Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


Harbadtos Advocate

eaten rane, ee eer tantra eons tn enter

ESTABLISHED 1895 THURSDAY, MAY. 24, 2851

a LT

-B.W.LS.A. WILL. NOT GO TO LONDON |

Communists On a |
° Commonwealth Producers
The Run Again | , HE BRITISH WEST INDIES Sugar Produc-

TOKYO, May 23. ee ers’ Association will not be represented on the
UNITED NATIONS FORCES on the Eastern| TREASURY | West Indian Goodwill Trade Commission which is
| due to visit the United Kingdom about the middle

CONSIDER of June on its way to Canada.

front to-night sealed the gap in their lines
The Hon. Harold Robinson tabled the follow-

= eee of the threatened massive Chinese
reakthrough into South Korea. At it

. es en $ SCHEME | ang draft statement at yesterday's meeting of the i

| Regional Economic Committee :— ;

end of the 120-mile front, counter-attacking South
Korean units were reported almost astride the 38th
: - » . The British West Indies Sug: They would be willing to wor!
parallel . At some points their patrols were believed For WwW. Indies Assseiutina have carefully tae together” with all ‘those polit
to have crossed into North Korea. sidered the majority decision of cians who might, at any time in
ik cated - the Regional Economic Commit- the future, come to talks specili-
tee, taken on 2Ist May to change cally dealing with sugar at the ;

———— = 1 The threat of a Communist
the Committee's previous de- same time that other ¢

breakthrough had hung over the
Ado t Bu et eastern sector for several days tes on ~
P while massed formations _ otf} cision and te send a delegation wealth countries wer:







PRICE; FIVE CENTS











* See



(From Our Owr Correspondent)
LONDON, May 23

No details are yet available

here of the scheme by which















Britain may make more , dollars 1 , M5 Wet
Chinese hurled themselves against| ivailable from her exchange pool aureeane on the ¢ anadian situ- the matter. : 4
B One Vote the sagging United Nations line in tor West Indies purchases from| ton before sending to Canada.) The B.W.1S.A., would give full
y , [the second phase of thelr spring Canada. The scheme which it was As the B.W.L8.4. informed | cooperation and help ‘and de
offensive. reported from. Ottawa yesterday the Regional Economic Commi!-| everything possible within the
PARIS, May 23. They drove a wedge into Allied is now under the ‘consideration| tee all Commonwealth Sugar| resources in matters of that sort 1
The French National Assembly | defences to a point 16 miles east- f the Treasury, is known to have| Producers are agreed that there|{n this particular instance hoi
to-night adopted by one vote the |southeast of Pungammi, but neat} the support of the Colonial Office should be no separate negotia- ever where a trade delegatk
new 1951 Budget Bill presented |Soksari they advanced into the ' vho have long been aware of the| ion with the U.K wr one going to discuss all aspect
by Government after its original] jaws of a giant Allied eineur| y ee West Indies’ feeling in the matter ment, The Association is eX-|of trade and obviously uh bal-
version failed ‘by five votes to}movement, | a ‘ SS ens at The final decision will rest with| tremely apprehensive that were! ance between imports and ex-
vain a second reading earlier} ‘The threat vanished as the! "HE SCENE as an infantryman dashes for cover as members of a unit of the 3rd Infantry Division the Treasury, but they will con-| the Association to appoint 4) ports and one thing and-another
to-day. jaws of the pincer began to close | are pinned down by enemy small arms fire “some Where in Korea” as the battle against Communist sult the Colonial Office and other representative to the above dele-| it must come very close to dis-
It took nearly three hours lO\threatening to trap the Com-j aggression continues. Ministries concerned before taking gation it should be interpreted cussing matters’ that ine
count the votes which were finally munists well south of their main} —-———-—-—"- nnn , Se action by the other Commonwealth P.W.LS.A should not diseuss and
announced as 182 for the Bill and } lines. 66 an ° e - s ry NET It is believed here that more Producers Associations as Neko! it would be impossible to con-
181 against. Popular Republicans,] Worn out in their efforts to asematt MACAR | 'HUR S ~ TRAIT |: GY details may beeome available} tating behind their backs The virions; othete “that they ned fot
inost Moderates and Gaullists|penetrate to the south, the L . when the present British delega- eras ee a done so ; :
abstained from voting. Wikbicers SAnaw-duirticd BPacice- E ey ene ss - tion under Mr. Bottomley, Sec-{ ¢4 that it would be most unwise ae we vf pe
i i tions to withdraw. ee: xhibition W OULD NOT END WAR retary for Overseas “inde. | for them at this stage to appoint th a wth ee a
This morning's setback was due} pit front line reports late f returns from trade talks in| Such a representative fer dis- ee es sake tad Tapiastyes
‘ eas s é : = § acts ake * action o
to the abstention of Socialists today indicated that they would Sa s Du dale Ottawa. They are due at London cussions in London in any was | io, seem: hid tual tvieraanaed she
ut an gas - 3 pain’ * tax be too late and that many woulc Ly : 8 4 WASHINGTON, May 23 Airport tomorrow night. Mr commected with sugar, Committee
religious se s certai ax a : : ; . . . : , Maint > : bee re ;
sean, ; be trapped in the ring of Allied} (From Our Own Correspondent) General Omar Bradley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs ee oe ee op lige Mr. Robinson said that when] Professor Beasley — enquired
. ” .o ie ae ne ae a ; a awe anada's e , ) 4 ns ‘ " + whe , “0 f “mE .
The new version omits this and |®™™our and infantry, aes Sas oon, 23. (| of Staff told the Senate Joint Committees to-day that the]jncrease trade with the B.W.1 the nae er aera a} whe - t Seog pe ae or
A v oo ae ee : r,’ John ugdale, Ministe vt . : : hal a ea : : ; 7 F ; : fas to ser é slegation at monwea Suga rodurers ss0-
went Parties ee lek ana Withdrawals State for Colonial Affairs, tides strategy PEA RORE d by General MacArthur would not . nd Officials here consider the Wes! ede de a purely consultative basi: ciation,
voted for during the past five] An Eighth Army Headquarters/attended a private view of al the Korean war, Testifyinigeat the inquiry into the dismissal ean have a strong claim for) tt was not to enter into any hego Exchange Of Opinion
months. - spokesman said tonight there| notable Exhibition of Traditionai | of MacArthur, Bradley said “General MacArthur thinks] && ditional dollars, but 1 under tiations but merely to act as a Hon. Harold Robinson sala that

The Bill was sent in a hurry} Were indications of a limited)Art from the colonies being that to do certain additional operations would be decisive stand the demands of othe) | goodwill mission, This now had]}there was not; there wag-only an

to the Senate as soon as theyChinese withdrawal along the/shown at the Imperial Institute! and we do not think they would be decisive.” By “we” he conaied lars” ot are * deen changed on some broaderjexchange of opinion throygh the

Assembly vote was known and the|entire Korean front. His state-| as part of the Festival of Britain meant himself? and the Chi@mmo? Stalt : coe a vefore any CONneessio! | otter West India @ommittee, THEY had

Assembly expects to be able to|ment was regarded as cautious Mr. Dugdale said, “This is al : roe . — ea : Not only would this Mission first agreed long before they came to
7 Rr aod for throughout the day Allied|fascinating exhibition.” It would,’ ” 5 Further discussions on the sub :



pass it on a second reading after

Republican Senator Owen go to England and be briefed on dthat Conference on a solidified
dinner. —Reuter,

{ ~
: " . ; 4 . : ‘ct are expected to be held wher 5s ‘
Commanders in all sectors had|enable people of this country, he 'B ; . ze J : he Cs 1 tte but they Pent for sugar negotiations with
le F Me ; 7) : | Brewster suggested that Senate . nglo-Ci j , the Canadian matter, y ; avec UN te
reported the enemy falling back|said, to learn something about We Students hearings had Citic eee Bie Coniiten nae See would generally moke trade nego- [he Commonwealth Countries ana
\"° the north, the artistic expression of the} | - . pidge: i

my tries tu > g re ac y oO " woth tiations and trade talks with the
; Chinese after suffering stagger-| people in the colonies. In ordey} _ “s .@ countries t mare positive actiony|month. This Committee, meetin
ype <9 ing losses began their withdrawal|to popularise art among colonial | / ay tri ec
‘O tce ‘0 in the west and centre, trying to] peoples,







hey must. give the impre



in the Korean situation twice yearly, keeps close watch British Government while there, not only in’ thelr heagte, | But uy
He said the United States hid]|on all West indian, Canadian an “When you are making general} ‘pearance to the world that they










the subject should, he jeng urged economic sanctions] United Kingdom trade deals trade talks and getting also at the | vere honouring that agreement
- ‘ A . ; ong § Si § als. M , re SK Jensley asked whethes
ia ig ay AS ea day eins bs "ta "teh Pig {From Qur Own Correspondent ugainst "Rarashuuniek China “but| It is also anticipated that a{ same time brn Cath Sarit ud t ee ntend d that ‘hoa aan
Mad Moor Say ithaiewatt econ th ‘ne cao Traditional art in ine Gnigi ies LONDON May 23. We did not achieve that in the|strong West Indian delegation ee to gues 4 : pose thy wu SP neoting of Commieesith
» ere tha: had ap a the|however, should be taught side| , Students at Mans Crescent, Lon«| United Nations until coincidentally understood to be arriving early a ak t ¥ Ga t ae it would be | ‘ugar - producers in -- London
PARIS, May 23 main weight of their offensive. by side with western art. A donis neaidentiol centve, run by {sith these hearings.” the. nae ‘nue Lo er MiMeult to avai any negotia horthy
i After “wunen-hunt-through-the! .Tonight’s Eighth Army com-| knowledge .about,art. could. nol, the Britian Siauall ase thygater- eres eid “Wel wxertainly we : ee aa tions at all.as regards sugar. oh Herve Haroleomestineony somnid
wild regions of the Atlas Moun-|™munique said that Alli troops/develop in tight compartments. yein'’s ° ad®@ progress’ iy the tast ‘six



eeks , gp jesscart 9 i that they did not know. Their
weeks, Now, what effect these Discussions’ Link tntetination at prewent’ Wee nme

: ° i :
hearings had on England and P . R d He said that the BWISA. a, 4
e here lcd be « neeting bu
France I would not venture to - ersia ea y with great reluctance had come jypee am noe nau whe 8

2 hey did not know when. He did
say.

B t It i y 1 T T to the perexpanrt in as eee not know whether they would be
rewster: “It is coincidental at oO ¢ k a Ov a ulay matter that genera rad® | meeting in October or when
any rate. It would a ¢ € r P

tains, police to-day arrested Mo-|0n the heels of the Communists The King and Queen will ‘visit
hammed Tademalit, the ‘mad{in the eastern sector were meet the Exhibition tomorrow; it will
Moor” who is alleged to have mur-|ing only light resistance be opened to the public on May
dered eight Europeans during the In their ‘six-day offensive,|25. Exhibits include rare ex-
last two weeks, a French News}Communists were estimated to amples of traditional colonial art

The Council has arranged that
the centre be vacated ¢ ntirely
for a fortnight in July and that
two-thirds of the students even-
tually make way for a_ fresh






Agency message from Rabat said have suffered well over 60,000}/—some never seen before in|batch of students arriving from seem they sud- discussions must be linked wit! They would have to meet, he
The message said Tademalit hao casualties, England. overseas for the academic year|denly changed what had hitherto TEHERAN, May 238 discussions relating to sugar mat [said before the end of the year to
made a “complete confession”, —Reuter. They are representative of}/commencing in October, The] been a firm resistance to economic! persia is ready to. take ove | ters and agreed that it would be \ discuss the price of sugar nex



A bloodstained banknote found West, Central and East Africa.| majority of the present students | *@pctions in London.” the Anglo-Lranian oil fields anc | very unwise for them to jeopa eal












the West Indies, Malaya and the ron “ : aNd Bradiey: “I w ay : “ » We i
on Sunday on a Moroccan trades- > . ts ‘Retin residence oppose the arrange- radiey: “I would not say it|installations “without furthe, | ise the position of the West In cs
man who admitted he had sold Deputies Met For a territories in South-East! ments and have not altered their we = oppepition to it; we just|delay.” The usually well in [ar allow any possible mise ppr ‘. aaron a eueeed whe hy
food to the killer, gave a clue to ; a a Klee i bas attitude despite the explanation|ad trouble getting them to ge] formed newspaper Kaisan saic|hension or wrong views to arise} tyey should fil tie pice of f
his whereabouts. ; Half Minute ‘eee om Dopittnent of tna] mat there is need for evacuation, | along with it.”"—Reuter, tonight that Kazam Hassibi | between sugar producers in th meee seein by a < a
A bearded blue-eyeti ex-soldier ae orf Se ghesn ohy assisted ini#iVen at a meeting this week Finanee Ministry representative] area and sugar producers in Aus ~ ene? o aecompt in
the “mad moor” was ‘hunted by PARIS, May 23. | the arranging of the ‘exhibition jbetween students and British on the Oil Nationalisation Boar | tralia and other Commonwealth [eer e On page %
12,000 police, Moroccan troops and Big Four Foreign Munisters'| .¢pjained to me: ‘The essential | Council officials. } RED DANGER eorine ee ae Lligai Santee ,
Foreign Legionaires.—Reuter. Deputies to-day had a sitting}ract which the visitor to this Thirty West Indian students . ine Minister Dr. «Mohame It was not only neeessary ti ie ami
which lastéd half a minute—their ibiti Rudde to -ecjate-.|are among those determined to 1-7 : Mosseadegh returned to his sanc for the B.W.LS.A., to stick to
: eds to appreciate-— g : t —- | ;
|apeak, yet. ey pip to rg ea to gorda the éxhibits stay at Hans Cresent. IN PERSIA bee = on oe aaa the letter of the law but that THE ‘ADVOCATE”
peak, the Western spokesman) oo inere curios—is that negro yuilding today after a secret sortk they should give every appear-
Vote $88,000 For "a D Andrei G k Africa and the other tribal ne Asked to-day what action the WASHINGTON, May 23. ment Dr F crak { ee ance of doing so. It would Were for NEWS
oviet Deputy Andrei Gromyko as ciate > British Council might take in the Chairms f the Joint Chiefs remier rr, Pauirni = rehusec t in the lon n, be to the ad-
: “hi represented mever underwent a & irman of the Joint Chiefs oi} ° , n the long run, | 1
Workers To U.S. Was = the Chair. He began the Shildeophical and scientific revo-jevent of students carrying out Staff, General Bradley testifying} 5#Y where Dr. Mosseddegh hac vantage of the West Indies, DIAL 3 1s |
39th Meeting by asking whether lution which has played such a (their threat, Mi. Hugh Paget,|today before the Joint Commit |%@en since Monday morning — whose interests they all wished Day or Night |
Cee rage Westers Deputle aid Sega large part in the moulding of Director of the Centre, repliec|tees Senate said: “There is dan-] Woy he had left his heavil to serve ace folds
stern Deputies sd Phe



GEORGETOWN, May 23. nothing to say. Gromyko: said he industrial civilization; and that|“I hope that on reflection resi-|8er of Russia’s moving into Irar guarded refuge













. iin } Ne wf : as genera velievec h
The Legislative Council Finance] had not either and adjourned the by chance of history, these colo- Sane wilt be reasonable and wil nee and starting another ean ‘eer naga —_ ee
Committee to-day approved a vote' meeting until to-morrow after- nial cultures developed in. direc eave Hans Cc scent on July 1574 8 ae f Giivita, tanidiies. naar ‘Teheran
of $88,000 for the recruitment of ; noon, tions more conducive to the)as requested. Whether or not that is any!py, Patimi described as ridicu
400 workers for U.S.A. farms The present deadlock is over growth of art. r re ‘i ‘ils more dangerous than Yugoslavie lous reports that the Prime Minis
The final ratification is expected] whether the Soviet item on the ac ert A erat ee, Pees ane re ae other ave ter was about to resign,
when the Council meets onjNorth Atlantic Treaty should bes veal eee aS. Sr aee yee sa sot prepared to say, bul —Reuter.
Friday. included in the Foreign Minis Lib l Wi Ss seas territories, recognise — ihe certainly it is a point of dangei
od : itnt vers iweralis ut eal British Council’s justification ir | and we would like to be in ;
This action followed the visit hoes siete ene thas ibe soni : treating Hans Crescent as pri-| better position to meet an} U S B f N su Pl [
of Dr, Claude Denbow, President) not include this item in their MELBOURNE, May 23. /marily for newcomers to the| further aggression, if it occurred. ». Dralt New an)
of the B.G. branch of the Coloured | agenda in any form. R. G. Menzies, of the Liberal country. Mr. Paget points out —Reuter. :
Peoples League, to the U.S.A, and —Reuter, | Country Party Coalition Govern-' that Hans Crescent is primarils By MICHAEL FRY. |
subsequent correspondence be- ment, has won an additional seat le gateway into the British com Bie Ra UNITED NATIONS, May 23
tween U.S. authorities and the in the Australian Senate, giving it tatty, canthe sbene Cotte y The United States has draftec
Jocal Government, culminating in “J a majority of four. : students would normally coms Parachutists May & plan for the creation of a naw
a conference between the Officer Governor Sees Voting for the line-up in (he poy one academit’ year”. Mr. Paget| gv ra ’ Disarmament Commission which |
administering the Government } new Parliament which will belincists that the newcomers have} GO Lo Middle East |WUld include atomic ener:
ond a Committee of the L.C.P. on Football Today opened on June 12 will be : House rtp strongest Bima ah eas ib J € armed forces and armament: |
Monday. ; of Representatives ; Liberal Coun- } - * daveb ce io + ates 4 . | a aca 2 and Internal Security Forces. |
, ic : -\try Party Government 69; Labour |#commodation — which ».Han Me IAMPSHIRE, May 23. |phe plan will be presented on|
will gent the ee Siteics. 51, non-voting members 2. Sen-|Crescent offers. It is learned tha Men of the 16th Independent) piday to the twelve nation }



almost 1,000 new students awe ex Parachute Brigade Group who

. > ‘ : Party 32 .

Barbados Footbali Test that takes| ate: Liberal Country Party 32, ea nei oad a were. hurriedly assembled hert
; ; . pected te rrive between Augu ¢ :

DYNAMITE STOLEN Pee my Heosington this ee. Labour 28.—Reuter, ond Sie . ee en Au ies Abed tus. “bogah to-deiy to go

United Nations Study Grouy com
posed of all members of — the
Security Couneil plus Canada



on a 72-hour leave before over-







(From Our Own Correspondent) teams at 4.45 p.m. | seas posting. —~Reuter, |
This mapiibthe sat teresceie wk he gore Coever follows; D DID NOT OBEY 23 | ‘ . ei Unofficial reports have sue |
maica:—Cooper, cel, a- oe 2 ‘ sested they would gc ) » Mid-
Fort James discovered that the Costa, Bayliss, ler, Parchment,| A Syrian Military épokesman | Glubb I asha Shot ite Mee leaned tittle Excharige Notes
arsenal had been broken open and | MeLean, Berry, Sasso, Miret, Hall.|today accused Israel of _ failing ;

TEL A-VIV, May 23 interests in Persia There was



12 cases of dynamite stolen. There Barbados: Cozier, Bright, Grant,| to carry out fully the Security, phe
was a similar occurrence a year|# Yutchinson, Cadogan, Gittens.| Council Resolution _ instructing
ago and the dynamite was never] Lucas, Drayton, Wilkes, R. St. C.j] her to stop draining Huleh Marsn
traced, Hutchinson, Chase on the Syrian border. —Reuter.

LONDON, May 28 } A ¥rederick Starke Dress Shaw attracts afl the leading fashion buyers and beauty

{ he United States and editresnes. Inthe long, gracious salem, with ite deep, tarurions Version carpets

Bi area ‘ “he { " | and beautiful Jacobean furniture, the guceta assemble and cocklaile are served,
; France have exchanged diploma- | Fach model known the must lack her beet. Bagla eyes will take in detail,
Arab Legion had been shot at and day that their destinations would] tic notes on the admission of Tur- not ondy of her dress uf make-up and hair, too. That's why Jutia Daniell,

de tu h
wounded by an Arab in the Jor-| be announced later this week key und Greece to the Atlantic lovely Frederick Starke model, always uses an Addis Beauty Brus

Jerusalem Post yeported| "9 official confirmation of such |
. 1 ¢ jan ¢ —Reuter, Pact, a Foreign Office spokesman
SECOND GOAL owe | é LOVELY YOUNG MANNEQUIN Julia Daniell says t
'

to-day that General Lu Glubb! Teports. :
Pasha, British Commander of the| A War Office spokesman said to-






The Jerusalem Post’s special said here to-day,

correspondent’s report which wa The matter bed also been dike For vada “A how - Y 's
| pin Ee cusséd in a Seandinavian capital, | brus
shot was fired after Emir Tala ‘Chevalier In Catiada but the spokesman did/not amplify | ‘ y
the eldest son of King Abdulla, | 4 t .. | this. the
had been sworn in ag Regent. cs TORON TO, May 23. The British Cabinet which dis- | e
Emir, heir-apparet to thx Maurice Chevalier, the French} cussed the question yesterday, was | Sleek-haired, blue-eyed Julia Daniell, top-
Throne, had taken over from his ®@tertainer who has been barrcd| more disposed to the two nation: rank model for Frederick Starke, of 31
father who has gone to Turkey |!0â„¢ entering the United States,| than hitherto, it was understood Bruton Street, knows the value of her
on a three weeks’ visit. The inci- arrived here to-day for a two-day —Reuter Addis Beauty Weush! “The Addis deep
dent was alleged to ha®e occurred | ®™84gement. ———~ brushing teebnique certainly leaves my
on Tuesday of last week and thc hair looking its best,” she says,
2 atest) x “IT have no pylities”, he told re- , . “a i .
report added that Glubb was ines , : e vert \nd Addis is tine for hair health, too.
confined to his house for the| Porters I am a Frenchman first rr st Atom Ex} It gives the sealp massage that’s so im-
week, and an @otertainer second portant. And at the salon, where every
detail of hair and make-up has to be right
I know my baie is looking its best,”

—Reuter. Chevalier has been barred from
| the United States because he hint-

The Addis Beauty Brush is speciall,

designed for deep brashing. Wight widely



|

not confirmed here, stated th

»





|
|



President Peron ordered :
trian scientist Donald Richter tc |
be placed under arrest, the news
paper Tribuna Da Imprensa re-
ported here to-day. Richter was |

Jed that the Soviet backed the
| Stockholm Peace Petition

{ “Millions of other people have
{signed it and I signed it in good

Two Die In Crash

spaced rows of tufts sweep through yeor
hair tight to the sealp, leaving it really silky















8 oa bike ae ripwith
TOKYO, May 23. faith.” he said.—Reuter. thea ee, yi ny ee cs lime ben that it'll look ita beat,” aod bustrots An about the Addis Manat
The 5th Air Force to-day reé | sponse r . a new method of pro | that eye Sc ics
ported the deaths in a plane cra ducing atom enersy , Dry Goods Store
of two outstandin; pilots Walter ONLY THIRTY-NINE , —Reuter. ,
Selenger and Colonel Leland of i tee
Holiand NEW YORK, May 23 ‘ s ®
Selenger flew over 2,000 hour The C gie Hall i rented EVACUATE BRITONS | 3 f
in jets—more than any other air-|last ni MacArthur ral); NICOSIA CYPRUS, May 23, | Von M1 13
force pilot but only 39 people turned ur A British Overseas Airwié | , ees
eland fi 63 Con nd nt The t MacArthi Com-! Corporation plane landed here " Y
He fl 67. miseio ee" spot of the to-day on its way from the Persi your owt bes awe BEAUTY BRUSH
I that 0 idan to Londor There Ad brushes deeper
THE JAMAICA tried op t econd cored aga side as it came ene Comb co match y ust
off his own full net Tr Jam are ig to co the ertor i —Reuter -Reuter Reuter woo. Sold separately





PAGE TWO





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

———

Caub Calling

EXCELLENCY the Gov-
will formally cpen the

HH:

nor

Empire Week Exhibition at Com-
bermere School this morning at
10 o'clock.

Qn display in the school hall

are entries of a great number of
Schools for the Project Compe-
titions for which handsome prizes
are offered. This year the Seniors

have also been drawn in by the
re-institution of the Essay Com-
petition

The exhibition will remain
open. until Saturday afternoon.

Civil Engineering
R. MAURICE A. ROCHE-
FORD, son of MrecandMrs

ftocheford of Black, Rock,
has passed in Economics, Higher
Natural Philosophy and Geolog:
and Minerology at Glassow Uni
versity .

Mr.

4
AG

Rocheford has just com
pleted the Third Year of the
Course for his B.Se. in Civil
Engineering.

Mr. Roecheford won a scholar- |

ship from the Barbados Govern-j ;

ment to attend the University.

Leaving Today i

1SS ISABEL LENAGAN,
daughter of Major and Mrs.
Detiis Lenagen of “Dona Zoyla”,

Gott Club Road, is due to leave
for..Canada to-day by T.C.A.
Her destination is Montreal.

Also expected to leave this
moruing for Canada are Capt,
and Mrs. Darragh Phelan.

Gomes Leaves Tomorrow
He ALBERT GOMES, Trini-

dad’s Minister for Labour,
Commerce and Industry, is due to
return to Trinidad tomorrow after
attending the Regional Economic
Committee meeting here. Leaving
by the same plane will be Mr.
and, Mrs, Charles Newbold. They
have been-spending a short holi-
day in Barbados with Mr. and
Mrs. Rex Stollmeyer who are at
present here

Mr. Newbold and Mrs. Stoll-
meyer are brother and _ sis-
ter Mr Newbold is Lega!

Adviser to the East African High
Commission and is on long leave.
They will be continuing their
holiday in Trinidad,

Official Representative

R. F, A. BISHOP, Cuntrolier

of Supplies, flies to Canada
today by T.C.A. as an official re-
presentative of the Government or
Barbados, in connection with tie
talks in Canada about the token
import scheme.



CROSSWORD



ACTOSS

1, One way to make the miser seem

‘different. (9)

7 Shrub that produces the teast
ore, (8)

9 Oxide of silicon. (6)

10. Valuabie in age, my tad, (3)

11 Pools return it shipshape. (5)

13. The Frene: follow to spoon. (3)

15 The fall c.mes later. (5)

16."Cove 1 get mixed up with. (5)

l# Experimental, (9)

20 On guard inter of course, (5)

21. The revurn of .K, (3)

22. Money given away on Thursday

iy Holy Week. (fi)
Down








i

























{ Lt. JOSEPH KNIGHT.
Old Combermerian

T. JOSEPH D. KNIGHT, son
of Mrs. Edith Knight of
Martindales Road and the late
Mr. Knight, although not a
Barbadian, came here as @
youngster and left soon after the
last war started when he went to
the U.S.

Joseph was educated at Com-
bermere School and was a mem-
ber of the Ist Barbados Sea
Scouts’ troop.

He enlisted in December 1942.
Hie holds five battlestars won
during duty as an Operations
N.C.O. with the First U.S
Army. He received his commis-
sion in November 1950.

Formerly with the 7744 ETU in
Wurzburg, (Germany) he has
just assumed duties as Adminis-
trative Officer of the same unit on
Heidelberg, (Germany) Military
Post.

School In the Deanery

OYS at the King’s
Canterbury, will soon be
working in the home of the Red
Dean, Dr. Hewlett Johnson. The



;



Rupert is puzzled by what thi

man has said, ‘* Surely there can't
be a way through these tunnels,”
he murmurs. is strange com-

anion only smiles and, leading him
tack part of the way, tells him to
be quick. So the little bear goes
-arefully through the rough passages

books or stationery.

library on the first floor of the







B.B.C.. Radio
Programme

THURSDAY, 24 May, 1951.

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT at 4.9
FRANCES LANGFORD — RALPH EDWARDS
in “BEAT THE BAND’
and GENE KRUPA and His Band.

PHILIP TERRY













Deanery is to be one of their *% *&m—12 15 pm 19 60 M papeileninp npr es - -
classr Ss ” en ne niet ainetecastaieealt MATINEES: FRIDAY & SATURDAY at 5 P.M.
classrooms. c . 6.30 a.m. Sports Diary; 6 45 a m. Sport- FRIDAY TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 6.30
This means no inconvenience to ing Pecord; 7 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m. NORL, COWARD'S
the Dean or his wife. They have News Ana}ysis; 7.15 a.m. Programme “THE ASTONISHED HEART”
not used this library since before Parade; 7.20 a.m. From the Editorials: Starring; NOEL COWARD — CELIA JOHNSON
Y ' &
the war. The schoolboys will use 7 30 a m. Generally Speaking; 7 45 a.m
a side entrance Land and Livestock; 815 am _ Listen- =
ers’ Choice; ee a.m. Daioy Richards;
84 am ngineering Achievements
The 77-year-old Dean should be 9 09 am The N : ’ SSLLSEEEOELOPPPCOPO OTF)
+ ews: 910 a.m H LLCO OOOO
used to children around the house. News From Britain;: 9 15 . eo Close 7s "
Since he married ¢)jain in 1938 his Down; 11.15 a.m, Programme Parade; s 7
second wife has borne him two 11 25 am _ Listeners’ Choice; 11 45 a.m G L oO BE THEA TR E
=

School, .



Rupert and the Ice-flower—34

JUNIOR COMPETITION

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to send in
a humorous essay, story or poem on the subject of “CLOCKS”.
The best entry will be published every Monday in The Evening Advo-
cate, and the winner will receive a prize to the value of 7/6 in either
Entries must reach The Children's Editor
Advocate Co., Ltd., City, not later than Wednesday every week,

inica delegate at

daughters, now aged 10 and seven
They attend the local elementary
school.

R.E.C. Delegates

ON. H. D, SHILLINGFORD,
Dominica planter and Dom-
the Regional
Economic Committee meeting, re-
turns to Dominica today by B.G,

Mr. Alistair MacLeod-Smith,
Grenada Adviser attending the
same meeting, leaves to-day for
Grenada by B.W.I.A. He is accom-
panied by his wife,

Mr. F. LL. Walcott, General
Secretary of the Barbados Work-
ers’ Union flies to Grenada by the
same plane today to investigate the
work of the Trades Union in that
Colony. He returns to Barbados on
Tuesday.

Off to Grenada

R, ARNOLD CHATOOR,

Trinidad solicitor and Mr
Deoraj Samaroo, Trinidad busi-
nessman, who have been holiday-
ing in Barbados since May 11th,
leave this morning for Grenada by
B.W.LA, They expect to be back
in Trinidad by the end of the
month,

Member of Trade Mission
R. ERIC P. KEELY, Assistant
Secretary of the Ministry of

Food, a member of the U.K, Trade

Mission to the W.I., is due to leave

for the U.K. via Canada this

morning by T.C.A.

Leaving by the same plane is

Mr. W. A. Morris of the Colonial

Office.

Airways.

Incidental Intelligence
‘WF your efforts are criticised—
you must have done something
worth talking about—New York
Journal American,
—L.E.S.



Wy




A ED
and over the piled-up bracken and
behind the frozen waterfall. The
sledge is still where he left i amd
soon he is dragging it into the «ave.
“7 wish new why the man
wams me to bring it here when my
home's in the other direction,’’ he
thinks,



¢

}

, The

2 Carpet material, (8)
Say tha Nee ein as na NOTE: Stories must not be copied,
B. (ibe Send this coupon with your story.
person ee me te?
is nothing e
ithout an artist, (3) JUNIOR COMPETITION
air away from PNM cide vd heh aie SULCT Ne'y diane e ane aes piebee lee wise °
ne 18. (6) PAB ash Swe aya Vole his Wated ACER eee chs ts ee
ie Dee, (6)
She Ey acs Hep he ) cee HL RRA SER RAED TL Ee ROR
i yesterday s puszle. —Across; Home Address ................5+: Peer e cere esene .
B® Over. 4. Earth: 31, Novel
id t 18, Ugiy
Bains Sag eh a baba eeenivew yes ere eeeseveens . Ce eeeeeeeeeeecens .
Down i sing, 3. Revolt 4, Ore
10. eter Ta. eats Geet Form jeerule RaRney vas os bres ‘nsw ak ORE WE wie iee
Drnamo “¢ Evil 84 Tey 24 Arm:
OLB LAP ALLLPLLLBDEPLP LPB LDL PDP PBPLBPDBDVVPPDPLPP PPP DAP,
. +
‘ :
x Ny
‘ Gut ‘
x x
s x
x / 8
ys
x . §
9 :
g and.so does every woman! ! %
. ’ ¥
% Therefore try the famous ... . 3
$$ 3
3s ' ~ x
$ CAMELIA SANITARY %
S x
is s
8 NAPKINS $
%
> $
% St. Andrew Mills Products ANDREX TOILET PAPER 3
Ss,
8 are especially suitable for ANDREX FACIAL TISSUES x
& 4 z ~
x those with delicate skins. STANEX PAPER HANDKERCHIEFS %
a .
‘ Exira soft ai t %
§ oft and absorbent, SAMARITAN TOILET PAPER :
Mi hygienic end soluble. % 5
® v. .
% Obtairiable at all leading stores. x
COLLEEN OLOE KL ELOPLDLL LLB EVAL LALLLLARRALM AS

BREE eee ee ee eee,
"White Duchess Satin
White Slipper Satin

- White Sharkskin

Black Crepe-

a
Er
ea
at Men's Hats

DIAL 4606

e
@
m
Â¥
4

36”
46”
46"
back Satin 36”

YOUR SHOE STORES

$1.95
2.40 4.00 8.12

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

a
$3.02
3.70
4.03
2.58

DIAL 4220 {
BD



Special Dispatch; 12 00 noon The News;

12 10 pm News Analysis; 1215 pm TO-DAY at 5 & 8:15 P.M, LAST SHOWS
115645 pom 19 76M dad
4" pm Variety Ahoy; 445 pm ss WILD HARVEST

Montmartre Players; 5 00 p m Composer

of the Week; 515 pm _ Scottish Maga- ALAN LADD — DOROTHY LAMOUR









zine; 5 45 pm ‘Pipes and Drums: 6.00] &

p.m. BBC Scottish Orchestra; 6.45. pm % LLOYD NOLAN — ROBERT PRESTON

Programme Parade x eee

7 11.00 p.m . 25 58 M. 44.32M

baci enon opi | TO-MORROW

ae . p ~ ow aaa 7 Oe m News|? AN’
nalysis; 5pm e See Britain; 7 45 " WN

pm Génerally Speaking; 800 ‘pm, g LETTER SROM AN UNKNO WOM

Radio Newsreel; 815 pm The Adven- %

tures of P.C. 49; 845 pm_ Interlude; YOO PEEELS SLL POSSESS PPPS SSS

855 p m_ From the Editorials; 9 00 p m
Special Dispatch; 915 p m. Have a Go;
9 45 p.m. Do You Remember; 10 p.m. The
News; 10.10 p.m. Interlude; 10.15 p.m



is of ou a New Judgement on
Rudyard ipling; 10.45 p.m. Life in RR W
Britain; 11 p.m. From the Third TO-MO 0

Programme
C.B.C, PROGRAMME
THURSDAY, MAY 2%, 1051
10 00-—10 15 p.m —News; 10 15—10.30
pm -—This Week in Canada
11.76 Mes 25.51 M.
FRIDAY, May 25, 1951
6.20 a.m.—12 15 pm 19 Go M



REE OES




OPENING GLOBE






UNIVERSAL- INTERNATIONAL
presents

JOAN FONTAINE

Jn Her Greatest Portrayal

~ LOUIS JOURDAN



6 30 a.m. Take it From Here; 7 00 a m
The News; 7 10 a4 m_ News Analysis; 7.15
am Programme Parade; 7)20 am
From the Editorials; 7 30 a m. Generally
Speaking; 8 00 am Southern Serenade
Orchestra; 8 20 am Festival of Britain

i "The Paradine Case
BBC’ Exhibition; 8 45 a m What Are We Romantic New Star of ‘The Paradi



Like; 900 am The News; 910 am
Home News From Britain; 915 a.m
Close Down; 1115 a m Programme Par-

ade; 11 25 am _ Listeners’ Choice; 11.45
am World Affairs; 1200 noon The
News; 12 10 pm News Analysis; 12 15]

pm, Close Down,

415-645 p.m 1976 M



415 pm Jazz Music; 4.45 pm Sport-
ng Record; 5 00 p m Composers of the
Week; 5 20 p m Light Music; 6 00 p.m





Merchant Navy Programme; 615 p m
Generally Speaking; 645 pm Pro-
gramme Parade; 700 p.m The News;

710p m News Analysis; 715 pm West
Indian Diary; 745 pm Think on These
Things; 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m
English Magazine; 8 45 pm _ Interlude;
855 p.m_ From the Editorials; 9 00 p m +
World Affairs; 915 p m Festival of Bri-
tain; 9 30 pm Ted Heath; 10 00 pm

The News: 1010 p m_ Interlude; 10 15
pm The Spur of the Moment: 10.30 p.m

Pavilion Players; 10 45 p m The Debate
Continucs; 1100 pm _ Ring up the Cur-
tain





;

A RAMPART
PRODUCTION

PLUS
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

—_—_—_—__
C.B.C, PROGRAMME
FRIDAY. MAY 25, 1951
10 00—10.15 p.m.—News; 10 15—
p m —Canadian Chronicle
1L.76 Mes 25.51 M.

Baby’s Life Saved
By Hiccups Machine

By CHAPMAN PINCHER

THE lives of 25 babies, who
could not start breathing when
they were born, have been saved
by an ingenious machine devel-
oped by two London scientists.

One of the babies was thought
to be dead. But after 45 minutes’ [/7
treatment with the machine he
began to breathe normally.

The machine works by giving
electric shocks to the nerves and
causing hiccups.

A silver disc is placeq on the
baby’s neck. Shocks fed into this
disc stimulate the phrenic nerve;
which makes fhe floor of the
chest jerk up and down,

Dr. K. W. Cross and Mr. P. W.
Roberts, of St. Mary’s Hospital,
W., developed the machine, which
is described in the British Medical

NORTON MOORE
SEER ENGSY | WE MURA so 5 53-0 cop hc ve wo vgs tice tae
“SUGAR RAY” GODDARD
DOUGLAS GRIFFITH

“Bring Back My Bonnie To Me”
“Our Very Own”
“Tf” (The Singing Pugilist)
“Why Do I Weep”

10 30



IVOR HADMAN
WINSTON RUDDER

ant To Be Loved”
“Accentuate The Positive”
GUEST STARS
JOE CLEMENDORE (Contortionist)
WILLIE IFFILL (New Singing Discovery)
PRICES :
Pit 20 — House 36 — Balcony 48 — Box 60
TICKETS on Sale DAILY and FRIDAY NITE









JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Lower Broad Street Upstairs Over Newsam’s

BATHING SUITS

LADIES’

SATIN LASTEX with Straps also Strapless—One piece styles





Journal. —LES. and Two piece styles ...............eceeeees from $11.88
COTTON—Two piece ................ pakibsale eg $ 8.07

, i i PAPUA SCN te eke EaVERL A Css 3440s Com eke eye from $ 7.62

PLAZA OISTIN NRMP hs PU DTD Pe RTE Tei k td kal ihe RRS ER NIOS . $12.19

THURSDAY 24th 10 a.m,



| N D | A N From. 1 to 4 Years 05.56 eicciccccccccscsececes from $1.69
SPUN ae OO Ns oh oo 654.4 e040 5. bain anle Sie cinets bad from $2.54
rom 8 40: 12 YORre: cc csaveccciscccsvicvegeas from $3.35

FILM!

ELAN (i.e) DECLARATION

Don’t miss this grand thrill
with Musie & Dances

ADMISSION :
1/6 & 1/— for Non Indians



1 year size
2 year size
3 year size











ATTENTION !!
FACTORY MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining youx requirements
IN

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE

Ranging from %” upwards

MILD STEEL

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes -
BOLTS & NUTS—AIl Sizes

FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill
At PRICES that cannot be repeated.



The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.

White Park Road, St. Michael
DIAL 4528

Beautify
your

Rooms!!



FOR YOUR WINDOWS—kKirsch Curtain Tubing and
Fittings
Orlwite Aluminum Curtain Tubing
FOR YOUR FLOORS—Congoleum Squares
Rugs
A Wide Range from which you may select your
requirements.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON FACTORY LYD.
} Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039

————SeS FE







OSD OOS SCC CCS 9S POSSESS















—S
—S

——————_—_——



THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951





COOCCS OSS OS

| PLAZA

ASTOR THEATRE

THURSDAY TO SATURDAY
“HALL’S OF MONTEZUMA”
“PITTSBURGH” and “GREEN HELL.”
Special Matinee TO-DAY 4.30 :

“STAGE TO TUCSON

”



Sunday :







THEATRE --

(piaL 2312.9 PLAZA ssrmcerow,
, TO-DAY (only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
. + ”
‘ TEA For TWO
Color by Technicolor
alk os Gordon MacRAE—Doris DAY
30, * * p.m
it jal To-day 9.20 & 1,30
"KO. Radios. , Spe DEVIL'S CARGO” SATURDAY

MCON OVER

BORN TO 8E BAD MONTANA (MONOGRAM)
Joan FONTAINE— Jimmy Wakely REVENGE OF THE
Robert RYAN—Zachary SCOTT ZOMBIES

John CARRADINE &
“MARKED TRAILS”
Hoot Gibson

GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James
Last Show Tonite 8.30
Adventures of
KITTY O'DAY & VIOLENCE
To-day (Bank) 4.30 p.m
“JOE PALOOKA CHAMP”
Leon ERROL &
“MILLION DOLLAR KID”
Leo GORCEY
Friday to Sun. 830. Mat. Sun. 5 p.m
Bob HOPE in “FANCY PANTS” &
Wm. Holden in
STREETS OF LAREDO
MIDNITE SAT. 26TH
“FACE OF MARBEL”
“VALLEY OF FEAR"

Plus Latest, This is America
Series
“TRADING POST”



OISTIN
Dial 8404

Last Two Shows To-day 5 & 8.30 p.m.
DEAR WIFE & RAINBOW ISLAND
Wm. Holden . Dorothy Lamour

To-day 1.30 p.m. Monograms Double
SONG OF THE WASTELANDS | |
Jimmy Wakeley |
“LOUSIANA” Jimme DAVIS |
Friday to Sun. 5 & 8.30 p.m. |
(Warner)
James Cagney in WHITE HEAT
IT’S ACTION ALL THE WAY!
Also “CARIBBEAN”
MIDNITE SAT. 26TH
“PRISON MUTINY” :&
“WEST OF ALAMO”

| sis

&











Did you smile
into your
mirror today?

MAKE THIS
PEPSODENT MjRROR
TEST







Were your teeth
as white as hers ?



your mirror—take 9
good look at your
teeth,









When you use Pepsodent your mirror
will show you a smile to be proud of !
A smile that shows sparkling white
teeth! For Pepsodent contains Irium,
wonderful ingredient which dissolves



NEXT — Clean your teeth
with Pepsodent. Do this,
morning and evening,
for a week.





dull film and ugly stains, uncovers
the natural brilliance of your smile!






THE TOOTHPASTE
WITH IRIUM*










THEN — Smile iato your
mirror again. You'll see how
a week of Pepsodent makes
your teeth whiter — your
smile simply dazzling.










*
Irium is the registered trade mark of
Pepsodent Ltd., for a special soluble in-
gredient that gives greater clzaning power,












XPD 23-302-50

PLASTIC ma
OIL CLOTH

CONGOLEUM
SQUARES

mn THE CORNER STORE

$66.65666660600%
POOP OS PSG FPF PSSTO












9.30 a.m. & 1,30.p.m |


















&
+
%
s
8
s
%
e
‘

s

>





THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951

Briiain Must
Free Colonies

OTTAWA. May 22.
Informed sources said on Tues-
day Canada suggested that Brit-
ain’s colonies might earn more
dollars if Britain freeq them from
the long-term supply commit-
ments, and allowed them to sell
more goods to Canadian buyers.
The suggestion was made as
trade officials from both coun-
tries completéq the second day of
their discussions in the fifth ses-
sion of the Canada-United King-
dom conference continuing under
their Trade Committee.
High ranking officials are ex-
ploring the means by which trade
between the two countries could



be increased, thus providing
Britain with more dollars with
which to buy Canadian goods.

Dollars earned by Britain’s colon-
ies are transferred to the com-
mon exchange pool which is con-
trolled by Britain, the Canadian
officials pointed out.

Informants said Canada would
like to buy copra to make coconut
oil from Australia and the Fiji
Islands, and peanuts or ground-
nuts from Nigeria. These are two



relatively unimportant items: yet
Canadian imports totalled
$13,000,000 last year. Barred from
Commonwealth source tied up

in a long term contract’s supply
to Britain, Canada ventured into
the higher priced non-Common-
wealth market purchasing about
$5,000,090 worth of copra from
the Philippines and _ about
$8,000,000 worth of peanuts from

the United States, Mexico and
other non-Commonwealth areas.
—(CP)

> .
Fortune Hunting
Yee .
Still Going On
MONTEVIDEO, May 23.
Digging for the “Cardinal's
fortune” in a cemetery here
entered thé third day to-day with
the Church reported to be taking
unusual interest in the outcome.
The fortune, said to be worth
$2,000,000 in gold and jewels, was
allegedly buried a century ago on
the edge of the national Pantheon

in which remains Artigas and
other Uruguayan heroes are
entombed .

According to a 45 - year - old
Italian woman, Claudia Maggil-
jatti, they were hidden there by
her grandfather Carlo Odescalchi,
Rishop of Sabina who was given
Gardinal’s hat by Pope Leo
Twelfth but resigned it in Novem-
ber 1838 and came to Uruguay.
According to unconfirmed reports
if the fortune is found the Church
may claim it for the Vatican.

—Reuter.

SHIP ABANDONED
TRANS-JORDANIA, May 23.
The 7,240-ton Greek steamer

Nicolaou Georgios on fire in the
Red Sea has been abandoned by
her crew, Lloyds reported in
London ‘to-day. The crew of 35
were picked up by United States
tanker Montebeo Hills. according
to Lloyds report from Port Sudan
—Reuter.

Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield, Sch, Marea Henrietta,
Sch rion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Cyril E






Smith, Sch. Franklyn D.R,, Sch, D’Or-
tac, Sch Philip H Davidson, Sch,
Laudalpha, M V_ Blue Star, M V. Cara-

Everdene, Sch Lucille M
Mary M_ Lewis
ARRIVALS
Schooner Enterprise 5., 63
Capt Dixon, from St Lucia
Schooner W L_ Eunicia, 38 tons net,

Capt. Joseph, from Dominica.
DEPARTURES
Schooner Sunshine R., 25. tons
Capt. Barnes, for British Guiana,
Schooner Fi ces W Smith, 74 tons
net, Capf. Hassell, for British Guiana
MV T B Radar, 116 tons net, Capt
Mitchell, for St, Lucia
Schooner Eastern Eel, 35 tons net, Capt.

cas, Sch
Smith, Sch

tons net,

net,





Joseph, for Grenada
M V_ Cacique de) Caribe, 162 tons net,
Capt. Archibald, for St. Lucia

Red Riding Hood
Outsmarts the Wolf!

one bright, sunny day a little girl called
xed Riding Hood went to visit her
grandmother » ho lived ina small house
in a big dark forest, She was singing
happily as she skipped along . . .

WE WISH TO

THAT

ist JUNE TO MO
1951,
FOR

ANNUAL ST

ECKSTEIN

BAY STREET

PLP LALA LAA AAA LALLA LA AAA
SLOSS IGEN INOS R OST ON TE COLT,

Ly aerrenecenerrnpbrohnnteenrene pth





CUSTOMERS

PARTS DEPARTMENT
WILL BE CLOSED FROM FRIDAY,

BOTH DAYS



DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING (0.,
LTD.

FESTIVAL OF BRITA

THE scene across the River Thames of the South Bank Festival of Britain Exhibition, showing the
Shot Tower, the Festival Skylon, with the Houses of Parliament and Big Ben behind.

~ Distribution



Rainfall
Uneven In April

THE AVERAGE total rainfall for the Island for the
month of April was well above the average.
tion was very uneven; certain areas experienced heavy falls
on the Ist., 2nd. and 2lst.,






This distribu-

with frequent light showers

between these dates, while others received little or no rain
during the first half of the month; well distributed rains fell

on the 20th. and 27th.

According to rainfall returns
received from 45 Stations typical
of the various rainfall categories
of the Island, the average total
rainfall for the month was 6.53
inches. The average total fall
for April, 1950, was 1.17 inches;
the average total for April for
the past 100 years was 2.28 inches.

The highest total fall for April,
1951, at any of these stations
was 11.88 inches, recorded at a
station in the parish of Si.
Thomas and the lowest was 3.66
inches measured at a station in
the parish of St. Lucy.

Sugar Cane

The harvesting of the old cane
crop was continued during the
month; field yields have remained
high, and juice quality fairly
satisfactorily. According to re-
turns received from the various
factories in the Island, the crop
is now estimated at the equiva-
lent of 179,000 tons of sugar.

The young cane crop made good
growth during the month, and is
very green and vigorous in ap-
pearance. In some areas, the ap-
plication of potash to the ratoons
has been started.

Food Crops

Several fields of sweet pota-
toes were harvested during the
month, and the market supply of
ground provisions in general was
satisfactory. Market garden crops
such as tomatoes, cabbages,
French beans, etc. were in fair
supply.

Cotton

In accordance with Section 3
(1) of the Mosaic Disease (Erad-
ication) Act, 1943-22, 34 returns

SOLD ICED FISH
ALONG STREETS

Seon Whitehouse of Chapman
Lane, St. Michael, was fined 30
to be paid in one month or one
month’s imprisonment by a City
Police Magistrate for selling iced
fish in the streets,

The offence was committed on
April 24, Inspector Cumberbatch
told the Court that Whitehouse
was warned on several occasions
about selling iced fish,



But a big bad wolfsaw Red Riding Hood

and ran. to the grandmother's. cottage.
When Red Riding Hood arrived, he
unced on her and cried, “Aha! Now
*m going to eat you up!”

