Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


PHavbavros -

United States must stand ‘arm
-gainst recognition of Red China

“ESTABLISHED 1895. 1895



Britain will support U.S. on
raw materials embargo

MATERIALS:

AK,







MARSHALL:



FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1951







KOREA:

STOPS RUBBER SUPPLIES TO CHINA





Communist forces withdraw
from South Korean capita!

PRICE: FIVE CENTS



Prcsident Arias ousted:
New Chief takes over

PANAMA:



Churchill demands ban on exports from the colonies
‘You Ought To Be «Us,

Ashamed’’—-Shinwell

LONDON, May 10

INSTON CHURCHILL demanded in the)

British House of Commons today that Britain
should stop all exports of rubber to Communist
China.

Speaking in the debate on shipments to China, |
Churchill said Labour members gave the impres-
sion from their speeches and behaviour, that their|
sympathies were on the whole more with “Red
China’’ than with the United States.

“We ought not to have any sympathies with
Red China.’’

Churchill said exports of rubber
from Malaya in the first quarter
of this year—46,000 tons—were at
the rate of 184,000 tons per year,
or 2% times the annual rate for
1950.

It
stantial and significant advance at
this moment when matters are
hecoming more and more tense,
serious and eritical,’ Churchill
said. It meant China had had in
the first three months of 1951, half
much again as would be the

civilian Chinese ration of
as calculated by Govern-
the whole year.
not to be exporting
to China at all,”



is a very remarkable, sub-

as
full
rubber
ment for

“We ought
any rubber
Churchill thundered amid cheers.

Churchill said the abrupt and
decisive stop of such exports
might well be the prelude to
wholehearted agreement with the
United States,

Churchill clashed with
nister Shinwell whom he
tor saying: “Perhaps things
in Korea now that
has been re-
immediately



Defence
eriti-

N



|
cised
will go better
General MacArthur
moved.” Shinwell
denied making such a statement,
Amid angry shouts Churchill P
raid he would produce a news- eS ge
paper report of Shinwell’s speech. or /
Shinwell shouted above the en
general uproar, “You ought to be
mshamed of yourself,” | and
rehill retorted: “Lhe Frene!
nay saying that it is only the F f
truth that wounds,” ; 2
Earlier in his speech, Churchill 4 é
said that in 1949 he had favoured ‘
de facto recognition of Communist b 4 :
China provided it could be brought a
with the ae
the Common- ee
Govern- ee f
ment had given full de jure recog
i

as a joint policy
States
But

about
United
wealth,

and
the Labour



WINSTON CHURC HILL

as an isolated act.
to have diplo-
with a Govern-
censured by the
A period of the
well
strong

nition to China

It was illogical
matic relations
ment formally
United Nations.
acute danger
before we

Jet Kills 10 Japs
And The Pilet

might |

TOKYO, May 10.
The Far East Air Force to-day
\

are

most
erise just
enough,”

SUPPORT FOR EMBARGO

In the Government's reply, Sir
Hartley Shaweross said Britain
would give full support to the

United States proposal for an em-
materials

announcéd the death of
of
crashed
destroyed
aged six.

The plane was on a training
flight with another Shooting Star
near Fukuoka. The two aircraft
locked wings in a practice dive.
One aircraft went out of control
and crashed into a house. The
other returned to the base with its
pilot uninjured.

the pilot
jet which
Japanese,
and dam-

the Shooting Star
killed 10
houses

and
two

bargo on strategic raw

to China,

—Reuter

(From Our Own

GASCOIGNE BLAIZE,
Gairy at the outbreak of
agricultural workers, and ge
in-command of the Manual



SIR HARTLEY SHAWCROSS

“We have decided to request
Governments concerned in Malaya
and Borneo, to take steps to en-
sure that there shall be no further

“U.S. WOULD NEVER).
ADMIT RED CHINA”

To United Nations Organisation

GENERAL

MARSHALL

WASHINGTON,

to-day made

May 10.
his fourth

appearance before the Joint Senate Committee inquiring
into American Far East policy.

Questioned about the dismissal of General MacArthur,
he replied that President Truman very carefully considered
its effect on the Japanese people before announcing his

decision.

-1} Marshall described his mission

Acheson Is Not:
Due To Resign

WASHINGTON, May
President Truman said at his
weekly Press Conference today
that there was no foundation for
rumours that his Secretary of
State, Dean Acheson, was about
to resign. The President dismissed
rumours which had been circulat-
ing here chiefly amongst critics of
Acheson,

He also dismissed rumours that
William O'Dwyer, present Ambas-
sador to Mexico and former Mayor
of New York would shortly resign.
O'Dwyer had been criticised for
laxity in prosecuting organised
crime durin g his New York politi-

cal career.

10.

—Reuter.

New Slant On |
Race Bias

JOHANNESBURG, May 10.

A country-wide South African
Population Census gives a new
definition to white and coloured
persons, a vital distinction under
segregation laws of the govern-
ment,

The definition makes the ap-
pearance and associations of a
person, rather than his parentage
as before, the main consideration
in determining to which racial
group he belongs. A white person
is defined on the form as one who
“looks obviously, or is generally
accepted” as such, If he is gen-
erally accepted as coloured though
white in appearance, he is consid-
ered coloured,



NE denne

Asians, Cape Malays and col-
oured persons fill in the same
form, But Africans have a separ-

ate form,
—(C.P.)

Mother Love

VIENNA, May 10

Bella, a hippopotamus at the
Schoenbrunn Zoo, is being given
hormone treatments to induce
mother love. When Bella gave
birth to a baby last year she
promptly killed it. Now she is
about to produce another prepara-
tion has been made to take it
away when it is born, but special
hormone treatment is being given
to make her love her child.—CP),





Gairy Suspends
Chief Lieutenant

Correspondent)

GRENADA, May 10.
co-sufferer in detention with
the recent general strike of
nerally acknowledged second-
and Mental Workers Union,

was yesterday suspended for a two-week period for what
_is described i in an official Union notice as “A certain offence.”

exports of pues to Crane from : —————' For sometime past indications
Malaya or other territories in- have been growing of a rift be-
volved this year,” Sir Hartley SUDDEN STOP ltween Gairy and Blaize due te
said. : is the latter’s dissatisfaction with his
He said some critics of Britain's SYDNEY, May 10. chief after the conclusion of the
trade policy with Communist Work stopped suddenly on 60} wage agreement ending the strike.
countries did not remember that ships in Sydney harbour today
she was not self-supporting, They | when 5,500 dockers staged a masa]. It is alSo apparent that Blaize
forgot that granaries in Europe} walkout because the High Court}! gaining support from elements
are largely east of the Iron Cur-|had refused to release a gaoled|of the country districts, particu-
tain, official of their union, jJarly from St. Andrew’s parish
For over two years Britain had The official, Edward Roach, | where he is considered qualified





to contest a seat in the coming

been controlling and in many | Assistant Secretary of the Water-!

cases banning exports. which|side Workers’ Federation had| general election, although he is
might be of strategic value to|been sentenced to 12 months’?|not mentioned in Gairy’s casting
Communist countries, imprisonment on March 1, on two|cf probable M.M,W.U. - backed

Britain had recognised the|charges of contempt of court, candidates y
Peking Government as a plain] Five High Court Judges today | The recert sight of Blaize driv
acknowledgment Qne_ might! dismissed his application for a'!jng the ear of the Hon. BE. A.
speculate on whether the situatic n' writ of prohibition against his con- | Mitchell, member of the Legisla
would have been so serious if; viction and sentence, {tive Counci! and Vice-President
other countries had followed| Six thousand dockers struck |of the rival Grenada Worker
Pritain’s lead, he added. p weet he was sentenced, —Reuter. | Union, has also aroused the sus
of M.M.W.U.

Raymond Blackburn, Indepen
dent, alleged that the figure Gov-
ernment had given on rubber ex-}



Fire Flares Up

| picions

The decision io suspend Blaize|
| was taken at an M.M.W.U, execu-
tive meeting yesterday afternoon,























ports to China os not prelude
exports to Hong ong which in pd
Pisnetgy rd went to China. If these} KA JV IENNA, May 10.
were included the figure would A fortnight-old fire flared up}
he shout double. Sir Hartley said 988!n to-day in’ the newest Rus-
he cenied it entirely, —Reuter sian developed oilfield at Matzen
: tbout 30 northeast of
; Vienna, shocting a 50-yard pillar
WILL CUT AID ‘cf flame into the air
WASHINGTON, Mav 10. | Experts here nated that be
The Senate voted to-night to cut twee 600 and 000 tons of oil
off econemic aid to any nation and 1,000,000 cubic feet of gas
vh permitted its citizens are burning d
to trade with Communist areas Cl is cf ek oke un
It te th an into the Appro- smut fro burning oil
} n B which it passed C i the count le



- Reuter



ce ve te. —Reuter,



one of the stormy meetings of
irecent weeks.

; ‘Tomorrow afternoon Gairy holds
ja meeting in Market Square when







to China in 1945 as an attempt to
bring about an armistice in the
fighting between the Communists
and the Nationalists.

The late General Stilwell,
American: theatre
| China felt that the Nationalist
ee were “too much involved
in fighting the Communists rather
han getting together in the opera-
tions against the Japanese."

Marshall said the United States
should never yield to admit Com-
munist China to the United Na-
tions,

He made the statement during
the questioning by Republican
Senator, Alexander Smith, who
said the United States “must stand
firm against recognition of Com-
munist China or else we will be
giving up everything that the Ko-
rean struggle had been had for.”

The “Green Light”

The Senator also said that he

had been told that the United

ther
Commander’ in

States gave Britain the “gréén
light” to recognise Chinese Com-
munists.

Marshall repeated that he con-
sidered the Administration's pro-

gramme was a practical way tr
victory in Korea with the least

loss of life and the least possibility
of intervention by Russia

Senator Wayne Morsé (Repub-
lican, Oregon) asked Marshall if
a blockade of the Russian held
Port Arthur as it was proposed by
MacArthur, would not “create
such a state of international ten-
sion as to have an effect on thr
earlier entrance of Russia into the
war.”

“That is correct. sir. T think it
would introduce that likelihood,”
General Marshall replied.

The Defence Secretary said
Rritish chiections were also con-
sidered when the proposed block-
ade of Port Arthur was turnec
down.

—Reuter



Await Details Of | «iin

Angtlo-Cuban Pact

Own Correspondent!

LONDON, May 10.

The Commonwealth sugar inter
ests here are awaiting official
details of the Anglo-Cuban suga:
pact at present under discussion

(From Our

"Yhe decision is expected fairly
shortly.
The British Government he

been fully warned of the serious
effect that the long term Cuban
agreement may have upon Com-
menwealth producers and
recently assurances were sought
that Commonwealth interests
would not be prejudiced.

It is understood that immedi-
ately following the announcement j
of the pact with Cuba, there will |
be a further meeting of Common-

wealth interests here to discuss
what, if any, action should be
taken.



CRASH LANDING

SAN FRANCISCO, May 10.
Coastguard reported that an Air
Force B26 bomber flying to Hawaii
rash-landed in flames 420 miles |
off the California coast to-day.
Five men were reported aboard.
—Reuter,

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

Toe art



very |



J



}
|

|



CLIFFORD HUSBANDS, Barbados Law Student,

ALL

the quality of Barbados Rum at

Barbados Haraware Lva.

Panama Gets New Head: |
Pres. Arias Thrown. Out ©



and Mrs
the B.I

tells Mr

the West Indian Stall of



COMMUNIST TROOPS
FLEE FROM SEOUL

THE LAST Communis
withdrew out of the range

t

TOKYO, May 10.
troops anywhere near Seoul
of Allied attacks to-day after

three days’ pressure by South Korean forces

The Communist

South Korean capital

positions,

Eighth Army headquarters said‘
to-night “little or no enemy con
act reported in the area nortii |
west of Seoul.” |

Nations troops ne« 12 miles north of Seoul |
|

leaat three Communist companie



Way
A new London dock strike
threatened to-day,

Representativas of 1 500 tally |
clerks, key men of the docks, told |
the Labour Ministry that they

would walk out next Tuesday un-
less the decision to recruit 80 ad-
ditional clerks was cancelled.
They claimed their action would
force 180,000 dockers to stop work



There was not even enough
j work for present tally clerks, they
said.

Tally clerks measure and check
eargoes and record freight charges

At Port Birkenhead in north-
west England to-day over 1,500
dockers were locked out for being
five minutes late.

This interfered with
ing of 16 ships.

Dockers are seeking
ment intervention,

the load-
Goverr-

—Reuter

Churchill



Mrs.

LONDON, May 10
Mrs. Winston Churchill, wife
of Britain’s wartime Premier now
Opposition Leader ig to enter é
London hospital next week for
a minor operation. It is no
known how long she will be ir
hospital but all her engagement:
have been cancelled for the time

_being. Reuter.

was | three

|
|

“earned here to-day

manned by an

Walerfront
Workers Strike
IN DOMINICA





! Allies claimed limited gain
j against mode ate resistance on from Our Own Correspondent
he east front DOMINICA, May 10
ais" shaban ei ., | There has been a shore front
: Air strikes to-day were direct-| strike in Dominica for the last
ed against Communist concen- twelve days or so, threatening to
traticn southeast of Munsan near cause starvation of the island
ig Pe ae ; The Dominica Trade Union had
e Far Bast air force whic peen requested by waterfront
mounted over 900 combat flights workers to present a case on their
ey claiming the Killing or behalf for an increase in their
tro ok of 220 Communist rates and charges. Negotiations
roops .~-Reuter, | were entered into at once with!
| Steamship agents and shore work- |
fers, and a 24o per cent increase
' r r ts lear fr
y + agreed upon, Dissatisfaction and
London 'T ally Che rks delay crept in va are de-
manding instead a 75
Thireaten Walk Out | cceise
LONDON, 10. | They reuse to unload two

ships and a few sehcaners
| laden with cargo. The S.S, Herds-
! man arriving at Roseau with some
500 tons of cargo had to leave port
unloaded, Appeals of all kids
were made to the strikers but they
insisted on their demands. The
Government of Dominica took in-

stant and firm action and caused
essentials including flour, petrol
and kerosene to be landed unde

police escort without interference

by strikers

The following
dynamite sticks
Electric power s

night, Monday,
vere hurled at the
ation and also the





Central Telephone Exchange with
explosions terrifying the whol
town

The Gov-
number ot

resulted
on a

No damage
ernment took

pecial patrols to guard Roseau’s
most strategic centres which was
uccessfully carried out To-day
H.M.S,. Snipe arrived early in the
morning the workers had already
ome to a satisfactory agreement

aecepting 25 per cent, The arrival

of H.M.S. Snipe and Government
action relieved the anxiety and
tens.on

MISSIONARIES EXPELLED
VATICAN CITY, May 10

Over 200 foreign catholic mis-

sionaries have been expelled from

Ccmmunist China this year, it

—Reuter

London Welcomes Royal Visitors

LONDON. May 10.
Thousands of cheering London-
ers lined sunlit city streets today




‘he is expected to deal with this]}t9 welcome King Frederik and
ind cther development eee Ingrid of Denmark ‘to the

| capital's commercial centre.
| Up to the present the Fusiliers} Escorted by troopers of the
have not had the slightest connec-! British Household Cavalry, the
| tion with the local situation and| Royal visitors drove in an open
are settling down and _ doing! horse-drawn carriage from Buck-
camping exercise Among 1 1 ‘ingham Palace through the city
lar army men here are for the official reception by the

conscripts under the Le

Service Scheme whose ssed slowly through
ntinues L treets, they saw

| from

fiying
Office
them

British and Danish ffigs
almost every window
workers leaned out to cheer

on their way.

Searlet uniformed guardsmen
from Britain’s crack regiments
lined the route and the glistening

|

whom he installed a Knight)
Commander of the Order of
Danebrog.

He thanked him for the nar
vellous reception from the
people of London

“It is very much due to you ar|
a nation, to you as fighters foi |
right, freedom and justice, that my
country today can enjoy her in-
dependence and her existence <
one of the free nations of the
| world,” King Frederik said

q ~~Reuter

swords and breastplates of the
outriders gave London its third |
successive day of colour and
pageantry since the King and
Queen arrived,

King Frederik received an
Address of Welcome from Lord
Mayor Alderman Denys Lowson



ABOUT RUM

estimated |
to regiments, had been a potential flank threat to the |



Russia Has
New Plan
For Agenda

PARIS, May 10.
Russia has made a new counter-
»roposal for the agenda for For-
‘ign Ministers meeting, a Soviet

spokesman announced to-night.
At a Russian Embassy News
Conference, the spokesman said
he counter-proposal was to “‘con—

sider” a split in the agef®da pro-
posed by western delegates on
May 2, but with two modifications,

1 The subject of the “demili-

tarisation of Germany” should be

listed as an already agreed subject
for discussion. In the western
split agenda it figures last in the

Western column subjects and first
in the Soviet column,

2, The Atlantic Pact and
American bases abroad should be

edded to the list of subjects for
discussion—it did not figure in
the western list

Gromyko had said ~= Wesiern
deputies agreed to his suggestions
the Soviet Government was _ wil-
‘ling to accept the rest of the
! western draft of the split Agenda

Gromyko’s spokesman _— said
Russia wag willing to accept for
Blanchette of Barbados all about discussion the following subjects.
F. Mr. Blanchette is Manager ; 1, The completion of the Aus-
| trian Treaty.

2. Problems relating to the
‘= satebuiienent of German unity
and preparation of the Peace
ees.

The Fulfilment
7 with Italy,
Bulgaria and Hungary and of
Agreements of the four powers
jconcer ning Germany and Austria.

4. The fulfilment of the Peace

of Peace
Rumania,



PANAMA, May 10 |
The Panama Supreme Court oi|‘freaty with Italy in the part
Justice to-day declared by three|Concerning Trieste. He said the
votes to two that the designation |order of these subjects could be
of Vice-President Alcibia Aro} “discussed later, —Reuter.
semena by the National ssem
bly was Tanase: ang

Arosemenga was
President this afternoon

sworn ir fe

‘o Study Air

15,000 people. ;
Chief of Police, Developments
has declared he will abide by the
| decision of the Supreme Ccurt ‘ WIESBADEN, May 10.
and will support President Air experts from nine allied air

Arosemena. forces are to go to Korea to study

|

before

Colonel Remor
|

|





1" " c , atest developments in tactical
ee Seana Saas air power, United States air force
saying “Que Se Vaya” and cheer pect vei llgy:t Clown samen * _
ing Arosemens while Arias is selected by each of the following
practically besieged in the Presi countries Belgium Denmark
le f e oo ’ 2
ae Ne b> palace i | France, Greece, Italy, Nether-
RN was said that officials of the| jands Norway, Portugal and
Vational police had become dis Turkey, They will stay in Korea
gusted with the attitude adopted} gor a month. Reuter

ly Arias,—Reuter,

“

“ADVOCATE”









Approves Promotion

THE

WASHINGTON, May 10
The United States Senate to
day approved the promotion of | vere for NEWS

Lieutenant
Ridgway,

General

DIAL 3113

Matthew B

United Nations Com i
mander in Korea to the Pils of Day a Night
General —Reuter,



eee
(FLEE







ae





© BRIDGETOWN PLAYERS

1
| PRESENT
{

| The
SHOP AT
SLY CORNER

A Play in three acts
By Edward Percy

\
| under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency
The Governor and Lady Savage

AT THE EMPIRE THEATRE



heh QTY =i
WED. 16th, THURS. 17th, & FRI. 18th MAY

| MATINEE: FRIDAY 18th

ORCHESTRA & BOXES $1.50, CIRCLE $1.20, HOUSE $0.72

I MATINEE PRICE

i Orchestra and Circle $1.00 — House and Baleony 24c.

WM Booking Office Opens TO-DAY,FRIDAY, at 8.30 a.m.

»)
»





PAGE TWO

——



Caub Calling

IS EXCELLENCY the Gov-
ernor an Lad) Savage
their daughter Pat, Mr. and Mr
Hopwood and Mr. Ernest Balthrop
accompanied by the Governor's
ADC Major Vaughan were



the Reception
ean Commi

Hotel



among the gue
given by the C
sion at the Marine
night

The party took place under one
of the large evergreen trees on
the grounds of the hotel It was
illuminated for the occasion



ribt

last










Intransits

NTRANSIT through Barbado
yesterday i r.C.A, from
Trinidad on her way to Canada
was Mrs. Grant Major, wife of
Mr. T. Grant

a â„¢ Major, Cana-
dian Govern-

ment Trade

Commissioner
for the Eastern
Caribbea n
head
are in
Trinidad. Mrs
«= Grant Majar
& told Carib that
her husband
Mrs, Grant Major would be leav-
ing Trinided on Sunday for New





York. He is on his way to Otta-
wa to attend the Canada-B.W.1I
Trade Conference. Mrs. Grant
Major's destination is Ontario, She
is going to see their son Bill
graduate at McMaster University
in Hamilton, Ontario. They will
be returning to the West Indies

in October.

Other intransit passengers from
Trinidad en route to Canada were
Miss Theresa Milne, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. T. Malcolm Milne
of Trinidad. Theresa will be in
Canada for about three months,
staying in Montreal with her sis-
ter Joy. Joy’s room-mate Zita
Rodriguez was also on the .C.A,

plane for Canada yesterday, She
is returning to Canada after a
holiday in Trinidad. Theresa
hopes to return to Trinidad via
New: York.
Summer Holidays
ISS SUSAN VICKERMAN
has come down to spend
the summer holidays with ner
mother. She arrived yesterday

+e

morning by







ADVENTURES



ee enee cence tom

HE campaign for courtesy on

the roads must not be taken
too literally. We do not want to
see a whole street jammed while
polite men drivers take off their
hats and beg a lady driver to go
ahead of them, Nor must a driver
who has received a civility stop to
thank the other driver,

Imagine the annoyance of a
line of drivers who are forced to
wait while compliments are ex-
changed. “That was awfully nice
of you.” “Not at all,” “Oh, but
it was.” “It was nothing.” “I don't
think you’ve met my daughter.”
Then an exchange of names and
a writing down of addresses, while
a “courtesy cop” takes particulars
of the civility, in order to recom-
mend both drivers for the Courtesy
Medal, and his colleagues arrest
the drivers of all the jammed cars
for using impatient language.

When a lady driver extends her



BY THE

®
—_—
POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER








if â„¢, LY :

Y/

s

oj

L/
e
“1



“Purely as an_ interesting
point of natural history, how
do wou suppose rats can be
thsolutely certain that @ ship

is sinking?”



\

T.C.A. Departures
RS. ‘BILL’ STUART, wife of

s T.C.A’s Manager here and
their young daughter were among
the passengers leaving for Canada
yesterday by T.C.A. Mr. Stuart
will be following next week on a
fortnight’s visit,

Due Tomorrow

ASSENGERS due to arrive
from England to-morrow by
the Golfito are Mr. and Mrs.
E. L. N. Ascough. Mr, Ascough is
the new Divisional Manager of
Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd.,
Rev. W. J. Barrett, Mr. and Mrs.
R. H. Brand and two children, Mr,
W. D. Charlton, Wing Comdr. and
Mrs. D, F. A, Clarke and child,
Mr. and Mrs, C. Godfree, Mrs. E. I.
Hosking and two children, Mr. and
Mrs. F. G. Hurt and Miss E. G.
Hurt, Mr, C. Martindale, Rev, and
Mrs. E. E, New, Mr. F. E. Peek,
Maj. O F. C, Walcott, Dr, and
Mrs. H. D. Weatherhead, Miss P.
Weatherhead, Mr. W. W. Willis,

Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Young.





AY By

will mean a shortage of the near-
zine eggs laid by hens fed on old
seraps of plastic zine alloy.

Twenty Years of Uproar

“Q:HE seemed,” writes a music

critic, “to ignore the conduc-
tor.” Her mother had probably
warned her that these men with
batons can be the very devil, 1
know one who, when he taps his
lectern with the baton at the be
ginning of a piece, raps out a
Morse message of impudent ad-
miration,

On one occasion Rustiguzzi sang
with such power that she blew
the baton clean out of Richter’s
hand. It landed in the _ stalls,
where it awoke a vulgarian who
thought it was a stick of liquorice,
took a sleepy bite, and broke two
teeth,

back in Barbados in November.

OF PIPA

After Three Months

RS. GRAHAM ROSE and
her son, Hugh, who had been
holidaying in Barbados for the
past three months, left yesterday
by T.C.A, for Toronto where her

husband is with the Western
Assurance Co, Other pas.
sengers for Toronto were Mr

Garth Searle, Mr. Theodore Good-
ridge and Miss Ruby Gill.

Labour Adviser

ME ERNEST BALTHROP,
Labour Adviser to the Sec-
retary of State who arrived from
St. Vincent yesterday morning
by B.G. Airways. will be a guest
at Government House until he

leaves for Dominice. Arriving
by the same plane were Dr
A. A. Gibbons and Mr, Eric
Holder.

Vancouver Bound
R. AND MRS. NOEL AGARD

who arrivéd here a few
days ago from St. Vincent, left
yesterday for Canada by T.C.A

They are on their way to settle
in Vancouver Island. Mr, Agard
was formerly on the staff of
Cable and Wireless’ Branch in St.
Vincent, His father is Mr.
Aubrey Agard.

U.S, School-Teacher

RS. GLADYS viCKERSON

who arrived from Trinidad
May 2nd, left yesterday for
Grenada by B.W.I1.A. Mrs,
Dickerson is a school-teacher in
Brooklyn, She is touring the
W.I. Other passengers on the
plane for Grenada was Mr. W,
Medtord who has gone to spena
about eight days’ holiday jn that
colony. tele

Winter Home

R, and Mrs. Colles J. Coe, who
make Barbados their home

every winter, left yesterday for
Bermuda by T.C.A. They are en
route to their home in Long Island
and will spend a few days in Ber-
muda pefore leaving for the U.S,
Accompanying them were their
two cocker spaniels “Laddie” and
“Chi Chi”, The Coes expect to be




Copyright Var Qias tnt Amsterdam



Beachcomber

Sunday Pea-pushing
Y refusing to push a pea with

his nose on Sundays, Evans

the Hearse has saved the Govern-
meul, the Festival people, the in-
formers and all the rest of them
a great deal of argument, While
it is true that the spectacle might
keep people away from church,
it cannot be called a music-hall
turn, as there is no dressing-up.
The people of Aberbananer sup-
port Evans. ‘Do you want London
turned into one vast Moulin
Rouge?” asked Davies the Milk.
“The Devil,” commented a Coun-
cillor, “rubs his great red hands
every time nose is laid to pea on
the Sabbath,” Fresh in the mem-
ory of Aberbananer is the attempt
to establish the Continental Sun-
day by letting the boys roller-
skate in the drill-hall,







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Hotel Managers

C= in yesterday n-
ing by T.C.A.‘frum Can-
ada was Mr. Rene H. Martin,
former Manager of the Windsgi
Hotel. Mr. Martin had been in
Canada on a short visit. Mr
Martin is the new Manager of

the Marine Hotel. Coming in by
the same plane was Mr. Rene
Talon who is replacing Mr. Mar
tin at the Windsor as Manager

Back From Trinidad

R. and Mrs. Ralph Hunte, who

were married a few days ago
in Trinidad, flew home yesterday
by B.W.LA. Coming in by the
some plane were Mrs, M. Jones
who had been visiting hey daugh-
ter Mrs, E. Donawa and Mr
Simon Mendes.

Visiting Their Sons

. and Mrs, R. Eric Smythies,
who own a home on the St.
Peter coast, have gone to Canada
to visit their two sons. They left
yesterday by T.C.A. and expect
to be back in Barbados by July

Oil
R, PETER BATTEN, who is
an oil well contractor in

Venezuela, is in Barbados with his
wife for a short holiday. They
came in yesterday via Trinidad by
B.W
of Maturin.

Majority ’

| AJORITY of passengers for
by

Barbados yesterday
T.C.A. were staff members
They were Mr. Irvin Muir fron
Port Arthur, Toronto, Mr.
Mis, Frank Schofield from
Brunswick, Mr, and Mrs.
ence McLean of Steveston,
Mr. and Mrs. John Klem
Lethbridge, Alberta, Miss

New

Kay Freeman and Mr.
Martel from Ottawa, Ontario
They are all down to spend par

of their summer holidays in Bar-

bados,
Secretary

RINIDAD born Henry Dixon
Canada witn
daughter Kathleen.

is on Nis way

She is going

up for medical at

attention, Mr. Dixon is the Segre
Manufacturers Life eIn-

tary of
surance Co, in Port-of-Spain.

CROSSWORD
TF PPP UTE
ere
Le
Prec
CECE
rhe
ae
PEP
sl

Across

Part of Cupid's equipment.
Open out. (6)















0





(6)
Hives that produce records, (3)

Hebrew measure from Rome, (4)
You men become equal. rigtrseows
jaw, (6)

Chev make me upset a song (6)
Can never be disproved, (5)
Feature nigh or tow, (4)
Where you will get lies (4)
For a cricketer Mister includes
two ducks (4) 22 Blow up! (6)
Tale that is told) not the tay
that waga ()

ee ee
= S=3c8e Serer

Down
| Phia should give the current
rice, (9)
2 akes the steve run, (8)
“ Such features are often attrac
ive. (9)
4 You can be this without com
ulsion (9) 5. Dash! (4)
6 ita the nall vp the head (fi)
7 Colour. (4)
8 CarDs abuut the atum perhaps
(5) 10, Appear for weaving. (4)
19 Electrica: measure (3)
17. Toy one may sink tn a sink. (4)
18 Telegraph poles nhye th (4)
21 Briefly the padre (4)
Solution of vesterday's ouzele Acca
L gturegons, H Axiom. jo id! +}
Plan. Byacuiate 15 ued
BSlonct, 21) Maditenea, 1 Hnapoesd
a2 Tweive Down | Suied ¢ Uniaced
5. Rue; 4 Gamit 7 Bapinine Sl FT
Adiutant; 9 Oat. 12° Now mode 1

Candia: iA Siew 1% Sime ih Gel
Tdew



.1.A. His base is just outside

and

Ter-
BC.
from
Har-
riet Hall from Mt. Royal, P.Q.
and Miss Annie Magrichuk, Mrs
Albert





B.B.C. Radio Programme |



Serenade
at the Piano
Ake’ 9.00

Parade
11.45 a m
News, 12.10 pm
pm. Close Down

25 a.m
World Affair
New



115-645 p.m. — 19.76 m
4.19 p.m. Jazz Music
na Record, 5 00 pm

4.45 pm Spor

The Walker
5.05 p.m. Composer of the Week,
pm Light Music, 6.00 p m

Navy Newsletter, 6.15 p.m. The Sorcere





Lower Broad Street

| DRE

SSES

Ready-Made from London
Also Made-to-Order

BATHING SUITS





GLOHL
4 4



eer a aia oe cts

ees ean
. Y



Stanung
RICHARD CONTE + COLEEN
ond totrodveng ALEX NICOL
Extras ! !
TED WEEMS & ORCH.
2 Reels of Modern Music
















MIDNITE SATURDAY 12
BY REQUEST



—- ALSO: =
MON. 9.30 A.M. & 1.30 P.M.
“LOUISIANA” AND

SONG oF THE WASTELAND

taney CAOMICHAFL





TO-DAY (Friday) 2.30—
445 & 8.30 p.m. and
Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.














» The
2 15 Debate Continues, 11.00 p.m. Ring Up The

Cu

Merchant p m

JANETTA DRESS SHOP |
Upstairs Over Newsam’s

~ LINGERIE — STOCKINGS
COCKTAIL HANDBAGS



Starting To-day 5 and 8.15 and Continuing

GRAY





















FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1951











—— alae
AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEES : TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW AT 5 P.M.

TO-NIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT AT 8.50
RKO Presents :

ROSALIND RUSSELL MICHAEL REDGRAVE

RAYMOND MASSEY KATINA PAXINOU

LEO GENN — KIRK DOUGLAS
in Eugene O'Neill's

“MOURNING BECOMES ELECTRA”





> pm. Inter
nde

ude, 6.45 p.m





Som 2132 m



7.00 pam. The News, 7.10 p m






News



Analysis
74

715 pm _ West Indian Diary,
Think On These Things, 8 00

English







Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p m
Magazine. 845 p.m The Walker Cup.
8.50 p.m. Interlude, 855 pm. From The
Editorials, 900 pm World Affairs, 9.15
The

pm









Eric Winstone,
10.10 pm _ Interlude
The Spur of the Moment,

Rendezveus Players, 10.45

pm 9.00 pm
10.15 pm
0 30 pm
pm. The











PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

TODAY ; 2.80 — 4.45 and $.30 p.m and Continuing Daily at 445 & 8 30 p m
Warner Excitine New Triumph !

“YOUNG MAN “™ HORN”

with KIRK DOUGLAS -— LAUREN BACALL — DORIS DAY
MIDNITE SATURDAY 12th ¥ 12th—9.30 am. &
Also MONDAY (Bank) !

9.30 aum. and 1.30 p m
By Popular Demand - - -
“LOUISIANA” — and —
“SONG OF THE WASTELANDS”

PLAZA DIAL
OISTIN 8404

Today to Sunday — 5 & 8.30 p.m.
Monogram’s Thrill Double ! !
“THE DUDE GOES WEST"

Eddie Albert, Gale Storm &



Curtain




C.B.C.

FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1951
pm -—~-10.15 p.m. News,
—10 30 pm. Canadian Chronicle.
25.61 m,



Pp.
20



10.00 10 15




8 11.76 Mes.,



1.30 pm




















an —=

GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James
TODAY to SUNDAY — 830 p.m.

Mat, Sunday — 5 p.m.
RKO Hit Double !













of all Types







“BLU Pwr E tt Step Lively” “TARZAN &
oar ay eae KENTUCKY (0? Frank Sinatra & the Slave Girl”
3 | Lex Barxer

Bill Williams, Jane Nich ‘Buzz’ Henry
———————————————





Midnite Sat. 12th (Monogram Double!
Cisen Kid in
“Beauty & The Bandit” &
“The Living Ghost”
James Dunn
—
—
,

MIDNITE SAT
“SPY TRAIN"
Richard Travis

12th (Monogram)
“MOON OVER

& MONTANA’

Jimmy Wakely











THEATRE

Can YOU decide
Cham tig
MA amet eg








REGGIE CASEY
‘Count Every Star”

“DENNIS CLARKE
“My Love Loves Me”

“EDDIE CLARK
“TE

MALCOLM MURRAY
“Time After Time”

DORIAN THOMPSON
“You Can Do No Wrong”

FRANK AUSTIN
“4 Winds and Seven Seas”




















GUEST STARS

The Pride.of Belle Gully—
WILL IFILL
and
GERALD DAISLEY

Local Talent TONITE













Aa BRL TODD ; Norman WOQUAND, van DESNY
EMPIRE THEATRE

8.30 p.m.
and continuing Daily 4.45

EMPIRE

TO-DAY at 2.30 Only

‘TD CLIMB THE HIGHES'|
MOUNTAIN”



~ Pit 20—House 36—Bal. 48
Boxes 60

Tickets on Sale from. 7 p.m.
& 8.30

ROYAL

To-day and To-morrow
4.30 and 8.30
Republic Big Double
Edgar BARRIER
And
Adele MARA in








TO-NIGHT at 8.30 and

continning “SONG OF MEXTOO”
J. Arthur Rank presents - - “UNDERCOVER WOMAN”
. with
** MADELEINE” Stephanie BACHELOR
Starring: AND

Robert LIVINGSTON

Special Mid-Nite Show
Saturday Night

Ann Todd — Norman Wool-
ond— Ivan Desny



Serene eee mena een OC “CONVICTED”
ROXY AND
“BEYOND THE PURPLE
Last Two Shows To-day HILLS”



4.30 and 8.15
Columbia Big Double - -

OLYMPIC
To-day and To-morrow
4.30 and 8.15
First Instalment

Republic Serial





** RELENTLESS ”

MICHAEL CUR

DIRECTED BY

: ; “DRUMS OF FU
>and : MANCHU”
‘i Starring Henry BRANDON
“LUST FOR Along with the Picture
GOLD ” “MAN FROM
OAKLAHOMA” |
Starring: Starring :

Roy ROGERS And
Dale EVANS




Glen FORD & Ida LUPINO









>

SOPPOSF










E Eagle Hall

WEDNESDAY 4.45 & 8.

ROXY THEATR

arm to give a signal, is the pedes-
trian who runs into the road to
kiss her hand being courteous or

x PPPCPISFPSS
s
+

A












15 Das. s




COMBINATION









merely foolish? Rye oe venmwoe, Se : Bs .
Plastic Egg Shortage 2 ppamasnenye iz %
ROFESSOR E. N. da C, An ( Tie screen’s one Great: » %
drade is to give a lecture to ; : yr, a 7 ‘
children, Intending to show them ‘ 2.) ry i) OL LL NEED Il I 8
how to tell a fresh egg, he adver- >

tised for a loan of this rare article.
I hope he will say a word about
the recent boast that a way had
heen discovered “to keep eggs
new-laid” for a year or more, At
present, I believe eggs imported
from Chile may only be claimed
as new-laid for six months after
their arrival here, To tell the age
of a bit of dried egg you hold a
lighted match above it. If the
match goes out, the dried egg may
be deemed to be un-new-laid, and
therefore fit for human intake.

The coming control of metal



PHILIPS ELECTRIC
BULBS

5 — 200 WATTS

mine, and. I've been sleeping here
since October, or trying to," replies
the man plaintively, ‘‘I haven't
slept very well though! You say

u're lost. Then come with me."

ising stiffly and stretching himself,
he leads the way further into the
cave, which is not really very dark.

The strange man gazes in amaze-
ment at Rupert. ‘' Please, | didn't
mean any harm,"’ says Rupert.
“I'm lost, and I found the way in
at the back of the frozen waterfall,

and I thoughe I might shelter here.
Is this your caver" ** Yes, it's













FOR ELEGANT

— SEE THE — ~

BROADWAY DRESS SHOP

TEL. : 3895 1, BROAD STREET

SCREW & BAYONET

AND

FLECTRIC LAMP

SHADES
BEAUTIFUL COLORS IN



‘







LADIES’ SHOES

“WINDSOR BRAND”

WHITE NUBUCK SANDALS ___o_.w-
TAN, NAVY & BLACK SANDALS_ _WWWW—
TAN & NAVY CASUALS. HH «89.37
TAN & WHITE CASUALS ___._._ 8.50

AU with Platform Soles and Wedge Heels

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

We Oifer - - -

$9.50 per bag 100 Ibs.

WHOLE CORN ...
SCRATCH GRAIN ......... $8.50 per bag 100 Ibs.

BAKELITE FROM
27e. — $1.29

Obtainable from our - - -
PLANTATION SUPPLY DEPARTMENT
~‘Phone 4657

$9.44
$8.53

.
8
%
$

monn



VPSSSSSODSO SSS SSPE GEESE EELS COSE SESS SE GOSS GOGO GSES OS GSE SSS SOOSSO9GSES



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.



.
%
-
,
>
%

+
&

ro

THE CORNER STORE

POSSESSES SESS SSS SSS SOS ESSE SFOS EES





299999999 9O99F



DIAL 4606 DIAL 4220





EEO! EOE EO OE OO

FRIDAY, MAY it, 1951



Appointments Of W.1.
To Secretariat Posts

Approved

By Caribbean Commission

THE CARIBBEAN COMMISSION yesterday decided
to hold its Thirteenth Meeting in St. Croix from October

29 to November 3 this year.

This is the first time that the

meeting will be held in that island.
The Commission did a great deal of work during the

4

The Commission dealt with 19
reeommendations which the West
Indian Conference (Fourth Ses-
sion) held in Curacao in Novem-—
ber had submitted to It for its
action.

Of the recommendations con-
sidered yesterday, the Commis-—
sion agreed that the implemen-
tation of the praiseworthy policy
of appointing West Indians to
posts in the Secretariat be con—
tinued.

Other recommendations ac-
cepted were that all Territorial
Governments be requested to
improve and expand the cireu-
lation of Commission publica-
tions and information in their
respective territories; that the
Secretary General be instructed
when submitting future reports
to the Conference, to report

s€parately and_ specifically on
the action taken by Member
Governments on the projects

recommended by the Commission

The Commission agreed to re-
néw its enquiries of Territorial
Governments in regard to their
need of capital for development
projects of a private and public
nature; as well as to take steps
to determine the availability of
investment capital both within
and without the Caribbean area,
and to seek the assistance of
technical experts of the United
Nations and _ its Specialised
Agencies. 8!

Industrial Projects

The Commission aiso instruct-
ed the Preparatory Meeting for
the Industrial Development Con-
ference to take these recommen-—
dations into consideration in
preparing the agenda for the
Industrial Development Confer-
ence and for the West Indian
Conference (Fifth Session), and
request it to give particular at-
tention to studies of inducements
offered by governments in the
area to encourage the investment
of local and outside capital in
new industrial projects.

In regard to recommendations
made by the West Indian Con-
ference concerning _ tariffs in
which they have asked for a
Tariff Conference to examine the
steps necessary to lower tariffs
and promote inter—territorial
trade, the Commission instructed
the Secretary—-General to prepare
a comprehensive study of the

matter for submission to the
Commission at its Fourteenth
Meeting in order that it may

then decide whether a tariff con-
férence should be convened.
The studies should include an
examination of the effect on the
trade of the area of the General
Agreement on Trade on Tariff and
other international measures for
the liberalisation of trade

Labour Migration

Among other recommendations
agreed to by the Commission
were the removal of restrictions
on the migration of labour to the
Americas and elsewhere, particu -
larly those imposed on the ground
of race and colour; the enact.-
ment of legislation to provide
that, in case of jurisdictional dis—
putes between trade unions, polls
should be conducted by govern-
ment among the workers con—
cerned; the expansion of existing
scholarship programmes for the
Caribbean area with a view to
making additional scholarships
available at metropolitan univer-



BEAUtâ„¢Y AND PROTKCTION



sate

With Bergertex

concrete, plaster, brick or stone.

Bergertex cannot crack or peel off,

afternoon and went on until late in the night.

Fish Markets
Everywhere

Last month 56,863 pounds of
fish were sold in the Public
Market. In April last year the
amount was 113,634 and of that
65,784 pounds were flying fish.

Large quantities of fish are not
however brought into the market.
In order to get black market
prices some fish vendors prefer
to sell Along roads and on beaches.

“The amount of fish sold along
Bay Street nearly doubles the
amount carried to the market,” an
cfficial told the Advocate yester-
day. He said that every day he
could see boats, loaded with fish,
heading for the beaches.

“In Trinidad a Policeman,
Market Constable or Food Inspec-
tur, who brings a charge for
profiteering against a person, gets
one third of the fine imposed by
the magistrate. This encourages
thrift and more people are brought
before the Courts,” he said.

He said that if this system were
adopted in Barbados and heavy
fines imposed the black market~
ing would cease,

At the corner of Westbury
Road and Fontabelle many fish
scales could be seen in the road
yesterday. The area has a bad
smell,

At Brown’s Beach and Burke's
Beach, both in Bay Street, sharks’
heads, scales, intestines and bones
of fish can be seen scattered
around, These places also have
a bad smell, e Temple Yard
area, opposite St. Mary’s Church
wall, has now become a regular
fish market. On many occasions
when there is a rush for fish in
the market, you can purchase
some at Temple Yard for 2 few
vents over the schedule price.

Untidy Beach

Fish is also sold on the Reef
Beach. Afart from the bad smell
of the area, the beach is regularly
littered with old ting and at one
time g dead goat was on the beach
for many days.

“These conditions would be
bettered if the Police, Market
Constables, would make a special
effort to run the fish vendors off
the road. ‘The Police seem to co-
operate with the fishermen instead
of the Market Constables and Food
Inspectors”, a housewife told the
Advocate yesterday.

She said that she has, on many
eceasions, bought fish on the wharf
while the Police looked on, “When
the fisherman was about to shift
to another site he looked at the
Policeman and said: Want a ‘ish,
bud?”

During last month the quantities
brought to the market were:
13,430 pounds of flying fish, 29,728
pounds of dolphin, 846 of king fish,
1,424 of bill fish, 8,745 of shark,
1,998 pounds of albacore, 487 of
bonito and 205 pounds of seine fish,

Alveady this month large quan-
tities of albacore are being
brought in. A few dolphin are
also being caught,

sities and local institutions of uni-
versity status for students in the
area; and the establishment of a
routine reperting service for all
Caribbean territories in respect
of important and contagious
plant pests and diseases.

ITH

Waterproof and weather resisting,

for in drying it becomes an integral

part of the wall on which it is painted. Its crisp, matt finish stays

fresh and smart almost indefinitely.



Bergertex is

delicate colours

WVADE

available in many

for use inside or

outside,

BY

BERGER PAINTS



Stocked by

ALL HARDWARE STORES

GARDINER AUSTIN

& co.,

LTD. — Agents.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Handicrafts
Development
Discussed

Mr. Fred Leighton, Viee-Presi-
dent of the National Council of
American Importers and a Mem-
ber of the Advisory Committee
cen Imports to the U.S. Depart-
ment of Commerce, on the in-
vitation of the Chairman, briefly
addressed one of the Committees
of the Caribbean Commission on
the possibilities of the develop—
ment of handicraft (cottage) in-
dustries in the Caribbean, based

on his observations made
during a tour of the Brit-
ish territories of the area

arranged under the auspices of

the velopment and Welfare
Organisation.

He pointed out that there were
certain contradictory features

characterising the present stage
of development of handicrafts in
the Caribbean. There was good
local demand and also pos-
sibilities of limited export but
there are shortages of materials
and neglect to develop the use
of other more readily available
materials.

The most advanced territory
was Jamaica. There the fibres
in use were in good supply but
techniques were at a_ relatively
low level of development: the
loom was not utilised nor were
articles such as rush rugs made,
while there was an undue con—
centration on hats and handbags.
There was need for the infusion
of fresh ideas and an awakening
of the creative talents of the
local peoples. These latter were
very responsive to guidance and
receptive of new ideas.

Export Markets

There was a marked desire in
the territories to develop export
markets in the United States but
he did not consider that the time
was yet ripe for this. For the
most part, local demand could not
be satisfied in the territorial and
tourist markets of the area and,
moreover, the state of develop-—
ment had not yet reached the
high level required for success—
ful marketing in the United
States.

Unit prices in the British ter-
ritories, especially, were high due
to low labour productivity, poor
methods of preparation, in-
efficient use of labour and to
certain other artificial causes like
high import duties on materials
used in the industry.

A further important prejudicial
factor is the very high north—
bound freight between the Carib—
bean and the United States as
compared with the south-bound:
$1.20—70c. US. per cu, ft.
north-bound as against 35c. U.S.
south-bound.,

There was undoubtedly a good
market in the United States, par—
ticularly for basketry as a result
of loss of supplies from China,
and there were good prospects for
developing a market for fibre
products if the unfavourable fac-
tors mentioned above could be

overcome. _
Basketry

In regard to basketry, an in-
teresting development had been
the recent revival ef Carib
basketry in Trinidad and Domin—
ica. This was being stimulated
by an order placed by the Alcoa
Company with the Tourist Board
of Trinidad for fifty satchels per
week,

Distribution in the United
States could best be developed
by the fostering of active local
markets. These would serve to
attract buyers from the United
States who were now regularly
visiting the Caribbean on tourist
cruises and likely to continue
doing so on an increasing seale
In the future.

The most successful procedure
was to offer a large variety of in—
dividual items from which buyers
could choose and to develop the





to

He knows that the Blue Gillette
Blade is a treasure

For making his shave
every morning a pleasure.





TRADE ENQUIRIES TO



‘ALL OVER THE. WO

BERGERTEX

chere’s new beauty and protection for walls of

The Dutchman’s a hard-headed
sensible man

And his shaving is done

In Holland, as in every other
country, the smart men know
there is nothing to equal

Blue Gillette Blades for a
clean, comfortable shave.
And because they last so long,

no blade so economical.

Blue Gillette Blades

Industrialist Advises

Use Of Loeal Materials:

In Howse Building

MR. WARD CANADAY, industrialist and manufac-
turer of Toledo, Ohio, and the American Co-Chairman of
the Caribbean Commission, has been interested in low cost

housing for a long time,

He said that although he did
not live in the tropics, yet he
had a plantation in St. Croix,
Virgin Islands, and is greatly
interested in eattle for the tropics,
and sugar cane.

Mr. Canaday told the Advocate
yesterday that he had visited
several of the housing develop-
ments in Barbados and thought
‘hat they were very attractive.

He believed that it will be
found that plans which utilize
Yocal materials, and encourage
self help in construction under
expert supervision and guidance,
will, in the long run, prove most
effective in improving the living
conditions of the largest number
of people.

Will B'dos Join
Tourism Effort?

Mr. Louis S. Law, Executive
Secretary of the Caribbean Interim
Tourism Committee with head-
quarters at Kent House, Trinidad,
is now in Barbados to present him-
self to Mr. G, H. Adams and the
Hon. W A. Bustamante, the newly
elected British Commissioners of
the Caribbean Commission.

Mr. Law arrived from Trinidad
by B.W.1.A. on Wednesday and 1s
staying at the Marine Hotel

He told the Advocate yesterday
that the Caribbean Interim Tour-
ism Committee was the implemen-
tation of a recommendation made
years ago by the Caribbean Com-
mission and the West Indian
Conference.

It held its first, meeting in
Trinidad in August 1949 and
actually started functioning in
1950.

The



member territories are
Haiti, the Dominican_ Republic,
Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin
Islands, the Leeward and Wind-
ward Islands, Martinique, Guade-
loupe, Trinidad and Tobago, as
well ag all the islands the
Netherlands West Indies,

He said that Barbados had not
so far, seen fit to join in the
regional effort, but beeause it was
utterly impossible for any individ-
ual territory to change the trend
of travel in such a large market as
the United States, he hoped that
Barbados would eventually do its
share in aq regional effort which
was the only way that this object
could be achieved.

Advertising

This year, the Caribbean Interim
Tourism Committee started a
modest advertising programme
which was already producing
extraordinary results,

Mr. Law said’ that advices from
New York showed that the num-
ber of enquiries so far received in
answer to the suggestion of
spending summer vacations in the
Caribbean evyceeded the Commit-
tee’s expectations.

The object of the Committee he
said, was not to do the work of
individual islands, but rather to
supplement it by promoting more
traffic to the area generally from
which the individual — islands
would reap such extra benefits,
as their own efforts would merit,

capacity and train workers to
produce the lines selected in the
quantities required,

The British territories would
do well to emulate the example
of Puerto Rico by encouraging
skilled craftsmen and interpre-
neurs to establish themselves 10
the island. These have already
made .important contributions by
developing the loom weaving of
vegétable fibres, other than cot
ton, and the use of the screw
pine (Pandanus sp.) for a variety
of goods.





a sensible plan;

CEPDES GRANT LIMITED

Better Citizenship

He also believes that a plan
which spreads over a period of
20 years, the repayment of cost
plus low interest, will result in
ride of ownership, to a greater
degree than rental and will also
result in better citizenship and
greater security. For éxample,
he said that a house in which
the material and land = costs
amcunt to say $1,000 if built
with self help, can become a
pro y worth $2,000 or more
If the payment of $1,000 can be
divided into 20 annual instal-
ments, and if the interest rate
is say 4%% per year of the un-
paid balance, the average pay
ment by the purchaser will be ap-
proximately $75 a year for both
principal and interest. Added to
this, the cost of insurance and
depreciation would bring the
total payable price by the new
owner within $100 a year or $2
a week,

The advantage of the plan is that
the moment a man becomes the
owner, he and his whole family
will have interest in developing
flowers and a garden and main-
taining and improving the ap-
pearance and value of the prop-
erty. That, he said, develops
pride of ownership and respon-
sible citizenship and also brings
in to improving the value of the
property, the labour of the whole
family, which otherwise would be
lost to a large degree in rental
property.

Lower Cost

In many instances, it is found
that the actual material cost and
land cost of such property, is
considerably less than $1,000,

In Puerto Rico, the minimum
subsistence housing programmer







PAGE THREE
} C
$300, amd he was told that in| : FP,
Antigua, civ minded citizen: * : Vv
owning land, had donated some & | '
{or such housing projects, thus @ | 4
iding still value to the e® | &

completed property as a resuit|
ci the labour put into it by the}



BEST






bee Mi: ! Photo Cards
e said that’ he was particu aos
larly happy to note the experi ‘of Modern British Cars

menting that is aN
with the use of
such ag concrete blocks being
cast around a core of bagasse.
He understands that there is
a very large amount of surplus
bagasse each year after the crop
is harvested and also that the}
cost qf lumber here is very high
It is undoubtedly within the
bounds of probability that native
materials low in cost, may be
used to supplement the more
costly structural materials oa
'

|

being done pr
new "oeat|



developing low cost housing

He said that when a solid roo
and supporting celumns provide
structure, walls might be made
of light material standardised in |
production to greatly reduce cost». |

He noted that studies are being |
made as to the relative cost of |
baked clay and the quarrying of |
native stone and various forms |
of pre-cast concrete, |

that builds! Save ’em
and Swap ‘em... 40
Cards in the Series.

TY Klloggs
CORN FLAKES |
today!



TRADE MARK

HAIR |
TONIC B

Quarrying Equipment

It is possible that equipment
permitting the ‘quarrying of
native stone at lower cost might |
reduce the price involved in the |
use of this plentiful material.

VASELINE is the registered trade mark of
Mr, Canaday said ‘that the hesehrough Manufacturing Co., Cons’d tice

start which is being made in mu To es, a te a

various parts of the island

eer the social benetits |

of etter housing should bear | | TL ae

fruit in very rapid improve WP ys Wy

ment for the next few years as :

it had in Puerto Rico,

He was particularly impressed
with the vision and enterprise
with which this programme is
being undertaken by Hon, F, C
Hutson and his associates, under
the immediate supervision of Mr
Thomas Lashley, Secretary of the
Housing Board and Mr. T. FE
Went, the Colonial Engineer.

Another thing which impressed

him he said, is the cleanliness
and apparent care the people
here take of their homes, no

matter how small they are, That
quality of pride in “good house
keeping” is a great asset to any



NEEDS NO REFRIGERATION —

if your teeth are
as white as hers!
Smile at yourself in the mirror! Look
|
i

involve material costs as low a* community, he said,







ae ae
Ive switched
% Fleisch inatins PA









AS EASY TO USE AS OLD-
FASHIONED PERISHABLE YEAST

@ Fleischmann's new granule yeast stays
fresh for weeks right on your pantry shelf, If . ‘ it
you bake at home, try Fleisehmanu’'s for j wad imine’ |
more delicious hot breads and coffee cakes. \ Si aaa?” f
For Your Health's Sake—try Fiviseh- arts bh ha aoe

mann’s Dry Yeast dissolved in fruit juice,

milk or water. Like old-time foil yeost—it
helps tone up your system.

SO EASY TO USE! Bpritvicic into
lukewarm water. Let stand 10
niinutes, Then stir, One pach
mke equals one compreteéd
yeast cake in any recips

Keo a sygnly on hand ~beke af a moments nonce |





5
G
0

*
O
mY

\




Only your mirror will tell you. - .



















r
TONIGHT — Smile into
your mirror—-take a
good look at your

carefully at your teeth. Do they sparkle
and shine as they should ? The answer
is “ Yes” when you use Pepsodent, for
Pepsodent contains Irium, the special
ingredient that floats away dull film
from your teeth, leaves them so much
whiter, your smile so much brighter!

NEXT — Clean your teeth
with Pepsodent. Do this,
morning and evening,
for a week.

THE TOOTHPASTE
WITH IRIUM*




Ns
THEN—Srnile into your mir-
ror again. You'll see how a
week of Pepsodent makes
your teeth whiter — your

% Triwn is the registered trade mark of
se smile siunply dazzling

« Lird., for a specigs soluble in-
gredient that gives greater cleaning power.

