Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
rbados



ESTABLISHED 1895







Adams will put position
of industry before mission

Sugar: Washington:

might leed to global conflict

WEDNESDAY... 16, 1951
*

Proposals put forward by MacAr 2c



Khorea :





Lull all along central front:
Reds building up for offensive

ana
PRICE: FIVE CENTS



New price controls suggested

Prices:
>* to curb excess profits in U.S.

‘CUKE WILL SPEAK FOR OUR SUGAR’

Adams Says Barbados Will}
Tell Bottomley Everything

ME. J. H. WILKINSON, Leader of the Opposition in the Barbados
House of Assembly, yesterday called on Mr. G. H. Adams to see that
Barbados was fully represented at the talks which the Regional Eco-
nomic Committee would have this week with the Mission from London,
headed by Mr. A. G. Bottomley, Secretary for Overseas Trade.

Mr. Wilkinson said that Mr. Adams was a member of
G airy hes the Regional Economic Committee and therefore Barbados

would be represented. “I hope,” he added, “that the hon.
member will insist on calling before the Mission, people
who are well aware of what this sugar question means to
the West Indies and Barbados in particular.”
Mr, Adams said that there neec) —~————
(From Our Own Correspondent
GRENADA, May 15

Eric Gairy to-day gave noticc of

appeal when convicted of a

charge of using threatening lan-

The Mad Moor
Kills Another

event was half way through.

HERE is the Nine Mile Cycle Race at Kensington on
Farnum, who won the

be no fear that the position of the
man in the street and the sugar\
guage in a public speech concern
ing certain members of the Legis-

industry would be put very
lature and was placed on a good

strongly. He referred to his ad-
visers and said that it was im

behaviour bond for six months

with surety of £200.

possible to find more qualified
Gairy conducted his own

de-
fence calling seven witnesses after
having notified his intention of
summoning 30.

Six of these added a aualifying
clause to the statement in the
charge saying that Gairy did not
say that Legislators in question
“would be choked by their own
consciences,” when questioned in
connection with his preceding
words to the effect that if he is
sent to jail for sedition, on com-
ing out he would look for the
graves of those members of the
Council who supported the sedi-
tion Bill. ;

Two policemen gave evidence
for the prosecution, A_ further
charge covering unlawful harm
with intent to put the Legislators
mentioned in fear of harm was
not proceeded with.

Gairy last week told a meeting
that he did not want any of the |
workers to come to town unless |
he called them. The Magistrate
rejected Gairy’s plea in the
course of his address to the
court which said that the case was
planned and in the. sentence he
ordered a_ three’ mo prison |
term in default.



Labour Down
To Three

LONDON, May 15,

The Labour Government's
majority over the combined!
Opposition in the House of
Commons was reduced to three

today by the resignation through
ill health of Mr. Rhys Davies 74
year-old Socialist member for

Westhoughton, Lancashire,
Davies who represented Wesl-
houghton Division for 30 years
was Under-Secretary for the
Home Office in the Labour Gov-
ernment of 1924. At the last
General Election he had a majority
of 11,858 in a straight fight with
the Conservatives. jee
—Reute’.

RAILWAY STRIKE
RIO DE JANEIRO, May 15.
A railroad strike for wage in-
creases broke out today in the
southern state of Rio Grande de
Sul.—Reuter.

6. Points

Inflation Spiral

ERIC JOHNSTON, Director

men to put the commercial point
of view. Of Hon, H. A. Cuke, one
of these advisers, he said: “I can-
not think of anybody in the West
Indies who would be able to put
the case of the sugar industry
better than Mr Cuke,”

Mr. Wilkinson who moved the
adjournment of the House. for a
few minutes to speak on the mat-
ter, said that it was a most im.
portant one for the West Indies
and the Commonwealth,

When he spoke of wishing the
hon, senior member for St. Joseph
to insist in calling upon people
who were well aware of the
situation, he was not implying
that the hon. member was not so
well aware of the serious blow
to the West Indies and the Com-
monwealth, in that England had
negotiated the purchase of a large
quantity of sugar from Cuba, It

!was rumoured too that Canada

ae one time.

CASABL.
Mohammed

"NCA, May 15,
Bouali, the mad
Moor who is sowing terror in
upper Atlas, struck twice agai:
teday, bringing the number of his
murders to seven. He then crept
back into the mountains out of
reach of his pursuers.

Israel, Syria | hoc
Peace Resolution

NEW YORK, May 15%
Syria and Israel have accepted














A French engineer called Chan-| ‘he Security Council’s ceasefire
dot was picnicking on the banks} Pesolution of - May 8, it was
of Lake Azzlal with his wife and announced here today.

Both parties agreed to observe

baby and a friend Mile Greugnet,

when Mohammed Bouali sprang|¢ ceasefire and to withdray
from the bushes with an. old-|Mtlitery forces from the demill-

fashioned musket. tarised zone; : saad
Chandot 4 ‘ To refrain from aggressive
jot shouted to the man in action across or against the

Arabie but Bouali fired twice, kill-

ing him instantly. Then he swung| @militarised zone; and

jhad only guaranteed to purchase

; for St. Joseph will see that labour

'parts”,

thing, Canada wants our sweets.
We

was following her example.
As they were aware, England
Police tonight completed arm-
ing every male member of the
population of Kasta Tadla region

a certain amount of sugar produced
in the West Indies and the Com-

monwealth, the rest would be Reporters covering the hunt
from what’ was known as the/were given steel helmets and
“open market.” If the quantity] rifles. Yesterday a reward of

from these areas was going to .be
veduced the price would go down j
und the position would indéed be- |
come very serious,
as regards Barbados.
“T hope the hon. senior membei

100 sheep was offered to anyone
helping police. arrest Bouali.
On Sunday he killed his mis
particularly; tress’ soldier-husband and then
took pot shots at passing vehi-
cles on the main road with the
soldier’s rifle.
‘is properly represented not only He killed 21-year-old Andre
} by himself but other representa-| Sauvignon and his mother Car
lives because it affects labour very {ren Sauvignon and wounded two
very seriously,” other people travelling in a car
Speaking of trade hetween| with them.
Canada and the West indies, Mr. After robbing them he fired at
Wilkinson said that he thought}two motor cyclists who were
it was over thirty-live years-since}] only slightly injured and eseaped.
the Lady boats started ca theit} He then killed » 22-year-old
nn to the West Indi subsidised | motorcyclist Herve Du Bourg and
by Canada and the West Indies.| his pillion passenger.
Unfortunately these boats since
the war had been coming to the
colonies half empty, due to the
fact that the United Kingdom
would not allow the colonies to
spend their dollars in Canada.
“It will be a very severe blow to
ithe West Indies in particular if
these boats cease to run to these
Mr. Wilkinson said.
“Canada to us means every-





—Reuter.



Parachute Brigade
Alerted For Iran

LONDON, May 15.
Informed sources said that the
4,500-man Sixteenth Independent
Parachute Brigade has been alert-
want her flour, hardware,| eq for a possible air drop in Iran
lumber, ete., and yet we are not] in case British lives become en-
allowed the’ dollars to buy what dangered there. The War Office
confirmed that the Brigade has
been alerted for overseas duty,
but declined to say where it was
going. Informed sources said
Britain has no intention of all
out military intervention in Iran.
“But if the situation arises where-
in British lives are endangered
cbviously there will have to be

action to safeguard them. \
Sources said the Navy could
inot do the job because any
shore parties have to move up
river after reaching Abadan.
Today’s moves followed






@ On page 5.

To Halt

WASHINGTON, May 15

of the Economic Stabilisation lively

Agency, asked today’ for powers to enforce controls on diplomatic exchanges during the

profits.

: Whitsun. holiday between British
Cabinet Ministers, Foreign Office |

He told the Senate Banking Committee that there were experts and the British Ambassa-

six major threats to the “sound dollar” and he laid down aj dor in Teheran, Sir Francis Shep-
six point programme for flattening the inflatien spiral.
“Unless we have a stabilised economy, unless we hold

herd. The United States has
infla- been kept informed of all moves,
and consultations between Lon-

tion in check, we cannot. mount the defence effort as Wel Gon and Washington are continu-

need” he said.

Johnston outlined these six —
threats to a “sound dollar”,

1, Expectea spending of
$1,000,000,000 per week on de-

fence later this year:
.~2, High profits, price and wage
demands :

3. Rising food prices:

4. Speculative scare
and hoarding when
shortages appear :

§. Any’ break
peace between
ployers :

6. General unwillingness to re-

buying
consumer

in the

present |
labour and

em-

cognise the existence of the
national emergency,
He proposed that Congress

these remedies :
taxation to take
out of cireulat-

should provide

“Pay as we go”
spending money
ing :

Increased savings:

General economy —‘non-essen-
tial consumption and waste by
Government business and_ indi-
vidual must be eliminated” :
Materials control — allocation
of materials for both defence and |
civilian needs with production of}
luxuries limited to what is left |
over : |
Strengthening and continuation |
of direct controls |
Johnston called for removal of}
the $10,000 iimit on fines ag
iolators of the Defence Produc-

Act



mst

king Reuter

ing.—(U.P.)

ARTIE’S HEADLINE





Twelve Injured |

RIO DE JANEIRO, May 15

Twelve passengers were serious
ly injured and four suffered only
minor injuries when two twin-
engined Dakota aircraft crasned
today near the airport of Maceiv,
the capital of the northern state
of Alagoas.

The plane which had left Receife
early this morning was on its way
to Rio. The aircraft belonging to
Linhas Aeras Paulistas was
seriously damaged.



Renter

; Rpeeerseer CALIFORNIA, May 15
Miss Francisca De Scaffa has
“Would you please srop aske d here for a divorce i io

referring to m eating a
salad as ‘gobbling up
raw materials’?”

CLEARANCE |
|

netor Bruce Cabot, allazing
treme cruelty —Reuter.



WITHDRAWN

SINGAPORE, May 15

(
The Pan By

ROBERT RUSSELL) |

ma registered freighter | LONDON. May 15. |




| Nerbay which left Singapore fout| pyofescor Norbert Wiener said
days ago with £225,000 worth of tna: in the event of another
first grade yas tonight On} 15} war, robot machines will
ts w pare. operat factories in the free
Pe ig € iy her port orld while ever av le

sarance for China was with-/m; and man is engaged
last minute—Reuter. ' di: ly in fighting or behind the

To reaffirm the authority of
c a Palit )

the seup) on the a ae and Mile the Chairman of the Mixed
Greugnet dropped dead. Madame]. a scat oa hl
Chandot ran into the bushes Armistice Commission to super=
screaming with her baby in her} YS¢ the implementation | Of "tie
arms Then she apes od: tor av. armistice agreement in the
eral hours throug = rough bs st if demilitarised zone, thus agreeing
to veach her fe eet bate pushes!to complete freedom of move
i ron ather's factory near-| ment for United Nations
y. »bservers on duty in the zone,



|
Asks For Divorce |

Parties have also reaffirmed





nic ve LE DAY

Monday as

sixteen
race in record time was in the middle of the bunch



riders strung out when the

fommunists 12
Miles From 38th

RAIN-DRENGCHED Chinese troops plodded through
build-up for a

Central Korean mud on
new offensive.

Spearheads of the growing Cormmunist force facing
the centre of the 100 mile United Nations line were reported

Tuesday

TOKYO, May 15.

in their

12 miles south of the 38th Parallel.

United Nations
Communists in units of 500 or 600
slogging through the hills east of
Kapyong,

patrols spottect ~

|

U.N. Meeting

Mac’s Plan Would
Increase Risk Of
Third World War

Bradley Tells Committee

WASHINGTON, May 15.
(GENERAL OMAR BRADLEY, Chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff, testifying today before
the joint Committees of the Senate, said that he
believed General Douglas MacArthur’s Korean war
proposals would increase the “risk of global war’’.
General Bradley, third witness called by the Senate
Armed Services and Foreign Relations Committee
| inquiring into the dismissal of General MacArthur,
| said he knew some critics were impatient with the
Administration’s plan to fight a limited war in
Korea and were calling for a “showdown’’. But he
said this was not desirable from a purely military

viewpoint.

“We are not in the best militar

to showdo wi

military rule the

world”,

power
he declared

to ! collier was smaller than had been

feared

position seek a |
even if it were the _ natic
desire to forfeit chances yt O : D . dl
peace, by precipitating a Bae ta | ne ea n
re he Soneter at ~ «
le said the United Sti tee S ‘ C ll
Russia represented two centres! ea oO 1s10n
of powe supporting opposins ‘|
ideologies. NORFOLK, Virginia, May 15
“If Soviet Russia ever control | The Atlantic Fleet Headquarters
the entire Eurasian land mass !saiq today the death roll in
then Soviet satellites may have *| yesterday's collision between tne
broad base upon which to pene | Seaplane tender Valoour and a

The U.S. Eighth Army did not P, General Bradley testified be Today's Mcik . oie scious
indicate how close they weve to ostponed hind closed doors as did other ee ktown: awed "Taven eis
U.N. lines. Clashes elsew here on |FLUSHING MEADOWS, May 15 eee ee s > sears prerow eine, presumed deed and 19
4 yor »vidence vas
he rain swept batile line were The meeting of the United! ] fe wies a - Seer ‘in hospital. Last night’s announce

between groups of 100 or 200.







An | Nations



Security Council

sche

reporters,

|” Bradley said that MacArthur's; Ment of 11 known dead was based

their undertaking to respeet the Allied officer said that, well: pro lee for today to discuss th |programme calling for bloc kacl- | on “estimate” that nine bodies

letter and spirit of the generai} tected U.N. positions and restless | Palestine border situation between!ing Red China, bombing Man-| were in’ Ingeroom Headquarters,
armistice agreement, the staie-, Patrols probably would insuve|Israel and Syria has been post-jehurian bases and using Chinese| the announcement explained.

ment said,—Reuter, i about 24 hours warning before |poned until tomorrow at 7 p.m. Nationalist troops had strong .

J hinese hit in strength at the The United States, Britain and PUAN seats: AR: iro, ac AG The Valeour was bound for

— Yeentral front. France were expected to intro Korean campaign was concerned | Operational training with 70,000

S £ M: ke Mo , } A Briéfing™ officer said —the}duee--a resolution=-before the - iets “ yallonscoheasiation spirit and 227

WISS Wake WioOve weather probably would speéd up/Council calling on Israel and] But he added: “Joint Chiefs of jofficers and men aboard when she

me the expected Red offensive about |Syria to remove their troops fron:| Staff believe that these sane} was in collision with the collier

To Train Army two days. the demilitarised zone, north of measures would increase the risk!sS § | Thomas Tracy, five miles out

- strike generally ig expected |Lake Tiberias. The United Nations }of a global war and that such {in the Atlantic off Cape Henry,
BERNE, May 15. next week on the western front. |Coneiliation Commission = an-' risk should not be taken unneces- | pear here,

The Swiss Council today an—|Ten Allied soldiers, Eight Ameri-|nounced last night that the tw: y Sarily.’ ate r4 Sarak ; :
nounced plans during the coming;cans and two Tur returned to|countries had agreed to observe} ‘We now have localized _ the The fire broke out in both ships,
winter for intensive trainir their own lines after being ceasefire and to permit United; conflict in Korea”, he said Some]but the crew eventually got the
courses in the latest weapons de leased by the Chinese. They wer Nations observers to inspect th ;military measures under discu flames under control. The Thomas

iss Army
to be

veloped by the S\
Plans which have

proved by both Chambers,

classes from 1894 to 1931.

Troops will train fof periods be
tween six to 20 days in handling
hew weapons ranging from heavy
field guns to super bazookas,
rockets, new rapid-firing machine
guns and grenades,

In its message to Parliament the
Federal Council said that a change
over must be achieved in the
shortest possible time “having

regard to the actual political ar |



ap
cove:

military situation,”—Reuter.



Baruch Wants

Strength licrease

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA,
May 15

Bernard M. Baruch, former Ad—
viser to several United States
Presidents called today for a huge
increase in the military strength
of the United States her
allies,

Without naming General Mac
Arthur in his speech prepared for
delivery at the Virginia Military
Institute, he said: “I wonder how
much of the controversy in recent
days is really a reflection of
differences between the leader of
troops and organizers”. Baruch
said that today in Korea the United
States were “buying time for the |
whole free world-to re-arm.”” This
was the time to ask whether “we
are doing as much as we can as

and

quickly as we can.”
—Keuter.



“National Guest,
TOKYO May 15,

The Japanese Cabinet today
discussed a Draft Bill to be sub-
mitted to Diet for approval to
make General Douglas Mac

Arthur Japan’s
for life.

“National Guest”

—Reuter.



THIRTEEN BURNT

RIO DE JANEIRO, May 15

Thirteen passengers were burned,
four seriously, when a car caught
fire ih a train running between
Sao Paulo and Varnhagen in Sao
Paulo State

The accident,
yesterday, was
circuit in the
tem,— Reuter

which occurred
1used by a shor
5 elec tr ical sy










lines. An authority on Cyber-
netch——the new seience of the
“thinking” machine—Dr. Wiener
is on leave from Massachusette
for a lecture tour in Br : id
France. His theme i wha 1
call New Industrial Re
tior

Eve without
we

taken prisoners on April 25 in the
ode first spring offensive
Ah told of comparatively
treatment by their captor The )
said they were told never again
fight the Chinese released
(C.P.)

good

and



Urge Admittance
Of Greece To U.N.

LONDON, May 15

United States Ambassaaor, Wal-
ter Gifford, today told Britain, that
the United States will press for the
full membership of Greece and
Turkey in the Atlantic Pact within
the next few months, it was un-
derstcod in diplomatic quarter
here tonight.

The United States
tion now mMopes to secure the full
admission of Greece and Turkeys
at a meeting which is expected tc
take place some time in August

The first request of Greek and
Turkish Governments to be admit
ted was turned down by the meet-

administra.

ing of the Atlantic Council held in
New York last September

Since then the United States i
understood to have become i:

creasingly convinced that nothing
short of full membership of the
Pact would give the necessary
Seerete to the East basin of the

Mediterranean.

Since it wes decided to z
Greece and Turkey with
fence plans of the ‘Atlantic
in the Mediterranean practicat
aiTangements have been heid up
by delay in organising an overal)
Mediterramean command of NAITO
powers.

sociate
the De-
Power:



—Reuter.



Three Powers Will

Discuss Defetice

SINGAPORE,

Joint strate

U nited Y States 3
defe _ of

May 15.
by Britain, the
and France for the
southeast Asia agains:



ny ‘hinese Communist aggres-

ion, 18 expected to be discussed
it three power military talks
which opened here -today.

Top ranking representatives of
military forces of three powers in
he Far East met in a closely

guarded conference room at the

adquarters of Malcolm Mac-





T

r British Commissione!
ie al f« Southeast Asia

A host of advisers acco:npaniec
the mi i ary chief Reuter.

aid, machines

te supplement or

will oon
re Sa Ace

begin
men ii



ome industric Dangerous pro-
cesse in chemicals r example

<

Suppose war con the United
State countries whic hay
cast t ‘ ¢ t 1

i ild be

Ame Fi

eH
|
,

}

}quarters

|

'| Mo cals e

demilitarised zone

|sion might well place the United

Tracy was able to reach port unde:
States a position of responsi

The reason for the cancellation | in ; her own power and Valeour wiih
of today’s meeting was given ppiltty for broadening the war and}, pine-foot hole below the water
diplomatic quarters as that} at the sare time losing most If/ tine was assisted by salvage
ponsors had not yet reached fu.j.â„¢0t all, of our Allies. ; vessels, '
agreement on the interpretation of Bradley said the Joint Chiefs of | —Reuter
certain article in the Armistice Staff were in a better position .

Agreement,
It was
that the Council
not meet until next week
~—-Reuter.



| Miss Truman Will
Tour Continent

WASHINGTON, May
President Truman's

15

daughter Margaret, will sail or
May 26 for her first visit to Brit
ain and the Continent, it wa
officially announced today

But she will not sing

A White House announceme
said she would tour en
France, Holland, Belgium, Luxen

burg “and italy accompanied b
her secretary ne

Mrs. James B. Holm, Whit
House Social Secretary, sa
Miss Truman had never bet

abroad and it seemed



to take a sight—seeing trip
The concert singer, Miss Trt
man, has no singing engagemen
during her tour.—Reuter.
Successful
Operation
LONDON, May 15
Mrs. Winston Churchill, wife
Britain’s wartime Premier had ar:



operation at a London hospita |
today. A _ bulletin issueq = fr« \
the hospital tonight seid: ‘Mr
Churchill’s operation has bee
perfectly successful. It wil!
entail her remaining in hospits
about three weeks followed by si>
to eight weeks’ convalescence afié
which she will be quite oll’
—-Reuter
Gets New Post
TOKYO, May 15.
Atomic expert, Rear Admira!

Ofisit was today named as Chiet
of Staff to Vice Admiral Turner
Joy, Commander of the United
Nations’ Naval Forces in Korean
waters and Commander of the
ee States’ Naval Forces
the Far East

He icceeds Rear Admiral!

whose new a

jas not announced

—Reuter

ROBOTS WILL REPLACE MEN

largest army of occupation ev
yet developed. Then develop
industry to increase productic

Dr. Wiener believes the chemi<
industry will be the first to
machines in place of men in son
proce nad that i embly
industrie I er

pu Se U.P

2) ace



considered likely in some
might

27-year*olc

a good time

ignmer

our

r to assess the risk

THE “ADVOCATE”

and to judge

than MacArthur

of a general war

the country’s military resources.

He forecast that some critics

would say “Why are the Joint v ’
Chiefs of Staff disclosing the fact pays for NEWS
that we are not militarily in posi-

|
|
}
|
|
|
|
}
|
|

n DIAL 3113
tion to have a showdown” with

Russia | Day or Night
—Reuter. \ |



a
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——





PAGE TWO



Carub

HE twelfth meeting of

Caribbean Commission
over and Commissioners, delegat«
and the Commission's staff hav
left Barbados.

Opening here today is anothe,
conference. Hastings House
be the headquarters.

It is the first meeting of the
Regional Economic Committec
Delegates from the various islands
began coming in on Monday.
Yesterday morning the Grenada
delegates, Hon. J. B. Renwick, Mr.
George Adams and Mr. Alistair
Macleod Smith arrived aeeom
panied by their wives. They are
staying at the Marine Hotel,

Other passengers arriving from
Grenada were Mr. Edward Hopkin

the



is io

and Mr, Anthony Williams. Mr.
Fred Casson was the lone passen-
ger coming in yesterday morning
from Trinidad. He is a guest at
the Windsor Hotel.

Hon. C. A. Beaubrun the St.
Lueia delegate also arrived
yesterday,

Intransit

NTRANSIT to England from

British Guiana on the Gas-
ecOgne for a holiday were Cat.
and Mrs. Ivor Robinson and Dr.
L. R. Sharples.

Capt. Robinson is with the
Social Assistance Department ‘in
British Guiana, while his wife is
the daughter of Mr. E. O. Pilgrim,
Assistant Master of Queen’s Col-
lege and Mrs. Pilgrim of George
town,

During the few hours ashore
on Saturday, she spent it with her
relatives Mr. O, A. Pilgrim, and
Mr, Gregg Pilgrim.

Dr. Sharples who has been with
the B.G. Medical Services for
many years, will shortly be retir—-







Graham, is on her way to spend
the
son Bertie who is studying medi-
cine in England.

Ronnie’s chief



s
Ten
POCKET CARTOON mere
by OSBERT LANCASTER M&.,7. 3. SHILLINGFORD of
4 Grenada who was in Barba
cos earlier in the year, is now
back again on a ten-day visit,
ving at the Savoy, Bay Street
e is Manager of the Grenada
Lime Factory,
Aceompanying him was his
sister Mrs. Verdun Wallace of
Dominica, who had spent two
months’ holiday with him in
Grenada, She is intransit for a

couple of days and is the guest of



Mrs. Robert Yearwood of My
Lord's Hill,
No Plans
R. H. D. WEATHERHEAD
who has been Director of
“Just tét me potnt oul to Medical Services in North Borneo
you, Wortlesdon pent little for some years, is now on leave
OYS wW. leaner ne no-qun “4 res ‘
Bowe une tear seneriwe UM” | prior to retirement. He” arrived
imperil their chances of play over the weekend from England
ing St. George i" accompanied by his wife and
younger daughter Pam.
Summer Holiday Dr. Weatherhead who was

GRAHAM. formerly Chief Medical Officer of
George sarbados told Carib that at pre—

sent, he had no plans for the
future. He is staying with his
brother Mr. Bruce Weatherhead
at “Galba Lodge”, For abelle.

Three Months In England

ACK in Barbados after three
months’ houday in England
visiting relatives are Wing Comdr.

RS.
widow

CECILE
of Capt.

summer holidays with her

She left by the Gaseogne.

St. Lucia and Grenada
RS. MARIE MENDES and her
son George have gone to St

Lucia to spend three weeks’ holi- ang Mrs. D. F. A. Cl

; and Mrs. D. F, A, arke and
day. They left by the Gascogne. their young son Gerald. The
Arriving by the same ship from Clarkes who have spent about

Grenada was Mr. Ronnie Gresham nine months in the W.1 prior to
who works with Geo. F. Huggins

their holiday in the U.K. own a

hobby is weight. house here at Rendezvous, Wing













. BARBADOS



Back to Trinidad





MESS, MARILYN oegtotsa M{"S, ERROL, STEFLE 1 Flying Visit EMPIRE ROWVAL
and Miss* Noreen MtCarthy. othe. Mic Moreedes Planch ir’ LAST TWO sii0WS
oa a : a ag brs: a fon neh va B wrA’ Fedeenth AT™= a few days in Trinidad TO-DAY at 8.30 p.m. TODAY 30 ae ‘30
arbados since April , left for flight on Monday afternoon, They + and one in Grenada, Mrs. ‘ ‘ one ' :
ae ee er until their home, “Bonnie Dundee” Lloydstill’s daughter, is back in eee sl: ae ec the in St. Lawrence, is finished. Mr, Barbados, She came in over the “THE SHOP AT SLY eae ve
Mrs. Fred Olton ahs had yee Steele is expected hors in another wee by fe See CORNER” Starring:
holidaying in ‘Trifidad for WMe-- © = eeamaiaeninn xa aanicniieioniion tan aoieacaen Hemry Brandon and Robert
past few wetks. \ ae "eo Pye Py els x COREE GATUNPAT Este " Kellard.
a ance niannesnnen Sy a
. * a BACK By, la Li Ss ed ‘ EA yy .Along with the picture—.
St. Lucia Holiday T BELVEDERE’ é “a ae dail “SECRETS OF SCOTLAND
Leaauner ”
R. AND MRS, BERNARD : YARD
MOORE and their your Starrifg with Edgar BARRIER
daughter Heather have goyie to F lifton WEBB and
spend a noligay in St, Lucia, stay- AT Clifton 7 BENNETT Stephanie BACHELOR
ing with Mrs, Moore’s parents, = 7 a

Mr. and Mrs, Fréddie Potter. Mr.



Bore S MEP Cable and Wireless | 56 5606s O00 C1900795 01 OOO 110804

Branch at St. Lawrence

Mr, Aubrey Douglas-Smith
Résident Tutor of the University
College of the West Indies, who
had been in St. Lueia on a short
visit, returned on Monday by
B.W.I.A.

B.B.C. Radio |
Programme

19 OM

am Announcer's Choice; 7 60 |
am The News; 7 16 a m_ News Analy- |
sis;.715 am From the Editorials; 7 25 |
am Progtamme Parade; 7.30 am. Red
Letter Day; 745 am _ Jazz Music; 8 15
a.m, The Spur of the Moment; 8.30 a.m

6.0 a.m.—12 15 p.m

6 30



Work and Worship; 845 am _ The
Colonies Today; 9 am The News; 9.10
am Home News From Britain; 9 15

4m Close Down; 11.15 a.m Programme
Parade; 11.25 a m_ Listeners Choice; 11.45
am Statement of Account 12 Noon The

News; 1210 pm. News Analysis; 12 15
pm Close Down.
1.15 pm —6 45 p m - WM

415 pm. Ronnie Pleydell; 5 00 p m





















WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 1951

two weeks. He’ is the proprietor rd

ADVOCATE





Here Again

of Steele’s Book Stores in Caracas







EMPIRE starviné sav. 1.15 & 8.20 OLYMPIC

LAST TWO siiows
TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.15

Republic Big Double
Lyn WILDE Adele MARA



ROXY

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.15

20th C. Fox Presents—

m
“HALLS OF «« CAMPUS
MONTEZUMA ” HONEYMOON ”
- AND
Starring:
Richard —— —- Walter << HEADING FOR
oe Gov'’s COUNTRY ”
with Reginald Gardner and Starring
Robert Wagner William LUNDIGAN '











GLOB

TODAY & TOMORROW 4.45 & 8.15 p.m.

J. ARTHUR RANK
presents

SIE










Plus
THE ANDREW SISTERS

WM. Le
MURR ay & Ce in
“HER LUCKY NITE



































































ing from his present post as lifting. Comdr. Clarke who has retired .3)\3,°.. ¢ the Week. 5.15 , { ,
District Medical Officer of Port 2 from the R.A.F. is a Chartered Musi “5 45 pon Viniti Cocena: ont « CAROL REED'S :
Mourant in Berbice, Medical Supt. poe He hopes to go to p i Yolce, of the Violin; 615 pm Production Hear These Song Hits {
Fe enezucla shortly, Meanwhile] From the Third Programme; ct MANNING & co L a
New Divisional Manager T PRESENT holidaying in they are staying at the Enmore| ig pm 00pm. #33 a "9 ‘ Es You Is Or Is You Aint”
arbados staying a 1 Hotel. a celal et aad “Strai we
R. H. L. N. ASCOUGH, the Ocean View Hotel are Com- ‘ Ast Pe The Wawa 110 p mn. News AGENTS aighten Up & Fly Right
new Divisional Manager for Mander E. H, Allen, RKN., En route to St. Kitts Indies: 745 pm) Red Letter Day: 8 p.in. | 29S0%G999S999469665959999569990556099995O09 909995 “Dance With A Dolly”
Messrs. Cable and Wireless (West Medical Supt. of the Demerara R i MRS. RONALD Hedis Pewsreeh: 2 * oa, 3 Opening FRIDAY __
ndies Ltd), who arrived on Satur- Bauxite Co, at McKenzie, B.G _ and MRS. KI, =i 34h 08 ee” mew Him; 6 ae pening 3
aoe utink team Badend by the and Mrs, .jlen, They came in a BRAND and their ‘=P Editorials: @ bin ‘statement Fans 3 ASTOR THEA TRE starring ROBERT NEWTON “DARK CITY’
Golfito, has come to relieve Mr,.# Week ago Sndexpect tn be of eren are on their way to St.10 18 pm. Dennis Browrt 9 #1 p.m. Seri and STMT ROL nieee were FRIDAY MAY 18 i
kG Lb. Douges the peeseni here until May 28rd. a. mirived — England ou peument, ie me a a Sw 5 Oe WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL RELEASE ALL STAR CONTES?
Divisional Manager On island Tour St. Kitts by-B.W1.A., later this] an Rome pee Universal Double
z * ot. S$ by : ‘ é ; s rom the 1ird Programme . ——>- .
Mr. ASscough was aécompanied 5 alf week r a ae S—SSSSSSSSSSSS=SS=_-
- eet tame” Taiyo We Gimaedar CANE | ue AICP ANGE (1) “COBRA WOMAN”
at “Beverley,” St. Lawrence. ay . ie ; Mr. Brand is a surveyer and] «pe > m }
Prior ta his hew appointment, through the country I met* a wii shortly be taking up a post) © ° PROGRAMME WED. may 10 (2) “RIDERS OF SANTE FE }
Mr, Ascough was Manager of former ee ee i With the Government of the} ;,10.00 pm—i0 15 p.m News , GLOBE
Cable and Wireless and Resident Hon. Jesus T. Pinero. He was | coward Islands. During the war]! !5 P.™—10.30 pam Starring Randolph Scott ea f a :
Magistrate of Ascension Island, 0M @ ac ae . ‘9 “rg he was with the Intelligence Keep Yous Anal - This pisn!
a Representative of the St. accompaniec iy aj, and Mrs. Department of the R.A.F. attach- e is Destine or ardom
Halene Government, . ren Mr. ae sens og ne aa to the US, Air Force during CROSSWORD i His Name is CHARLTON HESTON
During the war, he was Con- Lashley anc ey, illy ICk- the European campaign and after- : f
struction Engineer of Cable and ham, Spanish Master on the wards he went out East. ; AQUATIC CLUH CINEMA (Members Only) Opening FRIDAY M£AY 18th
Wireless in Hong Kong and spent staff of Combermere School ? Until they leave for St. Kitts
four years in a Japanese intern- Mr, Pinero has since returned they are staying at the Hastings MATINEE: TODAY at 5 p.m,
ment camp. to Puerto Rico, NCPR Ss ban pte TONIGHT & TOMORROW NIGHT at 8.30
+, . DEED RKO Radio Pictures present
ADVENTURES OF PIPA SILL WILLTAMS, BARBARA HALE
in “FIRST YANK INTO TOKYO” |
. the women who love him
DIAL ind the men who
(PLAZA srasts
OISTIN 8404 (THE GARDEN) St. James
Today & Tomorrow 5 & 8.30 p.m. Today & Tomorrow 8.30 p.m.
tems es asvonoai pe sony WEEE
& ee P aous eo ae eet ; : KITTY O'DAY TARZAN TRIUMPHS &
9. Ballet danced in India, (6) Jean PARKER, Peter COOKSON Robert MITCHUM in— 5
31. Inevitable conclusion, (3) & VIOLENCE WEST OF THE PECOS ¢ 5 :
12. With care @ person includes this, Michael O'SHEA Nancy COLEMAN ‘ ‘ 3 = * : FS cy
\4 Reveited Sains Bis ‘abeiins ws FHI. to SUN. 5 & 8.90 p.m Te kcanh aes ie hein CHARLTON LiZABETH viveca Dean non ee
4 . 5 5 pr (Monogram) : Sunday 5 p.m.
CAH BP | HE BRAS Re Al aan ftw tenet oies sitet Ht, ig HESTON: SCOTT: LINDFORS - JAGCER- DEFOR
Saldana ed i his - (4 ‘ ) Bob HOPE, Lucille” BALL in- ie A )
2 —————————————— fi: £ dade Beam? ‘ay° Senne, 2 FANCY PANTS a. Be eee ema Girected by WILLIAM DIETERLE - s- by John Merecyth L .
2. igety. STREETS OF * Scrvenptay n Merec) S5CaS and Larry Marcus + Adaptation by Ketti Frings
W L 2%. This does 2 Bill WILLIAMS, Jane NIGH ou
BY THE AY By Beachcom r 24. emuind one, St cereale, 2)" on William BO Anaad ékney Bee” HENRY | A Paramount Picture Hes
fs HEN
Baws : THE ALL STAR TALENT CONTEST
memeearen | ening ra te tke “ee ig Matt A Olartent Viclory {He gu a ws | EOE AA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) |f | Biivtuts, CoutyMone!™ "YE NARs onass:
authors in newspapers anc up to he dog 1c t 3. e song asked for its ‘ : ’ BEES Saad oni sie wiv on a soem Eta! ;
periodicals ahriars oe in the conductor decide. HE Board of Trade, in decid- * pineh up this jretencen (a) a6; a wi TODAY & TOMORROW (Only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. favntas tanae eae -. ...“LOST IN A DREAM”
i . . . ers Excitins 3 * «< . ”
background, shelves of expen- war Sir, losi gubd ing that the words “Illb. 5 He Cuele, gree can be (7 W109 mt “THE RETURN OF THE FRONTIERSMAN” JOAN BENTHAM pada eee Web-t> tapi MATEN fin baOAGED
i : > eC osine oO ? ~~ 8 Fo . Ug UU SD SE) ee ate ei 3h Sarva ry eS lk ee eee Se ee ft,
sively Bound POuke. es ore? Yesterday, in-a No. 47 nett” on a pot of honey were no] 10; Reasoning process, (aye ©? Color by Technicolor DENNIS-GLARR 6045.5)... .sccedee<45 “4 WINDS & 7 SEAS”
Ss
I am told that, in these manners? Yesterday, ina No, 4 15 You get plenty of in 16 GORDON MéRAE — RORY CALHOUN — JULIE LONDON
hard days, there is a firm which bus, I saw a man reluctantly infringement of the Prepacked Down, (4 18. Eistitie (4 i Plus “SONG OF THE SADDLE” WILLIE IFFILL.......................,..“NITE AND DAY”
lends eae books to authors who rise to cer his seat to a female Foods (Weights and Measures ? Come ‘back to live here. (4) with DICK FORAN WET PRI yo ce bk gues eis “ROSES OF PICADDY”
cannot afford the usual dummies, dog. Not only did he not raise Marking) Order, has struck a aie A nes ee THURSDAY 1 30 p.m, (Monogram) Guest Star: “SHORTY MOE” B.G’s best Bassist
The writers hire them as so his hat, but he muttered, as “8'Xins RS a EE ‘Antaretion @’porcarase tae Rotereest “THE LIVING GHOST” The Teenagers in Intransit United Kingdom
rie’ 1 th h he resented having to resounding blow for freedom.,; i2 “Include: “dae panne: hs » eae & “HIGH SCHOOL HERO”
much a go, and an experienced though he esentec g t ; Re ‘ . rinted | Pacts: 19, ‘Need? 21° Letter: 22 orke! JAMES DUNN FREDDIE STEWART Pit 24, House 40, Bal. 60, Boxes 72
book-arranger calls on the day show common decency to a four- Labels may now be printed | pyr fota: 24, bo" st Down: 4, Ave Tickets On Sale Globe Daily
the photograph is to be taken, footed passenger: one net ae “nett. ; r ne Fool: 2. intciest 9 Fievole; 4 dit, | Coming Friday “HASTY HEART”
and arranges them tastefully. rs, truly, a lope, nette: or gnet, uiberts 1h Slates: 15, Ulster: 16. ees Be ics aa.
On one occasion a_ reporter “Fed Up. does not mean licence, 20. Drat

followed hard on the heels of the
photographer. “I see,”
“that you have a very fine and)
complete set of Tolstoy's works. |
May I look?” He did look, and
found that half the Tolstoys were
uncut copies of a Frepych novel;
tthe other half were mere blank
paper. ‘
Courtesy to Animals

HE never-ending exchange

of letters to newspapers
about men who do not give up
their seats in buses to women has
never touched on the heart of the

problem. Should a man give up |
his seat to a woman who _ has
given up her seat to a dog?

Again, if a cat is brought into a
bus, should the owner of the dog
make it give up its seat to the
eat? And will the owner of the

he said, |



cat expect the man who had
given up his seat to the woman|
who had given up her seat to;
the dog to be prepared to allow
the cat to sit im the seat he had}

“ one oenercenracsngramepestenie- > tienen —_——,—

JUNIOR COMPETITION

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to send in
a humorous essay, story or poem on the subject of “A TOP HAT.”
The best entry will be published every Monday in The Evening Advo-
cate, and the winner will receive a prize to the value of 7/6 in either
books or statfonery, Entries must reach The Children’s Editor, The
Advocate Co., Ltd,, City, not later than Wednesday every week,

NOTE: Stories must not be copied,
Send this coupon with your story.

JUNIOR COMPETITION

Age
School
Home Address



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WEDNESDAY, MAY

16,

Property
Settlemer
Required
THE case in which Hugh M
Best and others charged Perey G
Seales and others of being in
possession of property which
belong to both parties began’ at
the Court of Chancery yesterday

before His Honour the Vice-
Chancellor, Sir Allan Collymore.



Percy Seales and the other
defendants are alleged to have
sold some of the property with-

out making any settlement wiih
Hugh M. Best and his party about

the money obtained from the
sales.
Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., in-

structed by Carrington and Sealy
appeared for Best. Mr. G. H.
Adams instructed by Haynes and
Griffith are for Percy Seales.

Yesterday no evidence was
taken. A review of the case and
legal points were mostly raised.

Mr. Adams submitted to the
Court that Best and his party had
come to the Court of Equity with-
out disclosing that they were
asking the Court to enquire into
the conduct of the plantation
bought with other people’s money

The whole action purported a
Straightforward action of joint
owners in their own _ interest
against other joint owners. In
that case, he argued, an amend-
ment would be wrong. and the
case should be struck out.

Vice-Chancellor’s Ruling

His Honour the Vice-Chanceilor
will make a ruling on Mr. Adams’
submission when the case con-
tinues on the 30th., of this month.

Best and the other plaintiffs
want an enquiry to be made, They
want the payment and transfer by
Seales and the other defendants
to them of what should be found
due to them, They also seek the
appointment of a receiver who
would manage the plantations as
the Court might direct,

The plantations for the pur-
chase of which Best and the other
plaintiffs claim that the money
was provided by both parties are
Colleton, Lascelles, St. James,
Four Hills, St, Peter, Mt. Prospect
and Trent.

Seales and the other defendants
denied that each of the sugar
plantations was bought by its
respective purchasers as trustees
for the Barbados Progressive
Society and not otherwise.

They are of the opinion that the
plantations are not the property of
either party nor did the money
belong to either of them on a joiné
account or otherwise,

Mr. Reece told the Court that it
appeared that about the time the

lantations were aequired in

arbados, there were two societies
of the same name, one in Colon
and the other in Panama, Eact
of the societies used to set aside
money for the purpose of purchas-
ing estates in Barbados.

The societies used to help its
members.



Store Sweepings

It happened in Bridgetown
today. One of the leading city
stores had had the store sweep-
ings piled up in front of the
building and on the pavernent,

At 11.30 am. Mr. &.
Mottley, one of the Sanitary
Commissioners for St. Michael,
went in to a Floor-walker himself

and made strong representations,

These were not enthusiasti-
eally received, but when the
Advocate checked later in the
day. the sweepings had beeft
removed,

Forger Gaoled
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 11.

Osmond Bradley of Boissiere
Village, Port-of-Spain, was
sentenced to six months’ imprison—
ment for uttering forged Sanitary
Laundry slips and for the larceny
of paper and_ twine. Bradley
leaded to 182 charges.

7}







1951





BARBADOS

Walcott Going To Grenada Labourers |

Trade Union principles did not apply at the Trade Union
Talks held in ‘Trinidad last week, Mr. F. L. Walcott, M.C.P.,

told the Advocate yesterday.

Battomley’s
Mission

MR. A. G. BOTTOMLEY, M.P.,
Secretary for Overseas Trade, is
coming to Barbados this week.

To-day the Mission which Mr.
Mr. Bottomley leads will hold dis-
cussions in Jamaica on May 17th
with representatives of the cigar
industry.

The main object of the Mission's
visit to Barbados will be to ex-
plain to the -Region Economic
Committee the position in regard
to sugar which has arisen in the
course of negotiations with Cuba,
and to obtain full information as
to the views of the West Indies,
Members of the British West In-
dies Sugar Association will be
attending the meeting of the
Regional Eeonomic Committee and
will be present at these discus-
sions.

It is the Mission*’s intention to
hold a meeting in London on their
return with representatives of
Commonwealth sugar producers,
including London representatives
of West Indian producers.

The Directors of the British
West Indian Sugar Producers’
Association will meet in Barbados
on May 18th and 19th and hope
to have discussions after with Mr.
Bottomley.

—

BOTTOMLEY, ARTHUR
GEORGE, O.B.E., 1941; M.-P.
(Lab.) Chatham Division of
Rochester since 1945; Sec. for
Overseas Trade, Board of
Trade, since 1947; London
Organiser of Nat. Union of
Public Employees, 1935; Al-
derman of Borough of Walt-
hamstow; b 7 Feb, 1907; s. of
George Howard Bottomley
and his late wife Alice; m.
1986, Bessie Ellen Wiles; no
c, Educ.; Gamuel Road Coun-
cil School; Extension Classes
at Toynbee Hall. Elected to
Walthamstow Borough Coun-
cil, 1929; Mayor of Waltham-
stow, 1945-46; Chairman of
Emergency Committee and
A.RB.P.. Controller, 1939-41.
Deputy Regional Commission-
er for South-Eastern England,
1941-45, Parl. Under-Sec. of
State for Dominions, 1946-47;
Land Tax Commissioner,
Becontree Div. of Essex;
Member Parl. Mission to
India, 1946; Special Govt. |
Mission to Burma. 1947;
Deleg. to U.N., New York,
1946 and 1947; Leader U.K.
delegation to World Trade
and Employment Conf., Ha-
vana, 1947; U.K. deleg. to
Commonwealth Conf., Delhi,
1949, Publications: Contribu-
tor to Local Government Jour-
nals. Recreations; Walking
and theatre-going.

NO PRICE LIST

A fine of £5 and 2/- costs to



be paid in one month or two
months’ imprisonment was im-
posed on Clarence Gill, a s

keeper of Cheapside, St. Michael,

by a City Police Magistrate
yesterday.
He was found guilty of not

displaying the price of regulated
goods in his shop on February
13. Sheila Gill, also of Cheap-
side, was fined £3 and 1/-— costs
by the same Magistrate for
selling cocoa at a greater price
than that fixed by the schedule.

Her offence was also com-
mitted on February 13 and the
fine is to be paid in 21 days or
one month’s imprisonmert.

RATES OF EXCHANGE



CANADA ,
MAY 15, 1951
62 2/10% pr. Cheques on
. Bankers 60 2/10% pr.
Demand
Draits 60 05% pr.
Sisht Drafts 59 9/10% pr.
62 2/10% pr. Cable
60 7/10% pr. Currency 58 7/10% pr.
Coupons 58% pr.

Silver 20% pr.



UALITY

FLAVOUR

STANDS

SUPREME.

After a dinner on Sunday
night the sub-committee met at
12.15 a.m. and worked until the

early morning of 3.30. “I have
never attended a Conference thai
did. as much work in so shor

a time as this.”

Mr. Walcott had returned on
Sunday from attending an Inter-
American Trade Regional Organ-
ization Conference, affiliated to
‘the International Confederation
of Free Trade Unions.

The Conference discusseg or-
ganisational matters and met Mr.
George Woodcock, Assistant Gen-
eral Secretary of the British
Trades Union Congress,

Officers’ Training

The delegates of the Brilish
section discussed with Mr. Wood-
cock problems of trade unions in
the West Indies and asked for

greater assistance in training
trade union officers.

They regretted that training
courses held under the auspices
of the Colonial Development
and Welfare Organisation had
been discontinued. They felt
that representation should be

made to provide training in the
West Indies for Trade Unions.

Mr. Woodcock was thanked for
financial assistance given to the
Unions by the British Trade
Union Congress, and some repre-
sentatives said that their Union
had already received office equip-
ment from the T.U.C.

Mr. Woodcock said that it was
not the intention of the T.U.C.
to make the Unions in the West
Indies dependent on outside
sources for their success and
etrength, but that they were pre-
pared to help stable trade unions
with equipment for their offices.

Transportation

Some delegates said that trans-
portation was absorbing a large
part of the contributions of the
Union.

Business on the agenda included
organisational arrangements, rep-
resentation at the Milan Confer-
ence, 1.L.0. representation. _

Mr. Walcott was appointed
member of a Sub-Committee to
deal with organisation in the
area. Other members are Mr.
F. J. Carasco (St. Lucia) and Mr.
Cc. P. Alexander (Trinidad).

Mr. Walcott is going to Gren-
ada shortly in his capacity as
member of the Sub-Committee to
investigate Trade Union problems
there and to report to the
Regional Organisation,

Labourer

Joshua Williams, a labourer
of Thomas Gap, was yesterday
remanded until May 17, by a

City Police Magistrate when he
was charged by the Police with
the larceny of a fishing net
valued at $18, the property of
Mr. A. Guiler of Brighton, Black
Rock on May 11.

Mr. Guiler said that on May 11
he left his net hanging in his
house and the next morning
when he looked for it, it was not
there. He had seen the defendant
by his house many times and on
the beach, 7”

Also remanded yesterday until
May 22, was, Noel King, a labour-
er of Chapman Lane, St, Michael,
when he appeared before a
Police Magistrate on a charge of
stealing lumber, the property of
DaCosta & Co., Ltd., on May 13.

Herman Clarke, a watchman
on the wharf, told the court
yesterday that he was on duty
on May 13 about 5 o'clock on
Bridge Street and saw the accus-
ed pulling a hand cart on which
was placed a quantity of lumber.
He asked him where he had got
it from and he received no satis-
factory _explanation. He then
notified the Police.



. . ‘

Await Loans
|

LARGE NUMBER of labour
ers from various parts of the
island stood outside a building at

Pinfold Street yesterday

This building hor
Welfare Office and P«

Lavour
Loan

s€s the




Ant



Bank. The labourers wait
ing Labour Welfare Housing
Loans.

While these offices are on the
ground floor, the Goverimem

Staff of Sanitary Inspectors is on
the second storey.





This staff formerly occupied a
building at Dottin’s Alley while
the Labour Welfare Office was at
Crumpton Street

The building in which these
offices are located is very old

fashioned. It has plenty of land
surrounding it and on this
grow a few fruit trees. The main
entrance to the building is guarded
by a greyhound dog cut out of
stone. The Government is renting
it from Miss Fmily Fieid ef Spry
Street.

SHOWER in the

before
afternoon
waterfront.

jand

City shortly
one oclock yesterday
held up work on the

Labourers could be

seen scampering for shelter whiie 't

truck hands placed tarpaulins over

trucks loaded with sugar.
The shower was a short

but it left the day gloomy.

one,



Phe\

temperature during the afternoc eo

was 86 degrees Fahrenheit in the
Shade.
VAN BOYCE of Nelson Street,
St. Michael, is at present de
tained at the General Hospital.
He was taken there in an uncon
scious condition on Sunday and
detained. :
Boyce was found lying beside
the motor lorry M-1756, owned by



Messrs. Plantations Ltd., along
Welches Road, St. Thomas, on
Sunday night. The lorry ran off
the road and plunged into a
quarry on the right side of the
road



INCE the opening of the Whit-
sun term Mr. W. C. Skeete,
ewner of the Intermediate Class
yacht Dauntless, has been acting
Headmaster of Wesley Hall Boys’
School.

Mr. F.. Broome, the Head-
master, is acting Inspector of
Schools for the country districts.

‘At Wesley Hall Boys’ School the
senior boys are occupying the
building which was recently
renovated and extended. The
junior boys are in the other build
ing.

NOTHER shipment of deep sea
fish has arrived in the island
This shipment, 5,000 pounds of
Red Snapper, was caught by the
Sunshine R., a fishing smack, for
Messrs. J. N. Goddard & Sons.
WALLET containing $38, the
property of Daphne Scott of
Yearwood Land, Black Rock, was
stolen from a counter at the Dress
Department of the Ideal Store
Broad Street on Saturday The
incident was reported by Cpl, 205
Devonish.
INNIE WELLS of Rockley,
Christ Church, reported that
her house was broken and entered
and a wrist watch stolen from her
bedroom.

Cc



Found Unconscious

Elsie King, a labourer of the
Housing Scheme, Black Rock
was found lying near the Mentai

Hospital on Monday night about
7.15 o'clock by the Police in an
unconscious state.

She was taken to the General

Hospital where she was detained
for further observation He
condition is not considered to b«
very serious. The Police are
making investigations

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PAGE FOUR



Noa

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lt4., Broad St. Bridgetown



Wednesday, May 16, 1951



IN THE DARK

THE complaint is often made that the
public in the West Indies are not very in-
terested in matters that will affect them
vitally. be

There is one contribution to this apathy
that could be removed at once.

To-day for example there begins in Bar-
bados the first session of the Regional Eco-
nomic Committee.

Nothing has happened since the war end-
ed of greater importance to the West Indies
than the formation of this Committee. For
the first time in the history of the British
West Indies, Governments have agreed to
look after their own trading interests, by
pooling opinions and resources and speak-
ing with one voice.

