Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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?





ESTABLISHED 1895

BUILD

D



West Indians Must

Go To Ottawa

“Adams Calls For “One Voice”

WEST INDIAN representation at the Ottawa
talks next week and a West Indian front on
sugar were demanded by Hon. Albert Gomes, Trini-
dad’s representative at the Regional Economic
Committee which opened in Barbados yesterday.

“Our government”, said Mr. Gomes, “has experienced con-
Siderable difficulty in working the Trade Liberalization

Plan,

Not Quite
The Same

Says Hanlon

(From Our Own Correspondent)

QUEENSLAND, May 14,
Draft copies of the Common-
wealth Agreement drawn up in
London last year and despatched
to Commonwealth Producers have
been found to differ slightly from
the original Terms of the Agree-
ment. This has been revealed by
Premier Hanlon who was
Australia’s representative at the
London negotiations and agree-
ment. Premier Hanlon has
asserted that Australia is taking
no risk on the interpretation ot
the five year agreement for ex-—
porting 600,000 tons of sugar to

Pritain annually from 1953.

He saia ne received a copy of
the draft agreement submitted to
all Commonwealth Sugar Pro-
ducers, He found there had been
seme slight departures from what
was agreed in London,

Acterations have been made in
Australia in the wording to ensure
the Agreement as made wouid be
carried out.

No More Cuts
In BWIA Staff

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May 16
No further cuts in B.W.I.A.
staff of services are contemplated
now or in the future, This assur-
ance was given by Sir



We think that whenever mat-
ters affecting the West Indies are
to be discussed, it is essential that
someone representing the West
Indies is there to represent the
interests of the West Indies.”

“It may be possible, if the rep-
resentatives of the other territor-
ies are Willing to meet and crystal-
lize our thoughts on the matter.
It is. something that we feel
should be given much thought.”

Agreement Necessary

With regard to the United
Kingdom delegation which is led
by Mr. Bottomley and which is
expected in Barbados this week-
end, Mr, Gomes said: “An agreed
point of view is necessary: we
must iron out our opinions: we
must be able to tell Mr. Bottom-
ley: “We have agreed: these are
our conclusions.”

When Mr. Robinson, President
of the British West Indian Sugar
Association stressed that the West
Indies could not act alone on the
question of sugar, but must nego-
tiate in London on a Common-
wealth basis, Mr. Gomes replied
that “even to say that to the
United Kingdom delegation will
require a considerable degree of
discussion.”

Mr, Adams agreed with Mr.
Gomes that there must be discus-
sion on West Indian representa-

tion at trade talks in Canada, but
suggested that owing to the
absence of the delegates from

British Guiana, discussion should
be postponed,

“If we are really going to be
effective” said Mr, Adams “we
have got to speak with one voice,”

Dutchman To
Study The Atom

AMSTERDAM, May 16.
Dutch Atomic Scientist Profes-





Miles] 80r C. J. Baker is flying to Argen-

Thomas, B.O.A.C. Chairman, just! tina tomorrow for a study trip

baek from a visit to the Caribbean ; °!

avea in ah exclusive interview
this afternoon.

Sir Miles said he was satisfied
that sufficient pruning had been
carried out on the West Indies
Airways, From now on B.W.1.A.
can look forward to real progress,
I want it to become a self-reliant
organisation”. he added. Discussing
the possibilities of jet aircraft
being used on the North Atlantic
route between the United King-
dom and New York and possibly
down to Nassau end Jamaica as
well, Sir Miles said it would be
two and a half years at least be-
fore this type of aircraft could be
brought in, B.O.A.C, had al-
ready had deliveries of a certain
type of jet aireraft—the Series
One “ghost” he ag jet—end ex-
perimental flights had been car-
ried out.

These had shown that from
B.O.A.C’s point of view “ghost”
engined jets were not suitable on
long distance flights such as
those involved in crossing the
North Atlantic,

Not Available

At the same time they were
entirely suitable for use on
short Empire routes such as
London-Rome and thence over—
land to Africa or India ana
Yakistan and it was hoped to
put them into service on these
routes before the end of the
year.

For the North Atlantic service,
however, B.O.A.C. were expect-
ing to use “Avon”-engined jets
and these would not be available
for over two years.

Referring to his visit to New
York, Sir Miles said that Ameri-
cans were showing increasing
interest in the Caribbean_afea as
a holiday resort and_-B.O.A.C.
were intending to reopen a
direet New York-Bermuda_ ser-
vice on June 1, as well as im-
proving services between Jarnaica

and New York, and Nassau and
New York. ;

He said these improvements
would partly come about as a
result of curtailment of the
Lendon-Santiago service which
ended last. month and thus

enabled B.O.A.C. to use aircraft

for other purposes



German Plants
For Mukden

WASHINGTON, May

16

told today that West German

arbados
UP WEST



FIVE WEST INDIANS :

THURSDAY, AY 17, 1961









BEFORE the historic Regional Economic Committee opened its deliberations at Hastings House yester

day these well-known West Indian
D. R. Walwyn (Montserrat), the

characters posed for the Advocate cameraman. Left to Right: Mr.
Hon. H. A. Cuke (Barbados), Professor Beasley (U.K., Chairman),

Mr. D. G. Lencock, Jnr. (Barbados), Hon. R. L. M, Kirkwood (Jamaica) aid Hon. Albert Gomes (Trini

dad).

Centre Goes

KINGSTON, Jca., May 16,

The Rockefeller Foundation will
cease active operations in Jamaica
at the end of July, and with this
the fate of the B.W.I. Public
Health Training Station in Jamai-
ca will rest with the local Gov-
ernment and Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare. The station is
headquarters for a scheme for
(training public health nurses,
sanitary inspectors, and meat and
food inspectors from British Car-
ibbean territories, and is support-
ed by funds from the Foundation,
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare, and the Jamaica Govern.
ment,

It has been learned that the
Foundation will consider continu-
ing financial aid to the station on
eendition that the local Govern.
ment and Colonial Development
and Welfare keep up their contri-
butions

The station trains an average
ef 50 health officers annually for
the British Caribbean, about half

nor a stud, of the trainees being Jamaicans
“unlimited duration”, it was | The territories from which stu-
learned here today. ‘dents are sent for a one-year

Prefessor Baker will go to the] course include Antigua, Barbados.

island Huemuel in Nahuel Huapi
lake near Bariloche where Ar-
gentina’s atomic research is being
carried out under the guidance of
Austrian-born Professor Ritcher.

The Netherlands news agency
understands that the Dutch scien-
tist’s trip is probably the result
of talks which Prince Bernhard |
had with President Peron during}
his recent goodwill visit to Ar-|
gentina,
. Argentine interest in the Dutch
,eyclotron in Amsterdam was
{manifested during those talks it
is learned, and Professor Baker
is taking model of it with him.

—Reuter.



Whirlwind Kills 3

TAIPEH, Formosa, May 16.

A whirlwind over Chinese
Nationalist naval headquarters in
southern Formosa killed three
cadets and injured over 100.
The whirlwind, which raged for
three hours, developed three
miles out at sea yesterday after
a flash of lightning,

Three civilians walking on the
beach were sueked up and were
still missing, it was réported,

—Reuter.



Campaign To Help

Blind In
LONDON, May 16.

The British Empire Society for
the blind is launching on Empire
Day (May 24) a campaign to help
1,000,000 people in the colonies
estimated to be blind

The incidence of blindness in
the West Indies is believed to be
at least three times that of the
United Kingdom, but actually eye
disease in the colonies generally
cannot be accurately assessed
though it has been’ variously
estimated at frem 10 to 15 per
cent. of the population.

Seventy-five per cent. of this
blindness and eye disease, said the
statement issued today, is pre-
ventable.

“Many colonies lack eye special-
ists amd few have eye hospitals.
lithere is nto opthalmic research

{centre in the Colonial Empire.”
|

The Senate sub-Committee was ‘Working in overerowded

| clinics in the colonies, doctors save

firms had arfanged to ship a Com-j{thousands of eyes each year, but

plete power plant to Mukden in
Commun-|bling for lack of simple treatment,

Manchuria, province of





ist China. Kenneth Hansen inves-
tigator for the Senate sub-Com-|
mittee on export contr and poli
cies, said he has seer actua
¢ for the order and ship-
T re Tangiers |

€
further action hari been taken bs
the authorities—Regiter

|great numbers of people still go

sight of
cestr
parents
eye health

thousands of
each

gnorant of

jand_ the
ldren

year










British Honduras, British Guiana
Grenada, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, St
Vineent, Trinidad and Turks
Island. In addition there are sev-
ernl refresher courses.—(C.P.)



South Africans |
Hit 388-9

BRISTOL, May 16.
The South African touring team
are running into their best form.







Following their victory over
Glamorgan, the tourists made a
sound start against Gloucester-

shire today in scoring 388 for nine
wickets, their highest total of
ihe tour so far.

Young opening batsmen Jackie
McGlew (90) and John Waite (62)
put together 169 runs in the best
partnership of the tour and later
Jack Cheetham (92) and his Cap-
tain Dudley Nourse (38) added
95 in 85 minutes in a sparkling
fourth wicket partnership

But all batsmen exercised cau-
tion when facing fast bowler
George Lambert who claimed five
wickets for 78

—Reuter

Colonies

means of preventing eye disease

There would be a_ continuous
eampaign by films, radio, leaflets.
and the Press to teach people how
to preserve their own and their
children’s sight.

At Least £ 1,000,000
Grants would be made to volun—
tary bodies to extend and improve
research facilities of eye hospital:
and clinics, and to develop exist
ing schools and training centres,
Regional offices staffed by experts
would be established in each
principal area. They would
stimulate ‘and co-ordinate work
for the blind bY Government and
unofficial agencies.
Appeals are being made this
year for at least £1,000,000. It is
hoped to raise half that sum in the

United Kingdom, in certair
dominions and in the Unitec
States.

The Society concludes: “Blind

people in the colonies live as family
dependents cr as beggars wander
ing from town to town 3lind
children are often exploited by
beggars guilds, and there is fii
‘|



dence that few African tribes







practise infantifMde of blind «
dren. Blindness and eye disease|
Y r es of disability and
@ m will ate ease
t y 1on pro eri
Col 4] Empire’’.—Reuter



B.W.L. Health| REDS MAY HIT |

WITH THE MOON,

By ROSS MARK

SOMEWHERE IN KORBA, May 16.
Another major attempt to smash the United Nations army
in Korea will be launched within days or possibly houyrs,
General Bryan, Commander of the American 24th Division
forecast tonight. The full moon is tomorrow.

He said if Chinese were willing

lraq Sends Army i aceept even more appalling

losses than in their previous offen-




. ry . ee sive, they could possibly push
Units lo Aid ‘ Pia} bck the Allied line, But they
" would come up against a “couple

BAGDAD, May 16. 4 yot¢brandendweweapons/!.hevsaid.

The Pasha of Iraq told Parha-
ment today that the Iraqi army
Royal Bodyguard and anti-aircraft

Bryan added: “My men killed
about 9,000 Chinese during the
first day of their attack three

units arrived in Syria today '6] weeks ago. The terrible toll rose

defend Syrian territory against/to about 20,000 of their total

ony air attacks. attacking foree of 35,000 in two
The move was taken after full] and q half days of slaughter.

accord with the Syrian Govern “My present defence line -is im-
ment, and is designed to meet] meisurably stronger and my men
any Israeli aggression against!) could inflict much heavier casual-

Syrian territories ties. But there is a limit to the
number of men one can kill.”

Long range Allied patrols were
also active. They fanned out north
and east of Seoul seeking a Chin-
ese strong point.

Jets, fighter-bombers and artil
lery pounded dug-in Communists
in the hills northeast of Vijongbu
after a United States tank and in-
fantry force had attacked their
position,

Another tank and infantry team
battled for two hours with a Com-
munist pocket further west befor:
returning to its own lines

“Iraqi army units will not re-
turn to Iraq until Syria does not
require them’.

A Damascus report yesterday
said it was understood that Syrian
Premier Khaled Azim had told an
Arab League Political Committee
meeting there that representa
tives of a number of Arab states
had expressed readiness to give
immediately such military help
as Syria may ask,—Reuter.





Arias Goes On Trial

Communist self-propelled guns

brought up to support the renewed

PANAMA, May 16 offensive shelled patrols at several

The police carried out a new] points north of the key junction
round-up on Wednesday of mem-]of the Han and Pukhan Rivers
bers of the ousted President Communists were filtering south
Arnulfo Arias’ Cabinet as the}in growing strength under cove)



of low clouds which have obscured
hilltops.—-Reuter,

death toll from last week's bloody
rioting mounted to 17, Arias him
self ig in jal) and will stand trial
on May 25 charged with abusing
his constitutional powers





Will Review Arms
Plau Of 12 Nations

LONDON, May 16,
States diplomats and
from North Atlantic
Pact Nations began a two-day
secctet conference here today on
Jive practical. aspects of Delence,

They will review the rearma-

(C.P.)

United
diplomats

ment programmes of the 12
nations and prepare recommenda
tions. to strengthen the defence

and. economy of Western Europe
No policy decisions will be taken

Charles Spoffard, Chairman of
the Atlantic Pact Council of
Deputies is presiding.



—Reuter.

| Danger Found
In Cosmic Rays



DENVER, Colorado, May 16

The diseovery of danger to
humans {n cosmie rays at high alti-
tudes was reported Wednesday
by the United States Navy to the
Aero Medical Association.

This hazard begins at about 20
miles Up where rocket planes are
expected to fly. Harm is similar
to effects of radio activity.—C.P.



CASE CLOSED
OSLO, Norway, May i6.
The case of Lyford Moore, ABC
correspondent, whose body was











ee cme enema reet nnn ts nnn

NDIAN ECONOMY

ynoressow | AND BUILD A NATION





PRICE: FIVE CENTS



Compromise,| Says Sir George

U.S. Tells
Persia—U.K.

By DENYS CORREY SMITH
LONDON, May 16
The United States is believed
in diplomatic quarters here to have
advised Britain and Persin to go
to extreme limits of compromise in
seeking a negotiated settlement in
oil nationalisation
But London has been taking
steps to achieve as perfect an
agreement with Washington on the

crisis before sending her next
and possibly decisive note to
Persia

Britain is still
comments from the
on this note,

awaiting final
United States
despatch of which

to Persia is still delayed it is
understood here

In the hope of paving the
way to future negotiations

Britain may propose despatching a
ministerial mission to Teheran, it

is understood, to handle any future

aiscussions with the Persian Gov
ernment

Sir Francis Shepherd, British
Ambassador in Teheran today

cabled to the Foreign Office an
account of his talk with Nagher
Khazer, Persian Foreign Minister,
yesterday

Although it was deseribed as 4
courtesy visit, Sir Francis is be
lieved to have discussed Britain’
latest views on the Persian decisica
to nationalise the Anglo-Iranian
Oil Company’s installations

Herbert Morrison who is 69
holiday in the Isle of Wight was
again in touch by telephone with
the Foreign Office today to receive
latest reports of developments in
Teheran, London and Washington,
He will return to London tomor
row .—Reuter,



Bradley Excused
Until Monday

WASHINGTON, May 16

The joint Senate Inquiry Com
mittee today voted 19 to 6 to ex
cuseé General Bradley until nex
Monday as a witness, He is duc
to attend the Armed Forces Day
celebrations in California tate:
this week

Questioning of Bradley was de

layed while Senators debater
whether they should insist on hi:
telling them about private talk

President Truman

The President’s Press Secre
tary, Joseph Short, told a new
conference today that Truman di
not wish Bradley to testify abou!
their confidential talks on the di
missal of General MacArthur

“The President made the de
cision Conversations which led
up to it are his busines

At the opening of the twelft!
day of the hearings today the
Republicans appeared to be di
vided on whether they would re
new efforts to probe these
versations,—Reuter

with

con





Britain Backs
U.S. In Struggle

NEW YORK, May 16.

Sir Gladwin Jebb, Chief British
delegate to the United Nations
pledged Tuesday night that Brit-
ain will stand wholeheartedly
with the United States in the
general struggle against Commu
ist inspired aggression,

Jebb defended Britain’s recor«
in the Korean War and her trade
policy toward Communist Chin:
in a speech before the New Yorh
City Bar Association

“Everything we can do short o!
fatally weakening our main posi-
tion to assist the general effort we
shall do, even if that results as it
may well result, in some lowering
ef the standard of living in Grea



Britain itself, which has been s«
laboriously built up = since the
war.”

He said Britain, early in the

wat, had halted exports of strate-
gic materials to Communist China

particularly of petroleum prod
ucts, but not of rubber Now
rubber shipments also were em
bargoed.—(CP)



Fifteen Arrested

MADRID, May i6
Barcelona police announced to
day the arrest of 15 men allegec

to have tried to organise strike
there and neighbouring Matar:
on May 1. Police said they be
longed to thé outlawed anarchist
Confederation and had obeyec
orders from its exiled committes

in France. They said they had
distributed 100,000 leaflets in Bar-
celona,.—Reuter,



BOLIVIAN PRESIDENT











jfound on Sunday in an Oslo fjord RESIGNS
jafter he had been missing for five BUENOS. AIRES, May 16
}mcnths is considered closed, Police New reports from Boliviz
| Saicl Tuesday broadcast by radio stations here
| Franz Kaltenborn, Chief of |today snid that a military junt
} Police asserted an autopsy pYro-|tad ized control of the eountry
a ; Bar j}duced no evidence that Moore/ end that the President had 1
LINDA CHRISTIAN died by violence—O,P, signed.—Reuter
bast ca y 427 | ‘ip
7 I YORK, May 16 e e i at Mat *
Film yrone Power
nounced te t } wife I LONDON, May 16
Chri in is expectis vat Be AIN’S ARMED FORCES t i 809,000 100,000
Ovrtober He et f | '
| neer ' nonth ( I
t line Niew Amsterdam | ¢ ‘I p ti ‘ rate aha
Jerse T Ope Reuter, | ' -Reuter

SWEEP away frustration and weakness: don’t be
isolated and disunited: build up a self-reliant

British West Indian economy.

That was the message Sir George Seel gave to the delegates
attending the First Regional Economic Committee of the
West Indies at Hastings House yesterday

Sir George conveyed the follow-
ing message from the Right Hon-
ourable James Griffiths, M.P.,
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies :—



jture to hope that when this mat-

ter comes to be discussed, there
will be agreements as to the need
for an agency, both in Canada

and the United Kingdom, which

“IT warmly welcome the estab-|can represent West Indian tzade

lishment of the Regional Economic
“ommittee, which holds its inau-
gural meeting today The pro-
posal that such a Committee
should be set up was first put for-

ward at the Conference on the
Closer Associntion of the West
Indian Colonies held at Montego

Boy in September 1947, and much
thought has since been given
the practical details of the project,
It has given me grent satisfactien
to learn that all the Governments

concerned have now decided to
participate in the work of the
Committee,

“This decision is, I believe, one
of considerable significance, I be-
lieve that by providing a means
for effective regional cooperation
in economic matters, the Commii-
tee will contribute materially (o

the strength and well-being of thet calling

participating territories, which
have hitherto lacked any machin-



interests with the backing of all
the territories. I am sure there is
no better way of ensuring that
the voice of the West Indies is
heard with attention,

Perhaps I should pause here to
say that I fully realise that when
I use the term ‘British West
Indies’, I may seem to delegates

to}|from the continental territories to

take things a little too much for
granted, But whether West In-
dian or Caribbean, or some other
term, does not really matter in
this connection. The thing of im-
portance I would urge, is to re-
member throughout your discus-
sions that unity, under whatever
name, is strength,
Economic Problems

The agenda paper lists a num-
ber of current economic problems
for early attention. Of
these, all I would say is that I
leave them to you members of the

ery for speedy and regular con-|Committee, and to your Chair-
sultation on economic questions,}|man, I don't propose to ascend
or for the expression of united] with you into the higher realms of
views on major issues of common {economic thought; on the other
concern within this fleld hand, I trust that none of you will
Co-operation descend into the arena of mere

“T welcome the spirit of co-{controversy, I hope you will find
operation in which representatives | yourselves able to propound



Caribbeen have come to Berba-
dos, and [ wish the Committee all
ssible success I shell follow

discussions with close atten-





its
tion

various British territories in the }agreed solutions, for

again, unity
is strength,

You will also have the oppor-
tunity of discussions with a Mis-
sion from His Majesty's Govern-
ment in the United Kingdom,
headed by Mr. A, G. Bottomley,
M.P., the Secretary for Overseas
‘Trade, and including senior official
representatives of the Colonial
Office, the Board of Trade, and the
Ministry of Food,

The visit of this Mission to Bar-
bados indicates the high value
which the United Kingdom Gov-
ernment place upon the Regional
Economic Committee, as a body
with which questions of economic
policy affecting both Great Brit-
ain and the West Indies can be
discussed in full confidence be-
tween Lhe parties

The main object of this Mission
is to explain the position in re-
gard to sugar which has arisen in
the course of negotiations with
Cuba, and to obtain full informa-
tion as to the views of the West
Indies on it. It is the Mission's in-
tention to hold a meeting in Lon-
don, on their return, with repre-

| sentatives of other Commonwealth

SIR GEORGE SEEL

“Being myself neither a mem-
viser”’ said Sir George
hope to be more than an observer
at your meetings from time to
time as and when any matters
arise in the course of your discus-
sion in which you may think that
I can help, But perhaps you will
first allow me a few moments to
make one or two comments

It gives me very great pleasure
indeed to welcome you to Hastings
House, and to express my earnest
jesire that your discussions may
ve fruitful. We are proud, in the
Development and Welfare Organi-
ation, that our Headquarters
should be the scene of what, we
ire confident, will prove to be an



‘vent of profound signifieance in
he economic history of the Brit+
h Caribbean territories

You hive before you an agenda
yaper packed with items of great
mportance. Among these the



nitial tas s that of so organising
yourselves es to place the Regional
Economic Committee upon a

‘table and efficient footing. Per-
saps, looking to the future, this
may be the most important of

your tasks, We may be able to be
of some service to you here, as we
have ourselves a certain continu-
ty of existence as a regional
entre, But I am most anxious
hat the Regional Economic Com-
mittee should not at any time
ippear to be a creature of the De-
velopment and Welfare Organisa-
ion, and I am sure that in this I
hare the views of the members of
the Committee itself

W.L. Trade Commissioner

Another important matter which
will fall to be discussed is the pro-



|
ber of this Committee, nor an ad-| ‘
“L cannot} 22nd of May,

producers, at which of course
Londen representatives of the
West Indies will also be welcome
The Mission is expected to arrive
in Barbados on Saturday next, and
to leave on Tuesday evening, the

Journey's End
There is one thing more that |

would venture to say about this
meeting. If we looked for it:
full significance only to the
printed page of your agenda, I

am quite certain that we shoult
not be assembled with the sense
of history that fills our minds
today. This meeting is a point of
departure, the beginning of 4
journey of which we cannot see
the limits, :

You have the opportunity,
gentlemen, of creating, subject io
the sanction of your governments
to what you may propose, a per~-
manent body competent to co-
ordinate the economic policies 0°
more than a dozen British Wes
Indian territories, and to repre-
sent them to the outside world
with authority and strength.

The absence of a fully com-
petent co-ordinating authority is,

as things stand today, a_ fatal
impediment to the successful
further development of these
territories. Internationally, there
is no such thing as a_ British
West Indies, and one must be

frank and recognise that in inter-
national negotiations, even the
largest West Indian territories
cannot hope to count individually
for a great deal.

That is, I suppose, one, reason
why many thoughful people in
this area have been anxious to
see the creation of a British
West Indian Federation and
indeed it is difficult for outsiders,



and especially those with ihe
instinet for administrative _ tidi-

understand the slowness
Indian Government

to

ness,

of the West

ct for setting up a regular West

Indic Trade Commissioner Ser-]|in reaching decisions on the pro-
i¢é in the United Kingdom as posuls made last year by the
well as in Canada, The British| Standing Closer Association
West Indies have had a Trade} Committee, ‘
Commissioner of their own in But one must be practical, and
Canada for a number of years, and} Tealise that a federal British
| should like to pay tribute to the] West Indian Government coulc
valuable services which Mr. Rex|mot be imposed _ for purely
Stollmeyer has rendered in this administrative reasons, and that
rppointment fany such plan must be fully

At the same..time I . think he understood, and willingly accept-
would agree with me if I say that ed, in all the territories, betore
it has been a serious handicap to it can have any chance of péer-

him that there has been no central
able to speak in trade mat-

ter for the British West Indies
is a whole, to which he could look
for support and for instruction
The same is true of the West In-
dia Committee in London, which
has also served this area weil

Y field f trade and ct



a | THE “ADVOCATE

Tnanent success,

At the same time
cal, we should accept
of recent events, and realise
in the meantime, other countries

being practi-
the Indi

thot
ha

@ On page 5.
| pavs for NEWS

DIAL 3113
\ Day or Night







PAGE TWO



Carub Calling

MISS HSU From Hongkong

H*® EXCELLENCY the
Governor, Lady Savage and



party attended the opening per-
formance of “A -Shop ai Sl;
Cornet a Bridgetown Players
production, which opened at the
Empire Theatre last night,

This is the Bridgetown Players
eighteenth production and the
first time for many years that
they are running their show for
three nights and one ‘:natinee

One-Day Visit
M®* J. NUNES, one of the

Managing Directors of
Messr: William Fogarty Ltd.,
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
on a one-day visit. Carib under—
stands that he and his wife will
shortly be leaving Trinidad for
England via New York.

Shopping and Lunch

ESTERDAY, the opening
session of the Regional
Economic Committee's Confer-~
ence over, most of the visiting
delegates headed for Bridgetown.
Some went shopping, others
junched at Goddard’s. Mr. W.
urtenay, the British Hon-

H. Ce
ad




delegate came in via Trini-
de yesterday aftCrnoon and five
hours later

the British Guiana
delegates arrived on B.W.1.A’s
B.G. flight.

Arriving on the same plane as
Mr. Courtenay were Mr. Keith
McCowan Secretary of the
B.W.IS.A. whe has come over
“i meeting of this Associatiort.

Wroug title
] SEE that I gave Comdr, E
H. Allen. R.N. his wrong
title yesterday. Comdr. Allen is
Mechanical Supt. of the Dem-

erara Bauxite at McKenzie. He
and his wife are on a short visit
to Barbados. They leave for
B.G. during the middle of next
week.

Back From Tobago,

RS. WINIFRED SMITH of

Hopewell, St. Thomas, who
spent a short holiday in Tobago,
returned yesterday afternoon by
B.W.1.A. via Trinidad . . Mr,
Nestor Baiz, Director of Bottlers
Ltd., who was in Barbados for a
few days, returned to Trinidad on
Tuesday night.

Rita; The End
HE MARRIAGE of Rita
Hayworth and Aly Khan is
at an end.. At last her lawyer in
the United States admits Miss
Hayworth is considering seeking
a divorce.

Less than two years ago—in
May. 1949-——accounts of their
wedding filled hundreds of
columns in the newspapers of
the world,

Soon the story of the cdisentan-
gling will be filling hundreds
more.

Where Snoop-meat Goes
OM oe -SIX women and 554

men make up the Food
Ministry’s Enforcement Officer’s
department in England. Their
job it is to catch butchers or
other shopkeepers giving cus-
tomers more rations than they
are entitled to get.

What happens to the meat the
Enforeement Officers buy when
trying to trap butchers?

Say the Ministry: “It is given
to hospitals against a receipt,” is
the official reply.



BY

( WNERS of large country

estates might well consider,
as an alternative to charging for
admission, having their wives
tattooed, with a view to starting a
circus

A Pittsburg lady has just won
a divo ease against a husband
who “was always trying to get
her tattooed, so that he could open
a circus,’ I can imagine a con-
vergation on the terrace. “Do
you mean you want me to have
a sort of serpent and anchor busi-
ness stamped on my forearm?”
“Well, more or less. Or two
hearts *transfixed by an arrow.”
“And then?” “Oh, well, my dear,
IT thought you could wear tights
and hand the ape a glass of port,
or ride two horses at once, or
something.” “And what do you
suppose my people would say?”



“Well, the Canon might object;
but Charles and Diana would
laugh themselves sick.” ‘Thanks.
No.”

Getting out of the Rul

Men are afraid of being uncon-
ventional in their dress,
(Evening paper.)
OT Vidange, the Surrealist
painter. He puts. his legs
through the arm-holes of his
waistcoat, thrusts his trousers
over his head, upside dowr, so
that his arms go into the legholes,
hangs his coat on a hook attached
to his shirt, stuffs his socks into
the lining of his hat and ties his
shoes over his knees with his
braces. Thus prepared, he paints
green circles on bleached tree-



THE WAY By a aa cs



She likes bowling alleys:

Silhouette Girl
LIM Chinese girl wearing the

Shanghai silhouette gown
is seeing London for the first
time.

She is Miss Lilian Hsu, who

comes from Hongkong with her

father, Mr. K. H. Hsu, big
Chinese corporation lawyer,
They are among 125 Chinese
flown from Hongkong to the
British Industries Fair.

Miss Hsu is 22, speaks her

English with a_ slight American
accent, This she acquired as a
student at a university near
Chicago. In China she is secre-
tary in a business firm,

In Miss Hsu's
gowns she weats
are called ishang. They have a
close-fitting collar and reach
down to the ankles in a_one-
piece sheath, slit to the knees at
each side,

Only the small-boned Chinese
figure and graceful neck are
suited to this dress, It sets off
the Oriental good looks of Miss
Hsu’s rosebud mouth and soft
black eyes.

country the
so gracefully



~~ ADVENTURES OF PIPA

bark with a brush made of barbed
wire.

Chaos, 1 Fear

HATTER caused a sensation

at a session of the Cockle-
carrot Commission yesterday by
saying: “If the Dorset Coast
Erosion Commission gives expert
advice on sleeping in brimless
bowlers, what is to stop me from
giving expert advice on coast
erosion?” A member of the Com-
mittee, Mr. Paul Bibbett, had
been talking ignorantly about the



With U.B.O.T.

R. AND MRS. JOSEPH A.

McGRATH flew in from
Trinidad yesterday by_B.W.1.A, to
spend three weeks holiday at
Indramer Guest House. Mr, Mc
Grath is with U.B.O.T. in Point
Fortin.

Coming in by the same plane
were two of Hon. Albert Gomes’
daughters Sandra and Vanessa.
They plan to spend six weeks at
the Sandy Beach Hotel.

Oft to Jamaica

R. AND MRS: RAY De SILVA

who left Barbados on Tues-
day night by B.W.1.A. for Trini-
dad flew to Jamaica yesterday
where Mr. de Silva is stationed
with the Royal Bank of Canada
in Kingston. Mrs de Silva is the
former Dorothy Eckstein, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Eckstein of
Casablanca, Maxwells.

Paper!
DULL DAY at Seawel!l was
considerably brightened On
the arrival of Prof Seaton better
known as “Majahara”, who came
in on B.W.1.A’s flight from Trini-
dad yesterday afternoon.

Shortly after he entered the
Terminal Building, he tore a small
piece of paper from a _ travel
folder, stopped: a passing porter,
put the piece of paper into his
mouth, then proceeded to pull
reams of paper out the porter’s
mouth, much to the amusement
and astonishment of everyone.

Prof. Seaton told Carib that he
was in Barbados about four years
ago, when he performed at the
Lodge School. He has just re-
turned from a tour through Ger-
many

Eyesore Gone

BUILDING now nearing com—
pletion is being erected on
the site of the burnt out Rendez-
vous Beach Club at Paynes Bay
and so an eyesore of charred wood
and broken masonry has been re-
moved.
The first tenant of the new house
is to be the Vicar of St. John the
Baptist Church, Rev. Alfred Hatch,
pending the building of a new
vicarage near the Church

Western Style
TACKS of ‘hay’, old cartwheels
and the general appearance of
the good old West will be the
interior decorations in the ball-
room of the Crane Hotel on Satur—
day night. The dance ig in aid

of the St Winifred’s Building
Fund, ti aida,
When St Winifred’s Schoo!

found that it had to move from
its old site in George Street,
Belleville, it was thougnt at one
time that the school would close
down. However, “Welbeck” in
Pine Hill was purchased and the
school moved there in January,
1950. Every year a dance is just
one of the ways of helping to pay
off the debt.

The Police Dance Orchestra will
supply the music which begins at
9.30 p.m.

Costume for those attending is
optional, but why not make it
Western Style,







Copyright P36 Vaz Dias Int Amsterdam







vents in a bowler. He described
a brimless bowler as a mere pud-
ding-basin. But Sir Hoskyn Rock,
of the Worshipful Company of
Vent-Borers, at once replied that
vents or holes in a pudding~—basin
would be superfluous, “The pud-
ding would drop through,” he
said, “Not if it was lumpy,”
corrected Mrs. Symington. “Is it
suggested that to sleep in a brim-
less pudding-basin 2” began
the Rev. Lucius Larkins. He was
interrupted by a loud ery of
“Yes!” followed by shouts of “No!”





JUNIOR. COMPETITION

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to send in
a humorous essay, story or poem on the subject of “A TOP HAT.”
The best entry will be published every Monday in The Evening Advo-
cate, and the winner will receive a prize to the value of 7/6 in either

books or stationery.
Advocate Co., Ltd., City, not later

NOTE ;

Entries must reach The Children’s Editor, The

than Wednesday every week,

Stories must not be copied.

Send this coupon with your story,

JUNIOR COMPETITION

Form

g 36”
peo"
wc”
8 36”

me
int

DIAL 4696

ee ee ee tee ee et

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES
4

—_ A. ar a se po, Ay a fp

A NR ek ha eG Se pf

ALL OVER LACE WHITE & COLOURS $2.35 & $2.77B eerie OF VICKS V
FLOWERED SPUN Be eer! st
FLOWERED LINEN SPUNS
TAFFETA in WHITE & COLOURS ___85¢
goo STRIPED RAYONS
geo" STRIPPED CREPE

$1.37 & 1.40
L777

$1.80
_$2.00

DIAL 4220



j return of empty package,

‘

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Gagsters Keep An B.B.C. Radio |



Eye On Bob Hope

ty

Beverley

Haxter. M.P.

After watching Mr. BOB HOPE for an hour and a quarter
at the Prince of Wales Theatre I seriously believe that he

has a sense of humour. The sa

ess of the clown is one of the

theatre’s oldest traditions, but I’ cannot believe that Mr.
Hope is a “merry man moping mum whose sou! is sad and

whose face is glum.”

In the first place his counten-
ance is anything but glum. His
lively eyes are set so wide apart
that he seems to be taking in
everything to right and left o1
him; his forehead is broad and
philosophical, his nose is amia-
ble and his mouth is cheerfully
innocent. What is more, he is
the only human being who cai
chew gum without offence to the
onlooker.

Yet if you waich him clesely you
will discover a furtive apprehen-
s.veness in his expression. It does
not come from a fear of the audi-
ence, for we were on good terms
from the beginning. i suggest that
it is caused by the knowledge that
his brigade of gag writers and
publicists, men with sallow cheeks
and sad eyes, are standing in the
wings. Once he fluffed a joke and

ve could almost feel the despair of “%

the harpies off stage.

FOR the first fifteen minutes

his jokes were about Blackpool,
Dudley and Manchester, where he
had appeared before marching on
London. We could visualise the
serious conference with his gag-
siers when they explained about
the humour of Manchester’s cli-
mate.
_ Then there was Dudley. What
is Dudley to himn or hé to Dudley?
Ideas are discussed, dropped, re-
vived and sorted.

“I met the Lord Mayor of Dud-
ley,” Mr. Hope confided to us at
the Prince of Wales, “ and I ask-
€d him where Dudley was. He
said that he didn’t know, himself.”
Or words to that effect. The gag-
sters had not explained in vain.

He told us how much Jack
Benny enjoyed his visit to Lon-
don. “He was awfully excited

when he discovered that coin you
call a halfpenny. He found it so
useful for tipping.”



Rupert and t

tht NE
i \




At Rupert's question the strange
man sighs. ‘It's not impossible,’’
he says. ** I'm making a wonderful
medicine which will let one sleep
all the winter. I've nearly done it.
1 need one more very rare plant,
then it will be perfect. But that's
enough about me. | want to know



a)
Continuing "Be on
to
TUESDAY
4.45 & 8.30

p.m.







Peo
ee
Soy
=



BOB HOPE

A little later he appeared in an
eight-gallon Texan hat and with
a semi-Southern drawl assured
us that he nevah took his hat off
to any man. No, Suh. Then he
added: “Ah cahn’t get it off.
Ah've got an eight-gallon hat but
a nine-gallon head.”

This, you will agree, is the
very stuff of humour, My only
criticism is that he does not suffi-
ciently exploit his gift of carica-
ture. Naturalness can be dis-
arming, but it should be balanced
with artifice.

I liked Mr, Hope immensely.
In a world that is harsh and
parehed he has brought the warm-—
ing sunshine of laughter. Such
a Man deserves our gratitude.

—L.E.S.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED



r---28

more about you. | haven't seen you
Properly yet. Where are my
specs ?'’ He fumbles on a shelf to
find a very large pair of glasses
ang he peers at Rupert through
them. He stares and stares and
seems to be suddenly speechless, as
if he can't believe hie own ever





Programme





THURSDAY MAY 17, 1951
6% am.—I2 15 p.m, 9 6M
6.30 a.m, Sports Diary; 6.45 a.m

Sporting Record; 7 a.m. The News; 7.10
am, News Analvsis; 7.15 a.m. Fron
the Editorials; 7.30 a.m, The Noise and
the People; 7.45 a.m. Land and Live-
stock; 6.15 a.m, Listeners’ Choice; 8.3
am. Inia Te Wiata; 8.45 am Engin-
eering Achievements; 9 a.m. The News;
9.10 a.m. Home 4News from Britain
915 a.m, Clore Down; 11.15 a.m.
Programme Parade; 11 25 a.m. Listen-
ers’ Choice; 11.45 a.m, Statement of
Account; 12 noon The News; 12.10 New
Anaiysis; 12.10 p.m, Close Down

4.15—6.45 por.

19 76 M



4.15 p.m. Top Score; » p.m. Composer
of the Week; 5.15 p.m. Scottish Maga
zine; 5.45 p.m. Semprini_at the Pianc
6 p.m. BBC Symphony Orchestra; 6.45
p.m. Programme Parade.

6 0O—11.00 p.m,

25.53 M., 3122 M



6.45 p.m. Programme Tarade; 7 p.m
The News; 7.10 p.m, News Analysis
7.15 p.m. We See Britain; 7.45 p.m
The Noise of the People; 8 p.m. Radic
Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. The Adventures °
PC. 49; 8.45 p.m. Interlude; 8.55 p.m
From the Editorials; 9 p.m. Special
Dispatch; 9.15 p.m. Have a Go; 9,45 p.m
Do you Remember; 10 p.m. The News
10.10 p.m Light Music; 1045 ".m
Moray McLaren Talking; 11 pom. From
the Third Programme .

C.B.C. PROGRAMME

THURSDAY MAY 17, 1951

News;
This Week in Canada.

10.00-—10.15 p.m
10.15—10.30 p.m

CROSSWORD



Across

1. Where they dope flesh? (9)

8. Tease where the tan ts late. (9)

10. Dispiace your cap in extreme
fright. (5) 12, Cut off. (3)

13. Not childish, or even womanish.
(5) 14, It’s a grand canal. (5)

16. Blue. (5)
18. To 1.0.U.s he’s irksome. (3)
19. Not so plentiful. (5)
. This tin is a bird. (3)
21. Even a small saint around this
word will provide the way. (4)
22, Breaks evens. (5)
23. Proves the egg dad led to be
mixed was rotten. (6-3)
Down
. Law broken in the start in sturd
fashion. (8) 2 At random. (9
Charmea to demean our altera-
tion. (9) 4. Neat eruption, (4)

Ship ropes, (8) 6. Greasy. (4)
Hanging on. {3}

Called for a lame O.1.D. (7)
Only a broken vesta. (5)
Dance in the cotton-mill? (4)

1
%
5
9 Cara game
6
7





Solution of vesterday’s puzzle.— Across:
', Pomposity; 7, Nauten; 11, End; 12,
Reaper: 13, Gloaming: 14, Mutinied; 16.
Alas: 17, Ante: 20, Tale; 21. Ray; 22,
Irksome; 25, Corn; 24, Well. Down: 1,
Pneumatic; 2. Mud; 3, Ocean; 4. Sham;
5, Impietv:; 6. Trend: 8 Angular; 9,
Jrrois; 10. Argument: 15, Talk; 18, Name:
19 Evil; @L, Row.





"RICHARD TODD GIVES THE GREATEST PERFORM
HEDOA HOPPE

R




RONALD REAGAN PATRICIA NEAL-RICHARD TODD PLAZA town

Extra Special:

“CARIBBEAN”





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ruin sleep and _ ener another day
without trying MENRACO, This great
internal medicine works thru the
bleod, thus reaching the bronchial
tubes and lungs. Starts helping nature
immediately to remove thick, sticky
mucus, thus alleviating coughing and
promoting freer breathing and more
refreshing sleep, Get MENDACO
from your chemist today. Quick satis-
faction or money back guaranteed,



S/

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pains, itching and torment from Piles
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$2.68 each
$3.10 each

CHECK OUR PRICES ON THE ABOVE

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.
Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039

THURSDAY, MAY 17,, 1951

=





=S
——

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Upstairs Over Newsam’s













Lower Broad Street -t-

rca
SS



| DRESSES of all Types

Ready-Made from London
Also Made-to—Order

BATHING SUITS — LINGERIE — STOCKINGS
COCKTAIL HANDBAGS









PLAZA Theatre~Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

Last 2 Shows TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

“THE RETURN OF THE
F THE SADDLE
FRONTIERSMAN oe " Dick Foran
GORDON McRAE





The T < in and continuing

e Teenagers @ #

“HIGH SCHOOL HERO” HASTY HEART
Freddie Stewart Ronald Reagan, Patricia Neal,

“LIVING GHOST” James Dunn Richard Todd

GALETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James
Last Show TONITE 8.30
“TARZAN TRIUMPHS”"
Johnny Weissmuller
“WEST OF THE PECOS”
Robert Mitchum

FRI. to SUN. 8.30 p.m
{ MAT: Sunday 5 p.m.
. “DUDE GOES WEST"
Eddie Albert, Gale Storm
“BLUE GRASS OF KENTUCKY”

Color by Cinecolor

Bill Williams, Jane Nigh

“Buzz Henry

MAT : TODAY (Thurs) 1.30 p.m. | FRI, 2.30, 445 & 830 p.m









= @ & DIAL |

} ZA DIAL
ene 8404

Last 2 Shows PORAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.
fe f ADVENTURES 3
ag KITTY O'DAY
Jean Parker, Peter Cookson
iOLENCE
Michael O’Shea, Nancy Coleman













a
ES

FRI. to SUN. 5 & 8.30 p.m
Paramount's Technicolor Double Bill!
Bob Hope — Lucille Ball
FANCY PANTS &
“STREETS OF LAREDO”
))) William Holden, McDonald Carey

GLOBE THEATRE

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.15 P.M. LAST SHOWS
“ODD MAN OUT” —JAMES MASON—

— and —

“HER LUCKY NIGHT” THE ANDREW SISTERS

I













GLOBE i



j OPENING GLOBE TO-MORROW
Y » 7 eee.
| Pao oP hl ‘aS
Se Se Sk mm

POC tale

y
}
His kind of yiolence is | Fa
the deadliest of all...to
SCC Ue ee é
De Cm

_ i ani

THE ALL STAR TALENT SHOW
Tickets on Sale Daily GLOBE

Pit— 24c.; House—4ic.; Bal—60c.; Box—72¢

HAL WALUS













AQUATIC CLUH CINEMA (Members Only)



TONIGHT at 8.30

RKO Radio Pictures present
BILL WILLIAMS, BARBARA HALE
in “FIRST YANK INTO TOKYO"



Commencing FRIDAY 18TH Ys
CLAUDETTE COLBERT, ROBERT RYAN
In The New RKO Picture

“THE SECRET FURY"







ROYAL

To-day Only 4.30 & 8.30
Republic Action Double

« VALLEY OF
ZOMBIES ”°
with
Robert LIVINGSTON
Adrian BOOTH



| EMPIRE

TO-DAY at 8.30 p.m,

Bridgetown Players present

“THE SHOP AT SLY
CORNER ”



OPENING SATURDAY 19th and
«© TRAFFIC IN CRIME”
“FOR HEAVEN’S ee
oa 99 Kane e L
SAKE Adele MARA
Starring ~~Opening Friday 18th.
Clifton WEBB

Joan BENNETT

- *ROXY

To-day & To-morrow

“HALLS OF MONTEZUMA ”

OLYMPIC

To-day Only 4.30 & 8.15

_ 4.30 & 8.15 Republic Double
Wih CLFox Double SE Sea
Victor MATURE in
Richard ee «LADY AND THE
« KISS OF DEATH” ear
ms ; “ROAD TO
“BORDER INCIDENT ” ALCATRAZ”
with vith

Robert LOWERY
June STOREY

George MURPHY
Ricardo MONTALBAN







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THURSDAY,

_—

MAY 1/7,

T’dad New

Constitution

Successful
—GOMES

Hon. Albert Gomes, Minis-
ter for Labour, Commerce anc
Industry and the Trinidad
delegate attending the Re-
gional Economic Conference,
told the Advocate yesterday
that the new constitution in
Trinidad is operating very
smoothly and very success-
fully and the five elected min-
isters are co-operating in an
effort to make it permanently
successful.

Mr. Gomes arrived on Tues-
day by B.W.1.A. and is staying
at the Worthing Guest House.

He said that at the moment,
Government is primarily concern-
ed with developing the economic
resources of the country in order
to create better living conditions
for all the people

“We are carrying out an in-
tensive drive to attract new in-
dustries to the colony and to
persuade the foreign investor that
the prospects of investment in the
colony are good.” In order to
achieve this, he said that stable
conditions are necessary.

It is essential that relations be-
tween employer and employee
should be of the very best and that
disputes should be settled by
negotiations and not by strikes.

Mr. Gomes said that it had often
been alleged against the colony
that they had not developed
politically as rapidly as some o!
the other territories. Those who
made that criticism, no doubt, had
in, mind the fact that they had n>
political parties

In his view he said that what
some regarded as their weakness,
was in fact their strength, be-
cause, when they looked around
them and observed the gathering
chaos in some of the territories,
and the manner in which the
political situation was getting out
of hand and threatening the eco-
nomic future of those territories,
he felt that Trinidad could con
gratulate itself on the fact that it
was getting down seriously to the
business of strengthening and de-

veloping the country’s economy.

They suffered from many of the
problems from which the other
territories suffered like the rising
eosts of imported foodstuffs and
general inflationary trend in
prices.

He felt, however, that if they
could keep the general politica!
situation in hand and _ further
maintain peace in industry, they
had a chance to get out of the
woods,

Asked about Federation of the
West Indies, Mr. Gomes said that
Sir George Seel’s opening speech
to the Regional Economic Commit-
tee was one of the soundest pro-
nouncements on the subject of
federation they had heard in these
parts for a very long time “It
is a sad reflection on our statés-
manship,” he said, but some
colonies had not yet expressed
their views on the report of the
Standing Closer Association Com
mittee.

“The need for a Federal Author-
ity in the West Indies is being ex~
perienced more and more every
day and as individual colonies, our,
bargaining power is pathetic. Our
voices can only count for some-
thing if we speak in unison,” Mr.
Gomes said.

He hoped that in the
future, some effort would be made
to revivify the report of the
Standing Closer Association Com-—
mittee, since without federation,
they were merely wasting their
time in the British West Indies

near



$4,000 INCREASE

From Our Own Corresponder.t

Corporation

will be increased by $4,000. The
pensionable
yearly in

corporation pays 24
employees $10,740
travelling expenses.



RINSO






BRIGHTER—
quicker!

1951

BARBADOS ADVOCATE *



“) seant to ask him to send me sone more of those fine English bulls te help me-keep this new contract.”



Blackburne
To Broadcast

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ANTIGUA, May 15,

Through the courtesy of Cable
and Wireless His Excellency Mr,
K, W. Blackburne will be broad-
casting to the people of Antigua
on Thursday 17th, May, at 6.30
p-m. on a wavelength of 5,740
Kilocycles or 52.26 Metres, The
station’s call sign VRZ4 will be
giving the call 10 minutes before.

The Governor's broadcast will
be printed and made available to
the public as soon as_ possible
after. ‘

This is the first occasion ot
which a Governor of the Leeward
Islands will be speaking at a
critical time when Antigua’s
economy is more seriously
threatened than ever before.
Strikes prevail in the sugar in-
dustry and waterfront, Today red
flags and pickets were standing in
front of the Antigua Star
printery.

Family Home Week
For Antigua

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ANTIGUA,

Antigua is going to have a Home
and Family Week beginning on
Sunday June 24.

Mrs. Blackburne, wife of the
Gevernor, is largely responsible
for suggesting that a week be set
aside for encouraging people to
improve their homes.

Antigua hopes to make it an
annual, event and a competitive
system will be introduced to en-~
courage gardens and more at-
tractive homes.

_Last week a small house was
displayed on Government House
grounds to show how a typical
small house could be kept cheerful.

There were charades to illustrate
Hygiene, Cookery and Children’s
behaviour—good and bad.

WILL MAKE BROOMS,
SRUSHES IN T'DAD

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 11

A factory to manufacture brooms
and brushes will soon be in opera—
tion in Trinidad. Mr, Guy Rupert
Shaw, manufacturer of Shaw’s
Ltd., Ashton—Under-Line, Lan-
cashire, has applied to Govern-
ment for pioneer status to obtain
concessions under the Aid to
Pioneer Industry Ordinance.



washes





easier! 4

Trinidad
Waterfront
Always Busy

Mr. A. T. Shill, Controller. of
Customs of Trinidad, told the Ad-
vocate yesterday that the Trini-
dad waterfront is always busy,
Recently, they had heavy cargoes
and there were a lot of tranship-
ment for the Windward and
Leeward Islands, Dutch Guiana
and Venezuela.

Mr, Shill is one of the Trinidad
Advisers attending the Regional
Economic Conference which open-
ed at Hastings House yesterday

morning. He arrived here on
Tuesday night by B.W.I.A. and
is staying at the Marine Hotel.

He said that not so long ago,
they were rather handicapped in
transhipment by lack of onward
shipping facilities, Within the
last month they had more small
craft available so that they were
able to expedite transhipment
cargo to the Windward Islands
more considerably,

He said that recently, they had
one onward steamer with 5,000
tons of very varied onward cargo
of which 3,800 tons was for tran-
shipment and the whole lot was
completely cleared in 9 or 10 days.

Mr. Shill said that the Manag-
ing Director of one of the largest
international petroleum organiza-
tions had told him, while on a
visit to Trinidad, that, as far as his
Company was concerned, Trinidad
was the third largest bunkering
port in the world.

Apart from the waterfront
activities, they had a continuous
stream of vessels from all quarters
of the globe calling for bunkers
end stores.

He said that the average clear-
ance of ocean-going vessels in
Trinidad averaged between 23
and 24 a year, and as regards air
traffic at Piarco, the average
throughout the year, was 28
planes a day.

Matric Results

FOLLOWING are the results of
the University of London Matri-
culation Examination held in Jan-
uary this year:—Blackett, J. A.;
Brewster, G. W.; Broome, M, L.;
Pollard, G. E.; Ruck, Orn.
Shepherd, V. L.; Small, L. and
Small, S. E. passed the full exam-
ination. :

Grant, R. S.; Hope, K. W.;
Roach, D, A. and Thompson, C. L.
passed in one subject to complete
Matriculation. .

Briggs, G. C.; Daniel, A. F.;
McClean, D. Da C.; Trotman, C. A.
and Yearwood, H. Da C. passed
in one subject to complete exemp-
tion.












Landon Pxnress Service

Jamaica Interested In

Industrial Development

The Jamaica delegation now

attending the Regional Econo-

mie Conference at Hastings House told the Advocate
yesterday that Jamaica is very keen on industrial develop-

ment at the moment.

The delegation comprised Hon
D. B. Sangster, Minister for Social
Welfare and his four advisers
Hon’ble R. L. M. Kirkwood,
Chairman of the Sugar Manufac-
turers’ Association and Chairman
of the Central Committee of Pri-
mary Producers and citrus
Growers’ Association, Mr, J, B.
Clegg, Under-Secretary for Econo-

mic Affairs, Mr. E, A. Maynier,
Acting Commissioner of Com-
merce and Industries and Mr.

Dudley E, Levy, Second Vice-
President of the Jamaica Chan:de;
of Commerce, They arrived on
Tuesday night by B.W.1.A., anc
are staying at the Marine Hotc!.

They said that a. delegation of
three had just returned from a
month’s visit to the U.S.A., with
a view to interesting U.S., invest-
ors in coming to Jamaica. That
delegation found that investors
were very interested in the
proposal, particularly as it was
put to them as a business proposi-
tion showing mutual advantages
for both investor and for Jamaica,
They were able to assure investors
as to the long term prospects,

Great Momentum

In Jamaica, they had now
gathered very considerable
momentum in this drive for in-
dustrial development and the
people and the Government were
solidly behind it, They thought it
was going to help them very con-
siderably in their aim to secure a
more balanced economy and weie
certain that Government wouid
be able to offer still further in-
ducements to industrialists in the
near future.

As regards tourism, they con-
firmed that the West Indies were
becoming increasingly popuiai
with American tourists and indeed
they were happy about the trend
of tourism, The drive should now
in their view be concentrated
upon the summer season in order
to lengthening its duration,

The Jamaica delegation to the
Regional Economie Conference
regarded it as not only histovic,
but a major move in promoting
the closer unity of the British
West. Indies which in their view
is so vital for the interests of all
its territories.

Jamaica was eager and willing
to play its full part in promoting
and maintaining this unity whici
would undoubtedly yield hand-
some returns to all territories in
the years to come.

&

THE WORLD’S
FIRST CHOICE IN

erento

Abuse ts Not
Argument

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 11,
‘ The Sgooke of the Legislative
Council, Mr, William Savary, in a
letter addressed to members ot
the Council, has urged them to

raise the standard of _. their
debates. He says that the atmos
phere in which the business of

the Council was being conducted
was not conducive to its effec
tiveness as a _ legislative body
and tended to lower its dignity
Good temper and moderation are
the characterizations of Parlia
mentary language. The Speaker
g£0es on to suggest that members
should avoid personalities as they
did not “strengthen your argu
ments or destroy the other mem

ber’s,” “Remember,” he add
“abuse is not argument.” Con
tinuing, it reads: “Even violent
political differences should not

be allowed to interfere with the
courtesy expected between mem
bers, much less with their respect
for the House itself, I am sure that
members will agree _ that
debates that attain a high stand
ard are not only instructive but
are of importance in the political
education of the Colony, Finally,
I ask Hon. members to take this
appeal in the right spirit.”.



Political Asylum
Case Started

THE HAGUE, May 15.

The International Court of
Justice _ began hearings here
today in the second phase of
the Colombia Peru dispute over
asylum granted by Colombia | tc
the Peruvian political leader.

Last November the
decided that Colombia
been legally justified in
asylum to Victor Raul Haya De
La Torre, political leader and
author who fled into the Colom-
bian Embassy in Lima in January
1949 to evade arrest by his Gov-
ernment and who has been
there ever since,

Court
had not
ranting

—Reuter.









Inquiry Into Seaman’s

Death Urged By M.C.P

NOTICE of an Address to the Governor by Mr. E. D. Mott-
ley at Tuesday's meeting of the House of Assembly, told
of a Barbadian seaman who had been beaten to death by
a member or members of the Police Force of the Union of

South Afriza.

It was pointed out that this
seaman, Milton King by name,
had been working on the S.S.

Strategist which was plying be-
tween the United Kingdom and
the Union and that the incicent
had taken place between March 3
and 4 this year

The Address seeks to ask the
Governor to inform the Secretary
of State for the Colonies of the
matter and request him to do his
utmost to ensure that a thorough
and intensive investigation be
made into the circumstances sur-
rounding King’s death Purpose
of the investigation would be to
bring to justice those responsible
and also to get adequate compen-
sation from the Union of South
Africa for King’s children.