‘ CWA

S

P

X*O 32-907-50 PEPSODENT LTD., LONDON, ENOLAND







Can an antise

ptic help in healing?”
7ounds heal of theit own accord when they ere kept free
from the germs that cavce septic infection. To keep

wounds in the healthy condition for healing, surgeons



have for years relied upom *Detrol’, This ruthless des+
*royer of germs is non-polsonous, gentle and safe on
human tissues. While it divinfects the wound, ‘Dettol’
leaves the living tissues undamaped to continue the
natural processes of safe ayiel rapid repair.
4 ors te) ¥ ¥
DETTOL
THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC
DE TOR. FOR BOD SIC RR uy)
ni , e #8 pr, 1950
Fo / tute r a Cobe,





/ / 4, Wenw ved

KLIM is superior quality cow’s milk, produced
under strictest sanitary conditions. Yes, and the
specially-packed tin protects KLIM so that you
get milk as fine as the day it left the farm, Buy
KLIM—milk that you can always depend upon for
its wholesomeness and purity!

Yum 1S PURE, SAFE MILK

{2} KLIMkeeps without refrigeration

{3} KLIM quality is always uniform

{4} KLIM is excellent for growing children
{3} KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes
{6} KLIMis recommended for infant feeding

{7} KLIM is safe in the specially-packed tin

{s} KLIM is produced under strictest control






add KLIM, stir

Take pure water,

and you have pure, safe milk

pore safe

MILK |

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER ~ 7 oo





tree eA,

LAA ORO De

=e

‘ PAGE FOUR



Printed by the Advocate vo, Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown

Friday, May 11, 1951

FIELD

4 THE Princess Alice Playing Field built
at a cost of approximately $16,000 was
opened with much ceremony and amidst
the fond hopes of those who saw the crying
need for recreation facilities for the people
of Bridgetown. After a period of two years
it,is of little use to the public except for a
few people who have staged public dances
in the pavilion and for special holiday at-
tractions.

‘Time and again, criticism in the Press has
been launched against this waste of public
funds and energy. The criticism has been of
no avail. Before any money had been spent
on it, the field had been popular as a com-
munity centre. One or two clubs played ten-
nis there and the expense of preparing the
lawns and keeping the grounds in order
was defrayed from subscriptions from the
players. Now that public funds have been
lavishly spent, the field looks like a field
and little else.

There is a Committee of which the Chair-
man is the Churchwarden of St. Michael,
charged with the responsibility of looking
after the Playing Field. The grass has
grown high and several sheep benefit there-
from.

' During the weeks when there was a con-
troversy between the Barbados Amateur
Football Association and the Pickwick
Club it might have been possible to carry
on the football series on this ground at
small expense. The field could have been
cleaned up and made fit in two weeks.

| Anumber of private clubs ought to make
use of the Playing Field and maintain it in
good condition. There is precedent for this
action. The Spartan and Police Cricket
Clubs have for years found a home in
Qtieen’s Park and they pay for the upkeep
of this part of the grounds.

' If the Vestry is not now prepared to do
something to make the Princess Alice Play-
ing Field the public centre which it was in-
tended to be, then it ought to give private
clubs the opportunity to do better.



‘ The money which has already been spent
will have been wasted if more is not spent
to make the fullest use of the grounds.
It is no use letting the Playing Field be-
come derelict because of some remote plan
to have an investigation into the spending
of.the original sum of money.

The Playing Field is within easy reach
of the shopping centre where clerks work

THE Cabinet system emerged in
Britain in the eighteenth century,
and so did the office of Prime
Minister. Historians are _ still
arguing about the exact dates,
though most of them agree that
if anyone can be called the first
Prime Minister of England that
person is Sir Robert Walpole.
However, Sir Robert Walpole, if
he were to return today, would

In Britain the Cabinet as a
system of government has
been in existence for mere
than 200 years, Maharajku-
mari Indira of Kapurthala,
who reports Parliamentary
affairs each week in the Gen-
eral Overseas Service of the
B.B.C., explains the duties of
the Cabinet.

be surprised at the transfor-
mation in the responsibilities BY ee ee INDIRA
of the Prime Minister and of Kapurthe.

in the tremendous increase in
the duties undertaken by all of
His Majesty’s Ministers, With a
population under ten million, and
with few large towns, in an age
when for the predominant part of
the people, life was a very simpie
affair, the government was effec-
tively carried on without the need
of a highly complicated and effi-
cient machinery.

In the eighteenth century, most
of the Civil Service was still a
branch of the royal household; the
responsibility of the government
was not so much to administer the
country as to maintain sufficient
public order, and see that the
country was properly defended.
Prime Ministers such as Sir Robert
Walpole or the elder Pitt did un-
dertake a tremendous amount of
work, especially during times of
crises, but, for the most part, the
less important ministers enjoyed
an easy life with plenty of time to
indulge in party intrigue and to
pursue their own private pleasures.
Since those days the work of gov-
ernment has increased and increas-
ed, until now it is generally agreed
that His Majesty’s Government is
one of the most overworked bodies
of men in the whole world.

In 200 years the ministries have
been transformed—and so have
the types of men who compose
th

em,

During the first world war, Mr.
Lloyd George probably had to
make up his mind on a larger
number and variety of important
issues than any Prime Minister in
the nineteenth century. And
neither he nor any holder of that
high office since would have had
the time to write novels, like Dis-
raeli, or engage in abstruse theo-
logical arguments in learned
magazines, like Gladstone, Being
a Prime Minister in the twentieth
century is a full-time job, and tho
branches of his work are legion.

With his Foreign Secretary he
must decide on events abroad, and
devise effective action to see that
the country’s security is never
carelessly endangered. In times of
war his personality will come al-
most to embody the spirit of the
nation. In time of peace, although
such personality in leadership is
not so important, there are other
qualities with which a Prime Min-
ister must be endowed if he is to
fulfil his tremendous responsibility
—that of being the trustee of the
nation’s heritage and the guardian
of its interests.

Vital Role of Prime Minister

This ‘trusteeship’ does not stop
short at Britain—it is extended in
full measure towards the Common-
wealth, too. The Commonwealth
Conference held in London is a
case in point. Much of the work
involved, no doubt, has been done
by the Minister of Defence and
others, but it is the Prime Minister
who acts as unofficial chairman at
this conference—and, of course, it



is the Prime Minister upon whom,
ultimately, the order and stability
of British society depends. It is
up to him to ensure that the Par-
liament whom the people have
elected should govern with confi-
dence and keep the nation’s
respect,

Then what about the team itself
—in other words, the subordinate
ministers, of His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment? Most of thems are heads
of special departments, though it
is customary to have a few people
with roving commissions, whose
time is not taken up with running
a huge department. But most of
the ministers have enormous staffs
whose job, firstly, is to supply
material and information (facts
and figures, in other words), on
which policy and legislation is
based, Then, secondly, when the
legislative measures have been
passed, it is the responsibility of
those staffs to provide the machin-
ery for carrying them out in de-
tail.

For instance, recently a scheme
for controlling the supply of raw
materials first had to be devised
and now is being applied. This
work is being done jointly by the
Board of Trade and the Ministry
of Supply.

The minister is answerable to
Parliament for the work of his de-
partment but the staff who carry
out that work provide the solid
foundation upon which a minister's
career in that department de-
pends, To put it briefly, it is the
Civil Service—that ‘hidden girder
upon which the government rests,’
as it has been described—from
which are recruited these vas:
ministerial staffs. The Civil Ser.
vice has the pick of the best brains
in the country; it is without doubt
the most highly skilled, highly
experienced, and_ highly
ciplined organisation in the world.

In all democratic countries the
civil servant’s job is to administer
the laws laid down by the elected
representatives of the people, But
whereas in other countries these
tasks are often given to men who
are appointed by politicians, in
Britain they are kept in the hands
of professionals.

What kind of men are these
‘professionals’ who constitute
Britain's Civil Service? How are
these men appointed? Let me
explain,

The service is divided into three
principal branches: clerical, execu.
tive, and administrative, each of
which requires a different educa-
tional standard. The administra.
tive class is the most important,
so, I will confine myself to that.
It is what people usually have ui
mind when they talk of the Civil
Service as a career,

Entry into this class is by way
of a very stiff written examination
and an interview, and the majority
of the candidates are between the



dis- min

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ages of twenty-one and twenty-
four. A young man enters this
branch ag an Assistant Principel
with a salary of £400 a year, At
first, he does not specialise in any
one department, He may be moved
from the Ministry of Labour to
the Ministry of Food, or from the
Board of Trade to the Common-
wealth Relations Office. Once he
has become an Assistant Secretary,
his chances of promotion are rapid,
if he can prove his worth.

If he is sufficiently outstanding
he may become the head of a dce-
partment by the time he is forty.
The highest point to which a
young man can aspire in the Civi'
Service is tha of Permanent
Under Secretary, which usually
carries a knighthood with it,

Relationship Between Minis-

ter and Staff

These, then, are the experi-
enced experts—the ‘professionais’
upon whom the minister depends
when he finds himself answerable
for his department to Parliament,
and the relationship between the
minister and his staff is a curious
one. é

The minister, for all his brains
and experience and ability, has
nevertheless. the status of an
‘amateur’ in his particular depart
ment. This must obviously be so.
a man who has just been moved,
say, from the War Office to the
Food Ministry cannot be expecte
to pick up in a few days or few
weeks the detailed knowledge
and experience of the department’s
routine which the professional
civil servant has taken years to
acquire.

But the minister is still the
guiding figure. He may be an
amateur in detail but he is usually
a man of very wide experience
of public life. A nineteenth-cen-
tury Chancellor of the Excheque
once said that a politician is made
a minister of a department chiefly
to tell the Civil Service what the
country would not stand. And,
like all aphorisms, there is some
truth in it. Politicians understand
the ‘art of the Possible’— some.

D What Is The Cabinet? | NEWS FROM |

BRITAIN

By

DAVID TEMPLE

ROBERTS
LONDON.

ROYALTY added just the right note to the
Festival. It needed the excitement of crowd-
lined streets and the glamour of a state coach
in procession to cap, with something tradi-|
tional, the rather flighty artificialities of the
South Bank. The King’s speech on opening |
the Festival touched up the brash confidence
of the Festival promoters into what is surely
a truly national gesture of belief in 1951.
Plenty of voices have said, in the last year, |
that this is no time for counting our gains
when we may soon have to face war, the most
dreadful of losses, But I sense that the King’s
speech, the Festival, and its stimulus to take
a pride in aqurselves, have strengthened the
national conviction that another twentieth
century war can be avoided.



Festival week—this opening week—has
revealed an extraordinary national unity.
When it was first mooted, Conservatives were
inclined to condemn the Festival in advance
as camouflaged Socialist propaganda at the
nation’s expense. But Herbert Morrison was
wise enough to restrain any leftish enthusi-
asm for a scheme like that. And the Festival
show on the South Bank emerges without
any noticeable political colour. I was amused | "SRS a nanoeeoesooe
to see how the Daily Worker, our small circu-
lation Communist paper, treated the Festival.
Their commentator wrote a friendly descrip-
tion of the South Bank as the best value for
five shillings in London. Of course, he could
not restrain a sneer at the “Lion and Unicorn”
Pavilion which sets out to delineate the Brit-

thing a professional administrator{ish character—“the Pavilion of ruling class

often tends to forget.

But I do not want to give the
impression that there is much
rivalry or friction between the
ister who is a politician and
the non-political civil servants
under him, In fact, there is an
accepted tradition of loyalty be-
tween the two which over-rides
party attachments. This is reveal-
ed most clearly at Question Time
in the House.

Constitutionally, questions are
of great importance, since they
provide the principal means by
which the ordinary citizen can
keep control over the bureaucracy,
‘P.Q.s,’ as they are called (Parlia~
mentary Questions), are priority
in every department, and in every

case the circumstances are
thorougly investigated. Questior
Time is an occasion when the

ministers and their deputies—the
Parliamentary Under Secretaries
—are under the full scrutiny o/
the public. The Department
officials realise. this: they know
the politician’s future, may depend
on his success in giving convinc-
ing answers, and it is an accepted
principle never to let him down.
In return, the minister takes great
pains to clear his department of
criticism,



daily and it would be well for some of them
to form a tennis club and be able to enjoy
some form of healthy recreation during the
afternoon. If the Vestry, who is to take

charge of playing fields, or the Committee

responsible for finishing it will not do

N

(By FREDERICK COOK)

SOUL mates for lonely Ameri-

NEW YORK.

“when there is no lonely person
forced to sit alone of an evening
end mourn a mateless state”. In

More Lonely Hearts

dance? Smoke?

Physical defects? Health? Do you
Armed with these details Miss

Drink?”

something, then for once the community
spirit in Barbados should put them to shame
and make the Princess Alice Playing Field
the recreation centre which it was intended
to be.



SCOUTS

RECENT changes in the Scout Movement
in Barbados seem to indicate that it will be
“given a new lease of life. The appointment
of Major J. E. Griffith as the new Island
‘Commissioner brings to the helm one who
is a keen scout and who has done good work.

Among the youth of this island there is
an enormous field for scouting and if Major
Griffith can influence the schools to take
up scouting on a wider scale then he will
have done further service to the Movement.
4. There is virgin soil waiting to be tilled.
Wt is no use waiting until youngsters have
6ffended society and need to be reclaimed
to carry scouting to them. Work among
youth in this island has been spasmodic

_ and left in the hands of people who cannot
be regarded as ideally suited to the task.
"It is the duty of the general public to give
the utmost co-operation and especially old
scouts who should give of their time to re-
build a Movement which can certainly do
great work among the youth of Barbados.

cans—and,some Britons, too—are
unerringly picked out in New
York now by a_ mechanised
Cupid with a much better scoring
record than the old-fashioned
type armed with nothing but a
bow and arrow.

You feed into a machine a card
punched with holes, These repre—
sent your qualifications and
characteristics, your. dream of
romance, your defects and finer
points—and perhaps just a pass—
ing reference to your bank and
the sort of car you drive. The
thing goes whirrrr, And out pops
a card for a woman matching
your tastes and temperament with
precision,

It is all so scientific. It is called
the ‘Mate-o-Matic.”

“Cupid is my business,” says
the ruler of this machine, amply—
built 50-year-old “friendship
centre tycoon” Clara Lane—
herself happily married without
benefit of ‘““Mate-o—Matic,” which
had not been thought of in her
time, And it is no over statement.

It is a business that provides
motherly Miss Lane with endless
fun, lots of work, plenty of head-
aches—and that best of all cures
for a headache, an income of
around half a million dollars a
year.

From a suite of offices orna—
mented with pictures of couples
whom she hag organised into a
state of wedded bliss she directs
20 “friendship centres” all over
America, She is planning six more.
Further, she is seriously thinking
of opening her first in London,

“I hope to see the day,” said
this former farm girl from Iowa,

the past 10 years she has en-
gineered some 20,000 marriages.
Her clients have intluded an
opera singer, a_ retired judge,
models, showgirls school-teachers,
secretaries by the hundred, doc-
tors, lawyers, businessmen, archi-
tects and even a couple of million-
aires,

Miss Lane operates on the
theory that there is nothing mys-
terious about love. It is something
that can be promoted, When two
people with the desire to love and
be loved are brought together—
well love just materialises, in-
evitably.

To join one of her “friendship
centres” you fill out a question-
aire. “What film did you enjoy
most last year? What is your
favourite restaurant? Dise jockey?
Strip ca¥toon? How do you take
disappointments defeats rever-
sals?

THEN you pay the fee on a
sliding scale. A six-month mem-
bership for a woman under 30,
costs £35. Up to 45 it is £53 10s.
Women listed as “over 45” are ex-
pected to pay £76 10s.

Men whose’ expenses’ are
swollen by dinner bills and enter-
tainment, get off much more
lightly. For them, irrespective of
age there is a flat fee of 17
guineas,

Before acquiring full member-
ship, the prospective client must
fill out a confidential application.
This asks about your sex. age,
height, weight, education, religion
and marital status. Then comes
the really pertinent inquiries:
“Do you own property? A car?
What is your iricome? Hobbies?

Lane or one of her 12 glamourous
assistants (pretty girls, handsome
men) then has a chat with the
matrimony-seeker, “We can usu—
ally tell in a few minutes without
looking at the questionaire,” said
Miss Lane, “what a person is like
and who to introduce him to.”
WHEN a couple believed suit-
able (or proved so by “Mate—o—
Matic”) have been Ified up, for—
mal introductions follow, The
men members are expected at
least to take their dates out to
dinner. Usually members report

jideas” he calls it. That, coming from such a
pen, is perhaps the best compliment to the
designers that they have hit the mark they
aimed at.

The millions that cross the Thames to the
South Bank will probably ask themselves
what will happen to this bit of land when the
Festival moves away. Somebody should pin
up some notices answering that question, but
for the moment nothing has been decided | ~
except that, of course, the Concert Hall will
remain with its front and its restaurant look-
ing on to the river. Most of the Thames water
frontage is crowded with wharfs and indus-
trial plant. Behind the wharfs on this stretch
of the river were little rows of houses, not
very well built in the last century. It is un-
likely that the water front will go back to
industrial use. It will probably be an open
space in front of a new housing settlement.
That is certainly not a very grand develop-
ment for one of the finest bits of the London
river, with a view stretching from the Houses
of Parliament to St. Paul’s. But a great deal of
south London needs rehousing and [ doubt
whether the local authorities will resist the
temptation to take up that bit of open space.
The Skylon and the Dome of Discovery are
up for sale so it is open to some enterprising
promoter to dismantle them and re-erect them
somewhere else. But the Dome of Discovery
does not make a good auditorium. On its
present plan it is not tall enough to have tiers
of seats all round in the form of a real amphi-
theatre. Still it would be a pity to have the
greatest dome in the world taken down in
October and never seen again. The Skylon
would just be a monster advertisement—and
it all depends what it is made to advertise!

The deeper question the visitors to the



back to the centre about the first; South Bank might ask is whether the future

date. New candidates are prompt-
ly produced should the first not
prove up to expectations.

‘An average member requires
six to eight introductions, But
there is in the file a_ tattered
folder covering the affairs of a
48-year-old businessman who has
proved unusually fractious,

“This man,” said Miss Lane,
with an air of faint disapproba-
tion, “has been with us four years,
And despite our very best efforts
is still unmarried. He has, dated,
let me see, 138 of our members
and spent simply untold sums on
entertaining them, But he has not
married one of them yet. Dis-
couraging!”

One would not have supposed
the reluctant bridegroom’s bill of
particulars uriduly hard to fill.
For his future wife he seeks a
Methodist, and one who comes
from the Middle West. Beyond
that all he asks is that she be
small in size, neat of aspect.
plain and soft-spoken.

(World Copyright Reserved)

—LES.

—— |



; LONDON,
Castle Bromwich, 1951, is cer—
y not the exuberant, bust-

lingly expectant Castle Bromwich,

we knew in 1950. :

The bogey of raw material
shortages is there; triumphantly
it stalks across the floor—space of
so many Big Order hopes.

ders? They don't want
orders at Castle Bromwich this
year. At least, that’s the impres-—
sion overseas buyers get if they
visit the same stands as I did;
stands I knew to be interested—
very interested last year—in the
Commonwealth export market.

First, I went to see Birmingham
manufacturers of a wide variety
of kitchen utensils, a firm that
sells to all parts of the world and
particularly to the colonies — to
places as far apart as Hong Kong
and East Africa. The manager
was there. :

“Bit pointless our being here at
all this year”, was his opening
reply to my query as to how
things were going. “In fact. I’ve
left the order book at home”.

He has been exhibiting at
Castle Bromwich ever since the
B.I.F. first opened a section at

Castle Bromwich—31! years ago.









The Bogey Of Castle Bromwic

By DOUGLAS COBBAN

There was no point in accepting,
far less inviting, orders that could
not be fulfilled in view of the
scarcity of raw materials, he said.
He drew fe attention to the al-
most negligible show of goods in
the small glass case outside his
temporary office. ‘We're here
just to keep contact with the old
friends who will be coming along”.

And the worries of export trade
are not confined to the question
of raw materials. Freight charges,
packing costs are all going up.
For a normal wooden packing
case that cost five shillings in the
“bad, old days’, the cost in the
past few months has risen from
33/— to 55/-.

All of which boiled down to
the uncomfortable fact that prices
of domestic utensils for the con-
sumer in the colonies, or else-
where, are on the way up.

If I had hopes of better news
at the next stand I stopped at,
they disappeared—faster than the
men who come to place unwanted
orders. Here I discussed the
problem of chrome and like

metals for which you can get
Ministry of Supply allocation
chits, but which your supply
agent will tell you cannot be met;
not, at any rate, the moment you
want the stuff.

Chrome, for instance, is’the all—
important requirement for the
face-piece of a welcome new
laundering iron that is going to
be very useful to the woman, or
the man, finding himself “at the
back of beyond” and well away
from such conveniences as elec—
tricity or gas. All that is needed
for this iron is paraffin oil.

The overseas demand for this
domestic ally is already big, but
unless supplies of the necessary
raw materials for its making im—
prove tremendously, it will be
difficult to get.

“No; we don’t want orders for
it during the Fair. We just
couldn’t meet them”, an official of
the manufacturers, well-known in
the oil-lamp world, informed me
~almost. brusquely

How is all this bother about
raw materials going to affect the
colonies? Officials at different
stands told me that they do not
think the present position is go-
ing to result in serious reduction
of supplies for old customers.
The worry of exporters is that
they must ignore all the oppor-
tunities for landing new custom-
ers.

From America, as well as the
Commonwealth, come big orders
every year for a British speciality
the portable oil—burning flood-
lighting lamp. But the needs of
Malaya’s anti-Communist forces
for such lamps in the jungle war-
fare would always be a first
priority, a representative of
the manufacturers at Castle
Bromwich told me.

Despite the shortages of mate—
rials, and the attractions of a
dollar market, long-honoured
Commonwealth markets would
not be let down, he declared.
“But we just cannot take on at

the moment any new order that
comes along.” :

“Export market?” The big
Yorkshire sales manager of a
world-wide known firm of copper
tubing manufacturers grunted
sadly. “We haven't got one”.

Yet just a year ago this firm
was rejoicing in the prospect of
bigger and better orders from
such centres as the West Indies—
for sugar and oil refinery works.
“We do quite a bit—sorry, did
quite a bit with the West Indies”,
their spokesman said, But with
the present copper supply prob—
lem, “we are not able to export
at all now”.

The depressing story of my two
hours’ tour had its moment of
relief when I faced a stand with
large and shining rows of alumin-—
ium cooking utensils, stewpans
and the like. The gleam they re—
layed reflected itself in the more
hopeful tones of the manufactur—
ers’~official with whom I chatted.

“Oh yes. I think we'll manage
to meet fresh orders”, he said.
nies there was an inevitable
“Dut” . '

« ws



shape of London will be changed. In the last
20 years the population of London has moved
a great deal. Far fewer people live in the
central’ areas, and far more people in the
suburbs. At the same time, the centre of Lon-
don has allowed its business and its pleasure
to become more and more mixed. Numerous
firms have moved their head offices from their
traditional place in the City of London to the
West End—slipping in between the residen-
tial houses of Mayfair. So the West end has
become more and more crowded. The possi-
ble development is for both business and en-
tertainment to push their way across the
river. But it would need a big stimulus from
officialdom and a complete change in Lon-
doners’ habits. It is just possible this exhibi-
tion may improve the social standing of the
South Bank just as the Paris Exhibition ele-
vated the Trocadero district.

16





Last Novernber the East Afri-
can, West Indian, Australian or
Canadian buyer could have been
assured on ordering that such
aluminium goods would be deliv—
ered to him within two or three
months at the most. The panic
buying from overseas that follow-
ed in the wake of the British
housewives’ panic when warned
that cooking utensils might be-
come scarce resulted in deliveries
overseas being slowed down to
six months. And the prospect
now, in view of the raw materials
position, is delay to as much as
nine months.

There are brighter sides to the
B.LF. at Castle Bromwich
Mechanical ingenuities as well as
mechanical monsters are there to
delight as in other years .

But the sun that shone a year
ago for the opening of this great
northern outpost of the B.I.F. has
been replaced by a_ wintr
wind. It whistles through th
flags of welcome to penetrate most
corners of the vast arena; it add
its chill to an atmosphere heavy
with the sad change—temporary
it is hoped — in Britain’s t:
prospects as comps

aqaing

red with 1950

| NOW

FRIDAY,

MAY





FOR SCHOOL

PHILIPS’

and

ARITHMETIC
READERS

ATLAS
LAYNG’S
ROYAL

Advocate Stationery











No. 505 LIGHT ORLWITE

CURTAIN RAILS

(Aluminum Alley)

AND
STEEL PLATED CADMUM

HOOKS

for heavy or light curtains

ALSO

EXTENSION RODS

Plastic in various colours and Steel





WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.

Successors to

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

*Phones : 4472 & 4687

LTD.




A SYMBOL OF QUALITY



FOR ENTERTAINING PLEASURE
That’s why—YOU SHOULD SELECT

H.M.V. RADIOS and
RADIOGRAMS
e

DA COSTA & CO, L1D.—Blectrical Dept.

SOCCSSSESOSSSPEE SESE EOS OOP OS POOP



FOR

BEST BUYS
VISIT,

DA COSTA'S

IN STOCK FOR

\ YOUR SELECTION

SIMMONS BEDSTEADS

IN THE FOLLOWING SIZES
oft Sin. and 4ft Gins.

ALSO

ALUMINUM =SAUCEPANS

in 7.83.9 and 10 pts.
. e
DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.
Dry Goods Dept.

3 ft.

















Se a re OOS,
x“
s
%
‘
: :
. %
s s
% %
* *
% %
‘ :
* %,
: WHIT-SUN PARTY!
x .
8 %
‘ KEEP A HAM :
x %
R On Hand! LIQUORS OF THE S
-Â¥ FINEST BRANDS 3
. sie * es ?
; Hams in tins (3 sizes) Gola Fraid Rum v
* Weg Hams cut or whole Top Notch Rum %
> Prunier Brandy %
$ Picnic Hams - | Vielle Curé >
$ Sandeman’s Wines xv
g Ox Tongues in tins Gilbey’s Wines %
‘,
Cheese in tins 12-oz, and 5!b Guinness Stout %
con, Bass's Ale S
x Vienna Sausages Worthington's Ale x
% Golden Tree Beer %
Frankfurter Sausages %
% SWEETS for the §&
x Kiddies and YOU! %
+ %.
* Chocolates in Boxes x
& Chocolate Bars »
x Carr’s Cream Biscuits %
& Carr’s Chocolate Lunch >
> 8
$ a %
*
s

+

GODDARDS pbetrver §

< ¢ 4 2)
POOP PPPS PEELE PLPC SEE CPSP SPST CN

ee



FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1951



Looking At Pictures py.

MR. JOHN HARRISON, Art & Exhibitions Officer of
the British Council, gave the last of his series of lectures
“Looking at Pictures” at the Museum this week. The sub-
ject of the lecture was genre painting : this was neither
landscape nor portrait painting, but in a way it combined
both for it depicted people doing something indoors or out

of doors.

Electricity
Supply Problems
Shortage Until1954 AtLeast

Sir John Hacking, Deputy
Chairman (Operations), British
Flectricity Authority, forecast in
a lecture to the Royal Society of
Arts, at a joint meeting with the
Jnstitution of Electrical Engineers,
that demands for electricity would



rot be met in full until 1954 at
the earliest and, with bad weather,
possibly not until after 1958

Any forecast of the position in
future years, he said, was largely
governed by the accuracy of the
estimates of the load to be met
and by the weather which would
be experienced. The time taken
from the initial planning to the
ecmpletion of a new station! was
now some five years. Because of
the many preliminaries necessary
before final consent could be given
to the construction of a new sta-
tion, provisional programmes had,
in fact, to be prepared for six or
seven years ahead, and the diffi-
culties of accurately forecasting
the load to be met at so far
distant a date would be under-
stood.

Estimates

“The authority has, neverthe-
less, made estimates of the
probable position during future
years, and these indicate that even
under the most favourable condi-
tions that is, assuming the
upper limit of plant commissioning
will be achieved and that weathec
of no more than average severity
will be experienced — it will not
be possible to meet the probable
demand in full before 1954, If it
proves impossible to achieve the
higher rate of commissioning, and
if exceptionally severe weather is

. experienced, full demands will not
be met until after 1958.”



12 Months For
Cloth Larceny

Justices G. L. Taylor and
J. W. B. Chenery agreed with the
decision of Mr, H. A. Talma,
Police Magistrate of District “A’
who sentenced George Downes a
labourer of Thomas Gap, St.
Michael to 12 months’ imprison—
ment with hard labour for larceny
when the case came before them
in the Court of Appeal yesterday.

Downes stole a quantity of
cloth on April 6 from an India+
merchant Mohommed Kola, The
value of the cloth was estimated
at £2 5s, : :

Kola said that he was rine his
motor eycle when a buf&ile of
cloth dropped from the motor
eycle to the ground. He saw
Downes pick up the cloth and ge
away with it. Viola Thorne, a
hawker said that the defendant
gave her a parcel to keep for him
but she could not say where he
got it from.

Mr. E. W. Barrow who appeared
on behalf of the defendant sub -
mitted that the evidence was most
unsatisfactory and they should
reverse the decision of the Police
Magistrate.

Their Honours before confirm.
ing the decision, told Downes
that there were slight incon-
sistencies in the evidence but
these had to be expected when
the court had to deal with peo-
ple who did not speak English
as their everyday language.
On the evidence as a whole

they were sure that he was weil
convicted and looking at his
records they saw that in 1949 he
was sentenced to 18 months’ im-
prisonment at the Court of
Grand Sessions.

Appeal costs of 8/4 were also
imposed on Downes.





Guiliv Of Speeding

Keith Rayside of Black Rock,
St. Michael was yesterday ordered
to pay a fine of £6 by monthly

instalments or two months’ im-
prisonment when he appeared
before a City Police Magistrate

on a charge of speeding while
driving the motor lorry I —2217
on Wildey’s Road, St. Michael.

The offence was committed on
April 5, Cpl. Jones of the Traffic
Branch said he was on Wildey’s
Road and checked the speed of
the motor lorry with a stop watch.
He found that it was being driven
at 53 miles per hour and the
speed limit on that read for such
vehicles is 20 miles per hour.

Rayside who pleaded guilty to
the charge is to produce his
licence for endorsement,





B.G. PRODUCTION
OF SUGAR RISING

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, May 7
Despite an early setback due
to weather and the appearance
of Leafscald Disease, British Gui-
“ana sugar estates are pushing up
sugar production satisfactorily .
Total production for the year up
to the week ended April 28, last,
amounted to 61,104 tons, a yield
of 2.96 per acre. Total produc~
tion for the same period in 1950
was 67,036 tons, a yield of 3.40

Ail European painting began as
the art of the church, and it was
through votive painting that all
secular art had its beginnirdgs.
Genre painting, like portrait and
landscape painting also had its
origin in religious art. The earli-
est conversation pictures occurred
in religious pictures where groups
of people enacted a scene such as
the Mother of Our Lord, St. John
and Mary Magdalene at the foot
of the Cross,

Art Patronage

The first patron of art was the
Church. Art in time became more
secular owing to the patronage of
princes, and, as merchants became
more influential they in turn
patronised art. By the 17th cen-
tury, the merchants of Flanders
and Holland had become art
patrons, They required smaller
pictures—cabinet paintings—than
those demanded by the church for
its adornment or by princes for
the embellishment of their palaces,
As the church had commissioned
pictures which glorified bible sto-
ries and the life of Our Lord, and
as princes their own glorification
in battle, hunting, feasting and
other pursuits, so too the Flemisn
and to a greater extent Dutch mer-
chants commissioned works from
painters which glorified their
own prosperity and the rich
comfortable lives led by them-

selves and _ their families,
A large number of these
pictures were of interiors and

domestic scenes, but sometimes
there were outdoor scenes as well.
Dutch artists also sought subjects
from low life and tavern scenes.

In the 18th century, the English
artist Hogarth was the counter.
part of the Dutch painters. He
painted both scenes of low life
and portraits as conversation
pieces. The family was depicted
vs a group living the life of a
family rather than as a number
of persons posing for their por-
traits. In France, Chardin like
Hogarth painted the wealthier
middle class of which he was a
member, but, his pictures are
somewhat reserved and pustere,

English Conversation
Pictures
The 18th century was the’ hey-
cay of the English conversation
picture, Gainsborough liked to
paint portraits of his sitters in
their own landscapes and those of
children in the parks of their
parents. English country-gentle-
men were fond of being painted
with their horses, or, taking part
in sports and pastimes. Gradually,
however, the conversation piece
moved away from direct repre-
sentation. Today the figures are
seldom portraits, but they form
part of a pattern in which they
represent movement,

Allegory

Another use of the human
figure was in allegorical paint-
ings. Opulent figures were used
to describe myths, and equally
opulent settings depicted the
background of the artist’s patron.
Sometimes the allegorical figures
“ere actual portraits of the
patron's family. Allegorical paint-
ing, however, is not popular with
modern artists, Instead, the artist
creates his own myth and sur-
rounds his figures with mystery
as Gaugin did, or, as Stanley
Spencer does today. Frequently
the artist creates a dream world
of limitless planes where strange
figures and objects are depicted
with super-realism.

Religious Art

Mr. Harrison also traced the
history of religious art and pointed
out that artists through the ages
have re-told the bible stories in
settings of their own times. Often
portraits were included in these
religious paintings; a portrait of
a boy with his guardian angel
became “Tobias and the Angel,”
Many parts of these religious
paintings had no connection with
the scene depicted. When the
most miraculous happenings were
taking place in the picture, normal
life continued in other parts of
the painting. This was true of life,
in Chagall’s “Crucifixion,” the per-
secution of the Jews in modern
times occurs in other parts of the
picture. .

The Haitian painters consciously
or unconsciously had grasped this
fdet: life continues whatever mys
teries, tragedies or joys occur. Mr.
Harrison projected by means of
an epidiascope a number of photo-
graphs which he had taken of
murals in the Cathedral of Port-
au-Prince executed by contempor-
ary popular painters,

House Wired:
No Pay?

In the Court of Original Juris-
diction yesterday His Honour Mr.
J. W. B. Chenery gave judge-
ment for plaintiff Keith Weather-
head of Deacons Road, St
Michael, to the amount of $160
in a case he brought against
Iris Prescod of Sea Rock, Christ
Church for debts,

Weatherhead claimed the
amount of $161.30 which he said
was owed to him by Prescod for
some work he did on her house,
This work included the wiring ot
the whole house.

It was alleged that he hired
two men Gilbert Nurse and John
Reid to help him with the work
and Prescod had agreed to puy
him $160 for the wiring.

He claimed that wher the jop
was finished he had not received
a cent from Prescod.





per acre. p se Pere | aa
_ @ y 4 ° .
Guide Movement Is Alive Overseas
LONDON, May 10. members of the scout and guide
Lady Baden - Powell, world’s movement. At every one of the

Chief Guide, fresh from her tour
of the West Indies told a London
Press Conference that the guide
movement was as alive overseas
as it was in Britain—the founder
country.
She said
dies she
number of
aing, as

that in the West In-
was impressed by 9
men and women of
well as ordinary)

street who



eople were
I

p

18 Caribbean islands she visited,
she said, she found “great num-
bers of guides and scouts plod-
ding on against difficulties of
poverty and lack of leaders”.
“Yet they were going on with
their guiding”, she added ‘“be-
cause they love to feel they are
part of one body with its mem-
bers all over the world.”
“Although there are

sO man}



July 1.

appointment.

He will reside at Roseville, St. Peter, when he takes
up office. Dr. A. C. Kirton, P.M.O. of St Lucy, is acting

P.M.O. of St. Peter.

R. J. P. OMAHONY, Direc-

_tor of Medical Services,
carried out his annual inspection
at the St. Peter’s Almshouse
yesterday. Dr, O’Mahony said
that he found the Almshouse in a
very satisfactory condition. Miss
L. Hinds ig Matron.

NUMBER of new books, fic

_tion, and non-fiction, were
received at the Speightstown
Library yesterday. They will be
in circulation from to—day.

Among them were “Struggle
for Germany”, “Marriage Hand-
book”, “The Natural History o,
Mosquitoes”, “Conversations ot
Dr. Johnson”, “Modern Law of
Nations”, “Jane Austin”, “Cosma
Gordon Lang”, “The History of
Sugar Cane”, “Queen of To
morrow”, “The Saviour of the
Navy”, “Wonder That Would Be”,
“The Range Hawk” and “Doo
Between”.

The Librarian, Miss E. Jordan,
told the Advocate that she has
been receiving grants of books
from various subscribers. One
of the gifts, “Bungalow by the
Beach” by Derrick Ball, has its
plot laid in Grenada.

Ske said that the Library's
staunch subscribers are Dr. Cha!-
lenor of New York, Mrs, Lloyd-

Thomas, Mrs.'Sheldon, Mr. C
Shepherd and Mr. Edward
Powell, She received 43 books

on March 15.
CHORAL GROUP, known as
the Assembly Singers, has
been formed in Speightstown.
The group is 20 strong. Its pur-
pose is to promote voice culture
and music appreciation.

The group’s President is
I. Byer and Miss E. Jordan
Vice-President. Mrs.
Haynes, wife of Mr, “Josh”
Haynes is the Musical Director
and Miss M. Hurley is Accom-
panist. The group has a Steering
Committee.

ARROWS HOUSE, bordering

on St. Lucy and St. Peter,
is still on the “agenda” for dis-
cussion by the Commissioners of
Health for the two parishes.

It was to be decided a week
ago at a scheduled meeting of
these * vo »odies what was to be
done with the property. Farrows
is jointly owned by the St. Peter
and the St. Lucy parishes, The
meeting was not held as the
Commissioners of Health of St.
Lucy did not attend the meeting.

HE HIGHEST FINE imposed
during the week by District
“E” Police Magistrate, Mr. S. H.
Nurse, was one of 20/- and 3/-—
costs imposed on Joan Boyce of
Grave Yard, St. Lucy, for inflict-
ing bodily harm on Iola Austin,
She has to pay the fine in 7 days
or undergo one month's im-
prisonment.

Iola Austin of the same locality
was fined 12/— and 3/— costs with
an alternative of 14 days im-
prisonment for inflicting bodily
harm on Joan Boyce.

The second highest fine
posed by Mr. Nurse was 15/— and
1/— costs on Joseph Cumber
batch of Benny Hall, St. Peter
who drove a lorry overloaded
with canes,

There were fines for
guarding, cruelty to
causing disturbance,
language, assault and
offences.

T. PETER had another dry

week. The rainfall returns
at District “E’ Police Station re-
corded only 30 parts of rain up
to yesterday, The 30 parts of
rain fell on Monday night.

Planters of the parish agree that
they were two good weeks for
reaping their crops. They have
made much of them,

ISHERMEN returned to the

Speightstown fish market
during the week with fair catches
of flying fish and dolphin, Some
fishing boats got in late and the
fish were sold cheaper than the
scheduled price of 6c. each, Some
of the fish were teken to Bridge-
town,

Mr.
iy

Mona

im

black-
animals,
indecent
traffic





ON MURDER
CHARGE
Samuel Beckles of Marley
Vale, St. Philip, was taken
to Dr. Hutson's home, Ster-
ling, St. Philip at about 11.30
o'clock yesterday morning.
He was suffering from a

gunshot wound and died
shortly afterwards.

Thirty - three — year -o ld
Joseph Holligan, a cousin, is
held in connection with the
incident. He appeared be-
fore City Police Magistrate
Mr. H. A. Talma yesterday
on a charge of murdering
Samuel Beckles and was re-
manded until today.



GOLDEN GOOSE

HONG KONG

Revenue officers seized a live
goose from six coolie women at
Hong Kong recently. They found
gold had been forced down its
gullet. Then they bagan cracking
peanuts the women had brought
with them. Most of the shells
contained gold. Total haul? About
£6,250.

dreadful things in the world to-
day, there is this ‘big thing’ of
doing constructive work amongs'
boys and girls the world over.”

Lady Baden-Powell’s arrival

a4
a

St. Kitts, the last stop on het
Caribbean tour was delayed. Shc
was pleased and surprised to
find however, that guides were
waiting for her though it wa
11.30 p.m

—Reuter.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Peter



CARIB FESTIVAL

The Caribbean Festival fea-
turing Music, Dance, Arts and
Crafts of the Caribbean wil)
not be held in August 1951.
The new date has been fixed
for August 1952 and the Fes-
tival Will be held in San Juan,
Puerto Rico.





U.S. SEEDS COME

The S.S. Trya which arrived
here on Monday, brought a sup
rly of seeds from America for the
Seed section of the Agriculturs
Department,

Seeds were scarce for the past
week, but now the Department has
ell 1ypes of sveds usually asked
for hy local planters,

Seeds ure sold between 9 and 11
a.m, and 12 noon and 3 p.m. from
Mondays to Fridays and half dav
on Saturdays.

Among the types of seeds whicit
are now in stock are, beets, onions,
cauliflowers, beans and carrots,

One of the jobs of the seed
clerk is to parcel out seeds so as
not to detain customers.

—_—

Reader Appointed P.M.O.
Of St.

TJ). F. G. READER, who has recently been appointed

P.M.O. of St. Peter, is expected to take up office from
Dr. Reader is first completing his contract with
the Barbados General Hospital before taking up. the







Stole White Lead

A City Police Magistrate yes
terday sentenced George Prescoa,
a labourer of Rouen, St, Michael
te 12 months’ imprisonment witn
hard labour for larceny, Prescod
stole one tin of white lead valued

at £2. 4/4, the property of
Messrs. Plantations Ltd, on
May 9.

Harbour Police Constable 25
Gill who brought the case, told

the court that he was on patrol
duty on Lower Bay Street when
he saw the defendant with a
parcel under his arm. He stopped
him and on opening the parcel
saw it was a tin of lead, He asked
him how he came by it and
receiving no satisfactory expla.
nation from the man he took him
to the Bridge Station where the
tin of lead was identified as the
property of Messrs Plantations
Ltd,

Prescod has four previous con
victions for larceny.



Canes Lost Ir. Fire

A cane fire at River Plantation,
St. Philip on Wednesday evening

burnt eleven acres of first and
* second crop ripe canes. They are

the property of Messrs. DaCosta &

Co. Ltd sea were insured
Another fire at Congo Road
Plantation, St. Philip on Wednes
day night burnt five acres of
second crop ripe canes and four
eres of second crop ratoons,

property of Oldbury Estates Ltd
These were also insured,



Princess Alice
*‘Playing”’ Field

Even A_ Football

A COOL BREEZE was

at 1.30 p.m. when the Advocate visited Princess Alice Play-

ing Field.

There was such a contrast between the cool and restful

aimosphere there and that

the heat, that, had a few benches been placed along the
outskirts of the grounds, there should be a rush at meal-

times for city workers to sit

However only a dozen or so
sheep were grazing in grass which
was a foot deep at most parts of
the very uneven surface of the
Field.

No attempt could be made to
play any ball game there as even
a football is in danger of being
lost for some time,

Employees of the Sanitary De-
partment had just sprayed some
refuse on the harbour side of the
field with oil. There were tins
and bits of paper, and two large
parts of a disused seweve’ pipe
nearby. .

: Smouldering Fire

A fire was burning and had

been burning for the last two
weeks.
This stuff had been dumped

there to fill in the gap between
the breakwater and the field
proper. The rains had laid bare
most of the surface and paper
and tins became exposed, The
wind added to the nuisance by
Strewing much of it over the
grass.

Because residents in the sur-
rounding area have complained
of the odour and the flies, dump-
ing has ceased for the past few
wecks,

A barbed wire fence is being
erected around that part of the
field leading from the entrance
to the pavilion, A water meter
has been positioned above the
gicund and. must be only tem-
porary since it would corstitute
a danger to anyone playing
games on the field,

Two tennis courts have been
cut and are in a fair state of
repair, but the area immediately
around them is so uneven that if
players ran off the court they
might be severely injured,

Leg Broken

A lady playing tennis there
recently, fell and broke her leg
having slipped on the worn end
cf a part of the lawn.

Attempts have been made to
plant two trees and these have
been carefully fenced off,

The cricket pitch has disap-
peared and in its place is a worn
uneven patch where the grass has
refused to grow.

Vehicles which have come
across the ground have left ruts
so well defined that they could
now be called unofficial roads.



~

















Digestive
Upsets

After extensive research,
De Witt’s Laboratories have

roduced De Witt’s Antacid

ablets, new companion-

roduct to their renowned

owder. They are the most
convenient way of checking
digestive disorders away from
home, No water requived—
just dissolve one or two on the
tongue for prompt relief
anywhere, Pleasant tasting
De Witt's Antacid Tablets
are separately ce//-sealed for
freshness, In handy tear-off
strips for pocket or handbag.
Try them today.





ANTACID
TABLETS

No water needed
Easily carried anywhere — Cell-sealed

@ For home use—
Here's the family standby

@ Quick'y soothes DeWITT’S

and settles

upset stomach ANTACID
@ Lasting effects POWDER



i

Would Get Lost

coming off the sea yesterday

\

: : . »,
of Bridgetown, sweltering in| x n “y
x
\% eto
< °

and eat their lunch in comfort.







When your throat feels
dry and scratchy from harsh
coughing or over-smoking,
ust let a soothing, delicious
icks Cough Drop bathe your
irritated throat
membranes with
throat-easing medi-
cinal ingredients of
Vicks VapoRub.
Really medicated!
Really soothing] ‘





bicycle
im the

world
carries this
mark of
perfection

mone

The Aristocrat




HUMBER



A Home Of
Tins And Card

ALL that her neighbours
know about her is that her
name is Miss Payne and that
she has no relatives, but in
the seclusion of her small
home on Welches Land near
Nurse Land, she does not talk
to anybody.

The little house is near the
Nurse Land refuse bin. Before
Combermere School was built the
house used to be on Weymeuth
basture. It is made of tins, bags,
paper, boards, anything which has
«x broad side and could keep out
vain. For instance, if Miss Payne
found a discarded condensed milk
tin in the bin, she would beat it
flat to patch her home,

There is one sinall note through
which Miss Payne enters hei
house. She has to bend low when
she is entering.

The floor is made of stones and
marl and there is such a hea;
of other things within beside
that she cannot do much moving
around. Almost throughout the
day though, smoke can be seen
coming from inside,

Always Busy

Miss Payne seidom leaves home
She just seems to be busy all day
with the laying out of her home

She brings water from the pipe
in bottles and wares she used to
“ell for a living years ago.

When Miss Payne lived as
Weymouth, her house was built
of the same material and it used
to fall down occasionally then
too as it does now. Her neigh
bours always help her to get
things ‘ship shape’ again after
a high wind.



She seems very absent-minded
end her hair is very grey though
she seems to be only in her late
fifties.

Yet such a strange woman ha
a hobby which her means cannot
now afford, She likes fowls an
when she used to keep them o1
Weymouth, they would sleep in
the same little place. Each fowi
had a name, She would say,
“Come here Mike”, and the cock
would come.



SSS POSSE
°
‘.





LET US DISPENSE
YOUR DOCTORS’

SLES E LSPS OP PSPS PSS
SSCS L LEE LLELCLLLE

y
PRESCRIPTIONS x
‘
y
e §
x
% In Illness . %
% you need two friends— %
%)
s¢ your DOCTOR and. ,. .
% your DRUGGIST,
¢ To ensure that your ¢
% doctor's wishes are accom. X
x plished, take your next x
x Prescription to... . , s
@ WEATHERHEAD’S DRUG %
g STORE
% where you can be sure of .
st obtaining drugs of high
% quality, accurately dis-
st pensed in minimum time
x and at a moderate price >
st Remember—we serve you x
x DAY and NIGHT
+
$ °
N bY
Bruce N
R sy
% %
s W
s Weatherhead Lid. 3
e Weatiernead Lid. &
%,
Tel Nos—Day 2164, 2165, %
* Night: 3144, 3240, 4189. 9
a
‘

The Humber
is your guararrse of lasting
quality, fine appearance and
unrivallcd strength, The
World's leading quality
bicycle carries ‘this mark of
distinction.

trademark |






of all Bicycles

NX
\. FULL RANGE







For Single or

Double Beds





LIONESE SHEETS

90" x 108” ea. $8.29
80" x 100” ea. ... $7.01
70” x 90” ea $5.52

COTTON PILLOW
CASES

19” x 30” en. $1.45

DAMASCLENS

50” wide in Blue, Rose,
Gold, Green & White
per yard . .. SL98
Huckaback Towelling

in Gold, Rose Blue and

Green 15” wide per
RUE RaoscsBerecscricices $1.02
In White

per yard oo... Mle

a LT ed





NO FLEAS

ON THIS
DOG...

Equally effective
against parasites
en poultry.



pests on domestic animals and poultry.

Also in packings

“LOREXA

DUSTING POWDER

PAGE FIVE











CAVE

SHEPHERD
S& Co, Ltd.

10—13, Broad St.





*Lorexane’ Dusting Powder, containing pure
gamma B.H.C., is a potent killer of insect

It is

pleasant and non-irritant to animal or user,

In convenient sprinkler-top containers of 100 grammes.

500 grammes and 3 kilos.

TRADE MARK

of

IMPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED

A subsidiary company of Imperial Chemical Industries Limited

WILMSLOW

Sole Agents and Distributors

A. S. BRYDEN & SONS

SERB RRR ESEe BER eS
“PURINA”

LAYENA

see

gill. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—pistributors.

(BARBADOS)

MANCHESTER

LIMITED
Ph.57

KE!





%

4,

oe

KRAFT CHEESE

SWIFT'S CHEESE
DANISH SALAMI

; MORTADELLA
CRUSHED PINEAPPLE
COLUMBIAN PINEAPPLE
STEPHEN’S NAVY
HAMBURGER STEAK



FLEES OD

44,4, <
PEEL APLE LALO LLLP LEO?

ORDER THESE FINEST FOOD

for the Holidays

PICKLES

LUNCHEON BEEF WITH CE
PERLSTEIN BEER
$ * ,
% OC .
& COCKADE

STANSFELD SCOTT & Co.. Ltd.

6.656.656.6666 OC OO88C8OOO

5 SREP P PSP OPES OOOO FOES POOF P°PPPAVOISTT
4%,

JOY OUR
TO-DAYS

SPECIALS



CALL

IN
KNIGHTS — PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN

PLLA LPL ALCO SCALPEL OLE

AT

GCF PPSSSOS

v
AAAI LL IOLI â„¢

Sy otetet lt.
y

.
%
3
x
;
.
:
Â¥
°
»
ny
>
o
x
%
144% Pkt. $ .39
per Tin 57
per 5% Tin 3.72
per 1 41
per Bb 44 g
per Tin 24
per Tin ~o4
per Jar 84 x
per Tin 44 x
SREAL per Tin “527 Q
per Bottle 18 §
per Carton 4.00 %
FINE RUM %
»
XX
%
PSOE POOP OOOOSSS SSO.



PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MAY li, 1951
BY CARL ANDERSON



—






The World’s Greatest
SKIN OINTMENT




HAVE YUR
EYES
EXZAMINED

| A REMINDER








BUY
PEEK
FREAN





Zam-Buk

$odthing, Healing, Antiseptic
Keep a box always handy

GOooD
THINGS
for YOU

» WINCARNIS WINE
Large Bots. .. $2.88
Small Bots... $1.56

RESERVA WINE
Large Bots. .. $2.38

CRAWFORDS CLUE
CHEESE BISCUITS
BP vg ctisscess $1.26

PEEK FREANS
BISCUITS in Tins
OLIVE OIL—in Tins

CHEF SAUCz.
in bots. ........ 138
Rich & appetising

“BLACKBUCK”
SAUCES—Bots. 24

FOR GOOD VALUE

} INCE & Co., Ltd.

6, 7, 3 & 9 Roebuck Street.
Dial 2236





AL King Peetaieg Bir Achat a 4-18

BY WALT DISNEY

eee einen












—-——— |

MICKEY MOUSE

coo | Or
re. ET a
(SETTLED IN YOUR HOUSE |

,/








OM .. t GUNSS WE CAN |
IT HEZE FOR A
LITTLE WHILE!

OF COURSE ...IT ISN'T VERY FANCY ! )
YOU CAN GET YOURSELF SOMETHING
BIGGER LATER ON!













Cope: Wenn, &
World Righs F —y

BY CHIC YOUNG



BLONDIE





































See eae | ee IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
7 MY SCISSORS AND TO THINK. )
DADDY, WILL YOu LAST DOLLAR FROM WHAT BECAME 1S DULL--1 LAND TO THINK, ) | ia
JAKE YOUR NAP SOME YOUR PANTS POCKET?)| |OF My \ USED YOUR (JUST TOpay ee reer ee
“(Ne WANT TO PLAY ener “Ss CRT | Sweet was ) | SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only
meh 'N HERE ad party TD So gfLINOLEUM (| MARRIED yr | ; Keo ies
| “We a Te ee, | USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
: " i oi ‘ a | j
ABR Sa — ae a f MOIRS CHOCOLATES PLANTERS PEANUTS ‘
© t,) \ os. dl iB per PKG, __ is aiiinaoiinasiacl 9¢ghge. AO TINS 96 85
del SH Lt Ray eS ROWNTREES COCOA GREEN SEAL RUM












TINS 3 Sos ae 20 BOTS. (large) 1.08 38



CARR'S CHEESE CRISPS & HEINEKENS BEER
CLUB CHEESE BISCUITS tins 1.20 96 BOTS.

26 21





TTL

I i |










Ltd. Broad Street

—

—-— r rm A =
YOU THINK (LLLET ; HH “i SuSs ‘iy Se SS ban
YOURE NOT YOU. TELL THE WORLD ae IY aS Vinee Si | | |
GOING TO 'M ONE OF THE - | i} TT
SHOOT ME! BANK ROBBERS? , \ a iN WAM ae ay Tg
GUESS AGAIN! & zi . ih , ~w \y)











































Keiller’s Orange
Squash
Keiller’s Lemon

ON THE WATER MAY

FLARE UP? TOGIVE UPTHE AQ\! WON'T QUIT?

SRI NONT 7 te —
fe} f

APG

Lie

Rose’s Lime Juices- | ap . Grapes Frankfurter Sausages
|
|

-

| .

