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The Barbados advocate

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Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
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Daily
regular
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English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

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Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
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Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
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Newspaper ( lcc )

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Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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:
, ‘ *-
ee Gul? |
, § 2
ESTABLISHED 1895 ___ TUESDAY, MAY 27 OR ee en Sak;



-K. SHOULD SCRAP CUBAN BLACK. PACT

ne .

ee a ee Rue TT et ee ~TWESE TOL GorromLy ge te ‘LE TU, S F ORGET
BOTTOMLEY THE PAST

GOES S WANNING Negotiate As Partners

|
|

(From Our Own Correspondent) .
In Happy Family







: LONDON, May 21.
"THIS is how the “Express”’ Special Correkpeudent,
,CRAP the Cuban Pact.
S Give us two way traflic. a

: John Redfern, reports Mr. Bottomley’s visit:
This sweet-tooth island—-its economy is built on

Help the West Indies to help the Common
wealth as a whole.

sugar—has a sour taste to-night.
This was what Mr. Bottomley was told at

Mr. Arthur (Overseas Trade Department)
Hastings House yesterday by the united voice of

. Bottomley is in town. A British Minister swanning
around the British Colonies and defending the in-

the Regional Economic Committee and the British

West Indies Sugar Association

terests of Cubans.
Hon. Albert Gomes told the United Kingdom Mission

{hat lest they considered the abrupt termination of Sun-
day’s meeting as intended to be discourteous, he would
hasten to agsure them that the symptoms they had observed
were merely those of shock.





After weeks of Secrecy and
e fatuous denials—no special dele-
e ties gation was necessary for the
West Indies yet here it is—Mr,

Bottomley sbowed the shape of

| the Black Pact this week-eng and
a e ood jhow tacked on to his team of ex-
perts, are unwelcome visitors to

these sunny lands: alarm and
despondency,

Pr res We know at last that the
Ss tobacco deal with Cuba is for

$500,000 worth by March 1952 and

I think it must be said of the different matter, “May we ask
statement made,” said Mr. Gomes, | what is going to happen if we can-
‘that it has added nothing to the not narrow the gap as belween
fund of our knowledge of this these prodigiously high | prices—
subject.” jand they are steadily rising--and

West Indians were very warm- | 7 fadt a eo ener get e

sarte xeople and in ordinary | high price for what we expor
: Forel Ministe haps “150,000 tons to the nd at , ne atamtsteak the paaaben of the | Further that we have no siare>
pulice antifeved "‘consideranis|J96%. the. is-proposing tp, extaca A Mission would have been one | tee whatever that we will be able

|
|
another $500,000 for 1953. |
deputies achieved considerable|!953 she is proposing to 3 AFTER telling the U.K. Mission to scrap the Cuban Pact, Membors of the Begional Economic Committee discussed the proposed Mission to narked by its warmth and gen- | to secure a market,

° There is no hope of increased
On Big 4 Agenda preference on Jamaica’s cigars

Qn sugar since Britain is pro-

Canada.



















progress to-day by agreeing on until then her ul.dertaking to find mm 0 isi rosity It this delegation, how- | Mr. Gomes referred to the way
placing German demilitarisation|@ Market for 900,000 tons of : e % s eS ee ver, found them wearing a scowl, | in w hich it was explained that the
in the agenda for the Foreign |SU8ar a year from the West Indies. P. 2 2 | : . t Was the policy of the United iF me minenc. ong pare ne-
Ministers Conference. R l = “eS : vance M: ae Pl Singdom that had put that scowl | gotiations with Cuba, as being ex-
With this step forward the Producers will have the choice ersia e ec Ss ac 5 d an here, The delegation need have tremely difficult to accept. We
deputies have agreed on the con-|® Selling about 30 per cent at | ¥ 7 yr 10 doubt as to Knowledge of the | eo. hardly conceive of that as be-
troversial first item of the agen-|W0"ld price plus preference, and SS. A eal ' e | W ould U ) West Indian delegates of the | ing the true state of stairs, ne
da dealing with the causes pres- 70 per cent at a negotiated price even ‘/ i eS | road seoncevie background : You paid, panes you must Rage thet
i The “beef” here of sugar , , ? ‘ave trave a long way ring we ) “Pes: i
ent in international tension. © |, The “beef” here of sugar men TEHERAN, May 21 | Korean W wave travelled a long way to bring | |e Know Your interes: in Cube
To-day’s meeting opened twelfth i D wire ie contribution of) ‘Persia to-night rejected the : ee ’ | oreali ar There was nothing new in the | ket for goods that you want to
Week discussions on the agenda.|'?© , Dominions, they can easily| United States appeal for negotia LOK YO, May 2 . of ; neech of the Leader of the dele- | export. You must not believe that
Western deputies accepted to- ee oan a ten-year period) tions to reach a friendly settle- The western end of the United Nations line wheeled Ce ieee none May 21 ation. “Even the promise of the | W¢ are so generous that we are
day the Russian proposal that pha jor the requirements of!ment of the oil nationalisation! north to-day in a move to oulflank Communists. jay that tt Un at Said to- 1 ‘tension from 1952 to 1963 as re- | Willing to aceept that it is Cuba
the German demilitarisation ritain and Canada, crisis. The Government described Rand Rat a ha tatie £ Britis! Berd, _ {gay that the Jnited | tates would irds sugar, we look ou as a gop. |] vho is determined at all costs, to
should appear twice on the Yet Cuba is allowed to put its|the United States recommenda- vecon 1A issance forces oO Jeritish anc f meric ans enter-|have had to trip” its military | We feel that we must say to you | infliet this trade agreement with
agenda—once in preamble and|!0°t inside the door. tion last week to settle the oil dis- ed Munsan; 25 miles northwesef Seoul, South Korean cap- | power elsewhere to carry out Gen- | at the West Indies—at any rate | vou whether you want it er not
again following the point dealing| The great fear is that the pact|pute by the discussions as “inter- ital, and a Task force went to Uijongbu, 15 miles north of }S"@l MacArthur's Asiatic pro | ome of us—are not willing to bite, | May 1 remind’ you that we <0 eee
with the reduction of armaments. | Will be the beginning of a per-|ference in the internal affairs of{ the city, an Eighth Army communique announced, eae poe fa ee PADOSADS Lourie
The footnote to the agenda}™anent claim by Cuba for a stake} “fran,” cask teee ; H : = thik surprise “little offensive" | Bradley resumed his evidence Appeal Made alsa t Tab Corgi. Information apes
‘i ; ae “ {in the British market British sources here to-day be- iin — a . c | before the continued Senate Arm- When they examined the state- | Seep out and we do get some pic-
will state that deputies were un- : f , s ¥ 2 made across rugged slopes mad ; ; funn of what. areciahia tik’ skies
‘ ; lieved Persia would also reject a . : ae vain, | ed Services and Foreign Relation: | yent carefully, they found that a] ture of what | § the Ai
able to agree to the precise place ‘ Fas ns reje a €acherous by drizzling rain,|&" * ge ae On z tion is
that the German demilitarisation Doubled-Crossed Britain’s offer to talk to a mission r ur ined 7 miles yesterday and was|co™mittees on MacArthur's dig-| nost impassioned appeal had keen ’
should take. bing te eee hao ge — Stsienatieation. eee A irparted today to be making puget said. the Joint: Chiefs of oo oe Sweet te teas Celie Prior Claim
° ies ith ; vy - rature drop- ’ — > ‘ 2 ~ , 1 rane ve ting |. F y Se « s is § : : : ¥ r . ;
i Ernest Davies, Br itish Deputy, ped to-day when Mr. Bottom ing :The British Government is ex- ecused Of Bree er ae ie hn ae Stafl feared that if war was not}od Kingdom. It was the distress He thought shat the Weat indies
said only two, points remained to ant > . inti i+ 4 : iv only. moderate resistanee, 1° “ » people s area and the | had a prior claim on the United
; | faced 30-odd . pected to intimate that it intends } vine confined te Korea, “wermmight-fing| { the people in this area an ’ ;
es : r j ~ICG,,,p0-odd’ members: and ad- i > ° att Penitits “ot” the ‘crive were) for ‘ che es i . »y | Kingdorn’s trade and goodwill and
‘ be settled: the order of the item is iy A tg take the issue before the Inter- our war enlarged bevorml our] breat. there. was-in the policy Ho &
on the agenda: and the Russian|WS@Ts of the new — Regional national Court at The Hague for ece jtion seen on the eastern front, whete} conacity to ca ” “it + success. | vhich the United Kingdom was | they did not expect therefore that
demands that the North Atlantic Tr on tee busy in ses- judgment the Eighth Army reported Jessen faily” ye eee la thine ay vursuing to further that distress, | ‘le United Kingdom should pur-
Treaty sho inclu he | ton on West Indies problems. er ‘ eeome 3 ed contact with Communists “hey a at. hat concerned their delegates} %Ue a policy of sacrificing these
kpeus uld be included in th Not even Mr. Bottomley's an- Persia has meanwhile demand WASHINGTON, May 21 But the threat to Allied posi Bradley said one reason why the ten that table. “Do you expect | celonies in the interest of a trade

ed that the Anglo-Iranian, oil! Pemocratic Sens Military , 5 § fe
: 1 reme: : A Russian. delegation had to Sat ene — ee smile company should hand over imme- Wulbright, sald: today va ari —_ eal Ra at FRrDA he MacArthur’s removal wags tha act | , ‘ ;
face realistically that it was im- : 4S not gaging to do) djately all its £500,000,000 instal-| of General. Douglas. MacArthur's! 4... "oe? nroughout the! General MacArthur's public state- | ‘Ppeal of this sort, when through-

‘ the deal with Cuba, for grapefruit | lat; lay he eas u rer , wotle 5s WwW is in
possible for western powers to é a, for grapefruit | lations, day. In t east, outnumbered ment and communications “indi- | Out your negotiations v ith us

is to react sympathetically to an] agreement which was in her in-
terest but detrimental to the West
Indies

‘ : , after all, took the bite f the Is naligtsies atuivres cowl recent testimony to the Senate] {initead Nations troops were ‘ngland, throughout the negotia- Mr, Gomes said that he felt
accept the inclusion of the Atlan- air, b out of the haere Sees econ ree committees investigating his dis-l[holding on doggedly ] 1s iy , | cated that he was not in sympathy ane” with 5 WIS A. your atti- he ought to tell the delegation
tic Pact, Davies added. a © company would Tre-!missal was “almost equivalent. te positions under constant Com-| With the decision to try to limit! ude has been one of disregard to that as far as the West Indies

Mr. Albert Gomes, Trinidad’s|fuse the demand and appeal to
massive Minister of Commerce,|the British Government majority
Said shortly that the Committee | shareholders in the company—to
would give its reactions to Bot-| Protect its interests.

Davies proposed the following
order for the Agenda:
1, An item dealing with the

were concerned the fight had
only just begin. He had been
ten weeks in Engiand last year.

the conflict to Korea” He said} she human factor involved in this
thi would make it difficult for ugar. situation?’ Mr Gomes
General MacArthur to carry out] \cked.

deception” = : .
leception and amounted in| munist blows

some cases to “half truth” Fig? '
fies . ; . mghting in the east was heavi
The Senator said MacArthur] oct 2 the South eheean a a







cayses of international tension. tamley’s piece to-morrow Meanwhile the Persian Govern- made no mention of the message! where 5,000 Communists main- | directives, = f So long as they preferred to as- He had left the West Indies with
4. The Austrian Treaty. : . ment in the midst of one of its he sent to the Joint Chiefs of tained pressure northeast of Bradley said the Pacific Com-] sume that attitude they would find a certain confidence in the
3. German unity and prepara-| And the sugar men whose lead-| periodical crises had made an un-| St in Washington on January} py ngamni | mander had also taken independ-| ‘hese colonies most reluctant to] gopdwill of the English who
tion of the German Pence Freaty.|ing representatives are on the| Official approach to the Anglo-|!0 saying it might be necess The United ° States Second owned these colonies. He re-

for the Allies to evacuate Korea ate directly with the Communist{ hey had come to make

ent action in proposing to négoti-| yield to the further appeal that
| turned disillusioned, and be-
|





4. Italian and Balkan Peace] (co aeaaas 1 Tranian ¢ » th h Govern- Division wv Pre
: mmittee srowled on ote ranian company rough Govern 7 : . division With French and Dutch] % 4 3 rn z sel Ae = the re he
Treaties and agreements con-| verandahs Th, muttered Ro ale ment bankers asking it to resume] He also accused the General offi oops attached, which bore the|Pield Commander for Armistice scat ee gen ip is tis we ag cause temperamentally it. was
cerning Germany anc Austria ways feel the British Govern-}monthly royalty payments of|creating the impression that there|) unt of the initial Communist] 4d had made that statement React OM teh oot Gabor “ had dificult for him to hecame very
5. The Italian Peace Treaty in! ment is going to double-cross us.” | £2:000,000. Payments were stop wre only four points instead o1/ attack round Inje, reported only | public Geapite the ms ee at fe Snanble ts gee Nit fusther| bitter, he had not been. bitter.
so far as it concerned Trieste, Up Mr. Bottomley’s sleeve, was | Ped last month because of the un-|1® in the document he received) jicht probing attacks chew the Present bed: sucha 1h say that we have borne even, “We think it necessary to say

certainty of the company’s posi-/ftom the Joint Chiefs of Staff or] “phe” Second Division was| PFO} osal under consideration from more than a fair share of it. No} this to you, gentlemen, that if

—Reuter. A" a nisert 5 haa . 4 a
Reu G.A.T.T abbreviation for Gen- tion in Persia. January 12, and of tpt mention Governmental level
















































































eral Agreem Tariffs < in Pel t e Sa” om estimated today to have inflicted he Ae te . ies » can question the fact that we you expect loyalty from us, you
; foe hh greement on Tariffs and Britain is also likely to protest ing the message sent to him bY] 37,950 casualties i Comipuniatal , The Joint Chiefs of Staff “have es Seats cals apart ertint tis to the must be loyal to us as well.” If
V HERE DO } At the right moment he pullea | ##2inst_ the growing list being|President Truman on January 131i" five days of the Chinese| ‘lt and feel now that the military | vshabilitation of this vast area| they wanted that most undesir-
RS oasis ae os ; pu ts compiled of Britons in Persia outlining the political aspects of offensive. must be controlled by’ civilian vhich you have, with some pride able relationship where the col-
; Ke a emmy, o brea 7 ; ° irg > , . > yover ant’s ] i . .}au . s ry? ge Ww ’ * '
W L S ? into the ecudtine ‘of Colonial [Eker DS eEE AIO RY — - aor tee yee In the west and west central} ; ane Her cee Wate aes fara | called the sterling area. When onies would find it necessary to
7 . Momparity a") Persian Government, informed | Korea --|cectors where the Allied line] “V80 vo, weatings were adjourn 1 you ask us to consider the welfare] accept whatever was imposed on
4 yey? sources said, ; Some of these messages were! wheeled to the north, South) ©¢ until Tuesday afternoon, Brad= |i the people of the United King- them whether or not they re-
SYDNEY, May 21. He said the Cubans had been}, 20ugh the oil company is re-!mentioned in the testimony by] Korean troops advanced against |/¢Y Was asked to return to the wit- | dom, 1 think we ought to ask you sented {t, merely because they
; The British Government s|, : ; ticent on the subject, there is no}General Omar Bradley, Chairmar| ness chair.—Reuter, fo consider our people.” as for
. ; neld off from trading until next . nade’ tol nf ‘hiefs a arying opposition 5 ; . had no option, then it was for
1,036 ton reserve ship Discovery doubt that a sense of restraint isjof the Joint Chiefs of Staff and : 7 a ee Health Services
ai ay in an{year only by the strongest plead- ing ¢ B aged | Secretary - Defence tenere Cammunists counter attacked in ‘ ~ ase ’ them to decide.
TI sailed from here today in an ing : growing among Eritons engage jgesretary | for Defenc General one area southeast of Munsan| $6 : 9 . Mr. Gomes said that he thought The United Kingdom had some-
attempt to sail around the me = in the oil industry, and thei?)George Marshall, but broke off the fight and ee ac S fiw very unfortunate that the | thing to offer the colonies; their
Antarctic Ocean and find out] | course they could go to| families. ss ; . —Reuter. etreated when South ovaanal telegates did not have sufficient |jnstitutions and their way of life
among other things where whales|G.A.T.T., with their case for| The number of resignations is ieee ne stood. their ground, Vie ‘ime to go around in the various | They had lessons the people of thi
50 j i i trading with the sterling area reported to be above normal. . & ilinwe: > oe " sae) eed Yo "Slew
ee phe wane ee F Mie s i & 1 are : Reuter Inj d T ti South Koreans were reported 4 villages of the colonies id see |area could v well learn as a
e ship is making a_ six ith our improved balance of = : ure esting : : 3 . «- 40th | conditions for themselves. See the | srowing people, but “you have
months voyage in the south polar tise ihe ee G.A.T.T., could J : 8 bie He in dn cedkern ease Tt ‘ meaon: Fone 21 ibsence of the most elementary damaged bud frist and our confi-
regions before’ returning to;decide that import restrictions F T. Y YW W > 4 “Piritic ; ais gH any yates ‘he British Admiralty announc-| social and medical services and|derce very considerably and we
Britain, should no longer remain against IMPOR ANT New apon sige aes a ed tonight the appointment Of} compare this with their much | think that’ im honesty and because
In addition to the routine work Cuba. M, SS ‘ RIO DE JANEIRO, May 21. Seoul’ came: under Communist} 4¢™ral ar eat ee vaunted — he ilth services which | ws want to be frank with you we
of taking sea temperatures and We must listen to Cuba as T. ION Former War Minister General achinegun fire at one stage, but| °°. “TS ea hotd.and “niet a they posse sed : a cught to tell you so
soundings, the expedition will] we've listened to Canada and the |Canrobert Costa and Commander pt. /Qorimunists aside — and| ‘CP _Daval staff in succession tc Even admitting that we can }
study the distribution of plankton,| United States”, he said. BONN, May 21 of the First Military District) o.ntinued their advance. United| ST"! of the Fleet, Lord Fraser} hardly expect that a society Well Known History
minute animal life and the dis— Perhaps tobacco smoke brought West German Chancellor Dr. |General Zenobio Costa were both| nati lanes has speated|s jof the North | Fleet ; which is almost altogether agri- To your. advisers aid Mr
tribution of whales themselves. |h back rigs Konrad Adenauer, said to-day} red today while testing Nations planes today repeatedly The appointment takes effec cultural could ever hope to], Ft ; Be
Ss . im bac to cigars, that’ British Foreign Secretary injure oda y while testing. ©| attacked pnd brought to a stand jahout December 1951 maintain services of this sort, | ®@binson, the history mus@ be
Pha ‘ei . r . . Herbert Morrison’s visit to Ger-| 2° Brazilian made anti-tank}ain Gaihese columns south of Sir Rhoderick commanded | I think we have got to admit|Well-known but we in the West
He offered the suggestion that many was a matter. of the first! YEBPOP. | 4 the junction of Pulchan and Hon-|/during the last war the Renown; that our responsibility to our |1ndies feel that if we do not take
now—that is after ten years of]; hed Beis General Zenobio was hit in thé} ghon rivers. Communist casual at the-sinking of the German xeople must be to ensure for |this opportunity of putting to you
eieiacn . ‘ 3 importance. y Bled ; a peoy ‘ c t rims ve would }
Burma Flouts activity—the taste for Jamaica ‘Tr means that direct contact) f@ce by the recoil from the guntting were estimated at 400 Lattleship Bismarck, In 1948, he them at least the minimum fon Bee Seca, Wnuk oe
; cigars is so well established that/na, been established between] Which according to reports, he Reuter. |was appointed Commander-in standards of living that is com-|'sing an opportunity which may
} U.N. Embar, oO they'll hold their own when thelGrogt Britain and the Federai| ad handled in the wrong posi- iChief of the Home Fleet and patible with ordinary decency chars She ROVORY. 08 ou rortien-
et & Cubans go into Britain. Republic,” he told a Press Con-| #oh to shoot the new weapon. a became Commander-in-Chief of {t is precisely for these things |S)'p between the United Kingdon
} 2 Nobody else is so optimistic. | ference General Canrobert suffered a] Si yn Of W ceakness Plymouth in March last year that we are fighting and fight- |#9d ourselves on this matter of
. RANGOON, way a They reckon that the proposed] “On the British attitude towards deep leg wound from shrapnel s ' - oe —Reuter, ing resolutely in these sugar gal
ae will keep up ae intake is about one-third of|uropean questions, Adenauer] Which ricochetted after hitting} | BONN, May 21 negotiations “We feel that when you look
he Sia Ur Cieter witne Sore cigars, mainly Jamaicans im-|sajd: “Naturally Great Britain] @ two inches thick steel plow] woo Galan “Chateclior. D: “You have asked us to im-~jat the history the position has
On etrategic cde mheseninie nee, {ported by Britain now. has a special position, but I arm gused as a target Konrad Adenauer said to-night hi Blackburne Asks agine what we would do if we} been so painfully clear that if it
on strategic raw materials, accord- They say Cubans will knock|econvinced that -she recognises Both wounds were said not to}; os S eh . aA Meals “ vere in your position. We ask] were known in its full details by
ing to a competent source here. Jamiaiped shia’ sideways. Europe's importance to her and]be of serious nature Hig nag a eee aA we ’ A ac w you now, what you would do if|those responsible for making
The same source said strategic |"").° Des a eae her own importance to Europe —Reuter nee Andi gnast es jes ib de pair For Barltrop you were in ours, That seems)policy which in the end affect
goods such as rubber and petro-| Mr. Bottomley is a non-smoker. “yt “accdyten with great pleasure cratic measures of an uncemo to be a very relevant question.” |the standard of living in these
leum products would soon move| But we've got to take Cubans, Morrison’s {rvitat £ to me tc cratic Governmen ANTIGUA, May 21. They knew how vital sugar was |territories, the justice of our
into China from Burma by an] else be held up at the point of viel Loum GMa ceenrds “the Party Banned He added in a reply to a ques- Work throughout Antigua’s | o the West Indies, yet they were |-ause and necessity for reorien-
; overland trade route across|G.A.T.T., says he. event ” of great importance”, ; ion that he did not mean they] sugar industry was at a standstill | sbviously reluctant to give that !tation would be apparent not only
, Burma's northern border. the Chancellor said. SARBAUDECKEN, May 21, | {Pid revolt, but that they) today. The sugar factory has been Maid ta able Eetlack te tha uc [oemeee. but Sipe: to you. wind
The first Soviet Ambassador to Come Into The Open Replying to questions, Adenauer | The Saar Government ‘to-day |;;sc0, aap ee ert closed since May 11 when worker's fever to be able to loo Sebo thie fey ee ceeny in your hanes
: Burma, Alexander Saveliev to-day} Although the Regional Eco-|said that among the matters he j banned the Opposition Democratic teh undemeertic tice eet | Walked out for the third time inf ure with yome security are fol Ts bere Uae ee cae eee
presented his credentials to. the nomic Committee normally works | digeussed with Morrison were Party of Sear (D.P.S.) West Ger- atta the - Noaition ot ¥ six days. ef aa 4% ae we fact that tt brane Aaah 3 es we va a a
Burmese President Sao Shwel|in private, it intends to come out|trade between East and West!,- veri ey VIA sms sd S.A >PD' pe Wee There have been repeated stop xpangion, eee ee ' ' {the sterling bloc, we wish to I
id man News Agency DPA reportec Pp I
x . Pe .. 7 : “ hace Alene My ie . Ng : : Democratic party and the refusal sal : eo zs ertain territories, the entire econ- | yg strengthen your position in
F Thaike and received assurances of]in the open to-morrow on Bot- | Germany: Germany's future} D.P.A. said that the Govern-|4, allow two German. politicians | P@8@8 Since the cane harvest began} ya. based almast entirely on k a Pome ib ; two-way
“ 3 ation" . at ae 4 s ‘ : ee a, oak’ > " : v rermeé f Ser aes at neti oe 7 my Z as st ec J Ingle ‘ “We
g fullest co-operation” of th2/tomley: “What he has to say | international status: questions of] ment had ordercd the cohfiscation to“enter Saar to address meet-| 0% February 17. Waterfront work- {i itt you appreciate that SaMie ih ccannot He. GomMannad
Burmese Government.—Reuter. should, be said to those vitally |European unity and the abolition} o¢ the party's entire property| ings. ers are also on strike 1en I think you will very readily We ‘abe sdor. You cannot.déain
concerned —West Indians”, said |of the Rhur authority Saar Criminal Police called on the} , Speaking at a Press Conference, In .a broadcast the Governor ypreciate precisely what our situ- |, Fl , ro o help you
Ny 3 On the latter Adenauer said he A Sp ‘ B. 'W" Blackburne said hay’ 4h py ite | yur blood from us to help ;
Mr. Gomes. : a” 6 hat - nie ee : Party Chairman, Richard Becker,|Adenauer said the banning of the ; ' = urn Hac toc ay t ‘a ion i: } unless you give us the food neces-
U Ss Lik I . T : © J relieved rw. rae. coe ,.» {this morning and handed him a]party was a “sign of extraordin-| he had cabled the British Colonia The West Indians were a very]cory to put new blood in our
ante wKelv Oo ift This was soniething the Mission | abolition “in a benevolent light vritten ban D.P.A. added wy weakness’, Secretary, Mr. James Griffith roliie people and they therefore | Jain.
e hadn't bargained for. —Reuter. Police searched the homes of —Reuter, | asking that his chief Labour Ad id to consider not only the pres- |° i I t licy of th
oO - . Mr. Bottomley tried to put a ; oe e ser, Ernest Barltre be sent tc t population but the number of Generally the past policy of the
t ’ evera sading party nbe vi 4 L 9p, be sent 4 i poy . > " Lise “ametit
Stay f Execution good face on it. “Oh yes”, said A ¢ e Be f vetet jeepllag par “i aitentee s | itigua ‘‘to look into the appallirrs hildren that were being born | United nano he wa a
- Mr. ttomley, he welceme he » > K 7 f labor slation ' very day past policy ecause tO SOrTt
\ ™ Veron, May ia ure a a poleaneg: phe rgenitine re. No Change | BR re) ei ay oe Fs ae " We a *xtent it had been changed— wa
e ate partment is like- re z . * MACK DUSHE Nas J oe ECONOMY lwavs cheap ° suga for the
ly to rescind within a day or so} i, eee a ery guts Reaches Enigland CHILD KILLED AS WASHINGTON visit to the island of Montserra He would ask them to consider ay ie in England. The cheapes'
its order staying the execution of| © rom 1e well- cnown sritish ” 2 The United States S a : tt ewards group for ict irefully the position of the area ne no f tter who suffered and
seven German war criminals at| Paper called the Daily Express— SOUTHAMPTON, May 2! LORRY OVERTURNS ment today denice as » to leave toda hey had what was obviously a} *" Fk RE
Landsberg prison, Bavaria, accord~ | “a paper which isn’t sympathetic} First meat cargo shipped from RIO DE JANEIRO, May 21 hat American policy —Reuter veak economy, At the same time } @ On page 3
‘ ing to usually reliable sources. to be views I've put. But I’ve|Argentina to England gince last/ A child was crushed to death | heen changed there was a rapidly rising poy
7 = stav of exec » by! provided pj unity orl July . as . prio Ante Mh 9. F . ion and th ‘ so to Pantera emia aNsenyanre
one sone stay of ce eel ‘ |} ‘ € oF eer nee y for guly. 1.290 fos, was ‘due at ;and 23 people were injured. fou Department spoke an Michael SYRIA PROTESTS ate Hil y ne rater fi r od VOCA “-
the State Department would m¢ a0}.ni ) me aroun suthampton today in the 22.0 j seriously, when a lori ite neas MeDermmott d attempte'to read | NEW YORK. May 21 her curious situation o HE AD CATE
that the United States High Com-} es : | ton liner Alacantara. tly 40 passengers turned over : to Sa eech of n| Syria tonight proteste t \ nade to pay higher price
missioner McCloy could either) This- report paid his own] Also aboard are 33,000 case iskidding on a wet road in 7 isk. A : f-Gtate| SecuPity ‘Cour saa I is their imports than they were re | pays for NEWS
order death sentences to be car-} Way 4nd if now a again he hz itine appl pears. in the interior state of Sa I r 4 ‘ A fla ‘ ta teat 7 : ceiving for their export Wher j
ried out or exercis lemency r ee n tt € ft a apefruit ; | "Phe lor : ¢ ote y Pile ¥ : ae " 3 . ‘ , : rae i pri vere entioned DIAL 3113
3 own behalf Missi¢ was Mr. R besifis ton Pa caletteting: Tn {eas I art elated to the things they ha ;
Reuter. ‘1 ut ( Reuter t Reuter Reuter Leuter Pee 7 : i ware Day or Night
. se € ee e i t ‘ ‘ erned va i perenne. ——





rypry se

PAGE TWO





ee

Caub Calling

IS EXCELLENCY the Govern-
or amd Lady Savage gave a
Cocktail Party at Government
House last night in honour of the
U.K. Trade Mission headed by Mr.

A. G. Bottomley, M.P, and tne
visiting delegates attending the
Regional Economic Committee
meeting.

About one hundred and fifty
people, which included members
of the Legislature, the House of
Assembly and other officials at-
tended the party which began at
6 o’clock and ended shortly after
7.30 pam.

Good Move

VT. SEF that one of the Bus Stops

it the Esplanade has been
moved from opposite the Band
Stand to a spot thirty yards away,
near to the Esplanade shed. This
was done yesterday. If it does
make some people walk a few
yards more, it serves one useful
purpose. In the event of rain,
would-be bus travellers can shel-
ter in the shed, They can see the
bus round the corner by the Bay
Street Boys’ Club and have plenty
of time to get to the pole ahead of
the bus and get a minimum wet-
ting from the rain, Sheltering in
the Band Stand with the entrance
where it is, was inconvenient.
People sometimes could not get
to the poleyin time. Another point
is that it separates the two bus
stops in that area which were
nlmost opposite to one another.

Back to Trinidad

RS. CLAIRE HERRERA, sis-

ter of Mrs. Cecil Goddard,,
who had been holidaying in Bar-
bados with her daughter Roons
returned to Trinidad yesterday
afternoon by B.W.1.A.

Her son Ian, who had also been
holidaying here, returned some
time ago.

Transferred

pe to Puerto Rico on Sunday

morning »y B.W.1.A, went
Mr. and Mr:. John McBeth and
their son Brian. Mr. McBeth who
is from British Guiana is with the
Royal Bank of Canada, He was
transferred here a couple of years
ago from their Branch in Trinidad
and he has now been transferred
to their branch in San Juan,

Yesterday's Arrivals

R. JOSEPH CAMACHO of

Trinidad avd his sister Rosa-
lind came in on B.W.L.A’s Trinidad
flight yesterday morning to spend
a holiday in Barbados staying at
Aquatic Gardens .... arriving by
the same plane were Mr, Richard
Hill, Mr. and Mrs, Earle Heimpel
‘and daughter and Mr. Leo Siegel
who is staying at Abbeville Guest
House.

Arriving from St, Vincent yes-
terday by B.G. Airways were Mr.
Frank Howard who is a guest at
the Ocean View Hotel and Mr,
Colin Phillips.





nor here. Obviously.
An urticle about tactical
Surprise in warfare reminded me
of an idea of mine,

Suppose you are fighting a war
in 4 country where there are no
rhinoceros@s. Imagine the effect
of loosing carefully collected and
imported herds of them suddenly
on a quiet sector. Imagine the
fury at headquarters when the
message comes through that the
enemy wre using rhinoceroses ia
enormous numbers, Of course, :t
would only be a trick, and its
effect would be temporary, but the
initial surprise and commotion
would be worthwhile. 1 have
many such ideas, if the War Office
would care to hear of them. For
instance, drop dead whales from
planes, The enemy would suspect
some sort of new mine or other
trap. He would never imagine that
anyone would just drop dead
whales.

The Story of A Bicyele

HE bicyele which Foulenough
bought on credit at one end

of the town and sold at the other
was stolen from outside the shop,
4nd sold to a third shop in the
middle of the town, The min who
bought it was told that the police
were looking for a stolen bicycle,
so, having got into conversation
with Foulenough in an inn, he
sold it to him cheap. Foulenough,
realising that this was the machine
the police were after, sold it to a
man in another inn who sold it
40 a policeman on holiday from
another district. This policeman
was arrested, but by then so many
people were claiming the bicycle
that the case was dropped, and
Foulenough bought it cheap from
the police, sold it to a tourist in

86” x 66”
66” x 84”

DIAL 4606

BY THE WAY



MISS BAKER
Pictured at Bournemouth

Two-handed Beverley
OTENTIAL Wimbledon Cham-

B. C’s Arts Officer

R. JOHN HARRISON, Arts

Officer of the British Council
for this area, left yesterday after-
noon by B.W.LA. for Trinidad.
He will be away for two or three
weeks, helping with the U.N.E.-

S.C.O. Exhibition,
M*® JACK SPEAKMAN who
spent the week-end with the
Risely Tuckers, left for Trinidad on
Sunday by B.W.LA. Of the firm
of Sutcliffe and Speakman of
Manchester, a firm which makes
active carbon, Mr, Speakman is
touring several of the West Indian
islands.

Here and There
R. ARTHUR TIBBITTS, Cable
and Wireless Engineer, has
his brother Eric staying with him.
Eric, who is an Assistant Supt., in
Trinidad Police Force, is on leave
.... Mr. Bernard Moore also with
Cable and Wireless returned from
St. Lucia on Sunday by B.W.LA.
after a short holiday with his
‘in-laws.’ His wile and young
daughter have remained on in St.

Lucia for a longer holiday.

W.1. Pantomime
OUISE BENNETT, well known
writer of Jamaican dialect, who

recently started composing Calyp-
soes as a hobby, says she has com-
pleted work with a London film
company. She hopes to be able
to play the part of a film-star
again. Meantime she is busy writ-
ing a pantomime depicting life in
the West Indies generally.

Drame
ALLERINA IVY BAXTER,
who, with Beryl McBurnie,
recently staged a demonstration of
Caribbean dances in London, is

Touring W.1.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

\
|
}

B.B.C. Radio



Would You Give These

Programme | A Prize For Originality?

EILEEN ASCROFT inspects the Festival souvenirs

TUESDAY, MAY 2, 1051

6.30 a.m.—12.15 pm 19 60 |



6.30 a.m. Forces’ Favourites; 7.00 a m.
The News; 7.10 a.m, News Analysis; 7.15
a.m. Programme Parade, 7.20 a.m. From
the Editorials; 7.30 a.m. Generally Speak-
ing; 7.45 a.m. ‘Tom Jones Trio; 8 a.m. Do
You Remember; 815 am. MCC vs
South Africans; 8 30 a.m. Think on these
Things; 8 45 a m. Letter From America;
900 am The News; 910 am, Home
News from Britain; 9,18 a.m. Clos¢
Down; 1115 am Programme Parade;
11.25 am Listeners’ Choice; 11 45 a m
Report From Britain; 1200 noon The
News; 12 10 pm. News Analysis; 12 »
pm Close down
4.15 — 645 p.m, 19 76M

415 pm_ Souvenirs of Music; 5 00
pm MCC. vs. South Africans; 5 05
p.m. The Davis Cup; 5.10 pm Inter~

jude; 515 p m New Records; 6 00 pm |
Music Magazine; 6.15 p.m, Welsh Maga-
zines; 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade

6.00—11,00 p.m. . 2553 M 31 32 M

m The News; 710 pm. News

715 p.m West Indian Guest,
Night; 745 pm. Generally Speaking;
800 pm _ Radio Newsreel; 815 p.m.
Meet The Commonwealth; 8 45 pm In-
terlude; 855 pm. From the Editorials;
9 00 p m. Report from Britain; 9 15 p.m,
BBC Scottish Variety Orchestra; 10 00
_m. The News; 10 10 p.m, Interlude;
1015 pm Light Music; 10 45 p m_ Fes-
tival in Britain; 11.00 pm. BBC Sym-
phony Orchestra

C BC. TUESDAY, May 22.
11.76 Mes 25.51 M.
_
10 00-10 15 p.m News;
pm Caribbean Corner

700 p
Analysis;



10 15—10.30.



The Rich | C

Aunt
Is Back

From R, M. MacCOLL.

NEW YORK.
Fannie Mae will soon be back.
A strip-teaser? A torch singer?
The revival of an old-time play?
No. Fannie Mae is what Ameri-

pion now making her first ap- now attending a series of student cans familiarly call the Federal
pearance on British tennis courts Welfare activities arranged by the National Mortgage Association.

is 21-year-old

Miss Beverley
Baker, from California.

British Drama League. Ivy is

‘And it is big news for many

She is studying drama and dancing under people who are just getting mar-

seeded fourth among American the auspices of the British Coun- yjeq and want a home. For Fannie

women player's; has won her way
to the semi-finals in the women’s
singles at Bournemouth in the
hard court championships.

Since she was 11 Miss Baker has
been training to become a cham-
pion, Her English-born father,
who is Director of: Recreation at
Santa Monica, gave her her first
tennis lesson.

hand strokes with both hands,
needs no backhand. Her father
taught her to play that way be-
cause she is small. It gives her a
longer reach.
only with her left hand.
Miss Baker eats well,

drinks beer and wine “socially and
in moderation,” rarely
spirits.

But she can write

‘ likes
plenty of meat, She never smokes,

takes

cil,

Cricket Lovely Cricket

RICKET, is certainly our game.
From 1946-51 the captains of
the London University Cricket
teams have been West Indians
—three from Jamaica,
from the Leeward Islands,
the Registrar of London
versity.

Incidental Intelligence

and one
7 ; Thiy
She is ambidextrous, plays fore- fact was revealed last week. by

Mae has a thousand million dol-
Jar bank roll in her purse.

In official jargon it means that
the U.S. Government will be
back in the secondary mortgage

market. And if you don’t like
jargon, just say that Washington
will be entering the building

socicty business.
THE DEEP SOUTH is tradition-

Uni- ally gallant about the “fair flower

ot American womanhood,”
Florida’s Supreme Court, stick-

ing close to tradition, has just

ruled that a divorced woman is

OUBTFULLY the young moth- tii entitled to all the alimony

er examined the toy.
this rather complicated for a small
child?” she asked,

The shop assistant teplied, ‘It’s

“Isn’t

she can get even if she is young,
attractive and able to support
herself.

“An woman’s

innocent rights

Miss Baker has no other ambi- 29 educational toy, madam, de- are not to be ignored because of

tions beyond her tennis.

Those Signed to adjust a child to live in per good looks,” remarked the

who have seen her at Bourne~ the world of to-day. Any way he court
mouth think she may go far at I
Wimbledon,

THE ADVENTURES

OF

the local hotel, and stole it back
the next day. After which he
pedalled merrily out of the town,

in Passing

{ URING a week when firemen

had tewer cats to rescue
from trees and roofs, they were
hard at work on people trapped
in lifts, So far have we advanced
beyond the old reliable lift work-
ed by a rope that it is possible to
spend half a day in one of the new
glittering affairs without getting
anywhere. How long will it be
before firemen are called to rescue
people trapped in _— stationary
traffic?

A faint cry from a man in a
vob-webbed taxi will lead the
rescuers to the spot, and he will
be brought to the pavement by
breech-cable, or passed over the



puts it together it is wrong.”—
Estelle Ward McCray.—L.E.S.

PIPA

Copyright . P 39 . Vaz Dias Int’ Amsterdam



By BEACHCOMBER

heads of the brigade. It is fun to
think of life slowing down day b/
day in an age which can talk and
think of nothing but speed.

Sleep My Little One . .
M* paper says that 1,000 bag-

" pipers, all playing the bag-
pipes, are to march in processicn
this month, When you've heard
one bagpipe you haven't heard
them all. There was an occasion
when the poet Yeats was invite:
to hear 20,000 Boy Scouts singing
“The Lake Isle of Innisfree” .
“And I shall have some peace
there . . .” says the poem, If your
baby is restless at night, put on 9
record of the Ride of the Valkyries
Andante, Ma, non troppo, as Ros-
sini said to his mother when sic
poured the Brolio with a somewhat
heavy hand,



Rupert enters the cave and calls
out, There is no answer except the
faint buzzing of a winter bee which

he has disturbed. ‘ Who are you,
and what do you want ?"’ The tiny
voica #ounds close to his ear, ‘1
want to find the man who just came

ALL WOOL BLANKETS

60” x 78”





EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

d the lce-flowe



WHITE, FAWN, PINK, BLUE, PEACH

r—32






ae

"Then
on unt you
see a light, and dont wake ie op

in here,"’ says Rupert.
turn to the lel. Nea

again,’ grumbles the bee as it
buzzes The little bear does as
he’s told. The passage is rough,

and as i¢ begins to go downhill he
is faced with a blaze of light.

BER eee Pee eee
COTTON BLANKETS

WHITE, FAWN, BLUE, PINK, GREEN
50” x 70”

75° x 55”

a
a
@ $ 3.34
@ $ 3.85

@ $ 4.69
@ $ 4.83

& $12.07

DIAL 4220

THE WIFE of Freddie Rich, a
band leader, sued him for divorce

~ jin Los Angeles, claiming that he

called her names, But Fred’s
lawyer argued that this was im-
possible since Fred lost his voice
in a car smash in 1945.

AMERICA tried to outlaw drink
with her “Noble Experiment”
from 1919 to 1934, It failed. Now
they are again trying to legislate
against human nature, In IJinois
a are busy discussing a Bill to
outlaw tipping. Tip the waitress
in Illinois and you may get fined
$5. Tip her a second time and it
{will cost you $25.

IN AMERICA they call a
gloomy fellow a “sad sack.’’ Now
the sack men are very sad. There
is a shortage of burlap bags and
as a result one-third of Califor-
nia’s potato crop may go to waste.

MacARTHUR is getting an
average of 4,000 telephone calls
a day at a special switchboard
set up in the Waldorf-Astoria
Hotel. And the_ official count on
the paper dropped during his
welcome is 3,249 tons.

CROSSWORD




















1. Sort of grass thet is valuable
fc vin ¢ + (8)
7. Unwritten ! v)
Y. Water, thaua«s to the Navy. (4)
10. Outiaw in the b . 3)
ll, Slope of the bear, (3)
12 On a cap itt should produce
interest. (4)
13 vin not the rest J get that does
14. n Surrey. N. (7)
16
ly d in @ sideway look, (5)
20 Lr SPAN whe a sty. (4)
21. Briefly brother take three direc
tions. (1)
22 Twice in the kth. (3)
Down
L May huid the means of entry. (7)
2. Bird Upsets et. 4B)
8 and 16 Sie in all R.A.P, (7, 6)
4 lakes aputt two tu mend. (6)
6. In the potter's workshop, (5)
6 Guards’ “birthday suits"? (9)
8 He played Svengali, (4)
13 Stare In watery fashion (5)
15 Empluys (4)
(7 Only one or two here and there
(3) 18 Generai tn shelter ? (3)
Solution of vesterd « onetle = Acrow
4, Haversuck 1% Lot: i
Pix ja
tr » Ma
A
vols
Ble Almanac, 7
2 eover iS Stage 17

2

| ESCHALCT
ESCHALOT
ESCHALOT

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.



HEADQUARTERS FOR’ BEST |

RUM |

a aad
‘



A hundred years ago every
tamily visiting the Great Exhibi
tion would take home a keepsake
mug or china figure of the Queen
to be placed on the mantlepiece
or piano,

What shall we take home from
the 1951 exhibition? Souvenir
Committee has been selecting
mementoes for the past year.
Those on sale officially are sup-
posed to represent good design,
originality and value for money.

For the home there are pottery
ashtrays, hand-carved platters of
wood, brass door-knockers, and an
embossed teapot-stand of heat—
resisting glass.

Gifts for women range ‘from
head-scarves and parasols to metal

Mrs. Keighl

compacts and cigarette cases. For
men there are leather stud boxes,
metal tobaece containers, Festival
ties or braces of woven elastic,
incorporating Nelson's column.

For children: pencil sharpeners
in the shape of St. Paul’s torches
like Big Ben, or toy sailors w!
climb. up ropes to fly Festival
flags.

Breakfast in Bed

Most useful discovery in the
Furniture section:
stand between twin beds. Its twe
trays slide out sideways for break-
fast. The trofley is made of
Californian eucalyptus and alu
minium, The trays are heat-anc
stain-proof, in pastel colours, and
need no cloths.

ey Packs Her

Round-The-World Wardrobe

What clothes need a woman

ltake to fly round the world?

Here’s one who is doing it:




“at:

THE CONGO

sible cotton hat:
Cote miey wearing it.

Mrs.



PARIS, CHANGES

THE SHAPE AGAIN
from IRENE RICHARD

PARIS.
Mid-season summer col-

lections reveal a feminine
silhouette with fuller skirts,
often pleated, sloping shou)d-
ers and Magyar sleeves.
* Leading colour is white,

with all shades of yellow
and Biarritz blue.

Linen and_ shantung

dominate the collections
with many prints and
“sheers.”

Smartest models are

adaptable. Jean Desses
shows a_ round-the-clock
dress, with detachable
apron-cum-cape and remova-—
ble sleeves.

The three - quarter -

length dance dress, with
bouffant tulle skirt, is de-
signed for hot weather.
* Long gloves are a

“must” for evening
wear. Schiaparelli makes

oyster satin gauntlets, which
pull up to the armpits, fin-
ished with bows,

fe
Vs

Cartwheel hat in white horsehair

is trimmed witli leaves and veiling
(CLAUDE ST. CYR).




Brenda Rawnsley, in private lif:
| Mrs. Keighley and mother 0
seven-month-old Jonathan Eden
Her round-the-world wardrobe
designed to cover hot and colc
climates, packs into two suitcase:
—and it has ideas for 1951 holiday
makers. s

She will take it with her this
week on a five-week tour of th¢
Middle East, Australia, New Zea
land, Canada and America. He:
job: selling lithographs of well.
known paintings to schools and
starting school picture circulating
schemes,

Basic colour for her cold weath-
er clothes is black: for the hot
parts of her trip, white. Only
two hats are included, but they
pack flat and can be worn in
many ways. A black velvet cap is
dressed up with sequin veiling,
real flowers or feathers. For
sunshine there is a large white
cotton hat called “congo.” It is
made on a piano wire frame,
which opens out into an enormou:
sunhat. It can be worn inside out
or on windy days at half mast.

Lingerie is all nylon, nylon lace
trimmed, which washes over-
night and requires no ironing.
And the whole trousseau is crease
resisting to save time in packing
and pressing.

All Change

“Separates” play an important
part, with interchangeable nylor
blouses and seersucker skirts for
hot weather, lace stoles to dres.
up a plain black dinner dress fo)
Australia’s winter and a _ Pari
black tie, silk dress with colourec
scarves that tuck into the waist
band to give it six differen
personalities,

To go with her brown eyes, dark
red-brown hair and light skir
Mrs. Keighley has chosen a peac:
powder and blue-pink lipstick
bright enough to face sunshine of
electric lights.

Bravo

I applaud the restaurant thai
has relaxed its “evening dres:
only” rule for the Festival period
Many visitors arriving by air have
no luggage room for
evening dress, It
would be a_ graceful
gesture * other night
= spots would follow suit

for the holiday months.

Advice
From a Woman

“Push yourselves as
hard as you can, and
- don’t be afraid of be-

making a big noise.*

win,

tary of the

and Administrative
Workers’ Union,

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED
—L.E.S.

OPENING GLOBE. FRIDAY

UNIVERSAL-
INTERNATIONAL presents

LOUIS JOURDAN

Untorgettably Matched for Love with

JOAN FONTAINE

Romantic New Star of “The Paradine Case’*

Beautify

your

Rooms!!

; with
LOCAL TALENT ON
PARADE °-

with

GUEST STARS

WILLIE IFILL
(The Pride of Belle Gully)

and

“JO’ CLEMENDORE”
(Famous Contortionist)

and

(2) Singing Discoveries
“SUGAR RAY” GODDARD
(The Singing Pugilist)

and

DOUGLAS GRIFFITH
(10-year Vocal Marvel)

Tickets on Sale Daily





FOR YOUR WINDOWS—Kirsch Curtain Tubing and
Fittings
Orlwite Aluminum Curtain Tubing
FOR YOUR FLOORS—Congoleum Squares

Rugs

A Wide Range from which you may select your

requirements.

THE

RARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON FACTORY LID.
Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039



| ELLA RAL,

SSSOOCD POPES o a
hich
TO-DAY 5 & 8.15 P.M. LAST SHOWING
a trolley to or DARK CITY a

\
|
| SAKE ”
Starring
i ; Clifton Webb —
To save unpacking on overnigh: ‘
ai 2 2 Bennett with
ene, Lone te travel togethe: Robert Cumnainae

ing a little unladylike
_ on occasions and of
-—Miss B. Anne God-
- wi Assistant Secre-

Clerical

TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951







AQUATIC CLUB C ENEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT at 6.30
CLAUDETTE COLBERT — ROBERT RYAN
in RKO’s New Picture
“THE SECRET FURY”
with JANE COWL — PAUL KELLY



MATINEE: WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m.
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
FRANCES LANGFORD
in “BEAT THE BAND”

with RALPH EDWARDS — PHILIP TERRY

oo



—=——=~

LESSEE CESSES SEPPPOE OLE LEE

GLOBE

ELIZABETH SCOTT & CHARLTON HESTON
TO-MORROW ONLY 5 & 8.15 P.M.

-MANHANDLED”

Dorothy Sterling
LAMOUR HAYDEN

$999SSSSS9SS99959995995956666666N





Dan
DURYEA

SO SOSSOS SS PSSP SF IFO FITS,

2S







THEATRE —
BRIDGETOWN

ar

(DIAL 2310) PLAZ:

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30
WARNERS oe

“HASTY HEART”

RONALD REAGAN —
PATRICIA NEAL —
. RICHARD TODD
Plus :
“CARIBBEAN”

WED. & THURS. —
con) 445 & 8.30 p.m.
v7 1 !
GORDON MacRAE — Doris DAY in

memes “TEA FoR TWO™

Color by TECHNICOLOR

~ THURSDAY (Bank-Holiday) 9.30 a.m. & 1.30 pm.
The New FALCON in JIMMY WAKELY —

DEVIL'S CARGO __& _MOON OVER MOTNANA_

-SSaSSsSsSS_‘_FBV_[—[[w[—[_[—[—"_"‘#[]3FSS——

EMPIRE ROYAL

To-day and To-morrow
Last Two Shows TO-DAY
445 and 8.30 4.30 and 8.30

20th Century Fox Double —

=



























DIAL
8404

GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James
Last Show Tonite 8.30
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TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951

Residential
Colleges
Preferred

BY W. INDIANS

LONDON, May 21.

West Indian students here pre-
fer colleges to be residential
rather than non-residential.

A resolution to this effect was
passed by an overwhelming ma-
jority when West Indian students
from Londan came to Oxford to
debate the matter last night. Al-
bert Hydoman (Trinidad) of Ox-
ford, proposing the resolution, said
academic study was not the whole
of their training.

_In colleges, students and tutors
lived as a family, something which
was missed in non-residential col-
leges to such an extent that many
colleges had now adopted the
hostel system. Hydoman added:
“In the West Indies there is need
for good leaders and it is only in
residential colleges where West
Indians meet Englishmen, Scots-
men, Americans and people from
all over the world that necessary
leaders can be trained.” i



Froy Auter Mowatt (Jamaica)
opposed for London. He said that
in residential colleges everything
was done for them and they had
no chance of settling for them-
selves the problems of life. In
London they had to find their own
lodgings, do their own shopping
and scive their own problems.

“If we are to send leaders to the
West Indies, that training in day
to day problems is essential,” he

said.
Social Life

Hydoman said the fact that in
the West Indies their University
was a residential one showed that
the motion was right. He said it
had been suggested that chores
and shopping were good training
but these simply absorbed valu-
able time which should be devoted
to education.

John Hall (Jamaica) of London
contended that social life was an
important part of their education,
In London, he said, games for West
Indians were “practically impos-
sible.” Only woman speaker—,
Miss Nelson—said West Indians
were accustomed to well prepared
food. They did not get that in
residential colleges,

In the Chair was Ernest Dow
(British Guiana) of Oxford.

—Reuter.



New Unions Formed

WELLINGTON, May 19.
William Sullivan, New Zealand
Labour Minister, today gave a
new protection guarantee to all
dockers who join unions being

formed to replace the deregister- ©

ed Waterside Workers.

Sullivan said that he realised
that many former watersiders
feared victimisation, but they
would be protected by the Gov-
ernment if they came forward.

New Dockers’ Unions were
formed today at Wellington and
Lyttleton, bringing to 18 the
number of ports at which this
has been done. .

But Auckland, where about
900 men are engaged, is the
only major port where new
unionists are working.—Reuter,

Detained

LONDON, May 21.

The British Foreign Office said
to-day that as far as it is known
four Britons, six Canadians, three
Austrians and about 35 Ameri-
cans are detained without trial
by Chinese authorities,

British Charge D’Affaires at
Peking has requested the Chinese
Foreign Ministry on April 30 to
see that Chinese authorities
should take steps to cause an
early hearing of charges against
these people.

No reply had yet been received
the Foreign Office said.

——Reuter.

—









Five Hundred Dead

DACCA, East Pakistan,

~ ais May 21.
_Five hundred people may have
died and about two thousand
have been re ed injured in a
Tornado which devastated a re-
mote area in Bengal on May 12,
East Bengal'’s Relief Officer Afi-
zuddin Ahmad said to-day.

The Tornado ripped a_ wide
path of ruin through the 25 mile
Faridpur district, obliterating
more than 25 villages and smash-
ing to pieces more than 3,000
houses and huts.

Ahmad returning here from a
tour of the stricken greas said
that destruction was unparalled
in human history.”

Debris had_ been cleared and
hundreds of dead buried.
—Reuter.



Wants To Form
New Indian Party

NEW DELHI, May 21.

J. B. Kripalani ex-President and
Secretary of the Indian National
Congress (Government Party)
who left the party last week to-
day invited his supporters to
meet in Patna on June 10 to form
a new party to oppose Congress
at elections,

The new party it was learned
in circles close to Kripalani, may
be called “People’s Congress’
thus embodying the World Con-
gress which for many Indians has
stood for all that is patriotic
since, the days of the struggle for
freedom.

A draft programme understood
to be similar in general outlining
to that of the Indian National
Congress is expected to be issued
by the end of May,

Rumours Of U.S.—
Soviet Talks Denied

WASHINGTON, May 19

New rumours of the Soviet
approach to the United States sug-
gesting that direct Soviet-Ameri-
can talks could lead to Korean
settlement were met with scepti-
cism in official and diplomatic
quarters here today.

The State Department for the
third successive day said that it
had no knowledge of the reported
Russian peace feelers,

The State Department's denials
have been made in the midst of
rash press reports and rumours
from Washington and London.
Usually well-informed foreign
quarters are professing complete
ignorance.—Reuter.

SUGAR DROUGHT
, BRISBANE,

The drought in the Queensland
sugar belt is expected to mean a
loss of £1,000,000 to Australia this
year, The sorghum harvest on the
British food farms in Central
Queensland is also expected to be
disappointing.





BRITISH _WEST (INDIAN AIRWAYS





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ONOLITH
“iN POLISHED

OaAn
ee



Prisoners Riot

UTAH, May 21.
Four guards held as hostages by
rioting inmates of the Utah State
prison were released late last
night, The rioting prisoners had
taken six prison guards as hos-
tages but earlier two had escaped
through the windows.
The prisoners had smashed
furniture, windows and _ equip-
ment before a truce was arranged
with officials, .
More than two hundred of the
532 inmates jumped into an orgy
for several hours before a truce
brought partial order back. Riot-
ers released all inmates in “death
row,” but locked doors at the
ends of the corridors of the cell
houses prevented escape by the
doomed men or other inmates.
The truce and release of guards
were reported by six prisoner
spokesmen who complained to
the authorities that some prison
officials had been unfair.
—Reuter.

Red Chinese Using
Nationalist Forces
N.Y. TIMES WRITER

NEW YORK, May 21.

New York Times Hong Kong
correspondent Henry Lieberman
said today that an analysis has
shown that Chinese Communist
units, being thrown against United
Nations fire power in Korea, were
composed largely of former Na-
tionalist soldiers,

Nationalists had been reorgan-
ised into units controlled by com-
missioned officers of proven politi-
cal reliability.

The heavy losses among former
Nationalist troops in Korea had
raised the question whether the
Communists would alter their
“human sea” tactics if it became
necessary to fall back increasingly
on units with a higher proportion
of Communists, he continued.

w...

‘
In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield, sch. Marea Henrietta,
Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Cyril E
Smith, Sch Enterprise S , Sch. Frances
W. Smith, Sch. Eastern Eel, MV. T B
Radar, Sch Belqueen, Sch. Franklyn
D R , Sch. D’Ortac, Sch, Philip H. David-
son, MV Moneka, Sch Laudalpha, M.V
Blue Star, M.V. Cacique del Caribe

ARRIVALS

M.V. Caracas, 235 tons net, Capt. Angel
Velasquez, from Venezuela

Schooner Everdene, 68 tons net, Capt
Phillips, from St Vincent

SS _ Aleoa Polaris, 3,945 tons net, Capt
Mullelly, from Puerto Suere

Schooner Lucille M_ Smith, 74 tons net,
Capt Hassell, from British Guiana.

Schooner Mary M Lewis, 69 tons net,
Capt. Marshall, from British Guiana

DEPARTURES

Sch. Emeline, 72 tons net, Capt, Clarke,

for British Guiana

MV. Moneka, 100 tons net, Capt.
Hutson, for Dominica
MV. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt.

Gumbs, for Dominica
Schooner Timothy A. H.
76 tons net, Capt

Vansluytman,
Stoll, for Trinidad.

Schooner Amberjack Mac, 41 tons net,
Capt. MecLawrence, for Martinique

- Serap Cuban

From page 1
what happened. That was not
exactly the policy to-day, but it
was the policy of the past which
had caused the misery and unres
and the social standard whic!
was the heritage in this part o?
the world, :
Sugar Price

In times of scarcity, if sugar
was scarce the price was arbi-
trarily fixed. When it was in
plentiful supply price-fixing
ceased, and these areas had their
main product fixed at a price by
the price at which other terri-
tories would dump their sugar on
the world markets after they had
satisfied their requirements and
their own markets.

The West Indies had to com-
pete against people who had very
‘arge internal markets such as
Australia, and who could protect
heir industry without damaging
their economy by the price they
fixed in their own market.

“We here consume. very little of
our sugar. We have to export. In
times of scarcity you fix a price,
but when you see the position is
reversed and that there will be
plenty of sugar, you change that
policy and say, ‘I am going to buy
in the open market’, when you
know in your heart there is no
such thing.”

When the first World War came
there was a shortage of sugar and
the price was fixed. In the early
twenties the position began tec
change, the production of sugas
caught up with world demands.
What did they see? Did they see
the United Kingdom saying ‘we
fixed your price during the war?
Not at all.

Price Rise

It would be remembered that the
price rose very high for a short
time and then the controls were
taken off. The price went down
and down until the main industry
in this area, the industry on which
the population depended, was sell-
Ing sugar at £7 and £8 per ton.
The world price it was called but
it was no such thing at all. It
was merely that Cuba after satis-
fying her requirements in her pro-
tective markets could sell at a
cheap price.

No words he could use could
express the hardship and misery
and resentment that the policy of
the United Kingdom then caused
in this area. F

The Olivier Commission was
sent out here, to inquire into the
situation, :

This Commission recommended
that the British Government buy
West Indian sugar at £15 per ton.
They realised that this was only
fair and just to the people in the
areas who were then living at the
lowest standard of life. ‘This re-
port was either put on the dusty
shelves of the archives of the
government or was thrown in the
waste paper basket, As far as the
West Indies were concerned no-
thing happened to improve the
situation in the area. This im-
partial commission had reported
but evidently the determination of
the United Kingdom was to get
cheap sugar at the expense of the
West Indies. / :

“During this period you_will re-~
call, I am sure, that the Japanese
started flooding these markets
with cheap goods. The people
who were working for a small
amount of money could get cheap
shoes and shirts for the first time.

“You made representations to
us that this would damage the
standard. of living of the people
of your country and you and we
put on quotas and duties to pro-
tect the standard of living of your
people, These poor countries with
their poor people who only re-
ceived eight, nine or twelve
pounds for their sugar.

“The British Government must
realise that these things must be
two ways. We are prepared to
bear our share of their difficulties,
but we wish to see that it is not
only us with our weak resources
who get the worse of these bar-
gains.” ~ @

Sugar Shoisage

When the second World War
broke out, said Mr. Robinson,
there was again a shortage of
sugar and it was considered that
the West Indies might get some-
thing to put their house in order,
so that they might do all the
things that ought to have been
done in those years when they
could get nothing. The price of
sugar was again fixed, and it was
significant that at the time it was
fixed at £11. 5s. per ton, The
Olivier Commission had recom-
mended years ago that the price
jshould be £15.

In 1948 the great experts in
England decided and as was now
known, wrongly, that there was
going to be a surplus of sugar
very shortly and therefore the
time had come for them to get
out of the arrangement which
had been so profitable to them
durfng the past years.