ADVISE OUR

OUR

NDAY 4th JUNE

INCLUSIVE,
OUR

OCK-TAKING

BROTHERS

See cren}

CHECK THAT

$
3
DIAL 4269 %
%
4,

were received from estates, and
no infected holes. reported.

The Cotton Close Season and
Okra Close Season Posters were
posted up throughout the Island,
as well as at the yarious Police
Stations during the month, The

reaping of the cotton crop was
completed and fields were being
cleared in accordance with the

provisions of the Cotton Diseases
Prevention Act. Inspection of
these fields continues.

The search for wild cotton trees
was continued.

Owners and occupiers of land
who are desirous of planting
cotton in July, 1951, are asked to
make an early application for the
supply of seéd.

Peasant Agriculture

Cultivators, wherever possible,
took the advantage of the excel-
lent weather conditions which pre-
vailed during the month to begin
planting of food crops. Moist con-
ditions made hand cultivation
relatively easy, and such crops as
corn and garden vegetables were
planted. Some peasants, however,
owing to difficulty in getting la-
bour to reap their canes, were be-
hind hand in preparing their land
for the planting of food crops.
Towards the end of the month,
large tomatoes were in excellent
supply and prices had dropped
from 36 cents to 20 cents per
pound. Yams and sweet potatoes
continued to be easily available.

Sugar Cane

Peasants continue to report
satisfactory yields of cane, The
progress. of the crop has been

hampered to some extent by the
rains, but more so by shortage of

labour, The young plant and
ratoon canes are making very

good growth, Some growers were
able to apply muriate of potash
during the month

Cotton

Yields generally have not been
satisfactory. Long before the end
of April when the growing sea-
son ended, a large number of cot-
ton cultivators had begun to dis-
pose of all plant residues and pre-
pare their land for feod crops.



| LANDMARKS



Coconuts and bananas
goed supply
market. Other crops
ving the month included pawpaws]|
and limes. It
breadfruit will soon appear on the
market in
and mango trees are tiowering and
setting fruit satisfactorily

The main
tacking peasants’ crop were slug
the cabbage
scale insects.
cultural
advocate suitablé methods of.con-
trol. One disease which is becom-
ing widespread in its incidence, is
black rot in cabbage, Growers of
the crop are becoming alive to the
importance
crop rotation as a means of check-
ing the spread of this infection.

Succulent
green cane tops, was easily avail-
able throughout the month. Some
peasants, however, complained of
difficulty
animal teed and oats.

The
structors visited 651 peasant hold-
ings
April.
growing on
topworked with
desirable
Julie,

The reaping of canes at
gitts
month, At all other stations reap-
ing of this crop is proceeding sat-
isfactorily. Muriate of potash has
been applied to all the young plant
canes and is being applied to the
ratoons as fast as they
back. In the case of the four Sta-
tions under irrigation, ag applica-
tion of sulphate of ammonia has
also been given, A well planned
catch-cropping
“Jerusalem” has already begun to
pay dividends in the way of good
returns early crop of
cabbage grown under irrigation.

Animal Husbandry

There were 122 head of livestock
on the Stations at the end of April,
These comprised stud animals,

cattle,
equines, Five hundred and twenty~
seven gallons of milk were pro-
duced and 1
breeding.

Stud
Stations were as follows:— bulls
129, bucks
83, making a total of 306 for the
month.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



|
|

|

a
AA

CQ b>44 >a
BEFFAFFAFZ

Tree Crops

were 10
Bridgetown

available du-|

in the

is expected that!

large quantities. Pear

Gs

Pests and Diseases
pests reported at-



white butterfly and
The Peasant Agri-
Instructors continue to

BAEFASE



of practising proper

Peasant Livestock
fodder, including

in obtaining balanced

Extension Work
Peasant Agricultural

oe
PAPA AA FS

In-

and 11 school gardens in
Fourteen mango seedlings
peasant plots were
scions of more
varieties, mainly the

Crop Husbandry

Hag-

was eompleted during the

are cut

programme at

from an

goats, sheep, pigs and

young pig sold for

services paid for at the

58, rams 36 and boars

7

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PAGE FOUR



24, 1951

Thursday,

May



UNITY IN THE
COMMONWEALTH

IT was a day of mourning yesterday: of
mourning for newly won West Indian
unity.

The British West Indies’ Sugar Associa-
tion announced their intention of with-
drawing from the delegation to London.
The position was fully explained by the
Chairman, Mr. Robinson,

A political delegation was going to the
United Kingdom to have trade talks with
the United Kingdom. Sugar would have
to be discussed. It was impossible for the
British West Indian Sugar Association to
go back on its word, to other Common-
wealth producers.

West Indian Governments, said Mr.
Gomes on Monday, were 100% behind the
British West Indies’ Sugar Association.
There was no wedge in West Indian unity.

Today there is not only a wedge in West
Indian unity. There is a wedge in Com-
monwealth unity.

The delegation to Canada would not have
discussed sugar contracts with Canada.
How could it since the West Indies, in the
words of Sir George Seel, do not exist in-
ternationally. They could only have
listened to Canadian views on general
Canada-West Indies trade. They would
have visited Canada while trade liberaliza-
tion talks were going on and would have
read in the Canadian Press, the points of
view of Canadians with regard to Canada-
West Indies trade. Since Canada buys so
much West Indian sugar, there could be no
possible excuse for other Commonwealth
countries objecting to the presence of West
Indians in Canada, especially as it is well
known that Canada buys West Indian
sugar through the United Kingdom and
does not negotiate direct with the West
Indies.

But the visit of a high-level political
delegation to the United Kingdom is in
quite a different category. The West Indies
are in a position to negotiate direct with
the United Kingdom, since the United
Kingdom controls the West Indies and is
responsible for them.

“It is quite possible that, should the Brit-
ish West Indian Sugar Association accom-
pany the high-level political delegation to
London that the rest of the Commonwealth
sugar producers (of whom Australia is only
one) should be suspicious of West Indian
intentions with regard to sugar allocations
in the United Kingdom market.

Just as Mr. Adams regrettably expressed
the opinion that Australia’s actions in their
last dealings with the United Kingdom
were not based on West Indian interests,
so the rest of the Commonwealth politi-
cians might take this unfortunate view as
a line for them to follow during the com-
ing London-West Indies trade talks. But
as Mr. Robinson consistently explained
the West Indies would benefit from the
support of the Commonwealth politicians
no less than from the Commonwealth sugar
producers. And it seems poor tribute to
the integrity of the United Kingdom to
suggest that in its position as trustee for
the dependent West Indian territories, she
would permit Commonwealth politicians to
browbeat the United Kingdom to concede
benefits to them at the expense of the West
Indies.

Mr. Robinson has taken his stand on
Commonwealth unity. The West Indian
Governments have said in the words of its
spokesnian that they are 100% behind the
British West Indies’ Sugar Association. Mr.
Robinson has pleaded for the integrity of
the West Indian word: has pleaded for
Commonwealth unity. What else could be
have done?

If the West Indies are going to be sus-
picious of the motives of other Common-
wealth countries, and if their politicians
are going to be suspicious of an organisa-
tion which has done so much to promote
the interests of the West Indies the greater
cause of Commonwealth unity is at stake.
There must be an end to suspicion and dis-
trust. If the West Indian politicians feel
that “they are reflecting West Indian
desires in going to the United Kingdom at
this time there can be no opposition to their
going} although the wisdom of their de-
cision can be challenged.

But it is illogical to state that the Chair-
man of the British West Indian Sugar
Association is indispensable to a Trade
Mission to London and at the same meet-
ing to suggest the existence of ulterior
motives in the natural desires of that
Association to learn as much as possible
about the Canadian attitude to trade with
the West Indies.

The cause of West Indian unity has not
been well served by the politicians.

|

|

Ee a

LONDON.
Winston Churchill took a chance

quite recently of explaining his
view — the Conservative Party's
view — of the big events in the
world, _China, the Korean war

our alfiance with the United
States; |— he used the debate on
trade with China to put the policy
of what we may soon be calling
the new British Government.

Winston Churchill is back to his
old standard of wit and stamina
and vitality. At 76, he probably
has to reach some sort of compro-
mise with the vigorous 18-hour
day he used to practise during the
war. It is often said that oratory
is out of place in the House ot
Commons. That is more than
true — it is an understatement.
Speaking in the House of Com-
mons is really a branch in the art
of conversation. The easiest fault
is to overstate a case with rhetori-
cal flourish. Churchill has none of
the flourishes though his phrases
are full of life, full of original
adjectives.

He began by stating that in
November 1949 he was in favour
of the recognition of Communist
China, “provided that it was de
facto and not de jure.” He made
a plummy, pompous sound of the
two Latin legal phrases. Serious
it was, but he managed to poke a
little fun at the pedants:— “or as
it would probably be called among
the old school tie brigade of the
party opposite ‘di yuri'”. That
raised a little laugh. And then
Churchill added the real thema
of the whole speech that was to
follow. He upproved of recogni-
tion “provided that it could be
brought about-as a joint policy
ef the United States and the
Dominions.” 8

Why Not China

We recognised the Soviet Union,
end Communist Poland, so why
not recognise China. “One has
to recognise and deal with all
sorts of things in this world as
they come along.” This was said
in the youngest possible, school-
boyish, cheekiest manner — so
disarming. It also gained a laugh
as it was obviousty a reference to
the arrival of the Socialist Gov-
ernment in 1945.

On that basis he condemned the
course of British policy in the Far
East. Of the Pekin Government
he said, “They did not even re-
cognise us.” And the United
States were much offended. The
substance of the whole speech was
that Britain could not afford tq
offend the United States. “After
ell, the United States are doing
nineteen-twentieths of the work,
and suffering losses of 50 and 60
to one compared to us.” This is
a very unpopular line of talk
with the Labour Left. And that
was what it was meant to be. As
Churchill said waving his hand
casually towards the wild men
who sat as, far away from Mr.
Attlee as possible, “that is where
the weather comes from.” What
he was trying to do was to stimu-
late some of the Left Wing critics
of the United States into inter-
ruptions, It must be said he only
half succeeded, They know they
can really interrupt him without
a crushing retort. But Winston
Churchill was obviously enjoying
himself, as well as outlining a
serious policy. His advice to the
government was “so to act as .to
prove beyond all doubt or question
that we are good and faithiul
comrades of the American
democracy and will stand with
them, whatever may happen as

brothers in arms,”
At The End
But that was at the end of the
speech. Before that he had

defying him for it, “we cannot
managed to say, without anyone
watch and listen to them — the
Labour dissidents below the gang-
way — without deriving the im-
pression that their sympathies





By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

are, cn the whole, more with Red

China than with the United
States.” Winston Churchill did
not, of course, deny that the

Labour Government itself assent-
ed to the branding of Red China
as the agc-:3sor. What he was
doing was drawing a thin red line
between the Government and
what once before he called “the
Silvermen” — Sydney Silverman,
Julius Silverman, Tom Driberg,
and others. On the great prob-
iems, Winston Churchill does not
change his mind. He still thinks
that American ascendency in the
atomic bomb is the only deterrent
to the advance of the Red Army
across Europe. We are getting
stronger, he argued, but that does
not mean we are getting safer.
“It is only when we are strong
enough that safety is achieved;
and the period of the most acute
danger might well arrive just be-

fore we are strong enough”. This
is a complicated idea — and a
very important one. Winston

Churchill put it to the House of
Commons in just that manner of
explanatory simplicity that
gained him such fame during the
war whether he spoke to
Parliament or to a radio audience.
He paused to underline it.
Not Quiet

He does not keep still when he
is speaking. At the despatch box,
he is first on one foot, then on the

other. His hands moved with
explanatory, not rhetorical ges-
tures. But the real vitality is in

his face. Few men of his age can
call on such a variety of expres-
sions; usually, age sets a states-
man in a certain mould — noble,



it may be, haughty sometimes, in-
different, often, Winston Churchill
can change his age at will; and he
can taunt in one instant, and
warn in the next, and play a
verbal prank the minute after. So
there was a dead pause while he
underlined this great danger we
might face before we are strong
enough. “I hope that may be
pondered upon because it is a very
potent and relevant fact.”

Few actors could read those
words to make them sound better
than a politiciam’s platitude.

Danger

But Churchill managed it, and
then his voice rose to a real em-
phasis; “Our great danger now is
in pursuing a policy of girding the
United States and giving them
the impression that they are left
ito do all the work, while we pull
at their coat tails and read them
moral lessons in statecraft about
the love we all ought to have for
China.” “Girding” is just a
Churchillian word—it is the sort
of word that carries its meaning
in its sound and. can make a
speech just by itself. Are we gird-
ing at the United States? Winston
Churchill then bowed to the
House of Commons metaphori-
cally and apologised for taking so
much of its time on great matters
when of course M.P.’s wanted to
discuss how many tongs of rubber
or how many gallons of oil had
gone to China. It is just this sort
of touch that wins him. every
battle in the House of Commons.
Of course M.P.’s wanted to hear
Churchill and they would rather
hear him on important matters
than on trivial ones. In this case
he seemed to be laying down the
principles of his own foreign
policy for the future government.
Winston Churchill would, of

BARBADOS ADVOCATE


























course, be Prime Minister, but that
would hardly prevent him from
guiding foreign policy. His pres-
ent vitality, with four years still
before his eightieth birthday,
points to the chances of another
period when British policy and
Churchill's policy would be count-
ed the same thing.
Overruled

He overruled his wartime For-
eign Secretary, Anthony Eden,
who igs now Deputy Leader ana
heir apparent of the Conservative
Party. The story goes that
with cruelty, asked Tony, “Do
you remember, how old was Mr
Gladstone when he formed his
last administration?” Mr. Glad-
stone was 84; and if the precedent
is to be followed, that leaves some
weary years of waiting for An-
thony Eden.

I make no apology for devoting
all of this week's article to one
speech by Winston Churchill. To
complete the story of that speech
there are two more phrases in i
to tell of. Both illustrate the rea:
Churchill—still with a youn
streak in him, still enjoying the
struggle for power, and still en-
tirely lacking in pomposity.

He was just saying that we ir
Britain are bitterly divided anc
absorbed in party strife. He wa:
going to add that we are kep
month after month waiting for
news of a General Election, /
Labour Member with a_ stron;
Lancashire accent interruptec
him—‘So is America,” he callec
out. “Quite true,” said Churchill
then paused, looked round, . hi:
eyes twinkled, he grinned, anc
added, “But they have at any rat
a fixed date for their elections.’
You must admit that that is nic
candour !

Figures

And then there was an inciden
a little later on when Winstm
Churchill had come round to dis-
cussing the actual] figures of trad
with Hong Kong. He was makin;
a complicated case, based on thi
forty-six thousand tons of rubber
in. three months, that have come
to China from Singapore. Ray
mond Blackburn got up and in-
terrupted. Now Raymond Black-
burn was a Labour M.P., he “de-
serted” Socialism and is now ai
independent. He sits on the Tor)
side of the House of Common:
and his independence is that kinc
of independence. He is a young
vigorous, opinionated and argu
mentative fellow. He is the mos

active at denouncing Labour:
softness with Communism in
China. I would go further anc

say, (and I hope Mr. Blackburt
will not regard this as an insult)
that he is potentially the Senato
Macarthy of Westminster. This
Raymond Balckburn interrupte:
cheerfully. “Would the’ Righ
Honourable Gentleman forgive me
for one moment?” he asked. Mr.
(Churchill looked round to his left,
a litthe surprised at youth inter-
rupting experience from that quar-
ter of the compass. I thought we
‘were on the same side of the line,”
said Churchill, waving his hands a
little impatiently and sitting down,
as the convention is, to allow an
interrupter to have his word. What
Raymond Blackburn had to offer
‘was additional ammunition for
Churchill's argument. Once he got
back to the argument, Churchill
sounded a little good-humouredly
impatient of being tripped up by
his own friend an¢~dmirer, while
he was in full course in chase of
a trade statistic,

Much more can be said of the
debate; but what we have written
is of Churchill, his style and his
delivery, his policy and his air of
confidence that it is a policy that
will soon be the Government's. In
this debate he asked for rubber
bupplies to China to be ended
completely. The Government has
decided to terminate the delivery
of all supplies of rubber to China.



Canadians Obtai in

OTTAWA, May.

Canada is buying from the
United States war materials that
are on the “secret list”, despite
én American law which prohibits
sale of such material to foreign
countries,

It was disclosed in the public
accounts committee of the House
of Commons here that this is
achieved by an arrangement be-
tween Ottawa and Washington,
under which the U.S. government
orders such materials in its own
name and then turns them over
to Canada,

This is the reason that Canada
does not deal directly with Amer-
ican manufacturers in placing
millions of dollars worth of de-
fence orders, explained the deputy
defence minister, C. M. Drury.

One thing on the “secret list” in
Canada is the sort of gun the
Royal Canadian Air Force will,
use to arm the F86E “Sabre” jet
fighter, an American type high-

Weapons

speed fighter plane which is start-
ing to roll off mass-production
assembly lines at a Canadian plant
in Montreal,

Canada may herself manufac-
ture the guns for this fighter, he
said. But when a member of
Parliament asked what type gun
the Sabre plane would use, Drury
who was a brigadier in the last
war, said the defence department
is not talking publicly about air
armament,

Naval Guns Too
_ Canada is already manufactur-
ing naval guns. But the manu-
facture of guns for planes would
take Canada into a new field in
peacetime,

Mr. Drury said Canadian pro-
cuction of the Sabre fighter
compared ‘very favourably” with
the time taken for related
production in other countries. The
production schedule would have



OUR READERS SAY:

The Rights To The African

Of South Africa
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—After paying two visits to
South Africa one in 1946, and the
cther one early this year, they
have prompted me to write to you
at this time.

I have asked myself many times
why there should be so much
racial disharmony in South Africa
and, after mature consideration, 1
have come to the conclusion that
there is no excuse at all for this
state of affairs. This is supposed
to be a christian-like world and,
most of the governments are pro-
posedly democratic.

If these two suppositions are
correct, then it is the bounden
duty of each and every one t4
work for the happiness and pros-
perity of all sections, African,
Coloured, non-European and
European.

Why should the African be told
that he shall be a “hewer of wood
and drawer of water” all his days ?
The African is a part of our popu-
lation, a large part especially the
Qutus of South Africa and, there
are many of high intelligence and

ability. Shall the door of progress
be closed to them ?

_1if the Europeans of the Union of
South Africa have pledged them-

selves to cultivate such dis-
harmony among the Africans
who are the rightful owners of
Africa, what are the principles of
the U.N.O.?

Can anyone tell me why the
African should not be allowed to
lead a life free from fear of op-
pressions and restrictions ?

Now, as regards the coloured
community — whose rights are
now in great jeopardy, a com-
munity numbering about one
million people, why should these
pecple lose those democratic
rights they have enjoyed for al-
most a century ?

This is unchristian and unde-
mocratic, I ask myself where is
South Africa heading for ?

Fear seems to be the basic fact
that engenders racial strife, but
were we true christian and demo-
cratic government, perfect love
would cast out all fear and, we
should write for the highest good
of all irrespective of colour, race
or creed.

In conclusion by Stevan I quote,
“Just as we feel the need for air
enly when we are choking and,
feel the desperate struggle for our

lungs when we lack this most
indispensable element of our
existence, so, only now when we
see our freedom threatened do we

**Seeret”’

keen even more: accelerated if
component parts could have been
obtained faster from the United
States,

It was disclosed recently that
in dollar values, about $175,000 of
the total $400,000 cost of each of
these planes is represented by
engines and other components im-
ported from the United States
While the Canadian version closely
approximates the American
however, the Canadian-built plane
uses a Canadian-built “Orenda”
engine.

Defence headquarters also dis-
closed that it is borrowing 100 or
so Harvard training planes from
the United States air force for
use ih the plan to train airme:
for her Atlantic pact allies. More
than 150 airmen from overseas
now are training in Canada, which
has undertaken to train 1,100 each
year in a modified form of the
great Commonwealth air training
plan which turned out 131,000
fiiers in the last war.

begin to be aware that democracy
has always been essential to our
moral and spiritual existence and
that it alone makes possible the
dignity and freedom of man.”

ERIC W. BROWNE,
“Ebje”,

Culloden Rd.
22.5.51

Guava Jelly
To Tre Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—A correspondent writes
from Bournemouth “In the
local shops one can buy Barbados
Guava jelly at 1s. 3d. per pound,
The taste is pleasant but for some
reason the jelly we tried was al-
most liquid.”

My cook, who makes excellent
and firm guava jelly, tells me that
when guava jelly is not “boiled
high enough” it is apt to be
liquid; and that a small amount
of alum used in the boiling will
help to make and keep it firm.

It seems important that our at-
tempt at establishing markets for
cur local produce should be at-
tended with every precaution
against the commodity not being
up to standard. Furthermore, no
erticle for sale should be shipped
without a brand mark or the name
of the manufacturer,

Yours truly,

E.M.S.

FESTIVAL

(By PATRICK KIRWAN)

SEVILLE,

WITH all due respect to Mr. Herbert Mor-
rison and his planners and publicists (not to
mention the bull-dozers) it is really an easy
matter to run a festival. Each spring, for
centuries, the citizens of Seville have held
a festival that is famous all over Europe. It
‘s held not to prove anything or even to sell
anything; but simply because the solemnities
of Lent are past, the air is fragrant with
the scent of orange blossom, and the roses
re blooming in the Garden of the Alcazar.
t is held because spring has come to Seville
ond its citizens feel like enjoying themselves.

A' THOUSAND MASTS

There is an open space traversed by boule-
ards. It is about as far from Seville Cathe-
tral as Green Park is from Westminster. The
‘ycal corporation moved into the open space.

1 less than a week an area larger than the
sattersea site had been strung with 135,000
ulbs, 55,000 gleaming white and golden lan-
cerns. :

A thousand venetian masts garlanded with
yur or five miles of close-knit olive and
1yrtle had been set up with bunting, flags
nd huge gleaming butterflies, seemingly in-
umerable, at their peaks.
Noble illuminated archways gave vistas to
venues of palms, eucalyptus, lime and lilac;
1 the open spaces between them sprang up
) vast marquees for use as public restaur-
iats and bars; and over 300 “Casetas”—gaily
wiped pavilions, of varying size, for private
use,

ENTER THE GIPSIES

At the week’s end the corporation moved
out and the citizens of Seville moved in—to
lecorate their pavilions, which they rent
(families, “futbol” clubs and get-togethers of
every kind) at the cost of a few shillings a
nead, thus clearing the municipality’s initial
expenses.

There is no planning. No busybodies dic-
tate what form the decorations should take.
The citizens simply set to work with paint,
paper, pictures, tables, chairs and floorboards
for the dancing platform.

The result is something to take the breath
away — ariot of colour and fantasy that rele-
gates Cecil B. de Mille to the “B” picture
category.

Then with the bars well stocked with
sherry, brandy, sausages, olives, almonds,
Spanish hams, cheese and the. world’s most





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delectable prawns, Seville is ready for its];

festival. The girls—of all ages from three to
thrice-times 30 — change into the gay, full-
skirted “Gitanas” and put flowers in their
hair. There is a premonitory clicking of
castanets, a staccato tap of heels and the
strumming of guitars. Already the gipsies
are flocking in with bright eyes and eager
out stretched palms.

FIVE CIRCUSES

Near by is the fairground—with five cir-
cuses, the dodg’ems, almond paste and fried
octopus : all the fun of the fair.

Now, after just a few days and at no cost
to the public purse, the festival can begin,
prompt to the minute.

Seville is ready to forget its troubles for a

while, to rejoice and welcome its guests. Not
that visitors are sought. Indeed, the local
paper rather deplores the festival’s growing
popularity in the outside world, fearing com-
mercialisation; but none the less the tourists
dock in from all quarters, with cameras, cars
and desirable currencies. Women visitors
nave to be rather careful though. A notice
in the cathedral gives biblical warning that
those immodestly dressed—that is, in short
skirts or with plunging necklines, “will be
driven out of the temple.”

DANCING GIRLS

There are bullfights, concerts and exhibi-
tions galore. No Arts Councils arrange any
of them, but all of them thrive, none the less.

Now the proud horsemen of Spain ride in
from the wide grasslands on their high-step-
ving thoroughbreds, cantering between the
2asetas in their ornate leather shaps, scarlet-
sashed waists and tight short jackets. Their
senoritas, resplendent in flamencos filmy with
lace, cling behind them like fabulous orchids.

Cavalcade after cavalcade canters by, inter-
spersed with smart gigs and shiny coaches,
mule-drawn, horse-drawn, even ass-drawn;
but all fantastically caparisoned and with
bright jingling bells. In them drive clusters
of the loveliest girls in the world.

Every caseta has its complement of lovely
girls, dancing. the “Sevillanas,” swaying with
graceful, undulating hands to clicking fingers
and the strange sad voices of the singers.
Each caseta vies with the next in spectacle
and hospitality. The spectators watch with
rapt faces, clapping the rhythm of the dance
and uttering full-throated “Oles” when some
measure is executed with particular skill.

LIGHTS, LAUGHTER

The myriad lights, the colourful casetas,
the vivid costumes, the laughter and constant
strangely stirring music make the visitor feel
as though he had wandered into some dream-

like ballet-cum-opera-cum-musical comedy
with, literally, a cast of thousands.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S.



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EMPIRE DAY

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THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951



B.W.LS.A.
GO TO

From page 1

It was felt by some members
of the committee that an agricul-
turalist should be sent. It was
further suggested that a member
of the Primary Producers’ Fedeva-
tion be sent.

An Underestimation

Hon. Albert Gomes felt that the
Delegation shculd remain as. it
was. He thought it was an under-
estimation of the delegation to
think that they could not put the
ease for agricultural produce of
the West Indies.

Mr. Clegg said it was regrettable
that sugar, the -princip?! product
of the West Indies, wou*i not be
represented. It seemed a waste
of time to send the delegation
withcut a representative of
B.W.LS.A.

Hon. D. B. Sangster thought that
even at that stage the B.W.LS.A.
could reconsider their decision.

He knew that in Hon. Albert
Gomes, the Hon. W. Raatgever,
the Hon. Bustamante and Mr.

Adams they had four politicians
that would hold their own against
any in the world.

Mr. Adams said that the
B.W.LS.A. must not make the mis-
take again of giving the politicians
in this area, the impression that
they were merely making use of
them as a shield. When the poli-
ticilans were eventually asked to
go to Great Britain last time, he
said, it was to give the opinion of
the West Indian people. He had
no intention of being used unin-
tentionally or deliberately as a
stooge.

Politicians’ Status

Politicians in the West Indies,
especially Labourites, had to be
very careful that they were not
being suspected of being used by
B.W.LS.A. for -their convenience.

“T cannot see how Australia can
suspect B.W.LS.A. in going to
Great Britain any more than they
can suspect them in going to Can-
ada,” said Mr. Adams,

“Let us strongly recommend to
B.W.LS.A. to reconsider. their
position, When we as politicians
go to Britain, how effective are
we going to be without B.W.1.S.A.?
I am going to ask them to recon-
sider their position especially in
the light of their willingness to go
to Canada.”

Hon. Albert Gomes said that
despite the fact that Mr. Adams
and he very often had their little
differences, he had great respect
and regard for him and he appre-
ciated the frankness with which
he had spoken.

He thought those who were
there and had to do with sugar
must appreciate what was the
position with regard to politicians
in the West Indies.

“There is a suspicion in the
West Indies that there is the dan-
ger of the sugar people in some
way or the other using political
support when it suits their con-
venience.

Co-operation

“IT have felt at almost every
stage of these discussions, that if
there is going to be co-operation
between the governments and
B.W.LS.A. it would be extremely
dangerous if the Association take
the responsibility in their own
hands to proceed to negotiate, and
then when they find themselves in
trouble ask the governments to
come in again. It seems to me that
this Committee should take the
stand that the co-operation of the
governments and the Association
must take a tangible form.”

He wanted to remind B.W.LS.A.
that Australia was now coming
forward to join with the West In-
dies for very obvious reasons, but
when it was in Australia’s inter-
est to battle her own canoe she
acted otherwise. That was some-
thing that had to be borne in mind
and it was something which was
known by the governments in the
area,

“I frankly think that this is
not as simple a matter as it
may seem, I feel that it is a
situation that should definitely
be clarified because I share
Mr. Adams’ views to a very
great extent,

“I happen to be a politician
also and I know what the
situation is. In many of the
territories even among the
sugar workers, there is a great
suspicion that we politicians
who are concerned in this
matter are just thinking of the
sugar manijllacturers, It is a
misguided view, because we
all realise how important
sugar is to the economy of the
West Indies, and it is for that
reason we are determined to
fight these political battles.”
Mr. Gomes said that he thought

they should not leave the situation
as it was at the moment. In his
opinion, it was a very acute one.

The Chairman, Professor Beas-
ley, said that it might help if,
despite the fact the B.W.LS.A. was
not sending a representative, they
ask Mr. ‘Robinson to become a
member of the delegation as Mr.
Robinson.

An Agreement
Mr. Robinson said that he was
bound by the decision which his
directors had made. He was a
party to it and had agreed to it.
“If my directors are of the



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for fitness in the cellular fabric de-
signed for measured ventilation. This
enables the air to insulate the body
against sudden changes of temper-



WILL NOT
LONDON

opinion that B.W.1.S.A. should not
take part, wouldn’t it be asking
me to take a position which you in
your hearts would not expect me
to accept?” Mr. Robinson ques-
tioned.

“I could only be of use to you
if 1 were free to give you my best
advice. On the other hand, I am
quite willing and always will be
to consider every point of
view and work with you to the
best of my ability. This is also
the position of B.W.1.S.A. They
are not asking you to stand by
and take their burdens off them.

“There has got to be co-opera-
tion on all sides, but if I become a
member of the delegation under
the present circumstances, you
would have very good reason to
lose your confidence in anything
I may say. If I come here and ex-
press my own view it has got to
be my own view. I cannot be in
two positions at one time.”

“The one hope of the le in
this area,”’ said Mr. Robinson, “is
that we should free our minds of
suspicion and that we should
speak freely and frankly and tell
each other what we have to say,
and that neither one side nor the
other should take any opportunity
of placing the other in two posi-
tions.”

For that reason it would be
wrong for him, so long as the
B.W.LS.A. continued with their
decision—and that was his in-
structions at present—to become a
member of the delegation.

United Front

Mr. Robinson said that it had
been made clear to the meeting
from the beginning, that quite
separately from anything that was
being discussed there, there was an
agreement with the other Com-
monwealth producers, that no ne-
gotiations should be entered into
before there was a chance to come
together in a united front for the
purpose of making representa-
tions.

There was not one member
there who would not want
B.W.I.S.A. to stand by thai
agreement. Not only must
they do so but appear to
do it in the eyes of the
world: It would not be in the
highest interest of the West In-
dies for B.W.LS.A. to take part
in the proposed talks at the
present time, Mr. Robinson said.
The Chairman finally said that

he believed he was expresing the
view of the Commitee that they
wanted Mr. Robinson to be a
member of the delegation. The
Committee had their faith and
confidence in him. It would be
very prejudicial if he could not
find. it possible to reconsider the
matter. The best thing was to ask
Mr. Robinson to consult his direc-
tors on the matter. Mr. Robinson
promised he would,

What the Flags Mean

A flag is often seen flying from
the pole which rises above the
Harbour and Shipping Depart
ment, Wharf.

Sometimes a_ single blue-
checkered flag or a blue checkered
flag with a pendant beneath it is
flying. -Another time, there is the
House Flag of a steamship com-
pany.

The flags are flown as signals
of ships approaching Barbados. A
flag with blue checkered on a
white background indicates that
an unknown steamer is to the
windward of the island. If the
line of the steamer is known, the
house flag if flown in place of the
checkered flag. ;

A checkered flag, under which
is flown a pendant with a red dot
in its middle, is the signal for an
unknown steamer to leeward. ‘In
case the line of the steamer is
known, the house flag is flown
with the pendant.

To signal a man-of-war to
windward, a red and _ white
diagonal flag is hoisted. A pendant
with a red dot in its centre,
hoisted inferior to the red and
white diagonal flag, signals a
man-of-war to leeward. A black
ball is hoisted inferior to the man-
ef-war flag to tell that a squadron
of men-of-war is approaching
harbour from the windward.

If a squadron is approaching
from the leeward, a pendant with
a red dot in the middle is hoisted
inferior to both the man-of-war
flag and the black ball.

The Harbour Signal Station also
gives hurricane signals. A red
flag with a black rectangle in the
centre is used as a cautionary
signal while two similar flags,
hoisted together, are hurricane
signals.

When a red pendant with a
white vertical cross is flown with
a black ball hoisted inferior to it,
the signal permits small craft to
enter molehead before’ being
granted pratique in bad weather.

Notices of ships approaching the
island are communicated to the
Harbour Signal Station from a
“look-out” station at Highgate.
The flags are immediately hoisted
when the notices are given. They
are lowered shortly citer the ship
has been lying at anchorage.



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ways keeps its shape when laundered.







Empire Day
Message

From The Rt. Hon. The
EARL OF GOWRIE
VO.. PC. GiMG., C.B.,
D.S.O.,

President
Ores woe-al ab ay MY pr.v-

ge and my i.dnvtr,
wo senag you 4 messuye iv
BMmpsre sway bus, w ity
vegre., I nave w uo ww
When world conditions coi.-
Ubue in an unhappy, uns .i-
Med and dangerous state.
At such a ume we ma .-
venance of tne wonuciiu:
P.renershp whien exis.i
between tne varus coun-
tres which make up we
Commonwealth and mpuire
is of paramount importance.

Te foster and improve
mutual understanding pe-
tween the many different
races to be found in this
large family is the task for
which this Movement wus
founded. I can truthfully
Say that much has beecr ac-
complished but I cannot
stress too strongly the
urgency for continuing our
work consolidating past
achievements and makiug
progress in those areas as
yet little touched.

This. is particularly im-
portant and immediate at
jthe present time, when
rapid political change is
being made within the Com-
monwealth and Empire
whilst world conditions re-
majin so difficult and un
certain,

I am most grateful to all
friends and supporters for
their past assistance and I
confidently appeal to you
all, at this critical time, to
continue your efforts and
strive to achieve the aims
and principies for which the
Movement stands, the main-
|tenance of peace and the
furtherance of world pros-
perity.

-.I wish you all God-speed
and success in your endeav-
our,
GOWRiE.
Empire Day, 1951,

To the Youth of the British
Empire
EACH of you I send
this message at a time
when you must hear and
see many things which may
sadden you.

It is true that the peazee in
which you had hoped to
sTrow up has not yet come
about nor can we be sure
when this will be. But it
is also true that many of
you, the young people of the
British Commonwealth and
Empire are, through your
friendships learning the
great truth that distance and
a different way of life need
not divide you.

Take courage, be brave
and remember that you are
met together this day with
‘the children of many races,
to celebrate Empire Day
and our common pbrother-
hood.

GOWRIE
Empire Day, 1951.



Gomes’ Motion
Recorded

Hon, Albert Gomes’ motion
favouring West Indian Govern-
ments to give their views on the
Report of the Standing Closer
Association Committee Meeting,
before discussing the report of
the Customs Union Commission
was yesterday simply recorded at
the meeting of the Regional
‘Economic Committee, but no other
action taken since there was such
cleavage of opinion by members
of the Committee.

The resolution read as fol-
lows: —
The Committee resolves to

communicate with the Secretary
of State urging him to make
immediate representations to all
Governments which have not yet
considered the Report of the
Standing Closer Association Com-
mittee asking for an_ early
expression of their views on the
proposals contained in the
report.

The Committee agrees that it
is not desirable to consider the
Report of the Customs Unior
Commission until such time as
there has been a full expression
of views from all territorial Gov-
ernments on the Standing Closer
Association Committee Report,



ROTTEN SUPPLIES

No ships were in the Bay yes-

terday, but some boatmen still got Officer,

a job to do. They were hired to
take off rotten merchandise into
the Bay for dumping. One row-
coat took-out a supply of potatoes.






sa
IMPERIAL LEATHER

Wee ask: for

BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

New Pictures
At Combermere

HREE NEW pictures have

been added to the collection
at Combermere School. These
were brought from Engiana by
Major C. Nostt, Heaamaster of
the School, when he returned
from a vacation on Marcn ¥1 by
the S. S. Golfito.

One, which is about two feet
long by a foot and a half wide,
is of Frankie Worrell, the Inter-
national cricketer, an old Gom-
bermerian.

The picture

¢ shov7s Worrell,
wearing his

Commonwealth
blazer with the Commonwealth
crest. It was taken in Madras,
India, during the last Common-
wealth tour. It is the true
“Frankie”. Tnis is hung up in
the Combermere Hall among the
School's Set Cups and Shields

The other pictures are of Lord
Combermere, founder ot tne
School. One, hung up in the
School Library, shows Lord Com-
bermere in his military outfit.
The other is hung up over the
stage at Combermere and in this
eminent position Lord Comber-
mere wears his civvies.

All old Combermerians jnter-
ested are invited to £0 and have
a look at them.
ferent of Queen's College.

Bey Street Boys’ ScHool
and St. Saviours School, were
ar.ong those who visited the
Combermere School Hall yester-
day morning to get a glimpse of
the exhibits of the Empire Weex
Exhibition.

The boys of Bay Street School
were especially interested . jn
their project which was awarded
first prize in the Intermediate
Division, it showed Cook landing
at Botany Bay in 1770. The back-
ground showed the map of Aus-
tralia, New Zealand and. sur-
rounding islands.

The Combermere boys too were
constantly admiring their pro-
ject which was given second
prize in the Intermediate Divi-
sion. This showed Scott in. the
South with his camp pitched near
a mountain of ice, This project
had no background and therefore
Bay Street’s had the edge.

Pe R. YT. MICHELIN, Com-

missioner of Police, is giving
his Annual Talk to bus arivers
and conductors at the Empire

Theatre on Thursday moruing,
May 31, at 10 o’clock. A film on
Road Safety will also be shown. ;
The Commissioner told the
Advocate that he hoped ail the
bus drivers and conductors in the
island will attend. Those who are
interested in Road Safety shoula
also make a special effort to be

there.
HE POLICE DOGS are doing
fine. They were on the beach

at Gravesend during the week
practising trails.
“In about three months the

dogs will complete their training
and will be ready for service,” the
Commissioner told the Advocate.

A CANE FIRE at Hope Planta-
tion, St. George, on Tuesday
night burnt six acres of first
crop ripe canes. They are the
property of C. G. Gale and were
insured,
FIRE at Bulkeley Tenantry,
St. George, early yesterday
morning completely destroyed a
boarded and shingled house with
shedroof attached. It is the prop-
erty of Edna Crichlow of Farm
Tenantry, St. George. It was noi
insured. The Police are making
investigations. ‘
HE HOME of 8l-year-old
Marry Leach at Bibby Lane,
St. Michael was completely de-
stroyed on Tuesday night. It is
valued $240 and was not insured
An adjoining house, owned by
Joseph Browne, was charred on
the western side, This also is not
insured.

‘ St. Lawrence, Christ Church,
on Tuesday between motor car
X.1855, owned and driven. by
Montague White of St. Lawrence
and a bicycle owned and ridden
by Vernon Forde of the same dis-
trict.
Forde, who was injured, was
treated by Dr. Ward. The cycle
was slightly damaged.
PART of Frizers Road, St,
r Joseph, is at present under-
going repairs. This road leads to
Burke Village, via Vaughan’s
Land. It is the third time that it
has been repaired for the year.
On each occasion it was damaged
by rain.
The Chimborazo Road has been
completed and is once more open
to traffic

MEDICAL OFFICER
APPOINTED

The Secretary of State for tha
Colonies has selected Dr. Zyg-
munt Witold Skomoroch fors ap-
pointment to the post of Medical
Barbados General Hos-
pital.

Dr. Skomoroch and family are
expected to arrive by the s-s.
Bonaire on May 29.



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Poultry Feeds are being sold as Startena, Growena and

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Agents and Distributors

Louis, Mo., U.S.A.

Iwas

| fastest airliners—to Paris, Rome...
N ACCIDENT occurred stopovers in England, Ircland.
}



Naney Moller
In Singapere

SINGAPORE, May 23.
The British cargo ship Naney
Moller with 3,700 tons of Malayan

Fined 40/- For
Larceny = i "ub. tints

In Mental! Hospital Case Siagapore just before noon today
She moved up the Straits ir
Elsie Hutson, a labourer

Goodland, St. Michael, was ye. sweeper Michael which had es
terday found guilty of larceny ecrted her for the last 500 miles
by His Worship Mr. H. A. Talr:a,
Police Magistrate of District - A"
For the offence she was ordered the destroyer Coassak. —Reuter.
to pay a fine of 40 and 3
costs in: ]4 days or in default one
month’s imprisonment, She gave
notice of appeal at the Bar.

Labourer



War On Insects

In the case were Mr, E. W LONDON, May 23
Barrow for the defendant and The British Empire Society for
Mr. W Reece, Solicitor Germ-th> blind today launched ¢
eral for the Crown 31 000,000 appeal It wants the

flsie Hutson who was employ. money in’ about seven months
ed as a maid at the Mental Pert of the campaign is war o1
Hospital on April 20 stole a beautiful silver and black insec

quantity of goods from there, the wiich blinds people

property of the Governo--.n The West Indies is joining, Th
Executive Committee, The vauc iriect, the Simulium Fly (Buffalo
of the goods was estimated by Goat) lives in’ a fertile rive
the Police at 5 region of the northern Gol

Cpl. Watson wuao gave evider. °c vast. It has established a reign
on the first hearing, told how he of terror and chased the peopk

searched Elsie Hutson’s
when she was leaving the Mental

baskel away
For the British Empire Society

Hospital on the afternoon of for the blind, the insect is ‘a
April 20. ereh enemy that must be wipec
His search showed that she out at all costs.

Mr. John F. Wilson, the bline
secretary of the Society ha
this “country of — thr

had a quantity of goods in her
basket which included = milk
tomatoes and rice Questioned visited
about how she obtained these blind.” His journey took hin
goods, Cpl. Watson said that she 500 miles up the spine of thc
told him that she got them from Gold Coast 150 miles across thc



the place where she was working. ncrthern wilderness and finall
through about 50 miles of ele
Mr. W. W. Reere submitted phant grass. —Reuter,
that he saw no reason why the
defendant should not be convict neete
ed as the evidence had proved °
that larceny had been committed Discuss Trade
by the accused e e
Mr. Barrow in his address Commissioner
submitted that the prosecution
had not proved that the goods ‘The Regional Economic Com-

that were in the possession of the Mittee today discussed in private
accused on the day mentioned S@ssion the report of its Sub-
were the property of the Gov- c¢nmittee on the proposed Trade

Cr nmissioner Services to the

ernor—in-—Executive Committe a7 s
There was also no eviderce ‘ha. United Kingdom and Canada,
the Governor-in-Executive ¢ aon i
mittee had lost a quantity of HOUSE BURNT

goods that day \ small board and shingle house



He also submitted th he Si med at Berepon, St. Philip,
defendant was not charged with 4 | ‘lo property of Harold Nurse
breaking bulk, but when C o the same district was partly
Watson accosted her she had o bi rut when a fire broke out in the

small amount of goods in her heuse thortly after 12.15 p.m.

basket. He said that people go, yesterday, 7
out of the Mental Hospital and The Fire Brigade went to the
buy goods which they carry inte|Sc2ne and the fire was quickly

brought under control. The house

1s insured,

the Institution with them,

In ending his address Mr.
Barrow submitted that the onus
upon the prosecution § to
prove their case and it was never
thé duty of the defence in a
larceny charge to explain when
and how the goods were stolen.

-————————



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fort and thoughtful serv-
ice which have made PAA
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travelers the world over.



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WORLD AIRHAYS

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ot” spite, «8





SINGAPORE PINEAPPLE CUBES & SLICES per tin 45e
COLUMBIAN PINEAPPLE SLICES per tin . 24e,
BAHAMAS CRUSHED PINEAPPLE per tin . . 240
CROYDON PRUNES IN TINS per tin .,.... ; 43e,
IMPERIAL SLICED CLING PEACHES per tin . 64¢c.
CARLTON BARTLETT PEARS per tin ........., 62¢,
SURFMAID GRAPES small tin 29c., large tin 50e,
JERSEY TOMATO JUICE per tin 38c.
FRERE PILGRIM SLING per tin . ei 15e.
PEAK FREANS CHOCOLATE BISCUITS per tin . $1.60

TINS OF TOFFEES Lg. $1.74, Med. 67c., Small 46¢.
AUSTRALIAN LEG HAMS 15—18 ‘Ibs. per Ib. . $1.19

STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO... LTD.





arrived off

ef ecmpany with the British mine-

The Naney Moller was inter-
c€pted on her way to China by





















PAGE FIVE





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{
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The Quality is Excellent
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At

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Your Inspection is

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cket



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The above may not mean much to the average person,
but to cricketers it means we
tion of the most prized BATS autographed by such
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Prices from $10.00 to $17.00

NOTE: 10% discount allowed on any bu
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have an excellent selec.

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kk purchase















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KNIGHT'S DRUG STORES





S

PAGE SIX

HENRY



LAWNMOWERS
SHARPENED fF

MICKEY MOUSE
PANN ee I

ote Boy
LIKE “TO SEE OUR STUDIO!
AROUND, WELKINRING ! t










wT JHINK ILL STay
HGME TODAY-I JUST |
FEEL UKE SRENDIN’
4 QUIBT TIME AND A
HAVIN A GOOD REST- | rig

Sn ee |







HOW MANY TIMES MUST
I TELL YOU NOT TO SWEEP
DIRT UNDER THE RUGS ?
AND WHY DON'T YOU
DUST THE BOOKS IN THE

| o>) ANO TIRED~ TALKING
€ >) TO YOuR ,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
BY CARL ANDERSON





[THAT'S “LENNIE” THE DOG STAR!






UNIT HERE.... 16 - AVILLIMETE:
oe FOR TELEVISION!











oN
cy Coe aes 2
a oo HE SAID
aoe, Cs ‘bey ( WED GET IT
7) fe Cy Ton ) ALL OVER
tah WOULDN'T ( OURSELVES








'M COUNTING TO Five!
ONE -- TWO-- THREE-~







LIBRARY? I'M SICK









} '

A Net's
~_ a ic
; oN NO
ZENA S
ISN

Ada NOs
Wot



ME Too... BUT I CAN STILL
SEE $800,000! CUTTLE,
GRAS THAT BAG! WE'RE

GETTIN’ OUTTA HERE !
















LOOK









THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951



For a radiant shine




ella,

»

The quality ma
Metal Polish

446





al]
TEA

ck aoe

Ee

es

STANDS

SUPREME






breakfast
that builds! Save ‘em
and Swap ‘em... 40
Cards in the Series.

Hlloggis
CORN FLAKES

today!















Simple Beauty Plan

Avwasn your face with Palmolive Soap

Then, for 60 seconds, massage with
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CP this 3 times a day for 14 days.
This cleansing massage brings
your skin Palmolive’s full
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LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH
— Also —
GALV. OIL CANS —1, 2

T. HERBERT Lid.

& 5 Gin, Sizes

Extablished
1860

Incorporated
1926
TRADE MARK

VASELINE ia the registered trade mark
of the Chesebrongh Mfg. Co., Cons'd

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only



































USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW

TINS TINS
ORANGE & GFRUIT JUICE 29 25 SELECT P. MILK (1b) 105 84
Pkgs. MOIRS CHOCOLATES 10 3pkss.18 Tins LAMBS TONGUES 70 62





POTATOES per lb. 12 8lbs. for) Bots. ALLSOPPS BEER 26 20

D. V. SCOTT’ & Co. Ltd. Broad Street









<=







with Energy-Building
Breakfast Foods

CEREALS

Vigro Toasted Wheat Flakes
Pest Toasties Corn Flakes
Wafer Corn Flakes

Kelloggs All Bran

Welgar Shredded Wheat
Weetabix

Danish Rye Crispbread

Ryvita Rye Bread

Peek Freans
Crispbread

HE
A MAKES MORE MONEY THAN ALL THE
A OTHER ACTORS PUT TOGETHER!
1) ‘apg g2% , HW
> " Bul 4 ' \ *
A” , —s e i “| ofBX !
ae A -
OH ... THAT'S A NEW MIDGET PRODUCTION eee THEY MAKE



2 ee, te

Sa, £& ss
Give the Meal its || ;OWER JELLY CRYSTAL
finishing touch with

4 in Five Flayours
Qe: See Most Enjoyable 14e. pk. |

Grape Nuts











Vita-Weat




SS ANDWHATIFIDONT
J WANNA FORGET ABOUT IT?
S\ WHATLL YOU DO ABOUT IT.

memaeemnd | HONEST JOHN HERE HOLDS THE
MERE | STAKES. HE CAN RETURN THE BETS
is. | |TO YOU AND DAVE PALMERSAND IT












Brown & Polson’s Flavoured





{ — CAN ALL BE " BOY FRIEND?” Corn Flour for Blanc- BACON & HAM
M | FE ——=[ © ) “FORGOTTEN ey mange — 3 Flavours to
ae 4 >: Stee * é Sticed Bacon by the pound
= y 2 " 1
= Flour in < Pokaan ' Sliced Ham by the pound

pkt,

| Creamola Custard Pudding
in pkgs. for 10c.

Pearce Duff's Pudding or

Blancmange P 0 w de r,

Assorted Flavours in tins

OF Course it’s

rn einer panirnisnistar soning
SSF EX —

for 24c, es Smooth delicious
| ALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co.