Drax Hall Purchase

Mr. F, E. Miller also gave
notice of an Address asking the
Governor to take steps to send
down legislation having for its
object, the purchase of Drax Hall
Plantation in St. George

The desire is to have this plan-
tation divided into one—acre plots
with the necessary facilities of
water, roads, etc., provided for
the accommodation of 700 famil-
ies. Also that priority be given
to renters now on the land, and
that the land be acquired on a
long-term easy-payment plan.

At this meeting of the House
Mr. E. K. Walcott, senior member
for St. James, was granted two
months’ leave of absence.

The request was made by the
junior member of the parish, Mr
J. H. Wilkinson.

Mr. Walcott has been absent
from the House for some time due
to illness.

Police Representation

Mr, T. ©. Bryan gave notice
of questions concerning the Police
at Tuesday’s meeting of the House
of Assembly

He asked:

Is Government

aware that

members of the Police Forcé who
are required to answer charges
against themselves before the
present Commissioner of Police
are not permitted by him to be
represented on such occasions’

Will Government acquaint the
Commissioner of the necessity, in
the interest of fair play and jus-
tice, to permit such policemen to
be represented by counsel on such
occasions?

1S IT a fact that a number of
Police constables were recently
fined for sheltering out of neavy
rains, and are now compelled to
remain on duty during such heavy
rains without proper protection
cr suitable shelter?

Will Government take immedi-
ate steps to protect such Police
Constables from punishments of
this nature?

£7M. DAMAGE

GUATEMALA CITY, May 16

A cyclone today damaged 27
large banana plantations on the
Pacific coast area. Damage was
Pstimated at £7,000,000. There
was no loss of life. The damage
would halve the export of bananas,
the United Fruit Company stated.
—Reuter.















This cleansing massage brings
our skin Palmolive's full
autifying effect!

New Lov
wit PALMOLIVE

3 Follow this
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Awasn your face with Palmolive Soap

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PAGE THREE

Harbour Log

IN CARLISLE BAY





M.V Sedgefield, Sch Wonderful

@ Counsellor, Sch. Marea Henrietta Sch

Marion Belle Wolfe, Sc Gardenia W

Sch. Cyril E. Smith; Sch. Enterprise S

Sch. Frances W Sch. Eastérn

Eel, M.V. T.B. Radar, Sch. Belqueen,
ARRIVALS

FRANKLYN D. R 82.tons net

Sealy





British Guiana
ATHE sROOK 246 «6tons net,
0k, from Trinidad
Sch D'ORTAC, 58 tong net, Capt



jing, from British Guiana

Sch. PHILIP H, DAVIDSON, 87 tons

net, Capt. Sea fom British Guiana.
8.8 RUNA, “4 to net, Capt
Haroldsor from taracaib
Oil Tanker RODAS, 1,85 tons net,
Capt. Van der Meule Y Grenada
DEPARTURES
Ser GARDENIA W
Capt Waliace, for T
Sch. WONDERFUL



tons net, Capt. Alexar
M.V. ATHELBROOK
Capt, ¢ k, f Trir



RATES OF EXCHANGE

CANADA
MAY lé 1951
62 1/10 Cheques
on Bankers 60 2/10% p
De <
Draft 60.05°% pr
8 9 9/10 pr
re
(i ie 5 cy + 7/10 pr
60 £ 1 r pr
MAIL NOTICE
MAILS for St LUCIA , the M/V
LADY JOY will be closed at the Gen-
«ral Post Office a inder
Parcel, Registered and Ordinary Mails
at 12 noon on the I7th Ma 1961

eliness For You

SOAP



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PORT-—OF-SPAIN, May 11.
Travelling allowances of em-
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a

PAGE FOUR





Sa {ese ==)

Printed by the Advocste


Thursday, May 17, 1951



WELL SAID,
SIR GEORGE

SIR GEORGE SEEL’S speech at the
opening of the First Regional Economic
Committee at Hastings House yesterday
was the speech of an Englishman of the old
school. Delivered with great simplicity the
words went straight to the heart of the
matter and the unanimous applause that
greeted its conclusion showed how truly
Sir George had interpreted West Indian
feelings. Internationally, said Sir George,
- there is no such thing as a British West In-

dies. At the same time it is inevitable

that West Indians should prefer direct re-
presentation in making trade arrangements.
How impossible the present situation is,
said Sir George, you can see for yourselves.
It took four years to get this Committee
assembled: The reports of the Rance Com-
mittee and the Maurice Holmes Committee
seem like Mahomet’s coffin to be suspended
between heaven and earth. These terri-
tories, said Sir George, should be engaged
together in an enterprise in which they can
rely. on their own skills, their own re-
sources and their own judgement: from
which when they are successful they can
derive renewed confidence in themselves:
and in which, when they do not achieve all
they desire, they can search for the reasons
at home, and not exhaust themselves in
recriminations against others.

“I believe,” said Sir George and the whole
West Indies re-echoes his belief “that much
of the criticism which is being voiced at
this moment arises from a sense of frustra-
tion, because the British West Indies have

not yet organised themselves to speak to-
gether and exert their full strength in the
field of trade and commerce.” That is the
challenge which Sir George threw down to
the meeting, the challenge of a great civil
servant whose service to the West Indies
here and in London has been so often pro-
claimed and championed by all those who
know his merits. It was for the West Indies
to take up that challenge, and Mr. Albert
Gomes was waiting and ready. He would
not allow the meeting to proceed without
drawing to their attention the view of the
Trinidad Government that the West Indies
must have direct representation at the
trade talks between the United Kingdom
and Canada which open next week in
Ottawa. Nor was Mr. Gomes silent about
the need for a united front with regard to
Mr. Bottomley’s mission. He made it clear
and the point was well taken by a Govern-
ment official attending the conference, that,
although the agenda of the Regional Eco-
nomic Committee was a large agenda, an
important agenda and a historical agenda,
the issue of Canada-West Indies Trade and
the approach of Mr. Bottomley in search
lof sugar facts, were matters of far greater
urgency.

' “You have the opportunity”, said Sir
George, “to sweep away the frustration and
weakness that arise from isolation and dis-
unity to build up a self-reliant British West
Indian economy and present it to the
world.” Mr. Albert Gomes more perhaps
than any other West Indian politician of
to-day knows how necessary it is to act on
this advice. But he was not prepared, nor
can we believe that Mr. Grantley Adams
is prepared, to sit quietly back discussing
the preliminaries of general economic
unity, when two great issues were awaiting
for solution by unity. The lamentable fate
of Grenada, the growth of “masquerading”
politicians throughout the area can only be
checked by united action in the economic
field.

Mr. Gomes is giving a great lead to West
Indian federation of a real and practical
kind. Sir George Seel exhorted the Com-
mittee to speak together and exert “their
full strength in the field of trade and com-
merce. Nothing has happened in his life-
time,” he said, “to suggest that when they
do so théy will not be heard at any rate in
Britain, with ready sympathy and with
every desire to reach mutually advantage-
ous results.”

The West Indies applaud this statement
from the heart. That is why they support
Mr: Gomes in his determination to see that
the West Indian voice is heard in Ottawa
next week and that Mr. Bottomley is unani-
mously told what the West Indies think
about trade pacts with Cuba, which may
result in further loss of markets for West
India sugar.

|

— Eee eo™',_0_—0@”0@”'@—_ CO_ LL

—

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THURSDAY,

MAY

17. 195i



Cleansing The Leper:
A Modern Miracle

FOR countries where the disease
May occur, modern seience has
opened up an entirely new outlook
for sufferers from leprosy. No
longer are they considered “un-
clean,” or doomed to die of an
affliction hitherto considered in-
eurable.

Those who know the truth about
leprosy are surprisingly few. In
fact, only a restricted mumber of
doctors and specialists are aware
of the astounding fact that leprosy
is not and never has been contagi-
ous—except to children .

The facts have been carefully
collected by a magazine called
The Star which is edited, printed,
and published by the patients of
the U.S. Marine Hospital at Car-
ville, Louisiana, in the southern
part of the United States. The
other name for that hospital is the
U.S. National Leprosarium.

Among the facts regularly re-
iterated in The Star are the fol-
lowing :

Science records 145 experi-
ments in which researchers have
tried to infect themselves or
other volunteers with leprosy by
putting the known germ (Myco-
bacterium leprae) into their
bodies; there has not been a
single infection in these efforts.

In 264 years of succouring
leprosy sufferers, no physician,
nurse, or attendant of the San
Lazaro Hospital in Manila,
Philippine Republic (says Dr.
M. Carron of the hospital staff)
has ever contracted the disease.

In the 55 years of Carville’s
history only one employee has
developed leprosy. He was
found to have been exposed to it
as a child, and he came from
an endemic area in one of the
only three States in the U.S.
where leprosy now endemically

occurs: Louisiana, Texas, and
Florida.
That childhood history is the

important point. Unless a person
has been exposed to leprosy as a
child, it is a 99.9 per cent. scien-
tific certainty that he will not con-
tract the disease later whatever he
may do.

Dr. Brownlow David Moles-
worth, medical superintendent of
Sungei Bulor leprosarium in
Malaya, goes further. He has
found that a person must be ex-
posed to leprosy, not only once but
repeatedly, in childhood to con-
tract it, and he reports: “It is a
series of infections added together
that finally win a foothold. Once
this is established the disease lies
dormant, it may be for one, two,
four, eight, or even twenty years
before it breaks out.”

That wags what happened with
Mrs. Hans G. Hornbostel, a fam-



Luxury Creeps Back To
British Manufactures

- LONDON,

Luxury has crept back to Bri-
tish goods and craftsmanship—but
still for export only!

Jewels, gold and_ silver, rich
silks, beautiful glass and china
cazzle the eye at this year’s Bri-
tish Industries Fair. For the first
time since the war quality and
magnificence have stolen the field
from easy-to-make and austerity-
utility. Paper-thin gold cups with
patterns delicate as fine lace catch
the attention of foreign buyers;
sheer fabrics iglimmer in shaded
folds, But

“No good me showing you these
things, sir—they’re all for export”,
IT heard one exhibitor say. All
over the vast acreage of Earls
Court and Olympia they were
telling unhappy British buyers the
same thing.

Down Millionaire’s Row — the
name they have given to the Jew-
ellery section — there are well
over £1,000,000 of gems on show.
One tiny shop has £100,000 of
shimmering diamonds and highly-
decorated jewelled watches array-
ed on red velvet cushions. Buyers
stroll in, glance over diamond
rings worth a rajah'’s ransom,
dangle a diamond bracelet from
a nonchalant hand, and saunter
out again.

This air of casual go-as-you-
please masks, however, extensive
security precautions by Scotland
Yard. Liberally scattered among
the crowd are plain-clothes detec-
tives, and a ring of London uni-
formed police circle the jewellery
section, An alarm would bring
the police network to life in a split
second,

Modern methods of effective
display show to advantage square
and oblong-cut diamonds which
appear to be gaining in popularity
Platinum-and-diamonds is rivalled
by the Continental preference for
gold and diamonds — and for
heavy settings.

From Romé and Florence comes
the inspiration for rather heavily-
rounded gold ladies’ watches
laden with diamonds, and from
Zurich and Geneva, the amusing
Swiss-style novelty watches, Small
figures wheel barrows and carry
drums which incorporate a tiny
watch-face, just big enough to tell
the time; there are sailing-ships,

Barbados Christian. Party
To_The Editor, The Advocate---

SIR,— Kindly allow me a little
space in your paper to mention
the thing that to my mind pre-

sents forthcoming problems.

I am thinking of the registra-
tion of thousands of persons who
for some reagon or another ‘have

refrained from in
past,
the christian section,

sons who look

voting

upon

set apart from their
and a thing with which
must have nothing to do.

This idea is especially fostered

by the belief that the paths or
by-paths of the politically en-
gaged are broad, or tinged with
evil, (Broad is the way

leads to evil—etc., etc.) or
further (to quote the Rev
Stanley Jones, author of the book
“The Christ of the American
Road”, when dealing with
Hesitation of American Christi-
anity in regard to the application

OUR READER

Years of research and discovery of

helpful new drugs have served to

disprove many misconceptions
about this once -dreaded disease.

By DONOVAN PEDELTY
From United Nations World

ous case of leprosy in modern
American life, The wife of a U.S.
Army major, Gertrude Hornbostel
was liberated from a Japanese
prison camp in the Philippine Is-
lands after World War II and was
found on arrival at the Pacific
Coast city of San Francisco, to be
suffering from leprosy. She was
rushed into another kind of con-
finement at Carville and her hus-
band, Major Hornbostel, insisted
on going with her. It is generally
agreed that it was the weakening
conditions of life in the prison
camp that brought out the dor-
mant leprosy in Mrs. Hornbostel.
It is known she had been exposed
to it as a child on Pacific Islands.

The most quoted case—Father
Damien — is misleading. Damien
de Veuster was a Roman Catholic
missionary to the lepers at Kalau-
papa on the lonely Hawaiian is-
jand of Molokai. He became their
chaplain in 1873, developed the
disease, and died there, unques-
tionably a heroic, saintly man.
Famous biographies of the great
Father Damien fail to mention that
in the latter half of the last cen-
ury leprosy was endemic in the
Lowlands of Europe, including the
parish near Louvain, Belgium,
where Father Damien was born
and spent his boyhood.

Heredity has been ruled out as
a factor in transmission of the dis-
ease. “Babies of parents with lep-
rosy,” says Dr, Molesworth, “are
always born healthy — it is the
close contact after birth with an
infectious parent that finally in-
fects the child.”

The words “finally” and “child”
should be noted particularly. Re-
peated contact is not enough.
Childhood contact is not enough.
There must be both.

That leprosy is not a disease of
the “unclean” was proved 76 years
ago, when Norwegian Dr. Ar-
mauer G. H. Hansen isolated the
germ which causes it, a microbe
closely related to the tuberculosis
bacillus and as hard to kill or
harder—even boiling does not des-
troy Mycobacterium leprae. Lep-
rosy is no more “foul” than tuber-
culosis, and yet, as American and
British doctors have shown, it is
100 times less infectious.

“From the public health stand-
point,” writes Dr. F. A. Johan-
sen, affectionately known to his
388 Carville patients as “Dr. Jo,”

“leprosy might be considered as
practically a non-communicable
disease.”

Finally it has been established
that leprosy does not even “spell
doom.” The disease can be halt-
ed, held, even put into reverse.
Mrs. Hornbostel already has been
returned to normal life, is now an
ordinary, unnoticed suburban
housewife.

Four nations contributed to this
peacetime triumph, German chem-
ists originated the drug DDS (dia-
mino-diphenyl-sulfone) or “basic
sulfone.” English laboratory
scientists demonstrated its extra-
ordinary germ-killing power in the
test tube. French workers tried
it on tuberculosis germs in the hu-
man body and discovered that in
its early form DDS was too toxic
for use on humans, Then both
American and British chemists
learned how to rearrange the
molecular construction of DDS so
as to lessen its danger for human:
while retaining its deadly effect
on germs. The altered forms —
promin, diasone, sulphetrone —
proved ineffective against tuber-
culosis, but on the related leprosy
bacillus the tests gave leprology
doctors their most encouraging re-
sults in 76 years of research effort.

Some forms of leprosy have
always been self-arresting. Germs
which develop along the nerves
eventually paralyze a whole area
of the host body, in effect locking
themselves up and _ rendering
themselves harmless. Such cases,
when their nature has been deter-
mined, have alweys been dis-
charged from leprosaria as safe.
Within a few years of trying DDS,
which is slow-acting but steady,
the rate of discharge of patients
around the world has grown amaz-
ingly, At Carville the rate doubled.

In 1950 more good news came
from Carville, Doctors there have
been trying a still further-refined
form of DDS—promacetin—which
can be swallowed at meal-times
and which produces no acute toxic
effects. It is reported to result in
clinical improvement which is
“universal, uniform, and sustain-
ed,” even among patients in an
advanced stage of the disease.
There is no doubt that, while a
cure for leprosy is not yet officially
here, the outlook is definitely en-
couraging .

END

This article appeared in the
January 1951 issue of United
Nations World, a private pub-
lication printed monthly in the
United States and distributed
internationally. The author is a
frequent contributor to Ameri-
ean periodicals.



‘

By HAZEL MAY

gondolas, motor-cars — anything,
in fact, which can be depicted in
gold and jewels, One British
manufacturer hides in a brooch a
watch which is only revealed by
swinging a portion of it over, on
the smallest of hinges.

Queen Mary, one of the B.I.F’s
most faithful visitors and a
great connoisseur of china and
glass, will find much to admire
in the magnificent display from
the Midlands.

“Service plates’, used by the
Americans as a form of table

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER








“If you dsk me, Socialist!
spokesmen nowadays ure |
nothing but a lot of black
legs taking the unkind words
out of our very mouths!”

decoration before a meal is
served, are being produced by
many firms as_ dollar-earners.

Each plate must be different and
individual, Best among these
was a jet black set decorated
only by Japanese-type line
drawings in white of various
flower sprays. American buyers
usually place large orders for
these. j

No less extravagant is the glass,

lustre under

amethyst

|

cut by British workmen in Y
patterns that have been handed
down from father to son, through
the centuries,

In a modern hall of mirrors
one’s reflection stares back from
every sort of looking-glass ever
conceived by manufacturers since
the 14th | century. There are
gold frames, glass frames,
wooden frames, convex and
oblong glasses, and an_ entire
room devoted to Queen Anne
mirrors set off in their beautiful
gold-painted shining brown wood.
On one wall there hangs a fine
reproduction of the sun-ray mirror.

British leatherwork can hardly
be rivalled in the world today
A prince’s luggage could be
bought at some stands—dressing
cases of finest blue seal
morocco lined with moire
Fittings are of enamel mounted
on silver and arranged in a
dazzling display—brushes and
combs, bottles and jars, mirrors,
manicure implements and pow-
der bowls. Most popular design
on the enamel was a
fleur-de-lis pattern,

British Ceylonese have woven
the brocade for the most luxurious
evening gown displayed in the
Fair in gleaming pink and blue
brocade, designed by Norman
Hartnell with the motif on the
material picked out with glittering
sequins and Ceylonese fabric made
evening gloves in satin, beaded or
with sequins. Extravagance was
the key-note of nylon evening
dresses with floating gauzy skirts.
No ironing is needed for these, the
answer to a woman traveller’s
prayer.

Immediately after the war a
decorator who designed a door
with a cut-out alcove to be filled
with fresh flowers woujd have
been laughed at; today such
millionaire’s whims are encour-
aged. At one stall exhibitors were
showing a hidden flower vase in
a hollow portion of the door whicn

grain
silk,

delicate

a

























A NEW IDEA IN
STATEHOOD

The Governor of Puerto Rico tells how his homeland,

enjoying the privileges of a commonwealth, may

choose to become an independent republic or a full-
fledged State of the United States at any time.

| PRACTICAL
| SPANISH
| GRAMMAR

Hy Hills & Ford
Advocate Stationery

By LUIS MUNOZ MARIN
(Governor of Puerto Rico) }
From United Nations World

PUERTO RICO is associated with the Uni-
ted States in a bold, new manner. We Puerto
Ricans are in the process of creating a new
type of statehood, a statehood which is re-

lated by citizenship and law to the U-S. fed-
eral government itself, rather than to the

other States of the Union. Our privileges as
an autonomous entity within the Union are
many-and varied, as are our responsibilities.

Like the other 48 States and like independ-
ent nations, too, Puerte Rico has the right
to proclaim its own constitution as well as
to alter it- We elect our own government:
municipal councils, mayors, representatives,
senators, and our chief executive, the Gov-
ernor. With consent of the Puerto Rican
senate, the Governor appoints his Ministers,
the Chief of Police, and the Commander of
the National Guard, as well as the judges of
the various tribunals. The Puerto Rican Con-
titution. specifically indicates procedure for
he appointment of justices to our Supreme
Court.

These officials are in no way responsible
to any authority of the United States, but
they are all answerable either to the Puerto
Rican voters or, in the case of appointive
oositions, to the Governor. Our autonomy
is further vividly demonstrated by the fact
hat no official of the United States—not even
the President—has any authority over the

Governor. Authority is vested solely in the
people of Puerto Rico who can replace the

Governor at the end of his four-year term,
and in the Legislature, which can impeach
him.

This new type of State, similar in structure
to a dominion in the British Commonwealth
of Nations, is now in full development within
.he framework of our United States.

Since we are associated with the United
States, our merchandise enters U.S. ports
duty-free, but because we are not a State of
the Union, Puerto Rico pays no taxes to the
U.S. Treasury. All revenue is diverted into
channels specified by the Puerto Rican Leg-
islative Assembly, elected by universal suff-
rage.

Puerto Rico is represented in Washington,

D.C., by a delegate in the U.S. Congress. His
status is different from representatives of

other States of the Union in that he is recog-
nized by the Executive Branch of the U.S.
Government, and different, too, from that of
envoys from other countries in that he has
a seat in the Congress.

The United States has granted large-scale
economic aid to Puerto Rico in the difficult
task of raising the standard of living of our
steadily growing population. Federal alloca-
tions have been made for road-building,
schools, public health, technical education,
agricultural development, and social secur-
ity. Puerto Rico’s imports exceed exports by
a substantial margin. Without aid from the
United States we would suffer a disastrous
imbalance.

And so our island of 3,435 square miles,
with a population of some 2,250,000, appears ,



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and especially do I mean
those per-
anything
political as something outside, or
activities,
they









much of which is decorated with k , n %
gold, silver and vitreous enamels Keeps flowers alive and blooming:} are fully conscious. s
on glass, and exquisitely tinted ® Portion of trellis can be removed ; se eee ie : x
in delicate hues. This effect is Whey ete . qpnewed. This political creation is indeed a dynamic $ ne g
obtained by applying a metallic e best of Britain’s manu-—, indi ; “ , % ok y
Cee ee nece tae aan th0Usee AEN IGRAy dost: to. tears oe the Sipeot the United States $ ; x
outstanding display of British markets, they continue to enhance pH g new political ideas, and of the | x he) . x
crystal and cut-glass in rose-red, the status of British craftsmen, Peal possibility of good neighbourliness and 2 nd .
SS ee | mutual trust of the peoples of the Americas. |X COCKTAIL VEGETABLES
8 SA W : nould S = ns DUTCH FINE PEAS :
should awaken to the fact that GOLD BRAID RUM. 7 Ea arias gS
’ et the time has come for christianity Thanks From B.G. ‘TOP NOTCH RUM. SMEDLEY PEAS $
ee ea bi to take a very active part, not To The Editor, The Advocatc--- ‘* GORDON’S GIN. | SMEDL _PEAS y
of Christian Principles and Spirit only in keeping the barnacles SIR,—I have to thank you for % BURNETT'S GIN. | ASPARAGUS TIPS %
to domestic. politics and, foreign ete. from obstructing the smooth publishing my request for cor- x PRUNES. ] KALE
relations—“As a consequence of running of the political ship, but respondents from your Island in SS DATES. SPINACH
this hesitation the Political life of in the setting of the course of | Your newspaper. % COLOURFUL COCKTAIL CARROTS .
America is tg below the the ship. Why not the BARBA- I have haq@ such an_ over- * ONIONS BEETS. 5
— 08 the R e of Ge noe is BOS CHRISTIAN PARTY? You whelming response to my request, x (Red, Yellow, Green). Mato cuAtaOM hae eee 3
merican life sie Ber nd may ask about capital for that I am finding it almost im- * PEANUT BUTTER. $
higher than its political life, The campaigns. How about sub- — possible to cope with my cor- § PRUNES. DESSERTS
saan rewarte Po scriptions from the thousands of respondence. However, I have S$ COCKTAIL BISCUITS.
have, been so much higher {rar Willing christians to a Party taken the liberty of passing the SALTED PEANUTS. JELLIES—(5 Flavours)
e financial rewards /of ~ s Fund under christian super- names and addresses of some of %& ANCHOVIES. BIRD'S CUSTARD .
politics that the best brains an vision, to elect representatives the people who wrote to me on S$ SARDINES. | POWDER. §
7 me this ee ne oa from among the christians just to Editors of our local new§- % ——————_ |, GRAPES in, tits. x
oN Gukiness The Political life roeeeeec: yo for by the papers, in the hope that interested s PICNIC SPECIALS GUAVAS in tins %
hes been impoverished, morally. fpannans of eleven parishes. parties from British Guiana will % MARSHMALLOWS RHUBARD in tins %
: Pay.) from every parish a candidate? write te th S| ? KRAFT’S ICE CREAM $
and intellectually.”) It can be Yes indeed Mr. Editor in time to rite tc them. S BARLEY STICKS. %
said that something like the come I can even visualise I shall be much obliged if you % CHOCOLATE LUND. ; POWDER ,
above mentioned may have Barbados vibr: . ae will kindly convey my sincere x CARR'S BISCUITS. | Just arrived: .
st atti ados vibrant with new life, ; . FRESH RED SNAPPERS
accounted for the past attitude for who is there better to set ‘0anks, through the medium of BEER in Bottle. i: So sede Sore " ©
of the christian regarding politics the path for the christian active your newspaper, to all those ist BEER in Can. | SMOKED KIPPERS. ~
in Barbados, although we may be in politics than the christian persons who have responded to cm S
thankful that it has not been to a himself? nee my request. ie s
greater extent. Thanking’ you. Sir Again thanking you for your — 8
: ; ne , kind -assistance, Sy %
Now if ever with the registra- Yours truly, MAIZIE BRUMELL % %
tion of thousands who will be GEORGE B. BASCOMBE. Fire Brigade Headquarters, * RED SNAPPERS — SMOKED KIPPERS g
a i Te to vote Glendairy Road, Water Street . i 1 x
vecause of their 1esitations, [ Carrington’s Village, ; stown |g 7, 7 TT , %
think that those capable of lead- St Michael, ” pag carey js ORDER FROM GODDARDS TO-DAY. ¥
ership among the christians 15th May, 1951. he n 7th May, 1951. FoGSSSSSSSSESSSFSS9G9959 9959999555 9O 9S SO OOOO IOS



THURSDAY, MAY 17%,



1951

Build Up West Indian

Economy

From page 1.
cannot and do not wait to make

trade arrangements with each
ether. However conscientiously
they may bear West Indian

interests in mind, it is inevitable
that West Indians should prefer
direct representation,
Co-Ordination
At present, the only semblance

of a co-ordinating authority in
the British West Indies, is the
Organisation over which I, for

the time being, preside. But this

Organisation could never in its
present form be accepted as a

West Indian authority, because it
is not based on any local sane-
tion. It is true that we devote
an increasing part of our time to
assisting in the co-ordination of
various West Indian activities; io
such an extent, indeed, that we
are no longer primarily a
Development and Welfare
Organisation but a West Indian
Regional Centre.

ut our efforts at co-ordination



are woefully handicapped, be-
cause we cannot speak for the
West Indies. You can see for
yourselves how impossible the

present position is, if you recall
the time taken, since the Montego
Bay Conference, in getting this
present Committee assembled
The same story could be told of
several other projects. The
reports of the Rance Committee

and the Maurice Holmes Com-
mittee seem, like Mahomet’s
coffin, to be suspended between
heaven and earth. Is the same
fate in store for the Customs
Union Report?

We must hope not, These
territories should be engaged
together in an _ enterprise in

which they can rely on their own
skills, their own resources and
their own judgment; from which
when they are successful, they
can derive renewed confidence
in themselves; and in which,
when they do not achieve ail
they desire, they can search for
the reasons at home, and not
exhaust themselves in recrimina-
tions against others.

Frustration

1 believe that much of the
criticism which is being voiced
at this moment arises from a
sense of frustration, because the
British West Indies have not yet
organised themselves to speak
together and exert their full
strength in the field of trade and
commerce. Nothing has happep-
ed, at any rate in my lifetime, to
suggest that when they do

so
they will not be heard, at any
rate in Britain, with ready

sympathy, and with every desire
to reach mutually advantageous
results,

As members of this
Economic Committee, you . have
the opportunity to achieve that
organisation and that co-ordina—
tion; to sweep away the frustra-
tion and weakness that arise
from isolation and disunity, to
build up a_ self-reliant British
West Indian economy and pre-
sent it to the world. In doing
this, you will be making the
greatest contribution possible at
this time towards building up a
West Indian nation. “Your city
to that nation is laid upon you in
the words of the Psalmist—

“Mark well her bulwarks: set

up her houses: that ye may

tell them that come after”

Regional

Welcome

Professor Beasley said that he
was sure that they would all wish
him to thank Sir George Seel,
both for his words of welcome at
the opening of that committee and
particularly for the candour with
which he had expressed a point
of view which clearly commended
itself to the meeting

They were essentially a working
party. They were not there to
indulge in flights of eloquence.

They had a chance now, possibly
for the first time, to schieve some
concrete results which had not
been possible with many of those
conferences’ which had _ been
assembled from time to time

He remembered very clearly
the circumstances under which
the original proposal for conven.
ing a meeting of the regional
economic committee arose.

There had been at Montego
Bay, very great speeches of elo.
quence which occupied most of
the time set for the conference,
When but forty-eight hours re-
mained there had not yet been
any resolutions or proposals.

Only in the middle of the night
before the penultimate night was
there the greatest measure of
agreement on matters to be sub-
mitted to the various govern-
ments.

It had been generally realised
that in the economic field the
West Indies did not exist under
International law but must be
made to exist in concrete fact.
Out of this had arisen the tenta-
tive proposal that a_ regional
economic committee set up.

No Separatism

There was a tendency in the
West Indies today to treat eco-
nomic problems as separate ones
Cuban sugar, currency con.
trols, There was the danger of
treating these as separate prob-
lems.

There was at present a world
crisis of economic policy. In the
meantime there was no worldwide
agreement as to how the problem
of currency could best be solved

It was part of the duty of that
committee to provide some con-
tinuing machinery whereby the
economic needs of the West Indies
would be placed in the hands of
a competent coordinating authori-
ty.

“The only successful committee
on regional cooperation for eco-
nomic parties in the West Indies

THE PRINCESS WHO
WOULDN'T SMILE .

In a far-off land lived a Princess who
never smiled. Clowns and jugglers came
from all over, but not one could bring

out even the tiniest smile.

had been a very successful work
of the British West Indies Sugar
Producers’ Association which had
steadily built itself up as a body
that spoke with authority and
worked for the good of all par-
ties as a whole.

That was the prototype of the
thing they were after.

Trade Liberalisation

Professor Beasley then intro-
duced Mr. W. A .Morris to the
meeting. He said that Mr. Morris
was on his way to Canada on
behalf of the Governmenw of
England for discussions on liber-
alisation of trade. He would be
glad to answer any questions
which the committee might care
to put to_him and which he was
capable of answering.

Mr. Morris said that it was a
great honour to him to be pres-
ent on that historic occasion in
the West Indies.

Hon. Albert Gomes said that
his Government was very muca
concerned about the question of
West Indian representation at the
meeting of the Continuing Com-
mittee in Canada. He did not
know how the members of the
other delegations felt about it.

Professor Beusley pointed out
that there were two meetings due
to take place in Canada and they
should not be confused. They
Were the Continuing Committee
Meeting and an ad hoc commit-

tee for liberalisation of trade.
No Decision
Mr. Adams thought that they

should not take any decision on
that point yet until all the
delegates were assembled. They
would want to speak with a
unanimous voice on the issue.

Mr. Gomes thought the matter
was important and stressed that
the West Indies had often been
placed in an anomalous position
in matters of that sort and they
were of the opinion that the
West Indies should send _ their
own representatives. The West
Indies should also speak with
one voice about sugar in the
talks with Mr. Bottomley.

Hon. H. E. Robinson said that
any discussions which they might

have with regard to sugar they
should not take decisions on
their own since it had _ been

agreed in London that the British
West Indies, the Solomon Islands,
Mauritius, Fiji, East Africa and
the Commonwealth would work
together in matters of that sort
and they in the British West
Indies did not want to give tha
impression that they were dealing
behind others backs.

Committees

Hon, A, Gomes, Hon. J. B.
Renwick and Mr. FE. A. Maynier
were appointed an Editorial
Committee.

Hon, H. A, Cuke, Hon. D.
Sangster, Hon W. Raatgever,
Hon, H. E. Robinson, and Hon.
C. A. Beaubrun were appointed
a Steering Committee.

The Committee adopted
agenda for the Conference and
discussion is due to take place
under the following heads:—
Status, Organization and Fune-
tions of the Regional Economic
Committee, Trade Commissioner
Service, Customs Union Com-
mission Report, External Trade
matters, Regional economic
matters,

B.

the



Norway Celebrates
Constitution Day

THE crew of the Norwegian
steamship Runa will fire 21 canon
shells in Carlisle Bay today. This
is how they will begin their cele-
brations of the Norwegian Con-
stitution Day

Today will be a day of feasting
and merry making for the 35
members of the crew of the Runa.
Buntings will be flown on the ship
from stem to stern. “No member
of the crew will be working to-
day”, Captain Brynjulf Haraldsen
told the Advocate yesterday

Captain Haraldsen said that
May 17 is the same to Norwegians
as July 4 is to the Americans.
May 17 is called Constitution Day,
he said, because Norway got their
own laws on that day in 1814.

The Runa is expected to leave
port tonight for Trinidad.

Fuel Oils Come

DUTCH oil tanker Rodas made
her second visit in five days to
Barbados. yesterday with a ship-
ment of gasolene and kerosene
oil from Trinidad.

She brougnt a total. of 244,808
imperial gallons of motor gaso-
lene and 111,912 imperial gallons
ot kerosene. Of the total, 214,489
gallons of gasolene came for
Messrs. DaCosta & Co., Ltd.
33,169 of kerosene oil for Messrs.
General Traders Ltd., and
30,319 gallons of gasolene and
78,743. gallons of kerosene for
Messrs, R. M. Jones and Co., Ltd.

The Rodas sailed out of Carlisle
Bay a few hourg after her arrival,
for Sp Gardens, Black Rock,
She will discharge the fuel there.
Her agents are Messrs Da Costa &
Co., Ltd

SCHOONERS BRING
CARGO FROM B.C.

THREE schooners arrived at
Barbados with cargo from British
Guiana within the past two days,
Among them was the §87-ton
Philip H. Davidson which brought
1,500 bags of rice.





Other cargo arriving by the
vessels included firewood and
charcoal, They were all con-

signed to the Schooners Owners’
Association.

Close by lived a tailor and his son. One
day the son had an idea. “I know what
will make the Princess smile,” he said,
“Royal Pudding!”

AT THE



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



THEATRE

GRETA BANCROFT and Frank Collymore as they appeared in one
of the Bridgetown Players’ recent productions st the Empire Theatre.
They are again seen to good advantage in “The Shop at Sly Corner”,
which opened at the Empire last night.

THE SHOP AT
SLY CORNER

By MICHAEL

TIMSON

No one should miss the Bridgetown Players production of

Edward Percy’s “The Shop

at Sly Corner”, author of the

famous play “Ladies in Retirement”. Mr. Percy has here
developed his gift along more realistic lines, in the setting
of a curio shop, which is nevertheless equally exciting.

“The Shop at Sly Corner” has in
it some of tne quality of the Greek
me.odrama; in essence a tale oi
modern blackmail, It shows a
man in the grip of inexorable de
velopment of circumstances; but
with it all, Mr. Percy has so skil-
fully mixed elements of tender-
ness, pity and laughter, that only
«t tue end are we conscious of the
great forces that have been at
work,

The realisation of these forces
and their presentation to the
audience has been the big task
before the players, And how
well they have done it. \A large
measure of their success lies 1.2
the excellent scheme of direction
by which Mr. Collymore looked
ifter the players, and Mr. Barne:
their surroundings Much like
Gilbert and Sullivan, they can
work independently in terms of
each other’s contribution towards
a brilliantly designed whole.

Point Of Focus

Every play has a point of focus
but here Mr. Collymore as Mr
Heiss, the foreign curio dealer of
strange reputation and Greta
Bancroft ag his sister and nervous
partner in crime, provided a sort
of double centre, The, former
weedling, toothless, cunning,
humane and passionately violent;
and the latter weak, adorable
vibrating, and continuously ap-
prehensive, are the centre pieces
of inspiration for the rest of the
cast.

Together they isiuminate and
reveal the character—the innocent
and sweetness of Heiss’ daughter
Margaret, played with reserve and

charm by Joan King; the witty
dryness of her companion Joan
(Beryl Bladon): the vulgarity

and medical susceptibility of the
family char (heroically played
under great physical difficulty by
Mrs. Howe), The clear incisive-
ness of Dr. Graham (undertaken
at short notice by Doctor James)
the prodding inquisitiveness of the
remorseless police inspector (Bob
King); the loud, nervous and
jumpy nature of Corder Morris
(played with great gusto. and
character by “Mickie” Challenor);
and above gll, the nastiness, cheap—
ness, lowneSs, and supreme clever-
ness of Archie, the young shop
assistant who blackmails his em-—
ployer, and for it pays the supreme
penalty. This difficult part with
its difficult cockney accent is ex—
cellently played by one of the new
comers—Robert Maw, His con
ceited tone of bitterness and ex-
travagant tone of greed are re-
vealed in the arrogant voice, with
its flashes of darkness, and the

over—elegant movements of in
unnecessary nail file.
Masterpiece
Altogether, this is one of Mr.
Collymore’s finest efforts. In
personal achievement his per—

formance is a masterpiece

He was excellent in a part that
called for every emotion from the
pallidness of nervous exhaustion
to comic nonsense; every mark of
his criminsl background and every
blow from the relentless black
mailer is indelibly lined upon his
face. Even though the law would
never excuse the murder of his
tormentor, every sympathy is
solicifed to his side; so that we are
left in continual wonderment
to whether he will find a means
to evade it.

But beyond personal achieve—
ment, Mr, Collymore has also
welded together a whole new team
of actors, who have brought fresh
ness, vigour and life to the Bar-
vadian stage,

We
Be) Be:

as

can

|

So he brought her a dish of Royal Pud-
ding. And when she tasted it, her face
broke out into a big smile. In fact she
gave him her hand and her kingdom





NEW BISHOP

AT A MEETING of the
Anglican Church Synod held
yesterday two candidates
were nominated for the post
of Bishop of Barbados. They
were the Very Rev. the Dean
of St. Michael's Cathedral,
G. L. G. Mandeville and Rev.
Vaughan, Classical Tutor of
Codrington College.

The election will take place
to-day.



Boy Died From
Natural Causes

Death by natural causes was the
verdict returned by a nine man
jury yesterday when the inquiry
into the circumstances surround-
ing the death of Rudolf Jones, son
of Eudora Jones of Waterford
Tenantry, St. Micheel, was con-
cluded yesterday at District “A”
Court,

The Coroner was Mr. H. A.
Talma. Rudolf Jones was taken to
the General Hospital and detained
on April 28 and died on May 4,
A post mortem examination re-
vealed that death was due to tox-
emia, pneumonia and anemia. Dr,
E. L. Ward who performed the
post mortem said that the toxe-
mia could have been caused by
the gangrene of the tongue.

Four witnesses were called yes-
terday when the inquiry was re-
sumed. One of these, Leroy Jones,
brother of the deceased, said that
on April! 28 his brother Rudolf was
lying on the ground when a boy
with whom he had a quarrel threw
a stone into the house, striking ine
deceased.

Police Train For
Birthday Parade

HE MEN of the Mounted

Police will gather at District
“A” Station at the end of tho
week to begin their training for
the King’s Birthday Parade in
June.

The new drills that the mount-

ed police will do are the rank
and pass in sections and march-
ing pass in troop.
A Stee GIBSON of Kirton's
: Land, St. Philip, has a half-
bred leghorn chicken hatched
recently with only one wing.
The chicken is quite healthy.

EATRICE WHITTAKER of

Lightfoot Lane. St. Michael,
has reported to the Police the thefr
of an ice cream freezer belonging
to Dudley Gibbs, from Morgan
Lewis beach on Whit-Monday.



Judgement Given
To Defendant

In the Court of Original Juris-
diction yesterday Judge J. W, B.
Chenery gave judgement for the
defendant Gwen Goodridge, of
Dash Gap, Bank Hall, in a case
breught by Plaintiff Clarrie Rowe
a fisherman of Fairfield, Black

Reck, for damaging ‘and detain-
ing hig clothing. For this he
claimed £20.

Goodridge said that she used to
wash clothes for Rowe. The last
set he gave her to do she was
unable to get them for him on
the time arranged as she was
not feeling well and was attend.
ing a doctor.

There was no damage done to



the clothing and the plaintiff
owed her money for previous
work she had done for him.

BRINGS A SMILE TO
EVERYONE'S FACE

Just serve delicious Royal Puddings to
your family and friends —and then watch
the smiles of satisfaction. You'll smile,
too—for Royal Puddings are so easy to
prepare—and so economical, too. Try
one today.





es

Postmen Get Small

Travelling

Allowance

A postman from St. George can regularly be seen making
his rounds on his motor cycle. The Advocate was told yes-
terday that the motor cycle is the postman’s property and ke,
like every other postman, gets only six shillings a month

travelling allowance.

“Bus fares have increased, tie “

cost of
shoes are

still we

a bicycle has risen
more expensive, but
continue to get six
shillings a month travelling
allowance. For many years now
we have been getting this amount
és travelling allowance, but ne
one ever thinks of giving us an in-
crease to cope with the rising cost

and

of living’, a postman told the
Advoc:te yesterday,
He said that at one time the

Sovernment“was considering giv -
sng them bicycles, but one M.C.P..
talked as though he preferred a
horse and cart.

“I think that all country post-
men, especially those working ja
St. Jcseph and St. Andrew should
be given motor cycles by Govern-
ynent. These men could easily pay

for the cycles by monthly
inste'ments

“Postmen = in the country

distyicis get the same amount

of travelling allowance as those
in the City, Many have bicycies,

but these are useless in hilly
districts, Some can be seen
crawling over hills on their

hands and knees. The shoe-wear

alone is more than the ailow-

ance given them”, he said.

“It is obvious that you do not
have to spend six shillings on your
bicycle every month, but when
you do have to repair it, you spend
ten times that amount.”

He said that a Sanitary Inspec-
tor gets a monthly travelling
allowance of $2.00 if he owns a
bicycle and a $1 without » cycle.

Nothing Done

“On many occasions postmen
have asked for an increase on their
travelling allowance, but nothing
was done. I would like to say
right now, on behalf of all post-



men, we would like a
travelling allowance,” he said.
Describing the duties of the
country postman he said:
“The country postman very

often leaves his home for work
around six o'clock in the morning
He goes around clearing boxes
and then he carries in his letters
to his Post Office branch, He leaves
the branch office and goes home

at about 10.00 a.m.”
“He does not return to the
branch: office until around 2.00

p.m., when the mail van arrives
from the City. He then takes out
mail to be distributed at about
3.00 p.m., and is working through-
out the evening.

No Promotion

“Postmen who deliver letters in
the City area get to work at the
G.P.O,, at 8.00 a.m., and very
often we do not finish work until
5.00 p.m. At Christmas time we
finish even later. There is anothe;
shitt that arrives at the G.P.O., al
10.00 a.m., but this shift has ne
scheduled time to finish work.
Sometimes they work as late as
7.00 p.m,

He said; ‘Postmen do not ge‘
any promotion, We come in as a
postman on the street and die the
same ordinary postman, I feel
that there should be promotion to
which we could look forward, We
could be promoted to sorters, in-
spectors, superintendents, etc, As
inspectors we could see that other
junior postmen do their work
properly and there would be less
chance of pilfering from mail.”

“Only a dense man would work
at a place with the expectation of
remaining in the same position
until he dies,” he said,

DREDGE DRIVER DIES

Lionel Belle, who has been
driving the Government Dredge
for the past four years, died at
the General Hospital on Tuesday
evening after sorme weeks’ illness.

The Acting Harbour Master told
the Advocate yesterday that Belle
had dene good work in his 10 years’
service on the dredge. Belle joined
the dredge as a temporary deck
hand in 1941 and some years later
he became fireman. He was pro-
moted to driver in 1947,

Belle was a fireman when the
dredge worked day efter day on
the nets that were in Carlisle
Bay during the war.

TAKES AWAY. MOLASSES

Molasses tanker Athelbrook left
port yesterday for Trinidad with
a load of vacuum pan molasses.
She arrived the day before to
take her load. The Athelbrook’s



egents are Messrs, H, Jason Jones
& Co., Ltd.

JUDGEMENT to the amount of
£1 was given to the plaintif!
Rosalie Cummins of Ellerton, St.
George, when a suit in which she
claimed damages to the amount
of £2 against Lionel Cummins of
Eastlyn, St. George, was heard in
the Court of Original Jurisdiction
by Judge J. W. B. Chenery yes-
terday.

Mr. B. Niles appeared on be-
half of the defendant Lionel Cum-
mins while Mr. W. W. Reece
represented Rosalie Cummins.

Rosalie Cummins claimed that
her father died intestate and she
took out letters of administration
for the estate which included halt
of an acre of land, Her father
died in 1931 and. he bought this
land from a man name Pilgrim in

1917 :
On 23rd October she _ hired
Theophilis White to “work” the

land and he dug some cane holes.
Sometime the same day the de-
fendant. went to the same field
and did damage to the amount of

£2.
White aso said that he saw
when the defendant took a hoe

ane “fill up” the holes he had dug,

oi Rosalie Cummins’ instructions



DROVE WITH FAULTY

BRAKES
4 City Police Magistrate yester-
day imposed a fine of £3 on

Oswald Browne of Eagle Hall, St
Michael, for driving the motor
van M-87 on Bonnetts Road, Si
Michael, with faulty brakes on
March 5,

The fine is to be paid by monthly
irstalmeats or in default twe
m nths’ imprisonment

RUNA BRINGS LUMBEP.

A shipment of 24,997 feet of
pine lumber arrived here on Tues-
day by the Norwegian steamship
Runa, The shipment came from
Tampa, Florida, for Messrs Gar-
diner Austin & Co., Litd.

The Runa is expected to finish
discharging the lumber this eve-
ning.

Messrs Robert Thom Ltd.,
the Runa’s agents.

are












CHECK THAT
COUGH

WITH
BROWNE'S

CERTAIN

COUGH SYRUP
Colds Quickly.

lt Relieves

C, CARLTON BROWNE

136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813
Wholesale & Retail Deuggist

ARE YOU PREPARING
FOR THE BIG
ATHLETIC MEETING

az

To avoid muscular pains
and to keep up your stride
You should rub down with

SACROOL

THE GREAT PAINKILLER
e

on sale a’
KNIGHTS DRUG STORES







YES, YOU CAN

LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH

10 & 11 ROEBUCK



BUY IT AGAIN



— Also —
GALY. OIL CANS — 1, 2 & 5 Gin, Sizes
| ene TP APRBERT Ld. 7s



EET,












Arcola

Gets £1 Damages

|



IMPERIAL LEATHER



PAGE FIVE



EP. Sie

SOAPS

BLUE HYACINTH

TOILET
;
MOTD

e LINDEN BLOSSOM @



WH. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—bistributors.

eo



LAYENA.



“PURINA”

see

Sanam aererdc«c we





APTENTION i!

FACTORY MANAGERS

Yake this opportunity of obtaining your requirements

IN

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE

Ranging from %” upwards

MILD STEEL

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes

FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill
At PRICES that cannot be repeated.



The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.
White Park Road, St. Michael

DIAL 4528





2

DRUG
STORE!



MESSRS. A. S.
BOX 403,

P.O,

SS
LLL LLL PLL ELLE LEL LIE LELEPPEELLESD PP ELI PAP PPPI CE, g



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EMULSION

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e

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(ALL Branches)
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You
Should
Order
To-BPay

An _— Excellent

Body-Builder
and $1.20

SIZES 66c.



| Special Offer
LAUREL _ SAFETY
RAZORS
36c. Each





You can enjoy Britain’s
favourite tobaccos. Six
blends to choose from—
every one a balanced
blend of vintage leaf.

SOLB AGENTS?
BRYDEN 9& SONS (BARBADOS), LTD,
BRIDGETOWN, RARBADOS







Shoes for Ladies

In a wide variety of wonderful styles specially designed to

meet the latest trends,

Green Suede, Black Suede, Brown Suede and White Buck.

Sling backs and open toes. Spike heels and high Cuban heels,



CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.

|







Prices

from

$12.96

$14.97













PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY i7, 1951



STOMACH DISTRESS?

Aika Seltrer helps millions daily!

HENRY











Alka-Seltzer is so easy to take...
so pleasant-tasting. Just drop one
or two tablets into a glass of water,
watch it fizz, then drink it. Not a
laxative, not habit-forming, you can
| take it any time. Let Alka-Seltzer
; relieve your acid indigestion.

{ Have a supply handy.







(BRITAIN’S BEST HISCUITS)

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING storES = rae
ADVOCATE

TRY THESE FAMOUS PARTY AIDS BOOKS
CHEESELETS |
MARTINI CRACKERS i
PLAY BOX
TWIGLETS Etc. Etc Bcc

by James Hanley









Da EVERYTHING —
ALL RIGHT 7

Lineage Awe

WELL ... THIS 1S OUR FIRST
NIGHT IN HOLLYWOOD!
WONDER HOW GOOFY’S
MAKING OUT !













TIM’ WAY
OVER HERE,
MICKEY !



AAS MARE SISAL sa,
red SO NOW SUNIL Sey can te Mais,

BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG













vitt ii| HGH i} iy) Huot

a ah OH, | FORGOT TO

cA TELL YOU-- YOUR

BUMSTEAD

YOU'RE FIRED/
TY,





BOSS SAID HE'D THE AMERICAN GENIUS
oe pte ms (An anthology “ poetry
I~ x nd verse

ye 7, | PRACTICAL SPANISH
San DELICIOUS & APPETISING oN
3 set 5 by Hills & Ford
BH O- [ASW
—" ADVOCATE

ra a STATIONERY
IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only






























MNT

eta





{} | We
WAU












aH
VY

OR MAYBE PORK ROAST

AT 80¢ OR VEAL ATA

DOLLAR AND A QUARTER?
Dp



} HAVE PLENTY OF










DAGWOOD WOULD YOU LIKE
STEAK FOR SUPPER ATA “4
DOLLAR-TWENTY A POLIND OR

LAMB CHOPS AT A DOLLAR?’









USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW

Tins GUAVA JELLY 57 49 Sliced Bacon (perlb) $1.20 $1.00

°

Pkgs. RED ROSE TEA (3) 40 35 Tins Evaporated Milk 27 24

Tins TOMATOES 37 32 Bottles Jeffreys Beer 26 20

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

BOVRIL introduces

Maralyn

BRINGING UP FATHER









OUR NEW NEIGHBOR LIPSTAIRS
16 MR. STAN DUPANSING =

OPERA STAR-I'M ANXIOUS TO
MEET HIM-I THINK {I'LL SING/
HELL HEAR ME AND WANT TO

ANSWER THE
DOOR / I HAVE
AN IDEA THAT
MAY BE HIM /










/ @ THE MILK DRINK THAT \
ga EVERYONE ENJOYS

;





\ Senn
ee
&
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c, Inc, World rights reserved

THE LONE RANGER












wi 5 wh < ¥% Pure, creamy, country milk... enriched
ce THESE TWO FOLLOWED OUR "TRAIL FROM THE BANK, BOSS. Mh Mi ‘ ... flavoured... and already sugared —
fED ME AN'MADE ME BRING —M TO YOU! rT THAT MASK, THE! EI Tm HN, . ‘ that’s Maralyn Milk Plus ! Itis a satisfying,

\H

ad nourishing milk drink. It tastes gplicious
) -.\

ene (co=
ae tz .. . and the kiddies love it, too!
om me:
Ray ey x
= Fy -
r-)S







bkts”

Be
aw ee
care TAN

MATA

e @ It
( wink PLUS ) in B07. and 16 02. TINS




epee STREET
Nf ;

PLEASE, PLEASE, STAND UP LIKE A MAN, OR T'LL LET
MR. WHITEY ! YA HAVE IT RIGHT
c THERE !

CHEERFUL mind
so often goes with a
healthy body. To main-
tain good health, don’t
forget essential Jnner
Cleanliness. Andrews
Hi : ‘ = not only provides a
Wy) i . ‘wall WH: VV, Wen < Bee sparkling, refreshing
§ Mf! Car, We caiteng Poss Sys ant he Nd in tone ) he 2! : a4 it 0 itis taka
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES » ___ you clean inside as well.
| DONT KNOWWHAT TO DO! IF | KEEP GOING THEY LL STO “1 THINK YOUD Wit It functions by cleaning the mouth,
$ c ¥ Pp eK. WON \ .
cituitmmcaonn uf \ one UP THE SWIM, AT NOTHING «THEY'VE Anca Pe? BETTER LET 7G coe oe Ee the = —. toning ~
ul LOSE ALLHIS — ME TAKE . _— e liver. Finally, ews gen
TING, BUT Sos EV 10 THOSE a eC) eR y gently
EN







clears the bowels.

Take this “fizzy” drink whenever
you need refreshing. One teaspoonful
in a glass of water is all you need

4 to use.
PT ti z
ESTATES & TRADING COMPANY A wi DREWS :
Bain LIVER SALT
(ECKSTEIN BROS.) THE IDEAL FORM OF LAXATIVE,

El SE SP PS



‘ cere
TT

}



&



THURSDAY, MAY 17,



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508



For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each





196 cents Sundaws 24 worrts wer 2
eee oe wag ey bey Words Scents a word meek. « vente @
meee ae = = or Word Sinden

The charge for apnouncements cf; ~
Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices i: AUTOMOTIVE
61.50 on week-days and $1.20 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and -
3 cents per word on week-days and CAR--Vauxhall 12 hp. $,009 miles.
4 cents per word om Sundays for each Owner driven, Perfect order. Phone 8474.
additiona: word. 17.5.51--3n
CAR—Morr!s 8 Saloon. New Tyres
Hughes. Stansfeld Scott &
DIED 17 an.
—_— wiaagine i
2 + * ideal
GREENIDGE—On the 15th May 1951) f.mily car, one owner and in absolutely

Samuel Donald Greenidge (late retired
Clerk at Messrs. T. Herbert Ltd.) The
funeral took place the said evening
at the Westbury Cemetery.

R. B. Harrison. 17.5.51—In.



reasonable. Apply F. D. L. Gay, Staple
WHARTON—On the 16th May 1951.) Grove, Christ Chureh, Dial 3207.
Beatrice Ameiia (Aunt Emmie) 1.5.51-—t.f.n.
Wharton, late Cloth Merch:2* of 21] ——-——— ——___ "
Swan Street. The funeral leaves from CAR: 1948 Vauxhall “10°. A-1 con
the Funeral Parlour of Hinds & Co.,/ dition. Recently overhauled and painted
Tweedside Road, at 4.39 o'clock tnis| Bob Edghill, Hanschell, Larsen & Co

evening for Saint Leonard's Church.} Ltd. Phone 4104 16.5.51—-3n
Friends are invited ———$—$<$____—___ _ moon
Dr, Arthur ©, Thornhill and family MOTOR CYCLE—B.S.A 3% H.P
(U'S.A.) Edna Thornhill. Can be seen at B.A.T. Co. or Harts
It 17.5.51—1n.| Gap. Apply: Mervyn Cox 2414.
17.5.51—1n





THANKS

MeCASKIE. We acknc acknowledge with the anks
the cards and other tokens of sympathy ;
sent us on the occasion of the death;
of Joshua Cashmin McCaskie.

Ambrozine (wife), Winster,

Rowena, Elaine, Stella (children: .

17.5.51—fn.



Minna, |!



IN ' MEMORIAM

ROUCHER—In



loving memory of our

dear beloved Seymour Boucher, who

fell asleep on the 16th May 1948.

Two years hath speed since thou
hast left the same scene

Of mortal fears and tears yet are
thou dear

But in our memory still lives a
devoted—

Wife, mother and sister, Euclidia, Gwen
and Mrs, B. Ifill. 17.5.51—1n
PITT—In loving memory of our dear
one, Maria, who was called to higher
service one year ago to-day. i
The helpful word, the pleasant smile,
Thou knowest Lord, how we long;
But thou hast called our dear one
home. 2
Lord, thou canst
Ever remembered by
and friends.



do no wrong!
loving relatives

17.5.51—1n



YFARWOOD—In ever loving memory of
Anthony Yearwood (Tony) who was
lost at sea.

“No one knows how much I miss him

No one knows the bitter pain,

I've suffered since I lost him

Life will never be the same.”