14% . Strawberries Vienna Sausages ORDER $

; %,

Some cozy Pineappe Pieces | Cooktait Sausages EARLY §
Brockes’ Orange | %

> 4 -
Squash 0 ee Cane SR a cA



Brookes’ Lime Juice! , , Crushed Pineapple
Cordial

10- and 16: vz. tins Jersey Toma Li : ae ; ALLEYNE ARTHUR
to Juice 2-oz tins Trinidad Orange Juice
16-02. tin Golde Glor Fomate! » Trinidad Mixed Juice 5 Y
Coc ktail a ager - » Trinidad Grapefruit & i or) Ltd.
20-oz. tin Citrus Cocktail Tuice Juice

Bahamas Pine Apple 16-oz. tins Pure Purple Green | 7 7, .
Juic e : . Grape vent : | “} ow Rr GROCERS”

i

AES

{eo ers 74 4% 4 355355659909 SOS 9 GOSSS5S995699S SSF 599 99S S9 O99 9O9" DOOPOSS IOSD FOSS OOP FOTO
% »
1s i °
1% . ©
K a> N :
* 4, s
my >
1% id °
1% ms
be »
;% xy
A »,
* 3
* &
+ - »,
y >
* $
a és MS
‘ ry T. x
3 THERE AIN'T NO JUSTICE s
ee ¥
1%
eaeged nies, x . »
pasialas pcineny = Guy _ 8 By JAMES CURTIS. y
Tt KNOW THOSE |" ST ei ep ean 1% $
| "LAUGH 3" WILL it ‘ = | : AND AG MI 4 1 @ % ‘aie i . s
Se Oven we yew May | | Ge | ca ee ls THE SPOTTED DOG *
| Tâ„¢ Sree? | pe { Cen | WE qe | %
! Ket — ‘, >
oe | My we By ANTHONY TROLLOPE. %
\y *. yy . ‘ “ ‘
ma an -~ } : & >
LA ton % . ’ x x
~— , SORRY YOU’VE BEEN TROUBLED x
1% S
1§ f 2 3
x By PETER CHEVERY. 8
s
_
x a ‘ *
s THE BELOVED PHYSICIAN s
hs { .
* ~
% By NAOMI JACOB. x
% , x
‘ —__ADVOCATE STATIONERY.
' | 1 {8 é ATE STATIO - §
THAT'S THE Us? ! { Cure? OK, I..1 FORGOT. z z
HOUGE... MY — , “Pe ce z eon oll gor Soesnssosess, Oi “ito patito", “rtrty “4 ottess BHCOBOSS SOROS SOCIO SO FOROSESEF! GCSE OOS SORO SSO OOOO GONSS.
. ROOM |S ON THE me : DOOR! £\ *~ ”) EY: EP LLP LALLA LLL LALA LA PPLE PPL PLE PPO LPP ODPL PPD SLEEP ALEPPO ALAS EO SC PEPSPSOSOOOG,
7. SECOND FLOOR... c . 3
y Z 1 fy . - 3
I | | » eas . :
ry Wa V4 E x
1% aN - y
RS os ef pa ae. $
| a x
‘ } ' >
* ~ ‘ 7 , | , . r ‘ 4 .
< DELIGHTFUL CANNED CHOICE x
* | “
“ Y ‘hy @& Pr y ‘ . .
: SUICES FRUIM HAM x
‘
* 3
| .
% “Large Bots. avis +e gh | Large Tins L.K.B. Peaches} Fine quality Leg Hams 11—16tbs $
% ” » obinsoen's range %
z Bav'ley Water » Carlton Peas Tinned Hams ith, 2} ths, 6—8 Ibs, ‘ %
% aoe we | ». Bendigo Apricots 10—12Ibs, — also Sliced to order ff RU 3
b ey Wi ; : 4 rm %
sont ane eacoNeee oO NoraorusIntoO] |S Rose's Lemon § yuash | .. Koo Guavas Montadella Sausages — Sliced tof} AWTS x
THEY THINK OF NEXT? GET | | BOTH ESCAPED? THE THIS MESS! ITS UP * Squash ‘er ., Solid Pack Apples order e Cs % t
TO SHORE FAST! THEOIL J [GAMBLERS DID THATS & ease %
DIANA, YOU'VE GOT A DANDERS UP! *
ws
my
*
x
&
s
‘
‘%
‘
Ys
s*
Ky
ss
s*
*

PPG OS

POSSESSES

FAA OOF OAD AOD SHEA LAA AEA BAAR OBDEAEGEE ODOR S
5 LCL LLL LLL POLO







FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS. |. rom mvt

TELEPHONE 2508

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a



word Sundays.
For Births, Marriage or ent
announcements in Carib ing the FOR SALE HOUS oS
chaige is $3.00 for any number of words ES

up to 50 and 6 cents pe- word for escn| | Minimum charge week 72 cents and

re

. Terms . Phone 2508| 96 cents Sundays 24 words -— over 34 BAGNOR, Constitution Road, Drawing

between 830 and ¢ Dm. atis tor Desth words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a/ Dining and 3 bedroom: with running
5 ps and toilet, usual
11.5. S1--t.. fn,

word Sundare water, Kitchen, Bath

Notices only after 4 p.m. offices. Phone 38U2

The narge announcements of

Births, 7 hon Deaths, ar |
men) Memoriam ices if

ee on Getene oe Tae on teeaes| AUTOMOTIVE

tor any number of words up to 80, and/ “An Glo il, melan Parr he Prefect Ford. Engine |°%, May. Apply Frederica Fitzpatrick
8 ae ORE re on weakecays ane | recently overhauled. Price $450.00. Apply: | Telephone—3538, £8. Sert
4 cents per word on Sundays for eac L. A. Corbin, Boarded Hall Piantation Seni
additionai word. 11.5518 FLAT—Beaumont, Hastings unfur-

nished. Dining and Sitting room 2 bed-













CAR—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good
DIED tyres, in good working condition, price Dial—2636
reasonable. Apply F, D. L. Gay, Staple 10.5. 51—2n

TAKE NOTICE

INGRAM-—On May 10th, 1951 Maude 1b
PABLUM

Ingram. The funeral leaves from the
That MEAD JOHNSON & COMPAI'Y,













—t.in.

—_—_—__

f Mr. Bugene R. Donovan, CARS: This week's offer: One 192

tay weinet, at 430 p.m. to-day for} model Mercury Sedan. New tyres and

the Westbuny Cemetery. Friends are} engine in good condition. Ideal for taxi

invieda. No reasonable offer refused. Ring 4908,
. R. Donovan. B'dos. Agencies Ltd

en renee 11,5.51—1n 8.5.51—6n



Th re | laws of the. State of Indiana Unit
PHILLIPS—On May 10th, 1951 at het CAR—Hillman Car M—1199 in good| States of America, whose trade or

si ce, Silver Sands, Christ Chureh.}| working order Apply Frank Proverbs] business address is Ohio Street and Si.
coe Phillips. Her funeral leaves} C/o Harold Proverbs & Co., Ltd., High | loseph Avenue, Evansville, State of In-
al ence
teas mn Parish Chureh. Friends | - ————_—___———____________ tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
are invited, WAGGON: One 1942 V-8 Ford Station | Register in respect of specially prepared
Wakefield, Wilfred, Mitehell, Jane, | Waggon in perfect condition, Apply 3508 | foods for human use and pharmaceutical
Lydia, Ada, Bessie (children). or 3743. 22.4.51—t.f£.n. | Preparations which supply nutritional
= p NSA) | — ene | Heeds, and will be entitled to register
ELECTRICAL the same after one month from the th

day of May, 1951, unless some perron

— = | shall in the meantime give notice in











RADIO: One Hallicrafter 9-Tube, $40 | duplicate to me at my office of opposit'on
TAKE NOTICE Radio, almost new. Phone 3757. L. M,|of such registration. The trade mark
Clarke, James Street 8.5.51—3%] can be seen on application at my _ office.

Dated this 25th day of April, 1951.
H,. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

9.5.61—3n
That THE CELOTEX CORPORATION, 2 FURNITURE— At Ralph's Furniture

corporation organized and existing under! Show Room, Hardwood Alley. A large 7
TAKE NOTICE

’
‘
‘
! ‘
the laws of the State of Delaware, ga selection of new and second-hand fur-

FURNITURE

CELOTEX



States of America, whose trade or busi- | Miture all at Bargain Prices. For inquiry
ness address is City of Chicago, state of | Ringe 4683 5.51—3n
Iliinois, U.S.A., has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of wall board and
similar building material, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day.of May, 1951
unless some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my





























LIVESTUCK

; siosinicisieeatoehcabamdeinesaiaedinonatntninstiogseord

COW: One (1) Brown Cow due to
calf in a weeks time, gave 33 pints with
Jast -calf. For particulars. Fhone 3073





11.86.5131
ee of opposition of such registration, | —_—_—_ 7
@ trade mark can be seen on applica- \
Gen al wy clipe. MECHANICAL °



Dated this 16th day of April 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade M

nplienireti-aieaietisticeipaipesasialbatin. send

BICYCLE: B.S.A_ three-speed, in first That BROOKE, BOND & CO. LIMIT-
class condition. Apply Mr Green, Biaycle |BD, Tea and Coffee Dealers, a British
Repairer, Lower Bay Street. Compan: whose trade or business

11.8.51—1n | address Caleutta House, Goulston
———__ +--+... - —____.. | Street, Aldgate, London, E., England, has

BICYCLE—One Gent's Silver King|#PPiied for the registration of a trade
Hercules Bicycle, with light, lock and}Mark In Part "A" of Register in respect
good tyres. Phone 4239. of tea, coffee, mixtures of coffee and

9.5.51~2n | chicory, coffee essence and coffee and
aoe chicory erence, ang will be See to
—_—_———

TYPEWRITERS — Shipment of new | Tesister the same a ter ane month from
model “Olympia” Portable Typewriters | t# 9th day of May, 1951, unless some
just received—see these superb machines Perera shall in the meantime give notice
before committing yourself, A. G. S cumlcete re me ff my omtiog of ee:
St. Hill, Dial 3199° 29.4 51—c.0.d_|Sitlon of such registration. je trade

ark ean be seen on application at my
a ce

TYPEWRITER: Underwood, Standard,

full length carriage, In good condition Dated this 26th day of April, 1961,

Apply: Mrs. D, Moore, Bank Hall Main Radiatend ee are tee
Road, opposite second Avenue

11,.5.51—1n 9.5.51—3n

ee eee TAKE NOTICE

ACTUMUS — The Root Hormone Fer-
tilizer, from H. Keith Archer's Drug





TAKE NOTICE

FLYING FISH

That BROOKE, BOND & CO. LIMIT-
D, Tea and Coffee Dealers, a_ British
Company, whose trade or business
address is Calcutta House, Goulston
Street, Aldgate, London, E., England, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A’ of Register in respect
ot tea, coffee, mixtures of coffee and chi-
cony, coffee essence, and-coffee and chi-
covy essence, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 9th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppos+
ition of such registration. The trade mark





















—_ @
oat i seen on application at my office. more. 3.5.51—5n,
is 25 Se nearer ti
ated this 25th eee A ACTUMUS . 45 sawing

Power — from H. Keith Archer's Drug

Store, 3.5.51—5n,
eee reinsert ee
ACTUMUS — Controls Insect Pests —

from H. Keith Archer’s Drug ee. That THE MAGGI CO,, Manufacturers,

- a ores Ce nnreree, oeeNEne ae the
laws of Switzerland, whose trade or
is ae a ea gone. im 1 fSvt; | business address is 'Kempttal, Zurich,
Manure. From H Keith eames Dr Switzerland, has applied fer the regis-
Store. 5 Y 3651-5. tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
‘ ne on Br Register in respect of substances used ™

food or as ingredien n » especia
Peles dieames — BR Sper of 0 soups, bouillons, and seasonings, and wiil
tion of soils. From H. Keith ames be entitled to register the same after one
Drug Store, : 3.5.51—5n, | month from the 9th day of May, 1951,
s ~ ‘| unless some person shall in the mantis
ACTUMUS — time give notice in duplicate to me a
Marian, 3.80 . Frodpoed Boars es my office of opposition of such registra-
disease at the roots of plants, From H.|%0". The trade mark can be seen on

Keith Archer's Drug Store 3.5.51—5n, | @PPlication at my office.

Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.5.51—3n







TAKE NOTICE

QUAKER

















AKE NOTICE

(12 cups and saucers) believe to be
Stafford, Old cut glass Decanters, sev-
eral Ivory Jewel Boxes, miniature hand
painted pottery and numerous old plates,

ee

EUREKA--Enterprise Road. Purnisied
Bungalow. Telephone, Refrigerator, and
modern conveniences. Available middie

rooms, running water; Kitchen with ¢as;
usual conveniences. No pets or children,

& corporation duly organized under (the



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
PUHLIC SALES



PUBLIC NOTICES

Tea cents per agate line on week-days

and $1.80 on Su:



NOTICE

The Board begs to notify the teact

that the Written Exam. takes pi
SATURDAY June und st 9.48





the Ursuline Convent. Ail formes aad fe | sq ft land, and 1,982 eq: ft. road. Dial

must be in by May 25th.
A. INNISS, \S.R
AyshiorJ
11,3.51—1n



NOTICE oe
stonewall

Re I
GLADYS ee HARDING

Persons having any debt or claim against | James Street, on Friday 1@th May M51
the Estate of Gladys Albertine Harding | at 2 p.m

late of the parish of Saint Michael, who

January 1951, are hereby required to
send particulars of their claims duly

attested, to the undersigned Albertha 11,3.51—Tn

Harding the qualified Administratrix of

——————
the Estate of the deceased, in care of EVANTON—Situated Lower Maxwell

; AS) Hill
Street. Bridgetown oe Pasi vanec | {© having 3 Bedrooms two 12 by 13 {t
which date I shall proceed to distribute | @°4 One 12 by 13 ft with built in Cup-
the assets of the deceased among the | Poards
parties entitled thereto having regard | Separate Dining Reom 12 by 13 ft. and a

Messrs, Carrington & Sealy of Lucas
fore the 27th da



|
had notice,

Ten cents per agate tine on week-aay.
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, and 12 cent per ugate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days| minimum cnarge

and $1.80 om Sundays



REAL ESTATE

_—_——
SUITABLE BUILDING SITE: «ituated

206 Day and 3465 Night 2.5.5i—4.f.n IT aS anne
ing 2 reods, |

. In tion on application to Mr. J. A
died in this Island on the 24th day of Grimtn the tenant eee :
YEARWOOD & noycr

Solicitors

Poe ig eS A by

» for| Street. 5.5.51-—in | d . U.S.A. vis-| then have had notice, and that I wili} sink vo fully tt otlets and Shower
t 4.30 p.m. to-day fo . ‘ana, U.S.A., has applied for the revis | not be Hable for the assets or any part| complete with fittings. The property is
| thereof so distributed, to any person of | Constructed
Whose debt or claim 1 shali then have | Fioors. Also a drive in Two ear garage

2 servant's

decea:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all] sale by Public Competition at our

PAGE SEVEN

wantk» | SHIPPING NOTICES

Minimum charge week 12 cents
|

eee







96 cents Sundays 24 words over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents

$1.5C on week-days
word Sundays,





SOUTHROUND

Canadian National Steamships

Satis Set Satle Arrives
Wortrest Herre Boston Barbados Barbados


























rin & i ted , Ale 4 CAN. < TREC TO ; = 1° i: uae 28 May
at ¥i 2, 0.978 iTadi ue bt xander flouse > » - ia M ; 19 Mey MA ae lav
entnor Gardens, Ch. Ch. Area 1 James Street 9.5 = pa — . . ae Ss s AA
; y aie CAN, CHALLENGEN 26 M 1M 32 May 73 8 June
Di oe wee | geetecns ee et post cf Secretary | LADY RODNEY [2.8 dune 6 June 21 June 2 June 22. June
DWELLINGHOUS® and Land contain. 1 egtapher in or office, Suitable} any NELSON ** 90 June 3 Juls & July 14 July 18 July
T Perches adjoining the | (R's bald to ihe right person. Avply| tApy RODNEY +230 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug 13 Aug. 14 Aug.
*« | property kown as “The Abbey", Christ c re sig Sanitary Laundry Co. Lic
This property is a newly built | Country ad. 8.5.51 —t.f.n z Sale nisddeieiaenamic —
dwellinghouse comprising |
living rooms, bedrooms, usual conveni- TARY eee PRIVATE SECRE NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
ences and belongs to Ervin Jerome King. | 7 ~ English, experienced shorthand Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax Montreal
tw typist requires employment for one or » ‘ 5 Ju wd oa 16 June 19 June
The above property will be set up for] two days week, own typewriter. High.| LADY NELSON .. 3 June ne 14 June ao
est U.K. references x No. AC. C LADY RODNEY .. 8 Juiy 5 July 14 July - 16 July y



LADY NELSON ..27 Juhy 29 July 7 Aue 9 Aug. 12 Aug.

Advoante: Se. LADY RODNEY °.26 Aug. 38 Aug 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 13 Sept.

°
|
Responsibh harge of
commtenen Wepemtnant te neuen 2 it , ; | N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vessels fitted witn cold storage cham.
not later than Ist July — Salary $200.00 | bers. Passenger Mares and freignt rates on application to-—
Â¥4 P !
{

40.00 per month depending on quali! ey

penlcauion tg Secteur: bowing Fc GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.

application to Secretar», Dowding Fstat

& Trading Company, Lid.
standing on 19,000 «q



9.8.51—5n | eth mene. seglrierensfanienrttu-siererepenainsaeiaebteietclihniostistesisaitens laihbiimasbioibeinaniospins
large Lounge % by 17 ft MISCELLANEOUS ROYAL NETHERLANDS
Fully Ged Wonshe ind eee -Acbiot Beb. Sale aco "td Da al ei. a me FRENCH LINE
stone and has Timbered [



Cie Gle Transatlantique



NA spp eat ditinnaciiaentiatait | M.S, “Oranjestad’--10 May {951

LOST & FOUND | MS: "Banas lth May 1951

Toilets and Showers M.S. Hersitia’—24th May 1951

; ; , 333
lescnt all persons indebted to the said [The front garden is well laid out -having SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND

| gatate are requested to settle their in-/a double entrance.

this House
Dated this 27th day of April, 1951. V ith i

ling 4683.

debtedness without delay.

ALBERTHA HARDING,
Qualified Administratrix of the Estat:

Rock Bottom Price £4,250
possession for viewing —_——-





— AMSTERDAM

LOST M.S Willemstad” 17th May 1981
a SAILING TO TRINIDAD,
PARAMARIBO AND GRORGHTOWN



Before you buy view

SAILING TO
ENGLAND & FRANUE



working hours 8560 KEYS: One bunch of Keys between







ar ce M.S ecuba ith May, 198 " *
of Gladys Albertine Harding eee a Tr Oh arenas the, Parkin ) MS aerate ‘Joth 7) oat GASCOGNE, May 12, 1951.
seathe: ROPERTY: One large S-door shop &] turned to Dr. C. McConney, Office Spry | SAHANG To TRINIDAD. LA GUAIRA via St. Lucia, Martinique,
Sota ih | shed with galvanized and shingled Roof | St. or Call 2692 11,5.51—2n | CURACAO AND JAMAICA Guadeloupe and Antigua.
Must be removed after purchase. No ie ore oh H . | MS. “Orantestad “24h May, 1951
NOTICE Reasonable refused, Apply S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD.,, A
IN THE MATTER OF premises to Mr. Joseph St. Hill, Tweed Axgents

THE COMPANIES ACT, i910
and

side Road, St. Michae}



Yugoslav Paper





11.5.51—3a

i ; CARIBBEAN CRUISE.
IN THE MATTER OF —————______ . Y ej .V. Caribbee will accept Cargo

WARD TRUST COMPANY LIMITEN.| ‘The Property known as “The Abbey" Attacks De Gasperi 1% and’ Passengers for Dominica, COLOMBIE, May 30th, 1951.
ROtES is hereby siven that the Cred- | Christ Chureh. This property comprises | sete a aeerret The and St Trinidad, La Guaira, Cu-
Nurs @ e@ adevenamed Company which | a dwelling house with 2 acres, 2 roods — itt ailing Friday 18t stant =
is being voluntarily wound up, are|?i%z perches of land and belongs to Mr BELGRADE, May 10. | , racao, Cartagena and
Hoe debi cat, betore the 15th dav off Kenry H. D. King. The above property The Yugoslav Communist | _ The av. Moneka = wil pocneet Jamaica.

Â¥. . ng the day for that purnose | will be set up for Sale by Public Com- SDE * at ay at Cargo and Passengers for Domino $33
fred Ped eat enrpened, A send tir | petition at our Office on Friday 18th Mas “Fumosteus roe — bens ~ ue a oi Montse es t; Nevi

mes a résses and’ the particulars | 1951 os t or é and St, Kitts. "Sailing Friday 18th ‘i >
of their debts or claims and the appl)’ Mr. H. HM. D.J ether inch of her national ter- | 3% instant % Accepting et
nemes and addresses of their Solicit “S| King or premises ritory and a single Yugoslav to! M.V. Cacique Del Caribe will Cargo and Mail.
if ari’, to the undersigned. Henry Ray Ya a g g a

mond Leach and Deighton Harcourt Lisle

Ward, the Liquidators of the wad) 115.5

Company, in care of Messrs Bove

Skeete, Lucas Street, Bridgetown vd
if so required by notice in writing from
the said Liquidators, are to come in and
prove their said debts or claims et suc!

time and place as shall be specified i) —

such notice, or in default whereof, ihe
will be excluded from the benefit. of | I

YEARWOOD & BOYCE ,
wag 4 (Rn fall under foreign domination



AUC'tION



Marshall & Edwards, 45 9, . ; + ; a
any such distribution made before «ich | Roebuck Street opposite James A. Tudor ' shavia which is being waged in|
&

" accept Cargo and Passe
4 St. Luela, St. Vineer
Borba was attacking the recent and Aruba Sailing on

;
a |
}

speech by Italy’s Prime ener th instant
}

nu

| R. M. JONES & Co.,Ltd
i





Alcide De Gasperi when he des

eribed the frontiers. |
— — “It is clear’ the paper added,|
ace Co! “that the campaign against Yugo

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWN-
ERS ASSOC., INC,

Tele, 4047.

AGENTS
Phone i: 3814





of the Insur











sebts are proved, » on Friday (th at 2 p.m Italy, can only benefit Moscow ;' ” *=secerssocosososgessooosseoces =
Dated this 10th day of May, 1051. ae 7 Saloon sae Semanes 3 plan to hinder collaboration be _" ONE I IIE S (
DEIGHTON HARCOURT LISLE { paren. = 8.5.51-4n.| tween countries and nations." ;
RE 9 8 Sree eS on arate —Reuter. PASSAGES TO EUROPE
ais Milestone
11,8.61—3n t

ee
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Archibald Goodman
of Blunts, St, Thomas for permission to

Sell Spirits, Malt Liquors &c., at a board milestone
world trade

ed and galvanized shop attached to res-
idence, situated at Blunts, St. Thomas
Dated this 9th day of May 1951.
To: J. R. EDWARDS, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “D",
A. GOODMAN,

Police Court, District "D" om Monday

the road to free It was reported here that boat.
with the conclusion|S’wain Crawford of the Britisa IGG GONG OOGENESIS ELGG:

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for
sailing to Europe fortnightly. The usual rts of call are

BOATSWAIN MISSING

OTTAWA. May 9. Dublin, London, or Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual

RIO DE JANEIRO, May 9 reduction for chi.dren,

passed anothe:



; >are ,
of long term tariff trimming agree.|°teamer —- Dunstan disappear ed %
ments with 16 countries. New| When he fell between the steamer
concessions, the third round of| 4nd the seawall at Port Peet

, a oe ot i me . rted

prin, [Poet war tan cuts by countries tore te ws were ot 6 WF FES) LINE
N.B.—This application will be consid-|representing 85 per cent, of cee etme Js Revian Si
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at vere ann , st Sharks. Sa x 3
RY Ree tat ane ee befell a fellow seaman who en

the 23rd day of May 1951 at 11 o'clock |Might. Most significant were re-)eTe! a a ; ata
oe y a 00h EE atiee by the United States on|@eavoured a rescue by diving int e
J. R. EDWARDs, about 400
Police Magistrate, Dist. “D" Canada.—(CP).

11,5.51—1)

Strain On Europe RATES OF ‘EXCHANGE

MAY_10, 1951
CANADA
Caer ets 607/10% pr.! Ways and Means Committee voted e

Demand tentatively to-day to increase in

WASHINGTON, May 9.

The United States State Depart-| 62 7/10:

ment warned to-day that efforts
to rebuild West Europe's defences
were threatening to strain its

epee oe eat Gay ot MtiAMe: revit ing industry “beyond the} $?7/10% pr. Cable 50 .2/10% pr, | °3?2001000,000 a year Pate There is ample Ist Class Accommodation available
pANTIQUES for sale which jnelude Panikinhe at Trade, Mario.) breaking point.” It jamnounced as aaa ‘Coupons 38 8/10 ae, : for Trinidad, also one berth for a lady available on
Gee tae kates Garbaaos iu “eae : LErerosad Would mimes Se Besceny bass r eas are 24th May for Southampton,
Tea” anvien on ‘English hea danvise ed to Congress, laying down threo} 7 7

types of United States assistance
This would provide:
1. Weapons primarily of Amer

items of interest toithe sea. The ship left Cabedelo



. Sight Drafts 60 4/10% pr

IVER LET G0

to-day

initio rt THE T.S.8. GOLFITO will be arriving from South-
ampton on Saturday, 12th May, at 8 a.m., and will
i

be sailing at 5 p.m. the same afternoon for Trinidad.

INCOME TAX UP
WASHINGTON, May 9
The House of Representatives

eee, On ioe or.| dividual income taxes by about













FURNISH = NOW ! *

Apply...

































A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

month from the 9th day of May, 1951,





et .
j able ‘ ‘s . + c vigilance over the MAHOGANY. CEDAR,
CSE MeaWe soeron iieinone ie manufacture for use of Quality of BIRCH, PINE, DEAL
Alley : * 10.5.51—3n. European armed forces. ; vat, if y
2 Assistance in military § A s RU 1 1 renewed Bedsteads
That THE : ~ er ent Oe nan enna eerie a . NEW and ren ie \
a corporaion organized and’ existing une Boetigs. Keasebie ne oa 8 ae abe training services and in arms pro- ‘ , bdr deg» ulaplatee is a a
der the laws of the State of New Jerse: Y aa 7 _ ; ia Suction. . Dressing Tables 0 , s
i 5 a ; 4 ft. 6 ins. sizes with or without panel ' ; never relaxed ah . Suites r separate piece
WHOS, free coe Enmerica, Manufacturers, | © “wr Bitcignson & Con Lids Broad 3. Raw materials, equipmen’ Phas . oes : de alti the paar at Fe A gt up IGS OOM SNe Ste! :
; c 4 Streets. Dis . 4843, ‘ . ; a why s always the ‘ raney ‘Table S558
chandise Mart Plaza, Chicago, Tlinois, | °"4 Roebuck Streets, Dial 4222 or 4843 and other goods—economic de . , Dining. Kitehen, Pane ERODE GOS EGGS IODIDE GTO OGG GG EEOC GEN CCC,
3, : registr: ; 9.5,51—4n ae aad ; rae same ‘ ets, Sideboards, Lard
UPA, Dae applies for the, .Fegistration cl ere lM Mice Cake . fence aid—to help in the conver y earn yaennne TeCES: “Buokvacks You'll save heaps of time and get a better job done, x
ter in respect of cereal foods and feeds, CAMERAS: Standard Box Camera sion of European production to A truly outstanding Rum, Office Chairs if you use one of our : 2
and will be entitled to register the same | (using 120 fir, gt ow - eee \ en ee in a class all its own od ase net er ’
after one month from the 9th day of uy yours at G rae he é » sai i BLECTRIC weg a ‘ "— . rag ’ iTDE
May, 1951, unless some person shall in| son & Co,, Ltd, Broad Street Dial aneh CROSS-STAR We. sien : ee Se me shes . if Blended and Bottled Pickup Arms, Gramophone a ELECTRIX ‘ VACUUM CLEANERS
the meantime give notice in duplicate to 9.5. 51—3n es suropes = rearmamen by Portabie Gramophone Records 4 Ww
me at my office of opposition of such ——$—$____—_—__—_—— That THE MAGGI CO., Manufacturers, | efforts strained Western Europe’s up.
registration. The trade mark ean be|. GALVANISE—26 gauge @ ft, $7.00, 9 ft.| a Company incorporated according to the industry beyond breakin oint New shipment just received,
seen on application at my office, $7.75. Only a limited number at Ralph|laws of Switzerland, whose trade or song Pp iM STUART & SAMPS' N Pst Date Nese J
Dated this 25th day foe 1951. Beard’s furnishing show room Hardwood business address is see ete. use oc hcang ows be left “defenceless
H. WILLIAMS, Alley. 10.5.51—3n | Switzerland, has app! or ie regis- | Before viet aggression.”
Registrar of Trade Marks. , Se ——— | tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of iad Reute (1938) LID I S W CENTRAL EMPORIUM
9.5.51—3n GALVANISED SHEETS—Best quality paaisvet a ee iad qubesen one erie —~Keuter . eoWe vi} 4 4
Island ! | food or as ini ents in food, espec: SRR eter menenniage : “ST
re gba Tt: Sate a ch Ge Ths beet foups, bouillons, and seasonings, and wil ae oe ||] MEADQUARTERS = FoR BE cony oreaat. DAL Om,
oe vt! Bet t register the same after one
10 ft $8.40, Nett cash. Better hurry !| be en %j Aliens Enlisting



4.5, 51—t.f.n.
Hand made Crafts, Antiques,
Pottery, Hand blocked Beach-



James. Tel. 91-74,

igne -» $12.00 a doz

14.4.51—1m, hea en Z .. $10.00 a fon:

Sh 4 4 .. $10.00 a doz.

LOSSSEESSESSOSOSS SSS OSOGY Gatiite s. +. $13.00 a doz.

GLASS WARE~—A few angen ese
w black footed Champaigne, isky,
eae ee Sherry, and water Goublets are for sale.

unless some person shall in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such registra-
tion, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office,
Dated this 25th day of April, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
9,.5.51—3n







At Ralph Beard’s ‘furnishing show rooms

’ 7 5,51—3a ) ‘
Hardwood Alley, 10.5,51 = LOYAL BROTHERS OF
HUMBER CYCLE Tickets 1/- each.
mpeti s S$ day f
Grawing on Tuesdays May 15, ew tickets THE STAR
brand new cycles are on sayy basa Neediest Cases Fund
5.51—2n
Se —_—- TAT a
‘psgacee| ANNOUNCEMENT
wie tt ‘Gents a “Attractive-Strong

remaining at Harrison's Store where
easy to carry. Als White Tumblers at 8

BARBADOS
INVESTMENTS
Bought and Sold
A. M. WEBB
Stockbroker
33 Broad St., Bridgetown
(Over Phoenix Pharmacy)



















@ . W. Hutchinson & Co., Relative to Carnival and Fair to| countries, cannot enlist under this
[id, Broad St and Roebuck St. Dial 4223] be held on 7th and Sth June at scheme. Alien recruits, the first
or 4843 9-5-5149 | Queen’s Park, the undersigned will non-resident foreigners ever 0
O.K. COFFEE: Fresh supply of this| Teceive entries for the following:—|be taken into the United States
may now be had from your goer “ (a) i ern Bands ers are to serve for a five year
us ial (b) Steel Bands. period,
The new “MOULI” GRATER is really (c) Advertising Bands. Only unmarried men between
wieat for grating Cheese, Nuts, Nutmeg, (d) Historical Bands. 18 and 35 with sufficient know-
Bread Crumbs, Cocoanut ete, It is avicy | Im order to raise the standard of| ledge of English are to be ac-
and Efficient and is easily cleaned. ae Carnival, the Steering |. cepted They=wijl be. trained in
87 Cents Each. Obtainable from H - 1 4 eee °
RISON’S HARDWARE DEPT. Broad St.| would appreciate the co-ope sie the United States.
- 11.5.51—2n | of Firms, Clubs and Individuals —Reuter.
act eng lai one - | being as original as possible.
! a Y No entrance fee will be charged, ys
More particulars late: |:
L A D I E S! TAKE NOTICE A Carnival Band of thirty will AQUA PURA—
That FORT GARRY FLOUR MILLS be visiting Barbados to take part DISTILLED WATER
CY: ane Ls ince ot San in the parade. For using with:
ewan ue Dominion of Canada, Closing date, 19th May. { Motor Car or other Batteries —
pr ry trade or business address is in SEYMOUR BECKLES. Filled up Radiators of new cars—
the City of Saskatoon, Province - by c/o Vestry Clerk’s Office, Cocktail making; Coffee making;
Se entin See ae a in bat “An Bridgetown. Rum breaking, etc., etc. —
Sharkskin, Romaine Crepe Of Register in respect of flour, feed and] For Booths, Stalls, and side- GET IT AT YOUR GAS CO.,
4 . lai triped cereals, and, will be entitled to reniatte Shows, contact C. MORRIS, winal ‘maim dates x
ae? ae ” . FNREM ae oF May. 1951, unless some person| Sobers Lane, 5 .

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANTS

: : tion of such registration. The trade mark
& Georgette, Plain & Print- ean be seen on application at my office.
The applicant Sante all Sues Ve
e—d i i of the words “Milled from Selec
sae hee. Patines, Spring Wheat” as well as the name ot
the applicant as part of the trade mark
to_be registered.
Dated this 30th day of April, 1951,
H, WILLIAMS, 4
Registrar of balboa ay 980

5 .51- heme
of

Satins, Tafetas, Spuns, Etc.
Hats, Shoes, Nylons,



GENTS!

Taffetas, Spuns, Etc , Hats,
Shoes, Nylons.



T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH







Messrs. FRANK FORDE

and LEO 0. LAWRENCE
GENERAL CONTRACTORS,

LET US SERVE YOU. ae EMRE | pee AS AB eee Sertienl: Whine nal pane
Yard and Driveway Builders

Lorries supplied for haulage
Drawings and Estimates supplied

val of Britain, is at - - - -

' JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
_—_—
S Serve us with wour Orders. We
Serve you with workmoenship

Pr. Wm Henry &
Swan Sts. {

| ENAMEL-IT PAINTS for your

Pet Furniture is at - - - Addre Sweet Bottom St

George ot/and Elerton, St. George

That NEW WYVERN PEN that
JOHNSON'S HARDWARE |



i i e sha the meantime give notice in
Silver & Gold Tinsel Crepe sradiéate 10 ime at my office of opposi-



90





\o P9995 9SS9SGGIG9S99OSOSS,

SOOO SFOS

In U.S. Army

NUREMBERG, May 9.

United States recruiting offices
opened to-day in several Bava.
rian towns where aliens, mainly
Eastern European displaced peo-
ple, can enlist in the United
States army, a West German
news agency reported.

About 2,500 carefully selected
aliens are to be enlisted as regu-
lar soldiers,

Germans or nationals of Mar-—
shall Plan or North Atlantic Pact







FOR SALE

Crane House

This well known coastal
property with approx. |
124 acres including a
long stretch of beach
frontage is open to
offers.

Johan M, Biadon
A.F,S,, F.V.A.





























"Phone 4640
PLANTATIONS BUILDING









POLO CPEEOE POPOV



ot



















ELITE SHIRTS $378

Oreae Seren $905 + 3.5]
SPORT,




MEN’S HALF HOSE—

VEST & TOWEL SHIRTS

THE BARGAIN

30, Swan Street _

460664
LOCOCO OOOO OOOOH 000%.

Wm. FOGARTY Ltd.

Merchandise News
Ladies Art Silk Panties

From $1.10 to $1.37 per pair

’ Art Silk Briefs

From 62c. to $1.30 per pair

Ladies Art Silk Vests

From $1.05 to $1.51 each

ladies’ Art Silk Slips

From $1.60 to $2.58 each

Ladies’ Satin Slips

From $5.55 to $5.66 each

’ Crepe De Chene Slips

From $5.16 to $5.29 each

RECT POVS TSS |

4

Ladie:






BUY NOW
AND SAVE











SHIRTS —a new

RANGE OF DESIGNS





Ladies



CLEELEN EGGS EEEPAPL PIPL PES SCL LT LALA

-

ladies’ Art Silk Nightdresses =

.
From $3.30 to $4.20 edch %

Ladies’ Crepe De Chene Nightdresses §

From $7.50 to $12.00 each

Ladies’ Satin Nightdresse

From $8.19 to $19.00 each

3 PAIRS FOR $1.00 UP

AT LOW PRICES



HOUSE
S. ALTMAN, Proprietor
PHONE 2702



SSCSSSLSL GOO

+

PLE LLCS OS

+ OOOO OT BE
SISOS CCO SOO COO PO FOE9 OV FOO COU UDO CUCVVOE SEAOGE

*
a
4

PELE FLGIOOSS?







PAGE EIGHT

Notre



Dame Be

NOTRE DAME. defeated Carlton one nil in their First

Livision
® day afternoon
“Ally” Best on the left

the goal in the second half

return football match at Kensington Oval yvester-

wing for Notre Dame scored
The game was slow in the first

half but brightened up considerably during the second

half hour.

© Y -«
Kid German Wins
e LIVERPOOL, May 10.
“Ivor Germaine (Kid German)

lightweight champion of Barbados
@eicated Luigi Coluzzi, Italian
BPelierweight, cn points in a ten-
Pound contest at Liverpool
Sadium tonight

"Germaine, official contender for
fie British Empire Lightweight
Title. was conceding nine and a
quarter pounds to a strong punch
er but he dominated the proceed
ings trom start to finish



; rv oe
Arsenal Taking 19
Players To Brazil
; avers Lo raZi
% LONDON,

Arsenal are taking 19 players
on their summer tour of Brazil
‘They leave in two parties next
week—one going on Tuesday and
the other on Thursday, The club
expect to play six or seven match
es at Rio and St, Paulo

The only two first team aye:
unable to make the trip are
Mercer, the Captain because
business reasons and Leslie Comp
ton playing cricket for Middlesex

The full list of Arsenal play
ers making the trip are: Swindin,
Scott, Barnes, Smith, Shaw,
Forbes, Daniel, Fields, Bowen,
Roper, Cox, Pogie, Resis, Holton
Goring, Lishman, Marden, Mac
Pherson and Scott —Reuter.

Cambridge All Out
For 188 Ruts

CAMBRIDGE, May 19.

After dismissing Cambridge
University here for 188 today, the
South Africans made a bad start
to their first innings losing two
wickets for five runs, At the
close they were 64 for two,

The first day’s play was washed
out by rain and with only just
under four hours’ play to-morrow,
a tame draw appears certain.

The South African bowlers
showed up well on a pitch which
gave them little assistance. Clive
Van Ryneveld claimed five for 62
with his leg breaks and “Tufty”
Mann took the other four wickets
for 34 runs,

David Sheppard and Tom Wells
put on 69 for the opening Cam-
bridge stand but the last eight
wickets fell for 71 runs,

—Reuter.

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL

A team from A. S. Bryden &
Sons defeated a term of (,ommis
sion Agents by fivc goals to three
in a football match at Wanderers’
ground yesterday afternoon

For. Bryden, A. Farmer, K
Hutchinson and S, Edghill scored
one goal each while P. Edwards
kicked in two goals and D. Lewis
one for Commission Agents,

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL
WINS SIXTH GAME

Modern High School won the
sixth successive basketball game
for the season when they defeated
Sea Scout yesterday afternoon
16—8 at the Modern High School
grounds.

May 10



Joc
of









Paul Mandeville at centre—haif
for Notre Dame gave a good per-

formance. He was the backbon
cf his team His passes were
well placed and nearly all wer

along the ground
Carlton took the touch off with
Notre Dame defending the
southern goal. Soon after Fred-
die Hutchinson ran down the
left wing and centered. Brickic
Lucas received the ball but
kicked wide
McCollin, on the left
Notre Dame, received a through
ass and took a good one time
shot. King, the Carlton custodian
vas however in position and
punched out the ball.
Cariton made another
Reynold Hutchinson tried a
from well outside the
the ball went high
cross bar
Notre Dame
on the Carlton
centre forward,
but King saved.
Mandeville beat his

wing for

attack

shot
but
the

area
ove!

made a rai
Gill, theii
good shot

next
goal
took a

way down

the right wing and centered, Un-
fortunately there were no for
wards in position to shoot. Halt
time found the game still goal
less

Seon after the second half be-
gan Freddie Hutchinson took a
1ice shot from the left wing. The
ball passed a few inches over the
cross bar

Carlton
kick Bright, one of their full
backs, took a good shot from the
touch line, but Wilkinson pushed
‘e ball aver the cross bar

McLeod, one of the Carlton
forwards, received a long pass
and had a golden opportunity io
open the account for his team
He did not time the ball proper-
jy and the shot went wide of the

goal,
Freddie Hutchinson then re-
ceived a pass from Lucas. He

took a beautiful shot but the ball
struck the right upright and re-
bounded into play
Notre Dame. launched
attack and Green, their right
winger centered, King ran out
of goal, gathered and cleared.
Shortly afterwards the first
and only goal of the match came.
Gill got the ball and passed to

another

Best. They short passed to each
other until they were in the
Carlton goal area, Best then
took a good which completely
beat King.

Carlton fought hard for an
equaliser but their attacks were

constantly warded off by Browne
and Straughan. Wilkinson, the
Notre Dame goalie, was Jater sent
off by the referee and Straughan
deputised until the game ended

The teams were as_ follows;

CARLTON: King, Bright, Ken-
nedy, Cox, Clairmonte, Archer,
F. Hutchinson, N, Lucas (Capt.)
McLeod, R. Hutchinson and
Greenidge.

NOTRE DAME: Wilkinson’
Browne, Straughan, Archer,
Mandeville, Roberts, Green,
C. Daniel, Bes}, Gill and Mc-
Collin,

Referee: Mr. S. O’C. Gittens.



BASKETBALL

Results of the Division I Basket-
ball matches played at Y.M.P.C.

Beckles Road, last night are as fol-
low:
Y.M.P.C. beat Pickwick 4&—
23; Harrison College Old Boys
19—11,

beat Y.M.C.A.



‘Middle zone’ posers 4

OME of the most difficult ha
X are those that fall into tt
opener's first rebid.

Responder is too strong tc
strong enough to bid game on t
received.

A typical situation ts created
by a simple rebid of opener’s
suit. South bids One Heart
North Two Diamonds, and South
Two Hearts With an in-
between hand, North has the
choice of the following rebids. al!
of which are constructive with-
out necessarily ommitting the
partnership to a game contract

Two Spades.—A “ low” reverse
—-an urge. but not a force
Three Hearts.—Simple raise otf
# Suit that has been rebid. The
trump support may be mode

but










Nortl probably
tains a ruffing
E.g.:—

@IS5; 9387, @AINTS:
&AGM

Three Dinmonds.
of responder’s suit
tral rebid in a suit
ofter c
‘This

~ The rebid
after a neu-











shown a
rebiddab 1
have like this.
a! 95S; @AQ105 32;
AXBG

Over Two Hearts, he







pass—first be i

werous to 1 the ding
level. se use he has no
reasor that South's




x hey’ 1D

ol Every



Beg ast SATURDAY
NIGHT THE DOG-
WAGON WAS SO

BUSY, OTTO
DECIDED HE i
NEEDED MORE &
HELP «ss.



ORE SATURDAY ME »
me* HE PUT ON
TWO EXTRAS»:
SO THE JOINT’S
DESERTED ~~~



JOE GANCAS,
WALNUT ST.,
MEADVILLE, PA.

ise

‘Time

NOTHING FOR

o
nds for the responder to judge (
he intermediate zone after the

> let the bidding die, but not
he strength of the information

SE as
hy M. HARRISON-GRAY

Hearts are not as good as his
own Diamonds The Three
Diamond rebid should be
reserved for hands of a different
type, in the hope of inducing
South to bid Three No-Trumps
Eg. :

é 3) 975; @AKQIG64;



a
&Q92
Two No-Trumps. — A useful
limit bid, showing a reasonably
balanced hand with 11-12 points
or a “good” 10-count If no
better bid is available a part-
guard in one of the unbid suits
is permissible. E.g, :

@I9S,; 9105; @KQ874;
BATT ;

The same principles apply if
South makes a _ non-reverse
change of suit in a sequence such
as One Spade—Two Diamonds ;
two Hearts? But North’
range of constructive rebids is
extended to include a jump pre-
terence bid of Three Spades and





al to Three Hearts. Four
supporting trumps are normally
requlred tor the latter call.



YL
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
London Ervress Servi

“JUST CAME





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

‘£3,000 NOT ENOUGH |
Says Sands

at Carlton 1—O

PREPARING FOR RIDE



LOOKING over a map of the route:
L-cpl. Tillson, 21; Sergeant Burgess, 27;

In front,
Cpl.

from left to right, are
Bonner, 20. Standing

are Driver Allen, 24, and L-cpl. Smith, 21.

was awardea a tree SOldiers Ride 1,450 Miles

Motorcyclists come home on leave from Tripoli

FIVE British soldiers are on their way home on 28 days’

leave from Tripoli, but they are not coming by sea—they
are travelling on motorcycles.
Tne five who hope to make Sen Tp vatetan a
the 1,450-mile journey in six Foy ° a
days are Sergeant Burgess, of W nit, Bailey

Coedpenmaen Road, Ponty
pridd; L.-corporal Smith, of Hen
fold Cottages. Newdigate, Surrey;
Driver Allen, of Invicta Road,
Margate, Kent; L.—corporal Till
son, of Woodfield Farm, Sawtry,
Hunts; and. Corporal Bonner, of
Bank Road, Atherstone, Warwick-
shire

They left Tripoli last Thursday
at 4am. and are following a
route through Tunis across the
Mediterranean by boat to Mar-
seilles, to Parig then to Calais and
across to Dover. The return trip
will be the same.





Only four of them will drive
the motorcycles— Smith is rid
ing pillior with Tillson,

Race Arabs

At Dover eacn will make
their way home and late
they will meet at Dover for
the return journey.

Rough trips are no new

experience to Burgess and Tillson,
who are members of the Roya:
Signals speedway team, The
Meteors, that ride against Arab
and Italian teams in Tripoli.

Each man is carrying food and
a small allocation of francs, Be-
fcre they left they expected their
biggest holdup would be in get
ting a boat at Tunis,

They are travelling 18 hours
a day. The motor-cycles are
scrap ex~War Department
machines which the men have

bought and overhauled.

Why are these five men spend
ing their leave this way? “Mostly
for adventure,” they said before
they left, and because they want
to spend part of their leave at
heme,

—LE.S.



Dewan Singh For
South Africa

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, May j
Dewan Singh, light-weight
boxing champion of Britisn
Guiana who is also seeking the
welter-weight title in a maten
against Calvin Garraway on Whit

Monday has accepted an offer
from South Africa for two fighi
The organiser of the fight

Seaman Chetty, retired undeteat

Highlight Sports

LONDON, May #0
West Inaies athletes Arthur
Wint and McDonald Bailey pro-

vided the highlights of the match
in which the British Amateur
Athletic Team beat London Uni-
versity 112 points to 45 here last
night,

The long striding Wint, Olympic
400 metres champion, ran a great
race to win the quarter mile for
the University in the good time of
48.8 seconds on a damp track,

Bailey, running for the A.A.A.,
was an easy winner in the 100
yards in 10.1 seconds. He beat
Brian Shenton, European 200
metres champion,

Herb McKenley. who arrived
yesterday from Jamaica, will take
part in the British games at White
City Stadium on Saturday and
Monday.

McKenley
yards in

the 440
he will compete
apainst Mal Whitfield of the
United States and Arthur Wint
who is running for Britain,

will run in

which

In the 1948 Olympic games in
London, McKenley finished second
to Wint in the 400 metres with
Whitfield, who had won the 800
metres, third,

McKenley said today: “This
time I am hoping to beat my good



friend Wint. I like coming to
London and if the weather clears,
we should do good times. I am
in pretty good shape.”

McKenley is also dawn to run
in the 300 yards on Monday. He
holds the world record of 29.8

seconds for this event,—Reuter,



‘rying To Set New
Tight Rope Record

VIENNA, May 10.
Austrian tight rope walker, Hel-
muth Horlands, trying to set up
a new world record by staying 72
hours on a high wire, today put
a raincoat over his tights,

Rain came down in torrents as
he prepared to spend his third day

perched 12 yards above the
quare in Stockerau. Dense
crowds thronged the square in

ed Fly and Bantam Weight front of the Town Hall to look at
Champion of South Africa and him,

formerly rated sixth contender

for the world’s flyweight title, His pretty young wife, also a
has expressed high enthusiasm] ight rope artist, spends part of
over Dewan, and stated that they | he night talking with him to
would be glad to see him in action,} seep him from dropping off to

Coloured fighters are held in
high esteem in South Africa, 'The
feather—weight champion of thi
British Empire, Roy Ankarah dy
most of his campaigning in that
Dominion and judging from Mr
Chetty’s letter to Dewan, foreign
fighters can accomplish a great
deal The letter also recalls the
visit of Motee Kid Singh, forme:
featherweight champion of Brit-
ish Guiana who created quite
sensation in South Africa,




















‘eep and off the wire.
—Reuter.







x

4

AU 7,
I

fa

~

“Sh

Wm.

me

Prince

SODIIIG IOS

ore
SMART
side.
P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd
é

“!'T IS NOT WORTH my while to go to England for
a £3,000 (Australian) — about 2,400 sterling — purse. I

think about five or six thousand pounds would be nearer

,

the mark... .
That little speech was

probably represents the longest oration of which the agile
aborigine has ever delivered himself.

It ,also represents a consider-
able bombshell in British boxing
for, Sands is due to leave Aus-

ralia-by air on May 6 and fight
Randolph Turpin for the Empire
middleweight title at the White
City, Lendon. on June 5.

This is not, repeat not, pro-
moter Jack Solomons’s lucky
week

First, it’s announced that Jack
Gardner will not meet Cesar
Brion on May 22 because of his
injured thumb; then the Solo-

mons equine chestnut hope Sec-
onds Out, finishes 11th in a field
ef 17 in the City and Suburban;
now it looks as though the Sands
(of Australia) is running out,

But in the judgment of Solo-
mons there’s no cause for alarm
or despondency. Blowing a cigar-
smoke ring the size of another 0
ca the end of a boxer's purse
money. Jack the giant-biller
announced:

“I have sent
(Sands’s
tickets,

Tom Maguire”
manager) “three return
for which I’ve _ paid
£1,400, and I’m sure Sands will
leave for England on the aate
arranged”,

complained
Turpin has had a number of
fights this year, whereas the
Australian would have been out
of the ring for four months if he
fought on June 5

Solomons counterea this one
by saying that Sands could have
the equivalent of two fights by
constant work-outs in the gym-
nasium after he arrived in Eng-
land

So—according to Solomons—
the fight is still on. But then he
hasn't got to fight Turpin.

Thomas for U.S.

More pleasant news is that Ed-
die Thomas, British, Empire, and
European welter-weight cham-
pion, is to go to America, round
about the end of June, to fight
the winner of the fight between
Kid Gavilan, of Cuba, and John-
ny Bratton, of Chicago

The fight will take place before
the end of June at Madison

SPORTS
WINDOW

HOCKEY
afternoon ac 445 o'clock
there will be a hockey match at
the Garrason, This match will be
played on the pole pitch,
FOOTBALL
Second Division
Empire meets Lodge this after-
noon at Bank Hall, The referee

also that

Sands







This

will be Mr, O. Graham.

Spartan will play College at
College. The referee will be Mr,
W. Howorth,

Third Division
Regiment vs. Rolice at Garrison,
Combermere — Old Boys vs.

Everton at Combermere, .
Wanderers vs, Combermere at
Combermere.
YMPC
Road,
FRIENDLY FOOTBALL

ASSOCIATION

Rangers vs. Westerners “A’ at
St. Leonard’s Ground, Richmond
Gap. The referee will be Mr.
Robert Parris,

BASKETBALL (First Division)

Pickwick . YMCA at
YM P.C. and College vs, Pirates
at the same ground. Play starts
at 745 pm

TABLE TENNIS AT Y.M.C.A.

In the Division Uf Inter-Club
return matches, Foundation will
engage Police and Barna will meet
Lenville. Matches start at 6,00 p.m

NETBALL

A team of St. Michael's Old
Girls will engage the Ursuline
Convent team th's afternoon at 5
o'clock, *

vs, College at Beckles









—

What’s on Today

Police Courts and Court of
Appeal — 10.00 a.m.

Cocktail Party at Goddard's
Restaurant for French
delegation to Carib Com-
mission — 6.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema gives show at
Bay Street Boys’ Club —
7.30 p.m.

CINEMAS
“Sleeping City.”

“Madeline.”
and



Globe :

Empire :

Roxy : “Relentless”
Gold.”

Plaza (Bridgetown);
With A Horn.”
Aquatic Club
comes Electre.”

“Lust for
“Young Man

‘Mourning Be-





It’s so easy
to see those
extra fine
points in a
well tailor-
ed suit that
you should
always
‘contact the

Top Scorers

ney vs 2 x 5a
2, 8 . 3
Lp 1 . poe iN af » o
RS abe ee

LOLSL DLL bt bet heb Del Db tb Dab Dims ? bb ttt bbb tule bvbutbvbtdt-btvt-tvbtbvlvivt-tvbb tt tlle? t0 2 ¢ELIS GLIA PL OP LP LIL LILI LL DDD DN DD

PLODILD LLL LE LLL LAA PELE IPE EE POA AAA EEL A OPE PE PEPE AOE OOO Ot POCO T TINO OCC OO

Henry Street

red
Spee

III PILL PDI PIPE EEO
DRAG RDI ER IEE

made by Dave Sands, and it



PETER WILSON
says although it looks as if
Dave Sands is running out
cf his Empire title fight with
Randolph Turpin, promoter
sack Solomons insists that
the White City (June 5) date
sull stands



Square Garden, New York, ano
would be generally regarded in
America as carrying the world’s
10st. 7lb. title with it.

But the odd thing is that the
British Boxing Board of Contro!
still regards “wonder boy” “Su-
gar” Ray Robinson as_ world’s
welter-weight champion.

The board, however, is likely
to be over-ruled at the European
Boxing Union Conference which
is being held in London this
week-end and which will prob-
ably agree with the National
Boxing Association of America
that it’s not in the best interests
of the sport for one man to hola
more than one title,

* “* ts

P.S.—Already anguished, su-
percharged whines of protest
from speedway supporters about
“Anti-Speedway’s” views. More
of this later.

London Express Service

Stop *Pyorrliea
in 24 Hours

Bleeding Gums, Loose Teeth and Sore
Mouth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
Trench Mouth or a bad disease which
sooner or later will make your teeth fall
out and may cause Rheumatism and Heart
Trouble. Stop this disease now with the
new discovery Amosan. Stops bleedin.

gums in 24 hours, ends sore mouth a

tightens teeth. Iron clad guarantee.
Amosan must make your mouth well and
save your teeth or money back on return
of empty rackage. Get Amosan from your

& chemist today.
Amiosan

The guarantee
for Pyorrhea—Trea



prot









CRYPTOQUOTE No. 18

CZ SQ CPTCAOQ WA _ EWSQ,
SQ EQCFA KDQ EWVWKZ RB
RXF CHWEWKWQZ.

—BFRXPQ.

Last Crypt: Ability is of little
account without opportunity.
—Napoleon.
a

J. A. CORBIN & SONS.



KEEP FIT

KEEP FIT CLASSES





will commence at the
AQUATIC CLUB on
Friday, llth May, at
4.30 p.m.

Apply to...

MISS RANSOM
Dial 3390
The Bcrbados School

of Dancing Ltd.









The
AMATEUR ATHLETIC



CYCLE AND ATHLETIC

SPORTS MEETING

(under the distinguished
patronage of

His Excellency the Governor
Sir Alfred & Lady Savage)

KENSINGTON OVAL

Whit-Monday
‘Thursday
& Saturday .

May 14th
. May 17th
. May 19th
beginning at 1 p.m, each day

48 THRILLING EVENTS

See Ken Farnum, Lindsay
(Flash) Gordon, Cecil
Phelps, Harry Stuart, Mike
Tucker, The Hoad_ broth-
ers, George Hill, Harold

Archer, (Nugget) Hunte,
Oswin Hill, Bridgeman &
Company, The Lewis Twin

Brothers, and a string of
other male W.I. Cyclists
and .Athletes as well as
M'ss Grace Cumberbatch
and Miss Eileen King in
action at the Historic Oval

Gaceo Open at 12 noon daily
e
PRICES OF ADMISSION :
SEASON TICKETS
$2.16
$1.68

Kensington Stand
George Challenor
e
DAILY TICKETS
Kersington Stand



$1.00
George Challenor .
Uncovered Seats

Grounds



Season Tickets on Sale daily
at the Civic, Swan & High
Street.



;
ASSOCIATION
OF BARBADOS
presents its
RIG 3 DAYS §
2







oF CDOOSS

alk ol ae





39

MAY 11, 1951

as

FRIDAY,





Romantic







Crepe
Romaine '

In Beige, Pink, Lilac, +
Coral, Aqua, Blue,
Fuchia, Goblin Blue,
Gold, Cherry, Black,
Lime Green, Royal Blue,
Navy, Red, White and

Green ....


















per yard

$2.08
$2.29

CAVE

SHEPHERD
& Co, Ltd.

10—i3 Broad Street


















SE SURE OF

r
OVER? yelit?â„¢
. ‘(
6 kw -with the faithful
use of DREAM. —

~The Soap

of the Beautiful.
Play safe .. . be prepared,
for your romantic moment.

TOILET SOAP, use it
faithfully in your bath,
shower and at the wash

basin for a soft-smooth-
clear skin, radiant with notural
loveliness.

DREAM is available at toilet goods
counters throughout the island.










ABTENTION !!
FACTORY MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining youx requirements
IN

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE

Ranging from %4” upwards

MILD STEEL

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
Zé BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes

FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill
At PRICES that cannot be repeated.



The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.

