Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
har bados



ESTABLISHED 1895

NO



Hope Abandoned |, es a

For 62

Miners

EASINGTON COUNTY, Durham, May 30
HOPE was abandoned tonight for 62 miners

entombed in a coal
here.

pit following an explosion

Chairman of the National Ccal Board, Lord
Hyndley announced: “Though everything has been

done,

and is still being done at the

pit, there is

now no hope of any of the 62 entombed miners

being alive.’’

Visit To
North Ireland

: LONDON, May 30.
_ King George VI. who is suffer-
ing from influenza today decided
not to make his planned week-end
visit to Northern Ireland.

Queen Elizabeth and Princess
Margaret will carry out the pro-
sramme arranged for the visit.

After his doctors had seen the
King at Buckingham Palace to-
day, it was announced that the
King had not shaken off his
attack of influenza and had de-
cided on the advice of his doctors
not to go to northern Ireland.

The King’s temperature was
still unsettled, the Palace state-
ment added.

The King, who is 55, had been
confined to his room since last
Thursday. He was to have left for
Belfast on Friday night.

He had earlier this week can-
celled his visit to the famous
Derby horserace at Epsom today
The Queen, Princess Elizabeth
and Princess Margaret were at-
tending the race.

Government circles in Belfast
emphasized today that the King’s
health alone prevents him from
visiting Northern Ireland.

Reports that he had been ad-
vised to cancel the visit because
of the pessibility of terrorist at-
tacks were described as “pure
propaganda.”

The Queen ang Princess Mar-
garet will carry out the weekend
programme as arranged which
thi would not be doing if
authorities feared any such out-

rages.
The Belfast polite detained
13 suspected members of the

Terrorist Irish Republic Army in
connection with the crude petrol
bomb which had been discovered
and drawn to police attention
before it could explode.
Northern Ireland authorities
did not believe that any personal
attack on royal personages was
planned though they feared that
Extremists might further their
outrages during their visit.
—Reuter.



Prime Minister
Pasha Accused Of
Coritact With Reds

CAIRO, May 30.
Minister Nahas Pasha
was today accused of being in
teuech with “Communist con-
taets” in Cairo,

Dr. Hussein Heikal Pasha,
Leader of the Liberal Constitu-
tional Party and former Presi-
dent of the Egyptian Senate and
Inter-parlizmentary union — said
the Prime Minister was ‘in touch
with the Soviet Legation at Cairo
and had other Communist con-
tacts.”

Dr. Heikal Pasha took secret
deeuments containing charges to
the Royal Palace,

The Prime Minister has order-
ed the public prosecutor to in-
vestigate allegations which the
pro-Government newspaper, Al
Misri, ridiculed to-day as false.

Dr. Heikal Pasha’s house has
been searched for other docu-
ments.—Reuter,

Prime



4,100 Enter For

French Elections

PARIS, May 30.

Candidates for the French gen-
eral elections on June 17, total
4,100 for 627 seats in Metropoli-
ten and overseas France, 30 per-
cent more candidates than in the
1946 elections.

But the job of legislator has
become less popular with women.
There are only 280 women can-
didates of whom about 100 are
Communists. Five years ago
fhere were 384 women candidates,
of whom 39 were elected.

—Reuter.

China Vulnerable

WASHINGTON, May 30

Admiral Forrest P. Sherman,
Chief of the United States Naval
Staff, testifying before the Mac-
Arthur inquiry by the Senate, was
questioned about his attitude to
the naval blockade of Red China.
He said China was vulnerable to
a naval blockade, but he opposed



the United States undertaking
such a blockade on its own.
—Reuter.



SEVEN SPIES KILLED
LONDON, May 31
Moscow radio said to-day that
seven American spies parachuted
into various parts of North Korea
had been captured and killed
—Reuter

King Cancels

He made this statement at
Croydon Airport after a flying trip
to the scene of the disaster. He
had left rescue squads battling on
amidst intense heat and swirling
clouds of black gas in an attempt
to bring out more bodies.

Exhausted rescue workers grimy
and heavy-@yed, said here this
morning that “only a miracle”
could prevent the death roll from
yesterday's pit explosion rising to
80. The revised casualty list to-
day showed that 64 miners were
still missing at the coal face either
trapped behind thousands of tons
of rubble or buried beneath it.

Another 15 men were known to
be dead, one of whom died in
hospital shortly after he was
browght to the surface,

A rescue worker who collapsed
and died after hours of frantic
work in fumes and stifling heat in
the disaster area, brought the total
toll of dead and missing to 80.

Rescue teams were still making
desperate efforts to breach the
treacherous loose wall of rubble,
and pump air through to any
missing men who might still be
alive.

“It is a slender chante,” a rescue
man said. “So slender that if it
comes off it will be a miracle.”

At the pit’s head relatives
maintained their vigil ignoring
the drizzling rain and chill of the
bitter wind which swept in from
the North Sea.

Grim faced miners, scarves
knotted round their necks at-



COMPROMI



FATHER OF

mâ„¢

.

THURSDAY, -MAY 31, 1951





LARGEST



Ore.

AWARDED the title of “Father of the largest family for 1951” by the American National Father's

Day Committee Gerret Koorengor, and his wife Johanna pose for a-
There are five sets of twins and the ages of

twenty-one children.
twenty-five years.

e with eighteen of their
e children range from two to
~—Express.





Fire Engine | Persian Government

Shipped For
[ppe (Or
Barbados
(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, May 30.

A new nine ton fire engine for
Seawell Airport, Barbados, as
well as 50 of the latest British
cars and light vans were today
loaded aboard the M.S. Bruno at
Tilbury for the West Indies des-
tinations. The Brute, which has
been chartered by Saguenay
Terminals, leaves tomorrow on
what will be its first voyage tc
the West Indies.

The vessel was visited

Claims £90,000,000

” TEHERAN, May 30.
___ THE evening newspaper Ettalat to-day quoted Deputy
Finance Minister Kazem Hassibi as stating that the Per
sian Government's claims apainst the Anglo-Iranian Qil
Company which were still incomplete, could be conserva
tively estimated at £ 50,000,000,
The paper said the

Secretary of the Oil Na’
£ 100,000,000.

te given by Hussein Maki
nalisation Board, was abou:



- amine states that Hassibi when
ay ’ asked if after iransfer the powe:
Middle East s Oil of the Oil Company would bi

responsible fot the sales of Per



a i i te

toda
tempted to console sobbing wives 4

and mothers of the men who were
still missing 900 feet below
ground.

by a small party of West Indies
businessmen interested who were
conducted round by the Captain
jand his Norwegian crew. There

News that their long wait was, is passenger accommodation on
not yet over was brought by a;board for ten persons, but for
silent head shake from rescue|the voyage tomorrow only five
workers who came to the pit’s)berths have been booked.
head for a brief respite.

“It°may take us till Friday td With the imtroduction of the

M.S. Bruno, Saguenay Termin-
als will now be operating a once
monthly service from London to
the West Indies.

Two further vessels will be
chartered shortly and if demand
warrants it, they will both be

get through to the boys,” one res-
cue worker said. He was one of
the 40 work-mates of the trapped
miners who ignored the evacua-
tion order after yesterday’s dawn
explosion and insisted on joining
the rescue squads.—Reuter.

transferred to the West Indies
service, making a three weekly

or even more frequerit sailing in

POCKET CARTOON

each direction.
by OSBERT LANCASTER “It all depends upon the de-
mand”, an official of the Com-

pany told me today.

The Bruno will call at Barba-
dos, Trinidad, British Guiana and
Cuba.



Cotton Workers
Asked To Strike

ROUBAIX, France, May 30.

Directors of the cotton mill here
today asked their workers to
strike. Seven months ago the mill
adopted a co-operative system of
paying erhployees 50 per cent of
the profits in the form of a month-
ly wage bonus.

The French Treasury this week
decided to insist on social security
payments—-which in France are
proportionate to the salary earned
—being paid by both the Company
and workers on these bonuses.
They sent in a bill for 15 million

“Ie’s not that L’m defeatist,

Achmet, it’s just that i can’t a BM ss led
: . ympeny has appeale
get rid of an uneusy feeling against the decision and toda:

that this ha» been cried

asked its employees to organise a
before.”

protest strike



—Reuter.

End Of Lorry
Strike In Sight

LONDON, May 30.
An end to Britain’s three-day-
old ,lorry drivers’ strike which
has virtually paralysed the coun-
try’s* nationalised road transport
system, came in sight to-night.
After a meeting between Al-
fred Robens, Minister of Labour,
the Road Haulage Executive and
In January, Blair set up a new| Transport Workers Union offi-
New York to London record of] iais announced that it had
seven hours, 48 minutes, also in| #8reed to shelve further appoint-
a Mustang. ments of “snooping”, road patrols
until the union had consulted its
The route of his latest flight’ members.
lay across the North Pole. Most Hjecommyendation to resume
of the time, engine failure would| work by the week-end is ex-
have meant death for there were| pected to be put by the unofficial
few possible landing grounds. Road Haulage Strike Committee
To combat temperatures en-|to a mass meeting of drivers to-
countered at the high altitudes he| morrow night—Reuter.
chose, Blair wore a “vital piece
of equipment”—a full length suit
of thick red flannel underwear.
It was the first solo attempt to
fly this Arctic route in a single-
engined plane. His erigine was a
Rolis Royce Merlin and he car-
riod extra petrol tanks.
Two Norewegian Vampire jets
escorted him part of the



Flies Across
Northern Ice Cap

NEW YORK, May 30 |

Captain Charles Blair, American
Airlines pilot, has made the first
flight over the northern ice cap in
a single-engined plane.

His Mustang fighter plane;
touched down at Fairbanks,
Alaska today, ten hours and 29
minutes after taking off from
Barbufoss, 3,200 miles away in
north Norway. His average speed
was about 310 miles an hour.



7 Nazis Lose Appeal
Against Death

WASHINGTON, May 29.
Seven Nazi war prisoners un-
way.|der sentence of death in Lands-





When the jets turned away, he] berg prison, Bavaria to-day tos!
faced more than nine hours of!their latest appeal in the United
loneliness in the vast ice fields.; States Courts

As he neared the Pole—the Federal Judge Walter Bastian
earth’s magnetic field—the air-Idismissed the suit brought by
craft’s compass needle began tojthe prisoners’ lawyer Warren
react. Constant adjustments andjMagee who had asked the Dis-

careful regulation were
to keeb him on his course.
—-Reuter.

necessary|trict Court for a permanent stay
‘a

of executions



—Reuter.










Reserves Very Vast
Dr. G. M. Lees

THE HAGUE, May 30.

The Middle Bast’s ou i: eserves
are so vast that they exceed per-
haps by a substantial margi,
the total konwn and. estemated
serves of the whole North Ameri-
can Continent, an Anglo-Iranian
oil company expert said here to-
aay.

The expert Dr. G. M. Lees,
described these “giant oilfields
which are unique in the world” in
a lecture to the Third World
Petroleum Congress now meeting
here,

He said-that if as suggested
“one fifth of the total oil has al-
ready been discovered there, the
total reserve would be about
200,000,000,000 barrels compared
with the proved reserves of the
United States, currently esti-
mated at about 26,000,000,000
barrels and a total ultimate pro-
duction of 10,000,000,000 barrels.

In view of the present early
stage of exploration throughout
the vast area, tetal reserves may
be several times the estimate of
those already proved, he added.

Proved Middle East reserves in
1949 were; Kuwaith 10,950,000,-
000 barrels, Saudi Arabia 9,000.-
000,000, Persia 7,000,000,000 and
Iraq 5,000,000,000, giving a totat
of 31,950,000,000 barrels,

Since then new fields in Persia
and Arabia have added at least
a further 8,000,000,000 giving the

present estimate of about 40,000,- |’

000,000
teas.

barrels or 5,300,000,000

Dr. Lees pointed out that this
figure 40,000,000,000 barrels re-
lates only to the area which has

been actively explored to date.
This is about 130,000 square miles
out of the total current oil con-
cession of an area in the Middle
East of 850,000 square miles.
—Reuter,



U.S. Big Busiriess
Accused Of Bribery

WASHINGTON, Liay 30.
Tongress industrial organisa-
tions representing 6,000,000 organ-
ised workers to-day accused big
businegs of trying to bribe Labour
to join in “scuttling price con-

trols’ and then “share in the
ioot”’.
The organisations’ Secretary-

Treasurer James B. Carey, in a
statement to the Senate Banking
Committee named in particular
the Nationa! Association of Manu-
facturers and the United States
Chamber of Commerce.

He said the organisations were
guilty of “complete irresponsi-
bility and narrow greed that
could wholly wreck our defence
programme”.

“They propose ending price and
wage controls” he declared.

“We see in this big business
programme simply a bribe offered
to Labour.” —Reuter.

PAPAGOS RESIGNS

ATHENS, May 30.
Fielq Marshal Alexander Pap-
agos, Commander-in-Chief of the



Greek armed forces, resigned
to-night. He is 66. He was ap-
pointed to command the Greek
Army on Italy’s declaration of
war on Greece in October 1940
He is an ardent Royalist
—Reuter,

the benefit of Persi- if sales arc



sian oil, declared; “It will be to

a

a with overseas buyers.
“This will not only bring us

greater profits, but will increase

our commercial ties with the
wer

“About 30 eduntries are baying
i oil. ineluding * 4

, Holland, Norway, Swe-
den, Switzerland, Germany and
countries of the Mediterranean
Seaboard and of Eastarn and
North Africa, India, Pakistan
and China”, he added, according
to the newspaper.

It also quoted Hassibi as sta-
ting that the new Persian cen-
tral oil office had been formed
to take over the functions of the
Anglo-Iranian Oil Company and
articles of the association of this
body were almost completed.

Hassibi, who is Prime Minister
Moseddegh's candidate as chief of
Persia's nationalised oil industry,
was also quoted as saying the
first stage of nationalisation
would be the transfer of author-
ity of the oil company to a new
central oil office: (this, of course
is distinct from the Oil Nation-
alisation Board) which will as-





Big 3 Deputies|
Will Send Note

To Russia

PAPIS, May 30

It was understood from usually
reliable sources tonight that the
three Western Deputies will to-
morrow present the Soviet deputy
Andrei Gromyko with a note in-
viting the Soviet Foreign Minis-
ter to attend a Four Power Meet
ing in the latter part of July
Copies of the note will probably
also be delivered through usually
diplomatic channels to the. Soviei
Government in Moscow.

The Western noie was expected
to stress the fact that the agree-
ment already reached by the
Deputies provided an ample basis
for a useful full fledged meeting
of the Foreign Ministers.

The three Western Deputies met
ilone today. They were under-
stood to have put the finishing
teuches to their news effort, bu’
no official information about their
decision was available.

A Western spokesman = sai
afterwards: “Ever since the West-
ern pe’ vers submitted their three
alternative agendas, they have
seen endeavouring to persuad
the ‘soviet Government to attend
+ nieeting of Foreign Ministers
We have considered all possibili-
ties and shall continue to do so
It is not possible to say what
nay or may not be done.”

—Reuter,

————————



Bevin Will Be
Laid To Rest At
Westminster Abbey

LONDON, May 30

Prime Minister Clement Attlee
told the Commons today that for-
mer Foreign Minister Ernest Bevin
will be buried in the nationa!
shrine at Westminster Abbey—
the first Socialist statesman to be
So honoured.

Bevin died in Londen on April
14 at the age of 70, and was cre-
mated. His ashes will be re-
buried in the Abbey among the
remains of Britain’s Kiras,
Queens, statesmen and poets.

The Prime Minister announced
that the burial would take place
without’ official ceremony in the
presence of the Bevin family and
a few friends and colleagues.

Interment in Westminster Abbey
is an honour for commoners paid
only to the nation’s greatest
statesmen, men of letters and}
leaders of the armed forces.

Reuter,

—— acetates ersosaoreaaiaerinenetienceamsiatahis

; to-night that Russia's capacity to





British Banks
lhicrease Charges

For International Trade

LONDON, May 30.
bunks have decided to
increase their charges for financ-

British

cay the functions of the Com- ing international trade to and from
‘ing itai > air coun-
The second stage would be a een Rly. _Datween “thelr -¢
replacement of foreign experts This type of money will now
and technicians by Persians, Us

—Reuter.

BOTH ‘WON’
ROME, May 30

Both anti - Communists and
Communists today interpreted the
results of North Italy's municipal
and provincial elections as a biy
vietory for their cause,

Premier Aicide We Gasperi’s
Christian Democrat Party and its
allies pointed to their conquest of
such Leftist strongholds as Genoa
and Venice. They ousted Commu-
nists and extreme left-wing So-

| cialists from scores of other town

councils. They captured control
of 22 out of 28 provincial councils.

They achieved these results with
an electoral law which gave all
council seats to the winning party
er alliance

Christian Democrats said this
law was made for the benefit of
smaller anti-Communist parties
such as the Liberals and Republi-
cans,

Communists and their Socialist
allies claimed that the Christian
Democrats drafted the law to save
themseives. from defeat. They
pointed te Christian Democrat
losses as an individual party com-
pared with political elections of
1948.—Reuter.



New Issues On
Saar Arise

BONN, May 30

West German Chancellor Dr.
Konrad Adenauer told a crowded
Parliament today that “new issues
Have arisen over the Saar which
eompel the Government to review
its position.
| These issues include prohibition
pat the Lower House of Parliament
from entering the Saar, prohibi-
j tion of the Saar Democratic Party
(and a letter addressed to the Saar
|Premier Johannes Hoffman, by



‘Robert Schuman, French |

Minister on May 9.
‘eircumstances interfere with ef-
forts to establish good relations
between Germany and France and
thereby hamper reconstruction of
Western Europe,” Adenauer con-
tinued.— Reuter

Cn

“The Saar question must in no} treras,

cost about two per cent per an-
num which is cheaper than any
other money which most overseas
traders can obtain.

Britain has hitherto been lend-
ing at about one and a half per
eent.

The new charges will raise the
cost of imported goods by a small
fraction of one per cent

Subject to confirmation by their
committee, the Banks intend to
raise their commission rate for
“accepting” foreign bills of ex-
change (so-called “acceptance
credit’) from the present rate of
15 shillings to 24 shillings per
hundred sterling per annum,

—Reuter.

}
Tories Criticise
Labour Govt.

On Antarctic Issue

LOINDON, May 30

Brigadier Frank Medlicott, Con-
s€rvative, criticised the Govern
ment in the Commons today for
its “failure to react strongly” tc
Argentine’s challenge in the An-
tarctic.

The Government was setting ar
extremely dangerous precedent by
their “mishandling of this matter.”

It had been a direct cause of
Britain being challenged in other
vital matters in other parts of the
world, he contended.

oreign Secretary Herbert Mor-

rigon retorted that this was “a
most remarkable series of
asbumptions and propaganda

statements.” =

“We have asserted and are main-
taining the rights of this country”
he said,—Reuter.



Verezuelan Consul
Leaves Trinidad

(From Our Own Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 29
Senor Fernando Lopez Con-
Venezuelan Consul Gen-
@ral and Dean of the Consular
Body is expected to leave Trini-

LT



dad in June for Venezuela, He
| will not return Lieut-Col
| Ne te Paoli has been named



1ecessor

PRICE: F CENTS

E: NO CHOICE

SAYS GENERAL RIDGWAY

Defeat On Reds
Has No Parallel

TOKYO, May 30.
UNITED NATIONS SUPREME COMMANDER,
General Matthew Ridgway, told correspon-
dents to-day: ‘For the enemy there is no compro-

mise; for us there is no choice.’’

He said various factors, including “enormous’’
losses sustained in their April and May offensive,
show that “there must be the growing question in
the minds of the Chinese soldiers as to benefiting
their Communist leaders.” Ss ash ye aoe

rs ; Chinese prisoners of war had been
“Affray” Affair |

since April 10



There as clear evidence from

° r prisoners that desertions had as-

Stull A Mystery isumed reat si¢nifieance and was
-
a serious problem
LONDON, May 30 i
‘ am ’ He said the major defeat in-
Disappearance of the British | i :

. . flicted on two Communist offen-
submarine Affray six weeks ago is |” : 2 oe i
still a mystery, the House of Com- | Sives in April and May by “this
i ae ; . magnificent United Nations force”

mons was told today Walter J
Edwards, Civil Lord of the Ad-
miralty, said the search had nov

had no parallel in history.
Savage Chinese counterattacks
slowed down the United N:z





covered an area of 150 square] â„¢) fore:
tniles of the English Channel. bu fadvance into Northern Korea to-
no sv>marine wreck has been |@4Y, and Allied troops pushed

against a solid screen of Commun-
ists ready to die where they stood
rather than give further ground

positively identified so far

Of a large number of contact






aearides to be "pv otal ia Allied troops battled throughout
livers, he continued, Five havi daylight hours yesterday au
been investigated and diving on drenching monsoon rains all along
the other two will take place a the central and East central front.
soon as conditions permit , Heaviest fighting raged north: of

A further area 4 miles wide nje and southeast es Yanggu at
south of the eriginal area is now | ‘%° easrerh’ ip at the Hwachon
seing searched, Edwards ‘con- reservoir north and east of Hwa-
tinued. “When this is complete it chon and in the triangle formed by
is intended to carty out a search the Imjin and Hacan rivers, seven
eth siorth ad the. mek erea* miles north of the 38th Parallel

—Reuter. Allied airstrikes, artillery and

mortar bombardments failed to
dislodge one battalion southeast of
Yabgu Tanggu and the American
infantry finally had to go in with



Free World Need

‘ their bayonets to gain their ob-
» ie jectives
Not Use H Bomb Two large Communist truck

eonvoys with headlights blazing
and believed to be carrying rein-
“s-cements were reported heading
south along roads northeast and
southeast of Yanggu Massed
Allied artillery poured shells on
convoys, but resulls were not fte-

DULLES

TUCSON, Arizona, May 30
John Foster Dulles, Republican
®oreign Policy Adviser said here

wage a cold war could be quickly} Ported. ; :
destroyed “by skilfully applied The Chinese threw in heavy at-
pressures”. ; tacks against the United . States

units “around. Hwachon as South
Koreans seized the high ground
overlooking the Hwachon dam at
the western tip of the reservoir
and finally sealed the last escape
route left open to remnants of the
Communist division trapped south
of the reservoir,

The cause of human liberty
could find “positive expression
without the use of atom bombs”
he said.

The free nations should plan
“in terms of our own. strength
and our opponent's weakness”.





Despotic Societies “always look United States tank and infantry
more formidable than they are |] columns repulsed fierce Chinese
he told an audience at the Uni-! assaults,
versity of Arizona. A counterattack west of the
Pe I A ‘ a ib ruined town forced the Americans

; . eee eu tc withdraw from hill positions
visors is now preparing a Japan- after three and a half hours of
se peace treaty. Next week- battle
end he goes to London for talks In the western sector Aflied
with British officials. forces gained five miles at Some

—Reuter, points and South Koreans who had

| crossed the River Imjin against

stubborn resistance, thrust Com-

SLAVE CAMPS munists back until they broke

contact at dusk
Naval units ranged up and down
the coast during the day-shelling
of s-attered groups of Communists.
—Reuter.

KARACHI, May 30
Most of Communist China was
described as ‘near starvation” by
the Chinese Nationalist delegate
at the Asian Regional Conference | poset

of Free Trade Unions here to-day THE





“ADVOCATE”

China

had, he alleged, con- 7
icripted at least 541,000 workers pays for NEWS
‘for slave camps in Russia and DIAL 3113

atellite lands More than 11,000,- }
100 Chinese workers had been}
irafted into service connected with |
the Korean war Reuter.

Day or Night



Tottes “Ask About

Grenada Riots

LONDON, May 30,
The Labour Government was strongly pressed by the
Conservative Opposition in the House of Commons to das
to make a statement on recent disturbances in Grenada

| First questions brought from Tom Cook, Colonial Unde:

Secretary the reply: “The strength of the Grenada Police



Force has been increased and a Deputy Superintendent
appointed
In addition a proposal for cr
i . tion of a special police reserv:
Trade Unionism now being considered by tt

Legislative Council.

Steps are being taken to secur
more effective distribution of the
force to improve its mobility
and patrol arrangements in deal-
ing with disorder.

Can Check Growth
Of Communism

KARACHI, May 30 “Up to May 19, there were 2
On the lines taken in Great prosecutions for acts of violence
Britain an Indian delegate, Sub- during the recent disturbances
math’ Banerjee told the Asiar These involved 57 ner sons. ct
Regicnal Conference of Inter-| “hom 45 were convicted”.
national Confederation of Free Walter Fletcher, Conservativ
Trade Unions today that Com-| @ iked: Was it n at clear that the
munism usually swept over inability of island’s police force
‘under-developed countries with| tO cope with the situation which

led to employment of service-
men is sufficient reason for press-
ing on with integration of ser-
viees particularly the police on
whole of the West Indies?
—Reuter.

poor inhabitants.”

To check its onslaught he sug
gested state socialism on the lines
ef Britain's with strong and wicde-
spread Trade Unionism a

The Conference adopted
Resolution which called on Asian












Government to immediately
draw up a bold and planned DIAMONDS
programme” of social security TORONTO
and welfare for workers ‘pr A 2l-year-old Rumanian di
viding for a living wage, adequate |} placed person is now under-at
housing, sickness, insurance, SG) in Montreal, accused of-try ..%
ago pension and sickness benefit le 0.908 “ut jidmoncds
: smuggle 10,206 cu é 1
The »sol ion laid ow the! ” — .
The Resolution laid down the) i more than £66,000 ir
maximum period of ter ars in} Aanada The dianednde a
which the programme ; to be} Ba :
, 7 lhi nm i \ r r e@ ainers
completed, but emphasised that aj hidden in vo rubber eont ,
; and it toa three police exper
beginning should be ide ir « a t

“|

Reuter.



crn

Caub Calling

PAGE TWO












A KHAMA

ROW ?

\

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE





THURSDAY, MAY 31, 1951

eee

SENIOR COMPETITION

The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girls
between the ages of 12—19 to send in a humorous essay, story or poem
on the subject of “CAMELS”. Entries must reach the Short Story Editor,







Communist

Way?















































































































































































t2OUR ny onhaael 7 Queen of the ~
POURTEEN members of the Barbados Holida PARIS. | advocate Co., Ltd., City, not later than Wednesday every week. The
amaica football team left ARTIE'S HEADLINE ISS PEGGY O'DONNELL Bamangwatos best cornposition each week will be published in the Evening Advocate
xs vesterds , . * ‘ “GG D ar- . A man, i xd, was | beSt compos: ac yeek w > shed ir a
los aeetet day by the ~ eri = rived from Trinidad on ae peeta es eer nd and the winner will receive a prize of books or Stationery to the
route to Jamaica, Cay * . Ruth Khamz n p .
f. the team, Henry ‘Miller —= M4 ar. oot ie Satie ae ie edit: Sie heli ghd 13 miles from Paris. At hospital | V@lue of 12/6.
aa bias - "tA ; on sit < s stay r s. er ba : ca ae vas ti eo : ‘
wh > Ww orks with B.W.1 A. in Stoute in Rockley. Intransit to St it was discovered he was tattoo cd Send this coupon with your story.
gsto ? @ 5 « net “ — 3 s , ce
bee ~ d os ox inca Hever Lucia by the same plane was Mr. see See ans speeauaeae eee i
alr. yesterda) i . . -] , i f > . a y ar 5 a
spend a few days in. Trinidad Sue coal Ue chee pty she is thinking of were due to injections of Pen- SENIOR COMPETITION
before leaving for Jamaic: ‘ thatol, th th drug. It is pre-
y Seren i yim: Round Trippers a brother for her. eel that oe ue a Rumanian, OS. Soke ge SOR ds og oe O85 Ps AR SRD er
is the victim of an internal politi-
After Three Years aie Ruth w liga ” s ; AGE Oe hiacaeeeark esos hs eee ea
. and Mrs. Frank Wood of cal quarrel among Communists.
M* T.. BRUCE MARSHALL M “Culloden House” are mak- marriage to Se- oe ner Cape Pree ree er UE TC Teeny
— & of Fontabelle, who had ing the Caribbean Cruise by the —Reuter.
been in England for the past Colombie, which left Barbados retse Khama be- Ne OU 5s havc ccs vaspotadcecBit ter sbiteets .
three years at Cardiff Technical yesterday afternoon Other pas- . ‘
College studying Opthalmic Op- sengers going on the round trip cameaworld story A ee dence etter e reece tee eeenes Coen eee ewer eeesrereseee
tics, returned yesterday morning are Mrs. Consuele Goddard, Mrs. is happy, and does SHOPPERS PARADISE mannan
by ‘the Celombie, He intends to sn are, Miss Sarah B. ea CN. Meee rie ee ee “THEATRE '
sractise “here. rowne r. Lionel Jones, his not believe in one EDMONTON, Alberta. / — |
BMY. Marshall is the son of Mr. mother and sister Hazel. (DIAL 2310) PLAZA BRIDGETOWN
Rebert Marshall of Da Costa & En route to Jumaica by the Co- child families. Able Seaman Gerry Sinclair, on LAST = SHOWS TODAY
Co., Ltd. lombie are Mrs. Norah Wright, Story on p. 4. leave after duty with the Cana- RKO-Radio’s Big Action Double !
' “Ign’t this fust wondersus Mrs. Annie Parris, Miss Veronique dian navy in Korean waters, said ry ”
Back from U.K. Holiday Elmer—coming all that wav L. Nichols and Mr. Paul S. Shel- - Fp. . > Hong Kong is the shoppers’ para- THE se Wi N D O WwW
RS. E..L. WARD whose hus- for. this : don. BB. C. Radio Pro Tamme dise of the Orient. He said that}i] . ROARZancg “uur Menneay SPECIAL
band is P.M.O. of Christ mae To Spend One Month A with no*ttaxes there, top — DESERT Tones — 1 2M,
Church, returned yesierday te 2 m : British tweed suits were $35 an ie as . ec)
see oe Colemibie trom Trinidad Magistrate — FF to Trinidad by the Colom- , ee MAY 31, 1951 by Say it With Mule, 6:00 Pp ap List good wrist watches $7. att MYSTERY Joha Cae oe
England after about three R. B. W. CELESTAIN, Mag- bie yanleina wrietacen wat on ee ee ee meee ee as “VALLEY OF FEAR”
months’ holiday. She was accom- nee ¢ re , — Miss Grace Cumberbatch, daugh- 630 am | Sports Diary, 6.45 am 6.06—11.00 pam, — 25.58 m , 31 32 | |] sohany shemera ee ett Johnny Mack Brown
panied by their young son Rich- spent part of his long leave im ter of Mr. C. W. Cumberbatch, ?h0rting Fecrge nvsit, TIE an \pee ate ae - ~ |} i “i un << OPENING TOMORROW (Friday) 2.30 — 445 & 6.30 P.M
ard. England, is now spending. ee headmaster of St. Giles’ Boys’ gramme’ Parade. 720 am. From ‘The Analysis, 2.15 pm We Seo Britains 145 Wifj_ “DOUBLE INDEMNITY” : Fred MacMurray, Barbara
Also arriving by the Colombie Weeks’ holiday here. poeta School and Mrs. Cumberbatch of Editorials, 7.30.8 m_ Generally Speaking, pm Generally Speaking, 8.00 p m. Radio —
trom the, UK, yesterday’ “were on the Colomble, yestentay | 4: “tiolloway”, the Ivy. ee, eta tenes Ge Poe ate eat tne 1 == Sa ————
edt his wife and i | (f)
i ne on > Cc, oe ; ee re oa wSea The , She has gone for one month’s wards, u.45 am Engineering Achieve- From ‘The Editorials, 900 p'm — Special PLAZA at sins i} | GAIETY
Mr. Horlock has come out to sta) aa holiday which she will spend with ments, 9.00 am The News, 9.10 am. Dispatch, 9.15 pm Have A Go, 9 45 | BRIDGETOWN a }
take up an appointment as en- Stream. - mays har. Suter Mira: Albert Movre sot Scie mews Bram sisi UT nT Hb oe Remember! 10.00: 2 iy. Tne 5) Last Shows Today 5 & 8.30 pum. ||| THE GAKDaew —
j gineer with Messrs Cable & Mrs, _Celestain ~e en Port-of-Spain. ivel ob MeHiain, Coronation Cup, 1L4geOn- the: Perk, 1100p me Peni tg KISS AWAY a On de See, Me PINKY LAST me wee
ireless (W.1.) Ltd. rior o Mr, J, O. Gall, Assess § adm Special Dispatch, 12.00 noon The gfhird Programme. * > : ining stomhba ieee to et | DEAR WIFE” & RAINBOW ISLAND’
poi ‘s gee Pesos Fa . yee e Church. ee are ~ = News, 12.10 pm News Analys . THE STORY =e ie eed
cotning Or Aree anite ie i After Three Months 1156—6.45 pam — 19 75 m C.B.C. PROGRAMME A MURDER! OF AN 2 New Mottann Foae 2”, 2 (IIH FRE, SAT, SUN — 630 pm.
the 7 > ind “the Medit r En Route From Long R. AND ‘MRS. EDMUND I 4.15 p m. “reat Names in ith Afr GOS re Ae oe ee a “AMAZON QUEST” Jamas CAGHE Road
> Sar Hast anc > Meaiter- ‘ m 4 15, m. Gel mes in South Afri pm 10.15 . News, 10.15 bo h. ames CAGNEY is Red Ho
ranean. Leave COZIER ¢ Trinidad re- °° Cricket, 4.30 pm Top Score, 500 pm 10 30 p m ‘nls Week th me UNHOLY a Noe eae Mathews & “WHITE pi aoeenee i
° rin I pm 1951 Festival of Britain Coronation ada i 76 Mes., 25.51 m “DEVIL'S C Also Short CARIBBEA
Youngest Member R. and Mrs. G. B, Henderson turned home yesterday were Cup, 5.15 pm. Scottish Masazind, 5.45 LOVE! DEVIL'S CARGO" _Also Short — “CARIBBEAN”
‘ and their twdé children by the Colombie after spending MIDNITE SATURDAY 2nq ‘ MIDNITE SATURDAY 2nd
AV “NRY G » Poger and Stuart are spending two thr months’ holiday. They en | Paramount Presents : “REVENGE OF THE ZOMBIES” & ERISON MUTINE’ Baw. Nereis @
TyaAviD HENRY GEORGE, (08 holiday here before gcing were staying with Mr. and Mrs. ‘Rupert ar d the lee-fl — 39 ___ "MARKED TRAILS" WEST OF THE ALAMO
eight-month-old son of the (40 -prinidad where Mr, Hender- A. C. Cozier of “Ebenezer”, : f ower T ee aecrenmraas Fiased | |
Earl and Countess of Harewood <1), j, employed with “Trinidad Crumpton Street. — c rT —_ Fred MacMURRAY SONIDO g http ppnpe eae
and grancchild of cone Seen Leaseholds in the Stores Depart- Mr. Cozier is q retired hardware §g ' ae ——— Barbara STANWYCK PPLE IEDR GER CR:
Royal, has become the youngest ment, clerk. an " Edward G. ! I GLOBE
Y.M.C.A. member. They came in yesterday morn- 7 EK
“He has beeome an honorary ing on the Colomble from Eng- Doctor of Divinity | In To-day, 4.45 & 8.15 p.m. Last Shows
member in Leeds. land where they had spent two “LITTLE GIANT” (Abbott d Cost ll
Young David is a nephew of ynonths. While here they are stay- HHE Rev. Canon Malone, In- | And “CORVETT 29%) ats 0)
Gerald Las¢elles who owns the ing with Mr. and Mrs. Clarence cumbent of St. Peter’s Cathe- 66 DOUBLE 4in E K 225” (Randolph Scott)
Bele and Mount Plantations in skinner of Spring Gardens, Black qral, Prince Edward Islands, a
Barbados, Rock. brother of Sir Clement Malone has es PEER
ayer in England, Mi pees: been recommended to convocation J INDEMNITY AQUATIC
CROSSW D son said that he saw the Interna- for the honorary degree of Doc- j
e OR tional football geune between Eng- tor of Divinity. This recommenda- 1 Q A aC CLUB CINEMA (Me-.bers Only)
land and Scotland, the Cup Final tion was unanimously approved Opening To-morrow TONIGHT AT 2.30
between Blackpoo] and Newcastle and the degree was conferred in , . 2.30 — 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. Universal-International Presents - - - -
United and the Amateur Cup Final King’s College Chapel on May Though Rupert is very fright- pines. Bill and Algy have been home ie 7 . . “CALAMITY JANE AND SAM BASs"
between Pegasus and_ Bishop 10th. ened he remembers to hold tight to and have returned to the lake to d tinuing ‘dail 8 ee. Color by Technicolor
Aucklend. Canon Malone has been a priest the sledge. The cold air makes search for him. ‘* Here he comes,” and@ cont s y With DORDRIe CAL te oor ota ee
for forty-five years, thirty of him shut his eyes, and he waits for cries Algy. “Hi, Rupert, where 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. iN _with Do ART io: WILLARD PARKER :0: LLOYD BRIDGES |
On Leave which have been spent at St. the bump. hen it comes it is have you been?’’ But still Rupert bo eee CALE COMMENCING FRIDAY 1ST
AJOR ALBERT E, MOFFETT, Peter's. He was made a Canon of very slight, He finds he has landed cannot stop. The sledge streaks ————______—_—_— | JOAN FONTAINE :o: CARY GRANT
Divisional Commander of the Cathedral in 1926 and for oe nee slo Se, and is past sae heading straight for al in “SUSPICION”
a mmé . rushing down through the forest of Yutwood, sO
the Salvation Army in ee eee ae nite - oan w meee’ = ALL RIGHTS, RESBRVED * aE SE call
ate Sires souday oF TC. a cial and General Synod. ; rr ee eee ned paca an ———
for leave in Canada. During his _ He was formerly a Curate at St. | % WITH A
absence the Divisional Young Peo- Michael's Cathedral, Vicar of St, |% $ STAR”
ple’s Secretary, Sr. Captain Olive seiet 8, mg oy of ees a % % t EMPIRE ROYAL
White will be acting Divisional Barbacos and he once ac : i - . Popeye the Today Only 4.30 & 830 p.m.
Commander. kee, See ae ae % FOR ONE SOLID WEEK x Sailor) | TODAY—Last Two Shows Republic Big Double Zs
ee months. $ x 4.45 & 8.15 p.m. ° ur
- Pur, must 1 change? (8) Next Month Antigua 8 ; % Richard ARLEN and
t line) itt Pte a R. FRANK walcore Secre- Leddy Barrister % ‘ OPENI M TOMORROW ‘ 2 M-G-M presents Vera RALSTON in. . .
ea! but if It gets upset, (8) ; N BARB or a couple ‘ : ORES
. 2 . tary of the Barbados Work- : p wr ; ¥ > , “LADY AND THE
is Betty ate iD a ers’ Union who. returned from of weeks’ holiday is Miss % % “TWO WEEKS WITH , A aay 99 7
16. 14 changes to the north. (4) Grenada on Tuesday by B.W.1.A. Eugenie Charles, Barrister-at- % s VE” MONSTEI
ta Beats in les) expects to leave for Antigua June Law of Dominica. She arrived |Â¥ x LO AND
20, Pius, (4) 10th as a member of a Board of yesterday morning by the Colom- s ela a :
21, How war ts seen in fatigue, (9) Inquiry which will inquire into bie and is staying with Mr. and x Starring : “ROAD TO
Down the causes of the various disputes Mrs. Carlos E, Clarke at Palm , Z oe ae ea AT ”
+ caetaan arn sa. baht tw. Whidhchave coourred during the. Woech, Hawtngs, % Jane Powell — Ricardo ALCATRAZ
‘: 3. Sort of thing Kate would do, (4) year. The Board (other members Miss Charles is the daughter % Mdtidiban with Lould Starring Robert LOWERY
o pitees fase. (6, 8) ah équibs, (8) Sir Clement Malone, Hon. R. B. of Hon. J. B, Charles, planter of $ : June STOREY
Pye 6. A shy piece of purnt wood. (ay ence tr ake es Dominica and Mrs. Conia and 3 Calhern and Ann Harding BAe Tag ete a ar
8. A particular friend, (4) ntigua) will make recommenda~ 4 sister of Dr. R. M. F. Charles, — repay aa ent
eet a ee a eyes ta) ens ane observations as it may Medical Officer of Health, Arima, % ta ink Jat Nn hare a Pieese: Notes 3 hat ne Pore
13. Near a ring. (5) se ' : Trinidad, my 'Theatt “All be starting at
15. It’s a case, (3) Trinidad Secretary % y reatre will be st
: : stes 50 p.m.
17. The ‘body coming through ere AFTER spending six weeks holi- Incidental Intelligence % ¥ ROXY 8.15 instead of 8.30 p.m.
' " 10. —A. : day at Leaton-On-Sea, Max- NEW type of scarecrow makes 9s ee ee
1 nd 2a. Peentien century; 7, Dhobt: well, Mr. Eric Almandoz, Secre- a loud bang and waves its |¢ x | REX BEACH'S ; Today . ORG
%, “Undo; 11, Enlarge; 12, T.N.T.; 2 4 : : : ‘ Ri i 4.30 & 8.15 p.m. I ”
Gave. 14, Acid: 17, Oargo:'19, Trio: 48: tary of Messrs. Gordon Grant arms every twenty minutes. No- * 2) 4 GREATEST STORY!
Gnos; 21. Data: 22. Sea l'Across. Down: Jutd., of Port-of-Spain, returned tiing is said of its party affiliation KY oY ¥ Columbia Double— L Two Shows Today
2. When: 35, Eon; 4. Tiara; 5, Pngage; +i " ; * ‘ j ireg = %, sf ast Two Sho
BT eeo oat: t Detached: 8, Bludgeon: to Trinidad yesterday evening by or to what office it aspires. el 3 4.30. & 8.15 pm.
9. Urgent; 10,’ Debitity: 15.’ Caw: 16 B.W.ILLA. He was accompanied Canadian columnist. x (| be Robert LOWERY and ‘ ,
Irene; 18, Oast, .* by his wife and three children, L-8.8. x x | eget wend e Joan BARTON in . Republic Double . . .
7 ) ¥ | : Adele MARA and
THE ADVENTURES OF PIPA__ ; a) | TRE g rs “MARY LOU” fie
rai xacenmgaiboie be a me cere cae : _ sterrin a
' | 1% %] 2) JOHN CAPROLL + ADELE MARA AND “SONG OF MEXICO
$
| Role 1 19 > | » with MONA MARIS AND
ol Ss os | fs BN t vt % cond ROBERTS AIRALDI + VIVIAN RAY “BANDIT OF
r at 3) POT N es 3] fond introducing FERNANDO LAMAS “ OMAN"
| {| G { ' x ; Bl: ; f | EL DORADA” UNDERCOVER W
pa j ee eS ic x A REPUBLIC PICTURE 'L DORADA ehcdia
m a Gs : ‘ ieee & F LEPUBLIC PICTURES CORPORATION i U
1 ihe | Wn e ae x oan r Joseph : ___Horbert J. Yates, President | with Charles STARRETT Robert LIVINGSTON and |
1 i a “\ a & Fontaine Cotten y || and Smiley BURNETT Stephanie B |
1 ay / f i ¥
Vu \ / $ : .
| ; i % $ —— — — f
i | ; ‘, ——
1 I 2) “A ‘ly | g
+ ol agai ( /, / & 7 on ;
j de /; ’ hi / ii ig » HAL WALLIS A Columbia E M p [ R E STARTS
‘ “is $ ’
| ‘ / Sa . i
‘ :
~ ie ora 1g 5 ye Masterpiece!
{OOOO GG SOS O9OSSS POCO POTS OOOTSES POGO% x R ep er : } Sa ean Kg BREE: - «pn a
> . 1X - -
¢ ¥18
zt % x , v7)
s Vis 4
+~ ‘. .
x Seg sw snes FRANCOISE ROSAY | ,
x / 8 win JESSICA TANDY * ROBERT ARTHUR i
x SHS Directed by WILLIAM DIETERLE - Screenplay by Robert Thosran ; #
% e % } " ; From # Story by Pio br Thar % Here isa strange eo
a BIN sUS: i $| as
$ San LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE % and exciting
* and so x etree. aaa e $ | ;
x does every woman !! R}X JOHN MARSHALL “You're All I need” % ‘ :
x Theref the f Si ARTHUR MOORE “Yes I Do” %| woman, at war
. erefore e ae RE $ | 1
% ty aor 8/2 FRANK AUSTIN “Don't Cry Baby” %
5 ‘ > - | FRED SMALL ‘ “Roses of Piceardy” 5 ith i
. : 1 with everythi ;
% CAMELIA SANITARY %/% ERKOL BARNETT “Maybe It’s Because” 8 i eden
R CLYDE KING “Song of Songs” ‘
> ~ ~~
| % NAPKINS 8 Guest Stars : x and everyone
A aw RIS “THE LITTLE MAN WITH THE HORN” 8 h sod | :
7; st NDRE Bie LEROY ALLEN—Sensational 9-Year Trumpeter % Who stood In
‘ Mil ANDREX TOILET PAPER 1S AND x
Pa + 3
% St. Andrew Mills Products SN DOUG, GRIFFITH — 10-year-old Vocalist y her way.
$ are especially suitable for ANDREX FACIAL TISSUES $ % TICKETS ON SALE 'LO-DAY, TO-MORROW and % pe
% NED at The Ticket Booths To-mororw Nite % @ ONE OF
8 those with delicate skins. STANEX PAPER H ANDKERCHIEFS % EEO OS SOOO LCCC LEELA THE FIVE
satsticienaiameiadcbaiime sean ee ; :
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a ,
‘ ol Gaiectenatetoent SAMARITAN TOILET PAPER $ | si hh
: % hygienic and soluble. x M E S H W I R E COLUMBIA PICTURES presents PICTURES : }
s 7 m >
. % Obtainable at all leading stores. x JOAN WENDELL OF THE i
Â¥ (9645655556466 "$,66666665666565 O66. ney * . * e
- e os ote . o = . a OES a OG a —~ oo han aes ao F or FI SH POTS an d Dom. estic Purp oses YEAR! i)
a EBEeEEBSE &
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JUST IN
cee
Ee LUCILE WATSON - ALLYN YN - ‘
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| CONTINENTAL PRINTED ss MALWN SONER ace vit
| Produced by WILLIAM . by VINCENT
A famous
LACING WIR iach
e gives Joan Crawford
her most excitina role

IN RARE and EXQUISITE DESIGNS
The Perfect

Obtain your requirements NOW
°

EXTRA: “GERALD McBOING BOING ”

Summer Dress Material.



See i THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE The Academy Technicolor Shot
EVANS A WHITEIELOS COTTON FACTORY LYD. (First Prize at Montevido’s Film Festival)

Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039

DIAL 4606 He noocnneeW ‘=

YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220

















rom. gece TOR.

THURSDAY, MAY 31,





195

51

LAND WILL BE TAKEN
OVER FOR MARKET



{OUSE



to approve the compulsory a

f Assembly Tuesday passed a Resolution

cquisition by the Government,

of approximately 13,870 square feet of land on Eagle Hall

Road, for the establishment

of a district market.

. The land is owned by Hon. Mrs. Muriel Hanschell.
The Addendum to the Resolution states that in accord-
ance with the provisions of section 5 of the Land Acquisi-
tion Act, 1949, the approval of the Legislature is sought
for the compulsory acquisition of an area of land at Eagle

Hall for the purpose set out

nesses also improved between
1929 and 1950, although not as
much as that of the workers,

Professional men and unincorpor-
ated businesses received 10.6 per
cent. of the national income last
year compared with 9.7 per cent
in 1929.

Although the share of the
national income received by
tarmers was smaller in 1950 than
in 1929, the decline was more
apparent than real. Farmers
received 6.7 per cent. of the
Nation's income in 1929 against
5.8 per cent. last year, but 3,000,-
000 fewer people were working
cn farms in 1950. Thus, the
individual farmer received a much



lurger share of the national in-
come than he did 20 years ago.
By contrast, the people who
received incomes from rents,
interest and _ profits received
smaller shares of the yational
income in 1950 than in 1929.

Less for Landlord
The proportion going to land-
lords declined drastically from
6.8 per cent to 3.4 per cent. One

factor in this decline is the rent
controls which were imposed
during World War II. and whien
are still in effect in many urban
areas,

Interest payments representetl
7.6 per cent. of the national in-

come in 1929; they accounted for
2.3 per cent. in 1950.

Although corporate profits, after
taxes, were at a record high in
dollar terms last year, their part
of the national income decreaseii
from 9.8 per cent. in 1929 to 8.4
per cent. in 1950.

These figures clearly show, ac-
cording to American economists,
that the dynamic brand of Ameri-
can capitalism is producing results
altogether different from those
anticipated by the Communist
ideology. Under the Marxist
doctrine of exploitation there
should be larger and larger shares
for business, landlords and capital
over the years, The workers
should have been getting less and
less.

This gain in the fuller life for
the average American citizen is
not confined to the past 20 years
It typifies the trend that has
ceeurred over the first half-of the
twentieth century. ;

In this period the U.S, national
preduct has_ increased 5.5 time:
while the U.S. population
enly doubled. Ags a result, living
standards for the workers have
almost trebled.











J’can Mangoes

Own Correspondent)
JAMAICA,

Possibilities of a market ,in
Britain for the common varieties
of Jamaican mangoes in cans, were
diselosed recently by the Carib-
bean Preserving Company. After
months of experimenting, the
company has produced an item
that is being well received in the
United Kingdom, and the first
order for ten thousand cases of
canned mangoes will shortly be
shipped. The company intends to
buy large quantities of common
mangoes from the present crop
Growers of varieties other than
the Bombay and St. Julian may
xe able to sell their mangoes at
better prices than they would
ordinarily obtain the local
market,

From Our

on



MAIL NOTICES

Mails for Dominica, Montserrat by the
Sch, Marea Henrictta will be closed at
the General Post Office as under

Parcel Mail, Registered Mail, Ordinary







Tail at 11.45 a.m. on the Sist May, 1951
Mails for Dominica by the Sch Wok
Funicia will be closed at the Gener al
Post Office as under
Parcel Mail, Registered Mail, Ordinary
Mail at 10 aam. on the d June 1951



RATES OF EXCHANGE

MAY 30. 1951
CANADA
61 7/10% pr. Cheques on
Banker 69 7/10%% pr.
Demand
Draft 59.55% pr.
Sight Drafts 59 4/10 pr.
€17/10% pr. Cable
602/105 pr. Curre 6682/10) pr.




pr



The BAD witch who
became GO0D

in the Resolution.

U.S. Workers Get
Large Share Of
National lacome

WASHINGTON, D.C.

Wage earners and salaried em-
ployees of business and industry
in the United States have been
receiving a much larger share ot
the national income during the
past two decades than in previous
years,

As compared with the $50,800.-
000,000, or 54.9 per cent. of the
national income, which they re-
ceived in 1929, their share last
year was $152,200,000,000, or 69.5
per cent. The’ proportion that
they received in 1939 was 66.5
per cent, and in 1949 it was 68.9
per cent.

Hence, in the United States not
only the size of the national in-
come has grown but the propor-
tion of the total income received
by the average worker has in-
creased by 17 per cent.

The relative position of profes-
‘sional men, like doctors and law-
yers and of unincorporated busi-

“It has not been possible to

acquire the land by private
treaty.

“It is proposed as soon as the
land is acquired by the Govern-
ment to lease it to the St.
Michael's Vestry at a peppercorn
rental for a period of 21 years.
It is the intention of the Govern-
ment to provide the initial cost
of establishing district markets,
allowing the Vestries to build,
maintain and control them.”

Me. Cox (L) moved the passing
of the Resolution. He said thai
lor.some tive the question of dis-
trict markets had been engaging
the attention of the public. He
thought that it was from about
1940 the sanitary authorities of
St. Michael as well as the Chief
Medical Officer had been busily
engaged in selecting sites for
these markets and making recom-
mendations to Government.

As hon. members would re-
member, a Bil] was passed giving
the Vestry the right to purchase
these sites. Sites were recem-
mended in Carrington’s Viiage,
Milk Market, Eagle Hall, the old
railway area and other places
Nothing however, had yet been
done by way of actual erection.
The first attempt was now being
made to do so.

As, hon, members might have
heard, the price asked for the
site in Eagle Hall was one dollar
per square foot. This was feit
by Government as being too exor-
bitant. It had therefore become
necessary to have a _ Resolution
befote the House like the present
one in order to.acquire the site.

Mr. Fred Goddard (EB) said that
he was glad the Government was
at last making an attempt to
establish a district market, but he
regretted to see it should have
taken the present form,

The Compulsory Act was neces-
sary and. should be used only
where it was felt that certain
landowners were obstinate and
expected the Government to pay
fancy prices. He did not think
that the present case was such.

The land at Eagle Hall they all
knew and anyone who really knew
the* value of land in St, Michael
and the City, would readily agree
that one dollar a square foot was
not too high for Government to
pay. He knew that the land op-
posite the site at Eagle Hall had
recently been sold at one dollar
and twenty cents per square foot.
That would give some indication
as to what the site for the market
was worth.

Mrs. Hanschell Willing

Mrs. Hanschell was only too
willing to sell this land at what
she considered a reasonable price.
He believed that the price was not
put up by her but by people who
advised her and had a_ better
knowledge of real estate than she
had.

He would repeat that he felt
sorry the Compulsory Acquisition
Act had to be used to acquire this
land, the price of which he felt,
and many people to whom he had
spoken, felt was not exorbitant
Mrs. Hanschell would get that and
more from many persons willing
to buy the land. He knew many
people who were willing to get
this land for business purposes.
He could not agree with Govern-
ment in using the Act to acquire
the land.

Mr. A, E, S. Lewis (L) said that
the Government had to be com-
mended on attempting to acquire
this land at a reasonable price.
He believed, however, that last
time when Government purchased
land under the Compulsory Act,
they eventually paid more for it
than they would have done other-
wise. He certainly hoped that on
this oceasion it would not happen.

During the discussion which fol-
lowed. Mr. Mottley pointed out
that it was not correct to say it
had not been possible to acquire
the land by private tieaty. He
had been informed by Mr. Herbert
Sealy, of Messrs. Carrington &
Sealy, Solicitors, that Mrs. Han-
schell had been to him and said
she had not heard one word from
the Government or the solicitors
representing the Government,
about the purchase of the land.
Nobody had discussed the matter
with her. The only thing she
knew about it was when she saw
in the Press that the land would
be acquired under *he Compulsory
Acyuisition Act.

Mr. Mottley (E) referred to
other sites which the Government
had bought, among them the Cen-
tral Foundry site for which he
said they had paid a4 per square
foot. “i ask Gevernment to be
consistent,” he said,

He was not objecting to the Gov-
ermment trying to buy something
of which they thought the price
asked was exorbitant, but if they
had a public duty to perform, they
should not single out a certain
nrea and say “we will acquire thi:
under the Compulsory Acquisition
Act”.

“Where are the Government
valuers”, Mr, Mottley asked, “A
penny a square foot for land might
be too dear, a cent may be too
dear. It all depends.”

oT

if i

ON ee

Pl

!
Socal

a



saw a tiny gir

looked won
hands grabbed
vas the bad witch.

the





tn view of a possible oil shortage, do you think we cor



PASSAGE
PAYMENT
GOES UP

lating to the payment of pas-
sages to public officers,

r. H. G. Cummins (L) who
took charge of the Resolution
said that it sought to pay pas-

sages of officers from abroad, The
maximum amount to be paid
was $960 but it was found pos-
sible to increase’ it berause in
one or two cases, officers could
not get passage by boat and had
to travel by air, hence the $960
previously provided had proved
to be insufficient.

Mr. A. E. S. Lewis (L)
that the first impression of
order to which the Resolution
applied was that it was merely
extending the maximum passage
to the island from £200 to £300,
but he noticed that it mentioned
return passages for Scientific
Officers and that the definition
for Scientific Officer was that
given to it in the Department of
Science ana Agriculture Act,

He did not know if officers of
that department were affected or
whether the Scientific Officers
were only those employed at the
Hospital. He would suggest that
a maximum should be set for a
single person, another for a mar-
ried couple, and then a separate
allowance for each child where
children were concerned. He
hoped that some such scheme
would be adopted.

He observed too, that since
the new rates will become op-
erative as from April 1, 1950; the
House should be given some idea
of what this back pay would
amount to,



said
the

——

B.W.LA. Cuts
Party Fares



Special reduced return fares
are now available to sports teams,
clubs, delegations and_ similar

crganisations ‘travelling between
all BWIA’s ports of call (except
Caracas and Puerto Rico), in
order to fulfil sporting fixtures
or other commitments,

Under this arrangement, mem-
bers of teams or delegations will
each be able to obtain return
tickets for the cost of one-way
tickets plus 50% provided the
group consists of at least five
members and the return journey
ig completed by July 15th,

Supporters and wives of mem-
bers of the group are also entitled
to the reduced fare but their
journey must be sponsored by
and booked through the organisa-
lion arranging the trip.



Escape From
Fallen House

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 29.
A mother, her three-week-oiu
baby and two other children

miraculously escaped death when
iheir house collapsed and fell on
them during a heavy downpour
of rain,

Neighbours attracted by the
screams, rushed to the scenes and
pulled them from under a mass
of rafters and galvanised iron
sheets. Showing the effects of
shock the mother attributed her
escape from serious injury to the
“divine protection of the Virgin
Mary”. She proudly displayed
a medal with a replica of the
Virgin Mary round her neck.



3 .
SLEEP
An American furniture com-

pany is manufacturing a new mat-
tress that is being used in hos-
pitals to help patients sleep.
It contains a small electric motor
ihat produces gentle vibrations
that induce relaxation, ,



j,

udding that
1yone again

Blood Transfusion
centre Opened
In Martinique

Vuuer a re



Cet preiccvoral
d@ bAOVGA WansiUsion Cente
been Createu Wh iia tillique.
ine cenmre wii be uncer
qurecuon of the Pasteur Institure
OL Wharuimque, ana will be coD-
iclied by the adeparunental
Heaith Aunority. It wii be aided
by 4 consultative commiliee, Lie
establishment of this centre came
about through the joint eftoris
ot local physicians, the Martinique
branch of the French Red Cross,
which will play a vital rote in tine
proper tuncuioning of the centre,
and the Pasteur Institute.

The final implementation of
the decree was mage by the De-
partment of Health. The first
task of the centre will be to col-

deeree,

lias

we

lect donors, These will receive
regular medical examinations.
The centre will answer {
for blood from

will institute a service for urgen\
transfusions,

It will keep a constant supply
of dry plasma prepared by
authorised manujtacturers in
Metropolitan Frange. However,
during the construction of the
centre, it is hope@ that a start
may be made in the collection
of blood so that a bank may be
formed. .

The dry plasma bank is in the
process of being built up,
but the amount sent to date by
metropolitan centres is not enough
for local needs. It is hoped,
however, that delitcries will be
stepped up.

Harbour Log

IN CARLISE BAY

M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Marea Henrietta,
Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Cyril FE
Smith, Sch. D’Ortac, Sch. Philip H
Davidson, Sch Laudalpha, M.V. Blue
Star, Sch. Everdene, Sch. Mary M. Lewis,
Sch. Enterprise S., Sch. W. L. Eunicia,
Sch. Belqueen, Sch. Lindsyd WU, Sch.
United Pilgrim S., Sch. Rainbow M., Sch
Florence Emanuel, s.s. Sunvaliey, Sch.
Mary E. Caroline, Sch, Excelsior Hodge,
Seh, Gardenia W,

ARRIVALS

M.V. Daerwood, % tons
DeCoteau, from St. Lucia

S.S. Colombie, 7,554 tons
Kerharo, from Le Havre

SS. Sunwhit, 4.308 tons
Armour, from Halifax.
acht Tawana, 543 tons
Bernard, from St. Vingent,

M.V. Moneka, 100 tons net, Capt
Sen. from St. Lucia,

M.V. Canadian Cruiser,
Capt. Andersen, from Montreal

S.S. Bonaire, 1,857 tons net, Capt. Biiy-
temkuys, from Amsterdam via Madeira.

DEPARTURES

Schooner Philip H. Davidgon, 87 ton:
net, Capt, Sealy, for British Guiana.

Schooner Pinterprise 8, 66 tons
Capt. Gregg, for St. Lucia,

M.V. Lady Joy, 46 tons
Parsons, for St. Lucia,

Schooner Rainbow M., 35
Capt. Marks, for Trinidad

M.V. Moneka, 100 tong
Hutson, for St. Vineent

S.S. Bonaire, 1,857 tons net, Capt Buy
temkuys, for Trinidad,

M.V. Canadian Cruiser, 3,935 tons net
Capt. Andersen, for St, Vincent

fn Touch With Barbados
Coast Station

Cable and Wirelts (W.L) Ltd advis
that they can now communicate with
the following ships through their Barba
aos Coast Station

net, Capt

net, Capt

net, Capt



net, Capt





Hut-

3,935 tons net,



net
net, Capt
tons net

net, Capt




8.8. Bahia Aguirre, 4. Alstertor
Spurt, s.s. Tindra, Southern Star
8.5. Casablanca, A, Mitehell Paine
s.a. General San Mortin, Mesa Verde

8. Colombie Dolores, s Bonaire
Alcoa Cavalier, Rana, Bayan
s.8. Explorer, § Pescue Pione¢
Cem, 8.3, Mormacmar, Murtinho
8.8. Francisco R, Hart, s,s. Titunia, ¢
Rangitiki, ss. Rio Drinoco Sar
Paulo, 8... Loide Nicaragna, Alew.
Corsair, «% Runa Del” Racitioc
Oranjestad, Maric

Anglo Norse
8.9 Athezsultan,

s Linguist, 6.6, Alcoa Pegasu

° 6% gt
“Colombie” Calls
Passenger ship Colombie,
sailing on her Caribbean cruise,
called here yesterday morning
She had on board 402 passengers,
22 of whom got off here.

The Colombie arrived from L«



Havre via England, Martinique
and Guadeloupe. She left port
yesterday evening for Jamaici
via Trinidad, La Guaira, Cura-

cao and Cartagena
She is consigned to
R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd.

*Messrs



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BARBADOS ADVOCATE

demandsks iressed
hospitals, anc)...

now





CT A

-d have a little more in the engine and less on the car?"

Lanton Express Service



Walker's Action
Gousing Uneasiness

LONDON, May 30
Macchester Guardiau
political correspondent said today
that the decision of the Secretar)
for Commonwealth Nelations
Patrick Gordon Walker, to con
tinue to force the order excludin;:
Tshekedi Khama from the ter:
tory of the Bamangwato in Bech -
vanaland, was causing some w
easiness in various political
quarters. This was because of th,
suspicion that the policy of the
Commonwealth Relations Office
towards Africans is less generou



rae

than that of the Colonial Office
and that this difference arises
from the desire not to offend

South African opinion,

“Tt i$ not vet clear,” the corre-
spondent added, “what political
action may be taken to influence
the direction of the policy of the
Commonwealth Relations Office.”

Tshékedi Khama last night ad-
members of Parliament at

private meeting in the House
of Commons, He put his case for

returning to the Bamangwato
reserve and suggested measures
for in roving the administrative

system there.