Ever to be remembered by—
arse (grandmother). 17.5.51—1n,

TAKE NOTICE
LEO

That LOVENS KEMISKE FABRIK VED
A. KONGSTED, a firm organised under



the laws of Denmark, whose trade or
business address is 19, Bronshojvej,
Copenhagen, Denmark, has applied for

the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of pharmaceu-
tical preparations and substances, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 17th day of May
1951, unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.
Dated this 3rd day of May, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
17.5, 51—3n,







~ TAKE NOTICE
PETRO

That PETROLEUM HEAT AND POWER
COMPANY, a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is Southfield Avenue, Stamford,
Connecticut, U.S.A., has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part “A”
of Register in respect of oil burners and
parts thereof; boilers, furnaces and parts
thereof; heating, lighting and ventilating
apparatus and parts thereof; heating,
lighting and lubriéating oils and greases;
gasoline; fuel oils; petroleum = and
petroleum products, and will be entitled
to register the same after one month
from the 17th day of May 1951, unless
some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office of

opposition of such registration, The
teade mark can be s@en on application
at my office.

Dated this 9th day of May, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
17.5.51—3n
O04

OOOOOOOOOOTOF

KEEP ON

FURNISHING

x The Money-Saving Way

Wardrobes, Dresser-robes, Linea
Presses, Gay Vanities, Simpler
Dressing Tables, Bedsteads, Beds,
Washstands, Nightchair Comfort,
Hat and Shoe and Towel Racks,
Screen Frames.

69CSSS

Dining, Luncheon, Fancy and
Kitchen Tables in big range ot
shapes, finishes and sizes, China,
Kitchen and Bedroom Cabinets.
Liquer Case %



and
Re-

Morris Furniture, Rush
Caned furniture, Rocking,
clining, Berbice, Upringht, Arm
and Tub Chairs, Settees, all at

MONEY SAVING PRICES

L. 5. WILSON §

SPRY ST.

*
.
‘
DIAL 4069

| a AOS OCES





| For Sale or Lease

STRATHMORE

Culloden Road.

Handsome, =-siorey stone
re with ‘shingle roof
and pine floors. Contains 2
| reception, dining room, 4
| bedrooms, 3 baths and toi-
' lets. Extensively remodelled.
| Walled grounds of about
15,000 sq. ft. Pleasant town
residence suitable for Doc-
tor’s Home or Guest House.



John 4. Biadon

REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
‘Phone 4640

and Battery
Co., Broad Street.
CAR— Humber Hawk “Sa loon,

1951



FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cente and















first class condition. Cole



CAR—Vauxhall
tyres,

14 six with 4 good
in good working condition, price





















ELECTXICAL

_—
RADIO—One Philip Radio (9 tubes) in

good condition, no _ reasonable offer
refused. Apply to E. Lisle Edwards
C/o Ince & Co. 16.5.51—2n





REFRIGERATOR- Canadian G.E. 5 cu
ft. One year guarantee left Runs very
economically. Bennett 8349

17.5.51—3n

REFRIGERATOR—One U.S. 7 cubic
foot Frigidaire Refrigerator Apply:
Harold Weatherhead c/o Weatherhead's
Drug Store. Phone 2164—3144.

17.5.51—t.f.n

|

1,000 PYE RADIOS—Further evidence e
of the superlative popularity of PYE
radio rectivers is given by the fact that
the Harrison Liner “Planter” has on
board this trip one thousand Pye radios
destined for users in the Southern Carib-
bean area alone. Pye Ltd.



17.5.51—3n



POULTRY

CHICKS—White and Black Giants:
Rhode Islands, Plymouth Rocks, New,
Hampshire and R.O.P. White Leghorns
from U.S.A Gordon Matthews, Glen-
maur, Constitution Road.



16.5.51—2n



POULTRY: Parks breed, Pure bred,
Barred Rocks Chicks 5, 6 and 7 weeks
old. Apply to A. Forde, Sobers Lane
Opposite Pipe. 16.5.51—2n

MISCELLANEOUS



BALLOONS—We have just received 4
large assortment of Balloons for Parties



and Dances ete. KNIGHT'S LTD.
16.5 delist
BOOKS—A limited number of True
Story, True Detective, True Romance
ete. The Bornn Bay Rum Co. Dial 2938»
17.5,51—2n



~ CHRISTOPHER CoOL’ UMBUS Caraval
Nina at present moored at Holetown,
St. James. No reasonable offer refused.
Apply Ralph Hunte c/o Manning & Co. }
Ltd, Dial 4284, 12..51—t fn

“FILE FASTENERS"—Just received a



supply of File Fasteners. Phone 4442}
T. Geddes Grant Ltd., for your require-|
ments. 13.5.51—6n,. ,





GALVANISED SHEETS—Best quality
new sheets, Cheapest in the Island!
6 ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56; |
10 ft $8.40. Nett cash. Better hurry !!
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

4.5.51—t.f.n.

SHUTTER: One Steel Roller Shutter
18 ft. long by 9 ft. high. Apply: Evelyn,
Roach & Co., Ltd. 13.5.51—3ny





SCALES: One % ton and one 1-ton Plat
form Scale. Apply: Evelyn, Roach & Co.
Ltd. 13.5.51—3n

PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agete line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-daya
and $1.80 on Sundays.





THE SUGAR INDUSTRY
AGRICULTURAL BANK ACT, 1945.

To the creditors holding sptcialty liens
against Sea View Plantation, St. Lucy

TAKE NOTICE that I, the Owner of
the above Plantation am about to
obtain a loan of £250 under the pro-
visions of the above Act against the said
Plantation, in respect of the Agricul-
tural ;year 1951 to 1952.

No money has been borrowed
the Agricultural Aids Act,
above Act (as the case may
spect of such year.

Dated this 16th day of May 1951

A. SIMMONS,
Owner



under
1905 or the
be) in re-

16.5.51—3n



NOTICE

Applications for one vacant St. Joseph's
Vestry Exhibition tenable at the St
Michael's Girls’ School, will be received
by the Clerk of the Vestry up to 3 o'clock
Pp m.on Tuesday 29th day of May 1951.
Candidates must be daughters of Parish-
joners in straitened circumstances and!
must have attained the age of 8 ‘years, |
and must be under 12 years by July Bist |
1951, to be proved by a Baptismal Cer-
tificate, which must accompany the
Application, all Candidates to
examined must be at the School not later
than 9.15 a.m. on Saturday, June 16th
1951. Forms of Application can be
obtained from the Vestry Clerk's Office

A _ T. KING,
Clerk, St. Joseph's Vestry
16.5.51—6n

NOTICE

Applications for one or more vacant St.
Michael's Vestry Exhibition tenable at
the Combermere School, will be received
by the Clerk of the Vestry up to 12
o'clock noon on Thursday 22nd day of
May, 1951.

Candidates must be sons of parishion-
ers in straitenéd circumstances and must
not be less than ten years and four
months nor more than twelve years
oli on the Ist day of January 1951, to
be proved by a Baptismal Certificate,
which must accompany the application.

Parents and/or Guardians will be noti-
fied of the time and place of the Exam-
ination.

Forms of application can bg obtained
from the Vestry Clerk's Office.

‘By Order,
E, C. REDMAN,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry.
§,51—Tn





NOTICE _

PARISH OF ST. THOMAS
APPLICATIONS for
Vestry Exhibitions, tenable at
Michael's Girls’ School
value of £5 will be received by the
undersigned not later than 29th May 1951.
Applicants must be children of Parish-
ioners in straitened circumstances
between the ages of 8 and 12 years.

A birth certificate must be forwarded,
with an application form, obtained from
the Parochial Office.

The entrance examination will be held
at St. Michael's Girls' School on Satur-
day, June 16th at 9.15 a.m.

F. F.. PILGRIM,
to Vestry, St. Thomas.
17.5.51—4n

one or more

St
of the annual

Clerk

TO-DAY’S FLASH N

from 30 lbs. to
are obta

CENTRAL



[| res



, Christ Church. This property



FOU!
PIER HEAD LANE $

teerees.
SEEKS

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-cdays
and 12 cente per agate line on Sundays,
minimum cnarge $1. on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays

REAL ESTATE



SHARES
Trading Co
CLARKE
Street

~102 Barbados Shipping &
Ltd. Shares. Appi;; G. L. W
& CO., Solicitors, Jamies

vit.5.51—4n



By Public competition at our office
James Street, Bridgetown on Friday tne
Ist day of June 1951, at 2 p.m
1% perches of land at Welchman Hall
St. Thomas, Abutting on lands of James
Forde, J E. Brathwaite, J. Payne and
on Welchman Hall main road together
with the dwelling house thereon the
property of Edwin Alfred Holder
For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:—
HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD
17.5.51—Tn
DWELLINGHOUSE and Land contain-
ing 2 roods, 7 perches adjoining the
property kown as “The Abbe", Christ
Church. This property is a newly built
stonewall dwellinghouse comprising
living rooms, bedrooms, usual conveni-
ences and belongs to Ervin Jerome King.
The above property will be set up for
sale by Public Competition at our Office,

James Street, on Friday 18th May 1951,
at 2 p.m.
Inspection on application to Mr. J. A

Griffith the tenant
YEARWOOD & BOYCE
Solicitors.
11.5.51—Tn



ERNEST DALE, Passage Road standing
yn 22 perches of land. Dwelling house
comprises open verandah, Drawing ana
Dining rooms two bedrooms, kitchen,
toilet and bath.

The above will be
public competition on
at 2 p.m. at the office of the under
signed from whom conditions of Sal
and further particulars can be obtained

HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD
17.5.51—-5n

offered for sale tc
Friday 25th May)



LAND —
for building,

8—10 acres of land suitable
in lots of not less than
10,000 sq. ft. Overiooking a large area
of St. Philip and Christ Church Mag-
nificent environment. 15 to 20 minutes’
drive to Crane Coast. Walking distances
to Lodge and High School. Govt. Water,
Telephone, Electric Light pass the area,
Apply to W. I. Webster, Moncrieffe, St.
John, — ‘Phone 95-252.
29.4.51—9n,
——
The Property known as “The Abbe
comprises
a dwelling house with 2 acres, 2 roods
31% perches of land and belongs to Mr.
Renry H. D. King. The above property
will be set up for Sale by Public Com-
petition at our Office on Friday 18th May





1951, at 2.30 p.m

For inspection apply Mr. H. H. D.
King on the premises

YEARWOOD & BOYCE
Solicitors

11.5,51—7n

200. Shares CENTRAL FOUNDRY
LIMITED.

50 Shares BARBADOS SHIPPING AND





TRADING CO. LIMITED.

41 Shares WEST INDIA RUM RE-
FINERY LIMITED.

27 Shares 6% TELEPHONE CO
LIMITED.

18 Shares BARBADOS FOUNDRY
LIMITED

The above shares will be set up at
Public Cfmpetition at the Office of the
undersigned on Fr iday, the 18th May at

2 p.m
CARRINGTON & SEALY
Lucas Street.

13.5.51—4n



for sale by Public Com-
petition at my office, Victoria Street
on Friday, 18th at 2 p.m. The cottage
called LILA situated at McLean's
Gap, Brittons Cross Road — house con-
tains open gallery — Drawing Dining,
3 bedrooms, W.C & Bath — wash
basin, Kitchen with running water and
standing on about 10,000 sq. feet of
land. For inspection between 10 to 4
p.m. on application to the tenant, For
condition of sale apply to R. Archer
McKenzie, Dial 2947. 12.5.51—4n.



I will offe:





2 roods ;

BARBADGS ADVOCATE
‘LosT & FOUND WANTED
| es































or
ness address is 19, Bronshojvej,| 9 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
penhagen, Denmark, has applied for week—4 Cente o
the registration of a trade mark in Part

“A” of Register in respect of pharmaceu



bw
words & cents a word
word Sundays.





The





iK VED |S
A. KONGSTED, a firm organised under





Gov



IRNMENT NOTICE







PERSONAL |



public are hereby



PARKER

PAGE SEVEN





I}





Minimum charge week 72 cents and | ——————
FOUND cen Sundays 24 words — over 24 The public are her€by warned agains st |
e ris 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a] Siving credit to my wife, RETA LARRIER | ry
bes - Cae nese word Sundays. (nee Barrow as I do not hold myself |
EXPEN'! IVE FOUNTAIN PEN om | responsible for her or anyone else con- m I dit
or Rockley Beach Saturday evening | HELP tracting any debt or debts in my name ° ,
May 12. Owner please contact David! = nless t\ a written order signed by me
Fvans junior c/o T. R. Evans Broad | FITZGERALD LARRIER,
Street 17.5.51—In MISCELLANEOUS Rices, St. Philip
— od | 16 .5.51—2n
LICENSE; One (1) LI r License. | “~~ ee seen cnn
TAKE NOTICE Anu SB. Cole & Cota) Dini daes.| The public are hereby warned against
| of 10.5.51-2n| &!Ving credit to my wife, CYRIE PHIL-
5 tes ane | LIPS (nee Yearwood), as I do not hold
LEOCILLIN myself responsible for her or anyone
= else ccstracting any debt or debts in
That LOVENS KEMISKE FAN® — eee ee eee co
the laws of Denmark, whose trade Minimum charge week 72 cents aad gned MOTTLEY PHILLIPS,

Halls Village,
St, James.
16.5.51—2n

warned against

OTHER PEOPLE DO!

tical preparations and substances, and HOUSES ivir redit to my wife, ZENDORF
will be entitled to register the same after HARPER ies Weve -oe tae fot hee
et ene from the lith day of May BUNGALOW Swansea, Worthing myself responsible for her or anyone
— aoe pl ae person shall in tha | fully furnished 4 bedrooms Fridge,| else contracting any de\t or debts in
at_my office of opposition of such resis. | Dial suo ce’ see ee eee ee ee OMe Ore y
3 c 8 Pgis- al 2 or 3 3 me ‘

tration. The trade mark can bo seen 9n | —————— ae: es —— an ome GEORGE HARPER. Ot R HOME »_
application at my office ROOM AND BOARD for young — Jackson, St. Michael

Dated this ard day of Muy, 1951 couple or Bachelors, Excellent food *"711.5.51—2n

H. WiLLLAMS, On sea. Apply: Casuarina Residential] — _ Beacons
Registrar of Trade Marks | Club, Maxwell Coast Road. Tel, 8378 NJ Y
173.81 wea | TAKE NOTICE FURNISHING DEPT.

CAN OFFER

That PARKER PEN COMPANY, a cor-
: poration duly organized under the laws BI
ATTENTION is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) | of the State of Wisconsin. United States THE FOLLOWING NEW ARRIVALS
o merica, whose trade or business
(Amendment) Order, 1951, No. 12 which will be published in the!address is the Corner of urt and . ge

Vfficial Gazette of Thursday, 17th May, 1951. . USA.

price of “Oats (Feed)” are as foll@ws:—

ARTICLE | WHOLESALE PRICE Retail Price

(not mre than) caat@ more than)

cae oan) [oat more than)
Â¥
‘1

and
precious
metal) ;

imitation precious

metal or



pencils;

person shall in the

OATS (Feed) .86 per bag of 160.

|
| $12





of Register in respect
mechanical pencils

desk stands



Division Streets, Janesville, State of Wis-
. consin has applied for the reg-
2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail c= of a trade

mark in Part “A"

of fountain pens FLOWERED CRETONNE 48” wide @ $3.12 per yd.
of imitation reciows | yr’ 4 4
cnet of precious or HY "TAPESTRY 48” wide @ $3.12 per yd.

and ink, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 17th day of May,

H.B. TOWELLIN Peach, Green & Gold



—Blue,

1951, unless some
meantime give notice

in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-



4 a sition of such registration, The trade ed i (a) iy
Ibs. 9. per Ib mnarke ean be seen on se rpliesken ‘at oe 18” wide @ $1.00 per yd.
ef iti’
17.5.51—In Dated this 9th day of May, 1951 = » a ” : j
so pi ce a ee es pan Se evga H. WILLIAMS, WHITE H.B. TOWELLING 18” wide @ 77c. per yd.
eee Registrar of Trade Marks
17.5.51—3n
WHITE H.B. TOWELS—Hemstitched 88c. each
TAKE NOTICE LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
SPR. Sppeonton of FitzPatrick Max-
well, holder of Liquor License No, 585 ‘Ny TELS stite
east erate ae, Hicense Noses 1) WHITE H.B. LINEN TOWELS—Hemstitched
board and shingle shop at corner Deacons m
Road and Black Rock, St. Michael, for @ $1.51 & $1.72 each
| permission to use said Liquor License
yat a beard and shingle shop at Black
{ Rock, St. Michael,



That RALSTON PURINA COMPANY,
of the State of Missouri,
is City of St

a corporation organized under the
United States of America,
Louis, State of Missouri, U.S.A., has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A" of Register in respect pf food products for
animal use, animal feed containers, watering féuntains for animals,
disinfectants and vermifuges, and will be entitled to register the same

N.B.—This
sidered at a
at Police Court,

human and
insecticides,

after one

month from the 17th day of May 1951, unless some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my office of cpposition of such registration, The] 4" =
trade mark can be seen on application at my oMece E

Dated this 9th day of May, 1951
H, WILLIAMS,
Marks

17.5.51

Registrar of Trade





NEEDS

Confederation





a ements



accept
Domin-
Nevis
léth

June, Sydney 23rd June, arriving at Trin-
idad during the latter
proceeding
Liverpool.

Cargo and Passengers for
Montserrat;
Sailing Friday

half of July, and
thereafter to Barbados and - een’

instant



L RL DS WSS RoSSSoRSSRSSHSS ROSE SO SSS OOESS BRIDGETOWY. SARBADOS.
ROYA NETHE If 8 M.V. Caribbee will accept Cargo
STEAMSHIP co. and Passengers for Dominica,
e Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and St, —
S.S. ARABIA _is_ scheduled to wat? Kitts. Sailing Friday 18th instant
from Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th ORIEN AL
May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane 16th The M.V. Moncka will



Kitts



AUC'sI0N





146 STUDEBAKEF PLATFORM LORRY

We are instructed by the Insurance

Agents to sell this vehicle which has

been damaged in an accident by public

auction at the Courtesy Garage ct 2 p.m.
on Friday, 18th May, 1951.

JOHN M. BLADON,
Auctioneer
13.5. 51—4n

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

instructions received from the
Insurance Co., I will sell on Friday, Mai’
18th at 2 p.m. at the General Motor
Bus Co., Nelson Street (1) A-40 Austin
Car. Damaged in accident. Terms cash.
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer.
16.5.51—3n,

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

DOGDE TRUCKS
We will sell on FRIDAY the 18th
Courtesy Garage, Whitepark Road, one
1944 Dodge Army Truck with Steel
Platform in good order and condition,
Sale 1 o'clock. Terms cash.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers



By



at

16.5.51-

TAKE NOTICE
PETROHEAT

That PETROLEUM HEAT AND POWER
COMPANY, a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is Southfield Avenue, Stamford,
Connecticut, U.S.A., has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part “A”
of Register in respect of oil burners and

parts thereof; boilers, furnaces and parts
Thecect: heating, lighting and ventilating
apparatus and parts thereof; heating
lighting and lubricating oils and greases;
gasoline; fuel oils; petroleum and
petroleum products, and will be entitled
to register the same after one montn
from the 17th day of May, 1951, unless
some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office of
opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be ,.s¢en on apnlication
at my office,

Dated this

~2n

9th day of May, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
17.5, 51—3n,

TAKE NOTICE

Bir

That BIRO PENS LTD, Manufac-
turers, a British Company, whose trade
or business address is 67 Brook Street,
London, W. 1, England, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of writing
instruments, parts therefor ‘not being
of precious metal or coated therewith),
and will be entitled to register the same
| after one month from the 17th day of
May 1951, unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.
Dated this 9th day of May, 1951

H. WILLIAMS.
Registrar of Trade Marks.
17.5. 51—3n





5%;
PROS,

EWS

STEAM PRESSURE GAUGES

500 Ibs.
ainable at

DRY LTD.

capacity



SOLS

















In addition to general cargo this vessel
h les for chilled and hard M.V. Cael De! Caribe will ’ DIAL
frozen cargos nes OF Shales and Mar) aceept Garay’ and, Passengers for THANTS “xa

Cargo accepted on through Bills of Lad- St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada ae
ing for transhipment at Trinidad to Brit- and Aruba. Sailing on or about x 6 a
ish Guiana, Leeward and Windward 18th instant, |
TR isiner particulars apply — AvBer:t66+ ; ADIES’ HA S
PuRNgas, WitHY & Co. Etb, B.W1. SCHOONER OWN: on Semin’ sine so L

rinidad, ERS ASSOC, jo ,

Bwi. | ’ Fill Refri t . .

ad | Tele. 4047. foo pans with in CRINOLINE fine Straws
DA COSTA & CO,, LTD., j . ’ :
Bridgetown, ODA GONG .
is die en hl DISTILLED =WATER FELTS White and Colours
and taste the difference ' HO S
Akcoa steamship (/o |] SRP a LADIES’ DRESS SHOE
9 === open Toe & Back in White and Black
nL. ———— SSS SSS]
NEW YORK SERVICE : | BF.) MARE SER mere Q NY I ONS

SS. “TRYA” sailed 27th April Arrives Barbados 8th May | ASEOOEATION GOOD UALITY
A Steamer Sails 18th May ac “ 2th ,, |



NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

















S.S. “ALCOA PATRIOT” Sailed 18th April Arrives Barbados 4th May
S.S. “ALCOA POLARIS" Sails 2nd May - ” " 18th ,,
S.S. “ALCOA ROAMER” ‘Sails 16th May - * ” Ist June will be the subject of a Talk f CHILDREN SHOES
- . to be given by .
Dr. C. “BERTIE” CLARK
: CANADIAN SERVICE To-night Thursday, May 17, 1951 pelissip eodiaeeiainti —_—__——————
SOUTHBOUND At St. Mary's Boys’ Sehool
Name of Ship Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives B’dos, Room, Mason Hall Street
y at 8 o'élock, All are invited. FOR A FULL RANGE OF
*S.S. “ALCOA PEGASUS" April 27th April 30th May lith EL deLISLE YEARWOOD,
*S “ALCOA PIONEER" May llth May 14th May 24th Hony. Secretary.
S.S. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE” May 25th May 0th June = 10th “97,5, 51—1n I
NORTHBOUND E ITE SHIRTS
§ “ALCOA PLANTER” due May 11th, sails for St, John, & St, Lawrence
River Ports





*These vessels have limited passenger accommodation,



ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE







AND TWISTS

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products,

With Glossy

Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for phone to match









Dated this 16th day of May,
. A. MeLEOD,

application
Licensing Court to be held
District
th 28th day of May

Police Magistrate, Dist.



\| FOR YOUR INSURANCE
CONSULT

ANDREW D- SHEPPARD
Representing

Cyo F. B. ARMSTRONG LTD.,







SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened















CRICKET
REMINISCENCES



10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

——_——

TELEPHONE CORDS
OURED PLASTICS TO SAVE
THAT ANNOYANCE OF KNOTS

and
ENAMEL-IT, Paint

1951
Esq.,

To E
laws | Police Magistrate, Dist, “A"
whose trade or business address Signed FITZ PATRICK MAXWELL,
{

Appiicant

will be con-

Wm. FOGARTY Ltd.

oo

“A” on Monday,
1951,

at 11 o'clock,



nett SOOO SOCORRO PROPOR DEE PPVOOD

HOLIDAY

Hh



A. McLEOD,
han,



17.5.51—1n

Life Association

Tel, 2840

—









$136 to $1.86 all Sizes

in White, Blue, Green and Striped

NEW STYLED SPORT SHIRTS
All at BARGAIN PRICES

THE BARGAIN HOUSE







IN COL- ,)
y



ym
My
4



Quick-Drying
your Tele-
the colour of the

Xe
\%







sailing to Europe fortnightly. The usual ports of call are room.
Pea London, or Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual } sOuNGONE. Se AnIONERY 30, Swan Street — S. ALTMAN, Proprietor
& “Ay .
reduction for chi:dren ; AND Sint O ASE iB. PHONE 2702
OOOO OOOO D LS | SOL LLALO DALAL ELM ALLO
. WS OCP RPL RAPP PPL LLLP PPL APD Mone
° 8
Y
‘ Let Us Show You

PLYMOUTH — LE

HAVRE

| EUROPE



SOS

+34,4

955959 SSO OS OS SSFOSGSS SOSSSSGSSGSSOSOS OGG
SOOSSSOISOSS SSS SODOCS

oF

“COLOMBIE” “GASCOGNE”

REGULAR LUXURIOUS ECONOMY VOYAGES BY TWO
DISTINGUISHED SHIPS FROM iemet onsast TO eyaere

CARIBBEAN CRUISE

TRINIDAD — LA GUAIRA — CURACAO
CARTAGENA — JAMAICA
10 DAYS’ VACATION ON BOARD OF THE LUXRY LINER
8.S. “COLOMBIE”





FORTNIGHTLY SAILINGS
NEW - YORK - EUROPE



“ILE-DeFRANCE” and “LIBERTE”
THE NEW LUXURY SHIPS OF THE WEST INDIES
ANTILLES AND FLANDRE
20,000 Gross TompagernB8 | Knots
sp lissldie aio aie pale —— |
INE |
FRENCH L is
1 Agents: R. M. JONES & CO., LTD )} %
14 Pr. Wm. Henry Street _ Phone 3814 M1 @
a ar nents SLOOLPLEP SA
x= = —S— =



the ‘5-STAR’ car

GOOOOOVOTES

5998S

oer



Motoring

‘Five-Star
The Best at Lowest Cost
_JOIN THE BARBADOS ASSOCIATION-



CHARLES Mec ENEARNEY & (0. LTD.

AAC CESS SSSA:



+4
SLC SSSSCGO OLE CELLO





et

PAGE FIGHT



VALENTINE, RAMADHIN
AWARDED HONOUR
IN CRICKETER’S BIBLE

LONDON

Four of the five cricketers of the year chosen by Wisden’s
Annual the “Bible” of cricket to be published on Friday are

West Indians—Everton

Weekes, Frank Worrell, Sonny

Ramadhin and Alfred Valentine.
For the fifth cricketer of the year Wisden chose, Englishman
—Godfrey Evans, Test and Kent wicket-keeper.

Australian XI
Vs W.I. XI
Game Drawn





By CLYDE WALCOTT
Australia 2% ee hat
WI. (for 7 wkts.) 1G

LONDON, May
A cricket match between !
Australian XI and the West |
dies XI, played on Sunday ena
in a draw.
On Sunday, a cold depress

day, a West Indies XI were se
duled to engage an Australian
in a match at Urmston, Lancashi!

tl

Needless to say, the spectators all
surrendered their usual Suncay
occupations to see the match whic
might be somewhat indicative c!
the outcome of their encounte

Australia in the winter
The Australian XI was 1
all-round side; Bill Alley, Brucé
Dooland, George Tribe, Cecil Pep
per, Mick Raymer, Jack Pettiford,



Harry Lambert, D. Fitzmaurice
W. Cockburn, W. Walmsley anc
J. Lambert.

The West Indian XI was dom
inated by Barbadians, there being

Frank Worrell, Everton Weekes,
Clyde Walcott, Roy Marshall
E. A. Martindale and Harold
Brewster. who is playing as ah
amateur for Radcliffe on week

ends, The Skipper, Ellis Achong, is
from Trinidad, as well as Rama
dhin, while K. Rickards and L
Méssada are from Jamaica. Bruct

Pairaudeau was the sole repre
sentative from B.G

Australia won the toss and
batted first on a wicket, which
was helpful to bowlers. E. A
Martindale and Frank Worrell

opened the bowling, but did not
meéet with any success. Ramadhin
relieved Worrell end in his first
ever he captured two wickets
getting Walmsley 1.b.w. and Alley
stumped by Walcott for a duck
The Australians went on to score
146 runs; Ramadhin taking 7
wickets for a negligible amount of
runs. Bruce Dooland top scored
with 68 and had no difficulty in
playing Ramadhin. Roy Marshall
took Dooland’s wicket,
ed wiih 3 for 60,

Roy Marshall and Bruce Pair-
audeau opened the West Indies’
batting to the bowling of H, Lam-
bert and W. Cockburn both of
whom are left arm fast bowlers.
With the score at 8, Pairaudeau
was caught in the slips off Cock-
burn for 4 with a ball that moved

late ftom the leg side, Frank
Worrell partnered Marshall, but
with the score at 28, Marshail

was calight at cover off Lambert
for 17, Everton Weekes and Wor-
rell wére associated in the most
fruitful partnership of the innings,
Frank’s contribution being 9 caus

tious 28, and Everton's a more
foteeful 36, both losing their
wiekets to Cecil Pepper. Clyde
Walcott was unfortunately run

out at 8 due to a misunderstanding
with his partner K. Rickards, who
was soon bowled by Walmsley for
11 runs. With very little time left
fot play, Martindale stayed long
enéugh for 6 runs, giving Peppet
the last wicket of the day, Messada
was 2 not out and the West Indian
total 116 for 7 wickets

ft was a very entertaining
match and given time, the West
Indies might have been the win-
ners, Althouph the bowling and
fielding of their opponents were
such that one should reserve an
epihion.

The West Indies’ next fixture

will be played at Barnoldw
May 20th.

ick



———————
Traffie Do's
No.

4

Give signals of your in-
tention to stop, slow down,
overtake, turn ete.

Space made available by
CANADA DRY
fcr Safer Motoring.

They'll Do It Every Time

a

and finish- .



This
Indians

comes

selection of four West
for cricketing honours
a fitting compliment to
West Indian track triumphs in last
veek-end's British games,

In its article on Weekes, Wisden
tates: “Perhaps no batsman simee
Bradman has made such an im-
pression on his first English tour
ag a ruthless compiler of big scores.

‘There were many sceptical of
his ability to reproduce on English
county grounds the form by which
made so many high scores at
home and broke records in India
and in the Lancashire League.
Weekes in a predominately wet
summer soon proved them wrong,

as

If anything is certain in cricket

t is that this likeable player, so
cominating at the crease and so
quiet off field will continue to

break batting records,”
Of Frank Worrell it says, “Few,

if any, eminent ctickéters can

| view the game with such detached

ittitude as this slim lithely built
all-rounder. To him a match, be
it Test or a club fixture is just
another game of cricket to be en-
joyed.

“Furthermore he never reads
sports columns in newspapers, so
that he is unaffected by opinions
favourable or adverse of critics.

He is one of the foremost bats-
men in present day cricket.

At times a little uncertain at
the start of an innings, he is when
set, most difficult to dismiss and
elegant style, command of every
erthedox streke and perfection in
timing makes him a delight io
watch. As a bowler, by varying his
style to fast-medium, he accom

plished some valuable perform-
ances”,
Sonny Ramadhin, young right

arm, slow bowler, is déscribed as
“perplexing his rivals from the
start—a man who grew into 4
bogey with a reputation which
worried most batsmen before ho
bowled against them. Ramadhinr
eaptured wickets and the admira-
tion of cricket enthusiasts both
young and old.”

Wisden points out that Alfred
Valentine, slow lefthander, sent
down 92 overs (552 balls) in the
second innings against Bnagland in
the Third Test Match at Notting-
ham and so created a record of the
highest number of six ball overs
goowled in one innings in Test
cricket,

It comments: “Valentine was a
fine bowler and an object lesson
to Englishmen in value of true
finger spin, He became one of the
most successful bowlers ever to
leave the West Indies, His record
of 33 wickets in four Test matches
has seldom been surpassed”.

—Reuter.



STANDARD BRIDG

By M. Harrison-Gray
Dealer : North.
North-Beath game.

AQ63
SK Qo4e

a

w. e.
SPie Sa
e373 k Q98 6
#952 é 31083

$43
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worind Bcnistneny ews
orth’ Z
due to wie ‘et fact that

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st en ‘ora rr
. He ngre bid One
Spade, Bast Two Diamonds
and South Two No-Trumps.
North dare not say Three
Hearts for fear of being PUL
back to Spades. so he bid
Three No-Trumps
West led @J and South
won the second round of
Diamonds. He cashed
Dummy’s @ A. #Q, @ K and
Â¥Q. and came back lo his
hand with @A to make his
seventh trick With &K
Rast meanwhile had thrown
@4 and @6, so Seuth pul
him on play with @ 10 tHe
could mash tWo sO
and @43, but then had, 6
lead Spades
Egst ould) make thine-
harder by batihg @®® an-
the eonwar: could ae de
West had otadé mi
lead of @5

cur Outro 8 oenensCeeeeeEseEeerDseCeRSOUSCERSEDEEEeEescererse SSEpEEeEsEESBeeT seer ens

set if
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mii



Lime ASPIDISTRA HAS HER
PARENTS WORRIED: SHE'S FOUR
AND DOESN'T SPEAK VERY CLEARLY.

LY, LULL




L=/ You/RE WHAT,
me DEAR? I DION AGLOO »
CATCH THAT=:SOME- UTHAGLA MY
| THING ABOUT A SHLOE-IS AW
WHA, © SAY IT DUBLAR »sFLOO
AGAIN, PEAR» LOLLY SHLEEP



0 wwe

AWAH FRUBBY
SCHLUMF*=+











ern

That 4S, UNTIL
SHE BROADCASTS
FAMILY SECRETS*
THEN SHE‘S MISS
PERFECT DICTION

Weekes, Worrell Named Cricketers Of

BARREL SPORTS



We ote â„¢

PHOTO shows girls tryi






ng their feet and skill at barrel-rolling dur.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





ee

ing the sports held to celebrate the Wine Festival held at Robertson

Cape Province, South Africa.

—Express.



Carlton



Defeat

Spartan 2—1

In a game marked with thrills in both halves, Carlton
defeated Spartan two goals to one when they met in a foot-
ball match at Kensington Oval yesterday afternoon. The

crowd was noisy all through

and fast and the standard of

Carlton drew first blood in the
first half of play and went on to
score their second goal just after
the seeond half had started
Shortly after Spartan kicked in
their goal. For Carlton, Reynold
Hutchinson playing at inside
right scored both goals _ for
Carlton while Keith Walcott at
his usual position at centre-
forward netted the only goal for
Spartan,

Tâ„¢ the second half of the game
the crowd saw the Carlton for-
wards combining well and their
ball control was rather good.
Bright, their full back, played a
ood gumhe t her with Lucas.
hey both kicked hard and
accurate when the occasion arose.

The game started with Spartan
defending from the south end.
Just after the kickoff, Griffith
passed to Chase on the right wing
but before Chase could reach the
Carlton area he was challenged
by_ both backs.

Spartan was awarded

a free
kiek when

Clairmonte handled
the ball, but Hutchinson came
back and took a shot at the
Spartan area which missed the
goal by inches, Chase took
anothey try at King, but this was
fruitless, Carlton was given a
free kick and Bright their full
back, kicked this but Johnson
headed it out for a corner and Rh.
Hutchinson opened the

scoring
for Cariton by heading the bal!
into the Spartan goal from the
corner, Cozier eould net move

to make a save.

Carlton scored this goal about
10 minutes before the end of the
first half. Shortly after the first
goal was scored Spartan’ was
noticed frequenting the Carlton
area as their forwards looked
determined to equalise.

Spartan got a free kick which
Cadogan kicked but nothing came
out of it. Bright at full back
cleared brilliantly when Walcott
was dribbling ) unmarked.
When Referee Coppin blew for
half time the score was unchanged
— Carlton one goal and Spartan
rua,

After half time, Spartan began
to press b ‘ the Carlton forwards
were combining well and when
the second half was about 15 min-
utes old. Reynold Hutchinson
again put Carlton two up by scor-%
ing his second goal outside the}
Spartan area, the ball going into
the left corner of the nets, com-
pletely beating the Spartan cus-

todian Govier.
3} after Keith Walcott
scored the first goal for Spartan

on receiving a long pass. King



By Jimmy Hatlo

Wi

|

}
CH) |
|

,
















1B! SIXTY-TWO
FIFTY A WEEK!
MAMA WAS GONNA
GO OUT TO WORK!
WE'RE GONNA HAVE
A NEW BABY IN
OUR HOUSE::1-2-
3-4TESTING*:






the game. The pitch was firm
play was fairly good,

moved to save but was too slow.
Spartan now renewed their efforts
but at the end of play the score
was unchanged. Carlton had
scored two goals and Spartan one,

The teams were: —

Carlton: King, Bright, Kennedy,
Hutchinson, Clairmonte, Cox, K
Hutchinson, Lucas, McLeod, R.
Hutchinson and Marshall,

Spartan: Cozier, Bowen, Gib-
bons, Medford, Cadogan, Gittens,
Chase, Johnson, Walcott, Griffith
and Beyee.

The referee was Mr. O. S, Cop-
pin.



What’s on Today

Police Courts 10.00 a.m,

Public Session Regional
Economic Committee 10.00
a.m.

Second Day of A.A.A.B,
Cycle dnd Athletic Sports
Meeting 1.00 p.m.

Basketball—Second Division
—Pirates vs. M.H.S. at

M.H.S. 5.00 p.m,

THE BDOS FRIENDLY FroorT-
BALL ASSOCIATION

Today's Fixture
Rangers vs Westerners “HY at |
St. Leonard's, Referee: Mr. O. |

Graham,

Police Band at Esplanade,
Bay Street 7.45 p.m.

Meeting of Junior Section of
Alliance Francaise at
Modern High School, Roe-
buck Street, 8.00 p.m.

CINEMAS
Aquatic Club: First Yank Into ,
Tokyo 8.30 p.m,
Globe; Odd Man Out and Her

_ Lucky Night 4.45 and 8.15 pum
Empire; Bridgetown Players pre- |
sent The Shop At Sly Corner

8.30 pom,
Royal: Valley of Zombies

and
Trafic in Crime 4.80

and 8.0

porn.

Roxy: Kiss of Death and Border
Incident 4.30 and 8.15 p.m,

Olympic: Lady and the Monster
and Road to Alteatras 4.80 and
8.15 p.m.

Gaiety: Tarzan Triumphs and
West of the Peeos 8.40 p.m, j

Plaza Bridgetown: The Return of
the Fronti¢rsman and Song of |
the Saddle 4.45 and 8.80 p.m, |
laza Oistins: The Adventures of |



THURSDAY,







England Cricket Is On Trial

In Present Series

By HERBERT SUTCLIFFE
CRICKET season just beginning, for me, opens with a
mystery. Why have the South African Cricket Association

sent only 15 players on tou

r here? Yes, I know they’ve

come with a spirit of exceptional optimism, but surely it’s
being a little over-optimistic to try to face a hard tour with
only four possible replacements.

Even if the team members are

fortunate enough to escape injury.

1 maintain that it pays dividends
to give young players a chance“to
develop on English wickets. Al-
ways providing, of course, they
possess the necessary skill and ad-
here to the elementary principles,
for bowlers length, flight, spin or
swing, and for batsmen correct
footwork, body positioning and, in
the main, a straight bat.

Perhaps it may sound silly to
talk in those terms of international
cricketers, but several of the Eng-
land batsmen in Australia last
winter discarded those inevitable
principles, with inevitable failure.

: Just Plain Suicide

The “cow shot,” as played by at
least one member of Freddy
Brown’s team, may be excused
when executed cn the village
green by the local blacksmith, but
at Lord’s and Sydney, in hard-
fought Test battles, it is just plain
suicide.

Perhaps that’s the reason for
South African optimism. They
know that the standard in the

Union when England won the rub-
ber by the barest margin in 1948-
49 was not very high, and I sup-
pose that in the light of more re-
cent England performances, at
home and overseas, they feel that
they heve at least an equal chance.

England, they must feel, are just
aS much on tfial as they are, in
spite of the fact that the winning
of the final Test in Australia is
somewhat heartening to folk at
home. But for all that there is
still some hard work ahead for our
selectors — and for the men they
pick.

Any batsman to represent Eng-
land—and I feel that after my long
experience as an England opener I
am qualified to talk of them—
should be given a thorough test
against all types of bowling fast,
fast-medium, medium off-breaks.
leg-breaks and googlies.

If a batsman is scared of fast
bowling and shows ii by backing

away, he would not be in my
team.
In this respect we have in

Yorkshire the finest opening pair
in the world in Len Hutton and
Frank Lowson. Lowson was fully
qualified to take on the responsi-
bility of going to Australia last
winter with his more famous
partner.

In my view, a grave mistake
was made in omitting him, for
Frank is blessed with a very fine
ericket brain and for two years
has moulded his whole style and
method of execution on Hutton.

For that reason I say he cannot
possibly be left out of any Eng-
land team, and I venture to predict
for him a highly successful tour
on the next visit to Australia,
providing the selectors, of course
do not repeat their error of omis-
sion.

But .let us look again at the
South Africans. We know exact-
ly what the old brigade can do.
Dudley Nourse will be as vigor-
ous and fascinating to watch as
ever, and the oldest member of the
side, vice-captain Eric Rowan,
whose shrewd capiainey played a
big part in Transvaal’s Currie
Cup victory, will be one of the
most successful batsmen on either
side.

George Fullerton toured with
Alan Melville’s side. He has shown
much improvement, particularly
during the last South African sea-
son. If addition, he is 2 good
wicket-keeper, but is to be reliev-
ed of this responsibility on this
trip.

Athol Rowan, Eric’s brother, is
the best off-break bowler in the
Union, and also a useful bat, Like
Denis Compton he has been wor-
ried about a defective knee, and
with this in mind it would have
been good policy to have included
Hugh Tayfiela 4s reserve off-spin
bowler.

“Tufty” Mann, another who has
been here before, stamped himself
as ohe of the best slow left-arm
bowlers ever to tour this country.

Pi Bi Na anaes | ee aan eae Me al
exceptionally well with a fair
Rrhre|e’}’w7w“ananaaananaa=ae=——=
) SATNSFACTION
GUARANTEED
UNDER
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gives you

to fight your
way through life



J&R Broad is
Modorn

most



Barbados.

ITRPS

strensth

Bated in the
Bakory in

Of OOOO CCE





amount of spin, but falls far short,

as far as spin is concerned, of

Gloucestershire’s Charlie Parker.
McLean One To Watch

I shall watch closely the pro-
gress of two bowlers of similar
type, Clive van Ryneveld and
P. N. F. Mansell. Van Rynefeld’s
Oxford experience will be inval-
uable and I expect him to score a
fair number of runs

His leg-break googly bowling,
however, will be more successful
if he can command a Grimmett-
like length.

Roy McLean, although only 20,
immediately took my eye at the
nets. He played brilliant attacking
cricket, and if he can reproduce
this form in the middle, will give
English crowds some first-ciass
entertainment,

Caun MeCarthy, another of the
“Three Maes’—Jackie McGlew is
the third—is the tallest and hand-
scmest member of the party. Only
21, he’s six feet two inches tall
and is the fastest bowler South
Africa has produced for many
years,

He is as fast as Ray Lindwall
or Keith Miller, and I couple this
pair because Miller's fastest de-
livery is equal to Lindwall’s.

There’s Trouble In Store

McCarthy would be the fastest
of the three but for the fact that
he stops, quite noticeably, at the
crucial point of delivery. There
will, no doubt, be many arguments

Se

throughout the country as to
whether there is a suspicion of
illegal bowling, but as he his
played in Test cricket against

England and Australia without a
complaint being registered by

SSOOSSSSSESBSSSSSSS39S",

FREE HOOK — }

which makes
*“*GOD’S WAY OF
SALVATION

PLAIN”

Plesse write for one to
Samuel Roberts, Gospel
Book and Tract Service,
30, Central Avenue, Ban-
gor N. Ireland.”

POLITICAL
MEETING

30S SOOO OOO OOOO

under the auspices of

THE BARBADOS ELEC-
TORS’ ASSOCIATION

at
QUEEN’S PARK

on

FRIDAY NIGHT
MAY 18th.

at 8 o'clock
e

—_—_——— ee”

Speakers: Messrs. J. H.
Wilkinson, F. C. Goddard,
E: D. Mottley, H. A.
Dowding, W. W. Reece,
M.C.Ps and others.

Mr. Griffith
and Sydney Walcott.

Vincent

tT
—————————————

Hear our lady speaker,
Miss L. Reid, make her
political debut.

ee oopnt ieee
OOO RONNIE

Year









en

there’s no reason to
anticipate a storm in a teacup.

All the same, I would like to
see a continuity of delivery with—
out the vital pause, for his pace
would be terrific. He makes the
ball lift disconcertingly from a
good length, and I can visualise
trouble for England batsmen when
the pitch is favourable.

I ean see Geoff Chubb, in spite
of his being the third oldest mern—
ber of the side at 39, doing ex—
ceptionally well with his fast-
medium seam bowling. Fit and
strong, he’s the type who can
bowl all day without showing
signs of fatigue.

either team,

Wicket-keeper is Russell En-
dean, whose batting, too, should be
most useful, although it will not
be in the class of the late Horace}
Cameron, who at Bramall-lane a
few years ago hit Hedley Verity
for four 6’s and two 4’s in a six—
ball over.

That was the over which pro-
moted the classic remark by York—-
shire wicket-keeper Arthur Wood:

“You've got him in two minds
Hedley.”

“What do you mean?” asked
Hedley.

“Well,” said Arthur, “he doesn’t
know whether to hit you for four
or six.”

My summing-up of the South
Africans is that the bowling is
strong, but not exceptional, The
fielding will be brilliant, and if
the young, inexperienced batsmen
are blessed with the right sort of
temperament and ability to fight
hard and efficiently to back up
the efforts of Nourse, Eric Rowan
and Fullerton, they should score
a packet of runs against an Eng-
land attack which is not particu—
larly outstanding.

The fight for the rubber, by two
fairly even teams, should produce
thrilling cricket.

Si
Cc

MAY 17, 1951



Cycle Racing

(From Our Own Cerrespondent)
GEORGETOWN, May 16.
On a dry track Wilfred Korss,
urinam, won the three mile

yele Race. Trinidad’s Williams

won the nine mile in a qriving

fi

nish and broke the record.
RESULTS
Three Mile

Korss (Surinam)

Liddell (B.@.)

Williams (Trinidad)
Nine Mile

Williams ¢Trinidad)

2. Liddell (B.G.)

3, Small (B.G.)

Lap Prize, Holder (B.G.). Time

1.
2.
3

1.

5

24 mins., 4.9 secs.

d

Previous Record: Lindsay Gor-
on (B.G.). 25 mins 11.4 sees.

1949.



CRYPTOQUOTE No 2%.

GBFFME ZOHBZKESZ.EOM
YPKEIG PMUMESZEOM
—TBVVMP.

Last Crypt: Let no one be will-
ing to speak ill of the absent
—Propertius.

J. A. CORBIN & SONS.

NO CONSTIPATION NOW
AFTER YEARS OF MISERY

“For years I had been takin many
kinds of laxatives. Then | tri





ALL-BRAN It not only keeps me
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enjoy eating it every

day'’' Rudy R
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One of many uAso-
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ALL- BRAN Users
You, too, may ex-
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bull: if you follow this advice: Eat
an ounce (about '%4 cup) of crispy
Kellogy’s ALL-pRAN dally, drink
plenty of water! If not completely
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carton to Kellogg Co, of
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mare Mada

Cosmetics

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We have in a fresh stock
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PAGE 1