Yet this terrific achievement is to be
worked out behind closed doors. Twenty-
four hours before the meeting was about
to begin there was no information as to
whether or not the Committee would dis-
cuss anything in public. So the greatest
achievement of the British West Indies in
the economic field is to be left in the hands
of Government representatives and their
advisers, but the man in the street is only
to read whatever handouts may come his
way via the Press. This is not democratic
procedure, nor is it even good common-
sense practice. The extension of votes to a
community is nothing but a sham and
mockery of democratic principles if that
community is only to be told by their pol-
itical representatives about the merits or
demerits of their opponents.

If the representative government that
Barbados now possesses is to become re-
sponsible government, it pre-supposes the
existence cf a maximum number of voters
capable of understanding the major issues
external or internal on which their eco-
nomic security depends. What is true of
Barbados is applicable to the West Indian
region. Yet what measure of confidence is
placed in the public?

Should the West Indian public not hear
what its Government representatives and
advisers say about Canada-West Indies
trade?

Should it not be given the opportunity to
hear the views of the Committee on indus-
trial development, inter-island shipping,
oils and fats, regional marketing facilities,
Caribbean representation at major com-
mercial conferences and the proposals for
Customs Union?

Of course it should.

How else is it to become well-informed?

It cannot go to the debates in the House of
Assembly for two reasons. First, these im-

portant issues never seem to be debated in
local legislatures. Secondly even if these
were—in Barbados at any rate—there is so
long a gap between spoken word and print-
ing that the public would learn nothing
except that it was too late to learn any-
thing. The Press does its heroic best but
there is a limit on the resources of a Press
struggling to inform a public kept in the
dark.

To-day only unity will get the West In-
dian case heard and ensure a square deal
for the people of the area. The United
Kingdom despite its many lamentable mis-
takes of the past, present and future has
done much to help the West Indies. But it
is intolerable that any longer a small hand-
ful of Government Officials should control
the economy of the area. It is more than in-
tolerable. It is unjust. But what guarantee
is there that any local committee would be
any more tolerable or any more just, unless
responsible to informed public opinion? It
is informed public opinion that is lacking
and the “closed door” policy of conducting
vital public meetings is to blame.



MR. BOTTOMLEY

WHEN Lord Listowel returned to Lon-
don after attending the Governors’ Confer-
ence in Barbados at the end of 1949, he
spoke a lot of good sense about the West
Indies in the House of Lords.

This week Mr. A. G. Bottom!ey, M.P. His
Majesty’s Secretary for Overseas Trade is
coming to explain what the United King-
dom has been doing with regard to sugar
deals with Cuba and to listen to the views
of the West Indies.

‘Lord Listowel was told much, he listened
hard and being a man of high integrity and
honour he spoke fearlessly. Mr. Bottomley
has paid us the compliment of a visit. He
will be told much and doubtless he has an
infinite capacity for listening. There is no
doubt that he too will return to the United
Kingdom and will inform His Majesty’s
Government that the West Indies are per-
turbed about existing trade relations in the
Caribbean.

7

YESTERDAY was the anniver-
sary of the Workers’ Charter,

That is what the famous papal
encyclical issued on May 15,
1891, has been called.

Rerum Novarum was published

‘}at a time when modern techno-

logical advances had resulted in
the degradation and enslavement
of millions who sweated in fac-
tories and existed in slums.

The West Indies have never
seen such appalling conditions.
Rerum Novarum was the outcome
of a wide and deep Catholic
movement of thought and prac-
tice,

Von Ketteler to quote an ex-
ample, (Bishop of Mainz in 1850)
saw clearly how radical were the
social changes caused by indus-
trial capitalism and tried to
build up self-governing associa-
tions among industrial workers.

But the successes of Catholic
social movement have been hmi-
ted. Its failures are the failures
of the Catholic body in general.
A succession of great and holy
Popes from Leo XIII down to
our own day have been thoroughly

sensitive to the demands of
our time, It was Leo XIIi
who said “if society is to be

healed, in no other way can it
be healed save by a return to
Christian life and Christian in
stitutions.”

“The great mistake” wrote Leo
XIII in Rerum Novarum, “is to
take it for granted that one class
of society is naturally hostile to
the other, as if nature intended
rich and poor to live at war with
one another. So irrational and
false is this view that the exact
contrary is the truth. Each class
needs the other; capital cannot do
without labour nor labour without

capital.
Mutual agreement produces
harmony and order: perpetual

conflict, on the other hand, gives
rise to nothing but confusion and
outrage.”

Forty years after on May 15,
1931 Pius XI wrote in Quadra—
gesimo Anno “It will only be
possible to unite all in a harmo—
nious striving for the common
good when all sections of society
have the intimate conviction that
they are members of a single famn—
ily and children of the same
Heavenly Father. Then the rich
and others in power will change
their former negligence of their
poorer brethren into solicitous and
practical regard and will listen
with kindly feeling to their just
complaints. Working men too will
lay aside all feelings of hatred or
envy, which the instigators of
social strife arouse so skilfully.
Not only will they cease to feel
weary of the position assigned to
them by Divine Providence in
society; they will become proud
of it, well aware that every man
by doing his duty is working use—
fully and honourably for the com—
mon good, and is following in
the footsteps of Him, who being
God, chose to become a carpenter
among men, and to be known as
the son of a carpenter.”

The encyclicals are there but
they have been neglected not
only by the Catholic body but by
the world. In Great Britain there
is a strong and virile Christian



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By GEORGE HUNTE

tradition behind the _ British
Labour movement, but its influ-
ence is being weakened daily,

Douglas Jerrold writes. in
England Past, Present and Future:
“A most disquieting feature of
Britain under Socialism is the
decline in public morality due
to the decline not in religious
observance, which is of long
standing but in religious belief.
The Labour movement which
used to voice the strong, simple
and explicitly Christian belief of
the chapels, against the more
Erastian views of the Establish—
ment, is to-day becoming strongly
sceptical and secularist, if not
actively anti-clerical. A gulf is
opening up between the genera-
tions. There is painfully little
ethical difference between the
conception of political right and
wrong held by National Socialists
and Communists and those held
by many left-wing Socialists
«including many who are sincere—
ly anti-Communist). They dis-
like different things and different
people from those who fell under
the lash of Hitler or are still
under the lash of Premier Stalin,
but they react to what they dis-
uke in the same way.

The idea of equal justice for
all no longer birds the conscience
of the British progressives, and
the idea of justice of any kind is
losing ground.

.... The political doctrines so
long preached that the rights of
majorities are absolute, that any-
body’s property is everybody’s,
if only enough people say 50,
are themselves denials of elemen-
tary public morality and have
had a repercussive effect on pri-
vate morals. To take what you
can get is a measure which if
sound and accepted in _ politics,
cannot easily be confined to public
life.”

Less than a week ago a Bri-
tish official who has the ear of
the Secretary of State for the
Colonies was explaining to me
why the United Kingdom sup-
ported Mr. Gairy in Grenada at
the expense of Mr. Marryshow,
the father of Socialism in the
West Indies,

I understood him to say that
“Mr, Gairy exploited his oppor-
tunity.” “Suppose,” I replied, “that
Mr, Allder or some other mem-
ber of the Barbados Labour
Party exploited his opportunity,
would the Secretary of State let
Mr, Adams down, just as he let
Mr, Marryshow down?”

“Your views are prejudiced,” I
was told,

When a friend of mine rallied
to my support he was dismissed
out of hand and told “he must
a planter.” He was not.

This incident happened in
Barbados less than a week ago.

Another point made by Douglas
Jerrold in England Past, Present
and Future is no less disquieting.

He is talking of the new ruling
class which has already suppress-
ed the capitalist in England, This
ruling class as the Times pointed
out more that fifteen years ago
are “not those who own but those
who control capital.”

“The new ruling class’ writes
Douglas Jerrold, “is unique. Their

The Workers Charter”

predecessors, interested though
they may have been, were in
terested in something other than
themselves. They owed their
pre-eminence to their construc
tive ability, They were builders
even if the structure they built
was faulty. The bureaucrats only
direct the work of others, They
have not created what they con-
trol. They are builders only of
their own reputations and archi-
tects only of their own fortunes.”
We have got to stop the rot. We
have reached a low ebb in
morality when ‘opportunism’
and “justice” are used synony
meously and when the views of
men with decades of knowledge
and experience are dismissd as
“prejudiced” by intinerant dog-
matists and the appellation “plant-
er” is used with the same mean-
ing as Hitler gave to “Jew.” “A
lot of rubbish” writes Douglas
Jerrold (and I do not apologise
for so frequently quoting a book
which is so neeessary for under
standing our true position to-day)
“is at present being talked about
the need to restore material in.
centives to harder work, but it
is the restoration of moral im-
peratives and _ institutional ii
centives whic!
‘or, A return®to a proper con
zeption of Christian education is
the first condition of recovery,
the second is to restore and
defend continuously the rights o

Hee tei und ut the corporatio: | British West Indies would like to add other
and to recognise these rights in|things that used to come from Canada and

all legislation as superior to and

aihadedenh to those.cf ihe state.” which are still restricted. And there are

This is the
Novarum, the

spirit of
orkers’

yesterday. It is what Bishop
Bentley of Barbados used to tell
in simple words to the members
of the Young Men’s Progressive
Club when he said “only Jesus
can change the man.”

“Christianity today,” to quote
Deuglas Jerrold for the last
time, “has to reconquer the world
from its allegiance to the false
gods of the enlightenment, but its
task is far more difficult than at
any previous stages in Christian
history.

Christianity conquered the des-
pair of the Roman world in the
third, fourth end fifth centuries
by word of mouth and by ey-
ample, but it did not have to
face a mass-educated, mass prop

aganded body of opinionated
ignorance.”
And if anyone is tempted to

say there has been progress, let

him derive all the comfort he
can from “Eighty Thousand
Adolescents” a study of young

péople between 14 and 20 in the
factories, shops and workshops of
Birmingham, “Their average
pocket money is 7s. 6d. a week at
14 and rises to 21s, at eighteen,
but 25 per cent of these fortunate
young people read no books, and
of the remainder most read
weekly comics or boys’ and girls’
weeklies only. The staple amuse-
ment is the cinema: after that
the dance hall, the dirt track and
watching football, Sixty-five per
cent. of these young men never
enter a church.

All this is not
decline.”

progress, but

(England Past Piesent and Future by
Douglas Jerrold) (Dent 10s, 6d.)



The Colour Bar In

(By a Special Correspondent)

LONDON.
Mr. Reginald Sorensen, Social~
ist Member of Parliament and
Free Church Minister, has a dash
of that quixotic temper which
is the heart of chivalry and the
strength of foolishness confound-
ing wisdom. Jousting against the
windmills of ancient prejudice,
he has introduced a bill which
is to “make illegal any discrim-
ination to the detriment of any
person on the basis of colour or
race”. He does not want race or
colour to be made the excuse for
denying any man ‘“accommoda-

tion, advantages, facilities or
privileges”. He has in mind
particularly owners, managers,

agents and employees of hotels,
boarding houses and places of
entertainment. They would be
liable to prosecution already by
displaying a Colour Bar notice,
though the penalty would be no
more than £5 at the first offence
and £25 at the second.

It is to be hoped that Mr.
Sorensen cherished no undue
expectations about the pros-
pects of his bill. Even the Man-
chester Guardian could see
“almost no chance” for it, and
the Parliamentary Reports fea-
tured instead an equally
important (and possibly kindred)
bill providing for the prevention
of cruelty in pet shops.

Still, Mr. Sorensen was by no
means concerned with a matter
of merely academic _ interest.
Race discrimination is an ugly
fact in Britain to-day, and this
remnant of the slave trade has
seemed more odious and uncanny
ever since the Colonies were
granted increasing emancipation.
A melancholy picture of the
position was drawn at a confer-

ence recently organised by the
British Council of Churches to
consider the welfare of Coloured
workers in Britain, Heart-

rending instances of prejudice
were reported (including a story
about the segregation of six’
small children in a Welsh school),
and one of the delegates con-
fessed he could not but marvel
at the patience with which Col-
oured people endured provoca-
tive acts of discrimination.
The Bishop of Liverpool
that the “white problem” con-
fronted the Church with a
challenge at home every bit as
vital as the task once considered
the reserve of missionaries over-
sea. The urgency of his appeal
became evident when the sugges-
tion was put forward that
Coloured people should have their
own churches, elect their own
wardens and live in self-contained
communities. It was argued that
attempts had been made to pro-
life
it:

felt

duce a combined community
had come

experiment had
the evangel-

nothing of

the

but
actually
merely jeopardised
istic work among the white
parishioners! However, the idea
ran into staunch opposition which

would .\haye nothing to do with

Britai
this, “our own brand of Apart-
heid”’.

In fact there was a_ strong,
almost zealous desire to discount
all barriers of race, and one social
worker among the Coloured in
London’s East End, a_ priest,
went so far as to declare that it
would be all to the good if in a
generation or two the British
people’s skin were noticeably to
change from “white” (so called)
to varying shades of brown! He
made the widely noted proposal
not only that married men from
the Colonies be allowed to bring
their wives with them, but also
that a carefully selected number
of coloured women be brought to
England to save the menfoll
from the fate which too often
befalls them, of meeting no
women other than outcasts from
English society.

Competent planning might
wer help to bring some
relief into the affairs of the Col-
oured in Britain. The issue was
recently broached from an
economical angle. Mr, L. N.
Constantine, the famous cricketer
and conscientious champion of his
people, drew attention to the odd
contrast between the ove
lation in some _ Coloni and
Britain’s shortage of workers
which is being made acute by the
expanding rearmament. He said
that the People’s National Party,
Jamaica, was willing to send
20,000 workers if there were
evidence that they were really
needed. No doubt many of the
50,000 coloured folk in Britain
are not far wrong in their sus-
picion that only prejudice keeps
them out of useful employment,
though some perhaps do _ not
always sufficiently realise that
quite frequently rather more
qualifications are required than
merely being a British subject.

It is possible’ that accurate
information and careful selection,
mainly in Afriea and the West
Indies, would forestall at least
some disappointments. At the
same time, British industry is not
entirely a closed shop to
Colonials, Craven Brothers, one of
the largest engineering firms,
have offered tens of thousands of
vacancies for unskilled workers
who gradually would gain the
experience which Africans feel
they can obtain only in Britain
if West Africa, for example, is
to be rapidly and efficientiy
industrialised.

Yet even the best of good will
is occasionally thwarted by un-
foreseen difficulties. Because its
allocation under the Foreign Office
estimates was reduced to £1,862,-
000 (which is £364,000 less than
last the British Council has
been forced to close its hostel
for oversea (mainly African)
students in Manchester and Leeds

¢

year),

Public concern was keen and ob-
viously sincere. For not only did
those students lose an opportunity
of enjoying international fellow-
ship, but, as the Manchester
Guardian pointed out, “young
men who may rise to be leaders
of their countries and whose
friendship we should seek to win
and hold, may now be exposed
again to discourtesies and diffi-
culties which may sour their
memories of Britain and incline
their ears to those who revile us.”

Communists naturally take an
eager interest in them, and Mr.
Kwameh Nkrumar, for example,
was given a full measure of atten-
tion. But they do not have a clear
field. Their rivals also are active.
The British Council admittedly
must needs practise a precarious
economy, though its responsibility
to find accommodation for all Colo-
nial students of course remains,
Useful work is being done, under
its guidance by a number of volun.
tary societies (e.g. the East and
West Friendship Council, the
Victoria League) which seek to
assure the coloured man of hos-
pitality and friendship in British
homes,

Great and active interest too is
shown by the churches. The
British Council of Churches is
constantly reminding its constit-
uents of their duty. The Church
of Scotland, the Methodist Miss-
ionary Society and the Church
sMissionary Society each have
full-time officers whose sole task
is the care of visitors as well as
residents, particularly students,
from Africa, Asia and the Middle
East. The Methodists actually
Opened an International House jn
London and in doing so avowed
their pride of being “in the van
of a great social movement whicn
by smashing the colour bar here

can provide the justification for
protests against its existence
elsewhere,”

The difficulties of course are

formidable, and the great move.
ment does not always advance.
But the gallant action, however
forlorn, of the Socialist Member
of Parliament who seeks to stamp
out the injustice of racial dis-
crimination, bears the sure promise
that the British struggle against
bigotry will not abate. It was
perhaps more than a coincidence
that about the same time a Con-
servative Member pleaded for a
“Council of Empire” to proclaim
the incorruptible truth that “there
are no colour bars and the King
has no first-class and second-class

subjects,” for, he said and no
Britisher will lightly disagree, “if
we have not the courage or the
inspiration to do something on
these lines, we shall find ourselves
fighting a series of rearguard
ictions which will ultimately re-
Sult in the Union Jack being

pulled down all over the world.”

is urgently called/ ee a traditional product like oatmeal and a

tc;

Charter! plan is next reviewed there will be a further
whose anniversary was celebrated!enlargement of the quotas themselves.




















© tome





Trade With
Canada

By KENNETH WILSON
(in a CBC Eroadcast)

THE Right Honourable C. D. Howe, Can-
ada’s Minister of Trade and Commerce when
he announced the new B.W.I. Trade Liberal-
ization plan said: “The way has been opened,
but energetic sales efforts by Canadian ex-
porters will still be required to insure that

full advantage is taken of the opportunities
provided.” Since this statement was made,

the original list of goods covered by the Lib-
eralization Plan has been extended in one or
two respects because of items added by the
United States and which were not on the
original Canadian list. The most important
items are in the textile field—rayons, dresses,
shirts, and so forth. However, Canadians are
still very disappointed that the list doesn’t
jyet include hosiery. We’re almost certain to
'press for inclusion of that item when the list
is reviewed at midyear. We’d also like to

very important item like machinery included.

No doubt merchants and importers in the

strong hopes expressed here that when the

The reasoning and justification for this ap-
proach by Canada is well supported by the
trend of trade figures during 1950.

New twelve-month figures of Canadian
trade with the B.W.I. show that whereas our
purchases from you reached a new record
otal of $67 and a half million, the pre-

vious record was in 1949 when our imports
reached $62 million.

But at the very time when Canadian dollars
for your sugar and others goods was reaching
this all-time record figure, there was a drop of
> less than 30 per cent. in the dollar value of
vur sales in your market. According to our
new official 1950 trade statistics, our exports
to the British West Indies last year dropped
to $30,600,000. This compares with $43 million
in 1949. In dollar total, this is the smallest
volume of export trade which Canada has
enjoyed with the colonies since 1940.

And the comparison is even more striking
when allowance is made for the changes in
prices which have taken place in recent years.

To make a detailed price adjustment for
every commodity which enters into this im-
portant B.W.I.-Canada trade would be a
lengthy and difficult study.

But because sugar and flour dominate much
of our trade, the compilation is made consid-
erably easier. What’s been done therefore is
to make an exact price adjustment for flour
and sugar and to adjust the balance of our
trade in line with the general trend of prices
since 1938.

Using this plan I find that the actual vol-
ume of Canadian exports to the B.W.I. in 1950
was 5 per cent less than in the year 1938. It
was less than one quarter of the volume of
our trade in the peak years after the war. It
My one third below the export volume of

Having said this you will no doubt be in-
terested to know what has happened to trade
volume in Canadian import of your goods.
Here again the results are very striking. I
find that even after allowance for price
changes there was an actual increase of 8
per cent. in our purchases from you during
1950 as compared with 1949. Also that the
present real level of these purchases is still
at the highest point in history, a point about
27 per cent higher than 1938.

I must apologize for so many figures but
the basic and important point which they
substantiate is very clear. Namely, that
Canada’s very substantial and increasing
purchases of British West Indian goods, at
a time when we are being forced to sharply
curtail our sales to you, have indeed earned
the right to have this problem considered in
1951 on the basis of our mutuai trade in-
terests as merchants and customers. Rather
than through the arbitrary straight-jacket
of the dollar-gap crisis which so dominated
our trade climate a few years ago.

I think this approach is very convincing-
ly put forward in the new series of govern-
ment advertisements which were referred to
by Mr. Howe and Mr. Senator MacKinnon
earlier in this broadcast. The simple message
in one of these advertisements is found in

Let me read you one or two sentences:

“Because Canada is purchasing an in-
creasingly large amount of British goods
and services, it is possible now. under the
B.W.I. Liberalization Plan, to import many
items from Canada which you haven't
seen in quantity for many a long day.”

The advertisement continues:

“Pleasant. news for you—and for us. A
return to more normal trade with Canada
should be as natural to you as breathing.
After all, we are traditional trading neigh-
bours, Canadian East Coast fishing. craft
were a familiar sight in your ports nearly
200 years ago, They brought in dried fish
and took out cargoes of sugar, molasses,
rum. And, as sister nations in the British
Commonwealth, we have many mutual in-
terests.”

“So, now that broader trade for better
living is possible again we suggest that,
as of yore, you make Canada your first
source of supply—your first port of call.”
I know that with the new demand for

arms and weapons, the problem of supply
is again going to loom very large in all trads
calculations.

But I think this makes it all the more im-
portant that there be a broad and sympathetic
understanding on both sides and that the
broad purposes of this new and hopeful plan
for trade expansion between our two tradi-
tional trading areas be expanded as far and
as rapidly as possible.

the caption “Broader Trade—Better :

}
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WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 1951 4

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 1951

“Cuke Will Speak For Our Sugar”



@ From page 1

we require. I think that this is
a matter that should be taken up
very strongly with the gentlemen
that are coming here.

“I do not intend to delay hon,
members, but this matter is so
important that I considered 1
should draw it to the attention
of hon. members and particular-
ly the hon. senior member for
St. Joseph.

Mr. E, D. Mottley (E) second-
ed the motion for the adjourn-
ment. He was very pleased, he
said, that the hon. member had
taken the opportunity to bring
the matter to the attention of the
House on the eve of the arrival
of the Mission. It was a matter
of paramount importance, and
when one said so he was not
overstating the case.

There must have been some
feeling of anxiety during the past
jew weeks — anxiety especially
among responsible people in the
community, when there appeared
in the Press that shortly negotia-
tions would be carr’ed on between
the U.K., Canada and Cuba as
regards the purchase of sugar.
Hon. members would recall that
he had raised the matter in the
House and as a result an Address
had been presented to the Head
of the Administration in connec-
tion with it.

He had ho doubt that even
before the passing of the Address
a wide-awake Government would
have taken the matter up in the
right quarter. But as in most cases
of this sort, whenever it was
possible to hear the voice of the
people through their representa-
tives in the Chamber, some good
could always be done.

He was not versed in the eco-
nomic set-up or trade set-up in

this colony, but he was sufficiently

acquainted with conditions to
know that sugar was the only
staple product in the island, and
any negotiations which were
being carried on between the
U.K., Canada and any other com-
peting country, would create a
great hardship on the West Indies.
Any hardship therefore that was
created with respect to this com-
modity must inevitably be reflect-
ed in the standard of living of the
people, Not only the agricultural
labourer but every other worker
as well.

Hon, members were aware that
responsible persons would dread
competition between Cuba and the
West Indies where sugar was con-
cerned,

There had been so many com-
mitteés and commissions in this
colony during recent times, said
Mr. Mottley, that it made it diffi-
cult for one to be able to digest
all that they had been doing. He
was strongly suggesting to hon.
members, however, to join them-
selves together whatever might be
their political ideologies, to face
the present issue. It was an issue
that they must attack as one body.
It had to do with the lifeblood of
the West Indies and more so Bar-
bados,

He agreed with the Leader of
the Ofposition, it was a matter
that concerned everyone. One did
not have to be a son of a planter
or to be employed in the commer.
cial trade. All one had to do wes
to be interested in the welfare
and well-being of his community,
to know that any agreement
which must affect the agreement
the West Indies had put up must
in one way or another affect the
life of the people of the area.

He had observed from the re-
port which he had read in the
Press, that this Mission would be
having a discussion with the
Executive Council of Jamaica. No
doubt they would be doing the
same thing here, but it was also
reported that they would try to
get the expressions of opinions
from all interested parties ‘n
Barbados. “Let me say here and
now that any Mission, Committee
or otherwise, who come to Bar-
bados to make an inquiry and do
not also get the views of the Op-
position in this Chamber will not
be getting a true picture of the
state of affairs’’.

He was throwing out the sug-
gestion that in another few days

if possible a very important
matter was going to be discussed
in the House.. It was a Bill and
was in the name of the Leader of
the House. It was a Bill to ex-
tend the powers of the Governor
ef this colony relative to imports
and exports.

He was truly worried about
the present situation and he hoped
that every opportunity would be
given to make representations to
these officials from the Colonial
Office.

Mr. A. E. S. Lewis (L) said that
he was very pleased that the
junior member for St. James had
drawn attention to that matter.
He was not in his place to hear
the argument by the honourable
inember, but he knew that a cou-
ple of weeks ago, the House had
sent a protest against the negotia-
tions between the United Kingdom
and Cuba, Now, honourable mem-
bers had read in a paper that
someone was coming down here
i discuss the matter.

He said that the House had al-
ready sent an Address to the Gov-
ernor, tu be transmitted to London
in respect to the matter, but what
about tne House of Assembly?
Why was not the House of Assem-
bly told that this gentleman was
coming to this island?

The House sent a Message to the
Governor to be transmitted to the
Colonial Office, protesting against
this sugar pact. Now they were
hearing of a Regional Economic
Conference and he was not even
sure that the people of the colony
would be properly represented at
the Conference.

He said that the House should
have received a letter saying that
Mr. Bottomley was coming tc
Barbados to explain the position
in regard to sugar, and the House
could have sent back a message,

such as; exchange, controls,

American dollars and Canadian}

dollars etc.

For the last year or so, they had’

talked about sugar negotiations
between Great Britain and the
West Indies and to get up there

then and say that sugar was their,

only mainstay meant nothing.

They should instruct the senior’

member for St. Joseph as to what
he could do as the member repre-
senting them at this Regional
Economic Conference, but he did
not see why the House should say
that the Sugar Producers should
meet those people when the House
had not even been told that Mr.
Bottomley was to discuss the
matter.

Mr. Adams (L) said that ac—
cording to some information he
had got, Mr. Bottomley never
intended coming to Barbados,
Trinidad or elsewhere other than
Jamaica, Jamaica had cause for
grievances over and above the
rest of the West Indies.

Mr. Bottomley had been request-
ed, inasmuch as he was in the
area, to come here and hear theic
views. He had assented.

After speaking of the represen-
tation that Barbados would get,
Mr, Adams said that he agreed
that they should put their case
strongly. Do not let them fool
themselves however. If the Colon-
ial Office said that they could only
spend $10 they had got to spend
$10. What they had got to do was
to put up a first-class case to
them and show them why they
should release more dollars.

A question was asked in the
House sometime ago about dollar
allocations and dollar earnings,
but some colony had spoken about
more dollar allocations and it had
been shown that they were spend-
ing more dollars than they earned,
All those things had to be exam-
ined in the light that they were
all part of the sterling area.

“Let us say: ‘treat us better,’ but
do not let us fool ourselves and say
we must be our own representa-
vives at a conference say at
Ottawa or elsewhere. We are
not a sovereign country.” End-
ing his speech, Mr. Adams again
assured the House that the case
of Barbados will be well put to
the Mission.

Mr. F. C. Goddard (E) said that
he rose to correct one statement
and that was that the commercial
community in the West Indies
were not as anxious to do busi-—
ness with Canada as they had



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saying that they would like this tcommodities like potatoes,
cial to discuss economic matters; etc.

been making it out to be. That

was absolutely untrue.

fhe commercial community in
Barbados — and he spoke with
some authority — had always

been most anxious to keep trade
relations with Canada open, It
was only in the case of the
restrictions of dollars that their
trade from year to year had got
less and less. It was causing
them great concern because they
saw what the future was holding
in store for them.

Canadians were fed up and
were mad about it. They were
not blaming the people in the

West Indies, but were blaming
fhe Colonial Office, the British
Government and the British

Treasury for withholding those
dollars they were earning.

“I have seen some _ figures
recently which show that our
dollar earnings in Canada are
in the vicinity of $60,000,000 and
we are purchasing $24,000,000
from that source” Mr, Goddard
said and added that there was a
great disparity.

As the senior member for St.
Joseph rightly said, they were
in the sterling block, but geo-
graphically, they were in the dol-
lar area and were surrounded by
countries dealing with dollars.
As they had always drawn their
essential stuff from Canada and
the United States, that was one
reason why the cost of living
bore greatly on them that day.

They had to go abroad into
further markets and were finding
greater credit troubles on their
doorsteps. He had spoken on that
many times in the House and the
one answer to that was: “give us
more dollars”.

He said that they could land
onions
at greatly reduced prices,
* and he was only touching on
that sphere of the debate.

They were not divided in the
House as regards their problem
of sugar. They were giving
Great Britain their sugar at a
reasonable price with the hope
that she would continue, not only
to buy to-day or tomorrow, but
for a long time to come, every
ton that they could produce and
he hoped that Mr. Bottomley and
all the officials who came here,
‘would be told that in no uncer-
tain terms.

Mr. H. A. Dowding (E) felt
that the senior member for St.
Joseph was much too peacefui
when it came to dealing with
United Kingdom officials.

On this matter of sugar he said,
depended the life of every mem-
ber of the community, It was
therefore their duty to put up
united effort with regard to the
sale of their sugar.

He said that the House should
have been informed that thi:
U.K, official was coming to Bar—
bados as they had a right to that
courtesy. He did not know exact-
ly what the preliminary negotia-
tions were with regard to Mr
Bottomley and his senior officiais
from the Colonial Office. He how-
ever hoped that the senior mem-—
ber for St. Joseph would not be
too peaceful with them when it
came to discussing sugar, but
would deal with them very firm—

ly. + we
Jamaica was a large island
which had an easy jump to

America, it had its cigars besides
other resources, but Barbados only
had sugar and must therefore be
more important economically
when it came to that commodity.

For this pact to have been ne
gotiated without any information
being given to the House of As-
sembly was a reason why they
should voice their opinions, and
not lightly. In a matter of that
sort, they as members of the
House should be considered,

They knew that the — senior
member for St. Joseph would put
their case strongly as well as the
Hon'ble Mr, Cuke, but they were
not representatives of the constitu-
ents of this island and they should
have been notified and taken into
consideration with regard to any
other matter.

Mr. D. D. Garner (C) said he
believed that Mr. Bottomley
was coming out here to white

wash matters now that they had
settled everything already. He





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ADVOCATE

HOUSE PASS

$9,716

FOR FLOOD VICTIMS

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday passed a Res-
olution for $9,716 to pay claims in connection with flood

damage of two years ago.

Addendum to the
states that under the provisions of
Resolutions 44 and 54 of 1949, a
total of $29,049 was voted for the
purpose of relieving distress
caused by storm and flood da
during 1948 and 1949. Of this
emount $22,934 has been dis-
bursed, leaving an unexyended
balance of $6,115 which has iapsed.
In addition there is an amount of
$5,150.20 in hand from voluntary

subscriptions,
Further claims’ totalling
$14,865.60 and based on returns

from Vestries have now been ap-
proved and the amount of $9,716
is now required together with the
amount of voluntary = subscrip-
tions togpay these claims

Mr, Adams (L) moved the pass-
ing of the Resolution He said
that the Resolution, had come to
the House after a long period of
delay. The Government was al
Ways prepared to acknowledge
their faults. This, however, Mr
Adams pointed out, was because
Government had had to exanne
carefully the claims that had
been made; especially as on the
particular occasion there had been

substantial loss of life.

It was to be remembered that
the grant was an act of g¥ace.
There had been a lot of aceusa-
tions levied against Authority, not
recessarily Government, A great
Ceal of propaganda had been used
but it had become _ extremely
necessary for Government to
make 4 thorough investigation into
the claims.

“IT hope that now we have come
down to some figures, hon. mem-
bers on both sides of the House
should stop recrimination, Let me
remind hon, members that re-
crimination can be two-sided, “Of
the St. Michael Vestry, in spite
of the great number of attacks,
I intend to say nothing except
that of their original estimate of
sixty thousand odd dollars, they
themselves had cut it down to
seven thousand,”

He had no intention of criticiz-
ing anybody, but he was saying
that if they were going to start
recrimination they might con-
tinue consideration of the Reso-
lution unduly long.

Referring again to the St, Mi-
chael Vestry, Mr. Adams = said
that of the 550 parishioners for
whom claims had been made it
was discovered that many of them
were not in the flood area. It was
then suggested to the Vestry that

perhaps their estimate was on
too wide a basis. As a result the
Vestry hac appointed another

committee and tnen submitted an
estimate for $6,707. The first es-



was coming out to pacify the
people in the West Indies and
they could do nothing about it

He did not know anything
much about sugar, but he was
sure that if the pact between
Great Britain and Cuba comtin-
ued, it was certainly going to
lower the living standards of the
masses in the West Indies.

Great Britain he said, had
found itself in a precarious posi-
tion today and did not care who
got squeezed. They as members
of the House were sitting there
and allowing men from the Col-
anial Office to tell them how they
must shape their destiny.

If the people in the West Indies
were going to allow a few peo-
ple in the Colonial Office to ruin
their industries, then he would
gay that the world was coming
to an unhappy past. The trouble
was that they did not speak
strongly enough.

It was time that the Ministry
of Food and others should realise
that when they talked about
sugar, the West Indies was a unit
they must count on. If they
bought. sugar from Cuba, it must
interfere with the living stand-
ards of the West Indies

He personally felt that the
people in the West Indies had
been taken for a ride and even
now in this twentieth century,
Great Britain was still trying to
be diplomatic.

Mr, Wilkinson
his motion,

then withdrew



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e in St

Resolution timate was $69,000.

This was the first big item
Claims too came from nine other
parishes for the repair of houses,
There were also ten special cases
Michael for which a spe-
cial sum was voted and there
were one or two extra claims in
St. Michael and some _ other
parishes as well, to which it was
thought special attention should
be given. The Government still
hoped that members of the pub-
lic would, even at this late hour,
help flood victims in any way
they could. Government could
not give 100 per cent
Government could only in the
ease of big demands for big losses
give a) substantial amount, and a
less substantial amount to those
who had suffered less. When i!
came to people losing everything
like their clothes, furniture, etc.,
then Government had to do what
they had done at the Pine—a new
house and $120 in furniture.

Mr. Adams ending his speech
told members that they would
see from the Addendum how the
Resolution was made up. He
then moved that the Resolution
be passed.

Dr. H. G. Cummins seconded

Mr. Mottley (E) seid that Gov-
ernment had taken over 11 months
to bring down the resolution, “He
who gives quickly, gives twice,”
he said,

He was going to be reasonable
and fair in making his criticisms,
He was bound to criticise the Gov-
ernment on that matter, He was
not going to sit and allow it to be
said that the Si. Michael’s Vestry
amended their clare from
$69,000 to over $6,000 all of a sud-
den.

Mr, Adams replied and said
that he had pointed out that the
Government had suggested to the
St. Michael's Vestry that the basis
on which they had made their
claims was too wide and the esti-
mates were sent back to them.

Mr, Mottley said that when he
saw the figures from the Vestry
to the Government, he felt they
were too high. He remembered
telling one of the members of the
Government that there was no
point in sending to ask the Gov-
ernment for assistance to replace
furniture and such losses through
the flood water,

He wanted it to be known that it
was the Government who had sug-
gested to the Vestry of St, Michael
that their scope was too wide.

Mr. Mottley said that it was
true that the Government was
quite in order to make a thorough
investigation into the matter, but
it was inhuman for it to take two
years to make the investigations
with poor people suffering all the
while,

He said that the Government
had picked out certain people for
relief out of the 550 names sub-
mitted. In some cases, people
were helped that were not at all
in the flood area,

Mr. Adams, replying, said that
it was cishonest of the Hon, senior
member for the City to make that
accusation, He did not know, he
said, of anybody outside the flood
area getting help.

Mr. Mottley said that he wanted
to make it clear that the Hon.
senior member for St. Joseph had
nothing to do with it, He, how-
ever, knew that of the 550 claims
submitted, 11 persons had been
picked out by Government from
districts which were far removed
from the flood area,

If one would examine carefully
what had happened in the flood
area, he would find out that those
people who did not follow the
Labour Party, were left out while
others, that were not in the area,
were picked out and given assist-
ance, The actual figures on which
the Government was now working,
were in their hands long ago, Mr.
Mottley said,

Mr, Adams said that Govern-
ment had dealt with those per-
rons of greatest necessity imme
diately.

The Hon, Senior member for
the City had spoken as if the Gov-|
ernment had gone out and picked |
out houses. Ten houses, the list)
of which the Vestry of St, Michae |









rad checked back at the Govern.
ment, had been signed by the
Churehwarden and the Calonial
Engineer. “This is how the Gov-
ernment got the list; every. singld
list that has been acted upon,
came from the Churchwarden of
the particular parish,” he said.

Mr. Mottley said that it was un-
true to say that the ten houses
were selected by the Church-
warden, “It is a calculated wicked
lie when he said that the Church-
warden of St. Michael picked out
ten houses,” he said.

The real sufferers from the
flood waters were still suffering
and quicker relief would have been
brought about by a_ far-sighted
policy.

Mr. L. E. R. Gill said that he
was grateful to Government for
its attempt, although somewha'
belated, to assist those ee
who had suffered great loss as
result of the calamity which ha ud
befallen them in 1949. He
gretted that the list of persons eo
receive assistance and the amount
of assistance to be given, had not



been circulated, Had that been
done, Hon. members would have
readily seen that the amounts
allotted to the individuals were
xrossly inadequate to meet their

requirements

Mr. Dowding (EB) said that h
was wondering if it were not elec-
tion year, if any such resolution

would have been brought before
the House.
In two days, he = said,

Churchwarden of St. George and
he had got out the list of all the
damaged houses of that parish, Bu
the Government with a_ large

secretariat had taken until May
1951 te get through the estimates

“There is much left to be desired

he said.

He was not going to make any
accusations. However, he thought
it a very unbusinesslike and un-
fortunate way for the Government
to have acted in a serious case
like that,

Mr. Ward (E) said that
were getting a small relief.
did not know who to blame.

In St. Lucy, there were one or
two homes which the Government
had taken no notice of. They said
that the houses were not in the
best state of repairs when the
storm came and nothing could be
given. He knew of a house owner
in that parish who was given $70
and whose house was on the
ground.

He did not feel that the Govern-
ment intended giving any money
because they felt that it was not
a real storm.

Mr. D. D. Garner (C) said that
he had hoped to see a distinct
policy of rehabilitating those per-
sons who had lost their homes
completely through the flood. He
had hoped that the Government
would have built a house for these
sufferers giving them half of the
cost and allowing them to pay the
remainder on easy terms, e was
appealing to the Government to
pursue that policy.

the
He

Delegates Arrive
For Meeting

Arriving in the island last night
by B.W.1.A. Ltd, to attend the
first meeting of the Regional
Economic Committee were the
delegates from Jamaica and
Trinidad, The delegates are Hon,
D. B. Sangster, Hon. R. L. M
Kirkwood, Messrs, D, Levy, J. B
Clegg and E. A, Maynier of Jamai

ca, Hon. A. Gomes, Hon. A. W
Kobertson, Hon. H, E. Robinson,
Hon. A. Storey, Mess AST



Shill and R, Pringle of Trinidad

Also arriving by the same op-
portunity was Mr. Heetor Bernard
cf the Daily Gleaner Jamaica, who
is here to cover the meeting for his
paper.

The Regional Economie Com-
mittee meeting will be opened by
Sir George Seel at Hastings House
at 10 a.m, today,

Leaving the island for Trinidad
by the sarne plane w Mr, E. L
Cozier, Acting Information Officer
of the Caribbeaa Commission, who
v attending Caribbean Com-
mission Talks which ended at
Hastings House last week.

PIMPLES AND





BLACKHEADS

| Quickly helps to clear up these blemishes
aye skia soft and smooth, Proven over
years.

Dr. Chase’s Ointment





We'll soon have that better








fPPPPPIS SSS VOSPIS DV PISS 1S VOSSSRSOFPOVVPSPOFOSOOF Gg

Just Received

A Large Assortment

’ “Balloons”

|
| For Games. Parties. Dances ete

swith animal faces or plain

| KNIGHTS’ LTD.

ALL BRANCHES

ASEPTIC OINTMENT

Children’s skin ailments need the soothing
touch of Germolene Ointment.
lieves irritation, subdues inflammation and
gives protection against the entry of
harmful bacteria,
that Germolene draws out dirt from cuts,
abrasions, blisters and sores and stim-

It re-

You will find, too,

SPOTS, RASHES, BURNS





PAGE FIVE





In the treatment of sarcoptic mange in small animals
* Tetmosol’ is invariably effective. At the most, two or
three applications are required and moreover during
treatment no special isolation is necessary.
*Tetmosol' is non-greasy, non-staining
obnoxious smell.

“*TETMOSOL’

Tetraethylthiuram Monosilphide Solution (25°,)
IMPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED

A subsidiary company of Imperial Chemical industries Limited
WILMSLOW MANCHESTER
Sole Agents and Distributors :—

A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD.

and has no



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Cleanse the system from blood
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neuritis, pimpies, boils, sores and
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benefit from this well-known medicine.



In LIQUID or TABLET FORM

SER ER ER EBS BS
a “PURINA”

a
. RABBIT CHOW

aH. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors.
BEBSSCERRaaTaresw

Oniy be
ONE
bicycle
in the



see

Sggpeesn2 —







The

is your g ree of lasting |
is your guarartre of lasting j
|
|

Humber

quality, fine appearance :






oh e sen ng qua i ;
world ae this mark of
carries this }
mark of |

perfection





HUMBER

H
The Aristocrat of ail Bicycles
~«
\ FULL RANGE
OF MODELS



.
att
x

ae tede Dae tee ere seme








POPPE STE PELL LE LA LPL LAE LEE Oo, A .
_ 7 ‘on x r "—_ %, °
ORDER THESE FINEST FOOD
%
>
>
»
\
Ss
>
>
s
&
>
Pd
%
»
- ~
.
’
for the Holidays %
ROMARYS PARMASTIC Be per tin Bic *
HONEY BAKE BISCUITS—per tin 8 %
GINGER BAKE BISCUITS—per tin 79 %
Cc ADBURY’ S BOURNVILLE CHOCOLATE BIS- >
CUITS—-per tin $1.19 Q
LIFESAVERS—AI1 Flavours—per Roll 9c.; per box 51.57 %
STEPHEN'S NAVY PICKLES—per jar 34 ne
BAHAMAS CRUSHED PINEAPPLE—per ti: 24 x
» CRAWFORD'S UFILLIT BISCUITS—per tin $1.21 %
CRAWFORD’'S CLUB STRAWS—>per tin &
MacFARLANE LANG'S SAVOURY COCKTAIL v
> per tin &
ROSE LEMON BARLEY WATER—per bottle $1.00 &
ORANGE ‘ $1.00 x
2 COCKADE FINE RUM %
¥ ‘
5 ‘
yi 1m "ne ? a Veg ’ *
8 STANSFELD SCOTT & Co., Lid.
o ‘
$0809 $59 OOF GSS SS 809 4466664







PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 1951
————SS

' ESCHALOT.
ESCHALOT





PENTALUX

GLOSS FINISH PAINT |






HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON






STUART & SAMPSON
(i938) LID.

HEADQUARTERS . FOR BEST
RUM

FOR SUPPLIED

| 7)
. |

MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY |

— WL SSB | [MARA ea mye ee

ae ti!
IS THIS WHERE LL GI THE SITUATION! SN

TAKE UH wee OTHE VATION
ATH? | : my ee

K- ata itotnoa va

IN A
SE ty

EXTERIOR

AND
| INTERIOR












600D
THINGS
for YOU
WINCARNIS WINE

Large Bots... $2.88

Small Bots... $1.56
RESERVA WINE

Large Bots. .. $2.38

CRAWFORDS CLUE
CHEESE BISCUITS
Tin ..ccseeoeee $1.26

PEEK FREANS
BISCUITS in Tins
OLIVE OIL—in Tins

CHEF SAUCE.
in bots. ........ 38
Rich & appetising

“BLACKBUCK”
SAUCES—Bats. 24

FOR GOOD VALUE

INCE & Co., Ltd.

6, 7, 8 & 9 Roebuck Street.
Dial 2236



D WIDE

{4

&
{
ATTRACTIVE |

RANGE

nh
ny



"
NO ee
N ial 7 Te Lad

65
Ary ree | a
BS el COLOURS

OF

WAIT, FRIEND...! DO UM THE GAS COMPANY MAN! T

YOU HAPPEN TO HAVE Ov? CAME HERE TO FIX THE METER
A SANDWICH ON VOU? t FIVE DAYS AGO AND 1 HAVEN'T
TM STARVING ! BEEN ABLE TO FIND MY WAY OUT

USE





THE VERY BEST IN: PAINT

OBTAINABLE ATF ALL LEADING
HARDWARE STORES






















































SLONDIE. ) as BY CHIC YOUNG IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
ear ~ eo or (Sem Te —aresienenesetaitianiliaatiitiaaiatilailii iii ciaiaiaias
| f Ba | | L\/\t =m ie aa REY TT a : ===
Kook |< Lt Naat On, REALLY) [Bg —~—— MI SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only
I war x) a ( QUT SPARERIBS ) A ghee is WAITRESS AT ort, re : Peay | i ee ) rg pat aie Aarne ee
Fee roe 74 09, NG “fe OUNTER, er te MY LUNCH USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
ri Toman fr 9 TT ~~ Fong I rig BROWN & POLSON Lageia
“ | wali an Corn Flour. Pkgs. 37 32 Rolled Oats, Tins 55 A8
: | y H : V S l d Ti 55 AB HEINZ
et ee et Tomato Soup, Tins 34 29
Chum Salmon, Tins (Talls) 66 62 Grapefruit Juice, Tins 24 21

TUAATTRTT

LET ME HAVE
De \ YOUR NEWSPAPER
v2 A MOMENT, DE
Wea

XI. THINK

(HAS THE RIGHT TO SEE

On HUSBAND'S FACE











HEY! WHY ARE
YOU CUTTING THAT
BIG HOLE IN MY

Ro NEWSPAPER? J]






AT THE BREAKFAST



———— ———— S
aS —— ——



—







Ee
oP EY, Soap
THE WHOLE FAMILY

@ LEAVES BODY FRESH,
SWEET — HEALTHFULLY CLEAN

@ MORE LASTING PROTECTION
@ NO TELL-TALE ODOR

TT
i at 7 aT r
HINDOVAH 99148 e WOSSOTH NAANTT e aIHLVAT ‘TW WT
. ~—e gs








Y KERE COMES PETE WITH A GET YOUR GUNS ON THOSE TWO! JES pn aeaeee sal |
YS. B ee ciamannenaiae - y Pi Zeciriy y :
x PF Po spoccm «DELIVER IN STYLE Ovaltine

ats good for business
fet

RIP KIRBY

\ WHITEY, WE'RE
\. RicH ! / ab cess
~~ as MR.SEVEN..
“ime | PLEASE...MR.
Rw 4 SEVEN...

~~

4 O hic: SOX, wHiTEy, YOUR GuN'S
YOU PROMISED a \e ‘
TO TAKE CARE OF aca oes et a




4. IT

UP AGAINST THE
—, WALL!



helping to
energy, delicious ‘Ovaltine’ will
give you the zest to carry on your
work cheerfully and efficiently.

a

revive flagging



3tyled like a car, powered with For the first time
ALL 10 FEATURES IN ONE VEHICLE

a rugged, dependable engine, 4% All-steel, car-type safety cab

the COWLEY VAN will speed |X oritn bar independeat front wheel




‘Ovaltine’ provides elements, includ-
ing vitamins, of the highest nutritive
value derived from Nature's finest
foods. The famous ‘Ovaltine’ Farms
were established to set the highest
standards of quality for the malt,
milk and eggs used.

up your deliveries and bring *} i gearbox, with steering
c rs t

wheel arches to



| extra prestige to your business, J * B«

® ve controllable
New features have been included
rs with renewable



oF se
b * Cc ted 20)
which mean lower running cost, hardwood runners.

THE PHANTOM
a 3 tii
PULLIN A RODON ME, DAVE)

PALMER? YOU OUGHTA ra!
KNOW BETTERN ' Ee

THAT! al ..33 =
+ ee,

% Hypoid rear axle for silence and long
life.

longer trouble-free life, more de Bumpers front and reer.
% Van doors and pick-up tailboard

UNCLE DAVE (INSISTED ON GOING | J : : ‘an de
| profitable operation for you. dimpled for extra streng

TO THOSE GANGSTERS ALONE? |
HOPE NOTHING++ THERES THE BELL?
THATS HiM NOW! THANK GOODNESS

Because of its outstanding nutritive
qualities ‘Ovaltine’ is ideal for every
member of the family, at any time
of the day. As a bedtime beverage,
too, it is everywhere acknowledged
as a reliable aid to sound, natural,
restorative sleep.





_ COWLEY. VAN
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Quality has made Oval time
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" &

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A NUFFIELD PRODUCT









WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

PAGE SEVEN

os

BARBADGS ADVOCATE

| SHIPPING NOTICES





_ _—A—— ee

_ ae AL WANTED











PUBLIC SALES







| word



A ’
Ten cents per agate tine on week-aay. |
in charge week 72 cent ne
TELEPHONE 2806 po per agate line on Sundays aa : we Keret " : j Cs = “ Saas e sae he t
â„¢ nan an AF ne | 96 ce Sune 24 words wer 24
and $1.80 on fa Peer ny wife, RETA LARRIER| words 3 cents a word wel cents @

Canadian National Steams hipsl sr















































































































































































































































Relative to Carnival and Fair to
be held on 7th and 9th June at
Queen’s Park, the undersigned will
receive entries for the following:—

(a) Costume Bands
(b) Steel Bands.

(ec) Advertising Bands.
(d) Historical Bands.

In order to raise the standard of
Carnival, the Steering Committee
would appreciate the co-operation
of Firms, Clubs and Individuals
being as original as possible.

No entrance fee will be charged

More particulars latei

A Carnival Band of thirty will
Le visiting Barbados to take part
in the parade.

Closing date, 19th May.

SEYMOUR BECKLES.
c/o Vestry Clerk’s Office,
Bridgetown.

For Booths, Stalls, and side-
Shows, contact C. MORRIS,
Sobers Lane.

A Special Display will be given
by the B.L,.S. Mediterranean Fleet
under the Command of Comman
der S, Leaceck,

will be sold at my office to the highest
bidder for any sum not under the
appraised value, al) that certain piece of
Lend containing about 1,814 Square Feet







UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER



situate in Parish of Saint Michael By instructions received from the
butting and bounding on lands of The) Insurance Co., I will sell on Friday, Ma
Barbados Government Railway, on two] eth at 2 p.m. at the General Motor
sides on lands of Welches Tenantry, and | Rus Co., tl) A-40 Austin
on the Public Road at Fairfield together; Car, Damaged in accident, Terms eash

ee the Dwelling House and Shop
uildings, &c., appraised as follows:—

The whole property appraised to TWO
THOUSAND AND NINETY ONE
DOLLARS AND SEVENTY FIVE CENTS

VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer.
16.5, 51—3n

UNDER THE SILVER



(2,091.75). Attached from Sydney Roach

«nd Yvonne Burke for and towards sat-

isfaction, &c. HAMMER

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day DOGDFE TRUCKS

of purchase, We will sell on FRIDAY the 18th ot
T. T. HEADLEY, | Courtesy Garage, Whitepark Road, oné
,. ,Provost Marshal. 1944 Dodge Army Truck with Steel

Provost Marshal's Office. Platform in good order and condition

3.5.51—3n.

PUBLIC NOTICES

Tea cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.





