Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Havbadros
CHINESE OPE

Allied Line Makes\
Limited Advance

TOKYO, June 4.
CHINESE FORCES hurled one of the heavies:
barrages of the Korean War at the Unitec

PRICE: FIVE CENTS



wee es <> tf

N HEAVY BARRAGE
|BRITAIN SUPPORTS |
OIL CO. PROPOSAL

Morrison Tells Commons

LONDON, June 4



fi

: :

2
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4

IS ILL FIRST GIRLS’ CLUE





Nations troops thrusting forward on the Imjir Gritish-Fersian oil dispUte is at last moving to a »>sint
; ave or: prac | negotie trons arc in sight, observers be! ad |
e River sector today. The coast-to-coast Allied lin uve Today's principal devclepment was a ate iat tel
made a limited advance. Chinese mortar crews | Britith House of Commons by Foreign Secretary Her! ert
Morrison that the Government fully supported the proposa. |

fought tenaciously for every yard of ground in the
Imjin area but were forced back almost one mile.
Allied assault troops crossed the flooded river in

of the Anglo-Iranian Oil Ciupany to send a missicn to\|
leheran to discuss oil nationalisation with the Pers:an |
Government. ce ee

Y



The British Governmen





































open boats elsewhere on the western front ont e = ert vad |
: { Verve IBAL to ilervene nef
caught the Chinese troops unawares. Austin Rei CCte | 22 be OH he Hous: to nes |
Artillery shelled the Chinese digging emplacements ae ‘J bas Shen siversed aa. the tov
‘ramen Was a majority hare- |
along the banks. Ma 9 P li eth Wie Aenean.
» > sac.der in the company, |
uateene eee? r weried — ; ‘Wea S 0 Icy Mcrrison said he hopod tho}
at Chinese scemec strongly 2 Coupany’s mission weuld reach}
established. Reds Did Not 3¥RACUSE, New York, June 4. ‘eau untaliey aacedrni Py Sih’ tt
Allied troops in the central | arren Austin, United States] Persian Government. |
sector front blocked several] thief delegate to the United
Chinese counter attacks. In th>| I fl N said today that “further Interested Partner |
Yongchon area north of the 38th} nrmuenca Hi spose’: airalbat. . Gemma sted Partne
Parallel, 200 Communists attack | + “hire would be voted by the} Morrison saic it would be im-|
ed this morning. U * P. ] U.N.O. i ‘essary > ossible "7 » missi seus: |
Allies killed 31, took 50 prison-| nee o Icy International golleeiive’ att EE oe eeeh “Spereians| THB MEMBERS of the first Girls’ Club in Barbados aro being sorved with buns and sweet drinks. After
ers ahd scattefed ‘the: rest: i eauines extending ocnuliation Mare June 5. the deadline fixed | 12s they played gamos and sang (Story on page 5)
They met moderate to heavy} __ WASHINGTON, June 4. which was “time consuming but] 9Y, Persians. / | ee eee eee ee eT en 2
resistance in Yongongni area but United States Secretary of vice” he said in his speech at In its memorandum of May 30 e e ‘4
maintained their advance. State, Dean Acheson, _ testifying Syracuse University, the Persian Government hac -
It was the same tale northwest] today before the Senate commit- Austin said ue. Ti st i -oacl asked the company to put up! UuUSSIA e eC S eS Cl Ti
and west northwest of Hwachon.| tees investigating General Mac the problem 6? stren “ Aye a within five days any suggestion: |
Despite lowering skies and inter-| Arthur's cismisial, read a long rpeoving colle ti 8 a samme and tit might have within the frame-|
mittent heavy rain, air fore>)statement on United States’ policy United eta ats ah ant en work of Persian nationalisation | ‘ :
fighters and bombers | roamed|in the Far East for th last five of a skilled wate i oe Pas Oo e ri l = our a S
widely over North Korea dvrin*] years. with a fi we maker deali In-view of the complicatec | /
the day striking at marshalling! There hos been a sharp nh a fine chronometer”. nature of the issues involved, this

Rejecting General Douglas Mae
































yards, railway bridges, trocps| Senatorial split on U.S. policy in 4 ae ; MC tcould not be done so quickly
concentrations and supply centres.|the Far East. Arthur's Far East policy he said: | Morrisow said. . ~ i | PARIS. June 4
a ; : fe We know the United States Meanwhile, the Foreign Secre- “Abolish Selfish, vei ; , ‘ iNet
Fire wer Wien Acheson had__ finished cannot stand alone. We know if{ary added, the British Ambassa- RUSSIA to-day replied to the Western powers proposal
po reading the statement, Republican our country is to act, jointly with}|dor in Teheran had repeated to! N ; P liti wen?? for a big four conference im Washington on July 23 in
: , _,|Senator Alexander Wiley asked other nations — th 5 Persians the British view * Narrow Fonucs 4 ae ; F
Allied advances in the past} 5) “the hadi : en our ¢ ians the British view that the terms interpreted by the West as a rejection.
intai |; about “the purported influence of security must be considered in thé] British Government was = an * : ia eed ‘ 4
week have been maintained by|¢ ot ani cai ‘ De , Foreig M ster. Andre . 1} a reply
; Communist sympathisers in the wor 3 re” interes a tit eputy Foreign Minister, Andrei Gromyko, in a reply
sheer weight of firepower from | ct, - 7 Nyt os world perspective”. nterested partner in the oi) Says Barkley : i : y
massive artillery and swarms Gi td ae irtment during — this Austin received the Honorary | ‘ispute. Je m ae handed to Western Deputies agreed toa Foreign Ministers
j fighter and fighter bombers. But Pn ons pied: "T" @ t | Doctor of Laws Degree. At the same time the British FULTON, Missouri, June 4. meeting only on condition that the United States military
in the last 24 hours Communists} ; + ears a ae ip aah reece } “Reuter. | Ambassador Sir Francis Shep-| Vice President Alben Birktey bases and the Atlantic Pact are down for discussion.
‘ seared | believe there was or is any Com- | herd in an interview with Prime| today denounced the “depraved” oe
have fallen back to prepared] mynist influence anywhere affect -—— ini
positions of well-constructed | munist i nena cs ae aera ee eee Mossadeq | attempt to weaken public confi- It was this condition on which
bunkers in jagged hills. ake al . o r Ce ’ vas believec to have stated that} dence in the United States Gov- Fi | M. O Gromyko has been insistent that
To dig them out infantry have er +e policy either then 01 | Montgomery Is A ot on Government sup- }ernment. He called on Atericans | inc ap NT brought about the latest deadiec
gone in with sub-machine guns} uestioned, A . ai s 5 es | ~ eva ¥ > : ag SRE company's: “ncw © pros to resist those trying to “frighten ss in the deputies 13 weeks talks
and carbines and some of the} pneu on Be atten dried teaee H.M. THE KING Christian Soldier s0sals. the people” in the present world Czech 4 Western powers have refused to
bloodiest pitched battles of the enough to unseat he Communist * —Reuter. crisis for the sake of political or raw oman idmit it to the agenda,
whole campaign have beer | rogirme in China s King Cancels Peete LONDON, June 4. personal gain. | Russia suggested today that
fought. " oh 2 } t . Pines ae Lord i . ; Barkley said he favoured BORDEAUX, June 4. | Deputies should include the sub-
Savage fighting continued today On MacArthur's dismissal ; Yeputy Allied Supreme Commands checks and balances of the two A map showing the United] ject as a non agreed item on the
sequent, ere Tengen on fshveoors said the General “in Engagements er ch tn a Europe a Vietminh Forces patty system but appealed for| States military installations in| agenda,
nje. ave er wave 01 i effect challenged the policies as NUMNSe onig) “as a Christian s \ abolition of “narrow selfish, big-| France was found on a Czeeh| Deputies were holding the 65th
fighters and bombers sent high laid down by the President.” ine ie buleoue é ie paige’ corm 56. Gomgreenars and Push South of Hanoi goted, avaricious and ambitious | woman Vera Strobl, 27, wifen she\ session in search of es aged
explosives ~~ nap: e extension 0: e orean eee i . very it § S For, polities.’ ~ was detained at Blaye Hirdnde | egend: Forei isters’
Chinese north of Hwachon, break-| war to China would give Russia doctors has cancelled all public! Communism “is anti-Christian, Pee cn June 4. He wae speaking at’ Westmnins- eytiare, voted hae tals Girdnde | rn fora eign Ministers
ing up vicious counter attacks and|a legal excuse to intervene, he| °MZ#sements sore “month. retrograde and immoral” he said| Vietminh forces attacked weak! rer College where he was made} She had gone to register as inf A western spokesman said the
forcing limited withdrawal. said, The King who is suitering from] in a speech at the annual banque: |P98ts on the southern perimeter! an Honorary Doctor of Ls a alie lave ta none. seta ; 7 ee eee ;
: a slight catarrhal inflammation of |of the Royal Society of Saint |Of the Hanoi sector and threatened : _— cat ea AU GSe doa eT eo eae ven supply} position now appeared to be the
Last night Chinese came in from He believed the treaty between] the lung has improved, but a George—patribiic Aaeciatian ‘la break-through on Sunday into —Reuter. dump where the United States} Same as before western powers
three sides against Allied positions}Communist China and the Rus-j} period of rest is esseftial to his Saint George wai’ sieava tack. |the rice delta. The operation was jmilitary stores are landed at handed in their notes last Thurs-
in this area but were eventually] sians “is of such a nature that it} complete recovery. lings dracon (ot. especially large, but was | Bordeaux for transit to Germany.| day to Gromyko and direct to
repulsed with the aid of the/would give Russians that oppor- He therefore will not-be able} The tai bs) spelanare (potentially dangerous, Ve 1 |} Vera was said to have beer | Moscow
artillery early today. - tunity and it would also give|to welcome “King Wasnt af neem or i ee fore 1? The French Rey ‘ sarestiuial Se verile en Dead In l friendly with the United Stat The spokesman said these were
Allied troops screening the|Chinese a very considerable lever| Norway to London on Tuesday than Hitler, M 1 jecuives evel hattalion and several artillery | ® * jsailors. French Police decidec| preliminary observations because
Soyang River yesterday found tue|to demand that Russians do that."|it was announced. His younger! These er, Montgomery sald. | nits into the area, section of Mine Explosion jtoday not to bring an espior | the Russian reply would have to be
bodies of 1,500 Chinese and 700 brother the Duke of Gloucester Eur ne ware “sotusy, 0 destroy | which is on the extreme south- | charge against her, but they will] referred to three governments.
horses 10 miles northeast of} That was one of the reasons why] ,,i} deputise, sailing. down..the european civilisation altogether! co corner of the Handi’ sector HAMM, Westphalia, June 4. | hold her while inquiries are pur-| }
Chunchon. They had apparently | Government opposed MacArthur's River Thames es ee w " e and to establish the tyrannical and LShanting of the sae. Tt ha i been The death roll in the explosion} sued under the breach of | the : loday’s four power meeting
been cut down in the Communist'| proposal to bonb Conmunist] yagi, ' r greet the Nor-) sodless rule of Communism over | ; ' & = . tye ‘| in Heinrich Robert Mine at Her lal ne remulotie Aitrrs nro. | sted 90 minutes,
: ‘ : wegian King on his arrival aboard} th ; i ‘ | inactive for four years and only iens regulations (normal pt ; :
offensive. bases in Manchuria, he said. re : : Be BR the whole eastern hemisphere and ! a : Yiringen near here last Thursdé en Mat ar a | The next meeting will take
his yacht for a four-day visit : : : ‘weak garrisons of badly armed F Ree 488 iursday ; cedure for French Police in suet ,
—Reuter. —Reuter. ’ ; ‘ OP as much as possible of the west-} Indp - Chinese Catholic Militia has risen to 17, Three of the 20' cases). The Map wa cutting place on Wednesday when the
Ue. ern.” Montgomery is the new Pres-: .,, ie : “| miners injured have since die , Roses wat | West are expected to reply.
ident of the Society ; manned the posts A jured have since died, from a Communist newspape ply
to Society.—Reuter, Several of these were quickly Fourteen men were trapped at the campaigning against the Unite —Reuter.
taken by the better armed Viet-| time of the explosion and killed states “occupation.” —Reuter

C.L.C. Pass Resolution
For W.I. Federation

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, June 4.

A RES!)LUTION demanding immediate federation and
self-Government for the West Indies was passed unani-
mously at the Fourth Annual General Meeting of the Carib-
bean Labour Congress (London Branch) held yesterday.

0}
Self Government, it was
pleaded, was the key to economic
progress and general raising of
the standard of living in the West
Indies.

THE BIG “SNATCH”’

BOMBAY, June 4,
Two men attacked the Fin -nce
Minister of the Bornbay Gevern-
ment, Lal Mehta, when he was
out walking today, They snatched





The Executive Committee in its
report criticised the West Indian
Trade Unions for their failure “to} 9}! his valuables including a set of
co-ordinate common _ interestS| gojq buttons, a diary and a pair
affecting Trade Unionism in the] of spectacles.—Reuter.

West Indies.”

|
|



It was also pointed out that the





Crewmen Leave
Ship Stranded

MELBOURNE,
AUSTRALIA, June 4
The crew of the 17,486 ton liner
Aorangi due to sail for Vancouver
on Thursday walked off the ship

man of the
Chiefs of Staff, opened talks here



{ minh troops.—(C.P.)

BRADLEY, IKE TALK
WITH FRENCH CHIEFS

PARIS, June 4.
General Omar Bradley, Chair-
United States Joint

AgainstCommunism
Futile—PE ARSON

Monday as _ labour disputes pie — oa ri Pact

brought slow paralysis to Austra-|>Upreme \“ommander eneral f

lian Fe iaenonie, ahaa erernass Dwight Eisenhower and French OTTAWA, June 4.

of the Waterside Workers’ Feder- military leaders. External Affairs Minister Pear-
5 oak: Tomorrow he will discuss de-| son of Canada said last night, it

ation have blacklisted ships arriv= |
ing from New Zealand where a
dock strike is in progress.

Aorangi provides the only pas-
senger service between Australia,
New Zealand and Canada at
Geelong, Victoria’s second biggest
Port.

Royal Austialisn Air Force
men today began loading 17,000
cargo of wheat aboard the British |

freighter Doris Cludies.
The dockers refused to load the
vessel when it arrived from New





absence of united action in the Zealand last week. Police stood
field of politics in the Caribbean by as the airmen went aboard
area was due to the inability of There were no incidents. New
West Indian leaders “to co- Zealand dockworkers are de-}
operate on a common front . manding 24 cent wage increase |
from 60 to 84 cents an hour,
G P —(C.P.)
reetings
Greetings were expressed by
representatives of the West Indian FIRE DESTROYS
Students Union, the Africa
League, West Indian and Peoples | NITRATE PLANT
Sia Association! NORFOLK: Va., June 4.
; Fire destroyed a nitrate plant
Telegrams and messages came and more than 20 railway
} from Grantley Adams, The | waggons loaded with odiun
m Peoples’ Progressive Party nitrate here and threatened to
(British Guiana) and The | reac h the 5,876-ton Chilean
'Peoples’ National Party (Jamaica)| } | freighter Alamo.
and other associated organisations. 5 But the Alamo was pulled to
| | { | cafety by tugs which responded
] Guest speaker was Mr, John’






to her frantie siren, The fire had



Platts-Mills, former member of | reached hex pier by the time she
| Parliament for Finsbury. «No thanks—1 preter not | was towed away. It had been dis-
j , ' to suppurt these airect charging sodicen nithave ‘
The appeal was made by the symbols of decadent The destroyed plant belons
conference to the five great powers aggressine impulses ‘ the Chilean Nitrate Corporation.
to negotiate a Peace Pact —Reuter.





Oil Delegates Leaving Soon



FOR TEHERAN TALKS






LONDON, June 4, He was commenting on Deputy
Anglo-Iranian’s representa- Prime Minister Dr Hussein
tives for Teheran discussion or Fatemi’s reported statement to-
the Persian oil problem will cay that today was the absolute
leave London by air in a few deadline for the appearance in
days, a reliable source said here Teheran of representatives of the
today. Anglo Iranian company
The irce said that it wa t The Ang'o-Iranian Oil Com-
ble f the rn t f t ne arte l 4
Teheran today had decided in j ip €

i



these represen e

source stresscc the compar
was still considering » the
should be.

One r be Visc Al
btiesesle c ernme '
Dir

ft





lays in French and American] would be futile to wage a military
arms programmes with Jules! crusade against Communism, be-
Moch, French Defence Minister. | chide Communism is an idea; it
—Reuter. | cannot be destroyed by force, he

said in Baccalaureate address at

JUMPS TO DEATH convocation exercises of St.
Patrick's College. As an idea “It

NEW YORK, June 4. must be resisted by intellectual

Charles Ganeralla (44), a re-| and spiritual weapons and also p)

tired policeman, plunged to his} removing economic and social
death from the sixth floor of the| conditions of poverty and misery
court building today, a few min-| and injustice in which it finds

utes before he was to go on tria)| such favourable grounds,” he said
for bribery and conspiracy (CP)
He was one of 21 policemen for
trial for an alleged gambling pro- |
tection racket in Brooklyn.
_ Reuter.
|
|

PETAIN SLIGHTLY
BETTER

PARIS, June 4.
Ex - Marshal Philippe Petain,
who is eritically ill on the island
fortress of Ile d’Yeu, was slightly
better today, his doctors reported.
—Reuter.

U.S. Will Have H-Bomb
In A Year—Allen

NEW YORK, June 4.
A Washington newspaper ¢col-



U.N. General Assembly
Meets On November 6

LAKE SUCCESS, June 4.

Officials here were told today
that the United Nations Genera}
Assembly would open a session in
Paris in’ November

It was expected the session
would be divided into two parts
with an interval of about a week
at Christmas.—Reuter.





First an ator bomb was exploded
and the resulting stupendous heat





imnist to-day reported that the }set off the | layer of tritium that
United S ;, as the result of the }encased the atom bornbs.

recent wetok atomic tests, “Even we were astounded by
would be able to build a hydrogen {the effect.” Allen reported his

bomb within one year authority as saying ‘I think it can





Robert Allen writing in the }| be claimed that we nave success-
New York Evening Post said fully pierced the threshold of the
that of the three things ‘posi- }unknown in atomic energy.’
tively established” at the te
one as “the United States Allen said that the other two
know how to construct the |facts established by tests were
hydrogen bomb. All doubts as The United States has an atom





the feasibility of that has} bomb that is at least five times
er dissipated The cata-| more powerful than any ever
emic new weapon will be ajexploded before. But fabulously
within a year.” destructive as it is, the hydrogen
| J aid the most terrific | bomb will be 100 times more 50
jo rings at tests “scoreh- Army engineers have develoved
, k cinder everything in-| two differer type of relter
" rer that will ithstand act of
t r t 1 “the ri
ie
ylehead Reuter

|

Military Crusade |

Reuter



¢ ; .
U.K.Parachutists
‘ . _ ~
Sail For Cyprus
PORTSMOUTH, June 4
Thirty-four thousand men of the
Sixteenth Independent Parachut«
Brigrade Group suddenly alertec
three weeks ago for embarkatiot
boarded two British aircraf
carriers here today for Cyprus t«
reinforce the garrison there
The carriers, Warrior a
Triumph will sail early tomorrow
As the carriers sail tomorrow
troops from the Devonshire wil
leave Liverpool with the 33r<
(Airborne) Light Anti-Aireraf
Guns,—Reuter.

All Greek Court



| Officials Resign

ATHENS, June 4

All Greek court officials resigned
today to help King Paul solve the
cr arising from Field Marshal
Papagos’ resignation.

The Commander
last week was reported earlier
have complained in an interview
with American Amb:
Peurifoy about the €i¢
attitude towards him



s



*k Courts
Reuter



PRICE WAR RAGES

NEW YORK: June 4
Bargain hunters starmpeded New
York's department stores today as
the first all-out price war in mort
than’ 14 years entered its seconc
week

who resigned

ador, John

Customers queued up as early as

6 a.m.

Four hundred people surged in-
to Gimbals when the doors opened
and 600 poured into Macy's.

—Reuter.



Arrested For
OV PERSIAN

TEHERAN, . June
Nz S





Mojtaba yab v ead
of the fanatical Fa Isl
Religious Sect acc er
neering the as f
Persiar Pr

an on Marct r!





Sugar Workers’
Wages Agreed On
—IN JAMAICA

Ike Has More Men
Than The U.S.S.R.

Says Russian



|
|
|
|
|



KINGSTON, Ju 3

I was announced tonight that GENEVA. June 4.
n agreement was reached be The Soviet delegate to the sixth
ween the Sugar Manufacturer session of the Economic Commis-
\ssociation and the Labour ion for Rurope Amazasp Arstiu-
Tnions with respect to wage rates| nian said today that Eisenhower's
or sugar worker Unified Command outnumbered
The Conference, which laste the Soviet forces by two to one

” everal day was presider Fey ;
ver by Archibald Gordon, Labour Speaking on industry and raw
‘ounsellor of the British Emt materials he said: the United
t Washington, who wa issisted| States was trying to seize world
y four assessor The new rates|®ources of raw materials in
mnefit about 55.000 men ho! preparation for war

e all unionist (C.P.) Russell Me Lure of the Unitea

| States

Free Thirteen \':
BELFAST, Jun 4

said that stock-piling had
n carried out to offset the threat
ict aggression

Joza Vilfan, Yugoslavia said that







aa 7 Fd ie ae e the Soviet Union had tried to ob-
a ee 9a Wh | gto Tri i Re- | tain co nplete political domination
ublican Army yor the had r TUSSI on B RG tCE,
neld under lock and key for
days during the Britis} Re
isit to Northern Ireland FIRST FILIPINO
Police are convinced tt
fetaining them they averted pl VATICAN CITY, June 4.
r attacks with explosive ( Dr. Emanuel Moran today pre-
sublie buildings ind bridge ented = t Pope Pius XII his
med to take place before Queen | edential first Filipino
lizabeth and Princes Margaret Ambassador to the Holy See
Helge An’ the Vatican and the Philippines agree

city. —Reuter.

x ” tablish diplomatic relations








month, Of the Philippines’
{ WANTS TO REJOIN L.L.O. ad Mig Of v oe ts 14 600,000
GENEVA. June 4, ire Roman Catholics.—Reuter
Yt . jay! has a plied fo ail - sninsesiat ee
idmission to i¢ Internatior
‘bouy Orgar nit wa | THE “ADVOCATE”
ined here toc
With other eastern European pays for NEWS
ountries, Yugos avia resigned in
aac Wk ade da Wider o DIAL 3113
pplication since Yugoslavia is a .
rember of the United Nations. Day OF Night
—Reuter.



Assassination
PREMIER

He is wante é Safevi and his followers in the
hree y¢ s I K urtroom where he wags on

i Deput Pre t ) trial for writing books contrary
H in Fate to Islam doctrine.

P Safevi eseaped







PAGE TWO





Caub Calling

D* ROBER® DUNLOP,
Director of thé. Seventh Day
Adventist Medical Clinic in Port-
of-Spain, arrived from Trinidad by
yesterday morning by B.W.1LA. to
spend a week or ten days’ holiday

New Carib Commander

| POCKET CARTOON
LANCASTER

OSBERT RIG. E. K. PAGE who has just
completed his three years

tenure as Commander, Caribbean

in Barbados. Area is to be relieved by Brig.
He is staying with Rev. and Mrs. A. C. F. Jackson sometime this
Seth White in Rockley month, Brig. Page will be leav
ng shortly after his arrival for

Merchant In Venezuela England. *

R. F. W. GLEASON is a
merchant in Venezuela.

Bern in 1903, Brig. Ja¢kson was
educated at Haileybury and RMC.

Originally. from New Orleans, Gazetted to the Royal Hampshire
U.S.A. he has been living in Regiment in 1923 he served in
Wenezuela for about five years Egypt, India, West Africa, Pales-
Aceempanied by his wife ang tine and the U.K. until 1939.

daughte? “Linda, he arrived from
Trinidad yesterday morning by
They

During the war he was station-
ed in Cairo, the Western Desert,
B.W.LA. were intransit Hififa, Persia and Iraq.
from Tobago where they had spent
the last two weeks. Before re-
turning to Venezuela they plan to
spefid a week here staying at the
Paradise Beach Club.

Welfare Job
LIGHT-LIEUT. John Blair, of
Kingston, Jamaica, has been
appointed Welfare Officer in
charge of all Colonials in the
73 He succeeds ailewt
ohn Smyth, who has

Brig. Jackson comes from an
army family with at least half a
dozen consecutive generations in
the services. His great-great-
uncle, General Sir Alexander
Cosby Jackson commanded in the
West Indies for many years.

Medical Conference

R. E. D. B. CHARLES, Senior
rn. Medical Officer, St. Vincent

ae — a yan Counsel To Join Mr. Hammond came in on “= Airways’ eo
Flight-Lieu air says that his R. RAYMOND NORRIS of from _ St. Vincent yesterday
— Tae bem tole oe a Cc. D. and W. Secretariat Morning. He is here to attend
als from many parts o: © left Barbados over the week-end the Senior Medical Officers Con-

“You know, Willy darling,
it’s really almost impossible
to believe that they’re sei

all done by hand!”



Onial Empire. He is reading ference, which opened yesterday
for the Diploma in Publie Admin- me Vere a on at Hastings House under the
istration of London University, Adviser to C. D. and W., who is Chairmanship of Dr. J. W. Hark-

and ness, Medical Adviser to C.D. and

. investigating the organisation
No Opening salaries of the Civil Service both W. Dr. Charles is also a member
F YOU'RE ever in the U.S. Federal and Presidential in the of the St. Vincent Executive
bound for Chicago by train Leeward Islands. Council. toh 19

some night, and you hear the _ It is understood Mr; Norris will
porter of your sleeper humming be away for about one month.
the motif of a Bach toccata, it will

Dr. Charies expects to be in
Barbados for one week and is a

be Gordon Roberts of Barbados Short Visit guest at the Marine Hotel.
Now 50 years of age, besides R. GEORGE De NOBRIGA
working for C.N.R., Gordon ha Managing Director of the In England







Studied to be an organist. He Barbados Telephone Co, Ltd, rs cadeeidindeaien

went to the U.S. as a boy. At 18 arrived from Trinidad yesterday ara se a en oe wore
he was a shipbuilder. One of his by B.W.I.A., on a short visit. He | (Aspe % ae 33. Ge t
working mates Joe Thomas was is staying at the Marine Hotel, ie ates Tee "hens aan ce
choirmaster and organist of the Mr. Kenrie T, Murray, Director Baitish aicee She hea Sone te
Methodist Episcopal Church in the of Barbados Rediffusion Services ata nursiog “e St. "George's
town in which Gordon lived. Ltd., arrived by the same plane. hospital, London. Police Sergeant
Thomas offered to teach Gordon to He is a guest at the Ocean View G James from St. Lucia went up
play the piano and organ. In 1926 Hotel. the same boat to be trained
he moved to Toronto and Gordon R dui in police work at the Hendon
began working for C.N.R. He eturne ome Police College. Mr. K. B. Snaggs
decided to take lessons at the M*: W. H. CORBIN who had and Mr. G. D. Raeburn, both from
Toronto Conservatory. He made been in Trinidad for the past rrinicad, were passengers on the
sufficient progress that Sir Ernest five or six weeks visit het Gascogne. They have gone to
MacMillan consented to give him daughter in San Fernando re- study Civil Engineering

found an turned home yesterday morning
lessons. But he never found an BWA Mes: Atietals Critical

opening that would permit him te bY
give 2 ‘portering Bar become a Taylor and daughter arrived by
full-time musician. He is also in the “4 rm eee wh e a aying
the unhappy position of having no ** the St. Lawrence ote

ETURNING shortly to Barba-
dos is Lerenzo Williams,
Barrister-at-Law. Lorenzo, who

instrument on which to practice ili s hades ated 9
Gordon is married and. his Dominica and B.G, ; ae ae wurtliia teste tus eo
daughter, just through school has ISS OLIVE HUSBANDS, lem of over-population in the
chosen a career—art. i a a at a er West Indies and the general de-
‘ ospita: left here over the w velopment of the West Indian

From St. Vincent nd for Dominica, She is © jJands, He laments the fact that

also plans
British

month’s holiday and
some of it in

R. CYRIL BARNARD, St. a

Vincent planter accompanied to spend
by his wife arrived from St. Vin- Guiana. 4
cent yesterday morning by B.G. “
Aiswoys, Here for a week, they Staying With Her Son
are staying at the Marine Hotel. RS. E. A. PITT flew in {f0M can put into it.’ Lorenzo holds a
Mr. Stanley de Freitas, Barrister- St Vincent yesterday by B.G. law degree of the University of
at-Law in St. Vincent arrived by Airways to spend a week’s holi- London, and hopes to take another
the same plane. He too is here day with her son Mr. C. B. Pitt degree in Economics when he
for one week. of Welches, Christ Chureh, comes home.

THE ADVENTURES PIPA

there are West Indian students—
potential leaders of the West In-
dies—who seem concerned only
with “what they can get out of the
West Indies instead of what they

OF



P45

Ver Dias Int Amsterdam

Copyright

BY THE WAY By Beachcomber

naturalist acidly. “Did I say oak?
Beech, of course,” said Foul-

enough, making a mental note.
ry ; know what they had voted for”
It Will Come to This the other day. It is how you

F officials are allowed to exam- vote that matters, not what you
ine our banking accounts and vote about. In fact, it wouldn't

FOULENOUGH plaque on a

small Sussex cottage an-
nounced: “Here Milton wrote
‘Paradise Lost." Unfortunately
(or fortunately) the owner of the
cottage, a hedger, flushed with
financial success, became talka-

In Passing
T was very harsh to blame the
Socialists for “seeming not to



tive. He told an American lady

3 J * our savings accounts, it will not be a bad idea to withhold from
ae — STAs men atk be long before there will be a all Members any knowledge of
red whiskers. ‘The ‘America lady House-to-house round-up, to find What a vote is about until it is

out what money is being kept at all over. Then there would be



WRT cot tnt ition liven te home. If that “drive” does not no danger of some eccentric sud-
ona eighteenth century, and the "ke in enough to pay the new denly trying to represent the
man a tans have aS his body of official spies, inspectors opinion of his constituents or fol-
“Who's Milton?” snapped the Will be empowered to stop and lowing his conscience. This
lady. “Why this poet guy,” re- search anybody in the street who would also cut out all need for
lied her ‘husband “yf sure refuses to declare how much the completely pointless debates
tied ht it was Lipton ” said the Money he has in his pockets, which take up so much of the
eeetn “Ar” interrupted the what he proposes to spend it on, time needed for catcalls and other
houseowner “he used to bring us why, how, where, and when. national business
tea every Christmas.” ;
In the Footsteps of Nelson World Round-Up For Women
N a neighbouring village Foul-
Ba SUC bigs of ia a s _ From Paris flimsiest supports,
c “sei ig ie 1ac ere _ Gloria Swanson’s daughter, He believes American women
ene eerie a tk Visi, Michele Farmer, bought in Paris are approaching figure perfection

last week a novel penguin bathing that they will
suit from Jacques Heim. without corsets. An understanda-

The suit, which looks like a ble prediction as Varga lives in
tight black satin sheath, unbot- Hollywood.

“H. Nelson” carved on the wood, soon be perfect

and twopence a time was charged
to look through the telescope he

had used at Trafalgar. One . A iti 13 : .
rather surly visitor said, “It looks tons up the middle ot the:-ekirt This summer the American
a very modern telescope.” “Nel- to fold into a waistcoat shape, girl can be dressed from top to
son always insisted on the latest,” showing brief white pique pants. toe and fingertip in nylon—even
replied Foulenough, But next Alwynn’s new collection. shows to shoes of nylon mesh and a rain-
day the telescope had been bang- : hee = a s with oy coat in a sheer nylon fabric witb
ed about a bit, and stained a les-fitting satin jodhpurs instead a metallic stripe in it.

darker colour. “Why did Nelson of skirt. Tulle swathes a w hite Men Women Like . . .
come here?” asked a school- Satin hunting bowler and falls Bachelors. .
teacher. “Emma lived down the to the ground as a train. + Frenchmen ‘who kiss _ their
street,” replied Foulenough. “They Frem New York hands—Englishmen who don't.
used to meet under that oak tree Prediction that spells despair to Men who don’t say “Women

in the lane. It’s still called Nelson's
“It ought to be called
beech,” commented

are all alike.”
Men who don't profess to “Un-

American corset and brassiere
manufacturers has been made by
4 Varga, Peruvian designer of the derstand women.” —L.E.S,

ZEaesgnmhaeanaeaa as BREERBHEEEES PB
MEN'S SHIRTS at..........$3.55 & $390, $484, $4.86
MEN'S STRIPED PYJAMAS ___.__._..$5.59, $6.08
GREY WORSTED FLANNEL 56 inches __...._..$3.47
KHAKI SHIRTING 28 inches $1.08
OLIVE & PALMS SOAP Ile.

sa seccee (Ramen

SR ee ee ee a

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220

BARBADOS



Programme

TUESDAY, JUNE 5G, 1951

1115 am, Programme Parade, 11.25
a.m. Listeners’ Choice, 11.45 am. Report
from Britain, 12 noon the News, 12 10
p.m. News Analysis.

41.15 p.m.—645 p.m. 19.76 M

415 pm. Souvenirs of Music, 5 p m
Surrey v South Africans, 5.05 p.m. In-
terlude, 5.15 p.m. New Records, 6 p.m

Music Magazine, 6.15 p.m. Welsh Maga-
zine, 6.45 pm PIerating otra
645 P.m.—11.00 pam. 32M 25 53



7 pm. The News, “Ae pm. News
Analysis, 715 Bm. West Indiam Guest”

Night, 745 p.m. General Assembly of
the Church Scotland, 8 p.m. Radio
Neéwsreel, 6 15 p.m. Meet the Common-

wealth, 845 p.m. Interlude, 855 p m
From the Editorials, 9 p.m. Report from
Britain, 915 pm. Music from Grand
Hotel, 10 p.m, The News, 10.10 pm In-
terpidé, 1015 pm The Heritage of
Britain, 10 45 pum, Festival of Britain,
——____

cBC PROGRAMME

TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1958
10.00 p.m.—10.15 pom. New
10.15 p m —10.30 p.m. Caribbean Corner
11.76 Mes, 25.51 M.



British Women
Are Envied By
The French

RITISH women who
French women their high
fashioned Paris models, and
Americans their “cute little dress-
es,” will be surprised to know that
our British Utility clothes, es-
pecially coats and suits, are very
much envied by our visitors,

Paris has nothing to compare
with these reasonably priced
clothes.

FEW French Women can afford
the high prices charged by the
model houses in Paris, The
clothes in the shops are also ex-
pensive, so most of them have
their clothes made by “a little wo-
man round the corner.”

* * .

AMERICAN CLOTHES are
cheaper, but they are thrown to-
gether and don’t wear.

So Americans in London are
buying our Utility tailored suits
and classic coats.

FRENCH WOMEN, from the
fashion centre of the world, are
delighted with the more “dressy”
suits. The cnly criticism I have
heard is the dreary name given
to them. (Whoever was respon-
sible for the name “Utility’’?)

This I Must See...

A NEW YORK beauty expert
gave this advice to women in
London: —

“Once your weight is down,
start exercising. Help the fat off
your seat by giving it a
and hard bang every time you
pass a brick wall.”



Half The People You Dream About Are Strangers

Do you often dream about your
work? About the office? The
iactory? Or the kitchen? You are

e i

7 The results of the first scientific
inquiry ever made to discover
what normal people dream about
were published recently. They
show that the daily round rarely
intrudes into the plot or the
setting of our dreams.

Detailed descriptions of 10,000
dreams were provided by men and
women aged 18 to 80. Dreary
chores, like typing, darning, cook-
ing, and washing dishes were

CROSSWORD
errr
PCP Tee
OCC oo
PCCP CE









3 and 6 Sonia ‘what society,
slumming, may call
° Kk of @ cheap place to

)
Lato in the indigo plant. @8)

v.
il. poroer scan wa)
is: Tht mADge ved 4 Dow bie.

3 This wa
14, referees do to Ld
18 Briefly the doctor breaks

around tem. (6)
33: Drink fore child. 180
23. ir)
24. The man i roam beck with.@%
25. See 18 Down.

Down
Quite a number im money. §
Search for the sects 3
A wae Pa mene ee
The meer. ¥ bins
>. Chain tink or “paper
3 Across.

vb.
8. Maybe & sandy start. (3)
to

te iu pace it's a Y boat.
One eve — bids ASA
17. The vereeoulat.
Across. makes ag

is: The
18 and 26 Ai
21. Water a “Aouvie existence: th"

Ser

blame, 40)

harm cues ? (10)
i¥. Stupor

utlon of yesterday's San ae
ds aaa: i 4
Neto 5
az) ix
ok, Se ‘Toke: nt ie ae
fires; 6 ;
3

1, Pane; a} ¥ ehat .
18, S806.





Stopped

DS oP Pe





which makes “4
“GOD'S WAY OF
aor

Pleuse for to
Samuel Roberts, “Geapel
Book and Tract Service,

30, Central Avenue, Ban-

gor N. Ireland.” %

P SOSSSGSS SEG OOSSOS SESS



B.B.C. Radio Hollywood Takes On
The Flying Saucers

—and invents THE THING



(Not to be confused with the song)
R. M. MacCel} leaves the films
in some state of excitement . .
NEW YORK,
THOSE flying saticers, which
lied American skiés and wasted
newsprint so abundantly not long
ago, finally preyéd on the mind
of producer Howard Hawkes to
such an extent that he got going
and made one of the finest films of
its kind that I have ever seen. —
It is called “The Thing,” and it
comes to Britain soon (ne connec-
tion with that zany song).
Way up in Northern Alaska near

'W* the Arctic circle there is a group

of scientists and American air
foree men doing experimental
work it seems.

Their radio signals are going
mad and they put it down to a
mysterious plane crash 48 miles
away. Don’t ask me how they put
it down to this cause, Everything
is explained at top speed in a
thoroughly convincing form of
“popular science” jargon as you
go along. Thirty seconds later

envy) vou’ve forgotten the explanation).

Flattened .

When they get to the spot, there
is a huge smear of flattened metal,
all frozen over,

They décide to melt the ice.
(“Thermite bombs, sir?”—“Natur-
ally, lieutenant.”) But this is an
error, The metal—which is the
debris of a plane from somewhere
east of the Milky Way, weighing
an estimated 200 tons—is of a
nature which explodes easily. It
explodes,

But what is this? While the
husky dogs howl miserably, the
party discern—deep down under
the ice—a form some & ft, long.

(I'd better explain here, because
by now you must be wondering
who plays whom, that the cast is
made up of unknowns who all
act beautifully.)

So they hoick The Thing up
and get it into the plane all
jammed up in a huge block of ice
so that you still cannot see it at all
well,

Back to the base with it. Here
there begins the start of an in-
triguingly topical quarrel between
the handsome air force captain and
the bearded head of the scientists
as to the correct thing to do when
you meet A Thing.

Kill it, say the airmen, It looks
vaguely nasty. Prepdsterous, cry
the scientists. Preserve it for study.
We may well be making history!

The fun... 3
Listening to all this are a shapely
young woman, who conducts a





hardly ever mentioned.

“We show our aversion to work
in our dreams,” reports Professor
Calvin Hall, the psychologist who
organised the inquiry.

But his findings contradict the
belief that, hecause dreams are so
divorced from reality, they
usually have an exotic setting and
involve exciting people.

Most dreams are set in un-
romantic everyday buildings —
most commonly the living-room
or bedroom of a house, the report
states. And the intriguing per-
sonalities we would all like to
meet turn up only once in 100,

Walking, running, anq dancing
are the commonest activities. We
rarely sit in our dreams. Flying
and floating in the air are even
rarer events, says Hall.

The oddest finding, in my view,
is the fact that 43 per cent. of
the characters playing the princi-
pal parts in our dreams seem
to be total strangers.

Three main characters, includ-
ing the dreamer, make up the

“Every Picture tells a Story!”



qt Is OFTEN SURPRISING
how quickly backache, stiff,
aching muscles or joints,
bago, rheumatic pains and

troubles
to impurities in the blood can
ge kidneys safe-
trong, active 8
your health by straining
impurities and ‘wastes
out of the system. aoe

kidney action is inadequa they have regained by taki
fails to filter the bed en he Doan’s Pills. .
mrt [ROAR 29
Dealer for 2/9
5/-

MAKE YOUR.

A

COTTON



: paper reporter who has somehow

WEDDING GIFT
OSEFUL ONE

Select from our wide range of .. .
CAKE FORKS 1 Pint — +} Gallon
TEA SPOONS 2
UIT 1 Gallon

@ap~ There is no Parking Problem when you shop with us.
B

THE HARHBADGS CO-OPERATIVE

FACTORY LTD.

merguare sneent sha ne 2039

TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1951



Princess Starts New

Hair Fashion

who wore agg» In Nylon, Too
formal eve-\gThen it is sold to merchants.
“There has been

Princess Elizabeth,
chignon of hair for
ning oceasions in Malta, has start-%
ed London's latest fashion.

Mr. Peter Isaia, a London wig-
maker, said to-day: “The Princess

wry super-flirtation with the
captain (slacks and a sweeter),

and a cynical but lovable news-

than 20 years ago.

“more
working

wandered north.

ot cc

nothing like
this demand since the shingle day
By
overtime my staff can

S$

* wofe a ‘figure eight’ chignon on produce 30 to 50 chignons a week.”

The tun really begine when The lthe back of her head. This is the |
Thing gets prema y most popular style. Cheapest chignons cost abou:
out of his fee by an eleetric blanket. £7 7s. Most expensive are around

In short order:—

IT KILLS several husky dogs
for their biood.
GETS an arm torn off but grows

“The hair must be 24in. long
to make the full curves of the
figu® eight. Cost of a chignon of
this length vary between £9. 9s.
and £12 12s., depending on the
colour and texture of the hair.”

Hair for chignons is seldom pro-

14 guineas.
lighter, cost 1s little as £3 10s.

to-day:
for a

short cut. But

itself another;

Nylon chignons —»
often preferred because they are

One West End hardresser said
“Women pay up to £2 2s.
although

short hair is still the most popu-

them in & pat a a vided by English women. “Nearly jar style for day wear, women are
hen Greenhouse Up-| 51) of it belongs to Italian nuns.” getting tired cf it for evening
side Races o» Mr. Isaia anid. ep g- WUE.

pervious wo Wk ro ri
¢ Tommy tl ny ee me ae “Long” hair is still fashionable in “So more and more of _them
P gun = Italy, and when the nuns take are wearing chignons to suit the

to the accompaniment
wnt ge Mammeliter 9 onttee of eeooves
and howls as ever put feeding
time in the lions’ house at the
Zoo to shame.

present
ning dresses.

their vows at the end of five years’

probation, their hair is cut off. 7 —L.E:S.

——

AQUATIC CLUB CUNEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE: TODAY at 5 pm
rONIGHT at 8.30

The struggle between air force
and science on whether to pre-









extremely feminine eve-

fade or attempt to annihilate The BILL WIWLIAMS, __ SANGARA. af eB
grows fiercer. A New RKO Redio Picture
ony minutes left now, gentle- AO 9S STON ee ee ee ee eae nae
men, MATINEE: WEDNESDAY at 5 pom
The Sergeant has an idea which WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
he explaitis rapidly to the captain. Ay Aas Seen gen ;
But by this time the e cap- in ico!
tain tab bunmeena de tes caboone ose
There is some hasty work with
wires, and talk of “hooking up the | 6.6. 6.0365656,5660690G99 900909 POP PDO DDD FP DOODPPOPPOOIO®,



dynamos.” Then here it comes!

It looks remarkably unlike a
mangel-wurzel and remarkably
like Frankenstein.

On—on. The handsome captain
throws a switch—The Thing is

GLOBE THEATRE

For Women who have dreamed of the one Great Love

TODAY 5 (and continuing)

and 8.15 p.m.

perrael er meena
huge o ng eae big ea
oe ae ee ae ee “SEPTEMBER AFFAIR
ricassee,

JOAN FONTAINE — JOSEPH COTYEN

You'll love it
EXTRA! EXTRA!
Bene 108 ste eee: POPEYE in: “HOT AIR ACES”

piel com convincing hokum you are
oing to love all this. There is a
fantastic anti-climax when the
reporter, having secured a radio-
{telephone circuit to Fairbanks,
Alaska, leads his story with:—
“Two thousand years ago the
world was saved by an Ark—
Noah’s, To-night the world has
been saved once ¢ + > ean arc
—of electrici
try a lead he that “some time,
MacColl? Because I'd get fired,

V595S660G0OO"

na THEATRE --

P L A z A BRIDGETOWN

Today to Thurs. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m

Big Week End Special for
Mid-Week Engagement !

CAPTAIN CHINA

(DIAL ine

ee

_Thurs. (Bank)
9.30 a.m. & 1,30 p
Johnny Mack Breen in



2D

OSSSOSSS

SLOSOPOO LESSEE CL EPCS PPS PPS SSPE

, ? “LAWMEN” & John Payne, Gale
“eo ee matter. It is “WEST OF THE ALAMO” Russell, Lon
r Jimmy Wakely on Chaney



wonderful, The play’s the thing,
and in this instance The Thing
makes a wonderful play.—L.E.S.

FRIDAY &th 2.50, 4.45 * 8.30 p.m, & continuing

“WALK SOFTLY, STRANGER”











commonest cast. In one dream
out of every seven the eeeper|
plays a solo performance.
Bitter blow to romantic girls is
Hall’s discovery tha
male dreams iiss. more about
other men than about women.
The survey, which is being con-
tinued at Western’ Reserve
University, U.S., showed that one
dream in every three seems to be
“seen” in colour.

Painstaking . . . ie es a
IF you want a job done thor-| 7 Pe ee

oughly and accurately, get a EMPIRE ROYAL

middle-aged or elderly person tu |
| TO-DAY Only 4.30 and 8.30
To-day 4.45 and 8.30 and

do it.
Continuing Final

Last 2 Shows TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.
Monogram Double ! !

“ARMY WIVES”

{hi
|
|
| Last Show Tonite 8.30
|
Dorothea Kent & i}

Warner's Double ! !

“THE HARD WAY"
Dennis Morgan &

“SONG OF THE SADDLE”
Dick Foran

“MILLION DOLLAR KID”
Leo Gorcey and Dead End Kids



Wed 6th, 8 30 p.m.

MAT: Thurs. (Bank) 4.30 pm
LOUISIANA Jimmie Davis
SONG OF THE WASTELANDS

Jimmy WAKELY

Wed. & Thurs. 5 & 8.30 p.m.
Johnny Mack Brown in (both)

“LAW MEN” &
“WEST OF THE RIO GRANDE .







That advice is the outcome of
three years of experiment, carried
cut at Cambridge University, to
discover how the human capacity
for work alters with age.

The tests, which were carefully
devised to eliminate any advan-
tage from past experience, showed
that except in jobs where speed
is all-important, oldsters are

Serial

“FLYING G-MEN”

Along with the Pictures ,

Inst. Columbia

Columbia Pictures Presents
“ HARRIET CRAIG”

Starring
Joan CRAWFORD

“ Bandit of El Dorado”

mse Wendell CORRY Starring
caer Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETT



OLYMPIC

TO-DAY & TOMORROW
4.30 and 8.15





LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.45 and 8,15
Leia nel

Repubiic Pictures present . .

Universal Double

Michael REDGRAVE &
Joan BENNETT
in

Me see a ad Ne

“THE AVENGERS” * SECRET BEYOND
THE DOOR’
* * Starring * * AND
Reaieet oan mm John Carroll, Adele Mara “MA AND PA
bring happy seat Dy heipang with KETTLE”
to Guanee ie Widens > ‘ees, with
od chammelnlon cule eaten Marjorie MAIN &

Airaldi.

Mona Maris and Roberto
Percy KILBRIDE

—_—_==_= =



grateful coed an

testified to the good health














ALUMINUM

CIGARETTE CASES

in GOLD and SILVER
Finish

BOILING STOVES

Lucile Watson and Allyn
Joslyn.
ROXY
|
!
i



aie Joseph cht sree all ala aleinai ca
—_—_—__—_—_—_—_———————S
PLAZA out, || GALETY

THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES



SS





BOTT





ewer

TUESDAY, JUNE 4,

1951







Farm Families In
The United States

By CLARENCE

Under Secretany, U.S. De

J. McCORMICK

partment of Agriculture

Most of the land of the United States is owned by families of

people who are farmers and

have their homes on the farm.

The title to the land is usually in the name of the father, but
all members of the family help do the work and are sup-
ported by the money they get from the sale of farm products.
These people lead a hardy, outdoor life; they are physically
strong and healthy. All but the very young and the very old
work hard. A few are wealthy and a few are poor, but most
farmers have a medium high standard of living.

Farmers are very important in
the United States. They produce
food and raw materials for cloth-
ing for people in the large cities.
More important than that, from
the farmers and the children of
farm people have come many
national leaders. George
Washington, the first President of
the Nation, earned his livelihood
from his farm in the State of
Virginia. Abraham Lincoln earned
his livelihood as a lawyer, but as
a boy he lived on a farm and that
shaped his early experience,
Harry S. Truman, who is President
at this time, was a farm boy in
Missouri in his youth, and Vice-
President Alben Barkley was a
farm boy in Kentucky. Warren
Austin, U.S. Delegate to the United
Nations, has his home on a farm
in the State of Vermont where
he grows apples, He was born on
a farm, Ralph Cordiner, President
of General Electric Company,
spent his boyhood on a_ wheat
farm in the Pacific Northwest.
Many persons of prominence in
the United States were children
of families who owned and lived
on family farms.

In the early days families were
encouraged to move from civilized
centers to the wilderness which
then covered much of the land,
Those who used and improved the
land were given title to it with-
out cost. This established a deep
tradition of family ownership of
farm land. Many farms are still
owned and farmed by ‘the descen-
dants of the people who claimed
the land from the wilderness
many years ago. In a few remote
places there has been free land
for families within the last 25
years, One can always buy farm
land in the United States, al-
though land prices are high right
now.

Children of farm families in the
United States develop good
citizenship at an early age, They
help with light chores. Many of
them have animals of their own
to care for, and may keep the
money from the sale of the
animals. They learn how to work
hard as their fathers and mothers
do. When they grow older, one
or two of the children may be-
come owners of the family farm.
The other children may move to
cities and are no longer farmers,
But all their lives they carry the
honest ways and habits of hard
work they learned when young.

Like farmers everywhere, U.S.,
farm families are friendly with
their neighbours and visitors to
their communities. Bven in the
western part of the United States,
where farms are many miles apart,
visits are made to each other's
homes. In times of illness and
‘adversity they help one another.
They also make visits to cities,
where they have many friends
and relatives.

@ On Page 7



U.K. Received
32,000 Tons
Argentine Meat '

BUENOS AIRES, June 4

Argentine shipment of frozen
carcase meat to Britain since
loading was resumed on April
25th had by the end of May
totalled 32,000 tons according to
authoritative trade sources here
today. They said shipments in
June would probably amount to
19,000 tons.

The decline is due to seasonal
and other factors. Frigorifico out-
put always declines during
Argentina’s winter months in
addition to which breeders, they
suid, were /inclined at the mo-
ment to hold back cattle in ex-
pectation of official buying.

The shipment of top quality
chilled beef from Argentina since
before the war according to these
circles will probably be loaded
here in July for delivery to Brit-
ain in August,

It is likely to be experimental
and some time before volume
shipments of chilled beef. start,
because of the need to organise
tight shipping schedules to ensure
quick delivery to the British
market.

Roy Foulds British Food Minis-
try meat expert is at present in
Buenos Aires making arrange-
ments for chille@ beef shipments.

Between May 11 when Uruguay
resumed shipments to Britain and
the end of that month, Uruguay
had sent forward 5,400 tons of
frozen meat,

Uruguay is expected to clear
another 12,000 tons this month—
increased rate is largely due to
the fact that shipping schedules
are now fully organised.

—Reuter.





Denies Statement

MEXICO, June 4

A statement by the daily paper
El Popular today that the U.N.
Economic Commission for Latin
America, E.C.L.A. now meeting
here is to be dissolved and its
functions conferred on the Or-
ganisation of American States,
was denied by Dr. Raul Prebisch
of Argentina, Executive Secretary
of the Commission,

In a statement to Reuter Pre-
bisch said: “The report is ridicu-
lous and without foundation, The
Commission was never as strong
as it is now. Such a project was
not even discusse€ and sucn a de-
cision in any case would require
the approval of the United Na-
tions Economie and Social Coun-
cas —Reuter.



RESPECT THE PRESS

NEW YORK CITY.

The New York Times is helping teachers here prepare
students to play an active and intelligent role in community

life.

For the past seven years the Times, in co-operation with the
New York City Board of Education, has conducted a 15-week

course in “Education and the News”.

D—Tax--Day

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 1,
Over $50,000 was collected at
the Town Hall, Port-of-Spain
yesterday May 31, which was
D-Day for the payment of rates
and taxes for houses in arrears.

This drive has been negotiated
by the mayor, Mr. Raymond
Hamel-Smith who is determined

that monies due the Corporation
must be paid.

Rates of Exchange

CANADA, JUNE 6, 1951
60 8/10% pr. Cheques on

Bankers 58 9/10% pr.
. Demand

Drafts 58 N\% pr
‘ Sight Drafts 58 6¥10% pr

60 8/10% pr. Cable Obs poses
59 3/10% pr. Currency 57 4/106 pr.
a «+eeese+ Coupons 56 7/10% pr
ose keegeee Silver «(howe ete tne

The course is based on. the
premise that citizens must first
understand current news before
they can take intelligent action
on local and national problems.

International, economic, labour,
military, scientific, and cultural
news is covered in the course.
Each week’s programme is de-
veloped around a single subject.
Usually the first part of the class
period is devoted to lectures by
members of the Times editorial
staff, The rest of the time is given
over to questions and answers.

The course is designed especial-
ly for teachers of English and the
social sciences in the elementary
and secondary school, The teach-
ers use various methods in direct-
ing the study of current events in
their own schools. Some integrate
the news with regular_ history,
economics, and geography
courses, and others conduct
special events classes with the
Times as their only text.
















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A NUMBER OF RECRUITS for the famous Swiss Guards were sworn






BARBADOS



4
d

in at a picturesque traditional ceremony at the Vatican recently.

American Column

COPPER, BRASS ORDERED
TO HELP THE ARMY

From R. M. MacCOLL

Behind the storm of words in Washington over America’s day

NEW YORK, Sunday.

military-political policies in the Far East, the tremendous
rhythm of American industrial might is stepped up for pos-

sible trouble.

Producers of copper and brass
have been ordered by the National

ction Authority to devote
75 per cent. of their total output
from July 1 to filling military
needs,

Cars and refrigerators for civil-
ians will have to “get by” on the
aeons 25 per cent, And on
the heels of that, the steel manu-
facturers harr given the
same orcer.

This tonk Pittsburg—America’s
Sheffield — by surprise. Steel's
big men had not expected the
order until the late autumn.

THERE IS one small point in
the Iron Curtain where a few
people can still eddy back and
forth more or less at will, and
not even asked to show their
ey don’t have them).

glares
across the Bering Straits at
Alaska.

There, the island of Little Dio-
mede is American, Three miles
west is Big Diomede—Russian.
The privileges travellers are the
Eskimos. heir latest report:
after months of calm, the Rus-
sians are very busy on Big Dio-
mede. Soviet troops have built a
tall observation tower on a hill
and are “active” there daily.

A MILWAUKEEAN can now
tell you just how it feels to be in
Newcastle (England) when some-
one arrives there carrying coal.
For Milwaukee is America’s
greatest beer-producing city. And
when the est German ship
Geheimrat Sartori arrived there—
the first German freighter to dock
in nearly 20 years—it was carry-
ing 340 cases of Munich beer.

AMERICA can still be the land
of opportunity. Patti Page start-
ed out as one of eight daughters
of an Oklahoman railway fore~-
man. While trying to “crack”
night spot singing she almost
starved and she dwindled from



A man’s
choice..:

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heavenly flavor that makes every sip a

satisfying experience. With Chase & Sanborn \
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Ask for Chase & Sanborn today.

dress size 16 to size 10. Then the
break.

In 1947
fess,” in which Patti did a duet
for herself, broke her into big
time. Her “Tennessee Waltz” has
sold 3,000,000 records.

Now Patti is earning $500,000
(£178,570) a year.

BECAUSE non-smoker Rudolph
Bing—the Briton who bosses New
York's Metropolitan Opera Com-
pany—is sick of being offered
cigarettes, he often has a holder
in_his mouth.

In the holder is a half-smoked
“cigarette.” It never gets any
smaller because it is made of
plastic.