An - official statement issued
from the Commonwealth Rela-
tions Office last week said Gordon
Walker was fully satisfied that
only in the absence of both him-
self and his nephew Seretse
Khama could there be any hope
of establishing stable native ad-
ministration along more respon-
sible lines than in the past,

Gorden Walker praised
kedi’s recognition that more rep-
resentative institutions were de-
sirable, but he was satisfied that
none of theformer Regent's other
proposals were either acceptable
or practicable at present,

Some members of the Labour
Party believe this statement was
too inflexible.._Reuter,

Tshe-



Jungle Search For
Wild Sugar Canes

LONDON, May 25.

A search for native sugar canes
has taken a Queensland Govern-
ment expedition into the jungles
of New Guinea where no other
Australian or international cane-
searching expedition has ever
been,

The expedition has, in the last
month, made its way up to the
central highlands, 8,000 feet above
sea-level, Where it has discovered
a wealth of wild and commercial
varieties. New Guinea has long
been recognised by the sugar
industry throughout the world as

a home of wild canes,
The Queensland Minister for
Agriculture and Stock hag said

that the future of the Australian
sugar “industry depends largely
on thé use of hardy wild canes
for breeding, since it is only by
these meangs that varieties able to
resist disease and drought can be
developed,



For The
Honour Of
Britain

From R. M. MacCOLL
NEW YORK
1776, during the
revolutionary war
American General Nathaniel
Woodhull, was taken prisoner at
Jamaica, Long Island.

He was wounded in the
and died a month later
tiritish prison camp,

lm 1904 they put up an inscrip-

In August
american

arm
in a

hon outside the local council
school which said Woodhull,
while a captive, was mortally
sounded by a British officer for
vefusing to say ‘God Save the
King.’ *

Next date is 1947, when Mr

W. H. Sabine, a British historian,
come to live in the United States
\ ent for a stroll, saw the inserip-
tion, and decided to do something
about it,

He has. been busily digging into
the arehives and rying on an
immense correspondence with the

heol board ever since.

Now it looks as though Sabine
will get British military honour
vindicated. He has
proof that Woodhul) received his
vwound “while gallantly resisting
capture.”

And Sabine is asking for the
inscription to be changed accord-
ingly.

THEY are going to mass-pro-
duce an oxygen mask for airline
passengers which costs only 40
cents and is as tight as a hand-
herchief, Unfortunately, you can
still talk with it on.







Indian
scalps, it

WAH-NEE-OTE, Cree
chief, collects human
was revealed during a_ divoree
ction in Los Angeles. But he
cuys them all, his counsel added
hastily.

FIFTY-EPWO-YEAR-OLD Baron
ritz von Opel was once a name tc
conjure with in German big in-
custry. But when he came out
ef three years’ internment in
Louisiana, he promptly fell in love
with the 37-year-old daughter of
a Colombian diplomat.

So the baroness is suing for
divorce, The last straw, she told
‘he judge, was having to type out
the love poems which Fritz com-
posed for the other lady,

HEADLIN in two New York
papers in the wake of the drown-
ing of Bronx Zoo gorilla Makoko
“Gorilla’s widow carries on,” anc







“Gorilla'’s fiancee gives way te
irief.”

TWENTY - ONE - YEAR - OLD
Sergeant John Mason, back it

Morgantown, West Virginia, afte.
nine months in Korea, was know
as the “widest awake boy in the
cutfit.” Two days after he go
home he was killed in a car crash
Police reported he fell asleep at
the wheel.

JUNIOR COMPETITION

The Evening Advocate invites
poem
The best entry will be published every Monday in ie . ‘
and the winner will recetve a prize to the value, of 7/6 in either
Entries must reach The Children’s Editor, The

a humorous essay, story or

cate,
books or stationery.
Advocate Co,, Lid,, City, not later

NOTE:



all children under 12 to send in
on the subject of “CLOCKS”.
The Evening Advo-

than Wednesday every week,

Stories must mot be copied,

Send this coupon with your story.

JUNIOR COMPETITION

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LEEDS, May 28
The Princess Royal, of
King Geory.: Sixth, will have to
sell some of her furniture to heip

pay death duties for her husband,
aer agents said here to-night.

Four years after the death of
the Sixth Earl of Harewood, the
Princess will see some of her
best treasured possessions go un-
der the auctioneers hammer next
month.

The Earl was estimated to have
left almost £1,000,000 when he
died.

His son the. Seventh Earl said
that three quarters of the fortune

would go in death duties. Already
one of the family homes and
14,000 acres of land have been
sold.

Now antiques are coming out
from Harewood House itself, the

big Leeds mansion in which the
Harewood family have kept house
for generations. Furniture, poree-
lain, silver and paintings are on
their way to the sales,

The Princess Royal —- who gets
a state annuity of £6,000 wiil
part with a suite of Regency
furniture, 12 Adam armchairs, a
pair of Regency rosewood writ-
ing tables, a suite of Chippendale
hall furniture and Louis Six-
teenth pieces.

Also. to be sold are Paris dinner
service, Meissen dessert service,
dishes emblazoned with the arms
of King George the Third and
paintings by Seventeenth Century
Duteh masters

—Reuter.









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PAGE THREE

To Retrace
Darwin's Route

SDGEWATER, Ne



Jersey,
May 29.
technicians,
author Dod
to-day om a

Twe ive
led by the
Orsborne, set sail
global cruise that will trace the
sea-route followed more than. a
century ago by the English natur-
alist, Charles Darwin,

On the! voyage the explorers
will collect scientific specimens
similar to those collected v
Darwin during his study of the
beginning of life ow the earth. His
findings were later published’ in *
a_ scientific work entitled “Origin
of Species.”

Most of the specimens wilh be
presented to Harvard University.
the American Geographical So-
ciety, and the Cincinnati Museum
of Natural History, Colored .me-
tion pictures will be taken ofthe
places visited. The films will. be
used by researchers in determining
geographical changes in these
places since they were visited by
Darwin 120 years ago.

Among the members of
crew, who will sail the two-
masted craft around the world.
are an illustrator, a photographer

Americar
Scottish

lv

the

a meteorologist, a geolorist, en-

gineer, diver, and navigator.
They will first sail down the

coast of South America, stoppins

to explore the Estero Calvo inlet

on the Chilean coast. From there
the vessel will head into the

Pacific Ocean toward the Galapa-

gos and other islands fn the
Pacific. It will proceed later to
New Zealand and Australia, then
north through the Indian Ocean!
to visit a number of East Indian

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PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 31, 1951











9 SSE

sarninos € anvoate (Socialism And The Ricks Micen RUTH Talks About ae a

Caeser ee et tse S E D





| |
+
LONDON. By LE AVID TEMPLE ROBER'S Food has cartied rationing to its A Brother For Jac ueline |
vocate .. Ltd.. Broad Bridgetow How do the rich live under limit with theccalm announcement
ee a 3 = : British Socialism? The news this Rumours circulate, particularly this week that, at the present rate a FOR
re week offers several clues to jn political circles, about “where of home killing of cattie, it shoul By EVELYN IRONS





answers to this question, which is the money comes from”. Even the be possible to, allot to each , family
eertiinly a mystery to most people monthly magazine Vogue, the im Britain an oxtail in every 5
abroad and often a mystery to the taste-setter in Mayfair, wrote re- years. This seems to be the trea
rich themselves. cently about the “mysterious ex- of a lifetime worth looking forware

The most pathetic news is that pense-account rich”. It is odd that to! Charitably, we think that thi:
the Marquis of Bath recently went that particular mystery has only Ministry of Food official made the
up to Woodstock to see how the now crept through to Vogue. For @nneuncement in the spirit °
Duke of Marlborough was organ- several years ago, in Socialist ridicule—of his own department.

Thursday, May 31, ' 1951 WHAT has the first year of banishment
from Bechuanaland done to ‘Queen” Ruth,
the London business girl whose marriage to,
African chief Seretse Khama caused one of;

the hottest racial controversies ever to rage







CO0-OPERATIVES

THE history of Co-operatives in Barba-

dos has not been rosy. In fact the general
public interested in the progress of the
island and realising the advantages of such
a service have been left wondering whether
it is the intention of the Government to

ising the provision of refreshments
for the 2s. 6d. visitors to his Blen-
heim Palace. The Marquis had
been running his catering at a loss,
and wanted a tip from the Duke.
In point of fact the Duke of Mari-
borough, descendent of the victo:
of Blenheim, is the most success-

Government circles, this theory of
a mystery was brought forward
and the Chancellor instructed to
cut off these new rich from their
‘expense accounts. It was alleged
that business camouflaged pleas-
ure; so Sir Stafford Cripps ordered

Success And Failure

In the s week, the Londor
stage has had one stimulatin:
surprise, amd one of the mos
surprising failures—a Hamlet tha
failed. Laurence Olivier and Vivier.





within the Empire.

when the Government exiled Khama from ‘is
ecuni:y because he had married a white
woman. This week Jacqueline, the Khama’s
brown-skinned baby, had her first birthday,

She retorted with blistering protestations

We have just Received ...

an income-tax check on business 7 oj :
ful country-house showman. At- expenses. But the roundabout Theet Coe Shiteearon’ ate

tendance figures at his Blenheim keeps on turning, and now the aw’ 7.
Palace are now rising to a thous- awful truth is coming out—‘the etal Nr
and a day from whom the Duke rich are spending their own [eigh will be playing Cleopatra
receives £125 daily—less enter- money”. A few Left Wing voices one night,» as Bernard Shav
tainment tax. With such assistance are raised for a Capitel Levy on jmagined Caesar found her, anc
from the tourists, the landed own- the grounds that the only way to the next ni with her husban
ers of country houses can keep up prevent people spending their own ag Antony, will play the olde
their property. But that is hardly money is to take some of it from Queen of Egypt in the muc!
living like the rich of yesteryear. them. greater Shakespeare play. Tiv
And very few have houses of such All the figures we have men- plays have been not only a theatri
artistic eminence, What of the resi tioned relate to income. But the cal success, but the foyers hav
of the rich? fact is that hundreds more than also been a social success. I wou!
that small band of millionaires are say that Laurence Olivier, wh:












give some real assistance in the formation
of societies.

The answer is to be found in the publica-
tion of a notice in a recent issue of the
Official Gazette proclaiming: the coming
into foree on May 24th of the Co-operative
Act of 1949.

It could hardly be the intention of any
Government to lull people into a false
sense of security by proclaiming the com-

and turned the spotlight back on all that.

The controversy is not dead. As far as Ruth
is concerned it is merely dormant for another
three years and ten months.

Then comes the end of the five years’ ban
on Seretse and his white “Queen,” when the
Government must decide whether they are
to asume power over the 100,000 Bamang-
watos or not.

GREEN BIRKMYRE

Waterproof and Kkotproof

72, ins. wide

TARPAULINS















: ; i j ~ has mellowed in her com- ‘ :
i ing into force of an act and then leaving _ According to the income tax offi- jiving much better than even @ controls the St, James's Theatr To-day Ruth has a ed made to order if required.
: : cials there are now 83 people with millionaire could live on his taxed has the seeond most elegas | Ments on the colour bar. The year has healed
‘ the matter to settle itself. se ge satat baggy rig-og earnings—just by cutting into their theatre in London—first plac: }s9me of the anger and bitterness which was
: : eens eke. ena See = stored or inherited wealth. must be reserved for the Theatr 2 : : ‘
Already in this newspaper adverse com- each of those incomes the British oe ie nee weak Pera hee ants Pa ar hi. | er natural reaction to the events leading up WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD
ment has been made on the length of time pa binge er yey Strings of horses are being cut to stage the wwe pave together | 9 her husband's ejection from Africa. But Successors to
* . -. more a e te . S ’ i i effe ie" : :
which it has taken to secure the services of |‘.7ain, according to the tax figures, GOWN. There are not many town and it has ee aoe twice, | she is inflexibly set on returning to, Bechu-
: : houses left to open in the season. & g people WIce, SA
an officer to fill the post, At the time of the ~ last avetielie Apres any ony Most of them have been sold to much - ue oe See th | analand as wife of the Bamangwato. chief. . S. PITCHER & C >
i > was seconded 4 people w sncom er make the headquarters of big com- interval. Hardened theatre-goer | ,
ereation of the post an officer w ead and £100,000 a year—before the tax panies, And the brass and red- say ‘that this season at the S_ she avers that the two of them can be a "Phones : 4472 & 4687
from British Honduras for a perio mid Sebuction, Wace are. the es leather have gone to keep the James's BE ao them only © | .0wer for progress there. 7
™ Sant ionaires, and without much risk © t ing. Covent Garden in its best day: =
sent to England for training, , He returne error it is possible to mark them Pemariovine ae aspect of the There is the same social brilliance: PRINGEES a ee pemannnnnabensl
and was attached to the oe of Joff one by one in the reference ‘aristocratic scene this week, we the same practice in the art « | Quietly dvessed in a flannel-grey wool jer-
Agriculture. At the end of the time he re- books of industry, The wealthies. jotice that the House of Lords has Conversation, the same ; demau oo ress and sheerest nvlons, the former
turned to his post of agricultural officer in | ‘8 Probably Sir John Ellerman, the haq a good clean up since the Com- for longer and longer interva ey dress ard s st ny} , ; ‘
; P " son of a shipping magnate, Who jong left it last Autumn, The and a regret only that Londor | %uth Williams does not look conspicuously Only a few sa FENne
British Honduras. Little effort seems to | himself lives the life of a recluse. prasswork has been polished, and hour for theatre-going cannot | iiffetent from other wives ote 1tolewear
have been made othermdee: ubtt-now the [TM Dam cone published a these. 'e.Ted, weather Seats sgaines EMSS ven back to the pre-w: | men in London, She is calm, poised, ready to
. ror. : ot long é shed a re@ which so many plebeian backs § ) eee , . ’ , 7 ,
proclamation has been published telling -) volume book on the mouse, And have rubbed in the past ten years Suactee, to nies Go. Farts, 19 handle social situations competently. Her red- ‘SILENT KNI H
the public that the act has come into force... | ners are some bacco King some. are now, once again, right bench O14 PUAYSt pond (9 Ss < | sold halt is swept back from a high, intelli * GH!
re : . newspaper visco' : es for a belted earl. This House : - ee > mir le]
There are several opportunities in this | sno ‘propertied Buke—who owns Gf Lords was, built a hundred aftive a quarter of an hour lat | gent forehead. KEROSENE OIL
island where the knowledge and work of a : ah og Fa Sg ee years ago to suit the Duke of Wel~ Visitors ‘will be laiwenayed. ta the One oddity—her parti-coloured eyes. The
e i Officer would be of inestim- bracket of miilionaires, 1nen lington and those grand days when ee cal fon, ; : 5 “i!
able benefit to the island, In the fields of | 20,0" 40, mostly elderly men. 300, pears of Vieiorian England (at al seats are already sold wn’ | ety is clear grey, the right splashed with
sels Drees 50 ne Se en one wale Somes & OE Dare bch would drive to Westminster for a sone too F srown. Her complexion is clear, too, and pale.
agriculture the peasant needs a guiding paints. Moetly they are angel, Gebete. Sow * is toe vast, Sroabiis ’ ts ‘ . ike ihe 2: a oe ; ’ tanta;
: : * ecause they have built up own from the gallery, a debate » failure, it is harde ul in the year she spent in bechuanaland 1
hand to lead him to co-operative market fortuties theniéelves and there 18 -looke as Be “ * “And of the failure, it is e. :
; 3 8 Ss and ; as if there is a peer, here or {te e first ti fi sc i fee LEFT IN STOCK
ing of the produce which he now sells in a mot aya, hope of avoiding death there wwileleecktieved.. Nothing oan ee: oy Jk | was pe to withstand exposure to the burn
i i isad- uties and passing fortunes to theic can done to make the great )1; i ‘ ri ing African sun. ‘
Sy Dee nena ep epie ie bie oernodinns children, There are exceptions to space much smaller. Since the aly tock oe widee Sh seal toa. Khama lives to-day in a furnished Will those who asked for a refusal on one,
vantage. Combined purchase of manures every’ rule. Last year a million- Commons departed, the Speaker's Pyurd: “lee Guinness may be ng s to-day :
and the co-operative use of tractors would —[aire’s daughter who had made her Chair has been taken away. The declaim. ‘Pluck off my beard ar. three-floor maisonette in a modest street near call before they are all sold!
‘ : os home in Malta left more than a Lord Chancellor sits on his wool- it i -y h , ; : : . :
f f I
increase production. i ati blow it in my face’ i aven | Regent’s Park. From the wall of the little sit-
p ’ . million pounds and the Govern~ sack at the other end, and the got a beard.” But the beard do },. .
, : . ment has only captured £35,000 seating has been a bit shortened this middle-aged Hamu |'ing room a picture looks down—a young e
The nto foree of the act should]; i ; not save this middle-ag
aie tk G i ih in death duties, explain how nteut. the es are, uncomportabic Beverley Baxter, the theatre crit: | African resplendent in what appears to be
now inspire the Government to show a ut this does not explain how abo ir m ome, The writes that it is perhaps a tribu pe
aoe inteteat. in ihe establiahment the wealthy part of London stays Robing Chamber in which they tg Alec Guinness’s power in Uw +he full-dress uniform of the Household Cav- DaCOSTA A Co... Lid.
ee. ‘ a . et alight with gaiety and how tradi- have been meeting while their own fj}, that the audience felt las ilry, standing beside a venerable seated ‘ ,
of co-operatives and the first essential is | tions are kept up. It does not ex- home was lent to the House of night that Mr. Disraeli had com | . we : Dial 3878 a ELEC. DEPT
the appointment of some suitable officer plain who are the hundreds eacl Commons had a pleasant drowsy to Bisinore. It is very rarely tha | W8ure in a bush hat: Seretse’s father and 10: . :
rs +3 . . | year eager to give their children to warmth about it! a Shakespeare play fails on th | grandfather both Bamangwato chiefs.
And there is no good reason to limit the the world’s most expensive educa- One In 50 Years London stage. This first nigi Wis? ok the day whe ix 4h di rife ———~ :
work of co-operatives to agriculture alone. tion. An official of the Ministry of audience booed from the galler, rt o e day she 1S RO OR URN any wane SSS
The attempt to establish cottage indus- oa — . e ee a = ind mother that she might have been, this
Q
on oe firl who was born in Blackheath, played '
tries in this island has failed largely be- Beetles With E I his ; ,
cause of the fact that marketing facilities \ ,
had not kept pace with the production of Pyrophorus Luminosus is im and a half to an inch and three- skin is hardened to form a very is an ‘acting lance-corporal in the wey eres
the articles for sale. the news. According to Mr. C. C. quarters long, rather boat- strong armour. WAAF, became a Lloyd's underwriters’ clerk.
h Fl Ly Skeete, Director of Agriculture, shaped, and with conspicuous ‘These larvae attack the hara a i i
Co-operatives do exist in Barbados, but this large firefly beetle has been eye spots which shine with a back grubs, and are capable of ex ig et and feeds Jackie; nels Lae mais
‘as no one can pretend that full use is made of | seen in. imereased care ae eee light, These. lights orcising & very considerabi [With the housework, cooks her husband’;
- ips i 4 iH ‘ year, 4 is vV worus Ls - ar eyes, ut are orne ON degree of syontrol over the he ins r “ . . .
Co-operation as a principle of improving inosus? The late H. A. Ballou, the sides of the prothorax. The ematuaie ana be vchtetste ae aiate evening meal. (“I love cooking, particularly

the condition of the “small” man in agri- [Commissioner of Agriculture for head and eyes are rather small French dishes with lots of herbs and garlic.”)

development.





DON'T

NINE cane fires during

+

FORTY-TWO years in the
service of one’s country is a record
of which tobe proud and this is the
achievement of Mr. F, A. C. Clair-
monte, O.B.E., who retires from
the post of Income Tax Commis-
sioner today.

Mr. Clairmonte joined the Civil
Service in June 1909 when condi-
tions were entirely different from
what they are today; but it was
his adaptability to the existig
conditions which brought him
success, He served for a_ short
time in the Customs and for an-
other brief period in the Savings
Bank. The succeeding years found
him either in the Audit Office or
in the Police Magistrates’ Courts
until 1932 when he left Acting on
the Magisterial Bench for the post
of Clerk in the Income Tax De-
partment.

Here it was that Mr. Clairmonte
took a courageous step which it
was thought at the time would
lave lost him his years of service.
As clerk to the Income Tax De-
partment he had accepted an office
which carried no pension right:

the week
destroyed 65 acres of ‘canes. Despite thé .
entreaties and advice of intelligent opinion
this vandalism continues to 7
of revenue.
The excuse has been offered that at this
period of the reaping season the amount of
trash on the canes prevents the cutters
from reaping as quickly as they would if
the trash were burnt off. It is a-lame
excuse and a reflection on the standard of
intelligence in this island.
It is said that a cutter can reap five tons
of burnt canes in the same time as he would
reap three tons not cleaned by fire; but this
is no legitimate reason to set fire to fields
of canes merely to clear the trash.

This custom of setting fire to canes has
increased in recent years,
In the neighbouring island of Trinidad
letters now bear an official stamp saying :
“Do Not Burn Our Land”. It might be well *
for some such motto to be adopted as a re-
minder to people that to burn canes is to
rob each and every one of us of something
to which he is entitled. How about “Less
Fire: More Money?” Or Simply “Don’t Burn
Down Your Own Doorstep.”

‘ob the island



seen before. He was particular-
ly attracted by ‘the enormous
bright shining “eyes”. He
brought it up for me to see and it
proved to be one of the so-called
Fireflies or Lightning Flies.

This insect was one of the
large light-bearing beetles of the
family Elateridae, I knew this in-
seet did not belong to Barbados,
and 1 reebgnised that it was dif-
ferent from the | related form
which oceurs in the neighbouring
islands, Then I remembered
that the Government of Barba-
dos had been introducing natural
enemies of hard back © grubs,

Reference to the Government
Entomologist confirmed my sus-
picion that this insect had come
from those importations,

Some three or four years ago,
the Government imported fron:
Puerto Rico thousands of grubs
and adults of the beetle Fyro-
phorus luminosus, and this insect
Was one of that species, These
importations were liberated on
several estates in different parts
of the Island, the nearest to
Bridgetown being at the Belle
Estate. The adult beetles have
been seen in and about town on
three occasions just lately. The

{specimen he had given me came

from Henry's Lane, one was
taken in Spry Street, and I have
heard of another one in Strath-
clyde. This would indicate that
the. beetle - is established and
probably will be found in many
other parts of the Island at some
distances from the fields in
which they have been
| lished,

The beetle is about an_ inct,

phorus noctilicus. This is slight-
ly larger than the Puerto Rico
species, and it seems to me _ its
light is somewhat more powerful,
but I have not had the two side
by side to compare them.

The insects of the family Elat-
eridae are known’ variously as click
beetles, skik-jacks, end snappers
These names refer to the peculiar
habit of the adult insects. If one
of these is placed on its back it
will probably lie perfectly motion-
less for 4 short time, and then
make a sudden spring into the air,
If it does not regain its feet by this
manoeuvre it~ will try again. In
localities where they are reason-
ably. abundant, ~ children catch
them to play with them, ahd
grown-ups »'so are interested to
see these leaping insects.

This snapping into the air is
accomplished by a peculiar struc-
ture of the under side of the body,
specially adapted for this purpose
So far as | know there is only one
species of this family in Barbados,
and that is a small inconspicuous
insect which is very seldom
noticed.

The insects we are now consid-
ering are carnivorous, They are
specially enemies of hardback
grubs. They are also recorded in
Peurto Rico as attacking the mole
cricket, which is a serious pest in
that island.

Other species are carnivorous,
but the family includes also some
very serious agricultural pests. The
larvae are called wire worms.

oee?"f ion. are very slender in propor-

ion to their length. body sey-
ments are well marked, and the

of these beetles being worn by

ladies as jewelry.

They are

attached by means of a delicate

gold chain.

Also they have been

used to adorn fancy dress cos-

tumes to which they are attached
in little bags of net. In the
ballroom they would not be very
noticeable, but away from the
bright lights they would produce
a charming effect.

Schomburgk lists two fireflies
as occurting in Barbados, these
apparently have been extinct
here for sometime, although
visitors to the West Indies have
incluaed the firefiies in Barbados
amongst the sights seen. I have
always thought that in recent
years these statements were
mistakes, and that the fireflies
were really seen in some other
place.

The fireflies that are most
commonly seen in these Tropical
Islands belong to another family
of beetles, the Lampyridae. These
insects are smaller than the one
referred to previously, and they
are not much like the typical
beetles because their front wings
are not hardened to form definite
wing covers, but are soft and not
greatly different in texture from
the hind wings. The larvae of
these beetles are, as far as }
know, all carnivorous. At times,
and in certain localities they
occur in enormous numbers. In
Trinidad, from my windows |
could see out over a large cane-
field, and in their season there
were thousands, perhaps millions,
of these fireflies flashing over the
tops of the canes. The contin-
uous flashing of these fairy lights
is a wonderfully beautiful sight.

F orty-Two

but within a short time it became
obvious that this department
would soon be one of the import-
ant revenue praducing sources.
The belief was. justified and today:
it is second only to the Customs.

From 19382 Mr. Clairmonte
worked in this office until 1935
when he was appointed Commis-
sioner, The Department had been
re-organised and instead of three
Commissioners there was now a
single Commissioner with an es-
tablished Government, Office in the
Public Builaings.

As economic conditions im-
proved and trade and commerce
increased the problems of the office
increased. The number of persons
eligible for taxation increased.

Mr. Clairmonte’s introduction
of the new system of tax collect-
ing and his intimate knowledge
of income tax law won for him
the praise of no less an authority
than that of Mr, (now Sir) Ralph
Assheton, who was a member of
the Royal Commission of 1939,

But apart from the impression
which he gave as the unbending

Years’ Service

Civil Servant, Mr, Clairmonte
won the respect of every mem-
ber of the Service. The junior
members of the service sought
his advice and help because of
his wide knowledge of men and
affairs. He set an example of
efficiency which has been
equalled but unsurpassed in the
Civil Establishment and this won
for him the respect of Governors
and Colonial Secretaries.

Three years ago after the
amendment of the Pension Act of
1925 he intimated his intention
to retire, but because of difficulty
in filling the office Mr. Clairmonte
willingly continued. During his
long term of office Mr. Clair-
monte has built up a_ staff to
whose efficiency and thorough-
ness. much of the success of the
department is due. And it is the
pride of the service that today
the retirement of the Commis-
sioner will not mean the disloca-
tion of the work as it might have
in 1948. His Deputy who has
served in British Guiana is one
of the youngsters who have

spent much time and contributed
largely to the success of the ad-
ministration of that office.

But Mr. Clairmonte was not
merely the efficient civil servant.
He was interested in sport and
perhaps contributed to its success
in this island in a way in which
few men have been able to do,

In former years he was a fine

cricketer, athlete and footballer.
But ‘a knee injury in Egypt
during the war of 1914—18

limited his participation but not
his interest. He was able to do
more for cricket in that the sur-
vival of the Spartan Club was
directly due to his foresight and
encouragement to younger mem-
bers of the Club. This interest
broadened and today he is &
member of the Selection Com-
mittee of the West Indies Board
of Control and a Vice President
of the local Cricket Association,
Hie is also Judge of the Barbados
Turf Club,

Today he retires and carries
with him the good wishes of
everybody in Barbados.







lacrosse at her Eltham school, drove

culture or aitillary: #adess® Particularly re Wee sncies ieee Sf she eae fong =* shoonag tae Se ne diet oan ee nae Two evenings a week she goes ice-skating BY
lacking in the Co-operative principle is the patienrrag account; — wie Which can be seen from the side, flies is surprising. I have tried |'™ Bayswater with a girl friend while Seretsc
fishing industry where pooling of resources Jog has been. brought. tomy eapable of showing a ruby light Putting one under a glass on a | alays table tennis—because, she says, anyone BUKTA
would provide refrigerated ships and a eat lately. A few daye on the underside of its body. have been able to read the ordin- who has been accustomed to pleying games
weather bureau service. had ‘caught. an insect at night, the Lesser Antilies, that is, trom given of oy ine mmaee” te Uiaht} must exercise to keep fit. IN

in his house which he had not Dominica to Trinidad, is Pyro- [I have come across the record Unlike most girls, she doesn’t care for the

pictures, prefers plays. Unlike every othe
girl, she studies to be an African queen.

Each day she and Seretse read and work
together, discuss ideas for the welfare of the |
Bamangwatos. They meet many Africans, '
often have them to dinner at their house. Her |
current reading—a book on racial clashes
n South Africa: another on the differences |
detween India and Pakistan. i

She keeps up with most writings on North
and South African problems; reads the bun- |
dles of South African newspapers that arrive
from African friends in Seretse’s homeland.

The Bechuana language spoken there is
almost impossibly difficult for a European,
but she tries to pick it up (she has no text-
book) from her husband,

£1,000 A YEAR

Big, broad-shouldered Seretse, due to take !
his law finals as a barrister in September is |
having a Whitsun break from his studies, he | &
maintains his family on the £1,000 a vear 18
promised by the Government for the duratio;
of his five years’ banishment, &

The three are just back from a brief holiday, $
in Cornwall, touring in the brown. 32 hp .
American Ford brought from Africa. Ruth 1%
remembering her WAAF experience likes tc |
take a turn at driving but finds the car smali {

White, Khaki

and Cream

SIZES 30—40

Fawn,

These Shorts are Sanforized and
Regimel Shrunk.

The Plastic fitted Waistband gives
Snugness and Comfort.
°

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.
Dry Goods Dept.



















; :
ce +
FREES y :
ish after the big RAF lorries. ; JELLIED | FOR YOU.. : %
Everywhere they went, in pubs and inn- x me ae ee & YOUR PETS &
and villages, the Khamas were recognised. | * %
met with no rebuffs and instead were wel- IX Soups %
comed by the public. In London where 214 |%% HEINZ’S %
years ago they faced hostile stares and offen. is pole :
. 1s JHE Y SE

sive remarks they encounter no more trouble. * BAKED BEANS ¥
What about the upbringing of lively littic is vai cn ee a ae
Jackie? No tutors and governesses for her. | Cheese 3
She will go to “the ordine ” ‘ CHEPDAR CHEESE S
wee if Pal ee echaey ini $ 1-b CARTONS z
echuanaland, this means a Christian school. iy || ‘4b CARTONS (Blended
Both Khama parents are Christians: Jacque- $ ae with Rum)
line Tebogo was christened in the Church o1 is iene $
England on the last day of last year. x 4 VERMICELLE %
MALE HEIR? Ig hitita eae od Se

} f %

So far the delicate question of the Bamans- (> JN aeay -” %
watos being ruled by a chief with European, : SEAGRAM'S : 3
blood does not arise. Baby Jackie could never & FROZEN SALMON SCHENLEY’S *
LH ekGea Ts her, ; : ., {2 SMOKED HADDOCK mmm Tye rc ae
c een er fat because she is a girl. Bi ‘ \¢ SMOKED KIPPERS Kline x
the factor of a male heir may well come inte !\s 4 —llb tins, 51 tins ¥
the case before the Khamas exile ends. |: Chick Feed . oa %
Slim determined 27-year-old Ruth Khama RS LAYENA Doy Chows >
says that this will not be the only child of th tS GROWENA “a eae %
. . . . . s: > %
tamily. She doesn’t believe in only children. 2 %

She means to have more,

‘$ PHONE GODDARDS — WE DELIVER

{
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED. is



THURSDAY, MAY 31,



Commerce Chamber

1951

Active Says Head

THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ie continuing to be
really active nowadays in matters affecting the commercial
community of this island, the President of the Chamber,
Mr. CD. G. Leacock, Jnr., said at the Annual General Meet-

ing yesterday.

They would see from the re-
port, that apart from the regular
meetings of the Council and the
quarterly Genernl meetings, there
had been four special meetings of
the Council and three special gen-
eral meetinys—an unusually large
number. This showed that the
members as a whole and the Coun-
cil, had been wide awake to any
developments which might affect
business in the island.



‘Mr, Leacock who moved the
adoption of the annual report for



1950 said that members would no-
tice the list of conferences which
had taken place during that year
and which were of interest to the

commercial community. Though
ot some of these conferences,
members might not feel very

strongly that the interest was such
that the Chamber sheuld be repre-
sented by a delegate or adviser, on
the other hand one of them was
for the purpose of studying the
effects of devaluation in the Brit-
ish Caribbean. This was held on
March 8 under the Chairmanship
of Professor Beasley. “It Was at-
tended by officials from the vari-
ous territories, but I am quite sure,

speaking for Barbados, that some .

members of the commercial com-
munity here could give just as
good advice as to the likely effect
of devaluation on Barbados, as any
official.

“T think that at a conference of
this sort it was a great pity that
the Chamber was not asked to
nominate, say a panel of members

from whom a suitable délegate
could be chosen to attend.”
Seawell

At Seawell there was now com-
pleted a 6,000 feet runway which
could accommodate full size long
distance ‘planes, said Mr. Leacock.
He believed that Development and
Welfare had contributed very
largely to the funds for the build-
ing of this runway. “l hope it will
not be the policy, because the Brit-
ish taxpayers’ money was used so
largely in this project, to restrict
the use of the runway to British
owned and operated airlines.

“I think it would be of benefit
to the island as a whole if the air-
port was thrown open to any re-
sponsible airline of any national-
ity who wished to run a service
to Barbados.”

It seemed strange to him that
there should be the strong feeling

that all British traffic should be
restricted to British planes or
*planes from the Commonwealth

countries, when no such interest
was taken about the passenger
service to the United Kingdom,
“For many years now if we had to
rely on the British passenger ser-
vice to get to the United Kingdom,
we would not get there at all.”
Speaking of the Canada-West
Indies trade, Mr. Leacock said that
it was tragic to see that as regards
imports to this island for the year



1950, Canada’s share was only
14.5 per cent. From 1946 there
had been a_ steady decline of

Canada’s share of imports to this
country. This was dite to currency
restrictions and nothing else.

“J hope that this delegation
which is going shortly to the
United Kingdom and then Canada
as suggested by the Regional Eco-
nomic Committee, will be able to
arrange for the release of a con-
siderable amount of Canadian cur-
rency for the use of the British
West Indies in increasing their im-
ports from Canada.”

The two retiring members from
the Chamber this year through
seniority are Hon. V. C. Gale and
Mr. R. M. Cave. Mr. Gale had
been Senior Vice-President of the
Chamber, and acted for about
seven months as President during
the absence from the island of Mr.
Leacock.

Mr. Leacock thanked him yes-
terday for the able way in which
he had carried out the duties of
that office. He was most grateful
to him, he said, and he was sure
the entire Chamber owed him a
debt of gratitude. He wanted also
to express to him sincere thanks
on their behalf.

Of Mr. Cave, Mr. Leacock said
that he very much regretted he
was retiring because he had been
one of the most active members of
the Council throughout the time he
(Mr. Leacock) had been on that
body. He had taken a keen in-
terest in commercial affairs, and
was always willing to go to great
trouble in getting information or
particulars of details for the bene-
fit of the Chamber as a whole. He
was sure that members of the
Chamber who had served with him
would be sorry to lose him.

Mr. Cave is now in the United
Kingdom.

Me Gale thanked Mr. Leacock
for the kind things he had said
about him as regards the carrying
out of the duties of President, He
had got considerable help, how-
ever. from the other members of
the Council and the Secretary and
he was grateful for that help.

“IT would like to congratulate
you on your remarks on the re-
port,” said Mr. Gale to Mr. Lea-
cock. “I think we are all agreed
that the points you have touched
on were very well given, and that
they very aptly describe the pres-
ent picture. Especially is this the
case as regards the Canada-West
indies trade and the use of the
Seawell Airport.”

Office Bearers

Mr. Leacock was again elected
President of the Chamber. It is the
third year he will be holding the
office.

Mr. G. H. King wae elected
Senior Vice-President, Mr. T. N.
Pierce, Junior Vice-President and
Mr. Trevor Bowring, Honorary
‘Treasurer.

Two separate lists of members
to serve with the office bearers as
the Council of the Chamber for
the year, were submitted. As a
result it was decided to take a bal-
lot on Wednesday next between
10 a.m. and 1 pan.

Mr. A. R. Toppin proposed the
members of one list and Mr. W. H.
Grannum the members of the
other. .

Those comprising Mr. Toppin’s



list were: Mr, H. A. C. Thomas,
Mr. C. A. Proverbs, Mr. D. A.
Lucie-Smith. Mr. T: O. Dowding,
Mr. B. A. Weatherhead, Mr. G D
Bynoe, Mr. A. del. Inniss, Mr
AR. E. King, Mr. A. S Bryden,
Mr. S. H Kinch. Mr. 7. K. C. Gran-
num and Hon. K. R. Hunte
members of Mr. Grannum’s



jist were: Mr. H. A. C. Thomas,
Mr. Lucie-Smith, Mr. T. O. Dowd-
ing, Mr, J. O. Tudor, Mr. G. D.
Bynoe, Mr W. K, Atkinson, Mr.
A. R. E. King, Mr. A. S. Bryden,
Mr. S. H. Kinch, Mr. J. K. C.
Grannum, and Hon. K. R. Hunte.
Not less than six or more than
twelve members can be elected to
serve with the office bearers as
the Council of the Chamber
There was the usual election of

honorary members.
THE ANNUAL REPORT
Membership of the Barbados

Chamber of Commerce at the end
of 1949 was 148. During 1950
three new members were elected
and four members resigned, The
total number of members at the
end of 1950, therefore, was 147.

The credit balance at the be-
ginning of 1950 was $2,540.98.
Subscriptions from members dur-
ing the year amounted, to $5,305.-
20. Receipts from other sources
were $166.12. The expenditure
for the year was $5,572.31, leav-
ing a credit balance of $2,439.99
at the end of 1950.

The Commercial Journal

The credit balance of the Com-
mercial Journal account at the
beginning of the year was
$1,392.89. The receipts from ‘sub-
scriptions and advertisements
were $1,053.60. The expenses in

connection with the publicatior.
of the journal amounted to

$354.00, leaving a credit balance
at the end of the year of $2,092.49,

Only three editions of the
journal were published during the
year, due to the difficulty of find -
ing a suitable editor, Mr. Ian Gale
was recently offered the ost of
editor of the journal and this he
has accepted. The Council now
looks forward to the regular
appearance of the journal again

The Councit- was pleased 1s
welcome during the year Mr.
Donald Cheney, Assistant Cana-
dian Trade Commissioner, Mi
C. D. Thomas, Président of the
Barbados Clerks’ Union, and Mr.
J. Martinez, a Venezuelan trave;
agent, all of whom address
meetings of the Chamber,

The annual dinner of the
Chamber was held oa 2nd De-
cember. There were 41 members
of the Chamber present and 19
guests, as compared with 35 mem-
bers and 26 guests in the previ-
ous year.

Obituary

The Council records with regret
the death of the following during
the yeart

Sir John Hutson, C.B.E., V.D.,
who died on 2nd April at the age
of 91. He was educated at Cod-
ringtor. College and studied med-
icine in Edinburgh. He returned

to practise in Barbados, after-
wards joining the public healtlt
service. From 1912 to 1925 he

was Public Health Inspector, Sir
John beeame a member of the
Legislative Council in 1920 and
served until 1943, being elected
President of the Council from
1941 to 1943.

Mr, W. R. Redman, who died
on 19th October at the age of
87. Mr. Redman worked for many
years with Messrs. W. L. Johnson

& Co., after which he was one
of the founders of the firm of
Johnson & Redman,
Conferences
The following conferences of
interest to the commercial com-

munity were held during the year
in this Colony.

Delegates from thé various
islands in the Caribbean attended
the final meeting of the Customs
Union Commission which was
held in Barbados during January.

The Preparatory Committee of
the Unified Currency Scheme for
the Eastern Group of the British
Caribbean territories completed.
its meetings in Barbados on 14th
April. The Committee agreed on
the final drafts of the legislation
for each of the participating ter-
ritories and these would be pre-
sented to the Governments con-

cerned.
A conference to siudy the
effects of devaluation on the

British Caribbean opened on 8th
March under the chairmanship
of Professor C. G. Beasley, The
conference was attended by offi-
cials from the territorial “units
and by Mr. A. Emanuel, Head of

the Economic Department = at
the Colonial Office.

The Council of the Federation
of Primary Producers in the
British Caribbean held its; first
meeting in Barbados during the
month of October under the
chairmanship of Mr. R. L, M.

Kirkwood of Jamaica. Other col-
onies represented were Dominica
Grenaca, St. Lucia and Barbados.
Incorperated Chambers of

Commerce of the British

Caribbean

A meeting of the Incorporated
Chambers was held in Trinidad
from the 10th to the 14th of July
The celegates from this Chamber
were Mr. H. A. C. Thomas and
Mr, G. D. Bynoe. The following
matters were dealt with at the
meeting: (a) Federation of the
Britisn West Indies, (b) Steam-
ship passenger accommodation
facilities between the U.K. and
the British Caribbean Area, (c)
Curtaiiment in the Canada-West
Indies Trade, and (d) Differen-
tial in freight rates to smaller
colonies of the Caribbean Area.

Rat Control

The damage which is caused to
foodstuffs by rats was drawn to
the ettention of members of the
Chamber and suggestions for
their control which ‘had been ob-
tained from the Director of
Medicel Services -were circulated
to members. The Director also
assisted by the free distribution
of rat baits and the loan of rat
traps from his department.

Barbados Automobile

Association
At the suggestion of the Cham-
ber a number of motor car
owners and persons engaged in

the garage trade formed a local

Automobile Association. After

overcoming some difficulties at

the start the Association appears
@ On page.7.



MISS GETRUDE SHERMAN, winner of the Miss Jamaica

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



title in

1949, is in England on a three months holiday to see the Festival of
Britain. Here she is at a party held by the friends of Wine Society.



~Express.





Lady Savage Appeals

For Help

For Local

Guide Movement

ON SATURDAY NEXT, the Girl Guides of Barbados
will hold their Sixth Annual Fair at the Drill Hall, said
Lady Savage in her broadeast talk in aid of the Girl Guide

Movement.

“My object in speaking to you to-night is to

seek your support for a Movement whose influence for
good in this Island is both real and practical and is well
established on sound principles and practice of self-help.”



Farming
Held Up In
UK.

Mr. L. Forbes, District Com-
missioner of british Guiana who
was intransit on the Colombie

from England yesterday, told the
Advocate that farming in Ei
lend has been retarded this year
on account of the heavy weather
they had throughout the year.

He said that in some parts of
the country, people are now
beginning to plough the land.

In the Isle of Thanet in Kent,
there is a scheme — a fairly new
one which has just started
for cultivating grass from which
the people could get proteins.

Mr. Forbes spent one year in
the U.K. during which time he
took an administrative course
which included local government
and community development at
the University of London.

He said that he had the oppor-
tunity of comparing what the
Colonial Governments were do-
ing in the African colonies and
South East Asia with C.D. ana
W. funds and what they con-
templated doing in the Colombo
Plan which is drawn up by coun-
tries like Malaya, Sarawak and
Fiji.

6,000 Registered
In Bridgetown

To-day is the last day for regis-
fration of voters on Form “A”
and the City figures are well over
the six thousand mark. Figures
returned by enumerators to the
City Supervisor’s office show that,
up to Saturday, over 6,000 per-
sons were registered. There
were only 447 persons who re-
fused to register.

Mr. W. W. Merritt, City Super-
visor, told the Advocate yesterday





that he thought the response
good. The whole City area had
been covered Few people, who

had to be away from their homes
through their work and for other

reasons had not yet been regis-
tered, he said

Referring to the daily dssue
which quoted members of the

House as having asked the Gov-

ernment to extend the time for
enumerators to carry out the
registration, Mr. Merritt said

that he did not think it necessary
for enumerstors of the City to
have extra time.

He thought the City area well
covered and was hoping to be
completely through with the
scheme within another two week

Lecture For Drivers

The Department of Highways
and Transport and the police are
giving a lecture for all drivers
ard conductors of motor vehicles
at the Empire Theatre at 10 a.m.
to-day.

The speakers will be Col. R. T.
Michelin, Commissioner of Police,
the Director of Highways and
Transport, and Chairman of the
Automobiles Association und the
Chairman of the ‘Bus Owners’
Association.

20/. FOR OVERLOADING










A fine of 20s and 1s costs was
imposed on Dalton Springer. a
bus conductor of Masor Hall
Road by a City Police Magistrate
for overloading the motor bu
M.1850.

The offence was committed or
March 26 while the bus be-
ing driven along Black Rc¢ Rd



After the recent visit of Lady
Baden-Powell, she wrote in the
“Guider"—

“Barbados Guiding is, 4
always, on a sound, good foot-
ing, and in this last year they
have managed to buy and set
up their own Headquarters, It
is an enormous, wel built
wooden hut given by Govern-
ment—with permanent extra
bath houses, etc.,—standing in
14 acres of land which can be
used for camping. The Island
Commissioner, Mrs, Williams,
und her team of Guiders and
Guides, have indeed every
reason to be extremely proud
of their achievement which has
cost a very large sum of money,
almost all of it being earned by
sheer hard work in organising
Fairs, Concerts and money-
raising efforts in these recent
yeers since the war.’

This tribute, as I know from
personal knowledge and observ-
ation, is well deserved. There is
no slacking on the part of the
Guides now that they have
achieved their primary purpose
of having their own Headquarters



at Pax Hill.
Capital Expenditure
But you will appreciate that

with the maximum effort on their
part it is not possible for tho
thousand Guides in this Island to
directly meet further necessary
eapital expenditure, and the an-
nual cost of maintenance of the
Movement,

The Guides always keep their
Founder's word in mind, “Do not
beg for money, work for it,’ but
the time has come when the effori
of the Guides in Barbados must
be supplemented by the general
public if the Movement is to
develop in this Island,

Let me first tell you what the
Guide Movement is doing to he!p
itself. At present, each. Guider,
Guide and Ranger is required to
contribute one shilling a year and
eaoi Brownie six pence a year
to local Guide Funds. That con-
tribution is in the majority of
cases all that they can afford, but
the Annual Guide Fair represents
their major contribution for nesr-
ly all the articles on sale—ranging
from sweets, household goods,
books and gifts—have been pro-
vided or made by the Guides
themselves. Ag regards contribu-
tions ,and donations, Government
makes oan annual grant of $384.
Up to now the Movement has not
appealed directly to the public for
contributions or donations,

As you know there are no paid
officials in the Movement in Bar-
bados. All the administrative and
clerical work is done by volun-
teers, but the time is coming
when some pail workers will
have to be employed, Whilst it
is from the proceeds of the
Annual Fair that the Guides have
depended to meet their capital
expenditure, the Movement would
be relieved of financial ry if
it could be assured of receiving
by way of regular annual dona
tions—say, an income of $1,200 «
year towards its recurrent ex-
penditure

Annual Contributions

I feel certain that when thes:
facts are known and appreciates
there will be many people in
Barbados who will be prepared to
make some annual contributio’
or donation to the Guide Move-
ment to enable it to maintain and
extend its activities in the train-
ing of young girls in citizenship

If you are prepared to do
will you write or get into contact




we

De



















es

Pelice Will Seon
Get Het Meals At

Central Station

OLICEMEN at the Central





Police Station w soon be
Becting ho. meals “on the spor’, At
the back of the Mess hoom a
kitchen is being fitted out for a

eaterer who will be 2 civilian.

Small square tables now replace
the long wooden tables that were
formerly used in the Mess Room.
Chairs take the place of benches
and the Mess Room on a whole
ig being decorated so that Police-
men can take their meals in com-
fort

At present Pelicemen get their
meals sent from outside caterers
cr from their homes. Very often
by the time they get a chance to
eat, the food is cold and not ap-
petising

4 Constable told the Advocate
yesterday that he was anxiously
awaiting the ecccasion when he
can get his hot meal at any time
of the day.

ONSTABLE HAROLD WICK-

4 HAM of the local Police
Force left the islang by the S.S.
Bonaire on Tuesday for England
where he will take a six months’
course in the running and man-
agement of Boys’ Clubs. He will
also take an instructor's course
in physical training.

Colone} R. T. Michelin, Com-
missioner of Police, told the Adwo-
cat yesterday that the Boys
Club organisation in the island
ig now so big that it necessitates
someone with training to take
charge and run the clubs along
the proper lines.

The number of clubs is now
even. They are run from volun-
tary contributions but now that
the number is larger the expenses
ire increasing. The Commission-
er said that the organisation
would welcome any donations.
They should be sent to the Sec-
retary of the Boys’ Clubs, rolice
Headquarters.

CANE FIRE at River Planta-
tion, St. Philip, on tuesday
night burnt 13 acres of first and













‘ re . — . r 7

St. Kitts ExpectsTo C.J. Asks For
c 4 rt. / vy «

Make 46.000 Tons Evidence
{ . yu: '
Gl Sucar ihis Year _Hearing of the case in whicl

oe gh M. Best and others charg-

St. Kius expecis to manufa- °¢ Percy G ales and others
ure 46,000 tons of sugar this “* YEN In possession of proper-
eur beat last years crop ct ‘¥ Which belong to both parties
t200 tons which was a record resumed at the Court of Cha:
ene Hon. RK. L. Bradsraw, rresi. CTY yesterday morning

acnt of the Colony

§ Labour Unio

His Honour the Vice-Chancel-

wola the Advocate yesterday. ler, Sir’Allan Collymore pointed
Mr. Bradshaw who went up to cut to counsel _that they were
Qngland with Administrator Bur- °7€ OF two points in the case
rowes in April, spent 19 dajs which were baffling him. He in-
there doing work at the Colonial Yited Mr. Reece to give further
Office and at the British Trea: - ilucidations and arguments.
ury. He arrived here yesterday Mr. Reece addressed the Court
morning by the Colembie ir- 7 length on the points mention-
transit for Antigua and is stay~ @ by His Honour after which

ing at the Marine Hotel,

Mr. Adams replied briefly.







He said that his union which His Honour, after hearing
was in existence since 1940, ig a Counsel, said that it would be
general workers’ union with a L¢&tter if evidence were taken in
membership of about 8,000 anj the case since he felt that the
when he left home, everythin, “@Se would go to a higher court
Was working satisfactorily, | ind if such evidence were no

This year, they got a 12% in- ‘aken, the case would have to
erease for all sugar workers i. D¢. sent back to him fer such
the field and the factory, wate> ®Vidence.

{ront workers and Government In the Bill of claim Perey
non-established employees. The Seales and the other defendants
increase for sugar worker.,} #re@ alleged to have sold some of
would now mean an additiona!, "h€ property without making any
$253,000. for them this yeat i oftlement with Hugh M, [es

He said that the union had alyo{ '4 his party about the rion y
secured a bonus for sugar fa ‘tained from the sales.
tory workers after it had been Mr. W. W. Reece, KC., in-
taken away from them for 1°} structed by Messrs Carrington &
years, Sealy appeared for Best. Mr. G.

H. Adams, instructed by Haynes
Like Other Yelands & Griffith are for Perey Seales.
Further hearing of the case was
Asked about conditiens in S..| odjeurned until August 8.
Kitts, he said that they wer —_
about the same as in every other |

West Indian Island where ther
‘vas bad housing, low wages an
low standard of living

He said that their Labour Wel-
fare Fund Cess is the highest in
the West Indies. It is £1 per ton
of sugar exported from the isian.
and they are using that money
for housing chiefly in respeet
sugar workers,

Their political set up is not 9
advanced as Barbados’, but the.
have not got an upper House e



second crop ripe canes bey have here, They are hevin
are the property of Messrs, €’ constitution changed ini
DaCosta & Co., Ltd. and were - =! to provide for wivers:
insured. ul. suffrage, the removal of ;

Another fire at Coverly Flan- ‘uaiications, property and
tation, Christ Church on tne same (52, for membership to
night burnt five acres of second * 2#islaive Council and
crop ripe canes which were also | Hl an increase in
insured. ber of elected

them a clear

At Fairy Valley, Christ Church,
six and a half acres of second and
third crop ripe canes, four and a
half acres of first crop ratoons,
three and a half acres of trash
and one acre of sour grass were
burnt. They were insured and be-
long to Oldbury Estates Lid.

HE POLICE SPORTS will be
held at Kensington Oval at
3.00 o'clock this evening, Apart
from the regular events there will

, be amusing moments such as when

the Constables try to get over the
greasy slide in the Obstacle Race.
There will also -be a Sivk Race

and a race for Policewomen.
HE CROP SEASON in the
Lakes and Corbins districts
of St. Andrew has come to an

end. On Tuesday evening at about
3.30 o'clock the motor lorry A 138,
owned by Mr. S. Spencer, carried
off the last load of canes. In
these districts the crop lasted for
three months.

QUEER LOOKING house



is







A now being built in Belle-
plaine Bay, St. Andrew. It has
the shape of a bungalow but
closely resembles the Red Indi-
an’s shelter. It is being built from
sticks at the Bay, It is under-
stood that the sides will be plas-
tered with mud and the roof of
trash or grass.

EGGY ALY of Gittens Gap,



Culloden Road, was taken to
the General Hospital on Tuesday
night and detained.

Sealy was involved in an acci-
dent with the motor car M 772,
owned and driven by Frank Young
of Britton’s Hill, St. Michael, at
about 10.30 o'clock on the same
night near the corner of Culloden
noad.

HORTLY BEFORE MIDDAY

yesterday John J. Bovier, bo-
son on board the Harrison Liner
Astronomer, was taken to the
General Hospital suffering from
injuries. He was detained. An
X-ray examination was performed
Bovier is at present in Ward

At about 11.20 a.m. Bovier
was going up a ladder in No. 3

hatch on board the ship. When
about 12 feet up he fell. He
complained of pains in his side

and came ashore at the Marbout

Police pier. He was examined

by Dr. Reader.

HE FILM “Great
tions” will be shown
Combermere School Old

boys’ Association hold their

monthly reunion at Combermere

School hall at 8 o'clock to-morrow

night,
Alter

Expecta-
when
the

the film show there will
be the usual games and = the
Honorary Secretary will meet

members of the football division.

It is expected to see a large turn
out of old Combermerians. The
Advocate was told that a small

collection will be taken to defray

the expenses in, connection with
the showing of the film.
T DISTRICT “C” COURT

yesterday 28-year-old Darn-
levy Proverbs of Congo Road, St
Philip, appeared on a charge o

hooting at Alleisha Weekes of
he same district with intent a
190 o'clock on Tuesday night

fe was remanded until Friday
20/- Or 2 Months’
Imprisonment

A City Police Magistrate yes-
terday imposed a fine of 20s and
ls costs on Byron Ashby _ of
Hopewell, St. Michael when he

found him guilty of driving the
motor bus M.2541 without rea-
ronable consideration on Arthur

Hill Road on April 19.

There is an alternative of two
1onths’ imprisonment with hard
labour,





with the Treasurer, Miss R ty the grounds of Pax Hill.
Laborde, at No: 6 Pavilion Cou: If you can attend the Fair
Hastings, sending her your first please do so and spend gener-
yea donation. cusly, but if not, Miss Laborde
regards the Annual will be happy to acknowledge the
next Saturday, funds are u receipt of any donation you may
ly required for he expen care to send her.
in respect of necessary p in; It is a good cause, and your
—inside and outside of the Head- pelp, urgently needed if thi
quarters—for the installation of Wovement is to prosper in thi
electricity, and for improvements [stand 2

over the

ever took place.
The Legislature
however
bers to
Council,

he
elect some of
the

said, wil
its mem
Executive

serve on

Hearing Adjourned
In Death Inquiry

Further hearing in the inquir,
into the circumstances surrouna
ing the death of Christophe
Goodridge of Richmond Gap, St
Michael was further adjourne
until June 4 yesterday.

The Coroner
Walwyn, Acting
trate of District

Goodridge
Dr.
Road, on
on April 22.
the



Oot

was Mr ‘
Mugis

Police
admitted = t
Beckle

was
Bayley’s Hospital
April 20 but died ther
Dr. A. S. Cato wh
post
said the
to him by
of Riehmond
Death
hours

performed
amination
identified
Taylor

Michael.
about ten

mortem ex
body wa
Christophe
St

plac

Gap,
had taken
before,

On examination of the body h

found that it was well nourish
ed, but under the brain ther
was a slight swelling.

In his Opinion death was du
to inflammation of the brain. Dr
Cato also said that he took par
of the kidney, brain and bladde
and sent them to the Govern
ment Analyst for examination
He also said that one of the kid
neys contained a
cf chenopodium oil,

small amour

To a question asked by th
Coroner concerning the cheno
pedium oil Dr, Cato told the jur
that
caused
brain,

Set. Marshall
that he took
to the Analyst,

hav
th

could
inflammation

the oil
the

hardly
of

told the Cow

the Coroner's

bo

Mr. J. Robinson Acting Gov
evnment Analyst said that he re
eeived the Coroner's box o
April 23 from Sgt. Marshal
He examined the contents of th
box and traced
small quantity
oi) from

and identified
of chenopodiu
part of the
He also examined a
which was

kidney
capsule
thi

ubmitted and

contained approximately

grammes of chenopodium oil
Evidence will be taken

Cr, Bayley on the next hearings,





take it

FROM US

These Lace Materials

will make Excellent





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10—11 BROAD STREET





vil
oth-
the
there
the num
members to giv
working majorit
Government and nom
inated side of the Council.

At present, the Council is com
prised of five elected and si
nominated members, but he wr
not in a position to say what th
number will be when the chang

|
|

fro in|

|
|



For that rich



PAGE FIVE

“Sunwhit’ Brings
Bread Flour









Four thousand b ff bread
flour arrived here on Tuesday
evening from Canada by
Saguenay Terminats” 4,308-
Sunwhit. The ent of flout
was being landed during the da
it was consigned to NLEssrs
Hl. Jason Jones & Ca., Ltd.

The Sunwhit also brougit 655
begs of livestock and poultry
feed; supplies of enamel, varnish
and paint and 8,766 pieces of

of
Pe

pine lumber. The shipment
lumber carne for Messrs. J.
Leslie & Co., Ltd.

The Sunwhit joined here, hér
sister ship, S.S. Sun Valley, which
is ‘loading sugar for Canada,
She is consigned tc Messrs. Plan:
tatu Lay L td



Fruit Comes
By Daerwood





Crates, barrels and boxes of
mangoes and other frésh frust
were piled up on the deck and in
the hatches of the motor vessel

Daerwood which arrived from St.

Lucia yesterday Bunches of
plantains were also among the
cargo.

Forty-seven passengers came

up on the Daerwood. Some were
from Aruba. The Daerwood is
consigned to the Sehooner Own-
ers’ Association



savoury fiavour? .

Make that stew really tasty ®
with just a little Marmite !
Make it better for you too—
Marmite contains the B2
vitamins that build up
health and resistance to
illness. That’s why it’s so
good for everyone on bread
and butter or in tasty sand-
wiches, You can do so
much with Marmite in
soups, gravies, sauces and
savoury dishes-——-and Marmite
does so much for good cooking,

B@e ua.» .



irritations,

'}
pe pe

$1.23 |



Excellent for Nasal Catarrh.



at KNIGHTS DRUG STORES






MARMITE .

The Vitamin 8 Yeast Food

Made in England

SRBeazeRseuaherage
“PURINA”

LAYENA

see

H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors.



WITH

‘CANDA’

VAPOUR RUB

THE NEW ANTISEPTIC VA

POURISING OINTMENT

for use in cases of local congestion and inflaraation,

head and chest colds, coughs, hoirseness and throat

A 2-OZ%, POT FOR 56 CENTS



PAGE_SI<’ BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 31, 1951
i ER ST Ta anmeerens A

BY CARL ANDERSON | «J Bp '










On
children’s










EILM, RO
ree cuts, scratches

and abrasions




use

‘DETTOL'

THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC





Safe . . . Non-poisonous
Doesn't Pain . . . Doesn't Stain a











ees YOU WANT TO LOOK
AT MY EVES ?



T TIME PZOPLE
Ee eS. I(T FRIGHTE
HEM A LITTLE!

“oO i










oe “d ed ° Dom

BLONDIE ‘1

¢

Ws

»

$s ?

|

|

vs Sa’ fas
Lose 8h






THE LONE RANGER -

Ar ' {
(. FS f ETE iS SMARTER 7 THAN | THOUGHT. HE FOUND WHERE WE'LL HAVE TO STAY HERE,
My BULLE” — s ree AND va? XI KNOWS | y, NOTKILL. x ear AND TRY TO BRAZEN
THE ee ( $ ; an



R OTe









| to-pays News Plast | DAY'S NEWS FLASH

The Ye Book of me wee

THE RIGHT LOAF F OR
THE WHOLE FAMILY



Dirty or is Dir

JOHNSON’S "STATIONERY

|

|

icl ana” anythi ma that looké
Ne manowane | HARDWARE





IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE HERE |

a
——owoOona@=$=—“—=$=M030.E l=:

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only

















Usually Now Usually Now
Pkgs. CROWN MACARONI 35 #$£=28 CHEESE (Gouda) perlb $1.00 90
Champagne per case new stocks Pkgs.
VICTOR CLIQUOT $72.00 $58.00 Jacob Cream Crackers 41 36
LOUIS ROEDERER $72.00 $60.00
PEANUTS 2lbs for 76¢ 8 Bottles Tennents Beer 26 21

ee SCOTT & -s ee Broad Street









RGGI D ON GOD OOOO ORO OOS

| nee I DUNLOP Q



epee 1 sic TRUCK AND BUS TYRES
game! | |! WE WISH TO ADVISE OUR } 4
| CUSTOMERS |
THAT OUR



PARTS DEPARTMENT
_ WILL BE CLOSED FROM FRIDAY,
Ist JUNE TO MONDAY 4th JUNE
1951, BOTH DAYS INCLUSIVE,
FOR OUR

ANNUAL STOCK-TAKING

THE: PHANTOM

{
|
|



SS SGOGCRCCRS TO Fa FOC PCI FIR F I AFRO PPC OS
Ape nnen anh e ete 4 It th bt mint, tli elt t tPA LIAS "LI Ramp otns *
of

SO ORI EEE PINOT LOTTO OLDE AORTIC



La : * DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING (0... oe

ne: LD. ' a,

aS = a SN fe. 0> Tt if ECKSTEIN BROTHERS . DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING
(es : oF | oo BAY STREET eS anne COMPANY LIMITED

SOT IES , peoeeess CDOS | (ECKSTEIN BROS.)



4

‘ie



1 |

THURSDAY, MAY



1,



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508





Fer Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements im Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number cf words
up to 50 and G cents per word for each
additional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.





THANKS



ESTWICK: The family of the let Mrs. |

LOUISE ESTWICK who died on the
26th May, 1951, at Brereton’s Village,
St. Philip. Gratefully return thanks to
all who attended the funeral, sent
wreaths and letters of sympathy or in
any other way rendered assistance in
their bereavement

Mrs. Edna George and Ena (Daughters);

Walter, Osford, Harold and Allan (Sons).





Mrs. Olga Eve\yn and Earl (Grands);
Mazie (Stepdaughter) 315.51—I1n
IN MEMORIAM
INCE: In Loving Remembrance, of our

dear Father and Grandfather JOHN
ARCHER INCE, who was called to
higher service. Mm 31, 1944.
The fragrance of his life still lingers
with us
The Ince Family.



31.5551—1n.







SMITH—In loving memory of our dear
beloved one EUST, SMITH who
passed away on 3lst May 1960

Pa year has passed since that sad
ay,
The one § love was called away,
The shock was hard the blow severe
But little we know that death was
near.