Mr. Robinson then spoke of the
announcement that had been



NATIO a DEFENCE!
THE LEFT GROUP
=i wiki +

ns ae

what the position in the area
would be and we know what we
had to face.”

Political Pressure

To make matters worse,
Mr. Robinson, on the way to
England a statement was made by
the Canadian Government that if
measures taken by the sterling
bloc outside the control of the
West Indies continued to mar the
benefits of Canada and _ the
Canada-West Indies agreemeit,
there would be political pressure
in Canada which would cause the
West Indies to lose their prefer-
ences and destroy all the benefits
which “we were both eager to
maintain.”

In England they made this
position clear but without an
effect. Mr. Robinson went on to
speak of the difficulties they hac
encountered in England and th»
various meetings they had hac,
and the disappointments suffered
before the present agreement was
reached. “We have come here
to-day, he said, to try and iron
out the best devise for getting
the best done in the interest of
and for the welfare of this area,
You will never get a wedge
between us again on this issue
As you recognise that point, let
us make up a resolve that we
will now once and for all try to
forget the accumulated built-up
of the past history at this point

said

let us realise that we have
thoughts and aspirations alike.
That the aspirations the English

people have for a beter standard
of living are our aspirations too
That you need us just as much as
we need you. Not us alone but the
Commonwealth as a whole. Let
us, adopt a new policy to get
together and work as friends, let
us work together for the common
good.”

Preferential Rate

The present trade pact signed
between Canada and Cuba pro-
vided for 75,000 tons of sugar for
Canada, and Canada is also con-
sidering taking a similar amount
from somebody else unknown.
They were allowing the sugar to
go in at full preferential rate,
roughly it was going into Canada
on the same basis as West Indian
sugar

Agreement Extended

“You now come here to tell us
what we knew you were going
to tell us; that is, that you intend
to do the same thing. You say
to us, ‘we realise that you will
not be happy about it, therefore
we will extend the agreement tc
1953. You have nothing to worry
about.”

If this was accepted, said Mr.
Robinson, a trade would be built
up in the years the pact with Cuba
be made, and if it were sueccess-
ful as it probably would, public
pressure might be such that it
would have to be maintained
Where would the West Indies be
then and what could they do
Now was the time that if anything
could be done to do it. The same
thing applied to the Canada-Cuba
pact, he pointed out. “These
territories are selling their sugar
to you at a sacrifice of eight to
ten million pounds per year for
future security. In justice we ask
you, ‘let- us have our future
security.’ ”

New Relationship

Hon. D. B. Sangster said that
the Conference marked a new
departure in the relationship ol
the United Kingdom Government
with the West Indies but they
were not quite sure in their minds
why the U.K. Mission had come.

Some said that they had some-
thing that was unpalatable to give
them, something which they
thought it might be better to be
presented to them and get them io
accept on the spot. On the other
hand, was it to prove that they
were growing up in the British
Commonwealth and that they
were coming to talk about things
jin the British Commonwealth?
He would prefer to accept that
explanation,

He said that he would like
it to be very plain that this
meeting must not be regarded
as a discussion or agreement
or anything of the kind. lt
was just an exchange of views
particularly relating to the
Cuban Pact. As his friends
had said, there was no division
between free enterprise ele-
ments of the West Indies and
the political elements and they
were going to give them their
views, particularly to sugar
and tebaeco as they saw
them between Cuba and the
United Kingdom,

@ On page 5.



|
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: Black Pact —



>

London Express Service

N.A.T.O. Chairman.
Wants Turkey,
Greece Admitted

LONDON, Mery 21

United States Chairman of the
N.A.T.O. Deputies Council,
Charles Spofford, to-day asked the
Council to consider the possibilfty
of admitting Greece and Turkey
to full membership of the Atlan-
uc Pact.

The proposal was made, it was
learned, at one of the regular}
meetings of the Council of Depu
ties of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organisations held in London this |
afternoon

The move is in Tine with the}
known wishes of both the Greek!
and Turkish Governments, Greek |
ind Turkish Envoys in London
have called at the Foreign OMice}
fin the past week to urge Britain)
to support the new United States!
move. |

At present Greece and Turkey
ere associated with Atlantic Ran: |

te ee




* ers for purposes of defence plan-

ning in the Mediterranean, but
are not full members of the Pact

Last Autumn when the posst-
bility of admitting two Govern.
ments was first raised, Britain was
opposed to permitting an expan
sion of the territorial scope of the
Pact, but it is understood that the |
whole question is being consider
ed afresh in the Foreign Office.

—Reuter,



Ships Begin Chart
Exercises

VALETTA, MALTA
May 21,

Naval forees of four North At-
lantie treaty countries assembled
in Valetta harbour, began today
large scale chart exercises which
will last for a week.

Taking part are ships from
Britain, United States, France and
Italy. |

Italian vessels are under the
command of Vice Admiral G.
Girosi, Commander-in-Chief of
the Italian Navy, who ig to pay
official calls to heads of British
services in Malta.

A full squadron of Italian Hell-}
driver aircraft will join British
forces in anti-submarine man-
ceuvres during the week. U.S.
ebservation ship Mount Olympus
entered Valetta harbour yester-
day. She was delayed a day by
rough seas,





—Reuter.

ee ee

Workers In Rubber
Factory Strike

OSLO, May 21. |
Workers in a_ rubber factory
here were striking to-day in a
dispute which may lead to
nationwide lockout on June 4,
They were stopping work be-
cause their employers refused $4
allow a union representing 15
supervisors to be affiliated to the
Norwegian Trades Union Con-
@ress,

As a counter measure, employ-
ers have threatened a_ lockout
which will also affect clothing,
shoe, tobacco, chocolate, chemical!
and leather goods tactories but
they are meeting on May 29 to
consider an extension,

—Reuter,



WHY SHOULD U..S.A.
DEFEND EUROPE?

ARDEN, New York, May 21.

A group of 70 prominent Ameri-
cans gathered here to-day undex
Ahe sponsorship of the Colombia
University to try to clear a way

through the fog of debate over
United States help for Europe's
anti-Communist nations.

j
|
Discussions will revolve aepene |
four major points:
1. Why should United States |
help defend Europe?
2. How much backbone
Europe put into the fight?
3. When should Germany be
allowed to rearm, and how my
j

will

that affect France and Britain’?

4. How much aid,
end military, will Europe need |
and what are the chances of |
Russia becoming friendly?

Only the first and final sessions |
of the Assembly (to-day) and
Friday) will be opened to the
Press. —Reuter.

economic



made in the House of Commons
on September 27, 1948, by Dr
Summerskill, relative to a change
in United Kingdom policy con-
cerning sugar. This change, he
said, had been made without con-
sulting the West Indies. .

“We saw ourselves back to the
starvation and misery of the
twenties, back to the ruin of the
main industry which these col-
ronies depend on for the livelihood
|of their people.

| ‘We were concerned, we
were extremely concerned. The
B.W.1I.S.A. immediately sent

jtheir delegation to England and
jso did the Jamaica Governrrent.
| We followed the practice we had
followed many times. We knew

on the subject of “CAMELS”. Entries must reach the Short Story Editor, |
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PAGE THREE





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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS fap

ADVOGATE



eae ee Ja 8 et fee)

Printed by the Advocate o.,



Tuesday, May 22, 195:

HAPPY FAMILY

NONE but the criminally ignorant could
misinterpret the West Indian front pre-
sented to Mr. Bottomley yesterday. It was
the attitude of senior members
Commonwealth expressing their right to
speak their views. And what did they say ?
Not let us spit on Great Britain, let us
secede from the Commonwealth.
forget the past, they said. Let us become
a happy family. Let us work together for
the good of the Commonwealth. The Com-
monwealth is a whole and the strength of
the whole is, as Mr. Robinson neatly said,



the strength of the whole.

We have got to come together with

open minds.”

Whatever Mr. Bottomley may have been
told on the other side, he has no excuse
left than, as he himself said, to “report on

what has taken place.”

What has faken place puts an end to all
those misguided attempts on the part of
certain left-wing intellectuals, to drive a
wedge into the fact of West Indian unity.

Mr. Gomes did not speak

He spoke for the West Indies. Mr. Sang-
ster did not speak for Jamaica. He spoke
Mr. Robinson did

for the West Indies.
not speak for the British
Sugar Association.

are united and they do not

treated as juveniles incapable of adult co-
operation. “The fight,” »s Mr. Gomes put
it melodramatically, “has just begun.”

Mr. Sangster has spoken the thoughts of
every West Indian when he said to Mr.
Bottomley: “We ask you to scrap the Cuban

pact.”
Nothing less will satisfy

dies, Mr. Bottomley has been told. And

that is the message which
back.

The West Indies, as Mr. Sangster says,

want long-term contracts.

will create stable conditions which will

attract capital to the area.

tween relations must be to the advantage
The United Kingdom has
had 300 years happy family connections

of both parties.

with the West Indies.

To whom else should they turn for long-
term contracts which would make for sta-

The West Indies have contributed
much to the recovery of the sterling area.
They have had to bear the full brunt of
devaluation, They have no free spectacles,
no free dentures, no unemployment insur-
They have watched the purchasing
power of their dollar drop with exaspera-
tion and with heroic endurance. But they
have remained loyal to the Mother of the
family, whose achievements they know
But how can they strain
Mr. Bottomley has vouch-
But he has been told
straight(as it were)from the horse’s mouth
just what West Indians do believe and

bility?

ance.

and respect.
loyalty more?
safed no reply.

think. He will have been

that unity ahd never again (if ever he has
been in the past) will he believe those who

claim that the West Indies
within themselves.

The cause of the West Indies is the cause
of all the peoples who live in the West
Indies. The reason why there is so much
poverty, so much unemployment in the
West Indies is because the West Indies are
not paid more for the agricultural products
to enable them to pay higher wages and

employ more people.

Better wages, better conditions, better
education, better citizens all round, is the

aim of all political parties
Indies, however much they
on their approaches.

If Mr. Bottomley returns to the United
Kingdom and tells them we are one happy
family, who because of our family relation-
ships want to speak for ourselves instead
of leaving the Mother of the family to
speak for us, he will have done much, if
not all that is needed, to renew our trust
in-the United Kingdom. It has been sadly
shaken, but the leaves are still on the tree.







From FREDERICK COOK
-. NEW YORK.

A 50-year-old businessman
from’ Chelmsford, Essex, has
given the Americans a convincing
demonstration ‘that “know-how”
is not an exclusively American
export.

With British “know-how” in
industrial relations, he has trans-
formed in three years the Norma
Hoffman Bearings Corporation of
Stamford, Connecticut.

The company were torn’ by
bitter labour-management strife.
Profits fell in 1948 to some 30,000

dollars, from a quarter of a
million a year earlier

To-day, thanks to the man
from Chelmsford, all that has

been changed.

At the annual meeting a fort-
night hence, the firm’s president,
50-year-old William L. Hubbard
who came out from Essex late in
1948, will be able to report a

114., Broad St. Bridgetown

He spoke for every
man, woman and child in the West Indies. *
The old cliche so often used by well
meaning Englishmen that you could find
everything in the West Indies except unity
has been nailed hard in the coffin,
West Indies do speak with one voice. They



riton Shows U.S.

ell

the shore.

mist.

of the

of the previous
the Israelis.

He
Let’ us

lakeside fields.






















It seemed

sive attacks

for Trinidad.
bouring Israeli

West Indies

the village.

boxes with

The

He stared
gutted homes,
walls.
intend to be
in peace and
fight rather
homes and our
champions of
Arabs in this
Israelis of

the West In-

he will take

Nothing else

Contracts be-

accomplished
record of one

Here fs

impressed by
his sensitivity

are disunited heights 0’ war

It has the vitality of sashes

of the vivid
author himself,

the book's tragic moments.
erland, the Scotsman, and a dozen
other desperadoes from the RAF.
And even a handful from the other
side, Walter Nowotny, the German
ace, killed in the last week of the
war: “A face like that of a tired
child, with a trace of sadness and
a determined mouth and chin”
“A pity that type wasn't wear.
ing our uniform,” said Brooker.
These young men have the im-—
pression that they are in a world
of their own, with a meaning of
its own, something far superior

in the West
may disagree

to the grubby

and

massacres

record profit, a‘new factory near-
ing completion, the working force
in process of being doubled and
a multi-million-dollar backlog of
orders on hand sufficient to keep
the enlarged plant busy for two
years.

¢
Made him president

Mr. Hubbard came from the
Hoffman Manufacturing Com-
pany of Chelmsford, owners of
a majority of the stock in the
Norma Hoffman Company on this
side.

With him he brought British
notions of labour-management
relations and has “made them
stick.” Industrialists all over
the U.S. are watching his
results with envy.

It took him only five months to
straighten out the tangled affairs
of the Connecticut company. He
was preparing to go home when
the U.S. directors urged him to
take over the management on a

Behind the bare, placid hills the
sun was slowly dipping into thg
But the mayor o
had eyes for none of it.

He was too busy putting out his
guards to protect the village in
ease there should be a repetition

as -
inca anes une the tomato Israeli bulldozers and the ineffec-
gardens, behind what was left of tual efforts of UNO officers to stop
the mud wall of the village, and them.
up in the hills overlooking the flat

Three Attacks

Arab villagers they were, with
mvhite head cloths flapping down and observers
over their shoulders, ancient car- reporters
bines in their arms, khaki webbing with assessing the facts and ad-
with bulging cartridge pouches judicating them, but
strapped over their ragged clothes. mats.”
incredible that these I
rough peasants should have suc- compromise, trying to skirt diffi-
ceeded in repulsing three succes- cult situations.
the problems of conscience
trained Israeli frontier troops out- which a man faces when he finds
numbering them three to one and himself up against facts on one
with mortars and machine guns side
to pit against their musty carbines. group on the other,

in

But that is how it was. Only moment,
20 minutes earlier two United «¢he firing’ from the two sides
Nations observer officers had been makes it impossible for them to
in the village to pick up the Israeli approach the scene of strife in

dead from the night before and order to press on their UNO com-
carry them across to the neigh-

Geiv, a quarter of a mile down
the lake shore. I myself had seen
the foxholes where the Israeli dangerous. The pusillanimity of
raiders had lain 100 yards frem the YNO commissioners and the

cases and empty white cardboard
Hebrew
marked the spots only too clearly,

reflectively

“This is a poor vi

having broken

ing life with the RAF.
air
dimensional, confused, incredibly

emotions of the pilots—brought to
the eye and nerves of the chair-

rarely equalled,

dragging sentences,
stabbing phrases that will sammon
the mad, melodramatic scene to
the imagination, to pass on some
impression of the high tempo and
sudden furies of those air battles

on the resources of writing,
Clostermann may not command

fast and fused
borne reader
To translate
into words, to
—all that is a
the majesty of
model for all writers on the air, the
. | His style is his own and sufficient,
With his swift,
his capacity to
as if it were some glistening
enemy airplane sighted in the sky,
: as the scene, he soars to the

like these—“I hung there, with my
nose in the air, while the first
Huns began to flash like thunder-
bolts between our sections,”

It has the strength and interest

judges, obstreperous,
his hero, the French flier with the
emaciated figure and the irresis-
tible smile, whose death is one of

with its crawling, stinking tanks
children’ “Nowotny belonged to

us; he was part of our world,
where there were no ideologies,blows of my two cannon.”

‘The



How Neglect Is He
To Win The Middle East

A sharp evening breeze was
blowing across Lake Galilee, whip-
ping up the waves so that they _
smacked angrily against the fish- disregarded the UNO-appointed
erman’s skiff fighting its vay to armistice commissioners’ orders,

Disobeyed
UNO'S General Riley ordered

Israelis to cease
£] Nuqeib
The Israelis,

accuse the
aggression

night’s attack ky

men in the Of the invaston

Blame UNO, a
their anxiety to

prizes they drafted vaguely word-
ed regulations, promised the best
of worlds to both sides,

Their armistice commissioners

and

found

a fortnight by by

and

By Sefton Delmer

work south of Lake Huleh, The
Israelis disobeyed,

Arabs
when Arab peasants

fired on Israeli workmen and trac-
tors because they were impatient

them attempting to

a powerful

BARBADOS



the Arabs
land reclamation

in their turn, their

of military

of their land by the substantial

est,

most rapidly

nd its officers. In Middle East.

earn Nobel Peace

strategic value.

behaved not as

judges, charged js; jn all this.

as “diplo-
appreciate this
plore it.
They were awed
orders,

pressure
so outspoken,

In the fighting going on at this

settlement of En

Now this

Security Counci

A litter of used brass cartridge ciqes to deal with this is perilous
: r Western power and authority
lettering i, the Middle East,

It is ane ae pecans as re

Q 1 im, produced by Persia’s oil grab an

iy Pons ethers Snag va Egypt’s threat to the Suez Canal,
For Israel has hitherto enjoyed
llage,” the widest sympathy and support
he said to me, “We don’t want to from the Western world.

be a Korea, We just want to live ra I )
work, But we shall and suspicious of this popularity
than give up our Of the young State. They have
ascribed it to the financial and
Who is to blame ? The Syrians, political power of the Zionists in

at
with their burst

The Arabs h

land,”

Palestinian New York and

accuse the
the

the
area,







observers

mands of “ease fire.”

Dangerous
situation is

Don’t Dare

* t They claim that no newspaper,
armistice. agreement, of having no reporter, and no politician dare

report that

has done little

bloodshed will
most

situation now

1 called by both ¢
opportunity
agents of the

alists, all have

ave been jealous
In an

eve a
London, m | managed

Church,



Daredevils’

The Fighter Pilot Talks Of “The

By GEORGE MALCOLM THOMSON

THE BIG SHOW. By Pierre Clos-
termann, Chatto and Windus.
12s. 6d, 256 pages,

Let nobody underrate the feat

in the brilliant
Frenchman's fight-

warfare—three

with the desperate

with a_ vividness

such experiences
give wings to the
to find the

tremendous strain aka Aouunid
at 17,
a a mI
St. Exupery, that teustlom ates ¢

war

slangy narrative, no hatreds and

Battle

Above the cl
sane and lovely
men develop

dive on a phrase,

to the feeling as

painting. s
mystique. And
mann conveys,
purpose of his

a How
personalities; the

confident and, one

One day he
Mouchotte,

Frisian islands,

Suth-

of German fig

out of the cloud

At
formations
and Messerschm

bunch,

war below of the ring.
“T had the

diving into an

land

of women and



oe



permanent basis. |

They elected him president.

He told me to-day: “I called in
the leaders of the union, and told
them how I started out at 15 and}
came up from the ranks. They
liked that,””

A calm, reasoned approach to
the problems quickly led to a two-
year contract between union and
firm. It has just been renewed for
two years more.

No bluster
“The secret of the whole thing
was, the British approach -— no
bluster, no cajoling, nd threaten-
ing, and no pleading.

“When labour here gets a rise
it expects the industry to cut
costs to meet it. British labour
union negotiators are much
better trained and more experi-
enced.”

Mr. Hubbard has brought over
his wife and two children
—L.E.S





PIERRE CLOSTERMANN studied

engineering
d America, got his pilot's licence
Joined Free French Forces as
commanded a fighter

truction of 24 enemy airplanes, After
became
Deputy for Strasbourg,

almost a philosophy, certainly a

before his readers the hysteria of
the air battles and the fluctuating
course of the air war,

adroitly
executes his grand battle pieces!

on the grey sea, waiting for the
Forts to come back from bomb-
ing the Schweinfurt ball-bearing,
works, Space brings forth swarms

and Mustangs hurry home with
empty magazines, dodging in and

a forlorn and tragic sight.
have
shreds by avalanches of Junkers
over the sky, they try vainly to
Spitfires
into the clouds and bounce off
again like boxers against the ropes
impression I was

demented fish. The wings of my
Spit shuddered from the hammer-

Way ae

At such moments Clostermann
is a man inspired by the grandeur
and horror of his theme.

As the end of the war approaches

it is evident

this

nerves,
rates.

but

rose,
pillars. In a
machines had

as

action. A staggering blow hidden
from the public at the time,

Show Over
It would be a mistake to think

in France

Credited with des- of this book,
parliamentary
simply
daredevil with
for writing.

It is also a
history, and a

no frontiers,”
Hysteria

ouds, in those in-
battles, the flying

this, too, Closter-
although the first
book is to put

superhuman

There

ne blank: end public had been satisfied, The] Might write their comments. *
i programme had been rather} After the opening day the pages were.
h the heavy, the actors not too bad, li ae th that ld fli
pst na. iq andthe lions had eaten the chipped together so that no one cou Ip i
von, ooo ee trainer,” them back to read the opinions offered.
oe lion roars most impres-} Said an American friend, “You can quote

hters, Lightnings

itts, Seattered all
15s.) .
@ In

seem to bang

aquarium full of
15s.)

A Place To Settle

To_the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR, — Could you possibly
through the medium of your
Paper, put me in touch with any
person or persons on your Island
or neighbouring Islands who
would like to correspond with me.

My motive behind this letter is
due to a strong desire to settle
down in a more desirable place in
the World with my wife and two
sma!l children. When I do find the
place, I shall dispose of my Busi-
ness and possessions, and emi-
grate. I am by trade a Bricklayer,
and my wife runs a small Hard-
ware & Crockery Shop for me.

Possibly, your Island and _ its
environments is just what I am
looking for, in all events howexer,
whichever course I take, to be
able to correspond with someone so
distant from England will be of
considerable importance and plea-
sure to me,

If you kindly contact someone
for me will you be good enough to
ask them to describe, the Climate,
Natural resources, Language, pre-
vailing Industry, Customs, The



Iping Stalin |

criticise the Israelis, however re-
prehensible their behaviour.

This makes the weak attitude
of UNO and its officials
Middle East most damaging to
the Western cause.
the false
that Israeli influence is so strong
in the West that they can expect
no justice there.
complaints against
however justified.

Clearly in these A@rcumstances
the West can never expect to use

Israel—by a long way the strong-
best-led, best-equipped, and
mobilisable

The assurances of Israeli leaders
—-that they would regard a Soviet
incursion into the Middle Fast as
an attack on Israel itself—lose ali

One encouraging feature ther.

In Tel Aviv I found a substantial
number of influential Israelis who

The newspaper Haretz
has publicly criticised the Govern-
ment for ignoring General Riley's
however much it
disagree with them. r
of no other country in the Middle
East where a newspaper would b:

‘Opportunity’
So far UNO’s Security Counc!

dangerous situation,
If it continues to let it drift
the aggressions,

pound interest on both sides.
But most alarming of all, the

Galilean Korea present an ideal
for

covert, conscious and unconscious.
Communists and anti-Commun-
ists, nationalists and internation-

ingenious and skilful campaign o.
political warfare being tought by
the Kremlin here in the vital area
of the Middle East,

age-old
Damascus’s Street called Straight,
I found how the Russians have

the highest regions of the Christiar

physique alike are strained to
breaking point.
time commanding
describes the effect of this on
tempers 4 ;
He inserts a vivid account,
of the Luftwaffe’s last effort, the home.
bold, brilliantly planned stroke by
General Sperrle which left the
Allied aircraft on 27 bases nothing
smouldering heaps
which tall pillars of black smoke
straight as cathedral

many phases of the air war, as
the story of one young

. a. host of gallant men,
a point of view, mann’s comrades. It closes in the
sense of emptiness that follows
exertions,
ears of parting,
are regrets in farewells,
even the farewell to arms.

“The Big Show was over, The

@ Crazy world or
picture magnates is the scene of
THE DREAM MERCHANTS,

technique borrowed from _.
screen, (Weidenfeld and Nicolson.

THE BROKEN ROOT.
Arturo Barea make a novel out
of the experience of a Spanish
Republican who returns to Fran-
co's Spain—and to tribulation. No-
body need be surprised, (Fabers.

World Copyright Reserved,



ADVOCATE
|

Russia Busts Into The
Festival Game

CHARLES FOLEY reports on

The Milan Fair
HURRAH for the Soviet way of life.
Hurrah for the Festival of Russia.

in the

For it gives
impression : '
and sent 3,000 miles to the great market-place

of the West, the Milan World Trade Fair.

I have just returned from visiting the
show, and I am still fascinated by the bold-
ness with which Russia has challenged, for
the first time since the war, the best and
finest that the leading nations of the West
can produce.

The Russian bid opened with the arrival,
six weeks ago, of a general staff—Director
Serge Vishniakov and his wife, with 12 lead-
ing technicians.

Armed with diplomatic cards, they set up
headquarters in the fashionable Amedei
Hotel. From the roof garden they surveyed
Milan, the battleground.

The main body of Soviet factory experts
piled up fibre suitcases in the lobby of a
third-category hotel.

NO THIS, NO THAT

The Russian show was a sensation. Buyers
who pressed in from every country in the
world quickly stamped out again because
they could get no answer on prices or deliv-
eries: such buyers were always referred to
the Director — and Comrade Vishniakov
never seemed to be about.

Angry industrialists said they could see no
purpose in the display. But to the rest of
us, the 4,000,000 sightseers, it was plain as a
wink that Stalin put on this spectacular
parade of wealth and industry simply to let
us know what we have been missing.

Outside the Soviet paradise» there was
always Director Vishniakov’s immense Rus-
sian limousine to draw the crowds, And
when the people turned into the palace they
were met with a burst of Cossack singing and

No support for
Israel
armed forces of

in the

situation and de-

migh
I can thin

to deal with thi:

bombings, anc
increase by com-

created by this

the political
Soviet—open and

their place in th.

convent of:
high, lighted from within—of Joseph Stalin.

Beyond, a 200-yard panorama of Soviet
products and machines,

to percolate into

But of that tomorrow,

World |

Men We

NO MATCH

With all this ettort the resuit has been a
disappointment for the Russians. The Mos-
cow planners let down their Western follow-
ers with a bang.

British, American, and German experts
dismissed Russian technical pretensions at a
glance. They all told me that the Soviet
precision machinery was inferior to that
made in the West. ‘

The exhibits were poorly finished. Metal
parts betrayed second-grade production.
Aluminium castings. were pitted. with holes
which even paint could not conceal.

Farmers said they had better tractors at
Workers from the Necchi sewing
machine factory an hour away—they make
electrically-driven models and export them
to America by the thousand—found the Rus-
sians proudly showing machines still worked
by hand or treadle.

Girls from the ultra-modern Olivetti type-
writer plant outside Milan giggled at Soviet
models nearly 20 years out of date.

Killed”

that morale and

Clostermann, by
a_ wing,

and accident

--

from

few minutes, 300
been put out of

NO PEEPING
which touches so
ed at the wonderful! Russian furs, but de-
clared them botched in cut and style,

The textiles and shoes we saw* would not

an amazing talent

sketch for a war
moving tribute to
Closter- , ‘
Radios were dialled for Russian stations

only. . - oe

At the exit of the Russian pavilion Vishni-
akov placed an:angel_(with.a red hair-band)
holding a golden book in which awed visitors

in the
in bitterness

me that. this. is the finest propaganda for
Western Europe we could ever hope for.”
Let us not be too proud. At the tiny British

the motion

Harold Robbins’s novel, which ’

a follows the career of two adven-| stand, occupied mostly by B.E.A, photographs
last the Fortresses appear ont Cenedenine ae = glory of foreign capitals, one visitor was the American
Their “nickelodeon.” Crisply told, al-| Anibassador, James Dunn.

been torn to though over-playing a flash-back

He gazed tactfully round and, striving to
console the young man in charge, said : “I sup-
pose you people have been busy on the Festi-
val?’’

The Englishman : What Festival ?

Mr. Dunn : ‘‘ Why, the Festival of Britain.’’
The Young man blinked. ‘And what is that.
sir ? he inquired,

the





ES, —L.ES.
‘ : E The net proceeds were $1,110.4°
OURREADERSSAY which goes to the St, John Bap

tist Vicarage Fund.
Hoping all of you will be will
ing’ to help’ us: again: in the

tuture,
Mrs. Ben Moore,
Alfred J. Hatch,

Tsland’s general amenities ete.
what I would need to bring with
me, that is of course if you would
care to have me, and being a
builder, could this knowledge be
utilized fully on the Island.

Do please see that this letter
achieves its purpose, in the mean-
time even though it may be a little
premature I wish to thank you for

Un-registration
SIR,—One side of’ registration

everything. seems to have been neglected by
G. HEATH. the Government and others inter- |"
167 Park Road, ested in its success.
oe It is now more than two weeks
England. that the filled-in forms of my

household Have not been collected
by the registration officer.

The time-is getting near when
all forms have to be handed in.

If my case is not unique it is,
possible that many who waht to be |
registered will find that they have
no vote.

Will the Government see that
registration officers do not neglect
collection of forms?

Yours,
UNREGISTERED.

The Holetown Fair

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—We take this opportunity
to thank all those who gave so
Senerously and those who worked
so hard to make the Country
Fair held at Holetown on Whit-
Monday such a_ success.

The lucky winner of the cycle
was Joyce Iffill of Crab Hill, St,
Lucy with ticket No, 498,

Hurrah.
for the great exhibition which Stalin built! {

a glowing vision in stained glass, eight feet}

Women of Europe’s elegant cities exclaim-'

be saleable in the shabbiest Western village. |,











TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951



PRACTICAL

SPANISH
GRAMMAR

My Hills & Ford
Advocate Stationery














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TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951



Scrap Cuban Black Pact

@ From pafe 3.

“Let us for a moment examine
the ecohomy of the West Indies.
For hundreds of years, it has been
based on agriculture, then within
recent years, there has been a
slight diversion of minor secondary
industries of one kind or another.

Mineral Deposits

“There are certain § mineral
Geposits like bauxite and recently
the policy has been to try and
industrialise the area in’ some
measure. However 'much we may
try to industrialise, it is very
difficult.

Agriculture is the basis of cur
economy in this area.

We are forced to buy staple
goods and other commodities from
places which produce them at
higher costs.

To pay for these commodities,
we have to rely on the prices of
our agricultural products.

Sugar, said Mr, Sangster, was
the only industry that stood the
test of time in the West Indies.
For 300 years it was the mainstay
of our praduction and economic
life. It was a crop to which they
had looked forward to all those
years. “

“In the middle of the last
century, preferences were with-
drawn and the sugar industry
went up and down and here at
this particular time, we are no
better and have no guarantee.
We are asking for long term con-
tracts and guaranteed markets for
our goods.

“Why do we feel that you are
protecting us? We are in tne
Commonwealth area and we are
in the sterling area. We have
given you trade, we have helped
with the dollar restrictions and
have suffered greatly. We have
lost our Canadian contacts and
we have also lost our contacts
with America. We have suffered
not only from the dollar restric-
tions but at the hands of devalua-
tion.

“We are told that devaluation
should not do us a great deal of
harm, but we find things are going
up and the cost of living in the
West Indies is getting to the stage
where it cannot be checked.

The cost of commodities is going
up and we are forced to buy from
the sterling sources and at times
those commodities are not even
the best.

Turn Where ?

“We in the colonies have got
to turn to the United Kingdom ii
we want help, we cannot turn to
America, Cuba or Australia and
what is the Mother Country doing
to help us? She is now nego
ating a pact with Cuba. It must
be remembered that if England’
takes sugar from Cuba, it would
mean that the West Indies will
suffer,

“We feel that you are not happy
about this Cuban Pact or that it
will bring you trade. You have
not told us the details.

“When visitors come to the
West Indies and see people living
in shacks they will want to know
why they were living in such pov-
erty. But could we provide work
for such people when the one
thing we produce—sugar and our
agricultural products, you refuse
to give us a market and go and
buy from people outside the ster-
ling area. ,

“You have heard in Jamaica a
lot about tobacco. We have built
us a sugar trade in the U.K. In
1947, 26,000,000 cigars cost £9,600.
But what did you do to our to-
bacco trade? In 1940 the duty
was 18/-, the preference 3/10%.
In 1948 it was 67/9, the preference
had dropped to 2/11% and our
trade had dropped from 26,000,000
to 11,000,000, worth only £500,000
to employ 6,000 people.

Higher Duties

“If we have to pay higher duties
to help you to maintain your social
services which we will never have,
why turn and take $3,000 worth
of Cuban cigars and put 6,000
people out of work in Jamaica?

“We have been colonies of the
British Empire for 300 years, but
you are losing and destroying the
goodwill of the territories. ‘We
cannot protect the wolf at the door
and the one at the window too’,

“Canada is our natural friend.
We cannot really look to the US.
We are losing our opportunity and
our shipping and our pleas for
these have gone unheard, Are we
to give up this Canadian contact
entirely? Maybe in the future
we will have to turn to them and
go hat in hand and ask them for
help. '

“We cannot agree that we will
ever be happy to see you sacrifice
us at this present time in relation
to sugar and tobacco. We want





you to be very clear on that point

“When the news came out in
the West Indies about the U.K.-
Cuban Pact, I don’t suppose there
was any one who could read, who
was not shocked or silenced at
what had happened or was about
to happen.

“I must say to you that if you
are going to ruin the economy of
the West Indies, you will have to
bear with more millions coming
into the area.

“We say to you,” said Mr. Sang-
ster, “scrap the Cuban pact, have
nothing whatever to do with it no
matter how you fee! you may look
in international eyes. Your chil-
dren are entitled to have protec-
tion and we must get it. e must
ask you to negotiate long-tefm
contracts,

“For too long we have been used
as pawns in the _ international
game of chess. We wish promo-
tion. If this promotion is given we
will help to maintain the position
and the prestige of the Common-

wealth in this ever-changing
world.” ;
Hon. H. D. Shillingford said

years ago in the early thirties, the
British Government ‘realised the
necessity of diversification of trop-
ical products and sent Mr. Clarke
Powell who advocated the planting
of citrus throughout the areas
where it could be possibly grown.
Dominica, Trinidad, Jamaica
‘and British Honduras planted on
a large scale. Citrus, unlike canes,
‘took 6 to 8 years te get into bear-
ing and when the crops were in
Palestine, competition debarred
them from the U.K. market.

(Citrus Rot

With the advent of the war,
shipping was unobtainable and a
part of their citrus was allowed to
rot.

Mr. Shillingford said that the
entry of the C.D.C. in Dominica
with its packing shed and large-
scale planting of citrus, gave them
a reasonable hope of its future,
but that hope had» been shattered
by the happenings of the General
Agreement Trade and Tariff Con-
ference where America subsidised
her citrus exports, heavily.

They in Dominica, had no boats
to the U.K. and depended on for-
‘eign shipping. They shipped in
1950 over $160,000 worth of citrus
and that was only a small propor-
tion of their crop. It was, indeed
deplorable to see the amount of
grape fruit and oranges rotting on
the ground,

It can be argued that with dollar
restrictions, the United Kingdom
market was still oper, but in fact,
Spanish and Palestine citrus, not
being able to compete.with the
U.S.A. in Europe, will certainly
divert their exports to the U.K.
and that left them in.a most un-
desirable situation,

U.S. Subsidy

“The American subsidy is so
high, amounting to $1.65 per crate,
that we have no chance whatever,
and in fact, a firm in Jamaica
which sold fruit juices at 14/- per
carton, has now been offered in
Europe 7/-, the price at which the
American product is being sold.

“It costs 9/- to produce a carton
and you will realise that the pro-
ducer will have to give his fruit
free and pay 2/- to sell in those
markets.

“The general dependence on
agriculture had been stressed by
the previous speakers and you
will realise how serious the situ-
ation is with our rising population
and rising costs of living.”

Mr. Bottomley replying, said
that the speeches to which he had
listened, would grace any assem-
bly. He had listened to a good
deal from the historical survey
made by Mr. Robinson and he had
heard from Mr. Gomes a contribu-
tion which he was sure Mr; Gomes
would forgive him if he said it
was one to which he was accus-
tomed, being like him, a fellow
parliamentarian,

Mr. Sangster, he said, had made
a most witty contribution and he
should have liked to have heard
more from him and was sure that
he would hear more in future. Mr.
‘Shillingford had given substantial
comments about the citrus industry
and he hoped he would take it
from him that he was aware of a
‘large part of the comments he had
made, and that that had fortified
him when he had made representa-
tions about the importation of
citrus fruits into Great Britain.

“Of the speakers, particularly,
Mr, Gomes talked about the value
of this conference,” he said. “You
know where I stand. My opening
comments yesterday wereon the
value of this Conference and I am

glad to find that they are generally
accepted,
W.L Well-Being

“It is by this means that the
greatest contribution would be
made to the well-being of the Wes
Indies. The West Indies need no
Jonger talk about being children.
That stage is passing fast as this
contribution has already showed.

“IT want to talk to you as fellow
colleagues. In this endeavour io
promote the best for the West In-
dies in particular, and also for the
whole sterling area. I am quite
content to feel that I can play a
small part myself, because it was
my fortune early in the run
of first labour Government in
the UX: to get a trip to the Far
East. I knew before the war many
colleagues in“India as it was then.
Most of the Jeading Indian pol-
iticians of to-day, most of them in
Pakistan. and most of them in
Burma are my personal friends,
If you ever came inte contact with
them, you would find that they
have a kindred spirit in tne ap-
proach to these common problems
and are trying to lift up the stand-
ards of these poor distressed col-
leagues -in different parts of the
Commonwealth, '

“It is in the sense that I: stress
the importance of the sterling area
as a whole because we would let
down those people if we fail to
keep up their standard of eco-
nomic sufficiency by which alone
we can live, * :

U.K. Economy

“Talking in a narrow way, if
the U.K. economy cannot afford
to buy your sugar, you know what
the result would be. Several
points have been raised and it is
perhaps in this connection that I
may refer to Canada.

“In the case of the Canadian

Government, they had made a
Government statement which sets
out their views clearly. It would
be a good thing if you read it
carefully.
. “As far as Canadian sugar’ sales
are concerned, they had to buy
for each ten of sugar sent from
here to Canada an equal amount
of dollar sugar and I have it on
nuthority from the Ministry of
Food that far from making a
profit, there is indeed a loss and
I am also told that if it should
happen, all difference of prefer-
ence goods between Canada and
the U.K. would eventually show a
profit.

“An undertaking was given that
the profit would be shared with
the producers in the West Indies.

“It would be misleading” Mr.
{Bottomley said, to get the im-
pression that we are making a
profit as a result of this legitimate
trade transaction.

Review Needed

“When you come to 1953 it may
be seen that things have changed
and that we have to review the
Commonwealth Agreement. At
the moment, the Government in
the U.K. strongly takes the view
that it is desirable that we should
‘try and work towards: that end.

“There are many other points
on which I could dilate at great
length but they were covered in
yesterday’s statement. I havea
reason to believe that much of that
is going to appear in the Press.

“I want specifically to deal with
the Cuban Pact. I can say that
we did not particularly want pacts
with countries. Weare not court-
ing countries just for the sake of
having a pact or getting something
out of it. We hope that whenever
‘talks are made between one
country or another, they would be
mutually advantageous.

“What is the position with the
Cuban Pact? I tried to explain
the circumstances yesterday. In
the case of this pact most of the
details were known two months
ago and the only reason I have
come here is for the purpose of
explaining them further and for
the purpose of listening and get-
ting greater information so that
I can go back and tell my
colleagues in the Government
your feelings before any agree-
ment is signed.

“We are hoping that the pact
will be mutually advantageous,
but I want to assure you that it
would not be disadvantageous to
the West Indies,



Used Indecent Language

A City Magistrate ordered
Livingston Blunt of Alleyne’s
Land, Bush Hall, to pay a fine of
30/- for using indecent language
on Eagle Hall Road, St. Michael
on May 19.

for your complete furnishing

BROCADED COTTON TAPESTRY in Blue, Green, Rose, and

Brown 49” wide. Per yard ...



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48” wide. Per yard

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background. In Plum, Green, Blue and Tan-47” wide. Per yard

FLOWERED CRETONS: 36

Per yard

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, &



inches wide
$1.60



13, BROAD STREET







$1.42

BARBADOS

Bodily Harm
Costs 15/-

JUSTICES G. L
J Ww B Chenery yesterday
imposed a fine of 15/- to be paid
in seven days or in default seven
days’ imprisonment on lanthe
Rock for inflicting bodily harm on
Delcina Gittens of Kensington
New Road, St Michael, in the
Assistant Court of Appeal

By doing this, Their Honours
reversed the decision of His Wor-
ship Mr. C. L. Walwyn who dis-
missed the case without prejudice.
They however confirmed another
decision of Mr. Walwyn who dis-
missed a case against FitzGerald
McLean for inflicting bodily harm
against Delcina Gittens.

Taylor and

Gittens giving evidence yester-
day, said that on April 2 she was
passing by the house of the two
defendants, Janthe Rock and
FitzGerald McLean which is situ-
ated at Kensington New Road
Before she could pass the house,
;-both of them rushed out on her
and beat her.



Three Months
For Larceny

_ Sentence of three months’
imprisonment with hard labour
was yesterday passed on Percival
Straker of King William Street,
St. Michael, by a City Police
Magistrate who found him guilty
on a charge of larceny yesterday,

Straker stole a carton of «
ettes belonging to Evans Pil
on May 20,




rim
He was seen taking

these cigarettes out of a car in
which Pilgrim had put them.
Straker ran and later Police

Constable Jones arrested him on
Wellington Street

Seibert Waldron told the court
that Straker has three previous
convictions for larceny and on
the last conviction he was sen-
tenced to two months’ imprison-
ment with hard labour’ for
Stealing $5 belonging to Henry
Hill.



30/- For Assault

Prince Walcott, a laboure:

Rock Hall, St George, was
ordered by a District “A”’ Police
Magistrate to pay a fine of 30/-
for assaulting Police Constable
Pile on May 19.
_ Another fine of 10/- was
imposed on him for making a
disturbance on Marhill Street, St.
Michael.

of



Tamarind Cargo

Harrison Liner Speciatist is in
port loading 2,375 tons of dark
crystal and 500 tons of wet sugar
for Liverpool.

She is also taking a supply of
tamarinds and 26 bales of cotton.

The Specialist arrived here on



Thursday. She is consigned to

Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd,
CROWD ATTEND
‘BAND’ CONCERT

A large crowd attended the

Police Band Concert at the

Esplanade on Sunday evening

The Concert started at 4.45 p.m.
Those who arrived early were
able to occupy the few seats, but

the majority had to stand
throughout the evening.
The main item on the pro

gramme was the Introduction’ of
Act III and Bridal Chorus from
“Lohengrin”. This magnificient
piece of music is meant to sug-
gest the general atmosphere of
festivity and rejoicing that
follows the marriage of Lohengrin
and Elsa.

Other items on the programme
were the cornet solo of “Roses of
Picardy” and the Hymns, “I Vow
to Thee My Country” and “Lead
Kindly Light”,



“Mary Lewis”
Arrives

Schooner Mary M. Lewis ar-
rived here from British Guiana
over the week end with 1,300 bags
of rice. She also brought supplies
of firewood and charcoal,

The Mary Lewis is consigned to
Messrs. Schooner Owners’ Asso-

|











ADVOCATI



Mandeville Congratulated

On Appointment As
Bishop Of Barbados

DEAN G. L. G. MANDEVILLE. Bishop-Elect Chairman of

the St. Michael Vestry, was

congratulated on being elected

Bishop of Barbados when a meeting of the St. Michae:
Vestry was held yesterday afternoon.

Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C., on behalf of members of the
Vestry, offered Bishop Mandeville sincere congratulations.

He said that at Harrisun Col-
lege the Dean and himself were
in the same form. He had watched
with interest the Dean's suc-
cessful career in the ministry and
it is very gratifying to know that

he hrs been made Bishop of
Barbados, “an office in which I
know he will serve with dignity

and honour.”
He said that Barbadians were
very proud to know that the Dean



has been appointed to that high
office.

Mr. E. D. Mottley, MCP, in
supporting Mr rale’s motion,
said that he realised that the
honour corried a great responsi-
bility and added: “I hope that
the Dean will be given the health
to carry out this duty and he

would be a shining example to
those who felt that a Barbadian
could not fill such an office,”

Mr, McD. Symmonds and
T. Miller also offered
gratulations,

The Dean’s Reply

Dean Mandeville, repiying, said
that he was greatly moved by
what the Vestry had seen fit to
Say concerning his election,

He was sorry that his connec-
tion with the Vestry was so snort
but in that short time he had been
enriched by the contacts which he
had made.

He felt it a great pleasure and

Mr,
their con-

honour to be Chairman of the
Vestry of St. Michael,

Following this Mr. C. Brath-
waite said that he hed just re-

ceived the sad news of the desta
of Mr. Robert Martin Jone;, a
late member of the Vestry

“Mr, Jones had not only given

his -best, but also encouraged
others to give their best. He was
a determinedly honest Vestry-

man,” he said.

On behalf of the othe» Ve try-
men who came into contact with
Mr. Jones, he said without doubt
that Mr. Jones was a gentleman
*“A more honest man has never
sat around this table”? Mr. Brath-
waite said.

He moved that members of the
Vestry stood for a few minutes
in silence in respect to the late
Mr. Jones and also that a letter
be sent to Mrs, Jones expressing
their sympathy.

Tribute To Vestrymen
Mr. Mottley, who secondeq Mr.

Brathwaite’s motion, said that
Mr. Jones was an_ outstanding
character but what was most

outstanding was that he: was re-
sponsible for the District Nursing
System in Barbados.

Under the Head *“Correspond-
ence”, where the Commissioners
of Health reported to the Vestry
in the matter of Mr. Jamas E.
Daniel, late employee of the High-
ways &. Transport. Department,
re; His service with the Commis-
sioners of Health and Highways
of St. Michael, Mr. Mottley said
that it was of no use dealing with
this matter as the Government
had already passed a Bill throtgh
the Legislature pensioning Mr.
Daniel and giving him a gratuiiy,

Mr. Mottley saig that while he
was not opposed “Yo this gentle-
man getting his pension and gra-
tuity, he felt that the Vestry was
treated very badly in the matter
because in a letter to them dated
February 3, the Government had
asked them to investigate the
claims of Daniel who stated that
he hed been employed by the St.
Michael Commissioners for a
period of 13 years.

This matter as members _ re-
ealled, was referred to the Com-
missioners of Health, who called
in Mr. Daniel and other persons
with whom he claimed he worked

Greater Respect

“As a result of the report which
is before us, I again say that I
would be the last person to stand
in anybody’s way of getting con-
sideration for their services, but

I feel that at least the Vestry
could have been treated with
greater respect as it is not even
quite three months which we
have been asked,” Mr. Mettley
said,

He therefore askeq the Vesiry
to appoint a Committee to take
up the matter with the Colonia!

Secretary in protest against the
discourteous treatment meted ou
to the Vestry.

This motion was unanimously
supported by the Vestry and th
Committee appointed to meet th

Colonial Secretery were: M)
McD. Symmonds, Churchwarden
Hon. V. C. Gale, M.LC., ane

FE, D. Mottley, M.C.P.
The report to the Commission-
ers is as follows: Daniel was em

ployed as an_ assistant rolle
driver from 1912 to 1919 by Rich-
ard Hutson, a roller driver o
Messrs. D. M. Simpson & Co
Ltd. at the rate of sixty cont
per week,

“From 1919 to 1925 Daniel wa
employed as roller driver at $6. 0(
per week by Messrs. D. M
Simpson & Co. Ltd. who heli
eontract with the Commissioner
of Highways of St. Michael,

Report Adopted

The Vestry considered anc
adopted the Committee’s Major-
ity Report for the payment o
retrospective pay for Parochia
employees. Payments are ex-
pected to begin from Friday.

After considering the item
relative to Mr. H. C. Griffith's
pension, on the motion of Mr,
E. D. Mottley the ‘Vestry decided
that steps be taken to have a bil!
introduced in the Legislature
authorising the Vestry to pay Mr.
H. C, Griffith a pension or (and)
a gratuity for the services render-
ed by him while in the employ of
the Commissioners of Health of
St. Michael,

This motion was seconded by
Mr &-mmonds who pointed ou
thet Mr, Griffith was morally
entitled to this.







100 Years
Ago

WEST INDIAN
May 22,

We had written a few re-
marks on Thursday, on the
manner in which the clean-
ing of the streets and the
removal of the filth is at pre-
sent effected, but want of
room excluded them, Since
then the, advertisement of
the Clerk of the Vestry has
appeared, and we find it
embraces one or two sugges-
tions we had intended to
throw out. By the mode at
present adopted, taxpayers
and others obtain little re-
lief. They are compelled to
sweep as formerly, and, in
numerous cases, themselves
to have the rubbish removed.
The fact is, the undertaking
is too much for a single in-
dividual, It will only be
done efficiently by dividing ©
the City into districts, and
granting contracts for such
districts. We are therefore
glad to find that the Vestry
have arrived at this conclu-
sion; and some experience
having been acquired, we
hope that the object will be
attained, and that the streets
will be efficienly cleaned.



Pier Under Repairs

A hole about 10 feet long
eight feet wide and eight fee
deep has been dug out at the enc
of the Pier Head, Water is abou
2 feet deep in the hole.

Stones and gravel that havi
been dug up are packed aroun
the hole as a barrier, There ji
little room left for pedestrians

The hole was started by th
ea which was undermining thi
part of the Pier Head. The su
face of the Pier Head was slighti
broken some weeks ago, Thi
led masons to find out that cuit
a bit of the concrete was washec
away by the sea,

Yesterday, five men wearing
trunks, were to their knees it
the water digging out loose grave
and stones, The Governmer
Dredger is helping to remove th
sand and gravel from the hole.

WAR

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|| ROBERTSONS SILVER SHRED MARMALADE—per bot, 39c.
\| BAHAMAS CRUSHED PINEAPPLE—per Tin ...... 24¢,
| COLUMBIAN PINEAPPLE SLICES per Tin ‘ 24c.,
SINGAPORE PINEAPPLE CUBES & SLICES—per Tin. . 45e
STHPHENS NAVY PICKLES—per Jap B4c.
SAVOY CHOCOLATE MALT—per ‘Tin ‘ 10¢.
RED, WHITE & BLUE BAKED BEANS~— per Tin 15¢,
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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951





es


































i lal ad —_—
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON. ) (ose resect
These Bonds having been sold, this advertisement appears as a |
matter of record only.
: New Issue =
OVNI s\3
y ° i ® ° ia)
Alaska Pine & Cellulose Limited | “PAA
(Incorporated under the laws of Canada)
FIRST * MORTGAGE BONDS
$13,500,000 414% Sinking Fund Bonds, Series “A” er ee —
To be dated as of May Ist, 1951 To mature May Ist, 1952-4 and 196§ en ed
A sinking fund will be provided for the sinking fund bonds requiring a ice which have made PAA
payment on April Ist in each of the years 1952 to 1965 inclusive of an amount “first choice” of veteran
eyual to 15% of the consolidated net income of the Company and its sub- | travelers the world over.
sidiaries (after bond interest, depreciation, depletion and taxes and other-
wise as to be defined) for the immediately preceding fiscal year and an |



| NEW YORK

Via San Juan or by connecting air-
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round-trip Excursion Fares now in
effect from San Juan.

Effective April 18th, all flights
I land at New York Interna-
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' instead of La Guardia Field.

~ — additional payment on April 1st in each of the years 1955 to 1965 inelusive
MICKEY MOUSE of the sum of $500,000.
se ~ Trustee : Montreal Trust Company

In the opinion of Counsel, these Bonds will be investments in which The

Canadian and British Insurance Companies Act (1932) as amended states

that companies registered under part HI thereof may, without availing

themselves for that purpose cf the provisions of subsection (4) of Section 6°
of the said Act, invest their funds,









EUROPE, SOUTH AMERICA,
AFRICA, MEXICO, the FAR
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advantages. Upon completion of present financing Abitibi Power & Paper
5 SHE SHOULD'VE Company, Limited will own 50% of the common shares of Alaska Pine &
OLS er j I SAID FELT, AND you = DAISY'S GETTING REMINDED YOU THAT C te ys ited . mT sot A - . }
wm! SY, RI oe eee ets = MORE ABSENT: MINDED (you THREW OUT YOUR ellulose Limited.
PSTAIRS A aT hd BROUGHI MY LEATHE EVERY DAY FELT SLIPPERS )
FELT SL 25 51] \\ SLIPPERS --HOW CAN A ¢ w Le >
s eCyY A ue r

DOG BE SO FORGETFUL? aS eae ; ' Price ; 100 and accrued interest
ee A nt 7 ce aa dishiensialdilbintniiaia

" A. S. BRYDEN & SONS. Barbados Ltd.

Barbados Correspondent for
Royal Securities Corporation Limited.

. . MIAMI
The prospectus, a copy of which has been filed under the | Daily flights—non-stop service from
provisions of The Companies Act, 1934, will be forwarded i San Juan. Special 15-Day Round
promptly upon request. . \ Trip Excursion Fares now in effect.
Alaska Pine & Cellulose Limited was incorporated under the laws of Can- ipl ST. CROIX
ada in 1925 with the name British Columbia Pulp & Paper Company, Limited a ST. THOMAS
and is one of the most important manufacturers of prime quality dissolving || Frequent flights by swift Comvedee
pulp in Canada. Alaska Pine Company Limited was incorporated under ae —" Convenient depar-
the laws of British Columbia in 1939 and, together with associated compan- . “fy PAA’ to
ies, carries on in British,Columbia one of the largest lumbering businesses | You can now — tly
\
|

For 22 years the leading
international airline—PAA
was first to link the Amer-
icas by air, first to fly to
all six continents.



For reservations, see your
Travel Agent or










WORLD'S
MOST EXPERIENCED
SY AIRLINE

PAN AMERICAN

Hono AvaHwars

Wa Coste & Co., Ltd.
Broad St. —- Bridgetown
’Phone 2122 (After business hours
—2303)

CuirbYourPiles

t is no longer neo
pains, itching and torment from Piles
LLP LLL LLL EEE LLL LEED PILED TP PP FE OOOO GOFF FR since the Giscovery of 4 (formerly
known as Chinarold). Hytex starts to
work fin 10 minutes and not only stops
the pain but also takes out the swell-
ing, stops bleeding and com Rerve
irritation thereby curbing other trou-
bles caused by Piles such as Headache,
Nervousness, Backache, Constipation,
of energy, coteey. and irritable
disposition, G
drugeist@.oday under the ‘Dositive
guarantee Hytex must stop your pile
pains and troubles or money bask or
Seturn of empty package.

Gums Bleed,
Teeth Loose!

= 3B). mm oy,
fis ant a

BY BARRY APPLEBY

€

angel

eed





L egg ETO

{hel s
EG ra IS
yhae

j











4 f a Va “J | ' yi mad tg’ ry
5 YOU MEAN I'M TO BE Jf YOURE EITHER MW TAKES LOT OF STRENGTH
(T'S LEE! THE GOVERN- \ ( CROOKS LEARN WHOHE IS, YOUR ASSASSIN? WITH US OR TAKES A L

MENT MAN} HELPED IN pf THEY'LL KILL HIM/ , AGAINST US. YOU

oe ea) a —@ RS KILL LEE OR TO SAVE GOALS.... THAT'S

WHY FOOTBALLERS SHOULD
ALWAYS EAT aaa

SOI OOD OPP POPP LP POP POOP bot
PODS DG OOOO OO OO








BREA D

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Bleeding gums, sore mouth, or loose




















LA OD OD oe

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——<————



















f teeth mean that, you are a victim of Pyor-
i TRSE Git vamealy ae 90S ‘eos i
° iy \o'F" ‘ your teeth and have to wear false teeth
YOU Tt HAT OF HERE WE J WHERES Your WHAT ARE It's the TOUGHEST Guy before your time. Since the great World
WESTBRNS ARE FOR CHILDREN / ARE! TELEVISION SET? |] WE WAITIN' War these mouth diseases have spread
I EXPECT MR. AND MRS. SID DECHAP > throughout the world so that now scien-
TO CALL-THEY ARE INTELLECTUALS! ro for the JOR tists say that four out of every five people
TURN TT } are sufferers sooner or ater. Be warned In
pe NN OS » cS) THEY WENT time and stop these diseases before it is
{ vO NEVER oh \ 0) S THAT - A- too late, because they often ceuse not only

FIND OUT VARY o




the loss of teeth, but also chronic rheuma-
tism and heart trouble.

New Discovery Saves Teeth
Amosan, the discovery of an American
scientist, fights these troubles in a new
and q way. It penctrates right to the
{root of the ara stops gums from bleed-

: ABOUT
Wi) THOSE iF
/ RUSTLERS! fi



| MASSEY-HARRIS

| 42 B.H.P. 6 cyl. Diesel Wheel




soreness out of your mouth, and soon
tightens the teeth. The follow!:g letter
from Mr. W. W. B. shows the results that
mosan users get: ‘I suffered from Trench
Mouth and Pyorrhea for ten years. My
gums were sore and bleeding and had
lost four teeth, while several other teeth
Ii the time, £ tried
heard of this new
3 24 hours after using
Amoson my gum i stopped bleeding.
The soreness in my mouth, @isappeared tn
| three days and tn two weeks I found that
my loose teeth were much Prgms and that

- could eat the hardest of food.”

TRACTOR
e
| Also Available - - -
GRASS CUTTERS, MANURE SPREADERS
SIDE DELIVERY RAKES, FEED MILLS, Amosor are a0 cereain

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PASS THE WORD TO THE
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KEEP SEVEN AND WHITEY

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AN
SA AND LET ME HAVE
> SCE TEAR

\/l ors!

SY '

A f



















ee | Don't take a chance osing ¥ our teeth or

} suffering the dang from rheumatism

| and heart trouble. Get Amesan from your
chemist today under this iron-clad guaran-

ROBERT THOM, LTD. — White Park Rd. — Dial 4391 |) AtmoGar?g2.°

SPEQIAL offers to all Cash and Crédit: cudomers for Monday to Wednesday only





















PAYS YOU TO









—



















= USUALLY NOW USUALLY bad
— Wigon;] [HONEST JOHN, THE MAN Wao | TTELL DICE*THE PALMER DAMES Lin: ak ai rt
= MADY | |HOLDING THE BET THAT DAVE MADE. }] | BOY FRIEND 6 ON THE WAY THERE Tins HEINZ SPAGHETTI 30 26 Pkgs. T. PAPER 22

10 in TOMATO SAUCE



UH ++HES } |



THAT S A GOOD PLACE TOTALK ITO SEE HIM. TELL HIM *TO WATCH OUTA ;
PLACE 18 BMIPTY. WHERE DICE! _- gu a Fy | HES ROUGH ? ll
ICE AT HONEST =e (ae Tins CORNED BEEF with CEREAL 31 2.5 PRUNES (per 1b.) 50 44
|

"Pkgs. QUAKER CORN FLAKES 30 26 Bot.C. T. CHERRIES wor 1.40 1.20







99

TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
FOR SALE

snnouncements in Carid Calling tne
Minimum charge weck 7? cents and







charge is $3.00 for any number of word:
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508











between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for ee ot re ares ee
vents G wer .
etices only after 4 p.m. Geet Sandee
DIED A MOTIVE
eon May 21st 1951, at her! .— UTO Pays
residence Bedford Lodge, St. Micha‘) ALMOST NEW 12 H.P. Bedf
Miriam Elridge, wife of H. N. Roach.| Guarantee if required. Extra Ssasontin
Her funeral leaves the above residence} Flooring. Licensed and Insured. Upset

at 4.45 p.m. to-day for the Westbury
Cemetery.
H. N. Roach, A. C. Roach, V. N.
Roach, P. K. Roach, Lucy Kellman.

Price $1,850. New one Cost $2,125 pre-
sently. Apply Courtesy Garage.
22.5.51.—1n.













22.5.51—in. EXCEPTIONAL CAR—3% M>.G. 1949

Fiat 15. Very good condition Phone

THANKS 23950 +2.5.51—3n
OTOR CYCLE — One Velocette

KING—We the undersigned beg through
this médium to thank all those who
sent wreaths and letters or otherwise
sympathised with us in our recent

Motor Cycle 1% H.P. almost new,
Apply to L. M. Clarke, Jeweller, No.
12, James St. Phone 3757,
22.5.51—2n









bereavement occasioned through the
death of our dear mother Whillemina
King, ELECTRICAL
John, Gladys, Sydney, Mavis (children). aarvecipibatstintie
20.5.51—In. REFRIGERATOR—One U.S. 7 cubic
foot Frigidaire Refrigerator. Apply:

Harold Weatherhead c/o Weatherhead's
Drug Store. Phone 2164—3144.

IN ' MEMORIAM











oraeeesaneeassess usecase stint











17.5.51—t.i.n
ne a REFRIGERATOR—English Electric 6%
GREENIDGE—In loving memory of our} ©%- ft. New in January. 4% years
dear beloved husband and father} 2U#rantee. As new. Price $450, owner
Fitz Gardiner Greenidge who deparittd wate island. DERRICK PARAISO.
this life on 19th May 1950. AREES HILL. 19.5.51—3n.
“Happy and smiling always content Tee
Gone but not forgotten, POULTRY
With Jesus he may sleep, but not
forever.” CHICKS—Parks Pure Breed ‘Barred

Ever remembered by—
Marie Greenidge (wife), Lionel, Randolph,
Darnell (children). 22.5.51—1In.

Rock chicks 7 and 8 weeks old. Apply
to A. Forde opposite pipe, Sobers Lane.
City 22.5.51—1n.
DUCKS — Khaki Campbell. Dial £309.
§1--3n,

MOORE—In loving memory of Louise
Moore, who died on the 22nd and also
Jacob Nathaniel Moore who died on













22nd May, 1924. 4 POULTRY — Imported white Leghorn

We miss them, oh, we miss them Cockrels, eight weeks old, $2.50. Apply

Its only those who've lost can tell.’ | Miss F, Cameron, Sunbury, St. Philip.