A SALESMAN met death in
New Orleans. Cosimo Rocco did
not like his new car. So he pick-
ed a quarrel with car-salesman
Elmer Bahan and shot him dead,
Bahan had not sold Rocco the car,
Rocco did not even buy it in New
Orleans.



Jury Return
Open Verdict

An open verdict was returned
by a nine man jury when the
inquiry into the death of Christo-
pher Goodridge of Richmond
Gap was concluded yesterday at
District “A” Police Court.

Mr. C. L. Walwyn was the
Coroner, Goodridge was taken to
Dr. Bayley’s Hospital in Beckles
Road on Apvil 20 but died there
ion April 22. A post mortem was
later performed by Dr. A, §&.
Cato who attributed death to in-
flammation of the brain.

After the post mortem some of
the parts of the kidney, brain and
bladder were placed into the
Coroner’s box for the Analyst.
The Analyst said he found cheno-
podium oi! in a part of the kidney.










\

Fae ana

a record called “Con-

ADVOCATE





en

RUSSIA HAS ABANDONED

SOCIALIST

IDEOLOGY

Says Yugoslav Minister

BELGRADE, June 4.

Marshal Tito’s leading Marxist, Milovan Djilas, said here
today that a serious crisis had hit the Socialist movement
throughout the world. Djilas is Minister without Portfolic

and leading Politburo member.

Jamaica Has
Plan To Oust
Mosquitoes

Jamaica has a
the moment for the eradication
of the Aedes Aegypti Mosquito
and it is hoped shortly to intro-
duce into the colony a T.B. survey
and B.C.G. campaign. Hon, Dr
L. W, Fitzmaurice, Director of
Medical Services told the Advo-
cate yesterday.

programme at

He said that he had just had a
team of one doctor and two public
health nurses down in Ecuador
under the auspices of the World

Health Organization who had
been taking training for this
campaign.

In Jamaica, they had a Sugar
Industry Labour Welfare Board
which is very interested in the
health of the sugar worker. Part

of their policy is assisting in the
establishment of health centre
dispensaries on sugar estates, the
provision of nursing services on
these estates at the centre and the
provision of an ambulance.

Within the past two years ,he
said that these had been inStituted
by the Board and were doing very
good work,



Teachers Go Back

GUATEMALA, June 4.
thousand public school
returned to classes to-
reopening two thousand
schools throughout Guatemala
that had been closed for 18 days
by teachers’ strike. Demands for
payment of back wages and some
benefits have been met by Gov-
ernment.

Six
teachers

—Reuter,



Addressing the fourth plenary
session of the Yugoslav Commun
ist Party’s Central Committee ne
said the crisis had been caused
mainly by complete revision and
abandonment of the Socialist
ideology by Soviet Russia.

“Her leaders have already en-
tered the phase of forming new
actionary aggressive and exploit-
reactionary ideology and of re-
ary practice”, he said.

Attacking Soviet Communists he
said: “In the Soviet Union every-
thing that Stalin says—invariably
in conerete situation—is pro-
claimed as science and general
theory”.

Stalin’s theories
Socialist, non-Marxist
scientifie.”—Reuter.

were

eva non-

Trinidad Wood For
Australia’s Railway

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 1,
The first consignment of a

shipment of mora (a local wood)
for Southern Australia’s raslway
sleepers has left Trinidad, This
has been made possible through
the Minister of Agriculture, Hon,
Victor Bryan. “Australia has
asked to buy mora from Trinidad
for railway sleepers amd boats,”
he said. “These boats are bringing
food to us.”



Nalian Flights Up

ROME, June 4.
' The Itafian Air Company
“Alitalia” will increase the num-
ber of flights between Italy and
South America (Argentina and
Brazil) to six each way per
month instead of four as at pres-
ent. In addition to the present
weekly service there will also
be a fortnightly service twice
per month,
—Reuter.

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PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR

400s fp

Se

Printed by the Advocste Co.,



414., Broad St. Bridgetown



Tuesday, June 5, 1951



WOBBLE WHEEL

There is something fascinating about a
wobble-wheel roller. There is something
fascinating about any kind of roller, There
are rollers which are birds, there are roll-
ers for grass-courts, there are religious
rollers and there are of course roller skates.
But among the diverse family of rollers
there is none more important, more deserv-
ing of serious attention thar our own wob-
ble-wheel roller. In a report of the Sea-
well Airport Committee signed on Febru-
ary 29 and laid at a meeting of the House
of Assembly on 19th March, 1951, it was
stated that funds are being provided for a
Wobble-wheel Roller and that a wobble-
wheel roller was necessary for Seawell
Airport.

The wobble-wheel roller has come, but
like all wobble-wheel rollers, it needs
something to push it, something in short to
make its wheel wobble while it rolls. That
something was provided for in the wisdom
of the Committee. In part II, Section 3,
item 3, the Committee recommends among
other items of airfield equipment that a
tractor be purchased for $3,000. The tractor
would have three uses. The first use would
be to pull the wobble-wheel roller and
grass cutter. Secondly it would be avail-
able to manoeuvre aircraft on the parking
apron. Thirdly (and to conclude) it would
be available to clear the runway in case of
difficulty or emergency. ;

The report was written on February 17.
It was laid in the House of Assembly on
March 19th. To-day is June the fifth
What action has been taken on the report
of the Seawell Airport Committee ?

None.

The price of tractors in the meanwhile
is not going down. Nor is a tractor the only
thing needful. An extension to the ter-
minal building which will cost $40,000 must
be carried out. A fire engine house to
house the fire engine despatched last week
by the Bruno will cost $6,000. Accommo-
dation for staff and restaurant will cost
$5,000. Other necessary expenditure brings
the total up to $93,000. Every day that
passes without a decision on the Airport
Committee’s report will add to the original
estimated expenditure.

This is no way to administer an island,

The constitutional privileges of Barba-
dos are the envy of other West Indian
islands. But there can be little satisfaction
in hugging those privileges and revelling
in those privileges at the expense of neces-
sary action, It ought to be possible for
urgent priority business to be discussed by
the Barbados House of Assembly at least
once in the year. Could the House not
meet for a five-day week this month and
have action taken on outstanding reports?
Only by some bold action will the heavy
arrears of deferred reports be cleared up.
Only action will substantiate the claim of
our capability as a legislature to get things
done. Clinging to privilege for privilege’s
sake will rouse patriotism and cause fric-
tion, but only business-like despatch of
urgent business such as the report of the
Seawell Airport Committee will give Bar-
bados a reputation, which it now lacks, for
getting on with the job.



U.S. LABOURERS

| The Advocate understands that the 2,000
workers who have been selected to perform
the gruelling work detailed by the United
States selectors last week, will almost cer-
tainly be employed for a minimum of five
months in the United States before return-
ing to Barbados. The present debt that
the taxpayers of Barbados have to meet
with regard to these wrongly-labelled
“emigrants” is two thirds of the cost of
their return from the equivalent of Jamaica
to Barbados. .The workers themsélves will
have deducted from their pay envelopes
while they are in the United States the sum
of two West Indian dollars per week for the
original minimum period of twelve weeks.
The Government of Barbados has decided
to subsidise the labourers to the extent of
two-thirds of the remaining cost of passage

from the equivalent of Jamaica to Barbados.

This burden will have to be borne by the
taxpayers of Barbados unless the Govern-
ment shows greater business acumen than
it has hitherto displayed in this new
policy of doles for a privileged minority at
the expense of the majority who cannot
“emigrate.” Nothing but the low state of
political morality to which we have fallen
could justify such an action, but such
action having been taken, the Government
must ensure that, now that the possibility
of five months’ work in the United States
has been mentioned for these “emigrants”,
ymmedieic action is taken to recoup the
full return passage money and thereby
benefit both workers and their unfortunate
relatives left behind who suffer because
their ‘dole’ money cannot be spent on
them.



MORALITY in America is
dominated by the censor to a de-
gree which the unsophisticated in-
habitants of the Old World may
find puzzling.

The definition of virtue is geo-
metrical and is laid down precise-
ly in codes that govern the cine-
matographic industry. Kisses must
not last more than a certain num-
ber of yards and must be confined
to the face,

It might be thought that while
such codes might determine what
can be shown in public they could
not hope to have much influence
on. private life. This, however,
would be a complete mistake.
They do not, of course, decide
what people do in private, but
they do decide what, pone un-
consciously they consider it right
to do. The consequence is that al-
most the whole nation believes it-
self abandoned to sinful practices.

This has two consequénces: on
the one hand, since the accepted
standard of morals is an impossi-
ble one, everybody in moments of
depression or intoxication is per-
suaded he is a miserable sinner;
on the other hand, prohibitions
have an aphrodisiac effect. I have
never coveted my neighbour’s ox,
but when I remember that I must
not, I am almost: tempted ‘to do
so, ‘



The 79-year-old philosopher-
scientist examines a new sur-
vey by an American of how
the Americans live to-day.

ing prohibition most Americans
thought about liquor morning,
noon and night, and other subjects
had to be content with odd cran-
nies of their minds.

Prohibition in regard te liquor
is at an end but in matters of sex
the censorship is perennial and
the mental effects are very similar
to those which were produced by
prohibition,

The Cynics
One is compelled to suppose that
conventional mioralists are not

“very good psychologists since the

What Goes On

A new. book by Mr. Albert Ellis*®
may be confidently recommended
to ary European who is contem-

lating a journey to the United
states.

He will find in it vast stores of
information far more useful than
anything contained in Baedeker
and if he studies the work dili-
gently he may be able to behave
in such a manner as to increase
the American contribution to the
expenses of European rearmament.

In America, largely I think be-
cause of the prohibitions that still
govern the official pronouncements
of the law, the police, and the
clergy, sex fills the thoughts of
men and women more than in any
other country known to me,

Almost all advertisements, no
matter what the product con-
cerned, are carefully designed to
titillate sexual feelings.

The things that writers of cheap
fiction permit themselves to say
are such as to bring a blush to the
cheek of any hard-boiled French-
man, And even in the most hair-
raising passages there is a sickly
sentimentality which inclines any
person of taste to enter a monas-
tery at once.

I have known America before,
during and after prohibition. Dur-

steps that they take secure results
exactly opposite to those that they
profess to desire,

The attitude about sex in
America is part of a more general
attitude. Americans for the ‘most
part are unable to face reality ex-
cept in a mood of cynicism. One
finds this, for exampie, in politics.

They have a set of ideal rules
which they imagine that a virtu-
ous politician would obey, but the
rules are such as would cause any
man to be out of politics in a
week. Consequently, it is recog-
nised that no politician can be
virtuous according to the nominal
code,

He Is Wise

It follows, so at least the aver-
age American concludes, that a
politician cannot be justly blamed
whatever crimes he may commit.
It ddes not seem to occur to any-
one that a moral code, if it is to
serve a useful purpose, should not
be something totally divorced from
practical life, but something which
real live people in actual situations
may be able to follow.

There would be much less con-
fusion than there now is in Ameri-
can thought and feeling if this
view of moral codes were general-
ly adopted both in matters of
politics and in questions of sex,



BARBADOS

Mr. _Ellis’s

throughout is

point of

wise

view
and enlight-

terprise views sex a¢ a commodity
which may be profitably sold for
public consumption, This is true
of advertisemen' not only
America, but als@ in, England.

In America, , Owing to
the fact that ertisers have
more money to spend, the evil is
much greater in ree. He points
out that a cult lag permits
many highly illogical, inconsistent
and immature sex views to linger
on decades and centuries beyond
their original u ness and logi-
eal applicability te human affairs.”

It is a curious phenomenon that
a country which leads the word in
mechanised technique still lingers
in the 17th century in matters of
thought. It is earnestly to be
hoped that the superiority of
America in armed force will noi
be employed in destroying what is
best in the outlook of the Old
World.

There is in America, and to a
lesser degree in England, a three-
fold division in what people sa)
and think on moral questions.

There is first of all the officia!
code handed down from the past
which cannot be publicly floutec
without sevére pénalites, social i
not legal.

There is next what people’s own
reflections have led them to be-
lieve consciously. This, in many
people, perhaps in most, is much
less strict than the traditional
code. ”

in

The Turmoil

But thirdly beneath what people
consciously think, there is still the
unconscious effect of early up-
bringing, which is usually in line
with the old conventions.

The result is a turmoil in the
mind and a lack of consistency in
action. As Mr. Ellis puts it:

e sexual discomfort and incon-
venience, even when basic sex
needs are partly satisfied, motivate
millions of Americans to act dif-
ferently than they think and un-
consciously to think differently
than they consciously permit
themselves to think they think.”

If modern men are to have men-
tal health they must learn hon-
esty in thought and feeling, even
when honesty compels some de-
parture from the precepts that
they imbibed in infancy.

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED

* The Folklore of Sex by Albert
Ellis (published by Charles Boni,
New York, 5 dollars).

L.E.S.



How Hard Is Life For The
Mien Who Escape ?

PARIS,
SETTING in the sum watching

the tennis at the Roland
Garros

Drobny—the former Czech tennis
champion who fled from behind
the Iron Curtain nearly two
years ago, Beside him was’ Vladi-
slav Skonecky, the Davis Cup
player, who has just decided not
to return to Poland. Skonecky
disappeared from the Polish
Davis Cup team in Switzerland,
has now arrived in Paris seeking
asylum,

It was in July 1949 that Drobny
—the former Prague ball-boy who
became champion of Czecho-
Slovakia and No. 1 player in
Europe—defied an order forbid-
ding him to play against a Ger-
man and a Spaniard. With his
friend and runner-up Vladimir
Czernik he refused to return home
from Switzerland, where he was
playing at the time.

No Job

How has Drobny lived since
then? As we sat together in the
sun Drobny told me the story.

The Swiss gave him an identity
card when he exiled himself from
Czecho-Slovakia. But they would
not allow him to work in Switzer-
land, Drabny soon found that this
bit of paper was by no means
equivalent tp a passport, Also he
discovered that a man without a
country finds it hard to get a job.

Back in Prague he had been a
clerk in a branch of the Bata
Shoe Company, which made tennis
balls. He had a pleasant bachelor
flat and a small car, and he always
had enough pocket money to keep
him going in the tennis capitals
where the firm allowed him to
spend most of his time.

Quitting his country, he quitted
his job too,

When it proved impossible to
work in Switzerland he made his
way to the United States, think-
ing to find a future there, So long



stadium was Jaroslav ys.

By EVELYN IRONS.

as he played tennis, life in the

‘S.A, was easy. rican ten~
nis clubs and associations pay
the living and travel expenses of
amateur players, Also they allow
a bit extra for incidentals.

They Forgot

It was between matches when
he was not playing, that Drobny
found life difficult,

“I found that people forgot
about me as soon as the tourna-
ment ended.” he said. In
the U.S.A., as in Switzerland, it
was just not possible for a state-
less alien to make a living by
working.

Now in spite of the cynics a
man cannot make a living from
amateur tennis. Drobny was
very thankful when early last

year he was offered a job in
Egypt.
The offer came from a cotton

magnate who lives in a palace in
Cairo and is a tennis enthusiast.
He was in Czecho - Slovakia
before the war and he saw
Drobny play. They met.

Now this magnate has befriend-
ed Drobny and made it possible
for him to continue his tennis
career.

In March 1950 Drobny became
an Egyptian citizen. Also he
began work as a cotton salesman.
He will not disclose his salary.
But he says that it is “adequate”:
and on’ top of it he gets a com-
mission on sales of raw cottoa
effected through his introductions.
“IT have opportunities of meeting
businessmen socially all over the
world,” Drobny said. “I do not
actually carry out the sales—I am
the contact man. I have done
quite well so far.”

Drobny was completely with-
‘out experience of cotton growing
and selling. But he is making
a serious study of it. He recently

OUR READERS SAY

No! Nobody
To the Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—Fifteen years ago when
Mr. Nobody was thoroughly ap-
proving of the ‘“bloomered”
Queen’s College girl competing
for the High Jump, I was in-
dulging in the vaults, considered
violent by Mr. Nobody, and en-
joyed so much by the Queen’s
College girl of to-day.

Now, with appendages normal,
IT am married with a family, and
I hasten to assure him that his
horrible fears for the future of
these girls are quite groundless.
Advanced vaulting calls for ef-
fort, control, relaxation, confi-
dence and courage combined
with perfect co-ordination of
brain and muscle — all valuable
qualities to develop for later life.

Lest the public
erroneous impression.

get an
I would

Wot! No Sonny ?

SIR,—I was very interested to
observe in the Sunday Advo-
cate that the Governor had se-
lected Mr, Mapp to be the latest
member of the so called Labour
Party to go to England on a
‘joy ride’, free of cost.

What I would like to know is,
what has happened to “Sonny”?
When is his turn coming for a
trip? All the others seem to have
had a turn,

A trip to some big country
would, I am sure, be very bene-
ficial to “Sonny”. He could study
all the latest methods in moving
houses and huts, also, he might
even take a course in +e
Divining,” so‘ that some o 3°
unfortunate Barbadians in “the
country districts, may get a little
water in a few years’ time. I am
assuming that by that time, with
the Persian Oilfields nationalized,
there may be a few water pipes
available for all the suffering

like to state that in actual effort, people of. Barbados. -

these vaults are not as strenuous

, Surely the Governor-in-Exe-

as the competitive High Jump cutive Committee can arrange a

(even of 15 years ago), where a trip for
88 poor

maximum effort is required

“Sonny?
fellow is

I hear the
getting quite

one strives to improve on the worked up about it,—quite right
previous jump, and no spring- too! If there are free trips for

board
leaper.

is supplied to aid
Yours faithfully,

GYMNAST.

the the “faithful boys”, why should

he not have his turn too?
Yours faithfully,
“CURIOSITY”.

went on an intensive tour of his
firm’s cotton-growing land in
Upper Egypt.

He cannot, of course, represent
his new country th Davis Cup
matches; for, having once been

a Davis Cu layer for one coun-! : : ‘
aun m caer : Housewives complain that fisk is hard to

{

|

try, one cannot switch to another,
Drobny can never appear in tne
Davis Cup match for any country
but his own. But be plays for
Egypt in other tournaments,

To-day Drobny says he feels
reasonably secure for the first
time since the Iron
clanged down behind him. Settling
down and getting married?
“Not yet, I must save first.” He
is frugal; never smokes, hardly
ever drinks,

From January to March (those
are the best months for tennis
in Egypt) Drobny lives in a
Cairo boarding-house (“rather
like your private hotels in South
Kensington”) He is often to be
seen at the luxurious Gezira
sporting club.

He speaks no Arabic,
by with French and _ English.
Every day he talks his own
language with his friend Czernik.
who is also a naturalised Egyp-
tian living in Cairo, and frequent-
ly meets other exiled Czechs
working for the Bata shoe factory
at Alexandria,

The rest of the year he is tour-
img the world. Last November
and December he was playing
tennis in India and Pakistan.

Father Stayed

His father and mother are in
Prague, where Drobny senior | is
still a tennis groundsman. “He
has remained a simple working
man,” explained hig son, “It is I
who joined the bourgeoisie’ and
so became unpopular with the
men at the top.”

He has not heard from his pa-
rents for two years.

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED
—L.E.S.

getti

—_-_e-~-—

Registration

SIR,—Allow me through your
columns just to state, that an ex-
planation should be given to the
public with regards to the differ-
ence of registering on “Form A’
from that of “Form B”, as I am
sure there are many who do not
quite understand the difference.

According to a statement men-
tioned in your columns, I had
seen that if one did not then
register (with the registering
officer) he would find himself in
the position of not being able to
vote; and in a further statement
it was refuted by saying that “Ti
is not true, that if one was not
registered on “Form A” that there
was no one that could prevent him
from registering on “Form B”,

Now Sir, I have been registerec
by the registration officer, at his
first call, but I was never told
whether it was “Form A” or
Form B”, and I must commend
the honourable member who has
brought it to our attention.

I am hoping Sir, that the
registering officers are finding
their task much easier, because 1
am sure the people are more en-
lightened now since it has been
explained at Queen’s Park, and
other places.

L. B. CLARKE.
May 30, 1951

ened.
He points out that capitalist e

ADVOCATE

BERTRAND RUSSELL _ \No-DrinkCitySumsUp the

Asks: Are These Moral Codes Out Of Date?

Curtain ;

| tubes or into bottles quaintly labelled lighter
| fuel and poison, .

ing three times the normal price.



TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1951





CLOSED
FOR

REPAIRS

First Dry Year

From JAMES LEASOR
BOMBAY.

WHEN the rains break over this burning |
city (they are due three weeks from now) iti {
will become the wettest in the world—but
at this moment it is the driest. Reason:
Bombay is celebrating the end of its first year
of total prohibition.

Celebration is, perhaps, hardly the correct
word in a city where even a wedding toast is
drunk in fizzy lemonade. But at least some
citizens have cause for rejoicing. They are
the bootleggers, than whom no class is eur-
rently more successful.

Twelve months back these characters were
lowly liftmen, porters, and sweepers—the
lowest Indian caste of all.

Now they live in sea-front houses in Mar-
ine-drive, have white American roadsters,
and their wives 1,000-rupee (£75) saris. They
owe their sudden affluence to the absurd pro-
hibition policy started as a sop to Gandhi’s
words.

Once he said that if he had self-govern-
ment for one hour only, his first act would be
to ban foreign liquor. Hence, total prohibi-
tion in Bombay and Madras and one dry day
a week in Delhi.

QUESTIONNAIRE

Westerners who want a drink — curiously
referred to officially as addicts—have to
queue for hours in a steamy office to answer
a questionnaire.

The questionnaire includes such non-drink-
ing questions as where they were brought
up, and their monthly income. After due
bureaucratic delay they may be awarded one
to four units for one month, which means a
maximum of four bottles of gin.

An appeal may be made on medical
grounds, but the Director of Prohibition
though a non-medical man, can either quash
or grant it,

So much for the official means of getting
drink, They never made anyone rich, but
the unofficial ways have made hundreds
wealthy.

Backyard brewers operate in every street

Advocate Stationery

FIBRE MATS

Plain and Patterned

CON GOLEUM — 6 ft wide

in various patterns

PLASTIC OILCLOTH

45 inches

in four sizes

wide

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.
Successors to

C.S. PITCHER

"Phones : 4472 & 4687

LTD.

& CO.



PPO a II IOI III



Only a few...
‘SILENT KNIGHT’

KEROSENE OIL

REFRIGERATORS

LEFT IN STOCK

Will those who asked for a refusal on one,

— OOOO:

call before they are all sold!

in the kitchens of wealthy householders, .
where underpaid servants augment their
meagre incomes by running home-made DaCOSTA & Co.. Ltd.
stills. ,
They soak a handful of sugar molasses in or = . oe nals =

ea

water, ferment it, and distil it. This takes
time and also smells, so they accelerate the
brewing by throwing into the brew-pot a
handful of ammonium chloride.

The production of the drink is quickened

alarmingly, but the product does no good to
the drinker’s stomach.

DUMPED CARGO



NOW IN STOCK
GREEN WATERPROOFED

CANVAS

72 inches wide at

$8.25 per yard

- ALSO -
GREEN BIRKMYRE

CANVAS |

72 inches wide at

$7.43 per yard

Secure your requirements

buy. The fishermen are after more lucrative
hauls frorn the bosom of the sea. Large boats
packed with booze come up from Goa in Por-
tuguese territory. They dump their cargo
over the side and mark the position with a
float.

In the darkness fishing boats collect it and
bring it ashore in déserted creeks. There it
is either buried for future disposal or poured
into false petrol tanks on cars, or into inner

Touts offer black whisky in big hoteis
for 75 rupees (£5 12s. 6d.) a bottle about

Before prohibition many labourers lived
mainly on dried fish and toddy, a local drink
made by tapping palm trees and fermenting
the juice in the sun.

This of course is now illegal but they still
like the taste so much that the Government
makes a watery imitation—palm tree juice
that has not stood in the sun.

It is called neera and efforts by the people
to take it home and sun it themselves are
thwarted as it must be drunk at the place of
sale,

The cost of this absurd campaign so far is
12,000,000 rupees (£900,000) lost in revenue

Fiem <

Da COSTA & CO, LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT




















and tourists’ trade about une-fifth of Bom- wai pa poh are
bay’s total revenue. TRY TV 1 DAY
INSPECTION V
Also crime is violently increasing. Half of B A R L 0 A
Bombay’s police are on the look-out for stills MALT MILK and EGG

and secret drinking. All roads in and out of
the city have police blocks and all travellers
are inspected.

The other day returning in a car from a

with Chocolate Flavour
16 02, size $1.22
8 oz. size .65





bathe at Junu Beach 15 miles out I had the Ondet . 5:4

experience of breathing hard in a policeman’s|$ J & R SANDWIC

face while he smelled my breath for alcohol. . 2
What a performance as the late Sid Field RREAD LA Ss a.

would have said.

I wanted to ask Bombay’s Minister for Ex-
cise and Reconstruction L. M. Patel, one of
the city’s keenest prohibitionists know things
were going but he has left on a tour to see
for himself.

He left behind a statement though, saying:
“It gives me great pleasure to find ex-addicts

for the Picnic Thursday , AG “2

Sweet Counter ms
Canadian Chocolates WRITTANIA
Hreakfast Food





Kit Gat Chocolates
Sharp’s Toffees
Butter Almonds



: : : Marsh Ma zi Wheat Pruffs ready to serve
without exception: stating they were im- After di ints ie per 8 oz, pkg.
mensely benefited due to prohibition and ee

that their homes were more happy and peace-
ful than at any time before. Many of them
nad been able to pay off their long-standing

Cocktail Biscuits

Cake decorations

Carr’s Ice Cream Wafers
Jack Straws

Specials

Minah Tea 39c. per % Ib.
Cooks Paste 6 cents each





debts.” Glucose Tea Time Paste .15 per jar
For myself I have not so far met any of |
these happy people—only a number of char-j Milk Fresh Vegetables
acters prowling in dark corners who have; Archor Milk Powder | il ;
offered me booze at fabulous prices. Conciensed “Mii | Baily
Gloria Evap. Milk

Perhaps they are ex-addicts trying to pay
off their long-standing debts in Bombay's
easiest way.

—PSPPPOLPLPOL SEATS VAL OSSSCSFFFSSS FO

~

%,

ORDER To-Day from GODDARDS

VOOSSSSSGSSSOOSSSOGSSSSESSSSOGSSSS OS SS OSGOOD IOOS

s

—L.E.S.



a,

TUESDAY, JUNE 1951



_ Dispute

Supt Of °49-

00 Queried

THE CHRISTIAN MISSION case in which Frederick A.
Barrow and others have brought an action against Dalton L.

Hoyte and others dis

puting who was the rightful superin-

tendent in 1949 and 1950 continued at the Court of Chancery

yesterday and was adjourned until the
His Honour the Vice Chancellor

presiding.

Last time the case was heard,

legal points were raised and yes-
terday the Vice-Chancellor ruled
partly in favour of submissions
for Hoyte who is rep-esented by
Mr. G. H. Adams associated with
Mr. D. H. L, Ward,

Counsel. for Hoyte had objected
that the action was not maintain-
able because the

le Christian
Mission was a corporate body and
Barrow and the other plaintiffs

should sue in a corporate capacity,

Mr. W. W. Reece and Mr. J. S. B.
Dear represented Barrow.

The Vice-Chancellor said that a
review of the authorities cited and
others went to show that that sub-
mission was valid in so far as all
the claims, other than that for
the declaration, were concerned.

No Authority

He could find no _ authority
which debarred the claim by in-
dividuals of declaration that such
individuals properly constituted
the general superintendent ana
the Board of Management.

In the suit, Barrow and the 20
other plaintiffs claim the account
of the dealings by Hoyte and the
other defendants with the money,
goods, effects and property of the
mission during their term of
office. They claim the delivery to
themselves of all money, goods,
documents and such other things

They also claim the declaration
that Barrow is the Superintendent
of the mission for the year 1949
together with the other plaintiffs
who constitute the Board ot
Management of the Mission for
the same year.

On the other hand Hoyte and
the others denied the allegations
and claim the possession of the
Gospel Tabernacle and the office
attached. They want an account
of the dealings by Barrow and
the others with the money and
other property belonging to the
Mission during 1949 and up te
the hearing of the suit.

They also want a_ declaration
that Hoyte was the genera)
superintendent of the Mission for
1949-50 and he and the other de-
fendants were the Board of
Management for the same period.

Ownership Trial

The Court held that the trial
of the issue whether Barrow and
others or Hoyte and others con-
stituted the General Superinten-
dent and Board of Management
of the Mission had necessarily to
precede the trial of the other
issues which involved the owner-
ship of the corporation’s money
and property.

The Vice-Chancellor said that
it was to be noted that the
declarations sought were as re-
gards the position and rights of
the periods in 1949 and 1950, and
counsel might consider, before the
hearing was continued, whether,
by amendment of the pleadings or

otherwise, the conclusion might
not be reached.

This conclusion would be
at any rate, in part, by

the declaration by the Court to
the present position and rights of
the parties.

Counsel for MHoyte asked for
admission that in accordance with
the rules, Hoyte had been the
last Superintendent who had been
elected.

If the Christian Mission
Herald was not in.existence dur-
ing 1949, Counsel was arguing
that Hoyte was still Superinten-
dent during that period.

Counsel for Barrow said that
they were properly appointed in
1949 and 1950,

A new bill will be filed so that
a conclusion may be reached as
to the present position and rights
of the property.

Council for Barrow will also
reply to Mr. Adams call for
admissions.










18th.
, Sir Allan Collymore is

‘Nelson’ Makes
Direct Trip

THE Lady Nelson is expected to
arrive here from British Guicna
via Trinidad on Wednesday
morning to load sugar and
molasses for Canadian ports. She
will be taking passengers.

The Nelson will be fhe first
“ledy liner” to make a direct call
from Trinidad to Barbados. C.N.S
lady boats have always sailéd to
Barbados from British Guiana via
Trinidad, Grenada and St. Vincent.

The Nelson is making this direct
trip because she is late.

She is expected to leave port on
Friday evening for Montreal via

the British Northern Islands,
Bermuda, Boston and Halifax.
She is consigned to Messrs.

Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd.

Fruit, Charcoal

Brave Weather

SCHOONER Adalina arrived
here over the\week-end laden with
supplies of firewoad, charcoal,
cocoanuts, fresh fruit and cocoa-



nut oil. Most of the fruit were
mangoes.

The Adalinma took four days
sailing from St. Lucia. She
normally does it in about two
days. Captain Flemming said that

the wind was light. He met a
strong southwest current through-
out the trip.

He experienced lots of thunder
and lightning when he was coming
in to Barbados on Saturday night.
Except for the little bad weather,
the trip was fine,

The Adalina has been berthed
alongside the Pier Head to dis-
charge her cargo. People flocked
yesterday especially for the char-
coal. The Adalina is consigned to
the Schooner Owners’ Association.

The ‘Wolfe’ On Dock

THE 74-ton schooner Marion
Belle Wolfe has been on dry dock
here for the past two weeks. She
is expected to spend another week
on dock.

The Wolfe is undergoing ex-
tensive repairs to her hull. Old
timbers and rotten copper are
being replaced. Part of the hull
has to be painted,

When she comes off dock, she
will be taking cargo for British
Guiana. Her agents are Messrs.
Schooners Owners’ Association.

_ . e
Engineer Killed
Joseph Barnes, a 60-year-old
engineer of Greenwich Village,
St. James, died on the spot when
he was involved in an accident
at Vaucluse Factory at about

10.25 a.m. yesterday.

Barnes was sharpening tools
when he was suddenly caught up
in a belt and hurled to the
ground,

The body was removed to the
mortuary wihere a post mortem
examination was performed by
Dr. A. C. Kirton, P.M.O, of St.
Lucy.







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Ruling Required In Christian

ANOTHER HOYS’ CLUB



‘



SOON after the Boys’ Club. was opened at Clevers Hill yesterday evening members began to take an

interest in the various games. Th



OVERTIME

THE “ADVOCATE” has
been asked by the United
States Labour selectors who
visited Barbados last week to
state that overtime is paid
normally to workers in the
United States, in accordance
with the Fair Labour Stan-
dards Act of 1938.

But with regard to the Bar-
badian labourers who have
been selected for agricultural
work over a temporary period,
there is an exemption from
the Fair Labour Standards
Act for those employed in the
canning industry.

As the Barbadian workers

will be employed in work
which is subsidiary to the
canning industry overtime

will not be paid.



Girls’

No Selection Of

Workers Today
1,814 ALREADY CHOSEN

and thrty-one
more Barbadian workers were
yesterday selected and examined
at Queen’s Park for work in the
United States. Tihis brings the
number to 1,814. Approximately }
186 more are needed.

There will be no recruiting
today. Men who were summoned
for. yesterday and were not
attended to, and those summoned
for today, will be informed
through the Press when they are
required. This does not in any
way refer to those men who have
been selected and examined and
told to report back for results.

Mr. “Bill” Tyier who did
selecting yesterday, said that

Two hundred

the
me

standard of the men that day was Class. One boy particularly had
very poor, the poorest he had seen proved himself to be a great
so far. artist. He would not have been
The failure of a person to be able to show his qualities if the
selected was not attributable to Boys’ Club was not formed
one thing as many believed, he Col, Michelin said that the boys
said. He explained that it was must behave and conduct them
important to bear in mind the gelves properly. No boy must use
kind of work a man had to do, bad language or be unruly. BR,
and therefore several things had would he suspended for a month
to be taken into consideration in or two if he did not live up to the
that respect. He had long ex- syles of the Club.
perience in selecting men and he

knew exactly what to look for.
The workers are going to b«
employed for about ten to twelve

weeks, but it is hoped to get
further employment for them, the
Labour Commissioner told the ’

Advocate yesterday.

will

their

ese boys

are testing their ability at a@ominoes.

First Girls’ Cl

ub

In B’dos Opened

The first Girls’ Club in the island was opened at Clevers
Hill. St. Joseph, yesterday evening. Opposite this club a
Boys’ Club was opened too, Both buildings are rented by

the Police,

Usually when these Clubs are being opened the represent-
atives of the parish in the House of Assembly are present.
Unfortunately Mr. G. H. Adams, Senior Member for St.

Joseph, was not there. Mr. L. E. Smith, the Junior Member,
was present, however.

Fifty boys of St, Joseph have

already registered

The Girls’ Club has a membership

of thirty,

as

members.

Colonel R. T. Michelin, Commis-

sioner of Police, said that it was
the sixth Boys’ Club and the first
opened. The
Clubs already formed catered for
over 350 boys. In September last
Club was
The Com-
missioner svid that it is the inten-

Club being

year the first
formed at Bay Stree

Boys”

at.

tion of the Police Force to form a

Club in every paris

The Clubs are here to provide
healthy recreation for the boys in
their leisure time”, Colonel Mich-
“These Clubs
purely places of sport, The boys
learn some trade

lin’ said.

lave the opportuni

hands,”

1,

are not
They will

ty of

Keen Interest

He said that at

interest in gardenin

District

g. Each

bov

sells the vegetables he grows and

he gets 50 per cent of the sales. At

the Clubs at District

interest in carpentr
turning out some gc

He said that he hoped the Clubs
would eventually be run by the
community i
Although the Police had organised
the Clubs they wanted them to be

of

un by a Committee,

“C” and Bay

Street the boys had taken a great
are
At
the Bay Street Club there is an Art

They
work,

y.
od

the district

formed from

@ On Page 8



Colonial Secretary Has the Petition

The petition of the
Registering Officers for better
compensation for their work has
been sent to the Colonial Secre-
tary, Mr. L. A. Chase, Register-

ing Supervisor, told _ the
Advocate yesterday,
An Assistant Officer told the

Advocate on Saturday that they

Per yd.



Assistant had

against dark grounds.

Per Yard:

nH Demet em te ei Ne es

sent this petition to the
Supervisor a few weeks ago but
Mad got no reply.

This petition which was ad-
dressed to the Colonial Secretary,
said Mr. Chase yesterday, had
been brought to him with the
request that he forward it to the
Colonial Secretary. Within ten



Seintillating
Sea Island





minutes he thad

knew nothing more
matter.

All the field w
registration of pers

done

He
the

so.
about

ork

ons

of the
desirous

of voting has now been complet-

the Advocate
Preliminary

ed

day.

}

le

arnt yester-
ists are now

being compiled, it was said.

— —
eee eee

Cotton Fabrics

wide.

$5.06, $5.07, $6.22 &

IN PLAIN COLOURS ”
of Pink, White, and
Turquoise. 36 ins. wide
Bee Ware 2 $3.00

IN FIGURED LINGERIE
DESIGNS

$.339

A wide variety of the most beautiful patterns in large designs

Also in Paisley patterns—36 inches

$3.19, $3.56, $3.57, $4.55,

$6.26



CAVE

SHEPHERD

& Co., Ltd.
10-13 Broad St.

using

“an

Station the boys had taken « keen

Malaria Eradication
Campaign On

Dr. L, A. P. Slinger, O.B:E.,
Director of Medical Services in
British Honduras told_ the

Advocate yesterday that there is
a malaria eradication campaign
going on in the colony and they
are spraying every house twice a
year With D.D.T,

This he said, had been made
possible by means of a grant from
‘ie United Nations International
Children’s Emergency Fund.
U.N.I.C.E.F, he added, is also
giving school meals to children.

There are various schemes in
the colony for improving hospi-
tals and institutions, British
Honduras is now being developed
in a big way and the Medica)
Services have got to keep in pace
with the development.

Dr. Slinger arrived
week-end by B.W.1.A. for the
Conference of Senior Medical
Officers of the Caribbean area
which opened at Hastings House
vesterday morning. He is stay-
ing at the Marine Hotel

1,000 Acres Burnt

ONE THOUSAND ACRES of
ripe canes were burnt during
this year, Fires occutred all over
the island, but mainly in the
windward parishes.

Fifty acres of young canes and
90 acres of ratoons were also
burnt, Up to the end of May the

over the



number of fires so far was 172.
A comparison for the same
period ending May 31, last year

showed that the acreage burnt
was 745 acres ripe canes, 20 acres
young canes and 41 acres of
ratoons, The number of fires was
158.

“HERDSMAN” LOADING

HARRISON Liner S.S. Herds-
man anchored at Speightstown
yesterday morning to load 3,475
tons of sugar for Liverpool, Eng-
land. She is expected to sail for
England around the end of the
week, The Herdsman is consign
ed to Messrs. Da Costa & Co,, Ltd

Unconscrous Sailor

GREGORY TROCHE, a sailor of
the S.S. Alcoa Pegasus was taken
to the General Hospital at about
1.40 a.m, yesterday in an uncon-
scious condition, He was de-
tained.





Miss

‘ |
ion |
Fined £2 For |
Bodily Harm

In the Assistant Court of
Appeal yesterday, Justices G. L
Taylor and J. W. B. Chenery
confirmed a decision of Mr. C. L.
Wai n, Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A” who imposed a
fine of £2 and 2/- costs to be
paid in 21 days or in default two
months’ imprisonment on Louise
Simpso6n of My Lord’s Hill for
inflicting bodily harm’ on Marjorie
Murrell.

The offence was committed on
April 2. Simpson appealed
against Mr. Walwyn’s decision
and was also ordered yesterday tc
pay the cost of appeal © which
amounted 7/8.

She Longed To Go
To B.G: Fined £5

LENA CHARLES a labourer 01
Deightons, St. Michael was place.
on a bond for six months in the
sum of £5 by a District “A” Police
Magistrate for secreting herself on
the schooner Emeline on May 18

The Captain of the Emeline sai
that he never found out that the
defendant was aboard the schooner
until they were near to Demerara,
He was forced to bring her back as
the authorities there would no
have anything’To do with her.

Charles was fined ¢5 on April 28
for committing a similar offence.
Asked. by the Magistrate what she
had to say. ibout the case, Lena
Charles said “Sir I have always
lofiged to go to B.G.”

Lena Charles was born in St.
Lucia.



t

Lumber Crowd
Out Cargo Space

ALMOST all the landing space
for cargo in the inner basin of the
Careenuge was taken up yesterday
by heaps of Douglas fir lumber,

During the day, lighters were
bringing in more lumber. They
seemed to be discharging their

leads faster than waterfront
workers were removing the
lumber.

Discharging the lumber here is
the S.S. Mormacrey which called
from Vancouver and Seattle
Friday. She brought a total of
47,689 pieces and 12,986 bundles
of fir. The shipment came for
Messrs. T. Geddes Grant Ltd,

On Murder Charge



Joseph Cumberbatch, 32, a
labourer of Rose Hill, St.
Peter, was yesterday remanded

on a charge of murder following
the death of Cecil Jackman of
Ashton Tenantry, St. Peter.
Jackman died of stab wounds on
Sunday night.

An inquiry into the cifeum-
stances sutrounding Jackman’s
death was adjourned until next
Monday by Coroner Mr. 8, H
Nurse. The inquiry was being

held at District “E”

BLACKGUARD

A fine of 10/- and 1/- costs to
be paid in 14 days or in default,
14 days’ imprisonment was im-
posed on Euna Pile of Cane Hill,
St. Michael by a _ District “A”
Police Magistrate for black-
guarding on Cane Hill Road on
April 21.

BEGGED ALMS

Sentence of three months’ im-
prisonment was yesterday passed |
on James Chandler, a Jabour.r: of
Orange Hill, St. James, by a City
Police Magistrate for begging
alms on Broad Street on May 29.
Chandler later gave notice of
appeal.







RICE FROM B.G.

A SHIPMENT of 500 bags ol!
rice bran, 500 bags of rice reject
and 100 bags of polished rice
arrived for Barbados on Sunday by
the schooner Emeline. They ar-
rived from British Guiana,

8 LD’S
Notifications of Infectious Dis-
eases for May were: Diphtheria 3;
Enteric Fever 2; Tuberculosis 3. |






: ; 4 cee Oe .
| IMPERIAL LEATAER



WF

nr

.

\Cussons |



PPPS II GCOS CONGO OCG OOOO OO FON
“1, a
| yee? &
@ o “s
‘tans

~ wip





hy

ask for

SOAPS ;

4

oe

WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND

ABDOL

Improved Vitamin Capsules in a palatable form containing
and D. A Nutritive Tonic in Capsule form,
indicated in conditions of Vitamin Deficiency

vitamins A, Bl, B2

LLOELOPLA PID LODLS
POSTEO OTT SETS

Ped

@
KNIGHTS LTD.

tne
var aS ah SOSS

|







|S auzane
a

ts 5

|

1

PAGE FIVE





eaenennenene = The nane speaks for iicclf SERNSSREDESy
gy +

? : ‘ aid or fe
5 ns Mite oraer

Blood / © ;

’ re

%

Helps to cleanse the system H
from blood impurities =
impurities in the blood muy cause rheumatic e
aches and pains, stiff and painful joints, .
boils, pimples and common skin disorJers. ry
Clarke’s Biood Mixture Lelps to purify i z

the blood, cleanses the syst-a and assists ; a

in restoring good health. wT e 5
Sareeressseenenseseent ©” oo OT eSB NRE SASeee eae



SPECIFY

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ASBESTOS-CEMENT
CORRUGATED SHEETS

AND

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WOOD.



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LETTER SCALES

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Finished Black Chromium
A BOON TO ANY OFFICE
COMPLETE WITH CHROMIUM PLATED
WEIGHTS

only $6.34 each

RANSOME'’S
LAWN MOWERS

IN TWO GRADES: “ARIEL” & “TIGER”
12” 14”
PRICES COMPLETE WITH GRASS BOX:

from $38.17 to $46.60 eaeln

ALL METAL
WHEEL BARROWS

Heavy Gauge Steel — 3 cubic ft. Capacity
-—
at $15.17 eaeh
A LIGHTER
Fitted

in and









4

Each in 2 sizes and



GALVANIZED MODEL

with Rubber Tyred Wheel and

for

$14.65

HARRISON'S “°”

specially constructed Garden Use

Price



STREET





SS



LAYENA

see

pil. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Dbistributors.
SERRE R KAR EH BEB

eo





FOOD BUYS



IRAQ DATES, 12 oz. Pkt,
KRAFT CHEESE, 8 oz. Pkt
12 oz. Tir

DANISH CAMAMBERT CHE
ITALIAN TOMATO PASTE
SMEDLEYS GARDEN ‘ROOT
LEMINE MALTED MILK POWDER
BAHAMAS CRUSHED PINEAPPLE
FRENCH MUSHROOMS

MARVENS CANADIAN SODA BISCUITS
LETONA CREAM OF GREEN PEA SOUP
AUSTRALIAN ASPARAGUS SOUP
JACK STRAWS, Large Pkts



k
y



Bavnk ian ms a

Bah mh

ba



PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1951

oe iva

bietany BY CARL ANDERSON |f} 7
ef | | Gums Bleed,
| Sensational New Make-up | el
&

: ee
|

















— ge ea"
| Stop Pyorrhea and
Trench Mouth
in 24 Hours

Bleeding gums, sore mouth, or loose
teeth mean that you are a victim of Pyor-
rhea or Trench Mouth, or some bad disease
that will eventually cause you to lose all
i teeth and have to wear false teeth
wi












MICKEY MOUSE
— _{ OHNO.
- WOULD
BET MINNIE'LL BE MAD UNDERSTAND!
WHEN SHE FINDS You'RE
GOIN’ OUT WITH THUH FAMOUS
STAR *HESTER O”

















GOSH... MOST REALISTIC DREAM
l EVBR HAD!






=e

vere ar these mouth diseases have spread
throughout the world so that now scien-
tists say that four out of every five people

| | are sooner or later. Be warned in



| time and stop these diseases before it is

too late, because they often cause not only
the loss of teeth, but also chronic rheuma~
tism and heart trouble.

New Discovery Saves Teeth

,. the discovery of an American
scientist, fights these troubles in a new
and quick way. It pen*trates right to the
root of the t

BUT, MINNIE oes
HSESTER 1S wUSTA
GOOD FRIENP!

rouble, stops gums from bleed-
ing the very first day, quickly takes the
soreness out of your mouth, and soon
tightens the teeth. The following letter
r W. W. B. shows the results that



Amosan users get: “I suffered from Trench
Mouth and Pyorrhea for ten years. My
ms were sore and bleeding and © had

{
| four , while several other teeth
were agiting Yoosey, all the time i tried
. ) many Ings am hen heard of this new
NEWI Not a cake make-up, not a greasy foundation! Tasvenrd kmsans. th 4c noure afiee use
5 7 . pmaese my ee had stopped bleeding.
he soreness in my mouth disappeared !n
in two weeks I





“Angel Face” is foundation and powder all in one. No wet sponge, three days and f I found that
no greasy fingertips. “Angel Face” goes on easily and smoothly with my loose teeth were much tighter and that
its own white puff. Gives you a soft, velvety complexion instantly. I could eat the hardest of icod.

Guoranteed
Ampson works so fast und so cern
that it is guaranteed to stop your gums
from bleeding, end sore unouth and tighten

NEW! Stays on longer than powder!
your teeth to your compiete satisiaction or

The special ‘‘cling’ ingredient fused into ‘Angel Face” makes it money back on return of empty package.
stay on much longer than ordinary powder. And It's never drying, Don't take achance on osing “our teeth or
never greasy. suffering the dangers from rheumatisin
and heart trouble. Get Amoson from your



BLONDIE WILL BE
SO SURPRISED --
SHE'LL PROBABLY J)

GIVE MEA BIG OS® 7












'M-GLAD I QUIT
THE GAME WHEN
I O10 --FOR
ONCE I'M

BLONDIE -- re 'M TOO
DO YOU KNOW SN SLEEPY TONIGHT
WHAT TIME I'M

GETTING HOME?.) \



chemist today under this i: on-clad guaran-

tae, You sis:

’ : nothing ar th)

NEW! Can’t spill! | Amosarasiicic®

* tects you. ‘

You'll say Pond’s “Angel Face’ is the most convenient make-up you've For Pyorrkea--Trench Mouia
ever used — it can’t spill over handbag or clothes, It’s perfect to use .

anytime, anywhere,










Choose from five angelic shades: Blonde Angel, Ivory Angel, Pink
Angel, Tawny Angel, Bronze Angel. At all the best beauty counters,

CHECK THAT
COUGH
WITH
BROWNE'S
CERTAIN

COUGH SYRUP
It Relieves Colds Quickly.





5-16 _ i oN

THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER

MERRIER cad THe vay, xt } ELL ALL GO WITH “ LEE IN TOWN.) WE MUST TRY \ ( WE'RE HOLDIN'GUNS READY. ON
rae THE MAN CALLED "Tag e > ce RUN iF * ta WRENS ie on re \FALSE MOVE,AN’ WELL SHOOT BOTH
rs S, eae ;

v- OF YOu






WHATEVER IS
THE MEAL
IT’S ALWAYS
IMPROVED
WITH A

FEW SLICES










C. CARLTON BROWNE

136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813
Wholesale & Retail Druggist









BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS
ee EG eR ec eR Rint ARGU MarOMTE BR COMER Cas OR TARP aera aa

| Meat Hunch
: Luncheon Beef & Cereal,
Peas

Tomatoes,

JUST RECEIVED
Tins Vienna Sausages,

» Bausages

» Potted Meat

» Corned Beef & Cereal
Downs Australian Hams

» Ox Tongues

» Table Butter is
Tomato Juice

'



{| - ccna
(LL FIX HIM 6O He
JUST SIT AROUND - /’t



O/T GOT THE GOUT IN My ©
GHT ARM-ANII CUT MY |

J) THUMB -IIM ALL LAID UP

| GIVE ME A COMEORTABLE |
| CHAIR -=-I |



BY SOME WORK THAT A SGIE
fo TREAT Lin LKE i ' \\| HAS BEEN NAGGIN' ME TO
) A.GENTLEMAN / ( > \ | DO-VLL MAKE 2 -

—- shy il HIM HELP ME /
{ \) yi LP ME? |

Bots Cocktail Cherries






» Cocktail Onions
Tins Macaroni & Cheese
» Campbell's Soups, Chicken
woo rice, Chicken Noodle,
eet,









Good News! Your Favourite

MOTOR CYCLES Arrivce!!

VELOCETTE

The New Model L.E. 200 C.C. is different from the conventional type

Motor Cycle — in fact it’s the nearest approach to a motor car.

———___







STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum.





-
-
3

SPOS

Water-cooled. Hand-Started. Shaft-driven
and. Noiseless.





































i fe ee | | : For SIMPLICITY, ECONOMY and RIDING PLEASURE ‘
Ht | LAs See | | soe Choose a =
KA ite || |) Sm | eee (OM VEL Oc sFor Your
Aww qaa), ETTE (os
Kae ROBERT THOM. LTD. °
i aoeliteny Garage Os White Park Road Bots. Cocktail Onions
i ees
he





I Tins Cocktail Biscuits
VE YOUR BUSINESS _[|\"" ite"

* ,, Frankfurt Sausages
BY ALEX RAYMOND BY » Luncheon Beef

» Pate De Foie

‘

WHILE I WAS STAYING WITH LEILA












STAFFORD, L COULDN'T HE ) fhe CRYING... BUT, JERRI,.. ) 17'S JUST AWFUL! NOBODY LIKES ME! » Potted Meat
CE HOW TROUBLED AND aus OH, MISS DORIAN, YOU WOULDN'T WHAT 1S" << T NEVER GO ANYWHERE’..T JUST SIT I RO v ED PRINTIN $1 & } Pt. Tin Sasso Olive Oil
, UNDERSTAND... You'Re So| | THERE TO) AROUND THIS STUPID LD HOUSE Tins Cheese

DONE B Y tre Kraft ag
ADVOCATE PRINTERY :

UNDERSTAND? / AND ROT! I CAN'T STAND IT! IVE
TELL ME... A\ SOTTO GET AWAY FROM HERE |





%
3
” » Cherries %
» Stuffed Olives
x
x
3
:
g
$
S
~



THE PHANTOM

Tat {VE GOT TO GO DOWN-
ITOWN FOR SOME NEWS-/LONG. YOU
| }PAPER INTERVIEWS. NEED YOUR

Usually Now Usually Now







HOME. ARE YOU /AIN'T. WELLWAIT.| |COMEIN HERE? J AFTER YOU.WERE

NO, DIANA IGN'T ~ No, LADy, WE_| [HOW DARE YOu ) RELAX WERE NOT
MAKE THIS WORK OUT A

| |F Ri =RS? A THE ln ‘~ . 35

GGODONE, DIANA. —-7~ | {I'LL DROP YOU OFF a Oe i tm THe BOY FRINDS ees e eee “—e
TOIMOWROWE THE (~ Serer | AT HOME :

er —<_DAY_ AL ay h ;



Pkgs. Moirs Chocolates 10,,... 18 Tins Cooking Butter 1lb. 86 83

Bars Blue Soap 2 Bars 108 t00 Tins Klim 1 Ib. 148 130







as
oe



TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1951



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week
96 cents Su



announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 snd 6 cents per word for each

For Births, Ma*riage or Sailing ane |







































72 éents and





| PUBLIC NOTICES







NOTICE

Vestry

Exhibition



tenable at the













| Ten cents per aydté line on wWeek-day

and 12 cents per agaie ling on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days}
} end $1.80 on Sundeys.

‘ApBlicatiors for offe vacant St. Philip's ,

Sr, |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

}

FOR
: Minirttwm charoe

, £6 eentd Sutiddys

RENT



t word on Sundays.