BUILD UP WEST INDIAN ECONOMY West Indians Must Go To Ottawa Adams Calls For "One Voiced \yEST INDIAN representation at the Ottawa talks next week and a West Indian front on sugar were demanded by Hon. Albert Qomes, Trini dad's representative at the Regional Economic Committee which opened in Barbados yesterday. "Our government", said Mr. Gomes, "has experienced considerable rliflicullv in working ihc Trade Liberalization Plan. Wr think thai whenever mallei %  • uflertinff the West Indie* are tu be dlscuuM'tl. it is e-.senti.il that Not Quite The Same Says I Ian Ion (From Our Own CurrratmnBrnli QUEENSLAND. May 10. Draft copies of the Commonwealth Agreemi'it drawn up in Ixtrwlon last year and despatched to Commonwealth Producer* have Itf-en found to differ slightly from the original Terms of the Agreement This has been revealed by Premier Han ton who was Australia?: representative at Wo London negotiations and aglQO ment Premier Han I on ha* asset ted thai Australia is taking no risk on the interpre'.-itimi 01 the five year agreement for exporting 600,000 tons of sugar to Prltain annually from 1953 He saio ne received a copy of the draft agreement submitted to all Commonwealth Sugar Producers. He round there had been seme slight departures from what was agreed in London. Alterations have been made in Australi.i in the wording I i V I %  • %  '.he Agreement as made wouiri be carried out. No More Cuts In BWIA Staff "t Oar Own forr.as*sS*nt> LONDON. May 16 No further cut:: ir. B.W.f.Astart or services are contemplated now or in the future. This assurance was given by Sir Miles Thomas. B.O.A.C. Chairman, lust back from a visit to the Caribbean area in an exclusive interview this afternoon. Sir Mile* said -ie WM satisfied that siirticient pruning had been carried out on li'e West Indies Airways. Prom now on P W 1 A. can look forward to real progress I want it to become a self-reliant organisation", he sdded. Disc the posr.lbilitics of Jet n being used on liie North A route between the United Klndom and New York pnd possibly down to Nassau i nd Jamaica representing the West Indies is thereto ropri intertill of the West Indies." n rnaj be poatlble, if the representatives of the other territories are wflling to meet and crystallize our thoughts on the matter. It is anim. thing that we feel should he given much thought" Agreement Necessary With regard to the United Kingdom delegation which is led by Mr. Bottomley and which is expected in Barbados this weekend. Mr. Gomes said: "An agreed point of vkw is necessary: we must iron out our opinions: we must be able to tell Mr Bottomley "We have agreed our conclusions." When Mr Robinson. President of the British West Indian Sugar Association stressed that the West Indies could not Ml .done on the question of sugar, but must negotiate in Ixinrion on a Commonwealth basis. Mr. Gomes replied tha> "even le say that to the United Kingdom delegation will require %  considerable degree of discussion Mr. Adams agreed with Mr. Gomes that there must be dlacuasion on West Indian representation at trade talks in Canada, but suggested that owing to the absence of the di legates from nritisn Guiana, discussion should be postponed. "If we are lenlh going to be effective" said Mr. Adams "w have gut to siieak with one vo.ee II\I MINI IMIIWS tMi mi I'liorrssoKAND BUILD A NATION Compromise. Says Sir George BBFOhE la* hi stone Regional Economic Conuntttw ->p*ned It* deliberation* at Hastings Kens* VMtsr diy ihe-c sr|l known West Indian character* posed for the Advocate canieramaii. Left to Rigni Mi D V Walwyn (Mssatseriat). the Hon. H A Cuke (Barbados!. Profi-*-.* Bsasley (UK. Cbairniaii). Mr. D. O Lencock, Jnr. (Barbados), lion R L M. Kirgwooa (Janwdrs) oeen carried out. These had shown that from H.O.A.C's point of view 'gh cnghicd jet.* were not suitable on long distance flights such ai tho-tc involved in crossing the North Atlantic. Not Available At the Fame time they were entirely suitnbte lor use on .short Empire rautea such as I.ondon-Rome and thence ovarian! U> Africa or India aim Pakistan and it **J hoped t.. put them into service on these routag before the end of the year For The North Atlantic service. i, trevi i. M o A.C wttra earp" %  I ing to use "Avon"-nicine.1 Jets gnd these would not oe available for over two years. Referring to his visit to New York. Si! Miles said that Ameri<.ins a/ara ibOWing increasing Interest In the CoribbeaJi n holiday rnort and BO.AC wet* intending to reopen .liiect New York-Ben i \ic* on June 1. as Ml l roving service-bet wren Jamaica and New York, and Nassau and New York. lie said these impt would partly come about as a result of curtailment of the Lcndon-Santiaro service which ended last month and thus enabled B.O.AC to use aircraft for other purposes learned, and Professor Bake modal of it with him —Iteuter Whirlwind Kills 3 TAIPKH. Formosa. May 16. A whirlwind over ChinesNationalist naval headquarters UI southern Formosa killed thin cadets and Injured over lOU The whirlwind, which raged for three hours, developed threw miles out at sea yesterday after .i Haata of lightning. Three dvluani walking on th baach were sucked up and wer still mining, it ShU repented —KeuU-r Sou th Africa its Hit 388-9 BRISTOL. May 16. The South African touting bun are running into their best form Following their victory ovtfl Glamorgan, ihc tourists made sound stai t again*' Gloucester•hire today in scoring 386 for nine wicket', their highest total of the tour so far. Young opening batsmen JlckL' MoQlew (90) and John Waite (62) put loicether l69 runs in the b.-t partin iship of the tour and later Jack ('heelham iM2 and his Captain Duul. v Net S) added PS in 65 minutes in a spaiklmt fnurtli wicket partnership But all bi.lsmcn exercised cau lion when facing fast bowleGeorge Lambert who claimed fivi wickei. for "8 —Reuter REDS MAY HIT WITH THE MOON Bv ROSS MARK SOMEWHERE IN KOREA. May 10 Anollu-r major attempt to WlMh tlf Unilfvin Ui M.IV \t. future naajotiatlor Ihitain may propose despatching minuti rial nnlaaloo i" Teheran, i in,del -liniu. tu haiuiiiiin\ future arnmani SI i % % %  : %  I Shepherd Brill Teheran todH cabled la tbe roretgn OAoa aCCOtinl Ol his talk with Naitin Paratan Foreign Mlnutti yesterday Although it was daacrl irti viftl Sit Francti la B Ueved to hava dlaouaaad Britali tateat views on ". to nationalise the Angl Oil Compiny's in-lallatitiiillerhert Mornson who H i. P thMr of Wight again m loucn by laaap ho na aritn the Foieiitn Oftlie tinlay I reeeiv. lataal rapV %  ,: prngnta u leheran, London and %  He will return to London tomoc ron —Reater. BAGDAD. M... 16 .. The Pasha of Iraq told Parttamenr today th it iht 1IM>H army Royal Bodyguard units arrived g) SV.H lixl.iv IQ defend Syrian terntoi> attainsi any air attacks The move Wtl taken after Full accord with the Syrian Goverr ment, and is designed to nttW an* Israeli uggresslcii Sy.ian tan "Iraq] army unitwill not return to Iraq until Syria does not tequire ihem". A Duma %  i *nid it wta tiuder-itooii Qwi Syrian Premier Khaled Azim had told I Arab League Political ( there thai iopwaanta< lives of a number of Arab i *d expn to KIV immediately aucb military help .is Syria may ask Reuter Campaign To Help Blind In Colonies Arias Goes On Trial PANAMA. May Ifi The police carried oul .. nan loumi-uc On Witlia-d... of memId 0* the OtlltOd P Amuifo Aria* Cablnel death toil from latl weeat'a bhtod) riotini; mounted 'o i< AM*I htm Ml/ ia in (all and wBI aUnd in.' 1 on May 2S charged with abtadng nil er.iwlilutional | %  K PI He id if Chinese weie nflUing accept even more appalli'ir i pravioui ofhnf. that) could poibly pu*h th tiuAllied line But they me no again.-.! %  'couple ,.,.tiiMliM weaawaa," iw--id la van added: "My men hilled about 9.000 Chinese during the nf then attach three week* ago The terrible loll rote to about 30.000 of their total attacking torce of 3S.000 in two | hhll nayi ol slaughtei M. pro* daf< nee Una la Un>ngei "id my men could millet much heavtei daaual;., %  B u there li a Until to the number ol men oite can kill I-ong lange Allied patrol* were %  bM active They fanned nut north %  %  Seoul agagUnl %  O H %  9 rlrOttg point ,lelj'. tighter-bomberan lerv pounded dug-in C'oinmuniMH l t -if Vi)ongl,u iftai I llniled SI.it.lank and Inr, imttee on export controls and policlca, ald he has eaen the actual contract for the order tnd $hipment :hrough Tangier* hut ihat would W further action had bee-The authciil.e:— r.r*iter LONDON. May 16. Thv British Empire Society for the blind i launching on Empire (May 24) a campaign to help 1.000,000 people in the colonies climated to be blind The incidence of blindness in the West Indies is believed to bv it three times that of the United Kingdom, but actually eye disease in the colonial generally cannot be accurately assessed though it has been variously estimated j,t from 10 to 15 per wnt. of the population Seventy-Rv* per cent, ol 'Id" blindness and eye'dltease. said the vtatrment issued today. i<. pro vent able. Many colonies lack eye specialists and few have eye hospital* There Is Ho opthalmic research lentre in the Colonial Empt Working in overcrowded x-tors agve • tnensunii. t( f eye* each year. B*H freed numbers of people still go blind for lack of simple treatment, nnr! the sight of thousands of children is destroyed aa because parents are ignorant of a health plan of action, as aoor as necessary funds an • ampalgns conducted in i**i r* sen tat 1 ve region* >M • !" Empire to domonstrate practical means of preventing eye disease There would be a conlinuout eairpnlan by Mm*, radio, leaflet*, and the Press to teach people how %  <• their own and their rhiHli.-n'. sight. At Ueail M %  -'... uii. Otanti would be made to voliiiitary bodies to extend and Improve research facilities i,f eye hospital, arid clinics, and to dew Ing schools and trainin* centres. Regional ofllces staffed > it established in each principal areThey would sti!!Hil,.:e ann 10-ordinate work for the blind b* Gownraent unoflicial agencies. AppeaU are l-tng made this year for at least rl.000.000. It if huped to mise half that sum in the Unltr,i K.ngdom. in car lair dominions and States T'Iioclal people in the coloi la rr an beggars wander. Ing from town to town Blind children are often ettejl beggar, guilds, and there is i derwe that few Afrntn bribe. ssaH fanticrrle of bl %  are n.ajor cause* of di.> %  ies Their prevention will material!the production and pn ;lt* Colonial Emp;:""— Reater CWEEP away frustration iind weakness: don't be isolated and disunited: build up a self reliant British West Indian economy. Tl i1 was the mesnani-Sti Q. i S* ave 1 auendini; ttie First Reuion.il Economic Committeo of the lies at HaatinK* Hou o W ill Review Anns Plan Of 12 Nalion* UtNlJON. May 16. United Stataa diptomat • %  A diplomau (mm North Atlantic 'ions rtegan m twn-dav faoari conference fieri pacts i They will review the rearmaniant programmes of the 12 inHLOiignanala tuas to gtrangthen the defenc u.d gcoMM % % %  tarn Europe ions will he taken Charles S|iofTard. Chairman of the A'lantn Pal i Council .' 1 %  Id ing. Rr-utrr LINDA ( IIKISTI \\ BABY EXPECTED Film iDaff T :'. I 1 October He r> ft | NhMs \m*lerdi from Europe —Reuler. Danger round In Cosmic Rays DENVffi < Ol rssie Mav Ifl iOpvai i "I ilanger jmans In coamhl ray* at high all i' reported Wednesday %  i nltad Si '" Navy to Aero Medical Aaaociatior -i begin It about V) rnexaj rocket glgnao ire 'n fly. Haim is similar erTect, of radio ncli. I f Brudh'Y Evrusi'il Until Mmulai) WASHINGTON. May Iti The jomi Seni.li' Inqu ry Co net tod ft to • %  %  rni %  radtey untU nag Monday as a irltnaaa, Me li dm to -.itnd I'"Ai celebrations m California latel this week Qui tloolng l i layed while whether tin \ tellinic them aboul prh ith l*resident Tl Tn.Pre lenl P tary. Joseph Short, lold a now conferenc I not wish Itradli %  %  • %  %  i tbali onl A I rilssid of General MacArthur i ; the dh ision CanveraaUont which k up to it are \\w buatni A• %  % %  'i %  ol : i %  twelftl day .,f the hearings, today th< RBpublii i ppani to be dl %  ,.i, . %  %  %  effort* to probe tl It r liter Itrilain Harks U.S. Iir Slrugfrlr NEW YORK H Sir f.l.i.i111 I lrili I. itlrKale to the rnitd NaUona pledged Tuesday night that Urit am will ttarra %  Imleheartedlj iUi the united States In tht Mni ro ti uggla again I commun 1.1 Inaptred aggrt lot Jebb defended Hiitair n the Korean War and her trad* poiir> toward I %  nu In a speech before the New Yorl ii Association. %  'Everything we can do fatally weahenlng our main poet' W tin ganeral effort an sin.ii do, even if that reeulti *i it may *ll result In aomf lnwenne r the atandard ot living in Ore* Rillaln its*|f. which hU iborioual) oulll up tinea tht ..i He said llriuin. earlv In U I %  .n, had halted exports of strategic material! to Communl p igtlt ilarlj ol petroleum i rod nets. iot not .if rubber Ni robber . s.i Geoi %  ad the followj fa from the Righi Hoi liable James Griffiths. M.P, .>f State for ih Colonhi I warmly w*lcome the aatal*Ifkhment ol the Regional Economic Oomrnlttee, whiah hokki Ms mauKiir.il nicetirK to.ia> The proposal that such a Committee it be %  put fo d at Ihe t'onfei-nce on the \ Ml 'ii 't ibe West Indian Colonies held at Montego la .\. mbaff ia*7. and much tl.ought has since baeai gtvan to he practhail details of the project. Il ho glvan ma |re %  ; aatlafacth n L all 1 I i.vrinmen'j. nave son iieebied to paitiiipate in the work of the Committei-. This derision is, I btJ of i on aH.'t.ihie Bignlflcanee i believe thai bi providing a means fot effective regional cooperation mla nsattara, the Coromi will eaMrlbuts malar tall) strength and well-balng ol the III at Ing territories. whu h hava Mtharto teehed aat] a >> Un ery lor tp aedj end ragulai eonsuitation mi eoo n omtc guaat l oo e 01' for the eicpressioii of UOltCd tflOM OH ms|oi issues ol mminon CM earn within tad SaM Co operation "I welcome the fpii t of In whkl ii-pi setnta .: BriUah ten rtork Caribbeen have come to H. .bndoa, and I wish the Commlltee all I shell ii>llow ins v Ith i lose attanCASE CLOSED OSLO Hay ifl The case of I., ford Moore. ADC rorreipondent, whose body *B< found on Sunday in on 0 fiord ii for Bve onidere-d dot d Pi I born 'hief ii HssUtl that Mooi c.r Fifteen Arrested MADRID I Barcelona polloi day the arrest of II men alleges I ti "-'i gai irthi • \ gnd nalghbourlfi | gn \i, Poi a long-.i in liie 00 I orders from Its < %  %  %  • in France Wiej distnbiii'.i tooitim hMflel retr-m —Reuter l Mdead to wei. < BOLIVIA ^ rntriin \i RKSH;\S BUI -:.iy 16. tgOrl %  kUona hen %  .eaunti i etit had dgnad —rtrutrr U.K. FORCES (JP lOOAWa IJIMTAIN'S ARMED FOfU I are 100.000 months . • -Reiiter I i: all in ithoi .i membat oi ibis Conunittee, noi id Sn Oeorga bane la I"' more than Mil observer t iinga from time to Un .i and i n n anj matei in i-.in tat%  ..' id youi disi ii-n whk h '-nil nuu thuth thai help Hut ocih.ipK vim will illov* ma a low irawnctnta to ... two commenl i eressl ftleei ure nv -in to Hastingb and t.. expraai n %  i ai ttei I laiiri that your dlacuselo m fruitful w i... proud in the Davelopmei m rVeuaro Organlat ton that our Haadquartera bouid ' baa ieena ol what, wc %  i. UI provo in be an . .. lilc butoi ol iho Brit, iHfiu %  vi. II .ui igenda of icieal Among the i | Ol 0 Ol i-anr ing to plaa a th" Regional %  rnlttao upon u itabli and onVlenl footing. Perohlng to the futurta, thh the moat nnpurtsnt of *our taaha Wc may i able to ba i %  ..'.. Mm hare, . . %  -. • i i t i i i i i %  iy of existence -•• %  regional lint I am most aiix ;;, uonal Bi onoo mlttao hould noi ai I"-luna ba %  i reoture "t the Dail onl V/etfai I 1 .on sine thai UI thil I ..! -ii" membei i ol mlttea Itself, W.I. Trade < oininissioiier Ai .I iiiipiiitsnl matter whuh •vlll full to I*disci %  I %  % %  pr> ,-ti %  ,,; up a ragulai wa I Indu n vice m Un United Kn he Hi itish Has. have had %  TradM .ni-i ,.i •mi. own In i rn *H> i ..f rears, ami I should lihi lo paj Irlbuta to the • aluabta arvlei I I Mi Rah %  i ni this I At Uu I think ba would ague With me if I la) that lica| %  %  %  .( -peak in tl i %  '..ii he 'ould look lot huppi'i t and foi 1 i | has also i %  iiiai Trade C %  %  .tlv differenl OS, N^verthei'n. lo hope that when thl lo be discussed, there ii ba agrat m anu as to the need for an agency, both in Canada and the United Kingdom, which :an represent West Indian uade merestwith Ihe backing of all the territories I am sure there ii better way of ensuring that the voice nt tin Wi heard with attention. Perhaps I should paiua here lo a> thai I fully realise that when use thr term 'British West rss i may seem to delegates ront the continental teintones to lake things a little too much for gianted But whether West Indian or Caribbean, or some other term, does not really matter m this connection The thing of importance I would urge, is to rcmembei throughout your dlaaua sions that unity, under wbatevel line, is strrngth Kcononiic Problems The agenda paper lists %  nunv iwi oi currant economic problenu ealUng tot" early attention Ul these, all 1 would say I leave lliem to you member* of the Committee, and to your Chairman I don't propose to ascend IB) ft il into the higher realms of thought: on the Olhri hand. 1 trust that none o( you will descend Inio the arena of mere controveray, I hope you will find yourselves able to propound lulione, mi again, unit) is strength You will also have the opportunit) "I discussions with a Mission front His Majostys Govsrnment in the United Kingdom, lo.id.it bv Mi A r, Bottomley. M V the Seeretar) (or overseas Trade, arid iTMChatllng senior ofhcisl lUvee of ihe Colonial Olli.e. the tSoiud of Trade, and the Mhusti) oi Pood The visn 0l this Mission to Uaibadoa htdkatea the hiRh value which Ihe United Kingdom Government place upon the Regional I..-. II. .mi. r.muniltec. as a body with which Queatlona oi economic police %  ffectina imth Great Brilut ,i the West Iodise can be discussant in full eolllldence bei-i-n l|la psrtlei The main ob)ect of this Mission is I., explain fiia poaltlpn m reggrd to ugsi whleh has orison In tini ooi siol neKotiations with Cub. .mil t" obtain full informalion -is lo the views of the West Indlea on it I' H the Mission's Int. nth r to bol I rtlng Ih I I .'h ieprcif othet Ciitomonweallh at whk London repre entatlvog of the We-t Indies will also be welcome fhi Ml "ion is expected tO OmVl ,., it.ui.li.in. ..ii saturdaj naul, and to leave on Tuesday evening, the Itnd ol May. Journey's Kltd There u ana thing more thai would venture i" say about thil ineeting ir wc looked for it lull simuli.an.e only to thr pi idled page of your agenda. 1 ., I(ll ,-, ceiialri Rial wo should ..... i„.,.., %  n,i,I.-.i with the assUK ,, i | :,„ thai :ills oir minds today. This meeting is a point of departuie. Ihe beginning of imirm-. ..f win* h we cannot see ii-.. lo. 't vim have the opcwrtiinl smUssnan <>t creating Ihc • linn "i row k"-1 11 In what uiu m-> propose, a per atanent bod] %  %  %  r.nho.itithe econoodc i manthan %  > asiaafl Bril iinii.ui tarrttotiea, atsd hi sent them to the wield* with authority -i |l| l >tiength. i ho abaenca ol a imiy eampstenl i o 'niiifi.iiiiig authority is, iu* things stand ti In paoashenl t" the luilher .li-velopinent t ,,. ,n. Internationally, there is no such thlnn ..s I It H Wi it Indies, and one must 1-e frank and recognise that in Intel national negotiations, even the %  %  w. %  :i i. %  % %  %  cannot hope to count individually (or a great dewl That is. I %  u p pose, one wi.. aaany tinn.Khfi paowt this area have been anxious i. *M the creation of •> British West Indian Federation: and Indeed it h diftiruii (Or outsider, and especially those with instinct lor administrative tidih) inderstand the slowness, of 'he West Indian Government in n-ai-hina dscislons on Ihe r Ida last vear Off UK Btajutlng closer Aaao ( iimmittes' Hut one "list 1Mpractical, anf pBMase thai s federal BHtbB Wi j in.(isn Oovemment eOttW not limposed for purely ...lr n,i ti jtiva reasons, and th.T any such plan most he lull* ndsrstoorl and willingly Becfpled, in all the tern'oue-. betoft it can have am chincr Of permanent success. At the same tin %  < ; .i. *• slsotdd I of reevnt rventa, and real In thmeantime ether BOUsttrht* sontatlvat .. II. ,.. g, Oa page S THE 'ADVOCATE" payi for NEWS DIAL 3113 Day or Nifht




?





ESTABLISHED 1895

BUILD

D



West Indians Must

Go To Ottawa

“Adams Calls For “One Voice”

WEST INDIAN representation at the Ottawa
talks next week and a West Indian front on
sugar were demanded by Hon. Albert Gomes, Trini-
dad’s representative at the Regional Economic
Committee which opened in Barbados yesterday.

“Our government”, said Mr. Gomes, “has experienced con-
Siderable difficulty in working the Trade Liberalization

Plan,

Not Quite
The Same

Says Hanlon

(From Our Own Correspondent)

QUEENSLAND, May 14,
Draft copies of the Common-
wealth Agreement drawn up in
London last year and despatched
to Commonwealth Producers have
been found to differ slightly from
the original Terms of the Agree-
ment. This has been revealed by
Premier Hanlon who was
Australia’s representative at the
London negotiations and agree-
ment. Premier Hanlon has
asserted that Australia is taking
no risk on the interpretation ot
the five year agreement for ex-—
porting 600,000 tons of sugar to

Pritain annually from 1953.

He saia ne received a copy of
the draft agreement submitted to
all Commonwealth Sugar Pro-
ducers, He found there had been
seme slight departures from what
was agreed in London,

Acterations have been made in
Australia in the wording to ensure
the Agreement as made wouid be
carried out.

No More Cuts
In BWIA Staff

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, May 16
No further cuts in B.W.I.A.
staff of services are contemplated
now or in the future, This assur-
ance was given by Sir



We think that whenever mat-
ters affecting the West Indies are
to be discussed, it is essential that
someone representing the West
Indies is there to represent the
interests of the West Indies.”

“It may be possible, if the rep-
resentatives of the other territor-
ies are Willing to meet and crystal-
lize our thoughts on the matter.
It is. something that we feel
should be given much thought.”

Agreement Necessary

With regard to the United
Kingdom delegation which is led
by Mr. Bottomley and which is
expected in Barbados this week-
end, Mr, Gomes said: “An agreed
point of view is necessary: we
must iron out our opinions: we
must be able to tell Mr. Bottom-
ley: “We have agreed: these are
our conclusions.”

When Mr. Robinson, President
of the British West Indian Sugar
Association stressed that the West
Indies could not act alone on the
question of sugar, but must nego-
tiate in London on a Common-
wealth basis, Mr. Gomes replied
that “even to say that to the
United Kingdom delegation will
require a considerable degree of
discussion.”

Mr, Adams agreed with Mr.
Gomes that there must be discus-
sion on West Indian representa-

tion at trade talks in Canada, but
suggested that owing to the
absence of the delegates from

British Guiana, discussion should
be postponed,

“If we are really going to be
effective” said Mr, Adams “we
have got to speak with one voice,”

Dutchman To
Study The Atom

AMSTERDAM, May 16.
Dutch Atomic Scientist Profes-





Miles] 80r C. J. Baker is flying to Argen-

Thomas, B.O.A.C. Chairman, just! tina tomorrow for a study trip

baek from a visit to the Caribbean ; °!

avea in ah exclusive interview
this afternoon.

Sir Miles said he was satisfied
that sufficient pruning had been
carried out on the West Indies
Airways, From now on B.W.1.A.
can look forward to real progress,
I want it to become a self-reliant
organisation”. he added. Discussing
the possibilities of jet aircraft
being used on the North Atlantic
route between the United King-
dom and New York and possibly
down to Nassau end Jamaica as
well, Sir Miles said it would be
two and a half years at least be-
fore this type of aircraft could be
brought in, B.O.A.C, had al-
ready had deliveries of a certain
type of jet aireraft—the Series
One “ghost” he ag jet—end ex-
perimental flights had been car-
ried out.

These had shown that from
B.O.A.C’s point of view “ghost”
engined jets were not suitable on
long distance flights such as
those involved in crossing the
North Atlantic,

Not Available

At the same time they were
entirely suitable for use on
short Empire routes such as
London-Rome and thence over—
land to Africa or India ana
Yakistan and it was hoped to
put them into service on these
routes before the end of the
year.

For the North Atlantic service,
however, B.O.A.C. were expect-
ing to use “Avon”-engined jets
and these would not be available
for over two years.

Referring to his visit to New
York, Sir Miles said that Ameri-
cans were showing increasing
interest in the Caribbean_afea as
a holiday resort and_-B.O.A.C.
were intending to reopen a
direet New York-Bermuda_ ser-
vice on June 1, as well as im-
proving services between Jarnaica

and New York, and Nassau and
New York. ;

He said these improvements
would partly come about as a
result of curtailment of the
Lendon-Santiago service which
ended last. month and thus

enabled B.O.A.C. to use aircraft

for other purposes



German Plants
For Mukden

WASHINGTON, May

16

told today that West German

arbados
UP WEST



FIVE WEST INDIANS :

THURSDAY, AY 17, 1961









BEFORE the historic Regional Economic Committee opened its deliberations at Hastings House yester

day these well-known West Indian
D. R. Walwyn (Montserrat), the

characters posed for the Advocate cameraman. Left to Right: Mr.
Hon. H. A. Cuke (Barbados), Professor Beasley (U.K., Chairman),

Mr. D. G. Lencock, Jnr. (Barbados), Hon. R. L. M, Kirkwood (Jamaica) aid Hon. Albert Gomes (Trini

dad).

Centre Goes

KINGSTON, Jca., May 16,

The Rockefeller Foundation will
cease active operations in Jamaica
at the end of July, and with this
the fate of the B.W.I. Public
Health Training Station in Jamai-
ca will rest with the local Gov-
ernment and Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare. The station is
headquarters for a scheme for
(training public health nurses,
sanitary inspectors, and meat and
food inspectors from British Car-
ibbean territories, and is support-
ed by funds from the Foundation,
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare, and the Jamaica Govern.
ment,

It has been learned that the
Foundation will consider continu-
ing financial aid to the station on
eendition that the local Govern.
ment and Colonial Development
and Welfare keep up their contri-
butions

The station trains an average
ef 50 health officers annually for
the British Caribbean, about half

nor a stud, of the trainees being Jamaicans
“unlimited duration”, it was | The territories from which stu-
learned here today. ‘dents are sent for a one-year

Prefessor Baker will go to the] course include Antigua, Barbados.

island Huemuel in Nahuel Huapi
lake near Bariloche where Ar-
gentina’s atomic research is being
carried out under the guidance of
Austrian-born Professor Ritcher.

The Netherlands news agency
understands that the Dutch scien-
tist’s trip is probably the result
of talks which Prince Bernhard |
had with President Peron during}
his recent goodwill visit to Ar-|
gentina,
. Argentine interest in the Dutch
,eyclotron in Amsterdam was
{manifested during those talks it
is learned, and Professor Baker
is taking model of it with him.

—Reuter.



Whirlwind Kills 3

TAIPEH, Formosa, May 16.

A whirlwind over Chinese
Nationalist naval headquarters in
southern Formosa killed three
cadets and injured over 100.
The whirlwind, which raged for
three hours, developed three
miles out at sea yesterday after
a flash of lightning,

Three civilians walking on the
beach were sueked up and were
still missing, it was réported,

—Reuter.



Campaign To Help

Blind In
LONDON, May 16.

The British Empire Society for
the blind is launching on Empire
Day (May 24) a campaign to help
1,000,000 people in the colonies
estimated to be blind

The incidence of blindness in
the West Indies is believed to be
at least three times that of the
United Kingdom, but actually eye
disease in the colonies generally
cannot be accurately assessed
though it has been’ variously
estimated at frem 10 to 15 per
cent. of the population.

Seventy-five per cent. of this
blindness and eye disease, said the
statement issued today, is pre-
ventable.

“Many colonies lack eye special-
ists amd few have eye hospitals.
lithere is nto opthalmic research

{centre in the Colonial Empire.”
|

The Senate sub-Committee was ‘Working in overerowded

| clinics in the colonies, doctors save

firms had arfanged to ship a Com-j{thousands of eyes each year, but

plete power plant to Mukden in
Commun-|bling for lack of simple treatment,

Manchuria, province of





ist China. Kenneth Hansen inves-
tigator for the Senate sub-Com-|
mittee on export contr and poli
cies, said he has seer actua
¢ for the order and ship-
T re Tangiers |

€
further action hari been taken bs
the authorities—Regiter

|great numbers of people still go

sight of
cestr
parents
eye health

thousands of
each

gnorant of

jand_ the
ldren

year










British Honduras, British Guiana
Grenada, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, St
Vineent, Trinidad and Turks
Island. In addition there are sev-
ernl refresher courses.—(C.P.)



South Africans |
Hit 388-9

BRISTOL, May 16.
The South African touring team
are running into their best form.







Following their victory over
Glamorgan, the tourists made a
sound start against Gloucester-

shire today in scoring 388 for nine
wickets, their highest total of
ihe tour so far.

Young opening batsmen Jackie
McGlew (90) and John Waite (62)
put together 169 runs in the best
partnership of the tour and later
Jack Cheetham (92) and his Cap-
tain Dudley Nourse (38) added
95 in 85 minutes in a sparkling
fourth wicket partnership

But all batsmen exercised cau-
tion when facing fast bowler
George Lambert who claimed five
wickets for 78

—Reuter

Colonies

means of preventing eye disease

There would be a_ continuous
eampaign by films, radio, leaflets.
and the Press to teach people how
to preserve their own and their
children’s sight.

At Least £ 1,000,000
Grants would be made to volun—
tary bodies to extend and improve
research facilities of eye hospital:
and clinics, and to develop exist
ing schools and training centres,
Regional offices staffed by experts
would be established in each
principal area. They would
stimulate ‘and co-ordinate work
for the blind bY Government and
unofficial agencies.
Appeals are being made this
year for at least £1,000,000. It is
hoped to raise half that sum in the

United Kingdom, in certair
dominions and in the Unitec
States.

The Society concludes: “Blind

people in the colonies live as family
dependents cr as beggars wander
ing from town to town 3lind
children are often exploited by
beggars guilds, and there is fii
‘|



dence that few African tribes







practise infantifMde of blind «
dren. Blindness and eye disease|
Y r es of disability and
@ m will ate ease
t y 1on pro eri
Col 4] Empire’’.—Reuter



B.W.L. Health| REDS MAY HIT |

WITH THE MOON,

By ROSS MARK

SOMEWHERE IN KORBA, May 16.
Another major attempt to smash the United Nations army
in Korea will be launched within days or possibly houyrs,
General Bryan, Commander of the American 24th Division
forecast tonight. The full moon is tomorrow.

He said if Chinese were willing

lraq Sends Army i aceept even more appalling

losses than in their previous offen-




. ry . ee sive, they could possibly push
Units lo Aid ‘ Pia} bck the Allied line, But they
" would come up against a “couple

BAGDAD, May 16. 4 yot¢brandendweweapons/!.hevsaid.

The Pasha of Iraq told Parha-
ment today that the Iraqi army
Royal Bodyguard and anti-aircraft

Bryan added: “My men killed
about 9,000 Chinese during the
first day of their attack three

units arrived in Syria today '6] weeks ago. The terrible toll rose

defend Syrian territory against/to about 20,000 of their total

ony air attacks. attacking foree of 35,000 in two
The move was taken after full] and q half days of slaughter.

accord with the Syrian Govern “My present defence line -is im-
ment, and is designed to meet] meisurably stronger and my men
any Israeli aggression against!) could inflict much heavier casual-

Syrian territories ties. But there is a limit to the
number of men one can kill.”

Long range Allied patrols were
also active. They fanned out north
and east of Seoul seeking a Chin-
ese strong point.

Jets, fighter-bombers and artil
lery pounded dug-in Communists
in the hills northeast of Vijongbu
after a United States tank and in-
fantry force had attacked their
position,

Another tank and infantry team
battled for two hours with a Com-
munist pocket further west befor:
returning to its own lines

“Iraqi army units will not re-
turn to Iraq until Syria does not
require them’.

A Damascus report yesterday
said it was understood that Syrian
Premier Khaled Azim had told an
Arab League Political Committee
meeting there that representa
tives of a number of Arab states
had expressed readiness to give
immediately such military help
as Syria may ask,—Reuter.





Arias Goes On Trial

Communist self-propelled guns

brought up to support the renewed

PANAMA, May 16 offensive shelled patrols at several

The police carried out a new] points north of the key junction
round-up on Wednesday of mem-]of the Han and Pukhan Rivers
bers of the ousted President Communists were filtering south
Arnulfo Arias’ Cabinet as the}in growing strength under cove)



of low clouds which have obscured
hilltops.—-Reuter,

death toll from last week's bloody
rioting mounted to 17, Arias him
self ig in jal) and will stand trial
on May 25 charged with abusing
his constitutional powers





Will Review Arms
Plau Of 12 Nations

LONDON, May 16,
States diplomats and
from North Atlantic
Pact Nations began a two-day
secctet conference here today on
Jive practical. aspects of Delence,

They will review the rearma-

(C.P.)

United
diplomats

ment programmes of the 12
nations and prepare recommenda
tions. to strengthen the defence

and. economy of Western Europe
No policy decisions will be taken

Charles Spoffard, Chairman of
the Atlantic Pact Council of
Deputies is presiding.



—Reuter.

| Danger Found
In Cosmic Rays



DENVER, Colorado, May 16

The diseovery of danger to
humans {n cosmie rays at high alti-
tudes was reported Wednesday
by the United States Navy to the
Aero Medical Association.

This hazard begins at about 20
miles Up where rocket planes are
expected to fly. Harm is similar
to effects of radio activity.—C.P.



CASE CLOSED
OSLO, Norway, May i6.
The case of Lyford Moore, ABC
correspondent, whose body was











ee cme enema reet nnn ts nnn

NDIAN ECONOMY

ynoressow | AND BUILD A NATION





PRICE: FIVE CENTS



Compromise,| Says Sir George

U.S. Tells
Persia—U.K.

By DENYS CORREY SMITH
LONDON, May 16
The United States is believed
in diplomatic quarters here to have
advised Britain and Persin to go
to extreme limits of compromise in
seeking a negotiated settlement in
oil nationalisation
But London has been taking
steps to achieve as perfect an
agreement with Washington on the

crisis before sending her next
and possibly decisive note to
Persia

Britain is still
comments from the
on this note,

awaiting final
United States
despatch of which

to Persia is still delayed it is
understood here

In the hope of paving the
way to future negotiations

Britain may propose despatching a
ministerial mission to Teheran, it

is understood, to handle any future

aiscussions with the Persian Gov
ernment

Sir Francis Shepherd, British
Ambassador in Teheran today

cabled to the Foreign Office an
account of his talk with Nagher
Khazer, Persian Foreign Minister,
yesterday

Although it was deseribed as 4
courtesy visit, Sir Francis is be
lieved to have discussed Britain’
latest views on the Persian decisica
to nationalise the Anglo-Iranian
Oil Company’s installations

Herbert Morrison who is 69
holiday in the Isle of Wight was
again in touch by telephone with
the Foreign Office today to receive
latest reports of developments in
Teheran, London and Washington,
He will return to London tomor
row .—Reuter,



Bradley Excused
Until Monday

WASHINGTON, May 16

The joint Senate Inquiry Com
mittee today voted 19 to 6 to ex
cuseé General Bradley until nex
Monday as a witness, He is duc
to attend the Armed Forces Day
celebrations in California tate:
this week

Questioning of Bradley was de

layed while Senators debater
whether they should insist on hi:
telling them about private talk

President Truman

The President’s Press Secre
tary, Joseph Short, told a new
conference today that Truman di
not wish Bradley to testify abou!
their confidential talks on the di
missal of General MacArthur

“The President made the de
cision Conversations which led
up to it are his busines

At the opening of the twelft!
day of the hearings today the
Republicans appeared to be di
vided on whether they would re
new efforts to probe these
versations,—Reuter

with

con





Britain Backs
U.S. In Struggle

NEW YORK, May 16.

Sir Gladwin Jebb, Chief British
delegate to the United Nations
pledged Tuesday night that Brit-
ain will stand wholeheartedly
with the United States in the
general struggle against Commu
ist inspired aggression,

Jebb defended Britain’s recor«
in the Korean War and her trade
policy toward Communist Chin:
in a speech before the New Yorh
City Bar Association

“Everything we can do short o!
fatally weakening our main posi-
tion to assist the general effort we
shall do, even if that results as it
may well result, in some lowering
ef the standard of living in Grea



Britain itself, which has been s«
laboriously built up = since the
war.”

He said Britain, early in the

wat, had halted exports of strate-
gic materials to Communist China

particularly of petroleum prod
ucts, but not of rubber Now
rubber shipments also were em
bargoed.—(CP)



Fifteen Arrested

MADRID, May i6
Barcelona police announced to
day the arrest of 15 men allegec

to have tried to organise strike
there and neighbouring Matar:
on May 1. Police said they be
longed to thé outlawed anarchist
Confederation and had obeyec
orders from its exiled committes

in France. They said they had
distributed 100,000 leaflets in Bar-
celona,.—Reuter,



BOLIVIAN PRESIDENT











jfound on Sunday in an Oslo fjord RESIGNS
jafter he had been missing for five BUENOS. AIRES, May 16
}mcnths is considered closed, Police New reports from Boliviz
| Saicl Tuesday broadcast by radio stations here
| Franz Kaltenborn, Chief of |today snid that a military junt
} Police asserted an autopsy pYro-|tad ized control of the eountry
a ; Bar j}duced no evidence that Moore/ end that the President had 1
LINDA CHRISTIAN died by violence—O,P, signed.—Reuter
bast ca y 427 | ‘ip
7 I YORK, May 16 e e i at Mat *
Film yrone Power
nounced te t } wife I LONDON, May 16
Chri in is expectis vat Be AIN’S ARMED FORCES t i 809,000 100,000
Ovrtober He et f | '
| neer ' nonth ( I
t line Niew Amsterdam | ¢ ‘I p ti ‘ rate aha
Jerse T Ope Reuter, | ' -Reuter

SWEEP away frustration and weakness: don’t be
isolated and disunited: build up a self-reliant

British West Indian economy.

That was the message Sir George Seel gave to the delegates
attending the First Regional Economic Committee of the
West Indies at Hastings House yesterday

Sir George conveyed the follow-
ing message from the Right Hon-
ourable James Griffiths, M.P.,
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies :—



jture to hope that when this mat-

ter comes to be discussed, there
will be agreements as to the need
for an agency, both in Canada

and the United Kingdom, which

“IT warmly welcome the estab-|can represent West Indian tzade

lishment of the Regional Economic
“ommittee, which holds its inau-
gural meeting today The pro-
posal that such a Committee
should be set up was first put for-

ward at the Conference on the
Closer Associntion of the West
Indian Colonies held at Montego

Boy in September 1947, and much
thought has since been given
the practical details of the project,
It has given me grent satisfactien
to learn that all the Governments

concerned have now decided to
participate in the work of the
Committee,

“This decision is, I believe, one
of considerable significance, I be-
lieve that by providing a means
for effective regional cooperation
in economic matters, the Commii-
tee will contribute materially (o

the strength and well-being of thet calling

participating territories, which
have hitherto lacked any machin-



interests with the backing of all
the territories. I am sure there is
no better way of ensuring that
the voice of the West Indies is
heard with attention,

Perhaps I should pause here to
say that I fully realise that when
I use the term ‘British West
Indies’, I may seem to delegates

to}|from the continental territories to

take things a little too much for
granted, But whether West In-
dian or Caribbean, or some other
term, does not really matter in
this connection. The thing of im-
portance I would urge, is to re-
member throughout your discus-
sions that unity, under whatever
name, is strength,
Economic Problems

The agenda paper lists a num-
ber of current economic problems
for early attention. Of
these, all I would say is that I
leave them to you members of the

ery for speedy and regular con-|Committee, and to your Chair-
sultation on economic questions,}|man, I don't propose to ascend
or for the expression of united] with you into the higher realms of
views on major issues of common {economic thought; on the other
concern within this fleld hand, I trust that none of you will
Co-operation descend into the arena of mere

“T welcome the spirit of co-{controversy, I hope you will find
operation in which representatives | yourselves able to propound



Caribbeen have come to Berba-
dos, and [ wish the Committee all
ssible success I shell follow

discussions with close atten-





its
tion

various British territories in the }agreed solutions, for

again, unity
is strength,

You will also have the oppor-
tunity of discussions with a Mis-
sion from His Majesty's Govern-
ment in the United Kingdom,
headed by Mr. A, G. Bottomley,
M.P., the Secretary for Overseas
‘Trade, and including senior official
representatives of the Colonial
Office, the Board of Trade, and the
Ministry of Food,

The visit of this Mission to Bar-
bados indicates the high value
which the United Kingdom Gov-
ernment place upon the Regional
Economic Committee, as a body
with which questions of economic
policy affecting both Great Brit-
ain and the West Indies can be
discussed in full confidence be-
tween Lhe parties

The main object of this Mission
is to explain the position in re-
gard to sugar which has arisen in
the course of negotiations with
Cuba, and to obtain full informa-
tion as to the views of the West
Indies on it. It is the Mission's in-
tention to hold a meeting in Lon-
don, on their return, with repre-

| sentatives of other Commonwealth

SIR GEORGE SEEL

“Being myself neither a mem-
viser”’ said Sir George
hope to be more than an observer
at your meetings from time to
time as and when any matters
arise in the course of your discus-
sion in which you may think that
I can help, But perhaps you will
first allow me a few moments to
make one or two comments

It gives me very great pleasure
indeed to welcome you to Hastings
House, and to express my earnest
jesire that your discussions may
ve fruitful. We are proud, in the
Development and Welfare Organi-
ation, that our Headquarters
should be the scene of what, we
ire confident, will prove to be an



‘vent of profound signifieance in
he economic history of the Brit+
h Caribbean territories

You hive before you an agenda
yaper packed with items of great
mportance. Among these the



nitial tas s that of so organising
yourselves es to place the Regional
Economic Committee upon a

‘table and efficient footing. Per-
saps, looking to the future, this
may be the most important of

your tasks, We may be able to be
of some service to you here, as we
have ourselves a certain continu-
ty of existence as a regional
entre, But I am most anxious
hat the Regional Economic Com-
mittee should not at any time
ippear to be a creature of the De-
velopment and Welfare Organisa-
ion, and I am sure that in this I
hare the views of the members of
the Committee itself

W.L. Trade Commissioner

Another important matter which
will fall to be discussed is the pro-



|
ber of this Committee, nor an ad-| ‘
“L cannot} 22nd of May,

producers, at which of course
Londen representatives of the
West Indies will also be welcome
The Mission is expected to arrive
in Barbados on Saturday next, and
to leave on Tuesday evening, the

Journey's End
There is one thing more that |

would venture to say about this
meeting. If we looked for it:
full significance only to the
printed page of your agenda, I

am quite certain that we shoult
not be assembled with the sense
of history that fills our minds
today. This meeting is a point of
departure, the beginning of 4
journey of which we cannot see
the limits, :

You have the opportunity,
gentlemen, of creating, subject io
the sanction of your governments
to what you may propose, a per~-
manent body competent to co-
ordinate the economic policies 0°
more than a dozen British Wes
Indian territories, and to repre-
sent them to the outside world
with authority and strength.

The absence of a fully com-
petent co-ordinating authority is,

as things stand today, a_ fatal
impediment to the successful
further development of these
territories. Internationally, there
is no such thing as a_ British
West Indies, and one must be

frank and recognise that in inter-
national negotiations, even the
largest West Indian territories
cannot hope to count individually
for a great deal.

That is, I suppose, one, reason
why many thoughful people in
this area have been anxious to
see the creation of a British
West Indian Federation and
indeed it is difficult for outsiders,



and especially those with ihe
instinet for administrative _ tidi-

understand the slowness
Indian Government

to

ness,

of the West

ct for setting up a regular West

Indic Trade Commissioner Ser-]|in reaching decisions on the pro-
i¢é in the United Kingdom as posuls made last year by the
well as in Canada, The British| Standing Closer Association
West Indies have had a Trade} Committee, ‘
Commissioner of their own in But one must be practical, and
Canada for a number of years, and} Tealise that a federal British
| should like to pay tribute to the] West Indian Government coulc
valuable services which Mr. Rex|mot be imposed _ for purely
Stollmeyer has rendered in this administrative reasons, and that
rppointment fany such plan must be fully

At the same..time I . think he understood, and willingly accept-
would agree with me if I say that ed, in all the territories, betore
it has been a serious handicap to it can have any chance of péer-

him that there has been no central
able to speak in trade mat-

ter for the British West Indies
is a whole, to which he could look
for support and for instruction
The same is true of the West In-
dia Committee in London, which
has also served this area weil

Y field f trade and ct



a | THE “ADVOCATE

Tnanent success,

At the same time
cal, we should accept
of recent events, and realise
in the meantime, other countries

being practi-
the Indi

thot
ha

@ On page 5.
| pavs for NEWS

DIAL 3113
\ Day or Night




PAGE TWO



Carub Calling

MISS HSU From Hongkong

H*® EXCELLENCY the
Governor, Lady Savage and



party attended the opening per-
formance of “A -Shop ai Sl;
Cornet a Bridgetown Players
production, which opened at the
Empire Theatre last night,

This is the Bridgetown Players
eighteenth production and the
first time for many years that
they are running their show for
three nights and one ‘:natinee

One-Day Visit
M®* J. NUNES, one of the

Managing Directors of
Messr: William Fogarty Ltd.,
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
on a one-day visit. Carib under—
stands that he and his wife will
shortly be leaving Trinidad for
England via New York.

Shopping and Lunch

ESTERDAY, the opening
session of the Regional
Economic Committee's Confer-~
ence over, most of the visiting
delegates headed for Bridgetown.
Some went shopping, others
junched at Goddard’s. Mr. W.
urtenay, the British Hon-

H. Ce
ad




delegate came in via Trini-
de yesterday aftCrnoon and five
hours later

the British Guiana
delegates arrived on B.W.1.A’s
B.G. flight.

Arriving on the same plane as
Mr. Courtenay were Mr. Keith
McCowan Secretary of the
B.W.IS.A. whe has come over
“i meeting of this Associatiort.

Wroug title
] SEE that I gave Comdr, E
H. Allen. R.N. his wrong
title yesterday. Comdr. Allen is
Mechanical Supt. of the Dem-

erara Bauxite at McKenzie. He
and his wife are on a short visit
to Barbados. They leave for
B.G. during the middle of next
week.

Back From Tobago,

RS. WINIFRED SMITH of

Hopewell, St. Thomas, who
spent a short holiday in Tobago,
returned yesterday afternoon by
B.W.1.A. via Trinidad . . Mr,
Nestor Baiz, Director of Bottlers
Ltd., who was in Barbados for a
few days, returned to Trinidad on
Tuesday night.

Rita; The End
HE MARRIAGE of Rita
Hayworth and Aly Khan is
at an end.. At last her lawyer in
the United States admits Miss
Hayworth is considering seeking
a divorce.

Less than two years ago—in
May. 1949-——accounts of their
wedding filled hundreds of
columns in the newspapers of
the world,

Soon the story of the cdisentan-
gling will be filling hundreds
more.

Where Snoop-meat Goes
OM oe -SIX women and 554

men make up the Food
Ministry’s Enforcement Officer’s
department in England. Their
job it is to catch butchers or
other shopkeepers giving cus-
tomers more rations than they
are entitled to get.

What happens to the meat the
Enforeement Officers buy when
trying to trap butchers?

Say the Ministry: “It is given
to hospitals against a receipt,” is
the official reply.



BY

( WNERS of large country

estates might well consider,
as an alternative to charging for
admission, having their wives
tattooed, with a view to starting a
circus

A Pittsburg lady has just won
a divo ease against a husband
who “was always trying to get
her tattooed, so that he could open
a circus,’ I can imagine a con-
vergation on the terrace. “Do
you mean you want me to have
a sort of serpent and anchor busi-
ness stamped on my forearm?”
“Well, more or less. Or two
hearts *transfixed by an arrow.”
“And then?” “Oh, well, my dear,
IT thought you could wear tights
and hand the ape a glass of port,
or ride two horses at once, or
something.” “And what do you
suppose my people would say?”



“Well, the Canon might object;
but Charles and Diana would
laugh themselves sick.” ‘Thanks.
No.”

Getting out of the Rul

Men are afraid of being uncon-
ventional in their dress,
(Evening paper.)
OT Vidange, the Surrealist
painter. He puts. his legs
through the arm-holes of his
waistcoat, thrusts his trousers
over his head, upside dowr, so
that his arms go into the legholes,
hangs his coat on a hook attached
to his shirt, stuffs his socks into
the lining of his hat and ties his
shoes over his knees with his
braces. Thus prepared, he paints
green circles on bleached tree-



THE WAY By a aa cs



She likes bowling alleys:

Silhouette Girl
LIM Chinese girl wearing the

Shanghai silhouette gown
is seeing London for the first
time.

She is Miss Lilian Hsu, who

comes from Hongkong with her

father, Mr. K. H. Hsu, big
Chinese corporation lawyer,
They are among 125 Chinese
flown from Hongkong to the
British Industries Fair.

Miss Hsu is 22, speaks her

English with a_ slight American
accent, This she acquired as a
student at a university near
Chicago. In China she is secre-
tary in a business firm,

In Miss Hsu's
gowns she weats
are called ishang. They have a
close-fitting collar and reach
down to the ankles in a_one-
piece sheath, slit to the knees at
each side,

Only the small-boned Chinese
figure and graceful neck are
suited to this dress, It sets off
the Oriental good looks of Miss
Hsu’s rosebud mouth and soft
black eyes.

country the
so gracefully



~~ ADVENTURES OF PIPA

bark with a brush made of barbed
wire.

Chaos, 1 Fear

HATTER caused a sensation

at a session of the Cockle-
carrot Commission yesterday by
saying: “If the Dorset Coast
Erosion Commission gives expert
advice on sleeping in brimless
bowlers, what is to stop me from
giving expert advice on coast
erosion?” A member of the Com-
mittee, Mr. Paul Bibbett, had
been talking ignorantly about the



With U.B.O.T.

R. AND MRS. JOSEPH A.

McGRATH flew in from
Trinidad yesterday by_B.W.1.A, to
spend three weeks holiday at
Indramer Guest House. Mr, Mc
Grath is with U.B.O.T. in Point
Fortin.

Coming in by the same plane
were two of Hon. Albert Gomes’
daughters Sandra and Vanessa.
They plan to spend six weeks at
the Sandy Beach Hotel.

Oft to Jamaica

R. AND MRS: RAY De SILVA

who left Barbados on Tues-
day night by B.W.1.A. for Trini-
dad flew to Jamaica yesterday
where Mr. de Silva is stationed
with the Royal Bank of Canada
in Kingston. Mrs de Silva is the
former Dorothy Eckstein, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Eckstein of
Casablanca, Maxwells.

Paper!
DULL DAY at Seawel!l was
considerably brightened On
the arrival of Prof Seaton better
known as “Majahara”, who came
in on B.W.1.A’s flight from Trini-
dad yesterday afternoon.

Shortly after he entered the
Terminal Building, he tore a small
piece of paper from a _ travel
folder, stopped: a passing porter,
put the piece of paper into his
mouth, then proceeded to pull
reams of paper out the porter’s
mouth, much to the amusement
and astonishment of everyone.

Prof. Seaton told Carib that he
was in Barbados about four years
ago, when he performed at the
Lodge School. He has just re-
turned from a tour through Ger-
many

Eyesore Gone

BUILDING now nearing com—
pletion is being erected on
the site of the burnt out Rendez-
vous Beach Club at Paynes Bay
and so an eyesore of charred wood
and broken masonry has been re-
moved.
The first tenant of the new house
is to be the Vicar of St. John the
Baptist Church, Rev. Alfred Hatch,
pending the building of a new
vicarage near the Church

Western Style
TACKS of ‘hay’, old cartwheels
and the general appearance of
the good old West will be the
interior decorations in the ball-
room of the Crane Hotel on Satur—
day night. The dance ig in aid

of the St Winifred’s Building
Fund, ti aida,
When St Winifred’s Schoo!

found that it had to move from
its old site in George Street,
Belleville, it was thougnt at one
time that the school would close
down. However, “Welbeck” in
Pine Hill was purchased and the
school moved there in January,
1950. Every year a dance is just
one of the ways of helping to pay
off the debt.

The Police Dance Orchestra will
supply the music which begins at
9.30 p.m.

Costume for those attending is
optional, but why not make it
Western Style,







Copyright P36 Vaz Dias Int Amsterdam







vents in a bowler. He described
a brimless bowler as a mere pud-
ding-basin. But Sir Hoskyn Rock,
of the Worshipful Company of
Vent-Borers, at once replied that
vents or holes in a pudding~—basin
would be superfluous, “The pud-
ding would drop through,” he
said, “Not if it was lumpy,”
corrected Mrs. Symington. “Is it
suggested that to sleep in a brim-
less pudding-basin 2” began
the Rev. Lucius Larkins. He was
interrupted by a loud ery of
“Yes!” followed by shouts of “No!”





JUNIOR. COMPETITION

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to send in
a humorous essay, story or poem on the subject of “A TOP HAT.”
The best entry will be published every Monday in The Evening Advo-
cate, and the winner will receive a prize to the value of 7/6 in either

books or stationery.
Advocate Co., Ltd., City, not later

NOTE ;

Entries must reach The Children’s Editor, The

than Wednesday every week,

Stories must not be copied.

Send this coupon with your story,

JUNIOR COMPETITION

Form

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DIAL 4220



j return of empty package,

‘

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Gagsters Keep An B.B.C. Radio |



Eye On Bob Hope

ty

Beverley

Haxter. M.P.

After watching Mr. BOB HOPE for an hour and a quarter
at the Prince of Wales Theatre I seriously believe that he

has a sense of humour. The sa

ess of the clown is one of the

theatre’s oldest traditions, but I’ cannot believe that Mr.
Hope is a “merry man moping mum whose sou! is sad and

whose face is glum.”

In the first place his counten-
ance is anything but glum. His
lively eyes are set so wide apart
that he seems to be taking in
everything to right and left o1
him; his forehead is broad and
philosophical, his nose is amia-
ble and his mouth is cheerfully
innocent. What is more, he is
the only human being who cai
chew gum without offence to the
onlooker.

Yet if you waich him clesely you
will discover a furtive apprehen-
s.veness in his expression. It does
not come from a fear of the audi-
ence, for we were on good terms
from the beginning. i suggest that
it is caused by the knowledge that
his brigade of gag writers and
publicists, men with sallow cheeks
and sad eyes, are standing in the
wings. Once he fluffed a joke and

ve could almost feel the despair of “%

the harpies off stage.

FOR the first fifteen minutes

his jokes were about Blackpool,
Dudley and Manchester, where he
had appeared before marching on
London. We could visualise the
serious conference with his gag-
siers when they explained about
the humour of Manchester’s cli-
mate.
_ Then there was Dudley. What
is Dudley to himn or hé to Dudley?
Ideas are discussed, dropped, re-
vived and sorted.

“I met the Lord Mayor of Dud-
ley,” Mr. Hope confided to us at
the Prince of Wales, “ and I ask-
€d him where Dudley was. He
said that he didn’t know, himself.”
Or words to that effect. The gag-
sters had not explained in vain.

He told us how much Jack
Benny enjoyed his visit to Lon-
don. “He was awfully excited

when he discovered that coin you
call a halfpenny. He found it so
useful for tipping.”



Rupert and t

tht NE
i \




At Rupert's question the strange
man sighs. ‘It's not impossible,’’
he says. ** I'm making a wonderful
medicine which will let one sleep
all the winter. I've nearly done it.
1 need one more very rare plant,
then it will be perfect. But that's
enough about me. | want to know



a)
Continuing "Be on
to
TUESDAY
4.45 & 8.30

p.m.







Peo
ee
Soy
=



BOB HOPE

A little later he appeared in an
eight-gallon Texan hat and with
a semi-Southern drawl assured
us that he nevah took his hat off
to any man. No, Suh. Then he
added: “Ah cahn’t get it off.
Ah've got an eight-gallon hat but
a nine-gallon head.”

This, you will agree, is the
very stuff of humour, My only
criticism is that he does not suffi-
ciently exploit his gift of carica-
ture. Naturalness can be dis-
arming, but it should be balanced
with artifice.

I liked Mr, Hope immensely.
In a world that is harsh and
parehed he has brought the warm-—
ing sunshine of laughter. Such
a Man deserves our gratitude.

—L.E.S.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED



r---28

more about you. | haven't seen you
Properly yet. Where are my
specs ?'’ He fumbles on a shelf to
find a very large pair of glasses
ang he peers at Rupert through
them. He stares and stares and
seems to be suddenly speechless, as
if he can't believe hie own ever





Programme





THURSDAY MAY 17, 1951
6% am.—I2 15 p.m, 9 6M
6.30 a.m, Sports Diary; 6.45 a.m

Sporting Record; 7 a.m. The News; 7.10
am, News Analvsis; 7.15 a.m. Fron
the Editorials; 7.30 a.m, The Noise and
the People; 7.45 a.m. Land and Live-
stock; 6.15 a.m, Listeners’ Choice; 8.3
am. Inia Te Wiata; 8.45 am Engin-
eering Achievements; 9 a.m. The News;
9.10 a.m. Home 4News from Britain
915 a.m, Clore Down; 11.15 a.m.
Programme Parade; 11 25 a.m. Listen-
ers’ Choice; 11.45 a.m, Statement of
Account; 12 noon The News; 12.10 New
Anaiysis; 12.10 p.m, Close Down

4.15—6.45 por.

19 76 M



4.15 p.m. Top Score; » p.m. Composer
of the Week; 5.15 p.m. Scottish Maga
zine; 5.45 p.m. Semprini_at the Pianc
6 p.m. BBC Symphony Orchestra; 6.45
p.m. Programme Parade.

6 0O—11.00 p.m,

25.53 M., 3122 M



6.45 p.m. Programme Tarade; 7 p.m
The News; 7.10 p.m, News Analysis
7.15 p.m. We See Britain; 7.45 p.m
The Noise of the People; 8 p.m. Radic
Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. The Adventures °
PC. 49; 8.45 p.m. Interlude; 8.55 p.m
From the Editorials; 9 p.m. Special
Dispatch; 9.15 p.m. Have a Go; 9,45 p.m
Do you Remember; 10 p.m. The News
10.10 p.m Light Music; 1045 ".m
Moray McLaren Talking; 11 pom. From
the Third Programme .

C.B.C. PROGRAMME

THURSDAY MAY 17, 1951

News;
This Week in Canada.

10.00-—10.15 p.m
10.15—10.30 p.m

CROSSWORD



Across

1. Where they dope flesh? (9)

8. Tease where the tan ts late. (9)

10. Dispiace your cap in extreme
fright. (5) 12, Cut off. (3)

13. Not childish, or even womanish.
(5) 14, It’s a grand canal. (5)

16. Blue. (5)
18. To 1.0.U.s he’s irksome. (3)
19. Not so plentiful. (5)
. This tin is a bird. (3)
21. Even a small saint around this
word will provide the way. (4)
22, Breaks evens. (5)
23. Proves the egg dad led to be
mixed was rotten. (6-3)
Down
. Law broken in the start in sturd
fashion. (8) 2 At random. (9
Charmea to demean our altera-
tion. (9) 4. Neat eruption, (4)

Ship ropes, (8) 6. Greasy. (4)
Hanging on. {3}

Called for a lame O.1.D. (7)
Only a broken vesta. (5)
Dance in the cotton-mill? (4)

1
%
5
9 Cara game
6
7





Solution of vesterday’s puzzle.— Across:
', Pomposity; 7, Nauten; 11, End; 12,
Reaper: 13, Gloaming: 14, Mutinied; 16.
Alas: 17, Ante: 20, Tale; 21. Ray; 22,
Irksome; 25, Corn; 24, Well. Down: 1,
Pneumatic; 2. Mud; 3, Ocean; 4. Sham;
5, Impietv:; 6. Trend: 8 Angular; 9,
Jrrois; 10. Argument: 15, Talk; 18, Name:
19 Evil; @L, Row.





"RICHARD TODD GIVES THE GREATEST PERFORM
HEDOA HOPPE

R




RONALD REAGAN PATRICIA NEAL-RICHARD TODD PLAZA town

Extra Special:

“CARIBBEAN”





MornincCoucHs |”

Don’t let morning and night cough-
Ing, attacks of Bronvhitis or Asthma
ruin sleep and _ ener another day
without trying MENRACO, This great
internal medicine works thru the
bleod, thus reaching the bronchial
tubes and lungs. Starts helping nature
immediately to remove thick, sticky
mucus, thus alleviating coughing and
promoting freer breathing and more
refreshing sleep, Get MENDACO
from your chemist today. Quick satis-
faction or money back guaranteed,



S/

XA
APORUB

= PAINS of PILES.

BW Stopped in 10 Minutes

It is no longer necessary to suffer
pains, itching and torment from Piles
since the discovery of Mytex (formerly
known as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to
work fn 19 minutes and not only stops
the pain but also takes out the swell-

i] | ing, stops bleeding and combats nerve
| irr

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tation thereby curbing other trou-
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Nervousness, Backache, Constipation, |
loss of energy, debility, and irritable |
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False Collars

COTTON

THE FAMILY SOAP

© Gets skin really clean
© Banishes perspiration odor
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Odex makes a d cleansing lather that is
mild aa wearin foe face, hands and daily
baths. Odex is ideal for family use.

Clipping Machities












$2.68 each
$3.10 each

CHECK OUR PRICES ON THE ABOVE

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.
Hardware Department Tel. No. 2039

THURSDAY, MAY 17,, 1951

=





=S
——

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Upstairs Over Newsam’s













Lower Broad Street -t-

rca
SS



| DRESSES of all Types

Ready-Made from London
Also Made-to—Order

BATHING SUITS — LINGERIE — STOCKINGS
COCKTAIL HANDBAGS









PLAZA Theatre~Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

Last 2 Shows TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

“THE RETURN OF THE
F THE SADDLE
FRONTIERSMAN oe " Dick Foran
GORDON McRAE





The T < in and continuing

e Teenagers @ #

“HIGH SCHOOL HERO” HASTY HEART
Freddie Stewart Ronald Reagan, Patricia Neal,

“LIVING GHOST” James Dunn Richard Todd

GALETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James
Last Show TONITE 8.30
“TARZAN TRIUMPHS”"
Johnny Weissmuller
“WEST OF THE PECOS”
Robert Mitchum

FRI. to SUN. 8.30 p.m
{ MAT: Sunday 5 p.m.
. “DUDE GOES WEST"
Eddie Albert, Gale Storm
“BLUE GRASS OF KENTUCKY”

Color by Cinecolor

Bill Williams, Jane Nigh

“Buzz Henry

MAT : TODAY (Thurs) 1.30 p.m. | FRI, 2.30, 445 & 830 p.m









= @ & DIAL |

} ZA DIAL
ene 8404

Last 2 Shows PORAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.
fe f ADVENTURES 3
ag KITTY O'DAY
Jean Parker, Peter Cookson
iOLENCE
Michael O’Shea, Nancy Coleman













a
ES

FRI. to SUN. 5 & 8.30 p.m
Paramount's Technicolor Double Bill!
Bob Hope — Lucille Ball
FANCY PANTS &
“STREETS OF LAREDO”
))) William Holden, McDonald Carey

GLOBE THEATRE

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.15 P.M. LAST SHOWS
“ODD MAN OUT” —JAMES MASON—

— and —

“HER LUCKY NIGHT” THE ANDREW SISTERS

I













GLOBE i



j OPENING GLOBE TO-MORROW
Y » 7 eee.
| Pao oP hl ‘aS
Se Se Sk mm

POC tale

y
}
His kind of yiolence is | Fa
the deadliest of all...to
SCC Ue ee é
De Cm

_ i ani

THE ALL STAR TALENT SHOW
Tickets on Sale Daily GLOBE

Pit— 24c.; House—4ic.; Bal—60c.; Box—72¢

HAL WALUS













AQUATIC CLUH CINEMA (Members Only)



TONIGHT at 8.30

RKO Radio Pictures present
BILL WILLIAMS, BARBARA HALE
in “FIRST YANK INTO TOKYO"



Commencing FRIDAY 18TH Ys
CLAUDETTE COLBERT, ROBERT RYAN
In The New RKO Picture

“THE SECRET FURY"







ROYAL

To-day Only 4.30 & 8.30
Republic Action Double

« VALLEY OF
ZOMBIES ”°
with
Robert LIVINGSTON
Adrian BOOTH



| EMPIRE

TO-DAY at 8.30 p.m,

Bridgetown Players present

“THE SHOP AT SLY
CORNER ”



OPENING SATURDAY 19th and
«© TRAFFIC IN CRIME”
“FOR HEAVEN’S ee
oa 99 Kane e L
SAKE Adele MARA
Starring ~~Opening Friday 18th.
Clifton WEBB

Joan BENNETT

- *ROXY

To-day & To-morrow

“HALLS OF MONTEZUMA ”

OLYMPIC

To-day Only 4.30 & 8.15

_ 4.30 & 8.15 Republic Double
Wih CLFox Double SE Sea
Victor MATURE in
Richard ee «LADY AND THE
« KISS OF DEATH” ear
ms ; “ROAD TO
“BORDER INCIDENT ” ALCATRAZ”
with vith

Robert LOWERY
June STOREY

George MURPHY
Ricardo MONTALBAN







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FOR THE

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* PLANTATIONS LIMITED |
i k, SEO ENE EEE TE ji


THURSDAY,

_—

MAY 1/7,

T’dad New

Constitution

Successful
—GOMES

Hon. Albert Gomes, Minis-
ter for Labour, Commerce anc
Industry and the Trinidad
delegate attending the Re-
gional Economic Conference,
told the Advocate yesterday
that the new constitution in
Trinidad is operating very
smoothly and very success-
fully and the five elected min-
isters are co-operating in an
effort to make it permanently
successful.