Mrs. Mary Reefer, Mrs. Maude Branker, 20.5.51—2n.

Millicent Crichlow, (daughters), Harcourt -
Moore (son). 22.5.51—1In. LIVESTOCK



PROPS OSSOO OOP POSS POSSE

BUILDINGS FOR SALE



ONE HOLSTEIN COW—giving 36 pts.
milk, 3rd calf. See C. A, Edghill, Well
House, St.Philip. 22.5.51--In

MECHANICAL

GRASS CUTTERS — Massey-Harris 5
and 6 ft, immediate deliveries. Enquiries
Solicited Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616

22.5.51—6n

MISCELLANEOUS

CIGARETTES — Ardath Cork tipped
Cigarettes. Buy now before the ad-
vanced price comes into effect. We still
have a small stock at the reduced price



|

}

OFFERS ARE INVITED
FOR

ALL OR ANY
OF















S —namely 10's. 16c. and 20's 32c.
THE VALUABLE “eee 15.8.01-20,
FREEHOLD BUILDINGS) jor. yoursmis! . VANIL.

OCCUPYING
THE WHOLE OF ONE SIDE
G ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56;

: 10 ft $8.40, Nett cash, Better hurry!

THE MARKET SQUARE |* BARNES & CO. UTD. os ten,
IN LODGE SCHOOL BLAZER—Fit boy
8 to 10 years. $12.00. Wordnet
ST. GEORGE, GRENADA.
FOR DETAILS Apply to:-
P.O. Box 6, St. George,
GRENADA.

view of the islond wide Wag?
the above represents a splen-
to any “GO-AHEAD }

OUT! BARBA MFG. Co., 69 ROEBUCK
STREET. Dial 2297. IT'S LATER THAN
YOU THINK! 19.5.51—4n

GALVANISED SHEETS—Best qualite
new sheets. Cheapest



in the Istand !





—- SRD
PRIMUS—Lantern Parts, from needls
to tops. Primus Stove parts, Primus
Round giant stoves, boils 5 gallons in
20 minutes. Send your Primus troubles
to us, we will remedy them, Chandlers
Hardware and Bicycle accessories,

and Tudor Streets. Phone 4024
22.5.51-—-2n



en SD
WHITE TILES—6’’ White Tiles. Enquire
at the Auto Tyre Co. Trafalgar St. Phone
y 22.5,51—t.f.n

In
Increase,
cid opportunity
businessman.






“
ey.
s

eee abe

OS

Cured By Doing
What He Shouldn't

For 25 years John Parr spent
a “small fortune” trying to cure

University College of

tac his duodenal ulcer, Nearly

$ The West Indies 600,000 people suffer from : (
kind 4 lai i England

3 EXTRA-MURAL DEPART- ind of complaint in nglanc h

and Wales every year,



Reed | £iving credit

this}beef, mutton, lamb,





















a
} aH
j , >a
FOR RENT | PUBLIC NOTICES | PUHRLIC SALES WANTED OFFICIAL NOTICE
| | f€n cents per agate line on week-days | BARBADOS. a
Minimum charge week 72 cents «and | nd 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, Ten cents per agate tine on week-aays Minimum chorge week 72 cents and | IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY
i cents Sundays 24 words — over 24| minimum charge $1.50 on week-days 7d 12 cente per ugate line on Sundays,| % cents Sundoys 24 words over 24} IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, | do hereby give notice ‘to all ;
words 83 cents a word week—4 cente o| 2nd $1.80 on Sundays. | mimamum cnarge $1.50 on week-days| rds 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a| Persons having or claiming any estate, right interest or any lien or incumbrance —
| word Sundays. and $1.80 on . word Sundays in sffecting the property hereinafter itioned (the property of the defendants) >_ 7
' before me an account of their ws with their witnesses, documents ye tlw
. a vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours + ae
HOUSES ae NOTICK bis AUC’%1ION HELP 112 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Publie Butldmas +
pa pe onthene for one or more vacant St. — mes ae oe ae wssin weiner | Bridgetown before the 7th dav of July, 1951 in order that such claims may
BRRACHAN Opposite Roumanika, the ael’s Vestry Exhibition tenable at HILLMAN MINX 1949 MODEL. CAPABLE TEACHER of Portuguese. | ported on and ranked accoraing to the nature and priority thereof respectively,
Dayrells Road. Apply to present tenant ¢ Combermere School, will be received We are instructed by the owner who] Apply: Bell, Phone 4014 * otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be
22 5 51—6n by the Clerk of the Vestry up to/12/| has left the Colony to auction this very 22.5.51- deprived of ali clairss on or against the said property. :
atin Se eclock noon on Thursday 22nd day of | fine moter car which has only done 9,00) ——-: ——————- —-——— — Plaintiff; HERBERT HUTCHINSON BAYLEY, trustee of the will of George ||
BUNGALOW + Swansea, Worthing, | M4, 1951. | miles and to the best of our knowledge} STENOTYPIST (Beginner or qualif 3 varren, deceased 7 thi
fully furnished 4 bedrooms, Fridge Candidates must be sons of parishion- | has never been damaged in an accid ot] Weuled immediately. Apply in person Defendants AVINIA LEWIS; FANNY LEWIS: GLADYS LEWIS, MARS ni)
Phone, Radio, Garage. Fr 15th June. | 4 i straitened circumstances and must | Sale at Cole's Garage on Frid 2 and by letter to J. A, Mareon & Son GARET CADOGAN; BEATRICE LEWIS and CLARA LEWIS. 1
Dial 2490 or 3578 s 4 a not be less than ten years and four|May at2pm 7 ae tt ee, 19.8,81—t.f.n.| PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain parcel of land (formerly part of Goodiine® giamt) Yi
2 7 7.5.51—3n months nor ‘mare. than Sates oe he ne he JOHN M. BLADON Ds ei Sas ation) situate in the parish of Saint Michael and Island shovewia i
. oe mo | h F n 3 Q : ’ SA a ream containing by admeasurement Two acres three roods ten and 7a
FLAT: Beaumont, Hastings, unfur-| 4 om the Ist day of January 1951, to Auctioneer AL 1AN—A young and cnergeti perches or thereabouts abutting on lands of Ak ch i
nished. Dining and Sitting rooms, 2|%€ Proved by a Baptismal Certificate, 22.5.51—4n | Plesman for a commission — bupiness the Westbury Cemetery on lands of a place called, Frolic. end att Wy =
bedrooms, running water, Kitchen witn’ Wich must accompany the application. —_——--— —._..... | Apply by letter to P.O. Box 52 private roadway or however else the same is abutting, i.
gas, usual conveniences. No pets or Parents and/or Guardians will be noti- REAL ESTATE 0.20808: | BD Se Sith elerany.: 100 ; 2
children. Dial 2636. 22.5.51—2n fot the time and place of the Exam- ee nnn — Dated 2nd May, 1951.
ation. WILLIAMS,
“FONTAMARA” — On the Maxwell|, Forms of application can be obtained | . 2 WOODEN BUILDING — 21 it. MISCELLANEOUS Resutrerincipinlery
Coast, fully furnished—ineluding Fridge | f°™ the Vestry Clerk's Office. ft. 88 ft. in good order. H. C. Man SPAN SES é 4.5.51—4n
bk Palaghone for the months of June, By Order, ning, Newlands. Two Mile Hill, st |, SPANISH CLASSES—If you are in $$ letterncons E
October, ‘No’ Te ‘aaa ‘iaaaaeer E. C. REDMAN, Michael. 22.5,51—3n,. terested in learning Spanish, rapid and il
Apply at Browne Co. 43 Swan Street Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry ia — j correct, telephone 4716 19.5.8 ’ =
telephone 2257. : 22.5 ee, $.5.51—7n By public competition at our office | ~~ Rien ineimse eins memati —— y S&S ‘ oR
_ 32.5. Sao eI James Street on Friday 25th May 1951, I OsT «& FOUN >» ;
MODERN FURNISHED BUNGALOW ai | TRE AGRICULTURAL Alps ACTS, 1950. {t 2 Pam. 1 rood 14 perches of land at Sei, |
Haggatt Hall 2% miles from town. Hot | T° the creditors holding specialty liens | Pte Carlton, St. James. the propery } 4
ele. and. all modern conveniences et ore Plantation, St. Lucy. pecans Sane of the late William Jordan, LO
Ring 2 ‘or particulars. OTICE that we the f | :
SER os sigan tthe above ‘named phunation, sxe about | For further particulars and conditions|” RUNNING SHOES—At Kensington, one wy
i | to obtain a loan of £2,500 under tne | of sale, apply to pair running shoes, perhaps taken awa nie
HOUSE to rent furnished. 6 to 7/| Provisions of the above Act, against the HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD in error after Sports. Return to Advocate | '
months from June 10th. Top Rock | Sugar, Molasses and other crops of the 16.5.51—5n } Advertising Department 22,5.51—1n | ’
Excellent nztw. Modern | conveniences said plantation to be reaped. in 1931-88. | GAR REA Ee A Oe id ARN Se Ee a mt {
neludi 5 Y oT. . y u +—9 125 . a a itts y . - 5 mi ai
cement Ne asset | Mae sa nas Mee” SOTO) linge Be Font yo aiefor tat: x" Hay Baio tounge we | |
51—2 Dated this 19th day o i 7 - Finde t to Egbert Johnson, H.Jasor
20.5.51-2n | .PRTRUDE ELIZABETH THOMPSON Apply to L. M. Clarke, Jeweller, No Jones & Con eet en in '
ees TO SUBLET : BOYCE, 12 James St Phone 3757. 22.5.51—2n. ; — . * - ;
“TO! “—Cattlewash for month of an | g ‘ cz |
July” Apply: Gittens—4484 { JAMES F. W. BOYCE, | ERNEST DALE, Passage Road standing | cost our angling club £200, 5! j
19.5.51—3 ‘Gunere om 22 perches of land. Dwelling house > itt
-51—3n. 19.5 51—3n comprises open verandah, Drawing ana We gave them two days to settle ‘ iy
5 | Dining rooms two bedrooms, kitehen,| down. Then every evening since id

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, ean Waldron
(nee Suttle) as I do not hold myself re-
sponsible for her or anyone else con-
tracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

BERTIE WALDRON,
Bourn Land,
Christ Church
22.5.51—2n







The pubiic are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife RUBY HAYNES
(nee CALLENDAR) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting any debt or debts in
my name unless by a _ written order
signed by me.
CONRAD HAYNES,
Maxwell Hill,
Christ Chireh
1



2n

The public are heceby warned against
giving credit to my wife VIOLET
STUART inee GRIFFITH) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me

EDWARD STUART,
Westbury Road,
St. Michael,
22.5. 51—2n
a

The public are hereby warned against

giving credit to my wife CLARICE

VANILLA | GREEN (nee GRAHAM) as I do not hold

A] myself responsible for her or anyone else
}pint, or 6 cents an ounce, SELLING | contracting any debt or debts in. my

name unless by a written order signed
by me.
AUSTIN GREEN,
Jerico, near Jordans,
St. George.
22.5.51—2n
—_.
The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, GLENDEEN
GOODING (nee Walcott) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
ane else contracting amy debt or debts |
In my name unless by a written order
signed by me.
Bigned STANLEY GOODING,
Content Cot, St. Philip
22.5.51—2n.
The public are hereby warned against
to my wife, ESTELLE
LOUISE MURRELL (nee Mills) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else contracting any debt or
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me.
Signed FRANCIS MURRELL,
Fitz Village, St. James.
22.5.5







batter,

He could enjoy again lobsters,
erab and oysters. But he had to
avoid fatty fish like salmon,
herring, mackerel, and kippers.

But No Stems

OF meat HE COULD HAVE
veal, pork
but not the crackling),
am, and smoked meats.

~ \ ,

g art Than he went to a cocktail} But HE COULD NOT cat
x Residential party, where he heard about Dr |Stews, oxtails, curries, tripe
% J. Jacques Spira, who cured 95{Sausages, puddings, and pies, He

SUMMER SCHOOL, 1951

WEST INDIAN HISTORY
and ECONOMICS

Friday evening July 20 —
Sat. afternoon July 28
at
CODRINGTON COLLEGE

per cent of his patients
methods directly opposite to
recognised ulcer treatment.

Dr. Spira cured Parr in
weeks, permanently,

Strict Diet

John Parr found that normal

treatment consisted mainly of

five

pby}had to stick to grilled or roast
the}meats, but miss anything boiled,

fried, braised or minced,
Poultry, he found, should
be roasted, not boiled.

He could eat all root vegeta—
bles except onions, leeks and
radishes, Potatoes should. be
boiled or baked in their jackets.

rest and a strict diet. : Euer were banned
lusi e: $15, When you have an ulcer your t reall Se : ‘

Inclusive Fee: $ stomach functiong®. too. quickly He i wee allowed. to sigs
Apply to Resident Tutor, and doctors say the best way to meee: ately, particularly — alter
Sandy Hook, Maxwell Coast, slow it down is to feed it with fats, | C2’. kK? “Der Soir ie lite
Christ Church. Tel: 8526. But that is “only the initial ir teas io ree Mae e
i to answer,” says Dr, Spira. He S- s = a
ac eeeeet enaenaae argues this way. It is generally opdarnte rd & — in
S tion is limited. Programme believed that too much acid}@lute form should do any harm.

6 ; causes ulcers. But acid cannot Rich Man’s Fat

on application.

Opening Address by H.E.
the GOVERNOR, July 20,
8 p.m.

do it alone.

Spira points to bile as the
villain, It starts the trouble
and keeps it going with the
help of acid. Eliminate the
bile and you break up the
deadly combination.

Fat stimulates the flow of bil

Lecturers:

E. W. Barrow, B.Sc. Econ.
Judge J. W. B. Chenery, B.A.

$
%
%
|
y
:
%

A. E. Douglas-Smith, M.A. into the stomach, “The answer
A, deK, Tumere abt to the problem,” says Spira, “is
7 probably to eat less fat.”
Dr. Bruce Hamilton But he warns: “It is physically
% Prof. J. H. Parry, M.B.E., impossible to live normally on a
Bereta diet entirely free of fats. What
x mt a ° ea cM.G., I prescribe is a low-fat diet.”
s, -D., M.se.
$ The Rev, C, Sayer, B.A, x Lots of Cream
x raw 5 é For years John Parr had
& K._H. Straw, B.A. (Hons. R y 7 ro
ss Econ.) % | been doing the opposite.
% Judge H. A. Vaughan X| knew that a strict ulcer 4
& ete. %| ment consisted of living on milk
> ¥
hoe Pp root, farola, junket, custard,



allowed a ‘“coddled egs”
some thin bread and butter, He
had lots of cream and olive oil.

He had to avoid such things as
fried fish, pork, high game, meat
soup, cheese, curries and new
bread. He was told to have no
meat for six months,

One of his first diets conkisted
largely of milk, orange juice,
toa rusks and in inordinate
amount of steamed ssh.” He had
to eat or drink something every
two hours. a

His two “arch-enemies
alcohol and tobacco,

With Dr. Spira’s treatment
he found that milk was “for-
bidden except in the smallest
quantity for tea and coffee.
He had to by-pass all

REAL ESTATE
JOHN

4.
BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
Representative :
GERALD WOOD









were

|
| foods
FOR SALE

BRANDONS, St. Michael. A
mellow old stone property on the
coast with good boat anchorage
about 1 mile from town, with 3%
acres of enclosed grounds, the
major part planted with produc-
tive coconut and fruit trees.
There are 3 reception, 4 bedrooms,
galleries, 2 garages ete. Suitable
either for continued use as a priv-
ate residence, a club or boarding
house.



Calling .

ALL LADIES !!
NEWS FLASH
A smali shipment of .

EMBD. ANGLAISE

is just unpacked

REAL ESTATE AGENT

at

THANI'S

Prince Wm, Henry St.

AUCTIONEER |

PLANTATIONS BUTLDING |
’Phone 4640 |





rich in fats. He could have aj cooking f¢
wide choice of fish, grilled, boiled } 100 per cen
or even fried if he removed the;

The whole story is told in
“How 1 Cured My_ Duodenal





Kidneys, Newsprint Supply

BARBADOS ADVOCATE







THE SUGAR INDUST?. AGRICUL- |

TURAL BANK “CT, 1948
To the Creditors holiing spocialty lens
against LITTLE SPA _ Plantation,
St, Joseph.

TAKE NOTICE that I, the owner of
the above Plantation am about to obtain
loan of £250 under the provisions of
the above Act against the said Plantation,
in respect of the Agricultural year 19§1
to 1962

No money has been borrowed
the Agricultural Ai Act, 1905,
above Act as the case may
respect of such year.

Dated this 22nd day of May, 1951.

L. E. SMITH,
Owner,
22.5.51—3n.

NOTICE

Applications for one vacant St. Joseph's
Vestry Exhibition tenable at the St.
Michael's Girls’ School, will be received
by the Clerk of the Vestry up to 3 o'clock
p m.on Tuesday 29th day of May 1951.
Candidates must be daughters of Parish-
ioners in straitened circumstances and
must have attained the age of & years,
and must be under 12 years by July 3ist
1951, to be proved by a Baptismal Cer-
tificate, which must accompany the
Application, all Candidates to be
examined must be at the School not later

under
or the
be) in







then 9.15 a.m, on Saturday, June 16th
1951. Forms of Application can_ be
obtained from the Vestry Clerk's Office
A T. KING,
Clerk, St. Joseph's Vestry.
16 .5.51-
NOTICE

Is hereby given that Windward Cricket
Club grounds will be open for practice





from Tuesday 28th May. 20.5.51—2n
NOTICE
IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is the in-

tention of the Vestry of the parish of
Christ Church to cause to be introduced
into the Legislature of this Island a Bill
authorising the said Vestry to borrow

|

of sale

|



a sum of money not exceeding $7,200.00
to be used by them (a) as to $6,564.00 in
repairing existing roads and paths in the
Christ Church Cemetery, and laying out
and making new roads and paths therein,
(b) as to $587.40 in effecting repairs to
the Mortuary Chapel in the said
Cemetery, and (c) as to $48.00 in clean-
ing a drainage well ir the said Cemeteryy
the said sum so raised to be repaid in
ten annual instalments of $720.00 each,
commencing in the year 1955, together
with interest at a rate not exceeding
5 per centum per annum on the prin=
cipal sum and the unpaid balances

thereof for the time being owing.

Dated the 2ist day of May 1951.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,

Solicitors for the Vestry of
Christ Church,

22.5.51—8n.

To Obtain Bigger



LONDON, May.

Raw materials which hitherto
have gone to waste are to be used
to meet Britain’s critical shortage
of newsprint,

W. J. Curtis—Willson, President
of the Newspaper Society, in
making this disclosure at the
annual meeting of the organiza
tion, said a new process had beer
developed for the production of
pulp for newsprint and other
kinds of paper. The new source
of supply would become availabl
this summer, He did not disclose
details.

“It will only be a trickle, but
behind the venture are tremen-
dously powerful concerns,” Mr
Curtis-Willson said, “And, if es 1
firmly believe, this trickle of puly
proves that we can make news
print from raw materials at pre

Ulcer” (Michael Joseph, 8s. 64.).) cent untapped, we shall have em-
Dr. Spira argues that feeding] ,arked upon a new era for our

habits cause ulcers. Civilisation
and a better standard of living
have resulted in

e|ticher foods.

A wealthy man eats more
fat than a poor man. He also
gets ulcers more often,

John Parr interested his family
doctor in Dr. Spira’s treatment
He tried it out on some of his
patients. At least one in three
refused to give up their glass of
milk,

Of the doctor said:

rest, his

He “There’s no doubt about it, They
treat—|are quite definitely better.”

ere } showing thelof
and semi-liquid foods like arrow-)amount of fat in some common( thirds

Here is a_ list

foods. The figures are for

thick soup, and vegetable puree |dehydrated foods because this is
Once or twice a day he wWaS/the pest way

and | tat-content: —

of showing their









Food of fat
BUTTER .
MARGARINE 98
CHEESE ..... 30-67
MILK ... 30
EGGS 0-63
BEEFSTEAK 49
LAMB CHOP 60
PORK CHOP ., 63
BACON 72-85
PILCHARD 0
SALMON 35
MACKEREL 26
HALIBUT 2
TROUT ‘ 10
COD and HADDOCK 2
WHITE BREAD .... 1.9
BROWN BREAD 2.6
OATMEAL 9
VEGETABLES 1-5
FRUITS 1-8
HONEY 0
SUGAR . 0
Salad-oils, lard, pastry shortevings,

and cod-liver oil are all
fat
—LES.







10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Telephone Cords in different

Coloured Plastics, Easy to

put on, Saves that annoying
Twisting and Knotting.

CABINET GLASS
Opened by
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

& HARDWARE



|
|
|
|



Percentage | pal guest of the

newspapers.”

He warned of

that the price
tinue to rise and at £60 a ton many
of the smaller newspapers would
pass out of existence. ‘
“That is what it means unless
we come to their rescue,” he
added.
Sources Of Supply
Referring to world sources of
supply, Mr, Curtis-Willson said
annual production of newsprint

came to about 9,000,000 tons. 'The |

United States with a population
some 160,000,000 took two-
, the other third was lef
the 2,500,000,000 in the rest of
world to share out,
Lord Woolton, Chairm
Conservative Party, and
the current restrictior
necessitated a drastic
size of the British Newspapers,
“J do not believe c
good thing for the public life of
this nation that there should be
this severe restriction on the
quantity of news now p
Lord Woolton declared.
“There are some of us, at any
rate, who a
control you.
have had a be

IMPORTANT
NOTICE

ee

Some of us think we
liyfull of controls.”

The Annual General Meet-
ing of the Barbados Cricket
Association will be held at
KENSINGTON OVAL (and
not at Queen’s Park) on
Friday, May 25th at 4.30
p.m,

Entrance by George Chal-
lenor Stand

W. F. HOYOS,
Hony. Secty





|























t to|

princi- | About
Society, deplored | play footbail.
tions which had |
cut iu the! first among the craziest sports.

re not very anxious te























toilet and bath,

The above will be offered for sale te
public competition on Friday 25th May
at 2 p.m. at the office of the under-
signed from whom conditions of Sale
and further particulars can be obtained

HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD.
17.5.51—-5n




























we have been trying to angle them
out with artificial flies.

We have stalked them from be-
hind, wading doubled up in the
water. We have slithered over wet
grass on our stomachs to reach

| the edge of the high banking with-

PENRITH situate at the corner of
llth Avenue and Belmont Road, St
Michael, standing on 11,240 square feet
of land. The house is built of stone and
contains drawing, dining, breakfast
rooms and kitchen downstairs, three
bedrooms, toilet and bath upstairs,
Usual modern

and servants rooms in yard,

Inspection every day (except Sundays)
between 4 and 6 p.m. or by appointment
Dial 2965.

The above at

will be set up for sale

Public Competition at our office in
Lucas Street, Bridgetown, on Friday, the
Ist June 1951, at 3 pom
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors
19.5.51—9n

ee
The undersigned will offer for sale ai
their Office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-

town, on Friday the 25th, day of May,| (he creatures hushed their squeak-

1951, at 2 p.m.

The dwellinghouse knows as “GRAND
VIEW" with the land thereto containing
3 Roods 4 3/5th. Perches or thereabouts,
situate at Bathsheba, Saint Joseph.

Inspection on application to
Caretaker, on the premises.

For further particulars and conditions
apply to
COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.
18.5.51.—e.0.d

the



The New
Toothache
°Tec
Hy

Chapman Pincher

N ingenious device for detect-

ing tooth decay long before

ft can do any visible damage has

been invented by a London scien-
tist.

A platinum wire, linked to a
10-volt battery and a_ current-
measuring instrument, is fastened
to each suspected tooth in vurt
during a dental check-up. Another
ire, touching the cheek, completes
the circuit,

If a tooth is absolutely sound
no current passes becuuse an intact
covering of enamel is a bad con-
ductor of electricity.

But if there is a minute crack
or groove in the enamel in which
decay germs could get a grip a
current surges through, and a tell-
tale pointer swings into action.

Dr. Paul Pineus, of the Middle-
sex Hospital Medical School, W. },
who invented the device, has
proved that it will detect decay-
filled cracks missed by the sharp-
est-eyed dentists or even by

X-rays.
Test Cocktail

AS IF to prove that any ordeal

is worth enduring in the in-
terests of science, 21 London med-
ical = students—three of them
women—have each drunk one and
a quarter pints of a nauseating
chemical cocktail before breakfast
for several days running.

Recipe for the cocktail, which
was devised by Dr. J. N. Hunt, of
Guy’s Hospital, S.E.1 :—

Dissolve powder made from
lemon pips in water, add a little
sugar, colour with a red dye made
from carbolic acid, and finish off



people eating}imported newsprint would con-| with a dash of caustic soda,

The experiments showed thai
the more food you eat at a sitting

Fishing must also be an easy

Eight days ago I helped to

it can be a;dump into Surrey’s sandy River

{

|

Wey 500 fat, foot-long trout. After
a pampered, well-fed life on a
trout farm they were in perfect

rinted,” condition for the frying pan. They

« 7 -——












conveniences, Garage] erect in one big tin bath! It’s crazy





|



out being seen. At least one of us
has slithered over the edge.

Yet nobody I know has yet}
caught a trout. And to think that
last week we had them all corns

|
a |

Coo For Coins

WHAT sort of noise does

guinea-pig make? T thought
they were restricted to a high-
pitched squeak until yesterday

visited a guinea-pig farm. where
thousands were running about the}
floor,

“Rattle your money,” the head
keeper said. I did so. Immediately

ing and started cooing softly like
a great flock of doves.

They did this every time I jin-
gled the coins, But the name
guinea-pig has nothing te do with

|
|
}
|
‘

this ready response, It is a cor-
ruption. of Guiana, their Seuio
American home,
Alchemy, 1951
THE wildest dream of the
medieval alchemists —- trans-|
muting quicksilver (currently

priced at 22s. 3d. per lb.) into gold
(priced at £150 per Jb.) has been
realised by British atom scientist
Dr. F, D. 8, Butement.

The process, which involves the

use of a giant atom-smashing
machine at the Harwell, Berks,
atom station, is, unfortunately

too expensive to swell
gold reserves.,—4L.E,S.

Britain's
Rates Of Exchange
CANADA

May 21, 1951,

621/10% pr. Cheques on

Bankers 601/10% pr
Demand
Drafts 59 95% pr
Sight
Drafts 59 8/10% pr
62 1/10% pr. Cable
60 610% pr. Curreney 58 6/10% p
Coupons 57 9/1058 pr
Silver 20% pr





The Sun God

azzliing Spectacular, Brillian

THE CARNIVAL BAND

Trinidad,

D

From



less time each ounce of it shee sa ;
oye ney the Sarnach— Riel may |Sway to the Rhythm of Trinidad’:
be the main reason why over- Leading Steel Band beaten by :
eating ruins the digestion, {cam of experts.
Crazy Favourite The 1951 Costume Champion
WHICH British sport has the |from the South will bring glam
most active adult enthusiasts’? jour straight from the Histor
Football? Cricket? Racing? Gol!’ |Bookgs when staging the Exect
| None of these, The mee ion of Essex, Straight from th
lanswer ig fishing. tomantic West come the Wik
Careful estimates by the Asso- fndians and the Ranchers, 7)
the |ciation of Fishing Teckle Makers | out of the Belfry Come the Bats
| put the number of British anglers ; :
an of the| between 2,000,000 and 3,000,000 _ CONFIDENTIAL
800,000 adults regularly| At 7.30 pm. on 7th. June,

Queen’s Park will be transformed
into a family land of Song and
Colour,

Don’t Miss it.

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened



















THANTS iv
COCKTAIL PARTY ? seid
“o make your drinks oe
softer and nicer
USE
DISTILLED WATER IN
FURNISH
Your friends will notice the
difference,
Get it at your GAS WORKS, i NOW AND SAVE!
Bay St.
* { NEW and Rtnewed Bedsteads,
- — — Beds, Springs, Lathes—-Wardrobes,
oF, Linen Presses, Chests-of-Drawers
»
% Vanities, Smaller Dressing
Tables, Washstands, Screen
EE noOoK % Frames
whi ma! R Dining, Kitchen, Sewing
% rg, itchen, Sewing and
eh kes % Fancy Tables, China, Kite and
“ GOD'S WAY OF eo Bedroom Cabinets, Sideboards $17
. Sewing Basket in
SALVATION $ Stand, $6.00
AL % Bookeas Bookracks
” » 2 ge Glass-cased 1 divided
PLAIN a Office Chairs, Mats 0
%,
>
Plexse write for one % %| Serine
Samuel Roberts, Gospel st 7
Book and Tract Service, % t Be S, WILSON
a 30, Central Avenue, Ban- %|
412 gor N. Ireland” %! SPRY STREET, DIAL 4069
t ¥ -
, | %6OCO10O7 CECE OOE_E a ——————EEE EES
,

”

PAGE SEVEN





































my Ne
out

Jf ' Check the new 5-ton







100 HORSE POWER s
£
:
MORRIS-COMMERCIAL
against everything you and your ‘a
drivers want in a truck! aang
% tt

This new, husky Morris-

Commereial definitely sets a

new and higher standard in
truck values, Designed for
the operator who demands
iong and arduous work from
his vehicles, Planned for driv-
ing comfort, too, an important
factor on a tong haul

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504

PING NOTICES

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED





















The M/V “CARIBBEE” will

(M.A.N.%Z,. LIN) my

ee oe accept Cargo and Passengers for
joni ARABIA ig scheduled to sail Dominica, Antigua, MontSeffat, %

om Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th Nevi. nd St. Kitt: Sail 4
May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane 16th tune i. # Sailing 18h. .
June, Sydney 23rd June, arriving at Trin- e “AC - v
idad ‘during the latter half of July, and The M/V CACIQUE DEL u

CARIBE will

accept Cargo and
Passengers for St. Lucia, St. Vin-
cent, Grenada and Aruba, Sailing

proceeding thereafter to Barbados
Liverpool

In addition to general cargo this vessel

and

has ample space for chilled and hard Tuesday 22nd, inst.
frozen cargo. The M/V “MONEKA” wiil a
Cargo accepted on through Bills of Lad- accept Cargo and Passengers for
ing for transhipment at Trinidad to Brit- Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, _ bi
ish Guiana, Leeward and Windward Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing *
istands, Friday 25th inst,
For further particulars apply

FURNESS, WITHY & CO., LTD,
Trinidad,
Bwi,

—_—_—-
B.W.1, SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION (Ineo
Consignee. Tele, No, 4047,

and
DA COSTA & CO.,, LTD.,
Bridgetown,





NEW YORK SERVICE

April Arrives Barbados 8th May
May ” 29th

“TRYA" sailed 27th
Steamer Sails 18th





NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

nd
1S. "ALCOA PATRIOT” Sailed 18th April Arrives Barbados 4th May SE
S, "ALCOA POLARIS” Sails 2nd May ” ” 18th a «
8S. “ALCOA ROAMER” Sails 16th May é ” Ist June s%





NT

CANADIAN’ SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship

“ALCOA PEGASUS"

Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives B’dos,




"3.8 April 27th April 30th May Ilth ~
Ss. ‘ALCOA PIONEER” May lith May 14th May %th 7
S. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE” May 25th May = 30th June 10th .

SORTHBOUND
8. “ALCOA PLANTER" due May 11th, sails for St,

John, & St, Lawrence”
River Ports,



*These vessels have limited passenger accommodation,



ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE

boners,

o ne
CISA IIIS 95%

OGG GGT ISG ROOST GTN COCO IE
PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominic for
sailing to Europe fortnightly. The usual ports of call are
Dublin, London, or Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual ~




reduction for chidren,




» SRT
%

BOILER GAUGE GLASSES
are obtainable from

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

Pier Head Lane.

|

Sizes too numerous to mention.







(CE AGAIN AVAILABLE...
“NOXZEMA”’

coe This Medicated Skin Cream



<4 i



winnnd

Your Favourite Skin Cream ....,



Jah

prevents . SUNBURN Soothes and Heals... ts
Skin Irritations
“NOXZEMA\” .... allows you to enjoy your Holidays, or
Weekends without Fear or Worry about Sunburn. er
| Remember LS cesssesue “NOXZEMA" “a
The Medicated Cream in the “Little Blue Jar” “3
in Three Sizes 1/3, 3/9, and 5/6 per Jar oe

1

Obtainable at - - -

BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES
Ltd.—Broad Street
and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings

4
a

on ms

|
|











PAGE EIGHT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



JAMAICA TEAM BEAT COLTS XI

3—NIL

THE visiting Jamaica football team opened their tour

impressively when they defeated a Colts XI three—nil in
their first football fixture of their tour at Kensington Oval
yesterday afternoon,
3 A crowd well over three thousand witnessed the mateh
which was interesting and exciting from start to the finish.
The Jamaica team scored their first two goals in the first
half and the third came shortly after the second half had
begun.

SPORTS
WINDOW



The Jamaica goal scorers were
inside left Rebert 3erry, left
winger Keats Hall and the tall
well built right winger Alty
Sasso. All of these scored one
goal each to put Jamaica well on
top.







fiternoon Spartan meets The Jamaica goalkeeper Ronnie
Rovers at Kensington | Cooper thrilled the crowd with

livision football match + : ree ¢
DIVISION 3 his anticipation and style and
At the Garrison Notre D.me the Colts forwards found it hard
1 play inst Wanderers in 4 wo get past him. The two full
eget match. backs Huntley DaCosta and

BASKETBALL

FIRST DIVISION Dickie Bayliss played a_ brilliant





Harrison College v Harrison came and proved strong Oppon-
College Old Boys at ¥M.P.C. ents for the Colts forward line.
onal Dhatrose wwe.) ¥ 20-0. The Jamaica team took the

field first wearing roy eye

followed shortly -by the Solts

Com 1 XI wearing red jerseys and theit

compton Hits 147 goal-keeper Smith in a_ blue
ri . yullover.

For M.C.C, vs The game started with the

Ss tl Af icans Colts = rt wana ray © —

d Ss trom the southern en oO 1e

Ore HAee pitch, Jamaica took the kickoff

LONDON, May 21. and very soon their forwards

Denis Compton, England and were trying in the Colts area
Viiddlesex all-rounder, dominate About two minutes — after play
he cricket today at Lord’s whe) % McCollin at right wing for the
‘he Seuth Africans were 15 rurs Colts on receiving a long low
ehind the MCC with nine secon | pass from Drayton ran down
nnings wickets to fall at the en | unmarked with only Cooper to

beat but on reaching vee mais
-plying c Africans’ the area kicked the ball right
see Pines total ot 100 the MCC outside. The Jamaican custodian
yere all out soon -after tea for Cooper dashed across thinking the
271, At the close, the South Afri- ball was going goalwards
cans had made 66 for one wicket Shortly after the Jamaica right-
in their second innings. winger Alty Sasso centred nicely
across the Colts penalty area but
By scoring his fourth century iui] back Gibbons was there
in 6 innings, Compton bro:.ght his before the Jamaican centre
aggregate to 667 and materially lorward Minnett could reach the
increased his chances of scoring ball. The Colts got a free kick
1,000 runs in May, He batted three which Gibbons took and kicked
hours and a half for 147 which in- into the Jamaica area but
cluded one six and 17 fours, DaCosta and Bayliss were there
It was the 93rd century of his to clear. Y
career. The Colts made another attack
Compton showed form more like on Jamaica, and everyone thought
that of his vintage year in 1947 the first goal was going to be
when he set up a record aggregate netted against Jamaica when
of 3.816 runs, He appeared com- Williams at left wing ran gown
pletely untroubled by his knee .a- ind cut across with only the or
jury today. The thousand runs in Meeoes fo Bae a Rg as
May. has been accomplished by ?&# ; - ; ees
only three batsmen before. Three outside. White, centre forward
‘others have made a thousand be- 1° the Colts also = a try, but
fore June. Compton had yet to this also went outside ee a
achieve this notable feat. couple of inches from the cross
| —Reuter. bar, We Poa ibe Se
At this stage both teams were
pressing and Jamaica got their
tirst goal when Keats Hall on the
Yeft wing finding himsegi un-
‘ marked kicked a well directed
shot from the wing which com-
Derbyshire pletely beat Smith. The ball lodged
LONDON, May 21. itself in the left corner of the
County Cricket Results:—At goal,
Chesterficid, Yorkshire beat Der+ This goal was scored about 20
byshire by seven wickets. Derby- minutes after play had started.
shire 114, (Appleyard four for 31, With one goal up against !heim
Yardley four for 16) and 134 (Ap- Colts again went on the attack
pleyard four for 49), Yorkshire and an effort by McCollin to seore
182 (Yardley 75) and 68 for three. was again foiled by DaCosta and

of the second day's play.

t



Yorkshire Beat



—Keuter. Bayliss who were constantly om
the alert.
A nice centre by Sasso gave
Jamaica their second goal as
DAVIS CUP TENNIS Smith who rushed across to cuff
LONDON, May 21, the ball clear out of his area

Britain winning the doubles to- was charged, and Berry at inside
day took a lead of two matches to left who had reached the ball
one over France in their second the same time with Smith took
round of the European Zone the opportunity, and headeq the
Davis Cup tie »t Wimbledon here. ball into an empty goal, The score
Tony Mottram and Geoff Paish of was now two love in favour of
Britain beat Paul Remy and Ro- Jamaica, When referee Harris
bert Abdesselam 7—5, 6—3, 6—8, blew for half time, the score was
6—4.—Reuter. unchanged,

VIENNA, May 21, After half time the noisy

x crowd saw the Jamaica team com-
Sweden, who had already made

m ow “. Of bining well, and when the second
certain of meeting the Sardar hee half was about 16 minutes old,
the Britain v, France tie in © Sasso who had always been tak-

quarter finals, beat Austria 5—0 ing “tries” at the goal kicked in
in the Davis Cup here to-day, | a scorcher which Smith failed to

_ The Swedish won both fe final iold and to put Jamaica. three
singles to-day after gaining @ Jools up, Smith got down to the
winning 3—0 margin in the earlier ball but it trickleq through _ his
matches of the second round in fingers into the aaa .
the European zone tie, To-day’s é oy
results (Swedish players first) With their success, the Jamaica
were: Sven Davidson beat Hans players never at any time relaxed
Redl 6—4, 1—6, 6—4, 6—1. Tors- and time and time again when-
ten Johansson beat Specht 6—!, ever they found a gap in their
ij—5, 5—7, 6—4.—Reuter. gpponents defence made good use
of it. Their goal keeper Cooper
brought off a brilliaut save just
before the blow of* fom the right
winger McCollin,

The teams were;—

Jamaica: R. Cooper, H. Da
Costa, D. Bayliss, A. McLean,
T. Parchment, D. Smith, K. Hall,
R. Berry,- Minnett, H. Miller and
A Sasso.







Trafiie Do's
No. 8

HAVE ROAD



: Colts XI: Smith, Gibbons,
MANNERS Browne, F. Hutchinson, Gittens,
re Mt Clairmonte, MeCollin, Drayton,

Space made available by yo G. Hutchinson and Wil-

CANADA DRY

for Safer Motoring. The referee was Mr. L. F. Har-

ris, and the linesmen were Messrs.
E. Edwards and H, Thomas,

They'll Do It Every Time

Dios Ever NOTICE HOW SLOW A
@ TAX! SEEMS TO TRAVEL WHEN
YOURE WAITING FOR ONE 2









Registered U. &. Potent OMee







IT GOES
FAVORITE




TORTOISE TAXI? HERE'S SOME-

THING CREEPING









CAB I ORDERED ALONG MUST BE
AN HOUR AGO JAA HEARSE --NOâ„¢
= 2 pgj2ay





fioo

But once you Get int Wow!



NITE-SPOT'S CLOCK.»
Fi7 WHOA! HEY~
“Wee i |

F. HUTCHINSON makes a vain attempt to sten the ball from going into the goal after Robert Berry
had scored the second goal for Jamaica in yesterday's Colt-Jamaica football match,

Goalkeepor I. Smitn, in pullover, looks on,

Robinson K.O’s Oue German Team
FrenchChamp — '% Olympics

LAUSANNE, May 21,







PARIS, May 21. The Olympic Committees of Eas
Ray Robinson of the United and West Germany have agreed
States, world middleweight cham- that Germany should be repre-

pion, beat Kid Marcel, the French sented by only one team in the

champion in the fifth round of a 1952 Olympie games at Helsinki
ten-round non-title bout here This latest development will be
tonight Mareel’s seconds threw discussed to-morrow by the Inter-
ger = towel te tat national Olympie Committee.
obinson was content oO e Thou he rival German Olym-
Marcel do the foreing for the first ght ival German ae

pic Committees agreed that there



four rounds » stood back and
let the ee eee to him must be only one German team
countering on occasions when 0 decision was reached at to-day’s
Marcel landed with rather wild meeting of the International Com
punches to the head and body, mittee on the question of the es-
The second round followed a simi- tablishment and recognition of one
lar pattern Robinson used his German Olympic Cornmittee.
left effectively and was not unduly The East and West Germar
bothered. by the worrying tactics bodies were asked to sefd repre-
of his opponent. sentatives to Lausanne for the
Marcel got home a left hook meeting with the International
soon after the start of the third

Committee after they had failed
to reach agreement at the mecting
last week in Germany.—Reuter

Beverly Baker

round and cut Robinson’s eye. The
world champion replied with lefts
and rights to the head which drew
blood from.over the Frenchman's
right eye ahd his nose



Robinson warmed up in_ the
fourth round and began to hurt Tr . pate
the Frenchman with left and W Its Tennis litle
right hooks which forced Marce}
to seek the clinches, Robinson 5.) BIRMINGHAM, May 21.
opened out in true style in the Beverly Baker, of Santa Monica,
fifth round, He severely punish California, fourth ranking Ameri

can woman tennis player, won the

ed Marcel with two-fisted attacks. S°
.. Women's Singles title in the Pri

The Frenchman swung desperate









ly to the head but Robinson FY Club tournament on Saturday,
waded in and with a series of defeating the Australian cham
right and left hooks put Marcel pion, Mrs. Naney Bolton, 4—6,
down on his knees against the 6—4, 6-2.
ropes. Marcel’s seeonds threw in Jaroslav Drobny, who now plays
the towel after one minute, ten big time tennis in Egypt, won the
seconds, Men's Simgles title in the tourna-
—Reuter. ment at Guildford, Surrey
. vers defeated Vladmir Cer-
i nik, his old Czech Davis Cup
ase + oo tae nartner, Who went into exile w
x ores —_—_ Rui . fir go-8.~ G25 Boek ro with
. .
Wins By Iniings —-
KINGSTON, J’ca, May 19 BELGIUM BEAT
Probably history was made in EGYPT 4—1
any type of cricket today when

a local Jamaica major league side BRUSSELS, May 21










Campaign

MADRID, May 21,
The Spanish Government was
today reported to have. arrested

Madrid

cd in the
the State
Letters have

in. the capital

tomorrow in
campaign,
People were
public
nd_ places

»tters were

of



people for trying to
a cost of living demonstration in
by chain letter.

Among the arrested
civil servants said to be employ-
Roneo
Welfare

transport services,

Department

been
for the

“walk to

asked

amusement,
anonymous.





: Arrested For

‘Walk to Work’

organise

were two

c

Institution
circulating
last three
weeks urging peoples to take part
work”

to boycott
shops

All
They
ere believed to have come from
both right and left wing groups






of

The Police have been active
woughout Spain for the past
week arresting nine strike lead-
«rs in the Basque area and 15
‘anarchists’ in Barcelona, Ob-
servers believed this indicated
that the Police were making
careful investigation of recent
‘abour trouble.—Reuter.

Persian Issue
Affects Stocks

LONDON, May 21.
The Persian situation weighed

eavily on

seconds
levels.

most
lower
was

eonsisted of

with tomorrow Tuesday,

the
ixchange today

small and

and

moved to
Selling
business

levelling

prices

day of the account

Speculative

sales were

London Stock

in

slightly
however
mainly
positions
the last

en-

countered by the British Govern
ment funds which fell by three







after scoring only 22 runs won Belgium beat Egypt by four eighths and dullness was wide-
the match by an innings and matches to one in their second spread among industrials.
four runs in 95 minutes of play, round of the European Zone Rayon chares failed to hold the

The match, incidentally was Davis cup tie here today. initial gains that followed the
played between the West Indies Belgium, who met Germany in British celanese interim dividend
oldest cricket club Kingston and the Quarter Finals, had alreacy of six per cent, Last year
Melbourne, third oldest, at the gained a winning lead of 8—0 in payment of 10 per cent was made,
colony's deading cricket ground the tie and each team won one After being easier for most of the
Sabina Park, It was the aftermath of the final two singles today. day,’ engineering issues were
f overnight and early mornihg Results were: Marcel Coen +howing signs of recovery at the
ain, Kingston, sent in to bat, (Egypt) beat Philippe Washer close, Business in oils was
declared at 2 runs for 4 wickets (Belgium) 6—4, 1—6, 7—5, 6—4, small.

Melbourne hit up 22 for 2 -Reuter. —Reuter.
declared in 30 minutes, then rout-
ed their opponents for 16, batting > or
one man short owing to injury e aan ‘

Hero was Esmond Wentish SATISFACTION
West Indies fast bowler and ~ ain
captain of Melbourne who took GUARANTEED
3 for 1 and a match record ¢ ae
9 for 6 accomplishing the hat UNDER

rick in the second innings. F
tric in e seconc on Pao PERSONAL

Sta WY SUPERVISION



What's on Today

Police Courts 10.00 a.m.
House of Assembly meets
at 3.00 ».m.
CINEMAS
Globe “Dark City”. |
Royal “Kiss of Death”

$

Roxy “Stage to Tucson.” |

Olympic “The Great Maja- \
hara’’.

Empire “For Heaven's |!
Sake”.

Plaza “Hasty Heart’
By Jimmy Hatlo | |
|

ya

REED ST. CITY

ttt









8

THAT
FASTER THAN YOUR

SLOW DOWN!!
WE WANNA LIVE

1951,
FOR







BAY STREET

L.

& H.

MILLER

PHONE 2791



NOTICE

WE WISH TO ADVISE OUR
CUSTOMERS



OUR

PARTS DEPARTMENT
WILL BE CLOSED, FROM FRIDAY,

lst JUNE TO MONDAY 4th JUNE
BOTH DAYS

OUR

ANNUAL STOCK-TAKING



INCLUSIVE,

¢

DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING (0.,
TD.

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

DIAL 4269







Britain Wants

Raw Materials

OTTAWA, May 21.

According to informed sources
here, Britain is asking Canada for
assurances that she will get an
adequate supply of raw materials
tc develop her £4,700 million
arms programme, The British rep-
rescntatives were raising this issue
at today’s meeting of the Canada-

United Kingdom Continuing
Trade Committee, the sources
said.

This organisation was set up af
maintain permanent trade contact
between the two Governments
after Sir Stafford Cripps’ visit to
Canada in September, 1948, the
sources said,

No announcement was expect-
ed on the talks which are being |
held in secret. Informed quar- |
ters, however, said the agenda in-}
cluded a British request for gesur|
ances on raw materials and a
Canadian request for an expan-
sion of British imports from the}
Dominion.

Trade, economic and finance
officials from both couritries met
sue preliminary discussions before |
today’s Continuing Committee's |
fifth session opened. .

Expand Token Plan

The Canadian Press News

Agency said Canada would point ,

to the fact that Britain's import |

restrictions cut Caneda’s exports
to Britain from $700 million ia
1949 to $450 million in 1950. She
would ask: |

1. That the token shipment
plan be expanded

Under this plan Canadian ex -
porters with a traditional mar-
ket in Britain were allowed
import permits on 20 per cent
of their pre-war shipments
This was doubled to 40 per cent
last January. Canada would
ask for a further expansion
either by a percentage increase
or by expansion of the list of
goods for which their permits
are granted.

2. Approval by the Britisn
Government of a further allot-
ment of dollars to the West In-
dies to buy more goods from
Canada, Britain controls the
dollar pool for all of the Com-
monwealth’s sterling area coun-
tries. The British West Indies
have already indicated their
agreement with this view and
have coupled Canada’s request
with a similar request of their
cown.—Reuter,



Germany Wanied
As An Equal Party

BONN, May 21.

British Foreign Secretary
Herbert Morrison said here
today that his country wanted
Germany as an equal and im
portant partner among western
powers and as “an active partnei
in the maintenance of world
peace,”

He was speaking to corres-
pondents on the third day of his
four-day stay in Germany where
he is meeting leaders of Govern
ment and Opposition parties, He
described his conversations with
ee leaders as “suecess-
ul.”

Morrison is due to fly to Vienna
tomorrow for a_ three-day visit.
But he said taday that he was
ready to modify his plans at any

moment if the Persian oil dis-
pute necessitates his return to
London,

—Reuter.



Happy RELIEF
FROMBACKACHE

Neighbour said “Take Doan’s Pills”
HY PUT UP with needless
discomfort from backache,

rheumatic pains, lumbago, stiff,

aching muscles and joints or the
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Many theusands of healthy

Preis bless the day they took

oan’s Backache Kidney Pills.

This well known diuretic and
urinary antiseptic helps sluggish
kidneys to sory out their function
of ridding the blood of excess uric
acid and other impurities harmful
to health. Grateful le, every-
where, recommend Bean's Pills to
their friends and neighbours.

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TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951



Selecting Workers For U.S. Farms

From Our Ows
GRENADA, May 21,
About 1,000 men from all parts

of the island and the Dependency

of Carriacou crowded the Labour

Department yard, later shifting io

Queen’s Park for greater conve-

nience, seeking selection among

150 for farm work in the Uniter

States. 3
Interviews lasted most of” the

day and medical examinations

will follow before the fina] draft
of who will be sent to St. Lucia

to emplane there with the 500

Windwards’ contingent.

After police response had check-
ed two previous ilareups c.wsing

Correspondent











SS

IMPERIAL LEATHER ©!



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Romie yt aes S $7.09 &
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length with turn over &&
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Pair .... $1.03 & $1.24

and short sleeves.



STOILET SOAPS

Gents white India Gauze Vests with

slight damage—the first during the
strike period—Birch Grove Gov-
ernment schoo] in St, Andrew's
parish was last night completely
destroyed by fire.

The building was in a state of
aisrepair and overcrowded for u
long period but still met the great
need in the populous district until
the working out of the already
started priority progra'~me of new
school buildings recommended by
the Board of Edycation and ap-
proved by the legislature. This
adds to the financial problems ; ur
the provision in current years of
building as well as replacement of
those destroyed during the strike,





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Jantzen bath trunks & Suits
for men, in wool lastex and
nylon-cotton. Sizes 30 to
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Boys’ Jantzen bath
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and $4.49.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

HI M) W \! \V 22, 1*51 BAKHADOS ADVOCATE UirlUK Residential Colleges Preferred BY W. INDIANS IDOM, May 31. won* i:.itiorts at which thu has been done. Hut Auckland, where about 900 men %  %  engaged, is the only major port where nan* unionists arc working.— Reiner Detained LONDON. May 21. The British For-lgn Office snld to-day th l is known four Briton-, MI C a n ad l a rn three Austrians and aliout 35 American* are detained without trial by Chinese authorities. "British Charge 1>'Affaires at is requested the Chinee Foreign Ministry on April 30 to sec that Chinese should take atana lo cause an early hearing of charges against thee pi No reply had yet been received %  .; %  '. ''-! % %  —Beuter DACCA. East Pakistan. May 21. Five hundred people may have died and about two tnouaand have been reported injured In a Tornado which devastated a remote area In Bengal on May 12, Fast Bengali Belief Officer Aft7uddin Ahmad said to* I The Tornado ripped a wide path of ruin through the 25 mile Faridpur district. obliterating more than 25 villages and smashing to piece* more than 3.000 houses and huts. Ahmad returning here from a lour of the stricken areas said that dtstriitllon was unparailed in human history." Debit! had been cleared and hundreds of dead buried. —Reuter. Wants To Form New Indian Parly NEW DELHI. May 21 .1. It. KrtpaUnl ex-President and Secretory of the Indian National Congress (Government Party* who left the party last week today invited his supporters to meet in Palna on June 10 to form %  new party to oppose Congress at elections Tinnew party it was learned in circles close to Kripalani. may be called "People's Congress' thus embodying the World Congroai which t<>r many Indiana has .tood for all that is patriotic smce the days of the struggle for fre adorn, A draft programme understood to be similar in general outlining to that of the Indian National Congress i> expected to be issued b\ the end of May. —Reuter. Rumours Of U.S.— Soviet Talks Denied WASHINGTON. Mr>y 19 New rumours of the Soviet approach to the United States suggesting that direct Soviet-Amerii.m talks could lead to Korean seltiement were met with aceplidgm .n official and diplomatic quarters here today. The State Department for the thud successive day said that it had no knowledge of the reported Russian peace feelers. The Stnle Department's denials hare been made in the midst of rash press reports and rumours fiom Washington and l.ondon. Usually well-informed foreign quarters are professing complete ignorance.—Reuter. SUGAR DKOIGHT BRISBANE. The drought In the Queensland sugar belt is expected to mean n less of £1,000.000 to Australia thai year. The sorghum harvest on the British food farms in Central Queensland is auto expected to be disappointing. UTAH. May 21. Four guards held as hostages by rioting inmates of the Utah State i;riM n won released lale last night. The rioting prisoners had %  prison guards as hostages but earlier two had escaped through the windows. The prisoners had smashed furniture, windows und equipment before a truce was arranged with official-. More than fwo hundred of the 832 inmate* jumped into an orgy for several hours before a truce brought partial order back. Rioter, rsjoaaod ..11 Inmates In "death ii locked doors at Ihe ends of the corridors of the cell houses prevented escape by the doomed men or other inmates The truce and release of guards Lfj six prisoner spokesmen who complained to the authorities that some prison officials had botfl unfair. —Reuter Scrap Cuban Black Pact Red Chinese Using Nationalist Forces NY. TiMEZ WRITER NEW YORK, May II. New York Times Hong Kong correspondent Henry IJeberman said today that an analysis has shown that Chinese Communist units, being thrown against United Nations fire power in Korea, were composed largely of former Nationalist soldiers Nationalists had been reorganised into units controlled by commissioned officer* of proven political reliabilit> The heavy losses among former Nationalist troops in Korea had raised the question whether the Communists would alter their "human BM" tactic* if it became necessary to fall bark Increasingly on units uilh a higher proportion Of Communists, he continued. Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay J V. SrOBrR.1. left Pvaaass W Smilh. Sell Eaitrfn EH. M V T R Radar. Sri. Bvlquaen. Sch rrani-ltn p R Sell U'OiUH-. Sell Philip II David .on. M V Moneha. Bk-h Uudalpha. M V. llluc alar. M V i:aciQid.l Canbr ARRIVAL* H V Csrscaj>U Ionn*t. Capl. Ansel WUXIJM. from V-n-m-la Sehnmrr EverdtiMv H ton. ml. Cap! Phillip-. Hum SI Vincent 9 1 Alu I'ulam. SM i.'• % %  DBPI Mullitlx. Itom Puerto Buef* Schooner 1-ucille M s 7* t... %  nei Cai>t IU>>ll. 'icni RrllUh Cmana. Mary M Ley.... St turn ml. Cstp) Marshall from iiMtnh Guiana UrPARTIRES I .-line. TI ion. net. Cap! Clarke, for Brttiih Oulana St V MoneKa. 100 ton. net. Capl HUUOII. fur DDIIHIIU.1 bt*N |i ton. net. Capl. •sOeaasi TlnssOu A H. VassssMraan. IS total ml '.pi si..11. fur TrlRHUtf Srhoonrr Ambrflack Mar. 41 ton. net, Capl Mil..!".,, for Marllniqi. ff 4mmm o*Lp i %  i /\o^\ "m I I f 7$r BWIA BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS ^y \ i i / / sj Frsm pare 1 what happened. Tluit was not exactly the policy to-day. but ir was the policy of the past which had caused the mltOTJ and UflTOSl aiul the social standard %  Thfcl was the heritage in th.> port i the world. Sugar Price In times of B was acarre the price was arbitrarily ilxed Whrn It was in plentiful supply pMce-rtxint eeaaed. and these arooi had their main product tlxeri at a "price by ihe price at which other territorsmi wouhi dump their sugar on the world markets after they had satisfied their requirements and their own markets. The West Indies had to compete against people who had very 'urge internal markets sjpfti pj Australia, and who could hen indii-trv vtith.ul damaging their ocimm> l-y the price they fixed In their own market. "We here consume very UttU M our sugar. We have to export In ilines .if scarcity you fix a price. but when you see the position is reversed and that there will be plenty of sugar, you change that policy and 5y. *I um going %  > buy in the open market', when you know in your heart there is no such thing." When the fatal WorU War ('amithere was a shortage of sugar and the price was fixed. In the early twenties the position began IC change, the production of suga. caught up with world demand* What did thev see Ihd ; the United Kingdom toylnj "wj fixed vour price during the wV Hot tf .'ii Price Kise It would be rememlMTcri that the price rose very high lor a short time and then the controls were taken off. The price went dowt. and down until the main Indurfn in this area, the industry on which the population depended, was selling sugar at £7 and £8 per ton The world price it was called but It was no such thing at all. Iwas merely that Cuba after satisfying her requirements in her protective market, could sell at | cheap price No words he could use could express the hardship and misery and resentment thai the nolley of the United Kingdom then caused in this area. , The Olivier Commission was sent out here, to inquire into the situation. This Commission recommended that the British Government Imv West Indian sugar at £ 15 per ton. Thev realised that this was only fair'and Just to the people in thi area* who wore then living nt the lowest standard of life This report was either put on the dUflt) shelves of the archives of the l^.yrtnment H WW thrown In the waste paper basket. As far as the West Indies were concerned nothing happened lo improve th situation in the area. This Unpartial commission had rep"H<-.i but evidently the determination of the United Kingdom was to get -heap sugar at the expense of the West Indies %  During this period you will recall, I am sure, that the Japanese started flooding these markets with cheap goods. The people who were working for a small amount of money could get cheap shoes and shirts for the lint time. "You made representations to u that this would damage ihe standaid of living of the people of your country and you and we put on quotas and duties to protect (he standard of living of your people. These por coun-: their poor people who only received eight, nine or twelve pounds for their sugar. "The British Government must realise that these things must be two ways. We are prepared to bear our share of their difficulties, but we wish to see thai H is not only us with our weak resources who get the worse of these bargains." %  Sugar Shoi.-nr When the second World War broke out, said Mr Robinson. there was again a shortage of sugar and it was consi that they might do all the things that ought to have been done in those years when they %  ould get nothing The price of sugar was again fixed, and it was significant that at Ihe time it wa* fixed at £11. Ss per ton, The Olivier Commission had recommended years ago that the price should be fIS In 1048 the great experts in England decided and as was now known, wrongly, that there was going to he a surplus of sugar very shortly and therefore the time had come for them to get out of the arrangement which had been so profitable to them during the past years. Mr Robinson then spoke of the announcement that had been made in the House of Commons OB S.|,:ember 27. 1MB. hy Dr Summerskill. relative lo %  i bantfl in United Kingd'tm policy concerning sugar. This change, he said, had been made without consulting the West Indies.. "We saw ourselves back to the starvation and misery of the twenties, back to the ruin of lb* main industry which these colonies depend on for the Im-hhond of their people. "We were concerned. we were extremely concerned. The Ii W I S A. Immediately sent their delegation to T.rr so did the Jamaica Government WO followed the practico we had followed many times We knew what the position in the area *Q*JM be ami we know what we had to : Political Pi imri To malb "tse, said Mr. Kotisru : England a i tntomenl wg %  .; that | %  %  bloc ouLside the West Indies continued to Wncuts ef Canada Canada-Wot ItattiOj presstM • li.. would i aunt in West InrJ i %  which we were both eager lo maintain %  position clear hut without an. effect Mr Robin*!!! mill Dfl i 1 ^|>^ %  ak of the dillii ullie the) ha eneountered in kngl.nul and th %  %  -einigv tn*3 hod hi i and the disnppoiiumef.u suffere < befnre the present agrei-nniit wa. rssuOjed 'W# narvo conw hitre to-day, hsaid, to try arul Iron i v.: the lie*! devise (m gettnii Ihe best done in the interest of nnd foi the welfare of this area. You will never get I wOdfll lietwrei) u again on this issue As ycRi recognise that point, let i.make up '' roioJve that we will npw once and for all tr>' to forget the aeciiTnulated DUUt-up of tiie past history g| ihli point Let us realisi' thai wt hnv* thcughU and aspirations alike That the aspirations tiu Bngliah iVi li .i botsw of I.vim; are out ahpiraUuiu toe That jou need us just as much u we neexl you Not us alone hut the CornaMmwSBsMh %  ., w h ata Let Ul adopt a new poll* r togOtlMI and work as friend-. lein work tugetlier for the common good.*" Preferential Kale The present trade pan signed lietween Canada und Cuba provided for 73,000 tone of HlfltB foi Canada, and Canada is also eonSldortrt| UkLM a similar amount from somebody el.-e vinknowii. They wen%  UOWinj tht sugar lo go lo at full preferential rate. rough!'• ii was going into ("anad. on the same basis as West Indian sugar Agreement Extended I iksn* eomo hon to tell m what we know you were goto* that is, that you intend t> tin the same thing You say to us, 'we realise that you will %  it it. therefore we will extend the agreement I* IBM. You hava iM.tiunK %  bail If >ii was a''pled, said Mr Rol InsoJ trade would be built UP In Hi' /oar* the iacl with Cuba be mule, and if U were successful a* it probabl] would, pubtn press inmight Inmnlntalneri WhenWOUld UM ITOM I then and .v hat OOUM U tha time thai U could be don 10 do it The same thing applied to the Canada-Cuba pact, he pointed <>u! "These •rC selling their sugar to yeai nt a MCTtftce "f eight t future security. In )ugUea ue ask you, "let us have our fulure New K< lal.Miishii. Hi n D. B Sangster said that tht ConfsTonca marke.1 ;i DBW dopartore in the relatl* i the United Klngdorn (itivernmcnt with the West Lndlw but Ihey were not o,uite uie in Uu why the UK. MsOJion had ODRM Some said that they h thing that was unpal.it iblc to i: v. them, something which the;, thought It might I* beller to be presented to them and gel Uiem to accept on the spot 'hi (he Otbtl hand, was it to pros/a that they were growing up in ttlf MtW) Commonwealth and that in.were coming lo tnlk about things in the Hniish Commbuwealth? He would orefer to accept that i I ni K.ition He said thai he would like II lo he verv plain that U>> meellnr mul not be rrgarded as a dKeuwion or asreemenl or invtlunc of the kind. It a* Just an exchange uf vlewi.itiii ni iri, relallng lo the f'uhin Pact. AM his friends had said, there was no division between free enterprise elesaenta of the West Indirs and the political element* and thev were going lo give them their views, perttFUlarly to susae and Urfcacco as lbe saw them between Cubs and UM t'niled Klncdom. • On page I. YA.T.O. Chairman Wants Turk\. GMeee Adndttod LOtJl I ',t i an of th^ N.A.T.O L> %  . Council to considei tht of •dmlllin 4 it ... %  I iiieaUngji -r th. i ties of th. North AH." t)rganisai, %  The n ei SOS) Ufa ICM known Ki-hes of l>*>11 %  and Turkish 1J hi vi' called at tho 1 111 the pns' week to UTgl t. support the new Uniled S t ates At present On i %  re associated with Atlantic now i rs for purpOOM of defence plan ntng in ihe ModltOtTaW ue not full members of the Pact Last Autumn when the poaslI ility of admitting two OOOS OT mania was first rinsed. Britain wan eyposed to perm Rton Of the terntnnal acOBO of th* Tact, but it it understood that ih<* uhnii* luaotion Ii ba id afresh in the roreign Oilca —Reuter, Ships Begin Chart Exorcises VAl.KTTA. MALTA May 2: N %  lorces of four North Atlantic treaty countries assembled In V.ilett., harbour, began today large scale chart exercises which will last for u week. Taking part are ships trum Britain, Untied St..!. i, trance and Italy Italian vessels are under the command of Vic* Admiral %  Cilrosl. Comm iin.i-in t the Italian Na\>. win. b to pay official calls lo heads ol Brltln services in Mall a A full squadron of Italian Hfildriver aircraft will Join Brltlah forces In anti submarine n.nt • euvres during the week 13.3 < bservatioti ship Mount Olympus entered Valett-i luvbooi dav She was H.lav. .1 rough seas. Workers In Huhhur Victory Strike OSLO May ||. %  Torhni In %  nil ts %  here were striking to-day in a dispute which may lend to n natlonwid! lockout OB June A. %  %  %  %  %  .-.How a union irpit.-i i ij.: I: aupSa^raSOri lo be amllalxi |g ''>. Norwegian Trad, ureas. As a counter m> ers have threat'-ned .i lodctui l. hieb will UnO shoe, tnbin v" ehoeol chonlcnl .. %  ui tanthar anod I leforlaa hut %  'i Ua* I consider an extension. —Reuter. WHY SHOULD U..S.A. DEFEND EUROPE? Alt DEN. New Yr.rk H A group of 70 prominent Arnaei* canecoming friendly'' Only tha t sessi f the Assembly (to-day) and Friday) will l>e i Press. —Kruler SENIOR COMPETITION The Evening Adrocsle invites till school-boys and school-mi' bet wean the aaes of 12—19 ro send ha a humorous essay, story or poem •ni the subject of 'CAMRLK". KntHes must reach the Sheet SUr* Editor Advscate lo. Ltd (J'V. not later than Wednesday every week n .. %  best cerrposition each week will tie published In the Evening Advsralr nnd th. winner will receive u prize of book 1 or Stationery to the value of 12/6. Sand this coupon with your stoie. SENIOR COMPETITION Ntmr Air Sri...! i !" lit tp$ !•• i from biood (input Ul* %  %  aaasj ar—fla " aad asussftsl | ^rannaminanm s Mm-m! nothing adds to a perfect)" mea like a good cu of coffee! Especially if ii's Chose A Sanbom. For here's coffee o^ coffee should be — rich, heorty, satisfying. Jutt *nifl that invitiog aroma . J up tho' heavenly coffee flavor. You'll Otii for Choti '~1 LUCKY NOTHING) u8cHi!moliveBHHiirtbe to cowution and {room nn hairl AassVyeaassssjaBrtrhPaTlssAl .ii,...,.. ran an |M .• asssdrwi %  i... i % row knli soft.io'rana, kaaldrj tooblnfl ..iva^.t PALMOLIVC BRILUAN1IN' ,; ,l HEALTH BENEFITS • CONTAINS VITAMIN A & 0 IN A DELICIOUS FORM • INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS • ENSURES STRONG LIMBS AND SOUND TEETH IN CHILDREN Haliborange 'lliv nicest WHY of taking HALIBUT LIVER OIL %  %  da by OLE! 1 lillBURII LIO.. UK.Gil