HOUSES

PLAT: Neaument, Hastings, unsur























week 12 eents and
24 words — ower 4
words 3 cents a word week--4 ceute «



WANTED



GIRL with sound knowledge of Englisa
grommar who can also type well, to
take classified Only



ation nee’







i



PERSONAL



The public are hereby warned agai
Riving credit to any persen of person

twhomseever in my name) as I do not
held myself responsible for anyone
contracting any debt of debts in m

name upless by a written order «iene











fhesé with the above qual r °
additicnal word. Terms cash. Phone 2808 ays 24 words — over 24! Michael’ y Schoo! e4 Dished. Dining and Tooth, aj only q _ re ‘
between #20 and @ p.m., 3113 for Death | “OTds 3 cents a word week—4 cents a ny Oe Setsigned net ioe then Satur: | bedreoths. running water, Kitchen wn verilang Bepartment 7 i | ttn es
Netices only after 4 p.m. werd on Sundays. day 9th dune 191. ° | as, usual conveniences pets. of j . . Venture Gf John. —
DIED Candidates must be daughters of ‘hildten. Dial 2636. §.6.512n for lewd Walk” jaetiiessinibeitiasaelsincdiiatiniié ts es =
. perishioners in straitened circumstances, Py . - Apply peeen The public are hereby warn t
AUTOMOTIVE and must be over eight Years and less | on ‘Vaca OTe i BM. and 5.30 p.m 26.5 | giving credit to any peteon = sone
ANDREWS—On 4th June 1951. At her shan twelve years old on the Mist July. 2550 for particulars 5.6.51 S| (whomsoever ‘in my name) as 1 do not
late residence Edeys Village Ch. Ch. | - ——a hold myself responsible for anyone con-
Lavina Andrews. Her funeral wili A birth certificate must be forwarde!./ PLAT: «) Furnished Fiat at MANAGER > Lyng ms epee tracting any debt or debts in my name
leave at 4.15 p.m. for St. David's; ,.CAR—(7). 14-6 Vaux Hall Motor car] with an application form, obtained fro) st Lawrence Gap, Suitable for 2 ‘love | Apply ow: ,{ whless by 4 written order signed by
Cause 1938 model in good condition. Can be| th Parochial Treasurer's Office. | From June coward. AGHEY én , & fgveteme eae | ine.
Relatives of the Jones family, Oistins,|*¢¢n at Mr. Bovell's Garage Westmore- The entrance examination will be held! .,. phone e4u . a 4 2 i 6.514 .| GEORGE EVERTON FIELDS
5 6 51—in. | i#ne St. James. at the St. Michaels Girls’ School No reasonable offer refused. Saturday 16th Jurie 1961 at 913 am." | —ongas os 7 3 ‘ot ahamtie | * "St. Michael
THANK= sa 5.6.51—=2n. Se Tet. pining and Bravia Rooms. Sih st aperiance. of tee nd mS | 5.6.51—2n
BRANKER_—We beg to thank those wha |s— prly A. Gittens, Reed Street. 30.5.51—(9|" Norma: town. 3.6. 51=t
sent wreaths, cards and assisted us 5.6.51—4n ds indy ay need, ie Gavcak crnsn eens | PINE credit to my wife, Leotta Black
through the sad bereavement of our | ———— Ni | yey at?’ to . Bilis, 4 1 Liman présser, apply; 2% (nee Brathwaite) as I do not hold
dear father and brother—JULIMN | “CAR: Rover 16-1017 ls metre conale OTICE am K, mi Te See or. \ fem $.6.51.-2.| M¥8elf responsible for her or anyone
BRANKER. Mrs. Sybil Simmons, | tion as new. £650. No offers. Apply NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is __$.6.51=4n A eect | Ce contracting any debt or debts in
Gwen Denny, Julian Branker (Flori- | first instance. Courtesy Garage. the intention of the Commissioners of! WANTED —Young man fot the local] ™Z name unless by a written order
da), Rupert Branker (B G }, eBildren 2.6.51—¢n | Highways for the Parish of St. Georse| 70 SUB-LET and Lard Factory. Must have} S8nea by me.
and family. _— : to cause to be introduced into the House) “TOBRUK” — Cattiewash for the Of chemistry und be interes.| DARNLEY DaCOSTA BLACKMAN,
orn WAGGON: of Assembly of this Island a Bill to; ™onth of July — Dial 4484 or 4374, St. Patricks Near Valley Hill,
a G § One Ford V8 Station } téd in machinery. Good salary will be y.
BARKER: Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Barker | Waggon in perfect working order. Battery amend the Highways Act, 1900 to reduce 1.6.51—6n paid to the fight man ilar: Christ Church
and family gratefully acknowledge the |and tyres good. Dial 2888 for further | (2® 2™mount of Commission payable ‘o/ la letter to K. a ite, 5.6.81—2
various expressions of sympathy and information. 56 14 the Forounisl Xreeatitee a San Eonineater te ee a x ante & Co, Lid Lower Bron “Ghd public ate hereby warned aguldat
thank all who attended the funeral, | o_o er from six per cent. to four ee ae EN. ea. Street 7 7 The public are hereby warned aguinst
sent wreaths, Cards, letters or in any CAR: O 3 com fo urniture adshaw ‘oO Roberts giving credit to my wife, Emerald Harris
other way rendered assistance at the | Tyres an "B Fa 3 Seater Car soud Dated this Ist day of Jure 1951 Phone 3292, 2 6.51=n | Manutaeturing Co (nee Farnklin) ut do not hold m mity
and Battery. A bargain at the price CARRINGTON & SEALY | 5.6. 51—3n
death of their late dsughter Joan Odessa | of $600.00. Dial 2838 for further informa- _ : nin | eSponsible for her or anyone else con
Parker of Clifton Hill, St. Thomas tion 5 6 Si—4n. | Solicitors to the said Commissioner ; One (1) BOND in Marhili St. Ay SHIRT MAKERS on those wit] S2ecting any debt or debts in my name
‘6. St- om Hillman 1951, condition as new. ! NOTICE 5.6. 914 Factory, Spry Street CALEB HARRIS,
one 4683 of 8569. 5.6,51—2n ani Crab Hill,
IN MEMORIAM NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that it ‘| , LOUDSPEAKER 1961 | Model, Bn- eae St. Lucy
GRIFFITH: In Loving Memon of our ELECTRICAL the intention of the Vestry of the Pari-h| i.2¢ "qe Buble Addresses. Hecord. Siny- a
dear one James Griffith who passed ot St. George 6 cause t6 he. intremuced ing attachment fitted. Apply L vie LOST & FOUND TT i
to the Great Beyond on June 3rd FRIDGE: 6 cubic ft in good working | i"to the House of Assembly of this Island Spooners Hill, for particulars- ORIEN AL
1944, hs $200.00. Also small Deep Freezer % _ to ed bea oe - Oe . 5.6.51
Slee dear father your task is 0° $350 00. At Ralph Beard’s Furnishing t° MCE the SMOURS GE Commission vo
Fer? Seiten dates oes Mate ie o'r. Soar Room, Werdwood ‘Ailey whieh the Parochai ‘Frenmurer in ented LOST SOON EWELS
For those you loved you did your best 5 6 51—2n ae ag ms 40 (2) ore from six per PUBLIC SALES dolla at New :
May God grant you eternal rest. be enln/ Weer oe Seat wer gees PARCEL : Contai blue and white bs Shipment opened
Ever to be rer mbered by. Florence |. REFRIGERATOR—Electrolux Oil Burn-| Dated this Ist day of June 1951. Ten cents per agate line on week-dile ted dress lost near Purity
Griffith (Wife); Licille Sylvia (Daughter), in€ Refrigerator 5 c.f, perfect condition ities so tae Onceey, (ones m charge. $1.50, on week-deys | Renee” qmostuck Street. Rewatd offered THANT’S "ee
Durivitie Bt. Claie chons * | Reas ior Selling; Owner getting elec- icitors to the Vestry. | minimum ¢ 50 on wei i :
Nenad Clair (Son, 5.6,51—1 | ic model. Apply Ralph Watson, Ridge | 2.6.51—3n and $1.80 on Sundays. ee ee stn. — a
We Plantation. Dial 2605, 5.6.51—4n. — .
a” Ta THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICUL-
THE LOYAL BROTHERS OF FURNITURE he Ee ATE | —— eatin rece POST OFFICE NOTICE
TH e ereditors holdi ocialt: s
* feainst WELOHTOWN Plantation. Molen Getled ee ete he at ‘ .
Proudly Present their - - - BED—Solid Mah eee ‘owner, Fined Pro Radi
i ahogany Single Bed.| TAKE NOTICE that I, the Attorney 2f}9N€ owner, Fitted Pye Radio. Showroom Changes in Air Mails
Spring and pe aimoat new. Best | the above Plantation am about to obtain pr pee, ao a excellent mechani@n)
offer aroun 00, elephone—3074 * 4 order. For sale by Auction at M ir 4
twa 6 ED OO Beene ys | & loan of @8,000 under the provisions of | DO th Gas. Boon vider ath June ate) Effective 5th June, 1951, air mails will be closed at the General
° tne above Act against the said Plantation, : Post Offi f 1h °
eset in respect of the Agricultural year 1951 to |? John M. Bladon, Auctioneer. ee as follows: —

SIMMONS BEDSTEAD and SPRING

AT QUEEN'S PARK



tdouble}—no reasonable offer refused
—On-— g£00d «condition apply S E. Knight
THURSDAY 7th corner Jubilee Gap, Martindales Road.
5.6.51—1n
and
SATURDAY 9th June

LIVESTOCK

PUPPIES—3 Pure Bred Alsatian Pups
Apply Hill's Dairy. Dial 3723.
5,6.51—2n

MISCELLANEOUS

¥ — GALVANISED SHEETS—Bes! lity
under Commander S, Leacock! paw sheets, Cheapest in oe Island |

FROCESSION AND JUDGING OF: 6 ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56;
COSTUMES AND COSTUME 19 ft $8.40, Nett cash, Better hurry!
BANDS A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

CLIMBING THE GREASY POLE

STICK-LICKING DISPLAY

FIREWORKS DISPLAY

OPEN AIR CONCERT

MOBILE CINEMA

STEEL BAND COMPETITION

MERRY-GO-ROUND

CAMES

CALYPSO TENT

BEARDED BEE MAN





PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME

DISPLAY BY THE
MEDITERRANEAN FLEET



4.5.51—t.f.n.



PAPER—Carbon Paper, Foolscap and
Letter Size, also Adding machine Paper
2%” and 34/7 rolls. Phone 4675

A. S. Bryden & Son (B'dos Ltd.)
5.6,51—2n



SOAP—Clearance Sale Primrose
Leundry Soap. Packages of 6 Cakes
66cets. Primrose Carbolic Soap Packages
of 6 Cakes 66 cts.

Bradshaw & Company. 5.6.51—3n
ee
YACHT; 23-foot Motor-sailer, Diesel |
marine engine, easily handled by one; }












ADMISSION: sleeps two; has cruised inter-island wifh |

y three aboard; all accessories. Telephone

Adults 1/6 —. Children 1/- | sais. 2.6.18
: THE SUGAR INDUSTRY

IF IT’S DONE BY HEAT AG BANK ACT, 1943.

To the ereditors holding specialty liens
against Foursquare Group of Plantations,
St, Philip. '

TAKE NOTICE that we the Owners
of the above Plantations are about ‘o
obtain a loan of £23,000 under the pro-
visions of the above Act against the said
Plantation, in respect of the Agricultural
year 1951 to 1952,

No money has been borrowed under the
Agrcultural Aids Act, 1905, or the above
Act in respect of such year,

Dated this Ist day of June 1951,

FOURSQUARE ESTATES LIMITED,
per E, S. ROBINSON,
Managing Director

It's

NATURAL

you can do it better by

GAS
It's hotter and quicker
Your GAS CO is in
Bay St.

Phone No 4308



5.6.51—3n



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY
AGRICULTURAL BANK ACT, 145
To the creditors holding specialty liens

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH






The Year Book of the West against Foursquare Factory, St. Philip
Indies and Countries of the TAKE NOTICE that we the Owners
Caribbean including the Bermu- of the above Factory are about to obtain
das, the Bahamas and tne :

a loan of £12,000 under the provisions
of the above Act against the said
Factory, in respect of the Agricultural
year 1951 to 1952.

No money has been borrowed under the
Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the above
Act in respect of such year.

Dated this Ist day of June 1951.

Guianas.—$12.00



















:—The Great Enemy of
FAB A spotless cleans-
er of Clothes, Dishes, Painted
Articles and anything that looks
Dirty or is Dirty.

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

per E, S. ROBINSON, ,
> Renee Managing Director.
5 6.51—2n

—————



OPENING NIGHT



of the WEST INDIES
. (Department of Pathology)
Boulogne Guest Lederle Research Fellowship in Yaws
Applications are invited from regis~+
H . tered medical practitioners for the above
ouse Fellowship, which is tenable for one
THURSDAY JUNE 7th will work undet the direction of the
Professor of Pathology on the clinical,
at pathological and therapeute aspects of
ST. LAWRENCE GAP to and from Jamaica will be paid. The
‘ioe On the Sea duties will begin at a date to be Ur-
ai Phone 8459

obtained.

Applications should be sent to the
Registrar, University College of the West
TO SELL Indies, Mona, St. Andrew, Jaraica,

B.W.T. by July 14, 1951.
Many Articles of

PAINTED FURNITURE _

Perfect Condition P
GOING CHEAP
For Cash
Apply
“cosy COT”
Gap Opposite Hotel Royal
5,6.51—1n

5.6,51—19



Pole Takes Fire

SHORTLY after 6.55 p.m. yes-
terday the fuse on an electric pole
at the foot of Rockley Hill, Christ
Church went faulty and as a result
there was a small fire around the
top of the pole.

The Fire Brigade was called to
the scene, but on their arrival ihe
fire was under control,



FOR SALE

In ST. JAMES, one 7 Room
house—Built of Wood, with lights,
water and Modern Conveniences
—Attrective Price
Good Sea Bathing
. . *

CECIL JEMMOTT
Over Phoenix Pharmacy
33 Broad Street Phone 4563

Co. carried out repairs.

PILES."

In his talk in Queen's Park on Friday
sh etaring in Spuipsine” was reper
NEGLECTED, MAY LEAD TO in Saturday's fae We ga: “ithe Amer:
SERIOUS OPERATION lean overnment res s at’.
Many people suffer in silence untold
agonies, constarit brain-weurying irritation
and pain caused by piles, simply becanse
they have never discussed this trouble with
even such a confidant as their chemist. I1
you are a sufferer, make up your mind to
ask your chemist about the wonderfui
Preparation Man Zan. This clean, simple-
to-mse remedy is just marvellous in the
quick way it stops the maddening irritation,
allays inflammation and, ee = |







FURNISH
flome & Office

THE MONEY SAVING WAY

Wardrobes, Vanities, Dresser-
Robes, Bedsteads, with Stile to
keep your samile—Mofris, Tub and
other Fashion Furniture for your
Drawing Room—Tables Side-
boards, China Cabinets, Waggons
and other Dining Room pleasures:
Kitchen Cabinets, Larders, Easy
and Rush Chairs—Desks in plain
and mahognnised Deal, and hard-
wearing Chairs—-Rope Mats $1.08
up

|
|| L.s. WILSON

SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069. j

Man Zan Pile Remedy is no ordinary
ointment, but a special preparation solely
for those with pile trouble. - It is prepared
in a special nozzle applicator tube, making
it simple and clean to use; Sold by
chemists everywhere.

ManZan
PILE REMEDY



1952.

No money has been borrowed under the
#gricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the above
Act in respect of such year.

Dated this 2nd day of June, 1951,
Haymans Factory Ltd.,

Owners.
P. A. BYNOE,
Attorney.

We. mR. A.
NOTICE

All_ members of the BRA.
B.S.B.R.C., are invited to a general
discussion on the principles of Rifle
Shooting to be held at the Drill Hall on
Friday 8th. June at 8 p.m
j

2.6,.51--3n





5.6.51—I1n





NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH
Office Days and hours of the Parochial
Treasurer are now as follows:
TUESDAYS from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
WEDNESDAYS from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.!



THURSDAYS 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
i A. T. KING
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Joseph
; 5.6.51—4n EG
NOTICE

PARISH OF ST JOSEPH
Applications for a Vacant
Widow Annuity wil be received by
the lindersigned not Jater than the 14th

June 1951.
Applicants must be Widows (White),
Parishioners, and in straitened circum-

stances.
A. T. KiNG,
5.6.51—4n
Clerk, St. Joseph’s Vestr’.

Frizerr



Farm Families In
The United States

@ From Page 3
There are many ways
people meet together. Most

active in support of their church

They may hold any kind f}| The officer will be required to
religious belief freely without! reside at the La Pastora Propagat-
interference, ing Station, Santa Cruz, where
Farm children, like all othet)furnished quarters are available
US., children, are required t¢sfor which he will pay as rent
attend school, but schools ar¢}i0‘ of his salary plus 5% per
free, The schools are controllecfannum of the value of the furni-
in each community locally, anc} ure. :
parents of school childret Candidates should have attain-

frequently use the school build-

FOURSQUARE, FACTORY LIMITED, } ing for social or business activities | possess executive ability and have

Many farm children go to college

There are many social activities
among farmers in the United
States. They are free to joi!

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE organizations and hold meetings

at any time without asking per-
mission from anyone, They woulé
fiercely resist if anyone tried tc
take away this right, but of course
no one tries to.

Some iarmers’ meetings are t

year at a salary of £800. The Fellow} help them become better farmers

and they talk about how to grow
crops and animals, control insects

Yaws including field work and animal] and care for their land. They may
experiments, Travelling expenses both! invite experts from the Govern-

ment or other well imformec

ranged with the Professor of Pathology| persons to speak to them, if they
from whom further particulars can be] wish,

Some farmers’ meetings are for
recreation only, There are dances
and fairs at which they compete
for prizes by exhibiting their bes!
animals and other farm products
In summer there are picnics a
which men, women, and childrer
may take part in games and sports
events.

I would like people from _ al)
over the world to visit U.S.
family farms to meet the people

}while I am serving our Govern-

ment in Washington, my own
farm is being run by two of mj)
sons. When I can, I want to gc
pack to my farm. Farming in the
United States is hard work, but

A team] | ; : :
t is a good life, I hope it may be
of workmen from the Electric . gond fide like that for farmers

all over the world,

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay



M.V. Sedgefield, Sen. Marion Belle

This should have read: “The AmericaM | wolfe, Sch. Cyril E. Smith, Sch. D’Ortae,
Government exempts that’.

Sch. Philip H. Davidson, Sch _ Landalb
pha, MV. Blue Star, Seh. Everdene.
Sch. Maty M_ Lewis, Sch Enterprise S.,
Sch, W.L_ Eunicia, Sch. Belqueen, Sch
United Pilgrim §., Sch, Gardenia W ,
S.S. Mormacrey, Sch. Rainbow M
Sch Florence Emmanuel, Sch. Mary E
Caroline, Sch. Exceisior Hodge,
ARRIVALS

S.S. Herdsman, 4,015 tons net, Capt
Short, from Dominica.

Schooner Emeline, 72 tons net, Capt
Clarke, from British Guiana

Schooner Adalina, 50 tons net, Capt

from St. Lucia,
DEPARTURES

Flemming,

Schooner Marea Henrietta, 43 tons net,
Capt Selby, for Dominica
MV. Daerwood, 94 tors net, Capt

DeCoteau, for St. Lucia
Schoonet Burma D , 62 tons net, Capt
King, for Trinidad

M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt

‘| Gumbs, for Dominica

In Touch With Barbados
Coast Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd. advise
that they can now communicate with the
following ships through their Barbado+

| Coast Station:—
} SS. Wyoming,
| Maas, D. L. Harper
hensor Lady Neisor.

Avrane Eesi, Tet Dolo

Chemawe

Fort Step

Hertisrmman
Ta t





hes

\Tayior's Garage, Chureh Village,

tena |

farm) sistence allowances will be paya-
of}ble at
them go to church and many are|approved from time to



5 6 5S1—dn



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received I will sell gn
Friday June 8th at Messrs. Redman

cylinder convertible Plymouth Car,
condition. Always owner driven. Owner
leaving colony. Sale at 2 pm. Teri.
Cash, Vincent Griffith, Auctioneer.

5 6 Si—tn.

REAL ESTATE

ss
A Boarded and Shingled house at the
Kew near to Church 2% « 12 x 9 with!
shedroof, kitchen, closet. To be re-
moved by end of June, sale at 1 p.m
THURSDAY 7th inst. Terms cash
R.A McKENZIE,
Auctioneer
3.6.51—4n







I will offer for sale by Public Com-
petition at my office, Victoria Street on
FRIDAY 8th at 2 p.m, ALL THAT
CERTAIN piece pr pairs: of land 13 4/5
perches in FITTS. VILLAGE on the sea,
ST. JAMES with the double roofed
house and usual out-offices—there is
also a well fitted shop attached. For
inspection apply to Mrs. Collytnore ‘on
the premises. Conditions of saie from
R. ARCHER McKENZIE.

3.6.51—4n

VACANT POST

Chief Rehabilitation Officer,
Cocoa Board
Colony of Trinidad & Tobago
Applications are invited for the
vacant post of Chief Rehabilita-
tion Officer, Cocoa Board, +e
The salary will be at a rate in
the scale $3,600—-120-3,840-240-
5,760 per annum; the actual rate
depending on the qualifications
and experience of the successful
applicant. Travelling and Sub-

Diai 2947



to those
time for

rates similar

Government officers.

ed a good standard of education,

had wide agricultural experience.
Technical qualifications are desir-
able but not essential .
Duties of the post are: —
(i) to assume responsibility for
all cacao propagating work, and
management of all Propagating
Stations (under the immediate

supervision of the Chief Scientific
Officer of the Department of
Agriculture).

(ii) To receive all applications
for subsidy grants under the
Cocoa Subsidy Scheme and to
initiate their investigation.

(iii) To control both the office

and field staff engaged on the
work of the Cocoa Board,
(iv) To certify vouchers for

expenditure incurred on behalf of
the Cocoa Board.

(v) To supervise the general
field progress of the Cocoa Subsidy
Scheme.

(vi)To carry ou% any other
duties that may be assigned to the
officer by the Cocoa Board from
time to time.

The post is non-pensionable and
subject to three months’ notice of
termination on either side.

_ Applications containing — full
particulars of the candidate's age,
qualifications and experience to-
gether with copies of not less than
two recent testimonials, should be
addressed to the Chairman, Cocoa
Board, c/o Department of Agri-
culture, St. Clair, Port of Spain,
Trinidad to reach him not later
than June 23rd, 1951. Envelopes
containing applications should be
marked— “Application C.R.O.”"—
on the outside left-hand corner.

E. W. LEACH,
Chairman, Cocoa Board,
5.6.51—7n.



Antiliero, Aleoa Cavalier, President Dutra
Mormaemoon, Valhall. Apache Canyor
Aleoa Roamet, Frugusy Morrmacreed
Ringdrude, Queenston Heights, Imperial
Winnipeg, Al¢oa Puritan, Colombie,
Loide Uruguay, Brazil, Aleoa Pennant
Canadian Challenger, Herdéman, Alster-
tor, S. Rosa, Junin, American Oriole,
Agamemnon, Grays Harbour and

MAIL NOTICES

MAILS for St. Laicis, Dominiea. Mont-
scrrat, Antigua, St, Kitts, Betinuds. Ros
ton, Halifax and Montreal by the R.M,S
Lady Nelson will be closed at the Ger
eral Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registe¢ed Mall
at 2 p.m. Ordinary Mai! at 230 pm. on
the 6th June 1951.

MAILS for Grenada. Trinidad and Brit-
ith Guiana by the M.V. Canadian Chol-
lenger will be closed at the Gener
Post Office os under:-—

Parcel and Registered Maile at 2 p.m.
Ordinary Mail at 3.30 p.m. of the 6th
June 1991,

TO SELL

Sell PROPERTY anywhere
In the country, consult

To

CECIL JEMMOTT

Over
33 Broad

Phoenix Pharmacy
Street Phone 456
5.6.51—in

a

Sar .

Se a ee the invasion
e

Destination
Bermuda =

Canada (via Bermuda)
Canada (via Trinidad)
United States .. site

Schedules should be amended
General Post Office,
Sist May, 1951



Salient Features Of
U.S. Foreign Trade
1950

THE FOREIGN TRADE of the United States showed a closer
balance between merchandise exports and itnports in 195(
than in any other year in the past decade, according to ar
analysis made by the United

merce,

The huge gap between these exports and imports in the
early postwar yenes narrowed down in 1950 to an expor'

,433,000,000, only one-fourth as large as in 194
and the smallest of any year since 1940.

surplus of $1

Exports decreased in value in
1950 to $10,275,000,000, or 15 per
cent, less than the 1949 figure.
Imports increased 34 per cent. to
$8,842,000,000. Imports exceéd-
ed exports in August and October
1950 for the first time since June
1939. The export balance rose
sharply again in the last two
months of 1950.

U.S. exports continued to rise in
early 1951. In February, they
totalled $1,073,000,000, the highest
monthly total since June 1949.
Imports in February totalled
$907,000,000, down $114,000,000
from the record high in January.
The decline was chiefly due to
smaller rubber receipts.

There were marked ehanges in
the trade balance the United
States fad with other areas in
1950, compared with 1949. U.S.
imports exceeded exports in trade
with four of the seven continent
areas, whereas exports had ex-
ceeded imports to all areas in
1949. Those showing a shift in
the balance of trade were South
America, Asia, Oceania, and
Africa.

Export Balance

Moreover, the usual large ex-
port balance in trade with Canada
fell to a relatively small figure ang
the export balances with other
countries in North Arnerica de-
creased ee one-fourth
and with Europe about one-half.

Of the factors reducing the
export balance, the increase in
U.S. imports was dominant.
Imports continued to increase in
value in 1950 as demand accel-
erated and prices rose, especial-
ly the prices of coffee and woo!.
and, after the outbreak of
hostilities in Korea, of rubber
and metals.

As U.S. imports rose and ex-
ports fell, the world dollar
shortage was greatly alleviated.
Principal countries trading with
the United States accumulated
through all of their transactions,
gold and dollar assets sufficient
to restore their total losses over
the three preceding years.
Price rises influenced the value

of both exports afd imports in

of Korea. index of unit
value of imports had risen 5 per
cent. by May 1950 from the low
of November 1949, but by Decem-
ber 1950 it had risen 27 per cent.
In contrast, the index of unit
value of exports, after touching a
low point in May 1950, rose only

SOOO SCOO Roth otoroe








sailing to Euro fortnightly.
Dublin, London, ftterd

reduction for children.

OG OOSSSD =



CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.,

Gasolene Sérvice Station

,

PASSAGES TO EUROPE
Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for

or Rotterdam,

An OIL without ore is NOT a Lubricant
SE
FOR BEST RESULTS

GERM OIL

Time Day
11.45 a.m. Tuesday
2.00 p.m. Friday
2.00 p.m, Friday
11.45 a.m. Wednesday
11.45 a.m, Tuesday
2.00 p.m, Friday
accordingly,

2.6.51—2n.

WASHINGTON, D.C.

tates Department of Com-

13 per cent by December, (Fo
both indexes 1936-38 equals 100,
Higher Prices
At the end of 1950, exporters ii
countries selling goods to the
United States were obtaining con-
siderably higher prices for their
products than U.S, exporters were
getting for the goods they shipy ed
This is shown by the fact that the
unit value index for U.S, import:
was 270 while for U.S. exports i

was only 190.

In terms of volume, imports i
1950 exceeded the previous higi
total of 1948 by 19 per cent. an
the 1949 figure by 22 per cent
Exports in terms of volume de
ereased 13 per cent from 1949 ani
30 per cent. from 1947.

Exports in 1950 amounied to ap
proximately 7 per cent. of the
total U.S. production of movablk
goods, This compares with 7.!
per cent. before World War II, 1!
per cent. in 1947, and 9 per cent
in 1948 and 1949, However,
larger proportions of certain com
modities were shipped overseas-
especially raw cotton, leaf tobacct
motor trucks, and carbon black

Finished manufactures, as usua!
comprised by far the largest par
of U.S. exports in 1950. Thes
goods made up 57 per cent of the
export total, about the same pro:
portion as in 1947 and 1948 an
2 per cent. above 1949.

Crude Materials
Crude materials comprised abou.
19 per cent of U.S. exports, ai
increase from 15 per cent, in 1949

and semimanufactures, 11 pr
cent., about the same part as ij
1949. Foodstuffs, which ha‘

dropped from 23 per cent, of tota
exports in 1946 to 19 per cent, ii
1949, comprised only 13 per cent
of U.S. exports in 1950.

Of total imports in 1950, eruds
materials and semimanufacture
made up 52 per cent., an increa®
from 50 per cent in 1949 but
decrease from the proportions |

1946, 1947, and 1948. Crud
materials comprised 28 per cent
and semimanufactutes 24 pe
cent. in 1950, Foodstuffs repre-

sented 30 per cent. of total im-
ports, a smaller part than in 1949
Finished manufactures, thr
smallest of the four classes o
goods, comprised 17 per cen’
compared with 19 per cent in th
preceding year.

The many products included i
the U.S. export trade were a
usual, concentrated heavily in |

@ On Page &

rts of call aré
Single fare £70; usual

The usual

Trafalgar St ]









i
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW sxxeqecoe,

PAGE SEVEN



SHIPPING NOTICES

SOP A A BOOBIES

ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED ;
(M_A.N.Z. LINE!

SS. ARABIA cheduled 10 sail comes sane ts
from Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th eed ‘ a neneti-
May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane 16th | $2 Lueia, omer + ae ne
June, Sydney 43rd June, arriving at Trin- aere quly for § ine 3
idad during the latter half af July, and Frida, ist June
precede thereafter to Barbados | meV, “Cawtbbee? will _accept
In addition to general cargo this vessel | Cargo and Passengers for ene
has ample space for chilled and hard ca, Antigua, Mon'seirat. Nevis
frozen cargo | & St Kitts. Sailing Friday tst
Cargo accepted on through Bills of Lad- | June
ing for transhipment at Trinidad to Brit- } —_———
ish Guiana, Leeward and Windward | at
Islands. | B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS
j



For further 7S apply —
FURNESS, W & CO., LTD,



ASSOCIATION inc.)
Trinidad,

Bwi. |

and
DA COSTA & CO., LTD.,
Bridgetown,
B.W.L.

Consignee. Tele. No. 4047.



. JSG OLCOTT OOO



\aes Akon ay)

NEW YORK SERVICE
S8.S. “TINDRA” Sails 18th May Arrives Barbados
A STEAMER Sails 8th June Artivées Barbatios 19th

May, 1951

196

Ath
June,



NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
“ALCOA ROAMER" Sails 16th May Artives Barbados Ist June
“ALCOA PATRIOT” Sails 50th May



s$.s.
8.$



8

1981
Arrives Barbados 15th June, 1931.

SS. “ALCOA POLARIS” Sails 13th June — Arrives Barbados 28th June, 1951,

CANADIAN SERVICE





amen



SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives B'dos.
Ss. 0. PIONEEBR" May 11th May 14th May 2th
oa “POLKE BERNADOTTE” May 25th May 30th June 10th
s. “ALCOA PLANTER" June sth June 1th June 2st
ORTRDCOA PEGASUS” due May 28th sails for St. John and St. Lawrence

River Ports

ae es



tr

j

Leases





8.8, “SUNRELL"

VOGT TT TE
Ooo e ee oes Mitt Pte od, 5% Sot ete), tea, t tor
IDEAL DIGRGG OT 0 GPGEDGDE DP ILR EGE LDGV AEG VVPVPPDED TAGE ELIF OS

These vessels hve iimited passenger accommodation.

—————————
ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE

y ryote oF
a ae
CANADIAN SERVICE

From Halifax, N.S. & Montreal

LOADING DATES

{
| Halifax |
| Barbadow
28 May 14 June
1) June 27 June
25 June | 9 July
® July 23 July

Expected Arriva
Montreal

23 May
6 June
20 June
4 July

s. “POLYRIVER”
“A V ”



U.K. SERVICE —
From Newport, Bristol, Liverpool and Glasgow

Bristol Expected
Newport Ports

Barbados

May 12 June

22 May 27

U.K. & CONTINENTAL SERVICE
Expected Arrival
Antwerp Rotterdam

a4 May
st anh atnri

20 M 0 June

PLANTATIONS LIMITED
Shop Early

WORKERS ror U.S.A.

ITS WORTH YOUR WHILE TO
VISIT OUR STORES TO-DAY!

4 rryics
SHIRTS |
A grand variety of Work, Dress, Sport and
Holiday Shirts in stock



— Phone 4703



PYJAMAS

In various durable qualities & Designs

SHOES

in JOHN WHITE Plain Brown & Black,

nite





Suede, Loafers, & Two Tone

A fine selection of woollens in many qualities such as Grey

Flannel, Navy & Brown Tweeds in several qualities.
SOCKS, H.K, TIES & UNDERWEARS in large varieties!
THANI Bros.





D FOOEGSGSEE
SSIS SSSESIED.

NOTICE

WE WISH TO ADVISE OUR
CUSTOMERS
THAT OUR
PARTS DEPARTMENT
WILL BE CLOSED FROM FRIDAY,
lst JUNE TO MONDAY 4th JUNE
1951, BOTH DAYS INCLUSIVE,
FOR OUR

ANNUAL STOCK-TAKING





DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING €0.,
LTD.

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET DIAL 4269

Pay

.
SI FSGS



Dates, Bridgetown,

Liverpool Glasgow Arrival Dates

London Dates, Bridgetown,






nn
GS SRN

ee
GIO

Mee Rane
SOF SSR

%
ty

”

»



PAGE EIGHT



WEEKES SCORES 58 IN 25

Marshall Takes Nine|

For Thirty-one

From Our Lane



Over 4,000, probably the big-
est ccowd ever to attend a
eket match in Barnoldswick,
atched a game between a West
indies, XI. and a_ st engthened
Barnolds ck team as part of the
wit ‘stival of Britain cele-
tloas. The wicke! was; affected
by overnight showers and
Rarnoldswick won the toss and
sent tre West Indies to bat. Mar-
sal and® Fairaudeau opened the
innings and in Bulecck’s second
ver he got Marshall l.b.w., for
1 »:un. Wor.ell was next in but



eee sad

ROY MARSHALL

did not last very leng, in the
same over he was caught in the
slips for a “duck.” Pairaudeau
and Rickards took the score to

45 before Pairaudeau was caught
at mid-wicket for 31. A _ few
overs later Rickards was out to

similar stroke for 29. Walcott
and Messado took the score wel!
past the century mark before
Messado was caught at mid-off
for 32. Walcott went or to score
65 after seeing Martindale being
caught at mid-on for 5. The West
Indies XI. declared at 181 for 7
wickets with Harold Brewster
not out 3 and Ramadhin 12.



Bailey Does Double |

In Duteh

s Correspondent

Edwin St. Hill and Frank Wor-
rell opened the bowling for the
West Indies but were sot suc-
cessful The score went to 40
tefoe Ramadhin cam on to
bowl ard in no time ne ‘ad the
Barnoldswick batsmen worried
They scored 10 Pamaduin
taking 4 for 28, Mars*al 2 for 30
and Achong 3 for 22,

Bacup v:. Haslingden

Everton Weekes is gradually
exhausting the superlatives. te
had another day out against
Haslingden on Monday to contri-
bute new pages to Lanecasnie
\League history. His flashing bat
took 108 off the Hasiingaen bowl-
ing, tae last 58 in on y. 25 min-
utes, including one . spectacular
hit cove’ seme houses; outside the
Bacup giound—making his ‘third
century in successive innings in
four days. Bacup declared at 227
for 5 wickets. Haslingden, with-
cut the services of J. K. Holt
who has an injured knee, were
a.l out for 119, Ken Rickards
substituting for Holt seoring 45.
Weckes was also successful with
the bail taking 6 wickets for 66
runs in 20 overs. He took a
brilliant catch in the slips to dis-

miss the last batsman with onl,
two minutes left for play.

Rey Marshall won the fame
for his side at Ramsbottom with
a brilliant bowling feat of 9
wickets for 31 runs, the best of
the season so far,

Lowerhouse batted first and
were all out for 123, Marshall
scoring 19. The last Ramsbottom
wicket fell with only a minute
to go at 73.

The West Indies team play at
Laneaster on Sunday.

Lancashire League Table to
date.

P. W. D. L Pts
Nelson Pome Oo ee
Chureh 8 5 0 3 15
East Lancs 7 4 3 6 i5
Toducosden ee eh 1 12
Rawtenstall x 3 2 2 li
Bacup 8 2 a 2 10
Burnlay 6 2 4 6 10
Lowerhouse 8 2 4 2 10
Accrington erie 8
Enfield Be eee ee 7
Haslingden 8 1 4 3 7
Ramsbottom 8 2 1 5 7
Colne 6 0 4 2 ‘
Rishton
Athleties

AMSTERDAM, June 4.

The West Indian Sprinter E. Mc Donald Bailey won the

sprint double in the Intern
here yesterday to.celebrate

ational Athletic Meeting held
the golden anniversary of the

Royal Dutch Athletic Union. Me Donald Bailey won the
100 metres in 10.6 seconds and 200 metres in 21.5 seconds

with J. Lammers of Holland second in both races.

Gardner Fights
Brion Tonight

LONDON, June 4,

Jack Gardner, British Heavy-
weight Champion, has brought his
weight down by six pounds
for his fight against Brion of
Argentina at the White City, Lon-
don, tomorrow night,

Gardner scaled 214 lbs, when
he beat Jo Weidin of Austria in
February. He expects to weigh-in
tomorrow at about 207, “I was
surprised at what I scaled for my
Weidin fight” Gardner said at his
training quarters at Brighton on
the south east coast. “I felt too
heavy and uncomfortable, so this
time I have cut potatoes and all
starchy foods from my diet.”

Gardner developed a soreness
in his left hand while training,
and will be going into the ring
tomorrow with the hand strapped.
His menager, John Simpson said
“Our greatest trouble has been
finding sparring partners of the
right class. I think Jack will be
too strong for Brion and I am
considering taking him to America

for experience.”
—Reuter.









Traffic Do's



No. 19
Remember that a Load
projecting behind your
Vehicle is dangerous to
others.

Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.







They'll Do It Every



Gacop 01 MOM SLAVES DAY IN, ETC.,
GROOMING THE CHICKENS WITHOUT AS
NUCH AS A KIND WORD FROM POPs»



CHICKENS .OKAY!
YOU RAISE

Rian

Mrs. Fanny Blankers Koen,
famous Dutch sprinter, won the
80 Metres Hurdles and 100 Yards
events. In the hurdles she beat
her old Olympic rival Mrs. Mau-
reen Gardner Dyson by two-tenths
of a second in 11.53. while Miss
June Foulds, another British girl,
was second in the 100 Yards won
in 10.8 seconds.

Britain also took the first two
places in the 800 Metres, H. N. J.
Parlett beating A. Webster by 0.4
second in one minute 55 seconds.
P, B. Hildreth of Britain was
beaten by inches in the 110 Metres
Hurdles both being clocked at 15.1
seconds.



RESULTS;
100 Metres:
Me. Donald Bailey (Britain).
J. Lammers (Holland);
S. Haat (Holland),
Klein (Holland)
Time 10.6 sees.
200 Metres:
Me Donald Bailey (Britain).
Lammers Holland),
Haat (Holland),
Klein (Holland).
Time 21.5 secs,
1,500 Metres:
W. R. Beckett (Britain)
Cc. J. Chataway (Britain)
H. Harting (Holland)
Suewe Newutween (Holland).
Time: 3 mins. 56.8 secs
110 Metres Hurdles; 1. P
| (Belgium)
2 P.B. Hildreth (Britain)
Vv. D. Hoeven (Holland)
Time: 15.1 secs

Stree ae

Puswn

Breakmin

|
|

—Reuter.

| FRENCHMAN TO TRAIN
| WENEZUELAN TEAM

| PARIS, June 4.
Henri Vissault, French Profes-
}sional Tennis Champion = and
ltrainer of the French team has
} accepted proposals from the Vene-
|zuelan Tennis Federation to train
| the Venezuelan team and Vene-
zuelan tennis instructors for three
months, He will leave Paris early
jin September on an_ 18-hour
flight to Caracas.—Reuter.

Time

Registered V. 5. Patent Ofkee



TO RAISE



Burt wio GIVES EVERYTHING_AWAY
AND TAKES ALL THE BOWS? ASK
MOM=*s SHE KNOWS!

HERE, COUSIN “TAKE. THIS
MME MISCUSE RAISE EM) 5.
| NS > xh 7.
MYSELF~AN’ SOME FRESH > \\
EGGS"OH, YEAH“BETTER
TAKE SOME FOR WALDO
AND BERTIE’ MAW GAN
KILL EM AND. PLUCK
‘EM WHILE You AND ME
HAVE. A LITTLE SMILE~





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

S_———



on hae

et ae

“Loovely scenery, din’t it, mister!”





fondon Express Service



Ban Broadcasts On U-S. Foreign

B.B.C.

Bullfighter Killed
The Bull: Arrested

LISBON, June 4

One of Portugal's greatest
bull-fighters, Manuel Dos
Santos, has been arrested—
for killing the bull.

The law here, unlike that
in Spain and Mexico forbids
killing of bulls and provides
penalties for infringement
up to three years imprison-
ment and lifetime prohibi-
tion from fighting.

Last night, Dos
apparently got over
siastic and at the moment
when he was supposed to
simulate the kill he lunged
forward,

Santos
enthu-

Eighty thousand people
saw him do it. For a second
there was dead silence

Then came one of the big-
gest ovations ever heard in
a Portuguese bull-fight

Elegant ladies leaned to-
wards the ring waving
handkerchiefs as Dos Santos
was carried around shoulder
high,



Then he was arrested. The
date of his trial has not yet
been fixed, —Reuter.



Chess Tournament
Opens In New York

NEW YORK, June 4.
Wertheim Memorial Interna-

tional Tournament opened here
yesterday at the Manhattan Chess
Club with four Overseas and

Eight Amevican competitor:

Two of four recognised grand-
masters, Dr. Max Euwe of Am-
sterdam and Reben Fine of



York met in one match. Euwe
won in 37 moves. Okello Belgic|
and Horowitz, U.S. drew in i8
moves,

Larry Evans, United State
meeting Migue. “Najdorf, Argen- |
tine with pawn ahead, drew
knights ending in 53 moves.

~-Reuter.

By Jimmy Hatlo |



7,
“ THE USSR

3
a i! (

New }

Football Games

“WILL FIGHT”

| LONDON, June 4.

Storms of protest have greeted
|}the British Football League’
| week-end decision to ban broad-
| casts of matches and increase
| charges for admission to footb ll
| grounds’ cheap enclosures,

And players themselves ars
| bitter that they have been given i

; weekly wage increase of only
£2. 0, 0. during the playing
season.
The Players’ Union has in-
structed its 2,800 members not tuo
| Sign for next season until Union

| claims have been decided by the
| Ministry of Labour.

The British Broadeasting Cor-
| poration has stated “we mean to
fight the ban”’.

Homes for blind, and crippled
| ex-service men have said: Thous-
ands of keen football fans amon;
} the war blinded will be bitter

disappointed if the League persis
in the ban on broadcasting,
—Reuter.

THE PROFESSOR
TAKES ON A
HEAVYWEIGHT

By JON HOPE

@ Publication next month of
a volume weighing 2lbs. lloz, will
Signal the end of a formidable
task undertaken by 58-year-old
Professor Peter Alexander, of
Glasgow University,

It was in 1944 that publishers
commissioned Professor Alex-
ander to prepare a new, one
volume edition of Shakespeare,

eliminating discrepancies dis-
covered by experts since the
issuing of the Collins complet

Shakespeare in 1855.

For the professor, getting
ready this new Shakespeare for
press meant reading the million
words involved five time

Paper, bought some time ago,
is available for only 50,000 copies,
| They will sell at 15s. each.

| @ Which British author tops
fiction sales in South Africa’
Back from extended business
trip, publisher Michael Joseph
says, generously: “Peter Cheyney”
(who is published by Collins).
Runners up? Lesiie Charteris
H, E. Bates, Agatha Christie, C. S
forester, James Hadley Chase
@ At 12; theatre producer Peter
Cotes started amassing scrap
books on our most celebrated
Ceckney—Charles Chaplin. H
has used them to make a biogra-
phy titled The Little Fellow.
Cotes has never met Chaplin, bu
‘I know, him intimately from
afar.”
@ A year ago, Jean Nicol left
well-paid job at Savoy Hotel t
farm in Cornwall with husband
Derek Tangye.
Switch from heavy







carpets to





heavy soil was reported to be
permanent. But 11 exciting years
proved unforgettable. Results:



Mrs. Tangye has finished writing
her experiences atid, what’s more,
has sold them to first publisher
who read the manuscript Title:

Meet Me at the Savoy.
300k finished, the author has
returned to growing potatoes,
daffodils, violets “A turnip
again,” says she, “but I love it.”
—L.ES





Sports Window

BASKETBALI

| Tonight at 7.45 o'clock tt

| will be twe first division mate?

1 which will be played at ¥.M.P.¢
Beckles Road. Th u be F
tress vs Harrison c !

Boys, and ¥ MCA r }



Trade

@ From Page 7
broad commodity groups which
had a total value of $7,398,000,000,
or 73 per cent of total U.S. exports
in 19)U. They were:
Machinery, $2,021,000,000; raw
cotton, $1,024,000,000; grains and

preparations $834,000,000; chem-
vais and related products,
$711,000,000; automobiles, parts
and accessories, $703,000,000;

textile manufactures, $516,000,000;
petroleum and products,
Â¥ 900,000,000; iron and _ steel-mill
products, $473,000,000; tobacco and
manufactures, $298,000,000; coat
and related products $278,000,000.
Two Large Groups
Similarly, although many
articles were imported by the
United States, they too were con-
centrated in a few large groups.
The 15 leading commodity groups
aggregated $6,134,000,000, or 70
per cent. of total U.S. imports in
1950. They were:
Coffee, °$1,091,000,000;
rous ores, metals, and _ ferro-
alloys, 67,000,000; paper ana
paper materials, $746,000,000
petroleum and products,
$588,000,000; crude rubber,
$459,000,000; raw wool, $427,000,-
000; cane’ sugar, $380,000,000;
sawmill products, $264,000,000;
fruits, edible’ nuts, anq vege-
tables, $215,000,000; vegetable oils,
fats, and oilseeds, $190,000,000;
iron ore, pig iron, and crude steel,
174,000,000; chemicals, fertilizer
materials and related products,
$170,000,000; cocoa or cacao beans,
$167,000,000; fish, including shell-
fish, $157,000,000; diamonds,
$139,000,000.
* Countries of the Western
Hemisphere received 47 per cent
of total U.S. exports in 1950, a
larger part than in any pre-
ceding year. The Latin Ameri-

nonfer-






MINUTES



ca em eer ee ey

GIRLS’ CLUB
OPENED

@ From Page 5
people of the area.
will run the Clubs for two years,
out after ihat, they hoped that the
~iubs would be on = sound foot-
ing. By so doing they would be
«ubie to open more clubs.

Expenses Increase

The Commissioner said that the
*xpenses involved.by running the
‘tubs were increasing. The rents
alone were over $130 monthly.
they were not given a penny by
Government. Every cent was
srom voluntary cOntribution. It
twelve people decided to pay the
rent for a club they would have
a year’s rent. Without paying for
lighting, water rates or a fee for
the artisans who taught the various
trades, the running of the Clu_s
involved a big expenditure.

Recently he had visited Canada
and had seen what the Mountea
Police were doing there for the
vouth of the community. They
were taking a very active part in
organising the Canadian youth.

He said: “We want the youtl
of Barbados to regard tne police-

man, not as a man to be feared
Sut as an adviser and one wh+
helps.”

| For Training

He said that they had sent a
man to England to be trained.
| When he returned he would visii
j all the Boys’ Clubs and see that
; they are run along the correct
lines.

He again appealed to the people
| of the district to take as much
interest as possible in the Clubs.
He asked them to give lectures on

certain evenings and _ organise
games. He said: “A few hours oi

your time one evening per month
would mean a lot of success to the
Clubs.”

Rev. Mallalieu, Rector of St.
Joseph, officially opened the Clubs.
He thanked Colonel Michelin for
organising the Clubs in St. Joseph.

He said that when the Clubs
were being formed in _ other
parishes he began to be jealous.
He asked Colonel Michelin to open
a club in St. Joseph and he was
very pleased to sce that this was
done,

He said: “I wish to see these
clubs develop and do some good
work in the district.” He thought
it was no use asking the parishion-
ers for co-operation because he
knew he would get it.

Mr. John Beckles, a member of
the Committee of Management,
said that the Boys’ Clubs were
only recently formed but he was
surprised to see the success,

He congratulateq Colone!
Michelin and his co-workers ‘or
bringing the boys and girls from
streets and putting them in a place
where they could associate with
each other. He asked everyone
in the district to assist in running
the clubs.

Club For Adults

L. E, Smith, M.C.P., said
} that he felt the venture was a good
one, It was for the boys and
girls of today who would be men

Mr.

and women of tomorrow. He
said: “It is one of those thing

which we all should try and keep
alive,”

He was sorry that Colonel
Michelin did not see it possible to
open a club for adults, Some
adulfs needed the same training
as the youths. He once started
a club for adults. On the nights
when there was card playing ete.
the hall was packed. When there
was a lecture or scripture reading
the place was empty.

He wished the clubs every suc-
cess and hoped that every one
would assist.

After the opening refreshment:
were served, Colonel Michelir
took the opportunity to give a talk
to the members of the Girls’ Club.

Duty Roster

The June duty roster for the Barba-
dos Boys’ Club, Bay Street, is as

tg s tries Yt 27 ent, | follows: —

can coun “ig took 27 per cent iat F. i, -O'Nealé, 0/6 Protation
and Canada 20 per cent. Europe] office, Roebuck Street, 2nd Gay Mor-
remained, as usual, the main pe Shika Wey St. Michael, 3rd Mr,
4 s a0 £ ag 4 es, o St. Paul's Vicarage, St
continental areas of destina: Michael, 4th A. Jordan, Garden, St
tion of U.S. exports, although" James, ‘sth Vv. B. St. John. c/o N.B

the European continent's share

of 30 per cent. was a smaller

proportion than in any preced-
ing year. In 193638, Europe

took about 42 per cent. of U.S.

exports, while during the war

it took an average of 50 per
cent.

The Far East also had a smaller
share in U.S. exports in 1950—
about 14 per cent compared with
16 per cent. in 1949 and 19 per
cent. in the years 1936—38. The
Near East received about 2.2 per
‘ent. of total U.S. exports, and
African areas 3.5 per cent.

Europe supplied about 16 per
cent, of U.S. imports in 1950, an
increase from the 1949 share but
much below the 29 per cent, of
total U.S. imports which it sup-
plied in 1936—38. The Far East
provided about 19 per cent. in
1950, a slightly larger part than
n the two preceding years but
considerably below the 30 per
ent. it supplied in 1936—38. The
Near East and African areas sup-

, plied a little more than 7 per cent.

of US. imports, slightly greater
than in 1949 and_ considerably
sreater than the 3.3 per cent.

upplied in 1936—38,

The Weather

TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 5 38 a.m

Sun Sets: 6.17 p.m.

Moon (New): June 4

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Water: 243 a.m, 4.17
p.m.

YESTERDAY:

Rainfall (Codrington): nil.

Total for month to yesterday:
2.68 ins.

‘Temperature (Max.): 86.5 °F
Temperature (Min.): 75.5 °F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.

(3 p.m.) E.S.5.
Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour
Barometer
| (3 p.m.)

(9 a.m.) 30.015

29.968

Howell, Bay Street, Bridgetown, 6th S
Farnwell, C/o Recorder Office, Victoria
Street, 7th J. Jemmott, c/o Registrar's
Office, Public Buildings, 8th W. Edwards,
| ¢/o Salvation Army, Reed _Strf:t, 9th
Alonza Jones, Drax Hall, St. ~ George,
10th Mr. Thomas, c/o St Paul's Vica:-
age, St. Michael, 11th C. Brathwaite,
c/o General Hospital, St. Michael, 12th
Mr. Mapp, c/o Bethel Mission House,
is Michael, 18th W. Isaac, c/o Mr
H. H. Walcott, Probation Office, 14th
Mr. Owen FitzGerald, c/o Kenneth Pile,
General Post Office, 15th Noel Simmons,
c/o Mrs. Simmons, Bahk Hall, St. Mich-
ael, 16th A. Ishmael, c/o Planning Office,
Bridge Street, 17th Mr. Maloney, Tay-
lor’s Gap, Eagle Hall, St. Michael, 18th
Mr. K. Pile, c/o General Post Office,
Bridgetown, 19th Mr Blackman, ¢©/0
Hinds & Co,, James Street, 20th Rev.
Crosby, Bethel Mission House, St. Mich-
ael, @ist S Beckles, c/o Parochial
Buildings, 22nd Rev, Hatch, St. John
The Baptist, St. James, 23rd O. S
Coppin, c/o Advocate Co., Bridgetown,
24th Station Sergeant Yearwood, Central
Station, 25th B. B. Bourne, c/o Proba-
+ tion Office, Roebuck Street, 26th I
? ‘core, Bank Hell Cross Road, St. Mich-
sel, 27th Mr. Laurie, c/o Registrar's
Office, Public Buildings, 28th G. Wilson,



Upper Collymore Rock, St Michael,
29th W. Golloy, c/o St. David's School,
Ch. Ch., 30th S. S. Hutson, Central
Station







| What's oa Today

Police Courts—10.00 a.m.

Court of Appeal—10.00 a.m.

Sale of furniture at Officers’
Quarters at the Garrison.
Branker, Trotman & Co.,
Auctioneers—11.45 a.m.

Meeting of the Legislative
Council—2 p.m.

Meeting of the House of
Assembly—3 p.m.

Dress Rehearsal of King’s
Birthday Parade at Gar-
rison, Police Band in
attendance—4.30 p.m.

Mobile Cinema gives show at
Westmoreland Plantation
Yard, St. James — 7.30
p.m.

CINEMAS:
(Bridgetown)

Indemnity”

Empire: “Harriet Craig’

Roxy: “The Avengers”

Globe: “September Affair”

Aquatic: “A Likely Story”

Plaza “Double

eee enna







|



TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1951







7

Today's Football

The Barbados Friendly
Football Association’s Fixture



. Africa 150—1

Against Surrey

LONDON, June 4

The South African cricketers |

finished 113 runs ahead of Surrey | for to-day will be Harkliffe vs
With nine second innings wickets | Westerners “A” at St. Leon-
to fall at the end of the second|| a's.

day’s play at the Oval here. Referee: Mr. 0. Graham.

th

Tne Police;South Africans on first innings on



he fifth team to Jead the unbeaten

|
|
Surrey, all out for 246, became |
| ES 2 AT i Rn St
|
|

CRYFTOQUOTE No. 32
the tour. The South Africans had HM NBF LJ MBL. YC, GTB
scored 150 for one wicket in their | ISV LJ SNSHVCP YC?
second innings by the close. | UBDSVC

teh 5 ; wae : LAST CRYPT Reason and
Laurie Fishlock hit 62 for Sur- judgment are the qualities of ;
rey in three hours while Arthur leader. TACITUS

McIntyre spent only 75 minutes
over an attractive 57.



———=x—





|
| — TT
|
|

J. A. CORBIN & BONS.
—Reuter.







LINEN

Rexwear Sheets







SO 2 OR Baht Ss. ooh hee as $7.86
FO geet ti eb yale eaten SR $6.27
| ok Sy ae eerie he ke se ae $5.99

Cotton Pillow Cases

MM MRR eI hi a ah aie hie ay $1.45
Cotton Table Damask

54 ins. wide Per yard ............. $2.16
Cotton Damask Napkins

Be Wee OO be idee ss es oreas $1.06
ROO MAAC oes so Sas os 46e.





10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.