FRUIT JUICES

Bahama Pineapple Juice

Jainaica Tomato Juice

Trinidad Orange Juice

Trinidad Orange and Grape-
fruit Juice

Trinidad Grapefruit Juice

More DESSERT

Chivers Jelly Creams
Assorted Flavours in pkts.
20c. each

John Moir’s Special Dessert
17c, pkt.

START THE DAY BRIGHT

AFTER DINNER =

ALLEYNE

ARTHUR'S SPECIAL — that

RUM

Ltd. —“Your Grocers) — HIGH sr.

SSS

ee





THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.|







FOR RENT PUBLIC SALES







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC NOTICES





Minimum charge week 12 cents and Ten cents per agate line on week-days Ten cents per agate line on week-da
6 cents Sundays 4 wor rds — over 24] and 12 cents per agaie line on Sundays, | Gnd 12 cents pe r line on
words 3 cents a word w 4 cents aj] minimum charge $1.50 on week-days|miinimum charge $1.50 on weeb-day
word on Sundays end $1.80 on Sundays. end $1.80 on Sundays

For Births, Marriage or Engagement























































































































THE MARKET SQUARE
IN
ST. GEORGE, GRENADA.




'
‘
1
!

















































ee







LOST & FOUND

LOST



SWE PSTAKE TICKET.

Series































BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
Representative :
GERALD WOOD













i
=













PAGE



VEN

NOTICES ©



iia



| SHIPPING

t
as















































and
Vin-
Sailing

CARIBE
Passenge’
cent, G@





will accept Cargo
s for St. Lucila, St
ada and Aruba
Tuesd nad. inet

The M/V “MONEKA” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica Antigua,
Nevis and St
Friday 25th inst

-_—-—

Accepting Passengers,
Carge and Mail

R. M. JONES & Co, Ltd



Montserrat

Kitts. Sailing

Jz mee ee Seen! 6M SALE | wae pees © | Canadian National Steams ip
e'iarge is $3.00 for any number of words e HOUSES REAL ESTATE NOTICE : 24.5. 51-—In
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each am charge. week %2 cents and ensainaetsipenn Silalielils ace MC TER ee i SOUTHBOUND Sette Soi Satle pon
additional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 | 96 cents Sus “us A) eee 1 i APARTMENT at “Ocetta,” on-the-Sea NEWBURY—With 11% acres of land,| Applicants for positions under Rox B.C APPLEWHAITES LIMITED i Montreal Haittax Barbados sarvedos
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death) oo on Sudevs. 1 ¢ opposite Woodside, Bay Street. Apply ©n | 3 lime kilns. Building and out-buildings. | (Welders, Turners) selected for an inter- LOST SHARE CERTIFICATE | LADY NELSON .. 4 May 12. May 19 Moy 27 May 28 May
Notices only after 4 p.m. : = premises 24.5.31—In | Next door Gun Hill Barracks about 6 wae will be informed by letter shortly potication - os oe a CAN, CRUISER 17 May 20 May 29 May 30 May
“"RERACHAN ~~ OGansail, Bouunaniha.| miles from Bridgetown. Apply S. W: original references will be returned, ] ® cesee as been made to the] CAN. CHALLENGER 26 May 29 May 12 May 7 June 8 June
: edn Serene meee ene — Opposite Roumanika,| MeConney, St. George 24.5.51—In 24.5,51—2n | Directors of the above-named Company | LADY RODNEY 5 June 6 June 11 June 20 June 2: June
DIED 5 yrells Road. Apply to present tenant.) 0000 re by E. V. Goddard, (Sole Executor of! [aADY NELSON 30 June 3 July 5 July 14 July 15 July
AUTOMOTIVE .5,3s--00. | eee ——-——- | HE BARBADOS YOUTH MOVEMENT | ‘he Estate of Dudlay Cameron Hawkins.| LADY RODNEY 30 July 2 Acg 4 Aug. 13 Aug. 16 Aug.
- sseisiemecenpcinaalinaitietin manele ae cere << = the cocoate = “TH YEAR deceased) of this Island, for the issue 3 , anae
EXCEPTIONAL —25 MP EUREKA—Enterprise Road ‘urnished Fa gga elmont oad, St lf you oliticilans or those respo: of a duplicate Certificate Thirty (30 han ite Ie aig bith adie) teidaeealeidlameeeimaletnai nab deeaaieald lee’
GOOKOL—On May 23rd 1951, at the} Piet 15. Very pps pa. = Hh pmes Bungalow. Telephone, Refrigerator, and aren Sea tones 2 ae ee ae ook seeing "about pared pecan gp Preference Shares numbe
General Hospital, John Gookol, late! s9s9 22.5,51-Sn. | Modern conveniences. Available now | 0c ite, Te Maha, dining, Weccktast | Better housing for all instead of a 66-95 inclusive NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
sugar boiler of Fairfield Factory. Age Apply Frederica Fitzpatrick. Telephone awing, dining, breakfast | favoured few; well help the Barbados| UPON the statement that the original Barbados Barbades Boston St.John Halifax Montreal
68 years. His funeral leaves his late i 3535 24.5.51—3n.|!Ooms and kitchen downstairs, three Me = . ve. | Certificate No. 5 issued to Dud! DY N h e une 2 une =< 25th June
EL bedrcor toil : Youth Movement and watch the re- LADY NELSON .. &th June 10th J 2th June 22nd June
residence Eagle Hall Road at 4.30 to-day ; CTRICAL — reoms, toilet and ath upstairs./ ots then , ; 1. {Cameron Hawkins under date 27th June DY , 5 y 29 July
> 4 * _ | Usuai medern wire sults ther We stand for right versus r LADY RODNEY 3 July 5 July 14 July - 16 July ? wl
for the eevee Cemetery. ue a nets See, ee Saas anderen Pn con ar Garage might 1949 has been lost and not deposited] LADY NELSON July 29 July 7 Aus 9 Aug. 12 Aug.
Eva ookol (widow), Sy REFR. a ree hak cei ae ning an itting rooms, ‘ants rooms in yar a es ca with anyone as security th ise wend ete pty eae ‘Sept
(daughter), Dr, Ramessan (cousia) | foot ae Ton ‘One U S. 7 cuble} bedrooms, running water, Kitchen with Inspection every day (except Sundays) Rev. “L. BRUC E-CLARKG, and NOTICE: Is ALSO HEREBY "GIVEN ee ene spe staid rn $i
(B.G. Papers please copy) 40 rigidaire Refrigerator. Apply:| gas usual conveniences, No pets or | between 4 and 6 p.m. or by appointment Founder th ¢ within thirty a Pe .
: 24.5.81—In. | Hone tg wentnerhead c/o Weatherhead’s| children, Dial 2696, —=--22.5.51—2n Dial 390s Rev. J. B. GRANT, that if within thirty days from the dote] N.B.—Subject to change without notice. Ail vessels fitted witn cold storage cham
5. il re. one 144. ies » oe en: "The above will be set up for sale at Chaplain, es ae a es aren a rs. assenger Fares and freigut rates on applicatian to:— -
IN MEMORIAM ip 17.5.51—t.f.n pap Competition at our office in MRS. OLGA = s . cen a ag aa nace hae ay hac
—————— ucas Street, Bridgetown, on Friday, the . AT orocee vith such applic 1
POULTRY WANTED ee Gobel ties eee ae o c proceed to deal with such applicatic
CRAWFORD—In loving memory of our} ~__ eS ; CARRINGTON & SEALY o Pees eta Board of Direct
dear husband and father George Aubrey " DUCK s— ” Khaki Cam: Minimum charge week 72 cents and Solicit HE SUGAR INDU: « AG wt een Oe od wate inte .- rhea
, Crawford who fel’ asleep on the 25th 22.5. 51--3n | 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 2% 19.5.51—9n TURAL BANK CT, 1 ° e. ” wes gents.
May, 1948. # words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a| ——— To the Creditors holding specialty liens
Three rom have passed since that word on Sundays, sey public competition at our office aa SPA Plantation, e .
cod day ~ James Stree’ y a St, . ae neneimmenrenreeene eee
Grae tie eninal toptstoly Gan aay MECHANICAL HELP at 2 pam) rood 16 morehee Ch iand at |,, TAKE NOTICE that 1, the owner of i ‘s |
, ‘ eee . the above Plantation am about to obtain !
From thee we would never desire to rn Upper Car'ton, St. James, the propert a 4 4
part GRASS CUTTERS — Massey-Harris 5| > >.i0) sai | of the Estate of th ‘late William Jordan, | % 10a" of £280 under the provisions of |
Since heaven hath claim thee we| and 6 ft. immediate deliveries. Enquirie: nae oo ee ae ee aeanaaed =? e late William Jordan, | ihe above Act against the said Plantation, = e
i ; ; ce, oa 7 fe z sa ec bhai ae eee oo
could not refrain Solicited Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616 with experience in accounts, CENTRAL | For, further particulars and conditions | (5 respect of the Agricultural year 1951] ere at Last The New Wonder Machine 0.
In our memories still live a devoted 22.5.51—6n. | “ ; > : “| of sale, apply to py Your Name, Initials, Private Number
FOUNDRY LTD. 23.5.51—31y . , No money has been borrowed under : : f
father. ales i an mie ~ HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD. Ee Actuate Ace ee der | or your address can be marked on any
; : princes anne al Act, 1905, or the ie : we
Ever to be remembered by Ruth Crawford MISCELLANEOUS MALE AND | FEMALE—$ Ladies te 16-5-51—8n | above Act (as the ease’ may’ be) in S may aly enh online, Aoi .
Aubrey, Peter, Paul (Sons), Joy - Pion 4 The undersigned will offer for sale ai | TSPec* of such year Magazine Lane next door to Cosmopolitan
(Daughter), Denis Blades, Mrs. Legall ~—— Cote ice ation, Wee, their Office, No, 17, High Street, Bridge-| Dated this 22nd day of May, 1951 Garage 24.5.51—2n.| NEW YORK SERVICE Si
(Faithful Friends). 24,5.51—1n CIGARETTES — Ardath Cork tipped! sarin i “tl 2 Bobtite: Sewn town, on, Friday the 25th, day of May, L. E et So r% mtaneine sated oe April Arrives Barbados 8th May
C—O L ni! =. » a p.m. . - Steamer Sails th ay - » 29th w
JAMES—In loving memory of our dear’ Veheod itioe comes tite ottect. We 2d-| London, 6.16 BO Son | The, dwellinghouse knows as “GRAND 22.5.51-—-30 at iadiketdiahacads ik ihe a
daughter Vercelia James, who felli have a small stock at the reduced price " with the land thereto containing > .
asleep on the 24th of May 1942. May —namely 10's. 16c. and 20's 32c. B arlene. iecaandbte hota tat ceret 3 Roods 4 3/5th. Perches or thereabouts, i ERSONAL sii NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
she rest in peace, : KNIGHT'S LTD. a ie tier et A. creo B'Son | Situate at Bathsheba, Saint Joseph. NOTICE SS. “ALCOA PATRIOT" Sailed 18th April Arrives Barbados ey
She has gone but not forgotten 19.5.51—3n.| pra Syoes 19.5.51—t.f.0 Inspection on application to the ' 3.8 ALCOA POLAR ils 2nd May - ~ - 18
R ni wi ts God * weIee ‘a er, on e premises. _ an a ) a ainst; SS, “AL c e Sails 16th M. --
esting ith the Saints of — Caretak: th: IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is the The public are hereby warned again t} Ss, “ALCOA ROAME 1 ay oi Ist June
It will always be remembered GALVANISED SHEETS—Best quality -—-~=| For further particulars and conditions| so tion of the Vestry. at 8 the in|} giving credit to my wife, SELENA WHICE | nesses nN
On the 24th May. new sheets, Cheapest in the Island ! MISCELLANEOUS of sale apply to :— Christ Cuber is oaks te me Lp lle (nee THOMAS) as | do not hold myself CANADIAN SERVICE
When the roll was called, she 6 ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56; a COTTLE, CATFORD & Co, | into the Legislature of this Island a Bill | ;eponsible for her or, anyone elee Con | SOUTRBOUN
answered 10 ft $8.40, Nett cash.” Better hurry! WANTED TO BUY 13,5.61.—-@.0-8.] {ithorising the said Vestry to borrow | tracting any debt or debts in my name SOUTHBOUND
4 ‘ . 3, ———_— —<—<— , = niles ya wr Pr or tr signed by me. z.
I am coming Saviour, 1 om ere: A. BARNES & CO., LTD. — Bedr aes eek ee” ERNEST DALE, Passage Road standing , * SU™ of money not exceeding eo ARTHUR LEON WHITE. Name of Ship Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives B'dos,
Lewis James (Father), Clara James 4.5.51—t.f.n.] Sewing Machines, Ice Boxes, Gramo on 22 perches of land. Dwelling house | © be used by them (a) as to $6 Beckles Hill Ke a
(Mother) and family, 24.5.51—1n phones, Tarpaulin about 20 ft. x 8 ft., and pial sane Gevenaiik. Drawing ana | repairing existing roads and paths in the at, Michael 6:8 re OA Fee -. May ith May 14th May 24th
AMRIT ce tatane denne ae base LAUREL RAZOR—If you = in need] other House and Office Things—L 8 Dining rooms two bedrooms, kitchen, | Christ Church Cemetery, and laying out * seasi-ant?? + K BERNADOTTE May 25th May 30th June -10th
ea eg In we eS 8 wurlof a BALE, try a “Laurel”. Special] WILSON, Spry Street. 24,5,51—In. | et and bath and making new roads and paths therein s ALCOA PLANTER June &th June 1ith June 21st
lear daddy McDona’ forris who was| offer now 1/6 each, Obtainable at—| —— x ib) as t 7 offec e ,
a mi . e . iM f sale te as to $587.40 in effecting repairs te
ior ae Re eer Re eee ee Se Eze. ae JOINERS GOOD WORK In M hogany ones TTS tian On Peraay ‘Bsth. May the Mortuary Chapel in the sak MAIL NOTICE OO ALG A PEGASUS" due May 28th sails for St. Joh 1 St. Lawrence
§ . —In Maho |! ie ia * | Cemetery, dic) ) . nF aaah h oe 8 / Sus a ails for St. John and St. Lawre’
We shall sleep but not forever WHITE TILES--6” White Tiles. Enquira| Cedar, Birch, Fir, Deal for Home and t 2 pm. at the office of the under | ion) aEathniee atl cab aan Onis AIR MAILS for Aruba anc River Ports,
There will be a glorious dawn at the Auto Tyre Co. Trafalgar St. Phone| Office—L. S. WILSON, Spry Street. nce. arHetere bass ee obtained.| the Said sum so raised to be repaid ir | Curacao by K.L.M. Service Wil 5s
we ont meet to part no never } 2696. 22.5.51—t.f.n 24.5.51—1n, | ane HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD, | ten annual instalments of $720.00 each.| be closed at the General Post These vessels hve Hmited passenger accommodation
Ever to be remembered Uy his wife 17,5. 51- With intereat ates Sent 188s, together | Office at 10.00 a.m. on Wednesday
S . ccslbiaiaaiiebocetiaatnaelaeneiiaeainacitig ations mn at ¢ ate ne exceeding ae oie
Adina; Delana, Willie, Oscar, Ivan. John DWELLING HOUSE standing on 25%4|5 per centum per annum on the priné 30th May. ‘ : ROBERT THOM LTD. NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
Edna (Children), Gwen (sister-in-law). perches of land, situated at corner of| cipal sum and the unpaid balances H. N. ARMSTRONG, APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVI
24.5, 51—1n GOVERNMENT NOTICE Buckingham and Bank Hall Cross Roads,| thereof for the time being owing. Colonial Postmaster ;
House is built of Timber and roofed Dated the 2ist day of May 1651. i 2 . . ae
POODLES POSO SPO PPS SFOS IOS with Galvanised Tron and ig comprised YEARWOOD & BOYCE, General Post — -=- —-— - sia icles
of Open Verandah on three sides, Living Solicitors for the Vestry of 22nd May, 1951.
bs and ns, Roath, eee Bedroors, Christ Chureh, th ROYAL NETHERLANDS
reakfas joo, Sah, et oe 22.5.81—in. | (SSS
BUILDINGS FOR SALE Attention is drawn to the Defence (Control of Drug and Patent] with a large yard all enclosed. Very | ————__________ __ slbcietthaies STEAMSHIP co.
. . er . « a rt cool and airy. SAMLINGS FROM AMSTERDAM
a a Geared Casste Donor ta aay, 100.” Le a a Se OP, ren Cee enews WHO's? Oe Siete M'tes i 3
s vig z ° § y, 1951. + Witla * § is
published in the cial Gazette y terms and conditions of sale can be Coastal Station \ j " MMS OT inh
OFFERS ARE INVITED h ‘i i] selli ices of “Caroid | tained: Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd RAYMOND JORDAN ergata ast ae Cie Gle Transatlantique
a ee, Merce al e eae oe nye Settee aoe aS 20.5.51—4n paviee that they A pow communicate ; MS. “Oranjestad” 1th, June 1981.
. s a é as ith the follow ships tt sh | SAILINGS & y n :
FOR oe alts”, icks Vaporub”, “Urasal” an e AUCZION Baaine spbestag shige thfossh their Ask those who KNOW { sHeNOR ae ceeatee PARAMAR |
ALL OR ANY ee ct acai snes ai» Aleoe Comet 8/6 (| M.S. “Boniare” 29th, May 1991. | SAILING TO
ae — HILLMAN MINX 1949 MODEL razil; s.s vodas s. Oranjestad; s.s M.S. “Hersilia’ 1ith June 1951. ¥
Item Unit of Sale Maximum Retail Price} We are instructed by the owner who Alcoa Polaris; 8.5, Specialist; s.s. Roslin Sama i!) AT INGS TO TRINIDAD, LA GUAIRA, ENGLAND & FRANCE
OF | has left the Colony to auction this very| C*stle; s.s. Alpha; 8.5, Punta Amica; CURACAO & JAMAICA. :
. ‘ 1 « 7 1.13 fine motor car which has only done 9,000] 5.8. Robin Gray s.s. Amiens; s.s M.S. Oranjestad” 24th. May 1951 COLOMBIE June 10th, 1951
Caroid & Bile Salts .. Bottle of 50 tabs $1.18 miles and to the best of our knowledge| Tutanger; s,s. Norlys; 8.8. | John > ak via Martinique &
Me a i 7 Limited Passenger accommodation - q
THE VALUABLE 100 $1.88 has never been damaged in an accident.| MeDonogh; s.s niston City; s.s avallable Guadeloupe
4 " ¥ AE aie Ry at a” Sale at Cole's Garage on Friday 25th Goan: 8.8 1 s. Cazador; s. P MUSSON,- SON & CO, LTD P
FREEHOLD BUILDINGS | Vicks Vaporub ++ % 02. pot 46c. May at 2 Dm. SOHN M, BLADON, ss, Samana: 9.8, Tachira: pa ia Hi he Agents. i
av) i.
é 10 26c. Auctioneer. berg; s.8. Marion Lykes; s.s. Hudson
” ” eee a 22.5.51—-4n' Firth CARIBBEAN CRUISE.
OCCUPYING » * bottle Gc. . .
The M/V “CARIBBEE” will COLOMBIE May 30th, 1951
THE WHOLE OF ONE SIDE Urasal .. bit «+ small sized bottle $2.10 e soumnt Cargo an yesemgere ros Trinidad, La Guaira, Cur-
Jominica ntigua, ontserra .
ai ue a ah SARS 3 $3.00 Nevis ana st Kitts. Sailing 1st acao, Cartagena and Ja-
OF June 1961 maica
4 Maltevol bottle $2.65 The M/V CACIQUE DEL on

FOR DETAILS Apply to:-
P.O. Box 6, St. George,
GRENADA.

6BOVRIL





In view of the island wide Wage
Increase, the above represents a splen- ‘ §-
cid opportunity to any “GO-AHEAD h? 1 a art €!



businessman.

OL PPLEOE LSE ELSSOESS

coveRNMEN! xomicg | SOU cooks



better

convenien

EMIGRATION

Due to a change in the date of
arrival of the American employ-
ers who are to arrive to select the
labourers for employment in the
United States of America and the
representatives of the Air Trans-
port Company who will be re-
sponsible for arranging the dates
of departure and performing other
duties in connection with the re-
cruitment, it has been necessary to
change the dates of the medical
examinations.

All workers who have ‘Call
Cards’ stating the dates when next
they are to report at Queen’s Park
are now asked to report at 8.30
a.m. according to the following
time table:

Those called for Friday, the

25th May, 1951.

Now report on Wednesday,

30th May, 1951.

Those called for Monday the

28th May, 1951;

Now report on Thursday, the

31st May, 1951.

Those called for Tuesday, the

29th May, 1951;

Now report on Friday, the 1st

June, 1951,

Please note that those who have
vaccination certificates are re-
quested to bring them along when
they are coming to be examined.

24.5.51.—2n.

a
POOP PEP SPOP VO

Bovert gives that extra flavour to all soups, pies and
sayoucies. And nourishment, too !—for Bovril is
the ccncentrated goodness of beef. Bovril is also
a tasty sandwich spread—and a cup of hot Bovril
‘aily makes you feel fine !

2.
3.
4.



6.

add KLIM

‘Tell me.

doctor. .
If they all kill germs,

how can one antiseptic

Copr. 1950 Korden Co
Internat’! Copr. Reserved



be safer than another?’



Some antiseptics lose most of their potency in the presence
of blood. Some, though very powerful, require very careful



Sore » Mouth

$ diluting to be safe on human tissues. The safe antiseptic for

8 .

x untrained use has high germicidal efficiency even in the Loose Bloody T ‘eeth

% presence of blood. It is non-poisonous, does not stain, it is Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
$ : . . * Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
& gentle on tissue’, These are some of the reasons why *Dettol ‘Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
s z, 7 that will sooner or later cause your teeth
“ is safe, to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism



and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
and quickly tightens the teeth, Lron clad
guarantee. Amosan must make your
mouth well and save your teeth or
money back on return of empty pack-
age. Get. Amosan from your chemist



‘ DETTOL

* For Your THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC









: ‘ : ™ Amosan 5)!"
% Enjoyment For Pyorrhea—Trench Mo

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% e



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: IMPORTANT ||| FURNISH
$ xg
% Bots. Cocktail Onions
Ge cerns — | ORTENTAL NOW AND SAVE!
Stuffed Olives SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
ae = ; , NEW and Renewed Bedsteads,
% Tins Cocktail Biscuits % JEWELS | Beds, Springs, Lathes Wardrobes,
% = Swift Vienna Sausages } New Shipment opened | Linen Presses, Chests-of-Draw ers
% » Frankfurt Sausages THANI’S DIAL xoles, | Washstands, Screen
* » Luncheon Beef % 3466 The Annual General Meet- Frames
S ,. Pate De Foie os a =: ing of the Barbados Cricket yaney Fabien, China, Kitchen and
< Potted Meat x Association will be held at Bedroom Cabinets Sideboards $17
, Wage 5 ew! asket in
S 1&1 Pt. Tin Sasso olive on|{] ARRIVED! KENSINGTON OVAL (and Hilf ‘Zion Sand si
< Tins Cheese a 1 | not a ueens ar 9 teats MltRannes Sail
% pkgs, Kraft Cheese x SOLD! \)\) Friday, May 25th at 4.30 2 ‘large’ Giass-cases ‘well divided,
x gs, % s uv m Office Chairs, Mats $1.20
8 XI New Shipment of Gas p.m. |
- %| Cookers arrived, all i }
& @ | sold before arrival Entrance by George Chal- }
See th at Gas Showroom ‘ . i
: Qf Ecce eens ff tne ston L.S. WILSON |
S}E ' ’ y ° (
$ = pe- Book your order TO-DAY W. F. HOYOS, }f }
pr INCE & Co. Ltd. $I for next shined ‘at : Hony. Secty | SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069 i
¢ X
665950059 SLL Tiahiatihlaninip-nepcoeremanapeaneiaie: SSS = I =







Any recipe that calls for milk is a KLIM recipe.
Your favorite dishes are richer, smoother, more
nourishing with KLIM

1 KLIM is pure, safe milk

q

‘ |

|

, }

|

extra nourishment — extra flavor - With. deli- |

cious KLIM!
KLIM is produced under striciest control }
Rp
iter, — :

, stir and fs . |
\ ‘aol - " | |
D | |

KLIM keeps without refrigeration

KLIM quality is always uniform

Take SS pure wa

you have pure, safe milk

KLIM *: DAIL

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER

|

and KLIM is so

t and easy to use. Give your family



KLIM ts excetient for growing children
5 KLEM apps nourisHMment 10 cooKeD bisHES
KLIM is recommended for infant feeding

KLIM is safe In the specially-packed tin








rea

aE Ta











TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

THE CRICKETER SPRING
ANNUAL 1951

featuring the South Africans
and the M.C.C, in Australia
4/6

GLASS DECANTERS

— AT
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
& HARDWARE










2/-











FOR SALE

“SWEET FIELD” —- St Peter.
This interesting property, is now
offered for sale as the awner 15
leaving the Colony, The house
is of the Estate Type with %
storeys, solidly built of stone with
parapeted roof, There is a dining
room, large lounge with fre
windows leading into covered ver-
andahs from which there is ar
unobstructed view of the sea a
short distance away, The 3 bed-
rooms aré large and airy, one has
its own bathroom with tub bath



‘and hot water, There Is ample
scope for inexpensive improve-
ments and modernization to be

carried out without the property
losing its “Old World” atmosphere
The grounds are approx, 2% acres
in extent well planted with trees
and flowering shrubs of all varie-
ties. There are two carriageways
and there is a right of way over
the beach with excellent bathing,







“INCH MARLOW"--On approx.
2 acres coastland .near Silver
Sands, A solidly constructed stone
house with shingle roof and pine



flooring. 4 reception, 3 bedrooms,
verandah; 2 bathrooms and
toilets 2 kitchens, 2 servants’



Any reasonable



rooms, 2 gar
offer cons id



nd

“on, OCKERBIE HOUSE", Brit-
tons Cross Road—A distinctive and
well-bullt two storey stone house

set well back in secluded grounds
approx, one acre in extent. The
gardens are well matured and |&

there is complete privacy from the
roadway and adjoining property
There is a covered entrance porch
for cars, wide airy verandahs,
large lounge with a central stair-
way making an attractive feature,
dining room, four good bedrooms,
kitchen, butler'’s pantry, store-
rooms and usual offices, Outside
there is a large garage, servant's
quarters, ete, An extremely inter-
esting and desirable property
Building Land, Rockley Nev
Road A choice building plot of
more than ‘ an acre in this
populs n" development area
near Golf Club }

“WINSDALE", Cheapside—Single |

Storey Tresideiwe, 3 ininuies wall |









from town centre. 2 living rooms

dining room, verandahs, 4 bed
rooms. Area of plot approx
10,000 sq. ft. Open to offers.

“IN CHANCERY”
A modern, well
soundly built
coast where

Inch Marlow
designed and
bungalow on the
there is always a
cooling breeze. There is a large
combined lounge dining room,
Kitchen with serving hatch, 2 bed-
rooms, built-in-garage and all
usual offices Open to offers

REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
’Phone 4640



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its

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Ltd.—Broad Street

| Remember
}

and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings





































SEE

SOCSSOSSIS

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ASSOCIATION

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No, 4047

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Phone 3814





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PAGE EIGHT



CARLTON DEFEAT JAMAICA 4—3 © caustiss



THE visiting Jamaica football team suffered their first

etback

of their tour when they were defeated 4—3 by

Carlion at Kensington yesterday evening.

A large crowd watched the
game. Nothing bui cheers came
from the Kensington Stand dur-
ing play.

Lueas, inside right, and G.
Hutchinson, centre forward, both
Carlton players, gave outstanding
performances in the game. Lucas
notched two of the goals for his
té. and Hutchinson one. The
other Cariton goal was sent in by
the Jamaican player Parchment,

Da-





The Jamaica inside left,
Costa, and centre forward Nar-
cisse also played well for their
team, DaCosta scored their first
woal and Narcisse the second.
Maleolm McLean sent in their

third goal from a penalty.

Both teams showed good form

t the combination was superb.

e wel judged and

taken and shots at the goal were

powerful. In spite of the goals
yt, the goal-keeping was good

‘The ball was always kept close to

the ground.

our goals were shot during the



wer







first half Both teams were then
even

Quite a few corners were con-
écded to either side. They were
well kicked but just. as well
tleared, Thrill after} thrill the
players provided for the crowd.

The Game

The game was fast from. the

start. Carlton took the touch-oft

and kept straight through to Ja-

maica’s back line :
A few seconds in the Jamaica

eoal area and then full back Exce







ieared, sending the ball midfield
Jamaica’s forwards then too!
harge. Clever passing found th

Lall soon in Carlton’s goal are
ith the Carlton backs trying
ard to intercept
Play had now been going on for

five minutes and Jamaica got their
wst goal. DaCosta, playing at in-

cide left easily controlled a pass
from the right wing and beating
the Carlton backs, he shot from
close range. King stretched out
full length but the ball found the
right corner.

The game quickened, The Carl-
ton forwards, now nicely combin-
ing, made a very successful attack
right after. They brought the ball
gown in spite of Jamaica’s good
defense and climaxed the move-
ment with Hutchinson at inside
left giving Lucas at inside right a
fine pass. Lucas, about 20 yards
away from the bars, steadied the
ball with his chest and tried a
powerful right foot shot. Foote
in goal for Jamaica could not get
to it and the ball was in the nets.
The score was then one—all.

Both teams kept the speed up
and it was aot long before another
goal was in for Carlton.

In a fine forward movement by
Carlton, Lucas had got the ball
under his toes again. He was about
to shoot when he was intercepted
by Jamaica's full backs. A melee
developed with goalkeeper Foote
lying on the ground. Parchment,
in an attempt to clear, pushed the
ball into the nets, The score was
now 2-—1 in Carlton's favour.

Jamaica was playing well but
Carlton was getting the better of
the game. Lucas made serious
threats at scoring which the Ja-
maiea backs cleared or the goal-
keeper saved with no little ease.

On the other hand, Jamaica had
some opportunities at shooting, but
their efforts were nullified in the

same way. King did some nice
saving. 2
About five minutes before the

interval, Jamaica got in the equal-
iser, It was a lovely right foot
shot by their centre forward Nar-
cisse; all along the ground it went,
WNarecisse had received the pass
from right winger Sasso when he
was in an inside-right position.
King in goal did not move.

Half time saw the score at two

all.
Second Half
Both teams resumed looking for
the odd goal. Combination in both
forward lines was good.



Carlton was lucky to get the
first goal after the interval. i
was by way of a penalty which

Lueas safely placed in the nets.

The Jamaican full back Bayliss
fouled G. Hutchinson, Carlton's
centre forward. After this, the
game however, had slowed up a
bit. i

Carlton went four goals up.
They organised another. forward
movement and G, Hutchinson at
centre forward finally beat right
pack Excel and scored. The score
was 4—2

Jamaica then began to press. In





Traffic Do’s
No. 10



REMEMBER
THE SPEED

LIMITS

Space made ayailable by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.









They'll Do It Every Time — ¢ sms s rm oan By J

€ 2
ME eax COULD BURN THE
HIDE OFF A DEFENDANT,
WHEN HE WAS THE COUNTY
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY s+.


















81S So. B way.
ORLA, CITY, OKLA,

2-13

Bur now He's in private

PRACTICE AND HE'S BEEN
| HIRED BY THE VERY SAME
| DEFENDANT. L/STEN.



oe

SPORTS
WINDOW

THE BARBADOS FRIENDLY
FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION




" vs. Penrode, at



s L

Referee Mr. J. Archer



a few minutes they had their third
geal. Bright haa fouled Sasso in
‘Iton’s goal area and Jamaica
s awarded a penalty. Centre-
half Malcolm McLean gave King
in goal no chance to save. The
score was then 4—3.

Jamaica were still pressing, but
it was a fight to reach Carlton's
back line. Sasso climaxed one of
their fine movements during this
half with a powerful right foot
hot, which King jumped up and
varely pushed over the cross-bar
with an extended right hand.

The ball was kept up and down
the field for the rest of the eve-
ning, but there was no further
scoring. The game ended with
Carlton having the odd goal in
seven,

The teams were: —

Carlton: King, Bright, Kennedy,
I Hutchinson, H. Clairmonte,



Ee. W. Marshall, K. Hutchinson,

N. 8S. Lucas, G. H. Hutchinson,

R. Hutchinson, J. Williams.
Jamaica: Foote, Excel, Bayliss,

Parchment, McLean, Heron, Sasso,
Miller, Narcisse, DaCosta, Hall.
Referee Mr. D. Sayers.



Football Match
This Morning

St. BARNABAS and St.. Mal-
thias will be engaged in a fvot-
ball match this morning at Harri-
son College,

Following are the teams:—

St. Matthias: 6, Turton, H. O.
Williams, O. G. Burke, C. Grant,
Cc. W. Smith, B. Grimes, V. Watts,
A. M, White, G. E. Daniel, L,
Greene, V. Dottin, (Coloured
shirts)

St. Barnabas; P. Roach, V, Belle,
A. Wickham, E. Roach, John
AUeyne, James Alleyne, V. Reece,
G, Kirton, E. Jones, C, Maitland,
I Gollop. (White shirts).

Play starts at 8 O'clock.



Cricket Meeting

Tomorrow

The Barbados Cricket Asso-
ciation, at its 17th Annual Gen.
eral Meeting at Kensington to-
morrow evening, will elect two
representatives to serve on the
West Indies Cricket Board of
Centrol. The meeting begins at
4,30 p.m.
During the meeting Cricket
frophies will be presented to
Wanderers, winners in the First
Division last season, Y.M.P.C.,
winners of the Intermediate and
Empire, who headed the Second
Division.

The Association will also re-

ceive the Annual Report and Ac-
counts, elect officers and the
Board of Management for the
ensuing year.

This meeting was originally to
take place at Queen's Park but
as the Park is being used.
emigration work, it was necessary
to_change the venue.

Mr. W. F. ae Secretary of
the Barbados Cricket Association,
told the Advocate that more than
20 players circularised regarding
tours to Trinidad and British
Guiana in July and September re-
spectively, are available for both
tours. Six players are available
jor one tour only.

He said; “However, a snag has
arisen in the negotiations on ac-

count of the uncertainty of the |

Queen's Park Cricket Club placing
the Oval at the disposal of the
newly formed Trinidaq and 'To-
bago Cricket Association.”

_ Mr. Hoyos said that his Asso-
ciation accepted the Trinidad tour
on condition that the matches
were played at the Oval. Final
word was still awaited but
judging from the correspondence
passed between the Q.P.C.C.,
and the Trinidad Cricket Associa-
tion, it would appear that the
tour will not materialise.



TRUTH

BUENOS AIRES,

Under a new decree k
Pees ordered by

‘ Peron, all Argentine
ae are to be taught the

concerning the ownershi
of the Falkland Islands, ‘They will
learn that these islands, as well
as parts of Antarctica, are and
always have been “indisputably
within the frontiers of Argentina.”

C



c

a AU





I

YOU FIND HIM

Ge CHARGED, MY

LADIES AND






I BEG OF

WT



for |

AAG You SEE BEFORE YOU

C7 FORM OF ANIMAL LIFE !
IR! BREAKER OF EVERY \ /

LAW ON THE H Suk } UNLESS Wy




~ I LEAVE TOWN !!

LOOK AT MY CLIENT: THIS SWEET,
4, LOVABLE, SOBER, TRUSTWORTHY BOY
SENO HIM BACK TO HIS FAMILY

i ONLY JUST VERDICT=
oy NOT GUILTY !” Us
aw

“Pen” Bennett Made A N
T.T.C. Steward

The

long and coiourful career of the T.T.C. and fol] i TED
, a ie i s i fed this
of Mr. O. P. Pen" Bennett ony y sta at tn | ee ae
, p by being Starter «noi i ,
the West Indian turf took yet Trinidad but Barada” oe eey 35, ORE ac
seoee dramatic turn when last British Guiana. It is also : of
aturday he was elected one of interest to note that towards the Come and hear DARN- agen pce ergs

the Stewards
Turf Club,

of the Trinidad
This took place when

the Trinidad Turf Club held ite
annual General Meeting to elect
officials for the coming year
Other officers of the Club
elected at the same time were
His Honour Mr, Justice K.
Vincent Brown, Senior Vice

President; Mr. W. Arthur Murray,
Junior Vice President: Mr. C, A
Child, K.C., Steward; Mr. George
de Nobriga, Steward; Hon, J. L.

M. Perez, K.C., Steward,
The meeting was also notable
ior the action of the Committee

in placing a bar on all Jamaican
creoles from classic framed
by the T.T.C. while coupled
with this is an equally important

races

rule which also bars any half
breds, bred in Trinidad or else-
where, from the classics, Few

general meetings of the Club have
produced more head line results

The case of “Pen” Bennett must
be almost unique in that he is
one of the few gentlemen who
have ever ridden as a professional
jockey and later became 4
Steward of the Governing Body
of racing in any country This
event also throws in retrospect
the whole racing career of this
gentleman,

Amateur

First riding as an amateur for
his father who owned a string of
horses, he later took out a pro-
fessional licence as a jockey and
not long after became a trainer
as well, When his father went
out of racing he became an owhei
as well and therefore eombined
the three. In addition to this he
subsequently became a breeder of
race horses as the older horses
with which he had begun racing
vere retired to the stud, In a
T.T.C. programme of the early
thirties it was therefore possible
to see the name of the winner of
a classic which had been bred,
owned, trained and ridden by the
same person. Perhaps it was also
possible at the end of one of those
same yeurs for his name to head
the list of winning breeders,
owners, trainers and jockeys.
While he was still riding and
training, his son Steve Bennett
became a leading jockey in the
South Caribbean.

Barbados _ racing enthusiasts
will no doubt recall that Ben
nett’ career as a jockey was not
only successful but full of
dramatic incidents. Who will for—
get his victory on the half bred
mare Cowbell when he finished
with saddle and weights in one
hand and the reins in the other?
His two spectacular falls off
Bambolina, not to mention the
numerous occasions he completely
outwitted other riders with his

expert manipulation of the pace

of a race. f
In latter years on retirement
from racing he became Secretary



What's on Today

| His Excellency the Govern-
| or opens Empire Week
Exhibition at Combermere
| Boys’ School at 10.00.a.m,

Girls’ Industrial Union Fair

at Queen’s Park—3.00 p.m,
| First Football Test between
Jamaica and Barbados at
Kensington Oval, His Ex-
cellency will attend and
meet the teams—5.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema gives show at
Queen’s Park—7.30 p.m.

CINEMAS
Globe “Manhandled” 5.00 and
8.50 pom,
Plaza (Bridgetown) — “Tea For

Two" 145 & 8.30 pom
Aquatio—"Beal The Band” — $40
pom.









The Weather

TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 5.38 a.m.

Sun Sets: 6,15 p.m.

Moon (Last Quarter) May 27
ighting ; 7.00 p.m.
igh Water: 5.52
7.20 p.m.

YESTERDAY:

Rainfall (Codrington) : Nil

Total for Month to yester-
day: 1.05 ins,

Temperature (Max.) 87.5 °F

Temperature (Min.) 76.5 °F

Wind Direction (9 am.) E
(3 p.m.) E.N.E.

Wind Velocity: 11 m.p.h.

Barometer (9 am.) 29.966
(3 p.m.) 29.902,

a.m.,

\



a am Daas

imm Hatlo







FA

GENTLEMEN OF THE JURY~

YOU“BRING IN THE




CIOS o



| ANTACID

|
|
| MASSEY-HARRIS
|
|
|
|
|

' COURTESY

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

. THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951
























ie
[ANNUAL DANce 1

given by
MR. CHARLES MURRELL
‘Engineer, Launch Patricia) }
at the MODERN HIGH SCHOOL,
Roebuck Street



% FEDERATED }

ASSOCIATION

PUBLIC MEETING
Queen's Park

SEES AOES

TO-NIGHT 747TH MAY 1951
Music by
Mr. Perey Green's Orchestra
Dancing from 9.00
3.00 a.m

pm. to

Refreshments on Sale








|

































worst being at the Arima meeting] '-460¢0006099609
ef 1934 when his mount, Cock of ;
Aran, collided with a Police} 7
horse, Bennett sustained several
fractured ribs and Cock of Aran!
brake his shoulder and had to be
destroyed. In British Guiana in



tures of a female savage

cin a ate eee in a jungle of intrigue ! |



end of his riding and training] & LEY ‘brains’ ALLEYNE FRIDAY 2.30445 &
racing Up-to-date. , re ae XK and his associates. a oy ar continuing |
a . aily at 4. i .m. |
_,, Accidents . 24.5.5 | y So Sr pan, | BE SURE OF
In Trinidad he met with] @& 24.5.51—1n. | :
several accidents on the track—the The rare and racy adven-| 2 yon

ALL OVER
gk —with the faithful

use of DREAM—The &
of the Beautiful.



= |

}

ap

A Good Night's

|

Do you sink peacefulty on your
pillow and float away on clouds
of restful sleep?

Or do you lie down with
staring eyes... to have the
worties of the day come back
and taunt you? Many men and
women whose nerves are frayed
by anxiety--or a run-down
condition—find this to be true.
And that’s the time when Dr.

RKO—Radio Picture
Chase’s Nerve Food can do so
much to help you. For this

reliable tonic contains Vitamin iq) i i A Z A
|

Bi, iron and other needed |
BRIDGETOWN

minerals which help build up

e }
1939 he fell at the start of a race | ROBERT RYAN a Play safe .'. . he prepared,
and broke his hip. Thercafter ne R E Ss T | i ae eee DREAM
rede with one leg ; sts 7 C et a few cakes o ZAM |
ode with one leg almost straight | | ZA HARY SCOT | . TOILET SOAP, use it
fixed longer than the other 5 | | ; faithfully in your bath.
From amateur rider to pro- is 0 mportant | in | gener “ae eee oo .

fessional
jeckey-trainer und on to owner-
trainer—jockey, Thence on te
owner-breeder-trainer—jockey be
fore retirement. From _ retire-
ment to Secretary of the T.T.C

from that office to Official Starter
from Official Starter to Steward.
Few personalities in any sport
an equal -such a record,

Police Hold
Sports Finals

The Police held some of their
Sports finals at Kensington on
Tuesday morning. The Sports will
take place on May 31. Visiting
Trinidad Rolice will take part,

The results of Tuesday's finals

ockey ke i
j y, from jockey to clear skin, radiant with natural

loveliness,
DREAM is available at toilet goods
counters throughout the island. -

“Born to

be Bad” |

and JOAN LESLIE @
@ MEL FERRER e

one of his leathers always 8

















your vitality and tone up your
whole system—so you're in
better condition to get your
normal needed rest. Extra :
Canadians by the thousands This is America |
have proved in over half a cen- aeeine |





eamenics bury Of tee, that you rest better, “TRADING
a ? ) i king

Throwing the Cricket Ball oe. Chase's Nerve Poot as en it:

1, Blenman; 2 Shepherd; 3] don’t let your nerves rob you of “BRAVE
Rouse,—108 yards. proper rest! Get Dr. Chase's LITTLE |

Long Jump . Nerve Food in the large “econ- T ” |

1 Marshall; 2 Rouse; 3 Best.— omy size’. The name “Dr AILOR

19 feet 11 inches, Chase” is your assurance, 4 (Mickey Mouse) {|





























Putting The Weight

1 Payne; 2 Best; 3 Howard.—

35 feet 24 inches.
High Jump

1 Best; 2 Shannon; 3 Rouse—
5 feet 6% inches,

Heats for the 100 and 220 yards
flat races were also held.

MAKE SURE
THAT YOUR

NEXT SUIT
BEARS THIS

LABEL
OF DISTINCTION





SHOPPING BASKETS—Ea. ... .$2.50, $3.00, $3.75



















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De Witt’s Laboratories have
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anywhere, Pleasant tasting
De Witt's Antacid Tablets
are separately ce//-sealed for
freshness. In handy tear-off
strips for pocket or handbag.
Try them today.

CANE LILY ROOT—FEa. .............. 84c. & $2.50



NEEDLEWORK BASKETS—Ea., . ......$1.50 & $2.00

SISAL BASKETS—Ea.

A variety of lovely Decorated BASKETS at
various prices —

$5.00, $4.00, $3.60 Ete.