Ever to be remembered by Mrs. Muriel

Smith (Wife); Colleen, Pauline, Nella

(Daughters) and the Bascombe family.

31.5. 51—1n



—_—_—_—
YRARWOOD—In loving memon; of our
dear one Henry Allan Yearwood, who
passed to the great beyond or May
29th 1948.
Sleep on, dear father
Your task is o’er;
Your loving hands can do no more,
For those you loved you did your
best;
May God grant you eternal rest.
Ever to be remembered by Mrs, Carlotta

Yearwood (Wife), Mrs» Marguerite
O'neale (only daughter) and grand-
children. 29.5.51-——-1n.







1
THE LOYAL BROTHERS OF
THE STARS

Proudly Present their - - -

1951 CARNIVAL

AT QUEENS PARK
—On-—
THURSDAY 7th
and
SATURDAY 9th June

|

S|
fs |
I
Indian Chief |

Dazzling Spectacular, Brilliant

THE CARNIVAL BAND

From Trinidad. |

Sway to the Rhythm of Teldad's |
Leading Steel Band beaten by a
team of experts.

The 1951 Costume Champions
from the South will bring glam-
our straight from the History
Books when staging the Execu-
tion of Essex. Straight from the
Romantic West come the Wild
»ndians and the Ranchers, and
out of the Belfry Come the Bats,

CONFIDENTIAL

At 7.30 p.m. on Tth, June,
Queen’s Park will be transformed
into a family land of Song and



Colour.
Don’t Miss it.
ADMISSION:

Adults 1/6 — _ Children 64.

N.B.—All persons who have ob-
tained booths and stalls are asked
to have them erected not later
than June 4th so as to obtain

lights.





BUILDINGS FOR SALE

INVITED



OFFERS ARE

FOR

ALL OR ANY
OF

THE VALUABLE

FREEHOLD BUILDINGS
OCCUPYING

THE WHOLE OF ONE SIDE
OF

THE MARKET SQUARE
IN

ST. GEORGE, GRENADA.

FOR DETAILS Apply to:-

P.O. Box 6, St. George,
GRENADA.

In view of the island wide eee
Increase, the above represents a splen-
cid opportunity to any “GO-AHEAD
businéssman.

CCSOSSOOOROOOOOIOF

ARRIVED!

ORO

SOLD!

New Shipment of Gas
Cookers arfived, all

sold before arrival

See them at Gas Showroom
before delivery . and

gee Book your order TO-DAY
for next shipment





Es













FOR SALE
| Minimum charge week 72 cents and
£6 cents Sundays 2 ux - over 24
luords 3 ce word week—i cents a
e ord on Sundeys.
\-_
|

AUTOMOTIVE





-_——
CAR: Morris Oxford 1949. Perfect con-

dition, owner-driven, new tyres and bat-
j tery. Fitted with “Pye” Shortwave Radio.
| Cash or terms arranged. Dial 3084 or 4831
| 27.5.51—t.£.n.
}



CAR—One 1947 Frazer,
Contact H
James

Manning. Westmoreland, St.
29.5.51—6n,



CAR Chevrolet-—30,000 miles,
condition. At Golden Ridge. St. George.

Phone—95—259







CARS—1950 Morris Minor
9,000 miles 1945 Wolseley 14 Saloon
20,000 miles Ford V8 1935 Tourer
Fort Royal Garage Telephope—4504

29.5.51—4n.





VANS—New Morris Cowley and Type
J 10 cwt Vans. Last chance at old
prices: Morris 6 Saloon and Two Door
Minor Saloons all on hand for immed-
iate delivery.

Fort Royal Garage Ltd
Telephone—4504 29.5.51—4n. }



ELECTRICAL

FLASHLIGHTS & BATTERIES: Two
cell Flashlights with large focussing Re-
flectors $1.47 ea, Three cell at $1.84 each.
Penlights—which clip into your pocket
like a Pen—Only $1.03 each. Batteries
at 11 cents each G. W. Hutchinson,
& Co., Ltd. Broad & Roebuck Streets.

31.5.51—-lu



POULTRY

a
CHICKS: R.0.P, White Leghorns, New
Hampshires, Rhode Islands, Plymouth
Rocks, White and Black Giants $1.32
each 4 weeks old. From U.S.A. Gordon

Matthews, Glenmaur, Constitution Rd.
30.5.51—8n



MISCELLANEOUS

An_old friend just returned, namely
DANDERINE which is no trouble to use—
just put it on—and you will see it keeps



the hair looking its best at all times,
Knights Ltd. 30.5.51—2n
BARGAIN—Ladies Brown Fur Coat

Modern and as good as new Half orig-
inal cost Phone—2405. 29.5.51—3n.



CAR PARTS: 14 m.m. Spark Plugs,
Chamios Leather, Upholstery Material
and many other items. Enquire at the
Auto Tyre Co. Phone 2696.
30.5, 51—t.f.n



“FLUSHO” removes stains and cleans
Toilet Bowls, and is used in the same
way as Harpic. Price reduced to 42c.
tin. Obtainable at KNIGHTS Ltd.

.5.51—2n



GALVANISED SHEETS—Best quality
new sheets. Cheapest in the Island!
G ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56;
10 ft $8.40, Nett cash. Setter hurry!
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

4.5.51—t.f.n.



GALVANIZED SHEETS: We are sell-
ing Cheaper than any other firm in
Bridgetown. Try us first before you buy.

A. E. Taylor, Ltd., Coleridge Street,
where quality is Higher and Prices
Low. 31.5.51—In

OVENWARE; We have just received

a further shipment of Phoenix Oven
Tableware Dishes (many sizes), Roasters,
Cesseroles, Sauce Boats, Mixing Bowls,
Plates,etc, Buy your requirements today
at G. W. Hutchinson & Co., Lid. Broad
& Roebuck Streets. 31.5.51—1n

POOLE POTTERY—Just received in
wall plaques in flying ducks, blue birds,
sea gulls etc., also ornaments, cigarette
boxes, jam dishes, butter dishes, ashtrays
etc. Louis L. Bayley, Bolton Lane.

26.5.51—6n.

We also have in stock KURBICURA
» Veterinary product, for the treatment
of Thoropins, Curbs, Capped Hocks,





Price 5/-
0.5.51

and for Big Knees in Cattle

LTD 2n

KN'GHTS

We have in stock ATOMITE D.D.T
Insecticide, the Household Pest destroye:
which kills Flies, Mosquitoes, Ants, Cc

box













roaches, Fleas, Bugs ete., etc. Reduced
to 1/3. KNIGHTS Ltd 30.5.51—3n
————





EDUCATIONAL



HARRISON COLLEGE AND
QUEEN’S COLLEGE

Removai of Office of
Secretary-Treasurer



As from the Ist of June, 1951,
the office of the Secretary-
Treasurer to the Governing Bodies
of Harrison College and Queen’s
College will be situated at Har-
rison College (in the building
adjoining the Headmaster’s resi-
dence).









Fees for pupils of either schooi
will be received as follows:—
AT HARRISON COLLEGE:

on Mondays, Tuesdays and

Wednesdays 9.00 a.m.—12 noon

Fridays 9.00 a.m.~-12 noon

Saturdays 9.00 a.m.—10.00 a.m.
AT QUEEN'S COLLEGE:

on Thursdays 9.00 a.m.—12 noon

All cheques for fees in respect
of pupils of these schools must be
drawn in favour of the “Treasurer,
Governing Body, Harrison Col-
lege/Queen’s College.”

29,.5.51—2n,



TAKE NOTICE
DAWN

That SOAP & EDIBLE PRODUCTS
LIMITED, a company incorporated under
the laws of the Island of Jamaica, Manu-
facturers, whose trade or business address
is Producer Road, West End, Kingston,
Jamaica, British West Indies, has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A" of Register in respect of com-
mon soap detergents and all preparations
for laundry purposes gnd also in respect
of perfumery, including toilet articles,
preparations for the teeth and hair and
perfumed soap, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 29th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me «et my office of
cpposition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my

office.



Dated this 25th day of May, 1951.

HH. WILLIAMS,

j Registrar of Trade Marks.
29.5.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE
COLLEEN

That SOAP & EDIBLE PRODUCTS
LIMITED, a company incorporated under
the laws of the Island of Jamaica, Manu
facturers, whose trade or bu:
is Producer Road, West End, Kingrzon,
Jamotea, British West Indies, has ap) lied





| for laundry purposes and also in respect
}of perfumery, including toilet articles.
| preparations for the teeth and hair and
| perfumed soap, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 29th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
mm duplicate to me at my office of
cpposition of such registration
mark can be seen on application at my
office
Dated this 25th day of May, 1951
H. WILLIAMS,
| Registrar of Trade Marks



29.5.51.—3n. | specified

The trade

29.5.51—3n

| PUBLIC NOTICES

| Ten cents per aye





ne on week-days











and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
end $1.80 on Sundays.

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES
L ACT 1910

and
IN THE MATTER OF WEST INDIAN
KNITTING MILLS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Creditors of the abovenamed Company
which is being voluntarily wound up,
are required, on or before the 2nd day o:
July 1951, being the day for that purpose
fixed by the undersigned, to send their
names and addresses, and the particulars
of their debts or claims, and the names
and addresses of their Solicitors, if any,

to the undersigned H. Lisie Thomas in |

care of Messrs. Carrington & Sealy of }

mileage 20,000 | Lucas Street, Bridgetown, Barbados, the

Liquidator of the said Company, and,
if so required by notice in writing
from the said Liquidator, are te come

Excellent] in and prove their said debts or clans

at such time and place as shall be
in such notice, or in default

thereof they will be excluded from the

Saloon! benefit of any distribution made before

such debts are proved,
Dated this Ist day of May 1951.
H, LISLE THOMAS,
Liquidator.
2.5.57—Tn.
EES

NOTICE

“Applications for one vacant St. Philip's
Vestry Exhibition tenable at the St.
Michael's Girls’ School, will be received
by the undersigned not later than Satur-
day 9th June 1951.

Candidates must be daughters of
parishioners in straitened circumstances,
and must be over cight years and ltss
than twelve years old on the 3ist July,
1951.

A birth certificate must be forwarded,
with an application form, obtained fram
th Parochial Treasurer’s Office.

The entrance examination will be held
at the St. Michael's Girls’ School on
Saturday 16th June 1951 at 9.15 a.m.”

P. S. W. SCOTT,
Clerk to the Vestry,
St. Philip.
20.5 .51—tn



NOTICE

. Re Estate of

WILLIAM RUPERT St. CLAIR REDMAN
—deceased.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim against
the Estate of William Rupert St. Clair
Redman, late of Hastings, Christ Church,
who died in this Island on the 19th day
of October, 1950, are hereby required to
send particulars of their claims, duly
attested, to the undersigned, C/o. Cottié,
Catford & Co. No. 17, High Street,
Bridgetown, Solicitors, on or before the
Sist day of July, 1951, after which we
shall proceed to distribute the assets of
the Deceastd among the parties entitled
thereto, having regard only to such
claims of which we shall then have had |
notice, and that we will not be liable for
the assets or any part thereof so ats. |
tributed, to any person of whose debt
or claim we shall not then have had
notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
Estate are requested to settle their in-
debtedness without delay

Dated this 28th day of May, 1951.

RUPERT CHEESMAN REDMAN

FRANK MESSERVEY PHILLIPS

LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL
Qualified Executors of the Will









of
William Teupert St. Clair Redman,
deceased.
30.5.51—30

Re Estate of
GLADYS ALBERTINE HARDING
deceased

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim against
the Estate of Gladys Albertine Harding
late of the parish of Saint Michael, who |
died in this Island on thé@ 24th day of
January 1951, are hereby required to
send particulars of their claims duly
attested, to the undersigned Albertha
Harding the qualified Administratrix of
the Estate of the deceased, in care of
& Sealy of Lucas
Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors, on or be-
fore the 27th day of June 1951 after
which date T shall proceed to distribute
the assets of the deceased among the
parties entitled thereto having regard
only to such claims of which 1 ghall
then have had notice, and that T will
not be liable for the assets or any part |
thereof so distributed, to any person of
whose debt or claim I shall then have
had notice. ‘

And all

Messrs. Carrington

persons indebted to the said

j Windgalls, and Spruug Tendons in Hors€s| estate are requested to settle their in-

debtedness without delay.
Dated this 27th day of April, 1951,
ALBERTHA HARDING,
Qualified Administratrix of the Estate
of Gladys Albertine Harding





deceased,
28.4.51—4n, |
recta banat
THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICUL-
TURAL BANK ACT, 1948

TO THE CREDITORS HOLDING
SPEC"ALTY LIENS AGAINST Grigg
Farm PLANTATION, St. Andrew.

TAKE NOTICE that we the Trustees
of the above Plantation are about to
obtain a loan of £3,000 under the pro-

visions of the above Act against the
said Plantation, in respect of the
Agricultural year 1951 18 1952.

No money has been borrowed under
the Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the



above Act (as the case may be) in
respect of such year.
Dated this 29th, day of May 1951.
L. C, M. ARCHER,
et al Executor and Trustees;
B. H. V. OUTRAM.
Attorney, 29.5.51—3n
DREAM

That SOAP & EDIBLE PRODUCTS
LIMITED, a company incorporated under
the laws of the Island of Jamaica, Manu-
facturers, whose trade or business address
is Producer Road, West End, Kingston.
Jamaica, British West Indies, has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A" of Register in respect of com-
mon soap detergents and all preparations
for laundry purposes and also in respect
of perfumery, incluaing toilet articles,
preparations for the teeth and hair and
perfumed soap, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 29th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of
opposition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
cffice.

Dated this 25th day of May, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
29.5 .51—3n

TAKE NOTICE
HYGEA

That SOAP & EDIBLE PRODUCTS
LIMITED, a company incorporated under
the laws of the Island of Jamaica, Manu-
facturers, whose trade or business address
is Producer Road, West End, Kingston,
Jamaica, British West Indies, has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A” of Register in respect of com-
mon soap detergents and all preparations
for laundry purposes and also in respect
of perfumery, including toilet articles,
preparations for the teeth and hair and
perfumed soap, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 29th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give, notics
in duplicate to me st my office of
opposition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office,

Dated this 25th day of May, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marke
29.5.51-







TAKE NOTICE
CAMEO

That SOAP & EDIBLE PRODUCTS

i¢ Producer Road, West End. Kingston,

for the registration of a trade maric in| Jamaica, British West Indies, has applied | aircraft
Part “A” of Register in respect of com-j| for the registration of a trade mark in) within this range.
mon soap detergents and all preparations| Part “A” of Register in respect of com- |

mon soap deterges's and all preparations

of perfumery. including toilet articies
preparations for the teeth and hair and
perfumed soap,
register the same after one month from
the 29th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notire
my office



in duplicate to me at
cpposition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my

office. cr
Dated this 25th day of May, 1951
H. WILLIAMS,

29.5.51—3n



for laundry purposes and also im respect}

and will be entitled _to |

of |





















































BARBADOS ADVOCATE
ee -
7 NJ wr SJ Na
PUBLIC SALES | FOR RENT WANTED
|
Ten cents per agate line on wevk-days Minimum charge week 72 cents ena | Minimu charge week 72 eents and)
and 42 cents per agate line on Sundays,! $6 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24) 9 ent c _ 24 |
minimum charge $1.50 on week-tlays}| Words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a! words 3 « 4 cents a]
and $1.80 on Sundays. word on Sundays word on Sundeys
elena gieaiiptencaptts canst |
REAL ESTATE HOUSES | HELP
PENRITH sjwuate at the -orner of| , BOULOGNE, St. Lawrence Gap. Fully | A CHAW®FEUR: Apply A.S. Husbands
llth Avenue and Belmont Road, St.| {rMished. Vacant, June the Ist. Dial 439. | Babbs, St. Lua 30.5. 51—3n
Michael, standing on 11.240 square feet 31.5.51—1an | —— pene a
| of land. The house is built of stone and ——$—$$—$— FESPONSIBLE YOUNG MAN, mechani-
- contains drawing, dining, breakfast FURNISHED FLAT, Pavilion Court. | cally inclined, capable of handling
1ooms and kitchen downstairs, three Available for approximately 4 months) labour. Apply in person only to Canad»
\bedreoms, toilet and bath upstairs.} ‘Tom Sth July. Phone 2552 Dry, Riecket St. 31.5.51—3n
Usual medern conveniences. Garage 30.5. 51—3n —
and servants rooms in yard. ap GENERAL SERVANT; Apply: High-
Inspection every day (except Sundays) FLAT; Besumont, Hastings, unfur-| field, Pine Hill, between 12 and 2. Mrs
between 4 and 6 p.m. or by appointment Dining and Sitting rooms, 2|J. Connell. 29.5.51—1n
Dia) 2965. PAS smeen | water, ae with MISC —_
The above will be set up for sale at usual conveniences, lo pets or EL L ANE: Us
Buble _Gorapatlties at our office tn mn. Dial 2636, 30.5.51-—2n _ ELL ANEOS perenne
Lucas Street. Bridgetown, on Friday, the} -->-————— — “$24 —
Ist June 1981, at 3 “WRENSCOURT’ Beach, Hast~- WANTED TO BaNT

p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors.
19.5.51—9n.

——_- ———





UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER
TO-DAY

TODAY, Slst May, 1951, hy order Mr.
J. H. Peacock we will sell his Furniture
at LEeterre, Mexwell Coast, which in-
cludes Morris Suite, Settee (for 3) and 2
Arm Chairs with Sp: ng Cushions; orna-
ment Tables Rockers, Mir’d Cabinets
ell in Mahogany; Verandah Chairs, Nice
Oval Table, Congoleum, Viorolite Top.
Coffee Table, Oak Extension Dining Ta
Upright Chairs and Book Case with Desk,
Electric Lamps, Glass Ware, Simmons,
Single Bedsteads with Springs and
Sieep-Mattresses; Cedar Mir'd. Press with
Dressing Table Combined; Very nice
Gents Mahog. Compactum; Cream Paint- |
ed Press; Philco Refrigerator in perfect
working order; (2% years) Electric Ket-
tle; Service Washing Machine; Kitchen
Utensils; Tables; Larder, 3 Burner
Valor Stove, 2 Burner Rippingill Stove
Oven, Lawn Mower practically new;
Garden Tools; Pram, Tricycle. Toddle
Cart, Child's Chest of Drawers, Dolls
House, Dolis, Jamaican Mats and other
items ‘i
SALE 11.45 o'clock TERMS CASH.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers







27.5.51—2n

TAKE NOTICE
CORONET

That SOAP & EDIBLE PRODUCTS
LIMITED, a company incorporated under
the laws of the Island of Jamaica, Manu-
facturers, whose trade or business address |
is Producer Road, West End, Kingston,
Jamaica, British West Indies, has |



for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A” of Register in respect of com-
mon soap detergents and all preparations
for laundry purposes and also in respect
of perfumery, including toilet articles,
preparations for the teeth and hair and
perfumed soap, and will Le entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 29th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of
epposition of such registration. The trade}
mark can be seen on applicution at my
office
Dated this 25th day of May, 1951,
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
29.5. 51—3n

Chamber Of

{ ing? Company

m

ings. Cool, Comfortable, two flat Bunga-
lows, Near the Sea, open verandahs,
sitting, drawing and dining rooms, 5
bedrooms, kitchenettes, pantry, toilets
aud bath. running water and electricity
garages and enclosed yard. Avyailabie
from June Ist. Apply: C. E. Clarke, 7
Swan Street. Dial 2631 or 3029

%.5.51—In



| ANNOUNCEMENTS



ANNOUNCEMENTS; Starting
Ju 2nd, every Saturday at 7.10 p.m
and evens Wednesday at 7.25 a.m., PYE
Rudio will have a message for you over
the loudspeakers of Barbado$ Rediffusion
Services Ltd. Listen in to these.—-Pye
Lid. 31.5.51—3n



PYE RADIO: The Jamaica Broadcast-
has awarded the contract
tor the supply of one hundred communal
receiving sets to PYE RADIO. The sets
chostn-—the new PYE-six. Identical sets

| will be opened in Barbados this week

Pye Lid

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of A. E. Taylor, Ltd.
holder of Liquor License No, 1017 of 1961
sranted to Eve\/n Dowlin in respect of
4& board and shingle shop with shedroof
atteched at Six Mens, St. Peter for per-
n.ission to use the said Liquor License
&c, at a well and wooden buildings
known as Sandy Beach Hotel Apartments
and Bugolows, Worthings, Christ Church,
within District “A”

Dated this 29th day of May 1951.

To: A. BE. McLBOD, Esq.

Polce Magistrate, Dist. "A",

A. E. TAYLOR LTD,
per A. E,. TAYLOR,
Applicants.

N.B.--This application will be consid-

ered at a Licensing Court to be held at

31.5.51—3n





Pollee Court, Dist. “A" on Friday the
8th day of June 1951, at 11 o'clock, a,m
E. A, McLEOD
Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’
31.5.5)—In



Display of Gymnastics

QUEEN'S COLLEGE Gymnastics Dis-
play will be repeated at Queen’s College
for the public on Friday, June Ist 1981, at
4.90 p.m

Following the Display there will be a
Netball Match between the School's First
and Second Netball teams

ADMISSION



Adults 1/- Children

30.5, 51-

oa
2n

Commerce Report

From page 5

e
to be on a firm footing and the
membership is now gtowing. The
Police and the Department of
Highways and Transport have
given the newly-formed Associa.
tion considerable assistance and

advice,
Shipping

During the year 1,024 Merchant
Vessels with a total nett tonnage
of 1,645,678 tons arrived at the
port as compared with 999 vessels
of 1,234,120 tons in 1949. In ad-
dition to the above, 44 vessels of
other types amounting to 76,192
tons visited the port. These,
were comprised of 23 yachts, 10
Royal Fleet Auxiliaries, 3 British
and 4 American Men of War, 1
Dutch Aircraft Carrier, 1 Royal
Army Service Corps Vessel, 1
American tug and 1 cable ship.

Five hundred and eighty one

amounted to 70,522 tons entered
the Careenage as against 627
vessels of 73,680 tong gross in
1949; of these 149 were steam and
motor vessels, the remainder
being sailing vessels,

The Cruise Ships Mauretania,
Italia and Stella Polatis made a
total of six visits to Barbados
during the year, The number of
tourists carried by these vessels
was 1,580.

The total number of passengers
arriving in the Colony by sea
during 1950 exculsive of intransit
passengers and tourists, wag 5,238.

|'The number who left the Colony

by sea was 4,396, as compared
with 4,796 and 3,884 respectively
in 1949,

The following table gives the
class, nationality, mumber and
nett tonnage of vessels arriving



vessels whose gross tonnage! at the port during 1950:
Class of No. of Nett
Vessel Nationality Vessels tonnage
Steam British 355 904,161
and American .. 715 316,433
Motor .. French ie 31 91,237
Argentine .. “in 2 7,123
Dutch ae a ee 111,813
Norwegian ah, 38 108,223
Swedish .. eee Tl 14,487
Italian ‘i oe l 4,902
Honduran .. 3 10 1,454
Danish oe Pr 1 1,952
Egyptian .. iw’ 10,102 i
Finnish oF “s 1 4,964
Panamanian és 2 18,636
Venezuelan a 6 587 2,020 1,597,507
Tankers British oe o 3 3,342
Dutch °° oe 11 20,416
American ., oe 1 15 1,235
Sailing British hs «. 417 22,851
Vessels French a ‘ 5 422 327 23,178
Total Merchant Shipping
The following table shows the!

number of steam and motor ves-| 9th, T.C.A. operated into Seawell,{ 386 acres, as compared with 721

7%
|
eR

sels which arrived at the port of





LIMITED, a company incorporated under | way was permanently closed tol
address} the laws of the Island of Jamaica, Manu- la
turers, whose trade or business sddress |

ber 8th, 1950, and on December

both North and South-bound.







24,993) season was 24 acres 2rd., which

TWO BEDROOM furnished apartment.

Near town, Reasonable rental. Write
$307 ‘Brodeur Ave. Apt. 2, Montreal,
Quebec. Mrs, L, Rideau,

26.5.51—3n



MEDICINE BOTTLES: §& oz. bottles with
marks 8/16; 8 ov. bottles Plain. Knights
Ltd,, Phoenix Pharmacy 31.5. 51—2r
BUNGALOW: Four-Bedroom Bungalow
on Sea, with safe Bathing, for month of
August. Fully furnished. Ring, Michelin
Tel. 2014 31,5. 51-—2n



> iaseetnnenaema





Charcoal and Firewood

Four thousand and fifty two
tons of charcoal and 9,945 tons of
firewood were imported during
1250 from the following sources:

Charcoal Firewood

tons tons
B.G. 3,350 9,055
Dominica — 627
St. Lucia 702 247
St. Vincent .. oot 8
Trinidad o 8

4,052 9,945

The Sugar Industry.

Although the total rainfall wa
greater than that for the corres-
ponding periods for the past fdur
seasons, the distribution was very
unsatisfactory. The rainfall dur-
ing November and December 1948
was above average and there was
sufficient moisture for the estab-
lishment of the young cane crop.
The period February to May, 1949,
was dry and this somewhat re-
tarded the germination and early
development of the ratoons. The
months of July, November and
December were dry and although
the total precipitation for August
was 13.45 inches the great. majori-
ty of this fell on the night of the
Bist and could not be effectually
utilised by the crop. Fortunately
the rainfall for January and the
other early months of 1950 was
food and the cane erop, particu-
larly the ratoons, continued to de
velop until late in the season.

The area harvested for the 195(
crop was 41,241 acres as against
39,705 acres in 1949. These figures
include 7,000 acres for land unde:
peasants’ cane (estimated).

The equivalent of 45,600 punch-
cons of Fancy Molasses was pro-
duced during the 1950 crop season
At the end of December, 195
approximately 4,300 puncheons oi
this Fancy Molasses remained ir
this island. It is expected tha
out of the 1951 crop productioi
about 67,000 puncheons equiva-
lent of Fancy Molasses will be re-
quired for export, The lates
estimate of the 1951 crop produe
tion of sugar and faney molasses
shows that a record crop of 180,000
tons is expected,

The British Government,
through the Ministry of Food, has:
purchased the entire exportable
cutput of sugar during the 195!
crop season. The cif, price ol
£32.17.6 per ton includes 2/9 per
ewt.,, which under the Sugar In-
dustry (Rehabilitation, Price
Stibilisation and Labour Welfare)
Act, 1947, will be deposited to the
special reserve funds,







Food Crops..

Emergency regulations for the
compulsory planting of grounc
provisions and vegetables continue
to be enforced,

During the 1950-51 Crop Year
the total area required to be plant
ed in holdings of 10 acres anc
over was 21 per cent, and in hold-
ings of 2 to 10 acres 20 per cent.

The keeping of livestock by
plantations was maintained at the
same level as before, viz. one live-
stock unit to gvery 20 acres of
Jand.

The final
plantings has
requirements
tulfilled,

actua
the
than

survey of
revealed that
were more

Cotton,

The area of cotton cultivated by
plantations during the 1949/5(

yielded 21,524 lb. of seed cotton,
with a crop average per acre of
878.5 lb of seed cotton, Peasants
planted 361 acres 2rd, of cotton
yielding 107,948 lb, of seed cotton
or 298.6 lb per acre, The total
‘area under cotton cultivation was

acres 3rd. in the previous year.









Bridgetown during the years .
1945—50: Export Trade Figures
‘ear 5 SUGAR
* — or pon og , 1948 joy 1990 1048 1049 1960
1946 174 Tons Tons Tons £ £ £
ed aie Dark Crystals 43,691 116,699 121,554 1,065,878 + «3,019,591 3,540,262
Molasses : 1,851 2,587 2,295 28,691 40,098 60,724
1948 441 Muscovado 1,025 1,550 4,260 20,500 31,000 37,760
1949 547 White Crystals 3,085 5,773 6,044 67,151 183,213 229,356
Ls 602 49,652 126,000 441,743 «1,202,220 3,273,902 3,868,100
Air Traffic MOLASSES
The number of commercial air- 1948 1949 1950 1948 119 1950
craft arriving at Seawell Airport : , a
: Gall £ £ £
during 1950 was 1,297, as com- ert pes. Chee
pared with 1,242 in 1949. These] Fancy Molasses 6414,079 4,143,813 $006,890 1,088,688 013,899 aay
ated i Choice Molasses 143,401 247,099 135,159 O18 36,551
follon aaere by six Airlines as Vacuum Pan Molasses ape 1,753,014 2,804,311 32,869 24,119
ollows; -— ‘ Bottoms Molasses 3,090 _ - 232 --
British West Indian Airways 1,158 6,560,630 6,143,926 8,835,300 ‘1,052,170 682,358
B.G. Airways adh noes 66 aap greg ae ee —
. : RUM (Iinclading Ships’ Stores)
pa Airlines . 1048 1949 50 1948 1949 1950
ates ts Heke ee ues ss 4 Gallons Gallons Gallons ‘ £ £
jNationwide —..... sss 3 836,976 647,748 902,296 276,639 255,242 294,988
In addition to the above, F The values of staple crops exported during the years 1946-0 are as follows
| i ;
military and 15 private aircra Sugar Molasses Rum
landed at the Airport. 1946 £1,789,517 © 785.168
The number of passengers ar- 1947 1,879,255 1,147,279
riving by air during the year was 1948 1,202,220 1,052,170
13,503 and the number departing io pp lea ; eenaee aye
by air was 13,363, as compares Percentage Table of Exports of Local Produce & Ma ntoviaree of the Colony, 1946-50
|with 12,074 arriving and 11, 1946 1948 1969 1900
‘ ‘ United Kinedom 38.7 33.2 26.2 50.0 43.7
| departing during the previous Canada 47.7 51.3 52.0 39.6 47.3
year, Other parts of the British Empire 9.6 12.1 210 a7 65
iG o run- U.S.A, 28 30 5 10 22
On October 16th the old Other foreign countriés 11 4 3 7 3
Percentage Table of amports for the Vears 1946—50
ll air traffic, and 3,900 feet of 1946 1947 a 1949 1950
was opened to United Kinzdom 29.3 26.8 39.3 40.7 46.6
jthe. new saute an Coaratiog Canada 28.2 35.0 26.3 19.8 14.5
P Other parts of the British Empire 16.0 13.1 16.5 21.0 214
USA 10.8 19.5 12.2 12.5 66
The full length, 6,000 feet, of the Other foreign countries 6.1 5.6 5.7 6.9 10.9

new rmnway was opened to air
| traffie on the afternoon of Decem-

j
ne

| ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
| New Shipment opened

| THANTS "%





Values of Imports and Exports for the Vear® 1916—0









Year < Imports Exports Total Trade
1946 £4,992 492 £3,142,164 £4,134,656
1947 7,124,930 3,715,107 10,840,037
1948 6,346,230 3,048,165 9,394,295
1949 7,072 628 4,688,536 11,761,164
1950 8,007,944 5,758,975 13,826,919
The production figures for sugar for the years 1947 to 1950 are as follows
i 1047 1948 1949
| VP 86,369 56,496 133,868
Musee tar 1,655 1,262 1,991
| *Fancy Molasse 23,208 20,468 16,872
Total 111 78,226 152,731 158,183
Equated ec rate of 32 e gallons per ton of igar














LOST & FOUND



s.s,
rom fF
May,
june, §

dad during the latter half of July, and





SHIPPING NOTICES —



MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED

Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane 16th

PAGE. SEVEN
PERSONAL























LOST The public are hereby warned against 7}
LASSES st ; ~——, | Siving credit to amy person or Persons >
See + Prin AS n 3 ee ; homsoever in my name as I do not hold ;
j eee ore nee a Se yself responsible for anyone contracting
.* uitably rewarded on returiing debt cr debts in my name’ ufiless
Advocate Advertising Dep 1 written order signed by me ‘
CARLISLE PAYNE, ;
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET: Series S. 1919 Se aa i
Finde; please return same to miss Miriam | op 5 51—~2n j
Cumberbatch in Trafalgar Square ;
31.5.51—tr | 1
“for the years 1947-50 ts As 2 i
The rainfall for the years 1947-90 is as 7 4
soon FIRST OCCUPANT
1m7 1948 199 1950] The new graveyard at St. j
ins. ins. ins. ins. | Joseph parish chureh was used q
In the Highlands 43.45 75.91 64.56 86.8!) yesterday for the first tim@~ 2% ‘
In the Lowlands — 35,09 56.93 58.22 74.55]" Sarah King of Horse Hill, 3ta°* 7
Average ‘for the Joseph was buried there. 4
whole Island 33.80 69.81 60.69 79.374 —
Income Tax Statistics for the Years 1941-50 ona tien.
Rates in the £
191t «1942 Inte | 19t4 1945 16, 1947 1948 ino) 61950
From To 410 !
£1 £100 1 6 6 6 9 -/9 -/6 -/6 -/6
101-200 1 1 1 1 13 1/3 1/- 1/- 1/-
1 = 400 2 2/- 2 2 2/3 2/3 2/- 2/- 2/-
401 = 600 3/- 3/- 3- 3 3/3 3/3 3/- -
601 800 3- a 4/- 4 a3 a3 46 46 46
201 1,000 3/- 5. 5/- 5 “3 sy/3 5/6 5/6 s/s
1,001 1,750 4/- 6/6 66 7 73 73 1/6 6 7/6
1,751 2,000 4/- 66 6/6 V- 7/3 1/3 7/6 96 a6
2,001 2,500 S/- B/- 8/- 86 a9 89 9/- 9/6 /6
2.501 3,000 | 5/- 8/- B/- 8/6 I/- 7 11/- 11/3. 12/- 12/-
3,001 5,000 6/- 10, 10. 10/6 1l/- 1ly/- 11/3 12/- 12/- wiry
5,001 10,000 8/- 12 12 12/6 13/6 13/6 13/9 15/- 157+
Over 10,000 10/- 12/- 12/- 12/6 13/6 13/6 13/9 15/- 15f+, +»
Rates in the £
194 1962 1948 1948 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1958
Tax on Companies 4 S/- S/- &, 6/8 6/8 6/8 G/B 71/6 7/6
Tax on Life Assurance 2s 2s 2s. aleneeetiine
Companies 48d 9.5d 95d 9.5d 3.28. 3.25. 3.28 3.158 3.158 3.188 “-“"
Income Tax and Death Duties Collected ¥
for the years i ,
Imt = 194 194s rout 165 HG 1947 IMs «149 1950 "
£ “£ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ Dea
172,002 264,779 296,928 382,519 524,178 524,737 608,523 671,350 630,138 789,06T, {
om names







(M.A.N.Z, LINE)
ARABIA is scheduled to sail
jobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th

“Daerwood" will

and Passengers

accept
Cy for St
Lucia, Grenada & Aruba, Passen-



"oO

ydney 23rd June, arriving at Trin-
Friday Ist June,

proceeding thereafter to Barbados and

wiverpool, M.V. “Caribbee” will accept 3
In addition to general cargo this vessel Cargo and Passengers for Dotijni- 4%
has ample space for chilled and hard ca, Antigua, Montserrat, evia . &

frozen cargo,
Cargo accepted on through Bills of Lad-

& St. Kitts. Sailing Friday tat



ing for transhipment at Trinidad to Brit- et
ish Guiana, Leeward and Windward m4
Islandia, B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS:

For further particulars apply —
FURNESS, WITHY & CO., LTD,
eine
Iwi,

ASSOCIATION (Inc.)

Consignee. Tele. No. 4047. ©

and
DA COSTA & CO., LTD.,
Bridgetown,



| gers only for St. Vincent. Sailing
June. al









NEW YORK SERVICE











S.S. “TINDRA” Sails 18th May Arrives Barbados 30th May, 1951.

A STEAMER Sails 8th June Arrives Barbados 19th June, 1961, et eh
ms a _
NEW ORLEANS SERVICE wo Warnes
$.S. “ALCOA ROAMER” Sails 16th May — Arrives Barbados Ist June, 1951,~ 5 >,
S.8. “ALCOA PATRIOT" Sails 30th May — Arrives Barbados 15th June, 1951. oe)
3.8. “ALCOA POLARIS" Sails 13th June — Arrives Barbados 28th June, 1901, ‘= ~
Oe re en ae ee “—
CANADIAN SERVICE we
SOUTHBOUND ma .% peak |
Name of Ship Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives Bos. * oy
wee A
.8. “ALCOA PIONEER"... May llth May l4th May aati ee pate
ss, “POLKE BERNADOTTE” May 26th May 0th June 10tHe " ha
s.9. “ALCOA PLANTER" .. June 8th June 1th June Mist 4° a
ew
i J Goat + ee able Ue
soe TKLCOA PEGASUS" due May 26th sails for St. John and St. Lawrence ox
River Ports, y f rd
. .
These vessels hve limited passenger accommodation, ; z ae
a alma

ne

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE. ed
APPLY:—DA COSTA & C©O., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE & :



TO HAND THIS WEEK~



|




Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominica
sailing to Europe fortnightly, The usual
Dublin,
reduction for children.



|

' |

PLANTATIONS LIMITED °:.
soeegegnesnennenenanenernesnennneneeneeteetnesenineeeneeneesneeRees







PASSAGES TO EUROPE

for
rts of call art

London, or Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual




FLASH NEWS






CANADIAN ELECTRIC IRONS & TOASTERS
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets




1 Pint + Gallon

1 Gallon





ALUMINUM
CIGARETTE CASES Se
in GOLD and SILVER ‘
Finish ; ’





REAL ESTATE |

The Purchase or Sale of Good Class Property

is usually negotiated by

JOHN M. BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
REAL ESTATE AGENT
and
AUCTIONEER
*Phone 4640 “t- Plantations Building





| P PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 31, 1951

OLDSTERS FEAR
CRICKET DYING

VICTORIA, British Colombia
White haired, tweed-clad Vic-
torians—the breed that rightly
or wrongly gave this city its de-
signation of being “more English
than England”—are depressed.
Cricket is on the way out as
one of the recognised sports here.











Church Girls’

| ‘ARCTIC PRINCE’ WINS DERBY

Brigade Sports
Photo Finish for Second ee

And Third Positions ki

their Annual Sports at Codrington
College on Empire Day and the
(From VERNON MORGAN)
EPSOM DOWNS, Surrey, May 30.

there was a steady supply of fol-
lowers of the game from which
the regular teams could draw
That supply has dried up.”
Thrives Elsewhere
Elsewhere in Canada however
the sport is thriving. For the last
few years there has een a do-

La at

T INNER
THREE MES Ww All Saints’ Company won the Cup.
“ : The Rally, of which the sports
formed part was well attended and
a, service at the St. John’s Church

preceded the open-air activities.
Companies of the Church Lads’
Brigade attended and arranged
and supervised the programme for




JOSEPH McGRATH of Eire carried off Britain’s rich- the girls. ge pessimists predict it won't minion championship tournensens

est ever Derby when his colt Arctic Prince cantered away PRIZE LIST ee eee tO Ry Se, Pca test “sonra
~ from a huge id to win easily by six lengths. Arctic Class I—H. Jemmott (All Saints) or the last time. provinces, won last year by the

ug y by six lengths. retic Class W—G. Cumberbatch (St. Ontario eleven. Ontario beat the

Prince started at 28/1. Andrew's), One of the chief reasons for the British Columbia team 121—94

Class 111—Mavis Clarke (St. Clement's).
Class 1V—Marcene Gilkes (All Saints’.
Class V—Elsie Cummins (St. Clement's) .

decline of cricket here is that

After a photo, the 50/1 outsider Sybil’s Nephew was the elementary schools no longer

placed second and the Irish colt Signal Box, a 20/1 chance,

on the final day of play at Win-
nipeg last summer, and the 1949







i irty Relay Race (Jnrs)—All Saints. include it in their list of play- champions, Alberta, took third
third. Thirty-three ran, The Irish owned ” Colt ‘tratried Sack , Race (Snrs)—N Carter (St. ground sete They used to, omar
; : pada . + oaths . Leonard’s) ut a y was hit on the -head ame in Canada wil Y
. in England by Willie Stephenson (EER neh, Race (Snra—E. Blackman by @ cricket ball and his scalp a ‘great flllip Be vad al a
‘ ; 1 1 sit of :
Water Polo and tidden |. by ie Boghish ma ; a ey Vietrix’ Ludorum (Jnrs)—M. Gilkes Was cut. Cricket was summarily Marylebone Cricket Club side
jockey Charlie Spares took the \ em i (All Saints) . banned as being too rough. this summer. The tourists arrive
lead after rounding Tattenham s 4 P , Victrix Luderum (Snrs)—M. Clarke hen there’s the question of jn Montreal July 31 and the
corner and won the 172nd run- (St. Clement's) - ;

Opens Next Week

CHAMPION CUP supply. There is no manufactur- M.C.C, meets representative Ca-

, S ae - aoe a = All Beinte, Coy. sins — ae cement = Ca- nadian elevens at Toronto, Cal-
; ) Pe See ere Cer ae a oe : an uring e cond gary and Vancouver. The tourists
; oe mt eee Tt ro‘ None of the fancied horses Jnre—D. | Bawards (All Saints); L. World War it was impossible to will also play at Ottawa, St.
“I Eight cam sent ta fi e indies? finished in the first four and it Cesc Antrobua (St. John), §. Me #et it from Britain. Catharines and London, Ont.,
teams have entered for the ton was left to Lord Milford’s Sybil’s Clean (St. Stephen) And “upstart” sports such as Winnipeg, Edmonton, Victoria
competitions. The men’s teams Nephew, a colt of uncertain lacrosse, baseball and hockey are and Vernon, B.C.—CP)
are, Snappers, Swordfish, Flying Parentage, to take second place shoving the ancient game out of



Fish, Bonitas, Barracudas, Police, Just in front of the Irish ‘Two the picture, here at least. Vic-



Harrison College and Whippo
Rays. The Ladies’ teams are
Goldfish, Starfish, Sea Nymphs,
Mermaids and a team from the
Ursuline Convent.

The games. are to be played at
the Barbados Aquatic Club, by
kind permission of the manage-
ment. Matches will be played on
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays.
The ladies will play one match on
Tuesdays and sometimes two or
Fridays. The men will play on
Tuesdays and Thursdays.



There will be a special Gen-
eral Meeting of the Water
Polo Association at the Bar-
bados Aquatic Club this after-
noon at 5 o'clock.

Oné of the items on the
agenda is to decide whether
the season should not be post-
et for a couple of weeks
ue to unforeseen circum-
stances.



Snappers, last year’s Cup win-
ners though they have lost the
Manning twins to Harrison Col-
lege have unearthed some new
talent and they seem to be in a
comfortable position as the 1951
season opens. Flying Fish who
finished second last year have two
newcomers. They are still looking
for one or two more playéts. Bar-
racudas, Swordfish and Bonitas
are iff more or less the same posi-
tion as Flying Fish

Police and Harrison College
Will be entering teams from their
‘tanks’. For Harrison College this
ys the first time they will be enter-
ing the game as a team, but they
have several experienced players
who have been playing water polo
for two or three years. Their team
ig a group of keen youngsters and
much is expected of them when
the season gets going. Whippo
Bays are making their debut to
wa

er polo, Players of this team
are mostly from Black Rock and
the Paradise Beach Club area.

Eighty per cent of the ladies
playing water polo this season
started training about six weeks
ago for the first time. The other
twenty per cent. began playing last
November when Trinidad sent a
ladies: team to Barbados. The la-
dies have taken to the game like
a duck to water. Beyond all hopes
they have shown that they can
play the game, and are improving
every day. It is anticipated that
competition between these five
_teams~ will be greater than the
competition between the men’s
teams.



E s
S. Africa Recovers
After Bad Start
ILFORD, Essex, May 30

The South African cricketers,
after losing five wickets for 46
runs, scored 312 for 9 wickets on
the first day of their match against
Â¥ssex here today,

They were chiefly indebted to
John Waite 128, Athol Rowan 40
and ‘Hugh ‘Tayfield 68, who
brought about a revival after the
earlier batsmen had failed against
the pace bowling of Trevor Bailey
and Ken Preston, and the spin of
Peter Smith —Reuter.



Traffic Do’s

No. 15

GIVE REGULAR
ATTENTION

TO YOUR BRAKES,
STEERING AND

TYRES
Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.







They'll Do It Every Time vrscmee By Jimmy Hatlo |

Now OUR HEROINE |S THIRTY: AND

"When aspioist a WAS TWENTY,

Thousand Guineas winner Signal

Box.
Bright Sun ,

After a really Arctic morning,

which inspired many punters to

back the winner, the sun was
shining brightly as the
record field went to

including the Queen and other
members of the Royal family.

Arctic Prince is a son of the
1946 French Derby winner Prince
Chevalier out of the mare Arctic
Sun.

Officially placed fourth
American owned Le Tyrol from

near —
the post
watched by some 500,000 people

ihn tebe é

ge



JUAN GANGIO, Argentine ex-bus driver, humming over the silverstone circuit, Northamptonshire,
England, in his supercharged Alfa Romeo as he won the first heat of the International Trophy Race
for Grand Prix Cars. Gangio, who broke the track record three times, won the heat at a speed of more
His best lap was 92.29 miles an hour.

than 92 miles an hour,

~

In English League

was

France, the best of the five
horses which had crossed the ° 1
Channel in a bid to win the Rickards 83,
£20,000 first prize. 4

Several horses were fractious y 7
at the start including Gordon EVERTON WEEKES w
Richards’ mount Stokes. Zuc-
chero the mount of the fifteen-

year-old boy Lester Piggott, and
the Aga Khan's Fraise Du Bois
who was finally left several
lengths.

Crocodile finished fifth, Le Vent
sixth, Nyangal seventh, Sun Com-
pass eighth, Turco ninth, Ex-
peditious tenth and Arcot last.

The winner covered the mile
and a half in 2 minutes 39 and
2/5 seconds. —Reuter.

Regatta On
Saturday

The twelfth Regatta of the cur-
rent season will be sailed oa
Saturday under the auspices of the
Royal Barbados Yacht Club.

Handicaps and starting times









































are as follows:— 3

Class No. Yacht Start at Flag
b 13 Ranger ie ea

dD 4 Seabird 2.30 Red

D 10 Van Thorndyke 2.31 Yellow
* penance iahasanacntetrenineinenennnt ines
B 481 Fantasy 2.33 Red

a War Cloud 2.33.30 Yellow
B 6 ea Flirt ewes Paitin: a wged
D 12 Rainbow 2.34 Red
Bt Moyra Biair

B B Rascal 2.35 Yellow
B® Okapi

Do Olive Blossom 2.36 Red
aes Buccaneer _ F
TT Sinbad 2.38 Yellow
dD 2 Imp 2.40 ed

B23 Gipsy

BS Mischief 2.41 Yellow
c 8 Peggy Nan

Ce 9 Folly 242 Red
E:.® Eagle

C- Seamp

K 3 Baril 244 Yellow
1 9 Dauntles: 2.45 Red

itd Miss Behave i
K &4 Comet 246 © ©6Yellow

7 Mohawk

cn Magwin

* 12 Dawn 247 Red

¢ 7 Rogue ;

c Ww Gannet 2.48 Yellow
I 2 Invader

I it Reen 2.90 Red
I 18 Cistie 251 Yellow
K 29 Cyclone

K 40 Vamoose

I 1 Gnat 2.52 Red
43% Coronetta



N.B.—To qualify in the Series all Y
must start except exempted by the Com-
mittee,

The Frontenac Cup Regatta will be
held on Thursday Tth June 1951.

H. BLAIR BANNISTER,
Starter.

M.H.S. WINS AGAIN

Modern High School defeated
Lynch’s Secondary School at
Modern High School grounds
yesterday afternoon by a margin
of 23 points to 13, The Modern
High School team with only one
more match to play has so far





4 been undefeated.

Accrington visited Bacup,

Weekes, Holt, Martindale 100’s:

Marshall 75

as in a run-getting mood when
writes Clyde Walcott in his

report on the Lancashire League games played on Whit-

Friday and Saturday. He

scored a great 132 not out in

rapid time, and Bacup were able to declare at 238 for 7

wickets. Raymer did well t
: Accrington lost 6 wkts, in scor-
ing 178 runs when time was
called. Raymer hitting an unbeat-
en 63 and Carter 47. Weekes took
1 wkt. for 49 runs,

Roy Marshall, after his attack
vf influenza turned out for
Lowerhouse in their match

against Haslingden. Haslingden
batted first and were all out for
148, J. K. Holt top seored with
55, his first half-century for the
season, Marshall bowled 5 overs
for 28 runs without taking any
wickets. Lowerhouse were all out
for $9 runs, Marshall was l.b.w. to
Holt for 9. This victory gave
Haslingden their first win of the

season,
Worrell
On Saturday Radcliffe were at
home to Heywood. Although
Frank Worrell did not get going

—. Radcliffe wére able to score 18)

runs, Worrell was caught in the
slips off George Pope for 6 runs.
Heywood were all out for 116
giving Radcliffe their second win
of the season, Worrell took one
wicket for 16 runs,

One of the mysteries of League
cricket is the absence of Sonny
Ramadhin’s narhe fram the lime-
light. Crompton were again
beaten, this time by Milnow.
The defeat was due to a 171 run-
stand between Bill Cockburn (105
not out) and Edgar Robinson (75
not out). Milnow declared at 191
for 1 wkt. Ramadhin’s return was
one for 71 in 14 overs. Crompton
were all out in 75 minutes for 71
runs. Cockburn taking 5 for 22.

Ih the Ribblesdale League, Ken
Rickards who is in brilliant bat-
ting form scored 83 on Saturday

— Another Century —

Everton Weekes followed
182. mot out with 142 not oui
against Rishton—“Superbly con
fident, the ebony score-builde:
played every ball with the cal
culated precision of f& finely ad-
justed machine, A flick of thosc
trained wrists, and an effortless
swing of that poised body—and,
away the ball winged to the
boundary,”

Bacup declared at 260 for 3@
wkts., leaving Rishton more time;
than they had taken. Rishtou!
started playing for a draw but!
with ten minutes to play and the
score at 108 the tenth wicket fell
giving Bacup their first win oi
the season.

Walcott Bowls

Enfield had their first win of
the season on Saturday in thet
return match with Accrington, In
two hours Accrington were dis-
armed and back in the Pavilion
for « meagre total of 70 runs on

hi

a good wicket. Chief factor in
Enfiela’s glory day was thie
bowling of Clyde Walcott whe

captured 6 wkts. for 30 runs in 15
overs Raymer, Accrington’s pro-
fessional was caught behind the

wicket off Walcott for a “duck.”)

Enfield had no difficulty in pass-
ing the score for the Joss of 1







© take 5 wickets for 82 runs.
wkt. Walcott scored 23°not out.

J. K. Holt scored a brilliant
century against East Lancashire
and could have won if time per-
mitted,
at 215 for 6 wkts. giving Hasling-
don 150 minutes to get the runs.
They scored 196 for 6 wkts, when
stumps were drawn.

Colne was without a_profes-
sional against Lowerhouse,: Bil
Alley fractured his finger during
the week coaching and will be
out of the game for a _ monbn
Colne batted first and declared at
192 for 7 wkts. Lowerhouse went
for the runs and were 5 short
with 2 wickets in hand at the
end of the day’s play. Roy Mar-
shall played an attractive innings
for 75.

E. A. Martindale scored a cen-
tury on Saturday in the Bolton
League.

Mosely’s XI Gets
Ist Innings Lead

MR, BOB MOSELY’S team se-
eured a first innings lead over
Mr. Frank Taylor’s XI when their
cricket match ended at the Men-
tal Hospital Winning the
toss Frank Taylor’s XI. scored
62 runs, O. Fields top-scoring with



23. Bowling for Bob Mosely’s
team E. McLeod captured four
wickets for 16 runs and C

Allamby, three for 11.

Bob Mosely’s team replied with
110. C, Allamby top-scored with
26, S. Depeza 22 and K. Walters
22. C. Reid proved the most sue-
cessful bowler for Frank Taylor’s
XI in taking four wickets for 32
runs and S, Rudder two for 23.

In their second turn at the
wicket Frank Taylor's XI knock+
ed up 28 runs for the lost of four
wickets. E. McLeod three for 14
and C, Allamby one for six.





East Lancashire declared a great reserve of energy caught



—Express.

W.L Batting Well © Wint Beats.

Me Bailey

MIDDLESEX, May 30.
An unexpected clash between
two of the greatest attractions
in British athletics to-day —
&. Me Donald Bailey of Trinidad
and Arthur Wint, Jamaican Olym-
pic 400 metre champion — pro-
vided a thrilling conclusion to a
match between the London Poly-
technic Harriers and the Uni-
versity of London here to-night.
At the end of the 300-yards race
which was a thrill from start to
finish, Wint won barely by a yard.
His time of 31.1 seconds was

excellent in view of the wind.
Although Bailey appeared to be
drawing away as they hit the
home straight, Wint calling upon

him 40 yards from the tape.

With ten yards to go, Bailey
appeared to check suddenly and
Wint just edged to the tape first.

Earlier in the programme,
Wint had won 600 yards in 73.2
teconds and, he said, “I felt so

languished after this race, that
I need some fast work, so I
thought I would take Mac on
in the 300."’—Reuter.



What’s on Today

Police Courts .... 10.00 a.m.

Speech Day at Queen’s Coi-
SONGS 2 TLE es 3.00 p.m.

Annual Police Sports at Ken-
sington Oval; 3.00 p.m.

B.F.F.A. football game:
5.00 p.m.

Basketball Second Division:
L.S.S. vs. Modern High
School at Modern High
School and Barbados Regi-
ment vs. Pirates at Harris-
on College ...... 5.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema Show at
Husbands Plantation yard,

5 57f ee 8.00 p.m.
CINEMAS :

Globe—"'Little Giant” and ‘“Cor-
vette K 225"—4.45 & 8.15 p.m.
Empire—“Two Weeks With Love”

—t45 and 8.30 p.m,
dow” and ‘“Tarzan’s Desert Mys-
Plaza (Bridgetown) — “The Win-
tery’—5.00 & 8.30 p.m.
Plaze (Oistins)—"‘Strike Me Pink”
and “Golden Eye” — 5.00 & 8.30

p.m,

Olympie—‘Songe of Mexico” and
“Undercover Woman"—4.30 and
8.15 p.m.

Gaiety—"Dear Wife” and ‘‘Rain-
bow Island''—8.30 p.m,

Aquatic Clab—"Calamity Jane” &
“Sam Bass"’—8.30 p.m.



Brion Getting Ready

For Gardner
LONDON, May 29.

Cesar Brion, Argentinian
heavyweight is “keeping his
edge nicely” for his fight with

Jack Gardner, British and Euro-
pean heavyweight champion on
June 5 at the White City here.
This is the opinion of his trainer
Sam Goldman who has_ been
trainer of several former world
champions.

Daily visitors to the gymnasium
of Jack Solon.ons, famous Lon-
don boxing promoter readily
agree with trainer Goldman that
Brion is “a glutton for work.”

Brion starts the day at 6.30
a.m. and within a few minutes
he is hard at his road work in
fashionable Hyde Park a few
strides from his hotel. He never
does less than seven miles, when
he feels he has earned his break-
fast.

When most of London is taking
lunch, he is testing two hulking
sparring partners, boxing two fast
and fierce rounds with each.

Brion spares his own punches
but he demands that his sparring
pattners give all they can.

One of them is huge Jack
Herman, a_ “displaced person”,
improving rapidly as a boxer who!
tops Cesar by at least a couple of|
inches and weighs something like
a couple of stones heavier.

Herman certainly hits hard but
his complaint against Brion is
that “he never seems to be there”
when his heftiest punches. are
flung over at his principal.

Brion is thoroughly enjoying
his first visit to Britain but is
finding a little difficulty about
meals,

Meals do cause a little concern
he admits, but he quickly adds
that he has no real complaints.

He says philosophically: “Brit-
ish fighters get along with them.
So can I.” —Reuter.

GRENADA WINS

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, May 30.
Grenada won six of seven
scheduled matches this afternoon.
Lennard Hughes beat Hugh Lar-
tigue 6—0, 6—3, Roy Hughes beat
Edward Martin 6—2, 6—0;
Clifford Date and Laurie Comis-
song beat Edgar Edwards and Lee
Wescott 6—3, 6—3. St. Vincent
and St. Lucia play to-morrow.

Italians Beat Brazilians
PARIS, May 286.

Brazilians, Roberto Cardozo
end A. Procopio were beaten in
the second round of the men’s
doubles in the French lawn ten-
nis championships here to-day.

They went down after a great
five-set tussle with Italian Davis
Cup players, Rolando Del Bello
and Fausto Gardini who won
6—2, 4—6, 4—6, U--4 and 6—3.
| , —Reuter.





BARBADOS POLICE
SPORTS

AT

KENSINGTON

ADMISSION — 1/6

TO-DAY 3 p.m.

toria’s team in the Pacific Coast
Hockey League drew

er city in the circuit.

It is just 101 years since cricket
Vietoria by
W. Colquhoun Grant, the
first independent settler on Van- “4 £
couver Island. With its equable Charlie Johnston,
climate Victoria long has been for Buenos Aires
the home of many retired folk,
including a good proportion of
The
game thrived in the friendly at-

was
Capt.

introduced to

British service pensioners.

mosphere.

Now its different. One veteran
bowler explained: “If the young-
sters do not play, then it is only
a short time until there will be
At one time
it was played in the schools and

no players at all.

CRYPTOQUOTE No. 28

YES DIED NO THUS HZ E
KHYES NO HZ

ZBK WEVO, ESW ZKRR HZ
DUH

KTRB—QHT

Last Crypt: The world forget-
ting, by the world forgot — Pope
—

J. A. CORBIN & SONS.



Be sure to meet me at the

DANCE T0-NIGHT
Princess hikes Piya Field

Sponsored by
Mr. EVERTON ST. JOHN
(Bus Conductor)

Music by Mr. C. B. Browne's
: Ork.
ADMISSION 2/-
Bar Solid





bigger \
crowds last winter than any oth-





_ BOXERS LEAVE FOR
BUENOS AIRFS

NEW YORK, M

World Featherweight Ch
Sandy Saddler, Light Heavy weig
Archie Moore and their manage:
left by plane
to-day for a

e
20.

mipion





six-week tour.
Each boxer
fights scheduled.

six non-title
—Reuter.

has





' The pleasant way
to quick relief from
_ ACID INDIGESTION -







Alka-Seltzer’s pleasant taste
and sparkling effervescence
agsures gentle efficiency.
Drop one or two tablets into
a glass of water, watch it fizz,
then drink it. Keep a
supply handy always! s+

ee





All Roads lead to SILVâ„¢R SANDS
TO-NITE
To the

md _
Grand Dance
given by
IANTHE GILL and MISS
MOLLEY BARROW
known as Hollywood
Sperting Stars)
At the
SILVER SANDS ROYAL CLUB
Music by Mr, Cleve Gittens and
his full Orchestra
ADMISSION; ; 2/-
Bar Solid as a Rock Dinner will
be served. Miss this and blame
yourself

MRS.

(Better







Vedonis
Velvet

KNIT-WEAR

Vivacious

A really smart set of

after-games wear.

Shades of Saffron,
Torquoise, National

Blue and Wine.

Pullover.......$9,.42
Cardigan... $12.63

CAVE

SHEPHERD]

& Co, Ltd.

