other skilled
and semi-skilled jobs.





For best results, tie following instructions should be care-
fully followed :—

The Women’s Royal Army Corps, which |
has members serving in Singapore, Hong '
Kong, Germany, the Middle East and other.
parts of the world, reached a peak strength of
200,000 during the war and many awards for
gallantry and devotion to duty were won 2.

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TING”. Apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL” PRIMER
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its members. Its varied skilled jobs include ind Mauee Sen
that of experimental assistants in gunnery, in

TRY THIS FINE PRODUCT OF INTERNATIONAL

revenue earned by the agricultural com-
munity. That leads to greater spending
power, more profits and increased earnings
for people in other avenues of employment
such as the porters and labourers on the
waterfront and ships labourers, The tak-
ings in shops and stores are corresponding-
ly higher. In this way the entire commun-
ity benefits from the increased production
of cane and the revenue to the Govern-
ment by way of taxation and the cess from
the sugar sold to the British Government
at guaranteed prices are increased to the Oe eee 4 ior. ia
ultimate benefit of the same labourers who |{esert.. [also learned the sound-
refuse to put out fires. Cane burning pene of Sa mentee gel
should cease and every Barbadian should Dnat the. of deity, ge ‘definition,
make a special effort to prevent cane fires |should be water. Yet the scientist
and to assist in putting them out even when

they are accidentally caught.









the world, which might replace PAINTS, LTD., AND BE CONVINCED,
them, are tested and acclimatized.
There one could see the miracle
which can be worked by water ‘n
desert sand—the production of
oranges, tomatoes, potatoes, car-
rots, asparagus, onions, artichokes,
vines, oats, and barley. The gar-
den is watered by a foggara, an
ancient horizontal well which runs
for three or four miles-under the
dunes and maintains a constant~-
flow of water from these moun-
tains of “arid sand.”

the swarming millions of the In-
dian subcontinent. Egypt could
find additional territory for its
22,000,000 in its deserts. Israe]
insists that it could feed not only
its present million, but three times
as many, and the North African! teams at anti-aircraft practice camps.

granaries of Greece and Rome
THE “WRENS”

work on new weapons and ammunition.
Girls with mathematical qualifications are
serving as kine-theodolite operators who play
an important part in the training of gunnery

which they test, check and carry out zoe



AGENTS

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.

—_—_——_

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proof of all these claims in the
recovered areas and in the ex-

could be restored. One can see
The Women’s , ice i
sasdeisamstal Sete: Royal Naval Service is the

smallest of Britain’s women’s services, but

What was can be. We can pro-
voke the ancient world to redeem
the new. And'if we are to feed
an ever-increasing pcpulation we] steadfastness in the war.
cannot afford to ignore the des-
erts.

its thousands of members do equally valu-

able work and served with equal heroism and

Never before in her history except for mili-
tary nurses, has Britain had peacetime
women’s services integrated with her Armed
Forces but with the need to deter aggression
there will be more and more scope for the

women in uniform. |
x

This article appeared in the magazine
section of The New York Times, one of
the leading newspapers in the United
States, The writer, a former delegate
to UNESCO and the Food and Agricul-
ture Organization, is science editor of
The News Chronicle and on the staff of
The New Statesman and Nation,

“Fine Press agent you turned

owt to be. haemo me arrive at

the very ween: the o08s of

ALLS t stew stiently aay
OM 9 eecvot wrisgion 7”



put it second to “men and their
habits,” because, he argued, it was
men, not climate, that had changed

ee



—_—_—







ne



Luncheon Meat
Bacon in Tins

Our Readers Say: 3 :

Horrible Dictu : oe the first gentleman in ques- oe ane Toe Bets aontetts Night Club Worker call-slip to face _the examiners, an enquiry be held in the natter. 1 nee) eer ST, | FINEST
To, The Editor, The Advocate. : .<¢ that foreigners should be allowed 'o, The Editor, The Advocate Se Roger et Gent can eames vad 17.6.51 te SOUPS TY
SIR,—Allow me a small portion What baffles me in the first to stick initials behind their SIR. The Labour De. ®. | placed on the culprit or culprits *'"”" Heinz Soups \ QUALI
of your valuable space to men- place, is how these usurpers ever games, then run over to the land ‘ad - rd . ne Department responsible. Along with this mun Heron Bay Campbell's Soups |
tion a point which is badly in manage to be overlooked by the of great believers and admirers’ sinew” tae e Labour Commis- js an ex-police who has not leit To, The Edi Spaghetti & Cheese
need of remédy. I am alluding to Government. Does our Govern- anq f . merers sioner has made it known that the local force two months, yet 7,,Phe Editor, The Advocate. in Tins |
| ae t and occupy the most prominent only unemployed need registe ‘ink : $ . SIR,—In the Sunday Advocate] %& Cheese |
the recent case of the resigned, ment not examine their creden- positions in our service Pee . eister, he is issued with a call-slip also 4+ vecterday’ - Ha Baked Beans | FINEST
deported or sacked (I don't tials before employing them? If ; or words to that effect. Allow- and will be among those to leave Of Yesterday's date you published} __ Saked CANS |
know ‘quite which) master of this be so, it is high time the Another point, Sir, I daresay ®"¢¢S are also made for the on the 18th instant. He draws bg article on Mr. Ronald ‘Tree's CARRS BISCUITS
Combermere ‘School. Until re- Government did something about that if a Barbadian’ or even a S©#Sonally-employed, but I never a pension and runs a drive-your- ! cata Heron Bay, The article Cream Crackers FLAVOUR
cently, 1 remember seeing this it, for these are the men who are West Indian had committed so K"¢W that greater allowances self-ear business. Remember, the ns atk yy tne we a: Water Biscuits
gentleman on the Combermere supposed to impart to us the base a crime, headlines to that Wer made for those in good Labour Department directive Mr GA Jellie ny ag at on Cheese Biscuits,
staff and suddenly he—well, he knowledge for which we dearly effect would dominate the entire te een and enehe Le bee Pacer? with Shree in ‘Barbados Ge deees tne oo Assorted in Tivs Ask for
just_disappeared. pay. front pages of our local news- MOM aving this colony to- moti Pees 8s nem ; oe % Assorted in 141. Pkgs.

morrow. on (18th June) on a ployed will be given first choire {0m which the house was built,



“On dit” that this gentlérnan papers. However, in the case in . ; ildi “
was found guilty of the ica- Sir, this state of affairs; wotild question, the culprit simply dis- — ¥ help the island's un- in the event of emigration, and hee an ee Was erected by] % COFFEE |
ble art of forging ¢redentials. If not be half so regrettable if the appeared in thin air, witl ee weowowe, is Lo mnow many registered unem- ‘D6 Operulhion, Oo
this be the case, why has our inevitable fact that. the yorel of Sit that ua, & Pteprietor of two night clubs ployed for longer periods than R, W. BELL PURE COFFES IN
Government not’ taken drastic many honest unemployed 3. BE locar eae hae a se that oar clubs which do a swell busi- six months who have not, nor do 18.6.51 : NN SEALED TINS

a ; any ye arba- loce ress has a tendency to re- $ Sora i Oana heen te es ea F % .
stepe = eeriniperiog she tnatitey dians or, at least, West Indians, frain from publishing certain ey ee ae = ge gs a ree a hee onuee OP it [The Advocate apologises for | % oe. of | \
—— ios tajcams neo ~ ae debts equally = ae capable of oc- Such er mit does our Gov- would have found it more than dein in their present po ie Onn ee "whee anit gy marty Lipton’s
s =n steps 5 » eupying the offices held by these ernment actually prevent the os Bees eo a ; " tes save been caused to the Bell|%

why have these steps been so base usurpers, wefe not staring Pressmen from publishing same? Sioten. aed Mathiy ee et, ee 7 . eee ae re ne Construction Co., but when itt Pi SG, "White et bean
end secreted from the pub- us full in the faca After all, let Hoping | that our Government quired. by ae Tate Depart- ae ae - 3 eo . oe eee os Mr. Jellicoe] s ae ‘PHONE US

’ rs aT eatia , . a aeaeak e ee x art< ster- uilt” th a tee a ars s

I understand, Sir, that there is oe ee — a and ggg Along de | pants, ment. Furthermore, every mem- being among this same fot; he is necessarily: haan” that el % WE DELIVER —
another gentleman or are other __ ae: oe ee ee rere the staff of the” Labour well-known by the staff of the responsible for putting ever 2
pouiemen - pas ae who The fault of these occurrences LIVINGSTONE F. GORING. — ;.‘ eyed Set Well oat ae Geet oe te Weition. oth, block’ of stone upon an: | ‘% G oO D D A R D S

nave evidently been understudy- can He ir ly > place—viz: 13.6.5 . aman Bd : ag ile ata Sergei Ege .

in only one place—vi 6.51. fore when he is issued with w this department will offer, snowd Ed.] — %6:6966666665569969009 SOS OO SOG OOS POO D FOO FOF FOF





TUESDAY, JUNE 19,



1951

Speightstown And

lts Environs

SPEIGHTSTOWN, shopping centre of the Leeward
Parishes, resembles very much a small English fishing

village.
attractive gardens.
together.

Christian Mission

Dispute Will Be

Heard On Merits
On August 14

HIS HONOUR the Vice-
Chancellor will take evidence
and hear the Christian Mis-
Sion case on its merits when
hearing resumes on August 14.
This was decided yesterday at
the Court of Chancery when
the Vice Chancellor heard
counsel for the defence on a
preliminary legal point raised
by Mr. Adams, arising out of
the pleadings.

In the suit, Rev. Frederick A.
Barrow and others brought an
action against Rev. Dalton L. Hoyte
and others, Each is seeking a
pend in his favour as to his

ing Superintendent durin,
and 1950. a 20

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., associated
with Mr. J. S. B. Dear, instructed
by Hutchinson & Banfield appear
for Barrow. Mr, G. H. Adams as-
sociated with Mr. D. H. L. Ward
instructed by Messrs. Carrington
& Sealy appear for Hoyte, Yester-
day only Mr. Ward appeared for
Hoyte,

When the case was heard on the
last occasion, Mr. Adams had asked
for an admission that the Christian
Mission Herald had been out of
existence. He was arguing that if
it had been out of existence after.
Hoyte had been properly ap-
pointed, Superintendent, then since
notice had to be_given in the
herald of any me@ing fixed to
appoint, Hoyte would continue to
be Superintendent.

Herald Stopped

Yesterday Hoyte gave evidence
to prove that there was no issue
of the Herald since 1946, Hoyte
said that he had been appointed
in the meeting held in January,
1946. That was recorded in the
Christian Mission Herald of No-
vember—December, 1945, The last
issue had been in October, 1946.

Rev. Hoyte then showed from
the minute book of a meeting on
February 16, 1946, that there was
no equipment nor person to print
the Herald. Before that the Herald
used to be printed by Cole’s
Printery, he said, but he decided
to stop allowing the printing be-
cause they were getting into
arrears on the same magazine.

He said that in 1947 he was re-
elected Superintendent and a no-
tice was given through the week-
ly announcements to the 28
branches.

There was another bye-law, he
told the court, which governed the
position in case no Herald was
published,

The Vice Chancellor said that it
was perfectly clear at that stage,
following the ruling which he had



given on the previous occasion
that the case was then concerned
with whether Barrow and_ the

others or Hoyte and the others
were entitled to a declaration that
they were the Superintendent and
the Board of Management of the
Christian Mission for the years
mentioned in the pleadings.

The Court was not then con-
cerned with the claims as regards
the mission’s property, but was
solely concerned with the exam-
ination of the legal point taken
by Counsel for defence.

Different Case

Mr. W. W. Reece argued that
the case of ‘‘Prowst versus Foote”
which had been cited by Mr.
Adams as authority to show that
if Hoyte was the properly elected
Superintendent in 1946 he would
continue to be Superintendent,
did not bear on the case before
them.

That case said that if a mayor
was elected annually, he would
continue in office until another was
elected, But Section four of the
Christian Mission Act stated that
the Superintendent must be elect-
ed in January for the ensuing
year. At the end of the ensuing
year therefore Hoyte was no
longer the Superintendent.

Bye-law four dealt with meet~
ings of the Mission and a meeting
of the Board of Management was
silent as to meetings of the rep-
resentatives of the church of the
Mission. .

Each body was separate and dis-
tin® under the act and had differ-
ent futictions. The meeting of the
mission was a meeting of a
corpcrate body as distinct from
a meeting of representatives of
the churches.

The rules omitted to speak of
the meetings of the representatives
af the mission. This omiss.on
could not be supplied by the
Court whose function was to in-
terpret the law, and not to make

the law.

It does not however have the thatched roofs and
Its business places are all huddled
Its houses, in many cases of thr» sto: *vs, have
very little space between them.

Its one main road sas three
different names. From the
southern entrance to the centre

of the town it is called Queen
Street. Further down until it
reaches the Police Station it is
called Orange Street. Vhe re-
mainder of the main street is
called Sand Street. From Sand
Street, stretching north is Hey-
woods with its attractive beach
on which low hanging grape and
manchineel trees grow.

In the hurricane season the
sea washes into the main road at
Speightstown. When it retreats it
leaves sand and debris scattered
all over the road. The houses
along the coast are mostly in
need of repairs. They Mave very
little yard and in some cases the
yards need not be swept as the
in-rushing waves constantly keep
them clean.

Speightstown has its tradi-
tional blacksmith shop, This is
situated under a sand box tree
It is owned by W. L. Greaves.
The foreman. “smithy”, Chester -
field Maxwell, has been ham-
mering on the anvil in that shop
for the past sixteen years. He
is well known to Speightstonians.
The increased car and lorry traf-
fie has brought about a big cut
in his income, but he is. still
earning sufficien*+ for zis bread.

Watch Repairer’s

Fifty-four-year old Carlisle Cor-
bin is a watch repairer. His shop
is situated in a very unusual
place. It is in the same building
as the blacksmith’s shop. Fortu-
nately there is no likelihood of
the tools being mixed.

Corbin is the oldest watch re-
pairer in the town. He was re-
pairing watches long before the
other two watch repairers came.
The other two have up-to-date
business premises. It is now 25
years that he has been doing
watch repairing in Speightstown.

The Speightstown Police Sta-
‘tion, which was erected in 1939,
is situated on the left of the
“smithy’s” smoky shop. The Con-
stables at this station live as a
large family would. They have
their recreation room equipped
with a table tennis board and a
radio. There is also a_ kitchen
where they cook their meals.

In the yard of the Police Sta-
tion is a building which is called
the Fire Station. This should
have been called a Fire House
instead. It is very small and out
of date. The equipment of the

A



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



SOLDIER'S LIFE IN CAMP



A PLATOON from Headquarters Company of the
with Bren Gun group in the foreground.. This is part of the day's work of a soldier's life in

The Regiment In Camp ,,

ONE HUNDRED AND

bados Regiment including 1

St. Ann’s Fort.

Barbados Regiment in a “standing load”

position.
camp.



FORTY members of the Bar-
2 officers are now in camp at

These also include the members of the

Drums and Fifes of the Regiment who are in camp for the

first time.

The men went into barracks from Friday morning,
June 15 and spent the first two days settling in and learning
the routine duties of barrack life. They also saw a demon-

stration of

calls.

On Sunday, the
companied by
Fifes marched to St. Matthias
Church when the Padre Capt.
F. M. Dowlen preached the ser-
mon, The Police Band played
during the service.

When the Advocate visited the
camp -yesterday, one platoon was
practising for the annual musketry
course at the Government Rifle
Range, cnother was being taught
what action should be taken if the
Regiment was calleq out in emer-
gency to assist the Police and a
third was doing Bren Gun train-
ing while the Drums and Fifes
were hard at practice.

On visiting the barracks where
the men are housed, one saw a
elean building. Each man is pro-
vided with a palliasse, a blanket,
kit bag with equipment, washing
kit and eating utensils. In the
middle of each barrack room, there
is a rifle rack. There are also
additional tents for the members
of the Regiment and three mar-

ac-
and

Regiment
the Drums

Fire Station is a push cart with quees for meals.

hose and. branch pipes.

Oldest Baker
Alfred Payne is the oldest
baker in the town. His bakery is
practically an open air ome but
he has been running it for over 25
years. There is another bakery
in the town, but Alfred does a

good business. Apart from bak-
ing his own bread, he allows
people who make their home-

made loaves to bake them in this
oven for,a small fee. Speights-
town is also supplied with bread
from Bridgetown, but this does
not affect Alfred's trade.

Chureh Street, which branch-
es off from the main street, is so
named because one of the en-
trances .to the Speightbtown
Church is in it. This street also
has its many business places hud-

dled together. The road is ex-
tremely narrow and verandahs
of buildings actually form a

shade overhead,

St. Peter’s Church ‘tells every-
one in Speightstown the time. A
clock with three faces is built in
the steeple of this church. The
church does not tower over the
city. It is small but attractive.
It has very little garden but the
fences are well kept. It was built
in the eighteenth century and is
the resting place of many digni-
taries of the parish. On its walls
are many marble stones bearing
the names of Speightstonians
who had fallen in the’ various
wars, and others.

The entrance to the church
from Orange Street also leads to
the Vestry Rooms, On the othe>
side of the Vestry Rooms is the
St. Peter’s Girls’ School.

The Marketplace

The market place in Speights-
town is small. It is only a shed
but is regularly crowded with
fish vendors and sometimes
housewives from the City. There
is always a lot of activity in this
small market. When there is no
fish the people gather to chat on
various subjects.

Flowing across the town is
Salt Pond’ River. A beautiful
bridge was recently built across
this river. Its outlet is in the
sea but only when rain falls
Otherwise the river is satisfied
to remain without an outlet and
so resembles a lake.

A library, post office and As-
sembly Room are situated in one
building. Lectures are given in
the Assembly Room, and occa-
sionally the British Council, in

@ On page 7.







YOULL APPRECIATE THESE “|

SRG

TREBOR BARLEY SUGAR STICKS ...
KRAFT CHEESE—Pkt. 39c., 120z. tin
oy RR St =
GORGONZOL. Be—per Ih... ines sind owiehe '
SLICED BACON-per lb. $1.20, SLICED HAM per ib. 1.
SWIFT’S LUNCHEON BEEF WITH CEREAL—per tin
ACTO VIENNA SAUSAGES—per tin
SOUTH AFRICAN LOBSTER—per tin .
MAXAM BEEF SAUSAGES—per tin
PORK SAUSAGES—per tin .

ENJOY








THIS FINE BEER

PERLSTEIN BEER

18c. a bot



$4.00 per Carton



Ration Stores

Cpl. Proutt is in charge of the
ration stores attacheqd to the
kitchen. Yesterday the men had
boiled fish, string beans, rice and
vegetable for their midday meal.

Camp life starts at 6 in the
morning with the Reveille; then
there is the R.S.M. Drill Parade
from 7—8. The men then carry
out training from 9—12.30 when
they have a break for lunch. From
2—4, there is further training, tea
at 4.30 and supper at 7 p.m.

Entertainment is also provided
for the volunteers and there are
games like tennis, cricket, basket
ball, netball, badmington and table
tennis. All these can be played in
the afternoon after 4.00 p.m. The
men can also go to Graves End for
a bath after working hours,

This evening, there will be a
film at the Drill Hall of the Troop-
ing of the Colour in London, on
Wednesday, the men will hear the
history of the Royal Leicester
Regiment to which they are affili-
lated, on Thursday evening they
will hear a talk by Col. R. W
Oliver on the various war experi~
ences he has had and on Friday
evening there will be the end-of-
camp concert when the Volunteers
perform on the Drill Hall stage.
Also taking part will be Professor
Monts from Brazil and Miss Alice
Armstrong.

On Wednesday, the Commission-
er of Police will be visiting the
camp in his capacity as Command-
ant of Local Forces and the Regi-
ment will carry out internal secur-
ity duties. Platoons will visit the
Gas Co., B.U.O.C. and the Elec-
trie Company to gain practical
experience in carrying out guard
duties, ul

Off to Seawell

On Thursday, the Regiment
marches to Top Rock where it will
take buses for Seawell to spend
the remainder of the day. While
there, Volunteers will see a
demonstrafion of the fire power of
a platoon and will also get a
chance of firing rifles, Brens and
two-inch mortors.

On Saturday, they will do a
ceremonial march through Bridge-
town, Leaving St. Ann’s Fort at
9 in the morning, they will go
cown Bay Street, over the Cham-
berloin Bridge, down Broad Street
and on to the Princess Alice Play-
ing Field where there will be a

guard mornting and learnt the various bugle

ten-minute break refresh-
ment.

The Regiment will return to St
Ann’s Fort by the same route, but
this time taking the Victoria
Bridge. It will march with its
Drums and Fifes in full dress.

On Saturday afternoon, there
will be a falling plate competition
and fhe camp will break up at
4 p.m.

for



On Murder Charge

Inspector G. Springer yestemlay
informed District “A” Coroner
G. B. Griffith that 65-year-old
Ruby Layne, a labourer of Rich-
mond Gap, St. Michael had been
charged by the Police with
murder at an inquiry which was
adjourned sine die held at Dis-
trict “A” court over the death of
an un-named child which _was
found in g pit at Richmond Gap,
St. Michael on June 15.

No medical evidence was given.
Cpl. Shepherd attached to the
Black Rock Station told the
court that he went to Richmond
Gap on June 15 and found 4
female child in a pit. This child
was sent to the Maternity Hos-
pital. The following day shortly
after 1 p.m. he went to the Hos-
pital Mortuary and identified the
body of the child to Dr. A. '&
Cato.

Layne was yesterday remanded
until June 25.

Aireraft Fire
ghters Training

The Pyrene Aircraft Crash
Tender is now at Seawell and
when not im use is housed in a
temporary garage alt the airport
The tender will be manned by a
crew of five. Their first job is
to learn how to operate the
vender efficiently. A crew is said
to be efficient when on arriving
at the scene of an accident they
can get foam onto a burning air-
craft in nine seconds, Maj. R.
Craggs, the Fire Officer, has ac-
cepted the responsibility for the
training and efficiency of
crew. They began their training
yesterday.

Foum is a comparatively
chemical used for aircraft firc
fighting. The crash tender can
pump 2,500 gallofis of foam per
minute for periods of one and a
third minutes. It can also spray
carbon dioxide gas (C02) at the
rate of 1,600 cubic feet per
minute for periods of one and a
half minutes. It can pump water

new

from its own tank, from open
water or from a_ hydrant, but
when working on aircraft it
would’ only use foam and—or
c02,

It cannot be anticipated how
long it will take to train a crew.
The length of time will depend
to a great extent on the men
themselves. Besides the practical
vise of the Crash Tender they
must learn how to approach a
burning aircraft, know something
about its structure — where the
‘gag tank, batteries, fuselage,
exits and escape hatches are
situated, and how to release
safety belts on aircraft seats etc,

As the majority of aircraft at
present using Seawell airport are
Vikings, Lodestars, DC-3’s and
‘DC-4’s it is understood that the

tender crew will first learn the
fundamental structures of these
aircraft.

UNIFICATION OF W.L.
CURRENCY WANTED

MR. J. W. PLOWDEN-

spends seven months every

WARDLAW of England who
year in the West Indies, told

the Advocate yesterday that he hopes there will be unifica-
tion of currency in these islands very soon.

He said that when a visitor
leaves Jamaica and goes to the
Bahamas, the Jamaican pound ‘is
difficult to cash. The same thing
also obtains when he goes from
the Bahamas to Bermuda.

The visitor has to buy a bag
of silver from the bank to pay
the expenses of the last day in
any of these ‘places in order to
leave without a_ single pound
note.

Mr. Plowder-Wardlaw who was

in Barbados for the last two
weeks, leaves to-day for St.
Lucia. He will also visit St.
Kitts and Antigua before re-

turning to England in September.

A representative of Watney
Combe Reid of London, one of
the biggest brewing firms of Great
Britain, he was for 18 years with
J. & R. Tennent. His hobby is
bird collecting for museums.

Cost of Living

He said that Barbados was one
of the nicest places he had visited
because of its bathing, good roads
and low cost of living as com-
pared with Trinidad and eyen
more so, Venezuela, Bermuda ,0!
Jamaica.

The proportion
bados and Trinidad he said is as
60 is to 100 while in Venezuela
it is as 60 is to 180.

The food here is extremely good
Normally in the tropics, the fish
is not good but the Barbados
flying fish is equalled to some of
the best sold in Britain and that
is saying a lot.

between Bar-









Pessy Sage
Shimmering
Nail Polish

ling scintillating exciternent to finger-nails!



; ha the richness of brocade.
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; your selection
i
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a

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with



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PEGGY SAGE SHIMMERING NAIL POLISH brings a spark- |
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str

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If anyone had asked him which
was the island in the whole Carib-
bean area where there was least
likely to be trouble, he would have
said Grenada because it is an
island where they -have an ap-
parently. happy peasantry and no
colour bar.

He considered that the ,lanters
in Grenada are very’ blame
worthy in not sharing the wealth
They have been 1eceiving enor-
mous prices in dollars for their
nutmegs and mace and have not
passed it on.

This has given Gairy his op-
portunity which he is undoubtedly
abusing in many ways now, al-
though he has got the workers
benefits which they should have
had long before. These workers
who have received additional
wages in these times of inflated
prices must however, be prepared
to take a cut in wages when these
good prices go down,





the )





Death By
Mi
Misadventure
‘Due To Broken Neck’

A nine-inan yury yesterday re-
turned a verdict of death by
misadventure to District “A

Coroner G. B. Griffith when hear-
ing in the inquiry into the cir-
cumstances surrounding the death
of 60-year-old David Skinner of
Yearwood Yard, Black Rock, was

concluded at District “A” Police
Court,

Skinner met his death when
he was involved in an accidem

with the motor car M—893 owned
and driven by Cuthbert Small o
Garden Land, St Michael on
Brighton Road, Black Rock or
Jume 14 about 5.54 a.m,

Dr. A. S. Cato who performec
the post mortem examination a
the Public Mortuary on June 1k
about 11.45 a.m. said that one o
the legs was broken. A large
haematoma was present at th
back of the neck. And there wa
haemorrhage to the brain. Deati
was due to a broken neck.

Cuthbert Small said that he i
the owner of the motor car M-89:
On June 14 about 5.20 am. hk
was driving this car taking Boyc:
to his home in Brighton, Black
Rock.

While on Brighton Road he saw
a man about 40 feet ahead of the

car which was being driven a
about 16 to 18 miles per hour
The road was clear. When the

car had reached about eight fee
from the man, the man suddenl
made a pitch across to the righ
just in front of the car and there
was a collision. He stopped the
ear and went back to the mar
who had fallen on the ground
The man appeared to him to be
dead. He telephoned the Police
who arrived and carried out
vestigations,

Mr. E. W. Barrow appeared i
the inquiry on behalf of an inter-
ested party.

LAUNDRY FIRE
Plenty of clothes were burnt at
Farold King’s Laundry at St.
S‘ephen's Hill, St. Michael, on
S-turday. The house was slightly

damaged.
by

Nothing was covered
insurance,





NEW ARRIVALS AT
WEATHERHEAD'S

From U.S.A. & CANADA—

Stillmans Freckle Cream

Barbasol-Brushless Shave
Hinds Honey & Almond
Cream

Cream of Wheat
Livibron (P.D. & Co.)
Dr. King’s Sulphur Bitters
Palmers Ointment
Palmers Soap
Flangetype Torch Bulbs
J & J Plaster
Klim—5 lbs.
Langle Liver Salts
Creamalin
Bronchial Cough Syrup
Nujol
Bristols Sarsaparilla
Evenflo Feeders and Teats
Noxzema Cream
Cutrite Wax Paper
Ponds Tissues
Moirs Chocolates
Neilson's Choolates
Dr. Chase's Kidney & Liver
Pills '

Dr. Chase’s Nerve Food
Dr. Chase's Paradol
Codol
Camay Toilet Soap
Esterbrook Pens

From ENGLAND~

Yardley’s Shaving Bowls
Lanalol (Solid & Liquid)
Prele Shampoo

J & J Baby Lotion & Cream
Skol Sun Tan Lotion
Photo Frames

Rizla Cigarette Leaves
Iradol A

Haliver Oil

Calox Tooth Powder
Malt & Cod Liver Oil
Brewers Yeast Tablets
Woodwards Gripe Water
Mars & Crest Bars
Curicones (for Rheumatism)
Mum

Ipana Tooth Paste
Euthymol Tooth Paste
Musterole

Palatol Co.

Photo Albums

Sugared Almonds

Bemax

Town Talk Polish
Morgans Pomade



BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

HEAD OF BROAD ST,

y

SHOT CLOQUE.

Per yard

$3.96

METAL

Per yard

$3.72

FLORAL SATINS. Really

36 inches wide.
Per yard

$5.18



|





in- a

a
a
a



Something special
you look the last thing in the latest fashions.
In Blue and Rose. 36 inches wide.

STRIPED TAFFETA. Excel-
lent for evening dress eic. We have
it in Navy and Wine. 36 inches wide.

beautiful
stuff. You’ll want some as you see
it. Rich colours on white grounds.

PAGE FIVE

cnet







Every sweet is
more delicious with

BIRDS

CUSTARD

MADE. From conn STAR

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A*YECUALY covounto 6 Any




To make sure of unequalled flavour,
creaminess, smoothness be
certain your custard is Bird’s, For
as long as you... or your mother
. can remember the name Bird's
has been an assurance of unvarying
quality.
So when you ask for Custard, it’s wise
to ask for Bird's !

JUST ARRIVED a
PURINA CHICK a

STARTENA & GROWENAS
Obtainable from a

H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd. x

NEW SHIPMENT OF

SPARKLING
CRYSTAL GLASSWARE

FROM U.S.A.
Items received include :—
REFRIGERATOR WATER BOTTLES
Z » BUTTER DISHES
FRUIT AND SALAD BOWLS
COASTER ASH TRAYS
SALT AND PEPPER SHAKERS
VINEGAR (or OIL) BOTTLES
And Attractive 9-in. VASES

— WE ALSO HAVE —

JADE GREEN HEAT-PROOF
PUDDING & MIXING BOWLS

IN SEVERAL SIZES
BEING MERELY A TOKEN SHIPMENT THE QUAN-

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HARRISON'S *04° steer









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PAGE SIX BARBADOS. ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 1951









som : =| BOILS

â„¢ ? t rid of unsigh
BD) PIMPLES = Scnithes “tant “Gis
} them a speedy treatment with
medicated, a: tic Dr. Chase's
Ointment. Soothes as it heals. 69c.
| Large size, 6 times as much, $2.23.
7
DR. CHASE’S -

LOSS FINISH PAINT | ae
—- k a

|

|

SUPPLIED
















IN A

PL Wibk TAKE YOU
ALL THIS !






EXTERIOR
WIDE

}C it AM A GREAT LOVER |)
A
Wa

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INTERIOR

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OHTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING

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Why not get happy relief by taking Doan’s Backache
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Tins Heinz Ox Tail Soup 31 28 Bots. Cocktail Cherries 82 72



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OO [ REALLY, JEFF 2

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NEXT STOP UTOPIA AND
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HI. KID! YOU LOOK
UKE PEACHES
AND CREAM




















oo SS) eae | ae
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| y Proved Prell Shampoo more radiant — in hardest
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TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

eee
~ "eo#























































































































































- cee " Seeacen Eevee enema
ie, | | PU N ] fi
' > 7
ASSIFIED AD S | PUBLIC NOTICES | PUDLIC. SALES FOR RENT |. PERSONAL
es Ten cents per agate line on week-days WASP
r , Minimum charge week 72 cents and on
ts pe t > ‘
TELEPHONE 2508 | Suimtum Talley a golly ‘cobeaan REAL ESTATE a er sntiee a ee Se over 24 The public are hereby warned against
es ae 3 a word wee cents al giving credit to y wif ISMAY :
alin aR and : eS 3 .
ie ; 1 ee BUNGALOW — A comparatively new | “°'¢ 0" Sundays. GREENIDGE (nee ATWELL) as I do .
For Births, Marriage or Engagement FOR SALE ‘Fae a. eae modern bungalow situated at the Gar. not hold myself responsible for her} MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW *
thames OPGELSir aay wubbar ot wands bedsecus Sit Sana ee poe Gebte in my hae ee any, cette Of) «ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED :
& fo any : > rm i r el t
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each ; ne charge week 72 cents and NOTICE Gas “installed. "Wee dete berets HOUSES ceeer signed by me. eee (M.A.N.Z. LINE) The M.V. MONEKA will accept
additional word, Terms cash. Phone 2508, 96 Cevis Sundays 24 words — over 24 contact W. We G : : A.N.Z, cm v. eee l es i
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death Words 3 cents a word week—a cents a PARISH OF CARIST CHURCH Pouce Sel or tac | peat ia8- Se One i ee maa GIEEMIDGE, S.S. ARABIA is scheduled to sa Serge: and Fassonges fof Porters :
Notices only after 4 p.m | word on Sundays. Applications on { to be ob me BUNGALOW — On the seacoast in St. wie Hall, Peterkins Land, | from Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th cat Snnene, Scares se oe
ites GRGe tee, -eeiimeeminnte ae Seieeaia Tiiae Wak MeeeRte En eet eed Sele 15 6 51—t fn. | James — Apply Mrs. Cole, “Athol Blair, ' St. Michael. | May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane 16th St. Bites. | Sailing . Wegay * Sem i
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow!-! es | tsa! Certificates will be received at = SEASID! mm - opposite Appleby, St. James. ee June, Sydney 23rd June, arriving at Trin- —
a , aths, wi c ¥ 5 E HOUSES at foot of Cleaver’s 26.51—. |_| dad during the latter half of July, anc
ice cn Rusk-daye end $1.80 ont Sundays! AUTOMOTIVE Senn: 00s sor. cae Ge snore Wereut| pepsiar wethanp taseh eae Teun ™ somone | siving “seed te cat” Wie enieee | Lica rune OO Rectedes’ and a Passongete da
Doagalct : Se nme aterm , . Ps ? ich at “ Rock” “CHURCHILL”, jaxwell my wife verpool. zo ard Passengers for St,
ior any number of words up to 9, and| TRUCK—One 1946 Studebaker Truek | Archer Gittens Exhibitions tenable at the| 1. CULPEPPERS HOUSE, standing on} bedrooms, basins in each, laianeaoees VIOLA SEALY (nee Ross) as I do not] In addition to general cargo this vesse! ene ee, meee
3 cents per word on week-days and}j. grst class condition, Apply W. H.| 2¥5 Foundation School. 2 acres, 26 perches of land and ing room. Unfurnished, from August ist! ld myself responsible for her or any-| has ample space for chilled and harc Bengers onl’ for St. Vincent, Sai Ar i
4 cents per word on Sundays for each| Ramsa’, Eckstein Bros. SORA og cumbenetee tn pee fee tre sree | or ue SES ome Sxtenstee view | Apply: Lynch. Top Rock. Te 505, ON€ else contracting any debt or dewts | trogen caro, , ing Tuesday 26th instant—-~= a
aeditional word, *| the candidates must have been born in| of the sea and delightful coastline. For appointments to view. _ 19.6.51--n 412 Hy name unless by a written order 0 accepted on through Bills of Lad : <* es
ELECTRICAL the Parish, or whose parents have been} The house contains closed verandah, —. | Signed by me. ing for transhipment at Trinidad to Brit B.W.1 SGHOONER OWNERS’ -
MARRIAGE 4 é resident in the Parish for three years or | sitting room, three bedrooms (with dress- FURNISHED AP. at Coral St. CLAIR SEALY, ish Guiana, Leeward and Windward ay
—_— obeaitbheibiemghebsieemns jonger and are in straitencd cireum-} ing rooms) one with running _water,}Sands, Worthing, with Silver’ & Linen Roberts Road. Islands. ASSOCIATION INC,” .
HUNTED PAYNE On June Toth las |. O8¢ ECHO-PHONE Commercial, Ama-| stances, and not less than 8 years or| kitchen, pantny, buttery and usual con-|Good Sea bathing. For further particu. Howells Cross Road : oN tern
: P. ~<—-On June 16th, wur Pocelying Set, Model E.C. 3 more than 12 years of age on the date of} veniences. Elect: . particu-/ 19 6.51—2n A For furth ti ~ 0
at St. David's Church, §Christ Church ectricity and Government | lars, Dial 8134. 9.6.51—t.f.n er particulars apply Telephone #047, i
john Wynphaup. youngest san of dar. ac }Fbene ea 19.6.51—2n | the examination, Water installed. Servants rooms and | ——scsse=emeumemntenemnmeeee | FURNESS, WITHY & CO., LTD, ‘
soln woe en et” '—— | The exhibitions are tenable for a| Garage in yard. No. 6 Swan Street, Upstairs premis The public are hereby warned against} T'inidad, ey
No f are RADIO: One it) Ten Tube General! Period of not more than five (5) years. 2. DENTS MONIR, sta ‘a ee ving credit > wit Bwi, ‘
George, to Marjorie Millicent youngest | piectric Table Radio $60.00 reply to Box Candidates must present themselves to| 27 perches of 1 , Standing om 1 rood | very spacious for Sample rooms. Ageuts, | #1ViN€ to my wite VIOLET BERYL an oft
daughter of Mrs. G, D. Payne of Hilda- | Picctrie Table Radio, ply (to Box | ie Headmaster at the Foundation Schou| gromnd tee and and erected on high |and others Dial 3466, 19.6.51—1n | SPRINGER (nee Clarke) as I do not DA COSTA 1. y =
ee ne weed Matava 51—1n, dae eas ne ground with view of sea and part of hold myself responsible for her or any- & CO., LTD., ADVERTISE IT PAYS og
19.6.51—In, — Gaianitintion uly, + at 930 a.m. for} coastline. ‘KOOM; One (1) Large, Cool Room |e else contracting any debt or debts er i d *
LIVESTOCK WOOD GODDARD. cae house bg onli cage a furnished or unfurnished at Bel Air, St. ae pane unless by a written order ‘wt “Viiv
———$———_—— ~ | 1 : room, three fone Michael, Dial 3663, 19.6.51-—2n. | * y me, |
ache ieees » 1ED ae COW: One fresh Cow pints daily. ee Christ Chasch, Shue a slartentonese “neotte it pee sw all unique, My Lacde fi anni '
Net gM ye on ege 4 ai| gg bn Lashlay, “Retreat ears 17 6 51—4n. Government water installed. hea culty Rosina ie go eee it Pandata st = Michael Cc My he: Z|
a e enera pita ec funera : ial SSeS ‘tion ; :
wall leave, ner late, residence, Hops |” HEiPmmoFivcs quarter Guernsey. four- ee ds cr cc atte for mat momen at Oe Steamship Co.
" a aac —' . four- 78. .6.51-—3n, ve :
fords We Pade paid at WEST mantle. anabr eanetont Adc NOTICE a ee properties will be set up for 9.6.51-—3n. Win tahiie eke Mabele waleee chdinek ;
tt. Armstrong (Husband) Senior As-| other 44 pts. daily. Phone 3978. ys © by publics competition, in separate! No 53 Swan and Middle Streets Up- | Stving credit to my wife, Doris Lashley, ""
iy A - ; lots, 8+ our Office, James Street, Bridge- ; nee Fields) as b do ysel Fil.
stant Teacher, St. Clement's B 15.6.51—3n PARISH OF ST. JAMES 2 anor stairs premises, 2 stories wth water | | not hold myself .
ae ‘eacher, St. ement’s Boys sa Wemiinntaan’\ toe. Sealey Exhibitions 3°%,"7,, °° Friday 22nd June instant, at lights and bath. i iate at responsible for her or anyone else con- wane
Erskiné; Berard’ (Sons) GOAT: One (1) Saanen crossed, in Milk | tenable at a 2nd Grade Girls’ School ana ” YEARWOOD Dial 3466 19.6,51--1n | ttacting any debt or debts in my name NEW YORK SERVICE . aie
A a re Apply: N. Daniel, Chase Land, Tweedside | # snd Grade Boys’ School will be re- aie unless by a written order signed by me. | 8.8. “SEABREEZE” sails 8th June Arrives Barbados 19th June, J96f., ~~
siieeey eer Gn aaa a ee 19:6 51—3n | ceived by the undersigned up to Saturday | 19 .51—10n . SMALL FURNISHED FLAT: Sullable CAMERON, MeNICHOLL LASHLEY, ¢ A STEAMER sails 29th June Arrives Barbados 10th July¢ 1981,
residence, Station Hill, St. Michael, | ~ MEC ” 2m See eet a ate for rye person, at Glen Roy, St. Law- A oe ar Mayers Land, sk
James Nathaniel Beckles, late contrae- © arishioners in straitened : 7 rence, For further particulars. ; 2 ae a eneeegenenetth steiairnsiata eateries ee ¢
a ';CHANICAL stances and must (1) forward a Baptismal AUCTION 8124, ee 19.6,51—In. NEW ORLEANS SERVICE a



tor, His funeral leaves his daughter's
residence, Station Hill, at 4 p m. ‘for One 1) SINGER SEWING MACHINE r — Certificate and (2) a Certificate £201 Ue) mmm x mmm | RE 5.8, ALCOA 5" 83 3
ud MACHINE jiead Mistress or Head Master of a THURSDAY 2ist at 2 p.m. at Ist SMALL COTTAGE near Married Will the Person who advertised some ; Pecan Mais ith Sune ast



Barbados 28th June, 196t.













































































































































































the Hindsbury Brethren .Room and} complete with Electric motor and li s ” 9 7 :
. ight | , : Avenu A : . time ago that he gives car driving} 5:5. ALCOA ROAMERâ„¢ sails 27th Juns Arrives Barbados 13th July, 1981
then to the Westbury Cemetery. 1, | ever been used, a bargain. Phone 8535 | Suter “tne school, > Melt SMES 19 | dovtle® rooted boarded ahd ahirale house | becroomh.* Water. ta sand Bhectrints | leeeone please write to Bax Y. Col SS ALCOA PATRIOT” sails 1ith July “Arrives Barbados 20K J:lyy 108,

s ; : ¥ : = , — — xogibeniahatagiias
Beckles (Daughter), Lisle, Oliver, Carlon, ag ee ere area P, H. TARILTON, 16 x 9 x 8 with shed roof 16 x 9 x 8 with | probably soon. Pleasant Cool situation, | Advocate. 38:6.Q.—18 ~ as a
Norma, Kenneth and Monica (grand .6.51—6n. Clerk: Vestry St. James. out offices. House adjoining above 16 x | Untw ed. Four dollars weekly — = .
children). ——"WRSCELLANEOUS CELLANEOUS 17.6.51—3n. 19 x 8 land gan be rented $3.00 quarter. Telephone 2949. 19.6.51—1n. CANADIAN SERVICE ee
‘Sore nhenfeenpati Linchsisailivslle aiomctacens annie inthe . ic , Auctioneer, SOUTHBOUND
HAYNES—On June 17th at. Woodford, ai 17-6 -61—4n. TO-DAY'S (i A. SONG

: , cifecvintiiaihaisatli ° Name of Shi ils Montreat Sails Hall:
OF an el ae Oh eee Pella: See tts ee Pr Dertens pone NOTICE Friday 22nd at 2 p.m. by kind per- |: LOST fi = . eo eae
Leila Jones | ahiciiguencsndiaipapeaenbdioneniniasarmesiendeenate-snmcimeasemane mission of Messrs. C. McEnearney & ton HOUR LEAF CLOVER S.S. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE” May 25th May 30th June 19th
SanneBonee GERBEAS PLANTS: Several Colours | PARISH OF GuRIST CHURCH | ea | GO Ttd. Twill sell at thetr garage 1 “r apt over a four leaf, 3 2 “ALCOA PLANTER” June 8th June 1th June Zist. . .
, -t plications on Forms obtain ymouth Seda: GLASSES—P. green ‘f er” 3.3. “ ‘OA PEGASUS” June 22nd June 25th Jub h ‘ o
im Phone 4717 19.6.51—1n ‘from my office and accompanied by‘ condition, eine oe pot oh tie aes at Sian Ciao Getttine an, “That I've overlooked before” he oe: oe uly 6¢ ~ a
IN MEMORIAM GALVANISED SHEETS Beet qualit Best quality epee ees will be coves Me Kenzie, Auctioneer. 17.6 51—5n.| Saturday night. Finder will po ta. ine dens a ... Sunshine” —
litaieeagied i; at my office up to 3.00 p m on Monday . “The other is..........rain"” NORTHBOUND
SMITH: In Ever Loving Memory of our 5 eine es foe ‘vas mane | 25th June, 1951, for one. or more vacant yaa Teentng seme Sieeaea “Third is the roses that grow in *S.S. “ALCOA PENNANT” due June 25th sails for St. Lawrence River Ports.
dear Florence Smith who died on 10 ft $8 40. Nett cab, Better Res Le Sine Weomans mee eC tenable EDUCATIONAL _— . the lane” emmmee- ently cunetbustenmasnmeiiid
June 19, 1950, : : * at the Girls’ Foun on Schoo! 2 “No need explaining the one * These vessels have limited passenger accammodatior
Asleep in God's beautiful garden, A. BARNES & CO., LTD. Candidates must be daughters of parish- | divers ahaa Rad Ly ore aa tiene remaining” ee ssen ge cammodation .
Free from all sorrow and pain, 4.5.51-t.f.n Jioners in straitened circumstances and WANTED Kindly return san to Adv ate ‘Gy a IT'S A GAS COOKER !
When. lifes journey is ended, | ~ GUN: One 12-gouge, 7 shot Purp Gun, | {han if years of age on the date of the tising Department. 19.6.81-~3n. el ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE
We hope to meet you again, eS a . : . an years of age on the date o. e COMB: a 6. . _— E as
Mire ‘lis Gilk USA), Bery |" # condition, Phone 8335 examination ERMERE SCHOOL. AP : onli} ‘
seen eae BR ’ arene 19 6.51—2n Candidates must present a to ‘OG de ae BWt BARBADOS. PLY:—DA COSTA & co., LTD. ANADIAN SERVICE :
vle, Mar renda 3 haa = ap teeenatn —j|the Headmistress at the Foundation - Graduate eacher in Co reial
Rawle, are ee Bend e aainas! | ZOFLORA—A powerful germicide frog- | School on Friday 6th July, 1951, at 9.30 | Subjects. Tote | CHANCERY SALE
(New York Papers Please Cop’) van: ine oe seueeene ee aoe aon. for examination, an ears in September, a Grad-
aw containing a small proportion o' is WOOD GODDARD, uate ‘eacher of C
19.6.51—1N | tyyaluable for spraying in the sick room, Clerk of the Vestry, Should hold the degree at GA ge Tig, Sacermentioned eccoer ty Will be'ert up for sale at the Registration Qifics,
in the Home, Public Rooms etc. On sale Christ Church, |B. Com., or B.Sc, (Econ.) Boece Public Buildings, Bridgetown between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and on the
¥ e ~ at all Drug Stores. 7.6.51—e.o.d 17 6 51.—4n. | in office routine desirable, and a know- date specified and it not then sold it will be set up on each succeeding Friday, 2°
Vv ACANT POST re ledge of industrial the same place and during the same hours until sold. Full particulars on application
“FARM” POWDERED FULL CREAM Caribbean would be an advange °°] to me.
an advantage.
. j MILK — S&S lity ‘ Salary Scale: :
Chief cine. Officer, MILK — Supreme quail ny land only NOTICE Srateate naies = aib~2000 = 00! pao HERBERT HUTCHINSON BAYLEY, Trustee V, LAVINIA LEWIS et ai on! . ‘
‘ocoa Boar Get a tin today from your grocer or “ ; —£610 pa. : that certain parcel of land (formerly part of Goodland Planta- ; . « :
Colony of ‘Trinidad & Tobago | 4-ux store and tay the best milk obtain. | , PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH Graduate 1st @:-2u4 Cita" Hono tion) situate in the parish of Saint Michael and Island abovesaid containing by CANADIAN SERVICE ¢ =
Applicatoba-are invited for tha able, The 51 family size is really | , pplica oe tee to be obtained | ¢400 x £20—£600 x £30 2720 pa” admeasurement two acres three roods ten and one half perches or thereabouts From Halifax, N.S. & Montreal
en e abili economical, Insist’ on “Farm” for the | {rom my trate peroripanied by bap-| "Position on incremental scale mute t to abutting on lands of Alexander Gibson on the Westbury Cemetery on lands of -)
vacant post of Chief Rehabilita-] sake of your health and your pocket. al certificates will be received at my | adjustment for War Servic: lec a place called Frolic and on a private roadway or however else the same is | —-#—-———~- a ih a acini o4
tion Officer, Cocoa Board If your dealer cannot suppl h office up to 3.00 p m. Om Monday 25th | recognised yi Tyce. and prevaqus abutting. } r Q x
. ee 14 ea® Pa supply phone | June, 1951, for one or more vacant Christ eer SEV IEw. ve UPSET P " LOADING DATES —
The salary will be at a rate in 2229. 19.6.51—t.£.. | Church Vestry Exhibitions tenable at the|, FOF # suitably qualified candidate a ae i
the scale ' $3,600—120-3,840-240- Boys’ Foundation School. : yacaney, is available on the following e ors igh a t ea \ Expect Arrival ©. j'T
5,760 per annum; the actual rate ‘i Candidates cat be eony of Perienior Teacher's Diploma (e Se 6.6.51—4n Registrar-in-Chancery, Montreal | Halifax Da Bridgetown, .
4 ding th ualifications ers in straitened circumstances and not], Pp a (or recognised equiy- “ s | Barbados
depending on e quailitic s [tess than 8 years or more than 12 years alent) £45 p.a. additional to the aboye | ~~ eae RSS ——— | 8.8. ‘“BOLYCREST" 6th June 1 June 27. so
and experience of the successfulj| yginimum charge week 72 cents and jf age on the date of the examination, scales 4.8. “SUNWHIT" +. 8 June | 28 June os ~~ =
applicant, Travelling and Sub-] 9g cents Sundays 24 words =< over 24! Candidates must present themselves for | e i e e aa. TOARHIEAS sa duly | 0 July 23 July e
sistence allowances will be paya-| words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a/examindtion to the Headmaster at the) 2 Required in September Graduate i AR tot es asics? ++ 18 July 2 July 7 August 77
ble at rates similar to those] word on Sundays, a ea a ee WY | Certificate apalsh and Latin up to School os . a X
: : ’ -m, dard, : p . “ “
approved from time to time for WOOD GODDARD, Graduate: Salary Scales for Barbados: U.K, SERVICE a4
Government officers. Clerk of the Vestry, Graduate:—£360 x £15—2£450 ‘ x =
The officer will be required to HELP Christ Chureh, | —£610 p.a, + @n,e From Swansea, Liverpool! and Glasgow
reside at the La Pastora Propagat- CHAUFFEUR; Experienced Chauffeur iene 2400 x 200 e lige ey Aa 7 et O Cc a 0a 1 10n 1 ie. sndtitbees :
at the La Pas : ne ai x 600 30-— I Swansea Liverpool Gt Yates, Bi Thee.
ing Station, Santa Cruz, where]to drive’ Private Austin A.40. First salbaiiens nmin canine ee | re kee Potion e o
furnished quarters are available] ¢!@8s references required, Reply to Box THE SUGAR INDUSTRY Z ‘ bs, “SUNAVIS” + OJune dune — 2 June 7 July :
for which he will pay as rent| &: Advocate. 19.6.51—1n de the erestaee ar ACT, 1943 SPEIGHTSTO npn teh erent hs i, io

‘ - e a ene pene ae ‘o the creditors holding specialty liens , WN : . “

10% of his salary plus 5% per| COOK GENERAL: Apply to Mrs. Seatiat Haymans and Warleigh Planta- VIENNA, Austria, June 18, U.K. & CONTINENTAL SERVICE . ve
si he ve 0 nia | Lisle ilev, 4 y s i SE: , . ,

genase of the value of the farni-| Lisle Bailey, ‘The “Pavillion, Hastings: | toms, St. Peter @ From page 5. POLITICAL LEADERS have shown no inclination to Expected Arpival vas =
"Candidates ‘ghoul jive. atitlti~|- eae frmmn phe Piaaee e kaces | Chee ee Sawa ete about te an effort to enlighten Speights-| Scrap the oldest Government Coalition despite the upset SON eee ee hedaT AT

« 8 s —— f; - 2ST, ours | Oo in a loan oF A under e pro- | tonians’ . | i j j 3. “SU “ y ver 28 . vi
ad's yond attended of edGcation; -pirday, ce EATS THURS ck Tene Letina the knotaT mek ceatont aie ae show films there, victory in the recent Presidential elections, by the hitherto] *" “SUNRAY’ tune 20 dus 28 June 14 July, ae

sess exccutiv ili keeping, Apply Advocate Box M. c/9/said Plantation, in respect of the Agri- e is one gas station and a minority Socialists. SSE eT et an ee eet "he ss
possess executive ability and have Advocate with full particulars. cultural year 1951 to 1952 small cinema which resembl y *

; os . ‘ « cate Ww y 6 a a . iti . . “
had wide agricultural experience. Seen TAS ONO, LNG money has bees Haekowed ‘ander |inissioe house, vA’ sthall pit The present Coalition of the Conservative People’s Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703 *
able but not enventia"" «-| ~~ MHISGRELANEOUS |Site sctst fo cts mur’ ob “in| coe Plant wee recent, opene] asia anes December 20 1005 OT POWeE O°CUB a
é ; : sees : ' ; . Two jetties are used to shi ustria since December 20, 1945 peri : "
Duties. of the post are: — Sha Soren ~~. _| respect of such year, Dp ‘ eS a oak le Se We i
; vr on aa area reer Dated this 19th day of June, 1951.) Sugar. : President-Elect Ex-Imperial 3
(i) to‘assume responsibility for! RAGS: Clean Old Rag. Delivered to R. CHALLENOR and A fisherman who casts his net all|/General, 78 ar old Sociall t a
all cacao propagating work, and] Advocate Press Room Dept. T. A. GITTENS, Trustees.| along the from St, James (Th : ue ” Indi Get Grai
management of all Propagating 17.6.51—t.f.n. per C. R, PACKER, coast from St. James|Theodor Koerner will be sworn ta 8 rain
Stations (under the immediate] RoARDERS—an » Cool Airy Country Attorney, [tO aS far up as Heywoods, sup-finto office Thursday, June 21 and A COOL Shoe
supervision of the Chief Scientific] like district, on the Bus line, not far 19.6.51—3n,| plies residents with sprats and|the Government immediately will CANBERRA, June 15.
Officer of the Department of! trom town. ‘Rates Moderste, Apply Box + frays when there is a meat or}resign. Negotiations as to the shape] Australia is to send Indi:
Tarenbues). XX. c/o Advocate Co. 16.6,51—2n. NOFICE fish shortage. There are alsolof the new cabinet are now being] £4,200,000 (Australian) worth o! for a HOT Day
(ii) To receive all applications PARISH OF BT. PETER ecg fishermen who build large|conducted, but it is believed that] grain, mainly wheat, Externa
sh pots. Government’s lineup will remain] Affairs Minister Richard Case)



for subsidy grants under the
Cocoa Subsidy Scheme and to
initiate their investigation.