THE AGRICULTURAL AIDS ACT, 1905
To the creditors holding specialty liens
against ee PLANTATION,

it, Thomas
TAKE NOTICE that I the owner of
the above named plantation, am about to





Executor to the Estate of the late
E, A. Crawford, we will sell the Furniture,
at “The Farm"
St. Philip, which





Sale 1 o’clock. Terms cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers

1G 5.51-—-4n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 17th by order of

Mrs

(near Six Cross Roads),
includes: Very gdod
Round



the}









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fear or have an inferlority complex? Do you enjoy
the society of women or do beautiful women pass
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HARRISON

whieh th

obtain a loan of £2,000 under the pro-| Extension Dining Table (seat 18),









ee fl visions of the above Act, against the| Tip Top Table, Véry nice Oval Tip Top
ORIENTAL Sugar, Molasses and other crops of the] Table, Double Ends Settee, Couch,
me plantation to be Seaved in 1952, Ornament Tables, Pedesta! Sideboard
uv) R: RIO: ‘oO money has yet en borrowetl!| Lady's (antique). Vanity Table; Prie-
- ag y against the said crops. Dieu’ Chair all in very old Mahogany;
" Dated this llth day of May, 1951. Old Aurora Dinner Service, Tea Service,
New Shipment opened F. F. PILGRIM, Pictures, Glass Ware, Ornaments, Cut-
Owner. glass Bowl, Plated Ware, Silver Spoo:
THANIT’S DIAL 12.5.51—38 | Cordia Berbice Chair, Oak Settee a
3466 Chairs, Clock, Table, Waggon and Book-
THE SUGAR INDUSTRY shelf in Pine, Double Iron Bedsteads,
“= a dl = jane AGRICULTURAL BANK ACT, 1943.| Mattresses, Gld Mahog. Linen Press:







To the creditors holding specialty lens] M.T. Washstand, Chamber Ware, Bureau,

in pleasant,
taapaton let o do
is to ta . two iitte. ta Nets t bees ines
each 44 oa pre’ spripten ria work
im a stimulating the glands, in-

Visoutatine ine blood, and enlivening your |
whole body, As your ands rapidly become |
stronger, you will feel and see yourself be-
coming younger, more animated, and not
only able to keep up with your work, but

realizing the joys and pleasures of life
more frequently than ever before.

Doctor Praises Vi-Tabs
Dr. J, Rastelli, widely-known European
physician, recently stated: “Many acien-
ists are of the opinion that the true secret
of youthful vigour and vitality lies in the
lands. If we could keep our glands func-
properly, we would feel and look



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almost given up hope of ever being strong,
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AND QUEENS
Governing Bodies of Harrise
and Queen's College invite app!
vitebly qualified firma o
thelr Sehool Acc
the fee

The
‘ollege
ations
yersons to

Applicants

from
audit
should

unt
Zo



etate



For Mirth, Mepesage Engagement death ates he a : Saipteladnetancin
cements eR i. Calling the FOR SALE R a sa kame ‘ deb noi ame TR hee |
ry $3.00 for any number of words sebtin! h EAL ESTATE SOUTBSOUND te a ¥ der signed by me
60 and 6 cents pe- word for e say Charge wok TB clmts asec | wcrc ; Srila | Setie Arrivea Sails CITZGERALD LARPIF) CONFIDENTIAL PRIVATE BECRE e n nu es
itional word. Terms cash. Phone 2500 Baise Six 4 ee wer |. By public competition at our office! yABY NELSON Heit aw Bortor Barbados Satbados | .. Rices, St. Philip TARY — English, experienced shorthan
between 8.30 and 4 p.m,, 3113 for Death wad ‘nee week—4 cents a/ James Street on Frida ¥ 25th May 1951.) Gan CAUISER is M : lay WS 2. ] typist requires employment f¢ © c Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny seams
Notices only after 4 p.m. daw gt 2 p.m. 1 rood 14 perches of land :1 | CAN. CHALLE GER aS ‘ay » 7 Wea ee — «| two days a week, own typewriter and pores where germs hide and cause ter-
Upper Carlton. St. James, the proper | LADY RODNEY ‘ = M % td ss e: 3 The public ned t) est U.K. references, B No, A.C. Co! cible Itching, Cracking, Eczema, Peeling,
The charge for announcements cf of the Estate of the Inte William Jordan TADY NELSON pe @ ime | — 2 a Bg giving credit t ¥ wife, CYRIE Pity. | Advocate Co 0.5 51—1n.| Burning, Acne, Ringworm, Peorlasis,
Deaths, Acknow- deceased } x & July & amy 14 July S July LIPS inee Ye Dox I do vid tetra eecineeciain | Blackheads, Pimples, Foot Iteh and other
ledgments, and In’ Memoriam notices 1s AUTOMOTIVE For further particulars and conditions | /“P¥ RODNEY oat iy 9 Ave —_ ne — x Sie ee a he me] LADY for the post of Stenographer- | blemishes. Ordinary treatments give only
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays of sale, apply to | else contracting ar debt or ir ‘ Apr in writing to J. N. Har- €emporary rellef because they do not kill
for any number of words up to 50, and HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD | ne lala eR Seen name ess by a writt ovde & Co, Ltd., Alexander House, the germ canse, The new discovery, Nixo-
3 cents per word on week-days and ALMOST NEW 12 H.P. Bedford Van. 16.5 51-5 NORTHBOUN: signed by me _Street 9.5. 51— derm kills the germs in 7 minutes and is
4 cents per word on Sundays for each | Bustantes if required. Extra Masonite - a . Barbato B — beeen: deed, Gan. toe Signed MOTTLEY PHILLIPS ~— | euaranteed to give you a soft, clear, attrac-
Sn eet Prieh iss Cutt tess pat Saas pre: ‘ DWELLINGHOUSE amd Land contair-| Lapy NELSON arbados Barba on Boston St.John Halifax , | lontreal Halls Vitlage - MISCELLANEOUS tive, smooth skin in one week, oF money
’ . pre- | ing roods, 7 perches adjoining the! 7 ae : coe = BRe - St. Jame back on return of empty package. Get
sently. Apply . ie aa . LADY RODNEY > = + July — 6 ily » July
THANKS e. Property kown as “The Abbe". Chri LADY NELSON oo - an ax dhe 2 .eN GE tuaranteed Nixoderm from your chemist
Church. This property i y ie} - y 29 July Aug s 12 Aug easier aitacaiin Lea s LICENSE: One (1) 1 Licens eo S today i
CAR—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good | stonewall dwellinghouse | comprisin, | PAPY RODNEY .°26 Aug. 28 Aug Sept. @ Sept, 11 Sept Se ee noe meio eae N move the real
GREEN=We the undersigned beg through | tyres, in good workin; Spadisien, rice | living rooms, bedrooms, usual convent. | N.B LOST . Tw cause of skin
this medium to thank all those who] reasonable. Apply F, Gay, Staple | ences and belongs to Ervin Jerome Kine | \'>' pubseet to change without notice, Ail vessets Mtted witn cold storage cham " & FOUND pa -— |For Skin Trowbles trouble. 1/9
sent wreaths and gave us, their sym- | Grove, Churth. isi S207, The above property will be set up fo- | bers. Passenger Fares and freigit cates on application to: — yay |
pathy on the occasion of the death 1.5.51—t.£.n. | sale by Public Competition at our omic } —_—_— ——, —_——————_——_——_- OR REN
‘ate cs eae Miriam Green. “CAR. 198 V han 08 James Street, on Friday 18th May 1951 LOST ‘ | ae
t Green (husband) Florenza, Louise, auxhall “10°, A-1 con-|at 2 p.m | GARDINER AUSTIN & co LTD. Ba -A ai Minimum charge week 72 cente and
Naomi, Samuel, James, Claude Gieen and | dition. Recently overhauled and painted Inspection on application ta Mr. J | ” gents. eee anc 9 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24 ‘ any
Mrs’ Uada_ Downes (children), Audrey | Bob Bdghill. Hansehell, Larsen “& Co. | Grimmth the ferret. Reet a te nin ah go WPPRSTAKE TICKET BOOKS - | words 4 cents @ word week—4 Cente a N CONSTIPATION Ny
Osborne "Sister, U.S.A.) and Evelyn ene “S01. 16.5.51—-an YEARWOOD & , | erit 0040 to 49 Series U.8790 to] word Sundays. bec
OYCE 8 neer please tetut 7
(friend. 16.$.51—1n Pl chit css B f er please ret to the Ac sat nceticliniaplidimaaigheen ot ' Pays
= TRICK, one Beira Tage fmm HARRISO! Go nd ae" NG | AFTER YEARS OF MiSEI
IN’ MEMORIAM good working order. Apply to 8. seaty | 1° St" HOUSES ASER
anager of Belmont Funeral Establish- | HOUSE. A Choliel Tlemee cnoeoon ‘LDUNE “att! “ tal n
s Chattel House, comprisin CULDUNE Cattlewath, Bathsheba For years ] had heen talting many
GRERN—n._Joviig._ memory of May cneay teat ne: f eereen Rrepiwaite, se i8.x 10, one 17 x. 10 and Shedves e PU LIC NOTICES c SSELIC NOTIC Es For June, October and December 1951.| kinds of laxatives. ‘Chen i ed
Elizabeth Green, died May 15th 1945 n | attached, with outer offices. To be Containing 4 bedroon Fully furnished . t rly % .
—aa ne’ i > LL-BRAN [lt nol o
Memory Verse: 1 Thes. 4. 13 on the spot at Alleyne’s Land, Ist Avenue OUTWARD FROM TH UN KIN ———— | including refrigerator, + ing wate . stiy Cerne >
But 1 would not have you to be POULTRY Bush Hall, at 2 p.m. on the 18th May | M & ITED GDOM eae | all ‘bedrooms. Photic 8910. M Stuart | regular 1 realty ,
ignorant, brethren, concerning them —._. | 1951. Phone 4523. 12.5.5%—-3. | Re Estate of Bynoe 13.5. 51—3n | enjoy itevery } \
which are asleep, that ye sorrow not, CHICKS—White ana Black Giants. |——=2HH——__! Due WHILLEMINA AUGUSTA BUSHEL! nanan —— —~lday Rudy BR. I j
even as others which have no hope. | Rhode Islands, Plymouth Rocks, New, |, /4ND — 8—10 acres of land suitable | Vessel From Leaves Barbados } (Deceased) CARLDIEN—On the sea, Gt, Lawrence Adler, 1410 20thSt., | ;
For if we believe that Jesus died and Hampshire and R.O.P. White Leghorns or building, in lots of not less thar S.s. “PLANTER” I v. Mas , NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Gap. Ful furnished from Jul on= | nga, Po ae h. Fis ' j
rose again, even so them also that| ffom U.S.A. Gordon Matthews. Glen. | 10:00 8. {t. Overlooking a large area | S'S" “LINGUIS*” ondon May 16th May ous having any debt or claime| Apply Miss. K. Hunte—Bratton, Max-| Miami Beach, fle | {
sleep in Jesus—will God bring with | Ur, Constitution Road. of St. Philip and Christ Chureh, Mag- ava ST London h Ma 7th June against the Estate of Whilleminag A.} Well Coast, Dial 8967 One of any } :
him 16.8.81 Elijah, Siviuiel (ona); May. hate. ve to Crane Coas alking distances | S.S. “TRIBESMAN” London M 9th June | . spore in the parish of St. George} ~~ 4 ie ae . ALL-BRAN users }
Muriel, Allazena (Daughters); Lambert, , POULTRY: Parks breed, Pure tired, | Telephone, ‘Electric ‘Tiere pass the ares, | 9: “TRADER” Glasgow & | on the a8th day “of Decrnnsy Tose aval 3 iehed THAIRO ae. Bi ods tae SOG; TOO, they nx.
Clarice, Alfred, Bruce, Edward, rr ‘ocks Chicks 5, 6 and 7 -p8t , s ee ae Saamt wens ac srcorme |
Jean, Joan, Angelia (Grand Childeen) ne 1 oes aoe to A. Forde, Soness in sake Sy ‘Phone bie a meee oe I iver Peat eae om | ima ait y attested! iB the ators iene uae). savaries M ag pte ape Satie hs ecitisiation a }
16 5 51—1n. t pposite ipe. 16.5. 51- . 29.4.51—9n — —_— an —_—_ ——— Gertrude Sobnell of C ors: isual convenience 0 pets or ¢ a ae constipation 16 60 1a0r :
divinihitndanessinelscsiiens slimeaanes. 4. F } I jarden —Land,| Dial 2636 13.5. 51-24 tk it How this ¢ +
RADIO—One Philip Radio (9 tubes’ in| SUITABLE BUILDING SITB: slueica HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM | Country Road, St. Michael, on or before | —. 3.6.51--2 = z y vu fol . - t : - o. a
“= 4 $ situated » Wh day of July, 195 * . " hid an oun abo: , eur oF wepy
refused, Agpiy” i 2 tan he tip s “fr land aaa see Ch. Area 10,978 Vessel For Closes in Barbados | I shall proceed i distrioute tee panda i Exwrenee. Gab nesitabhe ibe Kellogg's BRAN daily, dr
. , 5 y to y visle wards le ind, a A sq: ft, road. Dial assets of the deceased among the ‘ z ; 4 ant % m Jen
Cyo Ince & Co. ais Se ete jong the partios only ym May Ist onward, Apply | plenty of er! If not complet
um fism Co. 16.5.51—2n } 2206 Day and 3465 Night. 3.5.51-t.f.n S.S. “SPECIALIST” 2 ee ith May | enutled thereto, having” Fegard only. to | on preinises or Phone 8240 'hS-S1—ten | gat shed after lOdavs, returmerMpty
claims « vich T shall then have es naan ;
LIVESTOCK The Property known as “The! Abbey" I had notice and I will not be liable for ROOM AND BOARD ’ 7 n tO Kellogg Co, of
Christ Church. This property comprises | =—————___——_--—— - mF ssets or any i 1
| or ; part thereot ao dis-/ couple or Bachelors. Excellent food. | AygatBriteia Ltd sta
fn ou: leép p Cate: Half Bred Holstem. Sire pure Scena eee tee 8 acres, . had For further information apply te o- r. a ", 7 oe of whose debt} On sea. Apply; Casuarina Residentia SR EETA mryes
“ red Holstein. Mother giving 32 pints a pelongs to Mr | claim sha not then have had | Che. Maxwell Coast Road, Te ‘ TOUBLE TOUR ME sACK
milk. Rex Dai Renry H,. D. King. The above propert: | notice 1 1
wi Pains i Joints are swollen, " ry Farm 3009 16.5.51—1n, | Will be set up for Sale by Public Com. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.— —Agente | And al persons indebted to the said —_$______—
shows yest CI DORIA fo sh a scereistn dame R toy Ua rte 1981, at at Sue Office on Friday 18th Ma MONTREAL, AUSTRA!. iA, NEW estate. are requested to settle their
faulty Kidneysnction. MISC a p.m é | debtedness without dela;
Sir eee ea ELULANEOUS ___|,, Fo ,inpection copy Mr. H. v. D.| ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED | | "ackintoe Gaageenk: 20
ing Joints and Limbs, sciatic, ANTIQUE CAMEO brooch in original YEARWOOD & BOYCE (M.A.N.Z, LINE) | I. Qualified executrix of the
\ Op Nights: Oinsincas Name | ANC, Hold _ setting $50. GORRINGES Solicitors. M.S, “TONGARIRO” sailed Brishane| | Whitlemina Augusta Bushelt, ide
susness, Circles under ives, Burning, Itching QUE SHOP. Upper Bay Street 11.5.51—tn March 24th, Arriving at Barbados Muy | 1.5.6
Pe Loss of Appetite and Fre- In, Seana || ist, ; ~ » san . a Ma
quent’ Headounas “GON Collet ere Grimes, | 200| Shares CENTRAL FOUNDRY|_ 8.S. “ARABIA” is scheduled to svi! | Cie Gle Transatlantique [IN THR MATTER OF THE COMPANIES, a
nedicines can't help much because you must | ANTIQUES — Of every description. | LIMITED from Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 2 a ACT 1010
tet to the root cause of the trouble. Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver] 50 Shares BARBADOS SHIPPING AND | May, Melbourne 6th June, Bri ut and :
The Cystex treatment ts specially compounded Water-colours, Early books, Maps,| TRADING CO. LIMITED 16th June, Sydney 23rd June, arriving | Ne [IN THE MATTER OF WEST INDIAN
soothe, tone and clean raw, sore, sic ineys utographs etc., at Gorringes Antique} 41 Shares WEST INDIA RUM RE-| at Trinidad during latter half of Juiy, | 3 + 4 KNITTING MILLS LIMITED
y pot a safely quickly and nufey- yet con Shop, adjoining Royal Yeoh Club i PINGS LIMITED, and proceeding thereafter to Barbadys | SAILING TO Se - ers a" that the
t t 4 t.f.n hares 6% TELE NE . and Liverpool | IN , P. SRANCE reditors of the abovenamec Somparty
eaetne were to end ee tution satya LIMITED. ee oe Cth dances: to general car this ee © eae | which is being voluntarily wound ap
L. Starts Killing the germs whieh are attacking eaky, Sie oe RING ‘Tiffany asaeheres BARBADOS FOUNDRY | vessel has ample ene for chilies. ada | GASCOGNE, May 12, 1951 are a Ss Ps ; ee day oF | AND
your Kidneys, Bladder inary System y ‘or quick Bale} L 5 ‘ a ‘ oor wb: Soe? July 1951, being the day for that purpose
, in byo hours, yet ts absolutely harmless to | £150. GORRINGES ANTIQUE SHOP. The above shares will be set up at agehs pecantea on through Bills o via St. Lucia, Martinique, feel by Gre wndersigned, to sets tei
2. Gets Fid of health-destroying, deadly poisons | --"- “42°: 18,5 Bi In. | hdersigved entan at the Office of the | Lading for transhipment at Trinidat | Guadeloupe and Antigua names and addresses, end the particulars |
ous acids with which r system has be- ® ne n 1y at] British Guiana, Leeward and Windward ot aeons yeas, 2 L s
© coos at saturated. you * ee ede ot Candelabra, 4)* p.m : Islands. 33 at SOO eaee oF Sere Rolicitare if any
$. Strengthens and reinvigorates the kidneys, rein pe ba with original diamond : CARRINGTON & SEALY For further particulars appl) o \ } ae ed Lat c - po ow "
, \ bn the delicate filter ofganism, and stimu: GORRINGES. Me Sor Serene. er FURNESS WITHY & CO. Lid., TRINI- | CARIBBEAN CRUISE \ Lucas Street. Bri igetown, “Barbados, (ha | Use ‘Mentholatum’ Baim
- , yal Ya 1 2.5 4n.| DAD, B.W.1, and - . . a way age the, ogee i
lates the entire system. 13,5. 51—1n DA COSTA & CO. LTD. BRIDGE- | | Liquidator of the sald Company, and, | +E
nist hehe . LTD. 3E- c 2 ) ep zx 3S oOo
by Doctors, Chemists, ond ie — The undersigned will offer for sale ai | TOWN, BARBADOS, B.W.1, COLOMBIE, May 30th, 1951. { a equired bi notice in writing | oa Ano. cease
One-time Sufferers a FILE FASTENERS'—Just received af their Office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge- Trinidad, La Guaira, Cu- rom the said Liquidator, are to com ‘ ¢ I g 5
Ovetex is approved by Doctors and Chemists in| supply of File Fasteners. Phone 4242| town, on Friday the ssth; day of May, | (NRNARAIRRRO NSAI aad ‘artagens a in and prove thels sald debts or olatrn Spots and Soreness, Use
73 countries and by one-time sufferers from tie | T. Geddes Grant Ltd, for your reduire-| 1951, at 2 p.m. SheNOS eee em SA. Oe Ae. Bince ae ehell Be *Mentholatum * daily. Iti
troubles shown above, Mr. J. C. writes: "/ am| ments. 13.5.51—6n The dwellinghouse knows as “GRAND M.V. Caribbee will accept Cargo | Jamaica pecified in such notiee, or in default entholaturr a y. it IS
freee Sai eet es suffered with terrible | ——W—_ __________ | VIEW" with the land thereto containing and Passengers for Dominica, | th thereof they will be excluded from th so simple to use, You just
backache and pain CGpeten? em much bares GENUINE ANTIQUE PLATHS and|3 Roods 4 3/5th. Perches or thereabouts, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and St | benefit of any distribution made befor RUBITON. Mentholatum’
then Pa hata tech der gate.” hae on spat figures—Royal Crown Derby, Rocking-| situate at Bathsheba, Saint Joseph Kitts. Sailing Friday 18th instant Ae tine Passengers such debts are proved, .
wonders Cystex has worked with me ccem ai} ham, Spode, Bow, Caughlar, Dresden,| Inspection on application to the | f yo ng ‘ge ied ' Dated this lst day of May 1081 makes your skin soft —
most impossible. If they were £1 a we th Royal Copenhagen and Royal Worcester— | Caretaker, on the premises. The M.V. Moneka will accept argo and Mai H, LISLE THOMAS, smooth and keeps it clear.
would still be worth double,” Wl AT GORRINGES. 13.5.51—1n For further particulars and conditions Cargo and Passengers for Dornir Liquidator * Mentt iI: , r d fi
m ' ; f { te ! 5.87-—7 Mentholatum ’ 1s good for
\ Guorenteed to Put Vou Ri reas =_ of sale apply to :— ica, Antigua; Montrersat; Nev j tn 2.5.87-—Tn. | , (
aartde 9 x. + | |GALVANISED SHEETS—Best quality COTTLE, CATFORD & Co, and St. Kitts. Sailing Fridey 18 3 ALL Skin troubles, Quick—-
Ps al anaes fee your chemist On $08 7 tt eared $73; 9 te 56. | cari er die nay, il ] NES & Co Ltd NOTICE rea ee ee
: oad —- M.V. Cacique Del Caribe will | . os LU 4
va Sees I a thorough test. | 10 ft $8.40, Nett cash. Beiter hurry {| 1 will offer for sale by Public Com- accept Cargo and Passengers for % | , Applications for one or more vacant St
we pro dcag ate Saunetr, troreet, A. BARNES & CO., LTD. petition at my office, Victoria Street St. Luela, St. Vincent, Grenada | AGENTS Michael's Vestry Exhibition tenable at
better in every way, in 24 4.5,51—tt.n, | Op Eridey, 18th at 2 p.m. The, cottage and Aruba, Sailing on or about %) veins the Combermere School, will be received
hours and to be completely cal ILA — situated at McLean's 18th instant. } Phone ::: 3814 ‘by the Clerk of the Vestry up to 12/
well in 1 week or your money SHUTTER: One Steel Roller Shutter| Gap, Brittons Cross Road — house con- | o'clock noon on Thursday 22nd day of
gS back if you return the empty | 16 ft. long by 9 ft. high. Apply: Evelyn,{ tains open gallery — Drawing Dining, May, 1951. F ,
. Act now! r Roach & Co., Ltd. 13.5.51—3n| 3 bedrooms, W.C. & Bath — wash B.W.1I. SCHOONER OWN. Candidates must be gons of parishion
for basin, Kitchen with running water and . c 2g . :
¢| SCALES: oO: standing on about 10,000 sq. feet of ERS ASSOC., INC. 3 | ‘ er. in straitenéd cireumstances and must
st ex * IDN t Ys né ¥ ton and one 1-ton Plat | {hg “For inspection between 10 to 4 Advertise It Pa GB Jnot be less than ten years and fou
LADDER | fcrm Scale. Apply: Evekyn, Roach & Co.! 0") Gn application to the tenant, For Tele. 4047. | X « 8 | imonths nor more than twelve year
C: NTEED Remedy RHEUMATISM | 1°. . 13.5.51—3n| Condition of sale apply to R. Archer . ye * old on the Ist day°of January 1951, to |
- McKenzie, Dial 2947. 12,5.51—4n. | CSS eailnes be proved by a Baptismal Certificate, |
—_— 18TH CENTURY MINIATURE on| “S : Ono. which must aecompany the application
LOYAL BROTHERS OF arene) epee, our | BeSuey, Benham Cc" * ON Parents and/or Guardians will be noti
deep ‘set gold frame $100. GORRINGES, AUC‘! fed of the time and place of the Exam ERLE RA
THE STAR Upper bay succes Cis Stain PASSAGES TO EUROPE is |
; 196 STUDEBAKER PLATFORM LORRY Forms of appligatinn ean hg obtained : f
Needi Public Official Sal Anehts Wo uell this vehicle which has |% Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for POR THE VOOR ee le i
A ane ~ ‘ n a ae « rad¢ 4 ‘ree ie ab:
eediest Cases Fund cla ale been damaged in an aceident by public selling 7. Bukope fortnightly. Pie yeual ports of all ae Cy ae
(The Pr » , auction at the Courtesy Garage at 2 p.m u in, on on, or iotterdam, singic are wx , Sue Clerk, St, Michael's Vestry s f
ANNOUNCEMENT 1908 (0-0) 8 SO SAFER Eee ak OL AOK reduction for children. 8.5,51-—7) ASK FOR REAL
, , ° = - es oo Ma 1
Py Nagin PS ie atiahioon Kea ie SSR GOO OOOO TROT AUDIT OF SCHOOL ACCOUNTS MEN-THO-LAY-TUM
n ee ———

would be prepared to under



} tale the work ae eres ‘ Made Only *
o the Director Kivieation, oO ue
On wilh be. received BY. the Hepat The Mentholatum 0. Ltd.,
ment up to Saturday, 26th ~~ ip 5 (Est. 1889) Slough, England.
‘5 ~~3n





a i Lidl OS OAM BA yy,
E FAMILY TRAVEL Po ®
y | B CRAIGS T 4 oY

t
rTAMILY TRAVEL PLAN a
y | TRAVEL PLAN Tha
TRAVEL PLAN THE F a
4 Puan THs %

LAN Pye FAULLY T B
ANILY TRAVE)

age: My ceaver PLAS TF








FOR.... against Sea View Plantation, St. Lucy.| Larder, 2 Burner Oil Stove and Oven,| tiont od
ry : years inger and live years longer, Based | yj_Tabs in thousands and thousands of
BATTERIES : tha IGE, NOTICE that 1 the Qwner of] Lignt House Lantern, ireiess Comer | on my veure of supeeisace in audyiend | Vases Throughout the word tat is now >
MOTOR CAR or other obtain a loan of £280 under the pro-| Terms CASH. practice, it is Pan ae neat” offered under & positive guarantee to gost
BATTERIES visions of the above Act against the said _ ‘| nothing unless entirely satisfactory. Un- ai
v ibs represents the eb >t u
You need Plantation, in respect of the Agricul- BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. viene ae and ack ae ph pupraniee ae y eRemE ot ,
T tural year 1951 tu 1952. Auctioneers tific internal method of | for yourself how new blood tingles t h ; NORMA.
DIST L ED W No money has been borrowed undet 12.5.51- tn stimulating and invit-| your veins, how your eye takes on c new EL PLAN T TRAYS PARR
. the Agricultural Aids Act, 1905 or the} ___ tpnsinitiasthadi sade Nene alle A curating ite giana ,, nd | sparkle, you step a fir I and PLAN THE FA ca ae .
a y 4 - us tends to resto that vou really can enj li ily a ik f
Always keep a supply handy ha an be via ante) rans youthful vigour and vi- and as. vigourou an you did in our FAMILY TRAVEL PLA! TH en 57.09
you can get it ee iat hid hh day of Max 1061 tality to the body.” | prime, ‘Then if for any reason at all you
From your Gas Works, Bay St. “e 7 ay O.. SIMMONS ar our 0g 24-Hour Results ot completely satisfied, snoroly return : nie
m 3 ; + ' 7 8, the empty pac and the full purchase !
1 gallon in Customers Bottle 1/3 { tite Owner Because Vi-Tebs are price will be refunded, Get Vi-Tobs tT" = Here ore the facts :
16.5. nm scientifically designed | your chemist today, The gugrantes pro-
ee ee i-| fects you.
nN Ck IN CARLISLE BAY and prepared to act d wets you te testere ea Sere and wife travelling together
OTIC! N ‘ : y ‘ouun- 7 will be able to ‘
Applications for one varint St Jon's] wl” Sgtegtels, sem wonder coor | Wike Tai « Guaranteed + manhoca, vitality Tor the 6st OF one way tickets plas
Vestry Exhibition tenable at the St.| Belle’ Woife, Sch. Gardenia W., Sen ~% ; ost of one woy tickets plus i



VTO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH












The Berbados School
of Dancing Ltd.

}

























































4640 P}

"hone










50%









|
Michael's Girls’ School, will be received] pine ut nm nj é
by the Clerk of the Vestry up to 3 o'clock We Beth Gk tee Ba ae eee OOSIIGS IF 0 So SOR IGG NISC DG Cote!
ee eee Cnritdajes faust peunngiters of Paria |e ARRIVALS TO-DAY’S FLASH NEWS ; @ Children under 12 yeors occompany
TELEPHONE CORDS IN COL- eee eT ae ee a eS. 3. Golfito, 4,505 tons net, Capt. Saps- HA porents will each poy holt the
E must have attaine e age o years.) worth, from Southampton, f 2 ve a
Be pee gehen’ ae Kote Soni: et ae ? ca, by ty st Pi eee feet tons net, Capt STEAM PRESSURE GAUGES free Same under 2 ars travel i a a
- 1 to be prove y a Baptisrna er-) Prigent, from Britis uiana, , sad Reg oe
STW ERE. tificate, which must accompany the] Schooner Harriet Whitaker, 50 tons net, from 30 lbs, to 500 lbs. capacity . eee Sy ' p
With Glossy” ind: Quidksbrouie Application, all faneines Sa, to bg Capt. Cantar, Som Doriaice, ie bl ‘ ‘ ete @ Return tickets are good fo: 30 doys REVEL PLAY
mined must be at the hoo! not later ES are,.obtainable a , sym aels a ‘
ee aii hate re ne shan 435 am. on Saturday, June 16th Ke 44 tons net, Capt i sity ie complete your jeurney F T ef
mr @ Solouy ef the . Forms ¢f Application can be} King, for St. Vincent ‘ y . ™/! , u uly 15th 1; g
eae Sptained from the Vestry Clerk's Office Ol, Tanker Rodas. 1.855 tons net, ‘Capt CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. . rae Fal
A T. KING, ornelius er Meuler, for Trini ‘ |
“ ‘s V , s y : é So You Aver S the paul
eu Clerk, St. Joseph's Vestry. | cant. Mitchell, for British Guiana, PIER HEAD LANE tie re ee ne ryan ae £4
| ABD WARS n | S.S. Gascogne, 2,681 tons net, Capt PL PAM
_—--___.______ Prigent, for England. a :
SSS PE eT © FTP tores apply oetwees Antigua p
ST. MARY'S OLD BOYS’ } Barbados, Belize. Caracas Subject to
KEEP FIT eo Government approval) Georgetown, Ls = 2 aut om i) a sim s
CRICKET ° re eae crews le Gaverneiont Sppedeih
weet to ernment approv
ge FIT Sears REMINISCENCES AFS,, F.V.A. e
vi commence at e
AQUATIC CLUB on will be ones ct a Talk { FOR
iday. seg te yen by 3
Friday, 11th May, . at Dr. C. “BERTIE” CLARKE RE AG KS a AT bp
4.30 p.m. To-morrow Night Thursd ; 4a + at 4 A 4
Apply to. . . ede eee een | ana
MISS RANSOM Room. Mase Han ‘ire! an
Dial 3390 ee ae eaTON. SALES



ITISH ao INDIAN: AIRWAYS

a
i
‘

site







PAGE EIGHT



DAMES BEAT ROVERS
FIVE—NIL

VOTRE DAME defeated Pickwick-Rovers five love in their
First Division football game at Kensington yesterday eve-

ning.

It was an easy walk over for Notre Dame.

They

missed many opportunities to score.
Alfred Best, at inside left for Notre Dame, scored two goals.

The other three were scored by Gill, Daniel and Green,

Cricket Report
From
Laneashire

CLYDE WALCOTT reports on
the Lancashire League, Central
Lancashire and Ribblesdale
League.

Most of the League games were
delayed on account of rain which
fell overnight and again on Satur-
day morning. It was an excep
tionally cold day and very few
spectators attended the games.

Bacup played Burnley, last
year’s Champions, on their home
ground, Burnley won the tos.
and sent the home team to bat
on a wicket by no means favour-
able to batsmen. Although Ever-
ton Weekes hammered the Burn-
ley bowling for a_ sparkling 78,
Bacup were still all out for 132.
Weekes completed his 50 in 61
minutes Burnley lost 4 wickets
for 40 runs, but managed to pass
the score for the loss of 8 wickets.
Bruce Pairaudeau scored 29.
Weekes captured 1 wicket for 16
runs in 6 overs.

Lowerhouse, who entertained
Ramsbottom, batted first and scor-
ed 105 for 9 wickets declared.
Roy Marshall again did not get
going, being caught at mid-on
for 2 runs. He only scored one
Jast Saturday, but is expected to
score a great deal of runs when
the wickets become drier, and the
days are not so cold. Ramsbot-
tom managed to draw the game
with their score at 59 for 9 wick-
ets. Roy Marshall was very suc
cessful with his off spinners, cap-
turing 4 wickets for 16 runs.

Enfield played their first away

game of the season at Nelson.
After several inspections of the
wicket by the captains, it was

decided to cut another wicket on
the square, and play commenced
at 3.30. There were no more
than 100 spectators at the start
huddled in what shelter they
could find in the cold. During the
first over, play was stopped when
one of the umpires chased his hat,
and on other occasions when the
bails were constantly blowing off.
Enfield batted first and were in
no hurry, scoring 73 for the loss
of 8 wickets in 150 minutes. Clyde
Walcott after being dropped be-
hind the wicket at 0 off Phadkar,

Green, the Notre Dame right
winger, gave a good performance
Paul Mandeville, their centre half,
dribbled too much while Gill,
eentre forward, was too slow and
his timing bad.

Charlie Daniel at inside right
was about the best player on the
Notre Dame side. Alfred Best
also gave a good performance. In
the back line Straughan and
Brown warded off a few attacks
made by the Pickwick-Rovers
forwards.

For Pickwick-Rovers Maurice
Foster, although five goals were
scored on him, gave a fine per
formance in goal. He saved many
good tries.

Notre Dame took the touch off
with Pickwick-Rovers defending
the southern goal. Soon after
Notre Dame was awarded a
corner kick. Doyle took a good
shot but Mandeville, who received
the ball, kicked wide.

The Notre Dame forwards and
halves then went on t@ miss many
opportunities, It was not until a
few minutes before half time that
they were able to score Charlie
Daniel sent a beautiful shot In
the left corner of the nets after
beating through the Pickwick~-
Rovers back line. Half time found
Notre Dame only one goal in the
lead.

Early in the second half Gill
missed two lovely opportunities
to score for Notre Dame. The
second goal came when Doyle ran
down the left wing and took a
shot, The ball struck_the cross
bar and rebounded. Green, who
was running in from the right
wing, punched the ball into the
nets.

The third goal was scored bv
Gill, Roberts, the Notre Dame left
half, ran down the left wing and
centred, Gill headed past Foster.

Best scored the fourth goal.
Green received a pass from Daniel
aud centred with a one time shot.
Best, who was in position, tapped
it into the nets.

Soon after the fifth goal went
in. Best received a_pass from
Mandeville and beat Foster with
a well placed shot.

The teams were as follows:

Notre Dame: Wilkinson, Brown,

Straughan, Archer, Mandeville,
Roberts, C. Daniel, Gill, Doyle,
Green and Best.
Pickwick-Rovers: M. Foster,
Lewis, Hunte, Wells, Carter,
Greenidge, Robinson, L. Foster,

Taylor. Worme and R.. Hoad.
Referee: Mr. L. F. Harris.



again tried out the wicket- -
keeper in the next ball but this
time he made no mistake. Nelson

were given 40 minutes to get the
runs, and at the end of the day’s
play were 56 for 2 wickets. Clyde
Walcott captured both wickets for
18 runs.

In the Ribblesdale League,
Darwen declared at 150 for 8
wickets of which Ken Rickards
scored 29, Leyland Motors pass-
ed the score for the loss of 7
wickets.

In the Central Lancashire
League, Crompton met Middleton,
who batted first scoring 219 for 2
wickets. Crompton forced a draw
scoring 78 for 9 wickets. Rama-
dhin was not successful with the
ball finding it too cold to spin the
ball, so the batsmen took advan-
tage of the situation, giving him
only one wicket for 61 runs.

Frank Worrell played another
grand innings of 78 for Radcliffe.

He was handicapped during his
innings by a fractured finger,

obtained while coaching during
the week, but was still master of
the situation.

Radcliffe declared at 161 for 5
wickets. At the close of play
Stockport were 111 runs for the
loss of 4 wickets.

Most of the West Indians men-
tioned they had never played
cricket on such a cold day and all
of them played in England last
summer. We are all hoping for
better weather in the coming
games.

WOMEN CRICKETERS
VISIT: BRITAIN

LONDON, May 14.
The first Australian women’s
cricket team to come to England
since 1937 arrived here on Satur-
day for a three months’ tour, They
will play three Test matches and
19 other fixtures.—(C.P.)

——————
! ee ey







Traffie Do's
No. 3



Always look for oncoming
Traffic before opening the
Door of your Motor Vehicle

Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.





|
BA

“if HOW WE DOIN’?
ARE WE RUNNING LATE?

ARE WE GONNA GET IN

ON TIME? WHAT TOWN



pay












IS GETTIN’ WARMER >
SAVING DOWN THIS WAY =

WHAT TIME WILL. MY
WATCH SAY WHEN yi
WE GET THERE ¢ Al

Ao
\ SN Ty

KM

NS

















They'll Do It Every

IS THIS HERE NOW? HUH?
DO THEY RUN ON DAYLIGHT
I'M ON EASTERN STANDARD

oom ip
See!

Everton, Spartan

Win Games

EVERTON seored anotae,
victory in the Second Division
when they defeated Carlton two
goals to one in a football mate!
which was played at Bank Hail
yesterday afternoon,

The game was fast throughout
and the Everton forwards com-
bined well and in the latter stages
of the second half clearly out-
played their opponents.

In the Spartan—Lodge fixture
at the Park, Spartan won one love.
Spartan started slowly but in the
second half the Lodge players
were being constantly pressed.



South Africatis
Beat Glamorgan

CARDIFF, May 15.

The South African cricketers
geined their first victory of the
tour when they beat Glamorgan
by an innings and i4 runs here
today.

When play started today,
Glamorgan who had followed on
200 rung behind South Africa’s
330, needed 173 to avoid the
innings’ defeat with nine wickets
standing. When they had lost
their first six wickets for 74, five
of them to Athol Rowan for a
personal cost of 20, it seemed as
if they were in for a crushing
defeat.

But a fine fighting innings of
80 by Hadyn Davies, wicketkeeper
during the afternoon, brought life
back into the dying game. He

hit 12 fours in this his highest
score in first class cricket. His
partnership with Pleass helped

Glamorgan to reach a total of 186.
—Reuter.

_—-

Russians Are
Basketball Champs

PARIS, May 14.
Russia won the European bas-
ketball championship on Satur-
day night with Russia’s Deputy
Foreign Minister, Andrei Gromy-
ko, abandoning his famed poker
face to grin and clap as the Rus-
signs beat Czechoslovakia 45—44.

—(C.P,)



Time
HE'S ASKED THE. POOR
CONDUCTOR EVERYTHING
EXCEPT “IS THERE A
SANTA CLAUS 2” AND
\“HOW HIGH IS UP!”

Registered U.S. Patent Offles

by
oD






eo

Ve








COMMENTARY. WITH

\/ STRICTLY A SIGHT-
SEEING BUS
RIDER ***
















ZA GOT ON» HE'S BEEN

ALAWAR _ HE'S USED
WW! to A RUNNING

HIS TRAVELS» HE'S



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



$155.84 Forecast
Paid Out On 2nd
Day Of Arima Meet

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 14,
Following are the results of the
second day’s racing at Arima.
WHITSUN HANDICAP
Happy Union (Lutehman up)
$12.42. Cupid (Hardwidge up)
$3.54. Princess Rasiyya (Ali up).
Forecast: $59.72
CKEOLE HANDICAP
H's Wership (J. Lutechman up)
$3.80. Flying Ann, (Lattimer up)



$1.84. Determine (Newman up)
$4.54,

Forecast: $21.72

LADIES’ HANDICAP

Blue Grass (A Joseph) $2.12
Ceres (Hardwidge up) $2.46.
ro Mahal (J. Lutchman up)
$1.96,

Forecast: $62.24.
CARIB HANDICAP

Leap On (J. Lutechman up) $2.24
Miniature (Yvonet up) $1.30, Dia-
potos (Reid up) $1.36.

Forecast: $14.60
MOUNT PLEASANT HANDICAP

Fair Profit (Quested up) $3.60.
Cupid (Hirdwidge up)
Princess Rasiyya (Ali up) $1.90

Forecast: $155.84.

BUENA VISTA HANDICAP

Goldpin (A, Jeseph up) $1.48.
Rigolo (J. Lutchman up) $2.84

Forecast: $26.26.

WOODLANDS HANDICAP

Blue Grass (A. Joseph up) $6.12.
Sun Tan (Ali up) $3.48. Taj Maha!
(J. Lutechman up) $2.72.

Forecast; $133. 60.

CONSOLATION HANDICAP

Diapotos (O'Neil up) $14.00.
Kismet (A. Joseph up) $1.60.

Forecast: $86.00.



Bannister Wins
Another Mile Race

LONDON, May 14.

Roger Bannister, Britain’s ace
miler, on Saturday turned in the
third fastest mile of his career to
win the international mile at the
British games at White City, Lon-
don,

Bannister, in his first race since
his triumph over America’s best
milers at the University of Penn-
sylvania on April 28, sprinted
away from the field in the last
350 yards, to win easily by 30
yatrds,—(C.P.)



FORTRESS, Y.M.P.C.
WIN MATCHES

The results of the First Division
Basketball matches which were
played at Y.M.P.C. Beckles Road
last night are as follows:—

Fortress defeated Pickwick by
29 goals to 22. -For Fortress S
Sandiford and R, Roachford netted
six goals each,

The Y.M.P.C.—Carlton maten
ended in a win for Y.M.P.C. who
scored 27 goals to Carlton’s 17.
The condition of the pitch could
not be called first class.

SPORTS
WINDOW

Carlton meets Spartan in a First
Division Football match at Ken-
sington Oval this afternoon, Both
teams have got the same number
of points and this afternoon's
match will have some bearing as
to wha will be this year's Cham-
pion,

The game should be interesting.
THIRD DIVISION FOOTBALL

Police will play against Carlton
at the Park.

Combermere Old Boys vs Notre
Dame at Combermere.

Empire vs The Barbados
ment at Bank Hall.

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL

This afternoon at St, Leonard's
sround, Richmond Gap, Maple
and Westerners ‘A’ will meet
The referee will be Mr, C. E



Regi-

Reece.
BASKETRALL SECOND
DIVISION M
YÂ¥.M.P.C. vs Harrison College at
Harrison College
Police vs James Street Boys’
Scouts at District “A Police Sta-
tion.
NETBALL

Queen's College Old Girls will
oppose a girls’ team from the Er-
diston Training College at Erdis-
ton College. The match will start
at 5 p.m,



What’s on Today

Police Courts—10.00 a.m.

Court of Appeal—10.00 a.m.

Police Band gives Concert
at Christ Church Alms-
house—4.45 p.m.

CINEMAS

Empire: “Madeline” 4.45 p.m. &
8.30 p.m,

Roxy : “Halls of Montezuma’ 4.45
pm, & 830 pm

Royal: “Drums of Fu Manchu"
and “Man From Oaklahoma”
445 pm & 8 380 p.m.

Olympic: “Drums of Fu Mancha"
445 pm, & 8.30 p.m.

Globe : “The Sleeping City"
pm. &€815 pm

5 00

By Jimmy Hatlo



ITS BEEN NOON-
24 TIME SINCE WR.WHAT







EATING LIMBURSER
SANDWICHES FOR
200 MILES >>















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pf” TVE HEARD
J] / OF GUYS WHO

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4,

By LLOYD’S

Motoring involves responsibility as well as
pleasure. An unguarded moment at the wheel
. a faulty tyre ...a scream, a sickening
crash! You’re defendant in a damage suit which
could erase a lifetime of earnings. That’s when
the protection of our Lloyd’s “H.P.” policy is
so vitally necessary, so greatly appreciated.
See us about your Motor Insurance today.

COLLINS BUILDING BRIDGETOWN

DIAL 3006 BARBADOS, B.W. |}.

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wos



SPRING ROUND-UP
DANCE

e@
under the auspices of
THE BARBADOS ELEC-
TORS’ ASSOCIATION
at
QUEEN’S PARK
on
FRIDAY NIGHT

at 8
e
Speakers: Messrs. J. H.
Wilkinson, F. C. Goddard,
E. D. Mottley, H. A.
Dowding, W. W. Reece,
M.C.Ps and others.
3
Mr. Vincent Griffith
and Sydney Walcott.
So
Hear our lady speaker,
Miss L. Reid. make her

AYoung Mother's
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ae



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CRYPTOQUOTE No 21.

GBFFME ZOHBZKESZEOM
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Last Crypt: Let no one be will-
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—Propertius

ee



J. A. CORBIN & SONS.



(WESTERN DRESS)
to be held at the
CRANE

on

SATURDAY, MAY 19, 1951

In aid of the St. Winifred’s
Building Fund

HOTEL

Misie. 50 <0
supplied by the Police
Band by kind permission
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DANCING 9.00 p.m.
Ticke(s $1.00 on sale now
Refreshments will be on sale
Support this worthy cause!
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Commissioner of









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MAY 18th.
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{



Full Text
rbados



ESTABLISHED 1895







Adams will put position
of industry before mission

Sugar: Washington:

might leed to global conflict

WEDNESDAY... 16, 1951
*

Proposals put forward by MacAr 2c



Khorea :





Lull all along central front:
Reds building up for offensive

ana
PRICE: FIVE CENTS



New price controls suggested

Prices:
>* to curb excess profits in U.S.

‘CUKE WILL SPEAK FOR OUR SUGAR’

Adams Says Barbados Will}
Tell Bottomley Everything

ME. J. H. WILKINSON, Leader of the Opposition in the Barbados
House of Assembly, yesterday called on Mr. G. H. Adams to see that
Barbados was fully represented at the talks which the Regional Eco-
nomic Committee would have this week with the Mission from London,
headed by Mr. A. G. Bottomley, Secretary for Overseas Trade.

Mr. Wilkinson said that Mr. Adams was a member of
G airy hes the Regional Economic Committee and therefore Barbados

would be represented. “I hope,” he added, “that the hon.
member will insist on calling before the Mission, people
who are well aware of what this sugar question means to
the West Indies and Barbados in particular.”
Mr, Adams said that there neec) —~————
(From Our Own Correspondent
GRENADA, May 15

Eric Gairy to-day gave noticc of

appeal when convicted of a

charge of using threatening lan-

The Mad Moor
Kills Another

event was half way through.

HERE is the Nine Mile Cycle Race at Kensington on
Farnum, who won the

be no fear that the position of the
man in the street and the sugar\
guage in a public speech concern
ing certain members of the Legis-

industry would be put very
lature and was placed on a good

strongly. He referred to his ad-
visers and said that it was im

behaviour bond for six months

with surety of £200.

possible to find more qualified
Gairy conducted his own

de-
fence calling seven witnesses after
having notified his intention of
summoning 30.

Six of these added a aualifying
clause to the statement in the
charge saying that Gairy did not
say that Legislators in question
“would be choked by their own
consciences,” when questioned in
connection with his preceding
words to the effect that if he is
sent to jail for sedition, on com-
ing out he would look for the
graves of those members of the
Council who supported the sedi-
tion Bill. ;

Two policemen gave evidence
for the prosecution, A_ further
charge covering unlawful harm
with intent to put the Legislators
mentioned in fear of harm was
not proceeded with.

Gairy last week told a meeting
that he did not want any of the |
workers to come to town unless |
he called them. The Magistrate
rejected Gairy’s plea in the
course of his address to the
court which said that the case was
planned and in the. sentence he
ordered a_ three’ mo prison |
term in default.



Labour Down
To Three

LONDON, May 15,

The Labour Government's
majority over the combined!
Opposition in the House of
Commons was reduced to three

today by the resignation through
ill health of Mr. Rhys Davies 74
year-old Socialist member for

Westhoughton, Lancashire,
Davies who represented Wesl-
houghton Division for 30 years
was Under-Secretary for the
Home Office in the Labour Gov-
ernment of 1924. At the last
General Election he had a majority
of 11,858 in a straight fight with
the Conservatives. jee
—Reute’.

RAILWAY STRIKE
RIO DE JANEIRO, May 15.
A railroad strike for wage in-
creases broke out today in the
southern state of Rio Grande de
Sul.—Reuter.

6. Points

Inflation Spiral

ERIC JOHNSTON, Director

men to put the commercial point
of view. Of Hon, H. A. Cuke, one
of these advisers, he said: “I can-
not think of anybody in the West
Indies who would be able to put
the case of the sugar industry
better than Mr Cuke,”

Mr. Wilkinson who moved the
adjournment of the House. for a
few minutes to speak on the mat-
ter, said that it was a most im.
portant one for the West Indies
and the Commonwealth,

When he spoke of wishing the
hon, senior member for St. Joseph
to insist in calling upon people
who were well aware of the
situation, he was not implying
that the hon. member was not so
well aware of the serious blow
to the West Indies and the Com-
monwealth, in that England had
negotiated the purchase of a large
quantity of sugar from Cuba, It

!was rumoured too that Canada

ae one time.

CASABL.
Mohammed

"NCA, May 15,
Bouali, the mad
Moor who is sowing terror in
upper Atlas, struck twice agai:
teday, bringing the number of his
murders to seven. He then crept
back into the mountains out of
reach of his pursuers.

Israel, Syria | hoc
Peace Resolution

NEW YORK, May 15%
Syria and Israel have accepted














A French engineer called Chan-| ‘he Security Council’s ceasefire
dot was picnicking on the banks} Pesolution of - May 8, it was
of Lake Azzlal with his wife and announced here today.

Both parties agreed to observe

baby and a friend Mile Greugnet,

when Mohammed Bouali sprang|¢ ceasefire and to withdray
from the bushes with an. old-|Mtlitery forces from the demill-

fashioned musket. tarised zone; : saad
Chandot 4 ‘ To refrain from aggressive
jot shouted to the man in action across or against the

Arabie but Bouali fired twice, kill-

ing him instantly. Then he swung| @militarised zone; and

jhad only guaranteed to purchase

; for St. Joseph will see that labour

'parts”,

thing, Canada wants our sweets.
We

was following her example.
As they were aware, England
Police tonight completed arm-
ing every male member of the
population of Kasta Tadla region

a certain amount of sugar produced
in the West Indies and the Com-

monwealth, the rest would be Reporters covering the hunt
from what’ was known as the/were given steel helmets and
“open market.” If the quantity] rifles. Yesterday a reward of

from these areas was going to .be
veduced the price would go down j
und the position would indéed be- |
come very serious,
as regards Barbados.
“T hope the hon. senior membei

100 sheep was offered to anyone
helping police. arrest Bouali.
On Sunday he killed his mis
particularly; tress’ soldier-husband and then
took pot shots at passing vehi-
cles on the main road with the
soldier’s rifle.
‘is properly represented not only He killed 21-year-old Andre
} by himself but other representa-| Sauvignon and his mother Car
lives because it affects labour very {ren Sauvignon and wounded two
very seriously,” other people travelling in a car
Speaking of trade hetween| with them.
Canada and the West indies, Mr. After robbing them he fired at
Wilkinson said that he thought}two motor cyclists who were
it was over thirty-live years-since}] only slightly injured and eseaped.
the Lady boats started ca theit} He then killed » 22-year-old
nn to the West Indi subsidised | motorcyclist Herve Du Bourg and
by Canada and the West Indies.| his pillion passenger.
Unfortunately these boats since
the war had been coming to the
colonies half empty, due to the
fact that the United Kingdom
would not allow the colonies to
spend their dollars in Canada.
“It will be a very severe blow to
ithe West Indies in particular if
these boats cease to run to these
Mr. Wilkinson said.
“Canada to us means every-





—Reuter.