Mr. Gomes arrived on Tues-
day by B.W.1.A. and is staying
at the Worthing Guest House.

He said that at the moment,
Government is primarily concern-
ed with developing the economic
resources of the country in order
to create better living conditions
for all the people

“We are carrying out an in-
tensive drive to attract new in-
dustries to the colony and to
persuade the foreign investor that
the prospects of investment in the
colony are good.” In order to
achieve this, he said that stable
conditions are necessary.

It is essential that relations be-
tween employer and employee
should be of the very best and that
disputes should be settled by
negotiations and not by strikes.

Mr. Gomes said that it had often
been alleged against the colony
that they had not developed
politically as rapidly as some o!
the other territories. Those who
made that criticism, no doubt, had
in, mind the fact that they had n>
political parties

In his view he said that what
some regarded as their weakness,
was in fact their strength, be-
cause, when they looked around
them and observed the gathering
chaos in some of the territories,
and the manner in which the
political situation was getting out
of hand and threatening the eco-
nomic future of those territories,
he felt that Trinidad could con
gratulate itself on the fact that it
was getting down seriously to the
business of strengthening and de-

veloping the country’s economy.

They suffered from many of the
problems from which the other
territories suffered like the rising
eosts of imported foodstuffs and
general inflationary trend in
prices.

He felt, however, that if they
could keep the general politica!
situation in hand and _ further
maintain peace in industry, they
had a chance to get out of the
woods,

Asked about Federation of the
West Indies, Mr. Gomes said that
Sir George Seel’s opening speech
to the Regional Economic Commit-
tee was one of the soundest pro-
nouncements on the subject of
federation they had heard in these
parts for a very long time “It
is a sad reflection on our statés-
manship,” he said, but some
colonies had not yet expressed
their views on the report of the
Standing Closer Association Com
mittee.

“The need for a Federal Author-
ity in the West Indies is being ex~
perienced more and more every
day and as individual colonies, our,
bargaining power is pathetic. Our
voices can only count for some-
thing if we speak in unison,” Mr.
Gomes said.

He hoped that in the
future, some effort would be made
to revivify the report of the
Standing Closer Association Com-—
mittee, since without federation,
they were merely wasting their
time in the British West Indies

near



$4,000 INCREASE

From Our Own Corresponder.t

Corporation

will be increased by $4,000. The
pensionable
yearly in

corporation pays 24
employees $10,740
travelling expenses.



RINSO






BRIGHTER—
quicker!

1951

BARBADOS ADVOCATE *



“) seant to ask him to send me sone more of those fine English bulls te help me-keep this new contract.”



Blackburne
To Broadcast

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ANTIGUA, May 15,

Through the courtesy of Cable
and Wireless His Excellency Mr,
K, W. Blackburne will be broad-
casting to the people of Antigua
on Thursday 17th, May, at 6.30
p-m. on a wavelength of 5,740
Kilocycles or 52.26 Metres, The
station’s call sign VRZ4 will be
giving the call 10 minutes before.

The Governor's broadcast will
be printed and made available to
the public as soon as_ possible
after. ‘

This is the first occasion ot
which a Governor of the Leeward
Islands will be speaking at a
critical time when Antigua’s
economy is more seriously
threatened than ever before.
Strikes prevail in the sugar in-
dustry and waterfront, Today red
flags and pickets were standing in
front of the Antigua Star
printery.

Family Home Week
For Antigua

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ANTIGUA,

Antigua is going to have a Home
and Family Week beginning on
Sunday June 24.

Mrs. Blackburne, wife of the
Gevernor, is largely responsible
for suggesting that a week be set
aside for encouraging people to
improve their homes.

Antigua hopes to make it an
annual, event and a competitive
system will be introduced to en-~
courage gardens and more at-
tractive homes.

_Last week a small house was
displayed on Government House
grounds to show how a typical
small house could be kept cheerful.

There were charades to illustrate
Hygiene, Cookery and Children’s
behaviour—good and bad.

WILL MAKE BROOMS,
SRUSHES IN T'DAD

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 11

A factory to manufacture brooms
and brushes will soon be in opera—
tion in Trinidad. Mr, Guy Rupert
Shaw, manufacturer of Shaw’s
Ltd., Ashton—Under-Line, Lan-
cashire, has applied to Govern-
ment for pioneer status to obtain
concessions under the Aid to
Pioneer Industry Ordinance.



washes





easier! 4

Trinidad
Waterfront
Always Busy

Mr. A. T. Shill, Controller. of
Customs of Trinidad, told the Ad-
vocate yesterday that the Trini-
dad waterfront is always busy,
Recently, they had heavy cargoes
and there were a lot of tranship-
ment for the Windward and
Leeward Islands, Dutch Guiana
and Venezuela.

Mr, Shill is one of the Trinidad
Advisers attending the Regional
Economic Conference which open-
ed at Hastings House yesterday

morning. He arrived here on
Tuesday night by B.W.I.A. and
is staying at the Marine Hotel.

He said that not so long ago,
they were rather handicapped in
transhipment by lack of onward
shipping facilities, Within the
last month they had more small
craft available so that they were
able to expedite transhipment
cargo to the Windward Islands
more considerably,

He said that recently, they had
one onward steamer with 5,000
tons of very varied onward cargo
of which 3,800 tons was for tran-
shipment and the whole lot was
completely cleared in 9 or 10 days.

Mr. Shill said that the Manag-
ing Director of one of the largest
international petroleum organiza-
tions had told him, while on a
visit to Trinidad, that, as far as his
Company was concerned, Trinidad
was the third largest bunkering
port in the world.

Apart from the waterfront
activities, they had a continuous
stream of vessels from all quarters
of the globe calling for bunkers
end stores.

He said that the average clear-
ance of ocean-going vessels in
Trinidad averaged between 23
and 24 a year, and as regards air
traffic at Piarco, the average
throughout the year, was 28
planes a day.

Matric Results

FOLLOWING are the results of
the University of London Matri-
culation Examination held in Jan-
uary this year:—Blackett, J. A.;
Brewster, G. W.; Broome, M, L.;
Pollard, G. E.; Ruck, Orn.
Shepherd, V. L.; Small, L. and
Small, S. E. passed the full exam-
ination. :

Grant, R. S.; Hope, K. W.;
Roach, D, A. and Thompson, C. L.
passed in one subject to complete
Matriculation. .

Briggs, G. C.; Daniel, A. F.;
McClean, D. Da C.; Trotman, C. A.
and Yearwood, H. Da C. passed
in one subject to complete exemp-
tion.












Landon Pxnress Service

Jamaica Interested In

Industrial Development

The Jamaica delegation now

attending the Regional Econo-

mie Conference at Hastings House told the Advocate
yesterday that Jamaica is very keen on industrial develop-

ment at the moment.

The delegation comprised Hon
D. B. Sangster, Minister for Social
Welfare and his four advisers
Hon’ble R. L. M. Kirkwood,
Chairman of the Sugar Manufac-
turers’ Association and Chairman
of the Central Committee of Pri-
mary Producers and citrus
Growers’ Association, Mr, J, B.
Clegg, Under-Secretary for Econo-

mic Affairs, Mr. E, A. Maynier,
Acting Commissioner of Com-
merce and Industries and Mr.

Dudley E, Levy, Second Vice-
President of the Jamaica Chan:de;
of Commerce, They arrived on
Tuesday night by B.W.1.A., anc
are staying at the Marine Hotc!.

They said that a. delegation of
three had just returned from a
month’s visit to the U.S.A., with
a view to interesting U.S., invest-
ors in coming to Jamaica. That
delegation found that investors
were very interested in the
proposal, particularly as it was
put to them as a business proposi-
tion showing mutual advantages
for both investor and for Jamaica,
They were able to assure investors
as to the long term prospects,

Great Momentum

In Jamaica, they had now
gathered very considerable
momentum in this drive for in-
dustrial development and the
people and the Government were
solidly behind it, They thought it
was going to help them very con-
siderably in their aim to secure a
more balanced economy and weie
certain that Government wouid
be able to offer still further in-
ducements to industrialists in the
near future.

As regards tourism, they con-
firmed that the West Indies were
becoming increasingly popuiai
with American tourists and indeed
they were happy about the trend
of tourism, The drive should now
in their view be concentrated
upon the summer season in order
to lengthening its duration,

The Jamaica delegation to the
Regional Economie Conference
regarded it as not only histovic,
but a major move in promoting
the closer unity of the British
West. Indies which in their view
is so vital for the interests of all
its territories.

Jamaica was eager and willing
to play its full part in promoting
and maintaining this unity whici
would undoubtedly yield hand-
some returns to all territories in
the years to come.

&

THE WORLD’S
FIRST CHOICE IN

erento

Abuse ts Not
Argument

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 11,
‘ The Sgooke of the Legislative
Council, Mr, William Savary, in a
letter addressed to members ot
the Council, has urged them to

raise the standard of _. their
debates. He says that the atmos
phere in which the business of

the Council was being conducted
was not conducive to its effec
tiveness as a _ legislative body
and tended to lower its dignity
Good temper and moderation are
the characterizations of Parlia
mentary language. The Speaker
g£0es on to suggest that members
should avoid personalities as they
did not “strengthen your argu
ments or destroy the other mem

ber’s,” “Remember,” he add
“abuse is not argument.” Con
tinuing, it reads: “Even violent
political differences should not

be allowed to interfere with the
courtesy expected between mem
bers, much less with their respect
for the House itself, I am sure that
members will agree _ that
debates that attain a high stand
ard are not only instructive but
are of importance in the political
education of the Colony, Finally,
I ask Hon. members to take this
appeal in the right spirit.”.



Political Asylum
Case Started

THE HAGUE, May 15.

The International Court of
Justice _ began hearings here
today in the second phase of
the Colombia Peru dispute over
asylum granted by Colombia | tc
the Peruvian political leader.

Last November the
decided that Colombia
been legally justified in
asylum to Victor Raul Haya De
La Torre, political leader and
author who fled into the Colom-
bian Embassy in Lima in January
1949 to evade arrest by his Gov-
ernment and who has been
there ever since,

Court
had not
ranting

—Reuter.









Inquiry Into Seaman’s

Death Urged By M.C.P

NOTICE of an Address to the Governor by Mr. E. D. Mott-
ley at Tuesday's meeting of the House of Assembly, told
of a Barbadian seaman who had been beaten to death by
a member or members of the Police Force of the Union of

South Afriza.

It was pointed out that this
seaman, Milton King by name,
had been working on the S.S.

Strategist which was plying be-
tween the United Kingdom and
the Union and that the incicent
had taken place between March 3
and 4 this year

The Address seeks to ask the
Governor to inform the Secretary
of State for the Colonies of the
matter and request him to do his
utmost to ensure that a thorough
and intensive investigation be
made into the circumstances sur-
rounding King’s death Purpose
of the investigation would be to
bring to justice those responsible
and also to get adequate compen-
sation from the Union of South
Africa for King’s children.

Drax Hall Purchase

Mr. F, E. Miller also gave
notice of an Address asking the
Governor to take steps to send
down legislation having for its
object, the purchase of Drax Hall
Plantation in St. George

The desire is to have this plan-
tation divided into one—acre plots
with the necessary facilities of
water, roads, etc., provided for
the accommodation of 700 famil-
ies. Also that priority be given
to renters now on the land, and
that the land be acquired on a
long-term easy-payment plan.

At this meeting of the House
Mr. E. K. Walcott, senior member
for St. James, was granted two
months’ leave of absence.

The request was made by the
junior member of the parish, Mr
J. H. Wilkinson.

Mr. Walcott has been absent
from the House for some time due
to illness.

Police Representation

Mr, T. ©. Bryan gave notice
of questions concerning the Police
at Tuesday’s meeting of the House
of Assembly

He asked:

Is Government

aware that

members of the Police Forcé who
are required to answer charges
against themselves before the
present Commissioner of Police
are not permitted by him to be
represented on such occasions’

Will Government acquaint the
Commissioner of the necessity, in
the interest of fair play and jus-
tice, to permit such policemen to
be represented by counsel on such
occasions?

1S IT a fact that a number of
Police constables were recently
fined for sheltering out of neavy
rains, and are now compelled to
remain on duty during such heavy
rains without proper protection
cr suitable shelter?

Will Government take immedi-
ate steps to protect such Police
Constables from punishments of
this nature?

£7M. DAMAGE

GUATEMALA CITY, May 16

A cyclone today damaged 27
large banana plantations on the
Pacific coast area. Damage was
Pstimated at £7,000,000. There
was no loss of life. The damage
would halve the export of bananas,
the United Fruit Company stated.
—Reuter.















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PAGE THREE

Harbour Log

IN CARLISLE BAY





M.V Sedgefield, Sch Wonderful

@ Counsellor, Sch. Marea Henrietta Sch

Marion Belle Wolfe, Sc Gardenia W

Sch. Cyril E. Smith; Sch. Enterprise S

Sch. Frances W Sch. Eastérn

Eel, M.V. T.B. Radar, Sch. Belqueen,
ARRIVALS

FRANKLYN D. R 82.tons net

Sealy





British Guiana
ATHE sROOK 246 «6tons net,
0k, from Trinidad
Sch D'ORTAC, 58 tong net, Capt



jing, from British Guiana

Sch. PHILIP H, DAVIDSON, 87 tons

net, Capt. Sea fom British Guiana.
8.8 RUNA, “4 to net, Capt
Haroldsor from taracaib
Oil Tanker RODAS, 1,85 tons net,
Capt. Van der Meule Y Grenada
DEPARTURES
Ser GARDENIA W
Capt Waliace, for T
Sch. WONDERFUL



tons net, Capt. Alexar
M.V. ATHELBROOK
Capt, ¢ k, f Trir



RATES OF EXCHANGE

CANADA
MAY lé 1951
62 1/10 Cheques
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Draft 60.05°% pr
8 9 9/10 pr
re
(i ie 5 cy + 7/10 pr
60 £ 1 r pr
MAIL NOTICE
MAILS for St LUCIA , the M/V
LADY JOY will be closed at the Gen-
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at 12 noon on the I7th Ma 1961

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PAGE FOUR





Sa {ese ==)

Printed by the Advocste


Thursday, May 17, 1951



WELL SAID,
SIR GEORGE

SIR GEORGE SEEL’S speech at the
opening of the First Regional Economic
Committee at Hastings House yesterday
was the speech of an Englishman of the old
school. Delivered with great simplicity the
words went straight to the heart of the
matter and the unanimous applause that
greeted its conclusion showed how truly
Sir George had interpreted West Indian
feelings. Internationally, said Sir George,
- there is no such thing as a British West In-

dies. At the same time it is inevitable

that West Indians should prefer direct re-
presentation in making trade arrangements.
How impossible the present situation is,
said Sir George, you can see for yourselves.
It took four years to get this Committee
assembled: The reports of the Rance Com-
mittee and the Maurice Holmes Committee
seem like Mahomet’s coffin to be suspended
between heaven and earth. These terri-
tories, said Sir George, should be engaged
together in an enterprise in which they can
rely. on their own skills, their own re-
sources and their own judgement: from
which when they are successful they can
derive renewed confidence in themselves:
and in which, when they do not achieve all
they desire, they can search for the reasons
at home, and not exhaust themselves in
recriminations against others.

“I believe,” said Sir George and the whole
West Indies re-echoes his belief “that much
of the criticism which is being voiced at
this moment arises from a sense of frustra-
tion, because the British West Indies have

not yet organised themselves to speak to-
gether and exert their full strength in the
field of trade and commerce.” That is the
challenge which Sir George threw down to
the meeting, the challenge of a great civil
servant whose service to the West Indies
here and in London has been so often pro-
claimed and championed by all those who
know his merits. It was for the West Indies
to take up that challenge, and Mr. Albert
Gomes was waiting and ready. He would
not allow the meeting to proceed without
drawing to their attention the view of the
Trinidad Government that the West Indies
must have direct representation at the
trade talks between the United Kingdom
and Canada which open next week in
Ottawa. Nor was Mr. Gomes silent about
the need for a united front with regard to
Mr. Bottomley’s mission. He made it clear
and the point was well taken by a Govern-
ment official attending the conference, that,
although the agenda of the Regional Eco-
nomic Committee was a large agenda, an
important agenda and a historical agenda,
the issue of Canada-West Indies Trade and
the approach of Mr. Bottomley in search
lof sugar facts, were matters of far greater
urgency.

' “You have the opportunity”, said Sir
George, “to sweep away the frustration and
weakness that arise from isolation and dis-
unity to build up a self-reliant British West
Indian economy and present it to the
world.” Mr. Albert Gomes more perhaps
than any other West Indian politician of
to-day knows how necessary it is to act on
this advice. But he was not prepared, nor
can we believe that Mr. Grantley Adams
is prepared, to sit quietly back discussing
the preliminaries of general economic
unity, when two great issues were awaiting
for solution by unity. The lamentable fate
of Grenada, the growth of “masquerading”
politicians throughout the area can only be
checked by united action in the economic
field.

Mr. Gomes is giving a great lead to West
Indian federation of a real and practical
kind. Sir George Seel exhorted the Com-
mittee to speak together and exert “their
full strength in the field of trade and com-
merce. Nothing has happened in his life-
time,” he said, “to suggest that when they
do so théy will not be heard at any rate in
Britain, with ready sympathy and with
every desire to reach mutually advantage-
ous results.”

The West Indies applaud this statement
from the heart. That is why they support
Mr: Gomes in his determination to see that
the West Indian voice is heard in Ottawa
next week and that Mr. Bottomley is unani-
mously told what the West Indies think
about trade pacts with Cuba, which may
result in further loss of markets for West
India sugar.

|

— Eee eo™',_0_—0@”0@”'@—_ CO_ LL

—

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THURSDAY,

MAY

17. 195i



Cleansing The Leper:
A Modern Miracle

FOR countries where the disease
May occur, modern seience has
opened up an entirely new outlook
for sufferers from leprosy. No
longer are they considered “un-
clean,” or doomed to die of an
affliction hitherto considered in-
eurable.

Those who know the truth about
leprosy are surprisingly few. In
fact, only a restricted mumber of
doctors and specialists are aware
of the astounding fact that leprosy
is not and never has been contagi-
ous—except to children .

The facts have been carefully
collected by a magazine called
The Star which is edited, printed,
and published by the patients of
the U.S. Marine Hospital at Car-
ville, Louisiana, in the southern
part of the United States. The
other name for that hospital is the
U.S. National Leprosarium.

Among the facts regularly re-
iterated in The Star are the fol-
lowing :

Science records 145 experi-
ments in which researchers have
tried to infect themselves or
other volunteers with leprosy by
putting the known germ (Myco-
bacterium leprae) into their
bodies; there has not been a
single infection in these efforts.

In 264 years of succouring
leprosy sufferers, no physician,
nurse, or attendant of the San
Lazaro Hospital in Manila,
Philippine Republic (says Dr.
M. Carron of the hospital staff)
has ever contracted the disease.

In the 55 years of Carville’s
history only one employee has
developed leprosy. He was
found to have been exposed to it
as a child, and he came from
an endemic area in one of the
only three States in the U.S.
where leprosy now endemically

occurs: Louisiana, Texas, and
Florida.
That childhood history is the

important point. Unless a person
has been exposed to leprosy as a
child, it is a 99.9 per cent. scien-
tific certainty that he will not con-
tract the disease later whatever he
may do.

Dr. Brownlow David Moles-
worth, medical superintendent of
Sungei Bulor leprosarium in
Malaya, goes further. He has
found that a person must be ex-
posed to leprosy, not only once but
repeatedly, in childhood to con-
tract it, and he reports: “It is a
series of infections added together
that finally win a foothold. Once
this is established the disease lies
dormant, it may be for one, two,
four, eight, or even twenty years
before it breaks out.”

That wags what happened with
Mrs. Hans G. Hornbostel, a fam-



Luxury Creeps Back To
British Manufactures

- LONDON,

Luxury has crept back to Bri-
tish goods and craftsmanship—but
still for export only!

Jewels, gold and_ silver, rich
silks, beautiful glass and china
cazzle the eye at this year’s Bri-
tish Industries Fair. For the first
time since the war quality and
magnificence have stolen the field
from easy-to-make and austerity-
utility. Paper-thin gold cups with
patterns delicate as fine lace catch
the attention of foreign buyers;
sheer fabrics iglimmer in shaded
folds, But

“No good me showing you these
things, sir—they’re all for export”,
IT heard one exhibitor say. All
over the vast acreage of Earls
Court and Olympia they were
telling unhappy British buyers the
same thing.

Down Millionaire’s Row — the
name they have given to the Jew-
ellery section — there are well
over £1,000,000 of gems on show.
One tiny shop has £100,000 of
shimmering diamonds and highly-
decorated jewelled watches array-
ed on red velvet cushions. Buyers
stroll in, glance over diamond
rings worth a rajah'’s ransom,
dangle a diamond bracelet from
a nonchalant hand, and saunter
out again.

This air of casual go-as-you-
please masks, however, extensive
security precautions by Scotland
Yard. Liberally scattered among
the crowd are plain-clothes detec-
tives, and a ring of London uni-
formed police circle the jewellery
section, An alarm would bring
the police network to life in a split
second,

Modern methods of effective
display show to advantage square
and oblong-cut diamonds which
appear to be gaining in popularity
Platinum-and-diamonds is rivalled
by the Continental preference for
gold and diamonds — and for
heavy settings.

From Romé and Florence comes
the inspiration for rather heavily-
rounded gold ladies’ watches
laden with diamonds, and from
Zurich and Geneva, the amusing
Swiss-style novelty watches, Small
figures wheel barrows and carry
drums which incorporate a tiny
watch-face, just big enough to tell
the time; there are sailing-ships,

Barbados Christian. Party
To_The Editor, The Advocate---

SIR,— Kindly allow me a little
space in your paper to mention
the thing that to my mind pre-

sents forthcoming problems.

I am thinking of the registra-
tion of thousands of persons who
for some reagon or another ‘have

refrained from in
past,
the christian section,

sons who look

voting

upon

set apart from their
and a thing with which
must have nothing to do.

This idea is especially fostered

by the belief that the paths or
by-paths of the politically en-
gaged are broad, or tinged with
evil, (Broad is the way

leads to evil—etc., etc.) or
further (to quote the Rev
Stanley Jones, author of the book
“The Christ of the American
Road”, when dealing with
Hesitation of American Christi-
anity in regard to the application

OUR READER

Years of research and discovery of

helpful new drugs have served to

disprove many misconceptions
about this once -dreaded disease.

By DONOVAN PEDELTY
From United Nations World

ous case of leprosy in modern
American life, The wife of a U.S.
Army major, Gertrude Hornbostel
was liberated from a Japanese
prison camp in the Philippine Is-
lands after World War II and was
found on arrival at the Pacific
Coast city of San Francisco, to be
suffering from leprosy. She was
rushed into another kind of con-
finement at Carville and her hus-
band, Major Hornbostel, insisted
on going with her. It is generally
agreed that it was the weakening
conditions of life in the prison
camp that brought out the dor-
mant leprosy in Mrs. Hornbostel.
It is known she had been exposed
to it as a child on Pacific Islands.

The most quoted case—Father
Damien — is misleading. Damien
de Veuster was a Roman Catholic
missionary to the lepers at Kalau-
papa on the lonely Hawaiian is-
jand of Molokai. He became their
chaplain in 1873, developed the
disease, and died there, unques-
tionably a heroic, saintly man.
Famous biographies of the great
Father Damien fail to mention that
in the latter half of the last cen-
ury leprosy was endemic in the
Lowlands of Europe, including the
parish near Louvain, Belgium,
where Father Damien was born
and spent his boyhood.

Heredity has been ruled out as
a factor in transmission of the dis-
ease. “Babies of parents with lep-
rosy,” says Dr, Molesworth, “are
always born healthy — it is the
close contact after birth with an
infectious parent that finally in-
fects the child.”

The words “finally” and “child”
should be noted particularly. Re-
peated contact is not enough.
Childhood contact is not enough.
There must be both.

That leprosy is not a disease of
the “unclean” was proved 76 years
ago, when Norwegian Dr. Ar-
mauer G. H. Hansen isolated the
germ which causes it, a microbe
closely related to the tuberculosis
bacillus and as hard to kill or
harder—even boiling does not des-
troy Mycobacterium leprae. Lep-
rosy is no more “foul” than tuber-
culosis, and yet, as American and
British doctors have shown, it is
100 times less infectious.

“From the public health stand-
point,” writes Dr. F. A. Johan-
sen, affectionately known to his
388 Carville patients as “Dr. Jo,”

“leprosy might be considered as
practically a non-communicable
disease.”

Finally it has been established
that leprosy does not even “spell
doom.” The disease can be halt-
ed, held, even put into reverse.
Mrs. Hornbostel already has been
returned to normal life, is now an
ordinary, unnoticed suburban
housewife.

Four nations contributed to this
peacetime triumph, German chem-
ists originated the drug DDS (dia-
mino-diphenyl-sulfone) or “basic
sulfone.” English laboratory
scientists demonstrated its extra-
ordinary germ-killing power in the
test tube. French workers tried
it on tuberculosis germs in the hu-
man body and discovered that in
its early form DDS was too toxic
for use on humans, Then both
American and British chemists
learned how to rearrange the
molecular construction of DDS so
as to lessen its danger for human:
while retaining its deadly effect
on germs. The altered forms —
promin, diasone, sulphetrone —
proved ineffective against tuber-
culosis, but on the related leprosy
bacillus the tests gave leprology
doctors their most encouraging re-
sults in 76 years of research effort.

Some forms of leprosy have
always been self-arresting. Germs
which develop along the nerves
eventually paralyze a whole area
of the host body, in effect locking
themselves up and _ rendering
themselves harmless. Such cases,
when their nature has been deter-
mined, have alweys been dis-
charged from leprosaria as safe.
Within a few years of trying DDS,
which is slow-acting but steady,
the rate of discharge of patients
around the world has grown amaz-
ingly, At Carville the rate doubled.

In 1950 more good news came
from Carville, Doctors there have
been trying a still further-refined
form of DDS—promacetin—which
can be swallowed at meal-times
and which produces no acute toxic
effects. It is reported to result in
clinical improvement which is
“universal, uniform, and sustain-
ed,” even among patients in an
advanced stage of the disease.
There is no doubt that, while a
cure for leprosy is not yet officially
here, the outlook is definitely en-
couraging .

END

This article appeared in the
January 1951 issue of United
Nations World, a private pub-
lication printed monthly in the
United States and distributed
internationally. The author is a
frequent contributor to Ameri-
ean periodicals.



‘

By HAZEL MAY

gondolas, motor-cars — anything,
in fact, which can be depicted in
gold and jewels, One British
manufacturer hides in a brooch a
watch which is only revealed by
swinging a portion of it over, on
the smallest of hinges.

Queen Mary, one of the B.I.F’s
most faithful visitors and a
great connoisseur of china and
glass, will find much to admire
in the magnificent display from
the Midlands.

“Service plates’, used by the
Americans as a form of table

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER








“If you dsk me, Socialist!
spokesmen nowadays ure |
nothing but a lot of black
legs taking the unkind words
out of our very mouths!”

decoration before a meal is
served, are being produced by
many firms as_ dollar-earners.

Each plate must be different and
individual, Best among these
was a jet black set decorated
only by Japanese-type line
drawings in white of various
flower sprays. American buyers
usually place large orders for
these. j

No less extravagant is the glass,

lustre under

amethyst

|

cut by British workmen in Y
patterns that have been handed
down from father to son, through
the centuries,

In a modern hall of mirrors
one’s reflection stares back from
every sort of looking-glass ever
conceived by manufacturers since
the 14th | century. There are
gold frames, glass frames,
wooden frames, convex and
oblong glasses, and an_ entire
room devoted to Queen Anne
mirrors set off in their beautiful
gold-painted shining brown wood.
On one wall there hangs a fine
reproduction of the sun-ray mirror.

British leatherwork can hardly
be rivalled in the world today
A prince’s luggage could be
bought at some stands—dressing
cases of finest blue seal
morocco lined with moire
Fittings are of enamel mounted
on silver and arranged in a
dazzling display—brushes and
combs, bottles and jars, mirrors,
manicure implements and pow-
der bowls. Most popular design
on the enamel was a
fleur-de-lis pattern,

British Ceylonese have woven
the brocade for the most luxurious
evening gown displayed in the
Fair in gleaming pink and blue
brocade, designed by Norman
Hartnell with the motif on the
material picked out with glittering
sequins and Ceylonese fabric made
evening gloves in satin, beaded or
with sequins. Extravagance was
the key-note of nylon evening
dresses with floating gauzy skirts.
No ironing is needed for these, the
answer to a woman traveller’s
prayer.

Immediately after the war a
decorator who designed a door
with a cut-out alcove to be filled
with fresh flowers woujd have
been laughed at; today such
millionaire’s whims are encour-
aged. At one stall exhibitors were
showing a hidden flower vase in
a hollow portion of the door whicn

grain
silk,

delicate

a

























A NEW IDEA IN
STATEHOOD

The Governor of Puerto Rico tells how his homeland,

enjoying the privileges of a commonwealth, may

choose to become an independent republic or a full-
fledged State of the United States at any time.

| PRACTICAL
| SPANISH
| GRAMMAR

Hy Hills & Ford
Advocate Stationery

By LUIS MUNOZ MARIN
(Governor of Puerto Rico) }
From United Nations World

PUERTO RICO is associated with the Uni-
ted States in a bold, new manner. We Puerto
Ricans are in the process of creating a new
type of statehood, a statehood which is re-

lated by citizenship and law to the U-S. fed-
eral government itself, rather than to the

other States of the Union. Our privileges as
an autonomous entity within the Union are
many-and varied, as are our responsibilities.

Like the other 48 States and like independ-
ent nations, too, Puerte Rico has the right
to proclaim its own constitution as well as
to alter it- We elect our own government:
municipal councils, mayors, representatives,
senators, and our chief executive, the Gov-
ernor. With consent of the Puerto Rican
senate, the Governor appoints his Ministers,
the Chief of Police, and the Commander of
the National Guard, as well as the judges of
the various tribunals. The Puerto Rican Con-
titution. specifically indicates procedure for
he appointment of justices to our Supreme
Court.

These officials are in no way responsible
to any authority of the United States, but
they are all answerable either to the Puerto
Rican voters or, in the case of appointive
oositions, to the Governor. Our autonomy
is further vividly demonstrated by the fact
hat no official of the United States—not even
the President—has any authority over the

Governor. Authority is vested solely in the
people of Puerto Rico who can replace the

Governor at the end of his four-year term,
and in the Legislature, which can impeach
him.

This new type of State, similar in structure
to a dominion in the British Commonwealth
of Nations, is now in full development within
.he framework of our United States.

Since we are associated with the United
States, our merchandise enters U.S. ports
duty-free, but because we are not a State of
the Union, Puerto Rico pays no taxes to the
U.S. Treasury. All revenue is diverted into
channels specified by the Puerto Rican Leg-
islative Assembly, elected by universal suff-
rage.

Puerto Rico is represented in Washington,

D.C., by a delegate in the U.S. Congress. His
status is different from representatives of

other States of the Union in that he is recog-
nized by the Executive Branch of the U.S.
Government, and different, too, from that of
envoys from other countries in that he has
a seat in the Congress.

The United States has granted large-scale
economic aid to Puerto Rico in the difficult
task of raising the standard of living of our
steadily growing population. Federal alloca-
tions have been made for road-building,
schools, public health, technical education,
agricultural development, and social secur-
ity. Puerto Rico’s imports exceed exports by
a substantial margin. Without aid from the
United States we would suffer a disastrous
imbalance.

And so our island of 3,435 square miles,
with a population of some 2,250,000, appears ,



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>I OOP









and especially do I mean
those per-
anything
political as something outside, or
activities,
they









much of which is decorated with k , n %
gold, silver and vitreous enamels Keeps flowers alive and blooming:} are fully conscious. s
on glass, and exquisitely tinted ® Portion of trellis can be removed ; se eee ie : x
in delicate hues. This effect is Whey ete . qpnewed. This political creation is indeed a dynamic $ ne g
obtained by applying a metallic e best of Britain’s manu-—, indi ; “ , % ok y
Cee ee nece tae aan th0Usee AEN IGRAy dost: to. tears oe the Sipeot the United States $ ; x
outstanding display of British markets, they continue to enhance pH g new political ideas, and of the | x he) . x
crystal and cut-glass in rose-red, the status of British craftsmen, Peal possibility of good neighbourliness and 2 nd .
SS ee | mutual trust of the peoples of the Americas. |X COCKTAIL VEGETABLES
8 SA W : nould S = ns DUTCH FINE PEAS :
should awaken to the fact that GOLD BRAID RUM. 7 Ea arias gS
’ et the time has come for christianity Thanks From B.G. ‘TOP NOTCH RUM. SMEDLEY PEAS $
ee ea bi to take a very active part, not To The Editor, The Advocatc--- ‘* GORDON’S GIN. | SMEDL _PEAS y
of Christian Principles and Spirit only in keeping the barnacles SIR,—I have to thank you for % BURNETT'S GIN. | ASPARAGUS TIPS %
to domestic. politics and, foreign ete. from obstructing the smooth publishing my request for cor- x PRUNES. ] KALE
relations—“As a consequence of running of the political ship, but respondents from your Island in SS DATES. SPINACH
this hesitation the Political life of in the setting of the course of | Your newspaper. % COLOURFUL COCKTAIL CARROTS .
America is tg below the the ship. Why not the BARBA- I have haq@ such an_ over- * ONIONS BEETS. 5
— 08 the R e of Ge noe is BOS CHRISTIAN PARTY? You whelming response to my request, x (Red, Yellow, Green). Mato cuAtaOM hae eee 3
merican life sie Ber nd may ask about capital for that I am finding it almost im- * PEANUT BUTTER. $
higher than its political life, The campaigns. How about sub- — possible to cope with my cor- § PRUNES. DESSERTS
saan rewarte Po scriptions from the thousands of respondence. However, I have S$ COCKTAIL BISCUITS.
have, been so much higher {rar Willing christians to a Party taken the liberty of passing the SALTED PEANUTS. JELLIES—(5 Flavours)
e financial rewards /of ~ s Fund under christian super- names and addresses of some of %& ANCHOVIES. BIRD'S CUSTARD .
politics that the best brains an vision, to elect representatives the people who wrote to me on S$ SARDINES. | POWDER. §
7 me this ee ne oa from among the christians just to Editors of our local new§- % ——————_ |, GRAPES in, tits. x
oN Gukiness The Political life roeeeeec: yo for by the papers, in the hope that interested s PICNIC SPECIALS GUAVAS in tins %
hes been impoverished, morally. fpannans of eleven parishes. parties from British Guiana will % MARSHMALLOWS RHUBARD in tins %
: Pay.) from every parish a candidate? write te th S| ? KRAFT’S ICE CREAM $
and intellectually.”) It can be Yes indeed Mr. Editor in time to rite tc them. S BARLEY STICKS. %
said that something like the come I can even visualise I shall be much obliged if you % CHOCOLATE LUND. ; POWDER ,
above mentioned may have Barbados vibr: . ae will kindly convey my sincere x CARR'S BISCUITS. | Just arrived: .
st atti ados vibrant with new life, ; . FRESH RED SNAPPERS
accounted for the past attitude for who is there better to set ‘0anks, through the medium of BEER in Bottle. i: So sede Sore " ©
of the christian regarding politics the path for the christian active your newspaper, to all those ist BEER in Can. | SMOKED KIPPERS. ~
in Barbados, although we may be in politics than the christian persons who have responded to cm S
thankful that it has not been to a himself? nee my request. ie s
greater extent. Thanking’ you. Sir Again thanking you for your — 8
: ; ne , kind -assistance, Sy %
Now if ever with the registra- Yours truly, MAIZIE BRUMELL % %
tion of thousands who will be GEORGE B. BASCOMBE. Fire Brigade Headquarters, * RED SNAPPERS — SMOKED KIPPERS g
a i Te to vote Glendairy Road, Water Street . i 1 x
vecause of their 1esitations, [ Carrington’s Village, ; stown |g 7, 7 TT , %
think that those capable of lead- St Michael, ” pag carey js ORDER FROM GODDARDS TO-DAY. ¥
ership among the christians 15th May, 1951. he n 7th May, 1951. FoGSSSSSSSSESSSFSS9G9959 9959999555 9O 9S SO OOOO IOS
THURSDAY, MAY 17%,



1951

Build Up West Indian

Economy

From page 1.
cannot and do not wait to make

trade arrangements with each
ether. However conscientiously
they may bear West Indian

interests in mind, it is inevitable
that West Indians should prefer
direct representation,
Co-Ordination
At present, the only semblance

of a co-ordinating authority in
the British West Indies, is the
Organisation over which I, for

the time being, preside. But this

Organisation could never in its
present form be accepted as a

West Indian authority, because it
is not based on any local sane-
tion. It is true that we devote
an increasing part of our time to
assisting in the co-ordination of
various West Indian activities; io
such an extent, indeed, that we
are no longer primarily a
Development and Welfare
Organisation but a West Indian
Regional Centre.

ut our efforts at co-ordination



are woefully handicapped, be-
cause we cannot speak for the
West Indies. You can see for
yourselves how impossible the

present position is, if you recall
the time taken, since the Montego
Bay Conference, in getting this
present Committee assembled
The same story could be told of
several other projects. The
reports of the Rance Committee

and the Maurice Holmes Com-
mittee seem, like Mahomet’s
coffin, to be suspended between
heaven and earth. Is the same
fate in store for the Customs
Union Report?

We must hope not, These
territories should be engaged
together in an _ enterprise in

which they can rely on their own
skills, their own resources and
their own judgment; from which
when they are successful, they
can derive renewed confidence
in themselves; and in which,
when they do not achieve ail
they desire, they can search for
the reasons at home, and not
exhaust themselves in recrimina-
tions against others.

Frustration

1 believe that much of the
criticism which is being voiced
at this moment arises from a
sense of frustration, because the
British West Indies have not yet
organised themselves to speak
together and exert their full
strength in the field of trade and
commerce. Nothing has happep-
ed, at any rate in my lifetime, to
suggest that when they do

so
they will not be heard, at any
rate in Britain, with ready

sympathy, and with every desire
to reach mutually advantageous
results,

As members of this
Economic Committee, you . have
the opportunity to achieve that
organisation and that co-ordina—
tion; to sweep away the frustra-
tion and weakness that arise
from isolation and disunity, to
build up a_ self-reliant British
West Indian economy and pre-
sent it to the world. In doing
this, you will be making the
greatest contribution possible at
this time towards building up a
West Indian nation. “Your city
to that nation is laid upon you in
the words of the Psalmist—

“Mark well her bulwarks: set

up her houses: that ye may

tell them that come after”

Regional

Welcome

Professor Beasley said that he
was sure that they would all wish
him to thank Sir George Seel,
both for his words of welcome at
the opening of that committee and
particularly for the candour with
which he had expressed a point
of view which clearly commended
itself to the meeting

They were essentially a working
party. They were not there to
indulge in flights of eloquence.

They had a chance now, possibly
for the first time, to schieve some
concrete results which had not
been possible with many of those
conferences’ which had _ been
assembled from time to time

He remembered very clearly
the circumstances under which
the original proposal for conven.
ing a meeting of the regional
economic committee arose.

There had been at Montego
Bay, very great speeches of elo.
quence which occupied most of
the time set for the conference,
When but forty-eight hours re-
mained there had not yet been
any resolutions or proposals.

Only in the middle of the night
before the penultimate night was
there the greatest measure of
agreement on matters to be sub-
mitted to the various govern-
ments.

It had been generally realised
that in the economic field the
West Indies did not exist under
International law but must be
made to exist in concrete fact.
Out of this had arisen the tenta-
tive proposal that a_ regional
economic committee set up.

No Separatism

There was a tendency in the
West Indies today to treat eco-
nomic problems as separate ones
Cuban sugar, currency con.
trols, There was the danger of
treating these as separate prob-
lems.

There was at present a world
crisis of economic policy. In the
meantime there was no worldwide
agreement as to how the problem
of currency could best be solved

It was part of the duty of that
committee to provide some con-
tinuing machinery whereby the
economic needs of the West Indies
would be placed in the hands of
a competent coordinating authori-
ty.

“The only successful committee
on regional cooperation for eco-
nomic parties in the West Indies

THE PRINCESS WHO
WOULDN'T SMILE .

In a far-off land lived a Princess who
never smiled. Clowns and jugglers came
from all over, but not one could bring

out even the tiniest smile.

had been a very successful work
of the British West Indies Sugar
Producers’ Association which had
steadily built itself up as a body
that spoke with authority and
worked for the good of all par-
ties as a whole.

That was the prototype of the
thing they were after.

Trade Liberalisation

Professor Beasley then intro-
duced Mr. W. A .Morris to the
meeting. He said that Mr. Morris
was on his way to Canada on
behalf of the Governmenw of
England for discussions on liber-
alisation of trade. He would be
glad to answer any questions
which the committee might care
to put to_him and which he was
capable of answering.

Mr. Morris said that it was a
great honour to him to be pres-
ent on that historic occasion in
the West Indies.

Hon. Albert Gomes said that
his Government was very muca
concerned about the question of
West Indian representation at the
meeting of the Continuing Com-
mittee in Canada. He did not
know how the members of the
other delegations felt about it.

Professor Beusley pointed out
that there were two meetings due
to take place in Canada and they
should not be confused. They
Were the Continuing Committee
Meeting and an ad hoc commit-

tee for liberalisation of trade.
No Decision
Mr. Adams thought that they

should not take any decision on
that point yet until all the
delegates were assembled. They
would want to speak with a
unanimous voice on the issue.

Mr. Gomes thought the matter
was important and stressed that
the West Indies had often been
placed in an anomalous position
in matters of that sort and they
were of the opinion that the
West Indies should send _ their
own representatives. The West
Indies should also speak with
one voice about sugar in the
talks with Mr. Bottomley.

Hon. H. E. Robinson said that
any discussions which they might

have with regard to sugar they
should not take decisions on
their own since it had _ been

agreed in London that the British
West Indies, the Solomon Islands,
Mauritius, Fiji, East Africa and
the Commonwealth would work
together in matters of that sort
and they in the British West
Indies did not want to give tha
impression that they were dealing
behind others backs.

Committees

Hon, A, Gomes, Hon. J. B.
Renwick and Mr. FE. A. Maynier
were appointed an Editorial
Committee.

Hon, H. A, Cuke, Hon. D.
Sangster, Hon W. Raatgever,
Hon, H. E. Robinson, and Hon.
C. A. Beaubrun were appointed
a Steering Committee.

The Committee adopted
agenda for the Conference and
discussion is due to take place
under the following heads:—
Status, Organization and Fune-
tions of the Regional Economic
Committee, Trade Commissioner
Service, Customs Union Com-
mission Report, External Trade
matters, Regional economic
matters,

B.

the



Norway Celebrates
Constitution Day

THE crew of the Norwegian
steamship Runa will fire 21 canon
shells in Carlisle Bay today. This
is how they will begin their cele-
brations of the Norwegian Con-
stitution Day

Today will be a day of feasting
and merry making for the 35
members of the crew of the Runa.
Buntings will be flown on the ship
from stem to stern. “No member
of the crew will be working to-
day”, Captain Brynjulf Haraldsen
told the Advocate yesterday

Captain Haraldsen said that
May 17 is the same to Norwegians
as July 4 is to the Americans.
May 17 is called Constitution Day,
he said, because Norway got their
own laws on that day in 1814.

The Runa is expected to leave
port tonight for Trinidad.

Fuel Oils Come

DUTCH oil tanker Rodas made
her second visit in five days to
Barbados. yesterday with a ship-
ment of gasolene and kerosene
oil from Trinidad.

She brougnt a total. of 244,808
imperial gallons of motor gaso-
lene and 111,912 imperial gallons
ot kerosene. Of the total, 214,489
gallons of gasolene came for
Messrs. DaCosta & Co., Ltd.
33,169 of kerosene oil for Messrs.
General Traders Ltd., and
30,319 gallons of gasolene and
78,743. gallons of kerosene for
Messrs, R. M. Jones and Co., Ltd.

The Rodas sailed out of Carlisle
Bay a few hourg after her arrival,
for Sp Gardens, Black Rock,
She will discharge the fuel there.
Her agents are Messrs Da Costa &
Co., Ltd

SCHOONERS BRING
CARGO FROM B.C.

THREE schooners arrived at
Barbados with cargo from British
Guiana within the past two days,
Among them was the §87-ton
Philip H. Davidson which brought
1,500 bags of rice.





Other cargo arriving by the
vessels included firewood and
charcoal, They were all con-

signed to the Schooners Owners’
Association.

Close by lived a tailor and his son. One
day the son had an idea. “I know what
will make the Princess smile,” he said,
“Royal Pudding!”

AT THE



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



THEATRE

GRETA BANCROFT and Frank Collymore as they appeared in one
of the Bridgetown Players’ recent productions st the Empire Theatre.
They are again seen to good advantage in “The Shop at Sly Corner”,
which opened at the Empire last night.

THE SHOP AT
SLY CORNER

By MICHAEL

TIMSON

No one should miss the Bridgetown Players production of

Edward Percy’s “The Shop

at Sly Corner”, author of the

famous play “Ladies in Retirement”. Mr. Percy has here
developed his gift along more realistic lines, in the setting
of a curio shop, which is nevertheless equally exciting.

“The Shop at Sly Corner” has in
it some of tne quality of the Greek
me.odrama; in essence a tale oi
modern blackmail, It shows a
man in the grip of inexorable de
velopment of circumstances; but
with it all, Mr. Percy has so skil-
fully mixed elements of tender-
ness, pity and laughter, that only
«t tue end are we conscious of the
great forces that have been at
work,

The realisation of these forces
and their presentation to the
audience has been the big task
before the players, And how
well they have done it. \A large
measure of their success lies 1.2
the excellent scheme of direction
by which Mr. Collymore looked
ifter the players, and Mr. Barne:
their surroundings Much like
Gilbert and Sullivan, they can
work independently in terms of
each other’s contribution towards
a brilliantly designed whole.

Point Of Focus

Every play has a point of focus
but here Mr. Collymore as Mr
Heiss, the foreign curio dealer of
strange reputation and Greta
Bancroft ag his sister and nervous
partner in crime, provided a sort
of double centre, The, former
weedling, toothless, cunning,
humane and passionately violent;
and the latter weak, adorable
vibrating, and continuously ap-
prehensive, are the centre pieces
of inspiration for the rest of the
cast.

Together they isiuminate and
reveal the character—the innocent
and sweetness of Heiss’ daughter
Margaret, played with reserve and

charm by Joan King; the witty
dryness of her companion Joan
(Beryl Bladon): the vulgarity

and medical susceptibility of the
family char (heroically played
under great physical difficulty by
Mrs. Howe), The clear incisive-
ness of Dr. Graham (undertaken
at short notice by Doctor James)
the prodding inquisitiveness of the
remorseless police inspector (Bob
King); the loud, nervous and
jumpy nature of Corder Morris
(played with great gusto. and
character by “Mickie” Challenor);
and above gll, the nastiness, cheap—
ness, lowneSs, and supreme clever-
ness of Archie, the young shop
assistant who blackmails his em-—
ployer, and for it pays the supreme
penalty. This difficult part with
its difficult cockney accent is ex—
cellently played by one of the new
comers—Robert Maw, His con
ceited tone of bitterness and ex-
travagant tone of greed are re-
vealed in the arrogant voice, with
its flashes of darkness, and the

over—elegant movements of in
unnecessary nail file.
Masterpiece
Altogether, this is one of Mr.
Collymore’s finest efforts. In
personal achievement his per—

formance is a masterpiece

He was excellent in a part that
called for every emotion from the
pallidness of nervous exhaustion
to comic nonsense; every mark of
his criminsl background and every
blow from the relentless black
mailer is indelibly lined upon his
face. Even though the law would
never excuse the murder of his
tormentor, every sympathy is
solicifed to his side; so that we are
left in continual wonderment
to whether he will find a means
to evade it.

But beyond personal achieve—
ment, Mr, Collymore has also
welded together a whole new team
of actors, who have brought fresh
ness, vigour and life to the Bar-
vadian stage,

We
Be) Be:

as

can

|

So he brought her a dish of Royal Pud-
ding. And when she tasted it, her face
broke out into a big smile. In fact she
gave him her hand and her kingdom





NEW BISHOP

AT A MEETING of the
Anglican Church Synod held
yesterday two candidates
were nominated for the post
of Bishop of Barbados. They
were the Very Rev. the Dean
of St. Michael's Cathedral,
G. L. G. Mandeville and Rev.
Vaughan, Classical Tutor of
Codrington College.

The election will take place
to-day.



Boy Died From
Natural Causes

Death by natural causes was the
verdict returned by a nine man
jury yesterday when the inquiry
into the circumstances surround-
ing the death of Rudolf Jones, son
of Eudora Jones of Waterford
Tenantry, St. Micheel, was con-
cluded yesterday at District “A”
Court,

The Coroner was Mr. H. A.
Talma. Rudolf Jones was taken to
the General Hospital and detained
on April 28 and died on May 4,
A post mortem examination re-
vealed that death was due to tox-
emia, pneumonia and anemia. Dr,
E. L. Ward who performed the
post mortem said that the toxe-
mia could have been caused by
the gangrene of the tongue.

Four witnesses were called yes-
terday when the inquiry was re-
sumed. One of these, Leroy Jones,
brother of the deceased, said that
on April! 28 his brother Rudolf was
lying on the ground when a boy
with whom he had a quarrel threw
a stone into the house, striking ine
deceased.

Police Train For
Birthday Parade

HE MEN of the Mounted

Police will gather at District
“A” Station at the end of tho
week to begin their training for
the King’s Birthday Parade in
June.

The new drills that the mount-

ed police will do are the rank
and pass in sections and march-
ing pass in troop.
A Stee GIBSON of Kirton's
: Land, St. Philip, has a half-
bred leghorn chicken hatched
recently with only one wing.
The chicken is quite healthy.

EATRICE WHITTAKER of

Lightfoot Lane. St. Michael,
has reported to the Police the thefr
of an ice cream freezer belonging
to Dudley Gibbs, from Morgan
Lewis beach on Whit-Monday.



Judgement Given
To Defendant

In the Court of Original Juris-
diction yesterday Judge J. W, B.
Chenery gave judgement for the
defendant Gwen Goodridge, of
Dash Gap, Bank Hall, in a case
breught by Plaintiff Clarrie Rowe
a fisherman of Fairfield, Black

Reck, for damaging ‘and detain-
ing hig clothing. For this he
claimed £20.

Goodridge said that she used to
wash clothes for Rowe. The last
set he gave her to do she was
unable to get them for him on
the time arranged as she was
not feeling well and was attend.
ing a doctor.

There was no damage done to



the clothing and the plaintiff
owed her money for previous
work she had done for him.

BRINGS A SMILE TO
EVERYONE'S FACE

Just serve delicious Royal Puddings to
your family and friends —and then watch
the smiles of satisfaction. You'll smile,
too—for Royal Puddings are so easy to
prepare—and so economical, too. Try
one today.





es

Postmen Get Small

Travelling

Allowance

A postman from St. George can regularly be seen making
his rounds on his motor cycle. The Advocate was told yes-
terday that the motor cycle is the postman’s property and ke,
like every other postman, gets only six shillings a month

travelling allowance.

“Bus fares have increased, tie “

cost of
shoes are

still we

a bicycle has risen
more expensive, but
continue to get six
shillings a month travelling
allowance. For many years now
we have been getting this amount
és travelling allowance, but ne
one ever thinks of giving us an in-
crease to cope with the rising cost

and

of living’, a postman told the
Advoc:te yesterday,
He said that at one time the

Sovernment“was considering giv -
sng them bicycles, but one M.C.P..
talked as though he preferred a
horse and cart.

“I think that all country post-
men, especially those working ja
St. Jcseph and St. Andrew should
be given motor cycles by Govern-
ynent. These men could easily pay

for the cycles by monthly
inste'ments

“Postmen = in the country

distyicis get the same amount

of travelling allowance as those
in the City, Many have bicycies,

but these are useless in hilly
districts, Some can be seen
crawling over hills on their

hands and knees. The shoe-wear

alone is more than the ailow-

ance given them”, he said.

“It is obvious that you do not
have to spend six shillings on your
bicycle every month, but when
you do have to repair it, you spend
ten times that amount.”

He said that a Sanitary Inspec-
tor gets a monthly travelling
allowance of $2.00 if he owns a
bicycle and a $1 without » cycle.

Nothing Done

“On many occasions postmen
have asked for an increase on their
travelling allowance, but nothing
was done. I would like to say
right now, on behalf of all post-



men, we would like a
travelling allowance,” he said.
Describing the duties of the
country postman he said:
“The country postman very

often leaves his home for work
around six o'clock in the morning
He goes around clearing boxes
and then he carries in his letters
to his Post Office branch, He leaves
the branch office and goes home

at about 10.00 a.m.”
“He does not return to the
branch: office until around 2.00

p.m., when the mail van arrives
from the City. He then takes out
mail to be distributed at about
3.00 p.m., and is working through-
out the evening.

No Promotion

“Postmen who deliver letters in
the City area get to work at the
G.P.O,, at 8.00 a.m., and very
often we do not finish work until
5.00 p.m. At Christmas time we
finish even later. There is anothe;
shitt that arrives at the G.P.O., al
10.00 a.m., but this shift has ne
scheduled time to finish work.
Sometimes they work as late as
7.00 p.m,

He said; ‘Postmen do not ge‘
any promotion, We come in as a
postman on the street and die the
same ordinary postman, I feel
that there should be promotion to
which we could look forward, We
could be promoted to sorters, in-
spectors, superintendents, etc, As
inspectors we could see that other
junior postmen do their work
properly and there would be less
chance of pilfering from mail.”

“Only a dense man would work
at a place with the expectation of
remaining in the same position
until he dies,” he said,

DREDGE DRIVER DIES

Lionel Belle, who has been
driving the Government Dredge
for the past four years, died at
the General Hospital on Tuesday
evening after sorme weeks’ illness.

The Acting Harbour Master told
the Advocate yesterday that Belle
had dene good work in his 10 years’
service on the dredge. Belle joined
the dredge as a temporary deck
hand in 1941 and some years later
he became fireman. He was pro-
moted to driver in 1947,

Belle was a fireman when the
dredge worked day efter day on
the nets that were in Carlisle
Bay during the war.