Bridgetown,
Barbados, ;












Sole Importers:
W.S. MONROE &CO.LTD.,

MACDONALD —

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Havbadros
CHINESE OPE

Allied Line Makes\
Limited Advance

TOKYO, June 4.
CHINESE FORCES hurled one of the heavies:
barrages of the Korean War at the Unitec

PRICE: FIVE CENTS



wee es <> tf

N HEAVY BARRAGE
|BRITAIN SUPPORTS |
OIL CO. PROPOSAL

Morrison Tells Commons

LONDON, June 4



fi

: :

2
(fh)

4

IS ILL FIRST GIRLS’ CLUE





Nations troops thrusting forward on the Imjir Gritish-Fersian oil dispUte is at last moving to a »>sint
; ave or: prac | negotie trons arc in sight, observers be! ad |
e River sector today. The coast-to-coast Allied lin uve Today's principal devclepment was a ate iat tel
made a limited advance. Chinese mortar crews | Britith House of Commons by Foreign Secretary Her! ert
Morrison that the Government fully supported the proposa. |

fought tenaciously for every yard of ground in the
Imjin area but were forced back almost one mile.
Allied assault troops crossed the flooded river in

of the Anglo-Iranian Oil Ciupany to send a missicn to\|
leheran to discuss oil nationalisation with the Pers:an |
Government. ce ee

Y



The British Governmen





































open boats elsewhere on the western front ont e = ert vad |
: { Verve IBAL to ilervene nef
caught the Chinese troops unawares. Austin Rei CCte | 22 be OH he Hous: to nes |
Artillery shelled the Chinese digging emplacements ae ‘J bas Shen siversed aa. the tov
‘ramen Was a majority hare- |
along the banks. Ma 9 P li eth Wie Aenean.
» > sac.der in the company, |
uateene eee? r weried — ; ‘Wea S 0 Icy Mcrrison said he hopod tho}
at Chinese scemec strongly 2 Coupany’s mission weuld reach}
established. Reds Did Not 3¥RACUSE, New York, June 4. ‘eau untaliey aacedrni Py Sih’ tt
Allied troops in the central | arren Austin, United States] Persian Government. |
sector front blocked several] thief delegate to the United
Chinese counter attacks. In th>| I fl N said today that “further Interested Partner |
Yongchon area north of the 38th} nrmuenca Hi spose’: airalbat. . Gemma sted Partne
Parallel, 200 Communists attack | + “hire would be voted by the} Morrison saic it would be im-|
ed this morning. U * P. ] U.N.O. i ‘essary > ossible "7 » missi seus: |
Allies killed 31, took 50 prison-| nee o Icy International golleeiive’ att EE oe eeeh “Spereians| THB MEMBERS of the first Girls’ Club in Barbados aro being sorved with buns and sweet drinks. After
ers ahd scattefed ‘the: rest: i eauines extending ocnuliation Mare June 5. the deadline fixed | 12s they played gamos and sang (Story on page 5)
They met moderate to heavy} __ WASHINGTON, June 4. which was “time consuming but] 9Y, Persians. / | ee eee eee ee eT en 2
resistance in Yongongni area but United States Secretary of vice” he said in his speech at In its memorandum of May 30 e e ‘4
maintained their advance. State, Dean Acheson, _ testifying Syracuse University, the Persian Government hac -
It was the same tale northwest] today before the Senate commit- Austin said ue. Ti st i -oacl asked the company to put up! UuUSSIA e eC S eS Cl Ti
and west northwest of Hwachon.| tees investigating General Mac the problem 6? stren “ Aye a within five days any suggestion: |
Despite lowering skies and inter-| Arthur's cismisial, read a long rpeoving colle ti 8 a samme and tit might have within the frame-|
mittent heavy rain, air fore>)statement on United States’ policy United eta ats ah ant en work of Persian nationalisation | ‘ :
fighters and bombers | roamed|in the Far East for th last five of a skilled wate i oe Pas Oo e ri l = our a S
widely over North Korea dvrin*] years. with a fi we maker deali In-view of the complicatec | /
the day striking at marshalling! There hos been a sharp nh a fine chronometer”. nature of the issues involved, this

Rejecting General Douglas Mae
































yards, railway bridges, trocps| Senatorial split on U.S. policy in 4 ae ; MC tcould not be done so quickly
concentrations and supply centres.|the Far East. Arthur's Far East policy he said: | Morrisow said. . ~ i | PARIS. June 4
a ; : fe We know the United States Meanwhile, the Foreign Secre- “Abolish Selfish, vei ; , ‘ iNet
Fire wer Wien Acheson had__ finished cannot stand alone. We know if{ary added, the British Ambassa- RUSSIA to-day replied to the Western powers proposal
po reading the statement, Republican our country is to act, jointly with}|dor in Teheran had repeated to! N ; P liti wen?? for a big four conference im Washington on July 23 in
: , _,|Senator Alexander Wiley asked other nations — th 5 Persians the British view * Narrow Fonucs 4 ae ; F
Allied advances in the past} 5) “the hadi : en our ¢ ians the British view that the terms interpreted by the West as a rejection.
intai |; about “the purported influence of security must be considered in thé] British Government was = an * : ia eed ‘ 4
week have been maintained by|¢ ot ani cai ‘ De , Foreig M ster. Andre . 1} a reply
; Communist sympathisers in the wor 3 re” interes a tit eputy Foreign Minister, Andrei Gromyko, in a reply
sheer weight of firepower from | ct, - 7 Nyt os world perspective”. nterested partner in the oi) Says Barkley : i : y
massive artillery and swarms Gi td ae irtment during — this Austin received the Honorary | ‘ispute. Je m ae handed to Western Deputies agreed toa Foreign Ministers
j fighter and fighter bombers. But Pn ons pied: "T" @ t | Doctor of Laws Degree. At the same time the British FULTON, Missouri, June 4. meeting only on condition that the United States military
in the last 24 hours Communists} ; + ears a ae ip aah reece } “Reuter. | Ambassador Sir Francis Shep-| Vice President Alben Birktey bases and the Atlantic Pact are down for discussion.
‘ seared | believe there was or is any Com- | herd in an interview with Prime| today denounced the “depraved” oe
have fallen back to prepared] mynist influence anywhere affect -—— ini
positions of well-constructed | munist i nena cs ae aera ee eee Mossadeq | attempt to weaken public confi- It was this condition on which
bunkers in jagged hills. ake al . o r Ce ’ vas believec to have stated that} dence in the United States Gov- Fi | M. O Gromyko has been insistent that
To dig them out infantry have er +e policy either then 01 | Montgomery Is A ot on Government sup- }ernment. He called on Atericans | inc ap NT brought about the latest deadiec
gone in with sub-machine guns} uestioned, A . ai s 5 es | ~ eva ¥ > : ag SRE company's: “ncw © pros to resist those trying to “frighten ss in the deputies 13 weeks talks
and carbines and some of the} pneu on Be atten dried teaee H.M. THE KING Christian Soldier s0sals. the people” in the present world Czech 4 Western powers have refused to
bloodiest pitched battles of the enough to unseat he Communist * —Reuter. crisis for the sake of political or raw oman idmit it to the agenda,
whole campaign have beer | rogirme in China s King Cancels Peete LONDON, June 4. personal gain. | Russia suggested today that
fought. " oh 2 } t . Pines ae Lord i . ; Barkley said he favoured BORDEAUX, June 4. | Deputies should include the sub-
Savage fighting continued today On MacArthur's dismissal ; Yeputy Allied Supreme Commands checks and balances of the two A map showing the United] ject as a non agreed item on the
sequent, ere Tengen on fshveoors said the General “in Engagements er ch tn a Europe a Vietminh Forces patty system but appealed for| States military installations in| agenda,
nje. ave er wave 01 i effect challenged the policies as NUMNSe onig) “as a Christian s \ abolition of “narrow selfish, big-| France was found on a Czeeh| Deputies were holding the 65th
fighters and bombers sent high laid down by the President.” ine ie buleoue é ie paige’ corm 56. Gomgreenars and Push South of Hanoi goted, avaricious and ambitious | woman Vera Strobl, 27, wifen she\ session in search of es aged
explosives ~~ nap: e extension 0: e orean eee i . very it § S For, polities.’ ~ was detained at Blaye Hirdnde | egend: Forei isters’
Chinese north of Hwachon, break-| war to China would give Russia doctors has cancelled all public! Communism “is anti-Christian, Pee cn June 4. He wae speaking at’ Westmnins- eytiare, voted hae tals Girdnde | rn fora eign Ministers
ing up vicious counter attacks and|a legal excuse to intervene, he| °MZ#sements sore “month. retrograde and immoral” he said| Vietminh forces attacked weak! rer College where he was made} She had gone to register as inf A western spokesman said the
forcing limited withdrawal. said, The King who is suitering from] in a speech at the annual banque: |P98ts on the southern perimeter! an Honorary Doctor of Ls a alie lave ta none. seta ; 7 ee eee ;
: a slight catarrhal inflammation of |of the Royal Society of Saint |Of the Hanoi sector and threatened : _— cat ea AU GSe doa eT eo eae ven supply} position now appeared to be the
Last night Chinese came in from He believed the treaty between] the lung has improved, but a George—patribiic Aaeciatian ‘la break-through on Sunday into —Reuter. dump where the United States} Same as before western powers
three sides against Allied positions}Communist China and the Rus-j} period of rest is esseftial to his Saint George wai’ sieava tack. |the rice delta. The operation was jmilitary stores are landed at handed in their notes last Thurs-
in this area but were eventually] sians “is of such a nature that it} complete recovery. lings dracon (ot. especially large, but was | Bordeaux for transit to Germany.| day to Gromyko and direct to
repulsed with the aid of the/would give Russians that oppor- He therefore will not-be able} The tai bs) spelanare (potentially dangerous, Ve 1 |} Vera was said to have beer | Moscow
artillery early today. - tunity and it would also give|to welcome “King Wasnt af neem or i ee fore 1? The French Rey ‘ sarestiuial Se verile en Dead In l friendly with the United Stat The spokesman said these were
Allied troops screening the|Chinese a very considerable lever| Norway to London on Tuesday than Hitler, M 1 jecuives evel hattalion and several artillery | ® * jsailors. French Police decidec| preliminary observations because
Soyang River yesterday found tue|to demand that Russians do that."|it was announced. His younger! These er, Montgomery sald. | nits into the area, section of Mine Explosion jtoday not to bring an espior | the Russian reply would have to be
bodies of 1,500 Chinese and 700 brother the Duke of Gloucester Eur ne ware “sotusy, 0 destroy | which is on the extreme south- | charge against her, but they will] referred to three governments.
horses 10 miles northeast of} That was one of the reasons why] ,,i} deputise, sailing. down..the european civilisation altogether! co corner of the Handi’ sector HAMM, Westphalia, June 4. | hold her while inquiries are pur-| }
Chunchon. They had apparently | Government opposed MacArthur's River Thames es ee w " e and to establish the tyrannical and LShanting of the sae. Tt ha i been The death roll in the explosion} sued under the breach of | the : loday’s four power meeting
been cut down in the Communist'| proposal to bonb Conmunist] yagi, ' r greet the Nor-) sodless rule of Communism over | ; ' & = . tye ‘| in Heinrich Robert Mine at Her lal ne remulotie Aitrrs nro. | sted 90 minutes,
: ‘ : wegian King on his arrival aboard} th ; i ‘ | inactive for four years and only iens regulations (normal pt ; :
offensive. bases in Manchuria, he said. re : : Be BR the whole eastern hemisphere and ! a : Yiringen near here last Thursdé en Mat ar a | The next meeting will take
his yacht for a four-day visit : : : ‘weak garrisons of badly armed F Ree 488 iursday ; cedure for French Police in suet ,
—Reuter. —Reuter. ’ ; ‘ OP as much as possible of the west-} Indp - Chinese Catholic Militia has risen to 17, Three of the 20' cases). The Map wa cutting place on Wednesday when the
Ue. ern.” Montgomery is the new Pres-: .,, ie : “| miners injured have since die , Roses wat | West are expected to reply.
ident of the Society ; manned the posts A jured have since died, from a Communist newspape ply
to Society.—Reuter, Several of these were quickly Fourteen men were trapped at the campaigning against the Unite —Reuter.
taken by the better armed Viet-| time of the explosion and killed states “occupation.” —Reuter

C.L.C. Pass Resolution
For W.I. Federation

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, June 4.

A RES!)LUTION demanding immediate federation and
self-Government for the West Indies was passed unani-
mously at the Fourth Annual General Meeting of the Carib-
bean Labour Congress (London Branch) held yesterday.

0}
Self Government, it was
pleaded, was the key to economic
progress and general raising of
the standard of living in the West
Indies.

THE BIG “SNATCH”’

BOMBAY, June 4,
Two men attacked the Fin -nce
Minister of the Bornbay Gevern-
ment, Lal Mehta, when he was
out walking today, They snatched





The Executive Committee in its
report criticised the West Indian
Trade Unions for their failure “to} 9}! his valuables including a set of
co-ordinate common _ interestS| gojq buttons, a diary and a pair
affecting Trade Unionism in the] of spectacles.—Reuter.

West Indies.”

|
|



It was also pointed out that the





Crewmen Leave
Ship Stranded

MELBOURNE,
AUSTRALIA, June 4
The crew of the 17,486 ton liner
Aorangi due to sail for Vancouver
on Thursday walked off the ship

man of the
Chiefs of Staff, opened talks here



{ minh troops.—(C.P.)

BRADLEY, IKE TALK
WITH FRENCH CHIEFS

PARIS, June 4.
General Omar Bradley, Chair-
United States Joint

AgainstCommunism
Futile—PE ARSON

Monday as _ labour disputes pie — oa ri Pact

brought slow paralysis to Austra-|>Upreme \“ommander eneral f

lian Fe iaenonie, ahaa erernass Dwight Eisenhower and French OTTAWA, June 4.

of the Waterside Workers’ Feder- military leaders. External Affairs Minister Pear-
5 oak: Tomorrow he will discuss de-| son of Canada said last night, it

ation have blacklisted ships arriv= |
ing from New Zealand where a
dock strike is in progress.

Aorangi provides the only pas-
senger service between Australia,
New Zealand and Canada at
Geelong, Victoria’s second biggest
Port.

Royal Austialisn Air Force
men today began loading 17,000
cargo of wheat aboard the British |

freighter Doris Cludies.
The dockers refused to load the
vessel when it arrived from New





absence of united action in the Zealand last week. Police stood
field of politics in the Caribbean by as the airmen went aboard
area was due to the inability of There were no incidents. New
West Indian leaders “to co- Zealand dockworkers are de-}
operate on a common front . manding 24 cent wage increase |
from 60 to 84 cents an hour,
G P —(C.P.)
reetings
Greetings were expressed by
representatives of the West Indian FIRE DESTROYS
Students Union, the Africa
League, West Indian and Peoples | NITRATE PLANT
Sia Association! NORFOLK: Va., June 4.
; Fire destroyed a nitrate plant
Telegrams and messages came and more than 20 railway
} from Grantley Adams, The | waggons loaded with odiun
m Peoples’ Progressive Party nitrate here and threatened to
(British Guiana) and The | reac h the 5,876-ton Chilean
'Peoples’ National Party (Jamaica)| } | freighter Alamo.
and other associated organisations. 5 But the Alamo was pulled to
| | { | cafety by tugs which responded
] Guest speaker was Mr, John’






to her frantie siren, The fire had



Platts-Mills, former member of | reached hex pier by the time she
| Parliament for Finsbury. «No thanks—1 preter not | was towed away. It had been dis-
j , ' to suppurt these airect charging sodicen nithave ‘
The appeal was made by the symbols of decadent The destroyed plant belons
conference to the five great powers aggressine impulses ‘ the Chilean Nitrate Corporation.
to negotiate a Peace Pact —Reuter.





Oil Delegates Leaving Soon



FOR TEHERAN TALKS






LONDON, June 4, He was commenting on Deputy
Anglo-Iranian’s representa- Prime Minister Dr Hussein
tives for Teheran discussion or Fatemi’s reported statement to-
the Persian oil problem will cay that today was the absolute
leave London by air in a few deadline for the appearance in
days, a reliable source said here Teheran of representatives of the
today. Anglo Iranian company
The irce said that it wa t The Ang'o-Iranian Oil Com-
ble f the rn t f t ne arte l 4
Teheran today had decided in j ip €

i



these represen e

source stresscc the compar
was still considering » the
should be.

One r be Visc Al
btiesesle c ernme '
Dir

ft





lays in French and American] would be futile to wage a military
arms programmes with Jules! crusade against Communism, be-
Moch, French Defence Minister. | chide Communism is an idea; it
—Reuter. | cannot be destroyed by force, he

said in Baccalaureate address at

JUMPS TO DEATH convocation exercises of St.
Patrick's College. As an idea “It

NEW YORK, June 4. must be resisted by intellectual

Charles Ganeralla (44), a re-| and spiritual weapons and also p)

tired policeman, plunged to his} removing economic and social
death from the sixth floor of the| conditions of poverty and misery
court building today, a few min-| and injustice in which it finds

utes before he was to go on tria)| such favourable grounds,” he said
for bribery and conspiracy (CP)
He was one of 21 policemen for
trial for an alleged gambling pro- |
tection racket in Brooklyn.
_ Reuter.
|
|

PETAIN SLIGHTLY
BETTER

PARIS, June 4.
Ex - Marshal Philippe Petain,
who is eritically ill on the island
fortress of Ile d’Yeu, was slightly
better today, his doctors reported.
—Reuter.

U.S. Will Have H-Bomb
In A Year—Allen

NEW YORK, June 4.
A Washington newspaper ¢col-



U.N. General Assembly
Meets On November 6

LAKE SUCCESS, June 4.

Officials here were told today
that the United Nations Genera}
Assembly would open a session in
Paris in’ November

It was expected the session
would be divided into two parts
with an interval of about a week
at Christmas.—Reuter.





First an ator bomb was exploded
and the resulting stupendous heat





imnist to-day reported that the }set off the | layer of tritium that
United S ;, as the result of the }encased the atom bornbs.

recent wetok atomic tests, “Even we were astounded by
would be able to build a hydrogen {the effect.” Allen reported his

bomb within one year authority as saying ‘I think it can





Robert Allen writing in the }| be claimed that we nave success-
New York Evening Post said fully pierced the threshold of the
that of the three things ‘posi- }unknown in atomic energy.’
tively established” at the te
one as “the United States Allen said that the other two
know how to construct the |facts established by tests were
hydrogen bomb. All doubts as The United States has an atom





the feasibility of that has} bomb that is at least five times
er dissipated The cata-| more powerful than any ever
emic new weapon will be ajexploded before. But fabulously
within a year.” destructive as it is, the hydrogen
| J aid the most terrific | bomb will be 100 times more 50
jo rings at tests “scoreh- Army engineers have develoved
, k cinder everything in-| two differer type of relter
" rer that will ithstand act of
t r t 1 “the ri
ie
ylehead Reuter

|

Military Crusade |

Reuter



¢ ; .
U.K.Parachutists
‘ . _ ~
Sail For Cyprus
PORTSMOUTH, June 4
Thirty-four thousand men of the
Sixteenth Independent Parachut«
Brigrade Group suddenly alertec
three weeks ago for embarkatiot
boarded two British aircraf
carriers here today for Cyprus t«
reinforce the garrison there
The carriers, Warrior a
Triumph will sail early tomorrow
As the carriers sail tomorrow
troops from the Devonshire wil
leave Liverpool with the 33r<
(Airborne) Light Anti-Aireraf
Guns,—Reuter.

All Greek Court



| Officials Resign

ATHENS, June 4

All Greek court officials resigned
today to help King Paul solve the
cr arising from Field Marshal
Papagos’ resignation.

The Commander
last week was reported earlier
have complained in an interview
with American Amb:
Peurifoy about the €i¢
attitude towards him



s



*k Courts
Reuter



PRICE WAR RAGES

NEW YORK: June 4
Bargain hunters starmpeded New
York's department stores today as
the first all-out price war in mort
than’ 14 years entered its seconc
week

who resigned

ador, John

Customers queued up as early as

6 a.m.

Four hundred people surged in-
to Gimbals when the doors opened
and 600 poured into Macy's.

—Reuter.



Arrested For
OV PERSIAN

TEHERAN, . June
Nz S





Mojtaba yab v ead
of the fanatical Fa Isl
Religious Sect acc er
neering the as f
Persiar Pr

an on Marct r!





Sugar Workers’
Wages Agreed On
—IN JAMAICA

Ike Has More Men
Than The U.S.S.R.

Says Russian



|
|
|
|
|



KINGSTON, Ju 3

I was announced tonight that GENEVA. June 4.
n agreement was reached be The Soviet delegate to the sixth
ween the Sugar Manufacturer session of the Economic Commis-
\ssociation and the Labour ion for Rurope Amazasp Arstiu-
Tnions with respect to wage rates| nian said today that Eisenhower's
or sugar worker Unified Command outnumbered
The Conference, which laste the Soviet forces by two to one

” everal day was presider Fey ;
ver by Archibald Gordon, Labour Speaking on industry and raw
‘ounsellor of the British Emt materials he said: the United
t Washington, who wa issisted| States was trying to seize world
y four assessor The new rates|®ources of raw materials in
mnefit about 55.000 men ho! preparation for war

e all unionist (C.P.) Russell Me Lure of the Unitea

| States

Free Thirteen \':
BELFAST, Jun 4

said that stock-piling had
n carried out to offset the threat
ict aggression

Joza Vilfan, Yugoslavia said that







aa 7 Fd ie ae e the Soviet Union had tried to ob-
a ee 9a Wh | gto Tri i Re- | tain co nplete political domination
ublican Army yor the had r TUSSI on B RG tCE,
neld under lock and key for
days during the Britis} Re
isit to Northern Ireland FIRST FILIPINO
Police are convinced tt
fetaining them they averted pl VATICAN CITY, June 4.
r attacks with explosive ( Dr. Emanuel Moran today pre-
sublie buildings ind bridge ented = t Pope Pius XII his
med to take place before Queen | edential first Filipino
lizabeth and Princes Margaret Ambassador to the Holy See
Helge An’ the Vatican and the Philippines agree

city. —Reuter.

x ” tablish diplomatic relations








month, Of the Philippines’
{ WANTS TO REJOIN L.L.O. ad Mig Of v oe ts 14 600,000
GENEVA. June 4, ire Roman Catholics.—Reuter
Yt . jay! has a plied fo ail - sninsesiat ee
idmission to i¢ Internatior
‘bouy Orgar nit wa | THE “ADVOCATE”
ined here toc
With other eastern European pays for NEWS
ountries, Yugos avia resigned in
aac Wk ade da Wider o DIAL 3113
pplication since Yugoslavia is a .
rember of the United Nations. Day OF Night
—Reuter.



Assassination
PREMIER

He is wante é Safevi and his followers in the
hree y¢ s I K urtroom where he wags on

i Deput Pre t ) trial for writing books contrary
H in Fate to Islam doctrine.

P Safevi eseaped




PAGE TWO





Caub Calling

D* ROBER® DUNLOP,
Director of thé. Seventh Day
Adventist Medical Clinic in Port-
of-Spain, arrived from Trinidad by
yesterday morning by B.W.1LA. to
spend a week or ten days’ holiday

New Carib Commander

| POCKET CARTOON
LANCASTER

OSBERT RIG. E. K. PAGE who has just
completed his three years

tenure as Commander, Caribbean

in Barbados. Area is to be relieved by Brig.
He is staying with Rev. and Mrs. A. C. F. Jackson sometime this
Seth White in Rockley month, Brig. Page will be leav
ng shortly after his arrival for

Merchant In Venezuela England. *

R. F. W. GLEASON is a
merchant in Venezuela.

Bern in 1903, Brig. Ja¢kson was
educated at Haileybury and RMC.

Originally. from New Orleans, Gazetted to the Royal Hampshire
U.S.A. he has been living in Regiment in 1923 he served in
Wenezuela for about five years Egypt, India, West Africa, Pales-
Aceempanied by his wife ang tine and the U.K. until 1939.

daughte? “Linda, he arrived from
Trinidad yesterday morning by
They

During the war he was station-
ed in Cairo, the Western Desert,
B.W.LA. were intransit Hififa, Persia and Iraq.
from Tobago where they had spent
the last two weeks. Before re-
turning to Venezuela they plan to
spefid a week here staying at the
Paradise Beach Club.

Welfare Job
LIGHT-LIEUT. John Blair, of
Kingston, Jamaica, has been
appointed Welfare Officer in
charge of all Colonials in the
73 He succeeds ailewt
ohn Smyth, who has

Brig. Jackson comes from an
army family with at least half a
dozen consecutive generations in
the services. His great-great-
uncle, General Sir Alexander
Cosby Jackson commanded in the
West Indies for many years.

Medical Conference

R. E. D. B. CHARLES, Senior
rn. Medical Officer, St. Vincent

ae — a yan Counsel To Join Mr. Hammond came in on “= Airways’ eo
Flight-Lieu air says that his R. RAYMOND NORRIS of from _ St. Vincent yesterday
— Tae bem tole oe a Cc. D. and W. Secretariat Morning. He is here to attend
als from many parts o: © left Barbados over the week-end the Senior Medical Officers Con-

“You know, Willy darling,
it’s really almost impossible
to believe that they’re sei

all done by hand!”



Onial Empire. He is reading ference, which opened yesterday
for the Diploma in Publie Admin- me Vere a on at Hastings House under the
istration of London University, Adviser to C. D. and W., who is Chairmanship of Dr. J. W. Hark-

and ness, Medical Adviser to C.D. and

. investigating the organisation
No Opening salaries of the Civil Service both W. Dr. Charles is also a member
F YOU'RE ever in the U.S. Federal and Presidential in the of the St. Vincent Executive
bound for Chicago by train Leeward Islands. Council. toh 19

some night, and you hear the _ It is understood Mr; Norris will
porter of your sleeper humming be away for about one month.
the motif of a Bach toccata, it will

Dr. Charies expects to be in
Barbados for one week and is a

be Gordon Roberts of Barbados Short Visit guest at the Marine Hotel.
Now 50 years of age, besides R. GEORGE De NOBRIGA
working for C.N.R., Gordon ha Managing Director of the In England







Studied to be an organist. He Barbados Telephone Co, Ltd, rs cadeeidindeaien

went to the U.S. as a boy. At 18 arrived from Trinidad yesterday ara se a en oe wore
he was a shipbuilder. One of his by B.W.I.A., on a short visit. He | (Aspe % ae 33. Ge t
working mates Joe Thomas was is staying at the Marine Hotel, ie ates Tee "hens aan ce
choirmaster and organist of the Mr. Kenrie T, Murray, Director Baitish aicee She hea Sone te
Methodist Episcopal Church in the of Barbados Rediffusion Services ata nursiog “e St. "George's
town in which Gordon lived. Ltd., arrived by the same plane. hospital, London. Police Sergeant
Thomas offered to teach Gordon to He is a guest at the Ocean View G James from St. Lucia went up
play the piano and organ. In 1926 Hotel. the same boat to be trained
he moved to Toronto and Gordon R dui in police work at the Hendon
began working for C.N.R. He eturne ome Police College. Mr. K. B. Snaggs
decided to take lessons at the M*: W. H. CORBIN who had and Mr. G. D. Raeburn, both from
Toronto Conservatory. He made been in Trinidad for the past rrinicad, were passengers on the
sufficient progress that Sir Ernest five or six weeks visit het Gascogne. They have gone to
MacMillan consented to give him daughter in San Fernando re- study Civil Engineering

found an turned home yesterday morning
lessons. But he never found an BWA Mes: Atietals Critical

opening that would permit him te bY
give 2 ‘portering Bar become a Taylor and daughter arrived by
full-time musician. He is also in the “4 rm eee wh e a aying
the unhappy position of having no ** the St. Lawrence ote

ETURNING shortly to Barba-
dos is Lerenzo Williams,
Barrister-at-Law. Lorenzo, who

instrument on which to practice ili s hades ated 9
Gordon is married and. his Dominica and B.G, ; ae ae wurtliia teste tus eo
daughter, just through school has ISS OLIVE HUSBANDS, lem of over-population in the
chosen a career—art. i a a at a er West Indies and the general de-
‘ ospita: left here over the w velopment of the West Indian

From St. Vincent nd for Dominica, She is © jJands, He laments the fact that

also plans
British

month’s holiday and
some of it in

R. CYRIL BARNARD, St. a

Vincent planter accompanied to spend
by his wife arrived from St. Vin- Guiana. 4
cent yesterday morning by B.G. “
Aiswoys, Here for a week, they Staying With Her Son
are staying at the Marine Hotel. RS. E. A. PITT flew in {f0M can put into it.’ Lorenzo holds a
Mr. Stanley de Freitas, Barrister- St Vincent yesterday by B.G. law degree of the University of
at-Law in St. Vincent arrived by Airways to spend a week’s holi- London, and hopes to take another
the same plane. He too is here day with her son Mr. C. B. Pitt degree in Economics when he
for one week. of Welches, Christ Chureh, comes home.

THE ADVENTURES PIPA

there are West Indian students—
potential leaders of the West In-
dies—who seem concerned only
with “what they can get out of the
West Indies instead of what they

OF



P45

Ver Dias Int Amsterdam

Copyright

BY THE WAY By Beachcomber

naturalist acidly. “Did I say oak?
Beech, of course,” said Foul-

enough, making a mental note.
ry ; know what they had voted for”
It Will Come to This the other day. It is how you

F officials are allowed to exam- vote that matters, not what you
ine our banking accounts and vote about. In fact, it wouldn't

FOULENOUGH plaque on a

small Sussex cottage an-
nounced: “Here Milton wrote
‘Paradise Lost." Unfortunately
(or fortunately) the owner of the
cottage, a hedger, flushed with
financial success, became talka-

In Passing
T was very harsh to blame the
Socialists for “seeming not to



tive. He told an American lady

3 J * our savings accounts, it will not be a bad idea to withhold from
ae — STAs men atk be long before there will be a all Members any knowledge of
red whiskers. ‘The ‘America lady House-to-house round-up, to find What a vote is about until it is

out what money is being kept at all over. Then there would be



WRT cot tnt ition liven te home. If that “drive” does not no danger of some eccentric sud-
ona eighteenth century, and the "ke in enough to pay the new denly trying to represent the
man a tans have aS his body of official spies, inspectors opinion of his constituents or fol-
“Who's Milton?” snapped the Will be empowered to stop and lowing his conscience. This
lady. “Why this poet guy,” re- search anybody in the street who would also cut out all need for
lied her ‘husband “yf sure refuses to declare how much the completely pointless debates
tied ht it was Lipton ” said the Money he has in his pockets, which take up so much of the
eeetn “Ar” interrupted the what he proposes to spend it on, time needed for catcalls and other
houseowner “he used to bring us why, how, where, and when. national business
tea every Christmas.” ;
In the Footsteps of Nelson World Round-Up For Women
N a neighbouring village Foul-
Ba SUC bigs of ia a s _ From Paris flimsiest supports,
c “sei ig ie 1ac ere _ Gloria Swanson’s daughter, He believes American women
ene eerie a tk Visi, Michele Farmer, bought in Paris are approaching figure perfection

last week a novel penguin bathing that they will
suit from Jacques Heim. without corsets. An understanda-

The suit, which looks like a ble prediction as Varga lives in
tight black satin sheath, unbot- Hollywood.

“H. Nelson” carved on the wood, soon be perfect

and twopence a time was charged
to look through the telescope he

had used at Trafalgar. One . A iti 13 : .
rather surly visitor said, “It looks tons up the middle ot the:-ekirt This summer the American
a very modern telescope.” “Nel- to fold into a waistcoat shape, girl can be dressed from top to
son always insisted on the latest,” showing brief white pique pants. toe and fingertip in nylon—even
replied Foulenough, But next Alwynn’s new collection. shows to shoes of nylon mesh and a rain-
day the telescope had been bang- : hee = a s with oy coat in a sheer nylon fabric witb
ed about a bit, and stained a les-fitting satin jodhpurs instead a metallic stripe in it.

darker colour. “Why did Nelson of skirt. Tulle swathes a w hite Men Women Like . . .
come here?” asked a school- Satin hunting bowler and falls Bachelors. .
teacher. “Emma lived down the to the ground as a train. + Frenchmen ‘who kiss _ their
street,” replied Foulenough. “They Frem New York hands—Englishmen who don't.
used to meet under that oak tree Prediction that spells despair to Men who don’t say “Women

in the lane. It’s still called Nelson's
“It ought to be called
beech,” commented

are all alike.”
Men who don't profess to “Un-

American corset and brassiere
manufacturers has been made by
4 Varga, Peruvian designer of the derstand women.” —L.E.S,

ZEaesgnmhaeanaeaa as BREERBHEEEES PB
MEN'S SHIRTS at..........$3.55 & $390, $484, $4.86
MEN'S STRIPED PYJAMAS ___.__._..$5.59, $6.08
GREY WORSTED FLANNEL 56 inches __...._..$3.47
KHAKI SHIRTING 28 inches $1.08
OLIVE & PALMS SOAP Ile.

sa seccee (Ramen

SR ee ee ee a

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220

BARBADOS



Programme

TUESDAY, JUNE 5G, 1951

1115 am, Programme Parade, 11.25
a.m. Listeners’ Choice, 11.45 am. Report
from Britain, 12 noon the News, 12 10
p.m. News Analysis.

41.15 p.m.—645 p.m. 19.76 M

415 pm. Souvenirs of Music, 5 p m
Surrey v South Africans, 5.05 p.m. In-
terlude, 5.15 p.m. New Records, 6 p.m

Music Magazine, 6.15 p.m. Welsh Maga-
zine, 6.45 pm PIerating otra
645 P.m.—11.00 pam. 32M 25 53



7 pm. The News, “Ae pm. News
Analysis, 715 Bm. West Indiam Guest”

Night, 745 p.m. General Assembly of
the Church Scotland, 8 p.m. Radio
Neéwsreel, 6 15 p.m. Meet the Common-

wealth, 845 p.m. Interlude, 855 p m
From the Editorials, 9 p.m. Report from
Britain, 915 pm. Music from Grand
Hotel, 10 p.m, The News, 10.10 pm In-
terpidé, 1015 pm The Heritage of
Britain, 10 45 pum, Festival of Britain,
——____

cBC PROGRAMME

TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1958
10.00 p.m.—10.15 pom. New
10.15 p m —10.30 p.m. Caribbean Corner
11.76 Mes, 25.51 M.



British Women
Are Envied By
The French

RITISH women who
French women their high
fashioned Paris models, and
Americans their “cute little dress-
es,” will be surprised to know that
our British Utility clothes, es-
pecially coats and suits, are very
much envied by our visitors,

Paris has nothing to compare
with these reasonably priced
clothes.

FEW French Women can afford
the high prices charged by the
model houses in Paris, The
clothes in the shops are also ex-
pensive, so most of them have
their clothes made by “a little wo-
man round the corner.”

* * .

AMERICAN CLOTHES are
cheaper, but they are thrown to-
gether and don’t wear.

So Americans in London are
buying our Utility tailored suits
and classic coats.

FRENCH WOMEN, from the
fashion centre of the world, are
delighted with the more “dressy”
suits. The cnly criticism I have
heard is the dreary name given
to them. (Whoever was respon-
sible for the name “Utility’’?)

This I Must See...

A NEW YORK beauty expert
gave this advice to women in
London: —

“Once your weight is down,
start exercising. Help the fat off
your seat by giving it a
and hard bang every time you
pass a brick wall.”



Half The People You Dream About Are Strangers

Do you often dream about your
work? About the office? The
iactory? Or the kitchen? You are

e i

7 The results of the first scientific
inquiry ever made to discover
what normal people dream about
were published recently. They
show that the daily round rarely
intrudes into the plot or the
setting of our dreams.

Detailed descriptions of 10,000
dreams were provided by men and
women aged 18 to 80. Dreary
chores, like typing, darning, cook-
ing, and washing dishes were

CROSSWORD
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“GOD'S WAY OF
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Pleuse for to
Samuel Roberts, “Geapel
Book and Tract Service,

30, Central Avenue, Ban-

gor N. Ireland.” %

P SOSSSGSS SEG OOSSOS SESS



B.B.C. Radio Hollywood Takes On
The Flying Saucers

—and invents THE THING



(Not to be confused with the song)
R. M. MacCel} leaves the films
in some state of excitement . .
NEW YORK,
THOSE flying saticers, which
lied American skiés and wasted
newsprint so abundantly not long
ago, finally preyéd on the mind
of producer Howard Hawkes to
such an extent that he got going
and made one of the finest films of
its kind that I have ever seen. —
It is called “The Thing,” and it
comes to Britain soon (ne connec-
tion with that zany song).
Way up in Northern Alaska near

'W* the Arctic circle there is a group

of scientists and American air
foree men doing experimental
work it seems.

Their radio signals are going
mad and they put it down to a
mysterious plane crash 48 miles
away. Don’t ask me how they put
it down to this cause, Everything
is explained at top speed in a
thoroughly convincing form of
“popular science” jargon as you
go along. Thirty seconds later

envy) vou’ve forgotten the explanation).

Flattened .

When they get to the spot, there
is a huge smear of flattened metal,
all frozen over,

They décide to melt the ice.
(“Thermite bombs, sir?”—“Natur-
ally, lieutenant.”) But this is an
error, The metal—which is the
debris of a plane from somewhere
east of the Milky Way, weighing
an estimated 200 tons—is of a
nature which explodes easily. It
explodes,

But what is this? While the
husky dogs howl miserably, the
party discern—deep down under
the ice—a form some & ft, long.

(I'd better explain here, because
by now you must be wondering
who plays whom, that the cast is
made up of unknowns who all
act beautifully.)

So they hoick The Thing up
and get it into the plane all
jammed up in a huge block of ice
so that you still cannot see it at all
well,

Back to the base with it. Here
there begins the start of an in-
triguingly topical quarrel between
the handsome air force captain and
the bearded head of the scientists
as to the correct thing to do when
you meet A Thing.

Kill it, say the airmen, It looks
vaguely nasty. Prepdsterous, cry
the scientists. Preserve it for study.
We may well be making history!

The fun... 3
Listening to all this are a shapely
young woman, who conducts a





hardly ever mentioned.

“We show our aversion to work
in our dreams,” reports Professor
Calvin Hall, the psychologist who
organised the inquiry.

But his findings contradict the
belief that, hecause dreams are so
divorced from reality, they
usually have an exotic setting and
involve exciting people.

Most dreams are set in un-
romantic everyday buildings —
most commonly the living-room
or bedroom of a house, the report
states. And the intriguing per-
sonalities we would all like to
meet turn up only once in 100,

Walking, running, anq dancing
are the commonest activities. We
rarely sit in our dreams. Flying
and floating in the air are even
rarer events, says Hall.

The oddest finding, in my view,
is the fact that 43 per cent. of
the characters playing the princi-
pal parts in our dreams seem
to be total strangers.

Three main characters, includ-
ing the dreamer, make up the

“Every Picture tells a Story!”



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TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1951



Princess Starts New

Hair Fashion

who wore agg» In Nylon, Too
formal eve-\gThen it is sold to merchants.
“There has been

Princess Elizabeth,
chignon of hair for
ning oceasions in Malta, has start-%
ed London's latest fashion.

Mr. Peter Isaia, a London wig-
maker, said to-day: “The Princess

wry super-flirtation with the
captain (slacks and a sweeter),

and a cynical but lovable news-

than 20 years ago.

“more
working

wandered north.

ot cc

nothing like
this demand since the shingle day
By
overtime my staff can

S$

* wofe a ‘figure eight’ chignon on produce 30 to 50 chignons a week.”

The tun really begine when The lthe back of her head. This is the |
Thing gets prema y most popular style. Cheapest chignons cost abou:
out of his fee by an eleetric blanket. £7 7s. Most expensive are around

In short order:—

IT KILLS several husky dogs
for their biood.
GETS an arm torn off but grows

“The hair must be 24in. long
to make the full curves of the
figu® eight. Cost of a chignon of
this length vary between £9. 9s.
and £12 12s., depending on the
colour and texture of the hair.”

Hair for chignons is seldom pro-

14 guineas.
lighter, cost 1s little as £3 10s.

to-day:
for a

short cut. But

itself another;

Nylon chignons —»
often preferred because they are

One West End hardresser said
“Women pay up to £2 2s.
although

short hair is still the most popu-

them in & pat a a vided by English women. “Nearly jar style for day wear, women are
hen Greenhouse Up-| 51) of it belongs to Italian nuns.” getting tired cf it for evening
side Races o» Mr. Isaia anid. ep g- WUE.

pervious wo Wk ro ri
¢ Tommy tl ny ee me ae “Long” hair is still fashionable in “So more and more of _them
P gun = Italy, and when the nuns take are wearing chignons to suit the

to the accompaniment
wnt ge Mammeliter 9 onttee of eeooves
and howls as ever put feeding
time in the lions’ house at the
Zoo to shame.

present
ning dresses.

their vows at the end of five years’

probation, their hair is cut off. 7 —L.E:S.

——

AQUATIC CLUB CUNEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE: TODAY at 5 pm
rONIGHT at 8.30

The struggle between air force
and science on whether to pre-









extremely feminine eve-

fade or attempt to annihilate The BILL WIWLIAMS, __ SANGARA. af eB
grows fiercer. A New RKO Redio Picture
ony minutes left now, gentle- AO 9S STON ee ee ee ee eae nae
men, MATINEE: WEDNESDAY at 5 pom
The Sergeant has an idea which WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
he explaitis rapidly to the captain. Ay Aas Seen gen ;
But by this time the e cap- in ico!
tain tab bunmeena de tes caboone ose
There is some hasty work with
wires, and talk of “hooking up the | 6.6. 6.0365656,5660690G99 900909 POP PDO DDD FP DOODPPOPPOOIO®,



dynamos.” Then here it comes!

It looks remarkably unlike a
mangel-wurzel and remarkably
like Frankenstein.

On—on. The handsome captain
throws a switch—The Thing is

GLOBE THEATRE

For Women who have dreamed of the one Great Love

TODAY 5 (and continuing)

and 8.15 p.m.

perrael er meena
huge o ng eae big ea
oe ae ee ae ee “SEPTEMBER AFFAIR
ricassee,

JOAN FONTAINE — JOSEPH COTYEN

You'll love it
EXTRA! EXTRA!
Bene 108 ste eee: POPEYE in: “HOT AIR ACES”

piel com convincing hokum you are
oing to love all this. There is a
fantastic anti-climax when the
reporter, having secured a radio-
{telephone circuit to Fairbanks,
Alaska, leads his story with:—
“Two thousand years ago the
world was saved by an Ark—
Noah’s, To-night the world has
been saved once ¢ + > ean arc
—of electrici
try a lead he that “some time,
MacColl? Because I'd get fired,

V595S660G0OO"

na THEATRE --

P L A z A BRIDGETOWN

Today to Thurs. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m

Big Week End Special for
Mid-Week Engagement !

CAPTAIN CHINA

(DIAL ine

ee

_Thurs. (Bank)
9.30 a.m. & 1,30 p
Johnny Mack Breen in



2D

OSSSOSSS

SLOSOPOO LESSEE CL EPCS PPS PPS SSPE

, ? “LAWMEN” & John Payne, Gale
“eo ee matter. It is “WEST OF THE ALAMO” Russell, Lon
r Jimmy Wakely on Chaney



wonderful, The play’s the thing,
and in this instance The Thing
makes a wonderful play.—L.E.S.

FRIDAY &th 2.50, 4.45 * 8.30 p.m, & continuing

“WALK SOFTLY, STRANGER”











commonest cast. In one dream
out of every seven the eeeper|
plays a solo performance.
Bitter blow to romantic girls is
Hall’s discovery tha
male dreams iiss. more about
other men than about women.
The survey, which is being con-
tinued at Western’ Reserve
University, U.S., showed that one
dream in every three seems to be
“seen” in colour.

Painstaking . . . ie es a
IF you want a job done thor-| 7 Pe ee

oughly and accurately, get a EMPIRE ROYAL

middle-aged or elderly person tu |
| TO-DAY Only 4.30 and 8.30
To-day 4.45 and 8.30 and

do it.
Continuing Final

Last 2 Shows TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.
Monogram Double ! !

“ARMY WIVES”

{hi
|
|
| Last Show Tonite 8.30
|
Dorothea Kent & i}

Warner's Double ! !

“THE HARD WAY"
Dennis Morgan &

“SONG OF THE SADDLE”
Dick Foran

“MILLION DOLLAR KID”
Leo Gorcey and Dead End Kids



Wed 6th, 8 30 p.m.

MAT: Thurs. (Bank) 4.30 pm
LOUISIANA Jimmie Davis
SONG OF THE WASTELANDS

Jimmy WAKELY

Wed. & Thurs. 5 & 8.30 p.m.
Johnny Mack Brown in (both)

“LAW MEN” &
“WEST OF THE RIO GRANDE .







That advice is the outcome of
three years of experiment, carried
cut at Cambridge University, to
discover how the human capacity
for work alters with age.

The tests, which were carefully
devised to eliminate any advan-
tage from past experience, showed
that except in jobs where speed
is all-important, oldsters are

Serial

“FLYING G-MEN”

Along with the Pictures ,

Inst. Columbia

Columbia Pictures Presents
“ HARRIET CRAIG”

Starring
Joan CRAWFORD

“ Bandit of El Dorado”

mse Wendell CORRY Starring
caer Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETT



OLYMPIC

TO-DAY & TOMORROW
4.30 and 8.15





LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.45 and 8,15
Leia nel

Repubiic Pictures present . .

Universal Double

Michael REDGRAVE &
Joan BENNETT
in

Me see a ad Ne

“THE AVENGERS” * SECRET BEYOND
THE DOOR’
* * Starring * * AND
Reaieet oan mm John Carroll, Adele Mara “MA AND PA
bring happy seat Dy heipang with KETTLE”
to Guanee ie Widens > ‘ees, with
od chammelnlon cule eaten Marjorie MAIN &

Airaldi.

Mona Maris and Roberto
Percy KILBRIDE

—_—_==_= =



grateful coed an

testified to the good health














ALUMINUM

CIGARETTE CASES

in GOLD and SILVER
Finish

BOILING STOVES

Lucile Watson and Allyn
Joslyn.
ROXY
|
!
i



aie Joseph cht sree all ala aleinai ca
—_—_—__—_—_—_—_———————S
PLAZA out, || GALETY

THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES



SS





BOTT


ewer

TUESDAY, JUNE 4,

1951







Farm Families In
The United States

By CLARENCE

Under Secretany, U.S. De

J. McCORMICK

partment of Agriculture

Most of the land of the United States is owned by families of

people who are farmers and

have their homes on the farm.

The title to the land is usually in the name of the father, but
all members of the family help do the work and are sup-
ported by the money they get from the sale of farm products.
These people lead a hardy, outdoor life; they are physically
strong and healthy. All but the very young and the very old
work hard. A few are wealthy and a few are poor, but most
farmers have a medium high standard of living.

Farmers are very important in
the United States. They produce
food and raw materials for cloth-
ing for people in the large cities.
More important than that, from
the farmers and the children of
farm people have come many
national leaders. George
Washington, the first President of
the Nation, earned his livelihood
from his farm in the State of
Virginia. Abraham Lincoln earned
his livelihood as a lawyer, but as
a boy he lived on a farm and that
shaped his early experience,
Harry S. Truman, who is President
at this time, was a farm boy in
Missouri in his youth, and Vice-
President Alben Barkley was a
farm boy in Kentucky. Warren
Austin, U.S. Delegate to the United
Nations, has his home on a farm
in the State of Vermont where
he grows apples, He was born on
a farm, Ralph Cordiner, President
of General Electric Company,
spent his boyhood on a_ wheat
farm in the Pacific Northwest.
Many persons of prominence in
the United States were children
of families who owned and lived
on family farms.

In the early days families were
encouraged to move from civilized
centers to the wilderness which
then covered much of the land,
Those who used and improved the
land were given title to it with-
out cost. This established a deep
tradition of family ownership of
farm land. Many farms are still
owned and farmed by ‘the descen-
dants of the people who claimed
the land from the wilderness
many years ago. In a few remote
places there has been free land
for families within the last 25
years, One can always buy farm
land in the United States, al-
though land prices are high right
now.

Children of farm families in the
United States develop good
citizenship at an early age, They
help with light chores. Many of
them have animals of their own
to care for, and may keep the
money from the sale of the
animals. They learn how to work
hard as their fathers and mothers
do. When they grow older, one
or two of the children may be-
come owners of the family farm.
The other children may move to
cities and are no longer farmers,
But all their lives they carry the
honest ways and habits of hard
work they learned when young.

Like farmers everywhere, U.S.,
farm families are friendly with
their neighbours and visitors to
their communities. Bven in the
western part of the United States,
where farms are many miles apart,
visits are made to each other's
homes. In times of illness and
‘adversity they help one another.
They also make visits to cities,
where they have many friends
and relatives.

@ On Page 7



U.K. Received
32,000 Tons
Argentine Meat '

BUENOS AIRES, June 4

Argentine shipment of frozen
carcase meat to Britain since
loading was resumed on April
25th had by the end of May
totalled 32,000 tons according to
authoritative trade sources here
today. They said shipments in
June would probably amount to
19,000 tons.

The decline is due to seasonal
and other factors. Frigorifico out-
put always declines during
Argentina’s winter months in
addition to which breeders, they
suid, were /inclined at the mo-
ment to hold back cattle in ex-
pectation of official buying.

The shipment of top quality
chilled beef from Argentina since
before the war according to these
circles will probably be loaded
here in July for delivery to Brit-
ain in August,

It is likely to be experimental
and some time before volume
shipments of chilled beef. start,
because of the need to organise
tight shipping schedules to ensure
quick delivery to the British
market.

Roy Foulds British Food Minis-
try meat expert is at present in
Buenos Aires making arrange-
ments for chille@ beef shipments.

Between May 11 when Uruguay
resumed shipments to Britain and
the end of that month, Uruguay
had sent forward 5,400 tons of
frozen meat,

Uruguay is expected to clear
another 12,000 tons this month—
increased rate is largely due to
the fact that shipping schedules
are now fully organised.

—Reuter.





Denies Statement

MEXICO, June 4

A statement by the daily paper
El Popular today that the U.N.
Economic Commission for Latin
America, E.C.L.A. now meeting
here is to be dissolved and its
functions conferred on the Or-
ganisation of American States,
was denied by Dr. Raul Prebisch
of Argentina, Executive Secretary
of the Commission,

In a statement to Reuter Pre-
bisch said: “The report is ridicu-
lous and without foundation, The
Commission was never as strong
as it is now. Such a project was
not even discusse€ and sucn a de-
cision in any case would require
the approval of the United Na-
tions Economie and Social Coun-
cas —Reuter.



RESPECT THE PRESS

NEW YORK CITY.

The New York Times is helping teachers here prepare
students to play an active and intelligent role in community

life.

For the past seven years the Times, in co-operation with the
New York City Board of Education, has conducted a 15-week

course in “Education and the News”.

D—Tax--Day

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 1,
Over $50,000 was collected at
the Town Hall, Port-of-Spain
yesterday May 31, which was
D-Day for the payment of rates
and taxes for houses in arrears.

This drive has been negotiated
by the mayor, Mr. Raymond
Hamel-Smith who is determined

that monies due the Corporation
must be paid.

Rates of Exchange

CANADA, JUNE 6, 1951
60 8/10% pr. Cheques on

Bankers 58 9/10% pr.
. Demand

Drafts 58 N\% pr
‘ Sight Drafts 58 6¥10% pr

60 8/10% pr. Cable Obs poses
59 3/10% pr. Currency 57 4/106 pr.
a «+eeese+ Coupons 56 7/10% pr
ose keegeee Silver «(howe ete tne

The course is based on. the
premise that citizens must first
understand current news before
they can take intelligent action
on local and national problems.

International, economic, labour,
military, scientific, and cultural
news is covered in the course.
Each week’s programme is de-
veloped around a single subject.
Usually the first part of the class
period is devoted to lectures by
members of the Times editorial
staff, The rest of the time is given
over to questions and answers.

The course is designed especial-
ly for teachers of English and the
social sciences in the elementary
and secondary school, The teach-
ers use various methods in direct-
ing the study of current events in
their own schools. Some integrate
the news with regular_ history,
economics, and geography
courses, and others conduct
special events classes with the
Times as their only text.
















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a





Vi



eeveceeeseees

4°

OF

A NUMBER OF RECRUITS for the famous Swiss Guards were sworn






BARBADOS



4
d

in at a picturesque traditional ceremony at the Vatican recently.

American Column

COPPER, BRASS ORDERED
TO HELP THE ARMY

From R. M. MacCOLL

Behind the storm of words in Washington over America’s day

NEW YORK, Sunday.

military-political policies in the Far East, the tremendous
rhythm of American industrial might is stepped up for pos-

sible trouble.

Producers of copper and brass
have been ordered by the National

ction Authority to devote
75 per cent. of their total output
from July 1 to filling military
needs,

Cars and refrigerators for civil-
ians will have to “get by” on the
aeons 25 per cent, And on
the heels of that, the steel manu-
facturers harr given the
same orcer.

This tonk Pittsburg—America’s
Sheffield — by surprise. Steel's
big men had not expected the
order until the late autumn.

THERE IS one small point in
the Iron Curtain where a few
people can still eddy back and
forth more or less at will, and
not even asked to show their
ey don’t have them).

glares
across the Bering Straits at
Alaska.

There, the island of Little Dio-
mede is American, Three miles
west is Big Diomede—Russian.
The privileges travellers are the
Eskimos. heir latest report:
after months of calm, the Rus-
sians are very busy on Big Dio-
mede. Soviet troops have built a
tall observation tower on a hill
and are “active” there daily.

A MILWAUKEEAN can now
tell you just how it feels to be in
Newcastle (England) when some-
one arrives there carrying coal.
For Milwaukee is America’s
greatest beer-producing city. And
when the est German ship
Geheimrat Sartori arrived there—
the first German freighter to dock
in nearly 20 years—it was carry-
ing 340 cases of Munich beer.

AMERICA can still be the land
of opportunity. Patti Page start-
ed out as one of eight daughters
of an Oklahoman railway fore~-
man. While trying to “crack”
night spot singing she almost
starved and she dwindled from



A man’s
choice..:

| this
Chase

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heavenly flavor that makes every sip a

satisfying experience. With Chase & Sanborn \
you get all the flavor your cup can hold.

Ask for Chase & Sanborn today.

dress size 16 to size 10. Then the
break.

In 1947
fess,” in which Patti did a duet
for herself, broke her into big
time. Her “Tennessee Waltz” has
sold 3,000,000 records.

Now Patti is earning $500,000
(£178,570) a year.

BECAUSE non-smoker Rudolph
Bing—the Briton who bosses New
York's Metropolitan Opera Com-
pany—is sick of being offered
cigarettes, he often has a holder
in_his mouth.

In the holder is a half-smoked
“cigarette.” It never gets any
smaller because it is made of
plastic.

A SALESMAN met death in
New Orleans. Cosimo Rocco did
not like his new car. So he pick-
ed a quarrel with car-salesman
Elmer Bahan and shot him dead,
Bahan had not sold Rocco the car,
Rocco did not even buy it in New
Orleans.



Jury Return
Open Verdict

An open verdict was returned
by a nine man jury when the
inquiry into the death of Christo-
pher Goodridge of Richmond
Gap was concluded yesterday at
District “A” Police Court.

Mr. C. L. Walwyn was the
Coroner, Goodridge was taken to
Dr. Bayley’s Hospital in Beckles
Road on Apvil 20 but died there
ion April 22. A post mortem was
later performed by Dr. A, §&.
Cato who attributed death to in-
flammation of the brain.

After the post mortem some of
the parts of the kidney, brain and
bladder were placed into the
Coroner’s box for the Analyst.
The Analyst said he found cheno-
podium oi! in a part of the kidney.










\

Fae ana

a record called “Con-

ADVOCATE





en

RUSSIA HAS ABANDONED

SOCIALIST

IDEOLOGY

Says Yugoslav Minister

BELGRADE, June 4.

Marshal Tito’s leading Marxist, Milovan Djilas, said here
today that a serious crisis had hit the Socialist movement
throughout the world. Djilas is Minister without Portfolic

and leading Politburo member.

Jamaica Has
Plan To Oust
Mosquitoes

Jamaica has a
the moment for the eradication
of the Aedes Aegypti Mosquito
and it is hoped shortly to intro-
duce into the colony a T.B. survey
and B.C.G. campaign. Hon, Dr
L. W, Fitzmaurice, Director of
Medical Services told the Advo-
cate yesterday.

programme at

He said that he had just had a
team of one doctor and two public
health nurses down in Ecuador
under the auspices of the World

Health Organization who had
been taking training for this
campaign.

In Jamaica, they had a Sugar
Industry Labour Welfare Board
which is very interested in the
health of the sugar worker. Part

of their policy is assisting in the
establishment of health centre
dispensaries on sugar estates, the
provision of nursing services on
these estates at the centre and the
provision of an ambulance.

Within the past two years ,he
said that these had been inStituted
by the Board and were doing very
good work,



Teachers Go Back

GUATEMALA, June 4.
thousand public school
returned to classes to-
reopening two thousand
schools throughout Guatemala
that had been closed for 18 days
by teachers’ strike. Demands for
payment of back wages and some
benefits have been met by Gov-
ernment.

Six
teachers

—Reuter,



Addressing the fourth plenary
session of the Yugoslav Commun
ist Party’s Central Committee ne
said the crisis had been caused
mainly by complete revision and
abandonment of the Socialist
ideology by Soviet Russia.

“Her leaders have already en-
tered the phase of forming new
actionary aggressive and exploit-
reactionary ideology and of re-
ary practice”, he said.

Attacking Soviet Communists he
said: “In the Soviet Union every-
thing that Stalin says—invariably
in conerete situation—is pro-
claimed as science and general
theory”.

Stalin’s theories
Socialist, non-Marxist
scientifie.”—Reuter.

were

eva non-

Trinidad Wood For
Australia’s Railway

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, June 1,
The first consignment of a

shipment of mora (a local wood)
for Southern Australia’s raslway
sleepers has left Trinidad, This
has been made possible through
the Minister of Agriculture, Hon,
Victor Bryan. “Australia has
asked to buy mora from Trinidad
for railway sleepers amd boats,”
he said. “These boats are bringing
food to us.”



Nalian Flights Up

ROME, June 4.
' The Itafian Air Company
“Alitalia” will increase the num-
ber of flights between Italy and
South America (Argentina and
Brazil) to six each way per
month instead of four as at pres-
ent. In addition to the present
weekly service there will also
be a fortnightly service twice
per month,
—Reuter.

THE FAMILY SOAP

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6

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Banishes perspiration odor
Leaves body sweet and dainty

makes a deep cleansing lather that is
and gentl 4 face, haods and daily

mila tle f
baths. Odex is ideal for family use,



THE BARBADOS BOTTLING 00.

AUTHORISED BOTTLERS

Take this opportunity to inform their many Friends
and Customers that the QUALITY. PURITY and PRICE

their

always.

of

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FFENDING -USE ODEX



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PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR

400s fp

Se

Printed by the Advocste Co.,



414., Broad St. Bridgetown



Tuesday, June 5, 1951



WOBBLE WHEEL

There is something fascinating about a
wobble-wheel roller. There is something
fascinating about any kind of roller, There
are rollers which are birds, there are roll-
ers for grass-courts, there are religious
rollers and there are of course roller skates.
But among the diverse family of rollers
there is none more important, more deserv-
ing of serious attention thar our own wob-
ble-wheel roller. In a report of the Sea-
well Airport Committee signed on Febru-
ary 29 and laid at a meeting of the House
of Assembly on 19th March, 1951, it was
stated that funds are being provided for a
Wobble-wheel Roller and that a wobble-
wheel roller was necessary for Seawell
Airport.

The wobble-wheel roller has come, but
like all wobble-wheel rollers, it needs
something to push it, something in short to
make its wheel wobble while it rolls. That
something was provided for in the wisdom
of the Committee. In part II, Section 3,
item 3, the Committee recommends among
other items of airfield equipment that a
tractor be purchased for $3,000. The tractor
would have three uses. The first use would
be to pull the wobble-wheel roller and
grass cutter. Secondly it would be avail-
able to manoeuvre aircraft on the parking
apron. Thirdly (and to conclude) it would
be available to clear the runway in case of
difficulty or emergency. ;

The report was written on February 17.
It was laid in the House of Assembly on
March 19th. To-day is June the fifth
What action has been taken on the report
of the Seawell Airport Committee ?

None.