Parachute Brigade
Alerted For Iran

LONDON, May 15.
Informed sources said that the
4,500-man Sixteenth Independent
Parachute Brigade has been alert-
want her flour, hardware,| eq for a possible air drop in Iran
lumber, ete., and yet we are not] in case British lives become en-
allowed the’ dollars to buy what dangered there. The War Office
confirmed that the Brigade has
been alerted for overseas duty,
but declined to say where it was
going. Informed sources said
Britain has no intention of all
out military intervention in Iran.
“But if the situation arises where-
in British lives are endangered
cbviously there will have to be

action to safeguard them. \
Sources said the Navy could
inot do the job because any
shore parties have to move up
river after reaching Abadan.
Today’s moves followed






@ On page 5.

To Halt

WASHINGTON, May 15

of the Economic Stabilisation lively

Agency, asked today’ for powers to enforce controls on diplomatic exchanges during the

profits.

: Whitsun. holiday between British
Cabinet Ministers, Foreign Office |

He told the Senate Banking Committee that there were experts and the British Ambassa-

six major threats to the “sound dollar” and he laid down aj dor in Teheran, Sir Francis Shep-
six point programme for flattening the inflatien spiral.
“Unless we have a stabilised economy, unless we hold

herd. The United States has
infla- been kept informed of all moves,
and consultations between Lon-

tion in check, we cannot. mount the defence effort as Wel Gon and Washington are continu-

need” he said.

Johnston outlined these six —
threats to a “sound dollar”,

1, Expectea spending of
$1,000,000,000 per week on de-

fence later this year:
.~2, High profits, price and wage
demands :

3. Rising food prices:

4. Speculative scare
and hoarding when
shortages appear :

§. Any’ break
peace between
ployers :

6. General unwillingness to re-

buying
consumer

in the

present |
labour and

em-

cognise the existence of the
national emergency,
He proposed that Congress

these remedies :
taxation to take
out of cireulat-

should provide

“Pay as we go”
spending money
ing :

Increased savings:

General economy —‘non-essen-
tial consumption and waste by
Government business and_ indi-
vidual must be eliminated” :
Materials control — allocation
of materials for both defence and |
civilian needs with production of}
luxuries limited to what is left |
over : |
Strengthening and continuation |
of direct controls |
Johnston called for removal of}
the $10,000 iimit on fines ag
iolators of the Defence Produc-

Act



mst

king Reuter

ing.—(U.P.)

ARTIE’S HEADLINE





Twelve Injured |

RIO DE JANEIRO, May 15

Twelve passengers were serious
ly injured and four suffered only
minor injuries when two twin-
engined Dakota aircraft crasned
today near the airport of Maceiv,
the capital of the northern state
of Alagoas.

The plane which had left Receife
early this morning was on its way
to Rio. The aircraft belonging to
Linhas Aeras Paulistas was
seriously damaged.



Renter

; Rpeeerseer CALIFORNIA, May 15
Miss Francisca De Scaffa has
“Would you please srop aske d here for a divorce i io

referring to m eating a
salad as ‘gobbling up
raw materials’?”

CLEARANCE |
|

netor Bruce Cabot, allazing
treme cruelty —Reuter.



WITHDRAWN

SINGAPORE, May 15

(
The Pan By

ROBERT RUSSELL) |

ma registered freighter | LONDON. May 15. |




| Nerbay which left Singapore fout| pyofescor Norbert Wiener said
days ago with £225,000 worth of tna: in the event of another
first grade yas tonight On} 15} war, robot machines will
ts w pare. operat factories in the free
Pe ig € iy her port orld while ever av le

sarance for China was with-/m; and man is engaged
last minute—Reuter. ' di: ly in fighting or behind the

To reaffirm the authority of
c a Palit )

the seup) on the a ae and Mile the Chairman of the Mixed
Greugnet dropped dead. Madame]. a scat oa hl
Chandot ran into the bushes Armistice Commission to super=
screaming with her baby in her} YS¢ the implementation | Of "tie
arms Then she apes od: tor av. armistice agreement in the
eral hours throug = rough bs st if demilitarised zone, thus agreeing
to veach her fe eet bate pushes!to complete freedom of move
i ron ather's factory near-| ment for United Nations
y. »bservers on duty in the zone,



|
Asks For Divorce |

Parties have also reaffirmed





nic ve LE DAY

Monday as

sixteen
race in record time was in the middle of the bunch



riders strung out when the

fommunists 12
Miles From 38th

RAIN-DRENGCHED Chinese troops plodded through
build-up for a

Central Korean mud on
new offensive.

Spearheads of the growing Cormmunist force facing
the centre of the 100 mile United Nations line were reported

Tuesday

TOKYO, May 15.

in their

12 miles south of the 38th Parallel.

United Nations
Communists in units of 500 or 600
slogging through the hills east of
Kapyong,

patrols spottect ~

|

U.N. Meeting

Mac’s Plan Would
Increase Risk Of
Third World War

Bradley Tells Committee

WASHINGTON, May 15.
(GENERAL OMAR BRADLEY, Chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff, testifying today before
the joint Committees of the Senate, said that he
believed General Douglas MacArthur’s Korean war
proposals would increase the “risk of global war’’.
General Bradley, third witness called by the Senate
Armed Services and Foreign Relations Committee
| inquiring into the dismissal of General MacArthur,
| said he knew some critics were impatient with the
Administration’s plan to fight a limited war in
Korea and were calling for a “showdown’’. But he
said this was not desirable from a purely military

viewpoint.

“We are not in the best militar

to showdo wi

military rule the

world”,

power
he declared

to ! collier was smaller than had been

feared

position seek a |
even if it were the _ natic
desire to forfeit chances yt O : D . dl
peace, by precipitating a Bae ta | ne ea n
re he Soneter at ~ «
le said the United Sti tee S ‘ C ll
Russia represented two centres! ea oO 1s10n
of powe supporting opposins ‘|
ideologies. NORFOLK, Virginia, May 15
“If Soviet Russia ever control | The Atlantic Fleet Headquarters
the entire Eurasian land mass !saiq today the death roll in
then Soviet satellites may have *| yesterday's collision between tne
broad base upon which to pene | Seaplane tender Valoour and a

The U.S. Eighth Army did not P, General Bradley testified be Today's Mcik . oie scious
indicate how close they weve to ostponed hind closed doors as did other ee ktown: awed "Taven eis
U.N. lines. Clashes elsew here on |FLUSHING MEADOWS, May 15 eee ee s > sears prerow eine, presumed deed and 19
4 yor »vidence vas
he rain swept batile line were The meeting of the United! ] fe wies a - Seer ‘in hospital. Last night’s announce

between groups of 100 or 200.







An | Nations



Security Council

sche

reporters,

|” Bradley said that MacArthur's; Ment of 11 known dead was based

their undertaking to respeet the Allied officer said that, well: pro lee for today to discuss th |programme calling for bloc kacl- | on “estimate” that nine bodies

letter and spirit of the generai} tected U.N. positions and restless | Palestine border situation between!ing Red China, bombing Man-| were in’ Ingeroom Headquarters,
armistice agreement, the staie-, Patrols probably would insuve|Israel and Syria has been post-jehurian bases and using Chinese| the announcement explained.

ment said,—Reuter, i about 24 hours warning before |poned until tomorrow at 7 p.m. Nationalist troops had strong .

J hinese hit in strength at the The United States, Britain and PUAN seats: AR: iro, ac AG The Valeour was bound for

— Yeentral front. France were expected to intro Korean campaign was concerned | Operational training with 70,000

S £ M: ke Mo , } A Briéfing™ officer said —the}duee--a resolution=-before the - iets “ yallonscoheasiation spirit and 227

WISS Wake WioOve weather probably would speéd up/Council calling on Israel and] But he added: “Joint Chiefs of jofficers and men aboard when she

me the expected Red offensive about |Syria to remove their troops fron:| Staff believe that these sane} was in collision with the collier

To Train Army two days. the demilitarised zone, north of measures would increase the risk!sS § | Thomas Tracy, five miles out

- strike generally ig expected |Lake Tiberias. The United Nations }of a global war and that such {in the Atlantic off Cape Henry,
BERNE, May 15. next week on the western front. |Coneiliation Commission = an-' risk should not be taken unneces- | pear here,

The Swiss Council today an—|Ten Allied soldiers, Eight Ameri-|nounced last night that the tw: y Sarily.’ ate r4 Sarak ; :
nounced plans during the coming;cans and two Tur returned to|countries had agreed to observe} ‘We now have localized _ the The fire broke out in both ships,
winter for intensive trainir their own lines after being ceasefire and to permit United; conflict in Korea”, he said Some]but the crew eventually got the
courses in the latest weapons de leased by the Chinese. They wer Nations observers to inspect th ;military measures under discu flames under control. The Thomas

iss Army
to be

veloped by the S\
Plans which have

proved by both Chambers,

classes from 1894 to 1931.

Troops will train fof periods be
tween six to 20 days in handling
hew weapons ranging from heavy
field guns to super bazookas,
rockets, new rapid-firing machine
guns and grenades,

In its message to Parliament the
Federal Council said that a change
over must be achieved in the
shortest possible time “having

regard to the actual political ar |



ap
cove:

military situation,”—Reuter.



Baruch Wants

Strength licrease

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA,
May 15

Bernard M. Baruch, former Ad—
viser to several United States
Presidents called today for a huge
increase in the military strength
of the United States her
allies,

Without naming General Mac
Arthur in his speech prepared for
delivery at the Virginia Military
Institute, he said: “I wonder how
much of the controversy in recent
days is really a reflection of
differences between the leader of
troops and organizers”. Baruch
said that today in Korea the United
States were “buying time for the |
whole free world-to re-arm.”” This
was the time to ask whether “we
are doing as much as we can as

and

quickly as we can.”
—Keuter.



“National Guest,
TOKYO May 15,

The Japanese Cabinet today
discussed a Draft Bill to be sub-
mitted to Diet for approval to
make General Douglas Mac

Arthur Japan’s
for life.

“National Guest”

—Reuter.



THIRTEEN BURNT

RIO DE JANEIRO, May 15

Thirteen passengers were burned,
four seriously, when a car caught
fire ih a train running between
Sao Paulo and Varnhagen in Sao
Paulo State

The accident,
yesterday, was
circuit in the
tem,— Reuter

which occurred
1used by a shor
5 elec tr ical sy










lines. An authority on Cyber-
netch——the new seience of the
“thinking” machine—Dr. Wiener
is on leave from Massachusette
for a lecture tour in Br : id
France. His theme i wha 1
call New Industrial Re
tior

Eve without
we

taken prisoners on April 25 in the
ode first spring offensive
Ah told of comparatively
treatment by their captor The )
said they were told never again
fight the Chinese released
(C.P.)

good

and



Urge Admittance
Of Greece To U.N.

LONDON, May 15

United States Ambassaaor, Wal-
ter Gifford, today told Britain, that
the United States will press for the
full membership of Greece and
Turkey in the Atlantic Pact within
the next few months, it was un-
derstcod in diplomatic quarter
here tonight.

The United States
tion now mMopes to secure the full
admission of Greece and Turkeys
at a meeting which is expected tc
take place some time in August

The first request of Greek and
Turkish Governments to be admit
ted was turned down by the meet-

administra.

ing of the Atlantic Council held in
New York last September

Since then the United States i
understood to have become i:

creasingly convinced that nothing
short of full membership of the
Pact would give the necessary
Seerete to the East basin of the

Mediterranean.

Since it wes decided to z
Greece and Turkey with
fence plans of the ‘Atlantic
in the Mediterranean practicat
aiTangements have been heid up
by delay in organising an overal)
Mediterramean command of NAITO
powers.

sociate
the De-
Power:



—Reuter.



Three Powers Will

Discuss Defetice

SINGAPORE,

Joint strate

U nited Y States 3
defe _ of

May 15.
by Britain, the
and France for the
southeast Asia agains:



ny ‘hinese Communist aggres-

ion, 18 expected to be discussed
it three power military talks
which opened here -today.

Top ranking representatives of
military forces of three powers in
he Far East met in a closely

guarded conference room at the

adquarters of Malcolm Mac-





T

r British Commissione!
ie al f« Southeast Asia

A host of advisers acco:npaniec
the mi i ary chief Reuter.

aid, machines

te supplement or

will oon
re Sa Ace

begin
men ii



ome industric Dangerous pro-
cesse in chemicals r example

<

Suppose war con the United
State countries whic hay
cast t ‘ ¢ t 1

i ild be

Ame Fi

eH
|
,

}

}quarters

|

'| Mo cals e

demilitarised zone

|sion might well place the United

Tracy was able to reach port unde:
States a position of responsi

The reason for the cancellation | in ; her own power and Valeour wiih
of today’s meeting was given ppiltty for broadening the war and}, pine-foot hole below the water
diplomatic quarters as that} at the sare time losing most If/ tine was assisted by salvage
ponsors had not yet reached fu.j.â„¢0t all, of our Allies. ; vessels, '
agreement on the interpretation of Bradley said the Joint Chiefs of | —Reuter
certain article in the Armistice Staff were in a better position .

Agreement,
It was
that the Council
not meet until next week
~—-Reuter.



| Miss Truman Will
Tour Continent

WASHINGTON, May
President Truman's

15

daughter Margaret, will sail or
May 26 for her first visit to Brit
ain and the Continent, it wa
officially announced today

But she will not sing

A White House announceme
said she would tour en
France, Holland, Belgium, Luxen

burg “and italy accompanied b
her secretary ne

Mrs. James B. Holm, Whit
House Social Secretary, sa
Miss Truman had never bet

abroad and it seemed



to take a sight—seeing trip
The concert singer, Miss Trt
man, has no singing engagemen
during her tour.—Reuter.
Successful
Operation
LONDON, May 15
Mrs. Winston Churchill, wife
Britain’s wartime Premier had ar:



operation at a London hospita |
today. A _ bulletin issueq = fr« \
the hospital tonight seid: ‘Mr
Churchill’s operation has bee
perfectly successful. It wil!
entail her remaining in hospits
about three weeks followed by si>
to eight weeks’ convalescence afié
which she will be quite oll’
—-Reuter
Gets New Post
TOKYO, May 15.
Atomic expert, Rear Admira!

Ofisit was today named as Chiet
of Staff to Vice Admiral Turner
Joy, Commander of the United
Nations’ Naval Forces in Korean
waters and Commander of the
ee States’ Naval Forces
the Far East

He icceeds Rear Admiral!

whose new a

jas not announced

—Reuter

ROBOTS WILL REPLACE MEN

largest army of occupation ev
yet developed. Then develop
industry to increase productic

Dr. Wiener believes the chemi<
industry will be the first to
machines in place of men in son
proce nad that i embly
industrie I er

pu Se U.P

2) ace



considered likely in some
might

27-year*olc

a good time

ignmer

our

r to assess the risk

THE “ADVOCATE”

and to judge

than MacArthur

of a general war

the country’s military resources.

He forecast that some critics

would say “Why are the Joint v ’
Chiefs of Staff disclosing the fact pays for NEWS
that we are not militarily in posi-

|
|
}
|
|
|
|
}
|
|

n DIAL 3113
tion to have a showdown” with

Russia | Day or Night
—Reuter. \ |



a
WV. VP only thee bed! wets, SO

Not every day, but now
and then, comes an
occasion which cises far
above the ordinary and
demands a fitting tribute
of nothing but ~he best.

_ Benson & Hedges
cigarettes are made with
precise care, appropriate
| for just such times as
these—when the merely
good must be left for other
people—when, for you,

only the best will do.

to st
ON and EO 4
A






In tins of 50
$1.06

k
dung




SUPER VIRGINIA CIG ARETTES

ay

BENSON w/ IEDGES /

Lip

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OLD BOND STREET, LONDON

tt



iC




——


PAGE TWO



Carub

HE twelfth meeting of

Caribbean Commission
over and Commissioners, delegat«
and the Commission's staff hav
left Barbados.

Opening here today is anothe,
conference. Hastings House
be the headquarters.

It is the first meeting of the
Regional Economic Committec
Delegates from the various islands
began coming in on Monday.
Yesterday morning the Grenada
delegates, Hon. J. B. Renwick, Mr.
George Adams and Mr. Alistair
Macleod Smith arrived aeeom
panied by their wives. They are
staying at the Marine Hotel,

Other passengers arriving from
Grenada were Mr. Edward Hopkin

the



is io

and Mr, Anthony Williams. Mr.
Fred Casson was the lone passen-
ger coming in yesterday morning
from Trinidad. He is a guest at
the Windsor Hotel.

Hon. C. A. Beaubrun the St.
Lueia delegate also arrived
yesterday,

Intransit

NTRANSIT to England from

British Guiana on the Gas-
ecOgne for a holiday were Cat.
and Mrs. Ivor Robinson and Dr.
L. R. Sharples.

Capt. Robinson is with the
Social Assistance Department ‘in
British Guiana, while his wife is
the daughter of Mr. E. O. Pilgrim,
Assistant Master of Queen’s Col-
lege and Mrs. Pilgrim of George
town,

During the few hours ashore
on Saturday, she spent it with her
relatives Mr. O, A. Pilgrim, and
Mr, Gregg Pilgrim.

Dr. Sharples who has been with
the B.G. Medical Services for
many years, will shortly be retir—-







Graham, is on her way to spend
the
son Bertie who is studying medi-
cine in England.

Ronnie’s chief



s
Ten
POCKET CARTOON mere
by OSBERT LANCASTER M&.,7. 3. SHILLINGFORD of
4 Grenada who was in Barba
cos earlier in the year, is now
back again on a ten-day visit,
ving at the Savoy, Bay Street
e is Manager of the Grenada
Lime Factory,
Aceompanying him was his
sister Mrs. Verdun Wallace of
Dominica, who had spent two
months’ holiday with him in
Grenada, She is intransit for a

couple of days and is the guest of



Mrs. Robert Yearwood of My
Lord's Hill,
No Plans
R. H. D. WEATHERHEAD
who has been Director of
“Just tét me potnt oul to Medical Services in North Borneo
you, Wortlesdon pent little for some years, is now on leave
OYS wW. leaner ne no-qun “4 res ‘
Bowe une tear seneriwe UM” | prior to retirement. He” arrived
imperil their chances of play over the weekend from England
ing St. George i" accompanied by his wife and
younger daughter Pam.
Summer Holiday Dr. Weatherhead who was

GRAHAM. formerly Chief Medical Officer of
George sarbados told Carib that at pre—

sent, he had no plans for the
future. He is staying with his
brother Mr. Bruce Weatherhead
at “Galba Lodge”, For abelle.

Three Months In England

ACK in Barbados after three
months’ houday in England
visiting relatives are Wing Comdr.

RS.
widow

CECILE
of Capt.

summer holidays with her

She left by the Gaseogne.

St. Lucia and Grenada
RS. MARIE MENDES and her
son George have gone to St

Lucia to spend three weeks’ holi- ang Mrs. D. F. A. Cl

; and Mrs. D. F, A, arke and
day. They left by the Gascogne. their young son Gerald. The
Arriving by the same ship from Clarkes who have spent about

Grenada was Mr. Ronnie Gresham nine months in the W.1 prior to
who works with Geo. F. Huggins

their holiday in the U.K. own a

hobby is weight. house here at Rendezvous, Wing













. BARBADOS



Back to Trinidad





MESS, MARILYN oegtotsa M{"S, ERROL, STEFLE 1 Flying Visit EMPIRE ROWVAL
and Miss* Noreen MtCarthy. othe. Mic Moreedes Planch ir’ LAST TWO sii0WS
oa a : a ag brs: a fon neh va B wrA’ Fedeenth AT™= a few days in Trinidad TO-DAY at 8.30 p.m. TODAY 30 ae ‘30
arbados since April , left for flight on Monday afternoon, They + and one in Grenada, Mrs. ‘ ‘ one ' :
ae ee er until their home, “Bonnie Dundee” Lloydstill’s daughter, is back in eee sl: ae ec the in St. Lawrence, is finished. Mr, Barbados, She came in over the “THE SHOP AT SLY eae ve
Mrs. Fred Olton ahs had yee Steele is expected hors in another wee by fe See CORNER” Starring:
holidaying in ‘Trifidad for WMe-- © = eeamaiaeninn xa aanicniieioniion tan aoieacaen Hemry Brandon and Robert
past few wetks. \ ae "eo Pye Py els x COREE GATUNPAT Este " Kellard.
a ance niannesnnen Sy a
. * a BACK By, la Li Ss ed ‘ EA yy .Along with the picture—.
St. Lucia Holiday T BELVEDERE’ é “a ae dail “SECRETS OF SCOTLAND
Leaauner ”
R. AND MRS, BERNARD : YARD
MOORE and their your Starrifg with Edgar BARRIER
daughter Heather have goyie to F lifton WEBB and
spend a noligay in St, Lucia, stay- AT Clifton 7 BENNETT Stephanie BACHELOR
ing with Mrs, Moore’s parents, = 7 a

Mr. and Mrs, Fréddie Potter. Mr.



Bore S MEP Cable and Wireless | 56 5606s O00 C1900795 01 OOO 110804

Branch at St. Lawrence

Mr, Aubrey Douglas-Smith
Résident Tutor of the University
College of the West Indies, who
had been in St. Lueia on a short
visit, returned on Monday by
B.W.I.A.

B.B.C. Radio |
Programme

19 OM

am Announcer's Choice; 7 60 |
am The News; 7 16 a m_ News Analy- |
sis;.715 am From the Editorials; 7 25 |
am Progtamme Parade; 7.30 am. Red
Letter Day; 745 am _ Jazz Music; 8 15
a.m, The Spur of the Moment; 8.30 a.m

6.0 a.m.—12 15 p.m

6 30



Work and Worship; 845 am _ The
Colonies Today; 9 am The News; 9.10
am Home News From Britain; 9 15

4m Close Down; 11.15 a.m Programme
Parade; 11.25 a m_ Listeners Choice; 11.45
am Statement of Account 12 Noon The

News; 1210 pm. News Analysis; 12 15
pm Close Down.
1.15 pm —6 45 p m - WM

415 pm. Ronnie Pleydell; 5 00 p m





















WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 1951

two weeks. He’ is the proprietor rd

ADVOCATE





Here Again

of Steele’s Book Stores in Caracas







EMPIRE starviné sav. 1.15 & 8.20 OLYMPIC

LAST TWO siiows
TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.15

Republic Big Double
Lyn WILDE Adele MARA



ROXY

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.15

20th C. Fox Presents—

m
“HALLS OF «« CAMPUS
MONTEZUMA ” HONEYMOON ”
- AND
Starring:
Richard —— —- Walter << HEADING FOR
oe Gov'’s COUNTRY ”
with Reginald Gardner and Starring
Robert Wagner William LUNDIGAN '











GLOB

TODAY & TOMORROW 4.45 & 8.15 p.m.

J. ARTHUR RANK
presents

SIE










Plus
THE ANDREW SISTERS

WM. Le
MURR ay & Ce in
“HER LUCKY NITE



































































ing from his present post as lifting. Comdr. Clarke who has retired .3)\3,°.. ¢ the Week. 5.15 , { ,
District Medical Officer of Port 2 from the R.A.F. is a Chartered Musi “5 45 pon Viniti Cocena: ont « CAROL REED'S :
Mourant in Berbice, Medical Supt. poe He hopes to go to p i Yolce, of the Violin; 615 pm Production Hear These Song Hits {
Fe enezucla shortly, Meanwhile] From the Third Programme; ct MANNING & co L a
New Divisional Manager T PRESENT holidaying in they are staying at the Enmore| ig pm 00pm. #33 a "9 ‘ Es You Is Or Is You Aint”
arbados staying a 1 Hotel. a celal et aad “Strai we
R. H. L. N. ASCOUGH, the Ocean View Hotel are Com- ‘ Ast Pe The Wawa 110 p mn. News AGENTS aighten Up & Fly Right
new Divisional Manager for Mander E. H, Allen, RKN., En route to St. Kitts Indies: 745 pm) Red Letter Day: 8 p.in. | 29S0%G999S999469665959999569990556099995O09 909995 “Dance With A Dolly”
Messrs. Cable and Wireless (West Medical Supt. of the Demerara R i MRS. RONALD Hedis Pewsreeh: 2 * oa, 3 Opening FRIDAY __
ndies Ltd), who arrived on Satur- Bauxite Co, at McKenzie, B.G _ and MRS. KI, =i 34h 08 ee” mew Him; 6 ae pening 3
aoe utink team Badend by the and Mrs, .jlen, They came in a BRAND and their ‘=P Editorials: @ bin ‘statement Fans 3 ASTOR THEA TRE starring ROBERT NEWTON “DARK CITY’
Golfito, has come to relieve Mr,.# Week ago Sndexpect tn be of eren are on their way to St.10 18 pm. Dennis Browrt 9 #1 p.m. Seri and STMT ROL nieee were FRIDAY MAY 18 i
kG Lb. Douges the peeseni here until May 28rd. a. mirived — England ou peument, ie me a a Sw 5 Oe WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL RELEASE ALL STAR CONTES?
Divisional Manager On island Tour St. Kitts by-B.W1.A., later this] an Rome pee Universal Double
z * ot. S$ by : ‘ é ; s rom the 1ird Programme . ——>- .
Mr. ASscough was aécompanied 5 alf week r a ae S—SSSSSSSSSSSS=SS=_-
- eet tame” Taiyo We Gimaedar CANE | ue AICP ANGE (1) “COBRA WOMAN”
at “Beverley,” St. Lawrence. ay . ie ; Mr. Brand is a surveyer and] «pe > m }
Prior ta his hew appointment, through the country I met* a wii shortly be taking up a post) © ° PROGRAMME WED. may 10 (2) “RIDERS OF SANTE FE }
Mr, Ascough was Manager of former ee ee i With the Government of the} ;,10.00 pm—i0 15 p.m News , GLOBE
Cable and Wireless and Resident Hon. Jesus T. Pinero. He was | coward Islands. During the war]! !5 P.™—10.30 pam Starring Randolph Scott ea f a :
Magistrate of Ascension Island, 0M @ ac ae . ‘9 “rg he was with the Intelligence Keep Yous Anal - This pisn!
a Representative of the St. accompaniec iy aj, and Mrs. Department of the R.A.F. attach- e is Destine or ardom
Halene Government, . ren Mr. ae sens og ne aa to the US, Air Force during CROSSWORD i His Name is CHARLTON HESTON
During the war, he was Con- Lashley anc ey, illy ICk- the European campaign and after- : f
struction Engineer of Cable and ham, Spanish Master on the wards he went out East. ; AQUATIC CLUH CINEMA (Members Only) Opening FRIDAY M£AY 18th
Wireless in Hong Kong and spent staff of Combermere School ? Until they leave for St. Kitts
four years in a Japanese intern- Mr, Pinero has since returned they are staying at the Hastings MATINEE: TODAY at 5 p.m,
ment camp. to Puerto Rico, NCPR Ss ban pte TONIGHT & TOMORROW NIGHT at 8.30
+, . DEED RKO Radio Pictures present
ADVENTURES OF PIPA SILL WILLTAMS, BARBARA HALE
in “FIRST YANK INTO TOKYO” |
. the women who love him
DIAL ind the men who
(PLAZA srasts
OISTIN 8404 (THE GARDEN) St. James
Today & Tomorrow 5 & 8.30 p.m. Today & Tomorrow 8.30 p.m.
tems es asvonoai pe sony WEEE
& ee P aous eo ae eet ; : KITTY O'DAY TARZAN TRIUMPHS &
9. Ballet danced in India, (6) Jean PARKER, Peter COOKSON Robert MITCHUM in— 5
31. Inevitable conclusion, (3) & VIOLENCE WEST OF THE PECOS ¢ 5 :
12. With care @ person includes this, Michael O'SHEA Nancy COLEMAN ‘ ‘ 3 = * : FS cy
\4 Reveited Sains Bis ‘abeiins ws FHI. to SUN. 5 & 8.90 p.m Te kcanh aes ie hein CHARLTON LiZABETH viveca Dean non ee
4 . 5 5 pr (Monogram) : Sunday 5 p.m.
CAH BP | HE BRAS Re Al aan ftw tenet oies sitet Ht, ig HESTON: SCOTT: LINDFORS - JAGCER- DEFOR
Saldana ed i his - (4 ‘ ) Bob HOPE, Lucille” BALL in- ie A )
2 —————————————— fi: £ dade Beam? ‘ay° Senne, 2 FANCY PANTS a. Be eee ema Girected by WILLIAM DIETERLE - s- by John Merecyth L .
2. igety. STREETS OF * Scrvenptay n Merec) S5CaS and Larry Marcus + Adaptation by Ketti Frings
W L 2%. This does 2 Bill WILLIAMS, Jane NIGH ou
BY THE AY By Beachcom r 24. emuind one, St cereale, 2)" on William BO Anaad ékney Bee” HENRY | A Paramount Picture Hes
fs HEN
Baws : THE ALL STAR TALENT CONTEST
memeearen | ening ra te tke “ee ig Matt A Olartent Viclory {He gu a ws | EOE AA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) |f | Biivtuts, CoutyMone!™ "YE NARs onass:
authors in newspapers anc up to he dog 1c t 3. e song asked for its ‘ : ’ BEES Saad oni sie wiv on a soem Eta! ;
periodicals ahriars oe in the conductor decide. HE Board of Trade, in decid- * pineh up this jretencen (a) a6; a wi TODAY & TOMORROW (Only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. favntas tanae eae -. ...“LOST IN A DREAM”
i . . . ers Excitins 3 * «< . ”
background, shelves of expen- war Sir, losi gubd ing that the words “Illb. 5 He Cuele, gree can be (7 W109 mt “THE RETURN OF THE FRONTIERSMAN” JOAN BENTHAM pada eee Web-t> tapi MATEN fin baOAGED
i : > eC osine oO ? ~~ 8 Fo . Ug UU SD SE) ee ate ei 3h Sarva ry eS lk ee eee Se ee ft,
sively Bound POuke. es ore? Yesterday, in-a No. 47 nett” on a pot of honey were no] 10; Reasoning process, (aye ©? Color by Technicolor DENNIS-GLARR 6045.5)... .sccedee<45 “4 WINDS & 7 SEAS”
Ss
I am told that, in these manners? Yesterday, ina No, 4 15 You get plenty of in 16 GORDON MéRAE — RORY CALHOUN — JULIE LONDON
hard days, there is a firm which bus, I saw a man reluctantly infringement of the Prepacked Down, (4 18. Eistitie (4 i Plus “SONG OF THE SADDLE” WILLIE IFFILL.......................,..“NITE AND DAY”
lends eae books to authors who rise to cer his seat to a female Foods (Weights and Measures ? Come ‘back to live here. (4) with DICK FORAN WET PRI yo ce bk gues eis “ROSES OF PICADDY”
cannot afford the usual dummies, dog. Not only did he not raise Marking) Order, has struck a aie A nes ee THURSDAY 1 30 p.m, (Monogram) Guest Star: “SHORTY MOE” B.G’s best Bassist
The writers hire them as so his hat, but he muttered, as “8'Xins RS a EE ‘Antaretion @’porcarase tae Rotereest “THE LIVING GHOST” The Teenagers in Intransit United Kingdom
rie’ 1 th h he resented having to resounding blow for freedom.,; i2 “Include: “dae panne: hs » eae & “HIGH SCHOOL HERO”
much a go, and an experienced though he esentec g t ; Re ‘ . rinted | Pacts: 19, ‘Need? 21° Letter: 22 orke! JAMES DUNN FREDDIE STEWART Pit 24, House 40, Bal. 60, Boxes 72
book-arranger calls on the day show common decency to a four- Labels may now be printed | pyr fota: 24, bo" st Down: 4, Ave Tickets On Sale Globe Daily
the photograph is to be taken, footed passenger: one net ae “nett. ; r ne Fool: 2. intciest 9 Fievole; 4 dit, | Coming Friday “HASTY HEART”
and arranges them tastefully. rs, truly, a lope, nette: or gnet, uiberts 1h Slates: 15, Ulster: 16. ees Be ics aa.
On one occasion a_ reporter “Fed Up. does not mean licence, 20. Drat

followed hard on the heels of the
photographer. “I see,”
“that you have a very fine and)
complete set of Tolstoy's works. |
May I look?” He did look, and
found that half the Tolstoys were
uncut copies of a Frepych novel;
tthe other half were mere blank
paper. ‘
Courtesy to Animals

HE never-ending exchange

of letters to newspapers
about men who do not give up
their seats in buses to women has
never touched on the heart of the

problem. Should a man give up |
his seat to a woman who _ has
given up her seat to a dog?

Again, if a cat is brought into a
bus, should the owner of the dog
make it give up its seat to the
eat? And will the owner of the

he said, |



cat expect the man who had
given up his seat to the woman|
who had given up her seat to;
the dog to be prepared to allow
the cat to sit im the seat he had}

“ one oenercenracsngramepestenie- > tienen —_——,—

JUNIOR COMPETITION

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to send in
a humorous essay, story or poem on the subject of “A TOP HAT.”
The best entry will be published every Monday in The Evening Advo-
cate, and the winner will receive a prize to the value of 7/6 in either
books or statfonery, Entries must reach The Children’s Editor, The
Advocate Co., Ltd,, City, not later than Wednesday every week,

NOTE: Stories must not be copied,
Send this coupon with your story.

JUNIOR COMPETITION

Age
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WEDNESDAY, MAY

16,

Property
Settlemer
Required
THE case in which Hugh M
Best and others charged Perey G
Seales and others of being in
possession of property which
belong to both parties began’ at
the Court of Chancery yesterday

before His Honour the Vice-
Chancellor, Sir Allan Collymore.



Percy Seales and the other
defendants are alleged to have
sold some of the property with-

out making any settlement wiih
Hugh M. Best and his party about

the money obtained from the
sales.
Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., in-

structed by Carrington and Sealy
appeared for Best. Mr. G. H.
Adams instructed by Haynes and
Griffith are for Percy Seales.

Yesterday no evidence was
taken. A review of the case and
legal points were mostly raised.

Mr. Adams submitted to the
Court that Best and his party had
come to the Court of Equity with-
out disclosing that they were
asking the Court to enquire into
the conduct of the plantation
bought with other people’s money

The whole action purported a
Straightforward action of joint
owners in their own _ interest
against other joint owners. In
that case, he argued, an amend-
ment would be wrong. and the
case should be struck out.

Vice-Chancellor’s Ruling

His Honour the Vice-Chanceilor
will make a ruling on Mr. Adams’
submission when the case con-
tinues on the 30th., of this month.

Best and the other plaintiffs
want an enquiry to be made, They
want the payment and transfer by
Seales and the other defendants
to them of what should be found
due to them, They also seek the
appointment of a receiver who
would manage the plantations as
the Court might direct,

The plantations for the pur-
chase of which Best and the other
plaintiffs claim that the money
was provided by both parties are
Colleton, Lascelles, St. James,
Four Hills, St, Peter, Mt. Prospect
and Trent.

Seales and the other defendants
denied that each of the sugar
plantations was bought by its
respective purchasers as trustees
for the Barbados Progressive
Society and not otherwise.

They are of the opinion that the
plantations are not the property of
either party nor did the money
belong to either of them on a joiné
account or otherwise,

Mr. Reece told the Court that it
appeared that about the time the

lantations were aequired in

arbados, there were two societies
of the same name, one in Colon
and the other in Panama, Eact
of the societies used to set aside
money for the purpose of purchas-
ing estates in Barbados.

The societies used to help its
members.



Store Sweepings

It happened in Bridgetown
today. One of the leading city
stores had had the store sweep-
ings piled up in front of the
building and on the pavernent,

At 11.30 am. Mr. &.
Mottley, one of the Sanitary
Commissioners for St. Michael,
went in to a Floor-walker himself

and made strong representations,

These were not enthusiasti-
eally received, but when the
Advocate checked later in the
day. the sweepings had beeft
removed,

Forger Gaoled
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 11.

Osmond Bradley of Boissiere
Village, Port-of-Spain, was
sentenced to six months’ imprison—
ment for uttering forged Sanitary
Laundry slips and for the larceny
of paper and_ twine. Bradley
leaded to 182 charges.

7}







1951





BARBADOS

Walcott Going To Grenada Labourers |

Trade Union principles did not apply at the Trade Union
Talks held in ‘Trinidad last week, Mr. F. L. Walcott, M.C.P.,

told the Advocate yesterday.

Battomley’s
Mission

MR. A. G. BOTTOMLEY, M.P.,
Secretary for Overseas Trade, is
coming to Barbados this week.

To-day the Mission which Mr.
Mr. Bottomley leads will hold dis-
cussions in Jamaica on May 17th
with representatives of the cigar
industry.

The main object of the Mission's
visit to Barbados will be to ex-
plain to the -Region Economic
Committee the position in regard
to sugar which has arisen in the
course of negotiations with Cuba,
and to obtain full information as
to the views of the West Indies,
Members of the British West In-
dies Sugar Association will be
attending the meeting of the
Regional Eeonomic Committee and
will be present at these discus-
sions.

It is the Mission*’s intention to
hold a meeting in London on their
return with representatives of
Commonwealth sugar producers,
including London representatives
of West Indian producers.

The Directors of the British
West Indian Sugar Producers’
Association will meet in Barbados
on May 18th and 19th and hope
to have discussions after with Mr.
Bottomley.

—

BOTTOMLEY, ARTHUR
GEORGE, O.B.E., 1941; M.-P.
(Lab.) Chatham Division of
Rochester since 1945; Sec. for
Overseas Trade, Board of
Trade, since 1947; London
Organiser of Nat. Union of
Public Employees, 1935; Al-
derman of Borough of Walt-
hamstow; b 7 Feb, 1907; s. of
George Howard Bottomley
and his late wife Alice; m.
1986, Bessie Ellen Wiles; no
c, Educ.; Gamuel Road Coun-
cil School; Extension Classes
at Toynbee Hall. Elected to
Walthamstow Borough Coun-
cil, 1929; Mayor of Waltham-
stow, 1945-46; Chairman of
Emergency Committee and
A.RB.P.. Controller, 1939-41.
Deputy Regional Commission-
er for South-Eastern England,
1941-45, Parl. Under-Sec. of
State for Dominions, 1946-47;
Land Tax Commissioner,
Becontree Div. of Essex;
Member Parl. Mission to
India, 1946; Special Govt. |
Mission to Burma. 1947;
Deleg. to U.N., New York,
1946 and 1947; Leader U.K.
delegation to World Trade
and Employment Conf., Ha-
vana, 1947; U.K. deleg. to
Commonwealth Conf., Delhi,
1949, Publications: Contribu-
tor to Local Government Jour-
nals. Recreations; Walking
and theatre-going.

NO PRICE LIST

A fine of £5 and 2/- costs to



be paid in one month or two
months’ imprisonment was im-
posed on Clarence Gill, a s

keeper of Cheapside, St. Michael,

by a City Police Magistrate
yesterday.
He was found guilty of not

displaying the price of regulated
goods in his shop on February
13. Sheila Gill, also of Cheap-
side, was fined £3 and 1/-— costs
by the same Magistrate for
selling cocoa at a greater price
than that fixed by the schedule.

Her offence was also com-
mitted on February 13 and the
fine is to be paid in 21 days or
one month’s imprisonmert.

RATES OF EXCHANGE



CANADA ,
MAY 15, 1951
62 2/10% pr. Cheques on
. Bankers 60 2/10% pr.
Demand
Draits 60 05% pr.
Sisht Drafts 59 9/10% pr.
62 2/10% pr. Cable
60 7/10% pr. Currency 58 7/10% pr.
Coupons 58% pr.

Silver 20% pr.



UALITY

FLAVOUR

STANDS

SUPREME.

After a dinner on Sunday
night the sub-committee met at
12.15 a.m. and worked until the

early morning of 3.30. “I have
never attended a Conference thai
did. as much work in so shor

a time as this.”

Mr. Walcott had returned on
Sunday from attending an Inter-
American Trade Regional Organ-
ization Conference, affiliated to
‘the International Confederation
of Free Trade Unions.

The Conference discusseg or-
ganisational matters and met Mr.
George Woodcock, Assistant Gen-
eral Secretary of the British
Trades Union Congress,

Officers’ Training

The delegates of the Brilish
section discussed with Mr. Wood-
cock problems of trade unions in
the West Indies and asked for

greater assistance in training
trade union officers.

They regretted that training
courses held under the auspices
of the Colonial Development
and Welfare Organisation had
been discontinued. They felt
that representation should be

made to provide training in the
West Indies for Trade Unions.

Mr. Woodcock was thanked for
financial assistance given to the
Unions by the British Trade
Union Congress, and some repre-
sentatives said that their Union
had already received office equip-
ment from the T.U.C.

Mr. Woodcock said that it was
not the intention of the T.U.C.
to make the Unions in the West
Indies dependent on outside
sources for their success and
etrength, but that they were pre-
pared to help stable trade unions
with equipment for their offices.

Transportation

Some delegates said that trans-
portation was absorbing a large
part of the contributions of the
Union.

Business on the agenda included
organisational arrangements, rep-
resentation at the Milan Confer-
ence, 1.L.0. representation. _

Mr. Walcott was appointed
member of a Sub-Committee to
deal with organisation in the
area. Other members are Mr.
F. J. Carasco (St. Lucia) and Mr.
Cc. P. Alexander (Trinidad).

Mr. Walcott is going to Gren-
ada shortly in his capacity as
member of the Sub-Committee to
investigate Trade Union problems
there and to report to the
Regional Organisation,

Labourer

Joshua Williams, a labourer
of Thomas Gap, was yesterday
remanded until May 17, by a

City Police Magistrate when he
was charged by the Police with
the larceny of a fishing net
valued at $18, the property of
Mr. A. Guiler of Brighton, Black
Rock on May 11.

Mr. Guiler said that on May 11
he left his net hanging in his
house and the next morning
when he looked for it, it was not
there. He had seen the defendant
by his house many times and on
the beach, 7”

Also remanded yesterday until
May 22, was, Noel King, a labour-
er of Chapman Lane, St, Michael,
when he appeared before a
Police Magistrate on a charge of
stealing lumber, the property of
DaCosta & Co., Ltd., on May 13.

Herman Clarke, a watchman
on the wharf, told the court
yesterday that he was on duty
on May 13 about 5 o'clock on
Bridge Street and saw the accus-
ed pulling a hand cart on which
was placed a quantity of lumber.
He asked him where he had got
it from and he received no satis-
factory _explanation. He then
notified the Police.



. . ‘

Await Loans
|

LARGE NUMBER of labour
ers from various parts of the
island stood outside a building at

Pinfold Street yesterday

This building hor
Welfare Office and P«

Lavour
Loan

s€s the




Ant



Bank. The labourers wait
ing Labour Welfare Housing
Loans.

While these offices are on the
ground floor, the Goverimem

Staff of Sanitary Inspectors is on
the second storey.





This staff formerly occupied a
building at Dottin’s Alley while
the Labour Welfare Office was at
Crumpton Street

The building in which these
offices are located is very old

fashioned. It has plenty of land
surrounding it and on this
grow a few fruit trees. The main
entrance to the building is guarded
by a greyhound dog cut out of
stone. The Government is renting
it from Miss Fmily Fieid ef Spry
Street.

SHOWER in the

before
afternoon
waterfront.

jand

City shortly
one oclock yesterday
held up work on the

Labourers could be

seen scampering for shelter whiie 't

truck hands placed tarpaulins over

trucks loaded with sugar.
The shower was a short

but it left the day gloomy.

one,



Phe\

temperature during the afternoc eo

was 86 degrees Fahrenheit in the
Shade.
VAN BOYCE of Nelson Street,
St. Michael, is at present de
tained at the General Hospital.
He was taken there in an uncon
scious condition on Sunday and
detained. :
Boyce was found lying beside
the motor lorry M-1756, owned by



Messrs. Plantations Ltd., along
Welches Road, St. Thomas, on
Sunday night. The lorry ran off
the road and plunged into a
quarry on the right side of the
road



INCE the opening of the Whit-
sun term Mr. W. C. Skeete,
ewner of the Intermediate Class
yacht Dauntless, has been acting
Headmaster of Wesley Hall Boys’
School.

Mr. F.. Broome, the Head-
master, is acting Inspector of
Schools for the country districts.

‘At Wesley Hall Boys’ School the
senior boys are occupying the
building which was recently
renovated and extended. The
junior boys are in the other build
ing.

NOTHER shipment of deep sea
fish has arrived in the island
This shipment, 5,000 pounds of
Red Snapper, was caught by the
Sunshine R., a fishing smack, for
Messrs. J. N. Goddard & Sons.
WALLET containing $38, the
property of Daphne Scott of
Yearwood Land, Black Rock, was
stolen from a counter at the Dress
Department of the Ideal Store
Broad Street on Saturday The
incident was reported by Cpl, 205
Devonish.
INNIE WELLS of Rockley,
Christ Church, reported that
her house was broken and entered
and a wrist watch stolen from her
bedroom.

Cc



Found Unconscious

Elsie King, a labourer of the
Housing Scheme, Black Rock
was found lying near the Mentai

Hospital on Monday night about
7.15 o'clock by the Police in an
unconscious state.

She was taken to the General

Hospital where she was detained
for further observation He
condition is not considered to b«
very serious. The Police are
making investigations

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PAGE FOUR



Noa

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lt4., Broad St. Bridgetown



Wednesday, May 16, 1951



IN THE DARK

THE complaint is often made that the
public in the West Indies are not very in-
terested in matters that will affect them
vitally. be

There is one contribution to this apathy
that could be removed at once.

To-day for example there begins in Bar-
bados the first session of the Regional Eco-
nomic Committee.

Nothing has happened since the war end-
ed of greater importance to the West Indies
than the formation of this Committee. For
the first time in the history of the British
West Indies, Governments have agreed to
look after their own trading interests, by
pooling opinions and resources and speak-
ing with one voice.

Yet this terrific achievement is to be
worked out behind closed doors. Twenty-
four hours before the meeting was about
to begin there was no information as to
whether or not the Committee would dis-
cuss anything in public. So the greatest
achievement of the British West Indies in
the economic field is to be left in the hands
of Government representatives and their
advisers, but the man in the street is only
to read whatever handouts may come his
way via the Press. This is not democratic
procedure, nor is it even good common-
sense practice. The extension of votes to a
community is nothing but a sham and
mockery of democratic principles if that
community is only to be told by their pol-
itical representatives about the merits or
demerits of their opponents.

If the representative government that
Barbados now possesses is to become re-
sponsible government, it pre-supposes the
existence cf a maximum number of voters
capable of understanding the major issues
external or internal on which their eco-
nomic security depends. What is true of
Barbados is applicable to the West Indian
region. Yet what measure of confidence is
placed in the public?

Should the West Indian public not hear
what its Government representatives and
advisers say about Canada-West Indies
trade?

Should it not be given the opportunity to
hear the views of the Committee on indus-
trial development, inter-island shipping,
oils and fats, regional marketing facilities,
Caribbean representation at major com-
mercial conferences and the proposals for
Customs Union?

Of course it should.

How else is it to become well-informed?

It cannot go to the debates in the House of
Assembly for two reasons. First, these im-

portant issues never seem to be debated in
local legislatures. Secondly even if these
were—in Barbados at any rate—there is so
long a gap between spoken word and print-
ing that the public would learn nothing
except that it was too late to learn any-
thing. The Press does its heroic best but
there is a limit on the resources of a Press
struggling to inform a public kept in the
dark.

To-day only unity will get the West In-
dian case heard and ensure a square deal
for the people of the area. The United
Kingdom despite its many lamentable mis-
takes of the past, present and future has
done much to help the West Indies. But it
is intolerable that any longer a small hand-
ful of Government Officials should control
the economy of the area. It is more than in-
tolerable. It is unjust. But what guarantee
is there that any local committee would be
any more tolerable or any more just, unless
responsible to informed public opinion? It
is informed public opinion that is lacking
and the “closed door” policy of conducting
vital public meetings is to blame.



MR. BOTTOMLEY

WHEN Lord Listowel returned to Lon-
don after attending the Governors’ Confer-
ence in Barbados at the end of 1949, he
spoke a lot of good sense about the West
Indies in the House of Lords.

This week Mr. A. G. Bottom!ey, M.P. His
Majesty’s Secretary for Overseas Trade is
coming to explain what the United King-
dom has been doing with regard to sugar
deals with Cuba and to listen to the views
of the West Indies.

‘Lord Listowel was told much, he listened
hard and being a man of high integrity and
honour he spoke fearlessly. Mr. Bottomley
has paid us the compliment of a visit. He
will be told much and doubtless he has an
infinite capacity for listening. There is no
doubt that he too will return to the United
Kingdom and will inform His Majesty’s
Government that the West Indies are per-
turbed about existing trade relations in the
Caribbean.

7

YESTERDAY was the anniver-
sary of the Workers’ Charter,

That is what the famous papal
encyclical issued on May 15,
1891, has been called.

Rerum Novarum was published

‘}at a time when modern techno-

logical advances had resulted in
the degradation and enslavement
of millions who sweated in fac-
tories and existed in slums.

The West Indies have never
seen such appalling conditions.
Rerum Novarum was the outcome
of a wide and deep Catholic
movement of thought and prac-
tice,

Von Ketteler to quote an ex-
ample, (Bishop of Mainz in 1850)
saw clearly how radical were the
social changes caused by indus-
trial capitalism and tried to
build up self-governing associa-
tions among industrial workers.

But the successes of Catholic
social movement have been hmi-
ted. Its failures are the failures
of the Catholic body in general.
A succession of great and holy
Popes from Leo XIII down to
our own day have been thoroughly

sensitive to the demands of
our time, It was Leo XIIi
who said “if society is to be

healed, in no other way can it
be healed save by a return to
Christian life and Christian in
stitutions.”

“The great mistake” wrote Leo
XIII in Rerum Novarum, “is to
take it for granted that one class
of society is naturally hostile to
the other, as if nature intended
rich and poor to live at war with
one another. So irrational and
false is this view that the exact
contrary is the truth. Each class
needs the other; capital cannot do
without labour nor labour without

capital.
Mutual agreement produces
harmony and order: perpetual

conflict, on the other hand, gives
rise to nothing but confusion and
outrage.”

Forty years after on May 15,
1931 Pius XI wrote in Quadra—
gesimo Anno “It will only be
possible to unite all in a harmo—
nious striving for the common
good when all sections of society
have the intimate conviction that
they are members of a single famn—
ily and children of the same
Heavenly Father. Then the rich
and others in power will change
their former negligence of their
poorer brethren into solicitous and
practical regard and will listen
with kindly feeling to their just
complaints. Working men too will
lay aside all feelings of hatred or
envy, which the instigators of
social strife arouse so skilfully.
Not only will they cease to feel
weary of the position assigned to
them by Divine Providence in
society; they will become proud
of it, well aware that every man
by doing his duty is working use—
fully and honourably for the com—
mon good, and is following in
the footsteps of Him, who being
God, chose to become a carpenter
among men, and to be known as
the son of a carpenter.”

The encyclicals are there but
they have been neglected not
only by the Catholic body but by
the world. In Great Britain there
is a strong and virile Christian



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By GEORGE HUNTE

tradition behind the _ British
Labour movement, but its influ-
ence is being weakened daily,

Douglas Jerrold writes. in
England Past, Present and Future:
“A most disquieting feature of
Britain under Socialism is the
decline in public morality due
to the decline not in religious
observance, which is of long
standing but in religious belief.
The Labour movement which
used to voice the strong, simple
and explicitly Christian belief of
the chapels, against the more
Erastian views of the Establish—
ment, is to-day becoming strongly
sceptical and secularist, if not
actively anti-clerical. A gulf is
opening up between the genera-
tions. There is painfully little
ethical difference between the
conception of political right and
wrong held by National Socialists
and Communists and those held
by many left-wing Socialists
«including many who are sincere—
ly anti-Communist). They dis-
like different things and different
people from those who fell under
the lash of Hitler or are still
under the lash of Premier Stalin,
but they react to what they dis-
uke in the same way.