TAKES AWAY. MOLASSES

Molasses tanker Athelbrook left
port yesterday for Trinidad with
a load of vacuum pan molasses.
She arrived the day before to
take her load. The Athelbrook’s



egents are Messrs, H, Jason Jones
& Co., Ltd.

JUDGEMENT to the amount of
£1 was given to the plaintif!
Rosalie Cummins of Ellerton, St.
George, when a suit in which she
claimed damages to the amount
of £2 against Lionel Cummins of
Eastlyn, St. George, was heard in
the Court of Original Jurisdiction
by Judge J. W. B. Chenery yes-
terday.

Mr. B. Niles appeared on be-
half of the defendant Lionel Cum-
mins while Mr. W. W. Reece
represented Rosalie Cummins.

Rosalie Cummins claimed that
her father died intestate and she
took out letters of administration
for the estate which included halt
of an acre of land, Her father
died in 1931 and. he bought this
land from a man name Pilgrim in

1917 :
On 23rd October she _ hired
Theophilis White to “work” the

land and he dug some cane holes.
Sometime the same day the de-
fendant. went to the same field
and did damage to the amount of

£2.
White aso said that he saw
when the defendant took a hoe

ane “fill up” the holes he had dug,

oi Rosalie Cummins’ instructions



DROVE WITH FAULTY

BRAKES
4 City Police Magistrate yester-
day imposed a fine of £3 on

Oswald Browne of Eagle Hall, St
Michael, for driving the motor
van M-87 on Bonnetts Road, Si
Michael, with faulty brakes on
March 5,

The fine is to be paid by monthly
irstalmeats or in default twe
m nths’ imprisonment

RUNA BRINGS LUMBEP.

A shipment of 24,997 feet of
pine lumber arrived here on Tues-
day by the Norwegian steamship
Runa, The shipment came from
Tampa, Florida, for Messrs Gar-
diner Austin & Co., Litd.

The Runa is expected to finish
discharging the lumber this eve-
ning.

Messrs Robert Thom Ltd.,
the Runa’s agents.

are












CHECK THAT
COUGH

WITH
BROWNE'S

CERTAIN

COUGH SYRUP
Colds Quickly.

lt Relieves

C, CARLTON BROWNE

136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813
Wholesale & Retail Deuggist

ARE YOU PREPARING
FOR THE BIG
ATHLETIC MEETING

az

To avoid muscular pains
and to keep up your stride
You should rub down with

SACROOL

THE GREAT PAINKILLER
e

on sale a’
KNIGHTS DRUG STORES







YES, YOU CAN

LUXOR CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH

SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH

10 & 11 ROEBUCK



BUY IT AGAIN



— Also —
GALY. OIL CANS — 1, 2 & 5 Gin, Sizes
| ene TP APRBERT Ld. 7s



EET,












Arcola

Gets £1 Damages

|



IMPERIAL LEATHER



PAGE FIVE



EP. Sie

SOAPS

BLUE HYACINTH

TOILET
;
MOTD

e LINDEN BLOSSOM @



WH. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—bistributors.

eo



LAYENA.



“PURINA”

see

Sanam aererdc«c we





APTENTION i!

FACTORY MANAGERS

Yake this opportunity of obtaining your requirements

IN

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE

Ranging from %” upwards

MILD STEEL

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes

FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill
At PRICES that cannot be repeated.



The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.
White Park Road, St. Michael

DIAL 4528





2

DRUG
STORE!



MESSRS. A. S.
BOX 403,

P.O,

SS
LLL LLL PLL ELLE LEL LIE LELEPPEELLESD PP ELI PAP PPPI CE, g



REXALL COD LIVER OIL
EMULSION

REXALL KIDNEY and

BLADDER PILLS 367 per bot.
e

KNIGHTS



(ALL Branches)
CEES LLLLELLCCCEEECLEEDS













You
Should
Order
To-BPay

An _— Excellent

Body-Builder
and $1.20

SIZES 66c.



| Special Offer
LAUREL _ SAFETY
RAZORS
36c. Each





You can enjoy Britain’s
favourite tobaccos. Six
blends to choose from—
every one a balanced
blend of vintage leaf.

SOLB AGENTS?
BRYDEN 9& SONS (BARBADOS), LTD,
BRIDGETOWN, RARBADOS







Shoes for Ladies

In a wide variety of wonderful styles specially designed to

meet the latest trends,

Green Suede, Black Suede, Brown Suede and White Buck.

Sling backs and open toes. Spike heels and high Cuban heels,



CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.

|







Prices

from

$12.96

$14.97










PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY i7, 1951



STOMACH DISTRESS?

Aika Seltrer helps millions daily!

HENRY











Alka-Seltzer is so easy to take...
so pleasant-tasting. Just drop one
or two tablets into a glass of water,
watch it fizz, then drink it. Not a
laxative, not habit-forming, you can
| take it any time. Let Alka-Seltzer
; relieve your acid indigestion.

{ Have a supply handy.







(BRITAIN’S BEST HISCUITS)

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING storES = rae
ADVOCATE

TRY THESE FAMOUS PARTY AIDS BOOKS
CHEESELETS |
MARTINI CRACKERS i
PLAY BOX
TWIGLETS Etc. Etc Bcc

by James Hanley









Da EVERYTHING —
ALL RIGHT 7

Lineage Awe

WELL ... THIS 1S OUR FIRST
NIGHT IN HOLLYWOOD!
WONDER HOW GOOFY’S
MAKING OUT !













TIM’ WAY
OVER HERE,
MICKEY !



AAS MARE SISAL sa,
red SO NOW SUNIL Sey can te Mais,

BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG













vitt ii| HGH i} iy) Huot

a ah OH, | FORGOT TO

cA TELL YOU-- YOUR

BUMSTEAD

YOU'RE FIRED/
TY,





BOSS SAID HE'D THE AMERICAN GENIUS
oe pte ms (An anthology “ poetry
I~ x nd verse

ye 7, | PRACTICAL SPANISH
San DELICIOUS & APPETISING oN
3 set 5 by Hills & Ford
BH O- [ASW
—" ADVOCATE

ra a STATIONERY
IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only






























MNT

eta





{} | We
WAU












aH
VY

OR MAYBE PORK ROAST

AT 80¢ OR VEAL ATA

DOLLAR AND A QUARTER?
Dp



} HAVE PLENTY OF










DAGWOOD WOULD YOU LIKE
STEAK FOR SUPPER ATA “4
DOLLAR-TWENTY A POLIND OR

LAMB CHOPS AT A DOLLAR?’









USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW

Tins GUAVA JELLY 57 49 Sliced Bacon (perlb) $1.20 $1.00

°

Pkgs. RED ROSE TEA (3) 40 35 Tins Evaporated Milk 27 24

Tins TOMATOES 37 32 Bottles Jeffreys Beer 26 20

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

BOVRIL introduces

Maralyn

BRINGING UP FATHER









OUR NEW NEIGHBOR LIPSTAIRS
16 MR. STAN DUPANSING =

OPERA STAR-I'M ANXIOUS TO
MEET HIM-I THINK {I'LL SING/
HELL HEAR ME AND WANT TO

ANSWER THE
DOOR / I HAVE
AN IDEA THAT
MAY BE HIM /










/ @ THE MILK DRINK THAT \
ga EVERYONE ENJOYS

;





\ Senn
ee
&
Eg

c, Inc, World rights reserved

THE LONE RANGER












wi 5 wh < ¥% Pure, creamy, country milk... enriched
ce THESE TWO FOLLOWED OUR "TRAIL FROM THE BANK, BOSS. Mh Mi ‘ ... flavoured... and already sugared —
fED ME AN'MADE ME BRING —M TO YOU! rT THAT MASK, THE! EI Tm HN, . ‘ that’s Maralyn Milk Plus ! Itis a satisfying,

\H

ad nourishing milk drink. It tastes gplicious
) -.\

ene (co=
ae tz .. . and the kiddies love it, too!
om me:
Ray ey x
= Fy -
r-)S







bkts”

Be
aw ee
care TAN

MATA

e @ It
( wink PLUS ) in B07. and 16 02. TINS




epee STREET
Nf ;

PLEASE, PLEASE, STAND UP LIKE A MAN, OR T'LL LET
MR. WHITEY ! YA HAVE IT RIGHT
c THERE !

CHEERFUL mind
so often goes with a
healthy body. To main-
tain good health, don’t
forget essential Jnner
Cleanliness. Andrews
Hi : ‘ = not only provides a
Wy) i . ‘wall WH: VV, Wen < Bee sparkling, refreshing
§ Mf! Car, We caiteng Poss Sys ant he Nd in tone ) he 2! : a4 it 0 itis taka
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES » ___ you clean inside as well.
| DONT KNOWWHAT TO DO! IF | KEEP GOING THEY LL STO “1 THINK YOUD Wit It functions by cleaning the mouth,
$ c ¥ Pp eK. WON \ .
cituitmmcaonn uf \ one UP THE SWIM, AT NOTHING «THEY'VE Anca Pe? BETTER LET 7G coe oe Ee the = —. toning ~
ul LOSE ALLHIS — ME TAKE . _— e liver. Finally, ews gen
TING, BUT Sos EV 10 THOSE a eC) eR y gently
EN







clears the bowels.

Take this “fizzy” drink whenever
you need refreshing. One teaspoonful
in a glass of water is all you need

4 to use.
PT ti z
ESTATES & TRADING COMPANY A wi DREWS :
Bain LIVER SALT
(ECKSTEIN BROS.) THE IDEAL FORM OF LAXATIVE,

El SE SP PS



‘ cere
TT

}
&



THURSDAY, MAY 17,



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508



For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each





196 cents Sundaws 24 worrts wer 2
eee oe wag ey bey Words Scents a word meek. « vente @
meee ae = = or Word Sinden

The charge for apnouncements cf; ~
Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices i: AUTOMOTIVE
61.50 on week-days and $1.20 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and -
3 cents per word on week-days and CAR--Vauxhall 12 hp. $,009 miles.
4 cents per word om Sundays for each Owner driven, Perfect order. Phone 8474.
additiona: word. 17.5.51--3n
CAR—Morr!s 8 Saloon. New Tyres
Hughes. Stansfeld Scott &
DIED 17 an.
—_— wiaagine i
2 + * ideal
GREENIDGE—On the 15th May 1951) f.mily car, one owner and in absolutely

Samuel Donald Greenidge (late retired
Clerk at Messrs. T. Herbert Ltd.) The
funeral took place the said evening
at the Westbury Cemetery.

R. B. Harrison. 17.5.51—In.



reasonable. Apply F. D. L. Gay, Staple
WHARTON—On the 16th May 1951.) Grove, Christ Chureh, Dial 3207.
Beatrice Ameiia (Aunt Emmie) 1.5.51-—t.f.n.
Wharton, late Cloth Merch:2* of 21] ——-——— ——___ "
Swan Street. The funeral leaves from CAR: 1948 Vauxhall “10°. A-1 con
the Funeral Parlour of Hinds & Co.,/ dition. Recently overhauled and painted
Tweedside Road, at 4.39 o'clock tnis| Bob Edghill, Hanschell, Larsen & Co

evening for Saint Leonard's Church.} Ltd. Phone 4104 16.5.51—-3n
Friends are invited ———$—$<$____—___ _ moon
Dr, Arthur ©, Thornhill and family MOTOR CYCLE—B.S.A 3% H.P
(U'S.A.) Edna Thornhill. Can be seen at B.A.T. Co. or Harts
It 17.5.51—1n.| Gap. Apply: Mervyn Cox 2414.
17.5.51—1n





THANKS

MeCASKIE. We acknc acknowledge with the anks
the cards and other tokens of sympathy ;
sent us on the occasion of the death;
of Joshua Cashmin McCaskie.

Ambrozine (wife), Winster,

Rowena, Elaine, Stella (children: .

17.5.51—fn.



Minna, |!



IN ' MEMORIAM

ROUCHER—In



loving memory of our

dear beloved Seymour Boucher, who

fell asleep on the 16th May 1948.

Two years hath speed since thou
hast left the same scene

Of mortal fears and tears yet are
thou dear

But in our memory still lives a
devoted—

Wife, mother and sister, Euclidia, Gwen
and Mrs, B. Ifill. 17.5.51—1n
PITT—In loving memory of our dear
one, Maria, who was called to higher
service one year ago to-day. i
The helpful word, the pleasant smile,
Thou knowest Lord, how we long;
But thou hast called our dear one
home. 2
Lord, thou canst
Ever remembered by
and friends.



do no wrong!
loving relatives

17.5.51—1n



YFARWOOD—In ever loving memory of
Anthony Yearwood (Tony) who was
lost at sea.

“No one knows how much I miss him

No one knows the bitter pain,

I've suffered since I lost him

Life will never be the same.”

Ever to be remembered by—
arse (grandmother). 17.5.51—1n,

TAKE NOTICE
LEO

That LOVENS KEMISKE FABRIK VED
A. KONGSTED, a firm organised under



the laws of Denmark, whose trade or
business address is 19, Bronshojvej,
Copenhagen, Denmark, has applied for

the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of pharmaceu-
tical preparations and substances, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 17th day of May
1951, unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.
Dated this 3rd day of May, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
17.5, 51—3n,







~ TAKE NOTICE
PETRO

That PETROLEUM HEAT AND POWER
COMPANY, a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is Southfield Avenue, Stamford,
Connecticut, U.S.A., has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part “A”
of Register in respect of oil burners and
parts thereof; boilers, furnaces and parts
thereof; heating, lighting and ventilating
apparatus and parts thereof; heating,
lighting and lubriéating oils and greases;
gasoline; fuel oils; petroleum = and
petroleum products, and will be entitled
to register the same after one month
from the 17th day of May 1951, unless
some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office of

opposition of such registration, The
teade mark can be s@en on application
at my office.

Dated this 9th day of May, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
17.5.51—3n
O04

OOOOOOOOOOTOF

KEEP ON

FURNISHING

x The Money-Saving Way

Wardrobes, Dresser-robes, Linea
Presses, Gay Vanities, Simpler
Dressing Tables, Bedsteads, Beds,
Washstands, Nightchair Comfort,
Hat and Shoe and Towel Racks,
Screen Frames.

69CSSS

Dining, Luncheon, Fancy and
Kitchen Tables in big range ot
shapes, finishes and sizes, China,
Kitchen and Bedroom Cabinets.
Liquer Case %



and
Re-

Morris Furniture, Rush
Caned furniture, Rocking,
clining, Berbice, Upringht, Arm
and Tub Chairs, Settees, all at

MONEY SAVING PRICES

L. 5. WILSON §

SPRY ST.

*
.
‘
DIAL 4069

| a AOS OCES





| For Sale or Lease

STRATHMORE

Culloden Road.

Handsome, =-siorey stone
re with ‘shingle roof
and pine floors. Contains 2
| reception, dining room, 4
| bedrooms, 3 baths and toi-
' lets. Extensively remodelled.
| Walled grounds of about
15,000 sq. ft. Pleasant town
residence suitable for Doc-
tor’s Home or Guest House.



John 4. Biadon

REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
‘Phone 4640

and Battery
Co., Broad Street.
CAR— Humber Hawk “Sa loon,

1951



FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cente and















first class condition. Cole



CAR—Vauxhall
tyres,

14 six with 4 good
in good working condition, price





















ELECTXICAL

_—
RADIO—One Philip Radio (9 tubes) in

good condition, no _ reasonable offer
refused. Apply to E. Lisle Edwards
C/o Ince & Co. 16.5.51—2n





REFRIGERATOR- Canadian G.E. 5 cu
ft. One year guarantee left Runs very
economically. Bennett 8349

17.5.51—3n

REFRIGERATOR—One U.S. 7 cubic
foot Frigidaire Refrigerator Apply:
Harold Weatherhead c/o Weatherhead's
Drug Store. Phone 2164—3144.

17.5.51—t.f.n

|

1,000 PYE RADIOS—Further evidence e
of the superlative popularity of PYE
radio rectivers is given by the fact that
the Harrison Liner “Planter” has on
board this trip one thousand Pye radios
destined for users in the Southern Carib-
bean area alone. Pye Ltd.



17.5.51—3n



POULTRY

CHICKS—White and Black Giants:
Rhode Islands, Plymouth Rocks, New,
Hampshire and R.O.P. White Leghorns
from U.S.A Gordon Matthews, Glen-
maur, Constitution Road.



16.5.51—2n



POULTRY: Parks breed, Pure bred,
Barred Rocks Chicks 5, 6 and 7 weeks
old. Apply to A. Forde, Sobers Lane
Opposite Pipe. 16.5.51—2n

MISCELLANEOUS



BALLOONS—We have just received 4
large assortment of Balloons for Parties



and Dances ete. KNIGHT'S LTD.
16.5 delist
BOOKS—A limited number of True
Story, True Detective, True Romance
ete. The Bornn Bay Rum Co. Dial 2938»
17.5,51—2n



~ CHRISTOPHER CoOL’ UMBUS Caraval
Nina at present moored at Holetown,
St. James. No reasonable offer refused.
Apply Ralph Hunte c/o Manning & Co. }
Ltd, Dial 4284, 12..51—t fn

“FILE FASTENERS"—Just received a



supply of File Fasteners. Phone 4442}
T. Geddes Grant Ltd., for your require-|
ments. 13.5.51—6n,. ,





GALVANISED SHEETS—Best quality
new sheets, Cheapest in the Island!
6 ft $5.04; 7 ft $5.88; 8 ft $6.72; 9 ft $7.56; |
10 ft $8.40. Nett cash. Better hurry !!
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

4.5.51—t.f.n.

SHUTTER: One Steel Roller Shutter
18 ft. long by 9 ft. high. Apply: Evelyn,
Roach & Co., Ltd. 13.5.51—3ny





SCALES: One % ton and one 1-ton Plat
form Scale. Apply: Evelyn, Roach & Co.
Ltd. 13.5.51—3n

PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agete line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-daya
and $1.80 on Sundays.





THE SUGAR INDUSTRY
AGRICULTURAL BANK ACT, 1945.

To the creditors holding sptcialty liens
against Sea View Plantation, St. Lucy

TAKE NOTICE that I, the Owner of
the above Plantation am about to
obtain a loan of £250 under the pro-
visions of the above Act against the said
Plantation, in respect of the Agricul-
tural ;year 1951 to 1952.

No money has been borrowed
the Agricultural Aids Act,
above Act (as the case may
spect of such year.

Dated this 16th day of May 1951

A. SIMMONS,
Owner



under
1905 or the
be) in re-

16.5.51—3n



NOTICE

Applications for one vacant St. Joseph's
Vestry Exhibition tenable at the St
Michael's Girls’ School, will be received
by the Clerk of the Vestry up to 3 o'clock
Pp m.on Tuesday 29th day of May 1951.
Candidates must be daughters of Parish-
joners in straitened circumstances and!
must have attained the age of 8 ‘years, |
and must be under 12 years by July Bist |
1951, to be proved by a Baptismal Cer-
tificate, which must accompany the
Application, all Candidates to
examined must be at the School not later
than 9.15 a.m. on Saturday, June 16th
1951. Forms of Application can be
obtained from the Vestry Clerk's Office

A _ T. KING,
Clerk, St. Joseph's Vestry
16.5.51—6n

NOTICE

Applications for one or more vacant St.
Michael's Vestry Exhibition tenable at
the Combermere School, will be received
by the Clerk of the Vestry up to 12
o'clock noon on Thursday 22nd day of
May, 1951.

Candidates must be sons of parishion-
ers in straitenéd circumstances and must
not be less than ten years and four
months nor more than twelve years
oli on the Ist day of January 1951, to
be proved by a Baptismal Certificate,
which must accompany the application.

Parents and/or Guardians will be noti-
fied of the time and place of the Exam-
ination.

Forms of application can bg obtained
from the Vestry Clerk's Office.

‘By Order,
E, C. REDMAN,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry.
§,51—Tn





NOTICE _

PARISH OF ST. THOMAS
APPLICATIONS for
Vestry Exhibitions, tenable at
Michael's Girls’ School
value of £5 will be received by the
undersigned not later than 29th May 1951.
Applicants must be children of Parish-
ioners in straitened circumstances
between the ages of 8 and 12 years.

A birth certificate must be forwarded,
with an application form, obtained from
the Parochial Office.

The entrance examination will be held
at St. Michael's Girls' School on Satur-
day, June 16th at 9.15 a.m.

F. F.. PILGRIM,
to Vestry, St. Thomas.
17.5.51—4n

one or more

St
of the annual

Clerk

TO-DAY’S FLASH N

from 30 lbs. to
are obta

CENTRAL



[| res



, Christ Church. This property



FOU!
PIER HEAD LANE $

teerees.
SEEKS

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-cdays
and 12 cente per agate line on Sundays,
minimum cnarge $1. on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays

REAL ESTATE



SHARES
Trading Co
CLARKE
Street

~102 Barbados Shipping &
Ltd. Shares. Appi;; G. L. W
& CO., Solicitors, Jamies

vit.5.51—4n



By Public competition at our office
James Street, Bridgetown on Friday tne
Ist day of June 1951, at 2 p.m
1% perches of land at Welchman Hall
St. Thomas, Abutting on lands of James
Forde, J E. Brathwaite, J. Payne and
on Welchman Hall main road together
with the dwelling house thereon the
property of Edwin Alfred Holder
For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:—
HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD
17.5.51—Tn
DWELLINGHOUSE and Land contain-
ing 2 roods, 7 perches adjoining the
property kown as “The Abbe", Christ
Church. This property is a newly built
stonewall dwellinghouse comprising
living rooms, bedrooms, usual conveni-
ences and belongs to Ervin Jerome King.
The above property will be set up for
sale by Public Competition at our Office,

James Street, on Friday 18th May 1951,
at 2 p.m.
Inspection on application to Mr. J. A

Griffith the tenant
YEARWOOD & BOYCE
Solicitors.
11.5.51—Tn



ERNEST DALE, Passage Road standing
yn 22 perches of land. Dwelling house
comprises open verandah, Drawing ana
Dining rooms two bedrooms, kitchen,
toilet and bath.

The above will be
public competition on
at 2 p.m. at the office of the under
signed from whom conditions of Sal
and further particulars can be obtained

HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD
17.5.51—-5n

offered for sale tc
Friday 25th May)



LAND —
for building,

8—10 acres of land suitable
in lots of not less than
10,000 sq. ft. Overiooking a large area
of St. Philip and Christ Church Mag-
nificent environment. 15 to 20 minutes’
drive to Crane Coast. Walking distances
to Lodge and High School. Govt. Water,
Telephone, Electric Light pass the area,
Apply to W. I. Webster, Moncrieffe, St.
John, — ‘Phone 95-252.
29.4.51—9n,
——
The Property known as “The Abbe
comprises
a dwelling house with 2 acres, 2 roods
31% perches of land and belongs to Mr.
Renry H. D. King. The above property
will be set up for Sale by Public Com-
petition at our Office on Friday 18th May





1951, at 2.30 p.m

For inspection apply Mr. H. H. D.
King on the premises

YEARWOOD & BOYCE
Solicitors

11.5,51—7n

200. Shares CENTRAL FOUNDRY
LIMITED.

50 Shares BARBADOS SHIPPING AND





TRADING CO. LIMITED.

41 Shares WEST INDIA RUM RE-
FINERY LIMITED.

27 Shares 6% TELEPHONE CO
LIMITED.

18 Shares BARBADOS FOUNDRY
LIMITED

The above shares will be set up at
Public Cfmpetition at the Office of the
undersigned on Fr iday, the 18th May at

2 p.m
CARRINGTON & SEALY
Lucas Street.

13.5.51—4n



for sale by Public Com-
petition at my office, Victoria Street
on Friday, 18th at 2 p.m. The cottage
called LILA situated at McLean's
Gap, Brittons Cross Road — house con-
tains open gallery — Drawing Dining,
3 bedrooms, W.C & Bath — wash
basin, Kitchen with running water and
standing on about 10,000 sq. feet of
land. For inspection between 10 to 4
p.m. on application to the tenant, For
condition of sale apply to R. Archer
McKenzie, Dial 2947. 12.5.51—4n.



I will offe:





2 roods ;

BARBADGS ADVOCATE
‘LosT & FOUND WANTED
| es































or
ness address is 19, Bronshojvej,| 9 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
penhagen, Denmark, has applied for week—4 Cente o
the registration of a trade mark in Part

“A” of Register in respect of pharmaceu



bw
words & cents a word
word Sundays.





The





iK VED |S
A. KONGSTED, a firm organised under





Gov



IRNMENT NOTICE







PERSONAL |



public are hereby



PARKER

PAGE SEVEN





I}





Minimum charge week 72 cents and | ——————
FOUND cen Sundays 24 words — over 24 The public are her€by warned agains st |
e ris 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a] Siving credit to my wife, RETA LARRIER | ry
bes - Cae nese word Sundays. (nee Barrow as I do not hold myself |
EXPEN'! IVE FOUNTAIN PEN om | responsible for her or anyone else con- m I dit
or Rockley Beach Saturday evening | HELP tracting any debt or debts in my name ° ,
May 12. Owner please contact David! = nless t\ a written order signed by me
Fvans junior c/o T. R. Evans Broad | FITZGERALD LARRIER,
Street 17.5.51—In MISCELLANEOUS Rices, St. Philip
— od | 16 .5.51—2n
LICENSE; One (1) LI r License. | “~~ ee seen cnn
TAKE NOTICE Anu SB. Cole & Cota) Dini daes.| The public are hereby warned against
| of 10.5.51-2n| &!Ving credit to my wife, CYRIE PHIL-
5 tes ane | LIPS (nee Yearwood), as I do not hold
LEOCILLIN myself responsible for her or anyone
= else ccstracting any debt or debts in
That LOVENS KEMISKE FAN® — eee ee eee co
the laws of Denmark, whose trade Minimum charge week 72 cents aad gned MOTTLEY PHILLIPS,

Halls Village,
St, James.
16.5.51—2n

warned against

OTHER PEOPLE DO!

tical preparations and substances, and HOUSES ivir redit to my wife, ZENDORF
will be entitled to register the same after HARPER ies Weve -oe tae fot hee
et ene from the lith day of May BUNGALOW Swansea, Worthing myself responsible for her or anyone
— aoe pl ae person shall in tha | fully furnished 4 bedrooms Fridge,| else contracting any de\t or debts in
at_my office of opposition of such resis. | Dial suo ce’ see ee eee ee ee OMe Ore y
3 c 8 Pgis- al 2 or 3 3 me ‘

tration. The trade mark can bo seen 9n | —————— ae: es —— an ome GEORGE HARPER. Ot R HOME »_
application at my office ROOM AND BOARD for young — Jackson, St. Michael

Dated this ard day of Muy, 1951 couple or Bachelors, Excellent food *"711.5.51—2n

H. WiLLLAMS, On sea. Apply: Casuarina Residential] — _ Beacons
Registrar of Trade Marks | Club, Maxwell Coast Road. Tel, 8378 NJ Y
173.81 wea | TAKE NOTICE FURNISHING DEPT.

CAN OFFER

That PARKER PEN COMPANY, a cor-
: poration duly organized under the laws BI
ATTENTION is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) | of the State of Wisconsin. United States THE FOLLOWING NEW ARRIVALS
o merica, whose trade or business
(Amendment) Order, 1951, No. 12 which will be published in the!address is the Corner of urt and . ge

Vfficial Gazette of Thursday, 17th May, 1951. . USA.

price of “Oats (Feed)” are as foll@ws:—

ARTICLE | WHOLESALE PRICE Retail Price

(not mre than) caat@ more than)

cae oan) [oat more than)
Â¥
‘1

and
precious
metal) ;

imitation precious

metal or



pencils;

person shall in the

OATS (Feed) .86 per bag of 160.

|
| $12





of Register in respect
mechanical pencils

desk stands



Division Streets, Janesville, State of Wis-
. consin has applied for the reg-
2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail c= of a trade

mark in Part “A"

of fountain pens FLOWERED CRETONNE 48” wide @ $3.12 per yd.
of imitation reciows | yr’ 4 4
cnet of precious or HY "TAPESTRY 48” wide @ $3.12 per yd.

and ink, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 17th day of May,

H.B. TOWELLIN Peach, Green & Gold



—Blue,

1951, unless some
meantime give notice

in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-



4 a sition of such registration, The trade ed i (a) iy
Ibs. 9. per Ib mnarke ean be seen on se rpliesken ‘at oe 18” wide @ $1.00 per yd.
ef iti’
17.5.51—In Dated this 9th day of May, 1951 = » a ” : j
so pi ce a ee es pan Se evga H. WILLIAMS, WHITE H.B. TOWELLING 18” wide @ 77c. per yd.
eee Registrar of Trade Marks
17.5.51—3n
WHITE H.B. TOWELS—Hemstitched 88c. each
TAKE NOTICE LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
SPR. Sppeonton of FitzPatrick Max-
well, holder of Liquor License No, 585 ‘Ny TELS stite
east erate ae, Hicense Noses 1) WHITE H.B. LINEN TOWELS—Hemstitched
board and shingle shop at corner Deacons m
Road and Black Rock, St. Michael, for @ $1.51 & $1.72 each
| permission to use said Liquor License
yat a beard and shingle shop at Black
{ Rock, St. Michael,



That RALSTON PURINA COMPANY,
of the State of Missouri,
is City of St

a corporation organized under the
United States of America,
Louis, State of Missouri, U.S.A., has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A" of Register in respect pf food products for
animal use, animal feed containers, watering féuntains for animals,
disinfectants and vermifuges, and will be entitled to register the same

N.B.—This
sidered at a
at Police Court,

human and
insecticides,

after one

month from the 17th day of May 1951, unless some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my office of cpposition of such registration, The] 4" =
trade mark can be seen on application at my oMece E

Dated this 9th day of May, 1951
H, WILLIAMS,
Marks

17.5.51

Registrar of Trade





NEEDS

Confederation





a ements



accept
Domin-
Nevis
léth

June, Sydney 23rd June, arriving at Trin-
idad during the latter
proceeding
Liverpool.

Cargo and Passengers for
Montserrat;
Sailing Friday

half of July, and
thereafter to Barbados and - een’

instant



L RL DS WSS RoSSSoRSSRSSHSS ROSE SO SSS OOESS BRIDGETOWY. SARBADOS.
ROYA NETHE If 8 M.V. Caribbee will accept Cargo
STEAMSHIP co. and Passengers for Dominica,
e Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and St, —
S.S. ARABIA _is_ scheduled to wat? Kitts. Sailing Friday 18th instant
from Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 26th ORIEN AL
May, Melbourne 6th June, Brisbane 16th The M.V. Moncka will



Kitts



AUC'sI0N





146 STUDEBAKEF PLATFORM LORRY

We are instructed by the Insurance

Agents to sell this vehicle which has

been damaged in an accident by public

auction at the Courtesy Garage ct 2 p.m.
on Friday, 18th May, 1951.

JOHN M. BLADON,
Auctioneer
13.5. 51—4n

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

instructions received from the
Insurance Co., I will sell on Friday, Mai’
18th at 2 p.m. at the General Motor
Bus Co., Nelson Street (1) A-40 Austin
Car. Damaged in accident. Terms cash.
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer.
16.5.51—3n,

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

DOGDE TRUCKS
We will sell on FRIDAY the 18th
Courtesy Garage, Whitepark Road, one
1944 Dodge Army Truck with Steel
Platform in good order and condition,
Sale 1 o'clock. Terms cash.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers



By



at

16.5.51-

TAKE NOTICE
PETROHEAT

That PETROLEUM HEAT AND POWER
COMPANY, a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is Southfield Avenue, Stamford,
Connecticut, U.S.A., has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part “A”
of Register in respect of oil burners and

parts thereof; boilers, furnaces and parts
Thecect: heating, lighting and ventilating
apparatus and parts thereof; heating
lighting and lubricating oils and greases;
gasoline; fuel oils; petroleum and
petroleum products, and will be entitled
to register the same after one montn
from the 17th day of May, 1951, unless
some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office of
opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be ,.s¢en on apnlication
at my office,

Dated this

~2n

9th day of May, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
17.5, 51—3n,

TAKE NOTICE

Bir

That BIRO PENS LTD, Manufac-
turers, a British Company, whose trade
or business address is 67 Brook Street,
London, W. 1, England, has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of writing
instruments, parts therefor ‘not being
of precious metal or coated therewith),
and will be entitled to register the same
| after one month from the 17th day of
May 1951, unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.
Dated this 9th day of May, 1951

H. WILLIAMS.
Registrar of Trade Marks.
17.5. 51—3n





5%;
PROS,

EWS

STEAM PRESSURE GAUGES

500 Ibs.
ainable at

DRY LTD.

capacity



SOLS

















In addition to general cargo this vessel
h les for chilled and hard M.V. Cael De! Caribe will ’ DIAL
frozen cargos nes OF Shales and Mar) aceept Garay’ and, Passengers for THANTS “xa

Cargo accepted on through Bills of Lad- St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada ae
ing for transhipment at Trinidad to Brit- and Aruba. Sailing on or about x 6 a
ish Guiana, Leeward and Windward 18th instant, |
TR isiner particulars apply — AvBer:t66+ ; ADIES’ HA S
PuRNgas, WitHY & Co. Etb, B.W1. SCHOONER OWN: on Semin’ sine so L

rinidad, ERS ASSOC, jo ,

Bwi. | ’ Fill Refri t . .

ad | Tele. 4047. foo pans with in CRINOLINE fine Straws
DA COSTA & CO,, LTD., j . ’ :
Bridgetown, ODA GONG .
is die en hl DISTILLED =WATER FELTS White and Colours
and taste the difference ' HO S
Akcoa steamship (/o |] SRP a LADIES’ DRESS SHOE
9 === open Toe & Back in White and Black
nL. ———— SSS SSS]
NEW YORK SERVICE : | BF.) MARE SER mere Q NY I ONS

SS. “TRYA” sailed 27th April Arrives Barbados 8th May | ASEOOEATION GOOD UALITY
A Steamer Sails 18th May ac “ 2th ,, |



NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

















S.S. “ALCOA PATRIOT” Sailed 18th April Arrives Barbados 4th May
S.S. “ALCOA POLARIS" Sails 2nd May - ” " 18th ,,
S.S. “ALCOA ROAMER” ‘Sails 16th May - * ” Ist June will be the subject of a Talk f CHILDREN SHOES
- . to be given by .
Dr. C. “BERTIE” CLARK
: CANADIAN SERVICE To-night Thursday, May 17, 1951 pelissip eodiaeeiainti —_—__——————
SOUTHBOUND At St. Mary's Boys’ Sehool
Name of Ship Sails Montreal Sails Halifax Arrives B’dos, Room, Mason Hall Street
y at 8 o'élock, All are invited. FOR A FULL RANGE OF
*S.S. “ALCOA PEGASUS" April 27th April 30th May lith EL deLISLE YEARWOOD,
*S “ALCOA PIONEER" May llth May 14th May 24th Hony. Secretary.
S.S. “FOLKE BERNADOTTE” May 25th May 0th June = 10th “97,5, 51—1n I
NORTHBOUND E ITE SHIRTS
§ “ALCOA PLANTER” due May 11th, sails for St, John, & St, Lawrence
River Ports





*These vessels have limited passenger accommodation,



ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE







AND TWISTS

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products,

With Glossy

Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for phone to match









Dated this 16th day of May,
. A. MeLEOD,

application
Licensing Court to be held
District
th 28th day of May

Police Magistrate, Dist.



\| FOR YOUR INSURANCE
CONSULT

ANDREW D- SHEPPARD
Representing

Cyo F. B. ARMSTRONG LTD.,







SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened















CRICKET
REMINISCENCES



10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

——_——

TELEPHONE CORDS
OURED PLASTICS TO SAVE
THAT ANNOYANCE OF KNOTS

and
ENAMEL-IT, Paint

1951
Esq.,

To E
laws | Police Magistrate, Dist, “A"
whose trade or business address Signed FITZ PATRICK MAXWELL,
{

Appiicant

will be con-

Wm. FOGARTY Ltd.

oo

“A” on Monday,
1951,

at 11 o'clock,



nett SOOO SOCORRO PROPOR DEE PPVOOD

HOLIDAY

Hh



A. McLEOD,
han,



17.5.51—1n

Life Association

Tel, 2840

—









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in White, Blue, Green and Striped

NEW STYLED SPORT SHIRTS
All at BARGAIN PRICES

THE BARGAIN HOUSE







IN COL- ,)
y



ym
My
4



Quick-Drying
your Tele-
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Pea London, or Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual } sOuNGONE. Se AnIONERY 30, Swan Street — S. ALTMAN, Proprietor
& “Ay .
reduction for chi:dren ; AND Sint O ASE iB. PHONE 2702
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TRINIDAD — LA GUAIRA — CURACAO
CARTAGENA — JAMAICA
10 DAYS’ VACATION ON BOARD OF THE LUXRY LINER
8.S. “COLOMBIE”





FORTNIGHTLY SAILINGS
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a ar nents SLOOLPLEP SA
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the ‘5-STAR’ car

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et

PAGE FIGHT



VALENTINE, RAMADHIN
AWARDED HONOUR
IN CRICKETER’S BIBLE

LONDON

Four of the five cricketers of the year chosen by Wisden’s
Annual the “Bible” of cricket to be published on Friday are

West Indians—Everton

Weekes, Frank Worrell, Sonny

Ramadhin and Alfred Valentine.
For the fifth cricketer of the year Wisden chose, Englishman
—Godfrey Evans, Test and Kent wicket-keeper.

Australian XI
Vs W.I. XI
Game Drawn





By CLYDE WALCOTT
Australia 2% ee hat
WI. (for 7 wkts.) 1G

LONDON, May
A cricket match between !
Australian XI and the West |
dies XI, played on Sunday ena
in a draw.
On Sunday, a cold depress

day, a West Indies XI were se
duled to engage an Australian
in a match at Urmston, Lancashi!

tl

Needless to say, the spectators all
surrendered their usual Suncay
occupations to see the match whic
might be somewhat indicative c!
the outcome of their encounte

Australia in the winter
The Australian XI was 1
all-round side; Bill Alley, Brucé
Dooland, George Tribe, Cecil Pep
per, Mick Raymer, Jack Pettiford,



Harry Lambert, D. Fitzmaurice
W. Cockburn, W. Walmsley anc
J. Lambert.

The West Indian XI was dom
inated by Barbadians, there being

Frank Worrell, Everton Weekes,
Clyde Walcott, Roy Marshall
E. A. Martindale and Harold
Brewster. who is playing as ah
amateur for Radcliffe on week

ends, The Skipper, Ellis Achong, is
from Trinidad, as well as Rama
dhin, while K. Rickards and L
Méssada are from Jamaica. Bruct

Pairaudeau was the sole repre
sentative from B.G

Australia won the toss and
batted first on a wicket, which
was helpful to bowlers. E. A
Martindale and Frank Worrell

opened the bowling, but did not
meéet with any success. Ramadhin
relieved Worrell end in his first
ever he captured two wickets
getting Walmsley 1.b.w. and Alley
stumped by Walcott for a duck
The Australians went on to score
146 runs; Ramadhin taking 7
wickets for a negligible amount of
runs. Bruce Dooland top scored
with 68 and had no difficulty in
playing Ramadhin. Roy Marshall
took Dooland’s wicket,
ed wiih 3 for 60,

Roy Marshall and Bruce Pair-
audeau opened the West Indies’
batting to the bowling of H, Lam-
bert and W. Cockburn both of
whom are left arm fast bowlers.
With the score at 8, Pairaudeau
was caught in the slips off Cock-
burn for 4 with a ball that moved

late ftom the leg side, Frank
Worrell partnered Marshall, but
with the score at 28, Marshail

was calight at cover off Lambert
for 17, Everton Weekes and Wor-
rell wére associated in the most
fruitful partnership of the innings,
Frank’s contribution being 9 caus

tious 28, and Everton's a more
foteeful 36, both losing their
wiekets to Cecil Pepper. Clyde
Walcott was unfortunately run

out at 8 due to a misunderstanding
with his partner K. Rickards, who
was soon bowled by Walmsley for
11 runs. With very little time left
fot play, Martindale stayed long
enéugh for 6 runs, giving Peppet
the last wicket of the day, Messada
was 2 not out and the West Indian
total 116 for 7 wickets

ft was a very entertaining
match and given time, the West
Indies might have been the win-
ners, Althouph the bowling and
fielding of their opponents were
such that one should reserve an
epihion.

The West Indies’ next fixture

will be played at Barnoldw
May 20th.

ick



———————
Traffie Do's
No.

4

Give signals of your in-
tention to stop, slow down,
overtake, turn ete.

Space made available by
CANADA DRY
fcr Safer Motoring.

They'll Do It Every Time

a

and finish- .



This
Indians

comes

selection of four West
for cricketing honours
a fitting compliment to
West Indian track triumphs in last
veek-end's British games,

In its article on Weekes, Wisden
tates: “Perhaps no batsman simee
Bradman has made such an im-
pression on his first English tour
ag a ruthless compiler of big scores.

‘There were many sceptical of
his ability to reproduce on English
county grounds the form by which
made so many high scores at
home and broke records in India
and in the Lancashire League.
Weekes in a predominately wet
summer soon proved them wrong,

as

If anything is certain in cricket

t is that this likeable player, so
cominating at the crease and so
quiet off field will continue to

break batting records,”
Of Frank Worrell it says, “Few,

if any, eminent ctickéters can

| view the game with such detached

ittitude as this slim lithely built
all-rounder. To him a match, be
it Test or a club fixture is just
another game of cricket to be en-
joyed.

“Furthermore he never reads
sports columns in newspapers, so
that he is unaffected by opinions
favourable or adverse of critics.

He is one of the foremost bats-
men in present day cricket.

At times a little uncertain at
the start of an innings, he is when
set, most difficult to dismiss and
elegant style, command of every
erthedox streke and perfection in
timing makes him a delight io
watch. As a bowler, by varying his
style to fast-medium, he accom

plished some valuable perform-
ances”,
Sonny Ramadhin, young right

arm, slow bowler, is déscribed as
“perplexing his rivals from the
start—a man who grew into 4
bogey with a reputation which
worried most batsmen before ho
bowled against them. Ramadhinr
eaptured wickets and the admira-
tion of cricket enthusiasts both
young and old.”

Wisden points out that Alfred
Valentine, slow lefthander, sent
down 92 overs (552 balls) in the
second innings against Bnagland in
the Third Test Match at Notting-
ham and so created a record of the
highest number of six ball overs
goowled in one innings in Test
cricket,

It comments: “Valentine was a
fine bowler and an object lesson
to Englishmen in value of true
finger spin, He became one of the
most successful bowlers ever to
leave the West Indies, His record
of 33 wickets in four Test matches
has seldom been surpassed”.

—Reuter.



STANDARD BRIDG

By M. Harrison-Gray
Dealer : North.
North-Beath game.

AQ63
SK Qo4e

a

w. e.
SPie Sa
e373 k Q98 6
#952 é 31083

$43
A104
worind Bcnistneny ews
orth’ Z
due to wie ‘et fact that

he did not sonst er ni ee
st en ‘ora rr
. He ngre bid One
Spade, Bast Two Diamonds
and South Two No-Trumps.
North dare not say Three
Hearts for fear of being PUL
back to Spades. so he bid
Three No-Trumps
West led @J and South
won the second round of
Diamonds. He cashed
Dummy’s @ A. #Q, @ K and
Â¥Q. and came back lo his
hand with @A to make his
seventh trick With &K
Rast meanwhile had thrown
@4 and @6, so Seuth pul
him on play with @ 10 tHe
could mash tWo sO
and @43, but then had, 6
lead Spades
Egst ould) make thine-
harder by batihg @®® an-
the eonwar: could ae de
West had otadé mi
lead of @5

cur Outro 8 oenensCeeeeeEseEeerDseCeRSOUSCERSEDEEEeEescererse SSEpEEeEsEESBeeT seer ens

set if
~“errect










aus easeneeey,
presenerensrseeenemecanens ened secenePEeeeeensOOts (FEES SCT CEST ESOERTREESEEER SE Seren eges naeDeeE sete eee! eneee



mii



Lime ASPIDISTRA HAS HER
PARENTS WORRIED: SHE'S FOUR
AND DOESN'T SPEAK VERY CLEARLY.

LY, LULL




L=/ You/RE WHAT,
me DEAR? I DION AGLOO »
CATCH THAT=:SOME- UTHAGLA MY
| THING ABOUT A SHLOE-IS AW
WHA, © SAY IT DUBLAR »sFLOO
AGAIN, PEAR» LOLLY SHLEEP



0 wwe

AWAH FRUBBY
SCHLUMF*=+











ern

That 4S, UNTIL
SHE BROADCASTS
FAMILY SECRETS*
THEN SHE‘S MISS
PERFECT DICTION

Weekes, Worrell Named Cricketers Of

BARREL SPORTS



We ote â„¢

PHOTO shows girls tryi






ng their feet and skill at barrel-rolling dur.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





ee

ing the sports held to celebrate the Wine Festival held at Robertson

Cape Province, South Africa.

—Express.



Carlton



Defeat

Spartan 2—1

In a game marked with thrills in both halves, Carlton
defeated Spartan two goals to one when they met in a foot-
ball match at Kensington Oval yesterday afternoon. The

crowd was noisy all through

and fast and the standard of

Carlton drew first blood in the
first half of play and went on to
score their second goal just after
the seeond half had started
Shortly after Spartan kicked in
their goal. For Carlton, Reynold
Hutchinson playing at inside
right scored both goals _ for
Carlton while Keith Walcott at
his usual position at centre-
forward netted the only goal for
Spartan,

Tâ„¢ the second half of the game
the crowd saw the Carlton for-
wards combining well and their
ball control was rather good.
Bright, their full back, played a
ood gumhe t her with Lucas.
hey both kicked hard and
accurate when the occasion arose.

The game started with Spartan
defending from the south end.
Just after the kickoff, Griffith
passed to Chase on the right wing
but before Chase could reach the
Carlton area he was challenged
by_ both backs.

Spartan was awarded

a free
kiek when

Clairmonte handled
the ball, but Hutchinson came
back and took a shot at the
Spartan area which missed the
goal by inches, Chase took
anothey try at King, but this was
fruitless, Carlton was given a
free kick and Bright their full
back, kicked this but Johnson
headed it out for a corner and Rh.
Hutchinson opened the

scoring
for Cariton by heading the bal!
into the Spartan goal from the
corner, Cozier eould net move

to make a save.

Carlton scored this goal about
10 minutes before the end of the
first half. Shortly after the first
goal was scored Spartan’ was
noticed frequenting the Carlton
area as their forwards looked
determined to equalise.

Spartan got a free kick which
Cadogan kicked but nothing came
out of it. Bright at full back
cleared brilliantly when Walcott
was dribbling ) unmarked.
When Referee Coppin blew for
half time the score was unchanged
— Carlton one goal and Spartan
rua,

After half time, Spartan began
to press b ‘ the Carlton forwards
were combining well and when
the second half was about 15 min-
utes old. Reynold Hutchinson
again put Carlton two up by scor-%
ing his second goal outside the}
Spartan area, the ball going into
the left corner of the nets, com-
pletely beating the Spartan cus-

todian Govier.
3} after Keith Walcott
scored the first goal for Spartan

on receiving a long pass. King



By Jimmy Hatlo

Wi

|

}
CH) |
|

,
















1B! SIXTY-TWO
FIFTY A WEEK!
MAMA WAS GONNA
GO OUT TO WORK!
WE'RE GONNA HAVE
A NEW BABY IN
OUR HOUSE::1-2-
3-4TESTING*:






the game. The pitch was firm
play was fairly good,

moved to save but was too slow.
Spartan now renewed their efforts
but at the end of play the score
was unchanged. Carlton had
scored two goals and Spartan one,

The teams were: —

Carlton: King, Bright, Kennedy,
Hutchinson, Clairmonte, Cox, K
Hutchinson, Lucas, McLeod, R.
Hutchinson and Marshall,

Spartan: Cozier, Bowen, Gib-
bons, Medford, Cadogan, Gittens,
Chase, Johnson, Walcott, Griffith
and Beyee.

The referee was Mr. O. S, Cop-
pin.



What’s on Today

Police Courts 10.00 a.m,

Public Session Regional
Economic Committee 10.00
a.m.

Second Day of A.A.A.B,
Cycle dnd Athletic Sports
Meeting 1.00 p.m.

Basketball—Second Division
—Pirates vs. M.H.S. at

M.H.S. 5.00 p.m,

THE BDOS FRIENDLY FroorT-
BALL ASSOCIATION

Today's Fixture
Rangers vs Westerners “HY at |
St. Leonard's, Referee: Mr. O. |

Graham,

Police Band at Esplanade,
Bay Street 7.45 p.m.

Meeting of Junior Section of
Alliance Francaise at
Modern High School, Roe-
buck Street, 8.00 p.m.

CINEMAS
Aquatic Club: First Yank Into ,
Tokyo 8.30 p.m,
Globe; Odd Man Out and Her

_ Lucky Night 4.45 and 8.15 pum
Empire; Bridgetown Players pre- |
sent The Shop At Sly Corner

8.30 pom,
Royal: Valley of Zombies

and
Trafic in Crime 4.80

and 8.0

porn.

Roxy: Kiss of Death and Border
Incident 4.30 and 8.15 p.m,

Olympic: Lady and the Monster
and Road to Alteatras 4.80 and
8.15 p.m.

Gaiety: Tarzan Triumphs and
West of the Peeos 8.40 p.m, j

Plaza Bridgetown: The Return of
the Fronti¢rsman and Song of |
the Saddle 4.45 and 8.80 p.m, |
laza Oistins: The Adventures of |



THURSDAY,







England Cricket Is On Trial

In Present Series

By HERBERT SUTCLIFFE
CRICKET season just beginning, for me, opens with a
mystery. Why have the South African Cricket Association

sent only 15 players on tou

r here? Yes, I know they’ve

come with a spirit of exceptional optimism, but surely it’s
being a little over-optimistic to try to face a hard tour with
only four possible replacements.

Even if the team members are

fortunate enough to escape injury.

1 maintain that it pays dividends
to give young players a chance“to
develop on English wickets. Al-
ways providing, of course, they
possess the necessary skill and ad-
here to the elementary principles,
for bowlers length, flight, spin or
swing, and for batsmen correct
footwork, body positioning and, in
the main, a straight bat.

Perhaps it may sound silly to
talk in those terms of international
cricketers, but several of the Eng-
land batsmen in Australia last
winter discarded those inevitable
principles, with inevitable failure.

: Just Plain Suicide

The “cow shot,” as played by at
least one member of Freddy
Brown’s team, may be excused
when executed cn the village
green by the local blacksmith, but
at Lord’s and Sydney, in hard-
fought Test battles, it is just plain
suicide.

Perhaps that’s the reason for
South African optimism. They
know that the standard in the

Union when England won the rub-
ber by the barest margin in 1948-
49 was not very high, and I sup-
pose that in the light of more re-
cent England performances, at
home and overseas, they feel that
they heve at least an equal chance.

England, they must feel, are just
aS much on tfial as they are, in
spite of the fact that the winning
of the final Test in Australia is
somewhat heartening to folk at
home. But for all that there is
still some hard work ahead for our
selectors — and for the men they
pick.

Any batsman to represent Eng-
land—and I feel that after my long
experience as an England opener I
am qualified to talk of them—
should be given a thorough test
against all types of bowling fast,
fast-medium, medium off-breaks.
leg-breaks and googlies.

If a batsman is scared of fast
bowling and shows ii by backing

away, he would not be in my
team.
In this respect we have in

Yorkshire the finest opening pair
in the world in Len Hutton and
Frank Lowson. Lowson was fully
qualified to take on the responsi-
bility of going to Australia last
winter with his more famous
partner.

In my view, a grave mistake
was made in omitting him, for
Frank is blessed with a very fine
ericket brain and for two years
has moulded his whole style and
method of execution on Hutton.

For that reason I say he cannot
possibly be left out of any Eng-
land team, and I venture to predict
for him a highly successful tour
on the next visit to Australia,
providing the selectors, of course
do not repeat their error of omis-
sion.

But .let us look again at the
South Africans. We know exact-
ly what the old brigade can do.
Dudley Nourse will be as vigor-
ous and fascinating to watch as
ever, and the oldest member of the
side, vice-captain Eric Rowan,
whose shrewd capiainey played a
big part in Transvaal’s Currie
Cup victory, will be one of the
most successful batsmen on either
side.

George Fullerton toured with
Alan Melville’s side. He has shown
much improvement, particularly
during the last South African sea-
son. If addition, he is 2 good
wicket-keeper, but is to be reliev-
ed of this responsibility on this
trip.

Athol Rowan, Eric’s brother, is
the best off-break bowler in the
Union, and also a useful bat, Like
Denis Compton he has been wor-
ried about a defective knee, and
with this in mind it would have
been good policy to have included
Hugh Tayfiela 4s reserve off-spin
bowler.

“Tufty” Mann, another who has
been here before, stamped himself
as ohe of the best slow left-arm
bowlers ever to tour this country.

Pi Bi Na anaes | ee aan eae Me al
exceptionally well with a fair
Rrhre|e’}’w7w“ananaaananaa=ae=——=
) SATNSFACTION
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J&R Broad is
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Barbados.

ITRPS

strensth

Bated in the
Bakory in

Of OOOO CCE





amount of spin, but falls far short,

as far as spin is concerned, of

Gloucestershire’s Charlie Parker.
McLean One To Watch

I shall watch closely the pro-
gress of two bowlers of similar
type, Clive van Ryneveld and
P. N. F. Mansell. Van Rynefeld’s
Oxford experience will be inval-
uable and I expect him to score a
fair number of runs

His leg-break googly bowling,
however, will be more successful
if he can command a Grimmett-
like length.

Roy McLean, although only 20,
immediately took my eye at the
nets. He played brilliant attacking
cricket, and if he can reproduce
this form in the middle, will give
English crowds some first-ciass
entertainment,

Caun MeCarthy, another of the
“Three Maes’—Jackie McGlew is
the third—is the tallest and hand-
scmest member of the party. Only
21, he’s six feet two inches tall
and is the fastest bowler South
Africa has produced for many
years,

He is as fast as Ray Lindwall
or Keith Miller, and I couple this
pair because Miller's fastest de-
livery is equal to Lindwall’s.

There’s Trouble In Store

McCarthy would be the fastest
of the three but for the fact that
he stops, quite noticeably, at the
crucial point of delivery. There
will, no doubt, be many arguments

Se

throughout the country as to
whether there is a suspicion of
illegal bowling, but as he his
played in Test cricket against

England and Australia without a
complaint being registered by

SSOOSSSSSESBSSSSSSS39S",

FREE HOOK — }

which makes
*“*GOD’S WAY OF
SALVATION

PLAIN”

Plesse write for one to
Samuel Roberts, Gospel
Book and Tract Service,
30, Central Avenue, Ban-
gor N. Ireland.”

POLITICAL
MEETING

30S SOOO OOO OOOO

under the auspices of

THE BARBADOS ELEC-
TORS’ ASSOCIATION

at
QUEEN’S PARK

on

FRIDAY NIGHT
MAY 18th.

at 8 o'clock
e

—_—_——— ee”

Speakers: Messrs. J. H.
Wilkinson, F. C. Goddard,
E: D. Mottley, H. A.
Dowding, W. W. Reece,
M.C.Ps and others.

Mr. Griffith
and Sydney Walcott.

Vincent

tT
—————————————

Hear our lady speaker,
Miss L. Reid, make her
political debut.

ee oopnt ieee
OOO RONNIE

Year









en

there’s no reason to
anticipate a storm in a teacup.

All the same, I would like to
see a continuity of delivery with—
out the vital pause, for his pace
would be terrific. He makes the
ball lift disconcertingly from a
good length, and I can visualise
trouble for England batsmen when
the pitch is favourable.

I ean see Geoff Chubb, in spite
of his being the third oldest mern—
ber of the side at 39, doing ex—
ceptionally well with his fast-
medium seam bowling. Fit and
strong, he’s the type who can
bowl all day without showing
signs of fatigue.

either team,

Wicket-keeper is Russell En-
dean, whose batting, too, should be
most useful, although it will not
be in the class of the late Horace}
Cameron, who at Bramall-lane a
few years ago hit Hedley Verity
for four 6’s and two 4’s in a six—
ball over.

That was the over which pro-
moted the classic remark by York—-
shire wicket-keeper Arthur Wood:

“You've got him in two minds
Hedley.”