White Park Road, St. Michael
DIAL 4528
BF suite A eats Et Dede te a ee cae









IN

HIGH CLASS
TAILORING

ALL KINDS

C. B. RICE & Co.

OF

OF

LANE



Get a few cakes of DREAM .

i



Full Text

PAGE 1

FRIDAY, MAI II, IMI BARBADOS ADVOCATi: PACE SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS.; roR "^ p ,wl iw !" Via mum r>hra %  *• r^i. -aa f-i ra-fa ^ u ._ %  .__ a. %  TILIPMON1 2901 n *u ana i r* Bjia.. or BMacmrai I'Mib Call'n i* • rh-i* M alvu for any number ol orj. W IS 10 IU I linn peorJ fur %  en W H IM "ord TUM "**. Pbon M between %  ird • %  Ill) lot DiMk N-i4*. oru> afier 4 m Tiirhun Bar •wiowaNM'ii ci Binn. Hn*.rnl*> lor .j.y ii.jr.ber of aorda up lo 3 cetita par woi Hill SALE %  MM rhn>ge M—fc Tl C*lB *M M ccnia Sandaaa M wvfdj — ore* 14 worn, j ,„„ %  i^ra veer* ce,l uvij .iiiauoi-* I )• 0* CO J.H^ .. rea.-a\i„. *i lt>ih. IBM at he. %  Sande. Chrtil Church Juliana fad Bat < aBeva inrtiini a' ** %  Cnrtet Chi re* Ftiand* Wllfr.-.t M.ii-hell. Jan. TAKE NOTICE CELOTEX %  I %  Prefeet f.o euled Pmc aasoot %  ir.UtUfci | am g i Kile her B J |>, „ II SBfe. I, ', >1I tlHttCA-tn'atp-MBead P\irnla.ied li.nj.lo* Telephone. Ftefriferator. -ntf nodern ronvenien. ... Available mn-dle May Apply rndfnr. F.tipji. i. roleprioaa M M • a M fa IM <*hu> wiib Una mtv.u.>ti. price t. O 1 Op*. Staple irnnn Cullin* m 'rtci Apply Prank p, .vecta. I Proverb* A Ca\, lid Mitt' WAGGON Una IM1 V-S Ford SlattM Waumi in perfect eonditliri Appl> af CM Mil. Bt 4 51 It ELECTRICAL 1 i.,.a Street FIRMTLK.; the Stale, of America, whuw IIM> .. iieia aQdr... p CM) .,r irnrui, Matt c .'PPi.ed fa* there*;.. Jtlt..n of ..!.. mark In Part -A" e l "* 1 1 "* leaped m -all beard n< -imil.r i., 1 idli: malriml. ., n( | M |i| o rnllllad In |f(i.(ri ii>,. ,,nit(ri mv i.rtw vjiilaam ia brdroomi. runnin*walrr. KiliKrn with iTAKE NOTICE PABLUM Thai MI-AD JOHNSON a. COMPA:Y a roawaOM %  '!> org-am-ad und-r ru law. o( thr stair of Indiana. In N miato> of Anwrita. oboar uMr ,. %  t.tr-a. ) %  onto Straat and Rl J..-ph Avrnua. Kvan-vill* tttbt ..f IA ha. .pp|,rd (or lha ra. %  uo.1myall i-i Pan "A al %  % %  •perl of upaciallv prrpa i .1 'I' pMiiu.i wnirh .iipflv nutrillo I.I inrd.. and will ba -nlillaw to irl%  %  ina aan>a altar ona monlh Irom lh ii NOTICE: "•<• Board bt i" apUII ir, Ma „„„ i., ., I RMP PI mi* BAUH rr. nan par ipaH 'raa aa tpaab^ap. REAJ. ESTATE i i i by Ma' %  BJfSJf, %  NOTICE •hall Hal lM. MM %  * %  I off,,. -na pr> lha i to ma at ro> ufBca of oppo^ii n rraiiliallon Thr tiada mm* "•n on appliraliuii at RU <.fl thi. nth day of April. IM II "IIUAMM llrgi.lrat ..( Tr.idr Mark* 1)11 3n TAKE NOTICE • Ra Ealaia <>< c;i-DVS AUURTINt HARDING NOTICE I" MIMIY GIVEN tbpt panan. navinc any d-bt or 1,1m a-wt ho KMbW of Olady. AIW. •ta o( tha |.ar:*h of Saint MtrdUML v. !. %  > Ilad in iftu I-land on Ilia J*ih .la. . anuary |H|. B rharaby rrquitait | "d partlrutar. of ,hrit -lairr.. dmfteaiad. to tha ^ilr"i|d Abai" %  ilard,n q^i^ad Admimatram, ,, *• r ..i. of S drrra^.. ,n r. M w !" lari.naion A "*a <••— fir,..-' ...... %  f* %  th day of June. IM1 aft" i.'i daia I ihall proraad ' rtXribmr lha a.m. of tha dacaaaad amona i|, i:ad tftarrto having rdpr oni .,..* rianrn of hich I .hall Uta-n ha.- bad r-ytlra. and that I w.il not br liabla for lha a>aeu or p>,v UMt*M w dMIIibiiled. to an* pe lu .. wno.r datM or rlaim I .halt than I had notice And all peraon* indebted to tha >a..l £.?.H "• ^ u ~ " • -""a their | oabladneai witttout dalav V._n!L?-."' April IMI I HARDING. %  MifE-i NOTICE IIHI Vf\l|| N 'itIOMP4.R, M IN IMI' KAaTBM • %  II TRl -T fUMMM %  UTICR % %  harany ..van tha V *„ 'v BICYCLE— our OwmTa tamtap B of ...,v aaaaace. -nd 'ill I n.iM.'i i leipeci BM Bth d.v peiaon ahall i In dupllcaia lo m liioti of aucli raaii -1 i •1, %  MB. rrom iearillme live notice it niy i.rtn-r ol d|i|>ia. itlon The tradr mark apRltradon al mv office. h day of April. 10SI II WILLIAMS. Ilitrar nf Trad.M..I.. 9 9 ! %  TAKE NOTICE QOIAKER t Thai THE gUAKEr. DeVW COMPANY. D corpotaion oiaant'ed ji.il fnURUfj up. der the law. of Ihc Ktate ol • Umted Stale, of America. Manufacturer. %  Vhoar trade at bu-meaU.i'. ehand.aa Ma.f Plar a CMna, niaWB V h A haapplied lor ihH-.I-UJIIIIU of a trade n.^rk in Pan 'A .,r !!,,inef v.. .-.ii i.'i iiile.1 i .Hi (,.. %  Me. reamer | Ihe •" TVmVRITIRS m ...-eued-aee th efore romnilttln S 11HJI1. Dial 3IPB Shipment of ri .it.tdle Typewrit* ^ :.irt. %  .>i,' Tl ci %  WHITER I'nderwood < Bill i.ik rirtuia in food Appn Mm D Moore. Bank H Ki'..n. oppotr wrcdiiit Avenue MISCELLANEOUS I Store .llSI-Sn ACTUMIM — It era I equal to M ton. •anure. FTom H. Ke mm lea I — l cwt. of Farm Yard lh Archer. Dra J.iSI— in. ArTUMVS The Pertillaar of tha Future--tncrea-e. the earthworm populolion of aolla. From || Keith Archer. Drua Store B.1-4B. ACTUMI-1 Urlan. D Sc dlaea.e al Ihe to. Kellh Archer'. D %  VadhMM EntUnd U of plant. rh 11-day Clork In number of Barbodo> Icea. Old Enallih Ti i -nd .aucerai bell* Old on .1... Deeai xsx Ralph ne;.r.t'. m., Hardwood 11 S M *o ItFjysTKADS' Simmon. Bed-lead. Jk print. Available In I ft 3 Ira. and fl ma i,re. with or without r -nel M M|I B C I M B d %  „•!..,,-k RrtMit Dial 4D3 or *ei f 5 II—4h peraon .hall rwu % %  -u .i pu .1-. nv orftce of oppoallion ol *IM on. The trade maik can | appl.at.on at my otTlce. ilu> ttth da> of April, \n\ H. WILLIAMS. Ratl.lrar of Trade Mmk< West Indian o\ British Ilarvd made Craftt, Antique*, Pottery. Hand blocked Be.chIMI l!,\*. ^' ml %  I B %  inn I'M Uni %  >' %  l| *: S ench \our. TODAY „l O W H A i % %  ltd B'nad Sl.eel Dial 43OT 9 31—Sn GALVANISE, -M leu* tT T5 Onlr .1 limited I AIM*. 1 ft S31-3 ;. ^aVVVWCV^^^^,*^A*,*^-,* > > V-* BARBADOS INVESTMENTS Bought and Sold A. M. WEBB Stockbroker 33 Broad St, Bridftrtnwn (Over I'IIIA-IU* Pharmucj I SHOP HERE! LADIES! DRESS GOODS Shark.'ttln. Romalnc Ctcpe JtrMT. Plain & Striped. Silver & Ould Tin*.* 1 CnpO it Oeorgrtte. Plain & PrintH| Crf>pc-de-Criinc, Satins, Satins. Tafptos, Spuns. Etc. Hau, Shops. Nylons. GENTS! Taffetas. Spun*. Elr HaU. Shoea. Nylon*. 1ST era SFRVF VOf. THANIs Pr. Wm Henry & Swan Sts. OALVANisr.n suri'T" iv-t i '' %  new iheelCheap-.t in the Island u ti MM; -. ft tiai. a ft m Hi a fi n M. 10 ft M 40 Netl caeh Better hurry I A BARNES A CO. LTD. ..,i.t; | a. 11' HL'AinrJi CYCIE Coenpetilkin clpamt lhl Saturday lor drawlnf on Tueadav. Mav IS Few tickeu remalnlnf at HarrlMm-< Slore h-.e brand new eye lea are on view II.8 Sl-tn LUNCH TINS Available ona al 13 eenta eaeh Attractive-llroit i.ty lo carry Al* White Tumbler, i.i a enta -ach G W Hulchln.on A Co. .Ml. Broad *lt and Roebuck St Dial 4M1 „ 4Mi t s 11 -an JIII EftVi.iit >"d I. ew.ll* tr t'riit* r-ch obtainaAM fr RINON •> HARDWARE IXIT TAKE NOTICE That PORT OABHY FLOt H MUJ CO UMITED. a cvrpaaaUpn oraanued :..',: BM '•• nl the Province of hai katchewan In Ihe Dominion ol Canada. the Clly ol Saakaloon. Province of SaCanada, ha* applied lor the ir.i.iration -l a ireele mark in P" 'A" QI >i"Ct>'er in reipect of Hour, feed and cereal', and will be entitled lo reaxler th.mr alt-, „. e maeith Iron Ihe Pill dav nf May. ItSL unle.n aome petaaei lha meantime the notice In duplicate to me al my nfllee of oppoet', 'eai.tration Tha trade mark ran be wen on application at mv offlaa The applicant declaim, all %  nf (he word. Milled f.i.m Selected Held Spnni Wheat a* well a. Ihe name oi thapplicant a* pan of the trade mark to be tea ft Dated thl. JWh dav of Afrtl IMI II WILLIAMS %  Ret. trar of Tradr Mark. 1111 *Tl.al BRtvOKR. BOND A CO IJMfTED. Tea a<-d Coffee Dealer., a Brill Cmpani. whoae trade .i Calculu If.iuar Oouleloii airert. Astute. London, E. I' .land ha> i ol May. Itll. unlaaa nim eraoti .hall in Ihe rieanllma eive nolin n duplicate lo tna at my office al pope HkM of •uch raai^ral.on The iradi riarh ean be *ren on applicatimi at m] nice ed ihi. 73ih dav ii fii&TSrmi TAKE NOTICE i THE MAGGI CO. Manufacture ipany incorporated arcordma In I of SwiUertand. whoae uade •a. addre.. I. Kemptlal. furln ftland. ha* applied far Ihe Reamer in reipect of tubatai A" of -i a> I food, r* pec tally >|X. boulllona. and aearontnfl*. and will enlitled to rmiMer lha tame after one mlh from Hie Bin day of May, IBSI. leu aome peraon ahall In UM miail ve live notice in duplicate to ma at office of opposition ol MKh reamtaTh. a"d up, air iv,. that pwyrnpat BUTTABI I BUtU -i YeMnor naidtvc. f* C. Are* )R all -aj fi land, j-^ | atr j T JOt Da. and *e N.iri 1 1 1I I n DWE14 INOHOL'SaT .., i l and "epT-ta^ in* 3 rood*, t p %  .. propert. hown aa The Ah hureh I %  ktonevall doeMinattouar raenaaMini •ivinf room, bedrc ....... . ,. V. I ...e K. i Th* above properiv win be art up l-r %  ale by Public CompeUt-r al our 0 ith immediate po.er-alon f,v, ^le-f, I..n| tan Afte. waaklni Hewn tea* WA.VIMI VaadUpi keek 71 < %  ••• Ilht-P SHIPPING NOTICES Canadian National Steamships YOUN.. v '. i' M Ua aa Mav %  %  I -• 31 iunt l.l, IS 1 I Auff. M A -a II.'.'. NT .%  tda ,,.. .,. Conwniaaian Depanmrn. ._ not later than l.t jufv — Salary a.* •m par a I. aependi on ,„.. •M Appi> ... pe,w.„ „(. a Arrleaa • %  J Bacbada* Barhadoa 1 APY BVUOrl IlM I J I IADY H"!> I IADY NIISON LADY RODNF.Y .. M Auf. %  .IUBJ lie without not.c Arrlvaa ArrKe* H.HfaB Maaireal IB J.uia Jna It July 1 I t Auff II Aut 8 Sept. II Sapl MISCELLANEOCS GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD. AenU. ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. LOST A HUM! e ia.a> a-door ahnp A Bad and ditrtleil R-..' I after pin haav V Appl* i The Property known ft Th. Abort : dwelltnt houee with 1 am IS perehae af I—d and b*i ..,. bj Mi liamv H D Ki', Tl^ iha\i a* aat up lor Sate t p Ml • %  \| IMI --.... BRPI Mr II H QMMM I .-„ %  •, .nd Deiahion Har, SkOtr ica. St,. r claim Mid LaauMaton. f% ineli Mild debt. and place a* 1 i notice or in default w'hereof be earluded from Ihe he>'< BOJ inch dlatrlbutlon made belor.> Jebti are proved. Paled this lh dav .f Mav. 1| HENRY RAYMOND I rACW DEIGHTON HARCOURT i.l-M f. WAI Al'C'flON -.1 rue I wll Ba the lm Roebuck Strrei „ Co ,.n Friday mi. al I Audin t Saloon Cai ar-iideht Ten.,, i \stl McKenrle ne. A Tudn I p in dai-i .ed 11 R Arc-he ii -t.m .,.d th. Patkl %  %  ^ ogoalaii Paper Attacks I .r Gasprri BKU.HADF H Ttm ^ ^ ^l||(tlB^ Ootntnuniai BBWIBBpti flarbi -mt to 'Li' thai Yunalavi.! will :-"t pi | tht'r Huh o( her UttOfl igoalai lo jii undt'i f.i.rikii don IHrha v.... ,,!i ukuu; i M %  rtbBd tha rronl i "II ia clear" the paper Bdaaed "that the campaign aKiilnal YiiK" si,via which is IH-IIIK Italy, can IIMU itenrllt M plan to hinder collaboratinn ba %  ii-i BitHWI —ReMler FRENCH LINE ('! % %  Gle Transatlanllque HAIIJNG TO I M.I.WII A | | \M | bAKaOONB, May 11. 1UI via |l luil. Haftliilqur. fiuadrloupe and Viili.ui OARBaVJ IM Mll'ISi: ( IILDMRIi: May IMh. I9S1. Trinidad La Guaira. 0a> %  aeaa. OrUfana and Jamaica ::: \.. liilitif raaaeuffen i in.* and Mall Ii. M. JONESICl, Lid. AGENTS rhone : %  : :isii LIQI'OR LICENSE NOTICE • r.lrillon of Arc-h|bald GjolTta I Blunt.. St Thoma* fo. .... ... I Spirit. Mall Liqi. iilualad i I ,-.i BlunU. Bt. Thoenai —" inw ein aav of Mav IMI > J R EDWARDS leg (Vlica UatiaUate DM 'D'. A GOODMAN Appln II N B —Thl. application win be .. ed al a Llrenainf Cmirt to ke hi1 Police Court. Dtdrict %  D' on M ( I the Mrd day af May lt*l tl Strain On Europe RATES OF EXCHANGE at my nnVe ited thu ISth day of April. itM II. WILLIAMS Ret'.lrar ol Trade Mark* • ril-aP| |h TAKE NOTICE + CROSS-STAa That THE MAGGI CO l. .... ., • hi "A" af S8 retlarul. hai applied %  n ol a trade inaik in Reamer in reipect of nubal food or a* inaredienU In lo Boupi. bouillon*, and araaon be entitled to m In lha tame after ""• n.onlh from Ihe Slh dav of Mi Bant aiv. notice In duplicate t. mi office of op pot It Ion pf lueh Tha trade mark can ba WASHINGTON. May 9 The United Statea SUt* Dtp.tr! ent warned to-day thai effort* lo rebuild Went Earope'a defctm^ were threalening to atrain It* ndurtry "beyond tlvr breaking point.' It taainounr eel new mulUBl sesurity pro .rnmrne would thortly be preaa-nt ed to Congress, laying down thr." types of United States anistanrc This would provide: i Weapons primarily of Amc ; lean manufacture for uae of Kurnpe.iTi armed forcea. 2. Assistance m milrtartraining services and in anna pro ouctlon. I, Raw materials, equipnu-r aiul oilier goods—mm ff'iri' .nd—to help in thi...iivi •Ion of Furr-Lirar, praductafM I., defetict". i The l).'(>.in,fi,.|,i | | ihaf. ,f s Western Europe's reni Mo'thr fforl! ,lrB,ntd Wrstert, Europal'l ade MfPdllrtry beyond breakiiik; point %  p"ai. Zurich. Europe would l>c lefi "defnneli" %  I oefoTP Soviet auression —Renter JMh day of April. IMI H WILLIAMS. Re S |.t.ar of Trade Mark* t a ai—an LOYAL BROTHERS THE STAR Neediest Cases Fund Ji OF .lion-, Enlisting In U.S. Army Relative to Carnival and Fair to be held on 7th and iu June at Queen's Park, the undersigned will receive entries for the lull..v. HK (al Coalume Banda IB) Steel Banda. (el Advertising Rands
furtiii8i.il> The usual portt nf call arc Dublin. London, oi Rotterdam. Single fare 1*70: usual -'^^^i^T^i^cv;;^;^-^^^-^^^^;^-^^^"^^"^^?* FYFFES LINE THBTJ9ILOOLPITO will be .MMVIH,; frorn Souih%  II Saturday, 121 It May. at 8 a.m. and will be sailing al 5 p.m Ihe same afternoon for Trinidad. Thl ra Uj ample 111 CUta Accommodation lVBUa*bli for Trinidad, alaa ana barth (at ;i lad| amllaUa on 24ih May f.n Soulhaaipton Appl] WILKINSON Ik U\m CO., LTD. IlldlllX VACUUM I'LEAMKS IHI I i:\TH\l %  vil'omi >l •.W,',',-,'/,'/,'// ( -,','///////,V,',V#V'/,V/.V.V/,'. 4III I I:\T\I SOCVENIRS. Cl'RIOS. JEWELS New Shipment opened THAWS -* TO-DAYS NEWS FLASH That NEW Wtvrs\ ITN %  I"KN"V. •Ta.TIOIFRl' 1^ %MI LIT PAIKTS for %  Pet Furniture II at lonsanv BASDWAr.r Htaan. nUli rOHIIE .mil LED n. LAVUSCE "id Drivewa .|.pl.e 1 lth iroi.r 1 wtih woikp asaaip Swpei Bollom. Si •it Georfr Ve'^eV-rfe'. Fon SAI I Crane House This well known coaslal property with approx. \2i acros including a long stretch of beach frontage is open to offers. .laafc>|. HlAdoa. A F H. F V A. •Phaae '-64S PLANTATIONH Bl'ILDlNC. ELITE SHIRTS $3.78 3.57 OTHER STRIPED O flC SHIRTS JUJ SPORT, SHIRTSRANGE OF DESIGNS A NEW MEN'S HALF HOSE — 3 PAIRS FOR JJ.OO UP VEST & TOWEL SHIRTS AT LOW PRICES THE BARGAIN 30, Swan Sir.. 1 HOUSE — S. ALTMAN. Proprirlor PHONK 2702 -,•.-,--*.-,-.-,-.-.-,•.-,•-'.-.'.-.-,Win. FOCiARTY lid. a Merchandise News i\s' Arl Silk Panties From 51.10 to SI 37 per pair I Ladies' Arl Silk Briefs From 62c. to SI.30 ner pair Uilies Arl Silk Vests r..-.in SI.05 lo 31.51 oach Ladies' An Silk Slips 11..in SI.eO lo S2 58 .ach ||| Ladies' Satin Slips From S5.55 lo SS.66 .ach ladies' (repe lie (lieiie Slips From SS.I6 lo SJ 29 .rich Ladies' Arl Silk Vighldresses From S3.30 lo S4 20 -ach Ladies' Creff Df (hene Nightdresses From J7.50 lo 112.00 .ach Ladies' Satin Nffbtaraues I From $8.19 lo S13.00 each .*-*,*-*.-,*,-,'.',',*.--'-',*,*.*.*.---.'-*--.-.-. 1 v--,'-',', *,'\ \



PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 1895 FRIDAY, MAY U. 1951 PRICE FIVE CENT3 %l \ I'lltl 41 M.Srtaia will support U.S. on .TM.m i r.— %  %  % %  < %  ruw „ aterill |, mbargo >l AII.SII AI I.: United States mutt stand t-m jinst recognition of Red China horn % Con.munist forces withdraw from South Koreun capital mm % M m %  iidfll Arias ousleei | J_l"b-L*_.*-* New Chief takes over U.K. STOPS RUBBER SUPPLIES TO CHINA Churchill demands ban on exports from the colonies Russia Has New Plan For Agenda 'You Ought To Be "U.S. WOULD NEVER Ashamed"—ShinweUl ADMIT RED CHINA" LONDON, May 10 I WINSTON CHURCHILL demanded in thej British House of Commons today that Britain should stop all exports of rubber to Communist China. Speaking in the debate on shipments to China, Churchill said Labour members gave the impres sion from their speeches and behaviour, that their sympathies were on the whole more with "Red, China" than with the United States. "We ought not to have any sympathies with %  Bed China." Churchill said exports of rubber from Malaya in the Ural qu of this ytar—46.000 tons—were at the rate of 184.000 tuns per year, or 24 time* the annual rate for 1950. It I .i very remarkable, subrtantlal and significant ad ihis moment when matters are becoming most and more tense. tenous and critical," Churchill %  Id It meant China had had In I Of llrst three months of 1W51. half us much igam as would ba the full civilian Chlneea ration of lubber as calculated by Governii,.in fur the whole year. "W> ought not '" be exporting any rubber to China at all,* Churchill thundered ami ill ^i-1 the abrupt and decisive exporis might well ba the prelude I" wholehearted agreement with the i i lied Stan Churchill clashed arid i whom be eriU%  avlng Perhaps things will go better in Korea now thai Qanaral MncArthur has been re.. Slunwell immediately denied mal i stateosaiit. Amid angry -limits ChUtl UU aid h< p would produce -> news liaper report of Shmwcll's speech. Shlnwell shouted above the general uproar. "'You ought to be of yourself." 3 ul .i,d. retorUKl to* Fcaafh %  ylng that it is only thtiuth that wound" Surlier In his speech. Churchill %  'i i!H!i he had favoured de farU recognition of Communist China provided It could be brought about a* a joint policy With tht United Slates and the Commonwealth Hut the l-abour Governmoni had gtvea tall de hire reoei China as an isolated act. It m tllnitical to have diploCbrtlOnS With a Government (ormall) cenaured by the United Nations. A period of the KUtS danger might well %  -• before we are strong r r.oogh SIPPitRT IOH EMBARGO In the Government's reply. Sir Hartlvv Shuwcross said Britain would' KIVO full support to the 1,'niled States proposal for an embargo on Strategic raw material? to China. WINSTON ( 111 K( HILL Jet Kills 10 Japs And The Pilot TOKYO May 10. The F.ir East Air Force to-day announced the death ol lh< pUot o( the Shooting SbU |Ot whieh crashed and kfuad i" destroyed two houses and damaged six. The plane was on a training flight w>th another Shooting Star near Fukuoka The tvs. locked wmgs III % %  practice dive. One aircraft went out "f control and crashed into a house. The other returned to the bas* with Its pilot unlnjmcd. —Reuter To United Nations Organisation WASHINGTON. Maj 10 GENERAL MARSHALL to-day mumnil fourth, appaafanct bafort tinJoint Senate Committaa Inquiring Into American Fur East policy. Questioned about tha diamtasal of Ganaral MarA/thur, he repl'ed thai President Truman v r\ carefull) C01 Us effect on the Japanese people before announcing his decision, i Marshall described his mission to China In IMS as an attempt to lolliicrhll FtI\Ja*^# nn aoout an armistice in the .'VI lit 9lll*l %  i %  the Communist, %  Mi trio Nationalists. The ut. General SUIwell, the* American theatre Commander in China felt that the Nationalist i if "too much Involved in fighting the Cocnmuntsai rathei nan getting together m tin opera pdnsl the Japanese Marshall said the United States should never yield to admit Communist China to the United Nations. He made the statement during i mil by Republican Senator, Alexander Smith, who %  aid the United States "must -"land i ognlQon of Communlat China or clue we will be giving up ev.rything that tho Korean struggle had been had for" The "Green UKM" The Senator also said that he had been told that the United States nave Britain the itreOii light" t" recognise Chine*.Communists. Marshall repeated that he con Sklered ihe Administration's programme was a practical wav |i victory In Koren with the legal i.l l.fc and Ihe least possibility of mli motion by Russia Senator Wavne Morse 'H.imh%  i. i, Orego %  %  ., blockade Ol the Russian held Port Arthur as it was proposed by MacArlhur. would not "cragM %  uch a state of international ten %  ion as to tuva an offer! on nV earlier eotranea of Russia Int.. lit.'ar -Thai .s correct, sir. f think it would introduce that likelihood.' General Marshall replied Th.Defence Secretary said tfere el ooi iddered when the prop os ed blockade of Port Arthur was turner down. Router Due To Resign WASHINGTON, fclu 10. Prcsid.ni Truman sal wet sly Preas Confer* no that there was no foundation for rumours that bit aV rotar) 'i Stat. Dean Acheson. was about :o resign The President dismissed rumours which had been clreulat'.%  ban i hlafl] Achaean, He slao dlamlssed rumours that William I'IHM,,. prseant Ambassador U. Mexico and tormei U Of New York would shortly resign, QTJw yet had bean artta i laxity in prosecuting i crime durir.R his New Tor* poUU. %  —Reuter New Slant On Race Bias JOHANNESBURG, May 10. A counts-wide South African Population Census gives u new definition to white and coloured persons, s vital distinction under segregation laws of the government. The definition makes the appearance and associations of a i>erson, rather than his parentage us before, the main consideration in determining to which racial group he belongs. A white person IN donned on the form as one who "looks obviously, or is generally accepted" as such. If he is generally accepted as coloured though white In appearance, he is considered coloured. Asians. Cope Malays and DOtourad naraona mi m the same form. But Africans have a separate form. — request Governments eonoarnad In Malayand Borneo, lo UsM steps to an< iurc that there shall be no furllier exports of rubber lo China from Malaya or other territories volveo Ho. year saM, some critic* I I trade policy with Cornnumis'. din nut remember that not sell supporting. They lorgot thai i" Europe • .( %  .;,, %  lit-f. r.ii 1..1II. For over two rears Britain had ntrolling and I" many eases bannirg axporl might bo cf -tiategic value ti ir.trios. ci sin bad recosjnl L at s ali warned of the serious afbet thai ihe long term Cuba* agreement may have upon Commcnwealth producers n<\i\ vary recently assurances weie sought that Commonwealth InterestJ would not be prejudiced. It is understood that iinmedi.itelv following the unnounnnient .1 the pact with Cube, there will be a further meeting or Commonwealth interests here lo discuss what, if any. action should ov, :i.ken. _^_^_ CRASH LANDING SAN FRANCISCO, May 10 Coastguard reported that un Air Force B26 bomber flying to Hawaii rash-landed m flames 420 miles the California coast to-day met were reported aboard. —Renter All. AIMM I III'M CLIFI'ORl. HUSRANDS. Bsrbado Law fttudeiit the quality of Burbudon Rum nt
iroposal lor tho agenda for For Igri Mnn-i.-is mc.Ting, a Soviet anno.uicetl tonight \., Ruastan ajuhaaai News 'o-'fi'ience. the spokesman said ho counter p roposa l was to "con,.lit in Ihe ageOda proaoaad ba waat an i delegates or. \l.i> J hut with Iwo inmlitleations i Tha subject of the "daanUti hould be % % %  .inreed subject loa In tha western Spill .igOllila it figures l.i*t in the Uiiiin subjects and first u the Kn\ n't column. I The Atlantic ('act and An iLI an i>ases abroad should be rdded to the list of subjects foe not figure m lorn Usl Wes.em depulMa agre-d to his suvgestions Ooi srnsnant wan willing to aecepl ttw real ol the -ft ..f thi' aplll Agenda Gl imvko's Kpukesnuin said Rtuana wag uling I i ae opt rot the following subjects. 1. The completion of the Autrlan Treaty. 2. Problems relating Jo Ihe ie establishment of (lenaran unitv mil preparation of the peaio Treat) 3 ThO Fulfilment f IV %  th Italy, Rumania. Od Hungary and of i lb "l the four [Kiweri ui> anil Austria 4. The fulfilment of Hi.' I". Treaty with Italy in ihe part ir II.'..ml tne order of tin %  mlmil-. rmild IK* dlSCUased later. — Heater. The CommunJgl poaltlong, manned by an %  (wo reaimanta, had been R potential flank thraal to " %  s mth Kon-.'ir capital anil 11 nippoi Eighth Army headquarh -o-nikht 'littliD • % %  rlh wast i Baoul' United Hal om I i tfljongbu 12 miles north of BOOU] ii,ei three Comni IAiiii-s iinimiii iti d gains %  gainst ni" 1 .: Ml i | Waterfront \\ orkers Strike l.\ BOWNKA Thou snds <.i paople %  lug tin' (reel baai ,.,. s. \ tyo" an %  %  at log Aroasmsna while Anas is 'he Presl dantl 'i palaot It w said that ..ftkial. • f \\uNational i" lit a h "' become dB %  i itn the attltudi Keuter. Approves Promotion WASHINOTON The United Bi itas Banata lo day approved the promotiori c Ueutenani Qanaral Uattbev ii Com in Koren ti> ti... non i>.. ...... I .!•..,.„*.,.! i.'.'ICA. May 10 ., .. , i There has baan i shore < • %  11 A "'"' %  '' rib i i.om.ui.a (et Ihe la I .ran. n southeast of Mum n ncai IJTRr^ ... I mounted over M0 cmnba, night. ,,.„,, S Ill i ' ,h '*!* yeaterriay rlaiming th.lulling or behali tot ai Increass in then R ""'' wounding of 2?n Communl rat* and chargea rfaaoOatkau ; ""T* Beater ,,. ,.„,,„.,( Ilttl .,, „,„,. Wllh __^____ I UU] -hoie woiki mrrsrise Paiaatlsfsstlotl and V/orfcai %  IvONDON. ivlay 10. < l l,r >' HW* W nnlo...i | A ram Latulon dock itrlfce wos| tn ree ships and thrratened to-day laden with cargoTha 8 M. Herd*Represcntativos uf I 500 tally man arriving at Itoscau with some larks, key men of UkS docgl told j 300 tons of cargo had to leave port To Study Air Developments WIESBADEN. May 10. Air experts from nine allied air i lo go tn Korea to study ii:te*i developments In lax tli si air power, United states nir forre headijimrtcis here announced todaj Two air observers will he %  iiell 04 USB following llelgium. Denmark. Sao Italy. Netherlands Norway. Portugal and I I,, v .II %  1 ii % in Korea i <>iilh neater. THE ADVOCATE" pays for NF.WS DIAL 3113 Day or Ni|ht ^ondonTulKCItrks Threaten Walk Out. POCKET CARTOON by OSB1 r LANCASTBR the I.about Mitnstty that would walk out next Tuesday unless ihe decision to nr m R ititionai clerks was caneaUed They claimed their action Would loree 181.000 dockers to •'. There was not even enough work for present tally clerks. tlic-<. aaid Tally clerks measure and chec cargoes and record freight charges At Tori liiikinlir.nl in notthwest England to-day over 1.5W* dockers were locked out for l>einK dee minutes late. Thil interfere! with I ing of 10 ships. • are srekii'i men! Intervention, —Reuter }frs. Ch ureh ill 1.0NDON. Mly 10. W nton Churrhill. w|f< 4 bntaii wan a I i n Laadi London hospital issstl .. nun.,iBparsrtlon. i* no Known how long she will le Ii BOSpltal Mil -all her eng.i have bean cancelled fa being. Reuter. V. loaded Appeals of all klfJg were made to the strikers bul thej nsisted on their demands. The %  nn enl ol Doming s took inAani arm flnn action and ca us ed Including Sour, petrol %  aacorl wrthoui interferenci b) itrlkan Tha roUowing night. Mon daj dynamite itlcki ware hurled at ihr Electric powei station an I Central relaphone Bxehango with %  whul. town. i lilted The Government took on numbes o itrols to guard Roseau'; SSriMS which w..' i . ... iiril out Tn-d.'O 'i M s laape arrived early •" the %  %  greamenl I 28 pei cent. The orrl Salae and Covernment |l .eveil the anxletv %  A BRIDGETOWN PLAYERS The SIIOI 1 AT STV ((HtMIt A Play in three acts By Edward Percy WSSIOJS \BIK8 BXP&dJSD] • .IICAN CITY M .< in %  .in i .11.-.I fi. i :i • .. „i de) — Rruter %  Ifcrllngalshai IHIMHH. Ihr v*rnor ami l.adi ol III. %  avaga London Welcomes Royal Visitorsj lay to. A fortnight-old tire again to-doy In the no* %  30 miles northaa 10. I i' iha; t>e %  o cut twee,, £00 and i ooo Ion nd I.OOO.UMi fas|are setUing down and dome I hor**-drawn carriage from Ducksuccessive day t-hich permitted its ''ramping exerci-eAmong regU mgham Palace through the cdy pageantry since the King aith Commu'ii ,.. and i„r araay men here are geverai for the official reception by the tjucen arrlead. ban into the Approsmuts fnsenpta under the King Fredenk Up lo the present '., %  had the slIgM' Hen *dh the local situation %  re settling: down LONDON May 10. British and Danish flags flying Thousands of cheering Londonfrom aim., tr Oflka ers lined sunlit city streets todav workers leaned out to rheei them to vvekome King Fredenk and on their way. Queen Ingrid of Denmark to Ihi ...rdsmen capital's commercial centre Britain's track regiments Escort* l troopers of the lined the route and the | British Household Cavalry, the swords and breastplates of the i.iitors drove in an open outriders gave London its third whom he installed as Knight Comma n do s ol the Oi Re thanked him fal %  iiom I London It btch It passed b> ,.,!f— Reater. "It la very much due to you art nation, to you ni fit' that Btry today can enjoy I dependence and her existence aSS of AT THE EMPIRE THEATRE WY.U. Hi Hi. Till US I7th. & Kill IXth MAV MATINKr!: KK1DAY IKth lllUMIslltA | Ht\IS SI Mi t IH( II >l !0 KNH M.12 M ITINBE PElCBSi (inleslrii mid Circle Si.(HI — House and ll.tlcoin 21c. rsoUss| "nice Opens TO-II W.I KIIIAV. lit H.:t0 n.m. covered the re.Scheme whose iraimnr A* they pasaed slowly through Address of Wei -ord | world," King Frede film of bl Reuter. continues London** busieat streets, they saw Mayor Alaartnaa I*enys Low son


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EDTRDC88E_M9FFCI INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T16:25:21Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02579
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

rKIIIAl StV\ i> HXItRAUOS AIJSiH All .'i KI r. Appointments Of W.I. To Secretariat Posts Approved By Caribbean Commission THE CARIBBEAN COMMISSI decided to hold its Thirteenth Meeting in Si CIOIX from October 20 to November i this year. This is the first time that the meeting will be held in that island. The Commission did a great deal of work during the OH tnd went on until l;.i> in the night The Coanrni L deall srith II recommendations which Ihr WM lndi.m luhtniii.r < %  • fcion ) In I it in l'.,; her had submitted to it for it* action. Of ihe recommendations considered yesterday, the Omrms•ion agreed that the implementation of the praiseworthy pnllc> of appointing West Indian* to posts In the Be tr e ta rii tinned. Other recommendations accepted were that all larrtttsrlal OovernmenU be rcyi.t improve and expand U lation of Commission pubttca tions and information In their respective territories; that tlw Secretary General be m struct en when submitting future reports to the Conference, to report separately and specifically on the action taken by Mi-mbor Governments on the profggtS recommended by the O The Commission agreed to reiw iu enquiries of Temtorinl Governments in regaid to their need of caplt.il fir development projects of a private and public nature; us well as to an stee. to determine the availability t>t investment capital both v. ithin and without the C.iribbean ;.rei>. and to seek the assistance of techlilr.-il CXpertl of the tTnitod Nations and 11 Agencieg. • Indtislrial Prnject The Commission am ed the Preparatory Meeting for Ihe Induitiial Develop! ference to take these recommendations Into consideration in Sreparlng the agenda for the industrial Devclopmen; once and for the West Indian Conference (Fifth BaanOB), and raquest it to give particular at tentlon to studies of Inducements offered by governments In the area to encourage the fojiailMni of local and nut-drip capital in new industrial projf %  In regard 10 reeonuw made by the West Indian Con. ference concerning tariffs in which tbCJ have gl kad fl I I Tariff CMuvrenca lo etraadne the steplit> %  !' and promote inter temtmiiil trade, the Commission Irartructed Ihe Secretary-General tn ergBMHtJ a comprehensive stud> <>f the matter for submission lo th* Commission at its Fourteenth Meeting In order that it may then decide whether • tariff conference should iw convanad The htudie* should IN< elimination of the effect on th>trade of the -irea of ihp Qanaral Agreement on TraHp n Tariff and other international nMOBUTi the liberalisation of trade. Labour Mivrition Amonc other reeornrnondationj agreed to by the CO were the removal <>t restrictlom (Ml ihe migration of labour to the Americas and elsewhere, particularly those imposed on .the ground of race an. colour; the enact, meni of B^pgtaOn la |>mvido that. In caw of junsdletinnnl di*entaa between trade unions, polls should be conducted by Movernment among the workers concerned, the expansion of existing .scholarship programme's for the Caiibbean area with • view to making additional KhotaraftlM <-li ip..li*an unlver Firth Markets Everywhere l*st month 56.863 pounds of fsh were sold in the Public Market. In April last year the % % %  113.(134 and Of that .nds were flying fish. B an not heerever brought bUo Ihe erkal In order lo get black market price* some fish x-endor prefer rig road* and on beacho. "The amount of nsh sold along Bay Street nearly doubles lb* amount carried to ihe market." .,n cAVial tol<( ihe Advocate yesterday. He said that every day he tould see boats, loaded with risn. heading for the beaches. • In Trinidad a Policeman, Market Constable or Food Inspecffte brings a chare-for Ing ugainst a person, gets i ne tliird of the line imposed by istrata This encourages thrift and more peoplp are brought hefoie the Courts." he said. He said that If this system were adopted in Bsrbadoi and heavy line* imposed the black marketing would cease. At the corner <>f Westbury Koinl and Kontabcllc many fish lid be seen in the road %  • %  bine 11. At Brown'* Beach and Burkes Beach, both in Bay Street. nharkV heads, scales. Intestines and bones *>t Ash can be seen scattered r round. These places also have %  bad smell. The Temple Yard area, opposite St. Mary's Chur.cn wall, has now become a regular lish market. On many occasions when ihere is a rush for fish in the market, you ran purchase some ll Temple Yard fur a few %  ithe schedule price. Untidy Beach Fish is also sold on theReel Bcarh Apart from ihe bad smell of the area, the beach is regularly littered with old tln s and at one Had goal was on the bOMb These nuidltlntis would be bettered if Ihe Police, Market Constables, would make a special effort to run the fish vendors off the road. "The Police seem to cooperate with the fishermen instead rf the Market Constables and Food Inspectors", a housewife told the Advocate yesterday. She said that she has, on many txiught fish on the wharf while the Police looked on. 'Wher< Ihe fisherman was about to shift to another site he looked at the "n1ireu>;tn and said: Want a 'lsh, '.nd — During lost month the quantities hrought tu the market were: 12,430 pound! oi flying fish, 29.72H pounds of dolphin. 846 of king fish, 1.424 of bill Psh. 8,745 of shark. 1.998 pounds of albaeor.-, 487 of bonlto and MM pound of seme nan. Already tins month large quan> albacpra are be ng hi ought in. A few dolphin art tfnfj caught slties and local institutions of university status for students in the area; and the establishment of a routine repnrtlnc service for all ones in respect of important and contagious plant pests and diseases Handicrafts Development Discussed Mr Fred Lemhlon. V* dent of the Nation-1 Council ol American Importer, an d %  Mem %  ag of the Advisor> Committee a. Imports u> the IS Department of Commerce, on the invitation of the Chairman, briefly rddrcaecd UM> of the Committees .iibbean Commission on the post ib Hi lies of the develop ment of handicraft icottage) industries in the Caribbean, based on his observations made during a lour of the Brit,-:i lerrttortas of the area arranged under the auspices of ine Development nnj We1l,n the tropics, yet he Belter 1 itiienship bed a plantation In St Crota, Ha also believes lhat a plan ftWl f i uniut r ^ vtv j, Virgin Islands, and is greatly which spreads over a period ol j, la undoubted)] J M>. aiul %  own.ng land, lad donates! B-MKlor suet. H to tr>completed properly as a lesui". ii the labour put nio II by the 11.said that l-irly haopv %  <' naag lhr eane. ulus low interest, will result In m-.-r,,,], ] nw ,„ eo-t ni - i,Mr Canaday told the Advocate pnde of ownership, to a greater JJi s,mn|e lent th, .y that ho had visited legn-e than rental and will ls, !" gij^rtSS several of th P housing developresult ... better cUuenahlp ami ^'L,,,.' 1 .'.' menta In Barbados and thought m*m seeurtsy For amujaa, ,, ^t J .^73 I..H •hat bV .luract.vc. fcr said that a house ... which "' "f. ,.;, ,l omHa believed lhat .t w.ll b-the material and land cost ""' J!!**l\t m,a V ,-1--, tan. which umta. amcunt to say .1.000 if built TS&wSEuTXSJi local materials, and encourag. MUI sell help, can brvome a Mashsrtaaa t. araatllv reduea a lf h*lp ,n coo.lrucl.o.i unw Druport. worth .2,000lor mor.„, ,,„ rt ','„*., „', euert smwrvision and guidance, if Ihe payment of g 1.000 can be mttit „. lo tne relative CO A-III 111 the long run. prove mort divided into annual instal Mkrd cUv „„. „, •fjaefive W improving the living menu, and if th Interest rate .,,„,.„ ,,„„. .„,, .,,„,,.. farms asidJUona of the lamest number .say e gfl Qtiarr>iiii: Kquiiutieul proxlmataly 73 a year for both u U p,;,^).that equ principal and interest Added to permitting ihe Quarrying -' ihii. the coat of Insurance and miliv fct one at lower dcprrciation would bring the i( . d ln ^,.. retal payable price by the new w of ^ tf ui rn „ fll i material owner within glOO a year or Mr anaday said %  ** ck ._ ._ *Urt whuh ix bring | The advantage of the plan Is lhaf vn|| us parU o( hr .„,„,, ,„ tfci ..".ment man tiecomes threCOUgtng the social ben.-hti owner, he and his whole family „, u Ul ,,.,,,.,, .,.,., A ,„ will nave interest in developing null ln V)l> ( ...„,| mpl w dowers and a garden and main (i „ 14% m y rcw vrmn „, talmng and Improving the an„ h llt in ,„,.,,„ „„,, pearancp and value of the pror e.tv That, he said. ds n raiOpi ownership and respatenahlp and also brine. In to impiovmK the value of the f Ihe whol' L00KY0UR of pcsiple. Vi ill Bdos J.iin Tourism Effort? Mr l*i.U S. Law, Exccutivu Secretary of Ihe Caiibbean Interim Tourism Conunltta. with headquarters at Kent House. Trinidad. i> now in 11m bados to present himselff U .^r C H Adams and the lion V. A Bust*mante. the ncwlv %  lotted British Commissioners of the Caribbean Commission Mr Law arrived from Trinidad ly B.W1.A. on Wednesday and is staying at the Mai miHtftal He told the Advocate yesterday pnawf t % "B llx>u 11M brcH.ll ih.i bulldi! S.vi 'am mnd Swap 'am ... 40 Cards in ih Sariai. CORNFLAKES Isssrl HAIR TONIC I. !" l--. %  < sWM tnat the Caribbean Interim Tour iv.ii CornrnJltSM was the implementation of a recommendation made years ago b> the Caribbean Com mission and thr West Indian Conference. It held its tirst. meeting .11 Trinidad In August 1MB and actually started functioning In 10511 The member territories aro Haiti, ihe llomlnican Republic. Puerto Rico, the U.S Virgin tl % %  I-ecwaro and Windward Islands, Martinique, (luade loupe. Trinidad and Tobago, as well as all the islands of Ihe Netherlands West Indies. He taid that Barbados had nor so lar, seen ill to join in the icgional effort, but because It area ult.ilv impossible for any bWrU U>1 territory to change the trend of travel in such a large market an the United Stales, he hoped that Barbados would eventually do its share in a regional effort which WHS the only way that this objec* could be achieved. Advertising This year, the Caribbean interim CosiUnlUaa started a modest advertising programme which was already producing extraordinary results. Mr. 1... A said that advicefron New Yo.k showed that the number of enquiries so far received in answer to the suggestion of spending summer vacations In the Caribbean exceeded ihe Commit tee's cjipwetalions. The ni.ject of ihe Committee he •aid, was not to do the work of individual i.lanris. bul rather t" j upplenu-nt It by nmmotinR nion traffic \,. the .".':i ({eiieiallv Iron, which the individual islands would reap u h extra benellls. a their own efforis would merit. %  nd train workers tn produce the lines solccled in the quantities required. TinBritish territories' would do srefl bs emulate the example Ol Puerto RlCO >> encouraaliia ,! %  men and interpre neurs to establish themselves ." •he island. Th.-se have :ilrend.v iportant contributions by developing the loom weavlnR of vecet.iMe fibres, other than cot ton. and ihe use of the sere* pTne iTandanus sp > tor 1. varletj of goods hlch other* IMwould b large degree In renta fumll; lost to prepgttj Lower COM many instances. .1 BE A I Y A XV PROTECTION ALL OVER THE WORLD that the actual material coat ami itid and cost of such property, H onsiderably less than $1,000. In Puerto Ric.1. the mlnlmun ubsistence housuui prograuune He was particularly impressed mi'the riaton and ensargelse with which tli 1. progj hemg landartakan b) Ron v. llulsnn and his aaeocsati the immediate Wpervition "I III Thomas Lashsf) Secretary of Ihe Housing Board and Mr. T E Went, ihe Coloni.d Knn.--i Another tiling which impresses found him he said, is the rleanllnef .. WITH liFRGERTEX With BeffeTtei and pndaetion for walls %  '! concrete, psaatat, bliffc Of dteaw. Wateinmof and weather resisting. Bergertex fgggi B drying ii baaVsMI an integral part of tli."..ii 01 I ,. ... )i,ih -t Jlv rnssJi and anart abnoai ia Pergertej IH available in many loan (<>r use inside or la NTS Slocked by ALL HARDWARE STORES GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD. — Ajent.. (iood moniings begin with (lillctlc Th Dutchman's a hard-headed sensihlc man And his ihaving is done lo a sensible plan; He knows thai Ihe Blue Gillette Blade is a treasure For making his shave even morning a phrasure. In Holland, as in every mher country, llie smart men knnw there is nalhinp lo equal Mine Gillelte Blades for a .1. 111. somlorcihlc shave. And because ihey last so lonj. no Made so economical Blue Gillette Blades ppureiit care ttte line iak,. ii ihau bornaa no nt itlar ii" ansall tb< 1 are TbV qu.ii.u ot pride Bi ^I-I bouae keeping" ., ,;.. %  community, he said. f /ye $Wi'tvhessM Tnann 1 Dry Veast dwMl in fVol milk or wmtet Like old tinic foil fl M belps ton* up vwui tystrm. aV! B< J 1. iitutaa. Tl.. sa Missit 1 .| Atyasu/p/y&r/w?d~63te3tt3w>meflf$ MHi sloclor . si*^ (in hulling?" 'miiul-. he.it of their own I apt free from tingerms that 1 io keep wmimU in the hggjth) 00 idil 1 1 uro;cona have fur yt.irs relied u| des•royer of ^ernis .. non-pi 1 | egg mi human tissue*. Wttili ll dial the vu-nul. %  Dgttol' IggvTgg tinIWirnj 11%  ooBtintig the natural prixi 1 I ii tir. D E TH€ MODfltN ANTISEPTIC lutpl l N0I istis 11 %  r LiMtiiD 1$ pure, J safemilk KI IM J^Mip.ri.iri^iiliivn*'sinillc.|'nHluced %  kdefl sukie. aanriarj condttioni v*. and the %  p.. tilpgefced mi prafarii Ki IM S. dial ro. get milk a\ lio. ..s ih. ggj i( U t. iln Big, BttJ KI IM milk thai ...111 tn always ggpand npog II irs. HhtihMiiiunivs .ind |>uri.v UiKLIM is punt, SAFE MILK fl] KLIMlieeps without refriqeroHoa [3 ( KLIMquality is always uniform [TJ KLIM is ese.llent for growing children |TJ KLIMadds nourishment to cooked diih.s [* 1 KLIM is recommended for infant feeding; [7) KLIM is saf. in the %peci.Hy-pocked tin [•] KLIM is produced under strictest control fS rnsa -^^L/^\ and you have pure. FUST IN PIISERtNCC THI WORLD OVIR




PHavbavros -

United States must stand ‘arm
-gainst recognition of Red China

“ESTABLISHED 1895. 1895



Britain will support U.S. on
raw materials embargo

MATERIALS:

AK,







MARSHALL:



FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1951







KOREA:

STOPS RUBBER SUPPLIES TO CHINA





Communist forces withdraw
from South Korean capita!

PRICE: FIVE CENTS



Prcsident Arias ousted:
New Chief takes over

PANAMA:



Churchill demands ban on exports from the colonies
‘You Ought To Be «Us,

Ashamed’’—-Shinwell

LONDON, May 10

INSTON CHURCHILL demanded in the)

British House of Commons today that Britain
should stop all exports of rubber to Communist
China.

Speaking in the debate on shipments to China, |
Churchill said Labour members gave the impres-
sion from their speeches and behaviour, that their|
sympathies were on the whole more with “Red
China’’ than with the United States.

“We ought not to have any sympathies with
Red China.’’

Churchill said exports of rubber
from Malaya in the first quarter
of this year—46,000 tons—were at
the rate of 184,000 tons per year,
or 2% times the annual rate for
1950.

It
stantial and significant advance at
this moment when matters are
hecoming more and more tense,
serious and eritical,’ Churchill
said. It meant China had had in
the first three months of 1951, half
much again as would be the

civilian Chinese ration of
as calculated by Govern-
the whole year.
not to be exporting
to China at all,”



is a very remarkable, sub-

as
full
rubber
ment for

“We ought
any rubber
Churchill thundered amid cheers.

Churchill said the abrupt and
decisive stop of such exports
might well be the prelude to
wholehearted agreement with the
United States,

Churchill clashed with
nister Shinwell whom he
tor saying: “Perhaps things
in Korea now that
has been re-
immediately



Defence
eriti-

N



|
cised
will go better
General MacArthur
moved.” Shinwell
denied making such a statement,
Amid angry shouts Churchill P
raid he would produce a news- eS ge
paper report of Shinwell’s speech. or /
Shinwell shouted above the en
general uproar, “You ought to be
mshamed of yourself,” | and
rehill retorted: “Lhe Frene!
nay saying that it is only the F f
truth that wounds,” ; 2
Earlier in his speech, Churchill 4 é
said that in 1949 he had favoured ‘
de facto recognition of Communist b 4 :
China provided it could be brought a
with the ae
the Common- ee
Govern- ee f
ment had given full de jure recog
i

as a joint policy
States
But

about
United
wealth,

and
the Labour



WINSTON CHURC HILL

as an isolated act.
to have diplo-
with a Govern-
censured by the
A period of the
well
strong

nition to China

It was illogical
matic relations
ment formally
United Nations.
acute danger
before we

Jet Kills 10 Japs
And The Pilet

might |

TOKYO, May 10.
The Far East Air Force to-day
\

are

most
erise just
enough,”

SUPPORT FOR EMBARGO

In the Government's reply, Sir
Hartley Shaweross said Britain
would give full support to the

United States proposal for an em-
materials

announcéd the death of
of
crashed
destroyed
aged six.

The plane was on a training
flight with another Shooting Star
near Fukuoka. The two aircraft
locked wings in a practice dive.
One aircraft went out of control
and crashed into a house. The
other returned to the base with its
pilot uninjured.

the pilot
jet which
Japanese,
and dam-

the Shooting Star
killed 10
houses

and
two

bargo on strategic raw

to China,

—Reuter

(From Our Own

GASCOIGNE BLAIZE,
Gairy at the outbreak of
agricultural workers, and ge
in-command of the Manual



SIR HARTLEY SHAWCROSS

“We have decided to request
Governments concerned in Malaya
and Borneo, to take steps to en-
sure that there shall be no further

“U.S. WOULD NEVER).
ADMIT RED CHINA”

To United Nations Organisation

GENERAL

MARSHALL

WASHINGTON,

to-day made

May 10.
his fourth

appearance before the Joint Senate Committee inquiring
into American Far East policy.

Questioned about the dismissal of General MacArthur,
he replied that President Truman very carefully considered
its effect on the Japanese people before announcing his

decision.

-1} Marshall described his mission

Acheson Is Not:
Due To Resign

WASHINGTON, May
President Truman said at his
weekly Press Conference today
that there was no foundation for
rumours that his Secretary of
State, Dean Acheson, was about
to resign. The President dismissed
rumours which had been circulat-
ing here chiefly amongst critics of
Acheson,

He also dismissed rumours that
William O'Dwyer, present Ambas-
sador to Mexico and former Mayor
of New York would shortly resign.
O'Dwyer had been criticised for
laxity in prosecuting organised
crime durin g his New York politi-

cal career.

10.

—Reuter.

New Slant On |
Race Bias

JOHANNESBURG, May 10.

A country-wide South African
Population Census gives a new
definition to white and coloured
persons, a vital distinction under
segregation laws of the govern-
ment,

The definition makes the ap-
pearance and associations of a
person, rather than his parentage
as before, the main consideration
in determining to which racial
group he belongs. A white person
is defined on the form as one who
“looks obviously, or is generally
accepted” as such, If he is gen-
erally accepted as coloured though
white in appearance, he is consid-
ered coloured,



NE denne

Asians, Cape Malays and col-
oured persons fill in the same
form, But Africans have a separ-

ate form,
—(C.P.)