The price of tractors in the meanwhile
is not going down. Nor is a tractor the only
thing needful. An extension to the ter-
minal building which will cost $40,000 must
be carried out. A fire engine house to
house the fire engine despatched last week
by the Bruno will cost $6,000. Accommo-
dation for staff and restaurant will cost
$5,000. Other necessary expenditure brings
the total up to $93,000. Every day that
passes without a decision on the Airport
Committee’s report will add to the original
estimated expenditure.

This is no way to administer an island,

The constitutional privileges of Barba-
dos are the envy of other West Indian
islands. But there can be little satisfaction
in hugging those privileges and revelling
in those privileges at the expense of neces-
sary action, It ought to be possible for
urgent priority business to be discussed by
the Barbados House of Assembly at least
once in the year. Could the House not
meet for a five-day week this month and
have action taken on outstanding reports?
Only by some bold action will the heavy
arrears of deferred reports be cleared up.
Only action will substantiate the claim of
our capability as a legislature to get things
done. Clinging to privilege for privilege’s
sake will rouse patriotism and cause fric-
tion, but only business-like despatch of
urgent business such as the report of the
Seawell Airport Committee will give Bar-
bados a reputation, which it now lacks, for
getting on with the job.



U.S. LABOURERS

| The Advocate understands that the 2,000
workers who have been selected to perform
the gruelling work detailed by the United
States selectors last week, will almost cer-
tainly be employed for a minimum of five
months in the United States before return-
ing to Barbados. The present debt that
the taxpayers of Barbados have to meet
with regard to these wrongly-labelled
“emigrants” is two thirds of the cost of
their return from the equivalent of Jamaica
to Barbados. .The workers themsélves will
have deducted from their pay envelopes
while they are in the United States the sum
of two West Indian dollars per week for the
original minimum period of twelve weeks.
The Government of Barbados has decided
to subsidise the labourers to the extent of
two-thirds of the remaining cost of passage

from the equivalent of Jamaica to Barbados.

This burden will have to be borne by the
taxpayers of Barbados unless the Govern-
ment shows greater business acumen than
it has hitherto displayed in this new
policy of doles for a privileged minority at
the expense of the majority who cannot
“emigrate.” Nothing but the low state of
political morality to which we have fallen
could justify such an action, but such
action having been taken, the Government
must ensure that, now that the possibility
of five months’ work in the United States
has been mentioned for these “emigrants”,
ymmedieic action is taken to recoup the
full return passage money and thereby
benefit both workers and their unfortunate
relatives left behind who suffer because
their ‘dole’ money cannot be spent on
them.



MORALITY in America is
dominated by the censor to a de-
gree which the unsophisticated in-
habitants of the Old World may
find puzzling.

The definition of virtue is geo-
metrical and is laid down precise-
ly in codes that govern the cine-
matographic industry. Kisses must
not last more than a certain num-
ber of yards and must be confined
to the face,

It might be thought that while
such codes might determine what
can be shown in public they could
not hope to have much influence
on. private life. This, however,
would be a complete mistake.
They do not, of course, decide
what people do in private, but
they do decide what, pone un-
consciously they consider it right
to do. The consequence is that al-
most the whole nation believes it-
self abandoned to sinful practices.

This has two consequénces: on
the one hand, since the accepted
standard of morals is an impossi-
ble one, everybody in moments of
depression or intoxication is per-
suaded he is a miserable sinner;
on the other hand, prohibitions
have an aphrodisiac effect. I have
never coveted my neighbour’s ox,
but when I remember that I must
not, I am almost: tempted ‘to do
so, ‘



The 79-year-old philosopher-
scientist examines a new sur-
vey by an American of how
the Americans live to-day.

ing prohibition most Americans
thought about liquor morning,
noon and night, and other subjects
had to be content with odd cran-
nies of their minds.

Prohibition in regard te liquor
is at an end but in matters of sex
the censorship is perennial and
the mental effects are very similar
to those which were produced by
prohibition,

The Cynics
One is compelled to suppose that
conventional mioralists are not

“very good psychologists since the

What Goes On

A new. book by Mr. Albert Ellis*®
may be confidently recommended
to ary European who is contem-

lating a journey to the United
states.

He will find in it vast stores of
information far more useful than
anything contained in Baedeker
and if he studies the work dili-
gently he may be able to behave
in such a manner as to increase
the American contribution to the
expenses of European rearmament.

In America, largely I think be-
cause of the prohibitions that still
govern the official pronouncements
of the law, the police, and the
clergy, sex fills the thoughts of
men and women more than in any
other country known to me,

Almost all advertisements, no
matter what the product con-
cerned, are carefully designed to
titillate sexual feelings.

The things that writers of cheap
fiction permit themselves to say
are such as to bring a blush to the
cheek of any hard-boiled French-
man, And even in the most hair-
raising passages there is a sickly
sentimentality which inclines any
person of taste to enter a monas-
tery at once.

I have known America before,
during and after prohibition. Dur-

steps that they take secure results
exactly opposite to those that they
profess to desire,

The attitude about sex in
America is part of a more general
attitude. Americans for the ‘most
part are unable to face reality ex-
cept in a mood of cynicism. One
finds this, for exampie, in politics.

They have a set of ideal rules
which they imagine that a virtu-
ous politician would obey, but the
rules are such as would cause any
man to be out of politics in a
week. Consequently, it is recog-
nised that no politician can be
virtuous according to the nominal
code,

He Is Wise

It follows, so at least the aver-
age American concludes, that a
politician cannot be justly blamed
whatever crimes he may commit.
It ddes not seem to occur to any-
one that a moral code, if it is to
serve a useful purpose, should not
be something totally divorced from
practical life, but something which
real live people in actual situations
may be able to follow.

There would be much less con-
fusion than there now is in Ameri-
can thought and feeling if this
view of moral codes were general-
ly adopted both in matters of
politics and in questions of sex,



BARBADOS

Mr. _Ellis’s

throughout is

point of

wise

view
and enlight-

terprise views sex a¢ a commodity
which may be profitably sold for
public consumption, This is true
of advertisemen' not only
America, but als@ in, England.

In America, , Owing to
the fact that ertisers have
more money to spend, the evil is
much greater in ree. He points
out that a cult lag permits
many highly illogical, inconsistent
and immature sex views to linger
on decades and centuries beyond
their original u ness and logi-
eal applicability te human affairs.”

It is a curious phenomenon that
a country which leads the word in
mechanised technique still lingers
in the 17th century in matters of
thought. It is earnestly to be
hoped that the superiority of
America in armed force will noi
be employed in destroying what is
best in the outlook of the Old
World.

There is in America, and to a
lesser degree in England, a three-
fold division in what people sa)
and think on moral questions.

There is first of all the officia!
code handed down from the past
which cannot be publicly floutec
without sevére pénalites, social i
not legal.

There is next what people’s own
reflections have led them to be-
lieve consciously. This, in many
people, perhaps in most, is much
less strict than the traditional
code. ”

in

The Turmoil

But thirdly beneath what people
consciously think, there is still the
unconscious effect of early up-
bringing, which is usually in line
with the old conventions.

The result is a turmoil in the
mind and a lack of consistency in
action. As Mr. Ellis puts it:

e sexual discomfort and incon-
venience, even when basic sex
needs are partly satisfied, motivate
millions of Americans to act dif-
ferently than they think and un-
consciously to think differently
than they consciously permit
themselves to think they think.”

If modern men are to have men-
tal health they must learn hon-
esty in thought and feeling, even
when honesty compels some de-
parture from the precepts that
they imbibed in infancy.

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED

* The Folklore of Sex by Albert
Ellis (published by Charles Boni,
New York, 5 dollars).

L.E.S.



How Hard Is Life For The
Mien Who Escape ?

PARIS,
SETTING in the sum watching

the tennis at the Roland
Garros

Drobny—the former Czech tennis
champion who fled from behind
the Iron Curtain nearly two
years ago, Beside him was’ Vladi-
slav Skonecky, the Davis Cup
player, who has just decided not
to return to Poland. Skonecky
disappeared from the Polish
Davis Cup team in Switzerland,
has now arrived in Paris seeking
asylum,

It was in July 1949 that Drobny
—the former Prague ball-boy who
became champion of Czecho-
Slovakia and No. 1 player in
Europe—defied an order forbid-
ding him to play against a Ger-
man and a Spaniard. With his
friend and runner-up Vladimir
Czernik he refused to return home
from Switzerland, where he was
playing at the time.

No Job

How has Drobny lived since
then? As we sat together in the
sun Drobny told me the story.

The Swiss gave him an identity
card when he exiled himself from
Czecho-Slovakia. But they would
not allow him to work in Switzer-
land, Drabny soon found that this
bit of paper was by no means
equivalent tp a passport, Also he
discovered that a man without a
country finds it hard to get a job.

Back in Prague he had been a
clerk in a branch of the Bata
Shoe Company, which made tennis
balls. He had a pleasant bachelor
flat and a small car, and he always
had enough pocket money to keep
him going in the tennis capitals
where the firm allowed him to
spend most of his time.

Quitting his country, he quitted
his job too,

When it proved impossible to
work in Switzerland he made his
way to the United States, think-
ing to find a future there, So long



stadium was Jaroslav ys.

By EVELYN IRONS.

as he played tennis, life in the

‘S.A, was easy. rican ten~
nis clubs and associations pay
the living and travel expenses of
amateur players, Also they allow
a bit extra for incidentals.

They Forgot

It was between matches when
he was not playing, that Drobny
found life difficult,

“I found that people forgot
about me as soon as the tourna-
ment ended.” he said. In
the U.S.A., as in Switzerland, it
was just not possible for a state-
less alien to make a living by
working.

Now in spite of the cynics a
man cannot make a living from
amateur tennis. Drobny was
very thankful when early last

year he was offered a job in
Egypt.
The offer came from a cotton

magnate who lives in a palace in
Cairo and is a tennis enthusiast.
He was in Czecho - Slovakia
before the war and he saw
Drobny play. They met.

Now this magnate has befriend-
ed Drobny and made it possible
for him to continue his tennis
career.

In March 1950 Drobny became
an Egyptian citizen. Also he
began work as a cotton salesman.
He will not disclose his salary.
But he says that it is “adequate”:
and on’ top of it he gets a com-
mission on sales of raw cottoa
effected through his introductions.
“IT have opportunities of meeting
businessmen socially all over the
world,” Drobny said. “I do not
actually carry out the sales—I am
the contact man. I have done
quite well so far.”

Drobny was completely with-
‘out experience of cotton growing
and selling. But he is making
a serious study of it. He recently

OUR READERS SAY

No! Nobody
To the Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—Fifteen years ago when
Mr. Nobody was thoroughly ap-
proving of the ‘“bloomered”
Queen’s College girl competing
for the High Jump, I was in-
dulging in the vaults, considered
violent by Mr. Nobody, and en-
joyed so much by the Queen’s
College girl of to-day.

Now, with appendages normal,
IT am married with a family, and
I hasten to assure him that his
horrible fears for the future of
these girls are quite groundless.
Advanced vaulting calls for ef-
fort, control, relaxation, confi-
dence and courage combined
with perfect co-ordination of
brain and muscle — all valuable
qualities to develop for later life.

Lest the public
erroneous impression.

get an
I would

Wot! No Sonny ?

SIR,—I was very interested to
observe in the Sunday Advo-
cate that the Governor had se-
lected Mr, Mapp to be the latest
member of the so called Labour
Party to go to England on a
‘joy ride’, free of cost.

What I would like to know is,
what has happened to “Sonny”?
When is his turn coming for a
trip? All the others seem to have
had a turn,

A trip to some big country
would, I am sure, be very bene-
ficial to “Sonny”. He could study
all the latest methods in moving
houses and huts, also, he might
even take a course in +e
Divining,” so‘ that some o 3°
unfortunate Barbadians in “the
country districts, may get a little
water in a few years’ time. I am
assuming that by that time, with
the Persian Oilfields nationalized,
there may be a few water pipes
available for all the suffering

like to state that in actual effort, people of. Barbados. -

these vaults are not as strenuous

, Surely the Governor-in-Exe-

as the competitive High Jump cutive Committee can arrange a

(even of 15 years ago), where a trip for
88 poor

maximum effort is required

“Sonny?
fellow is

I hear the
getting quite

one strives to improve on the worked up about it,—quite right
previous jump, and no spring- too! If there are free trips for

board
leaper.

is supplied to aid
Yours faithfully,

GYMNAST.

the the “faithful boys”, why should

he not have his turn too?
Yours faithfully,
“CURIOSITY”.

went on an intensive tour of his
firm’s cotton-growing land in
Upper Egypt.

He cannot, of course, represent
his new country th Davis Cup
matches; for, having once been

a Davis Cu layer for one coun-! : : ‘
aun m caer : Housewives complain that fisk is hard to

{

|

try, one cannot switch to another,
Drobny can never appear in tne
Davis Cup match for any country
but his own. But be plays for
Egypt in other tournaments,

To-day Drobny says he feels
reasonably secure for the first
time since the Iron
clanged down behind him. Settling
down and getting married?
“Not yet, I must save first.” He
is frugal; never smokes, hardly
ever drinks,

From January to March (those
are the best months for tennis
in Egypt) Drobny lives in a
Cairo boarding-house (“rather
like your private hotels in South
Kensington”) He is often to be
seen at the luxurious Gezira
sporting club.

He speaks no Arabic,
by with French and _ English.
Every day he talks his own
language with his friend Czernik.
who is also a naturalised Egyp-
tian living in Cairo, and frequent-
ly meets other exiled Czechs
working for the Bata shoe factory
at Alexandria,

The rest of the year he is tour-
img the world. Last November
and December he was playing
tennis in India and Pakistan.

Father Stayed

His father and mother are in
Prague, where Drobny senior | is
still a tennis groundsman. “He
has remained a simple working
man,” explained hig son, “It is I
who joined the bourgeoisie’ and
so became unpopular with the
men at the top.”

He has not heard from his pa-
rents for two years.

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED
—L.E.S.

getti

—_-_e-~-—

Registration

SIR,—Allow me through your
columns just to state, that an ex-
planation should be given to the
public with regards to the differ-
ence of registering on “Form A’
from that of “Form B”, as I am
sure there are many who do not
quite understand the difference.

According to a statement men-
tioned in your columns, I had
seen that if one did not then
register (with the registering
officer) he would find himself in
the position of not being able to
vote; and in a further statement
it was refuted by saying that “Ti
is not true, that if one was not
registered on “Form A” that there
was no one that could prevent him
from registering on “Form B”,

Now Sir, I have been registerec
by the registration officer, at his
first call, but I was never told
whether it was “Form A” or
Form B”, and I must commend
the honourable member who has
brought it to our attention.

I am hoping Sir, that the
registering officers are finding
their task much easier, because 1
am sure the people are more en-
lightened now since it has been
explained at Queen’s Park, and
other places.

L. B. CLARKE.
May 30, 1951

ened.
He points out that capitalist e

ADVOCATE

BERTRAND RUSSELL _ \No-DrinkCitySumsUp the

Asks: Are These Moral Codes Out Of Date?

Curtain ;

| tubes or into bottles quaintly labelled lighter
| fuel and poison, .

ing three times the normal price.



TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1951





CLOSED
FOR

REPAIRS

First Dry Year

From JAMES LEASOR
BOMBAY.

WHEN the rains break over this burning |
city (they are due three weeks from now) iti {
will become the wettest in the world—but
at this moment it is the driest. Reason:
Bombay is celebrating the end of its first year
of total prohibition.

Celebration is, perhaps, hardly the correct
word in a city where even a wedding toast is
drunk in fizzy lemonade. But at least some
citizens have cause for rejoicing. They are
the bootleggers, than whom no class is eur-
rently more successful.

Twelve months back these characters were
lowly liftmen, porters, and sweepers—the
lowest Indian caste of all.

Now they live in sea-front houses in Mar-
ine-drive, have white American roadsters,
and their wives 1,000-rupee (£75) saris. They
owe their sudden affluence to the absurd pro-
hibition policy started as a sop to Gandhi’s
words.

Once he said that if he had self-govern-
ment for one hour only, his first act would be
to ban foreign liquor. Hence, total prohibi-
tion in Bombay and Madras and one dry day
a week in Delhi.

QUESTIONNAIRE

Westerners who want a drink — curiously
referred to officially as addicts—have to
queue for hours in a steamy office to answer
a questionnaire.

The questionnaire includes such non-drink-
ing questions as where they were brought
up, and their monthly income. After due
bureaucratic delay they may be awarded one
to four units for one month, which means a
maximum of four bottles of gin.

An appeal may be made on medical
grounds, but the Director of Prohibition
though a non-medical man, can either quash
or grant it,

So much for the official means of getting
drink, They never made anyone rich, but
the unofficial ways have made hundreds
wealthy.

Backyard brewers operate in every street

Advocate Stationery

FIBRE MATS

Plain and Patterned

CON GOLEUM — 6 ft wide

in various patterns

PLASTIC OILCLOTH

45 inches

in four sizes

wide

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.
Successors to

C.S. PITCHER

"Phones : 4472 & 4687

LTD.

& CO.



PPO a II IOI III



Only a few...
‘SILENT KNIGHT’

KEROSENE OIL

REFRIGERATORS

LEFT IN STOCK

Will those who asked for a refusal on one,

— OOOO:

call before they are all sold!

in the kitchens of wealthy householders, .
where underpaid servants augment their
meagre incomes by running home-made DaCOSTA & Co.. Ltd.
stills. ,
They soak a handful of sugar molasses in or = . oe nals =

ea

water, ferment it, and distil it. This takes
time and also smells, so they accelerate the
brewing by throwing into the brew-pot a
handful of ammonium chloride.

The production of the drink is quickened

alarmingly, but the product does no good to
the drinker’s stomach.

DUMPED CARGO



NOW IN STOCK
GREEN WATERPROOFED

CANVAS

72 inches wide at

$8.25 per yard

- ALSO -
GREEN BIRKMYRE

CANVAS |

72 inches wide at

$7.43 per yard

Secure your requirements

buy. The fishermen are after more lucrative
hauls frorn the bosom of the sea. Large boats
packed with booze come up from Goa in Por-
tuguese territory. They dump their cargo
over the side and mark the position with a
float.

In the darkness fishing boats collect it and
bring it ashore in déserted creeks. There it
is either buried for future disposal or poured
into false petrol tanks on cars, or into inner

Touts offer black whisky in big hoteis
for 75 rupees (£5 12s. 6d.) a bottle about

Before prohibition many labourers lived
mainly on dried fish and toddy, a local drink
made by tapping palm trees and fermenting
the juice in the sun.

This of course is now illegal but they still
like the taste so much that the Government
makes a watery imitation—palm tree juice
that has not stood in the sun.

It is called neera and efforts by the people
to take it home and sun it themselves are
thwarted as it must be drunk at the place of
sale,

The cost of this absurd campaign so far is
12,000,000 rupees (£900,000) lost in revenue

Fiem <

Da COSTA & CO, LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT




















and tourists’ trade about une-fifth of Bom- wai pa poh are
bay’s total revenue. TRY TV 1 DAY
INSPECTION V
Also crime is violently increasing. Half of B A R L 0 A
Bombay’s police are on the look-out for stills MALT MILK and EGG

and secret drinking. All roads in and out of
the city have police blocks and all travellers
are inspected.

The other day returning in a car from a

with Chocolate Flavour
16 02, size $1.22
8 oz. size .65





bathe at Junu Beach 15 miles out I had the Ondet . 5:4

experience of breathing hard in a policeman’s|$ J & R SANDWIC

face while he smelled my breath for alcohol. . 2
What a performance as the late Sid Field RREAD LA Ss a.

would have said.

I wanted to ask Bombay’s Minister for Ex-
cise and Reconstruction L. M. Patel, one of
the city’s keenest prohibitionists know things
were going but he has left on a tour to see
for himself.

He left behind a statement though, saying:
“It gives me great pleasure to find ex-addicts

for the Picnic Thursday , AG “2

Sweet Counter ms
Canadian Chocolates WRITTANIA
Hreakfast Food





Kit Gat Chocolates
Sharp’s Toffees
Butter Almonds



: : : Marsh Ma zi Wheat Pruffs ready to serve
without exception: stating they were im- After di ints ie per 8 oz, pkg.
mensely benefited due to prohibition and ee

that their homes were more happy and peace-
ful than at any time before. Many of them
nad been able to pay off their long-standing

Cocktail Biscuits

Cake decorations

Carr’s Ice Cream Wafers
Jack Straws

Specials

Minah Tea 39c. per % Ib.
Cooks Paste 6 cents each





debts.” Glucose Tea Time Paste .15 per jar
For myself I have not so far met any of |
these happy people—only a number of char-j Milk Fresh Vegetables
acters prowling in dark corners who have; Archor Milk Powder | il ;
offered me booze at fabulous prices. Conciensed “Mii | Baily
Gloria Evap. Milk

Perhaps they are ex-addicts trying to pay
off their long-standing debts in Bombay's
easiest way.

—PSPPPOLPLPOL SEATS VAL OSSSCSFFFSSS FO

~

%,

ORDER To-Day from GODDARDS

VOOSSSSSGSSSOOSSSOGSSSSESSSSOGSSSS OS SS OSGOOD IOOS

s

—L.E.S.
a,

TUESDAY, JUNE 1951



_ Dispute

Supt Of °49-

00 Queried

THE CHRISTIAN MISSION case in which Frederick A.
Barrow and others have brought an action against Dalton L.

Hoyte and others dis

puting who was the rightful superin-

tendent in 1949 and 1950 continued at the Court of Chancery

yesterday and was adjourned until the
His Honour the Vice Chancellor

presiding.

Last time the case was heard,

legal points were raised and yes-
terday the Vice-Chancellor ruled
partly in favour of submissions
for Hoyte who is rep-esented by
Mr. G. H. Adams associated with
Mr. D. H. L, Ward,

Counsel. for Hoyte had objected
that the action was not maintain-
able because the

le Christian
Mission was a corporate body and
Barrow and the other plaintiffs

should sue in a corporate capacity,

Mr. W. W. Reece and Mr. J. S. B.
Dear represented Barrow.

The Vice-Chancellor said that a
review of the authorities cited and
others went to show that that sub-
mission was valid in so far as all
the claims, other than that for
the declaration, were concerned.

No Authority

He could find no _ authority
which debarred the claim by in-
dividuals of declaration that such
individuals properly constituted
the general superintendent ana
the Board of Management.

In the suit, Barrow and the 20
other plaintiffs claim the account
of the dealings by Hoyte and the
other defendants with the money,
goods, effects and property of the
mission during their term of
office. They claim the delivery to
themselves of all money, goods,
documents and such other things

They also claim the declaration
that Barrow is the Superintendent
of the mission for the year 1949
together with the other plaintiffs
who constitute the Board ot
Management of the Mission for
the same year.

On the other hand Hoyte and
the others denied the allegations
and claim the possession of the
Gospel Tabernacle and the office
attached. They want an account
of the dealings by Barrow and
the others with the money and
other property belonging to the
Mission during 1949 and up te
the hearing of the suit.

They also want a_ declaration
that Hoyte was the genera)
superintendent of the Mission for
1949-50 and he and the other de-
fendants were the Board of
Management for the same period.

Ownership Trial

The Court held that the trial
of the issue whether Barrow and
others or Hoyte and others con-
stituted the General Superinten-
dent and Board of Management
of the Mission had necessarily to
precede the trial of the other
issues which involved the owner-
ship of the corporation’s money
and property.

The Vice-Chancellor said that
it was to be noted that the
declarations sought were as re-
gards the position and rights of
the periods in 1949 and 1950, and
counsel might consider, before the
hearing was continued, whether,
by amendment of the pleadings or

otherwise, the conclusion might
not be reached.

This conclusion would be
at any rate, in part, by

the declaration by the Court to
the present position and rights of
the parties.

Counsel for MHoyte asked for
admission that in accordance with
the rules, Hoyte had been the
last Superintendent who had been
elected.

If the Christian Mission
Herald was not in.existence dur-
ing 1949, Counsel was arguing
that Hoyte was still Superinten-
dent during that period.

Counsel for Barrow said that
they were properly appointed in
1949 and 1950,

A new bill will be filed so that
a conclusion may be reached as
to the present position and rights
of the property.

Council for Barrow will also
reply to Mr. Adams call for
admissions.










18th.
, Sir Allan Collymore is

‘Nelson’ Makes
Direct Trip

THE Lady Nelson is expected to
arrive here from British Guicna
via Trinidad on Wednesday
morning to load sugar and
molasses for Canadian ports. She
will be taking passengers.

The Nelson will be fhe first
“ledy liner” to make a direct call
from Trinidad to Barbados. C.N.S
lady boats have always sailéd to
Barbados from British Guiana via
Trinidad, Grenada and St. Vincent.

The Nelson is making this direct
trip because she is late.

She is expected to leave port on
Friday evening for Montreal via

the British Northern Islands,
Bermuda, Boston and Halifax.
She is consigned to Messrs.

Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd.

Fruit, Charcoal

Brave Weather

SCHOONER Adalina arrived
here over the\week-end laden with
supplies of firewoad, charcoal,
cocoanuts, fresh fruit and cocoa-



nut oil. Most of the fruit were
mangoes.

The Adalinma took four days
sailing from St. Lucia. She
normally does it in about two
days. Captain Flemming said that

the wind was light. He met a
strong southwest current through-
out the trip.

He experienced lots of thunder
and lightning when he was coming
in to Barbados on Saturday night.
Except for the little bad weather,
the trip was fine,

The Adalina has been berthed
alongside the Pier Head to dis-
charge her cargo. People flocked
yesterday especially for the char-
coal. The Adalina is consigned to
the Schooner Owners’ Association.

The ‘Wolfe’ On Dock

THE 74-ton schooner Marion
Belle Wolfe has been on dry dock
here for the past two weeks. She
is expected to spend another week
on dock.

The Wolfe is undergoing ex-
tensive repairs to her hull. Old
timbers and rotten copper are
being replaced. Part of the hull
has to be painted,

When she comes off dock, she
will be taking cargo for British
Guiana. Her agents are Messrs.
Schooners Owners’ Association.

_ . e
Engineer Killed
Joseph Barnes, a 60-year-old
engineer of Greenwich Village,
St. James, died on the spot when
he was involved in an accident
at Vaucluse Factory at about

10.25 a.m. yesterday.

Barnes was sharpening tools
when he was suddenly caught up
in a belt and hurled to the
ground,

The body was removed to the
mortuary wihere a post mortem
examination was performed by
Dr. A. C. Kirton, P.M.O, of St.
Lucy.







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Ruling Required In Christian

ANOTHER HOYS’ CLUB



‘



SOON after the Boys’ Club. was opened at Clevers Hill yesterday evening members began to take an

interest in the various games. Th



OVERTIME

THE “ADVOCATE” has
been asked by the United
States Labour selectors who
visited Barbados last week to
state that overtime is paid
normally to workers in the
United States, in accordance
with the Fair Labour Stan-
dards Act of 1938.

But with regard to the Bar-
badian labourers who have
been selected for agricultural
work over a temporary period,
there is an exemption from
the Fair Labour Standards
Act for those employed in the
canning industry.

As the Barbadian workers

will be employed in work
which is subsidiary to the
canning industry overtime

will not be paid.



Girls’

No Selection Of

Workers Today
1,814 ALREADY CHOSEN

and thrty-one
more Barbadian workers were
yesterday selected and examined
at Queen’s Park for work in the
United States. Tihis brings the
number to 1,814. Approximately }
186 more are needed.

There will be no recruiting
today. Men who were summoned
for. yesterday and were not
attended to, and those summoned
for today, will be informed
through the Press when they are
required. This does not in any
way refer to those men who have
been selected and examined and
told to report back for results.

Mr. “Bill” Tyier who did
selecting yesterday, said that

Two hundred

the
me

standard of the men that day was Class. One boy particularly had
very poor, the poorest he had seen proved himself to be a great
so far. artist. He would not have been
The failure of a person to be able to show his qualities if the
selected was not attributable to Boys’ Club was not formed
one thing as many believed, he Col, Michelin said that the boys
said. He explained that it was must behave and conduct them
important to bear in mind the gelves properly. No boy must use
kind of work a man had to do, bad language or be unruly. BR,
and therefore several things had would he suspended for a month
to be taken into consideration in or two if he did not live up to the
that respect. He had long ex- syles of the Club.
perience in selecting men and he

knew exactly what to look for.
The workers are going to b«
employed for about ten to twelve

weeks, but it is hoped to get
further employment for them, the
Labour Commissioner told the ’

Advocate yesterday.

will

their

ese boys

are testing their ability at a@ominoes.

First Girls’ Cl

ub

In B’dos Opened

The first Girls’ Club in the island was opened at Clevers
Hill. St. Joseph, yesterday evening. Opposite this club a
Boys’ Club was opened too, Both buildings are rented by

the Police,

Usually when these Clubs are being opened the represent-
atives of the parish in the House of Assembly are present.
Unfortunately Mr. G. H. Adams, Senior Member for St.

Joseph, was not there. Mr. L. E. Smith, the Junior Member,
was present, however.

Fifty boys of St, Joseph have

already registered

The Girls’ Club has a membership

of thirty,

as

members.

Colonel R. T. Michelin, Commis-

sioner of Police, said that it was
the sixth Boys’ Club and the first
opened. The
Clubs already formed catered for
over 350 boys. In September last
Club was
The Com-
missioner svid that it is the inten-

Club being

year the first
formed at Bay Stree

Boys”

at.

tion of the Police Force to form a

Club in every paris

The Clubs are here to provide
healthy recreation for the boys in
their leisure time”, Colonel Mich-
“These Clubs
purely places of sport, The boys
learn some trade

lin’ said.

lave the opportuni

hands,”

1,

are not
They will

ty of

Keen Interest

He said that at

interest in gardenin

District

g. Each

bov

sells the vegetables he grows and

he gets 50 per cent of the sales. At

the Clubs at District

interest in carpentr
turning out some gc

He said that he hoped the Clubs
would eventually be run by the
community i
Although the Police had organised
the Clubs they wanted them to be

of

un by a Committee,

“C” and Bay

Street the boys had taken a great
are
At
the Bay Street Club there is an Art

They
work,

y.
od

the district

formed from

@ On Page 8



Colonial Secretary Has the Petition

The petition of the
Registering Officers for better
compensation for their work has
been sent to the Colonial Secre-
tary, Mr. L. A. Chase, Register-

ing Supervisor, told _ the
Advocate yesterday,
An Assistant Officer told the

Advocate on Saturday that they

Per yd.



Assistant had

against dark grounds.

Per Yard:

nH Demet em te ei Ne es

sent this petition to the
Supervisor a few weeks ago but
Mad got no reply.

This petition which was ad-
dressed to the Colonial Secretary,
said Mr. Chase yesterday, had
been brought to him with the
request that he forward it to the
Colonial Secretary. Within ten



Seintillating
Sea Island





minutes he thad

knew nothing more
matter.

All the field w
registration of pers

done

He
the

so.
about

ork

ons

of the
desirous

of voting has now been complet-

the Advocate
Preliminary

ed

day.

}

le

arnt yester-
ists are now

being compiled, it was said.

— —
eee eee

Cotton Fabrics

wide.

$5.06, $5.07, $6.22 &

IN PLAIN COLOURS ”
of Pink, White, and
Turquoise. 36 ins. wide
Bee Ware 2 $3.00

IN FIGURED LINGERIE
DESIGNS

$.339

A wide variety of the most beautiful patterns in large designs

Also in Paisley patterns—36 inches

$3.19, $3.56, $3.57, $4.55,

$6.26



CAVE

SHEPHERD

& Co., Ltd.
10-13 Broad St.

using

“an

Station the boys had taken « keen

Malaria Eradication
Campaign On

Dr. L, A. P. Slinger, O.B:E.,
Director of Medical Services in
British Honduras told_ the

Advocate yesterday that there is
a malaria eradication campaign
going on in the colony and they
are spraying every house twice a
year With D.D.T,

This he said, had been made
possible by means of a grant from
‘ie United Nations International
Children’s Emergency Fund.
U.N.I.C.E.F, he added, is also
giving school meals to children.

There are various schemes in
the colony for improving hospi-
tals and institutions, British
Honduras is now being developed
in a big way and the Medica)
Services have got to keep in pace
with the development.

Dr. Slinger arrived
week-end by B.W.1.A. for the
Conference of Senior Medical
Officers of the Caribbean area
which opened at Hastings House
vesterday morning. He is stay-
ing at the Marine Hotel

1,000 Acres Burnt

ONE THOUSAND ACRES of
ripe canes were burnt during
this year, Fires occutred all over
the island, but mainly in the
windward parishes.

Fifty acres of young canes and
90 acres of ratoons were also
burnt, Up to the end of May the

over the



number of fires so far was 172.
A comparison for the same
period ending May 31, last year

showed that the acreage burnt
was 745 acres ripe canes, 20 acres
young canes and 41 acres of
ratoons, The number of fires was
158.

“HERDSMAN” LOADING

HARRISON Liner S.S. Herds-
man anchored at Speightstown
yesterday morning to load 3,475
tons of sugar for Liverpool, Eng-
land. She is expected to sail for
England around the end of the
week, The Herdsman is consign
ed to Messrs. Da Costa & Co,, Ltd

Unconscrous Sailor

GREGORY TROCHE, a sailor of
the S.S. Alcoa Pegasus was taken
to the General Hospital at about
1.40 a.m, yesterday in an uncon-
scious condition, He was de-
tained.





Miss

‘ |
ion |
Fined £2 For |
Bodily Harm

In the Assistant Court of
Appeal yesterday, Justices G. L
Taylor and J. W. B. Chenery
confirmed a decision of Mr. C. L.
Wai n, Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A” who imposed a
fine of £2 and 2/- costs to be
paid in 21 days or in default two
months’ imprisonment on Louise
Simpso6n of My Lord’s Hill for
inflicting bodily harm’ on Marjorie
Murrell.

The offence was committed on
April 2. Simpson appealed
against Mr. Walwyn’s decision
and was also ordered yesterday tc
pay the cost of appeal © which
amounted 7/8.

She Longed To Go
To B.G: Fined £5

LENA CHARLES a labourer 01
Deightons, St. Michael was place.
on a bond for six months in the
sum of £5 by a District “A” Police
Magistrate for secreting herself on
the schooner Emeline on May 18

The Captain of the Emeline sai
that he never found out that the
defendant was aboard the schooner
until they were near to Demerara,
He was forced to bring her back as
the authorities there would no
have anything’To do with her.

Charles was fined ¢5 on April 28
for committing a similar offence.
Asked. by the Magistrate what she
had to say. ibout the case, Lena
Charles said “Sir I have always
lofiged to go to B.G.”

Lena Charles was born in St.
Lucia.



t

Lumber Crowd
Out Cargo Space

ALMOST all the landing space
for cargo in the inner basin of the
Careenuge was taken up yesterday
by heaps of Douglas fir lumber,

During the day, lighters were
bringing in more lumber. They
seemed to be discharging their

leads faster than waterfront
workers were removing the
lumber.

Discharging the lumber here is
the S.S. Mormacrey which called
from Vancouver and Seattle
Friday. She brought a total of
47,689 pieces and 12,986 bundles
of fir. The shipment came for
Messrs. T. Geddes Grant Ltd,

On Murder Charge



Joseph Cumberbatch, 32, a
labourer of Rose Hill, St.
Peter, was yesterday remanded

on a charge of murder following
the death of Cecil Jackman of
Ashton Tenantry, St. Peter.
Jackman died of stab wounds on
Sunday night.

An inquiry into the cifeum-
stances sutrounding Jackman’s
death was adjourned until next
Monday by Coroner Mr. 8, H
Nurse. The inquiry was being

held at District “E”

BLACKGUARD

A fine of 10/- and 1/- costs to
be paid in 14 days or in default,
14 days’ imprisonment was im-
posed on Euna Pile of Cane Hill,
St. Michael by a _ District “A”
Police Magistrate for black-
guarding on Cane Hill Road on
April 21.

BEGGED ALMS

Sentence of three months’ im-
prisonment was yesterday passed |
on James Chandler, a Jabour.r: of
Orange Hill, St. James, by a City
Police Magistrate for begging
alms on Broad Street on May 29.
Chandler later gave notice of
appeal.







RICE FROM B.G.

A SHIPMENT of 500 bags ol!
rice bran, 500 bags of rice reject
and 100 bags of polished rice
arrived for Barbados on Sunday by
the schooner Emeline. They ar-
rived from British Guiana,

8 LD’S
Notifications of Infectious Dis-
eases for May were: Diphtheria 3;
Enteric Fever 2; Tuberculosis 3. |






: ; 4 cee Oe .
| IMPERIAL LEATAER



WF

nr

.

\Cussons |



PPPS II GCOS CONGO OCG OOOO OO FON
“1, a
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‘tans

~ wip





hy

ask for

SOAPS ;

4

oe

WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND

ABDOL

Improved Vitamin Capsules in a palatable form containing
and D. A Nutritive Tonic in Capsule form,
indicated in conditions of Vitamin Deficiency

vitamins A, Bl, B2

LLOELOPLA PID LODLS
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tne
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1

PAGE FIVE





eaenennenene = The nane speaks for iicclf SERNSSREDESy
gy +

? : ‘ aid or fe
5 ns Mite oraer

Blood / © ;

’ re

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Helps to cleanse the system H
from blood impurities =
impurities in the blood muy cause rheumatic e
aches and pains, stiff and painful joints, .
boils, pimples and common skin disorJers. ry
Clarke’s Biood Mixture Lelps to purify i z

the blood, cleanses the syst-a and assists ; a

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Sareeressseenenseseent ©” oo OT eSB NRE SASeee eae



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only $6.34 each

RANSOME'’S
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PRICES COMPLETE WITH GRASS BOX:

from $38.17 to $46.60 eaeln

ALL METAL
WHEEL BARROWS

Heavy Gauge Steel — 3 cubic ft. Capacity
-—
at $15.17 eaeh
A LIGHTER
Fitted

in and









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Each in 2 sizes and



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with Rubber Tyred Wheel and

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STREET





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pil. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Dbistributors.
SERRE R KAR EH BEB

eo





FOOD BUYS



IRAQ DATES, 12 oz. Pkt,
KRAFT CHEESE, 8 oz. Pkt
12 oz. Tir

DANISH CAMAMBERT CHE
ITALIAN TOMATO PASTE
SMEDLEYS GARDEN ‘ROOT
LEMINE MALTED MILK POWDER
BAHAMAS CRUSHED PINEAPPLE
FRENCH MUSHROOMS

MARVENS CANADIAN SODA BISCUITS
LETONA CREAM OF GREEN PEA SOUP
AUSTRALIAN ASPARAGUS SOUP
JACK STRAWS, Large Pkts



k
y



Bavnk ian ms a

Bah mh

ba
PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1951

oe iva

bietany BY CARL ANDERSON |f} 7
ef | | Gums Bleed,
| Sensational New Make-up | el
&

: ee
|

















— ge ea"
| Stop Pyorrhea and
Trench Mouth
in 24 Hours

Bleeding gums, sore mouth, or loose
teeth mean that you are a victim of Pyor-
rhea or Trench Mouth, or some bad disease
that will eventually cause you to lose all
i teeth and have to wear false teeth
wi












MICKEY MOUSE
— _{ OHNO.
- WOULD
BET MINNIE'LL BE MAD UNDERSTAND!
WHEN SHE FINDS You'RE
GOIN’ OUT WITH THUH FAMOUS
STAR *HESTER O”

















GOSH... MOST REALISTIC DREAM
l EVBR HAD!






=e

vere ar these mouth diseases have spread
throughout the world so that now scien-
tists say that four out of every five people

| | are sooner or later. Be warned in



| time and stop these diseases before it is

too late, because they often cause not only
the loss of teeth, but also chronic rheuma~
tism and heart trouble.

New Discovery Saves Teeth

,. the discovery of an American
scientist, fights these troubles in a new
and quick way. It pen*trates right to the
root of the t

BUT, MINNIE oes
HSESTER 1S wUSTA
GOOD FRIENP!

rouble, stops gums from bleed-
ing the very first day, quickly takes the
soreness out of your mouth, and soon
tightens the teeth. The following letter
r W. W. B. shows the results that



Amosan users get: “I suffered from Trench
Mouth and Pyorrhea for ten years. My
ms were sore and bleeding and © had

{
| four , while several other teeth
were agiting Yoosey, all the time i tried
. ) many Ings am hen heard of this new
NEWI Not a cake make-up, not a greasy foundation! Tasvenrd kmsans. th 4c noure afiee use
5 7 . pmaese my ee had stopped bleeding.
he soreness in my mouth disappeared !n
in two weeks I





“Angel Face” is foundation and powder all in one. No wet sponge, three days and f I found that
no greasy fingertips. “Angel Face” goes on easily and smoothly with my loose teeth were much tighter and that
its own white puff. Gives you a soft, velvety complexion instantly. I could eat the hardest of icod.

Guoranteed
Ampson works so fast und so cern
that it is guaranteed to stop your gums
from bleeding, end sore unouth and tighten

NEW! Stays on longer than powder!
your teeth to your compiete satisiaction or

The special ‘‘cling’ ingredient fused into ‘Angel Face” makes it money back on return of empty package.
stay on much longer than ordinary powder. And It's never drying, Don't take achance on osing “our teeth or
never greasy. suffering the dangers from rheumatisin
and heart trouble. Get Amoson from your



BLONDIE WILL BE
SO SURPRISED --
SHE'LL PROBABLY J)

GIVE MEA BIG OS® 7












'M-GLAD I QUIT
THE GAME WHEN
I O10 --FOR
ONCE I'M

BLONDIE -- re 'M TOO
DO YOU KNOW SN SLEEPY TONIGHT
WHAT TIME I'M

GETTING HOME?.) \



chemist today under this i: on-clad guaran-

tae, You sis:

’ : nothing ar th)

NEW! Can’t spill! | Amosarasiicic®

* tects you. ‘

You'll say Pond’s “Angel Face’ is the most convenient make-up you've For Pyorrkea--Trench Mouia
ever used — it can’t spill over handbag or clothes, It’s perfect to use .

anytime, anywhere,










Choose from five angelic shades: Blonde Angel, Ivory Angel, Pink
Angel, Tawny Angel, Bronze Angel. At all the best beauty counters,

CHECK THAT
COUGH
WITH
BROWNE'S
CERTAIN

COUGH SYRUP
It Relieves Colds Quickly.





5-16 _ i oN

THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER

MERRIER cad THe vay, xt } ELL ALL GO WITH “ LEE IN TOWN.) WE MUST TRY \ ( WE'RE HOLDIN'GUNS READY. ON
rae THE MAN CALLED "Tag e > ce RUN iF * ta WRENS ie on re \FALSE MOVE,AN’ WELL SHOOT BOTH
rs S, eae ;

v- OF YOu






WHATEVER IS
THE MEAL
IT’S ALWAYS
IMPROVED
WITH A

FEW SLICES










C. CARLTON BROWNE

136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813
Wholesale & Retail Druggist









BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS
ee EG eR ec eR Rint ARGU MarOMTE BR COMER Cas OR TARP aera aa

| Meat Hunch
: Luncheon Beef & Cereal,
Peas

Tomatoes,

JUST RECEIVED
Tins Vienna Sausages,

» Bausages

» Potted Meat

» Corned Beef & Cereal
Downs Australian Hams

» Ox Tongues

» Table Butter is
Tomato Juice

'



{| - ccna
(LL FIX HIM 6O He
JUST SIT AROUND - /’t



O/T GOT THE GOUT IN My ©
GHT ARM-ANII CUT MY |

J) THUMB -IIM ALL LAID UP

| GIVE ME A COMEORTABLE |
| CHAIR -=-I |



BY SOME WORK THAT A SGIE
fo TREAT Lin LKE i ' \\| HAS BEEN NAGGIN' ME TO
) A.GENTLEMAN / ( > \ | DO-VLL MAKE 2 -

—- shy il HIM HELP ME /
{ \) yi LP ME? |

Bots Cocktail Cherries






» Cocktail Onions
Tins Macaroni & Cheese
» Campbell's Soups, Chicken
woo rice, Chicken Noodle,
eet,









Good News! Your Favourite

MOTOR CYCLES Arrivce!!

VELOCETTE

The New Model L.E. 200 C.C. is different from the conventional type

Motor Cycle — in fact it’s the nearest approach to a motor car.

———___







STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum.





-
-
3

SPOS

Water-cooled. Hand-Started. Shaft-driven
and. Noiseless.





































i fe ee | | : For SIMPLICITY, ECONOMY and RIDING PLEASURE ‘
Ht | LAs See | | soe Choose a =
KA ite || |) Sm | eee (OM VEL Oc sFor Your
Aww qaa), ETTE (os
Kae ROBERT THOM. LTD. °
i aoeliteny Garage Os White Park Road Bots. Cocktail Onions
i ees
he





I Tins Cocktail Biscuits
VE YOUR BUSINESS _[|\"" ite"

* ,, Frankfurt Sausages
BY ALEX RAYMOND BY » Luncheon Beef

» Pate De Foie

‘

WHILE I WAS STAYING WITH LEILA












STAFFORD, L COULDN'T HE ) fhe CRYING... BUT, JERRI,.. ) 17'S JUST AWFUL! NOBODY LIKES ME! » Potted Meat
CE HOW TROUBLED AND aus OH, MISS DORIAN, YOU WOULDN'T WHAT 1S" << T NEVER GO ANYWHERE’..T JUST SIT I RO v ED PRINTIN $1 & } Pt. Tin Sasso Olive Oil
, UNDERSTAND... You'Re So| | THERE TO) AROUND THIS STUPID LD HOUSE Tins Cheese

DONE B Y tre Kraft ag
ADVOCATE PRINTERY :

UNDERSTAND? / AND ROT! I CAN'T STAND IT! IVE
TELL ME... A\ SOTTO GET AWAY FROM HERE |





%
3
” » Cherries %
» Stuffed Olives
x
x
3
:
g
$
S
~



THE PHANTOM

Tat {VE GOT TO GO DOWN-
ITOWN FOR SOME NEWS-/LONG. YOU
| }PAPER INTERVIEWS. NEED YOUR

Usually Now Usually Now







HOME. ARE YOU /AIN'T. WELLWAIT.| |COMEIN HERE? J AFTER YOU.WERE

NO, DIANA IGN'T ~ No, LADy, WE_| [HOW DARE YOu ) RELAX WERE NOT
MAKE THIS WORK OUT A

| |F Ri =RS? A THE ln ‘~ . 35

GGODONE, DIANA. —-7~ | {I'LL DROP YOU OFF a Oe i tm THe BOY FRINDS ees e eee “—e
TOIMOWROWE THE (~ Serer | AT HOME :

er —<_DAY_ AL ay h ;



Pkgs. Moirs Chocolates 10,,... 18 Tins Cooking Butter 1lb. 86 83

Bars Blue Soap 2 Bars 108 t00 Tins Klim 1 Ib. 148 130




as
oe



TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1951



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week
96 cents Su



announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 snd 6 cents per word for each

For Births, Ma*riage or Sailing ane |







































72 éents and





| PUBLIC NOTICES







NOTICE

Vestry

Exhibition



tenable at the













| Ten cents per aydté line on wWeek-day

and 12 cents per agaie ling on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days}
} end $1.80 on Sundeys.

‘ApBlicatiors for offe vacant St. Philip's ,

Sr, |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

}

FOR
: Minirttwm charoe

, £6 eentd Sutiddys

RENT



t word on Sundays.



HOUSES

PLAT: Neaument, Hastings, unsur























week 12 eents and
24 words — ower 4
words 3 cents a word week--4 ceute «



WANTED



GIRL with sound knowledge of Englisa
grommar who can also type well, to
take classified Only



ation nee’







i



PERSONAL



The public are hereby warned agai
Riving credit to any persen of person

twhomseever in my name) as I do not
held myself responsible for anyone
contracting any debt of debts in m

name upless by a written order «iene











fhesé with the above qual r °
additicnal word. Terms cash. Phone 2808 ays 24 words — over 24! Michael’ y Schoo! e4 Dished. Dining and Tooth, aj only q _ re ‘
between #20 and @ p.m., 3113 for Death | “OTds 3 cents a word week—4 cents a ny Oe Setsigned net ioe then Satur: | bedreoths. running water, Kitchen wn verilang Bepartment 7 i | ttn es
Netices only after 4 p.m. werd on Sundays. day 9th dune 191. ° | as, usual conveniences pets. of j . . Venture Gf John. —
DIED Candidates must be daughters of ‘hildten. Dial 2636. §.6.512n for lewd Walk” jaetiiessinibeitiasaelsincdiiatiniié ts es =
. perishioners in straitened circumstances, Py . - Apply peeen The public are hereby warn t
AUTOMOTIVE and must be over eight Years and less | on ‘Vaca OTe i BM. and 5.30 p.m 26.5 | giving credit to any peteon = sone
ANDREWS—On 4th June 1951. At her shan twelve years old on the Mist July. 2550 for particulars 5.6.51 S| (whomsoever ‘in my name) as 1 do not
late residence Edeys Village Ch. Ch. | - ——a hold myself responsible for anyone con-
Lavina Andrews. Her funeral wili A birth certificate must be forwarde!./ PLAT: «) Furnished Fiat at MANAGER > Lyng ms epee tracting any debt or debts in my name
leave at 4.15 p.m. for St. David's; ,.CAR—(7). 14-6 Vaux Hall Motor car] with an application form, obtained fro) st Lawrence Gap, Suitable for 2 ‘love | Apply ow: ,{ whless by 4 written order signed by
Cause 1938 model in good condition. Can be| th Parochial Treasurer's Office. | From June coward. AGHEY én , & fgveteme eae | ine.
Relatives of the Jones family, Oistins,|*¢¢n at Mr. Bovell's Garage Westmore- The entrance examination will be held! .,. phone e4u . a 4 2 i 6.514 .| GEORGE EVERTON FIELDS
5 6 51—in. | i#ne St. James. at the St. Michaels Girls’ School No reasonable offer refused. Saturday 16th Jurie 1961 at 913 am." | —ongas os 7 3 ‘ot ahamtie | * "St. Michael
THANK= sa 5.6.51—=2n. Se Tet. pining and Bravia Rooms. Sih st aperiance. of tee nd mS | 5.6.51—2n
BRANKER_—We beg to thank those wha |s— prly A. Gittens, Reed Street. 30.5.51—(9|" Norma: town. 3.6. 51=t
sent wreaths, cards and assisted us 5.6.51—4n ds indy ay need, ie Gavcak crnsn eens | PINE credit to my wife, Leotta Black
through the sad bereavement of our | ———— Ni | yey at?’ to . Bilis, 4 1 Liman présser, apply; 2% (nee Brathwaite) as I do not hold
dear father and brother—JULIMN | “CAR: Rover 16-1017 ls metre conale OTICE am K, mi Te See or. \ fem $.6.51.-2.| M¥8elf responsible for her or anyone
BRANKER. Mrs. Sybil Simmons, | tion as new. £650. No offers. Apply NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is __$.6.51=4n A eect | Ce contracting any debt or debts in
Gwen Denny, Julian Branker (Flori- | first instance. Courtesy Garage. the intention of the Commissioners of! WANTED —Young man fot the local] ™Z name unless by a written order
da), Rupert Branker (B G }, eBildren 2.6.51—¢n | Highways for the Parish of St. Georse| 70 SUB-LET and Lard Factory. Must have} S8nea by me.
and family. _— : to cause to be introduced into the House) “TOBRUK” — Cattiewash for the Of chemistry und be interes.| DARNLEY DaCOSTA BLACKMAN,
orn WAGGON: of Assembly of this Island a Bill to; ™onth of July — Dial 4484 or 4374, St. Patricks Near Valley Hill,
a G § One Ford V8 Station } téd in machinery. Good salary will be y.
BARKER: Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Barker | Waggon in perfect working order. Battery amend the Highways Act, 1900 to reduce 1.6.51—6n paid to the fight man ilar: Christ Church
and family gratefully acknowledge the |and tyres good. Dial 2888 for further | (2® 2™mount of Commission payable ‘o/ la letter to K. a ite, 5.6.81—2
various expressions of sympathy and information. 56 14 the Forounisl Xreeatitee a San Eonineater te ee a x ante & Co, Lid Lower Bron “Ghd public ate hereby warned aguldat
thank all who attended the funeral, | o_o er from six per cent. to four ee ae EN. ea. Street 7 7 The public are hereby warned aguinst
sent wreaths, Cards, letters or in any CAR: O 3 com fo urniture adshaw ‘oO Roberts giving credit to my wife, Emerald Harris
other way rendered assistance at the | Tyres an "B Fa 3 Seater Car soud Dated this Ist day of Jure 1951 Phone 3292, 2 6.51=n | Manutaeturing Co (nee Farnklin) ut do not hold m mity
and Battery. A bargain at the price CARRINGTON & SEALY | 5.6. 51—3n
death of their late dsughter Joan Odessa | of $600.00. Dial 2838 for further informa- _ : nin | eSponsible for her or anyone else con
Parker of Clifton Hill, St. Thomas tion 5 6 Si—4n. | Solicitors to the said Commissioner ; One (1) BOND in Marhili St. Ay SHIRT MAKERS on those wit] S2ecting any debt or debts in my name
‘6. St- om Hillman 1951, condition as new. ! NOTICE 5.6. 914 Factory, Spry Street CALEB HARRIS,
one 4683 of 8569. 5.6,51—2n ani Crab Hill,
IN MEMORIAM NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that it ‘| , LOUDSPEAKER 1961 | Model, Bn- eae St. Lucy
GRIFFITH: In Loving Memon of our ELECTRICAL the intention of the Vestry of the Pari-h| i.2¢ "qe Buble Addresses. Hecord. Siny- a
dear one James Griffith who passed ot St. George 6 cause t6 he. intremuced ing attachment fitted. Apply L vie LOST & FOUND TT i
to the Great Beyond on June 3rd FRIDGE: 6 cubic ft in good working | i"to the House of Assembly of this Island Spooners Hill, for particulars- ORIEN AL
1944, hs $200.00. Also small Deep Freezer % _ to ed bea oe - Oe . 5.6.51
Slee dear father your task is 0° $350 00. At Ralph Beard’s Furnishing t° MCE the SMOURS GE Commission vo
Fer? Seiten dates oes Mate ie o'r. Soar Room, Werdwood ‘Ailey whieh the Parochai ‘Frenmurer in ented LOST SOON EWELS
For those you loved you did your best 5 6 51—2n ae ag ms 40 (2) ore from six per PUBLIC SALES dolla at New :
May God grant you eternal rest. be enln/ Weer oe Seat wer gees PARCEL : Contai blue and white bs Shipment opened
Ever to be rer mbered by. Florence |. REFRIGERATOR—Electrolux Oil Burn-| Dated this Ist day of June 1951. Ten cents per agate line on week-dile ted dress lost near Purity
Griffith (Wife); Licille Sylvia (Daughter), in€ Refrigerator 5 c.f, perfect condition ities so tae Onceey, (ones m charge. $1.50, on week-deys | Renee” qmostuck Street. Rewatd offered THANT’S "ee
Durivitie Bt. Claie chons * | Reas ior Selling; Owner getting elec- icitors to the Vestry. | minimum ¢ 50 on wei i :
Nenad Clair (Son, 5.6,51—1 | ic model. Apply Ralph Watson, Ridge | 2.6.51—3n and $1.80 on Sundays. ee ee stn. — a
We Plantation. Dial 2605, 5.6.51—4n. — .
a” Ta THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICUL-
THE LOYAL BROTHERS OF FURNITURE he Ee ATE | —— eatin rece POST OFFICE NOTICE
TH e ereditors holdi ocialt: s
* feainst WELOHTOWN Plantation. Molen Getled ee ete he at ‘ .
Proudly Present their - - - BED—Solid Mah eee ‘owner, Fined Pro Radi
i ahogany Single Bed.| TAKE NOTICE that I, the Attorney 2f}9N€ owner, Fitted Pye Radio. Showroom Changes in Air Mails
Spring and pe aimoat new. Best | the above Plantation am about to obtain pr pee, ao a excellent mechani@n)
offer aroun 00, elephone—3074 * 4 order. For sale by Auction at M ir 4
twa 6 ED OO Beene ys | & loan of @8,000 under the provisions of | DO th Gas. Boon vider ath June ate) Effective 5th June, 1951, air mails will be closed at the General
° tne above Act against the said Plantation, : Post Offi f 1h °
eset in respect of the Agricultural year 1951 to |? John M. Bladon, Auctioneer. ee as follows: —

SIMMONS BEDSTEAD and SPRING

AT QUEEN'S PARK



tdouble}—no reasonable offer refused
—On-— g£00d «condition apply S E. Knight
THURSDAY 7th corner Jubilee Gap, Martindales Road.
5.6.51—1n
and
SATURDAY 9th June

LIVESTOCK

PUPPIES—3 Pure Bred Alsatian Pups
Apply Hill's Dairy. Dial 3723.
5,6.51—2n

MISCELLANEOUS

¥ — GALVANISED SHEETS—Bes! lity
under Commander S, Leacock! paw sheets, Cheapest in oe Island |

FROCESSION AND JUDGING OF: 6 ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56;
COSTUMES AND COSTUME 19 ft $8.40, Nett cash, Better hurry!
BANDS A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

CLIMBING THE GREASY POLE

STICK-LICKING DISPLAY

FIREWORKS DISPLAY

OPEN AIR CONCERT

MOBILE CINEMA

STEEL BAND COMPETITION

MERRY-GO-ROUND

CAMES

CALYPSO TENT

BEARDED BEE MAN





PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME

DISPLAY BY THE
MEDITERRANEAN FLEET



4.5.51—t.f.n.