CARDIGANS and —
PULLOVERS .

that will make you look
trim and fetching at all
times. Excellent for



















NOBODY WAS GOOD ENOUGH “OR HER-
: ACCORDING TO MAMA***>

STILL UNHITCHED. LISTEN TO
MOTHER'S SONG NOWss




|
10-13 Broad St.
|



Good News!!! Your Favourite
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Full Text

PAGE 1

I ESTABLISHED 1899 THVRSPAY. MAY SI. 1951 PRICK. fTVECENTb NO COMPROMISE: NO CHOICE Hope Abandoned For 62 Miners „ EA8IKGT0N COUNTY, Durham, May 30 J-JOPE was abandoned tonight for 62 miners entombed in a coal pit following an explosion here. Chairman of the National Coal Board, Lord Hyndley announced: "Though 3verything has been done, and is still being done at the pit, there tfi now no hope Of any of the 62 entombed miners being alive." —— He made this statement ed. Hid henthis. morning that "only i rould prrvt.it the death ml) trntr. yesterday's pit explosion rising u 8o. The revised casualty list today shounl that (14 miner* m still missing at the coal face either trapped behind thousands of tons of rubble or buried beneath it Cancels Visit To North Ireland LONDON. May 30. King GeorgeVI. who IK suffering hum Influenza today decided not to make his planned Wis h e n d Vtgfl to Northern Ireland Queen Elizabeth and Princess Margaret will carry out the proI ramme arranged for the visit. After h doctors had seen the King at Buckingham Palac e day, it was announced that the King had not shaken off attack of influenza and had do< ided on the advice of his doctors • to northern Ireland. The King's temperature WHS Mill unsettled, the Palace statement added. The King, who Is 55, had been confined to his room since last Thursday. He wag to have left for Belfast on Friday night. He had earlier this week cancelled his visit to the famous Derby horserace at Epsom today The Queen, Princess Elizabeth and Princess Margaret were attending the race. Government circles m Bel fail emphasized today thnt the King'health alone prevents him from Northern Ireland. Reporti that he had been advised to cancel the visit because of the possibility of terrorist attacks were described as "pure propaganda." The Queen and Princess Margaret will carry out the weekend programme as arranged which they would not be doing if authorities' feared any such outrage*. The Belfast police detained 13 suspected members of the Terrorist Irish Republic Army in connection with the crude petrol bomb which had been discovered and drawn to police attention liefore it could explode. Northern Ireland authorities did not believe that onv personal attack on royal personages was ulamied though Ihey feared that Extremists might further their outrages during their visit. —Reuter. Prime Minister Pasha Accused Of Contact With Reds CAIRO. May 30. IMme Minister Nahas Pasha was today accused of being in t'UCh with "Communist BOB* tacta" In Cairo. Dr. Hussein Heik.il Pasha. Leader of the liberal Constitutional Party and former President of the Egyptian Senate ami I ntei -parliamentary union said the Prime MinlMer was 'In touch v ith the Soviet Legation at Cairn and had other Communist contacts." Dr. Helkal Pasha took secre' documents containing charge* to ;he Royal Palace. The Prime Minister has ordered the public prosecutor to in. vestigate allegations which tht pro-Government newspaper. A Misti. ridu-ulcd to-day as false Dr. Hcikal Pasha's house has been searched for other document* —Reutrr, 4,100 Enter For French Election;* PARIS. MtJ M Candidates for the French general elections on June 17. total 4100 for 627 seats in Metropolitan and overseas France. 30 percent more candidates than in the IM| elections. lint the job of legislator has become less popular with women. There are only 280 women candidate* of whom about 100 are Communists. Five years ago f| ete were 384 women candidates. of whom 39 were elected. —Renter. I VI IIS II Ofr' IVIIUM t.lMM n Anuthir 15 men were knowi I dead. MM of whom died in hospital shortly after he (nought to the surface. ". rescue worker who collapsed died after hours of frantk %  k m Annas, and sttfllAfl hag the disaster area, brought the total toll of .lead ard missing to 80. warns were still making desperate efforts to breach the ticacherous loose wall of rubble, and pump air through to any nissing men who might still be live. I: .., man said. -So slender thai if it fT it will be a miracle the pit's head relatives tained their vigil Ignoring the drizzling rain and chill of the bitter wind which swept in from UH North Sea. SrJn ( %  icoi miners, scarves Otted round their nt < templed to console sobbing wives and mothers of the men who were still mltting 900 feet hrlow giound. thai their long wait was not yet over was brought by silent bend shake from rescue workeis who came to the pit' head for a brief respite "It may lake us tilt Friday t, get through to the beys." one resrue worker said. He fnU on* the 40 work-matea of trntrapped miners who Ignored the evacuation ordwi tftei ra a totday'i daw; plosion and insisted on lolnin f rescue squads.— Rrutei AWARDED the title of rather of the largest family for lftM" By the American National Father'* Day Committee Oerrtt Koorongoi, and bla wife Jolisana po*e for a airfare -rtth alghtscn of their twenty-one children. Tsere are ive setof twins sod the ago* of tfca children raags from two to twenty live year*. —Express POCKET CARTOON by OSBERI LANCASTER ( ffiu It't not : %  11 :\: h 1.1, 1. tl'i | get rid of an un that thi* ha to. toe/ore." China Vulnerable WASHINGTON. May 30 Admiral Forrest P. Sherman, Chief of the United States Naval Staff, testifying before the MacAi-thur Inquiry by the Senate, was %  ,uestloi.ed about his attitude tc the naval blockade of Red Chinn. china was vulnerable to 0 naval blockade, but he opposed States undertaking such a blockade on it* own —Reuter. SEVEN SPIES KILLED LONDON. May 31 radio said to-day that %  CWn American *pies parachuted 1 killed —Reuter Fire Engine Shipped For Barbados lli.m O.r t. OlITISglStSSlI LONDON. ,r 1 Hew nine ton me engine for Seawetl Airport. Barbados, ss well as 50 of the latest British can and light vans were today loaded aboard the M s Rreno at Tilbury for the West Indies destinations. The Bruno, which hag been .'bartered h, N.igui na\ rei]i..n.d.s. leaves tofnoi what will be its first VoyeaM •.< the West 1 The vessel was visited today > a small party of West Indies businessmen interested who were onducted round by the Captair and his Norwegian crew There la passenger accommodation or. board for ten persons, but for the voyage tomorrow ortlv 1 berths have been booked. With the mtroauction of the M S Brune. Saguenay Terminals will now be operating a 01 monthly service finn. I 0 Weal Indies. Two further vessels will he chartered shortly and if demand warrants it. they will both b) transferred to the West Indies %  iniruUdng ., threw iveokly or even more frequent h direction. It all depei ds upon the demand", an offteial of U* n told me today. The Bruno will call at Burbadket, Trinidad, Brttbh Guiana and Cuba Cotton Workers Asked To Strike ROUEAIX, Trance Ma v ft) Directors 01 the t*)ttjDB null hen today asked their workrrs to .tiikiSeven months ago the mill 1 1 1 -"iterative system of BO per cant of the I '111 the frirm of a month* w/aaji bonua The French Treasury this week I on POCJBJ %  ecunq whli h In Prance an proportionate to the sol..] being pnid by both the Company and worker* on these bonuses They sent in 1 bill for IS million francs. The Company has appealed against the decision and toda..-.(:..,. • %  %  ,, ., protest .drlke —Reuter. Flies Across Northern Ice Cap NEW YORK Captain Chart* Airline, pilot. ha made the Mist flight over the northern ice cap :i single-engined plane. H k s Mustang fighter plaae touched down at Fairbanks, Alaska today, ten hours and 29 n.inutes alter takatng off from Barbufoss. 3.20ft miles away north Norway. His average speed was about 310 miles an hour. In January, Blatr set up a r New York to I-ondon record of seven hours. 48 minutes, also In a Must ant. The loute of his latest flight 1 lay across the North Pole. Mt of the tlmi. engine failure uuuld have meant death for there were few possible landing grounds. To combat temperatures encountered ai die high altitudes he chose. Blair wore I "vital piece of equipment —a full langth .1' of thick red flannel underwear. It was the first solo attempt to A> this Arctic route in a singlesnclned plan* His efgine was a i he oarpatrol tanks Two Korewegian Vampire Jets escorted him part of the way. When the Jets turned away, he faced more than loneliness m the vast iee fields As he naarCd the pole—the I —the aircraft's rdmpais needle began to %  nstant adjustments and (-.refill t'tulatior. xrrr nrrrary l„ ^e*-., him on his course. —Renter End 0/ Lorry Strike In Sight LONDON. May 30 An end to Britain 1 U old .lorry drivenstrike Vrfal has virtually paralysed the roun• unallsed road transport system, came in sight to-night After a meeting betw.", Alfred Robens, Minister of Labour the Road Haulage Executive andj Transport Workers' Union officials announced that it hai agreed to shelve further appoint ments of "snooping", road patrols until the union had consulted Its members i|ceomm)endsti'>n to return* work by the week-end is l>ected to be put by the unofficial Road Haulage Strike Committee to a mass meeting of drivers tomorrow night—Renter. 7 Nazis Lose Appeal Against Death WASHINGTON. May 2B Sevan Na/i war i>i I •nee of death in LaiM their latest appeal in the United States Courts %  Bastian dismissed ugh) h > the prisoners' Magee who had asked the Dis•rirt Court for a permanent slay of eaeet'tiois. —Reuter. Persian Government Claims £50,000,000 TEHKKAN. Hat N THE evening newspapf* h'flalal lo-dav (juoti-d Depute Finance Minister Kareni Haasibi a.s staling thai Ihr Per Hian Government's claims aj-ainst the Anglo-Iranian Oii Company which were still Intomplele mulri he conaerva lively estimated at £50,000,000 The paper said the eativtute given bv lh.^ein Makt ?I C M0WOO0 0ii Nat naUi;,l,UM Boarft 'M " u Middle Eani's Oil Ktserves Very Vast Dr. G. M. iees Jta THE HAGUE May 30 Middle Last a on n-aervea vast that they rsceed pernapa by a Bubstautlui margia rhe total kunwn and eaumstd rt> •orvta of ihe whole North Atnerinient. an Ajudo-Iranlan oil company expert said berg s> The expert Dr. 000,000.000. RIVHIK a total of 31.9S0.000,000 barrels Since thru new Held m PtrtU id Arabia have aildci t u-<^ further 8,000.000.000 | oresent estimate of abo.it 40.000,ooo.Oon barreli or 5.300.000.000 tc.is. I)r [>.i pointed out that this figure 40,000,000,000 barrels re"hirh has been .ulivelv aXPtOn This is about 130.000 square miles out of the total current oil eonaa in the Middle Eit of Bso.oon %  duara mile-. —Reuter Filai.it klatea that Hai askcl if after niansfei ti puwi of the <>ll Companv would h le for the s.des of Per n oil. declared IT will be to if I' %  '"• %  .•OtlJlIM wttfa This will not only hung Da gtwsivlr profits, but win increase ini commtnnal ties with the About 30 cOnuUlvk are btU'iUS l**lail oil imhiduut Rritaln Franee. Holland. Nnrwa... Sweden. Swltreiland, Cermnny and ^mntrie* of the Meditei t ;ine.in tVaboard and of Eastern and North Africa. India, Pakistan nil China", he added, according to the newspaper. ilso quoted Hasslhl as station that the new Persian central oil ofnee had been formotl lo take OVal the ftini U Anglo-Iranian oil to.nuuny ane eplarement of foreign expert. nd terhnielnns bv IVi —Reuter. SAYS GENERAL RIDGWAY Big.{Deputiesi Defeat On Reds win Send Note, Has JXo Pa rat lei To Russia %  AMI ,( It 1 11 ... 1 -: H d fn m usually ,t i.ible v u .ee-. lonight that the t. res w. .!. rn Depuuaa wilt tony rrov nraaant Ian Andrei Cromyko with BSBU1 U) vttlna the Bovtat foreign Mlrdi ...1 Meet lug in the lettei part of Jul> 1 the note will probably tlso be delivered through usuatt> hplomatir chain els la '""ii meill III Moscow. The Western no.e was cspectCi. O stress the fact that the .igreen em atraadji waeaad b] bSi >' piifie. provided an ample basis 'or a useful full Hedged meet in t: >( the Foreign Ministers. The three Western DefMl ilona loday. Tnay wan SONKI to have put the finishing NII. his to then nttn effort, bu .1 Information aboul theti decision was available. A Western spokesman sun afterwards: "Ever since the We-t %  rn p /ers submitted their three ilterni.tive agendas, ihev h %  ide.tvnmnnj to |..'i %  11 ,. •i.itoVtai Governmert to atlen. %  1 .rettug of Foreign MinisterW have considered all possihill*ifs and shall eonilnue to do so II is not possible to ail sffgfj .nav or maj DOt < < — Reuter Itevin Will lie Laid To Rest At V\ cstinin.sler AJibev I.ONIXIN, ItUvf :tu Prime Minister (lenient Attlet' told the Commons today tna) foi %  Foreign Minister Ernest Bavin will ho buried in the national ferine ai Waatmlnster Abi>ey ] UM oral s."i;.h-' -i itoeman to be so hi nourad Bavin died In LgMuion on Apni 14 at the age of 70. and mated. His ashes will be re* buned in UM Abbey among th*Rinti Queen*, statostnan tnd 1 m Pi Um Mia i arinouneeri thai the burial would lake place without oil., i.,i era ,.. Ih the presence of the Bavin l.m.U .u a few friends and COlloagUOl Interment in Waatnungtar Abbey is an honour for eoinmonets paid imlv to the natlont grejlesi statesmen, men of letter* and leaders of the aimed forces. Renter TOKYO, May 30 JJNITED NATIONS SUPREME COMMANDER, General Matthew Ridgway, told correspon dent* to day. "For the enemy there is no compro mise; for us there is no choice He said various (actors, including "enormous" losses sustained in their April and May offensive, show that "there must be the growing question in the minds of the Chinese soldiers as to benefiting their Communist leaders mn.onO %  "Affray" Affair Slill A Mystery %  still %  mysti Uv 'I%  of Con motu was t. Id lodu Walter .1 %  da .1,1 i 1, .1 Lord of the Ad.11 area of IN -i 1 i' 'I. of in -nine wterk I Of a large numhrr Of contact dt.um 1 i.ltlcienllv pratnlakni %  I I IIM n be contli d t %  K'i'ii Investigated ind diving on UOJ permit A furtl a 1, 1 nlli south ot the aiiglnal apti 1 nds con* limed linen Uut I %  otnpleta it is Intended 11 carrj out a searei to the north of the man — Reuier U.S. Big Business Aeeused Of Bribery WASHINC;Te Qg parfi ihii.ti.in [>emocrat Party and its Ua 1 Dinted to theii com) %  aeti Laftlet laronghold Thev ousted I'lramuflgts and extreme left-wing So%  i.iii 1. from con oim.'iTincaptured control I of 22 out of 28 provincial .ounrili I They achieve.i these results with a ..l law winch gave all %  "its to the w lau og alliance %  aid thi-v aw was made lor tin. benefit of mailer anti-Communist pnrtlei *urh s the Liberals and Republicans. Communlata and then BoctaUtl allies claimed tliat the Christian IJeiiv.ir.il' drafted Ibg law to save themselves from defeat They pointed to Christian Penioe r al losses as an individual Bali 1 < '"IIgri , %  %  IfHfl Reuier British Banks liirrease Charges For International Trade IXNIKN. Hai M Brltl ii I .!>;. %  i ava de. -'i"i to Increase then eh.'irges foi ihuiin ing Internatl gtal ti ida to and rrom Britain aad batwoen tbeti connErst %  Th|j tjrM of money HI!I now cost about two l>* 1 1 eni poi in num which la cheaper than an> other momn whli n nii I ovet 1 %  trader* can obtain. Britain bai hitherto been lending at aimui one and %  hnif pet •ant The now ctwraea arlll 1 eost of imported ajoodi by a small frm lion "i '.in pan ant 1 by thetr pommlttee, the Banki ratal tneii 1 otnn 1 %  ion 1 ite foi "accepting 1 foreign hills of cxrhange ( %  0-called rrom Lh> praaet I 16 shillings to >* shillings per 1 sterling |ier annum. —Realer Iree World Need Not UHV H-Bomh DULLES TUCSON. AI John K'ter Dull.Hepuhhcii e'orelgn I'oht v ,\ .\ o-nlght thpt Russia'*, c*p l< It* wage a cold wai could bo quicM) b] %  ilfuH %  I %  rineauaa of bunvan liberty .onid find "poahiVO expression s-lthi in the 1. or atom bomW sal d he goal to London foi u*JJji .viii Brltl • ofth Ltd —Rrairr. limply B u< % % %  A New Issues On Saar Arise BONN. May 30 West German Chancellor U Conrad Adenauar told 1 %  %  %  nave snsen over the Saar which i-*.mo*l ir.e Government to review —Rettler PAPAGOS RESIGNS .isue* include prohibition '.if the Uv.11 House of I'lrliament 'from entering the Soar, prohibi,'ion of the Saai ; %  and a letter addressed to the S*B {Premier Johannes llofTman. by Kobert S -i roreign ATIII.'. Field Marshal Alexander I agos. Commander-in-Chlet of the Minuter on Msy ff. Greek armed force*, resigned j "The Saar question must ii to-night. He is M. He was apcircurn '.m r-, Interfere with Um Greea lorl aatabllsh good relations larntiriii cl hetv I snd franre and war on Greece in October 1940 thereby hamper reconstruction if He is an ardent R WssMatn F.uroi^ Adenauer con— Reuter. United —Reuter Tories (Criticise l.alioKi Govt. On Antarctic Issue LONDON, btu m Itai rtai k Medlgtrvativfl the Govt ment in the Commons today foi Ha 'failure to read iti Argentlne'l 1 halleng'in the An bantii lie Government was Betting ai extremely dangvrout. pi" I tiandllnf of 'hi-, matter*It had been a direct cause ol Britain being challenged in othei vital matten. in other parts of the wbrld. he contended. foreign Secretary Heii-r Mot rjion retortad that thi* was mast reniarkable seriea aaluniptlona a n d propaganda stftements.' I ted and ;.re msintaininc Uw lountry he said .— Reuter. V r.e/uelun I.in 11I l^eaves ltiniil.nl 1 1. On < %  .! % %  .-.wittlrtii. I'ORT-OF-SPAIX. May 29. Lntnanoie Lopei Cpntreras. Van %  'I '•'<•> •ral and Dean or the Consular Body is expei ti-ii to leava Tnnidad in June lot Vaneauela. He will not return. Lieut-Col i'-ioll has been named at nis successor. SLAVF. CAMPS KARACHI M Mi .1 i.f i i.ini .Lir.ivt China f the rasnsrveJi United States tank and Infantry olumnn r. 1 %  aaulta, %  \ nb t ithdi lifter three I HI in the from %  1 eaten i n., hai crowd UM HIM 1 In jin rgjalnii .ti.i.i ..in. intil the* broke 1 dusk. Ad down —Renter. THE "ADVOCATE" Days for NEWS DIAL 3115 Day or Night Tories Ask Aboul Grenada Riots LONDON, : : The 1 -aboui Govarnm rongly pn H ratlve hppa iltloi Ln th Houae of Coeru lo make 1, itatetnant on recant diMur-astscaa In tlrenari.i Flrat quesstlona brought froin Tot Cool O i"th ol the drctiad i I 1 I a Dt puts 5u| %  intendent •ppotntetf, Trade I iiitnii-m Can Cheek CrowHi Of ('oiniiiimisiii KARA! 111 I %  ,. national 1 of Pre. %  da* that Commuajgm usually swept .. < %  1 %  under-*.'velopefJ riiiintrie R with %  •Wlaufhl he Mig the lines 1 f Britajn*! with *tt gag and wide"prea*! Ti. I %  %  which call, d 01 1 %  : 1 security and srelfare f> r work* Vldlng foi %  living Wilge housing, stcarnevs, insm The Resolution laid d nuiKlmum period was to I rompMed, but emphasised thai Reuter I 1 %  non of 11 ipeelsl pollct ranrtered b] thi Laidalatlve Council more efferllve di %  %  provi moblUt) in *tcsling with 1 %  %  are 1 acts or violence during t! whom -ii v>ere convicted**. trifle I '•' 11 asked; Wj it 1 IriUl>lllt> to cope %  'i whic't led to men Is sufficient 1. lug on arltl "f sg-'vices partieulnrly the | i of the West ll —Reuter. DIAMONDS TORONTO A il-ye ;. %  !.' Struggle in.2t; cut diamond* m CBflOOO 11 I %  at were hidden In two rubeer ew-Uiner. %  %  them


har bados



ESTABLISHED 1895

NO



Hope Abandoned |, es a

For 62

Miners

EASINGTON COUNTY, Durham, May 30
HOPE was abandoned tonight for 62 miners

entombed in a coal
here.

pit following an explosion

Chairman of the National Ccal Board, Lord
Hyndley announced: “Though everything has been

done,

and is still being done at the

pit, there is

now no hope of any of the 62 entombed miners

being alive.’’

Visit To
North Ireland

: LONDON, May 30.
_ King George VI. who is suffer-
ing from influenza today decided
not to make his planned week-end
visit to Northern Ireland.

Queen Elizabeth and Princess
Margaret will carry out the pro-
sramme arranged for the visit.

After his doctors had seen the
King at Buckingham Palace to-
day, it was announced that the
King had not shaken off his
attack of influenza and had de-
cided on the advice of his doctors
not to go to northern Ireland.

The King’s temperature was
still unsettled, the Palace state-
ment added.

The King, who is 55, had been
confined to his room since last
Thursday. He was to have left for
Belfast on Friday night.

He had earlier this week can-
celled his visit to the famous
Derby horserace at Epsom today
The Queen, Princess Elizabeth
and Princess Margaret were at-
tending the race.

Government circles in Belfast
emphasized today that the King’s
health alone prevents him from
visiting Northern Ireland.

Reports that he had been ad-
vised to cancel the visit because
of the pessibility of terrorist at-
tacks were described as “pure
propaganda.”

The Queen ang Princess Mar-
garet will carry out the weekend
programme as arranged which
thi would not be doing if
authorities feared any such out-

rages.
The Belfast polite detained
13 suspected members of the

Terrorist Irish Republic Army in
connection with the crude petrol
bomb which had been discovered
and drawn to police attention
before it could explode.
Northern Ireland authorities
did not believe that any personal
attack on royal personages was
planned though they feared that
Extremists might further their
outrages during their visit.
—Reuter.



Prime Minister
Pasha Accused Of
Coritact With Reds

CAIRO, May 30.
Minister Nahas Pasha
was today accused of being in
teuech with “Communist con-
taets” in Cairo,

Dr. Hussein Heikal Pasha,
Leader of the Liberal Constitu-
tional Party and former Presi-
dent of the Egyptian Senate and
Inter-parlizmentary union — said
the Prime Minister was ‘in touch
with the Soviet Legation at Cairo
and had other Communist con-
tacts.”

Dr. Heikal Pasha took secret
deeuments containing charges to
the Royal Palace,

The Prime Minister has order-
ed the public prosecutor to in-
vestigate allegations which the
pro-Government newspaper, Al
Misri, ridiculed to-day as false.

Dr. Heikal Pasha’s house has
been searched for other docu-
ments.—Reuter,

Prime



4,100 Enter For

French Elections

PARIS, May 30.

Candidates for the French gen-
eral elections on June 17, total
4,100 for 627 seats in Metropoli-
ten and overseas France, 30 per-
cent more candidates than in the
1946 elections.

But the job of legislator has
become less popular with women.
There are only 280 women can-
didates of whom about 100 are
Communists. Five years ago
fhere were 384 women candidates,
of whom 39 were elected.

—Reuter.

China Vulnerable

WASHINGTON, May 30

Admiral Forrest P. Sherman,
Chief of the United States Naval
Staff, testifying before the Mac-
Arthur inquiry by the Senate, was
questioned about his attitude to
the naval blockade of Red China.
He said China was vulnerable to
a naval blockade, but he opposed



the United States undertaking
such a blockade on its own.
—Reuter.



SEVEN SPIES KILLED
LONDON, May 31
Moscow radio said to-day that
seven American spies parachuted
into various parts of North Korea
had been captured and killed
—Reuter

King Cancels

He made this statement at
Croydon Airport after a flying trip
to the scene of the disaster. He
had left rescue squads battling on
amidst intense heat and swirling
clouds of black gas in an attempt
to bring out more bodies.

Exhausted rescue workers grimy
and heavy-@yed, said here this
morning that “only a miracle”
could prevent the death roll from
yesterday's pit explosion rising to
80. The revised casualty list to-
day showed that 64 miners were
still missing at the coal face either
trapped behind thousands of tons
of rubble or buried beneath it.

Another 15 men were known to
be dead, one of whom died in
hospital shortly after he was
browght to the surface,

A rescue worker who collapsed
and died after hours of frantic
work in fumes and stifling heat in
the disaster area, brought the total
toll of dead and missing to 80.

Rescue teams were still making
desperate efforts to breach the
treacherous loose wall of rubble,
and pump air through to any
missing men who might still be
alive.

“It is a slender chante,” a rescue
man said. “So slender that if it
comes off it will be a miracle.”

At the pit’s head relatives
maintained their vigil ignoring
the drizzling rain and chill of the
bitter wind which swept in from
the North Sea.

Grim faced miners, scarves
knotted round their necks at-



COMPROMI



FATHER OF

mâ„¢

.

THURSDAY, -MAY 31, 1951





LARGEST



Ore.

AWARDED the title of “Father of the largest family for 1951” by the American National Father's

Day Committee Gerret Koorengor, and his wife Johanna pose for a-
There are five sets of twins and the ages of

twenty-one children.
twenty-five years.

e with eighteen of their
e children range from two to
~—Express.





Fire Engine | Persian Government

Shipped For
[ppe (Or
Barbados
(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, May 30.

A new nine ton fire engine for
Seawell Airport, Barbados, as
well as 50 of the latest British
cars and light vans were today
loaded aboard the M.S. Bruno at
Tilbury for the West Indies des-
tinations. The Brute, which has
been chartered by Saguenay
Terminals, leaves tomorrow on
what will be its first voyage tc
the West Indies.

The vessel was visited

Claims £90,000,000

” TEHERAN, May 30.
___ THE evening newspaper Ettalat to-day quoted Deputy
Finance Minister Kazem Hassibi as stating that the Per
sian Government's claims apainst the Anglo-Iranian Qil
Company which were still incomplete, could be conserva
tively estimated at £ 50,000,000,
The paper said the

Secretary of the Oil Na’
£ 100,000,000.

te given by Hussein Maki
nalisation Board, was abou:



- amine states that Hassibi when
ay ’ asked if after iransfer the powe:
Middle East s Oil of the Oil Company would bi

responsible fot the sales of Per



a i i te

toda
tempted to console sobbing wives 4

and mothers of the men who were
still missing 900 feet below
ground.

by a small party of West Indies
businessmen interested who were
conducted round by the Captain
jand his Norwegian crew. There

News that their long wait was, is passenger accommodation on
not yet over was brought by a;board for ten persons, but for
silent head shake from rescue|the voyage tomorrow only five
workers who came to the pit’s)berths have been booked.
head for a brief respite.

“It°may take us till Friday td With the imtroduction of the

M.S. Bruno, Saguenay Termin-
als will now be operating a once
monthly service from London to
the West Indies.

Two further vessels will be
chartered shortly and if demand
warrants it, they will both be

get through to the boys,” one res-
cue worker said. He was one of
the 40 work-mates of the trapped
miners who ignored the evacua-
tion order after yesterday’s dawn
explosion and insisted on joining
the rescue squads.—Reuter.

transferred to the West Indies
service, making a three weekly

or even more frequerit sailing in

POCKET CARTOON

each direction.
by OSBERT LANCASTER “It all depends upon the de-
mand”, an official of the Com-

pany told me today.

The Bruno will call at Barba-
dos, Trinidad, British Guiana and
Cuba.



Cotton Workers
Asked To Strike

ROUBAIX, France, May 30.

Directors of the cotton mill here
today asked their workers to
strike. Seven months ago the mill
adopted a co-operative system of
paying erhployees 50 per cent of
the profits in the form of a month-
ly wage bonus.

The French Treasury this week
decided to insist on social security
payments—-which in France are
proportionate to the salary earned
—being paid by both the Company
and workers on these bonuses.
They sent in a bill for 15 million

“Ie’s not that L’m defeatist,

Achmet, it’s just that i can’t a BM ss led
: . ympeny has appeale
get rid of an uneusy feeling against the decision and toda:

that this ha» been cried

asked its employees to organise a
before.”

protest strike



—Reuter.

End Of Lorry
Strike In Sight

LONDON, May 30.
An end to Britain’s three-day-
old ,lorry drivers’ strike which
has virtually paralysed the coun-
try’s* nationalised road transport
system, came in sight to-night.
After a meeting between Al-
fred Robens, Minister of Labour,
the Road Haulage Executive and
In January, Blair set up a new| Transport Workers Union offi-
New York to London record of] iais announced that it had
seven hours, 48 minutes, also in| #8reed to shelve further appoint-
a Mustang. ments of “snooping”, road patrols
until the union had consulted its
The route of his latest flight’ members.
lay across the North Pole. Most Hjecommyendation to resume
of the time, engine failure would| work by the week-end is ex-
have meant death for there were| pected to be put by the unofficial
few possible landing grounds. Road Haulage Strike Committee
To combat temperatures en-|to a mass meeting of drivers to-
countered at the high altitudes he| morrow night—Reuter.
chose, Blair wore a “vital piece
of equipment”—a full length suit
of thick red flannel underwear.
It was the first solo attempt to
fly this Arctic route in a single-
engined plane. His erigine was a
Rolis Royce Merlin and he car-
riod extra petrol tanks.
Two Norewegian Vampire jets
escorted him part of the



Flies Across
Northern Ice Cap

NEW YORK, May 30 |

Captain Charles Blair, American
Airlines pilot, has made the first
flight over the northern ice cap in
a single-engined plane.

His Mustang fighter plane;
touched down at Fairbanks,
Alaska today, ten hours and 29
minutes after taking off from
Barbufoss, 3,200 miles away in
north Norway. His average speed
was about 310 miles an hour.



7 Nazis Lose Appeal
Against Death

WASHINGTON, May 29.
Seven Nazi war prisoners un-
way.|der sentence of death in Lands-





When the jets turned away, he] berg prison, Bavaria to-day tos!
faced more than nine hours of!their latest appeal in the United
loneliness in the vast ice fields.; States Courts

As he neared the Pole—the Federal Judge Walter Bastian
earth’s magnetic field—the air-Idismissed the suit brought by
craft’s compass needle began tojthe prisoners’ lawyer Warren
react. Constant adjustments andjMagee who had asked the Dis-

careful regulation were
to keeb him on his course.
—-Reuter.

necessary|trict Court for a permanent stay
‘a

of executions



—Reuter.










Reserves Very Vast
Dr. G. M. Lees

THE HAGUE, May 30.

The Middle Bast’s ou i: eserves
are so vast that they exceed per-
haps by a substantial margi,
the total konwn and. estemated
serves of the whole North Ameri-
can Continent, an Anglo-Iranian
oil company expert said here to-
aay.

The expert Dr. G. M. Lees,
described these “giant oilfields
which are unique in the world” in
a lecture to the Third World
Petroleum Congress now meeting
here,

He said-that if as suggested
“one fifth of the total oil has al-
ready been discovered there, the
total reserve would be about
200,000,000,000 barrels compared
with the proved reserves of the
United States, currently esti-
mated at about 26,000,000,000
barrels and a total ultimate pro-
duction of 10,000,000,000 barrels.

In view of the present early
stage of exploration throughout
the vast area, tetal reserves may
be several times the estimate of
those already proved, he added.

Proved Middle East reserves in
1949 were; Kuwaith 10,950,000,-
000 barrels, Saudi Arabia 9,000.-
000,000, Persia 7,000,000,000 and
Iraq 5,000,000,000, giving a totat
of 31,950,000,000 barrels,

Since then new fields in Persia
and Arabia have added at least
a further 8,000,000,000 giving the

present estimate of about 40,000,- |’

000,000
teas.

barrels or 5,300,000,000

Dr. Lees pointed out that this
figure 40,000,000,000 barrels re-
lates only to the area which has

been actively explored to date.
This is about 130,000 square miles
out of the total current oil con-
cession of an area in the Middle
East of 850,000 square miles.
—Reuter,



U.S. Big Busiriess
Accused Of Bribery

WASHINGTON, Liay 30.
Tongress industrial organisa-
tions representing 6,000,000 organ-
ised workers to-day accused big
businegs of trying to bribe Labour
to join in “scuttling price con-

trols’ and then “share in the
ioot”’.
The organisations’ Secretary-

Treasurer James B. Carey, in a
statement to the Senate Banking
Committee named in particular
the Nationa! Association of Manu-
facturers and the United States
Chamber of Commerce.

He said the organisations were
guilty of “complete irresponsi-
bility and narrow greed that
could wholly wreck our defence
programme”.

“They propose ending price and
wage controls” he declared.

“We see in this big business
programme simply a bribe offered
to Labour.” —Reuter.

PAPAGOS RESIGNS

ATHENS, May 30.
Fielq Marshal Alexander Pap-
agos, Commander-in-Chief of the



Greek armed forces, resigned
to-night. He is 66. He was ap-
pointed to command the Greek
Army on Italy’s declaration of
war on Greece in October 1940
He is an ardent Royalist
—Reuter,

the benefit of Persi- if sales arc



sian oil, declared; “It will be to

a

a with overseas buyers.
“This will not only bring us

greater profits, but will increase

our commercial ties with the
wer

“About 30 eduntries are baying
i oil. ineluding * 4

, Holland, Norway, Swe-
den, Switzerland, Germany and
countries of the Mediterranean
Seaboard and of Eastarn and
North Africa, India, Pakistan
and China”, he added, according
to the newspaper.

It also quoted Hassibi as sta-
ting that the new Persian cen-
tral oil office had been formed
to take over the functions of the
Anglo-Iranian Oil Company and
articles of the association of this
body were almost completed.

Hassibi, who is Prime Minister
Moseddegh's candidate as chief of
Persia's nationalised oil industry,
was also quoted as saying the
first stage of nationalisation
would be the transfer of author-
ity of the oil company to a new
central oil office: (this, of course
is distinct from the Oil Nation-
alisation Board) which will as-





Big 3 Deputies|
Will Send Note

To Russia

PAPIS, May 30

It was understood from usually
reliable sources tonight that the
three Western Deputies will to-
morrow present the Soviet deputy
Andrei Gromyko with a note in-
viting the Soviet Foreign Minis-
ter to attend a Four Power Meet
ing in the latter part of July
Copies of the note will probably
also be delivered through usually
diplomatic channels to the. Soviei
Government in Moscow.

The Western noie was expected
to stress the fact that the agree-
ment already reached by the
Deputies provided an ample basis
for a useful full fledged meeting
of the Foreign Ministers.

The three Western Deputies met
ilone today. They were under-
stood to have put the finishing
teuches to their news effort, bu’
no official information about their
decision was available.

A Western spokesman = sai
afterwards: “Ever since the West-
ern pe’ vers submitted their three
alternative agendas, they have
seen endeavouring to persuad
the ‘soviet Government to attend
+ nieeting of Foreign Ministers
We have considered all possibili-
ties and shall continue to do so
It is not possible to say what
nay or may not be done.”

—Reuter,

————————



Bevin Will Be
Laid To Rest At
Westminster Abbey

LONDON, May 30

Prime Minister Clement Attlee
told the Commons today that for-
mer Foreign Minister Ernest Bevin
will be buried in the nationa!
shrine at Westminster Abbey—
the first Socialist statesman to be
So honoured.

Bevin died in Londen on April
14 at the age of 70, and was cre-
mated. His ashes will be re-
buried in the Abbey among the
remains of Britain’s Kiras,
Queens, statesmen and poets.

The Prime Minister announced
that the burial would take place
without’ official ceremony in the
presence of the Bevin family and
a few friends and colleagues.

Interment in Westminster Abbey
is an honour for commoners paid
only to the nation’s greatest
statesmen, men of letters and}
leaders of the armed forces.

Reuter,

—— acetates ersosaoreaaiaerinenetienceamsiatahis

; to-night that Russia's capacity to





British Banks
lhicrease Charges

For International Trade

LONDON, May 30.
bunks have decided to
increase their charges for financ-

British

cay the functions of the Com- ing international trade to and from
‘ing itai > air coun-
The second stage would be a een Rly. _Datween “thelr -¢
replacement of foreign experts This type of money will now
and technicians by Persians, Us

—Reuter.

BOTH ‘WON’
ROME, May 30

Both anti - Communists and
Communists today interpreted the
results of North Italy's municipal
and provincial elections as a biy
vietory for their cause,

Premier Aicide We Gasperi’s
Christian Democrat Party and its
allies pointed to their conquest of
such Leftist strongholds as Genoa
and Venice. They ousted Commu-
nists and extreme left-wing So-

| cialists from scores of other town

councils. They captured control
of 22 out of 28 provincial councils.

They achieved these results with
an electoral law which gave all
council seats to the winning party
er alliance

Christian Democrats said this
law was made for the benefit of
smaller anti-Communist parties
such as the Liberals and Republi-
cans,

Communists and their Socialist
allies claimed that the Christian
Democrats drafted the law to save
themseives. from defeat. They
pointed te Christian Democrat
losses as an individual party com-
pared with political elections of
1948.—Reuter.



New Issues On
Saar Arise

BONN, May 30

West German Chancellor Dr.
Konrad Adenauer told a crowded
Parliament today that “new issues
Have arisen over the Saar which
eompel the Government to review
its position.
| These issues include prohibition
pat the Lower House of Parliament
from entering the Saar, prohibi-
j tion of the Saar Democratic Party
(and a letter addressed to the Saar
|Premier Johannes Hoffman, by



‘Robert Schuman, French |

Minister on May 9.
‘eircumstances interfere with ef-
forts to establish good relations
between Germany and France and
thereby hamper reconstruction of
Western Europe,” Adenauer con-
tinued.— Reuter

Cn

“The Saar question must in no} treras,

cost about two per cent per an-
num which is cheaper than any
other money which most overseas
traders can obtain.

Britain has hitherto been lend-
ing at about one and a half per
eent.

The new charges will raise the
cost of imported goods by a small
fraction of one per cent

Subject to confirmation by their
committee, the Banks intend to
raise their commission rate for
“accepting” foreign bills of ex-
change (so-called “acceptance
credit’) from the present rate of
15 shillings to 24 shillings per
hundred sterling per annum,

—Reuter.

}
Tories Criticise
Labour Govt.

On Antarctic Issue

LOINDON, May 30

Brigadier Frank Medlicott, Con-
s€rvative, criticised the Govern
ment in the Commons today for
its “failure to react strongly” tc
Argentine’s challenge in the An-
tarctic.

The Government was setting ar
extremely dangerous precedent by
their “mishandling of this matter.”

It had been a direct cause of
Britain being challenged in other
vital matters in other parts of the
world, he contended.

oreign Secretary Herbert Mor-

rigon retorted that this was “a
most remarkable series of
asbumptions and propaganda

statements.” =

“We have asserted and are main-
taining the rights of this country”
he said,—Reuter.



Verezuelan Consul
Leaves Trinidad

(From Our Own Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 29
Senor Fernando Lopez Con-
Venezuelan Consul Gen-
@ral and Dean of the Consular
Body is expected to leave Trini-

LT



dad in June for Venezuela, He
| will not return Lieut-Col
| Ne te Paoli has been named



1ecessor

PRICE: F CENTS

E: NO CHOICE

SAYS GENERAL RIDGWAY

Defeat On Reds
Has No Parallel

TOKYO, May 30.
UNITED NATIONS SUPREME COMMANDER,
General Matthew Ridgway, told correspon-
dents to-day: ‘For the enemy there is no compro-

mise; for us there is no choice.’’

He said various factors, including “enormous’’
losses sustained in their April and May offensive,
show that “there must be the growing question in
the minds of the Chinese soldiers as to benefiting
their Communist leaders.” Ss ash ye aoe

rs ; Chinese prisoners of war had been
“Affray” Affair |

since April 10



There as clear evidence from

° r prisoners that desertions had as-

Stull A Mystery isumed reat si¢nifieance and was
-
a serious problem
LONDON, May 30 i
‘ am ’ He said the major defeat in-
Disappearance of the British | i :

. . flicted on two Communist offen-
submarine Affray six weeks ago is |” : 2 oe i
still a mystery, the House of Com- | Sives in April and May by “this
i ae ; . magnificent United Nations force”

mons was told today Walter J
Edwards, Civil Lord of the Ad-
miralty, said the search had nov

had no parallel in history.
Savage Chinese counterattacks
slowed down the United N:z





covered an area of 150 square] â„¢) fore:
tniles of the English Channel. bu fadvance into Northern Korea to-
no sv>marine wreck has been |@4Y, and Allied troops pushed

against a solid screen of Commun-
ists ready to die where they stood
rather than give further ground

positively identified so far

Of a large number of contact






aearides to be "pv otal ia Allied troops battled throughout
livers, he continued, Five havi daylight hours yesterday au
been investigated and diving on drenching monsoon rains all along
the other two will take place a the central and East central front.
soon as conditions permit , Heaviest fighting raged north: of

A further area 4 miles wide nje and southeast es Yanggu at
south of the eriginal area is now | ‘%° easrerh’ ip at the Hwachon
seing searched, Edwards ‘con- reservoir north and east of Hwa-
tinued. “When this is complete it chon and in the triangle formed by
is intended to carty out a search the Imjin and Hacan rivers, seven
eth siorth ad the. mek erea* miles north of the 38th Parallel

—Reuter. Allied airstrikes, artillery and

mortar bombardments failed to
dislodge one battalion southeast of
Yabgu Tanggu and the American
infantry finally had to go in with



Free World Need

‘ their bayonets to gain their ob-
» ie jectives
Not Use H Bomb Two large Communist truck

eonvoys with headlights blazing
and believed to be carrying rein-
“s-cements were reported heading
south along roads northeast and
southeast of Yanggu Massed
Allied artillery poured shells on
convoys, but resulls were not fte-

DULLES

TUCSON, Arizona, May 30
John Foster Dulles, Republican
®oreign Policy Adviser said here

wage a cold war could be quickly} Ported. ; :
destroyed “by skilfully applied The Chinese threw in heavy at-
pressures”. ; tacks against the United . States

units “around. Hwachon as South
Koreans seized the high ground
overlooking the Hwachon dam at
the western tip of the reservoir
and finally sealed the last escape
route left open to remnants of the
Communist division trapped south
of the reservoir,

The cause of human liberty
could find “positive expression
without the use of atom bombs”
he said.

The free nations should plan
“in terms of our own. strength
and our opponent's weakness”.





Despotic Societies “always look United States tank and infantry
more formidable than they are |] columns repulsed fierce Chinese
he told an audience at the Uni-! assaults,
versity of Arizona. A counterattack west of the
Pe I A ‘ a ib ruined town forced the Americans

; . eee eu tc withdraw from hill positions
visors is now preparing a Japan- after three and a half hours of
se peace treaty. Next week- battle
end he goes to London for talks In the western sector Aflied
with British officials. forces gained five miles at Some

—Reuter, points and South Koreans who had

| crossed the River Imjin against

stubborn resistance, thrust Com-

SLAVE CAMPS munists back until they broke

contact at dusk
Naval units ranged up and down
the coast during the day-shelling
of s-attered groups of Communists.
—Reuter.

KARACHI, May 30
Most of Communist China was
described as ‘near starvation” by
the Chinese Nationalist delegate
at the Asian Regional Conference | poset

of Free Trade Unions here to-day THE





“ADVOCATE”

China

had, he alleged, con- 7
icripted at least 541,000 workers pays for NEWS
‘for slave camps in Russia and DIAL 3113

atellite lands More than 11,000,- }
100 Chinese workers had been}
irafted into service connected with |
the Korean war Reuter.

Day or Night



Tottes “Ask About

Grenada Riots

LONDON, May 30,
The Labour Government was strongly pressed by the
Conservative Opposition in the House of Commons to das
to make a statement on recent disturbances in Grenada

| First questions brought from Tom Cook, Colonial Unde:

Secretary the reply: “The strength of the Grenada Police



Force has been increased and a Deputy Superintendent
appointed
In addition a proposal for cr
i . tion of a special police reserv:
Trade Unionism now being considered by tt

Legislative Council.

Steps are being taken to secur
more effective distribution of the
force to improve its mobility
and patrol arrangements in deal-
ing with disorder.

Can Check Growth
Of Communism

KARACHI, May 30 “Up to May 19, there were 2
On the lines taken in Great prosecutions for acts of violence
Britain an Indian delegate, Sub- during the recent disturbances
math’ Banerjee told the Asiar These involved 57 ner sons. ct
Regicnal Conference of Inter-| “hom 45 were convicted”.
national Confederation of Free Walter Fletcher, Conservativ
Trade Unions today that Com-| @ iked: Was it n at clear that the
munism usually swept over inability of island’s police force
‘under-developed countries with| tO cope with the situation which

led to employment of service-
men is sufficient reason for press-
ing on with integration of ser-
viees particularly the police on
whole of the West Indies?
—Reuter.

poor inhabitants.”

To check its onslaught he sug
gested state socialism on the lines
ef Britain's with strong and wicde-
spread Trade Unionism a

The Conference adopted
Resolution which called on Asian












Government to immediately
draw up a bold and planned DIAMONDS
programme” of social security TORONTO
and welfare for workers ‘pr A 2l-year-old Rumanian di
viding for a living wage, adequate |} placed person is now under-at
housing, sickness, insurance, SG) in Montreal, accused of-try ..%
ago pension and sickness benefit le 0.908 “ut jidmoncds
: smuggle 10,206 cu é 1
The »sol ion laid ow the! ” — .
The Resolution laid down the) i more than £66,000 ir
maximum period of ter ars in} Aanada The dianednde a
which the programme ; to be} Ba :
, 7 lhi nm i \ r r e@ ainers
completed, but emphasised that aj hidden in vo rubber eont ,
; and it toa three police exper
beginning should be ide ir « a t

“|

Reuter.
crn

Caub Calling

PAGE TWO












A KHAMA

ROW ?

\

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE





THURSDAY, MAY 31, 1951

eee

SENIOR COMPETITION

The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girls
between the ages of 12—19 to send in a humorous essay, story or poem
on the subject of “CAMELS”. Entries must reach the Short Story Editor,







Communist

Way?















































































































































































t2OUR ny onhaael 7 Queen of the ~
POURTEEN members of the Barbados Holida PARIS. | advocate Co., Ltd., City, not later than Wednesday every week. The
amaica football team left ARTIE'S HEADLINE ISS PEGGY O'DONNELL Bamangwatos best cornposition each week will be published in the Evening Advocate
xs vesterds , . * ‘ “GG D ar- . A man, i xd, was | beSt compos: ac yeek w > shed ir a
los aeetet day by the ~ eri = rived from Trinidad on ae peeta es eer nd and the winner will receive a prize of books or Stationery to the
route to Jamaica, Cay * . Ruth Khamz n p .
f. the team, Henry ‘Miller —= M4 ar. oot ie Satie ae ie edit: Sie heli ghd 13 miles from Paris. At hospital | V@lue of 12/6.
aa bias - "tA ; on sit < s stay r s. er ba : ca ae vas ti eo : ‘
wh > Ww orks with B.W.1 A. in Stoute in Rockley. Intransit to St it was discovered he was tattoo cd Send this coupon with your story.
gsto ? @ 5 « net “ — 3 s , ce
bee ~ d os ox inca Hever Lucia by the same plane was Mr. see See ans speeauaeae eee i
alr. yesterda) i . . -] , i f > . a y ar 5 a
spend a few days in. Trinidad Sue coal Ue chee pty she is thinking of were due to injections of Pen- SENIOR COMPETITION
before leaving for Jamaic: ‘ thatol, th th drug. It is pre-
y Seren i yim: Round Trippers a brother for her. eel that oe ue a Rumanian, OS. Soke ge SOR ds og oe O85 Ps AR SRD er
is the victim of an internal politi-
After Three Years aie Ruth w liga ” s ; AGE Oe hiacaeeeark esos hs eee ea
. and Mrs. Frank Wood of cal quarrel among Communists.
M* T.. BRUCE MARSHALL M “Culloden House” are mak- marriage to Se- oe ner Cape Pree ree er UE TC Teeny
— & of Fontabelle, who had ing the Caribbean Cruise by the —Reuter.
been in England for the past Colombie, which left Barbados retse Khama be- Ne OU 5s havc ccs vaspotadcecBit ter sbiteets .
three years at Cardiff Technical yesterday afternoon Other pas- . ‘
College studying Opthalmic Op- sengers going on the round trip cameaworld story A ee dence etter e reece tee eeenes Coen eee ewer eeesrereseee
tics, returned yesterday morning are Mrs. Consuele Goddard, Mrs. is happy, and does SHOPPERS PARADISE mannan
by ‘the Celombie, He intends to sn are, Miss Sarah B. ea CN. Meee rie ee ee “THEATRE '
sractise “here. rowne r. Lionel Jones, his not believe in one EDMONTON, Alberta. / — |
BMY. Marshall is the son of Mr. mother and sister Hazel. (DIAL 2310) PLAZA BRIDGETOWN
Rebert Marshall of Da Costa & En route to Jumaica by the Co- child families. Able Seaman Gerry Sinclair, on LAST = SHOWS TODAY
Co., Ltd. lombie are Mrs. Norah Wright, Story on p. 4. leave after duty with the Cana- RKO-Radio’s Big Action Double !
' “Ign’t this fust wondersus Mrs. Annie Parris, Miss Veronique dian navy in Korean waters, said ry ”
Back from U.K. Holiday Elmer—coming all that wav L. Nichols and Mr. Paul S. Shel- - Fp. . > Hong Kong is the shoppers’ para- THE se Wi N D O WwW
RS. E..L. WARD whose hus- for. this : don. BB. C. Radio Pro Tamme dise of the Orient. He said that}i] . ROARZancg “uur Menneay SPECIAL
band is P.M.O. of Christ mae To Spend One Month A with no*ttaxes there, top — DESERT Tones — 1 2M,
Church, returned yesierday te 2 m : British tweed suits were $35 an ie as . ec)
see oe Colemibie trom Trinidad Magistrate — FF to Trinidad by the Colom- , ee MAY 31, 1951 by Say it With Mule, 6:00 Pp ap List good wrist watches $7. att MYSTERY Joha Cae oe
England after about three R. B. W. CELESTAIN, Mag- bie yanleina wrietacen wat on ee ee ee meee ee as “VALLEY OF FEAR”
months’ holiday. She was accom- nee ¢ re , — Miss Grace Cumberbatch, daugh- 630 am | Sports Diary, 6.45 am 6.06—11.00 pam, — 25.58 m , 31 32 | |] sohany shemera ee ett Johnny Mack Brown
panied by their young son Rich- spent part of his long leave im ter of Mr. C. W. Cumberbatch, ?h0rting Fecrge nvsit, TIE an \pee ate ae - ~ |} i “i un << OPENING TOMORROW (Friday) 2.30 — 445 & 6.30 P.M
ard. England, is now spending. ee headmaster of St. Giles’ Boys’ gramme’ Parade. 720 am. From ‘The Analysis, 2.15 pm We Seo Britains 145 Wifj_ “DOUBLE INDEMNITY” : Fred MacMurray, Barbara
Also arriving by the Colombie Weeks’ holiday here. poeta School and Mrs. Cumberbatch of Editorials, 7.30.8 m_ Generally Speaking, pm Generally Speaking, 8.00 p m. Radio —
trom the, UK, yesterday’ “were on the Colomble, yestentay | 4: “tiolloway”, the Ivy. ee, eta tenes Ge Poe ate eat tne 1 == Sa ————
edt his wife and i | (f)
i ne on > Cc, oe ; ee re oa wSea The , She has gone for one month’s wards, u.45 am Engineering Achieve- From ‘The Editorials, 900 p'm — Special PLAZA at sins i} | GAIETY
Mr. Horlock has come out to sta) aa holiday which she will spend with ments, 9.00 am The News, 9.10 am. Dispatch, 9.15 pm Have A Go, 9 45 | BRIDGETOWN a }
take up an appointment as en- Stream. - mays har. Suter Mira: Albert Movre sot Scie mews Bram sisi UT nT Hb oe Remember! 10.00: 2 iy. Tne 5) Last Shows Today 5 & 8.30 pum. ||| THE GAKDaew —
j gineer with Messrs Cable & Mrs, _Celestain ~e en Port-of-Spain. ivel ob MeHiain, Coronation Cup, 1L4geOn- the: Perk, 1100p me Peni tg KISS AWAY a On de See, Me PINKY LAST me wee
ireless (W.1.) Ltd. rior o Mr, J, O. Gall, Assess § adm Special Dispatch, 12.00 noon The gfhird Programme. * > : ining stomhba ieee to et | DEAR WIFE” & RAINBOW ISLAND’
poi ‘s gee Pesos Fa . yee e Church. ee are ~ = News, 12.10 pm News Analys . THE STORY =e ie eed
cotning Or Aree anite ie i After Three Months 1156—6.45 pam — 19 75 m C.B.C. PROGRAMME A MURDER! OF AN 2 New Mottann Foae 2”, 2 (IIH FRE, SAT, SUN — 630 pm.
the 7 > ind “the Medit r En Route From Long R. AND ‘MRS. EDMUND I 4.15 p m. “reat Names in ith Afr GOS re Ae oe ee a “AMAZON QUEST” Jamas CAGHE Road
> Sar Hast anc > Meaiter- ‘ m 4 15, m. Gel mes in South Afri pm 10.15 . News, 10.15 bo h. ames CAGNEY is Red Ho
ranean. Leave COZIER ¢ Trinidad re- °° Cricket, 4.30 pm Top Score, 500 pm 10 30 p m ‘nls Week th me UNHOLY a Noe eae Mathews & “WHITE pi aoeenee i
° rin I pm 1951 Festival of Britain Coronation ada i 76 Mes., 25.51 m “DEVIL'S C Also Short CARIBBEA
Youngest Member R. and Mrs. G. B, Henderson turned home yesterday were Cup, 5.15 pm. Scottish Masazind, 5.45 LOVE! DEVIL'S CARGO" _Also Short — “CARIBBEAN”
‘ and their twdé children by the Colombie after spending MIDNITE SATURDAY 2nq ‘ MIDNITE SATURDAY 2nd
AV “NRY G » Poger and Stuart are spending two thr months’ holiday. They en | Paramount Presents : “REVENGE OF THE ZOMBIES” & ERISON MUTINE’ Baw. Nereis @
TyaAviD HENRY GEORGE, (08 holiday here before gcing were staying with Mr. and Mrs. ‘Rupert ar d the lee-fl — 39 ___ "MARKED TRAILS" WEST OF THE ALAMO
eight-month-old son of the (40 -prinidad where Mr, Hender- A. C. Cozier of “Ebenezer”, : f ower T ee aecrenmraas Fiased | |
Earl and Countess of Harewood <1), j, employed with “Trinidad Crumpton Street. — c rT —_ Fred MacMURRAY SONIDO g http ppnpe eae
and grancchild of cone Seen Leaseholds in the Stores Depart- Mr. Cozier is q retired hardware §g ' ae ——— Barbara STANWYCK PPLE IEDR GER CR:
Royal, has become the youngest ment, clerk. an " Edward G. ! I GLOBE
Y.M.C.A. member. They came in yesterday morn- 7 EK
“He has beeome an honorary ing on the Colomble from Eng- Doctor of Divinity | In To-day, 4.45 & 8.15 p.m. Last Shows
member in Leeds. land where they had spent two “LITTLE GIANT” (Abbott d Cost ll
Young David is a nephew of ynonths. While here they are stay- HHE Rev. Canon Malone, In- | And “CORVETT 29%) ats 0)
Gerald Las¢elles who owns the ing with Mr. and Mrs. Clarence cumbent of St. Peter’s Cathe- 66 DOUBLE 4in E K 225” (Randolph Scott)
Bele and Mount Plantations in skinner of Spring Gardens, Black qral, Prince Edward Islands, a
Barbados, Rock. brother of Sir Clement Malone has es PEER
ayer in England, Mi pees: been recommended to convocation J INDEMNITY AQUATIC
CROSSW D son said that he saw the Interna- for the honorary degree of Doc- j
e OR tional football geune between Eng- tor of Divinity. This recommenda- 1 Q A aC CLUB CINEMA (Me-.bers Only)
land and Scotland, the Cup Final tion was unanimously approved Opening To-morrow TONIGHT AT 2.30
between Blackpoo] and Newcastle and the degree was conferred in , . 2.30 — 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. Universal-International Presents - - - -
United and the Amateur Cup Final King’s College Chapel on May Though Rupert is very fright- pines. Bill and Algy have been home ie 7 . . “CALAMITY JANE AND SAM BASs"
between Pegasus and_ Bishop 10th. ened he remembers to hold tight to and have returned to the lake to d tinuing ‘dail 8 ee. Color by Technicolor
Aucklend. Canon Malone has been a priest the sledge. The cold air makes search for him. ‘* Here he comes,” and@ cont s y With DORDRIe CAL te oor ota ee
for forty-five years, thirty of him shut his eyes, and he waits for cries Algy. “Hi, Rupert, where 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. iN _with Do ART io: WILLARD PARKER :0: LLOYD BRIDGES |
On Leave which have been spent at St. the bump. hen it comes it is have you been?’’ But still Rupert bo eee CALE COMMENCING FRIDAY 1ST
AJOR ALBERT E, MOFFETT, Peter's. He was made a Canon of very slight, He finds he has landed cannot stop. The sledge streaks ————______—_—_— | JOAN FONTAINE :o: CARY GRANT
Divisional Commander of the Cathedral in 1926 and for oe nee slo Se, and is past sae heading straight for al in “SUSPICION”
a mmé . rushing down through the forest of Yutwood, sO
the Salvation Army in ee eee ae nite - oan w meee’ = ALL RIGHTS, RESBRVED * aE SE call
ate Sires souday oF TC. a cial and General Synod. ; rr ee eee ned paca an ———
for leave in Canada. During his _ He was formerly a Curate at St. | % WITH A
absence the Divisional Young Peo- Michael's Cathedral, Vicar of St, |% $ STAR”
ple’s Secretary, Sr. Captain Olive seiet 8, mg oy of ees a % % t EMPIRE ROYAL
White will be acting Divisional Barbacos and he once ac : i - . Popeye the Today Only 4.30 & 830 p.m.
Commander. kee, See ae ae % FOR ONE SOLID WEEK x Sailor) | TODAY—Last Two Shows Republic Big Double Zs
ee months. $ x 4.45 & 8.15 p.m. ° ur
- Pur, must 1 change? (8) Next Month Antigua 8 ; % Richard ARLEN and
t line) itt Pte a R. FRANK walcore Secre- Leddy Barrister % ‘ OPENI M TOMORROW ‘ 2 M-G-M presents Vera RALSTON in. . .
ea! but if It gets upset, (8) ; N BARB or a couple ‘ : ORES
. 2 . tary of the Barbados Work- : p wr ; ¥ > , “LADY AND THE
is Betty ate iD a ers’ Union who. returned from of weeks’ holiday is Miss % % “TWO WEEKS WITH , A aay 99 7
16. 14 changes to the north. (4) Grenada on Tuesday by B.W.1.A. Eugenie Charles, Barrister-at- % s VE” MONSTEI
ta Beats in les) expects to leave for Antigua June Law of Dominica. She arrived |Â¥ x LO AND
20, Pius, (4) 10th as a member of a Board of yesterday morning by the Colom- s ela a :
21, How war ts seen in fatigue, (9) Inquiry which will inquire into bie and is staying with Mr. and x Starring : “ROAD TO
Down the causes of the various disputes Mrs. Carlos E, Clarke at Palm , Z oe ae ea AT ”
+ caetaan arn sa. baht tw. Whidhchave coourred during the. Woech, Hawtngs, % Jane Powell — Ricardo ALCATRAZ
‘: 3. Sort of thing Kate would do, (4) year. The Board (other members Miss Charles is the daughter % Mdtidiban with Lould Starring Robert LOWERY
o pitees fase. (6, 8) ah équibs, (8) Sir Clement Malone, Hon. R. B. of Hon. J. B, Charles, planter of $ : June STOREY
Pye 6. A shy piece of purnt wood. (ay ence tr ake es Dominica and Mrs. Conia and 3 Calhern and Ann Harding BAe Tag ete a ar
8. A particular friend, (4) ntigua) will make recommenda~ 4 sister of Dr. R. M. F. Charles, — repay aa ent
eet a ee a eyes ta) ens ane observations as it may Medical Officer of Health, Arima, % ta ink Jat Nn hare a Pieese: Notes 3 hat ne Pore
13. Near a ring. (5) se ' : Trinidad, my 'Theatt “All be starting at
15. It’s a case, (3) Trinidad Secretary % y reatre will be st
: : stes 50 p.m.
17. The ‘body coming through ere AFTER spending six weeks holi- Incidental Intelligence % ¥ ROXY 8.15 instead of 8.30 p.m.
' " 10. —A. : day at Leaton-On-Sea, Max- NEW type of scarecrow makes 9s ee ee
1 nd 2a. Peentien century; 7, Dhobt: well, Mr. Eric Almandoz, Secre- a loud bang and waves its |¢ x | REX BEACH'S ; Today . ORG
%, “Undo; 11, Enlarge; 12, T.N.T.; 2 4 : : : ‘ Ri i 4.30 & 8.15 p.m. I ”
Gave. 14, Acid: 17, Oargo:'19, Trio: 48: tary of Messrs. Gordon Grant arms every twenty minutes. No- * 2) 4 GREATEST STORY!
Gnos; 21. Data: 22. Sea l'Across. Down: Jutd., of Port-of-Spain, returned tiing is said of its party affiliation KY oY ¥ Columbia Double— L Two Shows Today
2. When: 35, Eon; 4. Tiara; 5, Pngage; +i " ; * ‘ j ireg = %, sf ast Two Sho
BT eeo oat: t Detached: 8, Bludgeon: to Trinidad yesterday evening by or to what office it aspires. el 3 4.30. & 8.15 pm.
9. Urgent; 10,’ Debitity: 15.’ Caw: 16 B.W.ILLA. He was accompanied Canadian columnist. x (| be Robert LOWERY and ‘ ,
Irene; 18, Oast, .* by his wife and three children, L-8.8. x x | eget wend e Joan BARTON in . Republic Double . . .
7 ) ¥ | : Adele MARA and
THE ADVENTURES OF PIPA__ ; a) | TRE g rs “MARY LOU” fie
rai xacenmgaiboie be a me cere cae : _ sterrin a
' | 1% %] 2) JOHN CAPROLL + ADELE MARA AND “SONG OF MEXICO
$
| Role 1 19 > | » with MONA MARIS AND
ol Ss os | fs BN t vt % cond ROBERTS AIRALDI + VIVIAN RAY “BANDIT OF
r at 3) POT N es 3] fond introducing FERNANDO LAMAS “ OMAN"
| {| G { ' x ; Bl: ; f | EL DORADA” UNDERCOVER W
pa j ee eS ic x A REPUBLIC PICTURE 'L DORADA ehcdia
m a Gs : ‘ ieee & F LEPUBLIC PICTURES CORPORATION i U
1 ihe | Wn e ae x oan r Joseph : ___Horbert J. Yates, President | with Charles STARRETT Robert LIVINGSTON and |
1 i a “\ a & Fontaine Cotten y || and Smiley BURNETT Stephanie B |
1 ay / f i ¥
Vu \ / $ : .
| ; i % $ —— — — f
i | ; ‘, ——
1 I 2) “A ‘ly | g
+ ol agai ( /, / & 7 on ;
j de /; ’ hi / ii ig » HAL WALLIS A Columbia E M p [ R E STARTS
‘ “is $ ’
| ‘ / Sa . i
‘ :
~ ie ora 1g 5 ye Masterpiece!
{OOOO GG SOS O9OSSS POCO POTS OOOTSES POGO% x R ep er : } Sa ean Kg BREE: - «pn a
> . 1X - -
¢ ¥18
zt % x , v7)
s Vis 4
+~ ‘. .
x Seg sw snes FRANCOISE ROSAY | ,
x / 8 win JESSICA TANDY * ROBERT ARTHUR i
x SHS Directed by WILLIAM DIETERLE - Screenplay by Robert Thosran ; #
% e % } " ; From # Story by Pio br Thar % Here isa strange eo
a BIN sUS: i $| as
$ San LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE % and exciting
* and so x etree. aaa e $ | ;
x does every woman !! R}X JOHN MARSHALL “You're All I need” % ‘ :
x Theref the f Si ARTHUR MOORE “Yes I Do” %| woman, at war
. erefore e ae RE $ | 1
% ty aor 8/2 FRANK AUSTIN “Don't Cry Baby” %
5 ‘ > - | FRED SMALL ‘ “Roses of Piceardy” 5 ith i
. : 1 with everythi ;
% CAMELIA SANITARY %/% ERKOL BARNETT “Maybe It’s Because” 8 i eden
R CLYDE KING “Song of Songs” ‘
> ~ ~~
| % NAPKINS 8 Guest Stars : x and everyone
A aw RIS “THE LITTLE MAN WITH THE HORN” 8 h sod | :
7; st NDRE Bie LEROY ALLEN—Sensational 9-Year Trumpeter % Who stood In
‘ Mil ANDREX TOILET PAPER 1S AND x
Pa + 3
% St. Andrew Mills Products SN DOUG, GRIFFITH — 10-year-old Vocalist y her way.
$ are especially suitable for ANDREX FACIAL TISSUES $ % TICKETS ON SALE 'LO-DAY, TO-MORROW and % pe
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8 those with delicate skins. STANEX PAPER H ANDKERCHIEFS % EEO OS SOOO LCCC LEELA THE FIVE
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s 7 m >
. % Obtainable at all leading stores. x JOAN WENDELL OF THE i
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- e os ote . o = . a OES a OG a —~ oo han aes ao F or FI SH POTS an d Dom. estic Purp oses YEAR! i)
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| Produced by WILLIAM . by VINCENT
A famous
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IN RARE and EXQUISITE DESIGNS
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°

EXTRA: “GERALD McBOING BOING ”

Summer Dress Material.



See i THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE The Academy Technicolor Shot
EVANS A WHITEIELOS COTTON FACTORY LYD. (First Prize at Montevido’s Film Festival)

Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039

DIAL 4606 He noocnneeW ‘=

YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220














rom. gece TOR.

THURSDAY, MAY 31,





195

51

LAND WILL BE TAKEN
OVER FOR MARKET



{OUSE



to approve the compulsory a

f Assembly Tuesday passed a Resolution

cquisition by the Government,

of approximately 13,870 square feet of land on Eagle Hall

Road, for the establishment

of a district market.

. The land is owned by Hon. Mrs. Muriel Hanschell.
The Addendum to the Resolution states that in accord-
ance with the provisions of section 5 of the Land Acquisi-
tion Act, 1949, the approval of the Legislature is sought
for the compulsory acquisition of an area of land at Eagle

Hall for the purpose set out

nesses also improved between
1929 and 1950, although not as
much as that of the workers,

Professional men and unincorpor-
ated businesses received 10.6 per
cent. of the national income last
year compared with 9.7 per cent
in 1929.