Mother Love

VIENNA, May 10

Bella, a hippopotamus at the
Schoenbrunn Zoo, is being given
hormone treatments to induce
mother love. When Bella gave
birth to a baby last year she
promptly killed it. Now she is
about to produce another prepara-
tion has been made to take it
away when it is born, but special
hormone treatment is being given
to make her love her child.—CP),





Gairy Suspends
Chief Lieutenant

Correspondent)

GRENADA, May 10.
co-sufferer in detention with
the recent general strike of
nerally acknowledged second-
and Mental Workers Union,

was yesterday suspended for a two-week period for what
_is described i in an official Union notice as “A certain offence.”

exports of pues to Crane from : —————' For sometime past indications
Malaya or other territories in- have been growing of a rift be-
volved this year,” Sir Hartley SUDDEN STOP ltween Gairy and Blaize due te
said. : is the latter’s dissatisfaction with his
He said some critics of Britain's SYDNEY, May 10. chief after the conclusion of the
trade policy with Communist Work stopped suddenly on 60} wage agreement ending the strike.
countries did not remember that ships in Sydney harbour today
she was not self-supporting, They | when 5,500 dockers staged a masa]. It is alSo apparent that Blaize
forgot that granaries in Europe} walkout because the High Court}! gaining support from elements
are largely east of the Iron Cur-|had refused to release a gaoled|of the country districts, particu-
tain, official of their union, jJarly from St. Andrew’s parish
For over two years Britain had The official, Edward Roach, | where he is considered qualified





to contest a seat in the coming

been controlling and in many | Assistant Secretary of the Water-!

cases banning exports. which|side Workers’ Federation had| general election, although he is
might be of strategic value to|been sentenced to 12 months’?|not mentioned in Gairy’s casting
Communist countries, imprisonment on March 1, on two|cf probable M.M,W.U. - backed

Britain had recognised the|charges of contempt of court, candidates y
Peking Government as a plain] Five High Court Judges today | The recert sight of Blaize driv
acknowledgment Qne_ might! dismissed his application for a'!jng the ear of the Hon. BE. A.
speculate on whether the situatic n' writ of prohibition against his con- | Mitchell, member of the Legisla
would have been so serious if; viction and sentence, {tive Counci! and Vice-President
other countries had followed| Six thousand dockers struck |of the rival Grenada Worker
Pritain’s lead, he added. p weet he was sentenced, —Reuter. | Union, has also aroused the sus
of M.M.W.U.

Raymond Blackburn, Indepen
dent, alleged that the figure Gov-
ernment had given on rubber ex-}



Fire Flares Up

| picions

The decision io suspend Blaize|
| was taken at an M.M.W.U, execu-
tive meeting yesterday afternoon,























ports to China os not prelude
exports to Hong ong which in pd
Pisnetgy rd went to China. If these} KA JV IENNA, May 10.
were included the figure would A fortnight-old fire flared up}
he shout double. Sir Hartley said 988!n to-day in’ the newest Rus-
he cenied it entirely, —Reuter sian developed oilfield at Matzen
: tbout 30 northeast of
; Vienna, shocting a 50-yard pillar
WILL CUT AID ‘cf flame into the air
WASHINGTON, Mav 10. | Experts here nated that be
The Senate voted to-night to cut twee 600 and 000 tons of oil
off econemic aid to any nation and 1,000,000 cubic feet of gas
vh permitted its citizens are burning d
to trade with Communist areas Cl is cf ek oke un
It te th an into the Appro- smut fro burning oil
} n B which it passed C i the count le



- Reuter



ce ve te. —Reuter,



one of the stormy meetings of
irecent weeks.

; ‘Tomorrow afternoon Gairy holds
ja meeting in Market Square when







to China in 1945 as an attempt to
bring about an armistice in the
fighting between the Communists
and the Nationalists.

The late General Stilwell,
American: theatre
| China felt that the Nationalist
ee were “too much involved
in fighting the Communists rather
han getting together in the opera-
tions against the Japanese."

Marshall said the United States
should never yield to admit Com-
munist China to the United Na-
tions,

He made the statement during
the questioning by Republican
Senator, Alexander Smith, who
said the United States “must stand
firm against recognition of Com-
munist China or else we will be
giving up everything that the Ko-
rean struggle had been had for.”

The “Green Light”

The Senator also said that he

had been told that the United

ther
Commander’ in

States gave Britain the “gréén
light” to recognise Chinese Com-
munists.

Marshall repeated that he con-
sidered the Administration's pro-

gramme was a practical way tr
victory in Korea with the least

loss of life and the least possibility
of intervention by Russia

Senator Wayne Morsé (Repub-
lican, Oregon) asked Marshall if
a blockade of the Russian held
Port Arthur as it was proposed by
MacArthur, would not “create
such a state of international ten-
sion as to have an effect on thr
earlier entrance of Russia into the
war.”

“That is correct. sir. T think it
would introduce that likelihood,”
General Marshall replied.

The Defence Secretary said
Rritish chiections were also con-
sidered when the proposed block-
ade of Port Arthur was turnec
down.

—Reuter



Await Details Of | «iin

Angtlo-Cuban Pact

Own Correspondent!

LONDON, May 10.

The Commonwealth sugar inter
ests here are awaiting official
details of the Anglo-Cuban suga:
pact at present under discussion

(From Our

"Yhe decision is expected fairly
shortly.
The British Government he

been fully warned of the serious
effect that the long term Cuban
agreement may have upon Com-
menwealth producers and
recently assurances were sought
that Commonwealth interests
would not be prejudiced.

It is understood that immedi-
ately following the announcement j
of the pact with Cuba, there will |
be a further meeting of Common-

wealth interests here to discuss
what, if any, action should be
taken.



CRASH LANDING

SAN FRANCISCO, May 10.
Coastguard reported that an Air
Force B26 bomber flying to Hawaii
rash-landed in flames 420 miles |
off the California coast to-day.
Five men were reported aboard.
—Reuter,

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

Toe art



very |



J



}
|

|



CLIFFORD HUSBANDS, Barbados Law Student,

ALL

the quality of Barbados Rum at

Barbados Haraware Lva.

Panama Gets New Head: |
Pres. Arias Thrown. Out ©



and Mrs
the B.I

tells Mr

the West Indian Stall of



COMMUNIST TROOPS
FLEE FROM SEOUL

THE LAST Communis
withdrew out of the range

t

TOKYO, May 10.
troops anywhere near Seoul
of Allied attacks to-day after

three days’ pressure by South Korean forces

The Communist

South Korean capital

positions,

Eighth Army headquarters said‘
to-night “little or no enemy con
act reported in the area nortii |
west of Seoul.” |

Nations troops ne« 12 miles north of Seoul |
|

leaat three Communist companie



Way
A new London dock strike
threatened to-day,

Representativas of 1 500 tally |
clerks, key men of the docks, told |
the Labour Ministry that they

would walk out next Tuesday un-
less the decision to recruit 80 ad-
ditional clerks was cancelled.
They claimed their action would
force 180,000 dockers to stop work



There was not even enough
j work for present tally clerks, they
said.

Tally clerks measure and check
eargoes and record freight charges

At Port Birkenhead in north-
west England to-day over 1,500
dockers were locked out for being
five minutes late.

This interfered with
ing of 16 ships.

Dockers are seeking
ment intervention,

the load-
Goverr-

—Reuter

Churchill



Mrs.

LONDON, May 10
Mrs. Winston Churchill, wife
of Britain’s wartime Premier now
Opposition Leader ig to enter é
London hospital next week for
a minor operation. It is no
known how long she will be ir
hospital but all her engagement:
have been cancelled for the time

_being. Reuter.

was | three

|
|

“earned here to-day

manned by an

Walerfront
Workers Strike
IN DOMINICA





! Allies claimed limited gain
j against mode ate resistance on from Our Own Correspondent
he east front DOMINICA, May 10
ais" shaban ei ., | There has been a shore front
: Air strikes to-day were direct-| strike in Dominica for the last
ed against Communist concen- twelve days or so, threatening to
traticn southeast of Munsan near cause starvation of the island
ig Pe ae ; The Dominica Trade Union had
e Far Bast air force whic peen requested by waterfront
mounted over 900 combat flights workers to present a case on their
ey claiming the Killing or behalf for an increase in their
tro ok of 220 Communist rates and charges. Negotiations
roops .~-Reuter, | were entered into at once with!
| Steamship agents and shore work- |
fers, and a 24o per cent increase
' r r ts lear fr
y + agreed upon, Dissatisfaction and
London 'T ally Che rks delay crept in va are de-
manding instead a 75
Thireaten Walk Out | cceise
LONDON, 10. | They reuse to unload two

ships and a few sehcaners
| laden with cargo. The S.S, Herds-
! man arriving at Roseau with some
500 tons of cargo had to leave port
unloaded, Appeals of all kids
were made to the strikers but they
insisted on their demands. The
Government of Dominica took in-

stant and firm action and caused
essentials including flour, petrol
and kerosene to be landed unde

police escort without interference

by strikers

The following
dynamite sticks
Electric power s

night, Monday,
vere hurled at the
ation and also the





Central Telephone Exchange with
explosions terrifying the whol
town

The Gov-
number ot

resulted
on a

No damage
ernment took

pecial patrols to guard Roseau’s
most strategic centres which was
uccessfully carried out To-day
H.M.S,. Snipe arrived early in the
morning the workers had already
ome to a satisfactory agreement

aecepting 25 per cent, The arrival

of H.M.S. Snipe and Government
action relieved the anxiety and
tens.on

MISSIONARIES EXPELLED
VATICAN CITY, May 10

Over 200 foreign catholic mis-

sionaries have been expelled from

Ccmmunist China this year, it

—Reuter

London Welcomes Royal Visitors

LONDON. May 10.
Thousands of cheering London-
ers lined sunlit city streets today




‘he is expected to deal with this]}t9 welcome King Frederik and
ind cther development eee Ingrid of Denmark ‘to the

| capital's commercial centre.
| Up to the present the Fusiliers} Escorted by troopers of the
have not had the slightest connec-! British Household Cavalry, the
| tion with the local situation and| Royal visitors drove in an open
are settling down and _ doing! horse-drawn carriage from Buck-
camping exercise Among 1 1 ‘ingham Palace through the city
lar army men here are for the official reception by the

conscripts under the Le

Service Scheme whose ssed slowly through
ntinues L treets, they saw

| from

fiying
Office
them

British and Danish ffigs
almost every window
workers leaned out to cheer

on their way.

Searlet uniformed guardsmen
from Britain’s crack regiments
lined the route and the glistening

|

whom he installed a Knight)
Commander of the Order of
Danebrog.

He thanked him for the nar
vellous reception from the
people of London

“It is very much due to you ar|
a nation, to you as fighters foi |
right, freedom and justice, that my
country today can enjoy her in-
dependence and her existence <
one of the free nations of the
| world,” King Frederik said

q ~~Reuter

swords and breastplates of the
outriders gave London its third |
successive day of colour and
pageantry since the King and
Queen arrived,

King Frederik received an
Address of Welcome from Lord
Mayor Alderman Denys Lowson



ABOUT RUM

estimated |
to regiments, had been a potential flank threat to the |



Russia Has
New Plan
For Agenda

PARIS, May 10.
Russia has made a new counter-
»roposal for the agenda for For-
‘ign Ministers meeting, a Soviet

spokesman announced to-night.
At a Russian Embassy News
Conference, the spokesman said
he counter-proposal was to “‘con—

sider” a split in the agef®da pro-
posed by western delegates on
May 2, but with two modifications,

1 The subject of the “demili-

tarisation of Germany” should be

listed as an already agreed subject
for discussion. In the western
split agenda it figures last in the

Western column subjects and first
in the Soviet column,

2, The Atlantic Pact and
American bases abroad should be

edded to the list of subjects for
discussion—it did not figure in
the western list

Gromyko had said ~= Wesiern
deputies agreed to his suggestions
the Soviet Government was _ wil-
‘ling to accept the rest of the
! western draft of the split Agenda

Gromyko’s spokesman _— said
Russia wag willing to accept for
Blanchette of Barbados all about discussion the following subjects.
F. Mr. Blanchette is Manager ; 1, The completion of the Aus-
| trian Treaty.

2. Problems relating to the
‘= satebuiienent of German unity
and preparation of the Peace
ees.

The Fulfilment
7 with Italy,
Bulgaria and Hungary and of
Agreements of the four powers
jconcer ning Germany and Austria.

4. The fulfilment of the Peace

of Peace
Rumania,



PANAMA, May 10 |
The Panama Supreme Court oi|‘freaty with Italy in the part
Justice to-day declared by three|Concerning Trieste. He said the
votes to two that the designation |order of these subjects could be
of Vice-President Alcibia Aro} “discussed later, —Reuter.
semena by the National ssem
bly was Tanase: ang

Arosemenga was
President this afternoon

sworn ir fe

‘o Study Air

15,000 people. ;
Chief of Police, Developments
has declared he will abide by the
| decision of the Supreme Ccurt ‘ WIESBADEN, May 10.
and will support President Air experts from nine allied air

Arosemena. forces are to go to Korea to study

|

before

Colonel Remor
|

|





1" " c , atest developments in tactical
ee Seana Saas air power, United States air force
saying “Que Se Vaya” and cheer pect vei llgy:t Clown samen * _
ing Arosemens while Arias is selected by each of the following
practically besieged in the Presi countries Belgium Denmark
le f e oo ’ 2
ae Ne b> palace i | France, Greece, Italy, Nether-
RN was said that officials of the| jands Norway, Portugal and
Vational police had become dis Turkey, They will stay in Korea
gusted with the attitude adopted} gor a month. Reuter

ly Arias,—Reuter,

“

“ADVOCATE”









Approves Promotion

THE

WASHINGTON, May 10
The United States Senate to
day approved the promotion of | vere for NEWS

Lieutenant
Ridgway,

General

DIAL 3113

Matthew B

United Nations Com i
mander in Korea to the Pils of Day a Night
General —Reuter,



eee
(FLEE







ae





© BRIDGETOWN PLAYERS

1
| PRESENT
{

| The
SHOP AT
SLY CORNER

A Play in three acts
By Edward Percy

\
| under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency
The Governor and Lady Savage

AT THE EMPIRE THEATRE



heh QTY =i
WED. 16th, THURS. 17th, & FRI. 18th MAY

| MATINEE: FRIDAY 18th

ORCHESTRA & BOXES $1.50, CIRCLE $1.20, HOUSE $0.72

I MATINEE PRICE

i Orchestra and Circle $1.00 — House and Baleony 24c.

WM Booking Office Opens TO-DAY,FRIDAY, at 8.30 a.m.

»)
»


PAGE TWO

——



Caub Calling

IS EXCELLENCY the Gov-
ernor an Lad) Savage
their daughter Pat, Mr. and Mr
Hopwood and Mr. Ernest Balthrop
accompanied by the Governor's
ADC Major Vaughan were



the Reception
ean Commi

Hotel



among the gue
given by the C
sion at the Marine
night

The party took place under one
of the large evergreen trees on
the grounds of the hotel It was
illuminated for the occasion



ribt

last










Intransits

NTRANSIT through Barbado
yesterday i r.C.A, from
Trinidad on her way to Canada
was Mrs. Grant Major, wife of
Mr. T. Grant

a â„¢ Major, Cana-
dian Govern-

ment Trade

Commissioner
for the Eastern
Caribbea n
head
are in
Trinidad. Mrs
«= Grant Majar
& told Carib that
her husband
Mrs, Grant Major would be leav-
ing Trinided on Sunday for New





York. He is on his way to Otta-
wa to attend the Canada-B.W.1I
Trade Conference. Mrs. Grant
Major's destination is Ontario, She
is going to see their son Bill
graduate at McMaster University
in Hamilton, Ontario. They will
be returning to the West Indies

in October.

Other intransit passengers from
Trinidad en route to Canada were
Miss Theresa Milne, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. T. Malcolm Milne
of Trinidad. Theresa will be in
Canada for about three months,
staying in Montreal with her sis-
ter Joy. Joy’s room-mate Zita
Rodriguez was also on the .C.A,

plane for Canada yesterday, She
is returning to Canada after a
holiday in Trinidad. Theresa
hopes to return to Trinidad via
New: York.
Summer Holidays
ISS SUSAN VICKERMAN
has come down to spend
the summer holidays with ner
mother. She arrived yesterday

+e

morning by







ADVENTURES



ee enee cence tom

HE campaign for courtesy on

the roads must not be taken
too literally. We do not want to
see a whole street jammed while
polite men drivers take off their
hats and beg a lady driver to go
ahead of them, Nor must a driver
who has received a civility stop to
thank the other driver,

Imagine the annoyance of a
line of drivers who are forced to
wait while compliments are ex-
changed. “That was awfully nice
of you.” “Not at all,” “Oh, but
it was.” “It was nothing.” “I don't
think you’ve met my daughter.”
Then an exchange of names and
a writing down of addresses, while
a “courtesy cop” takes particulars
of the civility, in order to recom-
mend both drivers for the Courtesy
Medal, and his colleagues arrest
the drivers of all the jammed cars
for using impatient language.

When a lady driver extends her



BY THE

®
—_—
POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER








if â„¢, LY :

Y/

s

oj

L/
e
“1



“Purely as an_ interesting
point of natural history, how
do wou suppose rats can be
thsolutely certain that @ ship

is sinking?”



\

T.C.A. Departures
RS. ‘BILL’ STUART, wife of

s T.C.A’s Manager here and
their young daughter were among
the passengers leaving for Canada
yesterday by T.C.A. Mr. Stuart
will be following next week on a
fortnight’s visit,

Due Tomorrow

ASSENGERS due to arrive
from England to-morrow by
the Golfito are Mr. and Mrs.
E. L. N. Ascough. Mr, Ascough is
the new Divisional Manager of
Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd.,
Rev. W. J. Barrett, Mr. and Mrs.
R. H. Brand and two children, Mr,
W. D. Charlton, Wing Comdr. and
Mrs. D, F. A, Clarke and child,
Mr. and Mrs, C. Godfree, Mrs. E. I.
Hosking and two children, Mr. and
Mrs. F. G. Hurt and Miss E. G.
Hurt, Mr, C. Martindale, Rev, and
Mrs. E. E, New, Mr. F. E. Peek,
Maj. O F. C, Walcott, Dr, and
Mrs. H. D. Weatherhead, Miss P.
Weatherhead, Mr. W. W. Willis,

Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Young.





AY By

will mean a shortage of the near-
zine eggs laid by hens fed on old
seraps of plastic zine alloy.

Twenty Years of Uproar

“Q:HE seemed,” writes a music

critic, “to ignore the conduc-
tor.” Her mother had probably
warned her that these men with
batons can be the very devil, 1
know one who, when he taps his
lectern with the baton at the be
ginning of a piece, raps out a
Morse message of impudent ad-
miration,

On one occasion Rustiguzzi sang
with such power that she blew
the baton clean out of Richter’s
hand. It landed in the _ stalls,
where it awoke a vulgarian who
thought it was a stick of liquorice,
took a sleepy bite, and broke two
teeth,

back in Barbados in November.

OF PIPA

After Three Months

RS. GRAHAM ROSE and
her son, Hugh, who had been
holidaying in Barbados for the
past three months, left yesterday
by T.C.A, for Toronto where her

husband is with the Western
Assurance Co, Other pas.
sengers for Toronto were Mr

Garth Searle, Mr. Theodore Good-
ridge and Miss Ruby Gill.

Labour Adviser

ME ERNEST BALTHROP,
Labour Adviser to the Sec-
retary of State who arrived from
St. Vincent yesterday morning
by B.G. Airways. will be a guest
at Government House until he

leaves for Dominice. Arriving
by the same plane were Dr
A. A. Gibbons and Mr, Eric
Holder.

Vancouver Bound
R. AND MRS. NOEL AGARD

who arrivéd here a few
days ago from St. Vincent, left
yesterday for Canada by T.C.A

They are on their way to settle
in Vancouver Island. Mr, Agard
was formerly on the staff of
Cable and Wireless’ Branch in St.
Vincent, His father is Mr.
Aubrey Agard.

U.S, School-Teacher

RS. GLADYS viCKERSON

who arrived from Trinidad
May 2nd, left yesterday for
Grenada by B.W.I1.A. Mrs,
Dickerson is a school-teacher in
Brooklyn, She is touring the
W.I. Other passengers on the
plane for Grenada was Mr. W,
Medtord who has gone to spena
about eight days’ holiday jn that
colony. tele

Winter Home

R, and Mrs. Colles J. Coe, who
make Barbados their home

every winter, left yesterday for
Bermuda by T.C.A. They are en
route to their home in Long Island
and will spend a few days in Ber-
muda pefore leaving for the U.S,
Accompanying them were their
two cocker spaniels “Laddie” and
“Chi Chi”, The Coes expect to be




Copyright Var Qias tnt Amsterdam



Beachcomber

Sunday Pea-pushing
Y refusing to push a pea with

his nose on Sundays, Evans

the Hearse has saved the Govern-
meul, the Festival people, the in-
formers and all the rest of them
a great deal of argument, While
it is true that the spectacle might
keep people away from church,
it cannot be called a music-hall
turn, as there is no dressing-up.
The people of Aberbananer sup-
port Evans. ‘Do you want London
turned into one vast Moulin
Rouge?” asked Davies the Milk.
“The Devil,” commented a Coun-
cillor, “rubs his great red hands
every time nose is laid to pea on
the Sabbath,” Fresh in the mem-
ory of Aberbananer is the attempt
to establish the Continental Sun-
day by letting the boys roller-
skate in the drill-hall,







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Hotel Managers

C= in yesterday n-
ing by T.C.A.‘frum Can-
ada was Mr. Rene H. Martin,
former Manager of the Windsgi
Hotel. Mr. Martin had been in
Canada on a short visit. Mr
Martin is the new Manager of

the Marine Hotel. Coming in by
the same plane was Mr. Rene
Talon who is replacing Mr. Mar
tin at the Windsor as Manager

Back From Trinidad

R. and Mrs. Ralph Hunte, who

were married a few days ago
in Trinidad, flew home yesterday
by B.W.LA. Coming in by the
some plane were Mrs, M. Jones
who had been visiting hey daugh-
ter Mrs, E. Donawa and Mr
Simon Mendes.

Visiting Their Sons

. and Mrs, R. Eric Smythies,
who own a home on the St.
Peter coast, have gone to Canada
to visit their two sons. They left
yesterday by T.C.A. and expect
to be back in Barbados by July

Oil
R, PETER BATTEN, who is
an oil well contractor in

Venezuela, is in Barbados with his
wife for a short holiday. They
came in yesterday via Trinidad by
B.W
of Maturin.

Majority ’

| AJORITY of passengers for
by

Barbados yesterday
T.C.A. were staff members
They were Mr. Irvin Muir fron
Port Arthur, Toronto, Mr.
Mis, Frank Schofield from
Brunswick, Mr, and Mrs.
ence McLean of Steveston,
Mr. and Mrs. John Klem
Lethbridge, Alberta, Miss

New

Kay Freeman and Mr.
Martel from Ottawa, Ontario
They are all down to spend par

of their summer holidays in Bar-

bados,
Secretary

RINIDAD born Henry Dixon
Canada witn
daughter Kathleen.

is on Nis way

She is going

up for medical at

attention, Mr. Dixon is the Segre
Manufacturers Life eIn-

tary of
surance Co, in Port-of-Spain.

CROSSWORD
TF PPP UTE
ere
Le
Prec
CECE
rhe
ae
PEP
sl

Across

Part of Cupid's equipment.
Open out. (6)















0





(6)
Hives that produce records, (3)

Hebrew measure from Rome, (4)
You men become equal. rigtrseows
jaw, (6)

Chev make me upset a song (6)
Can never be disproved, (5)
Feature nigh or tow, (4)
Where you will get lies (4)
For a cricketer Mister includes
two ducks (4) 22 Blow up! (6)
Tale that is told) not the tay
that waga ()

ee ee
= S=3c8e Serer

Down
| Phia should give the current
rice, (9)
2 akes the steve run, (8)
“ Such features are often attrac
ive. (9)
4 You can be this without com
ulsion (9) 5. Dash! (4)
6 ita the nall vp the head (fi)
7 Colour. (4)
8 CarDs abuut the atum perhaps
(5) 10, Appear for weaving. (4)
19 Electrica: measure (3)
17. Toy one may sink tn a sink. (4)
18 Telegraph poles nhye th (4)
21 Briefly the padre (4)
Solution of vesterday's ouzele Acca
L gturegons, H Axiom. jo id! +}
Plan. Byacuiate 15 ued
BSlonct, 21) Maditenea, 1 Hnapoesd
a2 Tweive Down | Suied ¢ Uniaced
5. Rue; 4 Gamit 7 Bapinine Sl FT
Adiutant; 9 Oat. 12° Now mode 1

Candia: iA Siew 1% Sime ih Gel
Tdew



.1.A. His base is just outside

and

Ter-
BC.
from
Har-
riet Hall from Mt. Royal, P.Q.
and Miss Annie Magrichuk, Mrs
Albert





B.B.C. Radio Programme |



Serenade
at the Piano
Ake’ 9.00

Parade
11.45 a m
News, 12.10 pm
pm. Close Down

25 a.m
World Affair
New



115-645 p.m. — 19.76 m
4.19 p.m. Jazz Music
na Record, 5 00 pm

4.45 pm Spor

The Walker
5.05 p.m. Composer of the Week,
pm Light Music, 6.00 p m

Navy Newsletter, 6.15 p.m. The Sorcere





Lower Broad Street

| DRE

SSES

Ready-Made from London
Also Made-to-Order

BATHING SUITS





GLOHL
4 4



eer a aia oe cts

ees ean
. Y



Stanung
RICHARD CONTE + COLEEN
ond totrodveng ALEX NICOL
Extras ! !
TED WEEMS & ORCH.
2 Reels of Modern Music
















MIDNITE SATURDAY 12
BY REQUEST



—- ALSO: =
MON. 9.30 A.M. & 1.30 P.M.
“LOUISIANA” AND

SONG oF THE WASTELAND

taney CAOMICHAFL





TO-DAY (Friday) 2.30—
445 & 8.30 p.m. and
Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.














» The
2 15 Debate Continues, 11.00 p.m. Ring Up The

Cu

Merchant p m

JANETTA DRESS SHOP |
Upstairs Over Newsam’s

~ LINGERIE — STOCKINGS
COCKTAIL HANDBAGS



Starting To-day 5 and 8.15 and Continuing

GRAY





















FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1951











—— alae
AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEES : TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW AT 5 P.M.

TO-NIGHT TO MONDAY NIGHT AT 8.50
RKO Presents :

ROSALIND RUSSELL MICHAEL REDGRAVE

RAYMOND MASSEY KATINA PAXINOU

LEO GENN — KIRK DOUGLAS
in Eugene O'Neill's

“MOURNING BECOMES ELECTRA”





> pm. Inter
nde

ude, 6.45 p.m





Som 2132 m



7.00 pam. The News, 7.10 p m






News



Analysis
74

715 pm _ West Indian Diary,
Think On These Things, 8 00

English







Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p m
Magazine. 845 p.m The Walker Cup.
8.50 p.m. Interlude, 855 pm. From The
Editorials, 900 pm World Affairs, 9.15
The

pm









Eric Winstone,
10.10 pm _ Interlude
The Spur of the Moment,

Rendezveus Players, 10.45

pm 9.00 pm
10.15 pm
0 30 pm
pm. The











PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

TODAY ; 2.80 — 4.45 and $.30 p.m and Continuing Daily at 445 & 8 30 p m
Warner Excitine New Triumph !

“YOUNG MAN “™ HORN”

with KIRK DOUGLAS -— LAUREN BACALL — DORIS DAY
MIDNITE SATURDAY 12th ¥ 12th—9.30 am. &
Also MONDAY (Bank) !

9.30 aum. and 1.30 p m
By Popular Demand - - -
“LOUISIANA” — and —
“SONG OF THE WASTELANDS”

PLAZA DIAL
OISTIN 8404

Today to Sunday — 5 & 8.30 p.m.
Monogram’s Thrill Double ! !
“THE DUDE GOES WEST"

Eddie Albert, Gale Storm &



Curtain




C.B.C.

FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1951
pm -—~-10.15 p.m. News,
—10 30 pm. Canadian Chronicle.
25.61 m,



Pp.
20



10.00 10 15




8 11.76 Mes.,



1.30 pm




















an —=

GAIETY
(THE GARDEN) St. James
TODAY to SUNDAY — 830 p.m.

Mat, Sunday — 5 p.m.
RKO Hit Double !













of all Types







“BLU Pwr E tt Step Lively” “TARZAN &
oar ay eae KENTUCKY (0? Frank Sinatra & the Slave Girl”
3 | Lex Barxer

Bill Williams, Jane Nich ‘Buzz’ Henry
———————————————





Midnite Sat. 12th (Monogram Double!
Cisen Kid in
“Beauty & The Bandit” &
“The Living Ghost”
James Dunn
—
—
,

MIDNITE SAT
“SPY TRAIN"
Richard Travis

12th (Monogram)
“MOON OVER

& MONTANA’

Jimmy Wakely











THEATRE

Can YOU decide
Cham tig
MA amet eg








REGGIE CASEY
‘Count Every Star”

“DENNIS CLARKE
“My Love Loves Me”

“EDDIE CLARK
“TE

MALCOLM MURRAY
“Time After Time”

DORIAN THOMPSON
“You Can Do No Wrong”

FRANK AUSTIN
“4 Winds and Seven Seas”




















GUEST STARS

The Pride.of Belle Gully—
WILL IFILL
and
GERALD DAISLEY

Local Talent TONITE













Aa BRL TODD ; Norman WOQUAND, van DESNY
EMPIRE THEATRE

8.30 p.m.
and continuing Daily 4.45

EMPIRE

TO-DAY at 2.30 Only

‘TD CLIMB THE HIGHES'|
MOUNTAIN”



~ Pit 20—House 36—Bal. 48
Boxes 60

Tickets on Sale from. 7 p.m.
& 8.30

ROYAL

To-day and To-morrow
4.30 and 8.30
Republic Big Double
Edgar BARRIER
And
Adele MARA in








TO-NIGHT at 8.30 and

continning “SONG OF MEXTOO”
J. Arthur Rank presents - - “UNDERCOVER WOMAN”
. with
** MADELEINE” Stephanie BACHELOR
Starring: AND

Robert LIVINGSTON

Special Mid-Nite Show
Saturday Night

Ann Todd — Norman Wool-
ond— Ivan Desny



Serene eee mena een OC “CONVICTED”
ROXY AND
“BEYOND THE PURPLE
Last Two Shows To-day HILLS”



4.30 and 8.15
Columbia Big Double - -

OLYMPIC
To-day and To-morrow
4.30 and 8.15
First Instalment

Republic Serial





** RELENTLESS ”

MICHAEL CUR

DIRECTED BY

: ; “DRUMS OF FU
>and : MANCHU”
‘i Starring Henry BRANDON
“LUST FOR Along with the Picture
GOLD ” “MAN FROM
OAKLAHOMA” |
Starring: Starring :

Roy ROGERS And
Dale EVANS




Glen FORD & Ida LUPINO









>

SOPPOSF










E Eagle Hall

WEDNESDAY 4.45 & 8.

ROXY THEATR

arm to give a signal, is the pedes-
trian who runs into the road to
kiss her hand being courteous or

x PPPCPISFPSS
s
+

A












15 Das. s




COMBINATION









merely foolish? Rye oe venmwoe, Se : Bs .
Plastic Egg Shortage 2 ppamasnenye iz %
ROFESSOR E. N. da C, An ( Tie screen’s one Great: » %
drade is to give a lecture to ; : yr, a 7 ‘
children, Intending to show them ‘ 2.) ry i) OL LL NEED Il I 8
how to tell a fresh egg, he adver- >

tised for a loan of this rare article.
I hope he will say a word about
the recent boast that a way had
heen discovered “to keep eggs
new-laid” for a year or more, At
present, I believe eggs imported
from Chile may only be claimed
as new-laid for six months after
their arrival here, To tell the age
of a bit of dried egg you hold a
lighted match above it. If the
match goes out, the dried egg may
be deemed to be un-new-laid, and
therefore fit for human intake.

The coming control of metal



PHILIPS ELECTRIC
BULBS

5 — 200 WATTS

mine, and. I've been sleeping here
since October, or trying to," replies
the man plaintively, ‘‘I haven't
slept very well though! You say

u're lost. Then come with me."

ising stiffly and stretching himself,
he leads the way further into the
cave, which is not really very dark.

The strange man gazes in amaze-
ment at Rupert. ‘' Please, | didn't
mean any harm,"’ says Rupert.
“I'm lost, and I found the way in
at the back of the frozen waterfall,

and I thoughe I might shelter here.
Is this your caver" ** Yes, it's













FOR ELEGANT

— SEE THE — ~

BROADWAY DRESS SHOP

TEL. : 3895 1, BROAD STREET

SCREW & BAYONET

AND

FLECTRIC LAMP

SHADES
BEAUTIFUL COLORS IN



‘







LADIES’ SHOES

“WINDSOR BRAND”

WHITE NUBUCK SANDALS ___o_.w-
TAN, NAVY & BLACK SANDALS_ _WWWW—
TAN & NAVY CASUALS. HH «89.37
TAN & WHITE CASUALS ___._._ 8.50

AU with Platform Soles and Wedge Heels

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

We Oifer - - -

$9.50 per bag 100 Ibs.

WHOLE CORN ...
SCRATCH GRAIN ......... $8.50 per bag 100 Ibs.

BAKELITE FROM
27e. — $1.29

Obtainable from our - - -
PLANTATION SUPPLY DEPARTMENT
~‘Phone 4657

$9.44
$8.53

.
8
%
$

monn



VPSSSSSODSO SSS SSPE GEESE EELS COSE SESS SE GOSS GOGO GSES OS GSE SSS SOOSSO9GSES



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.



.
%
-
,
>
%

+
&

ro

THE CORNER STORE

POSSESSES SESS SSS SSS SOS ESSE SFOS EES





299999999 9O99F



DIAL 4606 DIAL 4220


EEO! EOE EO OE OO

FRIDAY, MAY it, 1951



Appointments Of W.1.
To Secretariat Posts

Approved

By Caribbean Commission

THE CARIBBEAN COMMISSION yesterday decided
to hold its Thirteenth Meeting in St. Croix from October

29 to November 3 this year.

This is the first time that the

meeting will be held in that island.
The Commission did a great deal of work during the

4

The Commission dealt with 19
reeommendations which the West
Indian Conference (Fourth Ses-
sion) held in Curacao in Novem-—
ber had submitted to It for its
action.

Of the recommendations con-
sidered yesterday, the Commis-—
sion agreed that the implemen-
tation of the praiseworthy policy
of appointing West Indians to
posts in the Secretariat be con—
tinued.

Other recommendations ac-
cepted were that all Territorial
Governments be requested to
improve and expand the cireu-
lation of Commission publica-
tions and information in their
respective territories; that the
Secretary General be instructed
when submitting future reports
to the Conference, to report

s€parately and_ specifically on
the action taken by Member
Governments on the projects

recommended by the Commission

The Commission agreed to re-
néw its enquiries of Territorial
Governments in regard to their
need of capital for development
projects of a private and public
nature; as well as to take steps
to determine the availability of
investment capital both within
and without the Caribbean area,
and to seek the assistance of
technical experts of the United
Nations and _ its Specialised
Agencies. 8!

Industrial Projects

The Commission aiso instruct-
ed the Preparatory Meeting for
the Industrial Development Con-
ference to take these recommen-—
dations into consideration in
preparing the agenda for the
Industrial Development Confer-
ence and for the West Indian
Conference (Fifth Session), and
request it to give particular at-
tention to studies of inducements
offered by governments in the
area to encourage the investment
of local and outside capital in
new industrial projects.

In regard to recommendations
made by the West Indian Con-
ference concerning _ tariffs in
which they have asked for a
Tariff Conference to examine the
steps necessary to lower tariffs
and promote inter—territorial
trade, the Commission instructed
the Secretary—-General to prepare
a comprehensive study of the

matter for submission to the
Commission at its Fourteenth
Meeting in order that it may

then decide whether a tariff con-
férence should be convened.
The studies should include an
examination of the effect on the
trade of the area of the General
Agreement on Trade on Tariff and
other international measures for
the liberalisation of trade

Labour Migration

Among other recommendations
agreed to by the Commission
were the removal of restrictions
on the migration of labour to the
Americas and elsewhere, particu -
larly those imposed on the ground
of race and colour; the enact.-
ment of legislation to provide
that, in case of jurisdictional dis—
putes between trade unions, polls
should be conducted by govern-
ment among the workers con—
cerned; the expansion of existing
scholarship programmes for the
Caribbean area with a view to
making additional scholarships
available at metropolitan univer-



BEAUtâ„¢Y AND PROTKCTION



sate

With Bergertex

concrete, plaster, brick or stone.

Bergertex cannot crack or peel off,

afternoon and went on until late in the night.

Fish Markets
Everywhere

Last month 56,863 pounds of
fish were sold in the Public
Market. In April last year the
amount was 113,634 and of that
65,784 pounds were flying fish.

Large quantities of fish are not
however brought into the market.
In order to get black market
prices some fish vendors prefer
to sell Along roads and on beaches.

“The amount of fish sold along
Bay Street nearly doubles the
amount carried to the market,” an
cfficial told the Advocate yester-
day. He said that every day he
could see boats, loaded with fish,
heading for the beaches.

“In Trinidad a Policeman,
Market Constable or Food Inspec-
tur, who brings a charge for
profiteering against a person, gets
one third of the fine imposed by
the magistrate. This encourages
thrift and more people are brought
before the Courts,” he said.

He said that if this system were
adopted in Barbados and heavy
fines imposed the black market~
ing would cease,

At the corner of Westbury
Road and Fontabelle many fish
scales could be seen in the road
yesterday. The area has a bad
smell,

At Brown’s Beach and Burke's
Beach, both in Bay Street, sharks’
heads, scales, intestines and bones
of fish can be seen scattered
around, These places also have
a bad smell, e Temple Yard
area, opposite St. Mary’s Church
wall, has now become a regular
fish market. On many occasions
when there is a rush for fish in
the market, you can purchase
some at Temple Yard for 2 few
vents over the schedule price.

Untidy Beach

Fish is also sold on the Reef
Beach. Afart from the bad smell
of the area, the beach is regularly
littered with old ting and at one
time g dead goat was on the beach
for many days.

“These conditions would be
bettered if the Police, Market
Constables, would make a special
effort to run the fish vendors off
the road. ‘The Police seem to co-
operate with the fishermen instead
of the Market Constables and Food
Inspectors”, a housewife told the
Advocate yesterday.

She said that she has, on many
eceasions, bought fish on the wharf
while the Police looked on, “When
the fisherman was about to shift
to another site he looked at the
Policeman and said: Want a ‘ish,
bud?”

During last month the quantities
brought to the market were:
13,430 pounds of flying fish, 29,728
pounds of dolphin, 846 of king fish,
1,424 of bill fish, 8,745 of shark,
1,998 pounds of albacore, 487 of
bonito and 205 pounds of seine fish,

Alveady this month large quan-
tities of albacore are being
brought in. A few dolphin are
also being caught,

sities and local institutions of uni-
versity status for students in the
area; and the establishment of a
routine reperting service for all
Caribbean territories in respect
of important and contagious
plant pests and diseases.

ITH

Waterproof and weather resisting,

for in drying it becomes an integral

part of the wall on which it is painted. Its crisp, matt finish stays

fresh and smart almost indefinitely.



Bergertex is

delicate colours

WVADE

available in many

for use inside or

outside,

BY

BERGER PAINTS



Stocked by

ALL HARDWARE STORES

GARDINER AUSTIN

& co.,

LTD. — Agents.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Handicrafts
Development
Discussed

Mr. Fred Leighton, Viee-Presi-
dent of the National Council of
American Importers and a Mem-
ber of the Advisory Committee
cen Imports to the U.S. Depart-
ment of Commerce, on the in-
vitation of the Chairman, briefly
addressed one of the Committees
of the Caribbean Commission on
the possibilities of the develop—
ment of handicraft (cottage) in-
dustries in the Caribbean, based

on his observations made
during a tour of the Brit-
ish territories of the area

arranged under the auspices of

the velopment and Welfare
Organisation.

He pointed out that there were
certain contradictory features

characterising the present stage
of development of handicrafts in
the Caribbean. There was good
local demand and also pos-
sibilities of limited export but
there are shortages of materials
and neglect to develop the use
of other more readily available
materials.

The most advanced territory
was Jamaica. There the fibres
in use were in good supply but
techniques were at a_ relatively
low level of development: the
loom was not utilised nor were
articles such as rush rugs made,
while there was an undue con—
centration on hats and handbags.
There was need for the infusion
of fresh ideas and an awakening
of the creative talents of the
local peoples. These latter were
very responsive to guidance and
receptive of new ideas.

Export Markets

There was a marked desire in
the territories to develop export
markets in the United States but
he did not consider that the time
was yet ripe for this. For the
most part, local demand could not
be satisfied in the territorial and
tourist markets of the area and,
moreover, the state of develop-—
ment had not yet reached the
high level required for success—
ful marketing in the United
States.

Unit prices in the British ter-
ritories, especially, were high due
to low labour productivity, poor
methods of preparation, in-
efficient use of labour and to
certain other artificial causes like
high import duties on materials
used in the industry.

A further important prejudicial
factor is the very high north—
bound freight between the Carib—
bean and the United States as
compared with the south-bound:
$1.20—70c. US. per cu, ft.
north-bound as against 35c. U.S.
south-bound.,

There was undoubtedly a good
market in the United States, par—
ticularly for basketry as a result
of loss of supplies from China,
and there were good prospects for
developing a market for fibre
products if the unfavourable fac-
tors mentioned above could be

overcome. _
Basketry

In regard to basketry, an in-
teresting development had been
the recent revival ef Carib
basketry in Trinidad and Domin—
ica. This was being stimulated
by an order placed by the Alcoa
Company with the Tourist Board
of Trinidad for fifty satchels per
week,

Distribution in the United
States could best be developed
by the fostering of active local
markets. These would serve to
attract buyers from the United
States who were now regularly
visiting the Caribbean on tourist
cruises and likely to continue
doing so on an increasing seale
In the future.

The most successful procedure
was to offer a large variety of in—
dividual items from which buyers
could choose and to develop the





to

He knows that the Blue Gillette
Blade is a treasure

For making his shave
every morning a pleasure.





TRADE ENQUIRIES TO



‘ALL OVER THE. WO

BERGERTEX

chere’s new beauty and protection for walls of

The Dutchman’s a hard-headed
sensible man

And his shaving is done

In Holland, as in every other
country, the smart men know
there is nothing to equal

Blue Gillette Blades for a
clean, comfortable shave.
And because they last so long,

no blade so economical.

Blue Gillette Blades

Industrialist Advises

Use Of Loeal Materials:

In Howse Building

MR. WARD CANADAY, industrialist and manufac-
turer of Toledo, Ohio, and the American Co-Chairman of
the Caribbean Commission, has been interested in low cost

housing for a long time,

He said that although he did
not live in the tropics, yet he
had a plantation in St. Croix,
Virgin Islands, and is greatly
interested in eattle for the tropics,
and sugar cane.

Mr. Canaday told the Advocate
yesterday that he had visited
several of the housing develop-
ments in Barbados and thought
‘hat they were very attractive.

He believed that it will be
found that plans which utilize
Yocal materials, and encourage
self help in construction under
expert supervision and guidance,
will, in the long run, prove most
effective in improving the living
conditions of the largest number
of people.

Will B'dos Join
Tourism Effort?

Mr. Louis S. Law, Executive
Secretary of the Caribbean Interim
Tourism Committee with head-
quarters at Kent House, Trinidad,
is now in Barbados to present him-
self to Mr. G, H. Adams and the
Hon. W A. Bustamante, the newly
elected British Commissioners of
the Caribbean Commission.

Mr. Law arrived from Trinidad
by B.W.1.A. on Wednesday and 1s
staying at the Marine Hotel

He told the Advocate yesterday
that the Caribbean Interim Tour-
ism Committee was the implemen-
tation of a recommendation made
years ago by the Caribbean Com-
mission and the West Indian
Conference.

It held its first, meeting in
Trinidad in August 1949 and
actually started functioning in
1950.

The



member territories are
Haiti, the Dominican_ Republic,
Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin
Islands, the Leeward and Wind-
ward Islands, Martinique, Guade-
loupe, Trinidad and Tobago, as
well ag all the islands the
Netherlands West Indies,

He said that Barbados had not
so far, seen fit to join in the
regional effort, but beeause it was
utterly impossible for any individ-
ual territory to change the trend
of travel in such a large market as
the United States, he hoped that
Barbados would eventually do its
share in aq regional effort which
was the only way that this object
could be achieved.

Advertising

This year, the Caribbean Interim
Tourism Committee started a
modest advertising programme
which was already producing
extraordinary results,

Mr. Law said’ that advices from
New York showed that the num-
ber of enquiries so far received in
answer to the suggestion of
spending summer vacations in the
Caribbean evyceeded the Commit-
tee’s expectations.

The object of the Committee he
said, was not to do the work of
individual islands, but rather to
supplement it by promoting more
traffic to the area generally from
which the individual — islands
would reap such extra benefits,
as their own efforts would merit,

capacity and train workers to
produce the lines selected in the
quantities required,

The British territories would
do well to emulate the example
of Puerto Rico by encouraging
skilled craftsmen and interpre-
neurs to establish themselves 10
the island. These have already
made .important contributions by
developing the loom weaving of
vegétable fibres, other than cot
ton, and the use of the screw
pine (Pandanus sp.) for a variety
of goods.





a sensible plan;

CEPDES GRANT LIMITED

Better Citizenship

He also believes that a plan
which spreads over a period of
20 years, the repayment of cost
plus low interest, will result in
ride of ownership, to a greater
degree than rental and will also
result in better citizenship and
greater security. For éxample,
he said that a house in which
the material and land = costs
amcunt to say $1,000 if built
with self help, can become a
pro y worth $2,000 or more
If the payment of $1,000 can be
divided into 20 annual instal-
ments, and if the interest rate
is say 4%% per year of the un-
paid balance, the average pay
ment by the purchaser will be ap-
proximately $75 a year for both
principal and interest. Added to
this, the cost of insurance and
depreciation would bring the
total payable price by the new
owner within $100 a year or $2
a week,

The advantage of the plan is that
the moment a man becomes the
owner, he and his whole family
will have interest in developing
flowers and a garden and main-
taining and improving the ap-
pearance and value of the prop-
erty. That, he said, develops
pride of ownership and respon-
sible citizenship and also brings
in to improving the value of the
property, the labour of the whole
family, which otherwise would be
lost to a large degree in rental
property.

Lower Cost

In many instances, it is found
that the actual material cost and
land cost of such property, is
considerably less than $1,000,

In Puerto Rico, the minimum
subsistence housing programmer







PAGE THREE
} C
$300, amd he was told that in| : FP,
Antigua, civ minded citizen: * : Vv
owning land, had donated some & | '
{or such housing projects, thus @ | 4
iding still value to the e® | &

completed property as a resuit|
ci the labour put into it by the}



BEST






bee Mi: ! Photo Cards
e said that’ he was particu aos
larly happy to note the experi ‘of Modern British Cars

menting that is aN
with the use of
such ag concrete blocks being
cast around a core of bagasse.
He understands that there is
a very large amount of surplus
bagasse each year after the crop
is harvested and also that the}
cost qf lumber here is very high
It is undoubtedly within the
bounds of probability that native
materials low in cost, may be
used to supplement the more
costly structural materials oa
'

|

being done pr
new "oeat|



developing low cost housing

He said that when a solid roo
and supporting celumns provide
structure, walls might be made
of light material standardised in |
production to greatly reduce cost». |

He noted that studies are being |
made as to the relative cost of |
baked clay and the quarrying of |
native stone and various forms |
of pre-cast concrete, |

that builds! Save ’em
and Swap ‘em... 40
Cards in the Series.

TY Klloggs
CORN FLAKES |
today!



TRADE MARK

HAIR |
TONIC B

Quarrying Equipment

It is possible that equipment
permitting the ‘quarrying of
native stone at lower cost might |
reduce the price involved in the |
use of this plentiful material.

VASELINE is the registered trade mark of
Mr, Canaday said ‘that the hesehrough Manufacturing Co., Cons’d tice

start which is being made in mu To es, a te a

various parts of the island

eer the social benetits |

of etter housing should bear | | TL ae

fruit in very rapid improve WP ys Wy

ment for the next few years as :

it had in Puerto Rico,

He was particularly impressed
with the vision and enterprise
with which this programme is
being undertaken by Hon, F, C
Hutson and his associates, under
the immediate supervision of Mr
Thomas Lashley, Secretary of the
Housing Board and Mr. T. FE
Went, the Colonial Engineer.

Another thing which impressed

him he said, is the cleanliness
and apparent care the people
here take of their homes, no

matter how small they are, That
quality of pride in “good house
keeping” is a great asset to any



NEEDS NO REFRIGERATION —

if your teeth are
as white as hers!
Smile at yourself in the mirror! Look
|
i

involve material costs as low a* community, he said,







ae ae
Ive switched
% Fleisch inatins PA









AS EASY TO USE AS OLD-
FASHIONED PERISHABLE YEAST

@ Fleischmann's new granule yeast stays
fresh for weeks right on your pantry shelf, If . ‘ it
you bake at home, try Fleisehmanu’'s for j wad imine’ |
more delicious hot breads and coffee cakes. \ Si aaa?” f
For Your Health's Sake—try Fiviseh- arts bh ha aoe

mann’s Dry Yeast dissolved in fruit juice,

milk or water. Like old-time foil yeost—it
helps tone up your system.

SO EASY TO USE! Bpritvicic into
lukewarm water. Let stand 10
niinutes, Then stir, One pach
mke equals one compreteéd
yeast cake in any recips

Keo a sygnly on hand ~beke af a moments nonce |





5
G
0

*
O
mY

\




Only your mirror will tell you. - .



















r
TONIGHT — Smile into
your mirror—-take a
good look at your

carefully at your teeth. Do they sparkle
and shine as they should ? The answer
is “ Yes” when you use Pepsodent, for
Pepsodent contains Irium, the special
ingredient that floats away dull film
from your teeth, leaves them so much
whiter, your smile so much brighter!

NEXT — Clean your teeth
with Pepsodent. Do this,
morning and evening,
for a week.

THE TOOTHPASTE
WITH IRIUM*




Ns
THEN—Srnile into your mir-
ror again. You'll see how a
week of Pepsodent makes
your teeth whiter — your

% Triwn is the registered trade mark of
se smile siunply dazzling

« Lird., for a specigs soluble in-
gredient that gives greater cleaning power.

‘ CWA

S

P

X*O 32-907-50 PEPSODENT LTD., LONDON, ENOLAND







Can an antise

ptic help in healing?”
7ounds heal of theit own accord when they ere kept free
from the germs that cavce septic infection. To keep

wounds in the healthy condition for healing, surgeons



have for years relied upom *Detrol’, This ruthless des+
*royer of germs is non-polsonous, gentle and safe on
human tissues. While it divinfects the wound, ‘Dettol’
leaves the living tissues undamaped to continue the
natural processes of safe ayiel rapid repair.
4 ors te) ¥ ¥
DETTOL
THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC
DE TOR. FOR BOD SIC RR uy)
ni , e #8 pr, 1950
Fo / tute r a Cobe,





/ / 4, Wenw ved

KLIM is superior quality cow’s milk, produced
under strictest sanitary conditions. Yes, and the
specially-packed tin protects KLIM so that you
get milk as fine as the day it left the farm, Buy
KLIM—milk that you can always depend upon for
its wholesomeness and purity!

Yum 1S PURE, SAFE MILK

{2} KLIMkeeps without refrigeration

{3} KLIM quality is always uniform

{4} KLIM is excellent for growing children
{3} KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes
{6} KLIMis recommended for infant feeding

{7} KLIM is safe in the specially-packed tin

{s} KLIM is produced under strictest control






add KLIM, stir

Take pure water,

and you have pure, safe milk

pore safe

MILK |

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER ~ 7 oo


tree eA,

LAA ORO De

=e

‘ PAGE FOUR



Printed by the Advocate vo, Ltd., Broad St. Bridgetown

Friday, May 11, 1951

FIELD

4 THE Princess Alice Playing Field built
at a cost of approximately $16,000 was
opened with much ceremony and amidst
the fond hopes of those who saw the crying
need for recreation facilities for the people
of Bridgetown. After a period of two years
it,is of little use to the public except for a
few people who have staged public dances
in the pavilion and for special holiday at-
tractions.

‘Time and again, criticism in the Press has
been launched against this waste of public
funds and energy. The criticism has been of
no avail. Before any money had been spent
on it, the field had been popular as a com-
munity centre. One or two clubs played ten-
nis there and the expense of preparing the
lawns and keeping the grounds in order
was defrayed from subscriptions from the
players. Now that public funds have been
lavishly spent, the field looks like a field
and little else.

There is a Committee of which the Chair-
man is the Churchwarden of St. Michael,
charged with the responsibility of looking
after the Playing Field. The grass has
grown high and several sheep benefit there-
from.

' During the weeks when there was a con-
troversy between the Barbados Amateur
Football Association and the Pickwick
Club it might have been possible to carry
on the football series on this ground at
small expense. The field could have been
cleaned up and made fit in two weeks.

| Anumber of private clubs ought to make
use of the Playing Field and maintain it in
good condition. There is precedent for this
action. The Spartan and Police Cricket
Clubs have for years found a home in
Qtieen’s Park and they pay for the upkeep
of this part of the grounds.

' If the Vestry is not now prepared to do
something to make the Princess Alice Play-
ing Field the public centre which it was in-
tended to be, then it ought to give private
clubs the opportunity to do better.



‘ The money which has already been spent
will have been wasted if more is not spent
to make the fullest use of the grounds.
It is no use letting the Playing Field be-
come derelict because of some remote plan
to have an investigation into the spending
of.the original sum of money.

The Playing Field is within easy reach
of the shopping centre where clerks work

THE Cabinet system emerged in
Britain in the eighteenth century,
and so did the office of Prime
Minister. Historians are _ still
arguing about the exact dates,
though most of them agree that
if anyone can be called the first
Prime Minister of England that
person is Sir Robert Walpole.
However, Sir Robert Walpole, if
he were to return today, would

In Britain the Cabinet as a
system of government has
been in existence for mere
than 200 years, Maharajku-
mari Indira of Kapurthala,
who reports Parliamentary
affairs each week in the Gen-
eral Overseas Service of the
B.B.C., explains the duties of
the Cabinet.

be surprised at the transfor-
mation in the responsibilities BY ee ee INDIRA
of the Prime Minister and of Kapurthe.

in the tremendous increase in
the duties undertaken by all of
His Majesty’s Ministers, With a
population under ten million, and
with few large towns, in an age
when for the predominant part of
the people, life was a very simpie
affair, the government was effec-
tively carried on without the need
of a highly complicated and effi-
cient machinery.

In the eighteenth century, most
of the Civil Service was still a
branch of the royal household; the
responsibility of the government
was not so much to administer the
country as to maintain sufficient
public order, and see that the
country was properly defended.
Prime Ministers such as Sir Robert
Walpole or the elder Pitt did un-
dertake a tremendous amount of
work, especially during times of
crises, but, for the most part, the
less important ministers enjoyed
an easy life with plenty of time to
indulge in party intrigue and to
pursue their own private pleasures.
Since those days the work of gov-
ernment has increased and increas-
ed, until now it is generally agreed
that His Majesty’s Government is
one of the most overworked bodies
of men in the whole world.

In 200 years the ministries have
been transformed—and so have
the types of men who compose
th

em,

During the first world war, Mr.
Lloyd George probably had to
make up his mind on a larger
number and variety of important
issues than any Prime Minister in
the nineteenth century. And
neither he nor any holder of that
high office since would have had
the time to write novels, like Dis-
raeli, or engage in abstruse theo-
logical arguments in learned
magazines, like Gladstone, Being
a Prime Minister in the twentieth
century is a full-time job, and tho
branches of his work are legion.

With his Foreign Secretary he
must decide on events abroad, and
devise effective action to see that
the country’s security is never
carelessly endangered. In times of
war his personality will come al-
most to embody the spirit of the
nation. In time of peace, although
such personality in leadership is
not so important, there are other
qualities with which a Prime Min-
ister must be endowed if he is to
fulfil his tremendous responsibility
—that of being the trustee of the
nation’s heritage and the guardian
of its interests.

Vital Role of Prime Minister

This ‘trusteeship’ does not stop
short at Britain—it is extended in
full measure towards the Common-
wealth, too. The Commonwealth
Conference held in London is a
case in point. Much of the work
involved, no doubt, has been done
by the Minister of Defence and
others, but it is the Prime Minister
who acts as unofficial chairman at
this conference—and, of course, it



is the Prime Minister upon whom,
ultimately, the order and stability
of British society depends. It is
up to him to ensure that the Par-
liament whom the people have
elected should govern with confi-
dence and keep the nation’s
respect,

Then what about the team itself
—in other words, the subordinate
ministers, of His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment? Most of thems are heads
of special departments, though it
is customary to have a few people
with roving commissions, whose
time is not taken up with running
a huge department. But most of
the ministers have enormous staffs
whose job, firstly, is to supply
material and information (facts
and figures, in other words), on
which policy and legislation is
based, Then, secondly, when the
legislative measures have been
passed, it is the responsibility of
those staffs to provide the machin-
ery for carrying them out in de-
tail.