The idea of equal justice for
all no longer birds the conscience
of the British progressives, and
the idea of justice of any kind is
losing ground.

.... The political doctrines so
long preached that the rights of
majorities are absolute, that any-
body’s property is everybody’s,
if only enough people say 50,
are themselves denials of elemen-
tary public morality and have
had a repercussive effect on pri-
vate morals. To take what you
can get is a measure which if
sound and accepted in _ politics,
cannot easily be confined to public
life.”

Less than a week ago a Bri-
tish official who has the ear of
the Secretary of State for the
Colonies was explaining to me
why the United Kingdom sup-
ported Mr. Gairy in Grenada at
the expense of Mr. Marryshow,
the father of Socialism in the
West Indies,

I understood him to say that
“Mr, Gairy exploited his oppor-
tunity.” “Suppose,” I replied, “that
Mr, Allder or some other mem-
ber of the Barbados Labour
Party exploited his opportunity,
would the Secretary of State let
Mr, Adams down, just as he let
Mr, Marryshow down?”

“Your views are prejudiced,” I
was told,

When a friend of mine rallied
to my support he was dismissed
out of hand and told “he must
a planter.” He was not.

This incident happened in
Barbados less than a week ago.

Another point made by Douglas
Jerrold in England Past, Present
and Future is no less disquieting.

He is talking of the new ruling
class which has already suppress-
ed the capitalist in England, This
ruling class as the Times pointed
out more that fifteen years ago
are “not those who own but those
who control capital.”

“The new ruling class’ writes
Douglas Jerrold, “is unique. Their

The Workers Charter”

predecessors, interested though
they may have been, were in
terested in something other than
themselves. They owed their
pre-eminence to their construc
tive ability, They were builders
even if the structure they built
was faulty. The bureaucrats only
direct the work of others, They
have not created what they con-
trol. They are builders only of
their own reputations and archi-
tects only of their own fortunes.”
We have got to stop the rot. We
have reached a low ebb in
morality when ‘opportunism’
and “justice” are used synony
meously and when the views of
men with decades of knowledge
and experience are dismissd as
“prejudiced” by intinerant dog-
matists and the appellation “plant-
er” is used with the same mean-
ing as Hitler gave to “Jew.” “A
lot of rubbish” writes Douglas
Jerrold (and I do not apologise
for so frequently quoting a book
which is so neeessary for under
standing our true position to-day)
“is at present being talked about
the need to restore material in.
centives to harder work, but it
is the restoration of moral im-
peratives and _ institutional ii
centives whic!
‘or, A return®to a proper con
zeption of Christian education is
the first condition of recovery,
the second is to restore and
defend continuously the rights o

Hee tei und ut the corporatio: | British West Indies would like to add other
and to recognise these rights in|things that used to come from Canada and

all legislation as superior to and

aihadedenh to those.cf ihe state.” which are still restricted. And there are

This is the
Novarum, the

spirit of
orkers’

yesterday. It is what Bishop
Bentley of Barbados used to tell
in simple words to the members
of the Young Men’s Progressive
Club when he said “only Jesus
can change the man.”

“Christianity today,” to quote
Deuglas Jerrold for the last
time, “has to reconquer the world
from its allegiance to the false
gods of the enlightenment, but its
task is far more difficult than at
any previous stages in Christian
history.

Christianity conquered the des-
pair of the Roman world in the
third, fourth end fifth centuries
by word of mouth and by ey-
ample, but it did not have to
face a mass-educated, mass prop

aganded body of opinionated
ignorance.”
And if anyone is tempted to

say there has been progress, let

him derive all the comfort he
can from “Eighty Thousand
Adolescents” a study of young

péople between 14 and 20 in the
factories, shops and workshops of
Birmingham, “Their average
pocket money is 7s. 6d. a week at
14 and rises to 21s, at eighteen,
but 25 per cent of these fortunate
young people read no books, and
of the remainder most read
weekly comics or boys’ and girls’
weeklies only. The staple amuse-
ment is the cinema: after that
the dance hall, the dirt track and
watching football, Sixty-five per
cent. of these young men never
enter a church.

All this is not
decline.”

progress, but

(England Past Piesent and Future by
Douglas Jerrold) (Dent 10s, 6d.)



The Colour Bar In

(By a Special Correspondent)

LONDON.
Mr. Reginald Sorensen, Social~
ist Member of Parliament and
Free Church Minister, has a dash
of that quixotic temper which
is the heart of chivalry and the
strength of foolishness confound-
ing wisdom. Jousting against the
windmills of ancient prejudice,
he has introduced a bill which
is to “make illegal any discrim-
ination to the detriment of any
person on the basis of colour or
race”. He does not want race or
colour to be made the excuse for
denying any man ‘“accommoda-

tion, advantages, facilities or
privileges”. He has in mind
particularly owners, managers,

agents and employees of hotels,
boarding houses and places of
entertainment. They would be
liable to prosecution already by
displaying a Colour Bar notice,
though the penalty would be no
more than £5 at the first offence
and £25 at the second.

It is to be hoped that Mr.
Sorensen cherished no undue
expectations about the pros-
pects of his bill. Even the Man-
chester Guardian could see
“almost no chance” for it, and
the Parliamentary Reports fea-
tured instead an equally
important (and possibly kindred)
bill providing for the prevention
of cruelty in pet shops.

Still, Mr. Sorensen was by no
means concerned with a matter
of merely academic _ interest.
Race discrimination is an ugly
fact in Britain to-day, and this
remnant of the slave trade has
seemed more odious and uncanny
ever since the Colonies were
granted increasing emancipation.
A melancholy picture of the
position was drawn at a confer-

ence recently organised by the
British Council of Churches to
consider the welfare of Coloured
workers in Britain, Heart-

rending instances of prejudice
were reported (including a story
about the segregation of six’
small children in a Welsh school),
and one of the delegates con-
fessed he could not but marvel
at the patience with which Col-
oured people endured provoca-
tive acts of discrimination.
The Bishop of Liverpool
that the “white problem” con-
fronted the Church with a
challenge at home every bit as
vital as the task once considered
the reserve of missionaries over-
sea. The urgency of his appeal
became evident when the sugges-
tion was put forward that
Coloured people should have their
own churches, elect their own
wardens and live in self-contained
communities. It was argued that
attempts had been made to pro-
life
it:

felt

duce a combined community
had come

experiment had
the evangel-

nothing of

the

but
actually
merely jeopardised
istic work among the white
parishioners! However, the idea
ran into staunch opposition which

would .\haye nothing to do with

Britai
this, “our own brand of Apart-
heid”’.

In fact there was a_ strong,
almost zealous desire to discount
all barriers of race, and one social
worker among the Coloured in
London’s East End, a_ priest,
went so far as to declare that it
would be all to the good if in a
generation or two the British
people’s skin were noticeably to
change from “white” (so called)
to varying shades of brown! He
made the widely noted proposal
not only that married men from
the Colonies be allowed to bring
their wives with them, but also
that a carefully selected number
of coloured women be brought to
England to save the menfoll
from the fate which too often
befalls them, of meeting no
women other than outcasts from
English society.

Competent planning might
wer help to bring some
relief into the affairs of the Col-
oured in Britain. The issue was
recently broached from an
economical angle. Mr, L. N.
Constantine, the famous cricketer
and conscientious champion of his
people, drew attention to the odd
contrast between the ove
lation in some _ Coloni and
Britain’s shortage of workers
which is being made acute by the
expanding rearmament. He said
that the People’s National Party,
Jamaica, was willing to send
20,000 workers if there were
evidence that they were really
needed. No doubt many of the
50,000 coloured folk in Britain
are not far wrong in their sus-
picion that only prejudice keeps
them out of useful employment,
though some perhaps do _ not
always sufficiently realise that
quite frequently rather more
qualifications are required than
merely being a British subject.

It is possible’ that accurate
information and careful selection,
mainly in Afriea and the West
Indies, would forestall at least
some disappointments. At the
same time, British industry is not
entirely a closed shop to
Colonials, Craven Brothers, one of
the largest engineering firms,
have offered tens of thousands of
vacancies for unskilled workers
who gradually would gain the
experience which Africans feel
they can obtain only in Britain
if West Africa, for example, is
to be rapidly and efficientiy
industrialised.

Yet even the best of good will
is occasionally thwarted by un-
foreseen difficulties. Because its
allocation under the Foreign Office
estimates was reduced to £1,862,-
000 (which is £364,000 less than
last the British Council has
been forced to close its hostel
for oversea (mainly African)
students in Manchester and Leeds

¢

year),

Public concern was keen and ob-
viously sincere. For not only did
those students lose an opportunity
of enjoying international fellow-
ship, but, as the Manchester
Guardian pointed out, “young
men who may rise to be leaders
of their countries and whose
friendship we should seek to win
and hold, may now be exposed
again to discourtesies and diffi-
culties which may sour their
memories of Britain and incline
their ears to those who revile us.”

Communists naturally take an
eager interest in them, and Mr.
Kwameh Nkrumar, for example,
was given a full measure of atten-
tion. But they do not have a clear
field. Their rivals also are active.
The British Council admittedly
must needs practise a precarious
economy, though its responsibility
to find accommodation for all Colo-
nial students of course remains,
Useful work is being done, under
its guidance by a number of volun.
tary societies (e.g. the East and
West Friendship Council, the
Victoria League) which seek to
assure the coloured man of hos-
pitality and friendship in British
homes,

Great and active interest too is
shown by the churches. The
British Council of Churches is
constantly reminding its constit-
uents of their duty. The Church
of Scotland, the Methodist Miss-
ionary Society and the Church
sMissionary Society each have
full-time officers whose sole task
is the care of visitors as well as
residents, particularly students,
from Africa, Asia and the Middle
East. The Methodists actually
Opened an International House jn
London and in doing so avowed
their pride of being “in the van
of a great social movement whicn
by smashing the colour bar here

can provide the justification for
protests against its existence
elsewhere,”

The difficulties of course are

formidable, and the great move.
ment does not always advance.
But the gallant action, however
forlorn, of the Socialist Member
of Parliament who seeks to stamp
out the injustice of racial dis-
crimination, bears the sure promise
that the British struggle against
bigotry will not abate. It was
perhaps more than a coincidence
that about the same time a Con-
servative Member pleaded for a
“Council of Empire” to proclaim
the incorruptible truth that “there
are no colour bars and the King
has no first-class and second-class

subjects,” for, he said and no
Britisher will lightly disagree, “if
we have not the courage or the
inspiration to do something on
these lines, we shall find ourselves
fighting a series of rearguard
ictions which will ultimately re-
Sult in the Union Jack being

pulled down all over the world.”

is urgently called/ ee a traditional product like oatmeal and a

tc;

Charter! plan is next reviewed there will be a further
whose anniversary was celebrated!enlargement of the quotas themselves.




















© tome





Trade With
Canada

By KENNETH WILSON
(in a CBC Eroadcast)

THE Right Honourable C. D. Howe, Can-
ada’s Minister of Trade and Commerce when
he announced the new B.W.I. Trade Liberal-
ization plan said: “The way has been opened,
but energetic sales efforts by Canadian ex-
porters will still be required to insure that

full advantage is taken of the opportunities
provided.” Since this statement was made,

the original list of goods covered by the Lib-
eralization Plan has been extended in one or
two respects because of items added by the
United States and which were not on the
original Canadian list. The most important
items are in the textile field—rayons, dresses,
shirts, and so forth. However, Canadians are
still very disappointed that the list doesn’t
jyet include hosiery. We’re almost certain to
'press for inclusion of that item when the list
is reviewed at midyear. We’d also like to

very important item like machinery included.

No doubt merchants and importers in the

strong hopes expressed here that when the

The reasoning and justification for this ap-
proach by Canada is well supported by the
trend of trade figures during 1950.

New twelve-month figures of Canadian
trade with the B.W.I. show that whereas our
purchases from you reached a new record
otal of $67 and a half million, the pre-

vious record was in 1949 when our imports
reached $62 million.

But at the very time when Canadian dollars
for your sugar and others goods was reaching
this all-time record figure, there was a drop of
> less than 30 per cent. in the dollar value of
vur sales in your market. According to our
new official 1950 trade statistics, our exports
to the British West Indies last year dropped
to $30,600,000. This compares with $43 million
in 1949. In dollar total, this is the smallest
volume of export trade which Canada has
enjoyed with the colonies since 1940.

And the comparison is even more striking
when allowance is made for the changes in
prices which have taken place in recent years.

To make a detailed price adjustment for
every commodity which enters into this im-
portant B.W.I.-Canada trade would be a
lengthy and difficult study.

But because sugar and flour dominate much
of our trade, the compilation is made consid-
erably easier. What’s been done therefore is
to make an exact price adjustment for flour
and sugar and to adjust the balance of our
trade in line with the general trend of prices
since 1938.

Using this plan I find that the actual vol-
ume of Canadian exports to the B.W.I. in 1950
was 5 per cent less than in the year 1938. It
was less than one quarter of the volume of
our trade in the peak years after the war. It
My one third below the export volume of

Having said this you will no doubt be in-
terested to know what has happened to trade
volume in Canadian import of your goods.
Here again the results are very striking. I
find that even after allowance for price
changes there was an actual increase of 8
per cent. in our purchases from you during
1950 as compared with 1949. Also that the
present real level of these purchases is still
at the highest point in history, a point about
27 per cent higher than 1938.

I must apologize for so many figures but
the basic and important point which they
substantiate is very clear. Namely, that
Canada’s very substantial and increasing
purchases of British West Indian goods, at
a time when we are being forced to sharply
curtail our sales to you, have indeed earned
the right to have this problem considered in
1951 on the basis of our mutuai trade in-
terests as merchants and customers. Rather
than through the arbitrary straight-jacket
of the dollar-gap crisis which so dominated
our trade climate a few years ago.

I think this approach is very convincing-
ly put forward in the new series of govern-
ment advertisements which were referred to
by Mr. Howe and Mr. Senator MacKinnon
earlier in this broadcast. The simple message
in one of these advertisements is found in

Let me read you one or two sentences:

“Because Canada is purchasing an in-
creasingly large amount of British goods
and services, it is possible now. under the
B.W.I. Liberalization Plan, to import many
items from Canada which you haven't
seen in quantity for many a long day.”

The advertisement continues:

“Pleasant. news for you—and for us. A
return to more normal trade with Canada
should be as natural to you as breathing.
After all, we are traditional trading neigh-
bours, Canadian East Coast fishing. craft
were a familiar sight in your ports nearly
200 years ago, They brought in dried fish
and took out cargoes of sugar, molasses,
rum. And, as sister nations in the British
Commonwealth, we have many mutual in-
terests.”

“So, now that broader trade for better
living is possible again we suggest that,
as of yore, you make Canada your first
source of supply—your first port of call.”
I know that with the new demand for

arms and weapons, the problem of supply
is again going to loom very large in all trads
calculations.

But I think this makes it all the more im-
portant that there be a broad and sympathetic
understanding on both sides and that the
broad purposes of this new and hopeful plan
for trade expansion between our two tradi-
tional trading areas be expanded as far and
as rapidly as possible.

the caption “Broader Trade—Better :

}
|

PRACTICA

SPANISH

WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 1951 4

GRAMMAR

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. Advocate Stationery

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“Cuke Will Speak For Our Sugar”



@ From page 1

we require. I think that this is
a matter that should be taken up
very strongly with the gentlemen
that are coming here.

“I do not intend to delay hon,
members, but this matter is so
important that I considered 1
should draw it to the attention
of hon. members and particular-
ly the hon. senior member for
St. Joseph.

Mr. E, D. Mottley (E) second-
ed the motion for the adjourn-
ment. He was very pleased, he
said, that the hon. member had
taken the opportunity to bring
the matter to the attention of the
House on the eve of the arrival
of the Mission. It was a matter
of paramount importance, and
when one said so he was not
overstating the case.

There must have been some
feeling of anxiety during the past
jew weeks — anxiety especially
among responsible people in the
community, when there appeared
in the Press that shortly negotia-
tions would be carr’ed on between
the U.K., Canada and Cuba as
regards the purchase of sugar.
Hon. members would recall that
he had raised the matter in the
House and as a result an Address
had been presented to the Head
of the Administration in connec-
tion with it.

He had ho doubt that even
before the passing of the Address
a wide-awake Government would
have taken the matter up in the
right quarter. But as in most cases
of this sort, whenever it was
possible to hear the voice of the
people through their representa-
tives in the Chamber, some good
could always be done.

He was not versed in the eco-
nomic set-up or trade set-up in

this colony, but he was sufficiently

acquainted with conditions to
know that sugar was the only
staple product in the island, and
any negotiations which were
being carried on between the
U.K., Canada and any other com-
peting country, would create a
great hardship on the West Indies.
Any hardship therefore that was
created with respect to this com-
modity must inevitably be reflect-
ed in the standard of living of the
people, Not only the agricultural
labourer but every other worker
as well.

Hon, members were aware that
responsible persons would dread
competition between Cuba and the
West Indies where sugar was con-
cerned,

There had been so many com-
mitteés and commissions in this
colony during recent times, said
Mr. Mottley, that it made it diffi-
cult for one to be able to digest
all that they had been doing. He
was strongly suggesting to hon.
members, however, to join them-
selves together whatever might be
their political ideologies, to face
the present issue. It was an issue
that they must attack as one body.
It had to do with the lifeblood of
the West Indies and more so Bar-
bados,

He agreed with the Leader of
the Ofposition, it was a matter
that concerned everyone. One did
not have to be a son of a planter
or to be employed in the commer.
cial trade. All one had to do wes
to be interested in the welfare
and well-being of his community,
to know that any agreement
which must affect the agreement
the West Indies had put up must
in one way or another affect the
life of the people of the area.

He had observed from the re-
port which he had read in the
Press, that this Mission would be
having a discussion with the
Executive Council of Jamaica. No
doubt they would be doing the
same thing here, but it was also
reported that they would try to
get the expressions of opinions
from all interested parties ‘n
Barbados. “Let me say here and
now that any Mission, Committee
or otherwise, who come to Bar-
bados to make an inquiry and do
not also get the views of the Op-
position in this Chamber will not
be getting a true picture of the
state of affairs’’.

He was throwing out the sug-
gestion that in another few days

if possible a very important
matter was going to be discussed
in the House.. It was a Bill and
was in the name of the Leader of
the House. It was a Bill to ex-
tend the powers of the Governor
ef this colony relative to imports
and exports.

He was truly worried about
the present situation and he hoped
that every opportunity would be
given to make representations to
these officials from the Colonial
Office.

Mr. A. E. S. Lewis (L) said that
he was very pleased that the
junior member for St. James had
drawn attention to that matter.
He was not in his place to hear
the argument by the honourable
inember, but he knew that a cou-
ple of weeks ago, the House had
sent a protest against the negotia-
tions between the United Kingdom
and Cuba, Now, honourable mem-
bers had read in a paper that
someone was coming down here
i discuss the matter.

He said that the House had al-
ready sent an Address to the Gov-
ernor, tu be transmitted to London
in respect to the matter, but what
about tne House of Assembly?
Why was not the House of Assem-
bly told that this gentleman was
coming to this island?

The House sent a Message to the
Governor to be transmitted to the
Colonial Office, protesting against
this sugar pact. Now they were
hearing of a Regional Economic
Conference and he was not even
sure that the people of the colony
would be properly represented at
the Conference.

He said that the House should
have received a letter saying that
Mr. Bottomley was coming tc
Barbados to explain the position
in regard to sugar, and the House
could have sent back a message,

such as; exchange, controls,

American dollars and Canadian}

dollars etc.

For the last year or so, they had’

talked about sugar negotiations
between Great Britain and the
West Indies and to get up there

then and say that sugar was their,

only mainstay meant nothing.

They should instruct the senior’

member for St. Joseph as to what
he could do as the member repre-
senting them at this Regional
Economic Conference, but he did
not see why the House should say
that the Sugar Producers should
meet those people when the House
had not even been told that Mr.
Bottomley was to discuss the
matter.

Mr. Adams (L) said that ac—
cording to some information he
had got, Mr. Bottomley never
intended coming to Barbados,
Trinidad or elsewhere other than
Jamaica, Jamaica had cause for
grievances over and above the
rest of the West Indies.

Mr. Bottomley had been request-
ed, inasmuch as he was in the
area, to come here and hear theic
views. He had assented.

After speaking of the represen-
tation that Barbados would get,
Mr, Adams said that he agreed
that they should put their case
strongly. Do not let them fool
themselves however. If the Colon-
ial Office said that they could only
spend $10 they had got to spend
$10. What they had got to do was
to put up a first-class case to
them and show them why they
should release more dollars.

A question was asked in the
House sometime ago about dollar
allocations and dollar earnings,
but some colony had spoken about
more dollar allocations and it had
been shown that they were spend-
ing more dollars than they earned,
All those things had to be exam-
ined in the light that they were
all part of the sterling area.

“Let us say: ‘treat us better,’ but
do not let us fool ourselves and say
we must be our own representa-
vives at a conference say at
Ottawa or elsewhere. We are
not a sovereign country.” End-
ing his speech, Mr. Adams again
assured the House that the case
of Barbados will be well put to
the Mission.

Mr. F. C. Goddard (E) said that
he rose to correct one statement
and that was that the commercial
community in the West Indies
were not as anxious to do busi-—
ness with Canada as they had



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saying that they would like this tcommodities like potatoes,
cial to discuss economic matters; etc.

been making it out to be. That

was absolutely untrue.

fhe commercial community in
Barbados — and he spoke with
some authority — had always

been most anxious to keep trade
relations with Canada open, It
was only in the case of the
restrictions of dollars that their
trade from year to year had got
less and less. It was causing
them great concern because they
saw what the future was holding
in store for them.

Canadians were fed up and
were mad about it. They were
not blaming the people in the

West Indies, but were blaming
fhe Colonial Office, the British
Government and the British

Treasury for withholding those
dollars they were earning.

“I have seen some _ figures
recently which show that our
dollar earnings in Canada are
in the vicinity of $60,000,000 and
we are purchasing $24,000,000
from that source” Mr, Goddard
said and added that there was a
great disparity.

As the senior member for St.
Joseph rightly said, they were
in the sterling block, but geo-
graphically, they were in the dol-
lar area and were surrounded by
countries dealing with dollars.
As they had always drawn their
essential stuff from Canada and
the United States, that was one
reason why the cost of living
bore greatly on them that day.

They had to go abroad into
further markets and were finding
greater credit troubles on their
doorsteps. He had spoken on that
many times in the House and the
one answer to that was: “give us
more dollars”.

He said that they could land
onions
at greatly reduced prices,
* and he was only touching on
that sphere of the debate.

They were not divided in the
House as regards their problem
of sugar. They were giving
Great Britain their sugar at a
reasonable price with the hope
that she would continue, not only
to buy to-day or tomorrow, but
for a long time to come, every
ton that they could produce and
he hoped that Mr. Bottomley and
all the officials who came here,
‘would be told that in no uncer-
tain terms.

Mr. H. A. Dowding (E) felt
that the senior member for St.
Joseph was much too peacefui
when it came to dealing with
United Kingdom officials.

On this matter of sugar he said,
depended the life of every mem-
ber of the community, It was
therefore their duty to put up
united effort with regard to the
sale of their sugar.

He said that the House should
have been informed that thi:
U.K, official was coming to Bar—
bados as they had a right to that
courtesy. He did not know exact-
ly what the preliminary negotia-
tions were with regard to Mr
Bottomley and his senior officiais
from the Colonial Office. He how-
ever hoped that the senior mem-—
ber for St. Joseph would not be
too peaceful with them when it
came to discussing sugar, but
would deal with them very firm—

ly. + we
Jamaica was a large island
which had an easy jump to

America, it had its cigars besides
other resources, but Barbados only
had sugar and must therefore be
more important economically
when it came to that commodity.

For this pact to have been ne
gotiated without any information
being given to the House of As-
sembly was a reason why they
should voice their opinions, and
not lightly. In a matter of that
sort, they as members of the
House should be considered,

They knew that the — senior
member for St. Joseph would put
their case strongly as well as the
Hon'ble Mr, Cuke, but they were
not representatives of the constitu-
ents of this island and they should
have been notified and taken into
consideration with regard to any
other matter.

Mr. D. D. Garner (C) said he
believed that Mr. Bottomley
was coming out here to white

wash matters now that they had
settled everything already. He





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ADVOCATE

HOUSE PASS

$9,716

FOR FLOOD VICTIMS

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday passed a Res-
olution for $9,716 to pay claims in connection with flood

damage of two years ago.

Addendum to the
states that under the provisions of
Resolutions 44 and 54 of 1949, a
total of $29,049 was voted for the
purpose of relieving distress
caused by storm and flood da
during 1948 and 1949. Of this
emount $22,934 has been dis-
bursed, leaving an unexyended
balance of $6,115 which has iapsed.
In addition there is an amount of
$5,150.20 in hand from voluntary

subscriptions,
Further claims’ totalling
$14,865.60 and based on returns

from Vestries have now been ap-
proved and the amount of $9,716
is now required together with the
amount of voluntary = subscrip-
tions togpay these claims

Mr, Adams (L) moved the pass-
ing of the Resolution He said
that the Resolution, had come to
the House after a long period of
delay. The Government was al
Ways prepared to acknowledge
their faults. This, however, Mr
Adams pointed out, was because
Government had had to exanne
carefully the claims that had
been made; especially as on the
particular occasion there had been

substantial loss of life.

It was to be remembered that
the grant was an act of g¥ace.
There had been a lot of aceusa-
tions levied against Authority, not
recessarily Government, A great
Ceal of propaganda had been used
but it had become _ extremely
necessary for Government to
make 4 thorough investigation into
the claims.

“IT hope that now we have come
down to some figures, hon. mem-
bers on both sides of the House
should stop recrimination, Let me
remind hon, members that re-
crimination can be two-sided, “Of
the St. Michael Vestry, in spite
of the great number of attacks,
I intend to say nothing except
that of their original estimate of
sixty thousand odd dollars, they
themselves had cut it down to
seven thousand,”

He had no intention of criticiz-
ing anybody, but he was saying
that if they were going to start
recrimination they might con-
tinue consideration of the Reso-
lution unduly long.

Referring again to the St, Mi-
chael Vestry, Mr. Adams = said
that of the 550 parishioners for
whom claims had been made it
was discovered that many of them
were not in the flood area. It was
then suggested to the Vestry that

perhaps their estimate was on
too wide a basis. As a result the
Vestry hac appointed another

committee and tnen submitted an
estimate for $6,707. The first es-



was coming out to pacify the
people in the West Indies and
they could do nothing about it

He did not know anything
much about sugar, but he was
sure that if the pact between
Great Britain and Cuba comtin-
ued, it was certainly going to
lower the living standards of the
masses in the West Indies.

Great Britain he said, had
found itself in a precarious posi-
tion today and did not care who
got squeezed. They as members
of the House were sitting there
and allowing men from the Col-
anial Office to tell them how they
must shape their destiny.

If the people in the West Indies
were going to allow a few peo-
ple in the Colonial Office to ruin
their industries, then he would
gay that the world was coming
to an unhappy past. The trouble
was that they did not speak
strongly enough.

It was time that the Ministry
of Food and others should realise
that when they talked about
sugar, the West Indies was a unit
they must count on. If they
bought. sugar from Cuba, it must
interfere with the living stand-
ards of the West Indies

He personally felt that the
people in the West Indies had
been taken for a ride and even
now in this twentieth century,
Great Britain was still trying to
be diplomatic.

Mr, Wilkinson
his motion,

then withdrew



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e in St

Resolution timate was $69,000.

This was the first big item
Claims too came from nine other
parishes for the repair of houses,
There were also ten special cases
Michael for which a spe-
cial sum was voted and there
were one or two extra claims in
St. Michael and some _ other
parishes as well, to which it was
thought special attention should
be given. The Government still
hoped that members of the pub-
lic would, even at this late hour,
help flood victims in any way
they could. Government could
not give 100 per cent
Government could only in the
ease of big demands for big losses
give a) substantial amount, and a
less substantial amount to those
who had suffered less. When i!
came to people losing everything
like their clothes, furniture, etc.,
then Government had to do what
they had done at the Pine—a new
house and $120 in furniture.

Mr. Adams ending his speech
told members that they would
see from the Addendum how the
Resolution was made up. He
then moved that the Resolution
be passed.

Dr. H. G. Cummins seconded

Mr. Mottley (E) seid that Gov-
ernment had taken over 11 months
to bring down the resolution, “He
who gives quickly, gives twice,”
he said,

He was going to be reasonable
and fair in making his criticisms,
He was bound to criticise the Gov-
ernment on that matter, He was
not going to sit and allow it to be
said that the Si. Michael’s Vestry
amended their clare from
$69,000 to over $6,000 all of a sud-
den.

Mr, Adams replied and said
that he had pointed out that the
Government had suggested to the
St. Michael's Vestry that the basis
on which they had made their
claims was too wide and the esti-
mates were sent back to them.

Mr, Mottley said that when he
saw the figures from the Vestry
to the Government, he felt they
were too high. He remembered
telling one of the members of the
Government that there was no
point in sending to ask the Gov-
ernment for assistance to replace
furniture and such losses through
the flood water,

He wanted it to be known that it
was the Government who had sug-
gested to the Vestry of St, Michael
that their scope was too wide.

Mr. Mottley said that it was
true that the Government was
quite in order to make a thorough
investigation into the matter, but
it was inhuman for it to take two
years to make the investigations
with poor people suffering all the
while,

He said that the Government
had picked out certain people for
relief out of the 550 names sub-
mitted. In some cases, people
were helped that were not at all
in the flood area,

Mr. Adams, replying, said that
it was cishonest of the Hon, senior
member for the City to make that
accusation, He did not know, he
said, of anybody outside the flood
area getting help.

Mr. Mottley said that he wanted
to make it clear that the Hon.
senior member for St. Joseph had
nothing to do with it, He, how-
ever, knew that of the 550 claims
submitted, 11 persons had been
picked out by Government from
districts which were far removed
from the flood area,

If one would examine carefully
what had happened in the flood
area, he would find out that those
people who did not follow the
Labour Party, were left out while
others, that were not in the area,
were picked out and given assist-
ance, The actual figures on which
the Government was now working,
were in their hands long ago, Mr.
Mottley said,

Mr, Adams said that Govern-
ment had dealt with those per-
rons of greatest necessity imme
diately.

The Hon, Senior member for
the City had spoken as if the Gov-|
ernment had gone out and picked |
out houses. Ten houses, the list)
of which the Vestry of St, Michae |









rad checked back at the Govern.
ment, had been signed by the
Churehwarden and the Calonial
Engineer. “This is how the Gov-
ernment got the list; every. singld
list that has been acted upon,
came from the Churchwarden of
the particular parish,” he said.

Mr. Mottley said that it was un-
true to say that the ten houses
were selected by the Church-
warden, “It is a calculated wicked
lie when he said that the Church-
warden of St. Michael picked out
ten houses,” he said.

The real sufferers from the
flood waters were still suffering
and quicker relief would have been
brought about by a_ far-sighted
policy.

Mr. L. E. R. Gill said that he
was grateful to Government for
its attempt, although somewha'
belated, to assist those ee
who had suffered great loss as
result of the calamity which ha ud
befallen them in 1949. He
gretted that the list of persons eo
receive assistance and the amount
of assistance to be given, had not



been circulated, Had that been
done, Hon. members would have
readily seen that the amounts
allotted to the individuals were
xrossly inadequate to meet their

requirements

Mr. Dowding (EB) said that h
was wondering if it were not elec-
tion year, if any such resolution

would have been brought before
the House.
In two days, he = said,

Churchwarden of St. George and
he had got out the list of all the
damaged houses of that parish, Bu
the Government with a_ large

secretariat had taken until May
1951 te get through the estimates

“There is much left to be desired

he said.

He was not going to make any
accusations. However, he thought
it a very unbusinesslike and un-
fortunate way for the Government
to have acted in a serious case
like that,

Mr. Ward (E) said that
were getting a small relief.
did not know who to blame.

In St. Lucy, there were one or
two homes which the Government
had taken no notice of. They said
that the houses were not in the
best state of repairs when the
storm came and nothing could be
given. He knew of a house owner
in that parish who was given $70
and whose house was on the
ground.

He did not feel that the Govern-
ment intended giving any money
because they felt that it was not
a real storm.

Mr. D. D. Garner (C) said that
he had hoped to see a distinct
policy of rehabilitating those per-
sons who had lost their homes
completely through the flood. He
had hoped that the Government
would have built a house for these
sufferers giving them half of the
cost and allowing them to pay the
remainder on easy terms, e was
appealing to the Government to
pursue that policy.

the
He

Delegates Arrive
For Meeting

Arriving in the island last night
by B.W.1.A. Ltd, to attend the
first meeting of the Regional
Economic Committee were the
delegates from Jamaica and
Trinidad, The delegates are Hon,
D. B. Sangster, Hon. R. L. M
Kirkwood, Messrs, D, Levy, J. B
Clegg and E. A, Maynier of Jamai

ca, Hon. A. Gomes, Hon. A. W
Kobertson, Hon. H, E. Robinson,
Hon. A. Storey, Mess AST



Shill and R, Pringle of Trinidad

Also arriving by the same op-
portunity was Mr. Heetor Bernard
cf the Daily Gleaner Jamaica, who
is here to cover the meeting for his
paper.

The Regional Economie Com-
mittee meeting will be opened by
Sir George Seel at Hastings House
at 10 a.m, today,

Leaving the island for Trinidad
by the sarne plane w Mr, E. L
Cozier, Acting Information Officer
of the Caribbeaa Commission, who
v attending Caribbean Com-
mission Talks which ended at
Hastings House last week.

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Small Bots... $1.56
RESERVA WINE

Large Bots. .. $2.38

CRAWFORDS CLUE
CHEESE BISCUITS
Tin ..ccseeoeee $1.26

PEEK FREANS
BISCUITS in Tins
OLIVE OIL—in Tins

CHEF SAUCE.
in bots. ........ 38
Rich & appetising

“BLACKBUCK”
SAUCES—Bats. 24

FOR GOOD VALUE

INCE & Co., Ltd.

6, 7, 8 & 9 Roebuck Street.
Dial 2236



D WIDE

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ATTRACTIVE |

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ny



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65
Ary ree | a
BS el COLOURS

OF

WAIT, FRIEND...! DO UM THE GAS COMPANY MAN! T

YOU HAPPEN TO HAVE Ov? CAME HERE TO FIX THE METER
A SANDWICH ON VOU? t FIVE DAYS AGO AND 1 HAVEN'T
TM STARVING ! BEEN ABLE TO FIND MY WAY OUT

USE





THE VERY BEST IN: PAINT

OBTAINABLE ATF ALL LEADING
HARDWARE STORES






















































SLONDIE. ) as BY CHIC YOUNG IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
ear ~ eo or (Sem Te —aresienenesetaitianiliaatiitiaaiatilailii iii ciaiaiaias
| f Ba | | L\/\t =m ie aa REY TT a : ===
Kook |< Lt Naat On, REALLY) [Bg —~—— MI SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only
I war x) a ( QUT SPARERIBS ) A ghee is WAITRESS AT ort, re : Peay | i ee ) rg pat aie Aarne ee
Fee roe 74 09, NG “fe OUNTER, er te MY LUNCH USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
ri Toman fr 9 TT ~~ Fong I rig BROWN & POLSON Lageia
“ | wali an Corn Flour. Pkgs. 37 32 Rolled Oats, Tins 55 A8
: | y H : V S l d Ti 55 AB HEINZ
et ee et Tomato Soup, Tins 34 29
Chum Salmon, Tins (Talls) 66 62 Grapefruit Juice, Tins 24 21

TUAATTRTT

LET ME HAVE
De \ YOUR NEWSPAPER
v2 A MOMENT, DE
Wea

XI. THINK

(HAS THE RIGHT TO SEE

On HUSBAND'S FACE











HEY! WHY ARE
YOU CUTTING THAT
BIG HOLE IN MY

Ro NEWSPAPER? J]






AT THE BREAKFAST



———— ———— S
aS —— ——



—







Ee
oP EY, Soap
THE WHOLE FAMILY

@ LEAVES BODY FRESH,
SWEET — HEALTHFULLY CLEAN

@ MORE LASTING PROTECTION
@ NO TELL-TALE ODOR

TT
i at 7 aT r
HINDOVAH 99148 e WOSSOTH NAANTT e aIHLVAT ‘TW WT
. ~—e gs








Y KERE COMES PETE WITH A GET YOUR GUNS ON THOSE TWO! JES pn aeaeee sal |
YS. B ee ciamannenaiae - y Pi Zeciriy y :
x PF Po spoccm «DELIVER IN STYLE Ovaltine

ats good for business
fet

RIP KIRBY

\ WHITEY, WE'RE
\. RicH ! / ab cess
~~ as MR.SEVEN..
“ime | PLEASE...MR.
Rw 4 SEVEN...

~~

4 O hic: SOX, wHiTEy, YOUR GuN'S
YOU PROMISED a \e ‘
TO TAKE CARE OF aca oes et a




4. IT

UP AGAINST THE
—, WALL!



helping to
energy, delicious ‘Ovaltine’ will
give you the zest to carry on your
work cheerfully and efficiently.

a

revive flagging



3tyled like a car, powered with For the first time
ALL 10 FEATURES IN ONE VEHICLE

a rugged, dependable engine, 4% All-steel, car-type safety cab

the COWLEY VAN will speed |X oritn bar independeat front wheel




‘Ovaltine’ provides elements, includ-
ing vitamins, of the highest nutritive
value derived from Nature's finest
foods. The famous ‘Ovaltine’ Farms
were established to set the highest
standards of quality for the malt,
milk and eggs used.

up your deliveries and bring *} i gearbox, with steering
c rs t

wheel arches to



| extra prestige to your business, J * B«

® ve controllable
New features have been included
rs with renewable



oF se
b * Cc ted 20)
which mean lower running cost, hardwood runners.

THE PHANTOM
a 3 tii
PULLIN A RODON ME, DAVE)

PALMER? YOU OUGHTA ra!
KNOW BETTERN ' Ee

THAT! al ..33 =
+ ee,

% Hypoid rear axle for silence and long
life.

longer trouble-free life, more de Bumpers front and reer.
% Van doors and pick-up tailboard

UNCLE DAVE (INSISTED ON GOING | J : : ‘an de
| profitable operation for you. dimpled for extra streng

TO THOSE GANGSTERS ALONE? |
HOPE NOTHING++ THERES THE BELL?
THATS HiM NOW! THANK GOODNESS

Because of its outstanding nutritive
qualities ‘Ovaltine’ is ideal for every
member of the family, at any time
of the day. As a bedtime beverage,
too, it is everywhere acknowledged
as a reliable aid to sound, natural,
restorative sleep.





_ COWLEY. VAN
Se PICK-UP






Sold in airtight tins by all
Chemists and Stores

Quality has made Oval time
FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. | the Worlds most widely used Food Beverage
" &

| Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 | oS

A NUFFIELD PRODUCT






WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

PAGE SEVEN

os

BARBADGS ADVOCATE

| SHIPPING NOTICES





_ _—A—— ee

_ ae AL WANTED











PUBLIC SALES







| word



A ’
Ten cents per agate tine on week-aay. |
in charge week 72 cent ne
TELEPHONE 2806 po per agate line on Sundays aa : we Keret " : j Cs = “ Saas e sae he t
â„¢ nan an AF ne | 96 ce Sune 24 words wer 24
and $1.80 on fa Peer ny wife, RETA LARRIER| words 3 cents a word wel cents @

Canadian National Steams hipsl sr















































































































































































































































Relative to Carnival and Fair to
be held on 7th and 9th June at
Queen’s Park, the undersigned will
receive entries for the following:—

(a) Costume Bands
(b) Steel Bands.

(ec) Advertising Bands.
(d) Historical Bands.

In order to raise the standard of
Carnival, the Steering Committee
would appreciate the co-operation
of Firms, Clubs and Individuals
being as original as possible.

No entrance fee will be charged

More particulars latei

A Carnival Band of thirty will
Le visiting Barbados to take part
in the parade.

Closing date, 19th May.

SEYMOUR BECKLES.
c/o Vestry Clerk’s Office,
Bridgetown.

For Booths, Stalls, and side-
Shows, contact C. MORRIS,
Sobers Lane.

A Special Display will be given
by the B.L,.S. Mediterranean Fleet
under the Command of Comman
der S, Leaceck,

will be sold at my office to the highest
bidder for any sum not under the
appraised value, al) that certain piece of
Lend containing about 1,814 Square Feet







UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER



situate in Parish of Saint Michael By instructions received from the
butting and bounding on lands of The) Insurance Co., I will sell on Friday, Ma
Barbados Government Railway, on two] eth at 2 p.m. at the General Motor
sides on lands of Welches Tenantry, and | Rus Co., tl) A-40 Austin
on the Public Road at Fairfield together; Car, Damaged in accident, Terms eash

ee the Dwelling House and Shop
uildings, &c., appraised as follows:—

The whole property appraised to TWO
THOUSAND AND NINETY ONE
DOLLARS AND SEVENTY FIVE CENTS

VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer.
16.5, 51—3n

UNDER THE SILVER



(2,091.75). Attached from Sydney Roach

«nd Yvonne Burke for and towards sat-

isfaction, &c. HAMMER

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day DOGDFE TRUCKS

of purchase, We will sell on FRIDAY the 18th ot
T. T. HEADLEY, | Courtesy Garage, Whitepark Road, oné
,. ,Provost Marshal. 1944 Dodge Army Truck with Steel

Provost Marshal's Office. Platform in good order and condition

3.5.51—3n.

PUBLIC NOTICES

Tea cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.





THE AGRICULTURAL AIDS ACT, 1905
To the creditors holding specialty liens
against ee PLANTATION,

it, Thomas
TAKE NOTICE that I the owner of
the above named plantation, am about to





Executor to the Estate of the late
E, A. Crawford, we will sell the Furniture,
at “The Farm"
St. Philip, which





Sale 1 o’clock. Terms cash
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
Auctioneers

1G 5.51-—-4n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 17th by order of

Mrs

(near Six Cross Roads),
includes: Very gdod
Round



the}









Youthful Vigor Restore
In 24 Hours~\

Glands Fortified ©
by New Discovery

Do you feel old before your time? Are you tired,
run-down, worn out, end unable to keep up with the
spe ed and pleasures oi modern life? Do you suffer

vom loss of memory, nervousness, weak body, im-
pure blood? Are you worried? Do you suffer ‘trom
fear or have an inferlority complex? Do you enjoy
the society of women or do beautiful women pass
you by without a second glance? If you suffer from
these conditions, then you are the victim of weak
glands, and unless your glands are fortified and
stimulated, you can not hope to regain youthful
vigour and animation.

Vitalize Your Glands
Fo tunately for those who suffer from run-down
lan ion, & yaa jan with 30 years’ experience
as ferfaceed le, safe, and posi-ive prescrip-
tion to stimutate gland activity and thus bring a

saVi sia and he

Women
Adimnira
Vigourous










HARRISON

whieh th

obtain a loan of £2,000 under the pro-| Extension Dining Table (seat 18),









ee fl visions of the above Act, against the| Tip Top Table, Véry nice Oval Tip Top
ORIENTAL Sugar, Molasses and other crops of the] Table, Double Ends Settee, Couch,
me plantation to be Seaved in 1952, Ornament Tables, Pedesta! Sideboard
uv) R: RIO: ‘oO money has yet en borrowetl!| Lady's (antique). Vanity Table; Prie-
- ag y against the said crops. Dieu’ Chair all in very old Mahogany;
" Dated this llth day of May, 1951. Old Aurora Dinner Service, Tea Service,
New Shipment opened F. F. PILGRIM, Pictures, Glass Ware, Ornaments, Cut-
Owner. glass Bowl, Plated Ware, Silver Spoo:
THANIT’S DIAL 12.5.51—38 | Cordia Berbice Chair, Oak Settee a
3466 Chairs, Clock, Table, Waggon and Book-
THE SUGAR INDUSTRY shelf in Pine, Double Iron Bedsteads,
“= a dl = jane AGRICULTURAL BANK ACT, 1943.| Mattresses, Gld Mahog. Linen Press:







To the creditors holding specialty lens] M.T. Washstand, Chamber Ware, Bureau,

in pleasant,
taapaton let o do
is to ta . two iitte. ta Nets t bees ines
each 44 oa pre’ spripten ria work
im a stimulating the glands, in-

Visoutatine ine blood, and enlivening your |
whole body, As your ands rapidly become |
stronger, you will feel and see yourself be-
coming younger, more animated, and not
only able to keep up with your work, but

realizing the joys and pleasures of life
more frequently than ever before.