Although the share of the
national income received by
tarmers was smaller in 1950 than
in 1929, the decline was more
apparent than real. Farmers
received 6.7 per cent. of the
Nation's income in 1929 against
5.8 per cent. last year, but 3,000,-
000 fewer people were working
cn farms in 1950. Thus, the
individual farmer received a much



lurger share of the national in-
come than he did 20 years ago.
By contrast, the people who
received incomes from rents,
interest and _ profits received
smaller shares of the yational
income in 1950 than in 1929.

Less for Landlord
The proportion going to land-
lords declined drastically from
6.8 per cent to 3.4 per cent. One

factor in this decline is the rent
controls which were imposed
during World War II. and whien
are still in effect in many urban
areas,

Interest payments representetl
7.6 per cent. of the national in-

come in 1929; they accounted for
2.3 per cent. in 1950.

Although corporate profits, after
taxes, were at a record high in
dollar terms last year, their part
of the national income decreaseii
from 9.8 per cent. in 1929 to 8.4
per cent. in 1950.

These figures clearly show, ac-
cording to American economists,
that the dynamic brand of Ameri-
can capitalism is producing results
altogether different from those
anticipated by the Communist
ideology. Under the Marxist
doctrine of exploitation there
should be larger and larger shares
for business, landlords and capital
over the years, The workers
should have been getting less and
less.

This gain in the fuller life for
the average American citizen is
not confined to the past 20 years
It typifies the trend that has
ceeurred over the first half-of the
twentieth century. ;

In this period the U.S, national
preduct has_ increased 5.5 time:
while the U.S. population
enly doubled. Ags a result, living
standards for the workers have
almost trebled.











J’can Mangoes

Own Correspondent)
JAMAICA,

Possibilities of a market ,in
Britain for the common varieties
of Jamaican mangoes in cans, were
diselosed recently by the Carib-
bean Preserving Company. After
months of experimenting, the
company has produced an item
that is being well received in the
United Kingdom, and the first
order for ten thousand cases of
canned mangoes will shortly be
shipped. The company intends to
buy large quantities of common
mangoes from the present crop
Growers of varieties other than
the Bombay and St. Julian may
xe able to sell their mangoes at
better prices than they would
ordinarily obtain the local
market,

From Our

on



MAIL NOTICES

Mails for Dominica, Montserrat by the
Sch, Marea Henrictta will be closed at
the General Post Office as under

Parcel Mail, Registered Mail, Ordinary







Tail at 11.45 a.m. on the Sist May, 1951
Mails for Dominica by the Sch Wok
Funicia will be closed at the Gener al
Post Office as under
Parcel Mail, Registered Mail, Ordinary
Mail at 10 aam. on the d June 1951



RATES OF EXCHANGE

MAY 30. 1951
CANADA
61 7/10% pr. Cheques on
Banker 69 7/10%% pr.
Demand
Draft 59.55% pr.
Sight Drafts 59 4/10 pr.
€17/10% pr. Cable
602/105 pr. Curre 6682/10) pr.




pr



The BAD witch who
became GO0D

in the Resolution.

U.S. Workers Get
Large Share Of
National lacome

WASHINGTON, D.C.

Wage earners and salaried em-
ployees of business and industry
in the United States have been
receiving a much larger share ot
the national income during the
past two decades than in previous
years,

As compared with the $50,800.-
000,000, or 54.9 per cent. of the
national income, which they re-
ceived in 1929, their share last
year was $152,200,000,000, or 69.5
per cent. The’ proportion that
they received in 1939 was 66.5
per cent, and in 1949 it was 68.9
per cent.

Hence, in the United States not
only the size of the national in-
come has grown but the propor-
tion of the total income received
by the average worker has in-
creased by 17 per cent.

The relative position of profes-
‘sional men, like doctors and law-
yers and of unincorporated busi-

“It has not been possible to

acquire the land by private
treaty.

“It is proposed as soon as the
land is acquired by the Govern-
ment to lease it to the St.
Michael's Vestry at a peppercorn
rental for a period of 21 years.
It is the intention of the Govern-
ment to provide the initial cost
of establishing district markets,
allowing the Vestries to build,
maintain and control them.”

Me. Cox (L) moved the passing
of the Resolution. He said thai
lor.some tive the question of dis-
trict markets had been engaging
the attention of the public. He
thought that it was from about
1940 the sanitary authorities of
St. Michael as well as the Chief
Medical Officer had been busily
engaged in selecting sites for
these markets and making recom-
mendations to Government.

As hon. members would re-
member, a Bil] was passed giving
the Vestry the right to purchase
these sites. Sites were recem-
mended in Carrington’s Viiage,
Milk Market, Eagle Hall, the old
railway area and other places
Nothing however, had yet been
done by way of actual erection.
The first attempt was now being
made to do so.

As, hon, members might have
heard, the price asked for the
site in Eagle Hall was one dollar
per square foot. This was feit
by Government as being too exor-
bitant. It had therefore become
necessary to have a _ Resolution
befote the House like the present
one in order to.acquire the site.

Mr. Fred Goddard (EB) said that
he was glad the Government was
at last making an attempt to
establish a district market, but he
regretted to see it should have
taken the present form,

The Compulsory Act was neces-
sary and. should be used only
where it was felt that certain
landowners were obstinate and
expected the Government to pay
fancy prices. He did not think
that the present case was such.

The land at Eagle Hall they all
knew and anyone who really knew
the* value of land in St, Michael
and the City, would readily agree
that one dollar a square foot was
not too high for Government to
pay. He knew that the land op-
posite the site at Eagle Hall had
recently been sold at one dollar
and twenty cents per square foot.
That would give some indication
as to what the site for the market
was worth.

Mrs. Hanschell Willing

Mrs. Hanschell was only too
willing to sell this land at what
she considered a reasonable price.
He believed that the price was not
put up by her but by people who
advised her and had a_ better
knowledge of real estate than she
had.

He would repeat that he felt
sorry the Compulsory Acquisition
Act had to be used to acquire this
land, the price of which he felt,
and many people to whom he had
spoken, felt was not exorbitant
Mrs. Hanschell would get that and
more from many persons willing
to buy the land. He knew many
people who were willing to get
this land for business purposes.
He could not agree with Govern-
ment in using the Act to acquire
the land.

Mr. A, E, S. Lewis (L) said that
the Government had to be com-
mended on attempting to acquire
this land at a reasonable price.
He believed, however, that last
time when Government purchased
land under the Compulsory Act,
they eventually paid more for it
than they would have done other-
wise. He certainly hoped that on
this oceasion it would not happen.

During the discussion which fol-
lowed. Mr. Mottley pointed out
that it was not correct to say it
had not been possible to acquire
the land by private tieaty. He
had been informed by Mr. Herbert
Sealy, of Messrs. Carrington &
Sealy, Solicitors, that Mrs. Han-
schell had been to him and said
she had not heard one word from
the Government or the solicitors
representing the Government,
about the purchase of the land.
Nobody had discussed the matter
with her. The only thing she
knew about it was when she saw
in the Press that the land would
be acquired under *he Compulsory
Acyuisition Act.

Mr. Mottley (E) referred to
other sites which the Government
had bought, among them the Cen-
tral Foundry site for which he
said they had paid a4 per square
foot. “i ask Gevernment to be
consistent,” he said,

He was not objecting to the Gov-
ermment trying to buy something
of which they thought the price
asked was exorbitant, but if they
had a public duty to perform, they
should not single out a certain
nrea and say “we will acquire thi:
under the Compulsory Acquisition
Act”.

“Where are the Government
valuers”, Mr, Mottley asked, “A
penny a square foot for land might
be too dear, a cent may be too
dear. It all depends.”

oT

if i

ON ee

Pl

!
Socal

a



saw a tiny gir

looked won
hands grabbed
vas the bad witch.

the





tn view of a possible oil shortage, do you think we cor



PASSAGE
PAYMENT
GOES UP

lating to the payment of pas-
sages to public officers,

r. H. G. Cummins (L) who
took charge of the Resolution
said that it sought to pay pas-

sages of officers from abroad, The
maximum amount to be paid
was $960 but it was found pos-
sible to increase’ it berause in
one or two cases, officers could
not get passage by boat and had
to travel by air, hence the $960
previously provided had proved
to be insufficient.

Mr. A. E. S. Lewis (L)
that the first impression of
order to which the Resolution
applied was that it was merely
extending the maximum passage
to the island from £200 to £300,
but he noticed that it mentioned
return passages for Scientific
Officers and that the definition
for Scientific Officer was that
given to it in the Department of
Science ana Agriculture Act,

He did not know if officers of
that department were affected or
whether the Scientific Officers
were only those employed at the
Hospital. He would suggest that
a maximum should be set for a
single person, another for a mar-
ried couple, and then a separate
allowance for each child where
children were concerned. He
hoped that some such scheme
would be adopted.

He observed too, that since
the new rates will become op-
erative as from April 1, 1950; the
House should be given some idea
of what this back pay would
amount to,



said
the

——

B.W.LA. Cuts
Party Fares



Special reduced return fares
are now available to sports teams,
clubs, delegations and_ similar

crganisations ‘travelling between
all BWIA’s ports of call (except
Caracas and Puerto Rico), in
order to fulfil sporting fixtures
or other commitments,

Under this arrangement, mem-
bers of teams or delegations will
each be able to obtain return
tickets for the cost of one-way
tickets plus 50% provided the
group consists of at least five
members and the return journey
ig completed by July 15th,

Supporters and wives of mem-
bers of the group are also entitled
to the reduced fare but their
journey must be sponsored by
and booked through the organisa-
lion arranging the trip.



Escape From
Fallen House

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 29.
A mother, her three-week-oiu
baby and two other children

miraculously escaped death when
iheir house collapsed and fell on
them during a heavy downpour
of rain,

Neighbours attracted by the
screams, rushed to the scenes and
pulled them from under a mass
of rafters and galvanised iron
sheets. Showing the effects of
shock the mother attributed her
escape from serious injury to the
“divine protection of the Virgin
Mary”. She proudly displayed
a medal with a replica of the
Virgin Mary round her neck.



3 .
SLEEP
An American furniture com-

pany is manufacturing a new mat-
tress that is being used in hos-
pitals to help patients sleep.
It contains a small electric motor
ihat produces gentle vibrations
that induce relaxation, ,



j,

udding that
1yone again

Blood Transfusion
centre Opened
In Martinique

Vuuer a re



Cet preiccvoral
d@ bAOVGA WansiUsion Cente
been Createu Wh iia tillique.
ine cenmre wii be uncer
qurecuon of the Pasteur Institure
OL Wharuimque, ana will be coD-
iclied by the adeparunental
Heaith Aunority. It wii be aided
by 4 consultative commiliee, Lie
establishment of this centre came
about through the joint eftoris
ot local physicians, the Martinique
branch of the French Red Cross,
which will play a vital rote in tine
proper tuncuioning of the centre,
and the Pasteur Institute.

The final implementation of
the decree was mage by the De-
partment of Health. The first
task of the centre will be to col-

deeree,

lias

we

lect donors, These will receive
regular medical examinations.
The centre will answer {
for blood from

will institute a service for urgen\
transfusions,

It will keep a constant supply
of dry plasma prepared by
authorised manujtacturers in
Metropolitan Frange. However,
during the construction of the
centre, it is hope@ that a start
may be made in the collection
of blood so that a bank may be
formed. .

The dry plasma bank is in the
process of being built up,
but the amount sent to date by
metropolitan centres is not enough
for local needs. It is hoped,
however, that delitcries will be
stepped up.

Harbour Log

IN CARLISE BAY

M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Marea Henrietta,
Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Cyril FE
Smith, Sch. D’Ortac, Sch. Philip H
Davidson, Sch Laudalpha, M.V. Blue
Star, Sch. Everdene, Sch. Mary M. Lewis,
Sch. Enterprise S., Sch. W. L. Eunicia,
Sch. Belqueen, Sch. Lindsyd WU, Sch.
United Pilgrim S., Sch. Rainbow M., Sch
Florence Emanuel, s.s. Sunvaliey, Sch.
Mary E. Caroline, Sch, Excelsior Hodge,
Seh, Gardenia W,

ARRIVALS

M.V. Daerwood, % tons
DeCoteau, from St. Lucia

S.S. Colombie, 7,554 tons
Kerharo, from Le Havre

SS. Sunwhit, 4.308 tons
Armour, from Halifax.
acht Tawana, 543 tons
Bernard, from St. Vingent,

M.V. Moneka, 100 tons net, Capt
Sen. from St. Lucia,

M.V. Canadian Cruiser,
Capt. Andersen, from Montreal

S.S. Bonaire, 1,857 tons net, Capt. Biiy-
temkuys, from Amsterdam via Madeira.

DEPARTURES

Schooner Philip H. Davidgon, 87 ton:
net, Capt, Sealy, for British Guiana.

Schooner Pinterprise 8, 66 tons
Capt. Gregg, for St. Lucia,

M.V. Lady Joy, 46 tons
Parsons, for St. Lucia,

Schooner Rainbow M., 35
Capt. Marks, for Trinidad

M.V. Moneka, 100 tong
Hutson, for St. Vineent

S.S. Bonaire, 1,857 tons net, Capt Buy
temkuys, for Trinidad,

M.V. Canadian Cruiser, 3,935 tons net
Capt. Andersen, for St, Vincent

fn Touch With Barbados
Coast Station

Cable and Wirelts (W.L) Ltd advis
that they can now communicate with
the following ships through their Barba
aos Coast Station

net, Capt

net, Capt

net, Capt



net, Capt





Hut-

3,935 tons net,



net
net, Capt
tons net

net, Capt




8.8. Bahia Aguirre, 4. Alstertor
Spurt, s.s. Tindra, Southern Star
8.5. Casablanca, A, Mitehell Paine
s.a. General San Mortin, Mesa Verde

8. Colombie Dolores, s Bonaire
Alcoa Cavalier, Rana, Bayan
s.8. Explorer, § Pescue Pione¢
Cem, 8.3, Mormacmar, Murtinho
8.8. Francisco R, Hart, s,s. Titunia, ¢
Rangitiki, ss. Rio Drinoco Sar
Paulo, 8... Loide Nicaragna, Alew.
Corsair, «% Runa Del” Racitioc
Oranjestad, Maric

Anglo Norse
8.9 Athezsultan,

s Linguist, 6.6, Alcoa Pegasu

° 6% gt
“Colombie” Calls
Passenger ship Colombie,
sailing on her Caribbean cruise,
called here yesterday morning
She had on board 402 passengers,
22 of whom got off here.

The Colombie arrived from L«



Havre via England, Martinique
and Guadeloupe. She left port
yesterday evening for Jamaici
via Trinidad, La Guaira, Cura-

cao and Cartagena
She is consigned to
R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd.

*Messrs



You'll turn your family
into angels, too!

Just wait until they taste

] the rich flavor, the smooth S 8. F

goodness of Royal 7
Puddings. They "ll

keep coming back
for more. In 3
delicious favors—
vanilla, chocolate
and butterscotch.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

demandsks iressed
hospitals, anc)...

now





CT A

-d have a little more in the engine and less on the car?"

Lanton Express Service



Walker's Action
Gousing Uneasiness

LONDON, May 30
Macchester Guardiau
political correspondent said today
that the decision of the Secretar)
for Commonwealth Nelations
Patrick Gordon Walker, to con
tinue to force the order excludin;:
Tshekedi Khama from the ter:
tory of the Bamangwato in Bech -
vanaland, was causing some w
easiness in various political
quarters. This was because of th,
suspicion that the policy of the
Commonwealth Relations Office
towards Africans is less generou



rae

than that of the Colonial Office
and that this difference arises
from the desire not to offend

South African opinion,

“Tt i$ not vet clear,” the corre-
spondent added, “what political
action may be taken to influence
the direction of the policy of the
Commonwealth Relations Office.”

Tshékedi Khama last night ad-
members of Parliament at

private meeting in the House
of Commons, He put his case for

returning to the Bamangwato
reserve and suggested measures
for in roving the administrative

system there.

An - official statement issued
from the Commonwealth Rela-
tions Office last week said Gordon
Walker was fully satisfied that
only in the absence of both him-
self and his nephew Seretse
Khama could there be any hope
of establishing stable native ad-
ministration along more respon-
sible lines than in the past,

Gorden Walker praised
kedi’s recognition that more rep-
resentative institutions were de-
sirable, but he was satisfied that
none of theformer Regent's other
proposals were either acceptable
or practicable at present,

Some members of the Labour
Party believe this statement was
too inflexible.._Reuter,

Tshe-



Jungle Search For
Wild Sugar Canes

LONDON, May 25.

A search for native sugar canes
has taken a Queensland Govern-
ment expedition into the jungles
of New Guinea where no other
Australian or international cane-
searching expedition has ever
been,

The expedition has, in the last
month, made its way up to the
central highlands, 8,000 feet above
sea-level, Where it has discovered
a wealth of wild and commercial
varieties. New Guinea has long
been recognised by the sugar
industry throughout the world as

a home of wild canes,
The Queensland Minister for
Agriculture and Stock hag said

that the future of the Australian
sugar “industry depends largely
on thé use of hardy wild canes
for breeding, since it is only by
these meangs that varieties able to
resist disease and drought can be
developed,



For The
Honour Of
Britain

From R. M. MacCOLL
NEW YORK
1776, during the
revolutionary war
American General Nathaniel
Woodhull, was taken prisoner at
Jamaica, Long Island.

He was wounded in the
and died a month later
tiritish prison camp,

lm 1904 they put up an inscrip-

In August
american

arm
in a

hon outside the local council
school which said Woodhull,
while a captive, was mortally
sounded by a British officer for
vefusing to say ‘God Save the
King.’ *

Next date is 1947, when Mr

W. H. Sabine, a British historian,
come to live in the United States
\ ent for a stroll, saw the inserip-
tion, and decided to do something
about it,

He has. been busily digging into
the arehives and rying on an
immense correspondence with the

heol board ever since.

Now it looks as though Sabine
will get British military honour
vindicated. He has
proof that Woodhul) received his
vwound “while gallantly resisting
capture.”

And Sabine is asking for the
inscription to be changed accord-
ingly.

THEY are going to mass-pro-
duce an oxygen mask for airline
passengers which costs only 40
cents and is as tight as a hand-
herchief, Unfortunately, you can
still talk with it on.







Indian
scalps, it

WAH-NEE-OTE, Cree
chief, collects human
was revealed during a_ divoree
ction in Los Angeles. But he
cuys them all, his counsel added
hastily.

FIFTY-EPWO-YEAR-OLD Baron
ritz von Opel was once a name tc
conjure with in German big in-
custry. But when he came out
ef three years’ internment in
Louisiana, he promptly fell in love
with the 37-year-old daughter of
a Colombian diplomat.

So the baroness is suing for
divorce, The last straw, she told
‘he judge, was having to type out
the love poems which Fritz com-
posed for the other lady,

HEADLIN in two New York
papers in the wake of the drown-
ing of Bronx Zoo gorilla Makoko
“Gorilla’s widow carries on,” anc







“Gorilla'’s fiancee gives way te
irief.”

TWENTY - ONE - YEAR - OLD
Sergeant John Mason, back it

Morgantown, West Virginia, afte.
nine months in Korea, was know
as the “widest awake boy in the
cutfit.” Two days after he go
home he was killed in a car crash
Police reported he fell asleep at
the wheel.

JUNIOR COMPETITION

The Evening Advocate invites
poem
The best entry will be published every Monday in ie . ‘
and the winner will recetve a prize to the value, of 7/6 in either
Entries must reach The Children’s Editor, The

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books or stationery.
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NOTE:



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Stories must mot be copied,

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LEEDS, May 28
The Princess Royal, of
King Geory.: Sixth, will have to
sell some of her furniture to heip

pay death duties for her husband,
aer agents said here to-night.

Four years after the death of
the Sixth Earl of Harewood, the
Princess will see some of her
best treasured possessions go un-
der the auctioneers hammer next
month.

The Earl was estimated to have
left almost £1,000,000 when he
died.

His son the. Seventh Earl said
that three quarters of the fortune

would go in death duties. Already
one of the family homes and
14,000 acres of land have been
sold.

Now antiques are coming out
from Harewood House itself, the

big Leeds mansion in which the
Harewood family have kept house
for generations. Furniture, poree-
lain, silver and paintings are on
their way to the sales,

The Princess Royal —- who gets
a state annuity of £6,000 wiil
part with a suite of Regency
furniture, 12 Adam armchairs, a
pair of Regency rosewood writ-
ing tables, a suite of Chippendale
hall furniture and Louis Six-
teenth pieces.

Also. to be sold are Paris dinner
service, Meissen dessert service,
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of King George the Third and
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PAGE THREE

To Retrace
Darwin's Route

SDGEWATER, Ne



Jersey,
May 29.
technicians,
author Dod
to-day om a

Twe ive
led by the
Orsborne, set sail
global cruise that will trace the
sea-route followed more than. a
century ago by the English natur-
alist, Charles Darwin,

On the! voyage the explorers
will collect scientific specimens
similar to those collected v
Darwin during his study of the
beginning of life ow the earth. His
findings were later published’ in *
a_ scientific work entitled “Origin
of Species.”

Most of the specimens wilh be
presented to Harvard University.
the American Geographical So-
ciety, and the Cincinnati Museum
of Natural History, Colored .me-
tion pictures will be taken ofthe
places visited. The films will. be
used by researchers in determining
geographical changes in these
places since they were visited by
Darwin 120 years ago.

Among the members of
crew, who will sail the two-
masted craft around the world.
are an illustrator, a photographer

Americar
Scottish

lv

the

a meteorologist, a geolorist, en-

gineer, diver, and navigator.
They will first sail down the

coast of South America, stoppins

to explore the Estero Calvo inlet

on the Chilean coast. From there
the vessel will head into the

Pacific Ocean toward the Galapa-

gos and other islands fn the
Pacific. It will proceed later to
New Zealand and Australia, then
north through the Indian Ocean!
to visit a number of East Indian

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PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 31, 1951











9 SSE

sarninos € anvoate (Socialism And The Ricks Micen RUTH Talks About ae a

Caeser ee et tse S E D





| |
+
LONDON. By LE AVID TEMPLE ROBER'S Food has cartied rationing to its A Brother For Jac ueline |
vocate .. Ltd.. Broad Bridgetow How do the rich live under limit with theccalm announcement
ee a 3 = : British Socialism? The news this Rumours circulate, particularly this week that, at the present rate a FOR
re week offers several clues to jn political circles, about “where of home killing of cattie, it shoul By EVELYN IRONS





answers to this question, which is the money comes from”. Even the be possible to, allot to each , family
eertiinly a mystery to most people monthly magazine Vogue, the im Britain an oxtail in every 5
abroad and often a mystery to the taste-setter in Mayfair, wrote re- years. This seems to be the trea
rich themselves. cently about the “mysterious ex- of a lifetime worth looking forware

The most pathetic news is that pense-account rich”. It is odd that to! Charitably, we think that thi:
the Marquis of Bath recently went that particular mystery has only Ministry of Food official made the
up to Woodstock to see how the now crept through to Vogue. For @nneuncement in the spirit °
Duke of Marlborough was organ- several years ago, in Socialist ridicule—of his own department.

Thursday, May 31, ' 1951 WHAT has the first year of banishment
from Bechuanaland done to ‘Queen” Ruth,
the London business girl whose marriage to,
African chief Seretse Khama caused one of;

the hottest racial controversies ever to rage







CO0-OPERATIVES

THE history of Co-operatives in Barba-

dos has not been rosy. In fact the general
public interested in the progress of the
island and realising the advantages of such
a service have been left wondering whether
it is the intention of the Government to

ising the provision of refreshments
for the 2s. 6d. visitors to his Blen-
heim Palace. The Marquis had
been running his catering at a loss,
and wanted a tip from the Duke.
In point of fact the Duke of Mari-
borough, descendent of the victo:
of Blenheim, is the most success-

Government circles, this theory of
a mystery was brought forward
and the Chancellor instructed to
cut off these new rich from their
‘expense accounts. It was alleged
that business camouflaged pleas-
ure; so Sir Stafford Cripps ordered

Success And Failure

In the s week, the Londor
stage has had one stimulatin:
surprise, amd one of the mos
surprising failures—a Hamlet tha
failed. Laurence Olivier and Vivier.





within the Empire.

when the Government exiled Khama from ‘is
ecuni:y because he had married a white
woman. This week Jacqueline, the Khama’s
brown-skinned baby, had her first birthday,

She retorted with blistering protestations

We have just Received ...

an income-tax check on business 7 oj :
ful country-house showman. At- expenses. But the roundabout Theet Coe Shiteearon’ ate

tendance figures at his Blenheim keeps on turning, and now the aw’ 7.
Palace are now rising to a thous- awful truth is coming out—‘the etal Nr
and a day from whom the Duke rich are spending their own [eigh will be playing Cleopatra
receives £125 daily—less enter- money”. A few Left Wing voices one night,» as Bernard Shav
tainment tax. With such assistance are raised for a Capitel Levy on jmagined Caesar found her, anc
from the tourists, the landed own- the grounds that the only way to the next ni with her husban
ers of country houses can keep up prevent people spending their own ag Antony, will play the olde
their property. But that is hardly money is to take some of it from Queen of Egypt in the muc!
living like the rich of yesteryear. them. greater Shakespeare play. Tiv
And very few have houses of such All the figures we have men- plays have been not only a theatri
artistic eminence, What of the resi tioned relate to income. But the cal success, but the foyers hav
of the rich? fact is that hundreds more than also been a social success. I wou!
that small band of millionaires are say that Laurence Olivier, wh:












give some real assistance in the formation
of societies.

The answer is to be found in the publica-
tion of a notice in a recent issue of the
Official Gazette proclaiming: the coming
into foree on May 24th of the Co-operative
Act of 1949.

It could hardly be the intention of any
Government to lull people into a false
sense of security by proclaiming the com-

and turned the spotlight back on all that.

The controversy is not dead. As far as Ruth
is concerned it is merely dormant for another
three years and ten months.

Then comes the end of the five years’ ban
on Seretse and his white “Queen,” when the
Government must decide whether they are
to asume power over the 100,000 Bamang-
watos or not.

GREEN BIRKMYRE

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: ; i j ~ has mellowed in her com- ‘ :
i ing into force of an act and then leaving _ According to the income tax offi- jiving much better than even @ controls the St, James's Theatr To-day Ruth has a ed made to order if required.
: : cials there are now 83 people with millionaire could live on his taxed has the seeond most elegas | Ments on the colour bar. The year has healed
‘ the matter to settle itself. se ge satat baggy rig-og earnings—just by cutting into their theatre in London—first plac: }s9me of the anger and bitterness which was
: : eens eke. ena See = stored or inherited wealth. must be reserved for the Theatr 2 : : ‘
Already in this newspaper adverse com- each of those incomes the British oe ie nee weak Pera hee ants Pa ar hi. | er natural reaction to the events leading up WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LTD
ment has been made on the length of time pa binge er yey Strings of horses are being cut to stage the wwe pave together | 9 her husband's ejection from Africa. But Successors to
* . -. more a e te . S ’ i i effe ie" : :
which it has taken to secure the services of |‘.7ain, according to the tax figures, GOWN. There are not many town and it has ee aoe twice, | she is inflexibly set on returning to, Bechu-
: : houses left to open in the season. & g people WIce, SA
an officer to fill the post, At the time of the ~ last avetielie Apres any ony Most of them have been sold to much - ue oe See th | analand as wife of the Bamangwato. chief. . S. PITCHER & C >
i > was seconded 4 people w sncom er make the headquarters of big com- interval. Hardened theatre-goer | ,
ereation of the post an officer w ead and £100,000 a year—before the tax panies, And the brass and red- say ‘that this season at the S_ she avers that the two of them can be a "Phones : 4472 & 4687
from British Honduras for a perio mid Sebuction, Wace are. the es leather have gone to keep the James's BE ao them only © | .0wer for progress there. 7
™ Sant ionaires, and without much risk © t ing. Covent Garden in its best day: =
sent to England for training, , He returne error it is possible to mark them Pemariovine ae aspect of the There is the same social brilliance: PRINGEES a ee pemannnnnabensl
and was attached to the oe of Joff one by one in the reference ‘aristocratic scene this week, we the same practice in the art « | Quietly dvessed in a flannel-grey wool jer-
Agriculture. At the end of the time he re- books of industry, The wealthies. jotice that the House of Lords has Conversation, the same ; demau oo ress and sheerest nvlons, the former
turned to his post of agricultural officer in | ‘8 Probably Sir John Ellerman, the haq a good clean up since the Com- for longer and longer interva ey dress ard s st ny} , ; ‘
; P " son of a shipping magnate, Who jong left it last Autumn, The and a regret only that Londor | %uth Williams does not look conspicuously Only a few sa FENne
British Honduras. Little effort seems to | himself lives the life of a recluse. prasswork has been polished, and hour for theatre-going cannot | iiffetent from other wives ote 1tolewear
have been made othermdee: ubtt-now the [TM Dam cone published a these. 'e.Ted, weather Seats sgaines EMSS ven back to the pre-w: | men in London, She is calm, poised, ready to
. ror. : ot long é shed a re@ which so many plebeian backs § ) eee , . ’ , 7 ,
proclamation has been published telling -) volume book on the mouse, And have rubbed in the past ten years Suactee, to nies Go. Farts, 19 handle social situations competently. Her red- ‘SILENT KNI H
the public that the act has come into force... | ners are some bacco King some. are now, once again, right bench O14 PUAYSt pond (9 Ss < | sold halt is swept back from a high, intelli * GH!
re : . newspaper visco' : es for a belted earl. This House : - ee > mir le]
There are several opportunities in this | sno ‘propertied Buke—who owns Gf Lords was, built a hundred aftive a quarter of an hour lat | gent forehead. KEROSENE OIL
island where the knowledge and work of a : ah og Fa Sg ee years ago to suit the Duke of Wel~ Visitors ‘will be laiwenayed. ta the One oddity—her parti-coloured eyes. The
e i Officer would be of inestim- bracket of miilionaires, 1nen lington and those grand days when ee cal fon, ; : 5 “i!
able benefit to the island, In the fields of | 20,0" 40, mostly elderly men. 300, pears of Vieiorian England (at al seats are already sold wn’ | ety is clear grey, the right splashed with
sels Drees 50 ne Se en one wale Somes & OE Dare bch would drive to Westminster for a sone too F srown. Her complexion is clear, too, and pale.
agriculture the peasant needs a guiding paints. Moetly they are angel, Gebete. Sow * is toe vast, Sroabiis ’ ts ‘ . ike ihe 2: a oe ; ’ tanta;
: : * ecause they have built up own from the gallery, a debate » failure, it is harde ul in the year she spent in bechuanaland 1
hand to lead him to co-operative market fortuties theniéelves and there 18 -looke as Be “ * “And of the failure, it is e. :
; 3 8 Ss and ; as if there is a peer, here or {te e first ti fi sc i fee LEFT IN STOCK
ing of the produce which he now sells in a mot aya, hope of avoiding death there wwileleecktieved.. Nothing oan ee: oy Jk | was pe to withstand exposure to the burn
i i isad- uties and passing fortunes to theic can done to make the great )1; i ‘ ri ing African sun. ‘
Sy Dee nena ep epie ie bie oernodinns children, There are exceptions to space much smaller. Since the aly tock oe widee Sh seal toa. Khama lives to-day in a furnished Will those who asked for a refusal on one,
vantage. Combined purchase of manures every’ rule. Last year a million- Commons departed, the Speaker's Pyurd: “lee Guinness may be ng s to-day :
and the co-operative use of tractors would —[aire’s daughter who had made her Chair has been taken away. The declaim. ‘Pluck off my beard ar. three-floor maisonette in a modest street near call before they are all sold!
‘ : os home in Malta left more than a Lord Chancellor sits on his wool- it i -y h , ; : : . :
f f I
increase production. i ati blow it in my face’ i aven | Regent’s Park. From the wall of the little sit-
p ’ . million pounds and the Govern~ sack at the other end, and the got a beard.” But the beard do },. .
, : . ment has only captured £35,000 seating has been a bit shortened this middle-aged Hamu |'ing room a picture looks down—a young e
The nto foree of the act should]; i ; not save this middle-ag
aie tk G i ih in death duties, explain how nteut. the es are, uncomportabic Beverley Baxter, the theatre crit: | African resplendent in what appears to be
now inspire the Government to show a ut this does not explain how abo ir m ome, The writes that it is perhaps a tribu pe
aoe inteteat. in ihe establiahment the wealthy part of London stays Robing Chamber in which they tg Alec Guinness’s power in Uw +he full-dress uniform of the Household Cav- DaCOSTA A Co... Lid.
ee. ‘ a . et alight with gaiety and how tradi- have been meeting while their own fj}, that the audience felt las ilry, standing beside a venerable seated ‘ ,
of co-operatives and the first essential is | tions are kept up. It does not ex- home was lent to the House of night that Mr. Disraeli had com | . we : Dial 3878 a ELEC. DEPT
the appointment of some suitable officer plain who are the hundreds eacl Commons had a pleasant drowsy to Bisinore. It is very rarely tha | W8ure in a bush hat: Seretse’s father and 10: . :
rs +3 . . | year eager to give their children to warmth about it! a Shakespeare play fails on th | grandfather both Bamangwato chiefs.
And there is no good reason to limit the the world’s most expensive educa- One In 50 Years London stage. This first nigi Wis? ok the day whe ix 4h di rife ———~ :
work of co-operatives to agriculture alone. tion. An official of the Ministry of audience booed from the galler, rt o e day she 1S RO OR URN any wane SSS
The attempt to establish cottage indus- oa — . e ee a = ind mother that she might have been, this
Q
on oe firl who was born in Blackheath, played '
tries in this island has failed largely be- Beetles With E I his ; ,
cause of the fact that marketing facilities \ ,
had not kept pace with the production of Pyrophorus Luminosus is im and a half to an inch and three- skin is hardened to form a very is an ‘acting lance-corporal in the wey eres
the articles for sale. the news. According to Mr. C. C. quarters long, rather boat- strong armour. WAAF, became a Lloyd's underwriters’ clerk.
h Fl Ly Skeete, Director of Agriculture, shaped, and with conspicuous ‘These larvae attack the hara a i i
Co-operatives do exist in Barbados, but this large firefly beetle has been eye spots which shine with a back grubs, and are capable of ex ig et and feeds Jackie; nels Lae mais
‘as no one can pretend that full use is made of | seen in. imereased care ae eee light, These. lights orcising & very considerabi [With the housework, cooks her husband’;
- ips i 4 iH ‘ year, 4 is vV worus Ls - ar eyes, ut are orne ON degree of syontrol over the he ins r “ . . .
Co-operation as a principle of improving inosus? The late H. A. Ballou, the sides of the prothorax. The ematuaie ana be vchtetste ae aiate evening meal. (“I love cooking, particularly

the condition of the “small” man in agri- [Commissioner of Agriculture for head and eyes are rather small French dishes with lots of herbs and garlic.”)

development.





DON'T

NINE cane fires during

+

FORTY-TWO years in the
service of one’s country is a record
of which tobe proud and this is the
achievement of Mr. F, A. C. Clair-
monte, O.B.E., who retires from
the post of Income Tax Commis-
sioner today.

Mr. Clairmonte joined the Civil
Service in June 1909 when condi-
tions were entirely different from
what they are today; but it was
his adaptability to the existig
conditions which brought him
success, He served for a_ short
time in the Customs and for an-
other brief period in the Savings
Bank. The succeeding years found
him either in the Audit Office or
in the Police Magistrates’ Courts
until 1932 when he left Acting on
the Magisterial Bench for the post
of Clerk in the Income Tax De-
partment.

Here it was that Mr. Clairmonte
took a courageous step which it
was thought at the time would
lave lost him his years of service.
As clerk to the Income Tax De-
partment he had accepted an office
which carried no pension right:

the week
destroyed 65 acres of ‘canes. Despite thé .
entreaties and advice of intelligent opinion
this vandalism continues to 7
of revenue.
The excuse has been offered that at this
period of the reaping season the amount of
trash on the canes prevents the cutters
from reaping as quickly as they would if
the trash were burnt off. It is a-lame
excuse and a reflection on the standard of
intelligence in this island.
It is said that a cutter can reap five tons
of burnt canes in the same time as he would
reap three tons not cleaned by fire; but this
is no legitimate reason to set fire to fields
of canes merely to clear the trash.

This custom of setting fire to canes has
increased in recent years,
In the neighbouring island of Trinidad
letters now bear an official stamp saying :
“Do Not Burn Our Land”. It might be well *
for some such motto to be adopted as a re-
minder to people that to burn canes is to
rob each and every one of us of something
to which he is entitled. How about “Less
Fire: More Money?” Or Simply “Don’t Burn
Down Your Own Doorstep.”

‘ob the island



seen before. He was particular-
ly attracted by ‘the enormous
bright shining “eyes”. He
brought it up for me to see and it
proved to be one of the so-called
Fireflies or Lightning Flies.

This insect was one of the
large light-bearing beetles of the
family Elateridae, I knew this in-
seet did not belong to Barbados,
and 1 reebgnised that it was dif-
ferent from the | related form
which oceurs in the neighbouring
islands, Then I remembered
that the Government of Barba-
dos had been introducing natural
enemies of hard back © grubs,

Reference to the Government
Entomologist confirmed my sus-
picion that this insect had come
from those importations,

Some three or four years ago,
the Government imported fron:
Puerto Rico thousands of grubs
and adults of the beetle Fyro-
phorus luminosus, and this insect
Was one of that species, These
importations were liberated on
several estates in different parts
of the Island, the nearest to
Bridgetown being at the Belle
Estate. The adult beetles have
been seen in and about town on
three occasions just lately. The

{specimen he had given me came

from Henry's Lane, one was
taken in Spry Street, and I have
heard of another one in Strath-
clyde. This would indicate that
the. beetle - is established and
probably will be found in many
other parts of the Island at some
distances from the fields in
which they have been
| lished,

The beetle is about an_ inct,

phorus noctilicus. This is slight-
ly larger than the Puerto Rico
species, and it seems to me _ its
light is somewhat more powerful,
but I have not had the two side
by side to compare them.

The insects of the family Elat-
eridae are known’ variously as click
beetles, skik-jacks, end snappers
These names refer to the peculiar
habit of the adult insects. If one
of these is placed on its back it
will probably lie perfectly motion-
less for 4 short time, and then
make a sudden spring into the air,
If it does not regain its feet by this
manoeuvre it~ will try again. In
localities where they are reason-
ably. abundant, ~ children catch
them to play with them, ahd
grown-ups »'so are interested to
see these leaping insects.

This snapping into the air is
accomplished by a peculiar struc-
ture of the under side of the body,
specially adapted for this purpose
So far as | know there is only one
species of this family in Barbados,
and that is a small inconspicuous
insect which is very seldom
noticed.

The insects we are now consid-
ering are carnivorous, They are
specially enemies of hardback
grubs. They are also recorded in
Peurto Rico as attacking the mole
cricket, which is a serious pest in
that island.

Other species are carnivorous,
but the family includes also some
very serious agricultural pests. The
larvae are called wire worms.

oee?"f ion. are very slender in propor-

ion to their length. body sey-
ments are well marked, and the

of these beetles being worn by

ladies as jewelry.

They are

attached by means of a delicate

gold chain.

Also they have been

used to adorn fancy dress cos-

tumes to which they are attached
in little bags of net. In the
ballroom they would not be very
noticeable, but away from the
bright lights they would produce
a charming effect.

Schomburgk lists two fireflies
as occurting in Barbados, these
apparently have been extinct
here for sometime, although
visitors to the West Indies have
incluaed the firefiies in Barbados
amongst the sights seen. I have
always thought that in recent
years these statements were
mistakes, and that the fireflies
were really seen in some other
place.

The fireflies that are most
commonly seen in these Tropical
Islands belong to another family
of beetles, the Lampyridae. These
insects are smaller than the one
referred to previously, and they
are not much like the typical
beetles because their front wings
are not hardened to form definite
wing covers, but are soft and not
greatly different in texture from
the hind wings. The larvae of
these beetles are, as far as }
know, all carnivorous. At times,
and in certain localities they
occur in enormous numbers. In
Trinidad, from my windows |
could see out over a large cane-
field, and in their season there
were thousands, perhaps millions,
of these fireflies flashing over the
tops of the canes. The contin-
uous flashing of these fairy lights
is a wonderfully beautiful sight.

F orty-Two

but within a short time it became
obvious that this department
would soon be one of the import-
ant revenue praducing sources.
The belief was. justified and today:
it is second only to the Customs.

From 19382 Mr. Clairmonte
worked in this office until 1935
when he was appointed Commis-
sioner, The Department had been
re-organised and instead of three
Commissioners there was now a
single Commissioner with an es-
tablished Government, Office in the
Public Builaings.

As economic conditions im-
proved and trade and commerce
increased the problems of the office
increased. The number of persons
eligible for taxation increased.

Mr. Clairmonte’s introduction
of the new system of tax collect-
ing and his intimate knowledge
of income tax law won for him
the praise of no less an authority
than that of Mr, (now Sir) Ralph
Assheton, who was a member of
the Royal Commission of 1939,

But apart from the impression
which he gave as the unbending

Years’ Service

Civil Servant, Mr, Clairmonte
won the respect of every mem-
ber of the Service. The junior
members of the service sought
his advice and help because of
his wide knowledge of men and
affairs. He set an example of
efficiency which has been
equalled but unsurpassed in the
Civil Establishment and this won
for him the respect of Governors
and Colonial Secretaries.

Three years ago after the
amendment of the Pension Act of
1925 he intimated his intention
to retire, but because of difficulty
in filling the office Mr. Clairmonte
willingly continued. During his
long term of office Mr. Clair-
monte has built up a_ staff to
whose efficiency and thorough-
ness. much of the success of the
department is due. And it is the
pride of the service that today
the retirement of the Commis-
sioner will not mean the disloca-
tion of the work as it might have
in 1948. His Deputy who has
served in British Guiana is one
of the youngsters who have

spent much time and contributed
largely to the success of the ad-
ministration of that office.

But Mr. Clairmonte was not
merely the efficient civil servant.
He was interested in sport and
perhaps contributed to its success
in this island in a way in which
few men have been able to do,

In former years he was a fine

cricketer, athlete and footballer.
But ‘a knee injury in Egypt
during the war of 1914—18

limited his participation but not
his interest. He was able to do
more for cricket in that the sur-
vival of the Spartan Club was
directly due to his foresight and
encouragement to younger mem-
bers of the Club. This interest
broadened and today he is &
member of the Selection Com-
mittee of the West Indies Board
of Control and a Vice President
of the local Cricket Association,
Hie is also Judge of the Barbados
Turf Club,

Today he retires and carries
with him the good wishes of
everybody in Barbados.







lacrosse at her Eltham school, drove

culture or aitillary: #adess® Particularly re Wee sncies ieee Sf she eae fong =* shoonag tae Se ne diet oan ee nae Two evenings a week she goes ice-skating BY
lacking in the Co-operative principle is the patienrrag account; — wie Which can be seen from the side, flies is surprising. I have tried |'™ Bayswater with a girl friend while Seretsc
fishing industry where pooling of resources Jog has been. brought. tomy eapable of showing a ruby light Putting one under a glass on a | alays table tennis—because, she says, anyone BUKTA
would provide refrigerated ships and a eat lately. A few daye on the underside of its body. have been able to read the ordin- who has been accustomed to pleying games
weather bureau service. had ‘caught. an insect at night, the Lesser Antilies, that is, trom given of oy ine mmaee” te Uiaht} must exercise to keep fit. IN

in his house which he had not Dominica to Trinidad, is Pyro- [I have come across the record Unlike most girls, she doesn’t care for the

pictures, prefers plays. Unlike every othe
girl, she studies to be an African queen.

Each day she and Seretse read and work
together, discuss ideas for the welfare of the |
Bamangwatos. They meet many Africans, '
often have them to dinner at their house. Her |
current reading—a book on racial clashes
n South Africa: another on the differences |
detween India and Pakistan. i

She keeps up with most writings on North
and South African problems; reads the bun- |
dles of South African newspapers that arrive
from African friends in Seretse’s homeland.

The Bechuana language spoken there is
almost impossibly difficult for a European,
but she tries to pick it up (she has no text-
book) from her husband,

£1,000 A YEAR

Big, broad-shouldered Seretse, due to take !
his law finals as a barrister in September is |
having a Whitsun break from his studies, he | &
maintains his family on the £1,000 a vear 18
promised by the Government for the duratio;
of his five years’ banishment, &

The three are just back from a brief holiday, $
in Cornwall, touring in the brown. 32 hp .
American Ford brought from Africa. Ruth 1%
remembering her WAAF experience likes tc |
take a turn at driving but finds the car smali {

White, Khaki

and Cream

SIZES 30—40

Fawn,

These Shorts are Sanforized and
Regimel Shrunk.

The Plastic fitted Waistband gives
Snugness and Comfort.
°

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.
Dry Goods Dept.



















; :
ce +
FREES y :
ish after the big RAF lorries. ; JELLIED | FOR YOU.. : %
Everywhere they went, in pubs and inn- x me ae ee & YOUR PETS &
and villages, the Khamas were recognised. | * %
met with no rebuffs and instead were wel- IX Soups %
comed by the public. In London where 214 |%% HEINZ’S %
years ago they faced hostile stares and offen. is pole :
. 1s JHE Y SE

sive remarks they encounter no more trouble. * BAKED BEANS ¥
What about the upbringing of lively littic is vai cn ee a ae
Jackie? No tutors and governesses for her. | Cheese 3
She will go to “the ordine ” ‘ CHEPDAR CHEESE S
wee if Pal ee echaey ini $ 1-b CARTONS z
echuanaland, this means a Christian school. iy || ‘4b CARTONS (Blended
Both Khama parents are Christians: Jacque- $ ae with Rum)
line Tebogo was christened in the Church o1 is iene $
England on the last day of last year. x 4 VERMICELLE %
MALE HEIR? Ig hitita eae od Se

} f %

So far the delicate question of the Bamans- (> JN aeay -” %
watos being ruled by a chief with European, : SEAGRAM'S : 3
blood does not arise. Baby Jackie could never & FROZEN SALMON SCHENLEY’S *
LH ekGea Ts her, ; : ., {2 SMOKED HADDOCK mmm Tye rc ae
c een er fat because she is a girl. Bi ‘ \¢ SMOKED KIPPERS Kline x
the factor of a male heir may well come inte !\s 4 —llb tins, 51 tins ¥
the case before the Khamas exile ends. |: Chick Feed . oa %
Slim determined 27-year-old Ruth Khama RS LAYENA Doy Chows >
says that this will not be the only child of th tS GROWENA “a eae %
. . . . . s: > %
tamily. She doesn’t believe in only children. 2 %

She means to have more,

‘$ PHONE GODDARDS — WE DELIVER

{
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED. is
THURSDAY, MAY 31,



Commerce Chamber

1951

Active Says Head

THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ie continuing to be
really active nowadays in matters affecting the commercial
community of this island, the President of the Chamber,
Mr. CD. G. Leacock, Jnr., said at the Annual General Meet-

ing yesterday.

They would see from the re-
port, that apart from the regular
meetings of the Council and the
quarterly Genernl meetings, there
had been four special meetings of
the Council and three special gen-
eral meetinys—an unusually large
number. This showed that the
members as a whole and the Coun-
cil, had been wide awake to any
developments which might affect
business in the island.



‘Mr, Leacock who moved the
adoption of the annual report for



1950 said that members would no-
tice the list of conferences which
had taken place during that year
and which were of interest to the

commercial community. Though
ot some of these conferences,
members might not feel very

strongly that the interest was such
that the Chamber sheuld be repre-
sented by a delegate or adviser, on
the other hand one of them was
for the purpose of studying the
effects of devaluation in the Brit-
ish Caribbean. This was held on
March 8 under the Chairmanship
of Professor Beasley. “It Was at-
tended by officials from the vari-
ous territories, but I am quite sure,

speaking for Barbados, that some .

members of the commercial com-
munity here could give just as
good advice as to the likely effect
of devaluation on Barbados, as any
official.

“T think that at a conference of
this sort it was a great pity that
the Chamber was not asked to
nominate, say a panel of members

from whom a suitable délegate
could be chosen to attend.”
Seawell

At Seawell there was now com-
pleted a 6,000 feet runway which
could accommodate full size long
distance ‘planes, said Mr. Leacock.
He believed that Development and
Welfare had contributed very
largely to the funds for the build-
ing of this runway. “l hope it will
not be the policy, because the Brit-
ish taxpayers’ money was used so
largely in this project, to restrict
the use of the runway to British
owned and operated airlines.

“I think it would be of benefit
to the island as a whole if the air-
port was thrown open to any re-
sponsible airline of any national-
ity who wished to run a service
to Barbados.”

It seemed strange to him that
there should be the strong feeling

that all British traffic should be
restricted to British planes or
*planes from the Commonwealth

countries, when no such interest
was taken about the passenger
service to the United Kingdom,
“For many years now if we had to
rely on the British passenger ser-
vice to get to the United Kingdom,
we would not get there at all.”
Speaking of the Canada-West
Indies trade, Mr. Leacock said that
it was tragic to see that as regards
imports to this island for the year



1950, Canada’s share was only
14.5 per cent. From 1946 there
had been a_ steady decline of

Canada’s share of imports to this
country. This was dite to currency
restrictions and nothing else.

“J hope that this delegation
which is going shortly to the
United Kingdom and then Canada
as suggested by the Regional Eco-
nomic Committee, will be able to
arrange for the release of a con-
siderable amount of Canadian cur-
rency for the use of the British
West Indies in increasing their im-
ports from Canada.”

The two retiring members from
the Chamber this year through
seniority are Hon. V. C. Gale and
Mr. R. M. Cave. Mr. Gale had
been Senior Vice-President of the
Chamber, and acted for about
seven months as President during
the absence from the island of Mr.
Leacock.

Mr. Leacock thanked him yes-
terday for the able way in which
he had carried out the duties of
that office. He was most grateful
to him, he said, and he was sure
the entire Chamber owed him a
debt of gratitude. He wanted also
to express to him sincere thanks
on their behalf.

Of Mr. Cave, Mr. Leacock said
that he very much regretted he
was retiring because he had been
one of the most active members of
the Council throughout the time he
(Mr. Leacock) had been on that
body. He had taken a keen in-
terest in commercial affairs, and
was always willing to go to great
trouble in getting information or
particulars of details for the bene-
fit of the Chamber as a whole. He
was sure that members of the
Chamber who had served with him
would be sorry to lose him.

Mr. Cave is now in the United
Kingdom.

Me Gale thanked Mr. Leacock
for the kind things he had said
about him as regards the carrying
out of the duties of President, He
had got considerable help, how-
ever. from the other members of
the Council and the Secretary and
he was grateful for that help.

“IT would like to congratulate
you on your remarks on the re-
port,” said Mr. Gale to Mr. Lea-
cock. “I think we are all agreed
that the points you have touched
on were very well given, and that
they very aptly describe the pres-
ent picture. Especially is this the
case as regards the Canada-West
indies trade and the use of the
Seawell Airport.”

Office Bearers

Mr. Leacock was again elected
President of the Chamber. It is the
third year he will be holding the
office.

Mr. G. H. King wae elected
Senior Vice-President, Mr. T. N.
Pierce, Junior Vice-President and
Mr. Trevor Bowring, Honorary
‘Treasurer.

Two separate lists of members
to serve with the office bearers as
the Council of the Chamber for
the year, were submitted. As a
result it was decided to take a bal-
lot on Wednesday next between
10 a.m. and 1 pan.

Mr. A. R. Toppin proposed the
members of one list and Mr. W. H.
Grannum the members of the
other. .

Those comprising Mr. Toppin’s



list were: Mr, H. A. C. Thomas,
Mr. C. A. Proverbs, Mr. D. A.
Lucie-Smith. Mr. T: O. Dowding,
Mr. B. A. Weatherhead, Mr. G D
Bynoe, Mr. A. del. Inniss, Mr
AR. E. King, Mr. A. S Bryden,
Mr. S. H Kinch. Mr. 7. K. C. Gran-
num and Hon. K. R. Hunte
members of Mr. Grannum’s



jist were: Mr. H. A. C. Thomas,
Mr. Lucie-Smith, Mr. T. O. Dowd-
ing, Mr, J. O. Tudor, Mr. G. D.
Bynoe, Mr W. K, Atkinson, Mr.
A. R. E. King, Mr. A. S. Bryden,
Mr. S. H. Kinch, Mr. J. K. C.
Grannum, and Hon. K. R. Hunte.
Not less than six or more than
twelve members can be elected to
serve with the office bearers as
the Council of the Chamber
There was the usual election of

honorary members.
THE ANNUAL REPORT
Membership of the Barbados

Chamber of Commerce at the end
of 1949 was 148. During 1950
three new members were elected
and four members resigned, The
total number of members at the
end of 1950, therefore, was 147.

The credit balance at the be-
ginning of 1950 was $2,540.98.
Subscriptions from members dur-
ing the year amounted, to $5,305.-
20. Receipts from other sources
were $166.12. The expenditure
for the year was $5,572.31, leav-
ing a credit balance of $2,439.99
at the end of 1950.

The Commercial Journal

The credit balance of the Com-
mercial Journal account at the
beginning of the year was
$1,392.89. The receipts from ‘sub-
scriptions and advertisements
were $1,053.60. The expenses in

connection with the publicatior.
of the journal amounted to

$354.00, leaving a credit balance
at the end of the year of $2,092.49,

Only three editions of the
journal were published during the
year, due to the difficulty of find -
ing a suitable editor, Mr. Ian Gale
was recently offered the ost of
editor of the journal and this he
has accepted. The Council now
looks forward to the regular
appearance of the journal again

The Councit- was pleased 1s
welcome during the year Mr.
Donald Cheney, Assistant Cana-
dian Trade Commissioner, Mi
C. D. Thomas, Président of the
Barbados Clerks’ Union, and Mr.
J. Martinez, a Venezuelan trave;
agent, all of whom address
meetings of the Chamber,

The annual dinner of the
Chamber was held oa 2nd De-
cember. There were 41 members
of the Chamber present and 19
guests, as compared with 35 mem-
bers and 26 guests in the previ-
ous year.

Obituary

The Council records with regret
the death of the following during
the yeart

Sir John Hutson, C.B.E., V.D.,
who died on 2nd April at the age
of 91. He was educated at Cod-
ringtor. College and studied med-
icine in Edinburgh. He returned

to practise in Barbados, after-
wards joining the public healtlt
service. From 1912 to 1925 he

was Public Health Inspector, Sir
John beeame a member of the
Legislative Council in 1920 and
served until 1943, being elected
President of the Council from
1941 to 1943.

Mr, W. R. Redman, who died
on 19th October at the age of
87. Mr. Redman worked for many
years with Messrs. W. L. Johnson

& Co., after which he was one
of the founders of the firm of
Johnson & Redman,
Conferences
The following conferences of
interest to the commercial com-

munity were held during the year
in this Colony.

Delegates from thé various
islands in the Caribbean attended
the final meeting of the Customs
Union Commission which was
held in Barbados during January.

The Preparatory Committee of
the Unified Currency Scheme for
the Eastern Group of the British
Caribbean territories completed.
its meetings in Barbados on 14th
April. The Committee agreed on
the final drafts of the legislation
for each of the participating ter-
ritories and these would be pre-
sented to the Governments con-

cerned.
A conference to siudy the
effects of devaluation on the

British Caribbean opened on 8th
March under the chairmanship
of Professor C. G. Beasley, The
conference was attended by offi-
cials from the territorial “units
and by Mr. A. Emanuel, Head of

the Economic Department = at
the Colonial Office.

The Council of the Federation
of Primary Producers in the
British Caribbean held its; first
meeting in Barbados during the
month of October under the
chairmanship of Mr. R. L, M.

Kirkwood of Jamaica. Other col-
onies represented were Dominica
Grenaca, St. Lucia and Barbados.
Incorperated Chambers of

Commerce of the British

Caribbean

A meeting of the Incorporated
Chambers was held in Trinidad
from the 10th to the 14th of July
The celegates from this Chamber
were Mr. H. A. C. Thomas and
Mr, G. D. Bynoe. The following
matters were dealt with at the
meeting: (a) Federation of the
Britisn West Indies, (b) Steam-
ship passenger accommodation
facilities between the U.K. and
the British Caribbean Area, (c)
Curtaiiment in the Canada-West
Indies Trade, and (d) Differen-
tial in freight rates to smaller
colonies of the Caribbean Area.

Rat Control

The damage which is caused to
foodstuffs by rats was drawn to
the ettention of members of the
Chamber and suggestions for
their control which ‘had been ob-
tained from the Director of
Medicel Services -were circulated
to members. The Director also
assisted by the free distribution
of rat baits and the loan of rat
traps from his department.

Barbados Automobile

Association
At the suggestion of the Cham-
ber a number of motor car
owners and persons engaged in

the garage trade formed a local

Automobile Association. After

overcoming some difficulties at

the start the Association appears
@ On page.7.



MISS GETRUDE SHERMAN, winner of the Miss Jamaica

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



title in

1949, is in England on a three months holiday to see the Festival of
Britain. Here she is at a party held by the friends of Wine Society.



~Express.





Lady Savage Appeals

For Help

For Local

Guide Movement

ON SATURDAY NEXT, the Girl Guides of Barbados
will hold their Sixth Annual Fair at the Drill Hall, said
Lady Savage in her broadeast talk in aid of the Girl Guide

Movement.

“My object in speaking to you to-night is to

seek your support for a Movement whose influence for
good in this Island is both real and practical and is well
established on sound principles and practice of self-help.”



Farming
Held Up In
UK.

Mr. L. Forbes, District Com-
missioner of british Guiana who
was intransit on the Colombie

from England yesterday, told the
Advocate that farming in Ei
lend has been retarded this year
on account of the heavy weather
they had throughout the year.

He said that in some parts of
the country, people are now
beginning to plough the land.

In the Isle of Thanet in Kent,
there is a scheme — a fairly new
one which has just started
for cultivating grass from which
the people could get proteins.

Mr. Forbes spent one year in
the U.K. during which time he
took an administrative course
which included local government
and community development at
the University of London.

He said that he had the oppor-
tunity of comparing what the
Colonial Governments were do-
ing in the African colonies and
South East Asia with C.D. ana
W. funds and what they con-
templated doing in the Colombo
Plan which is drawn up by coun-
tries like Malaya, Sarawak and
Fiji.

6,000 Registered
In Bridgetown

To-day is the last day for regis-
fration of voters on Form “A”
and the City figures are well over
the six thousand mark. Figures
returned by enumerators to the
City Supervisor’s office show that,
up to Saturday, over 6,000 per-
sons were registered. There
were only 447 persons who re-
fused to register.

Mr. W. W. Merritt, City Super-
visor, told the Advocate yesterday





that he thought the response
good. The whole City area had
been covered Few people, who

had to be away from their homes
through their work and for other

reasons had not yet been regis-
tered, he said

Referring to the daily dssue
which quoted members of the

House as having asked the Gov-

ernment to extend the time for
enumerators to carry out the
registration, Mr. Merritt said

that he did not think it necessary
for enumerstors of the City to
have extra time.

He thought the City area well
covered and was hoping to be
completely through with the
scheme within another two week

Lecture For Drivers

The Department of Highways
and Transport and the police are
giving a lecture for all drivers
ard conductors of motor vehicles
at the Empire Theatre at 10 a.m.
to-day.

The speakers will be Col. R. T.
Michelin, Commissioner of Police,
the Director of Highways and
Transport, and Chairman of the
Automobiles Association und the
Chairman of the ‘Bus Owners’
Association.

20/. FOR OVERLOADING










A fine of 20s and 1s costs was
imposed on Dalton Springer. a
bus conductor of Masor Hall
Road by a City Police Magistrate
for overloading the motor bu
M.1850.

The offence was committed or
March 26 while the bus be-
ing driven along Black Rc¢ Rd



After the recent visit of Lady
Baden-Powell, she wrote in the
“Guider"—

“Barbados Guiding is, 4
always, on a sound, good foot-
ing, and in this last year they
have managed to buy and set
up their own Headquarters, It
is an enormous, wel built
wooden hut given by Govern-
ment—with permanent extra
bath houses, etc.,—standing in
14 acres of land which can be
used for camping. The Island
Commissioner, Mrs, Williams,
und her team of Guiders and
Guides, have indeed every
reason to be extremely proud
of their achievement which has
cost a very large sum of money,
almost all of it being earned by
sheer hard work in organising
Fairs, Concerts and money-
raising efforts in these recent
yeers since the war.’

This tribute, as I know from
personal knowledge and observ-
ation, is well deserved. There is
no slacking on the part of the
Guides now that they have
achieved their primary purpose
of having their own Headquarters



at Pax Hill.
Capital Expenditure
But you will appreciate that

with the maximum effort on their
part it is not possible for tho
thousand Guides in this Island to
directly meet further necessary
eapital expenditure, and the an-
nual cost of maintenance of the
Movement,

The Guides always keep their
Founder's word in mind, “Do not
beg for money, work for it,’ but
the time has come when the effori
of the Guides in Barbados must
be supplemented by the general
public if the Movement is to
develop in this Island,

Let me first tell you what the
Guide Movement is doing to he!p
itself. At present, each. Guider,
Guide and Ranger is required to
contribute one shilling a year and
eaoi Brownie six pence a year
to local Guide Funds. That con-
tribution is in the majority of
cases all that they can afford, but
the Annual Guide Fair represents
their major contribution for nesr-
ly all the articles on sale—ranging
from sweets, household goods,
books and gifts—have been pro-
vided or made by the Guides
themselves. Ag regards contribu-
tions ,and donations, Government
makes oan annual grant of $384.
Up to now the Movement has not
appealed directly to the public for
contributions or donations,

As you know there are no paid
officials in the Movement in Bar-
bados. All the administrative and
clerical work is done by volun-
teers, but the time is coming
when some pail workers will
have to be employed, Whilst it
is from the proceeds of the
Annual Fair that the Guides have
depended to meet their capital
expenditure, the Movement would
be relieved of financial ry if
it could be assured of receiving
by way of regular annual dona
tions—say, an income of $1,200 «
year towards its recurrent ex-
penditure

Annual Contributions

I feel certain that when thes:
facts are known and appreciates
there will be many people in
Barbados who will be prepared to
make some annual contributio’
or donation to the Guide Move-
ment to enable it to maintain and
extend its activities in the train-
ing of young girls in citizenship

If you are prepared to do
will you write or get into contact




we

De



















es

Pelice Will Seon
Get Het Meals At

Central Station

OLICEMEN at the Central





Police Station w soon be
Becting ho. meals “on the spor’, At
the back of the Mess hoom a
kitchen is being fitted out for a

eaterer who will be 2 civilian.

Small square tables now replace
the long wooden tables that were
formerly used in the Mess Room.
Chairs take the place of benches
and the Mess Room on a whole
ig being decorated so that Police-
men can take their meals in com-
fort

At present Pelicemen get their
meals sent from outside caterers
cr from their homes. Very often
by the time they get a chance to
eat, the food is cold and not ap-
petising

4 Constable told the Advocate
yesterday that he was anxiously
awaiting the ecccasion when he
can get his hot meal at any time
of the day.

ONSTABLE HAROLD WICK-

4 HAM of the local Police
Force left the islang by the S.S.
Bonaire on Tuesday for England
where he will take a six months’
course in the running and man-
agement of Boys’ Clubs. He will
also take an instructor's course
in physical training.