For instance, recently a scheme
for controlling the supply of raw
materials first had to be devised
and now is being applied. This
work is being done jointly by the
Board of Trade and the Ministry
of Supply.

The minister is answerable to
Parliament for the work of his de-
partment but the staff who carry
out that work provide the solid
foundation upon which a minister's
career in that department de-
pends, To put it briefly, it is the
Civil Service—that ‘hidden girder
upon which the government rests,’
as it has been described—from
which are recruited these vas:
ministerial staffs. The Civil Ser.
vice has the pick of the best brains
in the country; it is without doubt
the most highly skilled, highly
experienced, and_ highly
ciplined organisation in the world.

In all democratic countries the
civil servant’s job is to administer
the laws laid down by the elected
representatives of the people, But
whereas in other countries these
tasks are often given to men who
are appointed by politicians, in
Britain they are kept in the hands
of professionals.

What kind of men are these
‘professionals’ who constitute
Britain's Civil Service? How are
these men appointed? Let me
explain,

The service is divided into three
principal branches: clerical, execu.
tive, and administrative, each of
which requires a different educa-
tional standard. The administra.
tive class is the most important,
so, I will confine myself to that.
It is what people usually have ui
mind when they talk of the Civil
Service as a career,

Entry into this class is by way
of a very stiff written examination
and an interview, and the majority
of the candidates are between the



dis- min

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ages of twenty-one and twenty-
four. A young man enters this
branch ag an Assistant Principel
with a salary of £400 a year, At
first, he does not specialise in any
one department, He may be moved
from the Ministry of Labour to
the Ministry of Food, or from the
Board of Trade to the Common-
wealth Relations Office. Once he
has become an Assistant Secretary,
his chances of promotion are rapid,
if he can prove his worth.

If he is sufficiently outstanding
he may become the head of a dce-
partment by the time he is forty.
The highest point to which a
young man can aspire in the Civi'
Service is tha of Permanent
Under Secretary, which usually
carries a knighthood with it,

Relationship Between Minis-

ter and Staff

These, then, are the experi-
enced experts—the ‘professionais’
upon whom the minister depends
when he finds himself answerable
for his department to Parliament,
and the relationship between the
minister and his staff is a curious
one. é

The minister, for all his brains
and experience and ability, has
nevertheless. the status of an
‘amateur’ in his particular depart
ment. This must obviously be so.
a man who has just been moved,
say, from the War Office to the
Food Ministry cannot be expecte
to pick up in a few days or few
weeks the detailed knowledge
and experience of the department’s
routine which the professional
civil servant has taken years to
acquire.

But the minister is still the
guiding figure. He may be an
amateur in detail but he is usually
a man of very wide experience
of public life. A nineteenth-cen-
tury Chancellor of the Excheque
once said that a politician is made
a minister of a department chiefly
to tell the Civil Service what the
country would not stand. And,
like all aphorisms, there is some
truth in it. Politicians understand
the ‘art of the Possible’— some.

D What Is The Cabinet? | NEWS FROM |

BRITAIN

By

DAVID TEMPLE

ROBERTS
LONDON.

ROYALTY added just the right note to the
Festival. It needed the excitement of crowd-
lined streets and the glamour of a state coach
in procession to cap, with something tradi-|
tional, the rather flighty artificialities of the
South Bank. The King’s speech on opening |
the Festival touched up the brash confidence
of the Festival promoters into what is surely
a truly national gesture of belief in 1951.
Plenty of voices have said, in the last year, |
that this is no time for counting our gains
when we may soon have to face war, the most
dreadful of losses, But I sense that the King’s
speech, the Festival, and its stimulus to take
a pride in aqurselves, have strengthened the
national conviction that another twentieth
century war can be avoided.



Festival week—this opening week—has
revealed an extraordinary national unity.
When it was first mooted, Conservatives were
inclined to condemn the Festival in advance
as camouflaged Socialist propaganda at the
nation’s expense. But Herbert Morrison was
wise enough to restrain any leftish enthusi-
asm for a scheme like that. And the Festival
show on the South Bank emerges without
any noticeable political colour. I was amused | "SRS a nanoeeoesooe
to see how the Daily Worker, our small circu-
lation Communist paper, treated the Festival.
Their commentator wrote a friendly descrip-
tion of the South Bank as the best value for
five shillings in London. Of course, he could
not restrain a sneer at the “Lion and Unicorn”
Pavilion which sets out to delineate the Brit-

thing a professional administrator{ish character—“the Pavilion of ruling class

often tends to forget.

But I do not want to give the
impression that there is much
rivalry or friction between the
ister who is a politician and
the non-political civil servants
under him, In fact, there is an
accepted tradition of loyalty be-
tween the two which over-rides
party attachments. This is reveal-
ed most clearly at Question Time
in the House.

Constitutionally, questions are
of great importance, since they
provide the principal means by
which the ordinary citizen can
keep control over the bureaucracy,
‘P.Q.s,’ as they are called (Parlia~
mentary Questions), are priority
in every department, and in every

case the circumstances are
thorougly investigated. Questior
Time is an occasion when the

ministers and their deputies—the
Parliamentary Under Secretaries
—are under the full scrutiny o/
the public. The Department
officials realise. this: they know
the politician’s future, may depend
on his success in giving convinc-
ing answers, and it is an accepted
principle never to let him down.
In return, the minister takes great
pains to clear his department of
criticism,



daily and it would be well for some of them
to form a tennis club and be able to enjoy
some form of healthy recreation during the
afternoon. If the Vestry, who is to take

charge of playing fields, or the Committee

responsible for finishing it will not do

N

(By FREDERICK COOK)

SOUL mates for lonely Ameri-

NEW YORK.

“when there is no lonely person
forced to sit alone of an evening
end mourn a mateless state”. In

More Lonely Hearts

dance? Smoke?

Physical defects? Health? Do you
Armed with these details Miss

Drink?”

something, then for once the community
spirit in Barbados should put them to shame
and make the Princess Alice Playing Field
the recreation centre which it was intended
to be.



SCOUTS

RECENT changes in the Scout Movement
in Barbados seem to indicate that it will be
“given a new lease of life. The appointment
of Major J. E. Griffith as the new Island
‘Commissioner brings to the helm one who
is a keen scout and who has done good work.

Among the youth of this island there is
an enormous field for scouting and if Major
Griffith can influence the schools to take
up scouting on a wider scale then he will
have done further service to the Movement.
4. There is virgin soil waiting to be tilled.
Wt is no use waiting until youngsters have
6ffended society and need to be reclaimed
to carry scouting to them. Work among
youth in this island has been spasmodic

_ and left in the hands of people who cannot
be regarded as ideally suited to the task.
"It is the duty of the general public to give
the utmost co-operation and especially old
scouts who should give of their time to re-
build a Movement which can certainly do
great work among the youth of Barbados.

cans—and,some Britons, too—are
unerringly picked out in New
York now by a_ mechanised
Cupid with a much better scoring
record than the old-fashioned
type armed with nothing but a
bow and arrow.

You feed into a machine a card
punched with holes, These repre—
sent your qualifications and
characteristics, your. dream of
romance, your defects and finer
points—and perhaps just a pass—
ing reference to your bank and
the sort of car you drive. The
thing goes whirrrr, And out pops
a card for a woman matching
your tastes and temperament with
precision,

It is all so scientific. It is called
the ‘Mate-o-Matic.”

“Cupid is my business,” says
the ruler of this machine, amply—
built 50-year-old “friendship
centre tycoon” Clara Lane—
herself happily married without
benefit of ‘““Mate-o—Matic,” which
had not been thought of in her
time, And it is no over statement.

It is a business that provides
motherly Miss Lane with endless
fun, lots of work, plenty of head-
aches—and that best of all cures
for a headache, an income of
around half a million dollars a
year.

From a suite of offices orna—
mented with pictures of couples
whom she hag organised into a
state of wedded bliss she directs
20 “friendship centres” all over
America, She is planning six more.
Further, she is seriously thinking
of opening her first in London,

“I hope to see the day,” said
this former farm girl from Iowa,

the past 10 years she has en-
gineered some 20,000 marriages.
Her clients have intluded an
opera singer, a_ retired judge,
models, showgirls school-teachers,
secretaries by the hundred, doc-
tors, lawyers, businessmen, archi-
tects and even a couple of million-
aires,

Miss Lane operates on the
theory that there is nothing mys-
terious about love. It is something
that can be promoted, When two
people with the desire to love and
be loved are brought together—
well love just materialises, in-
evitably.

To join one of her “friendship
centres” you fill out a question-
aire. “What film did you enjoy
most last year? What is your
favourite restaurant? Dise jockey?
Strip ca¥toon? How do you take
disappointments defeats rever-
sals?

THEN you pay the fee on a
sliding scale. A six-month mem-
bership for a woman under 30,
costs £35. Up to 45 it is £53 10s.
Women listed as “over 45” are ex-
pected to pay £76 10s.

Men whose’ expenses’ are
swollen by dinner bills and enter-
tainment, get off much more
lightly. For them, irrespective of
age there is a flat fee of 17
guineas,

Before acquiring full member-
ship, the prospective client must
fill out a confidential application.
This asks about your sex. age,
height, weight, education, religion
and marital status. Then comes
the really pertinent inquiries:
“Do you own property? A car?
What is your iricome? Hobbies?

Lane or one of her 12 glamourous
assistants (pretty girls, handsome
men) then has a chat with the
matrimony-seeker, “We can usu—
ally tell in a few minutes without
looking at the questionaire,” said
Miss Lane, “what a person is like
and who to introduce him to.”
WHEN a couple believed suit-
able (or proved so by “Mate—o—
Matic”) have been Ified up, for—
mal introductions follow, The
men members are expected at
least to take their dates out to
dinner. Usually members report

jideas” he calls it. That, coming from such a
pen, is perhaps the best compliment to the
designers that they have hit the mark they
aimed at.

The millions that cross the Thames to the
South Bank will probably ask themselves
what will happen to this bit of land when the
Festival moves away. Somebody should pin
up some notices answering that question, but
for the moment nothing has been decided | ~
except that, of course, the Concert Hall will
remain with its front and its restaurant look-
ing on to the river. Most of the Thames water
frontage is crowded with wharfs and indus-
trial plant. Behind the wharfs on this stretch
of the river were little rows of houses, not
very well built in the last century. It is un-
likely that the water front will go back to
industrial use. It will probably be an open
space in front of a new housing settlement.
That is certainly not a very grand develop-
ment for one of the finest bits of the London
river, with a view stretching from the Houses
of Parliament to St. Paul’s. But a great deal of
south London needs rehousing and [ doubt
whether the local authorities will resist the
temptation to take up that bit of open space.
The Skylon and the Dome of Discovery are
up for sale so it is open to some enterprising
promoter to dismantle them and re-erect them
somewhere else. But the Dome of Discovery
does not make a good auditorium. On its
present plan it is not tall enough to have tiers
of seats all round in the form of a real amphi-
theatre. Still it would be a pity to have the
greatest dome in the world taken down in
October and never seen again. The Skylon
would just be a monster advertisement—and
it all depends what it is made to advertise!

The deeper question the visitors to the



back to the centre about the first; South Bank might ask is whether the future

date. New candidates are prompt-
ly produced should the first not
prove up to expectations.

‘An average member requires
six to eight introductions, But
there is in the file a_ tattered
folder covering the affairs of a
48-year-old businessman who has
proved unusually fractious,

“This man,” said Miss Lane,
with an air of faint disapproba-
tion, “has been with us four years,
And despite our very best efforts
is still unmarried. He has, dated,
let me see, 138 of our members
and spent simply untold sums on
entertaining them, But he has not
married one of them yet. Dis-
couraging!”

One would not have supposed
the reluctant bridegroom’s bill of
particulars uriduly hard to fill.
For his future wife he seeks a
Methodist, and one who comes
from the Middle West. Beyond
that all he asks is that she be
small in size, neat of aspect.
plain and soft-spoken.

(World Copyright Reserved)

—LES.

—— |



; LONDON,
Castle Bromwich, 1951, is cer—
y not the exuberant, bust-

lingly expectant Castle Bromwich,

we knew in 1950. :

The bogey of raw material
shortages is there; triumphantly
it stalks across the floor—space of
so many Big Order hopes.

ders? They don't want
orders at Castle Bromwich this
year. At least, that’s the impres-—
sion overseas buyers get if they
visit the same stands as I did;
stands I knew to be interested—
very interested last year—in the
Commonwealth export market.

First, I went to see Birmingham
manufacturers of a wide variety
of kitchen utensils, a firm that
sells to all parts of the world and
particularly to the colonies — to
places as far apart as Hong Kong
and East Africa. The manager
was there. :

“Bit pointless our being here at
all this year”, was his opening
reply to my query as to how
things were going. “In fact. I’ve
left the order book at home”.

He has been exhibiting at
Castle Bromwich ever since the
B.I.F. first opened a section at

Castle Bromwich—31! years ago.









The Bogey Of Castle Bromwic

By DOUGLAS COBBAN

There was no point in accepting,
far less inviting, orders that could
not be fulfilled in view of the
scarcity of raw materials, he said.
He drew fe attention to the al-
most negligible show of goods in
the small glass case outside his
temporary office. ‘We're here
just to keep contact with the old
friends who will be coming along”.

And the worries of export trade
are not confined to the question
of raw materials. Freight charges,
packing costs are all going up.
For a normal wooden packing
case that cost five shillings in the
“bad, old days’, the cost in the
past few months has risen from
33/— to 55/-.

All of which boiled down to
the uncomfortable fact that prices
of domestic utensils for the con-
sumer in the colonies, or else-
where, are on the way up.

If I had hopes of better news
at the next stand I stopped at,
they disappeared—faster than the
men who come to place unwanted
orders. Here I discussed the
problem of chrome and like

metals for which you can get
Ministry of Supply allocation
chits, but which your supply
agent will tell you cannot be met;
not, at any rate, the moment you
want the stuff.

Chrome, for instance, is’the all—
important requirement for the
face-piece of a welcome new
laundering iron that is going to
be very useful to the woman, or
the man, finding himself “at the
back of beyond” and well away
from such conveniences as elec—
tricity or gas. All that is needed
for this iron is paraffin oil.

The overseas demand for this
domestic ally is already big, but
unless supplies of the necessary
raw materials for its making im—
prove tremendously, it will be
difficult to get.

“No; we don’t want orders for
it during the Fair. We just
couldn’t meet them”, an official of
the manufacturers, well-known in
the oil-lamp world, informed me
~almost. brusquely

How is all this bother about
raw materials going to affect the
colonies? Officials at different
stands told me that they do not
think the present position is go-
ing to result in serious reduction
of supplies for old customers.
The worry of exporters is that
they must ignore all the oppor-
tunities for landing new custom-
ers.

From America, as well as the
Commonwealth, come big orders
every year for a British speciality
the portable oil—burning flood-
lighting lamp. But the needs of
Malaya’s anti-Communist forces
for such lamps in the jungle war-
fare would always be a first
priority, a representative of
the manufacturers at Castle
Bromwich told me.

Despite the shortages of mate—
rials, and the attractions of a
dollar market, long-honoured
Commonwealth markets would
not be let down, he declared.
“But we just cannot take on at

the moment any new order that
comes along.” :

“Export market?” The big
Yorkshire sales manager of a
world-wide known firm of copper
tubing manufacturers grunted
sadly. “We haven't got one”.

Yet just a year ago this firm
was rejoicing in the prospect of
bigger and better orders from
such centres as the West Indies—
for sugar and oil refinery works.
“We do quite a bit—sorry, did
quite a bit with the West Indies”,
their spokesman said, But with
the present copper supply prob—
lem, “we are not able to export
at all now”.

The depressing story of my two
hours’ tour had its moment of
relief when I faced a stand with
large and shining rows of alumin-—
ium cooking utensils, stewpans
and the like. The gleam they re—
layed reflected itself in the more
hopeful tones of the manufactur—
ers’~official with whom I chatted.

“Oh yes. I think we'll manage
to meet fresh orders”, he said.
nies there was an inevitable
“Dut” . '

« ws



shape of London will be changed. In the last
20 years the population of London has moved
a great deal. Far fewer people live in the
central’ areas, and far more people in the
suburbs. At the same time, the centre of Lon-
don has allowed its business and its pleasure
to become more and more mixed. Numerous
firms have moved their head offices from their
traditional place in the City of London to the
West End—slipping in between the residen-
tial houses of Mayfair. So the West end has
become more and more crowded. The possi-
ble development is for both business and en-
tertainment to push their way across the
river. But it would need a big stimulus from
officialdom and a complete change in Lon-
doners’ habits. It is just possible this exhibi-
tion may improve the social standing of the
South Bank just as the Paris Exhibition ele-
vated the Trocadero district.

16





Last Novernber the East Afri-
can, West Indian, Australian or
Canadian buyer could have been
assured on ordering that such
aluminium goods would be deliv—
ered to him within two or three
months at the most. The panic
buying from overseas that follow-
ed in the wake of the British
housewives’ panic when warned
that cooking utensils might be-
come scarce resulted in deliveries
overseas being slowed down to
six months. And the prospect
now, in view of the raw materials
position, is delay to as much as
nine months.

There are brighter sides to the
B.LF. at Castle Bromwich
Mechanical ingenuities as well as
mechanical monsters are there to
delight as in other years .

But the sun that shone a year
ago for the opening of this great
northern outpost of the B.I.F. has
been replaced by a_ wintr
wind. It whistles through th
flags of welcome to penetrate most
corners of the vast arena; it add
its chill to an atmosphere heavy
with the sad change—temporary
it is hoped — in Britain’s t:
prospects as comps

aqaing

red with 1950

| NOW

FRIDAY,

MAY





FOR SCHOOL

PHILIPS’

and

ARITHMETIC
READERS

ATLAS
LAYNG’S
ROYAL

Advocate Stationery











No. 505 LIGHT ORLWITE

CURTAIN RAILS

(Aluminum Alley)

AND
STEEL PLATED CADMUM

HOOKS

for heavy or light curtains

ALSO

EXTENSION RODS

Plastic in various colours and Steel





WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.

Successors to

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

*Phones : 4472 & 4687

LTD.




A SYMBOL OF QUALITY



FOR ENTERTAINING PLEASURE
That’s why—YOU SHOULD SELECT

H.M.V. RADIOS and
RADIOGRAMS
e

DA COSTA & CO, L1D.—Blectrical Dept.

SOCCSSSESOSSSPEE SESE EOS OOP OS POOP



FOR

BEST BUYS
VISIT,

DA COSTA'S

IN STOCK FOR

\ YOUR SELECTION

SIMMONS BEDSTEADS

IN THE FOLLOWING SIZES
oft Sin. and 4ft Gins.

ALSO

ALUMINUM =SAUCEPANS

in 7.83.9 and 10 pts.
. e
DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.
Dry Goods Dept.

3 ft.

















Se a re OOS,
x“
s
%
‘
: :
. %
s s
% %
* *
% %
‘ :
* %,
: WHIT-SUN PARTY!
x .
8 %
‘ KEEP A HAM :
x %
R On Hand! LIQUORS OF THE S
-Â¥ FINEST BRANDS 3
. sie * es ?
; Hams in tins (3 sizes) Gola Fraid Rum v
* Weg Hams cut or whole Top Notch Rum %
> Prunier Brandy %
$ Picnic Hams - | Vielle Curé >
$ Sandeman’s Wines xv
g Ox Tongues in tins Gilbey’s Wines %
‘,
Cheese in tins 12-oz, and 5!b Guinness Stout %
con, Bass's Ale S
x Vienna Sausages Worthington's Ale x
% Golden Tree Beer %
Frankfurter Sausages %
% SWEETS for the §&
x Kiddies and YOU! %
+ %.
* Chocolates in Boxes x
& Chocolate Bars »
x Carr’s Cream Biscuits %
& Carr’s Chocolate Lunch >
> 8
$ a %
*
s

+

GODDARDS pbetrver §

< ¢ 4 2)
POOP PPPS PEELE PLPC SEE CPSP SPST CN

ee
FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1951



Looking At Pictures py.

MR. JOHN HARRISON, Art & Exhibitions Officer of
the British Council, gave the last of his series of lectures
“Looking at Pictures” at the Museum this week. The sub-
ject of the lecture was genre painting : this was neither
landscape nor portrait painting, but in a way it combined
both for it depicted people doing something indoors or out

of doors.

Electricity
Supply Problems
Shortage Until1954 AtLeast

Sir John Hacking, Deputy
Chairman (Operations), British
Flectricity Authority, forecast in
a lecture to the Royal Society of
Arts, at a joint meeting with the
Jnstitution of Electrical Engineers,
that demands for electricity would



rot be met in full until 1954 at
the earliest and, with bad weather,
possibly not until after 1958

Any forecast of the position in
future years, he said, was largely
governed by the accuracy of the
estimates of the load to be met
and by the weather which would
be experienced. The time taken
from the initial planning to the
ecmpletion of a new station! was
now some five years. Because of
the many preliminaries necessary
before final consent could be given
to the construction of a new sta-
tion, provisional programmes had,
in fact, to be prepared for six or
seven years ahead, and the diffi-
culties of accurately forecasting
the load to be met at so far
distant a date would be under-
stood.

Estimates

“The authority has, neverthe-
less, made estimates of the
probable position during future
years, and these indicate that even
under the most favourable condi-
tions that is, assuming the
upper limit of plant commissioning
will be achieved and that weathec
of no more than average severity
will be experienced — it will not
be possible to meet the probable
demand in full before 1954, If it
proves impossible to achieve the
higher rate of commissioning, and
if exceptionally severe weather is

. experienced, full demands will not
be met until after 1958.”



12 Months For
Cloth Larceny

Justices G. L. Taylor and
J. W. B. Chenery agreed with the
decision of Mr, H. A. Talma,
Police Magistrate of District “A’
who sentenced George Downes a
labourer of Thomas Gap, St.
Michael to 12 months’ imprison—
ment with hard labour for larceny
when the case came before them
in the Court of Appeal yesterday.

Downes stole a quantity of
cloth on April 6 from an India+
merchant Mohommed Kola, The
value of the cloth was estimated
at £2 5s, : :

Kola said that he was rine his
motor eycle when a buf&ile of
cloth dropped from the motor
eycle to the ground. He saw
Downes pick up the cloth and ge
away with it. Viola Thorne, a
hawker said that the defendant
gave her a parcel to keep for him
but she could not say where he
got it from.

Mr. E. W. Barrow who appeared
on behalf of the defendant sub -
mitted that the evidence was most
unsatisfactory and they should
reverse the decision of the Police
Magistrate.

Their Honours before confirm.
ing the decision, told Downes
that there were slight incon-
sistencies in the evidence but
these had to be expected when
the court had to deal with peo-
ple who did not speak English
as their everyday language.
On the evidence as a whole

they were sure that he was weil
convicted and looking at his
records they saw that in 1949 he
was sentenced to 18 months’ im-
prisonment at the Court of
Grand Sessions.

Appeal costs of 8/4 were also
imposed on Downes.





Guiliv Of Speeding

Keith Rayside of Black Rock,
St. Michael was yesterday ordered
to pay a fine of £6 by monthly

instalments or two months’ im-
prisonment when he appeared
before a City Police Magistrate

on a charge of speeding while
driving the motor lorry I —2217
on Wildey’s Road, St. Michael.

The offence was committed on
April 5, Cpl. Jones of the Traffic
Branch said he was on Wildey’s
Road and checked the speed of
the motor lorry with a stop watch.
He found that it was being driven
at 53 miles per hour and the
speed limit on that read for such
vehicles is 20 miles per hour.

Rayside who pleaded guilty to
the charge is to produce his
licence for endorsement,





B.G. PRODUCTION
OF SUGAR RISING

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, May 7
Despite an early setback due
to weather and the appearance
of Leafscald Disease, British Gui-
“ana sugar estates are pushing up
sugar production satisfactorily .
Total production for the year up
to the week ended April 28, last,
amounted to 61,104 tons, a yield
of 2.96 per acre. Total produc~
tion for the same period in 1950
was 67,036 tons, a yield of 3.40

Ail European painting began as
the art of the church, and it was
through votive painting that all
secular art had its beginnirdgs.
Genre painting, like portrait and
landscape painting also had its
origin in religious art. The earli-
est conversation pictures occurred
in religious pictures where groups
of people enacted a scene such as
the Mother of Our Lord, St. John
and Mary Magdalene at the foot
of the Cross,

Art Patronage

The first patron of art was the
Church. Art in time became more
secular owing to the patronage of
princes, and, as merchants became
more influential they in turn
patronised art. By the 17th cen-
tury, the merchants of Flanders
and Holland had become art
patrons, They required smaller
pictures—cabinet paintings—than
those demanded by the church for
its adornment or by princes for
the embellishment of their palaces,
As the church had commissioned
pictures which glorified bible sto-
ries and the life of Our Lord, and
as princes their own glorification
in battle, hunting, feasting and
other pursuits, so too the Flemisn
and to a greater extent Dutch mer-
chants commissioned works from
painters which glorified their
own prosperity and the rich
comfortable lives led by them-

selves and _ their families,
A large number of these
pictures were of interiors and

domestic scenes, but sometimes
there were outdoor scenes as well.
Dutch artists also sought subjects
from low life and tavern scenes.

In the 18th century, the English
artist Hogarth was the counter.
part of the Dutch painters. He
painted both scenes of low life
and portraits as conversation
pieces. The family was depicted
vs a group living the life of a
family rather than as a number
of persons posing for their por-
traits. In France, Chardin like
Hogarth painted the wealthier
middle class of which he was a
member, but, his pictures are
somewhat reserved and pustere,

English Conversation
Pictures
The 18th century was the’ hey-
cay of the English conversation
picture, Gainsborough liked to
paint portraits of his sitters in
their own landscapes and those of
children in the parks of their
parents. English country-gentle-
men were fond of being painted
with their horses, or, taking part
in sports and pastimes. Gradually,
however, the conversation piece
moved away from direct repre-
sentation. Today the figures are
seldom portraits, but they form
part of a pattern in which they
represent movement,

Allegory

Another use of the human
figure was in allegorical paint-
ings. Opulent figures were used
to describe myths, and equally
opulent settings depicted the
background of the artist’s patron.
Sometimes the allegorical figures
“ere actual portraits of the
patron's family. Allegorical paint-
ing, however, is not popular with
modern artists, Instead, the artist
creates his own myth and sur-
rounds his figures with mystery
as Gaugin did, or, as Stanley
Spencer does today. Frequently
the artist creates a dream world
of limitless planes where strange
figures and objects are depicted
with super-realism.

Religious Art

Mr. Harrison also traced the
history of religious art and pointed
out that artists through the ages
have re-told the bible stories in
settings of their own times. Often
portraits were included in these
religious paintings; a portrait of
a boy with his guardian angel
became “Tobias and the Angel,”
Many parts of these religious
paintings had no connection with
the scene depicted. When the
most miraculous happenings were
taking place in the picture, normal
life continued in other parts of
the painting. This was true of life,
in Chagall’s “Crucifixion,” the per-
secution of the Jews in modern
times occurs in other parts of the
picture. .

The Haitian painters consciously
or unconsciously had grasped this
fdet: life continues whatever mys
teries, tragedies or joys occur. Mr.
Harrison projected by means of
an epidiascope a number of photo-
graphs which he had taken of
murals in the Cathedral of Port-
au-Prince executed by contempor-
ary popular painters,

House Wired:
No Pay?

In the Court of Original Juris-
diction yesterday His Honour Mr.
J. W. B. Chenery gave judge-
ment for plaintiff Keith Weather-
head of Deacons Road, St
Michael, to the amount of $160
in a case he brought against
Iris Prescod of Sea Rock, Christ
Church for debts,

Weatherhead claimed the
amount of $161.30 which he said
was owed to him by Prescod for
some work he did on her house,
This work included the wiring ot
the whole house.

It was alleged that he hired
two men Gilbert Nurse and John
Reid to help him with the work
and Prescod had agreed to puy
him $160 for the wiring.

He claimed that wher the jop
was finished he had not received
a cent from Prescod.





per acre. p se Pere | aa
_ @ y 4 ° .
Guide Movement Is Alive Overseas
LONDON, May 10. members of the scout and guide
Lady Baden - Powell, world’s movement. At every one of the

Chief Guide, fresh from her tour
of the West Indies told a London
Press Conference that the guide
movement was as alive overseas
as it was in Britain—the founder
country.
She said
dies she
number of
aing, as

that in the West In-
was impressed by 9
men and women of
well as ordinary)

street who



eople were
I

p

18 Caribbean islands she visited,
she said, she found “great num-
bers of guides and scouts plod-
ding on against difficulties of
poverty and lack of leaders”.
“Yet they were going on with
their guiding”, she added ‘“be-
cause they love to feel they are
part of one body with its mem-
bers all over the world.”
“Although there are

sO man}



July 1.

appointment.

He will reside at Roseville, St. Peter, when he takes
up office. Dr. A. C. Kirton, P.M.O. of St Lucy, is acting

P.M.O. of St. Peter.

R. J. P. OMAHONY, Direc-

_tor of Medical Services,
carried out his annual inspection
at the St. Peter’s Almshouse
yesterday. Dr, O’Mahony said
that he found the Almshouse in a
very satisfactory condition. Miss
L. Hinds ig Matron.

NUMBER of new books, fic

_tion, and non-fiction, were
received at the Speightstown
Library yesterday. They will be
in circulation from to—day.

Among them were “Struggle
for Germany”, “Marriage Hand-
book”, “The Natural History o,
Mosquitoes”, “Conversations ot
Dr. Johnson”, “Modern Law of
Nations”, “Jane Austin”, “Cosma
Gordon Lang”, “The History of
Sugar Cane”, “Queen of To
morrow”, “The Saviour of the
Navy”, “Wonder That Would Be”,
“The Range Hawk” and “Doo
Between”.

The Librarian, Miss E. Jordan,
told the Advocate that she has
been receiving grants of books
from various subscribers. One
of the gifts, “Bungalow by the
Beach” by Derrick Ball, has its
plot laid in Grenada.

Ske said that the Library's
staunch subscribers are Dr. Cha!-
lenor of New York, Mrs, Lloyd-

Thomas, Mrs.'Sheldon, Mr. C
Shepherd and Mr. Edward
Powell, She received 43 books

on March 15.
CHORAL GROUP, known as
the Assembly Singers, has
been formed in Speightstown.
The group is 20 strong. Its pur-
pose is to promote voice culture
and music appreciation.

The group’s President is
I. Byer and Miss E. Jordan
Vice-President. Mrs.
Haynes, wife of Mr, “Josh”
Haynes is the Musical Director
and Miss M. Hurley is Accom-
panist. The group has a Steering
Committee.

ARROWS HOUSE, bordering

on St. Lucy and St. Peter,
is still on the “agenda” for dis-
cussion by the Commissioners of
Health for the two parishes.

It was to be decided a week
ago at a scheduled meeting of
these * vo »odies what was to be
done with the property. Farrows
is jointly owned by the St. Peter
and the St. Lucy parishes, The
meeting was not held as the
Commissioners of Health of St.
Lucy did not attend the meeting.

HE HIGHEST FINE imposed
during the week by District
“E” Police Magistrate, Mr. S. H.
Nurse, was one of 20/- and 3/-—
costs imposed on Joan Boyce of
Grave Yard, St. Lucy, for inflict-
ing bodily harm on Iola Austin,
She has to pay the fine in 7 days
or undergo one month's im-
prisonment.

Iola Austin of the same locality
was fined 12/— and 3/— costs with
an alternative of 14 days im-
prisonment for inflicting bodily
harm on Joan Boyce.

The second highest fine
posed by Mr. Nurse was 15/— and
1/— costs on Joseph Cumber
batch of Benny Hall, St. Peter
who drove a lorry overloaded
with canes,

There were fines for
guarding, cruelty to
causing disturbance,
language, assault and
offences.

T. PETER had another dry

week. The rainfall returns
at District “E’ Police Station re-
corded only 30 parts of rain up
to yesterday, The 30 parts of
rain fell on Monday night.

Planters of the parish agree that
they were two good weeks for
reaping their crops. They have
made much of them,

ISHERMEN returned to the

Speightstown fish market
during the week with fair catches
of flying fish and dolphin, Some
fishing boats got in late and the
fish were sold cheaper than the
scheduled price of 6c. each, Some
of the fish were teken to Bridge-
town,

Mr.
iy

Mona

im

black-
animals,
indecent
traffic





ON MURDER
CHARGE
Samuel Beckles of Marley
Vale, St. Philip, was taken
to Dr. Hutson's home, Ster-
ling, St. Philip at about 11.30
o'clock yesterday morning.
He was suffering from a

gunshot wound and died
shortly afterwards.

Thirty - three — year -o ld
Joseph Holligan, a cousin, is
held in connection with the
incident. He appeared be-
fore City Police Magistrate
Mr. H. A. Talma yesterday
on a charge of murdering
Samuel Beckles and was re-
manded until today.



GOLDEN GOOSE

HONG KONG

Revenue officers seized a live
goose from six coolie women at
Hong Kong recently. They found
gold had been forced down its
gullet. Then they bagan cracking
peanuts the women had brought
with them. Most of the shells
contained gold. Total haul? About
£6,250.

dreadful things in the world to-
day, there is this ‘big thing’ of
doing constructive work amongs'
boys and girls the world over.”

Lady Baden-Powell’s arrival

a4
a

St. Kitts, the last stop on het
Caribbean tour was delayed. Shc
was pleased and surprised to
find however, that guides were
waiting for her though it wa
11.30 p.m

—Reuter.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Peter



CARIB FESTIVAL

The Caribbean Festival fea-
turing Music, Dance, Arts and
Crafts of the Caribbean wil)
not be held in August 1951.
The new date has been fixed
for August 1952 and the Fes-
tival Will be held in San Juan,
Puerto Rico.





U.S. SEEDS COME

The S.S. Trya which arrived
here on Monday, brought a sup
rly of seeds from America for the
Seed section of the Agriculturs
Department,

Seeds were scarce for the past
week, but now the Department has
ell 1ypes of sveds usually asked
for hy local planters,

Seeds ure sold between 9 and 11
a.m, and 12 noon and 3 p.m. from
Mondays to Fridays and half dav
on Saturdays.

Among the types of seeds whicit
are now in stock are, beets, onions,
cauliflowers, beans and carrots,

One of the jobs of the seed
clerk is to parcel out seeds so as
not to detain customers.

—_—

Reader Appointed P.M.O.
Of St.

TJ). F. G. READER, who has recently been appointed

P.M.O. of St. Peter, is expected to take up office from
Dr. Reader is first completing his contract with
the Barbados General Hospital before taking up. the







Stole White Lead

A City Police Magistrate yes
terday sentenced George Prescoa,
a labourer of Rouen, St, Michael
te 12 months’ imprisonment witn
hard labour for larceny, Prescod
stole one tin of white lead valued

at £2. 4/4, the property of
Messrs. Plantations Ltd, on
May 9.

Harbour Police Constable 25
Gill who brought the case, told

the court that he was on patrol
duty on Lower Bay Street when
he saw the defendant with a
parcel under his arm. He stopped
him and on opening the parcel
saw it was a tin of lead, He asked
him how he came by it and
receiving no satisfactory expla.
nation from the man he took him
to the Bridge Station where the
tin of lead was identified as the
property of Messrs Plantations
Ltd,

Prescod has four previous con
victions for larceny.



Canes Lost Ir. Fire

A cane fire at River Plantation,
St. Philip on Wednesday evening

burnt eleven acres of first and
* second crop ripe canes. They are

the property of Messrs. DaCosta &

Co. Ltd sea were insured
Another fire at Congo Road
Plantation, St. Philip on Wednes
day night burnt five acres of
second crop ripe canes and four
eres of second crop ratoons,

property of Oldbury Estates Ltd
These were also insured,



Princess Alice
*‘Playing”’ Field

Even A_ Football

A COOL BREEZE was

at 1.30 p.m. when the Advocate visited Princess Alice Play-

ing Field.

There was such a contrast between the cool and restful

aimosphere there and that

the heat, that, had a few benches been placed along the
outskirts of the grounds, there should be a rush at meal-

times for city workers to sit

However only a dozen or so
sheep were grazing in grass which
was a foot deep at most parts of
the very uneven surface of the
Field.

No attempt could be made to
play any ball game there as even
a football is in danger of being
lost for some time,

Employees of the Sanitary De-
partment had just sprayed some
refuse on the harbour side of the
field with oil. There were tins
and bits of paper, and two large
parts of a disused seweve’ pipe
nearby. .

: Smouldering Fire

A fire was burning and had

been burning for the last two
weeks.
This stuff had been dumped

there to fill in the gap between
the breakwater and the field
proper. The rains had laid bare
most of the surface and paper
and tins became exposed, The
wind added to the nuisance by
Strewing much of it over the
grass.

Because residents in the sur-
rounding area have complained
of the odour and the flies, dump-
ing has ceased for the past few
wecks,

A barbed wire fence is being
erected around that part of the
field leading from the entrance
to the pavilion, A water meter
has been positioned above the
gicund and. must be only tem-
porary since it would corstitute
a danger to anyone playing
games on the field,

Two tennis courts have been
cut and are in a fair state of
repair, but the area immediately
around them is so uneven that if
players ran off the court they
might be severely injured,

Leg Broken

A lady playing tennis there
recently, fell and broke her leg
having slipped on the worn end
cf a part of the lawn.

Attempts have been made to
plant two trees and these have
been carefully fenced off,

The cricket pitch has disap-
peared and in its place is a worn
uneven patch where the grass has
refused to grow.

Vehicles which have come
across the ground have left ruts
so well defined that they could
now be called unofficial roads.



~

















Digestive
Upsets

After extensive research,
De Witt’s Laboratories have

roduced De Witt’s Antacid

ablets, new companion-

roduct to their renowned

owder. They are the most
convenient way of checking
digestive disorders away from
home, No water requived—
just dissolve one or two on the
tongue for prompt relief
anywhere, Pleasant tasting
De Witt's Antacid Tablets
are separately ce//-sealed for
freshness, In handy tear-off
strips for pocket or handbag.
Try them today.





ANTACID
TABLETS

No water needed
Easily carried anywhere — Cell-sealed

@ For home use—
Here's the family standby

@ Quick'y soothes DeWITT’S

and settles

upset stomach ANTACID
@ Lasting effects POWDER



i

Would Get Lost

coming off the sea yesterday

\

: : . »,
of Bridgetown, sweltering in| x n “y
x
\% eto
< °

and eat their lunch in comfort.







When your throat feels
dry and scratchy from harsh
coughing or over-smoking,
ust let a soothing, delicious
icks Cough Drop bathe your
irritated throat
membranes with
throat-easing medi-
cinal ingredients of
Vicks VapoRub.
Really medicated!
Really soothing] ‘





bicycle
im the

world
carries this
mark of
perfection

mone

The Aristocrat




HUMBER



A Home Of
Tins And Card

ALL that her neighbours
know about her is that her
name is Miss Payne and that
she has no relatives, but in
the seclusion of her small
home on Welches Land near
Nurse Land, she does not talk
to anybody.

The little house is near the
Nurse Land refuse bin. Before
Combermere School was built the
house used to be on Weymeuth
basture. It is made of tins, bags,
paper, boards, anything which has
«x broad side and could keep out
vain. For instance, if Miss Payne
found a discarded condensed milk
tin in the bin, she would beat it
flat to patch her home,

There is one sinall note through
which Miss Payne enters hei
house. She has to bend low when
she is entering.

The floor is made of stones and
marl and there is such a hea;
of other things within beside
that she cannot do much moving
around. Almost throughout the
day though, smoke can be seen
coming from inside,

Always Busy

Miss Payne seidom leaves home
She just seems to be busy all day
with the laying out of her home

She brings water from the pipe
in bottles and wares she used to
“ell for a living years ago.

When Miss Payne lived as
Weymouth, her house was built
of the same material and it used
to fall down occasionally then
too as it does now. Her neigh
bours always help her to get
things ‘ship shape’ again after
a high wind.



She seems very absent-minded
end her hair is very grey though
she seems to be only in her late
fifties.

Yet such a strange woman ha
a hobby which her means cannot
now afford, She likes fowls an
when she used to keep them o1
Weymouth, they would sleep in
the same little place. Each fowi
had a name, She would say,
“Come here Mike”, and the cock
would come.



SSS POSSE
°
‘.





LET US DISPENSE
YOUR DOCTORS’

SLES E LSPS OP PSPS PSS
SSCS L LEE LLELCLLLE

y
PRESCRIPTIONS x
‘
y
e §
x
% In Illness . %
% you need two friends— %
%)
s¢ your DOCTOR and. ,. .
% your DRUGGIST,
¢ To ensure that your ¢
% doctor's wishes are accom. X
x plished, take your next x
x Prescription to... . , s
@ WEATHERHEAD’S DRUG %
g STORE
% where you can be sure of .
st obtaining drugs of high
% quality, accurately dis-
st pensed in minimum time
x and at a moderate price >
st Remember—we serve you x
x DAY and NIGHT
+
$ °
N bY
Bruce N
R sy
% %
s W
s Weatherhead Lid. 3
e Weatiernead Lid. &
%,
Tel Nos—Day 2164, 2165, %
* Night: 3144, 3240, 4189. 9
a
‘

The Humber
is your guararrse of lasting
quality, fine appearance and
unrivallcd strength, The
World's leading quality
bicycle carries ‘this mark of
distinction.

trademark |






of all Bicycles

NX
\. FULL RANGE







For Single or

Double Beds





LIONESE SHEETS

90" x 108” ea. $8.29
80" x 100” ea. ... $7.01
70” x 90” ea $5.52

COTTON PILLOW
CASES

19” x 30” en. $1.45

DAMASCLENS

50” wide in Blue, Rose,
Gold, Green & White
per yard . .. SL98
Huckaback Towelling

in Gold, Rose Blue and

Green 15” wide per
RUE RaoscsBerecscricices $1.02
In White

per yard oo... Mle

a LT ed





NO FLEAS

ON THIS
DOG...

Equally effective
against parasites
en poultry.



pests on domestic animals and poultry.

Also in packings

“LOREXA

DUSTING POWDER

PAGE FIVE











CAVE

SHEPHERD
S& Co, Ltd.

10—13, Broad St.





*Lorexane’ Dusting Powder, containing pure
gamma B.H.C., is a potent killer of insect

It is

pleasant and non-irritant to animal or user,

In convenient sprinkler-top containers of 100 grammes.

500 grammes and 3 kilos.

TRADE MARK

of

IMPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED

A subsidiary company of Imperial Chemical Industries Limited

WILMSLOW

Sole Agents and Distributors

A. S. BRYDEN & SONS

SERB RRR ESEe BER eS
“PURINA”

LAYENA

see

gill. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—pistributors.

(BARBADOS)

MANCHESTER

LIMITED
Ph.57

KE!





%

4,

oe

KRAFT CHEESE

SWIFT'S CHEESE
DANISH SALAMI

; MORTADELLA
CRUSHED PINEAPPLE
COLUMBIAN PINEAPPLE
STEPHEN’S NAVY
HAMBURGER STEAK



FLEES OD

44,4, <
PEEL APLE LALO LLLP LEO?

ORDER THESE FINEST FOOD

for the Holidays

PICKLES

LUNCHEON BEEF WITH CE
PERLSTEIN BEER
$ * ,
% OC .
& COCKADE

STANSFELD SCOTT & Co.. Ltd.

6.656.656.6666 OC OO88C8OOO

5 SREP P PSP OPES OOOO FOES POOF P°PPPAVOISTT
4%,

JOY OUR
TO-DAYS

SPECIALS



CALL

IN
KNIGHTS — PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN

PLLA LPL ALCO SCALPEL OLE

AT

GCF PPSSSOS

v
AAAI LL IOLI â„¢

Sy otetet lt.
y

.
%
3
x
;
.
:
Â¥
°
»
ny
>
o
x
%
144% Pkt. $ .39
per Tin 57
per 5% Tin 3.72
per 1 41
per Bb 44 g
per Tin 24
per Tin ~o4
per Jar 84 x
per Tin 44 x
SREAL per Tin “527 Q
per Bottle 18 §
per Carton 4.00 %
FINE RUM %
»
XX
%
PSOE POOP OOOOSSS SSO.
PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MAY li, 1951
BY CARL ANDERSON



—






The World’s Greatest
SKIN OINTMENT




HAVE YUR
EYES
EXZAMINED

| A REMINDER








BUY
PEEK
FREAN





Zam-Buk

$odthing, Healing, Antiseptic
Keep a box always handy

GOooD
THINGS
for YOU

» WINCARNIS WINE
Large Bots. .. $2.88
Small Bots... $1.56

RESERVA WINE
Large Bots. .. $2.38

CRAWFORDS CLUE
CHEESE BISCUITS
BP vg ctisscess $1.26

PEEK FREANS
BISCUITS in Tins
OLIVE OIL—in Tins

CHEF SAUCz.
in bots. ........ 138
Rich & appetising

“BLACKBUCK”
SAUCES—Bots. 24

FOR GOOD VALUE

} INCE & Co., Ltd.

6, 7, 3 & 9 Roebuck Street.
Dial 2236





AL King Peetaieg Bir Achat a 4-18

BY WALT DISNEY

eee einen












—-——— |

MICKEY MOUSE

coo | Or
re. ET a
(SETTLED IN YOUR HOUSE |

,/








OM .. t GUNSS WE CAN |
IT HEZE FOR A
LITTLE WHILE!

OF COURSE ...IT ISN'T VERY FANCY ! )
YOU CAN GET YOURSELF SOMETHING
BIGGER LATER ON!













Cope: Wenn, &
World Righs F —y

BY CHIC YOUNG



BLONDIE





































See eae | ee IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
7 MY SCISSORS AND TO THINK. )
DADDY, WILL YOu LAST DOLLAR FROM WHAT BECAME 1S DULL--1 LAND TO THINK, ) | ia
JAKE YOUR NAP SOME YOUR PANTS POCKET?)| |OF My \ USED YOUR (JUST TOpay ee reer ee
“(Ne WANT TO PLAY ener “Ss CRT | Sweet was ) | SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only
meh 'N HERE ad party TD So gfLINOLEUM (| MARRIED yr | ; Keo ies
| “We a Te ee, | USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
: " i oi ‘ a | j
ABR Sa — ae a f MOIRS CHOCOLATES PLANTERS PEANUTS ‘
© t,) \ os. dl iB per PKG, __ is aiiinaoiinasiacl 9¢ghge. AO TINS 96 85
del SH Lt Ray eS ROWNTREES COCOA GREEN SEAL RUM












TINS 3 Sos ae 20 BOTS. (large) 1.08 38



CARR'S CHEESE CRISPS & HEINEKENS BEER
CLUB CHEESE BISCUITS tins 1.20 96 BOTS.

26 21





TTL

I i |










Ltd. Broad Street

—

—-— r rm A =
YOU THINK (LLLET ; HH “i SuSs ‘iy Se SS ban
YOURE NOT YOU. TELL THE WORLD ae IY aS Vinee Si | | |
GOING TO 'M ONE OF THE - | i} TT
SHOOT ME! BANK ROBBERS? , \ a iN WAM ae ay Tg
GUESS AGAIN! & zi . ih , ~w \y)











































Keiller’s Orange
Squash
Keiller’s Lemon

ON THE WATER MAY

FLARE UP? TOGIVE UPTHE AQ\! WON'T QUIT?

SRI NONT 7 te —
fe} f

APG

Lie

Rose’s Lime Juices- | ap . Grapes Frankfurter Sausages
|
|

-

| .

14% . Strawberries Vienna Sausages ORDER $

; %,

Some cozy Pineappe Pieces | Cooktait Sausages EARLY §
Brockes’ Orange | %

> 4 -
Squash 0 ee Cane SR a cA



Brookes’ Lime Juice! , , Crushed Pineapple
Cordial

10- and 16: vz. tins Jersey Toma Li : ae ; ALLEYNE ARTHUR
to Juice 2-oz tins Trinidad Orange Juice
16-02. tin Golde Glor Fomate! » Trinidad Mixed Juice 5 Y
Coc ktail a ager - » Trinidad Grapefruit & i or) Ltd.
20-oz. tin Citrus Cocktail Tuice Juice

Bahamas Pine Apple 16-oz. tins Pure Purple Green | 7 7, .
Juic e : . Grape vent : | “} ow Rr GROCERS”

i

AES

{eo ers 74 4% 4 355355659909 SOS 9 GOSSS5S995699S SSF 599 99S S9 O99 9O9" DOOPOSS IOSD FOSS OOP FOTO
% »
1s i °
1% . ©
K a> N :
* 4, s
my >
1% id °
1% ms
be »
;% xy
A »,
* 3
* &
+ - »,
y >
* $
a és MS
‘ ry T. x
3 THERE AIN'T NO JUSTICE s
ee ¥
1%
eaeged nies, x . »
pasialas pcineny = Guy _ 8 By JAMES CURTIS. y
Tt KNOW THOSE |" ST ei ep ean 1% $
| "LAUGH 3" WILL it ‘ = | : AND AG MI 4 1 @ % ‘aie i . s
Se Oven we yew May | | Ge | ca ee ls THE SPOTTED DOG *
| Tâ„¢ Sree? | pe { Cen | WE qe | %
! Ket — ‘, >
oe | My we By ANTHONY TROLLOPE. %
\y *. yy . ‘ “ ‘
ma an -~ } : & >
LA ton % . ’ x x
~— , SORRY YOU’VE BEEN TROUBLED x
1% S
1§ f 2 3
x By PETER CHEVERY. 8
s
_
x a ‘ *
s THE BELOVED PHYSICIAN s
hs { .
* ~
% By NAOMI JACOB. x
% , x
‘ —__ADVOCATE STATIONERY.
' | 1 {8 é ATE STATIO - §
THAT'S THE Us? ! { Cure? OK, I..1 FORGOT. z z
HOUGE... MY — , “Pe ce z eon oll gor Soesnssosess, Oi “ito patito", “rtrty “4 ottess BHCOBOSS SOROS SOCIO SO FOROSESEF! GCSE OOS SORO SSO OOOO GONSS.
. ROOM |S ON THE me : DOOR! £\ *~ ”) EY: EP LLP LALLA LLL LALA LA PPLE PPL PLE PPO LPP ODPL PPD SLEEP ALEPPO ALAS EO SC PEPSPSOSOOOG,
7. SECOND FLOOR... c . 3
y Z 1 fy . - 3
I | | » eas . :
ry Wa V4 E x
1% aN - y
RS os ef pa ae. $
| a x
‘ } ' >
* ~ ‘ 7 , | , . r ‘ 4 .
< DELIGHTFUL CANNED CHOICE x
* | “
“ Y ‘hy @& Pr y ‘ . .
: SUICES FRUIM HAM x
‘
* 3
| .
% “Large Bots. avis +e gh | Large Tins L.K.B. Peaches} Fine quality Leg Hams 11—16tbs $
% ” » obinsoen's range %
z Bav'ley Water » Carlton Peas Tinned Hams ith, 2} ths, 6—8 Ibs, ‘ %
% aoe we | ». Bendigo Apricots 10—12Ibs, — also Sliced to order ff RU 3
b ey Wi ; : 4 rm %
sont ane eacoNeee oO NoraorusIntoO] |S Rose's Lemon § yuash | .. Koo Guavas Montadella Sausages — Sliced tof} AWTS x
THEY THINK OF NEXT? GET | | BOTH ESCAPED? THE THIS MESS! ITS UP * Squash ‘er ., Solid Pack Apples order e Cs % t
TO SHORE FAST! THEOIL J [GAMBLERS DID THATS & ease %
DIANA, YOU'VE GOT A DANDERS UP! *
ws
my
*
x
&
s
‘
‘%
‘
Ys
s*
Ky
ss
s*
*

PPG OS

POSSESSES

FAA OOF OAD AOD SHEA LAA AEA BAAR OBDEAEGEE ODOR S
5 LCL LLL LLL POLO




FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS. |. rom mvt

TELEPHONE 2508

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a



word Sundays.
For Births, Marriage or ent
announcements in Carib ing the FOR SALE HOUS oS
chaige is $3.00 for any number of words ES

up to 50 and 6 cents pe- word for escn| | Minimum charge week 72 cents and

re

. Terms . Phone 2508| 96 cents Sundays 24 words -— over 34 BAGNOR, Constitution Road, Drawing

between 830 and ¢ Dm. atis tor Desth words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a/ Dining and 3 bedroom: with running
5 ps and toilet, usual
11.5. S1--t.. fn,

word Sundare water, Kitchen, Bath

Notices only after 4 p.m. offices. Phone 38U2

The narge announcements of

Births, 7 hon Deaths, ar |
men) Memoriam ices if

ee on Getene oe Tae on teeaes| AUTOMOTIVE

tor any number of words up to 80, and/ “An Glo il, melan Parr he Prefect Ford. Engine |°%, May. Apply Frederica Fitzpatrick
8 ae ORE re on weakecays ane | recently overhauled. Price $450.00. Apply: | Telephone—3538, £8. Sert
4 cents per word on Sundays for eac L. A. Corbin, Boarded Hall Piantation Seni
additionai word. 11.5518 FLAT—Beaumont, Hastings unfur-

nished. Dining and Sitting room 2 bed-













CAR—Vauxhall 14 six with 4 good
DIED tyres, in good working condition, price Dial—2636
reasonable. Apply F, D. L. Gay, Staple 10.5. 51—2n

TAKE NOTICE

INGRAM-—On May 10th, 1951 Maude 1b
PABLUM

Ingram. The funeral leaves from the
That MEAD JOHNSON & COMPAI'Y,













—t.in.

—_—_—__

f Mr. Bugene R. Donovan, CARS: This week's offer: One 192

tay weinet, at 430 p.m. to-day for} model Mercury Sedan. New tyres and

the Westbuny Cemetery. Friends are} engine in good condition. Ideal for taxi

invieda. No reasonable offer refused. Ring 4908,
. R. Donovan. B'dos. Agencies Ltd

en renee 11,5.51—1n 8.5.51—6n



Th re | laws of the. State of Indiana Unit
PHILLIPS—On May 10th, 1951 at het CAR—Hillman Car M—1199 in good| States of America, whose trade or

si ce, Silver Sands, Christ Chureh.}| working order Apply Frank Proverbs] business address is Ohio Street and Si.
coe Phillips. Her funeral leaves} C/o Harold Proverbs & Co., Ltd., High | loseph Avenue, Evansville, State of In-
al ence
teas mn Parish Chureh. Friends | - ————_—___———____________ tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
are invited, WAGGON: One 1942 V-8 Ford Station | Register in respect of specially prepared
Wakefield, Wilfred, Mitehell, Jane, | Waggon in perfect condition, Apply 3508 | foods for human use and pharmaceutical
Lydia, Ada, Bessie (children). or 3743. 22.4.51—t.f£.n. | Preparations which supply nutritional
= p NSA) | — ene | Heeds, and will be entitled to register
ELECTRICAL the same after one month from the th

day of May, 1951, unless some perron

— = | shall in the meantime give notice in











RADIO: One Hallicrafter 9-Tube, $40 | duplicate to me at my office of opposit'on
TAKE NOTICE Radio, almost new. Phone 3757. L. M,|of such registration. The trade mark
Clarke, James Street 8.5.51—3%] can be seen on application at my _ office.