(iii) To control both the office

Parochial Treasurer’s office will NOT i
ANNOUNCEMENTS be opened on Saturday, 23rd June, but There is also the Boys’ Club
will be open on Tuesday 2Ist and Fri-}and the Alexandra School with

Wed y 20th, 8 is} j
GLADIOLI BULBS: Orders being booked ay ery oth, Thursday ist and Fri-)its attractive gardens,

almost exactly the same as now! announced to-day. The grain wi'/
with seven Peoples Party and six!be part of Australia’s contribu e
Socialist Ministers. tion under the Colombo Plan fo































































z 5 staff saged on they] for importation of these bulbs delivery (Signed) G. S. CORBIN, Speigihtstown, with onl a i ‘ ve
ae Per ee M Oooa sane Bia ee early January, 1992. Apply: T. Geddes wreearochisl Treasurer. '| main _ road, is still the Tain As a result of the October, 1949 Serine Suet aati for a yeu |) it 8
(iv) To certify vouchers for ; . 19.5.51—3n,| shopping centre of the Leeward |eélections the People’s Party has 77 The Minister ’ adiiad +h ; Ladies! See our
expenditure incurred on behalf of] Why not give your floors that new parishes. It is at its peak period |seats in Parliament, Socialists 67 Pakist 1d Ps as
she Cocéa Board look? Have them sanded by the Nu-Floor | NOTICE on Saturdays. League of Independents 16 and stan | wou receive goods |, latest Styles
: = a] | Method. Call Evelyn, Roach & Co., Ltd. + PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH Communists five worth £2,000,000 (Australian) |, ‘ ty
(v) To supervise the general} ag, 19.6.51—2n. » Sealed tenders, marked on the envelope and Ceylon £300,000 (Australian)
field progress of the Cocoa Subsidy | wtender tor the Erection of i Pavilion Jet H elic opter Will Unexpected ‘ Reuter
Scheme. 7 7" at Sarjeant's age’, Ww receiv 4 oe ; Ww
a it a pan 4 Mh ges ‘ oad ete GOV ERNMENT NOTICE uly 1961 for the erection ‘of a Pavilion CG: nap Pre-election rumours had it that . oor NE SHIPMENTS
uties ti ay SS t the Sarjeant’s Vill ing Field. :
officer by the Cocoa Board from f. Copies of the ‘Blan and specifications ar ry eople if Bepialiets won the sapeon a EF. (. PRESCOD & Co. : ST OPENED
time to time. . pan obtained from Mr, R. B. Moulder} Designers in Britain are works) Deer ey nor anyone e JU
Fe a eee MTEN lees reek ae ty eet Sey_ sees] cue On ole ee Baw aaa ec foe ney Parlnmentaty elece| tng Convers & nanoeto l
ree months c ul ($5.00), w « = e w -
Seomineiion ‘on either side. ne oe eh ra ve ae aae turnin the plan to Mr. Moulder ine senger-carrying = aaa p: t tions this autumn in the hopes of Modern ar Exclusive % j also a wide selection a
. : pee e 8
Applications containing, full ay Seaerell ae Pagans ed Bes i te motile ated One wok MeuL he powered by turboprop en .Jcoming out the largest National Paints & Olls of Beit Quality $1)
Vea = sporti Sets June, 1951, between the hours of | SomPleted and also submit the names of Gulicntaee oe OE mreweny en ly ered parliamentary |% ew to make Good Foundations >) ‘ y
ate with copies of not less than] 8.00 a.m. and 5.00 p.m. All fish~| with He ius een REO Gt TE oni ay WAL soon be flying. It hag] elections "would be in October any soil 6 fi of Hosiery, Cleaners a
two. recent testimonials, should be} !"8 boats ening off this area ro. oo eee ee ttion of the building ‘te| two Alvis Leonides 550 horse-| 1953. “As it was Socialist Koen- Air Influence on Soil. nA site
addressed to the Chairman, Ce20a] Warned to keep at least three (3)) the specified date. power engines and can fly oajer supported by the nation’s a deh ial tore . | and Polishes ‘
Board, c/o Department of Agri- noe Sh 5 de catia b BR sk Beis hele es chr nelligde, Api one engine. Design plans for} 220,000 Communists barely won) Dial 2660 x { ? } ne
culture, St. Clair, Port of Spain, iat an ae st . eiat, | Re try for the erection of the building. “| the other are being drawn up by] by a majority of 180,000 Social -| 14 ’
cones ge Ph gm spot saver Ski secailcn outs taker class ak The Vestry does not bind iteeit to} the Cierya Autogiro Company] ists figured they wos ae 19.6.61—In, ' -
than June 23rd, .. Envelopes mo rw accept the lowest or any tendered. now taken over by Saunders-Roe,.|to demand a new parliamentary :
containing applications should be|Friday, 22nd June, 1951, at the werk nt the Very, | The plans are for a three-rotor} election on the basis of that mar-
marked— “Application C.R.O.”—| same time. Christ Church,| @chine to carry 24—32 passen-| gin. { ™
on the outside left-hand corner. _ 17.6.51—2n, 17.6 51—5n.| gers, . . :
E. W. LEACH, The jet hescopter is under] There were reasons for the 10-DAY’S NEWS FLASH i
Chairman, Cocoa Board. GOVERNMENT NOTICES development by Faireys. Called|Coalition’s stability: Firstly, the \ has
5.6.51—7n. ‘i the Rotodyne, it will have twejonly assurance against Commun- Only a Few Copies wext:—
—- See outboard of|ists with assistance by ane AIDS TO SANITARY
z the cabin, and air from these en-|occupiers of eastern ustria IENCE AND LAW . : Ccteol EMAL,
ATTENTION is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence)|gines will be “tapped” to the cuiking Government is a_ strong By Det. White and Hanna POPOL LPP PLEO LLL LL EEL ALBALA AA NS :
(Amendment) Order, 1951, No, 15 which will be published in the Totor-blade tips to turn them.|coalition of all other groups ; 1/- each <=
Official Gazette of Monday 18th June, 1951, baw ae ae — 98 ve Se een all Sees Biss migh'{}} JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
yf ‘ : ‘ Pe as ; with small separate: jet units for] brea e coalition are never —ticseeinanteeinninanhereennpmannaeemne .
ug me ney this _Ordet the te ae retail selling price of ‘Meat—] giving a powerful thrust for take4] fought on the floor of Parliament,! Best Quality Bevell edged $
resh and Frozen” is as follows:— off and landing. The Rotodyne] If Socialists ever left the Colt MIRRORS :
Sean os, a emcee aa, Pn ee ee ee eet ee en ee ~~ | is designed to carry 23 paSsengers,|tion they could retain control of 22 in. x 16 in. ¢
ARTICLE RETAIL PRICE but a considerable amount of|labour unions, —UP. 24 in. x 18 in. *
Here’s Good News |___ (not more than) advanced development work will at X
MEAT-—-FRESH & FROZEN: | be necessary before it reaches the), .—_——_————— JOHNSON’S HARDWARE z
you've been waiting {{}| BEEF: flying stege, ' ORIENTAL %
(a) Roast and Steak from Rump, Round These large nelicopterg will $
for... Sirloin and Ribs yf of .. | 48c. per Ib. eventually take over from’ the SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
(b) All other cuts including soup and smal) single-engined helicopters JEWELS :
stew beef is ‘i Sy Fer MOOE Gh co Ne which are now operating experi- New Shipment opened
MUTTON: : mental services. The British * was i“
(a) Legs and loin chops .. ea Ce Aner = European Airways Helicopter THANI Ss ‘2466
(b) Shoulders ie + He Fa Mintek vis Unit, which ran the World's
(c) Stew i ay vi ve Bel) ke ees first night-mail service and the
“ PORK ay ae ea 9 ae 5:60) Mes ae kg first scheduled passenger 5 ; ‘ SPE
rere o A uSes the small eee ae E : x Ss
a) Legs and loin chops .. oe? AA et) Fob ca helicopter. Provin, ights a
(hb) Stew a sa yi 4 A Eee MO a Nae new Parerae eine between Clivie Gittens Orchestra xy



——-<<—-<«| London and Birmingham have

18th June, 1951. * already begun.
19.6.51.—1n. :
{r. Touch With Barbados

Gittens will be out of the
island for a short period
during which time his Or-







Orchestra Leader Clivie
It Relieves Colds Quickly.





CERTAIN
COUGH SYRUP

ATENTION is drawn to the Control of Livestock Prices (Defence) Costal Station chestra will function as %
Order, 1951 which will be published in the Official Gazette of Monday | “1.14 wirereas (west naien uta [Ree % VISIT OUR SHOWROOM AND LET
In WHITE and other 18th June, 1951. advise that they can now communicate For further articulars
Lovely Shades h just 2. Under this Order the maximum liveweight prices of Livestock wooiaee Pith Bg through thelr contact, Mr.’ Fred giteyne Cc. CARLTON BROWNE US DEMONSTRATE THIS WORLD
ovely ades has jus and Poultry are as follows: — s s, § zabeth, $.S Cas- axophonist), ‘ool Lane,
‘. ae an ee at eens Mi Sa ne ae tea, 8s "negent Lion, 88 % Halls Road, who will be de- 136 Roebuck St, Dial 2813 RECORD BREAKER TO YOU f
3 ion, S § , 3 5 b :
een opened a ANIMAL MAXIMUM LIVE- | ioe SASS Mareala, 8.8. Alcoa] @ Pe Wholesale & Retail Drageist Al



. WEIGHT PRICE Pennant, SS. Ampact Washington, 8 8S
a | Campas, SS. Esso Knoxville, 8 S_ Bra-



© 4 COLOURS IN STOCK



LADIES !
|
|

ec
ee e

PIGS (More than 10 weeks) .. st cp 24 cents per lb. jara, SS Securus, SS Rosario Rodas,
PIGS (Not more than 10 weeks) rs a 26 cents per lb. £6 seunewisk, # * nee Lykes, ye : ‘
3 n ermuda, § ascogne, §
' owe vy f ra tf a Ss psi per o Folkebernadotte, S'S Bonito, 8 8. Loide
TURKEYS. ee eae eee oe es ae - JUST THE TOOL TO DO
ey ti . ss 5. aa, 5 5 en *
Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466 (a) Over 10 lbs. in weight aa -- | 84 cents per lb. blanc. SS Lady Rodnes, $$ Canadian >
r. Wm. Hy. St. Dia (b) 10 lbs, weight and under... 72 cents per lb Chalienger, 6 5. Sundial, $8. El Gallo,
S$. Uruguay THAT DIFFICULT JOB 4
3. ‘Copies of the NOTICE cuvering maximum prices of Meat and x E CK S i I IN B R O S
. + ay : i o ® 4 ee
It’s worth your while to tee ee ec agee ae, may be procured from the] 4,,)), (MAIL NOTICE PAD SAWS with Extra Blades -
tral Police Station, the Police Stations in the out-lying districts] and Aruba by the M/V Daerwood will ‘
) SHOP NOW! Kt and the Controller of Supplies Office, Canary Street oS See at the General Post Office as THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM $ BAY STREET,
5 ) 18th June, 1951. Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at 2 Broad Street. %
) 19.651 te Ordinary Mail at 230 p.m. on - pater the ta ded ddd putt bb tte inte tae
Worn eee June, 1952 U QsOOCOCO CS GOb SO SSO SHI L GO COCO O CGI R OC N EE LLLP PLLA? LLL LET LLL LEIA







PAGE EIGHT

Intermediate Games|

Show Bright Cricket

Second Day’s Play

BRIGHT CRICKET featured play in the Intermediate
Division on Saturday as thé season’s opening fixtures en-





































THE GIBSON GIRL



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

FINDS A





—_ rn



HOT SPoT

hens
‘ete





Reshevsky Wins
Chess Tournament

NEW YORK, June 18

Samuel Reshevsky of the Unitec
States and Miguel Najdorf of Ar-
gentina battled to a draw after 31
moves
International
lith and
but Reshevsky
with a scoge of eight points won,

Chess









im the Wertheim Memorial
tournament's
final round on Sunday,
won the first prize











TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 1951



The name speaks for itseif

(la RP ad Mit

Helps to cleanse the system
from blood impurities
impurities in the blood may cause rheumatic
aches and pains, stiff and painful joints,

boils, pimples and common skin disorders.
Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify

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anesonenssss
a

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Regiviered US Potent OMes

They ‘Il Do It precy ‘Time










"Toorys 8008y-TRAP PRIZE
GOES TO MRS. LA BOOR »
WHILE STILL IN HER HOUSE DRESS
SHE MAKES UP HER COIFFURE~



HEN, LACQUERED AND HAIR-DOED,
E ZIPS OFF HER DRESS *sRESULT,
AHALF-HOUR MORE GOING OVER THE MESS!
























































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6566666 COCO nana

PALS



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RPS POOOSSF POPP OSPF FOS ol











tered their second day. a —s ” % BE se sara) f, — pnts the blood, cleanses the system and assists
e were fo ‘ in restoring
There were four games set 7 n i toring good health.
Empire's C. Rice carried hi EMPIRE ys. WINDWARD e@ tournament without losing a
tot ul to 126 not out last Saturday Empire — 90 bud et 9 wate ) 18 single garne outright finished tied
“ LM a x ind wa 12 i
when his team scored 263 run WINDWARD — ist Innings for second place with <3 Max-
against Windward at Intermediate—JV. C. Thornton ¢ Rudder b Arm- Euwe of Holland with 7% won,
‘rieket Cong Road. W strong 53 3% lost. Najdorf won aay games ee
Crieket at Congo Read. Wina fy. V"’Farmer rot out 4l 1 drew in sev Scat Oe
ward were bowled out for 145) ffi Atkinson b Prescott 25 and drew in seven,
ena 3 7 b Fvelyn b Rudder 1
aM mae is ak ie 057 int M Farmer ¢ & b Spooner 5 On the other hand, Reshevsky
enta pital scorec i M Farmer 1 b w , b Spooner 4 with sts: “Arew: Yn’ Boe a lost
ply to Spartan’s first innings Of—r Farmer 1.b w., b Prescott t m six, drey a our an os
i ire Spartan is now 116 for thef§3eale b Spooner . 0 one (to Euwe).—wU.P.
r ines of four wickets, ) Wilkie 1 bw, b Spooner 0
7 ‘ s Gill b Armstr 1
At -the Garrison, Regimen -packlen to Rometraner 0
bowled out Pickwick for 11: Extras 12 ;
after putting up the good total of ~
, 946. Regiment in their second ee = | The \ eather
j time at the wicket are 114 for Fall of wickets: 1—2, 2—11, 3—16, 4 } TODAY
Ewer . —27, 5-44, 6—13 38, @—198, 9—143 .
} six wickets. ; 5-44, G—137, 1-138, 8—138, 9 Sun Rises: 5.39 a.m.
A good struggle is going ©. BOWLING ANALYSIS : | Sun Sets: 6.21 p.m.
between Cable and Wireless anc Cee e * 2 ms Moon (Fuil) June 19
Wanderers and the game will c epanhee Se aii Besta Lighting: 7.00 p.m. an
most likely end in a fight fore Prescott cs 19 «(2 High Water: 2.46 a.m., 4.06 See ACT TTD Te Oe ~
first innings lead when it continue Jc. Harper 4 2 19 «(0 p.m.
next Saturday, Cable and Wire-ff\, Marris -. aes aes ae .
te a te rig ig Mi. “Armsteons a a Rainfall (Oedringten) 15 in P
; 267 and have one wic' stand-| iade . . d fu
he ing - q - 2ABLE & WIRELESS vs, WANDERERS ar ‘— yee to yester- retty an use ]
‘. Oo aes Cable & Wireless — 04 lay: 3.54 ine
; On Saturday, for Windward Wanderers — (for 9 wkts ) 267 Temperature (Max.) 86.5°F
y opening batsman N. C. Thornton oun = . , RA
fr scored a valuable 53. H. V, WANDERERS — Ist Innings CERES (AE). “TOG
d F . Na aa agi ee) V. Lewis 1bw.. b E. Branker 0 Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E,
? armer played a good inningsi#, peirce stpd, b CB Lawless 34 (3 pm.) ES.E
i for 41 not out. R. Atkinson’s 258. Greenidge c R. A. Lewless Wind Velocity: ‘15 miles per
reins , > . ~+hu-| b Branke 0 tt
' som the only other good contribu-@. @ “Manning, b i. B) MéKenzie 48 hour
: 3 felbw,bcC. B. Lawless 25 ‘ ‘
i C. Spooner claimed four Wind Bt. Clarke Be. Branker -.,.,¢ 48 Say, mister, here’s that 1951 Gibson girl, smiling Althea. She showed Manchester fans, when making ae ¢ Sn): 29.061,
ward wickets for 27 runs but MQ\ G. Seale not out 38 her first appearance in Britain, that more than syncopated rhythm comes from harlem. Miss p.m.)) 29.940 In Check Linen, Size 22 x 32, Each
Armstrong returned the bestfj; ©, Packer b Branker . 9 Gibson played her own tennis symphony on the courts, “Everything goes-over the net,” in beating Plain Li
oe . . +. Mayers b C. B. Lawless 12 Mrs. Pe Hodson 6—1, 6—1 ain Linen Oe we Be UR i ckece
average, taking three wickets{}> 4. Alleyne 1 b.w., b R.A Bey y :
wring ‘five overs, his bowling] Lawless 18 sere et ge ie Mo a ee Ten nis’s Nanny child has all the shots. Purring in the oN
ng only for five runs. 1. B. Proverbs not aut 19 sunshine——‘Guess tell the folks back home it’s hotter here than they think”-—America’s coloured COTTON GLASS CLOTHS
Hich 8 cores for Mental Hospi- Extras owe champion decided that she liked England's “cyte” courts, “Just fine and dandy.” Above Althea starts WHAT’SON TODAY
+l in their match against Spartar Total (for 9 wkts ) 267 a smash (right) and finished a smash (left Police Courts and Court of Size 22 x 32 Each ...... ; Giiee eshte 94c.
vere ¢. Williams who wat oe ; 5 23 eH a8 a Lk eG me Original Jurisdiction — 23 x 34 Each 93:
a eel) Of netokalas esd; Beh, On8h.6 : . PR Tic fy Fas Desens ceeaees ic.
cought off “Shell” Harris bowling} 00, 5160, 6 02, 7 1a2, 8199, 9-331, J runs for the loss of six wickets 10 a.m. . Z 20 x 30 Each ......... 84c
when he was 95, C. Best 49 and i before stumps were drawn. il Ses Meeting of the House of see aeeneeces etiee .
4 R. Chase 48. OWING ATER ER gy pr : S rt Wi Assembly — 3 p.m.
Pet Harris bowled well He took EL. Branker Boe aes CeCe po. s ind ow 146 Bi h Wolee Pate — 5 pm. RED BORDERED GLASS CLOTHS
; seven wickets for runs in A. Lawless a8 mee : obile aes a
af even wickets RA. Lawle i 2 g at Foundation WATER POLO. ehind a or minbah “eae 18 x 35 Each
{ os er 2 he @ Me McKehate 5 SF | reundation First Innings 26 Snappers vs. Whipporays ence Boys’ School Pas- “ ML. hn sa visto oc. ted ebb ores est pre OOO
t n is secon innings, 5S 4 ¢ Colzier 2 0 18 © | Pvilce First Innings 84 ture — 7.30 p.m. ‘ ?
r | Griffith scored 50 for Spartan “ ed Foundation Second Innings Boise toe tha the tre SR Ge eer eink Police Band, Popular Con-
snd 8. Morri, is not out with 30. C. Graham b, Griffith a onitas are the two Water Lancashire with six wickets still : : CHECK COTTON GLASS CLOTHS
§ D, Jones ¢, (w.k.) b, Browne.. 70 Polo matches to be played to fall, require another 146 runs | oorl, at wae St. Andrew
L, Warner not out io 2 ‘ Frid " ayin eld — 7.4 .m.
The : scores:— Poli Def - t kK, Yarde ¢. Denny b. Griffith 3 at the Aquatic Club this af- to lead the South Africans on first ” cn oe PAR MO. ME ks Claes ee Chen Ue EE Frat eee
: MEXTAL BOSPITAL vo, Wea) tie ice CAL | Gay 'v. catienaer i$ ternoon, Play begins at 5 | innings when the match enters Empire): “Of Men an om
Spartan — 174 and (for 4 wkts.) 116 4 ; M- L. Jones ¢, Callender b. Sealy 1 o'clock. The referee is Ma- its finalyday here tomorrow is & 8 M0 op - “ee
Mental Hospital — 257 e . Chase stpd. (w.k.) b. Sealy 14 ; 4s ° . nl " +”
MENTAL HOSPITAL iat Innings I oundation Mr, M. Callender ib.w. b, Seaiy 6 jor A. R. Foster. At ae of play today Lan- BONED ee, aetare ee Per Desk Cloths Each
Vv, C. Boyce 1b w, b K. Seuly 27 F. Nurse c. & b. Sealy.............. 0 cashire had replied to the South S 836 y 4 s ‘ ch ..
M. “hrichiow run out 10 F. Weekes b. Callender Cee ee ee peer Royal: “Our Vi i Tend
>) Will Sealy b Harris 95 H. Phillips c. Amey b. Sealy ........ 8 rst innings total of 403 leanaa Sat 2h. Other
¢ YUiiwowes c Morris b Harris 4 A flne bowling spell by C, Sealy MOE Hc tt 20 pecwear RABD Ve. CENTRAL for 7 declared with a score of 257 | Peete ee ea
Me Oe ts y Kk. Sealy 49 who bagged five wickets for 20 si Sa aaiees ye 165 for four. |] Olympic: “Haunted Harbour” — Oven Cloths ....... 32¢
Re Stoner e Grifith b Harris 48 runs enabled Police to score a six Total fee wecnnes 14) L, 0, Wood ? for 65 The South Africans increased tio: “In The. SHEPHERD
g one Pie te Hattie. 9 point victory over Foundation at BOWLING ANALYSS ©. E. Binds 2 for 34 their Saturday score by 99 runs in manees * “In The Navy" — 8.30
J. Gordon stpd. wkpr. b Harrt © Foundation on Saturday the last Oo. M R. W.z . - 75 minutes for the loss of two Polish Cloth
J Wiltshire mot out pierce ; day io me first series in the Sec-]C. Callender 9 0 2 2 Central First Innings i”9 Wickets before declaring. Ons oths ...... 38e. '
night ¢ Gittens b ‘ ond Division ericket matches. G. Grimth a ae? ey +s & C L d
r 1 ‘ ; a ee C. FE. Hinds 58 not out
SRR: ali! Foundation in their first innings |Aâ„¢Y pvc SL Be G. Gilkes & tor 58 Jack Cheetham hit his first] Fun Pa OEE 0.; td.
cute =e see ith 6s : woh roe re- | Denny + eas ee” Ase ee. century of the tour. He was three CRY PTOQU OTE No. 39 j
ah " ——, plied wi runs. ith runs | Sealy 821 2 5 Leeward’s 2nd Innings 106 end three-quarter hours getting FGJ ALCG MGPBFG WAG i0—j3
er) oh EE ee 20,286. Sg behind Foundation in their second | ,, Pollce Second Innings Tt 6! Weer ste ae fie: 197 ubhioh. troluded cae sik WBBRX BE i3 Broad Street
eer : ‘ innings scored 141 runs, D. Jones | & Sealy. Phillips : ‘ H, Andrews 2 for and 10 fours. : WAGKY WHER
BOWLING ANALYSIS top-scored with 70 runs while C.| 5. Howard 1.b.w. b. Philips: 0 rea Alan Wharton was rather 1
, a s un- A to last: Popular :
K. Sealy 15 : a ¥ Sealy bagged five of the wickets eee Gay..... 40 Central's end “dnnings 82 for 3% daacunate: ay. tat qabiing hia. ceb> sant tg eee Seiien
' & i “ " i not out 4 4 . CC Eb
F, MeCornite uo % 8 foe 20 runs after sending down} > Kayne not > ncibieides Rabid on’ diebich tury for Lancashire. He was out Casts
Moris «. 4 6:40 | een ee inh Ment otee EXtras........ ul arene for 98 which included twelve J. A. CORBIN & SONS.
- aE ; 4 eeding runs for full victory siete fours and John Ikin made 64 and ve ee i sk anal
2 f (i 1 24 1 «5,3; rl ; ; ‘ alee tbe
8. PE ais “4 gna lankane Bn wept on in thelr gecand in Total (for 5 wickets) 10L Harrison rn zen parent tor 6| Geoffrey Edrich 52 not out.
A. Gittens’ b Gordon : 35 os ye wickets after : . yne not ow Re "
s Grin ¢ hor. b Chrichlow * scoring aa runs. Griffith was not PIONS Ane + W. R. Se se
yood nigh: {fo out with 42 and Warner had a|Bb. Jones.,...........- oa ee fn
. 0 v.0
Be Ee RPS Bb richtow SY good knock to score 40 runs before |M. Phillips ... ose ? ey ao K
K. Sealy not out 15 he was bowled by Gay. & ew ; ; 2 ; pntays eiatce FREE ROO I O Our
re \ soe Lodge's rst In 108
ee — Carlton gained first innings lead | & Yarde...-.-- a a V. Outram 27, R. Murray 25 ur Tour as. which makes
Total (for 4 wkts ) 116 over Combermere at Carlton. Bat- = sae ceeds ‘ ¢ 18 ; om ee Terese 21 not out necessary to euiter * GOD'S WAY OF '
= ' . ' - ad ¥ + GAY. ase \ : i !
PICKWICK vs. REGIMENT ting first Carlton scored in their} L. Warner... b Oo 0 Rhevtnen Ovlitae's tad Prtes ieee pains, itohing ing and torment frptn Piles | G
Regiment — 246 and (for @wkts) 144 = first innings 190 runs and the CARLTON vs. COMBERMERE (Declared) tince the dlacovery of Hytax (lormerly SALVATION Man
Pickwick — U2 schoolboys replied with 144 runs. | carton bis Sapere 199 BORRe's And Insinge 346 for 2 wlekets ors in 10 minutes ad Rot only atone Sy
‘ ures. a 2 Carlton in their second turn! Combermere ... ot the pain Dut also takes out the ewan. +i
A’ 5 King b Phillips 6 knocked up 42 for the loss of no Carlton Second tnnings ¥.M.P.C, vs. PICKWICK at BRoKLES | {25 Roos Pieeatne sain combate eee. | PLAIN
D Evelyn b L Phillips 1 wicket and declared pressing for | Kennedy not out... 34 ROAD baton mn shereby curbing other trou- |
R ‘A Hoad 1 bw, b Pinder 38 an outright victory but when | ™ wig ans not out. 5 ervenacnae Bacirche, Constipation | Pleuse pie, =_ > ustomers
P. Evelyn stpd. wkpr. Ishmael, stumps were drawn Combermere } xtras : ¥.M.P.C.'s First Innings 90 long of energy, debit znnd irritab) Samuel Roberts, Gospe L
i a 18 3 . <— > * ' 7 e j ’
acme Girks b Pinder is had scored 46 runs for the loss of Total (for no wickets declared 42 i na oe drussies Gop Get Hytex from you: Book and Tract Service,
marke : : ol : avai : . ) ; gist@oday under the positive | Co al A Ban-
K M Taylor c Brathwaite b Pinder © nine wickets, A narrow escape. ~ ¥.M.P.C.'s 2nd innings 139 for G wickets SYA ARwe Hytex must stop your pllc 30, Central 1 hag ial
G. © Moore not out 10 BOWLING “ANALY#IS ©, Kaghill 60 not out, P. Goddard 2, pain troubles or money op gor N. Ireland.’
MF valle Philips b Brathwaite o , At Bank Hall Empire also got tmp, raitt Bes, a Be He RUIN FF a ure’ of empty Dachau
Li Lashley ec Price b Brathwaite 2 _ ion or ee Wanderers | rk. Mayeock.......... 3 1 5 6
Extras 5 who had score 5 runs on the;J. Ward. ; ee: See a .
—~ first day of play. Empire on the Combermere Second sane
Total 138 aries ganas : Mr. Taitt b, Matthews 2 WE WISH TO THANK YOU, th ti
es y scored 230 runs. Open- : ’ e entire
* Franeis b, Cox... 0
Rall of wickets : 17, ana1, 2-28. 4 ine hetamaen 4. Daniel hit 40 runs. Fields c. wk. (Kennedy) Bb. Cox '..” 0
-§1, 5—69, 6—93, 7-97, 8— - play was ended Wanderers | Harewood b. Cox 7 i ‘ ;
Re asn had completed their second in-|Méeveock b. Cow... 6 public for the very kind reception and
BONG ieee OR. w. Dings at 186 runs. J. Ramsey bat | i tushee ooo ;
L Partis .. » M if YS ted well to score 55. C. Beckles, | Browne bw. b Cox... 6 § enthusiasm given
Phillips 1 2) (OO * a medium pacer took four wickets | Lewis e, Kennedy b. Matthews 0 %
J Brathwaite ‘t 5 : 44 0 for 33 runs for Empire, Marshall not out i6
> 2 :
G. Piniet . 2 ii oe Leeward gained points for a oh wietrae,. vi WE ceraahdncto1 Sine 3 %
BARBADOS REGIMEN — 2nd inwin®® first innings lead over Central at Motel (tow okets) “46 %
3 Brathwaite ¢ & b Marshal! a7 Vaucluse, Leeward scored 165 OSE LE A RRR et a Se on % For Your x
R Price PD Ww, b Clarke 2 runs in their first innings, and BOWLING ANALYSIS 2 B
A enillioe stpd (Trotter) b Mar ear replied with 130 runs. In ‘ oO M R. W. 1%
sh: : gg their second innings Leeward de- | Matthews Bie: ae oe .
§ 1 not out ay . P 5 : s s
ite iee olen Sout 3 clared at 106 3 the loss of five |¢°* cw. ” a ae n % Enjoyment
Edwards c & b Marshall 4 wickets, L. O, Wood took three of | cox : idl: Baar 6 0 . ‘ . ,
Extras __* the wickets for 26 runs after some EMPIRE |v vs. WANDERERS at EMPIRE ) % e here, and would like to apologise for any
Total ior'6 wits) 114 steady bowling. At the end of | Wanderers’ First Innings meh SS ”
me —- play Central haa ncbred 82 runs | OMMt* Cares Raunepe nt Oe vB sain . ‘ inconvenience caused due to the non-arrival
soa iki eames or three wickets. J. Armstrong 1.b.w, b, C. Beckles.... 2 s, .
en At Lodge, Harrison College got |G. Skeete ¢. Sub. b. C. Reckiensi., 0 NGTHS SQUAR: Bots. Cocktail Onions %
a first innings lead after bowling | Pieree c. S.. Beckles b. C. Beckles 4 27” Wide 8x2 Yards » » Cherries % of our bottles and cases,
Traffie Do’s out [&dge for 103 runs in their |7 Sheqseman e. 8: Beokles is ” Stuffed Olives ;
a first oe ae ‘2 ey J. Remaay c, Beckles b. Skeeic .... 63 oe 3x 2% ‘ Tins Cocktail Biscuits $
second turn at the wicket declared | M, Clarke Lb.w. b, C, Beckles 4 é s %
No. 29 t 113 after losi | vi J. Patterson c. Gill b. Skeete 31 » Swift Vienna Sausages % re
cod « has Eating etthana poccea G. Patterson b. Downes, jewel ae 72” ” toes 3 x 3 ” + » Frankfurt Sausages ~ HOWEVER these are expected here within
re " ’ J. Pierce Lb.w. b, S, Beckles........ 1 ‘s ys "
145 runs for the loss of seven]}) ¢ox run out... ota’ 108” 3 x 314 ~% », Luncheon Beef %
TURN CORNERS wickets. ae College Wogme took | A. Thomas not out.. : 9 ” * 72 * % » Pate De Foie 3 the next few weeks, when we shall be in a
— y t 2. cxtras i
SLOWLY AND ee ee . see 3x4 i % , Potted Meat %
KEEP ON THE LEFT Bice IGR 90 Axe jpnings gents TA ~ * i 1 & } Pt, Tin Sasso Olive Oil S better position to supply you.
over Y. iC, a eckles , YSIS ~ . 8
Space made available by Pickwick in their first innings BOWING anya R WwW. ALSO DRY FELT UNDERLAY. | x a por Cheese %
scored 194 runs for eight wickets] S$ Beckles........... W 2 30 1 ; ie . ; »
CANADA DRY declared. in ‘reply to Y.M.P.C. | ¢ Beckles MPD. 2 38a Very pretty patterns and, reasonably priced, 1% %
for Safer Motoring. score of 90 runs. In their second \% pom PR Me ae iS e x e@
a —! innings ¥.M.P.C. collected fa | t Seen’. . om 2 % x
% >
&



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Full Text
eT

Be
a







ESTABLISHED 1895





Ki

SS
&

WU,
\ ‘}’ (7 7.



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14s*





American Appointed

Chief Of Allied Forces

In Southern Europe
Twelve Powers Agree

WASHINGTON, June 18.

‘THE APPOINTMENT of Admiral Robert Bj...

Carney as Commander-in-Chief, Allied Forces

in Southern Europe,

said here to-day.

was unanimously agreed to b
all twelve North Atlantic Treaty wees. c

There was no indication here, whether or not

Britain for instance had

pressed a separate nomina-

tion and withdrawn it for any special reason.
Officials emphasised that Admiral Carney had
not been appointed Supreme Commander, Mediter-

ranean Command.

An official spokesman in London
Said to-day that the British Medit-
erranean fleet did not come under
Admiral Robert Carney’s new
command in southern Europe,

But he added. “We might of
course, be asked to contribute
forces and we might well do so,
The question of the Command of
the Mediterranean is still open.”

Not in his Command

Answering questions the spokes-
man said Gibraltar fell within
Admiral Carney’s area, but did
not come under his Command.

“Command of Gibraltar remains
British and the same applies to
Malta. Admiral Carney may how-
ever ask for facilities at both these
bases.” he said.

He would have the United
States Sixth Fleet under him and
this was “a very big contribution”
to the northern European area
the spokesman said,

He explained that this fleet
operated not only in the Mediter-
wanean but in the Atlantic. In
another reply he explained that
nce country had placed any terri-
tory under General Eisenhower.
They had only placed various
forces at his disposal and given
facilities. There was therefore no
question of actual territory being
under Admiral Carney’s command.

-—Reuter.

U.S. Scientist
Resigns Post

WASHINGTON, June 18

The U.S. Navy announced to-
day it had accepted the resigna-
tion of Dr. Stephen Brunauer
one of its highest civilian sci-
entists suspended on April 10
“as a security risk”. At the same
time the State Department sus-
pended his wife Mrs. Esther
3runauer who was Liaison Offi-
cer on the United Nations Rela-
tions Staff.

The Navy said that Hungarain
born Brunauer, who had been
chief chemist in the research and
development section of the Or-
dinance Bureau had replied to
Navy charges but had not re-
quested a hearings,

Both Brunauer and wife were
among targets last year of Sena-
tor Joseph McCarthy (Republi-
ean Wisconsin) in charges of
Communist infiltration in Govern-
ment. —Reuter.





No Special Forces
For U.N. “Police”
Says Dr. Stikker

THE HAGUE, June 18

Holland will not earmark spe-
cial forces for service with the
United Nations “police force”
as long as other countries do not
Foreign Minister Dr. Dirk Stik-
ker said today.

In the memorandum on for-
eign affairs to the first Chame
ber of States General, he said:
“increase in the defence effort
under the North Atlantic Treaty
is claiming nearly all our re-
sources so that extra effort in
another field is not possible.

—Reuter.



THIS is the man who got away
FUCHS and his four fellow traitors

series of articles

Advocate, an



THE SIXTH MAN

by Chapman Pincher,
absorbing revelation of the Russian Atom spy ring





UK—WI Talks
Postponed

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, June 18.
Discussions between members of
the West Indies Regional Economic

Air Battles

oMeiais) “Stepped Up

IN KOREA

TOKYO, June 18.

American Sabre Jets shot down
six Red jet planes and damaged
eight others in two swirling ai
battles over northwest Korea Sun-
day and Monday.

Red jets came out in force ag
United Nations ground forces ham-
mered at threatening Communisi
build ups near the 28th parallel
Fierce Communist resistance all
along the front coupled with heavy
Red traffic hinted at the possibility
of the third round of the Rea
$pring offensive.. The Russian
type MIG-15 Jets were reported
more aggressive than ever before.

Far East air force said all U.S.

Committee and British Govern-|planes returned safely, A total of

ment officials

here in London on}108 planes were involved in

the

the future of B.W.I. trade relations|two air battles. Monday's was the

with Canada are unlikely
before Thursday it

should have begun Monday. This
had to be abandoned when it was
discovered that the
delegation would not be complete
until that day,

The new date was provisionally
arranged for Wednesday. Now it
seems that it will have to be can-
celled as B.W.I. representatives
will be wanting a couple of days to
meet among themselves and talk
over their plans.

“We can hardly be ready by
Wednesday” said Mr. Albert
Gomes leader of the Trinidad del-
egation to-day, “I should think)
we need at least a couple of days
to talk over our plans with Jama-
ica’s representatives headed by
Mr. Bustamante.”

Mr, Gomes and Mr. A. E.

West India} je

to begin| bigger and took the heaviest toll of
hu is now learned, | Reds.
The original plan was that talks|two were ng pe

Five were destroyed and
To Fight
Thirty-three Sabre
ts battled with 40 M.I.G's
from 28,000 feet down to tree top
level. Sunday’s air fight was be-
tween 20 American jets and 25
Reds. One M.1.G, was_ reported
shot down and six damaged. Both
battles were fought near the Man-
churian border.

Ground war stirred up strong
Red resistance in unexpected spot:
in the centre. Five Allied patrols
were turned back by a strong Red

Only gains reported Sunday
were in the east where front line
dispatches said Allies captured key
heights on the push toward the
strategic assembly area. Tightened
censorship forbade more specific

Barton, West India Committee| location.

Secretary were. among those at
London airport to-night to meet
Mr. Bustamante and Mr. Grantley
Adams of Barbados and Mr. W. J.
Raatgever of British Guiana.
To-morrow it is probable that
delegates will be received by Mr.
James Griffiths, Secretary of State
for the Colonies and when talks
finally begin they will be under
the Chairmanship of Sir Hilton

Poynton, Deputy Under-Secretary hs

of State.

No official information is avail-}@94 Norway — on the
able here concerning the possibili-| Northern

—(CP)



Can Mobilize
500,000 Forces
By End Of 1952

COPENHAGEN, June 18.
A survey showed that two small
tlantic Pact powers — Denmark
exposed
North

sector of the

ties of the British Government] Atlantic defence line of Western

releasing additional
dollars to permit the West Indies
to step up trade with the Domin-
ion,

But among delegates themselves
it is possible that there is a feeling
that their efforts to secure these
dollars will not be in vain,



Petain’s Life
Term Commuted

ILE DYEU, June. 19

Marshal Philippe Petain, 95-
year-old prisoner on the fortress
island was to-day too weak to
sign a statement saying he had
heard and understood that his
life sentence had been com-
muted.

The Ministry of Justice an-
nounced yesterday his life sen-
tence had been commuted from
life imprisonment to detention
in a military hospital.

The man who ruled France
under the Germans, will be moved
from Ile Dyeu to a hospital on the
mainland as soon as he is well
enough.

Meanwhile the fortress Pierre
Levee here where/Petain is de-
tained will rank as a hospital.

—Reuter.



the agent who managed
THE SIXTH MAN, a
starts in to-morrow’s

Canadian} Europe will

be able to mobilize
about 500,000 combat troops be-
fore the end of 1952,

Norway’s border to the Soviet
Union and Denmark’s border to
Germany are obvious weak spots
in the northwestern defence line.
Between them lies Sweden with
the most powerful army of the
European continent to-day west of
the “iron curtain”. But Sweden
fis neutral and not a member of
the North Atlantic pact. Accord-
ing to best available estimates,
Sweden can mobilize well-equip-
ped field forces of 20 to 25 divis-
fons, plus an effective modern
navy and airforce ranking fourth
in the world. Total strength of
Swedish defence forces is approxi-
mately 700,000 officers and men.
Denmark at the end of the year
will have a total military strength
of 230,000 officers and men, and
Norway at that time will be able
to raise about 200,000.

Costly

The yrearmament drive is a
costly experience for the three
Scandinavian nations. But indi-
cations are that all classes of the
Scandinavian peoples are firmly
determined to defend _ their
national independence and cultural
democratic rights.

Defence budget figures do not

_J alone indicate the burdens which

rearmament has placed on the
Scandinavian peoples. Their for-
fign trade is suffering to such a
degree that Denmark and Norway
‘yave not yet been able to abandon
fully wartime ration

By the end of 1952 the three
nations with a total population of
fourteen millions (Denmark four.
Norway three, and Sweden seven)
will have more than one million
well-armed soldiers to meet possi-
ble aggression from the east. Even
if Sweden << at present is still
minded to maintain her traditional
neutrality, it might be considered
a fact that Swedish military forces
will never be used against the
West.

—B.U.P.

7 On Murder Charge

SUMMERVILLE, Georgia,
June 18.
Two men and five women havé
been charged with the murder of
45 years old Miss Nellie Tucker
who was killed when pickets over-
turned a car carrying six women
to work at a strikebound textile
mill,



—Reuter.

TRADE STOPPED
HAMBUKG, June 18
Hungary has stopped her trans-
it shipping trade through Ham-

j burg, according to the Harbour!
i ( dz



ee cia vienitiiedeaiian



ommissior
mmissio

—Reuter

THIRTEEN-YEAR-OLD Cynthia Ga¥e from Barbados presents a boug
Grocers’ Hall in the City.. The Pringess opened a Congress of Empire

The Next Move Is
Up to the Russians

PARIS, June 18.

THE UNITED STATES, Britain and France left the
next move in their long debate over another four-power
Foreign Ministers meeting up t@ the Russians: Western
powers carefully timed. the lategt manoeuvre to make it
impossible for the Russians to take theie reply before the
French people cast their ballots on Sunday in an election
aimed primarily at cutting down the French-Communist
strength in the French Parliament.

Western Powers are still try-
ing to arrange that if no Foreign
Ministers meeting is ever held
the Russians will be held to blame.





U.K. Trade Union

, .

er On the other hand, however,

Worried Over Russians are using every instru-

}ment of propaganda to fix the

Rearmament jblame on the West, Deputies of

Sh “ the-four powers have been meéet-

ca BRIGHTON, ee jing here since Mareh 5—~almost

First indication that Crade| dcily—to work out ari agenda fot
Union leaders are getting wor-

their Foreign Ministers. At Fri-

ried about the extent and speed day’s seventy-first meeting, West«

of Britain’s



gramme came aia tae Sack |e" Deputies presented to Soviet
Tanner, President of the power- Deputy Andrei Gromyko _ three
ful 8,150,000 strong amalgamated |idemtical notes. ‘Latest Western
Engineering Union. notes in. effect askecl Russia. to

He told the annual conference | bd Deputies meeting here, accept |

4 partial agenda drafted here, and

of the Union here that criticism













et to Princess Elizabeth at the
Chambers of Commerce,

Kast Germany
Lifts Embargo

BERLIN, June 18.

West Berlin’s “little blockade,’
ended to-day when Bast Ger-
man authorities rescinded the
order imposing new restrictions
on exports from West Berlin to
West Germany, The order issued
on May 10 required west Berlin
exporters °¢o “lst on “loading
papers the origin of raw materials

used in the manufacture of ex-
port goods,
Western Allied Commandants

in Berlin started the self imposed
“little blockade,” by ordering
West Berlin authorities and‘ ex-
porters to disregard the request

After withdrawal of the order
Rast-West German trade negotia-
t.ons which West Germans broke
off soon after the order was is-
sued, were resumed at once

Goods had been piling up in
Berlin at the rate of $1,000,006
worth a day while the one way
blockade was in force,

Some West Berlin firms had
started to lay off workers.
—Reuter.