Colone} R. T. Michelin, Com-
missioner of Police, told the Adwo-
cat yesterday that the Boys
Club organisation in the island
ig now so big that it necessitates
someone with training to take
charge and run the clubs along
the proper lines.

The number of clubs is now
even. They are run from volun-
tary contributions but now that
the number is larger the expenses
ire increasing. The Commission-
er said that the organisation
would welcome any donations.
They should be sent to the Sec-
retary of the Boys’ Clubs, rolice
Headquarters.

CANE FIRE at River Planta-
tion, St. Philip, on tuesday
night burnt 13 acres of first and













‘ re . — . r 7

St. Kitts ExpectsTo C.J. Asks For
c 4 rt. / vy «

Make 46.000 Tons Evidence
{ . yu: '
Gl Sucar ihis Year _Hearing of the case in whicl

oe gh M. Best and others charg-

St. Kius expecis to manufa- °¢ Percy G ales and others
ure 46,000 tons of sugar this “* YEN In possession of proper-
eur beat last years crop ct ‘¥ Which belong to both parties
t200 tons which was a record resumed at the Court of Cha:
ene Hon. RK. L. Bradsraw, rresi. CTY yesterday morning

acnt of the Colony

§ Labour Unio

His Honour the Vice-Chancel-

wola the Advocate yesterday. ler, Sir’Allan Collymore pointed
Mr. Bradshaw who went up to cut to counsel _that they were
Qngland with Administrator Bur- °7€ OF two points in the case
rowes in April, spent 19 dajs which were baffling him. He in-
there doing work at the Colonial Yited Mr. Reece to give further
Office and at the British Trea: - ilucidations and arguments.
ury. He arrived here yesterday Mr. Reece addressed the Court
morning by the Colembie ir- 7 length on the points mention-
transit for Antigua and is stay~ @ by His Honour after which

ing at the Marine Hotel,

Mr. Adams replied briefly.







He said that his union which His Honour, after hearing
was in existence since 1940, ig a Counsel, said that it would be
general workers’ union with a L¢&tter if evidence were taken in
membership of about 8,000 anj the case since he felt that the
when he left home, everythin, “@Se would go to a higher court
Was working satisfactorily, | ind if such evidence were no

This year, they got a 12% in- ‘aken, the case would have to
erease for all sugar workers i. D¢. sent back to him fer such
the field and the factory, wate> ®Vidence.

{ront workers and Government In the Bill of claim Perey
non-established employees. The Seales and the other defendants
increase for sugar worker.,} #re@ alleged to have sold some of
would now mean an additiona!, "h€ property without making any
$253,000. for them this yeat i oftlement with Hugh M, [es

He said that the union had alyo{ '4 his party about the rion y
secured a bonus for sugar fa ‘tained from the sales.
tory workers after it had been Mr. W. W. Reece, KC., in-
taken away from them for 1°} structed by Messrs Carrington &
years, Sealy appeared for Best. Mr. G.

H. Adams, instructed by Haynes
Like Other Yelands & Griffith are for Perey Seales.
Further hearing of the case was
Asked about conditiens in S..| odjeurned until August 8.
Kitts, he said that they wer —_
about the same as in every other |

West Indian Island where ther
‘vas bad housing, low wages an
low standard of living

He said that their Labour Wel-
fare Fund Cess is the highest in
the West Indies. It is £1 per ton
of sugar exported from the isian.
and they are using that money
for housing chiefly in respeet
sugar workers,

Their political set up is not 9
advanced as Barbados’, but the.
have not got an upper House e



second crop ripe canes bey have here, They are hevin
are the property of Messrs, €’ constitution changed ini
DaCosta & Co., Ltd. and were - =! to provide for wivers:
insured. ul. suffrage, the removal of ;

Another fire at Coverly Flan- ‘uaiications, property and
tation, Christ Church on tne same (52, for membership to
night burnt five acres of second * 2#islaive Council and
crop ripe canes which were also | Hl an increase in
insured. ber of elected

them a clear

At Fairy Valley, Christ Church,
six and a half acres of second and
third crop ripe canes, four and a
half acres of first crop ratoons,
three and a half acres of trash
and one acre of sour grass were
burnt. They were insured and be-
long to Oldbury Estates Lid.

HE POLICE SPORTS will be
held at Kensington Oval at
3.00 o'clock this evening, Apart
from the regular events there will

, be amusing moments such as when

the Constables try to get over the
greasy slide in the Obstacle Race.
There will also -be a Sivk Race

and a race for Policewomen.
HE CROP SEASON in the
Lakes and Corbins districts
of St. Andrew has come to an

end. On Tuesday evening at about
3.30 o'clock the motor lorry A 138,
owned by Mr. S. Spencer, carried
off the last load of canes. In
these districts the crop lasted for
three months.

QUEER LOOKING house



is







A now being built in Belle-
plaine Bay, St. Andrew. It has
the shape of a bungalow but
closely resembles the Red Indi-
an’s shelter. It is being built from
sticks at the Bay, It is under-
stood that the sides will be plas-
tered with mud and the roof of
trash or grass.

EGGY ALY of Gittens Gap,



Culloden Road, was taken to
the General Hospital on Tuesday
night and detained.

Sealy was involved in an acci-
dent with the motor car M 772,
owned and driven by Frank Young
of Britton’s Hill, St. Michael, at
about 10.30 o'clock on the same
night near the corner of Culloden
noad.

HORTLY BEFORE MIDDAY

yesterday John J. Bovier, bo-
son on board the Harrison Liner
Astronomer, was taken to the
General Hospital suffering from
injuries. He was detained. An
X-ray examination was performed
Bovier is at present in Ward

At about 11.20 a.m. Bovier
was going up a ladder in No. 3

hatch on board the ship. When
about 12 feet up he fell. He
complained of pains in his side

and came ashore at the Marbout

Police pier. He was examined

by Dr. Reader.

HE FILM “Great
tions” will be shown
Combermere School Old

boys’ Association hold their

monthly reunion at Combermere

School hall at 8 o'clock to-morrow

night,
Alter

Expecta-
when
the

the film show there will
be the usual games and = the
Honorary Secretary will meet

members of the football division.

It is expected to see a large turn
out of old Combermerians. The
Advocate was told that a small

collection will be taken to defray

the expenses in, connection with
the showing of the film.
T DISTRICT “C” COURT

yesterday 28-year-old Darn-
levy Proverbs of Congo Road, St
Philip, appeared on a charge o

hooting at Alleisha Weekes of
he same district with intent a
190 o'clock on Tuesday night

fe was remanded until Friday
20/- Or 2 Months’
Imprisonment

A City Police Magistrate yes-
terday imposed a fine of 20s and
ls costs on Byron Ashby _ of
Hopewell, St. Michael when he

found him guilty of driving the
motor bus M.2541 without rea-
ronable consideration on Arthur

Hill Road on April 19.

There is an alternative of two
1onths’ imprisonment with hard
labour,





with the Treasurer, Miss R ty the grounds of Pax Hill.
Laborde, at No: 6 Pavilion Cou: If you can attend the Fair
Hastings, sending her your first please do so and spend gener-
yea donation. cusly, but if not, Miss Laborde
regards the Annual will be happy to acknowledge the
next Saturday, funds are u receipt of any donation you may
ly required for he expen care to send her.
in respect of necessary p in; It is a good cause, and your
—inside and outside of the Head- pelp, urgently needed if thi
quarters—for the installation of Wovement is to prosper in thi
electricity, and for improvements [stand 2

over the

ever took place.
The Legislature
however
bers to
Council,

he
elect some of
the

said, wil
its mem
Executive

serve on

Hearing Adjourned
In Death Inquiry

Further hearing in the inquir,
into the circumstances surrouna
ing the death of Christophe
Goodridge of Richmond Gap, St
Michael was further adjourne
until June 4 yesterday.

The Coroner
Walwyn, Acting
trate of District

Goodridge
Dr.
Road, on
on April 22.
the



Oot

was Mr ‘
Mugis

Police
admitted = t
Beckle

was
Bayley’s Hospital
April 20 but died ther
Dr. A. S. Cato wh
post
said the
to him by
of Riehmond
Death
hours

performed
amination
identified
Taylor

Michael.
about ten

mortem ex
body wa
Christophe
St

plac

Gap,
had taken
before,

On examination of the body h

found that it was well nourish
ed, but under the brain ther
was a slight swelling.

In his Opinion death was du
to inflammation of the brain. Dr
Cato also said that he took par
of the kidney, brain and bladde
and sent them to the Govern
ment Analyst for examination
He also said that one of the kid
neys contained a
cf chenopodium oil,

small amour

To a question asked by th
Coroner concerning the cheno
pedium oil Dr, Cato told the jur
that
caused
brain,

Set. Marshall
that he took
to the Analyst,

hav
th

could
inflammation

the oil
the

hardly
of

told the Cow

the Coroner's

bo

Mr. J. Robinson Acting Gov
evnment Analyst said that he re
eeived the Coroner's box o
April 23 from Sgt. Marshal
He examined the contents of th
box and traced
small quantity
oi) from

and identified
of chenopodiu
part of the
He also examined a
which was

kidney
capsule
thi

ubmitted and

contained approximately

grammes of chenopodium oil
Evidence will be taken

Cr, Bayley on the next hearings,





take it

FROM US

These Lace Materials

will make Excellent





Curtains
« :

" FOR YOUR HOME
ART SILK & COTTON « 4&5 39" wide
in Blue, Rose, Gold and T2g0 Patterns.
BOR Ward s...6) daisy sensed â„¢ SLAt
13” wide in Blue, Rose, Go'd, Tango
and Green. Per Yard .

.., ALSO
PRINTED PLASTIC TABLE
COVERING
45” wide. Per Yard .. . $1.74
PLAIN PLASTIC in shades of Green,
Blue and Pink,

15” wide. Per Yard .... $1.45
Te 4 _ Wm
CAVE SHEPHERD
& CO., LTD.
10—11 BROAD STREET





vil
oth-
the
there
the num
members to giv
working majorit
Government and nom
inated side of the Council.

At present, the Council is com
prised of five elected and si
nominated members, but he wr
not in a position to say what th
number will be when the chang

|
|

fro in|

|
|



For that rich



PAGE FIVE

“Sunwhit’ Brings
Bread Flour









Four thousand b ff bread
flour arrived here on Tuesday
evening from Canada by
Saguenay Terminats” 4,308-
Sunwhit. The ent of flout
was being landed during the da
it was consigned to NLEssrs
Hl. Jason Jones & Ca., Ltd.

The Sunwhit also brougit 655
begs of livestock and poultry
feed; supplies of enamel, varnish
and paint and 8,766 pieces of

of
Pe

pine lumber. The shipment
lumber carne for Messrs. J.
Leslie & Co., Ltd.

The Sunwhit joined here, hér
sister ship, S.S. Sun Valley, which
is ‘loading sugar for Canada,
She is consigned tc Messrs. Plan:
tatu Lay L td



Fruit Comes
By Daerwood





Crates, barrels and boxes of
mangoes and other frésh frust
were piled up on the deck and in
the hatches of the motor vessel

Daerwood which arrived from St.

Lucia yesterday Bunches of
plantains were also among the
cargo.

Forty-seven passengers came

up on the Daerwood. Some were
from Aruba. The Daerwood is
consigned to the Sehooner Own-
ers’ Association



savoury fiavour? .

Make that stew really tasty ®
with just a little Marmite !
Make it better for you too—
Marmite contains the B2
vitamins that build up
health and resistance to
illness. That’s why it’s so
good for everyone on bread
and butter or in tasty sand-
wiches, You can do so
much with Marmite in
soups, gravies, sauces and
savoury dishes-——-and Marmite
does so much for good cooking,

B@e ua.» .



irritations,

'}
pe pe

$1.23 |



Excellent for Nasal Catarrh.



at KNIGHTS DRUG STORES






MARMITE .

The Vitamin 8 Yeast Food

Made in England

SRBeazeRseuaherage
“PURINA”

LAYENA

see

H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors.



WITH

‘CANDA’

VAPOUR RUB

THE NEW ANTISEPTIC VA

POURISING OINTMENT

for use in cases of local congestion and inflaraation,

head and chest colds, coughs, hoirseness and throat

A 2-OZ%, POT FOR 56 CENTS
PAGE_SI<’ BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 31, 1951
i ER ST Ta anmeerens A

BY CARL ANDERSON | «J Bp '










On
children’s










EILM, RO
ree cuts, scratches

and abrasions




use

‘DETTOL'

THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC





Safe . . . Non-poisonous
Doesn't Pain . . . Doesn't Stain a











ees YOU WANT TO LOOK
AT MY EVES ?



T TIME PZOPLE
Ee eS. I(T FRIGHTE
HEM A LITTLE!

“oO i










oe “d ed ° Dom

BLONDIE ‘1

¢

Ws

»

$s ?

|

|

vs Sa’ fas
Lose 8h






THE LONE RANGER -

Ar ' {
(. FS f ETE iS SMARTER 7 THAN | THOUGHT. HE FOUND WHERE WE'LL HAVE TO STAY HERE,
My BULLE” — s ree AND va? XI KNOWS | y, NOTKILL. x ear AND TRY TO BRAZEN
THE ee ( $ ; an



R OTe









| to-pays News Plast | DAY'S NEWS FLASH

The Ye Book of me wee

THE RIGHT LOAF F OR
THE WHOLE FAMILY



Dirty or is Dir

JOHNSON’S "STATIONERY

|

|

icl ana” anythi ma that looké
Ne manowane | HARDWARE





IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE HERE |

a
——owoOona@=$=—“—=$=M030.E l=:

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only

















Usually Now Usually Now
Pkgs. CROWN MACARONI 35 #$£=28 CHEESE (Gouda) perlb $1.00 90
Champagne per case new stocks Pkgs.
VICTOR CLIQUOT $72.00 $58.00 Jacob Cream Crackers 41 36
LOUIS ROEDERER $72.00 $60.00
PEANUTS 2lbs for 76¢ 8 Bottles Tennents Beer 26 21

ee SCOTT & -s ee Broad Street









RGGI D ON GOD OOOO ORO OOS

| nee I DUNLOP Q



epee 1 sic TRUCK AND BUS TYRES
game! | |! WE WISH TO ADVISE OUR } 4
| CUSTOMERS |
THAT OUR



PARTS DEPARTMENT
_ WILL BE CLOSED FROM FRIDAY,
Ist JUNE TO MONDAY 4th JUNE
1951, BOTH DAYS INCLUSIVE,
FOR OUR

ANNUAL STOCK-TAKING

THE: PHANTOM

{
|
|



SS SGOGCRCCRS TO Fa FOC PCI FIR F I AFRO PPC OS
Ape nnen anh e ete 4 It th bt mint, tli elt t tPA LIAS "LI Ramp otns *
of

SO ORI EEE PINOT LOTTO OLDE AORTIC



La : * DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING (0... oe

ne: LD. ' a,

aS = a SN fe. 0> Tt if ECKSTEIN BROTHERS . DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING
(es : oF | oo BAY STREET eS anne COMPANY LIMITED

SOT IES , peoeeess CDOS | (ECKSTEIN BROS.)
4

‘ie



1 |

THURSDAY, MAY



1,



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508





Fer Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements im Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number cf words
up to 50 and G cents per word for each
additional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.





THANKS



ESTWICK: The family of the let Mrs. |

LOUISE ESTWICK who died on the
26th May, 1951, at Brereton’s Village,
St. Philip. Gratefully return thanks to
all who attended the funeral, sent
wreaths and letters of sympathy or in
any other way rendered assistance in
their bereavement

Mrs. Edna George and Ena (Daughters);

Walter, Osford, Harold and Allan (Sons).





Mrs. Olga Eve\yn and Earl (Grands);
Mazie (Stepdaughter) 315.51—I1n
IN MEMORIAM
INCE: In Loving Remembrance, of our

dear Father and Grandfather JOHN
ARCHER INCE, who was called to
higher service. Mm 31, 1944.
The fragrance of his life still lingers
with us
The Ince Family.



31.5551—1n.







SMITH—In loving memory of our dear
beloved one EUST, SMITH who
passed away on 3lst May 1960

Pa year has passed since that sad
ay,
The one § love was called away,
The shock was hard the blow severe
But little we know that death was
near.

Ever to be remembered by Mrs. Muriel

Smith (Wife); Colleen, Pauline, Nella

(Daughters) and the Bascombe family.

31.5. 51—1n



—_—_—_—
YRARWOOD—In loving memon; of our
dear one Henry Allan Yearwood, who
passed to the great beyond or May
29th 1948.
Sleep on, dear father
Your task is o’er;
Your loving hands can do no more,
For those you loved you did your
best;
May God grant you eternal rest.
Ever to be remembered by Mrs, Carlotta

Yearwood (Wife), Mrs» Marguerite
O'neale (only daughter) and grand-
children. 29.5.51-——-1n.







1
THE LOYAL BROTHERS OF
THE STARS

Proudly Present their - - -

1951 CARNIVAL

AT QUEENS PARK
—On-—
THURSDAY 7th
and
SATURDAY 9th June

|

S|
fs |
I
Indian Chief |

Dazzling Spectacular, Brilliant

THE CARNIVAL BAND

From Trinidad. |

Sway to the Rhythm of Teldad's |
Leading Steel Band beaten by a
team of experts.

The 1951 Costume Champions
from the South will bring glam-
our straight from the History
Books when staging the Execu-
tion of Essex. Straight from the
Romantic West come the Wild
»ndians and the Ranchers, and
out of the Belfry Come the Bats,

CONFIDENTIAL

At 7.30 p.m. on Tth, June,
Queen’s Park will be transformed
into a family land of Song and



Colour.
Don’t Miss it.
ADMISSION:

Adults 1/6 — _ Children 64.

N.B.—All persons who have ob-
tained booths and stalls are asked
to have them erected not later
than June 4th so as to obtain

lights.





BUILDINGS FOR SALE

INVITED



OFFERS ARE

FOR

ALL OR ANY
OF

THE VALUABLE

FREEHOLD BUILDINGS
OCCUPYING

THE WHOLE OF ONE SIDE
OF

THE MARKET SQUARE
IN

ST. GEORGE, GRENADA.

FOR DETAILS Apply to:-

P.O. Box 6, St. George,
GRENADA.

In view of the island wide eee
Increase, the above represents a splen-
cid opportunity to any “GO-AHEAD
businéssman.

CCSOSSOOOROOOOOIOF

ARRIVED!

ORO

SOLD!

New Shipment of Gas
Cookers arfived, all

sold before arrival

See them at Gas Showroom
before delivery . and

gee Book your order TO-DAY
for next shipment





Es













FOR SALE
| Minimum charge week 72 cents and
£6 cents Sundays 2 ux - over 24
luords 3 ce word week—i cents a
e ord on Sundeys.
\-_
|

AUTOMOTIVE





-_——
CAR: Morris Oxford 1949. Perfect con-

dition, owner-driven, new tyres and bat-
j tery. Fitted with “Pye” Shortwave Radio.
| Cash or terms arranged. Dial 3084 or 4831
| 27.5.51—t.£.n.
}



CAR—One 1947 Frazer,
Contact H
James

Manning. Westmoreland, St.
29.5.51—6n,



CAR Chevrolet-—30,000 miles,
condition. At Golden Ridge. St. George.

Phone—95—259







CARS—1950 Morris Minor
9,000 miles 1945 Wolseley 14 Saloon
20,000 miles Ford V8 1935 Tourer
Fort Royal Garage Telephope—4504

29.5.51—4n.





VANS—New Morris Cowley and Type
J 10 cwt Vans. Last chance at old
prices: Morris 6 Saloon and Two Door
Minor Saloons all on hand for immed-
iate delivery.

Fort Royal Garage Ltd
Telephone—4504 29.5.51—4n. }



ELECTRICAL

FLASHLIGHTS & BATTERIES: Two
cell Flashlights with large focussing Re-
flectors $1.47 ea, Three cell at $1.84 each.
Penlights—which clip into your pocket
like a Pen—Only $1.03 each. Batteries
at 11 cents each G. W. Hutchinson,
& Co., Ltd. Broad & Roebuck Streets.

31.5.51—-lu



POULTRY

a
CHICKS: R.0.P, White Leghorns, New
Hampshires, Rhode Islands, Plymouth
Rocks, White and Black Giants $1.32
each 4 weeks old. From U.S.A. Gordon

Matthews, Glenmaur, Constitution Rd.
30.5.51—8n



MISCELLANEOUS

An_old friend just returned, namely
DANDERINE which is no trouble to use—
just put it on—and you will see it keeps



the hair looking its best at all times,
Knights Ltd. 30.5.51—2n
BARGAIN—Ladies Brown Fur Coat

Modern and as good as new Half orig-
inal cost Phone—2405. 29.5.51—3n.



CAR PARTS: 14 m.m. Spark Plugs,
Chamios Leather, Upholstery Material
and many other items. Enquire at the
Auto Tyre Co. Phone 2696.
30.5, 51—t.f.n



“FLUSHO” removes stains and cleans
Toilet Bowls, and is used in the same
way as Harpic. Price reduced to 42c.
tin. Obtainable at KNIGHTS Ltd.

.5.51—2n



GALVANISED SHEETS—Best quality
new sheets. Cheapest in the Island!
G ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56;
10 ft $8.40, Nett cash. Setter hurry!
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

4.5.51—t.f.n.



GALVANIZED SHEETS: We are sell-
ing Cheaper than any other firm in
Bridgetown. Try us first before you buy.

A. E. Taylor, Ltd., Coleridge Street,
where quality is Higher and Prices
Low. 31.5.51—In

OVENWARE; We have just received

a further shipment of Phoenix Oven
Tableware Dishes (many sizes), Roasters,
Cesseroles, Sauce Boats, Mixing Bowls,
Plates,etc, Buy your requirements today
at G. W. Hutchinson & Co., Lid. Broad
& Roebuck Streets. 31.5.51—1n

POOLE POTTERY—Just received in
wall plaques in flying ducks, blue birds,
sea gulls etc., also ornaments, cigarette
boxes, jam dishes, butter dishes, ashtrays
etc. Louis L. Bayley, Bolton Lane.

26.5.51—6n.

We also have in stock KURBICURA
» Veterinary product, for the treatment
of Thoropins, Curbs, Capped Hocks,





Price 5/-
0.5.51

and for Big Knees in Cattle

LTD 2n

KN'GHTS

We have in stock ATOMITE D.D.T
Insecticide, the Household Pest destroye:
which kills Flies, Mosquitoes, Ants, Cc

box













roaches, Fleas, Bugs ete., etc. Reduced
to 1/3. KNIGHTS Ltd 30.5.51—3n
————





EDUCATIONAL



HARRISON COLLEGE AND
QUEEN’S COLLEGE

Removai of Office of
Secretary-Treasurer



As from the Ist of June, 1951,
the office of the Secretary-
Treasurer to the Governing Bodies
of Harrison College and Queen’s
College will be situated at Har-
rison College (in the building
adjoining the Headmaster’s resi-
dence).









Fees for pupils of either schooi
will be received as follows:—
AT HARRISON COLLEGE:

on Mondays, Tuesdays and

Wednesdays 9.00 a.m.—12 noon

Fridays 9.00 a.m.~-12 noon

Saturdays 9.00 a.m.—10.00 a.m.
AT QUEEN'S COLLEGE:

on Thursdays 9.00 a.m.—12 noon

All cheques for fees in respect
of pupils of these schools must be
drawn in favour of the “Treasurer,
Governing Body, Harrison Col-
lege/Queen’s College.”

29,.5.51—2n,



TAKE NOTICE
DAWN

That SOAP & EDIBLE PRODUCTS
LIMITED, a company incorporated under
the laws of the Island of Jamaica, Manu-
facturers, whose trade or business address
is Producer Road, West End, Kingston,
Jamaica, British West Indies, has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A" of Register in respect of com-
mon soap detergents and all preparations
for laundry purposes gnd also in respect
of perfumery, including toilet articles,
preparations for the teeth and hair and
perfumed soap, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 29th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me «et my office of
cpposition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my

office.



Dated this 25th day of May, 1951.

HH. WILLIAMS,

j Registrar of Trade Marks.
29.5.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE
COLLEEN

That SOAP & EDIBLE PRODUCTS
LIMITED, a company incorporated under
the laws of the Island of Jamaica, Manu
facturers, whose trade or bu:
is Producer Road, West End, Kingrzon,
Jamotea, British West Indies, has ap) lied





| for laundry purposes and also in respect
}of perfumery, including toilet articles.
| preparations for the teeth and hair and
| perfumed soap, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 29th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
mm duplicate to me at my office of
cpposition of such registration
mark can be seen on application at my
office
Dated this 25th day of May, 1951
H. WILLIAMS,
| Registrar of Trade Marks



29.5.51.—3n. | specified

The trade

29.5.51—3n

| PUBLIC NOTICES

| Ten cents per aye





ne on week-days











and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
end $1.80 on Sundays.

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES
L ACT 1910

and
IN THE MATTER OF WEST INDIAN
KNITTING MILLS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Creditors of the abovenamed Company
which is being voluntarily wound up,
are required, on or before the 2nd day o:
July 1951, being the day for that purpose
fixed by the undersigned, to send their
names and addresses, and the particulars
of their debts or claims, and the names
and addresses of their Solicitors, if any,

to the undersigned H. Lisie Thomas in |

care of Messrs. Carrington & Sealy of }

mileage 20,000 | Lucas Street, Bridgetown, Barbados, the

Liquidator of the said Company, and,
if so required by notice in writing
from the said Liquidator, are te come

Excellent] in and prove their said debts or clans

at such time and place as shall be
in such notice, or in default

thereof they will be excluded from the

Saloon! benefit of any distribution made before

such debts are proved,
Dated this Ist day of May 1951.
H, LISLE THOMAS,
Liquidator.
2.5.57—Tn.
EES

NOTICE

“Applications for one vacant St. Philip's
Vestry Exhibition tenable at the St.
Michael's Girls’ School, will be received
by the undersigned not later than Satur-
day 9th June 1951.

Candidates must be daughters of
parishioners in straitened circumstances,
and must be over cight years and ltss
than twelve years old on the 3ist July,
1951.

A birth certificate must be forwarded,
with an application form, obtained fram
th Parochial Treasurer’s Office.

The entrance examination will be held
at the St. Michael's Girls’ School on
Saturday 16th June 1951 at 9.15 a.m.”

P. S. W. SCOTT,
Clerk to the Vestry,
St. Philip.
20.5 .51—tn



NOTICE

. Re Estate of

WILLIAM RUPERT St. CLAIR REDMAN
—deceased.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim against
the Estate of William Rupert St. Clair
Redman, late of Hastings, Christ Church,
who died in this Island on the 19th day
of October, 1950, are hereby required to
send particulars of their claims, duly
attested, to the undersigned, C/o. Cottié,
Catford & Co. No. 17, High Street,
Bridgetown, Solicitors, on or before the
Sist day of July, 1951, after which we
shall proceed to distribute the assets of
the Deceastd among the parties entitled
thereto, having regard only to such
claims of which we shall then have had |
notice, and that we will not be liable for
the assets or any part thereof so ats. |
tributed, to any person of whose debt
or claim we shall not then have had
notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
Estate are requested to settle their in-
debtedness without delay

Dated this 28th day of May, 1951.

RUPERT CHEESMAN REDMAN

FRANK MESSERVEY PHILLIPS

LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL
Qualified Executors of the Will









of
William Teupert St. Clair Redman,
deceased.
30.5.51—30

Re Estate of
GLADYS ALBERTINE HARDING
deceased

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim against
the Estate of Gladys Albertine Harding
late of the parish of Saint Michael, who |
died in this Island on thé@ 24th day of
January 1951, are hereby required to
send particulars of their claims duly
attested, to the undersigned Albertha
Harding the qualified Administratrix of
the Estate of the deceased, in care of
& Sealy of Lucas
Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors, on or be-
fore the 27th day of June 1951 after
which date T shall proceed to distribute
the assets of the deceased among the
parties entitled thereto having regard
only to such claims of which 1 ghall
then have had notice, and that T will
not be liable for the assets or any part |
thereof so distributed, to any person of
whose debt or claim I shall then have
had notice. ‘

And all

Messrs. Carrington

persons indebted to the said

j Windgalls, and Spruug Tendons in Hors€s| estate are requested to settle their in-

debtedness without delay.
Dated this 27th day of April, 1951,
ALBERTHA HARDING,
Qualified Administratrix of the Estate
of Gladys Albertine Harding





deceased,
28.4.51—4n, |
recta banat
THE SUGAR INDUSTRY AGRICUL-
TURAL BANK ACT, 1948

TO THE CREDITORS HOLDING
SPEC"ALTY LIENS AGAINST Grigg
Farm PLANTATION, St. Andrew.

TAKE NOTICE that we the Trustees
of the above Plantation are about to
obtain a loan of £3,000 under the pro-

visions of the above Act against the
said Plantation, in respect of the
Agricultural year 1951 18 1952.

No money has been borrowed under
the Agricultural Aids Act, 1905, or the



above Act (as the case may be) in
respect of such year.
Dated this 29th, day of May 1951.
L. C, M. ARCHER,
et al Executor and Trustees;
B. H. V. OUTRAM.
Attorney, 29.5.51—3n
DREAM

That SOAP & EDIBLE PRODUCTS
LIMITED, a company incorporated under
the laws of the Island of Jamaica, Manu-
facturers, whose trade or business address
is Producer Road, West End, Kingston.
Jamaica, British West Indies, has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A" of Register in respect of com-
mon soap detergents and all preparations
for laundry purposes and also in respect
of perfumery, incluaing toilet articles,
preparations for the teeth and hair and
perfumed soap, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 29th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of
opposition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
cffice.

Dated this 25th day of May, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
29.5 .51—3n

TAKE NOTICE
HYGEA

That SOAP & EDIBLE PRODUCTS
LIMITED, a company incorporated under
the laws of the Island of Jamaica, Manu-
facturers, whose trade or business address
is Producer Road, West End, Kingston,
Jamaica, British West Indies, has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A” of Register in respect of com-
mon soap detergents and all preparations
for laundry purposes and also in respect
of perfumery, including toilet articles,
preparations for the teeth and hair and
perfumed soap, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 29th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give, notics
in duplicate to me st my office of
opposition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office,

Dated this 25th day of May, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marke
29.5.51-







TAKE NOTICE
CAMEO

That SOAP & EDIBLE PRODUCTS

i¢ Producer Road, West End. Kingston,

for the registration of a trade maric in| Jamaica, British West Indies, has applied | aircraft
Part “A” of Register in respect of com-j| for the registration of a trade mark in) within this range.
mon soap detergents and all preparations| Part “A” of Register in respect of com- |

mon soap deterges's and all preparations

of perfumery. including toilet articies
preparations for the teeth and hair and
perfumed soap,
register the same after one month from
the 29th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notire
my office



in duplicate to me at
cpposition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my

office. cr
Dated this 25th day of May, 1951
H. WILLIAMS,

29.5.51—3n



for laundry purposes and also im respect}

and will be entitled _to |

of |





















































BARBADOS ADVOCATE
ee -
7 NJ wr SJ Na
PUBLIC SALES | FOR RENT WANTED
|
Ten cents per agate line on wevk-days Minimum charge week 72 cents ena | Minimu charge week 72 eents and)
and 42 cents per agate line on Sundays,! $6 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24) 9 ent c _ 24 |
minimum charge $1.50 on week-tlays}| Words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a! words 3 « 4 cents a]
and $1.80 on Sundays. word on Sundays word on Sundeys
elena gieaiiptencaptts canst |
REAL ESTATE HOUSES | HELP
PENRITH sjwuate at the -orner of| , BOULOGNE, St. Lawrence Gap. Fully | A CHAW®FEUR: Apply A.S. Husbands
llth Avenue and Belmont Road, St.| {rMished. Vacant, June the Ist. Dial 439. | Babbs, St. Lua 30.5. 51—3n
Michael, standing on 11.240 square feet 31.5.51—1an | —— pene a
| of land. The house is built of stone and ——$—$$—$— FESPONSIBLE YOUNG MAN, mechani-
- contains drawing, dining, breakfast FURNISHED FLAT, Pavilion Court. | cally inclined, capable of handling
1ooms and kitchen downstairs, three Available for approximately 4 months) labour. Apply in person only to Canad»
\bedreoms, toilet and bath upstairs.} ‘Tom Sth July. Phone 2552 Dry, Riecket St. 31.5.51—3n
Usual medern conveniences. Garage 30.5. 51—3n —
and servants rooms in yard. ap GENERAL SERVANT; Apply: High-
Inspection every day (except Sundays) FLAT; Besumont, Hastings, unfur-| field, Pine Hill, between 12 and 2. Mrs
between 4 and 6 p.m. or by appointment Dining and Sitting rooms, 2|J. Connell. 29.5.51—1n
Dia) 2965. PAS smeen | water, ae with MISC —_
The above will be set up for sale at usual conveniences, lo pets or EL L ANE: Us
Buble _Gorapatlties at our office tn mn. Dial 2636, 30.5.51-—2n _ ELL ANEOS perenne
Lucas Street. Bridgetown, on Friday, the} -->-————— — “$24 —
Ist June 1981, at 3 “WRENSCOURT’ Beach, Hast~- WANTED TO BaNT

p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors.
19.5.51—9n.

——_- ———





UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER
TO-DAY

TODAY, Slst May, 1951, hy order Mr.
J. H. Peacock we will sell his Furniture
at LEeterre, Mexwell Coast, which in-
cludes Morris Suite, Settee (for 3) and 2
Arm Chairs with Sp: ng Cushions; orna-
ment Tables Rockers, Mir’d Cabinets
ell in Mahogany; Verandah Chairs, Nice
Oval Table, Congoleum, Viorolite Top.
Coffee Table, Oak Extension Dining Ta
Upright Chairs and Book Case with Desk,
Electric Lamps, Glass Ware, Simmons,
Single Bedsteads with Springs and
Sieep-Mattresses; Cedar Mir'd. Press with
Dressing Table Combined; Very nice
Gents Mahog. Compactum; Cream Paint- |
ed Press; Philco Refrigerator in perfect
working order; (2% years) Electric Ket-
tle; Service Washing Machine; Kitchen
Utensils; Tables; Larder, 3 Burner
Valor Stove, 2 Burner Rippingill Stove
Oven, Lawn Mower practically new;
Garden Tools; Pram, Tricycle. Toddle
Cart, Child's Chest of Drawers, Dolls
House, Dolis, Jamaican Mats and other
items ‘i
SALE 11.45 o'clock TERMS CASH.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers







27.5.51—2n

TAKE NOTICE
CORONET

That SOAP & EDIBLE PRODUCTS
LIMITED, a company incorporated under
the laws of the Island of Jamaica, Manu-
facturers, whose trade or business address |
is Producer Road, West End, Kingston,
Jamaica, British West Indies, has |



for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A” of Register in respect of com-
mon soap detergents and all preparations
for laundry purposes and also in respect
of perfumery, including toilet articles,
preparations for the teeth and hair and
perfumed soap, and will Le entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 29th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of
epposition of such registration. The trade}
mark can be seen on applicution at my
office
Dated this 25th day of May, 1951,
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
29.5. 51—3n

Chamber Of

{ ing? Company

m

ings. Cool, Comfortable, two flat Bunga-
lows, Near the Sea, open verandahs,
sitting, drawing and dining rooms, 5
bedrooms, kitchenettes, pantry, toilets
aud bath. running water and electricity
garages and enclosed yard. Avyailabie
from June Ist. Apply: C. E. Clarke, 7
Swan Street. Dial 2631 or 3029

%.5.51—In



| ANNOUNCEMENTS



ANNOUNCEMENTS; Starting
Ju 2nd, every Saturday at 7.10 p.m
and evens Wednesday at 7.25 a.m., PYE
Rudio will have a message for you over
the loudspeakers of Barbado$ Rediffusion
Services Ltd. Listen in to these.—-Pye
Lid. 31.5.51—3n



PYE RADIO: The Jamaica Broadcast-
has awarded the contract
tor the supply of one hundred communal
receiving sets to PYE RADIO. The sets
chostn-—the new PYE-six. Identical sets

| will be opened in Barbados this week

Pye Lid

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of A. E. Taylor, Ltd.
holder of Liquor License No, 1017 of 1961
sranted to Eve\/n Dowlin in respect of
4& board and shingle shop with shedroof
atteched at Six Mens, St. Peter for per-
n.ission to use the said Liquor License
&c, at a well and wooden buildings
known as Sandy Beach Hotel Apartments
and Bugolows, Worthings, Christ Church,
within District “A”

Dated this 29th day of May 1951.

To: A. BE. McLBOD, Esq.

Polce Magistrate, Dist. "A",

A. E. TAYLOR LTD,
per A. E,. TAYLOR,
Applicants.

N.B.--This application will be consid-

ered at a Licensing Court to be held at

31.5.51—3n





Pollee Court, Dist. “A" on Friday the
8th day of June 1951, at 11 o'clock, a,m
E. A, McLEOD
Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’
31.5.5)—In



Display of Gymnastics

QUEEN'S COLLEGE Gymnastics Dis-
play will be repeated at Queen’s College
for the public on Friday, June Ist 1981, at
4.90 p.m

Following the Display there will be a
Netball Match between the School's First
and Second Netball teams

ADMISSION



Adults 1/- Children

30.5, 51-

oa
2n

Commerce Report

From page 5

e
to be on a firm footing and the
membership is now gtowing. The
Police and the Department of
Highways and Transport have
given the newly-formed Associa.
tion considerable assistance and

advice,
Shipping

During the year 1,024 Merchant
Vessels with a total nett tonnage
of 1,645,678 tons arrived at the
port as compared with 999 vessels
of 1,234,120 tons in 1949. In ad-
dition to the above, 44 vessels of
other types amounting to 76,192
tons visited the port. These,
were comprised of 23 yachts, 10
Royal Fleet Auxiliaries, 3 British
and 4 American Men of War, 1
Dutch Aircraft Carrier, 1 Royal
Army Service Corps Vessel, 1
American tug and 1 cable ship.

Five hundred and eighty one

amounted to 70,522 tons entered
the Careenage as against 627
vessels of 73,680 tong gross in
1949; of these 149 were steam and
motor vessels, the remainder
being sailing vessels,

The Cruise Ships Mauretania,
Italia and Stella Polatis made a
total of six visits to Barbados
during the year, The number of
tourists carried by these vessels
was 1,580.

The total number of passengers
arriving in the Colony by sea
during 1950 exculsive of intransit
passengers and tourists, wag 5,238.

|'The number who left the Colony

by sea was 4,396, as compared
with 4,796 and 3,884 respectively
in 1949,

The following table gives the
class, nationality, mumber and
nett tonnage of vessels arriving



vessels whose gross tonnage! at the port during 1950:
Class of No. of Nett
Vessel Nationality Vessels tonnage
Steam British 355 904,161
and American .. 715 316,433
Motor .. French ie 31 91,237
Argentine .. “in 2 7,123
Dutch ae a ee 111,813
Norwegian ah, 38 108,223
Swedish .. eee Tl 14,487
Italian ‘i oe l 4,902
Honduran .. 3 10 1,454
Danish oe Pr 1 1,952
Egyptian .. iw’ 10,102 i
Finnish oF “s 1 4,964
Panamanian és 2 18,636
Venezuelan a 6 587 2,020 1,597,507
Tankers British oe o 3 3,342
Dutch °° oe 11 20,416
American ., oe 1 15 1,235
Sailing British hs «. 417 22,851
Vessels French a ‘ 5 422 327 23,178
Total Merchant Shipping
The following table shows the!

number of steam and motor ves-| 9th, T.C.A. operated into Seawell,{ 386 acres, as compared with 721

7%
|
eR

sels which arrived at the port of





LIMITED, a company incorporated under | way was permanently closed tol
address} the laws of the Island of Jamaica, Manu- la
turers, whose trade or business sddress |

ber 8th, 1950, and on December

both North and South-bound.







24,993) season was 24 acres 2rd., which

TWO BEDROOM furnished apartment.

Near town, Reasonable rental. Write
$307 ‘Brodeur Ave. Apt. 2, Montreal,
Quebec. Mrs, L, Rideau,

26.5.51—3n



MEDICINE BOTTLES: §& oz. bottles with
marks 8/16; 8 ov. bottles Plain. Knights
Ltd,, Phoenix Pharmacy 31.5. 51—2r
BUNGALOW: Four-Bedroom Bungalow
on Sea, with safe Bathing, for month of
August. Fully furnished. Ring, Michelin
Tel. 2014 31,5. 51-—2n



> iaseetnnenaema





Charcoal and Firewood

Four thousand and fifty two
tons of charcoal and 9,945 tons of
firewood were imported during
1250 from the following sources:

Charcoal Firewood

tons tons
B.G. 3,350 9,055
Dominica — 627
St. Lucia 702 247
St. Vincent .. oot 8
Trinidad o 8

4,052 9,945

The Sugar Industry.

Although the total rainfall wa
greater than that for the corres-
ponding periods for the past fdur
seasons, the distribution was very
unsatisfactory. The rainfall dur-
ing November and December 1948
was above average and there was
sufficient moisture for the estab-
lishment of the young cane crop.
The period February to May, 1949,
was dry and this somewhat re-
tarded the germination and early
development of the ratoons. The
months of July, November and
December were dry and although
the total precipitation for August
was 13.45 inches the great. majori-
ty of this fell on the night of the
Bist and could not be effectually
utilised by the crop. Fortunately
the rainfall for January and the
other early months of 1950 was
food and the cane erop, particu-
larly the ratoons, continued to de
velop until late in the season.

The area harvested for the 195(
crop was 41,241 acres as against
39,705 acres in 1949. These figures
include 7,000 acres for land unde:
peasants’ cane (estimated).

The equivalent of 45,600 punch-
cons of Fancy Molasses was pro-
duced during the 1950 crop season
At the end of December, 195
approximately 4,300 puncheons oi
this Fancy Molasses remained ir
this island. It is expected tha
out of the 1951 crop productioi
about 67,000 puncheons equiva-
lent of Fancy Molasses will be re-
quired for export, The lates
estimate of the 1951 crop produe
tion of sugar and faney molasses
shows that a record crop of 180,000
tons is expected,

The British Government,
through the Ministry of Food, has:
purchased the entire exportable
cutput of sugar during the 195!
crop season. The cif, price ol
£32.17.6 per ton includes 2/9 per
ewt.,, which under the Sugar In-
dustry (Rehabilitation, Price
Stibilisation and Labour Welfare)
Act, 1947, will be deposited to the
special reserve funds,







Food Crops..

Emergency regulations for the
compulsory planting of grounc
provisions and vegetables continue
to be enforced,

During the 1950-51 Crop Year
the total area required to be plant
ed in holdings of 10 acres anc
over was 21 per cent, and in hold-
ings of 2 to 10 acres 20 per cent.

The keeping of livestock by
plantations was maintained at the
same level as before, viz. one live-
stock unit to gvery 20 acres of
Jand.

The final
plantings has
requirements
tulfilled,

actua
the
than

survey of
revealed that
were more

Cotton,

The area of cotton cultivated by
plantations during the 1949/5(

yielded 21,524 lb. of seed cotton,
with a crop average per acre of
878.5 lb of seed cotton, Peasants
planted 361 acres 2rd, of cotton
yielding 107,948 lb, of seed cotton
or 298.6 lb per acre, The total
‘area under cotton cultivation was

acres 3rd. in the previous year.









Bridgetown during the years .
1945—50: Export Trade Figures
‘ear 5 SUGAR
* — or pon og , 1948 joy 1990 1048 1049 1960
1946 174 Tons Tons Tons £ £ £
ed aie Dark Crystals 43,691 116,699 121,554 1,065,878 + «3,019,591 3,540,262
Molasses : 1,851 2,587 2,295 28,691 40,098 60,724
1948 441 Muscovado 1,025 1,550 4,260 20,500 31,000 37,760
1949 547 White Crystals 3,085 5,773 6,044 67,151 183,213 229,356
Ls 602 49,652 126,000 441,743 «1,202,220 3,273,902 3,868,100
Air Traffic MOLASSES
The number of commercial air- 1948 1949 1950 1948 119 1950
craft arriving at Seawell Airport : , a
: Gall £ £ £
during 1950 was 1,297, as com- ert pes. Chee
pared with 1,242 in 1949. These] Fancy Molasses 6414,079 4,143,813 $006,890 1,088,688 013,899 aay
ated i Choice Molasses 143,401 247,099 135,159 O18 36,551
follon aaere by six Airlines as Vacuum Pan Molasses ape 1,753,014 2,804,311 32,869 24,119
ollows; -— ‘ Bottoms Molasses 3,090 _ - 232 --
British West Indian Airways 1,158 6,560,630 6,143,926 8,835,300 ‘1,052,170 682,358
B.G. Airways adh noes 66 aap greg ae ee —
. : RUM (Iinclading Ships’ Stores)
pa Airlines . 1048 1949 50 1948 1949 1950
ates ts Heke ee ues ss 4 Gallons Gallons Gallons ‘ £ £
jNationwide —..... sss 3 836,976 647,748 902,296 276,639 255,242 294,988
In addition to the above, F The values of staple crops exported during the years 1946-0 are as follows
| i ;
military and 15 private aircra Sugar Molasses Rum
landed at the Airport. 1946 £1,789,517 © 785.168
The number of passengers ar- 1947 1,879,255 1,147,279
riving by air during the year was 1948 1,202,220 1,052,170
13,503 and the number departing io pp lea ; eenaee aye
by air was 13,363, as compares Percentage Table of Exports of Local Produce & Ma ntoviaree of the Colony, 1946-50
|with 12,074 arriving and 11, 1946 1948 1969 1900
‘ ‘ United Kinedom 38.7 33.2 26.2 50.0 43.7
| departing during the previous Canada 47.7 51.3 52.0 39.6 47.3
year, Other parts of the British Empire 9.6 12.1 210 a7 65
iG o run- U.S.A, 28 30 5 10 22
On October 16th the old Other foreign countriés 11 4 3 7 3
Percentage Table of amports for the Vears 1946—50
ll air traffic, and 3,900 feet of 1946 1947 a 1949 1950
was opened to United Kinzdom 29.3 26.8 39.3 40.7 46.6
jthe. new saute an Coaratiog Canada 28.2 35.0 26.3 19.8 14.5
P Other parts of the British Empire 16.0 13.1 16.5 21.0 214
USA 10.8 19.5 12.2 12.5 66
The full length, 6,000 feet, of the Other foreign countries 6.1 5.6 5.7 6.9 10.9

new rmnway was opened to air
| traffie on the afternoon of Decem-

j
ne

| ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
| New Shipment opened

| THANTS "%





Values of Imports and Exports for the Vear® 1916—0









Year < Imports Exports Total Trade
1946 £4,992 492 £3,142,164 £4,134,656
1947 7,124,930 3,715,107 10,840,037
1948 6,346,230 3,048,165 9,394,295
1949 7,072 628 4,688,536 11,761,164
1950 8,007,944 5,758,975 13,826,919
The production figures for sugar for the years 1947 to 1950 are as follows
i 1047 1948 1949
| VP 86,369 56,496 133,868
Musee tar 1,655 1,262 1,991
| *Fancy Molasse 23,208 20,468 16,872
Total 111 78,226 152,731 158,183
Equated ec rate of 32 e gallons per ton of igar














LOST & FOUND



s.s,
rom fF
May,
june, §

dad during the latter half of July, and





SHIPPING NOTICES —



MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED

Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane 16th

PAGE. SEVEN
PERSONAL























LOST The public are hereby warned against 7}
LASSES st ; ~——, | Siving credit to amy person or Persons >
See + Prin AS n 3 ee ; homsoever in my name as I do not hold ;
j eee ore nee a Se yself responsible for anyone contracting
.* uitably rewarded on returiing debt cr debts in my name’ ufiless
Advocate Advertising Dep 1 written order signed by me ‘
CARLISLE PAYNE, ;
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET: Series S. 1919 Se aa i
Finde; please return same to miss Miriam | op 5 51—~2n j
Cumberbatch in Trafalgar Square ;
31.5.51—tr | 1
“for the years 1947-50 ts As 2 i
The rainfall for the years 1947-90 is as 7 4
soon FIRST OCCUPANT
1m7 1948 199 1950] The new graveyard at St. j
ins. ins. ins. ins. | Joseph parish chureh was used q
In the Highlands 43.45 75.91 64.56 86.8!) yesterday for the first tim@~ 2% ‘
In the Lowlands — 35,09 56.93 58.22 74.55]" Sarah King of Horse Hill, 3ta°* 7
Average ‘for the Joseph was buried there. 4
whole Island 33.80 69.81 60.69 79.374 —
Income Tax Statistics for the Years 1941-50 ona tien.
Rates in the £
191t «1942 Inte | 19t4 1945 16, 1947 1948 ino) 61950
From To 410 !
£1 £100 1 6 6 6 9 -/9 -/6 -/6 -/6
101-200 1 1 1 1 13 1/3 1/- 1/- 1/-
1 = 400 2 2/- 2 2 2/3 2/3 2/- 2/- 2/-
401 = 600 3/- 3/- 3- 3 3/3 3/3 3/- -
601 800 3- a 4/- 4 a3 a3 46 46 46
201 1,000 3/- 5. 5/- 5 “3 sy/3 5/6 5/6 s/s
1,001 1,750 4/- 6/6 66 7 73 73 1/6 6 7/6
1,751 2,000 4/- 66 6/6 V- 7/3 1/3 7/6 96 a6
2,001 2,500 S/- B/- 8/- 86 a9 89 9/- 9/6 /6
2.501 3,000 | 5/- 8/- B/- 8/6 I/- 7 11/- 11/3. 12/- 12/-
3,001 5,000 6/- 10, 10. 10/6 1l/- 1ly/- 11/3 12/- 12/- wiry
5,001 10,000 8/- 12 12 12/6 13/6 13/6 13/9 15/- 157+
Over 10,000 10/- 12/- 12/- 12/6 13/6 13/6 13/9 15/- 15f+, +»
Rates in the £
194 1962 1948 1948 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1958
Tax on Companies 4 S/- S/- &, 6/8 6/8 6/8 G/B 71/6 7/6
Tax on Life Assurance 2s 2s 2s. aleneeetiine
Companies 48d 9.5d 95d 9.5d 3.28. 3.25. 3.28 3.158 3.158 3.188 “-“"
Income Tax and Death Duties Collected ¥
for the years i ,
Imt = 194 194s rout 165 HG 1947 IMs «149 1950 "
£ “£ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ Dea
172,002 264,779 296,928 382,519 524,178 524,737 608,523 671,350 630,138 789,06T, {
om names







(M.A.N.Z, LINE)
ARABIA is scheduled to sail
jobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th

“Daerwood" will

and Passengers

accept
Cy for St
Lucia, Grenada & Aruba, Passen-



"oO

ydney 23rd June, arriving at Trin-
Friday Ist June,

proceeding thereafter to Barbados and

wiverpool, M.V. “Caribbee” will accept 3
In addition to general cargo this vessel Cargo and Passengers for Dotijni- 4%
has ample space for chilled and hard ca, Antigua, Montserrat, evia . &

frozen cargo,
Cargo accepted on through Bills of Lad-

& St. Kitts. Sailing Friday tat



ing for transhipment at Trinidad to Brit- et
ish Guiana, Leeward and Windward m4
Islandia, B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS:

For further particulars apply —
FURNESS, WITHY & CO., LTD,
eine
Iwi,

ASSOCIATION (Inc.)

Consignee. Tele. No. 4047. ©

and
DA COSTA & CO., LTD.,
Bridgetown,



| gers only for St. Vincent. Sailing
June. al









NEW YORK SERVICE











S.S. “TINDRA” Sails 18th May Arrives Barbados 30th May, 1951.

A STEAMER Sails 8th June Arrives Barbados 19th June, 1961, et eh
ms a _
NEW ORLEANS SERVICE wo Warnes
$.S. “ALCOA ROAMER” Sails 16th May — Arrives Barbados Ist June, 1951,~ 5 >,
S.8. “ALCOA PATRIOT" Sails 30th May — Arrives Barbados 15th June, 1951. oe)
3.8. “ALCOA POLARIS" Sails 13th June — Arrives Barbados 28th June, 1901, ‘= ~
Oe re en ae ee “—
CANADIAN SERVICE we
SOUTHBOUND ma .% peak |
Name of Ship Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives Bos. * oy
wee A
.8. “ALCOA PIONEER"... May llth May l4th May aati ee pate
ss, “POLKE BERNADOTTE” May 26th May 0th June 10tHe " ha
s.9. “ALCOA PLANTER" .. June 8th June 1th June Mist 4° a
ew
i J Goat + ee able Ue
soe TKLCOA PEGASUS" due May 26th sails for St. John and St. Lawrence ox
River Ports, y f rd
. .
These vessels hve limited passenger accommodation, ; z ae
a alma

ne

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE. ed
APPLY:—DA COSTA & C©O., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE & :



TO HAND THIS WEEK~



|




Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominica
sailing to Europe fortnightly, The usual
Dublin,
reduction for children.



|

' |

PLANTATIONS LIMITED °:.
soeegegnesnennenenanenernesnennneneeneeteetnesenineeeneeneesneeRees







PASSAGES TO EUROPE

for
rts of call art

London, or Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual




FLASH NEWS






CANADIAN ELECTRIC IRONS & TOASTERS
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets




1 Pint + Gallon

1 Gallon





ALUMINUM
CIGARETTE CASES Se
in GOLD and SILVER ‘
Finish ; ’





REAL ESTATE |

The Purchase or Sale of Good Class Property

is usually negotiated by

JOHN M. BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
REAL ESTATE AGENT
and
AUCTIONEER
*Phone 4640 “t- Plantations Building


| P PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 31, 1951

OLDSTERS FEAR
CRICKET DYING

VICTORIA, British Colombia
White haired, tweed-clad Vic-
torians—the breed that rightly
or wrongly gave this city its de-
signation of being “more English
than England”—are depressed.
Cricket is on the way out as
one of the recognised sports here.











Church Girls’

| ‘ARCTIC PRINCE’ WINS DERBY

Brigade Sports
Photo Finish for Second ee

And Third Positions ki

their Annual Sports at Codrington
College on Empire Day and the
(From VERNON MORGAN)
EPSOM DOWNS, Surrey, May 30.

there was a steady supply of fol-
lowers of the game from which
the regular teams could draw
That supply has dried up.”
Thrives Elsewhere
Elsewhere in Canada however
the sport is thriving. For the last
few years there has een a do-

La at

T INNER
THREE MES Ww All Saints’ Company won the Cup.
“ : The Rally, of which the sports
formed part was well attended and
a, service at the St. John’s Church

preceded the open-air activities.
Companies of the Church Lads’
Brigade attended and arranged
and supervised the programme for




JOSEPH McGRATH of Eire carried off Britain’s rich- the girls. ge pessimists predict it won't minion championship tournensens

est ever Derby when his colt Arctic Prince cantered away PRIZE LIST ee eee tO Ry Se, Pca test “sonra
~ from a huge id to win easily by six lengths. Arctic Class I—H. Jemmott (All Saints) or the last time. provinces, won last year by the

ug y by six lengths. retic Class W—G. Cumberbatch (St. Ontario eleven. Ontario beat the

Prince started at 28/1. Andrew's), One of the chief reasons for the British Columbia team 121—94

Class 111—Mavis Clarke (St. Clement's).
Class 1V—Marcene Gilkes (All Saints’.
Class V—Elsie Cummins (St. Clement's) .

decline of cricket here is that

After a photo, the 50/1 outsider Sybil’s Nephew was the elementary schools no longer

placed second and the Irish colt Signal Box, a 20/1 chance,

on the final day of play at Win-
nipeg last summer, and the 1949







i irty Relay Race (Jnrs)—All Saints. include it in their list of play- champions, Alberta, took third
third. Thirty-three ran, The Irish owned ” Colt ‘tratried Sack , Race (Snrs)—N Carter (St. ground sete They used to, omar
; : pada . + oaths . Leonard’s) ut a y was hit on the -head ame in Canada wil Y
. in England by Willie Stephenson (EER neh, Race (Snra—E. Blackman by @ cricket ball and his scalp a ‘great flllip Be vad al a
‘ ; 1 1 sit of :
Water Polo and tidden |. by ie Boghish ma ; a ey Vietrix’ Ludorum (Jnrs)—M. Gilkes Was cut. Cricket was summarily Marylebone Cricket Club side
jockey Charlie Spares took the \ em i (All Saints) . banned as being too rough. this summer. The tourists arrive
lead after rounding Tattenham s 4 P , Victrix Luderum (Snrs)—M. Clarke hen there’s the question of jn Montreal July 31 and the
corner and won the 172nd run- (St. Clement's) - ;

Opens Next Week

CHAMPION CUP supply. There is no manufactur- M.C.C, meets representative Ca-

, S ae - aoe a = All Beinte, Coy. sins — ae cement = Ca- nadian elevens at Toronto, Cal-
; ) Pe See ere Cer ae a oe : an uring e cond gary and Vancouver. The tourists
; oe mt eee Tt ro‘ None of the fancied horses Jnre—D. | Bawards (All Saints); L. World War it was impossible to will also play at Ottawa, St.
“I Eight cam sent ta fi e indies? finished in the first four and it Cesc Antrobua (St. John), §. Me #et it from Britain. Catharines and London, Ont.,
teams have entered for the ton was left to Lord Milford’s Sybil’s Clean (St. Stephen) And “upstart” sports such as Winnipeg, Edmonton, Victoria
competitions. The men’s teams Nephew, a colt of uncertain lacrosse, baseball and hockey are and Vernon, B.C.—CP)
are, Snappers, Swordfish, Flying Parentage, to take second place shoving the ancient game out of



Fish, Bonitas, Barracudas, Police, Just in front of the Irish ‘Two the picture, here at least. Vic-



Harrison College and Whippo
Rays. The Ladies’ teams are
Goldfish, Starfish, Sea Nymphs,
Mermaids and a team from the
Ursuline Convent.

The games. are to be played at
the Barbados Aquatic Club, by
kind permission of the manage-
ment. Matches will be played on
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays.
The ladies will play one match on
Tuesdays and sometimes two or
Fridays. The men will play on
Tuesdays and Thursdays.



There will be a special Gen-
eral Meeting of the Water
Polo Association at the Bar-
bados Aquatic Club this after-
noon at 5 o'clock.

Oné of the items on the
agenda is to decide whether
the season should not be post-
et for a couple of weeks
ue to unforeseen circum-
stances.



Snappers, last year’s Cup win-
ners though they have lost the
Manning twins to Harrison Col-
lege have unearthed some new
talent and they seem to be in a
comfortable position as the 1951
season opens. Flying Fish who
finished second last year have two
newcomers. They are still looking
for one or two more playéts. Bar-
racudas, Swordfish and Bonitas
are iff more or less the same posi-
tion as Flying Fish

Police and Harrison College
Will be entering teams from their
‘tanks’. For Harrison College this
ys the first time they will be enter-
ing the game as a team, but they
have several experienced players
who have been playing water polo
for two or three years. Their team
ig a group of keen youngsters and
much is expected of them when
the season gets going. Whippo
Bays are making their debut to
wa

er polo, Players of this team
are mostly from Black Rock and
the Paradise Beach Club area.

Eighty per cent of the ladies
playing water polo this season
started training about six weeks
ago for the first time. The other
twenty per cent. began playing last
November when Trinidad sent a
ladies: team to Barbados. The la-
dies have taken to the game like
a duck to water. Beyond all hopes
they have shown that they can
play the game, and are improving
every day. It is anticipated that
competition between these five
_teams~ will be greater than the
competition between the men’s
teams.



E s
S. Africa Recovers
After Bad Start
ILFORD, Essex, May 30

The South African cricketers,
after losing five wickets for 46
runs, scored 312 for 9 wickets on
the first day of their match against
Â¥ssex here today,

They were chiefly indebted to
John Waite 128, Athol Rowan 40
and ‘Hugh ‘Tayfield 68, who
brought about a revival after the
earlier batsmen had failed against
the pace bowling of Trevor Bailey
and Ken Preston, and the spin of
Peter Smith —Reuter.



Traffic Do’s

No. 15

GIVE REGULAR
ATTENTION

TO YOUR BRAKES,
STEERING AND

TYRES
Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.







They'll Do It Every Time vrscmee By Jimmy Hatlo |

Now OUR HEROINE |S THIRTY: AND

"When aspioist a WAS TWENTY,

Thousand Guineas winner Signal

Box.
Bright Sun ,

After a really Arctic morning,

which inspired many punters to

back the winner, the sun was
shining brightly as the
record field went to

including the Queen and other
members of the Royal family.

Arctic Prince is a son of the
1946 French Derby winner Prince
Chevalier out of the mare Arctic
Sun.

Officially placed fourth
American owned Le Tyrol from

near —
the post
watched by some 500,000 people

ihn tebe é

ge



JUAN GANGIO, Argentine ex-bus driver, humming over the silverstone circuit, Northamptonshire,
England, in his supercharged Alfa Romeo as he won the first heat of the International Trophy Race
for Grand Prix Cars. Gangio, who broke the track record three times, won the heat at a speed of more
His best lap was 92.29 miles an hour.

than 92 miles an hour,

~

In English League

was

France, the best of the five
horses which had crossed the ° 1
Channel in a bid to win the Rickards 83,
£20,000 first prize. 4

Several horses were fractious y 7
at the start including Gordon EVERTON WEEKES w
Richards’ mount Stokes. Zuc-
chero the mount of the fifteen-

year-old boy Lester Piggott, and
the Aga Khan's Fraise Du Bois
who was finally left several
lengths.

Crocodile finished fifth, Le Vent
sixth, Nyangal seventh, Sun Com-
pass eighth, Turco ninth, Ex-
peditious tenth and Arcot last.

The winner covered the mile
and a half in 2 minutes 39 and
2/5 seconds. —Reuter.

Regatta On
Saturday

The twelfth Regatta of the cur-
rent season will be sailed oa
Saturday under the auspices of the
Royal Barbados Yacht Club.

Handicaps and starting times









































are as follows:— 3

Class No. Yacht Start at Flag
b 13 Ranger ie ea

dD 4 Seabird 2.30 Red

D 10 Van Thorndyke 2.31 Yellow
* penance iahasanacntetrenineinenennnt ines
B 481 Fantasy 2.33 Red

a War Cloud 2.33.30 Yellow
B 6 ea Flirt ewes Paitin: a wged
D 12 Rainbow 2.34 Red
Bt Moyra Biair

B B Rascal 2.35 Yellow
B® Okapi

Do Olive Blossom 2.36 Red
aes Buccaneer _ F
TT Sinbad 2.38 Yellow
dD 2 Imp 2.40 ed

B23 Gipsy

BS Mischief 2.41 Yellow
c 8 Peggy Nan

Ce 9 Folly 242 Red
E:.® Eagle

C- Seamp

K 3 Baril 244 Yellow
1 9 Dauntles: 2.45 Red

itd Miss Behave i
K &4 Comet 246 © ©6Yellow

7 Mohawk

cn Magwin

* 12 Dawn 247 Red

¢ 7 Rogue ;

c Ww Gannet 2.48 Yellow
I 2 Invader

I it Reen 2.90 Red
I 18 Cistie 251 Yellow
K 29 Cyclone

K 40 Vamoose

I 1 Gnat 2.52 Red
43% Coronetta



N.B.—To qualify in the Series all Y
must start except exempted by the Com-
mittee,

The Frontenac Cup Regatta will be
held on Thursday Tth June 1951.