PAPER—Carbon Paper, Foolscap and
Letter Size, also Adding machine Paper
2%” and 34/7 rolls. Phone 4675

A. S. Bryden & Son (B'dos Ltd.)
5.6,51—2n



SOAP—Clearance Sale Primrose
Leundry Soap. Packages of 6 Cakes
66cets. Primrose Carbolic Soap Packages
of 6 Cakes 66 cts.

Bradshaw & Company. 5.6.51—3n
ee
YACHT; 23-foot Motor-sailer, Diesel |
marine engine, easily handled by one; }












ADMISSION: sleeps two; has cruised inter-island wifh |

y three aboard; all accessories. Telephone

Adults 1/6 —. Children 1/- | sais. 2.6.18
: THE SUGAR INDUSTRY

IF IT’S DONE BY HEAT AG BANK ACT, 1943.

To the ereditors holding specialty liens
against Foursquare Group of Plantations,
St, Philip. '

TAKE NOTICE that we the Owners
of the above Plantations are about ‘o
obtain a loan of £23,000 under the pro-
visions of the above Act against the said
Plantation, in respect of the Agricultural
year 1951 to 1952,

No money has been borrowed under the
Agrcultural Aids Act, 1905, or the above
Act in respect of such year,

Dated this Ist day of June 1951,

FOURSQUARE ESTATES LIMITED,
per E, S. ROBINSON,
Managing Director

It's

NATURAL

you can do it better by

GAS
It's hotter and quicker
Your GAS CO is in
Bay St.

Phone No 4308



5.6.51—3n



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY
AGRICULTURAL BANK ACT, 145
To the creditors holding specialty liens

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH






The Year Book of the West against Foursquare Factory, St. Philip
Indies and Countries of the TAKE NOTICE that we the Owners
Caribbean including the Bermu- of the above Factory are about to obtain
das, the Bahamas and tne :

a loan of £12,000 under the provisions
of the above Act against the said
Factory, in respect of the Agricultural
year 1951 to 1952.

No money has been borrowed under the
Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the above
Act in respect of such year.

Dated this Ist day of June 1951.

Guianas.—$12.00



















:—The Great Enemy of
FAB A spotless cleans-
er of Clothes, Dishes, Painted
Articles and anything that looks
Dirty or is Dirty.

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

per E, S. ROBINSON, ,
> Renee Managing Director.
5 6.51—2n

—————



OPENING NIGHT



of the WEST INDIES
. (Department of Pathology)
Boulogne Guest Lederle Research Fellowship in Yaws
Applications are invited from regis~+
H . tered medical practitioners for the above
ouse Fellowship, which is tenable for one
THURSDAY JUNE 7th will work undet the direction of the
Professor of Pathology on the clinical,
at pathological and therapeute aspects of
ST. LAWRENCE GAP to and from Jamaica will be paid. The
‘ioe On the Sea duties will begin at a date to be Ur-
ai Phone 8459

obtained.

Applications should be sent to the
Registrar, University College of the West
TO SELL Indies, Mona, St. Andrew, Jaraica,

B.W.T. by July 14, 1951.
Many Articles of

PAINTED FURNITURE _

Perfect Condition P
GOING CHEAP
For Cash
Apply
“cosy COT”
Gap Opposite Hotel Royal
5,6.51—1n

5.6,51—19



Pole Takes Fire

SHORTLY after 6.55 p.m. yes-
terday the fuse on an electric pole
at the foot of Rockley Hill, Christ
Church went faulty and as a result
there was a small fire around the
top of the pole.

The Fire Brigade was called to
the scene, but on their arrival ihe
fire was under control,



FOR SALE

In ST. JAMES, one 7 Room
house—Built of Wood, with lights,
water and Modern Conveniences
—Attrective Price
Good Sea Bathing
. . *

CECIL JEMMOTT
Over Phoenix Pharmacy
33 Broad Street Phone 4563

Co. carried out repairs.

PILES."

In his talk in Queen's Park on Friday
sh etaring in Spuipsine” was reper
NEGLECTED, MAY LEAD TO in Saturday's fae We ga: “ithe Amer:
SERIOUS OPERATION lean overnment res s at’.
Many people suffer in silence untold
agonies, constarit brain-weurying irritation
and pain caused by piles, simply becanse
they have never discussed this trouble with
even such a confidant as their chemist. I1
you are a sufferer, make up your mind to
ask your chemist about the wonderfui
Preparation Man Zan. This clean, simple-
to-mse remedy is just marvellous in the
quick way it stops the maddening irritation,
allays inflammation and, ee = |







FURNISH
flome & Office

THE MONEY SAVING WAY

Wardrobes, Vanities, Dresser-
Robes, Bedsteads, with Stile to
keep your samile—Mofris, Tub and
other Fashion Furniture for your
Drawing Room—Tables Side-
boards, China Cabinets, Waggons
and other Dining Room pleasures:
Kitchen Cabinets, Larders, Easy
and Rush Chairs—Desks in plain
and mahognnised Deal, and hard-
wearing Chairs—-Rope Mats $1.08
up

|
|| L.s. WILSON

SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069. j

Man Zan Pile Remedy is no ordinary
ointment, but a special preparation solely
for those with pile trouble. - It is prepared
in a special nozzle applicator tube, making
it simple and clean to use; Sold by
chemists everywhere.

ManZan
PILE REMEDY



1952.

No money has been borrowed under the
#gricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the above
Act in respect of such year.

Dated this 2nd day of June, 1951,
Haymans Factory Ltd.,

Owners.
P. A. BYNOE,
Attorney.

We. mR. A.
NOTICE

All_ members of the BRA.
B.S.B.R.C., are invited to a general
discussion on the principles of Rifle
Shooting to be held at the Drill Hall on
Friday 8th. June at 8 p.m
j

2.6,.51--3n





5.6.51—I1n





NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH
Office Days and hours of the Parochial
Treasurer are now as follows:
TUESDAYS from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
WEDNESDAYS from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.!



THURSDAYS 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
i A. T. KING
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Joseph
; 5.6.51—4n EG
NOTICE

PARISH OF ST JOSEPH
Applications for a Vacant
Widow Annuity wil be received by
the lindersigned not Jater than the 14th

June 1951.
Applicants must be Widows (White),
Parishioners, and in straitened circum-

stances.
A. T. KiNG,
5.6.51—4n
Clerk, St. Joseph’s Vestr’.

Frizerr



Farm Families In
The United States

@ From Page 3
There are many ways
people meet together. Most

active in support of their church

They may hold any kind f}| The officer will be required to
religious belief freely without! reside at the La Pastora Propagat-
interference, ing Station, Santa Cruz, where
Farm children, like all othet)furnished quarters are available
US., children, are required t¢sfor which he will pay as rent
attend school, but schools ar¢}i0‘ of his salary plus 5% per
free, The schools are controllecfannum of the value of the furni-
in each community locally, anc} ure. :
parents of school childret Candidates should have attain-

frequently use the school build-

FOURSQUARE, FACTORY LIMITED, } ing for social or business activities | possess executive ability and have

Many farm children go to college

There are many social activities
among farmers in the United
States. They are free to joi!

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE organizations and hold meetings

at any time without asking per-
mission from anyone, They woulé
fiercely resist if anyone tried tc
take away this right, but of course
no one tries to.

Some iarmers’ meetings are t

year at a salary of £800. The Fellow} help them become better farmers

and they talk about how to grow
crops and animals, control insects

Yaws including field work and animal] and care for their land. They may
experiments, Travelling expenses both! invite experts from the Govern-

ment or other well imformec

ranged with the Professor of Pathology| persons to speak to them, if they
from whom further particulars can be] wish,

Some farmers’ meetings are for
recreation only, There are dances
and fairs at which they compete
for prizes by exhibiting their bes!
animals and other farm products
In summer there are picnics a
which men, women, and childrer
may take part in games and sports
events.

I would like people from _ al)
over the world to visit U.S.
family farms to meet the people

}while I am serving our Govern-

ment in Washington, my own
farm is being run by two of mj)
sons. When I can, I want to gc
pack to my farm. Farming in the
United States is hard work, but

A team] | ; : :
t is a good life, I hope it may be
of workmen from the Electric . gond fide like that for farmers

all over the world,

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay



M.V. Sedgefield, Sen. Marion Belle

This should have read: “The AmericaM | wolfe, Sch. Cyril E. Smith, Sch. D’Ortae,
Government exempts that’.

Sch. Philip H. Davidson, Sch _ Landalb
pha, MV. Blue Star, Seh. Everdene.
Sch. Maty M_ Lewis, Sch Enterprise S.,
Sch, W.L_ Eunicia, Sch. Belqueen, Sch
United Pilgrim §., Sch, Gardenia W ,
S.S. Mormacrey, Sch. Rainbow M
Sch Florence Emmanuel, Sch. Mary E
Caroline, Sch. Exceisior Hodge,
ARRIVALS

S.S. Herdsman, 4,015 tons net, Capt
Short, from Dominica.

Schooner Emeline, 72 tons net, Capt
Clarke, from British Guiana

Schooner Adalina, 50 tons net, Capt

from St. Lucia,
DEPARTURES

Flemming,

Schooner Marea Henrietta, 43 tons net,
Capt Selby, for Dominica
MV. Daerwood, 94 tors net, Capt

DeCoteau, for St. Lucia
Schoonet Burma D , 62 tons net, Capt
King, for Trinidad

M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt

‘| Gumbs, for Dominica

In Touch With Barbados
Coast Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd. advise
that they can now communicate with the
following ships through their Barbado+

| Coast Station:—
} SS. Wyoming,
| Maas, D. L. Harper
hensor Lady Neisor.

Avrane Eesi, Tet Dolo

Chemawe

Fort Step

Hertisrmman
Ta t





hes

\Tayior's Garage, Chureh Village,

tena |

farm) sistence allowances will be paya-
of}ble at
them go to church and many are|approved from time to



5 6 5S1—dn



UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received I will sell gn
Friday June 8th at Messrs. Redman

cylinder convertible Plymouth Car,
condition. Always owner driven. Owner
leaving colony. Sale at 2 pm. Teri.
Cash, Vincent Griffith, Auctioneer.

5 6 Si—tn.

REAL ESTATE

ss
A Boarded and Shingled house at the
Kew near to Church 2% « 12 x 9 with!
shedroof, kitchen, closet. To be re-
moved by end of June, sale at 1 p.m
THURSDAY 7th inst. Terms cash
R.A McKENZIE,
Auctioneer
3.6.51—4n







I will offer for sale by Public Com-
petition at my office, Victoria Street on
FRIDAY 8th at 2 p.m, ALL THAT
CERTAIN piece pr pairs: of land 13 4/5
perches in FITTS. VILLAGE on the sea,
ST. JAMES with the double roofed
house and usual out-offices—there is
also a well fitted shop attached. For
inspection apply to Mrs. Collytnore ‘on
the premises. Conditions of saie from
R. ARCHER McKENZIE.

3.6.51—4n

VACANT POST

Chief Rehabilitation Officer,
Cocoa Board
Colony of Trinidad & Tobago
Applications are invited for the
vacant post of Chief Rehabilita-
tion Officer, Cocoa Board, +e
The salary will be at a rate in
the scale $3,600—-120-3,840-240-
5,760 per annum; the actual rate
depending on the qualifications
and experience of the successful
applicant. Travelling and Sub-

Diai 2947



to those
time for

rates similar

Government officers.

ed a good standard of education,

had wide agricultural experience.
Technical qualifications are desir-
able but not essential .
Duties of the post are: —
(i) to assume responsibility for
all cacao propagating work, and
management of all Propagating
Stations (under the immediate

supervision of the Chief Scientific
Officer of the Department of
Agriculture).

(ii) To receive all applications
for subsidy grants under the
Cocoa Subsidy Scheme and to
initiate their investigation.

(iii) To control both the office

and field staff engaged on the
work of the Cocoa Board,
(iv) To certify vouchers for

expenditure incurred on behalf of
the Cocoa Board.

(v) To supervise the general
field progress of the Cocoa Subsidy
Scheme.

(vi)To carry ou% any other
duties that may be assigned to the
officer by the Cocoa Board from
time to time.

The post is non-pensionable and
subject to three months’ notice of
termination on either side.

_ Applications containing — full
particulars of the candidate's age,
qualifications and experience to-
gether with copies of not less than
two recent testimonials, should be
addressed to the Chairman, Cocoa
Board, c/o Department of Agri-
culture, St. Clair, Port of Spain,
Trinidad to reach him not later
than June 23rd, 1951. Envelopes
containing applications should be
marked— “Application C.R.O.”"—
on the outside left-hand corner.

E. W. LEACH,
Chairman, Cocoa Board,
5.6.51—7n.



Antiliero, Aleoa Cavalier, President Dutra
Mormaemoon, Valhall. Apache Canyor
Aleoa Roamet, Frugusy Morrmacreed
Ringdrude, Queenston Heights, Imperial
Winnipeg, Al¢oa Puritan, Colombie,
Loide Uruguay, Brazil, Aleoa Pennant
Canadian Challenger, Herdéman, Alster-
tor, S. Rosa, Junin, American Oriole,
Agamemnon, Grays Harbour and

MAIL NOTICES

MAILS for St. Laicis, Dominiea. Mont-
scrrat, Antigua, St, Kitts, Betinuds. Ros
ton, Halifax and Montreal by the R.M,S
Lady Nelson will be closed at the Ger
eral Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registe¢ed Mall
at 2 p.m. Ordinary Mai! at 230 pm. on
the 6th June 1951.

MAILS for Grenada. Trinidad and Brit-
ith Guiana by the M.V. Canadian Chol-
lenger will be closed at the Gener
Post Office os under:-—

Parcel and Registered Maile at 2 p.m.
Ordinary Mail at 3.30 p.m. of the 6th
June 1991,

TO SELL

Sell PROPERTY anywhere
In the country, consult

To

CECIL JEMMOTT

Over
33 Broad

Phoenix Pharmacy
Street Phone 456
5.6.51—in

a

Sar .

Se a ee the invasion
e

Destination
Bermuda =

Canada (via Bermuda)
Canada (via Trinidad)
United States .. site

Schedules should be amended
General Post Office,
Sist May, 1951



Salient Features Of
U.S. Foreign Trade
1950

THE FOREIGN TRADE of the United States showed a closer
balance between merchandise exports and itnports in 195(
than in any other year in the past decade, according to ar
analysis made by the United

merce,

The huge gap between these exports and imports in the
early postwar yenes narrowed down in 1950 to an expor'

,433,000,000, only one-fourth as large as in 194
and the smallest of any year since 1940.

surplus of $1

Exports decreased in value in
1950 to $10,275,000,000, or 15 per
cent, less than the 1949 figure.
Imports increased 34 per cent. to
$8,842,000,000. Imports exceéd-
ed exports in August and October
1950 for the first time since June
1939. The export balance rose
sharply again in the last two
months of 1950.

U.S. exports continued to rise in
early 1951. In February, they
totalled $1,073,000,000, the highest
monthly total since June 1949.
Imports in February totalled
$907,000,000, down $114,000,000
from the record high in January.
The decline was chiefly due to
smaller rubber receipts.

There were marked ehanges in
the trade balance the United
States fad with other areas in
1950, compared with 1949. U.S.
imports exceeded exports in trade
with four of the seven continent
areas, whereas exports had ex-
ceeded imports to all areas in
1949. Those showing a shift in
the balance of trade were South
America, Asia, Oceania, and
Africa.

Export Balance

Moreover, the usual large ex-
port balance in trade with Canada
fell to a relatively small figure ang
the export balances with other
countries in North Arnerica de-
creased ee one-fourth
and with Europe about one-half.

Of the factors reducing the
export balance, the increase in
U.S. imports was dominant.
Imports continued to increase in
value in 1950 as demand accel-
erated and prices rose, especial-
ly the prices of coffee and woo!.
and, after the outbreak of
hostilities in Korea, of rubber
and metals.

As U.S. imports rose and ex-
ports fell, the world dollar
shortage was greatly alleviated.
Principal countries trading with
the United States accumulated
through all of their transactions,
gold and dollar assets sufficient
to restore their total losses over
the three preceding years.
Price rises influenced the value

of both exports afd imports in

of Korea. index of unit
value of imports had risen 5 per
cent. by May 1950 from the low
of November 1949, but by Decem-
ber 1950 it had risen 27 per cent.
In contrast, the index of unit
value of exports, after touching a
low point in May 1950, rose only

SOOO SCOO Roth otoroe








sailing to Euro fortnightly.
Dublin, London, ftterd

reduction for children.

OG OOSSSD =



CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.,

Gasolene Sérvice Station

,

PASSAGES TO EUROPE
Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for

or Rotterdam,

An OIL without ore is NOT a Lubricant
SE
FOR BEST RESULTS

GERM OIL

Time Day
11.45 a.m. Tuesday
2.00 p.m. Friday
2.00 p.m, Friday
11.45 a.m. Wednesday
11.45 a.m, Tuesday
2.00 p.m, Friday
accordingly,

2.6.51—2n.

WASHINGTON, D.C.

tates Department of Com-

13 per cent by December, (Fo
both indexes 1936-38 equals 100,
Higher Prices
At the end of 1950, exporters ii
countries selling goods to the
United States were obtaining con-
siderably higher prices for their
products than U.S, exporters were
getting for the goods they shipy ed
This is shown by the fact that the
unit value index for U.S, import:
was 270 while for U.S. exports i

was only 190.

In terms of volume, imports i
1950 exceeded the previous higi
total of 1948 by 19 per cent. an
the 1949 figure by 22 per cent
Exports in terms of volume de
ereased 13 per cent from 1949 ani
30 per cent. from 1947.

Exports in 1950 amounied to ap
proximately 7 per cent. of the
total U.S. production of movablk
goods, This compares with 7.!
per cent. before World War II, 1!
per cent. in 1947, and 9 per cent
in 1948 and 1949, However,
larger proportions of certain com
modities were shipped overseas-
especially raw cotton, leaf tobacct
motor trucks, and carbon black

Finished manufactures, as usua!
comprised by far the largest par
of U.S. exports in 1950. Thes
goods made up 57 per cent of the
export total, about the same pro:
portion as in 1947 and 1948 an
2 per cent. above 1949.

Crude Materials
Crude materials comprised abou.
19 per cent of U.S. exports, ai
increase from 15 per cent, in 1949

and semimanufactures, 11 pr
cent., about the same part as ij
1949. Foodstuffs, which ha‘

dropped from 23 per cent, of tota
exports in 1946 to 19 per cent, ii
1949, comprised only 13 per cent
of U.S. exports in 1950.

Of total imports in 1950, eruds
materials and semimanufacture
made up 52 per cent., an increa®
from 50 per cent in 1949 but
decrease from the proportions |

1946, 1947, and 1948. Crud
materials comprised 28 per cent
and semimanufactutes 24 pe
cent. in 1950, Foodstuffs repre-

sented 30 per cent. of total im-
ports, a smaller part than in 1949
Finished manufactures, thr
smallest of the four classes o
goods, comprised 17 per cen’
compared with 19 per cent in th
preceding year.

The many products included i
the U.S. export trade were a
usual, concentrated heavily in |

@ On Page &

rts of call aré
Single fare £70; usual

The usual

Trafalgar St ]









i
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW sxxeqecoe,

PAGE SEVEN



SHIPPING NOTICES

SOP A A BOOBIES

ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED ;
(M_A.N.Z. LINE!

SS. ARABIA cheduled 10 sail comes sane ts
from Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th eed ‘ a neneti-
May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane 16th | $2 Lueia, omer + ae ne
June, Sydney 43rd June, arriving at Trin- aere quly for § ine 3
idad during the latter half af July, and Frida, ist June
precede thereafter to Barbados | meV, “Cawtbbee? will _accept
In addition to general cargo this vessel | Cargo and Passengers for ene
has ample space for chilled and hard ca, Antigua, Mon'seirat. Nevis
frozen cargo | & St Kitts. Sailing Friday tst
Cargo accepted on through Bills of Lad- | June
ing for transhipment at Trinidad to Brit- } —_———
ish Guiana, Leeward and Windward | at
Islands. | B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS
j



For further 7S apply —
FURNESS, W & CO., LTD,



ASSOCIATION inc.)
Trinidad,

Bwi. |

and
DA COSTA & CO., LTD.,
Bridgetown,
B.W.L.

Consignee. Tele. No. 4047.



. JSG OLCOTT OOO



\aes Akon ay)

NEW YORK SERVICE
S8.S. “TINDRA” Sails 18th May Arrives Barbados
A STEAMER Sails 8th June Artivées Barbatios 19th

May, 1951

196

Ath
June,



NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
“ALCOA ROAMER" Sails 16th May Artives Barbados Ist June
“ALCOA PATRIOT” Sails 50th May



s$.s.
8.$



8

1981
Arrives Barbados 15th June, 1931.

SS. “ALCOA POLARIS” Sails 13th June — Arrives Barbados 28th June, 1951,

CANADIAN SERVICE





amen



SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives B'dos.
Ss. 0. PIONEEBR" May 11th May 14th May 2th
oa “POLKE BERNADOTTE” May 25th May 30th June 10th
s. “ALCOA PLANTER" June sth June 1th June 2st
ORTRDCOA PEGASUS” due May 28th sails for St. John and St. Lawrence

River Ports

ae es



tr

j

Leases





8.8, “SUNRELL"

VOGT TT TE
Ooo e ee oes Mitt Pte od, 5% Sot ete), tea, t tor
IDEAL DIGRGG OT 0 GPGEDGDE DP ILR EGE LDGV AEG VVPVPPDED TAGE ELIF OS

These vessels hve iimited passenger accommodation.

—————————
ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE

y ryote oF
a ae
CANADIAN SERVICE

From Halifax, N.S. & Montreal

LOADING DATES

{
| Halifax |
| Barbadow
28 May 14 June
1) June 27 June
25 June | 9 July
® July 23 July

Expected Arriva
Montreal

23 May
6 June
20 June
4 July

s. “POLYRIVER”
“A V ”



U.K. SERVICE —
From Newport, Bristol, Liverpool and Glasgow

Bristol Expected
Newport Ports

Barbados

May 12 June

22 May 27

U.K. & CONTINENTAL SERVICE
Expected Arrival
Antwerp Rotterdam

a4 May
st anh atnri

20 M 0 June

PLANTATIONS LIMITED
Shop Early

WORKERS ror U.S.A.

ITS WORTH YOUR WHILE TO
VISIT OUR STORES TO-DAY!

4 rryics
SHIRTS |
A grand variety of Work, Dress, Sport and
Holiday Shirts in stock



— Phone 4703



PYJAMAS

In various durable qualities & Designs

SHOES

in JOHN WHITE Plain Brown & Black,

nite





Suede, Loafers, & Two Tone

A fine selection of woollens in many qualities such as Grey

Flannel, Navy & Brown Tweeds in several qualities.
SOCKS, H.K, TIES & UNDERWEARS in large varieties!
THANI Bros.





D FOOEGSGSEE
SSIS SSSESIED.

NOTICE

WE WISH TO ADVISE OUR
CUSTOMERS
THAT OUR
PARTS DEPARTMENT
WILL BE CLOSED FROM FRIDAY,
lst JUNE TO MONDAY 4th JUNE
1951, BOTH DAYS INCLUSIVE,
FOR OUR

ANNUAL STOCK-TAKING





DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING €0.,
LTD.

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET DIAL 4269

Pay

.
SI FSGS



Dates, Bridgetown,

Liverpool Glasgow Arrival Dates

London Dates, Bridgetown,






nn
GS SRN

ee
GIO

Mee Rane
SOF SSR

%
ty

”

»
PAGE EIGHT



WEEKES SCORES 58 IN 25

Marshall Takes Nine|

For Thirty-one

From Our Lane



Over 4,000, probably the big-
est ccowd ever to attend a
eket match in Barnoldswick,
atched a game between a West
indies, XI. and a_ st engthened
Barnolds ck team as part of the
wit ‘stival of Britain cele-
tloas. The wicke! was; affected
by overnight showers and
Rarnoldswick won the toss and
sent tre West Indies to bat. Mar-
sal and® Fairaudeau opened the
innings and in Bulecck’s second
ver he got Marshall l.b.w., for
1 »:un. Wor.ell was next in but



eee sad

ROY MARSHALL

did not last very leng, in the
same over he was caught in the
slips for a “duck.” Pairaudeau
and Rickards took the score to

45 before Pairaudeau was caught
at mid-wicket for 31. A _ few
overs later Rickards was out to

similar stroke for 29. Walcott
and Messado took the score wel!
past the century mark before
Messado was caught at mid-off
for 32. Walcott went or to score
65 after seeing Martindale being
caught at mid-on for 5. The West
Indies XI. declared at 181 for 7
wickets with Harold Brewster
not out 3 and Ramadhin 12.



Bailey Does Double |

In Duteh

s Correspondent

Edwin St. Hill and Frank Wor-
rell opened the bowling for the
West Indies but were sot suc-
cessful The score went to 40
tefoe Ramadhin cam on to
bowl ard in no time ne ‘ad the
Barnoldswick batsmen worried
They scored 10 Pamaduin
taking 4 for 28, Mars*al 2 for 30
and Achong 3 for 22,

Bacup v:. Haslingden

Everton Weekes is gradually
exhausting the superlatives. te
had another day out against
Haslingden on Monday to contri-
bute new pages to Lanecasnie
\League history. His flashing bat
took 108 off the Hasiingaen bowl-
ing, tae last 58 in on y. 25 min-
utes, including one . spectacular
hit cove’ seme houses; outside the
Bacup giound—making his ‘third
century in successive innings in
four days. Bacup declared at 227
for 5 wickets. Haslingden, with-
cut the services of J. K. Holt
who has an injured knee, were
a.l out for 119, Ken Rickards
substituting for Holt seoring 45.
Weckes was also successful with
the bail taking 6 wickets for 66
runs in 20 overs. He took a
brilliant catch in the slips to dis-

miss the last batsman with onl,
two minutes left for play.

Rey Marshall won the fame
for his side at Ramsbottom with
a brilliant bowling feat of 9
wickets for 31 runs, the best of
the season so far,

Lowerhouse batted first and
were all out for 123, Marshall
scoring 19. The last Ramsbottom
wicket fell with only a minute
to go at 73.

The West Indies team play at
Laneaster on Sunday.

Lancashire League Table to
date.

P. W. D. L Pts
Nelson Pome Oo ee
Chureh 8 5 0 3 15
East Lancs 7 4 3 6 i5
Toducosden ee eh 1 12
Rawtenstall x 3 2 2 li
Bacup 8 2 a 2 10
Burnlay 6 2 4 6 10
Lowerhouse 8 2 4 2 10
Accrington erie 8
Enfield Be eee ee 7
Haslingden 8 1 4 3 7
Ramsbottom 8 2 1 5 7
Colne 6 0 4 2 ‘
Rishton
Athleties

AMSTERDAM, June 4.

The West Indian Sprinter E. Mc Donald Bailey won the

sprint double in the Intern
here yesterday to.celebrate

ational Athletic Meeting held
the golden anniversary of the

Royal Dutch Athletic Union. Me Donald Bailey won the
100 metres in 10.6 seconds and 200 metres in 21.5 seconds

with J. Lammers of Holland second in both races.

Gardner Fights
Brion Tonight

LONDON, June 4,

Jack Gardner, British Heavy-
weight Champion, has brought his
weight down by six pounds
for his fight against Brion of
Argentina at the White City, Lon-
don, tomorrow night,

Gardner scaled 214 lbs, when
he beat Jo Weidin of Austria in
February. He expects to weigh-in
tomorrow at about 207, “I was
surprised at what I scaled for my
Weidin fight” Gardner said at his
training quarters at Brighton on
the south east coast. “I felt too
heavy and uncomfortable, so this
time I have cut potatoes and all
starchy foods from my diet.”

Gardner developed a soreness
in his left hand while training,
and will be going into the ring
tomorrow with the hand strapped.
His menager, John Simpson said
“Our greatest trouble has been
finding sparring partners of the
right class. I think Jack will be
too strong for Brion and I am
considering taking him to America

for experience.”
—Reuter.









Traffic Do's



No. 19
Remember that a Load
projecting behind your
Vehicle is dangerous to
others.

Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.







They'll Do It Every



Gacop 01 MOM SLAVES DAY IN, ETC.,
GROOMING THE CHICKENS WITHOUT AS
NUCH AS A KIND WORD FROM POPs»



CHICKENS .OKAY!
YOU RAISE

Rian

Mrs. Fanny Blankers Koen,
famous Dutch sprinter, won the
80 Metres Hurdles and 100 Yards
events. In the hurdles she beat
her old Olympic rival Mrs. Mau-
reen Gardner Dyson by two-tenths
of a second in 11.53. while Miss
June Foulds, another British girl,
was second in the 100 Yards won
in 10.8 seconds.

Britain also took the first two
places in the 800 Metres, H. N. J.
Parlett beating A. Webster by 0.4
second in one minute 55 seconds.
P, B. Hildreth of Britain was
beaten by inches in the 110 Metres
Hurdles both being clocked at 15.1
seconds.



RESULTS;
100 Metres:
Me. Donald Bailey (Britain).
J. Lammers (Holland);
S. Haat (Holland),
Klein (Holland)
Time 10.6 sees.
200 Metres:
Me Donald Bailey (Britain).
Lammers Holland),
Haat (Holland),
Klein (Holland).
Time 21.5 secs,
1,500 Metres:
W. R. Beckett (Britain)
Cc. J. Chataway (Britain)
H. Harting (Holland)
Suewe Newutween (Holland).
Time: 3 mins. 56.8 secs
110 Metres Hurdles; 1. P
| (Belgium)
2 P.B. Hildreth (Britain)
Vv. D. Hoeven (Holland)
Time: 15.1 secs

Stree ae

Puswn

Breakmin

|
|

—Reuter.

| FRENCHMAN TO TRAIN
| WENEZUELAN TEAM

| PARIS, June 4.
Henri Vissault, French Profes-
}sional Tennis Champion = and
ltrainer of the French team has
} accepted proposals from the Vene-
|zuelan Tennis Federation to train
| the Venezuelan team and Vene-
zuelan tennis instructors for three
months, He will leave Paris early
jin September on an_ 18-hour
flight to Caracas.—Reuter.

Time

Registered V. 5. Patent Ofkee



TO RAISE



Burt wio GIVES EVERYTHING_AWAY
AND TAKES ALL THE BOWS? ASK
MOM=*s SHE KNOWS!

HERE, COUSIN “TAKE. THIS
MME MISCUSE RAISE EM) 5.
| NS > xh 7.
MYSELF~AN’ SOME FRESH > \\
EGGS"OH, YEAH“BETTER
TAKE SOME FOR WALDO
AND BERTIE’ MAW GAN
KILL EM AND. PLUCK
‘EM WHILE You AND ME
HAVE. A LITTLE SMILE~





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

S_———



on hae

et ae

“Loovely scenery, din’t it, mister!”





fondon Express Service



Ban Broadcasts On U-S. Foreign

B.B.C.

Bullfighter Killed
The Bull: Arrested

LISBON, June 4

One of Portugal's greatest
bull-fighters, Manuel Dos
Santos, has been arrested—
for killing the bull.

The law here, unlike that
in Spain and Mexico forbids
killing of bulls and provides
penalties for infringement
up to three years imprison-
ment and lifetime prohibi-
tion from fighting.

Last night, Dos
apparently got over
siastic and at the moment
when he was supposed to
simulate the kill he lunged
forward,

Santos
enthu-

Eighty thousand people
saw him do it. For a second
there was dead silence

Then came one of the big-
gest ovations ever heard in
a Portuguese bull-fight

Elegant ladies leaned to-
wards the ring waving
handkerchiefs as Dos Santos
was carried around shoulder
high,



Then he was arrested. The
date of his trial has not yet
been fixed, —Reuter.



Chess Tournament
Opens In New York

NEW YORK, June 4.
Wertheim Memorial Interna-

tional Tournament opened here
yesterday at the Manhattan Chess
Club with four Overseas and

Eight Amevican competitor:

Two of four recognised grand-
masters, Dr. Max Euwe of Am-
sterdam and Reben Fine of



York met in one match. Euwe
won in 37 moves. Okello Belgic|
and Horowitz, U.S. drew in i8
moves,

Larry Evans, United State
meeting Migue. “Najdorf, Argen- |
tine with pawn ahead, drew
knights ending in 53 moves.

~-Reuter.

By Jimmy Hatlo |



7,
“ THE USSR

3
a i! (

New }

Football Games

“WILL FIGHT”

| LONDON, June 4.

Storms of protest have greeted
|}the British Football League’
| week-end decision to ban broad-
| casts of matches and increase
| charges for admission to footb ll
| grounds’ cheap enclosures,

And players themselves ars
| bitter that they have been given i

; weekly wage increase of only
£2. 0, 0. during the playing
season.
The Players’ Union has in-
structed its 2,800 members not tuo
| Sign for next season until Union

| claims have been decided by the
| Ministry of Labour.

The British Broadeasting Cor-
| poration has stated “we mean to
fight the ban”’.

Homes for blind, and crippled
| ex-service men have said: Thous-
ands of keen football fans amon;
} the war blinded will be bitter

disappointed if the League persis
in the ban on broadcasting,
—Reuter.

THE PROFESSOR
TAKES ON A
HEAVYWEIGHT

By JON HOPE

@ Publication next month of
a volume weighing 2lbs. lloz, will
Signal the end of a formidable
task undertaken by 58-year-old
Professor Peter Alexander, of
Glasgow University,

It was in 1944 that publishers
commissioned Professor Alex-
ander to prepare a new, one
volume edition of Shakespeare,

eliminating discrepancies dis-
covered by experts since the
issuing of the Collins complet

Shakespeare in 1855.

For the professor, getting
ready this new Shakespeare for
press meant reading the million
words involved five time

Paper, bought some time ago,
is available for only 50,000 copies,
| They will sell at 15s. each.

| @ Which British author tops
fiction sales in South Africa’
Back from extended business
trip, publisher Michael Joseph
says, generously: “Peter Cheyney”
(who is published by Collins).
Runners up? Lesiie Charteris
H, E. Bates, Agatha Christie, C. S
forester, James Hadley Chase
@ At 12; theatre producer Peter
Cotes started amassing scrap
books on our most celebrated
Ceckney—Charles Chaplin. H
has used them to make a biogra-
phy titled The Little Fellow.
Cotes has never met Chaplin, bu
‘I know, him intimately from
afar.”
@ A year ago, Jean Nicol left
well-paid job at Savoy Hotel t
farm in Cornwall with husband
Derek Tangye.
Switch from heavy







carpets to





heavy soil was reported to be
permanent. But 11 exciting years
proved unforgettable. Results:



Mrs. Tangye has finished writing
her experiences atid, what’s more,
has sold them to first publisher
who read the manuscript Title:

Meet Me at the Savoy.
300k finished, the author has
returned to growing potatoes,
daffodils, violets “A turnip
again,” says she, “but I love it.”
—L.ES





Sports Window

BASKETBALI

| Tonight at 7.45 o'clock tt

| will be twe first division mate?

1 which will be played at ¥.M.P.¢
Beckles Road. Th u be F
tress vs Harrison c !

Boys, and ¥ MCA r }



Trade

@ From Page 7
broad commodity groups which
had a total value of $7,398,000,000,
or 73 per cent of total U.S. exports
in 19)U. They were:
Machinery, $2,021,000,000; raw
cotton, $1,024,000,000; grains and

preparations $834,000,000; chem-
vais and related products,
$711,000,000; automobiles, parts
and accessories, $703,000,000;

textile manufactures, $516,000,000;
petroleum and products,
Â¥ 900,000,000; iron and _ steel-mill
products, $473,000,000; tobacco and
manufactures, $298,000,000; coat
and related products $278,000,000.
Two Large Groups
Similarly, although many
articles were imported by the
United States, they too were con-
centrated in a few large groups.
The 15 leading commodity groups
aggregated $6,134,000,000, or 70
per cent. of total U.S. imports in
1950. They were:
Coffee, °$1,091,000,000;
rous ores, metals, and _ ferro-
alloys, 67,000,000; paper ana
paper materials, $746,000,000
petroleum and products,
$588,000,000; crude rubber,
$459,000,000; raw wool, $427,000,-
000; cane’ sugar, $380,000,000;
sawmill products, $264,000,000;
fruits, edible’ nuts, anq vege-
tables, $215,000,000; vegetable oils,
fats, and oilseeds, $190,000,000;
iron ore, pig iron, and crude steel,
174,000,000; chemicals, fertilizer
materials and related products,
$170,000,000; cocoa or cacao beans,
$167,000,000; fish, including shell-
fish, $157,000,000; diamonds,
$139,000,000.
* Countries of the Western
Hemisphere received 47 per cent
of total U.S. exports in 1950, a
larger part than in any pre-
ceding year. The Latin Ameri-

nonfer-






MINUTES



ca em eer ee ey

GIRLS’ CLUB
OPENED

@ From Page 5
people of the area.
will run the Clubs for two years,
out after ihat, they hoped that the
~iubs would be on = sound foot-
ing. By so doing they would be
«ubie to open more clubs.

Expenses Increase

The Commissioner said that the
*xpenses involved.by running the
‘tubs were increasing. The rents
alone were over $130 monthly.
they were not given a penny by
Government. Every cent was
srom voluntary cOntribution. It
twelve people decided to pay the
rent for a club they would have
a year’s rent. Without paying for
lighting, water rates or a fee for
the artisans who taught the various
trades, the running of the Clu_s
involved a big expenditure.

Recently he had visited Canada
and had seen what the Mountea
Police were doing there for the
vouth of the community. They
were taking a very active part in
organising the Canadian youth.

He said: “We want the youtl
of Barbados to regard tne police-

man, not as a man to be feared
Sut as an adviser and one wh+
helps.”

| For Training

He said that they had sent a
man to England to be trained.
| When he returned he would visii
j all the Boys’ Clubs and see that
; they are run along the correct
lines.

He again appealed to the people
| of the district to take as much
interest as possible in the Clubs.
He asked them to give lectures on

certain evenings and _ organise
games. He said: “A few hours oi

your time one evening per month
would mean a lot of success to the
Clubs.”

Rev. Mallalieu, Rector of St.
Joseph, officially opened the Clubs.
He thanked Colonel Michelin for
organising the Clubs in St. Joseph.

He said that when the Clubs
were being formed in _ other
parishes he began to be jealous.
He asked Colonel Michelin to open
a club in St. Joseph and he was
very pleased to sce that this was
done,

He said: “I wish to see these
clubs develop and do some good
work in the district.” He thought
it was no use asking the parishion-
ers for co-operation because he
knew he would get it.

Mr. John Beckles, a member of
the Committee of Management,
said that the Boys’ Clubs were
only recently formed but he was
surprised to see the success,

He congratulateq Colone!
Michelin and his co-workers ‘or
bringing the boys and girls from
streets and putting them in a place
where they could associate with
each other. He asked everyone
in the district to assist in running
the clubs.

Club For Adults

L. E, Smith, M.C.P., said
} that he felt the venture was a good
one, It was for the boys and
girls of today who would be men

Mr.

and women of tomorrow. He
said: “It is one of those thing

which we all should try and keep
alive,”

He was sorry that Colonel
Michelin did not see it possible to
open a club for adults, Some
adulfs needed the same training
as the youths. He once started
a club for adults. On the nights
when there was card playing ete.
the hall was packed. When there
was a lecture or scripture reading
the place was empty.

He wished the clubs every suc-
cess and hoped that every one
would assist.

After the opening refreshment:
were served, Colonel Michelir
took the opportunity to give a talk
to the members of the Girls’ Club.

Duty Roster

The June duty roster for the Barba-
dos Boys’ Club, Bay Street, is as

tg s tries Yt 27 ent, | follows: —

can coun “ig took 27 per cent iat F. i, -O'Nealé, 0/6 Protation
and Canada 20 per cent. Europe] office, Roebuck Street, 2nd Gay Mor-
remained, as usual, the main pe Shika Wey St. Michael, 3rd Mr,
4 s a0 £ ag 4 es, o St. Paul's Vicarage, St
continental areas of destina: Michael, 4th A. Jordan, Garden, St
tion of U.S. exports, although" James, ‘sth Vv. B. St. John. c/o N.B

the European continent's share

of 30 per cent. was a smaller

proportion than in any preced-
ing year. In 193638, Europe

took about 42 per cent. of U.S.

exports, while during the war

it took an average of 50 per
cent.

The Far East also had a smaller
share in U.S. exports in 1950—
about 14 per cent compared with
16 per cent. in 1949 and 19 per
cent. in the years 1936—38. The
Near East received about 2.2 per
‘ent. of total U.S. exports, and
African areas 3.5 per cent.

Europe supplied about 16 per
cent, of U.S. imports in 1950, an
increase from the 1949 share but
much below the 29 per cent, of
total U.S. imports which it sup-
plied in 1936—38. The Far East
provided about 19 per cent. in
1950, a slightly larger part than
n the two preceding years but
considerably below the 30 per
ent. it supplied in 1936—38. The
Near East and African areas sup-

, plied a little more than 7 per cent.

of US. imports, slightly greater
than in 1949 and_ considerably
sreater than the 3.3 per cent.

upplied in 1936—38,

The Weather

TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 5 38 a.m

Sun Sets: 6.17 p.m.

Moon (New): June 4

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Water: 243 a.m, 4.17
p.m.

YESTERDAY:

Rainfall (Codrington): nil.

Total for month to yesterday:
2.68 ins.

‘Temperature (Max.): 86.5 °F
Temperature (Min.): 75.5 °F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E.

(3 p.m.) E.S.5.
Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour
Barometer
| (3 p.m.)

(9 a.m.) 30.015

29.968

Howell, Bay Street, Bridgetown, 6th S
Farnwell, C/o Recorder Office, Victoria
Street, 7th J. Jemmott, c/o Registrar's
Office, Public Buildings, 8th W. Edwards,
| ¢/o Salvation Army, Reed _Strf:t, 9th
Alonza Jones, Drax Hall, St. ~ George,
10th Mr. Thomas, c/o St Paul's Vica:-
age, St. Michael, 11th C. Brathwaite,
c/o General Hospital, St. Michael, 12th
Mr. Mapp, c/o Bethel Mission House,
is Michael, 18th W. Isaac, c/o Mr
H. H. Walcott, Probation Office, 14th
Mr. Owen FitzGerald, c/o Kenneth Pile,
General Post Office, 15th Noel Simmons,
c/o Mrs. Simmons, Bahk Hall, St. Mich-
ael, 16th A. Ishmael, c/o Planning Office,
Bridge Street, 17th Mr. Maloney, Tay-
lor’s Gap, Eagle Hall, St. Michael, 18th
Mr. K. Pile, c/o General Post Office,
Bridgetown, 19th Mr Blackman, ¢©/0
Hinds & Co,, James Street, 20th Rev.
Crosby, Bethel Mission House, St. Mich-
ael, @ist S Beckles, c/o Parochial
Buildings, 22nd Rev, Hatch, St. John
The Baptist, St. James, 23rd O. S
Coppin, c/o Advocate Co., Bridgetown,
24th Station Sergeant Yearwood, Central
Station, 25th B. B. Bourne, c/o Proba-
+ tion Office, Roebuck Street, 26th I
? ‘core, Bank Hell Cross Road, St. Mich-
sel, 27th Mr. Laurie, c/o Registrar's
Office, Public Buildings, 28th G. Wilson,



Upper Collymore Rock, St Michael,
29th W. Golloy, c/o St. David's School,
Ch. Ch., 30th S. S. Hutson, Central
Station







| What's oa Today

Police Courts—10.00 a.m.

Court of Appeal—10.00 a.m.

Sale of furniture at Officers’
Quarters at the Garrison.
Branker, Trotman & Co.,
Auctioneers—11.45 a.m.

Meeting of the Legislative
Council—2 p.m.

Meeting of the House of
Assembly—3 p.m.

Dress Rehearsal of King’s
Birthday Parade at Gar-
rison, Police Band in
attendance—4.30 p.m.

Mobile Cinema gives show at
Westmoreland Plantation
Yard, St. James — 7.30
p.m.

CINEMAS:
(Bridgetown)

Indemnity”

Empire: “Harriet Craig’

Roxy: “The Avengers”

Globe: “September Affair”

Aquatic: “A Likely Story”

Plaza “Double

eee enna







|



TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1951







7

Today's Football

The Barbados Friendly
Football Association’s Fixture



. Africa 150—1

Against Surrey

LONDON, June 4

The South African cricketers |

finished 113 runs ahead of Surrey | for to-day will be Harkliffe vs
With nine second innings wickets | Westerners “A” at St. Leon-
to fall at the end of the second|| a's.

day’s play at the Oval here. Referee: Mr. 0. Graham.

th

Tne Police;South Africans on first innings on



he fifth team to Jead the unbeaten

|
|
Surrey, all out for 246, became |
| ES 2 AT i Rn St
|
|

CRYFTOQUOTE No. 32
the tour. The South Africans had HM NBF LJ MBL. YC, GTB
scored 150 for one wicket in their | ISV LJ SNSHVCP YC?
second innings by the close. | UBDSVC

teh 5 ; wae : LAST CRYPT Reason and
Laurie Fishlock hit 62 for Sur- judgment are the qualities of ;
rey in three hours while Arthur leader. TACITUS

McIntyre spent only 75 minutes
over an attractive 57.



———=x—





|
| — TT
|
|

J. A. CORBIN & BONS.
—Reuter.







LINEN

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SO 2 OR Baht Ss. ooh hee as $7.86
FO geet ti eb yale eaten SR $6.27
| ok Sy ae eerie he ke se ae $5.99

Cotton Pillow Cases

MM MRR eI hi a ah aie hie ay $1.45
Cotton Table Damask

54 ins. wide Per yard ............. $2.16
Cotton Damask Napkins

Be Wee OO be idee ss es oreas $1.06
ROO MAAC oes so Sas os 46e.





10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.









Bridgetown,
Barbados, ;












Sole Importers:
W.S. MONROE &CO.LTD.,

MACDONALD —

& MUIR LTD

Distillers
Leith, Scotland












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PAGE 1

in sow, ii \i IHI IMRIIWHis ,ll)V(K All IMF lllKl.r. Farm Families In The Lnited States By CLARENCE J. MrCORMICK l i:J. IK. IgftaSSStaf** Moet of the land of the United Stales is owned by families of people who are farmers and have their homes on the farm. The title to the land is usually m the name of the father, but all members of tinfamily ht-lp do the work and are supK rted by the money they qet from the sale of farm products ese people lead a hardy, outdoor life; they are physically strong and healthy. All but the very young and the very old wuik hud. A few are wealthy and a few are poor, but most farmers have a medium high standard of living. Farmers an* very important in the United States, rhev praduM W^" f> • 1 food nnd raw materials for clothU.IVa ITCCC1VCC1 mi: Ii>r peoplr in the lrge | More Important than that. Cm QO 4UU\ TV*ra^ the formers and the children o( Oe.ai/17U 1 OI1S (arm people have come man) w'SL.on.'^r.rP^S.mT, Argentine Meat Hw N '"ion, earned hi< livelihood fruin his (arm In the State o( BUENOS AIRES. June 4 Virginia. Abraham Lincoln earned Argentine shipment o( frozen In* livelihood .i nwat to Britain since a boy he lived on a farm and that loading was returned on April shaped his early experience. 25th had by the end of May Harry & Truman, who Is PnstdfOt totalled 32,000 tons according to at this time, was a (arm boj In authoritative trade sources here Missouri In his youth, and Vicetoday. They said shipments In President Albt-n Baikle> was a June would probably amount to farm b->y in Kentucky. Warrei 19.000 tons. Austin, U.S. Delegate to the United The decline is due to seasonal Nations, has his home on a faim and other factors. Frigonllco outIn the State of Vermont where put always declines during he grows apples. Ho v... bora on Argentina's winter months in a farm. Ralph Cordinrr, President addition to which breeders, they of General Electric Company, stud, were inclined at the mospent his boyhood on i wheat ment to hold back cattle In cxfann in the Pacific Northwest, pectation of official buying. Many persons of prominence in The shipment of top quality the United States were children chilled beef from Argentina since of families who owned and lived before the war according to these SW>;\HI\. IX swivs .i Aim* RUSSIA HAS ABANDONED SOCIALIST IDEOLOGY Says Yugoslav Minister BELGRADE. June 4 Marshal Tito's leading Marxist. Milovon DJIUM. said here today thai a serious crisis had hit the Socialist movement throughout the world. DJilas is Mintsler wilhou* Portfolic and leading Politburo member. Addressing the fourth plena-? am Ion of the Yugoslav Commun 1st Party's Central Committee — >aid the ertstl had been cause I mainly hs complete revision ant. .ibandonnuvii of the Socialisi ideology by S. i n't Russia. "Her le.uiei-. have already entered the phase of forming new aggressive and exploitreartionnry ideology and nf Pfary practice", he said. Ilsifotit all ways! Jamaica Has Plan To Oust Mosquitoes Trinidad Wood For Xustralia's Railway on family farms. In Ihe early flays fsUBl encouraged to move from civilised centers to the wUdatTM then covered much of the land. Those Who Uasdj and ID) land were given litlr to it without cost. This established a deep tradition of family ownership of farm land IfaU) hum are still owned and farm* d I dants of the pco,,!.. WTM> claimed uu ^ AlrM the land from the wilderness mtnU or chf||cd bmt ^ lpm ,. nU circles will probably be loaded here In July for delivery to Britain in August, %  ~" *• %  It is likely to be experimental AlllfrirBH A OlllHIU and sonic time before volume shipments of chilled beef start, because of the need to organise :..-.' shipping schedules to ensure ciuuk delivery to the British market. Roy Foulds Bi dish Food Minis' expert is at present in Buenos Aires making arrangcA NT'MBER Or RECRUITS for tha famous Swiss Guards wort sworn In at s plcturs*qu* traditional ceremony at tha Vatican recently. Jamaica has .i programme • the moment for the tswdtos of Ihe AedcM Aegyuti Mosquito Attacking Soviet Communist* h and it is hoped shortly to Intro"aid: "In the Soviet Union everyduce into the colony a T.B. survey thing that Stalin says—iii*..naul> Had lU'.t; campaign. Hun. pr m eoncrete situation—is pro I W. FiUmaun.e. Director of claimed as science and nenei %  '. Uedka] Services told the AiivoIhagfy" I ite yesterday. Stalin's theories were non Socialist. non-Marxist P M nonHe said that he had just .had i< sclentiMe."—Renter. %  •"ii "f one BSietaf mid two public nenllh nurses dimn in Ktu.idoi .^—^_ inder the auspices of the World Health Organization who had been taking training for thi* campaign. In Jamaica, tfiey had n Sugar Industry Labour Welfare Ilonrtt • Inch is very interested in the ..; ir uoikei I'iin %  sf thei policy is assisting in the estdt >. h'lietu of health centre dispensaries on sugar estates, the ,,„." Southern Australia's ra.lwa> provision of nuking services on .lotper* has left Trinidad these estate at the centre and the hJU( imm ^a? possible th.._ provision of an ambulance. the Minister of Agriculture. Mo Victor Bryan. "Australia hi— the past two ( yn ; he niied lo ^y „„,„ from TiinUad for railway sleepers and boats. 1, IKIIMI Our 0*1. C< irf ration dnt> POP.T-OF-SPA1N. JuiuThe insl consignment shipment of mcra (a local wood I This COPPER, BRASS ORDER UD TO HELP THE ARMY WhViin the p**t two %  .ml that tlMM had l*"cn instituted i> the Board ami <*•* %  doing \er\ Kood work he said. "These boat* 1 f,H.d to %  bringing Teacher, Go Back ***** FHgh,S U|> Between Mny 11 when Uruguay resumed shipments to Brltatn and the end of thai month, Uruguay had sent sorward 5,40O tons of fzosan meat. Uruguay is expected to clear nnother 12,000 ton3 this month— Production AutliorVtv to devote increased rate is largely due to 73 per cent, of their total output MM the fact that shipping schedules from July I to tilling military are now fully organised. needs. —Iteuter many years agoIn %  f" remote places there has ue*Mi (roe land for families within the last 25 yerOne can always buy farm land In the Unit though land price;ire high right now. Children of farm families in the United States develop riti/ei.-li,,. ISfeJ ftfnj help with light chorea. Many of them have animaloi Iheuown to care for. and DM] money from the sale of the animals. They learn how lo work hnni as their Mlnwi and mothei do. When thev grow older, 0M MEXICO. June ....... %  __. Or two of the children may beA statement by the daily paper ^J h *. onV PitUburg—America s come owners .,f tha family farm:i Popular today that the U.N. Sheffleld — by surprise Mcei 8 The other children may move to Economic Commission for Latin *t%  *gj 'g. g_ **&&? lno %  \ %  .. Fl'.LA. now meeting order until Uie ute autumn But all their lives thev cau-v the here i to be dissolved and its THERE IS one honest ways and habitl ol hard (Unctions conferred on the Or(he Iron Curtain From R. M. MMCOLL KEW YC1RK Sunday Behind the storm of words in Washington over America's day military-political policies in the Far East, the tremendous il) <;UATF.MA1^. June A The ROME. June 4. Italian Air Company Six thousand public school "Alitalia" will increase the numteachrrs returned to classes tober of flights between Italy "" %  pening t w o thousand South America (Argentina and throughout Guatemala Brazil) to six each way rh^hm^? Amorica,,TnTuslri8l migh, ta ..ipped up for p.& l *£*~J& l !*&.*8i ZTVTXti TS, V"^n siDle trouole. .* t .. payment of back wages and s..n weekly BSrvtoa there will alv Producers of copper and brass dress size 10 to sute 10 Then the benefits have be*ti met by Qovbe J fortnightly serwlco twle* ernment |X'r month. —Reuler. — Keuler. ^^Check the new 5-ton 100 HO.' 1: POWER MORRIS-COMMERCIAL against everything you and your drivers want in a truck! Tfa MI. ho*> M.vt.i t i>MtfMt>wl <1((llllt(l> Mia %  TXW and MatMi iianJatJ in '"Jit rfU* 1>I., < I I"' (>* %  HM! %  ntuvui .tV 'tax h.ft.U(. rssoMSsW Stn mi tonfoct. tov. m mutiiiii FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Diilribulon Phone ^504 ... dress size 18 to site 10. Then the have l>cen ordered by the National break. record called "Con'' uirs Statement Cart and refrigerators for clvtlLins wilt have to "get by" on the remaining 25 per cent. And on ihe heels of that, the steel manufacturers hfc'-< leen given the same -u-dcr less." in which Patti did a duet for herself, brokv her into big time. Her "Tennessee Wall*" has sold 3.000.000 records. Now Patti is earning $500,000 ( £178,570) a year BECAUSE non-smoker Rudolph Ringthe Briton who b Viuk' Mi'tropollliin Opera Company is -lek of luiiig offered cigarettes, he often has a holder in his mouth. In the holder is a half-smoked "cigarette." It smaller because H 1 made of mall point In plastic. here a tew A SALESMAN met dsnlh work thuy learned when young, canlaatlon of American States, people can still "eddy"back and New Orleans' Cosuno lu did Like farmers everywhere, Q S was denial by Dr. Raul P' %  eiiis.-h forth more or leas at will, and farm families are friendly iih of Argentina. Executive Secretary no t even be asked to show then their neighbours and visitors lo of tho Commission. passports (fhey don't have them) their cotnmuiiiliM. Even In the In n statement to Heater PreThis is where Siberia glaraa 1 part of the United BUiast, bison said: "Thw report is ridicuacross the Bering Strait-s at where firms aro many miles apart, lous and without foundation. Tho Alaska. visits are made to each other a Commission was never as strong There, the island of Little mohomes. In time* of illness and a, it is now. Such a project wag made is American. Jhie miles adversity thev help MM .mother, not even discussel and nucn a dewest u Big Diotnede— Huswaii. Th-v ..: a m ika U) Cities, cifJon u any case would require Jj£ P rivne C^ J!^}"," %  **„* 3 ,he_Unl,ed.Na*gp£j !" ^ lt f%£. slans are ver>' busy on Big Ih not like his new car. So he picked a quarrel with car-*ulcsman Elmer Bahan and btiot pioi dead Baliun hnrt not sold IUK-CO IDG %  %  where they have and On Pace 7 friends the approval ttons Economic cil." and Social Coun—Reulei RESPECT THE PRESS ,g Diomede. Soviet troops have built a tall observation tower on a hill and are "active" there dally Jury Open Return Verdict :i inquiry into the death of ChrlstoA M1LWAUKEEAN can now piivi Guodndj.e of Richmond tell you Just how it feels tn be in Onp was concluded yesterday at NEW YORK CITY. Newcastle (England) when aomeDistrict "A" Police Court The New York Tim> is helping' leacher* here prepare JJJ Silw.uk C y'J&eSeft c"o^?. Good"S7i. t.h ittldcjntl t> plav an active and intelligent role in community greatest beer-producing city. And r> r Bayley's Hoipltal in Beckles life when the West German -.hip Hoa j M Ap.il 20 but died therFor the past seven v.-i.rs Ihe Time*, in co-uperation with the ^JSfleSasssTfnslatS iSdoek ? n Apr S A T 1 l #rtrn *ff New Ynfk City Board ,f Education, has conducted a 15-week PjS^!mStSt^ ££> v'K'.mS.ttS Ml to aft course m "Education and the News". ln S40 cai*i o* Munich liecr. n ,, s--.,. The course is based on Ihe AMWICA cnntill be Ihe lind a '?Z".Z~imKtm some of undersland current news before ed out '' %  ''"' ^BJSTSS bUddir were plreed Into the they can uke utelhgenI .etion ol ... ^hcm., ra, way lor. r ^ J^ ^ An>1 "".„,.rn,'n,T 1E"SSour SS W* UnWI S .lnSt The An.ly.l -Id hi found ch.no8S? M sSiJc oo ss c .ss:a .".M^nd s Swindled mm poduShiu<;.=-*.**,. ODEX THE FAMILY SOAP O Gets shin really dean O Banishes perspiration odor O -eaves body sweet and dainty OXCK ASUUN AVAMLAMLB... "NOXZEMA" Thi. M-dL.tcd slin Ctcam Soothe* and Heals. Yout I avoutile Skin Cream presents ..._... SUNBURN Skin Irritatiom. "NOX7rMA" a llow you to BgdOl |roui llohJ.i)*. or Weekends *ilhout Hear or Wony aboOl BuSMtfl Remamber Rs "HOKUMA fie Mr4h*ttd Cr*mm in llrf "l.uilr Blue .or In Th.ce Suet I lA 3/^ & P" 1 '" Obtainable at BOOKER'S (Barbados; DRUG STORES Ltd-Broad Street and ALPHA PHARMACY. Hana f^^'^~^#9sr#s^-s^^,s^g^s$*^#^s^rs : ^#^ **m*l* NOTICE D—Tax-Day iFtoni Our 0n C*>rreipoifteiH 1 PORT-OF-SPAIK. -Kine 1. Over S50.000 wag COUacted at military, scientific, and cultural the Town Hall. Port-of-Spam news is covered in the course. yesterday May 31, which was Each work's programme Is deD-Dfty for the payment of ratal velnped around a single subject, and taxes for houses in ar-vars. Usually the first part of the class This drive ha* lieen negotidlcd period is devoted to lectures by by the mayor. Mi. Raymond members of the Time* editorial Hamel-Smith who is determined stall. The rest of the time is given that monies due the CorporaUOti ovtr to questions and answers. ;• bd paid Rates of Exfiuuige CANADA. JUNE ( 11 (10'. in rhwiur* on r... -• %  SraSki SiM Dr^ft0 1 10'. pr. fshto • 3 10--, pr • Osvy an i The course is designed especially for teachers nf English and the social sciences in the elementary :md secondary school. The teachers use various methods in directing the study of current events in their own schools. Some Integrate the new. with regular, history, ana geography courses, and others conduct special events classes with the Time, as their only text. For vigoroui health st ewry mage — give ScvenSeaS Pure Qnd Liver Oil. it contains jim tho*e vitamin* and extra noumhment a baby needs for strong bone*, sound teeth and firmfk*h. SrrenScaS i* readily digested — build* up natural resistance to chilli and infection. Mother* will appreciate it* enetgy-rc^tonng propcnies. Babies Ta nd'their Ttnot h tri need this sea-fresh food.•^vr. THE BARBADOS BOTTLING CO.. LTD. AI TIIORISEU Borru.Rs or 01 Take this opportunity to inform their many Friends and Customers that the i!AI.ITY. IT It IT* and I'll Hi: of their carbonated Beverages will be maintained always. WE WILL NOT BE PRODUCING ANY FLAVOURS OTHER THAN THESE LISTED BELOW. ,oca Cola 6£ Per Bottle BBC. GINGER 6^ Per Bottle BBC. ORANGE 6£ Per Bottle BBC. SODA6 { Per Bottle e YOXII gfJCUBM. I* OI'R FIRST OXSIDER.\TIO>.