Cave Shepherd & Co.,

10, 11, 12, & 13, BROAD STREET







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Easily carried anywhere — Cell-sealed



WE. KNOW

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RED HAND PAINT

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@ Lasting effects POWDER é



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Full Text

PAGE 1

r PAGK i i<.1.1 HAIIHADIIS \l>\ <1( \ I I TII1'RM>\V. M \Y 21 l'l-, 1 CARLTON. DEFEAT JAMAICA 4—3 \f,'.',;:*,'.*.'.::-. Jamaica football team suffered their first iur when they wore defeated 4 i'i %  '' %  %  •' % % %  • %  = wnL-hed the ._. ihe*n tinglon Stand durA l;ni.. on—. Hi ;hu>s but troni II in* flay. inside right, and G i can' uiitstandlnj ime. Lucas ,;. for his 1 ne. lie %  *isse also played well toi their .heir 1ir>I I Malcolm " hp r ...ilv. Hi>tii teami showed go I u %  ihe goal* %  | io % %  %  Tour goal* .vere rant elected o .,,,1,. that tovanfti the I of his riding and train! rut ^ jrf nFJ uh . 1 V."'.V" %  PubUahar a*! the Trinidad Tmi Club held it | ,. ... ,i (l ,AHHI.,,1. i' 'i'i taldad ha u %  Other ofli.c-i. ul th. i tub elaetad .it tha tame unie were Hll MiKiimr Mr Ju ii ti., ii l 3 ..<-!, ronIdc Th*i VMM ...... ,.., „_.... ... Ihrlil tha . the ,,,,,. i;..:*l rowd. / The tlaiiMi mm the . CM I'. A ,,.,, ihi Jamalei %  the ball nuanem %  an topi few minutes tlKJ h:u\ then .bird r aL Bright han fouled S i .rlter* goal .tea and Jamaica %  %  ""^^ -^T^vi^ '' 1934 *">n his mo,,. %  Ml u>.chance jo nn. The J !"!" -„ ~ !" !" !-,"',.' A i broke hiihouldeT and had %  < fell at the start of i and broke W hip I !" rode AMI. one ml almo I • in n..-ui. rid* uj pro 1 tomtonal -(.,.. i ,. ke an to >.w ring, but there wai no further "j= "f r q\n"'ih*o*''iui I % %  • :..•.;,„...::„.; ^ Tfi learnj wen The aaaaol p i • niteti n rarlfoH King, Bright .rfefincdy, ,,,. aijnoal unique In that ha v.,,. Pramricnt: Mr C K.C., Slew..id; Ml G . were Ull pressing, but do Nobriga. (Reward; Hoft, .1 i. ., fight tn reach CaritOffl'l M I*. %  K I Sauo climaxed one ->f The niieling Wl Iheir Hue movements during IhJ lion •>( 'he CammlttM hall with .i powerful right fool m placing i baj at hot, which King lumped up and t routes [torn lawn framed niireiy poshed ova the crm -bai ... in,, i T I llh ..ii i \ttiuWit right hand, lW ,ii thai is an ouuall i wag kepi ui. and down ,„,,. A( llh hall the field tor tha rait '( the eveH .,,-,*^ 5 ,„,. ( i„ 1M ill roe Clever paaatng lound th lton'1 RrtBl are j tryin* Hutohlnaon, H Clairmonte, ,.,„. ,, ( ,,„. r ,,^ gontlainan wl W. Marshall. KHu t O tlhi ao n hlVr ,. v ,,, ridden M ,,,, N I. Lucas, a H Hutcbtnaon, „.,. kPV ,„ lri i, ltri bacama %  !t. HutchiiiM.n. j WUllami Sl ,... i, ; U iair.. fppte, Kxcel, Hayhss. „, racln| in BU] event i throwin ul %  the whole rating caraer ot tt>i gj I-.,* nan %  i T ... lo OH f ; i.m oniciai Starter Io Steward pen paraonallUai In an aojual iw i' %  I Parchment. McLaan, nnu>i Miller, N.irnvr. DaCoata. Mali ;:. 1.1.1 H I %  %  the 1 ard to intercept ng on for Kjt then %  rft goal. DaCostn. plnylng at m.,.,lv i .ulrolled ii p.i'f-om the rich! wing and Iwating Iton backs, he aha from iruje. King stretched out ..ill length but the l>ll found the Amiilrnr Paiicp Hold Sports Finals Foolball Match This Morning hi The I'ohre I eld some of the Bj %  nabj at Kensington o Tuaaday w w r i Un s. Tha Sp taka plajca CI May |1, Visiting Trinidad RotKo w-ill uke parl The ri'sulti; of First riding an .in an it I Tathcr who owned a string of M later took %  fcsiional llconcc a a teckaj and not long attar ba qaw a -i trainar St. BAHNABAS and St. Matm wr j| When hia father wen' fi % % %  % %  mm rilH R„II miaa will be engaged m • Motut of rating ha bacama an ownai ,T n Z, •/ r sh r 'he,d 3 ..all match this morning al Hart 1afl frail and therefore eombined '; ,l,Pn ,un ./ -She,>herd. 3 the three. In addition to th he ~" ,^ um Following are the laami;— subiequenti, became a braodor Of M „_.,„|Ja RnTi1 nJ.i_ St. MalthUa: b. Turton, II. O. raca EotMl H the ohle, hortCJ 1B i f u ?I; h „ Williama. O. G. liurko, C Grant, with which he had begun racing '" l lll ii„, TI. W,I.M light after. They brought the ball ,.. W Smlt h,],. Crimea. V WatU, vere retired to the stud In a p.£J7B. aSLavrf spile of Jamaica a good A „ ^ Q K Dan e [J TT C programme -.1 tha early }>']%  2 Beat. 3 Howard .Miaxed the '<>'>v'c.reene. V. Dottin. (Coloured thirties it was therefore f> ment with HuUhlnaon at insWc mMwtm% lo ,, t h c name of the u cliiaslc which had been bred. The game quickened. The Carlton forward*, now nlrcly com binnude a very successful attack *" e ball good inside lull with hia chent and tried n ..llevne, Jamea Alleync. V .Here, powerful right !'' ihoV Foot. i'.. Kirton, E. Jones. C. Mai'lanrl m goal for Jamaica could not get r cjollop. (White shirts) It and l thf nets. p| ay f t ar t s „t g o'clock. II son. Perhaps i High Jump 1 Beat; 2 Shannon; 3 5 feet 6'* inches. Heats for the 100 and 220 Rouse— Cricket Meeting Tomorrow The score was then oneall Both teams kept the speed up unii It v.** not long bafora another C irllon. In .i tine forwnrd mov.inenl bl Carlton. LUCK bad got the ball under his toes asain. He was about to ftwxjt when he wan intercepled by Jamaica's full backs. A melee | with goalkeeper Foot* hing on the ground. Parchment. nipt io clear, pushed the ball into the DCtl The score was now 2— I in Carllon'a favour Jamaica was playing well but rnlroi Canton wn getting the bttter of -1.30 pm the game. Lucas made aerloua Dunn-, ttw meeting Cricket threats nt scoring which the J;iTroplueK will be presented to malca back* cleared or the goalWanderers, winners in the Firat keeper saved with no IKUo < % %  <-• %  Diviai.m last season. Y.M.P.C., C*i tht Other hand, Jamaica had winners of the Intermediate mid %  ome opportunities nt shooting, but Fmptrc. who headed the Second their effort! were luilblled in the Division. Mime waj King did some nice The Association will also reI ivfng , .. eaive the Annual Report and AcAbout live minutes before the t o Un ts, elect officers and the interval. Jamaica eol in the equalHoard of Management for the l: was a lovely right foot ensuing year. poaa.ble at the end of' one of thoaa '' %  racc>t wrn lso held %  ma rears fnr hia name to head __^_^^^^^_^ the list <>r winning breeder*. • wners. trainers and jockey. Uhilt he was still riding and I raining, hii ion Steve Bonnett leeame %  leading lock*) In tha South ( ..ribbean Barb.imis i.u log anthusiaati will nu doui.t recall U at Ben nett'a career as a Jockey was not the Barbados Cricket Asao„ n |y succeMful hul full of iation, at IU 17th Annual den((rani-t P incidents Who will forral Meeting at Kensington toffi his victory on the half bred sorrow evening, will elect two mirt Cowbell when he nDtehed epresentativcs to serve on the w o h 88 ddle and weights in one Indies Cricket Board cf h ^ and lhu nlnt ln h# ot har? The meeting begins at ( ls W1( ,pectacular falll ofl Rambolma. not to mention the numerous occasions he eompletel) outwitte.1 other rldata with hb eapert iinmipulatum of the pace of a race. In latter years on raurement from racing ho became Sat at rardi West hot by their centre forward N.uelsw; all alunR the ground it went. ceived the pass W winger Basao m an inside-nghl position. King in goal did not move Half line law the wore at two Second Half Both teams reaurned li the odd goi i ComWnatl forward lines was good. Carlton v.ilucky t" ECI the first goal after the Inti rval "' waa by waj of a penalty K-tdch Lucas snfeiy placed In the not %  : eentre forward SnaUy i*nt right M h '"T %  % ; n;, ,h ": back Excel and acorcd The-con "" pia>ed at the OvaL rmui w< id w a still nwmted but Jan d. i then began to press. In Judging from the correspondence I ui between the Q.P C.C and the Trinida.l Cricket Assoe-a tlon. it wmild appear that the Thai meeting was onginallv to take place at Queen g Pgrk but as the Park Is being used KM emigration work, it was neceasary lo change the venue. Mr. W. F. Hoyos, Secretary of | the Barbados Cricket Association, told the Advocate that more than :'0 players circularised regarding %  "king lor ours t„ Trinidad and British i ,n III hotn Qiiiang ,„ j U ) y dn(( SmtembCr n iU\ely, are available for both ' %  '.I Si\ pUryon am available i..i cm.'our only. He said; "However. ; mag has i ari.sen in the negntialmns •>• %  tint or the uncertainty of the i \\ hat's onToduy lib F.xcellrney thr tiovrrnor opens F.mplrr Week Exhibition al (ombermere Bey*' > %  in.ul at 10.08.a.m. CilrU' Industrial I'nlon Fair at Queen's Park—3 Oil p.m. First Football Teal belwren Jamaica and Barbados at Kemlnsloii Onl, His Excellency will in. %  d and meet the fall. Ill l m. Mubllr Cinema gffOa BBWW al Queen'* Park—~.:te p.m. Digestive Upsets After rxttnsiYe research. De Witt's Laboratories have produced De Wilt's Antacid Tablets, new companionS jducl to their renowned iwdri They are the most convenient way of checking digestive disorders away bom home. Nowattrw-iirtd — just diasotie one or two on the tongue foe pram pi rllUf aiiywhti*. Pleasant tAtng De Witt's Antacid Tablets are separately ctll-staM for fteahuess. In handy tear-on" strips for pocket or handbag. Try them today. ( IM Li..)-. Xlldl'tl Trnffir lUo's No. 10 REMEMBER THE SPEED LIMITS Space made available by i w \i i \ DRV for Safer Motoring. tour will not materials TRUTH BUENOS AIRES, Lnder a new decree ordered by President Peron, all Argentine children are lo be taught the Truth concerning the ownership of the Falkland Monde. They will learn that these islands, as well as parts of Antarctica, are und elwayi have been • indisputably within thc frontiers of Argentina 4^ ANTACID TABLETS No walaf r.dtd (jin'y carmdany-fwa ( IIIWMIW FEDERATED ASSOCIATION PUBLIC MEETING Quern's Park .MAY 25. 1*51 Come and henr DARNI.KV hraim' AI.LKVNK .-* %  Ills as-in i.lie. L'4.5.51 — ln. % %  • % %  .•.VMWWMM Um, A Good Night's REST Is So Important I to you ainV peacefully on TCUT pillow and float away on clouds of realful aleap? Or do you Ue down arKfa Uartmg ev. . to hnve tW worn.--. >f the day ooaao la.k aaul li'unl VOUr Many men and women wlnw.nervra irnfr\.^l by anxiety--or n run-doHii i.indition lind this to bo tnu-: And Ihat'l the time wh.n I'r f'liaae'a Nerve Pood can do m m.nh IO help you Foe tl reliable tonic eontelrai Vitamin Bi. iron and other ne.sl.-d minerala WHofa h.-l ( b.old up your vitnlity and (one up ye .r whole system so you re In iM-M.-r londliion io gel your normal ni**/trt reat, CanadiuiM bv the lliouanndhave p/m >i/in our half u ecnllirv of use. (lull you /ex/ hrltcr. aaf Mlrr, /erl heller after takir.*; I>r. Chasd'a Nerve F'hid. S, don't k-t your nertea rob you o/ nrn/*r rral' fiet Ilr. Oiaaa'n Naeve Food in the larve "eeonomy ahe". Thc name "l)r Cbawa" ia yotv aaaurance. u M* t BUUl Hiaaaii Kiutincn. Launon Mnn, HM iiir.ii %c i Bo*lm(k ll> Ml.ai KM MAI I..I %  l>v Mr rr. G.H.. Or.kr.lr. awai so pm io SSo a m Keftcnmrm. an SaM AIJ *a iNvrrgsO FRIDAY 2.30—4.45 St H.;i0 p.m. and continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.38 p.m. The rare and racy adt an tures of a female ggrvagt in a juncle of intrigue JOAN FONTAINE • ROBERT RYAN • ZACHARY SCOn • "Born to be Bad" and JOAN I.KSLIK • • MEI. naana • KKO— Radio Piclur.PLAZA BRIDGETOWN (t ^ Mawaa or Q\ KM^ -with the faithf ul ••' u-*r.lDK\M of 'lie UcaubJul Play sale uc pre) tcr your romantic momei.t. Get a few cakes of Dltl \ I TOILET KOAP. use It faithfully In your i and at the waatl basin fur a On, radiant w lb nat iral DREAM •' available at toifeM L da iiintera throuuhout tne island. Extra : ^^ %  i B,w Tin,. anaena Bwue /^.t Jj "TRADINC / --*i--%iai. POST" & "BRAVE LITTLE TAILOR" [urwrfi VromaT-^T/ nag %  v i MAKE SURE THAT YOUR NEXT SUIT BEARS THIS LABEL OF DISTINCTION P.CS.MAFFEI&Co..Ltd BASKETS t V^AAA'.AAA/AAA/. A^ SHOPHINti BASKETS—El S2.50. S3.1KI. $3.75 CAMS I.ll.V ROOT—Ea 84c. & S2.5II NEEDLEWORK BASKETS—Ea Sl.sn & S2.00 SISAI. BASKETS—Ea S2.II0 A variety of lovely Derornted BASKETS al vnriniK priees — S5.IMI. si mi s3.no Ete, Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11. 12. & 13, BROAD STREET The Weather TO-OAV Sun Una : :. 3H a III San Seta I G.U p.m Moon (Lail (Juarler) May 11 l.hrhtfni : 1 Hpm. lllsh Water: 5 52 am. rRITKRDAT: Rainfall i< ndrlnilon] i Nil Total for Month to yrilerday : 1.05 Ins. Temperature BREAD Till. IMAM THAT s HUM. nil >s \\ I kMIH Irotn louc rxperlrnre that IIEI) HAND PAINT will -Lind the MSI HI llw.1 Themfare e reeommenrf it to von lor Exterior and Interior Work. ;^'-K',*.WBWi? If* th,TOIUHEST t.u,i fur th,JOH MASSEY-HAIIRIS 42 B.H.P. 6 cyl. Diesel Wheel TRACTOR GKAaS OFRB. MANCTH sfl:i wi r.. BDI ni in IKV it \KI s i tin HBXI rmuDm oaeu COIRTESY THOM. LTD. — White GARAGE Park Rd. — Dial 4391 SUrked In Troplial While. Barbados l.leltl and n.rk Slone. lire). Hark OW, M "'" %  CreMn, s Mliilr TIIIIJI (jrrrn. Permanent Ureen; Mitlnto Mat HHe (ream and t.reen: Contrete I'alnt In Grey. Ilrlaht Red. Mid tireen Al> PAINT REMOVE" lor the ea.> removal or old Paint. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. FINEST QUALITY SKA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS IN WHITE GREY BLUE TAN WITH TRUBEMSE1) COLLAR PRICED AT SH.0. Ea


PAGE 1

'till KMlW. M\V 21. HS1 BARBADOS AIIVlll Ml I'M. I -IMS CLASSIFIED ADS. ton iiEvr TlLHOHI />• For Birth, Mi tii|f niinc(Mnli m drib Calling in. i >arg* u BS.DO lor any number ol ordi up to -rag • rent* per word lar m 1 ddilional aord Term* raah Phutie M* net ween S3* and pm J113 CM SleMI %  '•II'" %  | -' %  '•• t • P rr t.uOROl -On Mav Bid IMI. t Uv General rtoapltal, John Oookol. Ut. •ugar brnler f ralrneld Fartor^ Age Ol .ear* HM funeral IMVM KU Ut* IWHIM Eagle ilJll Boad .1 4 3D to-day for the Weataurv CaiiMlary. Eva Oookol .lOo*. Sibil .daughter*. Dr Hjninun iroualn B O Paper i pleaac ropy* Mill-In IN MBMOB1AM t RAMfOBO In lnvi %  .r* have pa %  It,.I When Ih* i Prom th** part Since heaven halh claim the* *" could not refrain In our memorle* Xill live a devoted lather fi rr to be -tnnmbfipa bv Hutfi Cravaiortl %  Wll*. Rerealord. Martin. Au.ti". ktt-feM, Aubrf. Peter, "an I %  Sonai. Jo Daughter' Drnl. Blade.. MM. Legall • tdithful Frlendi' M S SI In JAMBS— In loving memory daughter Vereella Jam*. ,.*leep on the B4lh nl May •*• %  •he reel In peace. (the Ha* (one but r.ot lorgotten Beating wtih the SaliiU ol God II will alkayLc remembered On the Mth May. roll called, i FOR •'-> cMroe 8AU Al-TOMOTIVt-: EXCrPTIONAL CAI! BLCIBICAL REPPIGEBATOB -One V | i loot mrkUIre Refiue...!.-! Applv: Harold .,..-. %  .th.tnePd-Drug Si..re Phone ! %  *—31*4 II 1 SI tin POl'LTRY Khaki Campbell D...I I MECHANIC \l. GRABS CUTTERS anal I It. Immediate del Solicited Courteay Oau \i., 11 !(. n D MM S3 9 91 fcl MISCELLANEOUS HOUSI a AP ABTMENT at 1111111. on-the-B* opi—.tr Woodude B*> SKreat prenuati M S 51 'i. | >T..I. |fjj Road Fumtahed ".. Available no>V/[..lr.. IBBBBM Mill >i ri in H SAUS Tea nnti per apole U- aad II ,-e.(. per eyua In ,.,,-.-,i.m itiaea* II Vi r-d IIM M InadaiK REAL ESTATC NVWRimV With II 1 line kiln. Building nd a Neat door Qua Hill Barrack, about . n-.il*. MM rd#eli.an Apply . W <*t Geerrr Mtmi FUAT ntahed baatnaea B-aumoni. Hartlng*. unlm Dining -nd Bitlnul loom*. i running water. Kitchen wit al convenM**-**. No peta %  Dial saw as si I w%viin Ml ol lent) •MaSSSt I t ( • at the rotner Belm.int Moid MI ii • aouare feel tUndin The M .1 kih-hen doan.Ulr*. taraa at, t iil-t J; io %  _|h i.p.Ulu RMMeen onrenlancea Oaraaat i and %  p m or by apnolnlmnl M* Dial ?MB The above wilt be l Public Competition .n l.l Jn IMI. at 1 P n, (".RHIMGTON i HP lot Ml* on rrloay. tl l JUNIOR C1JCHK—Fr our Cn'.n. PpH llt.ij l-ine rielrratilv OIL with ..irlvu.r ii, -m.Mitt. CCNTKAI UltrNDRY LTD S 51 CtGAKETTES — Ardath Cork tipped Cigarette* Buy now before the ad[ paj vanced prtre ramea Into effect. We rtlll •" % have a amall atock at !h reduced prtca >' —namely 10'a. lr and SO'a 31c 1 KNIOHTS LTD It 9 51—JO, MA1X AND FEMA1JCft l*dle t .ontact American F^millea In USA. ci.rrgelic youruj inen lit An-itii Farmeu Write lot particular!. Mr. ^ • Fulton Canning Tow t B ig nit to1" wcr.d 1 m here. if Jame. M UlIn MORRIS -In loving dear daddy McDonald MorrW who waa %  ailed to a highs tl. • ft ti M: 10 ft U 40 Nett c.ih. Better hurry A BARNES & CO.. LTD. a SI—I f n. I.AUHEI. RAZOR. If i WHITF. THJW While Tile. Enflnlr %  ,1 the Auto Tyre, Co. Tralalanr St. Phoo0M. H9SI-tfn STEN'tTYPLST .Brginiwr or QU,.IIIWd wanted immediately. Apply In perxi' and by letter to J A. Marion •> Roi Ltd. 1 9 91 I In MISCELLANEOUS \ni> TO BIT 1'SED B*d. Iron Bedalea.^ Lewing Machine., Ice Boxea. Gramo. about JD It x lit. and IUM ai>d Offlci VllflON. Spry 1. kill, 1..,.,. I. M S SI WA.MII> TO BIT JOINERS' GOtlD WORK In HaJkagBMI Cedal. Birch, Fir Deal lor Home Order. 1951, No. 9 which will b* pUbltgtWd in itn Offlcial Gazette of Thursday 24th May. 1951. 2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling prices of "Caroid & Bile Salts". "Vicks Vaporub". "Urasal" and "Maltevol" are n* follows:— liwr.MINO IIOtfSE .landing on I9H ptrche. ol land, illuated at POrMf or llucklngliam and Bank Hall croaa Road.. built ol Timber and Tooled artfli Ualvamaed Iron and la comprUed • if Open Verandah on three aide*. Living and Dining Boom.. Three Bedroom., j I Room. Rath. Kitihrn. rtc large yard all encloard. Very airy. SOB on application to S E. Cole Dial 4M0 or 4Mi where all •0.5S1 -*n %  aklj till a Item I nit of Sale Caroid & Bile Salts Vicks Vaporub Bottle of 50 tabs .. ,. 100 ., $i . pot 9 gram pot bottle MII j] fttwd boltk large Maximum Rrtall iTl.r iTii S1.88 4c. 26c 60c. >2 10 i view ol the leaae. the above opportiinlt.' lc Je V/*f a M>l"'l-AHEAIi G0VFRNMEN1 NOTICE i MH.I: \iiic. Dje lo a change in the date of arrival of the American employers who are to crrive to select the labourers for employment in the I'm ted States of America and the representatives of the Air Transport Company who will be re.V|H>IIMIJ1P for arranging the dates of departure and performing other duties In connection with the recruitment, it h:is been necessary to change the dates of the medical examinations. All workers WHO have 'Call Cards' stating the dates when next they are to report at Queen's Park itre now asked to report at 8.30 a.m. according to the following time table : Those called for Friday, the 25th May. 1951. Now report on Weane*da>. 30th May. 1951 Those called for Monday the 28th May, 1951; Now leport on Thursday, the 31st Hay. i % %  %  i Those called for Tuesday, the 29th May. 1951; Now marl on Friday, the 1st June. 1951. Please note that those who have vaccination eeitincates are requested to bring them along when thev ore coming to be examined 24.5.51—2n BOVRI makes good cook heller D WH1 KIVCS th.i: extra flavour lo all soup*, pies and savoLiicAnd nourishment, too —for Bovrli is the CCaMentaad good-ic-u of hcef Bovril is also a ta i> iMcMdl -.prcikl-iiid. a cup ol hot Bovril '•aily makes you feel fim \ MT\ %  nfi'iil .iil.-.-|.ii. i,.r liijili germii-nlal erneirne) even in llir i|.iii-iiiuii-. iliwnt>t >tain, it iMSJH iflfcltlBIUallllllJ Drll.il DETTOL THE MOOIIN ANTISEPTIC e ADVERTISE II PAYS I BoLs. Cocktail Onions 0 S j .. Cherries \ j H, Stuffed Olives J > Tins CorkUil Blseults o \ Swift Vienna Sausages o £ .. Frank furt Sausageg >. J Luncheon Heel * rate lie Foie I %  Potted Meal \ 1 ft f Pt Tin Sasso Ollv ; Tins Caaatin O Pfcrs. Kraft Cheese I • | | FNCE & Co. Ltd. j i on;. omi vi \i. SOlj'VENIKS. CURIOS, JEWELS New 8hlpment opened THANI'S i£ ARRIVED | SOLD! New Stiipirient Bold belore am Baa them at Oa delivery nf Oaa all -ai. Mi-Maxt and jtr r order TO-DAY IMPORTANT NOTICE The Annual General Meeting nf the Barbados Cricket Association will le held at KKNSiNGTON OVAL, (and ntn at Queen's Park) i May 25th at 4.SO \ p.m. Entrance by George Challenor Stand. W. F HOYOS. Hony. Secty. l 5 91 Sn tfMtttaai at our orTW Street on Friday SMh Ma/ ISSI. pm 1 rood 14 perch** ol laid at i Car ton St Jamev the proper*. I %  A I. .,.!., aid coudltUna BANFO-JJI. The undrnitfnnl will iiflrr lor aale ai their Office. No IT. High Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 19th. day of May. ISSI. at 1 p m The rfwtlliiigluxKe knowa ... "OKANr V'EW-iili Ilia land thereto rontainlnn 1 II—all 4 1/Mh I'erehea <.r thereabout*. Mimic at Kithaheba. Saint Joarph Inipecllon on applH-t'nii lu Ih* ( actakcr. on It,%  FOr fuMher partlcnUo and condittoni ul aalr apply lo — HUTU CATFOHD 4 Co. 13 j m %  .. .1 %  U W la TT DA1X. \-.v ,n. Koad lUndlni, M JJ |H'iclu' of l.ind Drllli |l hiiua. "imiiiiwi open verandah. I> IHntng roomi two brdruouu. Mliheii. toilet and bath -ill !• ottered lor Mile U Friday I'l IH 11 \OIIIIS %  %  ad nn ... NOTICE ba t > n ag •<• |e tenlion ol tl Cfcrl.t Churd u.lo the l.ee.1 aulhoriimg I KOTICK GIVEN it: < i pamh ol MM lo be mlroduceti ..( ttn. fa a v.. I I pm ai Hie ggBN igned from whom tor and lurther particular, HUTCHIN*>N S IH> obtained ANFIEI.I) 17 S 11 an Ltd ---li%  .>-' I.. M uggdJ i., in,,,, MI .. u, HIMOU n n-pairmg ekiatlng roads and path, m Uu%  CeaneWrv. and lav in r out | new road* and pjth. ih ibi a* to UP* in rfleet K.. Ill* Mortuarr cnapei in the MI, lo HIM in .1,.,, lilt; a drainage well It, the —id i Ih* Said aum ao ralaed Li be repaid n '• mtg o ITaOaa ^ci,. KBiiii.riu-.iig in tin >ear ISSS. logethn •.lib iutert -I > |wr .nituln per atuuun on the pe'n' i ,p-il turn ..,| balance. thereof for the time being owing. Dated the Slat day ol Mav thai. VRANWOOO %  novec. Solk-ltor. lor the Ve.ti. ,.f Chrut Church H S SI in In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station >' % %  'i. %  [Wasl i iUu : I.I I OS I A MMMI LOOT "•i K3UP Krtaa B Jt i *dverli.'. eri I Mil Mil I Kill II tKt i I %  I II li til HBRJJIV i.iv KM i .i*i MOT* r. upOllcatkan Dlraeloii ol Ui. at* Dtidlai t amiroo llaa-ku' il,,, d m 1 iinbered SS • I. upon the atalrawnt thai the nHgtnal IVitinrate No i lamaad to OuolCameron Hawkln. under Sal ISM h*. been loat and %  tM IB AtJ* MCKFJIY IIIVIN that il witbtn Ihnt. da., i heeeof no claim or reprc, raebret ol auch original Cg nade t„ the Direct."! th. o..-rd I., oe.l arttl lor a dm r %  L J SetALi \v\oiMi;iii:\is Ihiraj .ui, ..you wait U may onl. ..• i .. .nniiiig Applv I'lllSOMI The IHIII. i II i -A WHITI nee THOMAS, a. I ri—ran i. tn I.I debt. In mv name %  a. b .i written order Waned Bf MS umn ti i.roN W,IIT Becl %  SIS SI lr MAIL NOTICE Ml: MAILS for Arul.i Uld Curacao b) K t.\i Mr ClOSaXJ ..I thl O Saafa tm l l'" st i :u mi :i m. on Wednesday MKtl Mav II N AHMSTKON.i. Colonial PiMtirutstcr Qajnsj 'I PCM Offlce. Had May, IMI. AUCilOW Nil.IVAN MINX ISM MODS!. Hi-*H. • H'-l IVe are intnted by the owner whrt **"•• ""'*"'%  > left the Colony to auction tni. *w| I nJg %  Alph: mly done S.SO* %  ,l ,ur kno.led-*j T-5!!^ •_". I the beat I | ahipa through i Alcoa Clipper. a a Uraniaatad. ... a %  Punta An %  Cole. Oarage on Friday t > p.m. JOHN M BLADON. REAL ESTATE JOHN M. Ill 1IIOS A F 8. V V A. Rrprrsentatlve: GERALII WOOIt Am (i.,|„ ihal tall, nsri it .i Kl IM ni.iie l.mr b-..ritf dishi ^ • %  her miuritliing wuli Kl (M II 1 Kl IM i. M Rid MS) M U M, ( ive aaar fassil) tsxra iiiiti.iuiiiii tsu %  Ha ... trii .I.I, f5*J 1. KLIrVi It par*, tafs Milk 2. KUM • % %  %  (,. without wMiiisMsa 3. KLIM qsallty U olwayi u.ilor-i 4. KLIfV II % % % %  tlM far qroe^inq chlldraa 3 KLIM ADOS Nouaiitmtm TO COOKIO DISHIS 6. KLIM it r*eam*n>e} far .atM, faa.lttf 7. KLIM II of* iHM ipeelolly pocked *M 8. KLIM it prod-t-d HaSjSf ttrlcv*tt coatral Sore Mouth LOOM Bloody Tooth ding Oama. Bora Mouih an.1 Laaaa t, M ulh or i-th-iaoiiia I-..I ill....— ,III AK i* lal.r cauar ,nur H.ih Itnliii' |{h'umatlani I-...,.:. Brat llghlrl money bark an faturn of rmptt packA ||..|'.M "'"'"' V'f"",. fr Pycrrkis —Tr.ncli H.wlfc FURNISH NOW AND SAVE! Hencw VanlUei DlnUi*. Kit.l-cn S".,.| Fancy Table.. ChiBr-li^-. I CSB—III %  asBJBl t aJl up, Wafjona Sewing B.i.k. lemoveable Stand. MM. rseaka. B—ikeaae.. BooBiac 1 Urge Olaaa-eaMa well divided. OfBce Chair*. Mat* tl SO TO-DAYS NEWS HASH III! i i:n Ivl il r. Hl'RlNO ANNUL I9SI lentuiinc the South Africans an,i the Ml' (' in AUaTtraUa 4/4 f.LASS IIE< ANTfcltS t/— AT JOHNSONS STATIONFRV a\ IIARIIHAKi: L.S. WILSON FOR SALE trinii.g the Colony The honaa ,. .1 the F-tate T alorcyn. aolldlv built i.f HMM wTIB iMi,.peted raal Th... ...,-n line WBSdjg viiii. fn window* leadii.K IBM eotajraSl %  < aitdah* from whwh | „ obatl "'"I Hew ol lb* aea a .horl rtl.taiue aw*.The i liedrooina era large ami I Ita own bathroom with tub bath !and hoi waler There la ainpfa %  cop* 'or l'.eapen-i Itiellll and model lilfatMin to lie .% %  led out v. I . ... II planted with liee. „„t |V .-.•.!: BM %  and there In B right ol grM Ut* beach with c.ccllenl bathing. %  INCn MARI OH On .pnrok 9 acre a coaalland near Btlvvr Band* A Mildly MBMB hoaiM wllh ah Ingle roof and pin* BJgaarkaa 4 mepllon. 1 liedt IgaaSts: J knili'ii 1 aer. ..i..I ,.,!., ...1.1 I.IIIKtRBir MIIHBR". Brit; .... A .ii-tinctiva and .el well l.a.k In .e-ludad ground* approK. on* ac-tIn eatrnt Th* garileun aie will matured ami Plan a i..r..|.lnte privacy from the roadway and adlolnma proprrly Theie I. a SOU "'I i-li.ii' I I 1 >• %  m any veiaivdahi with a central atairwav making an attraciivfealu.e. llllllaa MOM MM gi-.d Iwdrnom-. kitchen, butler', panlry. utoie. room, and u.ual olncea. Outalde thar* la a large garaa*. aervanti fiiarfer.. elr An ealrenwly Inlerealing and de.liable property BulldltiK i ... .1 I %  Road A %¡ ,..,.. th l-.-li\l.: Cheapatde Sinai* tWa> rMldaiaJg, Z h wnwtaa wait from town centre I living muni) .lining rt. raoena. Area ol plot appro %  I0.MB aq ft Open to oflei. IN I HtM III |i.,h Mallow ..i ... I aoundiy built bungalow on tb*J coaat where there I. alwaya A %  ooliiui BVSMB ' I %  combined JOIi r aM dining nmnii [lichen with aervli • Ba* B T HImil REAL I • i \ i l AGENT AUCTIONEER PLANTATION*! Bt'lLi>tM. 'Phone 4648 BPBY inTOTXT. DIAL OWE ACUUN ,%y.\ii..\HI.K... "NOXZEMA" Your r,i.oiirite Sim Gnafli Ihi. Medic-iidl Ml ("icsm preventv SUNBURN Soothe and HealsSkin linuiiorn. "N(X/I MA klloart y.iu in eniy ytmr Holidays, or WccscniK srhhcBM Fear or Wotry nrxnil Sunhuin. Rimcmhcr Rf, "NOX/iAIA" The Meditated Cretan in the 'l.ittlr Hlur Jur" in 7hree S.t I I, V9. and 5/6 per Jar Obtainable at • BOOKER'S (Barbados DRUG STORES Lid-Broad Street and ALPHA PHARMACY. Hailing. SHIPPING NOTICES Canadian National Steamships III! TPMI %  Montreal .IN .. 14 Ma CAN III IT Mil i %  Mc.r.n M M<: MY .. I Juia IADV NKUattr: ,. ai J u n* IAHV KODNKY .. July M Ma r Mae • J.m. II June SJulv S Jul. a Aug. 4 Aug bartvana* Sir tl iigg TT Ma. IS May St Mi. M HI/ S June SB Jon* 1*. Jan* 14 July IS Juty 15 A „ %  :t A SUII.IOIM IADV NXUaOr* .. Bh Jm IADV RiiUSEV 3 July LADY M'lJtUN LAUV HiiliM.V ..JSAog. 3 July IB July n A< 4 ArrlWM ArrlM ArrtVM ArrleM SJaatan SI Job* HaUfag Montraail — XZnd J^ne h J"" 14 July IS July %  Wuly T Auf • Am. IJ *^ s*pi • —pi. %  > SSfPt GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD. — Af enU. W Mcoa, Si**MAhip fa NEW YORK 8EKVICR k" -a.le.1 ITih Apitl Arnvea Barbado* Sth May IBUt NEW ORLEANS SERVICE : llfad llth April Arrive* Baiha.t.x 4th May .1. IA POLARIS" Sail. J,„t May ., ., ||u, „ •AIXX>A HiiAMVR" Ball* igth May ,. j.i Jim* CANADIAN SKKVICE "' I HI!i L • tall. Ballfag Arrltti N 1>A I'l v. fl N %  M.i> June .aVth \ln, J4ih June lath .1.. |g ?l-i • %  II" Ml | BlBj SSIh ulU t r BJ John a ,1 *u UrBaMMi IIOIIKRT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE AI'I'I.Y:—l,A TOBTA a CO.. LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. %  MOM I M'l •VI.Ill II t Hill III A rt. li KI.X-I %  Oinije.Luf lllh June I KOI Kl IHIMIItll I M: *'I HI iv.,.in IMISIIItli I A (It AIMA i I II \l Ml A JAMAICA M -iH.nle.Ud24th Map IMI FRENCH LINE lie Ole Transatlantkqiifi Ml IM. TO ENGLAND a PRANCE COI.OMUIE June loth. 1031 via Martinique & Guadeloupe CUI.OMHIK May 30th, 1951 TMIIKIII. 1 1..I Ciiiaira, Curaeao. C:irt;i.ena and JaFINE QUALITY CREPE 1(1 outstanding shades al Cl TJ SATIN WHITE, PINK, BLUE at r)Qf' GEORGETTE WHITE. PINK BLUE a, 92* FLOWERED LINEN*** r/ CHILDREN and Larger Patterns Jl.jO LADIES'& CHILDREN'S HATS STRAWS & FELT in a Large Range ol Styles lui ABVASTAOS III y .von// | THE BARGAIN HOUSE 30, Swan Slrrtt — S. AMMAN, Propriilur TIIONE 2702






Harbadtos Advocate

eaten rane, ee eer tantra eons tn enter

ESTABLISHED 1895 THURSDAY, MAY. 24, 2851

a LT

-B.W.LS.A. WILL. NOT GO TO LONDON |

Communists On a |
° Commonwealth Producers
The Run Again | , HE BRITISH WEST INDIES Sugar Produc-

TOKYO, May 23. ee ers’ Association will not be represented on the
UNITED NATIONS FORCES on the Eastern| TREASURY | West Indian Goodwill Trade Commission which is
| due to visit the United Kingdom about the middle

CONSIDER of June on its way to Canada.

front to-night sealed the gap in their lines
The Hon. Harold Robinson tabled the follow-

= eee of the threatened massive Chinese
reakthrough into South Korea. At it

. es en $ SCHEME | ang draft statement at yesterday's meeting of the i

| Regional Economic Committee :— ;

end of the 120-mile front, counter-attacking South
Korean units were reported almost astride the 38th
: - » . The British West Indies Sug: They would be willing to wor!
parallel . At some points their patrols were believed For WwW. Indies Assseiutina have carefully tae together” with all ‘those polit
to have crossed into North Korea. sidered the majority decision of cians who might, at any time in
ik cated - the Regional Economic Commit- the future, come to talks specili-
tee, taken on 2Ist May to change cally dealing with sugar at the ;

———— = 1 The threat of a Communist
the Committee's previous de- same time that other ¢

breakthrough had hung over the
Ado t Bu et eastern sector for several days tes on ~
P while massed formations _ otf} cision and te send a delegation wealth countries wer:







PRICE; FIVE CENTS











* See



(From Our Owr Correspondent)
LONDON, May 23

No details are yet available

here of the scheme by which















Britain may make more , dollars 1 , M5 Wet
Chinese hurled themselves against| ivailable from her exchange pool aureeane on the ¢ anadian situ- the matter. : 4
B One Vote the sagging United Nations line in tor West Indies purchases from| ton before sending to Canada.) The B.W.1S.A., would give full
y , [the second phase of thelr spring Canada. The scheme which it was As the B.W.L8.4. informed | cooperation and help ‘and de
offensive. reported from. Ottawa yesterday the Regional Economic Commi!-| everything possible within the
PARIS, May 23. They drove a wedge into Allied is now under the ‘consideration| tee all Commonwealth Sugar| resources in matters of that sort 1
The French National Assembly | defences to a point 16 miles east- f the Treasury, is known to have| Producers are agreed that there|{n this particular instance hoi
to-night adopted by one vote the |southeast of Pungammi, but neat} the support of the Colonial Office should be no separate negotia- ever where a trade delegatk
new 1951 Budget Bill presented |Soksari they advanced into the ' vho have long been aware of the| ion with the U.K wr one going to discuss all aspect
by Government after its original] jaws of a giant Allied eineur| y ee West Indies’ feeling in the matter ment, The Association is eX-|of trade and obviously uh bal-
version failed ‘by five votes to}movement, | a ‘ SS ens at The final decision will rest with| tremely apprehensive that were! ance between imports and ex-
vain a second reading earlier} ‘The threat vanished as the! "HE SCENE as an infantryman dashes for cover as members of a unit of the 3rd Infantry Division the Treasury, but they will con-| the Association to appoint 4) ports and one thing and-another
to-day. jaws of the pincer began to close | are pinned down by enemy small arms fire “some Where in Korea” as the battle against Communist sult the Colonial Office and other representative to the above dele-| it must come very close to dis-
It took nearly three hours lO\threatening to trap the Com-j aggression continues. Ministries concerned before taking gation it should be interpreted cussing matters’ that ine
count the votes which were finally munists well south of their main} —-———-—-—"- nnn , Se action by the other Commonwealth P.W.LS.A should not diseuss and
announced as 182 for the Bill and } lines. 66 an ° e - s ry NET It is believed here that more Producers Associations as Neko! it would be impossible to con-
181 against. Popular Republicans,] Worn out in their efforts to asematt MACAR | 'HUR S ~ TRAIT |: GY details may beeome available} tating behind their backs The virions; othete “that they ned fot
inost Moderates and Gaullists|penetrate to the south, the L . when the present British delega- eras ee a done so ; :
abstained from voting. Wikbicers SAnaw-duirticd BPacice- E ey ene ss - tion under Mr. Bottomley, Sec-{ ¢4 that it would be most unwise ae we vf pe
i i tions to withdraw. ee: xhibition W OULD NOT END WAR retary for Overseas “inde. | for them at this stage to appoint th a wth ee a
This morning's setback was due} pit front line reports late f returns from trade talks in| Such a representative fer dis- ee es sake tad Tapiastyes
‘ eas s é : = § acts ake * action o
to the abstention of Socialists today indicated that they would Sa s Du dale Ottawa. They are due at London cussions in London in any was | io, seem: hid tual tvieraanaed she
ut an gas - 3 pain’ * tax be too late and that many woulc Ly : 8 4 WASHINGTON, May 23 Airport tomorrow night. Mr commected with sugar, Committee
religious se s certai ax a : : ; . . . : , Maint > : bee re ;
sean, ; be trapped in the ring of Allied} (From Our Own Correspondent) General Omar Bradley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs ee oe ee op lige Mr. Robinson said that when] Professor Beasley — enquired
. ” .o ie ae ne ae a ; a awe anada's e , ) 4 ns ‘ " + whe , “0 f “mE .
The new version omits this and |®™™our and infantry, aes Sas oon, 23. (| of Staff told the Senate Joint Committees to-day that the]jncrease trade with the B.W.1 the nae er aera a} whe - t Seog pe ae or
A v oo ae ee : r,’ John ugdale, Ministe vt . : : hal a ea : : ; 7 F ; : fas to ser é slegation at monwea Suga rodurers ss0-
went Parties ee lek ana Withdrawals State for Colonial Affairs, tides strategy PEA RORE d by General MacArthur would not . nd Officials here consider the Wes! ede de a purely consultative basi: ciation,
voted for during the past five] An Eighth Army Headquarters/attended a private view of al the Korean war, Testifyinigeat the inquiry into the dismissal ean have a strong claim for) tt was not to enter into any hego Exchange Of Opinion
months. - spokesman said tonight there| notable Exhibition of Traditionai | of MacArthur, Bradley said “General MacArthur thinks] && ditional dollars, but 1 under tiations but merely to act as a Hon. Harold Robinson sala that

The Bill was sent in a hurry} Were indications of a limited)Art from the colonies being that to do certain additional operations would be decisive stand the demands of othe) | goodwill mission, This now had]}there was not; there wag-only an

to the Senate as soon as theyChinese withdrawal along the/shown at the Imperial Institute! and we do not think they would be decisive.” By “we” he conaied lars” ot are * deen changed on some broaderjexchange of opinion throygh the

Assembly vote was known and the|entire Korean front. His state-| as part of the Festival of Britain meant himself? and the Chi@mmo? Stalt : coe a vefore any CONneessio! | otter West India @ommittee, THEY had

Assembly expects to be able to|ment was regarded as cautious Mr. Dugdale said, “This is al : roe . — ea : Not only would this Mission first agreed long before they came to
7 Rr aod for throughout the day Allied|fascinating exhibition.” It would,’ ” 5 Further discussions on the sub :



pass it on a second reading after

Republican Senator Owen go to England and be briefed on dthat Conference on a solidified
dinner. —Reuter,

{ ~
: " . ; 4 . : ‘ct are expected to be held wher 5s ‘
Commanders in all sectors had|enable people of this country, he 'B ; . ze J : he Cs 1 tte but they Pent for sugar negotiations with
le F Me ; 7) : | Brewster suggested that Senate . nglo-Ci j , the Canadian matter, y ; avec UN te
reported the enemy falling back|said, to learn something about We Students hearings had Citic eee Bie Coniiten nae See would generally moke trade nego- [he Commonwealth Countries ana
\"° the north, the artistic expression of the} | - . pidge: i

my tries tu > g re ac y oO " woth tiations and trade talks with the
; Chinese after suffering stagger-| people in the colonies. In ordey} _ “s .@ countries t mare positive actiony|month. This Committee, meetin
ype <9 ing losses began their withdrawal|to popularise art among colonial | / ay tri ec
‘O tce ‘0 in the west and centre, trying to] peoples,







hey must. give the impre



in the Korean situation twice yearly, keeps close watch British Government while there, not only in’ thelr heagte, | But uy
He said the United States hid]|on all West indian, Canadian an “When you are making general} ‘pearance to the world that they










the subject should, he jeng urged economic sanctions] United Kingdom trade deals trade talks and getting also at the | vere honouring that agreement
- ‘ A . ; ong § Si § als. M , re SK Jensley asked whethes
ia ig ay AS ea day eins bs "ta "teh Pig {From Qur Own Correspondent ugainst "Rarashuuniek China “but| It is also anticipated that a{ same time brn Cath Sarit ud t ee ntend d that ‘hoa aan
Mad Moor Say ithaiewatt econ th ‘ne cao Traditional art in ine Gnigi ies LONDON May 23. We did not achieve that in the|strong West Indian delegation ee to gues 4 : pose thy wu SP neoting of Commieesith
» ere tha: had ap a the|however, should be taught side| , Students at Mans Crescent, Lon«| United Nations until coincidentally understood to be arriving early a ak t ¥ Ga t ae it would be | ‘ugar - producers in -- London
PARIS, May 23 main weight of their offensive. by side with western art. A donis neaidentiol centve, run by {sith these hearings.” the. nae ‘nue Lo er MiMeult to avai any negotia horthy
i After “wunen-hunt-through-the! .Tonight’s Eighth Army com-| knowledge .about,art. could. nol, the Britian Siauall ase thygater- eres eid “Wel wxertainly we : ee aa tions at all.as regards sugar. oh Herve Haroleomestineony somnid
wild regions of the Atlas Moun-|™munique said that Alli troops/develop in tight compartments. yein'’s ° ad®@ progress’ iy the tast ‘six



eeks , gp jesscart 9 i that they did not know. Their
weeks, Now, what effect these Discussions’ Link tntetination at prewent’ Wee nme

: ° i :
hearings had on England and P . R d He said that the BWISA. a, 4
e here lcd be « neeting bu
France I would not venture to - ersia ea y with great reluctance had come jypee am noe nau whe 8

2 hey did not know when. He did
say.

B t It i y 1 T T to the perexpanrt in as eee not know whether they would be
rewster: “It is coincidental at oO ¢ k a Ov a ulay matter that genera rad® | meeting in October or when
any rate. It would a ¢ € r P

tains, police to-day arrested Mo-|0n the heels of the Communists The King and Queen will ‘visit
hammed Tademalit, the ‘mad{in the eastern sector were meet the Exhibition tomorrow; it will
Moor” who is alleged to have mur-|ing only light resistance be opened to the public on May
dered eight Europeans during the In their ‘six-day offensive,|25. Exhibits include rare ex-
last two weeks, a French News}Communists were estimated to amples of traditional colonial art

The Council has arranged that
the centre be vacated ¢ ntirely
for a fortnight in July and that
two-thirds of the students even-
tually make way for a_ fresh






Agency message from Rabat said have suffered well over 60,000}/—some never seen before in|batch of students arriving from seem they sud- discussions must be linked wit! They would have to meet, he
The message said Tademalit hao casualties, England. overseas for the academic year|denly changed what had hitherto TEHERAN, May 238 discussions relating to sugar mat [said before the end of the year to
made a “complete confession”, —Reuter. They are representative of}/commencing in October, The] been a firm resistance to economic! persia is ready to. take ove | ters and agreed that it would be \ discuss the price of sugar nex



A bloodstained banknote found West, Central and East Africa.| majority of the present students | *@pctions in London.” the Anglo-Lranian oil fields anc | very unwise for them to jeopa eal












the West Indies, Malaya and the ron “ : aNd Bradiey: “I w ay : “ » We i
on Sunday on a Moroccan trades- > . ts ‘Retin residence oppose the arrange- radiey: “I would not say it|installations “without furthe, | ise the position of the West In cs
man who admitted he had sold Deputies Met For a territories in South-East! ments and have not altered their we = oppepition to it; we just|delay.” The usually well in [ar allow any possible mise ppr ‘. aaron a eueeed whe hy
food to the killer, gave a clue to ; a a Klee i bas attitude despite the explanation|ad trouble getting them to ge] formed newspaper Kaisan saic|hension or wrong views to arise} tyey should fil tie pice of f
his whereabouts. ; Half Minute ‘eee om Dopittnent of tna] mat there is need for evacuation, | along with it.”"—Reuter, tonight that Kazam Hassibi | between sugar producers in th meee seein by a < a
A bearded blue-eyeti ex-soldier ae orf Se ghesn ohy assisted ini#iVen at a meeting this week Finanee Ministry representative] area and sugar producers in Aus ~ ene? o aecompt in
the “mad moor” was ‘hunted by PARIS, May 23. | the arranging of the ‘exhibition jbetween students and British on the Oil Nationalisation Boar | tralia and other Commonwealth [eer e On page %
12,000 police, Moroccan troops and Big Four Foreign Munisters'| .¢pjained to me: ‘The essential | Council officials. } RED DANGER eorine ee ae Lligai Santee ,
Foreign Legionaires.—Reuter. Deputies to-day had a sitting}ract which the visitor to this Thirty West Indian students . ine Minister Dr. «Mohame It was not only neeessary ti ie ami
which lastéd half a minute—their ibiti Rudde to -ecjate-.|are among those determined to 1-7 : Mosseadegh returned to his sanc for the B.W.LS.A., to stick to
: eds to appreciate-— g : t —- | ;
|apeak, yet. ey pip to rg ea to gorda the éxhibits stay at Hans Cresent. IN PERSIA bee = on oe aaa the letter of the law but that THE ‘ADVOCATE”
peak, the Western spokesman) oo inere curios—is that negro yuilding today after a secret sortk they should give every appear-
Vote $88,000 For "a D Andrei G k Africa and the other tribal ne Asked to-day what action the WASHINGTON, May 23. ment Dr F crak { ee ance of doing so. It would Were for NEWS
oviet Deputy Andrei Gromyko as ciate > British Council might take in the Chairms f the Joint Chiefs remier rr, Pauirni = rehusec t in the lon n, be to the ad-
: “hi represented mever underwent a & irman of the Joint Chiefs oi} ° , n the long run, | 1
Workers To U.S. Was = the Chair. He began the Shildeophical and scientific revo-jevent of students carrying out Staff, General Bradley testifying} 5#Y where Dr. Mosseddegh hac vantage of the West Indies, DIAL 3 1s |
39th Meeting by asking whether lution which has played such a (their threat, Mi. Hugh Paget,|today before the Joint Commit |%@en since Monday morning — whose interests they all wished Day or Night |
Cee rage Westers Deputle aid Sega large part in the moulding of Director of the Centre, repliec|tees Senate said: “There is dan-] Woy he had left his heavil to serve ace folds
stern Deputies sd Phe



GEORGETOWN, May 23. nothing to say. Gromyko: said he industrial civilization; and that|“I hope that on reflection resi-|8er of Russia’s moving into Irar guarded refuge













. iin } Ne wf : as genera velievec h
The Legislative Council Finance] had not either and adjourned the by chance of history, these colo- Sane wilt be reasonable and wil nee and starting another ean ‘eer naga —_ ee
Committee to-day approved a vote' meeting until to-morrow after- nial cultures developed in. direc eave Hans Cc scent on July 1574 8 ae f Giivita, tanidiies. naar ‘Teheran
of $88,000 for the recruitment of ; noon, tions more conducive to the)as requested. Whether or not that is any!py, Patimi described as ridicu
400 workers for U.S.A. farms The present deadlock is over growth of art. r re ‘i ‘ils more dangerous than Yugoslavie lous reports that the Prime Minis
The final ratification is expected] whether the Soviet item on the ac ert A erat ee, Pees ane re ae other ave ter was about to resign,
when the Council meets onjNorth Atlantic Treaty should bes veal eee aS. Sr aee yee sa sot prepared to say, bul —Reuter.
Friday. included in the Foreign Minis Lib l Wi Ss seas territories, recognise — ihe certainly it is a point of dangei
od : itnt vers iweralis ut eal British Council’s justification ir | and we would like to be in ;
This action followed the visit hoes siete ene thas ibe soni : treating Hans Crescent as pri-| better position to meet an} U S B f N su Pl [
of Dr, Claude Denbow, President) not include this item in their MELBOURNE, May 23. /marily for newcomers to the| further aggression, if it occurred. ». Dralt New an)
of the B.G. branch of the Coloured | agenda in any form. R. G. Menzies, of the Liberal country. Mr. Paget points out —Reuter. :
Peoples League, to the U.S.A, and —Reuter, | Country Party Coalition Govern-' that Hans Crescent is primarils By MICHAEL FRY. |
subsequent correspondence be- ment, has won an additional seat le gateway into the British com Bie Ra UNITED NATIONS, May 23
tween U.S. authorities and the in the Australian Senate, giving it tatty, canthe sbene Cotte y The United States has draftec
Jocal Government, culminating in “J a majority of four. : students would normally coms Parachutists May & plan for the creation of a naw
a conference between the Officer Governor Sees Voting for the line-up in (he poy one academit’ year”. Mr. Paget| gv ra ’ Disarmament Commission which |
administering the Government } new Parliament which will belincists that the newcomers have} GO Lo Middle East |WUld include atomic ener:
ond a Committee of the L.C.P. on Football Today opened on June 12 will be : House rtp strongest Bima ah eas ib J € armed forces and armament: |
Monday. ; of Representatives ; Liberal Coun- } - * daveb ce io + ates 4 . | a aca 2 and Internal Security Forces. |
, ic : -\try Party Government 69; Labour |#commodation — which ».Han Me IAMPSHIRE, May 23. |phe plan will be presented on|
will gent the ee Siteics. 51, non-voting members 2. Sen-|Crescent offers. It is learned tha Men of the 16th Independent) piday to the twelve nation }



almost 1,000 new students awe ex Parachute Brigade Group who

. > ‘ : Party 32 .