PAGE 1

i i i %  '>\\ M \\ M, IMI HANHAIMIS .IDVOCATl. PAGI IEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS. JZZZT" IlHUC NOTICES PIBLir SALES TBLEPHONI 1 508 For Blrtha. Marriage DIED <" Or. May JIM IM1. % %  he IMMMIC* Bedford IMfr Si MhaMutant Elndgc ifr ol H N. Roach Hn funeral leave* the above render*. •I 41 p in M-day fa* Hi* W.-Ib.ir> On • %  n II N Roach II C Roach. V Ho*" P K R..h. UVV Kellr .nanugurd t>eB thrnuiCh ind Irtlcr • IN MEMOR1AM '. %  trrsiliul-ln loving mmi f i>< dear beloved husband ind faVh, Fill Gardiner Grwuid)* who den.nl (Ilia lifton IMll Hi. 1M0 ll.ippv and smiling always content Gon. but not forgotten. With Jeau. ho may aKrp. but not Ever rmumW n d by— MarM Qreenldge i*vlfe>. Lionel. Randolph. Darnell 'children* HI II-In. FOII SALE .. %  T -. M Ufd liand"• AUTOMOTIVE AI.MUDT NEW II HJli. Guarantee il iiqimN Exlra llatStMM Flooring Llcenaed *-„t In.uied Vvml Price lino N„ on coal tl itt -re *ntl> Apply Court-ay Gar. a* sa.Vll -In. M MOTOR CYCLE On* Velocetle Motor Cycle I', II P alnuatt near. Apply lot M Clarke Jr.cllei. tUCTTatlCAL llBRiaEHATOR—On* U 8 I % %  I,-il. It I* •lrm—.,ti i Harold Weetherheac a W*,i. Dim Store 111.-,* 21** 31*4 17 i RfaPRIOEPATON—riuili.l) Ml II Ni in gu.-ranle* Am new |TKe MVO. ciwlwi leaving laland OFJUtfCK PARAMO UAHUAHJ3X HIl.l IB .1 SI In POULTRY CHICKS Parka Pure Hired -Barred lock chick* T and %  week* old. Apply o A Fordr ocipoait* pip-. SobfTi Lane ^IT tl 5 51—In MOORE-ti> loving memory of Moor*. hn died on innnd Jacob Nathaniel Moor* who i and May. IMH We ml** them, oh. we mm tl lu only those who"v# to.1 ri ll-efer. Mr. MaudI "ullsrent Cll.hl'.w .daughter. 1 ////,V///AV/,W/AV//iV, BUILDINGS FOR SALE ,.:• DUCKS ALL THR OFFERS ARF. INVITED FOR OR ANY OF VALUABLE FREEHOLD BUILDINGS OCCUPYING THEWHOLEOFONESIDE OF THE MARKET SQUARE IN ST. GEORGE. GRENADA. FOR DETAILS Apply to:P.O.Box 6. Si. George. GRENADA. In vw of Ih. UUnd "id. Was* Irrreu*. Ilir .l-iv. i.pre^nl. „ •."*"; <:,d cppotlunlV U> Miy • OO AHEAD li..... ..".,... | Inivrrsily Collrjjf ol | The West Intiies I POULTRY Impoiled %  .rule l1i,ir.i ockiels. na-hi weak* old. M Ml Apply II" F. ram*run. Sitnbury. Si. Philip MS 91 In LIVESTOCK %  hed 4 Imdnwni FrMae. Ftvoo*. Radio, Gar.cr From INK June Dal MM or MIt Hill Sn FI.AT; rVaumoi t il*d Din in* ..mi MMaM dmomi. runnliuf . uwial cmivrnWtH-fi —d 11 c %  .Ma w rharpr |l a*d tl M v* SkHda*. Iicha.l 1 NOTICE i lor AL'CilON .i -llimv MiNk law MOREI. th# CMnbnriitir Svhfol. will br rrrvlv^ W. arm.i.ucird b> Ih* . b> th* Cark ol In* VaMry up to' 11 ha. It*l Ih* Colon; In —rllla Tlturaday BMd day of One motor rar whlrh h. ..nlv Wn* •.a*) ^,l.k MM %  Mat.. 1MI. I b* M.. • .! %  %  |hM II,* 1.1 ini. lUpttM.i..! i mi :>< FONT AM AHA — On Ih* M..-r Coal. lully furni*h*d mrludl'is Frldca T*l*phon* for Ih* m. ,i MJtTIR W.M JMIUN Mom ii Land. C.MI.1 I %  |1 ONE HOUSTEIN COW—-Ivlnf 3 MM, milk Jrd cill S** C A Ed*hllL Wrll Houar St.Philip H 5 SI In MKCIIANICAi. CRASS CUTTKHS aUMry-HArrla .ind tl Irmi.rdi.it* ilrllvrrm Enqulrl Sol-rttrd CMlrtMy Qaraf* Dial 4414 MISCKtXANFOUS CIGARETTES — Ardalh Cork tlpprd Cicarrttaa. Buy now brfor* (hr ad. \ancrd pnr* rom*a li'.to rfTrrt W* Mill hav* a amall ilnck at ihe reduced price —namely lua lie ind Kl IV KNIGIirS 1-TD IB S SI—3n, ENJOY YOURSnj" VANIU.A ESSENCS Baual to BeM' M •*• t. • pint, or • cento an ounce BUXNO OUT' BAR11A MFC Co. f ROEBUCK sTiuarr um ar ITS LATER THAN YOU THINK; 1 > Sl-4n OAJ.VANIOD SHEETSBeat gualll' iMHaUieel. ChoapeM tn the laland 1 0 ft KM. 1 H ISM ft K 71. B ft IT.Mi 0 ft M 40 Net! caati. Belter hurry 1 A nAWN'ES ft CO.. LTD. 4 a 5i if" i niif,r to 10 ft MM •KtlOOI BM Slid lll-A7.rH Fit bov > Woodhou** T-l B B 91 M to lop* Prii nlern Parti, from needl-i i* Stm.* part*. Prlmu. MlM boll. 5 ml'onIn Send your Prlmu. trouble' fill remody Ihem Chandler! ml BaCKal • %  larHM. Hi-ed Sl.rel. |ti ;. I .. S3 i 91 In F.XTRA MURAL DEPART MENT SUMMER SCHOOL. lOftl WEBT INDIAN HISTORY mat ECONOMICS Friday opening July 20 Sit. afternoon July 28 CODRINOTON COLLEGE Inclusive Fee: $15. Apply to Resident Tutor. Sandy Hook. Maxwell Coast, Christ Church. Tel: 8526. Apply early to avoid disappointment, as accommodation is limited. Programme on application. Opening Address by HX the GOVERNOR, July 20. ; P m S E. W. Barrow, B.Sr. Econ. \ 0 Judge J. W. B. Chenery. I1A. N V A. E. Douglas-Smith, M.A. ^ A A deK. Frampton \ > (probably ^ S Dr. Brute Hamilton 0 S prrif. J H Parry. M.BE, J V Ph.D. A S Sir John Saint. CMC, A PhD, MSe. S ^ The Rev C. Saver, B.A. N X K. H. Straw, B.A. (lions. ^ * Eton S V Judge 11 A. Vaughan 8 elc % ?^,^'e***%  '-•'*V•-'*'e**V*-e*e**'***^'>'e'e* The public af* lieie'H w.nted againM KliW fiedil K. MI. ,(* |tl'H\ HAYNFM MM CAUJCNDARi a. I d ivelf reeponvlblr for h< r or anyone med lutainal MN credit i„ n. t.lA STUAJfT I do laM MU my>eH reepnnaible for her or anyone ela*> cnntror-Uu* any drbt nr debU In my by a written order •irfm.'d by i AUSTIN GKEIN Jrm-i. near Jordana. %  L IM1. I the .ill of OMNM ANHY LEWIS: Ol^DYS IJIWU. MAR. 1 f.Wh and 1'I.AKA LEWW. il % %  land >t.>imerly pat of ti.~-Hand plnnti.h ..f Saint Miehael and I.Und ahnveeaid i ken -i^l ene-kair t,f Ale lander OOMoei Otl i ol ^ plar* i-alled Frolic and An a a Ihe .ain* M al< H Wl U JAMS. BasmiM tH-CkMrery DM -4i Itsttiofil ^ilways! id NNtNa SHOBM „rr !C RAcr I. rOK TEW Around Milk Market n si to T,o K TIM %  Jorvea aialo.t I If II l -i J-irpfc TAKx Niypirr tiu.i habove PUiiLitlpn i i Bnd dar of May. IM1. 1B. SMITH Owner NOTICE one vacant St Joaeph'a Exhibition Irnntile at the St. a Girt"" School, win be received M-rk of Ihe Ve.li. M I Tueadav MHh day of Ma* IMI mod be daughter, of Parlah...nera In Mr-Itemed rirciimitanc*. and n.urt ha*e attained the ace of I year*, und mini be under II year* by July Hat 1151. to be proved by a Raptlx i.l Ce.tIScole. wUch n.u.t accompany the Applieaiton. all Candidate* to be cammed muM be at the Sch. ol Inter than B IS a m. on Saturday. June IMh 1*51 Form* of Application can be obtained from the Ve.lrv Clerk 1 OIT** A T. KINO. Cleik. Rl Jo.r,. !• • siIn BJUfEBT DALE. Paaaaft* Road *Undln. tn II pnvhet of land ll*..llm hmi. romprkara open verandah. Dr.winai ana Dining ronma two bedroom., kltrhon. toilet and bath The above will br offered lor *ale U pulilic romprlltlfin pn Friday XMh M-* at 1 pm. at the affftM M the under whom .L.i.lilii.i* of Balf ..ml furll.rr pailu ui HUTCIUNSON A I'ANFIEUI IT 5 51 Si. NOTICE i-, % %  I., km Club around. hat Windward Cricket I be open for procllc* i May 31 SSI In NOTICE IS HrPrJIY OIVTN thai II I. the I Utitlon of Ihc Veatry of th*. pariah Chrut Church lo cauaa lo bo IntioU.ic .to Ihe l>*i.iaiui* of thi. laland a 1 author IMna the tald Ve.tr* to bom %  um of money not oceedli.a IT.Me be uaed by Ihem a. to I1MI4 pairing roi.tma road, and palhi in I Chrlrt Church Cemetery, and laying REAL ESTATE JOHN M. Ill 1IIOS AT 9.. IV A. KepteientitlTe: GERALD WOOD FOR SALE I mllr from town, with 3i of •neloaed aroind. Ihe part planted lth producrocot.nt and fruit nee.. Cured By Doing What He Shouldn't i | For 25 years John Pin %  [ %  <> %  •. .i .i ill fortune" trying to cute this duodenal IfJcaT N.\irly 16OO.0OII people sufTer Ikiiui of eomplalnl in England land Wain 'my yoal I Then he went lo I I hPiini iiLHKit Dr J Juqin-i Spun. Who CUrd 95 per cent of his palient-. hy methods directly opposile to tl* i-eeognised ulcer treatment Dr. Splra cured Parr in five weeks, permanently. Slricl Diel John Parr found that normal trcvlmc'it consisted mainly of rest and a strict diet. When you have an ulcer your stomach functions t<"> qulcka* and doctors say the best wuy to Slow it down is to feed il with faR But that i* "only tha initial answer," soyi Dr. Spiru. He argues this way. It iv believed that too much acid causes ulcers. But acid cannot do It alone. Spirit points to bile as tlie villain. It .iniHntrouble and keeps It going with the help of ..i id limn";.!-the bile .ml you break up the deidlv eomblnalkm. Fat stimulates the flow of bile Into the stomach "The e to the problem." Bays Spira, "is to eat less fat." But he warns: "It is physically impossible to live in>rm;ill> on u diet entirely free of fats. What I prescribe is u low-fat diet." Lots of Crotm For yi'jt-i John Parr been doing the opposite knivs lluil I stiiot ulcer :sted of livinn 0 and somt-ltquid foods like root, farola. Junket. custard thick soup, and vegetable puree Once or twice a day he *H allowed a "coddled egn" mui some thin bread and butter He had lots of ertaom and olive oil He had to avoid such things as fried flsh. pork, high game, meal soup, cheese, curries and new bread. He was told to have no meat for six months. One of his first dleti conEiaied large'v uf milk, orange juice ks and %  m inordmulc of stemmed .l*h." He had to eat or drink something every two hours. Jlis two "Milt BBBlBll alcohol and tobacco. With Dr. Spiro'i |rcat.eal he found [hot milk u*ai '•forbidden except in the stnatleit oiiflnrif|i for lea and coffee." He luu i" !>>' l>a- ;i11 '" "'" rich in fats He could h wide choice of flsh. grilled, boded or even fried if he removed the Calling . ALL LADIES I NEWS FLASH A small shipment of . EMU. ANGLA1SE Is Just unpacked had REAL ESTATE AGENT M I IMiM I K PLANTATIONS It! %  IIING 'Phone 44 milk arrowbaltci. He could enjoy again lobsters. ab and oyster". But he had to avoid i.iiiy fish like salmon rrinf, mackerel, and kippers. But No Stems OF meat i: roii.n HAVF beef, mutton, lamb, veal, pork (but not the crackling), kidneys. ( %  .Hn tnoltBd tntMBi HE COt'Lll NOI stews, oxi.nl^. it.iin-. in pi usages, puitfinn; nd id had to stick to gulled or roast meats, but miss anything boiled. Tried, lirnised or minced. Poultry, infound, should be roasted, not boiled. Ho could eat all root vegeta bles except onions, leeks and radishes. Potatoes should be boiled or baked in their jackets. Eggs were banned. Hi' Wl iillnwed to smoke moderately. purlieu la rly alter mi %  Drink' 1 Dr. Spira put it like is: "There is no reason why a moderate amount of alCDbol In dilute fomi should do .my harm." Rich Man's Fat Tha wl off si..ry is told in How 1 Cured My Duodenal Ulcer" (Michael Joseph. 8s. 6.1.). Dr, Spu.i urgues that feeding habits cause ulcers. Clvilisat ind a better standard of hv-"p have resulted in people c.iimi richer foods. A irrattiiu iiid'i cats aWftf fat than a poor man. He also pels ulcerj more often. John Parr interested his family doctor In Dr. Spiio's treatment He tried it out on some of hii i...: At least one in time efused to give up their glass o nilk. Of tha %  'or said i 'LO doubt iiixiut it. They lie Quito octinittl. Iietter," Hi-ri.i li^l showing thO amount of fat in some WMTim< foods. The figures are fi deh>draU-d foodi because this Is the liesl way fat content* Food ni'TTiJt MAKGAH1NE mrsr. M (I .K of showing the! IJKMB CHOP PORK CHOP BACON PMfCHARD BALM ON MA'-KKKCI. MAI.tRLT TROl'T (l>|l .t.il HADtKlCK "line nitt.\i IIItOWN JIKJ.AIJ OATUEAI VECETAIH FK FFUITS HONEY SUGAR S.ilart-.iti cooking fi taking new . b. IU7 40 In effecllri Mortuary CXapel lr Cemetery, and %  ii^tltPin at our ofhc* m I uc Street. Bridget.... ... I I.l June llll. at :i p in CARHIM.I The under.ignil will offer for %  "!* ai theli OrSce. No IT. High BtfMI K tm town, on Friday the IMh day of May. The dwcllinghouae know. .. OatAMC VIEW" with the land thereto eonlamln* 3 Rood. 4 I Itk Per.-he, ,,i thereabout* .dual* at Bathaheba, Saint Joaepb ln*pr.tu>n on application to tile i-,T"ta"-i as the premlie* For further particular* and condition* of aale Bppb The Neur Toothache 'Tec Hy I liopinuu Pinrher A o ralaad lo be r< lalmenl* of ITW • the year IMI. < la t i. pMbjM i.-eding i Ih* pria%  and the unpaid balaneM ir the time bring owing ho ll.t day of May IMI. YflANWIMIDft HOYCE. kN Carl : Churrh. To Obtuiu Bigger Newsprint Supply IXJNDON. May Haw materials which hitherto have gone to waste are to be u*eers would puss out of existence. Th.it is what It means unles come to then rescue." In added. Sources Of Supply Referring to world HUI I ipplv. Mr. Curtil Willson aolil annual production of I came U> about O.OOO.OOO tons. Thi nptUKl Slates with a ptepuUttoi of some ltJO.000.000 took thirds, the other third the 2.500.000.000 In world to 'hare out Lord Woollon. Chain Conservative Party, arid p !" !,., HI '.. %  |,,11,; U-f..| London sctenI ingi nimis ilevi Ing tooth decji. tt ran do any VMM been invented by till A platinum wire, linked 10 a 10-volt battery and a current%  %  %  i %  i i '. %  to aadh suspected tooth in um during a dental check-up. Another 5 i"'*t wire, touchum tinctwiJk, complete the circuit. if a tooth is atootuUlj wuitd o < uiiiiit p;is-eI" overlng of enamel is l bad "">ductor of elcclii' il. But If taaOrO l .i NIP i in tha efwinel In wu ch ihM.iy gi-tii.s otMiM 0JTn| llaTgBB tlti-.dgli. Ohd B t<' ,! tale pointer swings Into action Dr. Puul I'lnruv ol the Midillc*ex Hospital Medical School. W I, who invented tho lievu. hai pa^rrad tint it win daw I iHU'fl oncfcl missifl h\ the sharpeit-eyed dentists or even by X-ray*. Test Cocktail %  aVAs IP to prow I *' *oo. . %  log alnoa ItlgM Hum oin with artlflclal flioa. Vo haei 'MUM bl hmil. \. > ,i MMllfM V., graaa on our stomachs | ( Ihe high DMaUog v. 1th%  OOfl of li haa siitiuTtvi "wi uia adaa Vot nobody i kirn.. caughl %  tioui. And lo think thai l;ist ni'i'k we had then. arairj li mi. U| Un bathi I Coo For loin•JVWI • i dothi d i IhOUffJ rUtod .i ajuliTawa-i >K fal %  %  I %  %  thousands were rtiiinini; about th%  I i | I ., %  i.-,li..T, 1 %  ini if.ituri''. hushni thotl inn ami atartod troofaii aofUy lllw %  i : ma i )tn leu Hni-iins. Hut Uli n on %  i.uunM-(iig h is nothing t* do Itt ,hii ready n-.|in.f tt is o corniptioii Of Cliiiiuiii kalffrlr BOtltil ,\m -i i. ..II homoh Alchemy, IIS I jL/IHI | di.-.im of lluiiieiiii-vl ilcliemists — trnruimutliijf Ott*lBH*llVl iiiiii'idl aiiead "i na. Sd. i' r ih btto fjpold iprireil nt tlSH per lb.) has been realised by British atom seient^t Dr. F. D. S. Itolement. The process, which lm %  %  .>f .1 ,". f ni.iciiiiii' .ii ih t > 1I.II w-ll. Hi 11* utom slalion, is. uifnitiiii.iti i. loo expen.-ivi prj • %  II Britain**. ra l.i i.-.ervM^dlaJti, Itutes Of Kxehungc ^rcbiidk the tn. worth enduring (avaotaof aolonco, 2\ kaortdon medicil -\ kl -in-' Of t 1 "'" 1 v,,,.,,. i. Ii.ive each iliunk one diid -I quarter pints of . nauseating • cktail be/ora hreafcfoaf fo< -i-vii B| deiya runntaf. ,.,i.i.iil. which I'd by lr J. N. Hunt ..f Guy's Hosplt.l. SKI i. ; ... r ri.ui.rron lemon pi|" fc iWitei add a lit" sugar, colour with ., red dye Bled) unlsh of! with a dash of caustic soda. The expeiiim-nt lilOWed thai Ih.' ti MIIhii.ii %  %  the leu time each ounce of II otnys in the -.OHI.KI: erbkfa ma) ibe the main reason wfc i i,in. the digestion Crazy Kavoitritf MVVIIIUII British sport h ioiiilt end Racing ; left tn the resi nt t) i Fooiljoll None of klteee. The correc! ntiswer is flahlni. Careful eatimtei b latKNl of Fishing T.ekk put the number Of B :i.ubo.ooo Al>. ii'. I"' llii//llllg llll Hie Sun Clod Spcctaciil.it. Ilnlli. i IMtMVAl KAMI new 5-ton 100 HORSE POWER MORRIS-CONNERCIAL against everything you and your drivers want in a truck! I kWA RMB) I xirunenUI .Id. ;i >n. new and higher wandard at ii...I MM I'.gned for ihe openioi who draaang* MM Mkl atduou* a.-* In.ru .. 1'l.ii.i.di.f dah Ing (ooifuat, loo. an unpi'lani IORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 SHIPPING NOTICES tlONTItEAL, AUSTBALIA. NKVT /' %  \l \MI LINE. I.IMIIHt IM ANZ LINEl Mi Mill i MltkeJ lo .all from lll>all. IIIIi May. Adelaide Mlh Mb June, llrldiane 11th %  IMd Jin... ai living at Tundad di.ong the latin half of July, and liter fa) liaii4d,iand for .aigo thi. vn %  ill.-l and ha pted OH On.i igU Hill, of l.a-l tot In pment -i Trinidad M IIHI I and Wln.lwalil %  IY a co. tn>. DA COST A CO., LTU -mr9nt. I NEW TORtX SFUVlCK NEW ORLRANft I 1THIOT Salle.1 ISth April sail* Snd Mat 1" i A Mill S.nl. mil) M.,v 1 4 "-all. the current restrictions which had Y \ necessitated a drastic cut lu tin 'first among the %  %  Ire of the IlriUsh Newspapers. Eight days ago l i "1 do not believe it can be a dump into Surrey's Bandy Rlvei (food thing for the public life of Wey 500 fit. foot-Ion;Irout. Aftet r t .-ft.. !" that there should h-a pampered, well-fed lifton i Sway to the Ithylhm of Tl intda B I 10, i I i \|iert*. The 1851 Ciistuine Cltlkinpil II Ti,,,, UM BOUth will % %  tur straight from till i |ing the r.x-' ion Of raaWHt, Sll.l|!ht II | %  i %  tmthe Wl* Indians and tho Tin nut -r the Beafry Come the Bnti f i.'-l Mil • %  i I \l At 7.SH pm 00 7th. Jun. Park will b ti into a family Lai Colour. ii..'. %  %  .:. II.1UU M"i'* % %  %  — .. this nation that there should this severe restriction on tiw quantity of news now printed. Lord Woolton declared. • i i. i .iro some of us. at an: rate, who are not very anxious t< control you Some of u^ think .. have had a bellyfull of c->ntrolj. pampered, wcll-feil lit trout fann they were in |>* rfed condition for the fryim: pa I %  i THAWS Prince Wm. Henry SI. TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH Telephone Cords In different Coloured Haitlc*. Easy lo inn on. Saves that annoying Twisting snd KntHtlng CABINET til.ASS Opened by . JOHNSONS STATIONERY •V HARDWARE COCKTAIL PARTY? DISTILLED WATER RORERT TIIOM LTD — NEW YORK AND GCTF SFR1TCE. APPLY:—DA COSTA % CO, LTD.—CANADIAN SUtVICF. PASSAGES TO EUROPE I I'roducts. limited, Roseau, Dominica, for fading I ,i'i. The mual porti of call ire Dublin, l.i>n.li>u. f,i HiiUcidain. Single fare £70; 111 n for children. '.'.'/ v.::'.OKI I M VI MIIVIMKS. ( CHIOS. JEWELS New Shipment opened THAMS •St The Annual General Meetj Ing of the Barbados Cricket Association will be held at j KF.NSINGTON OVAL (and not at Queen's Park) Friday, May 25th at 4.30 I pm. Entrance by George Challenor Stand. W. F HOYOS. Hony. Sett. i III r HOOK wbleh nukes CODS WAY OF SALVATION PLAIN" liOM I II t.Atl.L LI ASMS are obtainable from MM HAI HMMtin Pltr Head Une. N>O numerous to mentii 'V/A...V////,K:I WW :.// 1 ;.// / .:.I ::". ; ;:-/ ne.ee writ* far •nti i v SJIHUCI RoberU, Gaspel * It4.uk and Tract Rerrlre. I te. Central Avenue, Ban;. gor N Ireland %  FURNISH NOW AND SAVE! %  irrewers i.tie. i Sfv.i-,1; I aefe k It II -l" MM L.S. WILSON Id. Mc.lK.ilcd Skin Crtim Soothei and Heals. O.VfJV tf.lf.Y AVAILABLE... "NOXZEMA" Your Eavoiuiti.Skm (it.in prevent, M Mil KN Mm IrrnaUaoea. sn\/i \i \ aljowi v.u to aajo) sou Weekaodl wilhotit Feat or Worry about Sunburn. Rcn-.embcr Us "NOXZEMA" /*, tf. %  :... ,'i,; ( rarsai La 'AM 'Uflii i"e Jar" in Thicc Km I '. i/9, and 5/6 per fr Ottakmkh at • • BOOKER'S (Barbados; DRUG STORES Lid—Broad Street and ALPHA PHARMACY. Hastings



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PM-.F 1(11 K IIXKIIMHK WlKKATT TI'E-SDAT H \\ BARBADOS IB AM/OKIE PtlBWJ M U* AdTOCB*^ i.ia BrcM It. i m w m Tuesday. May 22. 195; HAPPY FAMILY NONE but the criminally ignorant could misinterpret tha West Indian tront presented to Mr. Bottomley yesterday. It was the attitude of senior members of the Commonwealth expressing their right to speak their views. And what did they say ? Hot I-f us spii on Ureat Britain, let us MOtdl from Uw Commonwealth. Let us ratffei the past, they said. Let us become a happy family. Let us work together for the good of the Commonwealth. The Commonwealth is a whole and the strength of the whole is. as Mr Robinson neatly said. the strength of the whole. "ttV Iwive L'fit t<> come together with open minds." Whatever Mr. Bottomley may have been told on the other side, he has no excuse letl than, as he himself said, to "report on what has taken place." Xhat has taken place puts an end lo all those misguided attempts on the part of certain left-wing intellectuals, to drive a to the f.ict of West Indian unity. Mr. Gomes did not speak for Trinidad. • tor the West Indies. Mr. Sangster did not speak for Jamaica. He spoke for the West Indies. Mr. Robinson did not speak for the British West Indies Sugar Association. He spoke for every man. woman and child in the West Indies. The old cliche so often used by well meaning Englishmen that you could find '•vervthing in the West Indies except unity has been nailed hard in the coffin. The West Indies do speak with one voice. They are united and they do not intend to be .is juveniles incapable of adult cooperation. "The fight." PS Mr. Gomes put it melodramatically, "has just b* Mr. Sangster has spoken the thoughts of every West Indian when he said to Mr. Bottomley; "We ask you to scrap the Cuban pact." Nothing less will satisfy the West Indies, Mr. Bottomley has been told. And that is the message which he will take buck. TinWest Indies, as Mr. Sangster says, want long-term contracts. Nothing else will create stable conditions which will attract capital to the area. Contracts between relations must be to the advantage of both parties. The United Kingdom has had 300 years happy family connections with the West Indies. To whom else should they turn for longterm contracts which would make for stability' 1 The West Indies have contributed much to the recovery of the sterling area. They have had to bear the full brunt of devaluation. They have no free spectacles, no frvc dentures, no unemployment insurance. They have watched the purchasing power of their dollar drop with exasperation and with heroic endurance. But they have remained loyal to the Mother of the family, whose achievements they know and respect. But how can they strain loyally more? Mr. Bottomley has vouchsafed no reply. But he has been told straight(as it werejfrom the horse's mouth just what West Indians do believe and think. He will have been impressed by that unity ahd never again (if ever he has been in the past) will he believe those who claim that the West Indies are disunited within themselves. The cause of the West Indies is the cause of all the peoples who live in the West Indies. The reason why there is so much poverty, so much unemployment in the West Indies is because the West Indies are not paid more for the agricultural products to enable them to pay higher wages and employ more people. Better wages, better conditions, better education, better citizens all round, is the ami of all political parties in the West Indies, however much they may disagree on their approachos. If Mr. Bottomley returns to the United Kingdom and tells them we are one happy family, who because of our family relationships want to speak for ourselves instead of leaving the Mother of the family to ..peak for us. he will have done much, if not all that is needed, to renew our trust in the United Kingdom. It has been sadly • htiken, but the leaves are still on the tree iio% \ i < is ii, i,,,„._; Mai in Russia Busts Into The To Win The >liil.ll East A sharp cvenliiK t>t. LU.\< in* MfOM Lake GII.H I ping up the waves so that they smacked antfrily against the flahermar.'s skiff fighting its v~ay to the short. Behind the bare, placid hills the sun was slowly dippiiigjnt iht had eyes for none of it. He ii too busy putting out hi:. guards to protect the village ri.ae there should be a repetition of the previous night's nttaek the urn He placed HU Sri'Kin II. In.., disregarded the UNO appointed ommissioners' orders. Disobeye* UNO'S General RUey ordered lnB Israelis to cease land reclamation B-r%5 j^-ja-i-i HU..H T^ The Israelis, in Iheir turn, accuse the Arabs of military igtfreisioii when Arab peasants mil nit Isutli workmen and tracbecause they were Impatient nen In He "' ,lu ">vashm of their land by shallow" ditche* union* the tomato Israeli bulldoiejs and the inclfrcfardens. behind what was left of '""' efforts of UNO officers to slop he mud wall of the village, and th m ma* up in the hills overlooking the flut Blame UNO. and IU officers. In l.ikt"-i earn Nobel Peace prizes they drafted vaguely wordThree Attacks xl regulations, promised the best of worlds lo both sides. Arab villagers ihcy were, with Their armistice ci.imiussioners and cloths flapping down and observers behaved not u ever their shoulders, ancient carreporters and judges, charged bines in their arms, khaki webbing with ussr*nng the facts and advith bulging cartridge pouches judamtlngj them, hut ns "diplotrappM nver then ragged clothes, mats." t seemed incredible that these I found them attempting to riugh peasants should have suecompromise, trying to skirt dtfflceeded in repulsing three suceescult situations. They were awed Mve attacks in a fortnight by by the problems of conscience trained Israeli frontier troops outwhich a man faces when he finds numbering Ihem three lo one and himself up against facts on one •with mortars and machine guns side and a powerful pressure to pit against their musty carbines, group on the other. In the fighting going on at this But thai in how it was. Only m0l r.ent. observers report that 20 minutes earlier two United ... n( nr i ng from the two alVM bserver officers had been n 8 ices it impossible for them to in the village to pick up the Israeli tpnrmuh the scene of stnf.in daad %  < %  "> the night before and ot)lpr lo pr c*, on their UNO -,nmcarry them across lo the netnh „ i>lll)s nf • %  -.'eose fire." bouring Israeli settlement of En Ceiv. a quarter of a mile down Dangerous the lake shore. I myself had seen Now tnU M tualion Is most the foxholes where the Israeli dangerous. The pusillanimity of . i had lain I0O yards Tram thc UNO commissioners and tha the village. Security Council called by both A litter or used brass cartridge 5ideil to dea wlln !hlg (g perilous caes and empty white cardboard Jor western power and authority lb ll.-biew lettering „. (u Mld(lu p^ arked tho spots only too clearly. „ ls ,,„„,. m primus as that The mayor looked around him. produced by Persia's oil grab and e stared reflectively at the Kgypt s § threa l to the Sue* t anal gutted homes, with their burst For Israel has hitherto enjoyed walls. "This w a poor village.the widest sympathy and support he said lo me. We dont want to from the Western world. a Korea. We just want to live The Arabs have been Mftloui oeacc and work. But we shall and suspicious of this popularity light rather than nfive up our "t the young State. They have I omes and our land." as ? r ,\ bcd ,l lo ,h /.J ln T ncia .L ai ? d Who Is to blame ? The Syrians, political power-of the Zionists In hampions of Ihe Palestinian New York and tendon. Arabs in this urea, accuse the Don t Dare Israelis of having broken ihe They claim thai no newspaper, armistice agreement, of having no reporter, and no politician dare IM Israelis, however reprehensible their behaviour. This make*the weak attitude. of UNO and Us onVnls in UV Middle East most damaging to Ihe Western cause. For it gives the Arabthe false impression that Israeli Influence is so strong n, 11. %  W. no justice 'here No support for their com plaints against Israel however justified. Clearly in the*e circumstance Ihe West cn never expect lo ujgfl the substantial aimed forces of Israel—by a long my '%  est. best-led. best-equipped, and most rapidly niobillsable m U Miodle East. The a.tsunncasl of Israeli leader—that they would regard a Sovlei Incursion into the Middle Fast a. U attack on Israel itvclflose all strategic vJlue. Ore entvui..*iini feature ther. ,< in all this. In Tel Aviv 1 found a substantial of aillueniiai IH %  ppprsjCUto this situation and deplore it. The newspaper Haret/ has publicly criticised thc Government for Ignoring General II.hy orders, however niu.h it nigh disagree with them. I ran thin! Of no ..ther country in the Mi nil ] ., N srfjMn .; ||SiaTI|ipr> would bN oiitspokeiu 'Opportunity' So fur UNO's Security CoUAC I has done little to deal with Ihl dangrrous situation. If it continues to lei It drill the aggressions, bombing-*, am bloodshed will Increase by com pound interest on both sides. But most alarming of all, the situation n.,m.,s. uv\ Street -".lied Slraigh' I found how the Russians havi even managed to percolate lnt< the highest regions of the Chi iitiai Church. But of that tomorrow. Daredevils 9 World TIMI iiiluii I'.lot Talkw Of *TIM.Men We Killed" By GEORGE MALCOLM THOMSON lilt BIG SHOW. By Pierre Clostrrmann. Chstto and Wlndus. Ill fid. 356 pages. Let noboily underrate the feat %  eCjOmplblhtQ in the brilliant record of one Frenchman's lighting life ivilh Ih* HAF. flcie Is air warfare—three dimensional, confused, incredibly M and fused with the desperate emotions of the pilots—brought to the eye and nerves of the chairborne reader with a vividness rarely equalled. To translate sUCh cxjperlences ii to words, to give wings to the dragging sentences, to llnd the slabbing phrases that will summon the mod, melodramatic scene to the ini.ik'ii.iiinn. to pass on some impression of Ihe high tempo and svddcn furies of those air battles —all that is a tremendous strain on the resources of writing. Cloetermann may tun i the majesty of St. Exupery, that odel for all writers on the air. His Ktylc Is his own and sufficient. With his ->wift, slangy nnrmtive. his capacity to dive on a phrase, if It were some glistening enemy airplane sighted in the b ky. tis sensitivity to the feeling a* well as thy scene, he soars to Ihe heights 0' war palntlmv It hOS th? vitality nT >IJN1WW like thu>e— -I hung there, ullh my nose In the air. while the Hrsi lluiu began lo Hash like Ihundrr bolts between our sections." It has the strength and Interest of the vivid personalities; the author himself, confident ami, one Judges, obstreperous. Mouchotle. his hero, the French flier with the I 'i, M 1.I---1 ilgurv and the irresistible smile, whose death is one of thc book's tragic moments. Sutherland, the Scotsman, and %  dogCU %  'I'll dt-.(ier;uti i fl.iiii tinHAF And even a handful from the other side. Walter Nowotny, the Oennan ace. killed In Ihe last wivk of the war: "A fan* like lb..t oi ., Urvd child, with ii Iran of ttdtl %  dttermlned mouth and chin "A i"i' that type wasn t wear •nrc our uniform. said Brooker. Theso young men have the mi presslon that they are In a world of Iheir own. with u meaning of Its own, something far superior to the grubbv land war below with its crawling; stinking tanks and massacres of women and Chlldrerr "Wewstoy belonged to HS: he was part of our world. where there were no IdeiMotie-. II'TIIH IV. I %  id AMtrira. %  •I II. i..i.,..i n. StfcUr i... .i rat < NIII.II -iih • %  itm, -,, r r.-.. MI, MM ..l..m,nl„, no hatreds and no frontiers Battle llyMcri. Above the clouds, in those in: i,.cU battles, ific ttyimi II. en i veli p ,i point of VH almost n philosophy, certainly a njittqiM. And lol*, loo. Closterinann conveys, although the first purpose of his iKKik is to pul liefore his reatiers the hysteria of id..MI batUra and thc fluctuating course of the air war. How adiMitly he plans and executes his grund buttle pieees' One day he hovers over the Frisian islands, yellow and arid on the grey sea. wailing for the Forts to come back from bombing the Schweinfurt boll-bearinfc works. Spare brings forth iwifBH Of German lighters. Lightnings and UlHtangi hurry home with empty magazines, dodging in and out Of the el i At msl the Foili-.-s.-es app.-.n. a forlorn and tiagle sight. Their formations have been lorn to sbieds by %  valaocbea Of Junkers and Me-.n i i".in. Scattered all over thc sk'. ttHQl ttj vunly to bunch. Spit 11 res seem to bang into the clouds and bounce off %  gain like boxers against the ropes Of thc ring "I had thc impression I was diving Into an aquarium full of demented fish. The wings of my B| II %  budd-ered from the hi btoin of niv t\> %  i At such moments Clostcrmann IK u man inspired by Ihe grandeur and horror of his theme. As the end of the war approaches It Is evident that morale and physique alike are strained to breaking point. Clostermunn, b> tin* lime commanding a wing, describes the effect of this on r< rves. tempers and occidem rctes. He inserts a vivid account, of the Luftwaffe's last effort. Ihe Lold. brilliantly planned stroke by General Sperrlc which left Uiu Allu'd aircraft on 2" bases nothing but smouldering heaps fro which tall pillars of black smoke rose, as straight as cathedral pillars. In a few minutes. 300 machines had teen put out of action A st agger nip blow hidden from ihe public ul the time. Show Over It would be a mistake to think of this book, which touches pbaMI of 'he air war. simply ihe story of one young irtla an amazing talent (or wilting. It is al— a sketch for a war history, and a moving tribute to a host of gallant men, Closti 1'iirades. It closes in the sense of emptiness that follows superhuman exertions, in the tears of parting, in bitterness Then are regrets in farewells even the firewell to arms. "The Big Show was over. Thc public had been satisfied. The programme had been rather heavy, the actors not too bad. and tho lions had eaten the trainer." liuii roars most impresFestival Game CIIARLCS 1 in I \ rc-porta on The Milan Fair HURRAH for the Soviet way of life. Hurrah lor the Festival of Russia. Hurrah for the great exhibition which Stalin built and sent 3,000 miles to tho great market-place t thc West, the Milan World Trade Fair. I have just returned from visiting the show, and I am still fascinated by the boldness with which Russia has challenged, for {he first time since the war, the best and finest that the leading nations of the West can produce. The Russian bid opened with the arrival. six weeks ago, of a general staff—Director Serge Vishiviakov and his wife, with 12 leading technicians. Armed with diplomatic cards, they set up headquarters in the fashionable Amtdei Hotel. From thc roof garden they surveyed Milan, the battleground. The main body of Soviet factory experts piled up iibrc suitcases in the lobby of a third-category hotel. NO THIS, NO THAT The Russian sh-tw was a sensation. Buyers who pressed in from every country n the world quickly stamped out again because they could get no answer on prices or deliveries : such buyers were always referred to the Director — and Comrade Vishniakov never seemed to be about. Angry industrialists said they could see no purpose in the display. But to the rest of us, the 4.000,000 sightseers. It was plain as a wink that Stalin put on this spectacular parade of wealth and industry gimply to let us know what we have been missing. Outside the Soviet paradise there was always Director Vishniakov's immense Russian limousine to draw thc crowds. And when the people turned into the palace they were met with a burst of Cossack singing and a glowing vision in stained glass, eight feet high, lighted from within—of Joseph Stalin. Beyond, a 200-yard panorama of Soviet products and machines. NO MATCH With all this eliort the result has been a disappointment for the Russians. The Moscow planners let down their Western followers with a bang. British, American, and German experts dismissed Russian technical pretensions at a glance. They all told me that the Soviet precision machinery was inferior to that made in the West. The exhibits were poorly finished. Metal parts betrayed second-grade production. Aluminium castings were pitted with holes which even paint could not conceal. Farmers said they had better tractors at home. Workers from the Neccbi sewing machine factory an hour away—they make electrically-driven models and export them to America by the thousand—found the Russians proudly showing machines still worked by hand or treadle. Girls from the ultra-modern Olivetti typewriter plant outside Milan giggled at Soviet models nearly 20 years out of date. <=~ This sivelv. • Cm picture Till: Harold follows v world o. the motion m.ignntrs is Ihe scene of mil IM MERCHANTS Robbing*! novel, which I eer of two adveni ise lo fume and glory from •wnerahip of an early nickelodeon." Crisply lold. al though over-playuig a flash-back lechoiqua borrowed from I screen, (Weidenfeld and Ntcotem 15s.). • In i iii BROKEN ROOT Arluro Ii.irea make a. novel oul nf the experience of a Spanish Republican who it-turns to Fran co'g Spain—and to Iribulation. No body need be surprised. (Fabers 15*.) W.rld Copyright Reserved. -L.K.S. NO PEEPING Women of Europe's elegant cities exclaimed at the wonderful Russian furs, but declared them botched in cut and style. The textiles and shoes we saw would not be saleable in the shabbiest Western vilkge> Radios were dialled for Russian station? only. At the exit of the Russian pavilion Vishniakov placed an angirl (with a red hair-band) holding a golden book in which awed visilon might write Iheir comments. ~ After the opening day tho pages were clipped together so that no one could flip them back lo read the opinions offered. Said an American friend, "You can quote me that this is the linest propaganda for Western Europe we could ever hope for." /../ u* not !>• loo prtmd. At ih, liny Brtiuh %  tiimi, oeeupbd nf.thi i>l" l>(plI >"i..ess of lieiim doubled and a multi-million-dolli.r backlog of orders on hand stifnclent to keep the ent-irged plant busy for two years. Made him president Mi Hubbard came from the HofTm-in Manufacturing Company of Chelmsford. oU'ners of ii majority of the stock in the Norma Huffman Coinp.*m Mile. With him he brought llntish notions of labour-ntiiii.i i;<-nti-Tii rtlafBou .Hid hat "made than Industrialist* all over DM U S re watching Ills Witt] envy It to'ik him only Bve B straighten out the tangled affairs >f the Connecticut company. He was preparing to go home when the U.S directors urged him to luxe over the management on a permanenl I They elected Mm pn He told me to-day* *i e.i!h-i |i the leaders of the union, and told them how I started out ;it 10 mid came up from the ranks They liked that." A calm, reasoned approach to the problems quirkly led to a twoyear contract between union and firm. It has just been renewed tot two yean, more No bluster %  The -e* ret ul :mwh >lc thing wan the British approach — no bluster, no cajoling, no I Ing. and no pleading. "When labour here g.' it expects the indusi: costs to I ,-h labour union latgoUston an hviter tralnwl tad no emed Mr Hubbard has brought ovei i' and two children -L.E.S A Plarr To Srttk I inor. The Adfocafe— SIR. C o II 1 d V.HI pnwlbly 'hiough the medium of your Taper, put RM in touch with'anv person or pernoiis on your Island nr neifihliouring Islands w h o would like to correspond with me My motive behind this letter Is due to a strong desire to settle down In a more desirable place in the World with my wife and two sm.-.'l children. When I do find the place, 1 shall dispose of my BusiRti possessions, and imlgrkte I am by trade a Bricklayer. .mil HU wile runs a small Hardware & Crockery Shop for me. Possibly, your Island and Its environments is ,ust what I am lOOMBl tar, in all events howexer. 'vliim.ver eOUW I UlM, to be BOM to correapond with someone so in England will be of considerable importance and plea%  nre to IBg If you kindly contact someone 111 you lie good enough to ask them to describe, the Climate. Naiural resources. Language, prevailing Industry, Customs. The G HEATH. Ollllll-AlftEHSSAY Dund*i BHieraJ waailttei w VMI / WOHld need fo bri'm icllh me, that is of course if you would • ne lo ban uisj. and being a builder, could this knowledge be utilized fully on the Island Do please see that this letter achieves its purpo.%-. In th, meantime even though it may be a little premature I wish to thank you for everything. 167 Park Road. St Helens, Lanes. England. The Ifo/rtown Fair T. Tl.r HHor, The Advocate— SIR.—We take this opportunity to thank all those who 'ave so generously ;uid those who worked so hard to make the Country Fair held at Holetown on Whit Monday such a success. The lucky winner of M IftUl of Crab Hill. St Luej u "h ticket No. 488. The net proceeds were SI. 110.-T which goe* to the St John Bail list Vie.ir.ise Fund Hoping .ill of >ou uill be will Ing to help n aj-f-ntn m il-.i tutniv. Mrs. Ben M Alfred J. Hatch. Vn-rvghtralion SIR,—One side of regtstrntio.seems to have been neglected by the Government and others Intciested m its success. It is now more than two weeks that the liUed-iu forms of ni> household have not been collected by the registration officer The time is getting near when I all forms have to be handed in. If my case is not unique it i*-, possible that many who want to be i registered will find that they have Wi'! thg Government see that registration officers do not neglect collection of form?? Yours, UNREGISTERED I'llAMH \l SPANISH GRAMMAR HT IlilN &. Ford Advocate Stationery BROOMS and BRUSHES BASS BROOMS SCAVENGER BROOMS STRAW BROOHR HANI) HAIR BROOMS SCRIB BRUSHES WHISK BRISIIES Kin ill \ BRl'SHES SHOE BRISHEH STEEL BRISIIES VEGETABLE BRUSHES LAVATORY BRISIIES WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD. THE ORGANIZATION THAT COVERS PAINTING REQUIREMENTS INSIDE and OUT. At present day renewal prices, it pays you to pTOtMl your property from the ravage of weather. We can offer you the following PAINTS FOR EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR WOODWORK AND METALWORK in a variety of beautiful colours:— i u.oi l\i I MM in it \ i l\<. .,nd "LAGOLINE" ENAMEL Undereoating—$5.65 per wine gallon, and upwards depending on colour. Enamel—$7 25 per wine gallon, and upwards depending on colour For best results, the following inslructions should be r'refully (ol lowed:— 1. For new work, treat nil knots with "PATENT KNOTTING" Apply I coat of "INTERNATIONAL" PRIMER EOR WOOD. Stop and fill all tracks Then applj I < % % % % %  i I "LAOOUNB" LNllERt'OAtTNG. followed wllhln U hours by 1 coat ol "LAGOLINE" ENAMEL 2. For previously painted work. If the surface is in good condition, rub down, clean, and apply 1 coal of "LAGOLINE" ITNDERCOATING. folli.wed within 24 hours by 1 coat of "LAGOLINE" ENAMEL. S. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor condition, rub down thoroughly, elctin. and carry out the procedure for new work, as described at 1 above. 1. For new work, apply 1 coat of "BROWN PRIMOCON". then 1 coat \ ST1MK VI* O.V illI SI ro-inr. TASTY BAKERY GOODS Carr's Cream Crackers Carr's Sweet Biscuits Carr's Chocolate Lunch Anchor Butter Anchor Milk Powder Sandwich Bread GRADJ A MEATS Ox Tail* Ox TWlMU Ox Brains r %  Smoked Kipj; Fillet Sole THRIFTY GROCERY BUYS SPECIALS 12 oz. tin Meat Lunch Te T M per tin Idrio Kola tonic Cooks Paste 06 pi • %  %  1 on i DRINKS of the BEST Canada Dry BhaaTI Ak Worthington Ale Golden Trel Beer Gold Braid Rum PHONE G0DDARDS WE DELIVER



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PAOI IK.HT HAHBADOS ADVOCATE ii i Mm M w L'J mi JAMAICA TEAM BEAT COETS XI 3-NIL Jamah i football loam oponod I Lmpr, Ihej defeated a Colts XI Ihrce nil in itball ftxtura <>i thatr tour at Kensington Oval yeeaarday after. A I well over throe thousand witnessed the match which nj and exciting from start to the finish. The Jamaica team scored their first two goals in the lirst half and the third came shortly aftei the second half had The Jamaica anal scorers weir inside lefi Robert Barry, lift winter Keati Hail aad the lall well built light winger Ally S.ts.* A't of thes.' scored one feel each to put Jamaica well on lop. The Jamaica goalkeeper Ronnl? Coopor thrilled the ciowit with Ml .intuipation and forward! found it hard MM him The two hill Ifunlley DaCogta and Dickie Bay.is, played a brilliant .amo and proved strong opponine Colts forward line The Jamai~a team took the Held Brat arearinfl followed shortly by the Colts V.n.pton Hits 147 nggg•££ %  •> ptUtoi SPORTS WINDOW !< %  mrtch. DivtsafM i ( Wandn*r> In • >i "KIIIAII, %  VISION ,< %  n Hurrlao-i V M P C. v MCA POT M.C.C. vs South Africans LONDON. May SI. D i,is Compton, England and it i %  I Afuciiis wetc IS rui CC will niing* wicketto f:>li ft the en I i.f the second day's play. Keph mg in the South Africans' l p total of IO0, the MCC game started with the XI defending their goal i urn thr southern end of the uiteh. Jamaica look the kirkoff Bad very sewn their forward* were trying in the Colts area About two minutes after play Mc<'Um ..i nghl wing lor the Colu on receiving a long low I pass from Draylon ed wllh onl..it but on irachmg well insld' the urea kicked the ball right nutelde The Jamaican custodia 11rihi in Wants Raw Materials Selecting Workers For l.S. /'arms OTTAWA. May 21 Accuroing to Informed sources I IUIII La asking Canada foi %  a ih.l ah* .ill Ml in nl ^ %  rr, "" h " u,u !" re %  -*•" lc davatofi ne. L*.A> million arms progurnnu The British repraMntatfvea a/ere i %  %  '. Untied Kingdom Continuing Trade Committee, the said %  rr" i .aM tl ght damage—the fi IT t during the GRENADA afar 3 he period—Bircti Grove GovAbout 1.000 men from all parts ern merit school m St Andrew'.* of the island and the Depended last night completely of Carnaeni crowded the Labour destroyed by nre. Mil i.li n. %  .•d in ihe popua the working mil r.r |lw already %  emplane there with the 50<; adds to tht financial problems Windw.nrds' contingent. the provision in current yrars of After polite respond tied checkbuilding us well as replacement of ed two pravloui •'• Ihjoee destroyed during lha ask for CusSonS II \i in >TOIM r SOAPS r. HOTCIUN*.. Ii.id scored tlica vain jtU-mpl to <.to il for Jamaica in ytrda ii. putkii. looks on RobinsonKO's "' Gmaa Teaw i French Champ *i* LAUSANNE Hay 21 PARIS H iv >l : rungs. w.nger Ally Sasso centred rile* 'hrew ,||^i across th Colts penalty area but By •coring till fourth century ,uil back Gibbons was there ""up .., filnn.nKs. C'cmpton iw.rhlh.s before the Jamaican centre „, .,. (i ,,,, ..-..•.. %  u. wi: .in-i m.U'iiall' lorwaro Minneii could reach tne \| I :I increased his chances of seorine ball. The Colts got a free KICK f((Ur 1mg to organisi efTw 'i' Keeper to beat but he lost hi untroubled b) h |Uf) loQ>y< t*"' 1 'h I runs l>een accomplished by the lalancc and kicked went outside passing a mple of inches from the croas %  i pot home #i uxn ^11 round and cut Rohi national Olympic Cmimtt< Though tha IW i I %  that there must be only one OWv l I'TI was reached at to-' i %  > %  Slat. Welfare rnittee on the i|U<--tion of ih. • UKcrs hav-* bean tabllshment und recognition of one German Olympic CooimtttM. The East ano H iked I for the i u ft hook rneetlpi with rhg |ntei *, tha liwd Committal aftaa tin h ml fofloi >* and w.ii not nndnV The h ive made a thousand hefore June. Compton had yet to !" s _i_ aohlev tins nolahlc feat. — Heater world eh. %  with lefts and right*, to ihe head which drew hii-iKi front over the Fri iobinson warmed up in the %  last h I —Reutrr right eye Rcanaop %  bar. fourth round At this stage both team* were lh)i j^,^ pressing and Jamaica gol their ,, Kn hook, lirst goal when Keats Hall on tbe (l hCC ^ y, left wing finding himarji un~ opened DUl marked kicked a well directed rtfttl round hot from the wing which com,.i \: uletely beat Smith T^beUlodied n... rrincti .(self in the left eornar of the iv to me i \p i faded I id Yorkshire t^-,.l !> %  This goal was scored annd hit h ,ket Darb> minutes after play had %  Hre 1'4'fApplevard four foi 31. With .me goal up again,lltem .o|>es. Yardl.v fin foi IB) ind 134 (ApColts again went on Ihe attack tae tOWOl UW foui f..r 49), Yorkshire ind an effort by Met'olln. |t % -.',1 nrtd fifl for three, wan again foiled by Uat""-1 Yorkshire Beat Derbyshire nd Iwgan to hurt tan wiiii 'fft ; n I wtnch force*I Marcil eUnehea, Ri in true gtyle in the Boverl) Uukrr >\ iUb Tennis TiliV l.i)NlhN. May SI. ^Kruter DAVIS CUP TENNIS 1/iNIXJN. Mnv : iiim.iK ' ClUb tOUIlUUW nt on Siitiuday. u, ., . defeating the Auatrail u ,k put Marcel 1 < '"' Mrs Nan. v Boiton, 4—n. .. his knoa the 0i. I I Uarc< ' %  I lag time tennh In %  gypt, Mir Blnjsag tin.. ,,, a • %  i Ouiidford, Bu Drota .i. Braled Vladmh Coroik. big ..I.I Catch D i into in of living demonstration in Madrid by chain tetbti Among the arrested were two i i %  employin tinRoneo Depar tm eni al Inatitutkag circulating loial for Ihe last three %  MIH |iople to take part I igoorrnw In %  "walk to work %  igq aiap were eelced t< boycott .nsport ser\'|ces. shops Of amusement. All 1-tters were anonymous. They were believed to have come from both right and left wing groups tne Police have been aCUtn i oughout Spain for the past %  ick arresting rime strike lead sources .day and meuical examinations school building* recon.n.i ; will follow before the nnal irafl the Board of EducaUon nnd apTnis organisation was set up to! of who will be sent to St. LucU proved by the tagOalatun maintain permanent trade contact between the two Governments afttr Su Stafford I npps visit 10 Canada in September. liMa. the • .aid No JOIK.IIIK.O %  1 ed on the talks win* h are iiring held In secret Informed Qoar-j ters. however, said the agenda in eluded a British request for assurances on law materials and a Canadian request for an expan' sion of British niports Irom the %  Dominion Trade, economic and finance otllciaU from both countries met .... praluniaary discussions befon today's Continuing Committee's fifth session opened I \naiul Token Flan The Canadian Press N. .v Agency said Canada would poi il to the fact that Britain's import ieatrlijUeiie cut Caneria's rxportu to Britain from SToo million in I 1949 to 1450 million in ISiO. 3h. would ask. I That the token shipment | plan be expanded Under this plan Canadian evportH i eritn •> traditional i u ket in Britain were allowed import permits on 20 per rent of then i>r-. Thu was doubled to 4o l last January. Canada woule ask for a further expansion ellhei by percent age in. 'in or by expansion of the list of goom l*.r which their permits are granted. 2. Approvil by the BritiM. Government of a further allotment of dollars to the West li.dies to buy more goods from Canada. Britain controls the dollar pool for all of the C i nun wealth's sterling area countries The British West Indiee have already indicated then agreement with this view and hive coupled Canada's reour-M with a similar reque-t of tbatl iwn.—Beater :V.| Blfl P ISMIK %  — Krulrr Scores iilliiii.-i; \\ ins II> Iniringa Ii -'. Ii I ,CP> vim favour ol 'h,' iii.ikh iv .."UMCI 7r "two matches lo lall who had raactwd lha ball one over Pranea i" their Mcond the same time with Smith took Buropaan Zona Ihe opportuiilty. anil hejil.il tl,< i IIK.II J.iin.m.i rnajoi laagl it' Ihwis Cup tie ;.| Wimbledon here, bull into an empty coal. The acore .ifter seoilliil only 22 Hum won Tony Mottrom ..n I (ie.ilt Pniah of was now two luvi benl I'.iui Remy nd Holm At-i. alam i. • -. •-. i: .4 —Heater VIENNA. M.iy II, Swetlen. who had nlrendy made caruln m meatln, tha winners ol llal| WM nbou la mlnulo oldi the Brit.ill a, trance Ik 111 tin g,,^, „ ho lad lw y „..,, ,,|. quarter HnaU. ba.it Austria — II |Jlg ..„.,„-. ,, tho goa n„ kn l u 111 the Davis Cup here t"-da> „.„,,„,.,. whuli Smiil, fal ad •I'l„. Swedish won both he filial ho|d „„„ 0 j„ malcn ,„„.. unties to-day after aJMI^I ,„,,, uu Sm| h J0 |||m| ,„ |h BELGIUM BEAT EGYPT 4—1 aVlnning 3—0 margin in the earlier matches of the tecond round In the European rone tie To-day's results (Swedish players nrst) Met! Sven Davidson beat Ham Red) ft -4. 1—6. G—4. O-l. Torsten Johansson beat Spccht 0—!. 1—7. 6— 4— acuter. KINO! I PrubebU blatoi • wi C of .ink* 'I Id BRU8B1L8, May Jl Belgium beat tgyUl hi t nnlnaa ind nwtchee to one In then second When referee Hamfour iiini In >B mlnuU* ol play |-"oid .>r the Europeai blew for half ItfM the score wi Tht !" P '"" "'"' ui.^ unchanged beiween Ihe Wool Indiei Beii i, who i .-r <.. After half time the noisy "hleat c.Ukel club Kingston and lh Quarter Final-,, bad al,..i... crowd saw the Jamaica warn comMelbourne, third ...dcM. ..t t .....,.....,a, i.,,,1 ..,,,„ ii,,, ,,,„,, olonri leading cricket ground the ue and aaea leevm won ..no pSrifwng the ..fteimati. ol the nnal two s.ngle, today t h ts won Marcel Coen aln Kin>t..o. tent In to bal (gypt) boat l>hili|)jWasher trlared :d 2 runs For 4 wkkett tBelgunn) f3—4. I—. 7-5. 8—4 : il up Ti for leclared In 30 mil foi 10, battli. H i BU short owing t i Haro was Esmond Kentish ifVect Ind i Lirae wrao Us h I u„ i and .i oi Id y for 0 %  ceompUahlni tinha) trick In I., .r I. i Affinls Storks LONDON. May 21 Tha Peisian .ituai.on weighed I i a\ il> on the London Stock rixiluiigc loda> and (lines in ,nost seconds moved to slightly rwer level*. SjaUina however II ami business mainly nf levelling positions With UHnorrOW Tuesday, the l;ist fiunt. iles were ena ai ntsred i" ihe Brttlah Govern men! funds whkn Fall by three etghttlS and dullness was wide spread among industrials. iiares failed lo hold the niti.il gam. that tolUrwril tin %  tenant Inl n dividend MS in'r cent. Last year payment of 10 |ier cent was made. A 11 %  %  i bain easier fur most of ttu "i Ing issues were i urns of reeover> ,,t th* dose B illness in oils wai —ReuU-r. (ii'rmany Vimled As An Equal Parly BONN, May 21. British Foreign Secretary Herbert Morrison said heri today that his country wanted Germany as an equal and lm l-oiUnt partner among western poweis and as "an active partne in the maintenance of world Mace He was speaking to correspi'iidentM on the third day of hi four-day stay In Germany when lie Is meeting leaders of Govern Tient and Opposition parties. Hi described his conversations win Government leaders as "successful." Morrison is due to (ly to Vienna tomorrow for I three-day visit But ho said today that he wai ready to modify his plans at any tneapant if the Persian oil dlsnute necessitates his return In l,ondon. Renter hall but It trickled through ringers Into the goal. I i...... |fto' No. 8 HAVE HOAD MAJNISEIKS Space made availablr by CANADA DRV for Baftf Metering. With Iheir BU CCees the Jamaica puuren never at any time relaxed and lime and time attain whenever they found a gup in their upponenU defence madv good use of it. Their goal keeper Cooper brought off a brilliant save just before the blow or t/Om the tight winter McCollin. The teams were.— Jamaica: II. Cooper. II Do Costa, D Bayliss. A VI T. Parchment, D. Smith. K. Hall. R. Berry, Mirmett. H. Miller and A Sasso. Colu XI: Smith. Browne, f HutchinaO Clairmonte. MrCnllm. winte. o. Rutoninaon Hams. The referee waa Mi. i. v Bai ns. and the linesmen were Messrs I Bdwarda and il. Than Qlbbona, %  Drayton, %  nd Wll\\ hat's on T.odaj police Oearla tooo a.m. lion-.al t'Ncmbly nieeU a| S.OO pja ( IMII \N Qlaha Dark ( Ity". Koyal Kiss of Death" Hoxy Stagr to Tin-on Olympic 'The (;ir.U M.ijahara". tmplnI or Heavens Sake' IMa/. II...W Heart' *m RfFRIGfRATION SERVICE s vriSI'AC THIN sl'PEKVIMtlN L. & H. BiEO Si CITY MILLER PHONE 2791 NOTICE WE OUR They'll Do It Every Time DMI EVER NOTICE HCW SLOW A • XHXI SEEMS TO TRAVEL WHEN M31/RE W*rriNQ ROR ONE ? By Jimmy Hatlo BUT ONCE you GET IN WoW! IT GOES FASTER THAN youS FAVORITE NITE-SPOT'S CLOCK-W1SH TO ADVISE CUSTOMERS THAT OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT WILL RE CLOSED FROM FRIDAY. 1st JUNE TO MONDAY 4th JUNE 1951. BOTH DAYS INCLUSIVE, FOR OUR ANNUAL STOCK-TAKING DOWLMNG ESTATES & TRADING (0. ITD. ECKSl'Kiv BROTHERS BAY STHI I i .m^Koiejiasas*asaa HAPPY RELIEF. FROMBACKACHE N.ifhbour tmtd -la** Ooon'i sV WHY PI 1 UP ilh necdicu ditcomlon from Hattrhr. rlieunuiiik ruin., lumbago. %  nlT. actung riiuiUc* aJ lumt* or the tummon urinary diturdrrt due IO %  Juuiiii kidney intion ubui juu ii.igln get happy relief. Many ilvii-.inJof health* peuole hlcsi the dsv thev look Dosn'i Backache KiJney Pilh. Thii well known diuretic and urinary anuicpnc help, ilupgi^l. iJmv> io carry out thcil tuiKimi ol ridding the blood of excess uric ia.i J and other impurities harmful io health. Grateful people, every where, recommend Dosn'i Pill, io their friend, and neishbourv ila! Arrowt 4Ain Arrow Shirts in white only, collars attaehed. Sizes 14|| to 1? Each $ 7.08 Boys Khaki socks, length with lurn over top*. Sires 8"v to 10. Pair .. SI.03 If $124 Oents white India Gauie Vests and short sleeves. Sue 36. Ea., ., 38-40, Ea. with button fronts '•" Jl.80 $1.89 JI.98 C.enU Toola! Iluliilkcrchicra In whltp ami tthitr will) niiniii'oii bontora. Eiirh .. .. 2 CAVE SHEPHERD &. Co., Ltd. 10-13 Broad St. Janlien bath trunk-. & Suits fur IU.-U. in wool last ex and nylon-COttOn. Sires 30 to 41 E.I. tll.ftt. IMfi W.4" and S3.33. Boys* Jantaen bath trunks m wool and laatn Ea. $1.52 nnd *4 49. S^a bland Oottan ahnia with truhanatad eaUat attached in shades of white. blur, rleum and aray. Ea $780 DOANS See Our Up-to-the-Min ute STYLINGS for Spring 1951 $.,..,o LADIES. HEN'S AND CHILDREN'S SOCKS ALSO CLEANERS. POLISHES AND lull -Ml -. For Your Enjoyment ^ Hi.i( ,.. ki.nl Onions X m Cherrlr> -iui>,-.i Olives ; Tins ( HI ki.i.l BteculU X Swift Virnna Sausages^ Frankfort Sansages ^ 1 unrhron Beef .. Pate De Fole •; .. Petted Meat 1 Pt Tin Nav... uilvr Mii; : Tins il„.-., pkr-v Kraft ( heesr |l.NCE&Co. Ltd.;: TERMITE-PROOF STANDARD HARDBOARD 19e. stjuare feet. TERMITE-PROOF TEMPERED HARDBOARD i sheets a lick. 4' x i: rauaie fee' SISCOLIN DRY DISTEMPER Create), Oreen, Butr. Bunahlaa, Peach, Vhlta, Rad, Turquoise in f> la packacea. Onven In M Imply rm\ v/tth water Phone 42*. 4456. WILKINSON 8. HAYNES CO.. LTD.