2 Guards Killed









about Britain rearmament could pamotelen ieee themselves eon
not be ignored. make e final decisions on the A 4 "

This was the first statement by | agenda At U.s. Embassy
a Trade Union leader on these Concessions Made HAVANA, Cuba, June 18
lines since Aneurin Bevan re- The latest Western note called Two guards were found shot tc
signed from the Government 6 a meeting in Washington July| death today in the United State:
month or so ago, 23, although that date might have| Embassy in Havana.

Bevah made it clear that re j}to be set back due to a lapse of First reports said one of the mer
armament was based on an un-/time, British delegate Ernest| was a United States marine anc
ittainable scale and would UN-) Davies admitted that the West|the other a Cuban civilian guard
dermine the social services {0F | had made ‘slight concessions to} A cordon was immediately throw:
ae = aga Party had/ihe Russians in. the last note.” around the building and officials
worked ‘for. years But Western delegate tood have declined to comment pending

He warned that an serious | , pri ; : Se ae
ieterioration of Britain's econo- |/itmly _ against listing either th investigation. d :

i. ate . . S Atlantic Pact or United State: Cuban police and Secret Service
nic stability would not weaken ? a, | aati annlaa clue
her influence throughout the} )S5°5 ape aa ste hao serie | Hien eae veer 4
vorld but it would enormously | ‘esa step that Russians would In Washington, police would no
strengthen forces of the comin-! certain to construe as calling | comment immediately, ;
form and increase the danger of | for Foreign Min decision One source said official reports
war. Although the ning of the] of the incident had not teen

—Retiter, | d¢livery of the Western note made,—Reuter,
obviously calculated to have the
we eee ee | best effect on French elections it .
Jeweller Arrested ite yonestea'ts fnve much] CHURCHILL LEAVES:
2 § otfe ie French people were
4 = 3 very apathetic about eae elec- THREE JETS CRASH
NEW YORK, June i8 |\tion ; eem uninclined to ge pet .

Two. New ¥ork city detectives texcited over oven ee ee BIGGIN HILL, Kent, June 18
arrested a former New» Yorkhtigm issue lot alone intern Honal Three jet meteor planes crashed
jeweller in Buenos Aires todaylynay ¢ rthermore the general ne re today, two an mid-air colliss
on a warrant charging him with | jablic ih ‘tther’ dountries as. well ions and the other on the aero-
the theft of $75,816 worth Of| se cegtrance has become rather| ome: Ali three pilots were
jewellery according to the Dis |, ynieal about ros ects ‘ { an | Riled. ‘
irict Attorney’s office oe + Big For } Se ae i Winston Churchill, Conservative

The accused man was identi- : 18 our meeting. ——B.U.F Party leader, had been visitin;
ied as Herman 8B. Sacks, 51, the aeradrome but left shortly,
who formerly had a_ jewellery before the jets crashed,-Reuter,
ousiness at 62 West 47 Street. BRIDGES DESTROYED

Disclosing. Sack’s. arrest As-| a
sistant District Attorney Skid JENEVA, June- 18.

Morgan, said that another count! Floods caused by violent rain- 50 BELIEVED DEAD

involving much larger jewellery |storms have destroyed bridges,
thefis was under investégation. | smashed . a hydro electric barri-
Sacks wag accused of stealiny|cade and swept away electricity
jewellery after it was sent to him|grids in the Val Dherens in
on consignment. | Switzerland
; —Reuter. | —Keuter

U.S. Seeks To Smooth
Out Persian Crisis

TEHERAN, June 18. |Grady has been urging both
American Ambassador Wenry| sides to keep”® cool. His inter-
F. Grady planned to meet ailing| cession with the Premier has

Iranian Premier Mahammed Mos-| broughy an extension until Tues-

sadez, Monday in a move aimed} day for British officials to reply
at lowering the temperature of|to an Iranian demand for immed
the boiling Anglo-Iranian oil| iate payment of 75 per cent of
crisis. Mossadez has just received! the Company’s profit
@ personal message from Foreig Finance Minister Mohammed
Secretary Herbert Morrison i Varasteh had threatened t
Britain expressing the hope that' break off negotiation unle
3ritis} Iranian negotiations « fund were handed over Sunday
the future of the Anglo-Irani Iranian Source said Britist
Comr a hok I gotiator f ”
. sed. would | x technical] * et th
C.P.)

IN TRAIN COLLISION

KARACHI, Pakistan, June 18
Workers Monday probed twistec

debris of a ‘wrecked passenger
train in which 50 people were
feared to have: perished.

The train, running between

Quetta and Lahore was in a col-
lision Sunday night with a wheat
train. Officials. said.thg list of
injured was very heavwe—CP)

BOMB KILLS THREE
NAPLES, June 18
Three children were killed by
a wartime bomb they found while
playing in a field at Acerra near
here.
—Reuter.

FOUR KILLED
NAMUR, Belgium, June 18.
Four workmeén were killed and

several injured following an ex-
h wrecked a gunpow-
i f t Jambes >

plo t hic

neal

Reuter

eS



PRICE: FIVE CENTS

Gaullists Sweep To

Top Place In Poll

PARIS, June 18

GENERAL CHARLES DE GAULLE’S PARTY

swept to top place in France’s General Elec-
tions today but could not break the overall majority
“third force’’ alliance which has governed since

1946.

Communists suffered heavily from the new
General Election voting law and with nearly all
returns in, had not many more than half the seats
which they held in the old Assembly, though poll-

ing the greatest number

Importation Of
Argentine Apples
Is No Real Risk

Webb Tells Commons
LONDON, June 18.

Conservative Ronald Russell
arked the Government in. Com-
mons to-day what ‘quantity \of
pples_ Britain was importing
under the Anglo-Argentine Agree-
nent of June 1949.

There was the danger that im-
ports of these apples in the early
months of the year will forestall
imports from Australia and New
‘ealand he said,

He asked whether these two
Dominions were consulted before
his item was included jin the
Anglo-Argentine Agreement,

Maurice Webb, Food Minister
teplied that the item covered ali
‘ruits.” There was no. specific
igure for apples. Australia anc
New Zealand were not consulted
‘bout it. But he did not think
(here was any real risk of !mporte;
apples from these countries being
affected.

This year, in fact, because of the
‘ateness of Australian and New
‘ealand crops and New Zealand
waterfront strike, Argentine apple;
had been welcomed and were in
very good demand, —Reuter,

Adenauer Ends
Visit To Italy

ROME, June 1?

German Chancellor Konrad
Adenauer ended his state visit te
Italy to-day with his second long
enversation with [talian Premier
Alcide De Gasperi.

De Gasperi accepted hig invita-
tion to visit Germany, and wil
probably go in the autumn
Adenauer later told the press con-
ference: “the Italian and German
Governments are at one in re-
cognising the absolute need for a
unified Europe,

He said the extreme rightist
who had “close relations” with the
Communists represented no peril
in Germany at present,

Germans also knew Communism
and the Soviets better than any
other people, and this was an
excellant deterrent”,

“T can state that 95 per cent of
the Germans living in the Soviet
Zone are anti-Communists” he
:dded, Reuter,

HOME FIRST
UNITED NATIONS, June 18.
India will not supply China
with any strategic war materials
because those goods are needed at
home, India told the United
Nations today,





—~Reuter.

of votes.

Observers here said voters wer
apparently not won over by the

Communists’ intensive ‘peace’ .
and “anti-American” election
campaign.

Semi-official figures up to noon
giving 565 results for 628 seats
showed: Gaullists 107 (23 fn the
old Assembly), Communists 96
(191), Socialists 96 (99), M.R.P. 77
(245), Radicals 85 (91) Moderates
100 (81), Others 4 (30).

Unofficial figures gave Gaullists
111 and Communists 99.

May Be Premier

Radical Premier Henri Queuille
whose coulition with the Social-
ists and Popular Republicans and
a backing of Moderates has a total
so far of 358 seats, may again be
Premier when the new Govern-
ment is formed after the new
Assembly meets on July 5.

The sixty-four year-old Premier
said today there were enough
Middle Party Deputies to form a
Government without a threat from

Gaullists or Communists.
“Government’s policy on the
international front has been ap-

proved by the people of France
and we shall be able to strengthen
our relations with other Demo-
cratic countries,” he added.

The electorates’ preference for
traditional methods was also re
flected im the re-election of al!
Cabinet Ministers and all but two
Secretaries of State.

Communist leader Maurice
Thorez, still absent in Moscow,
was re-elected with his second in
command, Jacques Duclos,

—Reuter.

*Quake Recorded

NEW YORK, June 18.

A moderate earthquake record-
ed at 5.50 p.m, today on the Col-
umbioa University seismograph
here was estimated to have
occurred 2,200 miles south of New
York,

Observatory authorities said the
Jisturbanee was 60 miles beneath
the surface. It probably took place
in El Salvador or Guatemala, Cen-
tral American Republics, they
added,



—Reuter.



SPAIN GETS SEAT

MONTREAL, June 18.

Spain was elected to fill the
vacant seat on the 21 nation
Council of Internations!l Civil

Aviation Organisation at the clos-
ing meeting of its fifth annual
session here today.

—Keuter.



THE “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS

DIAL 3113
Day or Night.






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»

PAGE TWO

RS. HELEN LILLIE LEARY
flew in from New York
yesterday via Trinidad to spend
a short holiday in Barbados. She
is staying with Mrs, P, Hewitt
Myring. Mrs. Leary told Carib
that she worked with Mrs. Hew-
itt Myring during, the war with
the British Information Service.
Originally from Scotlandyshe
has been living in the» United
States. for 12 years. There, she
works in tie New York office of
the Manila Times—the largest
daily paper in the Philippines.
She writes articles for this and
other Philippine newspapers and
also assists with Public Rela-
tions werk. She is also a repre-
sentative of the Manila Broad-
casting Company.

On Honeymoon
R. & MRS, JOE PLIMMER
who were married in Tri-
nidad on Saturday are spending

their honeymoon in Barbados.
They flew in trom Trinidad on
Sunday and are guests at the

Hotel Royal.

Joe, who was manager of the
Trinidad Water Polo teams which
visited “Barbados in November,
1950, is the son of Mrs. A. P.
Plimmer and a Director of Plim-
mer & Co. Ltd. His wife is the
former Gwen House, daughter
of Mrs. May House.

LC.T.A. Students

R. HUGH PAYNE and Mr.
Edward Cumberbatch ar-
rived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. Mr. Mi-
chael Nurse arrived on Sunday.
They are all Imperial College of
. Tropical .Agriculture students
They are on vacation. Hugh
will not be returning to I.C.T.A.
He has just finished the exam-
ination for a diploma in Agricul-
ture.
Pat Haynes, another I.C.T.A,
student is due here tomorrow.
Other arrival on the Trinidad
flight was Mr. David Lucie-
Smith who had been to Trinidad
en a short visit.

B.G. Dentist
D* JAMES FUNG, Dental
Surgeon of British Guiana
who left here to spend. a short
holiday in St. Vincent returned
yesterday by B.G. Airways. He
still has two more weeks in
Barbados before he returns to
British Guiana.
He is staying at Crystal Wa-
ters Guest House.

Week-end Departure

ETURNING to Trinidad over

the week-end after a short
holiday in Barbados was Mr
Aurelio Gomes of Stephens Ltd.,
in Port-of-Spain. Mr. Gomes was
formerly with Messrs Wm. Fog-
arty Ltd, in Barbados and B.G.



THE ADVENTURES OF



BY THE WAY

HAVE never claimed to be of

a mechanical turn of mind, If
put to il, I can sometimes wind a
clock or lock a door. But in all
pastoral innocence I ask, what on
earth is the point of “a device for
deearbonising eggs,’ unless eggs
are being used as some mysterious
part of the internal economy of a
motorcar.

You might as well invent a
method of sifting sheep’s wool
through a lantern or uncorking a
bottle with a croquet-mallet, or
smoking haddock through a
holder,

Expert Evidence
IVING expert evidence before
the Rhubarb Puff Commis-
sion, Sir Hardleigh Wright re-
vealed that experiments made
over a period of years with hares
had proved that tolderol had no
effect, good or bad, on any hare,
“but,” he added, ““we have reason
to believe that if we had used
mice instead of hares we could have
proved that the effect of tolderol
on human beings when taken in
small quantities in sweetmeats,
pastries or fish-lollipops, is similar
to that of tri-glucol, a substance
which turned the brown whiskers
of an old badger white in four
calender months.” When Cockle-
carrot asked if a diet of rhubarb
puffs made with tolderol would
turn brown human whiskers
white, Sir Hardleigh paused be-
fore replying. He then said, weigh-
ing his word, “No.” Asked how
Mr. Corker, proprietor of the Oso-
kozi Snack Dainties Dive, could
have known of the presence of
tolderol in his rhubarb puffs, a
Ministry official said, “The law is
the law.”

I Don’t Care
YPRHEY say that the Laban
method of notating ballet

movements, so that a dancer can
learn from a chart or movement-

DIAL 4220

“1 enjoyed a visit to tne
South Bank, but the wife
was annoyed—I spent all
day up the shot tower.”



London Express Service

Intransit
R. AND MRS. I. F. A. CHILD
came in from St. Vincent
yesterday by B.G. Airways. Mr.
Child is a planter, Their home is
at Grand Sable, St. Vincent. Mrs.
Child is the former Yvonne
Richards. For her the visit is a
holiday. She returns to St. Vin-
cent June 25th. Mr. Child is
intransit to Canada. He leaves on
Saturday by T.C.A. Meanwhile
they are staying at the Ocean
View Hotel.
Mrs. Child spent part of her
schooldays in Barbados and has
many friends here.

“Cinema Manager

ACK to Caracas yesterday
after a short holiday in Bar-

bados went Mr. and Mrs. Stan-
ley Day who ned been staying
with Mr. and Mrs. B. M. Dray-

ton,

Mrs. Day and Mrs. Drayton are
sisters. Mr. Day manages a chain
of cinemas in Venezuela.

Jockey Salesman
R. CHARLES PEIRCE and
Jockey Pat Fletcher flew
to Trinidad yesterday afternoon
by B.W.L.A for the Mid-
Summer race meeting. Besides
being q jockey Pat is also #
salesman at one of the commis-
sion agents here. Besides riding,
our jockey salesman will do
some business in Trinidad.

Back Home

R. WINSTON MARSON is

back from his two month

trip to the U.S., Britain and the

continent. He flew in on Sunday
via Puerto Rico by B.W.I.A.

score, is about to revolutionise
English ballet, All that I ask is
some new movements, such as a
pirouette on the elbows or a
glissade on the heels. And, above
all, the brouette or wheel-barrow
trick, with one dancer advancing
on her hands while another holds
her by the legs. Away with all
the thistledown stuff! To the devil
with your toe-twiddling! Let us
have great roaring ballets that
combine the fury of all-in wrest-
ling with the fooleries of a coun-
try fair. '

ta

Erratum
For “hat-sandwich” rea d
“Homburger.”

French Poetry
N Paris poets are trying to se:l
their poems from stalls in the

street. The way to do it is to
print an advertisement for some-

Artist’s Eyes Failing
HEAR with regret that
Wyndham Lewis, | brill

ia
British artist, is losing his sig

is

His eyes have troubled him She Likes Children,

for some time. When he painted
his second portrait of T. S. Eliot
in 1949 he found he had to move
close to his sitter to see what he
wanted. This rtrait ig now at
Magdalene College, Cambridge.
His first portrait of Eliot caused
a Royal Academy sensation when
the RAs rejected it in 1938.
Now Mr. Lewis “can no longer
see a picture.” %
It ig fortunate that Mr. Lewis
is no less a writer than a painter.
And he finds that by using a
dictaphone he can continue to
write as before. At present he
is engaged om a novel and an
art book,
Mr. Lewis is 66.
Reason
ISS DORA IBBERSON, Ad-
viser on Social Welfare to |
C.D. and W., leaves for St.
Vincent on June 25th. Reason
for her visit is to advise on the
organisation of the Fairhall
Children’s Home.
She will return to Barbados
July 2nd.

Talking Point

“THE weaknesses of women

have been given them by
nature to exercise the virtues of
men, — Mme. Necker.

Brother And Sister

R. TONY ALLAMBY is pack

in Barbados, This time he
has brought along his sister Ma-
falda who has come over for a
holiday, They arrived on Sunday
by B.W.1A,

Mafalda who now lives in Trini-

dad went to school at the Ursu-
line Convent here.

With Barclay’s Bank i
ISS DAPHNE GILL flew over
from St. Vincent yesterday
by B.G. Airways to spend a couple
of weeks’ holiday in Barbados.
She is staying with Mrs. Bourne
in Fontabelle. Daphne is on the
staff of Barclays Bank in St.
Vincent.

Arriving by the same plane was
Miss M. I. Minors who is here for
two weeks staying at Paynes Bay,
St. James. p

Legal Draughtsman
R. CLYDE ARCHER, Legal
Draughtsman of Trinidad re-
turned to Trinidad on Sunday by
B.W.1LA. after spending a holiday
here.

Incidental Intelligence
AN_ BERNARDINO, California,
has a city regulation whith
requires every clock in public
view to have the correct time or

the owner of said clock will be
fined.

—L.E.S.

PIPA

Crovegm P

9 Var Oras Int Amsterda

By Beachcomber

thing at the foot of each poem,
Nobody will mind about the
verses, if they can read about a
new “diet” or what-pot. Balthazar
Desgueux had the right idea in his
Coeur Chavireé: \
Toujours endormeuse avec ta
belle main pale... '
Quel chagrin ! Quelle horreur! |
Quelle tristesse sublime !

Mary spoils the children.

when the Royal Family
gether touring some exhibition or
show, like the Festival, the chil-
dren are

een Mary.
aa, inspecting everything, and Queen Mary gravely thanks them.
asking all the questions that chil-
dren would ask, if they weren't Queen Mary buys all the presents
shy.

Elizabeth
her advice

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Wonderful Queen
Mary

nt She Dislikes Nylons, Dogs and Young People Smoking
Theatres and Sitting in the Park

FOR nearly every child in the
world, somewhere there is a refuge
from mothers who scold and nurses
who forbid. Somewhere there is
always something nice to eat

For all Britain’s royal youngsters

that haven is Marlborough House,
home of Queen Mary.

Young Prince Michael of Kent,

her grandson, is a constant caller,
His
sure to be waiting for him.

favourite chocolate cake is

Just as Queen Mary insists on

knowing the likes and dislikes. of
her adult
gure that her young relatives will
have just what they want to eat

guests, so she makes

She ‘Spoils’ Them
There is no doubt that Queen
They,
n turn, find her far from dull and

old as they meet her in her sitting-
room surrounded by family photo-
graphs.

She is out and about seeing
so much that is new in the world,
and she always lodges in her
memory incidents and sights
which children like to hear
about. ty
You may have noticed ‘how,
are to-

rarely for away from
She moves along

Royal babies too have many

cpportunities for getting to know furry rabits, and rubber ducks will
Queen Mary. She is always calling bear new legends:—‘As purchased
to see how they are progressing, by H.M. Queen Mary.”

She takes a very loving interest
n Prince Charles and Princess
is also eager to have

A Favourite

As the young Prince grows,

Queen Mary may claim to have [If there is no sign of them, she
as great an influence on his edu- asks where they are.

cation and upbringing as she had of her ready gratitude for any -
en his mother’s.

Her strong opposition to any
form of relaxation from the old
dignified code of etiquette sur-
rounding the Court makes Queen
Mary take an exceptional ‘in-
terest in those highest in the line
of succession.

One of her favourite grand-

children is the Earl of Harewood
She was the first visitor to his
h

ome in London’s Orme-square

when his son was born recently.

BUT this frequent exchange of

visits between Queen Mary and
her young relatives is only part of
her life.

It is very unusual to find her at

Marlborough House in the morn- can still go on her Sunday after-

ings or afternoons and often, in

the evenings.

Misses Nothing

Round about the morning hour
when suburban housewives are
arriving in Oxford-street to do
their shopping the straight-backed
Daimler with the straight-backed
old lady inside is sweeping through
the gates of Marlborough House.

Queen Mary is on her way to
explore one of London's many ex-
hibitions.

Her taste is catholic, It doesn’t
matter whether it is a display of
agricultural implements, antiques,
or of exquisite needlework, she
goes from stand to stand missing
nothing.

The questions she ask are
legendary among exhibitors
.-,.and are often rather
dreaded. For they are not

mere polite inquiries; they are
sharp, shrewd, and searching.
It was out of such questions

that a disconserting rumour was Princess Elizabeth goes to tell her
born.

It began to be whispered
that Queen Mary is as acquisitive

as a squirrel; that what she likes, Sitting at home, still wearing her
she must have

Keen Curiosity
The truth is far from that. Sales-

men are perhaps too apt to mis- her children.

Dans ta voix j'entends le chant take her interest, and interpret it

matinal
De la chouette qui ronfle.

Visite St. Trophime.

Confort Moderne! Tennis
Réglementaire! Asile de Bon
Aloi! Chambres Ravissantes |
Ses Boues Adorables! Son Téleé- |
phone Exquis! Son Atmosphére
Tout Imprégnée D’une Aimable
Distinction! L’etape Des Gastro-,
nomes! Au Rendezvous Des Bons |
Viveurs ! {



~

Rupert and





Rupert
Horace.
friend
name's Simon,

kneels down to talk to
“You ask who my new
is?" he says. ‘* Well, his
As you say, he's a
simple of fellow, bur he's
rather nice and he's helping me to
find wild irises. D'you know where
there are any?" “I've no i‘2a.
4Ls RGUTS

sort

FIGURED WAFFLED PIQUE _
SRere JeSOAM Yeo
FLOWERED TAFFETA...
SILMIRA TAFFETA_

Assorted Colours including Black & White

YOUR SHOE STORE

fe
cdi
Cc ee
eae

i.
+
s

%



vi :

%,
%,
,
%,

Simon —H |
|

I've only just woken up, and | never
eat them anyway,"’ says Horace.
“*| don’t want them to eat,’ laughs

SLL POS

4

nie But his small pal has yy
walked back into the gorse bush,
so he runs on. For a long time he

searches. Suddenly he stops. ‘1 '
can hear a bell ringing. hat can |
it be ?"’ he whispers. = '
RESERVED }

$1.85
$2.02
$1.85
$1.40

EVANS & WHITFIELDS |

~ desire. Not so.



—_—_—_—_

OPPO PES FOE?

SOOO OPES ECCOEALLEL CELL CLL LLL:

The way she



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TONIGHT TO THURSDAY NIGHT
WEDNESDAY, AT
SATURDAY MORNING, AT 9.30

MATINEES ;

BUD ABBOTT and

DICK POWELL

“IN THE NAVY”

with The ANDREWS SISTERS

in



———



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READY-MADE, COCKTAIL,

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*

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Excellent Cut and Fit—Satisfaction Guaranteed
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35

——





PCOPOP OSS SS SOV SCO SST OPOF

JANETTA DRESS SHOP



ways with a holder. But she will
never smoke in public. And she
dislikes to see young people
smoking.

Smoking, indeed, ,is one of the
subjects on which she has strong
views. Just as she has on stock-
ings. She insists on silk stock-
ings; nylons she abhors,

LATE night trips from her home
are not encouraged by Queen
Mary’s doctors. But she horrified
them the other night when, long
after ten o’clock, she went to a
floor suite in the Savoy to see the
Festival illuminations. Doctors
= about the dangers of a
chill.

But Queen Mary just laughed.
Just as she did when she was first
confronted with her push-chair.

There were many confer-
ences about that chair, and
the gentlest way to introduce
it as a reminder of old age.

The royal wrath was feared.

Instead, Queen Mary studied it
from its pneumatic tyres to its
soft upholstery and then she sat
in it.

“It is quite comfortable,” she
{ said approvingly.

MARLBOROUGH HOUSE has
never looked more graceful or
pleasant than now. Queen Mary
has furnished it with wonderful
antiques, each with a little plate
attached, giving its history...

It is a charming home for the
upright old lady who. armed wiih
parasol and bag of peppermint
creams, insists on stepping out
and keeping a bright eye on the
world.—L.E.S.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

TUESDAY, JUNE 19, a
hey are 1115 am _ Programme Parade,
oe am Listeners’ Choice, 11.45
Report From Britain



QUEEN MARY
peers intensely into the inside of
the latest thing in saucepans; the
way she catches the hem of a
mannequin’s dress and, frowning,
feels the material, is just evidence
of the keenness of curiosity, which
has been whetted—not blunted—
by the years.

Nevertheless, flattered business
men will often insist on making
hasty presentations, for whicn

AF a
HM.

IT. is on these expeditions that

she loves to give through the year.
After she has gone, toy trains,

am

for the royal babies. The

12 00 noon

Gratitude News, 1210 pm News Analysis.
One of Queen Mary’s few in- 415% # Pm. — 19.76 m.
dications of great age centres 415 pm _ Souvenirs of Music, 5 00
round the gifts she makes. She P â„¢ Lancashire v South Africans, 5 05

pm _ England v. Australia, 510 pm
Interlude, 5 15 m. New Records, 6 00
pm Music Magazine, 6 15 pm. Welsh
Magazine, 6 45 p m. Programme Parade.

0—11 00 pm + 25 53 m, 31.52 m

700 pm The News, 7 10 pm. News
Analysis, 7.15 pm. West Indian Guest
Night, 745 pm. Generally Speaking,
800 pm. Radio Newsreel, 815 pm
Meet The Commonwealth, 8 45 p m_ In-
terlude, 855 pm From The Editorials,
900 pm Report From Britain, 9 15

wants to see her presents used.

A symbol



small favour done her are the
signed photographs of herself.
Queen Mary’s afternoons are
often spent in her favourite parks;
not the fashionable ones, but Bat-

tersea Park or Dulwich. She sits pm Music From Grand Hotel, 10 00
i pm. The News, 10 Pm nterlude,
for hours looking at the flowers. SAS: IR. An Sou Lake lic 1Oas out

“I think the flowers in Batter-
sea are the finest in London,” she
once said. Round her, children TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 1951
play and mothers sit knitting. 1000 pm. — 1015 pm. News, 10 15
Occasionally a small dog will yap A ies 10 29 ou Caribbean Corner.
and Quéen Mary will frown. She Kel
is not fond of dogs.

Afternoon Jaunt
Now the Festival Fun Fair is in
Battersea Park. But Queen Mary

Festival In Britain,

Cc BC. PROGRAMME





CROSSWORD

noon jaunt to Richmond Park,
where, as she is apt to say, she
often played as a little girl.

She has already made up her
mind about the Festival of
Britain. After she had been
pushed round in her shiny
plated chair she said: “It is all
very interesting, but I am
afraid it is too modern for me.
Perhaps I am too old-fashion-
ed.”

DESPITE her activities of the



day Queen Mary often visits a Across
theatre or a cinema in the evening. 1 many f poe is turned out o!
And her favourite places of enter-] 7 ius" fish, not the innkeeper’s
tainment are by no means all in ny Gpouse. 7) ; |
Joncerns the nose. (5)

the West End. She has a robust 12. Seems in retribution, (7)
sense of eee me ob us 18 Speak. Gr cined ? () nts te

The news of ndon’s nig ife ou wou e rapt in Ss. (4)

. ; , 1

always finds her listening intently. ° aN box has etriking possibilt
She likes to hear all the gossip} 18 Poain nina, oF & weed exter
about the fashionable restaurants} jy Shot cin (oh turt of

flowers. (3)
(4)

and the latest night clubs. She comes and goes.









5 od ‘ 22 Regret of all true penitents, (3)
And when there is a big party,| 93. Hes on the move. 49) ret
especially at Buckingham Palace, ha
1, What tree does the animal go to ¥
all about it. 2 Tree man appointed by the cit:
y the city’s
Often she finds Queen Mary rulers. (8) 3. Steerage. (4)
4. A very smal! hooter. (5)
out-of-doors hat—a foible of hers., 5 miner igre” SbF eneinger.0a1n
Grandmother is usually wens 8 Nothing rude here, (6)
a lot of jewellery, too—as well as . {t's sure nice but unsafe, (8)
To tas 9. Loyal. (8 5 |
lockets containing miniatures of] 18° [C3 Yerreshing ogy Pe (7)
a Sweet means of punishment ? (4) |
When she is alone, Queen Mary eae aoe ,
sometimes smokes a cigarette, al-] 1, “Mediocre: YUniverses 8 Stay TO.
Vault; 11. Granary; 13. Arrange: 16.
Tag; 17, Peck, 19, Amorpha; 21, Dilute:
22, Ghat; 25, Onser. wail, Mustard
2%. Borercaigs & Dia rach, 4, iy 2B 1
. tT; 8. Range; an; 12, Ra
14 Echo: 15, Skate; 18, Loot: 20. Pen

—



NOW SHOWING
4.45 & 8.30 DAILY

A

-
EMPIRE THEATRE

A new experience in music!

AT 8.30
PM

LOU COSTELLO

SES
EVENING, AFTERNOON

LLLP LLLP CLO



$64

WORKMEN

BEST TOOLS

Bench, Fore, Jointer



THE
PHILHARMONIC-
SYMPHONY *
ORCHESTRA aaa
OF NEW YORK Alama

A World Artists Production }

CO-OPERATIVE







PLAZA Siu GAIET

TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 1951

ee
- $666"
GLEE LLLP PLP PLL LLL LL

IMPORTANT NOTICE

“The undermentioned film companies wish to inform
the general public that the information contained in the
public announcement, purporting to be from ourselves and

signed by Keith WEATHERHEAD, appearing in the Sunday
/ Advocate of June 10th, was not correct in any respect; and
. that no authorization was given by us for such an announce-
ment to be made.

ee
%,

We wish to apologize for the embarrassment which this
erroneous public notice may have caused any exhibitor in
Barbados.

TWENTIETH CENTURY-FOX TRINID AD, Lrp.
L. E. Mittan—Manager.
PARAMOUNT FILMS OF TRINIDAD, Inc,
H. Donatp HunTER—Manager.

BOOP PPS SS

R.K.O. RADIO PICTURES (TRINIDAD) Inc. %

E. C, TeLrFer—Manager. S

UNIVERSAL PICTURES OF TRINIDAD, Inc. ¥

M. R. FerBeEr—Manager. a

MONOGRAM PICTURES OF TRINIDAD Inc. %

R. A. pe Sitva—Manager. ;

6550550000990 CS OOO OOOO OEE ALIN










(OAL 2310) P L A L A THEATRE -— \

BRIDGETOWN
Last 2 Shows TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p m.
Warner Bros, present - - -

THE GLASS MENAGERIE

by Tennessee Williams
with

Jane Wyman — Kirk Douglas
Gertrude Lawrence





















WED. & THURS
445 & 4.30 p.m.
arner’s Action
uble !
“BARRICADE”
Color by Technicolor
Dane Clarke, Ruth Roman,
Raymond Massey &
“PRAIRIE THUNDER”

SPECIAL |!
THURS. 2ist)
1.30 p.m
“SUNSET |
PASS" |
(James. Warren)

Arthur
Kennedy

and
“RIDERS of the RANGE”

reine (Tim Holt)
Trl. “MAD WEDNESDAY —Harold & “VARIETY TIME"'—Leon

Lloyd Errol

Dick Foran Sy Se” Tae















THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
Last Show TONITE — 8.30
“THE FOUNTAINHEAD”
Gary Cooper, Patricia Neal &

“LAND BEYOND THE LAW”
Dick Foran .

Last 2 Shows TODAY 5 & 8.30 P.M
“THE WINDOW"

Bobby ‘Driscoli” = Arthup. Kennedy rs

“TARZAN'S DESERT MYSTERY”
Johnny Weissmuller

WED. & THURS 5 & 8.30 P M
“STEP By STEP” (Lawrence Tierney)
“FALLEN SPARROW"

John Garfield & Maureen O'Hara





WED. & THURS. — 830 P M
“DICK TRACY'S DILEMMA”
with Ralph BYRD &
“CORNERED”
Dick POWELL & Walter SLEZAK









$995

POO

PPPPPPP OPP POO.
>

POPPPPE POPP POPP POOP SD

PPPPPPS SLL LS LIE

‘ > ’ x 7 x
GLOBE THEATRE %
TO-MORROW NITE — 11.00 O’CLOCK %
FAREWELL REPEAT SHOW y

9 ’ . . S

% T’dads Carnival Review %
A Ringside Seat at the world’s “BIGGEST FETE” 3

See CARNIVAL as it is played in Trinidod $

Pageants, Gorgeous Costumes, Calypsoes x

Pit 20c; House 36c; Balcony 48; Box 60c. x

%,

Tickets on Sale TO-DAY and TO-MORROW %
PPPOE EEE POPOL A AMMA A A A x



$|





: SOLSEELOELP ELLA PEAK AS Mo 08
: :
. \ x
’$ GLOBE THEATER
% TO-DAY, 5.00 & 815 P.M—LAST SHOWS >
“MYSTERY SUBMARINE” %

+

Marta TOREN ae MacDonald C\\REY %

s

TO-MORROW & THURSDAY, 4.45 & 815 PM. %
ABBOT & COSTELLO >

In x

“IT AIN'T HAY” %

And %

“HOUSE OF FRANKENSTEIN” ¥

% Boris KARLOFF & Lon CHANEY +
PSOOVOCCOS GOSS OSS SESS S999 SOOO
CDPD SPOOSODED SOOO SP OVESE OPEL D

PRESENTING A NEW STAR
Opening GLOBE June 22nd 3 & 8.15
This is Pier Angeli... Her first big M-G-M

picture ‘‘Teresa’’ is wonderful

M-6-M Ties

Presents
THE STORY OF A BRIDE

PIER ANGEL! + JOHN ERICSON

SPECIAL:
Free photographs of Miss Pier Angeli to the First 800 Patrons
on Friday Nite!
PSS

SOOO SSS SS POSS CESSES

ee





8



BY SPECIAL REQUEST

MADAM IFILL presents
STARBUDS OF 19351

at the GLohe Theatre Thursday July 5th 8.30 p.m.

Under the Patronage of
HON. V. C. GALE, M.L.C. and MR. E. D. MOTTLEY, M.C.P.

In Aid of the Christ Church Baby Welfare League Clinic
Orchestra and Box Seats; $1.00 — House 72c. i Sateen 48c.

Tickets on sale Globe Theatre and Madame Ifill’s Residence,
Hastings







EMPIRE |

To-day 4.45 and 8.30 and
Continuing

SEE .. MEET. . & HEAR
The World’s “—_ Masters

ROYAL

Last Two Shows Today
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

20th Century Fox Double—

of musit. Edward G. ROBINSON in
Twentieth Century Fox >
presents— “OUR VINES HAVE TENDER
“OF MEN AND MUSIC” ne
Featuring in order of their AND

appearance — Arthur RU- [|
BINSTEIN and Dimitri

MITROPOULOS conducting ‘THE OTHER LOVE”
the PHILHARMONIC-SYM- '
PHONY ORCHESTRA of Starring

NEW YORK AND OTFPERS Barbara STANWYCK





Today & Tomorrow
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Universal Big Double—

Michael REDGRAVE and
Joan BENNETT in. . .

“SECRET BEYOND THE

OLYMPIC

| Today Only 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Republic Whole Serial



“HAUNTED HARBOR ”

DOOR”
Starring
AND
, Kane RICHMOND and
‘ MASKED — RIDER” Kay ALDRIDGE



i a teen reienmnemel,

eal

—_

Be
'
i



TUESDAY,

Pei
tgs)

JUNE 19,

ee

To the first jockey who gets lost
in the dark from Manchester's

erperimental evenin
racing at the Castle
course.



horse-

1951



To the first American w
not tell me that.they p
trailers my size at the
Irwell

States.

Emigrants Crowd
Queen’s Park

EMIGRATION to the US. is keeping Queen’s Park as busy

as a bee.
in the Park vesterday.
Some of the men have

About 300 men and women spent hours

been selected for work in the

States and they brought their wives, sweethearts and
mothers to sign for the part of their earnings that will be
coming back to Barbados. They themselves were signing
contracts. They had six clerks attending to them.

Some others waiting around the
Park-had been selected but had
not been called to sign up. They
bunched at the Park House door
waiting to hear their names called.

Most of the people left their
homes without breakfast and so the
refreshment sellers did a roaring
trade. Water cocoanuts and bread
were the choice. The Summer
House encouraged two sleepers, as
usual, but two lads preparing the
cricket pitch could not relax that
much,

LOW PITCHED VOICE

called “Pass your’ book
please!” and immediately a man
leaning against the Government
Savings Bank’s counter was giving
an encaged clerk his bank book
through a cubby hole.

He headed a line of about 10
people who went to the Bank to
withdraw money. Each person
patiently awaited his turn. Those
coming in took their places in the
line wifhout any fuss.

The necessary subtractions and
entries were made at that booth
while the clerk sent them one by
one to another booth for pay-
ment. Not far from the paying
booth was a longer line of people,
some carrying hand bags and
others a bulge in their pockets.
They were depositing money.
Strangely enough, more /people
were depositing than were with-
drawing.

In the department, typewriters

were giving off a rhythmic
sound, silver was jingling as it
fell from the counter into the

educated palms of the clerks, who
all the while were keeping a
steady eye on rolls of notes. The
floor was strewn with torn up
forms which were badly signed,
Clerks peered into ledgers.

ITH BREAKFAST period

just a few minutes off, fire-
men were hustling to get through
with their morning routine when
the Advocate visited yesterday.

The fire engines were clean; the
brass sparkling and the water hose
as though scrubbed with lime. In
the case of a sudden alarm, the
crew just had to hop aboard and
“kick” Ue engines over.

A fireman, standing well at ease
and dangling a switch in his hands,
kept watch at the entrance to the
barracks. On his immediate left
was a table with a_ telephone.
The fireman who is doing duty at
the door receives all calls that are
put through to the station.

The clock pointed to 11.30 and
all the firemen—except the stand-
by man and the foreman—were
laying off the job to take their
lunch.

ERHAPS the most busy Gov-

ernment oflice from day to
Gay is the Customs. Clerks passing
warrants, receiving the reports of
whatever come into and goes out
of the island, typists—some mani-
pulating adding machines— and
other clerks searching into docu-
ments and ledgers all make the
Customs a hive of activity.

At any hour between 9 a.m. and
4 p.m., on office days the Customs
could be found as it was shortly
after mid-day yesterday. The
office is along the waterfront.
Shipping clerks were moving in
and out of the office.

But the Baggage Warehouse was
the complete contrast yesterday.
No passenger boats were in har-
bour, no baggage was coming in
or going out of the island. A single
clerk held the fort while porters
relaxed on benches.

‘WO STAMPS for six cents
please! Only seven people
were waiting for stamps at about
11.30 yesterday, and so the clerk
in the stamp booth was in no
hurry to attend to this call. The
seven people were however
quickly dispatched.

On a table in the Stamp Office,
are receptacles for water where
people posting letters wet their
stamps. So here comes the drill.

They bought their stamps, went



Good News!!! Your Favourite
CYCLES Arrivce!!

VELOCETTE

MOTOR

over to the table to stick on the
stamps to the letters and then
went over to the letter box. One
or two of them certified whether
they were posting the letter in the
overseas or local slot,

The clerk dropped the money
in the box and elosed the books
with the many different issues of
stamps.

The Parcel Post on the water-
front was even more quiet 20
minutes before. About four peo-
ple were going through the rou-
tine of posting parcels.

In the spacious department,
bags of mail ready for shipment to
England and parcels for many
other destinations were stacked
up. Some clerks were doing book
work and typewriters rattled far
in the back. Everyone was en-
joying the sea breezes,

NLY an occasional thud—the

sound of a lédger opened
back upon a desk—and soft foot-
steps broke the monotony at the
Agricultural Bank, Barbados Mu-
tual Life Assurance Building, yes-
terday.

On entering the office, the staff
eould be seen bent over books
with pens in their hands. The
Agricultural Bank makes ad-
vancements to planters of the
island. Friday is their busy day.
The Bank is now coming to the
end of its financial year and at
this time it is not frequented by
planters.

HE PEASANTS LOAN BANK
was at full swing at about
10.30 yesterday. Peasants from
various parts of the island queued
up at the office in Pinfold Street
for loans.- The number of the
crowd yesterday was not surpris-
ing because peasants will be busy
this month planting crops with
the coming of the rains.

Each peasant had to sign a cer-
tificate of loan. They next got
cheques which they eashed at the
bank. Only one clerk attended
them and so many anxious faces
kept quiet in the line. The bank
is like this every Monday, Tues-
day and Friday. After mid-day
yesterday, the peasants were al!
gone,

QUIET HUM went through
é the Old Age Pensions Office
at White Park around mid-day
yesterday. People, both young and
old, were seeing if .their money
tallied with the cards and passing
remarks to each other of some of
the current topics of the days.

The office was not hard pressed

their trailers ’way home in the

vho does |
ull little |
back of | 201
| As

hours

far as I'm



Tory Wants

LONDON, June 18.

Food Minister Mayrice Webb
was asked in the House of Com-
mons to-day why Britain paid
£10 more for foreign suger than
that from the British colonies in-
cluding Jamaice.

Webb stressed that Britain gave
a long term guarantee to Com-
monwealth countries which gave
security against a fall in price.

This year’s price was agreed as
giving a reasonable return to pro-
ducers. But Commonwealth sup-
plies were not enough to cover all
the British commitments.. Britain
therefore had to buy foreign
sugar at the open market price
which at present was above the
Commonwealth price.

Antigua Troubles

Peter Smithers, Conservative,
asked Secretary of State for the
Colonies James Griffiths if he had
any statement to make about An-
tigua. Griffiths said that feeling
on the island was running high
but there had been no serious in-

cidents since the troops arrived
there.
Smithers: “Is the Minister

aware that quite apart from trade
disputes the vast majority of West
Indians are loyal and law-abiding
people and wish to live their lives
in peace. Will he assure the
House that the West Indian Gov-
ernments will have his fullest sup-
port in taking any measures ne-
cessary to maintain the rule of
law?"

Griffiths: “Yes, Sir. I am equally
anxious to remorve the root of
the cause of these continuous in-
dustrial disputes and improve in-
dustrial relations.”

Lennox |Boyd (Conservative):
“Is the Minister aware that there
is a growing feeling that there is
not enough concentration on the
simple problem of maintaining
law and order, and will he tecon-
sider once more reorganisation of
the West Indian Regiment?”

Griffiths: “That is another mat-
ter.”

David Gammans (Conserva-
tive). “Can the Minister assure
the House that troops will not be
removed from the island so long
as there is any danger of a break-
down of law and order?

Griffiths: “That is a matter I
shall leave to the discretion of the
Governor.”

Lennox Boyd: “But this is the
second lamentable statement the
Minister has been forced to make,
and in view of the widespread
loyalty of the mass of people in
the West Indies will he not look
again into the question of reform-
ation of some of the loyal elements
in the West Indies who can play
their part in maintaining law and
order?”

Griffiths: “I think I am entitled
to ask for notice on that question,
It would be very dangerous to
assume because the people strike
they are disloyal.”

—Reuter.



Festival Of Britain

as most of the pensionersfor that~,

day had got their money already
and had gone on to their homes.,
Few pensioners were lurking

around in a shed built to keep the

sun off them when they assemble, ~
7THE LABOUR COMMISSION-~

ER’S Department was almost
deserted when the Adv0cate
dropped in yésterday. Most of the
clerks were out to breakfast. The
crowd of people who gather at the
department’s door almost daily
were in Queen’s Park hoping to
“get on the side” for America. The
furniture around the office showed
that there were quite a number
of clerks to return from lunch,

72 YEARS YOUNG
CHRISTCHURCH, N.Z,

“ He is too young to ride a
motor-cycle,” said a magistrate
here in fining a man for a traffic
violation. The 72 - year - old
defendant said he had been riding
a motor-cyele for 50 years and
this was his first offence.





—«CP)
HE CHOSE FREEDOM
LONDON.

A bridegroom at a marriage

ceremony replied “No” when the
opposite answer was expected.
He walked away from the altar
after commenting: “T choose
freedom.” Now the girl’s parents
are looking for him.

—(CP)

———





The New Model L.E. 200 C.C. is different from
Motor Cycle — in fact it’s the nearest approach to a motor car.

Water-cooled. Hand-Started,

and Noiseless.

‘Interesting—Marson

“After spending 2} months’ holi-
ay in Europe and the US.A.,
r. Winston Marson, Managing
Director of J. Ken Johnson &
Co., Ltd., is now back in Barba-
dos. He returned on Sunday
evening by B.W.LA. from the
U.S.A. via Puerto Rico.

He said that from the point of
view of the tourist, conditions n
England have somewhat im-
proved but everything there was
still expensive.

He saw the Festival of Britain
and found it extremely inter-
esting from every point of view
although it was felt by many that
it would only interest the scien-
tific minded.

He was particularly impressed
by the Dome of Discovery which
shows all the scientific advance-
ment in Great Britain throughout
the ages.

He spent ten days in Italy, and
was in Rome for the Beatification
of Pope Pius 10th. The cere-
mony at St. Peter’s was very in-
teresting and there was a crowd
of about § million people out-
side the square.

Mr. Marson also had a two-
week stay in France when the
weather was good, and an en-
joyable week in Switzerland be-
fore going on to, the U.S.A. for
a few days. Bs



the conventional type

Shattedriven

For SIMPLICITY, ECONOMY and RIDING PLEASURE

Choose a=

VELOCETTE

ROBERT THOM. LTD.

Courtesy Garage







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To “Syncopating Sandy” Strickland
of Boiten, attempting a record ot
non-stop piano playing
concerned
| place the award in his musical ear.

’ Caribbean Housing
W.I. Regiment Conference Opens June 25

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

To the lady
erpected

he can “What!

HOUSING EXPERTS from Barbados, Jamaica, the
Leeward Islands, Dominica, Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vin-
cent and Trinidad will assemble in Barbados for a Con- Washington)
ference on housing to be opened at Hastings House on the

25th of June.

The Conference has been ar-
ranged by the Development and
Welfare Organisation and is ex-
pected to last a week, The Chair-
man will be Mr. C. A. Grossmith,
O.B.E., Administrative Secretary
to the Development and Welfare
Organisation, Mr. W. M. Wood-
house, A.R.I.B.A., Building De-
velopment Adviser, will assist
him and act as Vice-Chairman.

The list of delegates is: —

BARBADOS :
Mr. T. E. Went, MBE, — Colonial
Engineer
Mr. T. Lashley - Secretary of the

Housing Board; and three observers—

Mr. M. E Cox, M.C P

Hon F.C. Hutson, ML C.,, and

Mr C A. Coppin, formerly of the
Department of Science and Agricul-
ture

JAMAICA:

Mr. Roy D. Lindo,—Chairman of Ja-
maica’s Central Housing Authority
Mr. Lindo was formerly a member
of the House of Representatives and
is well-known in business and the
public service in Jamaica

Mr E. N. Bird, M B E --Manager of
Jamaica Central Housing Authority

Mr D W. Spreull, A M P.T I —Town
Planning Adviser to the Government
of Jamaica and a member of the Cen-
tral Housing Authority

LEEWARD ISLANDS:

Mr. J. Knox, A M I C E —Federal En-
gineer and Chairman of the Central
Housing Authority of Antigua

Mr, Knox will also represent Montser-
rat and St. Kitts
DOMINICA :—

Mr H B Hetherington, O B E —Chair-
man of Dominica Central Housing
Authority and Senior Medical Officer
of Dominica.

Dr. Hetherington was formerly Director
of Medical Services in British Guiana.
GRENADA:

Mr C. Renwick,—Superintendent of
Public Works and a member of the
Grenada Central Housing Authority.

ST. LUCIA:

Mr. J C_ Rose, A RIB A.,—Execu-
tive Architect (Windward Islands).

St. Lucia will also be represented by a
Member of its Central Housing Authority
ST. VINCENT:

Mr J L Chapman--Secretary of the

St. Vincent Central Housmg Author-

ity
TRINIDAD :

Mr W L Osborne, M B E.—Director
of Works and Hydraulics; formerly
Director of Public Works in Aden

Mr H A _Littlepage—Chief Technical
Officer, Planning and Housing Com-
mission, Trinidad
A Medical Officer may also at-

tend as an observer on behalf of
the Trinidad Government,
Mr. M. S. Staveley of the Devel-
opment and Welfare Organisation,
will acl as Secretary of the Con-
ference,
Subjects for discussion will in-
clude; — a
(1) Survey of recent develop-
ments in housing in British
West Indies.

(2) Building standards and regu-
lations.

(3) Design, construction and costs,

(4) Building materials.

(5) “Self-help housing”.

(6) Housing finance, rents, man-
agement, etc.

The idea of the Conference
emerged from a proposal by the
Honourable Victor Bryan in the
Trinidad Legislature that there
should be a representative con-
ference of all British West Indian
Governments to study means of
relieving the working classes
housing shortage. In welcoming
Mr. Bryan's suggestion, the Gov-
ernment of Trinidad made the
proposal that in view of the pres~
ence of an expert adviser at Hast-
ings House, arrangements for the
Conference should be left in the













J. B, LESLIE & CO.

(J



- 7 al skin Palmolive's full
who, like most people, To the jirst publican who doesn’t utifying effect!
an old, bearded remind me that nearly all Br as + 4

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| thought you were



hands
Velfare

Following
appointed to report on the opera-
tien of the present Cost of Living
Index and, if necessary, to makc
recommendations for the adoption
of a new Index;

PAGE THREE








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Na PALMOLIVE SOAP

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This cleansing massage brings













London editors originally came
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o ae
®% PS. For bath and shower, gét the thrifty Bath Size Palmolive

MYCE si hae is)

Why, I
only the driver.”