Barbados Footbali Test that takes| ate: Liberal Country Party 32, ea nei oad a were. hurriedly assembled hert
; ; . pected te rrive between Augu ¢ :

DYNAMITE STOLEN Pee my Heosington this ee. Labour 28.—Reuter, ond Sie . ee en Au ies Abed tus. “bogah to-deiy to go

United Nations Study Grouy com
posed of all members of — the
Security Couneil plus Canada



on a 72-hour leave before over-







(From Our Own Correspondent) teams at 4.45 p.m. | seas posting. —~Reuter, |
This mapiibthe sat teresceie wk he gore Coever follows; D DID NOT OBEY 23 | ‘ . ei Unofficial reports have sue |
maica:—Cooper, cel, a- oe 2 ‘ sested they would gc ) » Mid-
Fort James discovered that the Costa, Bayliss, ler, Parchment,| A Syrian Military épokesman | Glubb I asha Shot ite Mee leaned tittle Excharige Notes
arsenal had been broken open and | MeLean, Berry, Sasso, Miret, Hall.|today accused Israel of _ failing ;

TEL A-VIV, May 23 interests in Persia There was



12 cases of dynamite stolen. There Barbados: Cozier, Bright, Grant,| to carry out fully the Security, phe
was a similar occurrence a year|# Yutchinson, Cadogan, Gittens.| Council Resolution _ instructing
ago and the dynamite was never] Lucas, Drayton, Wilkes, R. St. C.j] her to stop draining Huleh Marsn
traced, Hutchinson, Chase on the Syrian border. —Reuter.

LONDON, May 28 } A ¥rederick Starke Dress Shaw attracts afl the leading fashion buyers and beauty

{ he United States and editresnes. Inthe long, gracious salem, with ite deep, tarurions Version carpets

Bi area ‘ “he { " | and beautiful Jacobean furniture, the guceta assemble and cocklaile are served,
; France have exchanged diploma- | Fach model known the must lack her beet. Bagla eyes will take in detail,
Arab Legion had been shot at and day that their destinations would] tic notes on the admission of Tur- not ondy of her dress uf make-up and hair, too. That's why Jutia Daniell,

de tu h
wounded by an Arab in the Jor-| be announced later this week key und Greece to the Atlantic lovely Frederick Starke model, always uses an Addis Beauty Brus

Jerusalem Post yeported| "9 official confirmation of such |
. 1 ¢ jan ¢ —Reuter, Pact, a Foreign Office spokesman
SECOND GOAL owe | é LOVELY YOUNG MANNEQUIN Julia Daniell says t
'

to-day that General Lu Glubb! Teports. :
Pasha, British Commander of the| A War Office spokesman said to-






The Jerusalem Post’s special said here to-day,

correspondent’s report which wa The matter bed also been dike For vada “A how - Y 's
| pin Ee cusséd in a Seandinavian capital, | brus
shot was fired after Emir Tala ‘Chevalier In Catiada but the spokesman did/not amplify | ‘ y
the eldest son of King Abdulla, | 4 t .. | this. the
had been sworn in ag Regent. cs TORON TO, May 23. The British Cabinet which dis- | e
Emir, heir-apparet to thx Maurice Chevalier, the French} cussed the question yesterday, was | Sleek-haired, blue-eyed Julia Daniell, top-
Throne, had taken over from his ®@tertainer who has been barrcd| more disposed to the two nation: rank model for Frederick Starke, of 31
father who has gone to Turkey |!0â„¢ entering the United States,| than hitherto, it was understood Bruton Street, knows the value of her
on a three weeks’ visit. The inci- arrived here to-day for a two-day —Reuter Addis Beauty Weush! “The Addis deep
dent was alleged to ha®e occurred | ®™84gement. ———~ brushing teebnique certainly leaves my
on Tuesday of last week and thc hair looking its best,” she says,
2 atest) x “IT have no pylities”, he told re- , . “a i .
report added that Glubb was ines , : e vert \nd Addis is tine for hair health, too.
confined to his house for the| Porters I am a Frenchman first rr st Atom Ex} It gives the sealp massage that’s so im-
week, and an @otertainer second portant. And at the salon, where every
detail of hair and make-up has to be right
I know my baie is looking its best,”

—Reuter. Chevalier has been barred from
| the United States because he hint-

The Addis Beauty Brush is speciall,

designed for deep brashing. Wight widely



|

not confirmed here, stated th

»





|
|



President Peron ordered :
trian scientist Donald Richter tc |
be placed under arrest, the news
paper Tribuna Da Imprensa re-
ported here to-day. Richter was |

Jed that the Soviet backed the
| Stockholm Peace Petition

{ “Millions of other people have
{signed it and I signed it in good

Two Die In Crash

spaced rows of tufts sweep through yeor
hair tight to the sealp, leaving it really silky















8 oa bike ae ripwith
TOKYO, May 23. faith.” he said.—Reuter. thea ee, yi ny ee cs lime ben that it'll look ita beat,” aod bustrots An about the Addis Manat
The 5th Air Force to-day reé | sponse r . a new method of pro | that eye Sc ics
ported the deaths in a plane cra ducing atom enersy , Dry Goods Store
of two outstandin; pilots Walter ONLY THIRTY-NINE , —Reuter. ,
Selenger and Colonel Leland of i tee
Holiand NEW YORK, May 23 ‘ s ®
Selenger flew over 2,000 hour The C gie Hall i rented EVACUATE BRITONS | 3 f
in jets—more than any other air-|last ni MacArthur ral); NICOSIA CYPRUS, May 23, | Von M1 13
force pilot but only 39 people turned ur A British Overseas Airwié | , ees
eland fi 63 Con nd nt The t MacArthi Com-! Corporation plane landed here " Y
He fl 67. miseio ee" spot of the to-day on its way from the Persi your owt bes awe BEAUTY BRUSH
I that 0 idan to Londor There Ad brushes deeper
THE JAMAICA tried op t econd cored aga side as it came ene Comb co match y ust
off his own full net Tr Jam are ig to co the ertor i —Reuter -Reuter Reuter woo. Sold separately


PAGE TWO





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

———

Caub Calling

EXCELLENCY the Gov-
will formally cpen the

HH:

nor

Empire Week Exhibition at Com-
bermere School this morning at
10 o'clock.

Qn display in the school hall

are entries of a great number of
Schools for the Project Compe-
titions for which handsome prizes
are offered. This year the Seniors

have also been drawn in by the
re-institution of the Essay Com-
petition

The exhibition will remain
open. until Saturday afternoon.

Civil Engineering
R. MAURICE A. ROCHE-
FORD, son of MrecandMrs

ftocheford of Black, Rock,
has passed in Economics, Higher
Natural Philosophy and Geolog:
and Minerology at Glassow Uni
versity .

Mr.

4
AG

Rocheford has just com
pleted the Third Year of the
Course for his B.Se. in Civil
Engineering.

Mr. Roecheford won a scholar- |

ship from the Barbados Govern-j ;

ment to attend the University.

Leaving Today i

1SS ISABEL LENAGAN,
daughter of Major and Mrs.
Detiis Lenagen of “Dona Zoyla”,

Gott Club Road, is due to leave
for..Canada to-day by T.C.A.
Her destination is Montreal.

Also expected to leave this
moruing for Canada are Capt,
and Mrs. Darragh Phelan.

Gomes Leaves Tomorrow
He ALBERT GOMES, Trini-

dad’s Minister for Labour,
Commerce and Industry, is due to
return to Trinidad tomorrow after
attending the Regional Economic
Committee meeting here. Leaving
by the same plane will be Mr.
and, Mrs, Charles Newbold. They
have been-spending a short holi-
day in Barbados with Mr. and
Mrs. Rex Stollmeyer who are at
present here

Mr. Newbold and Mrs. Stoll-
meyer are brother and _ sis-
ter Mr Newbold is Lega!

Adviser to the East African High
Commission and is on long leave.
They will be continuing their
holiday in Trinidad,

Official Representative

R. F, A. BISHOP, Cuntrolier

of Supplies, flies to Canada
today by T.C.A. as an official re-
presentative of the Government or
Barbados, in connection with tie
talks in Canada about the token
import scheme.



CROSSWORD



ACTOSS

1, One way to make the miser seem

‘different. (9)

7 Shrub that produces the teast
ore, (8)

9 Oxide of silicon. (6)

10. Valuabie in age, my tad, (3)

11 Pools return it shipshape. (5)

13. The Frene: follow to spoon. (3)

15 The fall c.mes later. (5)

16."Cove 1 get mixed up with. (5)

l# Experimental, (9)

20 On guard inter of course, (5)

21. The revurn of .K, (3)

22. Money given away on Thursday

iy Holy Week. (fi)
Down








i

























{ Lt. JOSEPH KNIGHT.
Old Combermerian

T. JOSEPH D. KNIGHT, son
of Mrs. Edith Knight of
Martindales Road and the late
Mr. Knight, although not a
Barbadian, came here as @
youngster and left soon after the
last war started when he went to
the U.S.

Joseph was educated at Com-
bermere School and was a mem-
ber of the Ist Barbados Sea
Scouts’ troop.

He enlisted in December 1942.
Hie holds five battlestars won
during duty as an Operations
N.C.O. with the First U.S
Army. He received his commis-
sion in November 1950.

Formerly with the 7744 ETU in
Wurzburg, (Germany) he has
just assumed duties as Adminis-
trative Officer of the same unit on
Heidelberg, (Germany) Military
Post.

School In the Deanery

OYS at the King’s
Canterbury, will soon be
working in the home of the Red
Dean, Dr. Hewlett Johnson. The



;



Rupert is puzzled by what thi

man has said, ‘* Surely there can't
be a way through these tunnels,”
he murmurs. is strange com-

anion only smiles and, leading him
tack part of the way, tells him to
be quick. So the little bear goes
-arefully through the rough passages

books or stationery.

library on the first floor of the







B.B.C.. Radio
Programme

THURSDAY, 24 May, 1951.

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT at 4.9
FRANCES LANGFORD — RALPH EDWARDS
in “BEAT THE BAND’
and GENE KRUPA and His Band.

PHILIP TERRY













Deanery is to be one of their *% *&m—12 15 pm 19 60 M papeileninp npr es - -
classr Ss ” en ne niet ainetecastaieealt MATINEES: FRIDAY & SATURDAY at 5 P.M.
classrooms. c . 6.30 a.m. Sports Diary; 6 45 a m. Sport- FRIDAY TO TUESDAY NIGHT at 6.30
This means no inconvenience to ing Pecord; 7 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m. NORL, COWARD'S
the Dean or his wife. They have News Ana}ysis; 7.15 a.m. Programme “THE ASTONISHED HEART”
not used this library since before Parade; 7.20 a.m. From the Editorials: Starring; NOEL COWARD — CELIA JOHNSON
Y ' &
the war. The schoolboys will use 7 30 a m. Generally Speaking; 7 45 a.m
a side entrance Land and Livestock; 815 am _ Listen- =
ers’ Choice; ee a.m. Daioy Richards;
84 am ngineering Achievements
The 77-year-old Dean should be 9 09 am The N : ’ SSLLSEEEOELOPPPCOPO OTF)
+ ews: 910 a.m H LLCO OOOO
used to children around the house. News From Britain;: 9 15 . eo Close 7s "
Since he married ¢)jain in 1938 his Down; 11.15 a.m, Programme Parade; s 7
second wife has borne him two 11 25 am _ Listeners’ Choice; 11 45 a.m G L oO BE THEA TR E
=

School, .



Rupert and the Ice-flower—34

JUNIOR COMPETITION

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to send in
a humorous essay, story or poem on the subject of “CLOCKS”.
The best entry will be published every Monday in The Evening Advo-
cate, and the winner will receive a prize to the value of 7/6 in either
Entries must reach The Children's Editor
Advocate Co., Ltd., City, not later than Wednesday every week,

inica delegate at

daughters, now aged 10 and seven
They attend the local elementary
school.

R.E.C. Delegates

ON. H. D, SHILLINGFORD,
Dominica planter and Dom-
the Regional
Economic Committee meeting, re-
turns to Dominica today by B.G,

Mr. Alistair MacLeod-Smith,
Grenada Adviser attending the
same meeting, leaves to-day for
Grenada by B.W.I.A. He is accom-
panied by his wife,

Mr. F. LL. Walcott, General
Secretary of the Barbados Work-
ers’ Union flies to Grenada by the
same plane today to investigate the
work of the Trades Union in that
Colony. He returns to Barbados on
Tuesday.

Off to Grenada

R, ARNOLD CHATOOR,

Trinidad solicitor and Mr
Deoraj Samaroo, Trinidad busi-
nessman, who have been holiday-
ing in Barbados since May 11th,
leave this morning for Grenada by
B.W.LA, They expect to be back
in Trinidad by the end of the
month,

Member of Trade Mission
R. ERIC P. KEELY, Assistant
Secretary of the Ministry of

Food, a member of the U.K, Trade

Mission to the W.I., is due to leave

for the U.K. via Canada this

morning by T.C.A.

Leaving by the same plane is

Mr. W. A. Morris of the Colonial

Office.

Airways.

Incidental Intelligence
‘WF your efforts are criticised—
you must have done something
worth talking about—New York
Journal American,
—L.E.S.



Wy




A ED
and over the piled-up bracken and
behind the frozen waterfall. The
sledge is still where he left i amd
soon he is dragging it into the «ave.
“7 wish new why the man
wams me to bring it here when my
home's in the other direction,’’ he
thinks,



¢

}

, The

2 Carpet material, (8)
Say tha Nee ein as na NOTE: Stories must not be copied,
B. (ibe Send this coupon with your story.
person ee me te?
is nothing e
ithout an artist, (3) JUNIOR COMPETITION
air away from PNM cide vd heh aie SULCT Ne'y diane e ane aes piebee lee wise °
ne 18. (6) PAB ash Swe aya Vole his Wated ACER eee chs ts ee
ie Dee, (6)
She Ey acs Hep he ) cee HL RRA SER RAED TL Ee ROR
i yesterday s puszle. —Across; Home Address ................5+: Peer e cere esene .
B® Over. 4. Earth: 31, Novel
id t 18, Ugiy
Bains Sag eh a baba eeenivew yes ere eeeseveens . Ce eeeeeeeeeeecens .
Down i sing, 3. Revolt 4, Ore
10. eter Ta. eats Geet Form jeerule RaRney vas os bres ‘nsw ak ORE WE wie iee
Drnamo “¢ Evil 84 Tey 24 Arm:
OLB LAP ALLLPLLLBDEPLP LPB LDL PDP PBPLBPDBDVVPPDPLPP PPP DAP,
. +
‘ :
x Ny
‘ Gut ‘
x x
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ys
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9 :
g and.so does every woman! ! %
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% Therefore try the famous ... . 3
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$ CAMELIA SANITARY %
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Special Dispatch; 12 00 noon The News;

12 10 pm News Analysis; 1215 pm TO-DAY at 5 & 8:15 P.M, LAST SHOWS
115645 pom 19 76M dad
4" pm Variety Ahoy; 445 pm ss WILD HARVEST

Montmartre Players; 5 00 p m Composer

of the Week; 515 pm _ Scottish Maga- ALAN LADD — DOROTHY LAMOUR









zine; 5 45 pm ‘Pipes and Drums: 6.00] &

p.m. BBC Scottish Orchestra; 6.45. pm % LLOYD NOLAN — ROBERT PRESTON

Programme Parade x eee

7 11.00 p.m . 25 58 M. 44.32M

baci enon opi | TO-MORROW

ae . p ~ ow aaa 7 Oe m News|? AN’
nalysis; 5pm e See Britain; 7 45 " WN

pm Génerally Speaking; 800 ‘pm, g LETTER SROM AN UNKNO WOM

Radio Newsreel; 815 pm The Adven- %

tures of P.C. 49; 845 pm_ Interlude; YOO PEEELS SLL POSSESS PPPS SSS

855 p m_ From the Editorials; 9 00 p m
Special Dispatch; 915 p m. Have a Go;
9 45 p.m. Do You Remember; 10 p.m. The
News; 10.10 p.m. Interlude; 10.15 p.m



is of ou a New Judgement on
Rudyard ipling; 10.45 p.m. Life in RR W
Britain; 11 p.m. From the Third TO-MO 0

Programme
C.B.C, PROGRAMME
THURSDAY, MAY 2%, 1051
10 00-—10 15 p.m —News; 10 15—10.30
pm -—This Week in Canada
11.76 Mes 25.51 M.
FRIDAY, May 25, 1951
6.20 a.m.—12 15 pm 19 Go M



REE OES




OPENING GLOBE






UNIVERSAL- INTERNATIONAL
presents

JOAN FONTAINE

Jn Her Greatest Portrayal

~ LOUIS JOURDAN



6 30 a.m. Take it From Here; 7 00 a m
The News; 7 10 a4 m_ News Analysis; 7.15
am Programme Parade; 7)20 am
From the Editorials; 7 30 a m. Generally
Speaking; 8 00 am Southern Serenade
Orchestra; 8 20 am Festival of Britain

i "The Paradine Case
BBC’ Exhibition; 8 45 a m What Are We Romantic New Star of ‘The Paradi



Like; 900 am The News; 910 am
Home News From Britain; 915 a.m
Close Down; 1115 a m Programme Par-

ade; 11 25 am _ Listeners’ Choice; 11.45
am World Affairs; 1200 noon The
News; 12 10 pm News Analysis; 12 15]

pm, Close Down,

415-645 p.m 1976 M



415 pm Jazz Music; 4.45 pm Sport-
ng Record; 5 00 p m Composers of the
Week; 5 20 p m Light Music; 6 00 p.m





Merchant Navy Programme; 615 p m
Generally Speaking; 645 pm Pro-
gramme Parade; 700 p.m The News;

710p m News Analysis; 715 pm West
Indian Diary; 745 pm Think on These
Things; 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m
English Magazine; 8 45 pm _ Interlude;
855 p.m_ From the Editorials; 9 00 p m +
World Affairs; 915 p m Festival of Bri-
tain; 9 30 pm Ted Heath; 10 00 pm

The News: 1010 p m_ Interlude; 10 15
pm The Spur of the Moment: 10.30 p.m

Pavilion Players; 10 45 p m The Debate
Continucs; 1100 pm _ Ring up the Cur-
tain





;

A RAMPART
PRODUCTION

PLUS
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

—_—_—_—__
C.B.C, PROGRAMME
FRIDAY. MAY 25, 1951
10 00—10.15 p.m.—News; 10 15—
p m —Canadian Chronicle
1L.76 Mes 25.51 M.

Baby’s Life Saved
By Hiccups Machine

By CHAPMAN PINCHER

THE lives of 25 babies, who
could not start breathing when
they were born, have been saved
by an ingenious machine devel-
oped by two London scientists.

One of the babies was thought
to be dead. But after 45 minutes’ [/7
treatment with the machine he
began to breathe normally.

The machine works by giving
electric shocks to the nerves and
causing hiccups.

A silver disc is placeq on the
baby’s neck. Shocks fed into this
disc stimulate the phrenic nerve;
which makes fhe floor of the
chest jerk up and down,

Dr. K. W. Cross and Mr. P. W.
Roberts, of St. Mary’s Hospital,
W., developed the machine, which
is described in the British Medical

NORTON MOORE
SEER ENGSY | WE MURA so 5 53-0 cop hc ve wo vgs tice tae
“SUGAR RAY” GODDARD
DOUGLAS GRIFFITH

“Bring Back My Bonnie To Me”
“Our Very Own”
“Tf” (The Singing Pugilist)
“Why Do I Weep”

10 30



IVOR HADMAN
WINSTON RUDDER

ant To Be Loved”
“Accentuate The Positive”
GUEST STARS
JOE CLEMENDORE (Contortionist)
WILLIE IFFILL (New Singing Discovery)
PRICES :
Pit 20 — House 36 — Balcony 48 — Box 60
TICKETS on Sale DAILY and FRIDAY NITE









JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Lower Broad Street Upstairs Over Newsam’s

BATHING SUITS

LADIES’

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Journal. —LES. and Two piece styles ...............eceeeees from $11.88
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THURSDAY 24th 10 a.m,



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SPUN ae OO Ns oh oo 654.4 e040 5. bain anle Sie cinets bad from $2.54
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FILM!

ELAN (i.e) DECLARATION

Don’t miss this grand thrill
with Musie & Dances

ADMISSION :
1/6 & 1/— for Non Indians



1 year size
2 year size
3 year size











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FACTORY MANAGERS

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————SeS FE







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——————_—_——



THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951





COOCCS OSS OS

| PLAZA

ASTOR THEATRE

THURSDAY TO SATURDAY
“HALL’S OF MONTEZUMA”
“PITTSBURGH” and “GREEN HELL.”
Special Matinee TO-DAY 4.30 :

“STAGE TO TUCSON

”



Sunday :







THEATRE --

(piaL 2312.9 PLAZA ssrmcerow,
, TO-DAY (only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
. + ”
‘ TEA For TWO
Color by Technicolor
alk os Gordon MacRAE—Doris DAY
30, * * p.m
it jal To-day 9.20 & 1,30
"KO. Radios. , Spe DEVIL'S CARGO” SATURDAY

MCON OVER

BORN TO 8E BAD MONTANA (MONOGRAM)
Joan FONTAINE— Jimmy Wakely REVENGE OF THE
Robert RYAN—Zachary SCOTT ZOMBIES

John CARRADINE &
“MARKED TRAILS”
Hoot Gibson

GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James
Last Show Tonite 8.30
Adventures of
KITTY O'DAY & VIOLENCE
To-day (Bank) 4.30 p.m
“JOE PALOOKA CHAMP”
Leon ERROL &
“MILLION DOLLAR KID”
Leo GORCEY
Friday to Sun. 830. Mat. Sun. 5 p.m
Bob HOPE in “FANCY PANTS” &
Wm. Holden in
STREETS OF LAREDO
MIDNITE SAT. 26TH
“FACE OF MARBEL”
“VALLEY OF FEAR"

Plus Latest, This is America
Series
“TRADING POST”



OISTIN
Dial 8404

Last Two Shows To-day 5 & 8.30 p.m.
DEAR WIFE & RAINBOW ISLAND
Wm. Holden . Dorothy Lamour

To-day 1.30 p.m. Monograms Double
SONG OF THE WASTELANDS | |
Jimmy Wakeley |
“LOUSIANA” Jimme DAVIS |
Friday to Sun. 5 & 8.30 p.m. |
(Warner)
James Cagney in WHITE HEAT
IT’S ACTION ALL THE WAY!
Also “CARIBBEAN”
MIDNITE SAT. 26TH
“PRISON MUTINY” :&
“WEST OF ALAMO”

| sis

&











Did you smile
into your
mirror today?

MAKE THIS
PEPSODENT MjRROR
TEST







Were your teeth
as white as hers ?



your mirror—take 9
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teeth,









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A smile that shows sparkling white
teeth! For Pepsodent contains Irium,
wonderful ingredient which dissolves



NEXT — Clean your teeth
with Pepsodent. Do this,
morning and evening,
for a week.





dull film and ugly stains, uncovers
the natural brilliance of your smile!






THE TOOTHPASTE
WITH IRIUM*










THEN — Smile iato your
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a week of Pepsodent makes
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*
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>


THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951

Briiain Must
Free Colonies

OTTAWA. May 22.
Informed sources said on Tues-
day Canada suggested that Brit-
ain’s colonies might earn more
dollars if Britain freeq them from
the long-term supply commit-
ments, and allowed them to sell
more goods to Canadian buyers.
The suggestion was made as
trade officials from both coun-
tries completéq the second day of
their discussions in the fifth ses-
sion of the Canada-United King-
dom conference continuing under
their Trade Committee.
High ranking officials are ex-
ploring the means by which trade
between the two countries could



be increased, thus providing
Britain with more dollars with
which to buy Canadian goods.

Dollars earned by Britain’s colon-
ies are transferred to the com-
mon exchange pool which is con-
trolled by Britain, the Canadian
officials pointed out.

Informants said Canada would
like to buy copra to make coconut
oil from Australia and the Fiji
Islands, and peanuts or ground-
nuts from Nigeria. These are two



relatively unimportant items: yet
Canadian imports totalled
$13,000,000 last year. Barred from
Commonwealth source tied up

in a long term contract’s supply
to Britain, Canada ventured into
the higher priced non-Common-
wealth market purchasing about
$5,000,090 worth of copra from
the Philippines and _ about
$8,000,000 worth of peanuts from

the United States, Mexico and
other non-Commonwealth areas.
—(CP)

> .
Fortune Hunting
Yee .
Still Going On
MONTEVIDEO, May 23.
Digging for the “Cardinal's
fortune” in a cemetery here
entered thé third day to-day with
the Church reported to be taking
unusual interest in the outcome.
The fortune, said to be worth
$2,000,000 in gold and jewels, was
allegedly buried a century ago on
the edge of the national Pantheon

in which remains Artigas and
other Uruguayan heroes are
entombed .

According to a 45 - year - old
Italian woman, Claudia Maggil-
jatti, they were hidden there by
her grandfather Carlo Odescalchi,
Rishop of Sabina who was given
Gardinal’s hat by Pope Leo
Twelfth but resigned it in Novem-
ber 1838 and came to Uruguay.
According to unconfirmed reports
if the fortune is found the Church
may claim it for the Vatican.

—Reuter.

SHIP ABANDONED
TRANS-JORDANIA, May 23.
The 7,240-ton Greek steamer

Nicolaou Georgios on fire in the
Red Sea has been abandoned by
her crew, Lloyds reported in
London ‘to-day. The crew of 35
were picked up by United States
tanker Montebeo Hills. according
to Lloyds report from Port Sudan
—Reuter.

Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield, Sch, Marea Henrietta,
Sch rion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Cyril E






Smith, Sch. Franklyn D.R,, Sch, D’Or-
tac, Sch Philip H Davidson, Sch,
Laudalpha, M V_ Blue Star, M V. Cara-

Everdene, Sch Lucille M
Mary M_ Lewis
ARRIVALS
Schooner Enterprise 5., 63
Capt Dixon, from St Lucia
Schooner W L_ Eunicia, 38 tons net,

Capt. Joseph, from Dominica.
DEPARTURES
Schooner Sunshine R., 25. tons
Capt. Barnes, for British Guiana,
Schooner Fi ces W Smith, 74 tons
net, Capf. Hassell, for British Guiana
MV T B Radar, 116 tons net, Capt
Mitchell, for St, Lucia
Schooner Eastern Eel, 35 tons net, Capt.

cas, Sch
Smith, Sch

tons net,

net,





Joseph, for Grenada
M V_ Cacique de) Caribe, 162 tons net,
Capt. Archibald, for St. Lucia

Red Riding Hood
Outsmarts the Wolf!

one bright, sunny day a little girl called
xed Riding Hood went to visit her
grandmother » ho lived ina small house
in a big dark forest, She was singing
happily as she skipped along . . .

WE WISH TO

THAT

ist JUNE TO MO
1951,
FOR

ANNUAL ST

ECKSTEIN

BAY STREET

PLP LALA LAA AAA LALLA LA AAA
SLOSS IGEN INOS R OST ON TE COLT,

Ly aerrenecenerrnpbrohnnteenrene pth





CUSTOMERS

PARTS DEPARTMENT
WILL BE CLOSED FROM FRIDAY,

BOTH DAYS



DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING (0.,
LTD.

FESTIVAL OF BRITA

THE scene across the River Thames of the South Bank Festival of Britain Exhibition, showing the
Shot Tower, the Festival Skylon, with the Houses of Parliament and Big Ben behind.

~ Distribution



Rainfall
Uneven In April

THE AVERAGE total rainfall for the Island for the
month of April was well above the average.
tion was very uneven; certain areas experienced heavy falls
on the Ist., 2nd. and 2lst.,






This distribu-

with frequent light showers

between these dates, while others received little or no rain
during the first half of the month; well distributed rains fell

on the 20th. and 27th.

According to rainfall returns
received from 45 Stations typical
of the various rainfall categories
of the Island, the average total
rainfall for the month was 6.53
inches. The average total fall
for April, 1950, was 1.17 inches;
the average total for April for
the past 100 years was 2.28 inches.

The highest total fall for April,
1951, at any of these stations
was 11.88 inches, recorded at a
station in the parish of Si.
Thomas and the lowest was 3.66
inches measured at a station in
the parish of St. Lucy.

Sugar Cane

The harvesting of the old cane
crop was continued during the
month; field yields have remained
high, and juice quality fairly
satisfactorily. According to re-
turns received from the various
factories in the Island, the crop
is now estimated at the equiva-
lent of 179,000 tons of sugar.

The young cane crop made good
growth during the month, and is
very green and vigorous in ap-
pearance. In some areas, the ap-
plication of potash to the ratoons
has been started.

Food Crops

Several fields of sweet pota-
toes were harvested during the
month, and the market supply of
ground provisions in general was
satisfactory. Market garden crops
such as tomatoes, cabbages,
French beans, etc. were in fair
supply.

Cotton

In accordance with Section 3
(1) of the Mosaic Disease (Erad-
ication) Act, 1943-22, 34 returns

SOLD ICED FISH
ALONG STREETS

Seon Whitehouse of Chapman
Lane, St. Michael, was fined 30
to be paid in one month or one
month’s imprisonment by a City
Police Magistrate for selling iced
fish in the streets,

The offence was committed on
April 24, Inspector Cumberbatch
told the Court that Whitehouse
was warned on several occasions
about selling iced fish,



But a big bad wolfsaw Red Riding Hood

and ran. to the grandmother's. cottage.
When Red Riding Hood arrived, he
unced on her and cried, “Aha! Now
*m going to eat you up!”

ADVISE OUR

OUR

NDAY 4th JUNE

INCLUSIVE,
OUR

OCK-TAKING

BROTHERS

See cren}

CHECK THAT

$
3
DIAL 4269 %
%
4,

were received from estates, and
no infected holes. reported.

The Cotton Close Season and
Okra Close Season Posters were
posted up throughout the Island,
as well as at the yarious Police
Stations during the month, The

reaping of the cotton crop was
completed and fields were being
cleared in accordance with the

provisions of the Cotton Diseases
Prevention Act. Inspection of
these fields continues.

The search for wild cotton trees
was continued.

Owners and occupiers of land
who are desirous of planting
cotton in July, 1951, are asked to
make an early application for the
supply of seéd.

Peasant Agriculture

Cultivators, wherever possible,
took the advantage of the excel-
lent weather conditions which pre-
vailed during the month to begin
planting of food crops. Moist con-
ditions made hand cultivation
relatively easy, and such crops as
corn and garden vegetables were
planted. Some peasants, however,
owing to difficulty in getting la-
bour to reap their canes, were be-
hind hand in preparing their land
for the planting of food crops.
Towards the end of the month,
large tomatoes were in excellent
supply and prices had dropped
from 36 cents to 20 cents per
pound. Yams and sweet potatoes
continued to be easily available.

Sugar Cane

Peasants continue to report
satisfactory yields of cane, The
progress. of the crop has been

hampered to some extent by the
rains, but more so by shortage of

labour, The young plant and
ratoon canes are making very

good growth, Some growers were
able to apply muriate of potash
during the month

Cotton

Yields generally have not been
satisfactory. Long before the end
of April when the growing sea-
son ended, a large number of cot-
ton cultivators had begun to dis-
pose of all plant residues and pre-
pare their land for feod crops.



| LANDMARKS



Coconuts and bananas
goed supply
market. Other crops
ving the month included pawpaws]|
and limes. It
breadfruit will soon appear on the
market in
and mango trees are tiowering and
setting fruit satisfactorily

The main
tacking peasants’ crop were slug
the cabbage
scale insects.
cultural
advocate suitablé methods of.con-
trol. One disease which is becom-
ing widespread in its incidence, is
black rot in cabbage, Growers of
the crop are becoming alive to the
importance
crop rotation as a means of check-
ing the spread of this infection.

Succulent
green cane tops, was easily avail-
able throughout the month. Some
peasants, however, complained of
difficulty
animal teed and oats.

The
structors visited 651 peasant hold-
ings
April.
growing on
topworked with
desirable
Julie,

The reaping of canes at
gitts
month, At all other stations reap-
ing of this crop is proceeding sat-
isfactorily. Muriate of potash has
been applied to all the young plant
canes and is being applied to the
ratoons as fast as they
back. In the case of the four Sta-
tions under irrigation, ag applica-
tion of sulphate of ammonia has
also been given, A well planned
catch-cropping
“Jerusalem” has already begun to
pay dividends in the way of good
returns early crop of
cabbage grown under irrigation.

Animal Husbandry

There were 122 head of livestock
on the Stations at the end of April,
These comprised stud animals,

cattle,
equines, Five hundred and twenty~
seven gallons of milk were pro-
duced and 1
breeding.

Stud
Stations were as follows:— bulls
129, bucks
83, making a total of 306 for the
month.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



|
|

|

a
AA

CQ b>44 >a
BEFFAFFAFZ

Tree Crops

were 10
Bridgetown

available du-|

in the

is expected that!

large quantities. Pear

Gs

Pests and Diseases
pests reported at-



white butterfly and
The Peasant Agri-
Instructors continue to

BAEFASE



of practising proper

Peasant Livestock
fodder, including

in obtaining balanced

Extension Work
Peasant Agricultural

oe
PAPA AA FS

In-

and 11 school gardens in
Fourteen mango seedlings
peasant plots were
scions of more
varieties, mainly the

Crop Husbandry

Hag-

was eompleted during the

are cut

programme at

from an

goats, sheep, pigs and

young pig sold for

services paid for at the

58, rams 36 and boars

7

A hit everytime with everyone! Who can
resist the smooth, smooth flavor of
Royal Puddings. Perfect at parties, won-
derful after dinner, and a satisfying
treat in-between meals.

“Wait!” cried Red Riding

she pulled out a dish of Roy |
from her basket. The wolf liked it so
much, he forgot Red Riding Hood and
rushed out to buy more Royal Pudding!



=—_—_










COUGH

WITH
BROWNE'S
CERTAIN
COUGH SYRUP

It Relieves Colds

Quickly.



C. CARLTON BROWNE

136 Roebuck Si. Wiai 2813
Wholesale & Retail Druggist

ee !
ane

|
|







WE NEVER LET Go.

Our Vigilance over the t
Quality of

8. & S. RUM

is never relaxed.

That is why it is always the
same,

A traly outstanding Rum,
in a class all its own.

Blended and Bottied

— By —

So easy to make—so economical
so nutritious. Treat your family to
Royal Pudding today.



STUART & SAMPSON

(1938) LTD. i

Headquarters for Best Rum.

eee

and



THE CYCLIST’S
CHOICE

DOWDING ESTATES
COMPANY

(ECKSTEIN








JANE PowELL-



UNIVERSAL
I
=
inseminated ehaiaaneribichetietieetihesapsid mitheleridena die picanicicttns
SUNDAY & MONDAY, 4.30 & 8.30 p.m.
Y Republic Action Serial

SPECIAL MID-NITE SHOWS—SATURDAY 26th.
Universal’s Action-packéd Double . . .
John WAYNE — Randolph SCOTT in EDGAR BARRIER and ADELE MARA
“PITTSBURGH” on IN
AND Pa ara
“GREEN HELL” ‘ 9
dais Te “SONG OF MEXICO’
Douglas FAIRBANKS, Jr. — Joan BENNETT — Allan HALE
— AND —

Republic Smashing Double ,



BROS.)

PAGE THREE











QYLIYESSSKY BES! BSISBEESE FEA AEE FA FAFA FAG FF FFG AGFA] Zed
| »
SROODAL BIRTHDAY WE $
>) 4 \
¥ “4

ss
S

24th to 30th.

A Week of Entertainment to Please.



EMPIRE ROXY »

T —— TO-DAY, 24th—2 — 4.45 and 8.30,
FRIDAY 25th—2.30 & 8.30 p.m.
SATURDAY 26th,-—9.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
SUNDAY TO WEDNESDAY—4.45 & 8.30 p.m. Daily



TO-DAY TO MONDAY 4.45 and 8.15 Daily

presents

COLUMBIA PICTURES oa ; S



starring

PAUL HENREID as Jean Lafitie
with ACK SAKIE - Karin Goote - ry Andorsea

vert & Ket Produced by SAM MATIMAN - Di “

wie wees py
Wrilten tor the Screen by 7



Extra; 2 Reel Short: “TWO NUTS IN A HAT.” ‘

“TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY, 4 30 and 8.15 \
COLOMBIA DOUBLE

ars \

“UNDERCOVER MAN”



—AND —

“STREETS OF GHOST TOWN”
;
y



OLYMPIC

WW

.TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW, 4 45 AND 8 15 4
FIRST INSTALMENT... «
THE COLUMBIA SERIAL +S

“FLYING G-MEN” X

— STARRING —

Robert Paige — James Craig — Richard Frake —Lorna Gray.



SATURDAY and SUNDAY, 4.45 and 8.15

FINAL

“FLYING G-MEN”

INSTALMENT.




Co-starring

LOUIS CALHERN

Screen Play by JOHN LARKIN
and DOROTHY KINGSLEY
Srory by JOHN LARKIN §

+

ANN HARDIN

Directed by ROY
Cioduced by JACK CUMMRINGS



TECHNICOLOR





MONDAY and TUESDAY, 4.30 and 8.15.

A MCTRO GOLOWYN MAYER PICTURE





COLUMBIA'S SMASHING DOUBLE
R oO YAL HURD HATFIELD in. . . SK
TO-DAY ONLY, 4.30 and §.30. »
DOUBLE. .., f ty
CALLING DR, DSATH and “THE. INVISIBLE MAN.” es CHINATOWN AT MIDNIGHT : *
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BETRAYED.”



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PAGE FOUR



24, 1951

Thursday,

May



UNITY IN THE
COMMONWEALTH

IT was a day of mourning yesterday: of
mourning for newly won West Indian
unity.

The British West Indies’ Sugar Associa-
tion announced their intention of with-
drawing from the delegation to London.
The position was fully explained by the
Chairman, Mr. Robinson,

A political delegation was going to the
United Kingdom to have trade talks with
the United Kingdom. Sugar would have
to be discussed. It was impossible for the
British West Indian Sugar Association to
go back on its word, to other Common-
wealth producers.

West Indian Governments, said Mr.
Gomes on Monday, were 100% behind the
British West Indies’ Sugar Association.
There was no wedge in West Indian unity.

Today there is not only a wedge in West
Indian unity. There is a wedge in Com-
monwealth unity.

The delegation to Canada would not have
discussed sugar contracts with Canada.
How could it since the West Indies, in the
words of Sir George Seel, do not exist in-
ternationally. They could only have
listened to Canadian views on general
Canada-West Indies trade. They would
have visited Canada while trade liberaliza-
tion talks were going on and would have
read in the Canadian Press, the points of
view of Canadians with regard to Canada-
West Indies trade. Since Canada buys so
much West Indian sugar, there could be no
possible excuse for other Commonwealth
countries objecting to the presence of West
Indians in Canada, especially as it is well
known that Canada buys West Indian
sugar through the United Kingdom and
does not negotiate direct with the West
Indies.

But the visit of a high-level political
delegation to the United Kingdom is in
quite a different category. The West Indies
are in a position to negotiate direct with
the United Kingdom, since the United
Kingdom controls the West Indies and is
responsible for them.

“It is quite possible that, should the Brit-
ish West Indian Sugar Association accom-
pany the high-level political delegation to
London that the rest of the Commonwealth
sugar producers (of whom Australia is only
one) should be suspicious of West Indian
intentions with regard to sugar allocations
in the United Kingdom market.

Just as Mr. Adams regrettably expressed
the opinion that Australia’s actions in their
last dealings with the United Kingdom
were not based on West Indian interests,
so the rest of the Commonwealth politi-
cians might take this unfortunate view as
a line for them to follow during the com-
ing London-West Indies trade talks. But
as Mr. Robinson consistently explained
the West Indies would benefit from the
support of the Commonwealth politicians
no less than from the Commonwealth sugar
producers. And it seems poor tribute to
the integrity of the United Kingdom to
suggest that in its position as trustee for
the dependent West Indian territories, she
would permit Commonwealth politicians to
browbeat the United Kingdom to concede
benefits to them at the expense of the West
Indies.

Mr. Robinson has taken his stand on
Commonwealth unity. The West Indian
Governments have said in the words of its
spokesnian that they are 100% behind the
British West Indies’ Sugar Association. Mr.
Robinson has pleaded for the integrity of
the West Indian word: has pleaded for
Commonwealth unity. What else could be
have done?

If the West Indies are going to be sus-
picious of the motives of other Common-
wealth countries, and if their politicians
are going to be suspicious of an organisa-
tion which has done so much to promote
the interests of the West Indies the greater
cause of Commonwealth unity is at stake.
There must be an end to suspicion and dis-
trust. If the West Indian politicians feel
that “they are reflecting West Indian
desires in going to the United Kingdom at
this time there can be no opposition to their
going} although the wisdom of their de-
cision can be challenged.

But it is illogical to state that the Chair-
man of the British West Indian Sugar
Association is indispensable to a Trade
Mission to London and at the same meet-
ing to suggest the existence of ulterior
motives in the natural desires of that
Association to learn as much as possible
about the Canadian attitude to trade with
the West Indies.

The cause of West Indian unity has not
been well served by the politicians.

|

|

Ee a

LONDON.
Winston Churchill took a chance

quite recently of explaining his
view — the Conservative Party's
view — of the big events in the
world, _China, the Korean war

our alfiance with the United
States; |— he used the debate on
trade with China to put the policy
of what we may soon be calling
the new British Government.

Winston Churchill is back to his
old standard of wit and stamina
and vitality. At 76, he probably
has to reach some sort of compro-
mise with the vigorous 18-hour
day he used to practise during the
war. It is often said that oratory
is out of place in the House ot
Commons. That is more than
true — it is an understatement.
Speaking in the House of Com-
mons is really a branch in the art
of conversation. The easiest fault
is to overstate a case with rhetori-
cal flourish. Churchill has none of
the flourishes though his phrases
are full of life, full of original
adjectives.

He began by stating that in
November 1949 he was in favour
of the recognition of Communist
China, “provided that it was de
facto and not de jure.” He made
a plummy, pompous sound of the
two Latin legal phrases. Serious
it was, but he managed to poke a
little fun at the pedants:— “or as
it would probably be called among
the old school tie brigade of the
party opposite ‘di yuri'”. That
raised a little laugh. And then
Churchill added the real thema
of the whole speech that was to
follow. He upproved of recogni-
tion “provided that it could be
brought about-as a joint policy
ef the United States and the
Dominions.” 8

Why Not China

We recognised the Soviet Union,
end Communist Poland, so why
not recognise China. “One has
to recognise and deal with all
sorts of things in this world as
they come along.” This was said
in the youngest possible, school-
boyish, cheekiest manner — so
disarming. It also gained a laugh
as it was obviousty a reference to
the arrival of the Socialist Gov-
ernment in 1945.

On that basis he condemned the
course of British policy in the Far
East. Of the Pekin Government
he said, “They did not even re-
cognise us.” And the United
States were much offended. The
substance of the whole speech was
that Britain could not afford tq
offend the United States. “After
ell, the United States are doing
nineteen-twentieths of the work,
and suffering losses of 50 and 60
to one compared to us.” This is
a very unpopular line of talk
with the Labour Left. And that
was what it was meant to be. As
Churchill said waving his hand
casually towards the wild men
who sat as, far away from Mr.
Attlee as possible, “that is where
the weather comes from.” What
he was trying to do was to stimu-
late some of the Left Wing critics
of the United States into inter-
ruptions, It must be said he only
half succeeded, They know they
can really interrupt him without
a crushing retort. But Winston
Churchill was obviously enjoying
himself, as well as outlining a
serious policy. His advice to the
government was “so to act as .to
prove beyond all doubt or question
that we are good and faithiul
comrades of the American
democracy and will stand with
them, whatever may happen as

brothers in arms,”
At The End
But that was at the end of the
speech. Before that he had

defying him for it, “we cannot
managed to say, without anyone
watch and listen to them — the
Labour dissidents below the gang-
way — without deriving the im-
pression that their sympathies





By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

are, cn the whole, more with Red

China than with the United
States.” Winston Churchill did
not, of course, deny that the

Labour Government itself assent-
ed to the branding of Red China
as the agc-:3sor. What he was
doing was drawing a thin red line
between the Government and
what once before he called “the
Silvermen” — Sydney Silverman,
Julius Silverman, Tom Driberg,
and others. On the great prob-
iems, Winston Churchill does not
change his mind. He still thinks
that American ascendency in the
atomic bomb is the only deterrent
to the advance of the Red Army
across Europe. We are getting
stronger, he argued, but that does
not mean we are getting safer.
“It is only when we are strong
enough that safety is achieved;
and the period of the most acute
danger might well arrive just be-

fore we are strong enough”. This
is a complicated idea — and a
very important one. Winston

Churchill put it to the House of
Commons in just that manner of
explanatory simplicity that
gained him such fame during the
war whether he spoke to
Parliament or to a radio audience.
He paused to underline it.
Not Quiet

He does not keep still when he
is speaking. At the despatch box,
he is first on one foot, then on the

other. His hands moved with
explanatory, not rhetorical ges-
tures. But the real vitality is in

his face. Few men of his age can
call on such a variety of expres-
sions; usually, age sets a states-
man in a certain mould — noble,



it may be, haughty sometimes, in-
different, often, Winston Churchill
can change his age at will; and he
can taunt in one instant, and
warn in the next, and play a
verbal prank the minute after. So
there was a dead pause while he
underlined this great danger we
might face before we are strong
enough. “I hope that may be
pondered upon because it is a very
potent and relevant fact.”

Few actors could read those
words to make them sound better
than a politiciam’s platitude.

Danger

But Churchill managed it, and
then his voice rose to a real em-
phasis; “Our great danger now is
in pursuing a policy of girding the
United States and giving them
the impression that they are left
ito do all the work, while we pull
at their coat tails and read them
moral lessons in statecraft about
the love we all ought to have for
China.” “Girding” is just a
Churchillian word—it is the sort
of word that carries its meaning
in its sound and. can make a
speech just by itself. Are we gird-
ing at the United States? Winston
Churchill then bowed to the
House of Commons metaphori-
cally and apologised for taking so
much of its time on great matters
when of course M.P.’s wanted to
discuss how many tongs of rubber
or how many gallons of oil had
gone to China. It is just this sort
of touch that wins him. every
battle in the House of Commons.
Of course M.P.’s wanted to hear
Churchill and they would rather
hear him on important matters
than on trivial ones. In this case
he seemed to be laying down the
principles of his own foreign
policy for the future government.
Winston Churchill would, of

BARBADOS ADVOCATE


























course, be Prime Minister, but that
would hardly prevent him from
guiding foreign policy. His pres-
ent vitality, with four years still
before his eightieth birthday,
points to the chances of another
period when British policy and
Churchill's policy would be count-
ed the same thing.
Overruled

He overruled his wartime For-
eign Secretary, Anthony Eden,
who igs now Deputy Leader ana
heir apparent of the Conservative
Party. The story goes that
with cruelty, asked Tony, “Do
you remember, how old was Mr
Gladstone when he formed his
last administration?” Mr. Glad-
stone was 84; and if the precedent
is to be followed, that leaves some
weary years of waiting for An-
thony Eden.

I make no apology for devoting
all of this week's article to one
speech by Winston Churchill. To
complete the story of that speech
there are two more phrases in i
to tell of. Both illustrate the rea:
Churchill—still with a youn
streak in him, still enjoying the
struggle for power, and still en-
tirely lacking in pomposity.

He was just saying that we ir
Britain are bitterly divided anc
absorbed in party strife. He wa:
going to add that we are kep
month after month waiting for
news of a General Election, /
Labour Member with a_ stron;
Lancashire accent interruptec
him—‘So is America,” he callec
out. “Quite true,” said Churchill
then paused, looked round, . hi:
eyes twinkled, he grinned, anc
added, “But they have at any rat
a fixed date for their elections.’
You must admit that that is nic
candour !

Figures

And then there was an inciden
a little later on when Winstm
Churchill had come round to dis-
cussing the actual] figures of trad
with Hong Kong. He was makin;
a complicated case, based on thi
forty-six thousand tons of rubber
in. three months, that have come
to China from Singapore. Ray
mond Blackburn got up and in-
terrupted. Now Raymond Black-
burn was a Labour M.P., he “de-
serted” Socialism and is now ai
independent. He sits on the Tor)
side of the House of Common:
and his independence is that kinc
of independence. He is a young
vigorous, opinionated and argu
mentative fellow. He is the mos

active at denouncing Labour:
softness with Communism in
China. I would go further anc

say, (and I hope Mr. Blackburt
will not regard this as an insult)
that he is potentially the Senato
Macarthy of Westminster. This
Raymond Balckburn interrupte:
cheerfully. “Would the’ Righ
Honourable Gentleman forgive me
for one moment?” he asked. Mr.
(Churchill looked round to his left,
a litthe surprised at youth inter-
rupting experience from that quar-
ter of the compass. I thought we
‘were on the same side of the line,”
said Churchill, waving his hands a
little impatiently and sitting down,
as the convention is, to allow an
interrupter to have his word. What
Raymond Blackburn had to offer
‘was additional ammunition for
Churchill's argument. Once he got
back to the argument, Churchill
sounded a little good-humouredly
impatient of being tripped up by
his own friend an¢~dmirer, while
he was in full course in chase of
a trade statistic,

Much more can be said of the
debate; but what we have written
is of Churchill, his style and his
delivery, his policy and his air of
confidence that it is a policy that
will soon be the Government's. In
this debate he asked for rubber
bupplies to China to be ended
completely. The Government has
decided to terminate the delivery
of all supplies of rubber to China.



Canadians Obtai in

OTTAWA, May.

Canada is buying from the
United States war materials that
are on the “secret list”, despite
én American law which prohibits
sale of such material to foreign
countries,

It was disclosed in the public
accounts committee of the House
of Commons here that this is
achieved by an arrangement be-
tween Ottawa and Washington,
under which the U.S. government
orders such materials in its own
name and then turns them over
to Canada,

This is the reason that Canada
does not deal directly with Amer-
ican manufacturers in placing
millions of dollars worth of de-
fence orders, explained the deputy
defence minister, C. M. Drury.