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I ICI TWO I1AIU1.UK)-, AI>VIM \ll ii i -.ii w M w n, itsi #*A# Callinq B.B.C Radio Programme H i Coverugr M %  gave .1 iarn at Covernmem :.; in hOHOUl "f .li' i K to afcd by Wr. and the Ii uriK thi Regional %  undred and Afly filled included member.* I -iis.l.iturc. tlie House of and olhcr official* athich began at Mid raided shm ;K ;.f:ia Good Move f SKF that DOS of the Bus Slops i the Esplaninlr has been moved U • ,i% %  Hie H.im! Sf.iiui to a spot thirty yards awa>. i -lied. This %  >r,l*<. If if doe* yards mart*, it nerves onr useful purpose. In the event of rain. would DO bus traveller* can shelter In thr shed They < %  in see -he 'hicomer by the Bay Street Boys" Club and have plenty Of lure to fat, to the pole ahead >f the bus and net a minimum wetting from the rain. Sheltering in %  Stand wiin the entrane." WM inconvenient. II uld not g' .. HI 'innv Another point that i' BC two bus irw %  hirh were 0 gat .mother. Back to Irinidad M l LAIRI HERHEHA. sis• Mrs Cecil Goddaid.. i i .en hoUdaylBi In Barbadoi witb bar a^ugMcr Room to Trinidad yesterday p by B.W.I.A m in. who had also been i. returned some Transferred O FF to Puerto Rico on Sunday mommfi •> %  B.W.LA. wtn' Mi H d Mr John Miii. id and It M M B. C Art. Offiear ,_ "fj** %  *' M R JOHN HARRISON. Art! Offlcr r-t .<• BritlUi Council ,•,•• {Jf^JrSJSTSUltVSi (or thia ar*-J. l<-ft yrsterdav after, m 'p,.^.., !" !.. p>rd. m • %  F"- noon by B.W.I.A. (ot Trinidad, uw uitarlala; 1 "' G.irilv *.*II be awa> (or iwo or lhro a*. I4 m. T— J— T. H IrbiiAi Fan Give These A Prize For Originality? Ill I I S ASCKOFT intpwli /*<• MM tourrnirt %  Wk,'. MkjM'lUl ihe U.N.E.j^'SKST', V*. m"n." C ~ ^-S.C.O. Exhibition. Thin*.; %  • m. i*twr riom %  "'< t • • m TK* •.: I* % %  "<* % %  • lOUriMg W.l. 0,.^, ,, is m P.-si.mm. *•'•<" JACK SPEAKMAN wknim. I.i.ijn. !" CbjMrn "J "JT, t the we.k-v.id with ,h.;;-;" ,;',:.' l .~"-i"_-.'*r. 1 .'^?" ks. Irft for Tnnldad M"„,; Sundiy by B.W.I.A Of th< of Sutclltfe and Speakman of V..,.. .-'. %  ., linn wlmli m..ki, active carbon. Mr. Speakman .?£,?„ 1 Mi • — is p m -*: • M C C BMMIi Alti. Ine Urn'.Cup. 1 10 P rou'rbui"wveral ofVhe West Indian i^'J^^^gT. ^TW'.UVMV ulanriK. ay P %  ""*"2 ^ M'STH Here and There M R. ARTHUR TIBr.lTTS. Cubl and Wireless Entineer, has i h i brother Eric staying with him. Eric, who is an Assistant Supt.. in Trinidad Police Force, is on leave *' . Mr. Bernard Moore also with !" Cable and Wireless returned from 10 si Lucia on Sunday by B.W.I.A. after a short holiday with his •in-laws." His wUe and young daughter have remained on In St. Lucia for a longer holiday M*rl Thr 1.11 .'. %  Tlw New.. Tllpm MWS li v m W-.i Indian GUMS 1pm tl""H> *r"*''". RldW N*w>rrrl: %  IS p if illh; A hundred yean ago every compacts and cigarette cases Fj lamlly visiting the Great Exhlbi men there are leather stud box. lion would take home a keepsake metal tobacco container*. Festiv n ug Or china figure of the Quern tie* or braces of woven elastic. To be placed on the mantlepicce incorporating Nelson's column uv pijno. 'OT children: pencil sr^rpet What shall we take home from In the shape of St. Paul's turcinthe 1951 exhibition Souvenir like Big Ban. or toy sailors which Committee has been selecting climb up ropes to fly Festival mementoes for the post year, flogs. Those on sale officially are .upBreakfast in Bed posed to represent good design. Most useful discovery in thi originality and value for money. Furniture section: a trolley t. i*.!K r ""' huim u" 1 *' !" brc P" er y j4nd between twin beds. IU twe a M i> m imiray*. hand-carved platters of trays slide out sideways for break Mood, brass door-knockers, and an f A3 t. The troftey is made of embossed teapot-stand of heatCallfornian eucalyptus and alu %  1 iir.K glass. n.inium. The trays are he;it-an Gifts for women range 'from y\ a in proof, in pastel colours, and *>ead scarves and parasols to metal need no cloths. !" 1 1 m y Edit nilllpn -Iv pa* Mrs. Keighley Packs Her Itound-The-World Wardrobe private lifmolh W.l. Pantomime L OUISE BENNETT, well known writer of Jamaican dialect, who recently started composing CalypHoes as a hobby, savs she has completed work with a London illm company. She hopes to be able to play the part of a film-star again. Meantime she is busy writing n pantomime depicting life in ihe West Indies generally. MISS BAKCR Pictured st Bournemouth Two-handed Beverley Dramft B ALLERINA IVY BAXTER. who. with Beryl McBurnie. leceiitly staged a demonstration of ribbean dances in Londo The Rich Aunt Is Back From R M Marl OIX NEW YORK Fnnme Mae will soon be bark. A trip-tcaser? A torch singer'' The revival of un old-time play? No. Fannie Mae is what Ameri~jna familiarly cull the Federal nearnncc on British tennis courts welfare activities arranged by ihr N ilt i,Kial Mortgage Association. tj 21-year-old Baker, from ( seeded fourih POTENTIAL Wimhledon ChamCai pion now mnkiiig her llrst upnow attending a series of student ,. arul rumiliui Miss Biverlev British Drama League. Ivy iliforniu Slit is studying drama and dancing under ... among American the auspices of the British Coun;mgies ut Bournemouth in the Cricket Lovely Cricket game i? fiuiti British Guiaiia is ivilh the " hard court championships issllaker has Q ;<-i( here a couple of years 1 the) and hiInto theii braneh ... Vr.i.pJ.v'. A**; u .l. Simla Monica, gnve her her first —three from Jamaica, nnd one Yesterday Arrivals tennis lesson. from the I*eward Islands. Thii aai; .cjsr.pu i AHACHO__O She Is ambldixlrous. plays forefact ^vas revealed last week by %  ii hi .men in Trinidad been training to become :. cham^^ F """ 1MB-5I the captains of """ n '" now M-eii t.ansferrec' ,,,,,. n,. r English-born father, the London University Cricket ich in Ran Juan. WhO Is Director Of Racrestlon at ii'i""have been West Indians **>* %  J %  "And it h liit news for many people who are just getting married and want a home. For Fannie Mao has a thousand million dollar bunk roll In her purse In official jargon it IMSM thai the U.S. Oiivcriiiiienl Will be back in the secondary mortgage don't llk ut hniK thi.l way beFlorida'^ Supreme Court stick^JXjlSSX'^"lh52Lra5M 1-eWent.l InUlligenc. Ijjdta JjdjUjj. tmjm ... 1 Hi Richard only will, I,,, 1. ,, rV>UnT,1JL..Y tne youn, moth!" ?". !" \J !" Z 1, .h !" 11,11. M, "'""I" „£„"*', ',"" W, N 'L 1 "'* I"* examine the toy -Imt S?.ElS" JLuJST ^S •-.n.l daiuhtn I III LM BtaM ;> "' „ 2J thi. ralhor remnlir.tal for a .mar run HAW IOUM '" k ,,; l • w "" u ^;••"•• %  ; n i ; rl ld *" "" %  krt -. _. ipirllT """ '""" The .hop a„l.t.nt rt-plicd. -If.. -An Innocent woman', rlnht. Arnv.nu (i..m SI. Vlneenl yei•,„,„ „ akrr lllu ,„. „ lhrr „ mbl .„ cdue.itlon.l_ toy.__m.dam, de,„ nol ,„ ,„ l|ln ored bWUM "I her good look..*" remarked .he moderation, spirits. Miss Baker In I"'" W BO %  .. .11. Mi ,„„„ i„.,,„„, 1,,., ,.,,,„. Th ,„. ucned lo adjust a child to live Ii. Frank Howard who is a BUest at wno have seen her at Bournethe world of to-day. Any w.y he •I.1V can View Hotel and Mr. mouth think she may so far at puts it loirether it I* wrong."— Colin Phillips. Wimbledon. Katelle Ward McCrsy L.EK. attractive and able twmll upport TMI CONCO Coll.pobl. MM •: M (III UIVIMIIIIS OF IMIM BY THE WAY By BEACHCOMBEH B LGIN hore. Obviously. the local hotel, and slole it back heads of the brigade. It Is fun ( o An arUele about tactlc.l the next day. After wh.ch he think of life slo-.ving down dav a SI ran rsmlnfted me pedillwl DMrrUy OUl ol *'ie town, cloy In an age which can t ilk' nu |M "1 '"'no Ihink of r ,.!,„ i hut speed. .. arc BchUng s war ' ra**itiK In 1 counliy rbCrC there are no rxi'UINt; a week .siun luvnien Steep My Little fine . ;HUS the affacl U had lewer cut. to rescue A*Y paper says that 1.0QO ujg1 retully collected and from irevs nd rtMfts. ihev wri" i v l pipers, ill ulayuiu I I ftjn • .i.l.ieiil. hard at w-ork On people jrappctl pipes, aio io m..u-h" m ,„ Imagine the in lifts So fur have we advnnced this monlh. When vou\e „,,„. When the iseynnd the old reliable lift workone bagpipe you haven't hSkUfl %  ugh lhal ihe ...i by .. rope thai n is possible lo them all. There WJS k n taXSAlon r. u in mlnoceroass in spend half a day in one of tne new when the poet Yeats was invite ben. < Sasuni ol i snsNai b whith h aSS dmuibcd. Who „, yo,,, i-id *h do fou WIIK ? The uny vatok aspadi clow 10 hu asf, "I SMI to find lh Mit'i who )..,: WM kuptn. TVn ii you M up turn io ike EC k, we %  I'ghi. and don 1 wikt •sain.** jrumbki thr bw n ..-.-'I on. I %  Imte % %  !!' doet %  he's told. The "JH.,( ii rough, and *i ai bvguu TO go downhill he II i Middle East. Australia. New Zea land. Can.*Kla and America. He jobselling lithographs of well known paintings to schools anc itarting school picture circulating schemes. Basic colour for her cold weath er clothes is bluck: for the hoi parts of her trip, white. Only two hats are Included, but the, pack flat and can be worn li iiiaiiv ways. A black velvet enp is dressed up with sequin veilniK jcal flowers or feathers. For sunshine there Is a large white cotton hat called "congo." It Is made on a piano wire frame, which opens out into an cnormou. bunhat. It can be worn Inside out or on windy days at half mast Lingerie is all nylon, nylon lac* trimmed, which washes over night and requires no ironing. And the whole trousseau Is crease resisting to gave time in pe ek i n g unil pressing. All ChaiiRe "Separates" play an importani part, with interchangeable nyloi blouses and seersucker skirls fci •her. lace stoles to dres up a plain blaek dinner dress foi Australia's winter and a Parl black tie. silk diess with colourct •carves that luck into the waist band to give it s.x dilTeren i anonalltkeTo save unpacking on over nighstops, beauty aids travel togcthet in n lltted case. To go with her brown eyes. darV red-brown hair and light skii Mrs. Keighley has chosen n peac powder and blue—pink Unoca bright enough to face sunshine o< electric lights. Bravo I applaud the restaurant tha> has relaxed its "evening dres only" rule for the Festival period PARIS CHANGES TIIK SHAPE AGAIN from IRENE RICHARD PARIS. Mid-season summer collections reveal n feminine %  Ubouetta with faller sklrta. often pleated, sloping shoulders and Magyar slaves. ^ Leading colour is white, w with all shades of yellow and lliarril/ l>luc. ^L. Linen and shantung dominate the collections with many prints and "sheers." ^L Smartest models are m adaptatoVt. Jean Desses •hows a round-the-clock dress, with detachable apioiiiiimcapeand removable sleeves. JL, The three quarter length danr< dress, with bouffant tulle skirt. Is de %  IpsMl i' i hot sreatnar ^L Leag gloves ore a "must" for evening wear. SchUparelll makes oyster satin gauntleU. winch pull up to the armpits, rlnished with bows. AOI 'ATM € Lin CimENA !Mernber.Onry) IO Ml.Ml .1 %  CLAl'DCTTC COLBIKT HUBEHT HVAN lp Iklli Sf Plrl.-. THE SECRET FURY" •llh JANI COWL PALL KELLY MATINBI 1 WBDMBSDr al 8 m WfOSiDA\ a TIM IOIH Mi. Ml .1 with RALPH EU*AH*IS I'M 11 IP till GLOBE TO-DAY 5 dk 8.1* P.M. LAST SHOWING -wtfiA CMTYELIZABETH SCOTT & CHARLTON HESTON TO-MORROW ONLY 5 & 8.13 P.M. -Ml All WIH.I it (DIAL 2310) I'l.A/.A I-..I i M riin\i mi ,., c ,„ WARNERS "HASTY HEART" RONALD REAGAN PATRICIA NEAL HU'llARD TODD "CAaiOBSAN" THEATRE — I'.KIIM.I N)\\ \ OOaDON SUrHAE D...O DAT in *•'•" %  'TEA FOR TWO" OSSBfl S in IIMi niiiiIBl'BSDAl ilUnk.ll.llaa>> • .< %  ..ni. 1 ... „ „, Th New FALCON in I1MMV WAKKLY ^VIVl^-CARGp &_M0QN OVER_M0TNANA^ Many 1 CROSSWORU i i t • 9 •< %  1 *— II Cartwheel hat In white horsehair is trimnw-d willi leaven and vellliiK (CLAI'DE ST < YRt .. ing by air have HI luanage room for v e n I n g dress. It vould be a graceful icsture it other night pots would follow suit or the holiday months. Advice From a Woman "Push yourselves hard as you can. and don't be afraid of being a little unladylike on occasions and making a big nob Mm B. Anne Godvin. Aiiiitnnt Secretory of ihe Clerical and Administraftt'i Workers' Union. WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED —L.E.8 1 son or *o. Ill On 1 •* .... II Oi 1 ni) It %  lid %  I:,* !%  *•' i 1 11 It DAI !'r reM I BN IDS i\ K.-ia-. 1 %  '• I || a 1 win titittu IS '. (71 N rtlrw I I 1 p UMtSl 'UIU' t (Hi i !" **-a ii'inj'i m > : i • H.rv ( %  •linn Iftl % %  T III un* at 1*1. nrtr •nfl lliece is QiB sr Si in vneiier v 1)1 %  -.. OPENING 1.1 Oil I FRIDAY LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE GUEST STARS WILLIE 1FILL (The Pride of Bellr Gully) "JO' CLEMENDORE" (Famous Contortionist) (?) Slngini nbicovrrlen %  St <;AR RAY" nOART> (The Slngini Puilllst) IMU'GLAS GRIFFITH (I0-?car Vocal Manel) Tickets on Sale Dally COTTON BLANKETS WHITE FAWN, I1I.UR I'INK. liREEN so : " 88IJ.34 Wa" (SI3BS 8I >'' " a % 4 c9 %  eae 4.83 ALL WOOL BLANKETS fl0 78 ft $12.07 WHTTE, FAWN. PINK. BLUE. PEACH EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 ESCHALOT ESCHALOT ESCHALOT Nil Mil & SAMPSON (1938) LTD. Beautify your Rooms!! FOR YOL'R WINDOWS—Kirsch Curtain Tllbinij and Filling* Orlwite Aluminum Curtain Tubing FOR YOl'R FLOORS—Congoleuin Squares Rug A Wide Range from whirh you may select your requirements. THE IIVIIUAIIOS I O-OI-I II \l l\ I I OITOV FAITOBV LTD. Hardware Deportment Tel. No. 2039 MnanaHaanBisaaajaaNaaaaaaaaNHNMajaaaaajnRnBBr PLAZA DIAL IHSIIV 8404 Uil 2 Sho- TO-DAY 5 and SM pn Ul. S'lfK HBAI." RAY MIUAND and %  TAPTAIN TABBY. I'.S.A." AI.\N I.MM) Mr 11 %  : r.M M. "i 1111 • nmv WAKCI.Y rn.ANn-'a -I.UIISIANA JiiillnM DAVIS I.AII.I V IIHE GARDEN] SI Jamai kaOnograirTi HQfilr Hrri.d "QIBRN Or TMI JINUL4E" I" iRllHNMAN Krcd HtiH IS l UOIKIV I >ll'Htl Ta-dar and To-morrow II. and B.30 20th. Century Fox Presents "FOR HEAVE.WS SAKE Starring Clifton Webb — Joan Bennett with Robert Cummlngs and Edmund Gwenn IIOYY To-day al 4.45 Only Columbia Pictures presents •• STAGE TO TVCSON I'IMII al 8 15 MYSTERY AND MAGIC • IBS GBfitT MAIAIIARA THE WORLD'S GIFTED MAGICIAN AND MIND READER Along \\nh the picture '-HOMICIDE FOR THREE'' Starring Audrey Long— Warren Douglas ROYAL Last Tua Shows TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.30 20th Century Fox Double — Richerd Widmark and Victor Mature in • KISS OF UFA Til and • IIORDr.R L\CIDF.\T" with Ricardo Montalban and Ceorue Murphy OLYMPIC To-day and To-morrow 4 30 and 8.30 Universal Bit; Double Claude Rains and Gloria Stuart in— TIIF. IW7SIBI.F MAN "CALUSC. DR. DEATH Stirring I.x>n Chanev and J. Carrol 1 .IAXETTA DRESS SHOP Lower Broad Street Upstairs OresNewsam's BATHING SLITS LADIES' 8ATLN LASTKX with Straas also Strspleas—One piece style* and Two piece styles from $11.88 COTTON—Two piece S 8.01 TAFFETA from S 1 %  68 NYLON $12.11 From 1 to 4 years ... From 5 to 8 years . From S to 12 years GIRLS' BOYS' 1 year shu* 2 year shu* 3 year sise 6 to 8 years SATIN LASTEX from $1.69 from $2 54 fram M.tt SI 13 $1.25 11.47 $5.25 ,-£iseii-fiW^*^SS4gfr^wia ARRIVED!! SPARE PARTS FOR THE ALLEN MOTOR SCYTHE GET YOUR REQUIREMENTS NOW PLANTATIONS LIMITED i



PAGE 1

PAGF MX U.VKIIAIIOS ADVOCATE Tl ISI>\V. M \Y 23 19'.l HENRY .\>M /lt< Vlaskii Pint' havinK bwn told. thi d\rr1ieim-nl appears as a matter of r 5 inclusive Of tin.^um of $500,000. Trustee : Muiitreal Trust Company In (he opinion of Cuiuml. Ihe*r Bonds will he invcMnuuu in u iiirh The Canadian and British Insurance Companies Act (19J2) as amended itatcthat companies rrci-ii-rnl under part III thereof may. without availing themselves for that purpose v,( tinpm\ isions ol subheetiuti (I) of Section B" of the said Act. invest their fund-.. The prospectus, a copy of which has been filed under the provisions of The Companies Act. 1934, will be forwarded promptly upon request. Alaska Pine & Cellulo.se Limited was incorporated under the laws of Canada in 11*25 with the name British Columbia Pulp & Paper Company. Limited and is one of the most important manufacturers of prime quality dissolving pulp in Canada. Alaska Pine Company Limited was incorporated under the laws of British Columbia in 1939 and. together with associated OOmpan* ies. carries on in British Columbia one of the largest lumbering businesses in Canada. The acquisition by the Company of she res ol Alaska Pine Company Limited and associated companies will permit integrated operations of the combined businesses which should result in substantial advantages. Upon completion of present financing Abttibi Power & Paper Company, Limited will own 50'< of the common shares of Alaska Pine & Cellulose Limited Price : 100 nnd accrued interest A. S. BHYDIA A Barbados lloval Sr* urilM-, SONS, llurbados Ltd. Correspondent for i <>r|iriili<>n I iiiiilril. THE LONE RANGER wye?**—* ITS LEE'THE & MCNT MflJN I HCL THE INDIAN UPRISING' "-t WE'LL KILL MX 't \ky\l \/y \n ^jPw^ ^ ^^F 1 IT A \ i a ifW eaf M LaB %  '' Wm SJV BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MCMANUS The ADVOCATE has the BEST BOOKS in Town %  &.5S$ZaZii'.SZVW r 7i SAVED IT TAKES A 1MB OF STttEAIiTII TO SAVE GOALS. . THAT'S WHY HUH II11.1I'IIS SHOI 1.11 ALWAYS EAT mmm */. A n. EJ\ itn in ;i* BREAM* i in: I.OAI THAT SI III M. I III AS M''////."///.' 1 //' * %  *" *' -^"-i"" ll' lh,. TOVVIIEST Vu H lor ih, .11111 MASSEY-HARR1S 42 B.H.P. 6 cyl. Diesel Wheel TRACTOR Also Available GRAKR CUTTERS. MAM RF. M'RFADFRH SIDE DELIVERY RAKES, FF.FI) MILLS. FERTILIZING DRILLS COURTESY (.A1IAGE ROBERT THOM. LTD. White Park Rd. Dial 4391 m f>AA Injoy tho hoapitolity. comfort and thoughtful wrvico which havo mad* PAA "first choko" of veteran rrovoUrt tho world ovor. NEW YORK Via San Iiun or Irv ronnriltnl air%  Miami Reduced Ivday. mund-tTlp Fwuron Fsrea now in %  •fleet from Sin Juan. Effect lie April 1 S/n. all fchti Lmd at Xew ti*k International Airport in IdltuilJ inittad of J*i Cuarxlla Field. MIAMI Dalh Bifhtt-mm San hom lp* k Trip EKCUISHU F, ST. CROIK ST. THOMAS Frequent flight* try iwtft Convairt>pe Clipprf. Convrniml dt-parlure times. You can now "My PAA" to KL'ROPE. SOUTH AMERICA. AFRICA, MEXICO, the FAR F.ASI-in fact, contplrtely around the world. %  Hop amicr from I I5-D.iv Round !tn now in eBect For 22 yeors tho loading intornational airlino— PAA was fint to link tho AmorIcat by air, firtt to fly to all fix centlnonti. For rettrvationt, ue your Trow/ Agent or PAN-AMERICAN MtMUO Agmwirs .. %  -'• %  A I'd.. Lid. Broad St -Brldsrtown Phone 21 (After bualneaa hour* -23a3l Cu'fbYourPites it i? r... longar nacaaaarr to aiirrr p-in, n.-iiitif aa4 tormant from I'li" •inc* iba aUfMorf ot Hrtaa ((ermarl, kTiown % %  i.'hlnaj-old). Hytu etarta W %  %  la 10 r'I'.iiiH and not only (top* tna oalii but aiae lakaa Nt OM owalltti, at"i> MaMM and corabaia tin Irrimtlnn lhar.by curbin# eihar UxuB1I oun.1 t ; l'ii- tuch aa Hadah Nfriauan'M iia^kaoaa, ConatlMtln loa* of iiiy. d.MiUT. and brrlUbl* diaaovll^un Gi Hytaa from foui dn!ffc!*'*#-1a) DBdar lb* -joaltlv.. f untariua HyU* mutt atop rour pipain anl (roubiaa or monar Hit at niura of aeapty tackan. Gums Bleed, Teeth Loose! r€il ^X Stop yorrheci and Trench Mouth in 24 Hours Mardlnf jruma. aor* raoulh, or ktaaa tf-th m.an Chat *on arr a vknai of Vyi" iMaorTrrnrh UnuHi. or iom.Iiaddiva" ihat will rrmtaali* c*u> %  'ou lo low all roar t'rtri at.d hav* -o irrar (Ute iac(>> Utora rour tlmr H:IM*> 11rrral World war tnaae atouin m*ra>Fi ha*a spread throudhoayl th* world n that now acirntuu >ar tfiat four oat nt ritij n p>oui> ur lultpr-ti ID oner or it. At %  lined hi (in* and 'top thri* di.-raari >tforc It la loo lair, betauw tl* oll*n cailte not oril7 lh* low ol tth. but *Ho ctir-1 mm aod inan iroutua. Nw Discover> Stive* Treth Aanaii, Itw dlarairir of an !-••" % %  l^nll.t. B|Hl l' .-. fa .•. %  %  I 4.KI. >ai 11 |*e*iral*a ri.ht lo lb* .^t or lha tranbla. atopa ua>i I'-rr. ble"iinf the rery Boa fait and carrl-.n '/SA^e^StAXSSKJBS lo-ir tr-lh lo vout caatpaitei %  one* oar* on letLm of amply packafr Don't tak" i raar.rr or. eaing Owl teeth or aaafHtni UM iknnn rroaa ivntr'aiiara and bearl troiblr b-i Am.tan frnm jwur %  Am














:
, ‘ *-
ee Gul? |
, § 2
ESTABLISHED 1895 ___ TUESDAY, MAY 27 OR ee en Sak;



-K. SHOULD SCRAP CUBAN BLACK. PACT

ne .

ee a ee Rue TT et ee ~TWESE TOL GorromLy ge te ‘LE TU, S F ORGET
BOTTOMLEY THE PAST

GOES S WANNING Negotiate As Partners

|
|

(From Our Own Correspondent) .
In Happy Family







: LONDON, May 21.
"THIS is how the “Express”’ Special Correkpeudent,
,CRAP the Cuban Pact.
S Give us two way traflic. a

: John Redfern, reports Mr. Bottomley’s visit:
This sweet-tooth island—-its economy is built on

Help the West Indies to help the Common
wealth as a whole.

sugar—has a sour taste to-night.
This was what Mr. Bottomley was told at

Mr. Arthur (Overseas Trade Department)
Hastings House yesterday by the united voice of

. Bottomley is in town. A British Minister swanning
around the British Colonies and defending the in-

the Regional Economic Committee and the British

West Indies Sugar Association

terests of Cubans.
Hon. Albert Gomes told the United Kingdom Mission

{hat lest they considered the abrupt termination of Sun-
day’s meeting as intended to be discourteous, he would
hasten to agsure them that the symptoms they had observed
were merely those of shock.





After weeks of Secrecy and
e fatuous denials—no special dele-
e ties gation was necessary for the
West Indies yet here it is—Mr,

Bottomley sbowed the shape of

| the Black Pact this week-eng and
a e ood jhow tacked on to his team of ex-
perts, are unwelcome visitors to

these sunny lands: alarm and
despondency,

Pr res We know at last that the
Ss tobacco deal with Cuba is for

$500,000 worth by March 1952 and

I think it must be said of the different matter, “May we ask
statement made,” said Mr. Gomes, | what is going to happen if we can-
‘that it has added nothing to the not narrow the gap as belween
fund of our knowledge of this these prodigiously high | prices—
subject.” jand they are steadily rising--and

West Indians were very warm- | 7 fadt a eo ener get e

sarte xeople and in ordinary | high price for what we expor
: Forel Ministe haps “150,000 tons to the nd at , ne atamtsteak the paaaben of the | Further that we have no siare>
pulice antifeved "‘consideranis|J96%. the. is-proposing tp, extaca A Mission would have been one | tee whatever that we will be able

|
|
another $500,000 for 1953. |
deputies achieved considerable|!953 she is proposing to 3 AFTER telling the U.K. Mission to scrap the Cuban Pact, Membors of the Begional Economic Committee discussed the proposed Mission to narked by its warmth and gen- | to secure a market,

° There is no hope of increased
On Big 4 Agenda preference on Jamaica’s cigars

Qn sugar since Britain is pro-

Canada.



















progress to-day by agreeing on until then her ul.dertaking to find mm 0 isi rosity It this delegation, how- | Mr. Gomes referred to the way
placing German demilitarisation|@ Market for 900,000 tons of : e % s eS ee ver, found them wearing a scowl, | in w hich it was explained that the
in the agenda for the Foreign |SU8ar a year from the West Indies. P. 2 2 | : . t Was the policy of the United iF me minenc. ong pare ne-
Ministers Conference. R l = “eS : vance M: ae Pl Singdom that had put that scowl | gotiations with Cuba, as being ex-
With this step forward the Producers will have the choice ersia e ec Ss ac 5 d an here, The delegation need have tremely difficult to accept. We
deputies have agreed on the con-|® Selling about 30 per cent at | ¥ 7 yr 10 doubt as to Knowledge of the | eo. hardly conceive of that as be-
troversial first item of the agen-|W0"ld price plus preference, and SS. A eal ' e | W ould U ) West Indian delegates of the | ing the true state of stairs, ne
da dealing with the causes pres- 70 per cent at a negotiated price even ‘/ i eS | road seoncevie background : You paid, panes you must Rage thet
i The “beef” here of sugar , , ? ‘ave trave a long way ring we ) “Pes: i
ent in international tension. © |, The “beef” here of sugar men TEHERAN, May 21 | Korean W wave travelled a long way to bring | |e Know Your interes: in Cube
To-day’s meeting opened twelfth i D wire ie contribution of) ‘Persia to-night rejected the : ee ’ | oreali ar There was nothing new in the | ket for goods that you want to
Week discussions on the agenda.|'?© , Dominions, they can easily| United States appeal for negotia LOK YO, May 2 . of ; neech of the Leader of the dele- | export. You must not believe that
Western deputies accepted to- ee oan a ten-year period) tions to reach a friendly settle- The western end of the United Nations line wheeled Ce ieee none May 21 ation. “Even the promise of the | W¢ are so generous that we are
day the Russian proposal that pha jor the requirements of!ment of the oil nationalisation! north to-day in a move to oulflank Communists. jay that tt Un at Said to- 1 ‘tension from 1952 to 1963 as re- | Willing to aceept that it is Cuba
the German demilitarisation ritain and Canada, crisis. The Government described Rand Rat a ha tatie £ Britis! Berd, _ {gay that the Jnited | tates would irds sugar, we look ou as a gop. |] vho is determined at all costs, to
should appear twice on the Yet Cuba is allowed to put its|the United States recommenda- vecon 1A issance forces oO Jeritish anc f meric ans enter-|have had to trip” its military | We feel that we must say to you | infliet this trade agreement with
agenda—once in preamble and|!0°t inside the door. tion last week to settle the oil dis- ed Munsan; 25 miles northwesef Seoul, South Korean cap- | power elsewhere to carry out Gen- | at the West Indies—at any rate | vou whether you want it er not
again following the point dealing| The great fear is that the pact|pute by the discussions as “inter- ital, and a Task force went to Uijongbu, 15 miles north of }S"@l MacArthur's Asiatic pro | ome of us—are not willing to bite, | May 1 remind’ you that we <0 eee
with the reduction of armaments. | Will be the beginning of a per-|ference in the internal affairs of{ the city, an Eighth Army communique announced, eae poe fa ee PADOSADS Lourie
The footnote to the agenda}™anent claim by Cuba for a stake} “fran,” cask teee ; H : = thik surprise “little offensive" | Bradley resumed his evidence Appeal Made alsa t Tab Corgi. Information apes
‘i ; ae “ {in the British market British sources here to-day be- iin — a . c | before the continued Senate Arm- When they examined the state- | Seep out and we do get some pic-
will state that deputies were un- : f , s ¥ 2 made across rugged slopes mad ; ; funn of what. areciahia tik’ skies
‘ ; lieved Persia would also reject a . : ae vain, | ed Services and Foreign Relation: | yent carefully, they found that a] ture of what | § the Ai
able to agree to the precise place ‘ Fas ns reje a €acherous by drizzling rain,|&" * ge ae On z tion is
that the German demilitarisation Doubled-Crossed Britain’s offer to talk to a mission r ur ined 7 miles yesterday and was|co™mittees on MacArthur's dig-| nost impassioned appeal had keen ’
should take. bing te eee hao ge — Stsienatieation. eee A irparted today to be making puget said. the Joint: Chiefs of oo oe Sweet te teas Celie Prior Claim
° ies ith ; vy - rature drop- ’ — > ‘ 2 ~ , 1 rane ve ting |. F y Se « s is § : : : ¥ r . ;
i Ernest Davies, Br itish Deputy, ped to-day when Mr. Bottom ing :The British Government is ex- ecused Of Bree er ae ie hn ae Stafl feared that if war was not}od Kingdom. It was the distress He thought shat the Weat indies
said only two, points remained to ant > . inti i+ 4 : iv only. moderate resistanee, 1° “ » people s area and the | had a prior claim on the United
; | faced 30-odd . pected to intimate that it intends } vine confined te Korea, “wermmight-fing| { the people in this area an ’ ;
es : r j ~ICG,,,p0-odd’ members: and ad- i > ° att Penitits “ot” the ‘crive were) for ‘ che es i . »y | Kingdorn’s trade and goodwill and
‘ be settled: the order of the item is iy A tg take the issue before the Inter- our war enlarged bevorml our] breat. there. was-in the policy Ho &
on the agenda: and the Russian|WS@Ts of the new — Regional national Court at The Hague for ece jtion seen on the eastern front, whete} conacity to ca ” “it + success. | vhich the United Kingdom was | they did not expect therefore that
demands that the North Atlantic Tr on tee busy in ses- judgment the Eighth Army reported Jessen faily” ye eee la thine ay vursuing to further that distress, | ‘le United Kingdom should pur-
Treaty sho inclu he | ton on West Indies problems. er ‘ eeome 3 ed contact with Communists “hey a at. hat concerned their delegates} %Ue a policy of sacrificing these
kpeus uld be included in th Not even Mr. Bottomley's an- Persia has meanwhile demand WASHINGTON, May 21 But the threat to Allied posi Bradley said one reason why the ten that table. “Do you expect | celonies in the interest of a trade

ed that the Anglo-Iranian, oil! Pemocratic Sens Military , 5 § fe
: 1 reme: :
A Russian. delegation had to Sat ene — ee smile company should hand over imme- Wulbright, sald: today va ari —_ eal Ra at FRrDA he MacArthur’s removal wags tha act | , ‘ ;
face realistically that it was im- : 4S not gaging to do) djately all its £500,000,000 instal-| of General. Douglas. MacArthur's! 4... "oe? nroughout the! General MacArthur's public state- | ‘Ppeal of this sort, when through-

‘ the deal with Cuba, for grapefruit | lat; lay he eas u rer , wotle 5s WwW is in
possible for western powers to é a, for grapefruit | lations, day. In t east, outnumbered ment and communications “indi- | Out your negotiations v ith us

is to react sympathetically to an] agreement which was in her in-
terest but detrimental to the West
Indies

‘ : , after all, took the bite f the Is naligtsies atuivres cowl recent testimony to the Senate] {initead Nations troops were ‘ngland, throughout the negotia- Mr, Gomes said that he felt
accept the inclusion of the Atlan- air, b out of the haere Sees econ ree committees investigating his dis-l[holding on doggedly ] 1s iy , | cated that he was not in sympathy ane” with 5 WIS A. your atti- he ought to tell the delegation
tic Pact, Davies added. a © company would Tre-!missal was “almost equivalent. te positions under constant Com-| With the decision to try to limit! ude has been one of disregard to that as far as the West Indies

Mr. Albert Gomes, Trinidad’s|fuse the demand and appeal to
massive Minister of Commerce,|the British Government majority
Said shortly that the Committee | shareholders in the company—to
would give its reactions to Bot-| Protect its interests.

Davies proposed the following
order for the Agenda:
1, An item dealing with the

were concerned the fight had
only just begin. He had been
ten weeks in Engiand last year.

the conflict to Korea” He said} she human factor involved in this
thi would make it difficult for ugar. situation?’ Mr Gomes
General MacArthur to carry out] \cked.

deception” = : .
leception and amounted in| munist blows

some cases to “half truth” Fig? '
fies . ; . mghting in the east was heavi
The Senator said MacArthur] oct 2 the South eheean a a







cayses of international tension. tamley’s piece to-morrow Meanwhile the Persian Govern- made no mention of the message! where 5,000 Communists main- | directives, = f So long as they preferred to as- He had left the West Indies with
4. The Austrian Treaty. : . ment in the midst of one of its he sent to the Joint Chiefs of tained pressure northeast of Bradley said the Pacific Com-] sume that attitude they would find a certain confidence in the
3. German unity and prepara-| And the sugar men whose lead-| periodical crises had made an un-| St in Washington on January} py ngamni | mander had also taken independ-| ‘hese colonies most reluctant to] gopdwill of the English who
tion of the German Pence Freaty.|ing representatives are on the| Official approach to the Anglo-|!0 saying it might be necess The United ° States Second owned these colonies. He re-

for the Allies to evacuate Korea ate directly with the Communist{ hey had come to make

ent action in proposing to négoti-| yield to the further appeal that
| turned disillusioned, and be-
|





4. Italian and Balkan Peace] (co aeaaas 1 Tranian ¢ » th h Govern- Division wv Pre
: mmittee srowled on ote ranian company rough Govern 7 : . division With French and Dutch] % 4 3 rn z sel Ae = the re he
Treaties and agreements con-| verandahs Th, muttered Ro ale ment bankers asking it to resume] He also accused the General offi oops attached, which bore the|Pield Commander for Armistice scat ee gen ip is tis we ag cause temperamentally it. was
cerning Germany anc Austria ways feel the British Govern-}monthly royalty payments of|creating the impression that there|) unt of the initial Communist] 4d had made that statement React OM teh oot Gabor “ had dificult for him to hecame very
5. The Italian Peace Treaty in! ment is going to double-cross us.” | £2:000,000. Payments were stop wre only four points instead o1/ attack round Inje, reported only | public Geapite the ms ee at fe Snanble ts gee Nit fusther| bitter, he had not been. bitter.
so far as it concerned Trieste, Up Mr. Bottomley’s sleeve, was | Ped last month because of the un-|1® in the document he received) jicht probing attacks chew the Present bed: sucha 1h say that we have borne even, “We think it necessary to say

certainty of the company’s posi-/ftom the Joint Chiefs of Staff or] “phe” Second Division was| PFO} osal under consideration from more than a fair share of it. No} this to you, gentlemen, that if

—Reuter. A" a nisert 5 haa . 4 a
Reu G.A.T.T abbreviation for Gen- tion in Persia. January 12, and of tpt mention Governmental level
















































































eral Agreem Tariffs < in Pel t e Sa” om estimated today to have inflicted he Ae te . ies » can question the fact that we you expect loyalty from us, you
; foe hh greement on Tariffs and Britain is also likely to protest ing the message sent to him bY] 37,950 casualties i Comipuniatal , The Joint Chiefs of Staff “have es Seats cals apart ertint tis to the must be loyal to us as well.” If
V HERE DO } At the right moment he pullea | ##2inst_ the growing list being|President Truman on January 131i" five days of the Chinese| ‘lt and feel now that the military | vshabilitation of this vast area| they wanted that most undesir-
RS oasis ae os ; pu ts compiled of Britons in Persia outlining the political aspects of offensive. must be controlled by’ civilian vhich you have, with some pride able relationship where the col-
; Ke a emmy, o brea 7 ; ° irg > , . > yover ant’s ] i . .}au . s ry? ge Ww ’ * '
W L S ? into the ecudtine ‘of Colonial [Eker DS eEE AIO RY — - aor tee yee In the west and west central} ; ane Her cee Wate aes fara | called the sterling area. When onies would find it necessary to
7 . Momparity a") Persian Government, informed | Korea --|cectors where the Allied line] “V80 vo, weatings were adjourn 1 you ask us to consider the welfare] accept whatever was imposed on
4 yey? sources said, ; Some of these messages were! wheeled to the north, South) ©¢ until Tuesday afternoon, Brad= |i the people of the United King- them whether or not they re-
SYDNEY, May 21. He said the Cubans had been}, 20ugh the oil company is re-!mentioned in the testimony by] Korean troops advanced against |/¢Y Was asked to return to the wit- | dom, 1 think we ought to ask you sented {t, merely because they
; The British Government s|, : ; ticent on the subject, there is no}General Omar Bradley, Chairmar| ness chair.—Reuter, fo consider our people.” as for
. ; neld off from trading until next . nade’ tol nf ‘hiefs a arying opposition 5 ; . had no option, then it was for
1,036 ton reserve ship Discovery doubt that a sense of restraint isjof the Joint Chiefs of Staff and : 7 a ee Health Services
ai ay in an{year only by the strongest plead- ing ¢ B aged | Secretary - Defence tenere Cammunists counter attacked in ‘ ~ ase ’ them to decide.
TI sailed from here today in an ing : growing among Eritons engage jgesretary | for Defenc General one area southeast of Munsan| $6 : 9 . Mr. Gomes said that he thought The United Kingdom had some-
attempt to sail around the me = in the oil industry, and thei?)George Marshall, but broke off the fight and ee ac S fiw very unfortunate that the | thing to offer the colonies; their
Antarctic Ocean and find out] | course they could go to| families. ss ; . —Reuter. etreated when South ovaanal telegates did not have sufficient |jnstitutions and their way of life
among other things where whales|G.A.T.T., with their case for| The number of resignations is ieee ne stood. their ground, Vie ‘ime to go around in the various | They had lessons the people of thi
50 j i i trading with the sterling area reported to be above normal. . & ilinwe: > oe " sae) eed Yo "Slew
ee phe wane ee F Mie s i & 1 are : Reuter Inj d T ti South Koreans were reported 4 villages of the colonies id see |area could v well learn as a
e ship is making a_ six ith our improved balance of = : ure esting : : 3 . «- 40th | conditions for themselves. See the | srowing people, but “you have
months voyage in the south polar tise ihe ee G.A.T.T., could J : 8 bie He in dn cedkern ease Tt ‘ meaon: Fone 21 ibsence of the most elementary damaged bud frist and our confi-
regions before’ returning to;decide that import restrictions F T. Y YW W > 4 “Piritic ; ais gH any yates ‘he British Admiralty announc-| social and medical services and|derce very considerably and we
Britain, should no longer remain against IMPOR ANT New apon sige aes a ed tonight the appointment Of} compare this with their much | think that’ im honesty and because
In addition to the routine work Cuba. M, SS ‘ RIO DE JANEIRO, May 21. Seoul’ came: under Communist} 4¢™ral ar eat ee vaunted — he ilth services which | ws want to be frank with you we
of taking sea temperatures and We must listen to Cuba as T. ION Former War Minister General achinegun fire at one stage, but| °°. “TS ea hotd.and “niet a they posse sed : a cught to tell you so
soundings, the expedition will] we've listened to Canada and the |Canrobert Costa and Commander pt. /Qorimunists aside — and| ‘CP _Daval staff in succession tc Even admitting that we can }
study the distribution of plankton,| United States”, he said. BONN, May 21 of the First Military District) o.ntinued their advance. United| ST"! of the Fleet, Lord Fraser} hardly expect that a society Well Known History
minute animal life and the dis— Perhaps tobacco smoke brought West German Chancellor Dr. |General Zenobio Costa were both| nati lanes has speated|s jof the North | Fleet ; which is almost altogether agri- To your. advisers aid Mr
tribution of whales themselves. |h back rigs Konrad Adenauer, said to-day} red today while testing Nations planes today repeatedly The appointment takes effec cultural could ever hope to], Ft ; Be
Ss . im bac to cigars, that’ British Foreign Secretary injure oda y while testing. ©| attacked pnd brought to a stand jahout December 1951 maintain services of this sort, | ®@binson, the history mus@ be
Pha ‘ei . r . . Herbert Morrison’s visit to Ger-| 2° Brazilian made anti-tank}ain Gaihese columns south of Sir Rhoderick commanded | I think we have got to admit|Well-known but we in the West
He offered the suggestion that many was a matter. of the first! YEBPOP. | 4 the junction of Pulchan and Hon-|/during the last war the Renown; that our responsibility to our |1ndies feel that if we do not take
now—that is after ten years of]; hed Beis General Zenobio was hit in thé} ghon rivers. Communist casual at the-sinking of the German xeople must be to ensure for |this opportunity of putting to you
eieiacn . ‘ 3 importance. y Bled ; a peoy ‘ c t rims ve would }
Burma Flouts activity—the taste for Jamaica ‘Tr means that direct contact) f@ce by the recoil from the guntting were estimated at 400 Lattleship Bismarck, In 1948, he them at least the minimum fon Bee Seca, Wnuk oe
; cigars is so well established that/na, been established between] Which according to reports, he Reuter. |was appointed Commander-in standards of living that is com-|'sing an opportunity which may
} U.N. Embar, oO they'll hold their own when thelGrogt Britain and the Federai| ad handled in the wrong posi- iChief of the Home Fleet and patible with ordinary decency chars She ROVORY. 08 ou rortien-
et & Cubans go into Britain. Republic,” he told a Press Con-| #oh to shoot the new weapon. a became Commander-in-Chief of {t is precisely for these things |S)'p between the United Kingdon
} 2 Nobody else is so optimistic. | ference General Canrobert suffered a] Si yn Of W ceakness Plymouth in March last year that we are fighting and fight- |#9d ourselves on this matter of
. RANGOON, way a They reckon that the proposed] “On the British attitude towards deep leg wound from shrapnel s ' - oe —Reuter, ing resolutely in these sugar gal
ae will keep up ae intake is about one-third of|uropean questions, Adenauer] Which ricochetted after hitting} | BONN, May 21 negotiations “We feel that when you look
he Sia Ur Cieter witne Sore cigars, mainly Jamaicans im-|sajd: “Naturally Great Britain] @ two inches thick steel plow] woo Galan “Chateclior. D: “You have asked us to im-~jat the history the position has
On etrategic cde mheseninie nee, {ported by Britain now. has a special position, but I arm gused as a target Konrad Adenauer said to-night hi Blackburne Asks agine what we would do if we} been so painfully clear that if it
on strategic raw materials, accord- They say Cubans will knock|econvinced that -she recognises Both wounds were said not to}; os S eh . aA Meals “ vere in your position. We ask] were known in its full details by
ing to a competent source here. Jamiaiped shia’ sideways. Europe's importance to her and]be of serious nature Hig nag a eee aA we ’ A ac w you now, what you would do if|those responsible for making
The same source said strategic |"").° Des a eae her own importance to Europe —Reuter nee Andi gnast es jes ib de pair For Barltrop you were in ours, That seems)policy which in the end affect
goods such as rubber and petro-| Mr. Bottomley is a non-smoker. “yt “accdyten with great pleasure cratic measures of an uncemo to be a very relevant question.” |the standard of living in these
leum products would soon move| But we've got to take Cubans, Morrison’s {rvitat £ to me tc cratic Governmen ANTIGUA, May 21. They knew how vital sugar was |territories, the justice of our
into China from Burma by an] else be held up at the point of viel Loum GMa ceenrds “the Party Banned He added in a reply to a ques- Work throughout Antigua’s | o the West Indies, yet they were |-ause and necessity for reorien-
; overland trade route across|G.A.T.T., says he. event ” of great importance”, ; ion that he did not mean they] sugar industry was at a standstill | sbviously reluctant to give that !tation would be apparent not only
, Burma's northern border. the Chancellor said. SARBAUDECKEN, May 21, | {Pid revolt, but that they) today. The sugar factory has been Maid ta able Eetlack te tha uc [oemeee. but Sipe: to you. wind
The first Soviet Ambassador to Come Into The Open Replying to questions, Adenauer | The Saar Government ‘to-day |;;sc0, aap ee ert closed since May 11 when worker's fever to be able to loo Sebo thie fey ee ceeny in your hanes
: Burma, Alexander Saveliev to-day} Although the Regional Eco-|said that among the matters he j banned the Opposition Democratic teh undemeertic tice eet | Walked out for the third time inf ure with yome security are fol Ts bere Uae ee cae eee
presented his credentials to. the nomic Committee normally works | digeussed with Morrison were Party of Sear (D.P.S.) West Ger- atta the - Noaition ot ¥ six days. ef aa 4% ae we fact that tt brane Aaah 3 es we va a a
Burmese President Sao Shwel|in private, it intends to come out|trade between East and West!,- veri ey VIA sms sd S.A >PD' pe Wee There have been repeated stop xpangion, eee ee ' ' {the sterling bloc, we wish to I
id man News Agency DPA reportec Pp I
x . Pe .. 7 : “ hace Alene My ie . Ng : : Democratic party and the refusal sal : eo zs ertain territories, the entire econ- | yg strengthen your position in
F Thaike and received assurances of]in the open to-morrow on Bot- | Germany: Germany's future} D.P.A. said that the Govern-|4, allow two German. politicians | P@8@8 Since the cane harvest began} ya. based almast entirely on k a Pome ib ; two-way
“ 3 ation" . at ae 4 s ‘ : ee a, oak’ > " : v rermeé f Ser aes at neti oe 7 my Z as st ec J Ingle ‘ “We
g fullest co-operation” of th2/tomley: “What he has to say | international status: questions of] ment had ordercd the cohfiscation to“enter Saar to address meet-| 0% February 17. Waterfront work- {i itt you appreciate that SaMie ih ccannot He. GomMannad
Burmese Government.—Reuter. should, be said to those vitally |European unity and the abolition} o¢ the party's entire property| ings. ers are also on strike 1en I think you will very readily We ‘abe sdor. You cannot.déain
concerned —West Indians”, said |of the Rhur authority Saar Criminal Police called on the} , Speaking at a Press Conference, In .a broadcast the Governor ypreciate precisely what our situ- |, Fl , ro o help you
Ny 3 On the latter Adenauer said he A Sp ‘ B. 'W" Blackburne said hay’ 4h py ite | yur blood from us to help ;
Mr. Gomes. : a” 6 hat - nie ee : Party Chairman, Richard Becker,|Adenauer said the banning of the ; ' = urn Hac toc ay t ‘a ion i: } unless you give us the food neces-
U Ss Lik I . T : © J relieved rw. rae. coe ,.» {this morning and handed him a]party was a “sign of extraordin-| he had cabled the British Colonia The West Indians were a very]cory to put new blood in our
ante wKelv Oo ift This was soniething the Mission | abolition “in a benevolent light vritten ban D.P.A. added wy weakness’, Secretary, Mr. James Griffith roliie people and they therefore | Jain.
e hadn't bargained for. —Reuter. Police searched the homes of —Reuter, | asking that his chief Labour Ad id to consider not only the pres- |° i I t licy of th
oO - . Mr. Bottomley tried to put a ; oe e ser, Ernest Barltre be sent tc t population but the number of Generally the past policy of the
t ’ evera sading party nbe vi 4 L 9p, be sent 4 i poy . > " Lise “ametit
Stay f Execution good face on it. “Oh yes”, said A ¢ e Be f vetet jeepllag par “i aitentee s | itigua ‘‘to look into the appallirrs hildren that were being born | United nano he wa a
- Mr. ttomley, he welceme he » > K 7 f labor slation ' very day past policy ecause tO SOrTt
\ ™ Veron, May ia ure a a poleaneg: phe rgenitine re. No Change | BR re) ei ay oe Fs ae " We a *xtent it had been changed— wa
e ate partment is like- re z . * MACK DUSHE Nas J oe ECONOMY lwavs cheap ° suga for the
ly to rescind within a day or so} i, eee a ery guts Reaches Enigland CHILD KILLED AS WASHINGTON visit to the island of Montserra He would ask them to consider ay ie in England. The cheapes'
its order staying the execution of| © rom 1e well- cnown sritish ” 2 The United States S a : tt ewards group for ict irefully the position of the area ne no f tter who suffered and
seven German war criminals at| Paper called the Daily Express— SOUTHAMPTON, May 2! LORRY OVERTURNS ment today denice as » to leave toda hey had what was obviously a} *" Fk RE
Landsberg prison, Bavaria, accord~ | “a paper which isn’t sympathetic} First meat cargo shipped from RIO DE JANEIRO, May 21 hat American policy —Reuter veak economy, At the same time } @ On page 3
‘ ing to usually reliable sources. to be views I've put. But I’ve|Argentina to England gince last/ A child was crushed to death | heen changed there was a rapidly rising poy
7 = stav of exec » by! provided pj unity orl July . as . prio Ante Mh 9. F . ion and th ‘ so to Pantera emia aNsenyanre
one sone stay of ce eel ‘ |} ‘ € oF eer nee y for guly. 1.290 fos, was ‘due at ;and 23 people were injured. fou Department spoke an Michael SYRIA PROTESTS ate Hil y ne rater fi r od VOCA “-
the State Department would m¢ a0}.ni ) me aroun suthampton today in the 22.0 j seriously, when a lori ite neas MeDermmott d attempte'to read | NEW YORK. May 21 her curious situation o HE AD CATE
that the United States High Com-} es : | ton liner Alacantara. tly 40 passengers turned over : to Sa eech of n| Syria tonight proteste t \ nade to pay higher price
missioner McCloy could either) This- report paid his own] Also aboard are 33,000 case iskidding on a wet road in 7 isk. A : f-Gtate| SecuPity ‘Cour saa I is their imports than they were re | pays for NEWS
order death sentences to be car-} Way 4nd if now a again he hz itine appl pears. in the interior state of Sa I r 4 ‘ A fla ‘ ta teat 7 : ceiving for their export Wher j
ried out or exercis lemency r ee n tt € ft a apefruit ; | "Phe lor : ¢ ote y Pile ¥ : ae " 3 . ‘ , : rae i pri vere entioned DIAL 3113
3 own behalf Missi¢ was Mr. R besifis ton Pa caletteting: Tn {eas I art elated to the things they ha ;
Reuter. ‘1 ut ( Reuter t Reuter Reuter Leuter Pee 7 : i ware Day or Night
. se € ee e i t ‘ ‘ erned va i perenne. ——


rypry se

PAGE TWO





ee

Caub Calling

IS EXCELLENCY the Govern-
or amd Lady Savage gave a
Cocktail Party at Government
House last night in honour of the
U.K. Trade Mission headed by Mr.