~ RHEUMATISN!
ARTHRITIS!

Their terrible pain is often needless.

DOLCIN, a new type of treatment, brings prompt relief from pains
due to symptoms of these dread diseases, But more! DOLCIN
also has physiological action, particularly on metabolic procesers
which are a very important factor in the rheumatic state, ‘Tha is
due to the coordinated action of a new combination of acientitic,
atich octing ingredients,

DOLCIN has been tested thoroughly in hospitals and clinics. It is
being prescribed by doctors now! It has relieved the anguish ef many
of your fellow-eufferers with long-standing cases of joint-stiffness and*
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your condition may be improved,

Yet DOLCIN costs very little.



i\,orea War Is Run By
State Department
—HARRY CAIN

WASHIN:+TON, June 18
Senator Harry P. Cain (Rep.
said Monday that
the United States State Depart-
isent instead of military leaders is
!.anaging the war in Korea,

Cain is a member of the com-
ined Senate Armed Services and
boreign Relations Committee call-
ed into session Monday to decide
how many more witnesses to call
in the investigation of Genera)
Douglas MacArthur's ouster as
Picific Commander.

In advance of this session Cain
tola reporters nine who have tes-
tified thus far have convinced him

of the Development and

Organisation .



WILL REPORT ON
C.O.L. INDEX

is the Committec

Get it today—100 precious tablew

The Honourable’ Sir John that State Secretary Dean Achesyn| cost only 5 a

Saint, Kt., C.M.G., O.B.E., Chair- has more to say about vital SOLD BY:

man, “orean decisions than military BOOKERS (BARBADOS) DRUG STORES LTD.
K. H. Straw, Esquire, B.A., leaders. Broad Street and Alpha Pharmacy, Hastings.

B.A., (Hons. Econ.)
(Hons. Eeon.) — Economist, Uni-
versity College of the West Indies.

Acting Financial

King “Smiler”
Babies for THE BARBADOS

The Contest is n
GATE Milk Food, th
—Entries close

For entry forms and furth
n er particulars se
nouncements in the “Barbados Advocate” a write

THEY WILL BE WWAT YOU WANT
THEM TO BE- ON COW & GATE

The management of the Korean
wor remains in the State Depart-
ment hands with decisions made
on a political rather than military
basis, he said.—(€P)

Economist idle ingnidainsasinionicnsttintjennnialiiitenen





Captain G. J. Bryan, M.C

Secretary.

NEW
AMERICAN
AND
CANADIAN
LADIES’
DRESSES










Mm-m! 4:
nothing y
smells
so good

as a
good cup
of coffee!











They are the pick
of the Season,
waffle cloth, shan-
lungs and many
smart cottons and
art silk dresses.

“$15.00

nd

$18.00
@

—

THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE

BROAD STREET

Especially if the cup holds Chase & |
Sanborn, For here’s coffee as coffes 1
should be—rich, hearty, and satis- {
fying. Just sniff that inviting aroma = \
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Ask for Chase & Sanborn today!





ence tte tatiana tinae titel tiene ttt

Your money buys more

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nese

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invites all mothers to enter their
BONNIEST BABY
1951
all Babies fed on COW &
“The Food of Royal tabies,’’
on 30th September, 1951-—

CONTEST OF

an-

to agents as at foot:

FORT ROYAL

Phone 2385

CAR AT

GARAGE LTD.

LTD.—Agents Phone 4504

Sole Distributors

i
TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 195] |





PAGE FOUR oe i ie ili cas
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown The Sahara Desert Can MOEN IN DEFENCE

Tuesday, June'19$, 1951 4 ea
werming words must surely be “peace” and

“home”. It is, therefore, not pleasant, in con-
templating the state of the world today, to} {
realise that many many thousands of gentle: f

nan int glee wpe hearted people must again turn from their
In the Sahara Desert plants deliberately erode the soil cover- | quiet domestic pursuits and build up national
a i. : a - ing the and 4urn them | ee ae ae would then Siva water tess i the bitter, but unequivocally accepted
carry on their work of @is- WOU [htt hills where they had |. tk 7 in ed of
covering and revitalizing the 3 eee ene aa tcum In a region |Prospect which the women.of Britain and o
ancient system of wells and with a mean rainfall of six inches,|the free democracies as a whole are facing.
canals which made the region one acre of water shed by such tnt t new Defence Pro-
a rich granary more than devices can provide irrigation for In Britain, whose great ne
2,000 years ago.



Be Reclaimed

One-third of the surface of the
earth is arid zone, barren soil
which almost invariably is dis-
counted, and disregarded in any
discussion of how the multiplying
millions of the world car be fed.
“The deserts are on the march,”
is a prophecy uttered with fata'-
istic certainty that this is a judg-
ment on men’s follies—a juda-
ment from which there is no re-
prieve. But a third of the earth's



CANE FIRES REPAIRS

IN an island so dependent upon agricul-
ture and where that agriculture is based
so largely on the sugar industry, it is
criminal folly to allow so much of that
crop to be destroyed by fire every year.

The figures for the last three years are
evidence of this fact. In 1948 there were
89 fires destroying 659 3/8 acres of canes;
in 1949 there were 195 fires destroying





Advocate Stationery

(ialvanized Wove Wire

eight acres. In Tripolitania more | gramme will cost £4,700 millions in the next 4” MESH x 18” W.G. 2 feet





1,051 1/5 acres; 172 fires in 1950 destroyed murbsoat ty © than 200 of these ancient wells la ‘ i i
¥ oo much to discard, three years, women are once again, as In - # “2

i aan 2 ‘ have been .disgovered, out of the : : or 2 = x 14 oe ”
838% acres and up to the end of May this and if the deserts are on the march thousentetinineed t. More | World War II, facing up to their responsibil- ” S Cae Oo ee

nae a ne ee ee By RITCHIE CALDER than 100 have already been clean- |jties. There is no compulsion on women, as
a6 td ctioning @*| there ‘was during the war, for them to serve

thousands of square miles of @Mficiently as they did 2,000 years "
; - with the Armed Forces or the factories, yet

year 159 fires had destroyed 1,114 acres of
canes. Quite apart from the physical loss
of sucrose in the cane, quantities of cane

Galvanized Soft Lashing Wire

This world-scale problem lies into desert 280:

fires must result in rises in the premiums
paid to fire insurance societies, and the
heavy expenditure devolving on fire socie-
ties restricts capital available for invest-
ment and consequently lessens production.
It is a vicious circle, too little appreciated

the enemies of society who set cane fires.

or is the loss restricted to loss of sugar
Heat from
cane fires is sufficient to damage or kill
young canes especially when there is no

and loss of insurance funds.

immediate rain to follow fires.

But there is a further loss.

is produced in years of drought.

So serious is the condition to which this
wilful burning of canes gives rise that it
merits the closest investigation and a sub-
sequent publication of all the relevant facts
in order that every member of the com-
munity should realise the harm which is

done.

At present there is a belief that at times
labourers set fire to fields of canes for sev-
eral reasons. In the first place the canes
are easier to cut and the cutters can cut a
greater tonnage daily; secondly the tired-
ness of workers particularly women work-
ers, is blamed for the setting of fires which
seek to hasten the crop; thirdly labourers
are anxious to get back to their small plots
of land as soon as possible after the crop.

Cane fires also do damage which is not
intended. Fires cannot be controlled and
they often jump roads and consume acres
of young canes. This is probably the worst
effect of cane fires in Barbados. But there
needs to be a complete change of attitude.

There were occasions in the past when
cane fires expressed the spite of labourers
against owners. Today there are no such
feelings. A field of canes burning excites
labourers
already earn much money by reaping canes
and who seem to care not at all if the fires
Even when fields are burnt
by accident, little effort is made to prevent
In conse- °
quence of this attitude, hundreds of acres
of canes which might have been saved are

little interest among

are put out.

spreading to adjoining fields.

lost every year.

There is great need for educating the
sugar worker today. The worker must +
realise that the quantity of canes depends
on good rains and that no legislation exists
which can produce rain, It is up to work-
ers to avoid burning canes during years of
heavy crops and to save the land for years

of drought.

Everything in this island revolves around

a prosperous sugar industry.

The bigger the crop the greater is the

It is an es-
tablished fact that in fields where the canes
have been burnt the loss of trash for mulch-
ing-reduces the moisture content of the
fields and only half of the average tonnage

within the province of two United
Nations agencies—the Food and
Agricultural Organization and
UNESCO (United Nations Educa-
tional, Scientific and Cultural Or-
ganization). The first is concern-
ed with applying modern know-
ledge to soil conservation and
restoration to production of food
for the peoples of the world.
UNESCO is concerned with re-
search and was_ instructedâ„¢ by
member states to consider setting
up an international body to co-or-
dinate and promote research inte
the problems of the arid zone, Such
an undertaking would involve in-
vestigations going on, or required,
in five of the six inhabited conti-

nents. To get some idea of what
kind of research stations already
exist, what manner of men and
women carry science’ into the
desert, what they do or hope to
do, and what they need in the
way of international backing,
UNESCO asked the writer to make
a sample survey of a sector of the
arid zone. The sector chosen was
the classical deserts of North
Africa afd the Middle East—
“classical” because in this area
some 15 civilizations, cultures, or
empires foundered in the dust of
their own creation, and there an
opportunity was provided to study
what is, what was, and what might
â„¢

The assignment involved me in
a journey of 15,500 miles over and
across the deserts in Algeria.
Tunisia, Tripolitania, Cyrenaica,
Egypt the Biblical wildernesses of
Sinai and the Negeb, the lost lands
of Babylon, and the salt deserts of
Iran. It took a journey of a thou-
sand miles, or, in nomad meas-
urement, 40 camel days, from
Algiers to find the Center of Saha-
ran Research in the sand dunes of
the Great Erg. The Center lies at
the end of a trail which leads to
the great, white fortress of Beni
Abbes. Once this housed a regi-
ment of the French Foreign Legion
and a squadron of the Camel
Corps. To-day its “garrison” is a
group of scientists, field workers
whose “field” is thousands of
square miles of emptiness.

On the battlements of the for-
tress avFrench scientist enumer-
ated for me the following prior-
ities to consider in the problem of
reclaiming the deserts: (1) men
and their habits; (2) water; (3)
wind; (4) fuel, or energy.

“But what about the soil?” I
asked him. Above us reared “the
smoking dunes,” great mountains
of sand with plumes which looked
like volcanic smoke but were
streams of fine dust. Below us,
on the edge of the “Scorpion
Oasis” of the Zouara, a palmery
was so engulfed by sand that date
trees which ordinarily stood as
tall as houses now looked like
stunted shrubs. “The good earth
will not. fail you even in the
Sahara,” the Frenchman assured
me. He pointed over the parapet
to a garden and added, “That,
two years ago, was a dune.”

The garden into which I looked
is now an extensive experimental
nursery of the Center of Saharan
Research where desert plants and
trees are studied, and where food-
giving plants from other parts of

ancient agriculture
wastes. Of course climate is an
operative factor—low rainfall, ex-
tremes of heat or cold, violent
winds, and violent rains can, ol
themselves, fashion deserts. But
more than this, they can acceler-
ate the processes which men them-
selves begin.

On my first night in the desert
I saw something of the beginnings
of that process whereby Men can
turn agricultural land into desert
waste. Ahead of my jeep ap-
peared a succession of , shaped
in a semicircle. When we reached
the fiery ambush we scared a
shepheru and his boy—tne only
people for miles—who had merely
been following their normal prac-
tice of keeping warm in the
freezing night cold of the High
Plateau by setting fire to a grow-
ing bush and then moving on and
lighting the next and the next.
Whenever they find a large juju-
bier, or Christ’s thorn, they can
have a bonfire.

It is easy to take the desert for
granted and assume that it was al-
ways as it is to-day. But ancient
legend and history picture the
Sahara as once a forest area over-
run with elephants, lions, and
other wild animals. In addition,
soil surveys have confirmed the
historic fertility of the region.
And the French are already re-
claiming it as a large develop-
ment scheme which, by modern
machinery ang modern methods,
will grow enough grain to feed
al the nomads of the French
Sahara,

One of the most debatable points
about this region is whether the
climate has changed in historical
times. We have evidence from
Carthaginian, Grecian, Roman,
and Byzantine history that North
Africa was once a great granary.
We also have evidence that the
‘emporia,” the trading posts on
the Gulf of Sirte, established by
the Phoenicians and developed by
the Greeks and the Romans into
majestic cities, maintained a pros-
perous trade across the Sahara
into Equatorial Africa. If we ac-
cept all this as true then we must
also accept the fact that once
there was water in North Africa
sufficient for the production of
grain, and adequate oases through
the desert to feed and water the
pack animals of trading caravans.
some desert scientists claim that
the oases disappeared because the
water table dropped when the
climate changed. Experts working
in the field, however, insist that
the water tables dropped because
of the ancient predecessors of to-
day’s Bedouins who “killed” the
lost oases when they destroyed
the forests of North Africa. Per-
sonally, I challenge the view that
the climate has materially chang-
ed and support the latter opinion
because of the evidence of the
ancient water systems recently
found. All over North Africa and
in the Negeb wells, underground
cisterns, diversion dams, water-
holding terraces, and irrigation
channels built by the ancient
Romans to hoard the same limited
rainfall which the region has
today.



POCKE: CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

Curiously enough, deserts can
be crea by too much water
as well as too little. Mesopotamia
is, according to the rainfall charts,

an arid zone, Yet the desert of-

today was once an area so rica
and fertile that it has become
legendary as the site of the Gar-
den of Eden.

All the ancient water systems
exploited.
Euphrates, and exploited also the
fact that in the north the Euphra- |
tes is higher than the Tigris, and
in the south the gradient is re-
versed, so that the fertile soil
between the areas was irrigated
by a crisscross of gravitational

canals. The canals had to be:

hand-cleared of silt and, when the

bunds—the banks alongside—rose ;

to more than ten feet, human
muscle could not throw higher
and it was easier to dig new
canals. This shifting of the trri-
gation systems, and sometimes
the deliberate diversion of the
two rivers, not only left grea:
cities high and dry, but upset the |
rivers and led to the creation o!
marshes,

We cannot change the deser'| aim of Britain of manufacturing for defence

rainfall but afforestation can dis-
cipline it. In any event, the field

scientists in the Sahara insist that) er will be the last to be considered, Thus

they are walking on water. By
this they mean that beneath the
desert and sand at perhaps 10,000
feet is the “Albienne Nappe,” the
great water-bearing layer which
cutcrops in the Atlas and stretches
for hundreds of miles under the

Sahara—an underground fresh
water sea which has been proved
by a sinking at Zelfana near
Ghardaia and another near Gabes
in Tunisia. Evidence reveals
another underground lake stretch-
ing under the Lybian Desert of
Egypt and supplying the wideiy
separated oases.

To bore for water and to pump
water requires energy. To pre-
vent the nomads from burning
what is left of the trees and plants,
and hastening the progress cf the
desert, requires fuel. Fuel and
energy are scarce in the desert.
Paradoxically, energy is also
abundant in the desert, solar
energy. But the physicists have
not yet found a way to harness
this solar energy to man’s use
Another of the immediate prob-
lems in the desert is not finding
water so much as saving—that is,
from salting—water which al-
ready exists. Springs which are
palatable may contain a fraction
of salt. By a prccess of evapora-
tion and aggregation, this fraction
poisons the soil of the oases and
and salts the water that passes
through it. Cheap methods of de-
salting would be a godsend, in the
desert.

There are fundamental problems
cof research to be tackled in the
desert but most of the immediate
answers are self-evident. I be-
lieve that hundreds of thousands
of acres of desert could quickly
be made fruitful if the ancient
wells and cisterns were located,
cleaned out, and again put into
use. There is plenty of scope for
undeveloped countries, and many
projects which need money and
men and material. Babylonia
could become again a great gran-
ary. ran, in spite of its intract-
able salt deserts, tould raise not
cnly the standards of its own
people but probably help to feed

Tigris. and the} women, many of whom are taking their

| defence equipment, the call upon the woman- eee




































tens of thousands of them are serving as full-
time members of the Army, the Royal Navy
and the Royal Air Force. Hundreds of
thousands are working in the factories which
are turning over to production of equipment
j for defence. A large proportion of members
of the newly revived Civil Defence Corps, me
which are more than 73,000 strong, are also

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training courses in their spare time after
work. Additionally there has recently been
an increase in recruits for-voluntary, unpaid
service as part-time ovclicewomen in the
Special Constabulary, and in the auxiliary
| fire and nursing serv‘ces,

As more and more contracts are placed for



power of Britain grows more urgent. Al-
ready 700,000 married women are working
part-time in industry, and a very much
larger number full-time. The women in the
home will feel many repercussions of this
great new industrial activity, for the twin

PAINTS

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and export means that the domestic consum-

Britain’s homemakers are faced with further
, Shortages of things needed in the home, the
luxuries first, then house furnishings and
utensils, and even a greatly limited choice in
slothes.
SHORT SERVICE COMMISSIONS

Since the outbreak of the war in Korea
ind the announcement six months ago by the
Jnited Kingdom Government of its Defence
Programme, recruiting of women for service
vith the Armed Forces has risen steadily.
(he Women’s Royal Air Force, for example,
s receiving 50 per cent. more volunteers
every week than six months ago. In this ser-
vice, which like the Women’s Royal Army
-orps and the Women’s Royal Naval Service,
was integrated in 1949 as a permanent peace-
cime branch of the Armed Forces, a very
wide variety of trades, some of them highly
skilled, is open to women. Recently the scope

: F {
of their service was enlarged by the provi-
sion of short service commissions in the





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‘ighter Control Branch of the Royal Air
Force. This branch is the medium through
vhich all the active and passive defences of
Britain are alerted, set in motion and co-or-
dinated. Members of the Women’s Royal Air
Foree are serving as radio and radar
mechanics and as operators, as_ flight
mechanics, instrument repairers, fitters, elec- |
tricians, radiographers, photographers, air-|
eraft finishers and in dozens of other skilled
and semi-skilled jobs.





For best results, tie following instructions should be care-
fully followed :—

The Women’s Royal Army Corps, which |
has members serving in Singapore, Hong '
Kong, Germany, the Middle East and other.
parts of the world, reached a peak strength of
200,000 during the war and many awards for
gallantry and devotion to duty were won 2.

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TING”. Apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL” PRIMER
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its members. Its varied skilled jobs include ind Mauee Sen
that of experimental assistants in gunnery, in

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revenue earned by the agricultural com-
munity. That leads to greater spending
power, more profits and increased earnings
for people in other avenues of employment
such as the porters and labourers on the
waterfront and ships labourers, The tak-
ings in shops and stores are corresponding-
ly higher. In this way the entire commun-
ity benefits from the increased production
of cane and the revenue to the Govern-
ment by way of taxation and the cess from
the sugar sold to the British Government
at guaranteed prices are increased to the Oe eee 4 ior. ia
ultimate benefit of the same labourers who |{esert.. [also learned the sound-
refuse to put out fires. Cane burning pene of Sa mentee gel
should cease and every Barbadian should Dnat the. of deity, ge ‘definition,
make a special effort to prevent cane fires |should be water. Yet the scientist
and to assist in putting them out even when

they are accidentally caught.









the world, which might replace PAINTS, LTD., AND BE CONVINCED,
them, are tested and acclimatized.
There one could see the miracle
which can be worked by water ‘n
desert sand—the production of
oranges, tomatoes, potatoes, car-
rots, asparagus, onions, artichokes,
vines, oats, and barley. The gar-
den is watered by a foggara, an
ancient horizontal well which runs
for three or four miles-under the
dunes and maintains a constant~-
flow of water from these moun-
tains of “arid sand.”

the swarming millions of the In-
dian subcontinent. Egypt could
find additional territory for its
22,000,000 in its deserts. Israe]
insists that it could feed not only
its present million, but three times
as many, and the North African! teams at anti-aircraft practice camps.

granaries of Greece and Rome
THE “WRENS”

work on new weapons and ammunition.
Girls with mathematical qualifications are
serving as kine-theodolite operators who play
an important part in the training of gunnery

which they test, check and carry out zoe



AGENTS

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—_—_——_

# 65,6069 .
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proof of all these claims in the
recovered areas and in the ex-

could be restored. One can see
The Women’s , ice i
sasdeisamstal Sete: Royal Naval Service is the

smallest of Britain’s women’s services, but

What was can be. We can pro-
voke the ancient world to redeem
the new. And'if we are to feed
an ever-increasing pcpulation we] steadfastness in the war.
cannot afford to ignore the des-
erts.

its thousands of members do equally valu-

able work and served with equal heroism and

Never before in her history except for mili-
tary nurses, has Britain had peacetime
women’s services integrated with her Armed
Forces but with the need to deter aggression
there will be more and more scope for the

women in uniform. |
x

This article appeared in the magazine
section of The New York Times, one of
the leading newspapers in the United
States, The writer, a former delegate
to UNESCO and the Food and Agricul-
ture Organization, is science editor of
The News Chronicle and on the staff of
The New Statesman and Nation,

“Fine Press agent you turned

owt to be. haemo me arrive at

the very ween: the o08s of

ALLS t stew stiently aay
OM 9 eecvot wrisgion 7”



put it second to “men and their
habits,” because, he argued, it was
men, not climate, that had changed

ee



—_—_—







ne



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Our Readers Say: 3 :

Horrible Dictu : oe the first gentleman in ques- oe ane Toe Bets aontetts Night Club Worker call-slip to face _the examiners, an enquiry be held in the natter. 1 nee) eer ST, | FINEST
To, The Editor, The Advocate. : .<¢ that foreigners should be allowed 'o, The Editor, The Advocate Se Roger et Gent can eames vad 17.6.51 te SOUPS TY
SIR,—Allow me a small portion What baffles me in the first to stick initials behind their SIR. The Labour De. ®. | placed on the culprit or culprits *'"”" Heinz Soups \ QUALI
of your valuable space to men- place, is how these usurpers ever games, then run over to the land ‘ad - rd . ne Department responsible. Along with this mun Heron Bay Campbell's Soups |
tion a point which is badly in manage to be overlooked by the of great believers and admirers’ sinew” tae e Labour Commis- js an ex-police who has not leit To, The Edi Spaghetti & Cheese
need of remédy. I am alluding to Government. Does our Govern- anq f . merers sioner has made it known that the local force two months, yet 7,,Phe Editor, The Advocate. in Tins |
| ae t and occupy the most prominent only unemployed need registe ‘ink : $ . SIR,—In the Sunday Advocate] %& Cheese |
the recent case of the resigned, ment not examine their creden- positions in our service Pee . eister, he is issued with a call-slip also 4+ vecterday’ - Ha Baked Beans | FINEST
deported or sacked (I don't tials before employing them? If ; or words to that effect. Allow- and will be among those to leave Of Yesterday's date you published} __ Saked CANS |
know ‘quite which) master of this be so, it is high time the Another point, Sir, I daresay ®"¢¢S are also made for the on the 18th instant. He draws bg article on Mr. Ronald ‘Tree's CARRS BISCUITS
Combermere ‘School. Until re- Government did something about that if a Barbadian’ or even a S©#Sonally-employed, but I never a pension and runs a drive-your- ! cata Heron Bay, The article Cream Crackers FLAVOUR
cently, 1 remember seeing this it, for these are the men who are West Indian had committed so K"¢W that greater allowances self-ear business. Remember, the ns atk yy tne we a: Water Biscuits
gentleman on the Combermere supposed to impart to us the base a crime, headlines to that Wer made for those in good Labour Department directive Mr GA Jellie ny ag at on Cheese Biscuits,
staff and suddenly he—well, he knowledge for which we dearly effect would dominate the entire te een and enehe Le bee Pacer? with Shree in ‘Barbados Ge deees tne oo Assorted in Tivs Ask for
just_disappeared. pay. front pages of our local news- MOM aving this colony to- moti Pees 8s nem ; oe % Assorted in 141. Pkgs.

morrow. on (18th June) on a ployed will be given first choire {0m which the house was built,



“On dit” that this gentlérnan papers. However, in the case in . ; ildi “
was found guilty of the ica- Sir, this state of affairs; wotild question, the culprit simply dis- — ¥ help the island's un- in the event of emigration, and hee an ee Was erected by] % COFFEE |
ble art of forging ¢redentials. If not be half so regrettable if the appeared in thin air, witl ee weowowe, is Lo mnow many registered unem- ‘D6 Operulhion, Oo
this be the case, why has our inevitable fact that. the yorel of Sit that ua, & Pteprietor of two night clubs ployed for longer periods than R, W. BELL PURE COFFES IN
Government not’ taken drastic many honest unemployed 3. BE locar eae hae a se that oar clubs which do a swell busi- six months who have not, nor do 18.6.51 : NN SEALED TINS

a ; any ye arba- loce ress has a tendency to re- $ Sora i Oana heen te es ea F % .
stepe = eeriniperiog she tnatitey dians or, at least, West Indians, frain from publishing certain ey ee ae = ge gs a ree a hee onuee OP it [The Advocate apologises for | % oe. of | \
—— ios tajcams neo ~ ae debts equally = ae capable of oc- Such er mit does our Gov- would have found it more than dein in their present po ie Onn ee "whee anit gy marty Lipton’s
s =n steps 5 » eupying the offices held by these ernment actually prevent the os Bees eo a ; " tes save been caused to the Bell|%

why have these steps been so base usurpers, wefe not staring Pressmen from publishing same? Sioten. aed Mathiy ee et, ee 7 . eee ae re ne Construction Co., but when itt Pi SG, "White et bean
end secreted from the pub- us full in the faca After all, let Hoping | that our Government quired. by ae Tate Depart- ae ae - 3 eo . oe eee os Mr. Jellicoe] s ae ‘PHONE US

’ rs aT eatia , . a aeaeak e ee x art< ster- uilt” th a tee a ars s

I understand, Sir, that there is oe ee — a and ggg Along de | pants, ment. Furthermore, every mem- being among this same fot; he is necessarily: haan” that el % WE DELIVER —
another gentleman or are other __ ae: oe ee ee rere the staff of the” Labour well-known by the staff of the responsible for putting ever 2
pouiemen - pas ae who The fault of these occurrences LIVINGSTONE F. GORING. — ;.‘ eyed Set Well oat ae Geet oe te Weition. oth, block’ of stone upon an: | ‘% G oO D D A R D S

nave evidently been understudy- can He ir ly > place—viz: 13.6.5 . aman Bd : ag ile ata Sergei Ege .

in only one place—vi 6.51. fore when he is issued with w this department will offer, snowd Ed.] — %6:6966666665569969009 SOS OO SOG OOS POO D FOO FOF FOF


TUESDAY, JUNE 19,



1951

Speightstown And

lts Environs

SPEIGHTSTOWN, shopping centre of the Leeward
Parishes, resembles very much a small English fishing

village.
attractive gardens.
together.

Christian Mission

Dispute Will Be

Heard On Merits
On August 14

HIS HONOUR the Vice-
Chancellor will take evidence
and hear the Christian Mis-
Sion case on its merits when
hearing resumes on August 14.
This was decided yesterday at
the Court of Chancery when
the Vice Chancellor heard
counsel for the defence on a
preliminary legal point raised
by Mr. Adams, arising out of
the pleadings.

In the suit, Rev. Frederick A.
Barrow and others brought an
action against Rev. Dalton L. Hoyte
and others, Each is seeking a
pend in his favour as to his

ing Superintendent durin,
and 1950. a 20

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., associated
with Mr. J. S. B. Dear, instructed
by Hutchinson & Banfield appear
for Barrow. Mr, G. H. Adams as-
sociated with Mr. D. H. L. Ward
instructed by Messrs. Carrington
& Sealy appear for Hoyte, Yester-
day only Mr. Ward appeared for
Hoyte,

When the case was heard on the
last occasion, Mr. Adams had asked
for an admission that the Christian
Mission Herald had been out of
existence. He was arguing that if
it had been out of existence after.
Hoyte had been properly ap-
pointed, Superintendent, then since
notice had to be_given in the
herald of any me@ing fixed to
appoint, Hoyte would continue to
be Superintendent.

Herald Stopped

Yesterday Hoyte gave evidence
to prove that there was no issue
of the Herald since 1946, Hoyte
said that he had been appointed
in the meeting held in January,
1946. That was recorded in the
Christian Mission Herald of No-
vember—December, 1945, The last
issue had been in October, 1946.

Rev. Hoyte then showed from
the minute book of a meeting on
February 16, 1946, that there was
no equipment nor person to print
the Herald. Before that the Herald
used to be printed by Cole’s
Printery, he said, but he decided
to stop allowing the printing be-
cause they were getting into
arrears on the same magazine.

He said that in 1947 he was re-
elected Superintendent and a no-
tice was given through the week-
ly announcements to the 28
branches.

There was another bye-law, he
told the court, which governed the
position in case no Herald was
published,

The Vice Chancellor said that it
was perfectly clear at that stage,
following the ruling which he had



given on the previous occasion
that the case was then concerned
with whether Barrow and_ the

others or Hoyte and the others
were entitled to a declaration that
they were the Superintendent and
the Board of Management of the
Christian Mission for the years
mentioned in the pleadings.

The Court was not then con-
cerned with the claims as regards
the mission’s property, but was
solely concerned with the exam-
ination of the legal point taken
by Counsel for defence.

Different Case

Mr. W. W. Reece argued that
the case of ‘‘Prowst versus Foote”
which had been cited by Mr.
Adams as authority to show that
if Hoyte was the properly elected
Superintendent in 1946 he would
continue to be Superintendent,
did not bear on the case before
them.

That case said that if a mayor
was elected annually, he would
continue in office until another was
elected, But Section four of the
Christian Mission Act stated that
the Superintendent must be elect-
ed in January for the ensuing
year. At the end of the ensuing
year therefore Hoyte was no
longer the Superintendent.

Bye-law four dealt with meet~
ings of the Mission and a meeting
of the Board of Management was
silent as to meetings of the rep-
resentatives of the church of the
Mission. .

Each body was separate and dis-
tin® under the act and had differ-
ent futictions. The meeting of the
mission was a meeting of a
corpcrate body as distinct from
a meeting of representatives of
the churches.

The rules omitted to speak of
the meetings of the representatives
af the mission. This omiss.on
could not be supplied by the
Court whose function was to in-
terpret the law, and not to make

the law.

It does not however have the thatched roofs and
Its business places are all huddled
Its houses, in many cases of thr» sto: *vs, have
very little space between them.

Its one main road sas three
different names. From the
southern entrance to the centre

of the town it is called Queen
Street. Further down until it
reaches the Police Station it is
called Orange Street. Vhe re-
mainder of the main street is
called Sand Street. From Sand
Street, stretching north is Hey-
woods with its attractive beach
on which low hanging grape and
manchineel trees grow.

In the hurricane season the
sea washes into the main road at
Speightstown. When it retreats it
leaves sand and debris scattered
all over the road. The houses
along the coast are mostly in
need of repairs. They Mave very
little yard and in some cases the
yards need not be swept as the
in-rushing waves constantly keep
them clean.

Speightstown has its tradi-
tional blacksmith shop, This is
situated under a sand box tree
It is owned by W. L. Greaves.
The foreman. “smithy”, Chester -
field Maxwell, has been ham-
mering on the anvil in that shop
for the past sixteen years. He
is well known to Speightstonians.
The increased car and lorry traf-
fie has brought about a big cut
in his income, but he is. still
earning sufficien*+ for zis bread.

Watch Repairer’s

Fifty-four-year old Carlisle Cor-
bin is a watch repairer. His shop
is situated in a very unusual
place. It is in the same building
as the blacksmith’s shop. Fortu-
nately there is no likelihood of
the tools being mixed.

Corbin is the oldest watch re-
pairer in the town. He was re-
pairing watches long before the
other two watch repairers came.
The other two have up-to-date
business premises. It is now 25
years that he has been doing
watch repairing in Speightstown.

The Speightstown Police Sta-
‘tion, which was erected in 1939,
is situated on the left of the
“smithy’s” smoky shop. The Con-
stables at this station live as a
large family would. They have
their recreation room equipped
with a table tennis board and a
radio. There is also a_ kitchen
where they cook their meals.

In the yard of the Police Sta-
tion is a building which is called
the Fire Station. This should
have been called a Fire House
instead. It is very small and out
of date. The equipment of the

A



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



SOLDIER'S LIFE IN CAMP



A PLATOON from Headquarters Company of the
with Bren Gun group in the foreground.. This is part of the day's work of a soldier's life in

The Regiment In Camp ,,

ONE HUNDRED AND

bados Regiment including 1

St. Ann’s Fort.

Barbados Regiment in a “standing load”

position.
camp.



FORTY members of the Bar-
2 officers are now in camp at

These also include the members of the

Drums and Fifes of the Regiment who are in camp for the

first time.

The men went into barracks from Friday morning,
June 15 and spent the first two days settling in and learning
the routine duties of barrack life. They also saw a demon-

stration of

calls.

On Sunday, the
companied by
Fifes marched to St. Matthias
Church when the Padre Capt.
F. M. Dowlen preached the ser-
mon, The Police Band played
during the service.

When the Advocate visited the
camp -yesterday, one platoon was
practising for the annual musketry
course at the Government Rifle
Range, cnother was being taught
what action should be taken if the
Regiment was calleq out in emer-
gency to assist the Police and a
third was doing Bren Gun train-
ing while the Drums and Fifes
were hard at practice.

On visiting the barracks where
the men are housed, one saw a
elean building. Each man is pro-
vided with a palliasse, a blanket,
kit bag with equipment, washing
kit and eating utensils. In the
middle of each barrack room, there
is a rifle rack. There are also
additional tents for the members
of the Regiment and three mar-

ac-
and

Regiment
the Drums

Fire Station is a push cart with quees for meals.

hose and. branch pipes.

Oldest Baker
Alfred Payne is the oldest
baker in the town. His bakery is
practically an open air ome but
he has been running it for over 25
years. There is another bakery
in the town, but Alfred does a

good business. Apart from bak-
ing his own bread, he allows
people who make their home-

made loaves to bake them in this
oven for,a small fee. Speights-
town is also supplied with bread
from Bridgetown, but this does
not affect Alfred's trade.

Chureh Street, which branch-
es off from the main street, is so
named because one of the en-
trances .to the Speightbtown
Church is in it. This street also
has its many business places hud-

dled together. The road is ex-
tremely narrow and verandahs
of buildings actually form a

shade overhead,

St. Peter’s Church ‘tells every-
one in Speightstown the time. A
clock with three faces is built in
the steeple of this church. The
church does not tower over the
city. It is small but attractive.
It has very little garden but the
fences are well kept. It was built
in the eighteenth century and is
the resting place of many digni-
taries of the parish. On its walls
are many marble stones bearing
the names of Speightstonians
who had fallen in the’ various
wars, and others.

The entrance to the church
from Orange Street also leads to
the Vestry Rooms, On the othe>
side of the Vestry Rooms is the
St. Peter’s Girls’ School.

The Marketplace

The market place in Speights-
town is small. It is only a shed
but is regularly crowded with
fish vendors and sometimes
housewives from the City. There
is always a lot of activity in this
small market. When there is no
fish the people gather to chat on
various subjects.

Flowing across the town is
Salt Pond’ River. A beautiful
bridge was recently built across
this river. Its outlet is in the
sea but only when rain falls
Otherwise the river is satisfied
to remain without an outlet and
so resembles a lake.

A library, post office and As-
sembly Room are situated in one
building. Lectures are given in
the Assembly Room, and occa-
sionally the British Council, in

@ On page 7.







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Ration Stores

Cpl. Proutt is in charge of the
ration stores attacheqd to the
kitchen. Yesterday the men had
boiled fish, string beans, rice and
vegetable for their midday meal.

Camp life starts at 6 in the
morning with the Reveille; then
there is the R.S.M. Drill Parade
from 7—8. The men then carry
out training from 9—12.30 when
they have a break for lunch. From
2—4, there is further training, tea
at 4.30 and supper at 7 p.m.

Entertainment is also provided
for the volunteers and there are
games like tennis, cricket, basket
ball, netball, badmington and table
tennis. All these can be played in
the afternoon after 4.00 p.m. The
men can also go to Graves End for
a bath after working hours,

This evening, there will be a
film at the Drill Hall of the Troop-
ing of the Colour in London, on
Wednesday, the men will hear the
history of the Royal Leicester
Regiment to which they are affili-
lated, on Thursday evening they
will hear a talk by Col. R. W
Oliver on the various war experi~
ences he has had and on Friday
evening there will be the end-of-
camp concert when the Volunteers
perform on the Drill Hall stage.
Also taking part will be Professor
Monts from Brazil and Miss Alice
Armstrong.

On Wednesday, the Commission-
er of Police will be visiting the
camp in his capacity as Command-
ant of Local Forces and the Regi-
ment will carry out internal secur-
ity duties. Platoons will visit the
Gas Co., B.U.O.C. and the Elec-
trie Company to gain practical
experience in carrying out guard
duties, ul

Off to Seawell

On Thursday, the Regiment
marches to Top Rock where it will
take buses for Seawell to spend
the remainder of the day. While
there, Volunteers will see a
demonstrafion of the fire power of
a platoon and will also get a
chance of firing rifles, Brens and
two-inch mortors.

On Saturday, they will do a
ceremonial march through Bridge-
town, Leaving St. Ann’s Fort at
9 in the morning, they will go
cown Bay Street, over the Cham-
berloin Bridge, down Broad Street
and on to the Princess Alice Play-
ing Field where there will be a

guard mornting and learnt the various bugle

ten-minute break refresh-
ment.

The Regiment will return to St
Ann’s Fort by the same route, but
this time taking the Victoria
Bridge. It will march with its
Drums and Fifes in full dress.

On Saturday afternoon, there
will be a falling plate competition
and fhe camp will break up at
4 p.m.

for



On Murder Charge

Inspector G. Springer yestemlay
informed District “A” Coroner
G. B. Griffith that 65-year-old
Ruby Layne, a labourer of Rich-
mond Gap, St. Michael had been
charged by the Police with
murder at an inquiry which was
adjourned sine die held at Dis-
trict “A” court over the death of
an un-named child which _was
found in g pit at Richmond Gap,
St. Michael on June 15.

No medical evidence was given.
Cpl. Shepherd attached to the
Black Rock Station told the
court that he went to Richmond
Gap on June 15 and found 4
female child in a pit. This child
was sent to the Maternity Hos-
pital. The following day shortly
after 1 p.m. he went to the Hos-
pital Mortuary and identified the
body of the child to Dr. A. '&
Cato.

Layne was yesterday remanded
until June 25.

Aireraft Fire
ghters Training

The Pyrene Aircraft Crash
Tender is now at Seawell and
when not im use is housed in a
temporary garage alt the airport
The tender will be manned by a
crew of five. Their first job is
to learn how to operate the
vender efficiently. A crew is said
to be efficient when on arriving
at the scene of an accident they
can get foam onto a burning air-
craft in nine seconds, Maj. R.
Craggs, the Fire Officer, has ac-
cepted the responsibility for the
training and efficiency of
crew. They began their training
yesterday.

Foum is a comparatively
chemical used for aircraft firc
fighting. The crash tender can
pump 2,500 gallofis of foam per
minute for periods of one and a
third minutes. It can also spray
carbon dioxide gas (C02) at the
rate of 1,600 cubic feet per
minute for periods of one and a
half minutes. It can pump water

new

from its own tank, from open
water or from a_ hydrant, but
when working on aircraft it
would’ only use foam and—or
c02,

It cannot be anticipated how
long it will take to train a crew.
The length of time will depend
to a great extent on the men
themselves. Besides the practical
vise of the Crash Tender they
must learn how to approach a
burning aircraft, know something
about its structure — where the
‘gag tank, batteries, fuselage,
exits and escape hatches are
situated, and how to release
safety belts on aircraft seats etc,

As the majority of aircraft at
present using Seawell airport are
Vikings, Lodestars, DC-3’s and
‘DC-4’s it is understood that the

tender crew will first learn the
fundamental structures of these
aircraft.

UNIFICATION OF W.L.
CURRENCY WANTED

MR. J. W. PLOWDEN-

spends seven months every

WARDLAW of England who
year in the West Indies, told

the Advocate yesterday that he hopes there will be unifica-
tion of currency in these islands very soon.

He said that when a visitor
leaves Jamaica and goes to the
Bahamas, the Jamaican pound ‘is
difficult to cash. The same thing
also obtains when he goes from
the Bahamas to Bermuda.

The visitor has to buy a bag
of silver from the bank to pay
the expenses of the last day in
any of these ‘places in order to
leave without a_ single pound
note.

Mr. Plowder-Wardlaw who was

in Barbados for the last two
weeks, leaves to-day for St.
Lucia. He will also visit St.
Kitts and Antigua before re-

turning to England in September.

A representative of Watney
Combe Reid of London, one of
the biggest brewing firms of Great
Britain, he was for 18 years with
J. & R. Tennent. His hobby is
bird collecting for museums.

Cost of Living

He said that Barbados was one
of the nicest places he had visited
because of its bathing, good roads
and low cost of living as com-
pared with Trinidad and eyen
more so, Venezuela, Bermuda ,0!
Jamaica.

The proportion
bados and Trinidad he said is as
60 is to 100 while in Venezuela
it is as 60 is to 180.

The food here is extremely good
Normally in the tropics, the fish
is not good but the Barbados
flying fish is equalled to some of
the best sold in Britain and that
is saying a lot.

between Bar-









Pessy Sage
Shimmering
Nail Polish

ling scintillating exciternent to finger-nails!



; ha the richness of brocade.
it S¢ quins. There are six shades in this style
; your selection
i
a ’ ‘ ‘
} KNIGHTS
a

Can
with



)
PEGGY SAGE SHIMMERING NAIL POLISH brings a spark- |
(
{
(
}
{
t

Such Beautiful
Finger Nails

he Yours



Finger-tips now
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LIMITED

|
str

|

If anyone had asked him which
was the island in the whole Carib-
bean area where there was least
likely to be trouble, he would have
said Grenada because it is an
island where they -have an ap-
parently. happy peasantry and no
colour bar.

He considered that the ,lanters
in Grenada are very’ blame
worthy in not sharing the wealth
They have been 1eceiving enor-
mous prices in dollars for their
nutmegs and mace and have not
passed it on.

This has given Gairy his op-
portunity which he is undoubtedly
abusing in many ways now, al-
though he has got the workers
benefits which they should have
had long before. These workers
who have received additional
wages in these times of inflated
prices must however, be prepared
to take a cut in wages when these
good prices go down,





the )





Death By
Mi
Misadventure
‘Due To Broken Neck’

A nine-inan yury yesterday re-
turned a verdict of death by
misadventure to District “A

Coroner G. B. Griffith when hear-
ing in the inquiry into the cir-
cumstances surrounding the death
of 60-year-old David Skinner of
Yearwood Yard, Black Rock, was

concluded at District “A” Police
Court,

Skinner met his death when
he was involved in an accidem

with the motor car M—893 owned
and driven by Cuthbert Small o
Garden Land, St Michael on
Brighton Road, Black Rock or
Jume 14 about 5.54 a.m,

Dr. A. S. Cato who performec
the post mortem examination a
the Public Mortuary on June 1k
about 11.45 a.m. said that one o
the legs was broken. A large
haematoma was present at th
back of the neck. And there wa
haemorrhage to the brain. Deati
was due to a broken neck.

Cuthbert Small said that he i
the owner of the motor car M-89:
On June 14 about 5.20 am. hk
was driving this car taking Boyc:
to his home in Brighton, Black
Rock.

While on Brighton Road he saw
a man about 40 feet ahead of the

car which was being driven a
about 16 to 18 miles per hour
The road was clear. When the

car had reached about eight fee
from the man, the man suddenl
made a pitch across to the righ
just in front of the car and there
was a collision. He stopped the
ear and went back to the mar
who had fallen on the ground
The man appeared to him to be
dead. He telephoned the Police
who arrived and carried out
vestigations,

Mr. E. W. Barrow appeared i
the inquiry on behalf of an inter-
ested party.

LAUNDRY FIRE
Plenty of clothes were burnt at
Farold King’s Laundry at St.
S‘ephen's Hill, St. Michael, on
S-turday. The house was slightly

damaged.
by

Nothing was covered
insurance,





NEW ARRIVALS AT
WEATHERHEAD'S

From U.S.A. & CANADA—

Stillmans Freckle Cream

Barbasol-Brushless Shave
Hinds Honey & Almond
Cream

Cream of Wheat
Livibron (P.D. & Co.)
Dr. King’s Sulphur Bitters
Palmers Ointment
Palmers Soap
Flangetype Torch Bulbs
J & J Plaster
Klim—5 lbs.
Langle Liver Salts
Creamalin
Bronchial Cough Syrup
Nujol
Bristols Sarsaparilla
Evenflo Feeders and Teats
Noxzema Cream
Cutrite Wax Paper
Ponds Tissues
Moirs Chocolates
Neilson's Choolates
Dr. Chase's Kidney & Liver
Pills '

Dr. Chase’s Nerve Food
Dr. Chase's Paradol
Codol
Camay Toilet Soap
Esterbrook Pens

From ENGLAND~

Yardley’s Shaving Bowls
Lanalol (Solid & Liquid)
Prele Shampoo

J & J Baby Lotion & Cream
Skol Sun Tan Lotion
Photo Frames

Rizla Cigarette Leaves
Iradol A

Haliver Oil

Calox Tooth Powder
Malt & Cod Liver Oil
Brewers Yeast Tablets
Woodwards Gripe Water
Mars & Crest Bars
Curicones (for Rheumatism)
Mum

Ipana Tooth Paste
Euthymol Tooth Paste
Musterole

Palatol Co.

Photo Albums

Sugared Almonds

Bemax

Town Talk Polish
Morgans Pomade



BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

HEAD OF BROAD ST,

y

SHOT CLOQUE.

Per yard

$3.96

METAL

Per yard

$3.72

FLORAL SATINS. Really

36 inches wide.
Per yard

$5.18



|





in- a

a
a
a



Something special
you look the last thing in the latest fashions.
In Blue and Rose. 36 inches wide.

STRIPED TAFFETA. Excel-
lent for evening dress eic. We have
it in Navy and Wine. 36 inches wide.

beautiful
stuff. You’ll want some as you see
it. Rich colours on white grounds.

PAGE FIVE

cnet







Every sweet is
more delicious with

BIRDS

CUSTARD

MADE. From conn STAR

“CUSTARD

.
A*YECUALY covounto 6 Any




To make sure of unequalled flavour,
creaminess, smoothness be
certain your custard is Bird’s, For
as long as you... or your mother
. can remember the name Bird's
has been an assurance of unvarying
quality.
So when you ask for Custard, it’s wise
to ask for Bird's !

JUST ARRIVED a
PURINA CHICK a

STARTENA & GROWENAS
Obtainable from a

H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd. x

NEW SHIPMENT OF

SPARKLING
CRYSTAL GLASSWARE

FROM U.S.A.
Items received include :—
REFRIGERATOR WATER BOTTLES
Z » BUTTER DISHES
FRUIT AND SALAD BOWLS
COASTER ASH TRAYS
SALT AND PEPPER SHAKERS
VINEGAR (or OIL) BOTTLES
And Attractive 9-in. VASES

— WE ALSO HAVE —

JADE GREEN HEAT-PROOF
PUDDING & MIXING BOWLS

IN SEVERAL SIZES
BEING MERELY A TOKEN SHIPMENT THE QUAN-

TITIES RECEIVED ARE SMALL — MAKE SURE OF
OBTAINING YOUR REQUIREMENTS BY BUYING
WITHOUT DELAY.

HARRISON'S *04° steer









to make



Cave Shepherd & (o., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.













PAGE SIX BARBADOS. ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 1951









som : =| BOILS

â„¢ ? t rid of unsigh
BD) PIMPLES = Scnithes “tant “Gis
} them a speedy treatment with
medicated, a: tic Dr. Chase's
Ointment. Soothes as it heals. 69c.
| Large size, 6 times as much, $2.23.
7
DR. CHASE’S -

LOSS FINISH PAINT | ae
—- k a

|

|

SUPPLIED
















IN A

PL Wibk TAKE YOU
ALL THIS !






EXTERIOR
WIDE

}C it AM A GREAT LOVER |)
A
Wa

; gs

AND &



INTERIOR

BY CHIC YOUNG











., $
[ he ou OF . W. W.

Al bias eras
aD) oe" nae ae USE COLOURS rue ae Usha aed
Your BPEARAST if . se

: Ses aise
OHTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING

|
THE VERY BEST IN’ PAINT |

HARDWARE STORES






NOT AFRAID





HOLO ONTHERE! WHERE ARE YOU
ets MY HUSBANDS soe

SIMPLY GREAT

a to relieve ‘PERIODIC’

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Also nervous distress several days ‘before’

wo you suffer from monthly organs. Pinkham’s Com

cramps, headache, backache or only relieves this monnay pene
do you, like so many women, start but also annoying pre-period ner-
to suffer a few days just before yous, tense emotions of this na-
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restless, weak, dragging feelings— resistance against such female dis-
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Pinbeotee eee Lis E Reve reported amazing benefits.

ege e Compound Truk ¥

Ee Be oe, such symptoms. Pink oft cis ateye yaaa

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forting antispasmodic action on Lydia BE, Binkieate TAuLers
one Of woman's most important with added iron, ,

LYDIA E. PINKHAM’S Vegetable Compound

“Every Picture
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Picccd

Backache, Rheumatic Pain Relieved 2

BPs
va




~jardening, painting, odd jobs round the house can
be a pleasure again when you are free from backache,
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bago or common urinary troubles due to impurities
in the blood.