Doctor Praises Vi-Tabs
Dr. J, Rastelli, widely-known European
physician, recently stated: “Many acien-
ists are of the opinion that the true secret
of youthful vigour and vitality lies in the
lands. If we could keep our glands func-
properly, we would feel and look



in thousands of cases,
almost given up hope of ever being strong,
well, and vigorous





peor upon the gland system, the nerves,
and to build new blood and vigour, there ts
no long waiting for results Most users re-
port an astonishing improvement within
4 hours and that they feel ten years
pouaeer within one week. These results
have been accomplished time

some
again,

Results Guaranteed

So outstanding has ocen the succesd of



































AND QUEENS
Governing Bodies of Harrise
and Queen's College invite app!
vitebly qualified firma o
thelr Sehool Acc
the fee

The
‘ollege
ations
yersons to

Applicants

from
audit
should

unt
Zo



etate



For Mirth, Mepesage Engagement death ates he a : Saipteladnetancin
cements eR i. Calling the FOR SALE R a sa kame ‘ deb noi ame TR hee |
ry $3.00 for any number of words sebtin! h EAL ESTATE SOUTBSOUND te a ¥ der signed by me
60 and 6 cents pe- word for e say Charge wok TB clmts asec | wcrc ; Srila | Setie Arrivea Sails CITZGERALD LARPIF) CONFIDENTIAL PRIVATE BECRE e n nu es
itional word. Terms cash. Phone 2500 Baise Six 4 ee wer |. By public competition at our office! yABY NELSON Heit aw Bortor Barbados Satbados | .. Rices, St. Philip TARY — English, experienced shorthan
between 8.30 and 4 p.m,, 3113 for Death wad ‘nee week—4 cents a/ James Street on Frida ¥ 25th May 1951.) Gan CAUISER is M : lay WS 2. ] typist requires employment f¢ © c Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny seams
Notices only after 4 p.m. daw gt 2 p.m. 1 rood 14 perches of land :1 | CAN. CHALLE GER aS ‘ay » 7 Wea ee — «| two days a week, own typewriter and pores where germs hide and cause ter-
Upper Carlton. St. James, the proper | LADY RODNEY ‘ = M % td ss e: 3 The public ned t) est U.K. references, B No, A.C. Co! cible Itching, Cracking, Eczema, Peeling,
The charge for announcements cf of the Estate of the Inte William Jordan TADY NELSON pe @ ime | — 2 a Bg giving credit t ¥ wife, CYRIE Pity. | Advocate Co 0.5 51—1n.| Burning, Acne, Ringworm, Peorlasis,
Deaths, Acknow- deceased } x & July & amy 14 July S July LIPS inee Ye Dox I do vid tetra eecineeciain | Blackheads, Pimples, Foot Iteh and other
ledgments, and In’ Memoriam notices 1s AUTOMOTIVE For further particulars and conditions | /“P¥ RODNEY oat iy 9 Ave —_ ne — x Sie ee a he me] LADY for the post of Stenographer- | blemishes. Ordinary treatments give only
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays of sale, apply to | else contracting ar debt or ir ‘ Apr in writing to J. N. Har- €emporary rellef because they do not kill
for any number of words up to 50, and HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD | ne lala eR Seen name ess by a writt ovde & Co, Ltd., Alexander House, the germ canse, The new discovery, Nixo-
3 cents per word on week-days and ALMOST NEW 12 H.P. Bedford Van. 16.5 51-5 NORTHBOUN: signed by me _Street 9.5. 51— derm kills the germs in 7 minutes and is
4 cents per word on Sundays for each | Bustantes if required. Extra Masonite - a . Barbato B — beeen: deed, Gan. toe Signed MOTTLEY PHILLIPS ~— | euaranteed to give you a soft, clear, attrac-
Sn eet Prieh iss Cutt tess pat Saas pre: ‘ DWELLINGHOUSE amd Land contair-| Lapy NELSON arbados Barba on Boston St.John Halifax , | lontreal Halls Vitlage - MISCELLANEOUS tive, smooth skin in one week, oF money
’ . pre- | ing roods, 7 perches adjoining the! 7 ae : coe = BRe - St. Jame back on return of empty package. Get
sently. Apply . ie aa . LADY RODNEY > = + July — 6 ily » July
THANKS e. Property kown as “The Abbe". Chri LADY NELSON oo - an ax dhe 2 .eN GE tuaranteed Nixoderm from your chemist
Church. This property i y ie} - y 29 July Aug s 12 Aug easier aitacaiin Lea s LICENSE: One (1) 1 Licens eo S today i
CAR—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good | stonewall dwellinghouse | comprisin, | PAPY RODNEY .°26 Aug. 28 Aug Sept. @ Sept, 11 Sept Se ee noe meio eae N move the real
GREEN=We the undersigned beg through | tyres, in good workin; Spadisien, rice | living rooms, bedrooms, usual convent. | N.B LOST . Tw cause of skin
this medium to thank all those who] reasonable. Apply F, Gay, Staple | ences and belongs to Ervin Jerome Kine | \'>' pubseet to change without notice, Ail vessets Mtted witn cold storage cham " & FOUND pa -— |For Skin Trowbles trouble. 1/9
sent wreaths and gave us, their sym- | Grove, Churth. isi S207, The above property will be set up fo- | bers. Passenger Fares and freigit cates on application to: — yay |
pathy on the occasion of the death 1.5.51—t.£.n. | sale by Public Competition at our omic } —_—_— ——, —_——————_——_——_- OR REN
‘ate cs eae Miriam Green. “CAR. 198 V han 08 James Street, on Friday 18th May 1951 LOST ‘ | ae
t Green (husband) Florenza, Louise, auxhall “10°, A-1 con-|at 2 p.m | GARDINER AUSTIN & co LTD. Ba -A ai Minimum charge week 72 cente and
Naomi, Samuel, James, Claude Gieen and | dition. Recently overhauled and painted Inspection on application ta Mr. J | ” gents. eee anc 9 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24 ‘ any
Mrs’ Uada_ Downes (children), Audrey | Bob Bdghill. Hansehell, Larsen “& Co. | Grimmth the ferret. Reet a te nin ah go WPPRSTAKE TICKET BOOKS - | words 4 cents @ word week—4 Cente a N CONSTIPATION Ny
Osborne "Sister, U.S.A.) and Evelyn ene “S01. 16.5.51—-an YEARWOOD & , | erit 0040 to 49 Series U.8790 to] word Sundays. bec
OYCE 8 neer please tetut 7
(friend. 16.$.51—1n Pl chit css B f er please ret to the Ac sat nceticliniaplidimaaigheen ot ' Pays
= TRICK, one Beira Tage fmm HARRISO! Go nd ae" NG | AFTER YEARS OF MiSEI
IN’ MEMORIAM good working order. Apply to 8. seaty | 1° St" HOUSES ASER
anager of Belmont Funeral Establish- | HOUSE. A Choliel Tlemee cnoeoon ‘LDUNE “att! “ tal n
s Chattel House, comprisin CULDUNE Cattlewath, Bathsheba For years ] had heen talting many
GRERN—n._Joviig._ memory of May cneay teat ne: f eereen Rrepiwaite, se i8.x 10, one 17 x. 10 and Shedves e PU LIC NOTICES c SSELIC NOTIC Es For June, October and December 1951.| kinds of laxatives. ‘Chen i ed
Elizabeth Green, died May 15th 1945 n | attached, with outer offices. To be Containing 4 bedroon Fully furnished . t rly % .
—aa ne’ i > LL-BRAN [lt nol o
Memory Verse: 1 Thes. 4. 13 on the spot at Alleyne’s Land, Ist Avenue OUTWARD FROM TH UN KIN ———— | including refrigerator, + ing wate . stiy Cerne >
But 1 would not have you to be POULTRY Bush Hall, at 2 p.m. on the 18th May | M & ITED GDOM eae | all ‘bedrooms. Photic 8910. M Stuart | regular 1 realty ,
ignorant, brethren, concerning them —._. | 1951. Phone 4523. 12.5.5%—-3. | Re Estate of Bynoe 13.5. 51—3n | enjoy itevery } \
which are asleep, that ye sorrow not, CHICKS—White ana Black Giants. |——=2HH——__! Due WHILLEMINA AUGUSTA BUSHEL! nanan —— —~lday Rudy BR. I j
even as others which have no hope. | Rhode Islands, Plymouth Rocks, New, |, /4ND — 8—10 acres of land suitable | Vessel From Leaves Barbados } (Deceased) CARLDIEN—On the sea, Gt, Lawrence Adler, 1410 20thSt., | ;
For if we believe that Jesus died and Hampshire and R.O.P. White Leghorns or building, in lots of not less thar S.s. “PLANTER” I v. Mas , NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Gap. Ful furnished from Jul on= | nga, Po ae h. Fis ' j
rose again, even so them also that| ffom U.S.A. Gordon Matthews. Glen. | 10:00 8. {t. Overlooking a large area | S'S" “LINGUIS*” ondon May 16th May ous having any debt or claime| Apply Miss. K. Hunte—Bratton, Max-| Miami Beach, fle | {
sleep in Jesus—will God bring with | Ur, Constitution Road. of St. Philip and Christ Chureh, Mag- ava ST London h Ma 7th June against the Estate of Whilleminag A.} Well Coast, Dial 8967 One of any } :
him 16.8.81 Elijah, Siviuiel (ona); May. hate. ve to Crane Coas alking distances | S.S. “TRIBESMAN” London M 9th June | . spore in the parish of St. George} ~~ 4 ie ae . ALL-BRAN users }
Muriel, Allazena (Daughters); Lambert, , POULTRY: Parks breed, Pure tired, | Telephone, ‘Electric ‘Tiere pass the ares, | 9: “TRADER” Glasgow & | on the a8th day “of Decrnnsy Tose aval 3 iehed THAIRO ae. Bi ods tae SOG; TOO, they nx.
Clarice, Alfred, Bruce, Edward, rr ‘ocks Chicks 5, 6 and 7 -p8t , s ee ae Saamt wens ac srcorme |
Jean, Joan, Angelia (Grand Childeen) ne 1 oes aoe to A. Forde, Soness in sake Sy ‘Phone bie a meee oe I iver Peat eae om | ima ait y attested! iB the ators iene uae). savaries M ag pte ape Satie hs ecitisiation a }
16 5 51—1n. t pposite ipe. 16.5. 51- . 29.4.51—9n — —_— an —_—_ ——— Gertrude Sobnell of C ors: isual convenience 0 pets or ¢ a ae constipation 16 60 1a0r :
divinihitndanessinelscsiiens slimeaanes. 4. F } I jarden —Land,| Dial 2636 13.5. 51-24 tk it How this ¢ +
RADIO—One Philip Radio (9 tubes’ in| SUITABLE BUILDING SITB: slueica HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM | Country Road, St. Michael, on or before | —. 3.6.51--2 = z y vu fol . - t : - o. a
“= 4 $ situated » Wh day of July, 195 * . " hid an oun abo: , eur oF wepy
refused, Agpiy” i 2 tan he tip s “fr land aaa see Ch. Area 10,978 Vessel For Closes in Barbados | I shall proceed i distrioute tee panda i Exwrenee. Gab nesitabhe ibe Kellogg's BRAN daily, dr
. , 5 y to y visle wards le ind, a A sq: ft, road. Dial assets of the deceased among the ‘ z ; 4 ant % m Jen
Cyo Ince & Co. ais Se ete jong the partios only ym May Ist onward, Apply | plenty of er! If not complet
um fism Co. 16.5.51—2n } 2206 Day and 3465 Night. 3.5.51-t.f.n S.S. “SPECIALIST” 2 ee ith May | enutled thereto, having” Fegard only. to | on preinises or Phone 8240 'hS-S1—ten | gat shed after lOdavs, returmerMpty
claims « vich T shall then have es naan ;
LIVESTOCK The Property known as “The! Abbey" I had notice and I will not be liable for ROOM AND BOARD ’ 7 n tO Kellogg Co, of
Christ Church. This property comprises | =—————___——_--—— - mF ssets or any i 1
| or ; part thereot ao dis-/ couple or Bachelors. Excellent food. | AygatBriteia Ltd sta
fn ou: leép p Cate: Half Bred Holstem. Sire pure Scena eee tee 8 acres, . had For further information apply te o- r. a ", 7 oe of whose debt} On sea. Apply; Casuarina Residentia SR EETA mryes
“ red Holstein. Mother giving 32 pints a pelongs to Mr | claim sha not then have had | Che. Maxwell Coast Road, Te ‘ TOUBLE TOUR ME sACK
milk. Rex Dai Renry H,. D. King. The above propert: | notice 1 1
wi Pains i Joints are swollen, " ry Farm 3009 16.5.51—1n, | Will be set up for Sale by Public Com. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.— —Agente | And al persons indebted to the said —_$______—
shows yest CI DORIA fo sh a scereistn dame R toy Ua rte 1981, at at Sue Office on Friday 18th Ma MONTREAL, AUSTRA!. iA, NEW estate. are requested to settle their
faulty Kidneysnction. MISC a p.m é | debtedness without dela;
Sir eee ea ELULANEOUS ___|,, Fo ,inpection copy Mr. H. v. D.| ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED | | "ackintoe Gaageenk: 20
ing Joints and Limbs, sciatic, ANTIQUE CAMEO brooch in original YEARWOOD & BOYCE (M.A.N.Z, LINE) | I. Qualified executrix of the
\ Op Nights: Oinsincas Name | ANC, Hold _ setting $50. GORRINGES Solicitors. M.S, “TONGARIRO” sailed Brishane| | Whitlemina Augusta Bushelt, ide
susness, Circles under ives, Burning, Itching QUE SHOP. Upper Bay Street 11.5.51—tn March 24th, Arriving at Barbados Muy | 1.5.6
Pe Loss of Appetite and Fre- In, Seana || ist, ; ~ » san . a Ma
quent’ Headounas “GON Collet ere Grimes, | 200| Shares CENTRAL FOUNDRY|_ 8.S. “ARABIA” is scheduled to svi! | Cie Gle Transatlantique [IN THR MATTER OF THE COMPANIES, a
nedicines can't help much because you must | ANTIQUES — Of every description. | LIMITED from Hobart, 12th May, Adelaide 2 a ACT 1010
tet to the root cause of the trouble. Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver] 50 Shares BARBADOS SHIPPING AND | May, Melbourne 6th June, Bri ut and :
The Cystex treatment ts specially compounded Water-colours, Early books, Maps,| TRADING CO. LIMITED 16th June, Sydney 23rd June, arriving | Ne [IN THE MATTER OF WEST INDIAN
soothe, tone and clean raw, sore, sic ineys utographs etc., at Gorringes Antique} 41 Shares WEST INDIA RUM RE-| at Trinidad during latter half of Juiy, | 3 + 4 KNITTING MILLS LIMITED
y pot a safely quickly and nufey- yet con Shop, adjoining Royal Yeoh Club i PINGS LIMITED, and proceeding thereafter to Barbadys | SAILING TO Se - ers a" that the
t t 4 t.f.n hares 6% TELE NE . and Liverpool | IN , P. SRANCE reditors of the abovenamec Somparty
eaetne were to end ee tution satya LIMITED. ee oe Cth dances: to general car this ee © eae | which is being voluntarily wound ap
L. Starts Killing the germs whieh are attacking eaky, Sie oe RING ‘Tiffany asaeheres BARBADOS FOUNDRY | vessel has ample ene for chilies. ada | GASCOGNE, May 12, 1951 are a Ss Ps ; ee day oF | AND
your Kidneys, Bladder inary System y ‘or quick Bale} L 5 ‘ a ‘ oor wb: Soe? July 1951, being the day for that purpose
, in byo hours, yet ts absolutely harmless to | £150. GORRINGES ANTIQUE SHOP. The above shares will be set up at agehs pecantea on through Bills o via St. Lucia, Martinique, feel by Gre wndersigned, to sets tei
2. Gets Fid of health-destroying, deadly poisons | --"- “42°: 18,5 Bi In. | hdersigved entan at the Office of the | Lading for transhipment at Trinidat | Guadeloupe and Antigua names and addresses, end the particulars |
ous acids with which r system has be- ® ne n 1y at] British Guiana, Leeward and Windward ot aeons yeas, 2 L s
© coos at saturated. you * ee ede ot Candelabra, 4)* p.m : Islands. 33 at SOO eaee oF Sere Rolicitare if any
$. Strengthens and reinvigorates the kidneys, rein pe ba with original diamond : CARRINGTON & SEALY For further particulars appl) o \ } ae ed Lat c - po ow "
, \ bn the delicate filter ofganism, and stimu: GORRINGES. Me Sor Serene. er FURNESS WITHY & CO. Lid., TRINI- | CARIBBEAN CRUISE \ Lucas Street. Bri igetown, “Barbados, (ha | Use ‘Mentholatum’ Baim
- , yal Ya 1 2.5 4n.| DAD, B.W.1, and - . . a way age the, ogee i
lates the entire system. 13,5. 51—1n DA COSTA & CO. LTD. BRIDGE- | | Liquidator of the sald Company, and, | +E
nist hehe . LTD. 3E- c 2 ) ep zx 3S oOo
by Doctors, Chemists, ond ie — The undersigned will offer for sale ai | TOWN, BARBADOS, B.W.1, COLOMBIE, May 30th, 1951. { a equired bi notice in writing | oa Ano. cease
One-time Sufferers a FILE FASTENERS'—Just received af their Office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge- Trinidad, La Guaira, Cu- rom the said Liquidator, are to com ‘ ¢ I g 5
Ovetex is approved by Doctors and Chemists in| supply of File Fasteners. Phone 4242| town, on Friday the ssth; day of May, | (NRNARAIRRRO NSAI aad ‘artagens a in and prove thels sald debts or olatrn Spots and Soreness, Use
73 countries and by one-time sufferers from tie | T. Geddes Grant Ltd, for your reduire-| 1951, at 2 p.m. SheNOS eee em SA. Oe Ae. Bince ae ehell Be *Mentholatum * daily. Iti
troubles shown above, Mr. J. C. writes: "/ am| ments. 13.5.51—6n The dwellinghouse knows as “GRAND M.V. Caribbee will accept Cargo | Jamaica pecified in such notiee, or in default entholaturr a y. it IS
freee Sai eet es suffered with terrible | ——W—_ __________ | VIEW" with the land thereto containing and Passengers for Dominica, | th thereof they will be excluded from th so simple to use, You just
backache and pain CGpeten? em much bares GENUINE ANTIQUE PLATHS and|3 Roods 4 3/5th. Perches or thereabouts, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and St | benefit of any distribution made befor RUBITON. Mentholatum’
then Pa hata tech der gate.” hae on spat figures—Royal Crown Derby, Rocking-| situate at Bathsheba, Saint Joseph Kitts. Sailing Friday 18th instant Ae tine Passengers such debts are proved, .
wonders Cystex has worked with me ccem ai} ham, Spode, Bow, Caughlar, Dresden,| Inspection on application to the | f yo ng ‘ge ied ' Dated this lst day of May 1081 makes your skin soft —
most impossible. If they were £1 a we th Royal Copenhagen and Royal Worcester— | Caretaker, on the premises. The M.V. Moneka will accept argo and Mai H, LISLE THOMAS, smooth and keeps it clear.
would still be worth double,” Wl AT GORRINGES. 13.5.51—1n For further particulars and conditions Cargo and Passengers for Dornir Liquidator * Mentt iI: , r d fi
m ' ; f { te ! 5.87-—7 Mentholatum ’ 1s good for
\ Guorenteed to Put Vou Ri reas =_ of sale apply to :— ica, Antigua; Montrersat; Nev j tn 2.5.87-—Tn. | , (
aartde 9 x. + | |GALVANISED SHEETS—Best quality COTTLE, CATFORD & Co, and St. Kitts. Sailing Fridey 18 3 ALL Skin troubles, Quick—-
Ps al anaes fee your chemist On $08 7 tt eared $73; 9 te 56. | cari er die nay, il ] NES & Co Ltd NOTICE rea ee ee
: oad —- M.V. Cacique Del Caribe will | . os LU 4
va Sees I a thorough test. | 10 ft $8.40, Nett cash. Beiter hurry {| 1 will offer for sale by Public Com- accept Cargo and Passengers for % | , Applications for one or more vacant St
we pro dcag ate Saunetr, troreet, A. BARNES & CO., LTD. petition at my office, Victoria Street St. Luela, St. Vincent, Grenada | AGENTS Michael's Vestry Exhibition tenable at
better in every way, in 24 4.5,51—tt.n, | Op Eridey, 18th at 2 p.m. The, cottage and Aruba, Sailing on or about %) veins the Combermere School, will be received
hours and to be completely cal ILA — situated at McLean's 18th instant. } Phone ::: 3814 ‘by the Clerk of the Vestry up to 12/
well in 1 week or your money SHUTTER: One Steel Roller Shutter| Gap, Brittons Cross Road — house con- | o'clock noon on Thursday 22nd day of
gS back if you return the empty | 16 ft. long by 9 ft. high. Apply: Evelyn,{ tains open gallery — Drawing Dining, May, 1951. F ,
. Act now! r Roach & Co., Ltd. 13.5.51—3n| 3 bedrooms, W.C. & Bath — wash B.W.1I. SCHOONER OWN. Candidates must be gons of parishion
for basin, Kitchen with running water and . c 2g . :
¢| SCALES: oO: standing on about 10,000 sq. feet of ERS ASSOC., INC. 3 | ‘ er. in straitenéd cireumstances and must
st ex * IDN t Ys né ¥ ton and one 1-ton Plat | {hg “For inspection between 10 to 4 Advertise It Pa GB Jnot be less than ten years and fou
LADDER | fcrm Scale. Apply: Evekyn, Roach & Co.! 0") Gn application to the tenant, For Tele. 4047. | X « 8 | imonths nor more than twelve year
C: NTEED Remedy RHEUMATISM | 1°. . 13.5.51—3n| Condition of sale apply to R. Archer . ye * old on the Ist day°of January 1951, to |
- McKenzie, Dial 2947. 12,5.51—4n. | CSS eailnes be proved by a Baptismal Certificate, |
—_— 18TH CENTURY MINIATURE on| “S : Ono. which must aecompany the application
LOYAL BROTHERS OF arene) epee, our | BeSuey, Benham Cc" * ON Parents and/or Guardians will be noti
deep ‘set gold frame $100. GORRINGES, AUC‘! fed of the time and place of the Exam ERLE RA
THE STAR Upper bay succes Cis Stain PASSAGES TO EUROPE is |
; 196 STUDEBAKER PLATFORM LORRY Forms of appligatinn ean hg obtained : f
Needi Public Official Sal Anehts Wo uell this vehicle which has |% Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for POR THE VOOR ee le i
A ane ~ ‘ n a ae « rad¢ 4 ‘ree ie ab:
eediest Cases Fund cla ale been damaged in an aceident by public selling 7. Bukope fortnightly. Pie yeual ports of all ae Cy ae
(The Pr » , auction at the Courtesy Garage at 2 p.m u in, on on, or iotterdam, singic are wx , Sue Clerk, St, Michael's Vestry s f
ANNOUNCEMENT 1908 (0-0) 8 SO SAFER Eee ak OL AOK reduction for children. 8.5,51-—7) ASK FOR REAL
, , ° = - es oo Ma 1
Py Nagin PS ie atiahioon Kea ie SSR GOO OOOO TROT AUDIT OF SCHOOL ACCOUNTS MEN-THO-LAY-TUM
n ee ———

would be prepared to under



} tale the work ae eres ‘ Made Only *
o the Director Kivieation, oO ue
On wilh be. received BY. the Hepat The Mentholatum 0. Ltd.,
ment up to Saturday, 26th ~~ ip 5 (Est. 1889) Slough, England.
‘5 ~~3n





a i Lidl OS OAM BA yy,
E FAMILY TRAVEL Po ®
y | B CRAIGS T 4 oY

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rTAMILY TRAVEL PLAN a
y | TRAVEL PLAN Tha
TRAVEL PLAN THE F a
4 Puan THs %

LAN Pye FAULLY T B
ANILY TRAVE)

age: My ceaver PLAS TF








FOR.... against Sea View Plantation, St. Lucy.| Larder, 2 Burner Oil Stove and Oven,| tiont od
ry : years inger and live years longer, Based | yj_Tabs in thousands and thousands of
BATTERIES : tha IGE, NOTICE that 1 the Qwner of] Lignt House Lantern, ireiess Comer | on my veure of supeeisace in audyiend | Vases Throughout the word tat is now >
MOTOR CAR or other obtain a loan of £280 under the pro-| Terms CASH. practice, it is Pan ae neat” offered under & positive guarantee to gost
BATTERIES visions of the above Act against the said _ ‘| nothing unless entirely satisfactory. Un- ai
v ibs represents the eb >t u
You need Plantation, in respect of the Agricul- BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. viene ae and ack ae ph pupraniee ae y eRemE ot ,
T tural year 1951 tu 1952. Auctioneers tific internal method of | for yourself how new blood tingles t h ; NORMA.
DIST L ED W No money has been borrowed undet 12.5.51- tn stimulating and invit-| your veins, how your eye takes on c new EL PLAN T TRAYS PARR
. the Agricultural Aids Act, 1905 or the} ___ tpnsinitiasthadi sade Nene alle A curating ite giana ,, nd | sparkle, you step a fir I and PLAN THE FA ca ae .
a y 4 - us tends to resto that vou really can enj li ily a ik f
Always keep a supply handy ha an be via ante) rans youthful vigour and vi- and as. vigourou an you did in our FAMILY TRAVEL PLA! TH en 57.09
you can get it ee iat hid hh day of Max 1061 tality to the body.” | prime, ‘Then if for any reason at all you
From your Gas Works, Bay St. “e 7 ay O.. SIMMONS ar our 0g 24-Hour Results ot completely satisfied, snoroly return : nie
m 3 ; + ' 7 8, the empty pac and the full purchase !
1 gallon in Customers Bottle 1/3 { tite Owner Because Vi-Tebs are price will be refunded, Get Vi-Tobs tT" = Here ore the facts :
16.5. nm scientifically designed | your chemist today, The gugrantes pro-
ee ee i-| fects you.
nN Ck IN CARLISLE BAY and prepared to act d wets you te testere ea Sere and wife travelling together
OTIC! N ‘ : y ‘ouun- 7 will be able to ‘
Applications for one varint St Jon's] wl” Sgtegtels, sem wonder coor | Wike Tai « Guaranteed + manhoca, vitality Tor the 6st OF one way tickets plas
Vestry Exhibition tenable at the St.| Belle’ Woife, Sch. Gardenia W., Sen ~% ; ost of one woy tickets plus i



VTO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH












The Berbados School
of Dancing Ltd.

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4640 P}

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50%









|
Michael's Girls’ School, will be received] pine ut nm nj é
by the Clerk of the Vestry up to 3 o'clock We Beth Gk tee Ba ae eee OOSIIGS IF 0 So SOR IGG NISC DG Cote!
ee eee Cnritdajes faust peunngiters of Paria |e ARRIVALS TO-DAY’S FLASH NEWS ; @ Children under 12 yeors occompany
TELEPHONE CORDS IN COL- eee eT ae ee a eS. 3. Golfito, 4,505 tons net, Capt. Saps- HA porents will each poy holt the
E must have attaine e age o years.) worth, from Southampton, f 2 ve a
Be pee gehen’ ae Kote Soni: et ae ? ca, by ty st Pi eee feet tons net, Capt STEAM PRESSURE GAUGES free Same under 2 ars travel i a a
- 1 to be prove y a Baptisrna er-) Prigent, from Britis uiana, , sad Reg oe
STW ERE. tificate, which must accompany the] Schooner Harriet Whitaker, 50 tons net, from 30 lbs, to 500 lbs. capacity . eee Sy ' p
With Glossy” ind: Quidksbrouie Application, all faneines Sa, to bg Capt. Cantar, Som Doriaice, ie bl ‘ ‘ ete @ Return tickets are good fo: 30 doys REVEL PLAY
mined must be at the hoo! not later ES are,.obtainable a , sym aels a ‘
ee aii hate re ne shan 435 am. on Saturday, June 16th Ke 44 tons net, Capt i sity ie complete your jeurney F T ef
mr @ Solouy ef the . Forms ¢f Application can be} King, for St. Vincent ‘ y . ™/! , u uly 15th 1; g
eae Sptained from the Vestry Clerk's Office Ol, Tanker Rodas. 1.855 tons net, ‘Capt CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. . rae Fal
A T. KING, ornelius er Meuler, for Trini ‘ |
“ ‘s V , s y : é So You Aver S the paul
eu Clerk, St. Joseph's Vestry. | cant. Mitchell, for British Guiana, PIER HEAD LANE tie re ee ne ryan ae £4
| ABD WARS n | S.S. Gascogne, 2,681 tons net, Capt PL PAM
_—--___.______ Prigent, for England. a :
SSS PE eT © FTP tores apply oetwees Antigua p
ST. MARY'S OLD BOYS’ } Barbados, Belize. Caracas Subject to
KEEP FIT eo Government approval) Georgetown, Ls = 2 aut om i) a sim s
CRICKET ° re eae crews le Gaverneiont Sppedeih
weet to ernment approv
ge FIT Sears REMINISCENCES AFS,, F.V.A. e
vi commence at e
AQUATIC CLUB on will be ones ct a Talk { FOR
iday. seg te yen by 3
Friday, 11th May, . at Dr. C. “BERTIE” CLARKE RE AG KS a AT bp
4.30 p.m. To-morrow Night Thursd ; 4a + at 4 A 4
Apply to. . . ede eee een | ana
MISS RANSOM Room. Mase Han ‘ire! an
Dial 3390 ee ae eaTON. SALES



ITISH ao INDIAN: AIRWAYS

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PAGE EIGHT



DAMES BEAT ROVERS
FIVE—NIL

VOTRE DAME defeated Pickwick-Rovers five love in their
First Division football game at Kensington yesterday eve-

ning.

It was an easy walk over for Notre Dame.

They

missed many opportunities to score.
Alfred Best, at inside left for Notre Dame, scored two goals.

The other three were scored by Gill, Daniel and Green,

Cricket Report
From
Laneashire

CLYDE WALCOTT reports on
the Lancashire League, Central
Lancashire and Ribblesdale
League.

Most of the League games were
delayed on account of rain which
fell overnight and again on Satur-
day morning. It was an excep
tionally cold day and very few
spectators attended the games.

Bacup played Burnley, last
year’s Champions, on their home
ground, Burnley won the tos.
and sent the home team to bat
on a wicket by no means favour-
able to batsmen. Although Ever-
ton Weekes hammered the Burn-
ley bowling for a_ sparkling 78,
Bacup were still all out for 132.
Weekes completed his 50 in 61
minutes Burnley lost 4 wickets
for 40 runs, but managed to pass
the score for the loss of 8 wickets.
Bruce Pairaudeau scored 29.
Weekes captured 1 wicket for 16
runs in 6 overs.

Lowerhouse, who entertained
Ramsbottom, batted first and scor-
ed 105 for 9 wickets declared.
Roy Marshall again did not get
going, being caught at mid-on
for 2 runs. He only scored one
Jast Saturday, but is expected to
score a great deal of runs when
the wickets become drier, and the
days are not so cold. Ramsbot-
tom managed to draw the game
with their score at 59 for 9 wick-
ets. Roy Marshall was very suc
cessful with his off spinners, cap-
turing 4 wickets for 16 runs.

Enfield played their first away

game of the season at Nelson.
After several inspections of the
wicket by the captains, it was

decided to cut another wicket on
the square, and play commenced
at 3.30. There were no more
than 100 spectators at the start
huddled in what shelter they
could find in the cold. During the
first over, play was stopped when
one of the umpires chased his hat,
and on other occasions when the
bails were constantly blowing off.
Enfield batted first and were in
no hurry, scoring 73 for the loss
of 8 wickets in 150 minutes. Clyde
Walcott after being dropped be-
hind the wicket at 0 off Phadkar,

Green, the Notre Dame right
winger, gave a good performance
Paul Mandeville, their centre half,
dribbled too much while Gill,
eentre forward, was too slow and
his timing bad.

Charlie Daniel at inside right
was about the best player on the
Notre Dame side. Alfred Best
also gave a good performance. In
the back line Straughan and
Brown warded off a few attacks
made by the Pickwick-Rovers
forwards.

For Pickwick-Rovers Maurice
Foster, although five goals were
scored on him, gave a fine per
formance in goal. He saved many
good tries.

Notre Dame took the touch off
with Pickwick-Rovers defending
the southern goal. Soon after
Notre Dame was awarded a
corner kick. Doyle took a good
shot but Mandeville, who received
the ball, kicked wide.

The Notre Dame forwards and
halves then went on t@ miss many
opportunities, It was not until a
few minutes before half time that
they were able to score Charlie
Daniel sent a beautiful shot In
the left corner of the nets after
beating through the Pickwick~-
Rovers back line. Half time found
Notre Dame only one goal in the
lead.

Early in the second half Gill
missed two lovely opportunities
to score for Notre Dame. The
second goal came when Doyle ran
down the left wing and took a
shot, The ball struck_the cross
bar and rebounded. Green, who
was running in from the right
wing, punched the ball into the
nets.

The third goal was scored bv
Gill, Roberts, the Notre Dame left
half, ran down the left wing and
centred, Gill headed past Foster.

Best scored the fourth goal.
Green received a pass from Daniel
aud centred with a one time shot.
Best, who was in position, tapped
it into the nets.

Soon after the fifth goal went
in. Best received a_pass from
Mandeville and beat Foster with
a well placed shot.

The teams were as follows:

Notre Dame: Wilkinson, Brown,

Straughan, Archer, Mandeville,
Roberts, C. Daniel, Gill, Doyle,
Green and Best.
Pickwick-Rovers: M. Foster,
Lewis, Hunte, Wells, Carter,
Greenidge, Robinson, L. Foster,

Taylor. Worme and R.. Hoad.
Referee: Mr. L. F. Harris.



again tried out the wicket- -
keeper in the next ball but this
time he made no mistake. Nelson

were given 40 minutes to get the
runs, and at the end of the day’s
play were 56 for 2 wickets. Clyde
Walcott captured both wickets for
18 runs.

In the Ribblesdale League,
Darwen declared at 150 for 8
wickets of which Ken Rickards
scored 29, Leyland Motors pass-
ed the score for the loss of 7
wickets.

In the Central Lancashire
League, Crompton met Middleton,
who batted first scoring 219 for 2
wickets. Crompton forced a draw
scoring 78 for 9 wickets. Rama-
dhin was not successful with the
ball finding it too cold to spin the
ball, so the batsmen took advan-
tage of the situation, giving him
only one wicket for 61 runs.

Frank Worrell played another
grand innings of 78 for Radcliffe.

He was handicapped during his
innings by a fractured finger,

obtained while coaching during
the week, but was still master of
the situation.

Radcliffe declared at 161 for 5
wickets. At the close of play
Stockport were 111 runs for the
loss of 4 wickets.

Most of the West Indians men-
tioned they had never played
cricket on such a cold day and all
of them played in England last
summer. We are all hoping for
better weather in the coming
games.

WOMEN CRICKETERS
VISIT: BRITAIN

LONDON, May 14.
The first Australian women’s
cricket team to come to England
since 1937 arrived here on Satur-
day for a three months’ tour, They
will play three Test matches and
19 other fixtures.—(C.P.)

——————
! ee ey







Traffie Do's
No. 3



Always look for oncoming
Traffic before opening the
Door of your Motor Vehicle

Space made available by
CANADA DRY
for Safer Motoring.





|
BA

“if HOW WE DOIN’?
ARE WE RUNNING LATE?

ARE WE GONNA GET IN

ON TIME? WHAT TOWN



pay












IS GETTIN’ WARMER >
SAVING DOWN THIS WAY =

WHAT TIME WILL. MY
WATCH SAY WHEN yi
WE GET THERE ¢ Al

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They'll Do It Every

IS THIS HERE NOW? HUH?
DO THEY RUN ON DAYLIGHT
I'M ON EASTERN STANDARD

oom ip
See!

Everton, Spartan

Win Games

EVERTON seored anotae,
victory in the Second Division
when they defeated Carlton two
goals to one in a football mate!
which was played at Bank Hail
yesterday afternoon,

The game was fast throughout
and the Everton forwards com-
bined well and in the latter stages
of the second half clearly out-
played their opponents.

In the Spartan—Lodge fixture
at the Park, Spartan won one love.
Spartan started slowly but in the
second half the Lodge players
were being constantly pressed.



South Africatis
Beat Glamorgan

CARDIFF, May 15.

The South African cricketers
geined their first victory of the
tour when they beat Glamorgan
by an innings and i4 runs here
today.

When play started today,
Glamorgan who had followed on
200 rung behind South Africa’s
330, needed 173 to avoid the
innings’ defeat with nine wickets
standing. When they had lost
their first six wickets for 74, five
of them to Athol Rowan for a
personal cost of 20, it seemed as
if they were in for a crushing
defeat.

But a fine fighting innings of
80 by Hadyn Davies, wicketkeeper
during the afternoon, brought life
back into the dying game. He

hit 12 fours in this his highest
score in first class cricket. His
partnership with Pleass helped

Glamorgan to reach a total of 186.
—Reuter.

_—-

Russians Are
Basketball Champs

PARIS, May 14.
Russia won the European bas-
ketball championship on Satur-
day night with Russia’s Deputy
Foreign Minister, Andrei Gromy-
ko, abandoning his famed poker
face to grin and clap as the Rus-
signs beat Czechoslovakia 45—44.

—(C.P,)



Time
HE'S ASKED THE. POOR
CONDUCTOR EVERYTHING
EXCEPT “IS THERE A
SANTA CLAUS 2” AND
\“HOW HIGH IS UP!”

Registered U.S. Patent Offles

by
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COMMENTARY. WITH

\/ STRICTLY A SIGHT-
SEEING BUS
RIDER ***
















ZA GOT ON» HE'S BEEN

ALAWAR _ HE'S USED
WW! to A RUNNING

HIS TRAVELS» HE'S



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



$155.84 Forecast
Paid Out On 2nd
Day Of Arima Meet

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, May 14,
Following are the results of the
second day’s racing at Arima.
WHITSUN HANDICAP
Happy Union (Lutehman up)
$12.42. Cupid (Hardwidge up)
$3.54. Princess Rasiyya (Ali up).
Forecast: $59.72
CKEOLE HANDICAP
H's Wership (J. Lutechman up)
$3.80. Flying Ann, (Lattimer up)



$1.84. Determine (Newman up)
$4.54,

Forecast: $21.72

LADIES’ HANDICAP

Blue Grass (A Joseph) $2.12
Ceres (Hardwidge up) $2.46.
ro Mahal (J. Lutchman up)
$1.96,

Forecast: $62.24.
CARIB HANDICAP

Leap On (J. Lutechman up) $2.24
Miniature (Yvonet up) $1.30, Dia-
potos (Reid up) $1.36.

Forecast: $14.60
MOUNT PLEASANT HANDICAP

Fair Profit (Quested up) $3.60.
Cupid (Hirdwidge up)
Princess Rasiyya (Ali up) $1.90

Forecast: $155.84.

BUENA VISTA HANDICAP

Goldpin (A, Jeseph up) $1.48.
Rigolo (J. Lutchman up) $2.84

Forecast: $26.26.

WOODLANDS HANDICAP

Blue Grass (A. Joseph up) $6.12.
Sun Tan (Ali up) $3.48. Taj Maha!
(J. Lutechman up) $2.72.

Forecast; $133. 60.

CONSOLATION HANDICAP

Diapotos (O'Neil up) $14.00.
Kismet (A. Joseph up) $1.60.

Forecast: $86.00.



Bannister Wins
Another Mile Race

LONDON, May 14.

Roger Bannister, Britain’s ace
miler, on Saturday turned in the
third fastest mile of his career to
win the international mile at the
British games at White City, Lon-
don,

Bannister, in his first race since
his triumph over America’s best
milers at the University of Penn-
sylvania on April 28, sprinted
away from the field in the last
350 yards, to win easily by 30
yatrds,—(C.P.)



FORTRESS, Y.M.P.C.
WIN MATCHES

The results of the First Division
Basketball matches which were
played at Y.M.P.C. Beckles Road
last night are as follows:—

Fortress defeated Pickwick by
29 goals to 22. -For Fortress S
Sandiford and R, Roachford netted
six goals each,

The Y.M.P.C.—Carlton maten
ended in a win for Y.M.P.C. who
scored 27 goals to Carlton’s 17.
The condition of the pitch could
not be called first class.

SPORTS
WINDOW

Carlton meets Spartan in a First
Division Football match at Ken-
sington Oval this afternoon, Both
teams have got the same number
of points and this afternoon's
match will have some bearing as
to wha will be this year's Cham-
pion,

The game should be interesting.
THIRD DIVISION FOOTBALL

Police will play against Carlton
at the Park.

Combermere Old Boys vs Notre
Dame at Combermere.

Empire vs The Barbados
ment at Bank Hall.

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL

This afternoon at St, Leonard's
sround, Richmond Gap, Maple
and Westerners ‘A’ will meet
The referee will be Mr, C. E



Regi-

Reece.
BASKETRALL SECOND
DIVISION M
YÂ¥.M.P.C. vs Harrison College at
Harrison College
Police vs James Street Boys’
Scouts at District “A Police Sta-
tion.
NETBALL

Queen's College Old Girls will
oppose a girls’ team from the Er-
diston Training College at Erdis-
ton College. The match will start
at 5 p.m,



What’s on Today

Police Courts—10.00 a.m.

Court of Appeal—10.00 a.m.

Police Band gives Concert
at Christ Church Alms-
house—4.45 p.m.

CINEMAS

Empire: “Madeline” 4.45 p.m. &
8.30 p.m,

Roxy : “Halls of Montezuma’ 4.45
pm, & 830 pm

Royal: “Drums of Fu Manchu"
and “Man From Oaklahoma”
445 pm & 8 380 p.m.

Olympic: “Drums of Fu Mancha"
445 pm, & 8.30 p.m.

Globe : “The Sleeping City"
pm. &€815 pm

5 00

By Jimmy Hatlo



ITS BEEN NOON-
24 TIME SINCE WR.WHAT







EATING LIMBURSER
SANDWICHES FOR
200 MILES >>















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pf” TVE HEARD
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ANSWERS*BUT HE
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Mr. Vincent Griffith
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J. A. CORBIN & SONS.



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to be held at the
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SATURDAY, MAY 19, 1951

In aid of the St. Winifred’s
Building Fund

HOTEL

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PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1C, 1951 Il.MIIIAIMtS \n\oi Ml PACI i %  v i•Cuke Will Speak For Our Sugar" %  From % %  % %  1 wo require. I think that this l> a matter that should be taken up very sironjly with the gentlemen "I do not intend to delay hon. in.-mbei:. but this matter iM> important that I cot.-, should draw it lo UM attention cr! BAB. immbW BDd i>articularly the hon senior member for St Joseph. Mr I. D M.lUry 1E1 seconded the motion for the adjournment. He was very pleased, he % %  Id, that the botV member had taken the opportunity to bring the u...*u i, tha .,M. nil %  %  t%  •; in,MTival • >. the Mi M..11 h ..,.s a matter of paramount baportanrA %  **! when one aild so ha m nol iling the case. Thenmust have been some fteli.ig of anxiety during the past few weeks — anxiety especially %  mem responsible people in the community, wfewn there appeared In the Press that shortly negotiation*, would be CM* ed on between the U.K Cuba as regards the purchase of sugar. I :>il>crs would recall thai he had raised the matter in the ., | rwtllt m Adriirs* hjd been presented to the Head ol the Admini'tration in connection with il. Hihad no doubt thai even before the passing of the Address a wide-awake Government would hava lafcan the matter up in the right quarter. But as in most cases of this sort, whenever It was possible to hear tiie voice of the people through their representatives In the Chamber, some good -could always be done. He was not versed in the economic set-up or trade set-up in this colony, but he was sufficiently ntad with condition* to know that sugar was the only Maple product in the island, and any negotiations which were being carried on between the U.K., Can.da and any other competmg country, would create a Kie.it hardship on the West Indies. Any hardship therefore that was treated with respect to this commodity must inevitably be reflected in the standard of living of the people. Not only the agricultural labourer but every other worker as well. Hon. members were aware that responsible persons would dread competition Itetwcen Cuba and the West Indies where sugar was concerned. There had been so many committee! and commissions in this colony during recent times, said Mr Meltloy. lhat it made it dimcult for one to be able to digest all that they hud been doing. He was strongly suggesting to hon. members, however, to join themselves together whatever might be their political ideologies, to face the present issue. It was an issue that they must attack as one body. It had to do with the hfeblood of the Wcsl Indies and more so Barbados. He ugreed with the Leaclei ol the Opposition, it was a matter that concerned everyone. One did not have to be a son of a planter or to be employed, in the commercial trade. All one had lo do wJ to be interested in the welfare and well-being of his community, to know that any agreement which must affect the agreement the West Indies had put up must ; osM way or another affect the th people ol the area. He had observed from the report which he had read in the PrMB, ihat this Mission would be having a discussion with the Executive Council of Jamaica. No doubt they would be doing the same thing here, but it was alsu reported that they would try to Ket the expressions of opinions from all interested parties 'n Barbados. "Let me say here and now that any Mission. Committee or otherwise, who come to Bar bados lo make an inquiry and d" not also set the views of the Opposition in this Chamber will not IKgetting a true picture of the Mate of affairs". He was throwing out the eitgHCStion that in another few days if possible a very imporu." matter was going to be discusser m the House. It was a BUI and aaaj m the name of the Leader of the House. It was a Bill to extend the powers of the Governor uf this colony relative to imports and exports. He was truly woiried about the present situation and he hoped that every opportunity would be given to make representations to these official* from the GotOQlaJ Office. Mr. E. S Lewis (LI stld that he was very pleased that the minor member for St James had drawn attention to that matter He was not in his place to hear the argument by the honourable member, but he knew that a couple of weeks ago, the House had sent a protest against the nwjottanan tin United Kingdom and Cuba Now. honourable members bad read in a paper thai someone was coming down bin io discuss the matter He said that the House had already sent an Address to the C'.nvernor. to be transmitted to Ij>ndon in respect to the matter, but what about tne House of Assembly'' Why was not the House of AssemH> told that this gentle, eaaBlaj to thb i*lnnd? The House sent a Message to Ihc Govciniii to be transmitted to the Colonial Ones, pttrtOBttni against this sugar pact. Now tM) artM hearing of a Begional Economic Conference and he was not even sure that the people of the colony would be properly represented at th.> Conference. He said that the House should have received a letter saying that Mr. Bottomley was coming tt Barbados lo explain the position in regard to sugar, and the Housel could have sent back a message, saying that they would like this official to discuss economic matters-' men as. exchange, ronll American dollars and Canadian* dollars etc For the last year or so. they had talked about sugar negotiations between Groat Britain and the West Indies and to get up there then and say that sugar was their, only mainstay meant nothing. They should instruct the senior' member for SI. Joseph as to what he could do as the member representing them at this Regional Economic Conference, but he did not see why the House should say that the Sugar Producers should meet those people when the House had not even been told that Mr. Bottomley was to discuss the matter. Mr Adams (L) said that according to some information he had got. Mr. Bottomley never intended coming to Barbados. Trinidad or elsewhere other than Jamaica. Jamaica had cause for grievances over and above the rest of the West Indies Mr. Bottomley had been requeued, Inasmuch as he was in the area, to come here and hear their views. He had assented. After speaking of the representation that Barbados would get. Mr Adarm said thai he agreed that they should put their case strongly. Do nol let them fool tlienuelvts however. If the Colonial Office said that they could only spend f 10 they had got to spend $10. Whal they had got to do was to put up a first-cUiss case to them and ihow them why they should release more dollars. A question was asked in the House sometime ago about dollar allocations and dollar earnings, but some colony had spoken aBodt more dollar allocations and il had been shown that they were spending more dollars than they earned. All those things had to be examined in the light that they were all part of the sterling area. "Let us say: 'lieal us better," but do not let us fool ourselves and say wi must be our own represenla.ives at a conference say at Ottawa or elsewhere. We arc not a sovereign country." Ending his speech, Mr. Adams again assured the House that the caseof Barbados will be well put to the Mission. Mr. F. C. tioddard (El said that he rose to correct one statement and that was that thr commercial community in the West Indies were nol as anxious to de buaj nes< with Canada as they had been making it out t„ be That was absolutely untrue. 1'ne commercial community in Barbados — and he spoke w un some authority had nlwwjra been most anxious to keep trade relations with Canada OP** 1: was only in the case of the restrictions of dollars that their trade from year to year had got less and less. It was causing them great concern because they saw what the future was holding in store for them. Canadians were fed up and were mad about it They were nol blaming the people in the West Indies, but were blaming (he Colonial Office, the British Government and the British Treasury foe withholding those dollars they were earning. "1 have seen some figures recently which show that our dollar earnings in Canada are in the vicinity of $60,000,000 and we BN purchasing $24,000,000 from that source" Mi. Goddard Hid a ul added that there was a great disparity. As the senior member for St. Joseph rightly said, tnnj **** in the .sterling block, but geograp Wen Py, tbay were m the dollar area and were surrounded by countries dealing with dollars As they had always drawn Ihcir essentid .stuff from Canada and the United Slates, thai was one reason why the cost of HVIIIK bore greatly on them that day They had to go abroad into further markets and were rinding greater credtl troubles on their doorsteps He had spoken on that .many times in the House and the one answer to that was: H grM us. ore dollars". He said thai they could land commodities like potatoes, onions etc. at greatly reduced prices. he was only touching on that sphere uf the debate. They were not divided In the House as regards their problem of sugar. They were glvbll Great Britain their ugar at a reasonable price with the hope that she would continue, not only to buy to-day or tomorrow, but for a long time to COttO, aW] ton that they could produce and he hoped that Mr. Bottomley and all the officials who came here, would be lold thill in no umei tain terms. Mr. H. A. li in,/ Gamer (01 said he believed thai Mr Bottomley was coining out here to white wash matters now that they had settled everything alMadj Hi HOUSE PASS $9,716 FOR FLOOD VICTIMS THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday parsed a Resolution for $9,716 to pay claims in connection with HIMMI damage of two years ago. Addendum lo the Resolution timate was $60,000 stales that under the provWoM M Tins was the lirM big Hem Resolutions 44 and M Of lt4t. a Claims too came from nine other total of $2f,O40 w. voted [*r th" pMUhoa for the repair of houses. purpose of relieving divtress There wenalso ten special cases caused by storm and flood damage In St Michael for which a spedurlng IMS and 1949 Of this ?>* %  >"'" was voted and theie .-mount $22,934 has been diswere one or two extra claims in bursed. leaving an unc* tended s Hiehaol and some DUM balance of 16.115 which has'iapsed. parishes as mil, to w huh it wa.s In addition there k m am M ol *OUghl njMCUl attention should s-5.15020 in hand from voluntary *" PVen The QovommaOl still -uli-i i iptions hoped th.d nieinl-ers Of tho pubrurthor claims lotanfcu 'jl* " *t % Utfe houi. H4.865 GO and based on return., '"'i 1 "'"-' "•'""• '" ," waj from Ve.trlehave now been ap w "" u Government could proved and the amount of $9.716 '",„, *£',',J. 1 ,, '*'' is now required together with the .-.mount of voluntary tions taapay these eJalffla Mr. Adams il.l moved the piss ing ol the Hcfeolution He said that the Hcsoliitioiv, had come lo the House after a long period of data] The QovanuMDt ways prepared To acknowledge their faults Tins, however. Mr Adams pointed out. was because i. .i refully the claims been made; especially purlicular occasion there had b> substantial lots of life. as to be remembered that I cm.Id only in the case of big demands for big losses ghhl a Bubstanti.il .lnioim!. and %  > less substantial RmouM to thoa WbjO had suffeiixi less When r GUM io people losing everything Uk thaii ri otfaas, [Until then Government had to do n.r UM I'me—a new house and $120 in funiitiue \ ,im ending his speech lold mem I UW, thai) WTOUld •M (rom the Addendum ho* the He that the then mov ,hi ; !%  passed Or H (I Cummin.seconded Mr Mettley IE) said thai Oovinineni had t.'kcn over II months SiSTSi K? £„?,%;?. '** — *.S5^=~-H: arho gr*aa quickly, gives twice, ha laid He was going to be reasonable and fair in makinc his criticisms He was bound lo criticise |Lj Government on that mailer. He was not going to sit and allow it lo be e S, Michael's Ve.-l.s %  I'ciidi. ir claims from $69,000 to over $6,000 all of a sudMi, Ad an tions levied against Authority I ecessarily Government. A great deal of propaganda had but .t had become extremely foi Government to make i thorough inveslig. i n the claim* "I hope licit now we h down to some ngures. hon niembon on both MM M ihe Houaf should slop racjunlooUon i*-t mo remind hon mem bora that two can be the SI Michael Voatry, in spite of the great luimuei I i intend to *•-"> nothing except that ol their original estimate ol Sixty thousand odd dollars, they Ihcfnaolvoo ha ',"'„ "}, %  "'' 'V !" .h.d U the, were g..,ng h. stall W>hng one_of 1| membe raerlmbtatlon thoy might .-on^.y*T tinue eonMderaUon of ihe Hesopo"" replied and said W.'IeV -Of lhi hr ,iad J^int--*! out thai the Q ironunonl had niggaaloil to the Si Mich igl'i vaatrj tli.it the basis on which they had made their claims was loo wide and the estimataa were sent back to fiem Mr. Mottley .aid lhat when he saw the figure:; fiom the Vestry to the Government, he felt thoy mamborad of Ih Government that there iding lo nsk the Govk.tion unduly long. ernmem for as-istance lo npUCO Referring again lo the St. Mifurniture and such losses through ChBOl Vestry, Mr Adams said the flood water, thai of the 550 parishioner fM He wanted it lo be known that u whom claims had been made 11 was the Government who had sugwas discovered that many of them gested lo the Vestry of St. Michael weie no! in the flood area ll WU that then scope wns too wide then suggested to the Vestry that Mr. Mottley said thai it was perhaps their esti.nate was on true thai the Government mi too wide a basis. As a result the quite in order 'o make a thorough Yi-.ti\ ha" :i|inointrd estigation into the malter. hut committee and tnen submit!I'd estimate for 16.107 The first it was inhuman for it to take two %  on to make the investigations with poor people suffering all the while. was coming out lo pacify the He said lhat the Government people in the West Indies ano had puked out certain people for the) COUld do nothing about ll relief out of the 5SO n.nnesol He did not know anything milted. In some cases, people much about sugar, but he WOs were helped lhal were not at all sure lhal if the pad betweei In the flood area. OfOBt Britain and Oobg %  sHlnMr Adams, replvlng. said thai ued. il was certainly going t" it w;is <'ishones! of the Hon. senioi lower the living .standards of the member for Ihe City to make lhal mosses in the West [ndJOo accusation He did not know, h Great BrlUin he said, had found itself in i praonrioua pooltion today and did nut care who got squeeaed. They as member) of Ihe House wore sitting ll and lid. of • rea geinr rbod) out ide the flood f help. Mr. Mottley said lhal he v. anted make il clear lhat the Hon Mowing men from the dotcnior nieinbci foi St Joseph had Office to tell them how the) nothing to do with it. He. how %  mil: 1 'i..|' then de:di if thr people In the W Dg to allow a few pOO pie IB thO Colonial Oftlee to mil their Industries, then he would say thai the world was comlm; to an unhappy past. The trouble was that they did not speak strongly enough M ITM time that the Mini IfJ of Pood and others should realise U hen they talked about augar. Ihe Wesl Indies was a unil thev must count on If they bought sugar from Cuba, it must interfeo' with the living Stand„ '" '" !" ards of Ihe West Indloi He personally fell that the people in the West Indies had been taken rot • %  ltd* and even now in this twentieth Great Britain was still trying to be diplomatic. Mr Wilkinson then withdrew his motion. ever, knew thai ol tho 550 claims Mthmitud. ll person! had been puked out by Government from districts which wee far removed fiom the flood area. If one would examine carefully v hat had happened in the flood area, he would flint out thai thOOO i pit arho did not follow tne l-ibour I*arty. were left out while others, lhat were nol in the arc were picket! on' a nee. The actual figures on which Ihe Government was now workmc, their hands long ago, Mr Adams said thai Government had dealt with those per %  ons of greatest necessity Imme dlately. Tho Hon. Senior member for tin Otv had apOttOn Bl if the Qdl eminent had gone out and picked out houses. Ten houses, the li-: %  list lhat has been acted US0Q, i-anw from the Churchwarden if IhO porUeulor pariah." he said. Mi. Mottley said lhal it was unHue lo say lhat the ten house. were selected by the Church It is a calculated wicked Ue srhon he said that tii' i warden of St Michael picked oul ton houses." he said. The real suffererfrom B0 flood waters were still Hgwarlng and quicker relief would have be< n brought BbotU i>j %  Mr. I.. E R GUI said thai he nas grateful to Government |W its attempt, although somrwlu' belated, to assist thowho hud Buffered great %  reauM ol tho eolamTla whloh had benllon them in i4n Ho n grettetl thai the list of persons te Menace and d of assistance to be given, had nol icen clreulatod Had thai be.r done Hon meniKiWOUld lUnN leadiU si.-n lhal the amounts allottod li tho Indntdv tdequate to meet tholi require menu Mr l>**diii| ( %  ) said th,.l b wai wondering if it were nol elee d ins urh lcolutio; would have boon brought befoie In two days, he said, th Churchw ar den of st Ooorgaj ... he had got out th r list of all th damaged houses of that pariah, Bll the Government with secretariat had taken until Mav 1951 lo get through the i There is much left to I.. he said He was nol going to make air. kCCUUttona However, he thought it a very unbusinesslike and unfortunate Way for Ihe Covernmr-n' to have aitid m a serious case i ke thai Mr. W^ril (El -aid that 'hv were getting a small relief He did not kin.w i ho to blame In St Lucy, then were one nr two homes wMch the Son rnmani hud tnkeii no notice of They said thai the houses were nnl in the best state of repairs when Ihe storm came mid nothing could % % %  given II. kneu of ., house own. in that parish who wflfl | and whose house was on the ground He did not tool that thoOoverri men) intended giving ne.i tO see i %  li-titui policy of lehahllitating those person* who had lost then h %  %  completely through Ihe flood He had hoped that the Government would havi built a house for these • litorora giving them half of Ihe cost and allowing Ihem lo pay the remainder on easy lermii lie was appealing lo the Government lo pursue ih.it policy. Ih-iegales Arrive For Meeting Arriving in Ihc island last niyht by ii w i A u.i, to attend th ttrsl uivctiug of the Hegioiial V. omic Commlltec woro the doieatss from Jamaica a%  ritnldad Tlio deleg itoe oro Hen l> H Sangster, Hon B. L. M Kirkwoud. Mc-ssrs U l*vy, J II I'legg ,,nd K A Mayniei t l.,n i, HI, Hon A Qomoa, Hon A. W l(ol>ertaoii. Hon. II E RoblnoOfl Hon A Storey. Messrs. A T Shill ami II I'rmgle of Trinidhd Also aiming by the i p. portuoiij >• s Mi iiei tot Bon in! i ih' imu Oloonar Jamaloo, who U here I vn ide mooting for hit ..pel [Tie Regional v.' onoouV I in mil tee M Qa t t n g will IH0) i S.i George S-el al H.ishngs Home %  1 H) in today Lcnving the IHand tor Trinidad by Ihe same plane wui Hi B 1, Coaler, Aetlng InformathM Offlcei r th Carlbboe l ilsslon wbt was attending (' %  %  < i mtaatan Talks whb I H„-tings House las! week PIMPLES AND BLACKHEADS QIIKH. hrlpi io tUit ap ik*M bUmiOin i.,..-. .I,, tun o..l unftoib Ho..... n... wrain Dr. Chase's Ointment BABY'S TEETHING need give you no anxieties There need be no restless nights, no tears, no baby disorders, if i on have Ashton & Parsons nfsnts* Powders handy. Mothers all over the world have found them soothisg and cool* ing when baby is fretful through teething, and. best of all, they are ABSOLUTKI.Y SAFE. ASHTON & PARSONS I NFANTS' POWDERS %  TTTT For till u hitv slutvs — While ihoes. to paw muster in company, must be spotless, immaculate. Use |KUp > Properts White Renovato i^-V w h|r, or Properts Shu*hilc. No MB JW t*>,^' %  :*"":. surer way oT makirm sure f* ^ lhat white shoes are hitef r-+ PIIOPERT SHUWlllTE WHITE RENOVATOR In Cation* wiik Sponge "• We'll soon have that better with ASEPTIC OINTMENT %  i li'ii i Um %  ilinmli BCtd dn taodun| %  ii. h s In a wide variety of wonderful styles specially designed U> meet the latest trends. Green Suede, Black Suede, Brown Suede and White Buck Sling backs and open toes. Spike heels and high Cuban heels. l B rirr* CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. 10. U, 12 & 13 Broad Street. from SI2.5Mi %  a $14.97 (iliKMItl.KSI: ,'lhi, ,it j U mch—lualiin mord lime. •lusl Itt-ffii ,;'. A Larg 0RANOE „ 51.00 (ix K \I.I : IM El -l %  : STAXSnOM SCOTT A #.. I.ul. '/,V.V.V.V//.V//,V//A'/A'.'.V.'/,V.'//.*/',',V/.V////. 1