Dated this 25th day of April, 1951.
H,. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

9.5.61—3n
That THE CELOTEX CORPORATION, 2 FURNITURE— At Ralph's Furniture

corporation organized and existing under! Show Room, Hardwood Alley. A large 7
TAKE NOTICE

’
‘
‘
! ‘
the laws of the State of Delaware, ga selection of new and second-hand fur-

FURNITURE

CELOTEX



States of America, whose trade or busi- | Miture all at Bargain Prices. For inquiry
ness address is City of Chicago, state of | Ringe 4683 5.51—3n
Iliinois, U.S.A., has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of wall board and
similar building material, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day.of May, 1951
unless some person shall in the meantime
give notice in duplicate to me at my





























LIVESTUCK

; siosinicisieeatoehcabamdeinesaiaedinonatntninstiogseord

COW: One (1) Brown Cow due to
calf in a weeks time, gave 33 pints with
Jast -calf. For particulars. Fhone 3073





11.86.5131
ee of opposition of such registration, | —_—_—_ 7
@ trade mark can be seen on applica- \
Gen al wy clipe. MECHANICAL °



Dated this 16th day of April 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade M

nplienireti-aieaietisticeipaipesasialbatin. send

BICYCLE: B.S.A_ three-speed, in first That BROOKE, BOND & CO. LIMIT-
class condition. Apply Mr Green, Biaycle |BD, Tea and Coffee Dealers, a British
Repairer, Lower Bay Street. Compan: whose trade or business

11.8.51—1n | address Caleutta House, Goulston
———__ +--+... - —____.. | Street, Aldgate, London, E., England, has

BICYCLE—One Gent's Silver King|#PPiied for the registration of a trade
Hercules Bicycle, with light, lock and}Mark In Part "A" of Register in respect
good tyres. Phone 4239. of tea, coffee, mixtures of coffee and

9.5.51~2n | chicory, coffee essence and coffee and
aoe chicory erence, ang will be See to
—_—_———

TYPEWRITERS — Shipment of new | Tesister the same a ter ane month from
model “Olympia” Portable Typewriters | t# 9th day of May, 1951, unless some
just received—see these superb machines Perera shall in the meantime give notice
before committing yourself, A. G. S cumlcete re me ff my omtiog of ee:
St. Hill, Dial 3199° 29.4 51—c.0.d_|Sitlon of such registration. je trade

ark ean be seen on application at my
a ce

TYPEWRITER: Underwood, Standard,

full length carriage, In good condition Dated this 26th day of April, 1961,

Apply: Mrs. D, Moore, Bank Hall Main Radiatend ee are tee
Road, opposite second Avenue

11,.5.51—1n 9.5.51—3n

ee eee TAKE NOTICE

ACTUMUS — The Root Hormone Fer-
tilizer, from H. Keith Archer's Drug





TAKE NOTICE

FLYING FISH

That BROOKE, BOND & CO. LIMIT-
D, Tea and Coffee Dealers, a_ British
Company, whose trade or business
address is Calcutta House, Goulston
Street, Aldgate, London, E., England, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A’ of Register in respect
ot tea, coffee, mixtures of coffee and chi-
cony, coffee essence, and-coffee and chi-
covy essence, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 9th day of May, 1951, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppos+
ition of such registration. The trade mark





















—_ @
oat i seen on application at my office. more. 3.5.51—5n,
is 25 Se nearer ti
ated this 25th eee A ACTUMUS . 45 sawing

Power — from H. Keith Archer's Drug

Store, 3.5.51—5n,
eee reinsert ee
ACTUMUS — Controls Insect Pests —

from H. Keith Archer’s Drug ee. That THE MAGGI CO,, Manufacturers,

- a ores Ce nnreree, oeeNEne ae the
laws of Switzerland, whose trade or
is ae a ea gone. im 1 fSvt; | business address is 'Kempttal, Zurich,
Manure. From H Keith eames Dr Switzerland, has applied fer the regis-
Store. 5 Y 3651-5. tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
‘ ne on Br Register in respect of substances used ™

food or as ingredien n » especia
Peles dieames — BR Sper of 0 soups, bouillons, and seasonings, and wiil
tion of soils. From H. Keith ames be entitled to register the same after one
Drug Store, : 3.5.51—5n, | month from the 9th day of May, 1951,
s ~ ‘| unless some person shall in the mantis
ACTUMUS — time give notice in duplicate to me a
Marian, 3.80 . Frodpoed Boars es my office of opposition of such registra-
disease at the roots of plants, From H.|%0". The trade mark can be seen on

Keith Archer's Drug Store 3.5.51—5n, | @PPlication at my office.

Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.5.51—3n







TAKE NOTICE

QUAKER

















AKE NOTICE

(12 cups and saucers) believe to be
Stafford, Old cut glass Decanters, sev-
eral Ivory Jewel Boxes, miniature hand
painted pottery and numerous old plates,

ee

EUREKA--Enterprise Road. Purnisied
Bungalow. Telephone, Refrigerator, and
modern conveniences. Available middie

rooms, running water; Kitchen with ¢as;
usual conveniences. No pets or children,

& corporation duly organized under (the



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
PUHLIC SALES



PUBLIC NOTICES

Tea cents per agate line on week-days

and $1.80 on Su:



NOTICE

The Board begs to notify the teact

that the Written Exam. takes pi
SATURDAY June und st 9.48





the Ursuline Convent. Ail formes aad fe | sq ft land, and 1,982 eq: ft. road. Dial

must be in by May 25th.
A. INNISS, \S.R
AyshiorJ
11,3.51—1n



NOTICE oe
stonewall

Re I
GLADYS ee HARDING

Persons having any debt or claim against | James Street, on Friday 1@th May M51
the Estate of Gladys Albertine Harding | at 2 p.m

late of the parish of Saint Michael, who

January 1951, are hereby required to
send particulars of their claims duly

attested, to the undersigned Albertha 11,3.51—Tn

Harding the qualified Administratrix of

——————
the Estate of the deceased, in care of EVANTON—Situated Lower Maxwell

; AS) Hill
Street. Bridgetown oe Pasi vanec | {© having 3 Bedrooms two 12 by 13 {t
which date I shall proceed to distribute | @°4 One 12 by 13 ft with built in Cup-
the assets of the deceased among the | Poards
parties entitled thereto having regard | Separate Dining Reom 12 by 13 ft. and a

Messrs, Carrington & Sealy of Lucas
fore the 27th da



|
had notice,

Ten cents per agate tine on week-aay.
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, and 12 cent per ugate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days| minimum cnarge

and $1.80 om Sundays



REAL ESTATE

_—_——
SUITABLE BUILDING SITE: «ituated

206 Day and 3465 Night 2.5.5i—4.f.n IT aS anne
ing 2 reods, |

. In tion on application to Mr. J. A
died in this Island on the 24th day of Grimtn the tenant eee :
YEARWOOD & noycr

Solicitors

Poe ig eS A by

» for| Street. 5.5.51-—in | d . U.S.A. vis-| then have had notice, and that I wili} sink vo fully tt otlets and Shower
t 4.30 p.m. to-day fo . ‘ana, U.S.A., has applied for the revis | not be Hable for the assets or any part| complete with fittings. The property is
| thereof so distributed, to any person of | Constructed
Whose debt or claim 1 shali then have | Fioors. Also a drive in Two ear garage

2 servant's

decea:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all] sale by Public Competition at our

PAGE SEVEN

wantk» | SHIPPING NOTICES

Minimum charge week 12 cents
|

eee







96 cents Sundays 24 words over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents

$1.5C on week-days
word Sundays,





SOUTHROUND

Canadian National Steamships

Satis Set Satle Arrives
Wortrest Herre Boston Barbados Barbados


























rin & i ted , Ale 4 CAN. < TREC TO ; = 1° i: uae 28 May
at ¥i 2, 0.978 iTadi ue bt xander flouse > » - ia M ; 19 Mey MA ae lav
entnor Gardens, Ch. Ch. Area 1 James Street 9.5 = pa — . . ae Ss s AA
; y aie CAN, CHALLENGEN 26 M 1M 32 May 73 8 June
Di oe wee | geetecns ee et post cf Secretary | LADY RODNEY [2.8 dune 6 June 21 June 2 June 22. June
DWELLINGHOUS® and Land contain. 1 egtapher in or office, Suitable} any NELSON ** 90 June 3 Juls & July 14 July 18 July
T Perches adjoining the | (R's bald to ihe right person. Avply| tApy RODNEY +230 July 2 Aug. 4 Aug 13 Aug. 14 Aug.
*« | property kown as “The Abbey", Christ c re sig Sanitary Laundry Co. Lic
This property is a newly built | Country ad. 8.5.51 —t.f.n z Sale nisddeieiaenamic —
dwellinghouse comprising |
living rooms, bedrooms, usual conveni- TARY eee PRIVATE SECRE NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
ences and belongs to Ervin Jerome King. | 7 ~ English, experienced shorthand Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax Montreal
tw typist requires employment for one or » ‘ 5 Ju wd oa 16 June 19 June
The above property will be set up for] two days week, own typewriter. High.| LADY NELSON .. 3 June ne 14 June ao
est U.K. references x No. AC. C LADY RODNEY .. 8 Juiy 5 July 14 July - 16 July y



LADY NELSON ..27 Juhy 29 July 7 Aue 9 Aug. 12 Aug.

Advoante: Se. LADY RODNEY °.26 Aug. 38 Aug 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 13 Sept.

°
|
Responsibh harge of
commtenen Wepemtnant te neuen 2 it , ; | N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vessels fitted witn cold storage cham.
not later than Ist July — Salary $200.00 | bers. Passenger Mares and freignt rates on application to-—
Â¥4 P !
{

40.00 per month depending on quali! ey

penlcauion tg Secteur: bowing Fc GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. — Agents.

application to Secretar», Dowding Fstat

& Trading Company, Lid.
standing on 19,000 «q



9.8.51—5n | eth mene. seglrierensfanienrttu-siererepenainsaeiaebteietclihniostistesisaitens laihbiimasbioibeinaniospins
large Lounge % by 17 ft MISCELLANEOUS ROYAL NETHERLANDS
Fully Ged Wonshe ind eee -Acbiot Beb. Sale aco "td Da al ei. a me FRENCH LINE
stone and has Timbered [



Cie Gle Transatlantique



NA spp eat ditinnaciiaentiatait | M.S, “Oranjestad’--10 May {951

LOST & FOUND | MS: "Banas lth May 1951

Toilets and Showers M.S. Hersitia’—24th May 1951

; ; , 333
lescnt all persons indebted to the said [The front garden is well laid out -having SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND

| gatate are requested to settle their in-/a double entrance.

this House
Dated this 27th day of April, 1951. V ith i

ling 4683.

debtedness without delay.

ALBERTHA HARDING,
Qualified Administratrix of the Estat:

Rock Bottom Price £4,250
possession for viewing —_——-





— AMSTERDAM

LOST M.S Willemstad” 17th May 1981
a SAILING TO TRINIDAD,
PARAMARIBO AND GRORGHTOWN



Before you buy view

SAILING TO
ENGLAND & FRANUE



working hours 8560 KEYS: One bunch of Keys between







ar ce M.S ecuba ith May, 198 " *
of Gladys Albertine Harding eee a Tr Oh arenas the, Parkin ) MS aerate ‘Joth 7) oat GASCOGNE, May 12, 1951.
seathe: ROPERTY: One large S-door shop &] turned to Dr. C. McConney, Office Spry | SAHANG To TRINIDAD. LA GUAIRA via St. Lucia, Martinique,
Sota ih | shed with galvanized and shingled Roof | St. or Call 2692 11,5.51—2n | CURACAO AND JAMAICA Guadeloupe and Antigua.
Must be removed after purchase. No ie ore oh H . | MS. “Orantestad “24h May, 1951
NOTICE Reasonable refused, Apply S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO. LTD.,, A
IN THE MATTER OF premises to Mr. Joseph St. Hill, Tweed Axgents

THE COMPANIES ACT, i910
and

side Road, St. Michae}



Yugoslav Paper





11.5.51—3a

i ; CARIBBEAN CRUISE.
IN THE MATTER OF —————______ . Y ej .V. Caribbee will accept Cargo

WARD TRUST COMPANY LIMITEN.| ‘The Property known as “The Abbey" Attacks De Gasperi 1% and’ Passengers for Dominica, COLOMBIE, May 30th, 1951.
ROtES is hereby siven that the Cred- | Christ Chureh. This property comprises | sete a aeerret The and St Trinidad, La Guaira, Cu-
Nurs @ e@ adevenamed Company which | a dwelling house with 2 acres, 2 roods — itt ailing Friday 18t stant =
is being voluntarily wound up, are|?i%z perches of land and belongs to Mr BELGRADE, May 10. | , racao, Cartagena and
Hoe debi cat, betore the 15th dav off Kenry H. D. King. The above property The Yugoslav Communist | _ The av. Moneka = wil pocneet Jamaica.

Â¥. . ng the day for that purnose | will be set up for Sale by Public Com- SDE * at ay at Cargo and Passengers for Domino $33
fred Ped eat enrpened, A send tir | petition at our Office on Friday 18th Mas “Fumosteus roe — bens ~ ue a oi Montse es t; Nevi

mes a résses and’ the particulars | 1951 os t or é and St, Kitts. "Sailing Friday 18th ‘i >
of their debts or claims and the appl)’ Mr. H. HM. D.J ether inch of her national ter- | 3% instant % Accepting et
nemes and addresses of their Solicit “S| King or premises ritory and a single Yugoslav to! M.V. Cacique Del Caribe will Cargo and Mail.
if ari’, to the undersigned. Henry Ray Ya a g g a

mond Leach and Deighton Harcourt Lisle

Ward, the Liquidators of the wad) 115.5

Company, in care of Messrs Bove

Skeete, Lucas Street, Bridgetown vd
if so required by notice in writing from
the said Liquidators, are to come in and
prove their said debts or claims et suc!

time and place as shall be specified i) —

such notice, or in default whereof, ihe
will be excluded from the benefit. of | I

YEARWOOD & BOYCE ,
wag 4 (Rn fall under foreign domination



AUC'tION



Marshall & Edwards, 45 9, . ; + ; a
any such distribution made before «ich | Roebuck Street opposite James A. Tudor ' shavia which is being waged in|
&

" accept Cargo and Passe
4 St. Luela, St. Vineer
Borba was attacking the recent and Aruba Sailing on

;
a |
}

speech by Italy’s Prime ener th instant
}

nu

| R. M. JONES & Co.,Ltd
i





Alcide De Gasperi when he des

eribed the frontiers. |
— — “It is clear’ the paper added,|
ace Co! “that the campaign against Yugo

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWN-
ERS ASSOC., INC,

Tele, 4047.

AGENTS
Phone i: 3814





of the Insur











sebts are proved, » on Friday (th at 2 p.m Italy, can only benefit Moscow ;' ” *=secerssocosososgessooosseoces =
Dated this 10th day of May, 1051. ae 7 Saloon sae Semanes 3 plan to hinder collaboration be _" ONE I IIE S (
DEIGHTON HARCOURT LISLE { paren. = 8.5.51-4n.| tween countries and nations." ;
RE 9 8 Sree eS on arate —Reuter. PASSAGES TO EUROPE
ais Milestone
11,8.61—3n t

ee
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Archibald Goodman
of Blunts, St, Thomas for permission to

Sell Spirits, Malt Liquors &c., at a board milestone
world trade

ed and galvanized shop attached to res-
idence, situated at Blunts, St. Thomas
Dated this 9th day of May 1951.
To: J. R. EDWARDS, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “D",
A. GOODMAN,

Police Court, District "D" om Monday

the road to free It was reported here that boat.
with the conclusion|S’wain Crawford of the Britisa IGG GONG OOGENESIS ELGG:

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominica, for
sailing to Europe fortnightly. The usual rts of call are

BOATSWAIN MISSING

OTTAWA. May 9. Dublin, London, or Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual

RIO DE JANEIRO, May 9 reduction for chi.dren,

passed anothe:



; >are ,
of long term tariff trimming agree.|°teamer —- Dunstan disappear ed %
ments with 16 countries. New| When he fell between the steamer
concessions, the third round of| 4nd the seawall at Port Peet

, a oe ot i me . rted

prin, [Poet war tan cuts by countries tore te ws were ot 6 WF FES) LINE
N.B.—This application will be consid-|representing 85 per cent, of cee etme Js Revian Si
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at vere ann , st Sharks. Sa x 3
RY Ree tat ane ee befell a fellow seaman who en

the 23rd day of May 1951 at 11 o'clock |Might. Most significant were re-)eTe! a a ; ata
oe y a 00h EE atiee by the United States on|@eavoured a rescue by diving int e
J. R. EDWARDs, about 400
Police Magistrate, Dist. “D" Canada.—(CP).

11,5.51—1)

Strain On Europe RATES OF ‘EXCHANGE

MAY_10, 1951
CANADA
Caer ets 607/10% pr.! Ways and Means Committee voted e

Demand tentatively to-day to increase in

WASHINGTON, May 9.

The United States State Depart-| 62 7/10:

ment warned to-day that efforts
to rebuild West Europe's defences
were threatening to strain its

epee oe eat Gay ot MtiAMe: revit ing industry “beyond the} $?7/10% pr. Cable 50 .2/10% pr, | °3?2001000,000 a year Pate There is ample Ist Class Accommodation available
pANTIQUES for sale which jnelude Panikinhe at Trade, Mario.) breaking point.” It jamnounced as aaa ‘Coupons 38 8/10 ae, : for Trinidad, also one berth for a lady available on
Gee tae kates Garbaaos iu “eae : LErerosad Would mimes Se Besceny bass r eas are 24th May for Southampton,
Tea” anvien on ‘English hea danvise ed to Congress, laying down threo} 7 7

types of United States assistance
This would provide:
1. Weapons primarily of Amer

items of interest toithe sea. The ship left Cabedelo



. Sight Drafts 60 4/10% pr

IVER LET G0

to-day

initio rt THE T.S.8. GOLFITO will be arriving from South-
ampton on Saturday, 12th May, at 8 a.m., and will
i

be sailing at 5 p.m. the same afternoon for Trinidad.

INCOME TAX UP
WASHINGTON, May 9
The House of Representatives

eee, On ioe or.| dividual income taxes by about













FURNISH = NOW ! *

Apply...

































A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

month from the 9th day of May, 1951,





et .
j able ‘ ‘s . + c vigilance over the MAHOGANY. CEDAR,
CSE MeaWe soeron iieinone ie manufacture for use of Quality of BIRCH, PINE, DEAL
Alley : * 10.5.51—3n. European armed forces. ; vat, if y
2 Assistance in military § A s RU 1 1 renewed Bedsteads
That THE : ~ er ent Oe nan enna eerie a . NEW and ren ie \
a corporaion organized and’ existing une Boetigs. Keasebie ne oa 8 ae abe training services and in arms pro- ‘ , bdr deg» ulaplatee is a a
der the laws of the State of New Jerse: Y aa 7 _ ; ia Suction. . Dressing Tables 0 , s
i 5 a ; 4 ft. 6 ins. sizes with or without panel ' ; never relaxed ah . Suites r separate piece
WHOS, free coe Enmerica, Manufacturers, | © “wr Bitcignson & Con Lids Broad 3. Raw materials, equipmen’ Phas . oes : de alti the paar at Fe A gt up IGS OOM SNe Ste! :
; c 4 Streets. Dis . 4843, ‘ . ; a why s always the ‘ raney ‘Table S558
chandise Mart Plaza, Chicago, Tlinois, | °"4 Roebuck Streets, Dial 4222 or 4843 and other goods—economic de . , Dining. Kitehen, Pane ERODE GOS EGGS IODIDE GTO OGG GG EEOC GEN CCC,
3, : registr: ; 9.5,51—4n ae aad ; rae same ‘ ets, Sideboards, Lard
UPA, Dae applies for the, .Fegistration cl ere lM Mice Cake . fence aid—to help in the conver y earn yaennne TeCES: “Buokvacks You'll save heaps of time and get a better job done, x
ter in respect of cereal foods and feeds, CAMERAS: Standard Box Camera sion of European production to A truly outstanding Rum, Office Chairs if you use one of our : 2
and will be entitled to register the same | (using 120 fir, gt ow - eee \ en ee in a class all its own od ase net er ’
after one month from the 9th day of uy yours at G rae he é » sai i BLECTRIC weg a ‘ "— . rag ’ iTDE
May, 1951, unless some person shall in| son & Co,, Ltd, Broad Street Dial aneh CROSS-STAR We. sien : ee Se me shes . if Blended and Bottled Pickup Arms, Gramophone a ELECTRIX ‘ VACUUM CLEANERS
the meantime give notice in duplicate to 9.5. 51—3n es suropes = rearmamen by Portabie Gramophone Records 4 Ww
me at my office of opposition of such ——$—$____—_—__—_—— That THE MAGGI CO., Manufacturers, | efforts strained Western Europe’s up.
registration. The trade mark ean be|. GALVANISE—26 gauge @ ft, $7.00, 9 ft.| a Company incorporated according to the industry beyond breakin oint New shipment just received,
seen on application at my office, $7.75. Only a limited number at Ralph|laws of Switzerland, whose trade or song Pp iM STUART & SAMPS' N Pst Date Nese J
Dated this 25th day foe 1951. Beard’s furnishing show room Hardwood business address is see ete. use oc hcang ows be left “defenceless
H. WILLIAMS, Alley. 10.5.51—3n | Switzerland, has app! or ie regis- | Before viet aggression.”
Registrar of Trade Marks. , Se ——— | tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of iad Reute (1938) LID I S W CENTRAL EMPORIUM
9.5.51—3n GALVANISED SHEETS—Best quality paaisvet a ee iad qubesen one erie —~Keuter . eoWe vi} 4 4
Island ! | food or as ini ents in food, espec: SRR eter menenniage : “ST
re gba Tt: Sate a ch Ge Ths beet foups, bouillons, and seasonings, and wil ae oe ||] MEADQUARTERS = FoR BE cony oreaat. DAL Om,
oe vt! Bet t register the same after one
10 ft $8.40, Nett cash. Better hurry !| be en %j Aliens Enlisting



4.5, 51—t.f.n.
Hand made Crafts, Antiques,
Pottery, Hand blocked Beach-



James. Tel. 91-74,

igne -» $12.00 a doz

14.4.51—1m, hea en Z .. $10.00 a fon:

Sh 4 4 .. $10.00 a doz.

LOSSSEESSESSOSOSS SSS OSOGY Gatiite s. +. $13.00 a doz.

GLASS WARE~—A few angen ese
w black footed Champaigne, isky,
eae ee Sherry, and water Goublets are for sale.

unless some person shall in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such registra-
tion, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office,
Dated this 25th day of April, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
9,.5.51—3n







At Ralph Beard’s ‘furnishing show rooms

’ 7 5,51—3a ) ‘
Hardwood Alley, 10.5,51 = LOYAL BROTHERS OF
HUMBER CYCLE Tickets 1/- each.
mpeti s S$ day f
Grawing on Tuesdays May 15, ew tickets THE STAR
brand new cycles are on sayy basa Neediest Cases Fund
5.51—2n
Se —_—- TAT a
‘psgacee| ANNOUNCEMENT
wie tt ‘Gents a “Attractive-Strong

remaining at Harrison's Store where
easy to carry. Als White Tumblers at 8

BARBADOS
INVESTMENTS
Bought and Sold
A. M. WEBB
Stockbroker
33 Broad St., Bridgetown
(Over Phoenix Pharmacy)



















@ . W. Hutchinson & Co., Relative to Carnival and Fair to| countries, cannot enlist under this
[id, Broad St and Roebuck St. Dial 4223] be held on 7th and Sth June at scheme. Alien recruits, the first
or 4843 9-5-5149 | Queen’s Park, the undersigned will non-resident foreigners ever 0
O.K. COFFEE: Fresh supply of this| Teceive entries for the following:—|be taken into the United States
may now be had from your goer “ (a) i ern Bands ers are to serve for a five year
us ial (b) Steel Bands. period,
The new “MOULI” GRATER is really (c) Advertising Bands. Only unmarried men between
wieat for grating Cheese, Nuts, Nutmeg, (d) Historical Bands. 18 and 35 with sufficient know-
Bread Crumbs, Cocoanut ete, It is avicy | Im order to raise the standard of| ledge of English are to be ac-
and Efficient and is easily cleaned. ae Carnival, the Steering |. cepted They=wijl be. trained in
87 Cents Each. Obtainable from H - 1 4 eee °
RISON’S HARDWARE DEPT. Broad St.| would appreciate the co-ope sie the United States.
- 11.5.51—2n | of Firms, Clubs and Individuals —Reuter.
act eng lai one - | being as original as possible.
! a Y No entrance fee will be charged, ys
More particulars late: |:
L A D I E S! TAKE NOTICE A Carnival Band of thirty will AQUA PURA—
That FORT GARRY FLOUR MILLS be visiting Barbados to take part DISTILLED WATER
CY: ane Ls ince ot San in the parade. For using with:
ewan ue Dominion of Canada, Closing date, 19th May. { Motor Car or other Batteries —
pr ry trade or business address is in SEYMOUR BECKLES. Filled up Radiators of new cars—
the City of Saskatoon, Province - by c/o Vestry Clerk’s Office, Cocktail making; Coffee making;
Se entin See ae a in bat “An Bridgetown. Rum breaking, etc., etc. —
Sharkskin, Romaine Crepe Of Register in respect of flour, feed and] For Booths, Stalls, and side- GET IT AT YOUR GAS CO.,
4 . lai triped cereals, and, will be entitled to reniatte Shows, contact C. MORRIS, winal ‘maim dates x
ae? ae ” . FNREM ae oF May. 1951, unless some person| Sobers Lane, 5 .

ORIENTAL

SOUVENIRS, CURIOS,
JEWELS
New Shipment opened

THANTS

: : tion of such registration. The trade mark
& Georgette, Plain & Print- ean be seen on application at my office.
The applicant Sante all Sues Ve
e—d i i of the words “Milled from Selec
sae hee. Patines, Spring Wheat” as well as the name ot
the applicant as part of the trade mark
to_be registered.
Dated this 30th day of April, 1951,
H, WILLIAMS, 4
Registrar of balboa ay 980

5 .51- heme
of

Satins, Tafetas, Spuns, Etc.
Hats, Shoes, Nylons,



GENTS!

Taffetas, Spuns, Etc , Hats,
Shoes, Nylons.



T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH







Messrs. FRANK FORDE

and LEO 0. LAWRENCE
GENERAL CONTRACTORS,

LET US SERVE YOU. ae EMRE | pee AS AB eee Sertienl: Whine nal pane
Yard and Driveway Builders

Lorries supplied for haulage
Drawings and Estimates supplied

val of Britain, is at - - - -

' JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
_—_—
S Serve us with wour Orders. We
Serve you with workmoenship

Pr. Wm Henry &
Swan Sts. {

| ENAMEL-IT PAINTS for your

Pet Furniture is at - - - Addre Sweet Bottom St

George ot/and Elerton, St. George

That NEW WYVERN PEN that
JOHNSON'S HARDWARE |



i i e sha the meantime give notice in
Silver & Gold Tinsel Crepe sradiéate 10 ime at my office of opposi-



90





\o P9995 9SS9SGGIG9S99OSOSS,

SOOO SFOS

In U.S. Army

NUREMBERG, May 9.

United States recruiting offices
opened to-day in several Bava.
rian towns where aliens, mainly
Eastern European displaced peo-
ple, can enlist in the United
States army, a West German
news agency reported.

About 2,500 carefully selected
aliens are to be enlisted as regu-
lar soldiers,

Germans or nationals of Mar-—
shall Plan or North Atlantic Pact







FOR SALE

Crane House

This well known coastal
property with approx. |
124 acres including a
long stretch of beach
frontage is open to
offers.

Johan M, Biadon
A.F,S,, F.V.A.





























"Phone 4640
PLANTATIONS BUILDING









POLO CPEEOE POPOV



ot



















ELITE SHIRTS $378

Oreae Seren $905 + 3.5]
SPORT,




MEN’S HALF HOSE—

VEST & TOWEL SHIRTS

THE BARGAIN

30, Swan Street _

460664
LOCOCO OOOO OOOOH 000%.

Wm. FOGARTY Ltd.

Merchandise News
Ladies Art Silk Panties

From $1.10 to $1.37 per pair

’ Art Silk Briefs

From 62c. to $1.30 per pair

Ladies Art Silk Vests

From $1.05 to $1.51 each

ladies’ Art Silk Slips

From $1.60 to $2.58 each

Ladies’ Satin Slips

From $5.55 to $5.66 each

’ Crepe De Chene Slips

From $5.16 to $5.29 each

RECT POVS TSS |

4

Ladie:






BUY NOW
AND SAVE











SHIRTS —a new

RANGE OF DESIGNS





Ladies



CLEELEN EGGS EEEPAPL PIPL PES SCL LT LALA

-

ladies’ Art Silk Nightdresses =

.
From $3.30 to $4.20 edch %

Ladies’ Crepe De Chene Nightdresses §

From $7.50 to $12.00 each

Ladies’ Satin Nightdresse

From $8.19 to $19.00 each

3 PAIRS FOR $1.00 UP

AT LOW PRICES



HOUSE
S. ALTMAN, Proprietor
PHONE 2702



SSCSSSLSL GOO

+

PLE LLCS OS

+ OOOO OT BE
SISOS CCO SOO COO PO FOE9 OV FOO COU UDO CUCVVOE SEAOGE

*
a
4

PELE FLGIOOSS?




PAGE EIGHT

Notre



Dame Be

NOTRE DAME. defeated Carlton one nil in their First

Livision
® day afternoon
“Ally” Best on the left

the goal in the second half

return football match at Kensington Oval yvester-

wing for Notre Dame scored
The game was slow in the first

half but brightened up considerably during the second

half hour.

© Y -«
Kid German Wins
e LIVERPOOL, May 10.
“Ivor Germaine (Kid German)

lightweight champion of Barbados
@eicated Luigi Coluzzi, Italian
BPelierweight, cn points in a ten-
Pound contest at Liverpool
Sadium tonight

"Germaine, official contender for
fie British Empire Lightweight
Title. was conceding nine and a
quarter pounds to a strong punch
er but he dominated the proceed
ings trom start to finish



; rv oe
Arsenal Taking 19
Players To Brazil
; avers Lo raZi
% LONDON,

Arsenal are taking 19 players
on their summer tour of Brazil
‘They leave in two parties next
week—one going on Tuesday and
the other on Thursday, The club
expect to play six or seven match
es at Rio and St, Paulo

The only two first team aye:
unable to make the trip are
Mercer, the Captain because
business reasons and Leslie Comp
ton playing cricket for Middlesex

The full list of Arsenal play
ers making the trip are: Swindin,
Scott, Barnes, Smith, Shaw,
Forbes, Daniel, Fields, Bowen,
Roper, Cox, Pogie, Resis, Holton
Goring, Lishman, Marden, Mac
Pherson and Scott —Reuter.

Cambridge All Out
For 188 Ruts

CAMBRIDGE, May 19.

After dismissing Cambridge
University here for 188 today, the
South Africans made a bad start
to their first innings losing two
wickets for five runs, At the
close they were 64 for two,

The first day’s play was washed
out by rain and with only just
under four hours’ play to-morrow,
a tame draw appears certain.

The South African bowlers
showed up well on a pitch which
gave them little assistance. Clive
Van Ryneveld claimed five for 62
with his leg breaks and “Tufty”
Mann took the other four wickets
for 34 runs,

David Sheppard and Tom Wells
put on 69 for the opening Cam-
bridge stand but the last eight
wickets fell for 71 runs,

—Reuter.

FRIENDLY FOOTBALL

A team from A. S. Bryden &
Sons defeated a term of (,ommis
sion Agents by fivc goals to three
in a football match at Wanderers’
ground yesterday afternoon

For. Bryden, A. Farmer, K
Hutchinson and S, Edghill scored
one goal each while P. Edwards
kicked in two goals and D. Lewis
one for Commission Agents,

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL
WINS SIXTH GAME

Modern High School won the
sixth successive basketball game
for the season when they defeated
Sea Scout yesterday afternoon
16—8 at the Modern High School
grounds.

May 10



Joc
of









Paul Mandeville at centre—haif
for Notre Dame gave a good per-

formance. He was the backbon
cf his team His passes were
well placed and nearly all wer

along the ground
Carlton took the touch off with
Notre Dame defending the
southern goal. Soon after Fred-
die Hutchinson ran down the
left wing and centered. Brickic
Lucas received the ball but
kicked wide
McCollin, on the left
Notre Dame, received a through
ass and took a good one time
shot. King, the Carlton custodian
vas however in position and
punched out the ball.
Cariton made another
Reynold Hutchinson tried a
from well outside the
the ball went high
cross bar
Notre Dame
on the Carlton
centre forward,
but King saved.
Mandeville beat his

wing for

attack

shot
but
the

area
ove!

made a rai
Gill, theii
good shot

next
goal
took a

way down

the right wing and centered, Un-
fortunately there were no for
wards in position to shoot. Halt
time found the game still goal
less

Seon after the second half be-
gan Freddie Hutchinson took a
1ice shot from the left wing. The
ball passed a few inches over the
cross bar

Carlton
kick Bright, one of their full
backs, took a good shot from the
touch line, but Wilkinson pushed
‘e ball aver the cross bar

McLeod, one of the Carlton
forwards, received a long pass
and had a golden opportunity io
open the account for his team
He did not time the ball proper-
jy and the shot went wide of the

goal,
Freddie Hutchinson then re-
ceived a pass from Lucas. He

took a beautiful shot but the ball
struck the right upright and re-
bounded into play
Notre Dame. launched
attack and Green, their right
winger centered, King ran out
of goal, gathered and cleared.
Shortly afterwards the first
and only goal of the match came.
Gill got the ball and passed to

another

Best. They short passed to each
other until they were in the
Carlton goal area, Best then
took a good which completely
beat King.

Carlton fought hard for an
equaliser but their attacks were

constantly warded off by Browne
and Straughan. Wilkinson, the
Notre Dame goalie, was Jater sent
off by the referee and Straughan
deputised until the game ended

The teams were as_ follows;

CARLTON: King, Bright, Ken-
nedy, Cox, Clairmonte, Archer,
F. Hutchinson, N, Lucas (Capt.)
McLeod, R. Hutchinson and
Greenidge.

NOTRE DAME: Wilkinson’
Browne, Straughan, Archer,
Mandeville, Roberts, Green,
C. Daniel, Bes}, Gill and Mc-
Collin,

Referee: Mr. S. O’C. Gittens.



BASKETBALL

Results of the Division I Basket-
ball matches played at Y.M.P.C.

Beckles Road, last night are as fol-
low:
Y.M.P.C. beat Pickwick 4&—
23; Harrison College Old Boys
19—11,

beat Y.M.C.A.



‘Middle zone’ posers 4

OME of the most difficult ha
X are those that fall into tt
opener's first rebid.

Responder is too strong tc
strong enough to bid game on t
received.

A typical situation ts created
by a simple rebid of opener’s
suit. South bids One Heart
North Two Diamonds, and South
Two Hearts With an in-
between hand, North has the
choice of the following rebids. al!
of which are constructive with-
out necessarily ommitting the
partnership to a game contract

Two Spades.—A “ low” reverse
—-an urge. but not a force
Three Hearts.—Simple raise otf
# Suit that has been rebid. The
trump support may be mode

but










Nortl probably
tains a ruffing
E.g.:—

@IS5; 9387, @AINTS:
&AGM

Three Dinmonds.
of responder’s suit
tral rebid in a suit
ofter c
‘This

~ The rebid
after a neu-











shown a
rebiddab 1
have like this.
a! 95S; @AQ105 32;
AXBG

Over Two Hearts, he







pass—first be i

werous to 1 the ding
level. se use he has no
reasor that South's




x hey’ 1D

ol Every



Beg ast SATURDAY
NIGHT THE DOG-
WAGON WAS SO

BUSY, OTTO
DECIDED HE i
NEEDED MORE &
HELP «ss.



ORE SATURDAY ME »
me* HE PUT ON
TWO EXTRAS»:
SO THE JOINT’S
DESERTED ~~~



JOE GANCAS,
WALNUT ST.,
MEADVILLE, PA.

ise

‘Time

NOTHING FOR

o
nds for the responder to judge (
he intermediate zone after the

> let the bidding die, but not
he strength of the information

SE as
hy M. HARRISON-GRAY

Hearts are not as good as his
own Diamonds The Three
Diamond rebid should be
reserved for hands of a different
type, in the hope of inducing
South to bid Three No-Trumps
Eg. :

é 3) 975; @AKQIG64;



a
&Q92
Two No-Trumps. — A useful
limit bid, showing a reasonably
balanced hand with 11-12 points
or a “good” 10-count If no
better bid is available a part-
guard in one of the unbid suits
is permissible. E.g, :

@I9S,; 9105; @KQ874;
BATT ;

The same principles apply if
South makes a _ non-reverse
change of suit in a sequence such
as One Spade—Two Diamonds ;
two Hearts? But North’
range of constructive rebids is
extended to include a jump pre-
terence bid of Three Spades and





al to Three Hearts. Four
supporting trumps are normally
requlred tor the latter call.



YL
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
London Ervress Servi

“JUST CAME





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

‘£3,000 NOT ENOUGH |
Says Sands

at Carlton 1—O

PREPARING FOR RIDE



LOOKING over a map of the route:
L-cpl. Tillson, 21; Sergeant Burgess, 27;

In front,
Cpl.

from left to right, are
Bonner, 20. Standing

are Driver Allen, 24, and L-cpl. Smith, 21.

was awardea a tree SOldiers Ride 1,450 Miles

Motorcyclists come home on leave from Tripoli

FIVE British soldiers are on their way home on 28 days’

leave from Tripoli, but they are not coming by sea—they
are travelling on motorcycles.
Tne five who hope to make Sen Tp vatetan a
the 1,450-mile journey in six Foy ° a
days are Sergeant Burgess, of W nit, Bailey

Coedpenmaen Road, Ponty
pridd; L.-corporal Smith, of Hen
fold Cottages. Newdigate, Surrey;
Driver Allen, of Invicta Road,
Margate, Kent; L.—corporal Till
son, of Woodfield Farm, Sawtry,
Hunts; and. Corporal Bonner, of
Bank Road, Atherstone, Warwick-
shire

They left Tripoli last Thursday
at 4am. and are following a
route through Tunis across the
Mediterranean by boat to Mar-
seilles, to Parig then to Calais and
across to Dover. The return trip
will be the same.





Only four of them will drive
the motorcycles— Smith is rid
ing pillior with Tillson,

Race Arabs

At Dover eacn will make
their way home and late
they will meet at Dover for
the return journey.

Rough trips are no new

experience to Burgess and Tillson,
who are members of the Roya:
Signals speedway team, The
Meteors, that ride against Arab
and Italian teams in Tripoli.

Each man is carrying food and
a small allocation of francs, Be-
fcre they left they expected their
biggest holdup would be in get
ting a boat at Tunis,

They are travelling 18 hours
a day. The motor-cycles are
scrap ex~War Department
machines which the men have

bought and overhauled.

Why are these five men spend
ing their leave this way? “Mostly
for adventure,” they said before
they left, and because they want
to spend part of their leave at
heme,

—LE.S.



Dewan Singh For
South Africa

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, May j
Dewan Singh, light-weight
boxing champion of Britisn
Guiana who is also seeking the
welter-weight title in a maten
against Calvin Garraway on Whit

Monday has accepted an offer
from South Africa for two fighi
The organiser of the fight

Seaman Chetty, retired undeteat

Highlight Sports

LONDON, May #0
West Inaies athletes Arthur
Wint and McDonald Bailey pro-

vided the highlights of the match
in which the British Amateur
Athletic Team beat London Uni-
versity 112 points to 45 here last
night,

The long striding Wint, Olympic
400 metres champion, ran a great
race to win the quarter mile for
the University in the good time of
48.8 seconds on a damp track,

Bailey, running for the A.A.A.,
was an easy winner in the 100
yards in 10.1 seconds. He beat
Brian Shenton, European 200
metres champion,

Herb McKenley. who arrived
yesterday from Jamaica, will take
part in the British games at White
City Stadium on Saturday and
Monday.

McKenley
yards in

the 440
he will compete
apainst Mal Whitfield of the
United States and Arthur Wint
who is running for Britain,

will run in

which

In the 1948 Olympic games in
London, McKenley finished second
to Wint in the 400 metres with
Whitfield, who had won the 800
metres, third,

McKenley said today: “This
time I am hoping to beat my good



friend Wint. I like coming to
London and if the weather clears,
we should do good times. I am
in pretty good shape.”

McKenley is also dawn to run
in the 300 yards on Monday. He
holds the world record of 29.8

seconds for this event,—Reuter,



‘rying To Set New
Tight Rope Record

VIENNA, May 10.
Austrian tight rope walker, Hel-
muth Horlands, trying to set up
a new world record by staying 72
hours on a high wire, today put
a raincoat over his tights,

Rain came down in torrents as
he prepared to spend his third day

perched 12 yards above the
quare in Stockerau. Dense
crowds thronged the square in

ed Fly and Bantam Weight front of the Town Hall to look at
Champion of South Africa and him,

formerly rated sixth contender

for the world’s flyweight title, His pretty young wife, also a
has expressed high enthusiasm] ight rope artist, spends part of
over Dewan, and stated that they | he night talking with him to
would be glad to see him in action,} seep him from dropping off to

Coloured fighters are held in
high esteem in South Africa, 'The
feather—weight champion of thi
British Empire, Roy Ankarah dy
most of his campaigning in that
Dominion and judging from Mr
Chetty’s letter to Dewan, foreign
fighters can accomplish a great
deal The letter also recalls the
visit of Motee Kid Singh, forme:
featherweight champion of Brit-
ish Guiana who created quite
sensation in South Africa,




















‘eep and off the wire.
—Reuter.







x

4

AU 7,
I

fa

~

“Sh

Wm.

me

Prince

SODIIIG IOS

ore
SMART
side.
P.C.S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd
é

“!'T IS NOT WORTH my while to go to England for
a £3,000 (Australian) — about 2,400 sterling — purse. I

think about five or six thousand pounds would be nearer

,

the mark... .
That little speech was

probably represents the longest oration of which the agile
aborigine has ever delivered himself.

It ,also represents a consider-
able bombshell in British boxing
for, Sands is due to leave Aus-

ralia-by air on May 6 and fight
Randolph Turpin for the Empire
middleweight title at the White
City, Lendon. on June 5.

This is not, repeat not, pro-
moter Jack Solomons’s lucky
week

First, it’s announced that Jack
Gardner will not meet Cesar
Brion on May 22 because of his
injured thumb; then the Solo-

mons equine chestnut hope Sec-
onds Out, finishes 11th in a field
ef 17 in the City and Suburban;
now it looks as though the Sands
(of Australia) is running out,

But in the judgment of Solo-
mons there’s no cause for alarm
or despondency. Blowing a cigar-
smoke ring the size of another 0
ca the end of a boxer's purse
money. Jack the giant-biller
announced:

“I have sent
(Sands’s
tickets,

Tom Maguire”
manager) “three return
for which I’ve _ paid
£1,400, and I’m sure Sands will
leave for England on the aate
arranged”,

complained
Turpin has had a number of
fights this year, whereas the
Australian would have been out
of the ring for four months if he
fought on June 5

Solomons counterea this one
by saying that Sands could have
the equivalent of two fights by
constant work-outs in the gym-
nasium after he arrived in Eng-
land

So—according to Solomons—
the fight is still on. But then he
hasn't got to fight Turpin.

Thomas for U.S.

More pleasant news is that Ed-
die Thomas, British, Empire, and
European welter-weight cham-
pion, is to go to America, round
about the end of June, to fight
the winner of the fight between
Kid Gavilan, of Cuba, and John-
ny Bratton, of Chicago

The fight will take place before
the end of June at Madison

SPORTS
WINDOW

HOCKEY
afternoon ac 445 o'clock
there will be a hockey match at
the Garrason, This match will be
played on the pole pitch,
FOOTBALL
Second Division
Empire meets Lodge this after-
noon at Bank Hall, The referee

also that

Sands







This

will be Mr, O. Graham.

Spartan will play College at
College. The referee will be Mr,
W. Howorth,

Third Division
Regiment vs. Rolice at Garrison,
Combermere — Old Boys vs.

Everton at Combermere, .
Wanderers vs, Combermere at
Combermere.
YMPC
Road,
FRIENDLY FOOTBALL

ASSOCIATION

Rangers vs. Westerners “A’ at
St. Leonard’s Ground, Richmond
Gap. The referee will be Mr.
Robert Parris,

BASKETBALL (First Division)

Pickwick . YMCA at
YM P.C. and College vs, Pirates
at the same ground. Play starts
at 745 pm

TABLE TENNIS AT Y.M.C.A.

In the Division Uf Inter-Club
return matches, Foundation will
engage Police and Barna will meet
Lenville. Matches start at 6,00 p.m

NETBALL

A team of St. Michael's Old
Girls will engage the Ursuline
Convent team th's afternoon at 5
o'clock, *

vs, College at Beckles









—

What’s on Today

Police Courts and Court of
Appeal — 10.00 a.m.

Cocktail Party at Goddard's
Restaurant for French
delegation to Carib Com-
mission — 6.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema gives show at
Bay Street Boys’ Club —
7.30 p.m.

CINEMAS
“Sleeping City.”

“Madeline.”
and



Globe :

Empire :

Roxy : “Relentless”
Gold.”

Plaza (Bridgetown);
With A Horn.”
Aquatic Club
comes Electre.”

“Lust for
“Young Man

‘Mourning Be-





It’s so easy
to see those
extra fine
points in a
well tailor-
ed suit that
you should
always
‘contact the

Top Scorers

ney vs 2 x 5a
2, 8 . 3
Lp 1 . poe iN af » o
RS abe ee

LOLSL DLL bt bet heb Del Db tb Dab Dims ? bb ttt bbb tule bvbutbvbtdt-btvt-tvbtbvlvivt-tvbb tt tlle? t0 2 ¢ELIS GLIA PL OP LP LIL LILI LL DDD DN DD

PLODILD LLL LE LLL LAA PELE IPE EE POA AAA EEL A OPE PE PEPE AOE OOO Ot POCO T TINO OCC OO

Henry Street

red
Spee

III PILL PDI PIPE EEO
DRAG RDI ER IEE

made by Dave Sands, and it



PETER WILSON
says although it looks as if
Dave Sands is running out
cf his Empire title fight with
Randolph Turpin, promoter
sack Solomons insists that
the White City (June 5) date
sull stands



Square Garden, New York, ano
would be generally regarded in
America as carrying the world’s
10st. 7lb. title with it.

But the odd thing is that the
British Boxing Board of Contro!
still regards “wonder boy” “Su-
gar” Ray Robinson as_ world’s
welter-weight champion.

The board, however, is likely
to be over-ruled at the European
Boxing Union Conference which
is being held in London this
week-end and which will prob-
ably agree with the National
Boxing Association of America
that it’s not in the best interests
of the sport for one man to hola
more than one title,

* “* ts

P.S.—Already anguished, su-
percharged whines of protest
from speedway supporters about
“Anti-Speedway’s” views. More
of this later.

London Express Service

Stop *Pyorrliea
in 24 Hours

Bleeding Gums, Loose Teeth and Sore
Mouth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
Trench Mouth or a bad disease which
sooner or later will make your teeth fall
out and may cause Rheumatism and Heart
Trouble. Stop this disease now with the
new discovery Amosan. Stops bleedin.

gums in 24 hours, ends sore mouth a

tightens teeth. Iron clad guarantee.
Amosan must make your mouth well and
save your teeth or money back on return
of empty rackage. Get Amosan from your

& chemist today.
Amiosan

The guarantee
for Pyorrhea—Trea



prot









CRYPTOQUOTE No. 18

CZ SQ CPTCAOQ WA _ EWSQ,
SQ EQCFA KDQ EWVWKZ RB
RXF CHWEWKWQZ.

—BFRXPQ.

Last Crypt: Ability is of little
account without opportunity.
—Napoleon.
a

J. A. CORBIN & SONS.



KEEP FIT

KEEP FIT CLASSES





will commence at the
AQUATIC CLUB on
Friday, llth May, at
4.30 p.m.

Apply to...

MISS RANSOM
Dial 3390
The Bcrbados School

of Dancing Ltd.









The
AMATEUR ATHLETIC



CYCLE AND ATHLETIC

SPORTS MEETING

(under the distinguished
patronage of

His Excellency the Governor
Sir Alfred & Lady Savage)

KENSINGTON OVAL

Whit-Monday
‘Thursday
& Saturday .

May 14th
. May 17th
. May 19th
beginning at 1 p.m, each day

48 THRILLING EVENTS

See Ken Farnum, Lindsay
(Flash) Gordon, Cecil
Phelps, Harry Stuart, Mike
Tucker, The Hoad_ broth-
ers, George Hill, Harold

Archer, (Nugget) Hunte,
Oswin Hill, Bridgeman &
Company, The Lewis Twin

Brothers, and a string of
other male W.I. Cyclists
and .Athletes as well as
M'ss Grace Cumberbatch
and Miss Eileen King in
action at the Historic Oval

Gaceo Open at 12 noon daily
e
PRICES OF ADMISSION :
SEASON TICKETS
$2.16
$1.68

Kensington Stand
George Challenor
e
DAILY TICKETS
Kersington Stand



$1.00
George Challenor .
Uncovered Seats

Grounds



Season Tickets on Sale daily
at the Civic, Swan & High
Street.



;
ASSOCIATION
OF BARBADOS
presents its
RIG 3 DAYS §
2







oF CDOOSS

alk ol ae





39

MAY 11, 1951

as

FRIDAY,





Romantic







Crepe
Romaine '

In Beige, Pink, Lilac, +
Coral, Aqua, Blue,
Fuchia, Goblin Blue,
Gold, Cherry, Black,
Lime Green, Royal Blue,
Navy, Red, White and

Green ....


















per yard

$2.08
$2.29

CAVE

SHEPHERD
& Co, Ltd.

10—i3 Broad Street


















SE SURE OF

r
OVER? yelit?â„¢
. ‘(
6 kw -with the faithful
use of DREAM. —

~The Soap

of the Beautiful.
Play safe .. . be prepared,
for your romantic moment.

TOILET SOAP, use it
faithfully in your bath,
shower and at the wash

basin for a soft-smooth-
clear skin, radiant with notural
loveliness.

DREAM is available at toilet goods
counters throughout the island.










ABTENTION !!
FACTORY MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining youx requirements
IN

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE

Ranging from %4” upwards

MILD STEEL

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
Zé BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes

FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill
At PRICES that cannot be repeated.



The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Ltd.