Why not get happy relief by taking Doan’s Backache
Kidney Pills, They help the kidneys to rid the blood
of excess utic acid and other impurities which other-
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* HALF A CENTURY of success in relieving ailments due to inadequate

r (%& : 5
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ono \
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kidney action is the proud record of Doan’s Pills. Grateful men and
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9, 1/3
wt DDOANS :





i IT PAYS YOU TO

——>








SPECIAL offers to ail Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only























Usually Now Usually Now

JOHNNY HAZARD Pkgs. Cream of Wheat (large) 70 64 Bots. Guava Jelly 42 36





Vv

NOW IT KNOW Wy I
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PROVISIONER... HMM. LET'S
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Tins Heinz Ox Tail Soup 31 28 Bots. Cocktail Cherries 82 72



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ae SCOTT &



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IT’S HERE!!
BY ALEX RAYMOND



OO [ REALLY, JEFF 2

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NEXT STOP UTOPIA AND
“THE

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HI. KID! YOU LOOK
UKE PEACHES
AND CREAM




















oo SS) eae | ae
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z LITTLE
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| y Proved Prell Shampoo more radiant — in hardest
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x *

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Prove Preil leaves hair




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SOO SSS LEP L FLEES SS ESSOS ED LLLP EOE LLP FO LEA OF?








TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

eee
~ "eo#























































































































































- cee " Seeacen Eevee enema
ie, | | PU N ] fi
' > 7
ASSIFIED AD S | PUBLIC NOTICES | PUDLIC. SALES FOR RENT |. PERSONAL
es Ten cents per agate line on week-days WASP
r , Minimum charge week 72 cents and on
ts pe t > ‘
TELEPHONE 2508 | Suimtum Talley a golly ‘cobeaan REAL ESTATE a er sntiee a ee Se over 24 The public are hereby warned against
es ae 3 a word wee cents al giving credit to y wif ISMAY :
alin aR and : eS 3 .
ie ; 1 ee BUNGALOW — A comparatively new | “°'¢ 0" Sundays. GREENIDGE (nee ATWELL) as I do .
For Births, Marriage or Engagement FOR SALE ‘Fae a. eae modern bungalow situated at the Gar. not hold myself responsible for her} MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW *
thames OPGELSir aay wubbar ot wands bedsecus Sit Sana ee poe Gebte in my hae ee any, cette Of) «ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED :
& fo any : > rm i r el t
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each ; ne charge week 72 cents and NOTICE Gas “installed. "Wee dete berets HOUSES ceeer signed by me. eee (M.A.N.Z. LINE) The M.V. MONEKA will accept
additional word, Terms cash. Phone 2508, 96 Cevis Sundays 24 words — over 24 contact W. We G : : A.N.Z, cm v. eee l es i
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death Words 3 cents a word week—a cents a PARISH OF CARIST CHURCH Pouce Sel or tac | peat ia8- Se One i ee maa GIEEMIDGE, S.S. ARABIA is scheduled to sa Serge: and Fassonges fof Porters :
Notices only after 4 p.m | word on Sundays. Applications on { to be ob me BUNGALOW — On the seacoast in St. wie Hall, Peterkins Land, | from Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th cat Snnene, Scares se oe
ites GRGe tee, -eeiimeeminnte ae Seieeaia Tiiae Wak MeeeRte En eet eed Sele 15 6 51—t fn. | James — Apply Mrs. Cole, “Athol Blair, ' St. Michael. | May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane 16th St. Bites. | Sailing . Wegay * Sem i
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow!-! es | tsa! Certificates will be received at = SEASID! mm - opposite Appleby, St. James. ee June, Sydney 23rd June, arriving at Trin- —
a , aths, wi c ¥ 5 E HOUSES at foot of Cleaver’s 26.51—. |_| dad during the latter half of July, anc
ice cn Rusk-daye end $1.80 ont Sundays! AUTOMOTIVE Senn: 00s sor. cae Ge snore Wereut| pepsiar wethanp taseh eae Teun ™ somone | siving “seed te cat” Wie enieee | Lica rune OO Rectedes’ and a Passongete da
Doagalct : Se nme aterm , . Ps ? ich at “ Rock” “CHURCHILL”, jaxwell my wife verpool. zo ard Passengers for St,
ior any number of words up to 9, and| TRUCK—One 1946 Studebaker Truek | Archer Gittens Exhibitions tenable at the| 1. CULPEPPERS HOUSE, standing on} bedrooms, basins in each, laianeaoees VIOLA SEALY (nee Ross) as I do not] In addition to general cargo this vesse! ene ee, meee
3 cents per word on week-days and}j. grst class condition, Apply W. H.| 2¥5 Foundation School. 2 acres, 26 perches of land and ing room. Unfurnished, from August ist! ld myself responsible for her or any-| has ample space for chilled and harc Bengers onl’ for St. Vincent, Sai Ar i
4 cents per word on Sundays for each| Ramsa’, Eckstein Bros. SORA og cumbenetee tn pee fee tre sree | or ue SES ome Sxtenstee view | Apply: Lynch. Top Rock. Te 505, ON€ else contracting any debt or dewts | trogen caro, , ing Tuesday 26th instant—-~= a
aeditional word, *| the candidates must have been born in| of the sea and delightful coastline. For appointments to view. _ 19.6.51--n 412 Hy name unless by a written order 0 accepted on through Bills of Lad : <* es
ELECTRICAL the Parish, or whose parents have been} The house contains closed verandah, —. | Signed by me. ing for transhipment at Trinidad to Brit B.W.1 SGHOONER OWNERS’ -
MARRIAGE 4 é resident in the Parish for three years or | sitting room, three bedrooms (with dress- FURNISHED AP. at Coral St. CLAIR SEALY, ish Guiana, Leeward and Windward ay
—_— obeaitbheibiemghebsieemns jonger and are in straitencd cireum-} ing rooms) one with running _water,}Sands, Worthing, with Silver’ & Linen Roberts Road. Islands. ASSOCIATION INC,” .
HUNTED PAYNE On June Toth las |. O8¢ ECHO-PHONE Commercial, Ama-| stances, and not less than 8 years or| kitchen, pantny, buttery and usual con-|Good Sea bathing. For further particu. Howells Cross Road : oN tern
: P. ~<—-On June 16th, wur Pocelying Set, Model E.C. 3 more than 12 years of age on the date of} veniences. Elect: . particu-/ 19 6.51—2n A For furth ti ~ 0
at St. David's Church, §Christ Church ectricity and Government | lars, Dial 8134. 9.6.51—t.f.n er particulars apply Telephone #047, i
john Wynphaup. youngest san of dar. ac }Fbene ea 19.6.51—2n | the examination, Water installed. Servants rooms and | ——scsse=emeumemntenemnmeeee | FURNESS, WITHY & CO., LTD, ‘
soln woe en et” '—— | The exhibitions are tenable for a| Garage in yard. No. 6 Swan Street, Upstairs premis The public are hereby warned against} T'inidad, ey
No f are RADIO: One it) Ten Tube General! Period of not more than five (5) years. 2. DENTS MONIR, sta ‘a ee ving credit > wit Bwi, ‘
George, to Marjorie Millicent youngest | piectric Table Radio $60.00 reply to Box Candidates must present themselves to| 27 perches of 1 , Standing om 1 rood | very spacious for Sample rooms. Ageuts, | #1ViN€ to my wite VIOLET BERYL an oft
daughter of Mrs. G, D. Payne of Hilda- | Picctrie Table Radio, ply (to Box | ie Headmaster at the Foundation Schou| gromnd tee and and erected on high |and others Dial 3466, 19.6.51—1n | SPRINGER (nee Clarke) as I do not DA COSTA 1. y =
ee ne weed Matava 51—1n, dae eas ne ground with view of sea and part of hold myself responsible for her or any- & CO., LTD., ADVERTISE IT PAYS og
19.6.51—In, — Gaianitintion uly, + at 930 a.m. for} coastline. ‘KOOM; One (1) Large, Cool Room |e else contracting any debt or debts er i d *
LIVESTOCK WOOD GODDARD. cae house bg onli cage a furnished or unfurnished at Bel Air, St. ae pane unless by a written order ‘wt “Viiv
———$———_—— ~ | 1 : room, three fone Michael, Dial 3663, 19.6.51-—2n. | * y me, |
ache ieees » 1ED ae COW: One fresh Cow pints daily. ee Christ Chasch, Shue a slartentonese “neotte it pee sw all unique, My Lacde fi anni '
Net gM ye on ege 4 ai| gg bn Lashlay, “Retreat ears 17 6 51—4n. Government water installed. hea culty Rosina ie go eee it Pandata st = Michael Cc My he: Z|
a e enera pita ec funera : ial SSeS ‘tion ; :
wall leave, ner late, residence, Hops |” HEiPmmoFivcs quarter Guernsey. four- ee ds cr cc atte for mat momen at Oe Steamship Co.
" a aac —' . four- 78. .6.51-—3n, ve :
fords We Pade paid at WEST mantle. anabr eanetont Adc NOTICE a ee properties will be set up for 9.6.51-—3n. Win tahiie eke Mabele waleee chdinek ;
tt. Armstrong (Husband) Senior As-| other 44 pts. daily. Phone 3978. ys © by publics competition, in separate! No 53 Swan and Middle Streets Up- | Stving credit to my wife, Doris Lashley, ""
iy A - ; lots, 8+ our Office, James Street, Bridge- ; nee Fields) as b do ysel Fil.
stant Teacher, St. Clement's B 15.6.51—3n PARISH OF ST. JAMES 2 anor stairs premises, 2 stories wth water | | not hold myself .
ae ‘eacher, St. ement’s Boys sa Wemiinntaan’\ toe. Sealey Exhibitions 3°%,"7,, °° Friday 22nd June instant, at lights and bath. i iate at responsible for her or anyone else con- wane
Erskiné; Berard’ (Sons) GOAT: One (1) Saanen crossed, in Milk | tenable at a 2nd Grade Girls’ School ana ” YEARWOOD Dial 3466 19.6,51--1n | ttacting any debt or debts in my name NEW YORK SERVICE . aie
A a re Apply: N. Daniel, Chase Land, Tweedside | # snd Grade Boys’ School will be re- aie unless by a written order signed by me. | 8.8. “SEABREEZE” sails 8th June Arrives Barbados 19th June, J96f., ~~
siieeey eer Gn aaa a ee 19:6 51—3n | ceived by the undersigned up to Saturday | 19 .51—10n . SMALL FURNISHED FLAT: Sullable CAMERON, MeNICHOLL LASHLEY, ¢ A STEAMER sails 29th June Arrives Barbados 10th July¢ 1981,
residence, Station Hill, St. Michael, | ~ MEC ” 2m See eet a ate for rye person, at Glen Roy, St. Law- A oe ar Mayers Land, sk
James Nathaniel Beckles, late contrae- © arishioners in straitened : 7 rence, For further particulars. ; 2 ae a eneeegenenetth steiairnsiata eateries ee ¢
a ';CHANICAL stances and must (1) forward a Baptismal AUCTION 8124, ee 19.6,51—In. NEW ORLEANS SERVICE a



tor, His funeral leaves his daughter's
residence, Station Hill, at 4 p m. ‘for One 1) SINGER SEWING MACHINE r — Certificate and (2) a Certificate £201 Ue) mmm x mmm | RE 5.8, ALCOA 5" 83 3
ud MACHINE jiead Mistress or Head Master of a THURSDAY 2ist at 2 p.m. at Ist SMALL COTTAGE near Married Will the Person who advertised some ; Pecan Mais ith Sune ast



Barbados 28th June, 196t.













































































































































































the Hindsbury Brethren .Room and} complete with Electric motor and li s ” 9 7 :
. ight | , : Avenu A : . time ago that he gives car driving} 5:5. ALCOA ROAMERâ„¢ sails 27th Juns Arrives Barbados 13th July, 1981
then to the Westbury Cemetery. 1, | ever been used, a bargain. Phone 8535 | Suter “tne school, > Melt SMES 19 | dovtle® rooted boarded ahd ahirale house | becroomh.* Water. ta sand Bhectrints | leeeone please write to Bax Y. Col SS ALCOA PATRIOT” sails 1ith July “Arrives Barbados 20K J:lyy 108,

s ; : ¥ : = , — — xogibeniahatagiias
Beckles (Daughter), Lisle, Oliver, Carlon, ag ee ere area P, H. TARILTON, 16 x 9 x 8 with shed roof 16 x 9 x 8 with | probably soon. Pleasant Cool situation, | Advocate. 38:6.Q.—18 ~ as a
Norma, Kenneth and Monica (grand .6.51—6n. Clerk: Vestry St. James. out offices. House adjoining above 16 x | Untw ed. Four dollars weekly — = .
children). ——"WRSCELLANEOUS CELLANEOUS 17.6.51—3n. 19 x 8 land gan be rented $3.00 quarter. Telephone 2949. 19.6.51—1n. CANADIAN SERVICE ee
‘Sore nhenfeenpati Linchsisailivslle aiomctacens annie inthe . ic , Auctioneer, SOUTHBOUND
HAYNES—On June 17th at. Woodford, ai 17-6 -61—4n. TO-DAY'S (i A. SONG

: , cifecvintiiaihaisatli ° Name of Shi ils Montreat Sails Hall:
OF an el ae Oh eee Pella: See tts ee Pr Dertens pone NOTICE Friday 22nd at 2 p.m. by kind per- |: LOST fi = . eo eae
Leila Jones | ahiciiguencsndiaipapeaenbdioneniniasarmesiendeenate-snmcimeasemane mission of Messrs. C. McEnearney & ton HOUR LEAF CLOVER S.S. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE” May 25th May 30th June 19th
SanneBonee GERBEAS PLANTS: Several Colours | PARISH OF GuRIST CHURCH | ea | GO Ttd. Twill sell at thetr garage 1 “r apt over a four leaf, 3 2 “ALCOA PLANTER” June 8th June 1th June Zist. . .
, -t plications on Forms obtain ymouth Seda: GLASSES—P. green ‘f er” 3.3. “ ‘OA PEGASUS” June 22nd June 25th Jub h ‘ o
im Phone 4717 19.6.51—1n ‘from my office and accompanied by‘ condition, eine oe pot oh tie aes at Sian Ciao Getttine an, “That I've overlooked before” he oe: oe uly 6¢ ~ a
IN MEMORIAM GALVANISED SHEETS Beet qualit Best quality epee ees will be coves Me Kenzie, Auctioneer. 17.6 51—5n.| Saturday night. Finder will po ta. ine dens a ... Sunshine” —
litaieeagied i; at my office up to 3.00 p m on Monday . “The other is..........rain"” NORTHBOUND
SMITH: In Ever Loving Memory of our 5 eine es foe ‘vas mane | 25th June, 1951, for one. or more vacant yaa Teentng seme Sieeaea “Third is the roses that grow in *S.S. “ALCOA PENNANT” due June 25th sails for St. Lawrence River Ports.
dear Florence Smith who died on 10 ft $8 40. Nett cab, Better Res Le Sine Weomans mee eC tenable EDUCATIONAL _— . the lane” emmmee- ently cunetbustenmasnmeiiid
June 19, 1950, : : * at the Girls’ Foun on Schoo! 2 “No need explaining the one * These vessels have limited passenger accammodatior
Asleep in God's beautiful garden, A. BARNES & CO., LTD. Candidates must be daughters of parish- | divers ahaa Rad Ly ore aa tiene remaining” ee ssen ge cammodation .
Free from all sorrow and pain, 4.5.51-t.f.n Jioners in straitened circumstances and WANTED Kindly return san to Adv ate ‘Gy a IT'S A GAS COOKER !
When. lifes journey is ended, | ~ GUN: One 12-gouge, 7 shot Purp Gun, | {han if years of age on the date of the tising Department. 19.6.81-~3n. el ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE
We hope to meet you again, eS a . : . an years of age on the date o. e COMB: a 6. . _— E as
Mire ‘lis Gilk USA), Bery |" # condition, Phone 8335 examination ERMERE SCHOOL. AP : onli} ‘
seen eae BR ’ arene 19 6.51—2n Candidates must present a to ‘OG de ae BWt BARBADOS. PLY:—DA COSTA & co., LTD. ANADIAN SERVICE :
vle, Mar renda 3 haa = ap teeenatn —j|the Headmistress at the Foundation - Graduate eacher in Co reial
Rawle, are ee Bend e aainas! | ZOFLORA—A powerful germicide frog- | School on Friday 6th July, 1951, at 9.30 | Subjects. Tote | CHANCERY SALE
(New York Papers Please Cop’) van: ine oe seueeene ee aoe aon. for examination, an ears in September, a Grad-
aw containing a small proportion o' is WOOD GODDARD, uate ‘eacher of C
19.6.51—1N | tyyaluable for spraying in the sick room, Clerk of the Vestry, Should hold the degree at GA ge Tig, Sacermentioned eccoer ty Will be'ert up for sale at the Registration Qifics,
in the Home, Public Rooms etc. On sale Christ Church, |B. Com., or B.Sc, (Econ.) Boece Public Buildings, Bridgetown between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and on the
¥ e ~ at all Drug Stores. 7.6.51—e.o.d 17 6 51.—4n. | in office routine desirable, and a know- date specified and it not then sold it will be set up on each succeeding Friday, 2°
Vv ACANT POST re ledge of industrial the same place and during the same hours until sold. Full particulars on application
“FARM” POWDERED FULL CREAM Caribbean would be an advange °°] to me.
an advantage.
. j MILK — S&S lity ‘ Salary Scale: :
Chief cine. Officer, MILK — Supreme quail ny land only NOTICE Srateate naies = aib~2000 = 00! pao HERBERT HUTCHINSON BAYLEY, Trustee V, LAVINIA LEWIS et ai on! . ‘
‘ocoa Boar Get a tin today from your grocer or “ ; —£610 pa. : that certain parcel of land (formerly part of Goodland Planta- ; . « :
Colony of ‘Trinidad & Tobago | 4-ux store and tay the best milk obtain. | , PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH Graduate 1st @:-2u4 Cita" Hono tion) situate in the parish of Saint Michael and Island abovesaid containing by CANADIAN SERVICE ¢ =
Applicatoba-are invited for tha able, The 51 family size is really | , pplica oe tee to be obtained | ¢400 x £20—£600 x £30 2720 pa” admeasurement two acres three roods ten and one half perches or thereabouts From Halifax, N.S. & Montreal
en e abili economical, Insist’ on “Farm” for the | {rom my trate peroripanied by bap-| "Position on incremental scale mute t to abutting on lands of Alexander Gibson on the Westbury Cemetery on lands of -)
vacant post of Chief Rehabilita-] sake of your health and your pocket. al certificates will be received at my | adjustment for War Servic: lec a place called Frolic and on a private roadway or however else the same is | —-#—-———~- a ih a acini o4
tion Officer, Cocoa Board If your dealer cannot suppl h office up to 3.00 p m. Om Monday 25th | recognised yi Tyce. and prevaqus abutting. } r Q x
. ee 14 ea® Pa supply phone | June, 1951, for one or more vacant Christ eer SEV IEw. ve UPSET P " LOADING DATES —
The salary will be at a rate in 2229. 19.6.51—t.£.. | Church Vestry Exhibitions tenable at the|, FOF # suitably qualified candidate a ae i
the scale ' $3,600—120-3,840-240- Boys’ Foundation School. : yacaney, is available on the following e ors igh a t ea \ Expect Arrival ©. j'T
5,760 per annum; the actual rate ‘i Candidates cat be eony of Perienior Teacher's Diploma (e Se 6.6.51—4n Registrar-in-Chancery, Montreal | Halifax Da Bridgetown, .
4 ding th ualifications ers in straitened circumstances and not], Pp a (or recognised equiy- “ s | Barbados
depending on e quailitic s [tess than 8 years or more than 12 years alent) £45 p.a. additional to the aboye | ~~ eae RSS ——— | 8.8. ‘“BOLYCREST" 6th June 1 June 27. so
and experience of the successfulj| yginimum charge week 72 cents and jf age on the date of the examination, scales 4.8. “SUNWHIT" +. 8 June | 28 June os ~~ =
applicant, Travelling and Sub-] 9g cents Sundays 24 words =< over 24! Candidates must present themselves for | e i e e aa. TOARHIEAS sa duly | 0 July 23 July e
sistence allowances will be paya-| words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a/examindtion to the Headmaster at the) 2 Required in September Graduate i AR tot es asics? ++ 18 July 2 July 7 August 77
ble at rates similar to those] word on Sundays, a ea a ee WY | Certificate apalsh and Latin up to School os . a X
: : ’ -m, dard, : p . “ “
approved from time to time for WOOD GODDARD, Graduate: Salary Scales for Barbados: U.K, SERVICE a4
Government officers. Clerk of the Vestry, Graduate:—£360 x £15—2£450 ‘ x =
The officer will be required to HELP Christ Chureh, | —£610 p.a, + @n,e From Swansea, Liverpool! and Glasgow
reside at the La Pastora Propagat- CHAUFFEUR; Experienced Chauffeur iene 2400 x 200 e lige ey Aa 7 et O Cc a 0a 1 10n 1 ie. sndtitbees :
at the La Pas : ne ai x 600 30-— I Swansea Liverpool Gt Yates, Bi Thee.
ing Station, Santa Cruz, where]to drive’ Private Austin A.40. First salbaiiens nmin canine ee | re kee Potion e o
furnished quarters are available] ¢!@8s references required, Reply to Box THE SUGAR INDUSTRY Z ‘ bs, “SUNAVIS” + OJune dune — 2 June 7 July :
for which he will pay as rent| &: Advocate. 19.6.51—1n de the erestaee ar ACT, 1943 SPEIGHTSTO npn teh erent hs i, io

‘ - e a ene pene ae ‘o the creditors holding specialty liens , WN : . “

10% of his salary plus 5% per| COOK GENERAL: Apply to Mrs. Seatiat Haymans and Warleigh Planta- VIENNA, Austria, June 18, U.K. & CONTINENTAL SERVICE . ve
si he ve 0 nia | Lisle ilev, 4 y s i SE: , . ,

genase of the value of the farni-| Lisle Bailey, ‘The “Pavillion, Hastings: | toms, St. Peter @ From page 5. POLITICAL LEADERS have shown no inclination to Expected Arpival vas =
"Candidates ‘ghoul jive. atitlti~|- eae frmmn phe Piaaee e kaces | Chee ee Sawa ete about te an effort to enlighten Speights-| Scrap the oldest Government Coalition despite the upset SON eee ee hedaT AT

« 8 s —— f; - 2ST, ours | Oo in a loan oF A under e pro- | tonians’ . | i j j 3. “SU “ y ver 28 . vi
ad's yond attended of edGcation; -pirday, ce EATS THURS ck Tene Letina the knotaT mek ceatont aie ae show films there, victory in the recent Presidential elections, by the hitherto] *" “SUNRAY’ tune 20 dus 28 June 14 July, ae

sess exccutiv ili keeping, Apply Advocate Box M. c/9/said Plantation, in respect of the Agri- e is one gas station and a minority Socialists. SSE eT et an ee eet "he ss
possess executive ability and have Advocate with full particulars. cultural year 1951 to 1952 small cinema which resembl y *

; os . ‘ « cate Ww y 6 a a . iti . . “
had wide agricultural experience. Seen TAS ONO, LNG money has bees Haekowed ‘ander |inissioe house, vA’ sthall pit The present Coalition of the Conservative People’s Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703 *
able but not enventia"" «-| ~~ MHISGRELANEOUS |Site sctst fo cts mur’ ob “in| coe Plant wee recent, opene] asia anes December 20 1005 OT POWeE O°CUB a
é ; : sees : ' ; . Two jetties are used to shi ustria since December 20, 1945 peri : "
Duties. of the post are: — Sha Soren ~~. _| respect of such year, Dp ‘ eS a oak le Se We i
; vr on aa area reer Dated this 19th day of June, 1951.) Sugar. : President-Elect Ex-Imperial 3
(i) to‘assume responsibility for! RAGS: Clean Old Rag. Delivered to R. CHALLENOR and A fisherman who casts his net all|/General, 78 ar old Sociall t a
all cacao propagating work, and] Advocate Press Room Dept. T. A. GITTENS, Trustees.| along the from St, James (Th : ue ” Indi Get Grai
management of all Propagating 17.6.51—t.f.n. per C. R, PACKER, coast from St. James|Theodor Koerner will be sworn ta 8 rain
Stations (under the immediate] RoARDERS—an » Cool Airy Country Attorney, [tO aS far up as Heywoods, sup-finto office Thursday, June 21 and A COOL Shoe
supervision of the Chief Scientific] like district, on the Bus line, not far 19.6.51—3n,| plies residents with sprats and|the Government immediately will CANBERRA, June 15.
Officer of the Department of! trom town. ‘Rates Moderste, Apply Box + frays when there is a meat or}resign. Negotiations as to the shape] Australia is to send Indi:
Tarenbues). XX. c/o Advocate Co. 16.6,51—2n. NOFICE fish shortage. There are alsolof the new cabinet are now being] £4,200,000 (Australian) worth o! for a HOT Day
(ii) To receive all applications PARISH OF BT. PETER ecg fishermen who build large|conducted, but it is believed that] grain, mainly wheat, Externa
sh pots. Government’s lineup will remain] Affairs Minister Richard Case)



for subsidy grants under the
Cocoa Subsidy Scheme and to
initiate their investigation.

(iii) To control both the office

Parochial Treasurer’s office will NOT i
ANNOUNCEMENTS be opened on Saturday, 23rd June, but There is also the Boys’ Club
will be open on Tuesday 2Ist and Fri-}and the Alexandra School with

Wed y 20th, 8 is} j
GLADIOLI BULBS: Orders being booked ay ery oth, Thursday ist and Fri-)its attractive gardens,

almost exactly the same as now! announced to-day. The grain wi'/
with seven Peoples Party and six!be part of Australia’s contribu e
Socialist Ministers. tion under the Colombo Plan fo































































z 5 staff saged on they] for importation of these bulbs delivery (Signed) G. S. CORBIN, Speigihtstown, with onl a i ‘ ve
ae Per ee M Oooa sane Bia ee early January, 1992. Apply: T. Geddes wreearochisl Treasurer. '| main _ road, is still the Tain As a result of the October, 1949 Serine Suet aati for a yeu |) it 8
(iv) To certify vouchers for ; . 19.5.51—3n,| shopping centre of the Leeward |eélections the People’s Party has 77 The Minister ’ adiiad +h ; Ladies! See our
expenditure incurred on behalf of] Why not give your floors that new parishes. It is at its peak period |seats in Parliament, Socialists 67 Pakist 1d Ps as
she Cocéa Board look? Have them sanded by the Nu-Floor | NOTICE on Saturdays. League of Independents 16 and stan | wou receive goods |, latest Styles
: = a] | Method. Call Evelyn, Roach & Co., Ltd. + PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH Communists five worth £2,000,000 (Australian) |, ‘ ty
(v) To supervise the general} ag, 19.6.51—2n. » Sealed tenders, marked on the envelope and Ceylon £300,000 (Australian)
field progress of the Cocoa Subsidy | wtender tor the Erection of i Pavilion Jet H elic opter Will Unexpected ‘ Reuter
Scheme. 7 7" at Sarjeant's age’, Ww receiv 4 oe ; Ww
a it a pan 4 Mh ges ‘ oad ete GOV ERNMENT NOTICE uly 1961 for the erection ‘of a Pavilion CG: nap Pre-election rumours had it that . oor NE SHIPMENTS
uties ti ay SS t the Sarjeant’s Vill ing Field. :
officer by the Cocoa Board from f. Copies of the ‘Blan and specifications ar ry eople if Bepialiets won the sapeon a EF. (. PRESCOD & Co. : ST OPENED
time to time. . pan obtained from Mr, R. B. Moulder} Designers in Britain are works) Deer ey nor anyone e JU
Fe a eee MTEN lees reek ae ty eet Sey_ sees] cue On ole ee Baw aaa ec foe ney Parlnmentaty elece| tng Convers & nanoeto l
ree months c ul ($5.00), w « = e w -
Seomineiion ‘on either side. ne oe eh ra ve ae aae turnin the plan to Mr. Moulder ine senger-carrying = aaa p: t tions this autumn in the hopes of Modern ar Exclusive % j also a wide selection a
. : pee e 8
Applications containing, full ay Seaerell ae Pagans ed Bes i te motile ated One wok MeuL he powered by turboprop en .Jcoming out the largest National Paints & Olls of Beit Quality $1)
Vea = sporti Sets June, 1951, between the hours of | SomPleted and also submit the names of Gulicntaee oe OE mreweny en ly ered parliamentary |% ew to make Good Foundations >) ‘ y
ate with copies of not less than] 8.00 a.m. and 5.00 p.m. All fish~| with He ius een REO Gt TE oni ay WAL soon be flying. It hag] elections "would be in October any soil 6 fi of Hosiery, Cleaners a
two. recent testimonials, should be} !"8 boats ening off this area ro. oo eee ee ttion of the building ‘te| two Alvis Leonides 550 horse-| 1953. “As it was Socialist Koen- Air Influence on Soil. nA site
addressed to the Chairman, Ce20a] Warned to keep at least three (3)) the specified date. power engines and can fly oajer supported by the nation’s a deh ial tore . | and Polishes ‘
Board, c/o Department of Agri- noe Sh 5 de catia b BR sk Beis hele es chr nelligde, Api one engine. Design plans for} 220,000 Communists barely won) Dial 2660 x { ? } ne
culture, St. Clair, Port of Spain, iat an ae st . eiat, | Re try for the erection of the building. “| the other are being drawn up by] by a majority of 180,000 Social -| 14 ’
cones ge Ph gm spot saver Ski secailcn outs taker class ak The Vestry does not bind iteeit to} the Cierya Autogiro Company] ists figured they wos ae 19.6.61—In, ' -
than June 23rd, .. Envelopes mo rw accept the lowest or any tendered. now taken over by Saunders-Roe,.|to demand a new parliamentary :
containing applications should be|Friday, 22nd June, 1951, at the werk nt the Very, | The plans are for a three-rotor} election on the basis of that mar-
marked— “Application C.R.O.”—| same time. Christ Church,| @chine to carry 24—32 passen-| gin. { ™
on the outside left-hand corner. _ 17.6.51—2n, 17.6 51—5n.| gers, . . :
E. W. LEACH, The jet hescopter is under] There were reasons for the 10-DAY’S NEWS FLASH i
Chairman, Cocoa Board. GOVERNMENT NOTICES development by Faireys. Called|Coalition’s stability: Firstly, the \ has
5.6.51—7n. ‘i the Rotodyne, it will have twejonly assurance against Commun- Only a Few Copies wext:—
—- See outboard of|ists with assistance by ane AIDS TO SANITARY
z the cabin, and air from these en-|occupiers of eastern ustria IENCE AND LAW . : Ccteol EMAL,
ATTENTION is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence)|gines will be “tapped” to the cuiking Government is a_ strong By Det. White and Hanna POPOL LPP PLEO LLL LL EEL ALBALA AA NS :
(Amendment) Order, 1951, No, 15 which will be published in the Totor-blade tips to turn them.|coalition of all other groups ; 1/- each <=
Official Gazette of Monday 18th June, 1951, baw ae ae — 98 ve Se een all Sees Biss migh'{}} JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
yf ‘ : ‘ Pe as ; with small separate: jet units for] brea e coalition are never —ticseeinanteeinninanhereennpmannaeemne .
ug me ney this _Ordet the te ae retail selling price of ‘Meat—] giving a powerful thrust for take4] fought on the floor of Parliament,! Best Quality Bevell edged $
resh and Frozen” is as follows:— off and landing. The Rotodyne] If Socialists ever left the Colt MIRRORS :
Sean os, a emcee aa, Pn ee ee ee eet ee en ee ~~ | is designed to carry 23 paSsengers,|tion they could retain control of 22 in. x 16 in. ¢
ARTICLE RETAIL PRICE but a considerable amount of|labour unions, —UP. 24 in. x 18 in. *
Here’s Good News |___ (not more than) advanced development work will at X
MEAT-—-FRESH & FROZEN: | be necessary before it reaches the), .—_——_————— JOHNSON’S HARDWARE z
you've been waiting {{}| BEEF: flying stege, ' ORIENTAL %
(a) Roast and Steak from Rump, Round These large nelicopterg will $
for... Sirloin and Ribs yf of .. | 48c. per Ib. eventually take over from’ the SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
(b) All other cuts including soup and smal) single-engined helicopters JEWELS :
stew beef is ‘i Sy Fer MOOE Gh co Ne which are now operating experi- New Shipment opened
MUTTON: : mental services. The British * was i“
(a) Legs and loin chops .. ea Ce Aner = European Airways Helicopter THANI Ss ‘2466
(b) Shoulders ie + He Fa Mintek vis Unit, which ran the World's
(c) Stew i ay vi ve Bel) ke ees first night-mail service and the
“ PORK ay ae ea 9 ae 5:60) Mes ae kg first scheduled passenger 5 ; ‘ SPE
rere o A uSes the small eee ae E : x Ss
a) Legs and loin chops .. oe? AA et) Fob ca helicopter. Provin, ights a
(hb) Stew a sa yi 4 A Eee MO a Nae new Parerae eine between Clivie Gittens Orchestra xy



——-<<—-<«| London and Birmingham have

18th June, 1951. * already begun.
19.6.51.—1n. :
{r. Touch With Barbados

Gittens will be out of the
island for a short period
during which time his Or-







Orchestra Leader Clivie
It Relieves Colds Quickly.





CERTAIN
COUGH SYRUP

ATENTION is drawn to the Control of Livestock Prices (Defence) Costal Station chestra will function as %
Order, 1951 which will be published in the Official Gazette of Monday | “1.14 wirereas (west naien uta [Ree % VISIT OUR SHOWROOM AND LET
In WHITE and other 18th June, 1951. advise that they can now communicate For further articulars
Lovely Shades h just 2. Under this Order the maximum liveweight prices of Livestock wooiaee Pith Bg through thelr contact, Mr.’ Fred giteyne Cc. CARLTON BROWNE US DEMONSTRATE THIS WORLD
ovely ades has jus and Poultry are as follows: — s s, § zabeth, $.S Cas- axophonist), ‘ool Lane,
‘. ae an ee at eens Mi Sa ne ae tea, 8s "negent Lion, 88 % Halls Road, who will be de- 136 Roebuck St, Dial 2813 RECORD BREAKER TO YOU f
3 ion, S § , 3 5 b :
een opened a ANIMAL MAXIMUM LIVE- | ioe SASS Mareala, 8.8. Alcoa] @ Pe Wholesale & Retail Drageist Al



. WEIGHT PRICE Pennant, SS. Ampact Washington, 8 8S
a | Campas, SS. Esso Knoxville, 8 S_ Bra-



© 4 COLOURS IN STOCK



LADIES !
|
|

ec
ee e

PIGS (More than 10 weeks) .. st cp 24 cents per lb. jara, SS Securus, SS Rosario Rodas,
PIGS (Not more than 10 weeks) rs a 26 cents per lb. £6 seunewisk, # * nee Lykes, ye : ‘
3 n ermuda, § ascogne, §
' owe vy f ra tf a Ss psi per o Folkebernadotte, S'S Bonito, 8 8. Loide
TURKEYS. ee eae eee oe es ae - JUST THE TOOL TO DO
ey ti . ss 5. aa, 5 5 en *
Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466 (a) Over 10 lbs. in weight aa -- | 84 cents per lb. blanc. SS Lady Rodnes, $$ Canadian >
r. Wm. Hy. St. Dia (b) 10 lbs, weight and under... 72 cents per lb Chalienger, 6 5. Sundial, $8. El Gallo,
S$. Uruguay THAT DIFFICULT JOB 4
3. ‘Copies of the NOTICE cuvering maximum prices of Meat and x E CK S i I IN B R O S
. + ay : i o ® 4 ee
It’s worth your while to tee ee ec agee ae, may be procured from the] 4,,)), (MAIL NOTICE PAD SAWS with Extra Blades -
tral Police Station, the Police Stations in the out-lying districts] and Aruba by the M/V Daerwood will ‘
) SHOP NOW! Kt and the Controller of Supplies Office, Canary Street oS See at the General Post Office as THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM $ BAY STREET,
5 ) 18th June, 1951. Parcel Mail and Registered Mail at 2 Broad Street. %
) 19.651 te Ordinary Mail at 230 p.m. on - pater the ta ded ddd putt bb tte inte tae
Worn eee June, 1952 U QsOOCOCO CS GOb SO SSO SHI L GO COCO O CGI R OC N EE LLLP PLLA? LLL LET LLL LEIA




PAGE EIGHT

Intermediate Games|

Show Bright Cricket

Second Day’s Play

BRIGHT CRICKET featured play in the Intermediate
Division on Saturday as thé season’s opening fixtures en-





































THE GIBSON GIRL



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

FINDS A





—_ rn



HOT SPoT

hens
‘ete





Reshevsky Wins
Chess Tournament

NEW YORK, June 18

Samuel Reshevsky of the Unitec
States and Miguel Najdorf of Ar-
gentina battled to a draw after 31
moves
International
lith and
but Reshevsky
with a scoge of eight points won,

Chess









im the Wertheim Memorial
tournament's
final round on Sunday,
won the first prize











TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 1951



The name speaks for itseif

(la RP ad Mit

Helps to cleanse the system
from blood impurities
impurities in the blood may cause rheumatic
aches and pains, stiff and painful joints,

boils, pimples and common skin disorders.
Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify

SSsGeereneees

anesonenssss
a

Liquid or~
Tablets































Regiviered US Potent OMes

They ‘Il Do It precy ‘Time










"Toorys 8008y-TRAP PRIZE
GOES TO MRS. LA BOOR »
WHILE STILL IN HER HOUSE DRESS
SHE MAKES UP HER COIFFURE~



HEN, LACQUERED AND HAIR-DOED,
E ZIPS OFF HER DRESS *sRESULT,
AHALF-HOUR MORE GOING OVER THE MESS!
























































: INCE & Co. Ltd.

x
6566666 COCO nana

PALS



| LRCEOGOS



RPS POOOSSF POPP OSPF FOS ol











tered their second day. a —s ” % BE se sara) f, — pnts the blood, cleanses the system and assists
e were fo ‘ in restoring
There were four games set 7 n i toring good health.
Empire's C. Rice carried hi EMPIRE ys. WINDWARD e@ tournament without losing a
tot ul to 126 not out last Saturday Empire — 90 bud et 9 wate ) 18 single garne outright finished tied
“ LM a x ind wa 12 i
when his team scored 263 run WINDWARD — ist Innings for second place with <3 Max-
against Windward at Intermediate—JV. C. Thornton ¢ Rudder b Arm- Euwe of Holland with 7% won,
‘rieket Cong Road. W strong 53 3% lost. Najdorf won aay games ee
Crieket at Congo Read. Wina fy. V"’Farmer rot out 4l 1 drew in sev Scat Oe
ward were bowled out for 145) ffi Atkinson b Prescott 25 and drew in seven,
ena 3 7 b Fvelyn b Rudder 1
aM mae is ak ie 057 int M Farmer ¢ & b Spooner 5 On the other hand, Reshevsky
enta pital scorec i M Farmer 1 b w , b Spooner 4 with sts: “Arew: Yn’ Boe a lost
ply to Spartan’s first innings Of—r Farmer 1.b w., b Prescott t m six, drey a our an os
i ire Spartan is now 116 for thef§3eale b Spooner . 0 one (to Euwe).—wU.P.
r ines of four wickets, ) Wilkie 1 bw, b Spooner 0
7 ‘ s Gill b Armstr 1
At -the Garrison, Regimen -packlen to Rometraner 0
bowled out Pickwick for 11: Extras 12 ;
after putting up the good total of ~
, 946. Regiment in their second ee = | The \ eather
j time at the wicket are 114 for Fall of wickets: 1—2, 2—11, 3—16, 4 } TODAY
Ewer . —27, 5-44, 6—13 38, @—198, 9—143 .
} six wickets. ; 5-44, G—137, 1-138, 8—138, 9 Sun Rises: 5.39 a.m.
A good struggle is going ©. BOWLING ANALYSIS : | Sun Sets: 6.21 p.m.
between Cable and Wireless anc Cee e * 2 ms Moon (Fuil) June 19
Wanderers and the game will c epanhee Se aii Besta Lighting: 7.00 p.m. an
most likely end in a fight fore Prescott cs 19 «(2 High Water: 2.46 a.m., 4.06 See ACT TTD Te Oe ~
first innings lead when it continue Jc. Harper 4 2 19 «(0 p.m.
next Saturday, Cable and Wire-ff\, Marris -. aes aes ae .
te a te rig ig Mi. “Armsteons a a Rainfall (Oedringten) 15 in P
; 267 and have one wic' stand-| iade . . d fu
he ing - q - 2ABLE & WIRELESS vs, WANDERERS ar ‘— yee to yester- retty an use ]
‘. Oo aes Cable & Wireless — 04 lay: 3.54 ine
; On Saturday, for Windward Wanderers — (for 9 wkts ) 267 Temperature (Max.) 86.5°F
y opening batsman N. C. Thornton oun = . , RA
fr scored a valuable 53. H. V, WANDERERS — Ist Innings CERES (AE). “TOG
d F . Na aa agi ee) V. Lewis 1bw.. b E. Branker 0 Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E,
? armer played a good inningsi#, peirce stpd, b CB Lawless 34 (3 pm.) ES.E
i for 41 not out. R. Atkinson’s 258. Greenidge c R. A. Lewless Wind Velocity: ‘15 miles per
reins , > . ~+hu-| b Branke 0 tt
' som the only other good contribu-@. @ “Manning, b i. B) MéKenzie 48 hour
: 3 felbw,bcC. B. Lawless 25 ‘ ‘
i C. Spooner claimed four Wind Bt. Clarke Be. Branker -.,.,¢ 48 Say, mister, here’s that 1951 Gibson girl, smiling Althea. She showed Manchester fans, when making ae ¢ Sn): 29.061,
ward wickets for 27 runs but MQ\ G. Seale not out 38 her first appearance in Britain, that more than syncopated rhythm comes from harlem. Miss p.m.)) 29.940 In Check Linen, Size 22 x 32, Each
Armstrong returned the bestfj; ©, Packer b Branker . 9 Gibson played her own tennis symphony on the courts, “Everything goes-over the net,” in beating Plain Li
oe . . +. Mayers b C. B. Lawless 12 Mrs. Pe Hodson 6—1, 6—1 ain Linen Oe we Be UR i ckece
average, taking three wickets{}> 4. Alleyne 1 b.w., b R.A Bey y :
wring ‘five overs, his bowling] Lawless 18 sere et ge ie Mo a ee Ten nis’s Nanny child has all the shots. Purring in the oN
ng only for five runs. 1. B. Proverbs not aut 19 sunshine——‘Guess tell the folks back home it’s hotter here than they think”-—America’s coloured COTTON GLASS CLOTHS
Hich 8 cores for Mental Hospi- Extras owe champion decided that she liked England's “cyte” courts, “Just fine and dandy.” Above Althea starts WHAT’SON TODAY
+l in their match against Spartar Total (for 9 wkts ) 267 a smash (right) and finished a smash (left Police Courts and Court of Size 22 x 32 Each ...... ; Giiee eshte 94c.
vere ¢. Williams who wat oe ; 5 23 eH a8 a Lk eG me Original Jurisdiction — 23 x 34 Each 93:
a eel) Of netokalas esd; Beh, On8h.6 : . PR Tic fy Fas Desens ceeaees ic.
cought off “Shell” Harris bowling} 00, 5160, 6 02, 7 1a2, 8199, 9-331, J runs for the loss of six wickets 10 a.m. . Z 20 x 30 Each ......... 84c
when he was 95, C. Best 49 and i before stumps were drawn. il Ses Meeting of the House of see aeeneeces etiee .
4 R. Chase 48. OWING ATER ER gy pr : S rt Wi Assembly — 3 p.m.
Pet Harris bowled well He took EL. Branker Boe aes CeCe po. s ind ow 146 Bi h Wolee Pate — 5 pm. RED BORDERED GLASS CLOTHS
; seven wickets for runs in A. Lawless a8 mee : obile aes a
af even wickets RA. Lawle i 2 g at Foundation WATER POLO. ehind a or minbah “eae 18 x 35 Each
{ os er 2 he @ Me McKehate 5 SF | reundation First Innings 26 Snappers vs. Whipporays ence Boys’ School Pas- “ ML. hn sa visto oc. ted ebb ores est pre OOO
t n is secon innings, 5S 4 ¢ Colzier 2 0 18 © | Pvilce First Innings 84 ture — 7.30 p.m. ‘ ?
r | Griffith scored 50 for Spartan “ ed Foundation Second Innings Boise toe tha the tre SR Ge eer eink Police Band, Popular Con-
snd 8. Morri, is not out with 30. C. Graham b, Griffith a onitas are the two Water Lancashire with six wickets still : : CHECK COTTON GLASS CLOTHS
§ D, Jones ¢, (w.k.) b, Browne.. 70 Polo matches to be played to fall, require another 146 runs | oorl, at wae St. Andrew
L, Warner not out io 2 ‘ Frid " ayin eld — 7.4 .m.
The : scores:— Poli Def - t kK, Yarde ¢. Denny b. Griffith 3 at the Aquatic Club this af- to lead the South Africans on first ” cn oe PAR MO. ME ks Claes ee Chen Ue EE Frat eee
: MEXTAL BOSPITAL vo, Wea) tie ice CAL | Gay 'v. catienaer i$ ternoon, Play begins at 5 | innings when the match enters Empire): “Of Men an om
Spartan — 174 and (for 4 wkts.) 116 4 ; M- L. Jones ¢, Callender b. Sealy 1 o'clock. The referee is Ma- its finalyday here tomorrow is & 8 M0 op - “ee
Mental Hospital — 257 e . Chase stpd. (w.k.) b. Sealy 14 ; 4s ° . nl " +”
MENTAL HOSPITAL iat Innings I oundation Mr, M. Callender ib.w. b, Seaiy 6 jor A. R. Foster. At ae of play today Lan- BONED ee, aetare ee Per Desk Cloths Each
Vv, C. Boyce 1b w, b K. Seuly 27 F. Nurse c. & b. Sealy.............. 0 cashire had replied to the South S 836 y 4 s ‘ ch ..
M. “hrichiow run out 10 F. Weekes b. Callender Cee ee ee peer Royal: “Our Vi i Tend
>) Will Sealy b Harris 95 H. Phillips c. Amey b. Sealy ........ 8 rst innings total of 403 leanaa Sat 2h. Other
¢ YUiiwowes c Morris b Harris 4 A flne bowling spell by C, Sealy MOE Hc tt 20 pecwear RABD Ve. CENTRAL for 7 declared with a score of 257 | Peete ee ea
Me Oe ts y Kk. Sealy 49 who bagged five wickets for 20 si Sa aaiees ye 165 for four. |] Olympic: “Haunted Harbour” — Oven Cloths ....... 32¢
Re Stoner e Grifith b Harris 48 runs enabled Police to score a six Total fee wecnnes 14) L, 0, Wood ? for 65 The South Africans increased tio: “In The. SHEPHERD
g one Pie te Hattie. 9 point victory over Foundation at BOWLING ANALYSS ©. E. Binds 2 for 34 their Saturday score by 99 runs in manees * “In The Navy" — 8.30
J. Gordon stpd. wkpr. b Harrt © Foundation on Saturday the last Oo. M R. W.z . - 75 minutes for the loss of two Polish Cloth
J Wiltshire mot out pierce ; day io me first series in the Sec-]C. Callender 9 0 2 2 Central First Innings i”9 Wickets before declaring. Ons oths ...... 38e. '
night ¢ Gittens b ‘ ond Division ericket matches. G. Grimth a ae? ey +s & C L d
r 1 ‘ ; a ee C. FE. Hinds 58 not out
SRR: ali! Foundation in their first innings |Aâ„¢Y pvc SL Be G. Gilkes & tor 58 Jack Cheetham hit his first] Fun Pa OEE 0.; td.
cute =e see ith 6s : woh roe re- | Denny + eas ee” Ase ee. century of the tour. He was three CRY PTOQU OTE No. 39 j
ah " ——, plied wi runs. ith runs | Sealy 821 2 5 Leeward’s 2nd Innings 106 end three-quarter hours getting FGJ ALCG MGPBFG WAG i0—j3
er) oh EE ee 20,286. Sg behind Foundation in their second | ,, Pollce Second Innings Tt 6! Weer ste ae fie: 197 ubhioh. troluded cae sik WBBRX BE i3 Broad Street
eer : ‘ innings scored 141 runs, D. Jones | & Sealy. Phillips : ‘ H, Andrews 2 for and 10 fours. : WAGKY WHER
BOWLING ANALYSIS top-scored with 70 runs while C.| 5. Howard 1.b.w. b. Philips: 0 rea Alan Wharton was rather 1
, a s un- A to last: Popular :
K. Sealy 15 : a ¥ Sealy bagged five of the wickets eee Gay..... 40 Central's end “dnnings 82 for 3% daacunate: ay. tat qabiing hia. ceb> sant tg eee Seiien
' & i “ " i not out 4 4 . CC Eb
F, MeCornite uo % 8 foe 20 runs after sending down} > Kayne not > ncibieides Rabid on’ diebich tury for Lancashire. He was out Casts
Moris «. 4 6:40 | een ee inh Ment otee EXtras........ ul arene for 98 which included twelve J. A. CORBIN & SONS.
- aE ; 4 eeding runs for full victory siete fours and John Ikin made 64 and ve ee i sk anal
2 f (i 1 24 1 «5,3; rl ; ; ‘ alee tbe
8. PE ais “4 gna lankane Bn wept on in thelr gecand in Total (for 5 wickets) 10L Harrison rn zen parent tor 6| Geoffrey Edrich 52 not out.
A. Gittens’ b Gordon : 35 os ye wickets after : . yne not ow Re "
s Grin ¢ hor. b Chrichlow * scoring aa runs. Griffith was not PIONS Ane + W. R. Se se
yood nigh: {fo out with 42 and Warner had a|Bb. Jones.,...........- oa ee fn
. 0 v.0
Be Ee RPS Bb richtow SY good knock to score 40 runs before |M. Phillips ... ose ? ey ao K
K. Sealy not out 15 he was bowled by Gay. & ew ; ; 2 ; pntays eiatce FREE ROO I O Our
re \ soe Lodge's rst In 108
ee — Carlton gained first innings lead | & Yarde...-.-- a a V. Outram 27, R. Murray 25 ur Tour as. which makes
Total (for 4 wkts ) 116 over Combermere at Carlton. Bat- = sae ceeds ‘ ¢ 18 ; om ee Terese 21 not out necessary to euiter * GOD'S WAY OF '
= ' . ' - ad ¥ + GAY. ase \ : i !
PICKWICK vs. REGIMENT ting first Carlton scored in their} L. Warner... b Oo 0 Rhevtnen Ovlitae's tad Prtes ieee pains, itohing ing and torment frptn Piles | G
Regiment — 246 and (for @wkts) 144 = first innings 190 runs and the CARLTON vs. COMBERMERE (Declared) tince the dlacovery of Hytax (lormerly SALVATION Man
Pickwick — U2 schoolboys replied with 144 runs. | carton bis Sapere 199 BORRe's And Insinge 346 for 2 wlekets ors in 10 minutes ad Rot only atone Sy
‘ ures. a 2 Carlton in their second turn! Combermere ... ot the pain Dut also takes out the ewan. +i
A’ 5 King b Phillips 6 knocked up 42 for the loss of no Carlton Second tnnings ¥.M.P.C, vs. PICKWICK at BRoKLES | {25 Roos Pieeatne sain combate eee. | PLAIN
D Evelyn b L Phillips 1 wicket and declared pressing for | Kennedy not out... 34 ROAD baton mn shereby curbing other trou- |
R ‘A Hoad 1 bw, b Pinder 38 an outright victory but when | ™ wig ans not out. 5 ervenacnae Bacirche, Constipation | Pleuse pie, =_ > ustomers
P. Evelyn stpd. wkpr. Ishmael, stumps were drawn Combermere } xtras : ¥.M.P.C.'s First Innings 90 long of energy, debit znnd irritab) Samuel Roberts, Gospe L
i a 18 3 . <— > * ' 7 e j ’
acme Girks b Pinder is had scored 46 runs for the loss of Total (for no wickets declared 42 i na oe drussies Gop Get Hytex from you: Book and Tract Service,
marke : : ol : avai : . ) ; gist@oday under the positive | Co al A Ban-
K M Taylor c Brathwaite b Pinder © nine wickets, A narrow escape. ~ ¥.M.P.C.'s 2nd innings 139 for G wickets SYA ARwe Hytex must stop your pllc 30, Central 1 hag ial
G. © Moore not out 10 BOWLING “ANALY#IS ©, Kaghill 60 not out, P. Goddard 2, pain troubles or money op gor N. Ireland.’
MF valle Philips b Brathwaite o , At Bank Hall Empire also got tmp, raitt Bes, a Be He RUIN FF a ure’ of empty Dachau
Li Lashley ec Price b Brathwaite 2 _ ion or ee Wanderers | rk. Mayeock.......... 3 1 5 6
Extras 5 who had score 5 runs on the;J. Ward. ; ee: See a .
—~ first day of play. Empire on the Combermere Second sane
Total 138 aries ganas : Mr. Taitt b, Matthews 2 WE WISH TO THANK YOU, th ti
es y scored 230 runs. Open- : ’ e entire
* Franeis b, Cox... 0
Rall of wickets : 17, ana1, 2-28. 4 ine hetamaen 4. Daniel hit 40 runs. Fields c. wk. (Kennedy) Bb. Cox '..” 0
-§1, 5—69, 6—93, 7-97, 8— - play was ended Wanderers | Harewood b. Cox 7 i ‘ ;
Re asn had completed their second in-|Méeveock b. Cow... 6 public for the very kind reception and
BONG ieee OR. w. Dings at 186 runs. J. Ramsey bat | i tushee ooo ;
L Partis .. » M if YS ted well to score 55. C. Beckles, | Browne bw. b Cox... 6 § enthusiasm given
Phillips 1 2) (OO * a medium pacer took four wickets | Lewis e, Kennedy b. Matthews 0 %
J Brathwaite ‘t 5 : 44 0 for 33 runs for Empire, Marshall not out i6
> 2 :
G. Piniet . 2 ii oe Leeward gained points for a oh wietrae,. vi WE ceraahdncto1 Sine 3 %
BARBADOS REGIMEN — 2nd inwin®® first innings lead over Central at Motel (tow okets) “46 %
3 Brathwaite ¢ & b Marshal! a7 Vaucluse, Leeward scored 165 OSE LE A RRR et a Se on % For Your x
R Price PD Ww, b Clarke 2 runs in their first innings, and BOWLING ANALYSIS 2 B
A enillioe stpd (Trotter) b Mar ear replied with 130 runs. In ‘ oO M R. W. 1%
sh: : gg their second innings Leeward de- | Matthews Bie: ae oe .
§ 1 not out ay . P 5 : s s
ite iee olen Sout 3 clared at 106 3 the loss of five |¢°* cw. ” a ae n % Enjoyment
Edwards c & b Marshall 4 wickets, L. O, Wood took three of | cox : idl: Baar 6 0 . ‘ . ,
Extras __* the wickets for 26 runs after some EMPIRE |v vs. WANDERERS at EMPIRE ) % e here, and would like to apologise for any
Total ior'6 wits) 114 steady bowling. At the end of | Wanderers’ First Innings meh SS ”
me —- play Central haa ncbred 82 runs | OMMt* Cares Raunepe nt Oe vB sain . ‘ inconvenience caused due to the non-arrival
soa iki eames or three wickets. J. Armstrong 1.b.w, b, C. Beckles.... 2 s, .
en At Lodge, Harrison College got |G. Skeete ¢. Sub. b. C. Reckiensi., 0 NGTHS SQUAR: Bots. Cocktail Onions %
a first innings lead after bowling | Pieree c. S.. Beckles b. C. Beckles 4 27” Wide 8x2 Yards » » Cherries % of our bottles and cases,
Traffie Do’s out [&dge for 103 runs in their |7 Sheqseman e. 8: Beokles is ” Stuffed Olives ;
a first oe ae ‘2 ey J. Remaay c, Beckles b. Skeeic .... 63 oe 3x 2% ‘ Tins Cocktail Biscuits $
second turn at the wicket declared | M, Clarke Lb.w. b, C, Beckles 4 é s %
No. 29 t 113 after losi | vi J. Patterson c. Gill b. Skeete 31 » Swift Vienna Sausages % re
cod « has Eating etthana poccea G. Patterson b. Downes, jewel ae 72” ” toes 3 x 3 ” + » Frankfurt Sausages ~ HOWEVER these are expected here within
re " ’ J. Pierce Lb.w. b, S, Beckles........ 1 ‘s ys "
145 runs for the loss of seven]}) ¢ox run out... ota’ 108” 3 x 314 ~% », Luncheon Beef %
TURN CORNERS wickets. ae College Wogme took | A. Thomas not out.. : 9 ” * 72 * % » Pate De Foie 3 the next few weeks, when we shall be in a
— y t 2. cxtras i
SLOWLY AND ee ee . see 3x4 i % , Potted Meat %
KEEP ON THE LEFT Bice IGR 90 Axe jpnings gents TA ~ * i 1 & } Pt, Tin Sasso Olive Oil S better position to supply you.
over Y. iC, a eckles , YSIS ~ . 8
Space made available by Pickwick in their first innings BOWING anya R WwW. ALSO DRY FELT UNDERLAY. | x a por Cheese %
scored 194 runs for eight wickets] S$ Beckles........... W 2 30 1 ; ie . ; »
CANADA DRY declared. in ‘reply to Y.M.P.C. | ¢ Beckles MPD. 2 38a Very pretty patterns and, reasonably priced, 1% %
for Safer Motoring. score of 90 runs. In their second \% pom PR Me ae iS e x e@
a —! innings ¥.M.P.C. collected fa | t Seen’. . om 2 % x
% >
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PAGE 1