One thing on the “secret list” in
Canada is the sort of gun the
Royal Canadian Air Force will,
use to arm the F86E “Sabre” jet
fighter, an American type high-

Weapons

speed fighter plane which is start-
ing to roll off mass-production
assembly lines at a Canadian plant
in Montreal,

Canada may herself manufac-
ture the guns for this fighter, he
said. But when a member of
Parliament asked what type gun
the Sabre plane would use, Drury
who was a brigadier in the last
war, said the defence department
is not talking publicly about air
armament,

Naval Guns Too
_ Canada is already manufactur-
ing naval guns. But the manu-
facture of guns for planes would
take Canada into a new field in
peacetime,

Mr. Drury said Canadian pro-
cuction of the Sabre fighter
compared ‘very favourably” with
the time taken for related
production in other countries. The
production schedule would have



OUR READERS SAY:

The Rights To The African

Of South Africa
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—After paying two visits to
South Africa one in 1946, and the
cther one early this year, they
have prompted me to write to you
at this time.

I have asked myself many times
why there should be so much
racial disharmony in South Africa
and, after mature consideration, 1
have come to the conclusion that
there is no excuse at all for this
state of affairs. This is supposed
to be a christian-like world and,
most of the governments are pro-
posedly democratic.

If these two suppositions are
correct, then it is the bounden
duty of each and every one t4
work for the happiness and pros-
perity of all sections, African,
Coloured, non-European and
European.

Why should the African be told
that he shall be a “hewer of wood
and drawer of water” all his days ?
The African is a part of our popu-
lation, a large part especially the
Qutus of South Africa and, there
are many of high intelligence and

ability. Shall the door of progress
be closed to them ?

_1if the Europeans of the Union of
South Africa have pledged them-

selves to cultivate such dis-
harmony among the Africans
who are the rightful owners of
Africa, what are the principles of
the U.N.O.?

Can anyone tell me why the
African should not be allowed to
lead a life free from fear of op-
pressions and restrictions ?

Now, as regards the coloured
community — whose rights are
now in great jeopardy, a com-
munity numbering about one
million people, why should these
pecple lose those democratic
rights they have enjoyed for al-
most a century ?

This is unchristian and unde-
mocratic, I ask myself where is
South Africa heading for ?

Fear seems to be the basic fact
that engenders racial strife, but
were we true christian and demo-
cratic government, perfect love
would cast out all fear and, we
should write for the highest good
of all irrespective of colour, race
or creed.

In conclusion by Stevan I quote,
“Just as we feel the need for air
enly when we are choking and,
feel the desperate struggle for our

lungs when we lack this most
indispensable element of our
existence, so, only now when we
see our freedom threatened do we

**Seeret”’

keen even more: accelerated if
component parts could have been
obtained faster from the United
States,

It was disclosed recently that
in dollar values, about $175,000 of
the total $400,000 cost of each of
these planes is represented by
engines and other components im-
ported from the United States
While the Canadian version closely
approximates the American
however, the Canadian-built plane
uses a Canadian-built “Orenda”
engine.

Defence headquarters also dis-
closed that it is borrowing 100 or
so Harvard training planes from
the United States air force for
use ih the plan to train airme:
for her Atlantic pact allies. More
than 150 airmen from overseas
now are training in Canada, which
has undertaken to train 1,100 each
year in a modified form of the
great Commonwealth air training
plan which turned out 131,000
fiiers in the last war.

begin to be aware that democracy
has always been essential to our
moral and spiritual existence and
that it alone makes possible the
dignity and freedom of man.”

ERIC W. BROWNE,
“Ebje”,

Culloden Rd.
22.5.51

Guava Jelly
To Tre Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—A correspondent writes
from Bournemouth “In the
local shops one can buy Barbados
Guava jelly at 1s. 3d. per pound,
The taste is pleasant but for some
reason the jelly we tried was al-
most liquid.”

My cook, who makes excellent
and firm guava jelly, tells me that
when guava jelly is not “boiled
high enough” it is apt to be
liquid; and that a small amount
of alum used in the boiling will
help to make and keep it firm.

It seems important that our at-
tempt at establishing markets for
cur local produce should be at-
tended with every precaution
against the commodity not being
up to standard. Furthermore, no
erticle for sale should be shipped
without a brand mark or the name
of the manufacturer,

Yours truly,

E.M.S.

FESTIVAL

(By PATRICK KIRWAN)

SEVILLE,

WITH all due respect to Mr. Herbert Mor-
rison and his planners and publicists (not to
mention the bull-dozers) it is really an easy
matter to run a festival. Each spring, for
centuries, the citizens of Seville have held
a festival that is famous all over Europe. It
‘s held not to prove anything or even to sell
anything; but simply because the solemnities
of Lent are past, the air is fragrant with
the scent of orange blossom, and the roses
re blooming in the Garden of the Alcazar.
t is held because spring has come to Seville
ond its citizens feel like enjoying themselves.

A' THOUSAND MASTS

There is an open space traversed by boule-
ards. It is about as far from Seville Cathe-
tral as Green Park is from Westminster. The
‘ycal corporation moved into the open space.

1 less than a week an area larger than the
sattersea site had been strung with 135,000
ulbs, 55,000 gleaming white and golden lan-
cerns. :

A thousand venetian masts garlanded with
yur or five miles of close-knit olive and
1yrtle had been set up with bunting, flags
nd huge gleaming butterflies, seemingly in-
umerable, at their peaks.
Noble illuminated archways gave vistas to
venues of palms, eucalyptus, lime and lilac;
1 the open spaces between them sprang up
) vast marquees for use as public restaur-
iats and bars; and over 300 “Casetas”—gaily
wiped pavilions, of varying size, for private
use,

ENTER THE GIPSIES

At the week’s end the corporation moved
out and the citizens of Seville moved in—to
lecorate their pavilions, which they rent
(families, “futbol” clubs and get-togethers of
every kind) at the cost of a few shillings a
nead, thus clearing the municipality’s initial
expenses.

There is no planning. No busybodies dic-
tate what form the decorations should take.
The citizens simply set to work with paint,
paper, pictures, tables, chairs and floorboards
for the dancing platform.

The result is something to take the breath
away — ariot of colour and fantasy that rele-
gates Cecil B. de Mille to the “B” picture
category.

Then with the bars well stocked with
sherry, brandy, sausages, olives, almonds,
Spanish hams, cheese and the. world’s most





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delectable prawns, Seville is ready for its];

festival. The girls—of all ages from three to
thrice-times 30 — change into the gay, full-
skirted “Gitanas” and put flowers in their
hair. There is a premonitory clicking of
castanets, a staccato tap of heels and the
strumming of guitars. Already the gipsies
are flocking in with bright eyes and eager
out stretched palms.

FIVE CIRCUSES

Near by is the fairground—with five cir-
cuses, the dodg’ems, almond paste and fried
octopus : all the fun of the fair.

Now, after just a few days and at no cost
to the public purse, the festival can begin,
prompt to the minute.

Seville is ready to forget its troubles for a

while, to rejoice and welcome its guests. Not
that visitors are sought. Indeed, the local
paper rather deplores the festival’s growing
popularity in the outside world, fearing com-
mercialisation; but none the less the tourists
dock in from all quarters, with cameras, cars
and desirable currencies. Women visitors
nave to be rather careful though. A notice
in the cathedral gives biblical warning that
those immodestly dressed—that is, in short
skirts or with plunging necklines, “will be
driven out of the temple.”

DANCING GIRLS

There are bullfights, concerts and exhibi-
tions galore. No Arts Councils arrange any
of them, but all of them thrive, none the less.

Now the proud horsemen of Spain ride in
from the wide grasslands on their high-step-
ving thoroughbreds, cantering between the
2asetas in their ornate leather shaps, scarlet-
sashed waists and tight short jackets. Their
senoritas, resplendent in flamencos filmy with
lace, cling behind them like fabulous orchids.

Cavalcade after cavalcade canters by, inter-
spersed with smart gigs and shiny coaches,
mule-drawn, horse-drawn, even ass-drawn;
but all fantastically caparisoned and with
bright jingling bells. In them drive clusters
of the loveliest girls in the world.

Every caseta has its complement of lovely
girls, dancing. the “Sevillanas,” swaying with
graceful, undulating hands to clicking fingers
and the strange sad voices of the singers.
Each caseta vies with the next in spectacle
and hospitality. The spectators watch with
rapt faces, clapping the rhythm of the dance
and uttering full-throated “Oles” when some
measure is executed with particular skill.

LIGHTS, LAUGHTER

The myriad lights, the colourful casetas,
the vivid costumes, the laughter and constant
strangely stirring music make the visitor feel
as though he had wandered into some dream-

like ballet-cum-opera-cum-musical comedy
with, literally, a cast of thousands.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S.



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2. For previously painted work, if the surface is in good
condition, rub down, clean, and apply 1 coat of “LAGO-
LINE” UNDERCOATING, followed within 24 hours by 1
coat of “LAGOLINE” ENAMEL,

wo

For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor
condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and carry out the
procedure for new work, as described at 1 above.

Metalwork.
1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “BROWN PRIMOCON”,

then 1 coat of “LAGOLINE” UNDERCOATING, followed
within 24 hours by 1 coat of “LAGOLINE” ENAMEL,

2. For previously painted work, if the surface is in good con—
dition, rub down, clean, and apply 1 coat of “LAGOLINE”
UNDERCOATING, followed within 24 hours by 1 coat of
“LAGOLINE” ENAMEL,

3. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor con—

dition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and carry out the pro-
cedure for new work, as described at 1 above.

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DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—acenrs.















EMPIRE DAY

CALLS FOR CELEBRATION
STOCK UP ON

THESE TO-DAY.



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Anchor Butter
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LL LLL SSS
THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951



B.W.LS.A.
GO TO

From page 1

It was felt by some members
of the committee that an agricul-
turalist should be sent. It was
further suggested that a member
of the Primary Producers’ Fedeva-
tion be sent.

An Underestimation

Hon. Albert Gomes felt that the
Delegation shculd remain as. it
was. He thought it was an under-
estimation of the delegation to
think that they could not put the
ease for agricultural produce of
the West Indies.

Mr. Clegg said it was regrettable
that sugar, the -princip?! product
of the West Indies, wou*i not be
represented. It seemed a waste
of time to send the delegation
withcut a representative of
B.W.LS.A.

Hon. D. B. Sangster thought that
even at that stage the B.W.LS.A.
could reconsider their decision.

He knew that in Hon. Albert
Gomes, the Hon. W. Raatgever,
the Hon. Bustamante and Mr.

Adams they had four politicians
that would hold their own against
any in the world.

Mr. Adams said that the
B.W.LS.A. must not make the mis-
take again of giving the politicians
in this area, the impression that
they were merely making use of
them as a shield. When the poli-
ticilans were eventually asked to
go to Great Britain last time, he
said, it was to give the opinion of
the West Indian people. He had
no intention of being used unin-
tentionally or deliberately as a
stooge.

Politicians’ Status

Politicians in the West Indies,
especially Labourites, had to be
very careful that they were not
being suspected of being used by
B.W.LS.A. for -their convenience.

“T cannot see how Australia can
suspect B.W.LS.A. in going to
Great Britain any more than they
can suspect them in going to Can-
ada,” said Mr. Adams,

“Let us strongly recommend to
B.W.LS.A. to reconsider. their
position, When we as politicians
go to Britain, how effective are
we going to be without B.W.1.S.A.?
I am going to ask them to recon-
sider their position especially in
the light of their willingness to go
to Canada.”

Hon. Albert Gomes said that
despite the fact that Mr. Adams
and he very often had their little
differences, he had great respect
and regard for him and he appre-
ciated the frankness with which
he had spoken.

He thought those who were
there and had to do with sugar
must appreciate what was the
position with regard to politicians
in the West Indies.

“There is a suspicion in the
West Indies that there is the dan-
ger of the sugar people in some
way or the other using political
support when it suits their con-
venience.

Co-operation

“IT have felt at almost every
stage of these discussions, that if
there is going to be co-operation
between the governments and
B.W.LS.A. it would be extremely
dangerous if the Association take
the responsibility in their own
hands to proceed to negotiate, and
then when they find themselves in
trouble ask the governments to
come in again. It seems to me that
this Committee should take the
stand that the co-operation of the
governments and the Association
must take a tangible form.”

He wanted to remind B.W.LS.A.
that Australia was now coming
forward to join with the West In-
dies for very obvious reasons, but
when it was in Australia’s inter-
est to battle her own canoe she
acted otherwise. That was some-
thing that had to be borne in mind
and it was something which was
known by the governments in the
area,

“I frankly think that this is
not as simple a matter as it
may seem, I feel that it is a
situation that should definitely
be clarified because I share
Mr. Adams’ views to a very
great extent,

“I happen to be a politician
also and I know what the
situation is. In many of the
territories even among the
sugar workers, there is a great
suspicion that we politicians
who are concerned in this
matter are just thinking of the
sugar manijllacturers, It is a
misguided view, because we
all realise how important
sugar is to the economy of the
West Indies, and it is for that
reason we are determined to
fight these political battles.”
Mr. Gomes said that he thought

they should not leave the situation
as it was at the moment. In his
opinion, it was a very acute one.

The Chairman, Professor Beas-
ley, said that it might help if,
despite the fact the B.W.LS.A. was
not sending a representative, they
ask Mr. ‘Robinson to become a
member of the delegation as Mr.
Robinson.

An Agreement
Mr. Robinson said that he was
bound by the decision which his
directors had made. He was a
party to it and had agreed to it.
“If my directors are of the



—

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enables the air to insulate the body
against sudden changes of temper-



WILL NOT
LONDON

opinion that B.W.1.S.A. should not
take part, wouldn’t it be asking
me to take a position which you in
your hearts would not expect me
to accept?” Mr. Robinson ques-
tioned.

“I could only be of use to you
if 1 were free to give you my best
advice. On the other hand, I am
quite willing and always will be
to consider every point of
view and work with you to the
best of my ability. This is also
the position of B.W.1.S.A. They
are not asking you to stand by
and take their burdens off them.

“There has got to be co-opera-
tion on all sides, but if I become a
member of the delegation under
the present circumstances, you
would have very good reason to
lose your confidence in anything
I may say. If I come here and ex-
press my own view it has got to
be my own view. I cannot be in
two positions at one time.”

“The one hope of the le in
this area,”’ said Mr. Robinson, “is
that we should free our minds of
suspicion and that we should
speak freely and frankly and tell
each other what we have to say,
and that neither one side nor the
other should take any opportunity
of placing the other in two posi-
tions.”

For that reason it would be
wrong for him, so long as the
B.W.LS.A. continued with their
decision—and that was his in-
structions at present—to become a
member of the delegation.

United Front

Mr. Robinson said that it had
been made clear to the meeting
from the beginning, that quite
separately from anything that was
being discussed there, there was an
agreement with the other Com-
monwealth producers, that no ne-
gotiations should be entered into
before there was a chance to come
together in a united front for the
purpose of making representa-
tions.

There was not one member
there who would not want
B.W.I.S.A. to stand by thai
agreement. Not only must
they do so but appear to
do it in the eyes of the
world: It would not be in the
highest interest of the West In-
dies for B.W.LS.A. to take part
in the proposed talks at the
present time, Mr. Robinson said.
The Chairman finally said that

he believed he was expresing the
view of the Commitee that they
wanted Mr. Robinson to be a
member of the delegation. The
Committee had their faith and
confidence in him. It would be
very prejudicial if he could not
find. it possible to reconsider the
matter. The best thing was to ask
Mr. Robinson to consult his direc-
tors on the matter. Mr. Robinson
promised he would,

What the Flags Mean

A flag is often seen flying from
the pole which rises above the
Harbour and Shipping Depart
ment, Wharf.

Sometimes a_ single blue-
checkered flag or a blue checkered
flag with a pendant beneath it is
flying. -Another time, there is the
House Flag of a steamship com-
pany.

The flags are flown as signals
of ships approaching Barbados. A
flag with blue checkered on a
white background indicates that
an unknown steamer is to the
windward of the island. If the
line of the steamer is known, the
house flag if flown in place of the
checkered flag. ;

A checkered flag, under which
is flown a pendant with a red dot
in its middle, is the signal for an
unknown steamer to leeward. ‘In
case the line of the steamer is
known, the house flag is flown
with the pendant.

To signal a man-of-war to
windward, a red and _ white
diagonal flag is hoisted. A pendant
with a red dot in its centre,
hoisted inferior to the red and
white diagonal flag, signals a
man-of-war to leeward. A black
ball is hoisted inferior to the man-
ef-war flag to tell that a squadron
of men-of-war is approaching
harbour from the windward.

If a squadron is approaching
from the leeward, a pendant with
a red dot in the middle is hoisted
inferior to both the man-of-war
flag and the black ball.

The Harbour Signal Station also
gives hurricane signals. A red
flag with a black rectangle in the
centre is used as a cautionary
signal while two similar flags,
hoisted together, are hurricane
signals.

When a red pendant with a
white vertical cross is flown with
a black ball hoisted inferior to it,
the signal permits small craft to
enter molehead before’ being
granted pratique in bad weather.

Notices of ships approaching the
island are communicated to the
Harbour Signal Station from a
“look-out” station at Highgate.
The flags are immediately hoisted
when the notices are given. They
are lowered shortly citer the ship
has been lying at anchorage.



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Empire Day
Message

From The Rt. Hon. The
EARL OF GOWRIE
VO.. PC. GiMG., C.B.,
D.S.O.,

President
Ores woe-al ab ay MY pr.v-

ge and my i.dnvtr,
wo senag you 4 messuye iv
BMmpsre sway bus, w ity
vegre., I nave w uo ww
When world conditions coi.-
Ubue in an unhappy, uns .i-
Med and dangerous state.
At such a ume we ma .-
venance of tne wonuciiu:
P.renershp whien exis.i
between tne varus coun-
tres which make up we
Commonwealth and mpuire
is of paramount importance.

Te foster and improve
mutual understanding pe-
tween the many different
races to be found in this
large family is the task for
which this Movement wus
founded. I can truthfully
Say that much has beecr ac-
complished but I cannot
stress too strongly the
urgency for continuing our
work consolidating past
achievements and makiug
progress in those areas as
yet little touched.

This. is particularly im-
portant and immediate at
jthe present time, when
rapid political change is
being made within the Com-
monwealth and Empire
whilst world conditions re-
majin so difficult and un
certain,

I am most grateful to all
friends and supporters for
their past assistance and I
confidently appeal to you
all, at this critical time, to
continue your efforts and
strive to achieve the aims
and principies for which the
Movement stands, the main-
|tenance of peace and the
furtherance of world pros-
perity.

-.I wish you all God-speed
and success in your endeav-
our,
GOWRiE.
Empire Day, 1951,

To the Youth of the British
Empire
EACH of you I send
this message at a time
when you must hear and
see many things which may
sadden you.

It is true that the peazee in
which you had hoped to
sTrow up has not yet come
about nor can we be sure
when this will be. But it
is also true that many of
you, the young people of the
British Commonwealth and
Empire are, through your
friendships learning the
great truth that distance and
a different way of life need
not divide you.

Take courage, be brave
and remember that you are
met together this day with
‘the children of many races,
to celebrate Empire Day
and our common pbrother-
hood.

GOWRIE
Empire Day, 1951.



Gomes’ Motion
Recorded

Hon, Albert Gomes’ motion
favouring West Indian Govern-
ments to give their views on the
Report of the Standing Closer
Association Committee Meeting,
before discussing the report of
the Customs Union Commission
was yesterday simply recorded at
the meeting of the Regional
‘Economic Committee, but no other
action taken since there was such
cleavage of opinion by members
of the Committee.

The resolution read as fol-
lows: —
The Committee resolves to

communicate with the Secretary
of State urging him to make
immediate representations to all
Governments which have not yet
considered the Report of the
Standing Closer Association Com-
mittee asking for an_ early
expression of their views on the
proposals contained in the
report.

The Committee agrees that it
is not desirable to consider the
Report of the Customs Unior
Commission until such time as
there has been a full expression
of views from all territorial Gov-
ernments on the Standing Closer
Association Committee Report,



ROTTEN SUPPLIES

No ships were in the Bay yes-

terday, but some boatmen still got Officer,

a job to do. They were hired to
take off rotten merchandise into
the Bay for dumping. One row-
coat took-out a supply of potatoes.






sa
IMPERIAL LEATHER

Wee ask: for

BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

New Pictures
At Combermere

HREE NEW pictures have

been added to the collection
at Combermere School. These
were brought from Engiana by
Major C. Nostt, Heaamaster of
the School, when he returned
from a vacation on Marcn ¥1 by
the S. S. Golfito.

One, which is about two feet
long by a foot and a half wide,
is of Frankie Worrell, the Inter-
national cricketer, an old Gom-
bermerian.

The picture

¢ shov7s Worrell,
wearing his

Commonwealth
blazer with the Commonwealth
crest. It was taken in Madras,
India, during the last Common-
wealth tour. It is the true
“Frankie”. Tnis is hung up in
the Combermere Hall among the
School's Set Cups and Shields

The other pictures are of Lord
Combermere, founder ot tne
School. One, hung up in the
School Library, shows Lord Com-
bermere in his military outfit.
The other is hung up over the
stage at Combermere and in this
eminent position Lord Comber-
mere wears his civvies.

All old Combermerians jnter-
ested are invited to £0 and have
a look at them.
ferent of Queen's College.

Bey Street Boys’ ScHool
and St. Saviours School, were
ar.ong those who visited the
Combermere School Hall yester-
day morning to get a glimpse of
the exhibits of the Empire Weex
Exhibition.

The boys of Bay Street School
were especially interested . jn
their project which was awarded
first prize in the Intermediate
Division, it showed Cook landing
at Botany Bay in 1770. The back-
ground showed the map of Aus-
tralia, New Zealand and. sur-
rounding islands.

The Combermere boys too were
constantly admiring their pro-
ject which was given second
prize in the Intermediate Divi-
sion. This showed Scott in. the
South with his camp pitched near
a mountain of ice, This project
had no background and therefore
Bay Street’s had the edge.

Pe R. YT. MICHELIN, Com-

missioner of Police, is giving
his Annual Talk to bus arivers
and conductors at the Empire

Theatre on Thursday moruing,
May 31, at 10 o’clock. A film on
Road Safety will also be shown. ;
The Commissioner told the
Advocate that he hoped ail the
bus drivers and conductors in the
island will attend. Those who are
interested in Road Safety shoula
also make a special effort to be

there.
HE POLICE DOGS are doing
fine. They were on the beach

at Gravesend during the week
practising trails.
“In about three months the

dogs will complete their training
and will be ready for service,” the
Commissioner told the Advocate.

A CANE FIRE at Hope Planta-
tion, St. George, on Tuesday
night burnt six acres of first
crop ripe canes. They are the
property of C. G. Gale and were
insured,
FIRE at Bulkeley Tenantry,
St. George, early yesterday
morning completely destroyed a
boarded and shingled house with
shedroof attached. It is the prop-
erty of Edna Crichlow of Farm
Tenantry, St. George. It was noi
insured. The Police are making
investigations. ‘
HE HOME of 8l-year-old
Marry Leach at Bibby Lane,
St. Michael was completely de-
stroyed on Tuesday night. It is
valued $240 and was not insured
An adjoining house, owned by
Joseph Browne, was charred on
the western side, This also is not
insured.

‘ St. Lawrence, Christ Church,
on Tuesday between motor car
X.1855, owned and driven. by
Montague White of St. Lawrence
and a bicycle owned and ridden
by Vernon Forde of the same dis-
trict.
Forde, who was injured, was
treated by Dr. Ward. The cycle
was slightly damaged.
PART of Frizers Road, St,
r Joseph, is at present under-
going repairs. This road leads to
Burke Village, via Vaughan’s
Land. It is the third time that it
has been repaired for the year.
On each occasion it was damaged
by rain.
The Chimborazo Road has been
completed and is once more open
to traffic

MEDICAL OFFICER
APPOINTED

The Secretary of State for tha
Colonies has selected Dr. Zyg-
munt Witold Skomoroch fors ap-
pointment to the post of Medical
Barbados General Hos-
pital.

Dr. Skomoroch and family are
expected to arrive by the s-s.
Bonaire on May 29.



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N ACCIDENT occurred stopovers in England, Ircland.
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Naney Moller
In Singapere

SINGAPORE, May 23.
The British cargo ship Naney
Moller with 3,700 tons of Malayan

Fined 40/- For
Larceny = i "ub. tints

In Mental! Hospital Case Siagapore just before noon today
She moved up the Straits ir
Elsie Hutson, a labourer

Goodland, St. Michael, was ye. sweeper Michael which had es
terday found guilty of larceny ecrted her for the last 500 miles
by His Worship Mr. H. A. Talr:a,
Police Magistrate of District - A"
For the offence she was ordered the destroyer Coassak. —Reuter.
to pay a fine of 40 and 3
costs in: ]4 days or in default one
month’s imprisonment, She gave
notice of appeal at the Bar.

Labourer



War On Insects

In the case were Mr, E. W LONDON, May 23
Barrow for the defendant and The British Empire Society for
Mr. W Reece, Solicitor Germ-th> blind today launched ¢
eral for the Crown 31 000,000 appeal It wants the

flsie Hutson who was employ. money in’ about seven months
ed as a maid at the Mental Pert of the campaign is war o1
Hospital on April 20 stole a beautiful silver and black insec

quantity of goods from there, the wiich blinds people

property of the Governo--.n The West Indies is joining, Th
Executive Committee, The vauc iriect, the Simulium Fly (Buffalo
of the goods was estimated by Goat) lives in’ a fertile rive
the Police at 5 region of the northern Gol

Cpl. Watson wuao gave evider. °c vast. It has established a reign
on the first hearing, told how he of terror and chased the peopk

searched Elsie Hutson’s
when she was leaving the Mental

baskel away
For the British Empire Society

Hospital on the afternoon of for the blind, the insect is ‘a
April 20. ereh enemy that must be wipec
His search showed that she out at all costs.

Mr. John F. Wilson, the bline
secretary of the Society ha
this “country of — thr

had a quantity of goods in her
basket which included = milk
tomatoes and rice Questioned visited
about how she obtained these blind.” His journey took hin
goods, Cpl. Watson said that she 500 miles up the spine of thc
told him that she got them from Gold Coast 150 miles across thc



the place where she was working. ncrthern wilderness and finall
through about 50 miles of ele
Mr. W. W. Reere submitted phant grass. —Reuter,
that he saw no reason why the
defendant should not be convict neete
ed as the evidence had proved °
that larceny had been committed Discuss Trade
by the accused e e
Mr. Barrow in his address Commissioner
submitted that the prosecution
had not proved that the goods ‘The Regional Economic Com-

that were in the possession of the Mittee today discussed in private
accused on the day mentioned S@ssion the report of its Sub-
were the property of the Gov- c¢nmittee on the proposed Trade

Cr nmissioner Services to the

ernor—in-—Executive Committe a7 s
There was also no eviderce ‘ha. United Kingdom and Canada,
the Governor-in-Executive ¢ aon i
mittee had lost a quantity of HOUSE BURNT

goods that day \ small board and shingle house



He also submitted th he Si med at Berepon, St. Philip,
defendant was not charged with 4 | ‘lo property of Harold Nurse
breaking bulk, but when C o the same district was partly
Watson accosted her she had o bi rut when a fire broke out in the

small amount of goods in her heuse thortly after 12.15 p.m.

basket. He said that people go, yesterday, 7
out of the Mental Hospital and The Fire Brigade went to the
buy goods which they carry inte|Sc2ne and the fire was quickly

brought under control. The house

1s insured,

the Institution with them,

In ending his address Mr.
Barrow submitted that the onus
upon the prosecution § to
prove their case and it was never
thé duty of the defence in a
larceny charge to explain when
and how the goods were stolen.

-————————



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arrived off

ef ecmpany with the British mine-

The Naney Moller was inter-
c€pted on her way to China by





















PAGE FIVE





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and











EPHEDRO



IT clears the nasal
passages to remove
stuffiness and the
distressing co nd i-
tions of head colds
and = catarrh, The
Patent nasal appli-
cation bottle is infin-
itely better than
spray or dropper
and ean be car-
ried conveniently in {
handbag or pocket
without fear of leak- |

t

age

Obtainable from all Drug Stores:
KNIGHT'S DRUG STORES


S

PAGE SIX

HENRY



LAWNMOWERS
SHARPENED fF

MICKEY MOUSE
PANN ee I

ote Boy
LIKE “TO SEE OUR STUDIO!
AROUND, WELKINRING ! t










wT JHINK ILL STay
HGME TODAY-I JUST |
FEEL UKE SRENDIN’
4 QUIBT TIME AND A
HAVIN A GOOD REST- | rig

Sn ee |







HOW MANY TIMES MUST
I TELL YOU NOT TO SWEEP
DIRT UNDER THE RUGS ?
AND WHY DON'T YOU
DUST THE BOOKS IN THE

| o>) ANO TIRED~ TALKING
€ >) TO YOuR ,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
BY CARL ANDERSON





[THAT'S “LENNIE” THE DOG STAR!






UNIT HERE.... 16 - AVILLIMETE:
oe FOR TELEVISION!











oN
cy Coe aes 2
a oo HE SAID
aoe, Cs ‘bey ( WED GET IT
7) fe Cy Ton ) ALL OVER
tah WOULDN'T ( OURSELVES








'M COUNTING TO Five!
ONE -- TWO-- THREE-~







LIBRARY? I'M SICK









} '

A Net's
~_ a ic
; oN NO
ZENA S
ISN

Ada NOs
Wot



ME Too... BUT I CAN STILL
SEE $800,000! CUTTLE,
GRAS THAT BAG! WE'RE

GETTIN’ OUTTA HERE !
















LOOK









THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951



For a radiant shine




ella,

»

The quality ma
Metal Polish

446





al]
TEA

ck aoe

Ee

es

STANDS

SUPREME






breakfast
that builds! Save ‘em
and Swap ‘em... 40
Cards in the Series.

Hlloggis
CORN FLAKES

today!















Simple Beauty Plan

Avwasn your face with Palmolive Soap

Then, for 60 seconds, massage with
Palmolive's soft, lovely lather. Rinse!

CP this 3 times a day for 14 days.
This cleansing massage brings
your skin Palmolive’s full
beautifying effect!



LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH
— Also —
GALV. OIL CANS —1, 2

T. HERBERT Lid.

& 5 Gin, Sizes

Extablished
1860

Incorporated
1926
TRADE MARK

VASELINE ia the registered trade mark
of the Chesebrongh Mfg. Co., Cons'd

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only



































USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW

TINS TINS
ORANGE & GFRUIT JUICE 29 25 SELECT P. MILK (1b) 105 84
Pkgs. MOIRS CHOCOLATES 10 3pkss.18 Tins LAMBS TONGUES 70 62





POTATOES per lb. 12 8lbs. for) Bots. ALLSOPPS BEER 26 20

D. V. SCOTT’ & Co. Ltd. Broad Street









<=







with Energy-Building
Breakfast Foods

CEREALS

Vigro Toasted Wheat Flakes
Pest Toasties Corn Flakes
Wafer Corn Flakes

Kelloggs All Bran

Welgar Shredded Wheat
Weetabix

Danish Rye Crispbread

Ryvita Rye Bread

Peek Freans
Crispbread

HE
A MAKES MORE MONEY THAN ALL THE
A OTHER ACTORS PUT TOGETHER!
1) ‘apg g2% , HW
> " Bul 4 ' \ *
A” , —s e i “| ofBX !
ae A -
OH ... THAT'S A NEW MIDGET PRODUCTION eee THEY MAKE



2 ee, te

Sa, £& ss
Give the Meal its || ;OWER JELLY CRYSTAL
finishing touch with

4 in Five Flayours
Qe: See Most Enjoyable 14e. pk. |

Grape Nuts











Vita-Weat




SS ANDWHATIFIDONT
J WANNA FORGET ABOUT IT?
S\ WHATLL YOU DO ABOUT IT.

memaeemnd | HONEST JOHN HERE HOLDS THE
MERE | STAKES. HE CAN RETURN THE BETS
is. | |TO YOU AND DAVE PALMERSAND IT












Brown & Polson’s Flavoured





{ — CAN ALL BE " BOY FRIEND?” Corn Flour for Blanc- BACON & HAM
M | FE ——=[ © ) “FORGOTTEN ey mange — 3 Flavours to
ae 4 >: Stee * é Sticed Bacon by the pound
= y 2 " 1
= Flour in < Pokaan ' Sliced Ham by the pound

pkt,

| Creamola Custard Pudding
in pkgs. for 10c.

Pearce Duff's Pudding or

Blancmange P 0 w de r,

Assorted Flavours in tins

OF Course it’s

rn einer panirnisnistar soning
SSF EX —

for 24c, es Smooth delicious
| ALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co.

FRUIT JUICES

Bahama Pineapple Juice

Jainaica Tomato Juice

Trinidad Orange Juice

Trinidad Orange and Grape-
fruit Juice

Trinidad Grapefruit Juice

More DESSERT

Chivers Jelly Creams
Assorted Flavours in pkts.
20c. each

John Moir’s Special Dessert
17c, pkt.

START THE DAY BRIGHT

AFTER DINNER =

ALLEYNE

ARTHUR'S SPECIAL — that

RUM

Ltd. —“Your Grocers) — HIGH sr.

SSS

ee


THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.|







FOR RENT PUBLIC SALES







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC NOTICES





Minimum charge week 12 cents and Ten cents per agate line on week-days Ten cents per agate line on week-da
6 cents Sundays 4 wor rds — over 24] and 12 cents per agaie line on Sundays, | Gnd 12 cents pe r line on
words 3 cents a word w 4 cents aj] minimum charge $1.50 on week-days|miinimum charge $1.50 on weeb-day
word on Sundays end $1.80 on Sundays. end $1.80 on Sundays

For Births, Marriage or Engagement























































































































THE MARKET SQUARE
IN
ST. GEORGE, GRENADA.




'
‘
1
!

















































ee







LOST & FOUND

LOST



SWE PSTAKE TICKET.

Series































BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
Representative :
GERALD WOOD













i
=













PAGE



VEN

NOTICES ©



iia



| SHIPPING

t
as















































and
Vin-
Sailing

CARIBE
Passenge’
cent, G@





will accept Cargo
s for St. Lucila, St
ada and Aruba
Tuesd nad. inet

The M/V “MONEKA” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica Antigua,
Nevis and St
Friday 25th inst

-_—-—

Accepting Passengers,
Carge and Mail

R. M. JONES & Co, Ltd



Montserrat

Kitts. Sailing

Jz mee ee Seen! 6M SALE | wae pees © | Canadian National Steams ip
e'iarge is $3.00 for any number of words e HOUSES REAL ESTATE NOTICE : 24.5. 51-—In
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each am charge. week %2 cents and ensainaetsipenn Silalielils ace MC TER ee i SOUTHBOUND Sette Soi Satle pon
additional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 | 96 cents Sus “us A) eee 1 i APARTMENT at “Ocetta,” on-the-Sea NEWBURY—With 11% acres of land,| Applicants for positions under Rox B.C APPLEWHAITES LIMITED i Montreal Haittax Barbados sarvedos
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death) oo on Sudevs. 1 ¢ opposite Woodside, Bay Street. Apply ©n | 3 lime kilns. Building and out-buildings. | (Welders, Turners) selected for an inter- LOST SHARE CERTIFICATE | LADY NELSON .. 4 May 12. May 19 Moy 27 May 28 May
Notices only after 4 p.m. : = premises 24.5.31—In | Next door Gun Hill Barracks about 6 wae will be informed by letter shortly potication - os oe a CAN, CRUISER 17 May 20 May 29 May 30 May
“"RERACHAN ~~ OGansail, Bouunaniha.| miles from Bridgetown. Apply S. W: original references will be returned, ] ® cesee as been made to the] CAN. CHALLENGER 26 May 29 May 12 May 7 June 8 June
: edn Serene meee ene — Opposite Roumanika,| MeConney, St. George 24.5.51—In 24.5,51—2n | Directors of the above-named Company | LADY RODNEY 5 June 6 June 11 June 20 June 2: June
DIED 5 yrells Road. Apply to present tenant.) 0000 re by E. V. Goddard, (Sole Executor of! [aADY NELSON 30 June 3 July 5 July 14 July 15 July
AUTOMOTIVE .5,3s--00. | eee ——-——- | HE BARBADOS YOUTH MOVEMENT | ‘he Estate of Dudlay Cameron Hawkins.| LADY RODNEY 30 July 2 Acg 4 Aug. 13 Aug. 16 Aug.
- sseisiemecenpcinaalinaitietin manele ae cere << = the cocoate = “TH YEAR deceased) of this Island, for the issue 3 , anae
EXCEPTIONAL —25 MP EUREKA—Enterprise Road ‘urnished Fa gga elmont oad, St lf you oliticilans or those respo: of a duplicate Certificate Thirty (30 han ite Ie aig bith adie) teidaeealeidlameeeimaletnai nab deeaaieald lee’
GOOKOL—On May 23rd 1951, at the} Piet 15. Very pps pa. = Hh pmes Bungalow. Telephone, Refrigerator, and aren Sea tones 2 ae ee ae ook seeing "about pared pecan gp Preference Shares numbe
General Hospital, John Gookol, late! s9s9 22.5,51-Sn. | Modern conveniences. Available now | 0c ite, Te Maha, dining, Weccktast | Better housing for all instead of a 66-95 inclusive NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
sugar boiler of Fairfield Factory. Age Apply Frederica Fitzpatrick. Telephone awing, dining, breakfast | favoured few; well help the Barbados| UPON the statement that the original Barbados Barbades Boston St.John Halifax Montreal
68 years. His funeral leaves his late i 3535 24.5.51—3n.|!Ooms and kitchen downstairs, three Me = . ve. | Certificate No. 5 issued to Dud! DY N h e une 2 une =< 25th June
EL bedrcor toil : Youth Movement and watch the re- LADY NELSON .. &th June 10th J 2th June 22nd June
residence Eagle Hall Road at 4.30 to-day ; CTRICAL — reoms, toilet and ath upstairs./ ots then , ; 1. {Cameron Hawkins under date 27th June DY , 5 y 29 July
> 4 * _ | Usuai medern wire sults ther We stand for right versus r LADY RODNEY 3 July 5 July 14 July - 16 July ? wl
for the eevee Cemetery. ue a nets See, ee Saas anderen Pn con ar Garage might 1949 has been lost and not deposited] LADY NELSON July 29 July 7 Aus 9 Aug. 12 Aug.
Eva ookol (widow), Sy REFR. a ree hak cei ae ning an itting rooms, ‘ants rooms in yar a es ca with anyone as security th ise wend ete pty eae ‘Sept
(daughter), Dr, Ramessan (cousia) | foot ae Ton ‘One U S. 7 cuble} bedrooms, running water, Kitchen with Inspection every day (except Sundays) Rev. “L. BRUC E-CLARKG, and NOTICE: Is ALSO HEREBY "GIVEN ee ene spe staid rn $i
(B.G. Papers please copy) 40 rigidaire Refrigerator. Apply:| gas usual conveniences, No pets or | between 4 and 6 p.m. or by appointment Founder th ¢ within thirty a Pe .
: 24.5.81—In. | Hone tg wentnerhead c/o Weatherhead’s| children, Dial 2696, —=--22.5.51—2n Dial 390s Rev. J. B. GRANT, that if within thirty days from the dote] N.B.—Subject to change without notice. Ail vessels fitted witn cold storage cham
5. il re. one 144. ies » oe en: "The above will be set up for sale at Chaplain, es ae a es aren a rs. assenger Fares and freigut rates on applicatian to:— -
IN MEMORIAM ip 17.5.51—t.f.n pap Competition at our office in MRS. OLGA = s . cen a ag aa nace hae ay hac
—————— ucas Street, Bridgetown, on Friday, the . AT orocee vith such applic 1
POULTRY WANTED ee Gobel ties eee ae o c proceed to deal with such applicatic
CRAWFORD—In loving memory of our} ~__ eS ; CARRINGTON & SEALY o Pees eta Board of Direct
dear husband and father George Aubrey " DUCK s— ” Khaki Cam: Minimum charge week 72 cents and Solicit HE SUGAR INDU: « AG wt een Oe od wate inte .- rhea
, Crawford who fel’ asleep on the 25th 22.5. 51--3n | 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 2% 19.5.51—9n TURAL BANK CT, 1 ° e. ” wes gents.
May, 1948. # words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a| ——— To the Creditors holding specialty liens
Three rom have passed since that word on Sundays, sey public competition at our office aa SPA Plantation, e .
cod day ~ James Stree’ y a St, . ae neneimmenrenreeene eee
Grae tie eninal toptstoly Gan aay MECHANICAL HELP at 2 pam) rood 16 morehee Ch iand at |,, TAKE NOTICE that 1, the owner of i ‘s |
, ‘ eee . the above Plantation am about to obtain !
From thee we would never desire to rn Upper Car'ton, St. James, the propert a 4 4
part GRASS CUTTERS — Massey-Harris 5| > >.i0) sai | of the Estate of th ‘late William Jordan, | % 10a" of £280 under the provisions of |
Since heaven hath claim thee we| and 6 ft. immediate deliveries. Enquirie: nae oo ee ae ee aeanaaed =? e late William Jordan, | ihe above Act against the said Plantation, = e
i ; ; ce, oa 7 fe z sa ec bhai ae eee oo
could not refrain Solicited Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616 with experience in accounts, CENTRAL | For, further particulars and conditions | (5 respect of the Agricultural year 1951] ere at Last The New Wonder Machine 0.
In our memories still live a devoted 22.5.51—6n. | “ ; > : “| of sale, apply to py Your Name, Initials, Private Number
FOUNDRY LTD. 23.5.51—31y . , No money has been borrowed under : : f
father. ales i an mie ~ HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD. Ee Actuate Ace ee der | or your address can be marked on any
; : princes anne al Act, 1905, or the ie : we
Ever to be remembered by Ruth Crawford MISCELLANEOUS MALE AND | FEMALE—$ Ladies te 16-5-51—8n | above Act (as the ease’ may’ be) in S may aly enh online, Aoi .
Aubrey, Peter, Paul (Sons), Joy - Pion 4 The undersigned will offer for sale ai | TSPec* of such year Magazine Lane next door to Cosmopolitan
(Daughter), Denis Blades, Mrs. Legall ~—— Cote ice ation, Wee, their Office, No, 17, High Street, Bridge-| Dated this 22nd day of May, 1951 Garage 24.5.51—2n.| NEW YORK SERVICE Si
(Faithful Friends). 24,5.51—1n CIGARETTES — Ardath Cork tipped! sarin i “tl 2 Bobtite: Sewn town, on, Friday the 25th, day of May, L. E et So r% mtaneine sated oe April Arrives Barbados 8th May
C—O L ni! =. » a p.m. . - Steamer Sails th ay - » 29th w
JAMES—In loving memory of our dear’ Veheod itioe comes tite ottect. We 2d-| London, 6.16 BO Son | The, dwellinghouse knows as “GRAND 22.5.51-—-30 at iadiketdiahacads ik ihe a
daughter Vercelia James, who felli have a small stock at the reduced price " with the land thereto containing > .
asleep on the 24th of May 1942. May —namely 10's. 16c. and 20's 32c. B arlene. iecaandbte hota tat ceret 3 Roods 4 3/5th. Perches or thereabouts, i ERSONAL sii NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
she rest in peace, : KNIGHT'S LTD. a ie tier et A. creo B'Son | Situate at Bathsheba, Saint Joseph. NOTICE SS. “ALCOA PATRIOT" Sailed 18th April Arrives Barbados ey
She has gone but not forgotten 19.5.51—3n.| pra Syoes 19.5.51—t.f.0 Inspection on application to the ' 3.8 ALCOA POLAR ils 2nd May - ~ - 18
R ni wi ts God * weIee ‘a er, on e premises. _ an a ) a ainst; SS, “AL c e Sails 16th M. --
esting ith the Saints of — Caretak: th: IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is the The public are hereby warned again t} Ss, “ALCOA ROAME 1 ay oi Ist June
It will always be remembered GALVANISED SHEETS—Best quality -—-~=| For further particulars and conditions| so tion of the Vestry. at 8 the in|} giving credit to my wife, SELENA WHICE | nesses nN
On the 24th May. new sheets, Cheapest in the Island ! MISCELLANEOUS of sale apply to :— Christ Cuber is oaks te me Lp lle (nee THOMAS) as | do not hold myself CANADIAN SERVICE
When the roll was called, she 6 ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56; a COTTLE, CATFORD & Co, | into the Legislature of this Island a Bill | ;eponsible for her or, anyone elee Con | SOUTRBOUN
answered 10 ft $8.40, Nett cash.” Better hurry! WANTED TO BUY 13,5.61.—-@.0-8.] {ithorising the said Vestry to borrow | tracting any debt or debts in my name SOUTHBOUND
4 ‘ . 3, ———_— —<—<— , = niles ya wr Pr or tr signed by me. z.
I am coming Saviour, 1 om ere: A. BARNES & CO., LTD. — Bedr aes eek ee” ERNEST DALE, Passage Road standing , * SU™ of money not exceeding eo ARTHUR LEON WHITE. Name of Ship Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives B'dos,
Lewis James (Father), Clara James 4.5.51—t.f.n.] Sewing Machines, Ice Boxes, Gramo on 22 perches of land. Dwelling house | © be used by them (a) as to $6 Beckles Hill Ke a
(Mother) and family, 24.5.51—1n phones, Tarpaulin about 20 ft. x 8 ft., and pial sane Gevenaiik. Drawing ana | repairing existing roads and paths in the at, Michael 6:8 re OA Fee -. May ith May 14th May 24th
AMRIT ce tatane denne ae base LAUREL RAZOR—If you = in need] other House and Office Things—L 8 Dining rooms two bedrooms, kitchen, | Christ Church Cemetery, and laying out * seasi-ant?? + K BERNADOTTE May 25th May 30th June -10th
ea eg In we eS 8 wurlof a BALE, try a “Laurel”. Special] WILSON, Spry Street. 24,5,51—In. | et and bath and making new roads and paths therein s ALCOA PLANTER June &th June 1ith June 21st
lear daddy McDona’ forris who was| offer now 1/6 each, Obtainable at—| —— x ib) as t 7 offec e ,
a mi . e . iM f sale te as to $587.40 in effecting repairs te
ior ae Re eer Re eee ee Se Eze. ae JOINERS GOOD WORK In M hogany ones TTS tian On Peraay ‘Bsth. May the Mortuary Chapel in the sak MAIL NOTICE OO ALG A PEGASUS" due May 28th sails for St. Joh 1 St. Lawrence
§ . —In Maho |! ie ia * | Cemetery, dic) ) . nF aaah h oe 8 / Sus a ails for St. John and St. Lawre’
We shall sleep but not forever WHITE TILES--6” White Tiles. Enquira| Cedar, Birch, Fir, Deal for Home and t 2 pm. at the office of the under | ion) aEathniee atl cab aan Onis AIR MAILS for Aruba anc River Ports,
There will be a glorious dawn at the Auto Tyre Co. Trafalgar St. Phone| Office—L. S. WILSON, Spry Street. nce. arHetere bass ee obtained.| the Said sum so raised to be repaid ir | Curacao by K.L.M. Service Wil 5s
we ont meet to part no never } 2696. 22.5.51—t.f.n 24.5.51—1n, | ane HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD, | ten annual instalments of $720.00 each.| be closed at the General Post These vessels hve Hmited passenger accommodation
Ever to be remembered Uy his wife 17,5. 51- With intereat ates Sent 188s, together | Office at 10.00 a.m. on Wednesday
S . ccslbiaiaaiiebocetiaatnaelaeneiiaeainacitig ations mn at ¢ ate ne exceeding ae oie
Adina; Delana, Willie, Oscar, Ivan. John DWELLING HOUSE standing on 25%4|5 per centum per annum on the priné 30th May. ‘ : ROBERT THOM LTD. NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
Edna (Children), Gwen (sister-in-law). perches of land, situated at corner of| cipal sum and the unpaid balances H. N. ARMSTRONG, APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVI
24.5, 51—1n GOVERNMENT NOTICE Buckingham and Bank Hall Cross Roads,| thereof for the time being owing. Colonial Postmaster ;
House is built of Timber and roofed Dated the 2ist day of May 1651. i 2 . . ae
POODLES POSO SPO PPS SFOS IOS with Galvanised Tron and ig comprised YEARWOOD & BOYCE, General Post — -=- —-— - sia icles
of Open Verandah on three sides, Living Solicitors for the Vestry of 22nd May, 1951.
bs and ns, Roath, eee Bedroors, Christ Chureh, th ROYAL NETHERLANDS
reakfas joo, Sah, et oe 22.5.81—in. | (SSS
BUILDINGS FOR SALE Attention is drawn to the Defence (Control of Drug and Patent] with a large yard all enclosed. Very | ————__________ __ slbcietthaies STEAMSHIP co.
. . er . « a rt cool and airy. SAMLINGS FROM AMSTERDAM
a a Geared Casste Donor ta aay, 100.” Le a a Se OP, ren Cee enews WHO's? Oe Siete M'tes i 3
s vig z ° § y, 1951. + Witla * § is
published in the cial Gazette y terms and conditions of sale can be Coastal Station \ j " MMS OT inh
OFFERS ARE INVITED h ‘i i] selli ices of “Caroid | tained: Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd RAYMOND JORDAN ergata ast ae Cie Gle Transatlantique
a ee, Merce al e eae oe nye Settee aoe aS 20.5.51—4n paviee that they A pow communicate ; MS. “Oranjestad” 1th, June 1981.
. s a é as ith the follow ships tt sh | SAILINGS & y n :
FOR oe alts”, icks Vaporub”, “Urasal” an e AUCZION Baaine spbestag shige thfossh their Ask those who KNOW { sHeNOR ae ceeatee PARAMAR |
ALL OR ANY ee ct acai snes ai» Aleoe Comet 8/6 (| M.S. “Boniare” 29th, May 1991. | SAILING TO
ae — HILLMAN MINX 1949 MODEL razil; s.s vodas s. Oranjestad; s.s M.S. “Hersilia’ 1ith June 1951. ¥
Item Unit of Sale Maximum Retail Price} We are instructed by the owner who Alcoa Polaris; 8.5, Specialist; s.s. Roslin Sama i!) AT INGS TO TRINIDAD, LA GUAIRA, ENGLAND & FRANCE
OF | has left the Colony to auction this very| C*stle; s.s. Alpha; 8.5, Punta Amica; CURACAO & JAMAICA. :
. ‘ 1 « 7 1.13 fine motor car which has only done 9,000] 5.8. Robin Gray s.s. Amiens; s.s M.S. Oranjestad” 24th. May 1951 COLOMBIE June 10th, 1951
Caroid & Bile Salts .. Bottle of 50 tabs $1.18 miles and to the best of our knowledge| Tutanger; s,s. Norlys; 8.8. | John > ak via Martinique &
Me a i 7 Limited Passenger accommodation - q
THE VALUABLE 100 $1.88 has never been damaged in an accident.| MeDonogh; s.s niston City; s.s avallable Guadeloupe
4 " ¥ AE aie Ry at a” Sale at Cole's Garage on Friday 25th Goan: 8.8 1 s. Cazador; s. P MUSSON,- SON & CO, LTD P
FREEHOLD BUILDINGS | Vicks Vaporub ++ % 02. pot 46c. May at 2 Dm. SOHN M, BLADON, ss, Samana: 9.8, Tachira: pa ia Hi he Agents. i
av) i.
é 10 26c. Auctioneer. berg; s.8. Marion Lykes; s.s. Hudson
” ” eee a 22.5.51—-4n' Firth CARIBBEAN CRUISE.
OCCUPYING » * bottle Gc. . .
The M/V “CARIBBEE” will COLOMBIE May 30th, 1951
THE WHOLE OF ONE SIDE Urasal .. bit «+ small sized bottle $2.10 e soumnt Cargo an yesemgere ros Trinidad, La Guaira, Cur-
Jominica ntigua, ontserra .
ai ue a ah SARS 3 $3.00 Nevis ana st Kitts. Sailing 1st acao, Cartagena and Ja-
OF June 1961 maica
4 Maltevol bottle $2.65 The M/V CACIQUE DEL on

FOR DETAILS Apply to:-
P.O. Box 6, St. George,
GRENADA.