H. BLAIR BANNISTER,
Starter.

M.H.S. WINS AGAIN

Modern High School defeated
Lynch’s Secondary School at
Modern High School grounds
yesterday afternoon by a margin
of 23 points to 13, The Modern
High School team with only one
more match to play has so far





4 been undefeated.

Accrington visited Bacup,

Weekes, Holt, Martindale 100’s:

Marshall 75

as in a run-getting mood when
writes Clyde Walcott in his

report on the Lancashire League games played on Whit-

Friday and Saturday. He

scored a great 132 not out in

rapid time, and Bacup were able to declare at 238 for 7

wickets. Raymer did well t
: Accrington lost 6 wkts, in scor-
ing 178 runs when time was
called. Raymer hitting an unbeat-
en 63 and Carter 47. Weekes took
1 wkt. for 49 runs,

Roy Marshall, after his attack
vf influenza turned out for
Lowerhouse in their match

against Haslingden. Haslingden
batted first and were all out for
148, J. K. Holt top seored with
55, his first half-century for the
season, Marshall bowled 5 overs
for 28 runs without taking any
wickets. Lowerhouse were all out
for $9 runs, Marshall was l.b.w. to
Holt for 9. This victory gave
Haslingden their first win of the

season,
Worrell
On Saturday Radcliffe were at
home to Heywood. Although
Frank Worrell did not get going

—. Radcliffe wére able to score 18)

runs, Worrell was caught in the
slips off George Pope for 6 runs.
Heywood were all out for 116
giving Radcliffe their second win
of the season, Worrell took one
wicket for 16 runs,

One of the mysteries of League
cricket is the absence of Sonny
Ramadhin’s narhe fram the lime-
light. Crompton were again
beaten, this time by Milnow.
The defeat was due to a 171 run-
stand between Bill Cockburn (105
not out) and Edgar Robinson (75
not out). Milnow declared at 191
for 1 wkt. Ramadhin’s return was
one for 71 in 14 overs. Crompton
were all out in 75 minutes for 71
runs. Cockburn taking 5 for 22.

Ih the Ribblesdale League, Ken
Rickards who is in brilliant bat-
ting form scored 83 on Saturday

— Another Century —

Everton Weekes followed
182. mot out with 142 not oui
against Rishton—“Superbly con
fident, the ebony score-builde:
played every ball with the cal
culated precision of f& finely ad-
justed machine, A flick of thosc
trained wrists, and an effortless
swing of that poised body—and,
away the ball winged to the
boundary,”

Bacup declared at 260 for 3@
wkts., leaving Rishton more time;
than they had taken. Rishtou!
started playing for a draw but!
with ten minutes to play and the
score at 108 the tenth wicket fell
giving Bacup their first win oi
the season.

Walcott Bowls

Enfield had their first win of
the season on Saturday in thet
return match with Accrington, In
two hours Accrington were dis-
armed and back in the Pavilion
for « meagre total of 70 runs on

hi

a good wicket. Chief factor in
Enfiela’s glory day was thie
bowling of Clyde Walcott whe

captured 6 wkts. for 30 runs in 15
overs Raymer, Accrington’s pro-
fessional was caught behind the

wicket off Walcott for a “duck.”)

Enfield had no difficulty in pass-
ing the score for the Joss of 1







© take 5 wickets for 82 runs.
wkt. Walcott scored 23°not out.

J. K. Holt scored a brilliant
century against East Lancashire
and could have won if time per-
mitted,
at 215 for 6 wkts. giving Hasling-
don 150 minutes to get the runs.
They scored 196 for 6 wkts, when
stumps were drawn.

Colne was without a_profes-
sional against Lowerhouse,: Bil
Alley fractured his finger during
the week coaching and will be
out of the game for a _ monbn
Colne batted first and declared at
192 for 7 wkts. Lowerhouse went
for the runs and were 5 short
with 2 wickets in hand at the
end of the day’s play. Roy Mar-
shall played an attractive innings
for 75.

E. A. Martindale scored a cen-
tury on Saturday in the Bolton
League.

Mosely’s XI Gets
Ist Innings Lead

MR, BOB MOSELY’S team se-
eured a first innings lead over
Mr. Frank Taylor’s XI when their
cricket match ended at the Men-
tal Hospital Winning the
toss Frank Taylor’s XI. scored
62 runs, O. Fields top-scoring with



23. Bowling for Bob Mosely’s
team E. McLeod captured four
wickets for 16 runs and C

Allamby, three for 11.

Bob Mosely’s team replied with
110. C, Allamby top-scored with
26, S. Depeza 22 and K. Walters
22. C. Reid proved the most sue-
cessful bowler for Frank Taylor’s
XI in taking four wickets for 32
runs and S, Rudder two for 23.

In their second turn at the
wicket Frank Taylor's XI knock+
ed up 28 runs for the lost of four
wickets. E. McLeod three for 14
and C, Allamby one for six.





East Lancashire declared a great reserve of energy caught



—Express.

W.L Batting Well © Wint Beats.

Me Bailey

MIDDLESEX, May 30.
An unexpected clash between
two of the greatest attractions
in British athletics to-day —
&. Me Donald Bailey of Trinidad
and Arthur Wint, Jamaican Olym-
pic 400 metre champion — pro-
vided a thrilling conclusion to a
match between the London Poly-
technic Harriers and the Uni-
versity of London here to-night.
At the end of the 300-yards race
which was a thrill from start to
finish, Wint won barely by a yard.
His time of 31.1 seconds was

excellent in view of the wind.
Although Bailey appeared to be
drawing away as they hit the
home straight, Wint calling upon

him 40 yards from the tape.

With ten yards to go, Bailey
appeared to check suddenly and
Wint just edged to the tape first.

Earlier in the programme,
Wint had won 600 yards in 73.2
teconds and, he said, “I felt so

languished after this race, that
I need some fast work, so I
thought I would take Mac on
in the 300."’—Reuter.



What’s on Today

Police Courts .... 10.00 a.m.

Speech Day at Queen’s Coi-
SONGS 2 TLE es 3.00 p.m.

Annual Police Sports at Ken-
sington Oval; 3.00 p.m.

B.F.F.A. football game:
5.00 p.m.

Basketball Second Division:
L.S.S. vs. Modern High
School at Modern High
School and Barbados Regi-
ment vs. Pirates at Harris-
on College ...... 5.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema Show at
Husbands Plantation yard,

5 57f ee 8.00 p.m.
CINEMAS :

Globe—"'Little Giant” and ‘“Cor-
vette K 225"—4.45 & 8.15 p.m.
Empire—“Two Weeks With Love”

—t45 and 8.30 p.m,
dow” and ‘“Tarzan’s Desert Mys-
Plaza (Bridgetown) — “The Win-
tery’—5.00 & 8.30 p.m.
Plaze (Oistins)—"‘Strike Me Pink”
and “Golden Eye” — 5.00 & 8.30

p.m,

Olympie—‘Songe of Mexico” and
“Undercover Woman"—4.30 and
8.15 p.m.

Gaiety—"Dear Wife” and ‘‘Rain-
bow Island''—8.30 p.m,

Aquatic Clab—"Calamity Jane” &
“Sam Bass"’—8.30 p.m.



Brion Getting Ready

For Gardner
LONDON, May 29.

Cesar Brion, Argentinian
heavyweight is “keeping his
edge nicely” for his fight with

Jack Gardner, British and Euro-
pean heavyweight champion on
June 5 at the White City here.
This is the opinion of his trainer
Sam Goldman who has_ been
trainer of several former world
champions.

Daily visitors to the gymnasium
of Jack Solon.ons, famous Lon-
don boxing promoter readily
agree with trainer Goldman that
Brion is “a glutton for work.”

Brion starts the day at 6.30
a.m. and within a few minutes
he is hard at his road work in
fashionable Hyde Park a few
strides from his hotel. He never
does less than seven miles, when
he feels he has earned his break-
fast.

When most of London is taking
lunch, he is testing two hulking
sparring partners, boxing two fast
and fierce rounds with each.

Brion spares his own punches
but he demands that his sparring
pattners give all they can.

One of them is huge Jack
Herman, a_ “displaced person”,
improving rapidly as a boxer who!
tops Cesar by at least a couple of|
inches and weighs something like
a couple of stones heavier.

Herman certainly hits hard but
his complaint against Brion is
that “he never seems to be there”
when his heftiest punches. are
flung over at his principal.

Brion is thoroughly enjoying
his first visit to Britain but is
finding a little difficulty about
meals,

Meals do cause a little concern
he admits, but he quickly adds
that he has no real complaints.

He says philosophically: “Brit-
ish fighters get along with them.
So can I.” —Reuter.

GRENADA WINS

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, May 30.
Grenada won six of seven
scheduled matches this afternoon.
Lennard Hughes beat Hugh Lar-
tigue 6—0, 6—3, Roy Hughes beat
Edward Martin 6—2, 6—0;
Clifford Date and Laurie Comis-
song beat Edgar Edwards and Lee
Wescott 6—3, 6—3. St. Vincent
and St. Lucia play to-morrow.

Italians Beat Brazilians
PARIS, May 286.

Brazilians, Roberto Cardozo
end A. Procopio were beaten in
the second round of the men’s
doubles in the French lawn ten-
nis championships here to-day.

They went down after a great
five-set tussle with Italian Davis
Cup players, Rolando Del Bello
and Fausto Gardini who won
6—2, 4—6, 4—6, U--4 and 6—3.
| , —Reuter.





BARBADOS POLICE
SPORTS

AT

KENSINGTON

ADMISSION — 1/6

TO-DAY 3 p.m.

toria’s team in the Pacific Coast
Hockey League drew

er city in the circuit.

It is just 101 years since cricket
Vietoria by
W. Colquhoun Grant, the
first independent settler on Van- “4 £
couver Island. With its equable Charlie Johnston,
climate Victoria long has been for Buenos Aires
the home of many retired folk,
including a good proportion of
The
game thrived in the friendly at-

was
Capt.

introduced to

British service pensioners.

mosphere.

Now its different. One veteran
bowler explained: “If the young-
sters do not play, then it is only
a short time until there will be
At one time
it was played in the schools and

no players at all.

CRYPTOQUOTE No. 28

YES DIED NO THUS HZ E
KHYES NO HZ

ZBK WEVO, ESW ZKRR HZ
DUH

KTRB—QHT

Last Crypt: The world forget-
ting, by the world forgot — Pope
—

J. A. CORBIN & SONS.



Be sure to meet me at the

DANCE T0-NIGHT
Princess hikes Piya Field

Sponsored by
Mr. EVERTON ST. JOHN
(Bus Conductor)

Music by Mr. C. B. Browne's
: Ork.
ADMISSION 2/-
Bar Solid





bigger \
crowds last winter than any oth-





_ BOXERS LEAVE FOR
BUENOS AIRFS

NEW YORK, M

World Featherweight Ch
Sandy Saddler, Light Heavy weig
Archie Moore and their manage:
left by plane
to-day for a

e
20.

mipion





six-week tour.
Each boxer
fights scheduled.

six non-title
—Reuter.

has





' The pleasant way
to quick relief from
_ ACID INDIGESTION -







Alka-Seltzer’s pleasant taste
and sparkling effervescence
agsures gentle efficiency.
Drop one or two tablets into
a glass of water, watch it fizz,
then drink it. Keep a
supply handy always! s+

ee





All Roads lead to SILVâ„¢R SANDS
TO-NITE
To the

md _
Grand Dance
given by
IANTHE GILL and MISS
MOLLEY BARROW
known as Hollywood
Sperting Stars)
At the
SILVER SANDS ROYAL CLUB
Music by Mr, Cleve Gittens and
his full Orchestra
ADMISSION; ; 2/-
Bar Solid as a Rock Dinner will
be served. Miss this and blame
yourself

MRS.

(Better







Vedonis
Velvet

KNIT-WEAR

Vivacious

A really smart set of

after-games wear.

Shades of Saffron,
Torquoise, National

Blue and Wine.

Pullover.......$9,.42
Cardigan... $12.63

CAVE

SHEPHERD]

& Co, Ltd.

CARDIGANS and —
PULLOVERS .

that will make you look
trim and fetching at all
times. Excellent for



















NOBODY WAS GOOD ENOUGH “OR HER-
: ACCORDING TO MAMA***>

STILL UNHITCHED. LISTEN TO
MOTHER'S SONG NOWss




|
10-13 Broad St.
|



Good News!!! Your Favourite
| MOTOR CYCLES Arrive lf
{
|
|











=... °,°°-°Y
HE'S ONLY AN ASSISTANT Vice-24 | meme) WHY CONT YOU TREAT WE KNOW

Bd AR, OMWITTY NICER?
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PAGE 1

PACE JOT n\r.iv\nos \DVOCATE TIII'KM>\V. MAY it, 1*51 K.A.B. _Tt a,9mt %  "")> ' *•'** DIM A •poll**, (itu.nitf „l Ci. AM, Duhr*. P-inlfM Arliclc-i and anything thai look! Hull or I* Dirty JOHNSONS STATIONERY St HARDWARE IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPEQAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only isually Now Usually Now Pkgs. CROWN MACARONI 35 Hi CHEESE (GoudoJ per lb $1.00 M Champagne per case new stocks Pkgs. VICTOR CLIQUOT $72.00 K.1H.OO Jacob Cream Crackers 41 M LOUIS ROEDERER $72.00 ftOO.OO PEANUTS 21bs ior 76? 08.Bottles Tennents Beer 26 21 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street NOTICE WE WISH TO ADVISE OUR CUSTOMERS THAT OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT WILL BE CLOSED FROM FRIDAY, 1st JUNE TO MONDAY 4th JUNE 1951, BOTH DAYS INCLUSIVE, FOR OUR ANNUAL STOCK-TAKING DUNLOP TRUCK AND BUS TYRES I DOMING ESTATES & TRADING (0.. i LTD. ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAT STREET I "'*'*• | :-^tr^~. H %  %  r li.V M Wl! IjmiHHI II IIItr. M IIIH '""' Ik give •|K more jr miles >W for your F money DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING COMPANY LIMITED ff CKSTtIN 6OS;



PAGE 1

> I'K.I Mid HARD \lii is ADMil \ I I Qcodb Caliinq IWY ? i ol the .can left by the ('!Ktt* to Jamaica, Capi tmm, Henrj I srarffa arttn B.W.I A. in 1 fpenri .. bni dayi in Tl I s After Three Years M UtOCI \T AI'SHAIJ. ( FdnUbdlt, hr> hod ft %  • Opralni t oiemblr nen*. %  i , i is the >.Ht "f Mr. Robert Marshall of DM Co-ta 4 COM ud. ARTIE'S HEADLINE tn't fill* 1u$t wona?ti\ Elmer—toning all thai u lot I'm Barbados Holiday M ISS MDOOY O'DONNELL ar! from Tim: i Tuesday morning by B.W I A on a visit and li staying with Mrs Stoute in Rock Icy In transit to St l.ucla b> the same Diane was Mr William Spencc. Mr Anlhonv Barnes and Mr /hernias Shann. cf t h < Round Trippers M R. and Mn "Cul lode n Hoi nit Wood of aknK I he Caribbean Cruise I < u lorn Me which lelt BJI .( ten. i) artarnoon othc: s*.i|er K"in: on il;i round trip %  re Mi OoddanL Mm. Baatrlce Uuhley, %  >•* %  Bn BrOWM Mr Lionel Jon.".. Inmother and sinter Hazel. Fn mull' ii> Jamaica a* the < %  (•mMe sn MrHarah Wn K ht. Mrs. Annie Harris. Mis Vcroniqne I. NuhoU and Mr Paul S. Sheldon. BssasnawatJs Ruth Khama with her baby g.il raasjtasBssI r -he u •aassssswl "i t brothtr for ui. Ruth w h o s a mortage to Be retie Kasma foei aiae a world 'tory I> happy, :iml do." not aaastva in out chlM famlli** %  tory on p. i Communist \* ay PAK1S A man. bound and gagged, was found on the roadside at a spot 13 miles from Pan*. At hospital it was discovered he ana tattooea with a hammer and sickle, an 4 olombir f England nftar ahout three si. was ;icCom —-MBM win* U..M~. !" ... -..,..._ —. -~ panic! : HI >on Rich'!"' P-n of h. l !" '"' "• M .,1 Mr C. W. Cumb.Tb.lch. % ,"•, "-'. < „ i England, la now >pendin( Iwo he dma „, r of SI ol | M rioy, LSiT aj£. T:£ V Alo arriving by thCMaaabte •£ l K£J ,r f ,om Hi. i %  l I ,he Caaun D I/. Horlock. companiKI by hb %  "••""a. She has none hu comr oul lo laym at lxalon-on-Sca. The holldI whlch hc w| „ ,,*„,, wilh !" ju. i ip an appointment at ens "" m %  %  %  ^ her .liter Mrf Alb-rt MMn ol J,^.^ wilh Mrrs Cable L Mr. teleMain 1 n slater o0 ,.s 0 aln %  "i IV,,, .1 Prior to Mr J. O. OaU. Aaaeoor or Cbrm "'"%  spmn „, „„!,,„,,,,, B.B.C. Radio Programme Stwru DIM). U a V 1 I! a m ProI 00 • With M.i.lf. SOO p m U.lWi .1. OHIO-. 10 p m Muc of SHwnItB, S D in Priiaianir>ir I'maiir %  '•* MM p.m. — ;:. %  .i a 11 %  KH RHWW •""" %  "*'" %  headmaster ol St. Giles Hoys tf(amnH p a>H |T sn „, nsn n Anaiv.i*. T is p m w r s tin May here, lie arrned ^ho,,, and MrB Cumberbiitch of fsttariah %  %  • Owra G-.i-..iiv ftiwrtins, too P ilamMe yesterday in ..„_„_„„_.. h „.. ; to m Usst And UtssSsel Eu la Rowsrail %  is P m THAdvr Kv hi* u-lfi. ma Is Hollnway the Ivy. ,. .^. >,( %  p m ini*ridr. i y i !.c.. TJ" She has gone for one month':; ardi . SM I:, .,,...,,„ A.II. r. Pro !" Th. UiSsrlaa*. too pm The Nr. I Paiod*. II i.. ng !; %  mi four years Church. %  ngineer on cable ships in c — __. p_ A _, i ___ En Route From Long ranean. xr .as _^L^ aVafll "' ''' t; Henderson turned home yesterday evening' YOUngeat Member [VI and Uieir two" i hihiren by the (elomble iiftor spend.np months' holiday. Thet After Threr Montha \MU AND MRS EDMUND 1Leave 1VI rnziER of Trinidad r* 41 SUM I II p M SiHl N.n*. in tMUl Airt I Clichff. .• p m T<-p Scoe, SOO n IS i r •tivol ot Rrnaip I i. 1 10 p m Nr-t S*. lirllam. IAS m. Radio iluiai nt ".Mi A Go. S 4ft tn p r,. i.. ,1000 p in Th loin ,. m Uslil Mn-it. 10 sr> pro i Th. Parsn. li oo p m rmm The If ..i;: aintlta < 111 eaoiaBAMMB TIIL-IMDAV. MAY 11. lP^l 10 00 iii-i 10 15 pin. N*w. 10 15 t in 10 30 p tn ThM Woah In COJIr BelJe and Mount Plantations Uni badof. .,ri tl ucx-iav nvrtftnv RofjerandStutrt areapendlnttwo thro, months' holiday. Thcj ,)U ', eveeks %  101111 were Maying with Mr and Mr. eigbt-monv %  ontoTHiitdadwhaTeali HenderA C Cottar of -Ebene/er d t.ountes* of Han'wood fon )s ritl lt(lV H) w | ln Trinidad Crumpton Street. and ai-anc.-hild o< the Princes* t^^hoi,^ | n ,he Stores DepartMr. Cosier is a retired hardware has bacome the youngest mcnl ,.,,. lk • V.M.i'A member. 71,,^ eana In vestcrdav mornbecome an honorary ng ,^ t he (olombie from En,:Doctor of Divinity member in Leeds. i an d wher" thev had spent two i is ;i nephew of non | nR While hore thev are stay'T^HE Rev. Canon Malone. In. llei who owns the |nK w i, n Mr and Mr* Clarence I cumbenl ol St. Peter's CilheSklnner of Spring Gardens, Black dral. Prince Edward Islands, a Rock. brother of Sir Clement MalOOi a While in Englnnd. Mr. Henderbsstn recommended to convocation *on -aid that he saw thr Internafor the honorary degree of Doc|i ioal football itOTM batwecu Ftigtor of Divinity. This rocommenda[ l.inrt and Scotland, 'he Cur fll r>l Uon was unanimously approved Mliirk|Kiol and New a. le llir j „„. dearoe was conferred in United nnd the Amatrur Cup Final Kind's College Chapel on May between Pciasu-and Uish.m i m[) Auckland. Canon Malone has been n priest for forty-five yearn, thirty of Un Leave which have been spent at St. M AJOR ALBERT B. MOKFETT, Peter's. He was made a Canon of Divisional Commander of the Cathedral in 1926 and for the Salvation Army in the Harbamany years has been a member of dus and Ieward Islands Division committees of pioiesan. Provinid .hie U. leave tu-daj by T C.A clal and General Synod for leave in Canada During his He was formerly a Curate at Si absi S le's Sec rhile will be acting — Commander "' Sl Philips | ansh for •i „ , months. Next Month Antigua %  j o It FRANK WALCOTT. Secre^"Y Bamiler tary of tha Barbados Work1 N BAHHADOS for a eouDk jrs' Union who returned from M. of weeks' holiday is Miss Grenada on Tuesday by B.W.I A. Eugenie Charles, Bamster-atexpects to leave for Antigua June Low of Dominica. She arriveu luih as .i membci of Itoaixl of yesterday morning by the C'olomInqulry which will inquire Into ble and Is staying with Mr. and the causes ol the various disputes Mrs. Carlos E. Clarke at Palm which have occurred during the Beach. Hastings, veai The Board (Other members Miss Charles is the daughter Sir Clement Malone, Hon. R. B. „| Hon. J B. Chai Allnul. Director of Agnetiltui.. D,,„,ni..i and Mr, t'liarles and Antigua) will make recirtiirni-iii ., | )t H. M. F. Charles, lions and observations as il in:i> Mcdie.il (Mile i % %  ( Health. Ai ima. "* " . t* Ti.nidad. Trinidad secretary .,..„. \ FTKH spending M. weeks iu.iiIncidental Intelligence %  .,! -dii-sr;, M.iv. A NSW type ol anorvwmastai well. Mr. Euc Aliuandoz. SecreX a loud banv, and waves u^ 0l ^ft BkiiTTafcRsr liTnli io'. af y Of Messrs. Gordon Grant arms ever> twenl.v minutes. NoI.I li i i' t (fn Ui... ],td., uf Port-of-Spa in, returned t.iing is said ot its party affiliation ...U^brtaft?a.Vso1J£. ' Tnnidad yesterdav evening bor to what ofnet .1 a-i 1 tfrteai: i". r>f.iiii t£ Cao: li B.W IA H c was aecomponied Canadian colui.i(si. Iran*; ia, O-t. by witt 0 d lhrc ^ children. Rupert and ike lce-floicer—39 CROSSWORD i 2 3 U 6 J~ 1 r Iff '.' !v !" i %  -frSHOPPERS PARADISE EDMONTON. Alberts Able Seaman Gerry Sinclair. M leave after duty with the Candian navy in Korean waters, said Hong Kong Is the shoppers' paradise of the Orient. He said thtt with no* taxes there, top quality BrftM) tweed suits were S3!t and good wrist watches $7. THUESDAY. M \V :n. '''' %  SENIOR COMPETITION The Evening Aeveeale .;.\iK:. ..II school-boys and school-girls between the ages of 12—19 :o send in a humorous essay, story or poem on the subject of "CAMELS". Entries must rea. I.' assart "-lory Canor. Wvoe.tr €> Ud i •• I late* tnan Wednesday avarj sfssalt, Ti.e best corrposition e ich week will be published in the Eventag Aavocaie tn,l the winner will receive a prize of books or Stationery to the .aiue of 12/6. Send this coupon with your story. SENIOR COMPETITION Name Age Sehael Home Address (01AL 2310) PI A/A THEATRE -BKHM.r.Tt.VVN >l" III i Ull"|l|i I'llllllk ill.-* -.'. • the Divisional Young ProMichael's Caithedral. Vicar of St. § fcratary. Sr CapUin Olive Saviours. Vicar of Si Paul s. \ will IKacting Divisional Barbados and he onee acted Rector j A TSough Rupcn ia very IrigSt•ntd hc nrmembcri to hokl tin'm to th* sledge. 7 ha told air nukes him shuC hia ryi 1M 4 45 J. I : FreS MarMarraT. Bardara _.%a sl t S*aw. Tatar 1 s_iu M addle Cantor m %  -iiki Mr. rivn Charlie tn... ,n OOLUKN m "AMAIEOS orrr %  Val arale Math M tl HAT1-BDAV ; HU /OVIIII .* TRAIL* %  (.AIETV TUB t.AKl.e. nT. JAMES H '*•*•* .viir, i usr.ou Ml tfta MIDNITC SATl'RnAY Ind l-HI-OS MiriNV III. \-rtl. a ll 01 THI Al \Mil Jlanmr H .1.1. SJDLSJBSB. ., 2a£fV' '•' 5 sl i ,,n tea Seam LirTI.I. ClANT" (Ahboll and Cmtrllo) And "COaVMTE K :^25" (Itandolph Srnll) AOI \ III VJ.VB f XiejOMA [Ma WiOnly) i on il it set up*et (Si l-.liup~ ill.cud lb (&> 'ill. I'iua. i4l 21. How war Is seen in fatigue. i> Basn 1, Listen dare. |8| 2. Can L (0) ;i. Sort ol unng Kale would do. it) ^. un-iii IInr. >l II S Obtained :TI>ITI ilamp aQiiiDa l ournl wood. ( S. A particular frienfl. 4i 10, •jculc.'i Juiin at an KDgnati puo-ir acnool. ill II. Old eTes. (41 13. Near a ring. IB) li. It's a oaae. 13) M 1C FOR ONE SOLID WEEK un ADVE;\TI;IIES .or _PIPA„ •,^^^^.uv^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^i'^^^^^^^^^^/^^^^^^^^^r^^^%^^^^^^^^^^^. Sl. Andrew Mills Products are espclally suitable lor those with delicate) akins. Extra poll and absorbenl. t hygienic and soluble. i Obtainable at all leading stores. \JtST MX ... 1 CONTINENTAL PRINTED BEMBERG SHEERS | IN RARE and EXQUISITE DESIGNS %  I hi' I'vrft'rl Summi'r Hiiss .llatt'rial. EVA3VS & VVHITFIELDS DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES and so does every woman 11 Therefore try ihe lamoua .... < AMI-MA SAM I Alii \AIKI\S ANDREX TOILET PAPER ANDREX FACIAL TISSUES STANEX PAPER HANDKERCHIEFS SAMARITAN TOILET PAPER DIAL 4220


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PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIH'KMIAV. MAY ill ARCTIC PRINCE' WINS DERBY Photo Finish for Second And Third Positions (From VERNON MORGAN) t:rsoM DOWNS, kmy, May 30. JOSEPH MrC.KATIl of Kir* carried ofl Bi .tain's rich est ever Derby when his colt Arctic Prince cantered awav from a huge field to win easily by six lengths. Arrtic IVince started at 28 1. After a photo, the 50 I outsider Sybil's Nephew was placed second and the Irish colt Signal Box. a 20/1 chance, third. Thirtv-lhree ran. The Irish owned c.lt i mined in England by Willie Stephonson and ridden by the English jockey Charlie Spares took the lead after rounding Tattenham corner and won the 172nd running of Britain's n'p.itest race without ever being challenged. None of the fancied horses iinisliivl HI the first four and it was left to I-ord MUford'l Sybils Nephew, a coll of unesjrte.lt. to take second pla' iniii i i mi s ni>\M> Water Polo Opens Next Week The 10S1 Water Polo season begins on Tuesday, June 5th Eight men's team* and five ladies' teams have entered for the two ccmpelitioiis. The men's teanv""'m"i. ..re. Snappers. Swordfish. Flylm*^', ,* B f ... !rl ,h Two Tlfh. Bonltas. Barracudas. Police. i ul Harrison College and WhippRays. The Ladies' teams arc Goldfish, Starfish, Sea NymphMermaids and a team from th< t*rsultne Convent. Thousand Guineas winner Signal Box Briyht Sun the Barbados Aquatic Club, by kind permission af the management. Matches will be played on Tuesdays. Thursdays and Friday The ladies will play one mil.li On Tuesdays and %  omtthnts two O' Fridays. The men will ploy on Tuesdays and Thursdays. After a Toaily Arctic morning, wnlch inspired many punteis to ?Ug2rUZ£lB?£ %  >•* %  £• ,h r w Mulling brightly m^ the near record field went to the' post watchc'l by some 500,000 people Including the Queen and other members ol the Royal family. Arctic Prince is a son of the 19 French Derby winner Pride* Chevulier out of the marc Arctic Sun. Officially placed fOUrifa Wt Ameriun owned Le Tyrol from FI.HMC. the) bat) of the five horses which had crossed the Clcmnel in a bid to win the 120.000 first prig*. Several horses were fractious at the start including Gordon Richards' mount Stokes. ZUCehero the mount of the flflecnyear-old boy Lester Piggott, and the A.'.i Khan's FT %  Du Bois who w a a finally left several lengths Crocodile finished fifth. UVent %  .ixth. Nyangal seventh. Sun Cnmnew l ,nss t'ighth, Turco ninth. Ex%  n a iieditious tenth and Areot last JOAN UANOIO, Argentine xbu< driver, humming over the -Jlvsratone circuit. Nortli>mptonhlre. England, in ini miperchargad Alfa Romeo at he won the first heat of the International Trophy Rare for Orand Prix Can Oangto, who broke the track record three Utaes. won the heat at > speed of more than ti2 mile* an hour. HI* bout lap wan 92 20 mile* an hour. — Erprt$$. There will be a special General Meeting of the Water Polo Association at the Barbados Aquatic Club this afterBoon at b o'clock. One of the Items on the agenda n to decide whether the Heaaou should not be postponed for a couple of week* due to unforeseen circumstance*. W.I. Batting Well In English League Weekes, Holt. Martindale I (Mi's; Rickards 83, Marshall 75 Wint Beats Mc Bailey MIDDLESEX. May SO. An unexpected clash batWVfln i the greatest attractions 'u British athletics lo-day — E. Mc Donald Bailey of Trinidad and Arthur Wint, Jamaican Olympic 400 metre champion — pro.ided %  thrilling conclusion to a fashionable Church Girls' Brigade Sports The Church Girls' brigade heM their Annual Sports at Codringtoo College on Empire Day and the All Sa.nts" Company won the Cup. The Rally, of which the sport. formed part was well attended and a service at the St John's Church preceded the open-air activities Companies of the Church Lads' Brigade attended and arranged and supervised the programme for the girls. PRIZE LIST CUM I-H Jemmolt .All Saint• Ciaaa ll-Q Cumberteirh S-. Andrew 1 *!. Clan III-Mavia Clarke 'St Claownt •> Clan iV Mitimr G.UoCU.i V CW Cummin* St. ClrnwrU •' Relay Hate i-A1l iUlnU Urk RIM* iJnrtl—N Carter it*. Leonard "si Satlt Rare IgSSSf— %  BlBchnva" • Society. Vlrlrl. laidonlrr. Unrti—M OUIl'i i All Saint*' Vittili Ludorum i*an>'—M Cli'ke oxing promoter readily agree with trainer Goldman that Jinofi Is "a glutton fur work." Hi ion starts the day ;.t I M gJD. and within a few minutes is hard at his road work in Hyde Park a few OLDSTERS FEAR CRICKET DYING VICTORIA. British CoJ White bSUfwd, tAC-n tnnan*—the breed thag rightly or wrongly gave thii city Its designation of being more Engirt? than England"—are dwpreased. Cricket la on the way out as one of the recognised sports here. The pessimiaU predict it won't be long before Hump* ore drawn for the la-t time One of the chief reasons for the decline of cricket here is that the elementary schools no longer include It in their list ..f playground activities. They used to, but n boy was hit on the head by y cricket ball and his scalp was cut. Cricket was summarily banned as being too rough. Then there's ihe question of supply. There is no manufacturer of cricket equipment In Canada and during the Second World War It was impossible to -*et it from Britain. And "upstart" sports such as lacrosse, baseball and hockey art shoving the ancient game out of the picture, here at least. Victoria's team in the Pacific Coast Hockey League drew bigger crowds last winter than any other city in the circuit. It is lust 101 years since cricket ma Introduced to Victoria by Cant. W Colquhoim Grant, the flist independent settler on VauMuvei [fluid. With its equable climate Victoria long has been the home of many laUltaj Ml including a good proportion of British service pensioners. The gam* thrived in the friendly atmosphere. N< W its different. One veteran DOWler explained 'ir the youngster* do not play, then %  • a short time until there will be no players at all. At It was played in the school there was a steady supp lowers of the game from which the regular teams could draw i.ply ha> dried up." Thrives fclsewhere Elsewhere in Onad.' the aporl is thriving. Tor the last there lias teen a dominion championship tournament among teams from most of the provinces, won last year by the Ontario eleven. Ontario heat the British Columbia team 121—94 OP the final day of plr; nipeg last summehamploii %  ok third place. The game in Canada will get lip from the t Marylebone Cricket C. tier. The tourists arrive MegttMa) July 31 and the M.C.C. meets represent;,| nadian elevens at Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver. The tourists will also play at Ottawa, St. Catharines and London. Out. Winnipeg, Edti ti, it C EVERTON WEEKES Was in a run-Kettmjj mmxl wliep match between ihe l^ndon Poly; slrldPS from his hotel. He never ACCrlnRlon Visitwi BHCUp, writes Clyde Walcott in his lechnlc Harriers and the Unldoes less than seven miles, when %  ad Snappers, last year's Cup winners though they have lost tho Manning twins to Harrison College have unearthed some talent jiiti they seem to be comfortable posltlcn as the 19M season opens Flying Fish who finished second last year have two bjfnVCOITiejT They ;.ie still looking for one or two more players. Barracudas, Swordfish and Honilaare In more or less the fame position as Flying Fish Police and Harrison College will be entering teams from their 'tanks'. For Harrison College Ibil is the lint lime they will be entering the game as a team, but Uuy have several experienced placers who have been playing water polo for two or three years. Then team Is a group of keen youngsters and much is expected of them when clf-# the season gets going. Whippo Rays are making their debut to " water polo. Player* of this team are mostly from Black Rock and „ l9 the Paradise Beach Club area Eighty per cent of the ladles 1.4*1 nlavmc water polo this season started training about six week) ago lor the first time. The nthei ,, twenty per cent, began playing lost n 1? November when Trinidad sent a -—r ladies team to Barbados The laJJ J, dies have taken to the game like 1S a duck to wour. Beyond all hopes they have shown that they can r %  plav the game, and ore Improving j," every day It Is anticipated that n eonipetition Ijetww-n these five teams will )*• greater than the competition between the men's teams. The winner half In 5 seconds. covered 'he nih 2 minutes 39 and 'f —geuter. report on Ihe Lancashire League names plaved cm WhitKriday and Saturday. He scored a great 132 not out In rapid time, and Bacup were able io declare at 238 for 7 wickets. Haymer did well (o take 5 wickets for 82 runs Acmiigton lost B wkl* In MOTWitt Wiilrott scor-d 23 not out. "'f, J .. IU 1 *"•" l,mp "f J. K. Holt scored a brilliant called. Haymer hitting g-1 U ll bagg century against East Lancashiiv en 6S and Carter 47. Weekes loo!; and could have 1 .vkt for 49 runs inltted. Regatta On Saturday versity of London here to-night, he feels he has earned his breakAt the enn ot the 300-yards race fast, which was a thrill from start to When most of London is takinu ftntin. Wint won barely by a yard, lunch, he is testing two hulking His time of 31.1 seconds was sparring purtners, boxing two fast rxcellent in view of the wind. and fierce rounds with each. Although Bai'.ey appeared to be Brion spares his own pi.ndu-* drawing away as they hit thr but he demands that his sporrlne I time perhume „traight. Wint calling upoi paitners give ail Ihey can. With ten ywdi to *". Baili-v improving rapidly as %  boxer who' appeared to heck suddenly and tops Cesar by at least u couple I Wint just edged to the tape first inches and weighs something like ,11 the programme, a couple of stones heaviei; Wint had won 800 yards in 78.2 Herman certainly hits hard bul %  reconds and. he said. "I felt so '>'* complaint agains Brio, •anguished after this race, that 'bat 'he never seems to be there 1 need some fast work, so I whe n, be"'"* punches BOXERS LEAVE FOR BUENOS AIRF3 NEW TOKK World Feather v. %  Charlie Job for Buenc.\ %  six-week tour. Each boxer ha, six I'.HhK scheduled. —Hruier Thw plwoon way to quick reltwf from ACID INDIGESTION influenr.a The twelfth Regatta of Ihe rent season will be leiiled Saturday under the auspices of tht a ea Royal Barbados Yacht Club. Handicaps and starting times are as follows:— tinned Out for don 150 minutes to get tlu „ I .own-house in their match Th'-y scored 196 for 6 wkts. when Ilaslingdcn. Husllngden stumps were diawn batted tlrit and were all out f. 148. J. K. Holt lop -cored witli Culmwas without %  prof* M, his first half-centurv for the sional against Uiwerhouse.t Hi: veacon. Marshall bowled 5 oVwTI Allr > fmctured his linger duiiny for 28 runs without taking on' 'be week DOOOhlnfl and will '*' wickets. Lowerhousf WvrO Ul OU 1 'it of the game (Or %  %  . %  t>. for Pi* runs. Marshall was l.b.w. to Colnc hatted first and declared at Holt for II. ThU victory gjv,102 for 7 wkls. l^>werhou( rv Hailingden their first win of ths play. Roy Mar are li'iught I would lake m ^hc 800 — tteuter. Ma. Illl attrocttve mninps Hawser rijs Van Thorndvk. .31 Morra Olair Itawal > IS Oktipt Oltvf Blowoni :a On Saturday Rodcllffe won al shall played home to Heywood. Although ior „ %  M ^^^ Frank Worrell did not get goin/ > %  A. Martmdale scored a cenHadelifTe were able to score lRi ,urv " Saturday m the Bolt..n runs. Worrell was caught in tlv 1-wgfUO. "*" slipa off George Pope for 6 rim Vrilo Heywood were all out for 111 Living KadellfTe their second win sw of the season. Worrell took one wuket for 18 runs. One of the mysteries of Leagucricket ia the absence of Bonny liamndhin's nnihe frqm the limelight. Crompton wenbeaten, this tune t-> Milnow. relta••:• -i Mos'lys XI Gets ll Innings Lead MR MOR MOSEI.Y'S !t*nm •pund 11 llrnl innings kod over Mr. Fr-mk Taylor's XI when Ihctr anmn u. .. % %  . .... j......... rrickrl mulch tndrt al Ihe Mrallie di'lra: wns due 1„ :, 1,1 run,.,| Hospital. W i n n I n I ID S. Africu Recovers .\ftcr Bad Start ILFORD, Essex. May 30 The South African criekctei'. nfter lonini; Rv wukets for 48 runs, scored 3JS for 9 wlcketa on |ht ll i da) i I UMli match against r Essex hue tuday. They wire chiefly indebted to r John Walte 128. Athol Rowan 40 ( 1'iul Hugh Tayfield 88. wno J_ brought aloat a revival afn r tlu earlier batsmen had failed against the p-tce iHJwling of Trevor nailcy and Ken Preston, and tbe spin ol K Peter Smith.—Heater. K ) a Imp >e Red i i 1 a aa i*t VclltVW a s roily BaallUIII Srcl i lw*.mp F4l.ll 144 -, a n*H.nllei ltf C 1 K S4 1 M,.. li.l:... front 1 **..hak ia Vrllotv C 11 Majf*iii Dawn 3 4T Red stand between Hill Cockbum (I0S t,. ss rnrt out) and Edgar Robinson (73 not rut i. Milnow declared ,u 101 for I kl Ha m ad hi n*& retum w.ti one for 71 in H overs. Cnmipton were all out m 78 minute for 71 IUIIN. Cockbum taking 8 for Tl. Ill the UMHeafdgla league. K Frank Tnylor'i G2 runs. O. Fields top-scoring with 23. Bowling for Bob Moselv'leant K McLeod capliuctl (out %  wicket?, (or 16 run* and G Allamby. three for II i :<:ini replied With 110. C. Allamby top-scored wilh abkards who is in brilliant bat26, S. Dene/a '.'2 and K Wajtcag (i..^ %  Ra-ni 141 Yellow Traffic D' No. IS OIVB. 1:1 .i i v. ATTENTION TO VOl'R BRAKES, STEERING AND TVRES space made available by CANADA DRV far Safer Motoring. ting form scored 83 on Hturdaj — Another Century — %  verton Wivke. followed hi 132 not out wilh 142 not OUl ignlnst Hlshton— Sinx'ibly con 'Idenl. the ebony sco^-builde; plnjcd every ball with tbe) < i] ulat.'il pMOkdon of h llnely ad .usie.1 machine, A flick of thou lamed urists. and on efforlle.. •wind o' Ui.it imbed Uxly—ami away the ball winged to the boundary," Bacup dix-lured at 260 for u wkts., leaving Rishton more tin.. than Ihey had taken. Rlshto' lartcd playing for | draw bnl with ten minuti's to play and th. %  cot* r 't 108 the tenth wicket fell giving Bacup Ufcfll Utt w:n .i DM season. Walcott Bowls Enfleld had their first w ,n 4 ih<> MetWn on Saturday in tin n I'D a match wilh Act! im;ton. In two hours Accrington were dUl""•"" armed and I Mick in the Pavilion a* ti 'c iiria.iL' ,riiw '" ; meagre total of Til runs on M.H.S. WINb ACJAIN H ood wicket. Chief factor Io Modern High School defeated Rnfleld'^ glory day Wtg lit Lyneh's Secondary Scb.anl at bowling of Clyde Walcott win Modem High School grounds csptmed 6 wkts. for 30 runs in ITyesterday afternoon by a margin rMffn Rayroor. Acrrtngi1 of 23 points to 13. The ModOrn fe.Hional was caught behind tit High School team with only one wicket off Walcott for a ••duck more match to play has so I MMd Bad no difhVulu m pas been undefeated. UfJ the score for the Jen.-, of i v: iC' i.i prored UM most %  a let f..i (frank Tayloi a "aking four wickets for :i2 xr inns god S Rudder two for 23. In then -t'cond turn nt the wicktt Prai oi \i luwetoed up 28 rims foi the lost wickets. E Md4XKl three f.i N and V. AU.irnb. OM lot si* What's on Today Police Court* 10.00 a.m. Speech Day al Ouern's Cell--i.t 3.00 p.m. Annual Police Sports at Kensington Oval: : ' p m. B.F.F.A football same: 5.00 p m. Basketball Second Division: LB.K. vs. Modern High School at Modern Hlih School and Barbados Reslmenl vs. Pirates at Harrisen College 5.00 p m. Mobilr Cinema Show at Husbands Plantation yard, St. Lucy 8.00 p.m C IM MAS r.Uba—"l.llllr nhuil" anS "Cor.i" aaS "tanant lir.>n n... iiria,-t.-n — "The ,.,. %  -.. %  M riair iOUIIiiii-"Hlrlkr *l ssel %  oieiia r t — r>a njj—iii Seal at steles' "l'eS>r(>*r WMIM'— I :t SIS B.B*. i.. .i l, rl HHf" ami %  .... |.UnS "—SJB p.m .,...!.. lleb—'-t'BlB-nil* Jar "San. Bai. BBS SO arii flung over at his principal Brion is thoroughly enjoying his first visit to Britain but Is Ilnding a little difficulty about meals. Meals do cause I lUlH MaMffRI he admiU, but he quickly %  dfll that he has no real complaints He says philosophically: "British fighters get along with them So can I." — neuter. GRENADA WINS GRENADA. May 30. Grenada won six of seven scheduled matches this afternoon. Lennard Hughes beat Hugh Lartigue 6—0, 8—3, Roy Hughe? beat Edward Martin 8—2, 8—0, Clifford Date and Laurie Comissong beat Edgar Edwards and Lee We--coli 0—3. 6-3. St Vincent and St. Lucia play to-morrow Italians Beat Brazilians PARIS, May 28. Brazilians. Roberto Cardozo rod A. Procopio were heaten In the second round of the men doubloi in the French lawn tenni* championships hei-e to-day. Thev went down after a great five-set tussle with Italian Dnvi Cup ulavers. Rolando Del Hello and Fausto Oardini who won ((.j. 4_e. *—6, u. 4 and 6—3 —Reuter. THr rroriWiK t'up ltt-alta will held on ThiirBdaj tUi Jon. 1*41 H mjun iiANMi'-TKn They'll Do It Every lime By Jimmy Hatlo "WM. %  MEN A?Pi^STB*. WAS T^BNTV uoeooY WAS GOOD esoush: ""-oe HERACCORO\S TO V.AMA"" M lew OL'S HERONC IS tuxryAHO S T ILL UNMITCWeD. LISTEN TO AOWEWS SOMG HOM-" BARBADOS POLICE SPOUTS AT KENSINGTON TO-DAY .'I p.m. ADMISSION 1/6 1/A really fininrl sel of CAKDIGANS UHl PULLOVBM (hat will make ynn look trim and fetchino, al :ill lime*. I M il!en i fur lifter-game*, wear. Shades nf Saffron. Torqiioive. National Blue and Wine. Pullover $9.42 Cardigan.... $12.63 CAVE SHEPHERD &. Co, Ltd. 10-13 Broad St. %  "'"' .Y*r*// lour I in out ii,' Mount VYVl.ES Arri—tt VELOCETTE The New Model L.K. 149 C.C. is different from ihe conventional type Motor Cycle — in fart it's the nearest approach to a motor car. II n I ii -in,. It'tl. II,iml-S,„, liil. S/..I (V-.f / r .#/ mill \tn~sflf.*. For SIMPLICITY, ECONOMY and RIDING PLEASURE llinisii, — VELOCETTE ROBERT THOM. LTD. Courtesy Garage — White Park Road satatsgaapaaaaags ^%  % %  : %  .r ; ?.-? r. v: -tf^^—•. %  = %  r KSO from inn:' t-MiHuMcithat RED HAND PAINT will stand the I %  M Ol TIME Therefore we recommend It to >oi Eslerlor and Interior Work. far The "Shu of Quality I'iniM MR Storked In Tropleal White. Barbados Llsht and Dark Stone. Gre. Dsrk Gre>. Oak Brown (ream. 'S' White Tulip Green. Permanent Green: Matlnto FUl White. Cream and Green; Concrete Paint In Grey. Bright Red. Mid QTM AIM PAINT REMOVER for the ea> removal of old Paint WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD.



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I'M.i Miri BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIIIR--I>\V ll II, IK I BARBADOS *..„ 5 mated k? MM Advwttt* <-o.. JUMNgTE Broad H. BrldtioL Thiirul. v MaJ II, 1951 lO-or-KitviiYi:* THE history of Co-operatives in Barbados lias not been rosy. In fact the general pub!:* i in Ihe progress of the island and realising the advantages of such a service Lwfe UVII left wondering whether it in the intention of the Government to stance in the formation %  At r is to he found in the publication of a notice in a recent issue of the Official Gazette proclaiming the coming into force on May 24th of the Co-operative 1949. It could hardly be the intention of any Government to lull people into a false sense of security by proclaiming the coming into force of an act and then leaving .".;T to settle itself. Already in this newspaper adverse comment has been made on the length of time which it has taken to secure the services of an officer to till the post. At the time of the creation of the post an officer was seconded from British Honduras for a period and %  Hit to Kngland for training. He relumed and was attached to the Department of Agriculture. At the end of the time he returned to his post of agricultural officer in British Honduras. Little effort seems to have been made otherwise: until now the proclamation has been published telling the public that the act has come into force.. Then arc several opportunities in this island where the knowledge and work of a Ce-nperative Officer would be of inestimable benefit to the island, In the iields of agriculture the peasant needs a guiding hand to lead him to co-operative marketing of the produce which he now sells in a cut throat competition to his own disadvantage. Combined purchase of manures and the co-operative use of tractors would increase production. The coming into force of the act should now inspire the Government to show a more active interest in the establishment of co-operatives and the first essential is the appointment of some suitable officer. And there is no good reason to limit the work of co-operatives to agriculture alone. The attempt to establish cottage industries in this inland has failed largely because of the fact that marketing facilities had not kept pace with the production of the articles for sale. Co-operatives do exist in Barbados, but no one can pretend that full use is made of Co-operation as a principle of improving the condition of the "small" man in agriculture or ancillary trades. Particularly lacking in the Co-operative principle is the fishing industry where pooling of resources would provide refrigerated ships and a weather bureau service. for the 2*. 6d. visitors to his Blen%  IP. The Marqutt ha > bcrn runiiinK his catcrin;: led u lip fr.irn the Inikpoint nf fact the Duke of MarlI'-scPndent of the vtCsO i-t Blenheim, is Hie rM*f ful country-house showitendance ngttrM m his iiienhnm Palace are now rising to a thou*— Drotn whom the Dufco t 125 daily—less enterSocialism And The Rich &f !" " UTH * A,)0Ut A Brother For Jacqueline ratwi LOUD • i Soeiahsr offer* severe! clues to i quMtfcio, which b B* I mil TEMPLE ROUKt II r ing to H< limi". vsilh the islm % %  iiouiicemenT Rumours circulate, particularl: ih i,. point* I : %  kilhag 'i i 'tut, it shoui. Even the be possible to aU"H to each.fam.t nent. ri inly %  n-> -it-j > %  t. moM people mcathly MI nine vci.<*. the W Brit* This itenu rich ihe" %  king forwai. The most pathetic newi ll l| the Marquis of Bath recently weist that particular mysterv hs only Ministry <.f Food ofl up to Woodstock to see how Ust o. a crept Inrough 1o Ve. F •>' In ,h %  P' 1 larlborough was organseveral years ago. in Socialist ridicule— of feu own depart g the provision of nfTeahlllintl Ct.vernmeni circles, this theory of — %  %  ._. mysterv was brocghl forward Surreal And failure .nd Uje Chancellor IM WCM d lo |n Q wk lhc ^4,, rut off these new rich from their „ ^ had om slimulalln %  *•"• %  **<' u rp n ie. *i*t one of the mo. ffa Stafford Cr.pp* ordered falltM. ljursmce Olivier and Vrvier U n.come-ux check on hMM UW| ^J, u> ^ Sl j tspenscs. But the r-.undalM.ul Theatre bolh shakrspe 1 keeps on turning, and now the 8tmw ^ p i avg o( awful intth Is eomin>: outthe Throil g houl „,„ „„„,, V ivie re "pcndinjc their Own laetKh wl| ^ p i ayinj Cleopatra A few Left Wtna voices ,,,„, n ,rf a Bernard Shv With such assistance arc raised for a Capit I Lev] on %  ..agincd Caesar found her an from Ihe tOUtists, UM I mdOd ownihe grounds lhat the only way to lhe ncxl nigh* wiUl her husbom %  ra ol country house* can keep up prevent people spending their own a Anlonv, Mr* will play the okk their property Hut that i:: hardlv money is to take some of it from Qutoii ft Euypt in 'the muclivmg like the rich of yeataryeer. them. greater Shakespeare pla And very few liavo hOUOae Of tUdl All lhe figures we have men|>uys have been not i.nlv I !he;itu jrti-t.. % % %  tofuU real Ho n ed reltla t. Ineonw. nut the C ai success, but the loyen hav if lhe rich'' fact 1^ that hundreds more lhan also been a .social success. I wou that small hand of millionaires are say that Laurence Olivier. w| According to the income tax ofl., ivilll( mU( h bcllcr lBan cvi tl conUoU lhr Sl im f a Tnaatr inl there are now 83 people with millionaire could 11*1 mi his taxed has the second most %  1 iwumes ol more than £3.000 a .„ cutting Into iheir theatre In London first plat. year, after taxation. Hut out of „ W|I ^ m ^ OI Ulherttad wealth, must be reserved fm the Theatl each of those incomethe British Y...M* hava BUBOOl all gotu-. RoyaL It was enteiprisinji of hi. (.oY.rnmcm takes about ten times strings of horses are being cut to stage the two plays Uigethcrniore than the rich man gets. dowrip jy^p^ mrv nol mbny Wwn and H has he charmlnj ofleel 1 Aitain. according 10 the tax Bgnn .,.,, by open in |h season, givlig [MN.|>le more than the last available figures show only Most of lnotn have b^n wId w mucn ln Ul1k aboilt dur in K Jpeople with intomes over „,„*,. the headiiu .rlet. of big commterviil. Hardened theatre-goe. I'.iii CLOSED 1100 one a year—before lhe tax ^n^ And ln ,. brafis on( r) N ay lha t this season at the deduction. These are the real mil] patn er have gone to keep tho James's reminds them only ind without much rtsh tn roundabout turning. OoenM Garden in its best da> vrror it is possible to mark Ihem Surveying another aspect ot the There is lhe same lOCUl bliUlani off one by one in the relerviu e ar is[ocratic scone this week W* 'h** same practice in thibooks of industry. The we Uthies* notice lhat the Ih.us.-nf U.rds has totversation. the nune dama-l is probably Sir John Ellernian. thhad a good clean up since the Com'or longer and longer interva •...ri pi %  •hlppuu ntagnete, who m()liS ,,.„ „ |. tl Aulumn Tne "'"i ram* otU> lhat Londoi himself lives the life of a reclUBO. brasswork has been polished, and hour for thentre-coing < His main Intenal i-. lodenuiiogy. lno red i ea ihei seits agains. ntoved from tho Inconvenient ha. Not long ago he published a three i v hu-h so many plebeian backs l' asl ***ven back to 'i volume book on the mouse. And n-v ru bbcd in Uie pual ten years quarter to nine. (In Paris, 1 ... there are some tobacco kings, som: ,re now once again (.right benchlo,d P 1 ** 5 ,,r bookcd ,0 fi, r new.pap.-r vIscounM. and al lea.i „ for „ belua ,. arl Tnl ,. ,|„ usl 9 o clock. The audience \nn le propertied uke--l.o owns „, ljora w .„ bu|| , nlll „| r „, arrive a nujrler ..I in mv.iv part of Olldonin the lop _,„ a ,„ 10 u „ ate Duk( .,, W elJJ* "" %  '".'I-'!" '";'> ' r..ckel ol m,m,.,.., ; ,-. T,„ ; n Ihere iln8 ,„ n ml nos „ „,,„„ „,„„ OTjttMJ w. I b. HI,,,....re 30 or 40. moslly elderly men. 300 „,„ „, Viclo....,, Kn :...,. I "'"• %  ",' "" ". '" •'Jg* ~S ". hopo.a m eremiM.„i,..„ two, ,, u |d dnve lo Wc,l„„ile, (or a Au >""' """ '""' ""*" "'" "" pounds. Mostly Ihry are elderly, debate. Now il lb loo vast l,ookiriK K 1 "*' un Ihey have buill up these down (mm the gallery. I dabaU And ,., „„. r; ,, UlI ... u „ „rde to write. For the llrst lime I f..minis themselves and there s look* as If there is a peer, hi not much hopt „f ivoidlnl dsaUl n,,.,,.. widely scallered. Nothlnij Sot^Mv" dtuta and passing (ortiins to their !" n be done to make the K....I Xv^l in London w %  •< %  are,,. There are e s ce„,,ons to ; ,,„ce much smaU.-r BjlM.'S. gSSf-AlS.oSSl mlS iiliv IAISX year a millionluminous departeo. the Spenker s wne n he Baya "It's absurd 1 alrc's daughter who had triads her Chair has Ix-i-ii t..ken away. The declalm Plv ,. k ntt my beam ai home HI M tli.i left more than a Lord Chancellor 3its on his woolu j ow n n „, face' If 1 haven million pounds and the Governsack at lhe other end. and the ot n heard" But the heard menl has only captured il33,0O0 seating has been a bit shortened |U(l M ve tftii middle-oge 1 Qrinjieaa'l power in i alight with palatg :.iui how bradibeee been meeting while their own n(m tnat ,h,. aiathenca felt bj UOM an kepi up. H does not exhome wai lent to the House of nlgnl thot Mr Dawac-ii had COO plain who are the hundreds each Conunona had a pleasant *inwsy l|( Ei s nor p. | t i s v ery rarelv in, yeareaguto give Ihoir children to warmth about UI a Shukesp'aie play fails on U the world's itm-.i xpf.isivc w rob the llland .if revenue. The excuse has been offered that nt this period of the reaping season the amount of trash on the canes prevents the cutters from reaping as quickly as they would if the trash were burnt off. It is a lame excuse and a reflection on the standard of intelligence in this island. It is said that a cutter can reap five tuns of burnt canes in the same time as he would reap throe Urns not cleaned by lire; but this is no legitimate reason to set fire to fields of canes merely to clear the trash. This custom of setting tiro to canes ha? increased in recent years. ID lhe neighbouring inland of Trinuiad letters now bear an official stamp saying: "Do Not Burn Our Land" It might be well for some such motto to be adopted as a reminder to people that to burn canes is to rob each and every one of us of something to which he is entitled. How about "Less Fire: More Money?" Or Simply "Don't Burn Down Your Own Doorstep* Beetles With Lights Pyrophorus Liiminusus * I" nd a half to an inch uml threepkin Is nurdenod to form n veij tha MIC* /Irc'irdirif/ CO Air. ('. C. quarters long, rather boatttronK armour. Sktvtr, Director oj Agriculture! shnpwl. and with eonaplcuona Thoao l.irvae attack lhe haro (Mi la roe fin-ji], beetle ha* been ev.. Bpo*a which shine with a back rub ; aad an copOibla of ea wen ssThheveaaad na.i.ber. this soil men Uafat, These l. ft ho> c ,eu.ia a very comuderabl year. What is I'ljrophorus Lumare nol eyes, but are borne on degree of umlrol 0V01 thai ,no..,.v? rh* (eta H. .1 Manon. the sides of the M .< fneiui telephomtl lo av he J lie> COMVM ponding insect in ar\i iicu'*j"ip.-r prbU bu fhc liyln had ..lUKhi an insert at night, the Lesser Antilles, Ihot is. from atom off by the biatCt, .n hL* house which ho had not Dominica to Trinidad, is PirroI hav 0 come acrosj the record lean U^foie. Ho wai particularphorw nnrttlurna. This is sligh'of these iK-etlea being worn b' 'y attractexl by the enormOUi ly larger than lhe Puerto Rico Indies a, jewelry. They ar Jiighi shining "eyes". He %  peek) to mc it* attached by means of a delicat brought it up for mc to se** and ;' UgM hi somewhal more power f ul, gold chain. Also they have been proved to be one of the no-called but I have not had the two Bide used to adorn fancy dress co5Fireflies or Lightning Flies by side to compare them. tumet to *'hich they are attached Tliis Insect was one ol the The InaoeU Of the famfbj F.lntin little bags nf net. In thelarge light-bearing beetles of the eridaeari ItnewnNraiional? .• riick ballroom they would not be very f.unil> Ehtterldae. i knew thla inbeetlea tklk-jacka, < nd snappers noticeable, but away from th< seel did not Inai m retht lo IhO peculiar brtohl tlfthta they would produce %  .ii r edbj iaed that it dll habtt ol the aduH if one charmmg affect feront from the related form of Lhasa iplaced on it back it Schomburgk Hsu two ftreflafi arhlofa ecetara ln the neithbouring win probably lie perfectly motions occurring i n Barbados, these Islands. Then I I-CIIHUUNTWI ], „ f,„ ,,,.. ,!,.„ ;,„; ,(„.„ apparently have been exiim thai the Government of Harhe„,.,!. jaing into lhe air. '"''c for fc"me lime, although don hud been introducing natural |f t doea „ u „. ,| n ,,, r c ,., ., enemies of hard back grubs, manoeuvre it will try again. In Keteienee lo (he l.oveinm, ,!,„„ wh-n| „ |rt ., n 1( ., M n Entomologist .onhrmed my BUa* ( ,, h ibund ,. „ Mn ,. ,,,,.,, ""' them tO I'l • With ihem. arid grawn-upa 'so are interest! Some three or four years ago. see these leaping h" • the Goveminciit imported fronThis snapping into ihe air is Puerto Klco thousands of grubs accomplished by a peculiar atrVCmid adults ot the beeUa Ppre:u „. of the under aide of the body, norm larninoraa, and thl ..„ 1his purpose of beetles.' the~Lampyridae. Thlncse go fut rt „ kn0w ,,,„, ^ olll> (!R „ Ww;U ,„,, sin aller than the < picion thai thU Inaact had from those Impoi Ia1 visitors to the West Indies have iiivluaed the llrelhes In Barbados amongst the sights seen. I have always thought that in recent yenra Iheaa itatementa wen mistakes, and that the Brefne were really ^een in some other Plac-.-. The llreflies that are mo*". co mm o n ly seen in these Tropical Islands belling to another famn iinpuriatiuus LlDorated on species ot this ( nnlv in Barbados, referred to previously, tLIlui. %  ; , %  "•"'I MMl I vrv v.-l.l,.,.. DaMlW bccalli. OMr IKM wine II, dgou.v. I being .1 ,., r „ noI „, lrtww<1 ,„ orm dc ,|„ h Ealo. The adull bixll... have .... ,„_.. ..... „„ n ~,„,i,i. wing covers, bul urn soft and nol boon mil in and about town on ,'" '"' "',. ', ,0 !" '"'" B ,,..„ly dUMmi ... lexiure ft-orn ix;. ..'XrV-sSs: .no-, si SSKTKS3 trfssrsmSi Mard Of another one in Slrath"' !" '' w hk !l ' a • erlous •** m occur in enormous nun.be, •lyde. This wouhl indicate that 'hat island. Trinidad, from mv window, l tho beetle h eslablishctl aim OAhm speclen are runilvorous. could fcTO oul m a lar([c tllllc .. probably will be found in many bul the family Includes also some n ,.i d llllll ,„ tnc ir „,.,„„ there Other parts of the Island at some very serious .ign<-ultural pests. The were thousands, perhaps millions. tltUncea from lhe fields in larvae are tailed wire worms ,,( ,he-e llreflies flashing over the A huh ihey have been tatab-1 Tbey are verj slender in prepori. ms of jhe canes. Th c contlr.UabaXL U lor. to their length, body seguous Bashing of these fairy light:. The liectle is about an incl." nents are well marked, and the is a wonderfully beautiful sight. Forty-Two Years' Service* FonTY-Ttto yean h I try is a record I i be p. ndi achievement of Mr. F. A C i i., i i .: i:.. wh; retires broni lhe pus: of Income log Commissioner today. kfr i irmoi to folned the Civil Ol I June IMt .-. h> conditions were ml re]} dlfTerenl from toe} 'ire today; but it wai iaptaiality to th* existing condition* which ii ought him He served for a short time In the Customs and for another brief period in lhe) Savings ii Tik. The succ e eding veava found him i Ither Ln Lha Auo.t oitice or in tho I'olice Magistiales' Courts until 1932 when he left Acting on the Magisterial Bench for the post of Clerk iii lhe Income Tax beaut %  !.. % %  U I .i courafpMua step which ti Ehotlghl at the time would rh to ihe Income T.ix De%  %  .. hi bul within a short lime 11 became obvious thai this departmen'. would soon be one of the important revenue producing towcejg. The belaX was luattfled and today il is second only to 'he Customs From IMS Mr ( rtt worked in this office Until IMI when he . Commissloner The IX'partuient bad been re-organised and Instead of three Commissioners thcr,* was now a ."ingle Commissioner with an established Clovei nmciit (Mice in the Public Bul As economic conditions Improved and trade and commerce a I Uie oftlee %  11 The number of persons eligible for taxation increased HI Clalrmonte'i Inti H the new system because of hia Wktg knowledge ol men and affairs. He set an example of efficiency which has been equalled but unsurpassed in the Civil Establish men l .ml |haj WOO lor him the respect of GovertlOTl ,'lonial Secrcta Three years ago after the HI Act of 1025 he intimated his Intention to M'tire. but because ol difficult! in filling the ofnee Mr Claiiuionl. willingly continued. During hi* h.ng term of office Mr. Clalr< nli lias built up it staff to (octency and thorough. ,>i the lucceai ol the deparlinenl la due. And it is the pride of th,. srivieithat today nneol of the dislCK-awork as it might have in 194B. His Depotv wh ( h. i of the youngften wp o have spent much time and conlributerl UH*|al) to the success of the ad%  -H-'i .: .II; ..! thai ofiw But Mr. Cluirmonte was riot merely the efllcicnt civil erWll He was interested in sport and perhaps contributed to .* in this Island In a way in whicn few men have been able T In former years he •* cricketer, athicuand i But a knee injury during the war "f limited his participalic is a hue ii Egypt 1914—in hut lus interest. Ha WM able to do more for cricket in that the survivm] of the Spartan Club was directly due to his foresight and encouragement to younger memhcr.* of the Cl lb. This interesl broadened and today he Is a n amber or the Besoctlon Coml Iki Board Ol :il Vi.c President Cl A •o Judge ot the Barbados lurf Club. he retires and with him the good v. everybody in Barbados. Bv I.VKI.VN IKONS WHAT Kis th I %  %  %  of banishment rom Bechuanaiand done to 'Queen' Ruth. baj Londo 1 : i iiu-f Seretse Khama CJUSthe hottest racial controversie< ever to rage within the Empire. She retorted with blistering protestations when the Government exiled Khama from 'Ms y because he had married a white woman. This week Jacqueline, the Kham.t's brown-skinned bab>. had her first birthday. md turned the spotlight back on nil that. The controversy is not dead. As for as Ruth is concerned it is merely dormant for another three years and ten monthThen comes the end of the five years' ban >n Seretse and his while "Queen." when the Government must decide whether they arc '.o asume power over the 100.000 Ramani>watos or not. To-day Ruth has mellowed in her comDMntg in the colour bar. The year has healed RON 0( the ftlUJCff ami tullerness which was ler natural rea ct ion to the tventi l—ding up 0 her husband's ejection from Alnca. But .h*is inflexibly set on returning to Beebuir-i.bnd as wife of the Bamani;wato chief. Ihe avers that the two of them can IK' a lower for progress there. ANGKK GOES Quietly diessed in a flannel-grey wool jcr\ drejrag and sheerest nylons, the former tilth Will-anis does not look conspicuously UfTerent (rom other wives of il 1000-a-vear m ri [n I ondon. She is calm, poised, ready to handle aociej situations competently. Her redjold h.iir is swept back from a high, intelligent forehead. One oddity—her parti-coloured eyes. T! 'eft is clear grey, the right splashed with M own. Her complexion is clear. tix>, and pale 3ut in the year she spent in Bechuanaland it was able to withstand exposure to the burning African sun. Ruth Khama lives to-day in a furnisheti i three-floor maisonette in a modest street near Regent's Park. From the wall of the little siting room a picture looks down—a young African resplendent in what appears to U he full-dress uniform of the Household Cavilry. standing beside a venerable Mated Igure in a bush hat: Seretse's father and ;randfather both Bamangwato chiefs. Part of the day she is the ordinary wife ind mother that she might have bean, thai :irl who was born in Blackheath, played lacrosse at her Elthani school, drove lorrie ,s an acting lance-corporal in the wnr-tim< %  VAAF, became a Lloyd's underwriters' clerk She bathes and feeds Jackie, helps the maui with the housework, cooks her husband": evening meal. ("I love cooking, particular!' French dishes with lots of herbs and garlic." Two evenings a week she goes Ice>skaUn| in Bayswater with o gill friend while Ban tft jlays table tennis because, .she says, anyone who has been accustomed to pli jrln must exercise to keep fit. Unlike most girls, she doesn't care for tin pictures, prefers plays. Unlike every othai ;irl. she studies to be an African queen. Each day she and Seretea read and work togathar, discuss ideas lor the welfare of th( Bamangwatos. They meet many Africans, iften have them to dinner at their house. Hei .-urrent reading—a book on racial clashes n South Africa: another on the differences ictween India and Pakistan. She keeps up with most wi itingfl on Nor'h and South African problems; reads the bunj dies of South African newspapers that arrive from African friends in Seretse's homeland The Bechuana language spoken there i? almost impossibly difficult for a European but she tries to pick it up (she has no textbook) from her husband. JS 1.900 A YEAR Big, broad-shouldered Seretse. due to take his law finals as a banister m September t| having | Whilsun break from his studies hma-ntains his family on the £1.000 a year promised by the Government for the durati'-> 01 his live years' banishment. The three are just back from a brief holida; in Cornwall, touring In the brown 32 hp American Ford brought from Africa. Ruth. i Ing her WAAF experience lib I I take R turn at driving but finds the car small th aftar the big RAF lorries. Everywhere they went, in pubs and inn and villages, the Khamas were recognised met with no rebuffs and instead were welcomed by the public. In London where 2Vj years ago they faced hostile stares and ofTen live remarks they encounter no more troubk Whal about the upbringing of lively lit:! Jackie? No tutors and governesses for hei She will go to "the ordinary school/' In Bechuanaland. this mean, a t'luistuin school Both Khama parents are Christians: Jacqueline Tebogo was christened in the Church oi Kn'jhind on the last day of last year. MALE HEIR? So far the delicate question of the Bamam, watos being ruled by a chief with European blood does not arise. Baby Jackie could neve. succeed her father, because she is a girl. B... the factor of a male heii may well come inti Lvefore tha Khanias exile ends. Slim determined 27-year-old Ruth Kiian,. b ys thai this will not he the only child of the family. She doesn't believe in only ctiUdran. Mie means to have more. WOULD COPY1UGHT BESfll\TJ). i I.a. FOB REPAIRS Advocate Stationery We have just Received . GREEN BIRKMYRE II 'alvrproaf ami Halpntof 72 ins. wide TARPAULINS made to order ii required. WILKINSON & 1IAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C.S. PITCHER 'Phones : 4472 & liisv PHONE GODDAKDS — WE DELIVER