PACE roim BARBADOS ADVOC ATF. TUESDAY II Ml II IIS| W2SS&J28SF \Th* Sahara Ucsert Can Fn.-1-d bj .!.• M I I M > _.. IA *.. as-osO Ot, IMHW" Tuesday. June IP, 1931 CANB FIRES IN an islam! n ..epeni.enl upon agrinu* ture ami where thai agriculture is based so largely on the sugar industry, it is criminal folly to allow so much of that crop to be destroyed by (ire every year. The figure's for the last three years are evidence of this fact. In 1948 there were 89 fires destroying 659 3 8 acres of canes; in 1949 there were 195 fires destroy in* 1.051 1/5 acres; 172 (ires in 1950 destroyed 838Mz acres and up to the end of May this year 159 tires had destroyed 1.114 acres of canes. Quito apart from the physical loss of sucrose in the cane, quantities of cane tires must result in rises in the premiums paid to tire insurance societies, and the heavy expenditure devolving on fire societies restricts capital available for investment and consequently lessens production. It is a vicious circle, too little appreciated by the enemies of society who set cane fires. Nor is the loss restricted to loss of sugar and loss of insurance funds. Heat from cane tires is sufficient to damage or kill young canes especially when there is no immediate rain to follow fires. But there is a fuither loss. It is an established fact that in fields where the canes have been burnt the loss of trash for mulching reduces the moisture content of the fields and only half of the average tonnage is produced in years of drought. So serious is the condition to which this wilful burning of canes gives rise that it merits the closest investigation and a subsequent publication of all the relevant facts in order that every member of the community should realise the harm which is done. At present there is a belief that at times labourers set fire to fields of canes for several reasons. In the iirst place the canes are easier to cut and the cutters can cut a greater tonnage daily; secondly the tiredness ol workers particularly women workers, is blamed for the setting of (ires which seek to hasten the crop: thirdly labourers are anxious to get back to their small plots of land as soon as possible after the crop. Cane fires also do damage which is not intended. Fires cannot be controlled and they often jump roads and consume acres of young canes. This is probably the worst effect of cane fires in Barbados. But there needs to b a complete change of attitude. There were occasions in the past when cane fires expressed the spite of labourers against owners. Today there are no such feelings. A field of canes burning excites little interest among labourers who already earn much money by reaping canes and who seem to care not at all if the (Ires are put out. Even when fields are burnt by accident, little effort is made to prevent spreading to adjoining fields. In consequence of this attitude, hundreds of acres of canes which might have been saved are lost every year. There is great need for educating the sugar worker today. The worker must %  realise that the quantity of canes depends on good rains and that no legislation exists which can produce rain. It is up to workers to avoid burning canes during years of heavy crops and to save the land for years of drought. Everything in this i.v.and revolves around a prosperous sugar industry. The bigger the crop the greater is the revenue earned by the agricultural community. That leads to greater spending power, more profits and increased earnings for people in other avenues of employment such as the porters and labourers on the waterfront and ships labourers. The takings in shops and stores are correspondingly higher. In this way the entire community benefits from the increased production of cane and the revenue to the Government by way of taxation and the cess from the sugar sold to the British Government at guaranteed prices ore increased to the ultimate benefit of the same labourers who refuse to put out fires. Cane burning should cease and every Barbadian should make a special effort to prevent cane fires and to assist in putting them out even when they arc accidentally caught. ItV laVi-laiim-il WOMEN IN DEFENCE By PHYLLIS DA VIES In any language the two most heartwexming wordn must surely be "peace" and "BOOM**. It is, therefore, rot pleasant, in contemplating the state of the world today, to realist' that many many thousands of gentle hearted people must u^ii-i turn from their quid uVwnwtli; pumltS and build up national strength to guard these treasured ideals. This the bitter, but unequivocally accepted prospect which the women of Britain and of the free democracies as a whole are facing. In Britain, whose great M Defence Programme will cost £ i 700 millions in the next three years, women are once again, as in World War II. facing up to their responsibilities. There is no compulsion on women, as there was during the war. for them to serve with the Armed Forces or the factories, yet tens of thousands of them are serving as fulltime members of the Army, the Royal Navy and the Royal Air Force. Hundreds of 1*, %  IIVI U1III ILf IDA* 1UIIII.I1I lllill IV ganlzationi The Unit la concern,hemi lves Mh J on deserts. Bui an arld 20np Y et the desert of thousands are working in the factories which ,,i faod : "" %  >"'legendary as the site of ii* Oarfor defence. A large proportion of members On my first night in ihc desert „ien of Eden. „f the newlv revived Civil Defence Corps. 1 saw something ot Ihc beginnings I ,. . _., 1W ._ __„ .__ Ot that process whereby men can All the aswient water systems which are more than 7...000 strong, are also turn agricultural land into desert exploited the Tigris and i"; women, many of whom are taking their waste. Ahead of my jeep upEuphrates, and exploited also thr rd ol Hie surface ot the earth is arid rone, barren soil which almost invariably la <1irountcd.end disregard-' discussion of how the multiplying millions of the world cat "The deserts are on the march I* a prophecy uttered w latic lertamty that this is a judgment on i menl from which there Is no reprieve. But a third of the earth's surface Is too much to discard. %  lad if the desert an OH the march man must find *nme way to stop them. Thai world-sculc problem IM within the PfOTl—O <-i two Uniied Nations agencies—the Food and Agricultural Orgam/.ii. UNESCO (Unltd Nation* Educational, Scientific and Cultural OiThe Roman hyiiuulic engineers would survey a range of hill.-, deliberately credi the soil covering the croats and turn then, into roof-llaal run-off* They would then sfsor the • a cup in the hills where they had constructed • cistern. In a region with a mean rainfall ot <-ne acre of water shed by such c'evices can provide irrigation for right acres. In TripollUnla more than 200 of these ancient wells have been discovered, out of the thousands believed to exist. More than 100 have already been cleaned out and are functioning .. thousands of square miles of ""clently M they did 1,080 year* -i IM (fc -riculture into desert n *"f£ZXSU£ ,/~ JS-US ^T J C " asweilaatoo.i.tle. Mesopotamia ,inds, and violent rains can. ol it .ccom,,,, lo hc ralnfa u charts, "hlon deserts. Bui an arid 20n they can acceierloday was In the Sahara Desert plant* and trees grew in aa expertmrnUI nurvrj sad srleiifiaU carry on Hn-ir MOT* of di%  averlng and revlUliiins the anrlrnt system of wella and I..".i. viiniii irintithe regien a rich granary mare than ?.*00 years age. H i l i i mi %  M mi; cd with applying modern knowledge lo toll restoration to product for the ittoplcs of the world UNr.M I) .,ni. rni'd with search and was instructed" by id promote research intr ln a „ mlclrc | 0 wn ,„ w r ac „cd les Is rustier than the Tlrls. and work Addittonallv there hns recently been .„ ,h. „,,: ,„, .„d is r.-! anincrcaseinrecrul ^ t i ,.. vo unury unpaid the problem -the fiery ambush we scared a in the south thr gradient ., .n undertaking would involve in^ ,.,!„' nd ^ boy-me only versed, so that the fertile "fhfi!" 1 i5.^:.^^ ^ %  Pople '-' n.U-who had merely between the areas wa, Irrlialed service as part-time Dtltcewomen in the n rive or the six inhabited com,bfrn ,„„„„„,„ ,„,„. norn ,,i pr . by a crijscros. of graviutlonal [ s ja C onstabuiarv, ird ,n the auxiliarv s .,mtiss is£ S-u-y-r H SES£HHI r :nd n un 7 s erv ccs , ^,' exist, what manne. of men MM Platc-iu b; settina fire to a grow?""!*—'"' u b !" J"Kg "TT^ AS more n<1 more contracts are placed 1 women carry science into the Ing bush and then moving on and lhl( .^. hl|nri defence equipment, the call upon the womanirir ^V'^ h T£ S a 3SasS IS !" !" sa.-* !" '" Br am "" "" %  u rRem AN way of international backing, bier, or Christ", thorn, they can MUon mumt an 5 Sl UNESCO asked the writer to make have a bonfire ... .the deliberate diversion of the a sample survey of a sector of the H easy to take the desert tor wo r | vergi uot on iy i c fi grej arid zone. The sector chosen was granted and assume that it was at. cltl<1 mIn and drVt Dut upset th the classical deserL. of North ways as It Is to-day. But ancient ,1^.,^ and ted to the creat Africa and the Middle East— legend and history picture the marshes. because In this area Sahara as once a forest area ovcrlome IS civilizations, cultures, or run with elephants, lions, and We cannot change th. rmplres foundered in the dust of other wild animals. In addition, rainfall but afforestation their own creation, j.,,1 there an sofl surveys have confirmed the cipllne it. In any event, the held opportunity was provided to study historic fertility of the region, scientists in IM Sahara Insist ttul | cr will be the last to be considered, %  hat Is. what was. and what might And the French are already rethey are wHiking on water By Bri a i n S homemakers arc laced with further ciaimlng it as a large developm.s ui* mean mat oenea.n in*. mem nheme which, bv modern desert and sand at perhaps 10,000 fhurlaiji'S of things needed in the home, the machinery and modern'methods. ' Is the "Alblenne Nappe." the | uxurlcs Hrst, then house furnishings and ,11 grow enough grain to feed fWat water-bearing layerwhich I an the nomad, of the rrench '> %  * tr*d proved Iran it took •sand miles, • Lirooassst, M Journey of a ihouCarthaI)n | an> Grecian. Roman. '" and Byzantine history that Norlh Africa was once n great granary. %  Ghardaia and .mother near Gabe In Tunisia. Evidence reveals another unde: ground lake stretch'hose "field" la thousands square anUe* of emiitlness. Algiers to „„d the cente"?-,;,^'.^.^hV^ev^dence't^"^ '" -""' % ,,bi.n Desert o, ran Research In the sand dunes of •emporla.the trading posts on t^>T>t and stpplymg the wide.y the Great Erg. The Center lies at the Gulf of Sirte. established by separated oases. the end of n trail which leads to the Phoenicians and developed by . „,„_ the great, white fortress of Beni the Creeks and the Romans into J""l;' *;'"""" £ ."SI* Abbes. Once thi. housed a reelmajestic cities, maintained a pros!" f r ,5! ' "< ou "< 1 %  >" • "arnes,. Ml .,:,;,l,s.-rt ..,, %  :,!,, .Uini that 'h'' i ol '-energ>, to man, use le,l |„r me the following prior, h „„ disappeared because the Another of the Immediate problles to consider in the problem of wgtci tuble dropped when the '""" •" "" desert is not tlnding reclaiming the deserts (I. men r limato changed. Experts working "ler so much as saving—that Is. nd their habits! (I) water. (3) In the fiplil. bgtfi thai lrom salting—water 1uch •!,ind: (4i fuel, .n.rgy. ,i„. ,,.,ter tol.l.-s dropped because r !" > "I s Springs which an oredeXsnrs of topalatable ma, contain a fraction %  SEWASSJ essoipe W5ffi35 smoking dunes.great mountain, U p 'Zlj'Zl 1 the s'lew That "" salts the water that passes of sand with plumes winch looked "•" Jj,? 1 '"'?" ""„\ ""i}„." through It. cheap method, of dalike vsletnlc smoke but l h r .'Jr*l^ T1V..V1*Z£."L Mltlng would be a godsend,in thstreams of fa* dust Below 00 ihe edge of Ihc "Sci.rpion of the z r .„ p.lnnxv SSS* A'Skr'SSvr i SMSrSi ^.rea^fund^ents.. problem* P w, R V" ffd ^ yfl ^ d ,na dnlC in the Negeb well*, underground J rearch to l>e tackled In the which ordinarily stood as ristcrn:1 diversion dams, waterdMCTl bul moal of the immediate tall as houses now looked like hoWiI „. Urracet. and irrigation fnawcra are aelf-evidenr. I bestunt.,1 shn.b=. -The ROOd earth „„„„„& bllUl by the ancient h f V9 ^ hundreds of thousands will not fall you even in the Rom n> lo hoard the umo limited "' acr ^ f ft* 1 ^^ quickly f^ahara." the Frenchman %  agiml rainfall which the region has !" _,, nwd 5 J !" I .. U thc *""".' me He pointed over the parapet VHI.IV garden and tdttad, That, desert. i years ago. was a dune." •okett The garden Into nPtall b I is now an exlcnslve experiment.il nilisei'y of the i. %  RgasamTOft acton dOOsCl plants ana trees are studied, and where foodKivmg planUy from oilier pull at the world, which might repute them, ure tested and accliinatwdThero one could see ihe miracle winch can be worked by waler n dOOOTl iand—the production of uranges. lonialo.'.^. potaiH ruts, asparagus, onions, artichokes, vines, oats, and barley. The garden IN watered by <> foggara, an ancient horizontal well which rOBI for three or lour n,;!iw uadOl the iluncs gftd miilnliiiiig tun/lant flow .if aratCf from Ihese mountains of "arid sand." At the Center I learned to respect the go ,'s many, and the North Af granaries of Greece and Homo could be restored. One can see proof of all these claims In \$v recovered areas and in the exl ri imenls.1 stations. What was can be. We can pr<>\oke the ancient world to rcdeer the new. And If wc are to feed an ever-increasing population wo cannot afford to ignore thc de %  Tath TH u-.r Itvdlns i'>i|*pfr, in th* Unit*.! S.UU-* Th* -fiur. %  lotovr did-iH I'MK'O aixl 111* Tooa anil Al* ImiUiSaanliaiivn. la Hlmr* s-Jtlo. Th Na eatanHI* anal On Ihr -Ijfl ir.".I at,il Sat-. iiensiJs. and even a u'reatlv limited choice in lothes. SHORT .SERVICE COMMISSIONS Since the outbreak of the war in Korea Hid the announcement six months ago by the Jnited Kingdom Government of its Defence Programme, recruiting of women for service vith the Armed Forces has risen steadily. The Women's Royal Air Force, for example, 1 s receiving 50 per cent, more volunteers •very week than six month? ago. In this service, which like the Women's Royal Army 'orps and the Women's Royal Naval Service. rrai integrated in 1949 as a permanent peaceime branch of the Armed Forces, a very vide variety of trades, some of them highly •killed, is open to women. Recently the scope >( their service w.is enlarged by the provision of short service commissions in the Hghter Control Branch of the Royal Air Force. This branch is the medium through vhich all the active and passive defences of Britain are alerted, set in motion and co-orlinatcd. Members of the Women's Royal Air Force are serving as radio and radar mechanics and as operators, as flight mechanics, instrument repairers, litters, electricians, radiographers, photographers, airraft linishers and in dozens of other skilled and semi-skilled jobs. | The Women's Royal Army Corps, which has members serving in Singapore. Hong Kong, Germany, the Middle East and other parts of the world, reached a peak strength of 200.000 during the war and many awards for gallantry and devotion to duty were won byits members. Its varied skilled jobs include that nf experimental assistants in gunnery, in which they t.si. check and ccrry out research work on new weapons and ammunition. Girls with mathematical qualifications u* serving as kine-theodolite operators who play an important part in the training of gunnery teams at anti-aircraft practice camps. THE "WRENS" The Women's Royal Naval Service is the smallest of Britain's women's services, but i.s thousands of members do equally valuable work and served with equal heroism and -•eadfastness in the war. Never before in her history except for mili? tary nurses, has Britain had peacetime women's services integrated with her Armed Forces but with the need to deter aggression CLOSED FOR REPAIRS Advocate Stationery Galvanized Wove Wire 4" MESH 18" WC ^ (Mi r .. x i4„ 1 .. T .. X 14" X 3 .. Galvanized Sofl Lashing 12 lo 20 GAUGE Galvanized Mesh Wire FOR FISH POTS 1" MESH from 18" to W Wide: IN ., 18" ., 72" Wire WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C.S. PITCHER & CO. 'Phones : 4472 & 4B87 BF.CKWITH STORES "INTERNATIONAL" PAINTS COVER THE WORLD! Colour enriches and uplifts. Beautify those drab pieces of Furniture, Shelves, Picture Frames, etc. with colour. We have just the medium you require— PAINT FOR FURNITURE AND GENERAL HOUSEHOLD PURPOSES in a wide range of lovely colours:— "INTERNATIONAL" QUICK DRYING ENAMEL—$1.00 per pint, and upwards. This Enamel drie within four hours, and is satisfactory for use on Woodwork and Metalwork. It may be applied to either Interior or Exterior surfaces by Brush or Spray. For best results, t.ie following instructions rhould be carefully followed:— 1. For new work, treat all knots with "PATENT KNOTTING". Apply 1 coat of --IHTF.RNATIONAL" PKIMf.lt FO WOOD or 1 coat of "BROWN PKI.MOf'ON (lor metal work), followed by 2 coats of "INTERNATIONAL" Ql'H K DRYING ENAMEL. For previously printed work, rub clown thoroughly clean. and apply 2 coats of "INTERNATIONAL" QIK K DRYING ENAMEL. TRY THIS FINE PRODUCT OF INTERNATIONAL PAINTS. LTD.. AND BE CONVINCED. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. AGENTS VV.V////V/V//'V''/V.V/-V///V/.'/ m there will be more and more scope for the old w I'omen in uniform. Our Header* Say: Mghl f.lub Workvr ing fche tlntl gentlpmnn in quSUM |*cfa i.f ittfetQM in our Oovtion. i : iii|lorablc ;.! furct-icnm should bo allowed i,,. Th,Editor. Thc Adrocv, SIM —The Labour Departm TIIII^II the Labour Our nn enquiry be held In tho iv.t.er. DISSATISFILD. lTO.Jl llvrtm liny TO, The Editor. Thr .Maocatf. Ml.. Ir. the Sunday Advocate Of jaattrdaj'a date you published an article on Mr. Ronald TreV* house. Heron Bay. The article Iforriblv Diilu Th, The Editor. Tlic AdvocCltr. Mon SIR.—Allow me a small portion What batUca main the Brit to sgieij iniUm -u behind their <>' your valuable space to menplace, is how these UBW „< ,;,,.„ ni|) uv ,. r (o .... .. d tion a point which is badly In inanaue i had by the of ,,„.;,, lM 1lrviir< ..,,„, needj>f remedy. I am alluding t., Government. Ikxi our OWWI.nd .vcupy the me*, prominent tlie rocent case of the reaigned, menl not examine Ibeu craoaoposttlotu in our service. deported or sacked (I don*t tlnls before empl'>ylnc them* If know quite whuh) master of this bo so. It is high Ume the Anolbcr pOUlt, -Sir. | ,i,ne-.n Combcimere School I'ntil reCiovemment did something about that If a Barbadian or I I cently. I remember seaing ttui it. fur these arc the men kvho BTl West Indian had committed no Bcntleman on the Comt>ermerc supposed to Impart to on ihe btisc a .riirif. headlines to that fctnff and suddenly he—well, ha knowledge for which %  %  I would dominate the entire JU -oi?*a?rjhti this .enUem., W • ^.VV.. V,V'... i %  • '•>/•• • t*> •£ ,"' bTfjTfililffi.'Sr 22X2 U tDUnd "ill> of the .fcSSpicaSir. tlu. .late of .Bails. >. aild qussHoR. the culprit sin,, I -. l.-me to help the Island's mim the event ol emigration „,d %  '< the huildntf wa, wecled b ble art ot fmin( crsdrntssls. It not be half so raaiMUblc n the uupraml In thin air i i.U.ved rind work elsewhere. Is I know man) reck* '"• %  "en l .instruction Co. this be she case, why has our Inevitable fart that tl of comment. I. It thin oj. I"?""'." /'' ,'"" nl h 1 club olWed for loner periods run R. W. B Government not taken drastic many honest unemployed B..rl..,local prva. h..s ;. n-inuiit v in reciutw which do a swell li.i-iidx months win. have not nor oo steps In administerinK the merilcl dlons or. at least, West Indians, train from i ..,„. "**; This man Is well off fiiiiuinot expect calls. They I punishment' Or if the Cover,,,.„„j| v „ r „„„ %  ,. ,,„.. uch nutters, or does our Qov2JSH hfit ,TS "K" ,h; ",, hr c "''''" 1 f" ,nro '" inent his taken step. In so d..ii,. rupyins: ttm ofHeesh. iniieiit sMuslle pmtnl th. !,£li^! ii? Ih.m main In their preen'. ,. why have these step, been so bm usuipers. wsts '' ;'," „ ,. "J*^, r '"'" %  Wc, m ?L" c rT rup I'"'VThee carefully secreted from the pubus full in the face. After „. that our Governmcn ^ K ^ J*/ J '* *L*, ,h t rm 2' w'"'" '" %  nr ,ul,il "'''"• "'""" ''"' m ""W '" '"•'"' n enTVinhcr^orc'^er, "'"' 531. im*7 thl^sam"'"" %  island. Sir. that there Is son, of our soil. partlsl u, „r .iT 7^i.7s. ? %  !" '" b,l R 1 i. 2 f^'y. ,i ',' sr jtentlemnii i Ur "' "o staff of the' l-atmur well-k I .ff of Ihe Bentlemen In our Island who The fault of Shese CICIHINC. ''''•;' l '''' 1 '' knows that this man labour Departmeni .iideiiii, ban mdentudy. cm lia In ODU .^employed .„. ,„.. dednit wJi.t sort of e call-slip to face the H the linger of auilt nn eatily be placed on the culprit or culi-r.t* responsible. Aloni. with this man 1* an ••x-pollcr who Ivti nol Left •"""'' hus " %  ?, %  hnown.th.it the local force two rnooth only "employed need register. ne u Usuci wnh a caU-eUp sl u or uords to that eflect Allowand will be among those to leave ancea are also made for the on lha 18th Inatant Ha seasonally-employed, but I never B pension and run* s drivi knew that greater allowance* self-car business. Remenibcr the **>' %  _, hnuw wn bui 1 b : ifveft made for those in good Labour Department directive 7,2 E nauh architect Mr. Jeldcoe rtnanglal position and employpromises that all tho*e with tiuec ,'„'', J*'"icoe has never beei Iseavlnc this colony tomonths reuistratlon as uncn* n Barbados, he drew the plan froni which the house was bi 18.6.51. The Advocate apologise for r 'S,'S+','.**'SS,' bod ^Specials Whan lie It issued with a thus department will oil. any inconvenicner which maviO U*a bean caused to the Bellj\ •n C. but when illN was stated that Mr. Jelllcoel >; built" th* house it did not|\ • responsible for putUni I esw block of stone u.. %  I > j I BOUTS Ilelni .soupCampbeira -..t..> %  SpftChettl *tr Clicre Cheese In Tin* Baked Beans C.AKRS BISCUITS (ream Crarker* Water Btoeults ( hees* Blseutts Aaswrted In T.*s Asso rted In '-Iti Fkr COFFEK Pl'RF. COFFEK IN MAIH> TINS Muxwell lluuse Chase sl Sjnbome I.lpton'a Red, White .1 Blue 'PHONE US WE DELIVER _G0DDARDS FOR FINEST QUALITY FINEST FLAVOUR Ask for Ed.J -*.-,',',',',W,'.*.',*.'-*-'. '//.v.'.v/AV.w.v.v.r.v.v.'-'."'



PAGE 1

Ill li \ il M II ItSI HAKI14DOS ADVOCATI IMS" CLASSIFIED ADS. inmu W,,,KS JL'""! ALES i FO %  " %  rtiHOwt isoa For BinN. Mar up lo i and cei .idOiiimn worn Ti biifi l and *<• (or iiioun'II ii BBffBBkffB T-.: i %  %  ion SALE AUTOMOT1VI MAKKIAdt HINTS FAYNB O' I O'l.M.: ,(.' % %  (t .: Minii* Cltmi %  lauahlei % %  :h..ri>e. r.i.e hi>*d. Bvttf, Ch niKD Aa* 4i HSfrfl ina tr-.la :he St i M A.".*lr....g Hii^m". >i-l..m Teacher, Si dene-it'* Bo> • School. ErmKlnr. Beraid .Son.. Id.-l dan rXiXTKIC AI. %  ma Tii'Je Oeneral %  l"bM Ii, l.lVKSTOCK OOI OM (re"h Covv IS pint* dallv I uhln 'Retreat' U>M Hill. Rl Georc* n a SI—In iHm-Thr,qu • th*. nitdr n Dlhcr 44 pt*. dallv irtae Ourrnert. foureaiellenl (TMIh. Phone Wt% IJHI-Tl. llllkll-. (hi .lunr IK. IHI. at hi* Siatioii Hill. Jame* Nathaniel BreBlelate contra*funeral leave* hu daughter'* Hill, a! 4 p "i for tinitina-burv bri (htvii Room and than Is Carnal) Samuel Reekie, i-mi. Miriam Heckle-, i Daughter i. iJ-lr 01 Nwtu. Kernel h and MoSaM B'BIM) rhlldiet.il iin-i%  iTtiaa. Widow "II i l-aiu 1 Hannah Jonaa. %  DanM*, Cha*c Laml TWllijUl road. | |_j a MECBANICAt. NOTUK Uamal letuaeatae a HI be into* up to 1 SB p m on Monday Uth Juna. IHI. (or ona or more vacant %  'ion, tenable ai ih* %  an p| %  .-.,< m Bwaaal TM condition* o( Ihe aaard ara that the candidate* mint nave baan born in thPariah, or whoaa parent* hava baan rnid.nl In tha Pin* (or Ihiee >rai* W •tance*. and no4 " Ihan S ear. oi nan Ihan It yeai* uf aan ihe date at itlon Tha table (or iwnod o( not mora than (We >S, year* Candidate* mint preaeni themaelve* i< tliHradma'tei al the Foundation Srhnu "ii July, ini. at BJB an. n WOOD aODDAMn. Clark o( tha Va.tr>. Ch Hoard Colony mt Tritilil^l a( Tbaa rVppUcaUoau •><•' invliajd for Hie i of ChM RefaabUitmUOn uili.ir. Cocoa Board. Tinaalatf} will !" %  ii %  %  ;>.T(iU Ml niKiuni; llua.-tu.il mto cifpeiidini: on the quaJ and expmeact] uf tba J.UCCCM(U1 appUcaat Tnr*3Unfl %  :•" N I "ill be payable at ri lo those BjapRrrad frorn UOM t lime ( Governs The olllcer will !><• i 1 %  aSc i.i Pa ttora loj Buitlon, -S.niui Crux, wber funiishi'ii BVakUabta lor which litwill pa] % %  ,,n; 10'. i.i hu MiUrv pin p due ni tha IJMIIlure. taOUld hve iiltainad a tood l Un da r d >( adu ation, possess executive ability ond have bad wlda agileullural i % %  %  bla but no* eaaantlal. Duties, of the post are til lo anume raaponstblllty for .11 ... .. iMiiiatfatllH arOI Ii ai d Mnt of all PropafaUng Stations (under the Immediate a of fenc Chi-f Oncer Of the IHiurtment of [• %  ire). (ii) T" -;i|ilieations Cocoa Subsidy Scheme and to Initiate awlr investigation. dii i To control l>oth the office and field sUiiT engaged on the work of the Cocoa Board. (lv) Tn certify vouchers for experidltun Ini u ihe Cocoa Board. (v) To supervise the genenil field progress of the Cocoa Scheme. (vilTo carry out any other i may be aaalj n officer by tha Cocoa Board from time to I The iost is noo-pensl to throe months' notice of termination on cither side. Applications containmc full particular, of the candidate's age, quallAcatiana and gethar wtth coplaa nf rtol two recent testimoninl*. should be 1 to the Chairman, C* Board, c/o Deportment of Arirulture, St. Clair. Por! of Spain, "'rin'rtnd to mach him %  than June 23rd. IPS I. Envelope* containing applications ahould bo narked— "AppUcaUoo C.It O." on tha outside •aft-hanr] E W LEACH. Chairman. Cocoo Board. 5.6.51—7n. Kgaji lanrtMO UACHTMI Uactrlc motor and llshl baan uard. a bargain Pnona BBB I \KI-.M in -< I (Ml A : . %  .. %  1 tai^blr iliIU Oradr Gn J ind Uradr iii > %  civrd ti 1 Ilir i.:id-(iiiicd up lo Saturday 21,t Juli .Ichildren rl Padiailonaii I" itraitaiird < inum%  Ianon and mini III lormard a Bapt.anwl CarUAcala and il< a CWUOOSM in Haja4 ffUiUHS or Haad Ma.tr, Biconaary Brhool ai to thair flu REAL ESTATE all"!"!,.-, rKa'va %  mmaMtlvrl) pa modam bwasalow ..luatwl at tt,. Oar, -* !" and away rrom tha mass road badfoarna with ruantoa oaatr m aa, ^t.^""!1 ^ „ Tot furth r>i^ cowlsat JT W.tu ai T Oaddaa O.ant U rhona SHI II.. i II 4S1-I ( n M47*t£S£. U 01 ^ 1 " '"" < OH"" Mill. %  atnaht4M. St Joaaph. over ., •>.i"I'Frls H 1)1 SB, -"tltlfa on J aria., M parchn ol land ad amirl ' hian promontoty with ritmafVa vta a* tha aaa and dallaMful coaatUna rn* houar rontaina rloaad varandah. • Ulna naom. thaaa baaroam. iwith draaaini raoma. ona wltn running uatar. klM-lr>*.. pant*., bun,,, aad Zi.l ro. •• %  r..,. men, ... j ,..,,, „ r a^trr iixiallad Sar> .„\, raoni* and Oaraj* In v,d. M MONIF. .tandina oat 1 ra-d ara,ird on tuah %  r-i %  .1 (.. t HM kMBM BUS* %  opm varandah. al|. Una ruaa. Utraa brdrooma lona with di<*aln roaml. pa.tr. btltlM nr.d uaual can*an lr ncaa Ilactratlly and O'.irrnineid •.•Irr imUllrd Inipartlon iio application to tha ratpacTha abova propartla) will ba aal up for •ala by public caanpaUUan, In aaaaarai. (MTr-. J..i,i... Stiart. mwn. on Friday Mi.d jun> |na ri p in YEARWtH>n S. BOYCL, .Solicitor!. J %  M Ian HOUSES BlSUAIaOW On Uai 'op'. Ml*, tol.. Atrol aui aapoaTH Apalatoy. at. Jamaa l • SI mi J. Man-fit Coaat. ma room Unlumlahad. traan AUOMM IApply: U'l'H. Top Hi.k Trl'phonr S0! FU appolniatanta to vlata Iff S SI li rURNlBHSO APAKTMEMT. al Coral Sand. Worthlnx. a/IIR Allvar Unar. Good Saa balhln| For (urthar parti.i la-. Dial IIM | SI-I ( n la an Straat Dial Mar IvOOM Or* -..-i,,vl.| or un ^T'ha*.| tHal ; SWAKSTA Bn'iaalow at Wanhinfl nil. furniahad for ttv. n.onth af Jult nd (ion. lha In Saptrmbai Dtal MM a Klin TOM, MISCELLANEOUS NOTICE i an la UjadM OALVANISKO sneirrsiit ou.i iv naw ahaaia Chaapaat In th* laliM I ft '"*. 5 ft tbm. a n H.TJ : innv 1* n 8 40 Natt caah. Baltar hun r I A BARNES ft CO, LTD. 4 • II t I II Iff* M in ZQFLORA—A powrrful rrmtrlpra>to S l n tha abrk room. In tha lloma. Public Rnom* rte On a-lr al all DTUB Stoiaa ; b il c .. d LADIES!! Here's Good New* you've been \\:iiliiiu' for . EMBD. ANGLAISE In WHITE and other Lovely Shades tins just been opened al: THANI BROS. Pr. Wm. Ily. Si. Dial 3466 It's worth >"ir uhile lo SHOP NOW: FARM" lliWDKKIIi M'lJ rilFAM vil.K Siiprama Qualltv and o dv •JX> |.r lit. In. and • %  On p*> l-tb tin Get ii tin today from vour groiar oi MH Ittha baat milk obtax. TIM. 5-lh (amity ilia U ianllcronomlrat Inatat on "Farm" l.-r t...aaka of your haalth and vour pockrt If *our da.ili'i rannut 'iipply phona ana. issi in. WA.vnt Miair-tm tha'vt toaak TI trail oa M raali .Taadui/i St u-rd. — ..f. 4 u.i'di a canfa a word traak—4 ". w •taam aad AUCTION IVMaOAV ll*t at 1 pm al lit MM Ailayna'a Land Hu>n Mall .. MS r 1B ,fd baidftl and *hln|la hoUMI •!! I with ahad rool in • B with urnca* Houaa adjolnirul abova l S %  land ran br ranlad Ui quarto*. H ARCHER McKEVZIF Aucttonaar 17 H SI -4n i H i...t Iran than than 11 ) vt J th. ol U t>ic l-oiindalii i Friday 0th July. IHI. HODDAHD. Claik ol I Chrtat Church NOTICE I .ii H Ol i in Ii Application* on forma lo ba obtained %  i. ..i i • i li.mal crrtilU'atiavlll br recantd -i ofnea up to 3 00 p m on Monday Hth June. IHI. for ona W man vacaH C Church Vaatrv Eahibitiuni trnablr al Boy*' Foundation School Candida I IBM UMj J .d l t MAL'FFEUR: Eaparlancad CBaUffffll r, AtMlUl A *> rin q ilrad, Reply tu Bo Advaaat* iff H-i %  iii-xicnAi. Apply !• %  Mi* Liala Dall-y. Tha Pavllllon. Haatinaa. i" %  ,ii aa PART-TIME STBNOTVPaHT. 2 hour> Ka Koo.1 hiioulada.of booki idim Apply Advocate Box M. r. i LdvorMa with lull paititular* IV SM an. MISCELLANEOUS HAGS Clean Old Raw. Delivered to ",e Booni prpl 17 S SIII iiv-.'iii'is :. Cool Airy Country WMH.M I MIMS IHI Apply T Grddr* • 111..t new hr Nu-Floor Mi C. Ltd. uu] ii—at data of Ihe ruamlnalin n OM llradnuutcr M hool on rriday Sth July WOOD GODDARD. Ctsra "' nw v.-n. Chrial Church ini vi ,. Mi IN,,, .rat 1 Ill i. .. BASK All I'M I 1. Ihe rredllar* helel-ia tarflalla afiiat Ha.mail* and War Irian Plan.* IVIer. TAKF NOTICF. that we, Ihr Tiuilrc* of the above Plantation* arc about lo obtain a loan nf CS.OOS under the pro vli-iunt of Ihe above Art aifalnal tho ..nd Plnntatlon. l„ reape. t of the Aailcultural year IHI M lMf. No inonev ha* baan borroked under the Art !" itural Alda Act. IBDo. or IhBbOTS Ait ma the caav may pel In %  h year. Dated thla Iffth day of June. IHI. I' CHAI I.1NHR and T A niTTBNS, Truateea. per C H. PACKER Attorney. IffSftl—an NOHCB l'*l- "I -1 II 111 Pntochial Tnnunfi oflVe will NO! %  . i will ba open " Tuaadav Hit and Frl Wcdneadnv 10th. Thiiraday Hat and Frt ll-N ?.' %  -! • Slanedl G S. ri-ltlUN. ..hi.,, • Iff 1M 3r liOVER.NME.\T .NOTICE NOTICE TO FISHERMEN A practice shoot by the Barbados is scheduled to be held n 11 on Thursday, 21st June, 1S5I. bttwci'n the houri of 8.00 a.m. and 5.00 p.m. All l\shmg boats sailing off this area are warned to keep at least three (3) miles off shore. I si.mild Thursday. 21st. be rainy or otherwise unfavourable. I I M will take place on Und June, 1951. at lha sfime time. 17651—2r NOTICE i ..1-11 MI .11.1-1 ( IM >: %  II Healed tender-, maikrd on Ihe envelope "Tender (or the Erection o( a Pavilion at Sarjaanf* Villaae". will br received at my "(rite up to 3 p m on Monday 33rd July. 1MI (or the erection ol a Pavilion at the Saueant • Villaae Playins Field i ihe plan and ipecincation* a •BwUdi ..i fi.-. % %  : II li IdouM on Oepo.il of Ihe aim %  HOOi. which will ba turnlna the pUn to Mr Each tenderer ihould which it l> antlcipalad romplrted and aUo tubi ('.. I i,i late the date by He -ork will ba •ii the name* ol i.< ,-i i... i f 4 aw 00 ,aeh ol the contract ihe liniMliia by for the due perton and tai liimpleiiui the apeciSed date The %  u(rea*(ul tenderer will ba reojulr •d lo enter Into a contract wllh the Vei liv (,., ii..erection of the bulldlna The Vettrv doe* not bind Ittelf t< accept the lov.e-1 or any lendarad WOOD GODDArU). Oarii af t Chrut %  v. | I.O% I ltV>ll VI MMIIIS ATTENTION is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amendment) Order, 1951, No. 15 which will IKpublished In the Official O w a tl C Of Monday 1 atn June, 1951. 2. Under this Order the maximum retail sellinK price of 'Meat— "Fresh and Fror.cn" is as follows: — by kind per M, Enearney I .. _. their aaraa' inn smaii Car in perfect worklnj 'on Term* Caah. R Arckr niia. Auctioneer IT 51-3n No S3 swan a *Uir* premlae*. liaht. and bath Dial MM d Middle Street! Up. 1 ilorlaa tii B*SBai Immediate po m iilun SMALL FUHNISHETJ Flj\T: SulUble (of Unfjla paraon. at Glen Bay. Rl U*>ranca For furthar particular* Phi.na "S USSI-Sn Electrwll %  •i MMBVBB weekly IS S Si In vmn Ki>ir\rio\\i WANTED (Eron i. Eiperient. 2. ato ". ,,,uUn *' d *""la. and a bno. !" "f. of tndu.irlal .ondltlona In Ui. da— aan £is £o £so ti.il, r. 1*00 %  K Pi'*ui,,i, ..,, -i ,.i lat a. lnd Claea Honr*rr*%C4O0 %  CM E7J0 p„ nBPMBSSllal MBit ,.Uje.t *ai Service and pravkg For a Kiitablv qualinad randldnta vacanry u available .%  the (oIlowlBe 1 S.laiv Bpira Iff a SI-In IMIIMIWl SHIPPING NOTICES ntMlx* IBM ATWBi., a. 1 hold m.eeii raaponalbla for B aba* conUarUoa any n-bt i NtDOl Eagle Mall. Prierkin* land. St Mltha.l Tha public are aereoy warned I Iff S SI Sn The pubbc CtdUSl SKAI.V. Bobrit* Road, loaell* CroaB Boad ereby anted afalnal Bi*increoii lo m. .,,... VlotJTT ItFRVI. HPBINGER ipsB Clarke, a* 1 do not hold m.ai-ll leapoiialbla lor her or am ona elae .,-ilra. I.i* aft] debt or dcol* unleia by a rtt atf'ied h. ma WMTACE SPRINGER. MartinMiue. M< lord Hill St Mbrhael Iff 91—In The public i i i.ltig .ledit | i nee Field* %  i retponubie (oi 1 hereby warned *#*imt my wife, Dorti L.thl.-%  do not i m u m aai aa uler *l>ned by me t'AMErtLIN M.M. Iff HI IJSHHIfV Ml lord > Hill. Mayen Land. W. : II, IVl . % ha advarUaad aame .., U..1 ..... eaeon fl .1 1 to Be* Y to Id.... IIONTKEAI.. AtST\IJA. NEW ZEALAND LINE. LIMITED • M A NI LTNBl S.S. ABABUA i. Iron. Ilobart. 11th May. Adelaide Mill •ma Dtn June. BrUbana lath June. Sydney Hrd June, ani.ina at Tun•dad duilna the latter half of July, and laaBIBSdjBi i.. liaibadoa and. | ...i|-,F la addiiksn lo aenaial aarBo thla veaaei ha* an,nil apace (or chili. I t.awr. ,. Bl ("*'.. .-t.'.-l %  BUBIBJI I. iiiS Bar liaiuhipment at Trm... 'i Guiana. laatwarU aad UlandB. akvr partlculan applv — rL'KMKSS. WITHY A CO.. LTD. Trinidad. DA COSTA A CO. LTD. Kin* sailing rnd.i, U ..*si M i . 'rl'*""' "• \IVEKTISE II PAYS V 9nr. |TIW YORK SIliVICF _**rARJrET.r" raMB U I n A HTFAMFK ...il, BftUl l-n NEW ORLEANS SERVICE kLCOA JMLAK1*. aaii* 13th Juno |rM) .in" lffdt ILCSM BOAM1I liv IHI '.' All HA 1-ATHI'H TO-IIAVSG.A. -roiB IIM i ..1 i . : .... k, I I, I... clover That le "Ona leal li "The other M n "Third U lha roaaa (hat tha Una" "No need e.plaining Ihe CHANCERY SALE rd property will i. %  —,, betwee'i ...I then -old II i tins lha aamr ho %  ale at the Itr(i*tiitii>n iHtlie 1 p.m. (or the aum and on tha i iMi each aiM-ceedlTig Friday I" rull partlculan on appl-ratcr, HF.ItHl:HT Mt'Tt-IHNBlIN IIAVUTV. Tru*lee V l^VINlA 1JXWIS et al PHopaatTV All thai cerUin parcel of land llormeHy port of GaodUnd I'l.i I Mluata in Ihe pariah of Sainl Mnhael and Ulan.I abovaaald conUining By admaa*uiennl Iwo acrea I hire rood* ten and one half perche* or tlrevralxHii. abutting on landa of Aleainder tlilwin on the Writburv <". n a place .ailed Frolic and On a private roadway or however alie the tame li lb ilUnfl ITSFT PReTt; £SJH. 0 HATE OF SALE Und Juna, IMI M WIU.'AMS. ( 81—*n Bemtrtrar-ln.C'haii4-aiy SI'EIGHTSTOWN # I'mm pace 5. n effort to enlighten S|*MghtsUMiianr show nim-i usar*. There is one BA station and a small cinema which n-.inll.i :i mission house, A small cold storage plant wan recently open* ed. Two jetties are used to ship suvar. A II sherman who casts hii net all along laie coast from St. Jiun*^ far up as Hey woods, aupi,tents with .sprats and frays when there la a meat or fish shortage. There are also other llshennen who build large lir-h ].-,• %  There L* also the Boys* Quo and the Alexandra School with Attractive gardens. Speii*itstown, with only a main road, is still the mam shopping centre of the Leeward parishes. It Is at Its pee* period lavs Austria Unwilling I rrt o a^ 1 1 •*• !r*jasa, lo scrap Loalition Satu ARTICLE RETAIL PRICE (not more than) MEATFHESII & EUOZFN: 3CB>* (a) Roast and Steak from Ru up, H und. Sirloin and Ribs 48c. l*r Ih (b> All other cuts inducing soup slew beef ofle MUTTON: lafgaj and loin chops .. 4c. (b) Shoulders 45c 1' i Stew 40c. PORK 42c. Legs Bad loin chops .. 54c. first of the piston-enginco helicupten, |hc 10-12-seat Bristol H3, will goon be (lying. It bee two Aivis Leonldes 550 horsepower engines and ran fly oo OR*) engine. IXiiign plans for HM oilu-r are being drawn up by 1 I i >"a Autogiro Compai.y DOW taken over by Saund*Ts-Roe. The plans are for a three-rotor mui-hiiif tu tarry 24—32 paa-'enThe Jet hc.*coptc r b, under development by Falreys, Called the Hotodyne, it will have twi gas-turbine engines outboard of tlic cabin, and air from these engines will be "tapped" to the rotor-blade tips to turn them. The blade tips will also be fitted with small separate-Jet units for giving a powerful thrust for lakelanding The Hotodyne Is designed to carry 23 passengers, but a considerable amount 'f advanced development work; wnl be necessary before ,i r<-acties 'h' 1 flying stage. These large Helicopters will eventually take over from the small s ingleengined helicopters which arenow operating experimental services. The British European Airways Helicopter Cnit. which ran the World'j first night-mail service and toe first scheduled passenger serrate, uses the small Weatland S, 61 helicopter. Proving flights for a new summer service between London and Birmingham have already beguiIr Touch With Barbados '< Costal Station VIKNNA. Austria, June IH POLITICAL LEADERS have shown no inclination to scrap the uldest (lovemment Coalition despite the upset victory in the recent Presidential elections, by the hilhrin minority Socialists. The present Coalition of the Conservative People',* Party and Socialists has held office in four-power occupied Austria since December 20, 1945. President-Elect Ex-lmpct Lai General, 78 year old SCK-IIIIIHI Tinsii.i Koarnar win be swom Into office Thursday. June 2\ and lb* i ;,.\ eminent immediately will resign. Negotiations as to the shape of the new cabinet are now beinj conducted, but it it believed that Government's lineup will iiniaiti almost exactly the same as now with seven Peoples Party and si* Socialist Ministers. As a result of the October, 194S he People's Party has 77 seats in Parliament. Socialists B7 League of Independents 10 and Communist* live. Unexpected Pre-election rumours had it that if Socialists won the election neither they nor anyone else thought they would — they would •all for new Parliamentary elections this autumn In the hopes of coming out the largest National Assembly group. Normally next parliament ar> elections would be In October 1953. As it was Socialist Kuener supported by the nation's 220.000 Communists barely w'*> by a majority of 180.000 lorial ists figured they would ba fooli-' to demand a new parllajrientai. election on the basis of that margin. There were reaaona for the Coalitions stability Firstly, thi a Only assurance against Commun-I isls with assistance by Russiai \ occupiers of eastern Austria telitng Government la a stroni oalltion of all other groups Secondly, all disputes that migrr break the coaliUon are nevei fought on the floor of Parliament If Socialists ever left the Coall Uon they could retain control ti labour unions. —I'.P. India Gets Grain CANBERRA. June IB Australia Is to send IIHH £4.200.000 (Australian) worth o grain, mainly wbaBt, Rxtami Affairs Minister Richard i.i announced to-day. The grain v,l'i be part of Australia's conlribu tion under the Colombo Plan d aid to South East Asia for a vc> beginning July I, 1951. The Minister added lha Pakistan would inv ,:..,.i "•. %  th 1:2.000.000 (Aijatnuan %  nd Ceylon £300,000 (Australian) Reular F.G. PRESCOD & Co. Building Conlractora A Reno v. Modem Building*. Eaclualv DffMajrM % %  abit* A on* of Baal QualM: 0111 i:\r\i BOUVKNIK*. AL)1NC. HA'l'KS l %  ..i ... i .i "HtrNWHIT "IIAKHI14.' XI June IS J..I. I.M-lUAl.l IL i.. n.i.i..i. lUihad-n l.K asBBBaVICB From SuiuiM'ii, Uvcvpool and Gla %  M M. I I I 1 \rrl>al H*tllildietaaa. I'.K. & CONTINENT A I, SBRVICB I l| ...i ..I tiali-al I ...,di,Hat., nodietawa. It.ih.de* *-• MJ,il i..i". ,|. Bate* 17 June Jin Agenls: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — PbOfM "OS A COOL Shoe for a HOT Day l.tnlivs! SJBB "• III If-Si Sll/ll". NEW SHIPMENTS JUST OPENED also a wide selection of Hosiery, Cleaners and Polishes. i I Jok Spwiklinq (p&ifohmanxji \ 8 Jkc Gijudin a M li r •JUST THE TOOL TO DO THAT DIFFICULT JOB PAD SAWS with Extra Blades THK (IMIIAI I IIIMMIM II Brwd Slmt S VISIT OUR SHOWROOM AND LET I | US DEMONSTRATE THIS WORLD i RECORD BREAKER TO YOU J; 8 ;: X ECKSTEIN DUOS. BAY STREET. I imm its iv STOCM >• .VJV//.V///. •e'e'e'-'e'e'e'-•'.'///-'/-'/,'-'*'.'.-,'.'-'.'-'.', V,'.*..'-','. V-*