6BOVRIL





In view of the island wide Wage
Increase, the above represents a splen- ‘ §-
cid opportunity to any “GO-AHEAD h? 1 a art €!



businessman.

OL PPLEOE LSE ELSSOESS

coveRNMEN! xomicg | SOU cooks



better

convenien

EMIGRATION

Due to a change in the date of
arrival of the American employ-
ers who are to arrive to select the
labourers for employment in the
United States of America and the
representatives of the Air Trans-
port Company who will be re-
sponsible for arranging the dates
of departure and performing other
duties in connection with the re-
cruitment, it has been necessary to
change the dates of the medical
examinations.

All workers who have ‘Call
Cards’ stating the dates when next
they are to report at Queen’s Park
are now asked to report at 8.30
a.m. according to the following
time table:

Those called for Friday, the

25th May, 1951.

Now report on Wednesday,

30th May, 1951.

Those called for Monday the

28th May, 1951;

Now report on Thursday, the

31st May, 1951.

Those called for Tuesday, the

29th May, 1951;

Now report on Friday, the 1st

June, 1951,

Please note that those who have
vaccination certificates are re-
quested to bring them along when
they are coming to be examined.

24.5.51.—2n.

a
POOP PEP SPOP VO

Bovert gives that extra flavour to all soups, pies and
sayoucies. And nourishment, too !—for Bovril is
the ccncentrated goodness of beef. Bovril is also
a tasty sandwich spread—and a cup of hot Bovril
‘aily makes you feel fine !

2.
3.
4.



6.

add KLIM

‘Tell me.

doctor. .
If they all kill germs,

how can one antiseptic

Copr. 1950 Korden Co
Internat’! Copr. Reserved



be safer than another?’



Some antiseptics lose most of their potency in the presence
of blood. Some, though very powerful, require very careful



Sore » Mouth

$ diluting to be safe on human tissues. The safe antiseptic for

8 .

x untrained use has high germicidal efficiency even in the Loose Bloody T ‘eeth

% presence of blood. It is non-poisonous, does not stain, it is Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
$ : . . * Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
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% » Frankfurt Sausages THANI’S DIAL xoles, | Washstands, Screen
* » Luncheon Beef % 3466 The Annual General Meet- Frames
S ,. Pate De Foie os a =: ing of the Barbados Cricket yaney Fabien, China, Kitchen and
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TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

THE CRICKETER SPRING
ANNUAL 1951

featuring the South Africans
and the M.C.C, in Australia
4/6

GLASS DECANTERS

— AT
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unobstructed view of the sea a
short distance away, The 3 bed-
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its own bathroom with tub bath



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The grounds are approx, 2% acres
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PAGE EIGHT



CARLTON DEFEAT JAMAICA 4—3 © caustiss



THE visiting Jamaica football team suffered their first

etback

of their tour when they were defeated 4—3 by

Carlion at Kensington yesterday evening.

A large crowd watched the
game. Nothing bui cheers came
from the Kensington Stand dur-
ing play.

Lueas, inside right, and G.
Hutchinson, centre forward, both
Carlton players, gave outstanding
performances in the game. Lucas
notched two of the goals for his
té. and Hutchinson one. The
other Cariton goal was sent in by
the Jamaican player Parchment,

Da-





The Jamaica inside left,
Costa, and centre forward Nar-
cisse also played well for their
team, DaCosta scored their first
woal and Narcisse the second.
Maleolm McLean sent in their

third goal from a penalty.

Both teams showed good form

t the combination was superb.

e wel judged and

taken and shots at the goal were

powerful. In spite of the goals
yt, the goal-keeping was good

‘The ball was always kept close to

the ground.

our goals were shot during the



wer







first half Both teams were then
even

Quite a few corners were con-
écded to either side. They were
well kicked but just. as well
tleared, Thrill after} thrill the
players provided for the crowd.

The Game

The game was fast from. the

start. Carlton took the touch-oft

and kept straight through to Ja-

maica’s back line :
A few seconds in the Jamaica

eoal area and then full back Exce







ieared, sending the ball midfield
Jamaica’s forwards then too!
harge. Clever passing found th

Lall soon in Carlton’s goal are
ith the Carlton backs trying
ard to intercept
Play had now been going on for

five minutes and Jamaica got their
wst goal. DaCosta, playing at in-

cide left easily controlled a pass
from the right wing and beating
the Carlton backs, he shot from
close range. King stretched out
full length but the ball found the
right corner.

The game quickened, The Carl-
ton forwards, now nicely combin-
ing, made a very successful attack
right after. They brought the ball
gown in spite of Jamaica’s good
defense and climaxed the move-
ment with Hutchinson at inside
left giving Lucas at inside right a
fine pass. Lucas, about 20 yards
away from the bars, steadied the
ball with his chest and tried a
powerful right foot shot. Foote
in goal for Jamaica could not get
to it and the ball was in the nets.
The score was then one—all.

Both teams kept the speed up
and it was aot long before another
goal was in for Carlton.

In a fine forward movement by
Carlton, Lucas had got the ball
under his toes again. He was about
to shoot when he was intercepted
by Jamaica's full backs. A melee
developed with goalkeeper Foote
lying on the ground. Parchment,
in an attempt to clear, pushed the
ball into the nets, The score was
now 2-—1 in Carlton's favour.

Jamaica was playing well but
Carlton was getting the better of
the game. Lucas made serious
threats at scoring which the Ja-
maiea backs cleared or the goal-
keeper saved with no little ease.

On the other hand, Jamaica had
some opportunities at shooting, but
their efforts were nullified in the

same way. King did some nice
saving. 2
About five minutes before the

interval, Jamaica got in the equal-
iser, It was a lovely right foot
shot by their centre forward Nar-
cisse; all along the ground it went,
WNarecisse had received the pass
from right winger Sasso when he
was in an inside-right position.
King in goal did not move.

Half time saw the score at two

all.
Second Half
Both teams resumed looking for
the odd goal. Combination in both
forward lines was good.



Carlton was lucky to get the
first goal after the interval. i
was by way of a penalty which

Lueas safely placed in the nets.

The Jamaican full back Bayliss
fouled G. Hutchinson, Carlton's
centre forward. After this, the
game however, had slowed up a
bit. i

Carlton went four goals up.
They organised another. forward
movement and G, Hutchinson at
centre forward finally beat right
pack Excel and scored. The score
was 4—2

Jamaica then began to press. In





Traffic Do’s
No. 10



REMEMBER
THE SPEED

LIMITS

Space made ayailable by
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They'll Do It Every Time — ¢ sms s rm oan By J

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ME eax COULD BURN THE
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Bur now He's in private

PRACTICE AND HE'S BEEN
| HIRED BY THE VERY SAME
| DEFENDANT. L/STEN.



oe

SPORTS
WINDOW

THE BARBADOS FRIENDLY
FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION




" vs. Penrode, at



s L

Referee Mr. J. Archer



a few minutes they had their third
geal. Bright haa fouled Sasso in
‘Iton’s goal area and Jamaica
s awarded a penalty. Centre-
half Malcolm McLean gave King
in goal no chance to save. The
score was then 4—3.

Jamaica were still pressing, but
it was a fight to reach Carlton's
back line. Sasso climaxed one of
their fine movements during this
half with a powerful right foot
hot, which King jumped up and
varely pushed over the cross-bar
with an extended right hand.

The ball was kept up and down
the field for the rest of the eve-
ning, but there was no further
scoring. The game ended with
Carlton having the odd goal in
seven,

The teams were: —

Carlton: King, Bright, Kennedy,
I Hutchinson, H. Clairmonte,



Ee. W. Marshall, K. Hutchinson,

N. 8S. Lucas, G. H. Hutchinson,

R. Hutchinson, J. Williams.
Jamaica: Foote, Excel, Bayliss,

Parchment, McLean, Heron, Sasso,
Miller, Narcisse, DaCosta, Hall.
Referee Mr. D. Sayers.



Football Match
This Morning

St. BARNABAS and St.. Mal-
thias will be engaged in a fvot-
ball match this morning at Harri-
son College,

Following are the teams:—

St. Matthias: 6, Turton, H. O.
Williams, O. G. Burke, C. Grant,
Cc. W. Smith, B. Grimes, V. Watts,
A. M, White, G. E. Daniel, L,
Greene, V. Dottin, (Coloured
shirts)

St. Barnabas; P. Roach, V, Belle,
A. Wickham, E. Roach, John
AUeyne, James Alleyne, V. Reece,
G, Kirton, E. Jones, C, Maitland,
I Gollop. (White shirts).

Play starts at 8 O'clock.



Cricket Meeting

Tomorrow

The Barbados Cricket Asso-
ciation, at its 17th Annual Gen.
eral Meeting at Kensington to-
morrow evening, will elect two
representatives to serve on the
West Indies Cricket Board of
Centrol. The meeting begins at
4,30 p.m.
During the meeting Cricket
frophies will be presented to
Wanderers, winners in the First
Division last season, Y.M.P.C.,
winners of the Intermediate and
Empire, who headed the Second
Division.

The Association will also re-

ceive the Annual Report and Ac-
counts, elect officers and the
Board of Management for the
ensuing year.

This meeting was originally to
take place at Queen's Park but
as the Park is being used.
emigration work, it was necessary
to_change the venue.

Mr. W. F. ae Secretary of
the Barbados Cricket Association,
told the Advocate that more than
20 players circularised regarding
tours to Trinidad and British
Guiana in July and September re-
spectively, are available for both
tours. Six players are available
jor one tour only.

He said; “However, a snag has
arisen in the negotiations on ac-

count of the uncertainty of the |

Queen's Park Cricket Club placing
the Oval at the disposal of the
newly formed Trinidaq and 'To-
bago Cricket Association.”

_ Mr. Hoyos said that his Asso-
ciation accepted the Trinidad tour
on condition that the matches
were played at the Oval. Final
word was still awaited but
judging from the correspondence
passed between the Q.P.C.C.,
and the Trinidad Cricket Associa-
tion, it would appear that the
tour will not materialise.



TRUTH

BUENOS AIRES,

Under a new decree k
Pees ordered by

‘ Peron, all Argentine
ae are to be taught the

concerning the ownershi
of the Falkland Islands, ‘They will
learn that these islands, as well
as parts of Antarctica, are and
always have been “indisputably
within the frontiers of Argentina.”

C



c

a AU





I

YOU FIND HIM

Ge CHARGED, MY

LADIES AND






I BEG OF

WT



for |

AAG You SEE BEFORE YOU

C7 FORM OF ANIMAL LIFE !
IR! BREAKER OF EVERY \ /

LAW ON THE H Suk } UNLESS Wy




~ I LEAVE TOWN !!

LOOK AT MY CLIENT: THIS SWEET,
4, LOVABLE, SOBER, TRUSTWORTHY BOY
SENO HIM BACK TO HIS FAMILY

i ONLY JUST VERDICT=
oy NOT GUILTY !” Us
aw

“Pen” Bennett Made A N
T.T.C. Steward

The

long and coiourful career of the T.T.C. and fol] i TED
, a ie i s i fed this
of Mr. O. P. Pen" Bennett ony y sta at tn | ee ae
, p by being Starter «noi i ,
the West Indian turf took yet Trinidad but Barada” oe eey 35, ORE ac
seoee dramatic turn when last British Guiana. It is also : of
aturday he was elected one of interest to note that towards the Come and hear DARN- agen pce ergs

the Stewards
Turf Club,

of the Trinidad
This took place when

the Trinidad Turf Club held ite
annual General Meeting to elect
officials for the coming year
Other officers of the Club
elected at the same time were
His Honour Mr, Justice K.
Vincent Brown, Senior Vice

President; Mr. W. Arthur Murray,
Junior Vice President: Mr. C, A
Child, K.C., Steward; Mr. George
de Nobriga, Steward; Hon, J. L.

M. Perez, K.C., Steward,
The meeting was also notable
ior the action of the Committee

in placing a bar on all Jamaican
creoles from classic framed
by the T.T.C. while coupled
with this is an equally important

races

rule which also bars any half
breds, bred in Trinidad or else-
where, from the classics, Few

general meetings of the Club have
produced more head line results

The case of “Pen” Bennett must
be almost unique in that he is
one of the few gentlemen who
have ever ridden as a professional
jockey and later became 4
Steward of the Governing Body
of racing in any country This
event also throws in retrospect
the whole racing career of this
gentleman,

Amateur

First riding as an amateur for
his father who owned a string of
horses, he later took out a pro-
fessional licence as a jockey and
not long after became a trainer
as well, When his father went
out of racing he became an owhei
as well and therefore eombined
the three. In addition to this he
subsequently became a breeder of
race horses as the older horses
with which he had begun racing
vere retired to the stud, In a
T.T.C. programme of the early
thirties it was therefore possible
to see the name of the winner of
a classic which had been bred,
owned, trained and ridden by the
same person. Perhaps it was also
possible at the end of one of those
same yeurs for his name to head
the list of winning breeders,
owners, trainers and jockeys.
While he was still riding and
training, his son Steve Bennett
became a leading jockey in the
South Caribbean.

Barbados _ racing enthusiasts
will no doubt recall that Ben
nett’ career as a jockey was not
only successful but full of
dramatic incidents. Who will for—
get his victory on the half bred
mare Cowbell when he finished
with saddle and weights in one
hand and the reins in the other?
His two spectacular falls off
Bambolina, not to mention the
numerous occasions he completely
outwitted other riders with his

expert manipulation of the pace

of a race. f
In latter years on retirement
from racing he became Secretary



What's on Today

| His Excellency the Govern-
| or opens Empire Week
Exhibition at Combermere
| Boys’ School at 10.00.a.m,

Girls’ Industrial Union Fair

at Queen’s Park—3.00 p.m,
| First Football Test between
Jamaica and Barbados at
Kensington Oval, His Ex-
cellency will attend and
meet the teams—5.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema gives show at
Queen’s Park—7.30 p.m.

CINEMAS
Globe “Manhandled” 5.00 and
8.50 pom,
Plaza (Bridgetown) — “Tea For

Two" 145 & 8.30 pom
Aquatio—"Beal The Band” — $40
pom.









The Weather

TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 5.38 a.m.

Sun Sets: 6,15 p.m.

Moon (Last Quarter) May 27
ighting ; 7.00 p.m.
igh Water: 5.52
7.20 p.m.

YESTERDAY:

Rainfall (Codrington) : Nil

Total for Month to yester-
day: 1.05 ins,

Temperature (Max.) 87.5 °F

Temperature (Min.) 76.5 °F

Wind Direction (9 am.) E
(3 p.m.) E.N.E.

Wind Velocity: 11 m.p.h.

Barometer (9 am.) 29.966
(3 p.m.) 29.902,

a.m.,

\



a am Daas

imm Hatlo







FA

GENTLEMEN OF THE JURY~

YOU“BRING IN THE




CIOS o



| ANTACID

|
|
| MASSEY-HARRIS
|
|
|
|
|

' COURTESY

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

. THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1951
























ie
[ANNUAL DANce 1

given by
MR. CHARLES MURRELL
‘Engineer, Launch Patricia) }
at the MODERN HIGH SCHOOL,
Roebuck Street



% FEDERATED }

ASSOCIATION

PUBLIC MEETING
Queen's Park

SEES AOES

TO-NIGHT 747TH MAY 1951
Music by
Mr. Perey Green's Orchestra
Dancing from 9.00
3.00 a.m

pm. to

Refreshments on Sale








|

































worst being at the Arima meeting] '-460¢0006099609
ef 1934 when his mount, Cock of ;
Aran, collided with a Police} 7
horse, Bennett sustained several
fractured ribs and Cock of Aran!
brake his shoulder and had to be
destroyed. In British Guiana in



tures of a female savage

cin a ate eee in a jungle of intrigue ! |



end of his riding and training] & LEY ‘brains’ ALLEYNE FRIDAY 2.30445 &
racing Up-to-date. , re ae XK and his associates. a oy ar continuing |
a . aily at 4. i .m. |
_,, Accidents . 24.5.5 | y So Sr pan, | BE SURE OF
In Trinidad he met with] @& 24.5.51—1n. | :
several accidents on the track—the The rare and racy adven-| 2 yon

ALL OVER
gk —with the faithful

use of DREAM—The &
of the Beautiful.



= |

}

ap

A Good Night's

|

Do you sink peacefulty on your
pillow and float away on clouds
of restful sleep?

Or do you lie down with
staring eyes... to have the
worties of the day come back
and taunt you? Many men and
women whose nerves are frayed
by anxiety--or a run-down
condition—find this to be true.
And that’s the time when Dr.

RKO—Radio Picture
Chase’s Nerve Food can do so
much to help you. For this

reliable tonic contains Vitamin iq) i i A Z A
|

Bi, iron and other needed |
BRIDGETOWN

minerals which help build up

e }
1939 he fell at the start of a race | ROBERT RYAN a Play safe .'. . he prepared,
and broke his hip. Thercafter ne R E Ss T | i ae eee DREAM
rede with one leg ; sts 7 C et a few cakes o ZAM |
ode with one leg almost straight | | ZA HARY SCOT | . TOILET SOAP, use it
fixed longer than the other 5 | | ; faithfully in your bath.
From amateur rider to pro- is 0 mportant | in | gener “ae eee oo .

fessional
jeckey-trainer und on to owner-
trainer—jockey, Thence on te
owner-breeder-trainer—jockey be
fore retirement. From _ retire-
ment to Secretary of the T.T.C

from that office to Official Starter
from Official Starter to Steward.
Few personalities in any sport
an equal -such a record,

Police Hold
Sports Finals

The Police held some of their
Sports finals at Kensington on
Tuesday morning. The Sports will
take place on May 31. Visiting
Trinidad Rolice will take part,

The results of Tuesday's finals

ockey ke i
j y, from jockey to clear skin, radiant with natural

loveliness,
DREAM is available at toilet goods
counters throughout the island. -

“Born to

be Bad” |

and JOAN LESLIE @
@ MEL FERRER e

one of his leathers always 8

















your vitality and tone up your
whole system—so you're in
better condition to get your
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Canadians by the thousands This is America |
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eamenics bury Of tee, that you rest better, “TRADING
a ? ) i king

Throwing the Cricket Ball oe. Chase's Nerve Poot as en it:

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Putting The Weight

1 Payne; 2 Best; 3 Howard.—

35 feet 24 inches.
High Jump

1 Best; 2 Shannon; 3 Rouse—
5 feet 6% inches,

Heats for the 100 and 220 yards
flat races were also held.

MAKE SURE
THAT YOUR

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PAGE 1

IMrata • ESTABLISHED 1895 THIRSDAY. UA-, PRICE: nVCCBNTV B.W.I.S.A. WILL NOT GO TO LONDON Communists On The Run Again TOKYO. May 23 | UNITED NATIONS FORCES on tiie Eastern front tonight sealed the gap in their linen and disposed of the threatened massive Chinese breakthrough into South Korea At the opposite end of the 120 mile front, counter attacking South' Korean units were reported almost astride the 38th parallel At some points their patrols were believed \ to have crossed into North Korea ll\MI ton the Senate ns MOI U Assembly vote wag known and thi Assembly expecU to be able to pass it on a second reading after dinner. Rrutrr. Police Hold Mad Moot PARIS. May 23 Allot a % %  >— wwnt lhteua*> tha wild regions of the Atlas Mountains, police to-day arrested Mohammed Tademclit, the "mad Hooff*' who is Alleged to have murdered eight Europeans during tho last two weeks, a French Neva Agency message from Rabat laid The message said Tadcmaht hao made a "complete confession". A bloodstained banknote found on Sunday on a Moroccan tradesman who admitted he had sold food to the killer, gave a clue tn his whereabouts. A l>earded blue-eycM ex-soldier the "mad moor" was hunted by 12.000 police. Moroccan troops and Foreign Legioneircs.—Renter. The threat of a Communist :ih had hung over the eastern sector for KWll days : Tinned formal i"i* < buried themselves against he sagging United Nations line in the second phase of ihrlr sprint; eftauriva They drovo a wedge into Alhco to a point 16 miles eaatMitheeat of I but Soksori they advanced into the if i giant Allied pincer i i • threat vanished U the taws of the plnccr began to .-love threatening to trap the Cnm munlsts well south of their main Urn-*. WOrn OUt In thru efforts t'. penetrate to the south, the attackers made hurried prepare lions to withdraw. But front line re|orts late today indicated that thi be too late and that many woul< be trapped in the ring of Allied rtd infantry. Withdrawals An Eighth Arm> lieaia|liartiri tonight there were indication*of a limited Chinese withdrawal along DM entile Korean front. His stalOregarded as CSUUMU for throughout the day AUien Canvnanden In all sectors had {•ported the anctny falling back to the north. Chines* .iftn wffertng staggi Ing losses began their withdraw in tno west and centn 1 trying to poworful Allied counterattacks At the end of the da? the withdrawal spread to the cast main weight of their on. -, Tonight's Eighth Aim^convj munlque -aid that Allied troop* on the heels of the Communist, in the eastern sector were meet ing only iu;ht resistance In 'heir >.ix-day offensive, Communists were estimated to suffered well over 60,000 —Reulrr THE SCENE as so infantryman daubs* for cover are pinned down by enemy small armfire "some whsrt in Korea' atgres.ion conUmts*. of tlie .rd I* the battle aga •Fascinating MACARTHUR'S STRATEGY Exhibition" WOULD NOT END WAR Says Dugdalv Vote g88,000 For Workers To U.S. l-llKlrtll GEORGETOWN. May ::-t 1 .. Co mdl Ftnanc Committee lo-dny approved a vote of SM.tHHi lor the lecruitnuni or !i00 workers for U-S.A. farm*. The iinal ratification b npeeti I when the Council meets on rrkunr. This action fallowed tlir Vbdl of Dr. Claude Denbow. President of the B.G. branch of Ihe t oloured Peoples League, to the U.S.A. and il>: ,<| MII! lorrespondeni v Uvtween U.S. tuthorlUea and theloetl Government, culminating in .i conference between the Officer administering the Government nd a Committee of (ha i < P Vcnduy. DYNAMITE STOLEN %  r-om Our 0n CornsANTIGUA. May 28 Thii morning ihe Caretaker at Fort James discovered that the arsenal had been broker i : 2 rases of dyn-imile stolen. Thj anttai oot -.ruin i ,igo and the dynamite was never iraced, Deputies Met For Half Minute PARIS. May 23 Rig Fun i roreujn Dcpuiics to-day had a silting .I lull a minute—their %  hortest yet. Nobody wanl-M t" %  peak, the weetarn spokesman -aid Soviet Deputy Andrei Gromyko mi n the Chair. He began the asking whether anybody wanted to sa v anything •hey hnd nothing to My Gromyko said he ii. MI not cither and adjourned the awatlng until to-aaornw %  %  %  The prevent deadlock is over the Soviet item on the North Atlantic Treaty should b> included in the rorefgti Minis icrs' afenda Western powers have mode it clear that they w not include this item In the agenda n y form. —lleuter. om Our 0*i Com t ponder I %  LONDON May 2:t Mi. John Dugdalc. M<> State for Colonial Affair*, today attended a private view <,f ., notable Exhibition % %  f Traditional AJI from the colonial I*HI Aown ,.i MM bmawtal Inasltuh as pan of the Festival of Hntain j M. Dugdalisaid. Tl i exhibition %  It arOUld enable people of this BOH said, to learn son.vUung aboul the artistic expression of thi people in the colonies In ordci to popularise art among eataniel peoples, the subject should, he thought, be includc i oppaee the urrangemenls and have not altered Uw i ufim v —. A,^,_..,., attitude despite the explanation William F.O. As,ii ? m |lhal 0m ; 1> neM |or .JEESon. given g| .i meeting Ihtl BNsah between students and British Hindi officials. Tliirlv We^l !. e among tho*. f.-> %  II Keei>er of the Department of the) British Museum, who .. the arranging of uV exhibition (•(phoned to me "The to thi. exhibition needs to appreciate— if he is not to regard the exhibit is mere curtgo l i 'hat negn Africa and the other tribal area representtxl never uno> philosophical and lelentlflc revo lution whloh has played auch a large part In Ihe moulding of industrial civilization, and thai e of hlatory, the*.' t >lo nial eulturcN ilcvelo,ed in dire. tions more t-ondunve tn the groWtfa of art." Liberals Win Seal I d.'RNE, May 23 B. G. Menzlcs. of the Ubcral Country Party Coalition Ooven* n-.i-tv hawon an aiiditioun sal in the Australian Senate, giving it a majority of four. Voting for the line-up in ihe new Parliament which will ba opened on June 12 will !• KOUI I of Repre::entatiM try Party Qowenunent BBl Labou 51, non-voting members 2. Sen ate: Liberal Country Paitv n Labour 28 —Reuter. Hla Excellency the Governor will attend ait first JamaicaBarbados K-mii.;iii Test that takes place at Kalternoon The Oovernoi will meet the iilf^i. roil, DID NOT OBEY Jamaica -Cooper. %  •!, Da,,AM ^ S Costa Bayllss Miller. Parchment. [ A Syrian Mlliury sp< McLean. B' ^ Saaso, Mtret Hall.f today accused Israel of failin; HorhadoA Cozier, Brl#ji*,Cratf ut fuliv the B F. Hutchinson. Cadogan. dltens. I Council Resolution lnatiuctinij Lucas. Dr.ivton. Wllkea, ': St, C I her to stop draining Hulej Mulch-* .in the Syrian nordci — Reuti-r. Asked lo-dny what acdOfl tin llrillih Council might take at th< nt at i rlni ant •then threat. M.. Hugh I'agct. Birectoc i i bope that on reOeetion rai* leave Hani < reacenl on July i arto K t'-o %  A minority of the .Indents win an i• i> ntattvi if vai loua over: %  British Council's )uH: .< treating Ham Crescent as primarily for newcomers to iitt.,v\a yeeterd ) is now under the consideration I the Treoaury. i* known to havi%  he Ulpporl ( tha Colonial Omcc *ho have long been aware of the Wl Indies' feeling In the matte Tho all West Indian Canadian no. tiuted Kingdom trade deals ll la also anticipated that .. htrotig Waal Indian oalegaUoi i kvltu earl) June, will IKCOTaWaWM ttefort > Iinal decision u raai-in-. RED DANGER i\ PERSIA V. '.SHINfiTON. Ma, U. %  ..i 1.1 the Jon Chiefs Staff. General Brudh-N teMifyim ore the JotW cwinm Beaarte taid rhera is dangai of Russia'* moving into linr %  i %  anothm Is any ', ir Indo i %  %  other place %  ii to say, IHIli U i point of dangai %  mold hke to % %  %  . %  further aggraaalon, If H —Renter. Persia Ready To Take Over IK1IKHAN. May 21 Pi I.I n Bdy to take nve the An li %  Iranian oil UOni "WlthoUl furlhe delay Tho uaually wall w nowapi i • i K*IJII tonight that K....M, II 1 Minis) %  %  %  II. Mai nalUiatla li i.i i. ihli latemenl in thesn Pi mi. MlnlaUi in M o his ss an in the Malll i Parllameni buildini to latlm two da*i !>' !' %  Dl Kato.a nrl gu where Dr. Moaaeddagh had BOan Mine Monday nioiiiin h i v>hv he had left hli heavll guarded refUga i allevad ht had %  p< II' two nlghU i 11 E i h ate i %  Idani < %  naai Teheran FatunJ ilaai i l.hail H rldieu Ukai 'be II ime MlnU ibOUl 10 ireimi — Krutrr -hull I.I 11 %  lion with West Indian Goodwill Trade Commission which is due to visit the United Kingdom about the middle of June on its way to Canada The Hon Harold Robinson tabled the following draft statement at yesterday's meeting of tho Regional Economic Committee: The British West Indiegagef thi would be willing I bad ii:iii-rt I.*, earne to thai Cotifi be ('.mm ho> ino-i givi n, t ottb "I II DI hearl oul thai the-. Pi*, honou n %  re wool! i u aepa thr t'.K Viv ilium is Irrmrl> 4pprelirudvithat Well thr Association lo appoint J if|.i i -."i .d\ %  | Ihr above rirlrgSllon It Should he ml..|ir.l il h the other t ommoiiwrtl h I'rodiiirro' AsMieiallonH aOf luliiii behind their ba.h I '.." %  i ii (us therefore drehfrd thai II would lie IIIOM unwi r for them at this state to appal it surh a representative for dl • i "-l.il" 111 I •nub.li III 111) • connected with -mat Mr Re %  was to send a delegation to I ad i a pure!) t waa not to aotei inn am bag' ttaUon bui mi ri i to gdwiil mlatkm, This now bail ,,,'en rhangi Nol only would thiMbIn ajo to England and bo 1 %  %  neratt] mehc ti nations and trade talks with thi Hi ni.sb Qovanunenl while ihere, "When you ate makir U-ade lalka and gelling auo al Ihi %  kel i mattei n latlog to lugaj in Canada, 11 would i.mctdt to con* loee oul uda peopla ai d In fact li MI. Haw ,,II i,. ... DIMIISSMHIS Link ii. %  ild thai the B %  i to the conclualon in thai parth must i"' linked wlU i. tn t..i and %  read it ll >lom. %  id not know TN i %  %  PN ihe poattioi 11 tha Wi n glloa an> i henslon m a i < %  ''• kralla and oU> • %  thai tin-'. %  infern i %  then would ba maatinj btri hi. did oot KII.'.I nol know vhethei ihi % %  ould b* %  . i gld baton I discuss lb' | %  "" nwtt li thnj il i delegation of ll W I S A 10 delegation g> On pase '< nol 11 aan not far thr R.vTJ.g.4 the letter of the I they should gfjra '>"v ante of dolm It In the loua run. he l ViDUir of the Writ whose mi.ri -i. it %  all no t ".t to stlrk I a but that | >y 'Pee Id Hie .id 1 THE ADVOCATE payi for NF.WS DIAL 3113 Day or Nifht MIIIMI I.OAI. A-"" 1 THE JAMAICA goslkaapar triad in vain lo stop Bat tacond goal scorsd against bis stgs as it cam* off hl< own fall back Into his nets. The two Jamaicans arc mn trying to correct the error. men wa ChevaHertaCaittda Glnbb Pasha Shai TEL A-VIV. M The Jerusalem I'n-t reporter: I i. GluM Pasha. British Command* ot I Arab Legion had !>* % %  n shot at ar< wounded b> an Aiai. hi tne '< %  The Jerusalem P*i which DOt %  t tl i st .en of King Abdullai.. sworn in as Regent. Emli heu ii>parit to t-1 I oeei from hi father a*hc h^. BMU to Turke\ on a Ihrr* wgafca 1 KeseH "' %  ' U Of last v.e week. —tenter Two Dir lii (,rash Purachiilisls \Ia\ Go To Mlddk E*M HAMPSHIRE, laaj 23 Men of HM IHIh Indi Brigade Group who bled hen das i %  %  %  .,, ma %  SSMU DOStinu %  I w< .1 no oAlnal %  A War Office ipefseanuu %  lorl would be iiniiouruvcd latOI this week —Reulrr %  l afaguard itntish oil %  enntlrnialion of suli TORONTO. May Z %  diet, the Fre %  'ii bar'id "iing the United Stales. %  engagement. "I have no pvUttc*", he told rei ,nii a Fret* I and an ditertainer an %  the United Stales because he hint%  ked Ihr %  i of other pa> %  r.ruter. U.S. Draft NeM Plan IH MKIIAKL FR*. UNITED NATIONS. Mav 23 [tad Slates haa drafte. Ida.! for the creation of .aaw n whli I vouid mi lude atoml i %  iimni Corcea ax! Internal %  acurlta Peren The plan will ba pi l %  t to the twelve Melon Kudy (JI.OIO i'lii, I ail matnoeri & tl i i I plus Canada -Reulrr. ONLY THIRTY-NINK TOKYO. May 23 Wall' %  %  ger fl"w over 2.000 h aj ,^ rente. %  re tl % %  %  • ur rally %  %  %  Kore. He Bevi lg| n kauooi %  %  .buted —Renter —Ka;.r Exchaiige Notes 1/>NIM)N. May 31 I Britain, Ihe Un Plum, have exehangad diplon <( i on the odnUaalon of Tui %  kg) and Ormm lo the AUantH I Met. a Knrf'DM rifliee y|iokesmu.' said here to-da) The matter hnd also been dlseuaaad • a aaaiaallnavtan capital pokaaman did/not ampUf) this. ttlah t'.binet which dh i the guaattan yaaterday. % %  more dUpossd to the two nationthan hitherto, it W understood —Healer Arn'sl Atom K\|M'i 1 BUENOS AIRM May 23 Prasident Paeon orot Kieliter !. be plaeed under arrest, the neu i p-'-pa TrlbMNa Da Imprenaa rely, Rlehter wa who according to h oped undei Argent i IK hod of pro during —Reulrr *M WJu*.',]! -fl iJll I f~'"ilac %  u '•' mi % %  '*'* %  rf-.J.rf*-. .o...-. i.a.'—;^.p.,.4 A*.. '.-. r.il' ". aaNf naaiaf >,.. %  asaVsasas'saw as isaw IN"!/"-* IQVL 1 y YOUNG MANNt QUIN julto Ocinttl lays I hn-vtJMiM-luuYdufi (rrWvvMgVs r%C /rVVMsJ J i lags Dansstt. topI %  ...r, .,1 i Sir. i i %  ihr value nf h^i i....,iv BBasa! lieUlila Of',. %  IIJUIII* ira%-n an i mi HI bam •!* %  mm, || 4 ...I. MMA/I. I...,. T* ,..ri.. il \.i.l a III, HtkNI, -her^ r.. I'I „|ii IM .i.. bertitln -"-* %  • i ,..!.,.. is bast." %  Ualrriahl In Hi \ ass* %  If1.1 V, I.I. rtp ihgtMil MngitwaUysUki n, \ I.I,. gswal ,, .h-IHlU % % %  m oi. ataes EVACUATE BRITONS sSIA I TPItUfl %  A Brtl t> > %  Airways dad hare %  ci! port Abadan to l/mdori with %  Idren —Reutrr. BEAUTY BRUtH Bruihet


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l'Xi.i I OIK BARBADOS ADVOCATK llll KsDW M V\ M f I.I ^RRi^SjBjiApvtXKrE Lid Bro+4 g|_ HMMW* Thursday Ma I'XITV l.\ THE 4 0M>IO\WI \l Til IT was a day of mourning yesterday: of mourning for newly won West Indian limn The British West Indies' Suar Association annoumvd their intention of withdrawing from the delegation to London The position was fully explained by the Chairman, Mr. Robinson A political delegation was going to the United Kingdom to have trade talks with the United Kingdom. Sugar would have to be discussed. It was impossible for the British West Indjan Sugar Association to go back on its word to other Commonwealth producers. West Indian Governments, said Mr. Gomes on Monday, were 100''; behind the British West Indies* Sugar Association. There was no wedge in West Indian unity. Today there is not only a wedge in West Indian unity. There is a wedge in Commonwealth unity. The delegation to Canada would not have discussed sugar contracts with Canada. How could it since the West Indies, in the words of Sir George Seel, do not exist internationally. They could only have listened to Canadian views on general Canada-West Indies trade. They would hnve visited Canada while trade liberalization talks were going on and would have rend in the Canadian Press, the points of view of Canadians with regard to Canada\\\ ,t Indies trade. Since Canada buys so much West Indian sugar, there could be no possible excuse for other Commonwealth countries objecting to the presence of West Indians in Canada, especially as it is well known that Canada buys West Indian sugar through the United Kingdom and does not negotiate direct with the West Indies But the visit of a high-level political delegation to the United Kingdom is in quite a different category. The West Indies are in a position to negotiate direct with the United Kingdom, since the United Kingdom controls the West Indies and is responsible for them. It is quite possible that, should the British West Indian Sugar Association accompany the high-level political delegation to Ixmdon that the rest of the Commonwealth sugar producers (of whom Australia is onlyone) should be suspicious of West Indian intentions with regard to sugar allocations in the United Kingdom market. Just as Mr. Adams regrettably expressed the opinion that Australia's actions in their last dealings with the United Kingdom were not based on West Indian interests, so the rest of the Commonwealth politicians might take this unfortunate view as a line for them to follow during the coming London-West Indies trade talks. But as Mr. Robinson consistently explained the West Indies would benefit from the support of the Commonwealth politicians no less than from the Commonwealth sugar producers. And if seems poor tribute to the integrity of the United Kingdom to suggest that in its position as trustee for the dependent West Indian territories, she would permit Commonwealth politicians to browbeat the United Kingdom to concede benefits to them at the expense of the West Indies. Mr. Robinson has taken his stand on Commonwealth unity. The West Indian Governments have said in the words of its spokesman that they are 100'. behind the British West Indies' Sugar Association. Mr. Robinson has pleaded for the integrity of the West Indian word: has pleaded for Commonwealth unity What else could be haw done? If the West Indies are going to be suspicious of the motives of other Commonwealth countries, and if their politicians are going to be suspicious of an organisation which has done so much to promote the interests of the West Indies the greater cause of Commonwealth unity is at stake. There must be an end to suspicion and distrust. If the West Indian politicians feel that they are reflecting West Indian desire* in going to the United Kingdom at this time there can be no opposition to their going; although the wisdom of their decision can be challenged. But it is illogical to state that the Chairman of the British West Indian Sugar Association is indispensable to a Trade Mission to London and at the same meeting to suggest the existence of ulterior tttfM in the natural desires of that Association to learn as much as possible %  bovl the Canadian attitude to trade with the West Indies. The cause of West Indian unity has not I rail served by the politicians. < in in inn ;s LE LONDON hill took a chant" luite recently of expl.. MOW \hrConservative Party's view — of the bis event* in Ihe world. China, the Korean war often Mid that oratory i* out of place in the House o>' Commons. That i* more than true — It la an understatement. Speaking In the Houn moru IS really a branch in the art ItM fault is to over-til nourish. Churchill has none of the flourishes though his phrases are full of life, lull of original He began by statins that in November 1049 he was in favour of the recognition of Communist China, "provided that it was do facto and not de Jure." He made • plummy, pompous sound of the 'wo Latin legal phrases Serious it was, but he managed to poke a little fun at the pedanta:— "or aa It would probably be called among the old school tie brigade of Hat party opposite di yun". That raised a little laugh. And then Churchill added the real theme. Of thewhole speech that m t u .'• %  How. He approved of recognil:< Churchill's policy would be counted the same thing. Overrules! H. .virruled his wartime Foreign Sacratary, Anthony Eden %  naa ii i %  DastMj Leader heir apparent of the Conservative I'arty The story goes that with cruelty, asked '! %  you remember, how old was Mr I when he formed hi: last admim.~ti.Jitm" Mr. Gladstone was 84; and if the precedent %  to be followed, that leaves weary years of %  raiting for Anthony Eden. I make no apology for devoting all of this week's article u> one speech by tTaWton Churchill. To complete the story of that speech there are two more phrases in 1 10 tell off. Both illustrate the rea. Churchill—still with a youm streak m him. still enjoying tin struggle for power, and still entirely lacking in pomposity. He was Just saying that we ii Britain are bitterly divided am absorbed in party strife. He wa: going to add that wc arc kep month after month waiting foi news of a General Election. / Labour Member with a stroni Lancashire accent interrupt t.im—'So is America." he callei out. "QUItO true.'' said Churchill then paused, looked round, hi' eyes twinkled, he grinned. anr rdded, "But they have at any rati a fixed date for their elections' You must admit that that Is nici candour I Fisurc.. And then there was an inciden a lilile later on when Winstoi Churchill had come round to dis cussing the actual figures of trad with Hong Kong. He was m .km a complicated case, based o n th< forty-six thousand tons of rubbei in three month*, that have com* to China from Singapore. Ray mond Blackburn got up and in tcnupicd. Now Raymond Bleak burn was a Labour M.P., he "de scried" Socialism and is now ai independent. He sits on the Tor: side of the House of Common. and his independence is that kin of independence He is a young vigorous, opinionated and argu mentativc fellow. He Is the mos active at denouncing Labour', softness with Communism n China. I would go further am say. (and I hope Mr. Blackhun will rot regard this as an insult) that he is poteniially the Senato Macarthy of Westminster. This Raymond BaU-kburn Interrupt cheerfully, "Would the Righ Honourable Gentleman forgive me for one moment'" he asked. Mr. Churchill looked round to his left. a little surpn-eo at youth interrupting experience from that quarter of the compass. 1 thought wa were on the same side of the line," said Churchill, waving his hands a little impatiently and sitting down, as the convention is, to allow an bttOflttptor to have his word. What Raymond Blackburn had to offer was additional ammunition for Churchill's argument. Once he got kirk tfl UC argument. Churchill mounded n little good-humouredly impatient of being tripped up by his own friend ane->dmirer. while he was In full course in chase of a trade statistic. Much more can be said of the debate; but what we have written is Of Churchill, his style and his delivery, his policy and his air of confidence that it is a policy that vill soon be the Government's. In this debate he asked for rubber mppho to China to be ended completely. The Government h,__ decided to terminate the delivery of jdl supplies of rubber to China Canadians Obtain "Secret" OTTAWA, May. Canada is buying from the United States war materials that on the "secret list", despite r.r. American law which prohibits ile of such material to foreign countries. It was disclosed In the public accounts committee of Ihe House Commons here that this Is luhievcd t>\ an arrangement lieIween Ottawa nnd Washington. under which the U.S. government orders such materials in Us own name and then tutns them over lo Canada. This is the reason that Canada does not deal directly with American manufacturers in placing Diona of dollars worth ol ilefuii-e iiiders. explained, the deputy defence minister. C. M. Drury One ibioi " tho %  n ew list" in the sort of gun the Royal Canadian Air Force will to arm the FSfiE "Sabre" )et' fighter, mi American typo highWeapons %  peed fighter p| me which is starting to roll off mass-production f i nrm bly Hnoa. %  G : -..man plant in Montreal. Canada may herself manufacture Ihe guns for this fighter, ha said. But when a member of Parliament asked what type gun the Sabre plane would use, Drury who was a brigadier in Ihe last war. said the defence department Is not talking publicly about air armament. Navel Guns Too Canada is already manufacturing naval guns. But the manufacture of guns for planes would take Canada Into a new field in pogetttano Mr. Diuiy s.,i,| Canadian piodUMlotl Of the Sabre fighter compared "very favourably" wdh the lime taken for related production in other countries. The production schedule would Km teen even more accelerated if c(nponent parts could have been obtained faster from the United States. It was disclosed reccntlv Ihat in dollar Vgluaf. about $175,000 of Ihe total $400,000 cost of cacl these planes Is represented by engines and other components Imported from the United States While the Canadian version closely {•pproximatcs the American however, the Canadian-built plantuses a Canadlan-bullt "Orenda' engine Defence headquarters also disposed that It Is borrowing 100 so Harvard training planes from ihe United States air tore* In use ih the plan lo train airmei for her Atlantic p-ict allies. Mon than 150 airmen from oversea? ROW Or* training in Canada, which hiis undertaken lo train 1,100 each year in a inodllled form of tin. great O mmonwcslth air training plun which turned out 131,000 i.iers In the last war. Oil! III AIM IIS SAY: Thv Kifihtn To The African Of South Africa To the Editor. The Adt-ocale— SIR.—After paying two visits lo loulh Africa one in 1946. and the rther one early this ye IT, they have prompted me lo write lo you at this time. i in gated myself many tbnei why there should be so much racial disharmony in South Africa and. gftei maturo oonafcta lien i have come t' the conclusion thai %  'i' | %  Bxcu l .it til for this state of affairs. This Is supposed to bo a christian-like world and. most of the governments arc proposedly democratic. If these two suppositions are correct, then it is the boundeti duty of ench nnd every one Ut work fm iho happiness imd prosperity of all sections. African. Coloured, non-European and %  aarOPOai Why should the African be told that he shall be a "hewer ot wood ind drawer of water" all his days ? The African is a part of our popu.. i.iiiv the Qutus of South Africa and, there ire many of high intallLai ability. Shall the door i I be closed lo them '.' If the Europeans of the Union of South Africa have pledged themselves to cultivate such dlshirmony among the Africans who are the rightful owners of Africa what a-e the pringtotM %  • the U.N.O. ? Can anyone teU me why the African should not be allowed to lead a life free from fear u f op• i. ns and Now. as regards the colour?.) t immunity — whose rights are HOW in great jeopardy, a community numbering about one million people, why should Ihese i ei I'lllose those democratic rights they have enjoyed for almost a century This is unchristian and unde1 : !( where Is South Africa heuding for f Kear seems lo be the basic fact that engenders racial strife, bul were we !n,e hristian and democratic governiiuii'. |-rfcct love would cast out all fear and, we should write for the highest good of all irrespective of colour. raCO DT creed. in eotMluatou bj Btevaa i ojeota, %  %  %  inlv when \\e sre chokingand. feel the desperate struggle for our lungs when we lack this most Midispens. of our when we see our freedom threatened do wc begin to be aware that democracy has always been essential to our moral and spiritual existence and ihat it alone makes possible the dignity and freedom of man." _. ERIC W. BROWNE. "Ebje Culloden Rd. 22 5.51 Vumwm fi-Hv To Tnr Editor, The Advocate— SIR.— A correspondent wn;froni buurnemoulh "In the local shops one can buy Barbados (.uava Jelly at is. 3d. per pound The taste is plcasinl but for som* the jelly wc tried was almost liquid." My cook, who makes excellent Mid firm guava jelly, tells me that when guava jelly is not "boiled high enough" 11 is apt lo be liquid: and that a small amount of alum used In the boiling will help to make and keep it firm m important that nur attempt at establishing markets for i ur local produce should be atiirecautlon ag unsi ihe commodity not bcina up to standard. Furthermore, no %  i sale should be shipped without a brand mark or the name ot Ihe manufacturer. Yours truly, | M S HOW 1IIEV RM nun FESTIVAL (By PATRICK KIRWAN) SEVILLE. WITH all due respect to Mr. Herbert Mor-i nson and his planners and publicists (not to mention the bull-dozers) it is really an easy matter to run a festival. Each spring, for centuries, the citizens of Seville have held a festival that is famous all over Europe. It x held not to prove anything or even to sell auytlfcing; but simply because the solemnities if Lent are past, the air is fragrant with (he scent uf orange blossom, and the roses re blooming in the Garden of the Alcazar. I is held because spring has come to Seville nd its citizens feel like enjoying themselves. A THOUSAND MASTS There is an open space traversed by bouleards. It is about as far from Seville Catheiral as Green Park is from Westminster. The cal corporation moved into the open space, i less than a week an area larger than the •attersca site had been strung: with 135,000 ulbs. 55.000 gleaming white and golden lanterns. A thousand Venetian masts garlanded with mr or five miles of close-knit olive and lyrtle had been set up with bunting, flags nd huge gleaming butterflies, seemingly inumerable, at their peaks. Noble illuminated archways gave vistas t venues of palms, eucalyptus, lime and lilac; i the open spaces between them sprang up i vast marquees for use as public restaurits and bars: and over 300 "Casetas"—gaily ..riped pavilions, of varying size, for private UM, KNTEK THK GIPSIES At the week's end the corporation moved "Jl and the citizens of Seville moved in—to locorale their pavilions, which they rent families, "futbol" clubs and get-togethers of %  very kind) at the cost of a few shillings a nead, thus clearing the municipality's initial .'\penses. There is no planning. No busybodies dic;.ite what form the decorations should take. The citizens simply set to work with paint, paper, pictures, tables, chairs and floorboards hx ihe dancing platform. The result is something to take the breath away — a riot of colour and fantasy that relegates Cecil B. de Mille to the "B" picture category. Then with the bars well stocked with sherry, brandy, sausages, olives, almonds, Spanish hams, cheese and the world's most k-Iectable prawns, Seville is ready for its festival. The girls—of all ages from three to thrice-times 30 — change into the gay, fullskirted "Gitanas" and put flowers in their hair. There is a premonitory clicking of castanets, a staccato tap of heels and the strumming of guitars. Already the gipsies are flocking in with bright eyes and eager out stretched palms. FIVE CIRCUSES Near by is the fairground—with five circuses, the dodg'ems, almond paste and fried octopus : all the fun of the fair. Now, after just a few days and at no cost In the public purse, the festival can begin, prompt to the minute. Seville is ready to forget its troubles for a while, to rejoice and welcome its guests. Not that visitors are sought. Indeed, the local paper rather deplores the festival's growing popularity in the outside world, fearing commercialisation; but none the less the tourists flock la from all quarters, with cameras, cars and desirable currencies. Women visitors nave to be rather careful though. A notice in the cathedral gives biblical warning that those immodestly dressed—that is. in short ikirts or with plunging necklines, "will be driven out of the temple." DANCING GIRLS There are bullfights, concerts and exhibitions galore. No Aits Councils arrange any of them, but all of them thrive, none the less. Now the proud horsemen of Spain ride in .'rom the wide grasslands on their high-steppln| thoroughbreds, cantering between the -asetas in their ornate leather snaps, scarlet;ashed waists and tight short jackets. Their ienoritas, resplendent in flamencos filmy with Icce, cliug behind them like fabulous orchids. Cavalcade after cavalcade canters by. interspersed with smart gigs and shiny coaches, mule-drawn, horse-drawn, even ass-drawn; but all fantastically caparisoned and with bright iingling bells. In them drive clusters of the loveliest girls in the world. Every caseta has its complement of lovely girls, dancing the "Sevillanas." swaying with graceful, undulating hands to clicking lingers and the strange sad voices of the singers. Each caseta vies with the next in spectacle and hospitality. The spectators watch with rapt faces, clapping the rhythm of the dance and uttering full-throated "Oles" when some measure is executed with particular skill. LIGHTS. LAUGHTER The myriad lights, the colourful casetas. the vivid costumes, the laughter and coj strangely stirring music make the visitor feel as though he had wandered into some dreamlike ballet-cum-opera-cum-musical comedy with, literally, a cast of thousands. WORLD COPYRIGHT ItrSFRVFI) %  Ml \< THAI SPANISH GRAMMAR H Hill* A Ford Advocate Stationery BROOMS and BRUSHES BASS BROOMS SCAVENGER BROOMS STRAW BROOMS HAND II Hi: BROOMS SCRIB BRI'SIIFS WHISK HI I --III KITCHEN BRl'SHES SHOE BRt'SHFS STEEL BRUSHES VEGETABLE BRUSHES LAVATORY BRUSHES WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER &. CO. Tlioni", : 4472 & 467 INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD. THE ORGANIZATION THAT COVERS PAINTING REQUIREMENTS INSIDE and OUT. Undereoating $5 65 per depending on colour. Enamel—S7.25 per wine gallo: colour DA COSTA & CO.. LTD -AGENTS. EMPIRE HAY I/./..X HOC i:t:i.t:Hn\ri(i\ ST1HK Vm O.V llll si TO-nXY. A| present day renewal prices. It pays you to protect your property from the ravages of weather. Wc can offer you the following PAINTS FOR EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR WOODWORK AND METALWORK in a variety of beautiful colours:— LAGOLLNE UNDERCOATINO and %  'LAGOLINE" ENAMEL wine gallon, and upwards and upwards depending on For best results, the following} instructions should be carefully followed:— 1. For new work, treat ail knots with "PATENT KNOTTING" Apply 1 coal of "INTERNATIONAL" PRIMER FOR WOOD Slop and nil all cracks. Thro apply 1 coat of "LAGOLINE" UNDERCOATING. followed within 24 hours by 1 coal of "LAGOUNE" ENAMEL. 2For previously painted work, if the surface is in good condition, rub down, clean, and .apply I coat of "LAGOLINE" UNDERCOATING. followed within 24 hours by 1 coat of "LAGOUNE" ENAMEL. 3. Fur previously painted work if the surface Is in poor condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and carry out the procedure for new work, as described at 1 above. 1. For new work, apply I coat of "BROWN PRIMOUON". then I coat of "LAGOUNE" UNDERCOATING, followed within 24 hours by 1 coat of "LAGOLINE" ENAMEL. 2. For previously painted work. If ihe surface i s in s ood condition, rub down, clean, and apply 1 coal of "LAGOUNE* t NDERCOATINO. followed within 24 hours by 1 cut of "LAGOUNE" ENAMEL. 3. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor condition, rub down thoroughly, dean, und carry out the procedure for new work, as described at 1 abeve. TRY THESE FINE PRODUCTS OF INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD.. AND RE CONVINCED. ASTY BAKERY GOODS Carr's Cream Crackers CarPaSweel Biscuits Carr's Cho-olate Lunch c^:? Anchor Butter Anchor Milk Powder Sandwich Brend Tongue Brains A MEATS Fresh Salmon Smoked Kippers Fillet s THRIFTY GROCERY BUYS 12 oz. tin Meat Lunch 36 per tin cooks pajgta N ptx 'II Tea Time Paste .15 per jar Id no Kola tonic 1 00 per bot DRINKS of the BEST Canada Dry Itasas Ale Worthinglon Ale (inlden Trel Beer Cold Braid Rum PHONE G0DDARDS WE DELIVER