A. G. Bottomley, M.P, and tne
visiting delegates attending the
Regional Economic Committee
meeting.

About one hundred and fifty
people, which included members
of the Legislature, the House of
Assembly and other officials at-
tended the party which began at
6 o’clock and ended shortly after
7.30 pam.

Good Move

VT. SEF that one of the Bus Stops

it the Esplanade has been
moved from opposite the Band
Stand to a spot thirty yards away,
near to the Esplanade shed. This
was done yesterday. If it does
make some people walk a few
yards more, it serves one useful
purpose. In the event of rain,
would-be bus travellers can shel-
ter in the shed, They can see the
bus round the corner by the Bay
Street Boys’ Club and have plenty
of time to get to the pole ahead of
the bus and get a minimum wet-
ting from the rain, Sheltering in
the Band Stand with the entrance
where it is, was inconvenient.
People sometimes could not get
to the poleyin time. Another point
is that it separates the two bus
stops in that area which were
nlmost opposite to one another.

Back to Trinidad

RS. CLAIRE HERRERA, sis-

ter of Mrs. Cecil Goddard,,
who had been holidaying in Bar-
bados with her daughter Roons
returned to Trinidad yesterday
afternoon by B.W.1.A.

Her son Ian, who had also been
holidaying here, returned some
time ago.

Transferred

pe to Puerto Rico on Sunday

morning »y B.W.1.A, went
Mr. and Mr:. John McBeth and
their son Brian. Mr. McBeth who
is from British Guiana is with the
Royal Bank of Canada, He was
transferred here a couple of years
ago from their Branch in Trinidad
and he has now been transferred
to their branch in San Juan,

Yesterday's Arrivals

R. JOSEPH CAMACHO of

Trinidad avd his sister Rosa-
lind came in on B.W.L.A’s Trinidad
flight yesterday morning to spend
a holiday in Barbados staying at
Aquatic Gardens .... arriving by
the same plane were Mr, Richard
Hill, Mr. and Mrs, Earle Heimpel
‘and daughter and Mr. Leo Siegel
who is staying at Abbeville Guest
House.

Arriving from St, Vincent yes-
terday by B.G. Airways were Mr.
Frank Howard who is a guest at
the Ocean View Hotel and Mr,
Colin Phillips.





nor here. Obviously.
An urticle about tactical
Surprise in warfare reminded me
of an idea of mine,

Suppose you are fighting a war
in 4 country where there are no
rhinoceros@s. Imagine the effect
of loosing carefully collected and
imported herds of them suddenly
on a quiet sector. Imagine the
fury at headquarters when the
message comes through that the
enemy wre using rhinoceroses ia
enormous numbers, Of course, :t
would only be a trick, and its
effect would be temporary, but the
initial surprise and commotion
would be worthwhile. 1 have
many such ideas, if the War Office
would care to hear of them. For
instance, drop dead whales from
planes, The enemy would suspect
some sort of new mine or other
trap. He would never imagine that
anyone would just drop dead
whales.

The Story of A Bicyele

HE bicyele which Foulenough
bought on credit at one end

of the town and sold at the other
was stolen from outside the shop,
4nd sold to a third shop in the
middle of the town, The min who
bought it was told that the police
were looking for a stolen bicycle,
so, having got into conversation
with Foulenough in an inn, he
sold it to him cheap. Foulenough,
realising that this was the machine
the police were after, sold it to a
man in another inn who sold it
40 a policeman on holiday from
another district. This policeman
was arrested, but by then so many
people were claiming the bicycle
that the case was dropped, and
Foulenough bought it cheap from
the police, sold it to a tourist in

86” x 66”
66” x 84”

DIAL 4606

BY THE WAY



MISS BAKER
Pictured at Bournemouth

Two-handed Beverley
OTENTIAL Wimbledon Cham-

B. C’s Arts Officer

R. JOHN HARRISON, Arts

Officer of the British Council
for this area, left yesterday after-
noon by B.W.LA. for Trinidad.
He will be away for two or three
weeks, helping with the U.N.E.-

S.C.O. Exhibition,
M*® JACK SPEAKMAN who
spent the week-end with the
Risely Tuckers, left for Trinidad on
Sunday by B.W.LA. Of the firm
of Sutcliffe and Speakman of
Manchester, a firm which makes
active carbon, Mr, Speakman is
touring several of the West Indian
islands.

Here and There
R. ARTHUR TIBBITTS, Cable
and Wireless Engineer, has
his brother Eric staying with him.
Eric, who is an Assistant Supt., in
Trinidad Police Force, is on leave
.... Mr. Bernard Moore also with
Cable and Wireless returned from
St. Lucia on Sunday by B.W.LA.
after a short holiday with his
‘in-laws.’ His wile and young
daughter have remained on in St.

Lucia for a longer holiday.

W.1. Pantomime
OUISE BENNETT, well known
writer of Jamaican dialect, who

recently started composing Calyp-
soes as a hobby, says she has com-
pleted work with a London film
company. She hopes to be able
to play the part of a film-star
again. Meantime she is busy writ-
ing a pantomime depicting life in
the West Indies generally.

Drame
ALLERINA IVY BAXTER,
who, with Beryl McBurnie,
recently staged a demonstration of
Caribbean dances in London, is

Touring W.1.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

\
|
}

B.B.C. Radio



Would You Give These

Programme | A Prize For Originality?

EILEEN ASCROFT inspects the Festival souvenirs

TUESDAY, MAY 2, 1051

6.30 a.m.—12.15 pm 19 60 |



6.30 a.m. Forces’ Favourites; 7.00 a m.
The News; 7.10 a.m, News Analysis; 7.15
a.m. Programme Parade, 7.20 a.m. From
the Editorials; 7.30 a.m. Generally Speak-
ing; 7.45 a.m. ‘Tom Jones Trio; 8 a.m. Do
You Remember; 815 am. MCC vs
South Africans; 8 30 a.m. Think on these
Things; 8 45 a m. Letter From America;
900 am The News; 910 am, Home
News from Britain; 9,18 a.m. Clos¢
Down; 1115 am Programme Parade;
11.25 am Listeners’ Choice; 11 45 a m
Report From Britain; 1200 noon The
News; 12 10 pm. News Analysis; 12 »
pm Close down
4.15 — 645 p.m, 19 76M

415 pm_ Souvenirs of Music; 5 00
pm MCC. vs. South Africans; 5 05
p.m. The Davis Cup; 5.10 pm Inter~

jude; 515 p m New Records; 6 00 pm |
Music Magazine; 6.15 p.m, Welsh Maga-
zines; 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade

6.00—11,00 p.m. . 2553 M 31 32 M

m The News; 710 pm. News

715 p.m West Indian Guest,
Night; 745 pm. Generally Speaking;
800 pm _ Radio Newsreel; 815 p.m.
Meet The Commonwealth; 8 45 pm In-
terlude; 855 pm. From the Editorials;
9 00 p m. Report from Britain; 9 15 p.m,
BBC Scottish Variety Orchestra; 10 00
_m. The News; 10 10 p.m, Interlude;
1015 pm Light Music; 10 45 p m_ Fes-
tival in Britain; 11.00 pm. BBC Sym-
phony Orchestra

C BC. TUESDAY, May 22.
11.76 Mes 25.51 M.
_
10 00-10 15 p.m News;
pm Caribbean Corner

700 p
Analysis;



10 15—10.30.



The Rich | C

Aunt
Is Back

From R, M. MacCOLL.

NEW YORK.
Fannie Mae will soon be back.
A strip-teaser? A torch singer?
The revival of an old-time play?
No. Fannie Mae is what Ameri-

pion now making her first ap- now attending a series of student cans familiarly call the Federal
pearance on British tennis courts Welfare activities arranged by the National Mortgage Association.

is 21-year-old

Miss Beverley
Baker, from California.

British Drama League. Ivy is

‘And it is big news for many

She is studying drama and dancing under people who are just getting mar-

seeded fourth among American the auspices of the British Coun- yjeq and want a home. For Fannie

women player's; has won her way
to the semi-finals in the women’s
singles at Bournemouth in the
hard court championships.

Since she was 11 Miss Baker has
been training to become a cham-
pion, Her English-born father,
who is Director of: Recreation at
Santa Monica, gave her her first
tennis lesson.

hand strokes with both hands,
needs no backhand. Her father
taught her to play that way be-
cause she is small. It gives her a
longer reach.
only with her left hand.
Miss Baker eats well,

drinks beer and wine “socially and
in moderation,” rarely
spirits.

But she can write

‘ likes
plenty of meat, She never smokes,

takes

cil,

Cricket Lovely Cricket

RICKET, is certainly our game.
From 1946-51 the captains of
the London University Cricket
teams have been West Indians
—three from Jamaica,
from the Leeward Islands,
the Registrar of London
versity.

Incidental Intelligence

and one
7 ; Thiy
She is ambidextrous, plays fore- fact was revealed last week. by

Mae has a thousand million dol-
Jar bank roll in her purse.

In official jargon it means that
the U.S. Government will be
back in the secondary mortgage

market. And if you don’t like
jargon, just say that Washington
will be entering the building

socicty business.
THE DEEP SOUTH is tradition-

Uni- ally gallant about the “fair flower

ot American womanhood,”
Florida’s Supreme Court, stick-

ing close to tradition, has just

ruled that a divorced woman is

OUBTFULLY the young moth- tii entitled to all the alimony

er examined the toy.
this rather complicated for a small
child?” she asked,

The shop assistant teplied, ‘It’s

“Isn’t

she can get even if she is young,
attractive and able to support
herself.

“An woman’s

innocent rights

Miss Baker has no other ambi- 29 educational toy, madam, de- are not to be ignored because of

tions beyond her tennis.

Those Signed to adjust a child to live in per good looks,” remarked the

who have seen her at Bourne~ the world of to-day. Any way he court
mouth think she may go far at I
Wimbledon,

THE ADVENTURES

OF

the local hotel, and stole it back
the next day. After which he
pedalled merrily out of the town,

in Passing

{ URING a week when firemen

had tewer cats to rescue
from trees and roofs, they were
hard at work on people trapped
in lifts, So far have we advanced
beyond the old reliable lift work-
ed by a rope that it is possible to
spend half a day in one of the new
glittering affairs without getting
anywhere. How long will it be
before firemen are called to rescue
people trapped in _— stationary
traffic?

A faint cry from a man in a
vob-webbed taxi will lead the
rescuers to the spot, and he will
be brought to the pavement by
breech-cable, or passed over the



puts it together it is wrong.”—
Estelle Ward McCray.—L.E.S.

PIPA

Copyright . P 39 . Vaz Dias Int’ Amsterdam



By BEACHCOMBER

heads of the brigade. It is fun to
think of life slowing down day b/
day in an age which can talk and
think of nothing but speed.

Sleep My Little One . .
M* paper says that 1,000 bag-

" pipers, all playing the bag-
pipes, are to march in processicn
this month, When you've heard
one bagpipe you haven't heard
them all. There was an occasion
when the poet Yeats was invite:
to hear 20,000 Boy Scouts singing
“The Lake Isle of Innisfree” .
“And I shall have some peace
there . . .” says the poem, If your
baby is restless at night, put on 9
record of the Ride of the Valkyries
Andante, Ma, non troppo, as Ros-
sini said to his mother when sic
poured the Brolio with a somewhat
heavy hand,



Rupert enters the cave and calls
out, There is no answer except the
faint buzzing of a winter bee which

he has disturbed. ‘ Who are you,
and what do you want ?"’ The tiny
voica #ounds close to his ear, ‘1
want to find the man who just came

ALL WOOL BLANKETS

60” x 78”





EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

d the lce-flowe



WHITE, FAWN, PINK, BLUE, PEACH

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ae

"Then
on unt you
see a light, and dont wake ie op

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turn to the lel. Nea

again,’ grumbles the bee as it
buzzes The little bear does as
he’s told. The passage is rough,

and as i¢ begins to go downhill he
is faced with a blaze of light.

BER eee Pee eee
COTTON BLANKETS

WHITE, FAWN, BLUE, PINK, GREEN
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a
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& $12.07

DIAL 4220

THE WIFE of Freddie Rich, a
band leader, sued him for divorce

~ jin Los Angeles, claiming that he

called her names, But Fred’s
lawyer argued that this was im-
possible since Fred lost his voice
in a car smash in 1945.

AMERICA tried to outlaw drink
with her “Noble Experiment”
from 1919 to 1934, It failed. Now
they are again trying to legislate
against human nature, In IJinois
a are busy discussing a Bill to
outlaw tipping. Tip the waitress
in Illinois and you may get fined
$5. Tip her a second time and it
{will cost you $25.

IN AMERICA they call a
gloomy fellow a “sad sack.’’ Now
the sack men are very sad. There
is a shortage of burlap bags and
as a result one-third of Califor-
nia’s potato crop may go to waste.

MacARTHUR is getting an
average of 4,000 telephone calls
a day at a special switchboard
set up in the Waldorf-Astoria
Hotel. And the_ official count on
the paper dropped during his
welcome is 3,249 tons.

CROSSWORD




















1. Sort of grass thet is valuable
fc vin ¢ + (8)
7. Unwritten ! v)
Y. Water, thaua«s to the Navy. (4)
10. Outiaw in the b . 3)
ll, Slope of the bear, (3)
12 On a cap itt should produce
interest. (4)
13 vin not the rest J get that does
14. n Surrey. N. (7)
16
ly d in @ sideway look, (5)
20 Lr SPAN whe a sty. (4)
21. Briefly brother take three direc
tions. (1)
22 Twice in the kth. (3)
Down
L May huid the means of entry. (7)
2. Bird Upsets et. 4B)
8 and 16 Sie in all R.A.P, (7, 6)
4 lakes aputt two tu mend. (6)
6. In the potter's workshop, (5)
6 Guards’ “birthday suits"? (9)
8 He played Svengali, (4)
13 Stare In watery fashion (5)
15 Empluys (4)
(7 Only one or two here and there
(3) 18 Generai tn shelter ? (3)
Solution of vesterd « onetle = Acrow
4, Haversuck 1% Lot: i
Pix ja
tr » Ma
A
vols
Ble Almanac, 7
2 eover iS Stage 17

2

| ESCHALCT
ESCHALOT
ESCHALOT

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.



HEADQUARTERS FOR’ BEST |

RUM |

a aad
‘



A hundred years ago every
tamily visiting the Great Exhibi
tion would take home a keepsake
mug or china figure of the Queen
to be placed on the mantlepiece
or piano,

What shall we take home from
the 1951 exhibition? Souvenir
Committee has been selecting
mementoes for the past year.
Those on sale officially are sup-
posed to represent good design,
originality and value for money.

For the home there are pottery
ashtrays, hand-carved platters of
wood, brass door-knockers, and an
embossed teapot-stand of heat—
resisting glass.

Gifts for women range ‘from
head-scarves and parasols to metal

Mrs. Keighl

compacts and cigarette cases. For
men there are leather stud boxes,
metal tobaece containers, Festival
ties or braces of woven elastic,
incorporating Nelson's column.

For children: pencil sharpeners
in the shape of St. Paul’s torches
like Big Ben, or toy sailors w!
climb. up ropes to fly Festival
flags.

Breakfast in Bed

Most useful discovery in the
Furniture section:
stand between twin beds. Its twe
trays slide out sideways for break-
fast. The trofley is made of
Californian eucalyptus and alu
minium, The trays are heat-anc
stain-proof, in pastel colours, and
need no cloths.

ey Packs Her

Round-The-World Wardrobe

What clothes need a woman

ltake to fly round the world?

Here’s one who is doing it:




“at:

THE CONGO

sible cotton hat:
Cote miey wearing it.

Mrs.



PARIS, CHANGES

THE SHAPE AGAIN
from IRENE RICHARD

PARIS.
Mid-season summer col-

lections reveal a feminine
silhouette with fuller skirts,
often pleated, sloping shou)d-
ers and Magyar sleeves.
* Leading colour is white,

with all shades of yellow
and Biarritz blue.

Linen and_ shantung

dominate the collections
with many prints and
“sheers.”

Smartest models are

adaptable. Jean Desses
shows a_ round-the-clock
dress, with detachable
apron-cum-cape and remova-—
ble sleeves.

The three - quarter -

length dance dress, with
bouffant tulle skirt, is de-
signed for hot weather.
* Long gloves are a

“must” for evening
wear. Schiaparelli makes

oyster satin gauntlets, which
pull up to the armpits, fin-
ished with bows,

fe
Vs

Cartwheel hat in white horsehair

is trimmed witli leaves and veiling
(CLAUDE ST. CYR).




Brenda Rawnsley, in private lif:
| Mrs. Keighley and mother 0
seven-month-old Jonathan Eden
Her round-the-world wardrobe
designed to cover hot and colc
climates, packs into two suitcase:
—and it has ideas for 1951 holiday
makers. s

She will take it with her this
week on a five-week tour of th¢
Middle East, Australia, New Zea
land, Canada and America. He:
job: selling lithographs of well.
known paintings to schools and
starting school picture circulating
schemes,

Basic colour for her cold weath-
er clothes is black: for the hot
parts of her trip, white. Only
two hats are included, but they
pack flat and can be worn in
many ways. A black velvet cap is
dressed up with sequin veiling,
real flowers or feathers. For
sunshine there is a large white
cotton hat called “congo.” It is
made on a piano wire frame,
which opens out into an enormou:
sunhat. It can be worn inside out
or on windy days at half mast.

Lingerie is all nylon, nylon lace
trimmed, which washes over-
night and requires no ironing.
And the whole trousseau is crease
resisting to save time in packing
and pressing.

All Change

“Separates” play an important
part, with interchangeable nylor
blouses and seersucker skirts for
hot weather, lace stoles to dres.
up a plain black dinner dress fo)
Australia’s winter and a _ Pari
black tie, silk dress with colourec
scarves that tuck into the waist
band to give it six differen
personalities,

To go with her brown eyes, dark
red-brown hair and light skir
Mrs. Keighley has chosen a peac:
powder and blue-pink lipstick
bright enough to face sunshine of
electric lights.

Bravo

I applaud the restaurant thai
has relaxed its “evening dres:
only” rule for the Festival period
Many visitors arriving by air have
no luggage room for
evening dress, It
would be a_ graceful
gesture * other night
= spots would follow suit

for the holiday months.

Advice
From a Woman

“Push yourselves as
hard as you can, and
- don’t be afraid of be-

making a big noise.*

win,

tary of the

and Administrative
Workers’ Union,

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED
—L.E.S.

OPENING GLOBE. FRIDAY

UNIVERSAL-
INTERNATIONAL presents

LOUIS JOURDAN

Untorgettably Matched for Love with

JOAN FONTAINE

Romantic New Star of “The Paradine Case’*

Beautify

your

Rooms!!

; with
LOCAL TALENT ON
PARADE °-

with

GUEST STARS

WILLIE IFILL
(The Pride of Belle Gully)

and

“JO’ CLEMENDORE”
(Famous Contortionist)

and

(2) Singing Discoveries
“SUGAR RAY” GODDARD
(The Singing Pugilist)

and

DOUGLAS GRIFFITH
(10-year Vocal Marvel)

Tickets on Sale Daily





FOR YOUR WINDOWS—Kirsch Curtain Tubing and
Fittings
Orlwite Aluminum Curtain Tubing
FOR YOUR FLOORS—Congoleum Squares

Rugs

A Wide Range from which you may select your

requirements.

THE

RARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON FACTORY LID.
Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039



| ELLA RAL,

SSSOOCD POPES o a
hich
TO-DAY 5 & 8.15 P.M. LAST SHOWING
a trolley to or DARK CITY a

\
|
| SAKE ”
Starring
i ; Clifton Webb —
To save unpacking on overnigh: ‘
ai 2 2 Bennett with
ene, Lone te travel togethe: Robert Cumnainae

ing a little unladylike
_ on occasions and of
-—Miss B. Anne God-
- wi Assistant Secre-

Clerical

TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951







AQUATIC CLUB C ENEMA (Members Only)

TO-NIGHT at 6.30
CLAUDETTE COLBERT — ROBERT RYAN
in RKO’s New Picture
“THE SECRET FURY”
with JANE COWL — PAUL KELLY



MATINEE: WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m.
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
FRANCES LANGFORD
in “BEAT THE BAND”

with RALPH EDWARDS — PHILIP TERRY

oo



—=——=~

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ar

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Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30
WARNERS oe

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RONALD REAGAN —
PATRICIA NEAL —
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WED. & THURS. —
con) 445 & 8.30 p.m.
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GORDON MacRAE — Doris DAY in

memes “TEA FoR TWO™

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Last Two Shows TO-DAY
445 and 8.30 4.30 and 8.30

20th Century Fox Double —

=



























DIAL
8404

GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James
Last Show Tonite 8.30
Monogram's Whole Serial

“QUEEN OF THE JUNGLE”
Mary KORNMAN—Reed HOWES

PLAZA
OISTIN

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 p.m.
“ALIAS NICK BEAL"
RAY MELLAND and
“CAPTAIN CAREY, U.S.A."
ALAN LADD





:

Wed. & Thurs, 4.30 PM

“The Adventure of KIRZTY O'DAY”
Nancy Coleman &
“VIOLENCE”



WED. & THURS. 5 & $30 P.M.
“DEAR WIFE” William Holden &
“RAINBOW ISLAND”

Eddie BRACKEN—Dorothy LAMOUR peeeen Sue

— Thurs. (Bank Holiday) 4.30 p.m.
MAT, (Bank Holiday) THUR. 1,30 p.m “JOE PALOOKA” CHAMP" c
‘SONG OF THE WASTELANDS” & Leon ERROL &

“LOUISIANA”,
Jimmie DAVIS.

“MILLION DOLLAR KID”

Jimmy WAKELY Leo GORCEY





)





)



20th. Century Fox Presents

“FOR HEAVEN’S Richard Widmark and

Victor Mature in

«KISS OF DEATH”

Joan and
“BORDER INCIDENT”

ann with

Edmund Gwenn

ROXY
To-day at 4.45 Only
Columbia Pictures presents

Ricardo Montalban and
George Murphy



OLYMPIC

To-day and To-morrow



Se priate nee,

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TONITE at 8.15 Stuart in—
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“THE GREAT THE eae
MAJAHARA ” and
THE WORLD’S' GIFTED
MAGICIAN AND MIND «CALLING DR.
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Along with the picture
“HOMICIDE FOR THREE” Starring
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Warren Douglas Naish









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3 year size $1.47 )};
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TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951

Residential
Colleges
Preferred

BY W. INDIANS

LONDON, May 21.

West Indian students here pre-
fer colleges to be residential
rather than non-residential.

A resolution to this effect was
passed by an overwhelming ma-
jority when West Indian students
from Londan came to Oxford to
debate the matter last night. Al-
bert Hydoman (Trinidad) of Ox-
ford, proposing the resolution, said
academic study was not the whole
of their training.

_In colleges, students and tutors
lived as a family, something which
was missed in non-residential col-
leges to such an extent that many
colleges had now adopted the
hostel system. Hydoman added:
“In the West Indies there is need
for good leaders and it is only in
residential colleges where West
Indians meet Englishmen, Scots-
men, Americans and people from
all over the world that necessary
leaders can be trained.” i



Froy Auter Mowatt (Jamaica)
opposed for London. He said that
in residential colleges everything
was done for them and they had
no chance of settling for them-
selves the problems of life. In
London they had to find their own
lodgings, do their own shopping
and scive their own problems.

“If we are to send leaders to the
West Indies, that training in day
to day problems is essential,” he

said.
Social Life

Hydoman said the fact that in
the West Indies their University
was a residential one showed that
the motion was right. He said it
had been suggested that chores
and shopping were good training
but these simply absorbed valu-
able time which should be devoted
to education.

John Hall (Jamaica) of London
contended that social life was an
important part of their education,
In London, he said, games for West
Indians were “practically impos-
sible.” Only woman speaker—,
Miss Nelson—said West Indians
were accustomed to well prepared
food. They did not get that in
residential colleges,

In the Chair was Ernest Dow
(British Guiana) of Oxford.

—Reuter.



New Unions Formed

WELLINGTON, May 19.
William Sullivan, New Zealand
Labour Minister, today gave a
new protection guarantee to all
dockers who join unions being

formed to replace the deregister- ©

ed Waterside Workers.

Sullivan said that he realised
that many former watersiders
feared victimisation, but they
would be protected by the Gov-
ernment if they came forward.

New Dockers’ Unions were
formed today at Wellington and
Lyttleton, bringing to 18 the
number of ports at which this
has been done. .

But Auckland, where about
900 men are engaged, is the
only major port where new
unionists are working.—Reuter,

Detained

LONDON, May 21.

The British Foreign Office said
to-day that as far as it is known
four Britons, six Canadians, three
Austrians and about 35 Ameri-
cans are detained without trial
by Chinese authorities,

British Charge D’Affaires at
Peking has requested the Chinese
Foreign Ministry on April 30 to
see that Chinese authorities
should take steps to cause an
early hearing of charges against
these people.

No reply had yet been received
the Foreign Office said.

——Reuter.

—









Five Hundred Dead

DACCA, East Pakistan,

~ ais May 21.
_Five hundred people may have
died and about two thousand
have been re ed injured in a
Tornado which devastated a re-
mote area in Bengal on May 12,
East Bengal'’s Relief Officer Afi-
zuddin Ahmad said to-day.

The Tornado ripped a_ wide
path of ruin through the 25 mile
Faridpur district, obliterating
more than 25 villages and smash-
ing to pieces more than 3,000
houses and huts.

Ahmad returning here from a
tour of the stricken greas said
that destruction was unparalled
in human history.”

Debris had_ been cleared and
hundreds of dead buried.
—Reuter.



Wants To Form
New Indian Party

NEW DELHI, May 21.

J. B. Kripalani ex-President and
Secretary of the Indian National
Congress (Government Party)
who left the party last week to-
day invited his supporters to
meet in Patna on June 10 to form
a new party to oppose Congress
at elections,

The new party it was learned
in circles close to Kripalani, may
be called “People’s Congress’
thus embodying the World Con-
gress which for many Indians has
stood for all that is patriotic
since, the days of the struggle for
freedom.

A draft programme understood
to be similar in general outlining
to that of the Indian National
Congress is expected to be issued
by the end of May,

Rumours Of U.S.—
Soviet Talks Denied

WASHINGTON, May 19

New rumours of the Soviet
approach to the United States sug-
gesting that direct Soviet-Ameri-
can talks could lead to Korean
settlement were met with scepti-
cism in official and diplomatic
quarters here today.

The State Department for the
third successive day said that it
had no knowledge of the reported
Russian peace feelers,

The State Department's denials
have been made in the midst of
rash press reports and rumours
from Washington and London.
Usually well-informed foreign
quarters are professing complete
ignorance.—Reuter.

SUGAR DROUGHT
, BRISBANE,

The drought in the Queensland
sugar belt is expected to mean a
loss of £1,000,000 to Australia this
year, The sorghum harvest on the
British food farms in Central
Queensland is also expected to be
disappointing.





BRITISH _WEST (INDIAN AIRWAYS





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ONOLITH
“iN POLISHED

OaAn
ee



Prisoners Riot

UTAH, May 21.
Four guards held as hostages by
rioting inmates of the Utah State
prison were released late last
night, The rioting prisoners had
taken six prison guards as hos-
tages but earlier two had escaped
through the windows.
The prisoners had smashed
furniture, windows and _ equip-
ment before a truce was arranged
with officials, .
More than two hundred of the
532 inmates jumped into an orgy
for several hours before a truce
brought partial order back. Riot-
ers released all inmates in “death
row,” but locked doors at the
ends of the corridors of the cell
houses prevented escape by the
doomed men or other inmates.
The truce and release of guards
were reported by six prisoner
spokesmen who complained to
the authorities that some prison
officials had been unfair.
—Reuter.

Red Chinese Using
Nationalist Forces
N.Y. TIMES WRITER

NEW YORK, May 21.

New York Times Hong Kong
correspondent Henry Lieberman
said today that an analysis has
shown that Chinese Communist
units, being thrown against United
Nations fire power in Korea, were
composed largely of former Na-
tionalist soldiers,

Nationalists had been reorgan-
ised into units controlled by com-
missioned officers of proven politi-
cal reliability.

The heavy losses among former
Nationalist troops in Korea had
raised the question whether the
Communists would alter their
“human sea” tactics if it became
necessary to fall back increasingly
on units with a higher proportion
of Communists, he continued.

w...

‘
In Carlisle Bay

M.V. Sedgefield, sch. Marea Henrietta,
Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Cyril E
Smith, Sch Enterprise S , Sch. Frances
W. Smith, Sch. Eastern Eel, MV. T B
Radar, Sch Belqueen, Sch. Franklyn
D R , Sch. D’Ortac, Sch, Philip H. David-
son, MV Moneka, Sch Laudalpha, M.V
Blue Star, M.V. Cacique del Caribe

ARRIVALS

M.V. Caracas, 235 tons net, Capt. Angel
Velasquez, from Venezuela

Schooner Everdene, 68 tons net, Capt
Phillips, from St Vincent

SS _ Aleoa Polaris, 3,945 tons net, Capt
Mullelly, from Puerto Suere

Schooner Lucille M_ Smith, 74 tons net,
Capt Hassell, from British Guiana.

Schooner Mary M Lewis, 69 tons net,
Capt. Marshall, from British Guiana

DEPARTURES

Sch. Emeline, 72 tons net, Capt, Clarke,

for British Guiana

MV. Moneka, 100 tons net, Capt.
Hutson, for Dominica
MV. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt.

Gumbs, for Dominica
Schooner Timothy A. H.
76 tons net, Capt

Vansluytman,
Stoll, for Trinidad.

Schooner Amberjack Mac, 41 tons net,
Capt. MecLawrence, for Martinique

- Serap Cuban

From page 1
what happened. That was not
exactly the policy to-day, but it
was the policy of the past which
had caused the misery and unres
and the social standard whic!
was the heritage in this part o?
the world, :
Sugar Price

In times of scarcity, if sugar
was scarce the price was arbi-
trarily fixed. When it was in
plentiful supply price-fixing
ceased, and these areas had their
main product fixed at a price by
the price at which other terri-
tories would dump their sugar on
the world markets after they had
satisfied their requirements and
their own markets.

The West Indies had to com-
pete against people who had very
‘arge internal markets such as
Australia, and who could protect
heir industry without damaging
their economy by the price they
fixed in their own market.

“We here consume. very little of
our sugar. We have to export. In
times of scarcity you fix a price,
but when you see the position is
reversed and that there will be
plenty of sugar, you change that
policy and say, ‘I am going to buy
in the open market’, when you
know in your heart there is no
such thing.”

When the first World War came
there was a shortage of sugar and
the price was fixed. In the early
twenties the position began tec
change, the production of sugas
caught up with world demands.
What did they see? Did they see
the United Kingdom saying ‘we
fixed your price during the war?
Not at all.

Price Rise

It would be remembered that the
price rose very high for a short
time and then the controls were
taken off. The price went down
and down until the main industry
in this area, the industry on which
the population depended, was sell-
Ing sugar at £7 and £8 per ton.
The world price it was called but
it was no such thing at all. It
was merely that Cuba after satis-
fying her requirements in her pro-
tective markets could sell at a
cheap price.

No words he could use could
express the hardship and misery
and resentment that the policy of
the United Kingdom then caused
in this area. F

The Olivier Commission was
sent out here, to inquire into the
situation, :

This Commission recommended
that the British Government buy
West Indian sugar at £15 per ton.
They realised that this was only
fair and just to the people in the
areas who were then living at the
lowest standard of life. ‘This re-
port was either put on the dusty
shelves of the archives of the
government or was thrown in the
waste paper basket, As far as the
West Indies were concerned no-
thing happened to improve the
situation in the area. This im-
partial commission had reported
but evidently the determination of
the United Kingdom was to get
cheap sugar at the expense of the
West Indies. / :

“During this period you_will re-~
call, I am sure, that the Japanese
started flooding these markets
with cheap goods. The people
who were working for a small
amount of money could get cheap
shoes and shirts for the first time.

“You made representations to
us that this would damage the
standard. of living of the people
of your country and you and we
put on quotas and duties to pro-
tect the standard of living of your
people, These poor countries with
their poor people who only re-
ceived eight, nine or twelve
pounds for their sugar.

“The British Government must
realise that these things must be
two ways. We are prepared to
bear our share of their difficulties,
but we wish to see that it is not
only us with our weak resources
who get the worse of these bar-
gains.” ~ @

Sugar Shoisage

When the second World War
broke out, said Mr. Robinson,
there was again a shortage of
sugar and it was considered that
the West Indies might get some-
thing to put their house in order,
so that they might do all the
things that ought to have been
done in those years when they
could get nothing. The price of
sugar was again fixed, and it was
significant that at the time it was
fixed at £11. 5s. per ton, The
Olivier Commission had recom-
mended years ago that the price
jshould be £15.

In 1948 the great experts in
England decided and as was now
known, wrongly, that there was
going to be a surplus of sugar
very shortly and therefore the
time had come for them to get
out of the arrangement which
had been so profitable to them
durfng the past years.

Mr. Robinson then spoke of the
announcement that had been



NATIO a DEFENCE!
THE LEFT GROUP
=i wiki +

ns ae

what the position in the area
would be and we know what we
had to face.”

Political Pressure

To make matters worse,
Mr. Robinson, on the way to
England a statement was made by
the Canadian Government that if
measures taken by the sterling
bloc outside the control of the
West Indies continued to mar the
benefits of Canada and _ the
Canada-West Indies agreemeit,
there would be political pressure
in Canada which would cause the
West Indies to lose their prefer-
ences and destroy all the benefits
which “we were both eager to
maintain.”

In England they made this
position clear but without an
effect. Mr. Robinson went on to
speak of the difficulties they hac
encountered in England and th»
various meetings they had hac,
and the disappointments suffered
before the present agreement was
reached. “We have come here
to-day, he said, to try and iron
out the best devise for getting
the best done in the interest of
and for the welfare of this area,
You will never get a wedge
between us again on this issue
As you recognise that point, let
us make up a resolve that we
will now once and for all try to
forget the accumulated built-up
of the past history at this point

said

let us realise that we have
thoughts and aspirations alike.
That the aspirations the English

people have for a beter standard
of living are our aspirations too
That you need us just as much as
we need you. Not us alone but the
Commonwealth as a whole. Let
us, adopt a new policy to get
together and work as friends, let
us work together for the common
good.”

Preferential Rate

The present trade pact signed
between Canada and Cuba pro-
vided for 75,000 tons of sugar for
Canada, and Canada is also con-
sidering taking a similar amount
from somebody else unknown.
They were allowing the sugar to
go in at full preferential rate,
roughly it was going into Canada
on the same basis as West Indian
sugar

Agreement Extended

“You now come here to tell us
what we knew you were going
to tell us; that is, that you intend
to do the same thing. You say
to us, ‘we realise that you will
not be happy about it, therefore
we will extend the agreement tc
1953. You have nothing to worry
about.”

If this was accepted, said Mr.
Robinson, a trade would be built
up in the years the pact with Cuba
be made, and if it were sueccess-
ful as it probably would, public
pressure might be such that it
would have to be maintained
Where would the West Indies be
then and what could they do
Now was the time that if anything
could be done to do it. The same
thing applied to the Canada-Cuba
pact, he pointed out. “These
territories are selling their sugar
to you at a sacrifice of eight to
ten million pounds per year for
future security. In justice we ask
you, ‘let- us have our future
security.’ ”

New Relationship

Hon. D. B. Sangster said that
the Conference marked a new
departure in the relationship ol
the United Kingdom Government
with the West Indies but they
were not quite sure in their minds
why the U.K. Mission had come.

Some said that they had some-
thing that was unpalatable to give
them, something which they
thought it might be better to be
presented to them and get them io
accept on the spot. On the other
hand, was it to prove that they
were growing up in the British
Commonwealth and that they
were coming to talk about things
jin the British Commonwealth?
He would prefer to accept that
explanation,

He said that he would like
it to be very plain that this
meeting must not be regarded
as a discussion or agreement
or anything of the kind. lt
was just an exchange of views
particularly relating to the
Cuban Pact. As his friends
had said, there was no division
between free enterprise ele-
ments of the West Indies and
the political elements and they
were going to give them their
views, particularly to sugar
and tebaeco as they saw
them between Cuba and the
United Kingdom,

@ On page 5.



|
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between the ages of 12—19 to send in a humorous essay, story or poem |

: Black Pact —



>

London Express Service

N.A.T.O. Chairman.
Wants Turkey,
Greece Admitted

LONDON, Mery 21

United States Chairman of the
N.A.T.O. Deputies Council,
Charles Spofford, to-day asked the
Council to consider the possibilfty
of admitting Greece and Turkey
to full membership of the Atlan-
uc Pact.

The proposal was made, it was
learned, at one of the regular}
meetings of the Council of Depu
ties of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organisations held in London this |
afternoon

The move is in Tine with the}
known wishes of both the Greek!
and Turkish Governments, Greek |
ind Turkish Envoys in London
have called at the Foreign OMice}
fin the past week to urge Britain)
to support the new United States!
move. |

At present Greece and Turkey
ere associated with Atlantic Ran: |

te ee




* ers for purposes of defence plan-

ning in the Mediterranean, but
are not full members of the Pact

Last Autumn when the posst-
bility of admitting two Govern.
ments was first raised, Britain was
opposed to permitting an expan
sion of the territorial scope of the
Pact, but it is understood that the |
whole question is being consider
ed afresh in the Foreign Office.

—Reuter,



Ships Begin Chart
Exercises

VALETTA, MALTA
May 21,

Naval forees of four North At-
lantie treaty countries assembled
in Valetta harbour, began today
large scale chart exercises which
will last for a week.

Taking part are ships from
Britain, United States, France and
Italy. |

Italian vessels are under the
command of Vice Admiral G.
Girosi, Commander-in-Chief of
the Italian Navy, who ig to pay
official calls to heads of British
services in Malta.

A full squadron of Italian Hell-}
driver aircraft will join British
forces in anti-submarine man-
ceuvres during the week. U.S.
ebservation ship Mount Olympus
entered Valetta harbour yester-
day. She was delayed a day by
rough seas,





—Reuter.

ee ee

Workers In Rubber
Factory Strike

OSLO, May 21. |
Workers in a_ rubber factory
here were striking to-day in a
dispute which may lead to
nationwide lockout on June 4,
They were stopping work be-
cause their employers refused $4
allow a union representing 15
supervisors to be affiliated to the
Norwegian Trades Union Con-
@ress,

As a counter measure, employ-
ers have threatened a_ lockout
which will also affect clothing,
shoe, tobacco, chocolate, chemical!
and leather goods tactories but
they are meeting on May 29 to
consider an extension,

—Reuter,



WHY SHOULD U..S.A.
DEFEND EUROPE?

ARDEN, New York, May 21.

A group of 70 prominent Ameri-
cans gathered here to-day undex
Ahe sponsorship of the Colombia
University to try to clear a way

through the fog of debate over
United States help for Europe's
anti-Communist nations.

j
|
Discussions will revolve aepene |
four major points:
1. Why should United States |
help defend Europe?
2. How much backbone
Europe put into the fight?
3. When should Germany be
allowed to rearm, and how my
j

will

that affect France and Britain’?

4. How much aid,
end military, will Europe need |
and what are the chances of |
Russia becoming friendly?

Only the first and final sessions |
of the Assembly (to-day) and
Friday) will be opened to the
Press. —Reuter.

economic



made in the House of Commons
on September 27, 1948, by Dr
Summerskill, relative to a change
in United Kingdom policy con-
cerning sugar. This change, he
said, had been made without con-
sulting the West Indies. .

“We saw ourselves back to the
starvation and misery of the
twenties, back to the ruin of the
main industry which these col-
ronies depend on for the livelihood
|of their people.

| ‘We were concerned, we
were extremely concerned. The
B.W.1I.S.A. immediately sent

jtheir delegation to England and
jso did the Jamaica Governrrent.
| We followed the practice we had
followed many times. We knew

on the subject of “CAMELS”. Entries must reach the Short Story Editor, |
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PAGE THREE





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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS fap

ADVOGATE



eae ee Ja 8 et fee)

Printed by the Advocate o.,



Tuesday, May 22, 195:

HAPPY FAMILY

NONE but the criminally ignorant could
misinterpret the West Indian front pre-
sented to Mr. Bottomley yesterday. It was
the attitude of senior members
Commonwealth expressing their right to
speak their views. And what did they say ?
Not let us spit on Great Britain, let us
secede from the Commonwealth.
forget the past, they said. Let us become
a happy family. Let us work together for
the good of the Commonwealth. The Com-
monwealth is a whole and the strength of
the whole is, as Mr. Robinson neatly said,



the strength of the whole.

We have got to come together with

open minds.”

Whatever Mr. Bottomley may have been
told on the other side, he has no excuse
left than, as he himself said, to “report on

what has taken place.”

What has faken place puts an end to all
those misguided attempts on the part of
certain left-wing intellectuals, to drive a
wedge into the fact of West Indian unity.

Mr. Gomes did not speak

He spoke for the West Indies. Mr. Sang-
ster did not speak for Jamaica. He spoke
Mr. Robinson did

for the West Indies.
not speak for the British
Sugar Association.

are united and they do not

treated as juveniles incapable of adult co-
operation. “The fight,” »s Mr. Gomes put
it melodramatically, “has just begun.”

Mr. Sangster has spoken the thoughts of
every West Indian when he said to Mr.
Bottomley: “We ask you to scrap the Cuban

pact.”
Nothing less will satisfy

dies, Mr. Bottomley has been told. And

that is the message which
back.

The West Indies, as Mr. Sangster says,

want long-term contracts.

will create stable conditions which will

attract capital to the area.

tween relations must be to the advantage
The United Kingdom has
had 300 years happy family connections

of both parties.

with the West Indies.

To whom else should they turn for long-
term contracts which would make for sta-

The West Indies have contributed
much to the recovery of the sterling area.
They have had to bear the full brunt of
devaluation, They have no free spectacles,
no free dentures, no unemployment insur-
They have watched the purchasing
power of their dollar drop with exaspera-
tion and with heroic endurance. But they
have remained loyal to the Mother of the
family, whose achievements they know
But how can they strain
Mr. Bottomley has vouch-
But he has been told
straight(as it were)from the horse’s mouth
just what West Indians do believe and

bility?

ance.

and respect.
loyalty more?
safed no reply.

think. He will have been

that unity ahd never again (if ever he has
been in the past) will he believe those who

claim that the West Indies
within themselves.

The cause of the West Indies is the cause
of all the peoples who live in the West
Indies. The reason why there is so much
poverty, so much unemployment in the
West Indies is because the West Indies are
not paid more for the agricultural products
to enable them to pay higher wages and

employ more people.

Better wages, better conditions, better
education, better citizens all round, is the

aim of all political parties
Indies, however much they
on their approaches.

If Mr. Bottomley returns to the United
Kingdom and tells them we are one happy
family, who because of our family relation-
ships want to speak for ourselves instead
of leaving the Mother of the family to
speak for us, he will have done much, if
not all that is needed, to renew our trust
in-the United Kingdom. It has been sadly
shaken, but the leaves are still on the tree.







From FREDERICK COOK
-. NEW YORK.

A 50-year-old businessman
from’ Chelmsford, Essex, has
given the Americans a convincing
demonstration ‘that “know-how”
is not an exclusively American
export.

With British “know-how” in
industrial relations, he has trans-
formed in three years the Norma
Hoffman Bearings Corporation of
Stamford, Connecticut.

The company were torn’ by
bitter labour-management strife.
Profits fell in 1948 to some 30,000

dollars, from a quarter of a
million a year earlier

To-day, thanks to the man
from Chelmsford, all that has

been changed.

At the annual meeting a fort-
night hence, the firm’s president,
50-year-old William L. Hubbard
who came out from Essex late in
1948, will be able to report a

114., Broad St. Bridgetown

He spoke for every
man, woman and child in the West Indies. *
The old cliche so often used by well
meaning Englishmen that you could find
everything in the West Indies except unity
has been nailed hard in the coffin,
West Indies do speak with one voice. They



riton Shows U.S.

ell

the shore.

mist.

of the

of the previous
the Israelis.

He
Let’ us

lakeside fields.






















It seemed

sive attacks

for Trinidad.
bouring Israeli

West Indies

the village.

boxes with

The

He stared
gutted homes,
walls.
intend to be
in peace and
fight rather
homes and our
champions of
Arabs in this
Israelis of

the West In-

he will take

Nothing else

Contracts be-

accomplished
record of one

Here fs

impressed by
his sensitivity

are disunited heights 0’ war

It has the vitality of sashes

of the vivid
author himself,

the book's tragic moments.
erland, the Scotsman, and a dozen
other desperadoes from the RAF.
And even a handful from the other
side, Walter Nowotny, the German
ace, killed in the last week of the
war: “A face like that of a tired
child, with a trace of sadness and
a determined mouth and chin”
“A pity that type wasn't wear.
ing our uniform,” said Brooker.
These young men have the im-—
pression that they are in a world
of their own, with a meaning of
its own, something far superior

in the West
may disagree

to the grubby

and

massacres

record profit, a‘new factory near-
ing completion, the working force
in process of being doubled and
a multi-million-dollar backlog of
orders on hand sufficient to keep
the enlarged plant busy for two
years.

¢
Made him president

Mr. Hubbard came from the
Hoffman Manufacturing Com-
pany of Chelmsford, owners of
a majority of the stock in the
Norma Hoffman Company on this
side.

With him he brought British
notions of labour-management
relations and has “made them
stick.” Industrialists all over
the U.S. are watching his
results with envy.

It took him only five months to
straighten out the tangled affairs
of the Connecticut company. He
was preparing to go home when
the U.S. directors urged him to
take over the management on a

Behind the bare, placid hills the
sun was slowly dipping into thg
But the mayor o
had eyes for none of it.

He was too busy putting out his
guards to protect the village in
ease there should be a repetition

as -
inca anes une the tomato Israeli bulldozers and the ineffec-
gardens, behind what was left of tual efforts of UNO officers to stop
the mud wall of the village, and them.
up in the hills overlooking the flat

Three Attacks

Arab villagers they were, with
mvhite head cloths flapping down and observers
over their shoulders, ancient car- reporters
bines in their arms, khaki webbing with assessing the facts and ad-
with bulging cartridge pouches judicating them, but
strapped over their ragged clothes. mats.”
incredible that these I
rough peasants should have suc- compromise, trying to skirt diffi-
ceeded in repulsing three succes- cult situations.
the problems of conscience
trained Israeli frontier troops out- which a man faces when he finds
numbering them three to one and himself up against facts on one
with mortars and machine guns side
to pit against their musty carbines. group on the other,

in

But that is how it was. Only moment,
20 minutes earlier two United «¢he firing’ from the two sides
Nations observer officers had been makes it impossible for them to
in the village to pick up the Israeli approach the scene of strife in

dead from the night before and order to press on their UNO com-
carry them across to the neigh-

Geiv, a quarter of a mile down
the lake shore. I myself had seen
the foxholes where the Israeli dangerous. The pusillanimity of
raiders had lain 100 yards frem the YNO commissioners and the

cases and empty white cardboard
Hebrew
marked the spots only too clearly,

reflectively

“This is a poor vi

having broken

ing life with the RAF.
air
dimensional, confused, incredibly

emotions of the pilots—brought to
the eye and nerves of the chair-

rarely equalled,

dragging sentences,
stabbing phrases that will sammon
the mad, melodramatic scene to
the imagination, to pass on some
impression of the high tempo and
sudden furies of those air battles

on the resources of writing,
Clostermann may not command

fast and fused
borne reader
To translate
into words, to
—all that is a
the majesty of
model for all writers on the air, the
. | His style is his own and sufficient,
With his swift,
his capacity to
as if it were some glistening
enemy airplane sighted in the sky,
: as the scene, he soars to the

like these—“I hung there, with my
nose in the air, while the first
Huns began to flash like thunder-
bolts between our sections,”

It has the strength and interest

judges, obstreperous,
his hero, the French flier with the
emaciated figure and the irresis-
tible smile, whose death is one of

with its crawling, stinking tanks
children’ “Nowotny belonged to

us; he was part of our world,
where there were no ideologies,blows of my two cannon.”

‘The



How Neglect Is He
To Win The Middle East

A sharp evening breeze was
blowing across Lake Galilee, whip-
ping up the waves so that they _
smacked angrily against the fish- disregarded the UNO-appointed
erman’s skiff fighting its vay to armistice commissioners’ orders,

Disobeyed
UNO'S General Riley ordered

Israelis to cease
£] Nuqeib
The Israelis,

accuse the
aggression

night’s attack ky

men in the Of the invaston

Blame UNO, a
their anxiety to

prizes they drafted vaguely word-
ed regulations, promised the best
of worlds to both sides,

Their armistice commissioners

and

found

a fortnight by by

and

By Sefton Delmer

work south of Lake Huleh, The
Israelis disobeyed,

Arabs
when Arab peasants

fired on Israeli workmen and trac-
tors because they were impatient

them attempting to

a powerful

BARBADOS



the Arabs
land reclamation

in their turn, their

of military

of their land by the substantial

est,

most rapidly

nd its officers. In Middle East.

earn Nobel Peace

strategic value.

behaved not as

judges, charged js; jn all this.

as “diplo-
appreciate this
plore it.
They were awed
orders,

pressure
so outspoken,

In the fighting going on at this

settlement of En

Now this

Security Counci

A litter of used brass cartridge ciqes to deal with this is perilous
: r Western power and authority
lettering i, the Middle East,

It is ane ae pecans as re

Q 1 im, produced by Persia’s oil grab an

iy Pons ethers Snag va Egypt’s threat to the Suez Canal,
For Israel has hitherto enjoyed
llage,” the widest sympathy and support
he said to me, “We don’t want to from the Western world.

be a Korea, We just want to live ra I )
work, But we shall and suspicious of this popularity
than give up our Of the young State. They have
ascribed it to the financial and
Who is to blame ? The Syrians, political power of the Zionists in

at
with their burst

The Arabs h

land,”

Palestinian New York and

accuse the
the

the
area,







observers

mands of “ease fire.”

Dangerous
situation is

Don’t Dare

* t They claim that no newspaper,
armistice. agreement, of having no reporter, and no politician dare

report that

has done little

bloodshed will
most

situation now

1 called by both ¢
opportunity
agents of the

alists, all have

ave been jealous
In an

eve a
London, m | managed

Church,



Daredevils’

The Fighter Pilot Talks Of “The

By GEORGE MALCOLM THOMSON

THE BIG SHOW. By Pierre Clos-
termann, Chatto and Windus.
12s. 6d, 256 pages,

Let nobody underrate the feat

in the brilliant
Frenchman's fight-

warfare—three

with the desperate

with a_ vividness

such experiences
give wings to the
to find the

tremendous strain aka Aouunid
at 17,
a a mI
St. Exupery, that teustlom ates ¢

war

slangy narrative, no hatreds and

Battle

Above the cl
sane and lovely
men develop

dive on a phrase,

to the feeling as

painting. s
mystique. And
mann conveys,
purpose of his

a How
personalities; the

confident and, one

One day he
Mouchotte,

Frisian islands,

Suth-

of German fig

out of the cloud

At
formations
and Messerschm

bunch,

war below of the ring.
“T had the

diving into an

land

of women and



oe



permanent basis. |

They elected him president.

He told me to-day: “I called in
the leaders of the union, and told
them how I started out at 15 and}
came up from the ranks. They
liked that,””

A calm, reasoned approach to
the problems quickly led to a two-
year contract between union and
firm. It has just been renewed for
two years more.

No bluster
“The secret of the whole thing
was, the British approach -— no
bluster, no cajoling, nd threaten-
ing, and no pleading.

“When labour here gets a rise
it expects the industry to cut
costs to meet it. British labour
union negotiators are much
better trained and more experi-
enced.”

Mr. Hubbard has brought over
his wife and two children
—L.E.S





PIERRE CLOSTERMANN studied

engineering
d America, got his pilot's licence
Joined Free French Forces as
commanded a fighter

truction of 24 enemy airplanes, After
became
Deputy for Strasbourg,

almost a philosophy, certainly a

before his readers the hysteria of
the air battles and the fluctuating
course of the air war,

adroitly
executes his grand battle pieces!

on the grey sea, waiting for the
Forts to come back from bomb-
ing the Schweinfurt ball-bearing,
works, Space brings forth swarms

and Mustangs hurry home with
empty magazines, dodging in and

a forlorn and tragic sight.
have
shreds by avalanches of Junkers
over the sky, they try vainly to
Spitfires
into the clouds and bounce off
again like boxers against the ropes
impression I was

demented fish. The wings of my
Spit shuddered from the hammer-

Way ae

At such moments Clostermann
is a man inspired by the grandeur
and horror of his theme.

As the end of the war approaches

it is evident

this

nerves,
rates.

but

rose,
pillars. In a
machines had

as

action. A staggering blow hidden
from the public at the time,

Show Over
It would be a mistake to think

in France

Credited with des- of this book,
parliamentary
simply
daredevil with
for writing.

It is also a
history, and a

no frontiers,”
Hysteria

ouds, in those in-
battles, the flying

this, too, Closter-
although the first
book is to put

superhuman

There

ne blank: end public had been satisfied, The] Might write their comments. *
i programme had been rather} After the opening day the pages were.
h the heavy, the actors not too bad, li ae th that ld fli
pst na. iq andthe lions had eaten the chipped together so that no one cou Ip i
von, ooo ee trainer,” them back to read the opinions offered.
oe lion roars most impres-} Said an American friend, “You can quote

hters, Lightnings

itts, Seattered all
15s.) .
@ In

seem to bang

aquarium full of
15s.)

A Place To Settle

To_the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR, — Could you possibly
through the medium of your
Paper, put me in touch with any
person or persons on your Island
or neighbouring Islands who
would like to correspond with me.

My motive behind this letter is
due to a strong desire to settle
down in a more desirable place in
the World with my wife and two
sma!l children. When I do find the
place, I shall dispose of my Busi-
ness and possessions, and emi-
grate. I am by trade a Bricklayer,
and my wife runs a small Hard-
ware & Crockery Shop for me.

Possibly, your Island and _ its
environments is just what I am
looking for, in all events howexer,
whichever course I take, to be
able to correspond with someone so
distant from England will be of
considerable importance and plea-
sure to me,

If you kindly contact someone
for me will you be good enough to
ask them to describe, the Climate,
Natural resources, Language, pre-
vailing Industry, Customs, The



Iping Stalin |

criticise the Israelis, however re-
prehensible their behaviour.

This makes the weak attitude
of UNO and its officials
Middle East most damaging to
the Western cause.
the false
that Israeli influence is so strong
in the West that they can expect
no justice there.
complaints against
however justified.

Clearly in these A@rcumstances
the West can never expect to use

Israel—by a long way the strong-
best-led, best-equipped, and
mobilisable

The assurances of Israeli leaders
—-that they would regard a Soviet
incursion into the Middle Fast as
an attack on Israel itself—lose ali

One encouraging feature ther.

In Tel Aviv I found a substantial
number of influential Israelis who

The newspaper Haretz
has publicly criticised the Govern-
ment for ignoring General Riley's
however much it
disagree with them. r
of no other country in the Middle
East where a newspaper would b:

‘Opportunity’
So far UNO’s Security Counc!

dangerous situation,
If it continues to let it drift
the aggressions,

pound interest on both sides.
But most alarming of all, the

Galilean Korea present an ideal
for

covert, conscious and unconscious.
Communists and anti-Commun-
ists, nationalists and internation-

ingenious and skilful campaign o.
political warfare being tought by
the Kremlin here in the vital area
of the Middle East,

age-old
Damascus’s Street called Straight,
I found how the Russians have

the highest regions of the Christiar

physique alike are strained to
breaking point.
time commanding
describes the effect of this on
tempers 4 ;
He inserts a vivid account,
of the Luftwaffe’s last effort, the home.
bold, brilliantly planned stroke by
General Sperrle which left the
Allied aircraft on 27 bases nothing
smouldering heaps
which tall pillars of black smoke
straight as cathedral

many phases of the air war, as
the story of one young

. a. host of gallant men,
a point of view, mann’s comrades. It closes in the
sense of emptiness that follows
exertions,
ears of parting,
are regrets in farewells,
even the farewell to arms.

“The Big Show was over, The

@ Crazy world or
picture magnates is the scene of
THE DREAM MERCHANTS,

technique borrowed from _.
screen, (Weidenfeld and Nicolson.

THE BROKEN ROOT.
Arturo Barea make a novel out
of the experience of a Spanish
Republican who returns to Fran-
co's Spain—and to tribulation. No-
body need be surprised, (Fabers.

World Copyright Reserved,



ADVOCATE
|

Russia Busts Into The
Festival Game

CHARLES FOLEY reports on

The Milan Fair
HURRAH for the Soviet way of life.
Hurrah for the Festival of Russia.

in the

For it gives
impression : '
and sent 3,000 miles to the great market-place

of the West, the Milan World Trade Fair.

I have just returned from visiting the
show, and I am still fascinated by the bold-
ness with which Russia has challenged, for
the first time since the war, the best and
finest that the leading nations of the West
can produce.

The Russian bid opened with the arrival,
six weeks ago, of a general staff—Director
Serge Vishniakov and his wife, with 12 lead-
ing technicians.

Armed with diplomatic cards, they set up
headquarters in the fashionable Amedei
Hotel. From the roof garden they surveyed
Milan, the battleground.

The main body of Soviet factory experts
piled up fibre suitcases in the lobby of a
third-category hotel.

NO THIS, NO THAT

The Russian show was a sensation. Buyers
who pressed in from every country in the
world quickly stamped out again because
they could get no answer on prices or deliv-
eries: such buyers were always referred to
the Director — and Comrade Vishniakov
never seemed to be about.

Angry industrialists said they could see no
purpose in the display. But to the rest of
us, the 4,000,000 sightseers, it was plain as a
wink that Stalin put on this spectacular
parade of wealth and industry simply to let
us know what we have been missing.

Outside the Soviet paradise» there was
always Director Vishniakov’s immense Rus-
sian limousine to draw the crowds, And
when the people turned into the palace they
were met with a burst of Cossack singing and

No support for
Israel
armed forces of

in the

situation and de-

migh
I can thin

to deal with thi:

bombings, anc
increase by com-

created by this

the political
Soviet—open and

their place in th.

convent of:
high, lighted from within—of Joseph Stalin.

Beyond, a 200-yard panorama of Soviet
products and machines,

to percolate into

But of that tomorrow,

World |

Men We

NO MATCH

With all this ettort the resuit has been a
disappointment for the Russians. The Mos-
cow planners let down their Western follow-
ers with a bang.

British, American, and German experts
dismissed Russian technical pretensions at a
glance. They all told me that the Soviet
precision machinery was inferior to that
made in the West. ‘

The exhibits were poorly finished. Metal
parts betrayed second-grade production.
Aluminium castings. were pitted. with holes
which even paint could not conceal.

Farmers said they had better tractors at
Workers from the Necchi sewing
machine factory an hour away—they make
electrically-driven models and export them
to America by the thousand—found the Rus-
sians proudly showing machines still worked
by hand or treadle.

Girls from the ultra-modern Olivetti type-
writer plant outside Milan giggled at Soviet
models nearly 20 years out of date.