PAGE 1

1111 i:-.u vv, M \v R 1.1:1; Mm-. MiVilt VII CLASSIFIED ADS. ,,,,n,rxoTM,s p\r.r si \ is IBMM not 1Mb Ciilin| tlv number (I w-o.d. *r wor. for net FOR 8AU ap.te II •.-. .Mr,, ii M u mm g* w IN M faandova. TII.WKi 1 slHIf k T LOWJJ mtWMM orB* .i lM ,-. HM Mlb Ma>. 1001 al BreieBl Philip Grate %  II who attended Ihr I wreetM ard lett. %  any Mhir way r*ilrred awUnrr in .-en>ei.t Mra Ed nit Grorgr and Ena int'iftumi ; Waller Oxford. MaroM and Allan IBMI.I Mi* 0. i %  Mail* <*<> US SI—li IN Mh.MOKIAM AtTOMOTIV, dc-r PalhM KIM AM-nrx INCE. M|hi MT*WJM M.. 31 )( Thefragrance i %  idfathrt JOHN ... called The „n* i love a* call.,; The *PMirh wa> h,N iht bkiw uv.rr Bui lit Ik.r kimv. ih.it death wu Kwr i., IN KIIII intxn-d b> Mr* Muriel • NH, OBUWII, 1 1 i loving rnrnior. of OKI | (wood. Di 1 IMI le>ond or Mm .lAKMOOO(, dear on* Urn paiacd t.i itn N i m Sloop OJL dear falhr %  Your loving hand* ran do no mure. For ihoa* >ou loved >ou did your beat. May Cod anal KM n-mal re-i Ever to I* rcnirmMrfil lis \i Ycarwood rWtf*l. MMMarguar.t* Unrale (only daughter) and grandchildren as il—m Tun LOYAL IIROTIII>;KS OF mi: STARS 1951 CARNIVAL .AT tjt'FKNH PARK —On-THURSDAY 7th iwovtj n-d* irrmi arranged Dial KM or 4MI s?.j II it.i CAR-One 1MT Pram, mileage Contact II Jam** ag j %  ,TX CAM MM Mm.. HI B.OM mnn IMA Wokoory 1* Baloi M.ni mil*. Tord VI 1*35 Tourer • % %  • MM i Iknp i.;.," iIBM M S 11—4 ts VAN!" Haw Morn. Co. I*y and TTP* 10 .wt Van. I_i chance al old Morrli %  Saloon and Two Door Saloon, all on hand I NOTICE IS tHE MM. i.: ,i| *.(.., mUK KMl llSt. MIL L | IMI11 II NOTICE is HEKI\ Creditor* of Ihe ahov.rn.ned Compam •vIMrh % %  being .n\i:il*Mi. Mound up or* required an m i.l.tr lha Jnd day oi Julv iffBI brine the dav (or 1n.it i.urpoao .under mg.ird |. gMrooaoa. ,,o in* particular. •4 Ihnr debt, or rUima. and ON BJBMI and eddr i to c in and prove their uid ol .it Mat) tint* and place H %  PIIWd n> •urh notice „. n def.iull iheroof lhe> um be evchnled from U benefit ii .. | i.ado befoi %  ueh debta ar* proved Dated thai IM day of Mat 1MI. II. LISLE THOMAS. I iquldator : 1 7 7i I'l'iH.M SALES mi it M • REAL ESTATK i-T-Mirrif *|tuat* hael. rtandlna; land The noun, i Irawin*. i kilrhcv. and Balmorit hid %\. i J I bu.lt nl .It dlnrnj. bi uownataira thrao d balh urxtalra ivotUaacaa. Carat* L yard. KLfXTKIC Al. FLASMJJUHTS A PATTEHJE.S T II ria*hllKhU with large locuulng RrfMadan i *a Three cell al II M each, i whtth Hip Inio oor pocdel Onlv (I each Batl*ll-i rh a W II '. bk an A, Co Ltd Bimil ft Hnebiii k Street! POULTRY i RjCHJ HOC White l*ihorn.. NeHampahliFi. Rhode latandt. PlyRWyHi Pock. While and Black G1..1.I1. II .il 4 .rrka old Prom USA tiordo-, Matthru*. Glenmaur, Coi.it Hut ion Rd il , NOTICE 'Application! for one tar-M St Philin*. Veatit Ethibitu.i. tenable at the St lael-i Oirli School, will be received bv the underalajixri t.ot lain than S.iinrday tin June 1M1 C'.ii.dtdate* iiu..t be d...ight*r. ,i prnaMonera in -tr .Hnieil .ind mutt be mrr cihl U' lh,n lelve t lal old on the 3IM July. UM A birth rerllArat. with an application form. oM I l.ial Treaaurer'. Office The entrance examiitalinn *ill l v held %  v | Aalurda) lain Jvinr l*i „t an am P S W •t-OTT. CWrt l Bl l*hiln> LNl %  11 (.„ NOTIC-K %  •i.AIH RRDMAM I I The abov* will be —i rl-1iCompelltlod at a. Stieet Brtd—lnwp . t Juna 1MI .t a p „. CARHINUTuN X i for aal* I'M.' RM Al'CTION UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER TOIM 1 TO-DAY V Hat Ma>. 1*51 n. o.der Mr i ... .e a/U| %  hirh in%  uoe. Mom. ..., „ and %  i %  •*" TabRa.' Kocbera Mn %  M IRtajaatl \ ,,.,, ,(,,, <-,,,,. N .il Table. Cona..leii" Viotollle Top '..flee Table. Oak fc la j.al — nmm B TaAV .nht Chain and Boo* Caae with IV.. ...trie lamp.. Gla-a Ware Minmon.. RACW Beil.tead. with Rpnng. and Daajp .•ei-p-Maltrraaca. Trdar Mirif Pleat with -leolnaj Table Combin.d: \. hftlti M abaal Compaclum. Cream paint (Teaa. Phil... Hrli n.-t .,t,„ | n p*rf lorklna; order lit, Servwe Wa.hin Mi.hu. Kn.i,, FOR ill M %  eel: T? er.'i HI cent. I.-JJ.I 11 leOrdi — ... •Meda J <..,:. i. n4|ia 11.11 -I s H AMI II tree* T aeala and A CIIAVTVl II A;: M-R-NlMtEl, FLAT. Pavilion vva.lal.lr fnc .(.pi rom Mh Julv Phnne IU1 FIAT Beat inmi.I ||a*lnc> UIHM Dtntnaj and Sit Una room.. badRpoma. runnlnf valet. adRf uaual ConvtnMeiroa. Ho Pet. CERRT*.. Dial MR> fM %  OURT. Pain, Beach llaati -. rWtaW two Eat Buna. In* *e* open Verandah*. %  aaad bath, i %  from June IM Aa*.l> Swai. Street IHal RSI dinlm monia. pamrv. i„,ie'. and eaN-lii.Itt •id Availab.v' F Clarke. 1 1VMMMI1IIMS RYE ANBNN ROB .ltd m Wednesday I -ve a ma.. UW loudapeaker. nl IL.il BRVk-aa ltd Uitrn i. Lid Jl S SI r UM MISCELLANKOLS An old friend |-.-t returned, n-mel; UANDEHINE which I. no trouble to uwjuat put it onand you will at* It k**pi th* hall looking It* beat at all time* Knight* l-td 51—In C. BARGAIN I-dl*. Bi Modrrn and a. good a ..i ,...• Ph.Mie ;.-. PHI CAR I'AHTS in m Spark Plug*. Cpliolntrrv M.trn.l i me al one MM SATURDAY 9th Ju i i i Sim r. ...... and c MM ihe way a* Hatpk I'll..,..! ed In ..'. (iii ObUlnable 1 KNIGHT* ua 3" 5 SI r.Ai.VANisED siirrrrs Beat tuaiu. new iheet*. Cheaprat In th* l.l.i'nl r. fi l*.na. : ft UU. H ft in Tl. • fl ft 3d; 10 ft M 0 Nrlt raid Batter hurry I A BARNES Ii CO LTD. 4 a ai-t f n GAI VAMZEI) SHEETS: W* ore *ell g Cheaper than ai,/ other Arm In ndgetown Try u. fltal h*f .... %  ... .. .. | D %  itM Th* trade mark cm be areii on npgdkatlon al MTMR Pultd Ihn Mlh da> of May. IMi H WII I.1AMS. Begi.trir if Trade Mark ARRIVED! SOLD! New Slilpnenl ol Cooker* arrived. MM beMn -i""-: He* them at Oai t^.f .-iclriivery TAKE NOTICE COLLEEN T hat S OA.Q a, FDIBI.E PRODUCT LIMITED • •ompanv Incarporolod under the a-ti of th* Mand of JarnabM, Ma tactureia. vthnao Hade or bualnoM -.Jdr*M ,. Producer Rood. Wnl End. King-'o. l..m.>Ma. Brltian We*t Indie*, hoa applied for in* raglMraHon of a lead* mar. Part "A" of Reglilor In reipnrl o* i -non aoap detergent* and all preparil lor laundry purpnaea and olao In r*i of p*rfum*ry. ...lading toilet nil pr*paratMu for tha teeth and hair .ind perfumed aoap. and will be entitled leglater the *-inie after on the JSth day of May. IMI. unleaa tor p* r aim mail in the •naontimc give not! :n duplicate to me at mr office tipn.ltton of .ill' 1 %  • mark Can be ie*n on application al n v--" .-• Dalrd Ihu MO! day of May. IMI II 'MI.L1AMS. RogWrar of Trod* Mark* MS Sl-Sn Tl, .1 1 IMI It 11 the lawa of %  l'ii"l.ii. wll I I AM RUPERT" NOTlcr IS HERE11V : IVEL." lB any debi or rbi I Willi...; llMperl St Clair Redman, lot* of Haatlngi. CbrtW | who died In ihla Iiland on the Itlh dav of October. I*M are h*i*b lequird >n %  and particular* of thru rlalma. dult atte*l*d. lo Ihr und.i Colloid ft Co No u. High vti.,i .-. Slat day of Julv. |f>M. alter .hkh .. -• % %  •I 1 1 '-I I Iribllle Ih. ..-..', ..I Ihe Drceawd aiiHing thr pailn-. tharito. having regard onl. lo Ma Ml U clalma of MMCb *M .1 I Part uolke. and lhal *r will n..t IHII. hie for — Ml or any port i %  'iiy penuii of wluiae dent or claim vie .hall iwii ihen n.,te ,., notkr*. And all perunia Indebltal to Ih* u Ealale are requeated tn .eitle Ihrh i debtedneaa without delay Datad thu Mth day of Ma,. lll Kl-I-UITCHKEBMAM IlLDMAN I HVEY riHLLII- LINDSAY ERCIL IIYEBCRN GILL tfuollftrd IMOCUUn ..f Ihe Will Ld I Ro n m i Mippfitfll Stove "'" I.i-" M .. piiiticalli M*> ,.rden T0..1Pram. Tricycle Toddle art 1 1.1.1 <*h**t .if Drawer*. Doll* %  MM DM Jamaican Mai. lAIJt II 41 ...l,.ck Tr-KM* CASH. HRANhIK TROTMAN A (II \ll< llMtHl t M TAKE NOTICE CORONET I" & F.DII1IJ. PBCirH'CTS led undei de I.land of Jamaica. M*r Rood. Weal Rnd. Kmg.l. nuiiah We*1 Indie*, haa applied reghtratlon of a trad* mark Of Hegliter in te.pe.t pf CO .... ...... _..p drleigri.tand nil pro] % %  %  rtent'of perlunirry. liKludirvg I,., 1 1'VK ILAI110 Tie Jamaico Broadcaal .. |i 10 PYI HAtHii 1 • I'M .III b. opened In B..-b..d..I ft Lid II I M l. .: 11.-1 ibour Apply in fl UM. M %  .apable porton onlv to Canad 31 I II J. otaa RAJ .'.NV run MM PM* Mu brt Wwn J OMMIJI MISCELLANEOUS 1M TO KENT TWO iiWts-auM furniinod apartment Nrar IOHI, Reaaoiublr rental Write RraileiiiAve A|>l Quebec Mi I. 1; M S *l V 1 ...... 1. n . %  %  badjjg %  Churriiitl iiml EirewiMiil Four tho loni f vh.ii. RltMMMJd w IMO rraqi if l.tQl tn; LICENSE NOTICE Tn* %  pcdmUori of A F Taytar, Lt.i hoMer ol I JO,.. 1 LirotlM \" KMT of ia*l ayajMOd to Mr* nl June ISSI after hlch date I ahall ptoceed • di.lnbuii .,( Hi. ; •::;, MrVd part only lo iudi claim, of Which then have had nnllcc. and lha not be liable for the gagglg 1 hereof .,, dHrtrtbuted, d. ai whoa* debt or claim I .ha hod notice. And all prl...n. 'mt.btrd lo th* Mid entale ore rrojue.trd to *e11le their | n debiedr.r.. withom dalai Dated Ihl* 1li day nf April. IfM. Al.BEIITIIA HAIUWfa Quallflad Ai %  of UM Eitate ol Glad.Albeiline Hardlnc drceawMt M M n 1 for th* 1 %  ..I.I. 1 %  MaRMM leglater Ih. the Mth day of May. IMI, ut.lt* aomo prrtm-. .hall In th. me-ntimr give notko in triplicate to mo at n>, office rppo*lllon of attch legitliati.i. 1 mark can be ***.. on apDiir^u,,, a) onVe Daled Ihl* 31th day of May, IMI H WILLIAMS. Keglalrar u 7 ..,. A,.,,11 M M MMSj l-.nit to be held Ol Dl.t A .... ftl-tn. ,e IMI. .1 K P. A Mil <>I< II.. Magl-n il OM BXI %  st I..,,,., St VtncRnl %  %  mad ud nfty two %  1 e imported .lui ini. 1 tollowu 1 I II .1. %  .1 I %  V. ,.,., tun*. .1 :i..i) 9.055 827 Display of (iynna\lirs %  %  >! I.I Ol • repealed a' I. -1.1,1 e DI.I.IA "I S. ... %  N. 1h.ll team. IIK4I.-ION Adall. 1 — 1.. Chamber Of Commerce Report to be on a firm footing and th flip is now growing. Th, IMue and the Depart men I ol Highways and Transport havo Kivtm th 0 newly-formed Associa. tnii considerable assistance and IVII Shipping During the year 1,024 Merchant Vessels with a total nett tonnage ihr "l 1.045.678 tons arrived at the poii i eompared with 0B9 vessels of 1,234.120 tons 111 1949. In Hd! dllion lo the above. 14 vessels oi M 1 thgrr ty|M^t amounting to 76,192 From MUja s amounted lo 70,52'* tons entered 'he .-He: % %  ,,s agjinst H.'V vetueU of 73,680 long gross 111 1949. .f tbOMJ 149 were Steam iiivl mOtOC vessels, the remainder being sailing vessels. The Cruise Ship-. Msurrlanlo. lulu 1 il StelU I'oUru mad,. .. total f six vUits to Barbados during Ih,. year. Thr number "I tourists carried b v thCMi vessels W.. l.fiKll. Tin lot.il iiombft ..I pa.•n,:.' arriving in the Colony by sen during 19*10 txcultlvo oj intransi; Ions visited Ihe port. These passengei 1 -ag 6.23H "' *" l.vrl IM" -1 1 > tl.KP 1 I II Nil. I1WK \c | mi Tiir ctiiniTinis nottHNG l.lt.NS AGAINST UriiOf Farm PLANTATION Rt A 1 TAKE NOTICE 1h.it we Ihe Traded nf Ihr above Plantation are about lo obtain 0 loon of C.l.fNW under the pro. via 1 mi of th* above Act again at th* aald Plan lat Ion. In reipecl of pie Agricultural year IMI 10 IMI No money haa h**n borrowed undir Ihe Agricultural Aid above Ad n r.iporatod Te comprisetl of 2'i yachts, Id Royal Fleet, Auxiliaries, 3 British .nd 4 American Men of War, < Dutch Aircraft Carrier, 1 Royal Amy STVI.. Corps Vessel, I American tug and %  cable ship. Five hundred and eighty one : OattM Of Vr-sH Nationality -:. im I'.nii h and American gfOtM Kietu-h Argentine Dutch Norwegian Swedish Italian Honduran Danish Egyptian Finnish Panama nia i Venezuelan The number who left the Colon] ... was 4.398. as compared uh 4.790 and :iii"t rMJptcUYslji In 1949. The following table give* the class, nationality, numbi-i in Ti l..uii;.i:.' fj| V fl .mi' %  | tM port during 1950; No. of Nell tell 36S 75 31 52 38 II Tankers Sailing VesM IHfitlsh Dutch American British French Total Merchant Shipping .. 1,024 The following table chowg the DM Hlh IMtl abet Ol t.'..iii ami mot A'hich arrived at Ihe port of Bridget.!*1945—50 Vear the year 1.045.078 and on 9th. T.C A. operated IntoapMWatl both North and South-bound. 4052 w.MS The Stiuar Industry Altlitaitth the total i tinfoil WU poator HI .n lhal rot tl %  pondlnf Mrlodi for iinpaat raui %  unsatisfacloiv The rainfall aUTini Novtrnbei ., n( i Docomber i94f .. .ib.ive Bvarafa and than w i Miflun-iil ni.nstiiir fm ihi i tint of tha j [tM Bl i i...( Ki'hinai i lo II %  I % %  %  iieti lha iai mlnailiai and aarlj wiiipint-nt of the ratooai Tin Jo.. N.\,iiiler anH pecember ware orj and although ihtotal imri|u* it. i for Augii*' i major]. tv of this fell on the night ol tht ai t and oould not i>.oDoctuall I UM crop %  "orninatati Itfall fm Jam. .M > other early months of IMO wa i tha i .in*atop, p.H lu .. • larl) tha rat vt-iop until late in tin i The aria haiveated f„ r | m 19.V 41,241 acraa as aaatnai :705 acres in 194M These rlgura .a. huh1.000 acres for laud undei : %  ,. in' %  mr %  1 ..i,( Tha equlvalanl of 45.000 punah* %  r , Fancy Molasses wl , 1 ucad liming the 1950 i-rop reason Al itnand ol Dacembar, hV %  toly 1,300 pan* I thi' K.iin v \t< I.i %  1 It is expc.le<1 111.1 in of the IM] crop prodw I boul S7J300 pumlH'.iiis equivahnl ol fancy Molosses will lie retired foi .\i. 1 1 Tinlate Umata of lha IMI 1 rop wn dut an of -iiiK-' %  and lane} rop of 180,000 t M ii 1.(,. -. 1 ihe Bi it) 1 h Govi n .1 through Ihe Ministry of Footl. hw purchaaad UM anttra exporubw %  .itput %  sugi 1 during Ihe Ifl.t crop season. Ttie 1 1 1 pi...,. • ;:.' iv 11 pi 1 ton mi judai I I 1 ai nvi. which unth 1 tl 1 Bugai In dustr%(RahabUlutkHii Plica %  %  .d 1 w. tfaraj \. %  %  .. %  .1 %  1 .I.;. itad I., tha >iiet-ini raaarva hind i.ovr A 1 in MI I.OSl SEER w.lh II %  %  l.nd*. pie-., retjrn unve to IMT 1MB IMP ItW PI IISON \l rn in; name a* I d.. Ma In my ... il-r ngned trj n* M fjmrge FIRST OCCUPANT The new graveyard at iluirth wot 1 tuna*. K BSJ Of Ihuse Hill. waa buried there m IMI IMI i.mti ta • If a U a 11 d is s br I 11 a ii 11 1 •! I0M tall MM IM 11%. 3 1M I Ih %  SHIPPING NOTICES IONTRKAI.. AC41RAUA. NEW ZEALAND LINE. LIMITED .MAN I I DflBJ SS. ARABIA I. Hheduled to toll ...n II.IMII. Ilth May. Adeteid* Mth %  11 a.Million lu grnei | |,. M*> I '"' n-ll 1 a.i.l led cr cent, and 111 hold %  mr ol .' i" in .i' i' % %  n %  Tinaaaplng of Uv< plantation M II malntatrM I I %  in %  larval aa bal via. cue Uvatoch iitui to ayary 10 :. um %  ihe 1111..1 aurvag plantings has rave al ad .-i at ra %  h78 5 lb 1.1 Pt ... Il d ;i ... ies 2rd. of cotton >iehling 107.948 Ih %  ( aaad l Btl 1 .r 2980 ll> pel a. 1. Tin tut.. under totlon cultlVBl • .-, ,11 11 .. rat Ird ompaiad with 72; tinpi. 1 %  .ica. Mum. bSM Hade or bu.lneaa addr**. 1. Pr.Kl.--er It. ad. Weal End. King.ton Jamaica. Url1l.li We.l l.idle.. haa applied for Ihe irgl.li.ln.n of a ti.de mark W Part "A" of Regl.ter in reaped of common aoap deterge.,I. and all preparation* lor laundry purpoara and alao lu n.i* | ol perfumerv. including tot lit arlair. prepariition* for Ihe trefi and hilr .m-l perfumed aoap. and will he enlilled to legl'lrr ththe Mlh day of May IMI. unloaa aom* porton ihall In Ihe %  op:-H10.1 ol -ucrleirirtroliou The trod. inaoori on appUc.tk.n al in, office Dated rh... Mth dav ol May. IMI 11 wnj RVgiMrar nf T-. I II -.. TAKE NOTICE CAMEO Thot SOAJ* A EDIBLE PRODUCTM LWITED a companv i, rorporaled under th* la* of th* Iiland of Jamaica. Manuregi.tr.lion of a Irode m.rk Port **A" of Heglatrr In leaped of common aoap deterge %  '. and all preparation* for laundry purpna*. anl a|a


PAGE 1

Tlll'lUliw MAI II, UJi BARBADOS ADVtK ATI r\r,r nvi: Commerce Chamber Active Says Head THE < H tMBKR OF COMMERCE i i ntii il %  %  day* ui mattej i P rertdhni ol the Charabn Mr. C. t, Loantck. Jnr.. -air! at the Annual I, lng j en the reI'st were: Mr. H. A. C TbOBB' port, that apart from the regular Mr Lucic-Smlth. Mi T < UwI and the m ( ; Mr. J O. Tud.r. Mi Q D %  %  tfynoe Mi W K. Atkii-v ., Mr had been (our special meetings of A. R. E. Kinic, Mr A. S I. v i> %  S. H. K h, Mi J K ( oral meeting*—an unusually largo Granmim. and Hofl K II Hunt*. This *ho\ved that the Mot las* 11 ; the Coun'" %  i\ %  • member) can be i ril. had been aide awake to office hearers as . %  -.ruts whl ii might affect 'he Council of tlir Cham be.ri theisland. There WU the usual .-l-.-ri..n af lacacock who moved the honorary member?. of the annual report for _.,,,. ,___ --— %  . would no ''"• %  **' / Rf.PlMT •new which R.cmbership .>( the BarbudJS ten place during that yaw Chambei ofl .,the end of interest to Uw of 1949 was 148 II Thouiih three new i i i four memlier, resignc "•J2 t,,: '' "limber of inembei %  mi ol i5o. therefore, wag 147. Miss JAMAICA" i.'iiu ronunerctgl %  members might not %  • Interest was such that the Chamber pre-t-hr r**\<\ on iU ,\?i'\t ,ru Sl ort,ei March 8 under the Chairmanship %  , *1W.U. The expei.riilUMof Profaaa ft at! 0r lne VPai wai .s2-3i. leavIrim n ,T, d l>ala:„. of $2.439 99 out territories, but I am quite sure. nl ,n e < < 1 f '9* re-tt pity thai were $1,053.60. The e\i* I 1 %  < I to connection with the pubUeetlor. nominal' mpmher-; ,,f The journal amounted to fiom whom a suitable delegate 5354.00, leaving a credit balance could be chosen to attend." ,, the end of the year of $2,092.40. ScsrWeJI Only three edition* of th*> journal were published during the due to the difficulty of finding a suit.nl>!.editor. Mr. Ian Galu was recently offered the Police H\7/ Soon St kill* K\|M.I I, Get Bci Minis it Mak 16,000Teas CentralSiatUm < Sugar Thk Yew C.J. AkH lor Evidence "Sun* hit'" Brlllge. Unad Hour At Seaweti there eras now i leted i 8JM0 feat runway whleh could accommodate full sire long %  kti Leacoek. ,''-,. He beUeved thai Development and ,,u ,r,he J""" 11 '' •"• "" bai accepted. The Council no be Welfare had contributed very ; %  ""."',..... looks forward to Ihe regut* runwaj "I none it will appearance of the Journal ggalr noi he the nollev, beetnisr the BritThe Council wn, plense %  -, %  M largel) .:i thtl prnjBBa to reatgict Donald Cheney. Assistant Can.ithe use of the runway to British dian Trade Commissioner. Mi owned and operated airlines. C. D. Thomas. President of ih-. "I think It would be of benefit Barbados Clerks' Union, and Mi to the island as a whole if the airJ. Marline*, a Venezuelan travel port as thrown open to any reagent, all of whom address v' sponsible airline of any nationalmeetings of the Chamber. lty who wished to run a service to Barbados." It seemed strange to him that there should u the %  troni (aaUag ,.. that all British traffic should be gun i, as rnmnarsd bers and 26 guests The annual dinner of the Chamber was held KX 2nd Decembar. The.e were 41 member> if the Chamber present and 19 ith 35 meni the pre\-iti> British planes •rum the Conunonwa countries, when no nich Intaresl Ben aboul the passenger lDiuiar\ icrvtee to the United Kingdom. The Council records with regret %  •For many years now if we had to the death of the following dining rely on trie British passenger earthe yean vice to let to the United Kingdorn, Bit John Hutaon, O.B.E.. V.D.. we •" aid i %  let there at all." who died on 2nd April at the age Bpeasdnfi of 'he canada-Waat of yi. He was educated at Cod[ndfei trade, Mr Leaco cfc Hid that ringtoi College and studied medit was tragic !o see that as regards tl ,ic in Bdlnbursh. He returned frnporta to UHS island tor the year to practise in Barbados, after1950. Canada's share was only 14.5 per cent. From 1946 there had been i steady decline of :, ol imports ti> this wv country. This was title to cuuency |j. u s i„t, vi Council rcslrlciions and nothing else. JgjgT • -I hope that this delegation ,.,/,.' which is going shortlj tthe MISS OFTRUDE SHERMAN winner of the Mi-., .i.nii... title in 1949. is In England on a thrc montlx holiday to *es the Festival of Britain Here she Is at a party held by the friends of Wine Society. Lady Savage Appeals For Help For Local Guide Movement ON SATiTRRW NEXT, the Girl Quidta of Barbado! will hold thc.r Sixth Anniinl Fair at the Drill Hall, said I^tdy Snvage in her broadcast talk in aid of the Girl Gtlidf Movemenl "My object In speakiny lo you to-night is to seek your Bupport for :i Movement whose Influence foj Kood in this Island is both real and practical end iwell isi:ihlislu'(' or ^ound principles and practice ol ^elf-help." After the recent visit of !,adv Baiien-Pi.wel rota In the "Gi.ider"— Fanning Held Up In U.K. United Kingdom and then Can I suggested by the Hcgional FcoMr. i. Forbaa, District Com: British Guiana wi." a* Intranet! on the colombie ..oni England yeetarday, tuid the wards loWrej the puUk heaMH Adv -.u that farming | service From JJlS to lWa In ,.,.,, h; „. ,„.,, ,,.,,,,„.,, was PubUc Health I ccouat ol the heevj wta^hs, John beeatoa u memlwrf Uie IJlrv f1ilil lPirm)i hc ved until 1B4S. being elected of the Council 1941 to 194*. t the rea He said that in some parts i >. country, people are nc beginning to plough the land. "Barb Quid is. is always, on a sound. I^.-KI tooling, and in this |gel p u tinhave managed to buy and set up their own l|eadeiiig earned by Ml W. Redman, who died aheer hard work In o gai in the Isle uf Thonet in Kenl, K.U,*. <•,,,.,: „ rui money,., on 18th 0.tober at the age of there Is a sehem. la.rly m ,..,.. aflOrtM in tt,. | "IPSygy jJSL 'ifr y^SJg 87. Mr. Redman worked for many • which has Just ,, „ u w; .,., ,, curreara with Messrs w. I. Johnson "" %  cultlv< Ung I om wh,ch T j: i know froia •,.• I, sc ufThc B.'tsh t'".aftai what, he w.., o„e "' i"i'"<' could i-' pi WH ,,,,.-! gnowledge and obaervW • l,vi ".'. %  „ ,, %  %  „ %  % %  then miOl the loimders Of the lirm of Ml ft* I BUCSL is well .1. %  I SMSS' iohoaw & Redman. Uw VX during wbtch tune he no riaeklng on the part of the ^he two retiring members from Conference* *>*>* braUvi i %  cm an that they have the Chamber th:s year through The following conferences of whirh inclurled local goVorninenl achieved Ihi i -enioritv are Hon. V C Sale and interest to the commceiai com"d community development at of i <> .; Headquart Mr R. If. Cavi Mi. Gala bad nMn u v were held during the veur the University or London. %  Hill. tent of the in lh |„ colony. He laid thai he had the opporCapital l^cpeadltave Chamber, and acted for about relegates from th6 various U" paring what the Bui you aaven months as President during (j^jg j n t ne Caribbean attende" Bdihados mu-t he supplemented by the general public if the fcfoVl K'develop • "A i*n mo first tell you what Ihe (Mr. Leacoek had ieen on that (n *ects~ ol dcvaUi.itlm on the and the city ilgures are well ovei Guide Movemenl la doing to help body He had taken a keen inBiitish Caribbean opened on fllh the six Uwuaand mark. Figures jtgelf. At present, each u In commercial affairs, and M. 0rcn under the chairmanship returned W the Ou le and RangBt req was always willing to go lo grent (|f pn.fe^oc. O. Beasley. The Clt^ Supervisor*! Dfhea show that, real tWte one trouble In setting information or conference was attended by offlup to Saturday, over fi.000 perrno'i Brownie-six pence a yew details fee the beneCldk f|l)in th( territorial unite sons wenraadatered. There i,, local Guide Funds Thai lit of the Chamber as a whole He %  M A Pm .inuel. lle...l ..l were .nlv 447 persons who nt: ilmta.n is in the majontv ..'^ ^Tl£^ Economic Department at fugod loi .egiMi-i. %  iU that they CU fl-rd. but Chamber w-ho had M.wnvMh l.im ,.„!,„„.,, onU( : .,Tthe Annual GmdK,,, represenlr. would b t ,£! m tV-n I The Council of Hi. l^aoo feU on vlaor. told the Aahraeate y oa,.„.ontnimtion for n—i_ jatr.,Ca ee la now In the United rf J^^ p , |ne ,.-... ranging K ttB rLi ihsnimd Mr Nwcock Britlah CarirAean held Itj Prai had | foTtWPtand^SSS S I-! ...U meetlna In Berted ;:.,.„f ihe duties of President. He ehairmaiwhip of Mr. R. L. M. lhloUKll ,,„.„ vvl)lk alin u „ other Sf^T'Arrl^lZ. had nut vel b i ko llala Barawal 6,(100 Segistered In Bridgelown TOHIKJ is Ou urn day lor .ii.i.i ..I votcn on Furir ever, from Uw ollwi member, el enl "'•" %  lta inl1 "' t l and ihe s. rot..i\ inul ciren'ii. St. l-ucla and Berbedoi he uu grateful for thot help. Incorperaled I'liamlter". of •I woul.l like to ronBratulnte C „ mll „ rcr „f (he Brili-ll '"", ••" KrT lH 1^' Caribbean gS ftS vveiire a" a"rt A meellne of the Incerporaled S'^i^rffil^eSd^^ari^tottiMUiefJlu, ihit he did net think II .. ; !..,. ,'elrntee Irom Ihi. Chamber for enun-.er. \un of the I Ij 1 %  -* .< •. %  av*_ . . I, • /' •fKnnta. null I. tared, he Referring t,, the which quoted men House as having asked the G< So extend the tbTW lOT %  tors to carry out ihe aldad ri gtstratlon, Mr. kerritt t: n.;< .i. ai grant of $3M. ent picture. H-'-'i.i'l' ll thll the were Mr. H. A. C, Thomas and hi regards the Cirunla-Wem Mr. G. D. Bynoe. The fOUOWtl of the matMn were dealt with at the Segwell Airport reeling: ta> Federation rtfc British West Indk Ofli.e Dsmrall ghip passenger aecomi:: Mr Leacoek was again elected facUUlac between the IK and Pre*id-T.t of the Chamber. It is the hp baitlah C.irihbean Area. (C third year he will te holding the curtailment In the Canada-West office indi-i Trade, and (d> DifferetiMr. G H King was ejected ^^ |n freight rates to smallci Senior Vice-i'rosid.nt. Mr 7. N^ ^j,,..^.. 0 f the Caribbe-m Area. Rat Control %  u u i i .1 srament has not llnotl* to the public fi eofnVlbuUona or -ioiuitiona. As you know U Ln the Movement m Be I bados. All the administrative and lerlcal work Is done l vohU bul the time la i i woticei a H have to be emnloyi I. whilst it He thought the (Uy area rl| g f,,,,,, the 04*0084 '. H %  •• overed and was hoping lo be Artnual Fair that Ike Uuides in' mpleu 'v throiuth w'" %  Lecture For Drivers to met Iture tl e M %  n at ad oi flnand .i iuid <•<• aaaured <•! receevlnj by way of reguUi ana Income of $1,200 iitenf e %  %  %  Annual Contribution*. I feel certain thai when these facts are there will be nil 1 ih.: office bearers as the ucnuon 01 mcnwcis 01 -= ^p speakers will be Col R T. Barbados who wlU be pre* ihe Council of the Chamber for Chamber aiid ufge*llon a -, poBce, make eome annual eonthe year, were %  ubmiUed As a the..c.ntrol which had been obarate lists of members foodatufls by rats was drawn to ,, ( (1 2 n 7,h .h. .mr^ hearera as the 1 ttention of members of the l 1 %  iving a lectorifor aii d conductori of motor vehlclea i.-ridedto take .1 bal^ Uinco from the Director^ of Tranipor and ', lot on Wedne-i neat J tween Meii^-I Se^iees were circulated Au|omobll „ AMoctotlon and the extend its acUvttjea In the train10 am and 1 l"" to members. The Director also rhj .,, m .. n ... „„ -Bui Owners' '" f young girls in citizen*hip Mr A K Toppw prooosed *h" assistad by the free distribution If yuU are prepared to d" members of one list and Mr W H. 0 f r; u bolts and the loan of .' .. will you write or get into contact Grannum thl membeea of the. department. „.^.„ with the Treasurer. Mother. Barbados Automobile 20 FOR OVERLOADiNG 1 Those comprising Mr Toppln's A*ocialion A glM Hastings. hCnding her your first suggestion of the Chamimposed on Da fee dMIon Hall A* regards the Annual tons engaged in Road 1 firmed .. local for overloading the mot < Association. After M.18.10. Bpeet of necessary p:, P OUCCMI \ Central % %  %  %  %  .'. tinm. Small square tabUM now repOBCC th* long wooden tablaa thi wen used in ihe Mvsa Room. Chair* take the place of hencheg and the Mev* Room on is being decorated so that Policemen ran take their me.ils in com'ort. At present Pchcemeu get theii %  .-i .i,. Mterei ;r from their hornet. Verj "it.1 b> the time they get %  1 eat, the nv.t is cold and not anpataatng. fConsLiblc t. Id the Agvoeste thi %  wi anal %  u-u awaitinj the cecaston wh-n he %  is hot meal at any I %  C ONSTAB1.F HAKOl.U W1CKlt \>4 of Hie local P. lie Force left the ialand ^ the 3 B llonaiir 1 1. Tm ad I) (0 %  Will t.ike .1 all course m the running agement 1 1 Boj r" cluba n,ill .in Instructor*! course deal ttaiiiint. Coi<:ei H. T UKhelln, Comol Police, told Ihe Ad\aI %  %  -'. %  id 13 that uutit Club organisation m the island big that it necessitateWith :i-iriinn I,, tke change %  <"<' run lha 1 1 %  %  r lilieTna number 11 club i> an run from volyjiibutlona but nou thai ih, numblariei '<' % %  expanaes aalng The Commasslon* 1 1i1.1t the organisation *.vi did welcome any donations. Id be ami to the Se. rotai 1 ol the Boys' Qui ilt adqilltl'tCI s. A CAM. FIRE at River Plantation, si. Philip, on night burnt 13 ecree ol Hr-t and rop 1 Ipa i .no 1 1 iio) ..11 lha pfpper ta ol M. n a 00. Ltd "i wi n Inaured. Anothfi in. %  Coeerhr 1 Ian* tation. Chi 1st tne ante night burnt live %  I : Hi Inaured At Fairy Valley. Christ Church. six .ii KI J h.ilf ane. „t M-VOIHI ,ind third crop ripe canes, four and a half acres of llrt crop ratoon*. Ihrt %  and >i ii"" aerea of trash and one aero of sour grass were l urnl. They weninsured and bclong to Cslabun Bstatea Ltd. T HK FOLICF SPORTS will be in-hi at Keneuigton Oval at S.00 o'clock this evening. Apart %  regulai aventa there will be emuaing momenti PJch when lha O rtabli try to get over the %  TNI) iltde In the Obstacle Race. There will also be a S.( k Race and a race for Polleewoi I nptii-: cKttP BgAgON In the 1 1 igq 1 and CorMna dlatrtete of st Andrew bat come to afl 1 nd. in Tiieadjrj eveoJni il ibo d ;t M O'clock the motor lorry A 13H. all s Spent 01. can to oil the laat k* f oai these distiieis the CfOp lasted for three monthi A UIK.FR 1. (HIKING house is now being built in Belle* ptatne Bay, St. Andrew, it haa ttM "f a bungalow 1 ni eli ah n ami li it" Red Indian's shelti 1 II being built from UH B a ii 1mi,i.-iOtood Ihat the all Bared itii mud and tinroof of t 1 P ROOV SCALY ol Gltti 1 Oa] CuUoeV 1 B taken to the General Hoapltal on Tutaida> %  nd detained. Si :d. waa Involved In an accident with Ihe motor car M 772. owned and driven by Frank Young ri>iiuM*er waa taken to the 1 rg 1 l Hoapltal suffeVing from i.i' H %  %  ilnao An .,11 inalion w.is peifiuuie 1 and ii-iviei 1 at preaant in Wan' at. At about 11.20 a.in was going up a ladder in No. 3 hatch on board the ship. When Msoul 12 f.-.i up he i'ii Hi 1 *T-*m: FILM "Greet 1 a^ tions" will IH 1 -hown when Uw Combetmare School oin Boys' AaaocJatlori hold tin ii nionihly re %  ii 1 moermore -.. 1 hall .11 ii o'clock to-morrow %  Alter the Aim i' the I %  uy v.ill meet members o| tinI'-otb.ill dlvl lo I out ot old Combmnei uu 1 hi \dvwale was told that a BBBall DOllectlon will \xtaken to defray %  %  < j.l %  '. < %  .! %  I Ollll %  tlMIl V. itl. tig Ol the lllni A T I1ISTRK T "< COI R! lerday 28-year-old DarnI' uverii of 1 oil*" !( % %  ..( S' UMllp, appeared on a charge 0 l-> ani worfc at ti:. .: at the BrttU urj He arrived bicri by ihe caiiHibJe u iranatt for Antigua and a ata>'* HoteL Hilaid that his utuo-i Im; IM0, hi .1 11 aeral workera' uni .n with mamberehlp of aboul s.ouo ar 1 when he left home everythll | it.sf.Ktollh. .. ar, ihej k.-.. forxei %  1 .1 : % %  faa b %  %  Ii .ni wot ken and I Ilshed emploj c laereaae f"i ugai m 1 ki %  ould ii"" mean in %  He said tii.it ii union had a) U BU t.. tm. kvorkera aftei ll had t-t lahi 1 .!" as fn Like Other Mum'. A |k< d aboul condlta 1 Kittv be nud that KM t <-< about Ihe aame aa In at weal Indian island where the. •vaa bad housing, low a Ion atandard of living; Ho aald thai tin Laboui STel .IT.Pund COM is ihe hlgheat In %  %  • ffaal lodlaa. It is c 1 iier ion I wgar esportedj from tl 11.l lhey are using that numr. II hou Dtng chiefly In 1 orkai Their political art up advanced as Barbados', but the' %  • t in 1 ;., 1 1 iva here Thej are h \ In %  %  nitutlon changed uhl ...1 to provnie for ove n 1 wnTrage, the removal of .... catloni pi pert) and oth. %  %  i a i". tnemben hip to UK 10 Council and *i 1 •-• ill be -in IncreesM In Ihe num 1 n ol elected membera t" K>' them n clear working ma|orii 1 '" I-I ninent and nnrinated aide -t tinCouncQ. At 1 re ent, the Council 1 ooni prised of live e l ected and si nominated mcmlwr*. bur he an not In a position lo sav what Ih number will he when the chaflg over look place. The legislature he saul. aril bowevei eteet MHOC of [ta rtwr bora to serve 011 the I'•. %  ill Council Mtarin-i Afijmirn.fl In Death In<|iiir\ Furthei hastfuag in the Inquii Ih the ..11. in mg the death or ChrtstapcM i loodrldge "i Richmond Gap, s. Mic h a el w.is further adjournei until June 4 yesteiday. The Coronet waa Mi < 1 a/alwytii Acting Police Magli Irate or Dtatrtct "A". Ooediidge v^... admlUed 1 i>r. Bayley'i Hoapltal Beckli Road, mi April 211 but died ihei 00 April Tl Dr. A. s. t .ii., wh mad the ;i"-i ntorli %  %  1 tinbods wa Identified lo him by Chiiauphe raj 1 1 Richmond Qap, sMlehaeL Deatk had b 1 en phv about ten hour before, On examlnatloB of the bodi ti found that it v ... well nourial ad, bul under the bi.iin ther ...1. allghl iwelllni In his opinion death was dU to i n flam mat 1011 of the I. in CatO ulso said that he took pat "f the kidney. In, and ami them 1 the Govei 1 ii-nt Anaiyd fm examination He also said that MM of the kU ay eontalned .1 an all amen %  r 1 henopodlum oil. To a uni lion -< %  kei Ci rom 1 1 onoeraing the 1 han< pedium ml Dr. Cato told the jur ili.it tinol) could hardly hav cauaed tinInflammation of ih 1 .ni Sift Mar hall told the Com thai be '""k the I lot 1 to the Analyst. Mi /, Roblnpoo Acting <."^ ernment Analyst said that %  lived toe Coroner 1 ioc 0 April 2A from Sgt. ib' eKamlned Ihe oontenta of u .I ..11 quantlt) "f • henopodlu %  II fiom .. part of the kldne< %  %  %  • will be taken Iron Baybty on the neat hearln %  Hearing ot the .lugh M %  %  %  %  • • %  %  Hie IK lit 10 eouneel that ll %  whi.h i 1 %  %  illucidallons and Mr. Recce addressed || It length on the DOinta %  ii Hi* Honour aft' %  his Honour, after hearing -.nd that it better if vl taken in the ease since lie fell that the lid go to a hjgjl ind if aucb e\ idei a %  1 *aken, the htm lei %  In the Bill of elai 9 %  %  he propei %  erltk -rtiement with Hugh H 1 .1 ii. party about u %  1 1 talned tr< w ej 1:..., K intnietrii by M< 11 Cat rtngb .*. i. • 1 M Adama, inatructed I 1 \ (iuiiith are f"i Perej Beab Further hearing or the named until August 8. maand uags of hreaa flour arrived hen e\emng from C -... Pen SiiHwkit. was lie in.. it wai %  The Sunwhil baas of llvaafock and poultry feed; supplies o| %  and paint and 8.7 Ihe urounda of P:. Hill. If you '.ru^ Fair <,.iv. bul if net, Mia. Labor* v ill be happy i" arkm... •nd her. I! la %  Rood cause. %  ..'I. urgenl % %  iwedi rrt la lo proaper iri Ih ^e^as laAc il FROM US These l.ate MuleriuK will make Fxrellent Curtains FOR YOUR HOME ART SII.K & COTTON ". K-i .19'' wide in Hlne. Hose, I...I.I mid i I'er Ynnl 13" Hide in lllue. Kosr f and Oraata. Per Vnrd ALSO ritlNTKIi PLASTIC TABLE COVBSING 45" wide Pel Yard SI.T4 PLAIN PLASTIC in ehadn nl Oraefl, Blue and Pinl. 1.1" uidr. PIT \nrd . Sl.4"i CAM: SIIKPIIKRD & CO.. LTD. 10—11 BROAD STREET



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TIU'R-.|>i. \m II 1*51 i\i:n.\im< vi.v.* VII l-vj.i nun i I AM) WILL BE I \KI\ OVER I OR MARKET etnMy Tuesday passed a Resolution %  i nment. • %  vet of land CM Uriel by Hon Mrs Muriel Hanwhell. Th* Add that in accordance wnli the I Ml 5 of the Land AcquisiLCt, l<*49. the the Legislature is for the ..cquisitiun <>f an area of land at Ea&le Hall tor the purpose s,>l out in the Resolution. U.S. Workers Grt Large shun* Of NullOliul lid %  HimWASHINGTON, DC Lined cm%  %  much larger share oi idrnig the %  %  ..-. Wtl %  %  %  %  II I proposed lt iooa land is acquired by th. Q mem to Iggeg it I Vestry .1! .1 (. %  .1 1-1 kid oi .' 11 is the .mention of the I ment to p istrtet market.*, allowing thr Vestries to build. maintain and control them" V.. c* 1 as well Medical Officer had been UUMIV snjsaj -nig rites for : %  1 meat. % %  I %  A hoi raerabers would re%  other, %  111I1 we* pans ha inthe Vnury in.right to 1 the* B •• arere recem%  %  < .i ... Carrington*g Village, and 11 Milk Mario I %  i placea aowew r, had yet bcvii way of actual erection. that "I the wor ke rs. Tho first attempt was now being The lluntKHMfs Must 8*U To ItVlran DarwiiTfl Rout*? %  On the m D hegiannig of utv <* the %  %  .1 nave to ** %  > liorne, M* M pay death tfutSM nut global cruise thai will -night. *ea-route followed nv... t naturwill see .0. arcd JNUHIH %  The Earl .,.„.. %  %  8 A (ii %  nmiy mane* .... M U SNT. 14.000 .. have been ,t 1 ..red am%  I I will be km ,i which the geoeraphi<.ii rhi %  1 .1 ago i 1.000.000 I Hue son the Seventh Earl **td tn view ol .1 possible oil shortage, do you think we ( Mile mate in tho engtf 3 and lo&s on the cai I .I. . • PASSAGE PAYMENT GOES UP hlotxt 1 ra ttsfusion Centre O/wnwi In Marliniuiw • 10.6 per cent, i.f the national in %  %  %  The Ho A -.-I mbl resestitioB rebe pel** ..-klT"!,,''!^ Sfif? j %  ol pa>%  ajls 11..11 was one dolb "• ,m, r a : quays Eoai rim was ft 11 ment .is lieiug too exor' had thereffirv "A" SgS+m mii., km h* .. r .. .i,-.i r„, h n laung 10 in Dr. H. fjk Cmnmiiu (l.i Who t'h.k charai ol UM Resolution seM IIKU It toual %  %  %  iir(iiw|r |-i.-• -. -__ have .. neM.iiit.Qi, %  o' "" % %  ''""'• ^V ISO i %  Ible to 1 %  1 %  l! • Ilka the present the Bite, per cent, of the HV. tr.l (HMhUrd (f) MUd ir, bul 3.000.he iHi rcwi lasi linking an attempt . w 1 .i,,. iiruvuled hi aid have to Ininsumrlent. UM present form. 1 A. %  i iv ami should be u ... mt that < pal 1 %  '•-'. %  -i could 1 anch "i the Fran rhich will pta} iiu Pasteur Inetllute. \\ Jker*a V< a tion U&UBlllg t ma>iih"-'I HM T I..1 II.1I%  %  unue ID 1 %  antre cs K 1 Martuuqua t. I t 0.0-. %  1 .... ; about threui 01 loeaj For Thr Honour Of Britain who nets I 1..000 will .111 <>t I:. %  •OCW. \ %  erew, saw sfUl aa the ten%  -ire I n lUu I %  m i i^,. ipssre u> loktra Calva inlet .HI the < i wesset win bead %  1 1 Kin %  pautuiav* < 1 nniln tnrouj wsnil J ftiH'T 1" t-Ti.lt M. MarCOLL %  i.f UM Col I I %  %  rne Bnal imptenwnwtton f "ti H not ><-i %  Mr. A, R. S. I.rwis (L) mat the nnrt Impreaatoo of the ,, (sK „, lhl cll -n oixler t0 WhiCO the Hvsnlulio* kx -, (k Illlla T ,.. [ion*.*, ad the Oovernrn nt to pay that the present 1 l^-ss for Landlord The proportloii going to landThe land at Eagle Hall they all {!! %  1 km %  !,( anyone who really knew to 1 4 |>er cent. 0 m ••' land ill St. Michael ChVi would rem: m lollar %  souars foot was World Wi 11 and whlcn not too high tot Oovernraent to • I II m effect in "winy |f Knew that the land op|fc posits the site at Eagle Hall had wbethe hut bs noticed that It mcnl Minted for IB:O. 1 1 high %  n s last year, their part from BS per cent In 1929 to 8.1 %  rordmg i economists, that the dynamic brand c.f Amen. 'cnt from thoi 1 .mimunist Under Ih I %  tl* of blOIKl 1hal formed. Mtb Iteen sold i.1 one dollar 1 "" and twenb inaro foot. HospiUil. '" That would mve some mdfcatlon %  ub) be SM (or it the sftO for the market lUHda pel kg S merorth. rled couple, and Ua 1 sSowance for each child where Mrs. Ilanvchell Willing •„ %  .. swenstd hV hoped that some SUCb I 1 HansCnell tn only too would be adopted. Willing to sell this land at what He ubaerved too, that Wnce •lored a reasonable price, the new rate uilt bscone DOa II. believed thai the price was not erative ai from April I. ItWO; the pui up bv her but by people who (louse -hmild be given son\e id<> %  ?!" .'"7 !" 'Vh^e advised her end had a better of what toll back pay would nrntmlrt knowledge of real estate than she amount to. had „„.„. II,waidd raggl m.i h. Ml ,££Sd be l.rgOT and Urjer lh.rc. -'•"• ih.( ompuljory Acqiulhf.n Kllord. and C.BIUI Ac, had to bo used la .cqu.re this UM „,„,. ol vvlu.t, jhouMh... .,d nnd ninny people 10 whom lijiu.1 KM, fell wa* not exorbitant [. Jo ,„ lh r (iilU'i lilr IK-11 would gel lhi.1 ami ll man (ran many personi. wWlnl r,. land lie knew many 1 •" !CD I given tn It In tl -, : Metropolitan Lrranee. n%  He oi" not know II oa Veri ol during On of lbs l were affected or centre, it i 1 be made In NEW v< >RK tan i77ti. durl aUtUonar> a s r ajnarican Q ene r s 1 v was Psken n . He was wo ss aded Hi the arm I .1 month later in B .III p %  • %  %  %  I .., 1 tii' BIS ncal council btek said W.K.dhuii. I nii.ii.iii> LMUsh omeet rot u .... King VI vhen Mi eel liemI" 1 S.Pin.' %  hntish h %  111 thr United I fee .1 -ti-.ii. iew the Inserip-j snethlni '"' %  %  mistrntive Hi H] (Ing lnt< 1 ..!.! %  .. and can Oftlcer-. thai 1..) plasma bank : being .iniount -#oi to 'late by ioi enough ii < % %  da It is hoped. Will ll .,) //arbour Log IS CARUSE &AY • with tin hnce, • ill get Dt .1. .ii multarj honou iih r: onvineln WicMihuii reeerrs I W ound "while | pt.ll. % % %  Anl Sal 11 •• h ssUasj fi> Im :>li St'arrh I or \\ ilil Sugar (.'aiiis niv doubled As 1th* GovernMganisations travelling between %  %  PVorte Rico), ui I sporting ilxtures Mr. A. E. s. Lewis cL) said that or_other commitments. 1 si lie could not agree witn oovcm" %  faS S'lT" in tiiK period the UA nation ,, (lK the Act to seqiure %  UWIA, J' !" W tin* %  ., |.,nd "!'. %  u-hiio the 1 -. ... „ ._„,„„.„., :;*'.,':• 'i!:l .1-. 7,.%*4 1.1 I 1 %  HalUas. LONDON, May 2fl. lb with tt on. i\ Ml MI OH human ..i Inini. 11 Lea Angee uys thflin all. 1 d 1 aatily. 1 n 1 \ iw.i-vf AR-m.w ireai .1 name ii illi ill (l.'iinJIi lug in. .,: %  illli Kiinent %  Inii an %  sahm it .. drrorce I, ltul hi ,-i addsM 1 he 1 1 %  *" %  h J'can Mangoes %  %  (M.Mnnmnt had to be mended on attempting to acquire this land at a reasonable price Hi iK'lievod. however, that last nment purchased and under tin (Amipul 01 y Avt Under thi s arranrenient. %  .011. or delegations R ill tO -n relum ueketi fw the 1 la i.i %  pii 1 M' pvoi 1 T— MJ they eventually paid more for it naanberi and the return Journey Ui bai m v. %  (. %  M V MIKI. . Lo*,XI V 1 %  v S a Bnalri>. IJM i %  11 -. laj-AHi 1 Mliy II Uvtotl Brll I I •i%.. St IlKII IK-I %  ban they would have done otherI %  '•' l l " He .-.t.ui\iy hoped that on .Support. of rnems> wotudnot happen "', •''• *'' ,' L *"• During the diseueslon whk* fol%  llsclosed recentU bj UM ...... kfweti Mr. Mottley pointed out ffV !" %  ii vaa net correet to say the h;id no i been possible to acqii oust be spoil and booked through Ute D trip. %  1.'. %  produced an Item tu i aill t, y private treaty. He Oformed bg Mr. Herbert ,. : MessrsCerrii • .i mat Mrs. n.,ii ha 1 been la him and said : 1 beard ow word from mon the Oovernmenl or ih. iting %  v to sell u* si V.I.I I.8M %  Escape from fallen House % %  • %  %  no olhvT %  . Lo ins lari up to the mmerch 1 v .1 .assa* Ne 1 . %  ,.'. n ren ud 1 H ui ihe world "' %  1 ,.. : nd largely only by lib Ad %  %  ntt Hi." %  1 1 cam, JUNIOR COMPETITION %  ttg I vming Advocate Invites all Mr other Malt lev gkler 12 lo send Ir the subject of "CI.OKS" in The Lvriiiiii Adyo ,,.. 1 .-, %  to UM value I,,-,.. rnUSt %  %  'i Tke C'hUdreil'ti EdH.r, The Uverste <<• lid. I llv, aol la** than Wednesday every week. '..ni pant 11 i' foot, "i %  l G.\.M nt io be %  :." be said. RATES OF EXCHANGE ( VS IH. Shei ii DM I Sbi I shock ihe inether attributed I %  i' cans frot >'i kms injui > to the .hi me protection of tl Mai" sin. gri He wasnot objeeiipgio the Go% ..,,> 1 .1 oi tb' mmeni trying to bu. 1 etntni Vi „ M;il il which ihey thought the prtd t^ked was exorbilant. but it thev form. the. %  ,.. W(> W ill see ugder thi %  %  1 iitii ii %  iinciionof flsvoar HIGHLAND QUEEN SCOTCH WHISKY Sola Importasri .— W.S.HDNR0L KO.llD.BHlDUIOWN RARS90', Whiter Hh:i brighter coloured* — that's what you g.t with Rinso! Ui nch lather w>ak\ out Jin so thoroughly arvl oujckhj! SO gently loo' lor cjsicr, qUkfat washing. 11 I'm ' you'll It' thrilled wuh thfl wondcrtu rault> it g> vc ' RINSOforqll your wash! CamJ/a, eueGr. tfciiv II.I##. i###.*. "NOXZEMA" 1 %  Your I 1VOU prevent* SI MM i'N ,stin IrnUbonv Ni\/I \1 \ WccUedi .. lb i v • > %  %  fcuabum, NOX2I MA' %  (a (as Lmk M %  m rhrcf Si/es 1'J. r-' '" BOOKER'S (Barbados; DRUG STORES Ud-Broad Street and ALPHA PHARMACY. Hastings