“What do you mean?” asked
Hedley.

“Well,” said Arthur, “he doesn’t
know whether to hit you for four
or six.”

My summing-up of the South
Africans is that the bowling is
strong, but not exceptional, The
fielding will be brilliant, and if
the young, inexperienced batsmen
are blessed with the right sort of
temperament and ability to fight
hard and efficiently to back up
the efforts of Nourse, Eric Rowan
and Fullerton, they should score
a packet of runs against an Eng-
land attack which is not particu—
larly outstanding.

The fight for the rubber, by two
fairly even teams, should produce
thrilling cricket.

Si
Cc

MAY 17, 1951



Cycle Racing

(From Our Own Cerrespondent)
GEORGETOWN, May 16.
On a dry track Wilfred Korss,
urinam, won the three mile

yele Race. Trinidad’s Williams

won the nine mile in a qriving

fi

nish and broke the record.
RESULTS
Three Mile

Korss (Surinam)

Liddell (B.@.)

Williams (Trinidad)
Nine Mile

Williams ¢Trinidad)

2. Liddell (B.G.)

3, Small (B.G.)

Lap Prize, Holder (B.G.). Time

1.
2.
3

1.

5

24 mins., 4.9 secs.

d

Previous Record: Lindsay Gor-
on (B.G.). 25 mins 11.4 sees.

1949.



CRYPTOQUOTE No 2%.

GBFFME ZOHBZKESZ.EOM
YPKEIG PMUMESZEOM
—TBVVMP.

Last Crypt: Let no one be will-
ing to speak ill of the absent
—Propertius.

J. A. CORBIN & SONS.

NO CONSTIPATION NOW
AFTER YEARS OF MISERY

“For years I had been takin many
kinds of laxatives. Then | tri





ALL-BRAN It not only keeps me
regular lrealy FTI
enjoy eating it every

day'’' Rudy R
Adler, 1410 20thSt.,
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One of many uAso-
licited letters fram
ALL- BRAN Users
You, too, may ex-
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constipation due to lack of dietary
bull: if you follow this advice: Eat
an ounce (about '%4 cup) of crispy
Kellogy’s ALL-pRAN dally, drink
plenty of water! If not completely
satisfied after 10 days, returnempty
carton to Kellogg Co, of
GreatBiitain,Ltd., Manchester, Englana&
HOURLE YOUR MONEY BACK!



mare Mada

Cosmetics

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We have in a fresh stock
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SKIN TONIC.
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PAGE 1

r\r.i TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE THl'RSDAV. MAY IT 19.-.1 Cahib gatling H I \L KIJ.K.WY I h * tie and kg per.... %  blch opened %  Theatre ial niuM. I rodudlon inrt the uv> for itlner One-Day Visit M R J Nl/NES. one of the MAI %  i'.i: Inni %  •( % %  of I I | visit Carlo an i M and !->* *n'< shortly w leavinw Trinld., I New York ^hoppinc and Lunch Y tDAY. the of ti | %  u rtatUni %  Hi w. % %  BrK %  in vm Trinidad and live later the ft tes iirrivcfl rm B.W.I.A'* B.0 iliahi. Arriving on the same plane aj i KHth of iba arar %  %  WTO..K iitle I tndr. E H N till wrong I Allen is s.t.i p;iper* of eorkL Soon tin .1 tl %  ruatntan.1 be fill 111 f hundred.. Where Snoop-meal Goes T wiiNi'i-six women and IM nwn make up the Food Ministry';. Enforcement omcer* Ui Lowland. Their Job it U U) eaten butchers Ot oilier %  boDkeeperi giving cusore ration* than they timed to get Whnt happen* to the moat the %  1 a *MIH 11 uu] when trying to trap butel 1 Say the Ministry: H li 1 to hospitals against a receipt," is the ofBctal reply. MISS list' From il..r: i.. With U.B.O.T. M R. AND MRS JOSEPH A McGRATH new in from Trinidad yesterday by BWI.A to spend three weeks "holiday m Indramer Guest House. Mr. McGrath Is with I'll O.T. in Point Fort In. Coming In by the same plane were two of Hon. Albert Gomes' daughters Sandr.. and Vanessa They plan to spend six weeks at the Sandy Reach Hotel. Oft to Jamaica M R. AND MRS RAY De SILVA who left Barbados on Tuesday night by B.W I A. for Trinidad flew to Jamaica yesterday where Mr. de Silva is stationed with the Royal Bank of Canada in Kingston Mrs de Silva is the former Dorothy Eckstein, daughter f Mr. and Mrs. G C. Eckstein of Casablanca, Maxwells. Paper! A DULL DAY at Seawell was considerably brightened eg the arrival of Prof Seaton better known as "Majahara", who came m on B W I. A's flight from Trim dad yesterday afternoon. Shortly after he entered the Terminal Building, he tore a small piece of paper from a travel folder, stopped' a passing portei, Put the piece of paper Into his mouth, then proceeded to pull reams of paper out the porter's mouth, much to the amusement and astonishment of everyone Prof. Seaton told Canb tli.it .itwas in Barbados about four year* ago, when he performed at the l-odge School. He has just returned from a tour through Ger The Gagsters Keep An B.B.C. Radio j| JAXETTA DRESS SHOP Eye On Bob Hope __ DR£SSES of ^ Types •'".' %  Eyetore Gone She like, bowling alleys Silhouette Girl S LIM Chinese girl wearing the Shanghai silhouette gown Is seeing London for the nrst time. She is Miss Uliaa Hsu. who comes from Hongkong with her father. Mr. K. 11. HfU, big Chinese corporation lawyer. They are among 12.1 Chinese flown from Hongkong to the British Industries Fair. MisHsu is 22. lpHg| her English with a slight American accent. This she acquired as a student at a university near Chicago In China *he is secretary Hi a business firm. In Miss Hsu's country the gowns she wears so gracefully an called iahanu. They have a dose-ftttlng collar and reach down to the ankles in a oncptece sheath, slit to the knees ul each side. Only the small-boned Chinese ru %  md graceful neck arc suited to this drags It sets off UM Oriental good looks of Miss Hsu's rosebud mouth and soft black eyes. A BUILDING now neartng completion Is being erected on the site uf the burnt out Rendezvous Beach Club at Paynes Bay and so an eyesore of charred wood and broken masonry hur been re moved. The first tenant of the new house is to be the Vicar o< St. John the Baptist Church, Rev. Alfred Hatch, pending the building of a new vicarage near the Church Weitern Style S TACKS of "hay", old cartwheels and the general appearance of the good old West will be the interior decorations in the ball room of the Crane Hotel on Saturday night. The dance tg in aid of the St Winifred's Building Fund. u aUgi. When St Winifred's School found that It had to move from .1. old site In George Street. Belleville, It was thougnt nt one time that the school would close down. However, "Wclbeck" In Pine Hill was purchased and the school moved there In January. 1950. Every year a dance Is Just one of the ways of helping to pay off the debt. The Police Dance Orchestra will supply the music which begins at 0 30 p.m. Costume for those attending Is optional, but why not make it Western Style. K* llf*vrle ll.i\ii-r. MJP< After watching Mr. BOli HOI*!-: for an hour and a quarter at the Prince of Wales Then, tic 1 svrmusiy believe that he has a sense of humour. The &*.dj.e.:s of the down is one of the theatre's oldest traditions, but 1 cannot believe that M*. Hop*is a "marry man irwptng mum tvfeoN aoul is sad ami whose face is glum." In the first place his countenance la anything hut glum. Hi. lively eyes pjaj set |Q wide apnr. that ha MOTM to l>e Uiklng n< everything to right and lefi M him; his forehead is broad ana philosophical, hts nose is amiable and his mouth is i innocent. What Is more, he Is the only human being who can chew gum without offence to Ihit %  .li-.i.ii Yet if you v.'ill discover . furtive ..pprehen%  .veness in his expression 11 (j not come from a fear cl g ence. for we V.VK 00 nood term.' from the bogbrntouj i -uggest thai it is eiused by the know Ihut brigade of gag WI.L publicists, men wtl a id sad eyes, are uldlng in thewmgs Once he fluffed a joke an.i I/O could almost feel the despair of the h it pies off stage. rOB the first fifteen minutes In jokes were about Blackpool. Dudley and Manche-ter. where be had appeared before marching on London. We rould visualise the irrlOUJ conference with his gags.er.s when they explained about the humour of Manchester's climate. Then there was Dudley. What If Dudley to I n or he to Dudley*' Ideas are discussed, dropped, revived and sorted. "I met the Lord Mayor of ludh'y." Mr. Hope confided to us at the Prince of Wales. and I askiJ him where Dudley was. He said that he didnt know, himself <>r words to that effect. Th, ... s.ers had not explained i He told us how much Jnck Benny enjoyed nis visit to London. "He Was %  WfUlU excited when he dlacOVOTl t U % %  call a halfpenny He found It so useful for tipping." ntUHRDAY MAY IT. ISM ta HUM "* — %  osetaM H WMai 8 *i m "basinrrtu.M Achl*v# !" nu. B S.H Th' • t to m Men* * %  f'" nrtlain • it am Clow Oon: Il IS • m .Progtamni* %  *!*••. II m '-'" (..ChoR; H.S am SUUmcnl..of AOTTJ-'I. IS noon Th* Nri. IIN> It IS p m Cio Dawn i rt-i M u •< IS p m Ta Srore. > p i [ th* Wr**; B IS p> m So il* 1 V gm Brfliptlr-I •' p nt BBC Svmphony OrcMatra: 6 B m. PTOanin> Paradr as. II an> as u si i Ready-Made from London Also Made-to-Order BATHING SUITS — LINGERIE — STOCKINGS COCKTAIL HANDBAGS PLAZA Th*mir**-Bridgetown(DtAL 2310) FRONTIERSMAN GORDON MtHAr HAT %  TODAY CThur.1 I SO [ Tn Ta*naprin in." SCHOOL HI %  %  siawart %  -UVINO naosT" Jam*Dunn | & SONG OF THE SADDLE Dark Poran mi (SO S pm and conlinulp* M*-TT II1AKT' %  aaflaa, Paiitra N IHS V* !U* BriUl lh* Noiw ol in* I'roph. !4*ar**l: I II P m. Th. | C SISli "' InW-r'.j from in* IHllonata. t Ji.p-U-h. t l p m Havaa t rau Smrmlyr. 10 r I M) m. ftp*rl. HS.4S P" Thf Nr.i BOB HOPE A little later he appeared in an eight-gallon Texan hat and with ,i *emi •Southern drawl assured us that he nevah took his hat on* to any man. No. Suh. Then he aoded: "Ah cahnt get it off. Ah've got an eight-gallon hat but a nine gallon head." This, you "ill agree, is the vrt stuff of humour. My only criticism is that he does not sufficiently exploit his gift of carica%  I ut It should be balanced rtUtef I liked Mi Ropa immensely rid that is t*Bl at Mid ehed he has hrnught the warm inn sunshine of laughttw. Such '•• man deserve*; our gratitude. —L.E.8. leoBLS 'OPvaic.ifT nr-srnvrD in c MinnHMI TMIK.MWV MAY 17. 1SSI i10 IS p m h II N ft "i Thu W**k In Car ( IIOSS WOIIII :—r-> i' n : • 1 i 9 i ^ i ffl* iT\ V A -1 T" V PLAZA £*•: OISII\ S^ 04 TODAY nil' iin IMI • oi KITTY ODAY"'} nlor Duubl* Bllljj LucllW Ball FANCY PANTS a -nunoi I^SIUO I ni.lcn. McDonald Cai I. All II (THE GARDEN) Si. James "DIOI OOKft siiV. OlA-s Of KBNTICKY" Color bv Clnacolor Jan* Nih GLOBE THEATRE TO-PAT 4.45 A PIS P.M. LAST slum. •ODD MAN OUT" -JAMES MASONHER LUCKY NIGHT" THE ANDREW SISTERS GLOBE OPENING GLOBE TO-MORROW Rupert and thi lce-flo I'm miking a wonderful medtcme which will Tel one .leep .11 iht winter. I've nearly dona n. I need one more very rare plaitr, %  *r it will he pf'ft. But tS^t't %  nougS ibotn mr. I im ho know men show MM. I hsvan'i a properl* ei. Where in m xpti<. 7 He lumhl*. on I .hell tc had 4 very brae pair ot glif*. sag h pent it B up *'•inIU tlaret and ttarea .> %  DS luddenly tpcrchlet*. % %  vvnero tne* dopt flwh > IS) r*aa* woara (ha tan U ISU> I Ohanneo to demean our alteration. >VI . Neat eniptlt snip rope I II:IIIC:II>I ii. *' 4 r'oru umie ii I Culled for a lame C.l.D. 171 i Oni* s broken vosta. (Si l uanc e in the ciiUuo-mlll ? <*> solution or %  aatantari aaaak^aaratai 8. (Iifinv. (41 -, %  ; %  : Anta. 30, Til*. .Mi";;("ATaa" it.'jntJ^aO! Til*, il Hat: ii. wan; VVnin 4 faham: '* "fj_?: tn\iMims OF III.\ BY THE WAY /* Beachcomber O W RBR1 of large country bark with | bnHh ir*ad ol barbed vents In a bowler. He described might Ad! coniidcr, wire. a brimless bowler as a mere pudternatlve to charging for ,„ ,. ding ba*ln. But Sir Hoskyn Hock. Bdmlaaiuu, having theil wives f.**. / WmBt of the Worshipful Company of i view to starting ;. IIATTF.lt rao-i'ation Vent-Borers, at once replied that J\ at | imlon Of UM CoeWevents or holes in a pudding basin A PitUbtirg lady has just won carrot Commission veter.lnv hv would be superfluous. "The pud:, dlvi ne rate agilnat u husband snying: "If the IJorset Coast "ling would drop through.' he who "Wafl alwayi trying to wx Broaton Conmlraion pves expert snt 'r-''''" 1 ""I!; „SiL.,The best cnti.v wUl I* published every Monday 11. Tile EvenUic Adv.."^' %  ' "2Sl e.te. n,l Ihe winner will receive o.ize w the v.lue of 7,6 in either 1 %  „,?; iv r,.,k'Thank, •* r stationerv. Entries must reach Te CHIMim* Editor. The IMmsolVM .uk Thank.. AdVK .„ ,... Lld c ,„ nol ,„,,, h ,„ Wednesday every •.. GrttlHS nl "/ !*<• Kill NOTE: Stones must not be cooled. Men are a/raid r.| bring imconScm) ,|,i a CO uoon with your storv. rrulioTial IN ifwfe XJOT % 'gvPSSLL JUNIOR COMPETITION 1 "I painter. He puts his legs Maaasa through the arm-holes of hi* "*"' Ihruits hin trousers Age hU head, upside down, so that his arms go into the legholes. School mi a hook attached to his shirt, Stuffs his socks into Home Addreas Iba laailni of nla bad ..nd tie* hu shoes over hla knees with his brace*. Thus prepared, he paints green divlni %  btaaehad treelorm %  %  % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % %  m X6" ALL OVER LACE WHITE & COLOURS •8.3J A 2.77 B 36" FLOWERED SPUN *l.37 A I.IO B 36 FLOWERED LINEN SPUNS 1.77 pj36" TAFFETA in WHITE & COLOURS (Mf B 36 STRIPED RAYONS SI.HO -36' STRIPPED CREPE g'i.OO oni:\i\u iitinxv will < %  •/ SM&WSf ^ ^ J..HK I.l.i A .:/Op.m. rrJi*\)*' ]*" lOBB OlVrS THE H CRTEjr p P£f(>RMANCl: Of THE YEAST .^SOSOL -—-r^Tm aMI AOI'ATK n.llf < IXEMA :M.mb.r.Only) CU/iVOtm COLBERT. HOBEHT HYAN In Th* Ne HKO Platura THI: -HRFT nil %  t'VMS & WHITFIELDS O OiAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES i. DIAL 4220 PAINSol PILES Stopp.d in 10 Minutos known a* Chlnar. work In 10 talnule Ik* pain t>l la.> lake* n*rxy, d*bllll. %  "


PAGE 1

Tlll'RSDAY. MAV IT. 1931 mrimrv.s ADVOCATE p\r.r SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS. IfLKPHONI 250B For Birtha, MWTMI* %  aMBM Calling the iber at ward) I FOll uu -vs r. *ha(* to |)N lor an toWMudl rente IJBMgml word. Ten MONn IM arid 4 HI,. 1111 for DNl NeMee* only after 4 p m Tha chare* lor %  I,IIIWH'IMI • Birtha. Marriage. Doaihe, Act. %  -. MBkiaM, and In Ma—Ham nolle, n DM on •tfk-di l i u~d it 99 an S-inate*. for any number of worda up to M. and 1 fwiu par word am erk-dayi and I rente par word on Sundara for o*rh addnlnna: word MED LllkVIIXil -On the lith May Samuel ItKiuld Gwnldir < late retired Clerk ai Mnri T Herbert Lid I Thfuneral look place the uld rvenln. %  t the Weetlmri (rnifln) K B Harmon IT 9 91 — In HFHIIIUN On the lath Ma.' 1991 Brulr.ee An.-ila lAunl Enunlel Wharlon. lair CU.Ih M.: Swan Stree/t The funem! the Funeral Pa-lour o( Hind. A CM Tweed.ide Road, al 4 91 •.-clock Inn rinlr.i lor Hairl Leonard'* Chorcli Frl'nda are n i ilr Edna Thcmhill I 1? 9 91In THANKS ALTOMtrTIVfc : • a Sa ai d Sat.ri* Ktl'n Co Bin-,' CAB BMW*ay n,w* R.ioon. IT p.I CAB-Vaukhall 14 Ha with 4 good tyrea. in good working condition, prtcei reasonable Applr F D I.. Gay. Staple Orove. Chriat Church. Dial MM. UM Un CAB 1S4B V.uhall '10A-l condition ltee-.il> ....rh-nled and painle.1 pob Emhill Hamx-tieH. I>i*>n a, Co Lid Phone 4104 14 S M In MOTOR CVCIX— %  S A Can be aeen at D A T C C..p Appi! BtarW/aj Co. •XEmUCAL e.-.ru.ble oB^i LI.I. ru—id 14 9 MIn IN MEMORJAM roii urn i dMr be In i IBM hn*l lr(l We aame bane Ol mortal rein and teara >•< are thou dear Bui In our M49BTS % %  <.. devotedWife, mother and alaler. Euclldla. Owen %  •I Mr. B IPII II 5 il — In II11 vtai ol The helpful word, the nleaa, Thou knnwnt Lord, how But Ihoo Baal called our home. Lord, i hoi i en nil do no • Ever remmbrrd b\ loving • %  d Mti -iIT loa' .Tony i owi how much I mlr* h(r No one know* Ihe blller pain. I've suffered Mru-e I lo-l him Life will r*vr be the aame *' Ever to be re-ne inhered be— F-hra.ra ireondmolher i ITS SI III TAKE NOTICE LEO bualnaaa addre** la in Bn>i>ihiv-I. Copenhagen. Denn.mk. ha* applied fo" Ihc registration of a trade mark In Patl "A" ol Hei*ter In reaper! of phaimeceullcal preparation* and %  ub*lnnc<.in I v III be entitled to rrgl.tet the aame all" m month from Ihe ITlh dav of May 1981. unleaa aome peraon •hall In the maantime give rotiee in dm. ii MMM ol oppoalllon iif %  %  N Iratlon The trade mark can b k* IT J 51 3 W/.V.V.V/r'/W.W/AW KEEP ON FURNISHING The Mi.ntY-Sa\iiijj Way S w robe.. Dreaaei-ri' Dieaalrur Tab'r*. Bedrleada. Bedt. Waahatenda Nlajhtchalr Comlort. Hot and Shoe and Towel Haeka. Screen Frame* Dlninar. Luncheon. Fancv .ml Kitchen Tablea in bl| range ot %  hapaa. nnlahe* and >t" I Kltrhtn ard Bedroom Cabinet'. l.lquur Caaa. Morrla |-urnltn" BalaB Caned futnlture. Bock Inn, cllninar. Beiblce. UpiirKhl. Aim ., t Tub Chair*. Sett., i. all %  MONEY BAVINO ITtlCEt R • L S. WILSON SPRY ST. DIAL 4069 ,y,v,v///.v.w.v/.W'V 9(f9-RIGErtAroR Canadian One tear luaianlee lefl %  onnmicatly. Betinrtt IT 9 91 In SAIeES LOST MM Ml WAirrm oad II eew| REAL ESTATE :a Bartaadot smppini A ftadl (Co Ud •Oiare* A(>i (LARKE A CO. Solicitor*. Jarre, Street I Public comprtilion at our ofhr J nrwiaeto.n on rridav lux m 1991. at I pm f rood* perche. of land al Wek-liman Hall PaSUeafj FOL'M) E FOUNTAIN ItN Beacd -olurdat e I aj B**M ... tod < KLI-I,'., claaiie aerlc Tl i 1 H tal| Sa w iaaaj :. %  ronle 1 centa a ord ire**— .Jev* ft. te. J i'., % %  Wel'hman Hall mam road tos.t with the dwelling houte Iheeroi • Ed-ln Allreri Holdet For further partKular* .ml ronditlx.' ol aale applv to HirmilNHON MANyiEIJ) IT ^ ii -tn DWEI I 1NGHOUSE and I^nd contain. %  r( I modi. T ptnhr* adimmna the l-roperty knaa aa "The Abba CnrM Church Thl* property l> a newly buUt >tnnewall d.ellliiahouar I.vina room*, bedroom*, uaual (4MrV4Mr> enrea and baionaa io > The above property will be *et up fi>r •ale bv Public Competition at our Ofner Jamea Slrevt. on rrlday itth May 19*1. Mill InapaetHHi on application to Mr J A Gnfflth the lenanl YEAKWOOD A FrOYCE TAKE NOTICE LEOCILLIN That I ffl'BI KBMISKE FA'V .K VBB A KONOHTED. a f,,, the Uwa ol Dtaumarl irjulneaa adeb-e-* la IV Ki oiiahol v e|. Lopenhacn. Denmark, h*. UM --a-i.t. .-. "A'" Ol Rtn • %  ajHtratuMaaU* %  ",.i t>. aatUUed ha raaaMtai lha aaNM ..ti,,, one month I1-.1.1 .he IfM da ol Mai IvAl. unleaa aome peraon >hall in tnJ %  I'eantiine ... p lia t, to na %  I The trade mark Can bv aren .n PBlK ated thi. 3rd 1 ,!.! LAMB. Tr..de Mark* MISCELLANEOUS MMI III > Mtamaxi Curpe iMfk Tl cent, aid M cew'i A.-da k i a* io-*d* — over u-orue %  rente a awd week—4 reate HOUSES I Meal Ba 11. Dial *4a ,„ ROOM AND BOARD %  i-ple or Barheli Hi aea Apply Caoiarm. I H -veil Coaat Road Tel 4174 I.OVI iivtii vi \oriii I'M 7n Sol. ERNEST UAU: l'a>Li|i Road alaildln. n a perche* of land Dwelling houc .•..n puw. open vrrnndah Ih.ulim ano Dlntna mom. two bedroom*, kitrhen toilet and bath The above will inPaarteal fur -ale I, puMM competition on Friday Itth M>> at 1 pm al inr office i>( the UeMtM riffned Iro.n uhom nawlHHint ol Bob HPTCli |1 5 11 in HMPIGEHATuR Ow US T rubi, fool Fiigldalre Refrlarrator Apply; l'i' .•. %  ..,!., • %  .,.'-...! DrutT Store Phone 1194-3144 IT 9 SI t f .1 In lot IS 9 91— tn mber ol True ft H Horn 1--1 Co Dial a*M IT.9 M .' %  CIIRISTOPHEII COLUMBUS Caraval Nino at prevent moored at Holetown. St Jamea No reasonable catTer refuted. Applv Ralph llunte r o Mannin4 Co Ltd Dial 41K4 119 91—I I n Church Thl. propeHv comprlae %  durlllna houae with 1 acre*, t rood -I 1 perrhea of land and bri 1 %  Lenrv || D Kln The nl^v, peeaBtrl -.ill be set up for Sale bv p petition al our Omce on Prld.i lllli >t1991. at 1 M p in Fcr Inepecthm appl • Mr II II D King on the prrmlae-* YEARWOOD BOYCE Solicitor* II 3 31—Tn •JIM 11 TO Share. CENTHAL FOUNDRY month fi I 1M1TFD Share* BAKIIADOS -.HIITINn AN TRADING CO LIMITED I WEST INDIA HUM Bl FINERY IJM1TED r Hh-ieHI TEIJI'llONi: •< I I MIT II 1 II Sham BARBADOS FOUNDI! 1 "MPTEn The above aharra w,r, 1. Public Cfmpetitin.i at Hie Ofnre of Ui uider.Uined on Frldif. me l!h M-v 1 CARItlNGTON A SBALV. I. II9 91 4. ATTENTION is drawn Io the Control of Prices (Ot (Amendment) Order. 1951. No 12 whicfa will IKpulilishrd 10 UM \>mcial Gazette t.f Thurs.lay. nth May. 1951 2. Under this Order the mutipium wholesale and retail telling price of "Outs (Teed!" are u foil, PI HSON \l The pub'n are hereby %  iniad *aaii*t I \ 1 ARRI1 1 kaU m.aelf reaponalbkr lot hrt tractinB Baa* 4eM ae debt. In mr name %  rtfsqpMi D 1 .A 1,1 in. Bare.. SI IS 9 91 tn Tl.v,M„ 1 edit Teat %  -.—1 %  n.y*ell it-aaonalblr lor her or anyone rlae M trwilinf ant debt or debt* 111 m> mjne unleaa bv 1 .rittrn i\W< <.|i,ed bpled MOTTVIIY I-HIL4JPS. vnurr st Mm m IS 9 91 tn Wm. FOGARiY Ltd. ,r hnrl.i ..nud namat I li.nf cred.t to iv in /tMHHil IAHPER maw Br>am aa I do not hold %  \ ,..dSi ( ned GEOROI HAIIPCT. Ja.ka.in. *< Mk'Sael IT 9 SI-in TAKE NOTICE PARKER That PARKER PEN COMPANY. 4 IK. ration duly organ lied under ihe law* ,.f the State f Wlararatln, Unlte.1 Sta ARTICLE OATS (Feed) re as follfM-. — WHOLESALE PRICE (not nii Mian} • 12.Sit per bBf of l0, lbs Retail Pries mot more than) TAKE NOTICE That KA1-STON PURINA COMPANY . r UM si.tr of Mlaaourl. United State* of An-i ICltv ,.f St laHil*. SUIe of Mleaontl. U.SJk trade mark In Part "A" ol ltei*tei In irqm ua*>. animal feed container*, wuteri i diamfwinnt, and verm If ucve, and will be -n %  red in Hie 1 UM 1 ITth day of May IBM 1 iluiUi.ati to ine at m> o*T.ie ol %  II be *-en on appll, .: %  1 f load |,. -1 %  • I taut,1.H.1* (or animaia. tn*tle-t t.i iea|l*t(l the .,11* allrr 1 •hall 1 UM 1 •"IN, lien TI,.SHIPPING NOTICES -FIIX FASTEN ERA'~Ju*t received a pply of Pile Faatenei*. Phone 4441 Oeddci Grant Ltd for your requireenU I9 9 31^n GALVANISED Slir.lTS -B-at qui MM Clveaprat In the lull ft S9 04; T ft 99 U: 1 ft fl T2. D ft tT I) ft 99 40 Nell eaah Better hul RAHNKA A CO LTD. 4 9 91-1 SH LITER I It loin bi oaeh A Co One Steel Holler Shutter 9 ft high Apply r.rlytv Ltd. 139.31-On .pply Kve,/n. Roach A Co ITIH II Ml I It IS Taa ceali per aonte It"" and 19 centt per opefe II. .n 11 %  •—. clwi'oe 91 90 and |l.n n Sunday. irrek d.iy. 1 Swdiiv, week-daye .,., LCI lt*li I will oeTer lor aale by Public Competition ol my ..Sice. Vutona Street on Friday. lath at S p m The cnltai;. called LILA — altualed al MiLc-an Gap. Briltona Croaa Road home contalna open nalhrr Drawlnjc Dlnliiit. J bedrooma. W C a Bath — waah ha>m Kitchen with mnnlrur water and atandlnj*. on about lO.Otm BQ feet or land For inapection between In t.i t p m on appliciallon to the tenant For condition of aale -pply to B Archer McKenrie. Dial 4T U I II *" AUC'ilON l<*44 TI BUB***:! rl-9TFOKM LORRY W are Inatrurted bv the In.nror.c*At-tite to tell Ihta vehlrk* which has been damaaed In an neelderil 1 %  Ml auction at the Courla-av Guraae LI 1 %  SI on rridav. 19ih M 1 JOHN M IILADOK. Auctioneer I) 3 91—4n UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER I Co. Nelaoil Street III A-*l A -tin Dnmaa-erl in accident Trim. eaah. VINCENT GBIFFITH. TAKE NOTICE Ih..' I. UM <'% %  Ihe above PlanUtl.m am about to obtain a loan of £190 under the pro vi>ion< of the above Act aaamat the aaid In reaped of the Agricultural iear lfl to I No nvonev haa bi thr Afrtt above Act *ne loth June. Sydive. ;1TT1 J,„.e. anlvlng al Trlnidaii during tne latter half ol July, and pinccedlmf tlieieaftei to BaibBdo* and In add it for chilled and hatd %  crepled on tlin.ngh Bill* of lad ISIMIIIBI '*-i %  at Trinidad lo Hritana, Leeward and Windwalil and DA COSTA A CO LTD Bridgetown, II W 1 i* M V M-.'k* Will a.repl 1 %  %  ta H-Hing I .1 Rrgl. : I %  .1..I..1 )-. lmltati.>n pre* lou Tucian: iina aiano. 'not ot proclou* O imitation preranui metal* for pen* am ,-ii.H.. and in*, and will be entillrd t. irgi-tt-r il.iaanvF after one month froi the 17th day of May. 1931. unleaa aon prraon .hall In the meantime live nolk M duplicate t,, aan at my olTlre of "pp. -.11 ol -u, h ieei.tr at ion The trad mark can be .em on application al n, Dated Mh day of Mav, 1191 II WILLIAMS. Regxirar ol Trade Mark* IT 9 91 In IHMi'l; I.ICF.NSK NOTKI alwn n< PltiPatrirk Mayof liquor Itcenae No 9H9 led to him In reaped ol %  board and -hlngl* ahoo at corner Deacon. Road and lli.,.1, Koa-k. *.! Michael I 1 UM eald IJquor IJren .nd alaingle ahop .1 Ml. LOOK AT YOIR (IIMAINS... OTHER PEOPLE 00! Ol It IIO Ml — 11 itxisiiiM. BEPT. CAN OWE it THE FOIIOWINC. NEW AKR1VALS... FUt\VK.KKl> CWTONNI IH uiilr rj .I2 pt-r yd. TAI'ISTKY 4H wU u $3.12 |M*r yd. U.K. TO.VavU.lM. — Hluc. Pr.uh. Qnm & (.old IK BfMa (i 81.00 prr yd. WUI11 lilt. TOWBLLINQ IH WMB Q lie i>er yd. WI1ITF 11.11. TOW IOfB— llt'inslilched H8c. rach l May. Mock. Ht Ml Doled thl* loth dav i T.. %  A MclJi-JlD. Eaq IS.Ilce M... Mffaaal FIT7 PATRICK MAXWriJ. Appo*-nil .ii i-. eon I.I. i Ueett : i %  WHITE MB. LINEN T0TTI1 tl llwnillliiihri @ $1.51 & $1.72 each Wm. FOGARTY Ltd. ',',; ',;•,'.•.', ; ;:;-.;;'.-s t '.::'.-.'.-.'. *>*,rt>9 Ttll.'H INHUBANCB MEBDS — CONSULT ANIULW DSIIEPI'AKD Cealederalla. I.lfa Aaaaalallaa Co F. B. ARMSTRONG LTD, ilhTIHiETOWN 1AHBAI>OS TaL MM NEW SB %  TRYA" aalled TS(h April A Steamer Sill* Ilth May OCb \l V tarlajar D.I fail accept Cargo and l'a..rnaer* lor i %  \ i.renarla and Aruba. Sailing ,n Of about lllli inaianl. BAV.I. M(1IIM>NKR OWNERS ANSOC, INC. Tclo. 4047. St&am&hip Q 9nc. SEHVICR Arilve. BaiL-il.-. 4tl. Mil lll\i\l SOUVENIRS, i I mo-* JEWELS New SliiptiM'iil n-irliril THANI'S D itf DISTILLED WATEH and ta.tr the ilillerrmr NEW ORLEANS SERVICE IS. "AiroA PATRIOT*' Balled 19th April liar bad.. < ih May IS • AIATOA POLARIH Sail* 2nd M— Wlh .. IS "ALCOA ROAMEIIKail. I9ih Ma* ., .. l*t June -Ol iiir.iu si. CANADIAN "ALCOA PKiAHPS' "AlrjOA PIONEER" ruLKE BERNADuTTE" ApHI May May nth Uth lHll Hall. Mallfat April 90th ROBERT TIIOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE. APPLY:—DA COSTA 4> CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Products. Limited. Roseau, Dominica, lor silling In Euiope forlniiehllj. The usual uort3 of call are Dublin. London, or Rotterdam. Slr.gl*. fare £70; usual rtduction for chl.drcn. CRICKET REMINISCENCES aill be Ihe ...l.|..i of a Talk lo b*. given i. Ikr < %  "BERT IF rlAUKK To-night Thuraday. Ma* 17. 1991 Al St Mar.* Boy.School lliir-ri. Maaon Hall Street lit 9 o'rlork All ore Invited I' .1.1 DttaV YEARWOOD. Ii-.ii* Becretaiv For Sale or Leas*' STRATHM0RE Culloden Road. Handsome, r-siorey stone property with shingle roof and pine floors. Contains 2 reception, dining room, 4 bardrooms, 3 baths and toilets Extensively remodelled. Wulleo gruunds of about 15.000 sq. ft. Pleasant town resldrnce suitable for Doetor's Hume or Guest House. REAL ESTATE AGENT AUCTIONEER PLANTATIONS BUILDING 'Phone 4640 %  null be tons ol p •r m atraltenad •Ircumelanrea a not be lea* than ten >ear* %  month* nor more than lel* ol*. on the lat day of January be> proved by a Baptiarru.1 O which moat accompany the api Parent* and 'or Oiiardiana will fed nl the time and plica of in InaUon. Form a of application eon bottom Ihe Veatf By OIBce Order. E C REDMAN. NOTICI; PARISH Ol ST iini'i v APPLICATIONS for one or mor. Veatry Eathlbltiona, tenable at SI Mtctiaela Girla' School (at the amma value of £9 will be received bv th. ..ndiiMgned not later lha: *Mh Mav 1991 Applrranta rnuet be .hildi^. inner* In atraltrned circumatance* between Ihe age* of 9 -nd II A birth certificate nm*t be lorw.iile.l with an applteatnn form, obtained IN g Ihe Parochial OflWr The . June lair, at • 19 .. in PILORIM. UM %  Aa the Uth day ol M-j I"9I. N In duplicate to me at my oBlee oppoUtloo of auch ragitrat...i. I trade mark rail be j*-en on ap<;lic.ili rra' ofAce. Dated thl. Wh day of Mav. ISM II V.111HMRegi.trar ol Trade Mark. |1 9 91i ii ran Thon IT 9 91TAKE NOTICE That BIRO PENS LTD. Manufac liirrra. u Bcltlth Ceunpai.). Whoae trad or bnainea* addreaa la al Brook Strce. London. W I. England, haa applied f. UN registration of a trade mark in Par, A" of Begtner In reepect ol writnn -it being ol prarw.ua maUl or rooted thera^ith.. id Will be .i.titled to leg.-tc! the aame after one month from the ITth dav of MaISSI unleaa aome peraon ahull in the meantime give satire, in duplicate to ma al my oBlee of oppoalllon of with The trade mark car. be %  ten an appi-rathon at my afr.ee. Daled thi* 9th day of Mav. IWI. H WILLIAMS. .rill Trade Mark* TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH TELEPHONE C'OROS IN COL i i IF I'll It Ml AH LANK mnuiimttttfrrrf' 19 5 2 THE NEW HXIRY HUM'S OF THE WEST INDIES ANTILLES AND FLANDRE 2. H. Gtoa Tonnur—.J KluU THE BARGAIN HOUSE 30. Swin Slnel — 9. AI.TMAN. I'rupriolor I; I'HONK 2702 __^ t v .-..........,....-,-.-.-,-.•.'.'.•.-.•.-.-.•.•.•.-.---.'.•.--•.--' %  '.••'-'-'-'-•-'-'-'•'-'-•* ;////,W//,'/WW/'/-'/''.V/AW//V/M^^^^^^ Let Us Show You the^-STAR'car I run FRENCH LINE \.-iiR. M. IONBS Pi ,\m Henry HUn-l t.i i Mi rhonr 3114 C M S 'Firi'-Slur' Multtriiif/ ThiHfHt al I.UUVHI 1'ant JOIN THE BARBADOS ASSOCIATION-'Xr-*'e'-'--r'*'e'yf CHARLES Me ENEARNEY & CO. LTD. t..*--,--*-*.'#V-*e*^-*-'-'r*e'-*-*-*.--V'-*e--V-*.*e*-*e'*We*e*e<



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Till HSIIW. MAY 17. 1931 IIAKKADOS ADVOCATE PACK FIVE Build Up West Indian Economy w # Fraan |M(r 1. had been a very kucevsful wort U to DUlM of the British West Indies Sugar trade arrangements with each I'mducers' Association which had However i-m..v ., % %  .• %  adily built (Uelf up as a body they may bear West Indian Jut spoke with authority and interests in mind. It is inevitable worked for the good o( all parII • Waal Indian* should prefer ties as a whuk\ direct representation. That was the prototype of the t'o-Ordinatlim ,n,n ,hcv w r %  •* At present, the only aemblantv of a co-o.-riinating author.iy AT I III I III % I III gfe West Indies, Is tht ion over which I. fop %  *>eing. preside. But this Organisation could never Trade LiWralUailon Pr.rtVssor Beasley then inim duced Mr W. A .Morrlu. |ha meeting. He said that Mr. Mornt was on his way to Canada oi behalf of the Government of liber He would be glad to answer any t&M which the committee might capto put to him and which he ma ___..t for.n be accepted as a t ""l' ,1* t ,Z' Vet Indian authority. because l: K"' %&£* 8 is not based on any lo. al aanc tion it b trua that .davda SJffi a SOLVZSSi various Waal Indian aotlvMaa; w M f M ,, %  ,^H ,1 -• %  '-e ^Jflnir^ Cr8S >n '" .turn but a Wat Indian '.h.iTAlbSrt Gomes sa.d that his Government was very muea efforts alI co-ordination earned %  raofuQ) hanilicapinsi bau/est Ind cause we cannot speak (or UM West Indies. Vou can see for .. how impossible the I poatUon La, if you ibout the question of rapraaantaUon at the meeting of the Continuing Coi mittee in Canada. He did know hew the members of th^ all 0 iher delegations felt about It. the time taken, since the MynUfv professor Ucslcv pointed out Bat Ccnleience in getti:i K lliis (hat there were two meetings due Committee asscmbl.xl t-, take place in Canada and they The same story could be told of should not be confused They •tvwral other projects. The w ... :,. '-ontinuinji Commits report* or the Hance Committer Meetin* and an ad hoc commitaml the Maurice Holr.-es Comtm for liberalisation of trade. •am, like MahoawV \„ Ih-ri.inn lo be suspended between Mr Al) :, :i 1: ,_ J1 ., 1. %  niids on his motor cycle. The Advocate was told ytlaTdn) that themotur cycle is the postman's property and be. Uk every other postman. ets only six shilhnps a month trawlUnn allowance. "Bus fares have Increased, KM %  > l of .i bicycle han-shoes are more ex|Kiisive. bu' *till we continue to get MI shillings a month Fof many years nw ue have been retting |hi* amount tmvalUafl allowance, but nc %  i'ie ever thinks of giving GeU ^1 Duma^es JUDGEMENT to the amount 0| L 1 wg* given to the plain til 1 i "ununiiu ai Uactan, st (MBfJii when a suit in which she i.imtM daananai to UM amount raasa to cope *itli the rising cost '" *-% against Lionel Cummins 1IV.UK", a postman told the Easilyii, St George, was heard in Aateacta yaa t arnaj He said tn.ii g| MM ttnw th. '•ovetninant was considering gh -"** tn.m bo.ie but ona Mi'.r %  a though h. pr ar a n a d tw-sr and cart, 'I think thai nil couiiiu Mat especially UM • workln] the Court of Original Jur.srti.-ti. by Judge J W H Chenci. ratterday Mi It Nllcs appeared on behalf ol the defindant Uonel Cum mini while Mr w. vv Roan i spraoaatad BoaaUa Cummins. llOaalH Cummins claimed that her lather died uUestatr and she ORKTA BANCROFT and Frank Coliymor.. .. thty appeared m on* ot tlu Bridgetown Player** rewnt prodnctioax n tho Empire Thsalrr. TBay an again seen to S ood advantage In -Th* Shop at Sly Comer \ which opened at th Empire U*t niaht. Is the ind oattt fate in store for Uukm Ifeport? wO must hope territories should together In an 2Lm £S! Ca re y " ,nClr wn w important anef stressed that skills, their own rwources and the wSJ Uldi ^ hud oflcn ^ their own judgment: from which placod jn un anomalous position when they are successful, the.v ln mjU ,. r , lf hal „, !MU , nev can derivo renewed COBIMMM W IT.. of tha opinion that the to UMfnaalves; and to vrhkta. West Indka ihould send their ay do not achieve all own repreM-nlalives The Wont ihey can searrh for i nd |es should also speak with e. and not one voice about sugar in the i-italks with Mr Botlomley. lion II. F. Robinson said thai f-,.,i, ,H, any dlseussions which they migln I ueiu.v.-if,! !i?.!h u„ have wllh "'Wrd to sugar they ,. ,' %  i.xe.hat uch of ,"^ should not take decisions on u being voiced thclr own slnce „ had ^ irises rrom a flRrce d In Ia)ndon that the British because the Wesl i nd ies. the Solomon Islands, ^ncn yet Mauritius. Fiji, East Africa and the Commonwealth would work Iho exhaust themselves in recrl r ti":is %  aaJmrt others. THE SHOP AT SLY CORNER H> MKHAKI. TIMSON No one should miss the Bridgeto w n PLayon production of Edward Percy'i "The Shop at Sly Corner", author ol the lamous play "Ladit-s in Kt tiiement" Mr. Percy hia here developed his ift alont: more realistic lines, in the settiiu; of a curio shop, which is nevertheless 1 equally excitii "The Shop al Sly Corner" ha* i.t -m %  St J. seph and St. Andrew should 10llk oll trttvri of sd m ini strati or e gteon BMN CJ ,rnf or the estate which included halt %  int. inc. man could •naU) uajr if J( i gtra of land Rai fathai for the cycles by monthly died In 19SI and he bought thl. : ""* %  land (nun a man name Itlgrlm In On in the country 11*17 d t.t fat (he NttM amount On 13rd Ovtoln-r ttu Mrod M-!|]| iL; allowance as th .. ThOOphtUl While tn o,k U.. -n the City. Manv have bicynes. land nd he dug some cane hOsM but these are useless in hilly Sometime the same day IM B0.'>:u.i. BOBM Oao be seen t'*'lant went to the .ame Held crawling over hill* on thu. -' nd %  damage to the amount o. hands and knees The shoe-wear u alooa i< more than the alii anea aivon them", he -n ii bvioua thai rou do not l nd six shillings en youi Meyeli tvon month, but when vou do IIHVI[., repair it. you spm,! %  ii.it unouat" Hi ll l that | Siinitarv |MD S t eata %  aiontalj n ., v .-ii n. allownnea of 2.oo if he own* v id ;si ndthouj s rrelo. Nethttuj Dene "On many oicaslotis postmei Ked for iravelUng all White n.'so sold that he saw ivhcn ihe dafandanl t->k %  boo an" 'llll up" the holes he had du| o. Ho'idti Cummin*' instruction*! DROVE WITH FAULTY BRAKES \ City Police Mai trati vlei day Impo^d a tine of CS on (Kwald Browne of Eale Hall. St Mieltail toi diivini; the i OtOI increase'(in thai* VMn M 87 on i*wiietls Hoad. >U m, but nuthini. M |t h %  '. w ,,,ull > ta-am-N lit this moment sense of frustrati British West Indies ha organised themselves to speak together and exert their full .... strength in the Held of trade and „£i tlUv m th^ RHI^K W commerce. Nothing has h.ppep^^Z £ lh ed. at any rate in my lifetime, 10 .-...: % %  Hi..: when they do th. > "ill not be heard, at any rate III Britain, with ready sympathy, and with every desire to reach mutually advantageous results. A iMmtan „t un, RMtom c "")i" m rr together In matters of that aort .ant to give thu Impression that they were dealing behind others backs. Committee* Hon. A. Gome 1 ', Hon. J B Renwlck and Mr R. A. Maynier ppuinhxl an Editorial inotnic Committee, vou have "' .. Cu k S: !' l> opportunity to achieve that ??"*?/ %  *£", W %  %  and Ihat eo-ordina ( ? on H n E R<>,,,nsi> "un ''"", I A. lU-iu IIIIII ii-i"" -,11111,0 n-I Cconomie Cotnmitlee. th* organ! itl ticai; to sweep away the frust tton and weakness that arise and disunity, to build up a self-reliant Brlttgt) West Indian economy and pre—nt it to the world In dot C A. Beaubrun were appointed a Stealing Commute*. The Committee adopted tin' agenda for the Conference and discussion is due to lake plaor under the following heads-— It come of tne quality of UM i.< nwaoareina; in essence a tale oi ,!.ukiuail. It show, a man m UM grip ,.i inaxorabla da vetopmini of clrcumstni., with it all. Mr. Percy has so skilfully mixed elements of tenderness, pity and laughter, ihot o.ily i tun end are we conscious of the [real forces, that nave been at work. lie realisation u f these forces and their presentation t„ the audience has been the big task before the players. And howwell they have done it. A laritc measure of their gucoaai the excellent scheme of direction by which Mr, Collymore looked i fter the players, and Mr. Barne. their surroundings Much like Cilbert and Sullivan, thev can work independently m ternu ol verdict returnod by %  each other's contribution towards | UIV rMordV NEW BISHOP AT A MEETINO of the Angbcau Church Bynod hsld yesterday two candidate* wett nominated for the post of Bishop of Barbado*. Ttaejr w tinVry Rev. the Dean of St. Michael'Cathedral. 0. L. O MandeviUe and Bov. Vaughau, Clsasical Tutor of Codrlngton College. The election will take placa to-day. done. I would' like to toy M.rch V light now. on behalf of all poatlinn. we would like ., travelling allowance." he i-~id. Describing the dutlf I I country postman he said: "The country postman vei, %  i!eii Ir.iW' his home foi *.,.|. around six o'clock in the momliut P ln He goes around clearing boxts da) and then he curries In his letters ~ tobepej ba monthly in is or in default tw, m nthi* imprlsunmenl RUNA BRINGS LUMBER i thipment of 24 997 feet of pine lumber arrived here on Tliaaby the Norweglin steam^lup Tho shipment came f to his I'cwl Otflce branch He leave* Tampa. Florida, for Messr* t;. t Boy Died From Natural Causes Death by natural C Mi:e< was thl a brilliantly designed whol Point Of Kucus %  me ..ii he I 11 -kS/1!;? ,a, ^ l o ,r | 0 tl ? n m F,,vc greatOCl contrlbuUon possible ot t A nB ?!, lr *_Rlna Economic this time towarxis building u.. a C-miniilee. Trade Commissioner Went Indian nation. Your dab ReTV ''< ^ -££?•_ Unlon C 01 "tO that nation is laid upon vou in mi "' on Rep*". External Trade the words of the PsalrrWst-m ^ Regional economi'Mark well her bulwarks sot maXiCTii up her houses: that ve may tell ihem that come after' Welcome PraragfOr Beasley said ihat he was sure that they would all wish him to thank Sir George Seel THE crew of ,n e Norwegian both for his words of welcome at steamship Buna will rlrc 21 canon nig of that committee and hell s in Carlisle Bay today. This llarly tor the candour with ** now lhc y w 11 begin their celewhlcn he had expressed a point brations of the Norwegian Conof view which clearly commended stitutioo Day Itself lo the meeting Today will be a day ot f—atlni Tin were et.scntially a working Bnu merr y making for the 3i They were not there to members of the crew of the Buna. indulge in flights of eloquence. Buntings will be flown on the ship They had a chance now DQSslblv Irom !,om '" stern. "No member lu ll... —-I . ." •" n* lk ...III 1_._ .,. lien the inquiry the cirrums'ancia sui rounding the de.th of Kudulf Jones, son i i Jones Dl Waterford nnannry, st Michael, was con%  slerday al District "A" Every pl rty has a point of focu but here Mr. Cullymore as M. Helss, the foreign curio dealer of Cpyrt. strange reputation nnd Cireta _. f h< ( or n 'r w... Mr il A Bancroft a B his sister and nOTVOUl % %  %  >•• Hudolf Jon KU taken U partner in crime, provided a sort ln< ( * n*'ral Hospital and dot llnari of double centre The. fonnei '"" A|,rl1 28 a,,(t ''""'I n May Norway Colebratcs Constitution Dav past martem examination liil thai death m due to toxin pneumonia and anemia, Dr. L. Ward who performed tho post mortem said Una) n.ia could have been caused by the gangrene of the tongue. four witnesses were called yealugviher they iouminaic and terday when the inouirv reveal the characterthe InaoOBftt sumed. One ol thm I %  %  uiid sweetness of Heiss' daughter brother ol the rIaoMaiil. nkl that Margaret, played with reserve and on April 28 his brother Ru charm by Joan King; the witty lying on Ihe ground wh. diyness of her companion Joan With whom he had I quarrel th weedling. toothless, cunning. humane and passionately violent; and the latter weak, adorable vibrating, and continuously apprehensive, are the centre pieces of inspiration f<'r the rest of the cast. for the first time, to chii of the crew will be working Fu*I Oils Come concrete results which had not na >'". Captain Brynjulf Haraldsen been possible with many off those told lhe Advaeale yesterday conferences which had bean Captain Haraldsen said that •d from time to time May 17 is the same to Norwegians Ro remembered very dearlv as *' u, v '* l0 %h '' Americans the . ti„. King's Birthday Taradc in and above ujl. the nastincss, cheapJune. ness. lowncls. and suprei-c cU ver The new drills that the mountness of Archie, the young shop ed police will do are the rank assistant who blackmails his cm and pass in sections and marchployer, and for il p;vs the supreme Ing |ii>-i In troop. len.ti-v This difficult pan with A RTIII'R GIBSON of Klrton's it-difficult cockney accent fa] OS <* ' %  s > Thilip. has a halff iientiy played by r-elegant movements nnecessary nail file te*. cream Proexi 1 belonging U] Dudley (Iihbs. from Morgan I>-wi* beach on Whit Monday. the branch office and goes h at about 10.00 a.m." "He does not return to tho branch office until around 2.00 p m.. when the mall van arrives from Ihe City. He then takes out mail to be distributed lit about 3.00 p in and Is working throughout the evening. No Proinotinn 1 tmea who detlvei krtten "he C'il> iiren i;et 1,. \^ ,i i. \ t'., Q P.O at 8 00 a m and nfteii we do not finish work until VQ0 pm At ChrUtmas time w. finish even later. There is anotnc! shilt that arrive* at the OP.O ll 10.00 a.m., but this shift him no scheduled time to finish woik Bomatlmm they work as late ag 7.U0 p.m He said: '1\istmen do not ge* any promotion. We come In as a postman on the street and die the same ordinary postman I feel that there should be ptomotion to which we could look forward. We could bo promoted to RU let ii specters. sui>crint-ndents, etc. A* inspectors we could see that othei junior i" sliuen do then work properly and there would be less chance of pilfering from mail "Only a dense man would work at n place with the expect.ill f ramamlng In the same IMISIIIOI. until he iin--" he said DREDGE DRIVER DIES Lionel Belle, who has bee. i driving the Government Dredge for the past four years, died at ti.iGeneral Hospital on Tuesday evening afler some weeks' lllnesa. The Acting Harbour Mai b I teld the Advocate yesterday that Belli lad di nc good work in his 10yeirs' strviee on the dredge Belle joined tho dredge as a temporary deck hand m l!)4l and some years later he became flremtin. He was pro* moted to driver in 1947. Belle was a fireman when the dredge worked day pfter day on the nets th.t were In Carlisle Bay during the war. TAKES AWAY MOLASSES Molasses tanker Athclbrook left port yesterday for Trinidad with a load of vacuum pan molasses. She arrived the day before to take her load Th e Alhelbrook'* • : • ,,! % %  \'< i H JiiM.ii Jones & Co., Ltd. diner Austin A ( o. Ud The Runs Is expected to llnisl discharging the limit < ning Meurs Robert Thorn Ud ar' the Ruaa'> agenb ARK W0 MtMUNQ FOR Tin: RIG ATHLBTK NBBTINQ To -void muscular pain* %  hi to Un |> up vour sirlJe Vou should rub down with !i\i:iiiiin. THE GRKAT PAINKILI.IK on sale a. KNK.HTK DKt'G STtlRES Masterpiece %  — Cuban sugar, currency *ro|sThere treating these lama. There was at present a world aeono mi e peUer. In the meantime there was no worldwide nareement as to how the probl< icncy [| WM rommlttee to provide som,tKiuing machinery whacebi economic needs of the West Ind con. Snc 11 discharge the fuel there. Messrs Da Costa & the danger r>( Htr £enu separate prob£ Q HJ Sc7ioO\t£JRS~BRI \ 0 CARGO FROM B.C. THREE schooners arrived at cy could best be solved Barbados with cargo from British %  **." 2L2H-5LS? !" Guiana within the past two days Among them was the 87-ton Philip II Davidson which brought Jiii-r'inlaiil In the Court of Original J u ri*. diction yesterday Judge J W. B (Thenery gave Judgement for thtdefendant Gwen Goodrldge. .,1 Bank Hall. In a ca Altogether, this ;s one of Mr. Collym ore's finest efforts In personal achievement his per formance is a masterpiece He was excellent in a part that called for every emotion from the pallidness of nervous exhaustion to cumic nonsense: every mark of hu rnmln I backgrcund and ivery V>os*h"*C blow from the relentless black bought hy PlainliiT ciarrie~Row mailer is indelibly lined upon his a fisherman of Fairftcld. Hi I face Even though the law would Rock, ror damaging and detailing hia clothing For this he I,,uncd £20. Goodrldge said that she used to would be placed in the hands ot 'MO bags of tent coordinating authonOther cargo arriving by the ty. vessel) Included firewood and The only successful committee charcoal. They were all con on regional cooperation for ecosigned to the Schooners Owners' nomic parties In the West Indies Association. never excuse the murder of tormentor, every sympathy i* solicited to his side; so v left in continual wonderment as lo whether he will find a means to evade It. But beyond personal achieve„_ ment. Mr. Collymcre has also JJj f^jjgj welded together a whole sen nan of actors, who have brought fieh neea, rfajaur *d life t.. • oudian stage. THE PRINCESS WHO WOULDN'T SMILC In %  fjr-oll land lived %  PTIIKCK ho neve smiled Clon> n One % %  --,.1 he UiJ. So he broughl hrr a diUi of Ro>al Pudding And *h*n he u-icJ n. her face hioke out I.I to a big mil In fact he g*>e him her In id -nJ ne< kingdom %  %  The %  i %  %  .bar to do she %  unable to get them for him the time arranged as she %  11 and was atti doctor There was n n damage done to tho clothing and the plaint III owed her money for previous work she had done for him. BRINGS A SMILE TO EVERYONE'S FACE -i tene Mlaiw fto*al Padding* m %  fajnll) and n.ml. and thru *>(< %  > •mhto* at IB lot bi.l Puddhv •'! %  V) nt ( to r !" A. YES, YOU CAN DI'Y IT ACA1N IUX0R CLEAR GLOSS VARNISH SUPREME IN QUALITY AND FINISH — Also — OALV OIL CANS — I. J 5 Gin Hh. %  "ST T. HEKBKKT Ud. Um ST t II A 11 111,1 III K STREET. caaaiaisisiasiaajBi H a igi -I'l III.VA" wee I IH. JASON JONES & CO.. ITT mmnigiin I %  %  • •* %  •• %  • r • • HIHIIU IIAMI.IIIS lain, I hi. opportunity of ohlaininc >' %  "•quircnrenls IN GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE Ranginfi fioni 'i" upwards MILD STEEL Flats. Roundl, Squares in all Sites BOLTS & NUTS All Sizes FILTER CLOTH White Cotton Twill Al PRICES i!ut cannot be repeated. iMpmiM II uir.K //*. ft \nit \nos nn \nu, t.ui. r*#W**'--'*'#-*V*-*'*'*'( ftt f* WM > "a Should flrsfar REXALL COD LIVER OIL I'.MI LSION An [.client Bod, Build.. 2 SIZES 66c. and $1.20 REXALL KIDM^ and III. MIDI Ii PILLS aap per bol KM4.IIIS llllll.' STOIIKH %  S/M'rial 10ff**r LAUREL SAFETY RAZORS Mb I oils MtSSKS A S iniYIIIN*-; SONS IBAKIIAIIOS LTD.. P.O. BOX >. MUDOrrOWHi PARIIADOS If ••/ Sh m ma far Liulivs In a wide variety ir wonderful styles ipaclally deiiunetl to meet the lalest trends. Green Suede. Ulark Suede. Brown Suede and White Buck Sling hacks and optn toes. Spike heels and blah Cuban heels. I'ricM Ii "in CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., ltd. It. 11, 12 13 Broad Street. SlJ.JUi ( $14.5)7