Killed”

that morale and

Clostermann, by
a_ wing,

and accident

--

from

few minutes, 300
been put out of

NO PEEPING
which touches so
ed at the wonderful! Russian furs, but de-
clared them botched in cut and style,

The textiles and shoes we saw* would not

an amazing talent

sketch for a war
moving tribute to
Closter- , ‘
Radios were dialled for Russian stations

only. . - oe

At the exit of the Russian pavilion Vishni-
akov placed an:angel_(with.a red hair-band)
holding a golden book in which awed visitors

in the
in bitterness

me that. this. is the finest propaganda for
Western Europe we could ever hope for.”
Let us not be too proud. At the tiny British

the motion

Harold Robbins’s novel, which ’

a follows the career of two adven-| stand, occupied mostly by B.E.A, photographs
last the Fortresses appear ont Cenedenine ae = glory of foreign capitals, one visitor was the American
Their “nickelodeon.” Crisply told, al-| Anibassador, James Dunn.

been torn to though over-playing a flash-back

He gazed tactfully round and, striving to
console the young man in charge, said : “I sup-
pose you people have been busy on the Festi-
val?’’

The Englishman : What Festival ?

Mr. Dunn : ‘‘ Why, the Festival of Britain.’’
The Young man blinked. ‘And what is that.
sir ? he inquired,

the





ES, —L.ES.
‘ : E The net proceeds were $1,110.4°
OURREADERSSAY which goes to the St, John Bap

tist Vicarage Fund.
Hoping all of you will be will
ing’ to help’ us: again: in the

tuture,
Mrs. Ben Moore,
Alfred J. Hatch,

Tsland’s general amenities ete.
what I would need to bring with
me, that is of course if you would
care to have me, and being a
builder, could this knowledge be
utilized fully on the Island.

Do please see that this letter
achieves its purpose, in the mean-
time even though it may be a little
premature I wish to thank you for

Un-registration
SIR,—One side of’ registration

everything. seems to have been neglected by
G. HEATH. the Government and others inter- |"
167 Park Road, ested in its success.
oe It is now more than two weeks
England. that the filled-in forms of my

household Have not been collected
by the registration officer.

The time-is getting near when
all forms have to be handed in.

If my case is not unique it is,
possible that many who waht to be |
registered will find that they have
no vote.

Will the Government see that
registration officers do not neglect
collection of forms?

Yours,
UNREGISTERED.

The Holetown Fair

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—We take this opportunity
to thank all those who gave so
Senerously and those who worked
so hard to make the Country
Fair held at Holetown on Whit-
Monday such a_ success.

The lucky winner of the cycle
was Joyce Iffill of Crab Hill, St,
Lucy with ticket No, 498,

Hurrah.
for the great exhibition which Stalin built! {

a glowing vision in stained glass, eight feet}

Women of Europe’s elegant cities exclaim-'

be saleable in the shabbiest Western village. |,











TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951



PRACTICAL

SPANISH
GRAMMAR

My Hills & Ford
Advocate Stationery














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TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951



Scrap Cuban Black Pact

@ From pafe 3.

“Let us for a moment examine
the ecohomy of the West Indies.
For hundreds of years, it has been
based on agriculture, then within
recent years, there has been a
slight diversion of minor secondary
industries of one kind or another.

Mineral Deposits

“There are certain § mineral
Geposits like bauxite and recently
the policy has been to try and
industrialise the area in’ some
measure. However 'much we may
try to industrialise, it is very
difficult.

Agriculture is the basis of cur
economy in this area.

We are forced to buy staple
goods and other commodities from
places which produce them at
higher costs.

To pay for these commodities,
we have to rely on the prices of
our agricultural products.

Sugar, said Mr, Sangster, was
the only industry that stood the
test of time in the West Indies.
For 300 years it was the mainstay
of our praduction and economic
life. It was a crop to which they
had looked forward to all those
years. “

“In the middle of the last
century, preferences were with-
drawn and the sugar industry
went up and down and here at
this particular time, we are no
better and have no guarantee.
We are asking for long term con-
tracts and guaranteed markets for
our goods.

“Why do we feel that you are
protecting us? We are in tne
Commonwealth area and we are
in the sterling area. We have
given you trade, we have helped
with the dollar restrictions and
have suffered greatly. We have
lost our Canadian contacts and
we have also lost our contacts
with America. We have suffered
not only from the dollar restric-
tions but at the hands of devalua-
tion.

“We are told that devaluation
should not do us a great deal of
harm, but we find things are going
up and the cost of living in the
West Indies is getting to the stage
where it cannot be checked.

The cost of commodities is going
up and we are forced to buy from
the sterling sources and at times
those commodities are not even
the best.

Turn Where ?

“We in the colonies have got
to turn to the United Kingdom ii
we want help, we cannot turn to
America, Cuba or Australia and
what is the Mother Country doing
to help us? She is now nego
ating a pact with Cuba. It must
be remembered that if England’
takes sugar from Cuba, it would
mean that the West Indies will
suffer,

“We feel that you are not happy
about this Cuban Pact or that it
will bring you trade. You have
not told us the details.

“When visitors come to the
West Indies and see people living
in shacks they will want to know
why they were living in such pov-
erty. But could we provide work
for such people when the one
thing we produce—sugar and our
agricultural products, you refuse
to give us a market and go and
buy from people outside the ster-
ling area. ,

“You have heard in Jamaica a
lot about tobacco. We have built
us a sugar trade in the U.K. In
1947, 26,000,000 cigars cost £9,600.
But what did you do to our to-
bacco trade? In 1940 the duty
was 18/-, the preference 3/10%.
In 1948 it was 67/9, the preference
had dropped to 2/11% and our
trade had dropped from 26,000,000
to 11,000,000, worth only £500,000
to employ 6,000 people.

Higher Duties

“If we have to pay higher duties
to help you to maintain your social
services which we will never have,
why turn and take $3,000 worth
of Cuban cigars and put 6,000
people out of work in Jamaica?

“We have been colonies of the
British Empire for 300 years, but
you are losing and destroying the
goodwill of the territories. ‘We
cannot protect the wolf at the door
and the one at the window too’,

“Canada is our natural friend.
We cannot really look to the US.
We are losing our opportunity and
our shipping and our pleas for
these have gone unheard, Are we
to give up this Canadian contact
entirely? Maybe in the future
we will have to turn to them and
go hat in hand and ask them for
help. '

“We cannot agree that we will
ever be happy to see you sacrifice
us at this present time in relation
to sugar and tobacco. We want





you to be very clear on that point

“When the news came out in
the West Indies about the U.K.-
Cuban Pact, I don’t suppose there
was any one who could read, who
was not shocked or silenced at
what had happened or was about
to happen.

“I must say to you that if you
are going to ruin the economy of
the West Indies, you will have to
bear with more millions coming
into the area.

“We say to you,” said Mr. Sang-
ster, “scrap the Cuban pact, have
nothing whatever to do with it no
matter how you fee! you may look
in international eyes. Your chil-
dren are entitled to have protec-
tion and we must get it. e must
ask you to negotiate long-tefm
contracts,

“For too long we have been used
as pawns in the _ international
game of chess. We wish promo-
tion. If this promotion is given we
will help to maintain the position
and the prestige of the Common-

wealth in this ever-changing
world.” ;
Hon. H. D. Shillingford said

years ago in the early thirties, the
British Government ‘realised the
necessity of diversification of trop-
ical products and sent Mr. Clarke
Powell who advocated the planting
of citrus throughout the areas
where it could be possibly grown.
Dominica, Trinidad, Jamaica
‘and British Honduras planted on
a large scale. Citrus, unlike canes,
‘took 6 to 8 years te get into bear-
ing and when the crops were in
Palestine, competition debarred
them from the U.K. market.

(Citrus Rot

With the advent of the war,
shipping was unobtainable and a
part of their citrus was allowed to
rot.

Mr. Shillingford said that the
entry of the C.D.C. in Dominica
with its packing shed and large-
scale planting of citrus, gave them
a reasonable hope of its future,
but that hope had» been shattered
by the happenings of the General
Agreement Trade and Tariff Con-
ference where America subsidised
her citrus exports, heavily.

They in Dominica, had no boats
to the U.K. and depended on for-
‘eign shipping. They shipped in
1950 over $160,000 worth of citrus
and that was only a small propor-
tion of their crop. It was, indeed
deplorable to see the amount of
grape fruit and oranges rotting on
the ground,

It can be argued that with dollar
restrictions, the United Kingdom
market was still oper, but in fact,
Spanish and Palestine citrus, not
being able to compete.with the
U.S.A. in Europe, will certainly
divert their exports to the U.K.
and that left them in.a most un-
desirable situation,

U.S. Subsidy

“The American subsidy is so
high, amounting to $1.65 per crate,
that we have no chance whatever,
and in fact, a firm in Jamaica
which sold fruit juices at 14/- per
carton, has now been offered in
Europe 7/-, the price at which the
American product is being sold.

“It costs 9/- to produce a carton
and you will realise that the pro-
ducer will have to give his fruit
free and pay 2/- to sell in those
markets.

“The general dependence on
agriculture had been stressed by
the previous speakers and you
will realise how serious the situ-
ation is with our rising population
and rising costs of living.”

Mr. Bottomley replying, said
that the speeches to which he had
listened, would grace any assem-
bly. He had listened to a good
deal from the historical survey
made by Mr. Robinson and he had
heard from Mr. Gomes a contribu-
tion which he was sure Mr; Gomes
would forgive him if he said it
was one to which he was accus-
tomed, being like him, a fellow
parliamentarian,

Mr. Sangster, he said, had made
a most witty contribution and he
should have liked to have heard
more from him and was sure that
he would hear more in future. Mr.
‘Shillingford had given substantial
comments about the citrus industry
and he hoped he would take it
from him that he was aware of a
‘large part of the comments he had
made, and that that had fortified
him when he had made representa-
tions about the importation of
citrus fruits into Great Britain.

“Of the speakers, particularly,
Mr, Gomes talked about the value
of this conference,” he said. “You
know where I stand. My opening
comments yesterday wereon the
value of this Conference and I am

glad to find that they are generally
accepted,
W.L Well-Being

“It is by this means that the
greatest contribution would be
made to the well-being of the Wes
Indies. The West Indies need no
Jonger talk about being children.
That stage is passing fast as this
contribution has already showed.

“IT want to talk to you as fellow
colleagues. In this endeavour io
promote the best for the West In-
dies in particular, and also for the
whole sterling area. I am quite
content to feel that I can play a
small part myself, because it was
my fortune early in the run
of first labour Government in
the UX: to get a trip to the Far
East. I knew before the war many
colleagues in“India as it was then.
Most of the Jeading Indian pol-
iticians of to-day, most of them in
Pakistan. and most of them in
Burma are my personal friends,
If you ever came inte contact with
them, you would find that they
have a kindred spirit in tne ap-
proach to these common problems
and are trying to lift up the stand-
ards of these poor distressed col-
leagues -in different parts of the
Commonwealth, '

“It is in the sense that I: stress
the importance of the sterling area
as a whole because we would let
down those people if we fail to
keep up their standard of eco-
nomic sufficiency by which alone
we can live, * :

U.K. Economy

“Talking in a narrow way, if
the U.K. economy cannot afford
to buy your sugar, you know what
the result would be. Several
points have been raised and it is
perhaps in this connection that I
may refer to Canada.

“In the case of the Canadian

Government, they had made a
Government statement which sets
out their views clearly. It would
be a good thing if you read it
carefully.
. “As far as Canadian sugar’ sales
are concerned, they had to buy
for each ten of sugar sent from
here to Canada an equal amount
of dollar sugar and I have it on
nuthority from the Ministry of
Food that far from making a
profit, there is indeed a loss and
I am also told that if it should
happen, all difference of prefer-
ence goods between Canada and
the U.K. would eventually show a
profit.

“An undertaking was given that
the profit would be shared with
the producers in the West Indies.

“It would be misleading” Mr.
{Bottomley said, to get the im-
pression that we are making a
profit as a result of this legitimate
trade transaction.

Review Needed

“When you come to 1953 it may
be seen that things have changed
and that we have to review the
Commonwealth Agreement. At
the moment, the Government in
the U.K. strongly takes the view
that it is desirable that we should
‘try and work towards: that end.

“There are many other points
on which I could dilate at great
length but they were covered in
yesterday’s statement. I havea
reason to believe that much of that
is going to appear in the Press.

“I want specifically to deal with
the Cuban Pact. I can say that
we did not particularly want pacts
with countries. Weare not court-
ing countries just for the sake of
having a pact or getting something
out of it. We hope that whenever
‘talks are made between one
country or another, they would be
mutually advantageous.

“What is the position with the
Cuban Pact? I tried to explain
the circumstances yesterday. In
the case of this pact most of the
details were known two months
ago and the only reason I have
come here is for the purpose of
explaining them further and for
the purpose of listening and get-
ting greater information so that
I can go back and tell my
colleagues in the Government
your feelings before any agree-
ment is signed.

“We are hoping that the pact
will be mutually advantageous,
but I want to assure you that it
would not be disadvantageous to
the West Indies,



Used Indecent Language

A City Magistrate ordered
Livingston Blunt of Alleyne’s
Land, Bush Hall, to pay a fine of
30/- for using indecent language
on Eagle Hall Road, St. Michael
on May 19.

for your complete furnishing

BROCADED COTTON TAPESTRY in Blue, Green, Rose, and

Brown 49” wide. Per yard ...



$2.59

JASPE FURNISHING FABRIC in Blue, Brown and Tan

48” wide. Per yard

RAYON FURNISHING FABRIC. A really beautiful flowered stripe against a fawn
background. In Plum, Green, Blue and Tan-47” wide. Per yard

FLOWERED CRETONS: 36

Per yard

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, &



inches wide
$1.60



13, BROAD STREET







$1.42

BARBADOS

Bodily Harm
Costs 15/-

JUSTICES G. L
J Ww B Chenery yesterday
imposed a fine of 15/- to be paid
in seven days or in default seven
days’ imprisonment on lanthe
Rock for inflicting bodily harm on
Delcina Gittens of Kensington
New Road, St Michael, in the
Assistant Court of Appeal

By doing this, Their Honours
reversed the decision of His Wor-
ship Mr. C. L. Walwyn who dis-
missed the case without prejudice.
They however confirmed another
decision of Mr. Walwyn who dis-
missed a case against FitzGerald
McLean for inflicting bodily harm
against Delcina Gittens.

Taylor and

Gittens giving evidence yester-
day, said that on April 2 she was
passing by the house of the two
defendants, Janthe Rock and
FitzGerald McLean which is situ-
ated at Kensington New Road
Before she could pass the house,
;-both of them rushed out on her
and beat her.



Three Months
For Larceny

_ Sentence of three months’
imprisonment with hard labour
was yesterday passed on Percival
Straker of King William Street,
St. Michael, by a City Police
Magistrate who found him guilty
on a charge of larceny yesterday,

Straker stole a carton of «
ettes belonging to Evans Pil
on May 20,




rim
He was seen taking

these cigarettes out of a car in
which Pilgrim had put them.
Straker ran and later Police

Constable Jones arrested him on
Wellington Street

Seibert Waldron told the court
that Straker has three previous
convictions for larceny and on
the last conviction he was sen-
tenced to two months’ imprison-
ment with hard labour’ for
Stealing $5 belonging to Henry
Hill.



30/- For Assault

Prince Walcott, a laboure:

Rock Hall, St George, was
ordered by a District “A”’ Police
Magistrate to pay a fine of 30/-
for assaulting Police Constable
Pile on May 19.
_ Another fine of 10/- was
imposed on him for making a
disturbance on Marhill Street, St.
Michael.

of



Tamarind Cargo

Harrison Liner Speciatist is in
port loading 2,375 tons of dark
crystal and 500 tons of wet sugar
for Liverpool.

She is also taking a supply of
tamarinds and 26 bales of cotton.

The Specialist arrived here on



Thursday. She is consigned to

Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd,
CROWD ATTEND
‘BAND’ CONCERT

A large crowd attended the

Police Band Concert at the

Esplanade on Sunday evening

The Concert started at 4.45 p.m.
Those who arrived early were
able to occupy the few seats, but

the majority had to stand
throughout the evening.
The main item on the pro

gramme was the Introduction’ of
Act III and Bridal Chorus from
“Lohengrin”. This magnificient
piece of music is meant to sug-
gest the general atmosphere of
festivity and rejoicing that
follows the marriage of Lohengrin
and Elsa.

Other items on the programme
were the cornet solo of “Roses of
Picardy” and the Hymns, “I Vow
to Thee My Country” and “Lead
Kindly Light”,



“Mary Lewis”
Arrives

Schooner Mary M. Lewis ar-
rived here from British Guiana
over the week end with 1,300 bags
of rice. She also brought supplies
of firewood and charcoal,

The Mary Lewis is consigned to
Messrs. Schooner Owners’ Asso-

|











ADVOCATI



Mandeville Congratulated

On Appointment As
Bishop Of Barbados

DEAN G. L. G. MANDEVILLE. Bishop-Elect Chairman of

the St. Michael Vestry, was

congratulated on being elected

Bishop of Barbados when a meeting of the St. Michae:
Vestry was held yesterday afternoon.

Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C., on behalf of members of the
Vestry, offered Bishop Mandeville sincere congratulations.

He said that at Harrisun Col-
lege the Dean and himself were
in the same form. He had watched
with interest the Dean's suc-
cessful career in the ministry and
it is very gratifying to know that

he hrs been made Bishop of
Barbados, “an office in which I
know he will serve with dignity

and honour.”
He said that Barbadians were
very proud to know that the Dean



has been appointed to that high
office.

Mr. E. D. Mottley, MCP, in
supporting Mr rale’s motion,
said that he realised that the
honour corried a great responsi-
bility and added: “I hope that
the Dean will be given the health
to carry out this duty and he

would be a shining example to
those who felt that a Barbadian
could not fill such an office,”

Mr, McD. Symmonds and
T. Miller also offered
gratulations,

The Dean’s Reply

Dean Mandeville, repiying, said
that he was greatly moved by
what the Vestry had seen fit to
Say concerning his election,

He was sorry that his connec-
tion with the Vestry was so snort
but in that short time he had been
enriched by the contacts which he
had made.

He felt it a great pleasure and

Mr,
their con-

honour to be Chairman of the
Vestry of St. Michael,

Following this Mr. C. Brath-
waite said that he hed just re-

ceived the sad news of the desta
of Mr. Robert Martin Jone;, a
late member of the Vestry

“Mr, Jones had not only given

his -best, but also encouraged
others to give their best. He was
a determinedly honest Vestry-

man,” he said.

On behalf of the othe» Ve try-
men who came into contact with
Mr. Jones, he said without doubt
that Mr. Jones was a gentleman
*“A more honest man has never
sat around this table”? Mr. Brath-
waite said.

He moved that members of the
Vestry stood for a few minutes
in silence in respect to the late
Mr. Jones and also that a letter
be sent to Mrs, Jones expressing
their sympathy.

Tribute To Vestrymen
Mr. Mottley, who secondeq Mr.

Brathwaite’s motion, said that
Mr. Jones was an_ outstanding
character but what was most

outstanding was that he: was re-
sponsible for the District Nursing
System in Barbados.

Under the Head *“Correspond-
ence”, where the Commissioners
of Health reported to the Vestry
in the matter of Mr. Jamas E.
Daniel, late employee of the High-
ways &. Transport. Department,
re; His service with the Commis-
sioners of Health and Highways
of St. Michael, Mr. Mottley said
that it was of no use dealing with
this matter as the Government
had already passed a Bill throtgh
the Legislature pensioning Mr.
Daniel and giving him a gratuiiy,

Mr. Mottley saig that while he
was not opposed “Yo this gentle-
man getting his pension and gra-
tuity, he felt that the Vestry was
treated very badly in the matter
because in a letter to them dated
February 3, the Government had
asked them to investigate the
claims of Daniel who stated that
he hed been employed by the St.
Michael Commissioners for a
period of 13 years.

This matter as members _ re-
ealled, was referred to the Com-
missioners of Health, who called
in Mr. Daniel and other persons
with whom he claimed he worked

Greater Respect

“As a result of the report which
is before us, I again say that I
would be the last person to stand
in anybody’s way of getting con-
sideration for their services, but

I feel that at least the Vestry
could have been treated with
greater respect as it is not even
quite three months which we
have been asked,” Mr. Mettley
said,

He therefore askeq the Vesiry
to appoint a Committee to take
up the matter with the Colonia!

Secretary in protest against the
discourteous treatment meted ou
to the Vestry.

This motion was unanimously
supported by the Vestry and th
Committee appointed to meet th

Colonial Secretery were: M)
McD. Symmonds, Churchwarden
Hon. V. C. Gale, M.LC., ane

FE, D. Mottley, M.C.P.
The report to the Commission-
ers is as follows: Daniel was em

ployed as an_ assistant rolle
driver from 1912 to 1919 by Rich-
ard Hutson, a roller driver o
Messrs. D. M. Simpson & Co
Ltd. at the rate of sixty cont
per week,

“From 1919 to 1925 Daniel wa
employed as roller driver at $6. 0(
per week by Messrs. D. M
Simpson & Co. Ltd. who heli
eontract with the Commissioner
of Highways of St. Michael,

Report Adopted

The Vestry considered anc
adopted the Committee’s Major-
ity Report for the payment o
retrospective pay for Parochia
employees. Payments are ex-
pected to begin from Friday.

After considering the item
relative to Mr. H. C. Griffith's
pension, on the motion of Mr,
E. D. Mottley the ‘Vestry decided
that steps be taken to have a bil!
introduced in the Legislature
authorising the Vestry to pay Mr.
H. C, Griffith a pension or (and)
a gratuity for the services render-
ed by him while in the employ of
the Commissioners of Health of
St. Michael,

This motion was seconded by
Mr &-mmonds who pointed ou
thet Mr, Griffith was morally
entitled to this.







100 Years
Ago

WEST INDIAN
May 22,

We had written a few re-
marks on Thursday, on the
manner in which the clean-
ing of the streets and the
removal of the filth is at pre-
sent effected, but want of
room excluded them, Since
then the, advertisement of
the Clerk of the Vestry has
appeared, and we find it
embraces one or two sugges-
tions we had intended to
throw out. By the mode at
present adopted, taxpayers
and others obtain little re-
lief. They are compelled to
sweep as formerly, and, in
numerous cases, themselves
to have the rubbish removed.
The fact is, the undertaking
is too much for a single in-
dividual, It will only be
done efficiently by dividing ©
the City into districts, and
granting contracts for such
districts. We are therefore
glad to find that the Vestry
have arrived at this conclu-
sion; and some experience
having been acquired, we
hope that the object will be
attained, and that the streets
will be efficienly cleaned.



Pier Under Repairs

A hole about 10 feet long
eight feet wide and eight fee
deep has been dug out at the enc
of the Pier Head, Water is abou
2 feet deep in the hole.

Stones and gravel that havi
been dug up are packed aroun
the hole as a barrier, There ji
little room left for pedestrians

The hole was started by th
ea which was undermining thi
part of the Pier Head. The su
face of the Pier Head was slighti
broken some weeks ago, Thi
led masons to find out that cuit
a bit of the concrete was washec
away by the sea,

Yesterday, five men wearing
trunks, were to their knees it
the water digging out loose grave
and stones, The Governmer
Dredger is helping to remove th
sand and gravel from the hole.

WAR

Our Customers and F

STARTENA,
COMPANY of St.

Layena.



aay WHISEY,
{gore

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WT cee





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Agents and Distributors

ASDOIALO BR MUIR UTD ~ Cis

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jiends are reminded that

GROWENA & LAYENA
are registered Brand Names of the RALSTON PURINA

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Always insist on getting genuine STARTENA, GROWENA
and LAYENA as we have received complaints that other
Poultry Feeds are being sold as Startena, Growena and

sumaneneumnapene
ott!



This sovereign Whisky possesses that distinction of flavour
which will claim your allegiance from the first sip.

HIGHLAND
QUEEN

SCOTCH WHISKY

Sole Importers :—

W.5, MONROE & CO. LTD., BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS



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PAGE FIVE









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The following items are reduced
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ELEPHANT DATES—12 oz, pkt,












\ eee aa fave, ile
|| ROBERTSONS SILVER SHRED MARMALADE—per bot, 39c.
\| BAHAMAS CRUSHED PINEAPPLE—per Tin ...... 24¢,
| COLUMBIAN PINEAPPLE SLICES per Tin ‘ 24c.,
SINGAPORE PINEAPPLE CUBES & SLICES—per Tin. . 45e
STHPHENS NAVY PICKLES—per Jap B4c.
SAVOY CHOCOLATE MALT—per ‘Tin ‘ 10¢.
RED, WHITE & BLUE BAKED BEANS~— per Tin 15¢,
AYLMERS PORK & BEANS—Large Tin.............. 25e.
EASTPACK, BEEF—per Tin ..)..................- 406.








STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO., LTD.






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REGAIN YOUR SMILE
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ei?
PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951





es


































i lal ad —_—
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON. ) (ose resect
These Bonds having been sold, this advertisement appears as a |
matter of record only.
: New Issue =
OVNI s\3
y ° i ® ° ia)
Alaska Pine & Cellulose Limited | “PAA
(Incorporated under the laws of Canada)
FIRST * MORTGAGE BONDS
$13,500,000 414% Sinking Fund Bonds, Series “A” er ee —
To be dated as of May Ist, 1951 To mature May Ist, 1952-4 and 196§ en ed
A sinking fund will be provided for the sinking fund bonds requiring a ice which have made PAA
payment on April Ist in each of the years 1952 to 1965 inclusive of an amount “first choice” of veteran
eyual to 15% of the consolidated net income of the Company and its sub- | travelers the world over.
sidiaries (after bond interest, depreciation, depletion and taxes and other-
wise as to be defined) for the immediately preceding fiscal year and an |



| NEW YORK

Via San Juan or by connecting air-
lines from Miami. Reduced 15-day,
round-trip Excursion Fares now in
effect from San Juan.

Effective April 18th, all flights
I land at New York Interna-
tional Airport in Idlewild
' instead of La Guardia Field.

~ — additional payment on April 1st in each of the years 1955 to 1965 inelusive
MICKEY MOUSE of the sum of $500,000.
se ~ Trustee : Montreal Trust Company

In the opinion of Counsel, these Bonds will be investments in which The

Canadian and British Insurance Companies Act (1932) as amended states

that companies registered under part HI thereof may, without availing

themselves for that purpose cf the provisions of subsection (4) of Section 6°
of the said Act, invest their funds,









EUROPE, SOUTH AMERICA,
AFRICA, MEXICO, the FAR
EAST—in fact, completely around
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in Canada. The acquisition by the Company of shares of Alaska Pine
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tions of the combined businesses which should result in substantial
advantages. Upon completion of present financing Abitibi Power & Paper
5 SHE SHOULD'VE Company, Limited will own 50% of the common shares of Alaska Pine &
OLS er j I SAID FELT, AND you = DAISY'S GETTING REMINDED YOU THAT C te ys ited . mT sot A - . }
wm! SY, RI oe eee ets = MORE ABSENT: MINDED (you THREW OUT YOUR ellulose Limited.
PSTAIRS A aT hd BROUGHI MY LEATHE EVERY DAY FELT SLIPPERS )
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ee A nt 7 ce aa dishiensialdilbintniiaia

" A. S. BRYDEN & SONS. Barbados Ltd.

Barbados Correspondent for
Royal Securities Corporation Limited.

. . MIAMI
The prospectus, a copy of which has been filed under the | Daily flights—non-stop service from
provisions of The Companies Act, 1934, will be forwarded i San Juan. Special 15-Day Round
promptly upon request. . \ Trip Excursion Fares now in effect.
Alaska Pine & Cellulose Limited was incorporated under the laws of Can- ipl ST. CROIX
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and is one of the most important manufacturers of prime quality dissolving || Frequent flights by swift Comvedee
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L egg ETO

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4 f a Va “J | ' yi mad tg’ ry
5 YOU MEAN I'M TO BE Jf YOURE EITHER MW TAKES LOT OF STRENGTH
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99

TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
FOR SALE

snnouncements in Carid Calling tne
Minimum charge weck 7? cents and







charge is $3.00 for any number of word:
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508











between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for ee ot re ares ee
vents G wer .
etices only after 4 p.m. Geet Sandee
DIED A MOTIVE
eon May 21st 1951, at her! .— UTO Pays
residence Bedford Lodge, St. Micha‘) ALMOST NEW 12 H.P. Bedf
Miriam Elridge, wife of H. N. Roach.| Guarantee if required. Extra Ssasontin
Her funeral leaves the above residence} Flooring. Licensed and Insured. Upset

at 4.45 p.m. to-day for the Westbury
Cemetery.
H. N. Roach, A. C. Roach, V. N.
Roach, P. K. Roach, Lucy Kellman.

Price $1,850. New one Cost $2,125 pre-
sently. Apply Courtesy Garage.
22.5.51.—1n.













22.5.51—in. EXCEPTIONAL CAR—3% M>.G. 1949

Fiat 15. Very good condition Phone

THANKS 23950 +2.5.51—3n
OTOR CYCLE — One Velocette

KING—We the undersigned beg through
this médium to thank all those who
sent wreaths and letters or otherwise
sympathised with us in our recent

Motor Cycle 1% H.P. almost new,
Apply to L. M. Clarke, Jeweller, No.
12, James St. Phone 3757,
22.5.51—2n









bereavement occasioned through the
death of our dear mother Whillemina
King, ELECTRICAL
John, Gladys, Sydney, Mavis (children). aarvecipibatstintie
20.5.51—In. REFRIGERATOR—One U.S. 7 cubic
foot Frigidaire Refrigerator. Apply:

Harold Weatherhead c/o Weatherhead's
Drug Store. Phone 2164—3144.

IN ' MEMORIAM











oraeeesaneeassess usecase stint











17.5.51—t.i.n
ne a REFRIGERATOR—English Electric 6%
GREENIDGE—In loving memory of our} ©%- ft. New in January. 4% years
dear beloved husband and father} 2U#rantee. As new. Price $450, owner
Fitz Gardiner Greenidge who deparittd wate island. DERRICK PARAISO.
this life on 19th May 1950. AREES HILL. 19.5.51—3n.
“Happy and smiling always content Tee
Gone but not forgotten, POULTRY
With Jesus he may sleep, but not
forever.” CHICKS—Parks Pure Breed ‘Barred

Ever remembered by—
Marie Greenidge (wife), Lionel, Randolph,
Darnell (children). 22.5.51—1In.

Rock chicks 7 and 8 weeks old. Apply
to A. Forde opposite pipe, Sobers Lane.
City 22.5.51—1n.
DUCKS — Khaki Campbell. Dial £309.
§1--3n,

MOORE—In loving memory of Louise
Moore, who died on the 22nd and also
Jacob Nathaniel Moore who died on













22nd May, 1924. 4 POULTRY — Imported white Leghorn

We miss them, oh, we miss them Cockrels, eight weeks old, $2.50. Apply

Its only those who've lost can tell.’ | Miss F, Cameron, Sunbury, St. Philip.

Mrs. Mary Reefer, Mrs. Maude Branker, 20.5.51—2n.

Millicent Crichlow, (daughters), Harcourt -
Moore (son). 22.5.51—1In. LIVESTOCK



PROPS OSSOO OOP POSS POSSE

BUILDINGS FOR SALE



ONE HOLSTEIN COW—giving 36 pts.
milk, 3rd calf. See C. A, Edghill, Well
House, St.Philip. 22.5.51--In

MECHANICAL

GRASS CUTTERS — Massey-Harris 5
and 6 ft, immediate deliveries. Enquiries
Solicited Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616

22.5.51—6n

MISCELLANEOUS

CIGARETTES — Ardath Cork tipped
Cigarettes. Buy now before the ad-
vanced price comes into effect. We still
have a small stock at the reduced price



|

}

OFFERS ARE INVITED
FOR

ALL OR ANY
OF















S —namely 10's. 16c. and 20's 32c.
THE VALUABLE “eee 15.8.01-20,
FREEHOLD BUILDINGS) jor. yoursmis! . VANIL.

OCCUPYING
THE WHOLE OF ONE SIDE
G ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56;

: 10 ft $8.40, Nett cash, Better hurry!

THE MARKET SQUARE |* BARNES & CO. UTD. os ten,
IN LODGE SCHOOL BLAZER—Fit boy
8 to 10 years. $12.00. Wordnet
ST. GEORGE, GRENADA.
FOR DETAILS Apply to:-
P.O. Box 6, St. George,
GRENADA.

view of the islond wide Wag?
the above represents a splen-
to any “GO-AHEAD }

OUT! BARBA MFG. Co., 69 ROEBUCK
STREET. Dial 2297. IT'S LATER THAN
YOU THINK! 19.5.51—4n

GALVANISED SHEETS—Best qualite
new sheets. Cheapest



in the Istand !





—- SRD
PRIMUS—Lantern Parts, from needls
to tops. Primus Stove parts, Primus
Round giant stoves, boils 5 gallons in
20 minutes. Send your Primus troubles
to us, we will remedy them, Chandlers
Hardware and Bicycle accessories,

and Tudor Streets. Phone 4024
22.5.51-—-2n



en SD
WHITE TILES—6’’ White Tiles. Enquire
at the Auto Tyre Co. Trafalgar St. Phone
y 22.5,51—t.f.n

In
Increase,
cid opportunity
businessman.






“
ey.
s

eee abe

OS

Cured By Doing
What He Shouldn't

For 25 years John Parr spent
a “small fortune” trying to cure

University College of

tac his duodenal ulcer, Nearly

$ The West Indies 600,000 people suffer from : (
kind 4 lai i England

3 EXTRA-MURAL DEPART- ind of complaint in nglanc h

and Wales every year,



Reed | £iving credit

this}beef, mutton, lamb,





















a
} aH
j , >a
FOR RENT | PUBLIC NOTICES | PUHRLIC SALES WANTED OFFICIAL NOTICE
| | f€n cents per agate line on week-days | BARBADOS. a
Minimum charge week 72 cents «and | nd 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, Ten cents per agate tine on week-aays Minimum chorge week 72 cents and | IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY
i cents Sundays 24 words — over 24| minimum charge $1.50 on week-days 7d 12 cente per ugate line on Sundays,| % cents Sundoys 24 words over 24} IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, | do hereby give notice ‘to all ;
words 83 cents a word week—4 cente o| 2nd $1.80 on Sundays. | mimamum cnarge $1.50 on week-days| rds 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a| Persons having or claiming any estate, right interest or any lien or incumbrance —
| word Sundays. and $1.80 on . word Sundays in sffecting the property hereinafter itioned (the property of the defendants) >_ 7
' before me an account of their ws with their witnesses, documents ye tlw
. a vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours + ae
HOUSES ae NOTICK bis AUC’%1ION HELP 112 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Publie Butldmas +
pa pe onthene for one or more vacant St. — mes ae oe ae wssin weiner | Bridgetown before the 7th dav of July, 1951 in order that such claims may
BRRACHAN Opposite Roumanika, the ael’s Vestry Exhibition tenable at HILLMAN MINX 1949 MODEL. CAPABLE TEACHER of Portuguese. | ported on and ranked accoraing to the nature and priority thereof respectively,
Dayrells Road. Apply to present tenant ¢ Combermere School, will be received We are instructed by the owner who] Apply: Bell, Phone 4014 * otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be
22 5 51—6n by the Clerk of the Vestry up to/12/| has left the Colony to auction this very 22.5.51- deprived of ali clairss on or against the said property. :
atin Se eclock noon on Thursday 22nd day of | fine moter car which has only done 9,00) ——-: ——————- —-——— — Plaintiff; HERBERT HUTCHINSON BAYLEY, trustee of the will of George ||
BUNGALOW + Swansea, Worthing, | M4, 1951. | miles and to the best of our knowledge} STENOTYPIST (Beginner or qualif 3 varren, deceased 7 thi
fully furnished 4 bedrooms, Fridge Candidates must be sons of parishion- | has never been damaged in an accid ot] Weuled immediately. Apply in person Defendants AVINIA LEWIS; FANNY LEWIS: GLADYS LEWIS, MARS ni)
Phone, Radio, Garage. Fr 15th June. | 4 i straitened circumstances and must | Sale at Cole's Garage on Frid 2 and by letter to J. A, Mareon & Son GARET CADOGAN; BEATRICE LEWIS and CLARA LEWIS. 1
Dial 2490 or 3578 s 4 a not be less than ten years and four|May at2pm 7 ae tt ee, 19.8,81—t.f.n.| PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain parcel of land (formerly part of Goodiine® giamt) Yi
2 7 7.5.51—3n months nor ‘mare. than Sates oe he ne he JOHN M. BLADON Ds ei Sas ation) situate in the parish of Saint Michael and Island shovewia i
. oe mo | h F n 3 Q : ’ SA a ream containing by admeasurement Two acres three roods ten and 7a
FLAT: Beaumont, Hastings, unfur-| 4 om the Ist day of January 1951, to Auctioneer AL 1AN—A young and cnergeti perches or thereabouts abutting on lands of Ak ch i
nished. Dining and Sitting rooms, 2|%€ Proved by a Baptismal Certificate, 22.5.51—4n | Plesman for a commission — bupiness the Westbury Cemetery on lands of a place called, Frolic. end att Wy =
bedrooms, running water, Kitchen witn’ Wich must accompany the application. —_——--— —._..... | Apply by letter to P.O. Box 52 private roadway or however else the same is abutting, i.
gas, usual conveniences. No pets or Parents and/or Guardians will be noti- REAL ESTATE 0.20808: | BD Se Sith elerany.: 100 ; 2
children. Dial 2636. 22.5.51—2n fot the time and place of the Exam- ee nnn — Dated 2nd May, 1951.
ation. WILLIAMS,
“FONTAMARA” — On the Maxwell|, Forms of application can be obtained | . 2 WOODEN BUILDING — 21 it. MISCELLANEOUS Resutrerincipinlery
Coast, fully furnished—ineluding Fridge | f°™ the Vestry Clerk's Office. ft. 88 ft. in good order. H. C. Man SPAN SES é 4.5.51—4n
bk Palaghone for the months of June, By Order, ning, Newlands. Two Mile Hill, st |, SPANISH CLASSES—If you are in $$ letterncons E
October, ‘No’ Te ‘aaa ‘iaaaaeer E. C. REDMAN, Michael. 22.5,51—3n,. terested in learning Spanish, rapid and il
Apply at Browne Co. 43 Swan Street Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry ia — j correct, telephone 4716 19.5.8 ’ =
telephone 2257. : 22.5 ee, $.5.51—7n By public competition at our office | ~~ Rien ineimse eins memati —— y S&S ‘ oR
_ 32.5. Sao eI James Street on Friday 25th May 1951, I OsT «& FOUN >» ;
MODERN FURNISHED BUNGALOW ai | TRE AGRICULTURAL Alps ACTS, 1950. {t 2 Pam. 1 rood 14 perches of land at Sei, |
Haggatt Hall 2% miles from town. Hot | T° the creditors holding specialty liens | Pte Carlton, St. James. the propery } 4
ele. and. all modern conveniences et ore Plantation, St. Lucy. pecans Sane of the late William Jordan, LO
Ring 2 ‘or particulars. OTICE that we the f | :
SER os sigan tthe above ‘named phunation, sxe about | For further particulars and conditions|” RUNNING SHOES—At Kensington, one wy
i | to obtain a loan of £2,500 under tne | of sale, apply to pair running shoes, perhaps taken awa nie
HOUSE to rent furnished. 6 to 7/| Provisions of the above Act, against the HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD in error after Sports. Return to Advocate | '
months from June 10th. Top Rock | Sugar, Molasses and other crops of the 16.5.51—5n } Advertising Department 22,5.51—1n | ’
Excellent nztw. Modern | conveniences said plantation to be reaped. in 1931-88. | GAR REA Ee A Oe id ARN Se Ee a mt {
neludi 5 Y oT. . y u +—9 125 . a a itts y . - 5 mi ai
cement Ne asset | Mae sa nas Mee” SOTO) linge Be Font yo aiefor tat: x" Hay Baio tounge we | |
51—2 Dated this 19th day o i 7 - Finde t to Egbert Johnson, H.Jasor
20.5.51-2n | .PRTRUDE ELIZABETH THOMPSON Apply to L. M. Clarke, Jeweller, No Jones & Con eet en in '
ees TO SUBLET : BOYCE, 12 James St Phone 3757. 22.5.51—2n. ; — . * - ;
“TO! “—Cattlewash for month of an | g ‘ cz |
July” Apply: Gittens—4484 { JAMES F. W. BOYCE, | ERNEST DALE, Passage Road standing | cost our angling club £200, 5! j
19.5.51—3 ‘Gunere om 22 perches of land. Dwelling house > itt
-51—3n. 19.5 51—3n comprises open verandah, Drawing ana We gave them two days to settle ‘ iy
5 | Dining rooms two bedrooms, kitehen,| down. Then every evening since id

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, ean Waldron
(nee Suttle) as I do not hold myself re-
sponsible for her or anyone else con-
tracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

BERTIE WALDRON,
Bourn Land,
Christ Church
22.5.51—2n







The pubiic are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife RUBY HAYNES
(nee CALLENDAR) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting any debt or debts in
my name unless by a _ written order
signed by me.
CONRAD HAYNES,
Maxwell Hill,
Christ Chireh
1



2n

The public are heceby warned against
giving credit to my wife VIOLET
STUART inee GRIFFITH) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me

EDWARD STUART,
Westbury Road,
St. Michael,
22.5. 51—2n
a

The public are hereby warned against

giving credit to my wife CLARICE

VANILLA | GREEN (nee GRAHAM) as I do not hold

A] myself responsible for her or anyone else
}pint, or 6 cents an ounce, SELLING | contracting any debt or debts in. my

name unless by a written order signed
by me.
AUSTIN GREEN,
Jerico, near Jordans,
St. George.
22.5.51—2n
—_.
The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, GLENDEEN
GOODING (nee Walcott) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
ane else contracting amy debt or debts |
In my name unless by a written order
signed by me.
Bigned STANLEY GOODING,
Content Cot, St. Philip
22.5.51—2n.
The public are hereby warned against
to my wife, ESTELLE
LOUISE MURRELL (nee Mills) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else contracting any debt or
debts in my name unless by a written
order signed by me.
Signed FRANCIS MURRELL,
Fitz Village, St. James.
22.5.5







batter,

He could enjoy again lobsters,
erab and oysters. But he had to
avoid fatty fish like salmon,
herring, mackerel, and kippers.

But No Stems

OF meat HE COULD HAVE
veal, pork
but not the crackling),
am, and smoked meats.

~ \ ,

g art Than he went to a cocktail} But HE COULD NOT cat
x Residential party, where he heard about Dr |Stews, oxtails, curries, tripe
% J. Jacques Spira, who cured 95{Sausages, puddings, and pies, He

SUMMER SCHOOL, 1951

WEST INDIAN HISTORY
and ECONOMICS

Friday evening July 20 —
Sat. afternoon July 28
at
CODRINGTON COLLEGE

per cent of his patients
methods directly opposite to
recognised ulcer treatment.

Dr. Spira cured Parr in
weeks, permanently,

Strict Diet

John Parr found that normal

treatment consisted mainly of

five

pby}had to stick to grilled or roast
the}meats, but miss anything boiled,

fried, braised or minced,
Poultry, he found, should
be roasted, not boiled.

He could eat all root vegeta—
bles except onions, leeks and
radishes, Potatoes should. be
boiled or baked in their jackets.

rest and a strict diet. : Euer were banned
lusi e: $15, When you have an ulcer your t reall Se : ‘

Inclusive Fee: $ stomach functiong®. too. quickly He i wee allowed. to sigs
Apply to Resident Tutor, and doctors say the best way to meee: ately, particularly — alter
Sandy Hook, Maxwell Coast, slow it down is to feed it with fats, | C2’. kK? “Der Soir ie lite
Christ Church. Tel: 8526. But that is “only the initial ir teas io ree Mae e
i to answer,” says Dr, Spira. He S- s = a
ac eeeeet enaenaae argues this way. It is generally opdarnte rd & — in
S tion is limited. Programme believed that too much acid}@lute form should do any harm.

6 ; causes ulcers. But acid cannot Rich Man’s Fat

on application.

Opening Address by H.E.
the GOVERNOR, July 20,
8 p.m.

do it alone.

Spira points to bile as the
villain, It starts the trouble
and keeps it going with the
help of acid. Eliminate the
bile and you break up the
deadly combination.

Fat stimulates the flow of bil

Lecturers:

E. W. Barrow, B.Sc. Econ.
Judge J. W. B. Chenery, B.A.

$
%
%
|
y
:
%

A. E. Douglas-Smith, M.A. into the stomach, “The answer
A, deK, Tumere abt to the problem,” says Spira, “is
7 probably to eat less fat.”
Dr. Bruce Hamilton But he warns: “It is physically
% Prof. J. H. Parry, M.B.E., impossible to live normally on a
Bereta diet entirely free of fats. What
x mt a ° ea cM.G., I prescribe is a low-fat diet.”
s, -D., M.se.
$ The Rev, C, Sayer, B.A, x Lots of Cream
x raw 5 é For years John Parr had
& K._H. Straw, B.A. (Hons. R y 7 ro
ss Econ.) % | been doing the opposite.
% Judge H. A. Vaughan X| knew that a strict ulcer 4
& ete. %| ment consisted of living on milk
> ¥
hoe Pp root, farola, junket, custard,



allowed a ‘“coddled egs”
some thin bread and butter, He
had lots of cream and olive oil.

He had to avoid such things as
fried fish, pork, high game, meat
soup, cheese, curries and new
bread. He was told to have no
meat for six months,

One of his first diets conkisted
largely of milk, orange juice,
toa rusks and in inordinate
amount of steamed ssh.” He had
to eat or drink something every
two hours. a

His two “arch-enemies
alcohol and tobacco,

With Dr. Spira’s treatment
he found that milk was “for-
bidden except in the smallest
quantity for tea and coffee.
He had to by-pass all

REAL ESTATE
JOHN

4.
BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
Representative :
GERALD WOOD









were

|
| foods
FOR SALE

BRANDONS, St. Michael. A
mellow old stone property on the
coast with good boat anchorage
about 1 mile from town, with 3%
acres of enclosed grounds, the
major part planted with produc-
tive coconut and fruit trees.
There are 3 reception, 4 bedrooms,
galleries, 2 garages ete. Suitable
either for continued use as a priv-
ate residence, a club or boarding
house.



Calling .

ALL LADIES !!
NEWS FLASH
A smali shipment of .

EMBD. ANGLAISE

is just unpacked

REAL ESTATE AGENT

at

THANI'S

Prince Wm, Henry St.

AUCTIONEER |

PLANTATIONS BUTLDING |
’Phone 4640 |





rich in fats. He could have aj cooking f¢
wide choice of fish, grilled, boiled } 100 per cen
or even fried if he removed the;

The whole story is told in
“How 1 Cured My_ Duodenal





Kidneys, Newsprint Supply

BARBADOS ADVOCATE







THE SUGAR INDUST?. AGRICUL- |

TURAL BANK “CT, 1948
To the Creditors holiing spocialty lens
against LITTLE SPA _ Plantation,
St, Joseph.

TAKE NOTICE that I, the owner of
the above Plantation am about to obtain
loan of £250 under the provisions of
the above Act against the said Plantation,
in respect of the Agricultural year 19§1
to 1962

No money has been borrowed
the Agricultural Ai Act, 1905,
above Act as the case may
respect of such year.

Dated this 22nd day of May, 1951.

L. E. SMITH,
Owner,
22.5.51—3n.

NOTICE

Applications for one vacant St. Joseph's
Vestry Exhibition tenable at the St.
Michael's Girls’ School, will be received
by the Clerk of the Vestry up to 3 o'clock
p m.on Tuesday 29th day of May 1951.
Candidates must be daughters of Parish-
ioners in straitened circumstances and
must have attained the age of & years,
and must be under 12 years by July 3ist
1951, to be proved by a Baptismal Cer-
tificate, which must accompany the
Application, all Candidates to be
examined must be at the School not later

under
or the
be) in







then 9.15 a.m, on Saturday, June 16th
1951. Forms of Application can_ be
obtained from the Vestry Clerk's Office
A T. KING,
Clerk, St. Joseph's Vestry.
16 .5.51-
NOTICE

Is hereby given that Windward Cricket
Club grounds will be open for practice





from Tuesday 28th May. 20.5.51—2n
NOTICE
IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is the in-

tention of the Vestry of the parish of
Christ Church to cause to be introduced
into the Legislature of this Island a Bill
authorising the said Vestry to borrow

|

of sale

|



a sum of money not exceeding $7,200.00
to be used by them (a) as to $6,564.00 in
repairing existing roads and paths in the
Christ Church Cemetery, and laying out
and making new roads and paths therein,
(b) as to $587.40 in effecting repairs to
the Mortuary Chapel in the said
Cemetery, and (c) as to $48.00 in clean-
ing a drainage well ir the said Cemeteryy
the said sum so raised to be repaid in
ten annual instalments of $720.00 each,
commencing in the year 1955, together
with interest at a rate not exceeding
5 per centum per annum on the prin=
cipal sum and the unpaid balances

thereof for the time being owing.

Dated the 2ist day of May 1951.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,

Solicitors for the Vestry of
Christ Church,

22.5.51—8n.

To Obtain Bigger



LONDON, May.

Raw materials which hitherto
have gone to waste are to be used
to meet Britain’s critical shortage
of newsprint,

W. J. Curtis—Willson, President
of the Newspaper Society, in
making this disclosure at the
annual meeting of the organiza
tion, said a new process had beer
developed for the production of
pulp for newsprint and other
kinds of paper. The new source
of supply would become availabl
this summer, He did not disclose
details.

“It will only be a trickle, but
behind the venture are tremen-
dously powerful concerns,” Mr
Curtis-Willson said, “And, if es 1
firmly believe, this trickle of puly
proves that we can make news
print from raw materials at pre

Ulcer” (Michael Joseph, 8s. 64.).) cent untapped, we shall have em-
Dr. Spira argues that feeding] ,arked upon a new era for our

habits cause ulcers. Civilisation
and a better standard of living
have resulted in

e|ticher foods.

A wealthy man eats more
fat than a poor man. He also
gets ulcers more often,

John Parr interested his family
doctor in Dr. Spira’s treatment
He tried it out on some of his
patients. At least one in three
refused to give up their glass of
milk,

Of the doctor said:

rest, his

He “There’s no doubt about it, They
treat—|are quite definitely better.”

ere } showing thelof
and semi-liquid foods like arrow-)amount of fat in some common( thirds

Here is a_ list

foods. The figures are for

thick soup, and vegetable puree |dehydrated foods because this is
Once or twice a day he wWaS/the pest way

and | tat-content: —

of showing their









Food of fat
BUTTER .
MARGARINE 98
CHEESE ..... 30-67
MILK ... 30
EGGS 0-63
BEEFSTEAK 49
LAMB CHOP 60
PORK CHOP ., 63
BACON 72-85
PILCHARD 0
SALMON 35
MACKEREL 26
HALIBUT 2
TROUT ‘ 10
COD and HADDOCK 2
WHITE BREAD .... 1.9
BROWN BREAD 2.6
OATMEAL 9
VEGETABLES 1-5
FRUITS 1-8
HONEY 0
SUGAR . 0
Salad-oils, lard, pastry shortevings,

and cod-liver oil are all
fat
—LES.







10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Telephone Cords in different

Coloured Plastics, Easy to

put on, Saves that annoying
Twisting and Knotting.

CABINET GLASS
Opened by
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

& HARDWARE



|
|
|
|



Percentage | pal guest of the

newspapers.”

He warned of

that the price
tinue to rise and at £60 a ton many
of the smaller newspapers would
pass out of existence. ‘
“That is what it means unless
we come to their rescue,” he
added.
Sources Of Supply
Referring to world sources of
supply, Mr, Curtis-Willson said
annual production of newsprint

came to about 9,000,000 tons. 'The |

United States with a population
some 160,000,000 took two-
, the other third was lef
the 2,500,000,000 in the rest of
world to share out,
Lord Woolton, Chairm
Conservative Party, and
the current restrictior
necessitated a drastic
size of the British Newspapers,
“J do not believe c
good thing for the public life of
this nation that there should be
this severe restriction on the
quantity of news now p
Lord Woolton declared.
“There are some of us, at any
rate, who a
control you.
have had a be

IMPORTANT
NOTICE

ee

Some of us think we
liyfull of controls.”

The Annual General Meet-
ing of the Barbados Cricket
Association will be held at
KENSINGTON OVAL (and
not at Queen’s Park) on
Friday, May 25th at 4.30
p.m,

Entrance by George Chal-
lenor Stand

W. F. HOYOS,
Hony. Secty





|























t to|

princi- | About
Society, deplored | play footbail.
tions which had |
cut iu the! first among the craziest sports.

re not very anxious te























toilet and bath,

The above will be offered for sale te
public competition on Friday 25th May
at 2 p.m. at the office of the under-
signed from whom conditions of Sale
and further particulars can be obtained

HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD.
17.5.51—-5n




























we have been trying to angle them
out with artificial flies.

We have stalked them from be-
hind, wading doubled up in the
water. We have slithered over wet
grass on our stomachs to reach

| the edge of the high banking with-

PENRITH situate at the corner of
llth Avenue and Belmont Road, St
Michael, standing on 11,240 square feet
of land. The house is built of stone and
contains drawing, dining, breakfast
rooms and kitchen downstairs, three
bedrooms, toilet and bath upstairs,
Usual modern

and servants rooms in yard,

Inspection every day (except Sundays)
between 4 and 6 p.m. or by appointment
Dial 2965.

The above at

will be set up for sale

Public Competition at our office in
Lucas Street, Bridgetown, on Friday, the
Ist June 1951, at 3 pom
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors
19.5.51—9n

ee
The undersigned will offer for sale ai
their Office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-

town, on Friday the 25th, day of May,| (he creatures hushed their squeak-

1951, at 2 p.m.

The dwellinghouse knows as “GRAND
VIEW" with the land thereto containing
3 Roods 4 3/5th. Perches or thereabouts,
situate at Bathsheba, Saint Joseph.

Inspection on application to
Caretaker, on the premises.

For further particulars and conditions
apply to
COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.
18.5.51.—e.0.d

the



The New
Toothache
°Tec
Hy

Chapman Pincher

N ingenious device for detect-

ing tooth decay long before

ft can do any visible damage has

been invented by a London scien-
tist.

A platinum wire, linked to a
10-volt battery and a_ current-
measuring instrument, is fastened
to each suspected tooth in vurt
during a dental check-up. Another
ire, touching the cheek, completes
the circuit,

If a tooth is absolutely sound
no current passes becuuse an intact
covering of enamel is a bad con-
ductor of electricity.

But if there is a minute crack
or groove in the enamel in which
decay germs could get a grip a
current surges through, and a tell-
tale pointer swings into action.

Dr. Paul Pineus, of the Middle-
sex Hospital Medical School, W. },
who invented the device, has
proved that it will detect decay-
filled cracks missed by the sharp-
est-eyed dentists or even by

X-rays.
Test Cocktail

AS IF to prove that any ordeal

is worth enduring in the in-
terests of science, 21 London med-
ical = students—three of them
women—have each drunk one and
a quarter pints of a nauseating
chemical cocktail before breakfast
for several days running.

Recipe for the cocktail, which
was devised by Dr. J. N. Hunt, of
Guy’s Hospital, S.E.1 :—

Dissolve powder made from
lemon pips in water, add a little
sugar, colour with a red dye made
from carbolic acid, and finish off



people eating}imported newsprint would con-| with a dash of caustic soda,

The experiments showed thai
the more food you eat at a sitting

Fishing must also be an easy

Eight days ago I helped to

it can be a;dump into Surrey’s sandy River

{

|

Wey 500 fat, foot-long trout. After
a pampered, well-fed life on a
trout farm they were in perfect

rinted,” condition for the frying pan. They

« 7 -——












conveniences, Garage] erect in one big tin bath! It’s crazy





|



out being seen. At least one of us
has slithered over the edge.

Yet nobody I know has yet}
caught a trout. And to think that
last week we had them all corns

|
a |

Coo For Coins

WHAT sort of noise does

guinea-pig make? T thought
they were restricted to a high-
pitched squeak until yesterday

visited a guinea-pig farm. where
thousands were running about the}
floor,

“Rattle your money,” the head
keeper said. I did so. Immediately

ing and started cooing softly like
a great flock of doves.

They did this every time I jin-
gled the coins, But the name
guinea-pig has nothing te do with

|
|
}
|
‘

this ready response, It is a cor-
ruption. of Guiana, their Seuio
American home,
Alchemy, 1951
THE wildest dream of the
medieval alchemists —- trans-|
muting quicksilver (currently

priced at 22s. 3d. per lb.) into gold
(priced at £150 per Jb.) has been
realised by British atom scientist
Dr. F, D. 8, Butement.

The process, which involves the

use of a giant atom-smashing
machine at the Harwell, Berks,
atom station, is, unfortunately

too expensive to swell
gold reserves.,—4L.E,S.

Britain's
Rates Of Exchange
CANADA

May 21, 1951,

621/10% pr. Cheques on

Bankers 601/10% pr
Demand
Drafts 59 95% pr
Sight
Drafts 59 8/10% pr
62 1/10% pr. Cable
60 610% pr. Curreney 58 6/10% p
Coupons 57 9/1058 pr
Silver 20% pr





The Sun God

azzliing Spectacular, Brillian

THE CARNIVAL BAND

Trinidad,

D

From



less time each ounce of it shee sa ;
oye ney the Sarnach— Riel may |Sway to the Rhythm of Trinidad’:
be the main reason why over- Leading Steel Band beaten by :
eating ruins the digestion, {cam of experts.
Crazy Favourite The 1951 Costume Champion
WHICH British sport has the |from the South will bring glam
most active adult enthusiasts’? jour straight from the Histor
Football? Cricket? Racing? Gol!’ |Bookgs when staging the Exect
| None of these, The mee ion of Essex, Straight from th
lanswer ig fishing. tomantic West come the Wik
Careful estimates by the Asso- fndians and the Ranchers, 7)
the |ciation of Fishing Teckle Makers | out of the Belfry Come the Bats
| put the number of British anglers ; :
an of the| between 2,000,000 and 3,000,000 _ CONFIDENTIAL
800,000 adults regularly| At 7.30 pm. on 7th. June,

Queen’s Park will be transformed
into a family land of Song and
Colour,

Don’t Miss it.

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened



















THANTS iv
COCKTAIL PARTY ? seid
“o make your drinks oe
softer and nicer
USE
DISTILLED WATER IN
FURNISH
Your friends will notice the
difference,
Get it at your GAS WORKS, i NOW AND SAVE!
Bay St.
* { NEW and Rtnewed Bedsteads,
- — — Beds, Springs, Lathes—-Wardrobes,
oF, Linen Presses, Chests-of-Drawers
»
% Vanities, Smaller Dressing
Tables, Washstands, Screen
EE noOoK % Frames
whi ma! R Dining, Kitchen, Sewing
% rg, itchen, Sewing and
eh kes % Fancy Tables, China, Kite and
“ GOD'S WAY OF eo Bedroom Cabinets, Sideboards $17
. Sewing Basket in
SALVATION $ Stand, $6.00
AL % Bookeas Bookracks
” » 2 ge Glass-cased 1 divided
PLAIN a Office Chairs, Mats 0
%,
>
Plexse write for one % %| Serine
Samuel Roberts, Gospel st 7
Book and Tract Service, % t Be S, WILSON
a 30, Central Avenue, Ban- %|
412 gor N. Ireland” %! SPRY STREET, DIAL 4069
t ¥ -
, | %6OCO10O7 CECE OOE_E a ——————EEE EES
,

”

PAGE SEVEN





































my Ne
out

Jf ' Check the new 5-ton







100 HORSE POWER s
£
:
MORRIS-COMMERCIAL
against everything you and your ‘a
drivers want in a truck! aang
% tt

This new, husky Morris-

Commereial definitely sets a

new and higher standard in
truck values, Designed for
the operator who demands
iong and arduous work from
his vehicles, Planned for driv-
ing comfort, too, an important
factor on a tong haul

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504

PING NOTICES

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED





















The M/V “CARIBBEE” will

(M.A.N.%Z,. LIN) my

ee oe accept Cargo and Passengers for
joni ARABIA ig scheduled to sail Dominica, Antigua, MontSeffat, %

om Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th Nevi. nd St. Kitt: Sail 4
May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane 16th tune i. # Sailing 18h. .
June, Sydney 23rd June, arriving at Trin- e “AC - v
idad ‘during the latter half of July, and The M/V CACIQUE DEL u

CARIBE will

accept Cargo and
Passengers for St. Lucia, St. Vin-
cent, Grenada and Aruba, Sailing

proceeding thereafter to Barbados
Liverpool

In addition to general cargo this vessel

and

has ample space for chilled and hard Tuesday 22nd, inst.
frozen cargo. The M/V “MONEKA” wiil a
Cargo accepted on through Bills of Lad- accept Cargo and Passengers for
ing for transhipment at Trinidad to Brit- Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, _ bi
ish Guiana, Leeward and Windward Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing *
istands, Friday 25th inst,
For further particulars apply

FURNESS, WITHY & CO., LTD,
Trinidad,
Bwi,

—_—_—-
B.W.1, SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION (Ineo
Consignee. Tele, No, 4047,

and
DA COSTA & CO.,, LTD.,
Bridgetown,





NEW YORK SERVICE

April Arrives Barbados 8th May
May ” 29th

“TRYA" sailed 27th
Steamer Sails 18th





NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

nd
1S. "ALCOA PATRIOT” Sailed 18th April Arrives Barbados 4th May SE
S, "ALCOA POLARIS” Sails 2nd May ” ” 18th a «
8S. “ALCOA ROAMER” Sails 16th May é ” Ist June s%





NT

CANADIAN’ SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship

“ALCOA PEGASUS"

Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives B’dos,




"3.8 April 27th April 30th May Ilth ~
Ss. ‘ALCOA PIONEER” May lith May 14th May %th 7
S. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE” May 25th May = 30th June 10th .