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ESTABLISHED 1895 WEDNESDAY M .' l. 1861 fci PRICE : FIVE CENTS Si||i' • Aduim will put position "~* of induitry before mission Washinitl.m : p '?" u J* 'VT? by ., M cAr m might lerd to global conflict %  ^ „. Lull all along central frontReds building up for offensive 9 I . New price controls suggested to curb excess p.-ofits in U.S. 4 CUKE WILL SPEAK FOR OUR SUGAR' Adams Says Barbados Will Tell Bottom ley Everything M R „ J. H. WILKINSON, Leader of the Opposition in the Barbados House of Assembly, yesterday called on Mr. G. H. Adams to see that Barbados was fully represented at the talks which the Regional Eco nomic Committee would have this week with the Mission from London, headed by Mr. A. G. Bottomley, Secretary for Overseas Trade. Mr. Wilkinson said that Mr. Adams was a member oi £^* %  —• II %  1 the Regional Economic Committee and therefore Barbados %  j-Sl II* y f^U I would be represented "I hope." he added, "that the hon J menilcr will insist on calling before the Mission, people who are well aware of what this sugar question means to the West Indies and Barbados in particular." Mr Aprils said that there newt ——— be no fear that the position of the .. .-• m — In the street and the 5UKi\ I l.p \lflfl "flOOr Put On Bond GRENADA, M.i. Ifl 1 • dry to-day gave aotta ' appeal when convicted of u Charge Of uslnu threatening language in n public speech concern ing certain members of the Legislature aiui was placet) o ^ ol the Council who support."-! adltion Bill. Two policemen gave I for the prosecution. A fuuiier chaise covering unlawful barm with Intent to put the legislators mentioned in fear of harm wa* not proceeded with. dairy last week told a meeting thai he did not want any of the workers to come '<> town unless he called them The V rejected Dairy's plea in the course nf his address 1o the court which Slid that th< planned and In ordered a thro term In default. industry would be put very strongly. He referred to his advisers and said thai it WSS im possible to ll nd more qunlitled men to put the commercial point ...I view Of Hon. H. A Cuke, one %  t' %  ...-I In' ;i|. I .,:i not think of anybody in the West Indies wlvj would be able to put %  of Ihe suiar industry better thn:i Mr Cuke." Mr Wilkinson who moved the itdjourninent oi the House for a few minute-, to B pe:ik on the nutter, said 'hut :t wis most important one for the Wet India and the Commonwealth. When he ,poke of wishing Ihe hon. senior member for St. Joseph to Insist m calling upon people who were will aware of the •.(tuition, he was not implying that Ihe hon. member was not so well aware cf the serious blow to the West Indies and the Comr'oiiwcallh. m that England had negotiated the purchase of a large quantity of 'ugar from Cuba, ll •ftmred too that Canada was following her example. A!hey were aware, England had only guaranteed to purchase certain amount of sugar produced in ihe West Indies and the Cum monwealth. the rest would be from whatwas known as the ppen market." If the quantity .L i '"" !l these arean was going lobe 100 sheep was offered to anyone Hie SCntcnir tte ,_j „.,.„ %  ,i,„ .,rli uimilil m. rtiivcii '. hi>lnino i..l. iprut Rnu:itl Kills Another CASABJ :.'CA. May IS Mohammed Bouali, the mnd Moor who is sowing terror i upper Atlas, struck tw... ICday, tinnging the number of his murder* to seven He then crept back into the mountains out ot reach or his pursuers. A French engineer called Chan dot was picnicking on the (tanks of Lake A/zlal with In-. friend Mile Greugnet. when Mohammed Bouali sprang from the bushes with an oldf; shunted musket. Chnndot shouted to the man In Arabic but Bouali tired twice, killing him instantly The:, he swuntil.r nun On the women and Mlli Greugnet dropped dead. Madame Chandot ran Into the bushes screaming with her baby in her aims Then she crawled for neveral noun through rough btuhej tc reach her father's fattorv near by. Police tonight completed arming every male member of Ihe population of Kasla TadJj ItepcrtiTs covering the hunt were given steel helmets and lies. Yesterday a reward ii"ntpri" pi iwduii'd the price would go down j helping; polioa arrel Ilou.ili. Labour Down To Three LONDON. May 15. The Labour Q majority over the combl.ied Opposition in the House of I reduced to three today by the resignation through ill heulth of Mr. Rhys Pavtos M i.i-.](i Socialist member loi Weathoughton. l-meashirc. Davies who le preaentad Wi I'uughton Division fur 30 year.: WSW Under Secretary for the Home Ofllce in the Labour Government Of 1924 Al the last Unction he had i i %  Of n.HSR in ii straight fight with the ( xnservativc*. —Rente RAILWAY STRIKE RIO DE JANEIRO. May 15. A railroad strike for wane increases broke out today In the southern state of Rio Grande de St.I Kcuter and Hi* po*ilHM would indeed income very serious, particularly %  s regards Barbados. "I hope ihe hon. senior membo. lor Si. Joseph will sec that luboin fto represented not only by himself oul other representalives because it affects labour very' %  kouslv." n| ,,i irodi elwei' and the We I In lies, sir Wilkinson said (hat he thought cars since the Lady lull tu Hie Wesl |i rl %  idised I Indies. Unfortunately IhCSe %  -i'i" the war had been coming to the colonies half empty, due to the fact thai the United Kingdom Mould not nllO** the olorics to spend their dollars In Ci 'It will I* a very .-.cic lilnw to the Wast Indies in particular if •ts eaasa ii> run io ihe parts", Mr. Wilkinson said. "Canada to us mean* everything, Canada wants our sweets. We want her flour, hardware, lumber, etc.. and yet we are not allowed the dollars to b*V wh.-' On pare 5 6 Points To Halt Inflation Spiral WASHINGTON, May 15 ERIC JOHNSTON, Director of the Economic Stabilisation Agency, asked today for powers to enforce controls un profits. He told the Senate Banking Committee that there were six major threats lo the "sound dollar" and he laid down a six point proKramme for flattening the inllulieui spiral. "Unless we have a stabilised economy, unless w* hold inflation In check, we cannot mount the defence effort as w.need" he said. Johnston outlined these six % %  Hire.!;, tu | On Sunday he killed his mis liens' soldier-husband and thei took pot shots at passing vehi cles on (he main road with thr ^Idler's rifle. He killed 21-year-old Andre Sauvtgnon and his mother Cartr en Sauvignon and wounded two olher people travelling in a i with them. Alter robbing (hem he fired two motor cyclists who weir onlv slightly injured and escaped He then killed a 22-year-oli! motorcvclu-t Herve Du Bourg nnc hii>illiim passengpr. Reuler •rage when buying consumer in the present ,abotir ami cmA'illmgnrs* lo re1 dollar' I. Expectetr spending Of $1,000,000,000 per week on dercnee later ihi^ year -i' High pew demands 3 Rising food prices : -i Speculative scare md hoarding shortage 8, Ai peace I I ployers : ii Oeneral cognise the exlstenes oi tnc %  1 enwfsency Hi proposed that Congress should provide these remedies: i %  tax?tion to take Spaiadlng monev out of circulating: In. it ;>ed savings: amy — %  non-essential consumption and Government business md mdivldtial must IH^ eliminatedM.I'CI-Icontrol — allocation %  leeds with production of luxuries limited lo what is left over [thenlns . Iitili parties agreed to oti %  ryfJ ... I I'ni.i.ii, torn r i>n. the damfUl i B j is ed /"! %  To ic/raiii from aggressive ross Or against th' and To reallirm the authority o* the Chairman of the Armistice Commission to supervise the implementation <>1 the armistice agreement In tlv jcmilltarlsed toot, thui •greelm lo complete freedom i mil f o r United i • i i on duty in tlH Parties have alsg reafl det ilng to -ix %  t ihi letter and spuit of ihe rmistue agreement, the al :Cnt fciid,—Hauler rider* strung out when the is in ti,e middi. oi tii.beach Com mun ists 12 Miles From 38th Tl 1KYO, v RAIN-nitKNCHKD Chinos* troop* plodded through Ontr;.I Korean mud on Tuesday i> '.'TII build-up I"r ;i new oIT.Misivi'. Sp?urhcads f the growing t'ltiimunist forcej fgciltfl the cent roof tlic 100 mile) United .Nations I in.Wr ropoi t*d 12 milen south of the :*8th Parallel. I'niti i N.Ul i ndspOttOs l I 500 or eon slogginc through the bltlg %  I Tlutl S Mac's Plan Would Increase Risk Of Third World War Bradley Tells Committee WASHINGTON, May 15. (^ENERAL OMAR BRADLEY, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, testifying today before the joint Committees of the Senate, said that he i believed Oeneral Douglas MacArthur'a Korean war proposals would increase the "risk of global war". Oeneral Bradley, third witness called by the Senate Armed Services and Foreign Relations Committee inquiring into the dismissal of Oeneral MacArthur, said he knew some critics were impatient with the Administration's plan to fight a limited war in Korea and were callinfi for a "showdown". But he said this was not desirable from a purely military viewpoint. i mlliuu %  %  .. i %  forfeit i hi m lota | Swiss Make MoviTo Train Armv BERNE MBS I I The Swiss Council toda nounced plans during ihe nun. winter for Intensive trolnli courses in the lut< | velopcd by the Swiss Arin> Pans which have lo i"an proved by both Chambers. COvei classe* from 1894 lo 1M1. Tnwpa will train i iween six to 20 days m handling new weapons rnnginu fi.m heavy field suns to super I .. rockets, new r,i|nri •Arlng mi puns nnd grenades. In IU niesSJKv t, ( PaiilSl Federsi counni wid thai %  change r must be achieved in the Oioriesl possible time "having regard lo the actual polltli I milit-iry situation."—Heeler Einhih Army did not .' indiiMii' how close the> won % % %  'IN Inn i iwopl "..I.!•• Uni v# % %  telwi en gi. ups of inn oi U 'Uni oftl '-i .i %  tl %  Kvel %  pi i>ulily wpulil msrni % %  .'i kkSMirs' warning bofor. e hit in ilrength 1 -IvTeenlrat front. A BiiCllng etti'v weather probnlily would Kperil up the expected Red OfTVl twodayi A strike Roncmlly is axpoctod next week on |gM WOatarn tfCMH Tin Allied soldiers. Hght Amn i and two Turks, raturnod \ ihi ir own 1. %  t i an prlai men oh Apt II U Heda' flr %  Ive .Mi told i %  %  Thin ujaln i aaaad (C r i U.N. Meeting /'flsf/K'fll't/ FLUSHING MEADOWS, Ms Vu.MM. Tin. ol tba United Nations Beoui it. < '..un, \\ %  hi f..i til;iy to dsaOUM th' Palestine bonlsnr situation batwaen Israel and 8j i la baa been DO I ponad iintii umot row . 15 Bernard M iiamrh, Banner Ad viser to several United State> Presidents called today for a huge Increase In the military strength of the United States and hei allies. Without naminR Oeneral Mae Arthur in his speech prepared I % %  delivery at the VlTglnls Military Institute, he sain "I wonder huvmui'i ol ihe controversy in reoaftt days is really „ raflaetson ol differences between the loader of troops and organizers" Baic said that today in Korea the Untteu Medlterrancnn. Urgr \thnittat.ft' Of Greece ToU.N. LONDI IN, ", 1 IB roiled States Ambaasaoor, Wallet OuTortl, todaj told BrtteJi the United] SeetsawlU preat i.iii meml %  > ship ol Greece and Turkey In lhAtlnnlii Cacl witiii" Ihe in si ;• %  nionths, ii w;is undatstoui i uaBftJOT here tonlsjtst. The United Butes idminiatra. Uon now IMKM he full as Turkej at a meet mst whictl Is expect t;ikplace line time in AuKUk.. The hrst n quest erf Turkish Ooven dm.l. %  ing of the Atlantic Council I New York lat Bept> 8 ace Ihem the United Si understood to have become |l gl t convinced thai short of f.iii membership oi tin p d a*ouad give Ihi nnrrseary if ih Syria i" remo v e ihetr troop <• %  (he demihl-iriscd /one. north •>! Lake Tlberiaa The United Nation Concillatso) Conaml dot nounoad laM night that the Im eotinlrii i %  • %  l In ofaaarvi %  I % %  ... Nations obsei vei i %  ." In pi demiUtaiiaed aoew The reason for the eenoaUatioti ,.r today i maattag -..~ given dlplotnatic Quarters as thai rea c hed I %  terprel itlon >i n i -...in ..•..:n tlv > A %  %  i innil. i: an consider I h> ters thai the Council might nwet until new weeh Hewter State; were .'"'buying ume t"' the whole Irea world in re-arm.'' This wa* Ihe tithe to auk Sfhetl jre doing js murh a* we cn n% quickly as we can." —Kr liter .if Alagoas, The pis i early this r lo Rio. Thr tuch had left Receife nm: was o IIM ratt belonging to Linha* Aer:is I'.IUIM.Ia i ni;iped. — %  eater CLEARANCE WITHDRAWN SINGAPORE, May 15. The Pan ma reinsured freifchtci Vcrbov which lefi Singapore sks For Divorce CALIFORNIA. | %  I).Si ..'<.. hi .... %  % %  I %  irrme i-ru'ltv—Rrn'er •\alionul Gui'Bl.. TOKYO May 15. The Jsp i % %  s CaM el todUj Draii Hill I-. be i ibtied to Wet to i h naral Douglaa Mm Arthur Japan' NauOttal Guest' for life Reuler THIRTEEN BURNT RIO DE JANEIRO stay IS i n I.I -t %  %  nn in a train running bet an Soo Pnulo f.nd VarnhaRon in Sao Paulo Slat.' The accident, which i %  • dreuh in Ihi leal ays I em-Reuler %  it eras decloV d I Q and Turkey with the Do%  i I the Atlantic I m the hCea lb arrange een held up i iU :.. %  %  ng Me *>•' raneain i onvn md ol MA d • imwer^. —Reulrr. Three Powers Will I)is4*llSS Drfe'lU'l* : UffG U'OHK. Maj 13. J f Brll tin, th. Bteita F net for the %  %  %  i 11 led to be di powei Miilil.n t.ilk* named hen usaay, T .. ranking representatives ai I fosrees of three powr In i EUu.t met in a elosely conference room nt the %  %  r % %  M oil Ma British ( i imuwloner .... Boutl < ,,. th* mill, .iv hie! Krv>r. Miss TriuiKiii W ill Toilr (Itmliiltift WASIIINliTON. May 16 %  i.i Ti unuui 87-jn -II %  laughter Margaret, win aail •<• .lay 26 for her first visit I., Mm Un and IhiContinent, ll wa meed today ltut she win not stag A White House announcemeii %  Id i.' • 'ui.i lour Britati Pram e, II ft Lum. Luaem %  npanlad '^. inion, Mi James B Holm, win* H . i Boctal B< ii i-t.ii %  un .in had ifcevaj baa abroad and it seemed %  good tlirn I trip i i ina engagement II --ui Renter v*.n". he declared ii, i dd the Unite %  ui powei mppoftlng id .ih.mi's if BovW Kir..i.. vi I control tini-nlirr Guraalan lai.i then Soviet itelllte may hsve i,i ...ii bees upon which to bu'ie 1 military power tc rule Untie ill I lllll.l i i. i ..1 lii.iitk'v tiv-tiln'.l li himl rlimed doom ns ll Othei A oensoead I phie report ol evidence • fl provided f (, r reporters Hi idle) ni '.ii.t MacArthur' I proKiiimtne eiillini: fi'i hlmkii'l|mg l! ,, China, bombing Manrehurlan bases and using Chlneai National! I trooj military VahlC K< impalgn wa uni he added: "Jolnl Si..11 u-lievr thm (he • srould !' %  raose I of a Klohiil M.IT -Hid th.it Mh'h •' Irish should aol be la i. i M11 •We now have localised ihe Vonfliet in Korea", hiIL 1 •SO-mllltei • mearures un h i it m II place Ihe United :, \*\ limn iif feaponai i.ihiv lot bnedenlng Un l;ii the same llin* loslni Jnoi all. of our Allies Bradli ^ said ii"Jolnl st.iiT wen In %  betti i th,.ii M.K Arthur to nsaess the rink %  1.1 ii ii %  ne to jinik" ii nti i i.iiii'.u %  fi II i me crltli i %  rould sa) win .inthe Jolnl Chiefs ol Ing the feet that we are not mllltaruj In posl* tion to I loa n" with itnj i —Reuler One Dead In Sea Collision NORFOLK V rglnts, May IS, The AtlantJ Pit• in .' Kill III coUlejOB betan b dei Vainiur and 1 i %  than had '"' %  feared %  one kin"' i ., timed dead ai Last nlght'i %  nnouaoi nenl nf It kimvvti dead ... aitlmate" thai '•ii' ui Ingarnom Head i ih.. snoouncenMnl aavlalnsd rha \ d.imr i i. ..nd rot peratlonal traiiuiiu • gulloaa ul.awlauon apti H H i an ...... .... in coUhrton iti. One roiner s s Taeesaa Traep, live mlhsi oul In the Atlai tic "it Caps Henry, near here. The flre broke oul In both ships, hut the I SOt the %  i bees r i i. v ton uni., hot own p nd 1 ifesar "ii i %  lad by sulvaae —Beater THE •ADVOCATE" pays for NEWS niAL 3113 Day or Night Fr/trs* ot*/y /A/' 6rj/ //•/// r/o Mi Ih Its today th Suvvessful O/teralion IXJNDON. May IS i. Winston Churchill, wife %  i bad it a I bulletin < %  i i I..-. hospital tonlghl Id Churchll n '.,. perfectly suiiaasfuT It entail her remaining in hospit.aeki roDowed to eight week ileacei winch she will —Reuler Vets /Vew Post TOKYO May if. Atomic expert, Rear Admlri waa today named a.s Chiei -f SUrl t-. Vice Admiral Turn. mi nder .-r the United N.v.l Porcee in Korean waters and Commander of the Btatl Navul Forces In ll o rat Fi He %  Res \ %  %  eat si ROBOTS WILL REPLACE MEN Voi every . bsM aess hi.h rises faunas arsmserj' <•/ itviniuuU 'i Jilting Irititilr ofwolfiliM 'mi Jse 6eec< Ijewaaa A ffeegye < i L .... a. ,irirussls u*Ua firt • i> %  inee, apprt>i>rititr fur juni saea IOTH I as i It HI —iakaa 'ft'* "" '•' geesf fiilrtl hrlrflfnr oi/i.-r prtiptt — ir A . aauty ih,ftmi nsitt >/. -sIn nni.i M (By ROBERT RUKSEI.I.) "Iinei. An authority an Cjfbei LONDON May 15 a et ch t he new science of irn Profesaor Norbert Wiener said j"thinkini'" machine Dl Wlenei that In the event of anoUnrlison leave from MaBachuset'e' plnbal war. robot maehlnes will for a lecture tour In Brll In the fi*c f ^-hat he world, whlli i man and woman U engaccI ..ithout war. th* s wa a rh l n es will soon rx-jjr %  ret developed Then m %  • %  %  %  !>r Wn •,. >^e> war cornea ihe United industry will be the ilr*! mad %  %  %  i' r 9UFER VIRGINIA <:iG\!U:i 11> BEXSOX HVDtiMS out nnstt s/rtf/r, inMtn.w A --CS^&-' I



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WEDNESDAY, MAY It, IKl I CLASSIFIED ADS. BMir.MH.s \|>\ it( \TI IMCI: TtUPHOIil HH re* Bnuii. iiBtur C rvncrrrwtit. In Cn • M 0 • for any word* xd ro. wk J for Deata Kill SALE PIKIM v*iis SHIPPING NOTICES PEHMIVU wwrui rek-d..-.. %  hci iwUrn ii Ttaft eharpr tor Btrtha. Marnacee. kedftme-t. and In Nfemori •IM on week-day* >rKI |l I lor any mimbtr of word, i 1 NU par word on weagt day and 1 tar.ta par word on Sunday* lor earl • •MilWf U.e undenlftned b*aj Ihroudti HilaadlUta (o thank -.. Mlhft and gave ... their %  '>' pathaa the ocx-aaloe. "I Ih* dear. •rf our beloved M.r-am Green All—rt CNM .huabandi FKwiU. Louiar. NaM i "-I" e. J-in*.. ci.iu.1* Ore*" II Mr. Uada Daumea .children.. Audrey Oaborne *si*r. U8A. and Eveljn IfrtMtda IS JlIn IN MEMORIAM Fi.i.'heth Ofrrn. di— i May Meenorv Vrrae I The Bui I would not have y ignorant. baeUtraii. concern winch ere aale*p. Dial ye w •van a* olher* which have Tor If wo believe lhal Je.u< roar again, even an them %  leep in Jfiuiwill Ood In %  atai-...*. rh fl r fc .•* TS co-la ,nd 1^ v an' M "-*— ro-d \u.J.word w rt < 'ti a AUTOMOTIVE B*dfard v.,. ALMOST NEW II HI irqulred .!* % %  * ** Ineured V|eP .** %  Coal M.m prep l*e lift*" ••nib Apply (O.rlfv Oa-aa> Grove. ChrM CAR" dii.i... Bob Edirl.il I. HinwHeil. Ma -nit food od ")Hlnf cOndlltan. pri<* Applr F n I (. Chureh. Dial life. hail ioA-I or iv*rh* ,l*d and bomie-l tarwn ftr c TRUCK Or.ISM Bedford Trm* m g^*****"-**-*Appi, .„_-. i*.:v POULTRY htm r.lilah. Samuel .Son. Mullet. Allaien.i 'Dougtitei tlarlc*. Alfred. R M ., an K% whuo an d BI Rhode UUand*, Plymouth H-ch. !*.. Hamwhlr* m.rt Bop Whilr Leg he. r A Gordon Met",. manr Conatltutkin Boad. M 3 >i pi -a !" .-. La. m B POULTrW Edw.id. fie...ge. Barred B.TK. "Id A,.,..• ft d Rheumatism hlle You Sleep > I • ir roa laBu Uiarp .laMm,. PBIDI. II WI.-.11 •!' • •... IF r. II abawt roar !< I* aa i ia a rd %  '."I" f.". ...!r .* % %  ,n oirwr irwpiaau • Kidorr i......i-t. m t.-fl i-t-'i a* I — .. i< .at,. a. N—F la-*.,.. C!, DIIII->U Nn, Cr.l .•< f... •-,.,-, IUhbat a al !-•>•. oxa* Ac... .. *• r.. — "I — < Cola*, ir. %  laru ILIIIBC in. ftarnu •!> an *ar Kidrwr.. afladdar and U.IBJ l la* haan. r*t U aaoMal.lr I ) 13.11 lid ol I,I *rn(lnrna a araiMii tram an IM dalKn i. -. Ih* aoll Park, brrcd. Chick. S. f a< A l.ml, -. HA I H< i On* Philip Radio if tubMIn %  ood rondllMn. no rra-on.KI* pff,. raCHH* Api.lv | U E EMM idwarda C U IT. ft, CP. 18 II .:. LIVESTOCK REAL ESTATE Canadian National Steamships %  %  flip" 1 rood 14 -i*r, - pi i.nd t'ppri CarIMn it j„ w or Ua tMslv of ihf \ dXMard %  rr parilriiliif a> i %  Ht'Ti-iiiNSON I;AN>II> !ADV HtLSON 1 CAN CR .• w 'MAI IXNOCIt ^ u IADV MODNCY ,. S Jut* 1 ADY HEWaO?: „J0 Jurd) IADY BOONKY ..?• Jufe. It Mv a jui* A,i* l M) 13 A" U Auf l)IIIIM,IHH'J M ,.,„ ., ft I rood.. 1 pcrthc. adi< ro pprn kown aa Tfct Abba, Chi Church Thii pntprrtv it a naw >> Bui)' • %  M dwrllir.|DM. ift roomBMrWM (, IftUdJ r i. and bvioi-.ft. >o El -•"" propart* will ho wl up i' wlo bv Public Comp*tiii..i .i| our OrBtr. Riro. on riiday ifih May IU1 I Any Mtsos LADY I L-ADY NXLSQH IADY BUUMV Auft Si Auf Jun* I July I Au* Arrlvn ArrtYca •i J.ihai Kitiui. M ftw t r—I Au( a Sapl 11 •*i "Had wlih rold itoradft ctlaaa : trMBW r. nnir.ih ih %  VCAItWOOO A BOYCT Mr. J A I GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agent.. HARRISON LINE OUTWARD FROM TH2 UNITKD KINGDOM LAXD %  r bulMinft. :ii.OOfl >q ft Oierl .okinft a Ifttft* an,, o' 81. Philip and Chn.l Chinh Ma* Icriil rtivironnwnl II ti> K mlnulrana Coa.1 Walkina di.ioru-*. I. %  -la* and Hlftti MIlopI Oovt Watn TaTrphorw. Elrctnc Llfthl I a-. .i,r air* Appl> u, W | Wrl*1n. MonrilrrTr. HI MIW B4 II-IH BUITAIU luuniso STTEui^ivd it Wni !" G.r*n. Ch Ch A.r, 10 Pin •J. II land andI I.Rt %  • n. ro-d n.ii B Day and WO Ni.lt iiu ,,. MISCELLANEOUS ANTIQUE CAMS In* (old ttttn I tNTIQlT. SHOP AN'TIQUES — Of avary drarilpt.on Jc,-li. fli„ iJlpftf Early book.. Map.. Cortiuftoa Anilqui DIAMOND and Klin HIM; Mali ricrpllonal quality. For q>i I1BD CORRLNGEX ASTIQl't Dial 4Uft Tirfanv ona-linv. auft.ran ir*rn liaaMaa aboan aboit Mr J c .nm f It aaa'i old aad Mara i>Md a>lia Mrn •acl.fFin e.tf patai. coatin.allf aalli> if I* D I a hag IStr • G—a-f.ad I* Paj* Tw R.ghi .o. Ml l f Ratk V alfkl. *a t . .. Uaa / aarr Mm fa' paari > a-oadr-. (>aa a.i awtad a. *iel naaoina" If (A .rf NIY5 DDII .d, %  HIUMATISV Cyst ex.;: MM CUKMIIK LOYa\L BROTHERS OF THE STAR Neediest Cases Fund RrlRllvr to i .trim .I and Fair u. bp held on "Ih and 9lh Junp at tfUf-fn'* Fark. lhr> undr-ralEn*d ill rwiYe pnliira for thp followlnc:— (•) Cwlumr liimK 'in St**, luiui(0) Advrrtlslnc n.u.d"! %  HUloriral Bands. In ordtr Io rabw the sUndard ol Carnival. Ihp Sl?t?rina: Commltlrp would iiM.rr.-i.it,tinro-oprratlon of I inn. Clubs and IndivlduU lifinji aa ordinal aa possible. No rntrancr fp* u ill DP Inrcrrl Morp partlrulam lalpi A Carnival Band of ihlnv ..IH US vlslllnc RarbadoR to (ahr parl 'n Ihe parade. Closlnc (in.-. 19th Mar SEYMOIR BECKLES e/o Vestry Clerk's Offu-r. BridietaywB. For Booths. Stall*, nnd sideShows, contact C. MORRIS, Sobers Lane. A Speelal Display will be (Iven by the B L.S. Mediterranean Fleet under the Command of C<>mman der B, I'IM-,L EARLY rRBNCH Candrlabtft, branch*.. Pillad wiiii orlftlnal duunond rtchrd .torn. lamp. Prlnlnr condtlion C.<.HH|N<;EN An, | 1 V.rht Club U 3 SI In "FTIJt FASTENERS J—t racoivad I %  pply ol Pll* Faalaneia Phonr MI • Gadda. Oranl Lid. lor your rodjaaV ,.. %  %  uan-* CKNTISK ANTIQUE "IATI". ., ngurriRoyal Crown Darh., fUvklnc ham Spode. Bow. Cnufthi.. Roval Copanhargan and Ro'-l . ra.trAT exiRHINGFS 13 9 SI—In GALVANISKD SHEETS Baal quail*; -aw >ha*ta. Cheap..! in Ih* lUand n (MM: T ft aaat: i n H n. i n n & fi U 40 Nati caah. Bailer hurry I l IIAHNEB CO. LTD. 4 a ai-t The Property known a 'Tn* l AI ChrMt Church Tilt. | J SwSSSBfl Roua* wtlh t aria.. ;!', perche. ..f lan,i llanr. II D Kin TlahOT* n Mill be .el up for Kal* h Pubi.i.i,n.„ 4i ... r or'... ... ). r .i,, | IBM. al 1 SO p m rt ..•pcclion ,pp, Mr H I King; on In.' ptvataSM YPARWIX1D A BOYCr Bissn, II a at in %*es-el S S. "PLANTER B B l tNGUIST" SS. FACTOH SS. -TRIHESMAN s?* TRADER Irotn UoeriMKil In %  %  IIW I %  %  I Leaves %  %  %  Due K..I..I %  I sih June ISth Ju dabi %  "I! I I. v %  St Jam LOST A MM Ml I.OS1 I'UHK \OIII iv B0MEWARD FOE Tl'B DNTTED HTNODOM Vrwl For r. hi H.tluilfM s a "traciAUsr 1 ror further information .nplr ic DA COST \ & CO.. LTD.-Agent. W* Shnii-. CENTRAL POUNDrl' %  ". %  .TIM 50 HlmrrHARHAn'.s BHIP1 TPADiNt; CO, i.iuiTrn TELFPHOSE CO BABnAnos rotmosrt : iviTV.ii It Bhai i auTBD The .tbm-P aharea taill .. Piibllr C/mp*tnion al ti, r I I ui-der.lftned or, md.n lh IS) M l-i" Sirr-ri CABRINC.T.iN \ WAIT SHUTTER Ona Rieel H,.ll.: hulta. R fi lonfl by It. high Apply Evalyn loach A Co. Ltd 13.3 81-Sr, HrTH CSSNTtTBY MIXIATUBE %  ivory, lamoua court beauty, prislnwde*p .* %  ft.,),i fram* tioo (MHUilNt.i's Upper BMV Slreat. iy 1 11 Puklir Odirial Salt..Ml ,M in* abou Pan* l.ll Squ-i S.,,,.1 | %  §• I-inline and bounding Harbiido* n.ivernmani Rail*. %  Ida. on land* ol Welrhra T. •ii the public Kid at PalrSpM loneth. v.nh the limn' m Houap pnd Bn< riiilldliia.. Arc. a pu r ata od pa Th* whole pmpaity .ippr.ii -.1 t.. TWH TH'lUSANn AND NINETY ONE DUtXARS AND irTi'ENTY FIVE CENTS Svdi.ey Rnlili id Vvi •rke lor i4arli._ NB a*'. D-T-..II h. -ard. OniKXTAI SOCVENIRfl. ( 1 RIOS JEWELS New shipment opened PUBLIC s/OTIt'EK T i emla pa ftpat* llnft oi dnd 13 rrall par apafa line mltlmam ehargt II SO oil and ai.n on gfc sSJS aa a, u'*fk-da|fg %  iu-idan. wr.K-d-ia* THE AC.EICI IT!HI AIllTa iha rredllar* baldlaa .in lira. aaala.1 HI t fill's PLANTATION, at. Taaaaaa TAKE NOTICE that 1 th* owner of th* above named plantation, am nbmi to obtain a loan of rinoo under the provuiona of th* above Act. acai.,.| trie atolaaaaa aid other erop. ..f iv Doctor %  rolMi Vi-Tobs Dr J Baalelli. oidaly-liio ph.alcian, rttently atalrd tlata are of the opi a U body 24-Hour R-auIti e under.ia.iied will oilci for tale a. • Office. No IT. lli(h si.ee 11,1,. town, on Friday ihe JMh d. a] M.i ie dwrlluifthmiM know. a. GRANP VIEW with the land (hereto rantamm*. Bnnda 3/3lh Perche. or thereaboula. lual* at Ba'haheba Saim Jowph Intpeclion pn application to the Caretaker, on Ih* prrml.*. r further partH-uUra and condition. ,.le apply 10 — COTT1.E. CATFORD Co 13 5 SI —* o d I will offer for Ml* by Public Compotnion at my ofSce. Vi.t.. on Friday IBih al 3 p m Trm foltaf. called I.lU .luated al Mrtftan'. tiap. Bitltoni Croaa Road houte tonlalni open ftallrrv Drawlnft Dininft I bedroom.. W C Bath waah liaaln. Kitchen with runntnft mater and .laiblmft on about lO.OOfJ aq fa*t of land For inaporuon betwavn 10 to p m on applleallon Io Ihe lenanl Tor condition of mile -ppTv 10 R Arehei M.K-..rlc. Dial 7 12 SI—4n AUCilON MONTH I :.\L, AUSTRALIA. MLW ZEALAMI LINE, LIMITED ild.A.N /. UH1 rOMOAJU Marrh Jh, An'*"> at Bartaadoa K-i. SS 'ARABIA" la wbaduled to %  liom MolMil. 1Mb May. Adelaide) Set'i Maqr, MeiiK.,,..,. an. .r,..., Uri.ba.v at Trlhldad drin latlrc hall of July, and pro.aedi.iK Ih.r.aiiar 1 1 and Liverpool In addition to |* W ral I I ve.-.i haA COSTA a TOWN. BAHHAIH1 MV Caribbee will aeeei.' lam., and Paaaenften oi Ironunica. Aiiuiua. UoniKirai Nerl. and Hi Kni s.llln| Filda. IBth Tn* MV MJanek. SVU) rarao and Pai e. %  tea, A it Kf>in M and Si KmBail rrid< Itt M V (aria.H'l I am accept Carao and Paaaenaera for SI LutUl, St. V r-ertl. Gronada and Aruba. Ratlins on g en." lath inttant FRENCH LINE tie Qle TratLsalUntlque sMMM III I IWULAND I 1 i; v\i 1 ( UM Il(.\i Mr I I [HI \.x s.[ i., ( „. \| iitiiii.ue (.UJilrlnupr anil \nlUUS ( A It 111 tU W I OLOMI'H k| I] I.IU..I..I U t.lldil rarao, CSttBtSSI %  II Isl llllll I''.' hsairs (uajB. Arrepllni I'.I.-IMIKIIS i'.run ;tnl Mall II.M.JON[SiU#..l.ld. AGENTS Phone UI 3RU NOI It |; aUJEMIB uya 1 %  %  %  died 111 Harts*"., Ihe 13th day of Decaanb.. 1 %  %  %  1 ..(inell of Garden l,i| 1 11 into Rood, st MI.P.ICI an 1 1 HM IBIh d.y ol July, if. 1 fter wh( h 11 ara,...,, ,,, atttrtbut* th. %  %  .'.-niimi inavPW havkia raBtM I I Id Had ootir* jnd I will not b* liable IoI pan rlllVATr irpm in, Itch Germs Killed in 7 Minutes %  lion tiny lrM %  %  lala. %  MISCKI.LANKOrS VarI OIK 151 'a I Ilch and other tment. |lve only they do not hill dia.***r-i-. Nike. Harm kills tie pei ... nnd la 1 Ttintr. %  %  o Get %  *d Nlftodarm fi.ni yaur today nnd raBBo* ethereal %  Ma. i/s Nixoderni Tor Skin rionilti %  all %  I aaajaajtaaj Innelilrd 1 -l,ie ,ie r..ii,e,i*d i„ attU, I %  of Mav ISSt GERTRI Pi ISABI I.LA 1 ONNEI %  .-,..._. „„„ „, xnr tilJl ... tlnahelt. Ida** afcad iin....ir and Brttmi nottva rimnlni -aler Kllehan nii %  *< anhmr*i o p.t. 1 Hal 3BM u a at tn Flat, al .liable fan Apply %  NO CUNSTIPATlOr: AFTER YEARS 0 f MISERY 1 . ..... I ail BBAf reziiLir I Hay' %  \rll-r.l 114 Miami [l 1 •• I I : 1 %  %  %  %  % %  %  lura KsllBfi to. of %  %  lima, and Ihi %  a>uh and pi*" •>• %  %  tl.eO' the> .ill 1.. II iributkM debta are proved. B.W.I. SCHOON1R OWN lit. ASROC. INC TifiB. *:. Aaverme It Fay* Res*** NOTICE %  lie or nv.i MH'lurl'i Vc.ii. EMhlblthin 11 Kil, will be .1of in* Vsatry .. c. clock noon on Thin1av tliid %  day. Itwi .1.1.1 be at lain .linilUKI" PlAtlflRM HlKKt %  ,'..! l n 11.e 1". .ra..,. Aaenl. to Mil thla .ehlcie h--h La. been damaged In an aertdrhl I" |,,i.n. nuellon at Ih* Courteat Garaft* al 3 p.m. -.n Frida*. lath Mar IfAl. JOHN M HI UXIM 13 5 SI 4n UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER I'.I Hainan strei i|i A-ao Ai %  VINCENT f.llltVITH UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER IIOI.III TNI '-: We Will Mil on FRII>AY | OarafB, whiti-p.nK Hivd. .-I*** Ondie Am,. Timk ni. Slee Matiorm in *>*.'> 1 Ride I o'clock Term, ca.h H'MMvli: TROT.MAN 00. Auctioneers UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER I.. Thin *M lala Mil illor r. A. Crawford, we win •*< ..1 TiFarrn" .near SI. SI. Philip, which include: \ 1 r I.-. Ptnlna Table |paal IH. Ha.rid Tip Tcip Tabl*. TO,, ,„„ 01..I Ti ( fwf Enda S. II, Tab t*, PedeaUl mdrbSard Lady-a lantiqun \ 1 MM Chair all In ve.. old Mahoaanv. %  %  -Ml. CUtClaw Bowl, Plated Ware. Silve. Spoon.. Cordia Beibr t 1, Tabl*. Waaft'.n and nook.hell in MfM llcd.tft.dl Old Mar.itft W • I PB I M T WaalaUnd. Chamber War*, %  ajSfW irvar. Liftht lloua* I j 11 Urn. Puelaaa Oiokal „>.l „ther item. Sale. 11 JO ., ,-lne • 1 CASH. HKANKF.R, TROTMAN & CO. r ,"V.'.Me-d PASSAGES TO EUROPE %  A'Uiilfs i'T.idn. IB, I... tSSJ I I % %  I**. •'" %  snlling to Eurupv rortnlghtly. The IHor time* %  pi ad and plaaaaraa at noorrn life* Do you auffar -. abaajt Air M'WOTVB3*D| leat at hare an Inferloiur riimpU llie aorlrlT of wouieu or do beaa' )oj by irllhOOt a "-ond tUnre 1 1 laeaa eonditlon*. Ihen jou are th flanda. and unleia your ftlaida •..n.ulal-d you ran not nape 10 retain 11) on r and an ii at Ian. VitoMz* Your Glands FertunaUly la" tbaaa *ho auBer Iroai aland aettao. a phyaklan ilh 30 year. I:.a >rrf-c'-d a -imple, aafe, and nn.i-l. HM la itimaiat* aland acimly and thia. brliif a na ..1 mct.aaad an.riy, iiUllt,. a Tim prearupturn, tailed Vl-Taba, I. In pleaaanl, %  aaiaiaaa, taMat le.m AU yao need 11 do U 10 tare lea Mile tahl-n Iht— t.m'< earn Say. rhla yrwiipiion alaii-01* minedialalr. Hlai.ilatlnft the Hand-. H-lufatlnft the blood, and ciluriuii. your body. Aa your alanda ii>|" f. you "UI feel and aee %  Hole body. Aa your alanda rapidly b ow> ,,.„_ .._,_ (K ,.,! aaua ". ... n alionaar. >*u U1 feel and aee yaunalf be'', ?Ltf?n, ','„V?' CSSBSM roiina-'. n.iar.-o-.t-d. SBd M /" b ;''.„'",,' onlv alia to keep up with your or*. but "'J "" .iSf.!??..-., ,, reallimt the My* and pataaaraa el We PP T —'• % % %  "^ iinbtOAerrna... ftavraailf lUan em bala... # .. /. ,-.,„ %  BdiS*' Vi-Tabs •Guaranteed ro-DAY s n 4 // vrvvs STEAM PRESSURE GAUGES from 30 lb*. 0 I .11. (.: ll tbal M 4 KXTIIAI I HI Mill. I llri .. | HI %  < i UM JOHN M. BLADON A.rs. r.v.A. roR REAL ESTATE and AKTION SALE** 'Phone 4840 — Flan!,r BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS \