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II.HIIW.lis W.ViM VTE II I ~l\\ UNI :.. N.'.l WEEKES SCORES 58 IN Marshall Takes INine For Thirty-one a* lit in Our LuiiiN (*urrro|i.iiiflrn1 .25 MINUTES the big%  \ %  .'itt of the I %  i. %  sent I e V. bnt. Mar. i ad—u afxraed lb* B I !>.*.. for • I m but I:M\ HABBBAUi %  it. In the .. k Puiinudcau i iirt Rlckardj took t' %  45 before Piiuaudeaii nl mid%  A few Mr RJekards wm oul la similar ttroke fn, U VToleotl BBOkt took tin* srore wcl! irk before Mcssado was caught It, Man %  I 2 for 30 ..'i' Ac-hong 3 for 22. Ilacup v.. Ilasltn.'den r.ve.Um Wc kes h gradually i thauetlng UW I JC1 uiiot.' against HiiJ-lmgdei mi Monday tu cmtri.: .... %  %  League history Hi. i1,.shmg bgd took 108 off the Hits,mi. H tot!, t ie List SB in in y 25 mm. alas, Inclu outside ti" Baeup IVOIUMI makin| hi ihtrd ccntuiy ki i.iing* in i, t-d j| 2*'. (in s wkkets. Ilaslingden. will; of J K Bolt who ha* n Injured km-, v. .n .i I out for 119, Ken Radniitli Holt scoring 4fi. ., n ball taking ti wicket I >ons in 20 overs. He took a %  Idi in the KUI The i -I Uil-m.iii w I'd hlon too Bailey Does Double In Dutch Athletics Buiingiin-r Koied The Bull: Arrested Ban Broadcasts On Football Games IUI.C. 'WILL ffGHT" AMSTERDAM. Juno 4. The Wist [ndiafl Sprinter E. Mc Donald Bailey won the sprint double in the International Athletic Meeting held here yesterday to celebrate the golden anniversary of the Royal Dutch Athletic Union. Mc Donald Bailey won the J00 metre* in 10.6 seconds and 200 metres in 21.5 seconds ivilh J. Lammen of Holland second in both races. Mrs. Fanny Blanker* Koen. f.inn.us Dutch sprintrr. won the 80 Metres Hurdle-; and 100 Yards vents. In the hurdles *hc bent her old Olympic rival Mrs Mutircen Gardner Dyson by two-tenths -id In 1153. while Miss K. %  ul.ls. another Ilritlsh ul. nri In the 100 Yards won Go / v//i <>r / %gh ts Brian Tonight LONDON. June 4. %  i. Itlltlsll If* | weight CI brought his in in 8 seconds. itx iH.ua.ls Britain also took the first two %  Brlon -if ola.i's in tin-800 Metns. H. N. J. ArgmUna ai Ihe white City, LonParlett healing A Webster by 0.4 don, torrton u night, Meond In DIM minute 55 seconds. Oardner scaled 314 His when p. it Hildr.-th of Britain was he beat Jo Wcidin Of Austria in beettW k>) IIU-IK-S in the 110 Metres h In KurtUee boUt being clocked nt 15 I ow ai about 107, l %  .iid at his %  I Brighton on I felt too %  tlnU I have cut pO^OfaM Utd til Marshy toocb frorn my dM i soreness 1 ii h tuind hiii' treinlnf, an<< will lie going into the ring with the hand strnpped. HI rer, John Sim "Our greatest trouble I ilnding %  parting partners of the I think J %  d i .mi i %  —Iteuter. ftecond*. itrsuiTS I— M-l.r. I Mr Donald BiWy iU 1 J IM.it>rl% .Mi.lUri.|.. 1 B. IU..I (Holland.. Kl.n illolUiLd. Tin 10 II •I. %  .,; .. . I Haul iHolland•. Klvln (Holland*. W Ii llr-.kfll iDrllairn I J ihal.iw.v iBrllnlm II Hail Inn Holland 1 Siirw* Nrkulunn iHolland' LISBON, June 4 Oni' *.! 1'i.itu bull-Oghters, Munui-l Doa Santos, has lieen nrreitct— for killing the bull. The law here, unlike thai and Mi vno forbids killing: ol bull] and pi peneiuei f*.i Infringe up to three yeera HiiprUonini-iit ami llrotlmi prohibllion from fighting. Last night. Dot Santo apparently got over cnthu.iiui .d the momonl when i. i td t" simulate the kill he I forward Eighty thousand people %  aw him do It T*H %  i tin re wge deed silence Then OeRM 0TM Of U* !• i M* .itinns over hi Rl ,i Portuguese Imll-tigbl Klegant ladll wards the ring handkerchiefs as Dos Santos was carried around %  hourdei high. Then he Wal ited The deli of hit I —Reutrr. I P I'M I11 lllldrrlli illilli No. 19 Ki member thai a Load in I'MIIII behind your \diiile is il.H-iTiilh to others. %  JKM muli avuilable by CANADA HI-% for --.ill i Motoring. 1-KtNCHMAN TO TRAIN VENEZUELAN TEAM PAHIS June 4. Henri Vissault. Firm'i I'l.if.ssional Tennis Chumpmn ,ri i trainer of the French team hah accepted proposnls from the Venezuelan Tennis Fedendion 10 tr.nn the W-Tie/tiel.Ki le.im ,tnd Venezuelan tennis instructors for lime months. He will leave Pai is eul;. In September on an IH-houi iiight to Cereeee kruier Chess Tournuiiieiil Opens fn New York NF-W YOBK J Wi-nheim Memorial hilernational Tournamenl oponod hen yesterday at the Manhar Club with four Over* Eigiu Amo.icon eompetltors, Two of four recognised granrmaiten, Di Mai Buwa of Am%  twdajB and Reben Fine of New York met in on I won in 37 moves. Okclln I'.. || %  nd Horowits, U.fl ii..".Lam Fvans. United States meeting Migue 4Majdorf. Argentinc with pewn aha knight*, ending in S3 iv % %  ad— Thcyll Do It Every Time -—...-—.By JimmyHatio <3cOD OL'AAOM SLAVES DAY \U, ETC., G"*XWiMG WE CMICKENS WTHCUT AS iVLCW AS A I0NJO UORD FROM POP-* 3UT WHO <3.| that they ha^ weekly wage Incri i:2. 0. 0. during UM SI uon The Playari* Union itrueted its 2,800 membt 1 ii roi next leason until Union claims have been I 1 ibour, The British Bro At Hi poration haa tight the Humes for Mini h I the war btlnded trap] %  %  1 %  in the ben on 1 —Reiil'T. Tilt: PROFESSOR TAKES ON A HEAVYWEIGHT By JON HOll a> l"ublieotii.ii oaatl monih ol .1 volume weighing 21bv : ilgnal the and ol .1 tormadabai t..-k undertaken bj Bd-ye u -old Preraaaei Peter Alegeaakteri Glasgow University. II Hi that publafhen commissiom d P afeastor Ale x andcr to pn pet .1 new, one Volume edition 1 ig dlscrepancl covered I expen issuing nf the ( : %  Pot "ie prjofageor, |g the miili: n wordi Involved Bee turn Paper, l*night some | Ii irvaUable for OTUJ 50,0 They W'll lell |fl a> Which British auU ifction gajaa m South Africa' i..n k IIMIII ..-. %  I tup. publlaher Mlchaa) Joseph %  ays, jenerouilj "Psiai ihr> nrv %  iwho is pubUaned i^ C Runners up '[ I B it) %  • At 12; theatre produoci Peter rotes started 'books on our %  O ekney Chark 1 has used theni to maki '.v titled The Uttl %  %  I know, him intlmatel> from afar." 0 \ 1 ago, Jran Meol lef*. R |ob al Save farm m Cornwall with Taafya. Bwltch from %  %  1 permanent. Hut i proved untoi gettal % % %  Mr*. Tiingve has Anlshcd wriuafi her experiences and. I has sold them to first %  %  Booh I'm [hor has returne*i ;>oUatoes. \ turnip : —I M U.S. Foreign Trade # From Page 7 broad commodity groups which bad a total value of 7,3aH.000.000, or 73 per cent of lota] U.S. exports 1:1 iitoo. They were iv. $2,021,000,000; raw cotton, $1,U34,000J}0V; grains and .il.lHXI.OUO; ehemelated produclb, SiTll.OOO.OOO; automobiles, parts and accessories, $703,000,000; tCXlUI mamifiictiires. 51.000,000; petroleum and product*, TJ O0,O00.O<1U. iron and sleel-mlll 11,000. tobacco and manufaeturea, S2ii8.ooo.ouo; coai nnd related products $278,000,000. Two 1,11 rue Croups .1 (though many were Imported by the 1 tilted States, they too were concentrated in ; %  few large groups. Tfce 18 loading commodity groups i M>. 134.000.000. or 70 1 total u.s. Import*, in ... are Sl.O91.O00.O00; nonfer%  <•! da, and ferroaUoys, $97,IKM).OOO: papei materials. $746,000,000 petroleum and products, $588,000,000: crude rubber. s459.000.0lin, raw wool. $427,000,.1. $3811,000.000; Sawmill products. $264,000,000: %  nuts, edible nuts, an,) vegei 1.080.000; vegetable oils, • %  1-. siyo.ooo.ooo, pig iron, and crude steel, ^174.000.000. chemicals, fertilizer materials' and related products, .' 70.000 I'IH'.., II, .ir.. beans. l7,OU0.00O. ika.lt. Including shellIrt, $157,000,000: diamonds, 1 noo. C I .'I'ni's of the Western Heml ; here rei ehred 47 per cent of total U S. exports in 1950, a par! than in any preceding year. The Lntin AmeritOOll 27 per cent I pat i. ni. Burope remained, as usual, the main areea of destina' although the Europsan continent's shaie ..t 10 II r cent, was a smaller n than in any prcccd,i In 1936 _.38. Eurone took about 42 per cent, of U.S. while during the war it look an average of 50 pe> cent. The Far East also had a smaller share in US exports In 1950 aboW 14 per cent compared with 10 per cent, in 1949 and 19 per S tilt. In the years 1938—38. The %  received about 2.2 per eat, of totnl U S exports, and African areas 3.5 per cent. (uppliod about 16 per .ii' I U S Imports in 1950. an from the 1949 share but I 29 per cent of 9 Imports which it supI!i3fl-38 The Far East provided about IS :>er cent, in lightly larger part than n the two preceding years but bjj below the 30 per -ent it supplied m 1930—38. The I ond African areas sup, than 7 per cant. if IS imports, slightly greater San m 1949 and considerably rreetei than DM 3 3 per cent. uppliod In 1936—38. GIRLS'CLUB OPENED • tToaa P*ae 5 sopte ui i i ne PaUce will run the Clubs for two year.,. u,i< after that, they hoped that the •uoa would be < n • Bound looting. By so doing they would be torn to open more clubs. Kxprnics Increase The Commissioner said thai the %  • %  %  'i by running the %  i 'ne were over $130 monthly. • MQ were nut atVOfl a penny oy ML Every cent Wgi ma iranmtao ctfctrtbntlon. n twelve people decided to pay the rent for a club they would have j year's rent. Without paying foi lighting. M .. fe the artisans who taught the varum* II; ides, the running o| th. Clu I involved u big uxpenditure. Huentlv hi hail visiu.l L'.ui.id. and had seen what the htnilitti Police were lining there for Ut vouth of the community. The; were taking u very active port In ug.no ing the Canadian youth. He said -We want I i the polke'tian. not as a man to be (eared but as i one win helps %  Kur Traininu He said that they had sent a man to England lo be trained When he returned he would Vlgli all the Boys' Clubs and see thm they are run along the correct lines. He again appealed to the penpk of the district to take as much • uanstble In the CSuba, He asked them to give lectures on certain evenings and organise games. He said: "A few hours ol your time one evening per month would mean a lot of success to the Clubs." Rev. Mallalieu. Rector of St. Joseph, officially opened the clubs He thanked Colonel Michelkn for organising the Clubs in St. Joseph. ne lid that when the Clubs were being formed in "tlui parishes he began to be jealous. He asked Colonel Michelin lo open a club in St. Joseph and he was very pleased to see that this was done. He said: "I wish to see these clubs develop and do some good work in the district." He though! it was no use asking the parishioners for co-operation because he knew he would get it. Mr. John Beckles, a member ol the Committee of Monagemen: said that the Boys' Clubs were only recently formed but he was surprised to see the sine.;. He congratulated Colonel Michelin and his co-workers 'or bringing the boys and girls from streets and putting them in a place where they could associate with each other. He asked everyone in the district to assist In running the clubs. Club For .Units Mr. L. E. Smith. M.t I' that he felt the venture was a good one. It was for the boys nnd girls of today who would be men and women of tomorrow. He S id; "It la one of those thing ilch we all shuulrl trv | olive." He was sorry that Colonel Michelin did not sec it pOaslbli (*> open a club for adults. Some adults needed the same training as the youths. He once started a club for adults. On the night when there was cud playing etc the hall was packed. When ihi was a lecture or scripture reading the place was emplv. He wished the clubs every suecess and hoped that every i n would assist. After the opening refreshmentwere served. Colonel Michelle took the opportunity to give a talk to the members of the Girls' Club Duty Roster Ttw Jui ,1... IV.,, PsOswsr-UI P H O'Nwl*. co PtotMllor CMc. Roehuco RttMl. 2nd G>y UW ".. Pin* Imnd. SI MicKarl, Sid Mt Wrwhrt. C o Si Paul's Vlrar*f>. SI Mi.h..H. 41 h A Jordan, Garden. Si J.mr. rah V B Si John, ,o N B Howa.il. Hav Strrri, Undarlown SUl S rarnwrll. Co Rnnrilrr m'.. VI Mll. lUl J Jnr.mWt. tb*0 Hlatrai'> Office Public Buildlnai tin W Rdanl> ii> Salvation Army Read •tf>jl. f*l MS, Drai Hall, it Qm la r I0ih Mr Thomai. roll rSuri V I as* BS Michael, inn C Bralhalle. i ci (iriieial Hoapllal. SI Miehael 12tli V.Mapp. co Uelhel M. S Michael. Itlh W laaae. c o M H H W-lcnU, prbaun nri'.M M.Owen nuOvraid, e o Knnelh P.t li-nelal Poal Offl,-. Illh Noel Slmn,..i < o Mra SUnmona. Bank Hall. Sa Mxasl IMh A Irtimael. co Planning om.. Ilridce Sirrel, ITlh Mr at'aloney, Ta. Ion lap. lankHall. 81 Michael, lln Mr K Pile c o Oe-ieral Port OSAi-e Hridcelown. ISth Mr BlacKman. i Hind* 0 Co.. Jamea Siren. SOih R'% t'i-tb>Belhel Mi-ton Houae BJ IB I id. tint S Barhlci. c o Paiovhi,. Puildlniia, Mnd Re* Hatch. Bl Johi' The Ha | >t i.l. St Jame. J3rd O S Coppln. %  a Advocate Co Bridieti.a > 7lh Slullnti Seileanl Yearwood. Ceittr. I •• B II Boomr. CO Prooa USB Office Moebuck Si**l, Mth 1 tort. Hank H.-ll Crm. Road SI Mich ma Mr l-utie. r 0 Keaialiai I ., BulMSngs, SHI S. \ frit a ISO--] V^ainst Siii*r\ LONDON. June 4 The So th African cricketers ..head Of Surrey With nice second mnin. to fail at the -'lid of t: day's play at the Oval I Surrey, all out for 246, became the ntth lagan to h South Africans on first Inning* on the lour The South Af. scored ISO for one wicket ID their : second 'iimnks by the close. riabloCai hit 2 for Surrey in three hour., while A || Mclntyra apant only TS rmm t : 'iftia>"s FontLall The Barbados Friendly Football A-sociaUOfT* rtxtun* for to day will BS Harkhffe H Weaaan s !" at at LonRfferrc Mr 0 Oraham. CRVI nxji orr. No xt NBT U MBit VC. CTB U -V"HVPP \Ci HUM. IIIHBIN S SONS ii v c aiioi Rock. St Michati ti.iv .d School Sporls Window I.MHl.1 al •KiU he !•• H< I. ktrh Kill b. Il'.ll.. I..cl .II. H.... aai V The Weather fc TODAY Sun Ri-?' Vf a.m. Sun Sou: 6.17 p.m. Moon (New) Juno I lalghttng • '••• pai. High Water J 43 a.m. 4.1? p.m. YESTERDAY: Rainfall (C.vdrlngtcmi nil Total for month to y


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PAGE FOl-H BARBADOS AnVIX'ATE TUESDAY. JINE 1951 B\RR\0OSAD\ r 0rE rrtntrd b U>* Ad.mti i) 1.M ST.** 1. BrUasMftw* lllfNll.l>. .1.1.If I INI w onii11 UIIII i There is something fascinating about a wobbl?-uheel roller. There is something fascinating about any kind of roller There :uc rollen tvhieh arc bird*, there ore rollris (Hi crass-courti, there are relinimis rollers and then ueoi eounaraDtrskates. But among the diverse family of rollers there is none more important, more deserving of serious attention than our own wobble-wheel roller. In a report of the Seawell Airport Committee signed on February 29 and laid at a meeting of the House mbly on 19th March. 1951. it was stated that funds are being provided for a Wobble-wheel Roller and that a wobblewheel roller was necessary for Sea well Airport. The wobble-wheel roller has come, but like all wobble-wheel rollers, it needs something to push it. something in short to make its wheel wobble while it rolls. That something was provided for in the wisdom of the Committee. In part II. Section 3, item 3, the Committee recommends among other items of airfield equipment that a tractor be purchased for $3,000. The tractor would have three uses. The first use would be to pull the wobble-wheel roller and grass cutter. Secondly it would be available to manoeuvre aircraft on the parking apron. Thirdly (and to conclude) it would be available to clear the runway in case of difficulty or emergency. The report was written on February 17. It was laid in the House of Assembly on March 19th. To-day is June the fifth What action has been taken on the report of the Seawell Airport Committee? None. The price of tractors in the meanwhile is not going down. Nor is a tractor the only thing needful. An extension to the terminal building which will cost $40,000 must be carried out. A fire engine house to house the fire engine despatched last week by the Bruno will cost $6,000. Accommodation for staff and restaurant will cost $5,000. Other necessary expenditure brings the total up to $93,000. Every day that passes without a decision on the Airport Committee's report will add to the original estimated expenditure. Tins is no way to administer an Island. The constitutional privileges of Barbados are the envy of other West Indian islands. But there ran he little satisfaction In hugging those privileges and revelling in those privileges at the expense of necessary action. It ought to be possible for urgent priority business to be discussed by the Barbados House of Assembly at least once in the year. Could the House not meet for a tive-tlay week this month and have action taken on outstanding reports? Only by some bold action will the heavy arrears of deferred reports be cleared up. Only action will substantiate the claim of our capability as a legislature to get things done. Clinging to privilege for privilege's sake will rouse patriotism and cause friction, but only business-like despatch of urgent business such as the report of the Seawell Airport Committee will give Barbados a reputation, which it now lacks, for getting on with the job. I.*, i \etoi HI us The Advocate understands that the 2,000 workers who have been selected to perform the gruelling work detailed by the United States selectors last week, will almost certainly be employed for a minimum of five months in the United States betore returning to Barbados. The present debt that the taxpayers of Barbados have to meet with regard to these wrongly-labelled mis" is two thirds of the cost of their return from the equivalent of Jamaica to Barbados. The worker! themselves will have deducted from their pay envelopes while they are in the United States the sum of two West Indian dollars per week for the original minimum period of twelve weeks. The Government of Barbados has decided to subsidise the labourers to the extent of two-thirds of the remaining cost of passage from the equivalent of Jamaica to Barbados. This burden will have to be borne bv the taxpayers of Barbados unless the Government shows greater business acumen than it has hitherto displayed in this new policy of doles for a privileged minority at the expense of the majority who cannot "emigrate." Nothing but the W" state of political morality to which we have fallen could justify such an action, but such action having been taken, the Government must ensure that, now that the possibility of five months' work .n the United States has been mentioned for these "emigrants". ,'mmedi?Li action is taken to recoup the full *eturn passage money and thereby benefit both workers and their unfortunate relatives left behind who suffer because their "dole" money cannot be spent on them. Id III ItAMr IUSMII Asks: Are These Moral Codes Out Of Date? MORALITY In America Is dominated by the cennor to a dei.rie irUcn UM urisupluitu-atcd inhabitanta uf the Old World may lilul ptllZlllil The deAiutif." >f virtur Is geometrical and Is laid down precisely In codes that govern the cinematographic industry. Kisses must not last more than a certain number of yards and must In confined to the face. It might be thought that while such codes might determine what ran 1Mshown in public thev could tint hop,io have much t'Mmnct on private life This, however. would be a complete mistake They do not, of course, decide what people do in private, but they do decide what, perhaps unconsciously they consider it right to do. The consequence is that alMl 11 %  vktw nlightnot, I am almost' tempted U> do to. What Goes On tali-t enterpriseview. M >x % % %  a commodity which III.I\ bv ifroNt.ibly sold (or public consumption. Tni i.f .niv.ituenunta. not only I Ut also In England In America, hggfever. owing tn the fact that aaVrtiser* have more money to gfsnd, U much greater In ditgree. He points out that a cullan) lag permits many highh lllogt .nut lining %  to lingei on decades and centuries i eyond The 1t->ear-old philosopheriheirorigm.il usel.i. -cleiiUsl examines a new sur, a | applicabilitj t human affair* ve bv an Amenran of how || fa ., euriOUl phenomenon that the Americans live to-day | country which leads i mechanised technique still lingers prohibition most Americans in the 17th century in matters of moat the whole nation believes Itthought about liquor morning, thought. It is earnestly to be self abandoned to sinful practices, noon and night, and other subjects hoped that the superiority a This has two consequences: on had to be content with odd cranAmerica m armed force will n< the one hand, since the accepted nies of their mindsn dasuoying what i standard of murals is an impossiProhibition in regard to liquor best in tin the Ol hie one, everybody In moments of is at an end but in matters of sex World depression or intoxication is perthe censorship is perennial and There \in wSWlll S, and to I suaded he is a miserable sinner, the mental effects are very similar lesser dhffri t a threcon the other hand, prohibitions to those which were produced bv ion In What people saj have an aphrodisiac effect I have prohibition and think on moral u never coveted my neighbour's ox. Then is first of all the officla' but when I remember that I must The Cynics code handed down from the pas: One is compelled to suppose that which cannot be publicly noutex conventional moralists arc not without severe pSnalites, social i very good psychologists since the not legal. steps that they take secure results There u next wnal people's own exactly opposite to those thai they reflections have ted ihem to beAnew book bv Mr. Albert Ellis' profess to desire Ueve conwinii'ls Thlg, In many may be confident|v recommended The attitude about sex in people, perhaps in most, is much io MO European who is contemAmerica is part of a more general less strict than the traditional E lating a journey to the United attitude. Americans for the mofl COQ •• lutes. part are unable to face reality exHe will find in It vast stores of <*P* ,n "*ood of cytstcisfl "he Turmoil information far more useful than n*is this, for example, in politics. anything contained tn Baedeker !" y "ave * of 'deal rules But thirdly 1-eneaih what people and if he studies the work dillwhich they imagine that a virtuconsciously think, there is still the gently he may be able to behave >us poliucian would obey, but the unconscious effect of early upni such a manner as to increase rules are such as would cause any bringing, which is iiMially in line the American contribution to the man to be out of politics in a w" 1 the old conventions, expenses of European rearmament week. Consequently, it is recogThe rMUlt • turmoil in the nised that no politician can be mind and a lack of COi virtuous according to the nominal action. As Mr Elli> puts It: code. sexual oVscomfon and ineongVmgfSM, i-wri trVi.-ti basic sex nerds are portly soti.-ifd **OtsMt PimtoiU • •• Amcrli l I %  act differently than they think and unhiamM ""tsttouilp lo think differently than (hey consciously penssU thrmieivci to Hui\ they flunk itillate sexual feelings. one that" a" moral 'code', "if 'it "s "to al h mo ,I? V n "' n aCe to h ,,< "*"The things that writers of cheap wrve a useful purpose, should not '* ""'ft ,nc >, "*JV u \f n h n fletion permit themselves to say be something totally divorced from t y ,n '" ut,M and feeling, even are such as to bring a blush to the practical life, but something which wn *' n nn*y compels some decheek of any hard-boiled Frenchreal live people m actual situation* %  ^ l r,l,re n,m $•_£•?••* %  ,h: man. And even In the most hairmay be able to follow In y ,ml > | bed in inranc-y raising passages ihere is a sickly There would be much less conWORLD COPYRIGHT sentimentality which inclines any fusion than there now Is in AmcriRESERVED person of taste to enter a monascan thought and feeling if this The Folklore of Hex by Albert tery at once. view of moral codes were generalEllis (published b> Charles Boni. I have known America before, ly adopted both in matters of New York. S dollars) during and after prohibition Durpolitics and in questions of sex. L E S I.n America, largely 1 think because of the prohibitions that sUII govern the official pronouncements of the law, the police, and the SSffy, MX Bill the thoughts of men and women more than In any other country known to me. Almost all advertisements, no matter what the product con_. cerned. are carefully designed to It does not seem io that a moral code. He Is Wise It follows, so at least the age American concludes, that politician cannot be Ju*tl> he may commit r to anyf u is to whatever How Hard Is Lifr For The Men Who LEscapi V By EVELYN IRONS PARIS. OITTING In the sum watching r a the l ^ m l XM Bol Ild M ho played tennis, life Can us stadium was Jaroalav •• s %., __„ n.i r nmbny-the former Sa* lennli. „,? ,,2, T aM a .SVun. etamgta, wh„ i (ran behind lho ,^ ^tXSrZ!^ !" went tour of h land In an mien rot tongrow i i ig Uio u PP*r Egypt. !„. He eannot, of course. his new country |fl I matches; for, having once been the Iron Curtain nearly two amateur players. Also they allow a Dnvw Cl, P lfl > ,er f r no """years ago. Beside him was VladiB ,,„ PXtra for incidentals. lr y \ onc cannot wltch Ul another, slav Skonecky, the Davu Cup DrobBjr can never uppe-ar in In*.player, who has Just decided not jhey r'oruwt Davis Cup match for any country lo return to Poland. Skonecky but his own. But bo plays for disappeared from the Polish It was between matches when Egypt in other tournament*. Davis cup team in Switzerland, he was not playing, that Drobny To-day Drobny saya he feel, has now arrived in Paris seektnn found life difficult. teasonobly securo for the first asylum. "I found that people forgot time since the Iron Curtuin It was In July 1949 that Drobny about me as soon as the lourrTaclanged down behind him. SCUIUIK —the former Prague ball-boy who ment ended." he mild. in down und getting married' became champion of Czechothe USA., as In Switzerland, it "Not yet. I must save ilrst." He Slovakia and No. I player In was just not possible for a stateis frugal; never smokes, hardly Europe—defied an order forbidless alien to make a living by ever dilnks. ding him to play ngninst a Gerworking. From January to March (those man and a Spaniard. With his Now ln ipUc of lhe cvnioi u ore the be*t monttai for teiimfriend and runner-up Vladimir man cann ot make a living from In Egypt) Drobny Uves ln n' llhQO „ j ",„ k „.„ ., ,' """, "~"* Czcmik he refused to return homo amateur tennis Drobny was Cairo boarding-house ("rathe. I lubes or ml bottles quaintly labelled lighter from Switzerland where he was ^ thankful when early last "ke your private hotels in South I fuel ar.d poison, playing at the time. hf was off(Te(1 f Kensington") He l a often to be I T)( „ N Egypt. !*n at the luxuriouNo-Drink City Suras Up The First Dry Year Krom JAMKS I.KAKOR BOMBAY W1IKN the rains dirak ow this burning | dtj (lliey -ire Jue three weeks from now) it i will become UM wettest in the world—but I at this moment it is the driest. Reason •' Bombay is celebrating the end of its first year of total prohibition. Celebration is, perhaps, hardly the correct word in a cm wheneven a wedding toast i~ drunk in tizzy lemonade But at least some citizens have cause for rejoicing. They are the bootleggers, than whom no class is currently more successful. Twelve months back these characters were lowly liftmen, porters, and sweepers—the lowest Indian caste of all. Now they live in sea-front houses in Marine-drive, have white American roadsters. and their wives 1,000-rupee (£75) saris. They owe their sudden affluence to the absurd prohibition policy started as a sop to Gandhi's words Once he said that if he had self-government for one hour only, his first act would be lo ban foreign liquor. Hence, total prohibition in Bombay and Madras and one dry dav %  week in Delhi. QUKSTIONNAIRK Westerners who want a drink — cunouslv referred to officially as addicts—have to queue for hours in a steamy office to answer a questionnaire. The questionnaire includes such non-drinking questions as where they were brought up, and their monthly income. After due bureaucratic delay they may be awarded one to four units for one month, which means a maximum of four bottles of gin. An appeal may be made on medical grounds, but the Director of Prohibition though a non-medical man, can either quash or grant it. So much for the official means of getting drink. They never made anyone rich, but the unofficial ways have made hundreds wealthy. Backyard brewers operate in every street in the kitchens of wealthy householders, where underpaid servants augment their meagre incomes by running heme-made stills. They soak a handful of sugar molasses in water, ferment it, and distil it. This takes time and also smells, so they accelerate the brewing by throwing into the brew-pot a handful of ammonium chloride. The production of the drink is quickened | alarmingly, but the product does no good to fKKii ,,lc drinker's stomach. HI Mil II CARGO Housewives complain that fish is hard to buy. The fishermen are after more lucrative hauls from the bosom of the sea. Large boats packed with booze come up from Goa in Portuguese territory. They dump their cargo over the side and mark the position with a float. In the darkness fishing boats collect it and bring it ashore in deserted creeks. There it is either buried for future disposal or poured into false petrol tanks on ears, or into inner CLOSED FOR REPAIRS Advocate Stationery YplV.ISXSVttSZ'. seen at the luxurious Gezin. | a offer black whisky in big hot.-.s The offer came from a cotton "pojting club. (for 75 rupees (£5 12s. 6U) a bottle about How has Urobny lived since magnate who lives in a palace in He "peaks no Arabic, getUne lnree ., mos h norrna | urjc Ihen? As wisat together In the Cairo and is I tennis entlmslasl. ^ Wllh ( Ft ( ' "d English. %  un Drobny told me the story. He was in Clerho Slovakia vcry day he u,k ni The Swiss gave him an identity before the war and he saw "* rard when he exiled himself from Drobny play. They met. Ctecho-Slovakia. But they would Ni>w this magnate has befriend if paper was by no means career. to continue his tcimi. ly meet* other exiled Czechthe juice in the sun. working for the Bata shoe factory ut Alexandria. ,„ulv.lent'n. %  p^pirt. AUo ho Tn"ilarch 150 Drobn, become hn !' discovered that a man without a mworld. Last November country finds i, hard to get a Job. began wTrTaa cSlon .-dSlu 7 U d DeC T^ r ^ -X. t^*** mi. iwgan wort as a cotton salesman, tennis in India and I'.ikisi.n. Back in Prague he had been a He wl " ot diaclosa his salary. clerk in a branch of the Bata But he says that it is "adequate : Father Stayed Shoe Company, which made tennu ""? n "J> ' "• 8t* a comHu f ^ nether arc in balls He had I pleasant bachelor mission on sales of raw cotto i p Iilgue wh cre l)iobny senior i" ml he always fJd through his introductions. M ff* £g J ^unL'l "He onev to keep have opportunities of meeting hn wmo(n ^, „ K SJltl world.' Itat and a small had enough pocket money to keep "' nave opportuntti' him going In the tennu capitals businessmen socially where the firm allowed him to world." Drobny said. "I do not ipend most of his time. actually carry out the salei Quitting his country, he quitted the contact man. I have done his job too. quite well so far." When It proved impossible to Drobny was completely withwork in Switzerland he made hu out experience of cotton growing way to the United States, thinkand selling. But he is making Ing to And a future there. Sc long neribits study of it. He rtcanll} ihL na "whicd a simpU working '..':' V man," explained hi* son. "It Is I ho j.lined the bourgeoisie' and so became unpopular with the men at the top." He has not mv • U 1 moving tt was refuted by saying lhat 1. these glrU are quite groundless houses and huU. also, he might „ nol ln ,e. that if one was no'. ^, V n "^,lr"-,*„,;!^ 0r ''"f>h!r.i1^ "S? V* '" T-ir -i"l on "Form A" thai iher, fort, control, relaxation, connDivining." so that some of (tie dene* and courage combined unfortunate Barbadians In lie itli perfect co-ordination of country districts, may get a little brain and one that could prevent him from registering on "Form B" with perfect co-ordlnaiion of country districts, may get n little ii' ,7ih.Vh-,, .^.t. brain and muscle — all valuable water in a few years' lime. I am h N w S JI ,1.""," ^ .wal.tle* to develop for later life, assuming that by that time, with %* h "" ir "V" ""^ ''JS -.'hethor •rai -K-.i the Persian Oilfield', nationalized. Lest the public get an mere tnay ^ s (cw watcr plpcs erroneous impression. 1 would available for all the suffering or,n B %  und must commeno like to state lhat in actual effort, people of Barbados, *"* honourable member whr L these vaults are nol as strenuous Surely ine Governor-In-Exeuroughl 't to our attention. the competitive High Jump cutlvt Committee can arrange a am hoping Sir. that ih f 15 years ago) where a t^p (^ %  'Sonny'' • 1 hear the recistoring ofllccrs arr llndini maximum effort is required as (KKlr fellow Is getting quite l>'ir t^sk much easier, because I one strives to improve on the WO rked up about It—quite right am sure the ptc .[,; i,




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I PAGE SIX I1VRRID0S ADVOCATE ii i-i.w JIM: S, I;I HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY j\.... c ^\ E wow. 9 B5T.B\\£ .^. BE \1A? if L-NPEC3TANP: BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG aooE wiat_ SO SljPPWSED^FU PROBABLY GIVC ME A BIG KISS %  •NIIIMIiri ip I'M TOO ^ SLEEPV TONGMT • TO APGue WITH -*OJ THE LONE RANGER FRANK STRIKER ".ONTO CC3;;AM V.T^STSTO EXAMINE THE MAM CALLED BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS *U*T SiTAaCiajD-rLLCO MG M -*<~" %  • %  \: ../.'. %  ( frj ..A: ON >Af %  POiLL MAKVJ > MAPPEKBO 1 I na-^-ADM-AMTCUT k-v I • ; >* A COMCOOTABL5 \ •OCX.-**.*'*"'%  & L/*' j E^KO CO ANN '.LL as •• f) AMV WJMENT( I %  '-aoOW w-—/y") "&-(— >: '.• %  GLL"S^E 1 AM..• %  "V: g %  IHITIS-— RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND ..,.1 MM FDMN IW1N if LA SWSSO, I coouWfClf ur TIC£ KW TKufcEJ H-D INMWtV L CAJSMTE? JBWS '-. %  %  %  .%  -• .......... i OH ** D:e.-.M, "CXI WAC1 _, eecrrvAM? aUT Jf *HT .' M aj •: \ LM '"-' TEu. /-. rTl JUSTAneuL' 'Cttt lifcESMl < VOIU-bSTLfi.-.jHCuSE JX! I CANT TMC it | THE PHANTOM MAKE THIS W0CKOUI4> N£ DIANA, -^i, MytfaftFmfj BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES [SLY/ BABE VtX> \ REKU. WE'RE NOT COMEINMERE.'lAFTER VOU.V.EBE TMEMTOOHSJ WWTIN-Mft IMEBCn FBIENP.V Sensational New Make-up VmmwttUmtion in •/ Gums Bleed, Teeth Loose! Stop "yotrhea and Trench Mouth in 24 Hours li&L N EW! Not %  cke make-up,not a grea.y foundation! "Anael F.ca" la loundi no iituv fingertip* Ha on ".lute purl. Gl and powder all In ona. No wat apoafja, AtiHl -< %  •' %  "• %  " ••* *nd %  monthly iU> • Mil. velvety complexion laitaaiiy. NEW! Stays on longer than powder The apeclal "•fill*' indredlant tu—d Into -Anl Far**' ma it %  tav on mucri lonax than ordlnar* powder. And lt> never dryinff. NEW! Cant .pill! You'll MY Pond* "AnBel Kaee'" U the moat convenient make-jp TewVe ever uaed — It Mart P"I •HI handbaa ot clothe. Ilk perfect to U* anytime, anyv-hete Chooae from five angelic %  hade. Blonde Aturel. Ivory Anl. P\nk Anet. T*itv Aurl. Bronie Antel. At all the bet beauty cwinler*. Bletdlnf |um, !' " t\.t )Q rt—a or Trrnth U-i trial :ll fwTituall jour teeth and )i before yoar m mestri. or loo- > t vUUm of fr.-riraojMeMdlara*' • MMIM all > i-.r file* teelh tit* peal : M theae awaUi aaaaaaM ban ap rm tnroniboat the rtd to thtl now •rtentite ear thai four oui of'••rv fl P^ tlaaa and ilop thew oWaar. b-fore it la toe late. t*rajai Iher often rtuar not onlr the loae of teeth, but nlw enronie rfteaaaaUaai and hrart trouble. Nw DU(over> Saves Treth %  .he dtarevery ** "~ iri the *fl flin %  M T. %  ., %  ',flra*. I •f T. Meant ejid Potr;*a lo.Hi >'ri. Mr CH -."is* at nr^a" s, J .is %  ta ajatlMei tooaer alt the IIBM 1 trtea mn thioBi and then beard ef tbla naw daKoiar* ** % %  < %  In 3* haara after u*:nc Ammmm IT,, eur... .IACI P'.BU*,I I '.. .ii, The aorenrH la my mouth dfai.pearrd 1, IhrM dan ai.d ta lu aaa 1 (•urj that %  nylooae l"ih ar'e mar!i tlrHvi :.td Itat I could eat the bardett ui p Ouc*rant*d AMte* •-.!-. n Hit aaaj M r.,. i that It U %  uarai'.eed (o ttori vdir rcaia (taai WeedlBf, rar) mre irau'.h and lt|b'.(B your teelh U> tour i^.v,'.iit :>: MMtm -i Btenei ba'k on return el tiny.' aacaate. Daa't takaarbarweon oain| eur lae'.h or awBerlnf thr daneert from i jma:na and heart trouble O-t Aneaea fraat ** %  lacLQi.t taday under tnti ll jn-iU# faaranAmoian icU you. Fr lyorrJita.-Trench .'BH:^ WHATEVER IS THE MEAL IT'S ALWAYS IMPROVED WITH A FEW SLICES J & R BREAD BROWNE'S CERTAIN COUGH SYRUP ll Raliavas Cold) Quktly. C. CARLTON BROWNE 136 Ror-lMii k Si. DIM ZSU Wholf'Blr RUII linifpht fmipad \'is\ !! Your Fnroff rit*> MOTOH CYCLES Arrive* IT VELOCETTE The New Model L.E. 200 C.C. is different from the conventional type Motor Cycle — in fact it's the nearest approach to a motor car. II u f #*---re--/f'-/. Iliiiitl-S/tii /.it. S/f / ,V-#/f 11 */i timl \ ui si-If vs. For SIMPLICITY, ECONOMY and RIDING PLEASURE f liiinsia — VELOCETTE JUST RECEIVED rina Vienna Sauaasat, — ua af % %  oUad Meal Cumext Beef A Ceaeal T*t*n. AiuUillan Ham* Ox Trmfvlea Table Boiler ll % %  i'-' Hunch 1-invheon Beef Cereal. Pea* Tomatoaa. Tomato June (Vila Oirhlall Cherrlaa CotHt.,1 • Tma Maeanwu A Cher** Campbell'! ftoupa. Oileltan with me. Cntchen NoodlUeef STIABT & SAMPSON (1938) LTD. Headquarter* for Best Rum. 'MV.W/,v,y,v,v/.v,'///, FOODS ROBERT Couilesy Garage THOM. LTD. — White Park Road IMPROVE YOUR BUSINESS BY IMPROVED PRINTING DONE BY ADVOCATE PRINTERY SFor Your I Enjoyment £ Bota. ( ... kt.ul Onion*! v C'henie* S .. SlBlTed Olives $Tliu CoekUII BfseulU j ,. Swift Vienna Sauvace*! O Frankfurt Sausages S Lunchean Beef X .. >*ate De Fole ^ a rotted Meat ft A 11*1 Tin Sawto Olive Oil O Tina rtleeae X Ph. Kraft CtMM I f ESCE & Co. Ltd. '.-.•.-.-.•.v.w.-.-.-.---.'.'.'-'-'-'. IT PAYS Y OU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to ail Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only Pkgs. Kardomah Tea i Pkgs. Moiis Chocolates Bars Blue Soap 2 Bats 1'sually Now I'sualK Now 39 3.1 RICE 4 pts. 28 24 10 .. I Tins Cooking Butter 1 lb. 86 : 108 MM! Tins Klim 1 lb. 148 130 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street i



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I'AGK TWO BAKHADUS ADVOCATl: i i l SDA1 II Nl CaJub tfalUmf D R. ROBE H -f i> i Direct % Advcntist Mrdicnt Cl B %  %  . %  yestnday mumii d l>j ll W I A Io spend a week or ten days' holiday in Barbados. He i sgejlBaj wi'h ItV, and Mn. Seth Whit*In Merchant In Venezuela **-R F. W. (.LEA.s %  XTX mtrchinl in Venezuela Originally, from Nev. U S-A he has been living in Venezuela for abotii five yearr Aceenhpanicd bj naughtcr J Jnd.i. M arrivi .. terday morning ,> il.WJA. They were intransll from Tobago where they had spent the last two weeks. Before reTurning to Venezuela ihey plan ha %  pen B "Von know. Hill, darling. It's tiaUv uimoxt i.nf-..,..tir 10 keasree thai ihe. i. -.uu all done b hand!" Te Join Mr. Hammond IIAYMONI) NOBRia New Carib Commander ... kUHtasH %  fed his thre years I Commander. Caribbean %  ( V Jackson sometime this Peg* will be lea* • in* %  Hern hi 1903. link Jackson was erijeated at llaileybury and HMC to tinRoyal Hampshire Regiment in 1923 he 1 %  India. West Africa. Palesfhe U.K. until 1939. During the war he was slatlnnro, iha Western Desert. Haifa. Persia and Iraq Brig. Jackson comes from fen army family with at least half I :-ecutive generations |n the services. His great-great%  mile, f.eneral Sir AlssMAdtl Cosby Jackson commanded In Ihe West Indies for many years Medical Conference D\ B.B.C. Radio Hollywood Takes On Progta "! !" The Flying Saucers —and invents THE THING i'. .. in Houveam ..t Munr. S pi Starr*)' SaUIR AfiWiiw, iH p in terluer. S IS p m Nrw Heroes*. • p -4ijaic HMMIM. SIS I.I WMsh Mai /mo. Ill p ii, Piuar.rn.ii4 Para** •.41 %.m II M .. .lilt M SS VI C'h jr. .,;..,... t *S SM OVneral >.^M % rhosp. ~ 7.11*4 Am '•awsrael, wealth. I i.1 p m IntarliM.*, %  St rrwm the Editorial., s p m R*por' item .In.ai". B 11 p m M— linm Grand Hotel. IS pm. The N.. IS M p a-i Ifi. < %  n . ^nd W .h., U chairmanship Of Dr J. W. Harkinvestlgntlng tlie orsssnlaatiun mid •. Medical Adviser to CD. and salaries of the Civil Service r-.th W. Dr. Charlea is also a memb. Federal and Freaklential in the I .reward Islands. i understtMid Mr Nurris will for about one month .1 Ihe Council Vincent laerutiv I Dr. Ouriea expects to Rarbados for one week ar *uest at the Marine Hotel la F.nffland •"'•' "' *' %  %  > • %  .. „#.— th. No Openinf I F YOU'RE ever in the US bound for Chicago by train t'Ome night, and you hear the porter of your sleeper humming be awa, ;he motif of a Bach toccata, it w ill l-e Gordon Robcru ,.f Barbados bborl Visit Now 50 years of an\A il r KOH,ir 'IH NOHHICA wnrki.r for ( N.R.. OordBri ha lei M.II i i>f tl: atudied I" be an organist H< Bai l I went to the US ., .. ihe was a shipbuilder (nr pa % %  > —j r> •• i % working n. a . JoTll y^T* >h...rn,uWr and .: Itenm T. Muri ",CZil %  own .„ which 0. | 8SK Thomas offered ti> ie. want Up play the piano and organ. In 1926 nmtL .• |o be trained he moved to Toronto and Cordon — j u worfc at the Ifendon began worlring for CJl Keturned Home Ui K B \t' R. botht W*been ml .idad. sufficient progress that RS | Oaaesajne MacMdUn consented to give bin. daughter in San Fem leiuwns. But he ne\-e r found an "! '' %  opening that would permit him : W B w i.A M g.ve up portering and become a Taylor and daughter i PM to be confuaed w Itb the seat I It. M. Maef.'<- "T'^'-J* hemade by ''a little woP' ,r '> < instrument on which to practice Gordon is married and hii daughter. Just through school hath oaen a career—art | plan the Dominica and B.C. YfIN.- eLIVK HUB R ETURNING shortly to Barbadoa M Loreiiao Williams. i N %  From St. Vincent M R. CYRIL BARNARD. Vincent planter accompanied to apand by his wife arrived from St Vin* C.uiana. cent yesterday morning by B.G Airways. Here for a week, they are staying at the Marine Hotel. Mr. Stanley dc Frelta*. IlurnsUrl-Law, Lore is been'away from home for 12 MOrflSMl about the prob. lem of over-population in tbe J 11 West Indies and the general de>e l_ h *T*.? >CT J lc %  ?-*• velopmenl of the West Indian 5fi ^S?^** J^ i^ lllanda. He laments the fact that '"!'" %  ", -i.dentosome ol .. In Brill* p) ^ ntlM leiders of ^ Weat ln ale*—who seem eonceniexl only %*.<.;. U/UK U. P Q rt ' '• ,: 'hey can oel out of the Maying With Her bon w ,., ,,„,„., ll(]iU aa of whill Inej TM" S K A ll '.' w l '.^''l' ^ an p" 1 ,nl l v". Lorenzo hold Thi* I \1,M See . A NEW YORK beauty expert gave this advice to women HI London: — "Once your weight is down. start exercising. Help the fat off your seat by giving it a good and hard bang everv time you paws a brick wall." the bearded head of the -.ieii!, in to the correct thing to do when you meet A Thing. Kill it, say the airmen It look.: Vaguely nasty. Preposterous, cry the scientists. Preserve It for study We niav well be making history! The fun . Listening to all this are a shapciy young woman, who conducts . wry super-rlirtation arHfc thi captain (slacks and a sweater). and a cynical but lovable newspaper reporter wf.o has somehow wassaVred nortli. The fun reastr begina when The Thing gats prematurely thawen out of his *ee by en cleetrlc blanket In hort order — IT KILLS several husky dog' /or their blood. GETS JII arm torn ofl but grows itself another; KILLS two of the party and hangs them in the greenhouse upside down, and PROVEM impervious to a hail of Tommy gun bullets All this to the accompaniment of at unearthly a series of bellow and howls as ever put feedinc time In the liona" house at the '/.tto to shame. Fiercer The struggle oetween air narei and seienco on whether to preserve or attempt to annihilate The Thing grows fiercer. Only minutes left now. gentlemen. The Sergeant has an idea wh-.ch he explains rapidly to the ciptniii Hut by this time the handsome captain is aa bemused aa the audience There is some haaty work with wires, and talk of "hooking up the d-namoa." Then here It comes! It looks remark it t ly unlike a mangel-wurzel and remarkably like Frankenstein. On—on. The handsome captain throws a switch—The Thing is electrocuted down to nothing with luge bolls of chain lightning before our very eyes. Vegetable fricassee. You'll love 11 For sheer speed and often completely convincing hokum you arc going to love all this. There is a fantastic antl-elimiv when the reporter, having secured a radiotelephone circuit to Fairbanks Alaska, leads his story with: — 'Two thousand years ago the world was saved b> an ArkNoah's, To-night the world his been saved once again by an arc —of electricity. !" (Why donf you try a lead like ffvoi some rime. AforCoilT Because I'd pel fired. riir's why. tee?) But It does not matter. It hi wonderful. The play's the thing, and in this Instance The Thing makes a wonderful pliv.—L.K.R Princess Starts New Hair Fashion LI In Nylon. Tts> hignon of hair for f< rinal L, to merchants, nine occasions in Malta, has itart-5 There his been nothing lik.* %  d Lottdjon*! latasrl faahl i Mr. Peter toaia. a Lass maker, said to-day ; TtM wee* a ligure eight' chlgin>n M M of her head I* moat popul.il style this demand since the shmgje day* "i 20 >-ears ago. Bv working overtarne my staff can produce 3o to 50 .hignona week." I chignons COPt abou: f7 Ts. Most eapomlve are aroun-l "Tne hair must be 24ln. long H guineas. Nylon chignons — to make the full curves of the niieti preferred because they ar titurV eight. Cost of a chignon of lights* Ittle as £2 KM. this length vary between £• 9s. One Weal End lurdresser sa'nl and f!2 12s, depending on the to-dav: Women pay up to £2 2s. colour and texture of tbe hair." f or a short cut BUI although Hair for chignons is seldom proshort hair is still the most popuvided by Engli^i. .tyle for day wear, women arall of it belongs to Italian nuns." getting tire.l •; 'for evening Mr. Isaia said. ._eO-...T •' %  "Long hair is still fashionable in Italy, and when the nuns take il the and of I "So more and more ol then. ;ne wearing chignons to suit the present extremely feminine evening dre —L.E.S. \if% .VI H i I.I H MXKWA Members Only) I BARBARA 11 I la -A i CM II -TO1 A Nn I IM %  i %  HATDrBJ HiM-li\l %  -. p m i o\t BDA1 mt BJHMi sM.iti ^i | -\ \oi srt IMKII a Half The People You Dream About Arc Strangers St Vuic.i.' greaj if the Unh uty of ut-Law In St Vincent arrived by Airways to %  paaj I mi< n. aim hupea u> lake another the same plane. He too Is here day with her son Mr C. U. 1'Ut •legrev in Econoirucs when he for one week. Chi i.-' Church IIII: \IVI .\ri iu:s oi %  > % %  >.% li., you often dreum about your work' About the offleeT The loctory' Or the kitchen? You are rxcepuanal U ya do. The results of the first scientific inquiry ever made to discover what normal people dream about were published recently. They .'how that the daily round rarely intrudes into the plot or the setting of our dreams. Drtatiod descriptions of 10.000 dreams wen' provided bv men and women aged 18 to SO. Dreary chores, like typing, darning, cooking, and washing dishes were BY THE WAY % Beachcomber A FOULENOUOH plaque on a small Sussex cottage announced; "Here Milton wrote 'Paradise Loat Unit (or fortunately) the own* r of 'hi* cottage, a bedgei. ilosheo *ith financial success, became talkative He told an Ame that he could just remember too poet—a small, ruddy man. with red whiskers The Ann. was thrilled But hi pointed out that Milton Uvod m the eighteenth eenlcry. and the man couldn't have seen him "Who's Mnton"" %  na pced the l;uly Whv. HIIN pott NT," replied her husband. "I sure thought it a/as Ijpton woman. "Ar." interrupted the r. "he *<':treet," replie.t Foulenough The) used to meet in |p the lane. Its %  n.ik • it ought to %  i.iii.i Nelson's beech." coRlfnented I naturalist acidly "in,i i irae," sola Fouienough. making a mental // WUi Com* la Thi* I F officials are nllowe.l Ine our banking nc<< i our savings accoui be long DafOn there will be a %  i< being kept al home If thai i %  %  rake in enough to pa] body of official ipteo, Iratpactori will be ompowoi %  eareh an] refuses to declan how much nmiKv he bag in hJ proposes to sp< why, bow, •vnere, ud In Putting I T .is vafy harsh to I Socialists for "eemliig not u> kno what thty had voted for" the other day, it is how you ll matters, not what you vote about. In fact, il wouldn't be a bad idea to withhoM from it! Members any knowledge of h.it .i vote is about until it it il DVOI Then there would be i of some eccentric s,uddenb hrytng to represent the i hn constituents or following his conscience. This dee cut out all need for ,!.irly pointless debates Which, take UP so much of thr .iK.illi. and other CROSSWORD 1 i i t • r f> A T \ 1 14 1 r Lii T i M Jb l I .irdly ever mentioned. %  'W> show our aversion to work ir. our dreams," reports Profesaor ilvln Hall, the psychologist who organised the inquiry. But his lindmgs contradict the belief that, because dreams are so divorced from reality. they usually have an exotic setting and %  .citing people. Most dream* are set in unromantic everyday buildings — most commonly the living-room or bedroom of a house, the report states. And the inuiguin,. personalities we would all like to meet turn up only once in 100. Walking, running, and dancint;ire thp commonest activities. We larelv sit in our dreams. Flying and floating in tbe air are even rarer events, says BfuX The oddest finding, in my view, is the (act that 43 per cent, of the characters playing the principal parts in our dreams seem In be total strangers. Three main characters, includmu the dreamer, make up the commonest cast. In one dream out of every seven the sleeper plays a solo performance. flitter blow u> romantic girls is Hair* discovery that thf average male dreams much more about ether men than about women. The survey, which is being continued at Western Reserve University, U.S.. showed that one dream in every three seems to be "seen" In colour. Painstaking . IF you want g job done thoroughly and accurately, get a middle-ngrd or elderly person t" do It. That advice Is the outcome or thrc e years of experiment, carried cut at Cambridge University, to discover how the human capacity lo T work alters with age. The tests, which were carefully devised to eliminate any advantage from past experience, showed that except In jobs where speed w all-important, oldsters are generally more efficient than men and women under 30. I.IOIII THEATRE For Women who hue dreamed of the one C.reai Love j> TOHAV .1 and H IS p.m. (and roiitlnulne.) ^"SEPTEMBER AFFAIR" JOAN FONTAINE JOSEPH OOTT1CN LXTR.V EXTRA! POPEY1 ID "HOT /\IR \< I r &&S~1SSA*~*S**S*S**SSSS**'SS& %  ~> 'I IVVMF.N A "WEST Of THF ALAMO' I'APTAIN CHINA JOkfll Pavne Osle gkassej i is, ir. i s.w aao. WALK SOFTLY. STRANGER" World KiMiml-llp For Women >om raria Gloria Swanson's daughter il in Paris but week a novel peiinv;ln bathing suit from Jacques II. im. The suit, which gyoaa UlPJ I •;( ' % %  .!., .Mi -.li. alii unUit UMW u| the middle ol the skirl I tola Into %  %  rafcttt %  | showing brief white ptnae painli nlwjmi] u startling brnl.il ilie* with lom; leg-fitting satin |i i %  white Bath) hunting bowlan and f.ilt to the ground as u tr.ilii. i From Neaji York I'rtilUtiofi thai nanufai barei %  ha Varga, Peruvian designer oi ihe flimsiesi Mipports. He Iwlieves American women >:.ihing figure perfection that they will aoon be perfect without corsets. An understandaletl % %  ., ;,s Varga lives In %  unmer the American girl .im tie dressed from top 1k o( a -heap ptaca o sksa. • LHO in Bsg uuttea piaoC. aa* II. Holder piaoi. ti) U. IMcapilatod 4 Uon M Usss. teg ii i hiuiaiure "• rdibfcs. (4* n What refseaes So to foaassa. BM IS BrirR* Uta docSor fcfiita as* around too. (61 21. Kavinga. [*) ii. linns lotm oinu. gas ... _^_ R be* %  Down. Ktejpj ; h|itiiTI IMI.W LAST TWO SIKIWS TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.15 Republic I'ielures present . THF. A VK\GKRS • Starring " John (.irroll. Adrle Mara Mona Marls and Roberto Airaldl. ICOVAI TO-DAT Only 4.30 and .3 Final ln