SORTHBOUND
8. “ALCOA PLANTER" due May 11th, sails for St,

John, & St, Lawrence”
River Ports,



*These vessels have limited passenger accommodation,



ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE

boners,

o ne
CISA IIIS 95%

OGG GGT ISG ROOST GTN COCO IE
PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominic for
sailing to Europe fortnightly. The usual ports of call are
Dublin, London, or Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual ~




reduction for chidren,




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are obtainable from

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Pier Head Lane.

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Sizes too numerous to mention.







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Ltd.—Broad Street
and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings

4
a

on ms

|
|








PAGE EIGHT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



JAMAICA TEAM BEAT COLTS XI

3—NIL

THE visiting Jamaica football team opened their tour

impressively when they defeated a Colts XI three—nil in
their first football fixture of their tour at Kensington Oval
yesterday afternoon,
3 A crowd well over three thousand witnessed the mateh
which was interesting and exciting from start to the finish.
The Jamaica team scored their first two goals in the first
half and the third came shortly after the second half had
begun.

SPORTS
WINDOW



The Jamaica goal scorers were
inside left Rebert 3erry, left
winger Keats Hall and the tall
well built right winger Alty
Sasso. All of these scored one
goal each to put Jamaica well on
top.







fiternoon Spartan meets The Jamaica goalkeeper Ronnie
Rovers at Kensington | Cooper thrilled the crowd with

livision football match + : ree ¢
DIVISION 3 his anticipation and style and
At the Garrison Notre D.me the Colts forwards found it hard
1 play inst Wanderers in 4 wo get past him. The two full
eget match. backs Huntley DaCosta and

BASKETBALL

FIRST DIVISION Dickie Bayliss played a_ brilliant





Harrison College v Harrison came and proved strong Oppon-
College Old Boys at ¥M.P.C. ents for the Colts forward line.
onal Dhatrose wwe.) ¥ 20-0. The Jamaica team took the

field first wearing roy eye

followed shortly -by the Solts

Com 1 XI wearing red jerseys and theit

compton Hits 147 goal-keeper Smith in a_ blue
ri . yullover.

For M.C.C, vs The game started with the

Ss tl Af icans Colts = rt wana ray © —

d Ss trom the southern en oO 1e

Ore HAee pitch, Jamaica took the kickoff

LONDON, May 21. and very soon their forwards

Denis Compton, England and were trying in the Colts area
Viiddlesex all-rounder, dominate About two minutes — after play
he cricket today at Lord’s whe) % McCollin at right wing for the
‘he Seuth Africans were 15 rurs Colts on receiving a long low
ehind the MCC with nine secon | pass from Drayton ran down
nnings wickets to fall at the en | unmarked with only Cooper to

beat but on reaching vee mais
-plying c Africans’ the area kicked the ball right
see Pines total ot 100 the MCC outside. The Jamaican custodian
yere all out soon -after tea for Cooper dashed across thinking the
271, At the close, the South Afri- ball was going goalwards
cans had made 66 for one wicket Shortly after the Jamaica right-
in their second innings. winger Alty Sasso centred nicely
across the Colts penalty area but
By scoring his fourth century iui] back Gibbons was there
in 6 innings, Compton bro:.ght his before the Jamaican centre
aggregate to 667 and materially lorward Minnett could reach the
increased his chances of scoring ball. The Colts got a free kick
1,000 runs in May, He batted three which Gibbons took and kicked
hours and a half for 147 which in- into the Jamaica area but
cluded one six and 17 fours, DaCosta and Bayliss were there
It was the 93rd century of his to clear. Y
career. The Colts made another attack
Compton showed form more like on Jamaica, and everyone thought
that of his vintage year in 1947 the first goal was going to be
when he set up a record aggregate netted against Jamaica when
of 3.816 runs, He appeared com- Williams at left wing ran gown
pletely untroubled by his knee .a- ind cut across with only the or
jury today. The thousand runs in Meeoes fo Bae a Rg as
May. has been accomplished by ?&# ; - ; ees
only three batsmen before. Three outside. White, centre forward
‘others have made a thousand be- 1° the Colts also = a try, but
fore June. Compton had yet to this also went outside ee a
achieve this notable feat. couple of inches from the cross
| —Reuter. bar, We Poa ibe Se
At this stage both teams were
pressing and Jamaica got their
tirst goal when Keats Hall on the
Yeft wing finding himsegi un-
‘ marked kicked a well directed
shot from the wing which com-
Derbyshire pletely beat Smith. The ball lodged
LONDON, May 21. itself in the left corner of the
County Cricket Results:—At goal,
Chesterficid, Yorkshire beat Der+ This goal was scored about 20
byshire by seven wickets. Derby- minutes after play had started.
shire 114, (Appleyard four for 31, With one goal up against !heim
Yardley four for 16) and 134 (Ap- Colts again went on the attack
pleyard four for 49), Yorkshire and an effort by McCollin to seore
182 (Yardley 75) and 68 for three. was again foiled by DaCosta and

of the second day's play.

t



Yorkshire Beat



—Keuter. Bayliss who were constantly om
the alert.
A nice centre by Sasso gave
Jamaica their second goal as
DAVIS CUP TENNIS Smith who rushed across to cuff
LONDON, May 21, the ball clear out of his area

Britain winning the doubles to- was charged, and Berry at inside
day took a lead of two matches to left who had reached the ball
one over France in their second the same time with Smith took
round of the European Zone the opportunity, and headeq the
Davis Cup tie »t Wimbledon here. ball into an empty goal, The score
Tony Mottram and Geoff Paish of was now two love in favour of
Britain beat Paul Remy and Ro- Jamaica, When referee Harris
bert Abdesselam 7—5, 6—3, 6—8, blew for half time, the score was
6—4.—Reuter. unchanged,

VIENNA, May 21, After half time the noisy

x crowd saw the Jamaica team com-
Sweden, who had already made

m ow “. Of bining well, and when the second
certain of meeting the Sardar hee half was about 16 minutes old,
the Britain v, France tie in © Sasso who had always been tak-

quarter finals, beat Austria 5—0 ing “tries” at the goal kicked in
in the Davis Cup here to-day, | a scorcher which Smith failed to

_ The Swedish won both fe final iold and to put Jamaica. three
singles to-day after gaining @ Jools up, Smith got down to the
winning 3—0 margin in the earlier ball but it trickleq through _ his
matches of the second round in fingers into the aaa .
the European zone tie, To-day’s é oy
results (Swedish players first) With their success, the Jamaica
were: Sven Davidson beat Hans players never at any time relaxed
Redl 6—4, 1—6, 6—4, 6—1. Tors- and time and time again when-
ten Johansson beat Specht 6—!, ever they found a gap in their
ij—5, 5—7, 6—4.—Reuter. gpponents defence made good use
of it. Their goal keeper Cooper
brought off a brilliaut save just
before the blow of* fom the right
winger McCollin,

The teams were;—

Jamaica: R. Cooper, H. Da
Costa, D. Bayliss, A. McLean,
T. Parchment, D. Smith, K. Hall,
R. Berry,- Minnett, H. Miller and
A Sasso.







Trafiie Do's
No. 8

HAVE ROAD



: Colts XI: Smith, Gibbons,
MANNERS Browne, F. Hutchinson, Gittens,
re Mt Clairmonte, MeCollin, Drayton,

Space made available by yo G. Hutchinson and Wil-

CANADA DRY

for Safer Motoring. The referee was Mr. L. F. Har-

ris, and the linesmen were Messrs.
E. Edwards and H, Thomas,

They'll Do It Every Time

Dios Ever NOTICE HOW SLOW A
@ TAX! SEEMS TO TRAVEL WHEN
YOURE WAITING FOR ONE 2









Registered U. &. Potent OMee







IT GOES
FAVORITE




TORTOISE TAXI? HERE'S SOME-

THING CREEPING









CAB I ORDERED ALONG MUST BE
AN HOUR AGO JAA HEARSE --NOâ„¢
= 2 pgj2ay





fioo

But once you Get int Wow!



NITE-SPOT'S CLOCK.»
Fi7 WHOA! HEY~
“Wee i |

F. HUTCHINSON makes a vain attempt to sten the ball from going into the goal after Robert Berry
had scored the second goal for Jamaica in yesterday's Colt-Jamaica football match,

Goalkeepor I. Smitn, in pullover, looks on,

Robinson K.O’s Oue German Team
FrenchChamp — '% Olympics

LAUSANNE, May 21,







PARIS, May 21. The Olympic Committees of Eas
Ray Robinson of the United and West Germany have agreed
States, world middleweight cham- that Germany should be repre-

pion, beat Kid Marcel, the French sented by only one team in the

champion in the fifth round of a 1952 Olympie games at Helsinki
ten-round non-title bout here This latest development will be
tonight Mareel’s seconds threw discussed to-morrow by the Inter-
ger = towel te tat national Olympie Committee.
obinson was content oO e Thou he rival German Olym-
Marcel do the foreing for the first ght ival German ae

pic Committees agreed that there



four rounds » stood back and
let the ee eee to him must be only one German team
countering on occasions when 0 decision was reached at to-day’s
Marcel landed with rather wild meeting of the International Com
punches to the head and body, mittee on the question of the es-
The second round followed a simi- tablishment and recognition of one
lar pattern Robinson used his German Olympic Cornmittee.
left effectively and was not unduly The East and West Germar
bothered. by the worrying tactics bodies were asked to sefd repre-
of his opponent. sentatives to Lausanne for the
Marcel got home a left hook meeting with the International
soon after the start of the third

Committee after they had failed
to reach agreement at the mecting
last week in Germany.—Reuter

Beverly Baker

round and cut Robinson’s eye. The
world champion replied with lefts
and rights to the head which drew
blood from.over the Frenchman's
right eye ahd his nose



Robinson warmed up in_ the
fourth round and began to hurt Tr . pate
the Frenchman with left and W Its Tennis litle
right hooks which forced Marce}
to seek the clinches, Robinson 5.) BIRMINGHAM, May 21.
opened out in true style in the Beverly Baker, of Santa Monica,
fifth round, He severely punish California, fourth ranking Ameri

can woman tennis player, won the

ed Marcel with two-fisted attacks. S°
.. Women's Singles title in the Pri

The Frenchman swung desperate









ly to the head but Robinson FY Club tournament on Saturday,
waded in and with a series of defeating the Australian cham
right and left hooks put Marcel pion, Mrs. Naney Bolton, 4—6,
down on his knees against the 6—4, 6-2.
ropes. Marcel’s seeonds threw in Jaroslav Drobny, who now plays
the towel after one minute, ten big time tennis in Egypt, won the
seconds, Men's Simgles title in the tourna-
—Reuter. ment at Guildford, Surrey
. vers defeated Vladmir Cer-
i nik, his old Czech Davis Cup
ase + oo tae nartner, Who went into exile w
x ores —_—_ Rui . fir go-8.~ G25 Boek ro with
. .
Wins By Iniings —-
KINGSTON, J’ca, May 19 BELGIUM BEAT
Probably history was made in EGYPT 4—1
any type of cricket today when

a local Jamaica major league side BRUSSELS, May 21










Campaign

MADRID, May 21,
The Spanish Government was
today reported to have. arrested

Madrid

cd in the
the State
Letters have

in. the capital

tomorrow in
campaign,
People were
public
nd_ places

»tters were

of



people for trying to
a cost of living demonstration in
by chain letter.

Among the arrested
civil servants said to be employ-
Roneo
Welfare

transport services,

Department

been
for the

“walk to

asked

amusement,
anonymous.





: Arrested For

‘Walk to Work’

organise

were two

c

Institution
circulating
last three
weeks urging peoples to take part
work”

to boycott
shops

All
They
ere believed to have come from
both right and left wing groups






of

The Police have been active
woughout Spain for the past
week arresting nine strike lead-
«rs in the Basque area and 15
‘anarchists’ in Barcelona, Ob-
servers believed this indicated
that the Police were making
careful investigation of recent
‘abour trouble.—Reuter.

Persian Issue
Affects Stocks

LONDON, May 21.
The Persian situation weighed

eavily on

seconds
levels.

most
lower
was

eonsisted of

with tomorrow Tuesday,

the
ixchange today

small and

and

moved to
Selling
business

levelling

prices

day of the account

Speculative

sales were

London Stock

in

slightly
however
mainly
positions
the last

en-

countered by the British Govern
ment funds which fell by three







after scoring only 22 runs won Belgium beat Egypt by four eighths and dullness was wide-
the match by an innings and matches to one in their second spread among industrials.
four runs in 95 minutes of play, round of the European Zone Rayon chares failed to hold the

The match, incidentally was Davis cup tie here today. initial gains that followed the
played between the West Indies Belgium, who met Germany in British celanese interim dividend
oldest cricket club Kingston and the Quarter Finals, had alreacy of six per cent, Last year
Melbourne, third oldest, at the gained a winning lead of 8—0 in payment of 10 per cent was made,
colony's deading cricket ground the tie and each team won one After being easier for most of the
Sabina Park, It was the aftermath of the final two singles today. day,’ engineering issues were
f overnight and early mornihg Results were: Marcel Coen +howing signs of recovery at the
ain, Kingston, sent in to bat, (Egypt) beat Philippe Washer close, Business in oils was
declared at 2 runs for 4 wickets (Belgium) 6—4, 1—6, 7—5, 6—4, small.

Melbourne hit up 22 for 2 -Reuter. —Reuter.
declared in 30 minutes, then rout-
ed their opponents for 16, batting > or
one man short owing to injury e aan ‘

Hero was Esmond Wentish SATISFACTION
West Indies fast bowler and ~ ain
captain of Melbourne who took GUARANTEED
3 for 1 and a match record ¢ ae
9 for 6 accomplishing the hat UNDER

rick in the second innings. F
tric in e seconc on Pao PERSONAL

Sta WY SUPERVISION



What's on Today

Police Courts 10.00 a.m.
House of Assembly meets
at 3.00 ».m.
CINEMAS
Globe “Dark City”. |
Royal “Kiss of Death”

$

Roxy “Stage to Tucson.” |

Olympic “The Great Maja- \
hara’’.

Empire “For Heaven's |!
Sake”.

Plaza “Hasty Heart’
By Jimmy Hatlo | |
|

ya

REED ST. CITY

ttt









8

THAT
FASTER THAN YOUR

SLOW DOWN!!
WE WANNA LIVE

1951,
FOR







BAY STREET

L.

& H.

MILLER

PHONE 2791



NOTICE

WE WISH TO ADVISE OUR
CUSTOMERS



OUR

PARTS DEPARTMENT
WILL BE CLOSED, FROM FRIDAY,

lst JUNE TO MONDAY 4th JUNE
BOTH DAYS

OUR

ANNUAL STOCK-TAKING



INCLUSIVE,

¢

DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING (0.,
TD.

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

DIAL 4269







Britain Wants

Raw Materials

OTTAWA, May 21.

According to informed sources
here, Britain is asking Canada for
assurances that she will get an
adequate supply of raw materials
tc develop her £4,700 million
arms programme, The British rep-
rescntatives were raising this issue
at today’s meeting of the Canada-

United Kingdom Continuing
Trade Committee, the sources
said.

This organisation was set up af
maintain permanent trade contact
between the two Governments
after Sir Stafford Cripps’ visit to
Canada in September, 1948, the
sources said,

No announcement was expect-
ed on the talks which are being |
held in secret. Informed quar- |
ters, however, said the agenda in-}
cluded a British request for gesur|
ances on raw materials and a
Canadian request for an expan-
sion of British imports from the}
Dominion.

Trade, economic and finance
officials from both couritries met
sue preliminary discussions before |
today’s Continuing Committee's |
fifth session opened. .

Expand Token Plan

The Canadian Press News

Agency said Canada would point ,

to the fact that Britain's import |

restrictions cut Caneda’s exports
to Britain from $700 million ia
1949 to $450 million in 1950. She
would ask: |

1. That the token shipment
plan be expanded

Under this plan Canadian ex -
porters with a traditional mar-
ket in Britain were allowed
import permits on 20 per cent
of their pre-war shipments
This was doubled to 40 per cent
last January. Canada would
ask for a further expansion
either by a percentage increase
or by expansion of the list of
goods for which their permits
are granted.

2. Approval by the Britisn
Government of a further allot-
ment of dollars to the West In-
dies to buy more goods from
Canada, Britain controls the
dollar pool for all of the Com-
monwealth’s sterling area coun-
tries. The British West Indies
have already indicated their
agreement with this view and
have coupled Canada’s request
with a similar request of their
cown.—Reuter,



Germany Wanied
As An Equal Party

BONN, May 21.

British Foreign Secretary
Herbert Morrison said here
today that his country wanted
Germany as an equal and im
portant partner among western
powers and as “an active partnei
in the maintenance of world
peace,”

He was speaking to corres-
pondents on the third day of his
four-day stay in Germany where
he is meeting leaders of Govern
ment and Opposition parties, He
described his conversations with
ee leaders as “suecess-
ul.”

Morrison is due to fly to Vienna
tomorrow for a_ three-day visit.
But he said taday that he was
ready to modify his plans at any

moment if the Persian oil dis-
pute necessitates his return to
London,

—Reuter.



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Preis bless the day they took

oan’s Backache Kidney Pills.

This well known diuretic and
urinary antiseptic helps sluggish
kidneys to sory out their function
of ridding the blood of excess uric
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Selecting Workers For U.S. Farms

From Our Ows
GRENADA, May 21,
About 1,000 men from all parts

of the island and the Dependency

of Carriacou crowded the Labour

Department yard, later shifting io

Queen’s Park for greater conve-

nience, seeking selection among

150 for farm work in the Uniter

States. 3
Interviews lasted most of” the

day and medical examinations

will follow before the fina] draft
of who will be sent to St. Lucia

to emplane there with the 500

Windwards’ contingent.

After police response had check-
ed two previous ilareups c.wsing

Correspondent











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the working out of the already
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proved by the legislature. This
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the provision in current years of
building as well as replacement of
those destroyed during the strike,





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PAGE 1

n i SDAt. M\Y a, 1951 BAM vims VIA... Mi PAAI FIVE Scrap Cuban Black Pact Bodih HamCoats IS'• From safe 3 you to be ver> clear on thai point "Lot us for a momc.n tTttmim When the news came out in the evotiomy ">f the West Indies. ,h West Indies about the U.K.%  ireds of yean, it has been Cuban Pact. I dont suppose there Q L Taylor based on agriculture, then wlthi revent years, there has been .1 •light diverrm ol miner secondary industries of one kind or another. Mineral Deposits was any <.ne who could read. the West Indie*, you will have to i IIITC are certain mineral bear with more millions coming deposits like bauxiti glad to And that 'hey are general! accepted. contribution would br ZSTTJSS. wai not shocked or silenced at made lo the well-being oC the In i'l ."zS^HT" !"' • "-I happen !" or n .boul Indie.. Th, w„, .„",. m. fi u •.?,',* longer ..Ik .>., %  bein, chudren. SSrtt2 Mrt.cT 0 !" puniu la.! a. Urn MkM ,•„,„., „, A \"" M %  rhi bonaura _. fellow revcr-M u,, .om-jgues in Una endeavour lo ship Mr C. L. Wal*n wro disprornote the ben lor the West Inmlsaed the rue Mtkoul die, In particular, and also lor the The) | .npiher whole *terltng area. I am uu!te derision of Mi V. enntam to feel that I can play .1 misled a case agi amall part myarlf. beeauae It wa, McLerm for inniciir* bodl Mandeville Congratulated On Appointment As Bishop Of Barbados "I must say to you that tf you Tint stage going to ruin the economy of contribution has alread. "I want to talk to you —jd recently mto the area. The policy hn been to try and "We say to you.' 1 said Mr. Sangindustrialise the area in some ter, "scrap the Cuban pact, have measure. However much we may nothing wnatever to do with it no trv to Industrialise, it Is very matter how you fee! you may look I'lfflcult. m international eyes. Your chilAgrlculturc Is the basis of cu>*** %  ••"* entitled to have proUK"V good fortune early In ihe rui *. In this urea. tlon and we must get it. we must or the first labour Government U We arc forced to buy staple *** v u to negotiate long-term the UK. to get a trip to the Fit itjods and other rommodltie* from !" *fi places which pnduei them liiglr-r costs. T11 pay for these commodities, we have to rely on the prices of our agricultural products. Sugar, said Mr. Sangster, was I industry that stood the test of time in the West Indies. Kor 300 years it was the Kast. I knew before the i 'For too long we have been used colleagues in India as It w. pawns In the international Most of the fading game of chess. We wish promotion. If this promotion Is given we will help to maintain the position and the prestige of the Coinmonthlt of wealth world." Hon. H. D. ShllUngforo "flf.-*. years ago in the early thlrti ever-changing '£££ %  th then — polHicians of to-day, moat of them in Pakistan and most of them in Burma are my personal friend-. If you ever came into contact with you would And that thev have a kindred spirit in toe api-.ch to these common problem: against Delona (, 0*MM .... Ins ridea day. lain that on A passing by ihe house i I il tw defendant*. lanUu; %  >. k ai d FitxGentld MeLean ulucli i ,t„. ated at Kensington New Road Before she could pass the hour,-. both of them rushed out on hit and iK-at her It wa? l !" !, ^S. ST Bnlish Government realised the ""< are trying to lift up the standhad looked forw?.,. t ,11 ih£L necessity of diversl.ication of trop'*?* <" theae Door distressed colvcaW "'' P~SU and sent Mr. Clarke ]?>*** '" different parts of the "In the middle of the last fowell wno advocated the planting Co mmon *"" %  .en urvpref^nra were with of cllru iHHiihoui * areas >> ' " the aenae that l *tm dSSn-^S^tC^r^ify whe,. it could be possibly grown. £*%gZJ!SPS **"* •vent up and down and here it Dominica. Trinidad, Jamaica • SS-'SnJP 2* *-' d W ,m P r nm time, we are no "* Brltalll HoPdUM ptofl fd OP Je^p up^h, We ire asking for long term contook fl lo iracls ami guaranteed markets for *ng "nd when the crops Matt in yi ads. Palestine, competition debarred 'Why do we feel that you am them from the U.K. market, protecting us.' We are 'in inn Commonwealth area and we are Citnu Rot ii: the slerlmn area. We have With the advent of the war, Hiven you trade, we hive helped shipping was unobtainable and a with the dollar restrictions and pan of their citrus was allowed to have suffered greatly. We have rot. lost our Canadian contacts tnd Mr Shtlllngford said that :7.h h S-a? WlJJiSSSS £*!£?&££•&!?. 9^^%S K.^ nly from the dollar Agreement Trade and Tariff Cc 1,rm nd bU h We ftn ," f 1 !'". Ur ^^ KSwhelf America subsidised where it cannot !-• checked Thev m Domln,ca nad no tw^ of dollar sugar and I have it on The coi u??c*Mt$S£ ^. gomtf o U>e U.K. and depended on foi, uthorlty from the Ministry of to buv g frnm *'*" ' ,1 PP"'tT"^ ""PP^ 1 in Food that far from making g 19S0 over $160,000 worth of citrus profit, there is indeed .. low „n,i and that was only a small proporI am also told that if it should *n tion of their crop. It was. Indeed happen, all difference of preferH"ck deplorable to see the amount of grape fruit and oranges rotting on Hie ground. It can be argued that with dollar resirictkons, the United Kingd ho greatest contribution would DKANG L . was congratulated on bein^ electe*l Bislmp ol liail>ado.when a meeting uf thiSt Mtd Vettn vnunvkl nstcffdaqr Attvrnoon. rfon v C OcuN M.L.C.. on bt-half of minlWffB of thi Veatry offered Bishop Mandevillr sincere congrMulgti"n*.. He ssid that at I!,.: %  ,ietary In protest agains(hlege Ibg Dean and bin ^urteous treatment mele,i <>u in the same form. He tad watdbad to the Vestry. ">e Dean's sueThis motion was unanirm. islv la ttM niimslry and supported by the Vestry and th thai Oommltttt appointed to meet ih t>een made Bishop of Colonial Set ret i> wttt Mi Barbados, "an office in which I McD Symmondi. Churehwar.ler. he will serve with di.. I Ii\ C. Qaki II.UG K 1) Mottley. M.C.P. i th-it iiarUidiuns were The report to the Commission ..i to know thai the Dean ers is as follow* Daniel was em has been appointee to that high ployed as an assistant r.lie offlw liiver from 1912 to 11 i>% II i i Button. ,i mile, drivn .. Onlt'i motion, MCVMS. D M S i .t in-ratt I week. I nopa tbat "ftosn 1919 to 1925 DIU>1 # i 1'ivui M ralitf drlvof at $6 w <".t ihai ,iut> ami ha r" week i, t Messrs. D. M • .i ahlnlng twmnpH to Btonpion %  Co. Ltd., who h.-\ i trad with the Cotnml could not nil wen nn ocnM.' %  llusntwiyi i si Mi.imei. Nil HeD Synunocuhi and Mr. Kepori Adttpted T Miller alao Oflerod that] eonThe Vestry* considered ani ajntulatftj adople^l the Cominut*.The Ieiin> Krpl* [ty Report for Ihe payment u UandOvlUo, ropiyina; uM %  'ctroapcetive pay for Parorhl* that he wag pOnUj movtd ny employee" Paymenl wiKit nn Vaatn id latn A) t" P*****! i* 1 bttjlg dom Friday. bb eUviion After considering ihe iten Hi ml sorry that Inv eunne,lehitive |o Mr. II. C. Griffith Uon with tbo Vestrv W.I.H v,. Mi-.it ifusum, on ttu motion of Mi l. ui in that short time he had been V I' MOtttt] IhoVaatrj ll—1| Jsjll I ivhteh he "*>> steps be taken to have a lull | had made. introduced in the I-egislatun ,,._, ,. •'•• f'U H a great pleasure nn.l authorising Ihe Vestry to pay Mr .h. ^" "nou>o be Chairman of Lie C Griffith i vision or (and* niev luU s Veatry of B a gratuity for the services renderr^OUOWlni Ull Ml | Brgth* Mb> him while in the employ ol be a good thing if \ou" read'Vt" "wed lo nra monlha 1 mprbon" *" ,, \ ^ lo ,hi he h,d .*"* _ hr .^ omr ". i lon r "' Health of carefully. ment with hard labnui "As far as Canadian sugar sales ."tenllng $f U-longing to Hi Three For Months Laroesn Ihre.Ihte OlttWulU nine, wi are" no and Briiuh Honduraa planled or. S^ S^%JS&£j!' '.'" "' "^ '" %  """ %  > %  ^''".-/'''"'iVn-'Tv.i vsr~*£*£ Offers S&ZmSt^TS&^JS *"* we can live. S' M,Cn;,c '. b Clh Polic' Magistrate who found nun (UUJa .... "no charge of Ian-en yesgetday „_ ,, UK Ec.inni.iy Talking m a narrow w .y. if Uw belonging t.. Evan I the U.K. economy cannot afford ,m M "> 10 He wag **<'ii UUng to buy your sugar, you know what ""'*' dthntth i the result would be. Several which Pilgrim bad rut Hewn points have been raised and It is Straker ran and later PoUol perhaps in this connection that I Constable Jones arresteil Mm 00 mav refer to Canada. Wellington %  groat "IB Ihe case of the Canadian SPlbert Voldrt "* Straker nd 1 rec ""•• %  • •••• %  ^••. Many ma made a ,r "" Straker has th ,io,, s M ,he bin* „r £%£. r* is "ZsrsrS r !" L ^^ "^^ vES* !" "' Jl.rill|lltt** k *' ^ '** ?l A '" Canada. .„.„„!.. floolim, ii bSuJ TVuJZ - "• •: M'llu. .1.,., %  Tkk Uo> %  nre concerned, they had to buy 'or each ten of 5ugar sent from Hill up and we are forced to buy". the starting sources and at times those commodities are not even %  %  Turn Where ? "We in the colonies have got to turn to die United Kingd 30'For Assault we want help, we cannot turn to mirket was still open, but in fact, America. Cuba or Australia and Spanish and Palestine citrus, not hat is the Mother Country doing being able to compete with the iHottomley said, to get th. help us? She is now ncgo U.S.A. in Europe, will certainly preasion that we arc making Iota n rmber or uVe u>< *4i "Mi\ Jonag had not i m ''"' M r his best, bin UUod t Oft. lie was mlMdl] hOttOBl \r-.liv. man." he said. On behalf oj the ottx \'. tryr* WaU-oit. n I.ihi.in of Mien li<' came into contael with Hall. S' (.,.„ (rag Mr Jonag, he said WtthoUf doubt .n.-e goods between Canada and ordered b) .i DiaUfet "A" Police that Mr. Jones was n gentleman Ihe U.K. would eventually show .1 Magistrate to pay u (In..,f 30 "A m.-re hornet mun ha nevi-r pront. for assAiiim ; id thJa tobkV* Mi Brath"An undertaking was given thu: Pile on May 10. waite said, the profit would be share rnidt MIH> polnttsl 0*1 Griftlth wa* morallv this. ,. Mi rUke] iiating a pact with Cuba. It miiit divert their exports to the U.K. be remembered thai if England on(( nal \ e t x them in a most unt.ikes sugar from Cuba, it would dMirnb | c situation. mean that the West [ MifTer. •We feel that you arc not happy ..bout this Cuban Pact or that il U.S. Subsidy %  The American subsidy proflt as a result of this legitimate trade transaction. Review Needed "When you come to 1953 it may be seen that things have changpd and that we have lo review thi JflBMg impressing ..uoui inn* -uodn ruei ui uiiti i\j— % %  a_ , and th.lt we have In review lh will bring you trade. You have high, amount.ng to $1.65 per crate. aZ^„*?,£ a *\^£"? lh ." for Liverpool .,„• tnia V,s the details that we have PO chance whatever. !"!" £* tt "jff**"*"*. A l Tumuriiul Cargo Harrison Liner Specialist 1 port loading 2.375 tons of d..rk Mr rystnl and 500 tons Of we" told us the details •When visitors come to the "< ' * a !" n Jamaica West Indies and see people living which sold fru.t juices at 14/per ^[^ KSbta ttS in shacks they wUl want to know carton, has now been offered in why they wire living in such povEurope 7/-. the price at which the erty. But could we provide work American product is being sold, for such people when the one "It coats /to produce a carton thing we produce—sugar and our 0 nd you will realise that the proagrkultural products, you refuse ,i uccr w [\\ have to a.ive his fruit lo give us a market and go and frec and „ •/, to ^ij ,„ those buy from people outside the sterma rketi.. •The general dependei Uu am "You have heard in Jamaica a lot about tobacco. We have built us a sugar trade in the U.K. In 1947, 26.000.C JV cigars cost £9.600. agriculti th, had the moment, the Government in the U.K. strongly lakes the view should try and work towards that end "There are many other point* on which 1 could dilate at great length but they were covered in yesterday's statement. | have, reason to believe that much or thai if going to appear in the Press. "I want specifically to deal with the Cuban Pact. 1 can say that B alao takitiK %  suppit tamarinds and 26 bales of. cotton The Kpeclalki arrived hate Thurs.la> She is i'->iisigned -.< Mr Da Cost ; , CO I • CROWD ATTEND 'BAND" CONCERT been stressed by wc dld no particularly 1 id you large ere Band vd attended be Si-nt In their \vnipa1liy. I ii. To vestrymen Ml Mottley. who BflXODtiOd Ml Uralhwaite's moiion, said thai Jones was an outstanding chnraeler but what was most outstanding was that he was re%  ("i the Dtatrtet Nursing System in Itarbados. Under tin H.-. t ,| "ComapOlM. 'i %  vhora the Commissioners Cuban Pact? I tried to explain gramme was the tatroductton of lioated to employ 6.000 iicople. made by Mr. Robinson and he had the circumstances yesterday. In Act III and Bridal Cborui from becaus* „ %  ,.___ % %  heurd from Mr. Gomes -. contributhe case of this pact most of the "Lohengrin". This magi.nii.ieii! February 3. the Government had I ** r Ul '" ,. tion which he was sure Mr. Gomes oetails were known two months piece of music is meant to sugasked them t,, investigate the If we have to pay higher duties wouW forglvc hlm i( he Mld it aKri and h c only reason I have gest the general atmosphere of claims 0/ Daniel who stated that ?r^-^h^h^ n J'm'\;Xi r ,^^ w 0,, lo whicn ho %  accus come here a tor the P" t P' l e r 'estivity and rejoicing thai he h. d been employed by the St. !£Vta!Jrmr1 ^k-tajSfl vmVus ttmed. being like him, a fellow expUinlng them further and for follows the mi.rnage of ih<<>.gi m Michael Commissioners for a of Cuban eTgar^ and put 6 900 Parliamentarian. the purpose of listening and getand EIM. „, l3 years, people out of work In JamaicaMr. Sangster, he said, had made ting greaWr infonnati.m SJ that Other items O0 the Prognuime ThU mailer as memltera reMr Mottley said that gfhlhl was no) oppoatd^o ti, man netting his paooton tulty. he felt that the t/i ery badly in the matter letter lo ih bttod 100 Years Ago WEHT INDIAN May tt. t\> had writlen a few re marks on Thursday, n the manner In whlrh the eleanIrix of ih. streets and Ihe removal of the tilth la *| present effected, but want of room excluded them. Slnre then the advertisement of the Clerk or the Vestry has appeared, and we find it embraces one or two suggestions we had Intended to throw out. By the mode at present adopted, taxpayers and olhrrs obtain IllUe relief They are romprllcd lo oueep as formerly, and. In numerous, eases, themselves lo have Ihe rubbish removed. Thr I.I. i is, the andrrtaalng la loo much for a %  Ingle Individual. Ii uill only be done eltl-leiilly by dividing Ihe City Into districts and granting rontrsrts for such dlslrlrU We are therefore glad to find that the Vestry have arrived at this ronrlu -mil and some experience having lif-rii arqMlred, we hope that the object will be .M.m.ii .nd that the streets "III he efflrlrnly I.......I >eople w> %  ....,.% an _•<>• %  .>< %  "We have been colonies of the most witty contribution and h. British Empire for 300 years, but ahould have liked to hive heard colleagues information si that Other items on the progi back and tcli my were the cornet solo of "Roses of the Government Plcardy" and the Hwnn.s. "I Vow shipping and our pie these have gone unheard. Are \ to give up this Canadian contact entlrclv? Maybe In th futun we will havt to turn to them ant go hat In hand and ask them for help. "We cannot agree that wc will ever be happy to see you sacrifice \Mury Lew is" Arrivei .re losing and destroying the more from him and was sure that your feelings before uny agreelo Thee My Country" and "Lead p, Ml goodwill of the territories. 'Wc he would hear more in future. Mr. • nont ' signed. Kindly Ughl". v )tn cannot protect the wolf at the door Shillingford had given substantial "We are hoping that the pact ;,nd ihe one at the window too*. comments about Ihe citrus industry w, bc mutually advantageous. "Canada is our natural friend, .nd he hoped he would take it bul wanl to aasure you that it We cannot really look lo the U.S. from him that he was aware of a would not be disadvantageous to We nr< losing our opportunity and )arge pa,., of ho comments he haj the W Ml Indie*. -nade. and that that had fortified _________ him when he had made representations about the importation of I/--J i n J-,nf l nn nt,nno fchoOOti Mary M LOwta ar citrus fruiu into Great Britnin. U5ea matcent Language rived htrt tnm Btlllih "Of the speakers, particularly. ^ Clty Magistmie ordered over the week end with i.30ti bags Mr. Gomes talked about the value Livingston Blunt of Alleync'i of rice. SinJISO brought M| pllt I of this conference," he said. "You Land Bush Hall, to pay a line of f firewood and choiK.nl know where I stand. My opening 307"for using Indecent language The Mary Lewis is consign, d to 1 at this present time in relation comments yesterday were on the on Eagle Hall Road, St. Michael Maagrt, Schooner Owners' Assoto sugar and tobacco. We want value of this Conference and I am on May 19 elation. Pier Under Repairs A hole Ibotri 10 foot lonu Bight fe.-t wide mid eight f ( e dee,, has been dug out ul the em %  U ,. %  1'ier Head. Water Is abou 2 feet .leep in the hole. Stones and grovel that hav. been dug up are packed an.un. the hole as .1 l„ 11 riei The httle room left for podoatrfcal In,. h..le was started In ea which was undermining ll,. part of the Pun Hnad The su HIM. I WOI Slight! isiluneis of lle.ilth who called Daniel and other pi PI U v.'lth whom he claimed he worked (Jreafer i:%  • %  ... ^ .. <• di ol Hie report which |g bofora u 1 again lay that 1 would bl the last person to MMtd mm, in anybody's way of getting eonli|t(l uf Ulfl p|| • i.le,.,t 1 o,i (or their services, but bjvkon -ome weeks ago. I f.-l lhat at least the Vestry U -rt masons to find out that could liuvi I'tited with greater respect as it Is not even qultl Ihre.mOOthl which we have been asked," Mr. Muttfei %  id IItln-ri-foi.BSjna, 1 QV f, \ to appoint u Committee to take up the matter with th Colonial I 1.1 Ml Of the .iway by the sea Yesterday, live men woon ti unks. were to their kne?* ihe water digging out loose gi.i •ltd stone* The Q> Dredger Is helping to fl %  and and gr.ivel from the hole .VJTIV SUIPMEXT OF EMBROIDERED GEORGETTE WlllTK. PINK. "BLUE. SIAI/.K and I.HKI N will, WlllTK KMBROIDKKY iinrl WHITE mid PINK With 1 ui ill 111' I. I MIlllOinHiY Tlic Quflllty is Excellent iind Ihe Kmbri)iiler*.Ml DeMlin* nre M.H.1 Altrarlive A LOVELY MANGE TO CHOOSE FROM $2.62, -.'*i. and $3.24 per yd. Your Inspection is Cnrdiullv Invited HARRISONS BROAD ST. DIAL 2664 S. for your complete furnishing BROCADEI, COTTON TAPESTEY In Blue. Green. Rose. nd Brown 49' wide Per yard JASPE FURNISHING FABRIC in Blue. Brown and T.n 48" wide. Per yard (1.42 RAYON' FURNISHING FABRIC. A really beautiful flowered stripe against a fawn barkaround. In Plum, Grren. Blue and Tan 47" wide. Per yard 82.M FLOWERED CRETONS: 34 inches wide Per yard $1.64 Cave Shepherd& Co., Ltd. 10, 11, It ft 13. BROAD STREET %  Jiaaj % % % %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  at Lower Prices* Thifull,,,, i„f t ii„ mN „ r „ rmimmmd in |./.,. f„ r „ short /,,„„/ ,„,!,, %  LBPBANT DATES II or, „kl. ,, ItOBlBTSONS SILVKII SIII1E1. MARMALADE-per B.H JBc UAMAMAS CRUSHED PUOAPPLI per Tin COLUMBIAN PINEAPPLI SI.UKS pat Tin SIN.IAP.IIIK mrtlni: CUBtS4SLICES ,.,T„, HTBPIIBNS MAW PR Kris SAVOY CHOI OLA n. MALT pat til RED, will It s BLtfl BAKED HI UM ,,. i M AYI.MEIIS IIIRK n BEANSLarE* Tin EASTPACK BEET pa. Tin STANSMUJt. ston A e„ i.m. •w,VAV,v,w/y,v^^/w/iv^.v,y,v.v>w, Ml Sol. Imponan i— w.i. HOMOf l to tro uipctiowa. laauoo: %  -..% %  ...... .... .-.,... BHLD OP _^ c STRFMilll! -; mm mi i: aou WITH LIVIBORN [A PirLe Davli IT.Mlurt, A general Ionic eentalnlng Liver "onrentrale.vitamin B and Speelall> for Ihe Treatment of Anemia or general .IrhillU Suilihlf for (hilih-.il and AdulU. KNKlllTS IID.-ALL BRANCHES i N 4





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ESTABLISHED 1895 U.K. SHOULD SCRAP 'CUBAN BLACK PACT BOTTOMLEY GOES SWANNHVG (From Our Own Correspondent) Tu .. LONDON, May 21 T" t h w *• "Express" Special Correspondent John Redfern, reports Mr Bottomley's visit This sweet-tooth island its economy is built on sugar has a sour taste to night. Mr Arthur (Overseas Trade Department) Bottomley is in town. A British Minister swanning around the British Colonies and defending the in terests of Cubans i in si roi.it MTTMl.i:i Deputies Make Good Progress On Big 4 Agenda PARIS. May 21. Big Four Forei.n Minister deputies achieved considerable : %  re grew, to-day bv agreeing of placing Gnun demihtamatinr •n the agenda tor the Foreign Minister* Conference With this slop forward the ClSfUtlM hnvt agreed .%  iioversial first item of the agend| dealing w ith the cause* pre:ent in international tension. To-day's meeting opened twelfth weak discussions on the agenda Western deputies, j. , day the Russian proposal that the German danuj should appear twice on the agenda-.-n,. again following the point dealing with the reduction of armaments The footnote to the agenda will state that deputies were unable to agree to the precise pluce that the Germnn demilitaris.it ion -hould take. Ei nest Davies. British Deputy. *aid only two point* remained to ho settled: the order of the item o n the agenda: and the Russian ihat the North Atlantic Treaty should be inclimAgenda. A Russian delegation had to [.ire realistically that il w.is impossible for w.sti'ui pom in cent Hip inclusion ,,f u iv Atlantic Pact, Davies added Davwi proposed die following ordjei hr the A. %  I. An item dealing with (ha causes of International tension. 3. The Austrian Treaty. :i German unity and preparation of nut Qerrnan Peace Treaty. 4 Italian and Balkan pojasa Treaties :>nd Agreement* concerning Germany am: Austria 5. The Italian Peace Treat) lit so far as il concerned Tl %  I —Reuter. WHERE DO WHALES GO? SYDNEY. May 21. The British Government* 1.03(1 ton reserve ship Discovery II sailor! from here todaj In attempt to sail around the Antarctic Ocean and find out among other things where whaler KO in the wintertime The ship is making a six month* voyage in the south poJar regions before returning to Ilritain. In addition to the routine work of taking sea temperatures and soundings, the expedition will study the distribution of plankton, minute animal life and the distribution of whales themselves. Keuter Burma Flouts U.IV. Embargo RANGOON. May 21. Burma will keep up trade with CommunM China igptta DI United Nations embargo OB strategic raw material; [n| to %  coni|>etent source here. The same source said slrateaic goods such us rubber and petroleum nroducu would soon move? into China from Burma by an overland tride route across l.urma's northern border. The first Soviet Ambassador to Burma. Alexander Saveliev to-day presented his credentials to the Burmese President Sao Shwe Thaike and received assurances of -(.illest co-operation" of th> 'Burmese Oovemment.--Renter i U.S. Likely To Lift Stay Of Exeeutioir WASHINGTON. May 21. The Slate Department is likeIv to rescind within a day or so itorder staylnr the execution of .Tiiinals ai Lnndsberg pi MMM I ing to usually reliable aOUfCa Lifting the stay of CM that the United States High Cnmmissinner McCloy COUM order death sentence* to be carried ou? or aanrclae i-icmencv o-i hla own l>ehrilf -Reuter After vaata of aaerae* ... fatuous denials—no special delefor the West Indies \ V \ here II \1, Bottomley sflowed tho shape of • k-end -nd no w i:.ked on to his team of exI'lcomc visito these sunny lands: alarm despondency Wknow at |M te, d "" ***" Cul SSM.OOfl worth by March 1952 another s500.000 fur 1U53 i no hope of ll preference on Jamaica's cigars On sugar sira Qrl1 rosins to let Cubana send us ; ttapa 150,000 ions to the end is proposing to extend until then her ui-dertaktnf r.. find a market for tOO.OOU sugar a year from the W. tl Producers will have the choice %  about 30 per cent Bl Id price plus prefi-n I 70 percent al a neaiotlaied price I ef' here of sugar men %  U • with the >->iiiid)ution of the Dominion-, they can easily >ar period enough for the require Brilai ,,i ( aiiaila ad to put II fool inside the (mar. • II feai il thai tl I ill be iha beghmlng ol ar.ent claim by Cuba for a stake in the British market. Doubled-trussed Hereabouli toe all is arm and balmy, but the tvinperotuiidropped to-day when Mr. Bottom try raced 30-odd iwrnMn and odvbjerT of ihe new Rational Iconomlc Committee, buay In session on Waal in Not even Mr. Qottomai I i adlli %  auau ui *..* not going n> U<> IM deal with Cuba, for grapefruit after all. took the bite out of the air. fclr. Albert QOUMB, T Uintoter m Conunerce saui shortly mat iha Committee would giv. | 604. %  fee to-morrow. And the boaa leading reoreaentatlvea are on the commutegrowled an bnlai and muttered %  : |ha Brtiiah G li -cross m.' Up Mr. Bottomley's al* GA.TT —abbreviation for General Agreement on 'f\o irt> and Trnde At the right moment | i It out like a jemmv. | into the structure of Colonial prosperity. Me iald the Cubana had been held off from trading until next i strongest pleading. Of course they could go to GA.TT. with their case for trading with the sterling area. With our improved balance of payments position, G.A.T.T could decide that import restrictions should no longer remain against Cuba. W. rnuat listen to Cuba as we've listened to Canada I'mted Si' Perhaps tobacco smoke brought him back to cigars. %  red the suggestion that now—that is attar ten years of BCtlvtt] the taste Tor Jamaica %  o : ,hed Ibat Ihey'll hold their own when the | a into ilritain. Nobody else is so optimistic. They reckon iii.it the proposed UOftH II "bout onC-thil.l of cigars, ma ported by Britain now. %  UI knock unoam side* Mr Boltomkv is a non-smoker. But we've got to lane Cubans, %  held UP at 'he point of (i ATT. H Come Into The Open Although tinKcg'onal Economic Committee normally works in private, it intends to come out in the open to-morrow on Bottomley: %  What he has to *a> should, he said to those vitally ; Mr. Qa I This was something the Mission hadn't bargained for. tried to put •'• on it 'Oh Mi Hcitomley. he welcomed the Press. Why there oral present someone from the well-known British paper called the Dally Bxpnag "a paper which isn't sym pathetic • Bui [ % %  < %  provided every opportunity for him to fi Haeaaaad the propound MUMOU to Persia Rejects U.S. Appeal MacArthur Accused Of Deei k pfioii reportc m the sana m. it was Mr. B. who was !iottomlcy. TEIIEHAN. May 21. Persia tonight rep upited state, appeal for nafotia tipns la reach >• luendK %  etUenaeut of the oil natioiuilisation easalf, The fJovcrnmeni I onunandatipn last wtH-k to settle tl., pule U> the discussions as 'interference in the internal affairs <>l British sources here to-dsv b-;hevrd Persia would abjo reject Itnt.iKi'., offer to talk to a mission sent out specially to discuss oil nationalisation. .The British Government is expected to intimute that n intcn-n. tq take the issue baloie the Inter i.iiitm.il Court at The Hague for judgment the British Oovemment—majoritj 'i; 1 s ha..ho|ders in the company-to '•'" ''-. l1 • L protect i|, interests. T "' S*'""*"" ^I'J MacArthui Meanwhile the Persian Govern! lia,k n l "''"'" ,n '•' the mesad* met in the midst of one of its '"' £''* "' "'"l". '' parfodjcal crises had mad., an mi.''" '" Washington on January dnclal approach to the AngloJ JVl"/ %  Ian i-ompanv through Governll ""' Aihe lo i rnanl bankers ..^king it to roume "'' %  '*"• aceuaod the Qei monthly i oyaltv pa' %  .. : "" %  ""' '"i"' C2.000.000. Payments were slop •"• %  WUI l>""'tIn BOO ped last month because of Ihe un' '" *, ,l 1 '" certainly of the company'* posi' r '"" Uu %  '•""' ( ' tlon in Persia. January 12. .vid of r>t m< Brttam i fi also hkely to protest "*! U> ? mi him b) against the growing list bah muary 13 i-ompiled of Britons In Persia outlining the bold considered undesirable by Ul< %  Govemmi I'rrsian Government. informed Kfg sources said. i Sir Thougli the oil company is re-'mc-nUimcd in the utalunony bj licent on the subject, thei> is noIGeneral Omar Bn Allies Advance Seven Miles and maklny doubt that n sense of restraint growing among Britons engaged in the oil industry, and thenfamilies. The number of resignations is reported to be above normal —Beater. IMPORTANT MISSION BONN, Mav 21 West German Chancellor Dr. Konrad Adenauer, aald th*it Bii'ish Fan Herbert Morn.m' to Uei many wa a matter of the first importance. • %  It meani thai due %  has been establish^! l--t* RapUblk,' 1 he tuld a Press Con•On Ihe British attltudl Vuraueaa questions, said: "Natiu..!!. Qrttoll 'gtviaced that she t Eiuo)-i':. Importanea to her own Imp) riant a "I accepted with great limitation ti viail Lonfjaa wlnah regards "th event Of gii-i the Chancellor said KeplvbiK '" i. %  said thai among the n with laorrison were trade i>etwie0progress It I aean on the eastern frnni wh h the Kit! 'i ed contact with But the threat to nU i 'I front remalnI pt %  • In the < ai I tnumbered I'nlted Nations 1 Lo new nghuv aal in the South Koreaji i.ooo Communists % %  un north i The l s. n id Dutch Ual Communisi ted onlj hghi pi Tins -4Tmntcci i 37,750 .j, : i ommunlsu uflve oRenaive. In the %  central ..ii>ii Una luMlnd l r i 1 i aouthai I of Mui n qfl the nrl K •Mtiiin io the sun. .;.iii<-i -i the British. Austialian and CaiUJ oiar. trot: Irlvi north of Seoul came under Con.inuni-t United I'ii repeatedly %  % %  il ..li^a•'" %  coli i Communaft rasualt 400 Malar el Iha Joint Chiefs ol B i %  George laarahall —Keuter Injun if. Ti-Htiiif; \l u WJ eapon l:n i Id %  '. ,'. of the Kust Mii.i. i, ii %  | I %  i warm o-.a 1 i reapon I %  i i %  deep le. wound % %  %  Both wo %  —Keuter Parly Banned vMUlATDKCKEN Mav 21 The Saar Gove. nrncnt to-da> banned ll iN-moerati* Party of fl man News Agenry DPA reported I) I' A said that the G an %  of the Party*! antlra Scar Oruntnal Police i ..red on the %  d Kuril a I) P.A. added %  — Keutrr. CHILD KILLED AS LORRY OVERTURNS RIO DI -IANFIRO. May 21. A efail i %  : to doa' %  SnrTHAMPTON May 21 Plrst meat earf-> 'hipped fn Argentina to England since I. •luly. 1.230 tons, mt Southampton todoy in the ,irJ ano ALM. ..board are U.0I Turpan Of Argentine apple.. pei -.., Panlo grapes grapefruit and Lfnloading begins to-mot rtllgiou F celebratior —Keutrr ilruter Mac's Plan \\ oil Id Up Kort'aii \\ ar WARIIINtnON. Mav ^1 On.,.i lll.idhv .v.od toi i 'i ad Stab : a hare u> carry out Oai aral Mai \ U > laU pru ti Bradlej reaumad ha .: continued Senate Arm< i s. i v i P< a nd Foreign Committees on MocArthuri dhr> Bradley said the Jouil I aV nw . niigtit And i a -ond our eaparilv U \ H OUl 'iiceelull.v" Bri na reason why the Military >dgh Command MacArthur*! removal General MacArthur'i pUblli Mata 1 .' CatlOn "irnl: %  h< was not in i Mlh the decision to try to hunt %  IU .. .M arould make ll dimeuit for i .. %  ...I M.HA il I i Un i ilva i'i idle) nsid Ihi P k Cotnindi. bad -i 1 i lakl q kndapend ii preaaaMf to naget.tlj with jbe Communisi field Conumandei I %  and had mad. , public daapfta the raci Dial in knew the Prealdanl had such % %  i -.1 undei oiisiili-i. overnmental level"' The Joint Chief of Staff "have %  It and feei no* lb i the must be eontrolled h) llthority in tins eountry" said i Ingl were adjournil until Tueaday %  hem >•• Brad* > v TJkeii io return t.. the i ftn Chall —Keuter. Sign m \\ i ;ikin ss BONM U % %  ::i iv. i i Chan I %  i %  I it %  -. %  uerernment what they though: urh uru i inning In allow two i;errnan poiitieiaaI | % %  mas i' at a Press Conferenre %  I %  *\\ ee Mar" IH First Sea Lord LONDON May 21 The iti itn.ii Admlralto a n nouaeed lonlfhti iha ippolnunanl Admiral Sir Ithndenck IM i Lord and ." %  • %  Plaal Lord Frase llaal N %  %  %  %  'hisk Aai I — IL llluekhurne Asks For Barllrop AMTIQUA Ma> 11 throughou; Antigua' %  uaar induatry aval gi a standstill nisai rartory has been 11 aman ornrfcei '.liked oui roi the third time u six days. i uaaiatl atop p.igcs M J irvest began on rebruao 17 Waterfront ilao on slrlke lii .i brnadcint the KW Bla.kbume Hid U he had cabk h Colon ia Crifflthi %  Labour AIL 1 -. sfontaerrai %  %  %  —Keuter LET US FORGET THE PAST Negotiate As Hartnfjrs In Happy Family J^CRAP the Cuban Pact Oive us iwo way tratlkc Help the West Indies to help Ihe Oonmon wealth as a whole This was what Mr Bottomley was told at Hastings House yesterday by the united voice of the Regional Economic Committee and tho British West Indies Sugar Association ii %  Mbeii domes tojd in Uniied Kingdom M Idtrikd 'i e ibrupt lermlnallAn ol i intended \ be aheourtfM istenv -. IM IhMS Uw*l tl i lymplonii uajy had ol merely those of shock 4 war SYRIA PROTESTS %  %  % %  H i*equence-; Keuter I think ii must be said of thi different matter May i tatemen; i is aotnf to happen U that it has added nothing to the not narrow the gap BF und of oui knowli-dgi' ol Ihii their prodlgioush high pi i ,,.,-; and thev are .teadiL rtni | West Indians were vcrv warn ihd fj* that >v| cannot ge' .. ,-, | ...,,1, .,.,.,. h lif-e loi what am ireuminaneei the rwomUna ..: tm Purthai that am h Mission would hgva b I lutevei Ihat we will be ablo warmth and BNf I.-l. K ,.liuii. howi iham wearing a scowl. t Wu lh ROlk) Ol n^ UnHi'd ilngd th.tt had nut ih.it %  cowl hare The deseaauott need ham to duubl us to knowlid.ge ol 'IK Veal Indian delegates "i iha vii'. uttla %  ato Mi C a nothing m in Iha lbs i eadet ul n>. dele itioii %  Kvin Ihe | (roai iw'ii io i" i al the W''.i in.in %  ai na of ua ." %  nol willing lo Isfta ApaaaJ .Madr When th.y examined tinstale* fully, thai (omul that %  ida I i dree to lohi net ii Kini'O. II. It #01 thi %  %  %  nirnt thrrivm> in lhsoli. • .in,h ii %  United Kinadom KU ursiilng to further thai ,! earned theb delegatet %  round thai labl< 'Do row aapai I i' i 11 .i-' %  %  i illy to an .ip.ui nui naaotlatl ngland. Ihroiigl" lona ailh uw is A. mie has been on*of dtsregnrd '•> ha huinaii factor Involvt i u ga r stlu.hori "• Mi Q< n* i*ked So long at thev prefarred lo as< Mine that altitude thr.v would Und i i oli nla o.i %  reluctant to iald to t furll %  %  "It is evident to us that we have barm oui run lura of that dlablcl ii i lodged I i Ibta le go .i mt furthar %  .i ia] t!..it o>a ti.i'.. bunc i-M-ti hara ef ll Wo BUssstton Ihe l.iit that we i iva made our oontrtbuUon la Iha t'-imbilitatiuii of this vast area IU have, with mine pride. ..died tha %  tarllna area When >ou oik us to consider the welfare ( the people of thiUnited Kingdom, I think am ought to nsk you i-onsidet our people Health Servirrs Mr. Gomes said that he thought infori mata thai the did not have mfllcleiit %  II mil in the .I'.lages or the eoionlei %  aa Ilia i>senci' of th most aaamentar) .i ul .iti.l :iii(1n .,1 inn %  -11-1 oinpare this with then miKtt %  %  whir' %  %  !•. ti admlUlna that wa cai %  %  %  Which is almost altogethei ugni ultural could i"i hop! maintain servmol UtM I i thinh wa have gi to admit that our responsibility to to ii in ithem at la*t the minimum 0l living that is compattbla with rirdtiuus i for these t ghtlna .uid fighting reaoluu %  In then lion %  You navi asked u hat we would da if . youi puMtlon W( you noa %  ould do if %  i %  n the W<: India ret thaj ; glut lani io i;ivi' thai nduatry Ity what. vt i to be abb to looa %  I te it and to plan lot it %  my was bused almit • %  •. igai whan rou appreciate that. >ilt rou *ill very readily '. preclaaly what %  Tha w. ..... ran therefon %  lumber ol Weak EgBB|Om> Ih< what was ob* % %  %  %  | DOPUl i %  nade lo pgy higher i %  CetVing for their rximrtWtu-r%  I they had their nrnr concerned it wgi a li \L Qomw rmti rn il to the way in which ii wai ax plained thai the t'nit.d Klnadopi had gntered neloni w'ith Cuba, as ueiaa CK%  I %  %  dlaagull • %  iceepl "We M l>el.ite ol ..:l.o.:-." he I know that Cuba marl.i t ii.i gnudl Ihsl ynu want to %  i .. %  %  o arncroui thai wa an M Hling la .t thai il is Cuba ... bsrmfned • %  nil t. m with nu whethei '"n wanl it ml M.I. i remind rou ih ii nine of I %  %  >l 'ii.it oarl on II :. .!.. i, does %  I. : ii i u| whal ; i %  . %  Itusiii.' i I'rior t lalin Mr thoufhl Ui il %  : %  Wi L i %  a United Kingdoms ti.ul. and gitwill aud I hey did not exptet trteiefnre ttinf i nftad Kingdom iheadd p IM .i pollCJ "l ii'ii.ting these %  ; trad ..I her inWi %  \tr fsaaaaa -Jiii iht he LU he ought t. t-ll UM delrsjllon that a* fjr ai the \V<->t Indlen-ert* aeasaaraHd laa Mhl • •>* only lu>l neslii Me had lrn ten werk In KngUnrt BMl real iir hid ifit ihe HI laallaa a 'Hi a rertaln ronHdenee in I In rondwlll of IsH I ngllsh rhe aenaed aaeee .olonie*. lie relurned iL-iilii-i'.ii. und >•• %  %  rioe lemperjinenUlly It wi iliil.-ult for him to hernnif \v-•• bitter, he had nol been bitter. "Wr think it nreeaaarv to is* thli Ui von %  rntlrmni. ihil || ysu i MIL i loyalty Irom ua. rou mutt br loyal to us as well." If Ihey %  .mi.-! that most undesirable i' in i..ii-i.i|. "h. i. ihe eol•II Irs would find It nreeasarv 1o BBBB p l whatever was Imposed on them uln-thrr or not thr> rr nl.'il II. rn-i.l. I -. in-.,|ln>. in.i II., option, thrn ll was for Ihrtn tn .! %  -. ul.Tha Lulled Kingdom had soon thing to am tha colonia 'In i .InsUlutloni and lhaii was of life loui ih-s ha,i iaoooni lh< ao| area could ear) wall learn as u vrowiug people, lint "you | damuged our trusl and our eouflli".' t % %  %  %  i I Wlthink thnt m honesty and br< | %  .ui* to be frank with you am %  btil rou n Well Knoui. Mistorv F weli-BJ %  Indlea f--ei thai I i ortunlty -.f puttli %  .i pi Inl ol %  %  i Inalni .rn imortunlb whfeh ma.' UM I ol OUI n-lalionhlp between tha United Klnatforr i.ni out %  this n .".-, of %  "Wr tifi thai artum yon baeh .i iha hhitor) the %  ifuUJ i leai thai ir 11 were known in its full d>-t.uU bv tiiosv i. %  ponalbli i BSBJ pocli i n I..' %  net living in U i rllorias, tinluaUoa of our %  %  loi i-.-orienrould bo %  pparanl DM I • m bui %  %  to v"i who -.•.-, in your hat-.: w, in i si thai we wlab Ith rou we wuh to t>< i ling ah> A.. .i in liui it Is a Iwo-wav 11 cannot be one-sided. • pool You rannot dl blood from ua to help voi. untes.s you give u ihr food neeesput new hl'>od in oui %  %  to some . • % %  sugar for England The I %  a. On augr 3 THE -ADVOCATE" DOM for NEWS DIAL 3113 Day or Nifht