PAGE 1

PAGE FOUR BARBADOS All\ OCATK WEDNESDAY, MAY 1. 151 | BARBADOS S AlADttTE Ind atIdtoM May 1C, 1'IM l\ I III IIAIIK THE complaint is often made that the public in the West Indies are not very interested in matters that will affect them vitally. There is one contribution to this apathy that could be removed at once. To-day for example there begins in Barbados the first session of the Regional Economic Committee. Nothing has happened since the war ended of greater importance to the West Indies than the formation of this Committee. For the first time in the history of the British West Indies. Governments have agreed to look after their own trading interests, by pooling opinions and resources and speaking with one voice. Yet this terrific achievement is to be worked out behind closed doors. Twentyfour hours before the meeting was about to begin there was no information as lo whether or not the Committee would discuss anything in public. So the greatest achievement of the British West Indies in the economic field is to be left in the hands of Government representatives and their advisers, but the man in the street is only to read whatever handouts may come his way via the Press. This is not democratic procedure, nor is it even good commonsense practice. The extension of votes to a community is nothing but a sham and mockery of democratic principles if that community is only to be told by their political representatives about the merits or demerits of their opponents. If the representative government that Barbados now possesses is to become responsible government, it pre-supposes the existence < i a maximum number of voters capable of understanding the major issues external or internal on which their economic security depends. What is true of Barbados is applicable to the West Indian region. Yet what measure of confidence is placed in the public? Should the West Indian public not hear what its Government representatives and advisers say about Canada-West Indies trade? Should it not be given the opportunity to hear the views of the Commitlee on Industrial development, inter-island shipping, oils and fats, regional marketing facilities, Caribbean representation at major commercial conferences and the proposals for Customs Union? Of course it should. How else is it to become well-informed? It cannot go to the debates in the House of Assembly for two reasons. First, these important issues never seem to be debated in local legislatures. Secondly even if these were—in Barbados at any rale—there is so long a gap between spoken word and printing that the public would learn nothing except that it was too late to learn anything. The Press does its heroic best but there is a limit on the resources of a Press struggling to inform a public kept in the dark. To-day only unity will get the West Indian case heard and ensure a square deal for the people of the area. The United Kingdom despite its many lamentable mistakes of the past, present and future has done much to help the West Indies. But it is intolerable that any longer a small handful of Government Officials should control the economy of the area. It is more than intolerable. It is unjust. But what guarantee is there that any local committee would be any more tolerable or any more just, unless responsible to informed public opinion? It is informed public opinion that is lacking and the "closed door" policy of conducting vital public meetings is to blame. %  The Workers Charier' YESTERDAY sary of the Workers' Charter. Thai It what the famous papa encyclical iMued on May IS, t891, has been called. Ilentin N*varan was published at a time when modern techno logical advances had resulted In the degradation and enslavement of millions who sweated In factories and existed in slums. B> GEORI.E III Ml predecessors. In tr rested though they may have ted -Justice" are used synony tic*, the chapels, against the more mcualy and when the views ol Von Kettehr to <|uote an exEr.itian views „f the Establishmen with decades or knowledge ample, (Bishop of Mainz in IBM) ment. Is to-day becoming strong!v •'<* experience arc dismissd as KKNNKTH WILSON THE RigtH Honourable C. D. Howe, Canada's Minister of Trade and Commerce when I he announced the new B.W.I. Trade Liberal-1 ization plan said: "The way has been opened, but energetic sales efforts by Canadian exporters will still be required to insure that full advantage is taken of the opportunities provided." Since this statement was made, the original list of goods covered by the Liberalization Flan has been extended m one r two respects because of items added by the United States and which were not on the original Canadian list. The most important items are in the textile Held—rayons, dresses, [shirks, and so forth. However, Canadians are l'H\< IK M matists er" is used with'the same menuHitler gave to "Jew." "A Bui th* auccoue. of Catholic SS'icldbv NSl s£.h? t0 ,or <"•>'"< "*' %  %  "" •ocU.1 movement have Wen l,n,l)£H a m,m.nLu and th !" ThSd wMch " <***"* ,or un< "'' .— ro^S&ths^,r s ? ^' %  s r sv^stirsstfiixiUm*~>*>** ..n..doe*,,-, A .ucceion or ,/. and holy 17 am'^omTum.U "^cTdlt "" ,"" d *>"*" %  fiTfiL't "** ,nC UdC h S "" y ^'^ almOS, """" POP ,„ m ^ x.i. do.„ ,„ LSfflSsVftS rzr&zssr •ra-rv I. t P*P le ,rom thoM who W1 undor peratives and institutional U. lleo, Xlli the ln8h of Htllet or are I|U centlves whlci is urgently called under the lash of Premier Stalin, for. A relurrslui a proper con but UM3P reuct to what they dls.-option of Christian education .* uke In '.!• same way the first condition of recovery, the second is lo restore and ic The idea of equal justice im i.fcnd continuously the rights ...' all no longer bi-ds the COflgcJgaM %  [„. famthf and "' !*• corpora tioi The great mistake" wrote Leo "' ,nc British progressives, and and to recognise these rights in XIII in Rerun. Nuvarusn. •;* to ,ho "d** of Justice of any kind is aH legislation as superior to and take it for granted that one class losing ground. antecedent to those of the State." of society Is naturally hostile to %  %  %  The political doctrines _..,. „ ,_ the other, as if nature intended > %  ">* preached that the rights of „ Tht ll the nttOl Rerun. nrh .nd i-our la live at war wilh '"ajorillea are absolute. tht anyNovanssn. test sTOfftari i har, r o uve at war w.in ^^ propf rl> )s everybody's, whose anniversary was celebrated if only enough people say so. yesterday It il what Bishop are themselves denials „f elemen Bentley of Barbados used to tell tary public morality and have "J simple srordsto.t ng %  nwnbcgl had a repeicuss.ve effect „n prtg " Young >^ ft****** vate morals To take what you club •**" ,^ •*'< %  .. ^^ Jen n measure which if ran vhun v ,np m !" < accepted in politic our own day have been thoroughly sensitive to the demands our time. It was who said "If society is to bthealed, in no other way can I lit' hi'.ilcil s,i\i' by a return IChristian lifo and Christian iv solutions .'• one another. So Irrational Wd false is this view that the cxai contrary b the truth. Each .. % %  needs the other: capital cannot n Ithout labour nor labour withmit capital. „„„ Mutual agreement produces ^nJ* 1 ,,,^ press for inclusion of that item when the list is reviewed at midyear. We'd also like 1<> see a traditional product like oatmeal and a very important item like machinery included No doubt merchants and importers in the British West Indies would like to add other things that used to come from Canada and which arc still restricted. And there are strong hopes expressed here that when the plan is next reviewed there will be a further enlargement of the quotas themselves. The reasoning and justification for this approach by Canada is well supported by the trend of trade ligures during 1950. harmony and urder: perpetual conflict, on the other hand, gives JJlJV. lie to nothing but confusion and outrage." "Christianity today." to quote Qgshgn 'orty years after on May 15. II Plus XI wrote in ibno Anno "It will possible to unite all In nlous striving for the common good when all sections of society have the intimate conviction that ly be conllncd to public Douglas Jerrold for the last time, "has |0 rtMOqtMr I he world Less than a week ago a Biifrom its allegiance to the false ti*h official who has the ear of gods of the enlightenment, but its the Secretary of State for the task is far more difficult than Colon I e. explaining to me any previous stages In Christi; only be wnv ,he United Kingdom suphistory. hiirmrsported Mr. Gairy In Grenada M _._..,. the expense of Mr. Marryshow. Chml.anily conquered the desthe father of Socialism in lh. l>air of the Roman World in the Wt bl 1|U|1CS third, fourth and Bfth cent by word of mouth and by they are members of a single fain, understood him to sny that ample, but it .(id not have t, ily and children of the sainu -Mr. Gairy exploited his opporface ;i m; e.lu...ted, mass prop Heavenly Father. Then the rich (unity" "Suppose." I replied, "that nganded body of opinionated and others in power will change Mr. Allder or some other memignorance." their former negligence of Ihcir bcr of the Barbados labour poorer brethren into solicitous and Party exploited his opportunity. And if anyone is tempted practical regard end will listen would the Secretary of State let ?> h(lte has l^en progress, let with kindly feeling to their just Mr Adams down, just as he let mm derive all the c o complaints Working men too will Mr Marryshow down?" lay aside all feelings of hatred nstigatoi so skilfully. ease to feel Thousand Adolescents'' o study of young "Your views are prejudiced." I people between H and 20 in tli was told. factories, shops and workshops of When a friend of mine rallied Birmingham. "Their averagf dismissed pocket money is 7s. 6d. a week at out of hand and told "he must 14 and rises to 21s. at elsjfata be a planter." He was not. but 25 per cent of these foi tun.iti Thll incident happened in young people read no liooks. ana Barbados less than a week ago. of the remainder most read Another point made by Douglas weekly comics I r boy-' and girls' Jerrold In England r**t. Present weeklies only. Toe staple amuseand lutare is no less disquieting, ment is the enema: after that He is talking of the new ruling the dance hall, the dirt truck ant God. chose to become a carpenter ^^ w h|ch has already suppress watching football. Sixty-llve pe: among men, and to be known as ,.<] tn ,. capitalist in England This cent, or these young men nevei the son of a carpenter ruling class as the Times lnnnted fntcr a church. The encyclicals are there but out more that fifteen years ago Ihey have been neglected not are "not those who own but those All this is not progres.. bu only by the Catholic body but by who control caplt.il." decline. the world. In Great Britain there 'The new ruling class" write* ', KHVland p„„ h .,„ nl mi Paean ti is a strong and virile Christi.ni Douglas Jerrold, "is unique. Their n>. hV i.i> j-r.-id. tpr-t IOI. M I vy. which social ulrife Not only will they cease to feel "'"' ""."Z" weary of the position assigned to **J ^^.^ them by Divine Providence society: they will become proud of It. well aware that every man by doing his duly is workuiK use fully and honourably for the com nion good, and is following in the footsteps of Him. who being The Colour Bar In %  Britain (By a Hpeelal CorrespondrnU LONDON Mr. Reginald Sorensen. BOeiall Member of Parliament nnd Free Church Minister, has a dash ,Lthat quixotic temper which ).,.:„ the heart of chivalry nnd th tl fa( ., ., SKSBS1 rtrength Ol ^g*^" *""' ,, ( ,in ''; almost zealous desire' to discount "' the.r countries and wh "* fiS?" e'SLS nr"nHiilf " barriers of race, and one social friendship we should seek to win —ndmills of ancient prejudice. Wl rkl r am „ h C olourl in anl hold, may now be exposed own brand of ApnrtPublic concern was keen and obviously sincere. For not only did those students lose JH opportunity of enjoying international fell rhlp. but, as Ihc Manchester Guardian [xtinted itiit, ">oun< 'ho may rise to In" leaders bill which he has Introduced ll to "make Illegal any discrimination to the detriment of I^ndo SPANISH GRAMMAR II.. Hills A I ..itl Advocate Stationery YACHT FITTINGS BRASS MART TRACK GALVANISED ANCHORS—7. II and !4-li BRASS BILGE PIMPS BLOCKS—Single and Double %  I" SHACKLES'."; 5/18": *./': HARP SHACKLES—',"; J'U"; V Tt'RNBI'CKLES—',"; 5/IS": H" ( Ml IK BLOCKS SWIVEL I 'LI.F.VS CHOCKS RINGBOLTS—Galvanised—2'."; J" WILKINSON & HUMS CO. LTD. Successors to C. S. PITCHER & CO. 'Phones : 4472 & 4687 A SYMBOL OF QUALITY Emu End. a priest, ugaln lu dlS(H>utlcslrf( antl dlrt!ttTnt no far a. tu dwlare that it cultics which may sour their Ian nr v ml 1 '"' *" lo ""' ood ln moniorica ol Britain and Inellne !" ,"I ll 1 !" •,„!,S„ ra !" rllon or two the British their ears lo those who revile us "I, ," c '''" E M .Z %  "'"'', i;"' 1 1 -' 1 km "-" noticeably to Commu.ust, naturally take an ,i, I.,. ,, m,, -ieeonVmoda'"""• % %  "'"" """"" m M "" ''""'' ",1,-re.l In them, and Mr Uon odv ,,(.', r I r "' V s !"* ih ;"l" "' l """"' '" %  BSl* Nknimw for example. prTvile^' """."• has in mind SjT^IS-^3^SgS S2 ,V '' n ""' ""•""" re ""'"• iiirti.ul.uli owners im.na.ers '/' ," that married men from llon Bul in ,,„ „ ( Xt, and employs £ hoW ^i^".^ wTlh" ff hut l"o Sj"' Th "' r vaU "^ • "•' %  bMrdlni howaa and pliue, of fff, VZStSSTmBLs ^5mb5 n """* Cou c 1 "onuttedly ,,„.,,ainin,,,, They would be '^ 0 f 0 ^ T woLn 'he^brouZ.o "' hee,.s practice a pre,-a,, ; ,u. liable to prosecution already by R nff ian.i to save the nienfol!" '' though its responsibilit> lisph.vnn; .. Colour 11. ir notice. f om |h( fn(c whitn ton t1u .,\ to lind ;io %  nriniiud.ition for illc..!<>thouiih the penalty would be n hef a |is them, of meeting no nlnl students of course remains. %  Iher'than outcasts from Useful work is heing done, under than £5 at the llrst offence and C3.T -i the second. English s.nkit its fuldance by a number of volun tary societies (e.g. the East and Competent planning might West Friendship Council, the ,rr- t|H ,. onscu .„t, ous champion of hi' s h,„ hv ih ehiii-.*..v n„ mportant (and possibly kindred) ,„„„.„ .i !" w ntienilon tu the odd ,, T> ] ? ? u , \ Th0 bill providing lor the prevention ^l'-. 'SirSJttS^oVeSS-SBr,t 7* Counett ftl Churches is of cruelty In pet shops (Son ,n ^oTt.e CoionSwul constantly remiodlng Its Still. Mr. Sorensen was by no WUtM < shortage of worken. urn ''' \ ****& The Chuul. means concerned with a matter u .,, )( n lj( | K .|„ K made acute by thr r Scotl.in.1. the Methodist Mis.-of merely academic interest, spanning rearmament He said ', nar > Soc.eiy and the Chilli Race discrimination^ is an ugl> tn at the Pople*s Nntumnl Pnrty. JHissionary Society each ha send full-time officers whose sole task trtre Ii ttw ears> of visitoru well rtajU] residents, particularly students. i matter interest. %  n " ,v .,> fact in Britain to-day. and thin Jamaica, was willing remnant of the slave trade has n 000 worker* if then seemed more odious and uncanny ^y^eiice that they MK. HOTTOMLEY WHEN Lord Listowel returned lo London after attendinn the Governors' Conference in Barbados at the end of 1949. he spoke a lot of tfood sense about the West Indies in the House of Lords. This week Mr. A. G. Bottom'e;.. M.P. His Majesty's Secretary for Overseas Trade is coming to explain what the United Kingdom has ben doing with regard to sugar deals with Cuba and to listen to the views of tne West Indies. Li>rd Listowel was told much, he listened hard and being a man of high integrity and honour he spoke fearlessly. Mr. Bottomley has paid us the compliment of a visit. He will be told much and doubtless he h^ an infinite capacity for listening. There is no doubt that he too will return to the United Kingdom and will inform His Majesty's Government that the West Indies are perturbed about existing trade relations in the Caribbean. ever since the Colonies were nMfiieat No aou bt many of the from Africa, AMn and the Middle granted inci-eaRingemancipaUim. sn J* 0 111 *' ,, arK T nt ^ i ^ "T ,htm om of l eful -' %  "ploymcnt. lhcir prjd( of *! "tn th,vS British Council of Churches tj though some perhaps do n^ of a great MKUI movement whirn colder I*. gj Of CetoU^ nl Hy ..mciently reahse that g ^Su^ !" !;!;! i^orted (including %  %  Mg > 2nly being a British subject S2^ re V" n " 5 % %  > *— %  ,/ .IV' were about the wgregati all children In a Welsh school). It is possible that accurate Th .„. nf .i...... %  — and one of the delegates COOinformation ami careful selection. *££££"?„* c l "* al1 Smtt M BOUM not but marvel mainlv in Africa and the West fornud-ble. ami the great move. at the pat.cmc with whuh C1Indies. WOUU forestall at lest m *'"' * g"* "^W ^vanc.v .mri people endured provocasome disappointments At the " Ihe gallant action, however live acts of discrimination same time. British industry is not ' r |" 1 ' the Socialist Member The Bishop Of Uverpool ffll enUrely a closed shop to or Parliament who seek* to stamp that the white problem" conColonials Craven Brothers, one Of out the Injustice of racial disfronted the Church with a the largest engineering firms, crimination, bears the sure promlM hallensc ul home everv bit as have offered tens of thousands of th.t ih^ i 'T} Y et even the best of good Will has no ll.st.ciass and second-class 7 !" ' "KZ: II .H-cas.on.llv tlv.varied b> UIU !" M**. m fcr. he said and no 'I " ,..:;; %  u.iSunv ITw tanmm dScuWta. Because it. Br.Usher will lightly disagree. -|f du.e a c.....blnl tommumt> lift ^^^ undrr lu Poc-fB ni! „ tba „„ llu(i( or ^ had eatimates was reduced to £l.fW2.insplmUon to do something on but nothing actually experiment 10 (which is E364.WH1 '. >rk among the white last year), the British Council ha parishioners! However, the ksM been forced to clor.t its hostel ran into staunch opposition \. lio h f i African) lUlt in the Union inspiration ; lighting a •hall nnd our rearguaid II nltimatelv reJack bemg would Jtave nothing to do with students ai Manchester and Leeds nulled down all over the world." I New twelve-month figures of Canadian tMdi with the B.W.I, show that whereas our purchases from you reached a new record otal of $67 and a half million, the previous record was in 1949 when our imports reached $62 million. But at the very lime when Canadian dollars for your sugar and others goods was reaching this all-time record figure, there wtts a drop of T less than 30 percent, in the dollar value of our sales in your market. According to our new official 1950 trade statistics, our exports to the British West Indies last year dropped to $:i0,600.000. This compares with $43 million in 1949. In dollar total, this is the smallest volume of export trade which Canada has enjoyed with the colonies since 1940. And the comparison is even more striking when allowance is made for the changes in prices which have taken place in recent years. To make a detailed price adjustment for every commodity which enters into this imE rtant B.W.I.-Canada trade would be igthy and difficult study. But because sugar and flour dominate much of our trade, the compilation is made considerably easier. What's been done therefore is to make an exact price adjustment for flour and sugar and to adjust the balance of our trade in line with the general trend of prices since 1938. Using this plan 1 find that tht actual volume of Canadian exports to the B.W.I, in 1950 was 5 per cent less than in the year 1938. It was less than one quarter of the volume of our trade in the peak years after the war. It was one third below the export volume of 1949. Having said this you wilt no doubt be interested to know what has happened to trade volume in Canadian import of your goods. Here again the results are very "striking. I find that even after allowance for price changes there was an actual increase of 8 per cent, in our purchases from vou during 1950 as compared with 1949. Also that the present real level of these purchases is still at the highest point in history, a point about 27 per cent higher than 1938. I must apologize for so many figures but the basic and important point which they substantiate is very clear Namely, that Canada's very substantial and incTc;isin^ purchases of British West Indian goods, at a time when we are being forced to sharply curtail our sales to you. have indeed earned the right to have this problem considered in 1951 on the basis of our mutual trade interests as merchants and customers. Rather than through the arbitrary straight-jacket of the dollar-gap crisis which so dominated our trade climate a few years ago. I think this approach is very convincingly put forward in the new series of government advertisements which were referred to by Mr. Howe and Mr. Senator MacKinnon earlier in this broadcast. The simple message in one of these advertisements Is found in the caption "Broader Trade Better I.ivin,; Let me read you one or two sentences: "Because Canada is purchasing an increasingly large amount of British goods and services, it is possible now. under the B.W.I. Liberalization Plan, to import many items from Canada which you havcn'l seen in quantity for many a long day." The advertisement continues: "Pleasant news fur you—and for us. A return to more normal trade with Canada should be as natural to you as breathing After all. we are traditional trading neighbours. Canadian East Coast fishing eiati were a familiar sight in your potts nearl] 200 years ago. They brought in dried flsh and took out cargoes of sugar, molasses rum. And. as sister nations in the British Commonwealth, we have many mutual interests." "So, now that broader tr.ide for better living is possible again we niggMl that, as of yore, you make Canada your Aral source of supply.—your first port of call I know that with the new demand for arms and weapons, the problem ol nippl is again going to loom very large in all trad calculations But 1 think this makes it all the more important that there be a broad and sympathetic understanding on both sides broad purpoaesof thll new and hopeful pl^n for trade expansion between our tv tional trading .,: .".ded as far and as rapidly as possible. HIS MASTERS vcrrCt FOR BaUtTASBM PLEASURE Thaft why—YOU SHOULD SELECT H. M.V. RADIOS and RADIOGRAMS DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.—Electrical DtiL SELECT YOUR SUMMER SUIT NOW. .... Chooso from a wide range of materials of — ALL WOOL TROPICALS, LINENS. POPLINS. AND WHITE DRILLS All W*l TROPICALS from *6.33 per yd. LINKNS from SI 92 per yd. POPLINS @) $2-27 per yd. And WHITE TUTAKA DRILL Iff W*S WP do not know how lonn we can maintain our present keen prices—Order your Suit NOW! DA COSTA & CO., LTD. Dry I.**V>V>Irf^*,.*,.*.V-^^^ CCCKTAIL TEMPTERS GOL!> BRAID RIM TOP NOTCH Rl M. (iORIMIVS GIN HI KNKTT'S (UN PR!NKS DATSfl COLOI Rrl'l. IOC KTAIL ONIONS %  I;. .i Vrllow. Green). FEANl'T BITTER pmUNEfl COCKTAIL BISCCITN SALTED PEANITS ANCIIOVII:S SARDINES. PICNIC SPECIALS MARSHM ALLOWS BARLEY STICKS CHOCOLATE LIND CARRS BISCC ITS RFER In li..ul-HLIR in Can VEGETABLES DITCH FINE PEAS CillVER S PEAS BMKDLBf PEAS ASPARAGCS TIPS KALE SPINACH CARROTS BCBTfl DESSERTS ITU flit fl Flavours) MRU's (TSTARD POWDER GRAPES ui tins GI'AVAS In tins Kill BARD In Una KRAFT'S ICE CREAM POWDER Ju*l arrived: I Rl SH RED SNAPPERS. N\l<>KrD KIPPERS FEATURING FRESH FISH RED SNAPPERS — SMOKED KIPPERS ORDER atom f.oinuMts rojur. -'-'-'*-'--'-'-'-'-'•*-•-'-'-•-'-'-%  --' %  •.-------.-.-.-.-.-.-.•.-.-.-.•.-.-.-.•.-.•.•.-.-.-.-.'



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WEDNESDAY. M \V It.. I5I iivmiAiMw uiv>ii \n I'VI.I IHUII Property Selliemenl Required THE: n„ K h y. Best and other-, i balai ai.ii other, ol Mine i" %  o beimic lo the Court of Chancen before II :i, Chancellor. Sir Allan Ci Perry Se. If, and the other defendants arc %  flOfOd •old some i>f ihe prop out nuking any settlement wuh Hugh M Bent and hit pj Ihe motiej obtained i gales. Mr. W. W Heece. K C instructed by Cwrtnfton and Scaly appeared for Bert. M: Q i\ Admu m>trmic hv }\,.\ -.... Crimth are for P> Yesterday no .vnhm, *a taken. A rev w of the cose and legal point awed. Mr. A: NMd to ina Court thai Beat and hi | aoma to the C *ni ol Ro out diai i -in. thai then, war i u*kniK lb* i nqiura Into the rondiii-t of the ptantal bought with other people's money The whole action purported a straightforward action of Jotftt owners in their own interest against other joint owners. In that ease, he argu* ment would be wron-i case should ba struift Vice-Chaiui'llor's Killing His Honour the Vlec-Chanc.-....,will make a ruling on Mi Adam*' submission when the tinues on the 30th.. ol Ihll month Best and the other want an enquiry to be made. They want the payment rind transfer l.v Scales and the other defendants to them of what should he found duo to them They aba] appointment ol would rnanaga ihe plantation* as the Court miuht direct The plantaUom (Or the purchase of which Best and the other plaintiffclaim that the money was provided by both i Collclon. Uisielles, Si Jamen, Tour Hills. St. PMar, Ml. Prospect and Trent. and the other defendants denied tn.d each "f the su^ar plantations was bought by iu respective purchasers as trustees for the i' Society and not other* I Thev are of the opinion thai UM plantations are not the H either party nor did the moi.ey belong to either of them on a join. account or olluv Mr. Recce told the Courl that it appeared that about the tune tiu* t iantotioiwen MflgUn I .:> arbados. there were t o( the HUM name, one In Cotogj and the other in Panama. Each of the societies used to set aside money for th purpose of purchasing estates in Barbados. The societies used to help a* member;. \\ alcotl Going To Grenada i %  a pi wciplcci'd nd i*ui idad la* week Mi f L V. .. tfat Advocate yesterday. After a dinner on Sundav night the subf-committcc .iiid worked until UH earlv morning of 1.30 I I Boltomley's Mission \IB A G BOTTOMLEY. M P for Overseas Trade. Is coming lo Barbados this week. To-day the Mission which Mr. Mr. Bollomley leads will hold dls|n Jamaica on Ma> 17th reeratattVM of the cigar %  The main object of Ihe Mission"! i' ho BJ bgidOl WlD BO (0 explain to the Regional Economic Committee the position in regard lo sugar which has arisen in the %  negotiations with Cuba, and to obtain full information a* ... %  AS Of Ihe West Indica. Members of the British West Inr Association will be alt* nding the meeting ol the Icoaomlc Committee and n'senl at thoc discusIt i* the Mission"* intention to tlag in London on their return with rsgareeentatives of C niciitwcalth sugar producers'. Including London representatives Of West Indian producers. The Directors of the British West Indian Sugar Producer*' •\ will meet In Barbados an Mav I8th and 19th and hope •t. %  : % %  •: %  Mi. %  Store Sweepings II happened In Bridgetown today. One of tiiloadi ng city stores had had the store iWOOP lngs piled up in from of th. building and on the pavement. At 1130 a.m. Mr E. D. IfOttley, ono f too Banltan Com mi I %  mnrrs for SI Mi ch OOl •went in to • H -walkor hlmaeli and i %  %  ii,. M cally rOOOlVOd) bill when UM Advacate checked later In Ihe day. the iwooplngi had boefi rt'uovi d. BOTTOMLEY. ARTHUR OEOROE. O.B.E.. 1941: M-P. lLab.) Chatham Division of BodisiUT sines 1945. Bee. for Ovtr..Trad*. Board of Trade. since 1947; London Organnttr of Nat. Union of Public Employes*. 1936: Alderman of Borough of Walthamilow: b 7 Feb. 1907; s. of Oeorg* Howard Bottorol^y and his late wifo AUca: m. 1936. Bes-ie Ellen Wiles; no c. Edac: Oamuel Road Council School; Extension Classes at Toynboe II ill. Elected to Walttianistow Borough Coun cli. 1929; Mayor of Walthamstow. 1945-40; Chairman of Emergency Committee and ABP. Controller. 1939-41. Deputy Regional Commlisloner for South Eastern England. I-II t'.. Parl. Under See. Of State for Dominions. 1U16-47; Laud Tax Commissioner. Becontroe Dir. of Essex; Member Parl. Mission to India. 1040; Special Oort. Mission to Burma. 1947; Deleg. to U.K.. atew York. 1<46 and 1947; Loader U.K. deleiiatiou io World Trade and Employment Conf-. Havana. 1947; U.K. deleg to Commonwealth Conf.. Delhi, 1949. Publications: Contributor to Local Qovernment Journal-. Recreatioas: Walking and theatre-going. NO PRICE LIST A BM or £5 and 2 costs U> be paid in one month or two mouths' imprisonment was imp-sed on Clarence Gill, a shop keeper of Cheapslde. St. Michael. by a City Police Magistrate yesterday. He was found guilty of not displaying the price of regulated %  c.is shop on Fi-bruaxy 13. Sheila Gill, also of Cnoaf> tlned £3 and \'~ coats Irate for selling cocoa at a greater price than that llxed by the schedule, Her offence was also committed on February 13 and the 0 l>e paid in 21 days or ono month's fmprisonme> Forger Gaoled IFKMII Our Own Cemap PORT-OFSPAIN. May 11. Osmond Bradley of Boissiere Village. Port-of-Spain. eras sentenced to six months' ment for uttering forged Sanitary Laundry slips and for '.' of paper and twine. Bradley RATES OF EXCHANGE CANADA lid amuch work in from attending an Imvi Ai'iirican Trade Regional Organ i/.itiun Conference, affiliated lo •he international Confederalion ol Free Trade Unions. 11... danfori aoa •— I-UHMM or ganlsationa) matters and met Mr. tieorge Woodcock. Assistant General Secretary of the British Trades Union Congress. Officers' Training The delegates of thBritish section discussed with Mr. Wood a Ok problems of trade unions in the West Indies and sal lii.alcr assistance in training trade union officers. They regretted that trainiM courses held under the auspices Of the Colonial Development and Welfare Organisation ban been discontinued. They fell that representation should be made to provide training in the West Indies for Trade Unions. Mr. Woodcock was thanked fur financial assistance given to *c Unions by the British Trade Union Congress, and some repre scntutlves said that their Union had already received office 0qH>Bment from the T.U.C. Mr. Woodcock said that it *a* not the intention of the T.U.C to make the Unions in the West Indies dependent on ouUido sources for their success end itrength. but that they were pre pared to help stable trade unions with equipment for their offices. Transportation Some uilegaii-s laid that transportation wai. absorbing a large part of the contributions of Ihe L'niiHi Business on the agenda included organisational arrangements, representation a! the Milan Conference, 1 L.O. representation. Mr. Walcott was appointed member of a Sub-Commilte* to deal with organisation in the area. Other members are Mr. P. J Caraseo (St. Lucial and Mr. C. P. Alexander (Trinidad). Mr Walcott is going lo Grenada shortly In his capacity as member of the Sub-Committee U investigate Trade Union problems there and to report to the Regional Organisation. Labourer Remanded Joshua Williams, a labourer of Thomas Gap, was yesterday remanded until May 17. by a Cilv Police Magistrate when he was charged, by the Police with 'he larceny of a fishing aet valued at *1. the property of Mr. A. Ouller of Brighton. Black Rock on May II. Mr. (Stiller said thai on May II he left his net hanging in nil house and Ihe next mou.mg wheu he looked for it. it was not there. He had seen the defendant by his house many times and on the beach. Also remanded yesterday until May 22. was Noet King, a labourer of Chapman Lane. St Michael. when he appeared before n Police Magistrate on a charge of stealing lumber, the pro[>erty of DaCosta k Co., Ltd., on May 13 Herman Clarke, a watchman on Ihe wharf, told Ihe court yesterday that he was on duty on May 13 about 5 o'clock on Bridge Street and saw the accused [Hilling a hand cart on which was placed a quantity of lumber He aakad him where he had got it from and he received no sntishwtorj explanation. He then notified the Police. lAthoitwrs \wait Loans A LAK< i -i mm %  er> from VOi • Dd OUt**** a BSI %  Mrdny. v. iiank Thl Ing Las V VtoBENDorSrOOPk rfe* Backache. Rheumatic Pain Relieved 481 iay**I Iff Picture a *tor|r %  While theee offices an S round B taff of S. : irs is uO i %  Uie; v, :• %  i ,' %  ': : %  . fashioned h h| I %  prow -i Bra frulf traoi Sir,, t A momwM %  .iit... I itoin i''" La in urn n %  detained. !. > % % %  was fuand lyni*. ln'iide Ihe motor lorry M I7ati. Plwitatm Ltd doafl Wel.hrs Road. Si Tliou %  DM fuarsaj Mgh: Tho lorry i n the road and plunged Mi '" %  juarry on tho rinhi side nf the road. S IM i %  Ltfngj ,,i too Whitnin term Mr W C, BkOOtOj, i.wner of the nlOOtnod %  DaamMaw Hcidma o %  V, i i n til BojhV Bcbool Mr C F. Bn-onie. the RoadV mpster. is acting Inspector o| Sehuol' for tho eOUlitr] districts At Wnlrv Hall ltov~School the senior boys are OOCUDytna pie building which nu and txtondod. The junior boys org ai thai other building. A NOTHER sinpment of deep sea Ball has arrived In if* Thla shipment. 5.000 pounds of Red Snapper, was caught b] Ihe Sanakinr It I flohlnS 'na.k. for Messrs. J N Goddaid A | \ WALLET eontolalng 3H. the property o! I >• Ycarwood Land. BaftOh Roek, *W .stolen Croon ^ oou n tatr .,t too D ego Department of the Ideal Stove Broad Street o n Saturday The rldent was reported bv CpJ MM Bevonlsh M INNIE WKU-S Of Rockier Christ Church, reported that her house was broken anen. v.iv aario m Th" PoKoo an making inveWgntlonB HERE AT LAST!! A Cane Trailer Manufactured hy the well-known ^J^^yi.'J %  peii,.u> desnmed ui men th eKacUng .. i t of ptanlldion work in live Weat Indies, whel tourlrn and draining of land is practised. These Cane Trailer.* are i-iuipped dh large diameter ID ply rear tyres, and positive hi.i;.• tarrying i 3-ton pav load MIIII safely. ecirlroiuuis 5-loit 4 wheeled Sin. kM| x *' -' nddo, from stool :,.. II.I i I .' 'Aflll.it. Gooseneck eAiiembly:—of 4~ I I> Nidiframes:—of steel rhminel ,„j tubing mine. red and electrically .^lilir'"ira|. Jl =". %  %  %  • % %  J>ruti'bor of steel channel welded. Heor A'jle E./uiptiicnl* -3" sq. bed, ; i axle. with lournal i. arlng hubs. All m I I' 8 00x28. A .lie Bmdpmoid ^'a" wi. bed. itnlgd>i-Utfough %  xlo, srlth bearing hub?.. All iteel dl*C wlu.l. 4 00 x 18. PRK'R el iaooe "We know thai there are In IpOl ll market, but if you .u %  11iti rested in a unit entire latlsfactiou in both WET &. HHY WEATHER, wi Invite you to come ; In and examine these "specially" designed triillers." FOR QUALITY & FLAVOUR STANDS SUPREME AmoggJr&v.'Luv


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V.U.I EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. MAY 10, IISI I) I MES BEAT ROVERS FIVE—ML < ITRI DAMF, defeated Pickwick-Rovci;, five l>vc in then first Division football ame at Kensington yesterday evening. It was an easy walk over for Notre Dame 1 Mf '.unities to score. Alfred I lc left for Notre Dune le 'ed two noals. The otht i ilii were scored by Gill. Daniel and Green,. Gm-iv the Notre Dame right winger, gave ii good pr Pickwik-Rovrrs Maurice i Uhough live goals were scored Oil Mm. Have a fine per formance in goal He saved many good tries. Noire Dame t<>k ihe lunch off with Pickwick-Rovers defending the southern goal. Soon Cricket Report From Lancashire Cl.Vltl' WAU <>TT r" %  i.. I | i. 11 n d Ribblesdalc League Moat of the League games v. era dclavcd on accuurU of rain which tell nvt might and again on Saturday morning it was an aseep tteaally COM day and very few spectators attended the gamea. Bacup played tiurnley. List Si.-,:,.!! I I >,rr. ;,-! Paid Out On 2nd Day Of Ariina Heel I T— o.. O-H Oi HUf iatmll PORT-OF-KPAIN. May 14, Fallowing ..re HM resul second day's rating at Anmi. WI1ITSI N HANDICAP Happy Union < Lut* %  i' ( uptd (Hardwidgc up) -< ,i mm—! itaaiyya S4.M Forecast 111.72. LADIES' H4NDK IP Blug Oral I Jot. pnj 2 It (HaldWldga up) *2.4b. Taji Uabal miss many inn Weekcs hammered the Burn ODporlun uics. It wm not until n ling tor a sparkling 7B. f minutes before half time that Bacup were (till >n out for 132. %  II in Bl Burnley Imf wickets majuujsd i" pel the la r wickets. Bruce Pelraudeeu scored captured i runs in t> on) Lowerhouse. who entertained III:I:NA VISTA HANDICAP Ooldptn (A Joseph upi 11.48 Kigolo (J. Lutehman up) $2 84 rWseast: $26.26. WOODLANDS HANOI! AP IliueGi.i l. J %  i n (Ah upi S3 4B Taj Mahal nv: Wilkinson. Bn no hu Robinson. 1, F<>ste Tnvlor. Worme and R. Hood Referee: Mr L. F. Harriet re in ., scoring "3 for ... of 8 wickds in ISO minutes. Clyde Waleott after being dropped behind the wicket at 0 olT Phadkai. again tried out the Aukitkfeper In the nexl bell hut this ihme he made no mistake. Nelson were given 40 minutes to get the runs, and :>i the end of Ihe day S lay were a6 for 2 wickets 'slcuit captured both %  In tiie ltil.hles.lale League. Dsrwen declared j^MJg^ which was ployed at Evi'iion, Spartui* Win Games Clydi nickels for KVERTON scored BBOttM victory in the SWIHMI Wvl lo when they defeated ( fl goals to one in a football mate scored 20 MIMn Jjat^^^^^riast throughout „ the score for the loss of 7 ^ ^ Fvi iUm fll|Wlir(ls ,,„„ "STth. rcntral Lancashire Wned well und in the latter slaves Jaguo C.onipum'met afiBotest of the second half clearly outW ho batted M t Korlnj 219 for 2 played e r w n 7** ilII ,,,....„ wlrkely Crompton forced a draw In the Spartan—Lodge llxl.ni Soring 78 f.u wiekett Ramaat the Park, Spartan won ona love dhin was not successful with the Spartan -owned slowly but in iho ball finding it too cold to spin the second half the Utge |la..i iinii v., the batsmen took advan>v ,. ir beln| constantly pressed taco ••' the sttuaUon, giving him ,.nlv one Wicket for 61 runs %  "rank Worrell played UOthSI craiul innings of 78 for Radclifte. M. ... Ii : .ndicnppcd during his iway from the Held in tinlast %  0 y.it'i'. to wm Baslly by 3o yards.—(CP.) FORTRESS, Y.M.P.C. WIN MATCHES The results of the First Divi Hnsketball matches which wciv played ut YMI'C Heckles Rnnd last night are as follows:— Fnitress defseted Pickwick by 29 goals to 22. -For Fortress S d ind H R0 ichford netted six goals each. The Y.M.P.C.—Cariton match ended In %  win for Y.M.P C who scored 27 pooh to C u Itop' The condition of the pitch could in.' Iw called Bnt class. Innings by Fractured linger. South Africans Ural Glamorgan CARDIFF, May 15 The South African cricketers gi ined their lirst victory of the obtained while coaching during but was still master of the situation. Radcllfls declared at 161 for 5 ^ wickets. At the close M h'ay i,,,,, when they beat (Jlainorgnii Stockporl were 111 runs for the llV (|( |,inings and 14 runs here kiss of 4 wickets. todaj Most ol thi West Indians men. Whcn (1 y hlur ied today. eV i h 'L IRL -Sld y all Cllamurgan who bad followed .... %  urnrner bettss smog, sth. We are oil hoping for 330. needed 173 to avoid the | n the Mmteg Innings' defeat with nine wickets standing. When they had lost their first six wickets for 74. five of them to Athol Rowan for a personal cost of 20. it seemed as • they were In for a crushing defeat But a fine fighting innings of by Hudyn Davies, wickctkeepei ?MEN CRICKBTBRS VISIT BRITAIN LONDON, Mi14. Th.lir 1 A. SPORTS WINDOW For real rebef trom rheunnaUc pains it is to correct UOr cause. Wn*n they are doe to the sccumiUaooo of bod.l; impunues, it means that yow kidneri which should help to filter away the* impunuei are sluggish and need a medicim ht lorithen. up. De Witts Pil.s ar•peoally prepared for this vwy purpose. They have %  cl e a ns i n g; and sansep-JCSAUe. an toe kidneys, soothing ai.il toning then, up so etfettiwply that these TitaJ organs swifUy return to their normal function ol tleanag 'he lystem of impunuci • De Witt's Pills have been wiOly used all orer the work) with great sacces*. This is amply confirmed by many thankful letters sent to as by people who longed for relief from rheumatic pains and lound it after trying De Win's Pius. Why not try them for your trouble? Go to yoor chemist and obtain a supply right away. De Witt's Pills. tit Me ttci4k> lor BACKACH' LUMBAGO SCIATICA JOINT PAINS RHEUMATIC PAINS OUR GUARANTEE De Witt's Pills are made under strictly hygienic conditions nd die ingredients ail conform to rigid i*andards of purity, i DE WITT5 PILLS for Kidney and Bladder Troubles DIVUIDB I-.-H. M.rt iii........ relic* Qerex i ..Mr.. Ol* 1.1.1. •*•• % %  %  llrli' Warn Iran Ibr %  < %  .!.... I:. %  .,.!,, I ..II,,. .| g, %  f"H*. Thr Milrh Hill ins .o .peak II 1 Hbiil J. A. CO Rill a BONS kct team to come to F.nglaud I i!..c r .hlp with Plcara hel|-d Cilamornn to t*eh a total o* 186. —RNtrr Traffic • %  '• No. 3 Always laoa for on.omtnf Trallir l^lorr oprnim too Door -f sour Motor Vrhklf Sparr made available by CANADA !>RV I..* Safer Motorloi. I! ii-i. ins Arc Basketball Champ* PARIS. May II Russia won the European basketball championship on Saturday night with Russia's Deputy Foreign Minister. Andrei Cromy ko. abandoning his famed poker face to grin and clap as the Russians bent Cj.cchoslovakla 45—4*. —(C P.l What's on Today Police Courts—10 00 a.m. i in t of Appeal—10.01 a.m Police Baud frtvej Concert at Christ Church Almhouse—4 45 p.m. •nip,,, Tae -i",.,,.. catr They'll Do It Ever)' Time HOW WE LTOIN'? TARE WE RUNNIMG LATE? L ",FT IN am — By Jimmy Hallo ] IDR.VE INSURED I By LLOYD'S Motoring involves n :.|)onsibilily as well as plt'usurc. An unguanlfid momvnt at tha vhesl ... a faulty tyre ... a scream, a sickeninn t-rash' You're defendant in a damage suit which Could erase a lifetime ol earnings. That's whin the protection of our Lloyd's "H.P." policy It so vitally necessary, s-. greatly appreciated. J)oe us about your Motor Insurance today. SPRING HOUND-HP DANCE IWKSTKKN DRESS, to be held at the CRANE HOTEL on SATURDAY. MAY 19. 1901 In aid of the St. Wimficd\ llnilding Fund Music . supplied by the PoUcf Band by kind permission of the Commissioner Police. DANCING 9.00 p in. Ticket $1 00 on sale nnu Refreshments will be on Support this worthy eau*r' lir.-.Ot>l>**l Cosmetics The perfect beauty preparation. We have In a irr li stoek of lhee exrellent toilet i'-: i ii i % %  ..> iincluding: ( I.KANSINO LOTION SKIN TONIC SKIN FOOD COMPLEXION MILK SKIN SOAP. FACE CREAM. COMPACT ROt'CE RATH POWDER. BRA CINE CAVE SHEPHERD & Co, Ltd. 10—n Broa.l Street POLITICAL METING under Ihe auapicae of THK BARBADOS F.LECTOHS' ASSOCIATION at QUEEN'S PARK on FRT0A1 MGHI MAY 18th. al 8 o'clock Speaker! Meura. J. H. Wilkinson. P. C Goddard. E. D. Mottley, Ii. A. Dowdfng, W W, Reece. M.C Ps • Mr, Vn.i-it (iriiliil and SJrdi ej Walcotl Heai out I : -i>eaker. Hci.1 mal TEimiTErPROOF STANDARD HARDBOARD in sheets thick 4' x 6*. 8'. 10' long I 16c square feet. TERMITE-PROOF TEMPERED HARDBOARD In sheets Ik' thick. 4' x 12' only (&> 33c. square feet. SISCOLIN DRY DISTEMPER Cresnm, Green. Buff, Sunshuu. Pcnch. White, Red, Turquoise in 5 lb packages. W 2lc per lb. Covers in one coat, easy to use, simply mix with water. Phase 4207. 4458 WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD ',W.V.W/-'.V''-'-'''''SPECIALISTS MX HIGH CLASS TAILORING OF ALL KMNOS C. B. RICE & Co. OF HOIIOX LA1WB eoa aa>aMaaa, in nnnnnnn I



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PACK TWO IIAIllniXIs \ll\iil II Ccuub Calling T-M1E twelfth IhWlllll .if -.1 %  J. Cartl over and Conunl and Ih.( leli Barbados Opening here today la anothr. coonnoca Hasting* ROOM uUM baa Iqui ll I* Ui> first meeting of the Regional Bean Dek'sates from the various .sla-io"began coming la on Yesterday morning UM I.H . delcg.ite*. Hon. J B. Renwick. Mr. George Adam* and Mr. AUstair MacLeod Smith unvoi mi.im pnnied by their wiveThev art -laying Jt the Marine fetal Other passengers arriving fi.nn Grenada were Mr Edward Hookin and Mr Anthony Williams Mi. Fred Casson was the lone p..— ,igw coming in nfMrday SMrnifii from Trinidad He is .1 tiicst tn the Windsor Hotel. Hon. C A Beaubrun Ihe St. I.ueia delegate also arrived raBaMki lntransit 1 NTRANSIT lo England from British QalMM on the Us*, rags* for a holiday were Cavisit. Bay Street C Qrenadu AeeompanvifK him was his rdMl Wallace of had spent two hotMay witti htnj u, Sne Mranati for .. couple of days and 1* th< ut My 1 i't* III)] No Plant Summer Holiday M RS, CBOTLI GRAHAM widow lit Capt. Oe.irgt G run am. Is on In I l 1 holidays with her •on Iterhe who is Itudytng medicme in England. Sii, Jcft by the Gtiseogne St. Lucia and Grenada M RS. MARIE MENDES and h B I i-ive goal U '-' LuriB to I I 1 tfcf I'ol cloy. Thev left by the Omseocne. ArrlvInK by ihe same -ship from Granada was Mi. Ronnk Or. -' %  who works with Geo. F Ilug,*iin Ronnie's chief Imht.v I lifting Medical Supt \ T PRESENT hoUda Barbados staying at the Ocean View Hotel art Con manricr E H. Allen. H N MgfjtCal Supt. of the Bauxlta ('<. at MeXanzIe, B.G and MM. Men ftey came In a week ago and expect to be here nn'il Mn 2Srd On island Tour W HILE TAKING my half dgy off on Saturday driving through the country I met* a former Governor of Puerto Rico Hon. Jesus T. Pinero. He was on a tour around the Island accompanied by Mai and Mr* Noott, Mr QSaTOd, >'. % %  I 0 Lashlcy and Mr. Billy Wick h.mi. Spanish Master on the staff of Combermere School Mr Pinero has mice returned to Puerto Rico. rV' H I) WKATJIEHIiEAIi *-' who has been Director of Mi dlcal Bi 1 '.-.i lb Bornao %  years. Is now on leave i.tirement He aimed Od from Engl md accompanied by his tvtfa Bfan youiiir-idaughter Ptm. Di Wcitherhead who w a ,\ iMucer of Barbados told Carib that at preSSJSSa, he had no plans lor thfuture He is staying with his l rthe, Mr Bruce Weathcrhead at Galba Lodge". y,„. ibelle Three Months In England DACK in Barbados after three ** months' honday in England iitives are Wing Comdr. and Mrs I) F A Clarke and Oarald. The ll.iikf Who have spent ;dm" nma months In the W.i prior f tii.ir holiday in the U.K. own a It g| Itcndervou*. Wing Comdr Clarke who ha retired Irom Ihe R.A.F Is a Chartered Account.nt He hopes to go tt> %  I llv Meanwhilr laying .it the Enmoie hTotal En route to St. Kin M R and MItS. RONALD H iMlAND and their two children anon Hum way 1Q St. Kitti. They arrived from England MI UM -tiek-rnd and leave for St. Kills by B W.I A., later this week. Mr Brand i* a surveyor and Will hoitiy be taking up a post with the Government of the I • Wacd Islands During the war he was with the Intelligence %  1,1 of the R.A.F attachthe US. Air Force during the Kiiroi"'"" camiiaign and nfter1 went out East t'ntil they leave for St Kltts they are staving at the H.i-ting Hot*] Back to Trinidad M ISS MARILYN DsAot'SA MIM Noreen M d been holidaying in Barbados since April N Trinidad on Monday afternoon. They were staying at the Hot. I Royal COSBBUUJ 1., on u. morning plane on *<•< I Mrs. Fred Olton who had beer in Tr'.nid.id lor \ht past tew weeks N St. Lucia Holiday ; M R. AND MRS BKRNABp MOORE ..nd the d..ngliicr Heather have gone to %  pi'iid a hoUday m St. Lucia, stay. Ing with Mrv Moore's parents, Mr and Mr* Freddie Potter Mr. M<-.re Is with Cable snt Wlrclasr %  ranch at St Liure-' Mr. Aubrey Douglas-Simti. RtHildent Tutor of the Univeriri College of the Went Indies, who had been In St Lucia M visit, retiuned Ofl Mot II W I A Here Again M %  .', 1 R 1 A Vcneiucl. %  light ofl Monday afternoon They are staying >l Aquatic Gsrdenmtll their home. "BonntS Dundee I 1 erence. is bsslahl %  %  ,:i anothci two weeks He is the proprietor Caracas Flying Visit A FTER a lew Qays m Truddad ana one In Grenada. Mis Suire de Kuttel, Dr Barbara I.luydidill'i daughter, is back in Barbados. She rime in over the ".ek.end b> the Gawvsae. \W |i\r.SI>.\V MAY ll!. IMI B.B.C. Radio Programme WKUNRsaAT MAT l. 1*11 US %  -—11 II Bust m HWIDIM S "tll'X^U -U for Heavens Sake AT EMPIRE JJJIftJjM S\T. t.is § ruo I'rmrunmr Parailr; \9t DM. T m 1 The Spur of th* M<> k and Wir.hlp; %  MSI Today, Sam Hmiw N*< r-rofi i CktW Down. II.IS m tRRAYS MILK 'STOUT II\ I:\II ins OF IMI'A ^v.:. v^lf^l • *• Vj. I>x I-* I BY THE WAY Ify nwchcomber P HOTOGRAPHS Of l.mious authors In newspapeni and periodicals always show, m Us* background. *helves of expensively Iiound Look' I am told that, in these hard days, there Is a Ann whten lends these books to authors who cannot afford the usual dummies. The writers hire them as so much go, and an exirn'iiccii book-arranger calls on the day the photograph is to be tuktm. and arranges them tastefully. On one occasion a reportei followed hard on the heels of the photographer. "I see." he said. "that you have %  very flue and complete set of Tolstoy's works. May I look?" He did look, and found that half the Tolstoys were uncut copies of a French novel; the other half were mere blank paper. Courloay to Animal* T HE never-ending exch.ing.' of letters to newspapers about men who do not give up their seats in buses to women ha;. never touched on the heart of the problem. Should a man give up his seat to a woman who has given up her seat to a dog? Again. If n cat is brought into a bus. should the owner ol the dog make It give up its seat to thci cat? And will the owner of the! cat expect the man who had given up his seat to the woman who had given up her vc ;( t M the dog to be prepared to allow the cat to sit in the seat he had given up U. the woman SrhfJ gavi It up to the don' l-et thi conductor decide. f^F/WC .Sir. \J Arc UM las ton ew INgasssftflT Yesierdav. in a No If bus, I sate a man rehiriantli' rsM In I I'T hit seal to tl /e"mh' dno. Not only did hBOt rsssW his hnt, hnf h %  Miti '• d, BI rhougd he reseated I %  thou eowiiBon dscestci lo |osirloim %%  -11 M p 1 110 p m The New. T II p m K*w* AnabMi. 1 It, p m Catlins u>r \\i tralkaa: 141pm Red Lrt!i Da, Ipir itMio K*o- t:>iinti TODAY at g 30 s> m. Bridgetown Players preseri* %  r ut: SHOP AT SLi oaaasat %  OPKNINO AT1'RDAV 19th %  F OK IIKAYKSS I4B" SUrting Cliftor WEIJH Joan BENNETT HOW LAST TWO SHOWS TO IIAT 4 45 and R 15 •• HALLS OF MOSTEXVMA Slurring: Richard Widmaik -Wiillt-r MMM ISOYAI. I \-l l\M> -lit.M 1"0-D\V 4 [ and a 3 Ugd HcpublK Serial UIMS OF FV M \N< III Starring ll4-nr> BrasNUoi an:t*RFTS OF MDTI.AM) YARD' with Edgar BARRIER and Stephanie BACHELOR OLYMPIC I l-T TWO SHOWS T< II.W 4 .10 and 8 15 .lit Big Double . [*J 11 Wll.Of. Al!r MARA In • GUSTOS AND • %  IIEADI.SO FOR nnos cot.vrai • %  r..iii..ii.i. %  p HI ^ialeinenl nl ^rt-onnl • IS p m Drnox llrownr 30 pin Seni. Araumrnt. 10 L. M, The Ne-. K. II li > InlnlugS; 10 |i p m Va • '0 .' n i, M(H Week T.tfc II p in C I' H:iil.!\'IMI "Id -I 1 IIUSMVOI.lt r i i l f L r 1 b J 1 1 : P i J M ',' %  ] h %  V So moo is upsrt witq so ssu f ity rtb-mt 161 uiul ituncBd in India. (SI il ronrliLlm. 131 IX wm cai-r a pcnn inrhidca id III IS. TWltlttil. i 14. Re.ollfftl tnouuii loi UllUefl. B| 15. MUrtd a U).i WUH, (4i iv Burh a past l. milt • rfuetaalo. I. A radlu beam in, *^ %  %  ndajotv. |7) SI. nils In a light %  <> %  ioH auS H E*pjdlnlL 'io siDsTaboot lu ssa Down 1: S-i-1 S13J —•" %  < t. Tlie sons osfcwl ror 1U drpin. (B> 4 Hull up ihu. urotonc*. 14} >. Irretrrenrn (7l J. Tciidruct. SSI No clrclr e.sr aui b, (7| !" -. Hot ta tiiiii-n-ni in Pranco, j V lau: 3*. Ie ( PLAZA Thrntre-BridqctownlDiAL 2310} T(11A\ 4 TOMORROW iOn1 4.4S A IS* B m. *ilh DICK FORAN JAMES DINK lUoiinfTMrii Tile TffhW.1. la mi.ii .i IIIHII until FRr.nuir STKWAKT HESTON SCOTT LiNDFORS JAGGERDEFORr %  MM h WUIUIK1UU. s, „ ^,,_. m „ .„. mm . Plu lilt ALL STAK TALENI (CONTEST PHYLLIS COl.l.YMORE -THE GREEN GRASS I'.Hi'.'l: MAW ., ,, v or .,. v LlfT DORIAN THOMPSON 'LOST IN A DREAM MAI.COM MI'RRAV "IIEHF. COMES HEAVEN JOAN HENTIIAM "MAYBE ITS BECAUSE" "4 WINDS & 7 SEAS' NITE AND DAY "ROSES OF P1CADDY" ••SIIORTV MOK" B.O'a bnn Ba-hl InlraiiHli I ,,,!. %  ,• Klnidom DENNIS CLARK WILLIE 1FFI1.I. WALTER HURKE Hues! M.r : I'll Z4. Ilui,-,. 411. It.I 4441. K..v. n TlrkrtM On Sal.(;IOIHDmllv I wwwssssMswsinwaw W .--^ss&svrs**v.* t 's.s*-*'.'*-*-s. To-niyht visit < Ll II >IOIU.A.\ The rnosr B.'atill/iil Night Club 1mm Miami 10 Hlo trli a world-wide rrputarion for good food Music, Dancing Entertainment throughout the night Dial 4000 for reservations TREAT YOUR ANIMAL KINDLY We can supply False Collars S2.68 each Clipping Machines 83.10 each CHECK OUR PRICES ON THE ABOVE THE ii AISIIIIIOS io-ui>.:i!.vnvi<: COTTOIV FACTUHV LTD. SM M PLASTIC and OIL CLOTH CONGOLEUM SQUARES %  THE CORNER STORE 'AW/MWAWW.'l



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PACE SIX i:\Rll\iMfe ADVOtAlfc MI.liM-.HW. WAV In. I5I HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE NES.S.E...^ EVCEIT —-AT I w — j \£ O. -r-i --: WNMf I 9-AFP **-r* : \s __ -Asr_5 BY WALT DISNEY -\E :NAHOUSE TH'S BI61 1H TMB tfA COMPANY MAK1 I CAHAE HE8B TO F'X THE METE* Five PAV A*3 AND I HAVEN T 3Ei\ AEkB TO P'NJ? V WAV (Ju T oe THE PLACE 1 r JElaW*'-"' BLONDIE r" -.auio saj h • BY CHIC YOUNG : M !J1 njt .-PI %  %  5 v %  LUNCH •'(^Sf wwcw ft %  /• OH Of AJ.Y 0UDV K> GO TO LUNC'i _^I CAGwCCC' (* T M BffO ''I ( MV LUNCH I V_ TCO*> %  % %  '• %  % II* LET ME HAVE faWajP NEWSRHPEP (\JB( A MOMENT DEA9 \ -v,\' * THE LONE RANGER /DORSAN WI'-L TO MATE TOK"\ V KILL YOU THF *AT BIG HOLE IN MY L( NEWSPAPER^T uJx^t -r BY FRANK STRIKER RIP KIRPY BY ALEX RAYMOND THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES WUJNAIICCCMSM'.T. JklMEC; V0UTU6HT* KHWIBETEB .^ THAT' UNCLE D/IVE.'/) PENTALUX S FINISH PAINT FOR EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR P ENTALUX GLOSS FINISH •TH &LL$H STONl I-|B *t*. ESCHALOT mm & SAMPSON (1938) LTD. J V *M. '"ICAL IHO" %  IIOM SL< USE COLOURS THE BEST IN PAINT • llll AIV.III I AT ALL ilAIIIM. II VKItYV \KI SIOIIIS noon THMXUS lor YOU W1NCAKNIS WINK l-arst Bols. .. I*.M SIM 111 I Boll. . $1.M 1.1 -I i;\ \ WINE Largf Bolt. .. $2.31 CRAWFORDS CLUE CHEESE BISCUITS Tin *IM PEEK FREANS BISCUITS In Tins OI.1VE Oil,—in Tins CHEF SAUC2. In Dots. JS Rich & iippelisiliK "BLACKBUCK" SAUCES—Bills. .24 FOR l.in il VALUE INCE & Co., Ltd. I 1, 1 A 9 Rorbewk Street. %  Ul 223* IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPEQAL offers lo all Cash and Credit customers for Monday to Wednesday only BROWN t POLSON Corn Flour. Pkgs. USUALLY 37 Heinz Veg. Salad. Tins 55 Chum Salmon, Tins iTallsi 66 NOW LASSIE :2 Rolled Oats. Tins USUALLY NOW 55 l in HEINZ Tomato Soup, Tins 34 •9 Grapefruit Juice, Tins 24 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street HI-.II.UI t na • UPV"II ,. ,,ir.fi IMHI.I' ^pes^---A FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY DELIVER IN STYLE it's good for business Ovaltine Cheers & Energises iryled like a car, powered with a rugged, dependable engine, the COWLBY VAN will speed up your deliveries and bring extra prestige to your businc-s. New feature* have been tndud.d which mean lower running ont, longer trouble-free Life, more profitable operation ft> you For IJMfiril n... ALl 10 F£aTUS %  ME VCWCiE Ail• ll.l-.J ritf tc (at >iKm Skumfwn fro MH! rrat. FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phon? 4504 B Y haJpiag lo revivetl.-.n^ ISiiriT. d.Uciou. 'Ov.lhnt' will Biv >n : i„c icit to carry OD work checrfullv and efficiently. *• 'Ovaltine' I'roviJ.i (-IrntniK. Including • ilAliim-. O) Itir lll|hi vtduci derived from Nai food*. I l.r uim.ii. 'Ovaltine' Farm, war* eitabtl.hed to aet tl>e LIB hen aundarda of quality for the mall, milk and rggi uaod. Br.mif of ita outatandina; nutritiv* qualltiaa 'Ovaltine' i. ideal for every member of the family, at any time of the day. A. a bedtime beverage, too, it ia everywhere acknowledged aa a reliable aid to aound, natural, reatorative .leep. Sold *a atiiigkl ii>ti by all Cktmlitt mnd Slot ft Quality tuumm* Ovaltine the World's most widely used Food Beverage