PAGE 1

|-\(.l TWO IIVRIIADOS ADVOC'ATi: ii'sim. it \i in, I9JI CaJiih Callinji} M RS. HELEN LILL1E LEARY flew in from New York yesterday via Trininn| during the *-ar with the British Information Bn tllj from Scotland she has been living in the United !r • New York am of the Ihl large-.: daily pson ""' PMUpplBM. she %  Par Uili and other I'lulippiiu DewSMPtn and faaaMa with INibli.R"li• ve of the Manila BroadOn Honeymoon M R. ft MRS. JOE PLIMMCK •.,re ouurrtod nldad 011 Saturday are .pending oon in Barbados. The> flaw in tram innldad on Sunday .md are gucaU nt the II. %  I Royal. Joe, who was manager of the Trinidad Water Polo teams whieli visited Barbados In November. 19.W. ii the son of Mrs. A. P in 5'j I1 *m\§ib 3rw "l enjoyed a visit (0 ;# South Bank, but the wife was annoyed—I spent all day up (he shot toicet %  Aniil't Eyei Failing | HEAR with regrel lhat Wonderful Queen Mary Mr M Loadoa IIWll Se'the illtl.lMMt If. AND MRS. I F. A. CHILD from St. Vincent wyndham Lewu, brtihant 5n Ois/iJces Nylons, Dogs and Young People Smoainq Brittati artist, la losing hU sight. r Hi. ay have troubled h.m $/„, ^ L ej Children Theatres and Sitting in the Park lor some time. When he painted ** •rtralt of T. S. Eliot FOR nearl> every child m the in 1949 he found h#had to move world, somewhere there is a refuge* close to his sitter to see what he i,, m mothers who scold and n.i k wanted. This portrait is now at wh o forbid Somewhere there Magdalene College, Cambridge. .. n> ,,„,. | 0 e.i W HU first portrait of Eliot caused y„r all Britain* royal v.i.ng'ri a Hoyiil Acadamy aenaation when trial haven is Marlborough Houae. the RAs rejected it In 138 ,„ ,,,,. 0 f Qu.-m Mar.'. N..w Mr. Lewis "can no longer Young Prince MsefcaaI at Kitlga*. jipr grjiitdion. is a constant caller. It is fortunate that Mr. l-ewi* .| ls f.ivourltachocolate rake U is no less a writer than a painter. „„ rp (,, ^ waiting for him And he finds that by using a j us u Q lltH .„ |fan ilietaphone he can continue In knowing Ihe likes and dislikes of H before. At present he nor adu | t quests, an she makes ig.iged on a novel ami an ,, ur| inat her young relatives wii r %  book, have just what thev want to eat \I. Uariati 86. sht s,W Them Reason There is no doubt that Queen M ISS DORA IBBERSON. AdMary spoils the children They. vlser on Social Welfare to in turn, find her far from dull wad CD and W leave, for St. old H th.-> l % %  't her in her sittlngVin.ent cn June 25lh. Rea-on room surrounded by family photof.r her visit is to advise on the trap!; organisation of the Fairhall ways with a holder. But she will never smote bn public. And she aislikes to lee young people smoking. Smoking, indeed, is one of the subjects on which she haj strong views. Just as she has on stockings. She insists on silk stockings; nylons she abhors. 1-ATE night trips from lict home are not encouraged by Qugd gj Mary's doctors. But she horrified thrm the other night when, long after ten o'clock, she went to a floor suite in the Savoy to aeo the |> • raf illuminations. Doctors wcTTied about the dangers of a chill. But Queen Mary Just laughed. Just as she did when she was first confronted with her push-chair. There were snariy conferences about that chair, and the gentlest way to Introduce U as a re m ind e r of eld age. The royal wrath waa feared. Instead, Queen Mary studied it from its pneumatic tyres to its soft upholstery and then she sat It. th H.M. QltEN MARY Plimmer and a Director of Plim>:? l 1 c Ida > b >' g£" ^SUSt ?*. L Co Ud His wife is the th,ld IS planter. Their home Is at Grand Sable. St. Vincent Mrs. former Gwen House, daughter I.C.T.A. Students %  WH HUGH PAYNE Child lg the formei Richards. For her the visit is a holiday. She returns to St. Vincent June 25th Mr. Child is intransit to Canada. He leaves on Saturday by T.C.A Meanwhile Children's Home. She will return to Barbados July 2nd. Talking Point TM'E weaknesses of women have been given them t>v nature to exercise the virtue* of oefher touring some exhibits men. — Mme. Nseker. Brother And Sister the Ocean M" TONY ALLAMHY •** in Barbados. This nd Mr Edward Cumberbatch an lived from Trinidad yesterday 'hey are staying morning by B.W.I.A. Mr. MlView Hotel, chaet Nurse arrived on Sunday Mrs. Child spent part o, her has brought along his sister MalehnnM.v. in nWh.^L -...I h.. %  '* Wn ha* COBW OVff for fl holiday. They arrived on Sundav W I A. Mafalda who now lives in Trinidad went to school at the Ur*uline Convent here. With Barclay's Bank many friends here. Cinema Manager They ,-ire all Imperial College of schooldays in Barbados and has Tropical .Agriculture students n on vacation Hugh wID not be returning to I.C.T.A. He has just finished the examination for a diploma In Agriculture. Pat Haynes, another I C.T.A. student is due here tomorrow. Other arrival on the Trinidad flight was Mr. David LucleSmith who had been to Trinidad on a shoB ACK to after a i Caracas yesterday %  hurt holiday in Barbados went Mr. anj Mrs. Stanley Day wt*o net been staying with Mr and Mrs. B, |ISS DAPHNE GILL flew QVf* Elizabeth Mrs Da\ B.G. Dentist D R JAMSS FUNG. Dental Surgeon of British Quassia who left here ta spend a bhort holiday in St Vincent returned yesterday b> B.G. Airways. He still has two more weeks in Barbados before he returns to British Guiana. He is staying at Crystal Water* Guest House. Week-end Departure gfTUROTNQ SO Trinidad over the week-end after a short holiday in Barbados was Mr Aurelio Gomes of Stephens Ud. In Port-of-Spain. Mr. Gomes M" R U \ RSON his two month Britain and trie formerly with Messr* Wm Fog:continent He flew in on Sunday arty Ltd. in Barbados and B.G. via Puerto Rico by II W.I.A. M IS Trom St. Vincent yesterday M. Drayby HO. Airways to spend a couple of weeks' holiday in Barbados and Mrs Dr.vton are She is staying with Mrs. Bourne Day manages a chain in Fontabelle Daphne is on the lemas in Venezuela. staff of Barclays Bank in St. Vincent. Jockey Salesman Arriving by the same plane was R. CHARLES PEIRCE and Mi's M. I. Minors who is here for Jockey Pat Fletcher flew '*' 1 weeks staying at Paynes Bay. SO Trinidad yesterday afternoon Sl Jnts. by B w I A for the MidLegal Draughtsman Summer race meeting Besides R CLVDE ARCHER. Lsal tataman at^ if th^ etSmlf b M Draughtsman of Trinidad re. BsSA^nmV ,urnPd to Trinidad on Sunday by thil. rnamwiudo BWU after "Pending a holiday She Incidental Intelligence S AN BERNARDINO, California. has a city regulation which requires every clock in public view to have the correct time or the owner of said clock will be IbjNL —L-E.s. is quite cornfortabl' said approvingly. MARLBOROUGH HOUSE ha never looked more graceful or She b out and ..bout seeing , pleasant than now. Queen Mary so murh that hi new in the world. V peta n **naely Into the inside of has furnished il with wonderful jid she alwav* lodgm In her lne lale • lhiB *" aucepans; the antiques, each with a little plate memory incidents and sights w v *" catches the hem of a attached, giving its history. which rhildrrn like to hear ."wiequin's dress and, frowning, It Is a charming home for the about fc ,f la th material, is Just evidence upright old lady who. rm**l wiih You may have noticed WwJ of the keenness of curiosity, which parasol and bag of peppermint hen the Royal Family are tohas been whetted—not blunted by the years. show, like the Festival, the rhilNevertheless, flattered business dren are rarely for SWaj I ••"" *'" > ,t n '"S 1 " makln R Queen Mary She moves along hasty presentations, for win... SSOVrly, inspecting everything, and Queen Mary gravely thanks them asking all the questions that chilIT is on these expeditions that dren would ask. if thev weren't Queen Mary buys all the presents ahy. she loves to give through the yer Royal babies too have many After she has gone, toy trains. rpportunilies for getting to know furry rabiU. and rubber ducks will Mary She is always calling bear new legends:—"As purchased lu see how they are progressing, by HM Queen Mary." They are She takes a very loving Interest for the royal babies. Prince Charles and Princess Gratitude V.V/W. .-,-'---V„',WV .•,-,'.*.',:'.*,'.:*,','*'*'*•*• IMPORTANT NOTICE lhc undermentioned film companies wish to nilorm I lie asjaergj public that lhc information coat am ed in lhc puhli. gnnounccmenl. purporting lo be Itom (UsTlCiVCS Mad dggsfd in Ki im W \ riiniii %  A u' for such an announcement (o be made. \v^ DM Uap.>loj!i/c lor the enibarrassmenl v hich this CffrOCaMMl public noliec m;iv ha\e caused any e\hibiur in Barbados. TWFMIF.1H CENTURY-FOX iTUNin \H. LTD. L. n. MIILAN — Monet** PARAMOUNT FILMS OF TltlMDAI). IK( H. DONALD HUNTIB— ^fawoifi. R.K.O. RADIO PICTURES (iRiNiPvm INC. B. C. 11111 it Mm I \I\I.RSAL PICTURES OF TRINIDAD, INC. M. R. FERBER —jtfgaagari MONOGRAM PICTURES OF IRINIMAO K< It A. in Sti VA— MunniH'r. creams, insists on stepping out snd keeping .-. bright eye on the world.—L.B.S. B.B.C. Radio Programme also eager to have 0ne of Queen Mary's lew inner advice dications of great age centres A Favmirile round the gifts she makes. She the young Prince grows, wants to see her presents used. Queen Mary may claim to have |f there Is no sign of them, she isfcs where they are. A symbol TfESOAY. JUT** !•. 1S4I i %  m Prcfrimmr I'jmdr. L i m aa w ctwic*. u 1 Prom BnUln IS 00 noor II II p m Nrn Anslyilt. • u s H — isi as sion agents here. our jockey salesman some business in Trinidad Back Home M R. WINSTON back from tnp to UM U I ..f her ready gratitude for any small favour done her are the signed photographs of herself. Queen Mary's afternoons arcoften spent in her favourite parks, nut the fashionable ones, but Battersea Park or Dulwich. She sits for hours looking at the (lowers. "I think the flowers in Batlersea are the finest in London." she once said. Round her. children piny and mothers sit knitting. Occasionally a small dog will yap ,M1I frown. She THE AIPVKMI IIKS OF PI PA great an influence on his edu. ;t!i. n and upbringing as she had in his mother's. Her strong opposition lo %  mi of relasallon from thr aM dicnlllrd rode of rtiquetusurroundim the Court makes Queen Mary lake an exceptional interest In thoe hlhr*t In thr line of saeeeaslon. One of her favourite grand* children is the Earl of Hnrewood the llrst visitor to hihome in London's O"' when his son was born recently. BUT this frequent exchange of ''<"*" M "V vUits between Queen Mary and %  not ond o1 rto her young raUttTOl U only part of AUcrnuon Jaunt bag li^ Now the Festival Fun Fair is in It is very unusual to find her at U-ittersea Park. But Queen Mary Marlborough House in the morntan still go on her Sunday altering* or afternoons and often, In noon, jaunt to Richmond Park, the evenings. when.-, as she is apt to say. she Mlsse-t Nothing, often played as a little gin. Round about the morning hom She hs slresdy made up her when suburban housewives are mind about the Festival of arriving in Oxford-street lo do Britain. After sht had beei their shopping the straight-back* I Daimler with the straight-back* d old lady inside Is sweeping through the nates of Marlborough Housr Quean Mary is on her way t^> explore one of London's many exhibitions. Her taste is catholic. It doesn't d. 15 p m Souttnlrs of Uutlc. s M p III Wr„... ',,[ %  • f S. t ulh A' 1> m Enalaitd v Auilralla. S 10 p m IntrrhHlr. S 11 p m Nrw HMwd. %  00 p m MtMlr Masailn*. • IB p m WrhK MMJinr. IU p ." PnmimnvPsrsdc 7 10 i i Gun Kptakms. S 11 P IK ,1th. lUpm In.m Th* Editorial.. Britain. • IS Interlude. m Muslr From Grand m Th New.. 10 10 p n ) IB p in As You Llko It .llval In Hi Ham I m I rROCKAMN* Tl'rsDAY JUNF It. ItSl 1S0O p m — IS IS p m Now.. 10 IS p m 10 SO p m Caribbean Comer 11 Mn 11 M PLAZA SSTSH I Shawi TOOAT S a I -JHK mviiin, i7.bliy ^Dtlicon* -11 ,1 I i Welaam Iruralf t, Aithur__Kc-7inrHv § NS'OKSBBT HIBTCBT"* WED. ft THURS B St 30 P M %  STKP r r STRP" (Lxrieaea TletneT -TALLIN srAaaowJofin btuSalS a Maareea O'Hata GA1E1i THE GARDEN' ST. JAMES Last %  *•> TONITs — B.SS -TBK POt'NTAINgtAD' \ Till RS I *, ,. M TRAf'l'K I.II i it.I nn Ralph HYitu \ < ..I:N, i i ,. IWnX .V Waller SLEZAK %  T II K A Till: CROSiWOHU puohed round in her shiny plated chair she -mi "It Is all very InteresUnsr. but 1 am alrald It Is to* modern (< % %  me. I'erhapa I am loo old-fashioned." DESPITE her activities of the Queen Mary often visits BY THE WAY % no„chco m i^ matter whether it is a display of theatre or a cinema in the evening agricultural implements, antiques. And her favourite places of cnteror of exquisite needlework, she lainment are by no means all in goes from stand to stand missing the West End. She has a robui nothing. sense of humour. The questions *he ask are The news of London's night life lefendary among exhibitors always finds her listening intently 1 HAVE OtVgff < l;iimt'd to be of MOK, is aboul lo rcvululionise n mechanical turn of mind. If English ballet AH that I ask is put to u. I can sometimes wind g some new movements, such as a clock or lock a door Rut in all jiirouerte on the elbows or a % % %  %  % %  in ii ....... what on "liaaaa>on thabaafai And,above earth is the ooinl of "a device for all. the drmiettc or wheel-barrow Musing eggs." unless eggs trick, with one dancer advancim; nre being used as some mysterious on her hands while another holds part of the internal economy of a her by the legs Away with all thing al the foot <>f each poem. Nobody will mind about the verses, if they can read about a new "dietor what-not. Balthazar Desgueux had the right Idea in his Cocur Charmand are often ralhrr dreaded. For they are not mere oolite inquiries Ihey are tharp. ohrewd. and searchins. It was out of such questions that a dlscontertlng rumour wad born. It began to be whisperi-d that Queen Mary Is as acquisitive She likes to hear all the gossip about the fashionable restaurant! and the latest night clubs. And when there Is a big party, especially at Buckingham Palace Princess Elizabeth goes to tell hei all about It. Often she finds Queen Mary motorcar. You might as well invent a method of sifting sheep's wool through a lantern or uncorking a bottll with a croquet-mallet, or smoking haddock through n holder. Krperl Erirlencr G IVING expert evidence before lhc Khuhnrb Puff Commission. Sir Hardteigh Wright revealed that experiments made over a period of year* with hares had proved that tolderol had effect, good or bad. "but." he added, "w to believe that If mice instead of hares we proved that the effect of tolderol on human beings when taken in small quantities In sweetmeats, pastries or Ash-lollipops, is similar to that of tn-glucol, a substance which turned the brown whiskers of an old badger white In four calender months When Cocklecarrot asked If a diet of rhubarb puffs madr with tolderol would turn brown human whiskers white. Sir Hardleigh paused bef..re II-.:'.:M He than igld, gralalhmg hiward. "No" Asked howMr. Corker, proprietor of the Osokosl Snack Dainties Dive, could have known of the presence of tolderol in his rhubarb puffs, a Ministry official said. "The law is the law." / Don't Carr T*HEY say th-T the Lahan method of notating ballet movements, so that a dancer can learn from a char*, or movementIhe thistledown stuff! To the devil with your toe-twiddling! Let us hove great roaring ballets that combine the fury of all-in wrestling with the fooleries of a counIry fair. ( ( I 11,11 a in For "hat-sandwich" read "Mom burger." squirrel: lhat what she likes, sitting at home, still wearing her she mtalt haYfi out-of-doors hat—a foible of hers. i Grandmother is usually wearing Toulour* endnrmeuse avrc ta ( Kprn C „rio*itv a lol of Jewellery, loo-as well as Quel chagrin : Qwlle horreur | The truth la far from lhat. Saleslockets.containing miniatures Quell.tristcsse sublime! 'men are perhaps loo apt lo misher children. Dans ta voix J'cnUnds !e chant toke her interest, and interpret it vihen she is alone. Queen_ M-'O raattnaj De In rhoucttc qul ronfle. Visile St. Trophimc. Confort Moderne! Tennis Hiu'i" ii'ifiiirr I Asile de Bon .-tl"i Chanibrei Nat'lssanlcs Stt Bones Adorablei.' Son Teie1 phone Erquis Sot, Atmosphere N Paris ports arc trying to scil Tout ,rnpreyn*v Dune Aimable their puenis ft.mi stalls in the Distinction .' LVrapc Des Gastrottreet. The way to do it is to nowei,' An Rende*cous Des Sons n any hare, print an advertisement for someVlreurj,' have reason %  ^%  -' ... .e had used iuld have trvnvh I'tHlry Rupert and Simon 1 is desire. Not so. The wav she sometimes smokes a cigarette, aiAuM VIM i 'I.I H I.M;HA (Mambars Only} TONIOHT TO TSUasDAV Mi.lt 1 AT IS MATINrrs WIDNKDtt t 1 T M SATIXDAl MOSNIXd AT %  IU'11 AnnOTT and LOf COTKt.l.O DICK 1'llWCI L 1 in "IN THE NAVY" t ullh Ttxr ANDPBWA SISTERS •-*-*-*,',',*,',*,*,', V.***-'-*,-,*,'.',',*,*,-,',-,-,','-*--**---',-,*Hupfii aaath down to u Horjcr. Vou aik *ho my ni Inead ii ? ht U y. W*||. h umi'i Saaeo, Ai you ur. he'* > BU > o-i ol (vlloia, but h*' it iiiil hr'i txlping mr i firwl *.!d itiw.. D'ytHi kno* h(i lh, m .;i ( }" "|Ml no I'M I've only HJSI •kn u o. tnd I n**-i cat ihrm anyway." aayi rloratc. I don't *ini them to aft,'' taught Ruprri. But hit small pal hat walked back into the gofM buh. to h* turn on. For a long new he •cartliet. Suddenly he Hops. 1 tan hear a bell ringing. What can ii be ? he wHupers. a JANETTA DRESS SHOP OHKSS/CS READY-MADE. COCKTAIL, EVENING. Al IIRNOON MORNING .Nl) BEACH DRFSSFS I xcollcnl Cut and F'il ^''*'*r^*'*^''' v ''''SS''''''SS.'SSSSS^SS.'.*.*SS^^^W*>£ o.ir.v ussnvio FIGURED WAFFLED PIQUE 36" $1.85 CREPE JESSAMY 36" $2.02 FLOWERED TAFFETA 36" $1.85 SILMIRA TAFFETA 36" $1.40 Iwrrli'il 1'alaurs inrluilinff lllml, A II hiIf EVAMS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORE DIAL 4606 SUCCESSFUL WORKMEN isr ONLY • R i ( Oil Supply STANLEY PLANTS lll %  jJ a 1 1 1 l 1 1 4 '3 1 H %  I 1 TO-MOKROW NITE — II 00 O'CLOCK FAREWELL REPEAT SHOW T'dad's Carnival Review .*. RlriKiiidr Srsl .it Ihp w-orlrl'B "aWMBafl WkXIF See CARNIVAL H It la plajrd In Trlnld'd l*agranl)i. i...r .i,.u. t „..v Calyp>ors Tit ZOc. Ilouar 3S<; R.ilronv 4c; Bos 60r. Tickets on Sale TO-DAY and TO-MOKKOW ss,'.:;:','.'. J W/MV/W (•LOBE llll VI I It TO-DAV. 5.00 A g.l. "MYSTKRY Marta TOREN > P.M—LAST SHOWS SUBMAKIM. — MacDonald Ct\REY TO-MORROW & THURSDAY. 4, H r, I'M ABBOT Si COSTF.LLO In "IT AIN'T HAY" Ami "HOUSE OF FRANKKVSTKIV Boris KARI.OFF & Lou CHANEY 1* V,. . 'ft rtll Dun 1: tin rtrlDutlull. ,~i> dined T 151 id De rapt In i!i!. Hi airnma DOIDIII II ur •red eater 'Si tin i in IV Such mn tVa tint of fluwera. 13 31 She come* qnd oe. Hi i Regret of *!) tru penlienU. (3 31. He\ OD the move, is) MoM-n I. wnat tree dDea itts animal go to i Tree man appotntd 0 the w'i u era. 111 g. Btcengc. (4 e A eery amail Dootsr. (51 5 Provea that any eniineer 6 Nutmng rude here. (Si a if. au.r litre but tina-ie. il . Loyal. < %  LO. A perfume. IS. It %  refrea!iin. U( n fiweet mcaiva of ounl.hment? (> 20 HillocK. (Si j.fas !" "; n v"ffi,'.:,-.r'," .T.;:'T u i fenVw3E*afi^s* _onati Ulpaiil Oaa : 1. Uiaai-rd ut.-. B n.ii',. 10^ Van; ;fl "-[(bit 11 slate, lg UJI. ii fatflLWVnVG A >AM 8TAM Op?nina --l.OISi: Jmir 22II| .7 A U.I.. This is Pier Angeti... Her first big M-G-\t picture "Teresa" is wonderful PIER ANGEll • JOHN ERICSON SPECIAL: i of Mian Pier Ange.ll to the Flrmt 800 Patroiw on rrlday Nile | BY SPECIAL REQUEST MADAM (FILL presenU st itttti ##.s m? gftjg at the UI.OIMTheatre Thursday July 5th 830 pm Under the Patronage ol HON V C. QALE. M L C and MR. E. D. MOTTLEY. MOP. In Aid of the Ctarint Church Baby Welfare League CUalc Orthentra and Box Seat*: Si 00 — House 72c. Balcony iSc. Tlckata on iale Oloba Theatre and Madame Iflll'a Rldeiice, nap EMPIRE To-day 4.4S snd 8.30 and i iiiitinuini MEET . St HEAR The World's great Master* of music. Twentieth Century Fox presents— MSN AND MUSIC Featuring in order of their appearance — Arthur RUBINSTEIN and Dimitri MITROPOULOS conducting Ihe PHIl.HAHMONIC-SYMI'HONY ORCHESTRA of NEW YORK AND OTHERS ROW Today ATomorrow 4.3t • >.19 p.m. rs*l Big Double— Michsrl PEDGRAVE and Joan BENNETT In . %  SfCHC r tCYONO THf 000* AND MASKtO UDCB ROYAL Lasl Two Show. Today 4.3t A 8.15 p.m. 20th Century Fox Double — Edward G. "ROBINSON in %  OUR VINiS HAVE TENDER GRAPES THE OTHER LOVE Starring Barbara STANWYCK OLYMPIC Today Only 4.30 ft 8.15 p.m. Republic Whole Serial HAUNTED HARBOR Kane RICHM< 'ND Kay ALDR1DGE % 



PAGE 1

Tl'I.MUi II M U, Ml RARRMHW MiVOf ATI: [MCI THKhF. ~\ p /tr.*i jockey ir'io oets Jo-: • dar* from Mum To the JlrMt American u ho dotno* tell me that the* pull MiltraUtrt mr ***e at '"•' back ot ii.eir trader* vuv home lii !'.• T.i -Syncopating Sandy" Strickland „l flolfott. titlf-mpffnff -4Mr mu. ft rodri o) IJIUMI itiaytnu • can To the la/tp erprcted to oiunl ana ercldimmi. IVAnf YtWItV IhuttQli JMM )( % %  %  irho. MM oif people m*i ci old. bemrded why. I ir ilrn i r." To the fifes' publican who doesn't .1 me that nearly all London editors originullm came .; >,r 'tetter. Wollasey. Somtnpi i. IM Hi >tation% north Emigrants Crowd Queen's Park Tory \\ ants Caribbean Housing \\ .1. Regiment Conference Opentt June 25 LONDON. Juno 18 Food Minister Maul .iiked in Ihc House of Common.. u>-.: uio paid E 1 MUiRATION* to the U.S. is kerpini; Queen's Park as busv t\o more for foreign iu| ^ asa bee. About 300 men and women 'pent hours **** frwn the Bl "'* n c <-' "in tbo Park vocinrrlav k ,ua,n •*••"• %  The Conference ha* been arin the Park yesterday. Webb s1n Pvelooirirm anri bome of the men have been selected lor work in the a lone term guarantee to comWelfare Orgim*,.!!States and thev brought their wives, sweethearts and men weal in. MUBMH erlud. gave peeled to last J week The Chatrmothers to sien for the part of their earnings that will be •* u r,:y " ^'V""^ ^^^.,^."^22^ coming back to Barbados They ,hen,seh.>. were s:, : !" ; Aff^^ ,Sff7S £5"l^t^'Vnd^Sr? contracts. They had Six clerks attending to them. ducer> But Commonwealth *upOrganisation Mr W. M. Some others waiting around the over to the table to stick on this plies were not enough to cover all house. A.R.I.B.A.. Hulldt Park -had been selected but had stamps to the letters and then the British commitment*. Britain velopment Advis* not been called to sign up. They went over u> ihe letter box. One therefore lud to buy foreign him and net us Vice-Chair bunched at the Park House door or two of Uiern certified whether "gar at the open market price The list of delegate* I* — waiting to hear their names called, they were posting the letter in the hich P ros *' nl *'"* above the HAMADOB Most of the people left their overaMl or localI slot. Commonwealth pi H^v CM.SJ' .?!u£r^ T"n, *> CeJoOlefJai he had Si nt.nr, L.?<\?^^ B ,L '","" *" P !" ,nur 9*" Sjba, Gnmths said that filing '****£* cr.clte! pitch could not relax that minutes before. Aboul four peoon the island M running high A i r.** BBBMSBBBSBM ..,.„.. '"' were *'"K """^UKh 'he rouhut there hud been no seri-u* Inii J P"^* 11 "" UM of potting paitels odents SUK the troops arrived '— %  pacMiii department !** HOUSINt; KPERTS from Barbados Jamaica, the Leeward Islands, Dominica, Grenada. St. Lucia, St. Vincent and Trinidad will assemble in Barb* vorcuWurlsKuultv 9llt0 I)o|mrlmi v nl -HARRY CAIN WAalllN-.TON. June IS i | i .in | Hep ference on housing to be opened at Hastings HeuM on the 2Mh of June. nd* Ol the Hevt'lopnient ..HKI rlfare Organi-uitinn %  in s-d Monday that iitie v i fut the adopUan M B r %  natasM Ir T l*Ulr> Stentstr "I ISM Housing B*#'*l; '! IK'M iJuwwnM r CM hi c f i Huuon. %  .('. • %  Ir C A Coppln. loonwli I i"t rt*psftinrnt nf Scwnr SiW AStirulRfl D. Urvdo.—Chalrmsii M J ! %  • Onlrsl Ho,, ins Authority l.mdo *•(,mi*el* %  I th* lt..o.p "f Rrpmraisiivei and WILL RtPORT ON C.O.L INDEX BVUa*>ina H Ihc Cotni W'UMI* appi'iuied to report QO tb "iM.. ,: "" ' l ''' ] mt. lecorrunenoauoni of a new 1 The Honourable Sir Joti %  ; %  C.afAl 01 I man K. H. siia. Egqulre, r. A B.A.. (Hons. Ccon ) Economist The. management .f the Korean h ramaliu In lha State i>epariversilv COIK-K-' of the We?t [rtdh with decisions made •mn (i J Bryan, M* pel Uea] rather than military Aetiim nnai uUi. ha nM ce New Loveliness For You* M> I'li.iiiiuu: SHIP ^ "V" v Fuliow thi* Simple Heauty Han l>,i BBSBS h>li>li. Map %  >Mn| massaat HI sjs Pslnili< s hrtl Hying HI*, i %  -PA. Kor bath and shower, gel the thrift* Balli Site I'jlmoln e DOCTORS PROVED PAlMOUVf'S BEAUTY RfSUttS" United Slates State Dfpaft,*'i t instead of imlttarj leaders is .: the .n m Korea. a member of the com,n.i Senate Armed services and %  orelgn BeaaUona Commititf call|d mto session Monday t<> dsM ute how many moie wklnosaea to call m the wveattgaUoB iM O aneral Douglas alacArUkur's ouster as i 'ornmander. this session Cain run nine who Have les' fled thu I COS1 need htm rtarj Daan A, aai %  to say aboul vital >rean dei Ittons than military RHEUMATISM! ARTHRITIS! Thtlr terrible pain Is often needless. HOW IN, a new t<,/' of treatment, lring prompt faMssf fr,>m pains due i.. symptom* .i" tassM dr.nd Jfcsaasi Bui awea' IKl alao lia> pbyntiil imrtiimliirly nn nwtabotti waicfa are a v#ry imporiant MUM ka I'" %  tli.*umm. staU. '1 >a dur 10 lbs •••oidinnl"d mi mn til 11 IM-V, ...ii.liiii qukek acting uigrrdieiita. lull < IN li... baaai t>U%st Ihnroughlv m IhiKpilnlaand • hniea. 1* t. tit-irig ;uvcrihrd bv d.xlnn. n.v< ft hv relieved %  !,. ..| yooi fetlow^nifterera with long ntun ding .ir nf |iini -ndn'ts arfil" e %  (rente pain So. you see. the M-mrr you ua OOLCIN. I lie soont" r,,%  Miwliu.ut aui) i„ improved, Vi'l IHIMIN coat* very littlr. tiel it totlay 100 precious labiefseoal onlv SOtO if; lUHtKKKS S| l>KI —i^.u_ — /_ it W *l 'nd vithdraw money. Each MTSon n aill Ms an m i.ittir publK SSrVSSS in Jm.. Mr E H lli>a. M II E I Jsmalia rmlril H,.n-ni Ail HI 11 W Hprrnll. A M F T I t'lsnnina Aflviwi ..I IK^MJ -il %  tl*1 III': patiently swattea hb (urn. Tho' coming in took their pUrei In Ihi line wilhout ;oi> fUSS Th** in.,-.,1, .uii'.i. adfl a' tii.it booth uhile lln Cleft HI i..''in one U one to another booth for payment. Not far from tr. ing the sea breezes. f\SL\ .i occasional thud—tbe rjdvrnments will have his fullest support in taking niiv mriM. soun.l of | le.lgcr opened cessai v to maintain the rule of back ii" Bii soft footlawf" %  (he iMiioiony t the Oritllth'.: Vi-.. Sir. I nm equally Aericuitiir.il ii.mt. ii.n h.uiii:, Muaosnoui t" ramor v a the root of Uial Ufa A. -in, II. %  %  iiuiuiini!. yeathe i ,i,,ious lnterday. duauial disputes and uanreve InOn entering the ollice. the stalT dustn.,1 hM \>>'>-z tuu |,l lie seen bent over b"oKs Lennox lloyii ( C oiMs W VaUva) booth was a longer line of i-^.h v ( L ,,, |( h)i|| Ui]|ds Tht "Is the Mn,. that than *?h ^2XS i IsL KS J"? Agricultural Bang mikoi Idli ^ Rowing feeling thai than others a bulge In their pockets. v l( emcnls Ul JUS of Uu * "lough c-ncent. ..tion OB the They were depositing money. rt | llld p rl d ay ,, their ba-y day. lnl P |r problem pi nulntainlng The Baqfc is mm coming io the law •""' end >f its nnaneun jraar and it %  n is not frequented bj planten. Mr. Knme -111 i at. nan %  "' Hs Strangely enough, mop pai pi were depositing than %  I drawing. In the depart it, typewriters were giving ort %  Sound, silvei v,as jingling as it fell from the counter Into the educated palms of the i i> all the while were keeping u .steady eye on rolls of notes. Tho floor was strewn arHh torn up forms which were l*adlv signed. Clerks pearad Into MM 'pllt Pt.A4A.MN MIAN ANh ,, ,vul %  .. ,..,„. ,,-, I at Ml smm* .bout U J 1030 >e.U..da> Pea-., „, (| ,, ,, various parts i>f the utundqueueii r ,. mov „i roni the [eland poHiKica — Hi H ti Manwrlntnon <> n r chairman ot D.nlBM- Casual n<.a*n Aulhonlr and Brnu>. Mrtiosl Officer ol Dominica. Di llrlhniiiauni w tasi of Mrduat .ivv. in liriln* UiT ul FutilM U..K.:HI A'i>ii lonu Ml A l l, f^ r ( i,.l T.i l.i.i.-l "—— i-i ,ii| Toil.. Mm-m! nothing smells so good A Medical Officer may also attend as an observer on behalf of the Trinidad Government. Mr. M S. Rtnvcley of the l>evelup St the ,'!,, II. Pinfold S* % %  The number of the (lown tit lllVk ;i) .., ,„,(,., %  crowd yesterday was not surprtsQrifltthJ "That is a matter I ing because peasants will be busy f hall leave to the discretion of the this mould planting crops with Governor." W ITH BREAKFAST period the coming of the rains. I^-nnox Boyd: "But this Is the just a lew minutes off fire% %  ** peasant had to sign a cersecond lamentable statement the getni Bd !" ^>Vg?g %  Minister has been forced to make. *" ** a s oeii^"""y we w* ne when encques wmen mey casneu in tne and in view ul the widespread C.,K ^S^ttM^S^SSnSr bunl Ong one clerk attended loyalty of the masof peopl TIW UM engines Wire clean; tin*f" Jl1 1 m-n> anxious fa brass sparkling an,! the -lei in.. **P< %  %  • %  ' *• Uw The bank as though sciublied with Mine. | i( i* 'hevery Monda the case of a sudden alarm. U 1 just hod to hop al "kick" the engines over. .. %  After Tin, ere hustling to gel through 'I'"'"' 0 '. l i,n ..._ Tnrv .T xl J*f BuOjeeta for discussion will include:— • 41 (l i Survey of recenl th vrtop imnts in hoi.Miiji in Briti-.ii West Indiea. (2) Building standarda ami ragn> Urtlocu. I] lH.-it'".' onatfuetton end i oal 14) Building materials. Self-help housing". %  tip Housing finance, icnls. management, etc. The idea of the Conference emerged from a proposal by the Honourable Victor Bryan In the Trinidad Legislature that there should be a raprmatatfvi eea ference of all British West Indian %  ati to study means of relieving the tVOrUBg After spending 21 months* holi^Br%n'!Tueatlon. the GoepUHATg the most bus> GON "| l ; un ;| ^^ V vhen^lSe?oswmit *ny m Furope and the UAA. eramni of Tnmdad made the I. ernment ortUe front day to ^ ||E |(ABOim COMMISSION*' Winslcn IBS Department the West Indies will be not look again into the question i element in the Weet in".' tintalnlng law ami ssaca • %  % % %  '! %  %  "'• i.i'irT HI'W ..IP^I H..,*.I..I. OrWHths: "I think I am entitled A fireman, standing well at eaaa A ' '" %  M ""^' '" vk k '' """'' '" tnal and dangling I switch In his hands. %  * the Old Age PBiiSiuns Oflke [( J" kept watch at the entrance to the " White Park around mid-day aS5Um „ barracks. On his Immediate left Mstcday. People, both young and Ull ... was a table with a telephone, old, were feeing if u.. ihimn The fireman who is doing dul) at Ullled with the carda and pas.-ng ihe door receives ail i aii that an %  %  '"• each other-of. aojue of *J&Mtfft* BrX Peslival Of Britain nil Ihillr.im-ii. .-v.opl II... • •.,..:,.,: I %  i "fSrSi •• %  %  Interestatg-Manon i vere lurking mild IH very dangerous to assume because the people slrlkt —K ruler. laying off Hie job to take their nay is Ihc I U passing % %  • Tsaoarlmesit wtui ilmotl n warrant-, n the reports ol dc m ,^w£Thc AdXl Co. '•" % %  whatever come Into and goes out ' !" £S iri \SJLrdav Most oflhe * He returned Of th. islsnd. typists -some man^SS^^/^Z tareakSIt 0 '^ venmg by l> W.I.A. crowd of people who gather at the U.SA. via Puerto Bico. .-nfs door almost daily He said that from the point of were in Queen's Park hoping to view of the tourist, corm "get on the side" for America. The England have somewhal furniture around the office showed proved but everything thi that there were quite a number still expensive Marson. Managing proposal that ui view of the presK n Johnaon A ence of an expert adviser at Mastnow back in Barbaings House, arrangements for the pulating adding machines— and other clerks searching into docu. ments and ledgers all make the *E r *ff ,B & Customs a hive of activity. At any hour between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., on office days the ruainmg could be found as it was shortly after mid-day yesteruV. The office Is along the waterfront. Shipping clerks were moving in and out of the office. Bui ihe Baggage Warehouse was th complete contrast yesterday. No passenger boots were in harbour, no baggage wa* coming In or going out of the Island. A single clerk held the fort while porteJ relixed on benches. "-pWO STAMIS for s.x cents "> X please' Only seven people were waiting for stamps at about 11.30 yesterday, and so the eletk In the stamp booth was in no hurry to attend to this call. The %  even people were however quickly dispatched. On a table in the Stamp Office. are receptacles for water whero Sund from the was of clerks to return from lunch. He saw the Festival of Britain — — and found it extremely InterT\ v/c.nc vrwiMr' n from evpr >' P lm 0| vlrw / £ YtAKi TKJUntKJ although it was felt bv many that CHRISTCHURCH. N.Z. „ wou |d only interest the scien%  He is too young to ride I tl(k lnlnt ied. motor-cycle." said a magistrate He was pnrtich.riv |mprefad iiung a man for a traffic by tne Dome of Discovery which ,l 1 ehowi aJJ the KfeanliuC advancevioi.ition. The 72 year old lefendant laid he had been riding motor-cycle for 50 years and s was his first offence. _iCP) HE CHOSE FREEDOM LONDON A bridegroom at a marriage ceremony replied "No" wncn the opposite answer was expected Ho walked away from the altar after commenting "I choose people posting letters wet their freedom" Now the girl's parents stamps. So here comes the drill, ore lookmg for him. __ Thev K>ught their stamps, went' Great Britain throughout the agos. He spent ten days in Italy. anC w as m Rome lor ihc Beatification ot Pope Pius loih. The aaremony .f St. Peter's was very Interesting and there was a crowd of aboul J million people outside the square. Mr Marson also had a twoweek slay in France arhen the weather was good, and an enjovable week In Switzerland before going on to the USA. for a few days. MOTOR CYCLES SkrHmmU VELOCETTE The New Model LE. 200 C.C. ia different from llie conveiilional lypc Motor Cycle — in fact il'a the nearest approach to a motor car. II mtfr-eool—l. Ilanil-Startfil. Shmtl—lrivvn ami .Yoff#tf*#. For SIMPLICITY. ECONOMY and RIDING PLEASURE 1 hnif.4a — VELOCETTE ROBERT THOM. LTD. Courtesy Garage — White Park Road Cawlarani a I h bu ln ba lafl Kln "Smllrr 1 The Com, optn 10 :.ll Baku. f| on COW A (,ATE Milk Food. "ThFoad ol R„v,l Ba| • -Inlrla. rlow „„ .,„ h s„|,„. „-,,.. 'Otry rorrn* and rurth-r ounoemei.ti in thi 4 particulars | Barbados Advocate' i% M foot : THEY WILL BEWHAT YOU WANT TU&M TO BB ON COW 6 GATE J. B. LESLIE & CO. LTD.-Afenta tftM' -IT *" w Oody 'avvw ""lion,. '" %  -) 'n.*.r r ,i %  • %  THIS riNa caa At -,-.._ W* FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Diafribulora Phone 4504