White Park Road, St. Michael
DIAL 4528
BF suite A eats Et Dede te a ee cae









IN

HIGH CLASS
TAILORING

ALL KINDS

C. B. RICE & Co.

OF

OF

LANE



Get a few cakes of DREAM .

i




PAGE 1

PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE IKIIiW, MAY II. 151 BARR\DOSB|Am'(XTE PrtnHd tr tat Advocli i-ui fcoM St. HrWMIci. Friday. Ma> II. 1951 FIELD THE Princess Alice Playing Field built at a cost of approximately $16,000 was opened with much ceremony and amidst the fond hopes of those who saw the crying need for recreation facilities for the people Of Bridgetown. After -i period of two fmat it.is of little use to the public except for a few people who have staged public dances in the pavilion and for special holiday attractions. Time and again, criticism in the Press has been launched against this waste of public funds and energy. The criticism has been of no avail. Before any money had been spent on it, the field had been popular as a community centre. One or two clubs played tennis there and the expense of preparing the lawns and keeping the grounds in order was defrayed from subscriptions from the players. Now that public funds have been lavishly spent, the field looks like a field and little else. There is a Committee of which the Chairman is the Churchwarden of St. Michael, charged with the responsibility of looking after the Playing Field. The grass has grown high and several sheep benefit therefrom. During the weeks when there was a controversy between the Barbados Amateur Football Association and the Pickwick Club it might have been possible to carry on the football series on this ground at small expense. The field could have been cleaned up and made fit in two weeks. A number of private clubs ought to make use of the Playing Field and maintain it In good condition. There is precedent for this action. The Spartan and Police Cricket Clubs have for years found a home in Queen's Park and they pay for the upkeep of this part of the grounds. If the Vestry is not now prepared to do something to make the Princess Alice Playing Field the public centre which it was intended to be, then it ought to give private clubs the opportunity to do better. The money which has already been spent will have been wasted if more is not spent to make the fullest use of the grounds It is nn use letting the Playing Field become derelict because of some remote plan to have an Investigation into the spending of the original sum of money. The Playing Field is within easy reach of the shopping centre where clerks work daily and it would be well for some of them to form a tennis club and be able to enjoy some form of healthy recreation during the afternoon. If the Vestry, who is to take charge of playing Acids, or the Committee responsible for finishing it will not do something, then for <>nce the community spirit in Barbados should put them to shame and make the Princess Alice Playing Field the recreation centre which it was intended to be. SCOUTS RECENT changes in the Scout Movement in Barbados seem to indicate that it will be given a new lease of life. The appointment of Major J. E. Griffith as the new Island Commissioner brings to the helm one who is a keen scout and who has done good work. Among the youth of this island there is an enormous field for scouting and if Major Griffith can influence the schools to take up scouting on a wider scale then he will have done further service to the Movement. i There is virgin soil waiting to be tilled. Jt is no use waiting until youngsters have offended society and need to be reclaimed to carry scouting to them. Work among youth in this island has been spasmodic and left in the hands of people who cannot be regarded as ideally suited to the task. It is the duty of the general public to give the utmost co-operation and especially old scouts who should give of their time to rebuild a Movement which can certainly dc great work among the youth of Barbados. What Is The Cabinet? THE Cabinet systasn .-merged in Britain in the eighteenth century, and so did the office of Prime Historians arc still arguing about the am though most of them agree that if anvonc can be called the fir -t PrtlM Mmi-Li ,,i England that person is Sir Robert Walpole However. Sir Robert Walpole. if he were to return today, would be surprised at the matlon in the responsibilities (if the Prime Minister and in Ihe tremendous increase in „_. the duties undertaken by all of i Ui.iffln ,M Hi* Majesty's M.nislcrs With %  ultimately, the In Britain the Cabinet as a system ol lovrrnmmt hai been in existence for mo than ZM year* Maharajfcumm Indira of Iwpurlhala wl.ii repe>-bt Parliaments r> affairs each week In UV General Overseas Sen ice of the l'. It explain*, the duties of the Cahinrt l; 'MM \i; MKI M \I:I INI HI; \ Of h IIM.Ilh I %  population under ten mill with few large towns, in when for the prcd Ihe i-i.ple. lift. gove -ges of twenty-one and twentyfour. A young man enters Oils branch a* an Assistant Principe I with, a salary of £400 a year. At Brit, he does not specialise in any one department. He may be nwvea from the Ministry of Labour to th>Ministry of Food. o< from the Board of Trade to the Commoiiwculth Relations Office. Once hi has become an Assistant Secretary, his chances of promotion ore rapid, if hay can prove his worth If he Is sufficiently outstanding %  ter upon whom, ne may become the head of a dc der and stability ,*rtm*nt by the time he Is forty and ol British society depends. It is The highest point to which \*. in an age up to him to ensure that the Paryoung man can aspire in the CUT .mint part of Iiainenl whom the people have Service is that of Permanent I very simple elected should govern with connUnder Secretary, which usuilly flee, deme aid keep the t,.ii i knighthood with it. m^m^JmffS KS-l, .tou, ft. mm SMI %  "'" I *.w~n Miniscirnt machine!) —in other words, the subordinate |, and Staff In the eighteenth century, most ministers, of His Majesty's G-nThese then are the experi of the Civil Service was still ii ernment? Most of them, ate heads nciHl experts—the professional* branch of the royal household; the <>' "pectal departments, though K upon wnom Ihe master depend* responsibility of the government i* customary to have a few people wr ,en he finds himself answerable was not so much to ar.miiii-.lei th. "'" roving commisnons, whose for nis department to Parliament, country as to maintain sufficient '"" %  "t taken up with running and Inp re i at ionship between the public order, and see that the a^ huge department. But moat of min i*ter and his staff la a curious country was properly defended 'he ministers have enormous staffs Ma Prime Ministers such as Sir Robert whose fob. firstly, is to supply Walpole or the elder Pitt did unmaterial and information (Tacts derUke a tremendous amount of and "fures, in other words), on work, especially during times of which P? 1 0 ano •guiation i* crises, but, for the most part, the based Then, secondly, when the lew important ministers enjoyed legislative measures have been an easy life with plenty of time tc £ %  %  l lhe responsibility of indulge in party intrigue and to l J? !" ,^!!*££!? v ,£? ,he mich pursue their own private pleasure Since those days the work of government has increased and increased, until now it is generally agreed that His Malestv's Government Is one of the most overworked bodic* nd now is being applied This of men in the whole world. work Is being done Jointly by the In 200 years the ministries have ***J^ Trad and lh Ministry been transformed—and so have of Supply tail. deThc minister, for all his brain %  and experience and ability. h,i nevertheless the status of an amateur' in his particular depai' ment. This must obviously OP SO. u man who has just been moved, say. from the War Office to the Food Ministry cannot be expect*.*1 lo path up in a lew days or few >ks the detailed knowlcdg :initance. recently a scheme (m<| Mpcrtence ^ the dppar m( n r controlling th e supply of raw Iou(lnf T whirh ,h„ tonalfirst had to be devised ' professioi taken years still %  !. answerable to civil servant tun acquire. But the minister guiding figure. He amateur in detail out he is usually a man of very wide experience K oi m* ae^ pub i| c jj fe A nineteenUvcen*• c ?" y tury Chancellor of the Excheque once said that a politician is made u minister of a department chiefly to tell the Civil Service what the country would not stand And. like all aphorisms, there Is some the types of men who compose them. During the first world war. Mr. Lloyd George probably had to make up his mind on a largernumber and vnrlcjy of important Issues than any Prime Minister in the nineteenth century. And neither he nor a high office since % %  . .._.. ..__ the time to write novels, like DUwni fh are recruited these vas: thing a professional administrator raeli. or engage m abstruse theoministerial staffs The Civil Set olt cn tends to forgtt logical arguments in learned vice has the pick of the best brain* But I do not want to give the magazines, like Gladstone Being jo me country, it is without doubl impression that there is mud. a Prime Minister in the twentieth tfie most highly skilled, highly rivalry or friction between the century is a full-time job. and th" experienced, and highly dls minister who la a politician and branches of his work are legion riplined organisation In the world the non-polmral civil servants With his Foreign Secretary he „ „ under him. In fact, there ust decide on events abroad, and .'" %  democratic countries the accepted tradition of loyalty beNEWS FROM BRITAIN By DA'VIP TEMPLf ROBERTS LONDON. ROYALTY added just the right MM to the Festival. It needed the excitement of crovvdImi-d streets and the glamour of a state coach in procession to cap, with something tradi-1 grcHivwciweaaMji tional, the rather flighty artificialities of the South Bank. The King's speech on opening the Festival touched up the brush COOfldftflCO of Ihe Festival promoters into what is surely a truly national gesture of belief in 1951 Plenty of voices have said, in the last year that this is no time for counting our gains when we may soon have lo face war. the most dreadful of losses. But I sense that the King's speech, the Festival, and its stimulus in lake a pride in ourselves, have strengthened the national conviction that another twentieth century war can be avoided. Festival week—this opening week—has revealed an extraordinary national unity. When it was first mooted, Conservatives were inclined to condemn the Festival in advance as camouflaged Socialist propaganda at the nation's expense. But Herbert Morrison was wise enough to restrain any leftish enthusiasm for a scheme like that. And the Festival show on the South Bank emerges without any noticeable political colour. I was amused to see how the Daily Worker, our small circulation Communist paper, treated the Festival. Their commentator wrote a friendly description of the South Bank as the best value for five shillings in London. Of course, he could not restrain a sneer at the "Lion and Unicorn" FOR SCHOOL I'llll ITS' ATI.AK and uam uimiMETic ROYAI. KKADERS Advocate Stationery No. 503 LIGHT ORI.WITC CURTAIN KAILS ( \luiniMiiiii All>.y| S'l'l I I AND I'l.ATKO CADMUM HOOKS for heavy or li^ltl curtains ALSO EXTENSION RODS Plastic in various colours and Slecl WILKINSON & IIAYNKS Successors to PITCHER 'Phones devise effective action to see'that fi v ", ierVan , B J ob ta l .l dm ^ ll **!l lwee e tWo wn,ch overrides the country's security is never thc Uws lald dow ,,v th* elected party attachments Thla is reveal, ....,,,,,,,,; |.,„„..,, repnsent.itives "' iuneopli But ,-,i mo eksarlj it Qua tl o n Time war his personality will come iiwhere** in other countrtn these ,„ the House most to embody the spiri. of the ,0 ks ure ."*" %  lvcn \ ? cn whn ConatltuUonall>. questions are nation. In time of peace, although ro u fPtJ?"^ hy politicians, KI 0 f great Importance, since they such iiersonahtv in leadership k B / l ,l J h %  "? kept in the hands provide the principal means by not M impuruint. (here are other T XH'TVl'^ t ,^ ? hlch lnc ord u r > "* " qualities with WDM a PrbH Mm. Jffijvgfg5?T ""'' I hc sc keep conuol over the bureaucracy. StsV must be endowed if he is to P !" ,eMIO a s 11 ho MUIU '' %  *** "£"ymn called (Parllafullll his tremendous -espmisibility ?Jl !" " tlv S T,' ce I How a, mcnUtr >' Questions) are pnoruy H being the trustee of thc n a PP 0 nlc Let "** "> every department, and In every heritage and the guardian ^ .e^e —Ih nation of Its interests. How Let case the circum stances i divided into three thorougly investigated. Questic (By i Kl in i:i( K COOK) NEW YORK. SOUL males for Imajy Ameri cans—and some Unions, Uxi—are unerringly picked out In New York now by a mechanised Cupid with a much better %  ociring regard than the old-fashioned type armed with nothim: but bow and arrow. You teed into a machine a card punched with holes These represent your qua I i Heat Ions and characteristics, your The minister i Parliament for tru parunent but the staff out that work provide the solid foundation upon which a minister's career In that department doiwnds To pul it briefly. It Is the Civil Service—that 'hidden girder ,„x,i ss srr. "2? &r£Z£Zz% sps i, rise's* E*2which • out io *&f • *• *ish character—"the Pavilion of ruling clas? ideas" he calls it. That, coming from such a pen, is perhaps the besl compliment to the designers that they have hit the mark they aimed at. The millions that cross the Thames to tinSouth Bank will probably ask themselves what will happen to this bit of land when the Festival moves away. Somebody should pin up some notices answering that question, but for the moment nothing has been decided except that, of course, the Concert Hall will remain with its front and its restaurant looking on to the river. Most of the Thames water frontage is crowded with wharfs and industrial plant. Behind the wharfs on this stretch of the river were little rows of houses, not very well built in the last century. It is unlikely that the water front will go back to industrial use. It will probably be an open space in front of a new housing settlement. That is certainly not a very grand development for one of the finest bits of the London river, with a view stretching from thc Houses of Parliament to St. Paul's. But a great deal of south London needs rehousing and I doubt whether the local authorities will resist the temptation to take up that bit of open space. The Skylon and ihe Dome of Discovery are up for sale so it is open to some enterprising promoter to dismantle them and re-erect them somewhere ei>e. But ihe Dome of DafSOvery does not make a good auditorium. On Ltl present plan it is not tall enough to have tiers of seats all round in the form of a real amphitheatre. Still it would be a pity to have the greatest dome in the world taken down in October and never seen again. The Skylon would just be a monster advertisement—and it all depends what it is made to advertise! The deeper question the visitors to the i .f %  %  sjt-uiu Piincipnl branches clerical, ex ecu Time is an \ilal Role of Prime Minister uvei and lidmlIllll i IjUvc> MCn of when the misters and their deputies—the This "trusteeship' does not stop which requires different educaParliamentary Under Secretaries short at Britain—it i* extended in tional standard. The administra —are under the full scrutiny o.' full measure towards ihe Commonlive class is the most important, the public. The Department wealth, too. The Commonwealth so. I will confine myself to that, officials realise this they know Conference held in London is a It is what people usually have at Iho politicians future may depend case In point. Much of the work mind when they talk o( the Clv.l on his success In giving convlnc Involved, no doubt, has been done Service as H Career. ing answers, and it is an accepted by Ihe Minister of Defence and Entry into this class Is by way principle never to let him down others, but it is the Prime Miniate* of a very stiff written examination In return, the minister takes greal who acts as unofficial chairman at and an interview, and the majority pains to clear his deportment o! this conference—and, of course, it of the candidates are between the criticism. No More Lonelv Hearts "when there is no lonely person Physical defects? Health? Do you forced to sit alone of an evening dance? Smoke? Drink'. 1 "' and mourn a mateless state". In Armed with these detail* Miss past III years she nas enLon ur one ol her 12 glamourous gliuH'red some 20,000 marriages, assistants (pretty girls, handsome Her clients have included an men) then has a chat with the ipera singer, a retired Judge, matrimony-seeker. "We can usumodels. showgirls school-teachers, ally tell in a few minutes without aecretaries by the hundred, doclooking at the questionalre, 1 tors, lawyers, businessmen, archiMiss Lane, 'what a person is like tects nd even a couple of millionand who lo introduce him to." .liri-s. WHEN a couple believed suit Miss Lane operates on ihe ible (or proved so by "Male-o„ur dream r ,,u '" r > thul lno "' '* nolhin < m >' ,t Mutic") hove been Hied up, f< romance, your defects and liner JUK,S abot.t love It is something mal tnlroductions follow. The points.uid perhaps ,ust *, ,>ass thul can he promoted. When two men members are expected ing reference to your bank and PWk-with the desire t„ love and least to take their dates out to the sort of car vou drive Tho lM ll,ml nr h 1,0 "* 0 together— dinner. Usually members report thing goes wh.rrrf. And out pops ** J ove J usl materialises. ln buck to the centre_ about the first \ Soulh Bank mignt as k is whether the future ii card for a woman matching ^vitabty date New candidates arc prompt_ L f ___, .__„. L _,_ ., , your tastes and tem|>er:menl with To J oln ,,e of nrr "friendship ly produced should the first noi precision centres*' you fill out a questionprove up to expectations, II is all so scientific. Il is called ain Whot ln > did ? that the moment any new orde: comes along." "Export market?" The bl| for which vou can get How is all this bother about Yorkshire sales manager of i v of Supplv allocation raw materials going to affect the world-wide known lirm of coppei but which vuur supply colonies? Officials at different tubing manufacturers II tell you cannot be met; stands told mo that they do not sadly. "e haven t got Last November the East African. West Indian. Australian or Canadian buyer could have been assured on ordering that such aluminium goods would be delivered to him within two or three months nt the most The Milk buying from overseas that follow grunted ed In the wake of Ihe British housewives' panic who: bell th. „ order* conveniences as elecevery year for a British speciality _.' gas. All that is needed —the portable nil-burning flood i iron is paraffin oil. lighting lamp. But the needs of >ight delive bigger and betler orders from overseas being slowed down such centres as the West Indies— six months. And Ihe prospc-t for sugar and oil refinery works, now, In view'of the raw materials "We do quite a bit—sorry, did position, Is delay to as much as quite a bil with the West Indies", nine months, their spokesman said. But with probport orders at Castle Bromwich lids temporary "office "We're here not. at any rate.' the" moment "you! think the present position is goYet just a ve 0 !i f r 0 n come^arce esuiied vear At least, that's the impresjust to keep contact with the old want the stuff ing to result in serious reduction was rejoicing in the prospect o %  ion overseas buyers get if thev friends who will be coming along". Chrome, for instance, is the allof supplies for old customers visit the same stands as I did; And the worries of export trade important requirement for the The worry of exporters Is the' stands 1 knew to be interested atc nol confined lo the question face-piece of a welcome new they must ignore all the opporvy Interested last year—in the nf raw mitlrr jai Freight charges, laundering iron that Is going to tumties for landing new customCommonwealth export market packing costs are all going up '* very useful to the woman. Of crs. First. I went to see Birmingham For a normal wooden packing ,hc "> %  ". finding himself 'at the From America, as well manufacturers of a wide variety ,..„% cost five shillings In the back of beyond" and well away Commonwealth. CCSmootg of kitchen utensils, a firm that -bad, old days", the cost In the Iro '" •""' sells to all parts of the world and ya ,, (ow monthhas risen from 'ricitv particularly to the colonies '" 33 t„ 55/-. tm in> places as far apart as Hong Kong The overseas demand t..r this Malaya s antl-tommunist forces hours lour had Its moment 01 and East Africa The manager All of which boiled down lo domestic ally is already big. but for such lamp* in the jungle warrelief when I faced a stand with was there. 'he uncomfortable fact that prices unless supplies of the necessary fare would always be a first large and shining rows of alumin"Bit pointless our being here at of domestic utensils for the eonraw materials for its makine impriority. a represent,!live of lum cooking utensils, stewpans northern outpost of the B.I F all this vear". was his opening turner in the colonies, or elseDrove tremendously, it will be the manufacturers al Castle and the like. The gleam thty re— been replaced by a wintr replv to' my query as to how where, ore on the way up. difficult to net. Bromwich told me. laved reflected 'laelf in the more wind. it whistles through the things were going. "In fact I've If I had hopes of better news No; we don't want orders for Despite Ihe shortages nf mate hopeful tones of ihe manufacturflags of welcome to penetrate most order book at home" at the next stand I stopped at. It during the Fair. We iust rials, and the attractions of a rrs'"official with whom I chatted, corners of ihe vast arer Me has been exhibiting at they disappeared—faster than the couldn't meet them*, an official of dollar market. long-honoured "Oh yes I think we'll manage Its chill to an atmosph< 1 Mromwich ever since the men who come to place unwanted the manufacturers, well known in Commonwealth markets would lo meet fresh orders", he said, with the sad change—to moor a Ihe present copper supply lem. "we arc nol abl" at all now". The depressing story of my lw There arc bright. B.I.F. at Castle Bromwich Mechanical ingenuities as well ; mechanical monsters are there t< delight as In other years .... But the sun that sh< : ago for the opening of U uYI.F first opened a section at orders Here I "discussed the the oil-tamp world, informed me not be let Castle Bromwi.h 3! years ago. problem nf chrome and like —almost brusquely. "But down, he declared Just cannot take on at Alas there but". inevitable rt Is hoped — in Britain'* trading prospects as compared with 1950 l-es II.1111* 1 al 1'lenir HJMK


PAGE 1

FRIDAY. MAY 11. HSl RARBAOOK U>VOCATF. P\f.F FIVE Looking At Pictures Dr# R ea d e r Appointed P.M.O. H >KN HARRISON. Art & Exhibitions Officer of %  Of St. Peter n ' Bi the last of his series of lectures "Looking at Pictures at the Museum this week. The subC t of the lecture was itenre painting : this was neither dscape nor portrait painting, but in a way it combined both for it depicted people doing something indoors or out of doors. Ail European painting began as %  _-. the art or the church, and it was i^leCtr^City tlruugh votive painting that all J** secular art had IU beginnings SimitlV Priihh>tn*t G*" 1 pair.tmg. like portrait and gin in religious art. The earh. convcrsaUon pictures occurred HI religious picture* where group* John H.ekins. r*p..l> ,, „.„„!,. c ,^. lM J „„„ s £ h Z A Home Of Tins And Card Stole While Lamd D\ F (.;. READER, who has recently been appointed P M O. of St Peter, is expected to take up dm from July 1. Ur Reader is first completing his conflict with ALL that her nasshboun know about her is that her Miss Payne and that ana has no relatives, but In the seclusion of her small Shortage Untill9 54 AtLeast appointment He will reside at Roseville, St Peter, when he takes up office Dr. A. C Kirton. PMO. of St Lucy, is acting P.M.O. of St. Peter. Sir D" i anted v i ;i P. O'MAHONV. Din-, Medical Services, annual inspect ic ,. >,•,.!.„„„. Brhuih r^Vo'hor'oTSlr'l^rdrstToh" ' "" St Mh Ml, 1.......... ^ v !" ~* 1 i.iMt^. 1 *_ fVfcS k K Society of • %  W uniting with the Knmneem. i it) would met in full until IM at and, with i %  nd Mary Magdal* ol the Cross. ,na he found the Aim \M I',III,HM % %  ,very satisfactory I patron of an was the 'M !" m -ii--" r ,' > Church. An in tim e became more A NU !" * f new books, flc secular owing to the patronage of J ** llul1 %  nd BOO lictmn, were merchants became received at the Spcightstown %  MCI Influantlal they In turn Library yesterday They will ipatronised art. By the I7lh ecu,n circulation fn.rn to-day. the merchants of Flanders Among them were 8U U.S. SEEDS COME Any FOTOQOal I t thiposition ii future roan, he .iid, was largcl;, iraCy of the and Holland had become art f'r Germany". "Marriage H lilt load to be met i ..ironThey required .smaller book". "The Natural History u and by the weather which would pictures cabinet paintings—than Mosquitoes". "Conversati be experienced. The time taken these demanded by the church for Dr Johnson". "Modern L initial planning to the its adornment or by prince* for Nations". Jane Austin' "Cosma ,-. completion of I new station was the embellishment of their palaces. Cordon Lang", "The History of Seed section ol the Km now some five years. Because of As the church had commissioned Sugar Cane" "Queen of To Depai: the many preliminaries necessary pictures which glorified bible stomorrow". "The Saviour of th I %  taal consent could be given rlaj and the life of Ou r Lord, and Navy" "Wonder Th.it Would Be" .•instruction of a new staas princes their own glorification Tne R anKe Hawk" and I... Betw P M Ii terday sentenced Ceor*.labourer of Rouen. St. Michael % %  -i'~ months' imprisonment witn the Barbados General Hospital before taking up the hard labour for larceny Prescod home on Welches Land near ,< tm ..f white load valuod Nurse I*and. sh does not tnlk %  M * to anvlx>dv. Hasan, Plantations Ltd on ' May 9 The little house is near the Nurse Land refuse bin Rcfc.i Harbour Police Constable 23 Combcrmere School was built th" Gill who brought the case, told house used to be on Wl rol paatun It |g made of tins, bags Lawar Bay BMll ishcii paper, boards, anything which ha he saw the iOtaMhkM with %  ft broad UdM ami could keep our pod 'on For instance, If Miss Pay no luni sad on ope n i n g UM pared found •, discarded condensed mil'. taw it was a till of load. He aske I tin m the bin. she would beat It turn how he DMM i" >i and tut to patch her home. I SXSth %  on UM man ho look Etta in ibt Brldgo Station i tin of lead •**• idem mod as the Mi I Id d has four previous eon %  tions 1,1 lai • fool FOs*anlaj ur that he found th CARIB FESTIVAL The Caribbean Festival i.. tllllllK MtlMC. Craft*, of thi Caribbean Will not be held n Am*t IML The new date has OaOB %  •x.-l for AnKirt 1' %  md the rsUval Will be 1 Pnert Rlm. There i s on-' BUiall ti %  :< %  '.In u | Which Mi Payne OtttOfl t nouas ano baa to iirmi i,. who sho ionurlnsj tne SS Trja \\h\cn irre on Monday, brought 'ly of M^edll from Aim i %  .up and th as princes their : i.rogrammes had. in battle, hunting, feast i ba proparod for six or other pursuiU. BO loo the riemisn ..ven yoan aitoad, und tRe dlfft"nd to a greater extent Dutch mer, nines ot itetirutely forecasting chants commissioned works from the load to be met at so far painters which glorilled their cn-tant stood. Intimates "The authority has, nevertheless, mods it) s of Lhe probable position during future I these Indicate that even under the most favourable conditions — th it is, assuming the The Librarian, Miss E. Jordan, told the Advocate that she has been receiving grants of books from various subscribers One of the gifts, "Bungalow by lh I Boaen" by Derrick Ball, has Its plot laid in Grenada She said th:it the Library's Dona Seeds were scarce for the pout week, but now the Department has all ivpoa ,l -..eils usually risked for l-y loxal planters. s ( ,-.i.. %  • %  v. .i.i ,,. :„..., n ; %  in date would be under<>" prosperity and the rich roinfortable lives led by themselves and their families. A large number of these pictures were of interiors and domestic scenes, but sometimes staunch subscriber sea outdoor scenes as well, lenor of New York. Mrs. LloydDutch artists also sought subjects Thomas, Mrs. Sheldon, Mr C from low life and tavern scenes. Shepherd a n d Mr Edward mo '" !h .i th century, the English Powell. She received books ;,;s S5T ASS bl'-s^r^ !' to meet the I in full before 19*4. % %  proves li chlovo the TamU > higher rate of commissioning, and ss&,r u a..' un&Fm somewhat reserved and pusiere. and 12 noon and 3 put front Co Lt '.loiKi.iv. to Frldayi and hall .!.• %  i : s %  %  > Among the type, of seedwin,v i>re now in gtoek are, bei'ts. onloticauUfl won, beam and carrots. Canes Lost lr. Fire A cane tire at Hiver Plantation, St I b p on Wednesday ajff ohu burnt eleven acroo o( iirst and second crop ii|' OanOO. Thev are the property ( .M.-si > UaOotla 1 ooured One clerk of the jobs of the seea s to parcel out SOI detain CUOl Anether Are al Congo Koal Si Philip %  ff' %  day mull! acres of -econd crop ripe DBMS and fOOl rteras of seei nd crop retoons, property of Oldbur/ Estates Ltd These were also Inaurod m&^&mnm&m 66 oi persons posing for their portralu, In France. Chardin like 12 Months For Clolli Larceny and music appreciation. The group's President is Mr. I. Byer and M'ss E. J Vice-President Mrs M o n a Kavnaa, wife ^i Mr. -josh" Haynes i s Ihe Musical Director and MaH M. Hurley is Accompanist. The group has a Steering Committee |^ ARROWS HOt'SE. border in;; on St. Lucy and St. Peter. still on the "agenda" for disEnglish Conversation Pictures The 18th century vas the'hey ij) of the English conversation picture. Gainsborough liked? to paint portraits of Ins sitters in cunsion by the Commission* their own landscape* and those uf Health for the i*n pm IMI%  children in the parks of their It was to be decided a week parents. English country-gentle, ago at a scheduled meeting of men were fond of being painted these 'o >odles what was to be with their horses, or. taking part done with ihe property. Farrows in sports and pastimes. Gradually |g jointly owned by the St. Petci however, the conversation piece an< | tne s Lucy pgrUhes. Th. not held Justices G L. Taylor and J. W. B. Clieiiery agreed with the Of Mr. II. A. Talirui. Police M la Of District "A who sentenced George Downes a laiHHircr "f Thomas Gap. S*.. Michael t 12 months' imprisonmoved away from direct repremce (i nK M ment with hard labour for larc n. sentatlon. Today the figures are Commissioners „f Health of SI when the eaoo came ix-fore them trldom portraits, but they form Lucy d d ||0t at j' rn(1 lhc meeting, in the Court of Appeal yesterday, part of a pattern in which they <-pm ; mo HE ST FINr Downes stole n quantit. of W* movement. I during the week by District ,i., Ui „ *P U 8 trtm an India i AUes-ory 'J P""^ Magistrate Mr s. H. merchai Knut The Another use of the human nurse, was one of 20 and 3 value \l the cloth was estimated i;g ut e was in allegorical palmcosts imposed on Joan B ings. Opulent figures were used Grave Yard, St. Lucy. Kolaaaid that ha was rldJnghlS to describe mytns, and equally Ing bodily harm on lo| it Auotifi, motor cycle vheo - butwlie of opulent settrng* depicted tho She has to pay the line in 7 dey* elQOJi dropped Ironi the BSOOar L,ickground ot ihe artist's patron, or undergo one month's imcycle to the around. He saw Sometimes the allegorical figures prisonment. Downes pick up the cloth and k* -..tre sctual portraits of the lola Austin of the same locality with it. Viola Thorne. a patron's family. Allegorical paintwas lined 12'and 3 costs with hawker said that the defendant mgi however, Is not popular with a n alternative of 14 days' im gave her a parcel to keep fOf him modern artists. Instead, the artist prisonment for inflicting b'Klily but she could not sny where he creates his own myth and surharm on Jo.in Boyee. from. rounds his figures with mystery The second tUjpDOOt fine Im Mr. E. W. Harrow who appeared as Gaugln did. or, as Stanley posed by Mr. Nurse was 15 and On behalf of the defendant sub Spencer does today. Frequently |/_ coa i a 0n Joseph Cumlicrnutted that the evidence was most the artist creates a dream world batch of Benny Hall. 81 PM Princess Alice Playing" Field Evon A Football Would Gal Lo*l A COOL BREEZE was coniinn off the M-;I vest.Tr is marie of MOM I n.arl and there is suerl | hO0| of other ihmgs willin that she cannot do much moving around. Almost throughout the |h, OBsOkO • II %  am tnekts. \'wv> Bu>> "•'' li: -'%  nd in le .> m She Just seems to IH> busv .,11 ,|., Mb the lOlinsj out of her MOM Shi %  p o lr pip .n bottles and wares she u.tcd I %  ell for a hiving years ago When Mis. P.tnr lived a'. H>rHMth her hoii-r SfOO built •/ the samr material and it u>ed to rail dawn .... .....i, ,n then too aa II eaea now Her neigh boura alwato help hrr to fe; Ihlnt* %hip shjpp' „,i" aifor A Mih wind She seem* very alwenl minded and hoi oau i-. ven grey Itsough -•"• %  > %  %  be only in hex i.ii %  flicYet such %  MI .ime woman ha ii hobby which hei mOOAS • KM now afford She like* fowlan %  hen ano 10 keen them ot Weymouth, they would -.le.n the same little place Each fow, had a name She uculd .i\. "Come here Mike", .in,I thi COCfc would come. Foi Single or Double Beds i HIM SI MII n •0" x 18" ea. HJI BO x 100" ea. S7.IH 7ft x 9ft" en S5.52 cotroM ntxow (ASKS 19' v :i" H 91.45 n\M \s< IJ>:\>. :>' \\u\v in llliu-. ftaat, t.old. QrosM & While per \.rd >l ! partnlent had Just sprayed soir.. refuse on (ft,, hail-.ur S]dc of tin Held with oil. There were ttm ind bits of paper, and tw,, lsr. parti of nearby. disused sowi jo pip* Smouldering Fire A lire was burning and been burning for the last weeks. This stuff had been dm there to fill In the gap bet ihe breakwater and the Held proper The rains had laid bard most of the surface and paper and tins became exposed bad apod jlsaUetectory and they should of limitless planes where strarlgo who a T ovc a lorry overloaded rtrewlntf d much of !' %  '" thO doetekSB Of the P %  rbZUre. .md ohiects arc depicted witn can „ grT mUC ' l m "" V Magistrate wtth luper-iealism. Thf rc were nnes for b | ack Because residents in |h c surThen lloiiuui* iiefore confirm. %  Jlelaeai Hil auarding, cruelty to animals, rounding area have complained ing the decision, told DownM uLKS^diuV traced the CJ,u in 1 <"turb.uce. btdei-ent e..( eooti of a i imposeii on Downoa ..„ his guanlian onaet • >"<* %  • "" "" %  '"• -' h ....... .j t , Tobias and the Angel" rate fell on Monday night ., ilM<| mu „,. n| „ of these religious Planters of the parish agree that |wory ,,„„. „ wouln %  %  """" ' '""* %  %  ,*/*:,',"" uaintlnat had no connection with *ney were two good weeks for b danger to anyone ploythi was oentoneed to IK months Im. ^ l L n j fJ (U pit -ted When the reaping their crop: The* hav, . ,„.,,, prigestMll at the Curt of >e racuU ^ h piK mngs w „ made "'^''^u,. to the Twn ."' taking place in the picture, normal P—sia aiseeaw iclumed to the ^t nn( | arc i n a llIU st „|,. gj life continued in other parts of *? Speightstown fish market repair, but the area immediately the naintinrt This was true of lite, during the week with fair catcher around them is s<> uneven that if m Chagall's "Crucifixion." the pe -.eciitioii of the J' I When youi Utroat fedt dry and scratchy from harsh mghing or oversimil unr. ust let a sood.lng, delicious 'Icks Cough Drop bathe your rrltatcd (lit nbtai 'ith thioat'Casing medl• nial ingrcdKnts of Vlcks VapoKub, Krafly medicatrdl Kraify soolhingl LET US DISPENSE YOUR DOCTORS PRESCRIPTIONS v. vi nei.l iw friends— I -ur DOCTOI and , tour l)R(i B pOlcfll killer of InttCI pest* on domestic amnwh ind poultry. It is pleasant ami noii-nnlaiil to animal or UWf. %  JifH '/"i" 1 .'" top P*t "• %  \<&gramm*t Aho ii setAavi .' MO immmt ,W .1 ftftlu. 'LOREXANE DUSTING POWDER IMI'tkHI )IIIMI<\, rillUMK II lie II s I IMI 11 I) _,_._ I I CI \ s Hin 1)1 \ A MINs .|l\KIIM)OM IIMIIII) •pimntfA" ; L A i EI\A ; llrucf Wciiliicrlicad Lid. TH MM Mfhl lay 2I4. JIGS. 21(4. 3!lfl lltt, we market repair, but the r catcher around them la of flying fish and dolphin. Some plays Guiltv Of Speeding K.'illi Id.vsui.' ' '""."""'• e o.lriedi !"!" ios occur M,. HSS &JT' t nS£mEi H.rmr,n"p7„iccUM' by mean, o, ".. "?^J? J9EST an CDidWcope number o( pholo. modern fishing boats got in late and the might be times picture. The Haitian pointers consciously unconsciously had grasped thiii tmuos whatever ither pails of thp IWh were sold cheaper than the scheduled price of 6c. each. Some of the fish were tr-k-n t" Bridgeaverei] Lag Itrokin I Nce^= V^*?*: Cty Police M.R.straU ^FWhW IsThoT telft Of charge of speeding while *r ^ ^ cathedral of Portg IhO niolor lon\ M—li ^y.p,.^^. executed by contempordriving .... on Wildey's Rood, St. Mich The offence was committed on April 5. Cpl. Jones of the Tiaflic Branch said he was on Wildey's Road and checked the speed of the motor lorry with a stop watch He found that It was being driven n| S3 miles per hour and the It on thai read for such lea per hour. i: Ida who pleaded guilty to produce licence for endorsement popular pail House Wired: No Pay? B.G. PRODUCTION OF SUGAR RISING In the Court of Original Jurisdiction yesterday His Honour Mr. r J. W. B. Chenery Lave judgement for plaintiff Keith Weather. head of Deacons Road, St Michael, to the amount of J160 in a ease he brought against Iris Prescod of Sea Rock, Christ Church for debts. irises o.i or* CMmaM*-"" GEORGETOWN. May 7 Despite an early setback due to weather and the appeorance .,f Leafscald Disease. British Guiana sugar estates are pushing up tuear production satisfactorily. i -luction for the year up ON MURDER CHARGE Samuel Beckles of Marlcy Vale. St Philip, was taken to Dr. Hi'tsori't home. Sterling, St. Philip at about 11.30 o'clock yesterday morning. He was suffering from a gunshot wound and died shortly afterwards. Thirty three year -o Id Joseph Holligan, a OOU held In connection with ihrs" Caribbean tour wax delayed She "Yet they were going on with was pleased and surprised to She said that in the West Intheir guiding", she added "hofind however, that guides were dies she was impressed by i cause they love to feel they are waiting for her though .1 vac number of men and women of part of one body with Its mem11.30 p.m. standing, as well as ordinary bers all over the world." people in the street who were "Although there are so many —Renter. A lady playing tennis tin 1 recently, fell and broke BOt I having slipped on the woin | I t .i part of the lawn. Attempts have been plant two trees and these h;; been (.uefully fenced off The cricket pitch hi pearvd and in its place is a worn uneven patch where the grass refused to grow. Vehicles which have come geroaa the ground hav? left rut %  e well defined that they could i now be called unofficial road Digestive Upsets After extensive research. De Wilt's Laboratories have produced De Witt's Antacid Tablets, new compamoaproduct to their renowned Powd'r They sic ihe most convenient way ol checking digesUvrdisoxlrriaway ttoni home. .V u nj|,nn/iii.(/ just dissolve one or iwo oo the tongue for flrotnpt rrlitf a": -•" %  •II Pleasant tasting De Wilts Antacid Tablet* are separately etlt-sealrd for freshness. In handv tear-ofl Strips for pocket ot haiidbi Try diem today. dbag. ,H. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.-Di.uibutor.. B % % % %  S ^ S H M f fBSriSI ENJOi OUR TO-DAYS SPECIALS ^" CALL IN AT I I KMu'HTS — PHWM\ MIDI FOUNTAIN *•*•.*,**• -*.'.'-'-*-*-*-'-.*.*-'.',-.*.*.'.*-*,*.*.*,*.*.',*,'.-.*.*---*.*-*,*.%  ,•.*.*.<.*.'/ tmm it THESE FMJVEST i'0000§0 HUMBER '••ded t*%'if eorrssd *•" tot hom, M Hr', HN family >M.4hr 0..~.., D.WITT'S %  JMI Maul ANTACID i. %  -;..„ POWDER \\ ^ FULL RANGE ^ OF MODELS TO SELECT FROM REMEMBER ITS HARRISON'S ** IIUMBERS for thf Hi9tiitu9§*i KHArr U* \J per Tin per Sm Tin per lh %  | %  SWIFT'S CHEESE DANISH SAI.AMI V l IM k Mil I IM Itt M I SWAXSFBiM S0OIT A *'.. #-**/. a.72 l 41 I 44 24 1\ M 44 37 I'I 4 00



PAGE 1

"\l.i BARRA1MI-. ADVliJui..Kim.lt -Oil | III > H.l\v \\4lrt MMMtfl I.tt it I Hater tto-p* Irmi'i Fow> Qranrr Squash *• %  ' Una j. i KcllW.. Orange 1 Kriller* I.rmou U.<1| N __ SIU*d to Nfto 1 Frankfurter iuuif< Vienna vi.,,:., Cook tail s, IK i,,, f(^ >xm.z^ own It I:\HI. ALLEYJVK I It till It A <.. Lid. "YOIR i.itett iits10tad H ., hits J.rv. | In Julr* l-w. tin I...ltltn *.!..-> romlt 1 i JMkB Juice './ ims lrlnirt.it Orange .luir* Trinidad *!l\i-il InnTrinidad Grapefruit .luice Purr I'lltplior (.rrrn Grape .luii r /,-/.-.-.-//*,•,.



PAGE 1

I'M.I lllll ll\l(ll\lll>s AliMU in FRIDAY, MAY II. IMI Ca/ub Calling Ho,el ""*"• B.B.C. Radio Programme IINn in VMtinU. i. H IS EX hvue, ;ntd Mrs %  arr*np;>ii;'ii y ihr Governor's \ n< M among th* guaal given b^ night The PJI1> took pis*, of the la) the grounds of the nottL It WM illurt'in.ited [or the ore aslon Intrant-its I NTRANSIT through Barbnio A from to Canad.'i was Mi-. (• Mr T OnM Cana| id Mrs %  U 1 told ( hct husbnnd J*rs Orant Major would be leav%  d oti Sunday lor New York li %  to "'• % %  . Mi Gl Major's i Witarlo. She %  i H. %  her. Other Trinidad :>da were Mint Theresa Milne, daughter of Mr. and Ml f Ml Icolm Milne of Trtnldi %  I" "' m ut throe months, staying In Montreal with hrr nilMr Joy. Joy'l room-! Kodrtgmv lag r C A. • %  ].m [i | Sumrr.i r Holidays M ISS SUSAN VICKUVNN i pand the *ummer bjOttoayi with uer She arrived ng by T C A. POCKET CARTOON ay OSBFRT LANCASTER %  Puretv u an tnttve ..ituriu rf do von suppose rats eon 6* i.c(urelB ctrtmin that a shir l.C.A. Departures M RS. •uiu.STUAJrT, mU* of T.C.A's Manager here and their young daughter were among (he passengers leaving for Canada vesterday By T.C.A. Mr Stuart will be following next week on a fortnight's visit. Due Tomorrow P ASSENtiFHS due to arrive frorr. England to-morrow by t|M v TC A. for Toronto where her husband is wirh the Western Assurance Co. . Other NS> I r Toronto were Mr finrth .Searle Mr Theodore Goodndge and Miss Ruby Gill. Labour Adviser M R ERNEST BALTHROP. labour Adviser to tha Secretary of S'ate Who arrived from St. Vincent yesterday mommjt by B.G. Airways, will be i guest at Gavernment House until ho leaves for Dominica Arriving hv the same plane were Dr A. A. Gibbons and Mr BffM Holder. Vancouver Bound M il AND MRS NOEI. AGAIID who arrived here a few days ago from St Vincent lei. yesterday for Canada by T.C-A They are on their *ay to settle In Vancouver Island. Mr Agnrri was formerly on the staff ui Cable and Wireless' Branch In St Vincent. His father Is Mr. Aubrey Agurd. U.S. School-Teach.r M RS (1I-ADVS ulCKERSOiS who arrived from Trinidad May and. left yesterday for Grenada by B W.I A Mrs. Dickerson IK a schoolteacher in Brooklyn. She is touring the W.I. Other passengers on the S lane for Grenada waa Mr. W. lediorrl who has gone to spena about eight day** holiday in that colony Winter Home M il and Mrs. Collea J. Cot. who make Barbados their home every winter, left yesterday for Bermuda by T.C.A They are en roufe to their home in Long Island and wMI 'J-.-IHI a few days in Bermuda oefore leaving for the U.S. Accompanying them were their two cocker spaniels "I-addle" and "Chi Chi". The Cues expect to be back in Barbados in November. C OMING HI ing by T.C A f, ada was Mr. Rene H Martin, former Manager of the Winds? Hotel Mr Martin hCanada on a short visit Martin is the n' M inager <>' M Hotel Coming m %  •. the same plane was Mr Rene Talon who is replacing Mr MJI tin Ot the Windsor in Manager l*V II. is i J .-ii • 3D a. T.. I %  >'.ri. 7*1 %  i T*. : %  -. IN %  I I -li — I m -%  in TOO pn 1*1 % % %  AlillvW. IsssuSjjaa %  % %  *, Inil JI Back From Trinidad in 1 d Mrs Ralph Rtlsstt, vho rricd a few davs ago n Tiinidad. flew home yesterday iW i.A Cnmlng li, i some plane were Mrs. M JWvtt who had been visiting heg daughter Mrs. E. Oonaw-i and Mr Simon Mendes Visiting Their Sons VsTR and Mrs. R Eric Smyihie-.. 1*1 who own a home on the St Peter coast, have gone to 4 to visit their two son*. Thev left yesterday by T.C.A. and expect to he back in Barbados by July Oil M R PETER BATTEN, who is an oil well contractor in Venezuela, is in Barbados with hi wife for a short holiday. Thev tame In yesterday via Trinidad by H W I A His base is ;u of Maturln. I %  Ftimtr. 1111 am l-i *rU A*a.rK.i.. 12 in p tn Hr*> p m t %  „. % %  ; I is—au %  SJ : 4 1k p%  M arr-.nl. I T>* Kfi P -. HS<1K. Nr.r. aassuM. a t p.t SMI pm Intrrludr. fl. 8 11 p %  nu .*..,... i %  S i*. p m From Tt* W'.rM Aff,i. •!'. >>, !••• m T*>m .all p m ft C.B.C. 4 4S p tc apnrtThr • %  %  „ M M it.^ fail .<• I iht Hi.wr. S no p m J-rrtini rn.iAV MAY n isae a • — n p %  %  %  IS B p Ml Canadia I W Mr* SI nAVI All* I'M II I I.MiMA ;Mamb-rsOnh/i MATINEES : TO-DAV AM) I<) MORROW \T • I M IONK.II1 to MOMDAI MGHTAT3fl RKO I ROSALIND RI'SSELL — MICHAEL REDGRAVE RAYMOND MASSEV KATINA PAXINor UEOGtNN KIRK DOPGI.AS I u.-nr O Nrill. "MOURNING BECOMES ELECTRA" FLAZA 'WUrmtrr-Bndgetown(&AL 2210) ••YOUNG MAN T HORN" DOUOUUI LAl'HUN IIACAL1. DOK1S DAV Majority M AJORITY c passengei yesterday b> TC A. were staff ssstXtsberS They were Mr. Irvln Muir fi": Port Arthur. Toronto. Mr. arid Mis Frank Schofleld from Ne Brunewlck. Mr and Mrs. Tei ence McLean of Steveston. It < Mr and Mrs John Ki. Ix-thbridge, Alberta, Miss Harriet Hall from Mt. Royal, p ij and Miss Annie Magrk-huk. Mm Kay Freeman and Mr AHK*r Martel from Ottawa, Ontan<> They are all down to six-nd i of their summer holiday* In Barbados. Secretary T IINIDAD born Henry Dl %  on nia wsy !•> Canadh|a young daughter atathlwn She la going up for medit-.ii at attention. Mr. Dixon is the S-re tary of Mur.ufaclureri Life tin aursnee Co in Port-of-Spain. \n\i\u in s OF 1'ii'A 1 IIOSSWOIIII 1 1 2 1 ; %  • %  1 W 3 | w ; i .1" • 1 1 BY THE WAY By Beachcomber ll lllvr. inn pi II fe£F tMpld • equiprii.-nl ill ill. Ill I f*.lU, 13) II hnlV. it. it taken T HE ejunpaifn ta tho roads must too Utarally. wc do not wani i-> poiitt nun driven take off their hats and butt a lady driVM Id to -head of % %  kit a driver who has ir-.n.i g elvUI thank the other driver. |i the anaoyanoa of lino of driv i who in forced |o wall *rhU cofnpUmanu in %  • datnaad "Thai was awfully nu-o .' all "Oh, hut it irafl 'It was nOthillR." "I tivn \ think you've met my dall|htaT." The.i M cxchunic'' of names and a writing down of addresses, while I 'Vourtesy i-op" takes particulars of Iht civility, HI until mend both drivers tor the Courtaay I ,.-.., gt iin* lamntad esa i for using impatient language. When ,i luiy iinv tell the age of a bit of dued egg you hold a lighted match above It. If tho rnalch pota i-ut. the dried egg moy he deemed to be un new-laid, and ;it for human intake. The coming miitnol of matal %  ill mean a shortage of tho Marline eggs laid* by hens fed on aid scraps of plastic /me BUCQ 7'MV/ifY }rtirs / / pnmr S HE seem"!.' un;... mu n critic, "to Ignore the conductor" Her mothPr had probably warned her that these men with i.itons ciin he the very devil. 1 know one who. when he taps his lectern wilh the baton at the bt ginni n g of a piece, raps out a Morse message of impudent .1 miration. On one occasion Ruatiiv With such power that -\w bltai the baton clean out of EUchtar*] hand It landed in the stalls, where it awoke a vulgarian who thought (t was a stick of liquorice, took a sleepy bite, and broke two teeth. SlIlulllY I'rn -/m.i/iiilfr B Y i.fusing to push n pea with his nose on Sundays, Evans the Hearse has saved the Governmet.i, Die Ke-tival people, the informers and all the rest of them I fraat dastJ >f argument. While It la true that tha spectacle might keep people away from church, r cannot ire tailed a music-hall turn, as there la no dressing-up. Tha i.uple of Aberbaiiiiner sup port Evans. "Do you want I^nidon tinned into one vast Moulin Knuge?" asked Davie* the Milk. "The Devil." commented a Councillor, "rubs his ureot red hand* every time noae Is laid "i r." a T'lr 1 M %  two durn. i4< Bri llos ti r*te lint ie riot srs HPH lf>* i Vi PUI.Ian 0 HllU 1 Colo B Csrii i atpjiit tn nl,.•••• Soil's II ml II •/.• II, %  • %  %  EV/WS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4220 JflflwOinMirHAEi. TVNgfAl (Pi liar) 2..UI1.1.1 A a..'IO |>.n. unit Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. ROXY THEATRE Eagle Hail SATURDAY TO WI-'.DNESDAY 4.45 k B.W r he screen's one Great Story of The U.S. MARINES!* '.----'-'-'.-'*-'.-'*^-.---.*-'^*'V'^--^ K





PAGE 1

PAGI I li.'n liAKHADOS ADVOCATE 1 R1D.W. MAY II lt.11 Notre Dame Beat Carlton 1—0 unc nil in lhl Flnl l-ivi ion Baal on the left wing (or Notre Dame MONd nd hall The game was slow in Itta in U lurably during the sccmvl half hour ilandevilk! at centre ba>* .. _„, %  Dame gave a sood per-,, -, _., formuncc. He was the I Aw German Wt/?.* ceil placed and nearly all were i lOOfc llM lOUCh Off With i.(it champion o( llarli..Dam* defending the f l-uigi Coluui. II n %  nthcm goal Soon after FrcdKutchtnaoa ran dec r nrpooi ieft wing and centered H night. II '•" %  k %  : 101 kicked wide the lefi I-KI r i KIN . ioi{ HUM: %  .lie nine anil %  Bretrr \,>..;al Taking 1<> Players To Brazil LOW M in I'KliiH log ('" \otrc li through %  .ass and took a good OfM tie* %  hot, King, the Carlton custodian %  I unched out the ball. thai attack !: %  nold Hutchinson tried .. aboi ... %  %  tin hi I wanl hiKh m Dame next made a raic DB the ('.niton goal. Gill. then tsNtie forward, took a good sho: u and U %  .: %  %  centered Halt 'till goal %  :,: !\" in .i on Thuraday Th.. in paeMoa to shoot ind s: Paulo %  make the inp anJoe %  %  cricket ("i Middlesex The full UN ot Arienal „la. ,.„,„„„ w „ aw>rdcd ,„„ makine the Inp are; Swuidm. kil k Blillhl one o( h „ r ,„,, ...< k look a grtni (hoi from the £3,000 NOT ENOUGH Says Sands i IS NOT WORTH my while to go to England f<>r "00 (Australian) — about 2,400 sterling — purse. I tl ink about fiveor six thousand pounds would be nearer the mark ." That little speech was made by Dave Sands, and it probably represents the longest oration of which tin has ever delivered himself. %  I. a considcrSoon aflcr the second half be M Freddie Hutehloaoi) t -> %  > i %  mm the kali wing rhe i.ill paused a few inches over th i>ar LOOKINO over A map of lb* route. In trout, from Utt U Lcpl. TUlaon. 21. Bergoaat Burg***. 27. Cpl. Bonncr. M are Driver Allen. M md Lcpl Smith. M It . i> due In \< air on May 6 and nKhl Itucdolph Turpin lor the BmpLrC Ight title at the Whit:\ London mi June 5, not, repent not. promoter Jack Solomons'* lucky at k Pint d' announaad that Jaafc wiii not nm %  Ceaai Brian on May '-'-' u-eause of his baatnut hope BacBniahea nth bo a Bald ol 17 in the City and Suburban: n w ll looks as though the Bands irunning out. the judgment of Sni<>. ,i i c t-n .il.n n a in v mowing a cigarsmoke ring the size of another 0 *f o boxer': money toad. %  %  Tom Maguire" maatatfarl "three return tickets; lor which I've paid C.400. and I'm sure Sands will %  : %  i gland I PKTKR WILSON %  ays allhomh It laoks as i' Davi *-.*mlis i %  out I hfe Empire title Agfa* with I: uuiiiiiiti Turpin promoter j*rk Holemon* itufaiU that in.Wklle Cit> (June S) date S.ill M .'UN also complained that Scott. Barnes. Smith. Shaw Forbes. Daniel. Field la, Holton List '.i %  • M Renter. I uch line, but Wilkins %  IT the cross bt pushes < •Hlllll'ill-r All Out For 188 Huns Mil.n.l one of me Carlto.1 M'.i-ivcd a long pas^ and had u golden opportunlt) I open the account for his team iT ly and the shot went wide of the goal. CAMBRIDOE, Maj in Freddie Hutchinson then re< ridge eerved %  pass from Lucas, lit foi 188 today, the look a beauUful shot but the bal South Afrieani made I bad %  tart struck the Hjjhl upright and reto their tirst innings losing two bounded Into play wickets f"i live runs. At the Notre Dame launched anotbai cloaa they were M foj two. BM and Creon. their right The lirst days play WB> waahed inger (entered. King ran i out by rain and with only Just of BOel lathered and cleared under four hours' play lo-motrow. Shortly afterwards the llrs". %  tame draw appears certain. and only goal of the match came The South African bowlers Gill got the ball and pesaed to route through Tlinl showed up well on a pitch which lt *.t They short passed to tack Mediterranean by boat to Mar gftvc them little as*).".. -her until they srare U) the %  aUlBB, to Paris tnen to CaJ elalnsad Bva foi 61 Carttoa goal area. Best then aereea i<> Dover The aturn trip with his leg breaks and "Tufty" took a good which completed w ill be the same. Mann took the other four wickets beat King Only four o' them will drive tor 34 runs. Carlton fought hard for an the motoro: U q rid David Sheppard and Tom Wells equaliser but their attack." wen Ing pUllor with Tillson. put on 69 for the o|>cning Camconstantly warded oil by Browne bridge stand but the la-t eight and Sjraughan. Wilkinson, the Kaee Anna : did not lime the ball p.'.pc. ,„,.'", ;i | ( „„';'" days are Sergeant Burgt en Roan. Ponty lindd. L cmpor.d Smith, of lien (old Cottanas, MaeidlMBta. Burreyj H Allen, of Invicta Road. K> poral Till Mill. if W that the British Boxing Board of Centre (till regards "wonder boy" "Sugar" Ray Robinson as world's welter-weight champion. The board, however, is likely d or a boxerpurafl £ v"-ruled at the Europea,. Jack the .....nt-biller )**>** Union Conference whlcf is being held in l/mclni Ihiwe<'k-end and which will probably agree with the NaUona' Boxing Association of .Amend that il's not in the best uttoreatl u. t ' ">e sport for one man to hola ,P more than one title Soldiers Ride 1,450 Miles Motorcyclists come home on leave Irom Tripoli P S —Already anguished, 8UpaTchurgcd whines of protest Hum speedway supporters obou' "Anti-Speedway's" views. More of this later. London Express Service FIVE Bntish. Romantic Crcpc Romainc In Beige. Pink, I II n Coral. Aqua. Blue. I uiiii.i Goblin Blur. Gold, Cherry. Black. I.iine Green, Royal Blue. Navy. Red While ami Green per yard S2.UK >2.29 CAVE SHEPHERD SL CO., Ltd. 10—i % Broait StrecSo— according to Bok %  If still on But then he hasn't got to light Turpin Thiiiuas for I'S. i | pi i news is that EdLONDON. May •>> ,,,c Thomas. British. Empire, and ., opean welter-weight chamHailev proI h ". * * 8 to America, round W ii.l. Bailej ili^liliuhl Sports Slop Pyorrhca In 24 Hours vided the highlightof • In Which trieBrlHah Amateur Athletic Team beat London University 112 points to 48 The Long striding \V\nt. Olympic 4("i metre i .. era ii Tiice to win the quextef mlli f"' the University In the g(-l lima of 48.8 seconds on a damp track. ibout the end of June, to fight the winner of the tight l>etween i ';.. m. of Cuba, and Johnn Button, of Chicago The fight will take place N-fore the end of June at Madison wickets fell for 71 i Iteul. FRIENDLY FOOTBALL will and n.i k' Intei A team I Si.iio< i. ol ..mums Sinn Aaenti by ii't goals to thxi %  N %  %  i li rnoon, i'.i Bryden A ranner, K Mulch t Notre Dnme goalie, was later sen Off by Ihe referee and SUaughan At Dover OlCfl deputised until the game ended neir way home The teams were as follows, they will meet al CARLTON: King. Bright. Kenthe return Journey. |an 4 nedv. Cox, Clalrmonte. Archer, Hough trips ann m F. Hutchinson. N. Lucaa (Cap) i i \p iien.e to BUI % %  %  ind Ml MclA-od, It Hutchinson and who ,n> members of the Ro\ ;o Balkrj running for the A A A.. scag an %  n the loo yards In 10.1 %  etonda lie beat Brian Bhenton, B t tropean -''Hi I : Upll II. Herb M Kenli rrlved from Jama i a, will i:ik<* p iri II. the Brtttah Bar I Wl I Dover u ,~ ll> Sl .„ (UlMt Mondi Bal .ti la %  ii.e goal each Icfced nldJBB NOTRE DAME Wilkinson Browne, Stiaughau, Archer and s Ed M. ( ndcMUe, RoberU ehlla V Edwards and D L C Daniel CoUln Referee' M Orei n, Beaf, <;il| and Mrs or r.itien.i MODERN HIGH SCHOOL WINS SIXTH GAME I HUfe School won then i thai) gauiBASKETBALL Of the Division 1 Basketball matchi played at Y.M P < Baehlei Hoad. lart night urc for 'he Maaon when they defeated lowScu Scout yesterday afternOOi. Y.M IM beat Mcfcwlcfc 4 .ng their leave the #ayl M Signals speer 'MI I \ i I. •crap ax-War Dap maihiius v.hhh the foibtiught and overhauled. Why are these live men %  pend UcKenley will run in the 44t* i Which he will ilnat Hal wiuttieid of the United Btatag and Arthur Wlrd who is runnlnf lor Britain. 16—8 at the Mo it 23; Harrison College Old beat Y.M C A 18 II Boyi 'Middle zone posers S OME uf the most diftlcult hands lor the rcsponder to Judge Bra those that nil into the Intermediate zone after the opener %  first re bid. Risponder Is too strong tn let the bidding die. but not strong enough to bid game on the strength of the Information for adventure," the} tald before Ihey left, and becauM they to '.pend parl Ol then HM h> DM Ms 111 the !U lilvi London, Mi Kenlea llnlal %  ii Wmt in the 400 met] M rUtfleld. who I I iron Ihe HIMI • etraa, thud McKenlcy MUJ today Thll time i .mi hoping to 11 m rrlend Wlnt i like o L rui. HI and If th* r Id do good tin* it preli\ MeKenli' y*j Men I % %  H( arorld record ol S9J for thi~ event Kruter I u-wur. Singh For Soulli Africa Trying To Sri Nev> I ivhl l(•>.•> .1 I. Hall -III be Mr II Or.I •I .. ... Hill |.l. L.llie lh, ,.l.i. H.-orU.. "Mlmr.l .'. MS \ *-•(. in WnuriifK \" ai •I LSMBra*! l rmpiy m ktfi J :. 3; V Jj # Ay IS J 3 t: Ovtr TWO Ban I %  %  %  maii by M. HARRISON-GRAY ire not as good as his own uiamond' The Three Diamond rebid should be reserved for hands of a dlflrren: typo in the hope of inducing Mourn to bid Three No-'IriuTiu %  Eg : ai:, Vlll*AtQI|l4i Two Nn Trun11 — A useful limit hid. showing a reasonably balanced iiand aitn ll-U pnmi ur a "good" 10-rount I: no belter bid i. available a partituard in one of the unbid suits i* prrmiss'ir. K &f JS:i,Vlll;KI|lil: • ^ I I %  '. %  IV. .1 K | change ui .suit in a s,-qiiei Oni Spade-Two Diamonds i Hearts But Norths range ol coonrucUvs rrbtds is led t) ini'iudf a jump prein.|,iy '.,..,., from South Africa for two tii:h. The orfajugei %  i thi Seaman Chatty, retired iindefeal ft] Fly „nd Bant.im Weight f Champion of South Afrit., tnd formerly rated sixth coniendCI for the world's Bywelghl title. laeypr.-cl IM, : I, ..rhusl.i-Ti, oval la ...IT ., . tatf I that they would be glad to MB him m icUon .,.' %  \ feather-we ight champion of lh. British Empire. Hoy Ankarah d. most of his campaigning In that Dominion and pidgini. Chatty s letter to Dawai fighters can accomplish a great deal The letter aLs,, recnl visit of Motaa KI.I Bin I featherweight champion of Brit* lh Guiana who created quite i Ion in smith Africa. VIENNA. May 10. li i. HI tight rope walker, Heln uth Hollands, trying to set up I new world record by Staying "2 %  !.. .. %  moat o%'cr his tights. I hc/11 Do It Every Time Rain came ,md off the wire. —Reuter. Vv hat's on Today reatoe CourU and Courl of Appeal — 10.00 a.m. t ocktall Tarty a| Goddard'o ItrsUurjnt for French delegation lo Carlb Ce nii--ii.il — ti 00 p m. Mobile Cinema gives show al Bay Street Boys' Club — 7.30 p.m. ATTB&TtONtt I AMOKV >1 WH.I-US Take this nppnrlunily of blainiii(; yoAr requirements IN GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE Ranging from \4" upwards MILD STEEL Flat;, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes BOLTS & NUTS-AII Siie. FILTER CLOTH-White Cotton Twill At PRICES that cannot be repealed Thr U.lHH.UHfS I OlMHIt l.ld. White Park Road, St. Michael DIAL 4528 I AST SATURDAY NIGHT THE DOSWAGON WAS SO JfrJI BLSy, OTTO 17?, D;C XO HE isEECE^ MORE