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PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOC Mr THtnSDAY. MAV 17, ItSI HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON PEEK FREAN lllltll MVS HIM IMS( I IIS| OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING STORES TRY THESE FAMOUS PARTY AIDS CHEESELETS MARTINI CRACKERS PLAY BOX TWIGLETS Etc. Etc. DELICIOUS & APPETISING STOMACH DISTRESS? Alka-Saluer it to eaty to Wk • • • to plaoMnt-Iattinf. Ju* drop or* or two tablet* into a flail ol watf, v.olch it fuu, than drink it. Not a latativa. not habit-forminf, y> !" n lake n any tima. Lot Alka-Soitret irliove your acid indigattion. HIVI • tupply handy. BLACK HILLS OF GOLD by Adolph Reall A WALK IN THE WILDERNESS by hmn Hanley THE AMERICAN GENII'S (An ontholog* of poetry and verse) PRACTICAL SPANISH GRAMMAR by Hill* & Ford ADVOCATE STATIONERY IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW Tins GUAVA JELLY 57


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Tiiuismv M\V i7, mi n.\RB.\DOS ADVOCATE pu.r Tiinrc Tdad New Constitution Successful -GOMES Hon. Albert tiomes. Minister for Labour, Commerce ana Industry and the Trinidad delegate attending the Regional Economic Conference, told the Advocate yesterday that the new constitution in Trinidad is operating very smoothly and vary successfully and the live elected ministers are co-operating in an effort to make it permanently successful. Mr. Gomes arrived on Tuesday by B.W.l.A and is st.iyin, at the Worthing Guest House. He sard thai nt the moment, Government is primarily concerned with developing the economic resources of the count:-, to create better living conditions for all the people v.", .,: tying out an intensive drive to attract new industries to the colony and to persuade the foreign km the prospects ' investment In the colony are good l n order to achieve this, he uiiri that stable conditions are necessary. It Is essential that relations between employer and employe %  hould be of the very beat disputes should be settled by negotiations and not by strikes. Mr. Gomes said that it had oftci. been alleged against the colon v that they had not politically as rapidly at some of the other territories Those who m.i(l ( > th;it criticism, no doubt, had in nttnd UM fact that tlv political partkH In l.iview he said that what some r.gnrded as their weakness. was In fact their strength, because, when they looked around them and observed the gathering chaos in some of the taCTitortaa, and Hie manner in which the political situation was getting out Of hand and threatening the economic future of those territories, he felt that Trinidad could eon gratulate itself on the fact that n wvt getting down seriously to the business of strengthening and developing the country's economy They suffered from many of the problems from which the other territories suffered like the rising costs of imported foodstuffs and general inflationary trend in prices. He felt, however, that if they could keep the general political situation in hand and furthei maintain peace In industry, the;* had a chance to get out of the woods. Asked about Federation of the West Indies, Mr Gomes said that Sir George Seel's opening speech to the Regional Economic Committee was one of the soundest pro nouncements on the rubjeet of federation they had henrd m Ihesp parts for %  very long time "1: Is n sad reflection on our statesmanship." he suld. but some entonlc had not yet expressed their view-! on the report of the Standing Closer Association Com mlttee. "The need for a Federal Authority in the West Indies is being experienced moro and more every day and as individual colonies, our, bargaining power is pathetic. Our voices can only count for something if we speak in unison." Mr Gomes said. He hoped that in the near future, some effort would be made to revivify the report of the Standing Closer Association Com miltee. since without t"i they were merely wasting the.r time in the British West Indie* Inquiry Into Seaman's Harbour Log ^_ _ M CARLISLE BAY Death Urged By M.C.P. ; : %  1 ..-!"• 1.1 xterfui NOTICI Of M Address to the Gonmoi l>> all I I ley at Tuesday's meeting of the House of Assembly, told of a Barbadian seaman who had been beaten i<> death a member or members of the Police Force of the Utl South Afr.:\i. It was |innt counsel on such matter and request him to do his occ ,", vS*. .-• ...... .._^_ ,. utmost to ensure that a thorough s ,T • tart thai a number >t and urtenstv< Investigation be made into th, i air"<""' '<•< sheltering out of ncav} rounding King's death Purpose rjfj %  • -'•tnix-llcd to or the mTestifatlon irould be to remain on out, during sue* ncav.. SMOS w h -l SnWrp^lM rtarwa. W Skrjtri Dm. SoalaVn M V T B ,U<>. fch BWhluavn. ansvaia 1 nWSKJ.VN DM Uw. *M. nnliil Guiana ATIItl 111'.. HiK ?*• i< %  Srh IH.UTAC I* Hill n-l. Cn s.h nni.ic i Ml Qas %  I s i i s \ IHn.dxiii l-oni II G..UMU. . rl. C0' Onaaea. % %  •P\HI> srnARnwciA w u un*. • I-.-,. ATHfajaVKlK SK loroj !••".. %  RATE-S OF EXCHANGE ftiackburne To Broadcast i...p. Oar Oon Carr*>a€>>li ANTIGUA. May 15. Through the courtesy of Caole and Wireless His Excellency Mr. K. W. Blackburn,, will bo broadcasting to the people of Antigua on Thursday 17lh. May. at 630 p.m. on a wavelength of 5.740 Kilocycles or 52-26 Metre*. The StattOn's cull sign VR7.4 will be giving the call 111 minutes before. The Governor's broadcast will be printed and made available to the public as soon as possible after Thai is the tlrsi occasion oi. which a Governor of the Leeward %  ill be speaking at a critical lime when AntiguaV economy Is more seriously threatened than ever before. Strikes prevail in Ihe sugar industry and waterfront. Today red flags and pickets were standing in front of the Antigua Star printery. Family Home Week For Antigua • tttm Oar O.n Corr %  • %  •'**l> ANTIGUA. Antigua is going to have a Home and Family Week beginning on Sunday June 24 Mrs. Blackburne. wife of the (;. .-ei-nor. i H largely responsible lor suggesting thai a week be set aside for encouraging j>eople to improve their homes. Antlftua hopes to make it an annual event and a competitive system will be introduced to enci MI rage gardens and more attractive homes. Last week a small house wai displayed on Government House grounds to show how a typical small house could be kept rheeriul There were charades to illustrate Hygiene. Cookery and Children*' behaviour—good and bad. $4,000 INCREASE Fnjm Our Own Corrvapcxular.t PORT OF-SPAIN. MaU Travelling allowances of employees of the City Corporation will be increased by $4,000. The corporation pays 24 pensionable employees $10,740 yearly In travelling expenses. WILL MAKE BROODS. CXUSHIS IN T'DAD (From Our Own Corr m pondrnl %  PORT-OF-SPAIN. May II A fuctory to manufacture brooms and brushes will soon be in operation in Trinidad. Mr. Guy Rupert Shaw, manufacturer of Shaw's Ltd.. Ashton-Under-Line. Lancashire, has applied to Government for pioneer status to obtain U under the Aid to Pioneer Industry Ordinance. Trinidad Waterfront Always Busy Mr. A. T. Shill. Controller of Customs of Trinidad, told the Advocate yesterday that the Trinidad waterfront is always busy. Recently, they had heavy cargoes and there were a lot of transhipment for the Windward and Leeward Islands, Dutch C.ulana and Venezuela. Mr. Shill is one of the Trinidad Advisers attending the Regional Economic Conference which opened at Hastings House yesterday morning. !Ie arrived here on Tuesday night by B W.I A and Is staying at the Marine Hotel. He said that not so long ago, ihey were rather handicapped in Transhipment by lack of onward shipping facilities. Within the last month they had more small craft available so that they were able to expedite transhipment cargo to the Windward Islands more considerably. He said that recently, they had one onward steamer with 5,000 tons of very varied onward cargo of which 3,800 tons was for transhipment and the whole lot was completely cleared in 9 or 10 days. Mr. Shill said that the Managing Director of one <.f the largest international petroleum organizations had told htm. whale on a visit to Trinidad, that, as far as hir Company was concerned. Trinidad was the third largest bunkering port In the world. Apart from the waterfront activities, they hid n continuous stream of vessels from all quarters of the globe calling for bunkers nd stores. He said that the aversge clearance of ocean-going vessels in Trinidad averaged between 23 and 24 a year, and as regards air traffic at Piarco. the average throughout the year, was 2* planes a day Matric Results FOLLOWING are the results of Ihe University of London Matriculation Examination held in Jan • uary this year: — Blnckett J A.; Brewsler. G. W : Broome Ittl Pollard. C. E: Ruck. W O'H : Shepherd. V. Li Small. L. and Small. S. Fpassed the full examination. Grant. R S.; Hope. K. W.[ Roach. D. A. and Thompson, C. L. S ssed ln one subject to complete itrlculalion. Briggs, G. C; Daniel. A F.; McClean. D. Da C; Trotman. C A. and Yearwood. H. Da C. passed in one subject to complete exemption Jamaica Interested In Industrial Development The Jamaica delegation now attending the Regional Rcoi %  mic Conference it Hasting* House told the Advocate yesterday that Jamaica is very keen on industrial development at the moment. The delegation comprised lion D. B Saskgater, Minister for So-.ai Welfare and his four advisers Hon'ble R. L. M. Kirky.ood. Chairman of the Sugar afanufacturers' Association and Chairnia. of th< .',.,.( mtthtttei ..[ i'i. marj Producdn and cltrui Gl Association. Mr J. B. Clogg, Under.Secretary for Ecor.^ mic Affairs, Mr. E. A. Maynn-r, Acting Commissioner of Commerce and Industries and Mr. Dudley E LBW, Second VicePresident of the Jamaica ChaniOB) Of Commerce They arrived on Tuesday night by B W I.A., -ntl are staying at the Marine Holci. They said that a delegation of three had lust returned from a month's visit tu the USA, with a view to interesting U S.. investors in coming to Jemaica That delegation found that investors were very interested in the proposal, particularly as It was put to them as a business proposition showing mutual advantagej for both investor and for Jamaica They were able U> assure invevtoi'i. as to the long term prospects Great Momentum In Jamaica, they had Saw gathered very considerable momentum in this drive for Industrial development and the people and the Government were solidly behind it. They thought II was going to help them very considerably in their aim to secure a more balanced economy and we., certain that Government woa be able to offer rtill furthei inducements to industrialists In the near future. As regards tourism, they confirmed that the West Indies wenbecoming increasingly popuiai with American tourists and IndeSXl they were happy about the trei... of tourism. The drive should now in their view be concentrated upon the summer season In order to lengthening its duration. The Jamaica delegation to Uie Regional Economic Confcienrc regarded it as not only hlstoi V but a major move In prOmOtlnf the closer unity of the British West Indies which in Iheff VIIW Is so vital for the interests of all Its territories. Jamaica was eager and willing to play its full part in promoting end maintaining this unity whi< ,i would undoubtedly yieM hudsome returns to all territories In the yenra to come. Abuse Is Not Argument l^RT-OK SPAIN. May II Tlv Speaker Of the Legislative Council. Mr William Savary. in .. letter addressed to mgakpn the Council, has urged ihem to Talse the standard of Uieii debates. He says that the atm* pnerc in which the business of the Council was being conductc.' was not conducive to its cnVc tiveness as a legislative bod) and tended to lower its dignity t.ood temper and moderation an 'he characterizations of Purlin mentary language. TinSpeakei goes on to suggest that member, sltould avoid personalitie, as thv\ ind not "strengthen your argu menta or destroy the other mem berN" "Remember.*' he add> "abuse Is not nrgument Con taming, it reads. "Even violent pcHtleal differences should nor be allowed to interfere with Uu courtesy expected between rucir. IKTS, much less with their respect for the House itself I am surd that members will agree that debates that attain a high stand ard are not only Instructive but are of Importance in the political education of the Colony, Finally I ask Hon. members to lak,. tht* appeal in the right spirit ". bring to justice those responsible and also to get adequate compen% %  MOP from tlu* Union of South Africa for King's children Drax Hull Purchase Mr P. E. Miller also gave mine of nn Addrvss asking the QOvernOT to take steps to send down legjhdatton havtng for Its object, the purchase of Drax Hall I'laut.iiion in St tlciKgr have this plantttlon dlvtfltd into one sere plots with the MCC*S.O> facilities water, roads, etc.. provided for the accommodation of 700 families. Also thai priority be given to renters now on the land, and khal tin land Inactiuiied on a laojE-larm MJQ pevrnenl pttj At this meeting ol UM Hq i Mi | K \\ .. tl nior rnernbei for St. James, was granted two months' leave of i The request was made b> the lunioi niemin i of the parish, Mt J II Wilkinson. Mr. Walcott has been absent frost] Ihe House foi nms Ume due to loot %  Foliic Repn-entiilion Mr. T O. Bryan gave nottc ions concernini: the Police at Tuesaiay's meeting M the House • \ JUDob He asked Is Government ;iware thai %  llhoul pcopej .'"lection cr suitable gaeJn i Will (oivernment takr I'. %  11. Constables from punishments of this nature IV. I m i le. pr. £7M. DAMAGE CUATEMALA CITY, May 1Q. A ..vcionctoda) aamagod .'" MM plan tat lor. s on the Bsst area Daa hatimatod at i7.iHht.oon. liven (t BsBg no BM| Of life. The damago I notvo \> xjp.>n nt ban n Pruil Conqwn* stated. i>.i. no V, pr %  %  S* T 10-. v let w MAIL NOTICE %  UAll-S f! SI LU : v:i\ SOW will I>HM i/al Boat Ofllcc ai under — ffarsfl i*^iuicmi rn ore ISA) ir— Oan Political Asylum Clm Slartt-d THE HAGUE, May IS The International Court "' JusUce began hearings here today in the second phase of the Colombia Peru dispute ove: asylum granted by Colombia U the Peruvian political leader I-asl November the Coun ilecided that Colombia had not been legally justified In graiUin* asylum to Victor Raul Hayo I> La Torr*. political leader and author who bed Into the Colombian Enibas*> in Lima in Januar) IM to evade an. %  hi < o.vernment and who has lieen there ever since. —Keuler THE WORLD'S FIRST CHOICE IN TYRES With Rimo your coloured clothe* arc gayer, brighter, and your whites so much whiter too! Every trace of dirt is quickly washed away when Firno's rich, but gentle suds get to work. For easier, speedier washing always use Rinso — and take real joy in the results it gives. RINSO for all your wash GOOD/VEAR iTHE LONG-LIFE HARDEST WEAR":G TYRE mv^sgs New Loveliness I "" PALM0LIVE SOAP •FMOW //lit iSlrstpM Besnrly nan l.ur r..a l(hPlm..ll.*s..,p C II,... I. C r afcln V H-iir. .1,. I., "'" f r.lniohx. ii ,-i TNT Today Not TomoVbvu} This is to introduce "T.N.T." the dynainio little figure suggesting energy and action. "TONO" Chocolate Malt and Milk which •'T.N.T/'represents is the newCow&Gato tonic beverage — already famous and popular — a wholesome, energising food for nerves, brain and body, blended only from natural products. And "T.N.T.V first message to you is TAKE IT "TO-DAY NOT TO-MORROW I I %  THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO„ LTD. AVAILABLE!! BEDFORD DELIVERY VMS $2,135.00 Usual Fleet Owner'a Bteoaat COURTESY . M l %.l ROBERT THOM, LTD. — While PnrU Rd. — Dial 4391



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PACE FOIR BASBADOS ADVOCATE TIIL'HSIIAV. MAY 17 1U1 BARBADOS ADVDOTE *.1 f -1 Printed b U* A i i w .o, i-ia.. reaa OU Brtdae*ew Thm-d.n. Msf 1". 1951 Cleansing The Leper: A Modern Miracle A NEW IDEA IN STATEHOOD Hill SAID, Kill (.1 OIK.I SIR GEORGE SECTS speech at the opening of the First Regional Economic Committee at Hastings House yesterday was the speech of an Englishman of the old school. Delivered with great simplicity the words went straight to the heart of the matter and 'he unanimous applause that greeted iis conclusion showed how truly Sir George had interpreted West Indian feelings. Internationally, said Sir George, ihei c is no Aidl thing as a British West Indies. At the same time it is inevitable that West Indians should prefer direct representation in making trade arrangement--. How impoMlbk UM pnoml situation is, said Sir George, you ran see for yourselves. It took four years to get this Committee %  Wimbled The report! Of the Ranee Committee tnd the Maurice Holmes Committee seem like Mahomet's coffin to be suspended between heaven and earth. These territories, said Sir George, should be engaged together in an enterprise in which they can rely on their own skills, their own re"UJV< s and their own judgement: from which when they are successful they can derive renewed confidence in themselves: and in which, when they do not achieve all they desire, they can search for the reasons at home, and not exhaust themselves in recriminations against others. "I believe." said Sir George and the whole West Indies re-echoes his belief "that much of the criticism which is being voiced at this moment arises from a sense of frustration, because the British West Indies have not yet organised themselves to speak together and exert their full strength in the field of trade and commerce." That is the challenge which Sir George threw down to the meeting, the challenge of a great civil servant whose service to the West Indies here and in London has been ro often proclaimed and championed by all those who know his merits. It was for the West Indies to take up that challenge, and Mr. Albert Gomes was waiting and ready. He would not allow the meeting to proceed without drawing to their attention th.? view of '.he Trinidad Government that the West Indies must have direct representation at the trade talks between the United Kingdom and Canada which open next week in Ottawa. Nor was Mr. Gomes silent about the need for a united front with regard to Mr. Bottomley's mission. He made it clear and the point was well taken by a Government official attending the conference, that, although the agenda of the Regional Economic Committee was a large agenda, an important agenda and a historical agenda, the issue of Canada-West Indies Trade and the approach of Mr. Bottom ley in search tof sugar fads, were matters of far greater urgency. "You have the opportunity", said Sir George, "to sweep away the frustration and weakness that arise from isolation and disunity to build up a self-reliant British West Indian economy and present it to the world." Mr. Albert Gomes more perhaps than any other West Indian politician of to-day knows how necessary it is to act on this advice. But he was not prepared, nor can we believe that Mr. Grantley Adams is prepared, to sit quietly back discussing the preliminaries of general economic unity, when two great issues were awaiting for solution by unity. The lamentable fate of Grenada, the growth of "masquerading" politicians throughout the area can only be checked by united action in the economic field Mr Qomoi is giving a groat lead to West Indian federation of a real and practical kind. Sir George Seel exhorted the Committee to speak together and exert "their full strength in the field of trade and commerce Nothing has happened in his lifetime." he said, "to suggest that when they do so they will not be heard at any rate in Britain, with ready sympathy and with every desire to reach mutually advantageous results The West Indies applaud this statement from the heart. That is why they support Mr. Gomes in his determination to see that the West Indian voice is heard in Ottawa next week and that Mr. Bottomley is unanimously told what the West Indies think about trade pacts with Cuba, which may result in further loss of markets for West India sugar. FOR countries where the diaeaiu.may occur, modern science hw opened up an entirely new outlook for sufferer* Iron leprosy. No longer are they considered "unclean." or doomed to die of an affliction hitherto considered incurable Those who kno-i the truth about leprosy are surprisingly few In fact, only a restricted number of doc lorn and speciMMts are aware of the astounding fact thai leprosy is not and never has been contagious—except to children The facts have been carefully .olh-.ua by a magazine called The Star which is edited, printed, and published by the patients of the U.S. Marino Hospital at Carville, Louisiana, in the southern part of the United States. The other name for that hospital is the U.S. National Leprosarium Among the fuels regularly reiterated in The Star are ant following : Science records 141 experiments in which researchers have tried lo infect themselves or other volunteers with leprosy by putting the known germ (Myeohactrrlam leprae) into their bodies; there has not been a single infection in these efforts. In 264 years of succouring leprosy sufferers, no physician, nurse, or attendant of the San Lazaro Hospital in Manila. Philippine Republic (says Dr. M. Carton of the hospital staff) has ever contracted the disease. In the 53 years of Carvllle's history only one employee has developed leprosy. He was found to have been exposed to it as a child, and he came from an endemic area In one of the only three States in the US where leprosy now endcmically occurs: Louisiana, Texas, and Florida That childhood history is the important point. Unless a person has been exposed to leprosy as a child, il Is a 99 9 per cent, scientific certainty that he will not eontract the disease later whatever he TT .|l il'l Dr Rrownlow David Molesworth, medical superintendent of Sungei Bulor leprosarium in Malaya, goes further. He has found that a person must be exposed to leprosy, not only once but repeatedly, in childhood to contract it, and he reports : "It is a series of infections added together that finally win a foothold. Once this is established the disease lies dormant, it may be for one, two, four, eight, or even twenty years before it breaks out." That was what happened with Mrs. Hans G. Horn hostel, a famYears of research and discovery of helpful new drugs have served to disprove many misconception* about this once -dreaded tsssssM. By DONOVAN MNUI ous case of leprosy in modern American life. The wife of a U.S. Army ma)or, Gertrude Hornbostel was liberated from a Japanese prison camp in ihe Philippine Islands after World War II and was found on arrival at the Pacific Coast city of San Francisco, to be suffering from leprosy. She was rushed into another kind of confinement at Carville and her husband. Major Hornbostel, *fHtfl on going with her. It is generally agreed that it was the weakening conditions of life in the prison camp that brought nut the dormant leprosy in Mrs. Hornbostel. It is known she had been exposed to it as a child on Pacific Islands. The most quoted case—Father DaaatSfl is mis'eading. Damicn de Veuster was a Roman Catholic missionary to the lepers at Kalaupapa on the lonely Hawaiian island of Molokai. He became their chaplain In 1873. developed the disease, and died there, unquestionably a heroic, saintly man Famous biographies of the great Father Damien fail to mention that In the latter half of the las! cenury leprosy was endemic in the Lowlands of F.urope, including the parish near Louvain. Belgium, where Father Damien was born and spent his boyhood. Heredity has been ruled out as a factor in transmission of the disease. "Babies of parents with leprosy," says Dr. Molesworth. "are always born healthy — it is the close eontact after birth with an infectious parent that finally infects the child." The words "finally" and "child" should be noted particularly. Repeated contact is not enough. Childhood contact is not enough There must be both Thai leprosy is not a disease of Ihe "unclean" was proved 76 years ago. when Norwegian Dr. Armaucr G. H IIonsen isolated the Kerm which causes it, a microbe closely related to the tuberculosis bacillus and as hard to kill or harder—even boiling does not destroy Myeabaeterlam leprae. Leprosy is no more "foul" than tuberculosis, and yet. as American and British doctors have shown, it is 100 times less infectious. "From the public health standpoint," writes Dr. F. A. Johansen, affectionately known to his 388 Carville patients as "Dr. Jo," "leprosy m.gr.l considered ••* practically a n n-commuiueable disease Finally it has been established that leprosy doe: not even "spell doom The dlaSssM can be halted, held, even put into reverse. Mrs Hornbostel already has been lo normal life, is now an ordinary. unnoticed suburban housewife Four nations contributed lo this peacetime triumph. German chemists originated the drug DDS (diamino-diphenyl-sulfone) or "basic sulfonc." English laboratory scientists demonstrated its ext ordinary germ-killing power in ihe test tube French workers tried it on tuberculosis germs in the human body and discovered that in Its early form DDS was too toxic for use on humans. Then both American and British chemists laamad how to rearrange the molecular construction of DDS M as to lessen its danger for human: while retaining its deadly effect on germs. The altered forms — promin. diasone. sulphetrone — proved Ineffective against tuberculosis, but on the related leprosy bacillus the tests gave leprology doctors their most encouraging results in 76 years of research effort Some forms of leprosy have always been self-arresting. Germs which develop along the nerves eventually pamlyre a whole area Of the host body, in effect locking themselves up and rendering themselves harmless. Such cases when their nature has been determined, have alweys been discharged from leprosaria as safe Within a few years of trying DDS. which is slow-acting but steady the rate of discharge of patients around the world has grown amazingly At Carville the rate doubled In 1950 more good news came from Carville. Doctors there have been trying a still further-rellncd form of DDS—promacetin—which can be swallowed at meal-timi and which produces no acute tox effects. It is reported to result in clinical Improvement which "universal, uniform, and sustained. even among patients in on advanced stage of the disease. There is no doubt that, while a cure for leprosy is not yet officially here, the oullook is definitely engaging END This article appeared in the January 1951 issue of t'nlted Nation* World, a private publication printed monthly in the United States and distributed internationally. The author is a frequent contributor to American periodicals i Irll. h.w hi. h--.-l.-d Luxury Creep* Bark To British Manufactures LONDON, ept back to BrtBy HAZEL MAY Luxury has crept back to Brt. , ..•— tlsh good, and craftsmanship— but ondol*s. motor-cars — anythm*. Mill for export only! ''''"< %  %  which can ^ depleted In Jewels, gold and silver, rich %  ** " d £** nc JSS^ silks, beautiful glass and china manufacturer hide* In a brooch a ..aulc the eve at this year's Bri %  **. wnlcn s only revealed by tish Industries Fair. For the find flinging B |MaUuu of it over, on lime since the war quality and the smallest of hinge*, magnificence have stolen the Held <*"*? ****• "P.. 1 lh *£ VT from rasy-tomalM and austerity "toot IHlthf l visitors and a utility Paper ihia gold cups with %  ** connouBir__rt china j _and I'jitlerns delicate as One lace calch *J' the attention of foreign buyer tu.r laMei fUmmer In shaded folds. Hut . "No good me showing you th will find much lo adml: in the magnificent display from ; tTio Midlands. "Service plates", used by the Oil as a form of table things, sir—they're all for export", I heard ana exhibitor say. All ever the vast acreage of EBTb Oouri and Olympta they wan tclhng unhappy British buyers the same thin IT. Down Millionaire's Row — the n ime they have given to QM *< a ellcry section — there ore well over £1,000.000 of gems on show. One tiny shop hus £100.000 of shimmering diamonds and highly decorated Jewelled wntchag arrayed on red velvet cushions Buyer* stroll in, glance over diamond rings worth a rajah's ransom. dangle n diamond bracelet from a nonchalant hand, and saunter .ut again This air of casual go-as-youplease masks, however, extensive security precautions by Scotland Yard. Liberally scattered among the crowd are plain-clothe* detectives, and D ring of London uniformed police circle the jewellers section. An alarm would bring decoration the police network t> life la a split served, s< i i rid. many Modern methods of before a meal Is being produced by firms as dollar-earners. effective Each plate must bo different and euutifu1 gold-pulntcd shining brown wood. On one wall there hangs a fine reproduction of ihe sun-ray mirror. British leatherwork can hardly ba rivalled in the world today A prince's luggage could be bought at some stands—dressing eases of finest blue seul grain morocco lined with moire silk. Fitlimus are of enamel mounted on silver and arranged m I dazzling display—brushes and combs, boillc-. and jars, mirrors manicure implements and powder bowl. Most popular design on the enamel was a delicate fleur-de-lis pattern. British Ceylonese have woven the brocade for the most luxurious evening gown displayed In the Fair in gleaming pink and blue brocade, designed by Norman Hartnell with the motif on th material picked out with glittering sequins and Ceylonese fabric made evening BjOVOl m satin, beaded o with sequins Extravagance wa UM key iioie of nylon evenin_ dresses with floating gauzy skirts. No ironing Is needed for these. th< answer lo a woman traveller 1 prayer, Immediately after the war i decorator who designed a door with a cut out alcove to be filled with fresh flowers would have been laughed at; today such millionaire's whims are encouraged. At one stall exhibitors were showing a hidden flower vase In a hollow portion of th" door whit,. keeps flowers alive and blooming: a portion of trellis can be remc in %  • i lei I:, %  ., rt ,..i If the best of Brltun's ma.._ fdclures are today lost to home markets, they continue lo enhance the status of British craftsmen abroad. By LI IS MUN'OZ MAKIN (Governor of Puerto Rico) From United Nations World PUERTO RICO is associated with the United States in a bold, new mariner. We Puerto Ricans are in the process of creating a new type of statehood, a statehood which is related by citizenship and law to the US. federal government itself, rather than to the ther States of the Union. Our privileges as .n autonomous entity within the Union are many and varied, as are our responsibilities Like the other 48 States and like independent nations, too, Puerto Rico has the right to proclaim its own constitution as well as to alter it We elect our own government: -nunicipal councils, mayors, representatives, i'nators. and our chief executive, the Cov%  nor. With consent of the Puerto Rican Senate, the Governor appoints his Ministers. 'he Chief of Police, and the Commander of the National Guard, as well as the judges of ;he various tribunals. The Puerto Rican Conlitution specifically indicates procedure for he appointment of justices to our Supreme Court. These officials are in no way responsible to any authority of the United States, but 'hey are all answerable either to the Puerto Rican voters or, in the case of appointive Misitions, to the Governor. Our autonomy Il further vividly demonstrated by the fact hat no official of the United States—not even 'he President—has any authority over the Governor. Authority is vested solely in the people of Puerto Rico who can replace the Governor at the end of his four-year term, and in the Legislature, which can impeach him. This new type of State, similar in structure to a dominion in the British Commonwealth of Nations, is now in full development within .he framework of our United States. Since we are associated with the United States, our merchandise enters U.Sports duty-free, but because we are not a State of the Union, Puerto Rico pays no taxes to the U.S. Treasury. All revenue is diverted into channels specified by the Puerto Rican legislative Assembly, elected by universal suffrage. Puerto Rico is represented in Washington. D.C., by a delegate in the U.S. Congress. His st.11us is different from representatives of other States of the Union in that he is recognized by the Executive Branch of the U.S. Government, and different, loo, from that of envoys from other countries in that he has a seat in the Congress. The United States has granted large-scale economic aid to Puerto Rico in the difficult task of raising the standard of living of our steadily growing population. Federal allocations have been made for road-building, schools, public health, technical education, agricultural development, and social security. Puerto Rico's imports exceed exports by a substantial marginWithout aid from the United Stales we would suffer a disastrous imbalance. And so our island of 3,435 square miles, with a population of some 2,250,1)00, appears to-day as a Latin American country made up of good U.S. citizens. It is united to the North by warm political ties, to the South by close racial and historical bonds—and to both by the twin cultures that live on in its midst. Puerto Rico is fortunate indeed to have the privilege of expressing its desire to become an independent republic or a State of the Union at any time its people think such %  move desirable. The Puerto Rican people have the assurance of President Harry S. Truman that they need only ask for full independence to receive it. We are free to choose our own form of freedom, our own political formula, adapted by our own free spirit to our particular way of life This, indeed, is a privilege of which we are proud, and a responsibility to ourselves of which we are fully conscious. This political creation is indeed a dynamic indication of the vigour of the United States In developing new political ideas, and of the real possibility of good neighbourliness and mutual trust of the peoples of the Americas. I'll At THAI SPANISH GRAMMAR II > II ills A Foril Advocate Stationery YACHT FITTINGS BRASS HAST TRACK GALVANISED ANCHORS—7. II ml H-ths BRASS BII.C.C PIMPS BLOCKS—Slnfle and Double -D" SHACKLES— T: S'!*"• HARP SHACKLES—',"; 5-18"; V TURNBVCKXES—',"; S/16"; '." CHEEK BLOCKS HtMVt.L I CI.I.EIS CHOCKS RINGBOLTS— Galvanised—3'.": 3" WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER & CO. 'Phones : 4472 & 4687 A SYMBOL OF QUALITY I S FOR ENTERTAIXISG PLEASURE Thafs tehy—YOV SHOULD SELECT H. M. V. RADIOS and RADIOGRAMS DA COSTA & CO, LTD.—Elertriral Drpl. I ///,WW/,W///,v/////^////,y//,v,',.SELECT YOUR SUMMER SUIT NOW. %  .... Cho06e from a wide range of materials of — ALL WOOL TROPICALS. LINENS. POPLINS, AND WHITE DRILLS All Wool TROPICALS from .3S per yd. LINENS from $1 92 per yd. POPLINS @ $2-2' per yd. And WHITE TUTAKA DRILL (B $1.05 We do not know how long wo can maintain our present keen prices—Order your Suit NOW! • DA COSTA &. CO., LTD. Dry I.IMMIS Oep<. •--s:v f :'ssssss.'S.'S r 'ss.' r '.'.','.'.'''' -,'.v-.-.'.'.'.'.'.'.'-'.'-'-'-''-'''''OUR READERS SAY: Harhtnlits f.'hri'Han Party IN t-tti Mior, TIM An the thing that to my mind prevents forthcoming problems. I am thinking rrf the registration of thousand* of persons who fOr M>mr reason or another have refrained from voting in the past, and especially do I mean the Christian section, those persons who look upon laytalntf political as something outside, or *et apart from their nctivitics. and a thing with which they must have nothing to do. This idea I* especially fostered by the belief I hat the paths or by-paths of the polr gaged an brOBd, Or tinged with %  d in Ihe leads to evil—etc etc.! or still further ." Chriatl'i-gard to ihe application of Christian Principles and Splrll to domestic politics ami loralfn relations— "As a consequence of itloil tbt Political life of America is generally below the level nf Iht life "f the people. American life in general is higher than its political life. The financial reward* of business have been so much higher than the tlnancial rewards "of ho. f politics thai the best brains and talent ol this country has been drained from the political life into bmlnwjgThe political life has been impoverished, morally and intellectually "I It can be said that something like the above mentioned may have accounted for the past attitude 0| UM ehrlstlan regarding politics ID Barbados, nlthough we may bo thankful that it has not been to a extent. regi'traB will bo mulct iried or unwilling to vote because of th< -.: think that those capal.'. ershlp among the Christians should awaken to ihe fact that me lime has come for christianttv t" take a very active part, not wily In keeping the barnacles. PIC from obstructing the smooth running of the political ship, but in the setting of the course of 15S_-h *P WW not the BARBABOS CHRISTIAN* PARTY? You may ask about capital for campaigns. How about aub< i-us mm Ihe thousands of willing Christians to a Party Fund under Christian supervision, to elect representatives from among the Christians just r ofj gte red. voted for by the chri*lians of eleven parishes. from every parish a candidateYes indeed Mr Editor In time to come I can even visualise A Barbados vibrant with new life, for who is there better to set Hie path for the Christian active in politics than the rhnstt.m himself? Thanking you Sir. Yours truly, GEORi;i: ii BABCOMBT %  afton'i Village. St Michael. r, 1951. Thank,, from B.G. To The Editor. The .4rtroco*.— SIR,—I have to thank you loi publishing my request for correspondents from your Ml your newspaper. I have had such an over whelniniii response to my request, that I am finding it almost impossible to cope wilh my correspondence. However, I have taken the liberty of passing the names and addresses of some of the people who wrote to me on to Editors of our local neirfpapers. i n the hope that interested parties from British Guiana will write tc them. I shall be much obliged if you will kindly COnVej my sincere thanks, through the medium of your newspaper, to all those persons who have responded 10 my request. Again thanking you for your kind assistance. MAIZIE BUI" Fire Brigade H Georgetown. British Guiana. 7th May. 1951. COCKTAIL TEMPTERS GOLD BRAID RIM TOP NOTCH RUM. GORDON'S GIN BURNETT'S GIN PRISES '•OLOI'RFIL COCKTAIL ONIONS tRed. YeM aw. G reen). PEANUT BUTTER ; PRUNES ^^ COCKTAIL BI SCI ITS. SALTED PEANUTS \NCHOVIES. ; SARDINES PICNIC SPECIALS l MARSIIMALLOWS BARLEY STICKS i inn in. \ 1 I LUND • ARKS BISCUITS MM i: in RotUe 1UIR in Can VEGETABLES DITCH FINK PEAS C IIIYEK S PEAS RMBDLIY Pi ^ \NP.\KA<.1 Ml> KALE SPINACH CARROTS BEETS DESSERTS JELLIES—<5 Flavours) BIRIt S CUSTARD POWDER GRAPES hi In OI/AVAS In tins RHURARD In Una KRAFTS ICE CREtM POWDI It Just arrived: FRBBH RED SNAPPERS, SMOKED KIPPf RS FEATURING FRESH FISH RED SNAPPERS — SMOKED KIPPERS : ; ORDER FROM t.OIHHHItS /!! 5



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v\<:\ rit.nr n\l:i: \IM')S ADVOCATE TIII'RSn.W, MAY 17. I9.-.I Weekes, Worrell Named Cricketers Of Year Cycle Racing VALKNT1NK. RAMADHIN AWAIIUKD HONOUR IN CRICKETER'S BIBLE LONDON Four of the flvt (iirkclns ol the year clmssjn by Wisdcn's of i rlckei to be MiblMfaM on Friday are dUn I Frank Woin-11. Sunny i] in and Alfred Vak ntinc e fifth cricketer of th< en chose. EngUihinan nd Kent vicket-keeper four Wet . %  ng %  noun tuna: co m pl in ml to m % %  tadlan track triumph* In la %  nd*i British names. In itarticle on Weekes, W. l Pei heps no bataanan ,uh JII imki i Soflaa) t'-ur n't If. toirtpik'r "I I'll* M."I*-S B> C'LVDi: WAIXOi'l ... ,,,,,1, siepMcal of \i'-i i : I MUty tn reproduce on Ertfdbh W l. tier vrMa.) nty grouiada the form by arblcli 1AM" in) blajh icon T *. ,iiit ; .i match % %  • IM lad broke i**cord* in India : the l^neaaalrc Laagua. dlM \i. w pradoaUoataly wet In a draw raSi* MM proved them wrong. On Sunday, •< Id 6V i i iiiiuii I si-oiiis Australian \l \s W.I. \l Game Drawn |u% B WaM In s l(anythm ... %  crlain ...rtickel layer, so % %  I ,i mat %  Needle%  uYienden i Bun* %  might be Mnwwhai i he out* eawounta Tne Australian \i a .-.U-round side: Hill A ixxl .mi. George TT11 • I i*i Mu-k Rajmar, Jack Fetttford royed Hair* Lambert, n ntrmauric "Furthermore w Coekburn W Wi J Lambert. Th.Weal Indl in XI Barbadians. 'I • Frank WOl Bvert Clyde Waleott, Roj E. A. MarUnda Bmnti r. who i aButaui fd Radcliffe a etVBB, TheSkipnei. Klli* Achong, I from TV. SB K.m*dhln. while K link,nds and L. Maaaada arc from J IBM Pfiraudeau wai i %  % %  %  i AustraUa won the tow on* batted first on a wicket, which was helpful to bowk'i %  I t Martindalc and Frank Worrell f-pvied the bowllnv, IHII did not start—P TI: with any success. If imadhln hogr %  relieved Worrell and In hi* first i ver he captured ta arttuif Walmsley 1-b.W. and All. •tumped by Waleott for a duck The Australians went on to semt 14 runs; Rnmedhin taking wicket* for a negligible amount c! run* Bruce Dooland lop scored with 68 ii had i'" difficulty lr placing Rsmndhln. Roy Mnrshall took Dooland's wteket. and RoMln off Raid will ooottaue to %  Ulna records." oi frank Worrell II iaya. "law, • | riekctcr* run Hi view the game with such detached ittltaaa M ffaa ilka Uthaly bum To htm a match, be ii Test or %  cluh BJitura "• iust that game of cricket to be enhe never reads sport* columns in newspapers. *o unaffected h\ opinion i M adverse or erlUca. •moat batnwa HI ar aa nd day orfeket At time., a little uncertain t t ol an innings, he I %  %  set. moal difllrult to dismiss and elegant style, command of every orthodox "-trohe ind perfection In timing niMke* him a deltghl u) watch A* a bowler, by vaTftttf hll Ityla to fast-medium, he accom plishfl >onic valuable perform* ancaT, Sonny Ramadhln. young right 'inn. slow bowler, is describe,! a ng his rivals from tin man who grew Into i 1th a reputation which worried most bal*mer. before ho howled against Ihcm Rninadhir %  ickata and the admi cut the vital pause, for hts pace would be lerrinc. He makes the bill lift disconcertingly trom B lauaUi England Cricket Is On Trial In Present Series By HERBERT SUTCLIFFE CRICKET season just be^innm*. for me. opens with a frouble P for England batsmen when mystery, why have the South African Cricket Association the pitch is favourable sent only 15 players on tour here? Yes. I know they've oime with a spirit of exceptional optimism, but surelv it's beinK a little over-optimistic to trv to face a hard tour with only four possible replacements. Even if the team members are iim ". un of !pin bl f '"' '-r short ortunate enouh to escape injurv. ^ s far a P U1 1 ,s „ w ron ** r ed \. mn.nt.un that ,t pays dividend's ^.uce.tenihire'. Charl^ Ps.ker lo give young players n chance to Mrl.ean One To Watch ilevclop on Enah-ii wickets. AlI *hll vratftl cluacly the pro pntscUnaj, of couraat they ares* of two bowlers of simitir dein. I'*sest> the neces iary -ki %  l und adtype. Clive van Ryncveld and (iKtllUlF.TOWN. May 16 On a dry track Wilfred Korea, Surinam, won |he three mile %  B, there's no .easen to Cycle Race Trinidad'* Williams i storm in a teacup. won the nine mile ,n a driving All the fcame. 1 would lik< to rimsh and broke the record. see a continuity ot OssUvi Rr^SLT-TS I can see Geoff Chubb, in pite of his being the third oldesi member of the side :it 3. doing exceptionally well wi'h medium seam bowling. Fit a id strong, he's the type who can bowl all day without showing signs of fuli-f ne Wicket-keepei is Russell En'hose batting, too. should Ix* safui, although It • P N r Mansell. Van Rynafeld'a be in the rlaas or -Mr 1 . Hia<< Oxford experience will toe invalCameron, who at Biamall-1 i p c •> IMbfa and I expect him to score %  few years ago hit Medley Verity r ir number cf rum for four 8's and two 4's in a sixHis leg-break googly bowlin*-. bill over. however, will be more successful That WH the over which Broil be en OOtnmand % %  (Iiimmettmoted the classic remark by VI.IKllka li'iiKth shire wicket-keeper Arthur Wood Rov McLean. aHhmiKh only 20. "You've got him in two minds immediately took my eye at the HedU-y net Re pi cd brilliant attacking "Whai yoa raaranT:rsked cricket, and il he can reproduce Hedley. this form in the middle, will give "Well." -aid Arthur, "he docan I tagllsh crowds some first-class know whether to hit you for Tour team, may be excused entertainment. or six." xecutctl en the village Caun McCarthy, another of the **y summing-up or the South green by the local blacksmith, but "Three Macs"—J.ickie McOlew 1* / fr cms is that the bowling is a; Lord's and Sydney. In hard-he third—is the tallest and handirong. but not exceptional The fought Te*t battler, it is |u-t plain >(mes: member of the party Onlv Holding will be brilliant, and if • % %  icide. 2\, he's alx fe two Inches mil 'he young, inexperienced batsmen Perhaps that's the reason for am | hj the fastest bowler South are blessed with the right sort of 1 African optimi-sm. They Afrlc ha produced for many temperament^ and ability to fight Three Mile 1 Korss 1 Surinam) 2. Liddcll (II fl 3 Williams iTrinidadt Nine Mile l William* fTrlmdad) I laddell (B.G.) 3 Small (B.G.) PB, Holder (BO I. Time 24 mms, 4.9 sees. Previous Record: Lindsay Gordon (B C. I. M mlns 11 A sees. INI, to 'he clenvjiitaiy prlnclplce, Ii 1 bowlers length, flight, spin or swing, and for batsm?n correct otwork, body positioning nnti, in trie rn-nn. a 3.might bat Parhapa it may sound dlly to talk in those terms of rntarnaUpnal rrlclbators, but sev.rul of the Enuland batsmen in Australia last 1. niter di'cardelival held st Robertson Cape Province. South Africa -Express. Car I ton Defeat Spartan 2 — 1 kasatJen n * rketl w,lh , hrills in both halve*. Carlton M defeated Spartan two goals to one when they met in a footfa.t-medlum. medium off-breukt. ball match at Kensington Oval yesterdav afternoon. The crowd waa noisy all through the game The pitch was firm and fast and the standard of plav was fairly good. Carlton drew first blood in the moved to sOW ..un :* fov 60 R,.\ Marshall and Bruce Pair, .i\id\iu opened the Weal Indli hatting to the bowling "' H Uambert and W Coekburn h"Ui ol %  left arm fast l.wlers With the icore il M palraudtau %  ontheir second goal )usi attei the second half had started kei enthusiast* both Shortly after Spartan kicked in d old." their goal. For Carlton. Reynold Hulchinson playing at inside Ian [mints out that Alfred right scored both goals for Valentine, slow lefthander, sent Carlton while Keith Waleott ;,t down 02 overs (552 balls) in the his usual position ot centresecond innings against England in forward netted the onlv goal for the Third Test Match at NottmgSpartan. and so created reCotd ot the fii the second half e-f the gai .... was too "low nisi half of play and went on |o Spartan now renewed then gfl r but at the end of play the score unchanged. Carlton had know that ttM slandnrd ... Union when England won the lubber by the barc-t margin in IU4B49 was not very high, and 1 suppose that in th light of more rerent England performances, at home rind oversea*. They feel tiiat they hav.at least an equal chance England, they m 1st led, a-e just nr. much on trial as the] *[,ite of the fact tiat the winning of the final Ti-vt m Australia is somewhat heartening *o folk ot hum. Rut fo. all ;hal there >a -.till some hard work ahead for our selector* — and for the men they pick Any batsmin to reprerent England—and I feel that . nB ' Au£tr0 U UB1 Hutehlnson. Lucas. McLcod. H w,ni t wim his more famov Hutchinson and Marshall partner Spartao: Coxier. Brwen, (i,b lr > my view, a grave mistake bom. Medford. Cadogan. Glltens. %  < % %  m ede in omitting him. fo Chase, Johnson. Walcnit, Q a'id Ikyee yiarHe is as fast os Ray Llndwall or Keith Miller, and i couple this pair bneiuse Miller's fastest delivery is equal to Llndwall's. There's Trouble In Store McCarthy would be the fastest or the three but for the fact that he stops, quite noticeably, at the crucial point of delivery. There will, no doubt, be many arguments thTWlghOMl the country as lo %  Aether 'here is ,i suspicion of illegal bowling, but as he h .s played In Test cricket agamsl England and Australij without a complaint being registered b-. 1 HI i: HOOK which makes GOD'S WAY OF SALVATION PLAIN" Fleuae write tor •*• te Samuel Rabertt, Geaael Baek and Tract Sarvlec, M. Oeatfal Avenue, Bsngor N. Ireland." V''.'>^-'*'V'>'*-^-'>'VJ-Ve^<>e J -v*.-' Th. reflMI *a* Mr O S Cophud and eitUnently to back the efforts or Nour*e. Eric Rowan and Fullertoti. they should score a packet or runt ngfainst an England Utack which is not psrtlCUlarly outstanding The tight for the ruhber, by irly even teams, should produce CBYrTOQt OSB Mn 11. OBFTMr. 7UIIB7.KRR7FTM vrepid iMi->.ii-s/rtiM THVVMr I..I (f-n 1*1 i.o <* b • %  IINO CONSTIPATtON HOW AFTER YEARS OF MISERY "For year kinds or AIX-MAN regular #n/y psung dav' H.dy Adlcr.UlOJOihH Miami H< I Om ol -we) '• W.Vr. /i I had t-en taking manv llwn 1 ined h not only keeps m I really I *i i | r. v You loo may ex peel 1" overcome nifisUNtion due lo; lu:!:. U >*eni fohow I %  bout I .tup' of mapv Kell.^rcefui :iu. both losing thelr wackett I i Cei II Pepper. Clle Wali. H Sras unfiirtunaU'lv r,m out al H due t" B ni'Mii •!• witii his partner K Rlckards, who vtl i -.II i... led b Walmi lay %  >! il runl With very mil. llaae left I | %  %  IM last was 3 not oul and the #1 total 116 i i i It vras a %  the Weil r,,,!,,. p*|| i %  i U lUbh'iK <( UM lr %  i .. ,. .U] tl.e W* t Ii ra* next flxto.t io be pi % %  I %  %  old wick %  i May ^fltli ItebJ In miir Test matches passed to Chase on the right wing could reach the was challenpcd m lx-en surpassed'. —geuter. ^MiiviMinir TmHir llo'*. No. 4 f;te sleiuK of wi.ii I tenlion lo stop -lii" do* nvrrtikc turn etc Spare made .tvalUblr b> CANADA tt\ It.Hater Motorin-f. |y M. Harrison-Cray Ikraler : Norlb. N... IL vnuiii nine iiv llfl Sill If |i I I S 1 •lift > A 10 4 hkL.Ce >i inTtliea.-nPnl ** rlite to Hie .imngll.wt mat he did not consider in* nano ^inaig eiiiaiBti for a ieer*e pita He Xerrtore aid One suiutc. EaM To Diamonai md ffOqth Two Ho-Trunip* North dare noi say riiree llmrii lor lear ol i--.ru* put back to Sasades so he o*d I -.„ %  N-. IniiliP, West ii-d OJ n*i rtamli won the seeopd rourtfl He "a* n d Dummy*a) A. *tl. e K and *o. und nine Da hand *h a in lli,k ', : i!' Ir te ema *K %  ii and e <-> *— '•' % %  tnm on piev elUl • !• mid -ah i*o n**>" 1 a < %  %  ,i .,,.<,-s itireis a>a %  e-mll-ar: ft II \\. I ion*: lend ol 0 : He ragi i aye BalV IHII before Ch Carlton area 1 bv Uith bnck^ S ulan argl awatded %  free when Clairmonte handled the hail, imt HutchihCou came back and tuuk a shot at the Spartan area which missed the g.ni i.y inches. Chase took UiuMlmIi' at King. Uit this was fruitless Carlton was given D free kick and Bright their full back, kicked this but Jnhn*>n hrsdid it out for a comet and II HUtchinaen uueued the Bcorlng for Caitton by beading the boil Into ihe Spartan goal from the cornel i tuiei could in.t move to make n save Carlton red thta goal about 10 minutes befoir the end o( Hie fliat half Sliortly after the Hut goal Wll scored Spartan was noticed freqiienling the Carit m area a* thou torwards looked detortnlned to equalise. Spartan gol a free kick which Cadogan kicked but nothing caun out of it. Bright at full I .„ k cleared brilllantlv when WaJrotf was dribbling duw u unmarked When Retiree Coppin blew for half lime the score was unchanged with CaHtrm one goal and Slwn-.n nil. AHer hsir time. Sptrtan began to press hut the Carlton forwards waevj combining well and whett the econd half was alnil 15 niluJ ul.4 uld. Reynold Hutchln— again put Carlt.m two up by so Ing his second goal uulslde Spartan area, the ball going intr the Wt corner nf the neU. completely lieating the Spartan cuilodhM forte. Shottlv afliT Keith Walcelt scored the first goal foi Bpaitan on receiving a long pass. King XI hui's on Today Police Court* li.ee am. Public Messlon Regional I m. Committee 10 00 a.m. Second Day of A.A.A.B. Crete Aid Athletlr Sport* M" I HI;: I tm ,, ,,. Basket ball—Second Division -Pirates n, M M s jt M II S 5 M p.m. Tin n nomiMiir KIOI I1MI \-.*oi lll|(l\ T.d.y. mien Baassm ,. ,.,.,„,. n ., ;;...'.: *' """" %  • • I'idirr i:,n,| ,| Fsplanade. Bay Street 7.4S p.m Meeting of Junior Section ol Milan.e I .,-, g( Modem llish SehoaJ. Roebuck Street. Hill p,m. SBBHkfM SiiaiUr < l.k |„,| v.i.k t..|. Takia a St p.m Otoaei o*i M, n o. ( tn t i,„ 1 nth ni.4 n.rjr. a III -m M a ui Prank is blessed with a very fine cilcket hrnn and for two has moulded his whole rtyle and method of execution on Huttnn For that roaaon I sey he cannot nossibly be left oul of any England tram, and 1 venture to predict for ItOn a highlv successful tour nn the next VPil to An IrallBi providing the selectors, or course do not repeat their snot or omisMOtl But let us look again at the South Africans We know exactly what the old brigade can do. imdley Nourse will be as vigorous and fascinating lo watch as ever, and the oldesi member of the %  dp. vfcsB-captala fcric Rowan whose shrewd captaincy plaved a lng[ part in Transvaal's Carrie Cup victory, will be one of the most duct-essTtiI batsmen on either side. flsjorsftl Fullerton toured with Alan Melville's side. He has shown nun Ii improvement, pm ti< ulai ly during the last South African seaion in add it inn. ho is < good erieles t keeper but >* to be relieved or Ihi* responsibility on this trip. Atlui iiowiin. Biir/* brothei ta i : i. ;.k Ixiwler In thl l lAlOn, and llBO I Denis Compton he has been woe ,.. ,! oul a defi ctlve knee, and with Ihbl in mind it erOtlM have i sen so d is Ucj Ii have Included Hugh Tsyfiel.l hi p I pit bowu i • Tufty" Mann. snotneT who hat i.-ii hare before, naaap rd himself as one or the l>esi StAv. left knn bowlers ever to tour this country. He inaint tins a consistent and immaculate length. Utah'* the b*H %  xceiitioiially well with a tau i They'll Do Ii Every Time ._..-. %  By Jimmy Hatlo LITTLE ASPIDISTRA I-IAS MER PARENTS WORRIEDSUES FOUR AH? DOESN'T SPSAi< V2Ry CLEARLY' tfgg RfSgiefAMNN SERVICE s\TlSF.MTION nVAKAMTRD PFRSONAL srpFKvistnv L. & H. f€0 SI CUV MILLER PHONf POLITICAL MEETING under Ihe auspices of TSB BARBADOS ELECTORS' ASSOCIATION al ql'EKNS PARK FRIDAY NIGHT MAY 18th. a I 8 o'clock Spokcr.: Mnm. J. H. Wilkhuon, F C Cidilard. E. D. Mntlley. H. A. Dowding. W W. Reeco. M.C Pi anil others. Mr. Vincent Griffith and Sydney Walci.lt • Hear our lady speaker. Miss L. Reid. make her political debut. preparation*. Inrlodlnc: t I.FANSINO LOTION SKIN TONIC. SKIN FOOD. COMPLEXION MILK SKIN SOAP IACK (R1AM COMPACT MHNJI BATH POWDER BRACINF CAVE SHEPHERD ck Co, Ltd. 10—11 Broa.l Slrcel -...SWV-.-/VV/V .'.\4MMPMPIPWMnttSKnnnsn:'///4S1SSX WtlKKCi J V II IIII i; A If jjjivtvs TII si II-II "III fo .'."111 your way through liiV Sss Our Up-to-lhp-Minute VI17JV(.V for Spring 1951 S.1..70 LADIES. MEN'S AND CHILDREN'S SOCK* Atao CLEANERS. POLISHES AND BRUSHES fUUct ./ A H Hi, ,,.l is Hak-H in th,>. Mt.il. i, ll/il.fi i/ In ?'. i : tf .' .t ti'-i :L% i'.r