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PAOI TWO BARBADOS ADVOC All. TlllRMiW M\Y .'I ll'.l Cahib Calling H I he Govi pen the %  %  10 o'clock 1 are ntncs of %  sjaa. number f %  1 I have also %  t( iilOOti. Civil Engineerinf M H MAURICE *. HOCHEKOhU Mm <>f Mi. rd of Black Rock. iHip.hc %  fend CcologB.B.C. Radio Programme i Phliovophy ami Geolog-a • i ;i."" I'm %  I Mr. Rochrlord h;* lust comJ thiIhml Yenr of thew. i s. in 1'ivilM i h %  li,nkuli Guvern-, ma u> attend ih'• %  .. Ml • %  Pnc.n, Paraa* 7 n i 7 *> a m 0-iwr.il* Sprakim. 7 O a Land arrt Uvaatock. I II > m LM • m m i>.„ rtlrtiai %  46 a "i Rnainawring A W a TII Tha N> f 10 a m Iti %  nnum til li o Down, il IS a i., II r. %  in I.t-M-nrrC'i.,1, || 41 J Sbattal Di-.pal.ll; 11 no n B „, Th N. II I* |i m Maw* A...." ,.. u i-, ., •, hi c ,bn 1.1(1—...% ) %  I" is H R.E.C. Delegates ON H. D. SHIIXINGFOHI). I.t JOSEPH KNIGIIT Old Corrbermerian T Dominica planter and Dominica delegate at the Regional Economic Commitlee meeting, return' to Dominica today by B.C. A11 | %  Mr. Alistjir MacLeod-Smith, Creruda Adviser attendlna the same meeting, leaves to-day for Grenada by B.W.I.A. He is accompanied Dy his wife. Mr. F. 1. Walcott, General Secretary of the Barbados Workers' Union files lo Grenada by the same plane today to Investigate the •rark of the Trades Union In that JOSEPH D KNIGIIT, son Colony He returns to Barbados on of Mrs. Edith Knight of Tuesday. Doru. Z*.yui". Martindales Road and Uie Ml O"* !" '" IMVB Mr. Knight, although not %  Off to Grenada b T < A. Barbadian cam.here a* f wn to ureniu "!£,"' ,. „ youngsle,and l.fl soon „f.,T ..„• R ARNOLD CHATOOR, lo leave tin* last war stirted when he wM 10 JV1 for Canada are Caul, the U.S. :.... %  „ Joseph waa educated at Com( %  omrs Leaves Tomorrow ijermere School and was a memH O LBERT GOMES Trial£ %  f ,m '• I""'"*'"* Sos dlDMer for Labour. Scoulh tro P an,! lnduslr>. is dui t.. n, (>. %  ,.,.,U>, 1942 ijturn to Trinidad tomorrow aftc; JI P ho i n m ,. hJttllestars wnr, crSSX-^J,^T! 1 Eeono, J ,k -i-ring did Cpsnuona Member of Trade Mission jiiShcrc Uvng), C .0. with the First US igp PRir p KFFI Y AW.r' %  .on noli* IOn '" Novc,nber ,9i0 Food, a member of the UK. Trade day In Barbados with Mr and Formerly with the 7744 F.TU in Mission to the W.I.. is due to leave Mrs, Rex StoUniayar who are at Wui/imrg. (Germany) he has 'or < !" ."£;,,X lfl Canada lhl just assumed duties as Adminlsmorning by^T.C A i :md Mrs Stolltrjtive Officer of the same unit otbar and BisHeidelberg. (Germany) Military NewbOld i>, I •**;(• ? Post 4 M p in Variety Ahoj: < 44 p m liflitmartrc Flavor.. 5 OS p m Tamil mil tli* W~k: 1 1(1 p m Kcalll.ii Ma.. 1*: S 43 n m fiii*. aid Druma; a 00 arur s^onnh Orasasstra, *s p H 'X I l^ Inlrf li 'S Th. Nwa; T It p An.lv.1.. lllpm W> S#* Bl P ". G*n*.l|y Sp*Hins; I Radio Noiih'l S 1.1 p in Tl (urei of PC 4>: a l p 1 %  V p m From Ihr riltorl-.-. -Hn'.ial Ill-p4l
  • r> l.ndyard Klplln|: It 46 p n> Britain; II p.m. rinm the Third rragasaaM v.m.e. raot.R4.MMV TIIL'IMOAV. MAY M. IDS 10 OB-IO IS p m —N--. 10 I p in ThiWeek In Canada rain AT M.. -\ I*M 1 l W at i Trinidad solicitor and Mi Deora) Samaroo, Trinidad bu-i* neasman, who have been holidaying 111 Barbados since May nth. leave this morning for Grenada bv B.W.I.A They expect to be back In Trinidad by the end of the month. t JO ..rn TainI Th,. N*.. 1 IO. • m ptrii,ii,r Parade; Preni n.r Edn.ni.)>: t so %  11 (irncrali .1 of Bl '...n. ft V. a m Wlul Are We Uatl t Ot a m The Neva; %  10 • 1 H PI 1*. II IS a m I.itrnera' Chnlre; II a m World Aflalri; II On Ne.; II 10 p tn Nrw. An.. 1 1 pin Clnae Down. i.ta-d.U p M it i Advttcr to the East Afriean High nd li on lnc leave II ba eooUouinc their in Trinidad School In the Deanery Official Representative M R r. A BISHOP, Controller •if SuppUoS, Bias i> Canada if A as an official rcS si nment w nrbados. in co n nec ti on with 'iie t.-.ik* in Canada sbotU Uu* token iinpoi t IIOSSW I^nvlmt by the same nlane IMr W A Morris of Ihe Colonial Office Incidental Intelligence rF your efforts are criticised KiriK> School. v ,,„ m ,, st hnve done ompth|n 11 p m Ja fclu-lc; 4 41 p n. ^porl'" Fetord. iNpm Powwown of the Week, ft SO p in Ll|ht Mmlr; 6 00 pm Mrrrnant Navy Pnxrimmt; S IS p 1.1 Generally Speak ins: 41 p m Pro%  i.mme Parade. T 00 p m The Nev.v J Ift p m New. Analyil*. 7 IS p m We.1 Indian Diary; 1 U p m Think on The.* Thlfta-m a pm Radio New.reel. IIS p „, K-ii'ii Maaatine. H 4.1 p in Inlerhidr Ihe Ed M ., 15 I—1 Ted Heath; 10 0 i Cantcrl>ury, will soon be worth talking nbout—rVeuVorfc wurkiuii in the home of the Red Journal American. Dean, 0i n.-*ii-n a'otnssari The — L.E.S. Rupert and the Ice-flower—34 rni i i in i vi-ii PRIDAY MAY r> ISM lOl-i pi" Newa; 10 I!VIt SB Canadian Chronicle n.:o Mr> -r -1 M f iiuo-i oily iimlri Hid. tejiTirisj him irk part of ihe >>. iclli him 10 So ihe lutlc btftr RO*I >u i>c .. RMW why iht .11.1 n\i to buna n here when my horne't in the other Areaion." he orniuccs the least u. iS| IOW in lire in, iau J( r i *! LI pa|l;ipf> i | t i Fluhi. -iic I folio* IO an [all c mr later, I^I 18 Cb\e | an mi.i.i up wiih. (ftl H -w-y rtn Thiirada* h| it M Utmost, .a. ^ live m l;hout an srtlat. Hi * %  trom IS. Oalf I %  1 lu II Sar — |4| 1, l ill i %  %  JUNIOR COMPETITION The Evening Advocate Invites all children under 12 to send In humorou* essay, story or poem on Ihe aubject of "CLOCKS". The best entry will be published every Monday in The Evening Advo"if. %  %  Ihe winner will receive n prIH t DM value a| I I m aHhal booka or stationery. Entries must reach Tke Children's Editor, The Advocate Co. Ltd. City, not later than Wednesday every week. NOTE: Btorlas must not be copied. Send this ronpon with your story. Baby's Lift 1 Saved By Hiccups Machine By CHAPMAN rf-Mii i. THE lives of 25 babies, who could not start breathing when they were born, have been saved by an iiujenlous machine developed by two l/'iidon scientists. One of the babies was thought to be dead. But after 45 minutes' treatment with the machine he beu.m to breathe normally. The ni.iehlnc work, t|ttini electric shocks to the nerves and causing hiccups. A silver disc U placed on the baby's neck. Shocks ted Into this disc stimulate the phrenic nerve, which makes the floor of the chest jerk up and down. Dr K W. Cross and Mr P. W Roberts, of St. Mary's Hospit il. W. developed the machine, whim is described in ihe British Medical Journal —UBS. YOI Al U < I I II 4 l\l M% iSAamborsOniy) IO.IDM M *jn rp.v:a^ra i^NcroHD IVUJ*H LOW..RJ piriLip mwv la -BUT Till BAND. .d OCNC KBLTA .n.l III. IM .ulMit ram t .11. \. I NOB. C OWARDS -THE ARTOMHHED HKABT" toWl NUB. COWARD CEUA JOHNV.N \V//AV*VW/W. .....-.•.-.-.V.-.-.-.'.V^.'.VV-.V','..-..-.-.-.r vi.ituK rum AT mm TO-UAY llii :1S P.M. LAST SHOWS --V ll.ll IIAHVKSTALAN I.AIIII — DOROTHY LAMOUR LLOYD NOLAN — ROBERT PRESTON TO-MORtOH LETTER ntOM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN AST0M THKATRK .HlltSDAY TO SATTRDAY "HALL'S OF MONTEZUMA ^rTTSBfRGH" *nd "GREKN III I Spn-UI M.lln.cIII II M I %  STAGE TO TUCSON (DIAL 2310) PLAZA ••TEA FOR TWO THEATRE -RKIIHiETOWN R K O Haa m • BORN to If BAD j can r* >NT A rvsv tobert XYAN-Ietnarv SCOTT Ssrcial To-day 0 30 a 1 %  IK VII < .K(.o s4cov ovr.a VONTAMA Wakel.v 8ATVKDAV IB e.m A I3u p : UUMXiHAM' in i vi,i HI mi zo siait;* John CAHHAIHNK i MVBKI i. m\nHOl Glbwi. OPENING GLOBE TO-MORROW *T •I IVKSNATIONAL %  IllANJWCW. ions MM \ r Uti if Tlr l.ulPLUS LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE NORTON MOORE "Bring Back My Bonnie To Me" MEEITON WEIR "Our Very Own" "SUGAR RAY" GODDARD "If" (The Singing Pvigilisll DOUGLAS GRIFFITH "Why Do I Weep" (10-year Vocal Marvel) IVOR HADMAN "I Wanl To Be Loved" WINSTON RUDDER "Accentuate The Positive" OI'EST STAR8 JOE CLEMENDORE (Contortionist > WILLIE IFFILL (New Singing Discovery) PRICES : PR 20 — House 3fi — Balcony 18 — Box 60 TICKETS on Sale DAILY and FRIDAY NITE JUNIOR COMPETITION Name Age School Home Addn St. Andrew Mills Product! are especially suitable for those with delicate skins. Exlra soil and absorbent, hygienic end soluble. and so does every woman I 1 Therefore try the lamous .... AMELIA SAMTAllV >AIKI\S ANDREX TOILET PAPER ANDREX FACIAL TISSUES STANEX PAPER HANDKERCHIEFS SAMARITAN TOILET PAPER Obtainable al all leading stores. PLAZA OISTIA Till RSI1AV 24th 10 am. INDIAN FILM! ELAN (l.e) DECLARATION Don't miss this Brand thrill with Mu-tc A Dances ADMISSION : 1/fi A I/far Non Indlano JAM II A DRESS SHOP Lower Broad Street 1'psUlrs Over Ktwiam's It A I lll\4. SI 1 IS LADIESSATIN LASTEX with Strap, alu. Slraalcs. -One piece ntyle. and Two piece .1.1.. from f 11.18 COTTON—Two piece I 8.07 TAFFETA from J.6J NYLON |12. H From 1 to 4 yean . From 5 lo 8 year. From 8 lo 12 year. GIRLS' BOYS' from 81.89 from 82.84 from 13 35 1 year atae 81.11 2 year -i/. 81.18 8 year arse J1.47 6 lo 8 year. SATIN LASTEX 85.28 I'l A/A niii wir a RAI.SBOS. I-I Vn Holder, Dorolhy L-r To-day I 30 p m MotiocranM Du HOMI OF TC WASTSgLAWI Jlnun> WakrlH %  LOVSSAN*" FYMlay lo Sun [WSffl ., Jamn CaaTna* H .1. %  ... li..',!WHITE HIAT 4-A1ETV (IHt GARDEN) Si. Jam., Lai 'run. Tontia an r.-, of KITTT OPAI j, VMiii si 'lUnhi 4 SO p n. JO r.lOOKA € IMMr LM '.' MM | MII4.ION IIOIJ \K K||, L*O oon Jnd-v io Sun in Hal Sun ID R.b MOPE In -TAMO* r*j*TsW* ll.lflt.-l ""'IT' OF I.AIIDU Mlt>NITt SAT SSTM -r*t- OF MARnm. .1 bid you smile into your mirror today! Were your teeth as white as hers ? When you use Pcpsodem your mirror will show you a smile to be proud of A smile that shows sparkling while teeth) For Pcpsodem contains Irium, wonderful ingredient which dissolves dull film and ugly stains, uncovers the natural brilliance of your smi THE TOOTHPASTE WITH IRIUM* Intm ii ite /Vptadnr IJJ. Jm a i*,. u / arfaW. I'lJuw laur ,ii.i (finJttmnt paoxr. AITE.XTMOXtl FACTORY MANAGERS Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements IN GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE Ranging from V*' upwards MILD STEEL Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes BOLTS & NUTS All Size, FILTER CLOTH-White Cotton Twill Al PRICES that cannot be repeated. ri4 it i II n tints i oi \nin t I.I. White I'ark Road, St. Michael % %  / %  %  %  %  %  %  %  • %  %  % % %  %  % %  ^• % % % %  % %  .;::'.:-.: White Duchess Satin 36" White Slipper Satin 46" White Sharkskin 46" Black Crepe-back Satin 36" Men's Hats S.-I.02 .1.70 i.o:t si.-i.-, >. .-,n %  2. IO I.OO H.I2 EVAIVS fi wiinriri.ns DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 your Rooms!! FOR YOUR WINDOWS—Kirsch Curtain TIIIMII:: and Fittings Orlwite Aluminum Curtain Tiibins FOR YOUR FLOORS—Coiiuoleum Squares RUES A Wide Kin::.from which you may select your requirements. I III IIAIIII AIHIS MMU'IIUIIVI I III l\ FtUTOni LTD. Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039 1 I PLASTIC and OIL CLOTH CONGOLEUM SQUARES •THE CORNER STORE '-CW*W/,*////,*/, *.<,*,y.,V*,*,*,*,VV^OV',-, '---*.-.'.'.*.*---'-'-*.'. V



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    mi RSDAV, MAY U l1 BARBADOS \H\ui Ail i'\i-[ imti.i Britain Musi Free Colonies OTTAWA v Informed source* said on Tuesday Canadu sufjceMed thai Urite irn more . %  %  ; irvra i-iem from Ihe IOM. commitment.*, and allowed them to sell more goods to Canadian buyers. The sufjOTtlon was made as trade officials from both countries completed the second day of their discussion* In the fifth session of the Canada-Unit* .1 Km t doni conference continuing under their Trade Committee. I .inking arlttiaai are exploring the nmns by vfh iieiuii-ii the two muntriet could be increased, thus providing Britain with m which to buy Canadian goods. Dollars earned by Brttaii ics are transferred %  > the comUIIIRC pool which is contrnllfd i'y Britain. Ihi oAdab pointed out. Informants gaJd like to buy copra to mato oil from Australia and the Fiji Islands, and peanut* or groundnuts from Nigeria. These are two %  Canadian Imp S13.0O0.OOO last rear, Barred from Commonwealth sources, lied up in a Ion. I 1 l'a supply Ida ventured into the higher priced nor-< wealth % %  rig about ss.ooo.ooo wortl) iBd about 18.000,000 worth of pear the Ifnttod St;*'' other non-Commonwealih %  TOM —iCP> IIMIVAI Ol HIIII VI \ I \MMI\IIKS A* 1 ROODAL BIRTHDAY 24th to 30th. A Week of Entertainment to Please. I >l I* I II I T IIRM*. TO-DAY. J4th— 2 — 4 41 and I 39, W\ I MUM Mill—Ml 41 114 paa. wy -Ml KDAY Ifilh.— 34. 4.43 A S.lll p m 1 ~ SINDAV TO WTD\FSDT—4.43 34 p.m. Dally Jftftf* ^M**""*? THE •con* acrosN th River Thime* of thi Shot Tower, toe Festival Skylon, with tl'i Sonta Bank FestiTsJ of Britain Exhibition, Allowing th* Ron-en or ParlUmcnt and Big Ben behind. s I'orliifMHunting Still Going On MONTEVIDEO. May 23. Digging fa %  i m ;i i c.nelery here Ihjfe third dnv to-daj with the Church reported to be taking unusual interest in the outcome. Th.' lortuno, aid to be worth S2.ooo.oou in gold and Ivwott. was ira ago on the edge or the | I in whsefa rwnatai Artigas and other t'niCUoyan heroe* are ••nti'tnbcd. tfctj to ;| <5 year old Italian woman, Claudia Magftliatti, they war* hidden there by her mandfjUui Carlo > Rlshf'p of Sablna who was given OgrcUnal's bat by '*<>,>•• *•*> Twelfth but resigned it In November 1838 and came to Uruguay, i to unconfirmed reporta if the fortune is found the Church aim it for the V —Reutrr. SHIP ABANDONED THANR-JORDANIA. May 23. The 7.240-ton Greek N'irulami Grorilo* on fire in the hM been abandoned by nor crow, Lloyds reported In London to-day, The crew of 35 were picked up by United State-, tanker Monteheo Hills according io Llovd* report from Port —Rruler. Rainfall Distribution Uneven In April THE AVERAGE local rainfall 'or the Island (Of tin month of April was well above the awrara. This diati ibution was very uneven; certain M i ivy (alls on the 1st.. 2nd. and 21st., with frcqtirm light between these dates, while others received littU or no rain during the first half of the month; well distribuUd ri on the 20th. and 27th. According to rainfall returni •rOrO tatOB, nn theae fields conhThonias and the lowest was 3.66 The -ear, >, fa wild i inches measured at a station in was continued. the parish of St. Lucy. Owners and occupiers i>f land Sunr Cane who %  *• desirous of j ha.votmg of the old cane cotton In July, 19.11. are asked Th. crop was continued during th month,' '•' I remained high, and Juice quant] satisfactorily. According to returns received froni the various factories in the Island, the grop is now estimated at the equl' lent uf 179,000 tons of suga make an early nppliratln enpplv of seed. I'* .. -.mi AKrieultnre Cultivators, wherever possible, took Ibe advantage of the exeelwhieh prevalled during the month to baton of food crops. M> %  ,>. and *uch imps as Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay M V t*der(teld. *•*> M.n"'llrnilrlla. Srh UarhM Brii* Wolfe Sh. Cyril E %  nuth. Beh. I %  * DO 'i,o Vii Philip II Dandion, 8eh. I^rislphs. M V Blu Star. M V Can. .• ach Kvi1-. Sch Lucllk ^milh. Sdl ARRIVA1S Muifr rnlvtpriie S. C3 Ww IMH, Cap! Dixim, from St Luna •rltiMr W I. Funirla. 38 loe* nrl. Ci>t Jo*eph. Irom DofnUiira. iiirAsti ar* Sctaion" %  uaatkUM n M ton* wt. BrlUli Guiana. SdMMrwr Frsrcn W Smith. T4 ton* for fletnh Guiana M V T O Batlar. IIS Ma Mitchell, lor St Lima %  vh !" .nrr rs*torn El. loi" not. cpi. Joseph, (or Grcnadi The young cane crop made good plant: growth during the month, and vrrv green and vigorous in ap""lativi pearance. In torn. ,• l "" d garden v. of potnsh to the ratooni P'" 111 B iu.wevo;. has lcen stilted owing lo difficulty in getting In„ bour to reap their emies, were h>, fO ?0 Cr "P* hind hand In preparing lhe, r land Several fields of iweet potafor lhl pl(m (ni[ or f(X xl crops, toes were harvested during the Towards me end of hl month, and the market supply of lBr e tomM toes were In exci ground provisions in general was hUp|1 | V in a prices had dropped satisfactoryMarket garden crops rrotn 36 ^n,, lo 2 o cents per such aloraatossj, cabbages ^^^ v am .. and .w,yi French beans, etc were In lair rnn tlmied t<. he easily available. supply. s |lf|ir ,.,„„. totlun peasants oMtinut to renp t l In accordance with s..-i i. ,,. ,..,,,. T;.. (1) of the Mosaic Disease (Eradnrosresfc ol the crop has h**n ication) Act. 1943-22. 34 retursow tcsn HSU H.O\G STREETS hampered to some extent by the riiiiis, but labour The young ptl ratoon cans are ittaltl ,. : onwtn were Beon VMutehouse of Chapman Mv g nMMe Lane, St Wchael, tra. lined 30/duiL „, c nionth lo be [Mini in one monUi or one month'* imprisonment by a City V „ . Police Magistrate foi lelling iced Vkldi generaUj i i %  beet nsh in the streets. ; -'-"tory. Umg before the end The offence was lommitteil >" %  "' April when the gTOWtng seitAprll 24 Inspector Cumberbatcti son ended, a large number ot colloid the Court that Whitehouse ton cultivators li^d baton mod n several osoaslong i" ol all ; md pi about selling iced Bah, pare their land for I' or! crops. Tree Crop* Coconuts and b good supplj in the Bridgetown market, other crops rvaltaotc doing the month inelucied pawpaws and limes. it I • a 111 ioen apt i market In 1 irgB qua%  Pt and mane ..... Pesls and l>i r IM- The main pests reported attacking peasants' crop m rhe cabbage whtts scale insect.-:. 1 • cultural Instructors rontinui t^ advocate suitable methiI trol. One disease which is becoming srtojtspread in Ms hat black rot in cabbage (..the crop are becoming alive to the importance ol pmctismg pioper crop rotation as a means of checkpraod of this nfction. Peaaaud Uytatncfc i honor, tnelodtnsj %  %  'ops, was easily availabl througliuut the month Somo tvee •.'oniplalned of dUHeult) In otslsfintog balanced nnimnl leed and oats. iMrnsion Work The Pea* :. i rural instructors visited GM peasant holdings and LI school garden:. In %  uteen mang>i growini? on peasant plot lopworked with scions of • % %  < %  •desirable varieties, molnlv the .liil" Crop Husbandry 'lhe reaping of canes a' Magi!ts \< .s enmpletad during the month. At all other stationreaping of this crop Is proceed bfactorily. Muriate of potash has been applied to nil the young plant canes and is being applied to the tatoons as fast back in %  %  foui Stations under IndskktloQ < %  SBpUj IIOH nt Miiphatf uf ammonia nan H\\ i-n A ..< U catch-cropping progian Ji :us,t|( ii %  r i %  pa} luidends in the way of good returns from an sorb crop ol rahhage grown under Irrigation. Animal Husbandry There WOTO l-'i: %  lh< B % %  % %  I fna snd ol April. These comprised stud animals, Mitlle. gojts. sheep, pigs and 1'ive hundretl and twenty%  aren gallons of milk were prod l young pig sold for breeding. Stud '-rvlces paid for at the Station* w,-re ;IR follows:— bulls 129. bucks SB. ram* 36 and boars 83, making a total of 306 for th" month unc bnaht, %  cuicii^ I ,tcd Ri.i *i*n h*i %  ilir in a hi* d tMPpil> a< ^h^ -kipred along But J bis; ha J wolf *a Red Rkting llooil %  nd 'Jn 10 tdc KMidnKHl-o's cmiasr When RcJ RulinB II.HKI trffod, hc i h.i ,ind crajd. "Ahj' No* V,a.tV ensd Hrtl Riding Hood. Ai hc: puitcd ttut .. dlUi ol Ktj| PudJint from her haskci lhe *.iiriilve-l n "i muth. hf fora.i Red RiJm< Hood and rushed out to hu* more Royal Pudding? So ca*f lo make—to economical -Ami •o nuiriiioui Tet >oor l.inul> k| Ro>al Pudding lodjv • JANE POWELLRICARDO MONTALBAN II W Y A I T0-DA1 ONI.V. 4 30 ind ft 10 ^TNIVKKSAl. iMU'IlUE . OAIXINQ UK DBATH ind THE INVISIBLE MV TII-MIIRKOW >M HATI'RDAV 4 30 and II 30 ptepublk Arln.li Double . John WAYNI Franeu DIE m A MAN III i >i \i i n md nriinm jtSliirruiK . Wild IMI EIJ.IOT — MiniWINDSOR Fur.-sl TUCKER SI'NIIAT Mili u 4.30 IS FIRST INSTALMENT . THE OtSUHiStA SERIAL "FLYING G-MEN" — STARRING — l;..hr 11 hUfl* — Jjtnes < i .1. Kl.h-td Fraka — l-orn* C!ra>SVIIHUVV .mil SINDAV. *:• nut IS FINAL INSTAI.MFNT "FLYING G-MEN" MONDAY and Til SDAY. 4 30 and %  IS. COLUMIIIAS %  MASHING DOUBtl niRD HATFIFLD In . "CHINATOWN \t MIDNIGHT" AND — "GUN FIGHTERS" HUrrlni II IMinl I II SCOTT and IIVIIIIM > nRITTON WEDNESDAY and THI'RSDAY. 4 30 and I 15 REPUBLIC'S BIO DOUBLE— EDGAR BARRIER and ADII.F MARA — IN — "SONG OF MEXICO" — AND — l&vau IKSKKBKKlSiKiWSK!!!!-.!: *"* %  NOTICE WE WISH TO ADVISE OUR CUSTOMERS THAT OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT WILL BE CLOSED FROM FRIDAY, 1st JUNE TO MONDAY 4th JUNE 1951, BOTH DAYS INCLUSIVE, FOR OUR ANNUAL STOCK-TAKING DOWDINIi ESTATES k TRADING CO., LTD. ECKSTEIN BROTHERS i HI 11 1 'A'.tx'.v .V A' S .VAl'.'.'.'.w '.'.vs '. : : :: : i WITH BROWNE'S CERTAIN COUGH SYRUP II Roliavai Coldi Quiclly c CASLTON BROWNE: 13S Roaburk hi. Dia. U13 Wholpaala A Rrtall n-1, i-i WE NEVER LET OO Our \ i. ,1 in,,, over tha duality of S. & S. HUM la nevrr n-l.ixrd Thai Ii Hh l| h alwars lhe UIBf, A trol* ouUUadlnr Ram. In u t Li-, all it, nun l.l-llcl..| ,| It..Ill,\ — By — STUART k SAMPSON (1938) LTD. Headquarters for Best Rum. THE CYCLIST'S CHOICE DUNLOP ROADSTER ESTATES & TRADING COMPANY LIMITED (CCKSTftN BROS) I keep fresh all day...! iuse LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP Siay fre%h all day long uw Lifebuoy Toilet Soap in your daily bath or ihown and whenever you vvah. Lifebuoy*! dee;"-jleiming lather rcsllv free! you of weariness, keeps you looking Irtsr. so much longer. Buy a tablet today and dcKbta Rkf ynurseif the difference It maki-. VOR V)HM)X \l. IHI-ll\l^< l/IMts


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    INI B IDAY. M\V 14, I9.-.I BABBAOOS ADVOCATE B.W.I.SX. WILL NOT GO TO LONDON •. FT* PM opinion that 11 WIS A should not It was relt by some members take part, wouldn't It be asking 'if the committee that an agrteulmr to take a position whtch you in turalM should be sent It was your heart.* would not expect me further suggested that n member to accept' Mr Robinson quesof the Primary Prodm Uoaod, lion be sent "I could onlv be of use to you All Indcrestimalion lf were free to give you my best Hon. Albert Gomes felt that th.<*vlre On the other hand. I am Delegation shrald remain as it qui,< Wlll >" and always will to KM He thought it wan an underto "Onsider every point of on of the delegatit-i %  -i work with >ou to the think thai ih.v could no! put the D '-1 •' m y ability This la also case for agricultural proOUCC id ,nr P"*'tion of B.W IS A They Indies. are not asking you to stand by Ml Clegs wild II was regrettable %  %  ,1,kc their burdens off them that sugar, the principal product "There has got to be co-opcraof the West Indie* woi.| not '•-• llon " *" ldta but ,f beeoni* a reuroscmc t. It sccm-d %  waste S"""* Ih dff "'K a,lon n,, ' r a KpRMUlnc or low vour confldcn( 0 ,„ „, vlni „ g ^, L S >** .X.."!*•,,• be my own view I cannot be in toula two positions at one Ume i that in Hon. Albert The one hope of the people in he Hon. W Kaalgever. this area.*' Mid Mr Robinson "is the Hon. Bust unai.le and Mr that nra should free our minds of 'hey had four politician* suspicion and that we should il i h i.i Utada mm agalnsl apaah freely and frankly and tell any in the world. each other what we have to say. Mr Adams said that the and that neither one side nor the B W.I S A. in us*, not make the misother should take any opportunity take again of giving the politicians of placing the other in two poatin ir.is area, the Lmpraaatoa that uotw." thaj war* merely making use of For that reason it would be them as a shield When the pollwrong for him, so long as the tlcinns were eventually asked to B.W ISA continued with thai go to Great Britain last time.' he decision—and that was his insaid, it was to give the opinion of struclions at present—to become a the West Indian people. He had member of the dcU nation no Intention of being used unintentionally r deliberately as a I'nited front stooge. Mr. Itolnnson said that it had Politicians' Status been made clear to the meeting from the beginning, that quite Politicians in th* West Indies, separately from anything that was especially Labourites, had to be being discussed there, there was an Very careful that they were not agreement with the other Comix-lug suspected of being used by monwealth producers, that no neB.W.I.S.A. for .their convenience gotiations should be entered into "I cannot see how Australia can before there was a chance to come suspect II WIS A. in going to together in a united front for the Great Britain any more than they purpose of making representacan suspect them in going to Canlions. Ada." said Mr. Adams. There was not one member "1*1 us strongly recommend to there who would not wunt BW.I.S.A. tn reconsider their BW.I.S.A to stand by that position. When we as politicians agreement. Not only mut go to Britain, bow affective are they do so but appear to Wl going to be without B.W.I S.A? I am going to ask them t<. re.-miaiaei their petition especially in the light of their willingness to o to Canada." lion Albert Gomes said that despite the fact that Mr. Adams and he very often had their little differences, he had great respect and regard for him and he appreciated the frankness with which he had spoken. He thought those who were there and had to do with sugar Empire Da\ Message rrem The Ri. Hoe, The EAKL OP OOMRII va. pc. GiCJfto.. c\tv DS.O.. Pres'dcBt O M —— -n* R*.V%  M* ana my letvatCV, M ena you %  aaasaBja iw I m,,.,l *,, toB ^ „,, iere., I ,w ta U%J „ -1..11 worm HIM ii. ,i,. co... i.i.ue la an unA.ppv. w r ud and dangerous state. At Of Man do it in the eyes of the world. Il would not lx> in the highest interest of the West Indies for B.W.I S.A. to take part In the proposed talks at the present time, Mr. Robinson said. The Chairman finally said that he believed he was expresing the view of the CommWec that they wanted Mr Robinson to be u member of the delegation. The Committee had their faith and confidence in him It would be prejudicial if he could not must appreciate what araj the £jj (l possible to reconsider the position with regard to politicians matter. The best thing was to ask in the West Indies. Mr. Robinson to consult his dlrec. V? 10 '*..." lu P ,cl,,n '" "' tors on the matter. Mr. Robinson west Indies thai there is the danpromised he would ger of the sugar people in some way or the other using political %  support when it suits their coi venience. Co-operation "I have felt at almost evei stage of these discussions, that there is going to be co-operation What the Flags Moan A flag is often seen Hying from le which rises above the the pol Harbour and Shipping Depart mere is Bums ,u uv eo-operuuoii wh tt iy •< P-M between the governments and VI' !;Jiz"' „ ,—i u, B.W.I.S.A. it would be extreme!v ^'"etimes a single bluedansaroua if the Association take rn.vkere.1 flag or a blue checkered the responsibility in their own "ag with a pe-ndant beneath it is hands to proceed to negotiate, and (lying. _Anothcr time, there is the then when they find themselves In House flag of a steamship comtrouhle ask the governments to pany. attain. It seems to me that The flags are flown us signals this Committee should take the of ships approaching Barbados. A stand that the co-operation of the flag with blue checkered on a governments and the Association white background Indicates that must take a tangible form." an unknown steamer is to tho He wanted to remind B.W IS A. windward of the island. If the that Australia was now coming line of the steamer is known, tho forward to Join with the West Inhouse flag If flown in place of tho heckered flag. lenanee rtaersh p u.iwcrn tue v*ri<*us countries wbirn mane ua> ,..i(ammenweallh and %  % %  b > of aarmmount Mii|->ria... Ta feater and ( mprov. mutual undrnunding between the asan> differrm raeea to be found in this larae family ts the ia*k far which this Movement w .* founded. I ran truthfully say thai much ha* been accomplished but I caniiui streaa too airongly the urgency for continuing our uork consolidating past achievements and nulin progress In theae areas as jet little touched. This Is partlcuUrly Important and immediate al ithe present tune, when rapid political change is being made within the ( omasonwealth and Empire whilst world conditions remain so dlfth al; und uncertain I am most grateful to all friends and supporters for thenpaat assistance and I confidently appeal to you all. al this critical time, to continue your efforts and strive to aehievr the alms and principles for which the Movement stands, the m*ini-ii.ui,.of peace and the furtherance of world pro*aerlty. I wish you all QgJ injiaal ^nd success In your rndrat CiOWRir:. Kmpire l>ay. 1951. To the Voulh of the British Empire TO EACH of you I send 1 Una message at a limwhen you muat hear and sec many things which may sadden you. It Is true that the peiee la which you had hoped to rrew np has not >et come about nor can we be sure when this will be But it b also true that many of you. the youna people of the British Commenwralth and Kmplre are. throuih your friendships learning the resl truth that distance and a different way of life need not divide you. Take courage, be brave and remember that you are met together this day w IUi the children of many races, lo celebrate Empire Day and our common brotherkssSft COWRIE Empire Day. 1951. I'M.I. FIVE New Pictures At Cotnbermere 'I'HKH Mn •* •• %  coleMUon *t Combermerc School. These were brought from E-ig:ana oy Major C .aster oi the School, when he returned | !" m ." < v "" on " %  **" *' ''> **• liutaon, %  labours, the V N IMtita *-hie, rthich is about • long by a foot and a half frldt •' *ip Ml M \ I. is of rranku Worrell, thsj InterPoUCO Magistrate oi I^ahoiirriI ineel 40'For Larceny In Mental Hospital Case \a/tcy I ft>t letin Singapore SINGAP09X H The BriTish Cargo k hip' Nancy MoUer with 3.700 tons of Malayan mbjMf oraBsnaU* ,. tended fo o mmunist China, arrived off Si igapcrc )u*t before noon today IB ihe Strait* ti C npanf .ih the British mine.UlichtM wtUcti rte.1 h> %  .00 mileTh* Nancy Moller %  natiniial erksMOM ., CeaaWfe —Rruter. besvsoriaa, nd 3 — —. The picture sho."s Worrell, ,( *>s in 14 days or in default o ic --. - wearing ms .,-, months imprisonment. She gave HOT %Jfl iilseetn blarer with the ConanwawealU) ,,|,c 1 f *VP*d -t ihc take %  In the row for I v-t India, during the" bsnTcotames? [\-"\\ v \Z wealth tour I: tf • %  "rrankie inE [(|1 the Combermere Hull among i Schools Set Cups and Shields I W LONDON. May 23 "' "he British aeMttna S-niet^ (Q Mr. W. W. II :hwind todav Inunchod Sl OOO.OOIl appeal p asast Hutnon who %  u BntnJ i aej m gbniM M ,. ed aa a nu.uL M UetlUl P rt of the rglHnaigli 11 PI .1 Maotlful Mlvei and bfa The other picture., are ,,f Lord 'I'l-otity ..f goodg fretn Uwra the a*'Ue|i bunds pconle Combennere, found rho West tnaUta bj ioin:nir in School one. hung up in the ' the Stmulium Fly (Buflalo Scho.!l Library, shows Lord Con'' u . (. itj LhhM ,,\ | fei t ., barmara In big miutai l '" 1 "' 1 at 9 ,r the rwrtiwrn <;..! The other is bung U p over lh~ '''' v "! hl estal-h.hej „ reaB stage at Combennere and bj thhi ''' ,K '" ,! '" ,f lr l,lt "i' Coasted HM ptOpJ eminent posilion Long CoDlDM avay. '"'" "I-"* ht i*r the British Empi-c Societ' All old Combermenans inter. U ' n ' aternoor of f" the blind, the insect bl % %  ested are Invhed to go „ IKl '' mam* u-.a mual ba %  ripsj a look at them Hu *'"' %  lOwad thai tm Out at all costs C HILDREN ol IIH.,I i rvisssas h d * u n,it > ol loodl In hei Ml Jhn K Wtlaon, the hltnt H J, !" .? C basket which Inctudi _, ff * ,ir ?y* S Qua,) IMd thai ".nontix af th !" ih vloirs ^ ",l hov. she ol>:. i Rb kjumtl look hir r>W2LJ! c ? .VV. '*"" God '' C t'' W;| "">" a"' 'hat she SCO miles up the spin. „( U> f ombonnere S-liool Hall yeslerlold him that she not then, from G .Id Coast ISO mUOl .KI ZiL, ,f tho plnce wl mrtheiu wtl d a r nti I ..V X "' f ''"' ''"-I" 1 *• „ .. .. ibOUl W mile M alf Exhlbilion. Mi W W i;.,.. —Reilrr Theboysofiiai sm.; lehoo] "' %  '' n "' %  BO rooaon u h> the were especially inter. i.l:inl ahOttld i their project which ..... first prue in the Inb l ">>"'"* had botn conunlttod Division, it showed Cook it* used. al Botany Bav In ITTi.. The bl R ,'.. n ,"' ,,w "' '"' ground showed the map of Ai ,l,bmilIOtl "'•" 'he proeeution had no: pro vex I that the goods thai svara in the p.*ses,ion of the ...... a MWIli k. TI., ... ,, 'Zum,,*, th. hnu ,m b.i.kt..iiiui anil Ibl n I % %  ,,,.,. ... Bay Slrrot> h.,,1 .1, ,.„,,, „„,,, all.. K. T Mil III.I.IN I ..,, Wat:. ecoftad ber "hi imionCT or 1-Micr. s i\ mil '"" %  ""011111 f ..!. In ha Annual Talk la bui anvtn %  Od t.mdurlors at tne K11..111. Wo%sa*^rsjrv? *r; prove then ( ase ami it %  the duty ol the ta*fanj gplaln whin and how the good < tralia. New 7rounding islands. The Combermere IH.V^ DRINK & ENJOY COOLING & REFRESHING DiscuHtt Troth Com m inn toner nd h) %  Vi nu Advoeate that he lioped all the uus driven and GOOdlMten In ttu island will attend. Thus,., i„, gri interested in Hoad Safety gbould also make a special effort to he there. dol dies for very obvious reasons, but when it was in Australia's intereat to battle her own canoe she acted otherwise. That was something that had to be borne in mind and it was something which was known by the governments in the area. "1 frankly think thit this Is not as simple a matter as it may serm. 1 feel that it to a situation that should definitely be el irlfled because I share Mr. Adams' views to a very great exl-nt. "I happen to be a polillclin also and 1 know what Ihe situation is. In many Of Ihe territories even among the sugar workers, there is a gret suspicion that wr politicians who are concerned in this mattrr are Just thinking of the sugar mamsPachirers It is a misauided viru, because we all realise how important sugar Is io the economy of the Heat Indies and II to for that reason we are determined to i,,.in these political battles." Mr. Gomes said that he thought they should not leave the situation as it was at the moment, in his opinion, it was ,i very acute one. The Chairman. Professor Beaslev, said that it might help if, dsgpfta the fact the B W.l S.A was nut sendltjg .. M pic-cntaliw*. Use* ask Mr •Holiinson to iKcome a member of the delegation as Mr. Robinson. An Agreement Mr. Robinson said that he was bound by the decision which his directors had made H night burnt six nctW of first crop ripe canea. They ore tho property of C. G. Gale and were Murod EIRE al Bulkeley Tenunti George, earl, morning completely destroyed a boarded and shingled house with shedroof attached. It |g the >IMII>erty of Edna Crichlow of Kjrm Tenantry, St. George. It was not insured. The Police ore making investigations. T HE HOME of Bl-yp:ir-.,lrl Marry Leach at Hibby Line. St. Michael was completely destroyed on Tuesday night. It |fl valued $240 and was not insured adjoining house, owned b> AS 1 L-heckered Hag. under which b flown a pendant with a red dot in its middle, is the signal for an n^, Mberl Gomes moUo unknown steamer to leeward. .In favouring West Indian Govern case the line of the steamer is ments to give their views on ti, known, the house flag is flown Report of the Standing Closer An with the pendant. Associition Committee Meeting. Joseph Browne, was charred un , before discussing the report of Ihe western side. This nlso Is not io signal a man-of-war to tne Customs Union Commission insured. w.ndward, a red and whlta WM icsterday tilmply recorded al diagonal flag Is hoisted. A pendant lhp ne eting of the ltegi.mi.1 AN ACCIIU.NT QaouiTOd .' with a red dot In its centre Economic Committee, bul no other •* St LaWTMic*, Christ Chunh. inferior to the red onJ action taken since there was such "" Tuesday U-lwei -tor COJ cleavage of opinion by members X.1835. owned ami driven bj of the Committee. Montague White of S". 1-IWM-K The resolution read aa foland a bicycle owned and ridden lows:— by Vernon Fordc of tl i hile diagonal flag, man-of-war to leeward. A black ball Is hoisted inferior to the mancf-war flag to tell that a squadron o< men-of-war Is approaching f hc Committee resolves to trict harbour from the windward communicate with the Secretary Ford, If a squadron is approaching OI suu urging him to make .rom the leeward, a pendant w^th immediate representations to all a red dot in the middle is holsiod Governments which have not vet inferior to both the man-of-war considered the Report of the Hag and the black ball. Standing Closer Association ComTho Harbour Signal Station also mlttec asking for an ssWij gives hurricane signals. A red expression of their views on the ttag with a black rectangle In the proposals contained in the centre is used as a cautionary report signal while two similar flags. The Committee agrees that it hoisted together, are hurricane %  < not desirable to consider the signals. Report of the Customs Unlor Commission until such time av When a red pendant with a there has been a full expression white vertical crow is flown with c f views from nil territorial Gov0 black ball hoisted interior to il. ernments on the Standing Closer Ihe signal permits small craft Io Ajwocintlon Committee Report enter moleheid before* being • grantOd pratique in bad weather. —" "' Nctiees of ships approaching the Island are cominuiicaled to the Harbour Signal Station from u "look-out" station al IlighgaV. The flags are Immediately hoisted when the notices are given. They /re lowered shortly after the ship Las been lving at anchorage. ROTTEN SUPPLIES who was injured, was treated by Dr Ward The eyclo was slightlv damaged. A PART of Fri-ter* Road, St Joseph, is at present undergoing repnirr.. This road leads to Burke Village, via Vaughan's Land. It is the third time that it has been repaired for the year. On each -K-easlon it was damaged by rain. The rhitnborazo Rood has been completed and |. to traffic. MEDICAL OFFICER APPOINTED The Secretary of Slat, fa B Colonies haj eh.l'-.l l>r Zyginunt Witold ttOlMWoch tor anpointmetit to Ihe p-ist of Medtp llarhndos fierier.d Hi No ships were in the Buy yesterday, but some boatmen still got 00k u job to do. They were hired to pital. take off rotten merchandise Into Dr Skonuroch and famil the Bay for dumping One rowe>pec led to arrrn bj till loat took out a supply of potatoes. Bonaire on May 39. Keep the >ouiigMeri lit in Ibjajssfc Acnes blouses. They are fashioned t;>r iltness in the cellular fahrK 6c~ signed for mrat*rr.l\emtlari


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