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II I-IIU II M .V I-..-., IIAKII.VDOS ADVUCATF ivoi BI:VI:N CLASSIFIED ADS. vim or,,,s MMI uorr TCLCPHONS JSef Par MnlWa Ma-nag* r KnJ|i lUiiig fjii<• SJM *i-> M i c cent. p*> word far rs .rJ Tern,, rjrr. Phmr lwtw-.fi i JM pm. illllw l>.em • pm MED \Miff-On ath J. M lenee Edev Andre*.* THANK. Mir We he to iMnI thuor who mt vrreath'. cardand am*? eel M ad ij*"-m in. %  I-BI taOier and bentrier--jri.lB > N HRANKER Mr. S.bil Slmmoi... Gweii Denn>. Julian Rianaer -Florida.. Ruprf BranKcr R 0 %  children and lam il). Ii .KKI H Barker gratefully acknoBTlciae the thank all who attended lai sent wreath*. Card*, letter* or In any I cderrd i-uuiifr at the NouNtttet JIMIII in.li: IN MIMOIMUl Mi I li In U-vins Memor of our ( %  Ml OttMM „>*. p>wd lo th* Cttat Beyond on JHM Jrd sleeii U n dm fjihci \oi.r ti-k i* o'er. Vour lovlnd hand* can di %  ,.. Tit tho rou loved you did pata i-"t Miv Ood (rani >ou eternal re*t i" inn -nbered 6] .ruth iWifenciliI I-IMII St CM FOR Mill a\%MSSNBJ %  mil Suaalu • H i %  : M ft -gpag Al'TOMOTlVK AS i i*-d Vau* Hall Motor car i model in |oM eondttion CM M i ai Mr Bovr.i. Garage Weetinor*I li Jao-.ee a mxnWlt off.refused 1 H-an r IS 1MT IS metre, condlNSSO No oB#ni Apply Court** > Oarage i o Ji—dn WAQOON On* Ford %  Station WBUn la perfect .narking o.deBaiter. anO iwn ., DM) UM for f.ither information | f || .>, ''**: On* Plymouth 1 Sealer Car good "• and Batteiv A uarsain at the urkfe MM 1>>al SSM loi furthe %  i ii ,*.,, ,c, agflM Nonca ApNtvsfae" lor ..er ran V' tt r-.nb.iu it•..• QNM *-•—!. .,ii wtwti 'i* outer* r—-u net ie-e tfc*< Sal aa) OMaasatai %  m\ muM be daughter prriantoner* In ilraltened cm and tvuet be over e*gtn reai than t "reive >in old on tha Slit A kirth certlS.atr | • ilk an e*pa>retien th Parochial Trc. Tha enpai.ee riaaunation at lh It Hichari i 1.1 .rd.% )Nh J.me IM1 1 M WIN he hi r ichcwt _. M . m P ft W ^COTT iTlerk lo he VeHrv FLAT_Mo J Ocean ,,„, Horhtaf : %  •" %  lar aariwiban FUT v, Laaranrr Oa. SultaMa I < June onward Amh am i 'MAWll.it Jaakmn. *_ tnlM afwl fn-iwint Waa n %  Oiat J"-i f par,., -. I |Ti-„ i M 1AH H.ll,i, Kl.fX'TKU AI. minciE d cubic (i in good workina irder UN OP Alaa HMU Deep Frrraer NN. AI Halpb Beard'Furni.hin* v Roor>.< HardUood Allr< 1111 tihil'.HATiiH Fleclroluo r. Hef riaacator a tl perfect H*ai>n lar %  einni Owner M.Irlr model Apply Ralph WatTill: I.OYAL RKOTHI.KS OF THE STARS PNMDt their 1951 CARNIVAL AT QIII;NS I-ARK —On— THURSDAY 7th and SATURDAY 9th June FIRNITI KF BED Solid Mabocunv Single Bed. Iprlng and Mattraaa, almoal gn UaM er around N> 8d Telephone-JON %  iwce,, on S 00 I A —m SIMMONS IIF.DBTTEAD ,r-l Sl'HIS'li ilniihlei no icaaon-tble r.fl< ,-id condition apply S I K o'nar Jubllea Gap. Martualale. Rund LIVKSTIK'K PB0VISI0NA1 HWIAMMI DISPLAY 11Y TBI n RRANBAM FT.ERT undrr Commanrlcr S. Lr-arock' 1 ROCf-.SSION AND JUDGIN* ( 't VND COSTUME ItAN I i LIMBING :ni. GREASY POLE STICK-LICKING DISPLAY ) [REWORKS iS!'i^\Y OPKN AIH CONCERT MOBILE CINEMA STEEL HAND COMPETITION .VERRY-OO-ROL'ND CALYPSO TENT BEARDED HFE MAN rfltl i PUN BIH.1 Ai-diian I'up* Applv Hill* Dairt Dial 3T33 .-. s si :.. MISCELLANEOUS ADMISSION: Adulls |/| — Children !/ %  OALVANIMNJ SHnrrS kMat nuillte n-w .h-ati Chaapeal In Ih* liland I II ft 14 04 7 fl ISM. %  fl Hi 71. • H t M; 10 fl M 0. Nail eaah Bailer Hurry r A RAR.NH CO., LTD. 4 S II—1.1 n. Mi'l'li Cjrboti Paper. Foolicap and LriM mm %  ><> Addlii! machine P..r-l IS and "At" rolln PboTie 4*75 A R Brydan Ron 'B'doa Ud I 5 %  31—Iti SOAP Clearance Sale Prtmrwfc1 ...ndrr floap Pw.'kafe ot S Cakea e*rt Pfimroae Carbolic Snap Paraaar. < %  • S Cakea M rta Rr^dihaw A Company II IIAn VACIIT W-loM Mol.>r.*aller. Die-: marina enfina. eaHlv handled by one. : %  Irapa Iwo; hat < ml ted lut'r-iiland Jh Ihree abnaid. all arcea a orier Tclephoni( (4ld -j (, ai |n NOTICE VOTlCt B MFRERY GIVTM thai It > the Intention of the Cmrunlloneri i f Hunwjyt bf the Parish of Ceor e to cauaa to be .Produced into Ihe Kou c of Aitembly of thla laland a BUI %  an end the Hiahway* Act IM to red lithe amount of Cammiaeion payable • the Parochial Treasurer under Serlb i 41 tharauf from at, per cent, lo fo r per rant Oited Mah |*| ** i j,i,e IMI CAKHINUTON A REAI.V Solicitor, lo the uld CommManna1 4 II -3n NOTICE KOTfTB IS KEMBBV GIVTN UaM M %  i of SI George In rauar lo be intfolui .. it in the Hou of Aaacmblr of thi. laiara A Bill t amend the Vcalrte* Act 111 !. %  reduce tha amount of commiaalwn ti which the Parochial Trea-uter |g rnlltW under Section 4D <1< thereof from %  > p | til |g t,.„t %  *• cent Dated this IM daof J.ine IMI CARRINGTrtM BBALY. Solicitor, lo the VeMt I '. M pi TO -I I M rORRCK' Cattiewaih f.. f p>II nth of J'.laDial aMU or 4B. itor hewl. point a Brad-haw • Ca 1 l w\Mii HFJ.P •MMy m wtitthaj only M Aaiaaale AJ liwng Nepaetieen i I HH %  %  Wanted f-r Cla-d'iTalk Hill. Cn Ch Aawl* Delwae MAKAlMTR far SUIIon.i. in Bfd.' tawn Apply In writing only to S A C/d Advertiring Department Ad>aca'< CN.. Ltd : | ||-4J.n iiiisovu SHIPPING NOTICES HN ( .I, warned •gja|g*> StRNOOS\PfrC* *iVtlfW 'and *raMtu* e^perienee White af tlajMI'•a-ueed Wrtle •tatmg .tee >nd guall' >tMaM M Brnplaref No* If ft,,a,. .:r.Rir rvniTON ruijx QMda n Land. CountRj M MieNMi • .ii%< WAK~r-fV-Taind] man fof the loca Karparina and Lard Partan MuM hiv. rherautr* oM be Ihterea Rafcert. Manufaeturlng I < Hi BOND in Marhtn t ia. Cronoy Ca Ltd Pali •> I II ^r TNI St GAB INUI'HTRi At.KIt I I URAL BANK At T. IM* Ta the rreiHterl heldlna ,..-l.li. l,r., .. %  .:..Mill Hliitts PlaaUllan. It. Peter TAKE NOTaTK that I. i ,e Attorney -*l the above Plantation im ah. M Id obtau: a lean of • Indenitied not later Itian ihe 14th A T K'.NG. Jo*eph* Vc.tr \..i l. i i n >i HANK AIT. I'lll fa Ihe 'redltor* h.l.llnr iperlalli ll.n%  ralaat Faarionare Farlery. Ml. Philip TAKE NuTB'F. that we Ihe Owner* of the above Partory are abni.i tn oW ill.OMI uader the provifn.x ..f th.above Act agaln-l the MMI ra.lorv in re*prvt of Ihe Agrkc.iltural MM No n Agnci LO!, lural Aida Act. IMO. or the abov n in reipect of *uch >eai. Dated thl* lat day of June IMI. IOI-RSMUARX. FACTORY I.1MITFD. per E S ROBINSON. Managing Direrlor %  II—3n CNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WERT INDIES %  •tTHtPFAKER IMI Modal En ely Hew Oend for PolHlcJ Idr-II or public A UtWIH Nerved pin attarhment Sited Aaplv L Lewi Spo.mer* Hill partlc S I II -l 1*1 III It WALKS Ten enu per ooate ind II eeaii per av atr ui "|— charpe IIJO %  ..! II *i % % %  Xanda V f ..e^.- i 5-ad.i. %  MfdNJaW AUCTION •aogHia iitrnxn Moerto Oaford Ho. one owner Pitied P*e cmulitMn and In no onfcM For Mle by Awe BOS Garage on Frida' LATt Iet S.'aSS UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER in.tr.i.-| H mi rrcrivwl will Mil %  > .. Junr Ml. .1 M... IM..M LOST dk FOI .Ml LOST PARCEL %  (en tain in* blue and whit. %  polled dre.. lo-t Monday near Pur.t. ttakr-' H.-rii..,F. Street Reward oNeied Apply AdMirat* Adverti'ing Departmrn. The p.ibllr | living credit I MSN mew Bra 1 warned a r. Leatu I i I %  run MONTREAL, AI STK.ll U N I 11 ZKALAND LINK. LIMJTEH 'M AN / n. HuOati. lit June arr Kg 11* Utter lu.lt pi.H-reding therealter hoi ample .pace fur t T I iai.. %  laehlppMWt M Trlr.dad la Brit*. Laaward oad .-|odaid • .. : %  !i ;; Carga •'* Pa%  %  laNM V V Ml I'— • %  ereo I %  B w I BCHOONEB OWM.H' AfiSOCtATIOH tine Cof-Hfiee T.'.' '. aible for t.er ugneo b. mr DARMEV D-CONTA BIAOCHAN •R Patrick* Near Valiet Kill Chrut Chun i kddoNg warned m-m ; i jf HARRIS I. t.l. Hi,. ORIENTAL SOUVENIRA. ( I IMtis JErVKLR N*-w Shlpmenl opened TIIANFS W POST oi i i, i: \o i M i Chaagni in Air Mails Effective Sth June, 19.M, gir mails will be elo-ed at il ( r r. Po.t Offlre Bj follows: — yllndOf conveilible Plyrrvj andlfMo Alwayi owner raving eokMi> Hale al 1 :*.h Vincent Qiimih. Aui ir Gwa.i Owne. Terdl Canada, (vis Bermuda) Canada (via TntntUuli United States KEAL ESTATE RehPdnles ahould tie I ileneral Post Offlre, 31t May. 1 SI Tlmo 11 4S am 2 00 p m 2 00pm 11.45 N.m 11.48 N.m 2 00 p.m. imended aceordinfily Day TUB .i.iv Friday Friday VVetinestlp; Tuesdtiv F.iJi.v N ARCHER M. KEH71F ftuMonapi 9 4 al will offer far aak bv I'.il.lic Coinpetillon at m,. office. Victoria Street 0.1 FRIDAY Mh at I p m AU. THAT LHTAiN pice or parcel of land 13 ** arena* .n FTTTN VILLAGE nn the >ea T JAMES with the double roefe.l ouae and uiual out -office*—there la bo a well fltted nhop atla.irn r.u %  pectlon apply lo Mi* C<" premise* Condition, of %  •> fiar R ajUTIER M.KEK7.IE Dial SMT 1 • II—n viird Ire ragkh >uii|i wmch II tenable for me ai a %  alary Of Sfff* The Fellow will work under the direction of Ihe J'tofewor of POIhOlorv on the cllr'ital. ilhologlcal and therapeutc aapecta of aw* including field work and animal iperimenl* Travelling rapenae* both .tie. Mill begin at a date lo be aringed with Ihe Profeaaor of Pathology am whom further partlculari can be Appllrrtlk.ua ihould be Rrglctrar. UnivernV. Colle( Uieir cluinii They may hold any kind Bf religious belief freelv without interference. Fnrni children, like :itl 00*1 U.S.. children. ,ne ieqiurera.iic "-T i . Mdrboarda. China Cabinet.. Wagflun-and athai .-jiure* C aNN i S U l-ndeFa-y and Kuan Chair*--DrMo In plain and iriahog-.m*ed Deal, and hardL.S. WILSON Harbour Log In Carliile Bay M V SedteSeln. Sen. Marlon W.lle, Sen Cyril E Smi'h Sch D Sch Philip II Davidaon Sch L BtkS, M V Blae Star. Sch Ev kch Mary M lawl*. Srh EnWrpi B-h W L Eonieis. *Vh Belquee. fnited Pilgr.m S Sch Gardeni S t Mormat'ey Sch Ralnbm Si Plorenc* gmmania Caroline. See. raceuior Hodge. \snii *i ... Short, from DomlnMa Sil.'-iner Fnu-llne. 71 tone or %  Ialma SO ton* ne' rir-n.nlna from g| in i-i I a Vhormer Mare. M. C*>' Sellei-. loDominica M V thyrrwond M Ir.tl. ne> fov Bt. lueio %  %  T>M Sad \\i AST PWI ( hlef Rehabliilauan Olheer. C'oepp Board Colony of Trinidad £ Tobago Applications are invited for Uie vacant post of Chitrl Hetiabllitailon Ofncer, Cocoa Bowrd. The salary will be at | rttta bl the scale S3.A00-120-3,840-240.i.760 per annum; the actual rale ilepcndlng on the ejualirication^ and experience of the successful applicant. Travelling and Subsistence allowances will be payable at rates similar to ihuw %  MpwjBagrJ fi.mi lime lo lime ;,i.vi rrmient ofllcers. The .-fflcer will be rc.|ulred lo reei.le Bt she La Paslora nauifilINK Station. Santa Cm/, wheie furnished quarters are avaitabd taff iihirh he will pay as rent of his salary plus &'• %  |.nnum of the value of ihe furni ure. Candidates should havi atum.•d N good staiHUird of education, possess executive ability and have lad wide agricultural experience. tehnlcal quallllcations .. i tble but not essential. Duties of the post are — (1( to assume rcsponsihlliiv for ill cacao propagating wot nanaRement of all Pi' Stations 'under the Immediate ision of ti'ie Chief S-ientiil. Officer of the Deparlmenl 0 Agriculture). dii To receive all SppUeBtloni for subsidy grants under the 'Joroa Subsidy Scheme snd to nitiate their invesliRatton. fill) To control both the onVc nd Held staff engaged n the work of the Cocoa BSastfl .iv i TO eertlfy vouchers lr penditure incurred on Irehalf "f f Cocoa Board. (v) To supervise the gener.d Held progress of the Cocoa Subsidy Scheme. (vl)To carry ou*. any other duties tihal may be assigned lo the by Ihe Cocoa Htm id from time lo lime. Th* i-a.t inon-pensionable and BlbJasTl "> three months' notice of termination on either lde ApplifnitionN containing full paTtteulBtll of the candidate's age. oualillcitirins and experience 1ot-ethor with copies of not less than EfNM teslimonisls should oe jddiesaed to the Chairman, Coc Hoard, c'o Deportment of Agri-ulture. 5t. Clair. Port of Spain. Trinidad lo reach him not later than June 23rd, ItSl. EnveloiM-r, ontaining applications ieiould •*%  i U 1 -' l %  Application l H 0 •rti the outside left-hand corner E. W. LEACH Chairman. Cocoa Board. •1651 7M Salient Features Of U.S. Foreign Trade 1950 WASHINGTON. D.C THE FOREKiX TRADE of the United Slate-; showed a closer balnnco between merchandise exports and imports In l 1 > llian in any other y*ar in the past decade, iiccorUmtv to ai analysis made by the United Slates Department ot Com merce. Tlie huge ^ap between these exports and imports in tht early postwar years narrowed down in 1950 to an expot surplus of $1,433,000,000, only one-fourth os larRe as in 194! and the smallest of any year Since 1140 Exports decreased in value in 13 per cent by Decemlx-r. tV<1950 lo SI0.27S.WD.tWO, or IS per both indexes 1936-311 sjquals 100 cenl. less than the 1049 ilgu..Higher Prices Imports increased 34 per cenl. p9 At the end of 1950. exporters li SB.84^.000,000. Imports exceedikfMjatrafa -rllm* goods to iK ed exports in August and October United stated were obtaining B0I1 1950 for the Hrst time since June siderably higher prices for then i:iW The expoit hatMssM PBBS ,,,.,.h,cis than IS cx|xirters wen sharply again in the lat two getting for the goods thev ship) ni months of 1950. This is shown by the fact thai Ihi I'I' ni'd i ne in unit value index for U_S imptirt early 1951. In Pebmsry. they %  >• :>7() while lor US I UStallNd SI.073.0IIO.OOO. the highesi fjpaj (lll ly IWU tnonthly total sitirrJune 1949. In HBTEM OB \-olumt-. im|Mrt< | Imports in Fehiunrv loinlled 19S0 exceeded the prevum* IIMI $0117.000,1100. down {114.000,000 total of 1048 by 19 per cent IB from the record high In January the 1040 figure by 22 per cent The d'clir.Mi AUrfla (tut Id P.xporls in lermi of volume de smaller rubber receipts creased 13 per cent from 1040 an. 30 per cent from 1047. BxPOrtl in 10SO amouiocu lo ap proxlmately 7 per cent of thi tolal U.S. production of movahh There were marked changes in th trade balance the United States had with other areas in 1050. compared with liMH. rs imporli exceeded export* in trade goods. Tfitl compares with "th lour of the %even continent per cent, before World War II, i: reas, whereas exports c-eeded imports lo all 1949. Those showing the balam Americ.i. Africa shift IS47, 1948 and 1940. Hi larger proportions of certain com of trade were South modifies were shipped Oceania, a i Fxport llil.niir large especially raw cotton, leaf lobac. < motor trucks, and carbon black Finisiied manufacture*, as usua '<>mpr1aed by far the latit. i I *; of USegporti in IH!M) TMl goods made up 57 per cent of tin portion as 2 per i 1947 ibove 1040. I04S Crude Materials Crude materials comprised ahnu 19 per cent of U.6. exports, ai increase from 15 pU cent m 1'JI' and semlmiiiiul.ictiircs. II ( cci.t., about ihe 1040 Potxlsluffs. whn i. ha dftHMMKl from 23 per cent of lots xports in 1946 to 19 pvi M % %  I 1 V ''•> lib.. snasanT DIAL lor Dn In Touch With Barbados Coast Station Cable and Wlreleaa nd Mo-itir.1 b' the P M ^ rl..-rd al thr;%  eral Pnat OSVe aa mid" Parrel Man at II noon HeHi*-ed V %  .1 ? p n Ordinary Ma.1 at I P %  • as IMI MAMS l;t Grenada T-.nldOd and Rut M V Ca.iadiar. Ch II-rloaed nt %  >0*t Offlcr ..< under .1 Rrel'lrrrd Walk M 1 p >" Ordinary Mail at S p m. an the Sia June IMI. Moreover, the un port (,-lance In trade with Canad, B1 m .. -OM, „„.n %  , .n d f^"5a-aVa,"S. aaVTria the export balances wltn other countries in North America decreased approximately onc-fuurth and with Europe about mie-hall. Of the raetors redueUuj the export balance, the inereaoe In [let. Imports waa •'omlnant ImaorU eonllnued lo tnrraase in value In I95B a* demosd ...-. %  crated and prices raw. esperlally the prlers of roffrr and w-al and. afler the o-uiBreak at hostilities tn Korea, of robber m, ,ompii;ed .nily ["ni and metals „f \j S exports In 1050 As CH. Import, rooe and as(,f total imports in 1'i.n potts rail. Ihe world dollar materials and wini.nHi.ufmt ... %  hortage wag greatly alleviated. man > up j-y pa., (< nt I'rlnelpal countries trading with <„„„ 50 pa. r crnt ,„ 191'J but the Inlted Slates accumulated decrease from the proportions 1 throHgh all of their uansactlans. )U46. 1047, „„,! ,. M >t < n „t gold and dollar asset* aufllelenS rnaterlaU comprised 2H per eeni to restore their total loaaes over pnd semun.i.uf.n I r. 14 1the three preceding v.ars cent. In 1050, roodituffs repre Price uses influenced the value gented SO per cent of total Im of both exports and imports H ports, a smaller part than in 1041 1050. especially afler the invasion Finished manufactures, of Korea. The index of unit smallest of the four classe, u value of Imports had risen & per goods, comprised 17 per Ml cent, by May 1050 from the low compared with 10 per cent ir fi of November 1040. but by Decem..receding year ber 1050 it had risen J7 per cenl. The many products inrhi'i'.t In contra*!, the index of unit me i: S export trade wese a value of exports, after touching a usual, concentrated heavily .1 tow point in May 1050 rose only g> On Page S PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Products. Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for sating to Europe fortnightly. The usual ports of call ar Dublin. Ix.ndon. or Hotter dam. Single fare £70; usual reduction for children. ^Mcoa, S*"£*C. NITW TOH SEKVICK s •; -TIMiPi galla mi, Hal AtTWoa Rarb ain j„ne Arrive. H'-l-iOW* NlTf? ORLKASa RBBTHT If "Mi A NOAWBB "all* lh M*Artleea ITIHI. M I S %  AXOOA PATRIOTNOUS TPIh Ma, ,.lvr. la.bMo. M J NS -Al/TOA PtU-ARISRa.l. I"' > BaTBoaOO SSM dW MeCON IMONBeW" CM KB nrie.ADnTf \ .ANTI'H CANADIAN ftntVICK Sail* Montreal 'all* RalUaa Mai "" 1 HM \ Mil* I SI Jol npiNi ip %  SBI R01.ERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND RL'LF SERVICE APPI.Y -DA COSTA A CO. LTD—CANADIAN RERVIC SAGUENAV TERMINALS • -.mil POl VCH'I .1 POI.VRIMII S A U t ANADIAN SKKVKI I loin llnllfav. NS. i Monlreul 1 1 -rUHNG DATXS M.atreat Hilif.. ] I lt> Jui I I..U n Mav I %  as Jui I lull IK. SKKVKI From Ncwnt-ri, Hrislol. LtverptHil BBdJ (ilasutm %  mu 11 ll.i.l.l I (fried ira-parl Paeli i,>.,,.,„! i.u.a.n Artleal nnNertaaea I'.K. 31 Mai Ailents : PLANT ATM N8 LIMITKD — Phone 4703 ,''-'.W*444tC5JWV-^tWW4Shop l.tirlfi WORKERS M U.S.A. ITS WORTH YOUK VJHtlC TO VISIT OUR stows ro-o-y SHIHTS A arand vartet) ol i I M.iiid... Bhln i' PYJAMAS li. v 1 durable sajaUtlol .'. D> -*' %  SHOES 11, JOHN WINTF 1 lain ft %  Bit WOOLLENS A ine .-.'•' 1 1 riannel. Navv L Bro n TweeSIKKS II K Til'.'. UND1 rge varieties' TH AM Hi <>s. %  % %  ..••.v."... V,V.V.:-.*.V.V..:V,VA NOTICE TO SELL II paoPtjrrv 1 CBCll. JBMMOTT if Phoenlr PharmarT oid Vreet Phone fcta iiiiliout Oilihrs. ta NOT s USE EOR BEST RESILT1 t.i 11*1 Oil. CENTSAI. FOUNDRY LTD.. flmlUI ..rUHUUM. — Tr.r.lr -1 WE WISH TO ADVISE OUR CUSTOMERS THAT OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT WILL BE CLOSED FROM FRIDAY. 1st JUNE TO MONDAY 4th JUNE 1951, BOTH DAYS INCLUSIVE, FOR OUR ANNUAL STOCK-TAKING i: /DINIi ESTATES & TRADING CO., Lift. ECKSTEIN BROTHERS I BAT STREFT I DIAL •

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ES TABLISHED 1BM6 > ui.au/> .lurr. -. .~. CHINESE OPEN HEAVY BARRAGE Allied Line Makes Limited Advance TOKYO, June 4. CHINESE FORCES liurtad one of the lieavie3 barrages of the Korean War at the Unitec Nations troops thrusting forward on the Imjii | River sector today. The coast-to coast Allied lin. made a limited adv>ice. Chinese mortar crews fought tenaciously for every yard of ground in the Imjm area but were forced back almost one mile Allied assault troops crossed the flooded river ir open boats elsewhere on the western front and caught the Chinese troops unawares. Artillery shelled the Chinese digging emplacements along the banks Keels Did Not Influenco U.S. Policy %  ,i, i Fo that Chinee seemed MUbUshed. Allied in-op* in UM central srclm front blo.-k> ChincM.' counter attacks. In th Yongchon aroii north Of the 38th Parallel, 200 Communists attacked this morning. Allies killed 31, look 50 priroutn and scattered tfie rest. They met moderate to heavy resistance in Yongongni ar.-a but maintained their advance. It was the same tale i and west northwest of Hwarhon. Despite lowering skies and Iniei mlttent heavy rain. air for.fighters and bombers roofed widely nver North Korc.i drain 1 the rlav striking at Bgarshi llbi yards, railway hridges irncp* concent rat ions and supply cen'.rcs. Firepower Allied advanceg in the pas' week have been maintained by sheer weight of firepower ,iom massive artillery and swarms (.• lighter and lighter bomber*. Bui ,n the lust 24 hours Communists have fallen back to prepared positions of well-constructed bunkers in jagged hills. To dig them out infantry haw gone in with sub-machine guns and carbines and some of tho bloodiest pitched battles of the whole campaign have bcev fcugh: Savage lighting continued today around liwachon, Yanggu and Inje. Wave after wave of Allied lighters and boml-i I sonl high explosives and napalm on Chinese north of Hwachon, breaking up vicious counter attacks and forcing limited withdrawal. I-as*. night Chinese came in from three side* against Allied positions in this area but were eventually repuhed wr.'i the aid of the artillery early today. Allied troops screening the Suxaug l'iv.-i vi^terdaj feu d Uaf bodies of 1.500 Chinese and 700 horses 10 miles northea-t of t'hunchon. They had apparently been cut down in the Communist offensive — umr. WASHrNRTON June 4. United States BtrctgTJ "f State. Dean Achesou UM SenaKcommitlaei .iivefiiigaimc General Mac Arthur %  i Ismii d, read a long statement -ii United S'ates 1 policy In the Far Ea*: f.r N Tfrn ', hi i sh;i.i Seii.ituli.il -nlit on U s policy ir he Fa East. W Ma A.heson had finish.i reetLng the statement, BapUbUcan Senator Alexander Wiley asked about "the purported Influence of Cwimunl' >ym pat hirers in the SI %  partmarri during this period." l replied. "I do not luvr than .is nr i. any Comuuist influence 1 in* the determination of our l in i-o.i. ii'her then or now." Questioned. Aeheson said he knew of no Chinese forces strong enousjh to unseat the Communist 'gjmc in China. On Mai-Arthur's dismissal AchcKuii said the General "in effect challenged the policies as laid down by the President." The extension of Ihe Korean war to China would give Russia a legal excuse to intervene, he said. Ho ballaVfd MM treaty l)etween Communist China and the Russians "is of such a nature that it would give Huatiam thai opportumiy and it would il %  i very considerable lever to demand thu Russians do that." That was one ol the reasons why Government opposed Mat-Arthur** proposal to Imnb Co nmunist bases in Manchuria, he -aid. Reul-r. BRITAIN SUPPORTS OIL CO. PROPOSAL Morrison 7W/a Commons l i mttOS June 4 EM i| al It.sl irrnviM ; to .i j in' %  : 'i. %  fun: m kifhl abaci i LnCtpBl da i i H'Uive ol Commons %  > foreign Secret r\ 11 %  :i tha! tin GnverniQCi I til nationalisation with the Per.an tnent. nan %  -" : .. tad been stressed thai •mm, m was .i majority %  > %  n..dii in iic company, %  crrlaou laid 11 hop .1 ih • i .>,,,( i '.ici ,. mi nt will i"ei >ian < tovertunenL HUM i.im.v ii.iii' Austin ({ejects Mac's Policy IV \< 'M .... York. June 4. Austin. United Slates to the United d todaj that "further QorornunM i he voted hy the U.N o. ,i nocasaarj • it tonal collective action ^^ %  (ti nsh/e coniuliaU which was '•lime consuming but said in his speech at M University. Austin said, "we mutt approach the problani of iirenAhaiiuvj .md %  proving collccttva action in United Nation with the dlsclpl t a 'killed wateTlmakc dl'ili i Hoc chronometer". Rejecting Oonaral Douglas Mac Arthur*! Far East policy he laid: "Wo know the United Statet cannot stand alone. We know if o ll country is to act. Jointly w|i" ither nations then Interested Purtncr on *ai.. ii would be I paoaibte for the nuaucMi to . oil tuition a uaution with Pel i Jung I, tindeadUna i.in*. In iU> memnramium of May 30 %  he Persian Government hat I Jced Use compnn> to put up within live day any %  USjajagtioni I it iiight have wUbtrt Ihe frarnauork <>f I'ersian naUortaJwatior THE MCMBGB8 of the lint Oirl this they playU times tod Mfl compUcatat Invelvadi 'i>i : diHu> M. nuickly.l in rhn ot itmv Cst the i !%  Morrison sand Meanwhile, the Foreign Sevt.'ry added, the British Ambossa-I INIK)M. Jut.. 1 King Qeorasi \ i . % %  tm ae-v c - pointed out that thi absence of united artlon in the field of politics in the Caribbean area wa* due to the inability ol West Indian leaderi "to cooperate on a common front Greetings Greetings were expressed by representatives of the West Indian Students Union, Hie Africa League. West Indian and RaopaM of African descent Association (Birmingham). Telegrams and mnsogas came from Grnntley Adams, The I'eopl %  %  (Britud Guianai and The Peoples* National Party (J..! and other aftsociated organisations. Guest speaker was Mr. John PlattsMills, former memte of Parliament for Finsbury. THE BIG "SNATCH" nOMBAV. June 4. Two men ittadDMl Ihi Fin nc? Minister of the Iloiiio.iv ment. 1^1 Mcht.-i, .vhen he was out walking today, Tttaj HHrtchad %  U Ins valuables lncludln| g:>ld buttons, a diary and a pair of spectacles.—Rrutrr Brtlish Oovernment •ntvrested partner In iihe oil llspute. At Ihe same time the llntisl. \nibasaudor Sit Frai herd in nn interview with Prime Minister Mohammed M.sade., vas lielieved to have >! he liiiii-h Oovanunetil nip* mnett the rempany*i nw proRenter. \ itiminh ForrOS Mfonfgoniery Is A Christian Soldier LONDON. June 4 Field Marshal Lord Montgomei %  Di i ut) Allied Supreme CommandWettarn F.urope declared ,, ; -r^'o'c!" unl:r::-i i'u*hs4ouihotuanoi HANOI, Indo-Chlnn. June 4. Vietminn forces attacked vaaak posts on the southern partrnatar ut the Hanoi lector and threatened a break-through on Sunday into the rice delta The operation was %  paauuty i irge. bin wti m it stautls foi Communism "Is anti-Christian, retrograde and immoral" he said ir siH'erh at the annual banquet >f the Royal Society of ftain: George--, \ < i.dion. Saint George was tlwa v l M > I i • h SelBflh* \nrrow Polilics" Sayt Barkley PULTON, Missouri. Juna 4. Vice PMlluaJ.il AlU'ii II ii lO) todaj denounced the "de|H ,i\ i-d" ut tempt to vraoken public confidence hi the 1'uiled St.itu f'.overnnwnl. He cnlled OJ1 AMi to reilst tftoea trying to "frlfhtau the people" in the preM-nt world orisM for the sake of pnlitunl 01 personal Main. Ilarkley %  ... %  he fkvnure ft>rsifni aClnurti i %  nesting onl) on condition ih n tinUnited States mllltsj y bases and the Atlantic Pscl i i down for discussion The appcil was r-.ade b> -oriferencc to the live great p.i to negotiate a Peace Pact the. iranl CreHiiHMt Leave Ship Strniiclt'fl MEL BOURNE, AUSTUAI I \ J t The grew of the 17.486 ton liner Aarmngl due to sail for \ on Thursday wnlked oil the ihip Monday as labour dl putae brnughi .slow paraiyaii I ban \>.;.t<'i Croat*. 1. w of the Waterside Winkers' Federation have t>l.i i a the extreme southi ast iiiriier of the Hu BCtOI fronting on the sea. It hud been inactive for four years and Onl] *-\}£JS8EiJS8 tSS& ,.. |.mtgomer> is the new Pre.,.,„„,„.„ „„ : ant of the SoeJety. RaajMa | s .v. r „i ..i UMM ware quiekU [taken by the bettoi grmeil Vkrtnh trooptCP ) patroQ had^wldei; ohicctives even than llitiei. Montgomery said. These were "actually b European civilisation tillogethvi :it-.i to astabUata the tyrannical a .t i itle of Communism over the whole eastern hemisphere and Sevejatfatn Dead In Mine E\|>IOKI(II IIAMM. Westphalia, June 4 The death roil In the txploeloi in lleinriih Roberl Mtne id Herrlngan near here last Thuradaj lo IT. Thrae "f lha %  ijured have slme di.' fm BRADLEY. IKE TALK WITH FRENCH CHIEFS Fourteen men were Happed at iht Um <'t Uv %  -i'!' I "id killed. Beater Fiad^fapOn Czech Wimiaii BORDEAUX A map "himiiut the Unl Prance was. tound on . '.• woman Vm Htrutol. Tl. wHu she lined nt Blaye, Estuary, near Bnrifeativ She had none I .iiii'M. Blaye li neat the ouppl) damp where thi Unit military stores gra Bordeaiui roi Ir ru I to G Vr.., WI inendlv with Iht I aallon Pranch Pollct t.i liriuy in %  they will %  tied under the bet ich ol Uw Aliens raguletioi i eoura f'-> French P h u r unpalanlne aseinal the Unlli laalanr. PARIS, Ju lieneul Omar llrnilley. m.iii of UN Dnited Statei Chiefs of Staff, opened talks here with Atlantl" Pad Supreme Commander Gencial Dwight Biatnbower and French military leaders. Tomorrow he will discuss delnvs in Frcneh and Amen...-. arms programmes with JulcMoch, French Defence Mlnlstei -Reuter Military Crasade i-'hjuiAgainstCoinmuriiHni VlliWv-PE ARSON JUMPS TO DEATH NEW YORK. June 4. Ganeralla (44). a rellrad policeman, plunged to Ml Mi the sixth floor of the COurl lniildu.g today, a few minton be was to go on trial for bribery and conspiracy ..' || police men foi trial %  an lllesad gambling proiklyn. —neater. OTTAWA. June 4 External Affairs MiniM. Pan son of Canada said last night, It would be futile to wage %  nltttai i crusade against COtnnUUUSSn, because Communism b an idea, it can Dot be destroyed by force, he said in Baccalaureate address at vocation exercises of St ricks College A. „ % %  idc. il must be resisted by mtelle.rii.il and spiritual weapons and also py rmoving OCOnomlC il I i-onditiuna of povertv and misery and InJliaUce in whuh i, tind^ such favourable grounds." he said FIRE DESTROYS NITRATE PLANT ROBfOUt Fire deetroyt and more t h %  n 20 anSSJOH loaded with sodiun* nitr.de he a reach the :> .-.;• freighter Alama. Bad %  i ajaasa pulled to tug which %  teacher! her %  L'hargintt sodium %  i —Realer. PETAIN SLIGHTLY BETTER PARIS. June Ea Marshal Philippe Pete Ill on the inland ..I II. u'Veu. was Slightl (ay. his dortnnt reported —Renter. r.K.I'aracliulisl.s Sail For Clyprus PORTflMOUTH, June I, Thlrty-fa u Ihe i ind men of th< Sixteen'li [Odepefl MD1 I'arachuti I.M^r.ide up suddenly ih i <• %  three weeks ago for enuMrlutiol IWO lliiti-li rrlen here todaj f' Cyprui l> % %  ,. .] %  !.. The carrier*. Warrlar Triumph will sail early tomon .\* A. the carrier.-> sail tomorrow iTOOpe fr that the United Nations General Assembly would open a session in Paris in November It was expected Ihe session wi.ulil be divided into two part* with an interval of about a week at Christmas. Renter. loda; U.S. Will Have H-Bomb In A Year— Allen Oil Delegates Leaving Soon FOR TEHERAN TALKS LONDON. June 4. Anglo i %  preeentatlves for Teheran discussion on the Persian oil problem will leave London by air in a few days, a reliable source said here today. The source said that it was not %  Teheran today. Me was commenting on Deputy these rep. it the Prime Minister Dr Hussein source streseed that the i ritemn reported suument towas mil considering a ("av that today was tho absolute should be. fo the appearance in One may be Vtscou rt AM nTeheron of represaoutlvea of the brc-. D oil company. Dl The Ang'o-Iranlan Oil Comof Directors 0^ nany's headquarters In London tim'had decided in principle to send General Staff. YORK, June 4 A Washington newspaper col. pi.rled that tl" Unitcl States, as the result of th. rtoh atomic test* ould be able to build a hydrogea Hhrn one ver Anting In the %  % %  losa "posjhed" at 'he test* I'mled Staler knows how to eooatruet th-hv Irogen bomb All doubts BI :nat has i-'tpated Th* <-al .%  poo rlU be .. Mthin a yea' —t rater it an atom bomb was exploded the resulting stupendous, heat set off the laver of tntium that %  he atom bombs. Even we were astounded to the effect." Alien reported nil iuthorlty BI saying I think It can nmed tnat we ha\hill] ateread tho threshold of the aeatnowi aaffj AH* n Iher tan facts eitablivhi-. The United States has an atom bomb that is at least five times more powerful than any evtr exploded before. But I I :ivdrogen AHe MM the most oarrlAr bomb will be ICMi limes more so nas at tests "scorn -1 vi.hlng Ii rot :i;. doubleheade-1. Armv engineer! have rent types of that will withstand 1>< %  Rrutrr. ATIIKNS. June 4 3reeg i oon ofhV I %  to help King I'aul wive th. Im Ft Papagua' resigiitiiiou. Mioiandei who resigne Gimbals when the doors ep> ri


PAGE 1

TUESDAY, AMI S, US I BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE Ruling Required In Christian Mission Dispute t\ui inns < i i ti Supt Of '49-50 Queried THE CHRISTIAN MISSION case in which Frederick A Barrow and others have brought an action aainst Dalton L Hoyte and others disputing who was the rightful super intendent iii lM9and 1950 continued at the Court .if Chanrerv yesterday and was adjourned untiMhe 18th. His Honour the VietChancellor. Su Allan C •Uvmorcis presiding. Last time the ense was heard, %  .— S 'Nelson' Makes Direct Trip lemt ]K-int were raised and Mlerdav the Vtca-ChaacaUar n partly in favour of d mission* for H yte who Is rep esented* uv MiO. II. Adams associated wlUi Mr. D. H. L, Wart. Counsel for Hoytc had objected UtSt the action wa< not m.n lbl baeMiM thChristian Mission wu a corpoiale budv and Barrow and the ottwr plaintiff? should sue In a corporate, capacity. Mr. W. W. Reece and Mr. J S. 11 EXar represented Barrow. The Vice-Chancellor said that .1 review of the autho.itie* cited and others went to show that that subIIMsion was valid In so far ai all ihe claims, other than that foi the declaration, were concerned. \i Authority He could find no authorttv Snick debarred the claim by Individual* of declaration that such ttxEivlduals properly const .lilted the general superintendent anu the Board of Management. In the suit, Barrow and the 20 other plaintiffs claim the account 'if the dealing* by Hoyte and th.other defendants with the money, goods, effects and property of the mission during their term of office. They claim the delivery to themselves of all money, goods, documents and such other things They also claim the declaration that Barrow is the Superintendent of the mission for tho year 1*49 together with the other plaintiffs who constitute the Board of Management of the Mission for the same year. On the other hand Hoyte and the others denied the allegations and claim the possession of the Gospel Tabernacle and the office attached They want an account of the dealings by Barrow and the others with the money and other property l>elong|ng to the Mission during 1949 and up to the hearing of the suit. They also want a declaration that Hoyte was the general superintendent of tho Mission for 1949-SO and he and the other defendants were the Board of Management for the samo period. Ownership Trial The Court hold that the trial of the issue whether Barrow and others or Hoyte and others conMllutcd the General Superintendent and Board of Management of the Mission had necessarily to precede the trial of the other issues which involved the ownership of the corporation's money and property. The Vice-chancellor said that it was to be noted that the declarations sought were as regards the position and rights of the periods in 1949 and 1950. and counsel might consider, before the hearing was continued, whether, by amendment of the pleadings or otherwise, the conclusion might net be reached. This conclusion would be at any rate, in part. by the declaration by the Court to ihe present position and rights of the parties. Counsel for Hoytc asked for admission that in accordance with the rules. Hoyte had been the last Superintendent who had been elected. If the Christian Mission Herald was not in.existence during 1949, Counsel wa arguing that Hoyte was still Superintendent during that period. Counsel for Barrow said that they were properly appointed In 1949 and 1950. A new bill will be tiled so that a conclusion may be reached as to the present position and rights of the property. Council for Barrow will also reply t Mr. Adam; call fur admissions. THK Lrtjr Nelson is CM* PS from lirllish Qui M via Trinidad on \V morning to load sugar and molasses for Canadian portSh • will be taking passengers. The Nefawn will be tor flnt "1-dy liner" to make a direct rH from Trinidad to Barbados N S lady boats have always %  .! i n, Barbados from British QuU na Trinidad, Grenada and St Vincent The Nefcon la making this direct trip because she is late She is expected to leave port on Friday evening for Montreal via the British Northern Islands. Bermuda. Boston and Hullfnx She IS consigned to Messrs. Gardiner Austin ft Co.. Ltd Fined £2 For Bodily Harm In the Axki-d.mt Court of Appeal yesterday. Justices GL r .>l..i at*! J W. U Chencrv confirmed a decision of Mr. C. I. Wahs-yn. Acting Police Maj(i*tr;iU <>f Oiftui i A" who. imposed a nne irf fil uid „' eosti i" ba paid in 21 days or in default two months' imprisonment on l>niise Simpson of My Lord's Hill fot inflicting bodilv harm on surjofif. Murrell The offence was committed on \rril 2. Simpson appealed gainst Mr. Walwyn's decision md was also ordered yesterday t< iv the cost of appeal whlrti %  ounted 7 I She Longed To Go To B.G. Filled E5 i> l.KNA CHAHLES a labourer itons. Si. Mtchaal was pi* bond Uv mhs Hi Fruit. Charcoal if rave Weather SCHOONER Aaallna arrived here over the.week-end laden with supplies of firewood, charcoal, cocoanuts, fresh fruit and cocoanut oil. Most of the fruit were mangoes. The Adallsm took four days sailing from St. Lucia. She normally does it in about two days. Captain Flemming said that ihe wind was light. He met u strong southwest current throughout the trip. He experienced lots of thunder and lightning when he was coming In to Barbados on Saturday nightExcept for the little bad weather. the trip was fine. The Ailsllna has been berthed alongside the pier Head to discharge her cargo People flocked yesterday especially for the charcoal. The ASallaa is consigned to the Schooner Owners' Association. OVERTIME THE ADVOCATE hi been snkod by the Umfd States Labour selector* who visited Barbados last week to state that overtime u paid normally to workerin Ui* United States, in accordance will, the Fan Laboui Standards Act of 19:t8. But with regard to the Bar badlan labourers who have been selected for agricultural work over a temporary period, there Is an exemption from the Fair Labour Standard* Act for tho-o employed in ilicencing industry. As the Barbadian workers Will be employed In work which is subsidiary to the canning industry overtime will not be paid. First Girls' Club In B'dos Opened sum of O by a District A Pol Magistrate for secreting herself or the school in aCmellne on M.iy 1H The Captain of the timeline Mir that he never found out that the defendant was aboard the achoonei until they were near to pemernrn He was forced to bring her ua. k M the .iiithorities there would have jiivlhingT.i do with her Charles was fined £5 on April l*P DOj c'liniittini: a simtlnr oftVnce Aafcad by Ihe Magistrate wh:d sht %  Bj .bout the cas. I.en.i Charles said 'Sir I have alarav longed to go to MX'.." l-cn.i Charles was born in St Lucia. The Aral Girls' Club In Ihe island was opened at Clevers Mill. Si Joseph, yesterday evening Opposite this club a t'lub was opened too. H
l(->k fm The workers are going to IK employed for about ten to twelve i ut it is hoped to get further employment m Labour Commissioner told the Advocate Fifty bay* of St. Joseph have r %  or thirty [1 T Mtchelm, Commissioner of PoUoa, said that it arai 1 Club and the first ii being opened. The nubs alraadj formed eatared f"i ever 350 boys. In SepU-ntber last vear the ilrst Boys Club W$$ funned at Bay Street. The ComUM Lntanuon of ii. i' to torn < Club Ul every p I Tha (Mubs are here to provide haalttu raeraauon for the boys in %  nire time". Colonel MirhThaaa Quba are not purely phice* of sport. The boys will loam Mime Ir.Kie They Will 1 va uM ooDortunity of using Ibetr rtandj." Keen lntere-.| Ho said that -d Dtatrlc* A" tS.afon the boye hud taheti > kSMKn : gaidaojng. Kach %  >• \-egetables he grows and he gets 50 per cent of the sales. At • lubs it DiatriM "C" and Bay I hoys had taken a great 'i carpentry. '! turning out some good work A', the Bay Street CIul. ihei %  ,i A 1 %  boy particularly bad I to i-e %  peai i would n"t i ablo to snow hu qnaUl i :ub was not torrnad Col. Mlchelln said i iai th< boj must behave and cofidbuct them must use bad la n guag t M ba unruiv. !!. %  i a month ha riid not live up to the nil "' tha Club. Hi I that he hoped the Clubs would •vantuauy ba run by tha c o m m u n i t.y of the district Although tha Pollca had organised Clul lhay arantad I i %  i iSMOAlttea, imiiirii rroaa • on Paga s Vfuluriu ErudieulitMi Cani|ui^n On ini. A. i* sjungar, O.B.E it; actor "f MtHral services in rai told the Advoeatc raatcrday thai thenii a malaria eradication campaign gng on in tlie colony and thev %  re spraying every house twka %  yi ar with i> i> T This he said, hud been made ^ means ( f a grant from 1 tad NaUoni International Emergency F u n d. 1 'ii If ba ."hied, is also nool meals to children There are various scheme* In ihe colony for improving hospital %  and institutions llntish Honduras is now being developed in a big way and the Medical Services havi got %  with the development. in BUngat arrivad o\-er the .. .• -h ai << by II W 1 A lor the % %  ( Si n .i Medii .ti %  ii I'.n.l.l-c.,,. .,.,.,. which opened at rfastblgg House yesterday morninu l7] staving at the Marine Hotel ALMOST all the landing pgNKa toi ai-go in ttie inner basin of the C menage was taken up yesterday baaga %  ( Oonglas lir lumber. During Ihe iia>. lighters were brtaglag in more lumber. They scented to be discharging then loads faster than waterfront vMirk'i-were removing the lumber. Discharging the lumber here is tha SS Monnacrev which enUM from Vancouver and Seattle 0 Friday. She brought a total ul 47.689 pieces and 12.&M bundlei %  i The shlpnteiM came foi Messrs. T Cieddes Grant Ltd On Murder Churgi' Joseph Cumbeibatch, 32, I iHlxHircr of Ros.Hill. Si Peter, was yesterday remanded on a charge of murder following the death of Cecil Jack man <" AflhtQt) Tenantry. St P-te Jiirkman died of stah wounds o Sunday night. An inquiry into the cireum*lanccs surrounding Jackman'death was adjourned until next Monday by Coroner Mr. S H Nurse The Inquiry was being held at District "E" Colonial Secretary Has the Petition The petition of the Assistant RagMaring Officers for bett->r compensation for their work has been sent to the Colonial Secretary, Mr. L. A. Chase. Registering Supervisor, told the Advocate yesterday. An Assistant Officer told the Advocate on Saturday that they had sent IhtspeUUot to U* %  go bin iail got no reply. This petition wlu.h dressed to the Colonial Secretary. said Mr. Chait ban %  ight la him nitb tha request that he forward it to the Colonial Secretary. WlUun tan WO. He u lung more about the mattes' Ai! UN fiatd arork "f tht ol perk' %  ..:. %  %  ' %  . • %  ... %  "piled, it was said. 1,00(1 \eightstown -< 'inhiv morning to load 3.475 tons of sugar for Llvarpoal, Bagland. She || axpaetad to SJII for FoKland uruun<| Uta end ut DW wiek. The llerdsm.iii BLACKGUARD A line of 10/and I/coats to he paid III 14 days or in default 14 days' Inipcteocwnonl was imposed on Eumi Mia "I Cane HU1, St Michael by a District "A Police atagWrala 0M bUc* guarding on Cane Hill It mid. on April 21 BEGGED ALMS Sentence of thi nt nth on James Chandler, a laboui i of I OraiiKe Hill. St. Jamo. bj I City Police Magistrate for begging .hi, on Broad Street un May 2tt. Chandler latei gave BsWa 6/ ip p tal. Unconacrous Sailor CHKUOHY TKO( FIK. .. -ail. i 'tie SS Alcoa Peiaaas was taken to the General Hospital at about 1.40 am. yesterday in an unioncions i (.nditi'.n. Ha w^s dei.ii i-d. RICE FROM B.G. A SHII'MKNT of W0 bags nee bran, 500 bags or n< JOfatr fcmellne. TUSS SI %  rlvad from British Ouiana. 8 I.DS 'tons of Infi.tif.u; Diseases for May were: Diphtheria 3; EuU-nc Fever 2, TUIHTIUIOMK 3 Scin I ilia ting Sea Island Cotton Fabrics A uide variety i.l Ihi' IIMISI liruuliful padcni!. in lurur desiun.. ugainst dark ground.. \l... in Haitley pallerns—.16 in< hr*. wide. Per Yard: $3.19, $5.06. $3.56, $5.07, $3.57, $4.55, $6.22 & $6.26 IN PI.MS C'OI.OLKS of Pink. While, and Turquoise. 'l(i ins. wide Per yard S3.IHI IN FIGURED LINGERIE DESIGNS Per yd $.339 CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. 10 13 Broad St ask for % Gusson ^LtiXLRY^TOILET SOAPS'J^ DtTEIUl'tUTBEl • ITOIN ttOSSOM HUE HYACINTH fliinatairii' llrl/in lit clrnnnv tiny*'4>m t'rinn hlmul irnjmt itir* • mpuriile* In ihe blood m-v cause rh BB| %  >hn .md polo-., .lilt | %  .1 \ IKMU pin*,.)., m t I rsaabii iasssd atlsmra i %  I the blood, clcne* ihITS. i i I -i-.-..t. in reautrlag mod health. % % % % % %  • % % % % % % % % %  sun r -. -"ja5Ba ia_.at.aa SPECIFY "EVEHITE ASBESTOS-CEMENT CORRUGATED SHEETS AND TUHMLL ASBESTOS WOOD. HARRISONS BROAD STREET AlltW I M.H LETTER MALES Precision nuide iind lincl> liiil.mir,l Finished in III.,, I. and Chromium A BOON Ti ANY OFFICE COMPLETE WITH (TlliOMII'M PI \T II WBtOHTfl only Sti.'.t I each LtANSOME'S nn\ tioti i us IN TWO (ill Mil's : Mllll." f "ll(;i:ll" Kach in i; ..i/rs 12" and II Plillis COMPLETE nil II OBASfl BOXi from S:itt.l7 t HUUUi eaek \IJ. METAL WII III. 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