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ESTABLISHED 1895 TUESI>.\ iJ. I Q JI PRICE FIVE I t American Appointed Chief Of Allied Forces In Southern Europe Twelve Powers Agree WASHINGTON, June 18 THE APPOINTMENT of Admiral Robert B Carney as Commander-in-Chief, Allied Forces in Southern Europe, was unanimously agreed to by all twelve North Atlantic Treaty powers, officials said here to-day. There was no indication here, whether or not Britain for instance had pressed a separate nomina tion and withdrawn it for any special reason. Officials emphasised that Admiral Carney had not been appointed Supreme Commander, Mediter ranean Command official spokesman In London said to-day that the British Mediterranean fleet did not come under Admiral Robert Carney's nev t-ummand in southern Europe. Hut he added. 'We mig_ht o course, bo asked to contrlbuti forces end we might well do so The question of the Command ot the Mediterranean is still open." Not in his Command Answering questions the spokesman said Gibraltar fell within Admiral Carney's area, but did not come under his Command 'Command of Gibraltar remains I the same applies Malta Admiral Carney may however ask for facilities at both these bases." he said. He would have the United HSU) Fleet under him and ihis was "a very big contribution" to the northern European ares the .spokesman said. He explained that this fleet operated not only in the Mediterranean but in the Atlantic. In another reply he explained that no country had placed any territory under General Elsenhower They had only placed various I his disposal and given f:icilliles. There waa therefore no question of actual territory being under Admiral Carney's command. —Heater. U.S. Scientist Resigns Post WASHINGTON. June 18 The U.S. Navy announced today it .had accepted the resignation of Dr. Stephen Brunauer one of Its highest civilian scientists suspended on April 10 ".is a security risk" At the same lime the Slate Department susMiidcd his wife Mrs. Esther Bl matwr Who was l-iaison Officer on the United Nations Relations Stan*. The Navy said that Hungaraln boin Brunauer. who had been chief chemist in she research and development section of the Ordinance Bureau had replied to Navy charges but had not requested a hear in? Both Brunauer and wife were among targets last vear of Senator Joseph McCarthy (Republican Wisconsin) in charges of Communist infiltration In Government. —Heater. No Special Forces for U.N. "Police" Suy* Dr. Slikker THE HAGUE. June 18 Holland will not earmark special forces for service with Urn United Nations "police force" as long as other countries do not Foreign Minister Dr. Dirk Sttkker said today. In 6he memorandum on foreign affairs to the first Cham* bar of States General, he said: "incn ae in the defence effort under the North Atlantic Treaty Is claiming nearly all our re*Hirce-. M that extra effort in another Held is not possible. —Reuter. UK-WI Talks Postponed •Prsm Our Own CorrMpondrnD LONDON. June 18. Discussions between members of jno West Indies Regional Economic tommlttee and British Government officials here in London on the future of B.W.I, trade relations with Canada arc unlikely to bein before Thursday it || now learned. The original plan was that talks should have begun Monda.v This had to be abandoned when it was discovered that the West Indi.i delegation would not be complex until that day. The new date was provisionally ranged for Wednesday. Now it seeing that If will have to be cancelled as B.W.I, representative.) will be wanting a couple of days to meet among themselves and talk over their plans. "We can hardly be ready by WednoMlay" said Mr. Albe. t Gomes leader t ,f the Trinidad deltion to-day. "1 jvhould think need at least a couple of days to talk over our plans with Jamaica's representatives headed by Mi. Bustamante." Ii. Gomes and Mr. A. E. V. Barton, West I ndia Committee Secretary were, among th> London airport to-night to meet air. Bustamante and Mr Grantlev Adams of Barbados and Mr. W. I. Raatgever of Bntisl, Guiana. To-morrow It Is probable that delegates will be received by Me. James Griffith-.. Secretary of Slate for the Colonies and when talks finally begin they will be under the Ohnirmnnshlp of Sir Hilton Foynlon, Deputy Under-Secretary of Stale. No official information Is available here concerning the possibilities of the British Government releasing additional Canadian dollars to permit the West Indie, to step up trade with the Dominion. But among delegates thcmselve: it Is possible that there is .t bailing that their efforts to dollars will not be in va Air Battles Stepped Up IN KOREA TOKYO. June 18. American Sabre Jet* shot dowt six Red jet planes and daiiwg* e'vhi nthors ft two swirling aii • It northwest K daj and Monday ^ Fed ;ev ctlM out In forci Unit ed Nations ground forces ham' threatening Communi*. build ii>s near the 38th parallel mnumM resistance al! •long the fioni eeupled with heavy Fed tnflk hinted at the possibUU) of the third round of the Ron Spring offenMve The Russian l.vpe M1G-15 Jets were reported more aggressive than ever before Far East air force said all U.S. planes returned safely. A total of 108 pUnai were involved in the two air battles. Monday's was the bigger and took the heaviest toll of Red*. Five were destroyed and PO were damaged. To FlBht T h i r t y t h i e e Sabre Una bultkd with 40 M 1.01 from 28.000 feet down to tree b p Sundayair light was between 20 American jet* and 23 Rods. One M.I.G. was reported shot down and six damaged. Both hattles were fought near the M, hurian border. Ground war stirred up sin Red resistance in unexpected apotj Ull CSJOtra. Five Allied patiol were turned back by a strong Red fire On'y gains reported Sunday were in the cast where front Una dispalchcs said Allies ea ( heights on the push toward the ttrutegic assembly area. Tightened censorship forbade more upeciflt location. A B r % %  J'.T FOR THE PRINCESS these Pelain 9 8 Life Term Commutetl ILF DYEU, June. 19 Marshal Philippe Petain. 95 year-old prisoner on the fortresi island was to-day too weak It ign a statement saying he had heard and understood that his life sentence had been confuted. The Ministry of Justice announced yesterday his life sentence had been eomnuitfi from life imprisonment to detention In a military hospital. The man who ruled France under the Germans, will be moved from He Dyeu to a hospital on the mainland as soon as he is well enough. Meanwhile the fortress Pier Levee here wricro Potam Is determined to defend theii national Independence and cultural democratic right*. Defence budget figure, do not along aadieata UM buitfi rearmament has plaeed on the Scandinavian peoples. Their forfuri trade is suffering to such a degree that Denmark ;.nd Norway Inve not yet been able to abandon fully wartime ration By the end of 1952 the three nations with a total population of fourteen millions {Denmark four Norway three, and Sweden seven) will hnvo more than one million wHI-armed M.ldiers to meet possible aggression from the east Even if Sweden at present is still minded lo maintain her traditional neutrality, it might !* %  i lend a fact that Swedish aiUltan Trees will never be used agalnat the West. —Bl P THIRTEEN YEAR OLD Cyntli Oraaaia* H*II la tk* city Th do* prant. a lieu m*k< it impou ..-ins to rnaVv III French people cut their ballou on Sunday aimed primal Uj ;it mttll atremgtn In the French Parliament U.K. Trade Union W orried Over Rearmament llliltlHTON. June 18 First Indication thai I/nlon iBldarg ftM letting wori of Britain's gramme MUM t -' %  > from Jack naMt rraalilaiil o| | %  nil 0.150,01)0 strong ;niuilgamalcil I Ha lold the annual 'it the Union ban ibout nut.mi raa lot ie Ign %  %  .i Trade uidan b tdai %  lines since Aneurm •igned rrom the •'••'\ %  i %  noi.tli tevah II. i. Q i hair tliat i Jiinaiuent on an un< %  ttalnablc i lla and would un, %  Which Ihe IJIIM>III 1' .vorkcxl for yeai> He warned tli.r leteriorntion ..f B Hit) would not TTakn %  influence 1'ir.nighoui the world but it would an itranStban force, of the romm(orm and Increase the war. —R ruler. :.till trying to arrange thai if no I : i • \i i held %  %  inda to fix thi lien Hal .. %  .%  At Pri%  %  %  DcfKty Andrei Ol %  %  r. %  ni.ke rhe lion) decision .igenU.i t oncewioauj Mode %  • •' %  %  %  I %  lapse of %  the Wi Hill V. %  7 On Murder Char< SUMMM1VILLE. Georgia. June 10. Two man and five women navi been ch,.rat with the murder of 4IS years old sthai Nellie Tueker who was killed when pickets overturned :i rnr r.-iryinn six women to work jit a strikebound textile mill —Reuter. THIS 1* tbs man who cot away the again who maujR'd riTCHS and hi* four fallow trailer* THE SIXTH MAN A •ertea of arUdss by Ohastaan Finchei. itarta in to asorrow Advoeats. an sbserbiag revtlstion of the aosslan Atom -py ring. TRADE STOPPED HAMIUmG. June 18. Hungary has stopped her traruv it shippinK trade through Hamburg, according to the Harbour —Heater. jeweller Arrested NEW VtHtK %  l jewell,r i %  i %  i %  %  10 haVI run.I, %  p4a wn r. ibout th'-ar alec* %  unlnclirn i i %  1 r I maauiuj — nit BRIDGES DESTROYEu OENKVA. June18. >)*nt i i, norms I bridgei %  land. —Keulrr U.S. Seeks To Smooth Out Persian Crisis TEHEl an Amhaaaadoi 1 llmr r. Grady planned v> n i M a h a anm ad Hoi %  at lowering! the temperature ol the boiling AnRlo-Iranlan ol' crisis. Mossader has |u" %  (K-I onal ma i age front Forest Secretary Herbert Morrison • rpraga k n g the hope thai British Iranian nagot • lo-Inmlaii ng* Iran ducted in a friendly atmoephcr*. ibuj both caapJon with brought i intll Tuaa.!tn i ii. | rapb >r immediate payment .,f 75 pi i'any* profits. %  break off negotiations unless %  %  it would lx> %  < P r rrlaaaas i:in.iUi at the Chamben of Comiunco. East Germany Lifts Embargo i.n'i.i.v ii 1 i rlln'i HtUc btookada, 1 %  I .ii Baal tieroai Btithoi Itkti raa Hiflad Uu Brdag Impoalng %  w< i • lermaov. The ordi on May III ti. 1ll r%  ... % % %  port poaoa. asnandanti %  llttla blockada' bj .... portent t<> datraaai | raejui t After >• 'inofdai %  A %  •i was anaa %  Id 001 worth a day while the one way blockade was In M I Some Weat Herlin firms had ad Ul lav nfT w"i %  • —Heater. 2 Cuanfs K.Ht <1 \1 V..**. JMII.I--\ HAVANA, Cuba, June 18 %  r. fiuiid shot Ii • I : | <><) f tlic met %  Mi ti iv throwi around lb* building an %  %  ganta Manhad lor rlia** In Waihsnajtoo, \> Hoi vould noi mm* HI %  hud not I lleuter. {Gaullists Sweep To Top Place In Poll PARIS, June 18 (GENERAL CHARLES DE GAULLE'S PARTY swept to top place in France's General Elec tions today but could not break the ovdiall majority "third force" alliance which has governed since 1946. Communists suffered heavily from the new General Election voting law and with nearly all returns in, had not many more than half the seats which they held in the old Assembly, though poll ing the greatest number of votes. Ob*rvrr herr Mid \ %  |.trvnU\ %  Cnmmunliu inlrnitvi* \ir n fid "•nli-Amf.titr.n" tlttl..> Importation Of Argentine A/iples h No Real Risk M fhh Ti'ttm t'tunmona IX>NDON. June 18. llonald Russell .ifke.1 the O-vernmenl In Comaaaai lO -daj what qi ppaM llritam was importing 1 Anglo-Argentina Agreeent.if June 1M. danaat thai I Ibassj apple*, in tha ago l> %  I'll i i tha N'II a ill forestall nor! tnp AM mUa and H '.calami he aaid. IK ,i k.l viH'lh. i theic two lontlntona wenconaultad baAana ins item was In oU idnd ^n th< %  Vnglc-Argrniinr AXIT* inei.l MaurlcVVehh. Pood Minister spued that the itam covan %  uiU. There was no spei 1 i apphs. Australia New Zealand were not consullaf i'out it nut ha did no) tbbu any real risk of Import* ijiples fm> the-.. This year, in fa. 1. baeauai ..f th. lateness of Australian and New ealand crops und Ift* %  •ti'Mioni sldke. Argentine apple. %  iralcsjiuau and wara ( i;i ."I BOMB KILLS THREE NAIM.ES. June 18 Hi %  • nrava alUad b) wartime homh they loui D a HeW o" A' i tialar. FOUR KILLED M 18. vi>re killed anal lured i"ll"\ u3 an a %  b I cunpow. Jdinbas near here —Heater Adenauer Ends Visit To Italy HOME. June IP Oan Chanaalaar Kum.ni \dan.,u.i atMnd hh hl.ite visit u M iiis aicond loni a nversatinn with Italian rYetntai AkiHr l).. Caipen i Bl <|itd his niMt.itlon to visit Oarrnan) and wil K<> in the autumn *.te#tur>r later lold the. p**w eon%  i i i tha ttallaa BMJ Oaranaii QOVernnwntl are al one in reI tha aba lute m ad fi .' i aWopa. Ki i Ihe axtram • bo bad "cloa 11 i Dnununlata >( Mixler.iti-v has a total a t.ii i.f :i'iii i a1 maj %  I*remler when the Ban ment Is ItsnMd .ift-r lha naa Assembly meets on July S The sixty-four ye;,i-i.lI •aid today there were eiou|h Middle Party Deputies to form 6 Government without a threat frurr. Gaullists or Communists. % %  (inv. tiiment's policy on the irtemational front has been approved hy the people of France and w* shall be able to strengthen OUt relation* with ether Democratic countries." he added. Tha i lect<.rati-' preference for methods was also re— Qaetad la the re-election of al' Cabinet Ministers and all hut two Si I ratai la ol • % %  (nmmuiusl lender Maurice Thorei. still absent in Moscow, %  ... pi l'Hled with his second In command Jiu-quc* Duclos. —Reotrr 'Quake Recorded NKW YORK. June 18. K model ale earthquake recordii al 3.50 pin UMla) OB 'he t'"lunbli Univandty seismograph here was estimated to have DCURed 2.200 mi lea Miiith of New V<.rk Observutorv author it M'H -aid the kUturueiwa waa au and.-iM-nr.uh 1 II prntiiiliH t.M.k place in FI Salvad. -i (i tral Aaaatican Rwpuhiici, they Beklad —Neuter. SPAIN GETS SEAT MONTREAU June IB. Sp.nn waa alaatad lo fill the vncant seat on the 21 aatkaK Council of Ir.temaUonal Civil Avl.itlun Organisation at the closing meeting of its fifth annual rtaslon here today —Heater THE "ADVOCATE' pnya for NEWS DIAL 3113 Day or Night. A WINE FOR EVERY OCCASION ros mBanra cELaaassnaa KWV SI'\KKIIN<, 1R\SS( %  MUCIi'K KWV. Wl MM! RSIKll K (SAl.'TF.RNF. I MIR rOCB TABI.K K W V (Al'l DRY Rri) 11 lyhl-bodicJ 1 CLARL'I K W V SAUVIGNON BLANC M'KRITIKS KWV SHI-RRY \n I K.W.V. AMONTILLADO SHERRY KWV Ol D OLOROSO K W.V. OLD BROWN K W.\ KIMBFRLFY HUB SWKLT WINI.S K.W.V. PAARI. TAWNY KWV. MUSTATFI. KWV CORONA 1 ION MM // It* K. W. V. — It's GOOD



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PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JIM l. 1951 Intermediate Games Show Bright Cricket Second Day's Play BRIGHT CRICKET tortured play In the lntermnliate Division en Saturday as the maril opening fixture* cn! their second day TilltilBM.\ 4.1111. I IMIS A HOI SIMM Thent itfour games, IM not our last Saturday liia learn scored 263 run I Windward al tniwrmsdiati Read. i for 141 fP A Empire li rw.w 18. %  %  i # first innings a Ai the QUTttoa, Regimen .>ut Pickirk for 11! ttlni up the good total oi in their aeeonc The wicket arc 114 %  kets. A good struggle it going l-lwtm Cable and Wireless ant 'tiers and Ihi* game will .. tight l"T id whi II it continue M0C Saturday. Cable and Wirelesg score*! 3M. Wanderers 2C7 and have one wicket stand,. In*. On Saturday. f"r Wtnrtwnrtl ng batsman N. C. Thornton *,or*d a valunhle 53 II V Farmer played a good innuiR' for 41 not out. It. Atkinson'. u only other good contrl C. Spooner claimed four Wind ward wickets for 27 run.-, but M Armstrong returned the beat king three wickrt* nj live overs, his bowline I only for live runs. r Mental Hosplitch against Sparti L. .\ i %  who waj off "Shell" Harris bowllnr when he was 95. C. Best 49 an;| R Chase 48. Harris bowled well. He took nvW wickets fiT SS runs in 17 In hia second Innings. > Griffith scored 50 for Spartan and B. Morris is not out with 30. for the V -1 *'. b "P—"" Ciill b Anrnli i BH .. MIMIW MUI rW" — tea ed ir.r • -st. I W !..<-.Ml — 111 WINDWARD 1"< Inn.***. r Thomto* %  ST-daW i> A !" V fa iMI rial oui %  a> a apoont b w b Spooner „ I'lMfM now UNO ANALYSIS Hudder %  Mil 1 \ V.IK.I I -I .1.1. S Wlr.lr %  Mll WI I .tar WANIJUIHIS l'IH'1 It(ireeni.lii. rt A b F Branhrr D LankLewie-. Ti.lnl %  (<* • Wlll* HOWI.IN(. ANALYSIS n M I Brankee IS • A Le*k-e 10 I %  UwMa ti 3 McKentle 10 HPARIAS I wkU I % %  • apllal — IM UgHTAI %  llMffllll I E Carter I b w i> Barni Gordon slpd wkpr b llari WHlahiis mil Out i CHIMM b Harrla Police Defeat Foundation i-.i ANALYSTS 5 SJ'ARTAN >"i" tni'l"* A Oiiuni b Gordon S. Orlffilh c wkpr b Chilehlow N Wood b KnbjM w" Jtmnixti *> ChMrtiV..* K ' % %  i III KVU K .Mlt.lMI VI %  ( % %  hii'iii — •;•* d i-i • • %  <* %  PlafewH* HI I'lKWHK 1-t InnlnS' A. C Trotter b L Phillip. H P Kins b Phillip. li |. > %  i R A Hoarf Ibt, b Pln.trr P gvel>n ilpd "kpi Unmeet. ,..;.h I'llillrr K M Tyl-.r c Bi.ihws.lf b Pindtr <. .1 M H WrlN run "Hi W atanhall Pbilllpb Bralhwaur I. La-nlry r Pi>* b Btalbwaiir K*tiraii .t anakat l-J. -; ? B |*_ -•T, 5-. a-o. T-n. •—iaa. *-i" nowi.iNt; akWrn O M H 1. Varrta .. .1 : i !!. I S 1 p Resbevakj \\ ini ('li*'s.s Tournumeut NEW YOPK. June 18 %  States ano Miguel Najdorf of Ar•BUlarJ to a draw alto 3i moves in the Wertheim Memorial i nil Chesa tournament's 11th and final round on Sunday. • vsky won the first prize wllh a M-age of elfht points won. Ihffi %  no alone of i otitsaden went inrougb the lournamctit without losing a •angle game outright finished tied %  I pline with Dr Max' Euwe of Holland with 7>> won. 3*j lost Psur garner ;m,| duw .n -.'vrn. On the other hand. Reshevsky won six. dress hi four and lost i n cauae rtseumatlc aclars and pains. Miff and painful Mats, boil*, pimple* and common akin dlmrdcxa. Clarka'a Hi.-..I Misiur* help* to purify %  he blood, cleanses the system and aaalsis In reaiorlni sood beallh. gay. mister, here's that lWit Olbsen girl, smiling Althea. She showed Manchester ran*, when makuiK her nrst appearance in Britain, that More than syncopated rhythm comes from herlem. Miss Olbson played her own tennis symphony on the courts, "Everything goes-over the net," in beating Mrs. Peggy Hodson ti 1, 6 1. AlttifH agreed the spectators, is the tops. Tennis's honey child has alt the shot*. Purring In the sunshine--"Otirea I'll tell the folks back hone It's better here than they think"—America's coloured (iismpion decided that she liked England's 'cute" courts, "gust Ans and dandy." Above Althea start* a -ma-.il (right! and nm-hed a smash (left The Weathei TODAY San MgwH ;.v.> a. Rasg set Mrton tl ulh JuitH Lighiii.g: ;.on pi. High Water: 2.46 a.m.. 4.t* YCSTERDAY Rainfall Kedrinarton) .15 in. Total lor Month to reajtar. .!.|JM ins. Temieraiurr Mi\.) M6.S F 'lemperuture (Mhi I IM I Wind Pircrtion (It a.in > 1. (3 p.m.) t.S.K. Wind Velorit>: 15 miles per hour Barometer < a.m.) 29.911, (3 p.m.)) '"'in askfor V Cussoni LUXLRY TOILET ^ SOAPS r' IMPERIAL LFAIBEK • UND£N BLOSSOM • IttT HYACINTH runit for the loss of six wlekott before stumps wore drawn. llABHAPO-i i.KUIMCNT J Ilvm* b iJi-lito' J Bralhn. A %  A Phillipill"! ehsil %  -.in onl gShseri M-ir*hall tSlrt. ? %  .1 I TrnMir Wo*** No. 29 TURN CORNERS SLOWLY AND KEEP ON THE LEFT Space made available by CANADA DRY foe Safer Matortng. A line bowling spell by C. Seal. who bagged live wickets lor 20 rum enabled Police to score point victory over Foundation al Foundation on Saturday the das in the first series In the Second Division rri-ket matches Foundation In their first innings ttond 36 run.-. Ii>rh lo wort 40 runs hefore he was bowled by Gav. Carlton gained first innings load over Cornbermerr at CarH>n. Hitting first Caritoii rcored in their first innings two runs and the schooll>oy icplied wit*. 144 runs. Canton In their second turn knocked up 42 for the loss of no i.ickrt and tkeslarad pressing for an oiilrmht vic'urv but when slumps were drawn Combermere i %  i 40 runs for the loss of rune wtekatg A Dirnm %  if* Al Bank Hull Empire also got linings lead on Wandcurwho had s.nrc.1 I7fl runs on the i.f il.u Empire on the MColid day scored 230 runs. Opening batsman A. Daniel hit 40 runs When puts wu anoad watadaran bad comjalgtod their taKond bill 135 runs. J Ramsay huti II to s.<-ore 55 C Deckles. D medium pacer to-ik foui wickets lor 33 runs lor Empire. 1 aewatrd gained points for a Srat Inningji lead ovi r Central al Vaucluse. Leeward scored l(if> runs in their first innings, and Central replied with 13(1 runs. In -iid innings Leeward declared at IM for the loss of five h t* O. Wood took three of Utg for 28 runs after some •ead> boWUng, At Ihe end of uloy Central had scored 82 runs for three wickets. A: 1>KII;.\ Hai i I tirst innings lead nfler howling out IAMUV for 103 runs in their rlrst innings College In second turn al the wicket declared at 113 ufter losing eight srtefceta and it Lodge on who had scored 14.1 tuns for the loss of adjefctts, lOf College WIIIII lour wickils lor 24 runs • -iina.ll.n ln.l Innlaf. (' %  lira I ...I n %  ni.it. l..d.ll.* Br> a >d I—l.lC CJreham b GnSllh 1< Jones e oi.i Brewiw I Wamet not ml . V.irde t Dcnnv l> Otirflln C (l.iv b callendrf k*i 1. Ji> Callender b. Sralv V. t'linw upd IW.R.I b aalv .i.d>r lb* b Sealy F Nwrw r b seal* r Wi*ke* b <-llmder It Phillip. • Amev b Seely Sports Window UATF.K POLO Snappers vs Whlpporays and Harrison College vs. Bonltas are the two Water Polo matches to be played at the Aquatic Club this afternoon. Play begins at 5 o'clock The referee is Major A R Foster mui %  OWlTKO ANAtASI Denny •sab PallrH. C Sealr i Phillipi : St Oil !f...-nl lb v.*r. b Oai b. Phillip. tag ToUl .tor 5 k-keli •OWL1NG ANALYSifi SI PhlllUH C, Orah.irn K. Cheae I %  Uay I Warnrr tARJ.roN tarl| B nrrJ II a.ll-n Pickwick gel first innnigs poinS over V M PC at Beckles Road Pickwick in their Hist Uinlngl scored 194 runs for eight wicket: declared in ropb to Y.M.P-C %  core of BO runs. In their second innings Y.M.P.C. collected 13H BUI iloe no wu-lurU decUnd JIOW'UNO ANALVatK Iral In. i liM.im. |B ( > nine. • MI i I l.llkr. S r ., \ letaeiairi tnd i ..., itr. rat i t. O Weed S (ar ts II ndlf.. • tar %  Oaaa n ri tnd SBSIMat i... %  l Kin.l ...I ..M t-allag* I Iral Innlitfi—IIS I (' M.-.-. S| % %  ( ..HI P Wane* (A %  I.l.r n.l ant V Dilna a .1.1,1. rt •. rem !-(.. Plr.1 lanln. IM %  4er if... IS, %  ••* • .... to ..11 oll-fr >nd Ifinlnn II*-* (•eeaseaej ISg 1..1.11... iu fa. 1 whaMi V UK", rir.l laelnn — Ptehwleh'l llnl Innlnf.— CM far s [MH,. tae %  ekseags la* tea Meaeei O. 1 a.hi SO a al. 1 ... J.i.... II. Lancashire 146 Behind MANCIIFKTKIt. June 18 I^incashlre with six wickets still to full, require another 148 runs to tcad the South Africans on first InnMga when the match enters .1* linal.day here tomorrow. At the close of play today Uui...shire had replied to the Soulh African's first innings total of 403 foi V declared with a score of 257 for four. Tl-.e South African.-. Increased 'heir Saturday score by 99 runs in 73 i',mutes fur the loss of two Wlekets. i e fore declaring. J.i. k Chcctham hit Ins. iiist c< ntury of the tour. He was three ,'iKl three-quarter hou his 127 which included one .-ix and 10 fours, Alan Wharton was rather unfortui..iie in not getting his ccntUV] 'or Lancashire. He was out for 98 which included twelve t fou !" and John Ikin made 64 and 1 Geoffrey Edrich 52 not out. —Renter. WHAT'SON TODAY i ..I,. Courts and Court of Original JnrKdletlon — 10 am. t Meeting of the House of Assembly — 3 p.m. Water Polo — 5 p.m. Mobile t inrma — Providence Boys' School Pasture — 7.39 p.m. Police Band, Popular t oncert, al Ihe St. Andrew Playing Field — 7.45 p.m. (IN KM AH III t •• p n. h,... "aeeeet a...d TU. n.or saw %  awMferi n>4— — ssa orap*. sad raw Owe* Leve" iss a a. is m m oi>n>ai. ll.anlrd Haibver — *i A a 1.1 a a, tquai.. : 'In TSf Navp" — SS* I't'iiit" orr N. i: w .\V.K\ wunrix WARVat-V An"H la laM l*npu.nr opin 10 World. V'Ml'' J. A. COIMN A RONB. Pretty and useful In Check Linen. Size 22 x 32. Each Sl.Ot Plain Linen 22 x U Each 76c. COTTON CLASS CLOTHS Site 22 x 32 Each 4c. „ 23 x 31 Each S3c. .. 20x30 Each 84c. RED BORDERED GLASS CLOTHS 18 x .15 Each Sc. CHECK COTTON CLASS CLOTHS 21 x 32 Each Desk Cloths Each .. 18c. Oven Cloths 32c. Polish Clnlhs XV. CAVE SHEPHERD 6k Co, Ltd. 10— II Broad Street (urbYoiirPitef It is no longer aeeeeearr to IUTH wore La 10 minutes and not or.]. MM| Ma ealn but also ukaa eai the •• %  a etope Meadlacand eorntaU nev. la t Ion ll-rstn ourbtug oihsr In. Bra rsuaad bj Pllae such ea Hasdacha arvewatisaa. UaoKscbe. Co*eilpttr. laaa e( anatnv dablltty. and Irrllat.!%  aaagflMM, Gt Hyfes frowi you' d/uislew>jy uadai the '•TOSIMK liiaianWe MyU* mual slop your rllpalm and troubles er raor'" l-eturn of smtiy p..-k.,.. Tain b %  1'ielda li .i k. • i %  % %  inedyi b. CW M, Itualie. it CON M ., V |,| I. I ... hi.in. Ib.w. b. C> Lmait ,KmnNv L. si..ith r < Uarsliall iwl -a %  esM i I Tola! ifor S wlCketa. %  DWIaWO ANAIASW O M H.MI..I-. 1 j I i %  a i .i-iM .• -AMM> ai rsiei HiMri'i" lli.l Inalno %  I .:.,.iiHrt I...a-.. 1 > >.,.lrr.I. ..' I„nl.,|. tg i u b iIWi-kles S-ib. b t* neclilea i> -.S.. Kecklea b. CHeckles J ttieeaeenen c Beeklrl I a, IVshlea b SSlr M. CUrke l.b.w. b ( %  | .1 % %  It.-iann t OUI b Skeetr (, Pi.in-....t. i, fknanrs J Pierce l.b.w. b. H. Heckles A Thontas net oul iirtui irBOWLING ANALYSIS o. M n w 8 Heckletd I SO I 11 1 M a i > ia i CONGOLEIIM FLOOR COVERING LENGTHS 27" WIU 36" 72" ., 108" \v. rtanW-l Skaela 1 hc\ II Do It Ever Txws axy-TRAP PRIZE ^A oxs TO /URS. LA e&y. — K^ 8^/w.i.: snu. w HER fouse on=ss y^^St/S-E /'A h£K COFFJREB\Jimmy Hatlo [HEM. LACQUERED ASO UAK-ooeo, HE ZIPS OfP HER DRESS -RESULT, A HALF-HOUR /MORE I5QN3 OVER WE MESSI AUSO DRY FELT UNDERLAY. Very pretty patterns and reasonably priced. I'l \\ I \TIO\S I mi Till. I nil HOOK whleh fii ,-i -> •' QODS WAY OF SALVATION PLAIN" Pleiaso write 'or one to Samuel Roberta, tJoapel Rook and Tract Service, 30, Central Avenne. Baogor N. Ireland." FOODS .; For Your Enjoyment i in, Pkgs Cocktail Onions Cherries Stuffed Olives Cocktail BlsealU Swift Vienna Sausages Frankfurt Sausages l.mi. hr.ni Beef Pate Ie Fole Potted Meat 1*1, Tin Sasso Olive OH Cheese Kraft Cheese '*.-.**^-rc~*-. | INCE & Co. Ltd. I ^.VA..V,W.W.V. -W.W FOR A DELIGHTFUL SANDWICH ORDER J&R !•!#.. fur Many Customers WV WISH TO THANK YOU, Ihe entire public for Ihe very kind reception and enthusiasm j;iven ,£/ %  &£ BEVERAGES here, .ml would like to opolonisc fr any inconvenience caused due to the non-arrival of our bottles and cases. HOWEVER these are expected here within the next few weeks, when we shull IKin a hotter position to supply you. BOTTLERS (Barbados) LIMITED. '-*<.W-*,**V,'*''5^' TUL&on NAVY CUT CIGARETTES Offer an entirely new standard of smoking enjoyment. The linest leaf patiently and carefully selected, then treed from every trace of stem or other impurity and made into perfect cigarettes by the most modern methods. A CIGARETTE UNIQUE FOR COOLNESS. MELLOWNESS AND SATISFYING FLAVOUR Packages of 20 at 40 Cents Each. OBTAINABLE FROM ALL LEADING DRUGSTORES SANDWICH BREAD HILRINSON&HAYNKSCO.,I.TD-A..-U | ,',',',','/,•,',','/. •ssss*;'.;',*,;



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I'W.I sl\ H\l(l!\l>l>AllVIK'ATI TUESDAY. JUNE 1, 1M1 HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON I PI MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY BLONDIE f I -TNECP %  BY CHIC YOUNG V*ANT AtaOl THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER BRINGING FATHER GtORGE MC. MAiNUb %  i rug | %  %  %  %  %  JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBlNS ANpMtfftt INO MCAbt Of CKTec... A BAG lui Of A'.MONPft ANP 'MBit 1IEP **... THAT*. fNCXJG.t PEOVKIONC TO MAKE A RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND %  03 ONCS i 9*WP-Ori %  Anti.eplic OINTMENT Pyorrhea and Trench Hoiith Slopped in 24 Hours GlOSS FINISH *f ji ATTRACTIVE RANGE OF COLOURS THE VERY BEST IN PAINT (HHVIMIIII AT Al.l. II HUM. IIAHIIW \iti: STOKES N.w CHlMv.ryl Sov.l T..M. "* •<.— A—"— tl 3 "Every Picture ••III a Story %  ackacha, Rheumatic Pain Relieved .^rJening, painting, odd jobi round tha houte can bt a pleasure again when you are free train I rheumatic paint, Hilt,aching mutt let and joint-. lumbago or common urinary trouble* J ">" < impurities iu the blood. Why not get happy relief by taking l>oan'. Bakache Kidney Pilb. They help the kidney* to rid the blood of excess uric acid and other impurities which otherwise might collect In the system -nd cau.c distress. HALF A CENTURY of ageaaaj in relieving ailmenn due fa inadeauaie kidney action it tha proud record of /Wn'i I'illi. Urateful men and %  Mgfaj of all agit use and recommend thi> efficient diuretic and urinary antiirptic to their friends and neighbours. ^fc r% ^& WkM af% Deafer far M a M^W^L M^9 ^^V VnVBackftJicKuino -Palls %fcP 4** $/MPLYM£AT \>2 to relieve'PERIODIC FEMAtfMMS Also nervous di.lr.. aavaral daya 'bofore' own* Pltikh.m'r Compound not only rriletea ihia monthly P-II. Dul Hiw, m.iiuyinK pre-u.tli-1 nervou. i*n*r emotion. o( mia nature. R-'KUl.t ux? helpbuild Up i*Hitan romais dia% % %  wumrn oy tli fVniasuala r.p<>r-., warnaa, 'i-i *o Buffer a lr daya Juat brfon POHff prriod Iroin Mi.nRr. nrrvou* IWBUBBB. wit. Uii IUHW IrWIn^n aui:ii'l nan lurtinm uiilmpiioiiin*!) I inly (he woman'. ueh n cul tetton ... -'• lilllr 4~ 3 rnlnwic' I n.lu iiu-t.i lent" prove rml leave* haii mart radian! This new. different. emeraid-| clear sliampoo in the han lulie is wunderfiil For taring —uiih its i-\(lti>i\c formuln and pnlenled eleanitinK in> j; red ion I — remove* ugly, cmharr;ivsp dandruff init Leaves your hair more radiant than iinv soap shampoo . more ntdiant — in hardest water Get a larKe-size tube. ASK FOR PRELI. TO-DAY There's No Other Shampoo Lliko EMERALD-CLEAfl l'HEI.I.! ^im %  %  %  %  %  %  ,-.-,r ---.---.\-,\-,-,-.\\-.-,-,v,\v,\\-.-,-.-.-.-,-,-.-.-.-.t,^


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TUESDAY. JUNE 19. III:,I BARBADOS ADVOCATE P MSI FIVE Speightsiown And Its Environs SPEIGHTSTOWN. shopping centre of the leeward Parishes, resembles very much a small English fishinf village. It does not however have the thatched roofl and attractive gardens Its business places are a>l huddled together. Its houses, in manv cases o\ th'.-v ftoi Hoard On Merits On August 14 HIS HONOUR the ViceChancellor will take evidence and hear the Christian Mission case on its merits when nafa i *d different MM From Ihe southern entrance to t. %  .v ii It 11 railed (fueen Street. Further down until il raackes >*• Poiu.station u i* c-rfllid Onmge Street T ha remalndcr of the mala called Sand Street. Ki i Snwt. hlrctiihins nortr, a-a-ds with Hi .ittractiv,beach on which low .hanging pTBfM and iiumihlneel trees grow. In the hurricane season the ... sea washes Into the main road at hearing resumes on August 14 Speightstown When it retreats it Thta w„ decided ye^erday a, S'T.rk^^TlES tne Court of Chancery when along the coast are mostly m the Vice Chancellor heard mod of repair*. They i counsel for the defence on a "*"* Jar<1 ano ,n s Mnc caws the in-eliminarv lecal noint ri*H jni "} %  no <* %  %  ** %  *he L.. \<1 AJ _1 8 !" raisea ,.rushing wave* constant!) K-U by Mr. Adams, arising out of Them dean, the pleadings. Speightsiown has it* tradiIn the suit, Rev. Frederick A. tional blacksmith shop. This is Barrow and others brought aii situated under a sand box tm action against Rev. Do 1 ton L Hoyte M is owned by W. L. Greaver-. and others. Each Is seeking a The foreman "smithy". Chealei cleclaraUon in his favour a s to his flel(l Maxwell, has been I ui being Superintendent during 1949 mering on trtie anvil in thai shop •mil 1950. for the past sixteen MWi ll Mr. W. W. Recce. K.C., associated is *• %  < known to Spuightstonians. with Mr. J, S. B. Dour, instructed Thc increased car and lorry tmfby Hutchinson & Ban Held appear for Borrow. Mr. G. H. Adams associated with Mr. D. H. L. War I instructed by Messrs. Carringtou & Sealy appear for Hoytc. Yesterriay only Mr. Word appeared for Hoyte. When the case was heard on the last occasion, Mr. Adams had asked lie has brought about a big cut in his income, but he is still earning sufficient for i's bread. The Regiment In Camp ONE HUNDRED AND r*ORTY memhns of ll" H.ir bados Regiment including 12 officers are now in camp at St. Ann's Port. These also include the members of the Drums and Fifes of thc Regiment who are in camp for the first time. The men went into barracks from Friday morning, June 15 and spent the first two days settling in and learmm; the routine duties of barrack life. They also saw a demonn of guard mounting and learnt the various btiffle callr. On Sunday, ihe Regiment octen-minute break for rtfftshDruins and ment. Aireraft Fire Fighters Training The Pv %  ciif Ci.i-ll Tende 1-, now .1 Boiwtll and when MM nl in a ,i) .it lli> Thg tender will I*, manned by crew of live. Their first lob H how tu operate the 'jrnder efficiently. A crew is said 10 bj ,-niiicnt when on arriving ..tent they i in get fogai ants .1 burning aircraft in nine seconds. Maj. H .%  Piro Offte Watch Repairers Fifty-four-yeiir old Cat U bin is n watch repairer I is situated in a very UIIUSUJI ssn P ll,cc II la tn lhe nmp buildins companied for an admission that the Christian ,hr blacksmith's shop. FortuFifes marched to Si IfatthlM The Regiment will return to Si %  %  ;'t.sibihty for the *" < """> Mission Herald had been out 0/ nntrt / .""TT u no likelihood of Chur.Ii when the l\.dro Capt. Ann's Fort by the same route, but ti existence. He was arguing that if '"p tools being mixedF. M Dow leu pre.., h.-d the MMihis time taking the Victoria it had been out of existence after torbin ,ho oldest watch remun. The Police Band played Bridge. It will march with its Hoyte had been properly apjr.^aTJ ,. n "* was %  *during the sorv i.e. Drums and Fifes in full dress, pointed. Superintendent, then since ^,1 g alcft a lon .berore the When thc Advocate visited the On Saturday afternoon. 1I.-Mnotice had to be. given in the 2£,? r J£ r ,* Ch J*£ in ?.J!3"? m cam -yesterday, one platoon was will be a falling pMe competition herald of any meo/ing fixed to JS^rL*!. *? up-to-date pracl i s | n|l for ,„,. anni|il musketry and the camp will break Up it Death By Misadventure D-e T o Broken Neck A nine-.nai Brlajhton Rood, Black Rock M JtaTM 14 .ibout 1M a.m. I>| A. S. Ckto who pi-if inn. %  post mortem examination a (he Public Mortuary on June 1' about 11.4a a.m. said that one o LI l kkfj was broken. A largi l.iicmatuma was present at th book of the sack. And than .. haaniiailiaaji to the hnla Dtintl as due i., a broken neck Cuthi.eit Small said thai he i i UM motor oai M-S 9 On June 14 about 5.20 a.m. h M drtviDf this car taking Boyo to his homi in llnghton, Black Rook. While on Brighton Boail he saw a man about 4n feet uhc. \ , Bd He ti-leplioned the Puliei red .mil oartiad out In\. -.tl.ltlOHS. Mr. E. W Rarrow i| i inquiry on behalf of ;m mtei and efficiency of the crew. They began their training yesterday. flibuab j i %  i premises. It is now 25 that he ha: urse at thc Government Rifle. 4 p.m. third v appoint. Hoyte would contl b. Sup^g^od ^L M wgUft repl||nnt[ .„ Spo „ ht>lown _. ? ., •""PP" 1 Thr Spci(htolon F..li,"* Wi own bread, lie allows from 7 K. The men then carry Ca[ published people who make their homeout training from 9 —12.30 when latyne was vi The Vice Chancellor said that .1 m *de l ve l ? bak 5__ th€ m '" was perfectly clear at that stage. On Munler Charge Inspector G. Springn inform1 .] Dsfferiet "A" Coronet G. B. Grimth that 5-yer-oi,i Ruby Laynt, a labourer of Richinond Gap, .St. Michael had been charged by the Police with murder at an inquiry which was Foam Is a comparatively chemical used for aircraft lighting. The crash tender cm pump 2.500 gallons of foam per minute for periods of one and n third minut.s. It ckq also spray carbon dka I "-> at the i.it, of I.6O0 cubic feet per minute for periods of one and %  hall mfJUrbat It can pump water from its own lank, from open water or from a hydrant, but working k.t and eating .den*,!*: 1„ the f^^TjSS v.*L lh.\l.llh ot lon wiU ^'L 10 "'•ll ', CI W a middle of ejeh barrack room, there !*• £* 235 "tft?*?! The length U time will depend _.. named child which wa found in a pit t Richmond Qap, St. Michael on Jun c 15. great extent on the men themselves. Besides Uie practical use of the Crash Tender they No medical evidence was given, mutt learn how to WJ**' CpL Shepherd att.idied to Uuimnmig aircraft, know something Hlack Rock Station told th M...l its stwrture ' f ^e'f eoun that he went to Richmond s tank, batteries, fuselage. Gap on June 15 and found oven for a small fee. Speightsf..Mowing the ruling which "he had town is also supplied with broad given on the previous occasion 'rom Bridgetowii. but this d<--s that the case was then concernci nol altect Alfreds trade. with whether Barrow and the th ( urch %  £< wh Otrwn or Hoyte and the others .?. from lnP niatn we:.entitled to a declaration that named because one of the enthey i i Superintendent i trances .to the Speightfclnwn I of buildings actually form g shade overhead. SI. Peter's Church lelt* everyThe Court was not then concerned with the claims as regard 1 the mission's property, but was ination of the legal point taken _,„.,. ...^ ., u j,.,;,, a break for lunch. From 2—I. there is further training, tea %  1 i .in and nipptr at 7 p.m. Entertainment is also provided finthe volunteers and Uteri gM Raines like lenni-. cricket, basket ball, netball. badnnngton and table tennis. All these can be played in HOOD after 4.00 p.m. The men can also go to Graves End for a bath after working hours. This evening; there will be a film at the Drill Hull of the Trooping of the Colour in London, on Wednesday, the men will hear the history of the Royal LOtOHtOI clock with three faces is built ii Regiment tn which they are amliand escape hatche* are itu.ded. and how to release .urcraft seats etc. As the majority of aim aft a, present using Senwell airport are Vikings, I**destars. TX:-3's and IXM's it Is undsffatood that the lr.„ will tn < fc lerday remanded fundamental slructures aircraft. female child in a pit. This chill was sent to the Maternity Ho-; Iy .i K '" s „ on pita] The following day shortly after 1 p.m. he went to the Hopitml Mortuary and Idenllued thc body of the child to Dr. A. B. until June 23. UNIFICATION OF W.I. CURRENCY WANTED the steeple of this church. Tho oted, on Thursday tvenlng they hurch does not tower over trie will hear a talk by Col. R W f.raclive. Oliver oil the vsjrlOU bid the mi.'s he has had and on Fridav buQI enrdng there win be ihe end-ofmp coocart wban the volunteer by Counsel for defence. Different Cae Mr. W. W. Reeee argued that cl v It ,, ^nan but the case of "Prowst versus Foole" j. haB vwy n tt ^ garde which had been cited by Mr. fl nc „ arv w ,.u krpl n Adams as authority to show that j n Inc ..ighiecnth century and ir Hoyte was the properly elected the resting place of many digniSuperintendenl in 1946 he would larl04 „f tho punsh. On its walLi continue to be Superintendent. ;Ul ITl ,,nv marble stones bearing did not bear on the case befoiv tnp names of Speightstonians them. who had fallen in the various That case said that if a mayor warSi an d others, was elected annually, he would The entrance to the church continue In office until another was from Orange Street also leads to elected. But Section four of ttM the Vestry Rooms, On the other Christian Mission Act stated that a idc of the Vestry Rooms is the the Stlparlntsndent must be electSt. Peter's Girls' School, ed in January for the ensuing The Marketplace year At the end of the ensuing The market place in Speightsyear therefore Hoyta was no town ls amon. u a only a shed . longer the Superintendent. but Is regularly crowded with dl lp S' Bye-law four dealt with meetn n vendors and sometime-. Ings of the Mission and a Bleating housewives from the City. There ..f the Board of Management was ls always a lot of activity in this silent as to meetings of the repKmall market. When there is no .esentatives of the church of the lsIl Ui ,. people gather to chat on various: subjects. Each Ixtdy was separate and disFlowing across the town is tinft under the act and had diffeiSail Pond River. A v ni fuwtions. The meeting of the btWge artal recently built across mission was a meeting of a nhis river, Itoutlet iIn the corporate body as distinct from *ca but only when rain falls a met ting of rcprescnl.il L\ < %  e the river is satisfied the churches. lO remain without an nutlet and The rtilea omitted to speak c* , resembles a lake. tlie meetingof the representative-; A library, post office and As„f the mission This omiss or -cmbly Room are situated in one could not be supplied by the tuilding. Lecture* are giw Court whose function WHS to inthe Assembly R terpret the law and not to make sionally the BrlUsh Council. the law. MR J W PLOWDKN-VVAKiH.AW ol KngUnd who spends seven months every year in the West Indies, told the Advocate yesterday that fw hopee there will be uniHcatton t currency in these islands very soon. He sa:d thai when ., % %  .b> %  leaves Jamaica and goes to the was the .slund m %  %  Bahama* the Jamaican noun I ii*-.. IHM where thaw was least difticult to cash. The same thing likely to be trouble, h. also obtains when he goes Irorn said Orenad r experilhfi Ba hamas to Bermuda. Tho visitor has to buy a hag of silver from the bank to pay the expenses of the last any of these places in oidcr to without i i It is island whenUicy have in BDp: lei.tlv hapO] peasant; colour bar. He considered that the Grenada ai'' very Mr. Piowdcn-Wardlaw who mfl In Barbados for tha last two weeks, leaves to-day tof St. lAicia He will als4. %  Kitts and Antigua before returning |o England In Beptambtr. A representative of Watoay of l.ondon. un> of lantern blame single pound worthy n nn f hunng ti %  They have been lecelving enormous prices in dollars foi Iheb nutmegs and mace and have n.>< passed it on This hns given O^iry his op portunlty which he is ul abusing In many ways BOW, though he has got the worker* benefits which they should ha Off to Seauell OH pair 7 perfor m %  the II II Hall stags Also taking part will be Professor u^'y.' Moots fi. Mia Alice n y U Armstrong On Wednesday, the Commissioni % %  of Police will M vkdl camp in his capacity as Commandant of Local Forces and the Rgl* ment will carrv out internal security duties. Platoons will visit the JS SmpaVy^ X ^S £^^X^oX£ VStLTSJTVS^SS eXpen '"" EU ; r t Britain, he w.. for 18 year, wt-h !" '^ v r received a-t I" J. & R. Tennent. His hobby la bird collecting for museums. Cost of Living On Thursday, the Regiment He said that Barbados I marches to Top Rock where it will of Ihe nicest places he had w il %  •' lake buses for Senwell to spend |>erause of its bathing, gaud road* the remalfidei of Uu any whtto and Urw cost of living there. Volunteers will see a pared with Trinld iflon of the iii' %  penraj ol more so. VenemIs | • n platoon and will also get a Jamaica. chance of firing rifles. Brens and The proportion bottrtno Bl two-inch msetora. bados and Trinidad he said ias On Saturday, they will do a 00 Ls to 100 while In V ceremonial march through Bridgen is as 00 is to 180. town. Leaving St. Ann's Fort at The food here is eatremelv iiood. H in the morning, they will go Normally in the tropics, the fish %  ihe ChamIs not good but the Barbados and OCCaberl in I>i idge, down Broad Street flying fish is equalled to some of • I Alice Playthe best sold in Britain and that nig Field where there will be a is saying a lot. TREBOR BARLEY SUGAR STICKS KRAFT CHEESE—Pkt. 39c. 12ox. tin CAMEMBERT CHEESE— per tin .... GORGONZOI.A CHEESE per lb ..... ... SLICED BACONper lb 11.20. SLICED HAM p U SWIFT'S LUNCHEON BEEF WITH CEREAI—per tin ACTO VIENNA SAUSAGESper tin SOUTH AFRICAN 1XJBSTER -per tin MAXAM BEEK SAUSAGES—per tin PORK SAUSAGES—per tin .89 .57 ENJOY THIS FINE BEER PERLSTEIN BEER 18c. bot — $4.00 per Carton %  ••-say **se SI I XSFEI.lt STOTT A 10: LTD. PEGGY SAGE SHIMMHUNQ NAIL POLISH brlnj! a Iparkllng sclnClllktinc excitement to rnger-nail*' Finfri-' s of brocade. .as sparkling ai a cascade of scriuins. There are six shades in this style Come in and m k % %  I %  II who have received add it Iwnges in these times of infT.Vd prices must however, be prepsred to take n cut Ii M Co -loWd. "I, LAUNDRY FIRE lv of .lothe.s were burnt at re-id KU\ K \ Laundn at st phens Hill. 81 Michael, or iirday. The house was slightl> -iced Nothing was rane NKW ARRIVALS AT WEATHEKHEADS From U.S.A. StillniBio Fie. kle CUMIII Harli.isol-Bn.shless Shav MintHoney & Almond Crcaun Cream of Wheat Uvlbron 'V n i. Co I Or King's Sulphur Hittei Palmers Ointment I'.i.mi'i I Soap Flangetype Torch Bulbs J A A I. H OW IN \ Obtninable from H. JASON JONES & Co., Ltd. HARRISON'S BROAD STREtT NEW -lIli'Ml s l Of SPARKLING CRYSTAL GLASSWARE KKOM T.S.A. Hems received include:— KKI KK.KHAIOK WATI.ll noTTI.V.S Bums IHSIIKS IRI'IT AM) MUD BOWLS COASTB ASH TRAYS SALT AND I'EPPKR SHAKERS VINBaAS (iir (III.) BOTTLES And Atlructive Jin. VASES — WE ALSO HAVE — JADE GREEN HEAT-PROOF PUDDING & MIXING BOWLS IN SKVKHAI. SIZES BEING MERELY A TOKEN SHIPMENT THE QUANTITIES RECEIVED ARE SMALL — MAKE SURE OF OBTAINING YOUR REQUIREMENTS BY BUYING WITHOUT DELAY. WCATHIRHCAD LTD MEAD OF RttOAl) ST HARRISONS BROAD STREET % -TZi&lwtxYt Fldfoi SHOT ( I oiM I Sometiiini: special to make you look thelu^l Ihing in Ihe lateM fashions. In Blue nnd Hose. 36 liulies wide. S.'I.Btt METAL STRIPED TAFFH V Ecel lent for eveninn divas eir. We huvc ll in Navy and Wine. M i. ihes wide. I'rr yard 98.72 FLORAL SATINS. K-..II. beautiful slufl. You'll want some n\ you see it. Rich colours on while grounds. .'Ifi inches wide. IV i THrcl Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street.